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UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



NOV 6 1990 



DFr 1 3 • 




J 



Limum 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
UltBANA 



Field Museum of Natural History. 

Publication i6o. 

Report Series. Vol. IV, No. 2. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 19 11. 




THE LIBHAK^ ur JHh 

DEC 2 21942 
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



Chicago, U. S. A. 

January, 1912. 



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LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY Of ILUWW* 

WSkHh 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XVI. 




Norman w. Harris. 
Founder of Public School Extension of Field Museum. 



I 



Field Museum of Natural History. 

Publication 160. 

Report Series. Vol. IV, No. 2. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 19 11. 




Chicago, U. S. A. 

r ,^,, THE LIBRARY Of I HE 

[anuary, 1912. 

DEC 2 21942 
UNIVERSIiy OF \iim\^ 



CONTENTS. 



1''age 

Board of Trustees 102 

Officers and Committees 103 

Staff of the Museum 104 

Report of the Director 1 105 

Maintenance 106 

Staff 106 

Lecture Courses 107 

PubHcations 108 

Names on MaiHng List . . . • 108 

Distribution of Foreign Exchanges 108 

Distribution of Publications (Foreign) 109 

Distribution of Domestic Exchanges 109 

Distribution of PubHcations (Domestic) . no 

Library no 

Cataloguing, Inventorying, and Labeling in 

Accessions 113 

Expeditions and Field Work 119 

Installation and Permanent Improvement 124 

Printing 134 

Photography and Illustration 135 

Attendance 136 

Financial Statement 138 

Accessions 141 

Department of Anthropology 141 

Department of Botany 142 

Department of Geology 147 

Department of Zoology 148 

Section of Photography 151 

The Library 152 

Articles of Incorporation 171 

Amended By-Laws 173 

List of Honorary Members and Patrons 178 

List of Corporate Members 179 

List of Life Members 180 

List of Annual Members 181 



I02 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



George E. Adams. 
Edward E. Ayer. 
Watson F. Blair. 
William J. Chalmers. 
Richard T. Crane, Jr. 
Stanley Field. 
Harlow N. Higinbotham. 



Arthur B. Jones. 
George Manierre. 
Cyrus H. McCormick. 
George F. Porter. 
Martin A. Ryerson. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff. 
A. A. Sprague, 2nd. 



Owen F. Aldis. 



HONORARY TRUSTEES. 

Norman B. Ream. 



DECEASED. 



Norman Williams. 
Marshall Field, Jr. 



George R. Davis. 
Huntington W. Jackson. 
Edwin Walker. 






Jan., 191 2. Annual Report of the Director. 103 



OFFICERS. 

Stanley Field, President. 

Martin A. Ryerson, First Vice-President. 
Watson F. Blair, Second Vice-President. 
Frederick J.V. Skiff, Secretary. 
Byron L. Smith, Treasurer. 

D. C. Davies, Auditor and Assistant Secretary. 



COMMITTEES. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Stanley Field. 
Edward E. Ayer. William J. Chalmers. 

Watson F. Blair. George Manierre. 

Harlow N. Higinbotham. Martin A. Ryerson. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Watson F. Blair. Martin A. Ryerson. 

Arthur B. Jones. 

BUILDING COMMITTEE. 

William J. Chalmers. Richard T. Crane, Jr. 

Cyrus H. McCormick. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff. A. A. Sprague, 2nd. 

AUDITING COMMITTEE. 

George Manierre. Arthur B. Jones. 

George E. Adams. 

ADMINISTRATION COMMITTEE. 

Edward E. Ayer.. 
Watson F. Blair. George Manierre. 

Arthur B. Jones. George F. Porter. 



I04 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. I\ 



STAFF OF THE MUSEUM. 

DIRECTOR. 

Frederick J. V. Skiff. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 

George A. Dorsey, Curator. 

S. C. SiMMS, Assistant Curator Division of Ethnology. 

Charles L. Owen, Assistant Curator Division of Arch(Bology. 
Berthold Laufer, Associate Curator of Asiatic Ethnology. 
Albert B. Lewis, Assistant Curator of African and Mela- 
nesian Ethnology. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

Charles F. Millspaugh, Curator. 

Jesse M. Greenman, Assistant Curator. 

B. E. Dahlgren, Assistant Curator Division of Economic Botany. 
Huron H. Smith, Assistant Curator Division of Dendrology. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

Oli\er C. Farrington, Curator. H. W. Nichols, Assistant Curator. 
Elmer S. Riggs, Assistant Curator of Paleontology. 

Arthur W. vSlocom, Assistant Curator Section of Invertebrate 

Paleontology. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 

Charles B. Cory, Curator. Setii E. Meek, Assistant Curator. 
Wilfred H. Osgood, Assistant Curator of Mammalogy and Or- 
nithology. 
William J. Gerhard, Assistant Curator Division of Entomology. 
Edward N. Gueret, Assistant Curator Division of Osteology. 

RECORDER. 

D. C. Davies. 

THE LIBRARY. 

Elsie Lippincott, Librarian. 



I 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR. 

1911. 



To the Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History: 

I have the honor to present a report of the operations of the 
Museum for the year ending December 31, i g 1 1 . 

In one respect the year just closed must be considered the most 
important in the history of the Institution by reason of the action of 
the Board of Trustees accepting a site for the new Museum building 
in Jackson Park, tendered by the South Park Commissioners. This 
clearly complies with the terms of Mr. Field's will and secures a site 
without cost to the Museum within six years following the date of his 
decease. The location provided and accepted immediately north of 
the present building, — highly desirable in every way and determined 
upon after careful consideration had been given to other sites suggested 
in various parts of the city, — was designated at a special meeting of the 
Board, held March 22, 191 1; and a contract was thereupon executed 
between the South Park Commissioners and Field Museum of Natural 
History. The plans for the new building, including every detail of the 
interior arrangements, have been completed and approved by all par- 
ties in interest and the actual specifications for the contracts fully 
drawn up and approved. So far, then, as the executive staff of the 
Institution is concerned, its work on the new building is complete; 
the results of six years' consideration and study have been given 
final shape and expression. 

The activities of the Museum have been maintained in all directions. 
Several important expeditions were in the field at the date of the last 
report and several additional explorations have been inaugurated dur- 
ing the year. Among these the Meek Panama expedition and the 
Osgood Venezuelan expedition may be referred to as promising im- 
portant data and material. The return of Dr. Berthold Laufer from 
the Far East after an absence of over three years in the interests of 
the Mrs. T. B. Blackstone Fund, bringing over 10,000 specimens of 
Tibetan and Chinese ethnology, was a significant event in the year. 
Dr. Laufer at present is preparing this magnificent collection for 
installation, and the publication by him in the Museum series of a 
work on Jade is but one of the notable results of this expedition. 
The Curator of Botany left in August for an expedition and survey 
of the Northern Tropics and the Far East. 

105 



ib6 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

The movement for the extension of Hbraries and museums, univer- 
sities and other institutions of learning founded for the use of citizens 
of Chicago was heartily supported by the Board of Trustees. The 
intention of this movement is to bring the educational activities of 
the city to the attention of the people of Chicago and to avoid as far 
as possible duplication of effort. 

The announcement late in December of Mr. Norman W. Harris' 
important contribution of $250,000 for the extension of the work of 
the Museum into the public schools of Chicago was greeted by the 
press and people of the city with marked concert of congratulation. 
The plans for carrying out Mr. Harris' wishes have not as yet been 
more than outlined, but the project is receiving the careful deliberation 
of the director, the curators of the Museum and the officials of the 
Board of Education. It will take several months to arrive at even a 
tentative working plan. This rare donation to the cause of education 
and pviblic welfare will give life and light to the routine of the schools, 
instill love of nature in the scholars, make for good citizenship and 
constantly increase the friends and frequenters of the Museum. It 
is a wise, far-reaching and perpetual benefaction. 

An important addition to the fire protection equipment was the 
installation of the reinforcing fire pump and the purchase of a number 
of wheeled fire extinguishers with a capacity ranging from 25 to 40 
gallons. Two additional firemen were also added to the force. 

The present state of the building calls for no special comment 
except that persistent effort is made to keep it in as safe a condition 
as circumstances will allow. 

Maintenance. — The sum of $175,480.00 was appropriated by the 
Board of Trustees for the necessary expenses of maintenance during 
the fiscal year, and it is a matter of congratulation to report that the 
amount expended for this purpose was $149,127.00, leaving the satis- 
factory margin of $26,353.00. This is especially noteworthy, as numer- 
ous additions were made during the year to the force of departmental 
assistants. The actual amount expended, however, was $195,780. 
The difference between this amount and the cost of maintenance is 
accounted for by special appropriations for cases, expeditions and 
collections purchased. 

STAFF. — The Staff has been augmented by the appointment of Dr. 
B. E. Dahlgren as Assistant Curator, Division of Economic Botany, 
and the appointment of Huron H. Smith as Assistant Curator, Division 
of Dendrology. The death of Jesse E. Burt, who was attached to the 
Department of Anthropology as modeler and sculptor, has to be 
recorded. Mr. Burt for a long period rendered conscientious, efficient 



Jan., 191 2. Annual Report of the Director. 107 

and interestingly instructive work in the construction of life-size and 
miniature ethnic groups. 

LECTURE Course. — The Spring and Autumn lecture courses are still 
given in Fullerton Memorial Hall by arrangement with the Trustees 
of the Art Institute, and it is encouraging to be able to state that the 
capacity of the hall was taxed at almost every lecture. 

Following is the Thirty-fourth Free Illustrated Lecture Course, 
with the subjects and lecturers, delivered during the months of March 
and April, 191 1: 

"Precious Stones, how they are Found and Manipulated." 

Dr. George F. Kunz, New York City. 
"The Glacial History of the Great Lakes." 

Prof. Frank Carney, Denison University, Granville, 
Ohio. 
"The Sugar Maple and Maple Sugar Making." 

Prof. L. R. Jones, University of Wisconsin. 
"Peking." 

Dr. Berthold Laufer, Associate Curator of Asiatic 
Ethnology, Field Museum'. 
' ' Picturesque Sweden . ' ' 

Prof. James H. Gore, Washington, D. C. 
"The Real Filipino." 

Prof. Arthur Stanley Riggs, New York City. 
"Photographing the Heavens." 

Prof. G. W. Ritchey, Mount Wilson Solar Observatory, 
Pasadena, California. 
April 22. — "Recent Discoveries of Petroleum in the United States 
and Mexico." 
Dr. David T. Day, U. S. Geological Survey, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 
April 29. — "Turkestan; the Heart of Asia." 

Mr. William E. Curtis, Washington, D. C. 

Following is the Thirty-fifth Free Illustrated Lecture Course, with 
the subjects and lecturers, delivered during the months of October and 
November, 191 1: 

Oct. 7. — "Panama." 

Dr. Seth E. Meek, Assistant Curator, Department of 
Zoology, Field Museum. 
Oct. 14. — "Edible and Poisonous Mushrooms." 

Dr. WiUiam A. Murrill, Assistant Director, New York 
Botanical Garden. 



March 


4- 


March 


II. 


March 


iS. 


March 


25- 


April 


I. 


April 


8. 


April 


15- 



io8 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Oct. 21. — "The R. F. Cummings Philippine Expedition : The Wild 
Tribes of Mindanao." 
Mr. Fay Cooper Cole, Ethnologist, Field Museum. 
Oct. 28. — "From Sea Level to Snow Line in Vera Cruz." 

Prof. Frank M. Chapman, American Museum of 
Natural History. 
Nov. 4. — "The Geology of Yellowstone Park." 

Prof. William Harmon Norton, Cornell College, Iowa. 
Nov. II. — "The Extinct Mammals of the Uintah Basin." 

Mr. Elmer S. Riggs, Assistant Curator, Division of 
Paleontology, Field Museum. 
Nov. 18. — "Chinese Painting." 

Dr. Berthold Laufer, Associate Curator of Asiatic 
Ethnology, Field Museum. 
Nov. 25. — "Pre-Columbian Americans." 

Mr. Frederick B. Wright, Washington, D. C. 

Publications. 

Owing to the absence on expeditions of several members of the Staff, 
but two publications have appeared during the year in the series. 

Pub. 150. — Report Series, Vol. IV, No. i. Annual Report of the 

Director to the Board of Trustees, for the year 1910. 

100 pages, 15 halftones. Edition 2,500. 
Pub. 151. — Geological Series, Vol. Ill, No. 9. Analysis of Stone 

Meteorites. By Oliver Cummings Farrington. 35 

pages. Edition 1,500. 

Names on Mailing List. 

Domestic 597 

Foreign 671 



Total 1,268 

Distribution of Foreign Exchanges. 

Argentine Republic .... 12 East Africa 3 

Australia 30 Egypt 2 

Austria 33 Finland i 

Belgium 18 Fiji Islands i 

Borneo i France 56 

Brazil 8 Germany 137 

British Guiana 2 Ecuador i 

Canada 27 Tasmania 2 

Ceylon 3 Colombia 2 

Chile 2 Great Britain 11 1 

China i Greece 2 

Denmark 9 Italy 36 



Jan., 1912. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



109 



India 14 

Japan 8 

Java 4 

Liberia i 

Malta I 

Mexico 18 

Netherlands 19 

New Zealand 6 

Norway 8 

Peru 2 

Portugal 6 

Roumania i 

Russia 17 

Salvador i 

Sicily I 

Distribution of publications (Foreign). 

Anthropological 

Botanical 

Entomological 

Geological . 

Icthyological 

Ornithological 

Zoological . 

Report . 
Distribution of Domestic Exchanges. 

Alabama 2 

Arkansas i 

California 31 



Colorado 
Connecticut 
Delaware . 
District of Columbia 
Florida .... 



Illinois . 

Indiana . 

Idaho 

Iowa 

Kansas . 

Kentucky . 

Louisiana 

Maine . 

Maryland . 

Massachusetts . 

Michigan . 

Minnesota . 

Mississippi . 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 



14 
22 

2 

64 

2 

55 

I 
13 

7 
2 

3 

7 

10 

65 

14 

9 

3 

14 
2 

7 
3 
4 



Spain 5 

Sweden 14 

Switzerland 20 

Uruguay i 

West Indies 3 

Straits Settlements .... i 

Costa Rica 5 

Cape Colony 6 

Jamaica i 

Natal 2 

Rhodesia i 

Transvaal 3 

Bulgaria i 

Guatemala i 



307 
361 
167 
358 
169 
209 
296 
671 



New Jersey 
New York , 
North Carolina 
North Dakota 
New Mexico 
Ohio . . 
Oklahoma . 
Oregon . 
Pennsylvania 
Rhode Island 
South Dakota 
Tennessee 
Texas . 
Utah . 
Vermont 
Virginia 
Washington 
West Virginia 
Wisconsin . 
Wyoming . 
Philippine Islands 
Porto Rico 
Hawaii . 
Cuba 
South Carolina 



15 

80 
6 
I 
2 

18 
2 
I 

40 

5 
2 
2 

3 
I 

4 
4 
6 

4 
17 
2 
2 
I 

5 
3 
I 



no Field Museum of^atural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



Distribution of Publications 'Domestic) 
Anthropological 
Botanical 
Geological 
Historical 
Icthyological 
Ornithological 
Zoological . 
Report . 



245 
317 
33 + 
180 
164 

173 
274 

597 



LIBRARY. — The number of books and painphlets in the Library is 
now 55,870, which represents an addition during the year of 2,306 books 
and pamphlets, distributed as follows: 



General Library 


38475 


Anthropological Library 


2,660 


Botanical Library 


5-611 


Geological Library 


6,867 


Zoological Library 


2,257 



This increase represents growth mainly by exchange of the Museum's 
publications, exchange having been made with 674 institutions. There 
are outstanding orders for some .54 works selected from catalogues of 
second-hand book dealers. It is gratifying to be able to state that a 
number of the older works have been secured which were needed in the 
Departmental Libraries. There are in the Library at the present time 
requisitions for several thousand dollars worth of books. These repre- 
sent the accumulation of several years. Some were ordered, but it 
was iinpossible to secure them, as they were out-of-print works and 
were sold by the tiine the orders reached the dealers. No single large 
collection has been received either by gift or purchase. Mr. J. Pierpont 
Morgan presented a beautifully bound and superbly illustrated copy of 
his Catalogue of the Morgan Collection of Porcelains. This work is 
highly appreciated, as it is supplementary to the Museum's collection 
of a number of rare types of Chinese porcelains secured by the Mrs. 
T. B. Blackstone Expedition conducted by Dr. Berthold Laufer. The 
Catalogue of the Burlington Fine Arts Club and Bushell's Chinese 
Porcelain, i6th Century, colored illustrations, which were secured by 
purchase, further interpret this collection. Through the courtesy of 
the Smithsonian Institution the Museum received 13 volumes on the 
scientific results of the Harriman Alaskan Expedition of 1S99. Further 
issues of this valuable work will be received as published by the In- 
stitution. A list of all accessions is appended to this report. 

There were deducted from the total number of volumes some 700 
titles of Exposition Literature. With the consent of the donors, this 
library was presented to the Chicago Public Library, where it will be 



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Jan., 1912. Annual Report of the Director. hi 

kept intact. The current work of classifying, labeling, accessioning 
and cataloguing the pt:blications as they were received has continued 
without interruption. There have been written and added to the cata- 
logue 14,014 cards. Monthly installments of The John Crerar Library 
Catalogue cards have been received and filed. Two additional units 
of the metal card cabinets were purchased to accommodate the growth 
of the catalogue. There have been received from the Newberry Li- 
brary Bindery 879 periodicals and publications. The office of the 
Library has been thoroughly cleaned and redecorated and the stack 
room thoroughly dusted. Advantage was taken of the opportunity to 
borrow from the Department of Geology, for temporary use, one of 
the large exhibition cases. This was placed in the stack room and 
filled with books seldom used. This disposition temporarily relieves 
the crowded condition of the shelves in the stack room. The physical 
condition of the stack room and the Departmental Libraries cannot 
be improved in the present building. The Library, depending as it 
must to a large extent upon the larger libraries of the city for many 
of the rare and expensive books, takes pleasure again in acknowledging 
the courtesies extended bv these institutions,^ 

Departmental Cataloguing, inventorying, Akfl; J-ab'eling. — The Depart- 
ment of Anthropology reports that 3,250 ca^alQgue cajds were written 
and entered in the departmental inventory, which now number 34 
volumes. The most important collections catalogued and recorded 
have been those made by the late Dr. William Jones and Mr. F. C. 
Cole in the Philippines; the Alfred R. Brown collection from 
Andaman and Nicobar Islands; Australian material from the Uni- 
versity of Melbourne; material from Congo and Soudan, collected by 
Mr. E. E. Ayer, and Salish Indian material presented by Mr. Homer 
E. Sargent. Three thousand catalogue cards, forming a small portion 
of the Mrs. T. B. Blackstone Chinese and Tibetan collection, have 
been prepared by Dr. Berthold Laufer, but remain unentered in the 
departmental inventory, awaiting the completion of the cataloguing 
of the collections. The efficiency of the records of the Department 
has been maintained and the classified card catalogue of tribes, as 
well as an alphabetical record of same, has been continued. It is 
very gratifying to report that labels of black card with aluminum 
ink have been printed and placed upon iinproved wooden label holders 
of varying slants in 44 cases, containing ethnological material from 
California, and that in thirty-five exhibition cases devoted to the 
ethnology of the Hopi Indians the old and faded buff labels are being 
rapidly replaced with revised and rewritten black card labels. The 
information on the old buff printed labels accompanying the Tlingit 



112 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Indian collection, as exhibited in twenty-one cases, has been copied 
and is ready for the printer. The copying of these labels, instead of 
using same as copy for the printer, was deemed advisable, that the 
labels be not removed from the cases for any length of time, thereby 
denying the public the information upon same. Copy for labels of 
most of the cases containing Egyptian Archaeological and North 
American ethnological material, other than those cases cited above, 
has been prepared and is given the printer from time to time. Many 
specimen, case and general labels have been prepared for the Chinese 
and Philippine collections. The labelling of collections with the new 
labels greatly enhance the appearance of same. For the past year 
the printer has delivered to this Department 154 labels for Northwest 
Coast collection; 4,167 labels for California collections; 1,143 for the 
Stanley McCormick Hopi collection; 978 for the Mrs. T. B. Blackstone 
Chinese collection; 567 for the R. F. Cummings and other Philippine 
collections; 58 case labels, making a total of 7,067, besides 13,475 
catalogue cards for various collections. All new material installed 
during the year in the Department of Botany has been inventoried and 
labelled; entries to the number of 32,029 were made during the year, 
bringing the total up to date to 329,839, contained in 56 catalogue 
books. The principal work of cataloguing in the Department of 
Geology during the year had to do with the Head collection, the 
cataloguing of which was completed. The number of entries made 
for this collection during the year was 6,659, 1'naking a total of 10,203 
for the entire collection. In addition to the cataloguing of this col- 
lection, identification of the specimens was carried on, the unidentified 
material being named and previously identified material being examined 
for correctness. During the reinstallation of the petroleum collection 
the opportunity was improved to more fully catalogue its specimens, 
about 400 additional entries being made. To the Department library 
170 books and 189 pamphlets have been added during the year and 
159 cards to the card catalogue. The work of labeling has been 
carried on as fast as labels could be furnished by the printer. A full 
series was made for the gems and semiprecious stones of the systematic 
mineral collection. White or black board was used for these labels, 
according to the color of the background on which the gems were 
mounted. A total of 208 labels was thus prepared and installed. 
For the newly installed petroleum collection, 381 labels were prepared 
and distributed, 71 of these being descriptive. Of the labels for the 
clays and soils, copy for which has been prepared in full, 763 labels 
were made and distributed. About 30 other labels, more or less 
descriptive, were provided for the vertebrate and invertebrate fossils. 



Jan., 1912. Annual Report of the Director. 113 

Ten case labels were prepared and placed on the cases in Higin- 
botham Hall. In the Division of Mammalogy and Ornithology the 
cataloguing and labelling of specimens was continued as usual. 
The reference collection of mammals is now quite thoroughly cata- 
logued, with the exception of the specimens of large size stored in 
the iron insect-proof room in the basement of the Musuem. Under 
existing conditions, these large specimens are not readily accessible, 
but other work is now advanced so it will probably be possible soon 
to undertake the cataloguing and arrangement of them. During the 
year a small number of large skulls of mammals have been trans- 
ferred from the Division of Osteology to Mammalogy, and all the 
skulls and skeletons on exhibition have been numbered and entered 
in the Mammalogy catalogues, where reference to them is often 
necessary. A special card index of mammal skeletons has also been 
made and the card index of the mammal collection has been subject 
to continual revision. The greater part of the time of one assistant 
has been devoted to cataloguing and labelhng birds. Altogether, 
3,517 entries have been made — 2,803 i^ Ornithology^, 630 in Mammal- 
ogy, and 84 in Oology. 

The year's work on catalogues and inventorying is shown in detail 
below. 





No. of 


Total No. of 


Entries 


Total No. 




Record 


Entries to 


during 


of cards 




Books. 


Dec. 31, 1911. 


1911. 


written. 


Department of Anthropology . 


34 


117-530 


3,250 


120,530 


Department of Botany . 


56 


329.839 


32,029 




Department of Geology . 


20 


120,722 


8,227 


7,521 


Department of Zoology . 


40 


83,001 


3,999 


29,343 


The Library 


13 


87,417 


7,380 


123,976 


Section of Photography . 


6 


93,570 


6,431 





ACCESSIONS. — As in the previous year, the greater number of ac- 
cessions in the Department of Anthropology were acquired by gifts. 
Through Mr. Stanley Field, Mr. Edward E. Ayer, Mr. Arthur B. 
Jones, Mr. Watson F. Blair, Mr. George F. Porter, and Mr. George 
Manierre, a valuable collection of jewelry from the Kabyle tribes of 
Algeria, Africa, was donated and is now installed in Higinbotham Hall. 
An interesting collection of footwear was presented by Mr. T. A. 
Shaw of Chicago. Mr. Edward E. Ayer enriched the collection of 
archa:ological material from Egypt by a life-size stone statue of the 
Goddess Sehkmet. Mr. Homer E. Sargent presented a typical col- 
lection of Salish Indian material. While there were no large collec- 
tions purchased there were several individual specimens of consider- 
able interest and importance acquired in this manner, the principal 
one of this character being an Egyptian stone sarcophagus. 



114 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

The Departinent of Botany has received the usual annual additions 
of herbarium specimens, among which the following accessions are 
noteworthy: Botanic Gardens, Sydney, Australia, 201; Ezra Brainerd, 
various states, 181; Williain C. Cusick, Oregon, no; C. C. Deam, 
Guatemala, 112; Departmento de Exploracion Biologica, Seccion de 
Botanica, Mexico, 279; A. D. E. Elmer, Philippine Islands, 1,372; 
F. C. Gates, Illinois, Wisconsin, etc., 543; Geological Survey of Canada, 
346; C. W. Grassley, Illinois, etc., 524; Gray Herbarium, Australia, 
92; R. M. Harper, Georgia, Alabama, and Florida, 90; A. A. Heller, 
western United States, 304; C. Judson Herrick, New Mexico, 208; 
Dr. Walton Haydon, Oregon, 139; E. J. Hill, Illinois, etc., 85; 0. E. 
Lansing, Jr., Ozark Mountains, Missouri, 307, Michigan, Indiana and 
Illinois, 156; Dr. C. F. Millspaugh, Turks and Caicos Islands, 423; 
A. Nelson, Idaho, 173; Dr. C. F. Newcombe, Victoria, British Colum- 
bia, 98; New York Botanical Garden, Cuba and Jamaica, 794, Mont- 
serrat, 698; Dr. C. A. Purpus, Mexico, 552; Albert Ruth, Texas, 
226; E. E. Sherfl, Illinois, etc., 1,062; H. H. Smith, Alberta, British 
Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and California, 747; E. Stearns, 
Mexico, 81. One of the most important accessions of the year is the 
acquisition by purchase of the private herbarium and library of the 
late J. H. Schuette; this collection is estimated to contain from 15,000 
to 20,000 herbarium specimens representing mainly the flora of 
Wisconsin. 

The organization (i. e., poisoning, mounting, cataloguing and dis- 
tributing) of the current accessions has been kept up to date, and 
18,304 sheets have been installed from the larger herbaria, secured 
by the Museum, in accordance with the following tabulation: 

Estimated Organized Previously 

Herbaria. Contents. 191 1. Organized. 



Heller .... 

Rothrock 

Schott .... 

Small .... 

University of Chicago 



14,603 5,264 

22,510 14,178 8,027 

8,671 6 8,422 

21,528 12,714 

45,000 4,120 25,780 



Additions to the organized herbarium, during 1911, arranged ac- 
cording to geographic locality, are shown in the following table: 

Added to Total 

Herbarium now in 
191 1. Herbarium. 

North America: 

Canada (in general) 4 1,960 

Alberta 8 429 

Assiniboia i 21 

British Columbia 135 1,083 

Vancouver Island 148 342 



Jan., 1912. Annual Report of the Director. 115 

North America: , Added to Total 

_ 1 /■ i\ Herbarium now in 

Canada (in general) 1911. Herbarium 

Franklin 6 7 

Keewatin 29 34 

Mackenzie i li 

Manitoba 14 298 

New Brunswick 162 744 

Nova Scotia 72 222 

Ontario no 572 

Quebec 16 88 

Anticosti Island 33 39 

Saskatchewan 38 435 

Ungava 3 77 

Yukon 40 160 

Labrador 58 228 

Greenland 8 167 

United States (in general) 25 36 

Alabama . - . • 60 1,021 

Alaska 230 768 

American Plains 122 215 

Arkansas 31 219 

Arizona 648 7i798 

California 1,616 19.043 

Colorado 1,808 8,573 

Connecticut 27 333 

Dakota (North) 2 184 

Dakota (South) 12 115 

Delaware 89 1,187 

District of Columbia 87 i ,920 

Florida 1,054 18,633 

Florida Keys i 639 

Georgia 41 4.362 

Idaho 195 1.479 

lUinois 1,339 I7.940 

Indiana 287 4.308 

Iowa 22 1,308 

Kansas 10 260 

Kentucky 26 676 

Louisiana 63 I1O54 

Maine 85 1,220 

Maryland 119 899 

Massachusetts 463 2,683 

Michigan 364 2,584 

Minnesota 4 691 

Mississippi 6 1.875 

Mssouri 1,126 2,097 

Montana 84 3,271 

Nebraska 14 1.163 

Nevada 78 724 

New Hampshire 84 1.163 



n6 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

North America : Added to Total 

TT -i J Oi. i /• i\ Herbarium now in 

United States (in general) ipu. Herbarium. 

New Jersey 565 2,106 

New Mexico 225 2495 

New York 259 5,065 

North Carohna 408 1.857 

Ohio 15 1,475 

Oklahoma 9 175 

Oregon 432 5,932 

Pennsylvania 2,461 9,040 

Rhode Island 7 481 

Rocky Mountains 562 1,293 

South Carolina 86 705 

Tennessee 150 1,052 

Texas 764 6,883 

Mexican Boundary 2 1,396 

Utah 132 2,061 

Vermont 65 1,847 

Virginia 185 1,623 

Washington 19 4,548 

West Virginia I 1,281 

Wisconsin 109 869 

Wyoming 24 787 

Yellowstone National Park 18 283 

Mexico (in general) 1,638 28,242 

Lower California 3 1,651 

Yucatan 10 4,695 

Central America: 

Canal Zone 49 52 

Costa Rica i 388 

Guatemala 113 2,255 

Panama 2 46 

Bermuda Islands 16 643 

West Indies (in general) 10 14 

Bahama Islands 2 130 

Andros Islands 455 1,723 

Ambergris Cay 45 45 

Bay Cay i i 

Cotton Cay ... 1 7 7 

Crooked Island I 332 

Dellis Cay _ . 14 14 

East Caicos 54 54 

Eastern Cay 13 13 

Fortune Island I 345 

Gibbs Cay 7 7 

Grand Caicos 9 9 

Grand Turk Island 120 193 

Inagua i 444 

Little Ambergris Cay 7 7 

Long Cay 13 13 



Jan., 1912. Annual Report of the Director. 117 

North America: Added to Total 

TIT i T 1- /• i\ Herbarium now in 

West Indies (in general) 191 r. Herbarium. 

Bahama Islands 

New Providence 

North Caicos 

Parrot Cay 

Penniston Cay 

Pine Cay 

Salt Cay 

Sand Cay 

South Caicos 

Stubbs Cay 

Cuba 

Guadaloupe 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Martinique 

Montserrat 

New Granada 

Santo Domingo 

South America: 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chili 

Ecuador . . . . ' 

Guiana (British) 

Guiana (Dutch) 

Guiana (French) 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Tobago Island 

Trinidad 

Great Britain (in general) 

England 

Ireland 

Scotland '. . 

Wales 

Europe (in general) 

Austro-Hungary 

Belgium 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Italy 

Corsica 

Sicily 

Norway 

Portugal 

Cape Verde Islands 

Madeira Islands 



I 


2,398 


74 


125 


12 


12 


I 


I 


4 


8 


16 


64 


9 


9 


17 


124 


8 


8 


2,685 


8,231 


3 


1,062 


3 


302 


118 


6,501 


I 


603 


698 


698 


I 


531 


2 


476 


I 


3-104 


33 


296 


2 


161 


9 


834 


I 


69 


3 


3 


I 


2 


9 


1,401 


I 


6 


68 


1.033 


199 


363 


2 


388 


23 


1.313 


259 


1.754 


I 


10 


16 


381 


2 


30 


47 


70 


151 


5.953 


12 


195 


509 


4.045 


423 


5.952 


23 


512 


198 


1.815 


2 


49 


7 


123 


14 


1,010 


I 


6 


5 


5 


3 


17 



ii8 Field Mus£um of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Added to Total 

„ /. IS Herbarium now in 

Europe (m general) ipu. Herbarium. 

Russia 233 1,489 

Nova Zembla 29 29 

Spain 34 231 

Canary Islands 12 17 

Sweden 32 8,996 

Switzerland 298 2,034 

Asia (in general) 79 -82 

Asia Minor 3 3 

Turkey 100 279 

Ceylon i 9 

China 44 212 

India 128 856 

Japan I loi 

Java 29 57 

Kamtschatka 4 6 

Malay Peninsula 3 12 

Siberia 33 439 

Turkestan 32 83 

Africa (in general) 50 3.887 

Abyssinia 3 195 

Algeria 39 105 

Cape Colony I 1.594 

Egypt 7 17 

Mauritius 2 6 

Tibet 13 291 

Oceanica, etc. : 

Australia (in general) 441 1,837 

New South Wales 77 343 

Queensland 15 16 

Western Australia 9 9 

Tasmania 9 191 

Dutch East Indies 5 5 

Sandwich Islands 145 420 

New Zealand 1,294 1,313 

Philippine Islands 1,421 4,163 

Borneo 5 7 

Molucca Islands I i 

Samoa 3 23 

Sumatra 2 3 

Horticultural sources, etc 773 1,986 

The total increase of the organized herbarium during the year 
amounted to 31,092 specimens. The accessions deserving of especial 
mention in the Department of Geology were the following : By gift were 
received from the late Prof. W. P. Blake, two full-sized sections of the 
Noon meteorite, and from Dr. Walton Haydon of Marshfield, Oregon, 
141 specimens of fossils of the Oregon Tertiary and 8 specimens of con- 
cretions. By exchange, specimens of the Vigarano and Cowra meteor- 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY 



REPORTS, PLATE XVIII. 




The PAPAW iCarita Papaya) OF THE AMERICAN TROPICS. 



Jan., 191 2. Annual Report of the Director. 119 

ites were received. By collection about 400 specimens of invertebrate 
fossils from Illinois and Kentucky were obtained. By purchase were 
obtained an exceptionally fine slab of Ordovician crinoids from Ohio 
and three fine specimens of vivianite from Colorado. The total num- 
ber of accessions added to the Zoology collections is 1,381, of which 
357 are mammals, 485 birds, and 539 birds' eggs. These are sum- 
marized as follows: from Museum expeditions 249 mammals, 464 
birds, and 7 birds' eggs; by purchase 100 mammals, 9 birds and 532 
birds' eggs; by gift 8 mammals and 11 birds; by exchange i bird. Ex- 
cept for the work on the Panama expedition there have not been many 
additions made to the collection of fishes and reptiles during the year; 
but the Panama expedition in connection with the Smithsonian has 
largely increased the collection, at a minimum cost. No noteworthy 
acquisitions to the collection in the Division <^^ Entomology can be 
recorded for the period of time under conls^^f^mt^oi]^^'^, As the following 
summary will show, no insects were purchased,-.lieither "Were there any 
rarities among the limited number of specimens received from various 
sources. The insects accessioned during the year 191 1 were 428 local 
insects collected by WilHam J. Gerhard, 215 local insects collected by 
A. B. Wolcott, 49 insects collected on Museum expeditions and 64 
insects presented by various donors. 

EXPEDITIONS AND Field WORK. — After completing the work among the 
Bagobo referred to in the last Report Mr. Cole, in continuing the 
ethnologic survey of the PhiHppine Islands under the fund provided 
by Mr. Robert F. Cummings, went to the Manobo, a tribe living along 
the Padada River and in the Malalag swamps of the Davao district. 
From them he went to the Bilaan, a little-known tribe of the interior. 
Owing to a serious religious outbreak among the members of these 
two tribes, intensive study was greatly hindered, but considerable 
headway was made in the study of their laws and religion, particularly 
as related to their custom of annual human sacrifices. A collection 
of about 550 pieces was secured from that district. A small collection 
was also obtained from the Divavaon, an interior tribe. The last 
collection was made on the southeastern coast of Mindanao, among 
the Mandaya. The people of this tribe live in small villages, often 
building their houses high in the branches of trees. This tribe has a 
rather advanced material culture, possesses many beautiful weapons, 
and a distinctive type of dress, all of which are fully shown in the col- 
lection. More than 400 specimens and much valuable information 
had been secured when a severe illness caused Mr. Cole to leave the 
district and return to the States. Among the four tribes named 
he obtained two hundred physical measurements, three hundred 



I20 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

negatives illustrating the life of the people and the country they in- 
habit and two dozen phonograph records. The work of securing 
additional Hopi ethnological inaterial, under the recent Stanlej^ Mc- 
Cormick grant, was entrusted to Assistant Curator Owen. As the 
previous Hopi collection had been made chiefly at the third mesa, 
a house to house search of the first and second mesas was made and 
yielded i,6oo specimens. Prominent among these are masks, head- 
dresses, tihus, an old Oaqol altar (fragmentary) of 45 pieces, an original 
Balolokon screen, fetishes, charms, bahos, varieties of the throwing 
stick; food stuffs, medicines, basket materials, textiles, games, stone 
implements, necklaces, jewelry of silver, moccasins, floor smoothing 
stones, mortars for foods and paints, cotton seed, also a comprehensive 
collection of ceremonial paraphernalia. More than 200 photographs 
were made of scenes of Hopi life and surroundings. A most gratify- 
ing report from Dr. Lewis, who has been for some time past and is 
now conducting the Joseph N. Field, South Pacific Islands expedition, 
has been recently received. Dr. Lewis reports that since making his 
last formal report he spent six weeks in the British Solomon Islands, 
during which time he visited several of the different islands and obtained 
quite a number of specimens, though from the museum standpoint there 
is not very much left in most of these islands, except in the most in- 
accessible parts, and that, as it would take a year or so to visit the 
different islands and make a representative collection, he deemed it 
inadvisable to stay longer, so he secured the services of a resident who 
has occasion to visit most of the islands on business, to make a col- 
lection for him. In the early part of January Dr. Lewis returned to 
Sydney, intending to visit the New Hebrides and New Caledonia next, as 
it is impossible to get directly from the Solomon Islands to these other 
groups. On account of the season and the condition of his health 
Dr. Lewis thought it wisest to postpone his visit to these islands until 
April, and in the meantime took a trip to New Zealand by the way of 
Fiji, Samoa and Tonga. In Fiji he procured a few specimens and 
arranged to get additional ones. At Auckland Dr. Lewis procured a 
few very rare and valuable specimens, chiefly from the Solomon Islands. 
After spending a week or more in the geyser district he proceeded to 
Wellington and spent a week there, studying the collections in the 
Dominion Museum, where he arranged with the Director of that 
Museum to exchange material collected in the field for a collection of 
photographs, etc. From Wellington he returned to Sydney by way 
of the South Island and Melbourne, as he wished to visit the Museums 
at Dunedin, Christ Church and Melbourne, and obtain letters from the 
commonwealth officials at Melbourne to the officials in British New 



Jan., 191 2. Annual Report of the Director. 121 

Guinea and New Hebrides. He reached Sydney in time to catch 
the steamer for New Hebrides on April ist. It takes six weeks to 
make a round trip of the islands and return to Vila, the chief port. 
In addition to this trip he spent two months in Malekula and Ambrym. 
Here he succeeded in getting a number of very rare specimens, includ- 
ing some of the large drums and carved wood figures, most of which 
have been forwarded to the Museum, but unfortunately, owing to 
bad weather, the steamer was not able to stop at one place where he 
had a number of specimens so he arranged for these to be sent on later. 
He reports that arrangements with a missionary in the Santa Cruz 
group were made to send a collection to the Museum, as it would 
have taken too much time for him to have gone there. After packing 
his collections at Vila he proceeded to New Caledonia, where he spent 
a month visiting the wildest portions of the northern end of the island 
and getting a very interesting, though not a very large collection. He 
then returned to Sydney and there purchased a few rare specimens 
which he had not been able to get in the islands. He further reports 
that he has also arranged for a further collection from New Caledonia, 
which will probably not be ready for some months, as it will take some 
time to get it together. The collector who has agreed to do this has 
done quite a little collecting and made the collection for the Paris 
exposition among others. Dr. Lewis reports that he cannot, in the 
time he has, either make these collections himself or wait for others 
to make them. The region is too vast. Specimens are getting scarce 
in these islands, and unless things are obtained at once there will be 
nothing left. Dr. Lewis is now on his way to Simpson Hafen, where 
he hopes to buy a collection which will nicely fill out the collections 
from the German colony, it being from those islands he was unable 
to visit. From there he proposes to proceed to British New 
Guinea as soon as possible. Assistant Curator W. H. Osgood with 
S. G. Jewett, assistant, conducted an expedition to Venezuela 
and Colombia from January to April. They entered the port of 
Maracaibo, Venezuela, and, working in that vicinity a short while, then 
proceeded inland, finally reaching the high country lying on the boun- 
dary between Venezuela and Colombia some 200 miles south of Mara- 
caibo. Their collections, while not particularly large, are unusually 
varied and valuable. They number 232 mammals and 462 birds, 
besides a few fishes and reptiles. Among the mammals are 10 species 
and subspecies new to science and some eight genera new to Field 
Museum, while practically all the species were previously unrepresented 
in the collections and a considerable number are not seen in museums 
outside of Europe. Of particular interest and value were the discovery 



122 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

of the habitat and the acquirement of complete specimens of the rare 
marsupial, Caenolestes, living representative of the otherwise extinct 
family Epanorthidse and of which no perfect specimens had ever 
before been taken. Work on the birds is in progress and will prob- 
ably prove to include at least as many novelties. No other expeditions 
of importance were conducted in 191 1. The Curator of Zoolog}- made 
a number of short field trips for the purpose of study in relation to 
habitat groups and in studying habits of mammals in connection with 
his forthcoming work. Artist C. A. Corwin accompanied an expedi- 
tion from the University of Iowa to Laysan Island iii the Pacific Ocean 
west of Hawaii. Through his cooperation with their party, certain 
birds and group material are to be obtained for exhibition groups in 
this Museum. Through the kindness of Mr. Cyrus H. McCormick, 
Messrs. L. L. Pray and C. F. Brandler spent two weeks in June at 
White Deer Lake, near Champion, Michigan, where they obtained an 
excellent series of beaver and ample material for a habitat group of 
these animals. Mr. Friesser, taxidermist, has made various short 
trips in the vicinity of Chicago for miscellaneous material needed 
in his work. During the time from January i to May 24, the Assistant 
Curator, Dr. Meek, was in Panama collecting fishes and reptiles with 
representatives of the Smithsonian Institution, which is now engaged 
in making a biological sur\^ey of the Canal Zone and the adjacent 
region. Dr. Meek returned early in June to Chicago and has 
since devoted the greater portion of his time to the preparation of 
an account of the Fresh-water Fishes of Central America, with espe- 
cial attention to the fishes listed from the fresh and brackish waters 
of Panama, which is preliminary to a report of the Panama collection. 
The collection made in Panama by the Assistant Curator and the 
representatives of the Smithsonian Institution comprises 440 species, 
about 25 of which appear to be new. This collection, at present in 
the United States National Museum, is in an excellent state of pres- 
ervation, and has already been catalogued and arranged for future 
study. The larger fishes, more than 2,800 specimens, are supplied 
with collector's tags, and are preserved in stone jars. The remainder, 
about 15,000 specimens, are (with the exception of a small portion 
of the fresh -water fishes which are in this Museum) in bottles, occupy- 
ing a little more than 60 square feet of shelf -room. The small collec- 
tion here (about 300 specimens) contains the apparently new species 
of fresh-water fishes. The reptiles collected on this expedition are in 
the U. S. National A4useum. Dr. Meek reports these animals as far 
from abundant on the Isthmus, and this collection contains only about 



Jan., 1912. Annual Report of the Director. 123 

150 to 200 specimens. There were also collected on this expedition 
some shells and crustaceans. As soon as these collections are studied 
they will be divided between the U. S. National Museum and Field 
Museum. The Panama Railroad and Steamship Company trans- 
ported the entire party and equipment from New York to Colon and 
return free of charge; also provided the party with living quarters 
when in the Canal Zone free of charge, with free transportation on 
the Panama Railroad, besides granting other favours. The Curator 
of Botany began in February a botanical exploration of the Turks 
and Caicos Islands, . Bahamas. He chartered and provisioned a 
small sloop, enabling him to explore the following islands that 
would otherwise not have been possible: South Caicos, Long Cay, 
East Caicos, North Caicos, Parrot Cay, Stubb's Cay, Pine Cay, Dellis 
Cay, Little and Great Ambergris Cays, Sand Cay, Salt Cay, Cotton 
Cay, Penniston Cay, Eastern Cay, Gibbs' Cay, and Grand Turk Island. 
The expedition resulted in a very satisfactory reconnaissance of these 
islands and concluded the botanical survey of the Bahamian Archi- 
pelago that has received the combined attention of this Museum and 
the New York Botanical Garden for the past seven years. The 
Assistant Curator of the Division of Dendrology has spent the full 
year in field work upon the Pacific Coast, securing material for the 
North American Forestry Collection. He has shipped several con- 
signments of tree material from Oregon and Cahfornia; a large number 
of herbarium specimens, economic material, dried fruits, photographic 
negatives, and other interesting specimens. His work includes the 
securing of a Redwood trunk, "Wheel" and large plank intended for 
trophies in the Dendrological Hall of the new building. Mr. Lansing, 
of the Division of Herbarium, who has been collecting in the southern 
Lake Michigan area for the last decade, has continued the work during 
the past season through, making several trips in Michigan from Benton 
Harbor to New Buffalo. He also spent the month of June in a botan- 
ical investigation of the Ozark Mountains, Missouri. The Curator 
of the Department started September 6th, on a tour of the World in 
quest of additional economic material. His intention is to work in 
Japan, China, Philippines, Straits Settlements, Java, Ceylon, and 
India. The Assistant Curator of Invertebrate Paleontology obtained 
by collection about 150 specimens of invertebrate fossils at Chanahon 
and Thornton, Illinois, about 100 specimens at the Falls of the Ohio, 
near Louisvilk, Kentucky, and 134 specimens at Traverse Bay, Michi- 
gan. Following is a list of the expeditions since the date of the last 
report: 



124 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Locality. Collector. Material. 

Western Venezuela and 

Eastern Colombia . . W. H. Osgood, Birds and mammals. 

Pacific Coast . . . . H. H. Smith, Timber, economic material and 

herbarium specimens. 
Bahama Archipelago . . C. F. Millspaugh, Herbarium specimens and eco- 
nomic material. 

Ohio C. L. Owen, Archaeological investigations. 

Kansas S. C. Simms, Ethnological investigations. 

vSouth Missouri . . . O. E. Lansing, Jr., Herbarium specimens. 

Champion, Michigan . C. Brandler, Skins of Beavers and accessories 

for groups. 
Wisconsin and Illinois . . C. B. Cory, Group studies. 

Tropics of the Old World . C. F. Millspaugh, Economic material and herbarium 

specimens. 
Louisville, Ky. and Chan- 

ahon, Illinois . . . A. W. Slocom, Invertebrate fossils. 
New York and Washington C. B. Cory, Examining and comparing speci- 
mens in museums. 
Michigan, Indiana, and Illi- 
nois O. E. Lansing, Jr. Herbarium specimens. 

New Buffalo and Dowagiac, 

Mich C. B. Cory and Material for groups. 

L. L. Pray, 
New Guinea, New Hebrides, 

New Caledonia, etc. . . A. B. Lewis, Ethnological. 

Panama S. E. Meek, Fishes and reptiles. 

Installation, Rearrangement and Permanent Improvement. — During the 
early part of the year 94 cases, containing California ethnology and 
material from the Pawnee, Wichita, Caddo, and Arikara Indians, 
and material from South America, were removed from Halls 30, 31 
and 34 and Alcoves 106, 107 and 108 to the East Court, so that 
cases of installed material in the Department of Geology cordd be 
removed from the West Annex and accommodated in the above 
vacated Halls and Alcoves. In order to make this arrangement, it was 
foimd necessary to remove from public exhibition the contents of 
32 cases of North and South American archaeological material, 
which has been carefully packed, labelled and stored where it doubt- 
less will have to remain during the occupancy of the present building, 
as space for its proper display is not available. Hall 56, containing 
twenty-seven standard cases of installed Ainu material and material 
from Saghalin and Siberian tribes, and from India, Ceylon, Siam, 
Burma, and Korea, has been repainted and refloored and arranged 
for inspection by the public, which for some time past has been denied 
this privilege, due to crowded conditions existing in the rottmda of 
the East Annex, which no longer exists, and which, though not installed 



Jan., 1912. Annual Report of the Director. 125 

at present, is expected to be devoted to overflow of collections from 
neighboring halls or temporarily installed collections. Installation 
of Chinese material of the Mrs. T. B. Blackstone collection has pro- 
gressed favorably and material filling nine cases has been labelled and 
attractively installed in double Halls 43 and 44 (which were until 
recently occupied by the Department of Botany as a storeroom). 
These halls have been thoroughly renovated and refloored. When 
the new cases are assembled and accepted these halls will be opened 
for public inspection. Besides these nine permanently installed cases 
of Chinese material, there have been temporarily installed six cases of 
Chinese bronzes. It is hoped that hall 45 will shortly be renovated 
and put in proper condition for the exhibition of material of the Mrs. 
T. B. Blackstone collection, which cannot be shown in the adjoining 
Halls (43 and 45). The occupation of this hall for the above pur- 
pose will soon be necessary. Hall 42, which has also recently been 
used as a storeroom for botanical material, has been turned over to 
Anthropology, and has been renovated, and will be used as a 
Philippine Hall. The following Hopi altars: the Sakwa Lan (Blue 
Flute), Lagon, Tao (Singer), Yasangwu (New Year) and Ahl (Horn), 
have been reproduced by Mr. H. R. Voth under the Stanley 
McCormick fund and are ready for installation; two other altars, 
the Niman (Going Home) and Kwan (Agave) are advancing toward 
completion. Needed accessories for certain altars previously con- 
structed are also being prepared. Installation of Philippine material 
to the extent of sixteen standard cases, forming parts of the R. F. 
Cummings expeditions, have been installed. A group containing 
ninety-three miniature figures illustrating a Bontoc Igorot village 
and various phases of the life and industries of the natives, such 
as social and ceremonial life, blacksmithing, carpentering, basket weav- 
ing, spinning thread and weaving cloth, pottery making, pounding 
rice, feeding pigs, man and woman's transportation, and architecture, 
will shortly be placed on exhibition. A group of life-size human 
figures, representing pottery making by the Igorot of the Samoki 
village of the Bontoc Igorot has also been completed in detail. 
This group represents three adults and one child. These two groups 
are the work of Modeler Gardner. Arrangements are being perfected 
for installation of the stone Egyptian sarcophagus and of a life-size 
stone figure of the Goddess Sehkmet. Owing to the great weight 
of these two objects, it is necessary to reinforce the support of the floor 
during the progress of these specimens to their exhibition localities 
in Egyptian Hall. There have been removed from temporary instal- 
lation upward of 500 Moro specimens which will be installed in 



126 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

standard cases, and for which specimen, case and general labels have 
been prepared. There has also been reinoved from temporary exhibi- 
tion all Amburayan Igorot material, which is also being prepared for 
permanent installation. Labels for this group are being prepared. 
The temporarv^ exhibition of printing and engraving in the Newberry 
Library has been greatly strengthened by material loaned from the 
Mrs. T. B. Blackstone collection. Since the employment of an 
assistant, whose time has been devoted primarily to the reparing of 
broken and injured material, over four hundred specimens, which 
include many valuable objects in clay, ivory, jade, porcelain, metal 
and wood, have been prepared for exhibition. Owing to the steadily 
increasing area occupied by installed material and material now ready 
to be installed, it seems as though it would be necessary to make 
provisions for the relocating of physical anthropology material now 
stored in Hall 53, and the removal and caring for the vast amount 
of material stored in double Hall 46-47. These halls will have to 
be soon devoted to the exhibition of the Joseph N. Field collections 
and similar material. In the Department of Botany little new 
material has been received during the past year to augment the 
economic installations, although considerable reinstallation has been 
accomplished to render the exhibits more complete, educational and 
attractive to the public. The new material inserted has come mainly 
from the Section of Modelling. The following reproductions and 
models have been installed during the year: To the Calla Family 
(Araceae) has been added a full size plant of Anthurium acaule in situ 
upon a tree limb. This reproduction shows the root system exemplify- 
ing an aerophyte; several full-size leaves and one as yet unexpanded; 
three flower clusters; one with the 'bract unfolded, one with the 
ovaries unfertilized, and one heavy with developing fruits; and a full 
ripe fruiting spadix depending with its weight. Associated with this 
are a male and female inflorescence of the Jack-in-the-Pulpit {Arisama 
iriphyllum) , cut open to show the flowers at the base of the spadix, 
and a highly enlarged male and female element. The Lily Family 
(Liliaceae) has been further illustrated by additional economic 
material and a model of a complete plant of the Aloe (Aloe vera) in full 
flower. The Papaw Family {CaricacecB) has been augmented by a 
reproduction of a complete tree-top of the Papaw (Carica Papaya), 
bearing three fully expanded leaves, each about two feet in diaineter; 
a number of leaf- stems; a complete female inflorescence with three 
developed and many undeveloped flowers and twelve fruits grading 
from a young expanding ovary to a full ripe papaw. With this is 
associated a complete male inflorescence, wrought in glass, bearing 



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Jan., 191 2. Annual Report oe the Director. 127 

about two hundred buds and flowers; the male and female flowers 
enlarged and sectioned, showing the essential organs in situ; and a 
natural size ripe fruit in longitudinal section. See Plate XVIII. To the 
Orange Family {Auraniiacecs) has been added a reproduction of a 
complete branch of the Grape Fruit (Citrus decumana) in leaf, flower 
and fruit, the cluster of fruits showing the grape-like aggregation that 
gave rise to the name. Associated with this is an enlarged flower 
revealing all its characters, and a leafy branch-tip of the Kumquat 
{Citrus japonica) and the Lemon {Citrus Limonum) in fruit. The 
Lignum Vitas Family {Zygophyllacece) has gained additional interest in 
the reproduction of a complete branch of the Lignum Vitse {Guaiacum 
officinale), including the leaf, flower, and fruit characters executed 
entirely in glass. See Plate X^JS'V-II. -Associated with this is an enlarged 
flower of the same species sectiori^SytfJ' reveal its characteristics, and 
fruit of the Guaiacum sanctum entire aiad in transverse section to 
illustrate the ovarial characters. The case devoted to the .Custard 
Apple Family {Anonacece) now contains a natural size reproduction of 
a complete branch of the Custard Apple {Anona muricata) bearing a 
full complement of leaves, buds, flowers, and immature and full ripe 
fruit. Associated with this are: an enlarged flower of the same 
species sectioned to show the characters and approximation of the 
essential organs; a branch tip of Ilang-Ilang {Cananga odorata) with 
two leaves and a coinplete cluster of fruits (see Plate XXV) , a branch of 
the common Papaw {Asimina triloba) in leaf and fruit, and a full ripe 
fruit entire and in longitudinal section showing the relationship 
and character of the pulp and seeds. The Pomegranate Family 
{PunicacecB) is now complete with a full size branch of the Pome- 
granate {Punica granatum) in leaf, flower, and fruit; this is accom- 
panied by an enlarged flower, in section, showing the ranked stamens, 
and a ripe fruit in tw^o sections revealing the peculiar two-storied 
arrangement of the seeds. The Soap-berry Family {SapindacecE) has 
received the addition of a complete leafing, flowering, and fruiting 
branch of the tropic Akee {Blighia sapida). Associated with this is 
a portion of the inflorescence, enlarged, showing both a male and a 
female flower with the essential organs revealed. The first of the 
sixteen cases devoted to the Bean Family {Leguminosce) has been 
installed with: a reproduction of complete fruiting, and flowering leafy 
branch of the Tamarind {Tamarindus indica, Ccssalpiniacea). This 
reproduction is natural in its woody growth and its ripe fi-uits; the 
young twigs, leaves, and flowers are added in glass. Associated with 
this is a model of a Pea flower {Pisum sativum, Fabacece) enlarged in 
section to show the peculiar and characteristic arrangement of the 



128 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

essential organs; natural size flowers in three stages of development, 
and another separated to illustrate the peculiarities of the floral 
envelope. The balance of the case is occupied by mounted branch- tips 
of various large species, showdng in each instance natural clusters of 
ripe fruits characterizing various groups in this large order. The 
Mangrove Family {Rhizophoracece) has been augmented by a model 
showing the life-cycle of the Mangrove (Rhizophora Mangle); flowers 
and fruits; seeds germinating while the fruit is still on the tree, and the 
elongated downwardly projecting radicle; free floating and fixed seed- 
lings; roots dropping perpendicularly from the branches. An enlarged 
model of the flower; a pistil in vertical Section, and reproductions 
showing different stages in the germination of the seed are incorporated 
in the installation. See Plate XXII. In a number of other cases the 
installed material has been augmented through new elements, and the 
labelling has been kept up in all. The congested condition of the her- 
barium has been temporarily relieved by transferring a portion of 
the collection to the first gallery, thus giving sufficient case-room for 
a distribution of all inserendcB on hand and to accommodate the growth 
of the collection during the coming year. This arrangement infringes 
to a certain extent upon the space of the workrooms and renders refer- 
ence to herbarium specimens somewhat less convenient, but it enables 
further organization of the rapidly growing herbarium to continue. 
The labors of the Geological staff were chiefly devoted during the year 
to the removal of the major part of the collections from the West 
Annex to the Main building. Twenty halls were vacated and the 
specimens and cases which they contained were, after their removal, 
for the most part reinstalled. It is gratifying to state that this work 
was accomplished without the slightest injury to specimens or cases. 
More than two hundred cases with their contents, many of them of 
great weight, were moved, and in addition the Department library, 
paleontological laboratory. Department offices, and a large quantity 
of stored material, apparatus, etc. The disposition of the contents 
of the Halls in order was as follows: From Hall 6i, four cases and 
the Glyptodon mount were moved to Hall 36. From Hall 62 the 
collection of meteorites was moved entire, with the exception of one 
case, to Alcove 106. The systematic minerals. Halls 63 and 64, were 
moved to Halls 30 and 31, with the exception of two cases placed in 
Alcove 105. The collections illustrating structural geology. Hall 65, 
were moved to Hall 31, with the exception of the gypsum cave, which 
was moved to Hall 36. The limestone cave and exhibit of basalt 
columns in this Hall were dismantled and placed in storage. The 
rock collection. Hall 66, was moved to and installed in Hall 35. The 



Jan., 191 2. Annual Report of the Director. 129 

larger and structural specimens in this Hall were moved to Hall 31. • 
Space for the entire collection of marbles and building stones was 
found in Hall 34. Nine cases of the clays and sands collection and 
one case of mineral paints of Hall 68 were moved to Hall 33. Two 
cases of soils from Hall 68 were moved to Hall 35, and the remainder 
of the collection was placed in storage. The large coal map of the 
United States, Hall 69, was removed and placed in storage, as were 
also the accompamdng coal specimens. Of the collection of carbon 
minerals, Hall 70, space was found for six cases in Hall 35, and the 
Australian coal column was moved to Hall ;^t,. The contents of the 
remaining six wall cases of this collection were stored. Ten wall 
cases and two floor cases of the petroleum collection were moved to 
Alcove 107. The remainder of this collection was packed and stored. 
The oil refinery exhibit in this Hall was dismantled and such of its 
contents as were deemed desirable for preservation were stored. The 
collection of gold, silver and lead ores, Hall 72, was moved entire to 
Hall 34. Similar disposition was made of the collection of ores of the 
base metals occupying Hall 79, with the exception of three large speci- 
mens of zinc, nickel and manganese ores. These it will be necessary 
to store. The large specimens in Hall 80 were placed in storage. 
The collection of salts and abrasives comprising eighteen cases was 
moved from Hall 78 to Hall 31. Space was found for the majority 
of the relief maps fonnerly exhibited in Halls 75 and 77 in Hall 34 
and Alcoves 105, 106, and 107. To recapitulate, the present disposi- 
tion of the collections moved is as follows: In Hall 30 have been placed 
twelve floor cases and fourteen wall cases of the systematic mineral 
collection; one case of gems; one case of copper ores; and one case of 
nickel ores. In Hall 31, four floor cases and two wall cases of minerals; 
eight wall cases and ten floor cases of salts and abrasives; and fifteen 
wall cases of structural specimens and rocks. In Hall 23y "nme floor 
cases of clays and sands; one wall case of mineral paints; one case of 
coal; and one case of meteorites. In Hall 34, nine floor cases and four 
wall cases of marbles and building stones; ten wall cases and flfteen 
floor cases of gold, silver and lead ores; ten wall cases and twelve floor 
cases of ores of the base metals ; the model of the Chandler iron mine ; 
and thirty-eight relief maps. In Hall 35, six floor cases of coals; eight 
floor cases of systematic rocks; two floor cases of clays and soils; two 
cases of relief maps. In Hall 36, four wall cases of Quaternary fossils; 
the gypsum cave and two relief maps. In Alcove 104, sixteen relief 
maps. In Alcove 105, six relief maps and two cases of gems and 
crystals. In Alcove 106, six . wall cases and four floor cases of 
meteorites. In Alcove 107, ten wall cases and two floor cases of 



130 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

petroleum; and adjoining, seven relief maps. The laboratory of 
vertebrate paleontology formerly occupying Hall 73 was moved to 
the section of taxideraiy. Space was also found in this section for 
storage to the number of several hundred of the field bundles which 
are to be worked out later. The greater portion of the Department 
Library was moved to Alcove 118. By erection of a partition in 
front of the alcove an enclosed space was obtained in which the 
books are kept securely and at the same time inade accessible. 
The economic and mineral specimens stored in trays and formerly 
occupying Hall 75 were moved to Hall 60. Reinstallation of the 
specimens in the cases since their removal has for the most part 
been completed and in connection with the work some improvements 
and additions have been made. The case containing the Chalmers 
crystal collection and the case of ornamental stones was provided 
with finished glass shelves and the specimens reinstalled upon 
them. Some specimens were added to the case of ornamental stones 
and the entire collection was relabelled. Nine of the onyx slabs 
in the onyx collection were framed, improving their preservation 
and appearance. Several of the relief maps were repainted and framed, 
making this work, which has been carried on at intervals for some 
years, now practically complete. In repainting each map the opportu- 
nity was improved to bring the detail of the maps up to date, altera- 
tions being found especially necessary on the maps of the Grand 
Canyon, Yosemite Valley and Yellowstone Park. Other relief maps 
which were thus repainted and framed were those of Palestine and 
the Arkansas River. Considerable work was done before the removal 
of the petroleum collection in the way of placing the specimens in new 
containers and reorganizing the collection. The Standard Oil Com- 
pany generously provided for the collection a full "series of new cases, 
and installation in these had been nearly completed at the time of 
removal. The cases provided were nine wall cases, six flat floor cases 
and two pyramidal floor cases, all of the standard Departmental type. 
An important change made in the installation of the collection con- 
sisted in the adoption of a new jar for the liquid specimens. The 
new jar adopted holds a much smaller quantity than the old but makes 
nearly as much displa}', and the optical characters of the specimens 
are better b ought out. The jars used were of a special design, sixteen 
inches high and two inches in diameter. The expense of supplying 
them was also generously borne by the Standard Oil Company. An- 
other change made was to remove to closed cases the tubes of oil sands 
which have been so exposed as to have become badly soiled. The 
cases now used for these sands are of the standard pyramidal type. 



Jan., 1912. Annual Report of the Director. 131 

In order to permit turning of the tubes in the case for examination 
of their contents, the tubes were mounted in racks, connected by belts 
to pulleys and these to a wheel outside the case, so that the visitor, 
by turning the wheel, can turn the tubes and thus examine their con- 
tents in detail. Two cases containing forty tubes each were thus 
installed and fully labelled. Large additions were made to the series 
illustrating the use of the by-products of petroleum, these uses having 
greatly increased in the time that has elapsed since the collection 
was originally formed. In moving the collection it was necessary to 
store all of this series, but it will be available for future exhibit. The 
portion of the collection now on exhibition occupies ten wall cases 
and two floor cases. It includes 232 specimens of petroleums, 114 
specimens of lubricating oils, 57 specimens of vaselines and allied 
products, 40 quantitative specimens, and 80 specimens of oil sands. 
The series of by-products obtained in the production of coke was in- 
stalled in uniform sealed glass tubes, in order to insure the preservation 
of the materials and make a better installation possible. A series of 
models to represent the development of the blast furnace has been 
begun by the construction of a model of a modern iron blast furnace 
and some of its accessories. The design of the model was based upon 
careful studies made by the Assistant Curator, through the courtesy 
of the Illinois Steel Company, of furnaces at South Chicago. The 
model has been built so as to occupy one half of one of the wall cases 
used for the ores of the base metals. It consists of two equal portions, 
one showing the exterior appearance of the furnace and accessories, 
and the other the same in sectional form. All are built on a scale of 
two feet to the inch. In the group giving the exterior appearance, 
a tower elevator for bringing charges to the top of the furnace is repre- 
sented at the extreme right. This is connected by a bridge to a charg- 
ing platform in the furnace proper. The furnace on the scale mentioned 
represents one 60 feet in height. The tap hole is in front and the slag 
eye on the right. At the left is shown a downcomer to carry off the 
gases and at its base is a self-dumping dust-catcher. At the left of 
this is a single hot -blast stove with pipes, valves, etc. In the sectional 
group complete longitudinal sections are shown of the various members. 
In the section of the furnace the brick work, water-cooling pipes, 
charging bells and other pipes and valves are shown. A charge of 
real ore, fuel, etc., is also represented, passing to a molten state at the 
bottom. The sections of the stove, dust-catcher and downcomer also 
show full details. In addition to the sectional character of the con- 
struction above ground, the imder-ground connections and foundations 
are represented. In the laboratories of vertebrate paleontology the 



132 Field Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

work carried on has been, in addition to the moving of the laboratory 
and specimens to new quarters, chiefly the preparation of the Eocene 
material obtained by the expedition to Utah in 19 10. Chief in im- 
portance of the material prepared, and alone of sufhcient value to repay 
several times the cost of the expedition, is a skull of Eobasileus. This 
skull, of which only two others are known, is of large and striking 
form and well preserved. Good skulls of two genera new to science 
which were obtained by the expedition have also been prepared. 
There have also been prepared from this series five skulls and four 
lower jaws of Metarhimis. . This is much the largest collection of this 
genus ever made, the genus itself having been known for only three 
years. The material contains two new species and will furnish several 
other new characters. Other material prepared includes three skulls 
and one pair of lower jaws of Dolichorhinus, one skull of Amynodon, 
one skull of Protelotherium, one ^ skull^Wd one pair lower jaws of 
Telmatherium, one skull and one pair 61 ,Jj3wer' j'aws of Mesonys, and 
one lower jaw of the large carnivore Harpagalestes. The large skull 
of Brontotherium ramosum obtained by the expedition of 1906 has 
been placed on exhibition with the other titanothere skulls. The 
chemical laboratory at Jefferson Avenue was available for use during 
part of the year and several complete quantitative analyses were 
made there. Among these was one of the Noon meteorite and several 
of the Brazilian favas associated with the diainond. The latter 
analyses showed the presence of two minerals new to science. Re- 
moval of the laboratory during the latter part of the year to a new 
location compelled the discontinuance of this work until new facilities 
can be provided. vSeveral of the sections of iron meteorites, which had 
been poorly etched when received, were repolished in preparation for 
proper etching. Subsequent to the moving of the mineral collection 
the rearrangement of the study series of this collection was under- 
taken and completed for the silicates. The specimens comprised in 
this group were placed in individual trays, labelled and distributed 
according to species and localities. Preparation of plans for the 
Departmental offices and laboratories in the new building occupied 
the time of the staff during part of the year. The plans made were 
worked out with considerable care as to detail, and it is believed that 
the equipment planned for will provide the fullest possible facilities 
for the various lines of work which are to be undertaken. Of the 
four large bird groups being produced under the Field-Sprague 
Ornithology Fund one (a habitat group of the Loon) has been 
opened to the public, and the others are all in an advanced stage 
of preparation. The unusual amount of accessory material — leaves, 



UHWERSITY OF JLUNOIS 
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Jan., 191 2. Annual Report of the Director. 133 

flowers, etc. — to be made for them has delayed the work. Two of 
them are now practically finished and the work of final installation 
will soon be under way. The principal birds to be shown in these 
groups are the Loon (now on exhibition), the Great Blue Heron, the 
Whooping and Sandhill cranes, and the Golden Eagle. The group of 
American Antelopes or Prongbucks was completed early in the year. 
It consists of five animals, mounted by Taxidermist Friesser, in a 
setting representing the arid elevated region of northern Mexico, with 
reproductions or actual specimens of cacti, agaves, ocotillos, and other 
desert plants, and a large background painted by Mr. Corwin. This 
is the first flat background to be used for large groups, and it seems 
very successful especially, for a group of this size (9 x 14), having a 
large single plate-glass front and skilfully adapted foreground, produ- 
cing an effect of distance and atmosphere that is most realistic. A 
group of grizzly bears of the same size and with a similar background 
is practically completed and will be finally installed early in 191 2, now 
being delayed only by the necessity of subjecting some of the accessories 
to a long drying process. A large habitat Beaver group is well under 
way and seems likely to prove one of the most attractive groups. 
The specimens, houses, etc., were secured by permission of Mr. Cyrus 
H. McCormick on his preserve near Champion, Michigan. The group 
should be finished early in the coming year. A background has been 
painted for a large group of the Olympic or Roosevelt Elk, and the 
specimens are in hand to be used for it. The preparation of a group 
of Alaska Moose, which was planned, has been deferred until specimens 
can be obtained, those intended for use having proved unsatisfactory. 
A case of small mammals prepared by Taxidennist Pray was placed 
on exhibition early in the year, being the first of its kind among the 
exhibits. It includes representatives of four species so arranged that 
each has its characteristic environment shown without any unnatural 
or artificial division of the case. In this group, although no painted 
background is employed, a fine effect is produced by the use of bright- 
coloured leaves and attractively arranged foliage in the centre of the 
case serving as a background for all four groups. The species shown 
are the White-footed Mouse, the Jumping Mouse, the Meadow Mouse, 
and the Short-tailed Shrew. The serial or systematic exhibition of 
birds has been largely reinstalled in new cases fitted with longitudinal 
central screens painted dull black and carrying plate-glass shelves 
on which the birds on conventional perches are arranged in linear 
series according to relationship. Some twenty birds were mounted 
and added to this exhibition collection during the past year and others 
are now in the hands of the taxidermists. Some eight hundred new 



*b^ 



134 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

labels were provided for these birds and a large number of new labels 
was placed also in the serial exhibition of mammals. Considerable 
time was devoted to the work of reinstalling a portion of the bird 
collection. In spite of many interruptions the regular work of 
pinning and labelling entomological material was continued as usual, 
and 1,119 specimens were prepared. A number of daj^s was given to 
showing specimens to scientific visitors and teachers with their classes. 
The services of the assistant, Mr. Wolcott, were largeh' utilized in 
drawing maps and other illustrations for use in the publication on 
Mammals of Illinois and Wisconsin (now in press). Aside from the 
work of pinning and installing insects, experimental work was under- 
taken in preserving or reproducing insect larvae for proposed exhibition 
groups. The two forms to which the assistant gave the most atten- 
tion were the Cecropia and the Polyphemus moths. The eggs, larvae, 
and cocoons of these specimens collected during the fore part of the 
summer, and subsequently the various breeding stages, were utilized 
in order to illustrate the life history of these insects. After making 
a number of experiments on the immature stages of these species, 
it was found necessary to reproduce the larvae in wax, using, however, 
also parts of the original specimen, such as the head, feet, spines, etc. 
For the branches which are to contain the larvae there have been made 
over four hundred and fifty wax leaves. Although the wax is much 
in the nature of a new undertaking, and although some important 
problems have not yet been solved — the preservation of hairy cater- 
pillars, for instance — still the results are so promising that it is hoped 
to continue the work. During the year the work in the Division of 
Osteology has progressed favourably, a great deal of time being devoted 
to cleaning skulls for the study and exhibition series. A valuable 
acquisition to the Museum was a fine skeleton of the extinct Great 
Auk, Plautus impennis, which was skilfully mounted for exhibition by 
Assistant Curator Gueret. The degreasing plant at Whiting, Indiana, 
still being at the disposal of the Museum, ^7, skeletons and skulls of 
mammals, birds and fishes were degreased during the year, also a 
large iTiounted Tarpon. 

PRINTING. — The number of labels and the impressions made by this 
section is as follows : 

Department of Anthropology 

Department of Botany 

Department of Geology 

Department of Zoology 

Director's Office 



Labels. 


Oth 


er Impressions 


7,067 




14.075 


271 




19.893 


3.512 




350 


I-917 




7.560 
41.993 



Jan., 191 2. Annual Report of the Director. 135 

The chief work perfonned during the year was the printing of labels for 
the Department of Anthropology as the statement shows. There were 
also printed 250 copies of the regular Museum publication list (i i pages), 
50 copies of the new by-laws of the Corporation and 250 copies of a 
special Museum publication list for distribution to the names on the 
exchange list. 

Photography and Illustration. — This section has had an unusually 
active year. Following is a tabulated statement of the work performed: 





Negatives. 


Prints. 


Lantern 
Slides. 


Enlarge- 
ments. 


Photoma- 

crography 

of Seeds, 

Skulls, etc. 


Director's Office 


69 


247 




, . 




Department of Anthropology 


571 


2,474 


336 






Department of Botany 


84 


723 


38 






Department of Geology 


18 


13 


44 






Department of Zoology 


66 


661 


83 


I 


4 


Distribution 




170 








Gift 




72 


50 






Sale 




22 




50 




Totals 


808 


4.382 


551 


51 


4 



Negatives made in the field by inembers of the staff and developed by 
the Section of Photography: 

Department of Anthropology 264 

Department of Botany 131 

Department of Zoology 240 

Total • . . . 635 

Attendance. — The attendance for the year shows a slight decrease 
compared with previous years. This may be explained by the 
unusual number of rainy Saturdays and Sundays — ^free days — during 
the year. The following is the list of school classes (twenty pupils or 
more) that visited the Museum during the year: 

Schools and Location. 

Oak Park — Oak Park, Illinois 

Wendell Phillips High — Thirty-ninth Street and Prairie Avenue 

Hamline — Forty-eighth and Bishop Streets 

Hinsdale — Hinsdale, Illinois 

St. Brendens — Sixty-seventh Street and Centre Avenue 

Blue Island — Blue Island, Illinois 

Wendell Phillips High — Thirty-ninth Street and Prairie Avenue 

Hamline — Forty-eighth and Bishop Streets 

Blue Island — Blue Island, Illinois 

Hamline — Forty-eighth and Bishop Streets 



Teachers. 


Pupils. 


I 


29 




48 


3 


20 


I 


20 


2 


72 


2 


32 




32 


I 


24 


5 


108 


2 


55 



136 



Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



Schools and Location. 

Talcott — Ohio and Lincoln Streets 

Ogden — Chestnut and State Streets 

Newberry — Willow and Orchard Streets 

Kenwood —  Fiftieth Street and Lake Avenue 

William Penn — Sixteenth Street and Avers Avenue .... 

Bryant — Forty-first Court and Fourteenth Street 

Chicago University — Chicago, Illinois 

Chicago University — Chicago, Illinois 

Chicago University — Chicago, Illinois 

Chicago University — Chicago, Illinois 

Moody Bible Institute — 80 Institute Place 

Chicago University — Chicago, Illinois 

Bohemian Summer — 5061 North Fortieth Avenue 

McCormick Vacation — Twenty-seventh Street and Sawyer Avenue 

St. Alberts — Chicago, Illinois 

Chicago Academy of Fine Arts — Madison Street, near Michigan 

Avenue 

Chicago University — Chicago, Illinois 

Lake High — Forty-seventh Place and Union Avenue .... 
Lake View High — Ashland Avenue and Irving Park Boulevard 

Washington — Morgan Street and Grand Avenue 

University Elementary — Fifty-ninth Street and Monroe Avenue . 
Lewis Champlin — Sixty-second Street and Princeton Avenue . 
John Marshall High — Adams Street and Spaulding Avenue 

Chicago University — Chicago, Illinois 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue 

Forest Park — Forest Park, Illinois 

University Elementary — Fifty-ninth Street and Monroe Avenue . 

Chicago Latin — 1200 Michigan Avenue 

Lewis Institute — West Madison and South Robey Streets . 
Wendell Phillips High — Thirty-ninth Street and Prairie Avenue . 

Chicago University — Chicago, Illinois 

Chicago Evangehstic Institute — 1754 Washington Boulevard . 

Forest Park — Forest Park, Illinois 

Andersen — West Division and Lincoln Streets 

Art Institute — Michigan Avenue and Adams Street .... 
Lutheran Teachers Seminary — Addison, Du Page County, lUinois 
Sullivan — Eighty-third Street and Houston Avenue .... 

Francis W. Parker — 330 Webster Avenue 

Mayfair —  Lawrence and North Forty-fourth Avenues .... 
Curtis — One Hundred and Fifteenth and State Streets .... 

Evanston — Evanston, Illinois 

McCosh — Sixty-fifth vStreet and Champlain Avenue 

Chicago University —  Chicago, Illinois 

Illinois University — - Champaign, Illinois 

University Elementary — Fifty-ninth Street and Monroe Avenue . 
St. James High — Twenty-ninth Street and Wabash Avenue 

Chicago University — Chicago, Illinois 

Sumner — South Forty-third and Colorado Avenues 



Teachers. 


Pupils 


2 


47 


5 


22 


I 


23 


I 


25 


3 


85 




20 




21 




45 




26 


I 


40 




25 




25 


2 


24 


30 


489 


2 


21 




73 


I 


68 


I 


20 




30 


2 


48 


4 


23 


2 


36 




29 




32 




21 




38 




20 




24 




38 




20 




35 




35 




48 




24 




49 




31 




29 




26 




50 




27 




20 




30 




30 




35 


I 


24 




26 




35 


2 


36 



Jan., 191 2. Annual Report of the Director. 137 

Schools and Location. v Teachers. Pupils. 

Thornton Township High — Harvey, Illinois 2 80 

Chicago Academy of Fine Arts — Madison Street, near Michigan 

Avenue I 42 

St. Xavier's Academy — Forty-ninth Street and Evans Avenue . 2 25 

Chicago University — Chicago, Illinois i 28 

Chicago University — Chicago, Illinois i 27 

Chicago University — Chicago, lUinois 38 

Highland Park — Highland Park, Illinois 4 30 

Andersen — "West Division and Lincoln Streets i 30 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue . i 30 

Geo. W. Curtis High — One Hundred and Fifteenth and State Streets i 20 
Van Vlissengen — One Hundred and Eighth Place and Wentworth 

Avenue 2 36 

Waller High — Orchard and Center Streets 4 90 

Lewis Institute — West Madison and South Robey Streets ... i 40 

Wells — Ashland Avenue and Augusta Street I 20 

Oakland — Fortieth Street and Langley Avenue i 23 

Frances E. Willard — Forty-ninth Street and St. Lawrence Avenue 5 20 

Blue Island — Blue Island, Illinois i 25 

Wendell Phillips High — Thirty-ninth Street and Prairie Avenue . 52 

Young Men's Christian Association — 19 South La Salle Street . 45 

Wendell Phillips High — Thirty-ninth Street and Prairie Avenue . i 35 

Earle — Sixty-first Street and Hermitage Avenue 2 55 

Blue Island — Blue Island, Illinois 2 34 

Englewood High — Sixty-second Street and Stewart Avenue . . i 140 

University High — Fifty-ninth Street and Monroe Avenue ... 2 40 

River Forest — River Forest, Illinois i 39 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue I 36 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue . i 35 

Chicago University — Chicago, Illinois 55 

John Marshall High — Adams Street and Spaulding Avenue . . 2 40 

Hamline — Forty-eighth and Bishop Streets . i 38 

Irving — Lexington and Leavitt Streets 2 20 

Moody Bible Institute — 80 Institute Place 25 

Nathaniel Hawthorne High — Oak Park, Illinois i 40 

Lyons Township High — Lyons, Illinois i 20 

Blue Island — Blue Island, Illinois 2 45 

Wendell Phillips High — Thirty-ninth Street and Prairie Avenue . 31 

Chicago University — Chicago, Illinois 25 

Armour — Evanston, Illinois i ^H 

Herewith are also submitted financial statement, list of accessions, 
names of members, etc. Frederick J. V. Skiff, 

Director. 



138 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



Financial Statement. 



GENERAL ACCOUNT. 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS. 

Januarv 1, 1911 to December 31, 1911. 



Receipts 

Cash in Treasurer's hands, December 3I; 1910 $30,724.58 

Petty Cash on hand, December 31, 19 10 739-95 

Dues of Annual Members 1,400.00 

Life Members 3,000.00 

Admissions and Check Rooms 6,043.85 

Sale of Guides 275.25 

South Park Commissioners 15,000.00 

Interest on Investments 39-427-88 

Field Endowment Income 137,000.00 

Interest on Daily Balances 651.42 

Sundry Receipts and Refunds 2,472.99 

Sundry Sales 52 - 48 

Joseph N. Field South Pacific Islands Fund 5,000.00 

Joseph N. Field South Pacific Islands Fund Investment Income . . 80.56 

Field- Sprague Ornithology Fund 1,600.00 

Stanley McCormick Hopi Fund 3,500.00 

Huntington W. Jackson Library Fund 40.00 

"Marshall Field Endowment Sinking Fund 500.00 

New Building Moving and Furnishing Fund Income 3.639- 03 

Marshall Field Endowment Sinking Fund Income . ' 84.44 

$251,232.43 



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Jan., 191 2. Annual Report of the Director. 

Disbursements 

Salaries 

Guard Service 

Janitor Service 

Fire Protection 

Heat and Light — 

Wages $ 4,012.10 

Fuel 6,628.70 

Supplies, Gas, etc 1,236.48 

Repairs and Alterations — 

Wages of Carpenters, Painters, Roofers, etc. . $10,895.03 
Material used — paints, oils, glass, lumber, plaster, 

etc 1,465.80 

Furniture and Fixtures .^^^. %j 

The Library— '■''^' ■•>-.■;:•" 

Books and Periodicals . ■i?W,>^'f''*'is!;y .. . $1,601.84 

Binding '^"^ ."''^ . . . 671.65 

Sundries 66.67 

Sections of Printing and Photography 

Collections, etc.. Purchased 

Departmental Expenses 

Expeditions 

Publications 

General Expense Account — 

Freight, Expressage and Teaming $4,235.81 

Stationery, Postage, Telephone, etc 1,062.60 

Northern Trust Company, Custodian Fee . . 346 . 78 

Lecture Course Expenses 1,069.13 

Sundries 1,106.28 

Field-Sprague Ornithology Fund 

Standard Oil Fund 

Joseph N. Field South Pacific Islands Fund . 

Stanley McCormick Hopi Fund 

New Building Moving and Furnishing Fund . 

Mrs. T. B. Blackstone Fund 



In Treasurer's hands, December 31, 191 1 " . . . . 

Petty Cash on hand December 31. 191 1 

New Building Moving and Furnishing Fund Investment 
New Building Moving and Furnishing Fund Income 

Investment 

Joseph N. Field South Pacific Islands Fund Investment . 
Marshall Field Endowment Sinking Fund Investment . 
Byron L. Smith, Treasurer, Marshall Field Endowment 

Sinking Fund 



139 

$89,719.90 

13,466.46 

8,042.44 

3.948 98 



11,877.28 



12,360.83 



11.425-75 



2,340.16 

1,174.91 
3,614.81 

5.515-31 
1,658.89 
1,282.01 



7,820.60 





1,744.90 




2,580.00 




4,400 . 00 




3-843-76 




8,864.11 




118. 16 




$195,799-26 


$30,218.78 




739-95 




13,500.00 




4,990.00 




5,000.00 




980 . 00 




4-44 


55.433-17 




$251,232.43 



I40 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



ATTENDANCE AND RECEIPTS FROM JANUARY 1 TO 

DECEMBER 31, 1911. 



Attendance. 

Paid Attendance — 

Adults 20,967 

Children 2,150 23,117 

Free Admission on Pay Days —  

School Children 3.809 

Students 3.773 

Teachers 5^5 

Members: Corporate 75 

Annual 7^ 

Life I 

Officers' Families 131 

Special 79 

Press 14 8,518 

Admissions on Free Days — 

Saturdays 40.053 

Sundays 128,797 168,850 

Total Attendance 200,485 

Highest Attendance on any one day (September 3, 191 1) 6,308 

Highest Paid Attendance on any one day (September 4,1911) 640 

Average Daily Admissions (365 days) 549 

Average Paid Admissions (260 days) 88 

Receipts. 

Guides sold — 1,101 at 25 cents each $ 275.25 

Articles checked — 11,742 at 5 cents each 587-10 

Admissions 5.456-75 

$6,319.10 



Jan., 191 2. Annual Report of the Director. 141 



Accessions. 



DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 
(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

ALABAMA ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Montgomery, ALabama. 

;i2 flaked projectile points — Alabama. 
AYER, E. E., Chicago. 

4 beads of red agate with double perforations — Egypt. 

Life size stone statue of the Goddess Sehkmet — Egypt. 

10 apple wood stamps — Algeria. 

AYER. E. E., BLAIR, WATSON P., PORTER, GEO. F., FIELD, STANLEY, 
JONES, A. B., and MANIERRE, GEORGE, Chicago. 

54 pieces of jewelry — Algeria. 

12 blue porcelain button-like discs — Egypt. 
BLACKSTONE, MRS. T. B., Chicago. 

Armor and clothing — China (Collected by Berthold Laufer). 
CUMMINGS, R. F., Chicago. Philippine Islands Expedition. 

Ethnological material from Gulf of Davao (Collected by F. C. Cole). 
FIELD, JOSEPH N., Manchester, England. South Pacific Islands Fund. 

General ethnological collection — German New Guinea (Collected by A. 
B. Lewis). 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Purchases: 

Half of woman's dress — Navaho. 

Jicarilla Apache basket bowl — New Mexico. 

Blanket stripe of buffalo calfskin and 80 drawings — Oklahoma. 

Stone sarcophagus — Egypt. 
GUNSAULUS, DR. F. W., Chicago. 

Painting of war scene — China. 
KAMMERER, FRANK G., Chicago. 

Silk embroidered screen in carved wooden frame — China. 

Mccormick, Stanley. Hopi Indian Fund. 

Ethnological collection — Arizona (Collected by C. L. Owen). 
MURPHY, ANNA M., Chicago. 

8 knives and i spear — Philippine Islands. 
PATTEN, H. J., Chicago. 

Skull of European excavated at Sandwich, Illinois (Collected by F. C. 
Cole). 
PAHNKE, R. J., Fort Bayard, New Mexico. 

I pair lady's shoes — China. 

1 1 finger rings made and worn by the Moro of Mindanao, Philippin 

Islands. 



142 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

SHAW, T. A., Chicago. 

Collection of footwear. 

Pali book, leaves of palm leaf. 
UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE, Australia. 

Ethnological objects — -Australia (exchange). 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 
(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 
AIKEN, WALTER H., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

I herbarium specimen — New Mexico. 
AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, New York. 

6 herbarium specimens. 
ARMSTRONG CORK COMPANY, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

20 specimens cork products. 
AUSTILL, MRS. H., Spring Hill, Alabama. 

I specimen "Aurora" pecan — Alabama. 
AYER, MRS. EDWARD E., Fontana, Wisconsin. 

I Urticastrum divaricatum (L.) Ktze. — Wisconsin. 
BACON, G. M., PECAN COMPANY, De Witt, Georgia. 

I specimen "Georgia" pecan — Georgia. 
BEARDSLEY, WALTER H., Chicago. 

I illustration of Narcissus ornatus. 
BECHTEL, THEODORE, Ocean Springs, Mississippi. 

I specimen "Success" pecan — Mississippi. 
BERNICE PAUAHI BISHOP MUSEUM, Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands. 

I Cihotmm Menziesii Hooker — Hawaiian Islands. 
BOOY, REAR ADMIRAL C. J. G. DE, Utrecht, Netherlands. 

29 dried plants — Nova Zembla. 
BOTANIC GARDENS, Sydney, Australia. 

loi herbarium specimens — Australia (exchange). 
100 herbarium specimens — Australia (exchange). 
BRANDEGEE, T. S., Berkeley, California. 

I herbarium specimen —  Mexico. 
BRIDGE, VERN. A., Peru, Indiana. 

1 wood specimen — Mexico. 

BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY, Washington, D. C. 

50 herbarium specimens — Russia and Turkestan (Asia) (exchange) . 
BURNS, T. RODNEY, Eureka, California. 

2 specimens Sequoia sempervirens Endl. — Eureka, California. 
CALDWELL, OTIS W., Chicago. 

1 specimen Hibiscus Trionum L. — Indiana. 
CARR', W. P., Washington, D. C. 

2 specimens Euphorbia — South Dakota. 
CHAMBERLAIN, C. J., Chicago. 

I microscopic preparation of Araucaria wood. 
COULTER, J. M., Chicago. 

29 herbarium specimens — Nevada. 
I herbarium specimen — Texas. 
I herbarium specimen — Michigan. 



f 

I 



Jan., 191 2. Annual Report of the Director. 143 

1 herbarium specimen — Mexico. 

2 herbarium specimens — Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. 
CRERAR, JOHN, LIBRARY, Chicago. 

12 herbarium specimens — Bavaria. 
CROSBY, AIISS GRACE, Chicago. 

1 herbarium specimen — Illinois. 
CURTIS, J. B.; Orange Heights, Florida. 

2 specimens "Curtis" and "Kennedy" pecans — Florida. 
DEAM, C. C, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

112 herbarium specimens — Guatemala (exchange). 
9 herbarium specimens —  Indiana. 
DELLIS, GEORGE, Grand Turk Island, British West Indies. 

7 herbarium specimens — Caicos Islands, Bahama's. 
DEPARTAMENTO DE EXPLORACION, Tacubaya, Mexico. 

279 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 
DIBBLE, MRS. F. W., Glen Ellyn, Illinois. 

9 herbarium specimens — Illinois. 
EBERHART, MRS. E. H., Ocean Park, California. 

I herbarium specimen — California. 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Collated by J. M. Greenman: 

ID descriptions and illustrations. 
4 herbarium specimens — Canada. 
Collated by C. F. Millspaugh: 

I herbarium specimen — Mexico. 

48 herbarium specimens — America. 

I herbarium specimen — Chihuahua, Mexico. 
I herbarium specimen — Fortune Island, Bahamas. 
Collected by O. E. Lansing, Jr.: 

307 herbarium specimens — Ozark Mountains, Missouri. 

49 herbarium specimens — Michigan. 

21 herbarium specimens — New Buffalo, Michigan. 
35 herbarium specimens — • New Buffalo, Michigan. 
43 herbarium specimens — South Haven, Michigan. 
21 herbarium specimens — Mineral Springs, Indiana. 

8 herbarium specimens — Flossmoor, Illinois. 

14 herbarium specimens — Mineral Springs, Indiana. 
Collected by C. F. Millspaugh: 

432 herbarium specimens, economic specimens, dry fruits and fruits in 
formalin — Turks and Caicos Islands, Bahamas. 
Collected by Huron H. Smith: 

28 herbarium specimens, hand specimens, dry fruits and winter twigs — 

Oregon. 
49 specimens Sequoia sempervirens Endl. — Eureka, California. 

15 specimens paper products, pulp and cedar block — Oregon. 
72 economic specimens — Oregon. 

I herbarium specimen — Oregon. 
48 economic specimens — Oregon. 
I Gaultheria Shallon Pursh — Areata, California. 
I Salix sitchensis Sans. — Granite Falls, Washington. 



1 

144 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



Purchases : 

i8i herbarium specimens — United States. 
59 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 
493 herbarium specimens — Mexico and Arizona, 
no herbarium specimens — Oregon. 
1261 herbarium specimens — Phihppine Islands. 
1 1 1 herbarium specimens — Phihppine Islands. 
I economic specimen — Philippine Islands. 
455 herbarium specimens — Illinois and Wisconsin. 
88 herbarium specimens — Illinois, Maine, Michigan, Mississippi and 
Wisconsin. 
396 herbarium specimens — Canada. 
346 herbarium specimens — Canada. 
525 herbarium specimens — Illinois and Indiana. 
90 herbarium specimens — Florida, Alabama and Georgia. 
304 herbarium specimens — Nevada, Oregon, Washington, California and 

Idaho. 
1 01 herbarium specimens — Nevada, Tennessee and Texas. 
125 herbarium specimens — Idaho. 
48 herbarium specimens — Idaho. 
136 herbarium specimens — Texas. 

420 hand specimens of Philippine woods — Philippine Islands. 
103 herbarium specimens — Bolivia. 
Modeled by B. E. Dahlgren: 

I branch of Sour Sop. — Jamaica. 

I flower of Sour Sop. — Jamaica. 

I fruit of Ilang-ilang — Jamaica. 

I Aloe vera, complete plant in flower — Jamaica. 

5 flowers Ariscema triphyllum — Illinois. 

1 Citrus decumana, branch, fruit and flowers — Jamaica. 

2 models of Guiacum officinale, enlarged flower and branch — Jamaica. 
I branch of Blighia sapida. 

I Citrus japonica, fruit. 

3 models of pomegranate, flower and fruit. 
I Anthurium. 

I Carica Papaya — Jamaica. 
I Pisum sativum, flowers. 
I Citrus Limonum, fruit. 
I Tamarindus indica, branch. 

3 models Rkizophora Mangle, tree, leafing fruit, and fruits — Florida and 
Jamaica. 
FRANCIS, G. H., Morgan Park, Ilhnois. 

1 "Giant Pufif Ball"— Morgan Park, Illinois. 
FULLER, GEORGE D., Chicago. 

2^ herbarium specimens — Saskatchewan. 
GRAY HERBARIUM, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

2 herbarium specimens — Mexico (exchange). 
92 herbarium specimens — Australia (exchange). 

GREEN, MISS MARY POMEROY, Chicago. 
I economic specimen — Wisconsin. 



1 



I 



Jan., 191 2. Annual Report of the Director. 145 

GREENMAN, J. M., Chicago. 

3 herbarium specimens — Illinois and Indiana. 

I plant description. 
GRIPPING BROTHERS, Macclenny, Plorida. 

1 specimen "President" pecan — Plorida. 
GUERET, EDWARD N., Chicago. 

2 fungi — Chicago. 

GUPPY, HENRY BROUGHAM, Salcombe, England. 

18 dry fruits — Grand Turk Island, Bahamas. 
HAYDON, WALTON, Marshfield, Oregon. 

139 herbarium specimens — Oregon. 
HERBARIUM KRUG AND URBAN, Dahlem, Germany. 

6 herbarium specimens (exchange). 
HERRICK, C. JUDSON, Chicago. 

208 herbarium specimens — New Mexico. 
HILL, E. J., Chicago. 

85 herbarium specimens — United States. 
JOHNSON, PRANK D., PeHcan Lake, Wisconsin. 

1 herbarium specimen — Wisconsin. 
HELLER, A. A., Reno, Nevada. 

2 specimens of Senecio — Oregon and Idaho. 
LANSING, O. E., Jr., Chicago. 

16 herbarium specimens — Indiana and Wisconsin. 
15 herbarium specimens — Illinois. 

2 fungi — Illinois. 
LAUFER, BERTHOLD, Chicago. 

15 herbarium specimens — China and Tibet. 

I economic specimen. 
LAURIDSEN, ARNOLD, Chicago. 

I fungus — Ashland County, Wisconsin. 
LOCKE, OTTO, New Braunfels, Texas. 

I specimen "Daisy" pecan — -Texas. 
LUNELL, J., Leeds, N. Dakota. 

I herbarium specimen — North Dakota. 
MACDOUGAL, D. T., Tucson, Arizona. 

3 cross sections of Giant Cactus — Arizona. 
MACKEksEN, BERNARD, San Antonio, Texas. 

3 herbarium specimens — Texas. 
MACOUN, J. M., Ottawa, Canada. 

4 herbarium specimens of Senecio — Keewatin, Canada. 
MARRIOTT, BRUCE, London, England. 

10 specimens of Venezuelan woods — Venezuela. 
MEYERS, IRA BENTON, Chicago. 

15 herbarium specimens — Illinois and Indiana. 
MILLSPAUGH, MRS. C. P., Chicago. 

I piece fine banana cloth — Philippine Islands. 
MILLSPAUGH, C. P., Chicago. 

I edible nut of Canaritim album Raeusch. — New York market, from 

Philippine Islands. 
I nectarine pit — Chicago. 



146 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

NEWCOMBE, C. F., Victoria, B. C. 

98 herbarium specimens — British Columbia. 
NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN, New York. 

698 herbarium specimens — Montserrat Island, West Indies (exchange). 

3 herbarium specimens — Bahamas (exchange). 
786 herbarium specimens — Cuba and Jamaica (exchange). 
5 herbarium specimens — Ex. Hort., Jamaica (exchange). 
160 herbarium specimens —  Cuba and Jamaica (exchange). 
NORTH BEND MANUFACTURING COMPANY, North Bend, Oregon. 

I myrtle-wood bowl — Oregon. 
OREGON WOOD DISTILLING COMPANY, Portland, Oregon. 

13 wood distillation products — Oregon. 
PHARR, G. M., & SONS, Olivier, Louisiana. 

I specimen "Frotscher" pecan — Louisiana. 
REYNOLDS, MISS CARRIE, Chicago. 

50 herbarium specimens — Yellowstone Park, Wyoming and Illinois. 
ROE, MISS MABEL L., Chicago. 

I herbarium specimen —  Indiana. 
ROPER, WILLIAM N., Petersburg, Virginia. 

I specimen "Mantura" pecan — ^ Virginia. 
SCHWARTZ, JOSEPH E., Chicago. 

I specimen of starch of Zamia Allison- Armourii Millsp. — San Domingo. 
SCOTT, WILLIAM, Toronto, Canada. 

3 herbarium specimens — Ontario. 
SHERFF, E. E., Chicago. 

1 herbarium specimen — Michigan. 

27 herbarium specimens — Middle West. 

47 herbarium specimens — Arizona, Illinois, Michigan and Missouri. 
50 herbarium specimens — Illinois, Indiana and Michigan. 
418 herbarium specimens — Illinois, Michigan, and Missouri. 
520 herbarium specimens — Arizona, Illinois, Michigan, Missouri, and New 
Jersey. 
SIMPSON, J. H., Bradentown, Florida. 

2 herbarium specimens — Florida. 

SMITH, C. A., LUMBER COMPANY, Marshfield, Oregon. 

r wheel specimen — Oregon. 
SMITH, CHARLES PIPER, Logan, Utah. 

9 herbarium specimens —  Utah and Idaho. 
SAIITH, JOHN DONNELL, Baltimore, Maryland. 

I herbarium specimen — Costa Rica. 
SMITH, PERCIVAL B., Mobile, Alabama. 

3 specimens pecans —  Texas, Mississippi and Alabama. 
SMITH, WILBUR, Chicago. 

76 herbarium specimens — Michigan. 
SOUTH ORCHARDS COMPANY, South Orchards, Alabama. 

I specimen "Teche" pecan — Alabama. 
'S RIJKS HERBARIUM, Leiden, Holland. 
70 herbarium specimens (exchange). 
STEARNS, ELMER, Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico. 
81 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 
I herbarium specimen — Mexico. 



Jan., 1912. Annual Report of the Director. 147 

STONE, FRANK B., Chicago. 

4 tree specimens — Japan. 
TAYLOR, MISS LULU, Handsboro, Mississippi. 

I specimen "Taylor" pecan — Mississippi. 
TIETGEN, HENRY, Chicago. 

I specimen of wood, showing disarticulate branching — Brazil. 
UNITED STATES NATIONAL HERBARIUM, Washington, D. C. 
18 herbarium specimens, United States (exchange). 
118 herbarium specimens. United States (exchange). 
VOTH, H. R., Chicago. 

10 herbarium specimens — Arizona. 
WILSON, W. B., Ottawa, Kansas. 

I herbarium specimen — • Kansas. 
WOLCOTT, ALBERT B., Chicago. 

63 herbarium specimens — Illinois and Indiana. 
I herbarium specimen — Osborn, Indiana. 
ZINK, J. W., Orange Grove, Mississippi. 

I specimen "Big Z" pecan — Mississippi. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AYER, E. E., Chicago. 

300 specimens silicified wood — Arizona. 

150 specimens amethyst and quartz crystals on silicified wood — Arizona. 

1 tooth of mammoth — Arizona. 

2 specimens fossils — Arizona. 

1 specimen veins — Arizona. , 
BLAKE, W. P., Tucson, Arizona. 

2 sections (iioo grams) Noon meteorite — Noon, Sonora, Mexico. 
BOHM, JULIUS, Vienna, Austria. 

116 grams Vigarano meteorite (exchange). 
68 grams Cowra meteorite (exchange). 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Collected by O. C. Farrington : 

2 specimens basalt — Stoneham, Maine. 
I specimen syenite — Stoneham, Maine. 

Collected by H. W. Nichols: 

I specimen iron ore — Parry Sound, Ontario. 
Collected by W. H. Osgood: 

I specimen copper ore — Venezuela. 
Collected by A. W. Slocom: 

104 specimens invertebrate fossils — Chanahon, Illinois. 

134 specimens invertebrate fossils — Little Traverse Bay, Michigan. 

97 specimens fossil corals and brachiopods — Falls of the Ohio. 

49 specimens invertebrate fossils — • Thornton, Illinois. 
Purchases : 

I slab of crinoids. 

3 specimens vivianite — Leadville, Colorado. 



148 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

22 specimens minerals — Coeur d'Alene District, Idaho. 

1 specimen fossil coral (Silurian) — Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin. 
MILLSPAUGH, C. F., Chicago. 

41 specimens salt crystals — Turks Island. 
HAFFLER, J. C, Chicago. 

2 specimens petroleum — Wyoming. 

1 specimen asphaltic sand — Wyoming. 
HAYDON, WALTON, Marshfield, Oregon. 

141 specimens fossils — Coos Bay, Oregon. 
8 specimens concretions — Coos Bay, Oregon. 
KENKEL, L. V., Seward, Alaska. 

3 specimens minerals — Peru. 
LORENZ, F. A., Chicago. 

4 specimens coal — Ludlow, Colorado. 
OSGOOD, W. H., Chicago. 

2 fossil pelecypods — Queen Charlotte Islands, B. C. 
VANDEBURGH, CLYDE L., Cristobal. Canal Zone, Panama. 

Carapace and plastron of fossil turtle, Cirrosternum hucastorium — Mindi, 
Panama. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 
(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

BRANDLER, C, Chicago. 

1 Yellow Rail — Hyde Lake, Illinois. 

2 Phalaropes — Hyde Lake, Illinois. 
BOWER, H. M., Chicago. 

1 Fly — Palos Park, Illinois. 

2 Beetles — Palos Park. Illinois. 

5 Bugs — Palos Park, Illinois. 

6 Bees and Parasites — Palos Park, Illinois. 

1 Beetle — Palos Park, Illinois. 
BROADWAY, W. E., Tobago, West Indies. 

2 Cicadas — Tobago, West Indies. 
CHICAGO GOLF CLUB, Wheaton, Illinois. 

2 Whooping Cranes. 
CRANEY, MISS MARY E., Chicago. 

1 Mounted Barred Owl — Cary, Illinois. 
DEUBLER, L., Chicago. 

3 Roaches —  Northern Illinois. 

2 Beetles — Ohio. 
DOHMEN, U. A., Chicago. 

1 Fly — Chicago. 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Collected by F. C. Cole; 

2 Horn-bills — Philippine Islands. 
Collected by E. N. Gueret: 

I Robin — Cook County, Illinois. 

I Owl — Cook County, Illinois. 

I Pied-billed Grebe — Cook County, Illinois. 

I Mole — Cook County, Illinois. 



Jan., 191 2. Annual Report of the Director. 

Collected by W. J. Gerhard: 

541 Spiders, Dragon-flies, Bugs, Grasshoppers, Katydids, Sialids, 
Butterflies, Moths, Flies, Beetles, Bees, Wasps, Parasites, etc. 
Northern Illinois and Northern Indiana. 
7 Beetles — Reading, Pennsylvania. 
Collected by O. E. Lansing: 

I Butterfly — Cedar Gap, Missouri. 

3 Beetles — Cedar Gap, Missouri. 
I Bug — Mansfield, Missouri. 

1 Grasshopper — Mansfield, Missouri. 

2 Beetles — Mansfield, Missouri. 

4 Butterflies — Mansfield, Missouri. 
I Fly — New Buffalo, Michigan. 

1 Wasp — New Buffalo, Michigan. 

2 Grasshoppers — New Buffalo, Michigan. 

3 Beetles — New Buffalo, Michigan. 
I Beetle — Chicago. 

Collected by S. E. Meek: 

7 Water-beetles — Near Panama City, Panama. 
Collected by S. E. Meek and S. F. Hildebrand: 

300 Fishes — Panama. 
Collected by C. F. Millspaugh : 

1 Moth — Yokohama, Japan. 
Collected by W. H. Osgood and S. G. Jewett: 

29 Mammal skins — Maracaibo, Venezuela. 
122 bird skins — Maracaibo, Venezuela. 

6 Capybaras skins and skulls — Venezuela. 

2 Deer skins and skulls — Venezuela. 
I Aguti skin and skull — Venezuela. 

I Opossum skin only — Venezuela. 
I Skunk skin only — Venezuela. 

1 Skull of Anteater — Venezuela. 

240 specimens mammals — Venezuela and Colombia. 

2 long-beaked Dolphins — Venezuela. 

30 Fishes — Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela. 
10 Reptiles — Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela. 

2 Crustaceans — Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela. 

7 Skeletons of small rodent — Colombia. 

1 Shrew — Colombia. 

2 Fleas — Venezuela and Colombia. 

26 bird lice — Venezuela and Colombia. 

462 bird skins — Venezuela and Colombia. 

7 birds' eggs — Venezuela and Colombia. 
Collected by L. L. Pray and C. Brandler: 

I Wolf skeleton — Champion, Michigan. 

I Beaver skeleton — Champion, Michigan. 

6 Beaver — White-deer Lake, Michigan. 
\ I Gray Wolf — White-deer Lake, Michigan. 

I Collected by H. T. Raven: 

1 5 mammal skins — Catatumbo, Venezuela. 

\ 179 bird skins — Catatumbo, Venezuela. 

i 
i 



149 



150 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Collected b}^ A. B. Wolcott: 

2 Salamander — Willow Springs, Illinois. 

I Spider — Chicago. 

I Bug —  Chicago. 

28 Beetles — Chicago. 

362 Dragon-flies, Scorpion-flies, Bugs, Earwigs, Grasshoppers, Katydids, 

Moths, Flies, Beetles, Bees, Wasps, Parasites, etc. — Northern 

Illinois and Northern Indiana. 
Purchases : 

I Mounted Fox — Petersburg, Menard County, Illinois. 

17 Mammal skins — British Guiana. 

18 Mammals • —  China. 

47 Mammals — South America. 
I Elaphine Deer — China. 
16 Rodents — China. 
^ 2 Wild Turkeys — Virginia. 

532 birds' eggs — North America. 

I Passenger Pigeon. 

I Whooping Crane. 

I Loon. *,. ^ ^fs;t.r, 

1 Wood Duck. *•■'■'-.< ■■•' vr.. .. 

2 Canada Geese. '''\"?'r.. '"'"^' 
4 Hooded Mergansers. 

2 Wood Ducks. 
FRIESSER, J., Chicago. 

2 shells — - Liverpool, Indiana. 

I Thread-worm — Holland, Michigan. 

4 Beetles — Holland, Michigan. 
HELWIG, OTTO, Highland Park, Illinois. 

I Crow — Highland Park, Illinois. 
HENN, ARTHUR W., Bloomington, Indiana. 

1 Jumping Mouse — Winona Lake, Indiana. 
HINCKLEY, Dr. D. H., Chicago. 

2 Ticks — Santiago, California. 
LAUFER, BERTHOLD, Chicago. 

1 Cockroach — Asia. 
LAWSON, D. S., Chicago. 

2 Fiber zibethicus — Jackson Park, Illinois. 
LEIGHTON, JAMES, Cody, Nebraska. 

I Spotted Lizard — Cody, Nebraska. 
LINCOLN PARK ZOO, Chicago. 

I Drill. 

I Mandrill. 

I Baboon. 
LODING, H. P., Mobile, Alabama. 

1 Ant-lion nymph — Mobile, Alabama. 
MUNZNER, H., Chicago. 

7 Beetles — Northern Illinois. 

2 Spiders — Northern Illinois. 

2 Parasites — - Northern Illinois. 

8 Beetles — Northern Illinois. 



»-Sr- 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XXII. 




The Mangrove {Rhizoplwra Mangle). 
An important strand-plant of tropical regions. 



Jan., 191 2. Annual Report of the Director. 151 

MURPHY, ANNA M., Chicago. 

4 large shells. 
NICHOLS, H. W., Chicago. 

3 Moths — Porcupine, Ontario, Canada. 
OSGOOD, W. H., Chicago. 

I Richardson's Shrew — Wisconsin. 
ROMANO, J., Chicago. 

I Sphinx Moth — Chicago. 
SNYDACKER, MISS CLARICE, Kenilworth, Illinois. 

1 Katydid — Wilmette, Illinois. 
ROOD, W. H., Chicago. 

2 Wild Turkeys (mounted) — Indian Territory. 
THILL, HENRY, Du Quoin, Illinois. 

1 Beetle — Du Quoin, Illinois. 

3 Bugs — Du Quoin, lUinois. 
TITUS, E. G., Logan, Utah. 

2 Beetles — Gateway and Taylorsville, Utah. 
WALTERS, L. L., Chicago. 

I Alice's Thrush — Chicago. 
WOLCOTT, A. B., Chicago. 

I Silver haired bat — Palos Park, Illinois. 

1 Woodch\ick — Mineral Springs, Indiana. 
WILLARD, F. C, Tombstone, Arizona. 

2 Snakes — Tombstone, Arizona. 

3 Lizards — Tombstone, Arizona. 
2 Centipedes — Arizona. 

4 Whip-tailed Scorpions — Arizona. 



SECTION OF PHOTOGRAPHY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Made by C. H. Carpenter: 

808 negatives Museum specimens, etc., 4,382 prints, 551 lantern slides, 51 
enlargements, 4 photomacrographs, 635 negatives developed for field 
expeditions. 
Made by C. Brandler and L. L. Pray: 

48 negatives, landscapes, etc. 
Madeby F. C. Cole: 

750 negatives, portraits of natives, general views, etc. 
Made by O. E. Lansing, Jr.: 

12 negatives, general views and landscapes — Mineral Springs, Indiana. 

30 negatives, general views — Michigan. 

24 negatives, landscapes and general views — Missouri. 
Made by A. B. Lewis: 

236 negatives, portraits of natives, general views, etc. 
Made .by S. E. Meek: 

120 negatives, seascapes, landscapes, general views, etc. 
Made by C. F. Millspaugh: 

65 negatives, seascapes, landscapes, general views, etc. 



152 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Made by W. H. Osgood: 

72 negatives, landscapes, general views, etc. 
Made by C. L. Owen: 

216 negatives, portrait of natives, general views, etc. 
Made by H. H. Smith: 

358 negatives, portraits of trees, general views, landscapes, etc. 
Purchases : 

II lantern slides — Panama, Canal Zone. 
LAUFER, BERTHOLD, Chicago. 

1 1 negatives, photographs of ancient Chinese grave sculpture stones. 

THE LIBRARY. 

BOOKS, PAMPHLETS, AND SERIALS. 

(accessions are by exchange unless otherwise designated.) 

Books and 
Pamphlets. 

ACIREALE ACCADEML\ DI SCIEXZE, Acireale, Italy i 

ALABAMA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Auburn, 

Alabama 6 

ALABAMA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, University, Alabama 2 

ALBx\NY MUSEUM, Grahamstown, South Africa 

ALLEN, GLOVER M., Cambridge, Massachusetts 

ALTENBURG. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT DES 

OSTERLANDES, Altenburg, Germany 

AMEGHINO, FLORENTINO, Buenos Aires, Argentina 

AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, Cambridge, 

Massachusetts 

AMERICAN ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Boston, Massachusetts . . 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF 

SCIENCE, Washington, D. C 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF MUSEUMS 

AMERICAN CHEMICAL JOURNAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, 

Baltimore, Maryland 

AMERICAN FOLK-LORE SOCIETY, Cambridge, Massachusetts . . . 

AMERICAN GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, New York City 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF MINING ENGINEERS, New York City . 
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHARMACY, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, New York City . . 
AMERICAN ORIENTAL SOCIETY, New Haven, Connecticut .... 
AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

AMES, OAKES, North Easton, Massachusetts 3 

AMSTERDAM. K. AKADEMIE VAN WETENSCHAPPEN, Amsterdam, 

Netherlands 4 

AMSTERDAM. UNIVERSITEITS-BIBLIOTHEEK, Amsterdam, 

Netherlands 2 

ANGERS. SOCIETE D'ETUDES SCIENTIFIQUES, Angers, France . . i 

ANNALES DES MINES, Paris, France 3 

ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF GREAT BRITAIN AND 

IRELAND, London, England I 

ARCHAEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF AMERICA, Santa Fe, New Mexico 2 



Jan., 191 2. Annual Report of the Director. 153 

ARCHIV FiJR RELIGIOXSWrSSEXSCHAFT, Leipzig, Germany . . . i 

ARDENNES. SOCIETE D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Ardennes, France . i 
ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

Buenos Aires, Argentina (gift) 4 

ARIZONA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Tucson, 

Arizona 4 

ARKANSAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Fayetteville, 

Arkansas 4 

ARMSTRONG CORK COMPANY, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (gift) . . . i 
ASHMOLEAN NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY OF OXFORDSHIRE, 

Oxford, England I 

ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, Calcutta, India 4 

ASSOCIATION OF ENGINEERING SOCIETIES, Philadelphia ... 2 

ATKINSON, GEORGE F., Ithaca, New York i 

AUGSBURG. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN FUR 

SCHWABEN UND NEUBERG, Augsburg, Germany i 

AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, Rock 

Island, Illinois 2 

AUSTRALASIAN ORNITHOLOGISTS' UNION, Melbourne, Australia 5 
AUSTRALIA. GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH, Melbourne, 

Australia i 

AUSTRALIAN MUSEUM, Sydney, New South Wales 6 

BAILEY, F. MANSON, Brisbane, Queensland 19 

BAMBERG. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Bavaria, Germany, i 

BASEL. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Basel, Switzerland 2 

BATAVIAASCH GENOOTSCHAP WETENSCHAPPEN, Batavia, Java 4 
BATH. NATURAL HISTORY AND ANTIQUARIAN FIELD CLUB, 

Bath, England 12 

BATRES, LEOPOLDO, Mexico i 

BEEBE, C. WILLIAM, New York City (gift) i 

BELFAST NATURAL HIvSTORY AND PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, 

Belfast, Ireland 4 

BELOIT COLLEGE, Beloit, Wisconsin 3 

BERGEN MUSEUM, Bergen, Norway 2 

BERLIN. DEUTSCHE ENTOMOLIGISCHE NATIONAL-BIBLIOTHEK, 

Berlin, Germany I 

BERLIN. DEUTSCHE GEOLOGISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Berlin, 

Germany 2 

BERLIN. DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FUR ANTHROPOLOGIE, 

ETHNOL., UxND URGS., Berlin, Germany I 

BERLIN. DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FUR VOLKSTUMLICHE, 

Berlin, Germany 2 

BERLIN. DEUTSCHER SEEFISCHEREI-YEREIN, BerHn. Germany . . i 

BERLIN. DEUTSCHE UNIVERSITAT, Beriin, Germany i 

BERLIN. GESELLSCHAFT FUR ERDKUNDE, Berlin, Germany ... 2 

BERLIN. K. BIBLIOTHEK, Beriin, Germany i 

BERLIN. K. BOTANISCHER GARTEN UND MUSEUM, Berlin, 

Germany I 

BERLIN. K. MUSEUM FUR VOLKERKUNDE, Beriin, Germany ... 2 
BERLIN. K. PREUSSISCHE AKADEMIE DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, 

Berlin. Germany 2 



154 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV, 

BERLIN. VEREIN FUR VOLKSKUNDE, Berlin, Germany 2 

BERLIN. ZOOLOGICAL MUSEUM, Berlin, Germany 2 

BERN. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Bern, Switzerland . . i 

BERN UNIVERSITAT, Bern, Switzerland 17 

BERNICE PAUAHI BISHOP MUSEUM, Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands . 2 
BIOLOGISCH-LANDWIRTSCHAFTLICHES INSTITUT Amani, D. 

Ostafrika 2 

BIRMINGHAM. NATURAL HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHICAL 

SOCIETY, Birmingham, England 2 

BOAS, FRANZ, New York City i 

BOHMEN. NATUR. LANDESDURCHFORSCHUNG, Prag, Bohemia . . i 

BOLTON, H., London, England 3 

BOMBAY. ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Bombay, India . . . . i 

BONN. NATURHISTORISCHER VEREIN, Bonn, Germany .... 4 
BONN-POPPELSDORF. DEUTSCHE DENDROLOGISCHE 

GESELLSCHAFT, Bonn-Poppelsdorf, Germany i 

BOSTON MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, Boston, Massachusetts .... 2 

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY, Boston, Massachusetts 2 

BOSTON SOCIETY OF NATURAL HISTORY, Boston, Massachusetts . i 

BOSTON UNIVERSITY, Boston, Massachusetts ........ 2 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE, Brunswick, Maine 2 

BRANDEGEE, T, S., Berkeley, California i 

BRANDENBERG BOTANISCHER VEREIN, Brandenberg, Germany . . 2 
BRIGHTON AND HOVE NATURAL HISTORY AND 

PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Brighton, England i 

BRISTOL MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY, Bristol, England . . . , i 
BRITISH ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE, 

London, England i 

BRITISH COLUMBIA NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, Victoria, 

British Columbia 2 

BRITISH GUIANA ROYAL AGRICULTURAL AND COMMERCIAL 

SOCIETY, Georgetown, British Guiana 2 

BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY), London, England ... 5 
BRITISH NEW GUINEA. DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS, 

Melbourne, Australia (gift) i 

BROOKLYN INSTITUTE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, Brooklyn, New 

York 4 

BROOKLYN PUBLIC LIBRARY, Brooklyn, New York 2 

BRUNN. LANDWIRTH. LANDESVERSUCHSSTATION FUR 

PFLANZENKULTUR, Briinn, Austria i 

BRUNN. NATURFORSCHENDER VEREIN, Briinn, Austria .... 2 
BRUSSELS. ACADEMIE ROYALE DES SCIENCES, DES LETTRES ET 

DES BEAUX ARTS, Brussels, Belgium 2 

BRUSSELS. JARDIN BOTANIQUE DE L'fiTAT, Brussels, Belgium . . i 
BRUSSELS. MUSfiE ROYAL D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE DE 

BELGIQUE, Brussels, Belgium 2 

BRUSSELS. SOCIETE D'ARCHEOLOGIE, Brussels, Belgium .... 2 

BRYN MAWR COLLEGE, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 2 

BUCKING, H., Strassburg, Germany i 

BUDAPEST. K. MAGYAR-TERMES-ZETTUDOMANYI TARSULAT, 

Budapest, Hungary 2 



Jan., 191 2. Annual Report of the Director. 155 

BUDAPEST. MAGYAR ORNITHOLOGIAI KOZPONT, Budapest, 

Hungary i 

BUDAPEST. UNGAR. AKADEMIE WISSENSCHAFTEN, Budapest, 

Hungary i 

BUENOS AIRES. FACULTAD DE FILOSOFIA V LETRAS, Buenos 

Aires, Argentina 3 

BUENOS AIRES. INSTITUTO GEOGRAFICO ARGENTINO, Buenos 

Aires, Argentina 6 

BUENOS AIRES. JARDIN BOTANICO, Buenos Aires, Argentina . . . i 

BUENOS AIRES. MUSEO NACIONAL,, Buenos Aires, Argentina ... 2 

BUFFALO PUBLIC LIBRARY, Buffalo, New York i 

BUITENZORG. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Buitenzorg, Java 9 

BURMA. ARCH^OLOGICAL SURVEY, Burma, India i 

BURMA. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE, Burma, India i 

CAIRO INSTITUT EGYPTIEN, Cairo, Egypt 3 

CALCUTTA. ROYAL BOTANIC GARDEN, Calcutta, India i 

CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, San Francisco, California . . i 
CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Berkeley, 

California 8 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY, Sacramento, California 2 

CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY, Berkeley, California 16 

CAMBRIDGE ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Cambridge, England ... 4 
CAMBRIDGE MUSEUMS AND LECTURE ROOMS SYNDICATE, 

Cambridge, England i 

CAMBRIDGE PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Cambridge, England ... 2 

CAMBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cambridge, Massachusetts .... 2 

CAMPINAS CENTRO DE CIENCIAS, Sao Paulo, Brazil i 

CANADA. BOTANICAL CLUB, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia i 

CANADA. DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR, GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, 

Ottawa, Canada 27 

CANADA. ROYAL SOCIETY OF CANADA, Toronto, Canada . . . . i 

CANADIAN FOLKLORE SOCIETY, Toronto, Canada i 

CANADIAN INSTITUTE, Toronto, Canada i 

CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Cape 

Town, South Africa 2 

CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Cape Town, South 

Africa i 

CARDIFF. NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WALES, Cardiff, Wales . . . i 

CARDIFF NATURALISTS' SOCIETY, Cardiff, Wales i 

CARNEGIE INSTITUTE, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 4 

CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF PITTSBURGH, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania . 2 

CARNEGIE MUSEUM, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 4 

CARPENTER, G. N., Dublin, Ireland i 

CARREA, PIO, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (gift) i 

CASEY, THOMAS L., Washington, D. C. (gift) i 

CASSEL. VEREIN FUR NATURKUNDE, Cassel, Germany i 

CATANIA. ACCADEMIA GIOENIA DI SCIENZE NATUR., Catania, 

Italy 4 

CEMENT WORLD PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago (gift) . . . . i 

CEYLON AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY, Colombo, India 3 

CHARLESTON MUSEUM, Charleston, South CaroHna i 



156 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

CHICAGO ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Chicago . 3 

CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE, Chicago 6 

CHICAGO HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Chicago i 

CHICAGO PUBLIC LIBRARY, Chicago 6 

CHICAGO. SOUTH PARK COMMISSION, Chicago i 

CHICAGO. SPECIAL PARK COMMISSION, Chicago i 

CHICAGO UNIVERSITY, Chicago 24 

CHICAGO AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY, Chicago 

(gift) I 

CINCINNATI MUSEUMS ASSOCIATION, Cincinnati, Ohio .... 2 

CINCINNATI PUBLIC LIBRARY. Cincinnati, Ohio 8 

CINCINNATI UNIVERSITY, Cincinnati, Ohio 4 

CLARK UNIVERSITY, Worcester, Massachusetts 4 

CLEVELAND PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cleveland, Ohio 2 

COIMBRA UNIVERSITY, Coimbra, Portugal i 

COLE, FAY COOPER, Chicago (gift) 2 

COLLEGIO DE S. FIEL, Lisbon, Portugal 2 

COLLIERY ENGINEER COMPANY, Scranton, Pennsylvania .... I 

COLMAR. SOCIETE D'HLSTOIRE NATURELLE, Colmar, Germany 2 

COLOMBO MUSEUM, Colombo, India i 

COLORADO COLLEGE, Colorado Springs, Colorado 2 

COLORADO. SCHOOL OF MINES, Golden, Colorado i 

COLORADO SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY, Denver, Colorado i 

COLOR.\DO STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. AGRICULTURAL 

EXPERIMENT STATION, Fort Collins, Colorado 4 

COLORADO STATE BUREAU OF MINES, Denver, Colorado . . . . i 
COLORADO STATE HISTORICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY 

SOCIETY, Denver, Colorado i 

COLORADO UNIVERSITY, Boulder, Colorado 2 

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, New York City 3 

CONNECTICUT ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, New Haven, Connecticut . 3 
CONNECTICUT AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, New 

Haven, Connecticut 4 

CONNECTICUT COMMISSIONERS OF FISHERIES AND GAME, 

Hartford, Connecticut I 

CONNECTICUT STATE GEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HLSTORY 

SURVEY, Hartford, Connecticut 3 

COOK, MELVILLE T., Delaware, New Jersey 4 

COOPER ORNITHOLOGICAL CLUB, Hollywood, California . . . . i 

COPENHAGEN. BOTANICAL GARDEN, Copenhagen, Denmark , ... 14 
COPENHAGEN. NATURHISTORISK FORENING, Copenhagen, 

Denmark I 

COPENHAGEN. ROYAL SOCIETY OF NORTHERN ANTIQUITIES, 

Copenhagen, Denmark i 

COPENHAGEN UNIVERSITY ZOOLOGICAL MUSEUM, Copenhagen, 

Denmark 4 

CORA, GUIDO, Rome, Italy 2 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY, Ithaca, New York 7 

COSTA RICA. MUSEO NACIONAL, San Jose, Costa Rica 3 

CRAFTSMAN, THE, Eastwood, New York (gift) i 

CROOK, A. R., Springfield, Illinois i 



Jan., 1912. Annual Report of the Director. 157 

CROYDEN. NATURAL HISTORY AND SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY, 

Croyden, England 4 

CUBA. ESTACION CENTRAL AGRONOMICA, Santiago de las Vegas, 

Cuba 2 

CZERNOWITZ. K. K. FRANZ JOSEPH UNIVERSITAT, Czernowitz, 

Austria 4 

DARMSTADT. VEREIN FUR ERDKUNDE, Darmstadt, Germany . . i 
DAVENPORT ACADEMY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, Davenport, 

Iowa 

DAVENPORT PUBLIC LIBRARY, Davenport, Iowa 

DELAWARE COLLEGE. AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Newark, Delaware 

DELAWARE COUNTY INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE, Media, Pennsylvania, 

DENISON UNIVERSITY, Granville, Ohio 

DESERET MUSEUM, Salt Lake City, Utah 

DETROIT PUBLIC LIBRARY, Detroit, Michigan 

DIAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago 

DOMINION MUSEUM, Wellington, New Zealand 

DORETY, HELEN A., Chicago (gift) . . ' 

DOWELL, PHILIP. Port Richmond, New York 

DRESDEN. K. ZOOLOGISCHES UND ANTHROPOLOGISCH- 

ETHNOGRAPHISCHES MUSEUM, Dresden, Germany 

DRESDEN. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHE GESELLSCHAFT "ISIS," 

Dresden, Germany . . ' 

DUBLIN. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES BRANCH, 

Dublin, Ireland 4 

DUBLIN. NATIONAL MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND ART, Dublin, 

Ireland 3 

DUBLIN. ROYAL DUBLIN SOCIETY, Dublin, Ireland 5 

DUBLIN. ROYAL IRISH SOCIETY, DuWin, Ireland 4 

DUBLIN. ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF IRELAND, Dublin, 

Ireland i 

DUMFRIESSHIRE AND GALLOWAY NATURAL HISTORY AND 

ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Dumfries, Scotland i 

DUNN, SAMUEL O.. New York City (gift) i 

EAST AFRICA AND UGANDA NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, . 

Nairobi, East Africa 2 

EATON, GEORGE F., New Haven, Connecticut I 

EDINBURGH FIELD NATURALISTS' AND MICROSCOPICAL 

SOCIETY, Edinburgh, Scotland i 

EDINBURGH. GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Edinburgh, Scotland . . . . i 
EDINBURGH. ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, Edinburgh, Scotland . . i 
EDINBURGH. ROYAL SCOTTISH MUSEUM, Edinburgh, Scotland , . 3 

EDINBURGH. ROYAL SOCIETY, Edinburgh, Scotland 3 

EGYPT. SURVEY DEPARTMENT, Giza, Egypt 4 

ELISHA MITCHELL SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY, Chapel Hill, North 

Carolina 2 

EMERSON, BENJAMIN K., Amherst, Massachusetts 3 

ENGINEERING AND MINING JOURNAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, 

New York (gift) I 



158 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

ENGINEERS' SOCIETY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA, Pittsburgh, 

Pennsylvania 2 

ENOCH PRATT FREE LIBRARY, Baltimore, Maryland 2 

ERRERA, LEO, Mme., Brussels, Belgium (gift) i 

ESSEX INSTITUTE, Salem, Massachusetts 2 

EVANSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY, Evanston, Illinois i 

EWART, ALFRED J., Melbourne, Australia 21 

FERvSON, E. B., Chicago (gift) i 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, Chicago (purchase) . .156 

FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Tallahassee, 

Florida 4 

FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Tallahassee, Florida 2 

FOREST AND STREAM PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago ... 2 

FOREST QUARTERLY, Ithaca, New York i 

FRANKFURT-AM-MAIN. STADTISCHES VOLKERMUSEUM, 

Frankfurt-am-Main 2 

FRANKLIN INSTITUTE, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 2 

FREIBURG. K. SACHS BERGAKADEMIE, Freiburg, Germany . . . i 
FREIBURG. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Freiburg, 

Germany 6 

FRIEDLANDER, R. UND SOHN, Berlin, Germany 2 

FURLONG, CHARLES W., New York City (gift) i 

GENEVA. CONSERVATOIRE ET JARDIN BOTANIQUES, Geneva, 

Switzerland 3 

GENEVA. MUSEO CIVICO STORIA NATURALE, Geneva, Switzerland i 
GENEVA. SOCIETE DE PHYSIQUE D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, 

Geneva, Switzerland 4 

GENNEP, A. VAN, Paris, France i 

GEORGIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Experiment, 

Georgia 4 

GEORGIA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Atlanta, Georgia 3 

GERHARD, W. J., Chicago (gift) 3 

GIESSEN. UNIVERSITAT BIBLIOTHEK, Giessen, Germany .... 5 

GLEERUP, C. W. K., Lund, Sweden i 

GOTTINGEN. K. Georg-August Universitat, Gottingen, Germany ... 6 

GRAFF, L. v., Graz, Austria i 

GRANT, U. S., Evanston, Illinois 3 

GRAZ. ZOOLOGISCHES INSTITUT, Graz, Austria i 

GREAT BRITAIN GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, London, England . . . i 

GREENE, EDWARD L., Washington, D. C i 

GRtJBE, MRS. WILHELM, BerHn, Germany (gift) 16 

GUNN, DR., Aneityum, New Hebrides 4 

HAARLEM. STADTS BIBLIOTHEEK, Haarlem, Netherlands .... i 

HABANA. BIBLIOTECA NACIONAL, Havana, Cuba ...... 2 

HABANA. UNIVERSIDAD DE LA HABANA, Havana, Cuba 2 

HALLIER, HANS, Leiden, Holland 38 

HAMBURG. GEOGRAPHISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Hamburg, Germany i 

HAMBURG. NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM, Hamburg, Germany . . 7 

HAMILTON SCIENTIFIC ASSOCIATION, Hamilton, Canada . . . . i 

HANNOVER. GEOGRAPHISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Hannover, Germany i 



Jan., 191 2. Annual Report of the Director. 159 

HANNOVER. STADT BIBLIOTHEK, Hannover, Germany I 

HARDWOOD RECORD, Chicago (gift) 2 

HARRIS, J. ARTHUR, St. Louis, Missouri 14 

HARTFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY, Hartford, Connecticut 2 

HARTLAND, E. SYDNEY, Gloucester, England 2 

HARVARD COLLEGE, Cambridge, Massachusetts 7 

HARVARD UNIVERSITY, Cambridge, Massachusetts 6 

HASSE, C, Breslau, Germany i 

HAWAII AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Honolulu, 

Hawaiian Islands 5 

HAWAIIAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands ... 5 

HEIDELBERG UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Heidelberg, Germany . 31 

HELLER, A. A., Las Vegas, New Mexico i 

HERMAN, OTTO, Budapest, Hungary i 

HITCHCOCK, CHARLES H., Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands i 

HONOLULU. BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF AGRICULTURE 

AND FORESTRY, Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands 3 

HOPKINS, THOMAS C, Syracuse, New York i 

HORNIMAN MUSEUM, London, England 11 

HUDSON-FULTON CELEBRATION COMMISSION. New York City 

(gift) 2 

HUENE, F. von, Tubingen, Germany i 

HULL MUNICIPAL MUSEUM, Hull, England 3 

IDAHO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Moscow, Idaho . 3 

ILLINOIS STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Springfield, Illinois 3 

ILLINOIS STATE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Urbana. Illinois . . . . i 

ILLINOIS STATE HISTORICAL LIBRARY, Springfield, Illinois ... 4 

ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY, Urbana, Illinois 12 

INDIA. ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Calcutta, India 6 

INDIA. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Pusa, India 2 

INDIA. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Calcutta, India 2 

INDIA, GOVERNMENT OF, Calcutta, India 5 

INDIAN FORESTER, Allahabad, India i 

INDIAN MUSEUM, Calcutta, India 14 

INDIANA ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Indianapolis, Indiana . . . . i 

INLAND PRINTER PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago 2 

INTERNATIONAL BUREAU OF AMERICAN REPUBLICS, 

Washington, D. C 4 

INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION, Washington, D. C. . . . i 

IOWA ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Des Moines, Iowa i 

IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, Ames, Iowa ... 21 

IOWA STATE HISTORICAL DEPARTMENT, Des Moines, Iowa . . . i 

IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY, Iowa City, Iowa 3 

ISTHMIAN CANAL COMMISSION, Ancon, Canal Zone (gift) .... 4 

JACOBI, A.. Leipzig, Germany i 

JACOBS, J. WARREN, Waynesburg, Pennsylvania (gift) 3 

JASSY UNIVERSITE, Jassy, Roumania i 

JENNINGS, F. C, New York City 5 

JESUP, MRS. MORRIS K., New York (gift) i 

JOHN CRERAR LIBRARY, Chicago 2 



i6o Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY, Baltimore, Maryland 2 

JOURNAL OF GEOGRAPHY, Madison, Wisconsin (gift) i 

KANSAS ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Topeka, Kansas 2 

KANSAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Manhattan, Kansas 4 

KANSAS HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Topeka, Kansas 2 

KANSAS STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Topeka, Kansas ... 4 

KANSAS UNIVERSITY, Lawrence, Kansas 2 

KARLSRUHE. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Karlsruhe, 

Germany i 

KAUKASISCHES MUSEUM, Tiflis, Russia i 

KENTUCKY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Lexington, 

Kentucky 3 

KENTUCKY GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Lexington, Kentucky .... 5 

KEW. ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, Kew, England . ' 2 

KIEL. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN FUR SCHLESWIG- 

HOLSTEIN, Kiel. Germany i 

KLAGINFURT NATURHISTORISCHES LANDES MUSEUM VON 

KARNTEN, Klaginfurt, Austria 2 

KLEBS, RICHARD, Konigsberg, Prussia 3 

KOCH-GRUNBERG. THEODOR, Berlin, Germany 3 

KONIGSBERG. BOTANISCHER VEREIN, Konigsberg, Prussia . . . i 

LA CAMARA AGRICOLA, Merida. Yucatan i 

LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, Illinois i 

LAKE MOHONK CONFERENCE OF INTERNATIONAL 

ARBITRATION, Lake Mohonk, New York 2 

LANCASHIRE SEA FISHERIES LABORATORY, Liverpool, England . 1 
LANDSHUT. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Landshut, 

Germany I 

LAUFER. BERTHOLD, Chicago (gift) 23 

LEICESTER MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY, Borough of Leicester, 

England i 

LEIDEN. RIJKS ETHNOGRAPHISCH. MUSEUM, Leiden, Germany . 4 
LEIDEN. RIJKS GEOLOGISCH MINERALOGISCH. MUSEUM, 

Leiden, Germany 5 

LEIDEN. RIJKS HERBARIUM, Leiden, Germany i 

LEIPZIG. K. SACHS. GESELLSCHAFT DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, 

Leipzig, Germany 3 

LEIPZIG. MUSEUM FUR VOLKERKUNDE, Leipzig, Germany . . . i 

LEIPZIG. VEREIN FUR ERDKUNDE, Leipzig, Germany 2 

LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIVERSITY, Stanford University, 

California 4 

LEWIS INSTITUTE, Chicago i 

LIMA. SOCIEDAD GEOGRAFICA, Lima, Peru 3 

LIVERPOOL BIOLOGICAL SOCIETY. Liverpool, England i 

LIVERPOOL GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Liverpool, England . . . . i 

LIVERPOOL MARINE BIOLOGICAL STATION, Liverpool, England . . i 

LLOYD LIBRARY, Cincinnati, Ohio 7 

LONDON. IMPERIAL COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, 

London, England i 

LONDON. LINNEAN SOCIETY, London, England 5 



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Jan., 191 2. Annual Report of the Director. 161 

LONDON. ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, London, England 2 

LONDON. ROYAL HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, London, EngLand . . 2 

LONDON. ROYAL SOCIETY, London, England 2 

LONDON. ROYAL SOCIETY OF ARTS, London, England i 

LONDON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY, London, England 3- 

LOUISIANA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Baton Rouge, 

Louisiana 10 

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM, New Orleans, Louisiana 2 

LtJBECK. GEOGRAPHISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Lubeck, Germany . . i 

LUND. K. UNIVERSITETS BIBLIOTEK, Lund, Sweden i 

McCLURG, A. C. AND COMPANY, Chicago (gift) i 

McGILL UNIVERSITY, Montreal, Canada 2 

MACKENZIE, JOHN, Minneapolis, Minnesota (gift) i 

MACRITCHIE, DAVID, Edinburgh, Scotland i 

MADRAS. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Madras, India ... 2 

MADRAS. GOVERNMENT MUSEUM, Madras, India i 

MADRAS. HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Madras, India 4 

MADRID. BIBLIOTECA NACI0r^^„IvM4d, Spain i 

MADRID. R. ACADEMIA DE CIENCI'A^"; Madrid, Spain 2 

MADRID. SOCIEDAD ESPANOLA DE^'^JSTDR-li^ NATURAL, Madrid, 

Spain 2 

MAIDExX, J. H., Sydney, New South Wales 2 

MAINE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Orono, Maine . 2 

MAINE STATE LIBRARY, Augusta, Maine 36 

MAINE UNIVERSITY, Orono, Maine I 

MANCHESTER INSTITUTE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, Manchester, 

New Hampshire i 

MANCHESTER FIELD NATURALISTS' AND ARCH^OLOGISTS' 

CLUB, Manchester, England 2 

MANCHESTER LITERARY AND PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY. 

Manchester, England i 

MANCHESTER MUSEUM, Manchester, England 2 

MARBURG. GESELLSCHAFT ZUR BEFORDERUNG DER 

GESAMTEN NATURWISSENSCHAFTEN, Marburg, Germany . . i 

MARBURG. K. UNIVERSITAT, Marburg, Germany 39 

MARIETTA COLLEGE, Marietta, Ohio i 

MARINE BIOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION OF THE UNITED 

KINGDOM, Plymouth, England 2 

MARKS, E. L., Cambridge, Massachusetts i 

MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, College 

Park, Maryland 5 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Amherst, Massachusetts 3 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Boston, Massachusetts i 
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Boston, 

Massachusetts 3 

MELBOURNE. NATIONAL MUSEUM, Melbourne, Australia ... 3 

MELBOURNE UNIVERSITY, Melbourne, Australia i 

MEXICO. BIBLIOTECA NACIONAL, Mexico, Mexico 10 

MEXICO. INSTITUTO GEOLOGICO DE MEXICO, Mexico, Mexico . 4 



i62 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

MEXICO. MUSEO NACIONAL, Mexico, Mexico 2 

MEXICO. SOCIEDx\D GEOLOGICA, Mexico, Mexico i 

MEXICO. SOCIEDAD MEXICANA DE GEOGRAFIA Y 

ESTADISTICA, Mexico, Mexico i 

MICHIGAN AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Agricultural 

College, Michigan 11 

MICHIGAN COLLEGE OF MINES, Houghton, Michigan i 

MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY, Ann Arbor, Michigan - . . 2 

MILLSPAUGH, CHARLES FREDERICK, Chicago (gift) 90 

MILWAUKEE PUBLIC MUSEUM, Milwaukee, Wisconsin i 

MINING WORLD PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago 2 

MINNEAPOLIS PUBLIC LIBRARY, Minneapohs, Minnesota .... 2 

MINNESOTA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Minneapolis, Minnesota . . i 
MINNESOTA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, St. 

Anthony Park, Minnesota 4 

MINNESOTA GEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY, 

Minneapolis, Minnesota i 

MISSISSIPPI AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Agricultural 

College, Mississippi 9 

MISSOURI AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Columbia, 

Missouri 9 

MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN, St. Louis, Missouri i 

MISSOURI BUREAU OF GEOLOGY AND MINES, Jefferson City, 

Missouri I 

MISSOURI HISTORICAL SOCIETY, St. Louis, Missouri 4 

MISSOURI UNIVERSITY, Columbia, Missouri 3 

MONTANA AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Bozeman, Montana ... 16 

MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY, Missoula, Montana 9 

MONTEVIDEO. MUSEO NACIONAL, Montevideo, Uruguay . . . . i 

MOORE, CLARENCE B., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 2 

MORGAN, J. PIERPONT, New York City (gift) i 

MORSE, EDWARD S., Salem, Massachusetts  . . 28 

MOSCOW. SOCIETE IMPERIALE DES NATURALISTES, Moscow, 

Russia 3 

MUNCHEX. BOTANISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Miinchen, Germany . . 7 

MUXCHEN. GEOGRAPHISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Mtinchen, Germany 5 
MUNCHEN. K. BAYER. AKADEMIE DER WISSENSCHAFT, 

Munchen, Germany 7 

MUNN AND COMPANY, New York City 2 

MUSEE DU CONGO, Brussels, Belgium 2 

MUSEO DE LA PLATA, La Plata, Argentina 2 

MUSEU PAULISTA, Sao Paulo, Brazil 2 

NAPOLI. INSTITUTO ZOOLOGICO, Naples, Italy i 

NAPOLI. R. ACCADEMIA DELLE SCIENZE, Naples, Italy .... 3 

NAPOLI. SOCIETA DI NATURALISTI, Naples, Italy 

NAPOLI. UNIVERSITA. R. ORTO BOTANICO, Naples, Italy .... 

NATAL BOTANIC GARDENS, Durban, Natal 

NATAL MUSEUM, Pietermaritzburg, Natal 

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY, Washington, D. C 

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF WALES, Aberystwyth, Wales 

NATURALISTE CANADIEN, Chicoutimi, Canada 



Jan., 1912. Annual Report of the Director. 163 

NEBRASKA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Lincoln, 

Nebraska 2 

NEDERLANDSCH-INDIE. K. INSTITUT TAAL-LAND-EN 

VOLKENKUNDE, Batavia, Java 3 

NEDERLANDISCHE DIERKUNDIGE VEREENIGING, Leiden, 

Netherlands i 

NEVADA STATE UNIVERSITY, Reno, Nevada 2 

NEW BEDFORD FREE PUB^^IC LIBRARY, New Bedford, 

Massachusetts 4 

NEW CASTLE-UPON-TYNE NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, 

New Castle-upon-Tyne, England i 

NEW HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, Durham, New 

Hampshire 7 

NEW JERSEY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Trenton, 

New Jersey 5 

NEW JERSEY GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Trenton, New Jersey . . . i 
NEW JERSEY HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Trenton, New Jersey . . i 

NEW JERSEY STATE MUSEUM, Trenton, New Jersey i 

NEW MEXICO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. Mesilla 

Park, New Mexico 6 

NEW SOUTH WALES. BOTANIC GARDENS AND GOVERNMENT 

DOMAINS, Sydney, New South Wales i 

NEW SOUTH WALES. DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES, Sydney, 

New South Wales 2 

NEW SOUTH WALES. DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND 

AGRICULTURE, Sydney, New South Wales 9 

NEW SOUTH WALES. LINNEAN SOCITY, Sydney, New South Wales . i 
NEW SOUTH WALES. ROYAL SOCIETY, Sydney, New South Wales . 3 
NEW SOUTH WALES. TECHNOLOGICAL MUSEUM, Sydney, New 

South Wales 4 

NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, New York City i 

NEW YORK AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Geneva, 

New York 20 

NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN, New York City i 

NEW YORK FOREST, FISH AND GAME COMMISSION, Albany, 

New York 2 

NEW YORK. METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, New York City . 2 

NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY, New York City 1 

NEW YORK SOCIETY OF MECHANICS AND TRADESMEN, 

New York City i 

NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY, Albany, New York .178 

NEW YORK ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY, New York City 5 

NEW ZEALAND. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Wellington, 

New Zealand 2 

NEW ZEALAND INSTITUTE, Wellington, New Zealand 2 

NEWBERRY LIBRARY, Chicago i 

NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Raleigh, North Carolina 2 

NORTH DAKOTA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Fargo, North Dakota 2 

NORTH DAKOTA UNIVERSITY. University. North Dakota .... I 



164 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol, IV. 

NOTRE DAME UNIVERSITY, Notre Dame, Indiana 2 

NUMISMATIC AND ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Montreal, Canada . . i 

OAKLAND FREE LIBRARY, Oakland, California i 

OBERLIN COLLEGE LIBRARY, Oberlin, Ohio ....'.... i 

OHIO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Wooster, Ohio . . 19 

OHIO GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Columbus, Ohio 3 

OHIO STATE ARCH^OLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 

Columbus, Ohio i 

OHIO STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, Columbus, Ohio ... 4 

OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY, Columbus, Ohio 6 

OKLAHOMA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Stillwater, 

Oklahoma 5 

OKLAHOMA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Norman, Oklahoma .... 7 

OKLAHOMA UNIVERSITY, Norman, Oklahoma i 

ONTARIO DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Ontario, Canada . . 20 

OPEN COURT PUBLISHING COMPANY. Chicago i 

OREGON AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, CorvaUis, 

Oregon (gift) 4 

ORNITHOLOGISCHE GESELLSCHAFT IN BAYERN, Miinchen, 

Germany i 

OSNABRUCK. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Osnabriick, 

Prussia I 

OTAGO UNIVERSITY, Otago, New Zealand i 

OTTAWA FIELD NATURALISTS' CLUB, Ottawa, Canada . . . . i 

OUTES, FELIX F., La Plata, Argentina 3 

OXFORD DELEGATES OF UNIVERSITY MUSEUM, Oxford, England i 

PALACHE, CHARLES, Cambridge, Massachusetts i 

PALERMO. R. ORTO BOTANICO E GIARDIxNO COLONIALE, 

Palermo, Italy 3 

PAMMEL, L. H., Ames, Iowa 7 

PARIS. ACADEMIE DES SCIENCES, Paris, France 2 

PARIS. ECOLE D'ANTHROPOLOGIE, Paris, France i 

PARIS. MINISTERE DE L'INSTRUCTION PUBLIQUE ET DES 

BEAUX-ARTS, Paris, France 2 

PARIS. MUSEE D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Paris, France . . . . i 

PARIS. SOCIETE DES AMERICANISTES, Paris, France i 

PARIS. SOCIETE NATIONALE D'AGRICULTURE, Paris, France . . i 

PARKE, DAVIS AND COMPANY, Detroit, Michigan (gift) i 

PEABODY COLLEGE, Nashville, Tennessee i 

PEABODY INSTITUTE, Peabody, Massachusetts i 

PEABODY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY AND 

ETHNOLOGY, Cambridge, Massachusetts 3 

PELLETT, FRANK C, Atlantic, Iowa 2 

PENAFIEL, A., Mexico, Mexico i 

PENNSYLVANIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania ^ . . 6 

PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM AND SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania i 

PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD COMPANY. Altoona, Pennsylvania (gift) i 
PENNSYLVANIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 6 



Jan., 191 2. Annual Report of the Director. 165 

PENNSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania .... 10 

PEORIA PUBLIC LIBRARY, Peoria, Illinois 2 

PERADENIYA. ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, Peradeniya, Ceylon . . i 

PERKINS, G. H., Burlington, Vermont 2 

PERTHSHIRE NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUiM, Perth, Scotland . . i 

PERTHSHIRE SOCIETY OF NATURAL SCIENCE, Perth, Scotland . i 

PERU. CUERPO DE INGENIEROS DE iMINAS, Lima, Peru .... 2 

PERU. INSTITUTO HISTORICO, Lima, Peru i 

PHILADELPHIA ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania I 

PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania i 

PHILADELPHIA COMMERCIAL MUSEUM, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 4 
PHILADELPHIA GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania i 

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR. 

BUREAU OF SCIENCE, Manila, Philippine Islands 14 

PHILLIPS ACADEIMY, Andover, Massachusetts 4 

PLYMOUTH MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY, Plymouth, England . . 2 

POLLARD, CHARLES LOUIS, New Brighton, New York 3 

POMONA COLLEGE, Claremont. California 3 

PORTICI. R. SCUOLA SUPERIORE D'AGRICULTURA, Portici, Italy . 2 

PORTLAND PUBLIC LIBRARY, Portland, Maine i 

PORTLAND SOCIETY OF NATURAL HISTORY, Portland, Maine . . 3 
POSEX. DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FtJR KUNST UND 

WISSENSCHAFT, Posen, Germany 4 

PRAG. ACADEMIE DES SCIENCES DE L'EMPEREUR FRANCOIS 

JOSEPH I., Prag., Bohemia i 

PRATT INSTITUTE FREE LIBRARY, Brooklyn, New York .... 2 

PREUSS, K. TH., Berlin, Germany i 

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY, Princeton, New Jersey . i 

PRINTING ART, THE, New York City 2 

PROVIDENCE ATHEN^UM, Providence, Rhode Island i 

PROVIDENCE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Providence, Rhode Island .... 2 

PURDUE UNIVERSITY, Lafayette, Indiana .7 

QUEENSLAND. DEPARTMENT OF MINES, Brisbane, Queensland . . i 

QUEENSLAND. FIELD NATURALISTS' CLUB, Brisbane, Queensland . i 

QUEENSLAND MUSEUM, Brisbane, Queensland 2 

QUEENSLAND ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, Brisbane, 

Queensland i 

QUEENSLAND ROYAL SOCIETY, Brisbane, Queensland i 

RAFFLES MUSEUM, Singapore, Straits Settlements . . • i 

RANDALL AND COMPANY, Chicago (gift) 2 

RENNES UNIVERSITE, Rennes, France i 

REVUE BRETONNE DE BOTANIQUE, Rennes, France 2 

REVUE CRITIQUE DE PALEOZOOLOGIE, Paris, France i 

REVUE SCIENTIFIQUE DU BOURBONNAIS ET DU CENTRE DE 

LA FRANCE, Moulins, France i 

RHODE ISLAND AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Kingston, Rhode Island 4 

RICE, WILLIAM NORTH, Middletown, Connecticut 3 



1 66 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV 



RIES, HEINRICH, Ithaca, New York 2 

RINNE, F., Leipzig, Germany 4 

RIVET, P., Paris, France 2 

ROBERTS, GEORGE C., Sharon Hill, Pennsylvania 15 

ROBINSON, B. L., Cambridge, Massachusetts i 

ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Rochester, New York . . . i 

ROGER WILLIAMS PARK MUSEUM, Providence, Rhode Island ... 7 

ROME. R. ACCADEMIA DEI LINCEI, Rome, Italy 4 

ROvSE POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, Terre Haute, Indiana i 

ROTH, WALTER E., Georgetown, British Guiana 3 

ROTTERDAM MUSEUM VOOR LAND-EN-VOLKENKUNDE, 

Rotterdam, Holland I 

ROYAL ARCHAEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF GREAT BRITAIN AND 

IRELAND, London, England i 

ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY, CEYLON BRANCH, Colombo, India . . 2 

ROYAL CORNWALL POLYTECHNIC SOCIETY, Falmouth, England . i 

RUTOT, A., Paris, France 6 

SADIG, M., Quadin, India (gift) I 

ST. GALL. OSTSCH. GEOGRAPH. COMMERC. GESELLSCHAFT, 

St. Gall, Switzerland i 

ST. LOUIS ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, St. Louis, Missouri 16 

ST. LOUIS. CITY ART MUSEUM, St. Louis, Missouri 6 

ST. LOUIS MERCANTILE ASSOCIATION, St. Louis, Missouri . . . i 

ST. LOUIS PUBLIC LIBR.\RY, St. Louis. Missouri 2 

ST. LOUIS PUBLIC SCHOOLS, St. Louis, Missouri • i 

ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY, St. Louis, Missouri 2 

ST. PETERSBURG. ACADEMIE IMPERIALE DES SCIENCES, St. 

Petersburg, Russia II 

ST. PETERSBURG. SOCIETE IMPERIALE DES NATURALISTES, 

St. Petersburg, Russia 2 

SALEM PUBLIC LIBRARY, Salem, Massachusetts 2 

SAN JOSE. MUSEO NACIONAL, San Jose, Costa Rica 6 

SAN JOSE. SOCIEDAD NACIONAL AGRICULTURA, San Jose, Costa 

Rica I 

SAN SALVADOR MUSEO NACIONAL, San Salvador 3 

SANTIAGO DE CHILE. BIBLIOTECA NACIONAL, Santiago, Chile . . 53 

SAO PAULO. INSTITUTO AGRONOMICO, Sao Paulo, Brazil . . . . i 

SAO PAULO. SOCIEDADE CIENTIFICA, Sao Paulo, Brazil .... 2 
SA NE ET LOIRE. SOCIETE DES SCIENCES NATURELLES, 

Chalon-sur-Saone, France I 

SARAWAK MUSEUM, Borneo, India 2 

SATURDAY REVIEW, London, England 2 

SCHERMAN, LUCIAN, Miinchen, Germany 4 

SCHLAGINHAUFEN, OTTO, Dresden, Germany i 

SCHLESISCHE GESELLSCHAFT FtJR VATERLANDISCHE CULTUR, 

Breslau, Prussia i 

SCHMIDT, P. W., Modling, Austria 2 

SCHWEIZERISCHE ENTOMOLOGISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Bern, 

Switzerland I 

SCHWEIZERISCHE NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, 

Lausanne, Switzerland i 



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Jan., 191 2. Annual Report of the Director. 167 

SCOTLAND FISHERIES BOARD, Glasgow, Scotland i 

SCOTT FORESMAN AND COMPANY, Chicago (gift) 5 

SELL, HENRY, Copenhagen, Denmark 2 

SENCKENBERGISCHE NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, 

Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany I 

SERGI, GIUSEPPE, Rome, Italy 2 

SHUFELDT, R. W., Washington, D. C i 

SMITH, J. D., Baltimore, Maryland . I 

SMITH, WILBUR M., Chicago (gift) i 

SOCIEDAD CIENTIFICA "ANTONIO ALZATE," Mexico, Mexico . . 2 

SOCIETA GEOGRAFICA ITALIANA, Rome, Italy 2 

SOCIETA GEOLOGICA ITALIANA,. Rp'fhe, Italy i 

SOCIETA ITALIANA DI ANTROPbLbGIA, Florence, Italy . . . . i 

SOCIETA ROMANA DI ANTROPOLOGIA, Rome, Italy i 

SOCIETA TOSCANA DI SCIENZE NATURALI, Pisa, Italy ..... 2 
SOCIETE BELGE DE GEOLOGIE, DE PALEONTOLOGIE ET 

D'HYDROLOGIE, Brussels, Belgium I 

SOCIETE BOTANIQUE DE COPENHAGEN, Copenhagen, Denmark . i 

SOCIETE BOTANIQUE DE FRANCE, Paris, France i 

SOCIETE DENDROLOGIQUE DE FRANCE, Paris, France .... 3 

SOCIETE D'ETUDES DES SCIENCES NATURELLES, Rheims, France i 

SOCIETE D'HORTICULTURE ET DE BOTANIQUE, ManseiUes, France i 

SOCIETE DE GEOGRAPHIE, Toulouse, France i 

SOCIETE DES AMIS DE L'UNIVERSITE, Clermont, France . . . . i 

SOCIETE DES SCIENCES, Nancy, France i 

SOCIETE FRIBOURGEOISE DES vSCIENCES NATURELLES, Fribourg, 

Switzerland 8 

SOCIETE GEOLOGIQUE DU NORD, Lille, France i 

SOCIETE NATIONALE D'HORTICULTURE DE FRANCE, Paris, 

France i 

SOCIETE NEUCHATELOISE DE GEOGRAPHIE, Neuchatel, 

Switzerland 2 

SOCIETE OURALIENNE D'AMATEURS DES SCIENCES 

NATURELLES, Ekaterinburg, Russia i 

SOCIETE PORTUGAISE DE SCIENCES NATURELLES, Lisbon, 

Portugal I 

SOCIETE ROYALE DE BOTANIQUE DE BELGIQUE, Brussels, 

Belgium i 

SOCIETE ZOOLOGIQUE DE FRANCE, Paris, France i 

SOUTH AFRICA GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Johannesburg, South Africa 2 
SOUTH AFRICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF 

SCIENCE, Cape Town, South Africa 3 

SOUTH AFRICAN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Cape Town, 

South Africa 2 

SOUTH AFRICAN MUSEUM, Cape Town, South Africa 6 

SOUTH AFRICAN ROYAL SOCIETY, Cape Town, South Africa ... 2 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Adelaide, 

South Australia 2 

SOUTH AUSTRALIA. GOVERNMENT GEOLOGIST, Adelaide, South 

Australia i 



i68 Field Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

SOUTH AUSTRALIA. PUBLIC LIBRARY, MUSEUM AND ART 

GALLERY, Adelaide, South Australia i 

SOUTH AUSTRALIA. ROYAL SOCIETY, Adelaide, South Australia . . i 
SOUTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Clemson, South Carolina 6 

SOUTH DAKOTA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Brookings, South Dakota 9 

SOUTH DAKOTA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Vermilion, South Dakota i 

SOUTH KENSINGTON BOARD OF EDUCATION, London, England 2 
SOUTH LONDON ENTOMOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY 

SOCIETY, London, England i 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Los Angeles, 

California i 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD, San Francisco, Cahfomia .... 2 

SPEZIA, GIORGIO, Torino, Italy 2 

SPRINGFIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, Springfield, 

Massachusetts 2 

STARR, FREDERICK, Chicago i 

STATEN ISLAND ASSOCIATION OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, New 

York City i 

STECHERT AND COMPANY, New York City (gift) i 

STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Hoboken, New Jersey . i 

STEVENSON, JOHN J., New York City 2 

STOCKHOLM. K. VITT. HIST. OCH ANTIQ. AKADEMIEN, 

Stockholm, Sweden 2 

STOCKHOLM. SVEN. SALLSK. FOR ANTROPOLOGI OCH 

GEOGRAFI, Stockholm, Sweden i 

STOCKHOLM. UNIVERSITE DE STOCKHOLM. INSTITUT DE 

BOTANIQUE, Stockholm, Sweden i 

STRASSBURG. KAISERLICHE UNIVERSITAT, Strassburg, Germany . 15 

STRONG, R. M., Chicago (gift) i 

SWEDEN. FORSTLICHE VERSUCHSANSTALT, Stockholm, Sweden i 

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY, Syracuse, New York 2 

TASMANIA. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Hobart, Tasmania i 

TASMANIA. ROYAL SOCIETY, Hobart, Tasmania i 

TEXAS ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Austin, Texas • i 

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, College Station, 

Texas 6 

TEXAS UNIVERSITY, Austin, Texas 2 

THROOP INSTITUTE, Pasadena, California i 

THURINGISCHER BOTANISCHE VEREIN, Weimar, Germany . . . i 

THURSTON, E., Madras, India 6 

TIMBERMAN, THE, Portland, Oregon i 

TOKYO. ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Tokyo, Japan i 

TOKYO. BOTANICAL SOCIETY, Tokyo, Japan i 

TOKYO. DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FUR NATUR UND 

VOLKERKUNDE OSTASIENS, Tokyo, Japan 2 

TOKYO. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Tokyo, Japan i 

TOKYO. IMPERIAL UNIVERSITY, Tokyo, Japan 3 

TOOKER, WILLIAM WALLACE, Sag Harbor, New York i 

TORINO. MUSEO DI ZOOLOGIA ED ANATOMIA COMPARATA, 

Turin, Italy i 



Jan., 191 2. Annual Report of the Director. 169 

TORINO. R. ACCAD. DELLE SCIEXZE, Turin, Italy 2 

TORONTO UNIVERSITY, Toronto, Canada 4 

TRANSVAAL. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Pretoria, Transvaal i 

TRANSVAAL. DEPARTMENT OF MINES, Pretoria, Transvaal ... 2 

TRANSVAAL MUSEUM, Pretoria, Transvaal 2 

TRING ZOOLOGICAL MUSEUM, Tring, England i 

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO DEPARTMENT OP AGRICULTURE, 

Trinidad i 

TRINITY COLLEGE, Dublin, Ireland i 

TROMSO MUSEUM, Tromso, Norway 2 

TRONDHJEM K. NORSKE VIDEN. SELSKAPS, Trondhjem, Norway . i 

TUBINGEN. K. UNIVERSITATS BIBLIOTHEK, Tubingen, Germany . 4 

TUNIS. CARTHAGE INSTITUTE, Tunis, Africa i 

U. S. GOVERNMENT, Washington, D. C. 587 

U. S. INDIAN SCHOOL, Carlisle, Pennsylvania 2 

UPSALA. SOCIETAS SCIENTIARUM, Upsala, Sweden 3 

UPSALA. UNIVERSITY, Upsala, Sweden 5 

UTAH AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Logan, Utah . . 3 

UTAH. STATE HORTICULTURAL COMMISSION, Salt Lake City, Utah i 

VERMONT. STATE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Burlington, Vermont . . i 

VERMONT UNIVERSITY, Burlington, Vermont 8 

VICTORIA AND ALBERT MUSEUM, South Kensington, England . . 3 

VICTORIA. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Melbourne, Austraha 2 

VICTORIA FIELD NATURALISTS' CLUB, Melbourne, Austraha . . i 
VICTORIA. PUBLIC LIBRARY, MUSEUMS AND NATIONAL 

GALLERY, Victoria, Australia i 

VICTORIA. ROYAL SOCIETY, Melbourne, Australia i 

VICTORIA. ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL AND ACCLIMATIZATION 

SOCIETY, Melbourne, Australia i 

VIENNA. K. K. NATURHISTORISCHES HOFMUSEUM, Vienna, 

Austria i 

VIENNA. K. K. UNIVERSITAT, Vienna, Austria 3 

VIENNA. K. K. ZOOLOGISCH, BOTANISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, 

Vienna, Austria i 

VIENNA. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Vienna, Austria . i 

VIRCHOW, H., Berlin, Germany 3 

VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Blacksburg, 

Virginia 5 

VIRGINIA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Charlottesville, Virginia .... 8 

VIRGINIA STATE LIBRARY, Richmond, Virginia 2 

VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, Charlottesville, Virginia i 

WAGNER FREE INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE OF PHILADELPHIA, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania i 

WASHINGTON ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Washington, D. C. . . . 2 

WASHINGTON BIOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Washington, D. C 2 

WASHINGTON GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Olympia, Washington ... 2 
WASHINGTON STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Pullman, 

Washington 9 

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY, St. Louis, Missouri 2 

WAUGAUNI PUBLIC MUSEUM, Waugauni, New Zealand i 

WEGNER, RICHARD, Breslau, Germany 6 



lyo Field Museum of Natural History — ^ Reports, Vol. IV. 

WELLCOME CHEMICAL RESEARCH LABORATORIES, London, 

England i6 

WELLER, STUART, Chicago 3 

WELLINGTON ACCLIMATIZATION SOCIETY, Wellington, New 

Zealand i 

WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY, Middletown, Connecticut 2 

WEST INDIES. IMPERIAL DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

Barbadoes, West Indies 2 

WEST VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Morgantown, West Virginia 4 

WEST VIRGINIA. STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Charleston, 

West Virginia i 

WESTERN AUSTRALIA. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Perth, 

West Australia i 

WESTERN AUSTRALIA. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Perth, West Australia 2 
WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA ENGINEERS' SOCIETY, Pittsburgh, 

Pennsylvania 2 

WHITE, JEAN, Melbourne, AustraHa I 

WIESBADEN. NASSAUISCHER VEREIN FUR NATURKUNDE, 

Wiesbaden, Germany i 

WILLE, N., Christiania, Norway 2 

WILLIAMS COLLEGE, Williamstown, Massachusetts 4 

WILLISTON, S. W., Chicago 2 

WILSON ORNITHOLOGICAL CLUB, Oberhn, Ohio i 

WINDSOR-KENFIELD PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago .... 2 

WISCONSIN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Madison, Wisconsin . . i 
WISCONSIN GEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY, 

Madison, Wisconsin 2 

WISCONSIN STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Madison, Wisconsin 2 

WISCONSIN STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Madison, Wisconsin . . 2 

WISCONSIN STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Madison, Wisconsin 3 

WISCONSIN UNIVERSITY, Madison, Wisconsin 32 

WISTAR INSTITUTE OF ANATOMY AND BIOLOGY, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania 15 

WOOD, NORMAN A., London, England i 

WORCESTER COUNTY HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Worcester, 

Massachusetts i 

WORCESTER FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Worcester, Massachusetts . . 2 

WtJLFING, E. A., Heidelberg, Germany 3 

WURTEMBERG. VEREIN FUR VATERLANDISCHE NATURKUNDE, 

Wurtemberg, Germany 2 

WYOMING AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Laramie, 

Wyoming 3 

WYOMING HISTORICAL AND GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Wilkesbarre, 

Pennsylvania I 

YALE UNIVERSITY, NewHaven, Connecticut 12 

YOUNG, R. T., University, North Dakota (gift) i 

ZIMANYI, KARL, Budapest, Hungary 3 

ZURICH. BOTANISCHES MUSEUM DER UNIVERSITAT, Zurich, 

Switzerland 2 

ZURICH. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Zurich, Switzerland, 2 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS. PLATE XXV. 




Fruit Cluster of the ILANG-ILANG (Cananga odorala). 

Cultivated in the West Indies. 



Jan., 191 2. Annual Report of the Director. 171 



Articles of Incorporation 



STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

DEPARTMENT OF STATE. 

William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State. 

To All to Whom These Presents Shall Come, Greeting: 

Whereas, a Certificate duly signed and acknowledged having been filed in 
the office of the Secretary of State, on the i6th day of September, a. d. 1893, for 
the organization of the COLUMBIA!^, MUSEUM OF CHICAGO, under and in 
accordance with the provisions ' ol;. f './[^"'iVe-t Concerning Corporations," approved 
April 18, 1872, and in force July i, 1872, and .aljj acts amendatory thereof, a copy 
of which certificate is hereto attached. 

Now, therefore, I, William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State of the State of 
Illinois, by virtue of the powers and duties vested in me by law, do hereby certify 
that the said COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO is a legally organized 
Corporation imder the laws of this State. 

In Testituony Whereof, 1 hereto set my hand and cause to be affixed the Great 
Seal of the State. Done at the Citj^ of Springfield, this i6th day of September, 
in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three, and of the 
Independence of the United States the one hundred and eighteenth. 

W. H. HINRICHSEN, 
[Se.\l.] Secretary of State. 

TO HON. WILLIAM H. HINRICHSEN, 

Secretary of State: 
Sir: 

We, the undersigned, citizens of the United States, propose to form a corpora- 
tion under an act of the General Assembly of the State of Illinois, entitled "An 
Act Concerning Corporations," approved April 18, 1872, and all acts amendatory 
thereof; and that for the purposes of such organization we hereby state as follows, 
to wit: 

1. The name of such corporation is the "COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF 
CHICAGO." 

2. The object for which it is formed is for the accumulation and dissemi- 
nation of knowledge, and the preservation and exhibition of objects illustrating 
Art, Archaeology, Science, and History. 

3. The management of the aforesaid Museum shall be vested in a Board of 
Fifteen (15) Trustees, five of whom are to be elected every year. 

4. The following named persons are hereby selected as the Trustees for the 
iirst year of its corporate existence: 



172 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Ed. E. Ayer, Charles B. Farwell, George E. Adams, George R. Davis, Charles 
L. Hutchinson, Daniel H. Burnham, John A. Roche, M. C. Bullock, Emil G. Hirsch, 
James W. Ellsworth, AUison V. Armour, O. F. Aldis, Edwin Walker, John C. Black, 
and Frank W. Gunsaulus. 

5. The location of the Museum is in the City of Chicago, Count}^ of Cook, 
and State of Illinois. 

(Signed) , 

George E. Adams, C. B. Farwell, Sidney C. Eastman, F. W. Putnam, Robert 
McMurdy, Andrew Peterson, L. J. Gage, Charles L. Hutchinson, Ebenezer Bucking- 
ham, Andrew McNally, Edward E. Ayer, John M. Clark, Herman H. Kohlsaat, 
George Schneider, Henry H. Getty, William R. Harper, Franklin H. Head, E. G. 
Keith, J. Irving Pearce, Azel F. Hatch, Henry Wade Rogers, Thomas B. Bryan, 
L. Z. Leiter, A. C. Bartlett, A. A. Sprague, A. C. McClurg, James W. Scott, George 
F. Bissell, John R. Walsh, Chas. Fitzsimons, John A. Roche, E. B. McCagg, Owen 
F. Aldis, Ferdinand W. Peck, James H. Dole, Joseph Stockton, Edward B. Butler, 
John McConnell, R. A. Waller, H. C. Chatfield-Taylcr, A. Crawford, Wm. Sooy 
Smith, P. S. Peterson, John C. Black, Jno. J. Mitchell, C. F. Gunther, George R. 
Davis, Stephen A. Forbes, Robert W. Patterson, Jr., M. C. Bullock, Edwin Walker, 
George M. Pullman, William E. Curtis, James W. Ellsworth, William E. Hale, Wm. 
T. Baker, Martin A. Ryerson, Huntington W. Jackson, N. B. Ream, Norman Will- 
iams, Melville E. Stone, Bryan Lathrop, Eliphalet W. Blatchford, Philip D. Armour. 

State of Illinois ) 

f ss 
Cook County ) 

I, G. R. Mitchell, a Notary Public in and for said County, do hereby certify 

that the foregoing petitioners personally appeared before me and acknowledged 

severally that they signed the foregoing petition as their free and voluntary act for 

the uses and purposes therein set forth. 

Given under my hand and notarial seal this 14th day of September, 1893. 

G. R. MITCHELL, 

[Se.\l.] Notary Public, Cook County, III. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 

Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the Corporate members held 
the 25th day of June, 1894, the name of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM was changed 
to FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. A certificate to this effect was filed June 26, 
1894, in the office of the Secretary of State for Illinois. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 

Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the Corporate members held 
the 8th day of November, 1905, the name of the FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM 
was changed to FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. A certificate 
to this effect was filed November 10, 1905, in the office of the Secretary of State 
for Illinois. 



Jan., 191 2. Annual Report of the Director. 173 



AMENDED BY-LAWS. 



(January 9, 191 1.) 



ARTICLE I. 

MEMBERS. 



Section i. Members shall be of five classes, Annual Members, Corporate 
Members, Life Members, Patrons and Honorary Members. 

Sec. 2. Annual Members shall consist of such persons as are selected from time 
to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, and who shall pay an annual 
fee of ten dollars ($10.00), payable within thirty days after notice of election, and 
within thirty days after each recurring annual date. The failure of any person to 
make such initiatory payment and such annual payments within said time shall, 
at the option of the Board of Trustees, be sufficient grounds for the forfeiture of an 
annual membership. 

This said annual membership shall entitle the member to : 

First. — Free admittance for the member and family, to the Museum on any 
day. 

Second. — Ten tickets every year, admitting the bearer to the Museum on pay 
days. 

Third. —  A copy of all publications of the Museum when requested. 

Fourth. — Invitations to all special exhibits, receptions, lectures, or other 
functions which may be given at the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The Corporate Members shall consist of the persons named in the 
articles of incorporation, and of such other persons as shall be chosen from time 
to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, upon the recommendation 
of the Executive Committee; provided, that such persons named in the articles of 
incorporation sh'all, within ninety days from the adoption of these By-Laws, and 
persons hereafter chosen as Corporate Members shaU, within ninety days of their 
election, pay into the treasury the sum of twenty dollars ($20.00) or more. The 
failure of any person to make such payment within said time shall, at the option 
of the Board of Trustees, be ground for forfeiture of his corporate membership. 
Corporate Members becoming Life Members, Patrons or Honorary Members shall 
be exempt from dues. Annual meetings of said Corporate Members shall be held 
at the same place and on the same day that the annual meeting of the Board of 
Trustees is held. 

Sec. 4. Any person paying into the treasury the sum of five hundred dollars 
($500.00), at any one time shall, upon the unanimous vote of the Board, become a 
Life Member. Life Members shall be exempt from all dues. 

Sec. 5. Patrons shall be chosen by the Board upon recommendation of the 
Executive Committee from among persons who have rendered eminent service 



174 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

to the Museum. They shall be exempt from all dues, and, by virtue of their election 
as Patrons, shall also be Corporate Members. 

Sec. 6. Honorary Members shall be chosen by the Board from among persons 
who have rendered eminent service to science, and only upon unanimous nomina- 
tion of the E.xecutive Committee. They shall be exempt from all dues. 

ARTICLE II. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

Section i. The Board of Trustees shall consist of fifteen members. The 
respective members of the Board now in office, and those who shall hereafter be 
elected, shall hold office during life. Vacancies occurring in the Board shall be 
filled at a regular meeting of the Board, upon the nomination of the Executive 
Committee made at a preceding regular meeting, by a majority vote of the members 
of the Board present. 

Sec. 2. Regular meetings of the Board shall be held on the second Monday of 
each month. Special meetings may be called at any time by the President, and 
shall be called by the Secretary upon the written request of three Trustees. Five 
Trustees shall constitute a quorum, except for the election of officers or the adoption 
of the Annual Budget, when seven Trustees shall be required, but meetings may be 
adjourned by any less number from day to day, or to a day fixed, previous to the 
next regular meeting. 

Sec. 3. Reasonable written notice, designating the time and place of holding 
meetings, shall be given by the Secretary. 

ARTICLE III. 
honorary trustees. 

Section i . As a mark of respect, and in appreciation of services performed for 
the Institution, those Trustees who by reason of inability, on account of change of 
residence, or for other cause, or from indisposition to serve longer in such capacity, 
shall resign their places upon the Board, may be elected, by a majority of those 
present at any regular meeting of the Board, as Honorary Trustees for life. Such 
Honorary Trustees will receive notice of all meetings of the Board of Trustees, 
whether regular or special, and will be expected to be present at all such meetings, and 
participate in the deliberations thereof, but an Honorary Trustee shall not have the 
right to vote. 

ARTICLE IV. 

OFFICERS. 

Section i. The officers shall be a President, a First Vice-President, a Second 
Vice-President, a Secretary, an Assistant Secretary and a Treasurer. They shall 
be chosen by ballot by the Board of Trustees, a majority of those present and vot- 
ing being necessary to elect. The President, the First Vice-President, and the 
Second Vice-President shall be chosen from among the members of the Board of 
Trustees. The meeting for the election of officers shall be held on the second Mon- 
day of January of each year, and shall be called the Annual Meeting. 

Sec. 2. The officers shall hold office for one year, or until their successors are 
elected and qualified, but any officer may be removed at any regular meeting of 
the Board of Trustees by a vote of two-thirds of all the members of the Board. 
Vacancies in any office may be filled by the Board at any meeting. 



Jan., 191 2. Annual Report of the Director. 175 

Sec. 3. The officers shall perform such duties as ordinarily appertain to their 
respective offices, and such as shall be prescribed by the By-Laws, or designated 
from time to time by the Board of Trustees. 

ARTICLE V. 

THE TREASURER. 

Section i. The Treasurer shall be custodian of the funds of the Corporation. 
He shall make disbursements only upon warrants drawn by the Director and coun- 
tersigned by the President. In the absence or inability of the Director, warrants 
may be signed by the Chairman of the Finance Committee, and in the absence or 
inability of the President, may be countersigned by one of the Vice-Presidents. 
But no warrants shall be issued, except in conformity with a regularly prepared 
voucher, giving the name of the payee and stating the occasion for the expenditure 
and verified and approved as hereinafter prescribed. It shall be no part of the 
duties of the Treasurer to see that the warrants have been issued in conformity 
with such vouchers. 

Sec. 2. The securities and muniments of title belonging to the Corporation 
shall be placed in the custody of some Trust Company of Chicago to be designated 
by the Board of Trustees, which Trust Company shall collect the iricome and prin- 
cipal of said securities as the same become due, and pay same to the Treasurer. 
Said Trust Company shall allow access to and deliver any or all securities or muni- 
ments of title to the joint order of the following officers, namely: The President 
or one of the Vice-Presidents, jointly with the Chairman, or one of the Vice-Chair- 
men, of the Finance Committee of the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The Treasurer shall give bond in such amount, and with such sureties, 
as shall be approved by the Board of Trustees. 

Sec. 4. All vouchers executed for the payment of liabilities incurred in the 
administration of the Museum shall be verified by the Auditor, and approved for 
payment by the Director, and the Chairman of the Administration Committee. 
All vouchers executed for expenditures for the construction or reconstruction of the 
Museum building, or buildings, shall be verified by the Auditor and approved for 
payment by the Chairman of the Building Committee. All vouchers executed in 
connection with the investments of the Corporation, or, in any way having to do 
with the endowment funds of the Corporation, shall be verified by the Auditor and 
approved for payment by the Chairman of the Finance Committee. 

ARTICLE VI. 

THE DIRECTOR. 

Section i. The Board of Trustees shall elect a Director of the Museum, who 
shall remain in office until his successor shall be elected. He shall have immediate 
charge and supervision of the Museum, and shall control the operations of the 
institution, subject to the authority of the Board of Trustees and its Committees. 
The Director shall be the official medium of communication between the Board, 
or its Committees, and the scientific staff and maintenance force. 

Sec. 2. There shall be four scientific departments of the Museum — Anthropol- 
ogy, Botany, Geology and Zoology — eachunder thechargeof a Curator, subject to the 
authority of the Director. The Curators shall be appointed by the Board upon 
the recommendation of the Director, and shall serve during the pleasure of the 
Board. Subordinate staff officers in the scientific departments shall be appointed 



176 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

and removed by the Director upon the recommendation of the Curators of the 
respective Departments. The Director shall have authority to employ and remove 
all other employees of the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The Director shall make report to the Board at each regular meeting, 
recounting the operations of the Museum for the previous month. At the Annual 
Meeting, the Director shall make an Annual Report, reviewing the work of the 
Museum for the previous year, which Annual Report shall be published in pamphlet 
form for the information of the Trustees and Members, and for free distribution in 
such number as the Board may direct. 

ARTICLE VII. 

AUDITOR. 

Section i. The Board shall appoint an Auditor, who shall hold his office 
during the pleasure of the Board. He shall keep proper books of account, setting 
forth the financial condition and transactions of the Corporation, and of the Museum, 
and report thereon at each regular meeting, and at such other times as may be 
required by the Board. He shall certify to the correctness of all vouchers for the 
expenditure of the money of the Corporation. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

COMMITTEES. 

Section i. There shall be five Committees, as follows: Finance, Building, 
Auditing, Administration and Executive. 

Sec. 2. The Finance and Auditing Committees shall each consist of three 
members, and the Building and Administration Committees shall each consist of five 
members. All members of these four Committees shall be elected by ballot by the 
Board at the Annual Meeting, and shall hold office for one year, and until their 
successors are elected and qualified. In electing the members of these Committees, 
the Board shall designate the Chairman and Vice-Chairman by the order in which 
the members are named in the respective Committees; the first member named 
shall be Chairman, the second named the Vice-Chairman, and the third named 
Second Vice-Chairman, succession to the Chairmanship being in this order in the 
event of the absence or disability of the Chairman. 

Sec. 3. The Executive Committee shall consist of the President of the Board, 
the Chairman of the Finance Committee, the Chairman of the Building Committee, 
the Chairman of the Administration Committee, the Chairman of the Auditing 
Committee, and two other members of the Board to be elected by ballot at the 
Annual Meeting. 

Sec. 4. Four members shall constitute a quorum of the Executive Committee; 
three members shall constitute a quorum of the Administration Committee, and 
in all other standing Committees, two members shall constitute a quorum. In 
the event that, owing to the absence or inability of members, a quorum of the reg- 
ularly elected members cannot be present at any meeting of any Committee, then 
the Chairman thereof, or his successor, as herein provided, may summon any mem- 
ber of the Board of Trustees to act in place of the absentee. 

Sec. 5. The Finance Committee shall have supervision of investing the endow- 
ment and other permanent funds of the Corporation, and the care of such real estate 
as may become its property. It shall have authority to invest, sell, and reinvest, 
funds, subject to the approval of the Board. 



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Jan., 191 2. Annual Report of the Director. 177 

Sec. 6. The Building Committee shall have supervision of the construction, 
reconstruction, and extension of any and all buildings used for Museum purposes. 

Sec. 7. The E.xecutive Committee shall be called together from time to time 
as the Chairman may consider necessary, or as he may be requested to do by three 
members of the Committee, to act upon such matters affecting the administration 
of the Museum as cannot await consideration at the Regular Monthly Meetings of 
the Board of Trustees. It shall, before the beginning of each fiscal year, prepare 
and submit to the Board an itemized Budget, setting forth the probable receipts 
from all sources for the ensuing year, and make recommendations as to the 
expenditures which should be made for routine maintenance and fixed charges. Upon 
the adoption of the Budget by the Board, the respective Committees shall be con- 
sidered as authorized to make the expenditures detailed therein. No increase in 
the expenditures under any items of the Budget shall be made, except by authority 
of the Board of Trustees, but the Executive Committee shall have authority, in 
cases of emergency, to expend a further total sum not exceeding two thousand 
dollars in any one month. .•<■.• "'•. 

Sec. 8. The Administration Committee shall have general super^-ision of the 
affairs of the Museum. The Committee shall hold one meeting each month with 
the Director at the Museum within a week preceding each Monthly Meeting of 
the Board of Trustees. 

Sec. 9. The Auditing Committee shall have supervision over all accounting 
and bookkeeping, and full control of the financial records. It shall cause the same, 
once each year, or oftener, to be examined by an expert individual or firm, and shall 
transmit the report of such expert individual or firm to the Board at the next ensu- 
ing regular meeting after such examination shall have taken place. 

Sec. 10. The Chairman of each Committee shall report the acts and proceed- 
ings thereof at the next ensuing regular meeting of the Board. 

Sec. II. The President shall be ex-officio a member of all Committees and 
Chairman of the Executive Committee. Vacancies occurring in any Committee 
may be filled by ballot at any regular meeting of the Board. 

ARTICLE IX. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE. 

Section i . At the November meeting of the Board, each year a Nominating 
Committee of three shall be chosen by lot. Said Committee sh&U make nominations 
for membership of the Finance Committee, the Building Committee, the Admin- 
istration Committee, and the Auditing Committee, and for two members of the 
Executive Committee, from among the Trustees, to be submitted at the ensuing 
December meeting and voted upon at the following Annual Meeting in January. 

ARTICLE X. 

Section i. Whenever the word "Museum" is employed in the By-Laws of 
the Corporation, it shall be taken to mean the building in which the Museum as an 
Institution is located 'and operated, the material exhibited, the material in study 
collections, or in storage, furniture, fixtures, cases, tools, records, books, and all 
appurtenances of the Institution, and the workings, researches, installations, expendi- 
tures, field work, laboratories, library, publications, lecture courses, and all scientific 
and maintenance activities. 

Sec. 2. These By-Laws may be amended at any regular meeting of the Board 
of Trustees by a two-thirds vote of all the members present, provided the amend- 
ment shall have been proposed at a preceding regular meeting. 



178 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



1 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 



EDWARD E. 
HARLOW N. 
CHARLES B. 



AYER STANLEY McCORMICK 

HIGINBOTHAM ROBERT F. CUMMINGS 

CORY MRS. TIMOTHY B. BLACKSTONE 

NORMAN W. HARRIS 

DECEASED. 

GEORGE M. PULLMAN 
MARY D. STURGES 



PATRONS. 



ALLISON V. ARMOUR 
DANIEL H. BURNHAM 
JOSEPH N. FIELD 
ERNEST R. GRAHAM 
NORMAN W. HARRIS 
VERNON SHAW KENNEDY 



GEORGE MANIERRE 
JOHN S. MILLER 
JOHN BARTON PAYNE 
FREDERICK W. PUTNAM 
FREDERICK J. V. SKIFF 
WILLARD A. SMITH 



DECEASED. 

WILLIAM I. BUCHANAN 
EDWIN WALKER 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XXVII. 




Flowering Branch of Lignum Vitae. 
(Guaiacum officinale.) 



^^'^^ 



^'•*^">'»'' 



Jan., 1912. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



179 



CORPORATE MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, GEORGE E. 
ALDIS, OWEN F. 
ARMOUR, ALLISON V. 
AYER, EDWARD E. 

BARTLETT, A. C. 
BLACK, JOHN C. 
BLAIR, WATSON F. 
BLATCHFORD, ELIPHALET W. 
BUCKINGHAM, EBENEZER 
BURNHAM, DANIEL H. 
BUTLER, EDWARD B. 

CHALMERS, W. J. 
CHATFIELD-TAYLOR, H. C. 
CLARK, JOHN M. 
CRANE, RICHARD T., Jr. 

EASTMAN, SIDNEY C. 
ELLSWORTH, JAMES W. 

FIELD, JOSEPH N. 
FIELD, STANLEY 

GAGE. LYMAN J. 
GETTY, HENRY H. 
GRAHAM, ERNEST R. 
GUNSAULUS, FRANK W. 
GUNTHER, C. F. 

HARRIS, NORMAN W. 



head, franklin h. 
higinbotham, h. n. 
hutchinson, charles l. 

jones, arthur b. 

kennedy, vernon shaw 
kohlsaat, herman h. 

lathrop, bryan 

Mccormick, gyrus h. 
manierre, george 

miller, JOHN S. 
MITCHELL, JOHN J. 

PAYNE, JOHN BARTON 
PECK, FERD. W. 
PORTER, GEORGE F. 
PUTNAM, FREDERICK \Y. 

REAM, NORMAN B. 
RYERSON, MARTIN A. 

SKIFF, FREDERICK J. V. 
SMITH, BYRON L. 
SMITH, WILLARD A. 
SPRAGUE, A. A. 
SPRAGUE, A. A., 2D. 
STONE, MELVILLE E. 



DECEASED. 



ARMOUR, PHILIP D. 
BAKER, WILLIAM T. 
BISSEL, GEORGE F. 
BUCHANAN, W. I. 
CRAWFORD, ANDREW 
CURTIS, WILLIAM E. 
DAVIS, GEORGE R. 
FITZSIMONS, CHARLES 
HALE. WILLIAM E. 
HARPER, WILLIAM R. 
HATCH, AZEL F. 
JACKSON, HUNTINGTON 
LEITER, L. Z. 



W 



McCAGG, E. B. 

McCLURG, A. C. 
McNALLY, ANDREW 
PATTERSON, ROBERT W. 
PEARCE, J. IRVING 
PETERSON, ANDREW 
PULLMAN, GEORGE M. 
vSCHNEIDER, GEORGE 
SCOTT, JAMES W. 
STOCKTON, JOSEPH 
WALKER, EDWIN 
WALLER, R. A. 
WALSH, JOHN R. 
WILLIAMS, NORMAN 



iSo Field Museum of Natural History ^ Reports, Vol. IV. 



LIFE MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, GEORGE E. 
ALDIS, OWEN F. 

BARRETT, MRS. A. D. 
BARRETT, ROBERT L. 
BARRETT, S. E. 
BARTLETT, A. C. 
BLACKSTONE, MRS. TIMOTHY B. 
BLAINE MRS. EMMONS 
BLAIR, CHAUNCEY J. 
BLAIR, HENRY A. 
BLAIR, WATSON F. 
BOOTH, W. VERNON 
BURNHAM, D. H. 
BUTLER, EDWARD B. ^ ■,.-■' ,■ - 
BYLLESBY. H. M. 



CARTER, JAMES S. '' 
CARTON, L. A. 
CHALMERS, WILLIAM J. 
CUMMINGS, D. MARK. 



■f^- 



JOHNSON, FRANK S. 
JOHNSON, MRS. ELIZABETH 

AYER 
JONES, ARTHUR B. 

KEEP, CHAUNCEY 

KING, FRANCIS 

KING, JAMES C. 

KIRK, WALTER RADCLIFFE 

LAWSON, VICTOR F. 

McCORMICK, MRS. 
McCORMICK, CYRUS H. 
McCORMICK, HAROLD F. 
MacVEAGH, FRANKLIN 
MITCHELL, J. J. 

NEWELL, A. B. 

ORR, ROBERT M. 



DEERING, CHARLES 
DELANO, FREDERIC A. 
DRAKE, TRACY C. 

FARWELL, WALTER 
FAY, C. N. 
FIELD, STANLEY 
FULLER, WILLIAM A. 

GARTZ, A. F. 
GRISCOM, CLEMENT A. 
GROMMES, JOHN B. 

HAMILL, ERNEST A. 
HILL, LOUIS W. 
HOROWITZ, H. J. 
HOXIE, MRS. JOHN A. 
HUGHITT, MARVIN 
HUTCHINvSON, C. L. 



PAM, MAX 
PEARSONS, D. K. 
PIKE, EUGENE S. 
PORTER, GEORGE F. 
PORTER, H. H., Jr. 

REAM, MRS. CAROLINE P. 
REAM, NORMAN B. 
REVELL, ALEX. H. 
RUSSELL, EDMUND A. 
RYERSON, MRS. CARRIE H. 
RYERSON, MARTIN A. 

SCHLESINGER, LEOPOLD 
SINGER, C. G. 
SMITH, BYRON L. 
SMITH, ORSON 
SPRAGUE, A. A. 
STURGES, GEORGE 



INGALLS, M. E. 
ISHAM, MRS. KATHERINE 
PORTER. 



THORNE, GEORGE R. 
WILLARD, ALONZO J. 



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Jan., 1912. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



181 



ANNUAL MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, CYRUS H. 
ADAMS, MILWARD 
ALLERTON, ROBERT H. 
ARMOUR, GEORGE A. 

BAILEY, EDWARD P. 
BANGA, DR. HENRY 
BARRELL, JAMES 
BECKER, A. G. 
BILLINGS, C. K. G. 
BILLINGS, DR. FRANK 
BIRKHOFF, GEORGE, Jr. 
BLAINE, MRS. EMMONS 
BLAIR, HENRY A. 
BOAL, CHARLES T. 
BOUTON, C. B. 
BROWN, WILLIAM L. 
BURLEY, CLARENCE A. 

COMSTOCK, WILLIAM C. 
CONOVER, CHARLES H. 
COONLEY-WARD, MRS. L. A. 
CORWITH, CHARLES R. 
COWAN, W. P. 
CRANE, CHARLES R. 
CUDAHY, JOHN 
CUMMINGS, E. A. 
CURTIS, D. H. 

DAY, A. M. 
DAY, CHAPIN A. 
DEERING, JAMES 
DEERING, WILLIAM 
DILLMAN, L. M. 

EISENDRATH, W. N. 

FAIR, R. M. 

FARNSWORTH, GEORGE 
FORGAN, JAMES B. 
FORSYTH, ROBERT 
FRANK, HENRY L. 
FRASHER, JOHN E. L. 
FULLER, O. F. 
FURST, CONRAD 



GAYLORD. FREDERIC 
GLESSNER, J. J. 
GOODRICH, A. W. 
GORDON, EDWARD K. 
GREY, CHARLES F. 
GREY, WILLIAM L. 
GURLEY, W. W. 

HARDING, AMOS J. 
HARRIS, GEORGE B. 
HARRIS, JOHN F. 
HASKELL, FREDERICK T. 
HERTLE, LOUIS 
HIBBARD, WILLIAM G. Jr. 
HITCHCOCK, R. M. 
HOLT, GEORGE H. 
HOPKINS, JOHN P. 
HORNER, ISAAC 
HOSKINS, WILLIAM 

INSULL, SAMUEL 

JENKINS, GEORGE H. 
JONES, J. S. 

KEEFER, LOUIS 
KEITH, W. SCOTT 
KIMBALL, EUGENE S. 
KIMBALL, MRS. MARK 

LAMB, FRANK H. 
LAY, A. TRACY 
LEFENS, THIES J. 
LEIGH, EDWARD B. 
LINCOLN, ROBERT T. 
LINN, W. R. 
LOGAN, F. G. 
LORD, J. B. 
LOWDEN, FRANK O. 
LYTTON, HENRY C. 

McCREA, W. S. 
McWILLIAMS, LAFAYETTE 

macfarland, henry J. 

MAGEE, HENRY W. 



i 



i82 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



MANvSON, WILLIAM 
MANSURE, E. L. 
MAYER, LEVY 
MERRYWEATHER, GEORGE 
MEYER, MRS. M. A. 
MILLER, CHARLES P. 
MOORE, L. T. 
MOORE, N. G. 
MORRIS, EDWARD 
MULLIKEN, A. H. 
MULLIKEN, CHARLES H. 

NATHAN, ADOLPH 
NOLAN, JOHN H. 
NORTON, O. W. 
NOYES, LA VERNE W. 



SCHMIDT, DR. O. L. 

SCHWARTZ, G. A. 

SEARS, JOSEPH 

SEIPP, MRS. C. 

SEIPP, W. C. 

SELZ, MORRIS 

SHEDD, JOHN G. 

SKINNER, THE MISSES 

SMITH, F. B. 

SNOW, MISS HELEN E. 

SOPER, JAMES P. 

SOUTHWELL, H. E. 

SPENCE; MRS. ELIZABETH E. 

SPOOR, J. A. 

STOCKTON, JOHN T. 

STUART, ROBERT 



OEHNE, THEODORE 
ORB, JOHN A. 
OSBORN, HENRY A. 

PALMER, PERCIVAL B. 
PARKER, FRANCIS W. 
PEARSON, EUGENE H. 
PINKERTON, W. A. 
PORTER, WASHINGTON 

RIPLEY, E. P. 
ROSENBAUM, JOSEPH 
ROSENFELD, MRS. MAURigE 
RUNNELLS, J. S. 



TEMPLETON, THOMAS 
TOBEY, FRANK B. 

UIHLEIN, EDWARD G. 

WACKER, CHARLES H. 
WALKER, JAMES R. 
W^ALKER, WILLIAM B. 
WALLER, EDWARD C. 
WEBSTER, GEORGE H. 
WHITE, A. STAMFORD 
WHITEHEAD, W., M. 
WILSON, MRS. E. C. 
WILSON, M. H. 
WOODCOCK, LINDSAY T. 



CARPENTER, A. A. 



DECEASED. 

McGUIRE, REV. H. 



THE LIBKAKY Oh IHt 

DEC 2 2 1942 
UNIVERSITY Of ILLINOIS 



LD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XXIX. 




Device for Exhibiting Petroleum Sands. 
The sands are placed in tubes which can be turned for examination by a wheel outside the case. 



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UNIVERStTV OF ILUNOIS-URBANA 



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