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'LIBHARY 

OF THE. 
U N I VLR.S ITY 
Of ILLINOIS 

50T 




HISTOR**- JM*2 4 



W«l 



NOTICE: Return or renew all Library Materials! The Minimum Fee lor 
each Lost Book is $50.00. 

The person charging this material is responsible for 
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on or before the Latest Date stamped below. 

Theft, mutilation, and underlining of books are reasons for discipli- 
nary action and may result in dismissal from the University 
To renew call Telephone Center, 333-8400 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



NOVO0, S9O 
DEC 1 3 990 



L161— O-1096 




J 



UNlVEftSITY OF ILLINOIS ^ . . «.#% 



Field Museum of Natural History. 

Publication 173. 

Report Series. Vol. IV, No. 4. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 191 3- 




Chicago, U. S. A 
January, 1914- 



THE LIBKAKY Ut IHfc 

mwmm or urn® 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBAN A 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XLIV. 




GEORGE MANIERRE 

Secretary of the Museum Corporation from April, 1894, to May, 1907, and 
Chairman of the Auditing Committee since the organization. 



Field Museum of Natural History. 

Publication 173. 

Report Series. Vol. IV, No. 4. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 1913. 




^^^ 



Chicago, U. S. A THE LIBKAKY Oh IHE 

January, 1914. Qrrj 2 2 1942 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



CONTENTS 



Page 

Board of Trustees 276 

Officers and Committees 277 

Staff of the Museum 278 

Report of the Director 279 

Maintenance 280 

Lecture Courses 281 

Publications 282 

Mailing List 283 

Library 284 

Cataloguing, Inventorying, and Labeling 286 

Accessions 287 

Expeditions and Field Work 296 

Installation and Permanent Improvement 299 

The N. W. Harris Public School Extension 310 

Photography and Illustration 311. 

Printing 312 

Attendance 312 

Financial Statement 315 

Accessions 318 

Department of Anthropology 318 

Department of Botany 319 

Department of Geology 323 

Department of Zoology 326 

Section of Photography 329 

The Library 330 

Articles of Incorporation 351 

Amended By-Laws 353 

List of Honorary Members and Patrons 359 

List of Corporate Members 360 

List of Life Members 361 

List of Annual Members 362 



276 Field Museum of Natural History- — Reports, Vol. IV. 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



Adams. 

Ayer. 

Blair. 

Chalmers. 
Stanley Field. 
Harlow N. Higinbotham. 



George E. 
Edward E. 
Watson* F. 
William J. 



Arthur B. Jones. 
George Manierre. 
Cyrus H. McCormick. 
George F. Porter. 
Martin A. Ryerson. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff. 



A. A. Sprague, 2nd. 



Owen F. Aldis. 



HONORARY TRUSTEES. 

Norman B. Ream. 



Norman Williams. 
Marshall Field, Jr. 



DECEASED. 

George R. Davis. 
Huntington W. Jackson. 
Edwin Walker. 



Jan., 1914. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



277 



OFFICERS. 

Stanley Field, President. 

Martin A. Ryerson, First Vice-President. 
Watson F. Blair, Second Vice-President. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff, Secretary. 

D. C. Davies, Assistant Secretary and Auditor. 
Byron L. Smith, Treasurer. 



COMMITTEES. 



Edward E. Ayer. 
Watson F. Blair. 
Harlow N. Higinbotham 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Stanley Field. 

William J. Chalmers. 



George Manierre. 
Martin A. Ryerson. 



Watson F. Blair. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Martin A. Ryerson. 
Arthur B. Jones. 



BUILDING COMMITTEE. 



William J. Chalmers. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff. 



Cyrus H. McCormick. 
A. A. Sprague, 2nd. 



Stanley Field. 



SUB-COMMITTEE OF BUILDING COMMITTEE 

A. A. Sprague, 2nd. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff. 



George Manierre. 



AUDITING COMMITTEE. 



Arthur B. Jones. 
George E. Adams. 



Watson F. Blair. 
Arthur B. Jones. 



ADMINISTRATION COMMITTEE. 



Edward E. Ayer. 

George Manierre. 
George F. Porter. 



278 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



STAFF OF THE MUSEUM. 

DIRECTOR. 

Frederick J. V. Skiff. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 

George A. Dorsey, Curator. 

Berthold Laufer, Associate Curator of Asiatic Ethnology. 
Charles L. Owen, Assistant Curator Division of Archceology. 

Albert B. Lewis, Assistant Curator of African and Mela- 
nesian Ethnology. 
Fay Cooper Cole, Assistant Curator Physical Anthropology 
and Malayan Ethnology. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

Charles F. Millspaugh, Curator. 

B. E. Dahlgren, Assistant Curator Division of Economic Botany. 
Huron H. Smith, Assistant Curator Division of Dendrology. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

Oliver C. Farrington, Curator. H. W. Nichols, Assistant Curator. 
Elmer S. Riggs, Assistant Curator of Paleontology. 

Arthur W. Slocom, Assistant Curator Section of Invertebrate 

Paleontology. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 

Charles B. Cory, Curator. Seth E. Meek, Assistant Curator. 

Wilfred H. Osgood, Assistant Curator of Mammalogy and Or- 
nithology. 
William J. Gerhard, Assistant Curator Division of Entomology. 
Edmond N. Gueret, Assistant Curator Division of Osteology. 

RECORDER. 

D. C. Davies. 

THE LIBRARY. 

Elsie Lippincott, Librarian. 

THE N. W. HARRIS PUBLIC SCHOOL EXTENSION 

S. C. Simms, Curator. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR. 

1913 



To the Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History: 

I have the honor to present a report of the operations of the Museum 
for the year ending December 31, 19 13. 

A review of the year's activities, while not without the broader and 
more striking interest of expedition research and survey in various parts 
of the world, shows that the labor performed, the material progress made, 
has been very largely within the walls of the Institution in continuance 
and enlargement of the plans of the past two years in preparing exhibi- 
tion material for the New Building. This work not only includes the 
installation of material that has not been on exhibition but the re-instal- 
lation of exhibited material and the re-labeling of the latter. So well 
have the different departments devoted their energies to this task that 
the orderly and systematic physical appearance of the Museum has 
ceased to elicit commendation from visitors or contemporaries. The 
great number of installed new cases for which space is continually de- 
manded from the already crowded floor area has interlocked the installa- 
tion of departments and divisions to a degree that must be confusing to 
visitors, as it certainly is most unsatisfactory to the management. If 
the pressure for space continues, as it seems likely it will do, some por- 
tions of the Museum must be closed off as an improvised warehouse 
where cases can be stored without any relation to passage-ways or any 
regard for the convenience of visitors. In some of the courts and halls 
the circulation provisions have been reduced to two-feet passage-ways 
which really almost prohibits an inspection of the contents of the cases. 
The Joseph N. Field Ethnological expedition to the South Sea 
Islands concluded its three years' studies and collections, and Dr. Lewis, 
the head of the expedition, has returned and for several months has been 
engaged in cataloguing, labeling and installing this most prized collec- 
tion. It is now quite apparent that the great extent of this collection 
will not permit its complete installation for several years, though from 
its abundance a notable representation will be on view within the coming 
year. In addition to the fund provided by Mr. Joseph N. Field for the 
field work of this South Pacific expedition, a further and large sum was 
contributed by Mr. Field for the purchase of an important collection of 

279 



280 Field Museum of Natural History —  Reports, Vol. IV.* 



masks from New Britain and ethnological material from German New 
Guinea. 

The South American Zoological expedition is still in the field, being 
last reported as in Southern Brazil with splendid results. The consign- 
ments of material from the field reach the Museum at intervals of about 
three months, and, as will be seen from the report on the Depart- 
ment of Zoology made elsewhere, is giving the greatest satisfaction to 
the department. 

The Museum is the grateful beneficiary of the results from a private 
expedition to British East Africa and adjacent territories under Mr. 
Brent Altscheler of Louisville, Kentucky, a hunter, a lover of science, and 
a friend of the Museum. 

The announcement of the Hon. R. M. Barnes of Lacon, Illinois, that 
he had constituted Field Museum of Natural History legatee under his 
will for his collection of more than 24,000 birds' eggs was received by the 
authorities of the Museum with the greatest satisfaction, for not only is 
this act regarded as a high testimonial to the worthiness of the Museum 
and an evidence of extending confidence in its purposes and perform- 
ances, but it is of a great value to the Division of Ornithology to be as- 
sured that eventually this great collection will be added to its resources. 

The progress made by the N. W. Harris Public School Extension dur- 
ing the year, and the interest that the public and the Chicago schools 
system have manifested in this exhibition of collections from the Muse- 
um in the public schools, have encouraged the founder in this philan- 
thropy, and inspired with zeal the organization which is dispensing it. 
The preliminary stages in the difficult task of getting this undertaking 
in full operation have been passed; the experimental period is practically 
over, and when a few details, yet to be arranged with the Superintendent 
of Schools have been determined upon, the regular distribution of these 
cabinets will be begun. The force of scientific men and preparators 
under the guidance of the efficient curator of this foundation have a 
great many cabinets and cases completed, and recently, at the request 
of the Council for Library and Museum Extension, made an exhibition 
of a number of the collections at the Art Institute, which was very well 
attended and very cordially commended. 

maintenance. — The cost of maintenance for the year amounted to 
$170,000, which was $5,000 less than the amounted authorized by the 
Board of Trustees for the year ending December 31, 1013. The total 
amount expended for all purposes was $237,100, being $1,000 less than 
the previous year. The difference between the cost of maintenance 
and the actual amount expended is accounted for by special appropria- 
tions for the purchase of collections, and the cost of extensive repairs to 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 281 

the roof of the building. The building itself can be considered as being 
in good repair, yet the overhanging cornices which are rapidly de- 
teriorating occasion a certain amount of anxiety and are promptly 
removed as conditions demand. During the year the entire building 
was thoroughly examined by an expert assigned for this inspection by 
D. H. Burnham & Company, the architects. The report states that 
all brick work is in first class shape, as is also the structural steel in the 
columns and girders. The staff work throughout the interior of the 
building was found to be in good condition. The skylights were also 
reported as being in good state. A special request was made that this 
expert examine the floor loads throughout the building, and it is gratify- 
ing that the report states that much care had been exercised in this 
respect and where an unusually heavy load is concentrated the floor had 
been thoroughly reinforced in each instance. 

lecture courses. — The lecture courses have been particularly inter- 
esting and well attended. They have been participated in by dis- 
tinguished scholars and students in the various branches of the natural 
sciences, and acknowledgment is here made of the generosity and good 
will which this participation manifests toward the Museum. 

Thirty-eighth free illustrated lecture course, delivered during the 
months of March and April, 1913. 
March 1. — "A Look into South America." 

Prof. Rollin D. Salisbury, The University of Chicago. 
March 8.—" Fossil Collecting. ' ' 

Mr. A. W. Slocom, Assistant Curator, Division of Inver- 
tebrate Paleontology, Field Museum. 
March 15. — "Cultural and Somatic Evidences of Man's Antiquity." 

Prof. George Grant MacCurdy, Yale University. 
March 22. — "Spain — Country and People." 

Mr. Arthur Stanley Riggs, New York. 
March 29. — "Newfoundland." 

Prof. M. L. Fernald, Harvard University. 
April 5. — "Wild Flowers of the Chicago Region." 

Dr. C. F. Millspaugh, Curator, Department of Botany, 

Field Museum. 
April 12. — "Crossing the Andes of Northern Peru." 

Mr. W. H. Osgood, Assistant Curator of Mammalogy 

and Ornithology, Field Museum. 
April 19. — " Logging California Redwoods . ' ' 

Mr. Huron H. Smith, Assistant Curator, Division of 

Dendrology, Field Museum. 



282 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

April 26. — "Religious and Artistic Thought in China." 

Dr. Berthold Laufer, Associate Curator of Asiatic 
Ethnology, Field Museum. 

Thirty-ninth free illustrated lecture course, delivered during the 
months of October and November, 1913. 

Oct. 4.— "Korea." 

Mr. Homer B. Hulbert, Springfield, Massachusetts. 
Oct. 11. — "The Scenery and Resources of Alaska." 

Prof. Lawrence Martin, University of Wisconsin. 
Oct. 1 8. — "The Physical Basis and Determination of Sex." 

Dr. Horatio H. Newman, The University of Chicago. 
Oct. 25. — "Our Forests." 

Mr. Huron H. Smith, Assistant Curator of Dendrology, 

Field Museum. 
Nov. 1. — "Zoological Collecting in South America." 

Mr. Wilfred H. Osgood, Assistant Curator of Mammal- 
ogy and Ornithology, Field Museum. 
Nov. 8.— "The Inhabitants of Fresh Water." 

Dr. Victor E. Shelf ord, The University of Chicago. 
Nov. 15. — "Migration of Plants." 

Prof. L. H. Pammel, Iowa State College. 
Nov. 22. — "The Joseph N. Field South Pacific Expedition." 

Dr. A. B. Lewis, Assistant Curator of African and 

Melanesian Ethnology, Field Museum. 
Nov. 29.— "New Zealand." 

Dr. Carlos E. Cummings, Buffalo Society of Natural 

Sciences. 

publications. — The publications of the Museum have appeared as 
usual from time to time as opportunity presented itself. The list in- 
cludes eight numbers of the established series, details of which follow: 
Pub. 165. — Report Series, Vol. IV, No. 3. Annual Report of the 
Director to the Board of Trustees for the year 191 2. 90 
pages, 14 half-tones. Edition 2500. 
Pub. 166. — Zoological Series, Vol. X, No. 8. New Species of Fishes 
from Panama. By S. E. Meek and S. F. Hildebrand. 15 
pages. Edition 1500. 
Pub. 167. — Ornithological Series, Vol. I, No. 7. Descriptions of 
Twenty-eight New Species and Subspecies of Neotropical 
Birds. By C. B. Cory. 10 pages. Edition 1500. 
Pub. 1 68. — Zoological Series, Vol. X, No. 9. New Peruvian Mam- 
mals. By W. H. Osgood. 9 pages. Edition 1500. 



Jan., 1914. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



283 



Pub. 169. — Anthropological Series, Vol. XIII, No. 1. Notes on 
Turquois in the East. By Berthold Laufer. 72 pages, 
1 colored plate, 7 halftones. Edition 2000. 

Pub. 170.— Anthropological Series, Vol. XII, No. 2. The Wild Tribes 
of Davao District, Mindanao. By F. C. Cole. 153 pages, 
1 colored map, 75 halftones, 62 zinc etchings. Edition 
1500. 

Pub. 171. — Geological Series, Vol. IV, No. 3. New Trilobites from the 
Maquoketa Beds of Fayette County, Iowa. By A. W. 
Slocom. 41 pages, 6 halftones, 1 zinc etching. Edition 
1500. 

Pub. 172. — Botanical Series, Vol. II, No. 9. I. The Genera Pedi- 
lanthus and Cubanthus and other American Euphorbiaceae. 
By C. F. Millspaugh. II. Two New Stonecrops from 
Guatemala. By Raymond Hamet. 27 pages. Edition 1500. 



Names on Mailing List 
Domestic . 
Foreign 



Distribution of Foreign Exchanges 
Argentine Republic . 

Australia 

Austria-Hungary . 

Belgium 

Borneo 

Brazil 

British East Africa . 
British Guiana .... 

Bulgaria 

Canada 

Cape Colony 

Ceylon 

Chile 

China 

Colombia 

Costa Rica 

Denmark 

East Africa 

Ecuador 

Egypt 

France 

_ Fiji Islands 

Finland 

Germany 

Great Britain 

Greece 

Guatemala 



614 

693 

1-307 



12 India .... 

29 Italy .... 

31 Jamaica 

17 Japan . . . . 

1 Java .... 
9 Liberia .... 

2 Malta .... 

2 Mexico .... 

1 Natal .... 
29 Netherlands 

6 New Zealand . 

3 Norway 

2 Peru .... 
2 Portugal 

2 Rhodesia . 

4 Roumania . 

9 Russia .... 

1 Salvador 

1 Sicily .... 

2 Spain .... 
55 Straits Settlements 

1 Sweden 

2 Switzerland 
138 Tasmania . 
119 Transvaal . 

2 Uruguay 

1 West Indies 



13 

35 
2 

9 

4 
1 

1 
20 

3 

21 

7 
8 
2 

5 
2 
1 
16 
1 

3 
7 
1 

15 

23 

3 

3 

1 

3 



284 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



308 
366 
162 

357 



Distribution of publications (Foreign) 

Anthropological 

Botanical 

Entomological 

Geological 

Distribution of Domestic Exchanges 

Alabama 2 

Arkansas 1 

California 28 

Colorado 11 

Connecticut 21 

Delaware 2 

District of Columbia .... 65 

Florida 2 

Idaho 1 

Illinois 71 

Indiana 16 

Iowa 15 

Kansas 6 

Kentucky 3 

Louisiana 4 

Maine 7 

Maryland 9 

Massachusetts 65 

Michigan 12 

Minnesota 9 

Mississippi 3 

Missouri 12 

Montana 2 

Nebraska 7 

Nevada 3 

New Hampshire 4 

Distribution of Publications (Domestic) 

Anthropological 230 

Botanical 300 

Geological 311 

Historical 159 



Ichthyological 
Ornithological 
Report . 
Zoological 



New Jersey 
New Mexico 
New York . 
North Carolina 
North Dakota 
Ohio . . . . 
Oklahoma . 
Oregon . 
Pennsylvania . 
Rhode Island . 
South Carolina 
Sovith Dakota . 
Tennessee . 

Texas 

Utah . . . . 
Vermont 
Virginia 
Washington 
West Virginia . 
Wisconsin . 
Wyoming 
Cuba . 
Hawaii . 

Philippine Islands 
Porto Rico 



Icthyological 
Ornithological 
Report . 
Zoological . 



165 
205 

693 

298 

14 
2 

84 
6 
2 

22 
2 
1 

35 
5 
2 

2 
2 

2 
1 
4 
4 
6 
6 

17 
2 

3 
5 
3 

1 



150 
158 
614 
263 



. the library.— - The accessions to the Library during the year num- 
bered 4,003, an increase over last year of 1,737. Of these additions 3,908 
were received by gift or exchange and 95 by purchase. The volumes 
and pamphlets in the Library are credited to the different Depart- 
ments, as follows: 

General Library 41,102 

Department of Anthropology 3,008 

Department of Botany 6,444 

Department of Geology 8,751 

Department of Zoology 2,931 

Total 662,23 



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Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 285 

Publications were received from 808 individuals and institutions. 
A special effort was made to increase the useful collections of separata. 
Requests for reciprocation with equivalent literature were made to all 
authors who are receiving the publications of the Museum, and who 
had not done so hitherto. The response to date is gratifying, some 
four hundred titles having been received. The securing of these ad- 
ditions, the effecting of new exchanges, the obtaining of missing parts 
to fill in or to complete sets, involved the writing of approximately 
1,000 letters. From the translators and commentators, Mr. and Mrs. 
Herbert Clark Hoover, London and New York City, was received 
a copy of Georgius Agricola De Re Metallica, translated from the 
first Latin edition of 1556, with biographical introduction, annotations, 
etc. With copies of the original editions of 162 1 and 1657 in the 
library, this gift of an accurate translation of this classic in miner- 
alogical literature is highly prized. The library was also the recipient 
of a copy of the second volume of the J. Pierpont Morgan Catalogue 
of Porcelains. Other gifts of value received were from Mr. G. R. 
Agassiz, Cambridge, Mass.; Mr. William D. Boyce of Chicago; Mr. 
Arthur De Selm, Kankakee, Illinois; Mr. Martin A. Ryerson, Chicago; 
Mr. William Schaus, Washington, D. C; Mr. Charles D. Walcott, 
Washington, D. C; Imperial Botanical Gardens, St. Petersburg, 
Russia; Japan Society, London, 'England; Royal Academy of Science, 
Vienna, Austria; Ecole des Langues Orientales Vivantes, Paris, France; 
The Natural History Museum of .Hamburg, Germany; the Natural 
History Society of Hannover, Germany; U. S. Department of Com- 
merce and Labor; the Smithsonian Institution and Yale University 
Library, New Haven. A notable accession of the year was the 
literature received with the collection of Ward-Coonley meteorites. 
The late Mr. Ward had collected over three thousand titles, 1,250 new 
to this Library, covering the years 1620-1906. This addition to the 
literature already on the Museum shelves places this library in the 
front rank on this particular subject. Among the most important 
purchases were: Le Coq, Chotscho; Gorer & Blacker, Chinese porce- 
lain and hard stones; Dufour, Le Bayon d 'Angkor Thorn bas- 
reliefs; Brabourne & Chubb, Birds of South America; Giebel & Liche, 
Mammalia, 1874-1913; Martius & Spix, Reise in Brasilien, 1817-20. 

The books, periodicals and pamphlets bound during the year number 
1,021. The proper sequence of the accessions has had to be sacrifled to 
make more readily accessible the books most in demand. Two cases 
discarded for installation purposes by the Departments were fitted 
with shelves and placed in the General Reading Room and filled with 
works of a general character. All duplicate material has been packed 



286 Field Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

in boxes. There have been written and inserted in the various catalogues 
22,570 cards. 

Departmental Cataloguing, Inventorying and Labeling. — In no previous 
year in the history of the Department of Anthropology have so many 
cases been installed with their full complement of labels. At least 
150 cases have been fully labeled. It is confidently believed that no 
more adequate labeling could have been accomplished than that 
which now prevails throughout the Chinese and Philippine collections 
recently installed. For the Chinese collection alone over 2,600 labels 
have been printed. There have been entered in the inventory books of 
the Department nearly 3,000 catalogue cards, which were about equally 
divided between the Blackstone Chinese Collection and the Field South 
Pacific Islands Collection. The Chinese archaeological collection has 
been completely catalogued and the cataloguing of the Tibetan material 
is well advanced. Assistant Curator Lewis has written approximately 
3,000 catalogue cards of the South Pacific Islands collections, which are 
ready to be entered in the inventory books. These have not yet been 
turned over to the Cataloguer, but are retained for further reference in 
connection with the installation of the material which they chronicle. 

The cataloguing of the specimens of all accessions received during 
the year in the Department of Botany is complete to date, and 31,624 
sheets of the larger accessions of previous years have also been cata- 
logued. All new installations have received their labels so far as they 
have been secured from the printer. Copy has been written for 1,033 
labels, of which 290 are still in the hands of the printer. 

The principal work of cataloguing performed in the Department of 
Geology was that of the Ward-Coonley meteorite collection. All of 
this collection to the number of 1,661 specimens has been carefully 
catalogued. All other material received during the year has likewise 
been fully catalogued. The material so catalogued includes 784 econo- 
mic specimens, 1,034 of minerals and about 400 of fossils. For the card 
catalogue of vertebrate paleontology 72 descriptive cards were written. 
Books to the number of 282 and 1,355 pamphlets were added to the 
Department library during the year, and 1,004 cards were added to the 
card catalogue of the library, making a total of 3,618 cards now com- 
prising the Departmental library catalogue. To the Department photo- 
graphic albums 185 prints have been added since the last report, making 
a total of 2,685 photographs now contained in these albums. All of 
these photographs are fully labeled. The preparation of labels for the 
exhibition series during the year has principally been concerned with 
replacing labels of the old buff cardboard type by those of current type. 
In connection with this work constant revision of the labels has been 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 287 

carried on and any improvements deemed desirable in the text or style 
of labels have been made. Series which have been labeled in this way 
in full during the year include the asbestos collection, the collections of 
Lake Superior and Manhattan Island rocks, ores of copper, zinc, iron 
and many minor metals, the collections of concretions, stalactites, rock 
textures, etc., the glaciated slabs and other specimens in Alcove 103 and 
the soda collection. Many of these collections contain descriptive 
labels which were rewritten in order that the information given might 
be as fresh and up-to-date as possible, or improved in form. For this 
purpose or for newly installed material 65 descriptive labels were written 
during the year. Newly installed material was provided with labels as 
fast as received during the year and practically all specimens now on 
exhibition are provided with labels of the latest Museum pattern. New 
series labeled during the year include the graphite collection, several 
series illustrating uses of metals, a series of Patagonian fossils, of mis- 
cellaneous fossil mammals and a large number of invertebrate fossils. 
The series of blast furnace models, Hall 34, was also supplied with fully 
descriptive labels. The total number of labels prepared during the year 
was 3,215, of which 2,902 were printed and installed. 

The Curator of Zoology reports that cataloguing has proceeded in 
this Department as usual and all accessions received during the year 
have been properly entered. In the classified card catalogue much 
progress has been made both in Ornithology and Mammalogy. Cata- 
logue cards to the number of 350 have been written for mammals which 
represent more than 1,000 entries. For birds 400 cards have been 
written and 22 distribution maps have been labeled, the former num- 
bering 1,200 enteries. The card check list of the specimens of South 
American mammals has been increased to approximately 800 cards. 
New labels were provided for the serial collection of exotic birds. The 
Costa Rican collection of fishes obtained by Assistant Curator Meek has 
been partially catalogued. 

The year's work in the Museum on catalogues and inventories is 
shown in detail below: 



Department of Anthropology 
Department of Botany . 
Department of Geology 
Department of Zoology . 

The Library 

Section of Photography . 



No. of 
Record 
Books 

36 

57 
21 
40 

H 
10 



Total No. 


Entries 


Total No. 


of Entries to 


During 


of Cards 


Dec. 31, 1913 


1913 


Written 


126,530 


3,000 


130,781 


404-965 


41,781 


40,711 


128,036 


4,020 


7.659 


91.905 


2,975 


30,034 


95.865 


1.054 


164,692 


107,268 


5JI4 





accessions. —  The most important accessions of the year in the 
Department of Anthropology were those resulting from the Joseph N. 






288 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Field Expedition to the South Pacific. These not only include the 
material collected by Dr. Lewis, but several thousand specimens selected 
and purchased by the Curator from a dealer in Hamburg. As a result 
of the expedition and the purchase mentioned, the Department now 
possesses one of the most important and extensive collections of South 
Pacific ethnology. It is not possible at this time to state accurately the 
total number of specimens, but it is believed that it will exceed 20,000. 
The large number of specimens from most of the islands of Melanesia 
makes the collection of supreme importance. The collection from the 
Admiralty Islands is probably unique, for it not only comprises a series 
of fine carvings and a large series of specimens illustrating all phases of 
ordinary material culture of the islanders, but more than 30 carved 
beds, 20 huge carved drums, and 60 great bowls with highly decorated 
handles. From the Baining Mountains, New Britain, are no less than 
11 ceremonial masks, unmatched in character. The series of prepared 
skulls from New Hebrides runs into the hundreds ; of prepared skulls from 
New Guinea there are more than a thousand. Collections from the 
Kaiserin Augusta region of German New Guinea are especially rich 
and beautiful, comprising among other examples 4 feather masks 1 5 feet 
in height. The series of carved drums and house ornaments from New 
Caledonia adds to the effectiveness of an already rich collection from 
this interesting island. While the bulk of material acquired during the 
year must be credited to Mr. Field, yet the Department has made 
other important accessions. An especially notable acquisition is that 
of 1 5 7 ancient and wonderful bone carvings of intrinsic interest, assem- 
bled in China by that distinguished Chinese scholar and missionary 
Mr. F. H. Chalfant of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It is Dr. Laufer's 
opinion that these objects rank among the most ancient relics known 
of Chinese antiquity and that they were originally used for purposes of 
divination. The oracles and decisions given in reply to them by the 
seers are carved into the surface of the bone and present the Oldest form 
of Chinese writing now extant ; hence their remarkable interest. Among 
the carvings represented are alligators of a surprisingly realistic form, 
dragons, tortoises, snakes, and replicas of weapons, bells, and imple- 
ments; again there are imitations of shell money and specimens of 
ancient cowry-shells actually used in lieu of money. Somewhat similar 
collections are to be found in the museums of Pittsburgh, Edinburgh, 
London, and Berlin, but according to Mr. Chalfant this institution has 
secured the finest and most valuable series ever taken from China. This 
interesting and valuable acquisition was made possible through the 
generosity of Mrs. T. B. Blackstone. To the generosity of Prince Dam- 
rong, brother of the late King of Siam, the Museum is indebted for the 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XLVI 




Parade Uniform, Front and Back, of Officer in Attendance on the Emperor in 
the Palace, Peking, China (xviiith Century). 



\i*v 






Jan., i 9 14. Annual Report or the Director. 289 

gift of four Buddhist votive offerings of clay stamped with Buddhist 
subjects, excavated on the site of an ancient temple in Trang province, 
Siam. These objects are of great value inasmuch as the Museum pos- 
sesses similar specimens from China and Tibet. In connection with this 
gift the Museum is indebted to Dr. C. S. Braddock of New York, through 
whose mediation the tablets were forwarded to the Museum. Mr. 
Gotf ryd Anderson of Chicago and of the China Inland Mission presented 
to the Museum a Tibetan ink-drawing on yellow silk, mounted on 
Chinese brocade, representing Buddha surrounded by deities and saints. 
Of acquisitions made by purchase the two most important pertain to 
China. One is an excellent specimen of the parade uniform of an official 
in attendance at the imperial palace of Peking. It dates from the 18th 
century, and is in an unusually good state of preservation. The uniform 
is of silk almost solidly embroidered with heavy gold thread which is in 
practically perfect condition. The steel helmet of the uniform bears 
chased dragons in gold and is decorated with inlaid kingfisher feathers 
and painted eagle pinions. The uniform is accompanied with bow case 
and quiver, and studded with gilt brass ornaments, and the chest in 
which the whole is packed when not in use. From the British Museum 
the Museum purchased a color-print reproduction of the famous paint- 
ing attributed to Ku K'ai-chi. A copy of O. Franke's book on Agricul- 
ture and Sericulture in China was acquired to make use of the 91 
plates for exhibition purposes. These embrace -art interesting series 
of wood cuts executed in 12 10, of which but- one- copy is thus far 
known, found by Dr. Laufer in a bookshop of *T®kyO ' and now de- 
posited in the John Crerar Library. The whole series of plates is 
shown on a screen, individual labels being printed on the mats, and 
affords a good idea of the various stages of farming and the pro- 
cesses of weaving. 

The Curator of Botany reports important additions to the Herbarium 
of which the following may be noted: Arsene & Nicolas, Mexico 1159; 
Britton & Shafer, St. Thomas 125, St. Jan 71; W. E. Broadway, Tobago 
227; Brumback & Davies (Misses), Colorado 222; W. P. Carr, South 
Dakota 101; Clemens Mrs., Montana 51, Utah 50; Dr. Dalziel, Nigeria 
59; Judge DeSelm, Illinois 775, Michigan 68; A. D. E. Elmer, Phil- 
ippines 1000; Padre Fuertes, San Domingo 658; Wm. Harris, Jamaica 
420; J. H. Hart, Jamaica 94; Dr. Haydon, Oregon 128; A. A. Heller, 
Nevada 196; Hungarian Natl. Museum, Hungary 109; Frank W. 
Johnson, Indiana 52; C. F. Millspaugh, Wisconsin 65, Illinois 56; John 
Macoun, Vancouver Isl. 74; C. A. Purpus, Mexico 359; J. A. Shafer, 
Cuba 198; Shafer & Leon, Cuba 53; H. H. Smith, Indiana 69, Illinois 
108, California 681, Sta. Catalina Isl. 159; Tilden, fosephine, New 



290 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



South Wales 77, Victoria 399, Tahiti 94; S. S. Visher, South Dakota 
663; Vanoverburgh, Philippines 507. 

Status of the organization of larger Herbaria purchases: 



Herbarium 

Bebb, M. S. . . 
Chicago University 
Heller, A. A. . . 
Hitchcock, A. S. (Fla.) 
Millspaugh, C. F 
Patterson, H. A. 
Rothrock, J. T. 
Schott, Dr. A. 
Shuette, J, H. 
Small, J. K. . 
Wahlstedt, L. J. 



The additions to the organized Herbarium are 
ing geographically arranged table: 



North America (in general) . 
Alaska (in general) . 

Mary's Island 

Unalaska Island 
Canada (in general) 

British Columbia 

Labrador .... 
Kurnavik Island 

Manitoba .... 

New Brunswick . 

Nova Scotia .... 

Ontario 

Pr. Edward Island 

Quebec 

Queen Charlotte Island 

Saskatchewan 

Vancouver Island 

Yukon 

Newfoundland . 
Greenland 

Disco Island 
United States .... 

Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas .... 

California .... 
Santa Catalina Island 

Colorado 



Organized Completely 
1013. organized. 




3L583 


IO,36l 


44,048 




7,078 




5,002 




37,887 




22,809 




8,428 


10,990 


10,990 


10,273 


I9.38I 




17.555 


vn in the follow- 


Added to 

Herbarium 

IOI3- 


Total 

now in 

Herbarium. 


9 


140 


23 


553 


1 


I 


1 


32 


13 


2,015 


32 


I.OI2 


11 


I 7 8 


3 


3 


1 


259 


28 


780 


46 


194 


49 


624 


2 


11 


24 


145 


6 


6 


1 


363 


130 


36i 


1 


69 


4 


716 


39 


203 


4 


43 


285 


1,333 


79 


9,442 


142 


417 


1.895 


23.854 


159 


184 


863 


11,781 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 291 

North America (in general) 
United States 

Connecticut 

Dakota 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Indian Territory 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Mexican Boundary 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

Ohio . . 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

Rocky Mountains 

South Carolina 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington (State) 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Yellowstone National Park 35 435 



Added to 


Total 


Herbarium 


now in 


1913. 


Herbarium. 


222 


541 


3 


38 


300 


701 


935 


IO42 


125 


1,588 


385 


2,352 


778 


20,693 


105 


4,554 


362 


3.244 


1.831 


20,640 


649 


5,863 


27 


281 


303 


1,761 


127 


499 


269 


1,204 


47 


1,282 


61 


1,613 


127 


1,079 


216 


3,122 


3 


1.355 


501 


3,93i 


698 


1.598 


69 


2,031 


525 


3,oi5 


520 


4,026 


173 


413 


264 


1,011 


123 


1,481 


590 


2,013 


281 


2,953 


626 


6,046 


2,063 


4,557 


134 


1,670 


105 


287 


334 


7,858 


1.586 


10,845 


48 


592 


13 


I.39I 


268 


1,015 


226 


1.452 


977 


9,708 


250 


2,948 


114 


2,660 


2,356 


4.673 


92 


6,340 


3i 


1,840 


6,908 


8,088 


75 


929 



292 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Added to Total 

Herbarium now in 

Central America: 1913. Herbarium. 

Mexico (in general) 1.859 34» 26 9 

Lower California 85 i,8ii 

Cedros Island 1 165 

Yucatan 19 4.690 

Costa Rica 17 552 

Guatemala 26 2,881 

Honduras 1 34 1 

Nicaragua 3 88 

San Salvador 2 23 

West Indies: 

Anagada . . • 25 23 

Antigua 1 *3 

Bermuda 6 650 

Cuba 344 9.767 

Isle of Pines 1 654 

Jamaica 522 7.080 

Porto Rico 8 4,000 

Saint Kitts 2 12 

San Jan 71 7& 

Little San Jan 7 7 

Saint Thomas 175 620 

Buck Island 3 3 

Santo Domingo . 666 1,378 

Tobago 204 513 

Tortola 3 2 32 

Trinidad 13 478 

Virgin Gorda 5 5 

South America (in general) 

Brazil 113 510 

British Guiana J 7 1 

Chile 3 252 

Colombia 3 2,423 

Ecuador 15 8 49 

Juan Fernandez 3 3 

Magellan 2 40 

Peru 31 90 

Venezuela 2 1.063 

Bonaire Island 2 2 

Curacao Island 2 7 4 2 

Europe (in general) 4 83 

Austria-Hungary 54 6 7. 012 

Bavaria 2 2 

Belgium 3 75 

Dalmatia 3 3 

France *33 4-524 

Germany 231 7.098 

Great Britain: 

England Il6 679 

Ireland 9 161 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 293 

Europe (in general) Added to Total 

7 . Herbarium now in 

Great Britain 1913. Herbarium. 

Scotland 22 493 

Wight, Isle of 3 34 

Greece 5 5 2 5 

Italy 106 2,491 

Mediterranean Islands: 

Crete 1 8 

Malta 2 7 

Sardinia 2 7 

Sicily 1 no 

Norway 3 2I 9 

Portugal 2 11 

Finland 4° 95 

Scandinavia 3 19 

Spain 4 *39 

Sweden 324 823 

Gotland Island 5 203 

Lapland 24 231 

Switzerland 271 2,614 

Asia: 

Afghanistan I 2 

Arabia 13 17 

Armenia 1 175 

Asia Minor (in general) 

Asiatic Turkey (in general) 

Anatolia 2 2 

Mesopotamia 1 1 

Syria 3 75 

China 64 323 

Mongolia 1 1 

East Indies 3 3 

Japan 75 295 

Formosa 17 54 

Java 1 101 

Malaya 7 2 7 

Persia 2 21 

Philippine Islands 1167 51648 

Palawan 1,000 1,000 

Siam 3 6 

Siberia 19 429 

Turkestan .' 3 9 2 

Africa (in general) 2 3.9 28 

Abyssinia ..." 24 217 

Algeria 6 30 

Angola 1 n 

Cape Colony 14 81 

Central Africa 3 3 

Congo 1 1 

Egypt 1 23 

Gold Coast 1 1 



294 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



Africa (in general) 
Mauritius 
Morocco 
Mozambique 
North Africa 
Somaliland . 
South Africa 
Uganda . 
Zanzibar . 
Oceania (in general) 
Australia (in general) 

New South Wales 

North Australia 

Queensland . 

South Australia 

Victoria . 

West Australia 
Cooks Islands 

Raratonga 
New Zealand 
Samoa 

Sandwich Islands 
Tahiti . . . 
Tasmania 
Timor . . . 
Horticultural 
Illustrations, Drawings 
sheets 



etc., mounted as herbarium 



Added to 

Herbarium 

X9I3- 


Total 

now in 

Herbarium. 


I 


9 


I 


7 


7 


7 


63 


205 


4 


4 


10 


1,243 


4 


4 


26 


75 


424 


2,343 


in 


525 


10 


15 


7 


26 


1 


1 


488 


488 


10 


42 


29 


29 


2 


2,755 


40 


103 


10 


462 


94 


180 


1 


191 


1 


4 


613 


2,622 



58 



1,012 



The total increase of the organized herbarium during the year 
amounted to 41,401 specimens. 

Several interesting and valuable accessions were received by the 
Department of Geology. Of especial interest were two gold nuggets 
obtained in the California gold fields in 1850, presented by Mr. William J. 
Chalmers; also a quantity of silver nuggets from Lake Superior. A fine 
series of lead minerals and mercury ores was presented by Christopher 
Murphy. Six slabs of standard museum size of Georgia marble illus- 
trating different varieties of this marble were presented by the Georgia 
Marble Company; 13 slabs of Vermont marble, similarly prepared, were 
presented by the Vermont Marble Company; and three slabs of Cana- 
dian marble, likewise of standard size, by the Dominion Marble Company. 
A large mass weighing 400 pounds, of Versailles, Missouri, fire clay 
was presented by the W. S. Dickey Clay Manufacturing Company, 
and six varieties of pottery and other clays from various localities by 
the Land and Industrial Department of the Southern Railway. A 
series of 14 specimens illustrating a natural change of pyrite to hematite, 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 295 

as seen at Copete, Mexico, presented by Francis C. Nicholas, was of 
much interest, as was also a series of 10 specimens illustrating the con- 
centration of iron ores by washing, presented by the Oliver Mining 
Company. The Joseph Dixon Crucible Company presented an interest- 
ing series of 24 specimens illustrating uses of graphite, and the H. W. 
Johns-Man ville Company 19 specimens illustrating the uses of asbestos. 
The Heath & Milligan Manufacturing Company presented 13 specimens 
of buhrs tones and pigments. A series of 10 specimens of lead and 
silver ores from a new locality in California was presented by Dr. T. A. 
Dumont, and a large specimen of allanite used as an ore of rare earths, 
by A. C. Richards. A fine example of manufactured Monel metal was 
presented by the Biddle Hardware Company. About i ; ooo specimens 
of varieties of agate and jasper from Oregon were presented by C. H. 
Marsh, and a series of about 50 ores and minerals, chiefly from Mon- 
tana and illustrating ores of historic interest, was received from J. L. 
Rosenberger. Prof. R. D. Salisbury presented several specimens of 
obsidian nodules from Patagonia and some diamondiferous sand from 
Brazil, secured on his recent trip to South America. Through the kind- 
ness of Prof. Salisbury also 225 specimens of copper ores and concentrates 
were received from the Braden Copper Company, Rancagua, Chile. 
This suite was very complete in representing all phases of occurrence 
of the ore and many varieties of ore. By exchange with the University 
of California a valuable accession was received in a skeleton of Canis 
diurus, an extinct wolf from the asphalt beds near Los Angeles, Califor- 
nia. By exchange with the United States National Museum a section 
of the Perryville meteorite was obtained and one of the Nakhla meteorite 
was obtained in a similar manner from the Egyptian Geological Survey. 
Specimens of the Tepl and St. Germain meteorites were also obtained 
by exchange, and some specimens of minerals, a trilobite, and a skull of 
the fossil camel Stenomylus, the latter from Amherst College. The most 
important purchase was that of the Davis Mountains, Texas, meteorite, 
which was obtained entire. The entire mass of the Pickens County, 
Georgia, meteorite was also purchased, a section of the St. Michel 
meteorite and an unusual specimen of pollucite from Maine. 

The Department of Zoology received extensive accessions in all of 
its several divisions. The most important accessions of the year were 
those received from the Museum collectors in South America, which is 
shown by the fact that they contained 38 new species and subspecies; 
28 of birds and 10 of mammals. These have been described in Museum 
publications and the types have materially added to the value of the 
collections. In addition to these a very valuable collection of humming- 
birds, numbering 591 specimens and representing about 386 species and 



296 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

subspecies, was obtained by purchase. This is a part of the great pri- 
vate collection of humming-birds belonging to the famous French 
naturalist, M. Adolph Boucard, and is especially important since many of 
the specimens are cotypes or paratypes of species described by him. 
Mention should also be made of a small but valuable collection of South 
American birds and mammals purchased from a dealer in Merida, Vene- 
zuela, containing 6 mammals and 235 bird skins, together with 42 
humming-birds' nests and eggs, several species being very rare. Mr. 
John M. Studebaker of South Bend, Indiana, presented the Museum 
with a pair of American Elk, or Wapiti, which he killed a number of 
years ago in Colorado, and Mr. G. F. Steele of Chicago gave the Museum 
a number of mounted heads of Deer, Caribou, Goats, and one of the 
x\merican Bison. A notable addition to the Osteological collection 
is the skeleton of Ccenolestes obscurus from Columbia, which was 
mounted and installed and is the only known example on exhibition 
in any museum in the world. In the Division of Entomology an impor- 
tant addition was a collection of butterflies and moths from Key Is- 
lands. Among this lot were six specimens, three males and three fe- 
males, of the magnificent butterfly Troides priamns poseidon. These 
will form a welcome addition to the exhibit series. Chiefly from expedi- 
tions, 649 fishes were added to the collections in the Division of Ichthy- 
ology and several hundreds through exchange, mention of which is else- 
where in this report. 

expeditions and field work. — The Assistant Curator of African and 
Melanesian Ethnology, Dr. A. B. Lewis, returned to resume his duties in 
the Museum last June, having completed his four years' pilgrimage 
in the South Pacific among the Melanesian Islands, in charge of the 
Joseph N. Field South Pacific Islands Expedition. The early months of 
the winter Dr. Lewis spent in Dutch New Guinea, traversing the north 
coast as far east as Humboldt's Bay. From this point he proceeded to 
Batavia, Java, where he spent two weeks packing up the collections and 
studying in the museum in that city. He returned to Europe via 
Singapore, Rangoon, and India, where he visited the chief museums and 
the chief centers of ethnologic interest. May was spent visiting the 
principal museums of Italy, Austria, Germany, Holland, and England. 
About 12,000 specimens were secured by this expedition. If to these 
are added the number of specimens secured by purchase and from the 
Curator's expedition into Melanesia, the total should approximate 
20,000. Assistant Curator Owen returned to the Museum in May 
after a visit of several months among the Hopi Indians of Arizona. As 
a result of this expedition the Museum secured 50 boxes of additional 
specimens to be added to the already existing Hopi collection, all of 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 297 

which work has been made possible through the generosity of Mr. 
Stanley McCormick. Mr. Owen was especially fortunate on this 
occasion in securing a large number of old specimens of a sacred nature 
which heretofore had not been attainable. The number of specimens 
exceed 800, including, for the first time, a complete set of all known 
gourd vessels used by the Hopi; a complete set of earthenware vessels 
used for household or ceremonial purposes; some 50 tihus or decorative 
wooden images, either decided variants from those already in the 
collection or entirely new to the collection; many fine old Katcina masks 
and headdresses; a complete series of objects illustrating the manu- 
facture of shell beads; textiles, which include garments in the loom and 
every variety of weave known to the Hopi; complete sets of weaving 
implements; entire set of baskets and basket material from the Third 
Mesa; ceremonial paraphernalia, both for altars and costumes; raw 
materials, foodstuffs, etc. While in the Southwest the Assistant Cura- 
tor secured identifications and additional information for about 50 tihus, 
some of which have been on exhibition in the Museum since its founda- 
tion. Many old masks were also identified and information obtained 
for their proper labeling. Over 150 photographs were made of winter 
ceremonials, especially of Katcina dances held only at that time of the 
year. Measurements and photographs were made of a typical Hopi 
spring, as well as of wooden figurines of certain Hopi divinities, both 
for purposes of reproduction in the Hopi Halls. Early in the year the 
Curator was granted a month's leave of absence to accept an invitation 
to deliver four lectures at Cambridge University, England. During 
this time he visited the museums of Hamburg and Berlin, and made a 
careful and exhaustive study of the East Indian Museum in London. 

The material results of the work of the Assistant Curator of the 
Division of Dendrology of last season reached the Museum early in 
the year. The collections comprise many hundred photographic 
negatives of trees, tree growth, and forest conditions and operations; 
215 tree trunks, " wheels, " and boards ; 80 dried fruits, seeds, and barks; 
885 herbarium specimens and 2,275 duplicates for exchange purposes. 
During the present year the Dendrologist has spent his time in prepara- 
tory work in the Department, making two short field trips only in Indiana 
where he procured several tree specimens and photographs, 125 her- 
barium specimens, and 300 duplicates for exchange. 

A journey made by the Curator of Geology to western Texas re- 
sulted in securing for the Museum an iron meteorite of a hitherto un- 
known fall. It is the largest individual specimen but one now in the 
Museum meteorite collection. The weight of this individual is 1,520 
pounds. Besides its large size, it is of interest for its marked orientation 



298 Field Museum or Natural History — - Reports, Vol. IV. 

and for containing an appreciable quantity of platinum. The Assistant 
Curator of Paleontology secured by a trip to Grovertown, Indiana, a 
well preserved skull and nearly complete lower jaw of the extinct giant 
beaver, Castoroides. By using previously obtained remains of this 
species in connection with this skull it is probable that a mounted 
skeleton of this rare and interesting animal can be prepared. The 
Assistant Curator of Invertebrate Paleontology collected 182 specimens 
of invertebrate fossils at Little Traverse Bay, Michigan. 

Field work in South America in the interest of the Department of 
Zoology was continued with excellent results. Through co-operation 
with a Brazilian government expedition in charge of Roderic Crandall, 
the collectors in the field, M. P. Anderson and R. H. Becker, were enabled 
to reach, and work at small expense, regions difficult of access; namely, 
the upper parts of the Rio Branco and the Mountains of the Moon near 
the boundary between Brazil and British Guiana. Important collec- 
tions of birds and mammals were made and several fine examples of 
large mammals were obtained which will be used for habitat groups 
already planned. Mr. Anderson returned to the Museum in May, 
and Mr. Becker continued work in Brazil on the lower Amazon River 
and subsequently in the arid region of extreme eastern Brazil, in the 
Province of Ceara, whence he proceeded southward to Bahia and inland 
to the San Francisco River. The results of this work are mainly the 
acquisition of typical forms of vertebrate life, fresh material represent- 
ing species many of which were described by early explorers and ab- 
solutely essential to any accurate knowledge of the fauna. Mr. Ander- 
son, after a needed change in a northern climate, again entered the 
field, leaving here in October, commencing work in the little known 
Catatumbo region in northwestern Venezuela. An expedition to 
Alaska by Taxidermist Friesser proved highly successful. By permis- 
sion of the Secretary of Agriculture, Mr. Friesser secured four selected 
specimens of the Alaskan Moose, the skins and skeletons being carefully 
prepared. Samples of vegetation, photographs, and all needed acces- 
sories for a striking group of these animals were obtained, as well as 
desirable specimens of birds and the smaller mammals, including Alaskan 
Porcupines, Squirrels, Ptarmigan, Owls, etc. Some local field work was 
done by the Curator of Zoology including a short trip to Vilas County, 
Wisconsin, where photographs for studies in group work, and migration 
notes to be used in maps illustrating the range of various species, were 
secured. In addition to the expeditions named above mention is made 
of the African expedition undertaken by Mr. Brent Altscheler of Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, in the interest of the Department of Zoology, to whose 
generosity in this particular reference is made elsewhere in this report. 



Jan., 19 14. 



Annual Report or the Director. 



299 



The following is a list of the expeditions: 



Locality 

Brazil 

Brazil, Peru and Venezuela 

Monterey, California 

Baird, California 

Alaska, Seward Peninsula 

Indiana . 

Arizona 

Melanesia 

Indiana 

Michigan 

Texas 

British East Africa 



Collector 
R. L. Becker 
M. P. Anderson 
W. Heim 
W. Heim 
J. Friesser 
H. H. Smith 
C. L. Owen 
A. B. Lewis 
E. S. Riggs . 

A. W. Slocom 
O. C. Farrington 

B. Altscheler 



Material 

Mammals and Birds. 

Mammals and Birds. 

Fishes. 

Fishes. 

Mammals. 

North American Forestry. 

Ethnological Material. 

Ethnological Material. 

Vertebrate Fossils. 

Invertebrate Fossils. 

Meteorites. 

Mammals and Birds. 



Installation, Rearrangement, and Permanent Improvement. — The capacity 
of the staff and the assistants in the Department of Anthropology- 
has been fully tested this year, for besides the routine work an ex- 
traordinary amount of new work has been performed. Over 150 new 
cases have been placed on permanent exhibition, practically all of 
them fully and completely labeled. In addition to these, 15 standard 
cases installed in recent years have been rearranged, for such rearrange- 
ment seemed necessary on account of the acquisition of new material. 
More than 250 boxes, many of them of huge dimensions, have been 
unpacked and the contents assorted into temporary storage cases. 
All of this has required an extensive rearrangement and readjustment, 
but the time has now come when there is practically no room, outside 
the three small halls still reserved for Chinese and Tibetan material, 
for the display of new material except at the expense of material already 
installed. Borneo collections were installed in 9 cases as follows : 4 Iban, 
2 Malay, 1 Milanan, 2 Murut, 1 Kayan, and 1 Klemantan. These, 
together with 2 cases of Andaman Island material and one of Nicobar 
installed this year, and a case of Malay Peninsula material representing 
the primitive culture of the Semang and Sakai, have been placed in Hall 
8 where they completely fill up the aisles and block the cases of prehis- 
toric pottery from the Southwest. That hall now, though one of the 
most prominently placed halls in the Department, is merely a confused 
storage hall. Practically the entire Javanese collection has been rein- 
stalled, which was necessary because most of it was installed in old and 
inadequate cases. This collection now occupies Hall 54. To provide 
adequate space in the East Annex for the completion of the Philippine 
collections and the rapidly expanding Chinese and Tibetan collections, 
other changes than those already noted were necessary. First, all the 
Melanesian material, except the large canoes suspended from the ceiling 



300 Field Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

and the large house posts attached to the wall, was removed from Hall 
67 and transferred to the West Annex, where it is no longer available to 
the public. Again, the entire contents of Hall 66, consisting of a dozen 
cases devoted to Polynesia, Micronesia, and so on, were transferred to 
the West Annex. These collections also are no longer available to the 
public. But more serious was the enforced withdrawal from public 
exhibition of all the African collections, which now occupy a temporary 
resting place in a hall in the West Annex. While the Department has 
never maintained an expedition in Africa and while this African mate- 
rial has been acquired -in an indirect and, consequently, more or less 
unsatisfactory manner, yet, from certain regions, the collections are of 
importance and have distinctive value, and they certainly deserve a 
better fate than to be placed in storage. The Philippine collections are 
now completely installed and occupy Halls 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 54, and 
57. During the year 15 Philippine cases were reinstalled  — a necessity 
because of the acquisition of new material — and the following cases 
were installed for the first time: 1 Batak, 1 Ilocano, 1 Mangyan, 9 
Ilongot, 4 Ifugao, 1 Tingian, 1 Igorot, 1 Amburayan Igorot, 1 Guinnan, 
6 Mandayan, 1 Bagobo, and 1 Pulunan. Besides, special cases have 
been prepared for certain spirit houses, planting sticks, and other ob- 
jects requiring cases of special dimensions. A large group, to occupy 
a case 12 feet square, showing various phases of activity of the Bagobo 
represented by 7 figures modeled from life, is near completion and will 
soon be ready for installation. In the Northwest Coast Halls, 4 cases 
have been added — 3 Salish and 1 Chilcotin — of material presented to the 
Museum by Mr. Homer E. Sargent. Besides these, 3 cases of Thompson 
River material were reinstalled. To the Southwest Section have been 
added 2 new cases of pottery from the Hopi pueblos, 1 case of Navaho 
masks, 2 cases of Apache costumes, a case of Colorado River baskets, 
and 3 cases of decorated pueblo shields and buffalo robes. The installa- 
tion of this material has necessitated a certain amount of rearrangement 
in Halls 2,3, and 7. Every case in the Gem Room containing ethnologic 
material has been subjected to a careful revision, classification, and 
labeling. In the Chinese Section installation has progressed in a satis- 
factory and efficient manner. There have been 69 new cases installed, 
besides three special exhibits requiring platforms or bases. The mediae- 
val mortuary clay figures formerly shown on screens have been installed 
anew on shelves, and being now exposed in full light, their attractions 
can now be viewed and studied to best advantage. Five halls in the 
East Annex were fully installed which with Hall 44 are now devoted to 
East-Asiatic material. Hall 45 is mainly devoted to a display of the 
ceramic arts, 4 cases illustrating in historical development the most 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 301 

prominent types of porcelain, three others containing faience, and three 
funeral images to which a marble sarcophagus and a glazed pottery- 
coffin are joined. The other cases embrace miscellaneous material 
temporarily arranged; viz., coins, seals, and medals, Chinese and Tibetan 
silver jewelry, ancient bone carvings, and Buddhist votive offerings of 
clay. The object of the exhibits in the adjoining Hall 46 and 47 is to 
illustrate the religions of China — Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, and 
Islamism. Sixteen cases are now on view. Confucianism is illustrated 
by the most important portraits of Confucius and scenes in his life and 
career in examples chosen from the work of the best Chinese artists. 
The other religions are presented by a large number of paintings, rub- 
bings, and statues of bronze, iron, and pottery. The principle of arrange- 
ment is simultaneously chronological and according to subject-matter. 
The important event of the year in matters of installation proved to be 
the placing on exhibition of the Chinese and Tibetan masks, and in 
view of complexity of the technical problem involved, due credit should 
be given to the Department's efficient preparators who with untiring 
zeal and resourcefulness have made this exhibit a success. In principle 
this group of exhibits essentially differs from the other Chinese exhibits. 
The latter are analytic in depicting certain periods and facts; the former 
are synthetic, presenting in their totality an essential and vital organ 
of Eastern life, and spontaneously convey a feeling of reality. Three 
Chinese maps, one of the year 1136 and two printed in 146 1 with the 
imperial preface, have been hung in Hall 44. Six clearly engraved maps 
of China, due to the courtesy of the National Geographic Society of 
Washington, have been distributed over the various halls. The appear- 
ance of Hall 44 described in the last report has been improved in 
various ways: by the addition of labels, the reinstallation of the case 
containing ancient specimens of body armor increased by an important 
specimen obtained by purchase, and above all by the installation in wall 
cases of the two large painted scrolls presented by the Tuesday Art and 
Travel Club and appreciated in the last report. The silk tapestry 
acquired last year and a wood-cut reproduction of a celebrated landscape 
by the eminent Japanese painter Sesshu (obtained by Dr. Laufer in 
Tokyo) have been added to this wall, which now presents a unique 
spectacle of beauty of line and color. In this manner, not only is the 
best possible advantage taken of the wall space, but also the most 
efficient and impressive background is secured for the case exhibits. 
It was thought, for instance, very appropriate to include here Sesshu's 
famed scroll, inasmuch as it is Chinese scenery sketched by the artist 
during his sojourn in China, and the tribute paid by him in such masterly 
form to the beauty of Chinese landscape is a worthy monument to adorn 



302 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

a hall devoted to the civilization of China. The same reason applies 
to the two memorable paintings with their gay and vivid description 
of social and commercial life in media? val China. The numerous scenes 
displayed thereon have been interpreted in detail in a series of descrip- 
tive labels freely suspended from the lower rim of the wall-case, so that 
the interested visitor may hold them up to his eye to suit his convenience 
in reading. During the year an unusual amount of work has been done 
by the preparators. This was caused by the unusual demands made on 
their time from the nature of the Chinese collections and of the material 
brought from the South Pacific Islands by Assistant Curator Lewis. 
Of the work done in the Modeling Section not a little has been in com- 
pliance with requests from the Curator in charge of the Harris Public 
School Extension. For work of this nature casts for many replicas of the 
Igorot Ethnic Group, prepared last year, have been made. For the 
Harris Extension also have been made the following: Ground-work 
and houses for 8 coal-mines; ground- work and accessories for 6 Spanish 
forges; ground-work for 6 gopher groups; 6 Eskimo snow houses; 8 
Eskimo figures; casts of 8 gold nuggets; 16 reproductions of cacao pods; 
one piece-mold of cacao pod for wax casting; 6 miniature rhinoceroses; 
6 miniature hippopotamuses. For the Department the following work 
has been done by the Section of Modeling: For the Chinese Section, 42 
papier-mache display figures, besides a large number of miscellaneous 
rubbings, reproductions of seals, bronzes and porcelains, and iron 
inscriptions, etc., also reproductions of various designs for display and 
photography; for the North American Section, 12 papier-mache display 
figures, 96 moccasin forms, and 66 plaster busts; for the Philippine 
Section, 70 papier-mache display figures, used in installing garments, 
etc., ground- work for spirit houses and house models, and many mis- 
cellaneous repairs and restorations. The most important work done by 
the modelers during the year has been the preparation of a group to 
be ready early next year, intended to occupy a case 12 feet square. 
This will be a Bagobo group and comprise, among other things, seven 
figures in life-size which have all been modeled from life. 

In the Department of Botany little new material for exhibition 
purposes has been received during the past year, though that received 
has been of great value to the series for installation. The principal 
accessions were received from The Forest Economist of India, 56 fruits, 
gums, oils, rubbers, and fibers; from The United States Appraiser's 
Stores, specimens of imports of crude drugs and other vegetable sub- 
stances; E. W. Blake, California, four tree trunks and a box of fruits 
and nuts; The Pacific Improvement Company, California, four tree 
trunks; H. H. Smith, Dendrologist, 13 local medical roots; Miss Jose- 



Jan., i 9 14. Annual Report of the Director. 303 

phine Tildcn, 32 fruits, seeds, and gums from the South Pacific Islands; 
The American Trading Company of Yokohama, rice, kodzu, and bamboo 
papers; the N. K. Fairbank Company, 16 cottonseed oil products. 
Notwithstanding the small amount of material received, the public 
installation has progressed satisfactorily. New material has been added 
to the following families and the cases reinstalled to accommodate the 
same: The Fig Family; the Nutmeg and the Arrowroot Families; the 
Poison Ivy Family (2 cases) ; the Indian Lac Family; the Horsechestnut 
Family; the Mallow Family; the Pea Family; and a number of other 
cases readjusted. Ten new double cases were received in April. These 
were installed with the following material: The Grape and the Buck- 
thorn Families; the Vegetable-tallow Family; the Milkweed Family; 
the Dogbane Family; the Sapodilla Family; the Verbena Family; the 
Ebony Family; the Joint-fir Family; interesting utilizations of the 
Bamboo; the Australian Beefwood Family; the Birch Family; the Mint 
Family; the Bean Family; the Orchid Family; the Potato Family; the 
Ginger Family; the Geranium Family; the Magnolia Family and the 
Mushrooms. The North American Forestry exhibition has been aug- 
mented by twenty- two monographic installations as follows : the Winged 
Elm; Bitter Hickory; Black Ash; Kentucky Coffee-tree; Hackberry; 
Red Birch; Sugar Maple; Blue Ash; Texan Oak; White Hickory; Per- 
simmon; Tupelo Gum; Pecan; Sweet Gum; Pignut Hickory; Shagbark 
Hickory ; Sassafras ; Swamp Cottonwood ; Southern White Oak ; vercup 
Oak; Red Maple; and Box Elder. Ten other species are prepared and 
await cases. The following productions in the Section of Modeling 
have played a large part in the installation accomplished during the 
year: Ten different, growing mushroom colonies representative of as 
many edible or poisonous species; a full size plant of Mirmecodium 
illustrating the peculiar utilization of its bulbous base as a nest by ant 
colonies; a large, natural size branch of the Great Magnolia in full leaf, 
flower bud, flower and fruit, reproducing the freshly opened flower as 
well as those of several days' anthesis; a natural size branch of the 
Bilimbi tree, of Sumatra, in full leaf, flower and fruit; a fruiting branch 
of the East Indian Carambola; an enlarged flower of the common Sorrel 
illustrating family characteristics; a large, leafy, fruiting, and flowering 
branch of the peculiar Joint-fir of the tropics which join the exogenous 
(wood-heart) and the endogenous (fiber-heart) trees, also an enlarged 
flower cluster and two enlarged flowers of the same; a full size branch 
of the Maidenhair tree in full leaf and fruit; an enlarged flower of 
the Cardamom, somewhat like a pineapple in appearance, eaten as 
a vegetable in the Oriental tropics ; a full size cluster of leafy, flowering, 
and fruiting vines of the Vanilla plant; a natural size flower and leaf of 



304 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

the beautiful Cattleya orchid displaying family characteristics; a bundle 
of Betel leaves to accompany the exposition of betel chewing; a large 
branch of Connarus in full fruit and leaf; a tuber of the Oriental Yam; n 
full size plant of the common, roadside, Milkweed in full leaf, flower, and 
fruit; a branch of the Persimmon in full, ripe fruit; a large sprout of the 
edible Bamboo as sold in the markets of China and Java; a leafy, fruit- 
ing branch of the famed Mangosteen of Java, with two fruits in section 
showing the edible pulp ; a natural size fruit of the Guava and a section 
showing the seed characters; and a leafy twig bearing a pair of full ripe 
fruits of the Osage Orange. The Curator of Botany has conceived, and 
the Section of Modeling cleverly worked out, a unique method of placing 
before the public such microscopic plants as the germs of disease and 
other low orders of vegetable life. In this the microscope itself has been 
eliminated from the installations, its magnified field only being shown 
in the form of reproductions distinctly portraying the objects that it is 
desirable to display. In this manner the following plants, invisible 
to the unaided eye, have been prepared and placed on exhibition : 

A field showing graphically how bacteria multiply. 

Forms of Bacteria: 

Rod-like {Bacterium, Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Vibrio) 
Globular {Coccus, Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Sarcina) 
Corkscrew-like {Spirosoma, Microspira, Spirillum, Spirochcete) 
Thread-like {Streptothrix, Chladothrix, Leptothrix, Gallionella) 
Various shapes {Spirophyllum, Zooglcea, Actinomyces, Chondromyces) 

The formation of spores in Bacteria. 

Milk bacteria {Bacillus, Streptococcus) 

Nitrifying bacteria (Nitrosmonas, Nitrobacter, Clostridium) 

Germs of Cholera {Microspira comma) 

Pneumonia {Micrococcus pneumoniae) 
Tuberculosis {Bacterium tuberculosis) 
Syphilis {Spirochete pallida) 
Typhoid {Bacillus typhosus) 
Diphtheria {Bacterium diphtheritidis) 
Splenic fever {Bacterium anthracis) 
Epidemic Meningitis {Menigococcus) 

The cultivation of Bacteria illustrating both tube and plate cultures 
of several species. 

In these preparations the diseased tissue is represented in color on 
the field, and the germs, reproduced in glass, are placed, in 
situ, in the tissue. In this manner there have also been placed on 
exhibition a number of "fields" showing diatoms in colony and 
individual growths as well as an exemplification of their life 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 305 

history and their structure. Diatoms were formerly appreciated 
mainly because of their aesthetic beauty as microscope objects, 
but recently they are coming into prominence on account of their 
recognition as one of the fundamental food supplies of marine 
life. The series exhibited comprises: 

•The Barrel Diatom {Melosira Borreri) in colony and individual growth. 

The Triangle Diatom ( Triceratium favus) in single and dissected speci- 
mens, the latter illustrating the structural parts of diatoms. 

The Bristled Diatom (Chcctoceras Lorenzianum) in chain formation. 

The Fan Diatom (Licmorpha flabellata) two colonies attached to an alga. 

The Sun Diatom {Planctionetta Sol), highly magnified. 

The Bristling Rod Diatom (Bacteriastrum varians), in chain colony 
growth. 

Two Stylus Diatoms {Rhizosolenia styliformis and setigera), in chain 
growth and separate individuals. 

All these forms are reproduced very highly magnified to show their 
distinctive characters. 

The meteorite collection has been entirely reinstalled in order to 
incorporate into it the specimens, numbering about 1,600, of the Ward- 
Coonley collection. As exhibition space was not available for the entire 
collection it was divided, the iron meteorites being installed in Alcove 
106 and the stone and iron-stone meteorites in Hall 63, which is not at 
present open to the public. In making this reinstallation, all specimens 
have been placed according to the falls to which they belong so as to 
make the representation of the different falls as complete as possible. 
The installation in Alcove 106 is in the cases previously used for the 
collection, and that in Hall 63, in the cases obtained with the Ward- 
Coonley collection. All casts have been withdrawn from exhibition 
partly for lack of space and partly because their presence is liable to 
cause confusion. The installation of the meteorite collection is now 
complete with the exception of the Canyon Diablo specimens, the bases 
for which have not yet been prepared. It is intended that the Canyon 
Diablo specimens, when installed, will occupy a single case instead of 
being scattered among several as formerly. The large iron meteorite 
from the Davis Mountains, Texas, obtained during the year, was in- 
stalled in a floor case in Alcove 106. The bases of the glacial slabs in 
Alcove 103 have been mahoganized and some minor changes made in 
the installation of this alcove. All of the collections of ores of copper, 
zinc, iron, and many minor metals have been removed from the upright 
cases in Hall 34 and reinstalled. This removal was for the purpose of 
tinting the interior of the cases to the uniform black color now adopted 
for all cases. In reinstalling these collections considerable rearrange- 



306 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

ment was made in order to improve sequences and permit of the introduc- 
tion of new material. The new material was in part illustrative of the 
uses of the metals and in part illustrative of ores and ore dressing. 
Among new series so added may be mentioned that received from 
Francis C. Nicholas illustrating the development of hematite from 
pyrite and that from the Oliver Mining Company showing the con- 
centration of iron ores by washing. New illustrations of uses of metals 
added include series illustrating nickel plating, nickel steel, fracture and 
color of different alloys of copper and zinc, and glass tinting and making. 
The suites of six slabs of Georgia marbles, 13 slabs of Vermont marbles, 
and three slabs of Canadian marbles received during the year were in- 
stalled in their appropriate places in the marble collection in Hall 34, 
some readjusting of space and specimens having been necessary for this 
purpose. Some additions to the collections of abrasives, asbestos, and 
vein formations were installed in Hall 31, and rearrangements of the 
series already on exhibition were made for this purpose. Nine floor 
cases of clays and sands have been installed in Hall 63. These 
cases include six cases illustrating the classification of clays, one case 
showing effects of different components on clays, one case of refractory 
materials and one case showing uses of silica. A floor case of petroleum 
products has also been installed in this hall and a wall case showing 
varieties of soils in Hall 61. Two cases of graphite and asphalt in Hall 
35 were rearranged in order to add a collection illustrating the uses of 
graphite. A model of a coal mine, prepared for the uses of the Harris 
Extension Fund, was installed in Hall 34 pending its use in the schools. 
This model represents both the above-ground and underground equip- 
ment of a large colliery, the features shown being typical of those gener- 
ally employed. Above ground are shown in miniature a tipple and fan, 
boiler house, machine shop and a village of miner's houses. In front of 
these the ground is represented as cut away to a depth of 200 feet in 
order to uncover the underground system of galleries and chambers. 
Hoisting and air shafts connect the two portions. The underground 
portion is worked on the panel-retreating system. Three panels are 
shown; one worked out and caved in, one in active production, and one 
just being opened. Other exhibits to the number of 20 have been pre- 
pared for the use of the Harris Extension. These include series illustrat- 
ing the origin of coal, coal plants of Illinois, invertebrate fossils, ores of 
iron, ores of several metals, useful minerals, abrasives, glass manu- 
facture, steel manufacture, graphite, asbestos, salt, etc. Floor cases 
have been placed in Halls 35 and 59 for the installation of the Dolichor- 
hinus mount and the skeleton of the fossil camel Oxydactylus. The 
Dolichorhinus mount is the most nearly complete skeleton of this form 



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in existence. It shows all but a few limb bones of a complete individual. 
The skeleton is mounted in a recumbent position surrounded by matrix. 
As the rarity of the form will probably make detailed study of its parts 
frequently desirable, most of the parts have been mounted in such a 
way that though appearing joined together, they can be easily removed 
for examination. The mount was prepared from material obtained by 
the Museum expedition to the Uintah Basin in 19 10. Considerable 
labor was involved in preparing the mount from the fact that about 
half the bones were in such a distorted position as found that it was 
necessary to remove them entirely from the matrix before they could 
be brought into proper relation for mounting. In order to make room 
for the new cases mentioned, the cast of Dinotherium was removed from 
Hall 59 and the icthyosaur and plesiosaur models from Hall 35. The 
skull of the giant beaver Castoroides obtained during the year was 
assembled with other bones of the same genus and placed on exhibition 
in Hall 35. A collection of^ remains of extinct Patagonian mammals 
including some portions of 'the 'carapace of a glyptodon was installed 
in a wall case in Hall 59 and a floor case of White River turtles was 
placed on exhibition in the same hall. Some rearrangement of the 
adjoining exhibits was made in connection with this addition. A wall 
case of Oligocene mammals, chiefly titanotheres, was installed in Hall 
61 and one of Quaternary forms, chiefly remains of the Mammoth and 
Mastodon, in the same hall. In Hall 60 a case of marine Eocene mam- 
mals and other forms was installed, and in Hall 63 a table case of Miocene 
mammals. A wall case of Devonian invertebrate fossils was installed 
in Hall 61 and one of Cretaceous and Tertiary invertebrates in Hall 65. 
Some additions were made to the invertebrate fossils installed in Hall 
7,7, and some rearrangement performed in this connection. The Assist- 
ant Curator devoted over three months' time to the analysis of Chinese 
bronzes for the Department of Anthropology. One hundred complete 
quantitative analyses of these bronzes were made. Other quantitative 
analyses made by the Assistant Curator during the year included those 
of the Davis Mountains and MacQuarie River meteorites. Numerous 
qualitative analyses have also been made in the Lake Avenue laboratory, 
a number of meteorite sections etched, and several preparations for the 
exhibition series made. The material stored in trays in Hall 61, which 
had in part been withdrawn from exhibition at the time of moving from 
the West Annex, has been carefully gone over, much condensed and 
provided with better protection from dust and disintegration. It has 
also been grouped so that every specimen is readily accessible and each 
specimen has been labeled sufficiently for identification. As at present 
arranged, the material occupies 150 wooden trays 18 x 26 inches in size. 



308 Field Museum oe Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Early in the year the paleontological laboratory was moved from the 
quarters temporarily occupied in the section of taxidermy to Halls 77 
and 78 of the West Annex. Side windows were cut, work tables were 
fitted, and a sink, benches, and racks were installed in these halls. Racks 
for 350 trays were erected in part of Hall 78 and a sorting table pro- 
vided. The semi-prepared and duplicate material was carefully arranged 
in these trays, and its complete preservation and accessibility thus as- 
sured. In these quarters the preparation of vertebrate and invertebrate 
fossils has been actively carried on through the year and a notable 
amount of material worked out. The most important single piece pre- 
pared during the year was a slab showing twenty-six skeletons of the 
fossil water deer, Leptomeryx evansi. This slab was collected in South 
Dakota in 1905. It was known at the time to be a remarkable specimen, 
but its great richness in individuals was only realized on its being worked 
out. In preparing the slab for exhibition the upper surface of the stone 
has been chiseled away with great care, leaving the skeletons exposed 
in high relief upon a background of the natural matrix. Not a bone 
has been disturbed from its original position in the rock. Of the twenty- 
six individuals shown, nine are in articulated position. Some are in a 
natural reclining position, while others have legs, vertebral columns or 
skulls dislocated and some are entirely disarticulated. The slab presents 
one of the most notable aggregations of fossil mammals to be found in 
any museum, and exceeds all in the number of individuals shown 
associated. The size of the slab is four by seven feet. Sufficient mate- 
rial was secured in connection with this to enable an articulated skeleton 
to be mounted for exhibition beside it. The specimen as a whole will 
make known for the first time the complete structure of this animal, 
portions of which have been known to science for sixty years. The 
preparation of the slab has occupied a large part of the time during the 
year of Preparator Abbott under the supervision of the Assistant Curator 
of Paleontology. Air. Abbott was the discoverer of the specimen in the 
field. A large number of other valuable specimens of vertebrate fossils 
collected by the Museum expeditions of 1905, 1906, and 1908 in the 
Western States have been prepared for exhibition during the year or have 
been freed from their matrix so as to be readily available for study or 
exchange. The specimens so prepared, determined, and installed during 
the year include 28 miscellaneous specimens of Oligocene titanotheres, 
three skulls and one jaw of Miocene creodonts, four carapaces and plas- 
trons of Miocene tortoises and one each of Oligocene tortoise and Eocene 
turtle. Eight specimens of Miocene horses, 1 2 of Miocene creodonts, 1 1 
of Miocene camels and one each of Miocene rhinoceros and camel, were 
also prepared sufficiently for identification. The skeleton of Cards diurus 
received from the University of California was freed from adhering and 



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inhering asphalt and made ready for mounting. Specimens of Patagonian 
fossil mammals, 28 in all, were also prepared, determined, and installed. 
The Assistant Curator of Invertebrate Paleontology has prepared and 
published descriptions of 1 2 new species and one new genus of trilobites 
which he collected in the Maquoketa beds of Fayette County, Iowa, and 
has cleaned and identified a large amount of other material which he 
obtained at the same localities. In addition he has mounted on labeled 
tablets for exhibition a large number of invertebrate fossils, the work of 
mounting having progressed as rapidly as the tablets could be obtained 
from the printer. 

Several bird and mammal groups are nearing completion, but only 
one was actually installed during the year — a large group representing 
bird life on Laysan Island. This island, situated about 400 miles west 
of Honolulu in the mid-Pacific, has been set aside as a United States 
Government Bird Reservation on account of the vast number of pelagic 
birds that breed there. The group includes eleven species of birds 
(with a number of nests andtfgggs) , among them being Petrels, Man-o'- 
war birds, and two species of Albatrosses. The latter are shown indulg- 
ing in their peculiar "dance." 1 ; The" painted background shows the 
character of the island and the great number of birds which breed there, 
an illustration of environment, being of educational value. A very large 
group of American Bison is in the final stage of installation and will soon 
occupy space in the central rotunda of the Museum. This group of 
representative American mammals contains six Bison of varying ages, 
shown in a characteristic Western Plains setting, to which environ- 
ment "atmosphere" has been given by the addition of a few small 
animals, such as prairie dog, a burrowing owl, and a rattlesnake. A 
large amount of taxidermy work has been planned and partly executed. 
Groups in various stages of completion are: Olympic Elk, Capybara 
and Jaguar, and a chipmunk and Spermophile group. Fresh specimens 
for an imposing group of Alaskan Moose and also for an Arctic bird 
group (Walrus Island) have been received, and work on these groups 
will begin at once. Five specimens of mammals have been added to the 
serial exhibition collection and several more are partly mounted, some 
of which will be completed at an early date. These are Asiatic Takin, 
Spectacled Bear, Kansu Deer, Mandril, and White-lipped Peccary. Some 
twenty specimens were added to the series of mounted birds including 
two examples of the exceedingly rare Trumpeter Swan, a gift from Mr. 
J. M. Barnes of Lacon, Illinois. During the year the attention of the 
Division of Entomology was given as much as possible to work that 
pertained directly or indirectly to the installation of exhibits. A step 
in this direction was the week spent in completing the work of determin- 
ing local grasshoppers or Orthoptera, which, it is planned, will eventually 



310 Fielb Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

form a part of an exhibition -series of Illinois insects. With the same end 
in view, some time was devoted to local bugs or Hemiptera, the insects 
that follow the grasshopper in scientific arrangement. At different 
periods, equaling about three months, the Assistant Curator of Ento- 
mology gave his attention to the spreading and labeling of exotic butter- 
flies representing stored accessions intended for exhibition. By means 
of the material thus prepared, also by using the duplicates which were 
acquired with the Strecker collection, it will be possible to make many 
desirable additions to the butterfly exhibit when it is transferred to the 
new insect cases. The attention of the assistant was largely given to 
the making of life-history groups. 

The N. W. Harris Public School Extension of Field Museum of Natural 
history. — The problem of supplying museum material to the 
public schools of Chicago under the auspices of The N. W. Harris 
Public School Extension of Field Museum has been initiated and 
satisfactory progress may be reported. During the first part of the 
year considerable time was spent in seeking information, formulating 
plans of operation, and inaugurating methods of procedure. While 
these steps were necessary and essential, approved visible results during 
that period were few but helpful. Considerable of this period was 
devoted to the development of the character and construction of a type 
of exhibition case. It is believed that the adopted style of case meets 
the requirements for stability, portability, usefulness, and appear- 
ance. It is the aim to standardize all cases, so far as the length and 
height are concerned. The depths of the cases has so far been deter- 
mined at four, seven and ten inches. These variations of depths have 
met thus far the requirements of all installed material. In the very 
earliest stages of determining the suitability of the cases to be circulated, 
one very important feature had to be carefully considered. It was 
determined that the two framed explanatory labels which are to accom- 
pany each case to the schools should be a part of the case proper, so as to 
avoid leaving the labels either at the Museum or at the school when the 
cases were either being delivered or returned. To meet this requirement 
a scheme of having the two framed labels on grooves affixed to the back 
of the case was adopted. This arrangement permits of the labels being 
extended to full view on either end of each case when in use in the class- 
room, and of being closed flush with the cases when being transported 
to and from the Museum. In order to prevent as much as possible the 
handling of cases when in schoolrooms, and that the contents of the 
cases may be easily seen and studied by a number of students at one 
time, two hanging appliances have been attached to the top edge of the 
back of each case, that it may hang from hooks in the wall or upon a 
standard stand in full view of the classes. To lessen the occurrence of 



Jan., 1914. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



311 



accidents to the cases when being transported by pupils from room to 
room, experience clearly showed the advisability of having a light, strong 
handle at each end of a case. The design of a black painted wooden 
specimen and label holder in one piece assists not only in the rapid in- 
stallation of collections, but in the general appearance of neatness and 
order as well. The cases and contents which are now ready for distribu- 
tion among the schools, were designed with the idea of their serving as 
keys or sample cases from which duplicates can be easily and quickly 
prepared. Eighty cases of loan collections are now available for use in 
the schools. Thirty-eight of these cases represent zoological material, 
twenty-one geological, twenty botanical, one anthropological. Many 
public spirited individuals and corporations have given substantial aid 
by presenting materials of educational value. In many instances the 
materials represent the various stages of manufacture from the raw to 
the finished products. Such collections, accompanied by carefully 
prepared labels, should prove of value in geographical work, in com- 
mercial studies, and also in nature study courses. During the spring, 
each of the following schools — • Burr, Mann, Warren, McAllister, Haines 
Practice and Carter Practice — made use of the cases for a period of two 
weeks. The request of the Superintendent of Schools for cases to be 
sent to Burnside vacation school opened up an entirely new field of 
museum extension work. The request was granted, and for the entire 
period of the usual summer vacation, several cases were on exhibition 
at the above school, and not only were these cases viewed and studied 
by the pupils, but by many of the residents of the neighborhood adjacent 
to the school. 

Photography and Illustration. — The following table shows the actual 



results only of a large series of detailed operations 



v 
Si > v 

pit; 

|s?a 

Director's Office ... 8 
Anthropology .... 364 

Botany 157 

Geology 179 

Zoology 17 

Harris Extension . . .41 

Distribution 

Gift 

Sale 



fee 

G "> 



15 
907 
608 
346 
713 
183 

87 
160 

732 



s 8.x 

£ 53 



142 

IOO 

83 

95 

117 



00 

O C 

V 

U C <" 

3.2 
'z c 



u 
O w 

" ' c 



84 



u>T3.2 
3 1) V O. 

£z > * 



186 

12 



TS-3 



«> <D 8 






coo ">_, mJ? 
2. JS, > v.B'z 



96 



278 



Totals 766 3,751 537 86 476 98 

Total number of Catalogue entries during year 1913 5,714 

Total number of Catalogue entries to December 31, 1913 107,268 



312 Field Museum oe Natural History — - Reports, Vol. IV. 



Exhibition 
Labels 


Other 
Impressions 


4,107 


13-350 


2,922 


26,321 


6,337 
2,695 

5-545 


18,400 

59,738 
11,046 



printing. — The Head Printer reports that, notwithstanding the 
time devoted to the needs of the N. W. Harris Public School Extension, 
the regular Museum label work has been given the needed attention 
with the result that the Section has been able to keep up with the in- 
coming copy. 

The number of labels and other impressions which were turned out 
by the Section are tabulated below: 



Anthropology 

Botany 

Geology . 

Zoology . 

General 

N. W. Harris Public School Extension 



attendance- — The total number of visitors recorded during the 
year was 214,144, being a decrease of approximately 400 in the figures 
for the previous year. The classification of the attendance during the 
year is shown elsewhere in the report and a list of the school classes 
(twenty pupils or more) that visited the Institution during the year 
follows : 

Schools and Locations 
University Elementary —  Fifty-ninth Street and Kenwood Avenue 
Sullivan — Eighty-third Street and Houston Avenue .... 

Ray — Fifty-seventh Street and Kenwood Avenue 

Art Institute — Michigan Avenue and Adams Street .... 
Hyde Park High — Sixty-second Street and Stony Island Avenue . 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

Art Institute — Michigan Avenue and Adams Street .... 

Chicago Latin — 18 East Division Street 

Addison Normal — Addison, Illinois 

Ray — Fifty-seventh Street and Kenwood Avenue 

Andersen — West Division and Lincoln Streets 

Shakespeare — Forty-sixth Street and Greenwood Avenue . 

Hull House — 800 South Halsted Street 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

Chicago Academy of Fine Arts — 6 East Madison Street 

Chicago Latin — 18 East Division Street 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

University Elementary — Fifty-ninth Street and Kenwood Avenue 
Hyde Park High — Sixty-second Street and Stony Island Avenue . 
Seward — Forty-sixth Street and Hermitage Avenue .... 
University Elementary — Fifty-ninth Street and Kenwood Avenue 
Marshall High — Adams Street and Spaulding Avenue .... 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

New Trier High — Winnetka, Illinois 



ichers 


Pupils 


3 


20 


2 


37 


2 


24 


1 


30 


1 


88 




20 


1 


30 


3 


22 


1 


60 


1 


21 


1 


40 




30 


1 


25 




45 




81 


1 


20 




21 




25 


1 


21 


1 


30 


13 


207 


3 


3i 


2 


45 


1 


26 


1 


20 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XLIX. 




Type of Case Loaned to Public Schools by The n. W. Harris Public School 

Extension of Field Museum. 



Jan., 1914. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



3i3 



Schools and Locations 

Moody Bible Institute — 153 Institute Place 

Epiphany — 4219 West 25th Street 

Chicago Latin — • 1 8 East Division Street 

Wendell Phillips High — Thirty-ninth Street and Prairie Avenue . 
Wendell Phillips High — Thirty-ninth Street and Prairie Avenue . 

Clifton High — Clifton, Illinois  

Wendell Phillips High — Thirty-ninth Street and Prairie Avenue . 

Luther Institute — 1 135 South Marshfield Avenue 

Marshall High — Adams Street and Spaulding Avenue . 

Parker High — 330 Webster Avenue 

St. Charles — St. Charles, Illinois 

Steger — Steger, Illinois 

Warren — Ninety-second Street and Central Avenue . 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

Hyde Park High — Sixty-second Street and Stony Island Avenue 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

Kenwood — Fiftieth Street and Lake Park Avenue 

Dewey — Fifty-fourth Street and Union Avenue 

William Penn — Sixteenth Street and Avers Avenue . 

Warren — Ninety-second Street and Central Avenue . . . . 

Sherman — Fifty -first and Morgan Streets 

West Pullman — West Pullman, Illinois 

St. Michaels — Eighty- thirdU&treet ^>rld^Qntario Avenue 

West Pullman — West Pullman ;Tniiibis.' 

Juvenial Home — 771 Gilpin Placer*?,* ; . .' 

Chicago Hebrew Institute —  1258 Taylor Street . . . 

Holden — Thirty-first and Loomis Streets 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

Burnside — Ninety-first Place and Langley Avenue 

Jefferson Vacation — Elburn Avenue and Laflin Street . 
McCormick Vacation — Sawyer Avenue and West Twenty- 
seventh Street 

St. Marys — 1031 Cypress Street 

Central Y. M. C. A.— 19 South La Salle Street . . . . . . 

Copernicus Vacation  — West Sixtieth and Throop Streets . 

Bohemian — 15 10 West Eighteenth Street 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

Chicago Orphan — Fifty-first Street and South Park Avenue 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

Washington — North Morgan Street and Grand Avenue 
Chicago Evangelistic Institute — 1754 Washington Boulevard . 
Chicago Academy of Fine Arts — 6 East Madison Street 
University Elementary - —  Fifty-ninth Street and Kenwood Avenue 

Holy Family — 1444 West Division Street 

Home for Jewish Friendless — 5228 Ellis Avenue 

Moody Bible Institute — 153 Institute Place 

Carter Practice — Sixty-first Street and Wabash Avenue 
University Elementary — Fifty-ninth Street and Kenwood Avenue 
University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 



Teachers 


Pupils 




32 


2 


21 


3 


20 




25 




21 


I 


23 




29 


5 


95 




28 




60 




42 




20 




40 




25 




76 




25 




42 




20 




21 




32 


3 . 


74 




21 


1 


38 


2 


20 


4 


21 


4 


21 


1 


45 


1 


56 


2 


40 


6 


52 


14 


535 


2 


23 


4 


28 


20 


292 


2 


45 




27 




46 




32 




55 




4i 




4i 




25 


2 


24 


2 


55 




3i 


2 


45 


1 


20 




35 



314 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Schools and Locations Teachers Pupils 

Art Institute — Michigan Avenue and Adams Street .... i 22 

University Elementary — Fifty-ninth Street and Kenwood Avenue 2 20 

Chicago Latin — 18 East Division Street 5 25 

University Elementary — Fifty-ninth Street and Kenwood Avenue 3 22 

Andersen — West Division and Lincoln Streets 1 37 

Branscroft — Maplewood and Wabansia Avenue 1 30 

Herewith are also submitted financial statements, analysis of attend- 
ance, list of accessions, articles of incorporation, amended by-laws, 
names of members, etc. 

Frederick J. V. Skiff, Director. 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 315 



Financial Statement 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
January 1, 1913, to December 31, 1913 



Receipts 

Cash in Treasurer's hands, General Fund, December 31, 1912 . . $8,342.10 
Cash in Treasurer's hands, Endowment Sinking Fund, December 31, 

!9I2 504-44 

Petty Cash on hand, December 31, 1912 739-95 

Dues of Annual Members 1,200.00 

Life Members 1,000.00 

Life Memberships Fund — - Investment Income 275.00 

Admissions and Check Rooms 5,886.15 

Sale of Guides 218.00 

South Park Commissioners 15,000.00 

Interest on Investments and Bank Balances 44,784.39 

Field Endowment Income 136,500.00 

Field Endowment Sinking Fund 500 . 00 

Field Endowment Sinking Fund Income 152.89 

New Exhibition Cases Fund 1,829.24 

New Exhibition Cases Fund Income 2,760.00 

New Exhibition Cases Fund Investments retired 22,500.00 

Field-Sprague Ornithology Fund 578 . 00 

Joseph N. Field South Pacific Islands Fund 12,268.13 

Huntington W. Jackson Library Fund 40 . 00 

N. W. Harris Public School Extension 171. 15 

Donations 5,670.62 

Sundry receipts 17.27 

$260,937 . 33 
Disbursements 

Salaries $95,201.53 

Guard Service 13,152.69 

Janitor Service 8,003.03 

Fire Protection 5,216.42 

Heat and Light — 

Wages $4,071.28 

Fuel 6,081.68 

Gas 452.00 

Renewals, Supplies and Sundries 977-74 11,582.70 



316 Field Museum of Natural History -- Reports, Vol. IV. 

Repairs and Alterations — 

Wages of Carpenters, Painters, Roofers, etc. . . $9,643.18 
Material used — paints, oils, glass, lumber, plas- 
ter, etc 2,467.14 

Constructing Sewer 341.00 

Restoration' of West Annex 2,142.61 $14,593-93 

Sections of Printing and Photography 7,302.68 

Collections, purchased i3;832.oo 

Departmental Expenses . 6,350.00 

Expeditions 4,725.58 

Publications 2,763.17 

General Expense —  

Freight, Expressage and Teaming ....'. $2,321.51 

Stationery 3°8-33 

Postage, Telephone and Telegrams .... 752 . 87 

Sundries 3,229.59 6,612.30 

Furniture and Fixtures — 

New Exhibition Cases . $32,453.12 

Sundries 88.00 32,541.12 

The Library — 

Books and Periodicals ......... $1,401.82 

Binding 741-79 

Expense 78-73 2,222.34 

Field-Sprague Ornithology Fund . . . . . . . 34 8 • 25 

Joseph N. Field South Pacific Islands Fund .... 12,429.70 

Stanley McCormick Hopi Fund 12.20 

Mrs. T. B. Blackstone Fund 273.96 

Homer E. Sargent Fund 12.66 

$237,176.26 
In Treasurer's hands, December 31, 1913 — 

General Fund $11,690.37 

New Exhibition Cases Fund 930 . 75 

Endowment Sinking Fund 180.00 12,801.12 

Petty Cash on hand, December 31, 19 1 3 739-95 

New Exhibition Cases Fund — advance to Building 

Fund 3-500.00 

General Fund — Investments 5,500.00 

Endowment Sinking Fund-Investment 1 ,220 . 00 

$260,937.33 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 317 



ATTENDANCE AND RECEIPTS FROM JANUARY 1 TO 

DECEMBER 31, 1913 



Attendance. 
Paid Attendance — 

Adults 20,547 

Children 2,166 22,713 

Free Admission on Pay Days — 

School Children 3,836 

Students 3410 

Teachers 505 

Members: Corporate 36 

Annual 37 

Life 1 

Officers' Families 53 

Special 193 

Press 17 8,088 

Admissions on Free Days — 

Saturdays 40,842 

Sundays 142,501 183,343 

Total Attendance 

Highest Attendance on any one day (July 20, 1913) 
Highest Paid Attendance on any one day (September 1,1913) 

Average Daily Admissions (363 days) 

Average Paid Attendance (259 days) 

Receipts. 

Guides Sold — 872 at 25 cents each 

Articles Checked —  10,656 at 5 cents each 

Admissions 

$6,104.15 



214,144 


7.991 


618 


589 


87 


$218.00 


532.80 


5.353-35 



318 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



Accessions 



DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 
(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AYER, E. E., Chicago. 

Pair of gold bracelets — Italy. 

Female Ushabti figure of wood — Egypt. 

Belt, silver plates, Navajo. 

Ceremonial Copper Shield, Kwakiutl. 
BLACKSTONE, MRS. T. B., Chicago. 

Ancient Chinese bone carvings — China. 

Ancient bone carvings — Shantung, China. 

Pair of bronze staves —  Shantung, China. 
FIELD, JOSEPH N., Manchester, England. South Pacific Islands Fund. 

General ethnological collection — Melanesia (Collected by A. B. Lewis). 

Skulls and skeletons — Melanesia. 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Purchases: 

Painted scroll by Ku K'ai-chi in British Museum, reproduced in colored 
wood cut — China. 

Parade uniform of officer belonging to the Imperial Palace Guard, 
complete with helmet, boco-case and trunk — - China. 

Decorated Buffalo-hide robe. 

Four Navajo blankets. 
GARST, GOODWIN, Coon Rapids, Iowa. 

Flint arrowhead — Coon Rapids, Iowa. 
GISE, MISS VIRGINIA, Chicago. 

Miscellaneous ethnological specimens — Samoa and South Sea Islands. 
LANDIS, FRANKLIN, Chicago. 

Coat of intestines trimmed with fur — Aleutian Islands. 
MOORE, CLARENCE B., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Archaeological specimens. 
PFAFFER, DR. L., Weimar, Germany. 

Prehistoric archaeological remains. 
ROBERTS, GEO. C, Sharon Hill, Pa. 

Flint arrowheads — Pennsylvania (exchange). 
SETON-KARR, H. W., London, England. 

Flint archaeological specimens — Egypt. 
SIAMESE GOVERNMENT, Bangkok, Siam. 

4 Buddhistic clay tablets — Siam. 




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' m., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 319 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AMERICAN TRADING CO., Yokohama, Japan. 

Japanese rice, kodzo and bamboo papers — Japan. 
ARTHUR, J. C, Lafayette, Ind. 

Photographs of Cedar Apples — Indiana. 
BLACK, E. W., Santa Margarita, California. 

Economic specimens and dry fruits —  California. 
BRANDEGEE, T. S., Berkeley, California. 

1 herbarium specimen —  Mexico. 
BRITTON, MRS. E. G., New York City. 

4 illustrations. 
CLAYBERG, H. D., Chicago, Illinois. 

1 herbarium specimen — Michigan. 
CORY, MRS. C. B., Chicago, Illinois. 

1 herbarium specimen — Wisconsin. 
DEAM, CHAS. C, Bluffton, Indiana. 

6 herbarium specimens — Indiana and Florida. 
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Kingston, Jamaica, British West Indies 

3 branches and fruits of Capparis jamaicensis — Jamaica. 
DE SELM, JUDGE ARTHUR W., Kankakee, Illinois. 
229 herbarium specimen^ ; — Illifeai^ ; and Michigan. 
244 herbarium specimens — Kankakee, Illinois. 
371 dried plants — Illinois. 
FAIRBANK COMPANY, THE N. K., Chicago, Illinois. 

16 cottonseed oil products. 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Collated by C. F. Millspaugh: 

16 herbarium specimens — Peru and Ecuador. 

56 herbarium specimens — Java, Malaya, Mexico, United States and West 

Indies. 
53 herbarium specimens — Europe, Australia and West Indies. 
33 plant fragments, descriptions and drawings. 

3 herbarium specimens — Cuba. 
53 herbarium specimens —  United States, West Indies, Mexico, Central 
and South America. 
3 herbarium specimens — Mexico and West Indies. 
Collated from Museum Library: 

5 colored plates mounted as herbarium spec" :ns. 
Collated by E. B. Uline: 

3 drawings of Amaranthacea and Dioscoreace^. 
Collected by O. E. Lansing, Jr.: 

9 herbarium specimens — Indiana. 
Collected by H. H. Smith: 

Fruits of Euonvmus atropurpureus — Indiana. 
Fruits of Viburnum prunifolium — Indiana. 
Gum, seeds and cones of Pinus Sabiniana — California. 
125 herbarium specimens — Illinois and Indiana. 

Dry fruits of Rhus radicans (poison ivy) — Indiana. 



320 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Made by Section of Photography: 
7 photographs of type plants. 
Photo of Cacalia discolor — Cuba. 
Purchases : 

Economic specimens {Myristica fragrans) — Butter. 
Economic specimens {Myristica fragrans) — Oil. 
109 herbarium specimens — South Pacific Islands. 
I specimen of sealing wax. 
1 specimen of shell lac. 
1,000 herbarium specimens — Palawan, Philippine Islands. 
221 herbarium specimens — Canada. 
557 herbarium specimens — Santo Domingo. 
338 herbarium specimens — Montana, Nevada, California, Utah and 

Wyoming. 
612 herbarium specimens — South Dakota. 
490 herbarium specimens — South Pacific Islands. 
32 economic specimens — South Pacific Islands. 
359 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 
1,159 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 
122 herbarium specimens — Tobago and Trinidad. 
1 01 herbarium specimens — Santo Domingo. 
507 herbarium specimens — Philippines. 
51 herbarium specimens — South Dakota. 
105 herbarium specimens — Tobago, West Indies. 
50 herbarium specimens — South Dakota. 
56 herbarium specimens — Tobago, West Indies. 
87 herbarium specimens — South Dakota. 
218 herbarium specimens — Philippine Islands. 
Modeled by Section of Modeling: 
Toxylon pomiferum — fruits. 
Psidium Guajava — fruit section. 

Garcinia Mangostana — fruiting twig, fruit, and fruit section. 
Arnndinaria sp. — sprout. 
Cattleya Triancei — flower. 
Asclepias Syriaca — whole plant. 
Diospyros Virginiana — fruiting branch. 
Connarus diversifolius — fruiting branch. 
Dioscorea sativa  — tubers. 
Gnetum Gnemon — branch. 
Plant of Vanilla planifolia. 
Leaves of Piper Betel. 

Reproduction of small branch of vanilla plant. 
Reproduction of fruit head of "Cardamom." (Elettaria.) 
Modeling of enlarged flowers of Gnetum. 
Fruit of Averrhoa Carambola. 

Whole branch of Averrhoa Bilimbi in leaf, flower and fruit. 
Diatom — Triceratium favus. 
Diatom — Planktonella Sol. 
Flower of Oxalis corniculata. 
Model of branch of Magnolia feet ida. 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 321 

Diatom — Melosira Botteri. 
Diatom — Chaetoseros Lorenzianum. 
Barter iastrum varians. 
Rhizosolenia styliformis and R. setigera. 

Models of Cleome spinosa — enlarged flower, fruit natural size, ovary- 
section enlarged. 
Model of Diatom Licmophora flabellata. 
Reproduction of a plant of Hydnophytum formicarum. 
9 mushroom models. 
49 reproductions of Bacteria. 

A full leafy and fruiting branch of Gingko biloba. 
Reproduction of a group of fungi (Ar miliaria mellea). 
FOREST ECONOMIST, Dehra Dun, India. 
55 Vegetable products — India. 

Milk and Caoutchouc from Calotropis — India. 
FRIESSER, J., Chicago, Illinois. 

1 herbarium specimen — Florida. 

15 herbarium specimens — Alaska and Washington. 
5 herbarium specimens — State of Washington. 

GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF ALABAMA, University, Alabama. 

14 herbarium specimens — Alabama and Arkansas (exchange). 
GRAY HERBARIUM OF HARVARD UNIVERSITY, Cambridge, Mass. 

1 herbarium specimen — Cuba (exchange). 
GREENMAN, DR. J. M., Chicago, Illinois. 

2 herbarium specimens Maxillaria. 
HALL, MRS. HERMAN J., Chicago, Illinois. 

Living plant of Ginseng in full ripe fruit — Michigan. 
Illustration of Ginseng — Saugatuck, Michigan. 

HARRIS, WILLIAM, Hope Botanical Garden, Kingston, Jamaica, British West 
Indies. 

2 herbarium specimens — Jamaica. 

HELLER, A. A., Reno, Nevada. 

4 herbarium specimens Composites. 
HERBARIUM BOISSIER, Geneva, Switzerland. 

3 drawings and photographs of type plants Pedilanthus — Mexico. 
HUNGARIAN NATIONAL MUSEUM, Budapest, Austria-Hungary. 

109 herbarium specimens — Hungary (exchange). 
HYNES, J. A., Chicago, Illinois. 

1 Coumarin from Prunus Mahaleb. 
Flowers of Hibiscus Sabdariffa. 

Hat ornaments of Lycopodium — Germany. 

2 grass and sedge hat ornaments — Germany. 

16 economic specimens. 

Rhamnus Frangula — bark Boldoa fragrans — leaves Astragalus gum- 
mifer — gum. 

JOHNSON, FRANK W., Chicago, Illinois. 

67 herbarium specimens — Illinois and Indiana. 

KEW GARDENS, Kew, England. 

114 herbarium specimens (exchange). 



322 Field Museum of Natural History - - Reports, Vol. IV. 

LANSING, O. E., Jr., Chicago, Illinois. 

26 herbarium specimens — Indiana. 

1 composite bur ornament — Chicago market. 
MILLSPAUGH, DR. C. F., Chicago, Illinois. 

Economic specimens — Achras Sapota — fruit model, crude gum and 

refined gum — Mexico. 
Economic specimens — A chras Sapota — Latex — Guatemala. 
16 herbarium specimens — Maywood, Illinois. 
28 herbarium specimens — Palos, Illinois. 

5 herbarium specimens — Chicago, Illinois. 
53 herbarium specimens — Wisconsin. 

2 herbarium specimens — Michigan. 

Seeds of Tropaolum majus — Chicago, Illinois. 
2 herbarium specimens — Wisconsin. 
Fresh fruits of Tropaolum majus — Ephraim, Wisconsin. 
Cane made of stalk Verbascum Thapsus — Ephraim, Wisconsin. 
22 herbarium specimens — Wisconsin and Illinois. 

Economic specimens: Myristica fragrans — nutmegs from Chicago 
market. 
MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN, St. Louis, Missouri. 

2 photographs of book illustrations (exchange). 

1 herbarium specimen of Pedilanthus Finckii — St. Louis, Missouri 

(exchange). 
1 photograph of Pedilanthus Finckii — St. Louis, Missouri (exchange). 
1 herbarium specimen — St. Louis, Missouri (exchange). 
Leaves of Vanilla planifolia (exchange). 
648 herbarium specimens (exchange). 
MORSE, C. G., & CO., San Francisco, California. 

Fruits of Tumion californicum — California. 
NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN, New York City. 

Illustration of Scirpus floccosus — Cuba (exchange) . 
695 herbarium specimens Pedilanthus — West Indies (exchange). 
1 herbarium specimen —  Porto Rico (exchange). 
94 herbarium specimens — Jamaica (exchange). 
301 herbarium specimens — West Indies (exchange). 

3 herbarium specimens — West Indies (exchange). 
9 herbarium specimens — West Indies (exchange). 
1 herbarium specimen — Cuba (exchange). 

I herbarium specimen — New Mexico (exchange) . 

5 herbarium specimens — Cuba and Florida (exchange). 
PACIFIC IMPROVEMENT CO., Del Monte, California. 

24 economic specimens logs and dry fruits — California. 
PARISH, S. B., San Bernardino, California. 

I herbarium specimen Chamcesyce — California. 
SHERFF, E. E., Chicago, Illinois. 

7 illustrations and descriptions. 

8 herbarium specimens — United States and Canada. 
SMITH, HURON H., Chicago, Illinois. 

10 herbarium specimens — Illinois. 
42 herbarium specimens — Indiana. 
13 medicinal roots, etc. — Illinois. 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 323 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Division of Plants, 
Washington, D. C. 

19 herbarium specimens — Mongolia and Siberia (exchange). 
UNITED STATES NATIONAL HERBARIUM, Washington, D. C. 

19 herbarium specimens — United States, Central America and Philippines 
(exchange). 
UNIVERSITY OP PENNSYLVANIA, Botanical Garden, Philadelphia, Pa. 

91 herbarium specimens — United States. 
WURZLOW, E. C, Houma, Louisiana. 

9 herbarium specimens — Louisiana. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 
(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AMHERST COLLEGE, Amherst, Massachusetts. 

Skull and jaws of Stenomylus gracilis — Nebraska. 
ARMOUR SANDPAPER WORKS, Chicago. 

6 specimens abrasive powders. 
BETHLEHEM STEEL COMPANY, South Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. 

Nickel steel shavings from armour plate — South Bethlehem, Pa. 
BIDDLE HARDWARE COMPANY, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Propeller of Monel metal. 
BOHM, JULIUS, Vienna, Austria. 

1 specimen Tepl meteorite — Bohemia (exchange). 

1 specimen St. Germain meteorite — France (exchange). 
BRADEN COPPER COMPANY, Rancagua, Chile. 

225 specimens copper ore — Rancagua, Chile. 
BRITISH SCHOOL OF ARCHEOLOGY IN EGYPT, London, England. 
5 specimens building stones of Memphis, Egypt — - Memphis, Egypt. 
CHALMERS, W. J., Chicago. 

2 gold nuggets — California. 

Quantity silver nuggets — Lake Superior. 
COLLINS, P., Chicago. 

3 specimens gem obsidian. 

1 specimen obsidian in matrix — Near Reno, Nevada. 
DICKEY CLAY MANUFACTURING CO., W. S., Kansas City, Missouri. 
400 pound mass fire clay. 

1 brick made from same — Versailles, Missouri. 
DIXON CRUCIBLE COMPANY, THE J AS., Jersey City, New Jersey. 

Collection illustrating the uses of graphite — Jersey City, New Jersey. 
DOMINION MARBLE COMPANY, THE, Montreal, Canada. 

4 polished slabs of marble — Quebec, Canada. 
DUMONT, DR. T. A., Dumont, Iowa. 

10 specimens silver ores — San Bernardino County, California. 
EGYPTIAN GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Cairo, Egypt. 

I specimen El Nakhla meteorite — El Nakhla, Egypt (exchange). 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Collected by B. Laufer: 

1 polished specimen of ophicalcite — Region of the Upper Huang-Ho, 
Kansu Province, China. 



324 Field Museum op Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Collected by-E. S. Riggs: 

I specimen of Loup Fork sandstone — Agate, Nebraska. 
Collected by R. D. Salisbury: 

4 specimens obsidian nodules — Patagonia. 
I specimen diamondiferous sand — Brazil. 

Collected by A. W. Slocom: 

182 specimens invertebrate fossils. 

5 specimens brown coal — Little Traverse Bay, Michigan. 
Purchases: 

Etched slab of the Chinautla meteorite. 

Pickens County meteorite — Pickens County, Georgia. 
1 specimen pollucite — Buckfield, Maine. 
1 specimen St. Michel meteorite — St. Michel, Finland. 

Davis Mountains meteorite — Toyah, Texas. 
Modeled by B. E. Dahlgren: 

Branch with leaves and fruit of gingko — Washington, D. C. 
FOOTE MINERAL COMPANY, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
1 specimen hopeite — Rhodesia (exchange). 
1 specimen hinsdalite — Colorado (exchange). 

1 specimen hulsite — Alaska (exchange). 
GEORGIA MARBLE COMPANY, Tate, Georgia. 

6 slabs Georgia marble — Georgia. 

GILES & NIELSEN NICKEL WORKS, Troy, New York. 

2 specimens nickel plate. 

GOETZ BROTHERS, New Albany, Indiana. 

1 specimen pulverized silica for paint — New Albany, Indiana. 
HEATH & MILLIGAN MANUFACTURING COMPANY, Chicago. 

5 specimens buhr stones. 

8 specimens pigments. 
JOHNS-MANVILLE COMPANY, H. W., Chicago. 

19 specimens of asbestos products. 
JOHNSTON, W. M., Chicago. 

1 specimen gold ore — Animas Forks, Colorado. 

1 specimen tetrahedrite. 

1 specimen rhodonite — San Juan County, Colorado. 
KILBOURN, SILAS, Chicago. 

2 specimens marl — Compos Lake, Florida. 
KINRADE, J. J., San Francisco, California. 

1 specimen diopside. 

1 specimen obsidian — California. 

MISSOURI, KANSAS & TEXAS RAILROAD, St. Louis, Missouri. 

2 specimens burned clay ballast and raw clay — Tebbetts, 

Missouri. 
MACKIN, MRS. C. F., Chicago. 

1 polished geode — near Charlevoix, Michigan. 
MARSH, C. H., Marshfield, Oregon. 

980 specimens agate and jasper — Oregon. 
MARTIN, F. E., Chicago. 

1 specimen lead ore. 

I specimen lead and zinc ore — Hardin County, Illinois. 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 325 

MORONEY, JOHN J., Chicago. 
1 specimen diatomite. 

1 specimen kaolin — Mexico. 
MURPHY, CHRISTOPHER, Chicago. 

2 specimens mercury ore — Cinnabar, Arizona. 
2 specimens cerussite — Wardner, Idaho. 

2 specimens pyromorphite — Wardner, Idaho. 
NARRAWAY, J. E., Ottawa, Canada. 

1 fossil trilobite — Mechanicsville, Canada (exchange). 
NICHOLAS, FRANCIS E., New York City. 

14 specimens showing alteration of pyrite to hematite — Copete Mine, 
Sonora, Mexico. 
OLIVER IRON MINING COMPANY, Coleraine, Minnesota. 

10 specimens iron ores and concentrates — Coleraine, Minnesota. 
PEABODY, F. S., Chicago. 

Tibia of Mastodon — Du Page County, Illinois. 
PIERCE, HENRY B., Golconda, Illinois. 

3 specimens transparent fluorite — Golconda, Illinois. 

PLUMAS AMALGAMATED MINES COMPANY, San Francisco, California. 

2 specimens gold ore — Soda Creek, California. 
RENNE, D. S., Verona, Illinois. 

2 specimens clay — Walker, Lane County, Oregon. 
RICHARDS, A. G., Albany, Wyoming. 

1 specimen allanite — Albany, Wyoming. 
ROSENBERGER, J. L., Chicago, Illinois. 

47 specimens copper ores — Butte, Montana, and Lake Linden, Michigan. 
7 specimens various minerals. 
SCHROTT, FRED, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

2 specimens gold ore. 

1 specimen country rock — High Grade Camp, Modoc County, 
California. 
SMITH, HURON H., Chicago, Illinois. 

25 specimens opal and jasper pebbles — Oregon and California. 
SOSNOVEC, V., St. Louis, Missouri. 

Quartz geode — St. Louis, Missouri. 

3 specimens flint — St. Clair County, Illinois. 

4 specimens chert concretions — St. Louis, Missouri. 

SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY, Land & Industrial Dept., Washington, 
D. C. 

6 specimens clays. 

1 specimen silica — Southern States. 
UNION OIL COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA, Chicago, Illinois. 
I specimen petroleum. 

I specimen asphalt — Sunset District, California. 
UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM, Washington, D. C. 

I section Perryville meteorite — Perryville, Missouri (exchange). 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, Berkeley, California. 

Skeleton of Canis diurus — Los Angeles, California (exchange). 
VERMONT MARBLE COMPANY, Proctor, Vermont. 

13 polished slabs of Vermont marble — Proctor, Vermont. 



326 Field Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

WARSAW CO-OPERATIVE ASSOCIATION, Warsaw, Illinois. 
I specimen ferruginous shale — - Warsaw, Illinois. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise stated.) 

ALFARO, DR. A., San Jose, Costa Rica. 

3 snout beetles — Rio Higueron, Taboga, Guanacaste, Costa Rica. 
350 fishes — Pacific side of Costa Rica. 

3 reptiles — Pacific side of Costa Rica. 

AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, New York City. 

65 specimens of mammals — Alaska, Siberia, Mexico, South America 
(exchange) . 
AYER, EDWARD E., Chicago. 

1 Mallard Drake (albino) — Kankakee River, Illinois. 
BARNES, JUDGE R. M., Lacon, Illinois. 

1 Trumpeter Swan. 

1 Trumpeter Swan — Eastern United States. 
BEATY, WILBUR L., Chicago. 

1 Mountain Rat Nest — Butte, Montana. 
BORDEN, JOHN, Chicago. 

1 Mallard (albino). 

1 Cardinal Grosbeak (albino) — - Illinois. 
BROWN, LYLE E., Chicago. 

1 Herring Gull — Jackson Park, Chicago. 
DEUBLER, L., Chicago. 

I Mantispa. 

1 beetle — Edgebrook, Illinois. 

5 bird lice — Sheldon, Illinois. 
DEVLIN, MRS. J., Chicago. 

4 beetles — - Costa Rica, Central America. 
DOWD, MRS. LYDIA, Chicagp. 

1 American Bittern. 
DUNNING, JERRY, Olive Branch, Illinois. 

1 Cormorant — Olive Branch, Illinois. 
FAIRCHILD, ELIJAH S., Chicago. 

1 spider — Chicago, Illinois. 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Collected by M. P. Anderson: 
86 mammals — Eastern Peru. 
173 birds — Eastern Peru. 

2 snakes — Eastern Peru. 
1 lizard — - Eastern Peru. 

173 bird skins — Peru, South America. 

1 bumblebee j 

2 beetles \ — Boa Vista (Rio Bronco), Brazil. 

6 scorpions j 

5 reptiles \ 

r- v r — Brazil. 

10 fishes J 



\ — Eastern Brazil. 



> — Ballard Lake, Wisconsin. 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 327 

Collected by M. P. Anderson and R. H. Becker: 

540 bird skins 

51 mammal skins } — State of Amazonas, Brazil. 

61 mammal skulls J 

Collected by R. H. Becker: 

104 bird skins 

S7 mammals (skins and skulls)! 

... . ) — Amazonas, Brazil. 

4 skulls only 

442 bird skins 
85 mammals (skins and skulls) 
14 odd skulls 
13 bats 

5 fro g s 

1 lizard 

1 snake 

1 tarantula 1 _. _, 

, ., > — Amazon River, Brazil. 

1 beetle J 

Collected by C. Brandler: 

1 Musk Rat — Jackson Park, Chicago. 
Collected by C. B. Cory. 

1 bug 

1 dragonfly 

2 butterflies 

4 grasshoppers 

6 flies 

1 1 bees, wasps, etc. 

12 beetles 

5 shells — Lake Bucktoban, Vilas County, Wisconsin. 
Collected by J. Friesser: 

4 moose (skulls and 3 skeletons) skins, 1 pair moose horns, 5 Alaska 

porcupines (with skulls and 2 skeletons), 8 red squirrels, 9 varying hares 
(with skulls and 1 skeleton) — Kenai Peninsula, Alaska. 

2 bugs, 5 grasshoppers, 5 beetles — Bozeman, Montana. 

3 beetles, 20 flies, 1 ant, 3 bugs — Skilak Lake, Alaska. 
Collected by W. J. Gerhard: 

221 dragonflies, grasshoppers, bugs, butterflies, moths, beetles, flies, bees, 
wasps, and parasites — Northern Illinois and Northern Indiana. 
Collected by E. N. Gueret: 

2 Sanderling — Lake Michigan, South Chicago. 
Collected by William Heim: 

1 Kangaroo Rat — Baird, Shasta County, California. 
140 fishes — Monterey, California. 
85 fishes — Long Beach, California. 
9 boxes mounted fish — Long Beach, California. 
Salmon eggs —  Baird, California. 

1 keg of gravel — Baird, California. 
Collected by S. E. Meek and S. F. Hildebrand: 
17,000 specimens of fishes (550 species) — Panama. 
Collected by W. H. Osgood and M. P. Anderson: 

202 mammals, 208 birds, 2 lizards — - Peru. 

2 centipedes — Balsas, Peru. 



328 Field Museum op Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Collected by L. L. Walters: 

41 mammals (skins and skulls), 3 birds — Salamonia, Jay County, Indiana. 
56 birds, 3 mammals — Cook County, Illinois. 
Purchases : 

1 skink (lizard) — Fruitland Park, Lake County, Florida. 
6 eggs, nest and 5 eggs, nest and 4 eggs. 

1 cow buffalo. 

591 Humming-bird skins. 
37 moths, 40 butterflies — Key Islands, Dutch East Indies. 

2 Rough-legged Hawks. 

3 deer, 1 Coati, 1 Tayra (skins and skulls) — Venezuela. 

156 Humming-birds, 79 miscellaneous species, 42 Humming-bird nests — 

Venezuela. 
20 Murres Eggs. 

83 Arctic birds, 65 eggs, 4 nests, photographs and samples of moss — 
Behring Sea, Alaska and Siberia. 
6 Paradise Birds — German New Guinea. 
FRIESSER, J., Chicago. 

1 beetle — Willow Springs, Illinois. 

3 bugs, 6 beetles — Holland, Michigan. 
GAULT, B. T., Glen Ellyn, Illinois. 

3 bats — Cayenne, French Guiana. 
GAUMER, G. F., Tacubaya, D. F., Mexico. 

2 Pigmy Opossums. 
GIBNEY, J., Chicago. 

I millipede — Chicago, Illinois. 
GUERET, E. N., Chicago. 

1 bird parasite (bird louse) — Worth, Illinois. 
HANCOCK, DR. J. L., Chicago. 

4 bugs — Wheaton, Illinois. 
HEFTER, CHARLES, Kankakee, Illinois. 

1 starfish — Gulf of Mexico. 
INDIANA UNIVERSITY MUSEUM, Bloomington, Indiana. 

123 fishes — Guatemala. 
LEWIS, A. B., Chicago. 

1 Cassowary Egg — North Coast of Dutch New Guinea. 
1 Dugong Skull — German New Guinea. 
LILJEBLAD, E., Chicago. 

40 bugs, mantispas, beetles, flies, bees, etc. — Northern Illinois and 
Northern Indiana. 

3 bugs — Mt. Vernon, Ohio. 
MILLSPAUGH, DR. C. F., Chicago. 

4 moths — Ephraim, Wisconsin. 
MUNZNER, H., Chicago. 

1 bug, 2 beetles, 1 wasp, 3 spiders — Northern Illinois. 
NETHERCOT, MRS. ARTHUR, Chicago. 

1 scorpion, 1 Trapdoor Spider's Nest — San Remo, Italy. 
NICKERSON, V. C, Kankakee, Illinois. 

Specimens of scale insects on branch of cherry — Kankakee, Illinois. 
PHELPS, MRS. W. L., Chicago. 

1 Gar-fish. 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE LI. 




Reproduction of a Microscope Field showing Bacteria, 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 329 

PORTER, A. F., Decorah, Iowa. 

68 bugs, beetles, bees and wasps — Iowa, West Indies, South America and 
Africa. 
PRAY, LEON L., Chicago. 

1 Synaptomys cooperi — Dowagiac, Michigan. 
1 bee, 2 bugs, 2 flies, 7 beetles — Dowagiac, Michigan. 
SISSON, O. U., Chicago. 

I Gar-fish. 
STEELE, G. P., Chicago. 

1 Caribou head, 1 White-tail Deer head, 1 Mountain Sheep head, 1 

Black-tail Deer head, 3 Goat heads, 1 Buffalo head, 5 fish, 1 Jew 
fish, 2 pelicans, 1 Great Blue Heron, 1 Snowy Owl, 1 Great Horned 
Owl, 1 Barn Owl, 1 Saw-whet Owl, 1 Royal Tern, 3 California Quail — 
California and Michigan. 
STUDEBAKER, J. M., South Bend, Indiana. 

2 American Elk (male and female) — Glenwood Springs, Colorado. 
THOMPSON, S. L., Winnipeg, Manitoba. 

3 bugs, 1 butterfly, 2 bumblebees — Winnipeg, Manitoba. 
UNITED STATES BIOLOGICAL SURVEY, Washington, D. C. 

1 Viscaccia, 1 Euneomys — Peru (exchange). 
UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM, Washington, D. C. 

200 specimens of fishes (84 species) (exchange) . 
WARREN, J. B., Chicago. 

1 Manatee (skeleton) — Texas." ' 
WILLIAMSON, E. B., Bluffton, Indiana. 

1 Short-eared Owl — Bluffton, Indiana. 

1 Sparrow Hawk — Bluffton, Indiana. 

I Great Horned Owl — Bluffton," Indiana. 

I Horned Grebe — Bluffton, Indiana. 

I Red-tailed Hawk — Bluffton, Indiana. 

1 Carolina Rail — Bluffton, Indiana. 

1 Red -shouldered Hawk — Bluffton, Indiana. 

1 Marsh Hawk. 
WINCHESTER, MRS. NINA, Santa Cruz, Philippine Islands. 

30 shells — Santa Cruz, Davao District, Moro Province, Philippine Islands. 
WOLCOTT, A. B., Chicago. 

54 bugs, beetles, flies, bees, wasps, etc. — Northern Indiana and Northern 
Illinois. 

7 millipedes, 155 vials of spiders — Northern Indiana and Northern Illinois 



SECTION OF PHOTOGRAPHY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY: 
Made by the Section: 

766 negatives of Museum specimens, etc., 3,751 prints from the same, 537 
lantern slides, 86 tree enlargements, 476 negatives developed for 
Museum field expeditions, 98 6}4 x 8}4 positives (used in making large 
negatives for North American Forestry exhibit). 



33© Field Museum oe Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Made by M. P. Anderson: 

134 negatives of landscapes, seascapes, general views, etc. — Brazil. 
Made by J. Friesser: 

144 negatives of seascapes and landscapes — Alaska. 
Made by A. B. Lewis: 

1,100 negatives of landscapes, portraits of natives, industries, etc. — New 
South Wales. 
Made by C. F. Millspaugh: 

12 negatives of landscapes, tree portraits, etc. — Wisconsin. 
Made by C. L. Owen: 

168 negatives of landscapes, general views, portraits, etc.— Arizona. 
Made by H. H. Smith: 

12 portraits of plants, landscapes, etc. 
Purchases: 

100 miscellaneous photographs — Papua. 



THE LIBRARY. 

BOOKS, PAMPHLETS, AND SERIALS 

(accessions are by exchange unless otherwise designated.) 

ACIREALE ACCADEMIA DI SCIENZE, Acireale, Italy 1 

AGASSIZ, G. R., Cambridge, Massachusetts (gift) 1 

ALABAMA GAME AND FISH COMMISSION, Montgomery, Alabama . 7 

ALABAMA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, University, Alabama 2 

ALBANY MUSEUM, Grahamstown, South Africa . . 1 

ALLEN, GLOVER M., Cambridge, Massachusetts 1 

ALTENBURG. NATURFORSCHE.NDE GESELLSCHAFT DES 

OSTERLANDES, Altenburg, Germany 1 

AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, Cambridge, 

Massachusetts 2 

AMERICAN ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Boston, Massachusetts ... 3 
AMERICAN CHEMICAL JOURNAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, 

Baltimore, Maryland 2 

AMERICAN FOLK LORE SOCIETY, Cambridge, Massachusetts . . . 1 

AMERICAN GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, New York City 1 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF MINING ENGINEERS, New York City . 2 

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHARMACY, Philadelphia 1 

AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, New York City . . 45 

AMERICAN ORIENTAL SOCIETY, New Haven, Connecticut . . . . 1 

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Philadelphia 1 

AMES, ADELINE, Washington, D: C. (gift) 2 

AMHERST COLLEGE, Amherst, Massachusetts 1 

ANNALES DES MINES, Paris, France 3 

ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF GREAT BRITAIN AND 

IRELAND, London, England 1 

ARCHIV FUR RELIGIONSWISSENSCHAFT, Leipzig, Germany . . . 1 
ARIZONA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Tucson, 

Arizona 4 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 331 

ARMOUR INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Chicago 1 

ARNOLD ARBORETUM, Harvard University, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 1 
ASHMOLEAN NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY OF OXFORDSHIRE, 

Oxford, England 1 

ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, Calcutta, India 7 

ASSOCIATION OF ENGINEERING SOCIETIES, Philadelphia 2 

ATKINSON, GEORGE P., Ithaca, New York 4 

AUSTRALASIAN ORNITHOLOGISTS' UNION, Melbourne, Australia 1 
AUSTRALIA. GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH, 

Melbourne, Australia 11 

AUSTRALIAN MUSEUM, Sydney, New South Wales . 8 

BAKER, RICHARD T., Sydney, New South Wales 6 

BARCELONA. L'INSTITUT DE CIENCIAS, Barcelona, Spain 1 

BARNES, WILLIAM, Decatur, Illinois (gift) 4 

BARRETT, S. A., Milwaukee, Wisconsin 7 

BASCOM, F., Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 1 

BASEL. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Basel, Switzerland 1 

BATAVIAASCH GENOOTSCHAP WETENSCHAPPEN, Batavia, Java 3 
BATH. NATURAL HISTORY AND ANTIQUARIAN FIELD CLUB, 

Bath, England 1 

BELFAST NATURAL HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, 

Belfast, Ireland 2 

BELFAST NATURALISTS' FIELD CLUB, Belfast, Ireland 1 

BELOIT COLLEGE, Beloit, Wisconsin • . . 2 

BERGEN MUSEUM, Bergen, Norway . . . . 2 

BERLIN. DEUTSCHE GEOLOGISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Berlin, 

Germany 7 

BERLIN. DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FUR ANTHROPOLOGIE, 

ETHNOL., UND URGS., Berlin, Germany . 1 

BERLIN. DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FUR VOLKSTUMLICHE 

NATURKUNDE, Berlin, Germany 1 

BERLIN. DEUTSCHER SEEFISCHEREI-VEREIN, Berlin, Germany . 58 
BERLIN. DEUTSCHES ENTOMOLOGISCHES MUSEUM, Berlin, 

Germany 1 

BERLIN. GESELLSCHAFT FUR ERDKUNDE, Berlin, Germany 2 
BERLIN. JAHRES-VERZEICHNIS DER AN DEN DEUTSCHEN 

UNIVERSITATEN ERSCHIENENEN SCHRIFTEN, Berlin, 

Germany 1 

BERLIN. K. BIBLIOTHEK, Berlin, Germany 2 

BERLIN. K. BOTANISCHER GARTEN UND MUSEUM, Berlin, 

Germany 4 

BERLIN. K. MUSEUM FUR VOLKERKUNDE, Berlin, Germany . . 3 
BERLIN. K. PREUSSISCHE AKADEMIE DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, 

Berlin, Germany 2 

BERLIN. VEREIN FUR VOLKSKUNDE, Berlin, Germany 2 

BERLIN. ZOOLOGICAL MUSEUM, Berlin, Germany 2 

BERN. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Bern, Switzerland 2 

BERN UNIVERSITAT, Bern, Switzerland 14 

BERNICE PAUAHI BISHOP MUSEUM, Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands . 3 

BINGHAM, HIRAM, New Haven, Connecticut 1 



332 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

BIOLOGISCH-LANDWIRTSCHAFTLICHES INSTITUT, Amani, D. 

Ostafrika i 

BIRMINGHAM. NATURAL HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHICAL 

SOCIETY, Birmingham, England 2 

BLATCHLEY, W. S., Indianapolis, Indiana 4 

BOMBAY. ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Bombay, India . . . . 1 

BOMBAY. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Bombay, India . . . 1 

BONN. NATURHISTORISCHER VEREIN, Bonn, Germany .... 2 
BONN-POPPELSDORFF. DEUTSCHE DENDROLOGISCHE 

GESELLSCHAFT, Bonn-Poppelsdorff, Germany 1 

BORDEAUX. SOCIETE LINNEENNE, Bordeaux, France 1 

BOSTON MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, Boston, Massachusetts .... 6 

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY, Boston, Massachusetts 1 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE, Brunswick, Maine 2 

BOYCE, WILLIAM D., Chicago (gift) 1 

BRAND, CHARLES J., Washington, D. C 2 

BRANDENBERG, BOTANISCHER VEREIN, Brandenberg, Germany . . 1 
BRANDSTETTERS, RENWARD, Lucerne, Switzerland (gift) ....". 1 
BRAUNSCHWEIG. VEREIN FUR NATURWISSENSCHAFT, 

Braunschweig, Germany 2 

BRAZIL. REVISTA DE CIENCIAS NATURAES, Salamanca, Brazil . . 2 
BREMEN. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Bremen, 

Germany 1 

BRIGHTON AND HOVE NATURAL HISTORY AND 

PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Brighton, England 1 

BRISTOL MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY, Bristol, England .... 2 
BRITISH ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE, 

London, England 1 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Victoria, 

British Columbia 8 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, Victoria, British 

Columbia 5 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. DEPARTMENT OF MINES, Victoria, British 

Columbia 4 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. PROVINCIAL MUSEUM, Victoria, British 

Columbia 1 

BRITISH GUIANA ROYAL AGRICULTURAL AND COMMERCIAL 

SOCIETY, Georgetown, British Guiana 2 

BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY), London, England ... 11 

BROOKLYN ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Brooklyn, New York . . 1 
BROOKLYN INSTITUTE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, Brooklyn, New 

York 5 

BRUSSELS. ACADEMIE ROYALE DES SCIENCES, DES LETTRES 

ET DES BEAUX ARTS, Brussels, Belgium 2 

BRUSSELS. INSTITUTS SOLVAY, Brussels, Belgium 4 

BRUSSELS. JARDIN BOTANIQUE DE L'ETAT, Brussels, Belgium . . 2 

BRUSSELS. MINISTERE DES COLONIES, Brussels, Belgium . . . 1 

BRUSSELS. MUSEE DU CONGO, Brussels, Belgium 3 

BRUSSELS. MUSEE ROYAL D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE DE 

BELGIQUE, Brussels, Belgium ' 1 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 333 

BRUSSELS. SOCIETE D'ARCHfiOLOGIE, Brussels, Belgium .... 2 

BRYN MAWR COLLEGE, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 2 

BUCKING, H., Strassburg, Germany 2 

BUDAPEST. K. MAGYAR-TERMES-ZETTUDOMANYI TARSULAT, 

Budapest, Hungary 2 

BUDAPEST. MAGYAR ORNITHOLOGIAI KOZPONT, Budapest, 

Hungary 1 

BUDAPEST. UNGAR. AKADEMIE DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, Budapest, 

Hungary 3 

BUENOS AIRES. FACULTAD DE FILOSOFIA Y LETRAS, Buenos 

Aires, Argentina 1 

BUENOS AIRES. MUSEO NACIONAL, Buenos Aires, Argentina ... 6 

BUFFALO PUBLIC LIBRARY, Buffalo, New York 1 

BUITENZORG. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Buitenzorg, Java 13 

BUITENZORG. DEPARTMENT VAN LAND, Buitenzorg, Java ... 3 

BULYCHOV, NICOLAS, Kalovga, Russia 2 

BURMA. ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Burma, India 1 

CAIRO. INSTITUT EGYPTIEN, Cairo, Egypt 1 

CALCUTTA. ROYAL BOTANIC GARDEN, Calcutta, India . . . . 1 

CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, San Francisco, California . . 4 
CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Berkeley, 

California 9 

CALIFORNIA STATE BOARD OF FORESTRY, Sacramento, California . 3 

CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY, Berkeley, California 39 

CAMBRIDGE ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Cambridge, England ... 3 
CAMBRIDGE MUSEUMS AND LECTURE ROOMS SYNDICATE, 

Cambridge, England 2 

CAMBRIDGE PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Cambridge, England ... 2 

CAMBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cambridge, Massachusetts . . . . 1 

CAMPINAS CENTRO DE CIENCIAS, Sao Paulo, Brazil 4 

CANADA COMMISSION OF CONSERVATION, Ottawa, Canada . . . -i 
CANADA. DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR, GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. 

Ottawa, Canada 2 

CANADIAN FORESTRY ASSOCIATION, Ottawa, Canada 16 

CANADIAN INSTITUTE, Toronto, Canada 1 

CANDOLLE, CASIMIR, DE, Geneva, Switzerland 51 

CARACAS. MUSEOS NACIONALES, Caracas, Venezuela 2 

CARDIFF. NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WALES, Cardiff, Wales . . . 1 

CARDIFF. NATURALISTS* SOCIETY, Cardiff, Wales 1 

CARNEGIE INSTITUTE, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania . 5 

CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF PITTSBURGH, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania . . 6 

CARNEGIE MUSEUM, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 5 

CARPENTER, G. N., Dublin, Ireland 1 

CARUS, PAUL, Chicago (gift) ' 2 

CASEY, THOMAS L., Washington, D. C. (gift) 3 

CASSEL. VEREIN FUR NATURKUNDE, Cassel, Germany . . . . 1 
CATANIA. ACCADEMIA GIOENIA DE SCIENZE NATUR., Catania, 

Italy 1 

CEMENT WORLD PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago (gift) . " . . . 1 

CEYLON AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY, Colombo, India 1 



334 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

CEYLON ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, Peradeniya, Ceylon .... 5 

CHAPMAN, FRANK M., New York City 1 

CHARLESTON MUSEUM, Charleston, South Carolina 3 
CHEMNITZ NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHE GESELLSCHAFT, 

Chemnitz, Germany 2 

CHICAGO ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Chicago ... 6 

CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE, Chicago . . * 2 

CHICAGO HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Chicago 1 

CHICAGO PUBLIC LIBRARY, Chicago 1 

CHICAGO SCHOOL OF CIVICS AND PHILANTHROPY, Chicago . . 1 

CHICAGO. SOUTH PARK COMMISSION, Chicago 1 

CHICAGO. SPECIAL PARK COMMISSION, Chicago 1 

CHICAGO UNIVERSITY, Chicago 25 

CHILE. BIBLIOTECA NACIONAL, Santiago de Chile in 

CHOSEN. GOVERNMENT GENERAL OF, Korea 1 

CHRISTIANIA UNIVERSITY. MINERALOGICAL INSTITUTE, 

Christiania, Norway 5 

CINCINNATI MUSEUM ASSOCIATION, Cincinnati, Ohio 1 

CINCINNATI NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, Cincinnati, Ohio . . . 1 

CINCINNATI UNIVERSITY, Cincinnati, Ohio 4 

CLARK UNIVERSITY, Worcester, Massachusetts 2 

CLARKE, F. W., Washington, D. C 3 

CLAUSTHAL K. BERGAKAD., Clausthal., Prussia 2 

CLEVELAND PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cleveland, Ohio 2 

COCKERELL, T. D. A., Boulder, Colorado .... 18 

COGNIAUX, ALFRED, Genappe, Belgium 22 

COLLEGIO DE S. FIEL, Lisbon, Portugal 2 

COLLINGE, WALTER E., Birmingham, England 4 

COLMAR. SOCIETE D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Colmar, France . . 1 

COLOMBO MUSEUM, Colombo, India 2 

COLORADO SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY, Denver, Colorado 1 

COLORADO STATE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Fort Collins, Colorado 8 

COLORADO STATE BUREAU OF MINES, Denver, Colorado . . . . 1 

COLORADO UNIVERSITY, Boulder, Colorado 3 

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, New York City 3 

CONCARNEAU LABORATOIRE DE ZOOLOGIE ET DE 

PHYSIOLOGIE MARITIMES, Concarneau, France 2 

CONGRESO INTERNACIONAL DE AMERICANISTAS, Buenos Aires, 

Argentina (gift) . 1 

CONNECTICUT AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, New 

Haven, Connecticut 9 

CONNECTICUT FISH AND GAME COMMISSION, Hartford, Connecticut 1 
CONNECTICUT STATE GEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY 

SURVEY, Hartford, Connecticut 2 

COOK, MELVILLE T., Washington, D. C 5 

COOK, O. F., Washington, D. C 7 

COOPER ORNITHOLOGICAL CLUB, Hollywood, California .... 2 
COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND 

ART, New York City 1 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 335 

COPENHAGEN. BOTANICAL GARDEN, Copenhagen, Denmark . 1 

COPENHAGEN UNIVERSITY. ZOOLOGICAL MUSEUM, 

Copenhagen, Denmark 3 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY, Ithaca, New York 3 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT 

STATION, Ithaca, New York 1 

COVILLE, FREDERICK, Washington, D. C. 

CRAFTSMAN, THE, Eastwood, New Jersey (gift) .... 

CROOK, A. R., Springfield, Illinois 

CROSBY, W. O., Boston, Massachusetts 12 

CROSS, WHITMAN, Washington, D. C 

CROYDON. NATURAL HISTORY AND SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY, 

Croydon, England 

CUBA. ESTACION CENTRAL AGRONOMICA, Santiago de las Vegas, 

Cuba 

CZERNOWITZ. K. K. FRANZ-JOSEPHS-UiNIVERSITAT, Czernowitz, 

Austria 2 

DARMSTADT. VEREIN FUR ERDKUNDE, Darmstadt, Germany . . 2 

DARTON, N. H., Washington, D. C 15 

DELAWARE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Newark, 

Delaware 3 

DELAWARE COUNTY INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE, Media, 

Pennsylvania 1 

DENISON UNIVERSITY, Granville, Ohio 1 

DE SELM, ARTHUR W., Kankakee, Illinois (gift) 18 

DETROIT MUSEUM OF ART, Detroit, Michigan 3 

DETROIT PUBLIC LIBRARY, Detroit, Michigan 1 

DEUTSCHER NATURWISS-MEDICINISCHER VEREIN FUR 

BOHEM "LOTUS," Prag, Bohemia 2 

DIAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago 2 

DILLENIUS, JULIANE A., La Plata, Argentina 1 

DRESDEN K. ZOOLOGISCHES UND ANTHROPOLOGISCH- 

ETHNOGRAPHISCHES MUSEUM, Dresden, Germany 1 

DRESDEN. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHE GESELLSCHAFT 

"ISIS," Dresden, Germany *. 1 

DROPSIE COLLEGE, Philadelphia 7 

DUBLIN. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES 

BRANCH, Dublin, Ireland 4 

DUBLIN. NATIONAL MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND ART, Dublin, 

Ireland 2 

DUBLIN. ROYAL DUBLIN SOCIETY, Dublin, Ireland 2 

DUBLIN. ROYAL IRISH ACADEMY, Dublin, Ireland 9 

DUBLIN. ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF IRELAND, Dublin, 

Ireland 1 

DUMFRIESSHIRE AND GALLOWAY NATURAL HISTORY AND 

ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Dumfries, Scotland 1 

DURBAN CORPORATION, Durban, South Africa 1 

EALING SCIENTIFIC AND MICROSCOPICAL SOCIETY, London, 

England I 



336 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

EAST AFRICA AND UGANDA NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, 

Nairobi, East Africa 1 

EDINBURGH. ROYAL SCOTTISH MUSEUM, Edinburgh, Scotland . 2 

EDINBURGH. ROYAL SOCIETY, Edinburgh, Scotland 2 

EGYPT. SURVEY DEPARTMENT, Giza, Egypt 1 

EIGENMANN, CARL H., Bloomington, Indiana 8 

ELISHA MITCHELL SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY, Chapel Hill, North 

Carolina 1 

EMERSON, B. K., Amherst, Massachusetts 6 

ENGERRAND, JORGE, Mexico 3 

ENGINEERS' SOCIETY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA. Pittsburgh, 

Pennsylvania 2 

ENOCH PRATT FREE LIBRARY, Baltimore, Maryland 2 

ESSEX INSTITUTE, Salem, Massachusetts 3 

EVANSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY, Evanston, Illinois 1 

EWART, ALFRED L., Melbourne, Australia 7 

FARWELL, OLIVER A., Detroit, Michigan 3 

FEWKES, J. WALTER, Washington, D. C 1 

FIELD, JOSEPH N., EXPEDITION — NEW GUINEA (gift) .... 103 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, Chicago (purchase) ... 95 

FINSCH, O., Braunschweig, Germany 1 

FLINK, GUST., Stockholm, Sweden 5 

FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Tallahassee, 

Florida 1 

FLORIDA STATE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Tallahassee, Florida ... 3 

FOREST AND STREAM PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago .... 2 

FOREST CLUB, THE, Lincoln, Nebraska (gift) 1 

FOREST QUARTERLY, Ithaca, New York 1 

FORMOSA. GOVERNMENT. BUREAU OF PRODUCTIVE 

INDUSTRY, Taihoku, Formosa, Japan (gift) 2 

FRAAS, EBERHARD, Stuttgart, Germany 9 

FRANCESCHI, F., Santa Barbara, California 3 

FRANKFURT a. M. STADTISCHES VOLKERMUSEUM, Frankfurt 

a. M., Germany 2 

FRANKLIN INSTITUTE, Philadelphia 2 

FRAZEE, O. E., Harvey, Illinois 2 

FRAZER, J. G., Cambridge, England 1 

FREIBURG, K. SACHS. BERGAKADEMIE, Freiburg, Germany . . . 1 
FREIBURG. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Freiburg, 

Germany 6 

FRIEDLANDER, R. UND SOHN, Berlin, Germany 2 

FRITCH, KARL, Graz, Austria , 2 

FROGGATT, WALTER W., Sydney, New South Wales 5 

GAGE, SIMON HENRY, Ithaca, New York 2 

GAY, FREDERICK P., Berkeley, California 9 

GENNEP, A. VAN, Neuchatel, Switzerland 1 

GENEVA. CONSERVATOIRE ET JARDIN BOTANIQUES, Geneva, 

Switzerland 2 

GENEVA. MUSEO CIVICO STORIA NATURALE, Geneva, Switzerland 1 
GENEVA. SOCIETE DE PHYSIQUE ET D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, 

Geneva, Switzerland I 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 337 

GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY, THE, Washington, D. C. . . 1 

GERKENS, ARMAND, Batavia, Java (gift) 2 

GIESSEN. UNIVERSITATS BIBLIOTHEK, Giessen, Germany 5 

GLASGOW NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, Glasgow, Scotland . 1 

GLEERUP, C. W. K., Lund, Sweden 1 

GOTTINGEN. K. GEORG-AUGUSTUS UNIVERSITAT, Gottingen, 

Germany 7 

GRAZ UNIVERSITAT, Graz, Austria 4 

GRAZ. ZOOLOGISCHES INSTITUT, Graz, Austria 6 

GREAT BRITAIN GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, London, England ... 6 

GREENO, FOLLATT L., Rochester, New York (gift) 1 

GUAYAQUIL. BIBLIOTECA MUNICIPAL, Guayaquil, Ecuador (gift) 5 

GURNEY, J. H., Norfolk, England 2 

HAARLEM. STATS BIBLIOTHEEK, Haarlem, Netherlands . . . . x 

HABANA. BIBLIOTECA NACIONAL, Havana, Cuba 2 

HABANA. UNIVERSIDAD DE LA HABANA, Havana, Cuba . . . . 1 

HALSTED, BYRON D., New Brunswick, New Jersey 5 

HAMBURG. GEOGRAPHISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Hamburg, Germany 1 
HAMBURG. NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM, Hamburg, Germany . .31 

HAMBURG. WISSENSCHAFTLICHE ANSTALTEN, Hamburg, Germany 5 

HAMILTON SCIENTIFIC ASSOCIATION, Hamilton, Canada . . . . 1 
HANNOVER. NATURHISTORISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Hannover, 

Germany 25 

HANNOVER. STADTBIBLIOTHEK, Hannover, Germany 1 

HARDWOOD RECORD, Chicago (gift) . . - 2 

HARRIS, L., Victoria, British Columbia (gift) 2 

HARTFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY, Hartford, Connecticut 2 

HARTLAND, EDWIN SYDNEY, Gloucester, England 3 

HARVARD COLLEGE, Cambridge, Massachusetts 6 

HARVARD UNIVERSITY, Cambridge, Massachusetts 4 

HAWAII AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Honolulu, 

Hawaiian Islands 6 

HAWAII. BOARD OF AGRICULTURE AND FORESTRY, Honolulu, 

Hawaiian Islands 1 

HAWAII. BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF AGRICULTURE AND 

FORESTRY, Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands 5 

HAWAII, COLLEGE OF, Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands ........ 1 

HEATH, LILIAN M., Chicago (gift) 1 

HEGER, FRANZ, Vienna, Austria 18 

HEIDELBERG UNIVERSITATS -BIBLIOTHEK, Heidelberg, Germany . 20 

HEIM, ALBERT, Zurich, Switzerland 15 

HELENA PUBLIC LIBRARY, Helena, Montana ........ 2 

HELLER, A. A., Las Vegas, New Mexico 1 

HIERSEMANN, K., Leipzig, Germany 8 

HINTZE, C, Breslau, Germany I 

HITCHCOCK, C. H., Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands 1 

HONGKONG. BOTANICAL AND FORESTRY DEPARTMENT, 

Hongkong 1 

HOOVER, HERBERT CLARK, New York City (gift) 1 

HOPKINS, T. C, Syracuse, New York 3 

HORNIMAN MUSEUM, London, England 4 



338 Field Museum of Natural History — - Reports, Vol. IV. 

HOUSE, E., Brussels, Belgium 10 

HULL MUNICIPAL MUSEUM, Hull, England 5 

IDAHO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Moscow, Idaho . 2 

IDAHO UNIVERSITY, Moscow, Idaho 1 

ILLINOIS STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Springfield, Illinois . . 4 

ILLINOIS STATE ENTOMOLOGIST, Springfield, Illinois 1 

ILLINOIS STATE HISTORICAL LIBRARY, Springfield, Illinois "... 3 

ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY, Urbana, Illinois 20 

INDIA. ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Calcutta, India 6 

INDIA. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Pusa, India .... 3 

INDIA. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Calcutta, India 3 

INDIA. GOVERNMENT, Calcutta, India 2 

INDIAN FORESTER, Allahabad, India 1 

INDIAN MUSEUM, Calcutta, India 6 

INDIANA ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Indianapolis, Indiana 1 

INLAND PRINTER PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago 2 

INTERNATIONAL BUREAU OF AMERICAN REPUBLICS, 

Washington, D. C 2 

IOWA ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Des Moines, Iowa 1 

IOWA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Des Moines, Iowa 2 

IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, Ames, Iowa .... 5 

IOWA STATE HISTORICAL DEPARTMENT, Des Moines, Iowa ... 2 

IOWA STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Des Moines, Iowa ... 2 

IOWA UNIVERSITY, Iowa City, Iowa 3 

ISAAC DELGRADO MUSEUM OF ART, New Orleans, Louisiana ... 5 

ISTHMIAN CANAL COMMISSION, Ancon, Canal Zone (gift) .... 2 

JAMAICA. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Kingston, Jamaica . 1 

JAMAICA INSTITUTE, Kingston, Jamaica 22 

JANET, CHARLES, Paris, France 2 

JASSY INSTITUTE, Jassy, Roumania 1 

JOHN CRERAR LIBRARY, Chicago 2 

JOHN HERRON ART INSTITUTE, Indianapolis, Indiana 4 

JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY, Baltimore, Maryland ...... 2 

JUNGERSEN, HECTOR F. E., Copenhagen, Denmark 3 

KANSAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Manhattan, 

Kansas 4 

KANSAS STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Topeka, Kansas ... 3 

KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Topeka, Kansas . . . . 1 

KANSAS UNIVERSITY, Lawrence, Kansas 1 

KARLSRUHE. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Karlsruhe, 

Germany 1 

KAUKASISCHES MUSEUM, Tiflis, Russia 2 

KENDALL, W. C, Washington, D. C 17 

KENFIELD-LEACH COMPANY, Chicago 2 

KENTUCKY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Lexington, 

Kentucky 7 

KEW. ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, Kew, England 2 

KIEL. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN FUR 

SCHLESWIG-HOLSTEIN, Kiel, Germany 1 

KIEL. K. UNIVERSITATS BIBLIOTHEK, Kiel, Germany 1 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE Lll. 




The Bacteria. 
Complete installation showing kinds, multiplication, types and 

culture of bacteria. 



J**** 



>»*v v 



<y>> 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 339 

KLAGENFURT. XATURHISTORISCHES LANDESMUSEUM VON 

KARNTEN, Klagenfurt, Austria 2 

KNOWLTON, F. EL, Washington, D. C 14 

KNUDSON, L., Ithaca, New York 2 

KOCH, MATHILDE L., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 2 

KOENEN, A. VON, Hannover, Germany 1 

KONIGSBERG. BOTANISCHER VEREIN, Konigsberg, Prussia ... 2 

KRAKAU. K. AKADEMIE DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, Krakau, Russia 2 

LA CAMERA AGRICULTURA, Merida, Yucatan 1 

LAHILLE, FERNANDO, Buenos Aires, Argentina 9 

LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, Illinois 1 

LAKE MOHONK CONFERENCE OF INTERNATIONAL 

ARBITRATION, Lake Mohonk, New York 1 

LAMBE, LAWRENCE M., Ottawa, Canada (gift) 2 

LANCASHIRE SEA FISHERIES LABORATORY, Liverpool, England 1 
LANDSHUT. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Landshut, 

Germany 1 

LAUFER, BERTHOLD, Chicago (gift) 9 

LAWSON, ANDREW C, Berkeley, California 6 

LEHMANN, WALTER, Munich, Germany 1 

LEHMANN-NITSCHE, ROBERT, La Plata, Argentina 2 

LEICESTER MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY, Borough of Leicester, 

England 8 

LEIDEN. RIJKS ETHNOGRA?*H,LSCH,ES MUSEUM, Leiden, Netherlands 5 

LEIDEN. RIJKS HERBARIUM, LeMen^'Netherlands 1 

LEIPZIG. INSTITUT FUR MINERALOGIE UND PETROGRAPHIE, 

Leipzig, Germany ' v' 2 

LEIPZIG. K. SACHS. GESELLSCHAFT DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, 

Leipzig, Germany 3 

LEIPZIG. VEREIN FUR ERDKUNDE, Leipzig, Germany 2 

LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIVERSITY, Stanford University, 

California 2 

LEVALLOIS-PERRET, L'ASSOCIATION DES NATURALISTES, 

Levallois-Perret, France 2 

LEWIS INSTITUTE, Chicago 2 

LIMA. CUERPO DE INGENIEROS, Lima, Peru 2 

LIMA. INSTITUTO HISTORICO, Lima, Peru 2 

LIVERPOOL BIOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Liverpool, England 2 

LIVERPOOL GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Liverpool, England 2 

LIVERPOOL MARINE BIOLOGICAL STATION, Liverpool, England 2 

LLOYD LIBRARY, Cincinnati, Ohio 5 

LONDON. COMMISSIONERS OF WOODS, FORESTS, London, 

England l 

LONDON. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF GREAT BRITAIN, London, 

England 6 

LONDON. IMPERIAL BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY, London, England 2 
LONDON. IMPERIAL COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, 

London, England 2 

LONDON. JAPAN SOCIETY, London, England 8 

LONDON. LINNEAN SOCIETY, London, England 5 



34o Field Museum op Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

LONDON. ROYAL COLONIAL INSTITUTE, London, England i 

LONDON. ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, London, England . 2 

LONDON. ROYAL HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, London, England 1 

LONDON. ROYAL SOCIETY, London, England 2 

LONDON. ROYAL SOCIETY OF ARTS, London, England . . 3 

LONDON. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE, London, England 1 

LONDON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY, London, England 3 

LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY, Los Angeles, California .... 6 

LOUBAT, DUC DE, Paris, France 1 

LOUISIANA STATE .MUSEUM, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 4 

LUCK, HUGO, Leipzig (gift) 1 

LULL, RICHARD S., New Haven, Connecticut (gift) 1 

LUND. K. UNIVERSITETS BIBLIOTEKET, Lund, Sweden . . . . 1 

LUTZE, G., Sonderhausen, Germany 1 

LYON MUSEUM D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Lyon, France .... 1 

MACOUN, J., Ottawa, Canada 2 

MADRAS. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Madras, India ... 4 

MADRAS. GOVERNMENT MUSEUM, Madras, India 2 

MADRAS. HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Madras, India 1 

MADRID. BIBLIOTECA NACIONAL, Madrid, Spain 1 

MADRID. MUSEO DE CIENCIAS NATURALES, Madrid, Spain 2 

MADRID. R. ACADEMIA DE CIENCIAS, Madrid, Spain 2 

MADRID. SOCIEDAD ESPANOLA DE HISTORIA NATURAL, 

Madrid, Spain 2 

MAIDEN, J. H., Sydney, New South Wales 3 

MAINE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Orono, Maine . 4 

MAINE STATE LIBRARY, Augusta, Maine 26 

MANCHESTER FIELD NATURALISTS' AND ARCHAEOLOGISTS' 

SOCIETY, Manchester, England 1 

MANCHESTER LITERARY AND PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, 

Manchester, England 2 

MANCHESTER MUSEUM, Manchester, England 1 

MARBURG. GESELLSCHAFT ZUR BEFORDERUNG DER 

GESAMTEN NATURWISSENSCHAFTEN, Marburg, Germany . . 1 

MARBURG. K. UNIVERSITAT BIBLIOTHEK, Marburg, Germany . . 25 
MARINE BIOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION OF THE UNITED KINGDOM, 

Plymouth, England  1 

MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, College 

Park, Maryland 5 

MARYLAND GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Baltimore, Maryland .... 3 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF FORESTRY, Baltimore, Maryland . 1 
MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Amherst, Massachusetts 3 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Boston, Massachusetts 2 
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Boston, 

Massachusetts 1 

MATTHEW, W. D., New York 17 

MAUDSLAY, ALFRED, London, England 3 

MAXON, WILLIAM R., Washington, D. C 2 

MELBOURNE UNIVERSITY, Melbourne, Australia 1 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 341 

MENGEL, LEVI W., Reading, Pennsylvania (gift) 1 

MERZBACHER, G., Munich, Germany 3 

MEXICO. BIBLIOTECA NACIONAL, Mexico 2 

MEXICO. DIRECCION GENERAL DE ESTADISTICA, Mexico . . 10 

MEXICO. INSTITUTO GEOLOGICO DE MEXICO, Mexico .... 3 
MEXICO. MUSEO NACIONAL DE ARQUEOLOGIA, HISTORIA Y 

ETNOLOGIA, Mexico 3 

MEXICO. SOCIEDAD CIENTIFICA ANTONIO ALZATE, Mexico . . 2 

MEXICO. SOCIEDAD GEOLOGICA, Mexico 1 

MEXICO. SOCIEDAD MEXICANA DE GEOGRAFIA Y 

ESTADISTICA, Mexico 1 

MICHIGAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Ann Arbor, Michigan ... 1 
MICHIGAN AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Agricultural College, Michigan 7 

MICHIGAN COLLEGE OF MINES, Houghton, Michigan 7 

MICHIGAN GEOLOGICAL AND BIOLOGICAL SURVEY, Lansing, 

Michigan 15 

MICHIGAN STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Lansing, Michigan . 1 

MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY, Ann Arbor, Michigan 3 

MILLSPAUGH, CHARLES FREDERICK, Chicago (gift) 51 

MINING WORLD PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago 2 

MINNEAPOLIS PUBLIC LIBRARY, Minneapolis, Minnesota . . . . 1 

MINNESOTA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Minneapolis, Minnesota . . r 

MINNESOTA FORESTRY BOARD, St. Paul, Minnesota 2 

MINNESOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, St. Paul, Minnesota .... 2 

MINNESOTA UNIVERSITY, Minneapolis, Minnesota 7 

MISSISSIPPI AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Agricultural college, Mississippi 4 

MISSOURI AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Columbia, 

Missouri 8 

MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN, St. Louis, Missouri 1 

MISSOURI BUREAU OF GEOLOGY AND MINES, Jeffersoa City, 

Missouri 1 

MISSOURI HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Columbia, Missouri ..... 3 

MISSOURI UNIVERSITY, Columbia, Missouri 4 

MONTANA AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Bozeman, Montana . 2 

MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY, Missoula, Montana 21 

MONTPELLIER INSTITUT DE ZOOLOGIE, Montpellier, France 5 

MOORE, CLARENCE B., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 2 

MORGAN, J. PIERPONT, New York (gift) 1 

MORSE, EDWARD S., Salem, Massachusetts 4 

MOSCOW. SOCIETE IMPERIALE DES NATURALISTES, Moscow, 

Russia 1 

MUNICH. DEUTSCHES MUSEUM, Munich, Germany 1 

MUNICH. GEOGRAPHISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Munich, Germany . r 
MUNICH. K. BAYER. AKADEMIE DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, Munich, 

Germany 6 

MUNICH. K. BAYER. LUDWIG-MAXIMILIANS-UNIVERSITAT, 

Munich, Germany 7 



342 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

MUNN AND COMPANY, New York City (gift) 2 

MUSEU GOELDI, Para, Brazil 1 

MYERS, CHARLES S., Cambridge, England 8 

NAPLES. R. ACCADEMIA DELLE SCIENZE, Naples, Italy .... 3 

NAPLES. SOCIETA DI NATURALISTI, Naples, Italy 2 

NAPLES. UNIVERSITA. R. ORTO BOTANICO, Naples, Italy . . . r 

NATAL BOTANIC GARDENS, Durban, Natal 1 

NATAL GOVERNMENT MUSEUM, Pietermaritzburg, Natal . . . . 1 

NATIONAL ACADEMY OP SCIENCES, Washington, D. C 2 

NATIONAL EDUCATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Washington, D. C. . . . 1 

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY, Washington, D. C 1 

NATURALISTE CANADIEN, Chicoutimi, Canada 1 

NEBRASKA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Lincoln, 

Nebraska 5 

NEBRASKA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Lincoln, Nebraska 1 

NEBRASKA UNIVERSITY, Lincoln, Nebraska 8 

NEDERLANDSCH-INDIE. DEPARTMENT VAN LANDBOUW, 

Buitenzorg, Java I 

NEDERLANDSCH-INDIE. K. INSTITUT TAAL-LAND-EN 

VOLKENKUNDE, Batavia, Java 2 

NEDERLANDISCHE DIERKUNDIGE VEREENIGING, Leiden, 

Netherlands 1 

NEUCHATEL. MUSEE ETHNOGRAPHIQUE, Neuchatel, Switzerland . 7 

NEVADA STATE UNIVERSITY, Reno, Nevada 1 

NEW BEDFORD FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, New Bedford, 

Massachusetts 2 

NEW HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, Durham, 

New Hampshire 3 

NEW HAMPSHIRE FORESTRY COMMISSION, Concord, New 

Hampshire (gift) 3 

NEW JERSEY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Trenton, 

New Jersey 8 

NEW JERSEY GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Trenton, New Jersey .... 5 

NEW JERSEY HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Trenton, New Jersey . . 1 

NEW JERSEY STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Trenton, New Jersey 6 

NEW JERSEY STATE MUSEUM, Trenton, New Jersey 2 

NEW MEXICO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Mesilla 

Park, New Mexico 2 

NEW SOUTH WALES. BOTANIC GARDENS AND GOVERNMENT 

DOMAINS, Sydney, New South Wales 1 

NEW SOUTH WALES. DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES, Sydney, 

New South Wales 2 

NEW SOUTH WALES. DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND 

AGRICULTURE, Sydney, New South Wales 5 

NEW SOUTH WALES. LINNEAN SOCIETY, Sydney, New South Wales 1 

NEW SOUTH WALES. ROYAL SOCIETY, Sydney, New South Wales . 2 

NEW SOUTH WALES. TECHNICAL MUSEUM, Sydney, New South Wales 1 

NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, New York City 2 

NEW YORK AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Geneva, 

New York 9 

NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN, New York City 1 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 343 

NEW YORK CONSERVATION COMMISSION, Albany, New York . . 6 

NEW YORK. METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, New York City . 2 

NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY, New York City 1 

NEW YORK SOCIETY OF MECHANICS AND TRADESMEN, New 

York City r 

NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY, Albany, New York 25 

NEW YORK ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY, New York City 2 

NEW ZEALAND. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Wellington, 

New Zealand 2 

NEW ZEALAND. DEPARTMENT OF MINES, Wellington, New 

Zealand 1 

NEWBERRY LIBRARY, Chicago . 2 

NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, 

Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England 1 

NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Raleigh, North Carolina 2 

NORTH CAROLINA GEOLOGICAL AND ECONOMIC SURVEY, 

Raleigh, North Carolina 7 

NORTH DAKOTA STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Bismarck, North 

Dakota 3 

NORTH DAKOTA UNIVERSITY, University, North Dakota ..... 1 

NOTRE DAME UNIVERSITY, Notre Dame, Indiana 6 

NOVA SCOTIAN INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE, Halifax, Nova Scotia . . 1 

NUMISMATIC AND ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Montreal, Canada . . 1 

OAKLAND PUBLIC MUSEUM, Oakland, California 1 

OHIO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Wooster, Ohio . .16 

OHIO GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Columbus, Ohio 4 

OHIO STATE ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Columbus, Ohio 18 

OHIO STATE ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 

Columbus, Ohio 1 

OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY, Columbus, Ohio 4 

OKLAHOMA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Stillwater, 

Oklahoma 4 

OKLAHOMA. DEPARTMENT OF STATE GAME AND FISH, 

Guthrie, Oklahoma (gift) 1 

OKLAHOMA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Norman, Oklahoma 5 

ONTARIO. BUREAU OF MINES, Ontario, Canada 5 

ONTARIO DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Ontario, Canada . . 19 

OPEN COURT PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago 2 

OREGON AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Corvallis, 

Oregon (gift) 4 

OTAGO UNIVERSITY MUSEUM, Otago, New Zealand 1 

OTTAWA DEPARTMENT OF MARINE AND FISHERIES, Ottawa, 

Canada 2 

OTTAWA FIELD NATURALISTS' CLUB, Ottawa, Canada ..... 1 

OXFORD DELEGATES OF UNIVERSITY MUSEUM, Oxford, England . 1 
PALERMO. R. ORTO BOTANICO E GIARDINO COLONIALE, 

Palermo, Italy 2 

PARIS. ACADEMIE DES SCIENCES, Paris, France 2 

PARIS. ECOLE DES LANGUES ORIENTALES VIVANTES, Paris, 

France 10 



344 Field Museum oe Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

PARIS. ECOLE D'ANTHROPOLOGIE, Paris, France 1 

PARIS. MINISTERE DE L'INSTRUCTION PUBLIQUE ET DES 

BEAUX ARTS, Paris, France I 

PARIS. MUSEE D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Paris, France . . . . i 

PARIS. MUSEE GUIMET, Paris, France 3 

PARIS. SOCIETE DES AMERICANISTES, Paris, France 1 

PARIS. SOCIETE NATIONALE D'AGRICULTURE, Paris, France . . 1 

PARKE, DAVIS AND COMPANY, Detroit, Michigan (gift) 1 

PEABODY ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Salem, Massachusetts . . . . 1 

PEABODY INSTITUTE, Peabody, Massachusetts 1 

PEABODY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ARCHEOLOGY AND 

ETHNOLOGY, Cambridge, Massachusetts 3 

PENNSYLVANIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 4 

PENNSYLVANIA CHESTNUT TREE BLIGHT COMMISSION, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1 

PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM AND SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1 

PENNSYLVANIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 3 

PENNSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania .... 7 

PEORIA PUBLIC LIBRARY, Peoria, Illinois 2 

PERTHSHIRE NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM, Perth, Scotland . . . 1 

PERTHSHIRE SOCIETY OF NATURAL SCIENCE, Perth, Scotland . 1 
PHILADELPHIA ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania 1 

PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1 

PHILADELPHIA COMMERCIAL MUSEUM, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 2 
PHILADELPHIA NUMISMATICS AND ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 2 

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS. BUREAU OF EDUCATION, Manila, 

Philippine Islands 4 

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR. 

BUREAU OF SCIENCE, Manila, Philippine Islands 5 

PHILLIPS ACADEMY, Andover, Massachusetts 1 

PIONEER WESTERN LUMBERMAN, Sacramento, California (gift) . . 1 

PIRRSON, L. V., New Haven, Connecticut 19 

PLYMOUTH INSTITUTE, Plymouth, England 1 

PLYMOUTH MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY, Plymouth, England . . 1 

POMONA COLLEGE, Claremont, California 1 

PORTLAND PUBLIC LIBRARY, Portland, Maine 1 

POSEN. DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FUR KUNST UND 

WISSENSCHAFT, Posen, Germany 1 

PRAG. ACADEMIE DES SCIENCES DE L'EMPEREUR FRANCOIS 

JOSEPH I, Prag, Bohemia 1 

PRAG. BOHEM. NATUR. LANDESDURCHFORSCHUNG, Prag,  

Bohemia 1 

PRAG. K. BOHMISCHE GESELLSCHAFT DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, 

Prag, Bohemia 3 

PRATT INSTITUTE FREE LIBRARY, Brooklyn, New York .... 2 



ELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE Llll. 




SCENE FROM A CHINESE RELIGIOUS DRAMA. HALL 53. 

Mrs. T. B. Blackstone Expedition. 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 345 

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY, Princeton, New Jersey 6 

PRINTING ART, THE, New York City (gift) 2 

PROVIDENCE PUBLIC MUSEUM, Providence, Rhode Island .... 2 

PROVINCIAL MUSEUM, Toronto, Canada 5 

PURDUE UNIVERSITY, Lafayette, Indiana 3 

QUEENSLAND DEPARTMENT OF MINES, Brisbane, Queensland . . 1 

QUEENSLAND MUSEUM, Brisbane, Queensland 2 

QUEENSLAND ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, Brisbane, 

Queensland 2 

QUEENSLAND ROYAL SOCIETY, Brisbane, Queensland 1 

RANDALL AND COMPANY, Chicago (gift) 2 

REDWOOD LIBRARY AND ATHEN^UM, Newport, New Jersey . . 1 

RENNES UNIVERSITY, Rennes, France . . 1 

REVISTA DE AGRICULTURA TROPICAL, Mexico City 1 

REVUE BRETONNE DE BOTANIQUE, Rennes, France 1 

REVUE CRITIQUE DE PALEOZOOLOGIE, Paris, France I 

REVUE SCIENTIFIQUE DU BOURBONNAIS ET DU CENTRE DE 

LA FRANCE, Moulins, France 1 

RHODE ISLAND AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Kingston, Rhode Island 3 

RHODESIA SCIENTIFIC ASSOCIATION, Bulawayo, Rhodesia . . . 1 

RIES, HEINRICH, Ithaca, New York 2 

RINNE, F., Leipzig, Germany •■>■.. .''"". 3 

RIVET, P., Paris, France 6 

ROBERTS, THOMAS S., Minneapolis, Minnesota 7 

ROCK, JOSEPH, F., Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands (gift) 2 

ROEMER MUSEUM, Hildesheim, Germany 4 

ROGER WILLIAM PARK MUSEUM, Providence, Rhode Island ... 2 

ROME. R. ACCADEMIA DEI LINCEI, Rome, Italy 4 

ROSE POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, Terre Haute, Indiana 1 

ROTH, WALTER E., Georgetown, British Guiana 1 

ROTTERDAM MUSEUM VOOR LAND-EN-VOLKENKUNDE, 

Rotterdam, Holland 5 

ROYAL ARCHAEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF GREAT BRITAIN AND 

IRELAND, London, England 1 

ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY, NORTH CHINA BRANCH, Shanghai, China 2 

ROYAL CORNWALL POLYTECHNIC SOCIETY, Falmouth, England . 1 

RYERSON, MARTIN A., Chicago (gift) 3 

SACCARDO, P. A., Padua, Italy 5 

ST. GALL. OSTSCH. GEOGRAPH. COMMERC. GESELLSCHAFT, St. 

Gall, Switzerland l 

ST. LOUIS ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, St. Louis, Missouri 2 

ST. LOUIS. CITY ART MUSEUM, St. Louis, Missouri 9 

ST. LOUIS MERCANTILE ASSOCIATION, St. Louis, Missouri . . . 1 

ST. LOUIS PUBLIC LIBRARY, St. Louis, Missouri 2 

ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY, St. Louis, Missouri 1 

ST. PETERSBURG. ACADEMIE IMPERIALE DES SCIENCES, St. 

Petersburg, Russia l 3 

ST. PETERSBURG. IMPERIAL BOTANICAL GARDENS, St. 

Petersburg, Russia 19 



346 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

ST. PETERSBURG. SOCIETE IMPERIALE DES NATURALISTES, 

St. Petersburg, Russia 5 

SALEM PUBLIC LIBRARY, Salem, Massachusetts 1 

SAN FRANCISCO BOARD OF PARK COMMISSIONERS, San 

Francisco, California 1 

SAN JOSE. MUSEO NACIONAL, San Jose, Costa Rica 1 

SAONE ET LOIRE. SOClETE DES SCIENCES NATURELLES, 

Chalon-sur-Saone, France 2 

SAPIR, EDWARD, Montreal, Canada 2 

SARAWAK MUSEUM, Borneo 1 

SCHAUS, W., Washington, D. C 22 

SCHLAGINHAUFEN, OTTO, Zurich, Switzerland 2 

SCHLESISCHE GESELLSCHAFT FUR VATERLANDISCHE CULTUR, 

Breslau, Prussia 1 

SCHMIDT, P. W., Modling, Austria 1 

SCHWEIZERISCHE ENTOMOLOGISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Bern, 

Switzerland 1 

SCHWEIZERISCHE NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Aarau, 

Switzerland 2 

SCHWEIZERISCHE NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, 

Lausanne, Switzerland 2 

SCOTLAND FISHERIES BOARD, Edinburgh, Scotland 4 

SENCKENBERGISCHE NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, 

Frankfurt a. M., Germany 1 

SHELFORD, VICTOR E., Chicago 1 

SHUFELDT, R. W., Washington, D. C 1 

SLOCOM, A. W., Chicago (gift) 1 

SMITH, HARLAN I., Ottawa, Canada 1 

SMITH, HURON H., Chicago (gift) 15 

SMITH, J. D., Baltimore, Maryland 2 

SOCIETA GEOGRAFICA ITALIANA, Rome, Italy 2 

SOCIETA GEOLOGICA ITALIANA, Rome, Italy 1 

SOCIETA ITALIANA DI ANTROPOLOGIA, Florence, Italy .... 2 

SOCIETA ROMANA DI ANTROPOLOGIA, Rome, Italy 2 

SOCIETA TOSCANA DI SCIENZE NATURALI, Pisa, Italy .... 2 

SOCIETAS PRO FAUNA ET FLORA FENNICA, Helsingfors, Finland . I 
SOCIETE BELGE DE GEOLOGIE, DE PALEONTOLOGIE ET 

D'HYDROLOGIE, Brussels, Belgium 2 

SOCIETE BOTANIQUE DE COPENHAGEN, Copenhagen, Denmark . 2 

SOCIETE D'ETUDES DES SCIENCES NATURELLES, Rheims, France 1 

SOCIETE D'HORTICULTURE ET DE BOTANIQUE, Marseilles, France 1 

SOCIETE DE GEOGRAPHIE, Paris, France 2 

SOCIETE DE GEOGRAPHIE, Toulouse, France 1 

SOCIETE DES SCIENCES, Nancy, France 1 

SOCIETE HELVETIQUE DES SCIENCES NATURELLES, Bern, 

Switzerland 2 

SOCIETE IMPERIALE RUSSE DE GEOGRAPHIE, St. Petersburg, 

Russia * 

SOCIETE NATIONALE D'HORTICULTURE DE FRANCE, Paris, 

France l 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 347 

SOCIETE NEUCHATELOISE DE GEOGRAPHIE, Neuchatel, 

Switzerland 2 

SOCIETE OURALIENNE D'AMATEURS DES SCIENCES 

NATURELLES, Ekaterinburg, Russia 2 

SOCIETE ROYALE DE BOTANIQUE DE BELGIQUE, Brussels, 

Belgium I 

SOCIETE ROYALE ZOOLOGIQUE ET MALACOLOGIQUE DE 

BELGIQUE, Brussels, Belgium 1 

SOCIETE ZOOLOGIQUE DE FRANCE, Paris, France 3 

SOUTH AFRICA. GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Johannesburg, South Africa 1 

SOUTH AFRICAN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Cape Town, 

South Africa 2 

SOUTH AFRICAN MUSEUM, Cape Town, South Africa 3 

SOUTH AFRICAN ROYAL SOCIETY, Cape Town, South Africa . . . 1 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Adelaide, 

South Australia 2 

SOUTH AUSTRALIA PUBLIC LIBRARY, MUSEUM AND ART 

GALLERY, Adelaide, South Australia 1 

SOUTH DAKOTA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Brookings, South Dakota 5 

SOUTH DAKOTA STATE GEOLOGICAL AND BIOLOGICAL 

SURVEY, Vermilion, South Dakota I 

SOUTH DAKOTA UNIVERSITY, Vermilion, South Dakota 1 

SOUTH LONDON ENTOMOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY 

SOCIETY, London, England 1 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Los Angeles, 

California 1 

SPENCER, L. J., London, England 4 

SPRINGFIELD LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, Springfield, Massachusetts . 1 
STATEN ISLAND ASSOCIATION OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, New 

York City 1 

STEINMETZ, S. R., Amsterdam, Netherlands (gift) 7 

STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Hoboken, New Jersey . . 1 

STOCKHOLM K. BIBLIOTEKET, Stockholm, Sweden 2 

STOCKHOLM K. SVENSKA VETENSKAPSAKADEMIEN, Stockholm, 

Sweden 6 

STOCKHOLM. K. VITT. HIST. OCH ANTIK. AKADEMIEN, 

Stockholm, Sweden I 

STOCKHOLM. SVENSKA SALLSKAPET FOR ANTROPOLOGI OCH 

GEOGRAFI, Stockholm, Sweden 1 

STOCKHOLM. UNIVERSITE DE STOCKHOLM.. INSTITUT DE 

BOTANIQUE, Stockholm, Sweden 1 

STOSE, GEORGE W., Washington, D. C 6 

STRASSBURG. KAISER WILHELMS UNIVERSITAT, Strassburg, 

Germany 27 

STRECKER, JOHxN K, Waco, Texas 

SUDLEY, LORD, Kingston-on-Thames, England (gift) 1 

SUDWORTH, GEORGE B., Washington, D. C 7 

SYDNEY. ROYAL ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF 

AUSTRALASIA, Sydney, New South Wales 6 



2 



348 Field Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY, Syracuse, New York 3 

TASMANIA. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Hobart, Tasmania 1 

TASMANIA. ROYAL SOCIETY, Hobart, Tasmania 1 

TENNESSEE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Knoxville, 

Tennessee • 1 

TEXAS ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Austin, Texas 1 

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, College Station, 

Texas 2 

TEXAS. STATE BOARD OF ENTOMOLOGY, Austin, Texas .... 3 

THURINGISCHER BOTANISCHER VEREIN, Weimar, Germany . . . 1 

THURNWALD, R., Berlin, Germany r 

TIMBERMAN, THE, Portland, Oregon (gift) 1 

TOHUKO IMPERIAL UNIVERSITY, Sendai, Japan 2 

TOKYO. ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Tokyo, Japan 2 

TOKYO BOTANICAL SOCIETY, Tokyo, Japan 1 

TOKYO. DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FUR NATUR- UND 

VOLKERKUNDE OSTASIENS, Tokyo, Japan 1 

TOKYO. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Tokyo, Japan 1 

TOKYO. IMPERIAL COMMERCIAL MUSEUM, Tokyo, Japan ... 7 
TOKYO IMPERIAL UNIVERSITY. COLLEGE OF SCIENCE, Tokyo, 

Japan 8 

TORINO. MUSEO DI ZOOLOGIA ET ANATOMIA COMPARATA, 

Turin, Italy I 

TORINO. R. ACCAD. DELLE SCIENZE, Turin, Italy 2 

TORONTO UNIVERSITY, Toronto, Canada 12 

TRANSVAAL. DEPARTMENT OF MINES, Pretoria, Transvaal . . . 1 

TRANSVAAL MUSEUM, Pretoria, Transvaal 1 

TRING ZOOLOGICAL MUSEUM, Tring, England 1 

TRINITY COLLEGE, Dublin, Ireland 1 

TROMSO MUSEUM, Tromso, Norway .2 

TUBINGEN. K. UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Tubingen, Germany . 4 

TUNIS. INSTITUT DE CARTHAGE, Tunis, Africa 1 

U. S. GOVERNMENT, Washington, D. C 1,091 

U. S. INDIAN SCHOOL, Carlisle, Pennsylvania 2 

UPSALA. REGIA SOCIETAS SCIENTIARUM, Upsala, Sweden ... 2 

UPSALA UNIVERSITY, Upsala, Sweden 14 

URBA, K., Prag, Bohemia, Austria 29 

UTAH. AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Logan, Utah . . 9 
UTAH. STATE HORTICULTURAL COMMISSION, Salt Lake City, 

Utah 2 

VERMONT BIRD CLUB, Burlington, Vermont 5 

VERMONT STATE FORESTER, Burlington, Vermont 1 

VERMONT UNIVERSITY, Burlington, Vermont 4 

VICTORIA AND ALBERT MUSEUM AND BETHNAL GREEN 

MUSEUM, London, England  4 

VICTORIA. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Melbourne, Australia 2 

VICTORIA FIELD NATURALISTS' CLUB, Melbourne, Australia . . . 1 
VICTORIA. PUBLIC LIBRARY, MUSEUM AND NATIONAL 

GALLERY, Victoria, Australia ' . . . . 1 

VICTORIA. ROYAL SOCIETY, Melbourne, Australia 1 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 349 

VICTORIA. ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL AND ACCLIMATIZATION 

SOCIETY, Melbourne, Australia 1 

VIENNA. K. AKADEMIE DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, Vienna, Austria . 8 
VIENNA. K. K. NATURHISTORISCHES HOFMUSEUM, Vienna, 

Austria 1 

VIENNA. K. K. UNIVERSITAT, Vienna, Austria 7 

VIENNA. K. K. ZOOLOGISCH-BOTANISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, 

Vienna, Austria 1 

VIENNA. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Vienna, Austria 1 
VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Blacksburg, 

Virginia l 

VIRGINIA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Charlottesville, Virginia .... 2 

VIRGINIA STATE LIBRARY, Richmond, Virginia 4 

VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, Charlottesville, Virginia 1 

WAGNER FREE INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE, Philadelphia 1 

WANGANUI PUBLIC MUSEUM, Wanganui, New Zealand 1 

WASHINGTON ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Washington, D. C. . . . 1 

WASHINGTON BIOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Washington, D. C 1 

WASHINGTON STATE ART ASSOCIATION, Seattle, Washington (gift) 1 

WASHINGTON STATE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Olympia, Washington . 1 

WASHINGTON STATE MUSEUM, Seattle, Washington 1 

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY, St. Louis, Missouri 3 

WEBER, FRIEDRICH, Munchen, Germany (gift) 1 

WEIGEL, OSWALD, Leipzig, Germany (gift) 2 

WELLCOME CHEMICAL RESEARCH LABORATORIES, London, 

England 7 

"WELLINGTON ACCLIMATIZATION SOCIETY, Wellington, New 

Zealand 1 

WELLINGTON. DOMINION MUSEUM, Wellington, New Zealand . . 4 
WEST INDIES. IMPERIAL DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

Barbados, West Indies 1 

WEST VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 

Morgantown, West Virginia 3 

WESTERN AUSTRALIA. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Perth, West 

Australia 5 

WESTERN AUSTRALIAN MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY, Perth, 

West Australia 1 

WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA ENGINEERS' SOCIETY, Pittsburgh, 

Pennsylvania 2 

WEULE, K., Leipzig, Germany 3 

WHITE, I. C.,- Morgantown, West Virginia . . , 1 

WIESBADEN. NASSAUISCHER VEREIN FUR NATURKUNDE, 

Wiesbaden, Germany T 

WILLE, N., Christiania, Norway 6 

WILLIAMS COLLEGE, Williamstown, Massachusetts 2 

WILLISTON, S. W., Chicago 2 

WILSON ORNITHOLOGICAL CLUB, Oberlin, Ohio 1 

WINCHELL, ALEXANDER N., Minneapolis, Minnesota 5 

WISCONSIN GEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY, 

Madison, Wisconsin 3 






350 Field Museum op Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

WISCONSIN NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, Madison, Wisconsin . . i 

WISCONSIN STATE BOARD OF FORESTRY, Madison, Wisconsin . . 6 

WISCONSIN STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Madison, Wisconsin . . 6 

WISCONSIN STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Madison, Wisconsin 2 

WISCONSIN UNIVERSITY, Madison, Wisconsin 15 

WISTAR INSTITUTE OF ANATOMY AND BIOLOGY, Philadelphia, . 10 

WOODWARD, ROBERT B., Brooklyn, New York 1 

WRIGHT, ALBERT H., Ithaca, New York 6 

WORCESTER FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Worcester, Massachusetts . . 1 

WULFING, E. A., Heidelberg, Germany 5 

WURTEMBERG. VEREIN FUR VATERLANDISCHE 

NATURKUNDE, Wurtemberg, Germany I 

WYOMING AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Laramie, 

Wyoming 6 

WYOMING STATE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Cheyenne, Wyoming . . 1 

YALE UNIVERSITY, New Haven, Connecticut 136 

ZIMANYI, KARL, Budapest, Hungary 5 

ZURICH. BOTANISCHES MUSEUM DER UNIVERSITAT, Zurich, 

Switzerland 2 

ZURICH. GEOGRAPHISCH-ETHNOGRAPHISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, 

Zurich, Switzerland 1 

ZURICH. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT Zurich, Switzerland 1 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE LIV. 




Bronze Colander, China, Early Archaic Period. 
Mrs. T. B. Blackstone Expedition. 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 351 



Articles of Incorporation 






STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

DEPARTMENT OF STATE. 

William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State. 
To All to Whom These Presents Shall Come, Greeting: 

Whereas, a Certificate duly signed and acknowledged having been filed in the 
office of the Secretary of State, on the 16th day of September, A. d. 1893, for the 
organization of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO, under and in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of "An Act Concerning Corporations," approved 
April 18, 1872, and in force July 1, 1872, and all acts amendatory thereof, a copy 
of which certificate is hereto attached. 

Now, therefore, I, William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State of the State of 
Illinois, by virtue of the powers "and duties vested in me by law, do hereby certify 
that the said COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OP CHICAGO is a legally organized 
Corporation under the laws of this State. 

In Testimony Whereof, I hereto set my hand and cause to be affixed the Great 
Seal of the State. Done at the City of Springfield, this 16th day of September, 
in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three, and of the 
Independence of the United States the one hundred and eighteenth. 

W. H. HINRICHSEN, 
[Seal.] Secretary of State. 



TO HON. WILLIAM H. HINRICHSEN, 

Secretary of State. 
Sir: 

We, the undersigned citizens of the United States, propose to form a corpora- 
tion under an act of the General Assembly of the State of Illinois, entitled "An 
Act Concerning Corporations," approved April 18, 1872, and all acts amendatory 
thereof; and that for the purposes of such organization we hereby state as follows, 
to wit: 

1. The name of such corporation is the "COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF 
CHICAGO." 

2. The object for which it is formed is for the accumulation and dissemina- 
tion of knowledge, and the preservation and exhibition of objects illustrating Art, 
Archeology, Science, and History. 

3. The management of the aforesaid Museum shall be vested in a Board of 
Fifteen (15) Trustees, five of whom are to be elected every year. 

4. The following named persons are hereby selected as the Trustees for the 
first year of its corporate existence: 



352 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Ed. E. Ayer, Charles B. Farwell, George E. Adams, George R. Davis, Charles 
L. Hutchinson, Daniel H. Burnham, John A. Roche, M. C. Bullock, Emil G. Hirsch, 
James W. Ellsworth, Allison V. Armour, O. P. Aldis, Edwin Walker, John C. Black, 
and Frank W. Gunsaulus. 

5. The location of the Museum is in the City of Chicago, County of Cook, 
and State of Illinois. 

(Signed) , 

George E. Adams, C. B. Farwell, Sidney C. Eastman, F. W. Putnam, Robert 
McMurdy, Andrew Peterson, L. J. Gage, Charles L. Hutchinson, Ebenezer Bucking- 
ham, Andrew McNally, Edward E. Ayer, John M. Clark, Herman H. Kohlsaat, 
George Schneider, Henry H. Getty, William R. Harper, Franklin H. Head, E. G. 
Keith, J. Irving Pearce, Azel F. Hatch, Henry Wade Rogers, Thomas B. Bryan, 
L. Z. Leiter, A. C. Bartlett, A. A. Sprague, A. C. McClurg, James W. Scott, George 
F. Bissell, John R. Walsh, Chas. Fitzsimons, John A. Roche, E. B. McCagg, Owen 
F. Aldis, Ferdinand W. Peck, James H. Dole, Joseph Stockton, Edward B. Butler, 
John McConnell, R. A. Waller, H. C. Chatfield-Taylor, A. Crawford, Wm. Sooy 
Smith, P. S. Peterson, John C. Black, Jno. J. Mitchell, C. F. Gunther, George R. 
Davis, Stephen A. Forbes, Robert W. Patterson, Jr., M. C. Bullock, Edwin Walker, 
George M. Pullman, William E. Curtis, James W. Ellsworth, William E. Hale, Wm. 
T. Baker, Martin A. Ryerson, Huntington W. Jackson, N. B. Ream, Norman Will- 
iams, Melville E. Stone, Bryan Lathrop, Eliphalet W. Blatchford, Philip D. Armour. 

State of Illinois! 
Cook County J 
I, G. R. Mitchell, a Notary Public in and for said County, do hereby certify 
that the foregoing petitioners personally appeared before me and acknowledged 
severally that they signed the foregoing petition as their free and voluntary act for 
the uses and purposes therein set forth. 

Given under my hand and notarial seal this 14th day of September, 1893. 

G. R. MITCHELL, 
[Seal.] Notary Public, Cook County, III. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 

Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the Corporate members held 
the 25th day of June, 1894, the name of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM was changed 
to FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. A certificate to this effect was filed June 26, 
1894, in the office of the Secretary of State for Illinois. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 

Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the Corporate members held 
the 8th day of November, 1905, the name of the FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM 
was changed to FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. A certificate 
to this effect was filed November 10, 1905, in the office of the Secretary of State 
for Illinois. 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 353 



AMENDED BY-LAWS. 



(February 10, 19 13). 



ARTICLE I. 



MEMBERS. 

Section i. Members shall be of five classes, Annual Members, Corporate 
Members, Life Members, Patrons and Honorary Members. 

Sec. 2. Annual Members shall consist of such persons as are selected from time 
to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, and who shall pay an annual 
fee of ten dollars ($10.00), payable within thirty days after notice of election, and 
within thirty days after each recurring annual date. The failure of any person to 
make such initiatory payment and such annual payments within said time shall, at 
the option of the Board of Trustees, be sufficient grounds for the forfeiture of an 
annual membership. 

This said annual membership shall entitle the member to: 

First. — Free admittance for the member and family, to the Museum on any day. 

Second. — - Ten tickets every year, admitting the bearer to the Museum on pay 
days. 

Third. — A copy of all publications of the Museum when requested. 

Fourth. — Invitations to all special exhibits, receptions, lectures, or other func- 
tions which may be given at the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The Corporate Members shall consist of the persons named in the 
articles of incorporation, and of such other persons as shall be chosan from time to 
time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, upon the recommendation of the 
Executive Committee; provided, that such persons named in the articles of incorpora- 
tion shall, within ninety days from the adoption of these By-Laws, and persons 
hereafter chosen as Corporate Members shall, within ninety days of their election, 
pay into the treasury the sum of twenty dollars ($20.00) or more. The failure of 
any person to make such payment within said time shall, at the option of the Board 
of Trustees, be ground for forfeiture of his corporate membership. Corporate 
Members becoming Life Members, Patrons or Honorary Members shall be exempt 
from dues. Annual meetings of said Corporate Members shall be held at the same 
place and on the same day that the annual meeting of the Board of Trustees is held. 

Sec. 4. Any person paying into the treasury the sum of five hundred dollars 
($500.00), at any one time, shall, upon the unanimous vote of the Board, become 
a Life Member. Life Members shall be exempt from all dues. 

Sec. 5. Patrons shall be chosen by the Board upon recommendation of the 
Executive Committee from among persons who have rendered eminent service to the 
Museum. They shall be exempt from all dues, and, by virtue of their election as 
Patrons, shall also be Corporate Members. 



354 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Sec. 6. Honorary Members shall be chosen by the Board from among persons 
who have rendered eminent service to science, and only upon unanimous nomination 
of the Executive Committee. They shall «be exempt from all dues. 

ARTICLE II. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

Section i. The Board of Trustees shall consist of fifteen members. The respect- 
ive members of the Board now in office, and those who shall hereafter be elected, shall 
hold office during life. Vacancies occurring in the Board shall be filled at a regular 
meeting of the Board, upon the nomination of the Executive Committee made at a 
preceding regular meeting, by a majority vote of the members of the Board present. 

Sec. 2. Regular meetings of the Board shall be held on the second Monday 
of each month. Special meetings may be called at any time by the President, and 
shall be called by the Secretary upon the written request of three Trustees. Five 
Trustees shall constitute a quorum, except for the election of officers or the adoption 
of the Annual Budget, when seven Trustees shall be required, but meetings may be 
adjourned by any less number from day to day, or to a day fixed, previous to the 
next regular meeting. 

Sec 3. Reasonable written notice, designating the time and place of holding 
meetings, shall be given by the Secretary. 

ARTICLE III. 

HONORARY TRUSTEES. 

Section i. As a mark of respect, and in appreciation of services performed for 
the Institution, those Trustees who by reason of inability, on account of change of 
residence, or for other cause, or from indisposition to serve longer in such capacity, 
shall resign their place upon the Board, may be elected, by a majority of those 
present at any regular meeting of the Board, an Honorary Trustee for life. Such 
Honorary Trustee will receive notice of all meetings of the Board of Trustees, 
whether regular or special, and will be expected to be present at all such meetings and 
participate in the deliberations thereof, but an Honorary Trustee shall not have the 
right to vote. 

ARTICLE IV. 

OFFICERS. 

Section 1. The officers shall be a President, a First Vice-President, a Second 
Vice-President, a Secretary, an Assistant Secretary and a Treasurer. They shall be 
chosen by ballot by the Board of Trustees, a majority of those present and voting 
being necessary to elect. The President, the First Vice-President, and the Second 
Vice-President shall be chosen from among the members of the Board of Trustees. 
The meeting for the election of officers shall be held on the second Monday of Jan- 
uary of each year, and shall be called the Annual Meeting. 

Sec. 2. The officers shall hold office for one year, or until their successors are 
elected and qualified, but any officer may be removed at any regular meeting of the 
Board of Trustees by a vote of two-thirds of all the members of the Board. Vacancies 
in any office may be filled by the Board at any meeting. 

Sec. 3. The officers shall perform such duties as ordinarily appertain to their 
respective offices, and such as shall be prescribed by the By-Laws, or designated from 
time to time by the Board of Trustees. 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 355 

ARTICLE V. 

THE TREASURER. 

Section i. The Treasurer shall be custodian of the funds of the Corporation, 
except as hereinafter provided. He shall make disbursements only upon warrants 
drawn by the Director and countersigned by the President. In the absence or 
inability of the Director, warrants may be signed by the Chairman of the Finance 
Committee, and in the absence or inability of the President, may be countersigned 
by one of the Vice-Presidents. But no warrants shall be issued, except in conformity 
with a regularly prepared voucher, giving the name of the payee and stating the 
occasion for the expenditure, and verified and approved as hereinafter prescribed. 
It shall be no part of the duties of the Treasurer to see that the warrants have been 
issued in conformity with such vouchers. 

Sec. 2. The securities and muniments of title belonging to the corporation shall 
be placed in the custody of some Trust Company of Chicago to be designated by the 
Board of Trustees, which Trust Company shall collect the income and principal of 
said securities as the same become due, and pay same to the Treasurer, except as 
hereinafter provided. Said Trust Company shall allow access to and deliver any or 
all securities or muniments of title to the joint order of the following officers, namely: 
The President or one of the Vice-Presidents, jointly with the Chairman, or one of 
the Vice-Chairmen, of the Finance Committee of the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The Treasurer shall give bond in such amount, and with such sureties, 
as shall be approved by the Board of Trustees. 

Sec. 4. All vouchers executed for the payment of liabilities incurred in the 
administration of the Museum, shall be verified by the Auditor, and approved for 
payment by the Director, and the Chairman of the Administration Committee. 
All vouchers executed for expenditures for the construction or reconstruction of the 
Museum building;, or buildings, shall be verified by the Auditor and approved for 
payment by the Chairman of the Building Committee. All vouchers executed in 
connection with the investments of the Corporation, or in any way having to do 
with the endowment funds of the Corporation, shall be verified by the Auditor and 
approved for payment by the Chairman of the Finance Committee. 

Sec. 5. The Harris Trust and Savings Bank of Chicago shall be Custodian of 
"The N. W. Harris Public School Extension of Field Museum" fund. The Bank 
shall make disbursements only upon warrants drawn by the Curator of "The N. W. 
Harris Public School Extension of Field Museum of Natural History" and counter- 
signed by the Auditor of Field Museum of Natural History. In the absence or 
inability of the said officers, warrants may be signed by such officers as shall be 
authorized by special resolution of the Board of Trustees of Field Museum of Natural 
History. But no warrant shall be issued, except in conformity with a regularly 
prepared voucher, giving the name of the payee and stating the occasion for the 
expenditure, and verified and approved by the officers above designated. It shall 
be no part of the duties of the Bank to see that the warrants have been issued in 
conformity with such vouchers. 

ARTICLE VI. 

THE DIRECTOR. 

Section i. The Board of Trustees shall elect a Director of the Museum, who 
shall remain in office until his successor shall be elected. He shall have immediate 
charge and supervision of the Museum, and shall control the operations of the insti- 



356 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

tution, subject to the authority of the Board of Trustees and its Committees. The 
Director shall be the official medium of communication between the Board, or its 
Committees, and the scientific staff and maintenance force. 

Sec. 2. There shall be four scientific departments of the Museum — Anthropol- 
ogy, Botany, Geology and Zoology, each under the charge of a Curator, subject to 
the authority of the Director. The Curators shall be appointed by the Board upon 
the recommendation of the Director, and shall serve during the pleasure of the 
Board. Subordinate staff officers in the scientific departments shall be appointed 
and removed by the Director upon the recommendation of the Curators of the 
respective Departments. The Director shall have authority to employ and remove 
all other employees of the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The Director shall make report to the Board at each regular meeting, 
recounting the operations of the Museum for the previous month. At the Annual 
Meeting, the Director shall make an Annual Report, reviewing the work of the 
Museum for the previous year, which Annual Report shall be published in pamphlet 
form for the information of the Trustees and Members, and for free distribution 
in such number as the Board may direct. 

ARTICLE VII. 

AUDITOR. 

Section i. The Board shall appoint an Auditor, who shall hold his office during 
the pleasure of the Board. He shall keep proper books of account, setting forth the 
financial condition and transactions of the Corporation, and of the Museum, and 
report thereon at each regular meeting, and at such other times as may be required 
by the Board. He shall certify to the correctness of all vouchers for the expenditure 
of the money of the corporation. 

ARTICLE VIII. * 

COMMITTEES. 

Section i. There shall be five Committees as follows: Finance, Building, 
Auditing, Administration and Executive. 

Sec. 2. The Finance and Auditing Committees shall each consist of three 
members, and the Building and Administration Committees shall each consist of 
five members. All members of these four Committees shall be elected by ballot 
by the Board at the Annual Meeting, and shall hold office for one year, and until 
their successors are elected and qualified. In electing the members of these Com- 
mittees, the Board shall designate the Chairman and Vice-Chairman by the order 
in which the members are named in the respective Committee; the first member 
named shall be Chairman, the second named the Vice-Chairman, and the third 
named, Second Vice-Chairman, succession to the Chairmanship being in this order 
in the event of the absence or disability of the Chairman. 

Sec. 3. The Executive Committee shall consist of the President of the Board, 
the Chairman of the Finance Committee, the Chairman of the Building Committee, 
the Chairman of the Administration Committee, the Chairman of the Auditing 
Committee, and two other members of the Board to be elected by ballot at the 
Annual Meeting. 

Sec. 4. Four members shall constitute a quorum of the Executive Committee- 
three members shall constitute a quorum of the Administration Committee, and 
in all other standing Committees, two members shall constitute a quorum. In the 



Jan., 1914. Annual Report of the Director. 357 

event that, owing to the absence or inability of members, a quorum of the regularly 
elected members cannot be present at any meeting of any Committee, then the 
Chairman thereof, or his successor, as herein provided, may summon any member of 
the Board of Trustees to act in place of the absentee. 

Sec. 5. The Finance Committee shall have supervision of investing the en- 
dowment and other permanent funds of the Corporation, and the care of such real 
estate as may become its property. It shall have authority to invest, sell, and 
reinvest funds, subject to the approval of the Board. 

Sec. 6. The Building Committee shall have supervision of the construc- 
tion, reconstruction, and extension of any and all buildings used for Museum 
purposes. 

Sec. 7. The Executive Committee shall be called together from time to time 
as the Chairman may consider necessary, or as he may be requested to do by three 
members of the Committee, to act upon such matters affecting the administration 
of the Museum as cannot await consideration at the Regular Monthly Meetings of 
the Board of Trustees. It shall, before the beginning of each fiscal year, prepare 
and submit to the Board an itemized Budget, setting forth the probable receipts 
from all sources for the ensuing year, and make recommendations as to the ex- 
penditures which should be made for routine maintenance and fixed charges. Upon 
the adoption of the Budget by the Board, the respective Committees shall be con- 
sidered as authorized to make the expenditures detailed therein. No increase in 
the expenditures under any items of the Budget shall be made, except by authority 
of the Board of Trustees, but the Executive Committee shall have authority, in 
cases of emergency, to expend a further total sum not exceeding two thousand 
dollars in any one month. 

Sec. 8. The Administration Committee shall have general supervision of the 
affairs of the Museum. The Committee shall hold one meeting each month with 
the Director at the Museum within a week preceding each Monthly Meeting of 
the Board of Tr%stees. 

Sec. 9. The Auditing Committee shall have supervision over all accounting 
and bookkeeping, and full control of the financial records. It shall cause the same, 
once each year, or oftener, to be examined by an expert individual or firm, and shall 
transmit the report of such expert individual or firm to the Board at the next ensuing 
regular meeting after such examination shall have taken place. 

Sec 10. The Chairman of each Committee shall report the acts and proceedings 
thereof at the next ensuing regular meeting of the Board. 

Sec. 1 1 . The President shall be ex officio a member of all Committees and 
Chairman of the Executive Committee. Vacancies occurring in any Committee 
may be filled by ballot at any regular meeting of the Board. 

ARTICLE IX. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE. 

Section 1. At the November meeting of the Board, each year a Nominating 
Committee of three shall be chosen by lot. Said Committee shall make nom- 
inations for membership of the Finance Committee, the Building Committee, the 
Administration Committee, and the Auditing Committee, and for two members 
of the Executive Committee, from among the Trustees, to be submitted at the 
ensuing December meeting and voted upon at the following Annual Meeting in 
January. 



358 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

ARTICLE X. 

Section i. Whenever the word "Museum" is employed in the By-Laws of 
the Corporation, it shall be taken to mean the building in which the Museum as an 
Institution is located and operated, the material exhibited, the material in study 
collections, or in storage, furniture, fixtures, cases, tools, records, books, and all 
appurtenances of the Institution, and the workings, researches, installations, ex- 
penditures, field work, laboratories, library publications, lecture courses, and all 
scientific and maintenance activities. 

Sec. 2. These By-Laws may be amended at any regular meeting of the Board 
of Trustees by a two-thirds vote of all the members present, provided the amend- 
ment shall have been proposed at a preceding regular meeting. 






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Jan., 1914. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



359 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 



EDWARD E. AYER STANLEY McCORMICK 

HARLOW N. HIGINBOTHAM ROBERT F. CUMMINGS 

CHARLES B. CORY MRS. TIMOTHY B. BLACKSTONE 

NORMAN W. HARRIS 

DECEASED. 

GEORGE M. PULLMAN 
MARY D. STURGES 



PATRONS. 



ALLISON V. ARMOUR 
JOSEPH N. FIELD -.. ti -. 
ERNEST R. GRAHAM "'•'■'' 
NORMAN W. HARRIS 
VERNON SHAW KENNEDY 



GEORGE MANIERRE 
JOHN S. MILLER 
JOHN BARTON PAYNE 
FREDERICK W. PUTNAM 
FREDERICK J. V. SKIFF 



DANIEL H. BURNHAM 



WILLARD A. SMITH 

DECEASED. 

WILLIAM I. BUCHANAN 
EDWIN WALKER 






360 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



CORPORATE MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, GEORGE E. 
ALDlS, OWEN F. 
ARMOUR, ALLISON V. 
AYER, EDWARD E. 

BARTLETT A. C. 
BLACK, JOHN C. 
BLAIR, .WATSON F. 
BLATCHFORD, ELIPHALET W. 
BUTLER, EDWARD B 

CHALMERS, W. J. 
CHATFIELD-TAYLOR, H. C. 
CLARK, JOHN M. 
CRANE, RICHARD T. 

EASTMAN, SIDNEY C. 
ELLSWORTH, JAMES W. 

FIELD, JOSEPH N. 
FIELD, STANLEY 

GAGE, LYMAN J. 
GETTY, HENRY H. 
GRAHAM, ERNEST R. 
GUNSAULUS, FRANK W. 
GUNTHER, C. F. 

HARRIS, NORMAN W. 
HEAD, FRANKLIN H. 



higinbotham, h. n. 
hutchinson, charles l. 

jones, arthur b. 

kennedy, vernon shaw 
kohlsaat, herman h. 

lathrop, bryan 

Mccormick, cyrus h. 
manierre, george 
miller, john s. 
mitchell, john j. 

payne, john barton 
peck, ferd. w. 
porter, george f. 
putnam, frederick w. 

ream, norman b. 
ryerson, martin a. 

skiff, frederick j. v. 
smith, byron l. 
smith, willard a. 
sprague, a. a. 
sprague, a. a., 2d. 
stone, melville e. 



DECEASED. 



ARMOUR, PHILIP D. 
BAKER, WILLIAM T. 
BISSEL, GEORGE F. 
BUCHANAN, W. I. 
BUCKINGHAM, EBENEZER 
BURNHAM, DANIEL H. 
CRAWFORD. ANDREW 
CURTIS, WILLIAM E. 
DAVIS, GEORGE R. 
FITZSIMONS, CHARLES 
HALE, WILLIAM E. 
HARPER, WILLIAM R. 
HATCH, AZEL F. 
JACKSON, HUNTINGTON W. 
LETTER, L. Z. 



McCAGG, E. B. 
McCLURG, A. C. 
McNALLY, ANDREW 
PATTERSON, ROBERT W. 
PEARCE, J. IRVING 
PETERSON, ANDREW 
PULLMAN, GEORGE M. 
SCHNEIDER, GEORGE 
SCOTT, JAMES W. 
STOCKTON, JOSEPH 
WALKER, EDWIN 
WALLER, R. A. 
WALSH, JOHN R. 
WILLIAMS, NORMAN 



Jan., 1914. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



361 



LIFE MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, GEORGE E. 
ALDIS, OWEN F. 

BARRETT, MRS. A. D. 

BARRETT, ROBERT L. 

BARTLETT, A. C. 

BLACKSTONE, MRS. TIMOTHY B. 

BLAINE, MRS. EMMONS 

BLAIR, CHAUNCEY J. 

BLAIR, HENRY A. 

BLAIR, WATSON F. 

BOOTH, W. VERNON 

BUTLER, EDWARD B. 

BYLLESBY, H. M. 

CARTON, L. A. 
CHALMERS, WILLIAM J. 
CRANE, CHARLES RICHARD 
CRANE, RICHARD T. 
CUMMINGS, D. MARK 

DEERING, CHARLES 
DELANO, FREDERIC A. 
DICK, ALBERT BLAKE 
DRAKE, TRACY C. 

FARWELL, WALTER 
FAY, C. N. 
FIELD, STANLEY 
FULLER, WILLIAM A. 

GARTZ, A. F. 
GRISCOM, CLEMENT A. 
GROMMES, JOHN B. 

HAMILL, ERNEST A. 
HILL, LOUIS W. 
HOROWITZ, L. J. 
HOXIE, MRS. JOHN A. 
HUGHITT, MARVIN 
HUTCHINSON, C. L. 

INGALLS, M. E. 
I SHAM, MRS. KATHERINE 
PORTER. 



JOHNSON, FRANK S. 

JOHNSON, MRS. ELIZABETH AYER 

JONES, ARTHUR B. 

KEEP, CHAUNCEY 

KING, FRANCIS 

KING, JAMES C. 

KIRK, WALTER RADCLIFFE 

LAWSON, VICTOR F. 

McCORMICK, MRS. 
McCORMICK, CYRUS H. 
McCORMICK, HAROLD F. . 
MacVEAGH, FRANKLIN 
MASON, WILLIAM S. 
MITCHELL, J. J. 

NEWELL, A. B. 

ORR, ROBERT M. 

PAM, MAX 
PIKE, EUGENE S. 
PORTER, GEORGE F. 
PORTER, H. H., Jr. 

REAM, MRS. CAROLINE P. 
REAM, NORMAN B. 
REVELL, ALEX. H. 
ROSENWALD, JULIUS 
RUSSELL, EDMUND A. 
RYERSON, MRS. CARRIE H. 
RYERSON, MARTIN A. 

SCHLESINGER, LEOPOLD 
SINGER, C. G. 
SMITH, BYRON L. 
SMITH, ORSON 
SPRAGUE, A. A. 
SPRAGUE, A. A., 2D. 
STURGES, GEORGE 

THORNE, GEORGE R. 

WILLARD, ALONZO J. 



362 Field Museum of Natural History —  Reports, Vol. IV. 



ANNUAL MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, CYRUS H. 
ADAMS, MILWARD 
ALLERTON, ROBERT H. 
ARMOUR, GEORGE A. 

BAILEY, EDWARD P. 
BECKER, A. G. 
BILLINGS, C. K. G. 
BILLINGS, DR. FRANK 
BIRKHOFF, GEORGE, Jr. 
BOAL, CHARLES T. 
BROWN, WILLIAM L. 
BURLEY, CLARENCE A. 

COMSTOCK, WILLIAM C. 
CONOVER, CHARLES H. 
COONLEY-WARD, MRS. L. A. 
CORWITH, CHARLES R. 
COWAN, W. P. 
CUDAHY, JOHN 
CUMMINGS, E. A. 
CURTIS, D. H. 

DAY, A. M. 
DEERING, JAMES 
DILLMAN, L. M. 

EISENDRATH, W. N. 

FAIR, R. M. 
FORGAN, JAMES B. 
FORSYTH, ROBERT 
FRANK, HENRY L. 
FULLER, O. F. 
FURST, CONRAD 

GAYLORD, FREDERIC 
GLESSNER, J. J. 
GOODRICH, A. W. 
GORDON, EDWARD K. 
GREY, CHARLES F. 
GREY, WILLIAM L. 
GURLEY, W. W. 



HARRIS, GEORGE B. 
HARRIS, JOHN F. 
HASKELL, FREDERICK T. 
HERTLE, LOUIS 
HIBBARD, WILLIAM G., Jr. 
HITCHCOCK, R. M. 
HOLT, GEORGE H. 
HOPKINS, JOHN P. 

INSULL, SAMUEL 

JENKINS, GEORGE H. 
JONES, J. S. 

KEEFER, LOUIS 
KEITH, W. SCOTT 
KIMBALL, EUGENE S. 
KIMBALL, MRS. MARK 

LAMB, FRANK H. 
LAY, A. TRACY 
LEE, BLEWETT 
LEIGH, EDWARD B. 
LINCOLN, ROBERT T. 
LINN, W. R. 
LOGAN, F. G. 
LORD, J. B. 
LOWDEN, FRANK O. 
LYTTON, HENRY C. 

McCREA, W. S. 
McWILLIAMS, LAFAYETTE 
MacFARLAND, HENRY J. 
MAGEE, HENRY W. 
MANSON, WILLIAM 
MANSURE, E. L. 
MAYER, LEVY 
MERRYWEATHER, GEORGE 
MEYER, MRS. M. A. 
MILLER, CHARLES P. 
MOORE, L. T. 
MOORE, N. G. 
MULLIKEN. A. H. 



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LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBAN A 






Jan., 1914. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



363 



NATHAN, ADOLPH 
NOLAN, JOHN H. 
NORTON, O. W. 

OEHNE, THEODORE 
ORB, JOHN A. 
OSBORN, HENRY A. 



SKINNER, THE MISSES 
SOPER, JAMES P. 
SOUTHWELL, H. E. 
SPENCE, MRS. ELIZABETH E. 
SPOOR, J. A. 
STOCKTON, JOHN T. 
STUART, ROBERT 



PALMER, PERCIVAL B. 
PARKER, FRANCIS W. 
PEARSON, EUGENE H. 
PINKERTON, W. A. 
PORTER, WASHINGTON 

RIPLEY, E. P. 
ROSENBAUM, JOSEPH 
ROSENFELD, MRS. MAURICE 
RUNNELLS, J. S. 

SCHMIDT, DR. O. L. 
SCHWARTZ, G. A. 
SEIPP, MRS. C. 
SHEDD, JOHN G. 
SHORTALL, JOHN L. 



TEMPLETON, THOMAS 
TOBEY, FRANK B. 

UIHLEIN, EDWARD G. 

WACKER, CHARLES H. 
WALKER, JAMES R. 
WALKER, WILLIAM B. 
WALLER, EDWARD C. 
WEBSTER, GEORGE H. 
WHITE, A. STAMFORD 
WHITEHEAD, W. M. 
WILSON, MRS. E. C. 
WILSON, M. H. 
' WOODCOCK, LINDSAY 



BANGA, DR. HENRY 
BARRELL, JAMES 
DEERING, WILLIAM 



DECEASED. 

HORNER, ISAAC 
LEFENS, THIES J. 
MORRIS, EDWARD 
SELZ, MORRIS 



THE LIBRARY OF IHh 

DEC 2 21942 
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBAN A 



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