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TIBR.AR.Y 

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Of ILLINOIS 

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UNIVERSITY 



ILLINOIS LIBRARY 



URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



NOV 6 mo 
DFC 1 3 '990 



UBtttoor 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
URBAN* 

Field Museum of Natural History. 

Publication 165. 

Report Series. Vol. IV, No. 3. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 1912. 




Chicago, U. S. A 

January, 1913. 



THE til 

DEC 2 2 
UNIVERSITY OF !LiJNGj v s; 



**»•> W** rt ^ 



WBRARY 
UNIVER8ITV Of ILLIN0.8 
UffSANA 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XXX. 




Watson F. Blair. 
Second Vice-President and Chairman of the Finance Committee. 



Field Museum of Natural History. 

Publication 165. 

Report Series. Vol. IV, No. 3, 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 1912. 




Chicago, U. S. A TH£ UBRARY ^ ^ 

J-a ry , I9I3 . DEC 2 2 194: 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



CONTENTS 



Page 

Board of Trustees 184 

Officers and Committees 185 

Staff of the Museum 186 

Report of the Director 187 

Maintenance- 189 

Lecture Courses 189 

Publications 190 

Mailing List 191 

Library 193 

Cataloguing. Inventorying, and Labeling 194 

Accessions 197 

Expeditions and Field Work 206 

Installation and Permanent Improvement 210 

Printing 223 

Photography and Illustration 223 

Attendance 223 

Financial Statement 227 

Accessions 230 

Department of Anthropology 230 

Department of Botany 231 

Department of Geology 235 

Department of Zoology 237 

Section of Photography 240 

The Library 240 

Articles of Incorporation 261 

Amended By-Laws '. 263 

List of Honorary Members and Patrons 269 

List of Corporate Members 270 

List of Life Members 271 

List of Annual Members 272 



184 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

George E. Adams. Arthur B. Jones. 

Edward E. Ayer. George Manierre. 

Watson F. Blair. Cyrus H. McCormick. 

William J. Chalmers. George F. Porter. 

Stanley Field. Martin A. Ryerson. 

Harlow N. Higinbotham. Frederick J. V. Skiff. 

A. A. Sprague, 2nd. 



HONORARY TRUSTEES. 
Owen F. Aldis. Norman B. Ream. 



DECEASED. 



Norman Williams. George R. Davis. 

Marshall Field, Jr. Huntington W. Jackson. 

Edwin Walker. 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 185 



OFFICERS. 

Stanley Field, President. 

Martin A. Ryerson, First Vice-President. 
Watson F. Blair, Second Vice-President. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff, Secretary. 

D. C. Davies, Assistant Secretary and Auditor. 
Byron L. Smith, Treasurer. 



COMMITTEES. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Stanley Field. 
Edward E. Ayer. William J. Chalmers. 

Watson F. Blair. George Manierre. 

Harlow N. Higinbotham. Martin A. Ryerson. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Watson F. Blair. Martin A. Ryerson. 

Arthur B. Jones. 

BUILDING COMMITTEE. 

William J. Chalmers. Cyrus H. McCormick. 

Frederick J. V. Skiff. A. A. Sprague, 2nd. 

AUDITING COMMITTEE. 

George Manierre. Arthur B. Jones. 

George E. Adams. 

ADMINISTRATION COMMITTEE. 

Edward E. Ayer. 
Watson F. Blair. George Manierre. 

Arthur B. Jones. George F. Porter. 



186 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



STAFF OF THE MUSEUM. 

DIRECTOR. 

Frederick J. V. Skiff. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 

George A. Dorsey, Curator. 

S. C. Simms, Assistant Curator Division of Ethnology. 

Charles L. Owen, Assistant Curator Division of Archeology. 
Berthold Laufer, Associate Curator of Asiatic Ethnology. 
Albert B. Lewis, Assistant Curator of African and Mela- 
nesian Ethnology. 
Fay Cooper Com, Assistant Curator Physical Anthropology 
and Malayan Ethnology. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

Charles F. Millspaugh, Curator. 

B. E. Dahlgren, Assistant Curator Division of Economic Botany. 
Huron H. Smith, Assistant Curator Division of Dendrology. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

Oliver C. Farrington, Curator. H. W. Nichols, Assistant Curator. 
Elmer S. Riggs, Assistant Curator of Paleontology. 

Arthur W. Slocom, Assistant Curator Section of Invertebrate 

Paleontology. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 

Charles B. Cory, Curator. Seth E. Meek, Assistant Curator. 

Wilfred H. Osgood, Assistant Curator of Mammalogy and Or- 
nithology. 
William J. Gerhard, Assistant Curator Division of Entomology. 
Edmond N. Gueret, Assistant Curator Division of Osteology. 

RECORDER. 

D. C. Davies. 

THE LIBRARY. 

Elsie Lippincott, Librarian. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR. 

1912. 



To the Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History: 

I have the honor to present a report of the operations of the Museum 
for the year ending December 31, 191 2. 

The progress of installation during the year, especially in Asiatic 
and Philippine Ethnology and in Zoology — the latter including a 
number of large bird and animal groups — has so encroached upon the 
rooms reserved for storage purposes and so congested certain halls, that 
it has been found necessary to reopen the West Annex, which had been 
vacated in anticipation of the commencement of the construction of the 
new Museum building, and by the time this report reaches the Board 
the four scientific departments of the Museum will be provided, for 
the present at least, with ample storage and preparators' work rooms. 
The Joseph N. Field Expedition to the South Pacific Islands has con- 
cluded its work under Mr. Lewis, and upon his return, soon expected, 
the vast amount of material received by the Museum as a result of his 
survey and collections will be catalogued, labelled and prepared for 
installation. It is estimated that this material will fill four or five halls. 
The Curator of the Department of Anthropology, who has been absent 
on a protracted leave of absence, returned to his duties in June and the 
inspiration given to the work of that Department by the personal 
presence of its Curator is quite apparent in the references elsewhere 
made to the progress of that Department. Mr. Fay Cooper Cole, 
who conducted so successful an expedition to the Philippine Islands, 
has been appointed Assistant Curator of Physical Anthropology and 
Malayan Ethnology. Mr. S. Chapman Simms has, upon the approval 
of the Curators of the scientific departments, been appointed by the 
Director, Curator of "The N. W. Harris Public School Extension of 
Field Museum," and the work of preparation — in selecting type cases, 
character of unit collections, etc. — is well advanced. The suite of the 
Curator of Harris Extension has been established in the southwest halls 
of the West Annex. Assistant Curator Owen is completing his work 
among the Hopi in Arizona, under the Stanley McCormick Fund. Mr. 
Huron H. Smith, who has been in the field collecting North American 
Forestry for the past three years, having completed his work, has 
returned and is now in charge of the preparation and installation of 

187 



1 88 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

this large collection, which will naturally involve a great deal of time 
and labor and eventually present an unexampled exhibit in this material. 
Assistant Curator Greenman of the Department of Botany has resigned to 
accept a position with the Missouri Botanical Garden of St. Louis, leaving 
this Institution with the best wishes of his colleagues. Assistant Curator 
Riggs has made marked progress in working up the splendid result of 
his last paleontological expedition in the Uintah desert in northeastern 
Utah, and there is now on exhibition probably the most complete collec- 
tion of skulls from this formation in the world. The purchase of the 
meteorite collection of the late Henry A. Ward, which for several 
years has been on exhibition at the American Museum of Natural 
History, has established the Museum in the first rank in this interesting 
division. The material is being installed in the cases accompanying 
the collection, but will not be placed on exhibition in the present 
building. The most important field expedition this year was that under 
Mr. Osgood, Assistant Curator of Mammalogy and Ornithology, to 
South America, the results 'of which expedition are more specially set 
forth under the proper heading. The work is being conducted in charge 
of two assistants, although Mr. Osgood has returned to the Museum. 
Assistant Curator Meek has completed his second survey in the Panama 
Canal Zone in connection with Smithsonian Institution, with excellent 
results and abundant material for the study collections and for publica- 
tion. Mr. Carl E. Akeley has commenced work upon large African 
mammal groups in performance of his contract entered into with the 
Museum a year or more ago. His first group will be the Cape Buffalo, 
consisting of five individuals. Under the patronage of Mr. Stanley 
Field and Mr. Albert A. Sprague II four most striking, brilliant four- 
section bird groups have been acquired. In response to the demand 
from the Curators for exhibition cases, the Trustees transferred the sum 
of $105,000 to a "New Exhibition Cases Fund," and it is believed 
that this provision will give to the Museum all the cases it will be con- 
sidered advisable to install before the occupation of the new building. 
There is not sufficient exhibition space remaining in the entire Museum 
to accommodate this number of new cases, approximating 600, and, 
therefore, as the cases are installed, instead of being introduced in their 
proper halls or suites they will be stored in the West Annex and not be 
accessible by the public until placed in the proper position in the new 
building. Among the publications of the Museum, listed hereafter, 
that on "Jade; A Study in Chinese Archaeology and Religion," by Dr. 
Laufer, has created a demand from the public exceeding that of any 
publication issued by the Institution. It has been widely reviewed and 
highly complimented. Mr. Richard T. Crane, Jr., has resigned from 



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Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 189 

the Board of Trustees on account of the pressure of private business, and 
eleven new Life Members have been elected during the year. A num- 
ber of important donations have been made in the collections of the 
Museum , including two very interesting and valuable Chinese paintings, 
presented by the Tuesday Art and Travel Club of Chicago. The paint- 
ings are of scroll work on silk, measuring twenty-five and thirty feet 
in length. Every evidence of progressive activity in scientific and 
popular lines will be found upon consulting the review of the work 
following : 

maintenance. — The Budget authorized by the Board of Trustees 
provided the sum of $179,030 for the maintenance of the Museum 
for the year ending December 31, 191 2. The amount expended was 
$167,612 which leaves a margin of $11,418. In addition to the cost 
of maintenance $70,400 was expended by authority of the Board for 
collections, expeditions and so forth, bringing the total expenditure 
for the year to $238,000. 

lecture Course- — The attendance at the two courses given was 
highly gratifying, the seating capacity $£ Jftullertpn Hall being inad- 
equate to accommodate those desiring, tp^ attend. ' ' "Following is a list 
of the lectures given during the year: && 

Thirty-sixth Free Illustrated Lecture Course: 
March 2. "Elephant Hunting in Africa." 

Mr. C. E. Akeley, New York. 
March 9. — "A Monkey on Safari." 

Mi. C. E. Akeley, New York. 
March 16. — "Journeys in Mexico." 

Prof. 0. C. Farrington, Curator of Geology, Field 
Museum. 
March 23.— "The Life of the Soil." 

Prof. George T. Moore, Missouri Botanical Garden. 
March 30. — "The R. F. Cummings Philippine Expedition: The 

Philippines Before and After American Occupation." 

Mr. Fay Cooper Cole, Ethnologist, Field Museum. 
April 6. — "Conservation of Wild Life." 

Mr. Richard E. Follett, New York. 
April 13. — "The Panama Canal and its Makers." 

Mr. Frederick I. Monsen, New York. 
April 20. — "Egypt and the Nile." 

Mr. Arthur Stanley Riggs, New York. 
April 27. — "Southeastern Italy and Sicily To-day." 

Mr. Arthur Stanley Riggs, New York. 



190 Field Museum op Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Thirty-seventh Free Illustrated Lecture Course: 

Oct. 5. — "A Botanist in the Orient — I." 

Dr. Charles F. Millspaugh, Curator, Department of 
Botany, Field Museum. 
Oct. 12. — "A Botanist in the Orient — II." 

Dr. Charles F. Millspaugh, Curator, Department of 
Botany, Field Museum. 
Oct. 19. — "In Costa Rica and Panama." 

Dr. S. E. Meek, Assistant Curator, Department of 
Zoology, Field Museum. 
Oct. 26. — "A Naturalist's Reconnaissance in Colombia." 

Prof. Frank M. Chapman, American Museum of Natural 
History. 
Nov. 2. — "The R. F. Cummings Philippine Expedition: The 

Pigmies of the Philippine Islands." 
Mr. Fay Cooper Cole, Ethnologist, Field Museum. 
Nov. 9.— "Plant Breeding." 

Prof. J. M. Coulter, University of Chicago. 
Nov. 16. — "The Geology of China and its Influence upon the Chinese 

People." 
Prof. Eliot Blackwelder, University of Wisconsin. 
Nov. 23. — "The Mrs. T. B. Blackstone Tibetan and Chinese Expedi- 
tion: Chinese Art." 
Dr. Berthold Laufer, Associate Curator of Asiatic 
Ethnology, Field Museum. 
Nov. 30. — "Prof. Whitman's Unpublished Researches on Heredity 

and Evolution." 
Dr. Oscar Riddle, Research Assistant, Carnegie Insti- 
tution. 

publications. — During the year thirteen publications of the estab- 
lished series were issued and some of these exceed in importance any 
hitherto published by the Institution. Following is a list of the publica- 
tions issued and their distribution: 

Pub. 152. — Anthropological Series, Vol. VII, No. 4. Antiquities from 
Boscoreale in Field Museum of Natural History. By 
Herbert F. De Cou. 68 pages, 1 map, 64 halftones, 2 zinc 
etchings. Edition 1,500. 

Pub. 153. — Zoological Series, Vol. XI. The Mammals of Illinois and 
Wisconsin. By Charles B. Cory. 505 pages, numerous 
maps, halftones and zinc etchings. Edition 2,500. 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 191 

Pub. 154. — Anthropological Series, Vol. X. Jade, A Study in Chinese 

Archaeology and Religion. By Berthold Laufer. 370 

pages, 68 plates, 6 of which are colored, and 204 text 

figures. Edition 1,500. 
Pub. 155. — Zoological Series, Vol. X, No. 5. Mammals from Western 

Venezuela and Eastern Colombia. By Wilfred H. Osgood. 

t,^ pages, 2 halftones. Edition 1,500. 
Pub. 156. — Anthropological Series, Vol. XI, No. 1. The Oraibi 

Marau Ceremony. By H. R. Voth. 88 pages, 7,7, illustra- 
tions. Edition 1,500. 
Pub. 157. — Anthropological Series, Vol. XI, No. 2. Brief Miscellaneous 

Hopi Papers. By H. R. Voth. 61 pages, 24 illustrations. 

Edition 1,500. 
Pub. 158. — Zoological Series, Vol. X, No. 6. Descriptions of New 

Fishes from Panama. By S. E. Meek and S. F. Hilde- 

brand. 2 pages. Edition 1,500. 
Pub. 159. — Geological Series, Vol. IV, No. 2. New or Little Known 

Titanotheres from the Lower Uintah Formations. By 

E. S. Riggs. 25 pages, 23 halftones, 2 zinc etchings. 

Edition 1,500. 
Pub. 160. — Report Series, Vol. IV, No. 2. Annual Report of the 

Director to the Board of Trustees, for the year 191 1. 82 

pages, 14 halftones. Edition 2,500. 
Pub. 161. — Zoological Series, Vol. VII, No. 13. Index to Volume VII, 

Numbers 1 to 12. 
Pub. 162. — Anthropological Series, Vol. XII, No. 1. Chinese Pottery 

in the Philippines. By Fay Cooper Cole with postscript 

by Berthold Laufer. 47 pages, 22 plates. Edition 1,500. 
Pub. 163. — Zoological Series, Vol. X, No. 7. New Species of Fishes 

from Costa Rica. By S. E. Meek. 7 pages. Edition 

1,500. 
Pub. 164. — Botanical Series, Vol. II, No. 8. I. New Species of Cuban 

Senecioneae. II. Diagnoses of New Species and Notes on 

other Sperm atophytes, chiefly from Mexico and Central 

America. By Jesse More Greenman. 28 pages. Edition 

1,500. 



Names on Mailing List 

Domestic 602 

Foreign 690 

Total 1,292 



192 Field Museum of Natural History- — Reports, Vol. IV. 



Distribution of Foreign Exchanges 

Argentine Republic .... 12 

Australia 30 

Austria-Hungary 32 

Belgium 17 

Borneo 1 

Brazil 10 

British East Africa .... 1 

British Guiana 2 

Bulgaria 1 

Canada 28 

Cape Colony 6 

Ceylon 3 

Chile 2 

China _ . 2 

Colombia 2 

Costa Rica 5 

Denmark 9 

East Africa 1 

Ecuador 1 

Egypt 2 

France 57 

Fiji Islands 1 

Finland 1 

Germany 137 

Great Britain 114 

Greece 2 

Guatemala 1 



India .... 
Italy .... 
Jamaica 

Japan .... 
Java .... 
Liber a .... 
Malta .... 
Mexico . 

Natal .... 
Netherlands 
New Zealand . 
Peru .... 
Norway. 
Portugal 
Rhodesia . 
Roumania . 
Russia .... 
Salvador . ' . 
Sicily .... 
Spain .... 
Straits Settlements 
Sweden .... 
Switzerland 
Tasmania . 
Transvaal . 
Uruguay 
West Indies 



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9 
4 
1 

1 
20 

3 

21 

7 
2 
8 

5 
2 

1 

18 

1 

1 

6 

I 

16 

21 

2 

3 

1 

4 



Distribution of Publications (Foreign) 

Anthropological 306 

Botanical 365 

Entomological 160 

Geological 358 

Icthyological 164 

Ornithological 204 

Report 690 

Zoological 294 



Distribution of Domestic Exchanges 

Alabama 2 

Arkansas 1 

California 28 

Colorado 13 

Connecticut 21 

Delaware 2 

District of Columbia .... 66 

Florida 2 

Idaho 1 

Illinois 61 

Indiana 15 



Iowa . 

Kansas . 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota . 

Mississippi . 

Missouri . 



14 
7 
2 

4 

7 

9 

66 

12 

9 

3 

13 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 193 

Montana 2 South Dakota 2 

Nebraska 7 Tennessee 2 

Nevada 3 Texas 2 

New Hampshire 4 Utah 1 

New Jersey . 14 Vermont 4 

New Mexico 2 Virginia 4 

New York 80 Washington 6 

North Carolina 6 West Virginia 6 

North Dakota 2 Wisconsin 16 

Ohio 19 Wyoming 2 

Oklahoma 2 Cuba 3 

Oregon 1 Hawaii 5 

Pennsylvania 39 Philippine Islands 2 

Rhode Island 5 Porto Rico 1 

South Carolina 2 

Distribution of Publications (Domestic) 

Anthropological 233 

Botanical 303 

Geological . . 314 

Historical 165 

Icthyological 156 

Ornithological 160 

Report 602 

Zoological 265 

the library.- — The additions received during the year exclusive 
of duplicates were 2,263, increasing the number of books and pamphlets 
in the library to 58,133. Of this number 1,900 were received by gift 
or exchange and 363 by purchase, distributed as follows: 

General Library 39, 61 1 

Department of Anthropology 2,807 

Department of Botany 6,167 

Department of Geology 7, 114 

Department of Zoology 2,434 



Total 58,133 

The regular routine work of recording the books requisitioned, ordered, 
received, catalogued, bound and shelved has been continued, always 
with an aim to have the system as satisfactory as possible to give 
efficient results. The accessions of the year have been of unusual 
value and importance. Publications were received from 727 indi- 
viduals and institutions, and 27 new exchanges were effected. The 
fund available for the purchase of books was carefully expended 
upon works selected by the staff. Among the more important pur- 
chases were the New (nth) Edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, 
the last edition of the Century Dictionary, a beautifully illustrated 



194 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

copy of the "Catalogue of the Ancient Imperial Treasury called 
Shosoin," Fenollosa's Epochs of Chinese and Japanese Art, Smith's 
History of Fine Arts in India and Ceylon, Havell's Indian Sculpture 
and Painting, Lindt's Picturesque New Guinea, Bentham's Botany of 
the Voyage of H. M. S. Sulphur, 1836-1842, Bentham and Mueller's 
Flora of Australia, Bradley's Bibliography, Hallier's Flora von Deutsch- 
land, Richards' Ore Dressing, Osborne's Engraved Gems, Alpheraky's 
Geese of Europe and Asia, and Scammon's Mammals of the West 
Coast of Africa. Through the courtesy of Mr. George Manierre the 
Museum received a set of Paxton's Magazine of Botany, 16 volumes. 
This set is becoming increasingly rare and the library was fortunate in 
receiving so valuable a gift. As in former years the library is again 
indebted to Mr. Edward E. Ayer for gifts of books, also to Mr. Henry 
H. Getty of Paris, France; Mr. Ezra Brainerd, Middlebury, Vermont; 
Mr. William Barnes, Decatur, Illinois; Professor Walter Barrows, 
Lansing, Michigan; Mrs. M. W. Lyman, Chicago; and Dr. Berthold 
Laufer; and to the following institutions: Bureau of Aboriginal 
Affairs, and Bureau of Production and Industry, Government of 
Formosa; Indian Museum, Calcutta; Indiana State Board of Forestry; 
Maryland State Board of Forestry; Museo Nacional de Arqueologia, 
Historia y Etnologia, Mexico; North Carolina Geological and Economic 
Survey, Raleigh; Passau Naturhistorischer Verein. Germany; Penn- 
sylvania Topographic and Geologic Survey Commission; and Tokyo 
Botanical Society. The current periodical list is being gradually in- 
creased with a view to eventually including the standard scientific 
periodicals pertaining to the work of the Museum. The number of 
books, serials, periodicals and pamphlets bound during the year was 1,012. 
A number of pamphlets by various authors were bound in cloth to more 
properly protect them. The return of the books from the bindery 
again overtaxed the limited shelf space in the stack room and some of 
the least used books were shelved in temporary cases. A desired 
improvement was made in the library of the Department of Anthropol- 
ogy, the shelving having been enclosed by glass doors that will assist 
greatly in keeping the books free from dust. There have been written 
and added to the catalogues 18,146 cards. Two sections of the recently 
adopted metal card cabinet were purchased. Monthly installments of 
the John Crerar Catalogue cards were received and filed. 

Departmental Cataloguing, inventorying and Labeling. — Nearly 6,000 
catalogue cards have been entered in the inventory books of the 
Department of Anthropology during the year, the large majority of 
these pertaining to the Blackstone Chinese and Japanese collections. 
About 800 cards have been written from the Philippine collections, 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XXXII. 




Chinese Stone Sculpture of T'ang Period (742 a. d.) of Tortoise Carrying 

Inscribed Tablet. 



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Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 195 

covering the Ayer, Darrah, Jenks and Porter collections and nearly a 
thousand labels prepared for the Tlingit collections now installed 
in the East Alcoves of the South Court. The iron agricultural im- 
plements from Boscoreale installed in the North Court have been 
labeled and about 800 specimen labels have been prepared for the 
Philippine material, besides many large descriptive labels especially 
prepared for groups and for special industries. Many revised labels 
have been placed in the McCormick Hopi collections and the old buff 
labels in the Egyptian Hall have been replaced by black and white 
labels. Rubbings of the inscriptions on the great stone sarcophagus 
from Egypt have been made and submitted to Dr. Breasted of the 
University of Chicago, to be used in preparing a comprehensive label. 
There have been prepared for the Chinese collections 1,100 labels . In these 
Dr. Laufer has aimed, so far as possible, to avoid technical phraseology 
and erudition, to make the labels plain and intelligible to the layman. 
Thus, in explaining Chinese paintings emphasis has been laid on the 
appreciation of the spirit and inward qualities of Chinese art, in order 
to lead the public to a correct understanding and a sound judgment 
rather than to actual knowledge of a subject' so 1 - foreign to the majority 
of people. All the current accessions in the Department of Botany 
for the past year, amounting to 13,517 specimens, have been catalogued 
and 11,078 specimens entered from the large collections undergoing 
organization. These two items make a total of 24,595 entries made in 
the catalogue volumes during the year. A new and additional steel 
card index case has been added to the laboratory equipment, comprising 
91 drawers. This will give a capacity for expansion of the "Special 
Index" for about three years. All specimens added to the exhibition 
cases in the Department have been labeled. The material received 
by the Department of Geology during the year was fully inventoried 
and catalogued with the exception of the Ward-Coonley meteorites, 
cataloguing of which is still in progress. The cataloguing accomplished 
was chiefly of collections of fossils and minerals and the fossils collected 
in Iowa by the Assistant Curator of Invertebrate Paleontology. Care- 
ful identification of species was carried on in connection with this work. 
While this requires the expenditure of much time, the greater complete- 
ness of the catalogue thus obtained is believed desirable. The series 
of petroleums received during the year numbering 228 specimens was 
also fully catalogued. To the card catalogue of vertebrate fossils 32 
cards giving full description of specimens were added. The Depart- 
ment library was increased by the addition of 646 books, pamphlets 
and maps, and 123 cards were added to the catalogue of the library, 
making a total of 2,614 cards. A considerable amount of labeling of 



196 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

a permanent character has been accomplished, the total number of 
labels prepared and in part printed and distributed being about 3,000. 
A number of single series were fully labeled and the labeling accord- 
ing to standard practice of all specimens at present exhibited in the 
Department is rapidly approaching completion. For the most part 
new labels replace those of mixed character heretofore used. Many 
of these were hand written, and the rest were of the old buff card- 
board type, which were among the first products of the Museum printing 
shop. Many of these were made for a type of specimen mount now 
abandoned and in shape and size were unadapted to the present installa- 
tion. In reprinting these labels in aluminum ink on black cards, it 
was often found desirable to increase the size of the type. This called 
for a revision of the matter on the labels so that what was relatively 
unimportant as well as any matter appearing on the accompanying 
group labels was omitted. The greater part of the new labeling accom- 
plished related to the ore collections occupying Hall 34. Except for the 
marbles and building stones, which were done previously, the labels 
for the whole of Hall 34 were revised during the year, and those for 
the gold, silver, lead and platinum collections installed. The total 
number of labels thus prepared was about 2,000. Besides the prepa- 
ration of labels for the individual specimens attention was paid to 
group labels in this series and enough of them were provided to break 
up the too uniform appearance of lines of specimens. Besides the 
group labels of the type formerly employed, a number of mining 
district labels were prepared. These state briefly where the district 
is located and give a few of the more salient features of its ore de- 
posits. In preparing these labels every effort was made to keep the 
labels as brief as possible, to use as large type in the body of the label 
as possible, and to employ language as non-technical as the subject 
would allow. An extensive series of labels was prepared for the 
petroleum collection and the labeling of this collection was prac- 
tically completed. Nearly 500 labels were prepared for this col- 
lection, about 30 of them being descriptive and the remainder 
giving full details. The Chalmers collection of crystals, occupying 
Alcove 105, was provided with a full series of new labels, about 
200 labels being prepared for the purpose. About 300 labels were 
prepared and distributed among the larger rock specimens to replace 
those of a miscellaneous character which had hitherto been used. 
Complete individual labels to the number of 45 and one large descriptive 
label were provided for the case of fossil Eocene mammals, Hall 59. 
A series of individual and descriptive labels numbering about 30 was 
provided for the blast furnace models. A number of defective or writ- 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 197 

ten labels in the clay and soil collections were replaced by correct ones. 
Considerable attention was paid during the year to devising a new form 
of case label and the results at present attained seem satisfactory. The 
difficulty has been to find a stock for printing which would correspond 
with the case in color and not change under the action of light. After 
numerous experiments the end seems to be attained by employing a 
mahogany veneer mounted upon a heavy board . The veneer is finished 
to correspond in color and gloss with the case and the text of the label 
is then printed upon it. About 40 of these labels have been prepared 
and installed. Their appearance is much better than that of the card- 
board hitherto employed and it is believed they will not suffer from 
fading. In the Department of Zoology the usual routine of cataloguing 
has been maintained. Altogether 902 entries have been made; 861 in 
Ornithology and 41 in Mammalogy. The Division of Ichthyology 
and Herpetology has been without an assistant for more than two 
years and for this reason cataloguing in this Division has advanced 
slowly. In addition to his regular duties the Assistant Curator of 
Entomology has devoted considerable time to relabeling the systematic 
bird collection during the absence of Assistant Curator Osgood, who 
was absent in the field. Considerable progress was, however, made 
in improving the local collection of insects of which Soo specimens were 
pinned, labeled and distributed with the result that the Illinois Orthop- 
tera, or grasshoppers, roaches, etc., have now been identified and 
systematically arranged so that these insects will henceforth be acces- 
sible for study or other purposes. The collection of Systematic Osteology 
and Craniology has been relabeled throughout, the common name 
of the species being placed in bold type at the top of the label. 

The work in this important direction is shown in detail as follows: 





No. of 
Record 
Books. 


Total No. of 

Entries to 

Dec. 31, 1912. 


Entries 

During 

1912. 


Total No. 
of Cards 
Written. 


Department of Anthropology 


34 


123,530 


6,000 


124,281 


Department of Botany- 


56 


354.434 


24.595 


40,225 


Department of Geology . 


21 


124,016 


3,294 


7.579 


Department of Zoology . 


40 


83.930 


929 


29,962 


The Library 


14 


94,811 


7.394 


142,122 


Section of Photography . 


8 


ioi,554 


8,984 





accessions. — As usual, the majority of accessions acquired by 
the Department of Anthropology have been through gift. Mr. Homer 
Sargent continued to show his interest in the Museum by presenting 
additional valuable material illustrating the technology of certain 
Salish tribes of the Fraser River region. From Mr. Charles A. Baker, 
as administrator for the Estate of the late R. H. Baker, the Museum 



198 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

obtained valuable specimens from the South Pacific Islands, with many 
photographs and 66 Japanese and Ainu specimens. These have all 
been catalogued, labeled and installed in Hall 56. The Ainu material 
was especially welcome as it supplements the present collection. The 
Japanese specimens enables the Museum, with the addition of the 
material already on hand, to make what may be said to be the beginning 
of a Japanese section. Even thus, it must be admitted that Japan is 
very poorly and inadequately represented in this Department, and 
immediate attention should be given to its development. One of 
the most significant acquisitions of the year was by gift from the 
Tuesday Art and Travel Club of Chicago, who presented to the Museum 
two magnificent ancient rolls painted on silk. One, over 27 feet long, 
represents one of China's famous paintings, showing the life, traffic, 
and culture of a mediaeval town at the end of the Twelfth Century; 
the other picture, 21 feet long, represents one hundred boys at play 
and imparts a vivid description of China's games and customs, painted 
in a graceful style during the Ming period Both paintings are exhibited 
in specially prepared cases in Hall 45, being accompanied by detailed 
explanatory labels. Mr. John Muir, a missionary at Batang on the 
Tibetan and Chinese frontier, returned to Chicago with a collection 
of 165 Tibetan specimens, including a number of interesting paint- 
ings, books, costumes, weapons, ornaments, and a model of a Tibetan 
house, all of which form valuable additions to the Tibetan collections 
obtained by Dr. Laufer. A fine Chinese tapestry, nearly 20 feet long, 
representing The Eighteen Arhat (disciples of Buddha) in the act of 
crossing the sea, in the style of the famous painter Li Lungmien, has 
been acquired by purchase. This notable specimen came to this country 
at least a century ago through a Chinese family settling in California. 
A collection of 9 pieces of Han pottery has been purchased from Dr. 
Buckens, a Belgian physician in the service of the Peking-Hankow 
Railway, who had exceptional facilities for procuring antiquities exca- 
vated during the construction of railroads. The mortuary stoves and 
towers in this collection well supplement the manifold types on hand. 
There is, besides, a fine piece of Tcang pottery in this lot, an amphora- 
shaped jar with double dragon handles, made in imitation of Persian 
ware of the Sassanian epoch . A curious album , with beautifully lacquer- 
ed covers painted in gold with miniatures, is another valuable addition; 
it contains 25 specimens of popular art, depicting the life, customs, and 
industries of Southern China in the beginning of the Nineteenth Century 
— an interesting ethnological record of the now vanishing culture of 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 199 

the Manchu period. Through the continued interest of Trustee Ayer 
the South Italian collections have been enriched by four magnificent 
earthenware wine jars from Boscoreale, together with a bronze vase 
from the same villa and a collection of vases, jewelry and a sarcophagus 
from Etruria. Mr. Ayer, during the year, has also added many impor- 
tant examples to the extensive collection of North American ethnology 
previously presented by him. A certain portion of this accession has 
been set aside for use in the N. W. Harris Public School Extension of 
Field Museum project. A very interesting and unique crown from the 
Marquesas Islands has been acquired by purchase. From Melbourne 
University has been acquired by exchange an exceedingly valuable col- 
lection of ethnological material from the native tribes of Central Aus- 
tralia. Because lists have not yet been received, it is impossible to 
state at this time the number of specimens added during the year to 
the Melanesian collections, resulting from the Joseph N. Field South 
Pacific Islands Expedition in charge of Dr. A. B. Lewis. The Depart- 
ment of Botany has received the usual annual additions of herbarium 
specimens, among which the following accessions are noteworthy: 
Britton & Cowell, Cuba, 53; Otto Buchtien, Bolivia, 205; Ralph 
W. Chaney, Michigan, 300; June A. Clark, Idaho, 211; Jesse M. 
Greenman, West Virginia, 387; David Griffiths, Arizona, 74; Marcus 
E. Jones, Utah, 211; A. Kranz, Germany, 359; Otto Kuntze, Argentine 
141; Bolivia 225, Brazil 82, Chile 84, Venezuela 60; O. E. Lansing Jr., 
Illinois 102, Missouri 87, Wisconsin 73; Leland, Chase & Tilden, 
New Zealand, 167; Francis Macbride, Idaho, 305; B. Mackenson, Texas, 
117; C. F. Millspaugh, Ceylon 53, Japan 88, Philippine Islands 57, 
Wisconsin 176; Nelson & Macbride, Idaho, 323; C. A. Purpus, Mexico, 
451; Sandberg & Leiberg, Washington, 387; J. A. Shafer, Cuba, 402; 
Baron von Turckheim, Santo Domingo, 236; C. M. Weber, Philippine 
Islands, 260; F. Zuccarini, Germany, 222. W. E. Broadway, Tobago, 
212. The organization (i. e. poisoning, mounting, cataloguing and 
installing) of the current accessions has been kept up to date and 11,078 
sheets have been organized from the larger herbaria, secured by the 
Museum, in accordance with the following tabulation: 

Estimated Organized Previously 

Herbaria. Contents. 1012. Organized 

A. A. Heller 14,603 5,264 

J. T. Rothrock 22,510 302 22,507 

A. Schott 8,671 8,428 

J. H. Shuette 15,000 .... 

J. K. Small 21,528 229 12,943 

University of Chicago . . . 45,000 10,547 23,140 

With the above, and various minor accessions, the additions to the 



2co Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

organized herbarium, during 191 2, are shown in the following, 
geographically arranged, table which does not include those regions to 
which no additions have been received this year: 



North America (in general) . 
Alaska (in general) . 

Amakauk Island. 

Atka Island .... 

Japonski Island . 

St. George Island . 

St. Paul Island . 

Unalaska Island 
Canada (in general) . 

British Columbia 

Labrador .... 

New Brunswick . 

Nova Scotia .... 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Vancouver Island 

Yukon 

Newfoundland . 
United States: .... 

Alabama 

American Plains. 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California .... 
Santa Catalina Island 

Colorado 

Connecticut .... 

Dakota 

North Dakota . 
South Dakota 

Delaware .... 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Florida Keys. 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Indian Territory. 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky .... 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland .... 



Added to 

Herbarium 

1012. 


Total 

now in 

Herbarium. 


121 


131 


217 


528 


21 


21 


I 


I 


3 


3 


1 1 


1 1 


-> 


5 


31 


31 


42 


2,002 


25 


980 


3 


167 


8 


752 


1 


148 


3 


575 


33 


121 


1 


231 


2 


68 


247 


712 


27 


1,048 


1 


95 


1,566 


9,364 


56 


275 


2,924 


21,967 


1 


25 


2,345 


10,918 


20 


319 


15 


35 


217 


401 


23 


107 


276 


1,463 


48 


1,968 


1.283 


19,916 


18 


564 


87 


4,449 


1,403 


2,882 


949 


18,809 


906 


5.214 


105 


254 


151 


1,460 


in 


372 


265 


935 


188 


1.239 


332 


1,552 


54 


953 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 201 

North America (in general) Added to Total 

' Herbarium now in 

United States (in general) 1912. Herbarium. 

Massachusetts 223 2,906 

Michigan 846 3,43° 

Minnesota 209 900 

Mississippi 88 1,963 

Missouri 394 2,491 

Montana 3 6 3 3.5°7 

Nebraska 79 240 

Nevada 27 751 

New Hampshire 195 1,358 

New Jersey 317 2,423 

New Mexico 177 2,672 

New York 355 5.420 

North Carolina 537 2,494 

Ohio 61 1,536 

Oklahoma 6 182 

Oregon 1,596 7.524 

Pacific Coast 33$ 706 

Pennsylvania 219 9, 259 

Rhode Island 63 544 

Rocky Mountains 85 1,378 

South Carolina 42 747 

Tennessee 174 1,226 

Texas 1,850 8,733 

Utah 637 2,698 

Vermont 699 2,546 

Virginia 695 2,318 

Washington (State) 1,702 6,250 

West Virginia 520 i,8oi 

Wisconsin 321 1, 180 

Wyoming 67 854 

Yellowstone National Park 117 400 

Central America 

Mexico (in general) 4,192 3 2 ,434 

Lower California 153 1,726 

Carmen Island 18 22 

Cedros Island 61 164 

Guadalupe Island . 34 74 

San Benito Island 1 10 

Campeche I 28 

Tabasco I 5 

Yucatan 27 4,671 

Costa Rica 247 535 

Guatemala 601 2,856 

Honduras 75 340 

Panama (excl. Canal Zone) . 12 58 

San Salvador 1 21 



202 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



West Indies (in general) . 
Bahamas 

Eleuthera. 

Great Bahama . 

New Providence . 
Barbados .... 

Bermuda 

Cuba 

Guadaloupe .... 

Jamaica 

Martinique . 

Porto Rico .... 

Saint Thomas 

Santo Domingo . 

Tobago 

Trinidad 

South America (in general) 

Argentine 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chili 

Colombia 

Falkland Islands 
Galapagos Island 
Paraguay. 
Patagonia .... 

Peru 

Uruguay 

Venezuela .... 
Europe (in general) 
Austria-Hungary 

Belgium 

Denmark .... 

France 

Germany 

Great Britain 

Anglesey Island . 

England .... 

Ireland .... 

Scotland .... 

Wales .... 

Wight, Isle of . . 

Greece 

Italy 

Mediterranean Islands . 

Capri 

Corcyra .... 

Corfu 



Added to 


Total 


Herbarium 


now in 


1912. 


Herbarium. 


8 


22 


2 


686 


I 


625 


9 


2,407 


1 


328 


1 


644 


1. 193 


9-424 


1 


1.509 


57 


6,558 


13 


615 


18 


3,992 


7 


445 


236 


712 


212 


575 


77 


465 


5 


5 


150 


974 


430 


3,534 


101 


397 


88 


249 


1 


2,420 


1 


3 


5 


10 


41 


1,442 


1 


26 


108 


114 


33 


160 


28 


1,061 


9 


79 


513 


6,466 


2 


72 


2 


2 


346 


4,39i 


915 


6,867 


6 


6 


333 


563 


8 


152 


101 


471 


4i 


70 


1 


31 


8 


520 


57i 


2,386 


2 


2 


5 


5 


1 


1 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY 



REPORTS, PLATE XXXIII. 




Model of Early Blast Furnace. 





MODEL OF CATALIAN FORGE. 



■-"Si* 






Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 203 

Europe (in general) Added to Total 

- , ... T , , /. .. Herbarium now in 

Mediterranean Islands (in general) 1912. Herbarium. 

Corsica 1 2 

Elba 2 2 

Ischia 2 45 

Sardinia 3 5 

Sicily 17 109 

Zante 3 3 

Norway 7 216 

Portugal 1 9 

Roumania 1 1 

Russia 85 1,574 

Spain 84 135 

Sweden 36 499 

Switzerland 309 2 >343 

Asia 

Afghanistan 1 1 

Arabia 1 4 

Armenia 54 174 

Asia Minor (in general) 2 2 

Asiatic Turkey (in general) '^^tjjt ,• -* I2 x 9° 

Palestine ,, .'. V: "-'-*v. .. 8 1,142 

Roumeha 1 1 

Smyrna 2 2 

Syria 2 72 

Ceylon 56 65 

China 47 259 

India 86 942 

Indo-China 3 3 

Japan 119 220 

Java 42 100 

Philippine Islands  318 4,481 

Siberia 2 410 

Straits Settlements 12 12 

Turkestan 6 89 

Kerguelen Land 6 7 

Africa (in general) 39 3,926 

Abyssinia 1 193 

Algeria 16 24 

Canary Islands 28 32 

Cape Colony 67 67 

East Africa 1 1 

Egypt 13 22 

Galeja Island . 2 2 

Kaffraria, British 1 1 

Madagascar 2 11 

Mauritius 4 8 

Morocco 1 6 

Nubia 5 9 

Orange Free State 6 8 



204 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Added to Total 

. /■ 1N Herbarium now in 

Africa (in general) . IOI2 . Herbarium. 

Rodriguez Island . • 37 37 

Saint Helena 1 1 

South Africa 60 1,233 

Oceania (in general) • 9 9 

Australia (in general) 82 1,919 

New South Wales 71 414 

North Australia 5 5 

Queensland 3 19 

West Australia 23 32 

Friendly Islands 10 10 

New Zealand 1,440 2,753 

Sandwich Islands 51 452 

Tahiti 86 86 

Tasmania 8 190 

Horticultural 23 2,009 

Illustrations, Drawings, etc., mounted as herbarium 

sheets 74 944 

The total increase to the organized herbarium during the year 
amounted to 18,921 specimens. The material received for exhibition 
purposes during the past year proved highly gratifying both in character 
and amount. The principal accessions were the following: Alex. Camp- 
bell & Company, 29 examples of China teas; Prof. N. B. Ingraham, 
13 Eucalyptols from California; The American Trading Company, 
Yokohama, 20 specimens of Japanese papers, paper materials and 
fibers; The Indian Museum, Calcutta, 297 ample specimens of vege- 
table oils, resins, gums, seeds, tans, dyes, etc.; the Botanical Garden 
at Peridynia, Ceylon, 23 fruits, fibers, barks and woods; the Pacific 
Coast Kelp Mulch Company, 9 specimens illustrating, the extraction 
of rubber from sea weed; the Bureau of Forestry, Philippine Islands, 
22 specimens of gums, woods and fibers; C. F. Millspaugh, collections 
made in the Sandwich Islands, Japan, China, Philippines, Straits Settle- 
ments, Java, Burmah, India and Ceylon, consisting of 362 specimens 
of fruits, seeds, gums, articles fashioned from crude vegetable sub- 
stances, etc. The above material serves to fill gaps in many plant 
families and to round out that already on hand into installable form 
and sequence. The most important accession received by the Depart- 
ment of Geology during the year and one of the most important ever 
received by the Department, was that of the Ward-Coonley collection 
of meteorites. This collection was gathered by the late Professor Henry 
A. Ward during a period of about twelve years of effort devoted exclu- 
sively to this work, and at the time of his death was the largest private 
collection of meteorites in the world. Besides material gathered directly 
by Professor Ward, his collection included the large private collections 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 205 

of the late James R. Gregory, and Count Siemaschko. The addition of 
this magnificent collection to the large one already possessed by the 
Museum gives the institution the distinction of possessing the largest 
collection of meteorites in the world. Nearly all known meteorites are 
represented, the total number of falls possessed being 650 out of a pos- 
sible 700. Moreover the representation of most of the falls is large 
and adequate. Of the following falls the representation in the newly 
acquired material is larger than in any other collection: Ballinoo, 
Barratta, Bath Furnace, Bluff, Canyon City, Canyon Diablo, Castine, 
Central Missouri, Costilla Peak, Estacado, Illinois Gulch, Indarch, 
Luis Lopez, MacKinney, Ness County, Oakley, Pavlodar, Petersburg, 
Pipe Creek, Roebourne, Saint Genevieve, Surprise Springs, and Ute 
Pass. The weight of the combined collections is nearly double that 
of the Vienna collection, hitherto the largest, and exceeds it in number 
of falls. The large collections of the British Museum and of Paris, 
Berlin, Washington and New York are also considerably surpassed by 
the Museum collection either in weight or number of falls or both. 
The relation of the Museum's collection to the world's other large 
collections according to their latest catalogues is shown as follows: 

Institution. 

Field Museum of Natural History . 
Vienna Museum, Catalogue of 1902 
British Museum, Catalogue of 1908 
Paris Museum, Catalogue of 1909 . 
Berlin Museum, Catalogue of 1904 

Other additions by exchange, purchase, etc. were made to the 
meteorite collection during the year. These included a section of the 
Kermichel meteorite by exchange with M. de Mauroy of Wassy, France, 
several hundred specimens of the Holbrook, Arizona, fall by exchange 
with Foote Mineral Company, three specimens by exchange with 
Julius Bohm, Vienna, and sections of the Hermitage Plains and Kings- 
ton meteorites by purchase. A specimen of the Kilbourne meteorite 
was also acquired. An important addition to the economic collections 
was a series of crude petroleums from 2 28 separate localities in Okla- 
homa, Texas, Wyoming, West Virginia, and other states. These 
petroleums for the most part had been fully analyzed, and thus form 
a type collection of great value. The collection was presented by the 
United States Geological Survey through the kindness of Dr. David 
T. Day. The largest specimen of mineral wax ever washed up on the 
Pacific Coast was presented by Mr. C. H. Marsh of Marshfield, Oregon. 
This wax is similar to the small pieces that have for man}' years been 



No. of falls. 


Weight. 


. . 650 


7,824 kgs 


• • 56o 


3-313 " 


580 


5.822 " 


532 


2,258 " 


450 


246 " 



206 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

brought by the waves to the Coast. The piece presented by Mr. 
Marsh weighs about twenty pounds. He also gave specimens of 
agate, obsidian, etc., from Oregon. Mr. Louis V. Kenkel of Seattle, 
Washington, presented 50 specimens of ores and minerals from impor- 
tant and relatively inaccessible mining districts in Alaska, and thus 
added completeness to the series of ores from that region. Several 
collections received by gift or purchase contained material of value. 
These included 224 specimens of fossils and 116 specimens of rocks and 
minerals presented by Mr. Charles Winston of Chicago, a collection 
of about 200 specimens of fossils, minerals, ores and one meteorite 
presented by Dr. H. P. Woley of Chicago, 135 specimens of inverte- 
brate fossils from Iowa presented by Mr. A. G. Becker of Clermont, 
Iowa, and 236 specimens of fossils and minerals purchased from Mrs. 
Josie Pratten. The last named collection contained many specimens 
of historical interest, especially relating to early researches in the 
geology of Illinois. They included a number of types or supplemen- 
tary types. A valuable specimen of emerald in matrix was presented 
by Mr. W. S. McCrea of Chicago. Mr. John H. Muir of China gave 
an interesting series of rocks and minerals from the interior of Tibet. 
These included minerals used in bread making. A series of alundum 
and its products presented by the Norton Company of Worcester, 
Massachusetts, makes a valued addition to the collection of abrasives. 
By exchange, about 50 specimens of valuable mineral specimens rep- 
resenting localities or species not hitherto possessed in the collection 
were received from the Foote Mineral Company. By collection about 
1,500 specimens of invertebrate fossils were added. These were ob- 
tained by the Assistant Curator of Invertebrate Paleontology near 
Clermont, Iowa, and Little Traverse Bay, Michigan. The accessions 
in the Department of Zoology during the year were comparatively 
unimportant and limited in number, except those obtained in the field 
mentioned elsewhere. 

expeditions and field work. — The main field work of the Depart- 
ment of Anthropology was that of the Joseph N. Field Expedition in 
charge of Dr. A. B. Lewis. During the year nearly 100 cases of addi- 
tional material have been received from Dr. Lewis who is now on his 
fourth year of this Melanesian Expedition. After a somewhat extended 
visit late last year to the New Hebrides, Dr. Lewis returned to Sydney 
in January of this year, to re-equip preparatory to spending a year on 
the south coast of New Guinea, the first part of the year being devoted 
to British New Guinea, the second to Dutch New Guinea. Dr. Lewis 
is now on his way home. It is not known at this time how many 
specimens have been acquired as a result of this expedition, but they 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 207 

number many thousands and the collection forms one of the largest, 
most important, and most interesting ever acquired by the Museum 
through field work. Practically every region of Melanesia is rep- 
resented. Dr. Lewis has supplemented his specimens by numerous 
photographs, anthropometric measurements, and photographic records. 
To date 277 cases have arrived at the Museum as a result of the expedi- 
tion. Of these 91 have been received this year, and it is known that 
at least 21 cases additional are on the way. A great many of these 
cases exceed 10 feet in length, with other dimensions to correspond. 
With a view to securing as much economic material as possible for 
installation in the Department of Botany and to gain the co-operation 
of botanical institutions in the far East, the Curator began, in August, 
191 1, an expedition for that purpose. He visited Honolulu, where he 
was accorded a welcome by Dr. Wm T. Brigham of the Bernice Pauahi 
Bishop Museum, and collected about the city during a few hours' stop 
at the Island. In Japan exchange relations were established with the 
Imperial Botanical Institute in the Koishikawa, Tokio; the Japanese 
Imperial Forestry Bureau at Meguro; and arrangements made with the 
American Trading Company of Yokohama; many interesting specimens 
were secured from the city and village markets and shops. In the 
identification of material valuable assistance was received from Pro- 
fessors J. Matsumura and K. Fujii of the Botanical Institute. A few 
hours' stop in Shanghai added other interesting specimens from the 
bazaars, as did also those of Hong Kong and Canton. A nine days' 
stop in Manila and Los Bafios resulted in the establishment of exchange 
relations and co-operative bases with the Philippine Bureaus of Forestry, 
Education, Agriculture and Science, and some 60 specimens were 
accumulated from the shops and markets. The longest stay was at 
the Botanic Gardens, Buitenzoorg, Java, where the Curator was 
accorded every convenience and facility in the laboratories and gardens, 
and among the duplicate collections, as well as the valuable assistance 
of the Director, Dr. Konigsberger and his assistant Dr. von Faber. 
Here Dr. Millspaugh made water color studies, photographs and 
formaldehyde collections of a number of tropic genera for reproduction 
by the Section of Modeling, as well as market and field collections 
amounting to 250 specimens. In his searches through the markets he 
was kindly assisted by Mr. Heyne of the Botanic Technological Muse- 
um. In Burmah a number of items of economic interest were secured 
from the bazaars at Rangoon. In Calcutta he was given carte blanche 
to select such material as was desired from the large surplus stock of 
the Botanical Department of the India Museum and thus secured over 
400 specimens of seeds, oils, gums, resins, dyes, etc. of more than 



2o8 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

ordinary interest and value. Through the kindness of Mr. I. H. 
Burkhill, Reporter on Economic Products, and Mr. Hooper, the Curator, 
as well as that of Captain Gage, Superintendant of the Botanical 
Garden at Sibpur and Mr. Ralph H. Pearson, Forest Economist at 
Dehra Dun, relations were established that will prove of great value 
in the future acquirement of exhibition material. In India con- 
siderable additional material was secured at Benares, Delhi, Agra, 
Jeypur, Bombay, Madras and Madura. At Kandy, Ceylon, co-op- 
erative relations were established with the Botanic Garden at Peridynia 
through the kindness of the Acting Director, Mr. R. H. Locke who has 
since sent in some very important and interesting specimens for instal- 
lation. Returning via Europe a few days were spent in Munich in 
drawing out some one thousand herbarium specimens from the collec- 
tion of duplicates of the older Bavarian collectors. 0. E. Lansing, 
Jr., of the Department has continued, at odd intervals, to collect plants 
of the Lake Chicago Basin in Illinois and Indiana. He has also made 
several trips afield to secure living material for the use of the Section 
of Modeling; and has made a trip to Vermilion County, Illinois, and to 
Richland County, Wisconsin, principally to secure herbarium material 
for exchanges. The dendrologist, Assistant Curator Huron H. Smith, 
has continued, his work of securing specimens of Pacific Coast trees 
during the past year ; he has sent in a number of shipments of material ; 
and has continued to collect herbarium specimens at each of his stations. 
The material is not yet organized and therefore does not appear 
in detail in this report. The Assistant Curator of Invertebrate 
Paleontology examined a number of exposures of beds of Maquoketa 
age in Fayette County, Iowa, and procured about one thousand 
specimens there. Of these specimens about 550 were brachiopods, 
200 trilobites, 100 crinoids and cystids, and the balance corals, 
sponges, pelecypods, gastropods and cephalopods. Special attention 
was paid to the collecting of trilobites in the region with the result 
that two new species were obtained and much additional material 
secured which will throw light on the structure of previously known 
species. Two new species of crinoids were also secured. This 
material, taken in connection with that obtained by the trip to the 
same locality in 1910, affords specimens upon which the description 
of one new genus and eleven new species of trilobites and one 
new genus and four new species of crinoids and cystids will be 
based. Of twelve of these the Museum will possess the types. 
Material for re-description of six previously known species of trilobites 
was also obtained. Besides material of descriptive value, some good 




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Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 209 

exhibition material was obtained, including four separate slabs of 
trilobites. The largest of these slabs has a surface of about one square 
foot. Mr. A. G. Becker of Clermont, Iowa, gave valuable assistance 
in the work of collecting in this locality. Great progress has been 
made during the year in the zoological exploration of South America. 
Assistant Curator W. H. Osgood and Assistant M. P. Anderson 
conducted an arduous expedition over the Andes of northern Peru 
and thence across the continent by way of the Amazon River. They 
sailed from New Orleans January 25, crossed the Isthmus of Pana- 
ma, and thence proceeded down the Pacific Coast to Peru. After 
a few weeks' work on the arid coast of Peru, they started inland 
with pack mules and gradually worked across the Andean ranges 
and descended to canoeing waters on the upper tributaries of the 
Amazon River. At this point Mr. Osgood continued rapidly down 
the Amazon by regular means of transportation and returned to the 
Museum late in October. Me. Anderson remained to work in the little 
known upper Peruvian Amazon 'r^gipfr''and later entered Brazil. Mr. 
Becker was despatched in Decemfe^^to" join him in that country for 
work in the coming year. At the date of last 1 shipments, some of which 
are still in transit, over two thousand specimens had been obtained of 
birds and mammals of which practically all were previously unrep- 
resented in the collections and of which doubtless many will prove when 
studied to be new to science. The collection is particularly valuable 
and representative since it includes material from regions of such varied 
character, the arid Pacific coast, the high Andean paramos, and the hot 
tropical Amazonian forests. During the past season the Curator made 
several local trips to points in southern Michigan and northern Illinois 
and secured a number of photographs of birds and mammals and 
many notes relating to migration and habits to be used in future publica- 
tions. Early in January Assistant Curator Meek left for Panama to 
continue field work on the Biological Survey of the Canal Zone. During 
most of January and February he collected fishes in the salt water on 
both sides of the Isthmus. The latter part of February and first week 
in March were given to exploration of the Tuyra River which drains 
the southeastern portion of the Republic of Panama. The last 
three weeks of March collecting in salt water was continued. On 
April 4, Dr. Meek reached Costa Rica and collected in the streams most 
accessible on both sides of the Republic during the rest of the month. 
The Costa Rica collection contains over 2,000 specimens, representing 
about 60 species, 10 of which have been described as new. The Panama 
collection made during the past two years contains about 50,000 spec- 



210 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

imens, representing in all about 600 species, practically half of which is 
the property of this Museum. Following is a list of the expeditions 
since the date of the last report: 

Locality. Collector. Material. 

South America W. H. Osgood Birds and mammals. 

and 
M. P. Anderson 

Pacific Coast H. H. Smith Timbers, economic material and 

herbarium specimens. 
Southern Florida . . . . C. H. Carpenter Botanical specimens. 
Illinois and Michigan . . C. B. Cory Mammals, photographing and mi- 

gration work. 
Peru, Chile, Argentine and 

Brazil R. D. Salisbury Geological specimens. 

Iowa A. W. Slocum Invertebrate fossils. 

South Pacific Islands . . . A. B. Lewis Melanesian Ethnology. 

California W. Heim Fishes. 

Arizona C. L. Owen Hopi Ethnology and Archaeology. 

Illinois and Indiana . . . O. E. Lansing, Jr. Herbarium specimens. 
Japan, China and tropics of the 

Old World C.F.Millspaugh Economic material and herbarium 

specimens. 
Installation, Rearrangement and Permanent Improvement. — During the 
year more than 70 cases of material never before exhibited have 
been installed in the Department of Anthropology. To provide space 
for these cases, for work of installation, and for the arrival of cases, 
has necessitated much rearranging and the condensing of certain col- 
lections. Hall 45 has been repainted and refloored and is completely 
filled with a portion of the material of the Blackstone Chinese collection. 
To allow for the proper classification and cataloguing of the Chinese 
collection, Halls 50 and 51 have been temporarily closed to the public, 
and the cases condensed as much as possible to make room for work- 
tables. The lid of the Egyptian sarcophagus has been restored and 
installed in what is believed to be a unique and highly satisfactory 
manner above the body of the sarcophagus. The most important 
change affecting a single collection or group of collections during the 
year relates to the Joseph N. Field Melanesian collection. Till recently 
this material, resulting from four years of expedition in the South 
Pacific Islands, together with an expedition of the Curator's, the 
Parkinson, and Voogdt collections was scattered through various halls 
both in the East and West Annexes. They have all been transferred 
to Hall 71 in the East Annex, the material being partially classified 
to await Dr. Lewis' arrival. Meanwhile all the unpacked material 
sent in by Dr. Lewis, has been grouped in Hall 72. Recent acquisi- 
tions of Kabyle and Etruscan jewelry have been temporarily installed 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 211 

in Higinbotham Hall. Models of Asiatic water craft and other 
Asiatic ethnological material have been transferred from the large case 
recently demolished in Hall 39 and placed in temporary storage in 
Hall 49. Large specimens of Pueblo pottery, occupying the top of the 
above mentioned case, have been transferred to Hall 8, to await a re- 
adjustment of material now there stored. The great Cheyenne skin tipi, 
also necessarily removed from Hall 39, has been installed in Hall 45. 
To make Halls 46 and 47 ready for Chinese collections, has neces- 
sitated the transfer of certain collections. Over 2,000 specimens of 
archeological material from Calchaqui, Argentina, have been removed 
from Hall 46 and stored in Alcove 90 of the East Court. Several 
hundred Eskimo specimens have also been removed from Hall 46 and 
stored in special cases in Hall 4, awaiting necessary re-installation of 
the Eskimo material. Several hundred specimens of Mexican ethnol- 
ogy belonging to the Starr collection, were removed from Hall 47 and 
placed temporarily in standard cases in the East Court, awaiting 
re-installation. Owing to the urgent and immediate need of cases, two, 
installed with ethnologic material from Australia, but which because 
of the addition of new material would necessarily be re-installed, were 
emptied of their contents which was placed with other Australian 
collections awaiting re-installation. The same treatment was accorded 
a case of material from New Caledonia. To prepare Hall 39 for the 
reception of Philippine material, one old case was demolished, its con- 
tents transferred elsewhere, and four cases of Apache and one of 
Havasupai ethnologic material were removed to Hall 1. The Rio 
Grande Pueblo material, formerly occupying Hall 1, has been removed 
from the cases and placed in storage to await re-installation when more 
suitable cases are available. The cases in which this material was 
installed were transferred to the East Annex and turned over to the 
Asiatic section for the installation of Chinese material. The Eskimo 
material in the bases of the cases in Hall 1 has been placed with other 
similar material in Hall 4, as has been the small collection of Patagonian 
ethnology. To make room for the seven new Hopi altars reproduced 
with funds presented by Mr. Stanley McCormick the cases in Hall 
15 have been re-arranged and condensed in order to care for certain 
cases transferred from Hall 17. The ethnologic material, secured as a 
result of the Stanley McCormick expedition of 191 1, recently stored in 
Hall 45, has been placed in storage in Hall 16. The Philippine material 
collected by the Robert F. Cummings' Expedition has been installed 
in 45 cases during the year. Besides the contents of 6 cases, installed 
last year in old cases, have been re-installed in new standard cases. 
Of these three were Apayao, two Igorot, and one Kalinga. To make 



212 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

more effective the installation of the Philippine material, the Modeler 
has prepared about ioo papier-mache forms for the special display of 
clothing of certain Philippine tribes. A special exhibit has been prepared 
showing the method used by the Bagobo in casting and incising brass. 
All of the 45 cases of Philippine material above referred to may 
be regarded as permanently installed, for each case has been provided 
with labels, photographs, and, where necessary maps. The Bagobo 
cases are devoted to: Household utensils, substitutes for lamps — torches, 
holders, etc. ; riceplanters, — utensils used in gathering, storage, and 
preparation of rice; transportation and storage baskets, horse trappings, 
etc.; ceremonial articles and musical instruments; warfare and chase, — 
shields, knives, spear bows and arrows, bow-guns, traps and decoys; 
men's ornaments, — betel-nut outfits and carriers for same, working 
knives; casting of brass bells, rings, etc., manufacture and decoration of 
bracelets, warrior's turbans, pottery, weapons, and waterproof baskets; 
clothing showing decoration in embroidery, shell disks, and beads, 
decorated carrying bags; women's dress and ornaments, case showing 
nine complete outfits, together with ornaments and weapons from the 
little-known Divavaoan tribe of Central Mindanao, case of house- 
hold utensils, clothing, weapons, and musical instruments used by the 
Tagbanua of Palawan, also specimens of native writing on bamboo 
tubes. The Moro cases are devoted to: Weapons, — fighting knives; 
weapons, — cannons, spears, shields, and coats of mail; clothing and 
types of cloth manufactured by this tribe; brass bowls, dishes, betel- 
nut outfits, etc.; horse-trappings, etc. The Bukidnon cases are devoted 
to: Household furnishings, — hammocks, baby cradles, torch holders, 
water tubes, dishes, etc. ; household utensils,— corn crushers, rice 
mortars and other utensils for preparation of rice and other field prod- 
ucts; transportation baskets; fishing, — nets, traps, fish-arrows, etc., 
manufacture and dying of mats, types; Chinese jars, inlaid storage 
boxes, house-carvings, toys; musical instruments, ranging from the 
most primitive to those carved to resemble animal forms; women's 
clothing and ornaments; men's clothing; betel-nut outfits, hemp coats 
of mail, head-hunters' ornaments and charmed sashes; warfare,— 
spears, shields, bows and arrows, etc.; industries, — forge work, cane 
press, etc., traps; ceremonial objects and house model; textile industry, 
— all stages in manufacture of hemp cloth. The Bila-an cases are 
devoted to: Betel-nut outfits and cases, weaving, etc.; woman's dress 
showing fine embroidery; man's dress, showing fine embroidery; spears, 
knives, shields, bows and arrows, blow-guns, snares; household, — 
manufacture of baskets, sago-maker's outfit. The Kulaman cases 
are devoted to: Warfare and chase; household; mats, baskets, rice 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 213 

culture, etc. ; cloth and clothing, showing peculiar method of decoration 
by oversewing the fabric prior to dyeing; two cases showing household 
utensils, implements and weapons of the pigmy blacks or Negritos. 
The Amburayan Igorot cases are devoted to: Musical instruments, 
long drums, gongs, etc.; fish traps, etc.; transportation; wooden and 
rattan boxes for fire-making outfits, etc., manufacture of same; wooden 
boxes, dishes, carved spoons, etc.; household utensils; copper bowls of 
native manufacture; clothing and manufacture of same. In the 
Asiatic section 2 2 new cases have been installed, so that it was possible 
to open Hall 44 last June. The Hall contains 21 cases, the material 
being distributed as follows: 8 cases of Han pottery, 2 of mortuary 
clay figures, 1 of jade, 1 of bronze implements, 1 of textiles, 1 contain- 
ing tin, wood-carving, enamel, and miscellaneous; 4 of paintings; 
1 illustrating wood-engraving and printing, and 1 containing a screen 
with inlaid feather work. The metal mirrors have been withdrawn 
from the North Court and permanently reinstalled, being arranged in 
chronological sequence, in Hall 45. Three cases, one of silver orna- 
ments ; one of coins, and one of seals and medals ; and one of early Bud- 
dhist bronze figures of the Wei and Tcang periods, have just been com- 
pleted. The Buddhist masks from China and Tibet have been 
unpacked, arranged, and catalogued, and plans have been made for 
their installation in the rotunda. The collection of porcelain and 
faience has been completely labeled and temporarily arranged in 
chronological order in the Wall Cases of Halls 46 and 47, awaiting 
permanent installation as soon as new cases are provided. The 
stone sculptures have been spread out in chronological arrangement 
on tables in the same hall, and it is now possible to survey the Chinese 
material in its entirety. The Tibetan material is still packed away in 
storage cases, but in such condition that any specimen needed can be 
consulted at once. The Modeler has made a cast of an inscription 
stone after a rubbing, to be placed on the stone carving of a tortoise of 
the Tcang period. He has also completed casts from a number of 
seals, as well as from inscriptions and reliefs on metal and pottery vases. 
These have been used for exhibition purposes and largely aid toward 
grasping the scenes displayed on the reliefs of the Han pottery vases, 
which are laid around the shoulders in circular bands. The casts 
have been unfolded and allow a viewing of the designs in a continuous 
row. Casts of two ancient Chinese weights have been made at the 
request of the Director of the Deutsches Museum in Munich and sent 
there as a gift of the Museum. Two cases containing Japanese color- 
prints, acquired with funds of the Mrs. T. B. Blackstone Expedition, 
have been installed in Hall 56, individual explanatory legends being 



214 Field Museum of Natural History -- Reports, Vol. IV. 

printed on the mats of each sheet. The process of Japanese wood- 
engraving and color-printing is illustrated in comparative view with 
the analogous processes of China and Tibet in a case installed in Hall 
44. Many speciinens of ancient Japanese textiles and books illustrat- 
ing costumes and designs are on exhibition in the same Hall. Besides 
a large amount of work which the Section of Photography normally 
does for this Department an especially large number of photographs 
have been prepared for Dr. Laufer to illustrate publications or for 
exhibition purposes. It is gratifying that the collection has already 
attracted the attention of students from abroad and has been studied 
by several, among whom are Dr. William Cohn and Dr. Munsterberg 
of Berlin, the Museum Commission sent by the City of Munich, 
and Mr. Lawrence Binyon of the British Museum. American students 
interested in the East and engaged in Museum work or intending 
to pursue researches in the Orient, have availed themselves of the 
opportunities offered by the Museum collection, — e. g., Mr. Curtis 
and Dr. Denmar Rose of the Boston Fine Arts Museum; Mr. Crane, 
Trustee of the Newark Museum; Miss K. Ball, Superintendent of 
Art Education of San Francisco; Mr. Whiting, Director of the Art 
Museum of Indianapolis; President Wheeler of California University; 
Dr. Barrett of the Public Museum of Milwaukee; Dr. Carus, 
Editor of the Monist and the Open Court, and numerous collectors. 
No new cases have been added to the Department of Botany though 
many of the old installations have been rearranged, augmented, and 
preparations made for the rapid installation of new cases now under 
construction. The case devoted to the Orange Family has been re- 
installed through the addition of reproduced leafy branches with one 
or more ripe fruits of the Pumelo or Shaddock (Citrus decumana) and 
a transverse section of the fruit; the Mandarin orange and the Tangierine 
(C. nobilis) ; the usual and the fingered Citron (C. medico) with sections 
of each; the rough Lemon (C. limoniim) of the tropics; the Navel 
Orange (C. aurantium); the sweet and the sour Lime (C. Limetta), 
leaving only the Bergamot wanting to complete the representation 
of this family. The Custard Apple family has received the addition of 
a leafy branch with ripe fruit of the Bullock's Heart or Custard Apple 
(Anona reticulata) ; the Bamboos a reproduction of a full ripe and sprout- 
ing seed, a rarity, as the bamboos seldom perfect fruit. The botanical 
characters of the Buckwheat family are now represented by a complete, 
natural size, branch of the Sea Grape (Coccoloba uvijera) in full leaf, 
flower and fruit. The first case of the three devoted to the Madder 
family now contains a full size branch of the Coffee shrub in full flower 
and fruit as well as an enlarged flower showing its characters ; a natural 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 215 

size "berry" in section and a fruit enlarged to reveal its various parts; 
the Sapodilla family has received the addition of a natural size branch 
of the Sapodilla tree in full leaf and fruit, an enlarged flower cluster, 
and a fruit of the Star-apple with leaves ; the Milkweed family has been 
augmented with an enlarged flower of the rosy Milkweed (Asclepias 
incarnata) showing also the method of its cross fertilization (three 
models) ; in the Arrowroot family three enlarged flowers have been 
modeled and installed illustrating the natural preventive measures 
evolved to prevent self-pollination. A branch has been added to the 
Pine-apple family representing the more usual mode of growth of plants 
of this family as aerophytes resting upon other plants, i. e. Tillandsia 
recurvata growing upon a leafy branch of the Calabash tree. The 
Snakeroots have received the addition of a full size reproduction of the 
Swan-flower vine comprising a portion of the whole plant with several 
leafy vine sections bearing an unexpanded flower and one, fully opened, 
from eight to ten inches in diameter; also a flower in section showing 
the peculiar provision for fertilization by insects, together with an 
enlarged section of the ovary and the column of essential organs. To 
the Rose family there has been incidentally added a reproduction of a 
pair of interesting hybrid apples each showing a clearly demarked half 
of two varieties. To the Clove family a natural size reproduction of 
a full flowering, leafing and fruiting branch of the Guava tree has been 
added, to the Arums the full fruiting head of the Indian Turnip and to 
the Lily family a complete flower of the wild Lily showing its char- 
acteristic organs. Attention to the representation of the multitudinous 
cohorts of lower plant life, the non-flowering plants, most of which 
require modeling through the use of the compound microscope, is now 
begun and the following results placed on exhibition: A natural size 
reproduction of a Giant Puff ball, 14 inches in diameter, and a section 
of the same; a colony of Inky Mushrooms, in situ, comprising a "but- 
ton," a full freshly expanded plant and one in the deliquescing stage 
dropping its spore-charged inky liquid. The Liverworts are represented 
through the following models : A natural size reproduction of a mass of 
plants of Marchantia in situ; an enlarged transverse section of a thallus 
with male branches, rhizoids, gemma buds and open cups; a longitudinal 
section of a thallus with female branches; a life-history group showing 
a female branch, in section, disclosing the archegonia, an archegonium 
in section showing the egg-cell, another showing a sperm-cell entering 
its neck below; a male branch, in section, disclosing the spermaries, 
and a sperm-cell — all modeled highly magnified ; another life-history 
group representing a female branch with spore-capsules (Sporogonia) 
in situ; an embryo formed from the fertilized egg-cell, another with 



216 Field Museum of Natural History -- Reports, Vol. IV. 

its envelopes ruptured, and a third fully developed and discharging 
its spores; a dense cluster of spores and elaters; the germination of a 
spore in four stages; and the formation of a young thallus in two stages. 
The Horsetails (Equiselce) are represented by a reproduction of a sterile 
shoot natural size; a fertile shoot in spore producing stage; and the 
beginning of a life history sequence showing, so far, a greatly enlarged 
section of the female "cone" and the spores in four different states of 
expansion of the elaters. The staff of the Section of Modeling now 
comprises the ollowing artists and artisans: A modeler who is chief of 
the Section, an assembler, a glass worker, a colorist, and a caster 
and trimmer. The Section has executed a large amount of work during 
the past year which is embodied in 10 complete reproductions of leafing, 
flowering and fruiting branches each composed of about 650 separately 
made parts; 20 separate fruiting branch reproductions and 8 enlarged 
flower representations comprising an average of 5 separate models 
each. The following table showing the parts comprising an average 
"whole plant" reproduction will give an idea of the work required in 
these assemblages: 





Branchlets. 


Leaves. 


Flower parts. 


Fruits. 


Buds. 


Coffee . . 


12 


11 


288 


188 


63 


Mangrove . 


• • 27 


359 


164 


25 


17 


Sea Grape . 


. . 16 


98 


I50 


216 


4OO 



The work of revision of the petroleum collection which was interrupted 
by the dismantling of the West Annex was resumed during the year hy 
the Department of Geology and has been carried as near to completion 
as the limited space at present available will permit. The petroleums, 
their liquid derivatives and most of the vaselines were transferred to 
new, tall, oil-sample bottles in which the specimens appear to much 
better advantage than they did in the old style containers. These 
bottles have permitted a much more compact installation and thus 
room has been found for a large number of new specimens of crude 
petroleums and much material that it was previously necessary to 
store. The series as now exhibited consists of a large collection of 
petroleums of the United States, a collection of oil-bearing rocks and 
associated fossils, a collection of lubricating and other heavy, refined 
oils, a collection of vaseline and its preparations, a collection illustrat- 
ing applications of paraffin, some miscellaneous petroleum products, 
and a quantitative collection illustrating the varied products obtained 
from refining crude oil. The old order of installation of the petroleums 
principally according to color has been abandoned and a strictly geo- 
graphical arrangement substituted. The unit group of this arrangement 
is the oil field and each group has been provided with a large label 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 217 

describing the field and in a few words and in simple language, the more 
important features of the oils of that field. The heavy oils and lubricat- 
ing oils are grouped according to method of manufacture into reduced 
oils, paraffin oils, etc., and according to their uses into spindle oils, 
engine oils, cylinder oils, etc. Groups of kerosenes, gasolines and 
naphthas are not shown for obvious reasons. The few specimens of 
these needed to logically cover the subject of petroleum and its deriv- 
atives are represented by bottles filled with a non-freezable mixture of 
alcohol and water. At the time the petroleum collection was removed 
from the west annex plans had been made for a rather complete collec- 
tion illustrating the applications of paraffin. For such part of this 
material as had already been prepared room has been found in the 
cases. The display consists of paraffins, candles and a number of 
articles illustrating the applications of paraffin, especially its applica- 
tion to articles of ordinary household use. Although as it stands this 
collection is rather fragmentary, completion of the paraffin exhibit as 
planned is barred at present by lack of space. The vaseline exhibit 
has been transferred from the somewhat heterogeneous lot of bottles 
in which it was hitherto displayed to uniform, tall, oil-sample bottles 
of the kind used for the crude petroleums. The collection on exhibition 
contains examples of the materials from which vaseline is made, vas- 
elines of several grades, and vaseline preparations adapted to many 
toilet, pharmaceutical and other uses. A variety of objects in the 
preparation of which gasoline or kerosene has been used are also shown 
to illustrate the use of these materials in dyeing, painting, lacquering, 
and various other arts. A series of selected specimens of oils and their 
associated fossils is shown in sufficient number to illustrate the condi- 
tions under which the valuable deposits of petroleum occur. A com- 
plete quantitative exhibit illustrates the quantity of each product, 
intermediate or final, yielded by refining one barrel of petroleum. 
This formerly occupied several large cases but by avoiding unnecessary 
duplication a complete exhibit has been installed in one wall case. It 
has moreover been arranged in a more logical order, and thus the refin- 
ing process may be followed more readily than formerly. As it now 
stands a barrel representing one barrel of petroleum occupies one end 
of the case and the products of distillation the rest of the case. The 
lighter oils are placed in the upper part of the case and heavier oils 
and solids in the lower part. Large labels by the side of each specimen 
explain in simple language just what the specimen is, how it is prepared 
and what becomes of it. Individual labels have been printed and placed 
for all the specimens, and also group labels wherever such labels can be 
used to advantage. While the whole of the material formerly exhibited 



218 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

cannot be displayed at the present time, it is believed that the altera- 
tions in the method of installation are such that the educational value 
of the collection is greater than it was before. The collections of gold, 
silver and lead ores in Hall 34 which had been only temporarily rein- 
stalled after their removal from the west annex were given careful 
revision. Although no great changes were made, slight alterations in 
the positions of over a thousand specimens were instituted so as to 
improve the general appearance of the installation and aid especially 
by displaying in as good a light as possible the important features of 
the individual specimens. The placing of new labels was carried out at 
the same time. A number of specimens from the quartz-gold and 
copper mines of Alaska and a few other individual specimens were added 
to the exhibition series in this Hall. The collections of alkalies, abrasives 
and allied material in Hall 3 1 were cleaned and more or less rearranged 
in such a way as to secure the best illumination. This involved in a 
few instances the interchange of sections of the collection, but prin- 
cipally was accomplished by a rather tedious placing of the individual 
specimens in many positions and at many angles until the best position 
had been found for each specimen. Considerable rearrangement of 
the abrasives collection was also required to make room for a recently 
acquired collection of artificial corundum. An Australian coal column 
was installed in Hall ^t, and encased in glass to insure its protection. 
In Hall 59 the contents of two cases were rearranged and condensed 
in order to devote one to the exhibition exclusively of the fine series 
of fossil mammals collected in 19 10 from the Uintah basin. The 
collection as now exhibited is much the most complete and repre- 
sentative of the mammals of the lower Uintah formation ever shown. 
It includes twenty -four skulls and much other skeletal material. The 
types of one new genus and four new species recently described by 
the Assistant Curator of Paleontology form a part of the series. 
Two models of early forms of iron-smelting furnaces were built 
in the Department work rooms and placed on exhibition. These 
models are part of a series showing the development of the blast 
furnace and supplement the modern blast furnace already on ex- 
hibition. One of the models represents the stone-stack cold-blast 
furnace as it was developed during the first half of the 19th century. 
It consists of a pyramidal stone furnace 8 inches square at the base 
and 1 2 inches high. The working arch at the base which faces the front 
of the model shows the tymp and dam in use at that time. The two 
tuyere arches at the side show the fire-clay tuyeres entering the furnace. 
At the top of the furnace are shown the charging doors. To the right 
of the furnaces limestone cliff rises to the level of the furnace top, and 



"""Slow* 



•""•"SU 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 219 

a roadway on the top of this bluff is continued to the furnace top by a 
wooden bridge on which appears a man transporting a load of ore to 
be fed into the furnace through the open charging doors. At the right 
of the model the blowing engine appears with the dam and water 
wheel to drive them. These engines are two wooden tubs one inch in 
diameter with a third of the same size above for an air reservoir. The 
iron piston rods are driven by a very primitive type of wooden walking- 
beam which in turn is operated through a shaft by a gearing upon 
the circumference of a water wheel. This wheel is a breast wheel 3 
inches in diameter and 1 inch wade and represents upon the scale of the 
model, %. inch to the foot, a wheel of about 12 to 15 horse power. The 
wheel has an iron shaft turning in iron boxes, an iron spider and wooden 
buckets. The dam and retaining walls are built of limestone and in 
part of wooden planks, while the mill race is built of wooden plank 
backed apparently by earth well turfed. At the extreme right of the 
model a small log cabin is built over the mill race. Around the furnace 
and blowing engines a stone-pavecLcourt is placed, while the region 
around the mill race and taiK i rfcO£;,-to J 'aliti from the wheel is a hillside 
covered with imitative grass, bushes.,&ncl ~'tr%6s. The channels to and 
from the water wheel contain a liquid resembling water. The water 
wheel is very carefully balanced and the journals and bearings so care- 
fully constructed that when the "water" is allowed to run over the 
dam the wheel can turn and operate the blowing engines. In operat- 
ing, a concealed pump takes the water from the tail race and delivers 
it to the upper level so that whenever the pump runs, the water wheel 
turns and operates the blowing engines. The slight power required 
for this purpose is, however, not available in the present building. The 
second model built and put on exhibition represents a Catalian Forge 
as it was operated at the close of the 18th century. This model is 30 
inches long and 14 inches high, and is upon a scale of l /2 inch to the 
foot. It consists of a building, a forge, a hammer and a blowing device. 
Of the building three stone walls are shown and rather elaborate roof 
timbers. The forge, but little more elaborate than a blacksmith's fire, 
occupies a space of 1^4 by 2 inches inside the building and against one 
wall. The rest of the space inside the walls is nearly filled by a great 
wooden hammer and its iron-capped stone anvil. The hammer con- 
sists of a wooden beam pivoted at its center and movable by a lifting 
and tripping device operated by a water wheel not shown. On the 
opposite end is a hatchet-shaped iron head. Outside the building is 
shown a trompe, a water-actuated device for producing a blast of air 
to force combustion in the forge. As here shown the trompe consists of 
a device fed by a wooden canal leading water from a brook at a high 



220 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

level. From the bottom of this canal two hollow logs drop vertically 
to a wind chest in which air entrapped by the water falling through the 
hollow logs is collected. From this wind chest the air is conducted to 
the forge by hollow logs, leather and iron pipe, and a sheet copper 
nozzle or tuyere. In the laboratory of vertebrate paleontology atten- 
tion has been chiefly given to preparing the series of Uintah fossil 
mammals collected in 1910. This series has now been practically all 
prepared. The following specimens were worked out during the year: 
Two skulls and one lower jaw of the low-ground ungulate Metarhinus 
riparius; one skull of the closely allied Metarhinus cristatus; two skulls 
and one nearly complete skeleton of the large, river titanothere Doli- 
chorhinus longiceps; a skull of the new species Mesatirhinns superior; a 
skull of the new genus Rhadinorhinus; one skull and two pairs of lower 
jaws of the early rhinoceros Amynodon; an incomplete skull of the 
great horned amblypod Eobasileus; one of the nearly allied Uintatherium; 
two lower jaws of the small cursorial mammal Triplopus; an incomplete 
skull of the archaic and little known Stylinodon; and a large and well- 
preserved skull of the broad-headed Crocodilus. All of these skulls 
or skeletal portions where desirable have been mounted with metal 
supports on standard bases with the exception of the skeleton of Doli- 
chorhinus which was mounted in half relief in plaster preparatory to 
installing it in a special floor case now in process of construction. The 
specimens thus prepared and those of the same region worked out 
previously afforded the Assistant Curator of Paleontology material 
upon which a description of the fossil-bearing horizons of the Uintah 
formations and 'a description of a new subfamily, one new genus and 
four new specimens of titanotheres were prepared and published during 
the year. Opportunity w T as also found for preparation in the laboratory 
of vetebrate paleontology of some additional material collected on 
previous expeditions. This included among material collected by the 
expedition of 1906, acomplete skeleton and additional skull of Steneo 'fiber 
barb our i, two skulls of Pleurolicus leptophrys and portions of skeletons 
of allied species, and from material collected in 1905 a skeleton of Mery- 
coidodon gracilis and partial skeletons or skulls of Ischyromys cristatus, 
Aceratherium sp. and Protoceras celer. Work upon the study series of 
the mineral collection w r as carried on at intervals as opporunity could 
be found and the groups of carbonates and oxides were fully rearranged. 
Individual trays w r ere provided for the specimens and they w r ere labeled 
and grouped according to species and localities. The chemical labora- 
tory with apparatus and equipment w r as moved from Jefferson Avenue 
to Lake Avenue during the year. The new quarters occupied contain 
570 square feet of well-lighted space and are provided with w r ater, 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 221 

electricity, compressed air and steam. The space is divided into two 
rooms of about equal size and it has thus been possible to install the 
hood and furnace in one room and the balances and reagents in another. 
The hood has been provided with a sink and a 10-inch draft pipe. A 
Weisnegg furnace 7 inches by 4 inches by 3 inches provided with gas 
and compressed air furnishes sufficient heat for ordinary ignitions and 
minor assays. Draft for this purpose is provided by a 3 -inch pipe sur- 
rounded by an 8-inch pipe, open at both ends for prevention of over- 
heating. A blowpipe desk and small still for distilling water are in- 
stalled in the same room with the hood and furnace. With the facilities 
afforded some quantitative analyses have been made during the year 
and many qualitative ones. The quantitative analyses included one of 
a Chinese iron, two of Chinese glazes and a pottery body. In addi- 
tion to chemical work it has been found necessary owing to lack of space 
in the Museum building to carry on some mechanical work in the 
laboratory. The two blast furnace models were built there and some 
of the work of preparing the petroleum collection performed. In the 
Department of Zoology a small number of storage cans have been 
installed. Space for this purpose is becoming limited and incoming 
collections are cared for with increasing difficulty. Arrangements 
are being made for storage of skulls of large mammals in discarded 
exhibition cases and in -various ways. Temporary and more or less 
inconvenient methods are necessary to maintain the collection so that 
valuable material may be safe and reasonably accessible. The skin 
dresser has been occupied during the year with skins requiring special 
preparatory to mounting, among which were certain large skins, 
such as rhinoceros and hippopotamus, which it had not heretofore 
been possible to remove from pickle. Four large habitat groups of 
American birds produced under the Field-Sprague Ornithology Fund 
have been completed and successfully installed in a handsome quadrip- 
artite case of the style previously used for such exhibits. The principal 
birds shown are (1) the Northern Loon, (2) the Great Blue Heron, (3) 
the Whooping and Sandhill Cranes, and (4) the Golden Eagle. These 
groups are, without doubt, better in workmanship and reproduction of 
natural conditions of environment than any previously produced. 
They are all of the highest class, but the group of whooping cranes is 
especially interesting, not only from the beauty of its accessories, but 
also on account of the rarity of the birds which are practically on the 
verge of extinction. In the Golden Eagle group the nest contains the 
eggs of the species, but they will ultimately be replaced by a pair of 
"nestling" birds. Another large bird group is well toward completion 
showing a number of interesting pelagic species which nest on Laysan 



222 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Island, in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The material for this group was 
obtained through co-operation with the University of Iowa and it will 
include a striking background painted from original sketches by artist 
Corwin who accompanied the Iowa expedition. In addition to work on 
habitat groups, the systematic collection of mounted birds in Hall 26 
was installed in new cases and entirely relabeled. Two important 
mammal groups, both with painted backgrounds, have been completed 
during the year. These are the group of Sonoran Grizzly Bears and the 
Beaver group. The scene represented in the Beaver group is that of 
woodland and lake in the practically primeval forest on the estate of 
Mr. Cyrus H. McCormick (through whose courtesy the specimens were 
secured) near Champion, Michigan, where the material for the group 
was obtained. A group of Afr can Buffalo consisting of five individuals 
is being prepared for the Museum by Mr. Carel E. Akeley. Work on 
a group of American Bison has commenced and other groups of birds 
and mammals have been planned. Owing to the large amount of time 
spent on group work, additions to the systematic series of birds and 
mammals have been confined to some 30 birds and three mammals. 
Among the latter is an interesting marsupial, the Banded Australian 
Anteater Myrmecobius fasciatus. Mr. Heim, the Museum taxidermist 
in California, has mounted during the year 128 fishes. He also reports 
having in preparation 43 additional specimens. Taxidermist Heim 
has also mounted a crab and crawfish group for a case 6' x 2^' and has 
secured the necessary accessory material. One shark or sawfish 13 feet 
in length and several fishes more than 3 feet in length are included in 
this group. In some cases there are from 6 to 10 examples of one species 
intended to be used later for groups. The assistant in the Division of 
Entomology has given considerable time during the year to mak- 
ing life-history groups of insects, three of which have been completed 
and placed on exhibition. The groups so far completed, as well as 
those under way, with one exception, represent local forms of the order 
embracing the butterflies and moths. They are of interest primarily 
because they illustrate the various stages in the development of an 
insect having a complete metamorphosis. In the Division of Osteology 
560 skulls were cleaned for the Division of Mammalogy; 27 skeletons 
cleaned for the unmounted collection of comparative osteology ; 4 skele- 
tons repaired and remounted ; 5 skeletons mounted for the Systematic 
collection of osteology and 5 skulls cleaned and mounted for the collec- 
tion of craniology. 

printing.— - The Printing Office shows unusually good results. It 
is satisfactory to report that not only has there been an increase in the 
number of labels printed, and all accumulated copy treated, but the 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 223 

stage has now been reached where it is possible to keep up with incom- 
ing work. During the year the following work has been accomplished: 



Department of Anthropology- 
Department of Botany . 
Department of Geology 
Department of Zoology 

General 

Library 



Labels. 


Other Impressions 


5.645 




I-O34 


32,135 


5,528 


5,350 


I,o68 


29,IOO 




77,062 




22,000 



photography and illustration. — The following table gives the result 
■of the operations performed in this important Division: 





> 

C3 
M 


a 
■G 


c 


bo.2 


Negatives 

developed 

for field 

expeditions. 


. 

CTJ C/> 

5 P. 


Lumiere 

autochrome 

color 

plates. 


Director's Office . 


I 


86 




. . 


12 




. . 


Department of Anthro- 
















pology 


328 


4,063 


84 




56 






Department of Botany . 


93 


1,452 


i75 


23 


12 


5 


4 


Department of Geology . 


59 


186 


43 










Department of Zoology . 


H5 


625 


78 




128 






Distribution . . . . 


. . 


50 












Gift 




174 


21 










■Sale 




92 


17 


2 









Totals 596 6.728 418 25 208 5 4 

attendance. — The actual attendance for 1912 was approximately 
15,000 more than the previous year. It is encouraging also to report 
a sharp increase in the attendance of school children and students. 
The following is a gratifying list of the school and university classes 
(twenty pupils or more) that visited the Museum during the year: 

Schools and Locations 

Carter Practice — - Sixty-first Street and Wabash Avenue 

Addison Normal — Addison, Illinois 

University Elementary — Fifty-ninth Street and Monroe Avenue 

Thornton Township High — Harvey, Illinois 

Thornton Township High — Harvey, Illinois 

Lewis Institute — • 1955 West Madison Street 

Paul Revere — Thirteenth Place and Throop Street .... 
University Elementary — Fifty-ninth Street and Monroe Street 

West Chicago High —  West Chicago, Illinois 

Northern Teachers' Association 

University of Chicago —  Chicago, Illinois 

Ray — Fifty-seventh Street and Monroe Avenue 

Northern Teachers' Association 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 



Teachers. 


Pupils. 


3 


43 


1 


26 


3 


36 


1 


45 


1 


42 


1 


32 




40 


4 


20 


1 


22 


IOI 






22 


1 


21 


140 




2 


38 



224 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



Schools and Locations 

Canadian Teachers' Association 

Hinsdale — Hinsdale, Illinois 

Parker High — 330 Webster Avenue 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

Parker High — 330 Webster Avenue 

Drummond — Clybourn Place and North Lincoln Street . 

Addison Normal — Addison, Illinois 

New Trier High — Winnetka, Illinois 

Lyons Township High — La Grange, Illinois 

Hyland Park —  Hyland Park, Illinois 

Chicago Academy of Fine Arts — 6 East Madison Street 

Parker High —  330 Webster Avenue 

Ray — Fifty-seventh Street and Monroe Avenue 

Parker High — 330 Webster Avenue 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

University Elementary — Fifty-ninth Street and Monroe Avenue 

Waller High — Orchard and Center Streets 

McKinley High — W. Adams Street corner Hoyne Avenue 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

Blue Island — Blue Island, Illinois 

Libby Open-Air School 

Girton — Winnetka, Illinois 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

Hyland Park —  Hyland Park, Illinois 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue 

Ray — Fifty-seventh Street and Monroe Avenue 

Parker High —  330 Webster Avenue 

Drake — Twenty-sixth Street and Calumet Avenue .... 

Chase — Point Place and Cornelia Court 

Hyde Park High —  Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue 
Arthur A. Libby — Fifty-third and Loomis Streets .... 
Chicago Academy of Fine Arts —  6 East Madison Street 
University Elementary — Fifty-ninth Street and Monroe Avenue 

Goodrich — Sangamon and Taylor Streets 

University Elementary — Fifty -ninth Street and Monroe Avenue 

University of Chicago —  Chicago, Illinois 

Wendell Phillips High —  Thirty-ninth Street and Prairie Avenue 
Carter Practice —  Sixty-first Street and Wabash Avenue 

Holden — • Thirty-first and Loomis Streets 

McKinley High — W. Adams Street corner Hoyne Avenue 

St. Andrews — 3613 South Wood Street 

Moody Bible Institute — 153 Institute Place 

Englewood High — Sixty-second Street and Stewart Avenue 
Raymond — Thirty-sixth Place and Wabash Avenue .... 
University Elementary —  Fifty-ninth Street and Monroe Avenue 

Ray — Fifty-seventh Street and Monroe Avenue 

Wendell Phillips High — Thirty-ninth Street and Prairie Avenue 



Teachers. 


Pupils. 


42 




6 


20 


1 


22 




31 


1 


22 


3 


55 


1 


26 


2 


54 


1 


20 


8 


28 


1 


90 


1 


22 


2 


45 


1 


20 




40 


3 


23 


1 


27 


2 


45 




40 


3 


22 


1 


20 


3 


28 


1 


26 




21 


7 


70 


1 


37 


2 


30 


1 


32 


1 


37 


1 


35 


2 


43 


1 


37 




28 


1 


24 


1 


22 


2 


37 


1 


20 




24 


1 


20 


2 


, 3o 


1 


35 


2 


30 


4 


49 




4-2 


2 


212 


2 


95 


3 


20 


2 


30 




40 



Jan., 1913. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



'25 



Schools and Locations 

John Marshall High — Adams Street between Spaulding and 
Kedzie Avenues 

Blue Island — Blue Island, Illinois 

Wendell Phillips High —  Thirty-ninth Street and Prairie Avenue 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

Wilmette — - Wilmette, Illinois 

Seglitz Park — Blue Island, Illinois 

Chicago Academy of Fine Arts — 6 East Madison Street 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

East Chicago High — East Chicago, Illinois 

Greenwood — Blue Island, Illinois 

Farragut — Twenty-third Street and Spaulding Avenue 

University of Chicago —  Chicago, Illinois 

Lincoln —  Blue Island, Illinois 

Goodrich — Sangamon and Taylor Streets 

Perkins Bass — Sixty-sixth and May Streets 

Willard — Forty-ninth Street and St. Lawrence Avenue 

Goodrich — - Sangamon and Taylor Streets 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

Burr — Wabansia and North Ashland Avenues 

St. Brendan — 14 17 West Sixty-seventh Street 

Harvey — Harvey, Illinois 

St. John's — 308 West Twenty-fifth Street 

Blue Island — Blue Island, Illinois 

Seward — Forty-sixth Street and Hermitage Avenue 

Seymour — Blue Island, Illinois 

Darwin — Edgewood Avenue and Catalpa Court .... 

Sawyer Avenue — Blue Island, Illinois 

Wm. H. Ryder — Eighty-ninth Street and Lowe Avenue 

Kenwood —  Fiftieth Street and Lake Avenue 

G. M. Pullman — One Hundred and Thirteenth Street and Morse- 
Avenue 

Komensky — Throop and Twentieth Streets 

J. N. Thorpe — Eighty-ninth Street and Superior Avenue . 

University of Chicago — - Chicago, Illinois 

West Hammond — West Hammond, Illinois 

St. Charles — St. Charles, Illinois 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

Holden Vacation — Thirty-first and Loomis Streets .... 

Greene Vacation — Thirty-sixth and Paulina Streets 

Jefferson Park Summer — Elburn Avenue and Laflin Street . 

McCormick Vacation — - Twenty-seventh Street and Sawyer 
Avenue 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

University of Chicago —  Chicago, Illinois 

Moody Bible Institute — 153 Institute Place 



Teachers. Pupils. 



I 


20 


4 


25 


1 


52 


2 


45 




25 


2 


47 


2 


27 


1 


75 




25 


2 


47 


3 


27 


2 


22 




30 


2 


50 


2 


75 


1 


44 


1 


32 


2 


85 




24 


1 


40 


2 


60 


3 


75 


1 


84 


5 


132 


2 


32 


3 


135 


2 


40 


1 


35 


1 


35 


1 


40 


2 


70 


1 


25 


2 


45 




35 


4 


93 


5 


30 




32 




22 




25 


35 


412 


11 


180 


5 


54 


26 


59i 




24 




25 




25 



226 Field Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Schools and Locations Teachers. Pupils. 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 29 

Harrison Vacation — Twenty- third Street and Princeton Avenue . 13 216 

Libby Open Air — Loomis and Fifty-third Streets 5 35 

Forrestville — Forty-fifth Street and St. Lawrence Avenue ... 3 122 

Washington — North Morgan Street and Grand Avenue ... 3 59 

Wendell Phillips High — Thirty-ninth Street and Prairie Avenue . 25 

Kenwood — Fiftieth Street and Lake Avenue 3 21 

Bethany Bible Institute — 3435 West Van Buren Street. ... 28 

Lake High — West Forty-seventh Place and Union Avenue ... 1 45 

Lewis Institute — 1955 West Madison Street 1 24 

University Elementary — Fifty-ninth Street and Monroe Avenue . 1 21 

Bethany Bible Institute — - 3435 West Van Buren Street .... 20 

Chicago Evangelistic Institute — 1754 Washington Boulevard . . 3 38 

University Elementary — Fifty-ninth Street and Monroe Avenue . 1 28 

Chicago Latin — 18 East Division Street 4 25 

Harper — Sixty-fifth and Wood Streets 2 87 

Evanston — Evanston, Illinois 1 25 

Gladstone — Robey Street and Washburne Avenue 4 102 

Crane Technical High — 2246 West Van Buren Street .... 1 21 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 'I 41 

Lincoln — Kemper Place and Hamilton Court 4 50 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 1 21 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 1 41 

McKinley High — W. Adams Street corner Hoyne Avenue . 1 25 

Herewith are also submitted financial statement, list of accessions, 
names of members, etc. 

Frederick J. V. Skiff, Director. 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XXXVI. 



sc 




AURANTIACEAE ClTRUS FAMILY. 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 227 



Financial Statement 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
January 1, 1912 to December 31, 1912 



Receipts 



Cash in Treasurer's hands, December 31, 191 1 $30,218.78 

Petty Cash on hand, December 31, 1911 739-95 

Dues of Annual Members 1,310.00 

Life Members 2,500.00 

Life Memberships Investment Income fv-.fcv^.. 179.24 

Admissions and Check Rooms . . «W*\# -^jT-g S4 ; ^^-- . .... 5,933- 15 

Sale of Guides "••-•.*. ...... 260.50 

South Park Commissioners 15,000.00 

Interest on Investments and Bank Balances 34,602.80 

Field Endowment Income 136,500.00 

Field Endowment Sinking Fund 500 . 00 

Field Endowment Sinking Fund Income 100.00 

Sundry Receipts and Refunds 2 > 159-33 

Sundry Sales 53-72 

Joseph N. Field South Pacific Islands Fund Investment Income . . 86 . 1 1 

Joseph N. Field South Pacific Islands Fund Investment retired . . 5,000.00 

Field-Sprague Ornithology Fund 600.00 

Stanley McCormick Hopi Fund 1,236.98 

Huntington W. Jackson Library Fund 40 . 00 

Mrs. T. B. Blackstone Fund 3,165.19 

R. F. Cummings Philippine Fund 688.32 

Special Donation — Tuesday Art and Travel Club 600 . 00 

New Exhibition Cases Fund Investments Income 6,426.61 

New Exhibition Cases Fund Investment retired 13,500.00 

Sale of Real Estate 5,000.00 

General Fund — Mortgages retired 13,500.00 

$279,900.68 



228 Field Museum of Natural History -- Reports, Vol. IV. 



Disbursements 



Salaries 

Guard Service 
Janitor Service 
Fire Protection 
Heat and Light — 

Wages 

Fuel . . . . 

Supplies, Gas, etc. 



Repairs and Alterations — 

Wages of Carpenters, Painters, Roofers, etc. 
Material used — paints, oils, glass, lumber, plan- 
ter, etc 



Furniture and Fixtures . 

The Library — 

Books and Periodicals 
Binding .... 
Sundries .... 



Sections of Printing and Photography 

Collections, etc., purchased 

Departmental Expenses 

Expeditions 

Publications 

General Expense — 

Freight, Expressage and Teaming . 
Stationery, Postage, Telephone, Engraving 
Northern Trust Company, Custodian Fee 

Lecture Course Expenses 

Sundries 



Field-Sprague Ornithology Fund . 
Joseph N. Field South Pacific Islands Fund 
R. F. Cummings Philippine Fund 
Stanley McCormick Hopi Fund 
Mrs. T. B. Blackstone Fund .... 

Homer E. Sargent Fund 

New Exhibition Cases Fund . . .■ . 



In Treasurer's hands, December 31, 191 2 

Petty Cash on hand, December 31, 1912 . 

Byron L. Smith, Treasurer, Endowment Sinking Fund 

New Exhibition Cases Fund Investments 

New Exhibition Cases Fund Suspense .... 

N. W. Harris Public School Extension Fund Suspense 

Life Memberships Investment . 

General Fund Investments 





$9 6 .939.42 




13,283.23 




7.377-14 




4,071 .00 


$4,009.66 




7,369.61 




2.397.74 


13.777 01 


S10.742.02 




1,109.56 


11,851.58 




15.059 54 


$2,195.09 




810.38 




46.30 


3.051 77 




1.547-86 




28,702.63 




5.912.04 




5.353 04 




4.913 95 


S4.578.43 




1,419.01 




357.63 




765.10 




2,105.58 


9.225 -75 




51560 




5,005.10 




805.91 




1,867.28 




2,865.19 




12.19 




5,881.01 




$238,018.24 


$8,342.10 




739-95 




500 . 00 




12,000.00 




1,829.24 




171-15 




5,500.00 




12,800.00 


41,882.44 




$279,900.68 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 229 



ATTENDANCE AND RECEIPTS FROM JANUARY 1 TO 

DECEMBER 31, 1912 



Attendance. 
Paid Attendance — 

Adults 2 °»599 

Children 2,289 ' 22,888 

Free Admission on Pay Days — 

School Children ' 6,050 

Students 4,018 

Teachers 1,010 

Members: Corporate 25 

Annual 57 

Life 7 

Officers' Families 77 

Special 123 

Press 19 11,386 

Admissions on Free Days — 

Saturdays 4i>796 

Sundays 138,443 180,239 



Total Attendance 214,513 

Highest Attendance on any one day (August 4, 1912) . . 6,757 

Highest Paid Attendance on any one day (September 2, 1912) 585 

Average Daily Admissions (364 days) 589 

Average Paid Admissions (260 days) 88 

Receipts. 

Guides sold — 1,042 at 25 cents each $ 260.50 

Articles checked — 1 1 ,090 at 5 cents each 554-50 

Admissions 5.378.65 

$6,193-65 



230 Field Museum of Natural History - - Reports, Vol. IV 



Accessions 



DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 
(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AYER, E. E., Chicago. 

Ethnological material — North America. 
BAKER, C. H., JR., Chicago. 

Ethnological material — Japan and South Pacific Islands. 
BLACKSTONE, MRS. T. B., Chicago. 

Ethnological material — Tibet. 

Ancient Chinese pottery — Honan Province, China. 
DE YOUNG, M. H., San Francisco,. California. 

Lamanistic drum of portions of two skulls — Tibet. 
ETHERIDGE, R., Melbourne, Australia. 

Ethnological material — Australia (exchange). 
FIELD, JOSEPH N., Manchester, England. South Pacific Islands Fund. 

General ethnological collection — Melanesia (Collected by A. B. Lewis). 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Purchases : 

Silk tapestry with figures representing Buddhist priests and acolytes — 
China. 

Collection of Etruscan jars, bronze vase, Etruscan sarcophagus and wine 
jars — Italy. 

Etruscan jewelry — Rome, Italy. 

Pike-like tool of stone — Michigan. 

Buffalo robe with painted ornamentations on one side. 

Ingot of Chinese steel of Ming Dynasty — China. 

Large grooved axe of hematite — Keokuk County, Iowa. 

Crown of tortoise shell, human bones, etc.. ear ornaments, miniature god 
in stone, tubular stone bead — Marquesas Islands. 

Album in red lacquered binding and two vases of iron — China and 
Japan. 
HILL ; MRS. D. J. 

Gold bracelet — Northwest coast, United States. 
LAGERQUIST, REV. A. W., Chicago. 

Four Chinese documents and two Cash bills — China. 
SARGENT, HOMER E., Chicago. 

Ethnological specimens — British Columbia. 
SKINNER, GARDNER M., Royal Centre, Indiana. 

Axes, hammers, pestles, celts, stone balls, etc. — Ohio and Indiana. 
STAFFORD, REV. S. M., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 

Clay mold of miniature human face — Mexico. 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 231 

TUESDAY ART AND TRAVEL CLUB OF CHICAGO. 

Two Chinese scroll paintings — Peking, China. 
WOLEY, DR. H. P., Chicago. 

Two arrow heads, two pipes and two celts. 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 
ARNOLD ARBORETUM, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts. 

134 herbarium specimens — United States and Canada (exchange). 
ARTHUR, J. C, Lafayette, Indiana. 

1 herbarium specimen — Nordeshof , North Dakota. 
BEARDSLEY, WALTER H., Chicago. 

1 photograph of Aristolochia grandi flora — Chicago. 
BOTANIC GARDENS, Sebpur, Calcutta, India. 

1 specimen fruits of Melocanna bambusoides Trin. — India. 

1 specimen seeds of Bamboo — India. 
BOTANIC GARDENS, Sydney, Australia. 

102 herbarium specimens — Australia (exchange). 
BROOKS, F. E., French Creek, West Virginia. 

2 herbarium specimens — West Virginia. 
BRUMBACK, MISS FLORENCE M., Waukegan, Illinois. 

herbarium specimens — Colorado. 
CAMPBELL, ALEXANDER & CO., Shanghai, China. 

29 specimens China Teas — China. 
CHAMBERLAIN, C. J., Chicago. 

1 specimen fruit Encephalartos Altensteinii in glycerin — South Africa. 
4 herbarium specimens — Africa and Australia. 

CHANEY, RALPH W., Chicago. 

300 herbarium specimens — Michigan. 
43 herbarium and economic specimens — Colorado. 
COULTER, J. M., Chicago. 

3 herbarium specimens — Mexico and New Mexico. 

2 photographs of Quercus Alexanderi — Michigan. 
CROSBY, MISS GRACE, Chicago. 

1 herbarium specimen — Illinois. 
DAHLGREN, B. E., Chicago. 

1 specimen Fatsia papyrifera — Postal Cards — Chicago Market. 
DEANE, WALTER, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 
22 herbarium specimens — United States. 
DORME, E. V. G., Brampton, Canada. 

1 specimen leaves of Leucadendron argenteum — St. Helena Island. 
EIKENBERRY, WILLIAM LEWIS, Chicago. 

88 herbarium specimens  — Idaho, Wyoming and Yellowstone National 
Park. 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Collected by C. F. Millspaugh: 

29 herbarium specimens. 
Collected by O. E. Lansing, Jr. : 

63 herbarium specimens — Golf, Illinois. 



232 Field Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

12 herbarium specimens — Gary, Indiana. 
415 herbarium specimens — Illinois. 

42 herbarium specimens — Indiana. 
3 herbarium specimens — Indiana. 

Gingko biloba — branch, and Diospyros Virginiana — fruiting 
branch — Indiana. 
Collected by C. F. Millspaugh: 

63 herbarium specimens — Arizona and New Mexico. 

13 herbarium specimens — California. 

32 herbarium specimens — Oahu, Sandwich Islands. 
15 herbarium specimens — Kamakura and Tokyo, Japan. 
72 herbarium specimens — Japan. 
8 economic specimens — Kyoto, Japan. 

15 economic specimens — Japan, China and Sandwich Islands. 

3 economic specimens — Philippine Islands. 

4 economic specimens — Philippine Islands. 
44 herbarium specimens — China and Japan. 

2 economic specimens — Straits Settlements. 

2 specimens fruits and seeds of Hevea — Straits Settlements. 

3 economic specimens — India and Singapore. 
57 herbarium specimens —  Philippine Islands. 

52 herbarium specimens — India and Java. 

1 specimen old amber beads — Bremen Market. 
1 economic specimen — Sicily. 
220 economic specimens — Java. 
56 herbarium and economic specimens and water color studies —  Java and 
Straits Settlements. 

53 herbarium specimens — Ceylon. 

68 economic specimens — Ceylon, India, Japan and Java. 
Collected by H. H. Smith: 

24 herbarium and economic specimens — Washington. 

herbarium specimens and dry fruits. 

herbarium specimens. 

1 6 specimens tree trunks — California, 
economic specimens — California. 

herbarium and economic specimens — California. 

herbarium and economic specimens and dry fruits — California. 

14 economic specimens — California. 
3 economic specimens — California. 

1 herbarium specimen — California. 

2 specimens Pinus monophylla — - gum, and Juglans California — nuts — 

California and Nevada. 
Purchases: 

20 economic specimens — Japan. 

3 Bikaner Lacquer Vases — India, 
herbarium specimens. 

213 herbarium and economic specimens — Tobago, West Indies. 
22 economic specimens — Philippine Islands. 
112 herbarium specimens — Illinois and Texas. 
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Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 233 

867 herbarium specimens —  Michigan. 
42 specimens — steps in lacquer process — Japan. 
2 specimens — Oil of Lemon and Citric Acid — Sicily, 
herbarium of the late J. H. Schuette. 
252 herbarium specimens — Society Islands and New Zealand. 
451 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 
839 herbarium specimens — Idaho. 
236 herbarium specimens — Santo Domingo. 
260 herbarium specimens — Philippine Islands. 

102 herbarium specimens — Bolivia. 

103 herbarium specimens — Bolivia. 
Modeled by B. E. Dahlgren: 

1 fruiting cluster of Arisaema triphyllum L. — - Illinois, 
fruiting branch and enlarged flower of Achras Sapota and fruit of 
Chrysophyllum Cainito — Jamaica. 
1 Aloe vera, whole plant —  Jamaica. 
x 6 models, Pyrus Malus, Psidium Guajava, Lycoperdon giganteum (whole 
and section), Coprinus comatus and Asclepias incarnata. 

1 Citrus nobilis, Tangierine. 

13 models of Citrus fruits. 

2 models, Thalia dealbata, enlarged flower, and Tillandsia recurvata, 

group — Jamaica. 

3 models, Chrysophyllum Cainito, sections — Jamaica. 

6 models, Marchantia polymorpha and Equisetum arvense. 

1 model of Sea Grape. 

2 models, Anona squamosa — Jamaica, and Melocanna bambusoides — 

India. 
1 model of Coffea Arabica enlarged flower - — Jamaica. 

1 model of Coffea Arabica — branch. 

2 models, Equisetum arvense and Coffea Arabica. 
I model, Lilium umbellatum Pursh. 

1 model of Psidium Guajava — branch. 
GANO, MISS LAURA, Chicago. 

1 herbarium specimen — Florida. 
GOVERNMENT MUSEUM, Madras, India. 

2 herbarium and 5 economic specimens — India. 
GRAY HERBARIUM, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

1 herbarium specimen — Cuba. 

14 fragments of types and authentic specimens (exchange). 
387 herbarium specimens (exchange). 

GREENE, E. L., Washington, D. C. 

12 herbarium specimens — West Virginia. 
GREENMAN, J. M., Chicago. 

2 Plant Illustrations. 

1 herbarium specimen — Michigan. 
22 Plant Descriptions. 
1 herbarium specimen — Oklahoma. 
1 engraving of Newcastlia apodistra F. M. — Australia. 
HAUPT, ARTHUR W., Chicago. 

15 herbarium specimens — North Dakota, North Carolina and Oregon. 



234 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

HEATH, J. R., Carpinteria, California. 

i fruiting branch, Citrus species — California. 
HILL, ELLSWORTH J., Chicago. 

I herbarium specimen — Indiana. 
HYNES, J. A., Chicago. 

I Apium graveolens. 
INDIAN MUSEUM, Calcutta, India. 

327 economic specimens — India (exchange). 
INGRAHAM, N. B., Whittier, California. 

13 Eucalyptus Oils — California. 
JONES, R. H., Chicago. 

I talking machine needle. 
K. B. BOTANISCHEN MUSEUMS, Munich, Bavaria. Germany. 

991 herbarium specimens — Bavaria, Germany (exchange). 
KRASOWSKI, MICHAEL, Chicago. 

1 fruit of "Locka Bean" — Central Africa. 
LANSING, O. E., JR., Chicago. 

3 fungi — Illinois and Michigan. 

164 herbarium specimens — Richland County, Wisconsin. 
LIMA, J. A., Santiago de las Vegas, Cuba. 

2 herbarium specimens — Cuba. 
LOEB, J. A. Chicago. 

1 herbarium specimen — Chicago. 
MACKENSEN, B., San Antonio, Texas. 

1 photograph of Opuntia leptocarpa Mackensen. 

2 herbarium specimens — Texas. 

4 specimens of Opuntia — Texas. 
MILLSPAUGH. MRS. C. F., Chicago. 

1 specimen hand made arrowroot starch — Harbor Springs, Michigan. 

1 herbarium specimen — Wisconsin. 
MILLSPAUGH, C. F., Chicago. 

3 herbarium specimens — Chicago. 
204 herbarium specimens — Wisconsin. 

NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN, New York. 

2 herbarium specimens — Rocky Mountains and Jamaica. 
1 photograph of type of Andrachne Brittonii Urban. 

807 herbarium specimens (exchange). 

4 herbarium specimens — Louisiana. 

3 herbarium specimens — Cuba. 

12 herbarium specimens  — Bahamas (exchange). 
562 herbarium specimens — West Indies (exchange). 

1 herbarium specimen — Bermuda (exchange). 
1 1 herbarium specimens — Jamaica (exchange) . 

PACIFIC COAST KELP MULCH COMPANY. Los Angeles, California. 

9 kelp products — California. 
PARISH, S. B., San Bernardino California. 

2 herbarium specimens — Southern California. 

9 herbarium specimens — Arizona and California. 
RETON, M. C, San Diego, California. 

3 specimens kelp basket material and basket — California. 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 235 

ROTHROCK, J. T. West Chester, Pennsylvania. 

156 mosses — United States and Europe. 
ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, Peradeniya, Ceylon. 

26 economic and herbarium specimens — Ceylon. 
SCHUETTE, MISS CLARA, Green Bay, Wisconsin. 

Portrait of the late J. H. Schuette. 
SELM, ARTHUR W., Kankakee, Illinois. 

1 herbarium specimen — Kankakee, Illinois. 
SESSIONS, MISS KATE O., San Diego, California. 

I wood specimen —  California. 
SHELDON, JOHN L., Morgantown, West Virginia. 

1 1 herbarium specimens — West Virginia. 
SHERFF, EARL E., Chicago. 

33 herbarium specimens — Illinois, Arizona, Michigan and Indiana. 
I herbarium specimen — Iowa. 

1 herbarium specimen — Illinois. 

2 herbarium specimens — Arizona and Illinois. 

5 herbarium specimens — Illinois. 
SMITH, ERNEST C, Chicago. 

1 herbarium specimen — Illinois. 
9 herbarium specimens — Illinois. 

STEARNS. ELMER, Chihuahua, Mexico. 

2 herbarium specimens — New Mexico. 
TOWNSEND, C. H. T., Piura, Peru. 

2 herbarium specimens — Peru. 
51 herbarium specimens — Peru. 
TRELEASE, WILLIAM, St. Louis, Missouri. 

1 2 herbarium specimens — Arizona. 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Washington, D. C. 
4 oleoresins — California. 
160 herbarium specimens — Arizona, Colorado, Mexico, New Mexico and 
Texas (exchange). 

6 herbarium specimens — Turkestan (exchange). 
UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM, Washington, D. C. 

272 herbarium specimens — (exchange). 
434 herbarium specimens — (exchange). 
1 herbarium specimen — - San Salvador. 
57 herbarium specimens — North America and Europe (exchange). 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, Berkeley, California 

125 herbarium specimens — California. 
UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, Reno, Nevada. 
4 herbarium specimens — Nevada. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated). 

BARTON, S. W., Chicago. 

19 specimens thomsonite, chlorastrolite and chalcedony — Isle Royale, 
Lake Superior (loan). 



236 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV 

BECKER, A. G., Clermont. Iowa. 

138 specimens invertebrate fossils — Clermont, Iowa. 
BOHM, JULIUS, Vienna, Austria. 

3 specimens meteorites (exchange). 
DE MAUROY, M., Wassy, France. 

7 specimens Kermichel meteorite, aragonite, amblygonite and celestite - 
France (exchange). 
DORSE Y, GEORGE A., Chicago. 

3 specimens ruby crystal and moonstone — Mogouk. Burma. 
EMMERT, H. L., Chicago. 

50 garnet crystals — Blairmore, Alberta, Canada. 
FARRINGTON, O. C, Chicago. 

1 specimen glass sand — Utica, Illinois. 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 

Collected by O. C. Farrington: 

5 specimens eruptive rocks —  Caliente, Nevada. 
Collected by E. S. Riggs: 

2 specimens zinc ore — Carthage, Missouri. 
Collected by A. W. Slocom: 

920 specimens invertebrate fossils — Fayette County, Iowa. 
Purchases: 
Ward-Coonley collection of meteorites. 

I section of Hermitage Plains meteorite — Hermitage Plains, Australia. 
I quartz flask. 

1 skull of Dolichorhinus — Utah. 
1 meteorite — Reading, Kansas. 

1 section of Amalia meteorite — Amalia, South Africa. 
236 invertebrate fossils and minerals. 
1 specimen millerite — Keokuk, Iowa. 
1 gold nugget — Klondike, Alaska. 
60 specimens fossil leaves — Mazon Creek, Illinois. 
1 section Kingston meteorite — Kingston, New Mexico. 
FOOTE MINERAL COMPANY, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

4 specimens minerals (exchange). 
38 specimens minerals (exchange). 

I section of Kilbourn meteorite —  Kilbourn, Wisconsin. 

1 cast of Kingston meteorite — Kingston, New Mexico. 
202 individuals Holbrook meteorite — Holbrook, Arizona (exchange)^ 
GOODSELL, B. W., Chicago. 

1 specimen hematite — Lake Superior. 
GUNDLACH, E. T., Chicago. 

1 part of femur of megatherium — Andes of Peru, South America- 
KENKEL, LOUIS V., Seattle, Washington. 

49 specimens ores and minerals — Alaska. 
LILJEBLAD, EMIL, Chicago. 

1 specimen halotrichite — - Sherrard, Illinois. 
MC CAMMON, E., Oroville, Washington. 

I specimen weathered concretion — Washington. 
MC CREA, W. S., Chicago. 

I specimen emerald in matrix — Colombia, South America. 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 237 

MARSH, C. H., Marshfield, Oregon. 

1 1 specimens mineral wax, agate, petrified wood and obsidian — 
Oregon. 
MASON, THOMAS, Chicago. 

5 specimens fossil plants — Luke Creek, West Virginia. 
MILLSPAUGH, C. F., Chicago. 

I specimen flexible sandstone — Futehpur, Sikri, India. 
MUIR, JOHN R., Chicago. 

14 specimens rocks and ores —  Tibet. 
NORTON COMPANY, Worcester, Massachusetts. 

11 specimens alundum and products — Niagara Falls, New York. 
THURSTON, F. A., Chicago. 

1 specimen cyanite — Shawanaga, Ontario, Canada. 
SCHROTT, FRED, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

2 specimens native gold and liebethenite — California and Nevada. 
SKINNER, GARDNER M., Royal Center, Indiana. 

30 specimens fossils, concretions and obsidian. 
UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Washington. D. C. 

228 specimens crude petroleum — United States. 
WINSTON, CHARLES, Chicago. 

340 specimens fossils, rocks and minerals. 
WOLEY, H. P., Chicago. 

205 specimens invertebrate fossils, minerals, lavas, etc. 
ZOLLNER, PAUL, Plainfield, Ohio. 

22 specimens concretions — Coshocton County, Ohio. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

ANDERSON, J. A., Chicago. 

1 saw of Saw-fish and 1 back of Armadillo. 
BEER, EMIL, Chicago. 

14 moths and butterflies — Pennsylvania, Northern Indiana and Northern 
Illinois. 
CALVERT, P. P., and McLACHLAN. ROBERT. 

22 dragonflies — Borneo. 
CARPENTER, C. H., Chicago. 

1 butterfly — Edge Wood Grove, Miami, Florida. 
CORY, MRS. C. B., Chicago. 

14 beetles, bugs, etc. — Grand Beach, Michigan. 
DITZEL, H. F., Chicago, 

1 dragonfly — Chicago. 
DYSON, MRS. B. F., Bogota, Illinois. 

1 live Redshouldered Hawk. 
EVANS GAME FARM, Oak Park, Illinois. 

1 skin Canada Goose (domestic). 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Collected by Charles Brandler: 

8 ducks and teal — Washington County, Wisconsin. 



238 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Collected by C. B. Cory: 

5 Striped Ground Squirrels — Burnside, Illinois. 
Collected by W. J. Gerhard : 

283 dragonflies. roaches, grasshoppers, katydids, bugs, butterflies, moths, 
beetles, flies, bees, wasps and parasites — Northern Indiana and 
Northern Illinois. 
103 dragonflies, grasshoppers, bugs, moths, beetles, flies, bees, wasps and 
parasites — Southern Michigan, Northern Indiana and Northern 
Illinois. 
Collected by S. E. Meek: 

7 bugs and beetles — Costa Rica. 
Collected by S. E. Meek and S. F. Hildebrand: 

567 decapods and isopods — Canal Zone and vicinity, Panama. 
Collected by W. H. Osgood and M. P. Anderson: 

83 millipeds, spiders, mites, bird lice, bugs, grasshoppers, butterflies, moths, 
flies, fleas, beetles, etc. —  Peru, South America. 
3 skeletons of small rodents — Pacasmayo, Peru. 
214 fishes — Peru. 

44 lizards, snakes, toads and frogs — Peru. 
525 mammal and bird skins — Peru. 

6 Raccoon skins and skulls — Balboa, Canal Zone. 

127 mammal skins, skulls and skeletons and bird skins and eggs — 

Northern Peru. 
280 mammal skins and skulls, bird skins, bats, opossum-like forms and 

bugs — Peru, South America. 
344 mammal skins, skulls and skeletons, bird skins and eggs, spiders,  

grasshoppers, land shells, lizards, fishes and bats — Peru ; South 

America. 
Collected by A. B. Wolcott: 

139 grasshoppers, bugs, butterflies, moths, beetles, flies, bees, wasps and 

parasites — Northern Indiana and Northern Illinois. 
164 spiders, stoneflies, grasshoppers, katydids, crickets, bugs, moths, 

beetles, flies, bees, wasps and parasites — Northern Indiana, 

Northern Illinois and Missouri. 
Mounted by E. N. Gueret: 

1 skeleton of Toucan — Paramo de Tama, Venezuela. 

1 skeleton of Australian Anteater — Australia. 

2 skeletons of chameleon and 1 skeleton of snake — Africa. 
1 skull of chimpanzee. 

Mounted by W. Heim: 
130 fish — California. 
27 fish — Key West, Florida. 
1 Saw-fish — Tampico, Mexico. 

3 fish and some sea-weeds — Long Beach, California. 
Purchases: 

1 Great Blue Heron — Florida. 
33 specimens mammals — Jay County, Indiana. 
1 banded Australian Anteater — Australia. 

8 bird skins — Tobago, West Indies. 

1 Brewer's Field-mouse — Muskeget Island, Massachusetts. 






Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 239 

100 bird skins — British Guiana. 

8 mounted swans cranes, etc. 

2 skeletons of porpoise — Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela. 
78 birds' eggs and nests. 

24 birds, Albino or partly Albino— Europe (purchased by Mr. E. E. Ayer). 
19 bird skins — Antioquia, Colombia. South America. 
14 butterflies and moths — California, Maryland, New York and Ohio. 

1 Cackling Goose — Washington County, Wisconsin. 
FRIESSER, J., Chicago. 

1 Golden Eagle — Kansas (exchange). 

1 skin Hermit Thrush — Chicago. 

2 skulls buffalo — Fort Pierre, South Dakota. 
GAGE, S. H., Ithaca, New York. 

62 lampreys, larvae and eggs —  Ithaca, New York. 
GILLETT, CLARENCE R., Chicago. 

3 fish. 
GERHARD, W. J., Chicago. 

1 skin Fox Sparrow — Chicago. 
GUERET, E. N., Chicago. 

1 skeleton of Wilson Snipe — Lake Calumet, Cook County.. Illinois. 
HARPHAM, E. L., Evanston, Illinois. 

1 Whistling Swan. 
IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY, Iowa City, Iowa. 

24 species of birds — Laysan Island. 
KWIAT, ALEX., Chicago. 

5 mosquito, beetle, fly, parasite — Northern Indiana and Northern Illinois. 
LILJEBLAD, E., Chicago. 

1 spider — Bowmanville, Illinois. 
LINCOLN PARK COMMISSIONERS, Lincoln Park, Chicago. 

1 chimpanzee. 
LOEB, J. A., Chicago. 

35 bird skins — Central or South America. 
MCDONALD, MRS. H. P., Chicago. 

1 mounted Sail-fish. 
MAIN, W. W., Sinamox, Oregon. 

2 walking-sticks — Sinamox, Oregon. 
MITCHELL, FRANCISCO, Yurimaguas, Peru. 

2 snakes — Yurimaguas, Peru. 
PRAY, L. L., Chicago. 

1 Deer Mouse — Iowa City, Iowa. 
SCHUBERT, A., Chicago. 

1 parasite - — Chicago. 
SNETHLAGE, E., Para, Brazil. 

43 mammal skins — Brazil. 
STEPHENSON, FRED M. 

7 White-eared Kob Antelopes and Wild Dogs — Africa. 
THOMPSON, STUART L., Toronto, Canada. 

1 Otter skull. 
THOMPSON, S. L., Canton, Ohio. 

3 wasp, beetle, bug — Canton, Ohio. 



240 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

UNITED STATES BUREAU OF FISHERIES, Washington, D. C. 

252 freshwater shells — United States. 
WILLIAMSON, E. B., Bluffton, Indiana. 

1 American Coot — Bluffton, Indiana. 
WILLIAMSON, E. B., and DEAM, C. C, Bluffton, Indiana. 

I Whistling Swan — Vera Cruz, Wells County, Indiana. 



SECTION OF PHOTOGRAPHY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated). 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Made by C. H. Carpenter: 

596 negatives Museum specimens, etc., 6728 prints, 418 lantern slides, 25 
enlargements, 208 negatives developed for field expeditions, 5 photo- 
macrographs, 4 Lumiere autochrome color plates. 
Made by Edward L. Baker, Lake Forest, Illinois. 

negatives of general views, landscapes, etc. (The negatives were 

loaned to the Museum and one set of prints donated by Mr. Baker; 
total number of prints including the set presented, 1088.) 
Made by S. E. Meek: 

108 negatives, general views, landscapes, etc. — Panama and Costa Rica. 
Made by C. F. Millspaugh: 

378 negatives, general views, landscapes, etc. 
John R. Muir, Kingston, Canada. 

negatives of landscapes, general views, portraits, etc. — Philippines. 

(The negatives were loaned to the Museum and one set of prints 
donated by Mr. Muir; total number of prints including the set 
presented, 554.) 
Made by W. H. Osgood: 

217 negatives, general views, landscapes, etc. 
Made by H. H. Smith: 

934 negatives, landscapes general views, portraits of trees, etc.— Cali- 
fornia. 

THE LIBRARY. 

BOOKS, PAMPHLETS, AND SERIALS. 

(accessions are by exchange unless otherwise designated.) 

Books and 
Pamphlets 

ACIREALE ACCADEMIA DI SCIENZE, Acireale, Italy 1 

ALABAMA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, University, Alabama 1 

ALBANY MUSEUM. Grahamstown, South Africa 1 

ALLEN, GLOVER M., Cambridge, Massachusetts 1 

ALTENBURG. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT DES 

OSTERLANDES, Altenburg, Germany 1 

AMERICAN ACADEMY IN ROME, Rome, Italy (gift) 1 

AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, Cambridge, 

Massachusetts 2 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 241 

AMERICAN ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Boston, Massachusetts . . . 1 
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF 

SCIENCE, Washington, D. C 1 

AMERICAN CHEMICAL JOURNAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, 

Baltimore, Maryland 2 

AMERICAN FOLK-LORE SOCIETY, Cambridge, Massachusetts . . . 1 

AMERICAN GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, New York City 1 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF MINING ENGINEERS, New York City . 2 

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHARMACY, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania . 1 
AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, New York City . .14 

AMERICAN ORIENTAL SOCIETY, New Haven, Connecticut .... 2 

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Philadelphia 1 

AMSTERDAM. K. AKADEMIE VAN WETENSCHAPPEN, Amsterdam, 

Netherlands 6 

AMSTERDAM. UNIVERSITEITS-BIBLIOTHEEK, Amsterdam, 

Netherlands 2 

ANNALES DES MINES, Paris, France 2 

ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF GREAT BRITAIN AND 

IRELAND, London, England 1 

ARCHAEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF AMERICA, Santa Fe, New 

Mexico *•"*'<&! ^ '-■'■■ 2 

ARCHIV FUR RELIGIONSWIS*SENs£HAFT, Leipzig, Germany ... 2 
ARIZONA AGRICULTURAL EXfrERtM^NT STATION, Tucson, 

Arizona 6 

ARKANSAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Fayetteville, 

Arkansas 5 

ARMOUR INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Chicago 1 

ARTHUR, J. C, Fayette, Indiana 5 

ASHMOLEAN NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY OF OXFORDSHIRE, • 

Oxford, England I 

ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, Calcutta, India 5 

ASSOCIATION OF ENGINEERING SOCIETIES, Philadelphia ... 2 
AUGSBURG. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN FUR 

SCHWABEN UND NEUBERG, Augsburg, Germany 1 

AUSTRALASIA ROYAL SOCIETY, Sydney, Australia 1 

AUSTRALASIAN ORNITHOLOGISTS' UNION, Melbourne, Australia . 2 
AUSTRALIA. GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH, 

Melbourne, Australia 4 

AUSTRALIAN MUSEUM, Sydney, New South Wales 6 

AYER, E. E., Chicago (gift) 1 

BAILEY, F. MANSON, Brisbane, Queensland 7 

BAILEY, H. B., Newport News, Virginia 12 

BAMBERG. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Bavaria, 

Germany 1 

BARCELONA. L'INSTITUT DE CIENCIES, Barcelona, Spain .... 3 

BARNES, WILLIAM, Decatur, Illinois (gift) 6 

BARROWS, WALTER, Lansing, Michigan 1 

BASCOM, F., Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 1 

BASEL. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Basel, Switzerland. . 1 

BATAVIAASCH GENOOTSCHAP WETENSCHAPPEN, Batavia, Java . 3 



242 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

BATH. NATURAL HISTORY AND ANTIQUARIAN FIELD CLUB, 

Bath, England I 

BAY, J. CHRISTIAN, Chicago (gift) i 

BAYERISCHE BOTANISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Munich, Germany . . i 
BAYREUTH. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHE GESELLSCHAFT, 

Bayreuth I 

BEAN, ROBERT BENNETT, Manila, Philippine Islands (gift) .... 4 

BEAN, TARLETON H., Albany, New York 2 

BELFAST NATURAL HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, 

Belfast, Ireland 2 

BELFAST NATURALISTS' FIELD CLUB, Belfast, Ireland 1. 

BELOIT COLLEGE, Beloit, Wisconsin : . . . . 2 

BERGEN MUSEUM, Bergen, Norway 2 

BERLIN. DEUTSCHE ENTOMOLOGISCHE NATIONAL- 

BIBLIOTHEK, Berlin, Germany "... 1 

BERLIN. DEUTSCHE GEOLOGISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Berlin, 

Germany 2 

BERLIN. DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FUR ANTHROPOLOGIE, 

ETHNOL., UND URGS., Berlin, Germany 1 

BERLIN. DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FUR VOLKSTUMLICHE, 

Berlin, Germany 1 

BERLIN. DEUTSCHER SEEFISCHEREI-VEREIN, Berlin, Germany . . r 

BERLIN. DEUTSCHER UNIVERSITAT, Berlin, Germany 1 

BERLIN. GESELLSCHAFT FUR ERDKUNDE, Berlin, Germany ... 2 

BERLIN. K. BIBLIOTHEK, Berlin, Germany 2 

BERLIN. K. BOTANISCHER GARTEN UND MUSEUM, Berlin, 

Germany 2 

BERLIN. K. MUSEUM FUR VOLKERKUNDE, Berlin, Germany ... 3 
BERLIN. K. PREUSSISCHE AKADEMIE DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, 

Berlin, Germany 2 

BERLIN. VEREIN FUR VOLKSKUNDE, Berlin, Germany 2 

BERLIN. ZOOLOGICAL MUSEUM, Berlin, Germany 2 

BERN. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Bern, Switzerland . . 1 

BERN UNIVERSITAT, Bern, Switzerland 38 

BERNICE PAUAHI BISHOP MUSEUM, Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands . . 2 
BIOLOGISCH-LANDWIRTSCHAFTLICHES INSTITUT, Amani, 

D. Ostafrika 2 

BIRMINGHAM. NATURAL HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHICAL 

SOCIETY, Birmingham, England 2 

BLATCHLEY, W. S., Indianapolis, Indiana 3 

BOHMEN. NATUR. LANDESDURCHFORSCHUNG, Prag, Bohemia . . 1 

BOLTON, H., London, England 1 

BOMBAY. ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Bombay, India . . . . 1 

BONN. NATURHISTORISCHER VEREIN, Bonn, Germany 1 

BONN-POPPELSDORF. DEUTSCHE DENDROLOGISCHE 

GESELLSCHAFT, Bonn-Poppelsdorf, Germany 1 

BORDEAUX. SOCIETE LINNEEXE, Bordeaux, France 2 

BOSTON MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, Boston, Massachusetts .... 2 

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY, Boston, Massachusetts 2 

BOSTON SOCIETY OF NATURAL HISTORY, Boston, Massachusetts . 3. 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 243 

BOSTON UNIVERSITY, Boston, Massachusetts 2 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE, Brunswick, Maine 3 

BRAINERD, EZRA, Middlebury, Vermont (gift) 14 

BRANDEGEE, T. S., Berkeley, California 1 

BRANDENBERG. BOTANISCHER VEREIN, Brandenberg, Germany . . 1 
BRAUNSCHWEIG. VEREIN FUR NATURWISSENSCHAFT, 

Braunschweig, Germany 1 

BREMEN. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Bremen, 

Germany 1 

BRISTOL MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY, Bristol, England . . . . 1 
BRITISH ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE, 

London, England . 1 

BRITISH GUIANA ROYAL AGRICULTURAL AND COMMERCIAL 

SOCIETY, Georgetown, British Guiana 2 

BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY), London, England ... 7 
BROOKLYN INSTITUTE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, Brooklyn, 

New York 4 

BROOKLYN PUBLIC LIBRARY, Brooklyn, New York 2 

BRUNN. LANDWIRTH. LANDESVERSUCHSSTATION FUR 

PFLANZENKULTUR, Brunn, Austria 1 

BRUNN. NATURFORSCHENDER VEREIN, Brunn, Austria .... 3 
BRUSSELS. ACADEMIE ROYALE DES SCIENCES, DES LETTRES 

ET DES BEAUX ARTS, Brussels, Belgium 2 

BRUSSELS. INSTITUTS SOLVAY, Brussels, Belgium 5 

BRUSSELS. JARDIN BOTANIQUE DE L'ETAT, Brussels, Belgium . . 1 
BRUSSELS. MUSEE ROYAL D 'HISTOIRE NATURELLE DE 

BELGIQUE, Brussels, Belgium 2 

BRUSSELS. SOCIETE D'ARCHEOLOGIE, Brussels, Belgium .... 2 

BRYN MAWR COLLEGE, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 2 

BUCKING, H., Strassburg, Germany 4 

BUDAPEST. K. MAGYAR-TERMES-ZETTUDOMANYI TARSULAT, 

Budapest, Hungary 2 

BUDAPEST. MAGYAR ORNITHOLOGIAI KOZPONT, Budapest, 

Hungary 2 

BUDAPEST. UNGAR. AKADEMIE WISSENSCHAFTEN, Budapest, 

Hungary 2 

BUENOS AIRES. FACULTAD DE FILOSOFIA Y LETRAS, Buenos 

Aires, Argentina I 

BUENOS AIRES. INSTITUTO GEOGRAFICO ARGENTINO, Buenos 

Aires, Argentina '. 2 

BUENOS AIRES. MUSEO NACIONAL, Buenos Aires, Argentina ... 5 

BUFFALO PUBLIC LIBRARY, Buffalo, New York 1 

BUITENZORG. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Buitenzorg, Java . 8 

CALCUTTA. ROYAL BOTANIC GARDEN, Calcutta, India 1 

CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, San Francisco, California . . 4 
CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Berkeley, 

California 9 

CALIFORNIA STATE FORESTER, Sacramento, California 3 

CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY, Berkeley, California 20 

CAMBRIDGE ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Cambridge, England . . . 1 



244 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

CAMBRIDGE MUSEUMS AND LECTURE ROOMS SYNDICATE, 

Cambridge, England I 

CAMBRIDGE PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Cambridge, England . . i 

CAMBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cambridge, Massachusetts .... 2 

CAMPINAS CENTRO DE CIENCIAS, Sao Paulo, Brazil 2 

CANADA. DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR, GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, 

Ottawa, Canada 6 

CANADA. ROYAL SOCIETY OF CANADA, Toronto, Canada . . . . 1 

CANADIAN INSTITUTE, Toronto, Canada 1 

CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

Cape Town, South Africa 2 

CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Cape Town, South 

Africa 1 

CARACAS. MUSEOS NACIONALES, Caracas, Venezuela ...... 3 

CARDIFF. NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WALES, Cardiff, Wales . . . . 1 

CARDIFF NATURALISTS' SOCIETY, Cardiff, Wales 1 

CARNEGIE FOUNDATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF 

TEACHING, New York City 6 

CARNEGIE INSTITUTE, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 4 

CARNEGIE INSTITUTION OF WASHINGTON, Washington, D. C. . . 1 

CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF PITTSBURGH, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania . . 3 

CARNEGIE MUSEUM, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 4 

CARPENTER, G. N., Dublin, Ireland 1 

CASEY, THOMAS L., Washington, D. C. (gift) 2 

CASSEL. VEREIN FUR NATURKUNDE, Cassel, Germany ' 1 

CATANIA. ACCADEMIA GIOENIA DE SCIENZE NATUR., Catania, 

Italy 2 

CEMENT WORLD PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago (gift) . . . . 1 

CEYLON AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY, Colombo, India 1 

CEYLON ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, Peradeniya, Ceylon 4 

CHARLESTON MUSEUM, Charleston, South Carolina 1 

CHEMNITZ NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHE GESELLSCHAFT, 

Chemnitz, Germany 1 

CHICAGO ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Chicago 1 

CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE, Chicago 10 

CHICAGO HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Chicago 1 

CHICAGO PUBLIC LIBRARY, Chicago 2 

CHICAGO. SOUTH PARK COMMISSION, Chicago 1 

CHICAGO. SPECIAL PARK COMMISSION, Chicago 1 

CHICAGO UNIVERSITY, Chicago 37 

CINCINNATI MUSEUM ASSOCIATION, Cincinnati, Ohio 1 

CINCINNATI NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, Cincinnati, Ohio . . . 1 

CINCINNATI PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cincinnati, Ohio 6 

CINCINNATI UNIVERSITY, Cincinnati, Ohio 4 

CLARK UNIVERSITY, Worcester, Massachusetts 1 

CLAUSTHAL K. BERGAKAD, Clausthal, Prussia 2 

CLEVELAND PUBLIC LIBRARY,. Cleveland, Ohio 3 

COCKERELL, T. D. A., Boulder, Colorado 20 

COLLEGIO DE S. FIEL, Lisbon, Portugal 2 

COLLIERY ENGINEER COMPANY, Scranton, Pennsylvania . . . . 1 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 245 

COLOMBO MUSEUM, Colombo, India 2 

COLORADO COLLEGE, Colorado Springs. Colorado 2 

COLORADO MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, Denver, Colorado . 1 

COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES, Golden, Colorado 1 

COLORADO SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY, Denver, Colorado 1 

COLORADO STATE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. 

Fort Collins, Colorado 5 

COLORADO UNIVERSITY, Boulder, Colorado 2 

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, New York City 1 

CONCARNEAU LABORATOIRE DE ZOOLOGIE ET DE 

PHYSIOLOGIE, Mauritius 3 

CONNECTICUT AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

New Haven, Connecticut 4 

CONNECTICUT STATE FORESTER, New Haven, Connecticut . . . 1 
CONNECTICUT STATE GEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY 

SURVEY, Hartford, Connecticut 2 

COOK, MELVILLE T., Delaware, New Jersey 6 

COOPER ORNITHOLOGICAL CLUB, Hollywood, California .... 3 

COOPER UNION, New York City 1 

COPENHAGEN. BOTANICAL GARDEN, Copenhagen, Denmark ... 4 
COPENHAGEN. NATURHISTORISK FORENTNG, Copenhagen, 

Denmark 1 

COPENHAGEN. ROYAL SOCIETY OF NORTHERN ANTIQUITIES, 

Copenhagen, Denmark 1 

COPENHAGEN UNIVERSITY. ZOOLOGICAL MUSEUM, Copenhagen, 

Denmark 5 

COSTA RICA. CENTRO DE ESTUDIOS SISMOLOGICAS, San Jose, 

Costa Rica I 

CRAFTSMAN, THE, Eastwood, New York (gift) 1 

CROYDEN. NATURAL HISTORY AND SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY, 

Croyden, England  3 

CUBA. ESTACION CENTRAL AGRONOMICA, Santiago de las Vegas, 

Cuba 3 

CZEKANOWSKI, JAN, St. Petersburg, Russia (gift) 7 

DARMSTADT. VEREIN FUR ERDKUNDE, Darmstadt, Germany . . 1 

DAVENPORT ACADEMY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, Davenport, Iowa 1 

DAVENPORT PUBLIC LIBRARY, Davenport, Iowa 1 

DELAWARE COUNTY INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE, Media, Pennsylvania 1 

DENISON UNIVERSITY, Granville, Ohio I 

DETROIT. DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND BOULEVARDS, 

Detroit, Michigan 6 

DETROIT MUSEUM OF ART, Detroit, Michigan 2 

DETROIT PUBLIC LIBRARY, Detroit, Michigan 1 

DEUTSCHER NATURWISS-MEDICINISCHER VEREIN FUR 

BOHMEN "LOTUS," Prag, Bohemia 1 

DIAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago 2 

DOOLITTLE, ALFRED A., Washington, D. C 1 

DORETY, HELEN A., Chicago (gift) 1 

DOWNEY, MARY E., Columbus, Ohio (gift) 7 

DREIBRODT, OTTO, Leipzig, Germany (gift) 1 



246 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

DRESDEN. GESELLSCHAFT FUR NATUR- UND HEILKUNDE, 

Dresden, Germany 2 

DRESDEN. K. SAMMLUNGEN FUR KUNST UND WISSENSCHAFT, 

Dresden, Germany 2 

DRESDEN. K. ZOOLOGISCHES UND ANTHROPOLOGISCH- 

ETHNOGRAPHISCHES MUSEUM, Dresden, Germany 2 

DRESDEN. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHE GESELLSCHAFT "ISIS," 

Dresden, Germany 1 

DROPSIE COLLEGE, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 5 

DUBLIN. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES BRANCH, 

Dublin, Ireland 2 

DUBLIN. NATIONAL MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND ART, Dublin, 

Ireland 8 

DUBLIN. ROYAL IRISH SOCIETY, Dublin, Ireland 6 

DUBLIN. ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF IRELAND, Dublin, 

Ireland 2 

DUMFRIESSHIRE AND GALLOWAY NATURAL HISTORY AND 

ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Dumfries, Scotland 2 

DUNN, SAMUEL O., New York City (gift) 1 

EALING SCIENTIFIC AND MICROSCOPICAL SOCIETY, London, 

England 3 

EAST AFRICA AND UGANDA NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, 

Nairobi, East Africa 1 

EDINBURGH FIELD NATURALISTS' AND MICROSCOPICAL 

SOCIETY, Edinburgh, Scotland 1 

EDINBURGH. ROYAL SCOTTISH MUSEUM, Edinburgh, Scotland . . 2 

EDINBURGH. ROYAL SOCIETY, Edinburgh, Scotland 3 

EGYPT. PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT, Giza, Egypt 3 

EGYPT. SURVEY DEPARTMENT, Giza, Egypt 4 

ELBERFELD. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Elberfeld, 

Prussia 1 

ELISHA MITCHELL SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY, Chapel Hill, North 

Carolina 1 

ENGERRAND, JORGE, Mexico 10 

ENGINEERS' SOCIETY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA, Pittsburgh, 

Pennsylvania 2 

ENOCH PRATT FREE LIBRARY, Baltimore, Maryland 2 

ESSEX INSTITUTE, Salem, Massachusetts 2 

EVANSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY, Evanston, Illinois 1 

EWART, ALFRED L., Melbourne, Australia 7 

EXSTEENS, MAURICE, Brussels, Belgium 1 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, Chicago (purchase) . . .363 
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Tallahassee : 

Florida I 

FOREST AND STREAM PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago .... 2 

FOREST QUARTERLY, Ithaca, New York 1 

FORMOSA, GOVERNMENT. BUREAU OF ABORIGINAL 

AFFAIRS, Taihoku, Formosa, Japan 1 

FORMOSA, GOVERNMENT. BUREAU OF PRODUCT INDUSTRY. 

Taihoku, Formosa, Japan (gift) 2 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 247 

FRANKFURT-A.-M. STADTISCHES VOLKERMUSEUM, Frankfurt-a.-M. 1 
FRANKFURTER VEREIN FUR ORIENTALISCHE SPRACHEN, 

Frankfurt-a.-M., Germany 4:. 

FRANKLIN INSTITUTE, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 2 

FREIBURG. K. SACHS. BERGAKADEMIE, Freiburg, Germany. . . . 1 
FREIBURG. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Freiburg, 

Germany r 

FRIEDLANDER, R. UND SOHN, Berlin, Germany 2 

FROGGATT, WALTER W., Sydney, N. S. W 13, 

GENEVA. CONSERVATOIRE ET JARDIN BOTANIQUES, Geneva, 

Switzerland 4: 

GENEVA. MUSEO CIVICO STORIA NATURALE, Geneva, 

Switzerland 1 

GENEVA. SOCIETE DE PHYSIQUE ET D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, 

Geneva, Switzerland I 

GENEVA. SOCIETE ZOOLOGIQUE, Geneva, Switzerland 5 

GEORGIA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Atlanta, Georgia 4 

GERHARD, W. J., Chicago (gift) 3 

GETTY, HENRY H., Paris, France (gift) 5 

GIESSEN. UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Giessen, Germany .... 4 

GILCHRIST, DOUGLAS A., Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England 1 

GLASGOW NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, Glasgow, Scotland . . 3 

GLEERUP, C. W. K., Lund, Sweden 4 

GORLITZ NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Gorlitz, Silesia . 1 
GOTEBORG. K. VETENSKAPS OCH VITTERHETS SAMHALLET, 

Goteborg 1 

GOTTINGEN. K. GEORG-AUGUST UNIVERSITAT, Gottingen, Germany 5 

GRAND RAPIDS PUBLIC LIBRARY, Grand Rapids, Michigan ... 3 

GRAZ. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Graz, Austria . . 2 

GRAZ. ZOOLOGISCHES INSTITUT, Graz, Austria 2 

GREAT BRITAIN GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, London, England . . . . 1 

GREENMAN, J. M., Chicago (gift) 1 

GRIFFITHS, DAVID, Washington, D. C. (gift) 1 

GRUBE, MRS. LILLY (gift) 1 

GUPPY, H. B., Salcombe, South Devon, England (gift) 1 

GURNEY, J. H., Norfolk, England 1 

HAARLEM. STADTS BIBLIOTHEEK, Haarlem, Netherlands . . . . 1 

HABANA. BIBLIOTECA NACIONAL, Havana, Cuba 2 

HABANA. UNIVERSIDAD DE LA HABANA, Havana, Cuba .... 2 

HAMBURG. GEOGRAPHISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Hamburg, Germany . 1 

HAMBURG. NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM, Hamburg, Germany . . 2 

HAMBURG. WISSENSCHAFTLICHE ANSTALTEN, Hamburg, Germany 7 

HAMILTON SCIENTIFIC ASSOCIATION, Hamilton, Canada .... 1 

HANKINSON, THOMAS L., Charleston, Illinois (gift) 3. 

HANNOVER. STADT-BIBLIOTHEK, Hannover, Germany 1 

HARDWOOD RECORD, Chicago (gift) 2- 

HARTFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY, Hartford, Connecticut 2' 

HARVARD COLLEGE, Cambridge, Massachusetts 6- 

HARVARD UNIVERSITY, Cambridge, Massachusetts 5 

HAVRE. MUSEE D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Havre, France . . b 






248 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

HAWAII AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Honolulu, 

Hawaiian Islands 10 

HAWAIIAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands . . . 1 

HEIDELBERG UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Heidelberg, Germany . 30 

HELLER, A. A., Las Vegas, New Mexico 1 

HONGKONG. BOTANICAL AND FORESTRY DEPARTMENT, 

Hongkong 1 

HONOLULU. BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF AGRICULTURE 

AND FORESTRY, Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands 2 

HORN I MAN MUSEUM, London, England 1 

HUARD, VICTOR A., Quebec, Canada (gift) 1 

HULL MUNICIPAL MUSEUM, Hull, England 1 

HULL SCIENTIFIC AND FIELD NATURALISTS' CLUB, Hull. 

England 1 

IDAHO. MINING INDUSTRY, Boise, Idaho 1 

ILLINOIS. GENERAL ASSEMBLY, Springfield, Illinois (gift) .... 3 

ILLINOIS STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Springfield, Illinois . . 3 

ILLINOIS STATE ENTOMOLOGIST, Springfield, Illinois 1 

ILLINOIS STATE FISH COMMISSION, Springfield, Illinois . . . . 1 

ILLINOIS STATE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Urbana, Illinois .... 2 

ILLINOIS STATE HISTORICAL LIBRARY, Springfield, Illinois ... 4 
ILLINOIS STATE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, Springfield, 

Illinois 1 

ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY, Urbana, Illinois 14 

INDIA. ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Calcutta, India 3 

INDIA. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Pusa, India 2 

INDIA. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Calcutta, India 3 

INDIA, GOVERNMENT. Calcutta, India 7 

INDIAN FORESTER, Allahabad, India 1 

INDIAN MUSEUM, Calcutta, India 24 

INDIANA ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Indianapolis, Indiana 1 

INDIANA STATE BOARD OF FORESTRY, Indianapolis, Indiana. . . 6 

INLAND PRINTER PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago 2 

L'INSTITUT EGYPTIEN, Alexandria, Egypt 5 

INTERNATIONAL BUREAU OF AMERICAN REPUBLICS, 

Washington, D. C 2 

IOWA ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Des Moines, Iowa 1 

IOWA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Des Moines, Iowa 2 

IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, Ames, Iowa .... 5 

IOWA STATE HISTORICAL DEPARTMENT, Des Moines, Iowa ... 2 

IOWA STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Des Moines, Iowa . . . 1 

ISAAC DELGRADO MUSEUM OF ART, New Orleans, Louisiana . . . 1 

ISTHMIAN CANAL COMMISSION, Ancon, Canal Zone (gift) .... 2 

JAMAICA INSTITUTE, Kingston, Jamaica 1 

JANET, CHARLES, Paris, France 9 

JASSY UNIVERSITE, Jassy, Roumania 1 

JENNINGS, F. C, New York City 1 

JOHN CRERAR LIBRARY, Chicago 1 

JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY, Baltimore, Maryland 2 

JOURNAL OF GEOGRAPHY, Madison, Wisconsin 1 






FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XXXIX. 




One of the Elements. 
vegetable standards of weight and measure. 



"*%»»•» 



«<£i* 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report Of the Director. 249 

KANSAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Manhattan, 

Kansas 5 

KANSAS STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Topeka, Kansas ... 3 

KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Topeka, Kansas . . . . 1 

KANSAS UNIVERSITY, Lawrence, Kansas 2 

KARLSRUHE. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Karlsruhe, 

Germany 1 

KAUKASISCHES MUSEUM, Tiflis, Russia 1 

KENTUCKY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Lexington, 

Kentucky 7 

KENTUCKY BUREAU OF AGRICULTURE, LABOR AND 

STATISTICS, Frankfort, Kentucky 2 

KENTUCKY STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND 

IMMIGRATION, Frankfort, Kentucky 2 

KEW. ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, Kew, England 2 

KIEL. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN FUR SCHLESWIG- 

HOLSTEIN, Kiel, Germany 1 

KLAGINFURT. NATURHISTORISCHES LANDESMUSEUM VON 

KARNTEN, Klaginfurt, Austria I 

KONIGSBERG. BOTANISCHER VEREIN, Konigsberg, Prussia ... 2 

KRAKAU. K. AKADEMIE DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, Krakau, Russia . 5 

LA CAMERA AGRICOLA, Merida, Yucatan 1 

LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, Illinois 1 

LAKE MOHONK CONFERENCE OF INTERNATIONAL 

ARBITRATION. Lake Mohonk, New York 2 

LANCASHIRE SEA FISHERIES LABORATORY, Liverpool, England . 1 
LANDSHUT. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Landshut, 

Germany 1 

LAUFER, BERTHOLD, Chicago (gift) 35 

LEICESTER MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY, Borough of Leicester, 

England 1 

LEIDEN. RIJKS ETHNOGRAPHISCHES MUSEUM, Leiden, Netherlands 3 
LEIDEN. RIJKS GEOLOGISCH-MINERALOGISCH. MUSEUM, 

Leiden, Netherlands I 

LEIDEN. RIJKS HERBARIUM, Leiden, Netherlands I 

LEIPZIG. INSTITUT FUR MINERALOGIE UND PETROGRAPHIE, 

Leipzig, Germany ' 2 

LEIPZIG. K. SACHS. GESELLSCHAFT DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, 

Leipzig, Germany 3 

LEIPZIG. GESELLSCHAFT FUR ERDKUNDE, Leipzig, Germany . . • 9 
LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIVERSITY, Stanford University, 

California • I 

LEON, NICOLAS, Mexico City 1 

LEVALLOIS-PERRET L "ASSOCIATION DES NATURALISTES, 

Levallois-Perret, France 5 

LEVY-BRUHE, L., Paris, France (gift) 6 

LEWIS INSTITUTE, Chicago 2 

LIAS, MRS. SOLOMON, Middlebury, Vermont (gift) 1 

LIEBISCH, THEODOR, Berlin, Germany 2 

LIEGE. SOCIETE ROYALE DES SCIENCES, Liege, Belgium . . . . 1 



250 Field Museum of Natural History —  Reports, Vol. IV. 

LIMA. SOCIEDAD GEOGRAFICA, Lima, Peru 2 

LIVERPOOL BIOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Liverpool, England 1 

LIVERPOOL GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Liverpool, England 1 

LIVERPOOL MARINE BIOLOGICAL STATION, Liverpool, England . . 1 

LLOYD LIBRARY, Cincinnati, Ohio 6 

LONDON. ENTOMOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, 

London, England 5 

LONDON. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF GREAT BRITAIN, London, 

England 1 

LONDON. IMPERIAL COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, 

London, England 1 

LONDON LIBRARY, London, England 2 

LONDON. LINNEAN SOCIETY, London, England 6 

LONDON. ROYAL COLONIAL INSTITUTE, London, England . . . 1 

LONDON. ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, London, England . . 2 

LONDON. ROYAL SOCIETY, London, England 2 

LONDON. ROYAL SOCIETY OF ARTS, London, England 1 

LONDON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY, London, England 3 

LUND. K. UNIVERSITETS BIBLIOTEKET, Lund, Sweden 1 

LYMAN, MRS. M. W., Chicago (gift) 7 

McCLURE, C. F. W., Princeton, New Jersey 2 

MACCURDY, GEORGE GRANT, New Haven, Connecticut 1 

MACRITCHIE, DAVID, Edinburgh, Scotland . . . : 5 

MADRAS. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Madras, India ... 3 

MADRAS. GOVERNMENT MUSEUM, Madras, India 2 

MADRAS. HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Madras, India 2 

MADRID. BIBLIOTECA NACIONAL, Madrid, Spain 1 

MADRID. R. ACADEMIE DE CIENCIAS, Madrid, Spain 2 

MADRID. SOCIEDAD ESPANOLA DE HISTORIA NATURAL, 

Madrid, Spain 2 

MAIDEN, J. H., Sydney, New South Wales 2 

MAINE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Orono, Maine . 5 

MAINE STATE LIBRARY, Augusta, Maine 7 

MANCHESTER LITERARY AND PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, 

Manchester, England 1 

MANCHESTER MUSEUM, Manchester, England 1 

MANIERRE, GEORGE, Chicago (gift) 16 

MARBURG. GESELLSCHAFT ZUR BEFORDERUNG DER 

GESAMTEN NATURWISSENSCHAFTEN, Marburg, Germany . . 1 
MARINE BIOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION OF THE UNITED 

KINGDOM, Plymouth, England 1 

MARKS, E. L., Cambridge, Massachusetts 15 

MARSEILLES. FACULTE DES SCIENCES, Marseilles, France .... 2 

MARTELLI, UGOLINO, Florence, Italy 1 

MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, College 

Park, Maryland 6 

MARYLAND GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Baltimore, Maryland .... 2 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF FORESTRY, Baltimore, Maryland . . 9 
MARYLAND STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, College Park, 

Maryland 1 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 251 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Amherst, Massachusetts 4 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Boston, 

Massachusetts I 

MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Boston, 

Massachusetts 2 

MASSACHUSETTS STATE FORESTER, Boston, Massachusetts . . . 1 

MATSCHIE, PAUL, Berlin, Germany (gift) 1 

MELBOURNE NATIONAL MUSEUM, Melbourne, Australia . . . . 1 

MELBOURNE UNIVERSITY, Melbourne. Australia 1 

MEXICO. BIBLIOTECA NACIONAL, Mexico 5 

MEXICO. DIRECCION GENERAL DE ESTADISTICA, Mexico . . . 1 

MEXICO. INSTITUTO GEOLOGICO DE MEXICO, Mexico .... 2 
MEXICO. MUSEO NACIONAL DE ARQUEOLOGIA, HISTORIA Y 

ETNOLOGIA, Mexico 41 

MEXICO. SOCIEDAD GEOLOGICA, Mexico 1 

MEXICO. SOCIEDAD MEXICANA DE GEOGRAFIA Y 

ESTADISTICA, Mexico 2 

MICHIGAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Ann Arbor, Michigan . . . . 1 
MICHIGAN AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Agricultural 

College, Michigan 6 

MICHIGAN COLLEGE OF MINES, Houghton, Michigan 1 

MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY, Ann Arbor, Michigan 2 

MILLSPAUGH, CHARLES FREDERICK, Chicago (gift) 58 

MILWAUKEE PUBLIC MUSEUM, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 1 

MINING WORLD PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago 2 

MINNEAPOLIS PUBLIC LIBRARY, Minneapolis, Minnesota . . . . 1 
MINNESOTA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

St. Anthony Park, Minnesota 1 

MINNESOTA FORESTRY BOARD, St. Paul, Minnesota (gift) . . . . 1 

MINNESOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, St. Paul, Minnesota 1 

MISSISSIPPI AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Agricultural College, Mississippi 2 

MISSISSIPPI STATE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Jackson, Mississippi . . 5 
MISSOURI AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Columbia, 

Missouri 19 

MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN, St. Louis, Missouri 1 

MISSOURI BUREAU OF GEOLOGY AND MINES, Jefferson City, 

Missouri 1 

MISSOURI HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Columbia, Missouri 4 

MISSOURI UNIVERSITY, Columbia, Missouri 3 

MOORE, CLARENCE B., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 2 

MORSE, ALBERT P., Salem, Massachusetts (gift) 1 

MOSCOW. SOCIETE IMPERIALE DES NATURALISTES, Moscow, 

Russia 2 

MUNCHEN. BOTANISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Munchen, Germany . . 2 

MUNCHEN. DEUTSCHES MUSEUM, Munchen, Germany 1 

MUNCHEN. GEOGRAPHISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Munchen, Germany . 1 
MUNCHEN. K. BAYER. AKADEMIE DER WISSENSCHAFT, 

Munchen, Germany 7 



252 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

MUSEO DE LA PLATA, La Plata, Argentina 2 

NAPOLI. ISTITUTO ZOOLOGICO, Naples, Italy 1 

NAPOLI. R. ACCADEMIA DELLE SCIENZE, Naples, Italy .... 3 

NAPOLI. SOCIETA DI NATURALISTI, Naples, Italy 1 

NAPOLI. UNIVERSITA. R. ORTO BOTANICO, Naples, Italy . . . . 1 

NATAL BOTANIC GARDENS, Durban, Natal 1 

NATAL SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY, Durban, Natal 2 

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Washington, D. C 2 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF AUDUBON SOCIETIES, New York 

(gift) : 2 

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY, Washington, D. C 1 

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF WALES, Aberystwyth, Wales 1 

NATURALISTE CANADIEN, Chicoutimi, Canada 1 

NEBRASKA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Lincoln, 

Nebraska 9 

NEDERLANDSCH-INDIE. K. INSTITUT TAAL-LAND-EN 

VOLKENKUNDE, Batavia, Java 2 

NEDERLANDISCHE DIERKUNDIGE YEREENIGING, Leiden, 

Netherlands 1 

NEVADA STATE UNIVERSITY, Reno, Nevada 1 

NEW BEDFORD FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, New Bedford, 

Massachusetts 2 

NEW BRUNSWICK NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, St. Johns, 

New Brunswick 1 

NEW HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, Durham, 

New Hampshire 4 

NEW JERSEY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Trenton, 

New Jersey • 6 

NEW JERSEY GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Trenton, New Jersey .... 5 

NEW JERSEY HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Trenton, New Jersey . . 1 
NEW MEXICO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Mesilla Park, New Mexico 2 

NEW MEXICO HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Sante Fe, New Mexico . . 4 
NEW SOUTH WALES. BOTANIC GARDENS AND GOVERNMENT 

DOMAINS, Sydney, New South Wales I 

NEW SOUTH WALES. DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES, Sydney, 

New South Wales 2 

NEW SOUTH WALES. DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND 

AGRICULTURE, Sydney, New South Wales 8 

NEW SOUTH WALES. LINNEAN SOCIETY, Sydney, New South Wales . 1 
NEW SOUTH WALES. TECHNICAL MUSEUM, Sydney, New South 

Wales * 

NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, New York City I 

NEW YORK AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Geneva, 

New York I2 

NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN, New York City 1 

NEW YORK FOREST, FISH AND GAME COMMISSION, Albany, 

New York l 

NEW YORK. METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, New York City 3 

NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY, New York City 1 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 253 

NEW YORK SOCIETY OF MECHANICS AND TRADESMEN, 

New York City 1 

NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY, Albany, New York 24 

NEW YORK ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY, New York City 2 

NEW ZEALAND. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Wellington, 

New Zealand ! 3 

NEW ZEALAND INSTITUTE, Wellington, New Zealand 1 

NEWARK FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Newark, New Jersey 1 

NEWBERRY LIBRARY, Chicago 2 

NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Raleigh, North Carolina 2 

NORTH CAROLINA GEOLOGICAL AND ECONOMIC SURVEY. 

Raleigh, North Carolina 17 

NORTH DAKOTA STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Bismarck, North 

Dakota 3 

NORTH DAKOTA UNIVERSITY, University, North Dakota .... 3 

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY, Evanston, Illinois 1 

NOTRE DAME UNIVERSITY, Notre Dame, Indiana 2 

NOVA SCOTIAN INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE, Halifax, Nova Scotia . . 2 

NOVARA. INSTITUTO GEOGRAFICO DE AGOSTINI, Novara, Italy . 2 

NUMISMATIC AND ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Montreal, Canada . . 1 
NURNBERG. NATURHISTORISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Nurnberg, 

Germany 2 

OAKLAND FREE LIBRARY, Oakland, California 1 

OBERLIN COLLEGE LIBRARY, Oberlin, Ohio 1 

OBERRHEINISCHER GEOLOGISCHER VEREIN, Stuttgart, Germany . 1 
OHIO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Wooster, Ohio . .14 
OHIO STATE ARCH^OLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 

Columbus, Ohio 1 

OHIO STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, Columbus, Ohio ... 3 

OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY, Columbus, Ohio 4 

OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATION, Columbus, Ohio . . . . 1 
OKLAHOMA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Stillwater, 

Oklahoma 6 

OKLAHOMA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Norman, Oklahoma 2 

ONEIDA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Utica, New York 1 

ONTARIO DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Ontario, Canada . . 27 

OPEN COURT PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago 2 

OREGON AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Corvallis, 

Oregon (gift) 7 

OREGON STATE BOARD OF FORESTRY, Salem, Oregon 3 

OTTAWA DEPARTMENT OF MARINE AND FISHERIES, Ottawa, 

Canada 1 

OTTAWA FIELD NATURALISTS' CLUB, Ottawa, Canada 1 

OUTES, FELIX F., La Plata, Argentina 3 

OXFORD DELEGATES OF UNIVERSITY MUSEUM, Oxford, England . 1 
PALERMO. R. ORTO BOTANICO E GIARDINO COLONIALE, 

Palermo, Italy 2 

PARIS. ACADEMIE DES SCIENCES, Paris, France 2 

PARIS. ECOLE D'ANTHROPOLOGIE, Paris, France 1 



254 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

PARIS. MINISTERE DE L'INSTRUCTION PUBLIQUE ET DES 

BEAUX-ARTS, Paris, France I 

PARIS. MUSEE D 'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Paris, France . . . . I 

PARIS. SOCIETE DES AMERICANISTES, Paris, France I 

PARIS. SOCIETE NATIONALE D AGRICULTURE, Paris, France . . i 

PARKE, DAVIS AND COMPANY, Detroit, Michigan (gift) I 

PASSAU. NATURHISTORISCHER VEREIN, Passau, Germany ... 19 

PEABODY INSTITUTE, Peabody, Massachusetts 1 

PEABODY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ARCHEOLOGY AND 

ETHNOLOGY, Cambridge, Massachusetts 1 

PENNSYLVANIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 12 

PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM AND SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania I 

PENNSYLVANIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 5 

PENNSYLVANIA TOPOGRAPHIC AND GEOLOGIC SURVEY 

COMMISSION, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 8 

PENNSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 9 

PENROSE, R. A. F., JR., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 2 

PEORIA PUBLIC LIBRARY, Peoria, Illinois 2 

PERKINS, G. H., Burlington, Vermont 2 

PERTHSHIRE NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM, Perth, Scotland . . . 1 

PERTHSHIRE SOCIETY OF NATURAL SCIENCE, Perth, Scotland . . 1 
PHILADELPHIA ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania 1 

PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania ! 

PHILADELPHIA COMMERCIAL MUSEUM, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 7 
PHILIPPINE ISLANDS. BUREAU OF EDUCATION, Manila, 

Philippine Islands x 

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR. 

BUREAU OF SCIENCE, Manila, Philippine Islands 14 

PHILLIPS ACADEMY, Andover, Massachusetts 1 

PILGRIM MEMORIAL COMMITTEE, Southampton, England . . . . 1 

PIONEER WESTERN LUMBERMAN, Sacramento, California (gift) . . 1 

PLYMOUTH MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY, Plymouth, England . . I 

POMONA COLLEGE, Claremont, California 1 

PORTICI. R. SCUOLA SUPERIORE D AGRICULTURA, Portici, Italy . 2 
POSEN. DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FUR KUNST UND 

WISSENSCHAFT, Posen, Germany 2 

PRAG. ACADEMIE DES SCIENCES 1 DE L'EMPEREUR FRANCOIS 

JOSEPH I, Prag, Bohemia 2 

PRAG. K. BOHMISCHE GESELLSCHAFT WISSENSCHAFT, Prag, 

Bohemia 8 

PRATT INSTITUTE FREE LIBRARY, Brooklyn, New York .... 2 

PRINTING ART, THE, New York City (gift) 2 

PROVIDENCE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Providence, Rhode Island .... 2 

PURDUE UNIVERSITY, Lafayette, Indiana 1 1 

QUEENSLAND. DEPARTMENT OF MINES, Brisbane, Queensland . . 5 



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Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 255 

QUEENSLAND FIELD NATURALISTS' CLUB, Brisbane, Queensland . 1 

QUEENSLAND MUSEUM, Brisbane, Queensland 2 

QUEENSLAND ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, Brisbane, 

Queensland 1 

QUEENSLAND ROYAL SOCIETY, Brisbane, Queensland 1 

RANDALL AND COMPANY, Chicago (gift) 2 

RENNES UNIVERSITY, Rennes, France 4 

REVUE BRETONNE DE BOTANIQUE, Rennes, France 1 

REVUE CRITIQUE DE PALEOZOOLOGIE, Paris, France ... .1 

REVUE SCIENTIFIQUE DU BOURBON NAIS ET DU CENTRE DE 

LA FRANCE, Moulins, France 1 

LA RE VISTA DE AGRICULTURA TROPICAL, Mexico City . . . . 1 

RHOADS, SAMUEL N., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 5 

RHODE ISLAND AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Kingston, Rhode Island 6 

RHODESIA MUSEUM, Bulawayo, Rhodesia 1 

RHODESIA SCIENTIFIC ASSOCIATION, Bulawayo, Rhodesia ... 2 

RIES, HEINRICH, Ithaca, New York 4 

RIO DE JANEIRO MUSEO NAQIQNAL, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil ... 2 

RIVET, P.. Paris, France . ...'.' 6 

ROBERTS, THOMAS S., Minneapolis, Minnesota 3 

ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Rochester, New York . . . 1 

ROGER WILLIAMS PARK MUSEUM, Providence, Rhode Island ... 2 

ROME. R. ACCADEMIA DEI LINCEI, Rome, Italy 4 

ROSE POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, Terre Haute, Indiana 1 

ROSEN, NILS, Lund, Sweden 1 

ROTH, WALTER E., Georgetown, British Guiana 3 

ROTTERDAM MUSEUM VOOR LAND-EN-VOLKENKUNDE, 

Rotterdam, Holland 1 

ROYAL ARCHAEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF GREAT BRITAIN AND 

IRELAND, London, England 1 

ROYAL CORNWALL POLYTECHNIC SOCIETY, Falmouth, England . 1 
ST. GALL. OSTSCH. GEOGRAPH. COMMERC. GESELLSCHAFT, 

St. Gall, Switzerland I 

ST. LOUIS ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, St. Louis, Missouri 1 

ST. LOUIS. CITY ART MUSEUM, St. Louis, Missouri 4 

ST. LOUIS MERCANTILE ASSOCIATION, St. Louis, Missouri . . . . 1 

ST. LOUIS PUBLIC LIBRARY, St. Louis, Missouri 2 

ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY, St. Louis, Missouri 1 

ST. PETERSBURG. ACADEMIE IMPERIALE DES SCIENCES, 

St. Petersburg, Russia 17 

ST. PETERSBURG. SOCIETE IMPERIALE DES NATURALISTES, 

St. Petersburg, Russia 1 

SALEM PUBLIC LIBRARY, Salem, Massachusetts. 1 

SAN DIEGO SOCIETY OF NATURAL HISTORY, San Diego, 

California 3 

SAN JOSE. MUSEO NACIONAL, San Jose, Costa Rica 2 

SAO PAULO. DEPARTMENTO ESTADUAL DO TRABAIHO, 

Sao Paulo, Brazil 1 

SAO PAULO. INSTITUTO AGRONOMICO, Sao Paulo, Brazil .... 2 






256 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

SAO PAULO. SOCIEDADE CIENTIFICA, Sao Paulo, Brazil . . . . 1 
SAONE ET LOIRE. SOCIETE DES SCIENCES NATURELLES, 

Chalon-sur-Saone, France 2 

SAPIR, EDWARD, Washington, D. C 6 

SARAWAK MUSEUM, Borneo, India 1 

SARGENT, CHARLES S., New York City 1 

SCHLESISCHE GESELLSCHAFT FUR VATERLANDISCHE CULTUR, 

Breslau, Prussia x 

SCHMIDT, P. W., Moiling, Austria 2 

SCHOBERT, ERICH, Leipzig, Germany 1 

SCHWEIZERISCHE ENTOMOLOGISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Bern, 

Switzerland T 

SCHWEIZERISCHE NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Aarau, 

Switzerland 2 

SCHWEIZERISCHE NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, 

Lausanne, Switzerland 2 

SCOTLAND FISHERIES BOARD, Glasgow, Scotland 1 

SELER, EDUARD, Berlin, Germany 2 

SENCKENBERGISCHE NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, 

Frankfurt-a.-M., Germany 

SERGI, GIUSEPPE, Rome, Italy 

SHEFFIELD PUBLIC MUSEUMS, Sheffield, England 

SLOCOM, A. W., Chicago (gift) 

SLONAKER, JAMES ROLLIN, Palo Alto, California 

SMITH, J. D., Baltimore, Maryland 

SOCIETA AFRICANA ITALIANA, Rome, Italy 

SOCIETA GEOGRAFICA ITALIANA, Rome, Italy . . 

SOCIETA GEOLOGICA ITALIANA, Rome, Italy 1 

SOCIETA ITALIANA DI ANTROPOLOGIA, Florence, Italy .... 2 

SOCIETA ROMANA DI ANTROPOLOGIA, Rome, Italy 2 

SOCIETA TOSCANA DI SCIENZE NATURALI, Pisa, Italy .... 2 
SOCIETAS PRO FAUNA ET FLORA FENNICA, Helsingfors, Finland . 2 
SOCIETE BELGE DE GEOLOGIE, DE PALEONTOLOGIE ET 

D'HYDROLOGIE, Brussels, Belgium 1 

SOCIETE BOTANIQUE DE COPENHAGEN, Copenhagen, Denmark . . 1 

SOCIETE BOTANIQUE DE FRANCE, Paris, France 1 

SOCIETE D 'ETUDES DES SCIENCES NATURELLES, Rheims, France. 1 

SOCIETE D 'ETUDES SCIENTIFIQUES, Angers, France 1 

SOCIETE D 'HORTICULTURE ET DE BOTANIQUE, Marseilles, France 1 
SOCIETE DES AMIS DE L'UNIVERSITE, Clermont, France . . . . 1 

SOCIETE DES SCIENCES, Nancy, France 1 

SOCIETE FRIBOURGEOISE DES SCIENCES NATURELLES, 

Fribourg, Switzerland l 

SOCIETE GEOLOGIQUE DU NORD, Lille, France ....... 2 

SOCIETE IMPERIALE RUSSE DE GfiOGRAPHIE, St. Petersburg, 

Russia I2 

SOCIETE NATION ALE D 'AGRICULTURE, Angers, France . . . . 1 
SOCIETE NATIONALE D 'HORTICULTURE DE FRANCE, Paris, France 1 
SOCIETE NEUCHATELOISE DE GEOGRAPHIE, Neuchatel, 

Switzerland • l 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report or the Director. 257 

SOCIETE OURALIENNE D 'AMATEURS DES SCIENCES 

NATURELLES, Ekaterinburg, Russia 1 

SOCIETE PORTUGAISE DE SCIENCES NATURELLES, Lisbon, 

Portugal 2 

SOCIETE ROYALE DE BOTANIQUE DE BELGIQUE, Brussels, 

Belgium 1 

SOCIETE ROYALE ZOOLOGIQUE ET MALACOLOGIQUE DE 

BELGIQUE, Brussels, Belgium i 

SOCIETE ZOOLOGIQUE DE FRANCE, Paris, France 3 

SOUTH AFRICA. GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Johannesburg, South Africa . 3 

SOUTH AFRICA. MINES DEPARTMENT, Pretoria, South Africa 1 
SOUTH AFRICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF 

SCIENCE, Cape Town, South Africa 1 

SOUTH AFRICAN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Cape Town, 

South Africa 1 

SOUTH AFRICAN MUSEUM, Cape Town, South Africa 3 

SOUTH AFRICAN ROYAL SOCIETY, Cape Town, South Africa . . . 1 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA. Department of Agriculture, Adelaide, South 

Australia 3 

SOUTH AUSTRALIA PUBLIC LIBRARY, MUSEUM AND ART 

GALLERY. Adelaide, South Australia 1 

SOUTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Clemson, South Carolina 4 

SOUTH DAKOTA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Brookings, South Dakota 7 

SOUTH LONDON ENTOMOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY 

SOCIETY, London, England 1 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Los Angeles, 

California . 1 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD, San Francisco, California . . . . 1 

SPEZIA, GIORGIO, Torino, Italy 2 

STATEN ISLAND ASSOCIATION OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, New 

York City 1 

STECHERT AND COMPANY, New York City (gift) 1 

STETTIN. GESELLSCHAFT FUR VOLKER- UND ERDKUNDE, 

Stettin, Germany 2 

STOCKHOLM. K. VITT. HIST. OCH ANTIK. AKADEMIEN, 

Stockholm, Sweden .■ 3 

STOCKHOLM. KUNG. BIBLIOTEKET, Stockholm, Sweden 7 

STOCKHOLM. UNIVERSITE DE STOCKHOLM. INSTITUT DE 

BOTANIQUE, Stockholm, Sweden 1 

STRASSBURG. KAISER WILHELMS UNIVERSITAT, Strassburg, 

Germany 7 

STRONG, R. M., Chicago (gift) 5 

SWEDEN. FORSTLICHE VERSUCHSANSTALT, Stockholm, Sweden . . 1 

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY, Syracuse, New York 1 

TASMANIA. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Hobart, Tasmania . 2 

TASMANIA. ROYAL SOCIETY, Hobart, Tasmania 2 

TAUBENHAUS, J. J 3 

TEILING, EINAR, Stockholm, Sweden 1 



258 Field Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

TENNESSEE. AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Knoxville, 

Tennessee 11 

TENNESSEE. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Nashville, Tennessee . . 6 
TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, College Station, 

Texas 2 

THAXTER, ROLAND, Cambridge 3. 

THROOP INSTITUTE, Pasadena, California 1 

THURINGISCHER BOTANISCHER VEREIN, Weimar, Germany . 1 

TIMBERMAN, THE, Portland, Oregon (gift) 1 

TOKYO. ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Tokyo, Japan 2 

TOKYO. BOTANICAL SOCIETY, Tokyo, Japan ia 

TOKYO. DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FUR NATUR- UND 

VOLKERKUNDE OSTASIENS, Tokyo, Japan 1 

TOKYO. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Tokyo, Japan 1 

TORINO. MUSEO DI ZOOLOGIA ET ANATOMIA COMPARATA, 

Turin, Italy I 

TORINO. R. ACCAD. DELLE SCIENZE, Turin, Italy 3. 

TORONTO UNIVERSITY, Toronto, Canada 4 

TRANSVAAL. DEPARTMENT OF MINES, Pretoria, Transvaal . . . 1 

TRANSVAAL MUSEUM, Pretoria, Transvaal r 

TRELEASE, WILLIAM, St. Louis, Missouri r 

TRING ZOOLOGICAL MUSEUM, Tring, England 1 

TRIVANDRUM MUSEUM, Trivandrum, India 1 

TROMSO MUSEUM, Tromso, Norway 2 

TRONDHJEM K. NORSKE VIDENSKABERS SELSKAB, Trondhjem, 

Norway 1 

TUBINGEN. K. UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Tubingen, Germany 4 

TUFTS COLLEGE, Tufts College, Massachusetts 1 

TUNIS. CARTHAGE INSTITUTE, Tunis, Africa . . . • 1 

U. S. GOVERNMENT, Washington, D. C 642 

U. S. INDIAN SCHOOL, Carlisle, Pennsylvania 2 

UPSALA. UNIVERSITY, Upsala, Sweden 2 

UTAH. STATE HORTICULTURAL COMMISSION, Salt Lake City, Utah 1 

VAN DENBURGH, JOHN, San Francisco, California 2 

VASSAR BROTHERS INSTITUTE, Poughkeepsie, New York . . . . 1 

VERMONT BIRD CLUB, Burlington, Vermont 1 

VERMONT STATE FORESTER, Burlington, Vermont 1 

VERMONT UNIVERSITY, Burlington, Vermont 1 

VICTORIA. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Melbourne, Australia . 2 

VICTORIA FIELD NATURALISTS' CLUB, Melbourne, Australia . . . 1 
VICTORIA. PUBLIC LIBRARY, MUSEUMS AND NATIONAL 

GALLERY, Victoria, Australia 1 

VICTORIA. ROYAL SOCIETY, Melbourne, Australia 1 

VICTORIA. ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL AND ACCLIMATIZATION 

SOCIETY, Melbourne, Australia 1 

VICTORIA UNIVERSITY, Toronto, Canada 3 

VIENNA. K. K. NATURHISTORISCHES HOFMUSEUM, Vienna, Austria 1 

VIENNA. K. K. UNIVERSITAT, Vienna, Austria 5 

VIENNA, K. K. ZOOLOGISCH-BOTANISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, 

Vienna, Austria I 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 259 

VIENNA. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Vienna, Austria . 1 
VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Blacksburg, 

Virginia 3 

VIRGINIA STATE LIBRARY, Richmond, Virginia 3 

VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, Charlottesville, Virginia 2 

WANGANUI PUBLIC MUSEUM, Wanganui, New Zealand 1 

WASHINGTON ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Washington, D. C. . . . 1 

WASHINGTON BIOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Washington, D. C. . . . 1 

WASHINGTON STATE ART ASSOCIATION, Seattle, Washington (gift) . 1 

WASHINGTON STATE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Olympia, Washington . 3 

WASHINGTON STATE MUSEUM, Seattle, Washington 1 

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY, St. Louis, Missouri 1 

WEIGEL, OSWALD, Leipzig, Germany (gift) 3 

WELLCOME CHEMICAL RESEARCH LABORATORIES, London, 

England 16 

WELLINGTON ACCLIMATIZATION SOCIETY, Wellington, 

New Zealand 1 

WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY, Middletown, Connecticut 2 

WEST INDIES. IMPERIAL DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

Barbados, West Indies 2 

WEST VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Morgantown, West Virginia 2 

WEST VIRGINIA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Morgantown, West Virginia . 7 
WEST VIRGINIA STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Charleston, 

West Virginia l 

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, Morgantown, West Virginia . . . . 1 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Perth, West 

Australia J 

WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA ENGINEERS' SOCIETY, Pittsburgh, 

Pennsylvania 2 

WIESBADEN. NASSAUISCHER VEREIN FUR NATURKUNDE, 

Wiesbaden, Germany l 

WILLE, N., Christiania, Norway 2 

WILLIAMS COLLEGE, Williamstown, Massachusetts 2 

WILSON ORNITHOLOGICAL CLUB, Oberlin, Ohio 1 

WINDSOR-KENFIELD PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago .... 2 

WISCONSIN ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Madison, Wisconsin . . . . 1 

WISCONSIN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Madison, Wisconsin . . . 1 
WISCONSIN GEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY, 

Madison, Wisconsin 2 

WISCONSIN HISTORY COMMISSION, Madison, Wisconsin . . . . 1 

WISCONSIN STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Madison, Wisconsin . 2 

WISCONSIN STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Madison, Wisconsin . . 1 

WISCONSIN STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Madison, Wisconsin 2 

WISCONSIN UNIVERSITY, Madison, Wisconsin 16 

WISTAR INSTITUTE OF ANATOMY AND BIOLOGY, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania 9 

WOLCOTT, A. B., Chicago (gift) 1 

WORCESTER COUNTY HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Worcester, 

Massachusetts l 



260 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

WORCESTER FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY. Worcester, Massachusetts . . 2 

WULFING, E. A., Heidelberg, Germany 4 

WURTEMBERG. VEREIN FUR VATERLANDISCHE NATURKUNDE, 

Wurtemberg, Germany I 

WYOMING AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Laramie, 

Wyoming 3 

WYOMING HISTORICAL AND GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Wilkesbarre, 

Pennsylvania 1 

WYOMING STATE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Cheyenne, Wyoming . . 3 

YALE UNIVERSITY, New Haven, Connecticut n 

YOUNG, R. T., University, North Dakota (gift) 1 

ZIMANYI, KARL, Budapest, Hungary 2 

ZURICH. BOTANISCHES MUSEUM DER UNIVERSITAT, Zurich, 

Switzerland 3 

ZURICH. GEOGRAPHISCH-ETHNOGRAPHISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, 

Zurich, Switzerland 3 

ZURICH. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Zurich, Switzerland . 2 



#*#* 



^o* 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 261 



Articles of Incorporation 



STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

DEPARTMENT OF STATE. 

William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State. 
To All to Whom These Presents Shall Come, Greeting; 

Whereas, a Certificate duly signed and acknowledged having been filed in the 
office of the Secretary of State, on the 16th day of September, A. d. 1893, for the 
organization of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO, under and in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of "An Act Concerning Corporations," approved 
April 18, 1872, and in force July 1, 1872, and all acts amendatory thereof, a copy 
of which certificate is hereto attached. 

Now, therefore, I, William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State of the State of 
Illinois, by virtue of the powers and duties vested in me by law, do hereby certify 
that the said COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OP CHICAGO is a legally organized 
Corporation under the laws of this State. 

In Testimony Whereof, I hereto set my hand and cause to be affixed the Great 
Seal of the State. Done at the City of Springfield, this 16th day of September, 
in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three, and of the 
Independence of the United States the one hundred and eighteenth. 

W. H. HINRICHSEN, 
[Seal.] Secretary of State. 



TO HON. WILLIAM H. HINRICHSEN, 

Secretary of State: 
Sir: 

We, the undersigned citizens of the United States, propose to form a corpora- 
tion under an act of the General Assembly of the State of Illinois, entitled "An 
Act Concerning Corporations," approved April 18, 1872, and all acts amendatory 
thereof; and that for the purposes of such organization we hereby state as follows, 
to wit : 

1. The name of such corporation is the "COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF 
CHICAGO." 

2. The object for which it is formed is for the accumulation and dissemina- 
tion of knowledge, and the preservation and exhibition of objects illustrating Art, 
Archaeology, Science, and History. 

3. The management of the aforesaid Museum shall be vested in a Board of 
Fifteen (15) Trustees, five of whom are to be elected every year. 

4. The following named persons are hereby selected as the Trustees for the 
first year of its corporate existence: 



262 Field Museum of Natural History - - Reports, Vol. IV. 

Ed. E. Ayer, Charles B. Farwell, George E. Adams, George R. Davis, Charles 
L. Hutchinson, Daniel H. Burnham, John A. Roche, M. C. Bullock, Emil G. Hirsch, 
James W. Ellsworth, Allison V. Armour, O. F. Aldis, Edwin Walker, John C. Black, 
and Frank W. Gunsaulus. 

5. The location of the Museum is in the City of Chicago, County of Cook, 
and State of Illinois. 

(Signed), 

George E. Adams, C. B. Farwell, Sidney C. Eastman, F. W. Putnam, Robert 
McMurdy, Andrew Peterson, L. J. Gage, Charles L. Hutchinson, Ebenezer Bucking- 
ham, Andrew McNally, Edward E. Ayer, John M. Clark, Herman H. Kohlsaat, 
George Schneider, Henry H. Getty, William R. Harper, Franklin H. Head, E. G. 
Keith, J. Irving Pearce, Azel F. Hatch, Henry Wade Rogers, Thomas B. Bryan, 
L. Z. Leiter, A. C. Bartlett, A. A. Sprague, A. C. McClurg, James W. Scott, George 
F. Bissell, John R. Walsh, Chas. Fitzsimons, John A. Roche, E. B. McCagg, Owen 
F. Aldis, Ferdinand W. Peck, James H. Dole, Joseph Stockton, Edward B. Butler, 
John McConnell, R. A. Waller, H. C. Chatfield-Taylor, A. Crawford, Wm. Sooy 
Smith, P. S. Peterson, John C. Black, Jno. J. Mitchell, C. F. Gunther, George R. 
Davis, Stephen A. Forbes, Robert W. Patterson, Jr., M. C. Bullock, Edwin Walker, 
George M. Pullman, William E. Curtis, James W. Ellsworth, William E. Hale, Wm. 
T. Baker, Martin A. Ryerson, Huntington W. Jackson, N. B. Ream, Norman Will- 
iams, Melville E. Stone, Bryan Lathrop, Eliphalet W. Blatchford, Philip D. Armour. 

State of Illinois! 
Cook County J 
I, G. R. Mitchell, a Notary Public in and for said County, do hereby certify 
that the foregoing petitioners personally appeared before me and acknowledged 
severally that they signed the foregoing petition as their free and voluntary act for 
the uses and purposes therein set forth. 

Given under my hand and notarial seal this 14th day of September, 1893. 

G. R. MITCHELL, 
[Seal.! Notary Public, Cook County, III. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 

Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the Corporate members held 
the 25th day of June, 1894, the name of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM was changed 
to FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. A certificate to this effect was filed June 26, 
1894, in the office of the Secretary of State for Illinois. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 

Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the Corporate members held 
the 8th day of November, 1905, the name of the FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM 
was changed to FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. A certificate 
to this effect was filed November 10, 1905, in the office of the Secretary of State 
for Illinois. 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 263 



AMENDED BY-LAWS. 



(August 12, 1912). 



ARTICLE I. 



MEMBERS. 

Section I. Members shall be of five classes, Annual Members, Corporate 
Members, Life Members, Patrons and Honorary Members. 

Sec. 2. Annual Members shall consist of such persons as are selected from time 
to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, and who shall pay an annual 
fee of ten dollars ($10.00), payable within thirty days after notice of election, and 
within thirty days after each recurring annual date. The failure of any person to 
make such initiatory payment and such annual payments within said time shall, at 
the option of the Board of Trustees, be sufficient grounds for the forfeiture of an 
annual membership. 

This said annual membership shall entitle the member to: 

First. — Free admittance for the member and family, to the Museum on any day. 

Second. — Ten tickets every year, admitting the bearer to the Museum on pay 
days. 

Third. — A copy of all publications of the Museum when requested. 

Fourth. — Invitations to all special exhibits, receptions, lectures, or other func- 
tions which may be given at the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The Corporate Members shall consist of the persons named in the 
articles of incorporation, and of such other persons as shall be chosen from time to 
time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, upon the recommendation of the 
Executive Committee; provided, that such persons named in the articles of incorpora- 
tion shall, within ninety days from the adoption of these By-Laws, and persons 
hereafter chosen as Corporate Members shall, within ninety days of their election, 
pay into the treasury the sum of twenty dollars ($20.00) or more. The failure of 
any person to make such payment within said time, shall, at the option of the Board 
of Trustees, be ground for forfeiture of his corporate membership. Corporate 
Members becoming Life Members, Patrons or Honorary Members shall be exempt 
from dues. Annual meetings of said Corporate Members shall be held at the same 
place and on the same day that the annual meeting of the Board of Trustees is held. 

Sec. 4. Any person paying into the treasury the sum of five hundred dollars 
($500.00), at any one time, shall, upon the unanimous vote of the Board, become 
a Life Member. Life Members shall be exempt from all dues. 

Sec. 5. Patrons shall be chosen by the Board upon recommendation of the 
Executive Committee from among persons who have rendered eminent service to the 
Museum. They shall be exempt from all dues, and, by virtue of their election as 
Patrons, shall also be Corporate Members. 



264 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Sec. 6. Honorary Members shall be chosen by the Board from among persons 
who have rendered eminent service to science, and only upon unanimous nomination 
of the Executive Committee. They shall be exempt from all dues. 

ARTICLE II. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

Section i . The Board of Trustees shall consist of fifteen members. The respec- 
tive members of the Board now in office, and those who shall hereafter be elected, shall 
hold office during life. Vacancies occurring in the Board shall be filled at a regular 
meeting of the Board, upon the nomination of the Executive Committee made at a 
preceding regular meeting, by a majority vote of the members of the Board present. 

Sec. 2. Regular meetings of the Board shall be held on the second Monday 
of each month. Special meetings may be called at any time by the President, and 
shall be called by the Secretary upon the written request of three Trustees. Five 
Trustees shall constitute a quorum, except for the election of officers or the adoption 
of the Annual Budget, when seven Trustees shall be required, but meetings may be 
adjourned by any less number from day to day, or to a day fixed, previous to the 
next regular meeting. 

Sec. 3. Reasonable written notice, designating the time and place of holding 
meetings, shall be given by the Secretary. 

ARTICLE III. 

HONORARY TRUSTEES. 

Section i. As a mark of respect, and in appreciation of services performed for 
the Institution, those Trustees who by reason of inability, on account of change of 
residence, or for other cause, or from indisposition to serve longer in such capacity, 
shall resign their place upon the Board, may be elected, by a majority of those 
present at any regular meeting of the Board, an Honorary Trustee for life. Such 
Honorary Trustee will receive notice of all meetings of the Board of Trustees, 
whether regular or special, and will be expected to be present at all such meetings and 
participate in the deliberations thereof, but an Honorary Trustee shall not have the 
right to vote. 

ARTICLE IV. 

OFFICERS. 

Section 1. The officers shall be a President, a First Vice-President, a Second 
Vice-President, a Secretary, an Assistant Secretary and a Treasurer. They shall be 
chosen by ballot by the Board of Trustees, a majority of those present and voting 
being necessary to elect. The President, the First Vice-President, and the Second 
Vice-President shall be chosen from among the members of the Board of Trustees. 
The meeting for the election of officers shall be held on the second Monday of Jan- 
uary of each year, and shall be called the Annual Meeting. 

Sec. 2. The officers shall hold office for one year, or until their successors are 
elected and qualified, but any officer may be removed at any regular meeting of the 
Board of Trustees by a vote of two-thirds of all the members of the Board. Vacancies 
in any office may be filled by the Board at any meeting. 

Sec. 3. The officers shall 'perform such duties as ordinarily appertain to their 
respective offices, and such as shall be prescribed by the By-Laws, or designated from 
time to time bv the Board of Trustees. 






Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 265 

ARTICLE V. 

THE TREASURER. 

Section I. The Treasurer shall be custodian of the funds of the Corporation, 
except as hereinafter provided. He shall make disbursements only upon warrants 
drawn by the Director and countersigned by the President. In the absence or 
inability of the Director, warrants may be signed by the Chairman of the Finance 
Committee, and in the absence or inability of the President, may be countersigned 
by one of the Vice-Presidents. Bat no warrants shall be issued, except in conformity 
with a regularly prepared voucher, giving the name of the payee and stating the- 
occasion for the expenditure, and verified and approved as hereinafter prescribed. 
It shall be no part of the duties of the Treasurer to see that the warrants have been/ 
issued in conformity with such vouchers. 

Sec. 2. The securities and muniments of title belonging to the corporation shall 
be placed in the custody of some Trust Company of Chicago to be designated by the 
Board of Trustees, which Trust Company shall collect the income and principal of 
said securities as the same become due, and pay same to the Treasurer, except as 
hereinafter provided. Said Trust Company shall allow access to and deliver any or 
all securities or muniments of title to the joint order of the following officers, namely: 
The President or one of the Vice-Presidents, jointly with the Chairman, or one of 
the Vice-Chairmen, of the Finance Committee of the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The Treasurer shall give bond in such amount, and with such sureties, 
as shall be approved by the Board of Trustees. 

Sec. 4. All vouchers executed for the payment of liabilities incurred in the 
administration of the Museum, shall be verified by the Auditor, and approved for 
payment by the Director, and the Chairman of the Administration Committee. 
All vouchers executed for expenditures for the construction or reconstruction of the 
Museum building, or buildings, shall be verified by the Auditor and approved for 
payment by the Chairman of the Building Committee. All vouchers executed in 
connection with the investments of the Corporation, or in any way having to do 
with the endowment funds of the Corporation, shall be verified by the Auditor and 
approved for payment by the Chairman of the Finance Committee. 

Sec. 5. The Harris Trust and Savings Bank of Chicago shall be Custodian of 
"The N. W Harris Public School Extension of Field Museum" fund. The Bank 
shall make disbursements only upon warrants drawn by the Director and counter- 
signed by the President. In the absence or inability of the Director, warrants may 
be signed by the Chairman of the Finance Committee, and in the absence or inability 
of the President, may be countersigned by one of the Vice-Presidents. But no 
warrant shall be issued, except in conformity with a regularly prepared voucher, 
giving the name of the payee and stating the occasion for the expenditure, and veri- 
fied and approved as hereinafter prescribed. It shall be no part of the duties of the 
Bank to see that the warrants have been issued in conformity with such vouchers. 

ARTICLE VI. 

THE DIRECTOR. 

Section i. The Board of Trustees shall elect a Director of the Museum, who- 
shall remain in office until his successor shall be elected. He shall have immediate 
charge and supervision of the Museum, and shall control the operations of the insti- 
tution, subject to the authority of the Board of Trustees and its Committees. The 



266 Field Museum of Natural History -- Reports, Vol. IV. 

Director shall be the official medium of communication between the Board, or its 
Committees, and the scientific staff and maintenance force. 

Sec. 2. There shall be four scientific departments of the Museum — Anthropol- 
ogy, Botany, Geology and Zoology, each under the charge of a Curator, subject to 
the authority of the Director. The Curators shail be appointed by the Board upon 
the recommendation of the Director, and shall serve during the pleasure of the 
Board. Subordinate staff officers in the scientific departments shall be appointed 
and removed by the Director upon the recommendation of the Curators of the 
respective Departments. The Director shall have authority to employ and remove 
all other employees of the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The Director shall make report to the Board at each regular meeting, 
recounting the operations of the Museum for the previous month. At the Annual 
Meeting, the Director shall make an Annual Report, reviewing the work of the 
Museum for the previous year, which Annual Report shall be published in pamphlet 
form for the information of the Trustees and Members, and for free distribution 
in such number as the Board may direct. 

ARTICLE VII. 

AUDITOR. 

Section i . The Board shall appoint an Auditor, who shall hold his office during 
the pleasure of the Board. He shall keep proper books of account, setting forth the 
financial condition and transactions of the Corporation, and of the Museum, and 
report thereon at each regular meeting, and at such other times as may be required 
by fhe Board. He shall certify to the correctness of all vouchers for the expenditure 
of the money of the corporation. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

COMMITTEES. 

Section i. There shall be five Committees as follows: Finance, Building, 
Auditing, Administration and Executive. 

Sec 2. The Finance and Auditing Committees shall each consist of three 
members, and the Building and Administration Committees shall each consist of 
five members. All members of these four Committees shall be elected by ballot 
by the Board at the Annual Meeting, and shall hold office for one year, and until 
their successors are elected and qualified. In electing the members of these Com- 
mittees, the Board shall designate the Chairman and Vice-Chairman by the order 
in which the members are named in the respective Committee; the first member 
named shall be Chairman, the second named the Vice-Chairman, and the third 
named, Second Vice-Chairman, succession to the Chairmanship being in this order 
in the event of the absence or disability of the Chairman. 

Sec 3. The Executive Committee shall consist of the President of the Board, 
the Chairman of the Finance Committee, the Chairman of the Building Committee ; 
the Chairman of the Administration Committee, the Chairman of the Auditing 
Committee, and two other members of the Board to be elected by ballot at the 
Annual Meeting. 

Sec 4. Four members shall constitute a quorum of the Executive Committee; 
three members shall constitute a quorum of the Administration Committee, and 
in all other standing Committees, two members shall constitute a quorum. In the 




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Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 267 

event that, owing to the absence or inability of members, a quorum of the regularly 
elected members cannot be present at any meeting of any Committee, then the 
Chairman thereof, or his successor, as herein provided, may summon any member of 
the Board of Trustees to act in place of the absentee. 

Sec. 5. The Finance Committee shall have supervision of investing the en- 
dowment and other permanent funds of the Corporation, and the care of such real 
estate as may become its property. It shall have authority to invest, sell, and 
reinvest, funds, subject to the approval of the Board. 

Sec. 6. The Building Committee shall have supervision of the construc- 
tion, reconstruction, and extension of any and all buildings used for Museum 
purposes. 

Sec. 7. The Executive Committee shall be called together from time to time 
as the Chairman may consider necessary, or as he may be requested to do by three 
members of the Committee, to act upon such matters affecting the administration 
of the Museum as cannot await consideration at the Regular Monthly Meetings of 
the Board of Trustees. It shall, before the beginning of each fiscal year, prepare 
and submit to the Board an itemized Budget, setting forth the probable receipts 
from all sources for the ensuing year, and make recommendations as to the ex- 
penditures which should be made for routine maintenance and fixed charges. Upon 
the adoption of the Budget by the Board, the respective Committees shall be con- 
sidered as authorized to make the expenditures detailed therein. No increase in 
the expenditures under any items of the Budget shall be made, except by authority 
•of the Board of Trustees, but the Executive Committee shall have authority, in 
cases of emergency, to expend a further total sum not exceeding two thousand 
dollars in any one month. 

Sec. 8. The Administration Committee shall have general supervision of the 
.affairs of the Museum. The Committee shall hold one meeting each month with 
the Director at the Museum within a week preceding each Monthly Meeting of 
the Board of Trustees. 

Sec. 9. The Auditing Committee shall have supervision over all accounting 
and bookkeeping, and full control of the financial records. It shall cause the same, 
once each year, or oftener, to be examined by an expert individual or firm, and shall 
transmit the report of such expert individual or firm to the Board at the next ensuing 
regular meeting after such examination shall have taken place. 

Sec. 10. The Chairman of each Committee shall report the acts and proceedings 
thereof at the next ensuing regular meeting of the Board. 

Sec. 11. The President shall be ex-officio a member of all Committees and 
■Chairman of the Executive Committee. Vacancies occurring in any Committee 
may be filled by ballot at any regular meeting of the Board. 

ARTICLE IX. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE. 

Section i. At the November meeting of the Board, each year a Nominating 
Committee of three shall be chosen by lot. Said Committee shall make nom- 
inations for membership of the Finance Committee, the Building Committee, the 
Administration Committee, and the Auditing Committee, and for two members 
of the Executive Committee, from among the Trustees, to be submitted at the 
■ensuing December meeting and voted upon at the following Annual Meeting in 
January. 



268 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

ARTICLE X. 

Section I. Whenever the word "Museum" is employed in the By-Laws of 
the Corporation, it shall be taken to mean the building in which the Museum as an 
Institution is located and operated, the material exhibited, the material in study 
collections, or in storage, furniture, fixtures, cases, tools, records, books, and all 
appurtenances of the Institution, and the workings, researches, installations, ex- 
penditures, field work, laboratories, library publications, lecture courses, and all 
scientific and maintenance activities. 

Sec. 2. These By-Laws may be amended at any regular meeting of the Board 
of Trustees by a two-thirds vote of all the members present, provided the amend- 
ment shall have been proposed at a preceding regular meeting. 



Jan., 1913. Annual Report of the Director. 269 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 

EDWARD E. AYER STANLEY McCORMICK 

HARLOW N. HIGINBOTHAM ROBERT F. CUMMINGS 

CHARLES B. CORY MRS. TIMOTHY B. BLACKSTONE 

NORMAN W. HARRIS 

DECEASED. 

GEORGE M. PULLMAN 
MARY D. STURGES 



PATRONS. 

ALLISON V. ARMOUR GEORGE MANIERRE 

JOSEPH N. FIELD JOHN S. MILLER 

ERNEST R. GRAHAM JOHN BARTON PAYNE 

NORMAN W. HARRIS FREDERICK W. PUTNAM 

VERNON SHAW KENNEDY FREDERICK J. V. SKIFF 

WILLARD A. SMITH 

DECEASED. 

DANIEL H. BURNHAM WILLIAM I. BUCHANAN 

EDWIN WALKER 



270 



Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



CORPORATE MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, GEORGE E. 
ALDIS, OWEN F. 
ARMOUR, ALLISON V. 
AYER, EDWARD E. 



HIGINBOTHAM, H. N. 
HUTCHINSON, CHARLES L. 

JONES, ARTHUR B. 



BARTLETT, A. C. 
BLACK, JOHN C. 
BLAIR, WATSON F. 
BLATCHFORD, ELIPHALET W 
BUTLER, EDWARD B. 

CHALMERS, W. J. 
CHATFIELD-TAYLOR, H. C. 
CLARK, JOHN M. 
CRANE, RICHARD T., Jr. 

EASTMAN, SIDNEY C. 
ELLSWORTH, JAMES W. 

FIELD, JOSEPH N. 
FIELD, STANLEY 

GAGE, LYMAN J. 
GETTY, HENRY H. 
GRAHAM, ERNEST R. 
GUNSAULUS, FRANK W. 
GUNTHER, C. F. 

HARRIS, NORMAN W. 
HEAD, FRANKLIN H. 



kennedy, vernon shaw 
kohlsaat, herman h. 

lathrop, bryan 

Mccormick, cyrus h. 
manierre, george 
miller, john s. 
mitchell, john j. 

payne, john barton 
peck, ferd. w. 
porter, george f. 
putnam, frederick w. 

ream, norman b. 
ryerson, martin a 

skiff, frederick j. v. 
smith, byron l. 
smith, willard a. 
sprague, a. a. 
sprague, a. a., 2d. 
stone, melville e. 



DECEASED. 



ARMOUR, PHILIP D. 
BAKER, WILLIAM T. 
BISSEL, GEORGE F. 
BUCHANAN, W. I. 
BUCKINGHAM, EBENEZER 
BURNHAM, DANIEL H. 
CRAWFORD, ANDREW 
CURTIS, WILLIAM E. 
DAVIS, GEORGE R. 
FITZSIMONS, CHARLES 
HALE, WILLIAM E. 
HARPER, WILLIAM R. 
HATCH, AZEL F. 
JACKSON, HUNTINGTON W. 
LEITER. L. Z. 



McCAGG, E. B. 
McCLURG, A. C. 
McNALLY, ANDREW 
PATTERSON, ROBERT W. 
PEARCE, J. IRVING 
PETERSON, ANDREW 
PULLMAN, GEORGE M. 
SCHNEIDER, GEORGE 
SCOTT, JAMES W. 
STOCKTON, JOSEPH 
WALKER, EDWIN 
WALLER, R. A. 
WALSH, JOHN R. 
WILLIAMS, NORMAN 



Jan., 1913. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



271 



LIFE MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, GEORGE E. 
ALDIS, OWEN F. 



BARRETT, MRS. A. D. 

BARRETT, ROBERT L. 

BARTLETT, A. C. 

BLACKSTONE, MRS. TIMOTHY B. 

BLAINE, MRS. EMMONS 

BLAIR, CHAUXCEY J. 

BLAIR, HENRY A. 

BLAIR, WATSON F. 

BOOTH, W. VERNON 

BUTLER, EDWARD B. 

BYLLESBY, H. M. 

CARTER, JAMES S. 
CARTON, L. A. 
CHALMERS, WILLIAM J. 
CRANE, RICHARD T., Jr. 
CUMMIXGS, D. MARK 

DEERING, CHARLES 
DELANO, FREDERIC A. 
DRAKE, TRACY C. 

FARWELL, WALTER 
FAY, C. N. 
FIELD, STANLEY 
FULLER, WILLIAM A. 

GARTZ, A. F. 
GRISCOM, CLEMENT A. 
GROMMES, JOHN B. 

HAMILL, ERNEST A. 
HILL, LOUIS W. 
HOROWITZ, L. J. 
HOXIE, MRS. JOHN A. 
HUGHITT, MARVIN 
HUTCHINSOX, C. L. 

INGALLS, M. E. 
ISHAM, MRS. KATHERINE 
PORTER. 



JOHNSON, FRANK S. 
JOHNSON.MRS. ELIZABETH AYER 
JONES, ARTHUR B. 

KEEP, CHAUNCEY 

KING, FRANCIS 

KING, JAMES C. 

KIRK, WALTER RADCLIFFE 

LAWSOX, VICTOR F. 

McCORMICK, MRS. 
McCORMICK, CYRUS H. 
McCORMICK, HAROLD F. 
MacVEAGH, FRANKLIN 
MITCHELL, J. J. 

NEWELL, A. B. 

ORR, ROBERT M. 

PAM, MAX 
PIKE, EUGEXE S. 
PORTER, GEORGE F. 
PORTER, H. H., Jr. 

REAM, MRS. CAROLINE P. 
REAM, NORMAN B. 
REVELL, ALEX. H. 
ROSENWALD, JULIUS 
RUSSELL, EDMUND A. 
RYERSON, MRS. CARRIE H. 
RYERSON, MARTIN A. 

SCHLESINGER, LEOPOLD 
SINGER, C. G. 
SMITH, BYRON L. 
SMITH, ORSON 
SPRAGUE, A. A. 
SPRAGUE, A. A., 2D. 
STURGES, GEORGE 

THORNE, GEORGE R. 

WILLARD, ALONZO J. 



272 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV 



ANNUAL MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, CYRUS H. 
ADAMS, MILWARD 
ALLERTON, ROBERT H. 
ARMOUR, GEORGE A. 



GORDON, EDWARD K. 
GREY, CHARLES F. 
GREY, WILLIAM L. 
GURLEY, W. W. 



BAILEY, EDWARD P. 
BANGA, DR. HENRY 
BARRELL, JAMES 
BECKER, A. G. 
BILLINGS, C. K. G. 
BILLINGS, DR. FRANK 
BIRKHOFF, GEORGE, Jr. 
BOAL, CHARLES T. 
BOUTON, C. B. 
BROWN, WILLIAM L. 
BURLEY, CLARENCE A. 

COMSTOCK, WILLIAM C. 
CONOVER, CHARLES H. 
COONLEY-WARD, MRS. L. A. 
CORWITH, CHARLES R. 
COWAN, W. P. 
CRANE, CHARLES R. 
CUDAHY, JOHN 
CUMMINGS, E. A. 
CURTIS, D. H. 

DAY, A. M. 
DEERING, JAMES 
DEERING, WILLIAM 
DILLMAN, L. M. 

EISENDRATH, W. N. 

FAIR, R. M. 

FARNSWORTH, GEORGE 
FORGAN, JAMES B. 
FORSYTH, ROBERT 
FRANK, HENRY L. 
FULLER, O. F. 
FURST, CONRAD 

GAYLORD, FREDERIC 
GLESSNER, J. J. 
GOODRICH, A. W. 



HARDING, AMOS J. 
HARRIS, GEORGE B. 
HARRIS, JOHN F. 
HASKELL, FREDERICK T. 
HERTLE, LOUIS 
HIBBARD, WILLIAM G., Jr. 
HITCHCOCK, R. M. 
HOLT, GEORGE H. 
HOPKINS, JOHN P. 
HORNER, ISAAC 

INSULL, SAMUEL 

JENKINS, GEORGE H. 
JONES, J. S. 

KEEFER, LOUIS 
KEITH, W. SCOTT 
KIMBALL, EUGENE S. 
KIMBALL, MRS. MARK 

LAMB, FRANK H. 
LAY, A. TRACY 
LEFENS, THIES J. 
LEIGH, EDWARD B. 
LINCOLN, ROBERT T. 
LINN, W. R. 
LOGAN, F. G. 
LORD, J. B. 
LOWDEN, FRANK O. 
LYTTON, HENRY C. 

McCREA, W. S. 
McWILLIAMS, LAFAYETTE 
MacFARLAND, HENRY J. 
MAGEE, HENRY W. 
MANSON, WILLIAM 
MANSURE, E. L. 
MAYER, LEVY 
MERRYWEATHER, GEORGE 



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Jan., 1913. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



273 



MEYER, MRS. M. A. 
MILLER, CHARLES P. 
MOORE, L. T. 
MOORE, N. G. 
MORRIS, EDWARD 
MULLIKEN, A. H. 
MULLIKEN, CHARLES H. 

NATHAN, ADOLPH 
NOLAN, JOHN H. 
NORTON, O. W. 
NOYES, LA VERNE W. . 

OEHNE, THEODORE 
ORB, JOHN A. 
OSBORN, HENRY A. 

PALMER, PERCIVAL B. 
PARKER, FRANCIS W. 
PEARSON, EUGENE H. 
PINKERTON, W. A. 
PORTER, WASHINGTON 

RIPLEY, E. P. 
ROSENBAUM, JOSEPH 
ROSENFELD, MRS. MAURICE 
RUNNELLS, J. S. 



SCHMIDT, DR. O. L. 
SCHWARTZ, G. A. 
SEIPP, MRS. C. 
SELZ, MORRIS 
SHEDD, JOHN G. 
SKINNER, THE MISSES 
SOPER, JAMES P. 
SOUTHWELL, H. E. 
SPENCE, MRS. ELIZABETH E. 
SPOOR, J. A. 
STOCKTON, JOHN T. 
STUART, ROBERT 

TEMPLETON, THOMAS 
TOBEY, FRANK B. 

UIHLEIN, EDWARD G. 

WACKER, CHARLES H. 
WALKER, JAMES R. 
WALKER, WILLIAM B. 
WALLER, EDWARD C. 
WEBSTER, GEORGE H. 
WHITE, A. STAMFORD 
WHITEHEAD, W. M. 
WILSON, MRS. E. C. 
WILSON, M. H. 
WOODCOCK, LINDSAY T. 



FRASHER, JOHN E. L. 
SEARS. JOSEPH 



DECEASED. 

- SEIPP, W. C. 



THE LIBRARY Oh IHt 

DEC 2 21942 
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 



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