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1'IBR.ARY 

OF THE 
UNIVERSITY 
Of ILLINOIS 

50H 




HISTOR* jKU'i* 



NOTICE: Return or renew all Library Materials! The Minimum Fee for 
each Lost Book is $50.00. 

The person charging this material is responsible for 
its return to the library from which it was withdrawn 
on or before the Latest Date stamped below. 

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nary action and may result in dismissal from the University. 
To renew call Telephone Center, 333-8400 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



NOV 6 19g0 



DFC 1 3 



990 



L161— O-1096 



Field Museum ok Natural History. 

Publication 181. 

Report Series. Vol. IV, No. 5. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



£J 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 1914. 



THE LIBRARY OF THE 

FEB" 14 1938 

UNIVERST 




Chicago, U. S. A. 

January, 191 5. 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE LVII. 




THE LATE JOSEPH N. FIELD, 

A Benefactor of the Museum. 



Field Museum of Natural History. 

Publication 181. 

Report Series. Vol. IV, No. 5. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 1914. 




THE LIBRARY OF THE 

FEB 141931 

UNIVERSITY Of ILLINOIS 

Chicago, U. S. A. 
January, 191 5. 






CONTENTS 



Page 

Board of Trustees 366 

Officers and Committees 367 

Staff of the Museum 368 

Report of the Director 369 

Maintenance 371 

Publications 371 

Mailing List 371 

Library 373 

Cataloguing, Inventorying, and Labeling 374 

Accessions 375 

Expeditions and Field Work 384 

Installation and Permanent Improvement 384 

The N. W. Harris Public School Extension 395 

Photography and Illustration 396 

Printing 396 

Attendance 396 

Financial Statement 399 

Attendance and Receipts 401 

Accessions 402 

Department of Anthropology 402 

Department of Botany 403 

Department of Geology 406 

Department of Zoology 410 

Section of Photography 414 

The Library 414 

Articles of Incorporation 431 

Amended By-Laws 433 

List of Honorary Members and Patrons 439 

List of Corporate Members 440 

List of Life Members 441 

List of Annual Members 44 2 



366 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



George E. Adams. 
Edward E. Ayer. 
Watson F. Blair. 
William J. Chalmers. 
Marshall Field III. 
Stanley Field. 
Harlow N. Higinbotham. 



Arthur B. Jones. 
George Manierre. 
Cyrus H. McCormick. 
George F. Porter. 
Martin A. Ryerson. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff. 
A. A. Sprague, 2nd. 



Owen F. Aldis. 



HONORARY TRUSTEES. 

Norman B. Ream. 



Norman Williams. 
Marshall Field, Jr. 



DECEASED. 

George R. Davis. 
Huntington W. Jackson. 
Edwin Walker. 



Jan., 191 5. Annual Report of the Director. 367 



OFFICERS. 

Stanley Field, President. 

Martin A. Ryerson, First Vice-President. 
Watson F. Blair, Second Vice-President. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff, Secretary. 

D. C. Davies, Assistant Secretary and Auditor. 
Solomon A. Smith, Treasurer. 



COMMITTEES. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Stanley Field. 
Edward E. Ayer. William J. Chalmers. 

Watson F. Blair. George Manierre. 

Harlow N. Higinbotham. A. A. Sprague 2nd. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Watson F. Blair. Martin A. Ryerson. 

Arthur B. Jones. 

BUILDING COMMITTEE. 

William J. Chalmers. Cyrus H. McCormick. 

Frederick J. V. Skiff. A. A. Sprague, 2nd. 

SUB-COMMITTEE OF BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Stanley Field. A. A. Sprague, 2nd. 

Frederick J. V. Skiff. 

AUDITING COMMITTEE. 

George Manierre. Arthur B. Jones. 

George E. Adams. 

ADMINISTRATION COMMITTEE. 



Edward E. Ayer. 
Watson F. Blair. George Manierre. 

Arthur B. Jones. George F. Porter. 



368 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



STAFF OF THE MUSEUM. 

DIRECTOR. 

Frederick J. V. Skiff. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 

George A. Dorsey, Curator. 
Berthold Laufer, Associate Curator of Asiatic Ethnology. 
Charles L. Owen, Assistant Curator Division of Archceology. 

Albert B. Lewis, Assistant Curator of African and Mela- 
nesian Ethnology. 
Fay Cooper Cole, Assistant Curator Physical Anthropology 
and Malayan Ethnology. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

Charles F. Millspaugh, Curator. 

Huron H. Smith, Assistant Curator Division of Dendrology. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

Oliver C. Farrington, Curator. H. W. Nichols, Assistant Curator. 
Elmer S. Riggs, Assistant Curator of Paleontology. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 

Charles B. Cory, Curator. *Seth E. Meek, Assistant Curator. 

Wilfred H. Osgood, Assistant Curator of Mammalogy and Ornithology. 
William J. Gerhard, Assistant Curator Division of Entomology. 
Edmond N. Gueret, Assistant Curator Division of Osteology. 

RECORDER. 

D. C. Davies. 

THE LIBRARY. 

Elsie Lippincott, Librarian. 

THE N. W. HARRIS PUBLIC SCHOOL EXTENSION. 

S. C. Simms, Curator. 

• Deceased July 6, 1914. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR. 

1914 



To the Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History: 

I have the honor to present a report of the operations of the Museum 
for the year ending December 31, 19 14. 

The Twentieth Anniversary of the foundation of the Museum was 
ushered in with an intimation that it was necessary to curtail certain 
activities in the Institution, in view of the default in payment of inter- 
est on certain investments held in the Endowment Fund. There is 
satisfaction in announcing, however, that this condition is only tem- 
porary, for later in the year it was ascertained that the security for 
the investments referred to was ample to protect the Institution as 
to both principal and interest. The chief reduction in expenditure 
was effected by the temporary abandonment of work in the Modeling 
Sections of the Departments of Anthropology and Botany. It was 
felt that the postponement of this work would not seriously affect the 
plans of the Departments involved, and that the resumption of 
operations might be undertaken at any future time without detriment 
to the work in hand. 

Probably the most important event of the year was the tender 
to the Board of Trustees of a site for the new Museum building 
in the reclaimed area south of Grant Park by the South Park Com- 
missioners. It is confidently anticipated that ground will be broken 
on this site before the date of the next report. Already the greater 
part of the steel necessary for the construction of the building is on 
the ground, and of the marble necessary for the exterior of the 
structure more than one-half has been quarried and cut. 

In view of the necessity of retrenchment in the matter of main- 
tenance expenses, it was deemed advisable to discontinue for the 
present the two lecture courses hitherto given on Saturday afternoons 
in March and April, and October and November. The fact that there 
is no hall in the present building to accommodate these lectures, and 
the further fact that the only suitable auditorium with the requisite 
seating capacity is situated some seven miles from the Institution, seems 
to justify the temporary abandonment of this means of public instruc- 
tion. 

369 



370 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

The publication of a series of picture postal cards, portraying 
the various objects and groups installed in the Museum, was inaugu- 
rated during the year. The sale of the cards has been encouraging, 
for over fifty thousand have been disposed of, although they have 
only been offered for sale a few months. A second series representing 
forty-two objects and groups in the collections will shortly be pub- 
lished. 

The acceptance by Assistant Curator Osgood of the invitation 
to serve on a United States Government Commission to study and 
make recommendations regarding the management of the fur-seal 
herd on the Pribiloff Islands, deprived the Department of Zoology 
of his services for over half of the year. Leave of absence was granted 
to Curator Dorsey of the Department of Anthropology for approxi- 
mately one year. At least two months of Dr. Dorsey's time, however, 
will be occupied in an ethnologic survey of British India in behalf 
of the Museum. The remainder of the leave granted is for a personal 
undertaking. 

The death of Byron L. Smith, Treasurer of the Museum, in March 
has to be recorded. Mr. Smith had faithfully served the Museum 
as Treasurer since its foundation, and as an officer of the Board, a 
friend of the Institution, and a high-minded public-spirited citizen of 
Chicago, his loss will be keenly felt. Mr. Solomon A. Smith was 
elected Treasurer to succeed his father. The death of Mr. Joseph N. 
Field, a Patron of the Museum, has also to be chronicled, and as a 
memorial for his generosity to the Museum, the Board of Trustees by 
resolution have named the hall in which the South Sea Islands 
ethnological material is installed the "Joseph N. Field Hall." 
The death of Dr. Seth Eugene Meek in July of this year was a 
shock to his associates, and is an irreparable loss to the Department 
of Zoology, of which he was Assistant Curator for seventeen years. 
Dr. Meek's highly valuable services on behalf of the Institution were 
recognized by the Board of Trustees in formal resolutions adopted on 
the occasion of his death. 

Mr. Carl E. Akeley in performance of his contract completed and 
installed during the month of December a group of African Buffalo 
consisting of five individuals. This group which is installed in the 
South Court keeps fully up to the high standard of excellence exhibited 
by those previously produced by him. A brief description of this 
addition to the Museum groups is made elsewhere in this report. 

References elsewhere indicate that the activities in the Institution, 
more especially in the progress of installation, have been fully main- 
tained during the year under review. 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE LVIII. 




The Late Byron l. Smith, 
Treasurer of the Museum Corporation since its foundation. 



OF ILUi 



Jan., 1915. Annual Report of the Director. 371 

maintenance. — The cost of maintenance for the year amounted to 

approximately $135,000, which was $13,000 less than the amount 

authorized by the Board of Trustees. The total amount expended for 

all purposes was $198,600 being $38,500 less than the previous year. 

The difference between the cost of maintenance and the actual amount 

expended is accounted for by special appropriations for the purchase of 

collections. The necessary repairs to the building were performed 

by the regular maintenance force. 

publications. — The number of publications issued during the year was 

seven. These seven comprise parts of five volumes, details of which 

follow: 

Pub. 173. — Report Series, Vol. IV, No. 4. Annual Report of the 
Director to the Board of Trustees for the year 1913. 89 
pages, 14 half-tones. Edition 2500. 

Pub. 174. — Zoological Series, Vol. X, No. 10. An Annotated List of 
Fishes known to occur in the Fresh Water of Costa Rica. 
By S. E. Meek. 34 pages. Edition 1500. 

Pub. 175. — Zoological Series, Vol. X, No. 11. Four New Mammals 
from Venezuela. By W. H. Osgood. 7 pages. Edition 1500. 

Pub. 176. — Zoological Series, Vol. X, No. 12. Mammals of an Expedi- 
tion across Northern Peru. By W. H. Osgood. 43 pages. 
Edition 1500. 

Pub. 177. — Anthropological Series, Vol. XIII, No. 2. Chinese Clay 
Figures. Part I — Prolegomena on the History of De- 
fensive Armor. By Berthold Laufer. 245 pages, 64 plates, 
and 55 text-figures. Edition 1500. 

Pub. 178. — Geological Series, Vol. V, No. 1. New Meteorites. By 
O. C. Farrington. 14 pages, 6 half-tones. Edition 1500. 

Pub. 179. — Botanical Series, Vol. II, No. 10. Contributions to North 
American Euphorbiaceae — V. By C. F. Millspaugh. 
15 pages. Edition 1500. 

Names on Mailing List 

Domestic 626 

Foreign 704 

1,328 
Distribution of Foreign Exchanges 

Argentine Republic .... 12 Bulgaria 1 

Australia 33 Canada 29 

Austria-Hungary 32 Cape Colony 6 

Belgium 18 Ceylon 3 

Borneo 1 Chile 2 

Brazil 9 China 2 

British East Africa .... 2 Colombia 2 

British Guiana 2 Costa Rica 4 



372 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



Distribution of foreign Exchanges - 

Denmark 

East Africa 

Ecuador 

Egypt 

France 

Fiji Islands 

Finland 

Germany 

Great Britain 

Greece 

Guatemala 

India 

Italy 



■CONTINUED 

9 Natal 



Jamaica 
Japan . 
Java 
Liberia . 
Malta . 
Mexico 



I Netherlands 

1 New Zealand 

2 Norway 

56 Peru 

1 Portugal 

2 Rhodesia 

138 Roumania 

120 Russia 

2 Salvador 

1 Sicily 

17 Spain 

38 Straits Settlements .... 

2 Sweden 

9 Switzerland 23 

4 Tasmania 3 

1 Transvaal 3 

1 Uruguay 1 

18 West Indies 3 



3 
20 

7 
8 
2 

5 
2 

1 
18 
1 
3 
7 
1 

15 



Distribution of Publications (Foreign) By Series 

Anthropological 291 Ichthyological 165 

Botanical 373 Ornithological . .... 206 

Entomological 160 Report 704 

Geological 360 Zoological 306 



Distribution of Domestic Exchanges 

Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia .... 

Florida 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 



2 
I 
29 
11 
21 
2 
66 

3 
1 

69 
16 

15 
6 

3 

4 

7 

9 

65 

13 

9 

4 

11 

2 



Nebraska 7 

Nevada 2 

New Hampshire 4 

New Jersey 15 

New Mexico 2 

New York 87 



North Carolina 
North Dakota 
Ohio . . . 
Oklahoma . 
Oregon . 



.... 6 

2 

20 

.... 3 
1 

Pennsylvania 37 

.... 5 

2 

2 

2 

2 

1 

.... 4 

.... 4 

.... 6 

.... 6 

.... 17 



Rhode Island . 
South Carolina 
South Dakota . 
Tennessee . 
Texas . 
Utah . . . 
Vermont 
Virginia 
Washington 
West Virginia . 
Wisconsin . 



Jan., 191 5. Annual Report of the Director. 373 

Wyoming 2 Philippine Islands .... 3 

Cuba 3 Porto Rico 1 

Hawaii 5 

Distribution of Publications (Domestic) By Series 

Anthropological 232 Ichthyological 151 

Botanical 304 Ornithological 160 

Geological 313 Report 626 

Historical 161 Zoological 266 

the library. — The Library contains 64,875 books and pamphlets 
distributed as follows: 

General Library 42,656 

Department of Anthropology 3.189 

Department of Botany 6,718 

Department of Geology 9, 181 

Department of Zoology 3,131 



64.875 
There were added during the year 2,639 books and pamphlets. The 
principal growth has been through gifts and interchange of the Museum's 
publications with individuals and institutions. Among the important 
purchases were complete sets to date of the Transactions of the Asiatic 
Society of Japan; Journal fur Ornithologie; Ornithologische Monats- 
berichte; andOrnis. Through the continued interest of friends a num- 
ber of valuable publications were received. Mrs. Frank W. Barker, 
Chicago, presented ten parts of a rare work "The Acropolis of Ancon." 
Dr. Berthold Laufer, Chicago, a copy of " Epigraphische Denkmaler 
aus China, Part first" recently published by Dr. Laufer and Otto 
Franke. Publications were also received from Mrs. F. H. Chalfant 
of Pittsburgh; Prof. Henry F. Osborn of New York; Sir Thomas W. 
Northcote of London; Judge Curtis H. Lindley of San Francisco; 
and Prof. Alexander W. Evans of New Haven. The courtesy of 
several contemporary institutions enabled the Library to complete 
sets of their publications. The more noteworthy were: Amer- 
ican Geographical Society New York City; British Museum Lon- 
don; Cambridge University, Cambridge, England; Kentucky Geolog- 
ical Survey Frankfort; South Park Commission, Chicago; Museum of 
Natural History, Marseilles, France; Royal Asiatic Society, Shanghai; 
Royal Botanical Garden, Edinburgh, Scotland; Royal Museum of 
Bohemia, Prag; Senckenbergische Naturforschende Gesellschaft, Frank- 
fort-am-Main; Zoological Institute, Strassburg; Royal Society of 
Tasmania, Hobart; National University of La Plata, Buenos Aires. 
The books and periodicals bound during the year number 504. As 
routine work permits, the opportunity is being improved to make a 



374 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

more careful and extended analysis of many sets of periodicals. There 
have been written and filed in the catalogues 21,000 cards. Twelve 
installments of the John Crerar Library library cards have been 
received and alphabetically arranged in the catalogue. During the 
summer months the Stack Room was thoroughly cleaned, and a com- 
plete rearrangement of the books made. A discarded exhibition case 
was fitted with shelves and converted into a temporary bookcase. 

Departmental Cataloguing, Inventorying, and Labeling. — The catalogue 
cards prepared by the Department of Anthropology during the year 
numbered 2,825, distributed as follows: Archaeology, 401; Mela- 
nesian Ethnology, 1,374; Asiatic Ethnology, 1,050. These cards 
with the addition of 1,885 from the preceding year make a total 
of 4,710 that have been entered in the inventory books of the Depart- 
ment. Of the cards relating to American archaeology some have not 
as yet been turned over to the cataloguer, being retained for further 
reference in connection with the installation of the material which they 
record. The number of accessions for the year is 26, of which 25 have 
been recorded in the inventory. The volumes of inventories number 
37. The labels printed for the Department during the year number 
3,045, of which 621 were for the Melanesian division, with the addition 
of 135 prepared for the Fiji collection by Assistant Curator Cole, 22 for 
American Ethnology and over 2,000 for the Division of Asiatic Ethnol- 
ogy. The photographic prints prepared for the Department were 
classified and arranged in albums, of which 1 1 volumes were added to the 
series, 9 containing photographs of Chinese and 2 of Tibetan specimens. 

The Curator of Botany reports the preparation of 650 labels. Of 
these all that have been printed have been placed against the objects 
installed. The complete card catalogue of all the collectors and geo- 
graphic regions represented by specimens installed, containing over 
12,000 cards, has been finished and arranged in a new and readily 
referable steel index case. This catalogue is unique and of the greatest 
value not only to students of the world of plants, but to the efficiency of 
the Department itself. The work of inventorying the specimens 
organized has been kept up to date, 7,521 entries having been made 
during the year, making the total number of entries 412,486. 

The material catalogued in the Department of Geology during the 
year included 590 mineral specimens, 355 economic specimens, and 364 
miscellaneous. A total of 2,138 labels was prepared during the year, 
of which 891 have been printed and distributed. The most important 
series of these was that for the meteorite collection, the number made 
for that purpo?/ being 1,003. These labels show for each specimen 
the classification of the meteorite, the locality of the fall or find, date 



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Jan., 1915. Annual Report of the Director. 375 

of fall or find, the weight of the specimen and its catalogue number. 
A large number of miscellaneous labels in addition were prepared relat- 
ing mostly to material received during the year. Several of these 
labels were descriptive. Some of the series thus labeled include the 
asphalt collection, a part of the petroleum collection, the collection of 
Japanese volcanic material, the amber collection, a series of mammoth 
and mastodon teeth, and about 200 miscellaneous specimens of min- 
erals. The descriptive labels in Higinbotham Hall were provided with 
white frames corresponding in color to the interior of the cases in order 
to give a more attractive appearance to the installation. 

In the Department of Zoology cataloguing and labeling of specimens 
was continued as usual. In the various inventory books all new mate- 
rial received from Museum expeditions during the year was promptly 
entered as soon as the specimens were identified, and also card-cata- 
logued. Some rearrangement in the mammal and bird collection has 
been made, and the revision of old labels continued. The work of 
rearranging and transferring the exhibition collection of shells to new 
cases was commenced and about 2,500 specimens were placed on newly 
prepared tablets and a new arrangement of labeling adopted. Under 
the supervision of Assistant Curator Gerhard the entire time of one 
assistant was devoted to this work. The preparation of labels for 
the shells to be installed in the new cases is now progressing. The 
entire collection of humming-birds, including about 400 species and sub- 
species, was rearranged in new trays and properly card-catalogued, and 
labels for specimens of reptiles, fishes, and crustaceans, placed on exhibi- 
tion during the year, have been prepared and installed. The large 
mammal skins stored in the basement of the Museum have been re- 
arranged, listed, and catalogued in such a way that they are now readily 
accessible for quick reference. 

The following table shows the work performed on catalogues and the 
inventorying accomplished: 





No. of 


Total No. 


Entries 


Total No. 




Record 


of Entries to 


During 


of Cards 




Books 


Dec. 31, 1914 


1914 


Written 


Department of Anthropology . 


• • 37 


I3L240 


4,710 


133,606 


Department of Botany 


• • 57 


412,486 


7.521 




Department of Geology 


21 


129,345 


1.309 


7,705 


Department of Zoology 


. . 40 


94,160 


2,255 


30,045 


The Library 


• • 14 


96,890 


1,025 


185,692 


Section of Photography 


• • 15 


110,827 


3,599 





of Anthropology for the year have been made possible through the 
generosity of friends. The collection of classical archaeology has 



376 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

been increased by two gifts of Mr. Edward E. Ayer — a large Etrus- 
can bronze vessel with chain handle and a small variegated glass bottle 
from Egypt. Two other Italian bronze cistas of the third cen- 
tury B. C, acquired by Mr. Ayer in Rome, were purchased by the 
Museum. These specimens belong to a type now very scarce, and 
seldom, if ever, offered for sale on the market. A diorite statuette of a 
woman from Egypt, of great artistic beauty, likewise obtained by Mr. 
Ayer, was secured through exchange. The section of North American 
archaeology received from Mr. F. Schrott a flaked knife-blade of chert, 
and from Mr. Clarence B. Moore of Philadelphia an assortment of 
archaeological material. Fifty arrowheads and two stone axes from 
Rock Hall, Maryland, were secured through exchange with Mr. George 
C. Roberts. To Mr. Homer E. Sargent the Department is indebted for 
an ancient gold ring from Mexico which has been added to the exhibits 
of American gold jewelry in Higinbotham Hall. Dr. W. S. Lowe, 
Phoenix, Arizona, presented several sections of cane stem, some 
wrapped up with a small cotton fabric, found under a ledge of rock 
in the Camelback Mountains, fifteen miles northeast of Phoenix, 
and to have served as an offering. American ethnology has been 
enriched by a gift from Mr. Richard G. Ellis, consisting of a rawhide 
lariat, wooden bow with skin case, a stone celt, and a stone disc; and by 
a gift from Mrs. Frank A. Devlin of Chicago, comprising three finely 
carved cups of pod from Costa Rica (modern) and two prehistoric pot- 
tery vessels from the same locality. The following acquisitions from 
Assistant Curator Owen's recent expedition to Arizona have been 
added: three finished two-faced Navaho blankets, and one in 
the loom during the process of working, two-thirds being finished; 
specimens of yarn, and implements used in weaving. Mr. Cleaver 
Warden, Carlton, Oklahoma, presented the Museum with a peyote out- 
fit of the Arapaho. Mrs. Frank W. Barker of Chicago presented the 
Museum with a miscellaneous lot of 1 7 objects from Italy, Egypt, India, 
northwest coast of North America, Hawaii, and Micronesia. The fol- 
lowing gifts were received by the section of Asiatic Ethnology: a 
rhinoceros-horn presented by Mr. F. W. Kaldenberg of New York; a 
Japanese gold piece (10 yen), and a Japanese rectangular silver coin 
from Mrs. T. B. Blackstone; three printing-blocks from the Examination 
Halls of Nanking from the Curator; an interesting mariner's compass, 
enclosed in a copper case, from Mr. Thomas Mason. Three paintings 
representing polo matches, one album with 25 flower-pieces painted on 
silk, and another containing an Atlas of Hunan Province with sixteen 
hand-painted colored maps, were presented by Dr. John R. Taylor, in 
recognition of services rendered him in the identification of his collection 



Jan., 1915. Annual Report of the Director. 377 

of Chinese paintings. The most important gift accessioned during the 
year are two exquisite silk-embroidered hangings presented by Dr. 
F. W. Gunsaulus, who has always evinced a keen and generous interest 
in the work of the Museum. These specimens were made in the 
Imperial Atelier for use in the Palace, and are classical examples of the 
marvelous skill attained by the Chinese in art needlework. They have 
been placed on exhibition in special wall-cases in Hall 45. The Museum 
is further indebted to Dr. Gunsaulus for two Japanese water-colors, 
framed, one illustrating the pounding of tea-leaves preparatory to the 
tea-ceremonies, the other showing a woman engaged in painting. 
Three notable acquisitions for the Chinese Collection were effected by 
purchase. The generosity of Mrs. T. B. Blackstone enabled the 
Museum to secure a famous collection of ancient Chinese coins, 690 in 
number. This numismatic collection is of intrinsic scientific value, 
including, as it does, many rare and unique ancient specimens; particu- 
larly it abounds in those earliest forms of currency, bronze-cast sham- 
implements, like knives, axes, spades, bells, etc., which are of specific 
archaeological interest in permitting a study of the development of 
these ancient utensils. Mr. Chalfant, the collector, unfortunately met 
a premature death on January 14th, at the age of 52; his collection of 
ancient bone carvings, reference to which was made last year, and the 
coin collection in question, remain the most enduring monument of his 
fruitful activity and his serious aspirations. Mr. Chalfant had spent 
the last seven years of his life on the decipherment of the inscriptions 
on these bone carvings and left a voluminous manuscript on this work 
in two quarto-volumes. Mrs. Chalfant has placed this manuscript 
with others in the trust of Associate Curator Laufer, with the request 
that he take charge of the publication thereof. Two nephrite tablets 
from an imperial jade book, the one inscribed in Manchu, the other 
engraved with a pair of dragons, were purchased from Mr. Hackett. 
Through the services of Mr. W. W. Simpson, an American missionary 
in Taochow, Kansu, China, the Museum succeeded in obtaining the 
seal and grant conferred upon the Taochow Lama Temple by the 
Emperor K'ang-hi in 17 13. When Dr. Laufer secured the remaining 
spoils of this temple at the time of his sojourn at Taochow in 19 10, it 
was impossible to get hold of these documents, as the abbot of the 
monastery is not permitted to part with them without the sanction of 
the high Church Dignitaries of Lhasa. Word was accordingly left with 
Mr. Simpson, requesting him to arrange for this transaction, which is 
now felicitously concluded. The large, square seal is carved from wood 
surmounted by the figure of a standing lion which serves as a handle; 
the K'ang-hi date-mark is engraved on the top. The grant is written 






378 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

out in Tibetan on imperial yellow silk, which has dragons and other 
designs woven in, and is stamped with numerous seals. These unique 
objects naturally are of principal value to the Museum, inasmuch as 
they furnish substantial evidence for the fact that all treasures in its 
possession from the Lama Temple in question were indeed turned out 
during the K'ang-hi era (1662-1722) and prior to the year 1713. 

In the Department of Botany considerable valuable material for 
exhibition purposes has been received. The Chicago Varnish Company 
has presented a very complete and valuable collection of 344 charac- 
teristic specimens of natural varnish gums, many of them the largest, 
clearest, and most typical examples of their kind known. These have 
been fully labeled and installed in two cases, accompanied by tubes of 
varnishes made from each class of gum exhibited. From the Philippine 
Bureau of Education a series of 147 typical fibers and objects utilizing 
the same have been received and installed among other objects belong- 
ing to the various families of plants they illustrate. Dr. Laufer has 
presented the Department with several characteristic specimens of 
"brick Tea" and of paper and raw material illustrating Chinese paper 
made from Derge roots. The U. S. Bureau of Plant Industry has sent 
in 168 specimens of crude drug substances that will serve to fill many 
gaps in the systematic exhibitions of plant products. The U. S. Forest 
Products Laboratory has contributed, in exchange, 44 examples of 
wood-paper pulps and papers made therefrom. The Forest Economist 
of India has presented 19 valuable forest products of India that 
assist greatly in the representation of the economics of several plant 
families, and the Section of Modeling, during the last month of its labors, 
turned over 7 models of desmid species; 9 models of diatom species; a 
full-size reproduction of a leafy, fruiting branch of the Horsechestnut 
tree; a full-size reproduction of a flowering twig of the same; a full-size 
reproduction of a pandanus fruit, a chocolate fruit, cakes of manu- 
factured chocolate, and several sections of the fruit of Connarus. The 
important additions to the herbarium during the past year comprise 
the following: The private herbarium of Mr. Geo. F. Curtiss, consisting 
of ferns of central North America, presented by Miss E. Curtiss; the 
private herbarium of Miss Carrie A. Reynolds, consisting of plants 
collected in northwestern North America, presented by herself; the 
private herbarium of Mr. C. W. Dusener, consisting of plants collected 
locally in Illinois and Indiana, presented by himself; and the following: 
Abbon, Mexico, 70; Adole, Mexico, 106; Arsene, Mexico, 689; Britton, 
Cowell & Shafer, Vieques Isl., 72; Britton and Shafer, Porto Rico, 217; 
Curacao, 51; Britton, Stevens & Hess, Porto Rico, 78; Broadway, 
Tobago, 56; Buchtien, Bolivia, 201; Cowles, northwestern North Amer- 



Jan., 1915. Annual Report of the Director. 379 

ica, 1,240; Curtiss, Jamaica, 136; Elmer, Philippines, 863; Flora Exscicc. 
Austria-Hung., 310; Harris, Jamaica, 107; Heller, California, 169; 
Nevada, 242; Lansing, Illinois, 207; Macoun, Ontario, 48; Vancouver, 
124; Millspaugh, Michigan, 68; Natal Botanical Gardens, South Africa, 
101; Nicolas, Mexico, 120; Pennell, Gerardiae, 56; Purpus, Mexico, 
408; Huron Smith, Illinois, 160; Visher, South Dakota, 51; Tonduz, 
Costa Rica, 55; Wenzel, Philippine, 146; and Wood, Natal, 95. 

Alaska: 

Coronation Island 

Canada: 

British Columbia 

Nova Scotia 

Cape Breton Island 

Sable Island 

Ontario 

Prince Edward's Island 

Quebec 

Ungava 

Vancouver Island 

Newcastle Island 

Brandon Island 

Yukon 

United States: 

Alabama 

American Plains 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Carolina, North 

Carolina, South 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Dakota, South 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Big Pine Key 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Louisiana 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Missouri 



Added to 

Herbarium 

1914. 


Total 

now in 

Herbarium. 


I 


I 


5 


1,017 


5 


382 


1 


28 


2 


37 


5i 


675 


1 


12 


36 


181 


2 


62 


132 


710 


3 


3 


1 


1 


1 


70 


4 


1.337 


7 


219 


6 


9-448 


5 


422 


186 


24,040 


17 


4-574 


22 


1.035 


6 


11,787 


H 


555 


51 


1.093 


5 


1.593 


21 


2,373 


23 


20,716 


2 


2 


8 


4.562 


412 


21,052 


45 


5.9o8 


1 


1,762 


7 


506 


14 


1,296 


28 


1,107 


62 


3.184 


72 


4.003 


1 


1.599 


5 


3.020 



380 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Added to Total 

Herbarium now in 

United States: 1914. Herbarium. 

Nebraska 1 4 r 4 

Nevada 245 1,256 

New Hampshire 5 1,486 

New Mexico 8 2,961 

New York n 6,057 

Pennsylvania 16 10,861 

Rocky Mountains 4 1.395 

Tennessee 5 1.457 

Texas 56 9.764 

Virginia 3° 4.703 

Vermont 15 2,675 

Wyoming 1 93° 

Central America: 

Canal Zone 2 53 

Costa Rica 59 6l1 

Guatemala 5 2,886 

Honduras 2 343 

Mexico (in general) l,4 6 9 35.738 

Yucatan I 4.691 

Nicaragua 4 9 2 

Panama 10 7 1 

San Salvador I 24 

West Indies: 

Anegada 3 26 

Bahamas: 

Andros Island 3 I.73 2 

Crooked Islands 4 335 

Inagua 3 443 

Bermuda 7 657 

Cuba " 9.778 

Hayti 1 3°5 

Jamaica 308 7.388 

Porto Rico 586 4.586 

Culebra Island 1 221 

Desecheo Island 7 7 

Mona Island 24 24 

Vieques Island 75 75 

St. Thomas 1 62 i 

Santo Domingo 1 1.379 

Tobago 57 57<> 

Trinidad 4 482 

South America: 

Bolivia 202 3,715 

Venezuela 1 1,064 

Curacao Island 5 l 93 

Peru 39 J2 9 

Colombia 1 2 -4 2 4 

British Guiana 4 75 

Brazil 3 513 



Jan., 1915. Annual Report of the Director. 



381 



Europe: 

Austria-Hungary 

Bulgaria 

England 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Italy 

Mediterranean Islands: 

Corsica 

Sardinia 

Sicily 

Poland 

Portugal 

Russia 

Roumania 

Servia 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Africa: 

Canary Islands 

South Africa 

Cape Colony 

Natal 

Zululand 

Asia: 

Borneo 

China 

Mongolia 

India 

Java 

Siberia 

Oceania: 
Australia : 

New South Wales 

Victoria 

Sandwich Islands 

Horticultural 

Illustrations, Drawings, etc., mounted as herbarium sheets 



Added to Total 
Herbarium now in 
1914. Herbarium. 



55 
1 
2 
16 
33 
5 
9 

2 
1 

14 
1 

3 
7 

1 
1 
2 

1 

1 
16 

3 
89 
11 

I 

1 
1 
I 

1 
1 



1 
6 

3 
28 

233 



7,067 
2 

681 
4.540 
7.I3I 

530 
2,500 

54 

8 

124 

49 

14 

1,600 

31 

125 

141 

2,615 

47 
1.259 

84 
750 
160 

8 

324 

2 

1,038 

102 

430 



526 

494 

465 

2,650 

1,245 



In the Department of Geology a number of accessions have been 
received by gift, many of which are of unusual value. The most im- 
portant of these is a skeleton of the American mammoth formerly be- 
longing to the Chicago Academy of Sciences, which was presented 
through the generosity of Mr. George Manierre. This skeleton was, 
until recently, the only mounted skeleton of a mammoth on exhibition 
in America, and it still remains one of the most nearly complete and 
important. The skeleton was found in 1878 in Spokane County, 



382 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Washington. Owing to its fragile nature and the probability that it 
might not remain long in the present Museum building, it was decided 
not to remount the specimen at this time, and it has not, therefore, been 
placed on exhibition. A valuable collection of minerals, with some fos- 
sils, the whole numbering about 300 specimens, was received from Miss 
E. Curtiss. Many of these specimens were of exceptional beauty and 
rarity. A somewhat similar, though smaller, collection numbering 48 
specimens was received from Harold Wegg. It was chiefly valuable 
for its series of Mazon Creek fossils. Two large specimens of fossil 
logs, collected by Prof. R. D. Salisbury on his recent trip to Patagonia, 
were received during the year and made an appreciated addition. From 
Mr. Charles Winston eight exceptionally fine specimens of Carbonifer- 
ous plants from Pennsylvania and Rhode Island were received. Some 
of these were of importance as having been cotypes of Lesquereux and 
all are large and well-preserved specimens. Two excellent specimens 
of fossil glass sponge, Hydnoceras bathense, in group form were gener- 
ously presented by the New York State Museum. An excellent speci- 
men of fossil fish from Wyoming was presented by Mrs. E. F. Goodall. 
The skull of a Bison, found in an excavation near 67th Street, Chicago, 
was presented by Thomas Farley. This is one of few occurrences known 
showing the distribution of the buffalo in this vicinity. D. S. Renne, 
Verona, Illinois, presented two large specimens of septaria, which are 
interesting specimens of this type. From the Dolese & Shepard Com- 
pany were received two excellent specimens of Orthoceras found near 
Chicago. Besides the above a number of specimens of economic 
interest were received through the kindness of donors. Among 
these may be mentioned six specimens of gold and silver ore from 
San Bernardino County, California, presented by Dr. T. A. Dumont; 
27 examples of minerals and ores from Montana, presented by 
Mr. J. E. Strawn; 15 specimens of gold ore from the Bella Mariana 
Mine, Tlatlaya, Mexico, from William Brockway; 10 specimens illus- 
trating the manufacture of tungsten lamps, from the General Electric 
Company; two specimens of platinum and gold ore from the Boss Gold 
Mining Company of Nevada; three specimens of vanadium ore from 
the American Vanadium Company; 46 specimens of asphalt and its 
products and two large photographs of Trinidad Lake, from the Bar- 
ber Asphalt Company, and 1 1 specimens of coal tar and its products 
from the Barrett Manufacturing Company. Dr. F. C. Nicholas pre- 
sented a series of instructive specimens, which represented ores and 
lavas of Sonora, Mexico, and Messrs. L. V. Kenkel and H. V. Guild 
about 150 specimens of fossils and minerals from Idaho. In response to 
a number of requests sent to producers of building stones and marbles, 



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LIBRARY 

OF THE 

DIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



Jan., 19 i 5. Annual Report of the Director. 383 

a number of cubes and marble slabs were added to the building stone 
collection, making it more representative than formerly. Twenty-one 
specimens were received from these donors. By exchange a number of 
important specimens were received, the most important being a large 
and complete skeleton of the European Cave Bear from Austria. This 
and a skull of the fossil whale (Zeuglodon) from Egypt were received 
from Dr. F. Krantz. From the University of California there was re- 
ceived by exchange a practically complete skeleton of the sabre-tooth 
Cat from the Rancho la Brea beds of California. From Grebel, Wendler 
& Company there was received a fine series of Brazilian phenacite crys- 
tals, numbering 21 specimens. From Mr. George S. Scott of New York 
City were received by exchange 14 specimens of various minerals; from 
Prof. H. B. North of Rutgers College, 8 specimens of pseudomorphs 
after marcasite; and from the Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, three 
large polished specimens showing the occurrence of the silver and nick- 
el ores of Cobalt, Ontario. By purchase the Bishop Canyon meteorite 
was obtained entire; also the Scott City meteorite, nearly complete, 
and a large etched section of the Mount Edith, Australia, meteorite. 
Other purchases included: 163 specimens showing varieties and modes 
of occurrence of German amber; an interesting series, numbering 42 
specimens, showing products of the eruption of the volcano of Sakur- 
ajima, a specimen of a "bread crust" bomb in this series being of 
especial importance; a large specimen of Orthoceras, measuring six feet 
in length; a series of models of diamonds cut from the Cullinan dia- 
mond; and 11 teeth and two tusks of a young mastodon. 

The Curator of Zoology reports that an important addition to the 
Entomological collection was received from Dr. William Barnes of 
Decatur, Illinois, who presented to the Museum a collection of about 
3,500 moths, which are in fine condition and many of them will ulti- 
mately be used for the exhibition collection. Miss Elizabeth F. Curtiss 
also presented to the Museum a collection of butterflies containing some 
1,700 specimens, which may supply some material for exhibition pur- 
poses. A rare species of Sphinx Moth (Trogolegnum pseudambulyx) 
from Mexico, a gift from Mr. B. Preston Clark of Boston, was new 
to the Museum collection. The mammals and birds received from 
Museum Expeditions were of much scientific value and contained sev- 
eral new forms, which are being studied and will be the subjects of 
papers now being prepared for publication. The most important 
donation received was that of 26 large mammals and 3 birds from East 
Africa, presented by Mr. Brent Altsheler of Louisville, Kentucky. The 
collection consisted of 3 Ostriches, 4 Impala Antelopes, 1 Hartebeest, 
2 Waterbuck, 1 Wart Hog, 2 Elands, 1 Lioness, 3 Grant's Gazelle, 3 



384 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Oryx, 2 Dik Dik, 1 Klipspringer, 4 Gerenuk, 1 Buffalo, and 1 Jackal. 
Mr. E. B. Williamson of Bluff ton, Indiana, presented a number of 
birds during the year, and his continued interest is much appreciated. 
Judge R. M. Barnes of Lacon, Illinois, presented a body of the rare 
Trumpeter Swan. An albino crow was purchased. The Osteological col- 
lection was enlarged by 445 skulls cleaned for the study collection, and 
5 skeletons were prepared and installed in the exhibition collection. 

expeditions and field Work- — At the beginning of the year the 
Museum had two zoological collectors in the field: Malcolm P. Ander- 
son in Venezuela, and Robert H. Becker in Brazil. In January Mr. 
Anderson proceeded to Peru and worked in high altitudes in the Andes 
Mountains east of Chimbote, later going to Lake Junin (altitude 
14,000 feet). After leaving Lake Junin May 7th, he spent a month 
collecting in the vicinity of San Ramon on the Rio Chanchamayo, and 
sailed for home early in June. While Mr. Anderson secured valuable 
material, the specimens were less in number than could have been 
expected, owing largely to a series of unfortunate accidents. In Janu- 
ary, Mr. Becker proceeded from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, to Lagoa 
Santa in the State of Minas Geraes, where he made an important col- 
lection of birds and mammals. He then proceeded up the Rio San 
Francisco to Barra, and from there pushed on up the Rio Preto to and 
beyond Formosa, a small native town in a very little known region in the 
interior of Brazil. This country has not been worked by collectors, and 
it is unfortunate that after surmounting difficulties in reaching there, 
his stay had to be limited to two weeks. Interesting mammals 
and birds were secured, some of which are new and will be the subject of 
a publication in due time. Coming down the Rio Preto on a raft, which 
he built, Mr. Becker reached Barra safely, and from there went on to 
Bahia and took a steamer to Trinidad, where he had been directed to 
secure material for a group of Oil Birds (Steatornis caripensis). The 
birds, eggs, nests, and accessory material were obtained, also photo- 
graphs of the caves in which the birds live, and the group is now in 
process of construction. 

installation, rearrangement, and permanent Improvement. — A most en- 
couraging feature of the work performed in the Department of 
Anthropology during the current year is that, despite the reduction of 
the force rendered necessary in January, the progress of installation 
has been fully maintained to a remarkable degree, and, in fact, the work 
in every line of activity has been pursued with energy and devotion. 
A total of 70 new cases has been placed on permanent exhibition, all 
fully and completely labeled. The material installed in these cases is 
distributed as follows: Southwest Ethnology, 5 cases; New Hebrides, 12 



Jan., 1915. Annual Report of the Director. 385 

cases ; Admiralty Islands, 1 2 cases ; Fiji, 8 cases ; Chinese, 1 9 cases ; Tibetan, 
14 cases. As regards American ethnology, one case of Apache medicine 
shirts, one case of painted buffalo hides, two cases bearing on Paiute 
ethnology from California and Nevada, and one case of Pima storage 
baskets have been added to the Southwest Section, under the personal 
supervision of Assistant Curator Owen. Hall 8 has been cleared of 
nine cases of Borneo, three of Andaman and Nicobar, and one of Malay 
Peninsula material, these thirteen cases being stored indefinitely with 
the great number of installed cases already on the floor of the East 
Court. As Halls 2 and 3 have recently been devoted to the exhibition 
of New Hebrides, Admiralty and Fiji ethnology of the Joseph N. Field 
Collections, this arrangement resulted in the necessity of removing the 
following cases for storing in the East Court: three Sauk and Fox, one 
Iroquois, one painted buffalo hides, two Apache, two Warm Springs, 
three Shoshoni, one Klikitat, one Yakima, two Ute, two Wasco, one 
Comanche, one Bannock, one Kutenai, one Umatilla, and two Nez 
Perce. More than ninety boxes containing the Stanley McCormick 
Hopi material have been unpacked in Hall 16. The material has been 
classified and placed temporarily in new cases and storage bases, await- 
ing permanent installation with the exhibits of Hopi ethnology which, 
for the past fifteen years, have been displayed in Halls 15, 16, and 17. 
In Hall 17 the Hopi Home Case has been completely overhauled, the 
clothing renovated, and the five life-size figures repainted. Nine altar 
cases in the same Hall have also been subjected to a most careful and 
thorough examination and readjustment. 

Peruvian pottery, particularly from Chancay, and Egyptian tomb 
tablets have been properly treated and cared for to insure their preser- 
vation. About 400 photographs which had been stored in Hall 
48 for many years have been identified as belonging to about thirty 
tribes, and each lot has been placed in the cases where the respective 
tribal group is represented. Many of these prints, varying in character 
and quality, show scenes no longer obtainable, and before being perma- 
nently installed in the various cases, should be copied on permanent 
paper for exhibition purposes, while the old solio prints may be pre- 
served for the Department albums. 

During the year Assistant Curator Lewis has installed thirty-two 
cases of Melanesian material. These, with cases installed towards 
the end of the previous year, include the collections from Fiji, the 
New Hebrides Islands, and the Admiralty Islands. Assistant Curator 
Cole cooperated with Dr. Lewis and superintended the installation 
of the material from the Fiji Islands, which fills seven cases, illustrating 
the clothing and ornaments, household utensils, weapons, and various 



386 Field Museum oe Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

industries of the natives. The manufacture of tapa, an industry 
common throughout the whole of the South Seas, is well illustrated 
by numerous specimens of the implements used in the process, as 
well as by a great variety of finished product. Fourteen cases of 
New Hebrides material make an exhibit fairly representative of the 
culture of these islands, many of which have now almost completely 
lost their original features. The collections are most complete from 
Malekula, the largest and least known of the whole New Hebrides group. 
In this island alone over twenty languages are spoken, and the culture 
is by no means uniform. The collection illustrating the ceremonial and 
religious life of this people, — consisting of carved images, masks, pre- 
pared skulls, and figures of the dead, — is unusually complete. The 
various types of weapons employed by the tribe are also well illustrated, 
though many forms still remain to be represented. The Admiralty 
Island collection now occupies fourteen cases, while a considerable 
portion of it is not yet placed on exhibition. This collection is notable 
for the wealth in objects characteristic of the high degree of skill reached 
by these people in wood carving and decorative art. Particularly 
striking are the huge drums, finely carved food-bowls, some of them 
four feet in diameter, decorated wooden beds, and numerous carved 
images of various sizes, — all manifesting a well-developed artistic sense. 
There are several series showing the variations of design from realistic 
to conventional and geometrical stages, such as displayed by the forms 
of decorations on spears, daggers, and combs. Interesting groups of 
decorative elements are also seen in their personal ornaments, among 
which are included over 300 breast ornaments of shell and tortoise-shell, 
all different in decorative design despite the uniformity of type, and 
presenting excellent source-material for the study of variability of 
ornamental forms. There is also shown an extensive series of shell- 
bead dancing-aprons, which are rare. The process in the making of 
these shell beads is illustrated by numerous specimens in the consecutive 
stages of the work. Methods of fishing, including that of fishing by 
means of flying kites from canoes, which is restricted to a few localities, 
and the manner of preparing articles of food, are likewise shown, to- 
gether with models of various types of canoes. Worthy of particular 
mention are the four remarkable feather masks from Hansa Bay, New 
Guinea, presented by the late Mr. Joseph N. Field, and now placed on 
exhibition in the East Court. The Melanesian collections, thus briefly 
outlined in their main contents, have been assembled in Halls 2 and 3, 
which were thrown open to the public in the beginning of November. 
In addition to the installation and labeling of cases, much work has 
been accomplished by Assistant Curator Lewis in overhauling and sorting 



an., 191 5. Annual Report of the Director. 387 

out the different collections from other parts of Melanesia already in 
the Museum, many of which had not been catalogued. This cataloguing 
is now being pushed on with energy, and approximately 900 specimens 
of the Parkinson collection, as well as a few other small collections, have 
been entered and numbered. 

In the Asiatic Section installation has progressed steadily. Two 
large special cases designed for the Chinese stage-scenes were delivered 
in January, and all material and labels relating to these exhibits 
having been fully prepared in advance, their installation was achieved 
without delay. This completed the exhibits of Hall 53, which is now 
entirely devoted to a display of Chinese theatricals. Moreover, two 
new Halls have been added this year to the existing six, referred to and 
described in preceding Reports, and made accessible to the public. 
The Tibetan collection secured under the auspices of the Mrs. Black- 
stone Fund has received a further extension in Hall 50, which consists 
of 12 cases illustrating the domestic, social, and religious life of the 
Tibetan people in the following phases: objects used in the household; 
consumption of food, including articles of food, as well as the utensils 
serving for their preparation; consumption of tea; consumption of 
spirits and tobacco; basketry; ceremonial silk scarves exchanged by 
people in social intercourse; writing and printing; charms and domestic 
art; musical instruments, censers and other objects, and paraphernalia 
employed in the temples for religious worship. The case illustrating 
the process in the production of paper and books is of great culture- 
historical interest ; it forms a counterpart of the case arranged two years 
ago and displaying the arts of printing and engraving in China and 
Japan. It contains exquisite specimens of Tibetan manuscript work 
written in gold and silver on black-lacquered paper, manuscripts illu- 
minated by colored miniatures, in which the Lama scholars excelled as 
successfully as the mediaeval monks, and fine samples of Tibetan and 
Mongol prints; especially notable are some books printed in vermilion 
in the Imperial Palace of Peking (so-called palace editions), and one of 
the largest and heaviest books ever turned out (93^ pounds in weight; 
pages measuring 2 feet 10^2 inches in length and 14^ inches in width). 
The case, further, contains an interesting autograph written in vermilion 
ink by the Dalai Lama with his own hand and transmitted by him to 
Mr. Laufer for presentation to the Field Museum when he had an 
interview with him at Peking in 1908; there is also on view an attractive 
series of seals with wax reproductions of their inscriptions, writing- 
utensils, and appliances of the printer. Hall 49, which had served 
during the last years as a storage-house for the East-Asiatic material 
and as the basis of operation to prepare and catalogue it, has been 



388 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

entirely cleared, as it is planned to utilize this room for the continuation 
of the Tibetan exhibits, which will comprise means of transportation, 
saddlery, industries, costumes, jewelry, painting, and the culture of the 
Tibetan nomad tribes. Owing to this arrangement it was made possible 
to relieve the congestion prevailing in the East Court by transferring 
24 new cases to Hall 49. A Tibetan coracle and the trappings of a 
horse, shown on a papier-mache" model, are already installed in this Hall. 
Much time was consumed on the final installation of the large 
collection of Chinese stone sculpture. The pieces are of great dimen- 
sions and heavy in weight, and required drilling of their bases to secure 
solid and permanent intrenchment on the shelves. The material is 
installed in 1 2 two-foot cases, eight of which have been placed in the 
Rotunda of the East Annex, Hall 58, which seemed to offer the most 
suitable location. In order to make the best use of the available space, 
the principle of concentric arrangement has been adopted, the centre 
being occupied by a small special case sheltering an octagonal pillar 
inscription of the T'ang dynasty, — an important historical document 
which records the capture of the city of Taochow in Kansu Province 
through the Tibetans in the eighth century. From this centre radiates 
the collection of sculpture with an inner ring of four cases arranged 
in a square, and fortified by an outer ring of four others, flanking the 
niches. The distribution, balancing, and classification of the material 
in the cases proved a task beset with no small difficulties, partially due 
to the difference in bulk and weight of the single sculptures, partially 
owing to the repetition of the same types through the various periods of 
Chinese history. A chronological principle and simultaneously one 
according to religious types and subjects has been brought into effect. 
The collection well demonstrates the development of Chinese sculp- 
ture in its total range from the fourth to the eighteenth century, em- 
bracing the two religions of Buddhism and Taoism. Three main 
chronological divisions have been established: the early or pre-T'ang 
period, fourth to sixth century, mediaeval or T'ang period (618-906), 
and the retrospective modern or after-T'ang epoch. The assemblage 
of ancient Taoist sculpture is probably unique and exceptionally rich 
in beautiful statues of the Supreme Deity of the Taoist pantheon; it 
fills two cases which have been added to the Taoist section in Halls 46 
and 47, — one of these harboring in addition tombstones and inscription 
tablets of the T'ang period. A goodly number of Taoist sculptures 
has been incorporated in the Buddhistic department, in order to bring 
out the idea of the dependence of Taoist on Indian-Buddhist art and the 
interrelations of the two religions. As regards the exhibits of Buddhist 
statuary, the general scheme of division followed is: the Buddhas, the 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE LXI. 




I 



■• \* 



-*!■ 









bk 










Italian bronze Cista, Third Century, B. C. 



OF THE 
'ERSITY Of mjfy 



Jan., 191 5. Annual Report of the Director. 389 

Bodhisatvas, and the clergy, under each of the three chronological 
epochs. One case is entirely devoted to the portrait-statues of Bud- 
dhist monks from the T'ang period to the present, as in this manner a 
most striking phase in the religious and mental development of China 
is very forcibly impressed upon us. Nothing could better illustrate the 
ennobling influence of Buddhism on Oriental society and its lofty intel- 
lectual aspirations than these portraits of religious leaders with their 
refined and spiritualized features, and their sermon of salvation. It 
should be said that the present condition of the Halls does not permit 
of adherence to a rigidly scientific system of classification of these 
exhibits. 

In the Department of Botany cases representing the following 
economic exhibitions have been installed and fully labeled during the 
year: four case units of Varnish Gums; one case unit illustrating the 
Cycad family and its products, especially its starch roots and starches; 
one case unit containing the Gingko and the Yew families and their 
characteristic fruits and utilizations; a case illustrating in complete 
groups the Bacteria and their life history, the Diatoms and their methods 
of reproduction and growth, the Desmids and their life characteristics, 
and the unicellular Algae; a case illustrating all the phases in the life 
history of the Marchantiaceae ; one unit case containing the Morning- 
glory family and characteristic products ; three case units of the Rubiads 
and their products, including an interesting reproduction of the plant 
known as the "living ant's nest"; one unit case illustrating the products 
of the Maple family; a unit devoted to the fruit of the Coco-de-mer palm 
and the uses to which it is put; one unit case each comprising the 
products of the Milk- weed and the Horsechestnut families; a case 
containing both the Passionflower and the Benzoin families and their 
utilized products; two units exemplifying the various uses supplied by 
the Ferns ; three units devoted to the Grass family, especially the fibers 
yielded by various species; one case each exemplifying the characters 
and uses of fibers yielded by the Screw-pine, the Sedge, the Palm, the 
Eel-grass and Banana families; one case exemplifying the botany and 
products of the Snakeroot family; one case containing both the Elm and 
the Protead families; one case containing new products of the Fig 
family; two unit cases devoted to the fruit characters, and various useful 
products of the Sumach family; one case devoted to the products of 
Yam and the Iris families; a case containing various characters and use- 
ful products of the Coca family; one case illustrating the Lignum- vitae 
and the Quassia families; one unit case showing the products of the 
Mahogany family; two units devoted to the Connarus and the Bean 
families; one case comprising the characters and useful materials yielded 



390 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

by the Buttercup and the Akebia families and another the Barberry and 
the Moonseed families; and three cases representing the botany and 
products of the Monkey-pot and the Pomegranate families. 

In the Department of Geology two large mounts have been installed 
in Hall 36. One of these is the large Leptomeryx slab described in last 
year's report. This has been installed in a floor case of standard type, 
7>2 x 4>2 feet in size, in which it makes an effective and attractive 
exhibit. The other large mount installed is a skeleton of a Cave Bear 
from Triest, Austria, which has been placed in a temporary case. The 
skeleton is remarkable for its large size and completeness. In connec- 
tion with the installation of these mounts some rearrangement of the 
other cases was made. There were also added to the exhibition series 
of fossil vertebrates a skull of Aceratherium and one of Ancodon, 
complete skeletal fore and hind legs of the fossil camel Oxydactylus 
and a skeletal hind leg of Alticamelus. The two large fossil logs from 
Patagonia, collected by Professor Salisbury, have been installed in 
this Hall. One of these logs is eight feet in height and two feet in 
diameter and the other is nearly as large. The structure of the wood 
is beautifully preserved and the evidences of former tree growth are 
so unmistakable as to make them impressive specimens. The large 
slab of Uintacrinus, which has for some time been exhibited in this Hall, 
was found to be undergoing considerable disintegration owing to im- 
perfect adherence of the slab to the plaster backing. It was therefore 
taken down, the thin exhibition surface removed and carefully scraped 
and readjusted. This was then remounted on a firm plaster bed. By 
this means a permanent adherence of the slab to the plaster has been 
obtained and a durable and attractive mounting achieved. In Hall 32 
the large specimen of Orthoceras from Troygrove, Illinois, and a number 
of smaller specimens were installed and some minor rearrangements 
made. In Hall 30 a series of models showing the diamonds cut from the 
Cullinan diamond has been placed in connection with the model of that 
diamond. In the same Hall a large number of mineral specimens have 
been added to the series on exhibition, less important specimens having 
been removed wherever necessary to provide room. The series added 
includes a number of new species or occurrences that have been acquired 
in recent years, so that all important mineral specimens may now be 
considered to be on exhibition. In Hall 31 the series of lavas and vol- 
canic products has been thoroughly rearranged in geographical groups 
and a number of specimens added. The additions include the series of 
specimens from the Japanese volcano of Sakurajima. The series of 
concretions, faults, and veins in this collection was also rearranged and 
some additions made. Some marcasite stalactites which had begun to 



Jan., 1915. Annual Report of the Director. 391 

show signs of disintegration, were thoroughly treated with shellac and 
further decay checked. In connection with the rearrangement of the 
structural collections in this Hall, that of the study collection was car- 
ried on and considerable interchange of specimens made. About one- 
quarter of the entire exhibit, which occupies fifteen cases, was com- 
pletely reinstalled in order to bring the series to a satisfactory condition. 
To the economic collections in Hall 34 a large number of specimens has 
been added and a considerable amount of reinstallation performed. In 
several of the cases the exhibits were entirely removed in order to allow 
painting of the interiors. These interiors are now all a uniform black. 
New series installed in this Hall include a number of rare earths; a series 
illustrating the manufacture of tungsten wire; a series of minerals 
resembling gold; several series illustrating the uses of cobalt, nickel, 
zinc, and tin; a number of additions to the building stone collection, 
including several marble slabs; and a model of a log washer for iron ores. 
The large specimens of ores in this Hall, which had hitherto rested 
directly on the floors of the cases and the finish of which they injured 
on account of their weight and jagged surfaces, have been provided with 
individual wooden supports placed so as not to be visible. Further 
injury to the cases has thus been averted. Additions to the collections 
illustrating the uses of cobalt, zinc, and nickel compounds have been 
prepared in the Museum work-rooms and placed on exhibition. These 
include the pigments which have these metals for base. They are 
shown as varnished coatings on blocks of wood four inches square. 
Beside each block is placed a tube of the pigment in oil partly emptied 
into a small watch glass, in order to show its color in quantity. Besides 
the zinc pigments there have been added to the collection illustrating 
uses of zinc, a dry cell with the zinc exposed to illustrate electrical uses 
of zinc; a zinc etching block and a print from it; a jar of zinc ointment, 
and powdered willemite used as a fluorescent screen in X-ray and 
radioactive work. A beginning has been made of a collection to illus- 
trate uses of the rare earths and others of the less familiar elements. A 
Nernst lamp illustrates uses of zirconia, and a Welsbach mantle shows 
an important application of thoria and ceria that has made monazite 
valuable. A series of specimens shows all stages of the evolution of the 
filament of the tungsten electric light from the mineral scheelite to the 
wire ready to place in the lamp. One of the most interesting uses of 
titanium is shown in an example of the yellow enamel used by dentists. 
In order to obtain space for these additions, a collection of exhibited 
antimony ores was reduced. There has been added to the gold series a 
group of specimens illustrating the appearance of those minerals which 
are most frequently mistaken for gold. The series consists of two 



392 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

specimens of gold in quartz and flake gold for comparative purposes and 
selected specimens of fool's gold or pyrite, copper pyrite, native copper 
in slate, and two specimens of mica, one of which is mixed with sand 
and one is pure. To the collection of building stones exhibited, 27 cubes 
and slabs have been added. A large specimen of fire clay from Missouri, 
received in 191 2, has been installed in a case in this Hall, space being 
obtained by moving some less important specimens. Some of the less 
important pigments have been removed from their place of exhibit in 
Hall 33 and in their place has been installed the collection of coal tar 
products presented by the Barrett Manufacturing Company. The 
production of dyes, etc., from these substances make them of especial 
interest at the present time. Some additions have been made to the 
coal mine model in order to make some of its features more readily 
appreciable. Some of the underground portion has been cut away in 
order to show the position of the ventilating shaft and its connection 
with the hoisting shaft. This makes more evident the course of the 
ventilating system. In order to make the exhibit of washed iron ores, 
more instructive a small model of a log washer was constructed by the 
Assistant Curator and installed in connection with that exhibit. The 
model shows a trough containing a log bearing a series of fins arranged 
in a screw-like manner; a hopper and track on which the unwashed 
ores are brought to the washer; an engine house containing the en- 
gine for providing power for operating the washer; and a car for remov- 
ing the washed ore. A scale of one-third of an inch to the foot was 
carefully adhered to in constructing the model, such a size having been 
adopted in order that the model might not overbalance the collection. 
The model is chiefly intended to assist the label in making the collection 
more instructive. The usefulness of such models has been very favor- 
ably commented on by visitors, on account of the ease with which the 
details of the models can be studied as compared with the noise, confu- 
sion, and complexity encountered in visits to large working plants. 
Some improvements have been made in the installation of the collection 
of petroleums shown in Alcove 107, chief among them being replacement 
of the large two-gallon bottles of petroleum products by smaller bottles, 
which are uniform in pattern with those in which the crude petroleums 
are installed. The appearance of the collection has thus been much 
improved. The installation of the other petroleum products has like- 
wise been somewhat revised and improved. The series showing asphalts 
and their uses received from the Barber Asphalt Company, with two 
large photographs of Trinidad Lake, has been installed in Hall 35. 
Several new specimens of graphite have also been added to the graphite 
collection in this Hall. The specimens illustrating lithology and 



) MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE LXII. 




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EMBROIDERED SATIN PANELS, CHINA, EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. 

Gift of Dr. Gunsaulus. 



OF THE 
iTYOFILUNOJS 



Jan., 191 5. Annual Report of the Director. 393 

structural and dynamical geology, which occupy the drawers under the 
lithological exhibits, have been completely reinstalled; all specimens 
have been placed in trays in a logical order and labeled, the drawers 
have been numbered, and indexes have been prepared so that any 
specimen wanted can be found at once and can be shown to anyone 
desiring to study it. Material was prepared for several new cases for 
the work of the Harris Fund, in addition to a number of duplicates of 
those previously prepared. The new subjects illustrated include semi- 
precious stones, varieties of common rock, volcanic products, and coal- 
tar products. In the laboratory of vertebrate paleontology the prepara- 
tion of vertebrate fossils has been actively continued and a considerable 
amount of material has been prepared. A skeleton of the sabre-tooth 
tiger was prepared for mounting; completion of the preparation and 
mounting of the slab containing 25 skeletons of the Water Deer, Lepto- 
meryx, described in last year's report, was accomplished; the large 
slab of Uintacrinus was taken apart and entirely remounted; a skeleton 
of the Cave Bear was repaired and remounted; a nearly complete 
skeleton of the fossil camel Oxydactylus and a skull of Elotherium were 
prepared for exchange; a partial skeleton of Oxydactylus and skulls 
of Aceratherium and Ancodon were prepared for exhibition; a large 
specimen of Orthoceras was cleaned of plaster and a durable mount 
provided; the skeleton of the Washington mammoth presented by Mr. 
George Manierre was disarticulated and carefully packed in boxes so 
as to provide safety in storage; a set of jaws of the large shark Char- 
charodon was cast in plaster and mounted for the purpose of replacing 
the former exhibit of this kind which was somewhat defective as to de- 
tail; some progress was made in mounting a skeleton of Canis diurus, 
and the entire collection of teeth of mammoths and mastodons, some 
of which were undergoing disintegration, was carefully treated in such a 
manner as to insure its preservation. 

In the Department of Zoology a large habitat group of American 
Bison or Buffalo, consisting of five animals, a large old bull, a young 
bull, two females, and a calf, has been added to the exhibition collection. 
The scene is laid in Nebraska. Burrowing Owls, Prairie Dogs, and 
Rattlesnakes, which are common in that prairie country, are included in 
the group. The following single mammals have been installed and 
placed on exhibition in the serial collection: Chinese Takin (Budorcas 
bedfordi), a rare large mammal; Kansu Deer (Cervus kansuensis) ; 
Spectacled Bear (Tremarctos ornatus), a rare species from the Andes of 
Peru secured by Museum expedition, as was also the White-lipped 
Peccary (Tayassu pecari); Drill (Papio leucocephalus); White-tailed 
Mongoose {Ichneumia albicauda), and Porcupine (Erethizon dorsatum). 



394 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Painted backgrounds for a large group of Moose and a group of South 
American Capybara, including a Jaguar, have been prepared, and con- 
siderable work on the accessories for both these groups has already been 
done. The mounting of the specimens for the Moose group, very fine 
specimens secured by a Museum expedition last fall, is progressing in a 
satisfactory manner. A new method for making artificial bodies 
(manikins) for small mammals was introduced by Taxidermist Pray, 
which seems a decided improvement over the old way. A striking 
group of East African Buffalo, created by Carl E. Akeley, was 
installed in the South Court late in the year. This group, which 
includes two old bulls, one young bull, a cow, and a calf, is an impres- 
sive example of the possibilities of modern taxidermy. The five bulky 
animals are so skilfully and naturally grouped that the effect of space 
and power is not lost even in the confinement of a case of moderate size. 
In addition to simplicity and fidelity to nature both in grouping and in 
modeling, the individual animals of this group have an unusual quality 
produced by a new and superior technique in the treatment of the skin. 
The principal feature of this method consists in applying the tanned 
skin to the model in a dry instead of moistened condition. The result 
in the finished specimen, especially in the case of thinly haired animals, 
is much more likelife than that of other methods, the skin appearing 
soft and natural instead of hard and unyielding. In the exhibition 
of comparative osteology 445 skulls were cleaned, and the follow- 
ing skeletons mounted and installed: Gila Monster (Heloderma 
horridum); Box Turtle (Cistudo Carolina); Jacana (Jacana spinosa); 
Pigeon (Columba livid), and Cave Bat (Eonycteris spelaa). A large 
habitat group of birds representing bird life in the far north on Walrus 
Island, Alaska, has been completed and placed on exhibition. This 
group includes 51 birds with nests, eggs, and several nestlings; some of 
them, notably the Red-faced Cormorant, are rare and are becoming 
more so each year. Among the most interesting birds in this group may 
be mentioned, in addition to the Red-faced Cormorants, theTufted 
Puffins, Horned Puffins, Paroquet Auklets, and various species of 
Gulls (among them the Red-legged Kittiwake Gull), Murres, etc. 
An instructive feature of the group is in showing the Glaucous and 
Glaucous-winged Gulls stealing and eating the eggs of the Pallas Murres, 
which breed in great numbers on this barren, isolated island. For the 
serial collection there were mounted : 1 Coot (Fulica americana) ; 1 Red- 
shouldered Hawk (Buteo lineatus) ; 2 Kittlitz Murrelets (Brack yr am phus 
brevirostris) , and 1 Harlequin Duck (Histrionicus histrionicus) . A 
number of bird skins from fresh specimens sent in for the study collec- 
tion, including the Snowy Owl, were prepared. A number of fishes and 



Jan., 1915. Annual Report of the Director. 395 

crustaceans have been painted for the exhibition collection. One 
exhibition case of mounted fishes from California was installed, and 88 
fishes, 79 from Florida and California and 9 from Alaska, have been 
mounted and painted. Included are many handsome species, among 
them being a number of Salmon and Trout from California. A con- 
siderable number of specimens of various insects, moths, butterflies, 
beetles, etc., have been pinned and prepared. Early in the year 16 A- 
shaped cases were delivered for installing the exhibition collection of 
shells and insects to replace the flat cases at present in use. The Assist- 
ant Curator of Entomology devoted considerable time to rearranging 
shells for the new method of installation. Upon the return of Collector 
Becker from South America he was added to the staff of assistants in 
this Department and devoted his time to this work. 

The N. W. Harris Public School Extension of Field Museum of Natural History. 
— The Curator reports that the practical inauguration of Mr. Harris' 
benefaction has been attended with success. The cases prepared dur- 
ing the year number 207, making, with the cases previously installed, 
a grand total of 286. The pupils in the public schools examining 
these collections during the year numbered 368,044. The schools pro- 
vided with cases were 326, divided as follows: Main Schools 266, 
Branch Schools 39 and Vacation Schools 21. Each Main School was 
provided with not less than 6, each Branch School with not less than 
3, and each Vacation School with not less than 12 cases at a time. 
The automobile delivery car designed for the distribution of the 
circulating collections was delivered during the year and has proved 
satisfactory. It has a capacity of 45 cases and travels each day of the 
school week approximately 80 to 100 miles. Thirty-four of the cases 
will be exhibited at the Panama Pacific International Exposition, San 
Francisco, during the coming year. 



396 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Photography and illustration. — The reduction in the force of this 
section naturally affected the output for the year. Still the showing 
made is satisfactory. The following is a statement of the work performed : 



11 


Number of 

Lantern 
Slides made 


Number of 

Enlargement 

made 


Number of 

Negatives 

developed foi 

Expeditions 


131 


. . 


. . 


. . 


1,049 


28 


. . 


. . 


160 


35 


20 


. . 


30 








297 








213 




. . 


33 


86 




. . 


. . 


190 




. . 


. . 


884 









4> 



M 



a.tj§ fee fesa sjs-s sill s<£s B ^ 

Director's Office ... 89 
Anthropology .... 204 
Botany .../.. 35 160 35 20 .. 20 

Geology 27 

Zoology 23 

Harris Extension ... 45 

Distribution 

Gift 

Sale 

Totals 423 3,040 63 20 33 20 

Total number of Catalogue entries during year 19 14 3.599 

Total number of Catalogue entries to December 31, 1914 110,827 

Total number of Record Books 15 

printing. — The force in this Section was also reduced, but the 
printers were able to keep pace with the copy submitted for labels. 
The work performed is tabulated below: 



Jxhibition 
Labels 

2,660 


Other 
Impressions 

550 


2,417 

1,588 

88 


25,200 
1,000 




5,000 


7,803 


30,831 
2,120 



Anthropology 

Botany 

Geology 

Zoology 

Library 

General 

N. W. Harris Public School Extension .... 

attendance. — The total attendance record for the year is 208,769. 
Appended is a list of the classes, thirty or more, that visited the Museum 
during the term under review. 

LIST OF CLASSES 

Schools and Locations Teachers Pupils 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 23 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 2 28 

Northwestern Military Academy — Evanston, Illinois .... 4 92 

University Elementary — Fifty-ninth and Kenwood Avenue . . 22 
John Marshall High — Adams Street between Spaulding and 

Kedzie Avenue I 34 

Lake Forest — Lake Forest, Illinois 4 79 

St. Ignatius — 1076 West Twelfth Street 1 50 

University High — Fifty-ninth and Kenwood Avenue .... 1 34 



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Jan., 1915. Annual Report of the Director. 397 

Schools and Locations Teachers Pupils 

Francis W. Parker — 330 Webster Avenue 4 24 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 1 20 

Evanston — Evanston, Illinois 2 22 

John Marshall High — Adams Street between Spaulding and 

Kedzie Avenue 1 28 

Hyde Park High — Sixty-second and Stony Island Avenue ... 1 25 

Broad View Seminary — La Grange, Illinois 2 35 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 1 25 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 1 21 

Winnetka — Winnetka, Illinois 3 30 

Francis W. Parker — 330 Webster Avenue 1 20 

John Marshall High — Adams Street between Spaulding and 

Kedzie Avenue 1 41 

Froebel — West Twenty-first and Robey Street 2 28 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 21 

Willard — Forty-ninth and St. Lawrence Avenue 1 46 

Chicago Academy of Fine Arts — 6 East Madison Street ... 1 45 

Hyde Park High — Sixty-second and Stony Island Avenue ... 1 160 

Washington — Morgan and Grand Avenue 2 40 

Madison — Seventy-fifth and Dorchester Avenue 2 84 

Willard — Forty-ninth and St. Lawrence Avenue 1 27 

St. Patricks — 2303 Park Avenue 2 44 

St. Elizabeths High — 13 East Forty-first Street 2 50 

Hyde Park High — Sixty-second and Stony Island Avenue ... 1 54 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 25 

Englewood High — Sixty-second and Stewart Avenue .... I 90 

Hyde Park High — Sixty-second and Stony Island Avenue ... 2 50 

Concordia Teachers College — River Forest, Illinois 1 45 

East Chicago High — East Chicago, Illinois 3 34 

Gallistel — One-hundred and Fourth and Ewing Avenue ... 1 50 

Hyde Park High — Sixty-second and Stony Island Avenue ... 1 23 

Englewood High — Sixty-second and Stewart Avenue .... 1 20 

St. Benedicts Rectory — 294 York Street, Blue Island, Illinois . . 5 60 

MacGregor — Whiting, Indiana 3 73 

Hyde Park High — Sixty-second and Stony Island Avenue ... 1 32 

Sherlock — Cicero, Illinois 1 52 

Greek American — Sixty-first and Michigan Avenue 4 40 

Blue Island — Blue Island, Illinois 7 33 

River Forest — River Forest, Illinois 1 21 

Beale — Sixty-first and Sangamon Street I 23 

Bethany Bible Institute — 3435 West Van Buren Street ... 24 

Warren — Ninety-second and Chappel Avenue 1 38 

Notre Dame University — South Bend, Indiana 1 25 

Walsh — Twentieth and South Peoria Street 4 40 

Wells — North Ashland near Augusta Street 2 38 

Pullman — One hundred and Thirteenth and Forestville Avenue . 1 38 

Willard — Forty-ninth and St. Lawrence Avenue 2 34 

Thorp — Eighty-ninth and Superior Avenue 1 35 

Raymond — Thirty-sixth Place and Wabash Avenue .... 1 30 

Darwin — Edgewood Avenue and Catalpa Court 1 25 



398 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



Schools and Locations 
Willard — Forty-ninth and St. Lawrence Avenue .... 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

Parkside — Seventieth and East End Avenue 

Thorp — Eighty-ninth and Superior Avenue 

Komensky — Twentieth and Throop Street 

Harper — Sixty-fifth and South Wood Street 

Blaine — Janssen Avenue and Grace Street 

Grant — Wilcox Street and Western Avenue 

Blaine — Janssen Avenue and Grace Street 

Normal — Sixty-eighth and Stewart Avenue 

Chicago Hebrew Institute — West Taylor, corner of Lytle . 
Longfellow Vacation — Thirty-fifth and South Pulaski Avenue 
Gladstone Vacation — Robey Street and Washburne Avenue . 

Olivet Institute — 709 Vedder Street 

Jewish Training — 199 West Twelfth Street 

Agassiz — Diversey Boulevard and Seminary Avenue 

De Paul University — 1010 Webster Avenue 

Summit — Summit, Illinois 

Evangelic Lutheran Concordia — Sheffield, corner of Waveland 

Avenue 

Wendell Phillips High — Thirty-ninth and Prairie Avenue . 
Convent of the Holy Child — 6585 Sheridan Road . 

Washington — Morgan and Grand Avenue 

Carter Practice — Sixty-first and Wabash Avenue . 

Francis W. Parker — 330 Webster Avenue 

Goodrich — Sangamon and Taylor Street 

Chicago Latin — 20 East Division Street 

University High — Fifty-ninth and Kenwood Avenue . 

McCosh — Sixty-fifth and Champlain Avenue 

J. Sterling Morton High — Sterling, Illinois 

Ray — Fifty-seventh and Kenwood Avenue 



Teachers 



50 
2 

13 
24 
10 

9 
17 



1 
2 



Pupils 

35 
60 

32 
40 
29 

34 
22 

32 
20 

32 
241 
603 
224 

90 
280 

30 

30 

44 
33 
28 
58 
51 
32 
21 
21 
21 

43 
30 
48 



Herewith are also submitted financial statements, list of accessions, 
names of members, etc., etc. 

Frederick J. V. Skiff, Director. 



OF THt 

university nf u i mats 



FIELD MUSEUM CF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE LXIV. 



\WV\1 



1/ 




Built-in Hollow Manikin Method for Mounting Small Mammals. 

The initial step is to wire the specimen as though the ordinary method of mount- 
ing were to be followed. The inside of the skin is then given a coating of poison 
paste and immediately afterwards the composition is put in and modelled. The 
most satisfactory composition used so far is one made of library paste, water, and a 
pinch of arsenic, to which is added whiting and sufficient chopped tow to make the 
mixture of the proper consistency for modelling but nevertheless sticky. The cavity 
in the manikin is then lined with cloth and filled with sawdust, which, when the 
specimen is dry, is removed by means of the plug (p) inserted in the end of the body, 
or in the side, if the animal is to be in a recumbent position. Depressions in the 
anatomy are maintained by the use of insect pins, which are cut off flush when the 
skin has adhered properly to the manikin. The legs of very small mammals may 
be filled wholly with composition, as is shown in the figure (c), but the legs of larger 
mammals should have a wrapped core. The tail wire (t) is merely wrapped with 
cotton to secure the required thickness. The advantage of this hollow manikin 
method is that the mounted specimen is light, very durable and almost indestructible. 
(Originated and used by Leon L. Pray.) 



Jan., 1915. Annual Report of the Director. 399 



Financial Statement 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
January 1, 1914, to December 31, 1914 



Receipts 

Cash in Treasurer's hands, General Fund, December 31, 191 3 . . $11,690.37 
Cash in Treasurer's hands, Endowment Sinking Fund, December 31, 

1913 180.00 

Cash in Treasurer's hands, New Exhibition Cases Fund, December 31, 

1913 930.75 

Petty Cash on hand, December 31, 19 1 3 739-95 

Dues of Life Members 500.00 

Dues of Annual Members 1,090.00 

Admissions and Check Rooms 5,526.50 

Sales of Guides 158.75 

South Park Commissioners 15,000.00 

Interest on Investments and Bank Balances 9,609.62 

Field Endowment Income 136,500.00 

Field Endowment Sinking Fund 500 . 00 

Field Endowment Sinking Fund Income 160.00 

New Exhibition Cases Fund 3,500.00 

New Exhibition Cases Fund Investments retired 53>7 r 3-67 

New Exhibition Cases Fund Income 1,913.09 

Stanley Field Ornithology Fund 1,200.00 

Mrs. T. B. Blackstone Fund 900.00 

Huntington W. Jackson Library Fund 40 . 00 

Donations — George Manierre 500 . 00 

Life Memberships Fund Income 292.45 

Life Memberships Fund Investments retired 4,500.00 

Sales of Picture Postal Cards 433 . 34 

Sundry Receipts 72.02 

$249,650.51 
Disbursements 

Salaries $73-489-35 

Guard Service 12,208.03 

Janitor Service 7,121.35 

Fire Protection 6,124.50 

Heat and Light: 

Wages $4,102.00 

Fuel 6,967.78 

Gas 459 04 

Renewals, supplies, and sundries 906.71 12,435.53 



400 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Repairs and Alterations — 

Wages — Carpenters, Painters, Roofers, etc. . $8,717.49 

Materials used — lumber, paints, oils, glass, etc. 1 ,705 . 53 10,423 .02 



Furniture and Fixtures — Cases 29,067.24 

The Library — 

Books and Periodicals $1,472.73 

Binding 532-48 

Sundries 29.53 2,034.74 

Sections of Printing and Photography 4,283.15 

Collections, etc., purchased 27,287.44 

Departmental Expenses 2,940.91 

Expeditions 5 8 4- T 9 

Publications 2,815.99 

General Expense Account — 

Freight, Expressage, and Teaming $i>9 2 5-73 

Stationery, Postage, Telephone, etc 836.73 

Picture Postal Cards 518.00 

Liability Insurance Premium 697 . 56 

Sundries 1,408.81 5.386.83 

Stanley Field Ornithology Fund 1.457-25 

Mrs. T. B. Blackstone Fund 936.00 

In Treasurer's hands, December 31, 19 14 — 

General Fund $10,828.95 

New Exhibition Cases Fund 3,490.27 

Endowment Sinking Fund 5 2 5 00 

Picture Postal Card Account 433 • 34 

Petty Cash on hand, December 31, 1914 .... 



Life Memberships Fund Investments .... 
Huntington W. Jackson Library Fund Investments 
Endowment Sinking Fund Investments . 
New Exhibition Cases Fund Investments 



15.277 


56 


739 


95 


6,746.69 


475 


79 


315 


.00 


27.500 


.00 


$249,650 


•51 



Jan., 191 5. Annual Report of the Director. 401 



ATTENDANCE AND RECEIPTS FROM JANUARY 1 TO 

DECEMBER 31, 1914 



Attendance. 

Paid Attendance — 

Adults 19,101 

Children 2,098 21,199 

Free Admission on Pay Days — 

School Children 4,653 

Students 3,398 

Teachers 516 

Members: Corporate 43 

Annual 19 

Life 6 

Officers' Families 76 

Special 268 

Press 23 9,002 

Admissions on Free Days — 

Saturdays 50,816 

Sundays 127,752 178,568 



Total Attendance 208,769 

Highest Attendance on any one day (July 5, 1914) . . . 6,738 

Highest Paid Attendance on any one day (September 7, 1914) 569 

Average Daily Admissions (363 days) 575 

Average paid Attendance (261 days) 81 

Receipts. 

Guides Sold — 635 at 25 cents each $ i5 8 -75 

Articles Checked — 10,829 a * 5 cents each 541 .45 

Admissions 4,985.05 

$5,685.25 



4Q2 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



Accessions 



DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 
(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AYER, E. E., Chicago, Illinois. 

Large bronze Etruscan vessel. 

Small variegated glass bottle, neck and shoulders being restored in 
plaster — Egypt. 

Beautiful statuette, female, of diorite (exchange). 
BARKER, MRS. FRANK W., Chicago, Illinois. 

1 fragmentary Roman tile. 

7 Asiatic stone weights. 

2 Greek vases (an original and a copy). 
I Egyptian Ushabti figure. 

I Fan — India. 

I Fancy Fan. 

I N. W. Coast horn spoon. 

6 N. W. Coast gambling sticks. 

8 specimens Hawaiian ethnology. 
BLACKSTONE, MRS. T. B., Chicago, Illinois. 

I Japanese gold coin. 

1 Japanese silver coin. 

690 Chinese coins — Wei-hien, Shantung, China. 
DEVLIN, MRS. FRANK A., Chicago, Illinois. 

3 carved cups, made from a pod — Costa Rica. 

2 small clay vessels, prehistoric — Costa Rica. 
DORSE Y, GEO. A., Chicago, Illinois. 

3 Chinese printing-blocks from Examination Hall at Nanking, Nanking, 

China. 
ELLIS, RICHARD GORDON, Chicago, Illinois. 
Rawhide lariat. 
Wooden bow with skin case. 
Stone celt. 
Stone disc. 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL" HISTORY. 
Collected by Chas. L. Owen: 

3 two-faced Navajo blankets. 

1 two-faced Navajo blanket, in the weaving. 

1 ball coarse white yarn. 

1 ball coarse black yarn. 

1 plaited wool rope. 

1 batten. 

1 reed fork. 

1 shuttle — N. E. Arizona. 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE LXV. 






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Breast Ornaments of Shell and Tortoise Shell, admiralty Islands. 
The Joseph N. Field Expedition. 



Jan., 191 5. Annual Report of the Director. 403 

Purchases : 

2 nephrite tablets from imperial jade book inscribed in Manchu, China. 
1 wood-carved seal. 

1 grant written on yellow satin and bestowed by Emperor K'ang-hi on 

Lama Temple near Taochow, Taochow, Kansu Prov., China. 
20 tear bottles from Egypt. 

2 Italian bronze vessels of Greek style, Rome. 
FOWLER, E. H., Chicago, Illinois. 

Large flaked implement, shells, fragments of pottery, rejects from cave, 
and five stone objects — Pinal Co., Arizona. 
FRIESSER, J., Chicago, Illinois. 

1 Buffalo skull — Fort Pierre, South Dakota. 
GUNSAULUS, DR. F. W., Chicago, Illinois. 

2 silk embroidered hangings from Imperial Palace of Peking, Peking. 

2 Japanese water colors framed under glass — Japan. 
KALDENBERG, F. W., New York City. 

1 Rhinoceros horn. 
LOWE, DR. W. S., Phoenix, Arizona. 

6 sections of ceremonial cane stem. 

3 same as preceding, with the addition of a small rectangular cotton fabric 

tied around the joint — Camelback Mts., Arizona. 
MASON, THOMAS, Chicago, Illinois. 

1 Chinese mariner's compass, in case of polished copper — Hankow, China. 
MOORE, C. B., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Archeological specimens. 
ROBERTS, GEORGE C, Sharon Hill, Pennsylvania. 
50 arrow-heads. 

2 stone axes. 

SARGENT, HOMER E., Chicago, Illinois. 

Mexican gold ring — Mexico. 
SCHROTT, FRED, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Flaked knife blade of chert — Caliente, Nevada. 
TAYLOR, DR. JOHN R., Madison, Wisconsin. 

3 Chinese paintings representing a match of polo — China. 
2 painted albums — Peking, China. 

WARDEN, CLEAVER, Carlton, Oklahoma. 
Peyote Outfit — Oklahoma. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

ARTHUR, PROF. J. C, Lafayette, Indiana. 

Herbarium specimens. 
BAMBER, C. A., St. Cloud, Florida. 

1 bundle Palmetto sheaths — St. Cloud, Florida. 
BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY, Washington, D. C. 

Herbarium material, 200 Grasses (exchange). 

Specimens of Crude Drugs (exchange). 
CARSON, DR. H. R., Phoenix, Arizona. 

Herbarium specimen — Arizona. 



404 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

COKER, W. C, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. 

Herbarium specimen — South Carolina. 
COOS BAY PULP & PAPER COMPANY, Marshfield, Oregon. 

Compound Pulp for paper manufacture — Marshfield, Oregon. 
COVILLE, DR. FREDERICK V., Washington, D. C. 

Photograph of the original description of Euphorbia adenoptera. 
COWLES, PROF. H. C, Chicago, Illinois. 
1241 herbarium specimens. 

Herbarium specimens — Indiana and Greenhouse. 
CURTISS, MISS E., Chicago, Illinois. 

Private herbarium of George F. Curtiss. 
DAHLGREN, DR. B. E., Chicago, Illinois. 
Herbarium specimens — Colorado. 
DAY, MISS MARY F., Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Generic descriptions — Cambridge, Massachusetts. 
DEUSNER, C. W., Chicago, Illinois. 

His herbarium— Illinois and Indiana. 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Collated by O. E. Lansing, Jr. : 

I plant description. 
Collated by C. F. Millspaugh: 
337 herbarium specimens. 
31 illustrations of species. 
Wood of Oregon Maple. 
Wood plates Sugar Maple. 
1 specimen fruit. 

1 specimen wood. 

3 parts herbarium specimens — New Mexico. 
Collated by H. H. Smith: 

3 board specimens — Philippines. 
Collected by B. E. Dahlgren: 

Dry fruit Pandanus — Jamaica. 
Collected by O. E. Lansing, Jr. : 

229 herbarium specimens — Starved Rock State Park, Illinois and Indiana. 
Collected by H. H. Smith: 

14 herbarium specimens — Indiana. 
147 economic specimens — Indiana. 
Purchases : 

424 herbarium specimens — Nevada and California, Texas and New Mexico 

Various fibers and their utilizations — Philippine Islands. 
200 herbarium specimens. 
Herbarium specimens. 
863 herbarium specimens. 
1414 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 

2 herbarium specimens — Bolivia. 
56 herbarium specimens — Tobago. 

Cocaine. 

Rose petal rosary and components — California. 
Section of Modeling: 

7 glass reproductions of Desmidae. 



Jan., 191 5. Annual Report of the Director. 405 

Green Algae and Desmids. 

Branch of Horsechestnut. 

Flowers of Horsechestnut. 

Fruits of Horsechestnut. 

Chocolate pod. 

Chocolate cake. 

Reproduction of fruit of Pandanus utilissimus. 

Sectional fruits of Connarus — Java. 
FOREST ECONOMIST, Dahra Dun, India. 
9 economic forest products — India. 
19 vegetable products — India. 
FORBES, F. P., Brookline, Massachusetts. 

23 herbarium specimens. 
GARCIA, DR. CRESCENCIO, Tigulpan, Mexico. 

Coca leaves — Mexico. 
GAULT, BEN J. T., Glen Ellyn, Illinois. 

Trunk section. 

Board specimen. 

Photographic prints all of Crataegus Gaultii Sarg. — Illinois. 
GRAY HERBARIUM, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Description of Euphorbia adenoptera. 
GREENE, PROF. E. L., Washington, D. C. 

2 herbarium specimens. 

HAMILTON MANUFACTURING COMPANY, Two Rivers, Wisconsin. 

Maple wood type — Wisconsin. 
HELLER, A. A., Chicago, Illinois. 

5 herbarium specimens. 
HOLZINGER, JOHN M., Winona, Minnesota. 

1 herbarium specimen — Coronation Island, Alaska. 
KROUT, DR. A. F., Glenolden, Pennsylvania. 

4 herbarium specimens — Pennsylvania. 
LAUFER BERTHOLD, Chicago, Illinois. 

Derge paper-root and paper. Tibetan Tea. 
Tibetan medicines — Tibet. 
Tibetan Brick Tea — Tibet. 
MILLSPAUGH, MRS. CLARA MITCHELL, Chicago, Illinois. 

Cherry tree gum — Lake Side, Michigan. 
MILLSPAUGH, C. F., Chicago, Illinois. 
Fruits of Asclepias syriaca. 

Fruits of Calotropis gigantea — Jamaica and Illinois. 
192 colored illustrations of Mushrooms — Austria. 

Bundle Scouring rushes — Lake Side, Michigan. 
65 herbarium specimens — Michigan. 

3 herbarium specimens — District Columbia. 
MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN, St. Louis, Missouri. 

316 herbarium specimens — Austro-Hungary. 

2 photographs of a type (exchange). 

NATAL HERBARIUM, Berea, Durban, Union of South Africa. 
101 herbarium specimens — South Africa. 



406 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN, New York City. 
2 herbarium specimens — Jamaica (exchange). 
649 herbarium specimens (exchange). 

Specimen of Pedilanthus Smallii Millsp. (exchange). 
10 herbarium specimens (exchange). 
220 herbarium specimens — West Indies (exchange). 

2 herbarium specimens — Big Pine Key, Florida (exchange). 
1 herbarium specimen — Mexico (exchange). 

PADILLA, DR. SISTO ALBERTO, Salvador. 

1 herbarium specimen — Salvador. 
PARISH, S. B., San Bernardino, California. 
6 herbarium specimens — California. 
REECHER, S. E., Chester, Illinois. 

8 herbarium specimens — Illinois. 
REYNOLDS, MISS CARRIE A., Chicago, Illinois. 

Herbarium specimens — Illinois, Yellowstone, San Juan Island. 
SAFFORD, LIEUT. W. E., Washington, D. C. 

Dried petals of Cymbopetalum penduliflorum — Guatemala. 
SHERFF, EARL E., Chicago, Illinois. 

1 herbarium specimen — France. 
SMITH, HURON H., Chicago, Illinois. 

160 herbarium specimens — Illinois and Wisconsin. 
UNITED STATES FOREST PRODUCTS LABORATORY, Madison, Wisconsin. 

44 specimens of Wood Pulp for paper making (exchange). 
UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM, Washington, D. C. 

6 photographs of types (exchange). 
UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA, Herbarium, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

56 herbarium specimens (exchange). 
URBAN, PROF. DR. IGNATZ, Daglem-Steglitz. 

Part of type herbarium specimen — Cuba. 
WAITE GRASS CARPET COMPANY, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. 

5 specimens illustrating the manufacture of grass carpet — Wisconsin. 
WILLEY, C. L. COMPANY, Chicago, Illinois. 

Board and veneer of Gaboon Mahogany — Gaboon, Africa. 
WOLCOTT, A. B., Chicago, Illinois. 

1 herbarium specimen — Illinois. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 
(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AMERICAN VANADIUM COMPANY, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

3 specimens vanadium ores — Minasrarga, Peru. 

BARBER ASPHALT PAVING COMPANY, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
46 specimens asphalt and asphalt products. 

2 large photographs of Trinidad Pitch Lake — Trinidad and Venezuela. 
BARKER, MRS. F. W., Chicago, Illinois. 

1 specimen travertine. 
1 specimen tourmaline. 
BARRETT MANUFACTURING COMPANY, Chicago, Illinois. 
1 1 specimens coal tar and products. 



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Jan., 191 5. Annual Report of the Director. 407 

BURNHAM, AUSTIN A., Cleveland, Ohio. 

1 specimen fossil fish (Palaeoniscus brainerdi) in matrix — Chagrin Falls, 

Ohio. 
BLACKWELL, JOHN T., Chicago, Illinois. 

12 specimens agate, jasper, opal, etc., — Trinity County, California. 
BOSS GOLD MINING COMPANY, Goodsprings, Nevada. 

2 specimens platinum and gold ore — Goodsprings, Nevada. 
BOYDEN, DWIGHT B., Chicago, Illinois. 

20 specimens bonanza silver ores. 
1 specimen native copper — Mexico and Arizona. 
BROCKWAY, WM, Tlatlaya, Est. de Mexico, Mexico. 

16 specimens gold ores and associated minerals — Tlatlaya, Mexico. 
CHICAGO VARNISH COMPANY, Chicago, Illinois. 

Block varnished with elaterite varnish. 
CLEVELAND STONE COMPANY, Cleveland, Ohio. 

1 dressed specimen of Gray Canyon sandstone — Cleveland, Ohio. 
MICHAEL COHEN & COMPANY, New York City. 

1 four-inch cube of Caen stone — France. 
COLORADO- YULE MARBLE COMPANY, Chicago, Illinois. 

1 four-inch cube white Colorado- Yule marble — Yule Canyon, Colorado. 
CURTISS, MISS E., Chicago, Illinois. 

289 specimens minerals and fossils. 
DETROIT GRAPHITE COMPANY, Chicago, Illinois. 

1 specimen graphite — Baraga County, Michigan. 
JOSEPH DIXON CRUCIBLE COMPANY, Jersey City, New Jersey. 

5 specimens crude and refined graphite. 
DJORUP, FRANTZ, Chicago, Illinois. 

4 specimens magnesium oxy-chloride cement flooring. 
DOLESE & SHEPARD COMPANY, Chicago, Illinois. 

Orthoceras in matrix — Gary, Illinois. 
1 specimen fossil orthoceras — Gary, Illinois. 
DUMONT, DR. T. A., and ADAMS, H. C, Dumont, Iowa. 

5 specimens silver ores. 

1 specimen gold ore — San Bernardino County, California. 
FARLEY, THOS., and O'TOOLE, MICHAEL, Chicago, Illinois. 

Skull of Bison Americanus — Chicago. 
FIELD, JOSEPH N., EXPEDITION. 

6 specimens volcanic tuff — Ambrym, New Hebrides. 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 

Collected by O. C. Farrington: 

I crystal of orthoclase — Stoneham, Maine. 
Collected by H. W. Nichols: 

1 specimen vegetable mold — Antioch, Illinois. 
Purchases : 

Bishop Canyon Meteorite. 
Scott City meteorite. 
1 specimen orthoceras. 
Set of nine models of diamonds cut from the Cullinan diamond. 
Collection of volcanic products from the January, 1 9 12, eruption of 
Sakurajima. 



408 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Pictures of same. 
I etched slice Mt. Edith meteorite. 
Collection illustrating varieties of amber — Prussia. 
Teeth of fossil shark — South Carolina. 
Jaw of modern shark. 

Teeth and tusks of young mastodon — Chesterton, Indiana. 
EDISON LAMP WORKS OF THE GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY, 
Chicago, Illinois. 
10 specimens illustrating all stages of the manufacture of the tungsten 
lamp filament. 
GOODALL, MRS. ELLEN P., Chicago, Illinois. 

I fossil fish — Wyoming. 
GREBEL, WENDLER & COMPANY, Geneva, Switzerland. 

21 specimens minerals (exchange). 
GUILD, H. G., Vale, Oregon. 

137 specimens fossil shells, moss agate, etc. — Eastern Oregon. 
HARDIN, O. B., Chicago, Illinois. 

1 specimen black sand — Woods County, Oklahoma. 
ILLINOIS STEEL COMPANY, Chicago, Illinois. 

4 specimens coke oven by-products — Gary, Indiana. 
KENKEL, L. V., New Plymouth, Idaho. 

26 specimens minerals and fossils — Eastern Oregon. 
KRANZ, DR. F., Bonn, Germany. 

1 skull and lower jaw of Zeuglodon osiris — Fayum, Egypt (exchange). 
Mounted skeleton of cave bear (Ursus spelaeus) — Triest, Austria 

(exchange). 
LAMB, N. F., Jonesboro, Arkansas. 

2 elephant teeth — Bay, Arkansas. 
LEE MARBLE WORKS, Lee, Massachusetts. 

1 polished slab of marble. 

1 four-inch cube of marble — Lee, Massachusetts. 
MAINE AND NEW HAMPSHIRE GRANITE CORPORATION, Portland, 
Maine. 

1 cube each of Redstone Pink, Redstone Green, and North Jay White 

granite — North Jay, Maine and Redstone, New Hampshire. 
MANIERRE, GEORGE, Chicago, Illinois. 

Skeleton of the Mammoth — Spokane County, Washington. 
MARSH, C. H., Marshfield, Oregon. 

2 specimens natrolite — Douglas County, Oregon. 
McDERMOTT STONE COMPANY, McDermott, Ohio. 

2 specimens building stone — McDermott, Ohio. 
MEREDITH MINING AND MILLING COMPANY, Libertyville, Illinois. 

1 specimen crushed feldspar sized for bird grit — Coatesville, 
Pennsylvania. 
THE MICA MILLING AND MANUFACTURING COMPANY, Crawford, 
Nebraska. 

I specimen mica. 

1 specimen ground mica — Crawford, Nebraska. 
THE MT. WALDO GRANITE WORKS, Frankfort, Maine. 

1 four-inch dressed cube of Mt. Waldo Granite — Mt. Waldo, Maine. 



Jan., 19 i 5. Annual Report of the Director. 409 

THE NERNST LAMP COMPANY, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

1 Nernst lamp. 

NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM, Albany, New York. 

2 specimens fossil glass sponge (Hydnoceras bathense H. & C.) — Bath, 

New York. 
NICHOLAS, DR. F. C, New York City. 

62 specimens ores and lavas — Sonora, Mexico. 
NORTH, PROF. H. B., New Brunswick, New Jersey. 

6 specimens limonite after marcasite. 

1 specimen hematite. 

1 specimen iridescent pyrite — Wisconsin and New Jersey (exchange). 
NORTH CAROLINA GRANITE CORPORATION, Mt. Airy, North Carolina. 

1 dressed block Mt. Airy granite — Mt. Airy, North Carolina. 
OHIO QUARRIES COMPANY, Cleveland, Ohio. 

1 four-inch dressed cube of Buckeye gray sandstone — Cleveland, Ohio. 
PATTEE, FRED, Chicago, Illinois. 

1 specimen asbestos — Grand Canyon, Arizona. 
PELTZER, ALBERT, Argo, Illinois. 

1 specimen Orthoceras — Argo, Illinois. 
PHENIX MARBLE COMPANY, Kansas City, Missouri. 

2 specimens gray marble — Kansas City, Missouri. 
PIERCE, HENRY B., Golconda, Illinois. 

2 specimens fluorite (1st quality optical) — Golconda, Illinois. 
POTTER, LOUIS C, Chicago, Illinois. 

1 geode — Mississippi River near St. Louis, Missouri. 
RENNE, D. S., Verona, Illinois. 

2 septaria — Marseilles, Illinois. 

ROCKPORT GRANITE COMPANY, Rockport, Massachusetts. 

3 four-inch cubes of granite — Massachusetts and Maine. 
ROMANO, JOSEPH, Chicago, Illinois. 

1 specimen eroded limestone — Melrose Park, Illinois. 
ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM OF MINERALOGY, Toronto, Canada. 

3 polished specimens of silver ore — Cobalt, Ontario (exchange). 
ST. JOHN, C. A., Wayland, New York. 

1 marcasite concretion — Ogden, Iowa. 
SALTO, DR. A. B., Copenhagen, Denmark. 

1 specimen carnotite — Paradox Valley, Colorado. 
SALISBURY, PROF. R. D., Chicago, Illinois. 

2 fossil tree trunks — Patagonia. 
SCOTT, GEO. S., New York City. 

13 specimens minerals (exchange). 

1 specimen amethyst — Cripple Creek, Colorado (exchange). 
SHNABLE AND QUINN, Chicago, Illinois. 

1 specimen Orthoceras — Calumet-Sag Canal. 
SPANISH AMERICAN IRON COMPANY, New York City. 

3 specimens iron ore — Cuba. 

SOUTH DOVER MARBLE COMPANY, New York City. 
1 four-inch cube of white marble, dressed. 
1 polished slab of white marble — South Dover, New York. 



410 Field Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

STEARNS COAL AND LUMBER COMPANY, Steams, Kentucky. 

I specimen carbonate iron ore — Stearns, Kentucky. 
STRAWN, J. E., Silver Star, Montana. 

47 specimens of minerals and ores — Tobacco Root Mts., Montana. 
THURSTON, DR. FREDUS A., Chicago, Illinois. 

Titanium oxide coloring artificial teeth. 
UNIVERSAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY, Chicago, Illinois. 

5 specimens raw materials and finished Portland cement. 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, Berkeley, California. 

Skeleton of saber-tooth tiger {Smilodon neogens) — Los Angeles, Cal. 
(exchange). 
WEBB GRANITE AND CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, Worcester, 
Massachusetts. 

3 dressed cubes of granite — Massachusetts and New Hampshire. 
WEGG, HAROLD, Chicago, Illinois. 

48 specimens minerals, ores and fossils. 
WINSTON, CHAS., Chicago, Illinois. 

8 specimens carboniferous plants — Pennsylvania and Rhode Island. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 
(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

ABBOTT, J. B., Chicago, Illinois. 

1 moth — Chicago, Illinois. 
ALTSHELER, B., Louisville, Kentucky. 

3 ostrich skins. 

1 piece of skin (head) of an Oryx. 

2 mammals (skins only). 

3 mammals (skulls, scalps and skins). 
6 mammals (skulls and scalps only). 

16 mammals (skulls and entire skins) — British East Africa. 
BARKER, MRS. F., Chicago, Illinois. 
I specimen of brain coral. 

1 specimen of sea fan. 

2 specimens of sponges. 
BARNES, JUDGE R. M., Lacon, Illinois. 

1 Trumpeter Swan. 

1 Whistling Swan. 

2 bodies of Trumpeter Swans. 

1 body of Whistling Swan. 
BEATY, W. L., Homestake, Montana. 

2 wolf skulls — Homestake, Montana. 
CLARK, B. PRESTON, Boston, Massachusetts. 

1 Sphinx Moth — Guerro Mill., Hidalgo, Mexico. 
CORWIN, MRS. C. A., Chicago, Illinois. 

1 House Wren — Chicago, Illinois. 
CORY, MRS. C. B., Chicago, Illinois. 

1 box Turtle — Kelsey Lake, Dowagiac, Michigan. 



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Jan., 1915. Annual Report of the Director. 411 

CURTISS, MISS E., Chicago, Illinois. 
1 dragonfly — Bahamas. 
150 butterflies and moths — the World. 
169 beetles — United States. 
105 beetles — foreign countries. 

DERBY, W. M., JR., Chicago, Illinois. 

1 Ruddy Duck — Illinois. 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Collected by M. P. Anderson: 
8 mammals — Venezuela. 
219 bird skins — North West Peru. 

1 box of accessory material — Venezuela. 
182 bird skins — North West Peru. 
69 mammals. 
1 mammal (skin only). 
7 mammal skulls — North West Peru. 
18 bats — Colon and Maracaibo, Venezuela. 
18 mammals. 
4 mammal skulls. 

1 bat — Peru. 

55 bird skins — Peru. 

50 bird skins — Lake Junin, Peru. 

16 mammals. 

2 mammals (skins only) — Lake Junin, Peru. 

1 mammal skull — Salaverry, Peru. 

4 land shells. 

5 crustaceauo. \ 

3 snakes. 

6 toads. 
16 lizards. 

35 fish — Venezuela and Peru. 
6 snakes — Chimbote, Peru. 

2 lizards — Near Chimbote, Peru. 

514 spiders, bugs, grasshoppers, crickets, moths, butterflies, beetles, flies, 
bees, wasps, etc. — Peru, South America. 
Collected by R. H. Becker: 

1 lantern fly. 

2 millipedes. 

4 moth larvae — Santo Amaro, Bahia, Brazil. 
1 centipede. 

1 ear-wig — Northern Trinidad. 
119 mammals. 
16 mammal skulls. 

12 mammals (skins only) — Brazil. 

13 snakes. 

1 lizard — Brazil. 
372 bird skins — Brazil. 
145 bird skins — Brazil. 

45 mammals. 

60 mammals — Rio das Velhas, near Lagoa Santa, Brazil. 



412 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

1 17 bird skins — Rio Preto Region, Brazil. 

5 mammals. 

6 mammal skulls — Trini'i 
29 bird skins. 

accessories for group of oil birds (eggs, nests, etc.) — Trinidad. 

63 mammals. 

18 mammal skulls. 
3 mammals (skins only). 
79 bats — Rio Preto Region, Brazil. 

11 fish — Junction of Rio Grande and Rio Sao Francisco, Brazil. 
Collected by J. Friesser: 

18 bird skins — Kenai Peninsula, Alaska. 
Collected by W. J. Gerhard: 

24 dragonflies, bugs, grasshoppers, butterflies, moths, beetles, etc. — 
Northern Indiana and Northern Illinois. 
Collected by S. E. Meek: 

1 caiman — Lake Nicaragua, Nicaragua. 
1 1 bats — Panama. 
Collected by W. H. Osgood and M. P. Anderson: 

64 bats — Panama. 
Purchases : 

39 Arctic birds — Bering Sea, Alaska and Siberia. 
3,321 bird skins — United States. 

1 cardinal — Illinois and Wisconsin. 

2 song sparrows — Illinois and Wisconsin. 
1 giant clam — Madagascar. 

1 albino crow. 

2 passenger pigeons — Dekalb County, Indiana. 
FIELD, JOSEPH N., Expedition. 

599 shells — New Britain and German New Guinea. 
FRIESSER, J., Chicago, Illinois. 

1 mammal skull. 
GILLILAND, C. H., Trenary, Michigan. 

1 specimen of an abnormal four day old kitten — Trenary, Michigan. 
HANDY, COL. WM. J., Pasadena, California. 

1 Venus flower-basket sponge — Philippine Islands. 
HILL, A. L., Sterling, Illinois. 

4 plant lice — Rock River, Sterling, Illinois. 
JEONESCN, PROF. THEO., Chicago, Illinois. 

1 chimpanzee — Central Africa. 
LEOTANL, FELIX, Port-of -Spain, Trinidad. 

I snake — Near Port-of-Spain, Trinidad. 
LILJEBLAD, E., Chicago, Illinois. 

1 mantispa — Palos Park, Illinois. 
10 Insects — Edgebrook, Illinois. 

2 wasps — Edgebrook, Illinois. 
4 bugs — Miller, Indiana. 

McCORMICK, CYRUS H., Chicago, Illinois. 

2 beetles — Brazil. 
MESSINGER, JOE, Chicago, Illinois. 

1 albino mandril. 



Jan., 1915. Annual Report of the Director. 413 

MILLSPAUGH, MRS. C. P., Chicago, Illinois. 

19 spiders — Ephraim, Door County, Wisconsin. 
MILLSPAUGH, C. F., Chicago, Illinois. 

1 mayfly — Chicago, Illinois. 
NOTTER, MISS M., Chicago, Illinois. 

1 roach — Chicago, Illinois (ex Tropics). 
PAXON, MAHLAN, Bluff ton, Indiana. 

1 mandarin duck. 
PIKE, EUGENE S., Chicago, Illinois. 

I pair elk horns. 
PILE, JAMES H., Wayne, Nebraska. 

1 map terrapin — Wayne, Nebraska. 
PORTER, A. F., Decorah, Iowa. 

1 beetle — British Guiana, South America. 
27 beetles — West Indies. 

PRAY, L. L., Chicago, Illinois. 

25 bird lice — Chicago, Illinois. 
SASKO, PROF. V. G., Chicago, Illinois. 

2 spider wasps — Ogden, Utah. 
SETON, ERNEST T., Greenwich, Connecticut. 

2 weasels. 

2 stoats. 

2 red-backed mice. 

4 wood mice — England (exchange). 
SIEGEL COOPER & COMPANY, Chicago, Illinois. 

1 monkey — South America. 

1 South African baboon — South Africa. 
SKINNER, DR. HENRY, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

2 butterflies — Beaver Canyon, Idaho. 
STODDARD, H. L., Chicago, Illinois. 

1 Say's bat — Sumpter, Sauk County, Wisconsin. 

5 fleas — Miller, Indiana. 

10 fleas — Willow Springs, Illinois. 
WALTERS, L. L., Chicago, Illinois* 

3 fleas — Chicago, Illinois. 
WEGG, HAROLD, Chicago, Illinois. 

1 box of bird eggs (205) — Colorado. 
WILLIAMSON, E. B., Bluffton, Indiana. 

1 young red-shoulderd hawk — Bluffton, Indiana. 

I young red-tailed hawk — Bluffton, Indiana. 

1 Canada goose. 

1 common loon — Bluffton, Indiana. 

1 barn owl — Bluffton, Indiana. 

1 red-shouldered hawk — Bluffton, Indiana. 

1 red-tailed hawk — Bluffton, Indiana. 

1 yellow billed cuckoo — Bluffton, Indiana. 

1 horned owl — Bluffton, Indiana. 

1 bittern — Bluffton, Indiana. 
WOLCOTT, A. B., Chicago, Illinois. 

5 insects — Chicago, Illinois. 

4 beetles — Beverly Hills, Illinois. 



414 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 
SECTION OF PHOTOGRAPHY. 

(ACCESSIONS ARE BY GIFT UNLESS OTHERWISE DESIGNATED.) 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY: 
Made by the section: 

423 negatives of Museum specimens, etc., 3040 prints from the same, 63 
lantern slides, 20 enlargements, 33 negatives developed for Museum 
field expeditions, 20 positives for use in making large negatives. 
Made by R. H. Becker: 

100 landscapes, birds, etc. — South America. 

THE LIBRARY 
BOOKS, PAMPHLETS, AND SERIALS 

(ACCESSIONS ARE BY EXCHANGE UNLESS OTHERWISE DESIGNATED) 

ALABAMA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Auburn 3 

Geological Survey, University 3 

ARIZONA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Tucson 2 

ARKANSAS 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Fayetteville 2 

CALIFORNIA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Berkeley 1 1 

California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco 2 

California State Board of Forestry, Sacramento 2 

California University, Berkeley 14 

Cooper Ornithological Club, Hollywood 2 

Leland Stanford Junior University, Stanford University 5 

Oakland Free Library, Oakland 1 

Pioneer Western Lumberman, Sacramento (gift) 1 

Pomona College, Claremont 2 

San Diego Society of Natural History, San Diego 1 

San Francisco Board of Park Commissioners, San Francisco .... 1 

Southern California Academy of Sciences, Los Angeles 1 

State Mining Bureau, Sacramento 1 

COLORADO 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Fort Collins 9 

Colorado Scientific Society, Denver 1 

State Bureau of Mines, Denver 1 

University of Colorado, Boulder 2 

CONNECTICUT 

Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven 5 

American Oriental Society, New Haven 1 

Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences, New Haven 2 

Hartford Public Library, Hartford 2 

State Forester, New Haven 1 

Yale University, New Haven 2 



Jan., 191 5. Annual Report of the Director. 415 

DELAWARE 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Newark I 

FLORIDA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Tallahassee I 

State Geological Survey, Tallahassee 6 

University of Florida, Gainesville I 

GEORGIA 

Geological Survey, Atlanta I 

HAWAIIAN ISLANDS 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Honolulu 6 

Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Honolulu 2 

Board of Agriculture and Forestry, Honolulu 5 

IDAHO 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Moscow 3 

Inspector of Mines, Boise I 

ILLINOIS 

Academy of Sciences, Springfield 3 

Armour Institute of Technology, Chicago I 

Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago 2 

Cement World Publishing Company, Chicago (gift) 1 

Chicago Historical Society, Chicago 2 

Chicago Public Library, Chicago 2 

Dial Publishing Company, Chicago 2 

Forest and Stream Publishing Company, Chicago 2 

Hardwood Record, Chicago (gift) 2 

International Harvester Company of America, Chicago (gift) . . . . 11 

John Crerar Library, Chicago 2 

Kenfield-Leach Company, Chicago 2 

Lake Forest College, Lake Forest 1 

Lewis Institute, Chicago 1 

Mining World Publishing Company, Chicago 2 

Newberry Library, Chicago I 

Open Court Publishing Company, Chicago I 

Peoria Public Library, Peoria I 

South Park Commission, Chicago 36 

Special Park Commission, Chicago 1 

State Board of Agriculture, Springfield 4 

State Geological Survey, Urbana 4 

State Historical Library, Springfield 2 

State Laboratory of Natural History, Urbana 2 

State Museum of Natural History, Springfield 2 

University of Chicago, Chicago 7 

University of Illinois, Urbana 16 

INDIANA 

Department of Geology and Natural Resources, Indianapolis .... 2 

Indiana Academy of Science, Indianapolis 2 

John Herron Art Institute, Indianapolis 2 

Notre Dame University, Notre Dame I 

Purdue University, Lafayette 5 



416 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Rose Polytechnic Institute, Terre Haute I 

State Board of Forestry, Indianapolis (gift) i 

IOWA 

Geological Survey, Des Moines 3 

Iowa Academy of Sciences, Des Moines i 

State College of Agriculture, Ames 4 

State Historical Department, Des Moines 2 

State Horticultural Society, Des Moines 1 

University of Iowa, Iowa City 2 

KANSAS 

Academy of Science, Topeka 2 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Manhattan 8 

State Board of Agriculture, Topeka 3 

State Historical Society, Topeka 1 

University of Kansas, Lawrence 2 

KENTUCKY 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Lexington 4 

Geological Survey, Frankfort (gift) 17 

LOUISIANA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Baton Rouge 4 

Isaac Delgrade Museum of Art, New Orleans 1 

Louisiana State Museum, Baton Rouge 2 

MAINE 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Orono 3 

Bowdoin College, Brunswick 2 

Maine State Library, Augusta 22 

Portland Public Library, Portland 1 

MARYLAND 

Agricultural Experiment Station, College Park 3 

Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore 2 

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore 2 

State Board of Forestry, Baltimore 2 

MASSACHUSETTS . 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Amherst 5 

American Antiquarian Society, Boston 3 

American Folk Lore Society, Cambridge 1 

Amherst College, Amherst 1 

Archaeological Institute of America, Boston 1 

Arnold Arboretum, Jamaica Plain I 

Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 2 

Boston Public Library, Boston I 

Clark University, Worcester 3 

Essex Institute, Salem 2 

Harvard College, Cambridge 6 

Harvard University, Cambridge 2 

Horticultural Society, Boston 2 

Institute of Technology, Boston 2 

New Bedford Free Public Library, New Bedford 2 

Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology, Cambridge . 2 



Jan., 1915. Annual Report of the Director. 417 

Phillips Academy, Andover I 

Springfield Library Association, Springfield I 

Springfield Natural History Museum, Springfield 1 

State Forester, Boston (gift) 1 

Tufts College, Tufts 1 

Williams College, Williamstown 2 

Worcester County Horticultural Society, Worcester 10 

Worcester Free Public Library, Worcester 2 

MICHIGAN 

Michigan Academy of Science, Ann Arbor I 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Agricultural College 4 

Department of Parks and Boulevards, Detroit 1 

Detroit Museum of Art, Detroit 2 

Detroit Public Library, Detroit 1 

Geological and Biological Survey, Lansing 3 

Michigan College of Mines, Houghton I 

State Board of Agriculture, Lansing 1 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 3 

MINNESOTA 

Minnesota Academy of Sciences, Minneapolis 2 

University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 9 

MISSISSIPPI 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Agricultural College 2 

MISSOURI 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Columbia 7 

Bureau of Geology and Mines, Jefferson City I 

City Art Museum, St. Louis 4 

State Historical Society, Columbia 2 

Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis 1 

Academy of Science, St. Louis 2 

St. Louis Public Library, St. Louis 2 

St. Louis University, St. Louis I 

University of Missouri, Columbia 2 

Washington University, St. Louis 2 

MONTANA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Bozeman 2 

NEBRASKA 

Nebraska Academy of Sciences, Lincoln 1 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Lincoln 4 

Geological Survey, Lincoln 1 

NEVADA 

State University, Reno 1 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

College of Agriculture, Durham 4 

Forestry Commission, Concord 1 

NEW JERSEY 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Trenton 10 

Craftsman, The, Eastwood 2 

Geological Survey, Trenton 2 

Horticultural Society, Trenton I 



4i8 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Newark Public Library, Newark I 

Princeton University, Princeton .... 2 

Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken 1 

NEW MEXICO 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Mesilla Park 2 

NEW YORK 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva 2 

American Geographical Society, New York City 36 

American Institute of Mining Engineers, New York City 2 

American Museum of Natural History, New York City 42 

Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, Brooklyn 6 

Buffalo Public Library, Buffalo 1 

Buffalo Society of Natural History, Buffalo 1 

Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, New York City . 1 

Carnegie Hero Fund Commission, New York City 1 

Columbia University, New York City 35 

Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, New York City . 1 

Conservation Congress, Albany 1 

Cornell University, Ithaca 2 

Forestry Quarterly, Ithaca 1 

Japan Society, New York City (gift) 2 

Lake Mohonk Conference of International Arbitration, Lake Mohonk . 2 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City 2 

Munn and Company, New York City (gift) 2 

New York Academy of Sciences, New York City 1 

New York Botanical Garden, New York City 1 

Oneida Historical Society, Utica I 

Pratt Institute Free Library, Brooklyn 2 

Public Library, New York City 1 

State Library, Albany 15 

Staten Island Association of Arts and Sciences, New York City ... 1 

Zoological Society, New York City 2 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Raleigh 7 

Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society, Chapel Hill 1 

Geological and Economic Survey, Raleigh 1 

NORTH DAKOTA 

University of North Dakota, University 1 

OHIO 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Wooster 13 

Cincinnati Museum Association, Cincinnati I 

Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland 1 

Cleveland Public Library, Cleveland 2 

Denison University, Granville 1 

Lloyd Library, Cincinnati 2 

Marietta College, Marietta 1 

Oberlin College, Oberlin 1 

State Academy of Science, Columbus 1 

State Archaeological and Historical Society, Columbus I 



Jan., 1915. Annual Report of the Director. 419 

State University, Columbus 5 

University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati 2 

Wilson Ornithological Club, Oberlin I 

OKLAHOMA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Stillwater 2 

Geological Survey, Norman I 

OREGON 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Corvallis (gift) 5 

State Board of Forestry, Salem I 

Timberman, The, Portland (gift) 1 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Harrisburg 4 

American Journal of Pharmacy, Philadelphia 1 

American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia I 

Association of Engineering Societies, Philadelphia 3 

Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr 2 

Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh 3 

Carnegie Library, Pittsburgh 3 

Carnegie Museum, Pittsburgh 3 

Delaware County Institute of Science, Media I 

Dropsie College, Philadelphia 1 

Engineers' Society of Western Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh 2 

Franklin Institute, Philadelphia 2 

Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art, Philadelphia ... 1 

Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia I 

Philadelphia College of Physicians, Philadelphia 1 

Philadelphia Commercial Museum, Philadelphia I 

Philadelphia Numismatics and Antiquarian Society, Philadelphia . . . 1 

State Department of Agriculture, Harrisburg I 

Topographic and Geologic Survey, Harrisburg 4 

United States Indian School, Carlisle 2 

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 4 

Wagner Free Institute of Science, Philadelphia 2 

Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia 3 

Wyoming Historical and Geological Society, Wilkesbarre I 

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 

Bureau of Education, Manila 5 

Department of the Interior, Bureau of Science, Manila 7 

RHODE ISLAND 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Kingston 3 

Providence Public Library, Providence 2 

Roger Williams Park Museum, Providence I 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charleston Museum, Charleston I 

Department of Agriculture, Commerce and Industries, Clemson ... 1 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Brookings 4 

Huron College, Huron 1 

State Geological and Biological Survey, Vermilion I 



420 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

TENNESSEE 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Nashville 3 

State Geological Survey, Nashville 19 

TEXAS 

Scientific Society, San Antonio 1 

University of Texas, Austin 6 

UTAH 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Logan 6 

VERMONT 

State Forester, Burlington 2 

University of Vermont, Burlington 4 

VIRGINIA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Blacksburg 2 

Geological Survey, Charlottesville I 

University of Virginia, Charlottesville 2 

Virginia State Library, Richmond 3 

WASHINGTON 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Pullman 2 

State Geological Survey, Olympia 1 

State Library, Seattle 2 

State Museum, Seattle 1 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Biological Society, Washington I 

Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Washington 1 

International Bureau of American Republics, Washington 2 

National Academy of Sciences, Washington 2 

National Educational Association, Washington 2 

National Geographical Society, Washington 2 

United States Government, Washington 510 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Morgantown 3 

Forest, Fish and Game Warden, Bellington (gift) I 

University of West Virginia, Morgantown 1 

WISCONSIN 

Archaeological Society, Milwaukee 1 

Beloit College, Beloit 2 

Geological and Natural History Survey, Madison I 

History Commission, Madison 1 

Wisconsin Natural History Society, Madison I 

State Historical Society, Madison 2 

State Horticultural Society, Madison 2 

University of Wisconsin, Madison 11 

WYOMING 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Laramie 4 

Alexander, Charles P., Ithaca, New York 1 

Ames, Oakes, North Easton, Massachusetts 8 



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Jan., 191 5. Annual Report of the Director. 421 

Arthur, Joseph C, Lafayette, Indiana 1 

Barker, Mrs. Frank W., Chicago (gift) 10 

Bean, Tarleton H., Albany, New York 1 

Bingham, Hiram, New Haven, Connecticut 8 

Brandegee, Townshend S., Berkeley, California 1 

Brown, Rome G., Minneapolis, Minnesota (gift) 1 

Burnett, W. L., Fort Collins, Colorado 4 

Casey, Thomas L., Washington, D. C. (gift) 3 

Chalfant, Mrs. F. H., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (gift) 1 

Chamberlain, Ralph V., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1 

Crook, A. K., Springfield, Illinois 2 

Dunn, Elizabeth Hopkins, Woods Hole, Massachusetts 1 

Eigenmann, Carl H., Bloomington, Indiana 1 

Evans, Alexander W., New Haven, Connecticut 43 

Ford, W. E., New Haven, Connecticut 6 

Francis, David R., St. Louis, Missouri (gift) 2 

Gerhard, William J., Chicago (gift) 85 

Girty, George H., Washington, D. C 1 

Goldman, E. A., Washington, D. C 6 

Harris, Gilbert D., Ithaca, New York 1 

Heller, A. A., Chico, California 1 

Hopkins, T. C, Syracuse, New York I 

Kearney, T. H., Washington, D. C I 

Laufer, Berthold, Chicago (gift) 9 

Lewis, A. B., Chicago (gift) 17 

Lindley, Curtis H., San Francisco, California <^lft) 3 

Marks, E. L., Cambridge, Massachusetts 19 

Meek, Mrs. Seth E., Chicago (gift) 3 

Millspaugh, Charles F., Chicago 82 

Mitchell, Alexander N., Minneapolis, Minnesota 1 

Muller, Hugo, Manila, Philippine Islands I 

Osborn, Henry F., New York City 54 

Pellett, Frank C, Atlantic, Iowa (gift) 5 

Rehn, James A. G., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1 

Schubert, Charles, New Haven, Connecticut 41 

Simms, S. Chapman, Chicago (gift) 187 

Skinner, Henry, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1 

Smith, Huron H., Chicago (gift) 9 

Smith, J. D., Baltimore, Maryland 1 

Starr, Frederick, Chicago 13 

Strong, R. M., Chicago 3 

Taubenhaus, J. J., Newark, Delaware (gift) 2 

Thompson, Joseph G., Sausalites, California (gift) 13 

Vandenburgh, J., Berkeley, California 4 

Washington, Henry S., Washington, D. C 11 

Weller, Stuart, Chicago I 

Wickham, H. F., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1 

Williamson, E. B., Bluffton, Indiana (gift) 7 

Williston, Samuel W., Chicago 7 

Wyer, Raymond, Muskegon, Michigan (gift) I 



422 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

AFRICA 

Biologisch-Landwirtschaftlichcs Institut, Amani 

Botanic Society, Pietermaritzburg, Natal 

Department of Agriculture, Cape Town 2 

Department of Mines, Pretoria, Transvaal 

East Africa and Uganda Natural History Society, Nairobi 

Geological Society, Johannesburg ... 

Institut de Carthage, Tunis 

Rhodesia Scientific Association, Bulawayo 

Royal Society, Cape Town 

South African Museum, Cape Town 

Transvaal Museum, Pretoria 

ARGENTINA 

Facultad de Filosofia y Letras, Buenos Aires i 

Museum de La Plata, La Plata 3 

Museo Nacional, Buenos Aires 2 

Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Buenos Aires 6 

AUSTRALIA 

Australian Ornithologist's Union, Melbourne i 

Botanic Gardens and Government Domains, Sydney 4 

Department of Agriculture, Adelaide 2 

Department of Agriculture, Melbourne I 

Department of Agriculture, Sydney 3 

Department of Agriculture, Hobart, Tasmania i 

Department of Fisheries, Sydney I 

Department of Mines, Sydney 3 

Field Naturalists' Club, Brisbane i 

Field Naturalists' Club, Melbourne I 

Geological Survey, Perth 7 

Government of the Commonwealth, Melbourne 5 

Linnean Society of New South Wales, Sydney I 

Melbourne University, Melbourne I 

National Museum, Melbourne I 

Natural History and Scientific Society, Perth 2 

Public Library, Museum and Art Gallery, Adelaide I 

Queensland Museum, Brisbane 3 

Royal Anthropological Society of Australasia, Sydney 3 

Royal Society, Hobart, Tasmania 21 

Royal Society of New South Wales, Sydney I 

Royal Society of Queensland, Brisbane i 

Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales, Sydney i 

South Australian Ornithological Association, Adelaide I 

Technical Museum, Sydney I 

Western Australian Museum and Art Gallery, Perth I 

AUSTRIA 

K. K. Franz- Josephs-Universitat, Czernowitz i 

K. K. Naturhistorisches Hofmuseum, Vienna i 

K. K. Zoologisch-Botanische Gesellschaft, Vienna I 

Naturhistorisches Landesmuseum von Karten, Klagenfurt I 

Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein, Vienna l 



Jan., 1915. Annual Report of the Director. 423 

Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein fur Steiermark, Graz 13 

Verein fur Hohlenkunde in Osterreich, Graz I 

AUSTRIA-HUNGARY 

K. Akademie der Wissenschaften, Cracow I 

Kir. Magyar-Term6szettudomanyi Tarsulat, Budapest I 

Magyar Ornithologiai Zozpont, Budapest 1 

Ungar. Akademie der Wissenschaft, Budapest 2 

BELGIUM 

Acad6mie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, 

Brussels 2 

Institut Geologique, Louvain 1 

Instituts Solvay, Brussels 4 

Jardin Botanique de L'Etat, Brussels 2 

Musde Royal d'Histoire Naturelle de Belgique, Brussels 1 

Musses Royaux des Arts Decoratifs et Industriels, Brussels .... 1 

Soci^t6 d'Archeblogie, Brussels 2 

Soci^te" Royale de Botanique de Belgique, Brussels I 

BOHEMIA 

Bohm. Naturw. Landesdurchforschung, Prague I 

Deutscher Naturwissenschaftlich-Medizinischer Verein fur Bohmen 

"Lotos," Prague 

K6niglich-B6hmisch.es Museum, Prague 11 

BORNEO 

Sarawak Museum, Sarawak 2 

BRAZIL 

Campinas Centro de Ciencia, Sao Paulo I 

Instituto Agronomico de Estada, Sao Paulo I 

Museu Goeldi, Para 2 

Museu Paulista, Sao Paulo 3 

Sociedade Scientifica, Sao Paulo I 

CANADA 

Department of Agriculture, Ottawa 12 

Department of Agriculture, Victoria 5 

Department of Indian Affairs, Ottawa 2 

Department of the Interior, Geological Survey, Ottawa 29 

Department of Lands, Victoria I 

Department of Marine and Fisheries, Ottawa 3 

Department of Mines, Ottawa I 

Department of Mines, Victoria 2 

McGill University, Montreal 4 

Minister of Education, Toronto 2 

Naturaliste Canadien, Chicoutimi I 

Numismatic and Antiquarian Society, Montreal I 

Ottawa Field Naturalists' Club, Ottawa 1 

Provincial Museum, Victoria . 2 

Royal Society, Toronto 1 

CEYLON 

Ceylon Agricultural Society, Colombo I 

Colombo Museum, Colombo 2 

Royal Botanic Gardens, Peradeniya 3 



424 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 
CHILE 

Biblioteca National, Santiago de Chile 4 

CHINA 

Botanical and Forestry Department, Hongkong 1 

Royal Asiatic Society, North China Branch, Shanghai 33 

COSTA RKA 

Museo Nacional, San Jose" 1 

CUBA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Porto Rico 1 

Biblioteca Nacional, Havana 2 

Estacion Central Agronomico, Santiago de las Vegas 1 

Universidad de La Habana, Havana 2 

DENMARK 

Botanical Garden, Copenhagen 4 

Naturhistorisk Forening, Copenhagen 4 

Soci6te" Botanique de Copenhagen, Copenhagen 1 

Soci<He" Roy ale des Antiquaires du Nord, Copenhagen 1 

ECUADOR 

Biblioteca Municipal, Guayaquil 7 

EGYPT 

Egyptian Government School of Medicine, Cairo 3 

Institut Egyptien, Cairo 

Survey Department, Giza 

ENGLAND 

Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, London 

Ashmolean Natural History Society of Oxfordshire, Oxford 

Birmingham Natural History and Philosophical Society, Birmingham 
Brighton and Hove Natural History and Philosophical Society, Brighton 
British Association for the Advancement of Science, London .... 

British Museum, London 8 

British Museum (Natural History), London 5 

Cambridge Philosophical Society, Cambridge 2 

Cambridge University Library, Cambridge 8 

Cheltenham Public Library, Art Gallery and Museum, Cheltenham . . 1 

Croydon Natural History and Scientific Society, Croydon 1 

Ealing Scientific and Microscopical Society, London 1 

Entomological and Natural History Society, London 1 

Great Britain Geological Survey, London 2 

Horniman Museum, London 2 

Hull Municipal Museum, Hull 4 

Imperial Bureau of Entomology, London 2 

Imperial College of Science and Technology, London 1 

Japan Society, London 3 

Lancashire Sea Fisheries Laboratory, Liverpool 1 

Linnean Society, London 3 

Liverpool Biological Society, Liverpool 1 

Liverpool Geological Society, Liverpool 1 

Liverpool Marine Biological Station, Liverpool I 

London Library, London 3 

London Zoological Society, London 3 



Jan., 191 5. Annual Report of the Director. 425 

Manchester Field Naturalists' and Archaeologists' Society, Manchester . 1 

Manchester Museum, Manchester 1 

Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, Plymouth ... 1 
Natural History Society of Northumberland, Durham and Newcastle-on- 

Tyne 2 

Oxford Delegates of University Museum, Oxford 1 

Plymouth Institute, Plymouth 1 

Royal Archaeological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, London . . 1 

Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew 2 

Royal Colonial Institute, London 1 

Royal Cornwall Polytechnic Society, Falmouth 1 

Royal Geographical Society, London 2 

Royal Horticultural Society, London 1 

Royal Society, London 2 

Royal Society of Arts, London 2 

Scientific and Field Naturalists' Club, Hull 1 

South London Entomological and Natural History Society, London . . 1 

Tring Zoological Museum, Tring 1 

University College, London I 

Wellcome Chemical Research Laboratories, London 7 

FRANCE 

Academie des Sciences, Paris 2 

Annales des Mines, Paris 2 

L'Association des Naturalistes, Levallois-Perret 2 

Ecole d'Anthropologie, Paris 1 

Ecole des Langues Orientales Vivantes, Paris 7 

Faculte des Sciences, Marseille 

Laboratoire de Zoologie et de Physiologie Mari times, Concarneau ... 2 
Ministere de l'lnstruction Publique et des Beaux Arts, Paris .... 

Mus6e d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris 

Museum d'Histoire Naturelle, Marseille 6 

Museum d'Histoire Naturelle et d'Ethnographie, Havre 

Revue Bretonne de Botanique, Rennes 

Revue Critique de Paieozoologie, Paris 

Revue Scientifique du Bourbonnais et du Centre de la France, Moulins . 

Societe Botanique de France, Paris 3 

Societe d'fitudes des Sciences Naturelles, Rheims 

Societe d'Histoire Naturelle, Colmar 

Societe d'Histoire Naturelle des Ardennes, Charleville 

Societe de Geographie, Paris 

Societe de Geographie, Toulouse 

Societe d'Horticulture et de Botanique, Marseille 

Society des Americanistes, Paris 

Societe des Etudes Scientifiques, Angers 2 

Societe des Sciences de Nancy, Nancy 

Societe des Sciences Naturelles, La Rochelle 

Society Geologique du Nord, Lille 

Societe Nationale d'Agriculture, Paris 

Societe Nationale d'Agriculture, Sciences et Arts, Angers 

Societe Nationale d'Horticulture, Paris 

Societe Zoologique de France, Paris 



426 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

GERMANY 

Bayerischc Botanische Gesellschaft, Munich 2 

Botanische Stautsinstitute, Hamburg 4 

Botanischer Verein, Brandenburg 1 

Botanischer Verein, K6nigsberg 11 

Deutsche Dendrologische Gesellschaft, Bonn-Poppelsdorf 21 

Deutsche Geologische Gesellschaft, Berlin 4 

Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Anthropologic, Ethnologie und Urgs., Berlin . 1 

Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Volkstumliche Naturkunde, Berlin .... 2 

Deutscher Seefischerei- Verein, Berlin 2 

Deutsches Entomologisches Museum, Berlin 3 

Geographische Gesellschaft, Hamburg 1 

Geographische Gesellschaft, Lubeck I 

Gesellschaft fur Anthrop. und Urgeschichte der Oberlausitz, G6rlitz . . 1 

Gesellschaft fur Bef6rderung der Gesamten Naturwissenschaften, Marburg 1 

Gesellschaft fur Erdkunde, Berlin 2 

Institut fur Mineralogie und Petrographie, Leipzig 1 

Jahres-Verzeichnis der an den Deutschen Univ. Erschienenenschrif ten, Berlin 1 

Kaiser Wilhelms Universitat, Strassburg 1 

K. Bayer. Akademie der Wissenschaften, Munich 5 

K. Bayer. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat, Munich 3 

K. Bergakademie, Clausthal I 

K. Bibliothek, Berlin 2 

K. Botanischer Garten und Museum, Berlin 2 

K. Georg-Augustus Universitat, Gottingen 5 

K. Museum fur V6lkerkunde, Berlin 3 

K. Preussische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Berlin 2 

K. Sachs. Bergakademie, Freiburg 1 

K. Sachs. Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften, Leipzig 3 

K. Sammlungen fur Kunst und Wissenschaft, Dresden 2 

K. Zoologisches und Anthropologisch-Ethnographisches Museum, 

Dresden 2 

Nassauischer Verein fur Naturkunde, Wiesbaden I 

Naturforschende Gesellschaft, Freiburg 3 

Naturhistorische Gesellschaft, Hannover 1 

Naturhistorische Gesellschaft, Nuremberg 2 

Naturhistorischer Verein, Bonn 3 

Naturhistorisches Museum, Hamburg 3 

Naturwissenschaftliche Gesellschaft "Isis," Dresden 1 

Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein fur Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel .... 1 

Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein fur Schwaben und Neuburg, Augsburg . 2 

Naturwissenschaftliches Museum, Crefeld 3 

Schlesische Gesellschaft fur Vaterlandische Kultur, Breslau 2 

Senckenbergische Naturforschende Gesellschaft, Frankfurt a. M. . . . 8 

Stadt Bibliothek, Hannover 1 

Thuringischer Botanischer Verein, Weimar I 

Universitats Bibliothek, Bonn 29 

Universitats Bibliothek, Kiel l 

Verein fOr Erdkunde, Darmstadt 2 

Verein fur Erdkunde, Leipzig 2 



Jan., 191 5. Annual Report of the Director. 427 

Verein fur Volkskunde, Berlin 2 

Wissenschaftliche Anstalten, Hamburg 3 

Zoologisches Institut der Universitat, Strassburg 2 

Zoologisch.es Museum, Berlin 2 

INDIA 

Agri-Horticultural Society, Madras 1 

Anthropological Society, Bombay 1 

Archaeological Survey, Burma 1 

Archaeological Survey, Calcutta 7 

Asiatic Society of Bengal, Calcutta 2 

Baluchistan Forest Administration, Calcutta (gift) 19 

Department of Agriculture, Bombay 1 

Department of Agriculture, Madras 4 

Department of Agriculture, Pusa 2 

Geological Survey, Calcutta 5 

Indian Museum, Calcutta 5 

Royal Botanic Garden, Calcutta 1 

IRELAND 

Belfast Natural History and Philosophical Society, Belfast .... 1 

Belfast Naturalists' Field Club, Belfast 1 

Department of Agriculture, Fisheries Branch, Dublin 2 

National Museum of Science and Art, Dublin 3 

Royal Dublin Society, Dublin 3 

Royal Irish Academy, Dublin 7 

Royal Zoological Society, Dublin 2 

Trinity College, Dublin 2 

ITALY 

Accademia di Scienze, Acireale 1 

Accademia Reale delle Scienze, Turin 1 

American Society, Rome 1 

Museo de Zoologia et di Anatomie Comparata, Turin 1 

R. Accademia dei Lincei, Rome 2 

R. Accademia delle Scienze, Naples 2 

R. Orto Botanico e Giardino Coloniale, Palermo 1 

R. Scuola Superiore d'Agricultura, Portici 1 

Societa di Naturalisti, Naples I 

Societa Geografica Italiana, Rome I 

Societa Italiana di Antropologia, Florence I 

Societa Romana di Antropologia, Rome 1 

Societa Toscana di Scienze Naturali, Pisa 2 

JAMAICA 

Department of Agriculture, Kingston 1 

Jamaica Institute, Kingston 1 

JAPAN 

Anthropological Society of Tokyo, Tokyo 1 

Bureau of Productive Industry Formosa Government, Taihoku ... 1 

Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Natur- und Volkerkunde Ostasiens, Tokyo . . 1 

Geological Survey, Tokyo 1 

Imperial University of Tokyo, College of Science, Tokyo 7 



428 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Tohoku Imperial University, Sendai I 

Tokyo Botanical Society, Tokyo I 

JAVA 

Bataviaasch Genootschap van Kunsten en Wctenschappen, Batavia . . 5 

Department of Agriculture, Buitenzorg 9 

Nederlandsch- Indie K. Institut Taal-Land-en Volkenkunde, Batavia . . 2 

MEXICO 

Direccion General de Estadistica, Mexico 8 

Instituto Geologico de Mexico, Mexico 1 

Museo Nacional de Arqueologia, Historia y Etnologia, Mexico .... 2 

Sociedad Cientifico "Antonio Alzate," Mexico 2 

NETHERLANDS 

K. Akademie van Wetenschappen, Amsterdam 8 

Museum voor Land-en Volkenkunde, Rotterdam I 

Nederlandsche Dierkundige Vereeniging, Leiden 2 

Rijks Ethnographisches Museum, Leiden 16 

Rijks Herbarium, Leiden 2 

Stats Bibliotheek, Haarlem 1 

Universiteit van Amsterdam, Amsterdam I 

NEW ZEALAND 

Acclimatization Society, Wellington 1 

Department of Agriculture, Wellington 2 

Department of Mines, Wellington I 

Dominion Museum, Wellington 2 

NORWAY 

Bergen Museum I 

PERU 

Cuerpo de Ingenieros de Minas, Lima I 

Sociedad Geografica, Lima 1 

PORTUGAL 

Academia Real das Sciencias, Lisbon 7 

Collegio de S. Fiel, Lisbon 2 

Soci^te" Portugaise de Sciences Naturelles, Lisbon 3 

ROUMANIA 

Jassy Institute, Jassy 1 

RUSSIA 

Acad^mie Imp6riale des Sciences, Petrograd 16 

Imperial Botanical Gardens, Petrograd 1 

Kaukasisches Museum, TLflis 2 

Societas pro Fauna et Flora Fennica, Helsingfors 1 

Soci6te" Imp6riale des Naturalistes, Moscow 3 

Socie^ Imp£riale des Naturalistes, Petrograd 1 

Soci^te" Imp^riale Russe de G6ographie, Petrograd 1 

Soctete' Ouralienne d'Amateurs des Sciences Naturell>«, Ekaterinburg . . I 

SCOTLAND 

Fishery Board, Edinburgh I 

Natural History Society, Glasgow I 

Perthshire Society of Natural Science, Perth 1 



Jan., 191 5. Annual Report of the Director. 429 

Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh 31 

Royal Scottish Museum, Edinburgh 1 

Royal Society, Edinburgh 2 

SPAIN 

Broteria, Salamanca 2 

Museo de Ciencias Naturales, Madrid 2 

R. Academia de Ciencias, Madrid 2 

Sociedad Espafiola de Historia Natural, Madrid 2 

SWEDEN 

K. Biblioteket, Stockholm 1 

K. Svenska Vetenskapsakademien, Stockholm 6 

K. Vitt. Hist, och Antik. Akademien, Stockholm I 

Regia Societas Scientiarum, Upsala I 

Svenska Sallskapet for Antropologi och Geografi, Stockholm .... I 

Upsala University, Upsala 3 

SWITZERLAND 

Conservatoire et Jardin Botaniques, Geneva 2 

Geographisch-Ethnographische Gesellschaft, Zurich I 

Mus6e Ethnographique, Neuchatel 1 

Musee Zoologique, Lausanne I 

Naturforschende Gesellschaft, Basel 1 

Naturforschende Gesellschaft, Bern 1 

Ostsch. Geograph. Commerc. Gesellschaft, St. Gall I 

Soci^te" de Physique et d'Histoire Naturelle, Geneva I 

Soctete" Helvdtique des Sciences Naturelles, Bern 1 

Socidte' Neuchateloise de Geographie, Neuchatel 2 

Soci^te" Vaudoise des Sciences Naturelles, Lausanne 2 

Soci6t6 Zoologique, Geneva I 

VENEZUELA 

Museos Nacionales, Caracas 2 

WALES 

National Museum of Wales, Cardiff I 

WEST INDIES 

Imperial Department of Agriculture, Barbadoes 2 

YUCATAN 

La Camera Agricultura, Merida 1 

Capitan, L., Paris, France I 

Carpenter, G. N., Dublin, Ireland I 

Caziot, C, Nice, Italy (gift) 6 

Errera, Leo, Brussels, Belgium 1 

Ewart, Alfred L., Melbourne, Australia 8 

Fried, Alfred H., Berlin, Germany 1 

Friedlander, R., und Sohn, Berlin, Germany 2 

Furbringer, Max, Jena, Germany 1 

Gennep, A. van, Neuchatel, Switzerland 2 

Gleerup, G. W. K., Lund, Sweden I 

Gota, Se Faro, Tokyo, Japan 1 

Gurney, J. H., Norfolk, England 3 

Hamburg, Alexander, Upsala, Sweden 12 



430 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Hartland, Edwin Sidney, England I 

Hasse, C, Breslau, Germany 2 

Hayren, Ernst, Helsingfors, Russia (gift) I 

Heck, Ludwig, Germany ... i 

Janet, Charles, Paris, France 2 

Joly, Henri L., London, England 3 

Joyce, Thomas A., London, England 5 

Koch-Grunberg, Theodor, Freiburg, Germany 4 

Lenz, Rudolfo, Santiago de Chile, Chile 4 

Ling Roth, H., Halifax, England 2 

MacRitchie, David, Edinburgh, Scotland 3 

Maiden, J. H., Sydney, Australia i 

Matschie, Paul, Berlin, Germany 6 

Merzbacher, Gottfried, Munich, Germany 2 

Mogdigliani, E., Florence, Italy I 

Northcote, Thomas W., London, England 9 

Outes, Felix F., Buenos Aires, Argentina . 4 

Pearcey, F. Gordon, Edinburgh, Scotland (gift) i 

Rinnd, F., Leipzig, Germany I 

Rivet, P., Paris, France I 

Sapir, Edward, Montreal, Canada 4 

Sapper, Karl, Strassburg, Germany 3 

Schlagenhaufen, Otto, Zurich, Switzerland 2 

Schmidt, P. W., Modling, Austria i 

Smith, Harlan I., Ottawa, Canada I 

Torres, Luis Maria, Buenos Aires, Argentina l 

Trouessart, E., Paris, France 5 

Tuzson, Johann, Budapest, Austria-Hungary (gift) 3 

Virchow, Hans, Berlin, Germany I 

Wegner, Richard N., Munich, Germany 2 

Weigel, Oswald, Leipzig, Germany (gift) I 

Wulfing, E. A., Heidelberg, Germany 2 

Wille, N., Christiania, Norway 2 

Wood, Henry Trueman, England (gift) I 

Zimanyi, Karl, Budapest, Austria-Hungary I 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE LXIX. 




Marble Head of Taoist God of Creation, China, T'ang Period (618-906). 
The Mrs. T. B. Blackstone Expedition. 



Jan., 1915. Annual Report of the Director. 431 



Articles of Incorporation 



STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

DEPARTMENT OF STATE. 

William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State. 

To All to Whom These Presents Shall Come, Greeting: 

Whereas, a Certificate duly signed and acknowledged having been filed in the 
office of the Secretary of State, on the 16th day of September, A. D. 1893, for the 
organization of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO, under and in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of "An Act Concerning Corporations," approved 
April 18, 1872, and in force July 1, 1872, and all acts amendatory thereof, a copy 
of which certificate is hereto attached. 

Now, therefore, I, William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State of the State of 
Illinois, by virtue of the powers and duties vested in me by law, do hereby certify 
that the said COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OP CHICAGO is a legally organized 
Corporation under the laws of this State. 

In Testimony Whereof, I hereto set my hand and cause to be affixed the Great 
Seal of the State. Done at the City of Springfield, this 16th day of September, 
in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three, and of the 
Independence of the United States the one hundred and eighteenth. 

W. H. HINRICHSEN, 
[Seal.] Secretary of State. 



TO HON. WILLIAM H. HINRICHSEN, 

Secretary of State: 
Sir: 

We, the undersigned citizens of the United States, propose to form a corpora- 
tion under an act of the General Assembly of the State of Illinois, entitled "An 
Act Concerning Corporations," approved April 18, 1872, and all acts amendatory 
thereof; and that for the purposes of such organization we hereby state as follows, 
to wit: 

1. The name of such corporation is the "COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF 
CHICAGO." 

2. The object for which it is formed is for the accumulation and dissemina- 
tion of knowledge, and the preservation and exhibition of objects illustrating Art, 
Archaeology, Science, and History. 

3. The management of the aforesaid Museum shall be vested in a Board of 
Fifteen (15) Trustees, five of whom are to be elected every year. 

4. The following named persons are hereby selected as the Trustees for the 
first year of its corporate existence: 



43^ Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Ed. E. Ayer, Charles B. Farwell, George E. Adams, George R. Davis, Charles 
L. Hutchinson, Daniel H. Burnham, John A. Roche, M. C. Bullock, Emil G. Hirsch, 
James W. Ellsworth, Allison V. Armour, O. F. Aldis, Edwin Walker, John C. Black, 
and Frank W. Gunsaulus. 

5. The location of the Museum is in the City of Chicago, County of Cook, 
and State of Illinois. 

(Signed) , 

George E. Adams, C. B. Farwell, Sidney C. Eastman, F. W. Putnam, Robert 
McMurdy, Andrew Peterson, L. J. Gage, Charles L. Hutchinson, Ebenezer Bucking- 
ham, Andrew McNally, Edward E. Ayer, John M. Clark, Herman H. Kohlsaat, 
George Schneider, Henry H. Getty, William R. Harper, Franklin H. Head, E. G. 
Keith, J. Irving Pearce, Azel F. Hatch, Henry Wade Rogers, Thomas B. Bryan, 
L. Z. Leiter, A. C. Bartlett, A. A. Sprague, A. C. McClurg, James W. Scott, George 
F. Bissell, John R. Walsh, Chas. Fitzsimons, John A. Roche, E. B. McCagg, Owen 
F. Aldis, Ferdinand W. Peck, James H. Dole, Joseph Stockton, Edward B. Butler, 
John McConnell, R. A. Waller, H. C. Chatfield-Taylor, A. Crawford, Wm. Sooy 
Smith, P. S. Peterson, John C. Black, Jno. J. Mitchell, C. F. Gunther, George R. 
Davis, Stephen A. Forbes, Robert W. Patterson, Jr., M. C. Bullock, Edwin Walker, 
George M. Pullman, William E. Curtis, James W. Ellsworth, William E. Hale, Wm. 
T. Baker, Martin A. Ryerson, Huntington W. Jackson, N. B. Ream, Norman Will- 
iams, Melville E. Stone, Bryan Lathrop, Eliphalet W. Blatchford, Philip D. Armour. 

State of IllinoisI 
Cook County J 
I, G. R. Mitchell, a Notary Public in and for said County, do hereby certify 
that the foregoing petitioners personally appeared before me and acknowledged 
severally that they signed the foregoing petition as their free and voluntary act for 
the uses and purposes therein set forth. 

Given under my hand and notarial seal this 14th day of September, 1893. 

G. R. MITCHELL, 
[Seal.] Notary Public, Cook County, III. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 

Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the Corporate members held 
the 25th day of June, 1894, the name of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM was changed 
to FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. A certificate to this effect was filed June 26, 
1894, in the office of the Secretary of State for Illinois. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 

Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the Corporate members held 
the 8th day of November, 1905, the name of the FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM 
was changed to FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. A certificate 
to this effect was filed November 10, 1905, in the office of the Secretary of State 
for Illinois. 



Jan., 1915. Annual Report of the Director. 433 



AMENDED BY-LAWS. 



(February 10, 1913.) 



ARTICLE I. 



MEMBERS. 



Section i. Members shall be of five classes, Annual Members, Corporate 
Members, Life Members, Patrons and Honorary Members. 

Sec. 2. Annual Members shall consist of such persons as are selected from time 
to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, and who shall pay an annual 
fee of ten dollars ($10.00), payable within thirty days after notice of election, and 
within thirty days after each recurring annual date. The failure of any person to 
make such initiatory payment and such annual payments within said time shall, at 
the option of the Board of Trustees, be sufficient grounds for the forfeiture of an 
annual membership. 

This said annual membership shall entitle the member to: 

First. — Free admittance for the member and family, to the Museum on any day. 

Second. — Ten tickets every year, admitting the bearer to the Museum on pay 
days. 

Third. — A copy of all publications of the Museum when requested. 

Fourth. — Invitations to all special exhibits, receptions, lectures, or other func- 
tions which may be given at the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The Corporate Members shall consist of the persons named in the 
articles of incorporation, and of such other persons as shall be chosen from time to 
time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, upon the recommendation of the 
Executive Committee; provided, that such persons named in the articles of incorpora- 
tion shall, within ninety days from the adoption of these By-Laws, and persons 
hereafter chosen as Corporate Members shall, within ninety days of their election, 
pay into the treasury the sum of twenty dollars ($20.00) or more. The failure of 
any person to make such payment within said time shall, at the option of the Board 
of Trustees, be ground for forfeiture of his corporate membership. Corporate 
Members becoming Life Members, Patrons or Honorary Members shall be exempt 
from dues. Annual meetings of said Corporate Members shall be held at the same 
place and on the same day that the annual meeting of the Board of Trustees is held. 

Sec. 4. Any person paying into the treasury the sum of five hundred dollars 
($500.00), at any one time, shall, upon the unanimous vote of the Board, become 
a Life Member. Life Members shall be exempt from all dues. 

Sec. 5. Patrons shall be chosen by the Board upon recommendation of the 
Executive Committee from among persons who have rendered eminent service to the 
Museum. They shall be exempt from all dues, and, by virtue of their election as 
Patrons, shall also be Corporate Members. 



434 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

Shc. 6. Honorary Members shall be chosen by the Board from among persons 
who have rendered eminent service to science, and only upon unanimous nomination 
of the Executive Committee. They shall be exempt from all dues. 

ARTICLE II. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

Section i. The Board of Trustees shall consist of fifteen members. The respec- 
tive members of the Board now in office, and those who shall hereafter be elected, shall 
hold office during life. Vacancies occurring in the Board shall be filled at a regular 
meeting of the Board, upon the nomination of the Executive Committee made at a 
preceding regular meeting, by a majority vote of the members of the Board present. 

Sec. 2. Regular meetings of the Board shall be held on the second Monday 
of each month. Special meetings may be called at any time by the President, and 
shall be called by the Secretary upon the written request of three Trustees. Five 
Trustees shall constitute a quorum, except for the election of officers or the adoption 
of the Annual Budget, when seven Trustees shall be required, but meetings may be 
adjourned by any less number from day to day, or to a day fixed, previous to the 
next regular meeting. 

Sec. 3. Reasonable written notice, designating the time and place of holding 
meetings, shall be given by the Secretary. 

ARTICLE III. 

HONORARY TRUSTEES. 

Section i. As a mark of respect, and in appreciation of services performed for 
the Institution, those Trustees who by reason of inability, on account of change of 
residence, or for other cause, or from indisposition to serve longer in such capacity, 
shall resign their place upon the Board, may be elected, by a majority of those 
present at any regular meeting of the Board, an Honorary Trustee for life. Such 
Honorary Trustee will receive notice of all meetings of the Board of Trustees, 
whether regular or special, and will be expected to be present at all such meetings and 
participate in the deliberations thereof, but an Honorary Trustee shall not have the 
right to vote. 

ARTICLE IV. 

OFFICERS. 

Section i. The officers shall be a President, a First Vice-President, a Second 
Vice-President, a Secretary, an Assistant Secretary, and a Treasurer. They shall be 
chosen by ballot by the Board of Trustees, a majority of those present and voting 
being necessary to elect. The President, the First Vice-President, and the Second 
Vice-President shall be chosen from among the members of the Board of Trustees. 
The meeting for the election of officers shall be held on the second Monday of Jan- 
uary of each year, and shall be called the Annual Meeting. 

Sec. 2. The officers shall hold office for one year, or until their successors are 
elected and qualified, but any officer may be removed at any regular meeting of the 
Board of Trustees by a vote of two-thirds of all the members of the Board. Vacancies 
in any office may be filled by the Board at any meeting. 

Sec. 3. The officers shall perform such duties as ordinarily appertain to their 
respective offices, and such as shall be prescribed by the By-Laws, or designated from 
time to time by the Board of Trustees. 



Jan., 1915. Annual Report of the Director. 435 

ARTICLE V. 

THE TREASURER. 

Section i. The Treasurer shall be custodian of the funds of the Corporation, 
except as hereinafter provided. He shall make disbursements only upon warrants 
drawn by the Director and countersigned by the President. In the absence or 
inability of the Director, warrants may be signed by the Chairman of the Finance 
Committee, and in the absence or inability of the President, may be countersigned 
by one of the Vice-Presidents. But no warrants shall be issued, except in conformity 
with a regularly prepared voucher, giving the name of the payee and stating the 
occasion for the expenditure, and verified and approved as hereinafter prescribed. 
It shall be no part of the duties of the Treasurer to see that the warrants have been 
issued in conformity with such vouchers. 

Sec. 2. The securities and muniments of title belonging to the corporation shall 
be placed in the custody of some Trust Company of Chicago to be designated by the 
Board of Trustees, which Trust Company shall collect the income and principal of 
said securities as the same become due, and pay same to the Treasurer, except as 
hereinafter provided. Said Trust Company shall allow access to and deliver any or 
all securities or muniments of title to the joint order of the following officers, namely: 
The President or one of the Vice-Presidents, jointly with the Chairman, or one of 
the Vice-Chairmen, of the Finance Committee of the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The Treasurer shall give bond in such amount, and with such sureties, 
as shall be approved by the Board of Trustees. 

Sec. 4. All vouchers executed for the payment of liabilities incurred in the 
administration of the Museum, shall be verified by the Auditor, and approved for 
payment by the Director, and the Chairman of the Administration Committee. 
All vouchers executed for expenditures for the construction or reconstruction of the 
Museum building, or buildings, shall be verified by the Auditor and approved for 
payment by the Chairman of the Building Committee. All vouchers executed in 
connection with the investments of the Corporation, or in any way having to do 
with the endowment funds of the Corporation, shall be verified by the Auditor and 
approved for payment by the Chairman of the Finance Committee. 

Sec. 5. The Harris Trust and Savings Bank of Chicago shall be Custodian of 
"The N. W. Harris Public School Extension of Field Museum" fund. The Bank 
shall make disbursements only upon warrants drawn by the Curator of "The N. W. 
Harris Public School Extension of Field Museum of Natural History" and counter- 
signed by the Auditor of Field Museum of Natural History. In the absence or 
inability of the said officers, warrants may be signed by such officers as shall be 
authorized by special resolution of the Board of Trustees of Field Museum of Natural 
History. But no warrant shall be issued, except in conformity with a regularly 
prepared voucher, giving the name of the payee and stating the occasion for the 
expenditure, and verified and approved by the officers above designated. It shall 
be no part of the duties of the Bank to see that the warrants have been issued in 
conformity with such vouchers. 

ARTICLE VI. 

the director. 
Section i. The Board of Trustees shall elect a Director of the Museum, who 
shall remain in office until his successor shall be elected. He shall have immediate 
charge and supervision of the Museum, and shall control the operations of the insti- 



436 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

tution, subject to the authority of the Board of Trustees and its Committees. The 
Director shall be the official medium of communication between the Board, or its 
Committees, and the scientific staff and maintenance force. 

Sec. 2. There shall be four scientific departments of the Museum — Anthropol- 
ogy, Botany, Geology, and Zoology, each under the charge of a Curator, subject to 
the authority of the Director. The Curators shall be appointed by the Board upon 
the recommendation of the Director, and shall serve during the pleasure of the 
Board. Subordinate staff officers in the scientific departments shall be appointed 
and removed by the Director upon the recommendation of the Curators of the 
respective Departments. The Director shall have authority to employ and remove 
all other employees of the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The Director shall make report to the Board at each regular meeting, 
recounting the operations of the Museum for the previous month. At the Annual 
Meeting, the Director shall make an Annual Report, reviewing the work of the 
Museum for the previous year, which Annual Report shall be published in pamphlet 
form for the information of the Trustees and Members, and for free distribution 
in such number as the Board may direct. 

ARTICLE VII. 

AUDITOR. 

Section i. The Board shall appoint an Auditor, who shall hold his office during 
the pleasure of the Board. He shall keep proper books of account, setting forth the 
financial condition and transactions of the Corporation, and of the Museum, and 
report thereon at each regular meeting, and at such other times as may be required 
by the Board. He shall certify to the correctness of all vouchers for the expenditure 
of the money of th: corporation. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

COMMITTEES. 

Section 1. There shall be five Committees as follows: Finance, Building, 
Auditing, Administration, and Executive. 

Sec. 2. The Finance and Auditing Committees shall each consist of three 
members, and the Building and Administration Committees shall each consist of 
five members. All members of these four Committees shall be elected by ballot 
by the Board at the Annual Meeting, and shall hold office for one year, and until 
their successors are elected and qualified. In electing the members of these Com- 
mittees, the Board shall designate the Chairman and Vice-Chairman by the order 
in which the members are named in the respective Committee; the first member 
named shall be Chairman, the second named the Vice-Chairman, and the third 
named, Second Vice-Chairman, succession to the Chairmanship being in this order 
in the event of the absence or disability of the Chairman. 

Sec. 3. The Executive Committee shall consist of the President of the Board, 
the Chairman of the Finance Committee, the Chairman of the Building Committee, 
the Chairman of the Administration Committee, the Chairman of the Auditing 
Committee, and two other members of the Board to be elected by ballot at the 
Annual Meeting. 

Sec. 4. Four members shall constitute a quorum of the Executive Committee; 
three members shall constitute a quorum of the Administration Committee, and 
in all other standing Committees, two members shall constitute a quorum. In the 



Jan., 1915. Annual Report of the Director. 437 

event that, owing to the absence or inability of members, a quorum of the regularly 
elected members cannot be present at any meeting of any Committee, then the 
Chairman thereof, or his successor, as herein provided, may summon any member of 
the Board of Trustees to act in place of the absentee. 

Sec. 5. The Finance Committee shall have supervision of investing the en- 
dowment and other permanent funds of the Corporation, and the care of such real 
estate as may become its property. It shall have authority to invest, sell, and 
reinvest funds, subject to the approval of the Board. 

Sec. 6. The Building Committee shall have supervision of the construc- 
tion, reconstruction, and extension of any and all buildings used for Museum 
purposes. 

Sec. 7. The Executive Committee shall be called together from time to time 
as the Chairman may consider necessary, or as he may be requested to do by three 
members of the Committee, to act upon such matters affecting the administration 
of the Museum as cannot await consideration at the Regular Monthly Meetings of 
the Board of Trustees. It shall, before the beginning of each fiscal year, prepare 
and submit to the Board an itemized Budget, setting forth the probable receipts 
from all sources for the ensuing year, and make recommendations as to the ex- 
penditures which should be made for routine maintenance and fixed charges. Upon 
the adoption of the Budget by the Board, the respective Committees shall be con- 
sidered as authorized to make the expenditures detailed therein. No increase in 
the expenditures under any items of the Budget shall be made, except by authority 
of the Board of Trustees, but the Executive Committee shall have authority, in 
cases of emergency, to expend a further total sum not exceeding two thousand 
dollars in any one month. 

Sec. 8. The Administration Committee shall have general supervision of the 
affairs of the Museum. The Committee shall hold one meeting each month with 
the Director at the Museum within a week preceding each Monthly Meeting of 
the Board of Trustees. 

Sec. 9. The Auditing Committee shall have supervision over all accounting 
and bookkeeping, and full control of the financial records. It shall cause the same, 
once each year, or oftener, to be examined by an expert individual or firm, and shall 
transmit the report of such expert individual or firm to the Board at the next ensuing 
regular meeting after such examination shall have taken place. 

Sec. 10. The Chairman of each Committee shall report the acts and proceedings 
thereof at the next ensuing regular meeting of the Board. 

Sec. 11. The President shall be ex- officio a member of all Committees and 
Chairman of the Executive Committee. Vacancies occurring in any Committee 
may be filled by ballot at any regular meeting of the Board. 

ARTICLE IX. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE. 

Section i. At the November meeting of the Board, each year a Nominating 
Committee of three shall be chosen by lot. Said Committee shall make nom- 
inations for membership of the Finance Committee, the Building Committee, the 
Administration Committee, and the Auditing Committee, and for two members 
of the Executive Committee, from among the Trustees, to be submitted at the 
ensuing December meeting and voted upon at the following Annual Meeting in 
January. 



438 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 

ARTICLE X. 

Section i. Whenever the word "Museum" is employed in the By-Laws of 
the Corporation, it shall be taken to mean the building in which the Museum as an 
Institution is located and operated, the material exhibited, the material in study 
collections, or in storage, furniture, fixtures, cases, tools, records, books, and all 
appurtenances of the Institution, and the workings, researches, installations, ex- 
penditures, field work, laboratories, library publications, lecture courses, and all 
scientific and maintenance activities. 

Sec. 2. These By-Laws may be amended at any regular meeting of the Board 
of Trustees by a two-thirds vote of all the members present, provided the amend- 
ment shall have been proposed at a preceding regular meeting. 



Jan., 1915. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



439 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 



EDWARD E. AYER 
HARLOW N. HIGINBOTHAM 
CHARLES B. CORY 



Stanley Mccormick 

mrs. timothy b. blackstone 

norman w. harris 

DECEASED. 

ROBERT F. CUMMINGS 

GEORGE M. PULLMAN 

MARY D. STURGES 



ALLISON V. ARMOUR 
ERNEST R. GRAHAM 
NORMAN W. HARRIS 
VERNON SHAW KENNEDY 
GEORGE MANIERRE 

DANIEL H. BURNHAM 
JOSEPH N. FIELD 



PATRONS. 

JOHN S. MILLER 
JOHN BARTON PAYNE 
FREDERICK W. PUTNAM 
FREDERICK J. V. SKIFF 
WILLARD A. SMITH 

DECEASED. 

WILLIAM I. BUCHANAN 
EDWIN WALKER 



44Q Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



CORPORATE MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, GEORGE E. 
ALDIS, OWEN F. 
ARMOUR, ALLISON V. 
AYER, EDWARD E. 

BARTLETT, A. C. 
BLACK, JOHN C. 
BLAIR, WATSON F. 
BUTLER, EDWARD B 

CHALMERS, W. J. 
CHATFIELD-TAYLOR, H. C. 
CLARK, JOHN M. 
CRANE, RICHARD T. 

EASTMAN, SIDNEY C. 
ELLSWORTH, JAMES W. 

FIELD, MARSHALL III 
FIELD, STANLEY 

GAGE, LYMAN J. 
GETTY, HENRY H. 
GRAHAM, ERNEST R. 
GUNSAULUS, FRANK W. 
GUNTHER, C. F. 

HARRIS, NORMAN W. 



higinbotham, h. n. 
hutchinson, charles l. 

jones, arthur b. 

kennedy, vernon shaw 
kohlsaat, herman h. 

lathrop, bryan 

Mccormick, cyrus h. 
manierre, george 
miller, john s. 
mitchell, john j. 

payne, john barton 
peck, ferd. w. 
porter, george f. 
putnam, frederick w. 

ream, norman b. 
ryerson, martin a. 

skiff, frederick j. v. 
smith, willard a. 
sprague, a. a. 
sprague, a. a., 2d. 
stone, melville e. 



DECEASED. 



ARMOUR, PHILIP D. 
BAKER, WILLIAM T. 
BISSEL, GEORGE F. 
BLATCHFORD, E. W. 
BUCHANAN, W. I. 
BUCKINGHAM, EBENEZER 
BURNHAM, DANIEL H. 
CRAWFORD, ANDREW 
CURTIS, WILLIAM E. 
DAVIS, GEORGE R. 
FIELD, JOSEPH N. 
FITZSIMONS, CHARLES 
HALE, WILLIAM E. 
HARPER, WILLIAM R. 
HATCH. AZEL F. 
HEAD, FRANKLIN H. 
JACKSON, HUNTINGTON W. 



LEITER. L. Z. 
McCAGG, E. B. 
McCLURG, A. C. 
McNALLY, ANDREW 
PATTERSON, ROBERT W. 
PEARCE, J. IRVING 
PETERSON, ANDREW 
PULLMAN, GEORGE M. 
SCHNEIDER, GEORGE 
SCOTT, JAMES W. 
SMITH, BYRON L. 
STOCKTON, JOSEPH 
WALKER, EDWIN 
WALLER, R. A. 
WALSH, JOHN R. 
WILLIAMS, NORMAN 



Jan., 1915. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



441 



LIFE MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, GEORGE E. 
ALDIS, OWEN F. 

BARRETT, MRS. A. D. 

BARRETT, ROBERT L. 

BARTLETT, A. C. 

BLACKSTONE, MRS. TIMOTHY B. 

BLAINE, MRS. EMMONS 

BLAIR, CHAUNCEY J. 

BLAIR, HENRY A. 

BLAIR, WATSON F. 

BOOTH, W. VERNON 

BUTLER, EDWARD B. 

BYLLESBY, H. M. 

CARTON, L. A. 
CHALMERS, WILLIAM J. 
CRANE, CHARLES RICHARD 
CRANE, RICHARD T. 
CUMMINGS, D. MARK 

DEERING, CHARLES 
DELANO, FREDERIC A. 
DICK, ALBERT BLAKE 
DRAKE, TRACY C. 

FARWELL, WALTER 
FAY, C. N. 
FIELD, STANLEY 
FULLER, WILLIAM A. 

GARTZ, A. F. 
GRISCOM, CLEMENT A. 
GROMMES, JOHN B. 

HAMILL, ERNEST A. 
HILL, LOUIS W. 
HOROWITZ, L. J. 
HOXIE, MRS. JOHN A. 
HUGHITT, MARVIN 
HUTCHINSON, C. L. 

ISHAM, MRS. KATHERINE 
PORTER. 



johnson, frank s. 

johnson, mrs. elizabeth ayer 

jones, arthur b. 

keep, chauncey 

king, francis 

king, james c. 

kirk, walter radcliffe 

lawson, victor f. 

Mccormick, mrs. 
Mccormick, cyrus h. 
Mccormick, harold f. 
MacVEAGH, franklin 
MASON, WILLIAM S. 
MITCHELL, J. J. 

NEWELL, A. B. 

ORR, ROBERT M. 

PAM, MAX 
PIKE, EUGENE S. 
PORTER, GEORGE F. 
PORTER, H. H. 

REAM, MRS. CAROLINE P. 
REAM, NORMAN B. 
REVELL, ALEX. H. 
ROSENWALD, JULIUS 
RUSSELL, EDMUND A. 
RYERSON, MRS. CARRIE H. 
RYERSON, MARTIN A. 

SMITH, ORSON 
SPRAGUE, A. A. 
SPRAGUE, A. A., 2D. 
STURGES, GEORGE 

THORNE, GEORGE R. 

WILLARD, ALONZO J. 



442 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



ANNUAL MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, CYRUS H. 
ADAMS. MILWARD 
ALLERTON, ROBERT H. 
ARMOUR, GEORGE A. 

BAILEY, EDWARD P. 
BECKER, A. G. 
BILLINGS, C. K. G. 
BILLINGS, DR. FRANK 
BOAL, CHARLES T. 
BROWN, WILLIAM L. 
BURLEY, CLARENCE A. 

COMSTOCK, WILLIAM C. 
CONOVER, CHARLES H. 
COONLEY-WARD, MRS. L. A. 
CORWITH, CHARLES R. 
CUDAHY, JOHN 
CUMMINGS, E. A. 
CURTIS, D. H. 

DAY, A. M. 
DEERING, JAMES 
DILLMAN, L. M. 

EISENDRATH, W. N. 

FAIR, R. M. 
FORGAN, JAMES B. 
FORSYTH, ROBERT 
FRANK, HENRY L. 
FULLER, O. F. 
FURST, CONRAD 

GAYLORD, FREDERIC 
GLESSNER, J. J. 
GOODRICH, A. W. 
GORDON, EDWARD K. 
GREY, CHARLES F. 
GREY, WILLIAM L. 
GURLEY, W. W. 



HARRIS, GEORGE B. 
HARRIS, JOHN F. 
HASKELL, FREDERICK T. 
HIBBARD, WILLIAM G., Jr. 
HITCHCOCK, R. M. 
HOLT, GEORGE H. 
HOPKINS, JOHN P. 

INSULL, SAMUEL 

JENKINS, GEORGE H. 
JONES, J. S. 

KEEFER, LOUIS 
KEITH, W. SCOTT 
KIMBALL, EUGENE S. 
KIMBALL, MRS. MARK 

LAMB, FRANK H. 
LAY, A. TRACY 
LEE, BLEWETT 
LEIGH, EDWARD B. 
LINCOLN, ROBERT T. 
LINN, W. R. 
LOGAN, F. G. 
LORD, J. B. 
LOWDEN, FRANK O. 
LYTTON, HENRY C. 

McCREA, W. S. 
McWILLIAMS, LAFAYETTE 
MacFARLAND, HENRY J. 
MAGEE, HENRY W. 
MANSON, WILLIAM 
MANSURE, E. L. 
MAYER, LEVY 
MERRYWEATHER, GEORGE 
MEYER, MRS. M. A. 
MILLER, CHARLES P. 
MOORE, L. T. 
MOORE, N. G. 
MULLIKEN, A. H. 



Jan., 1915. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



443 



NATHAN, ADOLPH 
NOLAN, JOHN H. 
NORTON, O. W. 

OEHNE, THEODORE 
ORB, JOHN A. 
OSBORN, HENRY A. 

PALMER, PERCIVAL B. 
PARKER, FRANCIS W. 
PEARSON, EUGENE H. 
PINKERTON, W. A. 
PORTER, WASHINGTON 

RIPLEY, E. P. 
ROSENBAUM, JOSEPH 
ROSENFELD, MRS. MAURICE 
RUNNELLS, J. S. 

SCHMIDT, DR. O. L. 
SCHWARTZ, G. A. 
SEIPP, MRS. C. 
SHEDD, JOHN G. 



SHORTALL, JOHN L. 
SKINNER, THE MISSES 
SOPER, JAMES P. 
SOUTHWELL, H. E. 
SPENCE, MRS. ELIZABETH E. 
SPOOR, J. A. 
STOCKTON, JOHN T. 
STUART, ROBERT 

TEMPLETON, THOMAS 

UIHLEIN, EDWARD G. 

WACKER, CHARLES H. 
WALKER, JAMES R. 
WALKER, WILLIAM B. 
WALLER, EDWARD C. 
WEBSTER, GEORGE H. 
WHITE, A. STAMFORD 
WHITEHEAD, W. M. 
WILSON, MRS. E. C. 
WILSON, M. H. 
WOODCOCK, LINDSAY T. 



DECEASED. 
BIRKHOFF, GEORGE, Jr. 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE LXX. 
















/ / 







Getting Down the California Redwood Trunk Specimen for the Museum 
Collection Representing North American Forestry. 



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FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE LXXII. 




Part of the Crated Specimen of California Redwood Showing the Size of the 

Boards Secured for the Museum Collections Representing 

North American Forestry. 



446 



Fieui Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. IV. 



Opposite 

Plate No. Page 

Fossil Titanotheres from Utah Eocene XXXVI] 232 

Habitat Group. Golden Eagle XXXVIII 240 

One of the Elements. Vegetable Standards of Weight and 

Measure XXXIX 

Skeleton of Early Rodent. Lower Miocene of Nebraska XL 254 

Habitat Group. American Beaver XLI 200 

Habitat Group. Great Blue Herron  XLI I 266 

Igorot Women Spinning and Weaving X I.I II 272 

( Jeorge Manierre XLIV 275 

Groups of Tropical American Fishes and Tiger Shark with 38 

Voting XLV 2S4 

Parade Uniform, Front and Back, of Officer in Attendance on the 

Emperor in the Palace, Peking, China (XVIIIth Century) . XLV I 288 

Skeleton of Early Hoofed Mammal (Dolichorhinus longiceps) XLVII 306 

Habitat Group. Birds of Laysan Island XLVII I 308 

Type of Case Loaned to Public Schools by The N. W. Harris 

Public School Extension of Field Museum XLIX 312 

Reproductions of Diatoms in the Microscopic Field L 3ls 

Reproduction of a Microscope Field Showing Bacteria LI 328 

The Bacteria LII 338 

Scene from a Chinese Religious Drama LIII 344 

Bronze Colander, China, Early Archaic Period LIV 350 

Model Illustrating Panel — Retreating System of Coal Mines. . . . LV 358 

Skeleton of Caenolestes obscurus, Thomas, from South America . . . LVI 362 

The late Joseph N. Field LVII 365 

The late Byron L. Smith LVIII 370 

East African Buffalo (Syncerus caffer radcliffei) LIX 374 

Skeleton of Mammoth (Elephas Columbi) from Southern Wash- 
ington LX 382 

Italian Bronze Cista, Third Century B. C LXI 388 

Embroidered Satin Panels, China, Eighteenth Century LXII 392 

Chinese Takin (Budorcas bedfordi) LXI II 396 

Built-in Hollow Manikin Method for Mounting Small Mammals . LXIV 398 

Breast Ornaments of Shell and Tortoise Shell, Admiralty Islands . LXV 402 
Fossil Skeleton of Cave Bear (Ursus spelaeus) from Triest, 

Austria LXVI 406 

Bird Life on Walrus Island, Bering Sea LXVII 410 

Slab four by seven feet on which are shown the fossil skeletons 

of twenty-five Water Deer (Leptomeryx evansi) LXVIII 420 

Marble Head of Taoist, God of Creation, China LXIX 430 

Getting down the California Redwood Trunk Specimen for the 

Museum LXX 443 

Getting the "Wheel Specimen" of California Redwood out of 

the forest LXXI 443 

Part of the Crated Specimen of California Redwood LXXII 443 



Note. — Each Report has its own table of contents; see pages 1, 101. 
275, and 365. 



is:;. 



NDEX 1' > ILLUSTRATIONS. 



VOLI Ml iv— Kl:l'( >KI SERIES. 



The Late Edwin Walker. 

White Pine Monograph 

i Iroup of < rorillas 

Enlarged Flower < Iluster of the < Srape-frait . . . . 

Miniature Tinguian Village 

Skeleton of < Sorillaa 

^-Skeleton of Extinc< Mammal 

I xcavating Skull of Telmatherium 

- ' iroup nf Tinguian Iron Workers. 
: Model of Twenty Stamp Gold Mill 
: Male and Female Yellowish Chimpanzee 
t/> Group of California Condors with Nest and Egg 



( iroup nf Pelicans and < lormorants Breeding al Quill Lake 

( iroup of Wild Turkej a 

Group of Water Birds Breeding al Quill Lake 

Norman W. I [arris 

( Jollection of Paleozoic Sponges 

The Papaw Carica Papaya of the American Tropics 
Miniature Reproduction of Life and Activities in [gorot Village, 

P.I. 

I labital < Iroup. I. nun 

Model and Section of Modern Iron Blast Furnace 

The Mangrove 

Group of [gorot Pottery Makers. Samoki, I'. I 

(Iroup of American Antelope or Prong-Horn 

Frail < !luster of 'lie [lang-Ilang 

Habitat (iroup. Meadow Mice or Voles 

Flowering Branch of Lignum Vitae 

Babital (.roup of Northern White-footed Mice 

Devi xhibiting Petroleum Sands 

 n F. Blair 

Habital (iroup. Sonora Grizzly Bear 

Chinese Stone Sculpture of T'ang Period 742 A. D ol Tortoise 

1 arrying Inscribed Tablet 
Model of Early Blast Furnace and Model of Catalian Forge 
Life History of a Liverwort 
Habitat Group. Whooping and Sandhill < 'ranes 
Aurantiaceae < 'itras Family 

i IS 



Plate Ni 


i ipposlte 


1 


1 


II 


]J 


III 


20 


IV 


28 


V 


38 


VI 


Is 


VII 


58 


\ III 


7() 


IX 


SI) 


X 




XI 


!U 


XII 


LOO 


XII] 


PHI 


XIV 


100 


w 


100 


XV] 


KM 


XVII 


110 


win 


lis 


XIX 


126 


XX 


133 


XXI 


138 


XXII 


i:»i 


Will 


160 


XXIV 


H Hi 


XXV 


170 


XXVI 


176 


X XVI] 


17s 


XXVIU 


181 


X X 1 X 


182 


X X X 


Is:; 


XXXI 


!ss 


XXXII 


1M( 


XXXIII 


.'( 12 


X X X 1 V 


21 »s 


XXX \ 


218 


XXXV] 


226 



UNIVERSmr OF ILLINOISURBANA 



3 0112 071770561