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CI 11 L I Sj o I :, 




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y 



LIBUKY 

UNIVERS/ry OF ILLINOIS 
UftSANA 

Field Museum of Natural History. 
?> Publication i86. 
Report Series. Vol. V, No. i. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 



# 



TO THE 



BOARD OF trustees 



FOR THE YEAR 191 5. 




Chicago, U. S. A. 

January, 191 6. 



fHfc UHHmY Of- 8 HI: 

 -- >d2. 1942 
UNIVERSITY Of lUiNOli^ 



riflO MUiCUM 0> MATUHAL HlfTOKV 



RCPORTS, PlATf I. 




THE LATE NORMAS B. RLav 

An Incorporator antl Trustee of tl 



Field Museum of Natural History. 

Publication i86. 

Report Series. Vol. V, No. i. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



BOARD OF trustees 



FOR THE YEAR 1915. 




Chicago, U. S. A. 

January, 19 1 6. 



fHfc IJBhAKV Ul- Hit 

OEC 2 2 1942 
UNIVERSITY Of Uimi^ 




/- 



\c\ j 5^ /S 



CONTENTS 



Page 

Board of Trustees 2 

Officers and Committees 3 

Staff of the Museum 4 

Report of the Director 5 

Maintenance 7 

Publications 8 

Mailing List 8 

Library 9 

Cataloguing, Inventorying, and Labeling lo 

Accessions 12 

Expeditions and Field Work 19 

Installation and Permanent Improvement 20 

The N. W. Harris Public School Extension 29 

Photography and Illustration 31 

Printing 31 

Attendance 31 

Financial Statement 34 

Attendance and Receipts 36 

Accessions 37 

Department of Anthropology 37 

Department of Botany 38 

Department of Geology 41 

Department of Zoology 43 

Section of Photography 46 

The Library 46 

Articles of Incorporation 61 

Amended By-Laws 63 

List of Honorary Members and Patrons 69 

List of Corporate Members 70 

List of Life Members 72 

List of Annual Members 73 



Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. V 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

George E. Adams. Arthur B. Jones. 

Edward E. Ayer. George Ma.sierre. 

Watson F. Blair. Cyrus H. McCormick. 

William J. Chalmers. George F. Porter. 

Marshall Field III. Martin A. Ryerson. 

Stanley Field. Frederick J. V. Stirr. 

Harlow N. Hicindotham. A. A. Strague, and. 

Chauncey Keep. 



HONORARY TRUSTEE. 
Owen F. Aldis. 



DECEASED. 



George R. Davis. Norman B. Ream. 

Marshall Field, Jr. Edwin Walker. 

Huntington W. Jackson. Norman Williams. 



Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 



OFFICERS. 

Stanley Field, President. 

Martin A. Ryerson, First Vice-President. 
Watson F. Blair, Second Vice-President. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff, Secretary. 

D. C, Davies, Assistant Secretary and Auditor. 
Solomon A. Smith, Treasurer. 



Edward E. Ayer. 
Watson F. Blair. 
William J. Chalmers. 



COMMITTEES. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Stanley Field. 

Marshall Field III. 
George Manierre. 
A. A. Sprague, 2nd. 



Watson F. Blair. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Martin A. Ryerson. 
Arthur B. Jones. 



William J. Chalmers. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff. 



BUILDING COMMITTEE. 

Cyrus H. McCormick. 
A. A. Sprague, 2nd. 



Stanley Field. 



SUB-COMMITTEE OF BUILDING COMMITTEE. 

A. A. Sprague, 2nd. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff. 



George Manierre. 



AUDITING COMMITTEE. 



Arthur B. Jones. 
George E. Adams. 



Watson F. Blair. 
Arthur B. Jones. 



ADMINISTRATION COMMITTEE. 

Edward E. Ayer. 

George Manierre. 
George F. Porter. 



Field Museum of Natural Histoby — Reports, Vol. V. 



STAFF OF TUB MUbtUM. 

oiHtcTon. 
Frederick J. V. Surr. 

OCPARTMCNT or AMTHNOfOLOOY. 

Berthold Laufer, Curator. 

Charles L. Owen, Assistant Curator Division of Archaology. 

Albert B. Lewis, Assistant Curator of African and Mela- 

nesian Ethnology. 
Fay Cooper Cole, Assistant Curator Physical Anthropology 
and Malayan Ethnology. 

OCPARTMCNT OF BOTANY. 

Charles F. Millspaugh, Curator. 

DtPARTMCNT OF OCOLOOY. 

Oliver C. Farrincton, Curator. H. W. Nichols, Assistant Curator . 
Elmer S. Riggs, Assistant Curator of PaUontohf^y. 

DEPARTMENT OF 200L00Y. 

Charles B. Cory, Curator. 
Wilfred H. Osgood, Assistant Curator of .\[ammalo(^y and Ornithology. 
William J. Gerhard, Assistant Curator Division of Entomology. 
Edmond N. Gueret, Assistant Curator Division of Osttohgy. 

RECORDER. ASSISTANT RECORDER. 

D. C. Davies. Benj. Bridge 

THK LIBRARY. 

Elsie Lippincott, Librarian. 

Emily M. Wilcoxson, Assistant Librarian 



THE N. W. HARRIS PUBLIC SCHOOL CXTENSlOM. 

S. C. SIMMS, Curator. 



January t, 1916. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR. 

1915 



To the Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History: 

I have the honor to present a report of the operations of the Museum 
for the year ending December 31, 191 5. 

Pursuing the announced policy of the Musetmi, its efforts during 
the year have continued to concentrate upon the preparation for ex- 
hibition in the new Museum building of such material as had been 
previously acquired. This material is of a character that when properiy 
installed will fit into the general exhibition scheme which has been based 
fully as much upon material in storage as material in cases. Therefore 
the progress that has marked the period of this report has been largely 
due to the labors of the preparators, the taxidermists and the skilled 
workmen, and no particular effort has been made to acquire new mate- 
rial either by expedition or purchase. Later it is expected that some 
elimination of early work and imperfect material will take place. 

The contract between the South Park Commissioners and the Mu- 
seum corporation, granting a site for the new building near and south of 
Twelfth street extended in an easterly direction, was consimimated on 
January 27th. The work upon the new Museum building, actually 
commenced on July 26th, has progressed with such vigor that the date 
on which the edifice will be ready for occupation has been considerably 
advanced. The impetus given to the building operations has had its 
influence during the past four months upon the scientific staff, and plans 
for installation, the system of transfer, the arrangements of the halls, 
ofi&ces, laboratories, work rooms, shops, etc., have received much at- 
tention on the part of the curators and their assistants. It is not con- 
sidered necessary, if pertinent, to discuss the progress of the new build- 
ing in these reports, in as much as the entire work and its responsibil- 
ities rests upon and within the Building Committee, but, as items of 
history in the development of the Musetmi as a whole, simple record of 
the work is considered permissible. The Board of Trustees has granted 
the request of the Chicago Geographic Society for permanent quarters 
in the new Museum building. 

The report of the expert from Graham, Burnham & Company, who 
examined the present Museum building, indicates that the physical 

5 



6 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

condition of the structure is safe and stable. A thorouRh examination 
of the present Iniildin^ \s*as also made by expert inspectors to examine 
the fire conditions and the protection and equipment for the prevention 
and cxtinpuishinK of fires, who report that a hi^h degree of precau- 
tion is exercised insofar as fire hazard in the building was concerned 
and tliat the protection was good and well maintained. Three minor 
defects in the system were noted and the recommendations to remedy 
these have been carried out. 

A committee of citizens interested in the establishment of an aqua- 
rium addressed the Board of Trustees to ascertain to what extent the 
authorities of the Museum would support the movement and contribute 
scientific assistance or control of its management. The response of the 
Board was not only in favor of establishing the aquarium, especially if 
a location could be obtained in proximity to the new Muscimi building, 
but the Trustees declared their willingness and their desire to accept 
the scientific management of the proposed aquarium. 

A review of the acquisitions of the Museum by gift and purchase dur- 
ing the past year will demonstrate the increasing wealth of the In- 
stitution. Among the gifts may be mentioned many from the ex- 
hibiting countries and indi\'iduals at the Panama-Pacific International 
Exposition. The Museum acquired by purchase some striking and at- 
tractive material from the Chinese Government, which had been on 
exhibition at San Francisco. Other interesting material not costly but 
unusual and dc-sirable was also purchased. Special mention should be 
made of the gift of Mr. Fritz von Frantzius, consisting of two Imperial 
Chinese Jade books and a collection of Japanese coins. 

The resignation of Dr. George A. Dorsey, Curator of the Department 
of Anthropology, after twenty years service with the Institution, 
created a vacancy which was filled by the appointment of Dr. Berthold 
Laufer as Curator of the Department. Dr. Laufer was formerly the 
Associate Curator of Asiatic Ethnolog>' and, during the year Dr. 
Dorsey was absent in the Orient, assimicd the duties of Acting Curator. 
His extensive and varied experience in scientific research and investiga- 
tion has specially qualified Dr. Laufer for the position to which he 
has been appointed. He has conducted expeditions into eastern Siberia 
for exploration of the ethnology of native tribes and to Tibet and China 
for culture-historical investigations and ethnological collections; was 
assistant ciu^tor of ethnology at the American Muscimi of Natural 
Histor>'; lecturer in anthropology and East-Asiatic languages at Colum- 
bia University, and is the author of many important books and papers 
relating to the ethnolog>*, archacolog>' and philolog>' of the East. 

With funds contributed by Mr. Norman W. Harris an attractive and 



Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 7 

instructive exhibit of the Harris Public School Extension cases was made 
at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition. The exhibit excited 
considerable interest and much favorable comment on the part of visitors 
at the Exposition and was the means of inaugurating serious considera- 
tion of the adoption of this system of education both in foreign coun- 
tries and in other cities of the United States. The Japanese government 
asked for type cases for the information of the Imperial Department of 
Education. The exhibit was awarded a grand prize by the International 
Jury. 

During the year Mr. Chauncey Keep became a Corporate Member of 
the Museum and was also elected a member of the Board of Trustees 
to fill a vacancy in the Board. 

The following elections of honorary positions in connection with the 
Institution have been made during the past year. Mr. Fritz von 
Frantzius and Mr. Henry J. Patten were elected Life Members. Chiefly 
in recognition for their support and services in affairs of the site for the 
new building, Mr. Charles L. Hutchinson, Mr. Edward B. Butler, and 
Mr. Charles H. Markham were elected Patrons of the Museimi. Mr. 
Albert M. ColHns of Philadelphia and Mr. Lee Gamett Day of New 
York were elected Patrons of the Musetma in view of the eminent ser- 
vices they have rendered to the Institution. 

Mr. Norman B. Ream, who has been a member of the Board of 
Trustees from its organization, but who during recent years has resided 
in New York, died on February 9, 191 5. The death of Dr. Daniel 
Giraud Elliot, which occurred on December 22nd, a prominent man in 
science, who resigned from the staff of the Museum after twelve years of 
service as Curator of the Department of Zoology, has to be recorded. 
Prof. Frederick Ward Putnam, formerly professor of American archae- 
ology and ethnology at Harvard University and curator of the Peabody 
Museimi, and a Patron of Field Museimi of Natiiral History since 
January 31, 1898, died at Cambridge on August 14th. Mr. Robert F. 
Cummings, an Honorary Member of the Museum, who provided liberal 
funds for expeditions, for surveys and collections in the Philippine 
Islands and whose generosity has permitted the Museum to bring 
together a very extensive and attractive Philippine ethnology exhibit, 
died on December 31, 19 14. 

MAINTENANCE. — Thc budgct approved by the Board of Trustees 
provided the sum of $144,050 for the maintenance of the Museum for 
the fiscal year. The actual amoimt expended was $124,185, leaving 
a balance within the anticipated expense for the year of approximately 
$19,000. In addition to the cost of maintenance siuns were expended 
for collections, new installation and expeditions that brought the total 



8 Peelo Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

to $181,000. As will be observed from the details of the financial 
statement the sum of $7,075, representing individual contributions, 
has also been disbursed for special collections and expeditions. 

PuttucATHMt. — Six publications were issued during the year, com- 
prising parts of five volumes, details of which follow: 
Pub. 180. — Anthropological Series. Vol. XIV, No. i. Traditions of 

the Tinguian. A Study in Philippine Folk-lore. By Fay- 
Cooper Cole. 126 pages. Edition 1500. 
Pub. 181. — Report Scries, Vol. IV, No. 5. Annual Report of the 

Director to the Board of Trustees for the year 1914. 78 

pages. 16 half-tones. Edition 2500. 
Pub. 182. — Ornithological Scries, V^ol. I, No. 8. Descriptions of New 

Birds from South America and Adjacent Islands. By 

Charles B. Cory. 10 pages. Edition 1500. 
Pub. 183. — Ornithological Series, Vol. I, No. 9. Notes on South 

American Birds, with Descriptions of New Subspecies. 

By Charles B. Cory. ^ pages. Edition 1500. 
Pub. 184. — Anthropological Scries, Vol. XV, No. i. The Diamond. 

A Study in Chinese and Hellenistic Folk-lore. By Berthold 

Laufer. 75 pages. Edition 1500. 
Pub. 185. — Zoological Series, Vol. X, No. 13. New Mammals from 

Brazil and Peru. By Wilfred H. Osgood. 12 pages. 

Edition 1500. 

Names on Mailing List 

Domestic 523 

Foreign 672 



M95 



OimnaunoN of foreign Exchanges 

Africa 20 Holland SO 

Anstralia .^7 India .18 

Austria ^3 lUily 36 

Bd^um 18 Japan 10 

Borneo i Java ... 4 

Bulgaria i Mexico ... 19 

Canada 27 Norway 8 

Central Amoica 7 Portugal 5 

China i Russia t6 

Denmark South America 29 

Prance 54 Spain 7 

G«nnany i.U Sweden 14 

Great Britain 117 Switzerland 23 

Greece i West Indies 45 



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Jan., 1916. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



Distribution of domestic Exchanges 

Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia . 

Florida 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts .... 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 



2 
I 

24 

10 

18 

2 

39 

4 

I 

56 

15 

15 

6 

3 
4 

7 
8 

54 
II 
8 
2 
12 
2 
6 
2 



New Hampshire 
New Jersey 
New Mexico . 
New York . 
North Carolina 
North Dakota 
Ohio . . . 
Oklahoma . 
Oregon . 



.... 4 

. . . . II 

.... 3 

.... 68 

.... 6 

. . . . 2 

.... 19 

.... 3 

. . . I 

Pennsylvania 33 

.... 4 

. . . . 2 

2 

. . . . 2 

.... 3 

. . . . I 

.... 3 

.... 4 

.... 6 

.... 5 



Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 17 



Wyoming . 
Cuba . . . . 
Hawaii . . . , 
Philippine Islands 
Porto Rico 



2 
3 
4 
3 
I 



THE LIBRARY. — The books and pamphlets accessioned during the 
year were 3,400, bringing the total number of books and pamphlets in 
the library to 68,275, which are distributed as follows: 

General Library 44,221 

Department of Anthropology 3i293 

Department of Botany 6,946 

Department of Geology 9,579 

Department of Zoology 4i236 



Notwithstanding the small number of serial publications received 
from foreign exchanging institutions, there is a slight increase over the 
books and pamphlets received during the previous year. Among the 
gifts of the year is the simiptuous edition of Japanese Temples and Treas- 
ures in three illustrated volimies presented by His Imperial Majesty's 
Commissioner General to the Panama-Pacific International Exposition. 
The edition is limited to two hundred copies and was especially prepared 
for the Exposition. Through the Minister of International Affairs, 
Wellington, New Zealand, a copy of the Illustrated Flora of New Zealand 



lo Field Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

was rccjcivcd. An almost cor  ' oi its Transactions was presented 

by the South Australia R< ty, Adelaide. The Soci6t< des 

Sciences Naturallcs, La Roc:. v. ice, presented a complete set to 

date of its Annales and the Arc): , cal Sun-cy of India eleven of its 

eariy Reports to assist in complctinR the Museum file. Other gifts 
that ha\*c been received arc listed elsewhere. The late Dr. Scth E. 
Meck's ichthyolotncal librarv*, consisting largely of monographic papers 
and pamphlets, was purchased and from it 2,000 new titles were se- 
cured. These have been catalogued and boimd. Other important 
acquisitions by purchase were: The Oxford English Dictionary'; Aud^ 
bcrt, Histoirc Naturcllc des Singes et Maids, 1800; Bcrthelot et Ruellc, 
Collection des Ancicns Alchimistes Grccs; Hobson, Chinese Potter>- and 
Porcelain; sets to date of the Journal of Indian Art Omithologische 
Monatsbcrichte and The Zoologische Annalen. 

The number of periodicals received was ninety-nine with twenty- 
two in subscription sets which have been prc\'iousJy entered. There 
were bound during the year 564 books, pamphlets and serial publica- 
tions, and 19,275 cards were \^Titten and added to the catalogues. 
Twelve installments of the John Crerar Library cards have been re- 
ceived and added to its catalogue. 

There was an increasing number of students and other visitors who 
found the librar>' of service in seeking volumes not obtainable in other 
Ubraries in the city. A rearrangement of the book cases in the reading 
room was made during the year that rendered the books more accessible 
and improved its general appearance. 

Departmental Cataloouino. Inventoryinq. and Labeling. — The work of 

cataloguing in the Department of Anthropology during the year 
is quite notable, 10,062 cards ha\nng been written. The cards are 
distributed over the di\-isions as follows: 975 North American, chiefly 
Hopi ethnol^i -^ -.071 Mclanesian ethnology; 5,027 New Guinea, col- 
lections by ^ :;T, V'oogdt and Dorscy; 932 A.siatic ethnology*; and 
57 classical archaeology'. These cards have been entered in the in- 
ventory books of the Department, which now number 38, and the total 
number of cards recorded beginning from the first volume is 139,516. 
During the year the Department wvls supplied with 2.664 printed labels, 
which have been distributed as follows: 720 Ph>-sical Anthropology; 
1,250 Mrs. T. B. Blackstone Collection; 52 Models of Chinese Boats; 
373 Joseph N. Field Collection; 12 Edward E. Aver Philippine Guns; 
249 Classical Archaeology; and 8 objects in the Gem Room. From the 
section of Photography the Department has received 1,310 prints, which 
have been duly classified and added to the departmental albtims, euh 
print ha\-ing received a ty-pewrittcn description. Three albimis re- 



Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. ii 

lating to New Guinea were prepared. A catalogue of lantern-slides 
was inaugurated by the Department, for which 1,537 cards have been 
written. The sHdes have been arranged in the succession of the num- 
bers and placed in cardboard boxes v/ith a label pasted in front, showing 
the range of the nimibers, subject, and locality of the slides. By con- 
sulting the card-catalogue it is possible to locate any slide or to ascertain 
what slides relate to a particular subject, region, or tribe. To meet 
the demand of the public for information on specimens in the collec- 
tions and as copies of many labels have been solicited by students, a 
permanent record of all labels written for the Department has been 
established. When printing labels intended for installation, copies 
are made, which are mounted on cardboard, and classified according 
to the cases in which the specimens are installed. These cards, 
620 of which have thus far been prepared, are filed in proper order 
in cabinets showing identification labels on the outside. A card- 
catalogue of the exhibition cases, which have all been provided with 
numbers, has also been inaugurated. 

All material received by the Department of Botany during the year 
has been fully catalogued and distributed, either into installation or 
classified and placed ready for installation. There were catalogued 
19,831 sheets of specimens and 20,305 entries have been made, making 
the total nimiber of entries 432,791. 

Cataloguing of all specimens in the Department of Geology is com- 
plete, specimens received during the year being catalogued as received. 
Of the specimens catalogued 2,860 were palaeontological specimens; 286 
economic specimens; 102 mineralogical specimens and 118 miscellane- 
ous, making a total of 3,366. Labels prepared numbered 660, of 
which 309 were printed and distributed. Among the collections which 
were labeled entire were those of the folklore of gems, Pleistocene 
fossils, coal tar products, and others of the economic series. Among 
these were several large, descriptive labels. To the Departmental 
photograph albimas 63 prints have been added, making a total of 2,748 
prints now in these albimis. 

In the Department of Zoology 1,793 entries in the primary- catalogue 
for birds and mammals have been made. The systematic card cata- 
logues have received more than usual revision and additions. The col- 
lection of mammals in alcohol, principally bats, has been provided with 
617 new labels. 1,524 labels for shells have also been written, of which 
1,253 were installed. 

The following table shows the work performed on catalogues and 
the inventorying accomplished : 



12 Field Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 



Dipvttnent of Anthropoloor 
Department o< Bouny 
Department ot Gtoiogf 
Department c4 Zooiocy 
The Library 
Section ci Pboiograpby 



Naof 
R«raH 


Total No 
ctfaatrMi to 


Balrte 

Dwtac 

191S 


TouU No. 


38 


ULJOa 


10.063 


>39.5l6 


57 


4A3.79I 


20.305 


65.750 


21 


I.\J.7II 


3.366 


7.705 


40 


9t^.sy> 


1.793 


33.565 


U 


100,290 


3400 


204.967 


»7 


M3303 


24.7* 





. — The number of accessions in the E)cpartxnent of 
AnthropolofO' amounted to 31 durinj; the year, of which 27 have been 
entered. The majority of these were received through the generosity 
of friends of the Institution. Mr. Edward E. Ayer p resented several 
gifts of scientific importance. These include four brass guns (so-called 
lantaka) captured from the Moro on the Philippine Islands and pre- 
sumably cast by Chinese in the ciRhtecnth centur>'; a collection of 161 
chipped stone (mostly obsidian) projectile points from Upper Lake, 
Lake County, California, comprising a lar^c variety of t>*pcs; 19 mini- 
attire Porno baskets from California, of striking technique and variety 
of form and weave; and an interesting collection of beads and perforated 
shells discovered in a grave with two skeletons, cxcav-ated at Lead- 
better Landing, Benton County, Tennessee. A group of 20 tear bottles 
from Eg>'pt, found in Venice by Mr. Ayer during his travels, was pxur- 
chaaed by the Muscimi. A Roman lamp, unearthed in Transyl\-ania, 
Hungar>', was received as a gift from Mr. William J. Chalmers. The 
East- Asiatic collections have been enriched by several important gifts. 
Prominent among these are a complete jade book and a jade seal, both 
being treasures from imperial possession, presented by Mr. Fritz von 
Frantzius. The jade book is unique inasmuch as it is complete with 
the original binding in yellow silk brocade and in perfect condition. It 
consists of ten rectangular slabs carved from exquisite Khotan nephrite 
(thirty pounds in weight), and is inscribed with a composition in Chinese 
and Manchu of the famous Emperor K'ang-hi in i683; when he canonized 
his grandmother, the Empress Wen, and conferred upon her a posthu- 
mous title. The seal, 6^4 pounds in weight, a masterpiece of carving, as 
recorded by the inscription, was bestowed upon the Empress Jui on 
February 13,1 796, the day when she was officially app>ointed Empress of 
China. A description of these memorable objects has been pubhshed 
in the June number of the Fine Arts Journal. Mr. von Frantzius has 
likewise donated a very instructive collection of Japanese coins and paper 
money, numbering about 800 specimens, brought together by order of 
the Japanese Government, and a fine Chinese gold ring decorated with 
designs in relief. To E>r. Frank W. Gunsaulus the Museum is in- 



Jan., 191 6. Annual Report of the Director. 13 

debted for a very remarkable Chinese rosary of a hundred beads carved 
from exqmsite dark-red Burmese amber, and in all probability manu- 
factured in the imperial atelier. An interesting collection of Pompeiian 
antiqmties was purchased by the Museum. It represents a valuable ad- 
dition to the Pompeiian material and very well illustrates the agricultural 
phase and every-day life of the people in southern Italy toward the 
end of the first century. A Persian chain mail, acquired in Tiflis, 
was secured by purchase. The most important purchase of the year 
is represented by the models of Chinese pagodas and the wood-carved 
gateway made by the Orphan School of the celebrated Jesuit institu- 
tion in Sikkawai near Shanghai and secured at the Panama-Pacific 
Exposition of San Francisco. The purchase of a small collection of 
incised pottery dug from shell-heaps in Walton County, Florida, is a 
welcome addition to the small quantity of material possessed by the 
Museum from this region. With funds pro\dded by Mr. Homer E. 
Sargent, Mr. Cjons H, McCormick and Mr. Martin A. Ryerson, a col- 
lection consisting of approximately one thousand objects, illustrating 
textiles, costume, jewelry, brass and bidri ware, religious images, and 
ivory carving, was secured by Dr. George A. Dorsey in India. This 
collection also includes an interesting series of miniature painting 
and notable old wood-carvdngs originating from a Jaina temple. Al- 
together it denotes a hopeful beginning in the direction of a collection 
representative of the high ci\'ilization of India and augurs well for the 
large opportunities offered in this immense field in which work on ex- 
tensive lines may well be continued. 

There were added to the Department of Botany during the year 
19,831 sheets of herbarium specimens, comprising in part the following 
interesting and valuable series: Baker & Huber, Brazil 60; Botanical 
Garden, Natal loi; Botanical Garden, Sidney 99; Buchtien, BoH\4a 200; 
Clokey, Illinois 145; Cowles, British Columbia 164; Alaska 468; Alberta 
81, Saskatchewan 72, and Washington 491; Dusener, Illinois 292, 
Indiana 320; Elmer, Philippine Islands 865; Fendler, New Mexico 167; 
Gates, Philippine Islands 397; Gaimier, Yucatan 212; Heller, California 
1044; Holm, Porto Rico 149; Johnson, Wisconsin 118; Lansing, Illinois 
47, Indiana 128; Lindheimer, Texas 66; Meyer, Asia 47; Moodie, Al- 
berta 195; Millspaugh, Wisconsin 84; Palmer, Mexico 381; Payson, 
Colorado 260; Philippine Bureau of Sciences 1367; Purpus, Mexico 
227; Reynolds, Illinois 65, Wyoming 155, Yellowstone Park 75, Wash- 
ington 151; Sherff, Illinois 214, Photographs of Bidens and Cosmos 671; 
Huron H. Smith, Oregon 53; Standley, New Mexico 176; U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, Gramineae 201; Wenzel, Philippine Islands 841; 
and Wright, New Mexico 182. In addition to the above, the organiza- 



14 Field Museum or Natural Histoey — Reports, Vol. V. 



tkm <^ the private herbaria purchased by the Museum was completed, 
and the specimens incoiporatcd in the general herbarium. Of the 13,166 
sheets so incorporated the following are notable: Baker, Colorado 
534; Camp, Michigan and Ohio 549; Eggleston, Vermont 497; Fitzpat- 
rick, Iowa 443; Graut, Vermont 388; Heller, California 998; Idaho 447; 
p. "vania 406; Sandwch Islands 938; Kearney, New Jersey and 

Ten: "'. McDonald, Illinois 405; Mackenzie, Kansas and Mis- 

soun ^^v-- ■, .'•!' rris, Connecticut to Virginia 464; Nelson. Wyoming 443; 
Piper, Washington 268; Sandlx*rg, Minnesota 248; Sheldon, Minnesota 
204; Small, Virginia 224; Umhach, Illinois and Indiana 533; and Wat- 
son, Ohio 152. The private herbaria now incorporated with that of 
the Museum arc the following: 



Bcbb. M. S.. S«lix and generd 

Hdler. A. A.. General . . 

Hitchcock. A. S., Plohdian 

MJU^mgh. C. P., Euphorbia and general . 

Pattamo. H. N.. General 

Rothrock. J. T.. General 

ScnaU. J. K.. South U. S. and general .... 

Schott. A.. Yucatan and general 

Schuette. J. H.. Wtaoooan and general 

University ci Chicago. General . 

Wahlstcdt, J. H., Epilobium. Viola. Chora and general 



3 '.583 

13.166 

7.1M 

5.006 

37.»«7 

IQ..^8l 

8.447 
10,990 

44.«<H 

«7.555 



The additions to the organized herbarium during the year, geo- 
graphically arranged, are as follows: (The tabulation does not include 
regions from which no additions have been received this year). 



locality 
Alaska 
Canada: 

Albrrtn 

British Columbia 

Manitoba 

New Brunswick 

Saskatchewan 
UnrrKO Statss: 

Alabama . 

Arixona 

Caltforaia 

Carolina, North 

Camlina. South 

Colondo . . 

Coanecticut . 

Dakota, North 

Dakota, South 



AiSdMlto 

HfrtMriwB 
191S 

473 

277 

165 

I 

4 

73 

»J7 

74 

i.i5« 

213 

7 

346 

24 

4 

83 



ToUl 

'to 



1,162 

828 
1,182 

259 
181 

439 

1.464 
9.532 

35.091 
4.787 
1.042 

12.133 

579 

564 

1. 176 



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Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 15 

LOCALITY Added to Total 

United States: ""^^f^ nSlSm 

Delaware I 1.594 

District of Columbia 150 2,523 

Florida 19 20,735 

Florida Keys, General I 682 

Big Pine Key I 3 

Coon Key I I 

Georgia 4 4,566 

Idaho 219 3.479 

Illinois 1,109 22,161 

Indiana 760 6,668 

Indian Territory 25 312 

Iowa 39 1,801 

Kansas 45 551 

Kentucky 4 972 

Louisiana 53 1,349 

Maryland . II8 1,225 

Massachusetts 220 3,404 

Michigan 173 4,176 

Minnesota 812 2,411 

Mississippi I 2,079 

Missouri 360 3,380 

Montana 22 4,030 

Nebraska 6 420 

Nevada 17 1,273 

New Hampshire 56 1,542 

New Jersey 56 3,011 

New Mexico 630 3,59i 

New York 296 6,353 

Ohio 250 2,080 

Oklahoma 3 294 

Oregon . ^ 69 7,503 

Pennsylvania 653 11,514 

Rocky Mountains (General) 4 i,399 

Tennessee 105 1,562 

Texas 93 9,857 

Utah 3 2,535 

Vermont 1,014 3,689 

Virginia 594 5,297 

Washington 314 7,756 

San Juan Island 151 151 

Brown Island I ii 

West Virginia 7 2,010 

Wisconsin 237 4,900 

Wyoming 622 1,552 

Yellowstone Park 75 528 

Central America: 

Costa Rica 5 616 

Guatemala 5 2,891 



i6 Field Museum of Natural History — Rr.roRis, Vol. V. 

LOCAtfTY A44«d to 

Cbhtval AMBIICA: 191 1 

Mrito> ... 864 

IjOWTT Ca!.: ::.. k l8 

YucatAQ aia 

Panama: 

Cuud TLone IS 

TabofsIjUad . I 

S*o Sfllvador . . 1 

West Iifoiss: 
B*hanm«: 

Now Proridcoos I 

BarbadcM . 3 

Cuba S 

I»lc of Pr-.' . a 

Guadeloupe I 

HAyti 4 

JomAtca la 

Mar- I 

PorV, ix. 167 

San Jan. Little 1 

Santo Domingo a 

Santa Lucia I 

Sombrero Island I 

SoiTTH America: 

Bolivia aoi 

Bnuil 60 

Tobajfo a 

Trinidad 7 

Veocsuela 3 

Btnora: 

Aoitro- Hungary 316 

Boglaad i 

Asia: 

Bnmco a 

China 46 

I'hiljppinc Islands 3.467 

Siberia I 

AnucA: 

South Africm 34 

BasutoUnd 3 

Natal 44 

Zululand 15 

Ockaxia: 

Austvaua: 

New South Wala 

QoecDilaod 

Weit Attftralia 

Goani 

Fiji IsUodfl 



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Jan., 191 6. Annual Report op the Director. 17 

LOCALITY Added to Total 

Herbarium now in 
Oceania: 191s Herbarium 

Samoa i 63 

Sandwich Islands, general . . 484 

Mam I I 

Kauai 449 449 

Oahu 541 541 

Hortictdtural 21 2,671 

Illustrations mounted as Herbarium sheets 678 1.923 

The most important accession in the Department of Geology was the 
gift of a large quantity of specimens of the fossil skeletons fotmd in the 
asphalt beds of Los Angeles, California. This large collection was 
presented through the kindness of Mr. Edward E. Ayer, Mr. E. B. 
Butler, Mr. W. R. Linn, and Mr. Martin A. Ryerson. Among the im- 
portant features of the collection was a complete moimted skeleton of 
the sabre-tooth tiger. This forms a striking and valuable addition to 
the series of fossils. An additional skeleton of this tiger, incomplete 
but moimtable, was also included in the collection. An incomplete 
but mountable skeleton of the fossil wolf of the Los Angeles locaUty 
and in addition six good skulls and twelve lower jaws of the animal 
were also received. The large, extinct sloth found at this locality 
was represented by a skull nearly two feet in length, also by teeth 
and parts of lower jaws and some of the peculiar leg bones and claws of 
the animal. These will furnish a moimted Hmb. A large fossil Hon 
of the locaHty, about twice as large as the largest African Hon, is repre- 
sented by several bones; a large camel, one-half larger than the largest 
modem camel, is represented by vertebrae and some other bones; and 
the native horse is represented by leg bones and teeth. There are also 
contained in the coUection parts of four bird skulls, leg bones and claws, 
and probably one mountable foot. Some of these bones show birds 
of tmusuaUy large size. Bones of the mammoth and bison, the latter 
including one good bison skull, were also comprised in the coUection. In 
addition a large quantity of misceUaneous bones of various species was 
included which wiU be valuable for piuposes of comparison and pos- 
sibly for completing skeletons. Two meteoric stones of the faU which 
occtured at Blanket, Texas, May 30, 1909, were presented through the 
kindness of Mr. Stanley Field and Mr. Arthtir B. Jones. These stones 
represent aU the known material of this faU and make a valuable 
addition to the meteorite collection. About 60 specimens of min- 
erals and ores were presented by Mr. W. J. Chalmers. This series in- 
cluded a number of specimens of gold ores showing free gold, specimens 
of native silver, agate, turquoise and other valuable minerals. Fifteen 
specimens of jasper and moss agate, presented by Mr. J. H. Mosher of 



x8 Field Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

Glendivc, Montana, and several additional specimens of moss agate 
thowing remarkable imitative landscape cfTccts, loaned by him, furnish 
excellent specimens of a remarkable (xrcurrcncc of this mineral. Mr. 
Fred Pattec contributed a number of specimens of ores and industrial 
minerals from various western localities. These gifts included ores of 
copper and \'anadium, also specimens of phosphates, asbestos and barite. 
An interesting series of copper ores showing stages of replacement of 
hornblende by copper minerals was presented by Dr. F. C. Nicholas, 
also a valuable specimen of tun^'stcn ore. A striking and valuable 
epcdxncn of gold ore from the Smuggler-Union mine, Colorado, was 
p res en ted by Mr. T. S. Chalmers. The India Geological Survey pre- 
sented several specimens of Indian latcrite, thus securing a representa- 
tion of this pecuhar mineral which liad not hitherto been possessed. 
The representation of the Los Angeles fossil fauna was increased by 
the gift of 532 specimens by Dr. William Bcbb. These specimens 
included several hundred bones of Smilodon, a large number of 
bones of the fossil wolf and some of the fossil horse, sloth and bison. 
The Colorado-Yulc Marble Company presented .six full-sized slabs 
showing the varieties of marble obtained at its quarries. The col- 
lection of fuller's earths and baritcs which had hitherto been 
quite incomplete, was increased by the gift of specimens from several 
firms producing these substances. Of these, fuller's earths were pre- 
sented by the Manatee Fuller's Earth Corporation, the Floridin Com- 
pany, J. E. and R. M. Famsworth and the Lester Clay Company; and 
barite \**as presented by the Cherokee Chemical Company, Durex 
Chemical Works, Krebs Pigment and Chemical Company, and Thomp- 
son, Weinman and Company. Mr. H. R. Wood, the producer, pre- 
sented four specimens of tungsten ore from Arizona, and C. K. W^illiams 
and Company three specimens of crude and ground talc. Nine speci- 
mens of iron ore from the unusual deposits that occur at Ma>'\-ille, 
Wisconsin, were presented by Mr. E. S. O'Connor. Mr. Max Zi^e 
presented 33 specimens of ores from the Ruby Mountain District, 
Nevada, which included copper, antimony and silver ores and accom- 
panj-ing rocks. Exchanges made with several individuals and institutions 
resulted in adding desirable material. The most important accession re- 
ceived in this way was obtained from the Descret Museimi, Salt Lake 
City, Utah, and consisted of fifteen specimens of the products of the 
Great Salt Lake, Utah, and fifteen brilliant and rare specimens of 
cr>-stallized p>Tite and tetrahedrite from Bingham, Utah. The Salt 
Lake products included brines, calcareous o6lite, mirabilite and various 
forms of common salt, all obtained from the waters of the lake. A slab 
of the Big Skookum meteorite was obtained by partial exchange with 



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Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 19 

the Foote Mineral Company. From Mr. H. B. Derr were obtained 37 
specimens of analyzed soils, besides limestones and clays from various 
localities in Missouri. From Mr. William Foshag were obtained by 
exchange eight specimens of rare California minerals, and from Mr. E. 
G. Norton three specimens of crystallized . calaverite from Cripple 
Creek, Colorado. The principal accession by purchase was a number 
of specimens of the rare Carboniferous crinoid Phalocrinus, which had 
not previously been represented in the collections. Specimens of tracks 
of a Carboniferous batrachian were included in the same accession. 

In the Department of Zoology the ntmiber of accessions during the 
year were as follows: Birds 143; mammals 16; fishes 276; insects 923; 
and shells 432. Of these, 125 of the birds were an important purchase 
of Dutch Guiana birds from Mr. Penard; 152 Nicaraguan butterflies 
were obtained from Senor Dion. Chaves of Managua; 24 species of sphinx 
moths were presented to the Museiun by Mr. B. Preston Clark of Bos- 
ton, these with one or two exceptions being new to the Museum collec- 
tion and some of them very rare; also 116 Bolivian insects secured by the 
Collins and Day expedition to South America. There was obtained 
by piu"chase a very interesting abnormal form of Heliconius doris viridis. 
Of the 276 fishes added to the collection 265 were the gift of Dr. C. Eigen- 
mann and were desirable acquisitions. Of the 432 shells received, 255 
from southwestern United States were the gift of Mr. R. C. Orcutt; 52 
specimens from the Museiun's South American Expedition, and 117 from 
the Joseph N. Field South Sea Islands Expedition. 

EXPEDITIONS AND FIELD WORK- — Dr. Gcorge A. Dorsey, to whom leave of 
absence had been granted for a visit to the Orient, availed himself of the 
opportunity of his sojourn in India to acquire an ethnological collection 
for the Museum with funds provided through the generosity of Mr. 
Homer E. Sargent, Mr. Cyrus H. McCormick and Mr. Martin A. 
Ryerson. A description of the collection appears elsewhere in this re- 
port. 

The discontinuance of the regular zoological expedition to South 
America was compensated for by participation in an expedition 
known as the Collins-Day South American Expedition, organized and 
financed by Mr. Alfred M. Collins of Philadelphia and Mr. Lee Gamett 
Day of New York City. This expedition included besides Mr. Collins 
and Mr. Day and their associate, Mr. W. T. Walker, two zoological 
collectors, one, Mr. R. H. Becker, representing the Musetmi, and the 
other, Mr. G. K. Cherrie, representing the American Museimi of Nat- 
ural History of New York. The entire expenses and salaries of the 
collectors were generously defrayed by Mr. Collins and Mr. Day and 
every opportunity was afforded for work with the result that, despite a 



so PirLD Mnszm or Natubal Histoby — Repokts, Vol. V. 

rainy ^a^'^n and a Irr.itcl arTvunt ci time, some 1,300 spedmens of 
bjnls am! ii\amni.i'. w r<- <xnircd. By special agreement these will be 
divKlinl (xjually N *.%.,: t :.c two Museums. The expedition sailed from 
New York I\v(^nLicr io, 1014, and proceeded via Panama to MoUendo, 
IVni. Kmni there a short trip was made to the highlands near Lake 
Titirara and sp)ccimens were obtained of the larf^ "Mwrnnalf ci the 
rr^n"n, cs{>cnally the f^uanaco or wild llama, and the ncufia. It is of 
great interest to note, as illuKtratinf; the scant means available for study- 
ing; South Arochcan animals, that these vicufias were the first to be 
brouRht to a North American Museum, notwithstandinR the fact that 
the spcdcs is of relatively lan:c size and of great economic importance. 
The expedition continued through the Andes to Cochabamba, Boli\'ia. 
Prom Cochabamba it was decided to descend to the Madeira River and 
the Amaxon by way of the Chapare and Mamorc rivers instead of by the 
more frequented route via the Beni River. The difficult journey was 
made with a train of twenty-four pack mules at considerable expense 
of time, money and personal hardship. The remainder of the trip was by 
canoe and small steamer to the Madcira-Mamorc railroad by which 
the rapids of the Madeira were passed and thence to the Amazon at 
Manaos where steamships of good size were available. The collection of 
mammals secured by the expedition has not yet been studied and the 
s pecimens of birds, which will ultimately come to this Museum, have 
not been received. In September and October, Ta.xidcrmist Friesser 
made a successful expedition to the Olympic Mountains of the State of 
Washington, where, through the courtesy of state officials, he was permit- 
ted to obtain fine specimens of the Olympic or Roosevelt Elk. These 
and the accessory material secured at the same time will be used for a 
large group of these animals, which has long been planned and for which 
a striking background has already been painted. 
The following is a list of the expeditions : 

LocmUtr CoIUctor M«Urt«l 

British IndiA. G«o. A. Donej. Ethoolofy. 

Otjrmpic Mountaim. J. Pricaaer. Manwnah. 
Peru. Bolivia and 

N. Brazil. R. H. Becker j^iAmmaJa aod Birds. 

IMSTALLATIOM. RtABflANQtMSMT. AND Pf»»l«*NtPrr lumOVtMCMT. Thc WOrk 

aod efficiency of the Department of Anthropology in matters of instalia- 
tioo have been fully maintained during the year. A total of 68 new 
CMes have been placed on permanent exhibition, many of these being 
oompletely labeled. The material installed in these cases is distributed 
as follows: Classical archxology 6 cases; Hopi ethnology xo cases 
Tibetan ethnology 18 cases; Chinese ethnology 8 cases; Chinese archie- 



^'*'^mnY0F 






^IBAHA 



HtlO MUSCUM or NATUKAL MlSTOITy. 



«tPORT$. PUkTt V. 





TiouRC Of WOMAN FROM KuMUNOR Reoioh. is TESTive Costume. Front and Back. 



Jan., 191 6. Annual Report op the Director. 21 

ology II cases; Japanese ethnology i case; New Caledonian ethnology 
8 cases; Philippine ethnology i case; and Solomon Islands ethnology 
5 cases. The 3 1 cases on the gallery relating to physical anthropology 
were relabeled and reinstalled; work on the cataloguing of the main col- 
lections in physical anthropology has likewise been commenced. Hall 49 
has been installed with exhibits of the Mrs. T. B. Blackstone Expedi- 
tion to Tibet. One group of the displays illustrates the life of the nomadic 
tribes of eastern Tibet, their saddlery and other means of transportation, 
utilization of skins, leather, and yak-hair weavings. A large coracle, 
the only type of boat used in Tibet, is a notable feature in these ex- 
hibits. For comparative study, Chinese saddlery is likewise shown in 
this section on the dummy of a horse, which is equipped with full har- 
ness. Another group of Tibetan exhibits, consisting of 7 cases, illus- 
trates the manufacture of textiles, the process of weaving being shown 
by several looms, as well as the style and wear of costume. Sixteen life- 
size figures have been prepared with much care for faithfulness of all 
characteristic features. They are completely dressed in native style, 
even as regards the hair and hair-dressing procured in Tibet, and are 
thoroughly representative of the manifold tribes of central, eastern, and 
northeastern Tibet. A model of a woman from central Tibet is shown 
in festive attire complete with all jewelry. Special emphasis is laid 
upon the difference between the pastoral and sedentary or agricultural 
tribes, and upon the influence exerted upon Tibetan ciilture by China. 
In addition to the costumed figures, nine articles of clothing are exhibi- 
ted on dummies, also many specimens of woollen and hempen fabrics. 
Jewelry from Tibet and China, formerly deposited in Higinbotham 
Hall, is now installed in three standard cases on slanting shelves cov- 
ered with black velvet. The installation is well provided with photo- 
graphs depicting the wearing of the jewelry. This installation presented 
technical difficulties of great complexity, all of which have been over- 
come. In December the three jewelry cases, also one from Hall 
54, were moved to alcoves 121 and 122, North Comt. Two cases 
containing Tibetan religious paintings were installed in HaU 49. The 
Chinese bronzes temporarily placed in the North Court were trans- 
ferred to the East Annex and permanently installed in standard 
cases. They now occupy altogether eleven cases, and are arranged in 
strictly chronological order. In consequence of this addition, a re- 
organization of the Chinese Halls became necessary. The paintings 
were removed from Hall 43 and 44 to Hall 47 and replaced by nine cases 
of bronze. For technical reasons two cases of bronze have to remain 
in Hall 49. The interesting and instructive models of boats and palan- 
quins, acquired at the World's Columbian Exposition, were permanently 



3 3 Field Mcsecm of Natu»al History — Reports, Vol. V. 

installed in two st'^* -^-"-'l cases placed in Hall 53, each model being pro- 
vided with a dcsc: ., label. The im[x:^nal jade book and jade seal 

presented by Mr. von Frantzius are temjxirarily installed in Hall 45, 
in such a manner that they can be freely viewed from all sides. The 
two detached jade tablets purchased a year apo were added to these 
cxhr A special case was constructed for the larjjc brass tcmpN 

lamp irom India, secured during the time of the Columbian Exposition. 
The Japanese taiieslr>-, formerly in Hall 31, was moved to Hall 56 into 
its apprt>priatc .«^jrmur ' - Mr. Aycr's jjift of four Moro guns 

necessitated t'  '-■ '• • of two cases containing Moro armor. 

The New Ca! n, installed in cij^ht cases by Assistant 

Curator Lewis, is especially interesting for its rare old masks and fine 
assortment of weapons, notably the stone-headed clubs, one of which is 
said to be the largest in existence, and was the property of one of the 
famous chiefs in New Caledonia. Other objects of significance arc the 
boose-posts and ornaments, native money, and the old-style clothing 
and ornaments, especially the green-stone necklaces representing the 
most highly prized treasures of a New-Caledonian woman. Five cases 
containing material from the Solomon Islands were also installed. The 
installation of the Stanley McComiick Hopi Collections has pr o g r ess ed 
satisfactorily, ten cases hav-ing been completed. Five of these cases 
comprise 150 masks and head-dresses, shown upon freshly painted 
plaster busts, in their proper groupings and sequence. Throe cans 
are filled with modem domestic pottery, two of unpainted, one of 
painted ware, in their groupings, as recognized by the Hopi themselves. 
The scries of fifty objects showing the manufacture of pottery is very 
complete and instructive. One case includes rattles of every type, 
in fact, all musical instruments used by the Hopi, ejccept drums. In 
another case arc displayed the rabbit sticks, raw skins, and the rabbit- 
skin robes which are purely woman's work, no man being allowed to be 
present during their making. In the North Court, three cases have 
been installed; namely one of Etruscan Bucchero ware variously 
decorated, another of vessels with red designs on black ground. 
The third is occupied by bronzes which include the two cistas pur- 
chased last year, all being obtained through the efforts of Mr. Ayer. 
These cases, newly installed, necessitated some rearrangement in 
which the two candelabra cases and one of bronze pails were moved 
to the east line of cases in the Court where the three cases of Irish 
art-work have stood for years. These had been placed previously in 
alco\-es lai and 122. Minor transfers of material have also been made 
in this Court. The two cases containing antique glass in the North 
Court have been reinstalled upon a new principle of open shelving 



Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 23 

which fully exhibits the beauty of form, wonderful colors, and iri- 
descence of these specimens. The Pompeiian collection secured by 
the Director in San Francisco is temporarily installed in a hanging 
wall-case in alcove 121, North Court, and is completely labeled. When 
alcove 120 was vacated to make room for exhibits of the N. W. Harris 
Public School Extension, the Roman mills, braziers, and other objects 
were rearranged in the Court as best as its crowded condition would 
permit. A portion of the ethnological material obtained by Dr. Dorsey 
in India through the liberality of Messrs. Homer E. Sargent, Cyrus H. 
McCormick, and Martin A, Ryerson, has been placed temporarily in 
two wall cases in alcove 122. In H. N. Higinbotham Hall there 
have been some changes in installation as weU as rearrangement. 
Hanging-cases 21 and 22, on the South Wall, were stripped of Algerian 
jewelry, and in its stead was placed the Turkish, Armenian, Syrian, 
and Arabian jewelry, formerly in case 17, along with the Bulgarian 
jewelry from case 19. In the vacated space in case 19 were temporarily 
placed Tibetan charm-boxes and earrings. Tibetan jewelry, consisting 
of rings, bracelets, and hairpins, was also transferred from case 20 to 
case 19. The Algerian jewelry from cases 21 and 22, along with a more 
recent accession of the same material, was installed in the new case on 
the East Wall of the hall. Some Colombian gold objects were taken 
from the floor of case 24 and placed upon the floor of case 23. When 
the Tibetan jewelry was removed from cases 19 and 20 for permanent 
installation in Hall 49, a reinstallation of case 20 was made necessary. 
This installation brought about some rearrangement of cases, Nos. 1 7 
and 18 being moved from the East Wall to the North Wall, bringing 
all the jewelry from India into a single group. Case 23 and a new case 
were moved into vacated space upon the East Wall. Since Hall 48, 
East Annex, utilized for several years past as a work-room, was needed 
for the further exhibition of the Mrs. T. B. Blackstone collections, the 
north end of Hall 71 was cleared of all ethnological material stored 
there and equipped as a work-room, being in close proximity to the vast 
Pacific Island collections yet to be installed and stored in the West An- 
nex, there to await removal into the new building. To better condense 
the ethnological material in the south end of Hall 71, the Volk collec- 
tion and other material intended for exchange, as well as the large 
model of the Ruins of Mitla, Mexico, have been placed in Hall 68, now 
to be utilized for general storage. Six cases, heavily loaded with storage 
material, were taken from Hall 71 and placed in Hall 72 for early in- 
stallation. The two cases of stored Australian material now stand in 
HaU 80, having been moved there from HaU 72. The drums, previ- 
ously stored in Halls 79 and 80, having been shifted to Hall 68; those 



t4 Pbld Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 



two halls, with cmm placed to the best advantaf^c, will afford parking 
for fifty cmaeso( the Joaeph N. Field Nfclancsian Collections to be in- 
stalled. Preservation of material, photof^raphing, and rcarrangonent 
have neoenitated work in one hundrtxl ca.<;c.s of the Department during 
the >*ear. Halt 48 in the East Annex was originally intended to serve 
as a gallery of Chinese painting. In \'icw of the new material expected 
soon from San Frandsco, however, this plan has been abandooed, and 
the hall will \ic reserved for the reception of the pagodas and other 
new acquisitions. The former plaster-room has been divided by a 
partition-wall into two rooms. 

The Department of Botany has installed 39 new case-units in the 
public exhibition scries, while 1 7 others have been reinstalled and aug- 
mented with new and interesting material. Of these cases 15 were 
added to the Systematic Economic Series; 37 to the North American 
Forestry Scries; and 4 to General Dendrology. To the North American 
Forestry Scries nv hs of the following trees were added: Red or 

Pencil Cedar, Moui.i.un i'ine. Pitch Pine, Chestnut Oak, Yellow Locust, 
Honey Locust, Cork Elm, Red Spruce, Rod Ash, Butternut, Chestnut, 
Hop-Hombcam, Eraser's Umbrella Tree, Cuoimlxr Tree, Beech, 
Sour^-ood, Yellow Poplar, Penns>-lvania Cherr>', Eraser's Fir, Sweet 
Buckeye, Black Willow, Sweet Birch and Yellow Birch. To the Den- 
drologic Scries was added a display, in four cases, of the woods of the 
Hawaiian Islands, representing, with fair sized specimens, the trees 
of the islands as described in the new work of Mr. Joseph F. Rock. 
To the Systematic Economic Scries a case was added dspla>'ing the 
fruits, gums, and tan and dye barks belonging to the Combrctum and 
Mangrove families; one with similar products derived from the Com- 
brctum and Spikenard families; two cases devoted to the derivatives 
of the Birch family; one to those of the Willow, M>Ttle and Walnut 
famiUes; two to the Walnut family alone; one additional to the Oak 
family; one to the Sapodilla family and one each to the Spurge and the 
Daisy families. On account of lack of cases and cramped quarters in 
the rooms devoted to the working herbarium, it became necessary to 
entirely reorganize the collections during the year. In order that the 
material most frequently consxiltcd might be readily accessible the Eura- 
sian and African material was removed from the organized herbarium 
and placed in a series of metal storage cans racked in the mounting room 
on the first gallery; and the West Indian, Central and South American 
specimens rearranged in Uke storage cans racked above the regular 
herbarium cases. This divides, temporarily, the organized reference 
collection into three parts. In all three the plants are fully arranged in 
the order of modem classification. While not so conveniently referable 




eSSSSS|S5!£SS|| 




o 
CD 
< 

o 



o 






Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 25 

as when all like material is together, yet the collections are consistently 
available, until such time as they can be reassembled in the herbarium 
hall of the new Museiun building. 

In the Department of Geology a complete readjustment of the cases 
in Skiff Hall was made in order to give better lighting and group- 
ing. Formerly the low cases had been arranged on one side of the 
hall and the high cases on the other, but as the amount of light 
obtained by this method of arrangement was insufficient, the cases 
have now been arranged so as to form a series of alcoves with the 
taller cases forming the sides of the alcoves and the lower ones oc- 
cupying the center. The Hghting by this arrangement is much more 
satisfactory. Six of these alcoves were placed on each side of the main 
passageway through the hall, the forming of these alcoves having re- 
quired the readjustment of 56 cases. From most of these cases it was 
also necessary to entirely remove the specimens and reinstall them. In 
this connection the opportunity was improved to perfect the order of the 
specimens so as to bring related groups as close together as possible. The 
exterior woodwork of the cases was also entirely refinished. Space was 
fotmd in the cases for several new series, among them being a series of 
bonanza silver ores from Mexico and a collection illustrating the natiu"e 
and origin of certain "porphyry coppers." To the rare earths collec- 
tion a radiograph was added made by exposing a lead object to the 
emanations from camotite. This was installed with other radium 
ores as a means of showing the best method of detecting such ores. 
A portion of the collection of gold ores was removed to make room 
for a model of a gold mine constructed by the Assistant Curator. This 
model represents methods of working a small gold mine of meditmi rich- 
ness in a vertical quartz vein six feet wide. The background and above- 
ground scenery were prepared from studies of Arizona landscapes from 
photographs made by the Curator. The model occupies a space of four 
by three feet with a depth of about six inches. It illustrates a mine 
worked by levels connected by a shaft. The ore is represented as a vein 
of quartz containing minute particles of free gold. At one side the vein 
is represented as intersected by another nmning from the front to the 
back of the model. The ground about this vein is supposed to be looser 
than at the side and a different method of timbering is illustrated. To 
illustrate the methods of removing the ore several stopes are shown as 
well as raises and winzes. Various features of mining eqtdpment are 
also represented such as head frames, shaft house, tramways, ore cars, 
ptmip, etc. The scale of the model is five feet to the inch, and pains 
were taken to have it represent different features of a well managed 
mine as far as possible. In all parts of the economic collections 



a6 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

there has been a constant addition of new material in the form of 
single specimens or smaJl ^'rtmpit. Room for these has for the most 
part been obtained by \^-iihdm%\-inK older spedmens from exhibition. 
Space for increase in the number of rare earths and tungsten ores 
was obtained by withdrawinj; a portion of the antimony collection 
from exhibition. A collection of rocks from German coal fields 
which was properly a part of the coal collections not now on 
exhibitihn was withdrawn and the ."^pacc pained utilized for the dis- 
play of three new collections more in harmony with adjacent ex- 
hibits. One of these is a collection of fuller's earths from the most 
important American legalities; another is a series illustrating the raw 
materials, intermediate and final products of Portland cement; and the 
thinl collection is one gi^nng a s>*nopsis of the uses of quartz and quartz 
sands. In this collection numerous specimens show the more common 
occurrences of quartz; then the grades of quartz used for the more 
valuable products, such as prisms, lenses and blov^-n quartz utensils; 
antl a third section shows specimens of the poorer qualities of quartz 
uso<l for more ordinary purposes and sands suited to many special 
u.'k'^. These collections were installed in Hall 35. By reinstallation 
and some crmvding of specimens a much enlarged collection of barite 
has Uvn accommodated in the space formerly devoted to fewer 
six-cimens of this mineral. To the collection illustrating products 
of coal tar, some of the better known medicinal .substances made from 
it such as phenacitin and acetanilidc have been added. In Higin- 
botham Hall all the specimens were removed from the four central 
gem cases, the cases line<l with new white silk and the specimens re- 
i' tailed. This work was necessitated by the fact that the old lin- 
:: , s had become worn and faded. New linings were also pro\-ided for 
the upper parts of these cases and shelves of finished glass supported by 
glo-v"; pillars were put in place of the rough shelves swinging on chains 
which had hitherto been used. A new scries of moss agates and 
ja jicrs was installed and some other minor changes were made. In 
Alcove 105, leading to Higinbotham Hall, the collection numbering 
163 specimens illustrating the varieties and occurrence of amber which 
was obtained last year was installed. This' " >n illustrates diflerent 
forms and colors of crude amber, forms and t.u;«jrs of pressed amber or 
ambroid, carvings in amber, fossils found in amber, distillation products 
of amhrr, etc. The collection was installed on a scries of glass shelves, 
each s\ . being secured to an individual mahogany stand. In front 

of each specimen was placed a label secured by an individual clip. To 
the exhibition series of systematic minerals about fifty specimens of 
recent accessions were added. TTie series of Salt Lake products was 



Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 27 

installed in a case with other salts in Hall 31. The fossil Carboni- 
ferous tree from Michigan obtained from the St. Louis Exposition 
was installed in Hall 33 in connection with other fossils from this 
period. The series of Carboniferous crinoids and batrachians acqmred 
during the year was similarly installed. The work of mounting 
the invertebrate fossils upon tablets suitable for installation in floor 
cases was carried on during the year as opportunity permitted and about 
300 specimens were so prepared. Practically all the Pleistocene in- 
vertebrate fossils have now been mounted in this way and some other 
series have been completed. The Pleistocene fossils prepared were in- 
stalled temporarily in a case in Hall 33. Specimens chiefly of Pleisto- 
cene and Tertiary invertebrates which had been on exhibition were 
removed from two wall cases and the cases placed in position in 
Hall 35 to receive the skeleton of the sabre-tooth tiger and other 
important specimens of the large collection of vertebrate fossils from 
California presented by Messrs. Ayer, Butler, Linn and Ryerson. By 
use of these two cases it was possible to place a representative series 
of these fossils on exhibition. The specimens installed include a com- 
plete mounted skeleton of the sabre-tooth tiger, several skulls of the 
same species, several skulls and a large number of bones of the fossil wolf, 
skidls and limb bones of the grotmd sloth, limb bones of the mastodon 
and horse, skulls and other bones of the bison, and skulls and other bones 
of various vulture-like and other birds. In order to make room for the 
additional cases and secure a better grouping of the specimens, some re- 
adjustment of the large cases in the Hall was also made. The speci- 
mens of fossil elk skull and horns from Palos Park, Illinois, presented 
by Mr. H. H. Honink, were also installed in this Hall. In Hall 59 a 
disarticulated skeleton of the sabre-tooth tiger was installed in a table- 
case, with each bone labeled so that the anatomical features of the 
skeleton may be readily studied. In the laboratory of vertebrate 
palaeontology a model of the jaws of the great Eocene shark Car- 
charodon was completed, pains being taken to have the anatomical 
details as nearly correct as possible. The jaws, as completed, have 
a width of over six feet and an opening of four feet. For the 
first row of teeth actual fossil specimens were used and for the suc- 
ceeding rows casts of these. The modehng of the lines of the jaw 
was based on careful studies of modem sharks. By carefiil atten- 
tion to all these details it is believed that the characters of the 
ancient shark jaw are reproduced with great fidelity in this model. 
Owing to lack of space the model has not been placed on exhibition but 
will be available for the new building. The mounting of the skeleton 
of the sabre-tooth tiger received from California was modified so as to 



iS Field Mrsrm or Natural Histoey — Reports, Vol. V. 

pve gTMiter n^ndily and a mora natural pose and it w*as placed upon a 
new b«9e. A sJoill and jaws of the Miocene bone, Parahippus, were 
prepared for exhibition and the mountinK of a skdeton of the Miocene 
cund Oxydactylus was nearly completed. The large collection of 
fooQ bones from the Los Anf^es asphalt beds, numbering nearly 
3000 specimens, was taken to \Miiting, Indiana, where, through the 
courtesy of the Standard Oil Company, complete facilities were pro- 
vided for soaking the hones in naphtha and thus dissolving out the 
tarry material. This treatment of the specimens was necessary to 
avoid the slow exudation of the asphalt which experience had shown 
would otherwise occur and cause injury to the interiors of the cases. 
The generosity of the Standard Oil Company in this connection is 
gratefiilly acknowlcd^. 

In the Department of Zoology the collection of mammals in alcohol 
has been o\tThaulcd and fully identified. The collections of birds, 
•wwwn^U and insects were disinfected. The sldns of the large manmials 
stored in the basement of the Musetmi arc now reasonably acoesBble; 
only little progress has been made in completing the tanning of such skins 
as still remain in a raw state, the sldn dresser ha\nng been occupied 
the greater part of the year on fresh material. Three large groups of 
birds, provided by the ^♦-•'■>v Field Ornithology Fund, have been 
finished and pl.ir. «1 r.n c\ ... n. They represent bird life in Tropical 
America. (1) < : liornis cariptnsis. This group shows breed- 

ing birds in a cave in which they live, and illustrates a form oi bird life 
of great interest. The material for the group was secured by the Mu- 
seum South American Expedition on the Island of Trinidad in 1914. 
(2) Group of Screamers and Scarlet Ibis. A striking and instructive 
group, also obtained by the Museum Expedition near Lake Maracaibo, 
Venesuria. This grmip contains specimens of both the curious Homed 
Screamer and Crested Screamer, together with a number of richly col- 
ored Scarlet Ibis, and forms one of the most attracti\*c groups. (3) 
Group of American Flamingoes on their breeding ground on the Island 
of Great Inagua, Bahama Islands. The group .<^ows 7 adult Flamin- 
goes, with their peculiar cone-shaped nests, eggs, and two young birds 
in the nest. The painted background shows a continuation of the 
"rookery" which in the Inagua Colony numbered about 1,000 nests. 
The painted backgrounds of these groups greatly r ' their educa- 

tiooal value, as the o bee rver is able to become Camiluu >Mih the natural 
euvirucuuent of the spedes. Dup"'^ fVe year the taxidermists have 
been engaged in preparing an c ;<jn group of Alaska Mooee, 

whuh is now neariy ready for installation. Considerable preliminary 
work has also been done on two other mammal groups, a group of 



j;;""-"«" 
"•"'•';«.«'. 



Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 29 

Olympic Elk and one of the Capybara and Jaguar. A small group 
of Thirteen-lined Ground Squirrels or "Striped Gophers" has been 
completed and is ready for installation. The exhibition collection 
of fishes was increased by the addition of a large sectional case con- 
taining on one side two large and eighteen small groups of Florida 
fishes, on the other side the same number of groups of fishes from 
CaHfomia, the latter including very fine specimens of Salmon. 
A large group of Fljdng Fish is in course of preparation. The Wild 
Turkey group was improved by the substitution of a fine male bird 
for the yoimger one temporarily installed when the group was made. 
In the same way a rather small Canada Goose was removed from the 
Saskatchewan group and replaced by a fine large old bird. An Asiatic 
Elephant and a Giraffe, which through age and imperfection were un- 
desirable for exhibition purposes, have been withdrawn and placed in 
storage to be sold or exchanged. Throughout the year the reinstalla- 
tion of the shell exhibit has been carried on by Assistant Curator Ger- 
hard and Preparator Liljeblad. Four of the new A-cases have been 
permanently installed, and two more filled temporarily with shells 
which were glued on tablets last year. In addition, enough shells have 
been remounted to fill three more cases, for two of which labels are 
ready. Installing the shells on individual shelves cannot be done so 
expeditiously as when the specimens are mounted on tablets, for which 
reason the work is consmning more time than was anticipated. In the 
division of Osteology 2 skeletons of Porpoise and 7 skulls were degreased 
at the Whiting degreasing plant; 8 skeletons of animals were prepared 
for the Osteological study collection and 4 skeletons were remounted; 
367 skulls were prepared and cleaned for the Systematic study col- 
lection. 

The N. W. Harris Public School extension of field Museum of Natural history, 
— Early in May 1914, Mr. N. W. Harris offered to bear the expense 
of an exhibit at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition, of a 
number of cases, typical of those being circulated among the public 
schools of Chicago, under the auspices of The N. W. Harris Public School 
Extension of Field Museum of Natural History. This generous offer 
was approved by the Director and accepted by the President. The Cu- 
rator was instructed to select such types of cases as would illustrate the 
nature and character of the work that was being devoted to Museiun 
Extension. He was also instructed to make arrangements for suitable 
and adequate space for exhibiting the cases, to determine the architec- 
tural plans for the space, to make all arrangements for packing the cases 
and shipping same, and to depart for San Francisco in time to install the 
exhibit at the Exposition for the opening day, February 20th. Thirty- 



3© Fir.LD Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

four cases of natiiral history and ec o nomic f^ubjccts were le l e ct ed 
and exhibited in the Palace of Education of the Exposition. The space 
allotted the exhibit, axnntintint; to approximately 1300 square feet, 
was favorably and prot: iy located on three well traveled aisles. 

The exhibition of the cases was .supplemented by motion pictures, 
illu.<:tratinf; the present and future Museum building, types of cases on 
standards, loading cases in delivery cor, cor Ica\nnK Museum, and arriv- 
ing at school unloading cases, reception of coses in classroom, case on 
rack in classroom, pupils studN-ing case in classroom and teacher using 
case as a means of teaching. These \-icws were prefaced with an in- 
troduction on the cau-sc and scope of the Musctv" r^^*- " ' v. The ex- 
hibit and the motion picture theatre were n- . . ... by large 
ntunbers of visitors, whose interests were ma: .:• -. d in many instances, 
by words of comnnendation for the work that is being carried on, and 
praise for the attracti\-c ph>-sical features of the cases. R epre se n ta t ives 
of foreign and American institutions of learning made repeated care- 
ful and thorough examinations of the exhibit and enquiries as to 
methods of - he cases in schools. Japan, through its Commissioaer 

General to iul i:.x position, requested several cases of economic subjects 
be sent to Tokyo for the purpose of stt:'^"' them, with a viewtrf intro- 
ducing similiar cases and the some in the schools of Japan. 
Twenty-five thousand illustrated p.t s describing in brief the 
Museum Extension, were circulated during the exposition period. Five 
thousand cards were mailed to educators of the United States and Canada 
in\*iting them to inspect the Mu.(;ctmi exhibit at the Expositkn. 
Doctor Maria Montessori, internationally known as on educator of 
children, said of this exhibit in an un ' 1 letter. 

" I admire very much the way in >s au^i uaturc is interpreted in this 
exhibit. The units attract the child's attcnticm and do not teach errors. 

"They truly rep r esen t nature. Besides, they have added value of 
permitting prolonged observation c( the many details which in nature 
could only be seen in passing glimpses and to which it would be hard to 
attract the child's attention. The knowledge of these facts observed 
in this way makes the future obscr\'ation of real nature more interesting 
to the child. 

"I consider this collection a most dcsiiabie contribution to school 
work and edtication generally. I hope that more of these beautiful ex- 
hibits may be made." 

In a competitive group this exhibit was awarded the (n'and prize, 
the highest award possible. 

Many additional cases of various subjects were prepared during 
the jrear, bringing the total number of cases available for circula- 






K^' 



,\* 



Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 31 

tion among the schools to about 390. While the weight of the 
delivery car is thought to be heavier than necessary, the designing 
of the carrying accommodations continues to meet with approval. 
It has a capacity of 45 cases. Requests for cases have been 
made by schools and community clubs in towns near Chicago. 
Delivery of cases was made to about 280 Main Schools. Each of 
these schools was provided with no less than 6 cases. The Board of 
Education continues to furnish to the classrooms, the standards upon 
which the cases are displayed for observation and study. 

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION. — Thc followiug is a tabulatiou of the 
work performed in this Section: 

Number of 
Number of 6}^xS}i Posi- 
Number of Negatives tives made. 
Number of 
Negatives '. 
made ] 

General 12 

Anthropology . . . 352 

Botany 5 

Geology 14 

Zoology' 26 

Harris Extension ... 33 

Distribution 

Gift 

Sale II 

Totals 453 1,914 21 8 72 8 

Total number of Catalogue entries during year 1915 2,476 

Total number of Catalogue entries to December 31, 191 5 113,303 

Total number of Record Books 17 

PRINTING. — The number of labels and other impressions made by 
the Section of Printing is as follows: 

Anthropology 

Botany 

Geology 

Zoology 

Library 

General 

N. W. Harris Public School Extension . 

Attendance. — The total attendance record for the year is 194,926. 
Appended is a hst of the classes, consisting of twenty or more pupils, 
that visited the Museum during the term under review: 



umber of 
rintsmade 


Number of 

Lantern 

Slides made 


Enlarge- 
ments 
made 


developed 
for Expe- 
ditions 


Used in 

making large 

Negatives 


200 


.  


• • 


. . 


• • 


175 




8 


. . 


8 


^99 


2 






.. 






lOI 


2 






• • 






15 








72 






5 








•  






165 


. . 






• • 






410 


12 






• • 






444 


5 






 • 







Exhibition 


Other 


Labels 


Impressions 


2,624 


23,335 


1,065 


22,950 


1,954 


.... 


3,936 


1,875 




7,225 




35,709 


566 


950 



ja Field Mrsrru or Nattbal IIi«;tory — RKPOmw, Vol. V. 



PofMtnDa School — Forty-fifth Street ftod Su Lawrmcr Avenue . 

St. Loob School— 11713 South Sut« Street 

Fnocis W. Parker — 6800 South Sute Street 
Uni\Truty '  bool — Chicago, lUioois 

McLAprn I ' i *. and LAfltn Street* 

Laoc TccimiCiU High School — Divuion aad Sedr"^(^k Strrcts . 
Oofanan — 4655 South Deartmm Strrrt 

Unhrenity High School — Chicago. Ilhnrnii 

UniTvraty T'— — itary — Fifty-ninth Street and Kenwood Avenue 

Chicago A> of Pine Art« 

Lowrll — Hirach Street and North Spaulding Avenue .... 
St. Patrick's School — 230J Park ... 

8t BUiaheth'i School— 13 East 1 ., ..rst Street 

St. Catherinc't School — ll8lh Street and Lowe Avmue 

nUaois University — Urbana, Illinois 

Ilorfan Park Prep. School — Morgan Park, lliiwas 

St. Igitatius Academy — 6835 Broadway .... 

Parker School — 6800 South Stewart Avenue ... . 

Holy Trinity High School — South Lincoln and West Tayk>r 

StreeU . . 

ne«»iD« Township School 

Raymood School — Wabash Avenue and Thirty-sixth PUce 
University Blamentary School — Fifty-ninth Sur ^^^xxi 

Avenue 

Hyde Park Hi^h School — Sixty second Street and Stooj IsUod 

AveoiM .*..... 

Unhreratj Bkmcotary School — Fifty-ninth Street and Kenwood 

Avenue 

Sl Bridget's School — Archer Avenue Corner d Grady Court . . 
Praods W. Parker — 6800 South Stewart Avenue . . 

Gary School — Gary, Indiana . . 

BrowoeU School — 6509 Perry Avrtiuc ... 
Norwood Park School — $850 Hurlbut Street 
Saaaw School — South Kiklare Street and Colorado A vr: :. 
Ray School — Fifty ••eventh Street and Kimbark Avenue . . . 
Lewis Champlin School — Sixty-aecocKl Street and Stewart Avenue 
Darwin School — Bdgewood Avenue and Catalpa Court .... 
WiUard School — Forty-ninth Street and Su LawreiKe Avenue. . 
Citrtta School— 1 15th Stnetaad State Street . . . 
Gladstone School — Robey StrseC aad Wadibome Avenor 
Cornell Schod — Seventy-fifth Street and Dreiei Avcnoe 
Holy Cro«s School — Sixty-fifth Street and Maryland Avenvr 

SpcDoer School — Park and Fiftieth Awmca 

Ooodridi School — Sanganwn and Taylor SlTMla 

Waahbume School — Fourteenth between Jefferson and Union 

Streets 

INk School — Fulton and One Hundred Sixth StreeU . . 
Banard School — Charles and One Hundred Fourth StreeU . 

School — Perry Avenue be t wee n iiTth and ttSth StreeU . 




c 

o ,^ 

o 2 



o 



m 5-. 

-I 






o^^**U^>^'^ 



Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 33 

Schools and Locations Teacher Pupils 

Winnetka School — Winnetka, Illinois 6 37 

Zion Jewish School — 1261 South Halsted Street i 35 

Juvenile Protective League — Blackhawk and Noble Streets . . o 22 

Roseland Christian School — Roseland, Illinois I 23 

Madison School — Seventy-fifth Street and Dorchester Avenue . i 32 

Goodrich School — Sangamon and Taylor Streets 3 45 

Wendell Philipps High School — Thirty-ninth Street and Prairie 

Avenue i 20 

Englewood High School — Sixty-second Street and Stewart Avenue i 44 

Washington School — Morgan and Grand Avenues I 54 

Irving School — Lexington and South Leavitt Streets .... I 33 

Morgan Park High School — Morgan Park, Illinois I 81 

St. Andrews School — Hammond, Indiana 5 83 

University Elementary — Fifty-ninth Street and Kenwood Avenue 2 23 

University Elementary — Fifty-ninth Street and Kenwood Avenue 2 24 

University High School — Chicago, Illinois o 32 

University of Chicago o 52 

University of Chicago o 40 

Horace Mann — Thirty-seventh Street and Princeton Avenue . . 6 37 

SuUivan School — Eighty- third Street and Houston Avenue . . i 2"] 

John McLaren School — York and Laflin Streets i 46 

Dalton School — Dalton, Illinois 2 43 

West Hammond School — Hammond, Indiana . " i 20 

University of Chicago 2 22 

Flower High School — Twenty-sixth Street and South Wabash 

Avenue I 30 

Jewish Training SchooH ^^ Twelfth Place ' ^5 

Jewish Training School J ^^"^ ^^^^ ^^^"'^^^^^''^ i 41 

University High School — Chicago, Illinois i 35 

Pullman Manual Training School — Pullman, Illinois .... i 25 

Parker High School — Sixty-eighth Street and Stewart Avenue . . I 47 

Pullman Manual Training School — Pullman, Illinois .... i 25 

Bowen High School — Eighty-ninth Street and Manistee Avenue . o 23 

Herewith are also submitted financial statements, list of acces- 
sions, names of members, etc., etc. 

Frederick J. V. Skiff, Director. 



34 Fi£LO Mcscuu of Natural Histosy — Reports, Vol. V. 



Financial Statement 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
January 1, 1915, to December 31, 1915 

RKCWfT* 

GmH in Treasurrr's hands. General Fund. December 31, 1914 $10,828.93 

Cash in Treasurer's haods. New Eihibitioo Caaet Fund. December j i , 

I9»4 3490 27 

Cash in Trra.mrrr*s handa. Eodowmcnt Sinkinif Fund. December 31. 

I9U 535 00 

Cash in Treasurrr's haods. Picture PosUl Cards. December 31, 1914 433 34 

I^Blt]r Cash on haod« Deoembcr 31. 1914 . . 739 92 

Doc* o( Life llanben i ,000 og 

Doe* of Axumal Members 1,090.00 

AdmiaiocM aod Check Rooms 5.418 75 

SaleofGukks 15022 

South Park CommanoQers 15.000 00 

latcTHt oa InTestmeoU and Bank Balanrrs . 9490 . 75 

FWd Bodowmcnt Income 131.500. oo 

Field B udu w iuai t S i nkin g Fund 500. oo 

Field Bodowmest Sinkiag Fund loreetmeQU retire 1 3>5 00 

Field Endowment Sinking; Fund Income .... 22099 

New Exfaibitioo Caaee Fund Imreitineota redred 7.070. oo 

New BxhibMoo OuBi Fund Inoooe 620.88 

New Building Moving and Furnishing Fund Ixtcocne 1 75 00 

Stanley Field Ornithology Ftiod . 600. OQ 

R. W. Jackaoo Library Fund loooiDe 58.28 
Dooatioot: 

Martin A. Rfer*oa . . . IM50 00 

Homer E. Sargeot . 2.17500 

Cyrus H. McCormick 1.000.00 

Friu Von Frantaus 1.500 00 

Edward E. Ayer . 250 00 

Bdward D. DuUcr 250 00 

W. R. Linn . 250.00 

Stanley Field 200.00 

Arthur B. Jooei 20000 7.075.OO 

Life Membcnhtpc Fund Incocne .... 409 94 

Life Membcnhtpc Foad Invertnents retired 256.69 

Sale of Picture Foetal Cards 5^7 53 

Soadry Receipts . 71 60 

I197.628.17 



Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 35 

Disbursements 

Salaries $70,511.91 

Guard Service 11,955.87 

Janitor Service 6,757.51 

Fire Protection 4,306 . 72 

Heat and Light 12,125.73 

Repairs and Alterations: 

Wages — Carpenters, Painters, Roofers, etc. . . $7,715.41 

Materials used — lumber, paints, oils, glass, etc. . 1,179.03 8,894.44 



Furniture and Fixtures — Cases 10,263.44 

The Library: 

Books and Periodicals 1,091.37 

Binding 588.71 

Svmdries 89 05 1,769.13 



Collections, etc., purchased 37.351-92 

Installation expense 2,291.83 

Expeditions 4,300.00 

Publications 1,778.50 

Sections of Photography and Printing — Supplies . . 353 . 68 

General Expense Account: 

Freight, Expressage and Teaming 2,204.13 

Stationery, Postage and Telephones 747 . 45 

Liability Insurance 663 . 52 

Picture Postal Cards 645.27 

Simdries 889.95 51I50.32 



Stanley Field Ornithology Fund 724.75 

Woman's Temple Building Association — Foreclosure 

Expenses 2,407.18 

H. W. Jackson Library Fund — Investments ... 68 . 70 

New Building Moving and Furnishing Fund — Invest- 
ments 7,245.00 

Life Memberships Fund — Investments i ,666 . 63 

Endowment Sinking Fund — Investments .... 1,509.26 

Picture Postal Cards — Certificate of Deposit . . . 375 . 60 

In Treasurer's hands, December 31, 1915: 

General Fvmd 4,126.39 

New Exhibition Cases Fund 9I7-7I 

Endowment Sinking Fund 36.00 5,080.10 



Petty Cash on hand, December 31, 19 1 5 739-95 

$197,628.17 



j6 Field Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 



ATThNDANCE AND RbCKlPlS FROM JANUARY 1 TO 

DECEMBHR 31. IS^IS 



AmxDAXCs. 
Piud Attrodanoa — 

Adulu . 1= '"^a 

Children . . lo 

Free Adrnkaoo oo Pay Day« — 

SdxMlChiklreo . 4-^ 

Stmknta ^.<H^ 

TMcfaeri 498 

Memben: C' . ai 

Annu li 

Life . .5 

OAens* Pamflirs .74 

Spedal 109 

Pre«i 12 

00 Free I>ay« — 

SatnnUys 4^.223 

Sonday* 133.^4' 

Total AttoKlaoce 

AttCDdaooe 00 any one day (August 8, 1915) . . 

Paid Attendance on any one day (July s. 1915) 

ATcragv Daily Admianons (363 days) 

ATcraffe Paid Attcodaooe (a6o day«) 

Rscurrs. 

Oaid« told — 601 at 25 cents each 

Article* checked — 1 1 ,045 at 5 cenU each 



Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 37 



Accessions 



DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY 
(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AYER, E. E., Chicago. 

Collection of beads and shells found in grave, with two skeletons — 
Leadbetter Landing, Benton Co., Tenn. 
4 Moro bronze guns (lantaka). 
161 chipped obsidian projectile points — Upper Lake, Lake County, Cal. 
19 miniature Pomo baskets — Cal. 
BAHR, PETER J., Shanghai, China. 

6 archaic stone implements — Hupeh Province, China. 
18 archaelogical specimens of bone, stone, and bronze — Hupeh Province, 
China. 
BECKER, ROBERT H., Chicago. 

1 grooved stone axe — La Paz, Bolivia. 

2 pottery fragments — Ruins of Chanchan, Peru. 
CARPENTER, MRS. H. I., Chicago. 

18 miscellaneous ethnological objects, chiefly Alaska. 
CHALMERS, W. J., Chicago. 

Roman pottery lamp — Zalathna, Transylvania, Hungary. 
Metal charm — Abyssinia. 
21 African weapons. 
I Japanese temple gong. 
DUNN, MRS. FRANK A., Milwaukee, Wis. 

1 counterpane — Philadelphia, Pa. 
EGYPTIAN EXPLORATION FUND. 

Crystal eye set in copper, from a statue. 
Piece of agate for inlaying. 

2 fragments lapis lazuli from a jar. 
I lapis-lazuli bead. 

EMMONS, LIEUT., G. F., Princeton, N. J. 

I graphite carving of whale — Alaska (exchange). 
I Chinese bronze figure (exchange). 
FERNBACH, O. H., San Francisco, Cal. 

Pre-Columbian celt of diabase — Quezaltenango, Guatemala. 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Purchases: 

Persian chain-mail, helmet with sword, arm-guard, hauberk, and 
gatmtlet. 
15 pieces prehistoric pottery — Walton County, Fla. 
I pottery fragment — Walton County, Fla. 
I skull — Walton County, Fla. 
57 Pompeiian antiquities in bronze, iron, pottery, and glass — Pompeii. 



38 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

PTSHER. MRS H. S.. Chiaco. 

Sondstooc disc — Pooca Indiani. Neb. 
FR.\NTZIUS. FRITZ VON. Caiic«r>- 

CoUccttoo at JapaocM coins. r::,::..i:. ^r. 1 rrp rod a ctJoat, OMida bf 
onkr ci the JapuMts Govcnuncat, o^niplete Mt ooiHiitliif ot 747 
(more or lea) metal ooim, 31 piece* of paper money, aad 5 tmpl»^ 
menu, all motrnted aod labeled in Japaneee. 00 50 wooden platci — 
Tokyo. Japan. 
I imperial jade seal — Pddng, China. 
I imperial Jade book — Pekinf . China. 
I gold ring — China. 
GUNSAULUS. DR. FR.\NK W.. Chicago. 

Roeary 0/ a hundrrd Bunneee amber beads — Peking, China. 
HACKETT. B. P.. Albany. New York. 

7 ancient Chinese bronze coins — third century B. C. 

Mccormick, cyrus h.: ryerson. martin a.: sargent. homer 

E.. Chicago. 

General ethnological coDectioo : carvings, tcxtilet, brass, jewelry, 
etc — India. Collected by Geo. A. Dorsey. 
SARGE.NT. HOMER E.. Chicago. 

3 old Navajo blankets. 
SMITH. .MRS. CAROLINE. Chicago. 

4 carved wood images — Coogo. Af riok 
1 mask — Coogo. Africa. 

f email fragment from a tomb — Lasor, Egypt. 
SPRAGUE. A. A.. 2d. Chicago. 

I Nava)o blanket — Southwest. U. S. A. 
SUMNER. REV. W. T.. Chicago. 

I prdiistoric pottery )ar — Arizona. 
TEASON. WILLIAM. Palos Park. III. 

I prehistoric chert arrowhead — Palos Park. III. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY 

(ACCBSSIOKS ARS by Cirr tXLSSS othekwise desickatsd.) 

ARMOUR. ALLISON V.. New York, and MILLSPAUGH C. P.. Chicago. 

I a herbarium spodinetts — Yucatan and Mexico. 
BALL. CARLETON R.. Washington. D. C. 

3 hcTbariura speciroens — La. 
BEBB. HERBERT. Chicago. 

4 herbarium spwimen e — DL and Ohio. 
I herbarium specimen ^ lu. 

BOTANICAL G.\RDE^ lne>-, N. S. W. 

99 herbarium spcvtiin^u — New South Wales, etc (exchange). 
BOYD. D. H.. Whitii*. lad. 

I herbarium sp eci men — Ind. 
BUREAU OP SCIENCE. Manila, P. I. 

i:\f>7 herbarium specimens (exchange). 
CIL\LMERS. W. J.. Cfaic^a 

I blackthorn shiDelagh — Irdand. 



Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 

CLOKEY, IRA W., Decatur, lU. 

147 herbarium specimens — Mass., Saskatchewan, and 111. (exchange). 
COKER, W. C, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

I herbaritim specimen — S. C. 
COPULOS, MILTON D., Chicago. 

Wax reproduction of garden cucumber. 
CORY, MRS. CHAS. B., Chicago. 

5 herbarium specimens — 111. 

COWLES, HENRY C, Chicago. 

I herbarium specimen — 111. 

CURLEY, F. E. A., St. Louis, Mo. 

I Philippine sugar mill — St. Louis Exposition. 
DENSLOW, H. M., New York City. 

18 herbarium specimens — Vermont, New Jersey, and New York. 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
CoUated by C. F. Millspaugh: 

651 herbarium specimens — various localities. 
Collected by O. E. Lansing, Jr. : 

17 herbarium specimens — Palos Park, HI. 
151 herbarium specimens — Lake Chicago Basin. 
Purchases: 
689 herbarium specimens — Leyte, P. I. 
195 herbarium specimens — Alberta, Canada. 
608 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 
149 herbarium specimens — Porto Rico. 
109 native woods — Sandwich Islands. 
200 herbarium specimens — Bolivia. 
260 herbarium specimens — Colo. 
397 herbariiun specimens — Philippine Islands. 
1044 herbarium specimens — Cal. 
GAUMER, DR. G. F., Yucatan, Mexico. 

41 herbarium specimens — Yucatan. 
GRAY, HERBARIUM, Cambridge, Mass. (exchange). 
I herbarium specimen — Mexico. 
415 herbariiun specimens — Texas and New Mexico. 
HALL, H. M., Berkeley, Cal. 

1 herbarium specimen — Cal. 
HERBARIUM BOISSIER, Geneva, Switzerland. 

60 herbarium specimens — Brazil (exchange). 
HUTCHINSON, MRS. CHAS. L., Lake Geneva, Wis. 

1 herbarium specimen — Wis. 
JOHNSON, FRANK W., Chicago. 

1 18 herbarium specimens — Wis. 
KEW HERBARIUM, London, England. 

2 herbarium specimens West Indian boxwood — Venezuela. 
KING, MISS ANNA, Chicago. 

3 herbarium specimens — Mich, and lU. 
KNUDSON, PEDER, Ephraim, Wis. 

I specimen beech nuts — Ephraim, Wis. 



39 



40 Field Muscum or NAtrBAT Histoey — Reports, Vol. V. 

KUSSNER. ALBERT. Chicago- 

t old ipinning wbaaL 
LANSING. O. B.. JR.. Chk«r>- 

I weathered root — Ind. 
LOEB. JACOB A.. Chicago. 

24 hrrhar- itnens — New York. 

MANCHESTER M . . ..LM. Mancheater. Eogland. 

I bUckthom thilldagh — Irclaod. 

3 manes Kdp potaah — IrdaxKl 
MILLSPAUGH. C. P.. Chicago. 

Wax reproduction of Japanese penimTnon and of saaafras f niita. 
a herbarium ipecimeni — Chicago. 
84 berharium specimens — Ephraim, Wis. 
MOVER. LYCURGUS R.. Montevideo. Minn. 

rn herbarium specimens — various localities. 
MI MAN, V. G.. Quincy. lU. 

7 specimens fungi — III. 
NATAL BOTANICAL GARDEN. Berra. NaLil. 

101 herbarium specimens — South Africa (exchange). 
NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN. Bronx Park. New York City. 
6 photof^mphs of Wright's Cuban Coccolobi (exchange). 

4 herbarium specimens — Porto Rico (oB^magt), 
OWEN. C L.. Chicago. 

a herbarium specimens — Aris. 
PADILLA. SR. SISTO ALBERTO. EI Salvador. San Salvador. 

I bundle grass — El Salvador. 
PARISH. S. B.. San Bernardino. CaL 

10 herbarium specimens — Nev. and Cal. 
PARKE. DAVIS ft COMPANY. New York. 

I her' <;pecimen — Yucatan. 

PPEIFFER. ' ORMA E.. Chicago. 

t type i p e fime n Thismia .imcricana — III. 
SHERPP. EARL E.. Chicaga 

I herbarium specimen — Prance^ 
67a photographs of type sheets of Btdcns and Cosmos, 
33J herbarium specimens — Dl. and Ind. 
SMITH. la'RON H. Portland. Or^oo. 

53 herbarium specimens — Oregon. 
TYRELL. E. R.. Chicaga 

I fungus — Chicago. 

1 fungris Crudbulum vulgare — CfaicagD. 

U. S. DEPT. OP AGRICULTURE. Washi^ton. D. C 

47 herbarittm specimens — Siberia and China (exchange). 
U. S. NATIONAL HERBARIUM. Washington. D. C 

9aS herbantnn speanKu (exchange). 

aot hcfbarinni spacinicns of grasses (excnange). 
UNFV^RSITY OP CALIFORNIA. Berkeley. CaL 

2 portions of type plants — Mexico. 
WILBER, MARSHALL D.. Chicago. 

4 spwiment Malayan plantation nibber. 




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a. 

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I- ^ 

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O '" 

z ;=; 
z ^ 

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C5 5 

LU "2 

^ ^ 

< u 
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O SJO 

LU 2 

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Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 41 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

ALEXANDER, W. B., Scales Mound, lU. 

3 specimens vanadinite — Tucson, Ariz. 
AYER, E. E.; BUTLER, E. B.; LINN, W. R.; RYERSON, M. A., Chicago. 

21 1 1 specimens fossil vertebrates — Rancho La Brea, Cal. 
BAEKELAND, DR. L. H., Yonkers, New York. 

1 specimen bakelite. 
BAILEY, DR. E. S., Chicago. 

2 specimens glass colored by mesothorium. 
BEBB, DR. WM., Chicago. 

532 specimens bones of fossil vertebrates — Rancho La Brea, Cal. 
BRADFORD, PERRY, Centerton, Ind. 

5 specimens sapphire — Centerton, Ind. 

BRITISH COMMISSION, LOUISIANA PURCHASE EXPOSITION, St. 
Louis, Mo. 

I specimen magnesite — India. 

I specimen manganese ore — India. 
BROWN, MRS. A. S., East Stoneham, Maine. 

I feldspar crystal — East Stoneham, Maine. 
CHALMERS, THOS. S., Chicago. 

I specimen gold ore — Smuggler-Union Mine, Telluride, Colo. 
CHALMERS, WM. J., Chicago. 

60 specimens minerals and ores — various localities. 

1 specimen silver-lead ore — Kellogg, Idaho. 

2 specimens gold — West Coast of Africa. 
CHEROKEE CHEMICAL CO., Kings Creek, S. C. 

2 specimens barite — Kings Creek, S. C. 
COLORADO- YULE MARBLE CO., Marble, Colo. 

6 polished slabs Colorado- Yule marble — Marble, Colo. 
DERR, H. B., Sikeston, Mo. 

3 specimens St. Peter sandstone — Utica, 111. (exchange). 
I specimen molding sand — Utica, 111. (exchange). 

I specimen furnace sand — Utica, 111. (exchange). 
30 specimens soils, ochers, clays, etc. — Missouri (exchange). 
DESERET MUSEUM, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

15 specimens tetrahedrite and pyrite — Bingham, Utah (exchange). 
15 specimens products of Great Salt Lake — Great Salt Lake, Utah 
(exchange). 
DUREX CHEMICAL WORKS, New York City. 

I specimen barite — Sweetwater, Tenn. 
FARNSWORTH, J. E. and R. M., Lancaster, Mass. 

1 specimen fuller's earth — Lancaster, Mass. 
FIELD, STANLEY, and JONES, ARTHUR B., Chicago. 

2 meteorites — Blanket, Texas. 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 

Collected by O. C. Farrington: 

3 specimens granite — Pike's Peak, Colo. 

6 specimens gypsum — Garden of the Gods, Colo. 



4i Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

aaicctr! ! V H. \V. N:, h, I-. 

licos of c*. t\jc*iA Aod f oMfli — Stooy Creek, Granit« Co., Moot. 
.M. .e Dqwrtniaital Ubontorio: 

t intiie noaflL 
PorchAMs: 

3 tpccimfPt volcanic bomb* — Idaho. 

4 t p wimmi Mod-faceted pebblee — Cape Cod. Ma«. 

5 specimens gold ore — Cripple Creek. Cok>. 

17 spedinens crinoids and other foesils — Kansas City. Mo. 
I specimen Big Skookiun meteorite — Yukon Dist.. Alaska. 
FISHER. .MRS. H. S.. Chicaga 

41 cpedmens minerals and foMils—' various localities. 
FLORIDIN CO.. Warren, Pa. 

6 specimens crude and ground fuller's earth — Quincy. Pla. 
POSILAG. W.\I.. Berkeley. Cal. 

8 specimens minerals — Riverside, CaL (exchange). 
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OP INDIA. OUnitU. India. 

3 specimens lateritc — Kalahandi. IxKlia. 
GREEN. JAMES A., Chicago. 

I foesil elk antler — Pake Park. III. 

1 prnion deer antler — PakM Park. III. 
HANINK. H. H.. Pak» Park. 111. 

t fossil elk skull with antler* — PakM Park, lU. 
JEWELL. FRED. Osborne, Kan. 

6 specimens foesils — H.irlan, Kan. 
KRANTZ. DR. P.. Bonn. Germany. 

1 specimen fossil lizard — Solenhofen. Germany (exchange). 
KREBS PIGMENT AND CHEMICAL CO.. Newport, Del. 

2 Specimens barite — Cartcnvillc, Ga. 
LESTER CLAY CO.. Jacksonville. Pla. 

t specimen eadi ground and raw fuller's earth — Atttptigm, Ga. 
MALLINCKRODT CHE.MICAL WORKS. St. Louis. .Mo. 

I specimen acet.anilide. 

I specimen acrtphcnetidin. 
MANATEE FULLERS EARTH CORPOR.\TION. EDentoo. Fla. 

5 specimens fuller's earth — EUenton. Pla. 
MARSH. C. H.. .ManOificld. Ore. 

3 specimens o rv a Ore. 

I specimen natrolite — Myrtle Point, Ore. 
MINING MUSEU.M. Sydney. New South Wale*. 

I print etching figures of Dekfate meteorite. 
MOSHER, J. H.. GleBuiTC, Moot. 

8 sp ecimena iaspcr (cot). 

4 specxment agatiied wood (cut), 
a spe rimen a moat agate (cut). 

t specixnen nioei a^ate pebble (polidwd). 
13 specimens moes agate and jasper — Glcndive, Mont. Oo^n). 
NICHOLAS. FR.'INCIS C. Tucson. Arix. 

t specimen tungsten ore — Las Guijas. Ariz. 

9 specimeos copper ores — Nogales, Ariz. 



Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 43 

NORTON, E. G., Chicago. 

3 speciinens calaverite — Cripple Creek, Colo, (exchange). 
O'CONNOR, E. S., Mayville, Wis. 

9 specimens iron ore — Majrville, Wis. 
PATTEE, FRED, Chicago. 

6 specimens rock phosphate — Cokeville, Wyo. 

I specimen argillaceous chalk — Cheyenne, Wyo. 

I specimen conglomerate — Cheyenne, Wyo. 
25 specimens asbestos, gold and copper ores, etc. — various localities. 

9 specimens copper ore — Globe, Ariz. 
15 specimens vanadium ore — Globe, Ariz. 

3 specimens barite — Wyo. 

3 specimens gold, silver, copper and manganese ores — Ariz, and Wyo. 
PENNSYLVANIA SALT MFG. CO., Natrona, Pa. 

I specimen pyrite — Rio Tinto, Spain. 
PIERCE, FRANKLIN, Chicago. 

1 specimen eroded quartz — Adamana, Ariz. (loan). 
ROSENBAUM, RUDOLPH R., Chicago. 

2 specimens grahamite — Sardis, Okla. 
I specimen tmpsonite — Sardis, Okla. 

ROSS, D. M., Etna, Wyo. 

I specimen fossil crinoids — Etna, Wyo. 
SCHALL, GEO., Chicago. 

I specimen schist — Chicago. 
SCOTT, GEO. S., New York City. 

I specimen psittacinite — Bisbee, Ariz, (exchange). 
TEASON, WM., Palos Park, lU. 

14 specimens trilobites and other fossils — Palos Park, 111. 

3 specimens marcasite concretions — Palos Park, 111. 
THOMPSON, WEINMAN & CO., NicholasviUe, Ky. 

I specimen barite — NicholasviUe, Ky. 
TOWER, RAY J., GreenviUe, Mich. 

I specimen core sand — Greenville, Mich. 

I specimen core — Greenville, Mich. 
WILEY, JOHN, Florissant, Colo. 

I specimen petrified wood — Florissant, Colo. 
WILLIAMS, C. K. COMPANY, Easton, Pa. 

1 specimen talc — Easton, Pa. 

2 specimens ground talc — Easton, Pa. 
WOOD, H. R., Prescott, Ariz. 

4 specimens tungsten ore — Maricopa Co., Ariz. 
ZIEGE, MAX E., Joy, Nevada. 

33 specimens ores — Ruby Motmtain Dist., Nevada. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 
(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, Central Park, New York 
City. 

2 young flamingoes (exchange). 



44 FixLP Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

ARMSTRONG. EDWARD E.. Chicago. 

I silver baired b«L 
BATTi'. W. L.. South Butte, Mont. 

7 flying iquiiTels — South Butt«. Mont. 

3 American magpiei — South Butte. MooL 
CIwVFLIN. B. A.. Grroi Bay. Wis, 

I fthnormal domestic duck — Green Bay, Wit. 
CLARK, n. TRKSTON. Borton. Mas. 

34 (pecics hawk-moths. 
CURLEY. P. E. A.. Sl Louis. Mo. 

3 jaw bones of wbal& 
DOUDLER. L.. Chicago. 

I ensa^n fly — Chicago. 

I beetle — Ft. Jr Ohio. 

EIGENM.ANN. C. ».. P , • n. Tnl. 

265 fishes (43 s;-  :■ • I . '. :;'::. I and Ecuador. 
FIELD STANLEY. Chicago. 

6 icarlet ibis — ^' Bniil, 
109 bird skins — Dii.v.. x.,^;ana. 

I flamingo — Pla. 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HLSTORY. 
Collecleil by R. H. Becker: 

I cockroach — Trinidad, S. A. 
Collected by W. J. Gerhard: 

87 dragon-flies, grasaboppen, bugs, butterflies, moths, be et k i, 
bees, wasps and psrsBtes — N. Ind. and lU. 
Collected by J. Priesser: 

7 mammals — Wash. 
I beetle — Wash. 

Collected by A. B. Lewis: 
los shells — Bismarck Archipdaga 
\2 shdis — MalekuU, New Hebrides. 
Collected by W. H. Osgood: 
SO shells — La Vina. Peru, 
a shdls — Balsas. Peru. 
Purchases: 

I Alaskan moose — Kenai Peninsula. Alaska. 

I butterfly — Muto, Colombia. 

t passenger ptgeoo. 

5 frogs — Brownsville, Texas. 

8 ihcUs — Brownsville Texas. 
3 pssstngrr pigeons — New York. 
t BAimo curlew — Canada. 

PRIESSER. JULIUS. Chicago. 

I snowy owl — Chicago. 

t wild turkey egg. 
GILL. DR. GEO. M.. Lebanon. Tenn. 

a beetles — Lebaooo. Tenn. 

I homed corydalis — Lebanon, Tenn. 

9 parasites — Lebapon. Tenn. 



IIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 



PifLO MUStUW O' •••ruRAl MiSTOnv 




Group Of 0*1 Bmos. St) 

Scene, section o( Gt\ • . i 



HuMaoio 



..* : 1 ..i; 



Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 45 

HENN, A. W., Bloomington, Ind. 
I deer skull — Ecuador. 
I agouti skull — Colombia. 
I rabbit skull — Ecuador. 
I pair deer horns — Colombia. 

HALL, CATHERINE J. and MARTHA O., Chicago. 
I parrot. 

HEIMSTREET, DR. THOS. B., Troy, New York. 
I long-billed curlew — Canada. 

LILJEBLAD, E., Chicago. 

27 cicadas, flies, beetles, wasps, parasites, etc. — Ind. and 111. 

LINCOLN PARK ZOO, Chicago. 
I orang-outang (in flesh). 

ORCUTT, C. R., San Diego, Cal. 

255 shells — Cal., Texas, and Mexico. 
PRAY, LEON L., Chicago. 

1 calico bass — Jackson Park Lagoon, Chicago. 
ROD WAY, J., Georgetown, British Guiana. 

2 South American sparrow hawks (exchange). 

ROMANO, JOE, Chicago. 

2 pigeons — Jackson Park, Chicago. 

I English sparrow — Jackson Park, Chicago. 

SEWARD, MRS. EMMA MAY, Chicago. 
1 saw-fish — Ft. Meyers, Fla. 
I alligator (spoiled) — Ft. Meyers, Fla. 

SIEGEL, COOPER & CO., Chicago. 

I lemur — Madagascar. 
SMITH, HURON H., Ingalls, Ind. 

1 red-shouldered hawk — Ingalls, Ind. 
STODDARD, H. L., Chicago. 

5 bird lice — Dune Park, Ind. 

2 louse-flies — Hyde Ridge, 111. 
UMBACH, L. M., Naperville, 111. 

10 bugs — Naperville, lU. 
VOOGDT, CAPT. 

I emu egg — New Guinea (exchange). 
WELCH, WILLIAM, Chicago. 

1 lamprey — Jackson Park Lagoon, Chicago. 
WELD, L. W., Evanston, 111. 

4 gall insects — State of Michoacan, Mexico. 

3 gall insect guests — State of Michoacan, Mexico. 
WESTCOTT, DR. O. S., Oak Park. 111. 

2 jumping plant-lice. 

8 dragon-flies — 111., Fla., Cal., Mexico, and British Guiana. 
WICKER. MISS CAROLYN, Chicago. 

I mounted ruflf of a bustard — India. 
WICKHAM, H. F., Iowa City, Iowa. 

3 moths — Koehler, N. M. 



46 FiF.LD Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

WILLIAMSON. E. B.. niuff' * ' 

3 red-Uilcvi KawIcs - .,.^...^0. lod. 
I loon — Dluflton. Ind. 

I b^ra owl — BluffUm. lod. 
WOLCOTT, A. B.. Chicago. 

4 ■alamanderi — Mineral Spriogt, lod. 

18 dxagoo>flk«. bog*, beetle*, fliet, nx>ths and wmtfm — Northern Dlinott. 



SECTION OF PHOTOGR^\PHV 

(ACCSmOKS AKB BY GIFT UNX&SS OTBKKinSS DBSICJfATSO.) 

LAUFER. BERTHOLD. Chicago. 

188 mounted photographs o( Kxnet and typei of natives from Saghalin 
and Amur rrgioo. 
FIELD MUSEUM OP NATURAL HISTORY. 
Made by the section : 

453 negatives of Museum fpedment, etc, 1914 prints from game, at 
lantern slides. 8 enlaigements, 73 negatives developed for Mnnom 
field expeditions. 8 podtivet for use in making large n e gativ e a . 
HARRISON. WM. PRESTON. Chicago. 

35 photographs of South Sea Islanders. 

THE LIBR^VRY 
BOOKS. PAMPHLETS. AND SERIALS 

(ACOSStOKS ARl BT EXCHANGE UXLESS OTBEBWISE DE5tGNATSO) 

ALABAMA 

Agricttltur-' ^'-- • Station, Auburn 2 

Geological rsity i 

ARIZONA 

Agricultural Experiment Station. Tucson 2 

ARKASSAS 

Agricxiltural Experiment Station. Payrttcvillr i 

CALIFORNIA 

Agricultural Experiment Station. Berkeley .7 

California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco . . .2 

California Fish and Game Commiasioa, Sacramento 8 

California State Board at Forestry, Sacramento . i 

California Univerr ~ -Iccley 16 

Cooper Omitbologiv... ^ ,^b. HoUyifood 2 

Leiand Stanford Jonior University. Stanford University . . 2 

Oakland Public Library . . . . . i 

Pioneer Western Lumberman. Sacramento (gift) i 

Pomona College, Claremont 2 

Soatbem California Academy of Sciences. Los Angdes t 

State Mining Bureau. Sacramento i 

COLORADO 

Agricultural Experiment Station. Port Collins 10 

Colorado College, Colorado Springs 3 



Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 47 

Colorado Museum of Natural History, Denver 3 

Colorado Scientific Society, Denver I 

State Bureau of Mines, Denver i 

State Historical and Natural History Society, Denver i 

University of Colorado, Boulder 2 

CONNECTICUT 

Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven 6 

American Oriental Society, New Haven I 

Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences, New Haven 3 

Connecticut Fish and Game Commission, Hartford I 

Connecticut Geological and Natural History Survey, Hartford .... 3 

Hartford Public Library 2 

Yale University, New Haven 4 

DELAWARE 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Newark 2 

FLORIDA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Tallahassee 5 

State Geological Survey, Tallahassee 2 

GEORGIA 

Geological Survey, Atlanta I 

HAWAIIAN ISLANDS 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Honolulu 5 

Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Honolulu 2 

Board of Agriculture and Forestry, Honolulu I 

IDAHO 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Moscow I 

University of Idaho, Moscow I 

ILLINOIS 

Armour Institute of Technology, Chicago l 

Art Institute of Chicago 2 

Cement World Publishing Company, Chicago (gift) I 

Chicago, Geographic Society i 

Chicago Historical Society I 

Chicago Public Library 3 

Dial Publishing Company, Chicago 2 

Forest and Stream Publishing Company, Chicago 2 

Hardwood Record, Chicago (gift) 2 

Inland Printer Publishing Company, Chicago 3 

John Crerar Library, Chicago 3 

Kenfield-Leach Company, Chicago 2 

Lake Forest College i 

Lewis Institute, Chicago I 

Mining World Publishing Company, Chicago 2 

Newberry Library, Chicago 2 

Open Court Publishing Company, Chicago I 

Peoria Public Library, Peoria I 

South Park Commission, Chicago 2 

Special Park Commission, Chicago I 

State Board of Agriculture, Springfield 4 

State Geological Survey, Urbana 5 



4B Field Museum of Natural Hrtoiy — Rcpokts, Vol. V. 

State Historical Library, Spriogflald 4 

StAte Labormtory of N ' Hwtory, UrtMna . 3 

Sutc MuMum of Nat-:.» ..~,torf. SpringMd . 1 

Uoivcnuty ol Quaiffo 43 

Uaivcmiy ol Illioou. Urboim ... 19 

INDIANA 

lodiAna Acadanoy of Sdeocc, lodiAnApolU i 

John Hrrron Art lastitutc, lodianApolis 3 

Notre Dome Univenaty ... . . i 

Purdue University. Lafayette ... .33 

Rom Polytochnic Institute, Terre Haute 1 

Sute Board of Forestry. Indianapolis (£ift) i 

IOWA 

Forrstr>' Club. Ames 2 

G«ol<i(fical Survey, I)cs Moines ... i 

Iowa Stale Horticultural Society. Des M< •.:'.'•; . . i 

State Collcifc of A re. Ames . i 

State Pish and GoiiK. couimiMion. Spirit Lake {g^t) 10 

State Historical Department, Des Moines ... . a 

State Horticultural Society. Dcs Moines . . . . . i 

University of Iowa. Iowa City 3 

KANSAS 

Academy of Science, Topeka ..... i 

Agricultural Kxperimeot Station. Manhattan M 

State Board of A(;riculture. Topeka .... .4 

Su*- TTJrforical Society. Topeka . i 

Ur.. of Kanna. Lawrence t 

KENTUCKY 

Ajfrioi*'  " nt StAtion. Lcsdngtoa. 5 

r.o, •, ..;..,.. ;.aikfort (ipft) » 

LOl A 

Aj^ncultural Experiment Station. Baton Rmijjc 8 

Isaac Delgrade Museum of Art. New OrleAns t 

Lottiaana Historical Society. New Orleans (g\h) t 

VLAINB 

Africultural Erpcrimcnt S' .•. r.. ' •: no . . . 3 

Bowdotn CoUege. Brunsw.. ^ 3 

Portland Public Ubrary .1 

MARYLAND 

Aifricultural Experiment Station. College Park . 3 

Enoch Pratt Free Library. Baltimore 2 

Johns Hopkms University. Baltimore 3 

Sute Board of Forestry. Baltimore . i 

MASS.ACH ^S 

••Vgno;.- ;r ». nxpcrimcnt Station. Amherst .S 

American Antjquari.in S*-<-irtT. B'-'t-n . . 3 

Amherst College . .1 

Archaeological In.^' ' " i 

Bottoo Moseom of I tnc Ans 2 

Bottoo PBbBc Library . . i 



Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 49 

Boston Society of Natural History I 

Cambridge Public Library I 

Clark University, Worcester 2 

Essex Institute, Salem 2 

Harvard College, Cambridge 4, 

Harvard University, Cambridge 2 

Horticultural Society, Boston 2 

Institute of Technology, Boston 2 

New Bedford Free Public Library 3 

Peabody Institute, Salem 3 

Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology, Cambridge . 2 

Phillips Academy, Andover I 

Salem Public Library 2 

Springfield Library Association 2 

Springfield Natural History Museum i 

Williams College, WHliamstown 4 

Worcester County Horticultural Society, Worcester I 

Worcester Free PubUc Library 2 

MICHIGAN 

Academy of Sciences, Ann Arbor I 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Agricultural College 4 

Detroit Museum of Art 2 

Detroit Public Library I 

Geological and Biological Survey, Lansing 3 

Grand Rapids Public Library 3 

Michigan College of Mines, Houghton i 

National Educational Association of the United States, Ann Arbor ... 3 

State Board of Agriculture, Lansing I 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 2 

MINNESOTA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, St. Paul 10 

Minneapolis Historical Society, St. Paul 3 

Minnesota Forestry Board, St. Paul (gift) I 

Minnesota Geological Survey, MinneapoUs I 

University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 6 

MISSOURI 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Columbia 9 

Bureau of Geology and Mines, Jeflferson City I 

City Art Museum, St. Louis I 

Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis 2 

St. Louis Academy of Sciences i 

St. Louis Mercantile Library Association I 

St. Louis Public Library 2 

St. Louis University I 

State Historical Society, Columbia 2 

University of Missouri, Columbia 2 

Washington University, St. Louis 2 

MONTANA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Bozeman I 



5© FiriD Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

NEORASiwA 

Aakdetnj oi Sdeoem, Lincoln .... . t 

AfricultunU Eiperimcnt Sutioo. Lioootn 3 

Nebnuka Game and Pish CoauntMoo. LcDOotn (gift) 3 

Omaha MoMitiD (fift) .... t 

Unhrwiity of Ncbnika. Lincoln . 2 

Unhrvnitj of Nabnaka PofWt Qub. Li . 6 

NEVADA 

Sutc Univcrnty. Reno .4 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

CoUoR* o( .^ ■••.rr, DurhAin .4 

Fortstry Co......».«v>a. Concord ... j 

NEW Jpt^^^Y 

Agr. il Experiment Station, Trmtm la 

CrBit4Bnan. Eastwood (ipft) . } 

Geological Surrey. Trenton .2 

Newark Moseum Asaociatioo. (gift) . i 

Newark Public Library i 

Prinoeton Univcnity. Princctnn .... .3 

Stevens Institute of Technology. Hobokcn ... 1 

NEW MEXICO 

Agricultural Experiment Station. Mcsilla Park 6 

Museum of New Mexico, Santa P6 36 

NEW YORK 

Agricultural Experiment Statioa. Geneva 3 

American Cfcojfraphica! . New York City i 

American InsUtuteof .' ' '-—neers. New York City . } 

American Mtaran o( ^^ ory. New York City 35 

Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Scicpet . 
Buffalo -\ry . . . . 

Buffalo ^^x >t-i.> oi .N'atural History 

Carnegie Poundatioo for the Affvancement of Teaching. New York City 
Cornell Univcrnty. Ithaca 

Fnrrslry Quarterly. Ithaca 

General Education Board. New York City (gift) 

HklMak Sodaty of America, New York City 

Japan Society. New York aty (gift). 

LsJce Mobook Coofereooe of International Arbitration. Lake Mohook 

Metropolitan Moseom of Art. New York City 

Munn and Company. New York City (gift) 

National Association of Audubon Societies, New York City . 

New York Academy of Sciencea, New York Qty 

New York Botanical Garden. New York Cty 

Pratt Institute Free Library. BrooklyQ . . 

Public Library. New York Gty 

State LAirmry. Albany 

Stateo latoad Aaaodation of Arts and Sciencca. New York City . 
Zoological Society. New York City ... 



Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 51 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Raleigh 2 

Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society, Chapel Hill I 

NORTH DAKOTA 

State Historical Society, Grand Forks I 

University of North Dakota, University I 

OHIO 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Wooster to 

Chemical Rubber Company, Cleveland (gift) I 

Cincirmati Museum Association, Cincinnati 2 

Cleveland Museimi of Art i 

Cleveland Public Library 2 

Denison University, Granville i 

Geological Survey, Coltmibus i 

Lloyd Library, Cincinnati 2 

Marietta College i 

Oberlin College i 

State Academy of Science, Columbus I 

State Archaeological and Historical Society, Columbus I 

State University, Columbus Ig 

University of Cincirmati 2 

Wilson Ornithological Club, Oberlin I 

OKLAHOMA 

Geological Survey, Norman a 

OREGON 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Corvallis (gift) 6 

State Board of Forestry, Salem I 

Timberman, Portland (gift) I 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Harrisburg 5 

American Entomological Society, Philadelphia 4 

American Journal of Pharmacy, Philadelphia i 

American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia I 

Association of Engineering Societies, Philadelphia 2 

Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr i 

Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh 2 

Carnegie Library, Pittsburgh 6 

Carnegie Museum, Pittsburgh 3 

Delaware County Institute of Science, Media i 

Dropsie College, Philadelphia I 

Engineers' Society of Western Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh 2 

Franklin Institute, Philadelphia 2 

Pennsylvania Department of Forestry, Harrisburg (gift) I 

Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art, Philadelphia . . . i 

Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences I 

Philadelphia College of Physicians I 

Philadelphia Commercial Museum I 

Philadelphia Numismatics and Antiquarian Society i 

State Department of Agriculture, Harrisburg 2 



S3 FiKLD MnsttTM OF NATrRAi. History — Reports, Vol. V. 

T' ;^'>:rA;ihir an^l CtCDloffu- Survr>*. riltshiirKh 4 

Vtv/.r-l StA'.r^ IniSi.vn Sch'X.l. CArl««lr . . a 

Univm-jty .f Pmivrj-lviuiiA, PhilAddj)hi.» .6 

Wakh'T Frrc lostitute of SirTicr, rhiladdphia 1 

W'v.-.a: !  • I 8 

>' yoruitij, 1 i I . V i .' -k. .1 .u k>t>v.ii ij , •' li ic I 

PHILIPPINE ISLAM'. 

Bureau o{ Education. N! 3 

Department of the Intennr. Bormu ci Science, ManiU 4 

V .c Libraxy. Maaila i 

RH(' 'ND 

.\„ Expcrimcflt Statioo, Kingftoo t 

Providence Public Libnuy 3 

Roger Williams Pork Museum. Providence i 

SOUTH CAROLINA . 

Charlostoo Museum l 

Department o( Agriculture, Commerce and lodusthc*, Qcmjon . . . . i 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Brookings 7 

Sutc Geological and Biological Survey, Venniljon i 

TENNESSEE 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Nashville 3 

TEXAS 

International Society of Archaeologists, Hico (gift) i 

Scientific Society, San Antonio lo 

University of Texas, Austin 3 

UTAH 

Sutc Horticultural Gommiaion. Salt Lake City i 

VERMONT 

( . il Survey, Burlington i 

L nivcrsity of Vennont, Burlingtoo 6 

VIRGINIA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Bladobtirf 3 

Univernty ol Virginia, Charlottesville t 

Virginia State Library, Richmond t 

WASHINGTON 

Sutc Geological Survey. Olympia 3 

Sute Library. Seattle .... 3 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 

Biological Society x 

Intematioaal Bureau <d AflMrkan Rcpablica 2 

National Acmdtmaf of Sdanoa 3 

National Geographic Society ... 3 

United Sutes G ov er nm ent 780 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Agricultural Experiment Station. Morgantown 6 

Univenity of West Virginia, Morgantown i 



i 



Jan., 191 6. Annual Report of the Director. 53 

WISCONSIN 

Archaeological Society, Milwaukee l 

Beloit College 2 

Geological and Natural History Survey, Madison 4 

Natural History Society, Madison 1 

State Historical Society, Madison 2 

State Horticultural Society, Madison 2 

University of Wisconsin, Madison 10 

Wisconsin Academy of Science, Madison 1 

WYOMING 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Laramie 3 

State Board of Horticulture, Laramie 1 

Atkinson, George F., Ithaca, New York 6 

Avery, Samuel P., Hartford, Connecticut (gift) i 

Ayer, Edward E., Chicago (gift) . i 

Barnes, William, Decatur, Illinois i 

Barrington, D. M., Philadelphia (gift) I 

Bean, Tarleton H., Albany, New York I 

Brandegee, Townshend S., Berkeley, California i 

Branner, J. C, Stanford University, California 17 

Brimley, C. S., Raleigh, North Carolina (gift) 4 

Casey, Thomas L., Washington, D. C. (gift) 4 

Chalmers, W. J., Chicago (gift) 5 

CockereU, T. D. A., Boulder, Colorado il 

ColHns, G. N., Washington, D. C 2 

Conklin, Edwin Grant, Princeton, New Jersey i 

Coutant, A. F., Ithaca, New York (gift) I 

Cross, Whitman, Washington, D. C 3 

Evans, Alexander W., New Haven, Connecticut 6 

Farrington, OUver C, Chicago 9 

Farwell, OUver A., Detroit, Michigan 3 

Felt, E. P., Nassau, New York (gift) I 

Gay, Frederick P., Berkeley, California (gift) 5 

Gerhard, William J., Chicago 5 

Goldman, E. A., Washington, D. C I 

Greene, Edward L., Washington, D. C 2 

Hough, Walter, Washington, D. C i 

Hrdlicka, Ales., Washington, D. C 1 

Hurst, Ethan Allen, Hereford, Texas (gift) I 

Kimz, George Frederick, New York City 2 

Laufer, Berthold, Chicago 8 

McCormick, Ryerson, Sargent Indian Expedition (gift) 6 

Meek, Mrs. Seth Eugene, Chicago (gift) i 

Merriam, C. Hart, Washington, D. C 125 

Millspaugh, Charles Frederick, Chicago 90 

Moorehead, Warren K., Andover, Massachusetts i 

Morehouse, George P., Topeka, Kansas (gift) 1 

Osbom, Henry T., New York City 2 

Osbum, Herbert, Columbus, Ohio 2 



54 Field Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

0«ood. Wilfred H., Oucaco > 

Pltfka DaTU and Company. Drtrott, Micht£%n . . i 

Pienftwe. R. A. P.. Jr., rtuladdphia 3 

Randall. T. A., lodianapolu. Indiana (g;i'.) . .. i 

Robartaoo. James A., aevdand. Ohio (giii) 1 

Scfaata. W., Waahinfton. D. C i 

Thazter. Roland. Cambridge, MaMachtuetU 4 
Toomej. Nozoo. St. Louis. Miaouri (gift) .a 

Walker. J. W., Chicago (gift) .... f 

Warren. Charles H., Boston. Mi— ch uacttj i 

WiPoughby. Charles C. Cambridge. Mawarhntrtu 14 

AFRICA 

AIKiny Muccum. Grahamstown i 

Department of Mines, Pretoria. Transvaal i 

Geological Society. Johannesburg 3 

Geological Surrey. Pretoria . . t 

Institut de Carthage. Tunis 1 

South African Museum, Cape Town . . j 

Transvaal Musoun. Pretoria i 

ARGENTINA 

Musoo Nadooal, Boeoos Aires 3 



AUSTRALIA 

Australian Mui^ ~ ' v 

Australian OrmU ^•"'~' ^{lion. Melbourne 

Botanic Gardens and Government Domains. Sydnry . 
Department o^ Agriculture, Adelaide. 
Department ol Agriculture, Hohart. Tasmania 
Department ot Agriculturr, Melbourne 
Department o( Agriculturr. Sydney . 
Department of Pisherics, Sydney .... 
Dqiartmcnt of Mines, Sydney 
PSdd NaturalisU' Qub, BriAane 
Field NaturalisU' Qub, Mdbourae 

Geological Survey*. Perth 

Gove mm mt cl tiie Coomoswealtfa, Mdboomc 
IntdUgCDoe and Toorist Barean. Addaide . 
Linnean Sodety of New South Wales. Sydney 

MrlVrurnc Univerrily 

NaUonal MiisBum. MdboonM .... 

Natoral History and Sckntiflc Sodctr. Perth 

Premier's Office, Perth 

Public Library. Mtaeom and Art Gallery. Adelaide 

Queensland Govenuaeot, Brisbane (gift) 

QoflCMHod Mosettm, Brtsbane ... 

Royal Geographical Society of AostTBlstii. QoeeDdafid 

Royal Sodety of New South Wales, Sydney 

Royal Sodety of Queensland, Brisbane . . 

Royal Society of South AostraUa. Addaide . 

Royal Zoological Sodety of New South Wales, ?ydr.-y 



18 
I 



Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 55 

South Australian Ornithological Association, Adelaide i 

Technical Museum, Sydney I 

Victoria National Museum, Melbourne I 

Victorian Government, Melbourne (gift) I 

Western AustraUan Museum and Art Gallery, Perth I 

AUSTRIA-HUNGARY 

Magyar Nemzeti Museum, Budapest l 

BORNEO 

Sarawak Museum, Sarawak i 

BRAZIL 

Campinas Centro de Ciencia, Sao Paulo I 

Instituto Agronomico de Estada, Sao Paulo l 

Museo Nacional, Rio de Janeiro I 

Museu Paulista, Sao Pavdo I 

BRITISH GUIANA 

Royal Agricultural and Commercial Society, Georgetown i 

CANADA 

Commission of Conservation, Ottawa (gift) 13 

Department of Agriculture, Ottawa 14 

Department of Agriculture, Regina, Saskatchewan (gift) i 

Department of Agriculture, Victoria, British Columbia 2 

Department of the Interior, Geological Survey, Ottawa 32 

Department of Lands, Victoria i 

Department of Marine and Fisheries, Ottawa 2 

Department of Mines, British Columbia 2 

Department of Mines, Ottawa 2 

Minister of Education, Toronto 2 

Naturaliste Canadien, Chicoutimi I 

Numismatic and Antiquarian Society, Montreal 1 

Ottawa Field Naturalists' Club, Ottawa I 

Provincial Museum, Victoria I 

Royal Society, Toronto 3 

University of Toronto 4 

CEYLON 

Colombo Museum 2 

Royal Botanic Garden, Peradeniya 2 

CHILE 

Biblioteca Nacional, Santiago de Chile 4 

CHINA 

Botanical and Forestry Department, Hong Kong I 

Royal Asiatic Society, North China Branch, Shanghai i 

DENMARK 

Botanical Garden, Copenhagen 3 

Naturhistorisk Forening, Copenhagen I 

Soci6t6 Botanique de Copenhagen 1 

EGYPT 

Zo6logical Gardens, Cairo I 



56 Field Museum of Natural IIjstoky — Rxports, Vol. V. 

ENGLAND 

Anthropc4ocical Institute of GrcAt Britain and IreUad, London . . i 

A&hmolcAO Natural Hutory Society of Ozfordahire, Oiford . . i 

AsMtic Society, Loodoo i 

Bhf btoQ and Hove Natural History and Philoaophical Society 3 

Bralol Mnseoin and Art Gallery .1 

British Asaociatioo for the Advaacemcat of Scienc e . Loodoo t 

finti&h Nfu-vnim (Natural llistnry). Loodoo 16 

Cambhdfe Antiquarian Soartjr .1 

Cambridfe Philoaophical Soacty 2 

CorobridKc Uni\*crtity Library 4 

Gty of Sheffield I 

CroydoQ Natural History and Sdeotific Society ... i 

Dove Marine Laboratory. CuUerooats. Northumberland . i 

Ealing Scientific and Microscopical Society. Lo o doo i 

Entomological and Natural History Society, Loodoo i 

G"^-.' ■"'^tain Geological Survey, Loodoo i 

}: .n Museum. Loodoo 2 

Hull Municipal Museum. Hull 3 

Imp* - -eau of Entomology, London 2 

Imp<...>. X .icge of Sdeoceaod Technology, Loodoo ... 

Japan Society, LoodoQ 

Lancashire Sea Pisherie* Laboratory. Liverpool 

IJnnean Society. Loodo o 3 

Liverpool Biological Soci'-'v 

Liverpool Geological So* 

Liverpool Marine Biological Stat; n 

Loodoo Zo6iogical S 

Lord Derby Natural ... ./ Musexmi. Liverpool (gift) 

Maocbestcr Field Naturalists' and Archaeologists' Society 

Manchester Muscur 

Marine Bioknical Assooauon of the United Kingdom, Plymouth 

Oxford Dckgatas ci Uotvernty Museum 

Royal Archaeological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland. Loodoo 

Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew 3 

Royal Colotnal Institute. London . . ... 3 
Royal Geographical Society. London .3 

Royal Horticultural Society, Loodoo. .: 

Royal Society. Loodoo 2 

Royal Society of Arts, Loodoo 2 

South Loodoo Eotomologkal and Natural Histrrv Sr>r:rtv. L- r. !> n. i 

Tring Zo6logical Museum t 

PRANCE 

Acadteae des Sdeoces, Paris 2 

AsBodataoo des Naturalistes, LevaUots-Pcrrct 2 

Rcoie d'Anthropologie, Paris i 

Mus^m d'Histoire NatureOe et d 'Ethnographic. Havre i 

Socitt^ de Gtegraphie, Toulouse i 

^oakU des Etudes Sdentifiques. Angen 3 

Sod^t^ des Sciences Naturefles, La Rocbdle 14 



Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 57 

Soci6t6 des Sciences Naturelles des Saone et Loire, Chalon-sur-Saone . . 2 

Soci^t^ G^ologique du Nord, Lille I 

Soci^te Linn^nne de Bordeaux, Bordeaux I 

Soci6t^ Nationale d'Agriculture, Paris I 

Soci^te Nationale d'Agriculture, Science et Arts, Angers I 

Soci^t^ Nationale d'Horticiilture, Paris I 

Soci6t6 Zoologique de France, Paris 2 

GERMANY 

Botanische Staatsinstitute, Hamburg I 

Deutsche Dendrologische GeseUschaft, Bonn-Poppelsdorf I 

Deutsche GeseUschaft fur Anthropologic, Ethnologic und Urgs., Berlin . . I 

Deutsche GeseUschaft fur VolkstumUche Naturkunde, Berlin 2 

Deutscher Seefischerei-Verein, Berhn I 

Deutsches Entomologisches Museum, Berlin I 

GeseUschaft fiir Erdkunde, Leipzig I 

Institut fur Mineralogie und Petrographie, Leipzig 5 

Jahres-Verzeichnis der an den Deutschen Univ., Berlin 2 

K. Bayer. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat, Mvmich 7 

K. Bibliothek, Berlin 3 

K. Botanischer Garten und Museum, Berlin 3 

K. Georg-August-Universitat, Gottingen 2 

K. Sachs. GeseUschaft der Wissenschaften, Leipzig 

Universitats Bibliothek, Kiel 

Verein fiir Volkskunde, Berlin 

INDL\ 

Agri-Horticultural Society, Madras 

Anthropological Society, Bombay 

Archaeological Survey, Burma 

Archaeological Survey, Calcutta 23 

Archaeological Survey, Peshawar 

Colony of Mauritius, 

Department of Agriculture, Bombay 

Department of Agriculture, Madras 2 

Department of Agriciilture, Pusa 3 

Geological Survey, Calcutta 3 

Government Museum, Madras I 

Indian Museum, Calcutta 7 

Map Record and Issue OflEce, Calcutta (gift) I 

National Indian Association, Calcutta (gift) i 

Royal Asiatic Society, Straits Branch, Singapore I 

Royal Botanic Garden, Calcutta I 

Superintendent of Government Printing, Calcutta 4 

IP-ELAND 

Department of Agriculture, Fisheries Branch, Dublin 2 

Royal Dublin Society, Dublin 3 

Royal Irish Academy, Dubhn 3 

Trinity CoUege, Dublin I 

ITALY 

American Society, Rome I 

GaUeria Sangiorgi, Rome (gift) I 



58 FiF.LD Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

M r«-i '.i Z" ly-.i r-l Aa.%tomi.» ("' mpamtA, Turin I 

P ■-■ M ■! I Su{i*T-."rr i!'A^;n> >Iti;r.», I'l-r'.in I 

- .. ;A t"-r« >;r.vf:i.k I'..4.Ii.i:-..i. K r: r 3 

SodrtA ("r«- '. ^-.A I'..kl:.kri.i. k ::.<• . I 

SoartA I'..v!tAn.» '!: Av.'.p {>■!•>:: a. I"1 n :-. <• I 

SodctA I'.u'.An.t .'.i Sirn.-'- N.»'.i:r.i!:, M:l.uiu .... I 

SodetA K<.:r..in.i >ii Ar.'.r. ;m 1. ^-..i, K :nc . . I 

Sodet4 TcwcmoA di Sdcnze Naturali, Pi&a i 

JAPAN 

Anthr. i» . gica! '' * ' "^ ';yo t 

Durrau of Ppcm!': PoroKwa GofTemment. Taihoku . t 

Deutsche GcscIlschAft ftir Natur- and Volkerkunde OsUsiens. Tokyo 3 

Gcoiocical SunT>'. Tokyo 3 

Govi • '*-ncral of Chosen. Seoul. Korea i 

Imj- Mty of Tokyo. College of Sdcnce, Tokyo ... 3 

Tohoku Imperial Univeraly. Scndai i 

Tokyo Botanical Sodety, Tokyo i 

JAVA 

Batariaasch Gesootachap van Kunstcn rn Wrtcnschappcn. Batavia. 4 

Department of Agriculture, BuitcnzorK 10 

Encydopaedijch Bureau. Batavia 3 

Janiin Botanique, Buitcnsorg i 

MEXICO 

Sodedad Cicntifica "Antonio Aliate," Mexico i 

NETHERLANDS 

K. Instituut Taal-Land en Volkerkunde Nederlandsch-Indie, '•OfSVWiHie i 

Museum voor Land-cn Volkerkunde. Rotterdam i 

Nederlandsche Dierkundife Vereeniging, Ldden 3 

Rijki Ethnof^raphiachcs Museum. Ldden .... a 

Stats Bibliothcck, Haarlem i 

NEW ZEALAND 

Accltmatiiation Sodety. Wellington i 

Auckland Institute and Museum . . i 

Department of Agriculture. Wellington . 3 

Department ci Mioea, WeUinctoa .1 

DominioD Maseuin, WeDiiiitOD .1 

Minister of Internal Affairs, Department of E^. : . Wellinftoo (gift) . i 

NORWAY 

Ber^eo Museiun 3 

PERU 

Cuerpo de Ingenieroc de Minas. Ltma I 

PORTUGAL 

Academia Real des Sckndaa, Liaboo 2 

CoUegio de S. Piel. UAoa .... a 

RUSSIA 

Imperial Botanical Garden, Petrrf^.i^ i 

SCOTLAND 

Dumfriesshire and Galloway Natural History and Antiquarian Sodety, 

Dumfriei . i 



Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 59 

Fisheries Board, Edinburgh 3 

Royal Scottish Museum, Edinburgh i 

Zoological Society of Scotland, Edinburgh 6 

SPAIN 

Museo de Ciencias Naturales, Madrid 2 

R. Academia de Ciencias, Madrid i 

Sociedad Espanola de Historia Natural, Madrid 2 

SWEDEN 

K. Bibhoteket, Stockholm 2 

K. Svenska Vetenskapsakademien, Stockholm 6 

K. Vitt. Hist, och Antik. Akademien, Stockholm 2 

Ltmd Universitets-Biblioteket 2 

Statens Skogforsokanstalt, Stockholm I 

Svenska Sallakapet for Antropologi och Geografi, Stockholm i 

Tromso Museum 2 

Upsala University I 

SWITZERLAND 

Botanischer Garten, Universitat, Zurich 2 

Conservatoire et Jardin Botaniques, Geneva i 

Lausanne University i 

Musee d'Histoire Naturelle, Lausanne i 

Mus^e Ethnographique Neuchatel I 

Mus6e Zoologique, Lausanne I 

Naturforschende GeseUschaft, Basel 2 

Naturforschende GeseUschaft, Bern I 

Societe des Sciences Naturelles, Fribourg i 

Societe Helvetique des Sciences Naturelles, Aarau i 

Universitat Bern lO 

URUGUAY 

Ministirio de Industrias, Montevideo (gift) I 

WALES 

National Museum of Wales, Cardiff I 

WEST INDIES 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Porto Rico i 

Biblioteca Nacional, Havana i 

Department of Agriculture, Kingston 2 

Estacion Central Agronomico, Santiago de las Vegas 2 

Imperial Department of Agriculture, Barbadoes 2 

Jamaica Institute, Kingston I 

Trinidad and Tobago Department of Agriculture, Port of Spain .... 3 

Universidad de la Habana, Havana 2 

Bolton, Herbert, Bristol, England 2 

Carpenter, G. H., Dublin, Ireland I 

DeCandoUe, Casimir, Paris, France i 

Dieterich, Albert, Leipzig, Germany i 

Dtmcan and Davies, New Plymouth, New Zealand (gift) i 

Ewart, A. J., Melbourne, Australia 7 

Gilchrist, Douglas A., Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England I 



6o Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

Ouppy. H. B.. Kcw. KnjclAr. ! [£ii:) 

Otiroey, J. H.. Norfolk. EnsUxul .... 

HATtUod. B. Sydney. Gloucccter, BogUnd 

Latulle. P.. Bueno« Aires, Ancmtioa 

Levy-Bruhl. L.. Pom, Pnsoe 

MArqoet, Alberto. Parmhyba, Bnudl (fift) 

Niederlein. D. Gtistav. ZitUu. Grrmany (gift) 

Outm, Felix T.. Bucooc Aire*. ArKcntina 

Saptr, Edward. OtUwa, Canada ... 

SchlagenhAufen. Otto. ZOrich. Switsertaixl 

ToiTM, Luis Maria, La Plata, Argentina 

Tristan. J. P.. San Jo«6, Co«U Rica (gift) 

Wcijd. O.. Ldptig. Germany . 

Wille. N.. ChristianiA, Norway 

Yamawaki. H.. Japan (jpft) 

Zinuner, George P., London. England i 



H 



Field museum of natural history. 



REPORTS. PLATE XII. 




Model of a Magnified Section of wood. 
The designating lal^els are printed upon the feathered portion of arrows that point 
to the special structural element of the wood referred to. 



U^^vvO"*' 



^■'^tt^*- 



Jan., 1916. Annual Report or the Director. 61 



Articles of Incorporation 



STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

DEPARTMENT OF STATE. 

WiUJAM H. His-iiCHSBK, Secretary of Staie. 

To Aix TO Whom These Presekts Shall Come, Greeting: 

Whertas, a Certificate duly signed and acknowledged having been filed in the 
office oi the Secretary of State, on the i6th day of September, a. d. 1893. for the 
CMsanization of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO, under and in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of "An Act Concerning Corporations," approved 
April 18, 1872, and in force July i, 1872, and all acts amendatory thereof, a copy 
oi which certificate is hereto attached. 

Now, therefore, I, William H. Hinrichsea, Secretary of State of the State of 
Illinois, by virtue of the powers and duties vested in me by law, do hereby certify 
that the said COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO is a legally organized 
Corporation under the laws of this State. 

In Testimony Whereof, I hereto set my hand and cause to be affixed the Great 
Seal of the State. Done at the City of Springfield, this i6th day of September, 
in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three, and of the 
Independence of the United States the one hundred and eighteenth. 

W. H. HINRICHSEN, 
[Seal.] Secretary of State 



TO HON. WILLLANl H. HINRICHSEN. 

Secretary of State: 
Sir: 

We, the undoslgned ritiiirns of the United States, propose to form a corpora- 
ticm under an act of the General Assembly of the State of Illinois, entitled ''An 
Act Concerning Corporations," approved April 18, 1872, and all acts amendatory 
thereof; and that for the purposes of such organization we hereby state as follows, 
to wit: 

1. The name of such corpraation is the "COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF 
CHICAGO." 

2. The object for which it is formed is for the accumulatiooi and dissemina- 
tion of knowledge, and the preservation and exhibition of objects illustrating Art, 
ArchjBology, Science, and History. 

3. The management of the aforesaid Museum shall be vested in a Board of 
Fifteen (15) Trcstess. five of whom are to be elected every year. 

4. The following named persons are hereby selected as the Trustees for the 
first year of its corporate existence: 



63 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

E<1. B. Afer. OiAries D. Panrell. Geonte E. AdAms. George R. Dftvis. ChArlct 
L. Hutchiono. Ovud H. Damham. John A. Rochf. M. C. Bullock. EmU G. Hinch. 
Jamea W. BOcwortb. AIUjuti V Am r«!r n r Al iu, Edwin Walker. John C. BUck. 
and Prank W. Gunsaulus. 

5. The localiOQ o( the Musenm u in the City o( ChicafO, County ot Cook, 
and Sutc o( lOtnoia. 

Georce B. Adams. C. B. Parwdl. Sidney C. Eaatman. P. W. Putnam. Robert 
McMordy. Andrew Peterson. L. J. Ga^c, Charles L. Hutchinson. Ebenexer Boddng- 
ham. Andrew McNally. Edward E. Ayer. John M. Clark. Herman H. Kohbaat. 
George Schneider. Henry H. C/«tty. William R. Harper. Pranklm H. Head, E. G. 
Kath, J. Irving Pearce. Aiel P. Hatch. Henry Wade Rogers, Thomas B. Bryan. 
L. Z. Later. A. C. Bartlett. A. A. Sprague. A. C. McClurg. James W. Scott, George 
P. BiaeU. John R. Walsh. Chas. Pitzsimons. John A. Roche. E. B. McCagg, Owes 
P. Aldis. Pcrdinand W. Peck. James H. Dole. Jo«rph Stockton, Edward B. Butler. 
John McCooneil. R. A. Waller. H. C. ChatSdd-Taykw. A. Crawford, Wm. Sooy 
Smith. P. S. Petertoo. John C. Black. Joo. J. Mitchell. C. P. Gunther. George R. 
Davis, Stephen A. Porbes. Robert W. Patterson. Jr.. M. C. Bullock, Edwin Walker. 
George M. Pullman. William E. Curtis. James W. Ellsworth. WiUiam E. Hale. Wm. 
T. Bak- »'--*- " " Ton. Huntington W. Jackson. N. B. Ream. Norman Wil- 
Ikma. ? i : ryan Lathrop. Eliphalet W. Blatchford. Philip D. Armour. 

Statv or iLLiwoisl 
Cook Cocvrr J 
I. G. P ^''--r" -. Notary Public in aiui for said County, do hereby certify 
that the : :. ,  ->ners personally appeared before me and acknowledged 

severally that they signed the foregoing petition as their free and voluntary act for 
the uses and purposes therein set forth. 

Giveo under my hand and notarial seal this 14th day of ^ — "-- ber. 1893. 

G. R. mi; L. 

(Sbal.) NoTAtT Public. Cook Couktt, III. 



CHANGE OP NAME. 

Pormant to a resotutioo psfj at a meeting of the Corporate members held 
the 35th day of June. 1894. the name of the COLUMBIAN \' Nf was changed 

to PIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. A crrtif^cate to this tn^. was filed June 26. 
1894. ia the office of the Secretary of State for Illinois. 



CHANGE OP NAME. 

Pitrmant to a resoiatioo passed at a meeting of the Corporate members held 
the 8th day of November. 1905. the name o( the PIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM 
was changed to PIELD MUSEUM OP NATURAL HISTORY. A certificate 
to this affect was filed November 10, 1905. in the office of the Secretary of State 
for 



Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 63 



AMENDED BY-LAWS. 



(February 10, 1913.) 



ARTICLE I. 



MEMBERS. 



Section i. Members shall be of five classes, Annual Members, Corporate 
Members, Life Members, Patrons and Honorary Members. 

Sec. 2. Annual Members shall consist of such persons as are selected from time 
to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, and who shall pay an annual 
fee of ten dollars ($10.00), payable within thirty days after notice of election, and 
within thirty days after each recurring annual date. The failure of any person to 
make such initiatory payment and such annual payments within said time shall, at 
the option of the Board of Trustees, be sufficient grounds for the forfeiture of an 
annual membership. 

This said annual membership shall entitle the member to: 

First. — Free admittance for the member and family, to the Museum on any day. 

Second. — Ten tickets every year, admitting the bearer to the Museum on pay 
days. 

Third. — A copy of all publications of the Museum when requested. 

Fourth. — Invitations to all special exhibits, receptions, lectures, or other func- 
tions which may be given at the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The Corporate Members shall consist of the persons named in the 
articles of incorporation, and of such other persons as shall be chosen from time to 
time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, upon the recommendation of the 
Executive Committee; provided, that such persons named in the articles of incorpora- 
tion shall, within ninety days from the adoption of these By-Laws, and persons 
hereafter chosen as Corporate Members shall, within ninety days of their election, 
pay into the treasury the sum of twenty dollars ($20.00) or more. The failure of 
any person to make such payment within said time shall, at the option of the Board 
of Trustees, be ground for forfeiture of his corporate membership. Corporate 
Members becoming Life Members, Patrons or Honorary Members shall be exempt 
from dues. Annual meetings of said Corporate Members shall be held at the same 
place and on the same day that the annual meeting of the Board of Trustees is held. 

Sec. 4. Any person paying into the treasury the sum of five hundred dollars 
($500.00), at any one time, shall, upon the unanimous vote of the Board, become 
a Life Member. Life Members shall be exempt from all dues. 

Sec. 5. Patrons shall be chosen by the Board upon recommendation of the 
Executive Committee from among persons who have rendered eminent service to the 
Museum. They shall be exempt from all dues, and, by virtue of their election as 
Patrons, shall also be Corporate Members. 



64 FiF.i-D Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

Ssc. 6. Hooormry Meisbcn thaJl b« chosen by Um Board from UDOOf ptrtotm 
who hAve rcoderad emioent tenrke to tcieoce. and only upoa ananiinoas Doaunattoo 
of Um Btecutive CommitUa. Tbey thall be exempt from all duea. 

ARTICLE II. 

nOAKD Of TttrSTT.RS. 

SwrnnN I, The Board o( Tristrcs r.hAll consvst of fifteen members. The respec- 
thremenitx-n of the Board oowin ofiice, and thosr who shall hereafter be elected, shall 
hold office during life. Vacancies occurring in Uie Boari! shall he filled at a refular 
mertinc of Uie Board, upon the nomination of the Executive Committee made at a 
precoling regular meeting, by a majority vote of the mcml^ers of the Board preMOi. 

Sac. a. Regular meetings of the Hoard shall be held on the woood Monday 
ol each month. Special meetings may be called at any time by the PrHidaot. and 
shall be called by the Secretary upon the wnttcn ret^ucst of three Trustees. Pive 
Trustees shall ccnstitute a quorum, except for thr election of officers or the adoptioa 
of the Annual Budget, when seven Trustees shall be required, but meetiogi may be 
adjourned by any leas number from day to day. or to a day 6xed, previous to the 
oeit regular meeting. 

Sec 3 Reasonable written notice, designating the time and place of hiding 
nettings, shall be given by the Secretary. 

ARTICLE III 

BOHOKABY TKUSTEKS. 

SacnoM I. As a mark of respect, and in appreciation of services performed for 
the Institution, those Trustees who by rea.son of inability, on account of change of 
residence, or for other cause, or from indisposition to serve longer in such capacity, 
shall resign their place upon the Board, may be elected, by a majority of thoM 
present at any regular meeting of the Board, an Honorary Trustee for life. Such 
Honorary Trustee will receive notice of all meetings of the Board of Trustees, 
whether regular or special, and will be expected to be present at all such meetingl and 
participate in the deliberations thereof, but an Honorary Trustee shall not have the 
right to vote. 

ARTICLE IV. 

omcaaa. 

SacriON I. The officers shall be a President, a Pint Vice-President, a Second 
Vice-President, a Secretary, an Assistant Secretary, and a Treasurer. Tbey shall be 
cboaeo by ballot by the Board of Trustees, a majority of those present and voting 
beinj; nt Misery to elect. The President, the Pint Vice-President, and the Second 
Vice- President shall be chosen from among the memben of the Board of Trusteea. 
The meeting for the electioo of officers shall be held on the second Monday of Jan- 
nary of each year, and shall be called the Annual Meeting. 

Sac. 2. The ofiicen shall bold office (or ooe year, or r.r.'.:. -.Y.^-.t <:uccesson are 
d e cted and qualified, but any officer may be r emo v e d at any rc^ax meeting of the 
Board of Trustees by a vote of two-thirds of all the memben of the Board. Vacancies 
in any office may be filled by the Board at any meeting. 

Sac. 3. The offioera shall per fo rm such duties as ordinarily appertain to their 
l e ap e cU ye offices, and such as shall be prescribed by the By-Laws, or designated from 
time to time by the Board of Trustees. 



Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 65 

ARTICLE V. 

THE TRBASUKKR. 

Section i. The Treasurer shall be custodian of the funds of the Corporation, 
except as hereinafter provided. He shall make disbursements only upon warrants 
drawn by the Director and countersigned by the President. In the absence or 
inability of the Director, warrants may be signed by the Chairman of the Finance 
Committee, and in the absence or inabiUty of the President, may be countersigned 
by one of the Vice-Presidents. But no warrants shall be issued, except in conformity 
with a regularly prepared voucher, giving the name of the payee and stating the 
occasion for the expenditure, and verified and approved as hereinafter prescribed. 
It shall be no part of the duties of the Treasurer to see that the warrants have been 
issued in conformity with such vouchers. 

Sec. 2, The securities and muniments of title belonging to the corporation shall 
be placed in the custody of some Trust Company of Chicago to be designated by the 
Board of Trustees, which Trust Company shall collect the income and principal of 
said securities as the same become due, and pay same to the Treasurer, except as 
hereinafter provided. Said Trust Company shall allow access to and deliver any or 
all securities or muniments of title to the joint order of the following officers, namely: 
The President or one of the Vice-Presidents, jointly with the Chairman, or one of 
the Vice-Chairmen, of the Finance Committee of the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The Treasurer shall give bond in such amount, and with such sureties, 
as shall be approved by the Board of Trustees. 

Sec. 4. All vouchers executed for the payment of liabilities incurred in the 
administration of the Museum, shall be verified by the Auditor, and approved for 
payment by the Director, and the Chairman of the Administration Committee. 
All vouchers executed for expenditures for the construction or reconstruction of the 
Museum building, or buildings, shall be verified by the Auditor and approved for 
payment by the Chairman of the Building Committee. All vouchers executed in 
connection with the investments of the Corporation, or in any way having to do 
with the endowment funds of the Corporation, shall be verified by the Auditor and 
approved for payment by the Chairman of the Finance Committee. 

Sec. 5. The Harris Trust and Savings Bank of Chicago shall be Custodian of 
"The N. W. Harris Public School Extension of Field Museum" fund. The Bank 
shall make disbursements only upon warrants drawn by the Curator of "The N. W. 
Harris Public School Extension of Field Museum of Natural History" and counter- 
signed by the Auditor of Field Museum of Natural History. In the absence or 
inability of the said officers, warrants may be signed by such officers as shall be 
authorized by special resolution of the Board of Trustees of Field Museum of Natural 
History. But no warrant shall be issued, except in conformity with a regularly 
prepared voucher, giving the name of the payee and stating the occasion for the 
expenditure, and verified and approved by the officers above designated. It shall 
be no part of the duties of the Bank to see that the warrants have been issued in 
conformity with such vouchers. 

ARTICLE VI. 

THE DIRECTOR. 

Section i. The Board of Trustees shall elect a Director of the Museum, who 
shall remain in office until his successor shall be elected. He shall have immediate 
charge and supervision of the Museum, and shall control the operations of the insti- 



66 Field Museum op Natcbal History — Reports, Vol. V. 

tatioQ, nibiect to the Authority of the Boftrd of TruftMt and it< Coaunitteec. Tba 
Director »h»li be the officiaJ medium of communication between the Board, or it« 
Committees, and the scientific staff and mjuntrnance force. 

Sac. 7. There shall be four tcicnttfic dcpartioenta of the MoMom — Antfaropol- 
ofy. Botany, Geology, aod Zoology, eadi under the charge of a Curator, lub^ect to 
the authority of the Director. The Curators shall be appointed by the Board upon 
the recommendation of the Director, and shall serve during the pleaaurc of the 
Board. Subordinate stafl officers in the scientific departments shall be appointed 
and r emoTe d by the Director upon the recocnmeodation of the Curators of Uw 
re a pe cti ve Departments. The Director shall have authority to employ and remort 
all other employees of the Museum. 

Sac. 3. The Director shall make report to the Board at each regular meeting, 
recounting the operations of the Museum for the previous month. At the Annual 
Meeting, the Director shall make an Annual Report, re v iew i ng the work of the 
Museum for the previous year, which Annual Report shall be published in pamphlet 
form for the information of the Trustees and Members, and for free distribntioo 
in mcfa number as the Board may direct. 

ARTICLE VII. 

AL'DITOB. 

SicnoM I . The Board shall appoint an Auditor, who shall hold his office during 
the pleasure ol the Board. He shall keep proper books of account, setting forth the 
financial condition and transactions of the Corporation, and of the Museum, and 
report thareoo at each regular meeting, and at such other times as may be required 
by the Board. He shall certify to the correctness of all vouchers for the expenditure 
of the money of the corporation. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

COMMITTEKS. 

SicnoN I. There shall be five Committees as follows: Finance, Building. 
Auditing, Administration, and Executive. 

Sac. 7. The Finance and Auditing Committees shall each coosist of three 
members, and the Budding and Administratioo Committees shaD each oooiiit of 
five members. All members of these four Committees shall be elected by ballot 
by the Board at the Annual Meeting, and shall hold office for one year, and until 
their soccfon are elected and qualified. In electing the members of theM Com* 
mitteca, the Board shall designate the Chairman aod Vice-Chairman by the order 
in which the members are named in the respective Committee; the first member 
named shall be Chairman, the aeoood named the Vice-Chairman. and the third 
named. Second Vice-Chairman, luccawion to the Chairmanship being in this order 
in the event of the abeeooe or disability of the Chairman. 

Sac. 3. The Executive Committee shall cooidst of the President of the Board 
the Chairman of the Finance Coamiittee, the Chairman of the Building Committee, 
the Chairman of the Administratioa Committee, the Chairman of the Auditing 
Committee, and two other members of the Board to be elected by ballot at the 
Annual Mceltng. 

Sac. 4. Four members shall constitute a quorum of the Executive Committee: 
three members shall constitute a quorum of the Administration Committee, and 
in all other standing Committees, two memben shall ooostitute a quorum. In the 



Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 67 

event that, owing to the absence or inability of members, a quorum of the regularly 
elected members cannot be present at any meeting of any Committee, then the 
Chairman thereof, or his successor, as herein provided, may summon any member of 
the Board of Trustees to act in place of the absentee. 

Sec. 5. The Finance Committee shall have supervision of investing the en- 
dowment and other permanent funds of the Corporation, and the care of such real 
estate as may become its property. It shall have authority to invest, sell, and 
reinvest funds, subject to the approval of the Board. 

Sec. 6. The Building Committee shall have supervision of the construc- 
tion, reconstruction, and extension of any and all buildings used for Museum 
purposes. 

Sec. 7. The Executive Committee shall be called together from time to time 
as the Chairman may consider necessary, or as he may be requested to do by three 
members of the Committee, to act upon such matters affecting the administration 
of the Museimi as cannot await consideration at the Regular Monthly Meetings of 
the Board of Trustees. It shall, before the beginning of each fiscal year, prepare 
and submit to the Board an itemized Budget, setting forth the probable receipts 
from all sources for the ensuing year, and make recommendations as to the ex- 
penditures which should be made for routine maintenance and fixed charges. Upon 
the adoption of the Budget by the Board, the respective Committees shall be con- 
sidered as authorized to make the expenditures detailed therein. No increase in 
the expenditures under any items of the Budget shall be made, except by authority 
of the Board of Trustees, but the Executive Committee shall have authority, in 
cases of emergency, to expend a further total sum not exceeding two thousand 
dollars in any one month. 

Sec. 8. The Administration Committee shall have general supervision of the 
affairs of the Museum. The Committee shall hold one meeting each month with 
the Director at the Museum within a week preceding each Monthly Meeting of 
the Board of Trustees. 

Sec. 9. The Auditing Committee shall have supervision over all accounting 
and bookkeeping, and full control of the financial records. It shall cause the same, 
once each year, or oftener, to be examined by an expert individual or firm, and shall 
transmit the report of such expert tadividual or firm to the Board at the next ensuing 
regular meeting after such examination shall have taken place. 

Sec. 10. The Chairman of each Committee shall report the acts and proceedings 
thereof at the next ensuing regular meeting of the Board. 

Sec. II. The President shall be ex- officio a member of all Committees and 
Chairman of the Executive Committee. Vacancies occurring in any Committee 
may be filled by ballot at any regular meeting of the Board. 

ARTICLE IX. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE. 

Section i. At the November meeting of the Board, each year a Nominating 
Committee of three shall be chosen by lot. Said Committee shall make nom- 
inations for membership of the Finance Committee, the Building Committee, the 
Administration Committee, and the Auditing Committee, and for two members 
of the Executive Committee, from among the Trustees, to be submitted at the 
ensuing December meeting and voted upon at the following Annual Meeting in 
January. 



68 Fi£LD Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 



ARTICLE X. 

SxmoN I. Whenever ' ••».'•■ - : • •/ - HvI.iw, >A 

the Corporation, it thAll b« ; '..'• '<'. ; '■■■■■■.. .is .lu 

Institution is located and operated, tbe material exhibited, the material io study 
collections, or in storage, furniture, fixtures, cases, tools, records, books, and all 
apporieaaocea of the Institution, and the workings, rcaearchca, installations, ex- 
penditarea. 6eld work, laboratories, library publicatiooi, lecture counea. and all 
scientific and maintenance activities. 

Sac. 3. These By-Laws may be amended at any regular meeting of the Board 
of Trustees by a two-thirds vote of all the members present, provided the ameod* 
meat shall have been proposed at a preceding regular meeting. 




< 

o  

W < 

? 3 



> 






•2 ^ 



^ c 

K^ O 

03 

IT 
UJ 



< 

U 

q: 
o 
CO 



o 
C3 



Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 



69 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 



EDWARD E. AYER 
HARLOW N. HIGINBOTHAM 
CHARLES B. CORY 



STANLEY Mccormick 

MRS. TIMOTHY B. BLACKSTONE 
NORMAN W. HARRIS 

DECEASED. 

ROBERT F. CUMMINGS 

GEORGE M. PULLMAN 

MARY D. STURGES 



ALLISON V. ARMOUR 
EDWARD B. BUTLER 
ALBERT M. COLLINS 
LEE GARNET DAY 
ERNEST R. GRAHAM 
NORMAN W. HARRIS 
CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON 

DANIEL H. BURNHAM 
JOSEPH N. FIELD 



PATRONS. 

VERNON SHAW KENNEDY 
GEORGE MANIERRE 
CHARLES H. MARKHAM 
JOHN S. MILLER 
JOHN BARTON PAYNE 
FREDERICK J. V. SKIFF 
WILLARD A. SMITH 

DECEASED. 

FREDERICK W. PUTNAM 
WILLIAM I. BUCHANAN 
EDWIN WALKER 



7© Field Miseum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 



CORPORATE MEMBERS. 



AD.\MS. GEORGE E. 
ALDIS. OWE.\ P. 
ARMOUR. ALLISON V. 
AVER. EDWARD E. 

RARTLETT. A. C. 
BLACK. JOHN C. 
BLAIR. WATSON P. 
BUTLER. EDWARD B 

CHALMERS. W. J. 
CHATFIELD-TAYLOR. H. C. 
CLARK. JOHN M. 

(-,,-, TN. s! ti.HRT M. 

C ARD T. 

DAY, LEE GARNET 

EASTMAN. SIDNEY C. 
ELLSWORTH. JAMES W. 

FIELD. MARSHALL III 
FIELD. STANLEY 

GAGE. LYMAN J. 
GETTY. HENRY H. 
GRAHAM. ERNEST R. 
GUNSAULUS. PRANK W. 
GUNTHER. C. P. 



harris. norman w. 
higini- '"*m. h. n 
hutch-. .. charles l. 

jones. arthur b. 

ki:ep. chauncey 

kennedy. vernon shaw 
kohlsaat. herman h. 

lathrop. bryan 

Mccormick, c^-rus h. 
markham. charles h. 

MANIERRE. GEORGE 
MILLER. JOHN S. 
MITCHELL. JOHN J. 

PAYNE. JOHN BARTON 
PECK. FERD. W. 
PORTER. GEORGE P. 

RYERSON. MARTIN A. 

SKIFF. FREDERICK J. V. 
SMITH. WILLARD A. 
SPRAGUE. A. A.. 2nd. 
STONE. MELVILLE E. 



DbCtASbD. 



ARMOUR. PHILIP D. 
BAKER. WILLIAM T. 
p' '•' "ORGE P. 

h RD. E. W. 

BUCHANAN. W. I. 
BUCKINGHAM. EBENEZER 
BURNH.VM. DA" ''"' H. 
CRAWFORD A W 

CURTIS. WILLIAM E. 
DAVIS. GEORGE R. 
FIELD. JOSEPH N. 



FITZSIMONS. CHARLES 
HALE. WILLIAM E. 
HARPER. WILLIAM R. 
HATCH. AZEL P. 
HEAD. FRANKLIN H. 
JACKSON. HUNTINGTON W. 
LEITER. L. Z. 
McCAGG. E. B. 
McCLURG. A. C. 

!.Y. ANDREW 
i .. , . ..RSO.N, ROBERT W. 



Jan., 1916. Annual Report of the Director. 71 

PEARCE, J. IRVING SMITH, BYRON L. 

PETERSON, ANDREW SPRAGUE, A. A. 

PULLMAN, GEORGE M. STOCKTON, JOSEPH 

PUTNAM, FREDERICK W. WALKER, EDWIN 

REAM, NORMAN B. WALLER, R. A. 

SCHNEIDER, GEORGE WALSH, JOHN R. 

SCOTT, JAMES W. WILLIAMS, NORMAN 



72 Finn MrsFUu or NATrsM. History — Ritobt';. Vor . V. 



LIFE MliMBlfRS. 



ADAMS. GEORGE E. 
AI.DIS. OWEN P. 

hakki-tt. MRS. a. d. 

BARRETT. ROHERT L. 

BARTLETT. A. C. 

BLACKSTONE. MRS. TIMOTHY D. 

BLAINE. MRS. EMMONS 

BLAIR. CHAUNCEY J. 

BLAIR. HENRY A. 

BLAIR. WATSON F. 

BOOTH. W. VKRNON 

BUTLER. EDWARD B. 

BYLLESBY. H. M. 

CARTON, L. A. 
CHALMERS. WILLIAM J. 
CRANE. CHARLES RICHARD 
CRANE. RICHARD T. 
CUMMINGS. D. MARK 

DEERING. CHARLES 
DELANO. FREDERIC A. 
DICK. ALBERT BLAKE 
DRAKE. TRACY C. 

PARWELL. WALTER 
PAY. C. N. 
PIELD. STANLEY 
FRANT2IUS. FRITZ VON 
FULLER. WILLIAM A 

 ^ A. P. 

, B. 

HAMILL. ERNEST A. 
HILL. LOUIS W. 
HOROWITZ. L. J. 
' MRS. JOHN A. 

ITT. MARVIN 

HUTCHINSON. C. L. 

ISHAM. MRS. KATHERINB 
PORTER. 



jo elizabeth ayer 

jones. arthur b. 

keep. chauncey 

king. francis 

king. ja.mes c. 

kirk. walter radclippb 

lawson. victor p. 

Mccormick, mrs. 
Mccormick. CYRUS h. 

McCORMICK. HAROLD P. 

macveagh. franklin 
mason. william s. 
mitchell. j. j. 

newell. a b. 

orr. robert m. 

PAM. MAX 
PATTEN. HENRY J. 
PIKE. EUGENE S. 
?(•; GEORGE F. 

POK...... H. H. 

REAM. MRS. CAROLINE P. 
REVELL. ALEX. H. 
ROSENWALD. JULIUS 
RUJ^SFT.L. EDMUND A. 
RV .. MRS. CARRIE H. 

RYLK5U.N, MARTIN A. 

SMITH ORSON 

. A. A. 2D. 

ai LivuLi. GEORGE 
THORNE. GEORGE R. 
WILLARD. ALONZO J. 



Jan., 1916. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



73 



ANNUAL MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, CYRUS H. 
ADAMS. MILWARD 
ALLERTON, ROBERT H. 
ARMOUR, GEORGE A. 

BAILEY, EDWARD P. 
BECKER, A. G. 
BILLINGS, C. K. G. 
BILLINGS, DR. FRANK 
BOAL, CHARLES T. 
BROWN, WILLIAM L. 
BURLEY, CLARENCE A. 

COMSTOCK, WILLIAM C. 
COONLEY-WARD, MRS. L. A. 
CUMMINGS, E. A. 
CURTIS, D. H. 

DAY, A. M. 
DEERING, JAMES 

EISENDRATH, W. N. 

FAIR, R. M. 
FORGAN, JAMES B. 
FORSYTH, ROBERT 
FRANK, HENRY L. 
FULLER, O. F. 
FURST, CONRAD 

GAYLORD, FREDERIC 
GLESSNER, J. J. 
GOODRICH, A. W. 
GORDON, EDWARD K. 
GREY, CHARLES F. 
GURLEY, W. W. 

HARRIS, GEORGE B. 
HARRIS, JOHN F. 
HASKELL, FREDERICK T. 
HIBBARD, WILLIAM G., Jr. 
HITCHCOCK, R. M. 



HOLT, GEORGE H. 
HOPKINS, JOHN P. 

INSULL, SAMUEL 

JENKINS, GEORGE H. 
JONES, J. S. 

KEEPER, LOUIS 
KEITH, W. SCOTT 
KIMBALL, EUGENE S. 
KIMBALL, MRS. MARK 

LAMB, FRANK H. 
LAY, A. TRACY 
LEE, BLEWETT 
LEIGH, EDWARD B. 
LINCOLN, ROBERT T. 
LINN, W. R. 
LOGAN, F. G. 
LORD, J. B. 
LOWDEN, FRANK O. 
LYTTON, HENRY C. 

McCREA, W. S. 
McWILLIAMS, LAFAYETTE 
MacFARLAND, HENRY J. 
MAGEE, HENRY W. 
MANSON, WILLIAM 
MANSURE, E. L. 
MAYER, LEVY 
MERRYWEATHER, GEORGE 
MEYER, MRS. M. A. 
MOORE, N. G. 
MULLIKEN, A. H. 

NATHAN, ADOLPH 
NOLAN, JOHN H. 
NORTON, O. W. 

ORB, JOHN A. 
OSBORN, HENRY A. 



74 Field Museum or Natural Histoiy — Reports, Vol. V. 



PALVIKR, PERCIVAL B. 
PARKER. FT ; W. 

PF*pv*i\- ] ..E n. 

PI N. W. A. 

PORTER. WASHINGTON 

RIPLEY. B P. 
ROSENBAUM. JOSEPH 
R ». .MRS. MAURICB 

Rt.>Nt.i-i-o. J. S. 

SCHMIDT. DR. O. L. 
SCHWARTZ. G. A. 
SEIPr. MRS. C. 
SHEDD. JOHN G. 
SHORTALL. JOHN L. 

MISSES 

■;.-■ P. 

UH. E. 



SPENCE. .MRS. ELIZABETH E. 
SPOOR. J. A. 

ST'"*'~VTuN. JOT^V T 
?. .. RGB' 

TE.MPLBTON. THOMAS 

UIHLEIN. EDWARD G. 

V. R.CHARLES H. 

V. K.JAMES R. 

WALKER. WILLIAM B. 
V. DC 

V. V. IL 

V. . .:-.D 

WHITEHEAD. W. M. 
V. E. C 



Cv. 



DECEASED. 

H. CUDAHY. JOHN 

R. GREY. WILLIA.M L 

WOODCOCK, LINDSAY T. 



t':i 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORV 



REPORTS, PLATE XIV. 




OLD HOP, BALULUKON SCREEN WITH PICTORIAL SYMBOLS ON CANVAS 

Cjitt of Stanley McCormick. 



»rt»rr Of ^^v-^***^'* 



74V^- . .