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CENTRAL CIRCULATION BOOKSTACKS 

The person charging this material is re- 
sponsible for its renewal or its return to 
the library from which it was borrowed 
on or before the Latest Date stamped 
below. The Minimum Fee for each Lost 
Book is $50.00. 

Theft, mutilation, and underlining of books are reasons 
far disciplinary action and may result in dismissal from 
the University. 
TO RENEW CALL TELEPHONE CENTER, 333-8400 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY AT URBAN A-CHAMPAIGN 



MAR 7 1995 
FFR 1 3 



When renewing by phone, write new due date below 
previous due date. LI 62 



LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

Field Museum of Natural HisttW* 

Publication 194. 

Report Series. Vol. V, No. 2, 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 1916. 




Chicago, U. S. A. 
January, 191 7. 



JHfc LIBMKY Qt Hit 

■42 

mmnsm qf nu m 



-, victory Li&rarv 



UBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

UR8ANA 









' 







. 



Field Museum of Natural History. 

Publication 194. 

Report Series. Vol. V, No. 2. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 1916. 




Chicago, U. S. A. 
January, 191 7. 



THE LIBRARY Oh Mfc 
UNIVERSITY OF ILUNOI 









CONTENTS 



Page 

Board of Trustees 76 

Officers and Committees 77 

Staff of the Museum 78 

Report of the Director 79 

Maintenance 82 

Publications 82 

Mailing List 83 

Library 84 

Cataloguing, Inventorying, and Labeling 86 

Accessions 87 

Expeditions and Field Work 96 

Installation and Permanent Improvement 97 

The N. W. Harris Public School Extension 105 

Photography and Illustration 106 

Printing 107 

Financial Statement  . 108 

Attendance and Receipts 1 10 

Accessions 

Department of Anthropology in 

Department of Botany 112 

Department of Geology 114 

Department of Zoology 1 17 

Section of Photography 119 

The Library 120 

Articles of Incorporation 133 

Amended By-Laws 135 

List of Honorary Members and Patrons 141 

List of Corporate Members 142 

List of Life Members 143 

List of Annual Members 145 



75 



76 I'm u History — Report V. 



III!-" HOARD 0I ; rRUSTEES 

II VRI.oW N. H1..INH m \M. 

k. :ihk B. ] 

Bl MR. 

Wll MM. Mi 

Hi RBI F: 1 I). K. 

M UtSH M I 1 \RTIN A. I 

St\ ; d. PBXDBHCI J. V. Skiff. 

A. A. SFI 101 i . :■ 



HC> FY rRUSTEE. 

o 



Jan., 1917. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



77 



OFFICERS. 

Stanley Field, President. 

Martin A. Ryerson, First Vice-President. 
Watson F. Blair, Second Vice-President. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff, Secretary. 

D. C. Davies, Assistant Secretary and Auditor. 
Solomon A. Smith, Treasurer. 



COMMITTEES. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Marshall Field. 
Arthur B. Jones. 
George Manierre. 
A. A. Sprague, 2nd. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Martin A. Ryerson. 
Arthur B. Jones. 

BUILDING COMMITTEE. 

Cyrus H. McCormick. 
A. A. Sprague, 2nd. 

SUB-COMMITTEE OF BUILDING COMMITTEE. 

Stanley Field. A. A. Sprague, 2nd. 

Frederick J. V. Skiff. 

AUDITING COMMITTEE. 

George Manierre. Arthur B. Jones. 

George E. Adams. 

ADMINISTRATION COMMITTEE. 

Edward E. Ayer. 

George Manierre. 
Henry Field. 



Stanley Field. 
Edward E. Ayer. 
Watson F. Blair. 
William J. Chalmers. 

Watson F. Blair. 



William J. Chalmers. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff. 



Watson F. Blair. 
Chauncey Keep. 

Arthur B. Jones. 



PENSION COMMITTEE. 



A. A. Sprague, 2nd. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff. 



\I I 1 1 > T t » K Y — RjEPOll 



STAFF I 'I- THE MUSEUM. 

OiRECTOR. 
PtXDI KI( K J. '• 

OEPAUTMfNT N ASTHROPOIOQV. 

I. ( )V 

krt B. ! • >r 0/ . . . 

Pay < pology 

1 A i Dl N M trator of uth 

Arch . 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTA-- 

P. Mm ! IPAUOR, 

DEPARTMENT OF OEOLC 

P \i--v H. \Y. Xirit irator. 

Bl Mf r S .tor of I 

DEPARTMENT Of rOOlOOY. 

( 'll IRLES B. * ' >1 ■". 

ifrf.pH  Uor of ntthology. 

Wn.i iaii J. ( iTkh \r;>. A | N '. :. ilomoloi 

Bdmomd N Gukuct, on of < 

Cari. L Hum i rtor / jn<i 

TMt N W HARRIS PUM.IC SCMOO. 

C SlMM iralor. 

RECORD AMtfTAMT N XMDU 

D. C. Davij BBMJ. Brip 

thi i wuurv. 

LcpPtMCOTT, -in. 

I ' Wu ittt'jtarii / m. 

Jar. . 191 7. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR. 

1916 



To the Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History: 

I have the honor to present a report of the operations of the Museum 
for the year ending December 31, 1916. 

The year has been profitable in accessions of material notwith- 
standing there have been no expeditions or field work except of a local 
and unimportant character. More or less confusion is observable 
throughout the Museum by reason of the prosecution of the large work 
of installing new material and re-installing old material and selecting 
material from storage for display, all occasioned by the labor constantly 
going on in preparation for the exhibition halls of the new Museum 
building. In fact, the justifiable pride taken in the orderly, system- 
atic and classified arrangement of the public courts and halls of the 
Museum is rapidly disappearing in the face of the over-crowded condi- 
tion and shifting about of cases in preparation necessary to the consum- 
mation of the ambitious plans of the occupation of the new Grant 
Park structure. 

Mr. George F. Porter, Trustee,, has resigned his place upon the 
Board because of his intended protracted absence from the city. The 
vacancy has been filled by the election of Mr. Henry Field, second 
grandson of Mr. Marshall Field, the founder of the Institution. 

There have been no retirements from the scientific staff during the 
year. Dr. J. Alden Mason, of the University of California, has accepted 
the position of Assistant Curator in Mexican and South American 
Archaeology, and has entered upon his duties. An appointment to 
the Assistant Curatorship of the Division of North American Ethnology, 
authorized by the Board of Trustees, has not been decided upon. Mr. 
Carl L. Hubbs, of the Leland Stanford Junior University, has accepted 
the position of Assistant Curator of Ichthyology and Herpetology and 
will commence his duties early in 191 7. Both of these appointments 
are from the younger school of their respective sciences, but come 
to the Museum with the very highest endorsement and with the promise 
of a useful career in the Institution. 

Mr. Stanley Field having assumed the cost of restoring and main- 
taining the activity of the Section of Plant Reproduction in the Depart - 

79 



80 V. 

mcnt are ago, the Museum has been 

so fortunate H sccur- i of Dr. B. 

as an .he will resume 

with month. Work on the 

>s and q has a commenced. 

Tl. bof Mi N. \ ~ris 

. .nounccd. The 

Board of Trustees at a m . unanimously ado: 

"The death la life whose success 

and who 

princi; in human character. His wca 

public and | ns un< : 

r the ettcrment of civic conditions  

pv 

ss in t* r - times has been more scrupu- 

lous in hi >rablc in his dcalir. norc just in 

measurin. • immunities. 

All 

ose to d< 
e bcr o as to : .it forward not 

alor. od but f tual w 

r in pi :n finance. The 

honor an i life will be accorded his 

nan 

"In expressing th: f Mr. 

ECst • 
which n has been the . and humane 

." in no direc- 
i a means of : 

ng pood hi 
be \V. H ic School 

• 
"The Board of Ti 
ha 

be spread upon th< to 

ted and presented 
to the family of th 

The progre ss of tl to th' chools is re- 

-ed to r part of this n npressive fact that 

over 250,000 public school children arc led in the service 

of t: a matter for specia 

Mr. Stanley Field, President of th ' ' -urn, has during the year 
xi the funds for th' merit of a Pension System in behalf 

of the employes of the Museum whose compensation is not above a 



Jan., 191 7. Annual Report of the Director. 81 

certain annual sum. This act, affording such striking evidence of 
Mr. Field's interest in the work of the Museum and sympathy for 
those who are performing it, has brought to the employes a comforting 
assurance of the future, which not only spreads contentment and relief 
throughout the Institution, but must add to the efficiency of the work 
of its beneficiaries. 

The assumption by Mr. Edward E. Ayer of the cost of supplying 
to the Ayer Ornithological Library any desirable publications not now 
contained in the library, or which may hereafter be published, was 
announced during the year — a provision for the future of this import- 
ant section of the Museum Library which can hardly be over-estimated. 

Another gift from the membership of the Board of Trustees is that 
of Mr. Arthur B. Jones, who assumes the cost of securing and installing 
a group of six North American buffalo with landscape painting and 
accessories. This gift which enables the Museum to present in the best 
form known to the art of modern taxidermy this familiar but practically 
extinct and exclusively North American mammal in different ages and 
sex, is a most highly valued contribution to the exhibition halls of 
the Department of Zoology. 

During the year the material procured at the San Francisco Expo- 
sition has arrived at the Museum and altogether constitutes a very 
valuable acquisition to all the departments of the Museum. The 
Chinese pagodas are now installed in eleven cases. The Chinese 
gateway has been erected in the main dome court, while the minerals 
and birds and models and other items, all most desirable, have been 
cared for in the proper departments. 

At a meeting of the Board of Trustees held December nth, by 
unanimous vote permission was asked of Mr. Stanley Field to name 
one of the exhibition halls of the new Museum building in his honor, 
requesting him to select a hall. Mr. Field has since announced his 
preference for the Hall of Mammals. 

A most noteworthy gift to the Museum during the past year has 
been the private herbarium of the late Elihu Hall, consisting of ap- 
proximately 35,000 specimens, presented by the heirs of Mr. Hall. 
This extends the plant collection in the Museum to most gratifying 
proportions and adds much new material of unusual interest and 
worth. 

Dr. Frank W. Gunsaulus has presented the Museum with his re- 
markable collection of Japanese sword guards, a collection which has 
attracted much interest and comment while being on exhibition at the 
Chicago University. Accompanying this most unique and almost price- 
less collection, were a number of rare and costly volumes of Japanese 



Art. The Board «>f T iuIus a in rccog- 

nt nn 

asons. 
"shall FuM has presented the Boai 
M 

om of 

the 
:n- 
. 
• in th< 

I of 
<\s of • ' am. 
The contract for the filling in ;irca o:' >se 

the fl !>asem 

in fact, would 
have V)ccn aco 

ition nd 

I that • . in£ of th- and th :oarble 

will t)C^in as early in the spring 
mit. Th I to the br. 

luct has also b< btnlding 1 The marble 

1 thrc' 

at ; The structural .as all 

red to the 

Mi .-.£. — T luthori Trustees 

:n of $! f the Mu -cum for 

mount led was 

a balance ir. es of 

$.20,516. In addi'. | it, 000 was 

Board of Tru.stecs for col. 
total* car to $147,280. 

Pu»ttc*TK)v taring dexes 

These publi olumes, details 

i Annual report of the 

pages. 14 half-tones o. 

II. No. 11. 1. Contributions to 
rth American Eu # 1 Vcgctat: 

Alacran Reef. By ' ilspaugh. 32 pages. 2 half- 

tones. Edition 1500. 



1 



Jan., 1917. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



83 



Pub. 188. — Geological Series. Vol. Ill, No. 10. Catalogue of the 
Collection of Meteorites. By O. C. Farrington. 82 pages. 
4 half-tones. Edition 1500. 
Pub. 189. — Zoological Series. Vol. X, No. 14. Mammals of the 
Collins-Day South American Expedition. By W. H. 
Osgood. 18 pages. 2 half-tones. Edition 1500. 
Pub. 190. — Ornithological Series. Vol. I, No. 10. Descriptions of 
apparently new South American Birds, with notes on some 
Little Known Species. By C. B. Cory. 10 pages. Edi- 
tion 1500. 
These publications have been distributed to all names on the mailing 
list both in domestic and foreign countries with the exception of those 
foreign countries where service has been temporarily discontinued by 
the Bureau of International Exchanges. If a prompt acknowledgment 
of these publications may be taken as an evidence of appreciation, it 
has been noted that practically all of the acknowledgment cards have 
been signed and returned. With the increasing number of publications 
issued and the increasing demand, especially for the earlier numbers, it 
has been found advisable to take an inventory of the stock actually on 
hand. An inventory of the half-tones has also been taken. 



Names on Mailing List 
Domestic . 
Foreign 



Distribution of Foreign Exchanges 

Africa 20 

Australia 31 

Borneo I 

Canada 26 

Central America 7 

China 3 

Denmark 8 

France 54 

Great Britain 107 

Greece 1 

Holland 20 

India 17 



599 
671 

1,260 



Italy . . . 

Japan . 

Java . . . 

Mexico . 

New Zealand . 

Norway 

Portugal 

South America 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

West Indies 



37 
10 

4 
19 
6 
8 
5 
30 
7 

23 

8 



Distribution of Domestic exchanges 

Alabama 2 

Arkansas 1 

California 27 

Colorado 10 

Connecticut 21 



Delaware . 
District of Columbia 
Florida .... 
Idaho .... 
Illinois .... 



2 
62 

4 
2 

65 



84 Fin: ;<»ry — R V. 

rmauTioN of DOMitnc Exchanges 

1 )akota 

•i 

V.\S i 

I 
Louisiana 5 

7 4 

>) 
Massachusetts ith Dakota 

• :» ineSSee J 

1 Texai 3 

3 ih 1 

Missouri 14 -mont 4 

Vir^-.tv..i 4 

-aska 6 (tofl 7 

2 -ua 

Hampshire 2 consin 16 

v Jersey 13 Wyoming 2 

3 3 
80 5 

6 

Porto Rico 1 

tme u§«a*v. — T the Library for the year are 

fen: .mphlcts, brin£inp the total number in 

the library to 60,675, distribi 

il Library 44 028 
Departrr • 

Department of Bot 7.. . 

Department of Geology -68 

•artment of Zoology - 1 

TI <sions 

in^ c< it continue to affc« rom con- 

•utions and societies. It tat so rrui 

continue to send t' as. th< vill 

•' accessions. 

f the rom f r 

m, which ir. ut of print works of an unusually 

helpful cularl; 

of Japanese I by Dr. Frank \V 

in thi lanese material to the 

1 ' -.scum 1 v Dr. (run all time valuable to the 

stt: >f Japanese art. Among these works are: Audsle;. 

mental Arts of Japan; Bi- Japan; Dresser's Japan; Gonse's 

\rt Japonais; Joly's Sword Mounts and J -word Fittin; 



LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBAN* 






I*" A T I 







v 



Jan., 191 7. Annual Report of the Director. 85 

Tomkinson's Japanese Collection; Jacoby's Japanische Schwertzieraten. 
Mr. Edward E. Ayer presented copies of Nelson's Birds of Yorkshire 
and Dixson's Game Birds. Mr. Ayer has also caused to be ordered for 
the Museum a collection of ornithological works, which when secured, 
will further enrich the Edward E. Ayer Ornithological Library. The 
students and artists, as they become acquainted with the resources of 
the Museum Library, find it the only library in the city containing so 
many rare and beautifully illustrated ornithological works. Mrs 
Edward E. Ayer presented a copy of her translation of the Memorial 
of Fray Alonso Benavidies, 1 630. The Cambridge University, England, 
sent a set of sixteen volumes of its Archaeological and Ethnological 
publications. From the Instituto Biologico of Mexico was received 
eight of the earlier volumes of La Naturaleza. The Canadian Institute 
sent fifteen of its earliest publications. The Deutsche Morgenlandische 
Gesellschaft, Leipzig, presented twenty-three volumes of its Zeitschrift. 
The Academy of Arts and Sciences, Boston, completed its file of Pro- 
ceedings of fifty-one volumes to date, by sending volumes one to 
twenty-eight inclusive. Through the generosity of various governments 
represented at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition, the library 
received a hundred books and pamphlets. Among these contributions 
was that of the Chinese Commission consisting of a work in sixteen 
volumes, bound in cloth cases, entitled Km ting shu king t'u shuo, 
issued by the command of the late Empress Dowager in 1903, and now 
out of print. The Argentine Commission gave twenty-eight volumes, 
among which is a set of the Boletin of the Cordoba Academy of Natural 
Sciences, particularly desirable. The purchases have been confined to 
a limited number of books required by the staff for immediate use. Of 
the twelve orders approved, eleven were filled and these added thirty- 
five works to the Departmental libraries. Through exchanges with 
foreign book dealers for publications issued by the Museum, thirteen 
other important volumes desired by the staff were obtained. 

Year after year the periodical lists are examined by the Curators and 
those periodicals that were supposed to have permanent value when 
subscribed to but have become of less use to the staff, have been dropped 
from the list. At the present time ninety-eight periodicals are received 
with twenty continuations. 

The increased cost of materials used in binderies is reflected in the 
advance in the schedule of prices for binding, leather binding being 
almost prohibitive. For several years, however, all books except a few 
sets in continuation have been bound in cloth or library buckram in 
preference to leather as more durable bindings. During the year six 
hundred and thirteen books and pamphlets have been bound. 



86 Fi V 

TV ties which fa vith the 

ing. catal« nniit.. Uur — I 

tiass b it may 

i the as in past years. The sma 

num! analytical work 

sly 
0,560 < 

Of^AB CATM.OOU4NO. iNVlHTOHYtNQ. AMO LA* The WOrk Of 

the I ) < ■• artri >as bc< led 

as usual during ' iccar: 

036. These cards are 
ws: North >gy 

ai hnology ;i 

' African 
ords 9. 
Til hinese nology 181; 

Thest have I >ry 

bool :iumK  :al acces- 

which ha The total number 

the fir.-t vole 

 
These ar follow 

has pro- 
! 1 8 Iant< 
lea. T ic departmental 

tuns. prepared for the 

h was reported 
To the label '4s. 

Depart - 
ment of I <*ar has txvn ca" > 0,202 

entries have be num 1 

II her 14*149 S I" <m prcpar< 

1 catalog ^ral herbarium of the 

The ratal o£" kept pace with 

accessions and all s; lthedepn led. T 

largest numi was of nens, a total 

^2 new entries having \- These with 

cntri» I total 

irtment d 00. The numl- ritten 

during th< was 78. The labels written number 1,047. About 



Jan., 191 7. Annual Report of the Director. 87 

200 of these labels were handwritten with white ink on black card- 
board to serve as temporary labels until printed ones could be secured; 
the remainder were from the Section of Printing. Most of the labels 
were for newly installed economic specimens. A total of 722 printed 
labels has been received during the year, the larger part being for 
the meteorite collection. These have all been installed with the cor- 
responding specimens. There remains in the hands of the printer, 
copy for 1,143 labels. 

In the Department of Zoology the cataloguing and labeling of the 
South American birds received from Museum expeditions has been 
continued during the year. A regional catalogue of South American 
mammals was prepared in the form of an index of about 650 cards. A 
total of 1,105 labels were installed as follows: 36 labels for mounted 
fishes ; 2 for the Moose group ; 2 for the osteological exhibit ; 1 for South 
American bird group; 55 for mounted birds and 1,009 for the shell col- 
lection. The entries made during the year number 1,817, °f which 
1,663 were for ornithology and 154 for mammalogy. 

The following table shows the work performed on catalogues and 
the inventorying accomplished: 



Department of Anthropology . 

Department of Botany 

Department of Geology 

Department of Zoology 

The Library 

Section of Photography 

accessions. — In the Department of Anthropology the most remark- 
able purchase of the year is represented by the acquisition made at the 
Panama-Pacific International Exposition, consisting of a Chinese 
honorary gateway and eighty-four models of Chinese pagodas. This 
material was turned out by the Industrial School maintained by the 
Jesuit Establishment Sikkawei near Shanghai. The gateway is entirely 
carved of teakwood, and in its monumental character presents a fine 
example of Chinese architecture, and thus far is the first monument of 
this art in the Museum that is constructed on the size of an original. 
The magnitude of the composition, the harmony of proportions, the 
high technical skill, the numerous artistic and beautiful carvings, the 
wealth of ingenious decorative designs which embody a fine record of 
Chinese thought, make this object a most striking and prominent 
acquisition. The collection of eighty-four models of Chinese pagodas 
has both a highly scientific and an educational value. The pagodas are 



No. of 
Record 
Books 


Total No. 

of entries to 

Dec. 31, 1916 


Entries 

During 

1916 


Total No. 
of Cards 
Written 


38 


143.338 


2,036 


141.552 


57 


453,083 


20,292 


70,750 


22 


134-593 


1,989 


7.783 


40 


98,647 


1,817 


33,968 


14 


102,830 


2,540 


225,527 


20 


114.455 


1,152 





ro»Y — Rf.PoRT V. 

c landmarks 

into a museum and 
illy access i mode' lured 

;oof t an average), 

aimcn' allow a minute 

a are 

agodas from Korea 

an a collection 

'it hundr ts. The 

ma antiqu is on I 

\rnong the hundred 

tng a are many rare and 

unique forms. T! >tit two hundred small objects of 

and a: quality, comprising Mixtcc stone figurines, 

'US 

forms car 

ac< ts of s< 

in rth WmgBl 

T. rlai Army. The 

I durir collec - Japanese 

sword rurnitui 

I >r. Prank v. This important i >of o 

nine hui :ig all th 

co: 1 periods 

These he sword 

son in the appli -if Japanese desn 

<al th- 'irit oi ilry and gal- 

:'t of 

i panes' :\ particular to sword - 

P&red by 
nsaulus v. ifter r arnest 

ards (the 
£ lx>en taken) were presented by 

were 

 ' 

Mr. Lul inner 

ilippines, th< nment is indebted for 

a small, but -.ntercsting colic- ragments 

and other material, found i in burial caves on th< This 

pottery comes from the kilns rom those of 

southern China, and testifies to the mediaeval intercourse of the Islands 



Jan., 191 7. Annual Report of the Director. 89 

with the mainland of south-eastern Asia. Of special interest is a frag- 
ment of Celadon pottery of Chinese origin, the body of which exhibits 
a pure white porcelain mass, while as a rule the early Celadon glaze is 
wrought over a crude stoneware body. Mr. Arthur B. Jones enabled 
the Museum to acquire a silver statuette made in Lhasa, Tibet, and 
inlaid with pearls, turquois, and coral; it represents Amitabha, the 
Buddha of Light. Two fine old Navaho blankets, one of bayeta, are 
gifts from Mr. Homer E. Sargent. Mr. Sargent also provided funds 
for the purchase of a collection of ancient pottery from Casas Grandes, 
Mexico. It consists of 162 small pieces comprising coiled and indented, 
smooth, undecorated, polished red and black, as well as the beautiful 
polychrome ware characteristic of that region. It is equally of scientific 
and artistic value. Mr. Sargent also presented to the Museum twenty 
beautiful old head-plumes worn by the Karok Indians of northwestern 
California in the White Deer-Skin Dance. To Mr. Edward E. Ayer 
are due six fine old buckskin skirts, two aprons ornamented with pine- 
nuts, three excellent head-bands of buckskin, worn in the Jumping 
Dance, and a quiver of basketry carried during the same dance-cere- 
mony, all from the Hupa, Yurok, and Karok Indians of northwestern 
California. Mr. Ayer also contributed thirty-eight prehistoric stone 
implements collected in the vicinity of Phoenix, Arizona. An inter- 
esting image carved from green quartz, of Mexican origin, was presented 
by Mrs. S. E. Barrett. 

The number of accessions received by the Department of Botany 
during the year numbered 48, of these all the specimens of 44 have been 
prepared, organized, and catalogued. The accessions comprise 44 
economic and 20,248 herbarium specimens. The most important addi- 
tion to the plant collections is that of the private herbarium of Elihu 
Hall, presented by the family of the late Mr. Hall. This herbarium is 
estimated to contain about 35,000 sheets; it also comprises a great mass 
of duplicates that will be utilized in exchanges. The Hall herbarium 
embraces Mr. Hall's personal collections in Illinois, Texas, and Oregon, 
and Hall and Harbor's Rocky Mountain Plants; together with a mass 
of material acquired in exchange with his contemporaries: Curtiss, 
Bebb, Clinton Patterson, Bolander, Faxon, Gray, M. E. Jones, Mohr, 
Canby, Hale, Vasey, Blake, Bishop, Fendler, Eaton, Garber, Howell, 
Parry, Lemmon, Macowan, Oakes, Porter, Ravenel, Wolf, and many 
others in North America. From his foreign exchanges he secured a 
complete set of all the numbers of the Relique Mailleanas, and very 
full series of Bourgeau, Spain; Dasnen, Switzerland; Blanche, Syria; 
Laresche, Switzerland; Gaillardot, Syria; Cosson, France; Heldereich, 
Greece; Mathonnet, France; Bourgeau, Italy; Timothee, France; Pisa 



go Fin -j ■• \' u History — R>; 






• 



Border tirKcau, Prar 

Africa, and ma 
Tba H rbaritm to 1880. Its 

consists in a 1 nens gained 

-.rar his bQDB, in the nri. 
m seeds gathered in the western anil southwestern it 
I others amiird from fnii- -larium specimens 

investigators to compare 

:i tho m a » rent en\"ironmcnt. 

Th Philippine or ''.ids 

mt, 

hcrff, Illinois 

:>crta Botanical 

■8 1.44 

rbarium, California, California 

1 ; \\\v. lippines 6 The a<! to the organised 

.vn in the following tat 
Tb repn nt only those region that have been BOfmeoll ! 

•lm as a whole: 

LocAtiTv 
Aicrir Rataoi 

«ru 

va Scot 1 1 

Ariaooa 
Cal:f mis 

So- Urn* Isl 

to B«»edicto Isl 

j 

ICMtfa 

Plond* (Bid. of Key*) 

.ho 
Illinois 
Indiana 
Kentucky 
- . 

Isle Royal 



Uasiai 

la 1916 t 


Ibkrf 




8 


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1.15' 


1 


1 


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34 


1 




1 




6 




75 


637 


4 


1.306 


U 


1 


\A3 








Ml 






• 








1.200 


78 


3-43 1 


1 


1 



2 
3 
UJ 

<o 

3 
2 




CO 

nJ 

•c 
<u 

c 

c 
'3 
£ 
■/. 

c 
i-i 






O (u 

o g 

*% 

g.a 

• s. « 

K -= ° 
co -^ ►— i 

LLl r- >— ' 
£ 5 O 

u. ^ ce 

z =Cu 

< °3 ^ 

O - J c 
— CO • — 

^ c c 

< r- CO 
-r ^ CO 



O 



UJ ™ co 

to ^,h 

< CC 

UJ 5-S 

Q. U *^ 



o 

a 

CO 

u 

(D 



t£ 



o 



o 



VJ* 



v*< " 



I 



Jan., 1917. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



91 



Locality 
United States: 
Montana 
Nebraska 

Nevada .... 
New Hampshire 
New Mexico 
New York 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon .... 
Pennsylvania 
Rocky Mountains . 
Texas .... 

Utah 

Virginia .... 
Washington . 
Wisconsin 
Wyoming 
Yellowstone . 
Bermuda .... 
West Indies: 

Anagada .... 
Bahamas: 

Mangrove Cay . 

New Providence 
Barbados 
Cayman Brae 
Cuba 

Isle of Pines . 
Dominica 

Haiti 

Jamaica .... 
Martinique . 
Porto Rico . 

Culebra . 
St. Croix .... 
Santo Domingo . 
St. Kitts .... 
Tortola .... 
Central America: 
Costa Rica . 
Guatemala . 
Honduras 

Ruatan . 
Mexico .... 

Lower California 
Guadaloupe Isl. 
Yucatan .... 
Panama .... 



Added to 
Herbarium 
in 1916 


Total 

in 

Herbarium 


I 


4,029 


2 


493 


7 


1,270 


4 


1.554 


14 


3.502 


20 


6,457 


1 


2,045 


2 


296 


1,013 


8,401 


8 


10,130 


946 


2,322 


1,290 


9,607 


5 


2,548 


11 


2,723 


77 


7,420 


32 


4.931 


3 


1,569 


1 


528 


8 


669 



33 



I 


7 


I 


2,444 


3 


353 


3 


98 


206 


10,948 


10 


658 


13 


90 


22 


331 


564 


7,218 


1 


618 


613 


4,727 


1 


212 


1 


1,280 


5 


1,322 


1 


13 


1 


33 


2 


595 


1 


3,054 


1 


272 


2 


23 


29 


36,983 


2 


1,682 


1 


42 


1,088 


5,97o 


21 


103 



OJ r N v: sy — R> r 



LOO: T> 

\uwmi v 

 nt 

Braxal 

 i 
Ecuador 

•.ngary 
Belgium . 
■runark 



Grr.. 

Angle UL 

gland 
IreUnd 
r*Und 



IUlT 

'iterranean IUands 



V V 



un 

1 *•■- MM 

■.tterUn 
Turkey 
An 

Abywinia 
Algeria 

Ben • 

Morocco 

Sooth Africa 
l«r» . 
bta 

Mi 



V « J~l i . 


Total 


fi«rtMT«Mi 


■i 


 o f*i6 1 




94 




t 


1 


i 




" 


99 


i 


»S° 


i 




12 








»9 




IO 


J«l 




»M7 


i 


i 






i 


i 


"7 




s 






544 


4 


*J 




M 










I 


i 


'3 




i 




i 


4 






ii 




*9 




tj% 




*H 


.'■ 


0*o 






30 


I 


2» 




* 


IO 




1 






1.0 IS 










9 


SI 


I 


in 







Jan.,. 191 7. Annual Report of the Director. 



93 



locality 
Asia: 

Aria Minor 

China: 

Alt.. tains 

Mongolia 

Sungaria 

India 

Japan 

Persia 

Philippine Islands 

Siberia 

.... 

Australia (general) 

New South Wales 

Queensland 

:ralia 

Tasmania 

toria 

Wes: Australia 

Oceaxica : 

Marquesas Islands: 

y. '-"- 
Sandwich Islands (general) 

Oahu 

Horticultural 

Illustrations mounted as Herbarinm sheets 



la the Department of Geology a considerable number of valuable 
accessions were received from exhibitors at the Panama-Pacific Inter- 
national Exposition. The comrnissions or firms presenting important 
material were the Gas Light and Coke Company, London, England. 
Australian Commission, Bolivian Commission. Xew Zealand Com- 
ssion, Chinese Commission, and Greek Commission. The Gas Light 
and Coke Company. London. England, presented 22^, specimens illus- 
trating the by-products of gas manufacture and a mahogany floor case 
for its exhibition. The series is very complete and well prepared, 
showing the various products obtained from the distilation of coal. 
The specimens include coal, coke, pitch, large masses of crystals of 
prussiate of potash, various dyes, various hydro-carbons, such as 
benzol, toluol and varieties of creosote, various forms of naphthaline. 
pyridine, anthracene, alizarin, ammoniacal liquids, sulphates, nitra; 
muriates, carbonates, and other compounds of ammonia, sulphur, cop- 
peras, sodium and potassium cyanides, various blue coloring mattx: 
other coloring matters, cyanogen, fiuorescia. and various other produc 
The whole forms a very nearly complete series illustrating produ*: 



.-.Hi: :: 


T;._ 

m 


ia 1916 


.-. - ^.- — 


45 


104 


291 


291 


4 


6 


45 


- : 


24 


1,062 


1 


297 


28 


M 


S95 


8,912 


5 


468 


;:. 


362 


181 


2.234 


12 


25* 


4 


25 


2 


2 


I 


307 


4 


4c G 


1: 


142 


4 


4 


5 


4*9 


2 


495 


65 


- 73& 


109 


2.C-: 






I F N A TU R A L I ! 1 



■L I < immission prc- 

•nport.. 

accession aggre- 

ht. An imj ne was 

• • 

Hi' irrs from many 

I a numl ire all of 

I much I \ustral 

amission presented 80 specimens 

•s of b A large 

■•ns ill richness. 

• sources of t 
:n ores, so that 
the a 
and c< 

or« opper are of 

• 

1. These 
:l[)hur. bestow 

am tin, mn 
 
Tl  a nu: 

as and a 

numl" Ml «>f this material is c: 

>ns, no s a having 

bci aeetsed in Department. The Commission also 

presented a model of a large lead and dressing 

works at .a This model 

about topog- 

ra: and the various 

1m: ! tracks by means of which I 

of the mine irricd on. The 1 ted with care 

and accuracy and has geographic as well as ccon< .tcrcst. The 

mmissi":) presei ;>ccimcns of ores wh all 

the important mineral pt .rMcs. Tl 

in n, man^anc^ .1, copper 

a: me ores together with specimens of emery and magnesite. 

There are also specimens of lead and base bullion made from the ores, 
ar. powders, calcined magnesite, magnesite cement and 

magnetite fire brick. The specimens m size and well adapted 

- museum display. The large blocks of Greek emer ••specially 

•isfact- ' lseum has hitherto been unable to secure disj 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XVIII. 







Model of the So-called Porcelain Pagoda of Nanking. 
Made by the Chinese Orphanage of Sikkawei near Shanghai. 



uHiviRsm of m * 
IIP' 1 '' 



Jan., 191 7. Annual Report of the Director. 95 

specimens of satisfactory size of this widely used and well-known sub- 
stance. The zinc ores include a great variety of the brilliantly colored 
smithsonites for which Laurium is famous. Besides the ores there are 
two lots of the slags from the silver smelting operations of the ancient 
Greeks between 600 B.C. and 400 B.C. which are now being resmelted 
to save the silver that the early smelters could not extract. The New 
Zealand Commission presented a restoration of the giant, extinct bird 
known as the Moa. This restoration was prepared with great care at 
the New Zealand Museum, and shows a bird standing over 12 feet in 
height with a body measuring 8 feet in length. The probable feather 
covering is shown, also the form and dimensions of the bird. The 
great size of this creature makes it an object of special interest. A 
very valuable accession obtained largely through the efforts of Mr. W. J. 
Chalmers, consisted of 40 specimens of tin and copper ores presented by 
the leading tin mining companies of South Africa. These ores had not 
been previously represented in the collections and they are also of im- 
portance since they show characters not seen in the tin ores of other 
regions. Mr. Chalmers also kindly presented two especially fine 
crystals of gem tourmaline from California and a specimen of crystallized 
gold from French Guiana. A series of pebbles from Wyoming 
showing unusual polishing by wind, was presented by Messrs. Geo. F. 
Porter and A. A. Sprague. From the Chamber of Commerce of Chlo- 
ride, Arizona, a representative series of the gold, silver, lead, and other 
ores of that district was received by gift, making a valued addition. 
An interesting series of 15 specimens illustrating the manufacture of 
potash and other products from alunite and of nitrogen products manu- 
factured from the air, was presented by the Armour Fertilizer Works. 
In this connection also, the gift by Professor S. H. Knight, of the Uni- 
versity of Wyoming, of specimens of the leucitic rocks of Wyoming, 
which are considered possible sources of commercial potash, is worthy 
of mention. The Titanium Alloys Manufacturing Company presented 
a specimen of metallic titanium, which is a rarely produced substance, 
together with specimens of two ferro-titanium alloys. The Norton 
Laboratories gave a large bar of metallic magnesium. A series of 
pegmatite products used in cement facing and two large masses of peg- 
matite were donated by the Crown Point Spar Company of Essex, 
New York. Professor E. L. Moseley of Bowling Green, Ohio, gave 
some interesting specimens of celestite and invertebrate fossils. By 
exchange, 13 specimens of stream concretions were obtained from 
Professor F. Justin Roddy and specimens of the Dalton and Lake 
Okechobee meteorites were received from the United States National 
Museum. An iron meteorite from Batavia, New York, weighing 5,930 



q6 Vol. v 

grn :,ooo grams of the Plain view, Texas, 

rod also specimens of f< >ur other 

bt ape< . vsy forms called 

nit 40 specimens of 

fossils a !c\l as a result of the 

>r's tr . Illii 75 specimens min- 

rk in M The 

A tan! /.ona 20 »ns of copper ores 

Vpartmcn* accession of the 

year is a 

nis [1 MU purchased from Mr. I'. U t A Bjd obtained it from 

na iscar and pcrsonall .;ht it from there to this 

country. The first installment of the id of the birds 

taken on th< 

1 the .' M.-um :ral li The mam- 

ma in the year but have 1 

been accessioned. A • -.animals and . from 

1 were presented by the A c Commissioners to the 

Pn Pacific Internationa] Bxp pecial mention. 

hem a pedes new to the collection. To the 

col bi specimens. 

One < IHed Sea £ ry desira"' 

By far the largest and roost 
importa:. 1 was the Hall collection of 

BUhu H Illi- 

nois. Th consi water sh< 

ar 1 at least several thousand name*! As they 

orted by a s; :ie exact number 

. be acceario? annot be definitely 

at th Among the faaaa the most desirable 

I sccur reston 

I this lot at least tl ti new to the 

col though smaller acquisition, was an 

: 7 ran » from northern India were secur> 

The accessions a summar .. follow : Pur base: 138 mam- 

U 
and eggs, and approximately 3,000 shells; I change: 39 

mammals and 80 in 

«toiT)o^j»noPiiiowo«* — A (< by the Curator 

of Geology in v. ral localities in La Salle County, Illinois, and 

as a result specimens of a number of occurrences which had not been 



Jan., 1917. Annual Report of the Director. 97 

previously represented in the collections were procured. The material 
obtained included specimens of cone-in-cone structure, stylolites and 
concretions, fossil ferns and a series of hydraulic limestones and cements. 
A collecting trip was also made by the Curator of Geology among the 
pegmatite regions of western Maine. A large number of valuable 
specimens of the rare minerals of the region, such as tourmaline, colum- 
bite, beryl, and herderite were procured, also some showy dendrites and 
a striking series illustrating zonal weathering. The Assistant Curator 
of Geology through a brief trip among most of the large porphyry 
copper mines of New Mexico and Arizona secured a representative 
though limited suite of the characteristic ores of this important new 
development of the mining industry. The large mines visited on this 
trip and from which specimens were secured were the Chino and Empire 
Zinc mines in New Mexico, and the Copper Queen, Old Dominion, 
Inspiration, and Miami mines in Arizona. At Grand Canyon, Arizona, 
also, he obtained a number of specimens of Cretaceous fossils, copper 
and silver ores and asbestos. 

INSTALLATION, REARRANGEMENT, AND PERMANENT IMPROVEMENT. — - There have 

been placed on permanent exhibition in the Department of Anthro- 
pology 90 new cases, most of these being completely labeled. The 
material installed in these cases is distributed over the various 
divisions as follows: African ethnology 27 cases; Melanesian ethnology 
44 cases; American ethnology 1 case; American Archaeology 7 cases, 
and Chinese pagodas 11. The interesting Mexican pottery from Casas 
Grandes presented by Mr. Homer E. Sargent has been installed in two 
standard cases in the East Court. The recent acquisition of Navaho 
blankets necessitated the reinstallation of a case of Navaho blanketry 
in Hall 6. Progress has been made in the installation in standard cases 
in the East Court, which, since the opening of the Museum, has been 
shown in the old Peabody cases from the World's Columbian Exposi- 
tion. Four cases of the Hopewell material, from Ross County, Ohio, 
are well along toward completion in Alcove 83. The new arrangement 
on shelves is very satisfactory, and brings out to advantage the scientific 
value of this remarkable collection. The prehistoric pottery from 
Chiriqui Republic of Panama, has been permanently placed on exhibi- 
tion in two standard cases in Alcove 93 of the East Court. Costa Rican 
archaeology now in Alcove 84 is being prepared for permanent exhibi- 
tion. All Peabody cases released, as the work of reinstallation pro- 
gresses, are used for permanent storage in Halls 68 and 69 of the West 
Annex in accordance with the plan outlined a year ago. For the 
purpose of preserving and photographing material, work has been done 
in 138 exhibition cases. Installed cases of the Joseph N. Field collec- 



Pli lo Mi ' \n km. H Vol. '. 

I {.all Hall 80, thus giving needed 

ises. irth of the floor 

Space in Hall 7 i 

carefully in- 

> material 

the 

1. re M third, ige. The 

1 cases 
full and a con - of 

tl • rom Benin, many of 

of the 

itarics of 

tl. mali-land 

tribes, the war-! 

Lion from 
th. Zulu gives a 

bese m 'ongo 

•rcstir.. re of I 

her 
ar 

se peoples. In their present arrangement, ican collections, 

th re of the various 

well the interrc! 
trilws. Fur' lnstal- 

ith See 44 cases 

»ccn c 

Buka and Bougain- 

olomoi ^rc fully represented 

8 cases. «od carvings 

human statu* - balloon -shaped hats worn 

atases* to a secret socu 

th- coiled baskets, wooden pla* c nut-crackers, and 

a < ays of 

ha ;. The central Solomons arc represented by objects 

in! th pearl and by a large wooden bowl P jrtccn cases are 

tfa a d of huge ancestral images of 

«xi and memorial c.v (from central New Ireland and the Gard- 

ner Islands), ancestral figures of stone, and a great variety of masks, 



Jan., 1917. Annual Report of the Director. 99 

some very elaborate. The different types of clubs and spears, including 
those terminating in worked human bone, are completely represented. 
Native life on the island of New Hanover is shown in another case. The 
elaborately decorated clubs and spears of St. Matthias together with 
large ornamented combs, and woven mats and belts occupy two cases. 
The same number of cases illustrates the culture of Lihir, Aneri, Tanga, 
Nissan, small islands east of New Ireland, the manufacture of shell arm 
rings from Tanga and shell money from Nissan being especially note- 
worthy. Two further cases are concerned with Lord Howe, Mortlock, 
Tasman, and Sikaiana, small islands lying north of the Solomons, but 
showing a culture with Micronesian and Polynesian, rather than Mel- 
anesian affinities. New Britain is represented by a very complete col- 
lection, in sixteen cases, from the Gazelle Peninsula. It includes many 
valuable old specimens obtained and figured by Richard Parkinson, also 
a number of remarkable Baining and Sulka masks, numerous specimens 
from central and western New Britain as well as from the neighboring 
islands, showing a strong New Guinea influence. A representative 
collection from the southwest coast about Cape Merkus illustrates the 
life and industries of the people. There is a series of their finely carved 
wooden bowls, coiled baskets, painted bark-cloth, feather head-dresses 
used in dances, and personal ornaments. The Philippine material 
has been revised and partially reinstalled. The models of Chinese 
pagodas have been installed in three standard four-feet cases and eight 
special cases arranged in Hall 48 of the East Annex. This Hall was 
opened to the public at the end of the year. The Chinese gateway has 
been erected on the east side of the Rotunda. 

In the Department of Botany the following cases have been in- 
stalled, labeled and placed on exhibition: in the American Forestry 
Series: Sweet Buckeye; Fraser's Fir; Southern Red Cedar; Loblolly 
Bay; Silver Bell; Pennsylvania Cherry; Ogeche Lime; Water Gum; 
Black Cherry; and Basswood. Specimens, with their labels, sufficient 
for the installation of twelve other cases have been fully prepared and 
are ready to be put in place as soon as the cases for their accommodation 
are furnished. Installation in the herbarium cases has been sadly 
interfered with on account of lack of space in the rooms available to this 
section of the department. It has become necessary to remove from 
installation all specimens in the lower plant orders, wrap them up in 
bundles and store them away, in order to give up their place in the cases 
to families more frequently consulted. This has also been necessary in 
the case of newly arriving Eurasian plants, until the end of the year 
reveals over three hundred such bundles rendered unavailable for study 
or reference. A discouraging amount of time and labor had to be 



ioo lini' Mi'M • Ht IAL HlSTOll I<> V. 

wasted in shift i -.stalled in order to make 

m 

occupy 
th- Uhtl li -barium was 

tufting  >w square on 

the cxhil parator's 

room. 

tii- IVpartmcn' 

doted to the public for several ;. ailed I 

In 1 then xhibited numerous large, 

rate fossil including the Ct 

nil found at 
nt sloth, large turtle, la- 
armadill' D, an<! Ixmes of the 

mammoth and D . " whales end Tertiai 

m in the e halls. iee of t forms 

lix. In addi: round wo: 

ingi of the Shui kao Shan Uad mini 
in i Th about 170 eq 

• base I 
high. The ceei ase we: 

iteetf was the gift of the Chinese rnmmieriuu to the Panama-Par- 

In* :i a s< 

the plant at the surfac< beseing 

th< opean 

net! men and ill ; cam 

crimen of th' 
accompanies the exhibit. To the third hall, H the group 

'icd, ' no coll in 

wall case floor cases and 

Boor cases cd to 

in different « quantitati 

bit of t! irious 

tucts of p» 1 of petroleum - 

bearing s.v -r charact fossils. To the space 

•  

moved and fully 

of these cases was 1 to Canyon r- 

tuch the collection contains a large nunv pecfanefl I var 

from iot v ounces. The total weight of this 

-.hibitc :. 000 lbs. In other cases all the larger 




z 



X 



o 
o 
I 
o 

CO 



0. 



a. 
< 

I 



• 5 
z o 



UJ a, 



CD _i 



O 

o 
I 
o 
to 

o 

—I 

CO 

z> 
Q. 

O 
h 

Q 

LU 

z 
< 

o 



C/5 

< 

o 



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CL 

> 

I- 



u« 






*0** 



Jan., 191 7. Annual Report of the Director. ioi 

stone and iron-stone meteorites were placed, the specimens being 
grouped so as to bring those of the same class together. At the same 
time the opportunity was improved to definitely group all the meteor- 
ites, the grouping being on the basis of a classification founded on 
structural features. In Hall 31a number of series have been rearranged 
with or without the addition of new material. One of these is a collec- 
tion of volcanic products which has been so reorganized as to exhibit 
the characteristic products of each locality in groups. At present, 
good series of the products of the volcanoes of Vesuvius, Popocatepetl, 
Kilauea, Sakurijima, the Auvergne region and many localities in the 
western United States are shown. A special addition made to the 
products of Vesuvius was a series of specimens of volcanic ash thrown 
out during the eruption of April, 1906. These specimens show the 
changes in the character of the ash during successive days of the erup- 
tion. Photographs of a recent eruption of Sakurijima were installed 
among the products of that volcano. Other additions made to the 
series of dynamical geological products in Hall 31 include six splendid 
specimens of zonal weathering which were collected by the Curator in 
Maine, specimens of dendrites similarly collected, a number of speci- 
mens of cone-in-cone structure, stylolites, etc., collected by the Curator 
in Illinois, and a number of specimens showing several varieties of 
weathering. Another change made in the installation of this hall was 
the removal to storage of the series of New York rocks and the installa- 
tion in its place of collections illustrating the uses of lime and of borax. 
In the collection illustrating lime and its uses, a number of varieties of 
limestone and lime from various localities are shown and following these, 
illustrations of chemical and agricultural uses of lime and limestone, uses 
of lime for paints, plasters, and cements, medical uses of lime, etc. In 
the borax collection are shown various borax minerals, various refined 
boraxes, and illustrations of the uses of borax in the arts. Another 
collection prepared and installed in this hall was one illustrating sources 
and uses of potash. Various rocks and minerals containing potash in 
appreciable quantities are exhibited in this collection and many of the 
finished products from these rocks, including not only potash but 
alumina, sulphuric acid, etc. The collection illustrating magnesia and 
its uses was considerably enlarged and rearranged, additions of Indian 
and Grecian magnesite, raw and calcined, being made, also of metallic 
magnesium, hydraulic cements, magnesia packing, etc. To the sulphur 
collection were added some interesting specimens of molded sulphur 
received from China. Some additions were also made to the economic 
barite and fluorite collections. A magnetic compass was installed in 
connection with the large specimen of lodestone in Hall 30, the compass 



ioj Field M* • Natuiai Histoiy Ki V. 

bcr .in -u hat it < 

•i a sen The attrac- 

he nee 1 a 

• • 

In Skiff Hal 

.cw material 
I n place of 
the I> 

case con- 
r 200 1 ting the products of 

co.. ussiatcs  

:.akcs a brilliant 
this time, since t 
ecome desirable 
;Ti<mlt The exhibr 

I from 1 
havin. in it to tnak arancc with tl 

m the hall. T n the imber 

from * 
:' these a<! 
M has The a 

th African tin 
ous effort^ of Mr. V. taJ number of B< 

tin Australian tin n ores from 

scattering 1<- I in tungsten ores, this 

moat 

t lorn h am at th- was pro- 

cu: ores of Ontario 

hi bee r ii tail* I with the ! '. • ••.••: -,- :■•■ iting MfWll 

Part ot th- 
iiccn r -senting the 

ores of copper 
minin. of H A scries of 

;>ccimens 

• atna ' nal Exp from the mate- 

I [r, W. J <-cn installed with 

the ores r, lead, tv. tlly 

; these collections. A lection from the potash deposits 

of Utah ing the ores and their aluminum salts which are tl 

has b- vith the aluminum ores collection. A 

complete skeleton of the American camel Oxydactylus longipes, 
the lower Miocene period, was installed in a floor case in Hall 36. 



Jan., 191 7. Annual Report of the Director. 103 

This camel was remarkable for its size and slender structure, the 
slenderness being such as to make the skeleton difficult to mount. 
In order to obtain sufficient rigidity, steel sockets were set in the limb 
bones at intervals and these served as fastenings for pieces of half-round 
steel which were placed along the surfaces of the bones. In this way a 
firm but graceful mount was secured. The base of the mount was made 
of material imitative of the matrix in which the skeleton was found. In 
an adjoining case a fore leg of Alticamelus, another American camel 
remarkable for the size and length of its limb bones has been installed; 
and in still another case a number of skulls and limb bones of Miocene 
camels and horses have been placed. All of this material was col- 
lected by Museum expeditions in the western states. The skeleton 
of the saber tooth cat in this hall was transferred to a plaster base 
imitating the matrix from which it was taken. The series of Jurassic 
mollusks from Patagonia collected by Professor Salisbury' has been in- 
stalled in Hall 36, and a case of Devonian fossils has been brought from 
Hall 61 and installed in this hall. In the paleontological laboratory the 
cleaning and mounting of a skeleton of Oxydactylus has been completed; 
a fore limb of Alticamelus has been prepared and mounted; a skeleton 
of a small, Miocene, burrowing carnivore found in one of the peculiar 
corkscrew-like forms occurring in Nebraska has been prepared for 
mounting; two partial skeletons of the Oligocene three-toed horse, 
Mesohippus bairdii, have been prepared, as have also a large skull of 
Diceratherium and fore limbs of the smallest Miocene horse, Merychip- 
pus; the mounting of a skeleton of a fossil wolf from the Los Angeles 
beds has been nearly completed and the skeleton of the saber tooth cat 
from the same locality has been transferred to a base imitative of the 
matrix from which the specimen was obtained. 

In the Department of Zoology the reinstallation of the shell exhibit 
has been continued during the year. Seven cases of shells were installed, 
10 of the new A-cases now being filled. Of this number 7 have been 
permanently labeled. Some idea of the amount of work required to 
install a case may be formed when it is stated that one of those just filled 
contains 2,829 shells, most of which has to be mounted in a special man- 
ner and which required 718 tablets and almost the same number of 
individual shelves for their installation. In the Division of Osteology 
337 skulls and 12 skeletons were prepared. Three skeletons were also 
prepared for the exhibition collection. The usual precautions were 
taken against the depredations of insect pests and all collections were 
disinfected. Most of the exhibition cases are now provided with devices 
which permit disinfection without opening the case. In the serial col- 
lection of mammals on exhibition, rearrangement and elimination of 



u: Hmoe? — 










m*o«»T» *LA 







Jan., 191 7. Annual Report of the Director. 105 

bird groups was finished and installed. The group shown consists of 
birds characteristic of the low tropics of north-central Brazil where one 
of the Museum's expeditions worked a few years ago. The most con- 
spicuous of these are the large tropical American storks known as the 
Jabiru. Others included with them are ibises, sun bitterns, gallinules, 
and boatbills. Thirty-six mounted birds from Argentine and twenty 
from North America, including a Passenger Pigeon, were added to the 
serial exhibition collection. 

The N. W. Harris Public School Extension of field Museum of Natural History. 
— At the close of the year 476 cases were available for circulation 
among the public schools, 86 cases having been installed during 
the year. Six cases were permanently withdrawn from the supply 
and sent to the Museum of History, Art and Science of Los 
Angeles. There are also many cases on hand in various stages of prep- 
aration and installation. Not only do the members of the staff of this 
Department install all of the specimens of birds, mammals, fishes, 
reptiles, and insects, but they collect and prepare them for installation 
as well. Nearly all of the butterflies and birds found in and around 
Chicago are represented either by specimens installed or by specimens 
that have been partially prepared for installation. In many of the 
cases in which birds, mammals and reptiles are shown, enlarged colored 
photographs of the habitat or of characteristic environments of the 
specimens, form backgrounds. These backgrounds add greatfy to the 
naturalness of the taxidermy and to the realism of the accessories 
employed, and reduce the use and need of much of the latter. 

Sufficient time has elapsed since the inauguration of this work to 
permit competent judgment being passed upon the physical merits of 
the exhibition cases. It is gratifying to report that the type of case 
used has met all requirements demanded of it. The claim for the 
secureness of the installation of all specimens is well supported by 
the fact that thirty-four installed cases were transported by freight 
to San Francisco and returned, and not in a single instance was it 
necessary to repair any damage and in but one instance was it neces- 
sary to reinstall a specimen — that one being of a friable nature. 
The number now on hand of empty cases of the four and ten inch types 
is so small that a requisition for additional new cases will be made 
within a short time. It is more than likely, owing to space limita- 
tions, that with additional new cases some method, other than that 
now in use, for caring for empty and installed cases will have to be 
adopted. Representatives of the principals of the Chicago public 
schools expressed a desire to have types of the extension cases placed on 
permanent exhibition in one of the rooms of the Board of Education. 



IO0 M " N HAL H IT — Rl V. 

The school au est and granted permission 

to make the t ignated f rposc a room used by 

>als and tea as a con. I. ins for 

An at: ases will be made. 

In • with t: icst of t' the American 

Association of Museum <-um extension 

cases made at a met the asso» >. C, 

cases • In coir Q with the ex 

of the com rator on 

"Tl N hool Extension of 

iral II. ises conta !>irds 

od to * Art Institute for 

the purpose .ost i 

taking and thorough i >ds of insta' 

cases a arnon, 

or Vae^o Wado of the Department of 
..ional ' with the 

he sai thods in Japan. Tlv 

for i* .sion work, 

cases a <• of t: artment. 

of the value of the cooperation between The N. W. 
-is Pu hool E: m of Natural 

and th' 'ago, the letter from John D. 

Shoop, it of vlcrick J. V. 

of 

" | ity as I Htl egc to wr in 

testimony of the re led the 

closer cooperation th hed tx the public schools 

and t m. 

"The bequest made I has proved of great value to 

it! that have l>cen assembled under the dire- 
nms are \ ictors in int< ^ and enlarging the 

of the pu heres < I am cer- 

tain that you will be pleased to know that the movement made possible 
i the benevolence of Mr. ;n so much of 

interest and pro: ur public school syster 

pmotoojufmy and illustration. — The foil is a tabulation of the 

work performed in this secti< 



Jan., 1917. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



107 



Number of 



Negatives Number of Lantern ments 
made Prints made Slides made made 



Number of 
Number of 6>ix8K Posi 
Number of Negatives tives made. 
Number of Enlarge- developed 



General 16 61 

Anthropology .... 232 146 

Botany 10 61 

Geology 22 68 

Zoology 6 180 

Harris Extension ... 6 7 

Distribution 56 

Gift 94 

Sale 137 



18 



10 



for Expe- 
ditions 



10 



Used in 

making large 

Negatives 



Totals 292 810 20 10 16 4 

Total number of Catalogue entries during year 19 1 6 1,152 

Total number of Catalogue entries to December 31, 1916 114,455 

Total number of Record Books 20 



printing. — The number of labels and other impressions made by 
the Section of Printing is as follows: 



Anthropology 

Botany 

Geology 

Zoology 

Library 

General 

N. W. Harris Public School Extension 



Exhibition 
Labels 


Other 
Impressions 


4.509 


1,250 


234 


30,200 


1,478 


1,000 


2,560 


ISO 




3.250 




17,730 


1,036 


2,950 



Herewith are also submitted financial statements, list of accessions, 
names of members, etc., etc. 

Frederick J. V. Skiff, Director.. 



N ITtJRAL Hl^r<>n\ Rr.l . : V. 



FlNANi IAL VIEN1 



IPTS ami Dl • I - 

r 31, 1916 



RacnPTi 

Cash isurer"s 

Cash .surer's har ■« Fun-I. Decembr- 

lowment 
I91S 

Dues of n 

• : 

KB '. H iOCCS . 

.lowment Inooroc 

vcstmc: 1 

. 

I Income 

vestments n 
4?* Pund Investment* retired 

•iij and Purmshing Fund Income 

 

.' J.v k 

Arthur B. J'>ncs 

ll 
'. rcount 
Sundry Receipts . 



% 20.00 
60 
MO 00 



*4 

00 

600.00 
99" 

I iHm.oo 
10 



661 
311 









Jan., 191 7. Annual Report of the Director. 109 

Disbursements 

Salaries $71,161. 98 

Guard Service 12,006.13 

Janitor Service 6,807.34 

Fire Protection 3,306.64 

Light and Heat 13,132.28 

Repairs and Alterations : 

Wages — Carpenters, Painters, Roofers, etc. . . $7,799.01 

Materials used — lumber, paints, oils, glass, etc. . 554-83 8,353.84 

Furniture and Fixtures: 

Cases and Bases 5,365.00 

Office Furniture and Herbarium Cases .... 845.00 6,210.00 

The Library: 

Books and Periodicals 805.60 

Binding 552.85 

Sundries 136.98 1, 49543 

Collections, etc., purchased 14,848.28 

Installation expense 2,158.79 

Expeditions 18.55 

Publications 1,587.21 

Picture Postal Cards 232.65 

Sections of Photography and Printing — Supplies . . 323.44 

General Expense Account: 

Freight, Expressage and Teaming $1,211.65 

Stationery, Postage and Telephone 826.48 

Liability Insurance 663.52 

Sundries 1,500.09 4,201.74 

Stanley Field Plant Reproduction Fund 78.55 

Arthur B. Jones Buffalo Group Fund 125.00 

Stanley Field Ornithology Fund 925.00 

H. W. Jackson Library Fund — Investments .... 20.00 
New Building Moving and Furnishing Fund — Invest- 
ments 23,400.00 

Life Memberships Fund — Investments 26,321.25 

Picture Postal Cards Fund — Certificate of Deposit . 375-76 

Endowment Sinking Fund — Investments .... 1,010.00 

General Fund Investments (In Suspense) .... 2,225.00 



In Treasurer's hands, December 31, 1916: 

General Fund 

New Exhibition Cases Fund . 

Life Memberships Fund . . . . 

Sundry other Funds 

Petty Cash on hand, December 31, 19 16 . 







$200,324.86 


$2,188 


49 




791 


60 




1.514 


60 




1. 179 


20 


5.673.89 






739-95 



$206,738.70 



no Pl»l M HUM Of Natural History — Reports, YV . 



AT : AND rS I R( >* I tNUARY 1 K) 

CEMBI 



Attsmdamcb. 












• .'•  


18.088 




-. 


1,1 


19915 


Pree Admission • ;/•: 






School 


M 




• •« 






Teachers 


605 




x ' mbers: 






Corporate 


*9 




Annual 






 


6 




Officers' Pamilic* 


4« 




-xnal 


"i 




Press 


2 


99«0 


A 1 mission* on Pree Days: 






Saturdays 


I 779 




Sundays 












icst Attendance on any one day (July 9. 1916) . 




7.686 


-est Paid Attendance on any one day (July 4 




640 


Average Daily Admissions (364 days) 




568 


Average Paid Attendance Us* day) 




77 


Rtcatr 






lea sold — 88t at 25 cenU each 




% - 


Articles checke* 1 - 14 1 59 »t 5 cents each 






A 1 — . " 







• 






LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBAN A 



V 







I 






)l«S s 



Jan., 191 7. Annual Report of the Director. hi 



Accessions. 



DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY 
(Accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AYER, E. E., Chicago. 

38 objects of stone comprising milling stones, small mortar, pestles, balls, 
celts, grooved axes and hammers — near Phoenix, Arizona. 

6 buckskin dance skirts, 2 dance aprons, 3 ceremonial feather headbands, 

1 basket quiver — California. 
BARRETT, MRS. S. E., Chicago. 

1 large green quartz image — Mexico. 
CHINESE COMMISSION AT THE PANAMA-PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL 
EXPOSITION, SAN FRANCISCO, California. 
1 sulphur statuette — Shansi Province, China. 
8 musical instruments — China. 
DURNO, W. P., Chicago. 

4 Japanese books on sword-guards — Japan. 
FIELD, STANLEY, Chicago. 

1 chert spear-head — Lake Bluff, Illinois. 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Purchases: 

1 carved teakwood gateway and 84 models of Chinese pagodas — Sikkawei, 

near Shanghai, China. 
1 Tibetan silver image, inlaid with pearls, turquoises, and corals, made 
in Lhasa — Tibet. 
1056 flint implements and 20 casts — Northern France. 

1 banded slate celt — Bradyville, Tennessee. 

2 ancient Buddhist stone-relief sculptures — Peshawar, India. 
800 specimens archaeological material — Mexico. 

7 Navaho blankets — Fort Wingate, New Mexico. 
FREER, CHARLES L., Detroit, Michigan. 

Reproduction of famous landscape roll by Ma Yuan, with pamphlet — 
China. 
GUNSAULUS, DR. FRANK W., Chicago. 

926 Japanese sword-guards and sword furniture. 
HOLBROOK, MISS FLORENCE, Chicago. 

4 specimens Eskimo boots, gloves, and pocket-book, of sealskin — Greenland. 
MAC DOWELL, C. H., Chicago. 

1 stone celt — Malmo, Sweden. 
MARTIN, HENRI, Paris, France. 

100 fragments of bones, human and animal, and 125 specimens of flints — 
La Quina and St. Croix, France (exchange). 
I cast of prehistoric skull (exchange). 



i i : i I L H 1 

•■■ 

i ; .IculU. . rial from 

 

.indcs. ("'.■'•■• 
C.iruk — C* 
SILV 

•ase — B xchange). 

■raska (exchange). 
SMITH M 

belt — 

'.. 

I feather ape 



DEPARTMENT OP BOTANY 

V U •;? T t M F^s <>TIU I- KD.) 

H herbarium specimens i 
AR 

ncisco. I 
1 8 i 11 woods. 3 Quebracho products. 74 herbarium 

BALL. CARLE 

go. 
pecimens — various lo 
■cago. 

:ctiot». 

I herbarium speomen — Illinois, 
ELK T.\ 

7 spo 

Collate-' 

'ions and desenptiom of plant* mounted as herbarium specimens. 
Collect- ^ng. Jl 

herbarium spec im ens — Illinois, 
'chases: 

ta, Canada. 
485 herbarium specimens pptne Islands. 



Jan., 1917. Annual Report of the Director. 113 

371 herbarium specimens — California. 
151 herbarium specimens — Philippine Islands. 
335 herbarium specimens — Florida. 
FILEK, FRANK R., Chicago. 

46 herbarium specimens — Illinois. 
GAUMER, GEORGE F., Izamal, Yucatan, Mexico. 

314 herbarium specimens — Yucatan. 
GRECIAN COMMISSION AT PANAMA-PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL 
EXPOSITION, San Francisco, Cal. 
4 olive products — Greece. 
GRANT, J. M., Sequin, Washington. 

76 herbarium specimens — Washington (exchange). 
HALL, ELIHU, FAMILY OF, Athens, 111. 

The private herbarium of Elihu Hall. 
HAWLEY, MRS. HELEN D., Cedars, Canada. 

Her private herbarium — various localities. 
HANSEN, A. A., State College, Pa. 

1 herbarium specimen — Pennsylvania. 
HYNES, J. A., Chicago. 

1 skeletonized leaf (Magnolia macrophylla) — Germany. 

JOHNSON, FRANK W., Chicago. 

77 herbarium specimens — Michigan. 

KING, MISS ANNA A., Highland Park, 111. 
397 herbarium specimens — Kentucky. 

MARSH, C. D., Salina, Utah. 

3 herbarium specimens — Utah. 

MILLSPAUGH, C. P., Chicago. 

30 herbarium specimens — Wisconsin. 
9 specimens seeds — market. 

2 specimens seeds — various localities. 
1 plant description. 

1 drawing — seeds of Salix. 

MILLSPAUGH, C. F., and LANSING, O. E., JR., Chicago. 

22 herbarium specimens — Illinois and Indiana. 
NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN, New York City. 

7 photographs of herbarium specimens — Cuba (exchange). 
1442 herbarium specimens — various localities (exchange). 

PARISH, S. B. ( San Bernardino, Cal. 

1 herbarium specimen — California. 

PEACOCK, MISS BESS REED, Roswell, New Mexico. 
1 1 herbarium specimens — New Mexico. 

SHERFF, EARL E., Chicago. 

25 herbarium specimens — various localities. 

U. S. NATIONAL HERBARIUM, Washington, D C. 

5 photographs of type species — various localities (exchange). 

410 herbarium specimens — various localities (exchange). 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, Berkeley, Cal. 

129 herbarium specimens — various localities (exchange). 



D! " • LOOT 

v csanoMs akk by asn nan omswm obsignate©.) 

3 It ih. 

in. 

20 specimens v»iu near Tucson, Arizona. 

 
pecimcns bronxe — B« I 'a. 

 
art showing products 6 n coal. 

icago. 

ARV 1'F.RTILIZER WORK igo. 

I j specimens of alui is, S specimens synthetic oitroffjo 

-.ous localities. 
ART ^ THE. Waynesboro. Pa. 

4 specimens scagliola — Waynesb- 

!' NATIONAL 
-il. 
specimens of ores and minerals — New South Wales. 

BARRETT 

olur 

BA Canyon. Arizona. 

3 specimens copper and silver ores, t specimen asbestos — Grand Canyon. 

Anx. 

ICIFIC INTERNATIONAL 
Ln Francisco, Cal. 
80 specimens ores and minerals — Bolivia. 

BRA J . South Porcupine. Ontario. 

1 s pe cim en gold ore — Porcupine Div iUno. 

1 specimea gold ore — Baston I 

R OF O 'MM; -uona. 

;s ns ores — Chloridr ' ~ix, 

licago. 
a tourmaline crystals — Meaa Grande. Cal. 
1 specimen crystallised gold — Preach Guiana. 

CHIN MM -.TERNAT: 

ji Pranciao 
391 spcomens ores and minerals and model of Shui Kao Shan lead mining 
and ore dressing works — China, 

1 specimen marl — Oconto G 
CROWN : -own Pf V. 

4 specimens pegmatite and 6 specimens crushed pegmatite — Essex C 

V. 

^orcuptne, Ontario. 
1 specimen asbestos — Porcupine District, Ont. 






Jan., 191 7. Annual Report of the Director. 115 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Collected by O. C. Farrington: 

8 specimens fossil ferns, 24 specimens cone-in-cone, stylolites, etc., 5 specimens 
hydraulic lime, 2 specimens shale — LaSalle Co., 111. 
33 specimens red and green tourmaline, beryl, herderite, lepidolite, garnet, 
etc., 18 specimens dendrite on quartz and beryl, 8 specimens con- 
centric weathering, 16 miscellaneous — Oxford Co., Maine. 
Collected by H. W. Nichols: 

1 specimen river pebble — Fox River, 111. 

4 specimens quartz veins and 3 specimens rocks — Porcupine District, Ont. 
19 specimens porphyry copper ores, gypsum, breccia, fossil shells and corals 
— Arizona and New Mexico. 
Purchases : 

1 meteorite — Plainview, Texas. 

4 specimens meteorites — various localities. 

1 iron meteorite — Batavia, N. Y. 

8 specimens australites — Sydney, Australia. 

3 specimens agrite — Germany. 

1 section Cookeville meteorite — Cookeville, Term. 

FULLER'S EARTH CO., Somerville, Tex. 

1 specimen fuller's earth — Somerville, Tex. 

GALLAGHER, J. F., Chicago. 

25 specimens mineral abrasives and rocks — various localities. 
1 specimen fibrous serpentine — Rudolph, Wis. 
GARDEN CITY SAND CO., Chicago. 

1 specimen hydrated lime, 4 specimens cement facings, 1 specimen arti- 
ficial Caen stone. 
GOVERNOR AND COURT OF DIRECTORS, GAS LIGHT AND COKE 
CO., London, England. 
Collection illustrating by-products of gas manufacture, with case — London, 
England. 
GREEK COMMISSION AT PANAMA-PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL 
EXPOSITION, San Francisco, Cal. 
315 specimens ores and mineral products — Greece. 
HEATH, C. L., South Porcupine, Ontario. 

4 specimens gold ore — Tashota, Kowkash District and Swastika, Ont. 
HIGMAN, W. G., South Porcupine, Ontario. 

1 specimen scheelite — Porcupine District, Ont. 
HOTCHKLN, M. W., Kirkland Lake, Ontario. 

1 specimen gold ore — Tough-Oakes Mine, Ont. 
HUGHES, ROBERT W., Miami, Arizona. 

4 specimens chalcocite pseudomorph after pyrite — Miami, Ariz. 
INDIANA QUARRIES CO., Bedford, Indiana. 

4 specimens lime and dressed limestone — Bedford, Ind. 
JACKSON, ALLEN W., Temagami, Ontario. 

1 specimen silver ore — Cobalt, Ont. 
JEWELL, FRED, Osborn, Kansas. 

1 section of ammonite — near Harlan, Kas. 
KNIGHT, S. H., Laramie, Wyoming. 

3 specimens orendite and wyomingite — Leucite Hills, Wyo. 



" KM. li V 

- Lccuwpoort, 

rnsvaal. a. 

pectmr- cs — I-ceuwponrt.Tr.um-.iAl.: CB» 

ill. 

ML 

mestone - 

•ncn m< 

t specimen baritc — ! ill. 

JOHN, 

tceous earth — North \ Mt. 

y.LTD^IfwiM.TwtMl.a -ca. 

3 spe> rioa. 

i s >cks an nous localities. 

2 specimens paper clay — near Mao 

- • • ■•- •■•. • .".,::: - .'. etc •:■■ m I nhra on ■( Uo n ! 

n 

Restoration of Moa — New Zcila: 
R F. C. N> w 

2 spe ~on ores '. ' nx. 
NOi oekpor 

i ir metAl 
 
l specimen sine ore — fOi 

i ■■• ■••.-• . 

PR: MARRY B «o. 

nen powdered coal — C 
is. 
pecimens » ;hed pebbles — Musk i vt.n. W; 

em stream concretions — Little Conestoga Creek, Millcrsvillc. Pa. 
hangs). 

Rooiberg. 
Afhca. 
8 specimens tin ores — Rooiberg. - -ca. 

RUI hicago. 

specimens Indiana limestone — Bedford. Ind. 

3 sperimem soil s — near Pensacola . Pla. 



IIBRARV 
fNlVERSITV OF ILLINo.s 
UBBANA 




< 






Jan., 1917. Annual Report of the Director. 117 

SALA, C. A., Chicago. 

12 specimens crystallized topaz, transparent beryl, crystallized tourmaline 
— Mesa Grande, Cal. 
SALISBURY, R. D., Chicago. 

47 specimens fossil shells — Piedra del Aquila, Neugnen, Patagonia. 
SCHROTT, FRED L., Salt Lake City, Utah. 

2 specimens gold ore and 1 specimen cinnabar — Stanley, Idaho. 
SHNABLE AND QUINN, Blue Island, 111. 

1 specimen orthoceras annulatum, 1 specimen cyrtoceras — Blue Island, 
111. 
SPRAGUE, ALBERT A., II, AND PORTER, GEORGE F., Chicago. 
150 specimens wind-polished pebbles — Musk Rat Canyon, Wyo. 
STE. GENEVIEVE LIME COMPANY, St. Louis, Mo. 

3 specimens lime and limestone — Ste. Genevieve, Mo. 
THURSTON, DR. FREDUS A., Chicago. 

1 specimen stratified clay — Parry Sound, Ont. 

TITANIUM ALLOY MANUFACTURING COMPANY, Niagara Falls, New 
York. 

2 specimens ferro-titanium alloys, 1 specimen metallic titanium. 
TRANSVAAL CONSOLIDATED LAND AND EXPLORATION COMPANY, 

LTD., Johannesburg, So. Africa. 
9 specimens tin ores — Mbabane, Swaziland, So. Africa. 
U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM, Washington, D. C. 

1 etched section of Dalton meteorite — Dalton, Ga. (exchange). 
71 grams Lake Okechobee meteorite — Lake Okechobee, Fla. (exchange). 
UNITED STATES TUNGSTEN CORPORATION, Ely, Nevada. 

1 specimen rich tungsten ore — Ely, Nev. 
WESTON, RALPH C, Los Angeles, Cal. 

1 specimen gold ore — Oatman District, Ariz. 

9 specimens rocks and minerals — Oatman District, Ariz. 
WHITEHALL, C. C, Silver City, New Mexico. 

4 specimens invertebrate fossils — Silver City, New Mexico. 
WISCONSIN ZINC COMPANY, Platteville, Wis. 

2 specimens blende and galena — Empire Mine, Platteville, Wis. 
WOODVILLE LIME AND CEMENT COMPANY, Toledo, Ohio. 

3 specimens limestone and lime — Woodville, Ohio. 
ZAAIPLAATS TIN MINING COMPANY, LTD., Sterkwater, Potgietersrust, 

Transvaal, So. Africa. 
16 specimens tin ores — Sterkwater, Potgietersrust, Transvaal, So. Africa. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

ARGENTINE COMMISSION, PANAMA-PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL 
EXPOSITION, San Francisco, Cal. 

76 birds, 1 mammal — Argentina, So. Amer. 

57 mammal skins — Argentina, So. Amer. 
AVINOFF, ANDREW, New York City. 

17 butterflies — Kashmir, India (exchange). 



n8 M . V. 

I ' Lacon. Ill 

BRANDLB 

I ww . Ia\cc C n. 

ragua. 

ragua. 

U ju 

wths — various localities (cichan,; 

a. 

D< 

t scorpion — C 

ROM, : BE, B 

i 

i 

8 specimens shell lonehar 

:.n M N ITURAL B RY. 

hasee: 
I .'. 

I ■*£ Aq rni I OB udnHM - M . : tfM ir. 
u ; • - i -. ■-• i'. :2 mamma!' hoi — Bolivia. 

.nous r pe. 

3 weaver \ nbala. The 

»res — Kansas. 
PRIES.- 

i icago. 

«nedary — Damascus. 

FIEI.: 
•jo. 
'iea, beetles, sawfljcs ar. -.sects - 

•icisco. CaJ. 

1 beetle and I vd . -Los A nfdea and Orange < rk. Gal 

R, BERTH hicago. 

2 beetles — China. 

-.icago. 
litis— E 

LILJE1 hicago. 

8 moths and beetles — Northern Illinois and Indiana. 
LIN hkago. 



Jan., 191 7. Annual Report of the Director. 119 

MAIN, W. W., Maryhill, Washington. 

I nighthawk and cliff swallow's nest and eggs — Maryhill, Wash. 
McGRANER, A. C, Ancon, Panama. 

1 scorpion and 5 snakes — head waters of Chagres River, Panama. 
OWEN, CHARLES L., Chicago. 

9 beetles — Chicago. 
OWEN, V. W., Los Angeles, Cal. 

14 dragonnies, bugs, grasshopper and katydid — Cochise Co., Ariz. 
PRAY, L. L., Chicago. 

1 raccoon and one black squirrel (exchange). 
SKINNER, MRS. JANE B., Chicago. 

1 mounted peacock. 

SODERBERG. MISS ELSIE, Chicago, 
1 King Rail — Chicago. 

STAUFFER, D. L., Chicago. 

1 Diamond rattlesnake — near San Antonio, Tex. 

STODDARD, H. L., Chicago. 

1 Long-tailed Jaeger — Dune Park, Porter Co., Ind. 
3 cicadas — Miller, Indiana. 

STUMP, MRS. H. E., Chicago. 

2 mounted California quail. 

WALKER, ERNEST P., Wrangell, Alaska. 
37 Alaskan mammals (exchange). 

WALTERS, L. L., Chicago. 

I chipmunk — near Jordan, Montana. 

WEBER, C. M., Balabac, P. I. 

1 mouse deer and one civet — Philippine Islands. 

WILLARD, F. C, Tombstone, Ariz. 

1 skin of fawn of white-tailed deer — near Tombstone, Arizona. 

1 assassin bug — Tombstone, Arizona. 

WILLIAMSON, E. B., Bluffton, Ind. 

2 Great-horned Owls and 1 Red-tailed Hawk. 

WOLCOTT, A. B., Chicago. 

1 fly and 1 bug — Chicago. 

WOODBURY, FRANCES S., Chicago. 
1 alligator and 1 fish — Florida. 



SECTION OF PHOTOGRAPHY 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Made by the Section: 
292 negatives of Museum specimens, etc., 860 prints and lantern slides. 
GUNSAULUS, FRANK W., Chicago. 

1796 negatives of sword guards. 
NICKERSON, MISS G., Pasadena, Calif. 

20 photographs of California Indians. 



HA L H I 

LIBRARY 

\Mriii 

VRB BY 

xdogiar 3 

 
ilA 

2 
2 
I 

2 
Lt 3 

OS Angeles 4 

too 

• ->!rrn I . (gift) . • 

I'.moaaC i 

i 

t 
6 

1 1 

O 2 

Colorado Geological S 8 

io 
Color.. 2 

i 

5 

BJj I 

<■'•:•.:•.--• •:• \ idem) ' Arts md S ica as, New Haven 

2 

Urn, H i 

W.i bwortfa A' i 

4 
K 
A>: i 

A, Tallahassee . 4 

'rtologv Tallahassee i 

>ilojrica! . Atlanta t 

HAWAII. 1 

Agricul• I lonolulu 2 

<um. Honolulu 2 

BoanJ of Agriculture and Forestry, Honolulu 1 



UN ^S,TY 0F 






U *BANA 







o 



T 



3 
O 

M 

o 

•« 



Jan., 191 7. Annual Report of the Director. 121 

IDAHO 

Inspector of Mines, Boise 1 

University of Idaho, Moscow 1 

ILLINOIS 

Art Institute of Chicago 2 

Cement World Publishing Company, Chicago (gift) 1 

Chicago Historical Society I 

Chicago Public Library 2 

Dial Publishing Company, Chicago 2 

Forest and Stream Publishing Company, Chicago 2 

Hardwood Record, Chicago (gift) 2 

Illinois Audubon Society, Chicago (gift) 1 

Inland Printer Publishing Company, Chicago 2 

John Crerar Library 1 

Kenfield- Leach Company, Chicago 2 

Lake Forest College 1 

Lewis Institute, Chicago I 

Mining World Publishing Company 2 

Newberry Library, Chicago 1 

Open Court Publishing Company, Chicago 1 

Peoria Public Library 1 

Special Park Commission, Chicago 1 

State Board of Agriculture, Springfield 4 

State Entomologist, Springfield 2 

State Geological Survey, Urbana 2 

State Historical Library, Springfield 3 

State Laboratory of Natural History, Urbana 2 

University of Chicago 5 

University of Illinois, Urbana 10 

INDIANA 

Department of Geology and Natural Resources, Indianapolis .... I 

Indiana Academy of Science, Indianapolis 1 

John Herron Art Institute, Indianapolis 2 

Notre Dame University 1 

Purdue University, Lafayette 10 

State Board of Forestry, Indianapolis (gift) 1 

IOWA 

Iowa State Horticultural Society, Des Moines 1 

State College of Agriculture, Ames 1 

State Historical Department, Des Moines 1 

University of Iowa, Iowa City 2 

KANSAS 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Manhattan 8 

State Board of Agriculture, Topeka 4 

State Historical Society, Topeka 1 

KENTUCKY 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Lexington 4 

LOUISIANA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Baton Rouge 6 

Commission Panama-Pacific International Exposition, Baton Rouge . . 1 



I . I ' ' U  ! . V. 

CotnmiMoaer of A ation. Baton Rougr i 

■U Soa< i 

■nv..ia.i -lr.4iu l 

Orooo 4 

Bow ! .; •'-:• a: k I 

I 

u 

iaa, College i 

If 2 

:r 2 

I 

M Physiological Researches. Baltimore i 

itc Board of Forest i 

v. College Pi 'k 2 

• 

Amen ' ces, Boston a8 

At- -stem . 2 

.hcrst i 

Arcrurol<y erica. Boston I 

Boston Museum of Fine Arts 2 

Boston Pul li Li! rary i 

Boston Society of I 

Garni i 

Clark Univcn -cester « 

l* c I:  .■ • S ism - 

- 

of Corr Sridge 2 

H rti ;■.••■ .2 

: Technology. Boston . i 

Peabr- i 
Peabody Museum. C. 

Peabody Museum, Salrm i 

i 

S« r-. 2 

nngfid ' .- Associ.r.i n i 

A History Museum i 

4 

-y Company. Beverly (gift) 4 

' 'oOege, Wiluamstown 2 

..i 

A, d Experiment Sution. Agricultural College 6 

-partment of Parks and Boulevards. Detroit ... 3 

i 

Gee logical and Biological 1 .arising . 3 



Jan., 1917. Annual Report of the Director. 123 

Grand Rapids Public Library 2 

Michigan College of Mines, Houghton 1 

National Educational Association of the United States, Ann Arbor . . 1 

State Board of Agriculture, Lansing 1 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 3 

MINNESOTA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, St. Paul 6 

Minneapolis Historical Society, St. Paul 2 

Minnesota Geological Survey, Minneapolis 1 

St. Paul Institute (gift) 1 

University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 3 

MISSISSIPPI * 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Agricultural College 1 

Mississippi Geological Survey, Jackson 2 

MISSOURI 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Columbia 6 

Bureau of Geology and Mines, Jefferson City 2 

City Art Museum, St. Louis 2 

Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis I 

St. Louis Academy of Sciences 1 

St. Louis Mercantile Library Association 1 

St. Louis Public Library 2 

St. Louis University I 

State Historical Society, Columbia 2 

Washington University, St. Louis I 

MONTANA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Bozeman I 

Montana State University, Missoula I 

NEBRASKA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Lincoln 2 

University of Nebraska, Lincoln 2 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

College of Agriculture, Durham 4 

NEW JERSEY 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Trenton 8 

Craftsman, Eastwood (gift) 2 

Department of Conservation and Development, Trenton 1 

New Jersey Horticultural Society, Trenton 1 

Newark Museum Association (gift) 8 

Newark Public Library 1 

State Museum, Trenton 2 

Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken 1 

NEW MEXICO 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Mesilla Park 3 

Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe I 

State School of Mines, Socorro 1 

NEW YORK 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva 6 

American Geographical Society, New York City 2 



: i Natuiai Hi V 

lerican Iaititutc of Mining Eng in e ers . 
ffifiti Miucum of 

I 2 
4 

?.Uo Pu' 

•ural History 
Carnr. h 

C 

Come: "hacs 

Consr- 

i 

••.ft) 
rnation 
Muscur 

.d Association of A 

eft, New 

c 

9 
Association of . 

Z .;• .' - - :• • . V i* Y rk Citj . . . .t 

\koi.i 

Agnrultu- 

Elisha M i 

Geological and Eoon< 2 

VKOTA 

>akota. University i 

>4 
1 :*rum Association 

Cleveland Museum of Art i 

< 3ereUa ! Publi Libraty 

i 

: . ! : - - . i ':- -n:-, iti ...... I 

gi « 

College i 

e Academy of Scien c e. Columbus i 

if, 

itl 2 

mthological Club. Oberlin i 

-iment F 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF IU<N01S 

URBAN* 










Coi 



Jan., 191 7. Annual Report of the Director. 125 

OREGON 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Corvallis (gift) 5 

Fish and Game Commission, Corvallis 3 

Timberman, Portland (gift) I 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Harrisburg I 

American Entomological Society, Philadelphia 6 

American Journal of Pharmacy, Philadelphia 1 

American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia 1 

Association of Engineering Societies, Philadelphia 2 

Bryn Mawr College 1 

Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh 2 

Carnegie Library, Pittsburgh 4 

Carnegie Museum, Pittsburgh 14 

Delaware County Institute of Science, Media 1 

Engineers' Society of Western Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh 2 

Franklin Institute, Philadelphia 2 

Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art, Philadelphia ... 1 

Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences 1 

Philadelphia College of Physicians 1 

Philadelphia Commercial Museum I 

Philadelphia Numismatics and Antiquarian Society 1 

State Department of Agriculture, Harrisburg 3 

United States Indian School, Carlyle 2 

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 2 

Wagner Free Institute of Science, Philadelphia I 

Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia 6 

Wyoming Historical and Geological Society, Wilkes-Barre I 

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 

Bureau of Education, Manila 5 

Department of the Interior, Bureau of Science, Manila 8 

Philippine Library, Manila 1 

RHODE ISLAND 

Providence Public Library 1 

Roger Williams Park Museum, Providence I 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charleston Museum I 

TENNESSEE 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Nashville 2 

State Board of Entomology, Nashville 1 

TEXAS 

International Society of Archaeologists, Hico 2 

Scientific Society, San Antonio I 

Texas Folklore Society, Austin 1 

University of Texas, Austin 1 

VERMONT 

University of Vermont, Burlington 3 

VIRGINIA 

Agricultural Experiment Society, Blacksburg I 

Geological Survey, Charlottesville 2 



u6 Fir; 

imood 

  • 

•.al Academy of Science* 

'' ites Governmerr 

T VI K 
Agric <-nt Sta" 

i. Morgantown 

 
Archaeological So- 
lon College 
Geological and . History Surv< 

Mwaukee P 

ry Socv 

al Soai Una 

f Wisconsin. Madison 

Agricultural 1* -Tit Station, Laramie . 

Adams. Charlea C. Syracuse, New York 
Ames, Oakes. North Easton. Massachusetts (gift) . 
Atkinson. George P.. Ithaca, Ne» 
Atw.r 

Ayer. Mrs. Edward B ago (gift) 

ft) 

■.it 
' ndianapolis, Indiana 
Boas. Pranz. Now 

Casey. Thomas L . Washing C 

Uraers, ft) 

Qui 

Cock Boulder. Colorado . 

Cole. Pay-Cooper. Chicago 

Con- ^n Grai iceton. I -ey . 

Cook I Brunsw m Jersey 

Comings. E. K . Bloomingtnn. I p. : una (gift) 

ocago (gift 
-. Harry T . In lianapolis. Indiana (gift) 
Brans. Alexand en. Coonecticut 
Partington. Oiirer C. Chicago 
Parwell. Oiirer A.. Detroit. Michigan 
Pernald. Merr. ambridge, 
Pield. Marshall. Chicago (gift) 
Precr. Charles L.. Detroit, Michigan is 
Gerhard. William J., Chicago . . 12 



I 



Jan., 191 7. Annual Report of the Director. 127 

Gunsaulus, Frank W., Chicago (gift) 34 

Hall, Ivan C, Berkeley, California 5 

Lamb, D. S., Washington, D. C. (gift) 1 

Laufer, Berthold 10 

Le Baron, Francis, Austin, Texas (gift) I 

Magee, Charles H., Manila, Philippine Islands (gift) 1 

Mayer, Alfred G., Washington, D. C 1 

Meyer, K. F I 

Millspaugh, Charles F., Chicago 101 

Montane, Louis, Havana, Cuba (gift) 2 

Moore, Clarence B., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 2 

Morse, Edward S., Salem, Massachusetts I 

Muttkowski, Richard, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (gift) 1 

Nichols, Henry W., Chicago 4 

Osborn, Henry Fairfield, New York City (gift) 3 

Simms, Stephen C, Chicago 10 

Smith, John D., Washington, D. C. 1 

Stewart, V. B., Ithaca, New York 4 

Taubenhaus, J. J., Newark, Delaware 2 

Todd, W. E. Clyde, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 4 

Trelease, William, Urbana, Illinois I 

Weld,, Lewis W., Chicago (gift) 3 

AFRICA 

Durban Museum 3 

Geological Society, Johannesburg 1 

South African Museum, Cape Town 2 

Union of South Africa, Department of Agriculture, Pretoria .... I 

ARGENTINA . 

Museo de Farmacologia, Buenos Aires 4 

Museo de La Plata 1 

Museo Nacional, Buenos Aires I 

AUSTRALIA 

Australian Museum, Sydney 3 

Australian Ornithologists' Union, Melbourne 1 

Botanic Gardens and Government Domains, Sydney 2 

Department of Agriculture, Adelaide 2 

Department of Agriculture, Hobart, Tasmania 1 

Department of Agriculture, Melbourne 1 

Department of Agriculture, Sydney 2 

Department of Fisheries, Sydney 1 

Department of Mines, Sydney 4 

Field Naturalists' Club, Melbourne 1 

Geological Survey, Perth 3 

Government of the Commonwealth, Melbourne 2 

Linnean Society of New South Wales, Sydney I 

Public Library, Museum and Art Gallery, Adelaide I 

Royal Society of New South Wales, Sydney 1 

Royal Society of South Asutralia, Adelaide I 

South Australian Ornithological Association, Adelaide I 



H OF IN 

4 
... , 

MIA 

"uaenschAf- -tforschung (ur Bohmen. Prague i 

BRAZIL 

3 

t.) A»jroTV>mioo dc Estado. San P.v.i! I 

> Pernambucano, Recife <g\ i 

i 

-partment of Agriculture. Ottawa 16 

Dcpartmc ria 

• i" • *heries. Ottawa 3 

3 

Departmc- Victoria i 

Department of the Intenor. Geological Surv- ** 

uxnotogica] -.irio. Toronto 

'ucatiou. Toron*. 
Natural History Socic  -w Bm- ,hn 

e Canadien. Quebec 
in Institute of J 
mismatic and Antiquarian Society real 

•awa F-. 

Museum, \ 

adian Institute. Toronto . !5 

of Toronto 3 

CENTRA \ 

i 

Colon- ' ' *mm 3 

Royal Botanic Garden. Perademya t 

B ibhota ca Naoonal, Santaig 3 

Botanical and Forestry Department. i 
Rrral Asiatic Soc: na Branch. Shanghai 
DENMARK 

Acad* .ale des Sciences et des Lettrea de Danemark. Cnpmhagtr i 

lenskabernes SeUkab. Copenhafen i 

.: ' 3 

•itti Botamque de Copenhagen 3 

University. Zoological Museum, Copenhagen i 

■PT 

i 
Surrey Department. Cairo i 

Uiropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland. London > 

-imolea- d History Society of Osiordshire. Oxford i 

B- •. I Museum and Art Gallery i 

Association for the Advancement of Science. London 3 






Jan., 1917. Annual Report of the Director. 129 

British Museum (Natural History), London 7 

Cambridge Antiquarian Society I 

Cambridge Philosophical Society 1 

Cambridge University Library 18 

Cardiff Naturalists' Society 2 

Dove Marine Laboratory, Cullercoats, Northumberland 1 

Free Public Museum, Liverpool * 

Great Britain Geological Survey, London 1 

Imperial Bureau of Entomology, London 2 

Imperial College of Science and Technology, London I 

Lancashire Sea Fisheries Laboratory, Liverpool 1 

Linnean Society, London 3 

Liverpool Biological Society l 

Liverpool Marine Biological Station * 

Manchester Field Naturalists' and Archaeologists' Society I 

Oxford Delegates of University Museum 1 

Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew 2 

Royal Geographical Society, London 2 

Royal Horticultural Society, London 1 

Royal Society, London 2 

Royal Society of Arts, London .... 2 

South London Entomological and Natural History Society, London . . 1 

Tring Zoological Museum 1 

Wellcome Historical Medical Museum, London 2 

FRANCE 

Academie des Sciences, Paris 2 

Ecole d'Anthropologie, Paris l 

La Nature, Paris 2 

Soci6t(§ de Gebgraphie, Toulouse I 

Societe des Sciences Naturelles, La Rochelle 2 

Socicte" Nationale d 'Agriculture, Paris l 

GERMANY 

Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Anthropologic, Ethnologie und Urgs., Berlin . 1 

Deutsche Morganlandische Gesellschaft, Halle 23 

Geographische Gesellschaft, Munich 1 

Gesellschaft fur Erdkunde, Leipzig l 

K. Bibliothek, Berlin l 

K. Museum fur Volkerkunde, Berlin 2 

K. Sammlungen fur Kunst und Wissenschaft, Dresden 2 

Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein fur Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel .... 1 

Naturwissenschaftliche Wochenschrift, Jena x 

Stadtisches Museum fur Volkerkunde, Leipzig l 

Universitats Bibliothek, Giessen 5 

Verein fur Vaterlandische Naturkunde in Wurttemberg, Stuttgart . . . 1 

Verein fur Volkskunde, Berlin J 

INDIA 

Anthropological Society, Bombay l 

Archaeological Survey, Burma l 

Archaeological Survey, Calcutta 6 

Archaeological Survey, Peshawar l 






ijo !•':! " I HlSTOBY K» POBT V. 

Colon • t 

nartmcnt of A, c, Bombay t 

Department of Ajjnc-ultir i 

: ..i I 

<>logicai . Calcutta | 

I ' idras 4 

In.lsan Mu.rum. Calcutta 8 

National 1 Calcutta (gift) • 

(Calcutta . . . | 

.yal As: . .... i ; 

is. Calcutta 3 

La j 

IRI 



Irish Acad< 2 



> Zoologico, Naples 

. ituralc. Genoa 

R. Accademia 

. 
R ' -eo Zoo'. 

ilisti. N  
St- -njrafica It.. 

ina. Rome 

. 
Societi n 

i Rnmana d» A: 
scana di Scicnr 
Univenrita Pavia. Istituto Botan. Milan 

JAI 

Anthropological S 

Hurra istry Pormosa nent. Tathoku 

Geolofica! r, Tokyo 

Imperial University of Tokyo. Collrj; • I 

al Soar* . 

JAVA 

Bataviaasch Genootachar Vetcnschappen. Baiavia . 

I Hrpartment o{ Agriculture. Buitemorg 
Jardin Botaniquc , 

'■• 

Instit-:' M 

'reolofir 

i " Antonio Alxate," Mexico 

' 

-.offraphsch Museum. Leiden 

Rij M -cum ran Natu' Laidan . 

Rik* Geologisch Mineralogisch Museum. Leiden . 
ids Bihiiotheek. Haarlem . . 






> 

X 
X 

LU 

I- 
< 



co 

I- 
<r 
O 

Q- 



f, 




CO 

LU 

z 
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0. 



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Q. 

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Jan., 191 7. Annual Report of the Director. 131 

NEW ZEALAND 

Auckland Institute and Museum, Wellington 1 

Department of Agriculture, Wellington 3 

Department of Mines, Wellington 4 

Dominion Museum, Wellington 1 

PERU 

Cuerpo de Ingenieros de Minas, Lima I 

SCOTLAND 

Dumfriesshire and Galloway Natural History and Antiquarian Society, 

Dumfries I 

Fisheries Board, Edinburgh 2 

Geological Society, Edinburgh 1 

Royal Botanic Society, Edinburgh 1 

Royal Society, Edinburgh 2 

SPAIN 

Institute Nacional de Ciencias Fisico-Naturales, Madrid 3 

Junta de Ciencias Naturales, Barcelona I 

Museo de Ciencias Naturales, Madrid 1 

R. Academia de Ciencias, Madrid 2 

Sociedad Espanola de Historia Natural, Madrid 2 

SWEDEN 

K. Biblioteket, Stockholm 3 

K. Svenska Vetenskapsakademien, Stockholm 1 

K. Vitt. Hist, och Antik. Akademien, Stockholm 1 

Svenska Sallskapet for Antropologi och Geografi, Stockholm 

Upsala University 1 

SWITZERLAND 

Geographisch-Ethnographische Gesellschaft, Zurich I 

Musee d'Histoire Naturelle, Lausanne I 

Musee Ethnographique, Neuchatel I 

Musee Zoologique, Lausanne I 

Naturforschende Gesellschaft, Basel 1 

Ostschweizerische Geograph.-Commerc. Gesellschaft, St. Gallen ... 1 

Society de Physique et d'Histoire Naturelle, Geneva 2 

Soci6t6 des Sciences Naturelles, Fribourg 1 

Society Neuchateloise de G6ographie 2 

Universitat, Bern 8 

WEST INDIES 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Porto Rico I 

Biblioteca Nacional., Havana 1 

Department of Agriculture, Kingston 1 

Estacion Central Agronomico, Santiago de las Vegas 2 

Imperial Department of Agriculture, Barbadoes 2 

Jamaica Institute, Kingston 1 

Trinidad and Tobago Department of Agriculture, Port of Spain 

Universidad de la Habana, Havana 2 

Brazil, Vital, Sao Paulo, Brazil (gift) I 

Codazzi, Ricardo L., Bogota, Colombia 2 

Carpenter, G. H., Dublin, Ireland 1 



it K ! V. 

C& i 

r 4 

l 

"• '■ 3 

1 

k 1. . 1 

Thotn-i n<loo. 1 3 

1 

4 

■i!y 1 

S-.-r. • ••■ . ! 1  V l n Carl , R I [aocii Brasil i 



Jan., 191 7. Annual Report of the Director. 133 



Articles of Incorporation 



: 



STATE OF ILLINOIS. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE. 

William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State. 

To All To Whom These Presents Shall Come, Greeting: 

Whereas, a Certificate duly signed and acknowledged having been filed in the 
office of the Secretary of State, on the 16th day of September, a. d., 1893, for the 
organization of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO, under and in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of "An Act Concerning Corporations," approved 
April 18, 1872, and in force July 1, 1872, and all acts amendatory thereof, a copy 
of which certificate is hereto attached. 

Now, therefore, I, William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State of the State of 
Illinois, by virtue of the powers and duties vested in me by law, do hereby certify 
that the said COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO is a legally organized 
Corporation under the laws of this State. 

In Testimony Whereof, I hereto set my hand and cause to be affixed the Great 
Seal of the State. Done at the City of Springfield, this 16th day of September, 
in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three, and of the 
Independence of the United States the one hundred and eighteenth. 

W. H. HINRICHSEN, 
[Seal.] Secretary of State. 



TO HON. WILLIAM H. HINRICHSEN, 

Secretary of State: 
Sir: 

We, the undersigned citizens of the United States, propose to form a corpora- 
tion under an act of the General Assembly of the State of Illinois, entitled "An 
Act Concerning Corporations," approved April 18, 1872, and all acts amendatory 
thereof; and that for the purposes of such organization we hereby state as follows, 
to wit: 

1. The name of such corporation is the "COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF 
HCAGO." 

2. The object for which it is formed is for the accumulation and dissemina- 
ion of knowledge, and the preservation and exhibition of objects illustrating Art, 

Archaeology, Science, and History. 

3. The management of the aforesaid Museum shall be vested in a Board of 
Fifteen (15) Trustees, five of whom are to be elected every year. 

4. The following named persons are hereby selected as the Trustees for the 
first year of its corporate existence: 



PlXLD Ml KAI HlSTOlY — R? V. 

• 
L llu Roche. ! 

Jar 
and Frank V. 

S Museum is unty of Cook, 

i». 

'0. 

m. Robert 
I ' icking- 

ha: M. (,''...- n«in H Knhlsaat, 

try H. I t H. Head 

», Thomas B. Bryao. 
L Z. I .;. Jarnr- '. • George 

P Bia igg, Owen 

■Mad \\ James II . i and B. But 

Jo 1 -x>y 

M!ack. Jno. J George 

Walker. 
;. Jamo- worth. William E. Hal 

T : • ' .n. II : 

'.rmour. 



- Ii • 

TV / 



 

I.d R UBix. a Not\r > for said County, do hereby cer 

that the foregoing ners personally appeared before me and acknowledged 

the foregoing {• free an tary act for 

uses and purposes I forth. 

I seal th -*J3. 

Ml 
|S«al] tabv Pobuc, Cook C< 



'• 



to a resolution passed at a meeting of nibers odd 

M was chanced 

ite to this effect was filed June 
1894 SecrcU 



' 



Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the Corporate members held 
the 8th day of 

was changed t^ FIE! certificate 

to this effect was filed November e office of the Secretary of State 

for Illinois. 



Jan., 1917. Annual Report of the Director. 135 



AMENDED BY-LAWS. 



(June 12, 1916.) 



ARTICLE I. 

MEMBERS. 

Section i. Members shall be of five classes, Annual Members, Corporate 
Members, Life Members, Patrons, and Honorary Members. 

Sec. 2. Annual members shall consist of such persons as are selected from time 
to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, and who shall pay an annual 
fee of ten dollars ($10.00), payable within thirty days after notice of election, and 
within thirty days after each recurring annual date. The failure of any person to 
make such initiatory payment and such annual payments within said time shall, at 
the option of the Board of Trustees, be sufficient grounds for the forfeiture of an 
annual membership. 

This said annual membership shall entitle the member to: 
First. — Free admittance for the member and family, to the Museum on any day. 
Second. — Ten tickets every year, admitting the bearer to the Museum on pay 
days. 

Third. — A copy of all publications of the Museum when requested. 
Fourth. — Invitations to all special exhibits, receptions, lectures, or other func- 
tions which may be given at the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The Corporate Members shall consist of the persons named in the 
articles of incorporation, and of such other persons as shall be chosen from time to 
time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, upon the recommendation of the 
Executive Committee; provided, that such persons named in the articles of incorpora- 
tion shall, within ninety days from the adoption of these By-Laws, and persons 
hereafter chosen as Corporate Members shall, within ninety days of their election, 
pay into the treasury the sum of twenty dollars ($20.00) or more. The failure of 
any person to make such payment within said time shall, at the option of the Board 
of Trustees, be ground for forfeiture of his corporate membership. Corporate 
Members becoming Life Members, Patrons or Honorary Members shall be exempt 
from dues. Annual meetings of said Corporate Members shall be held at the same 
place and on the same day that the annual meeting of the Board of Trustees is held. 
Sec. 4. Any person paying into the treasury the sum of five hundred dollars 
($500.00), at any one time, shall, upon the unanimous vote of the Board, become 
a Life Member. Life Members shall be exempt from all dues. 

Sec. 5. Patrons shall be chosen by the Board upon recommendation of the 
Executive Committee from among persons who have rendered eminent service to the 
Museum. They shall be exempt from all dues, and, by virtue of their election as 
Patrons, shall also be Corporate Members. 



136 Field M *l Histoiv 

\iaoanrf Manbffi shall h»- 
who 
of the Exc< t* Thry shall be exempt from all due*. 

AR II. 

board or nonm 
Ssct i »M l B >ard of Trustee* shall consist o' 

ftheB *e who shall hereafter he dectr 

hold of 1 cancies occurn: .ird shall be filled at a regular 

Committee made at a 

preceding regular met- r - 1 of the Board prisat 

Sac. 2 Rswjsjftf BsMttoga . ■'. shall be held on the serood Monday 

of each month. Special meetings may br >ident. aad 

.11 be cm! ;uest of Trustees. 1 

Trustees shall constitute a .fncers or the adoption 

of t :al Budget, when seven Trustees shall be requ 

adjourned by any less number from day to d to a day fixed, previ ous to the 

.rular meeting. 

Reasonable writ' • •lace of holding 

i. shall be | 



ARTICLE III 

■oviAiY rat 

now | As a mark of respect, and in ap; 
the Institution, those Trustees who by reason of r, on account of chang- 

residen her cause, or from indisposition to serve longer in such capa* 

shall resign their p'..ire up^n the Board, may be elected, by a majority of those 
present at any regular meeting of the Board, an Honorary Truster Such 

Honorary Trustee will receive notice of all meetings itoard of Trustees. 

whether regular or special, and -xpected u> be present at all such meetings and 

participate in I -orations thereof . but an Honorary Trustee shall n the 

njrht to vote. 

ARTICLE IV. 

OffKBM 

Section i. The officers shall be a President, a 1 "resident, a Second 

- -President, a Secretary, an Assists -tary. and a Treasurer. They shall be 

chosen by ballot by the Board of Trustees, a ma I those pre* 

being necessary to eJc« Second 

•President shall be chosen from among the members of the Board of Trustees. 

The meeting for the election of officers shall be hi he second Monday 

uary of each year, and shall be called the Ann- 
Sac 2 The officers shall hold office for one ye- r su cces s o r s are 

elected and qualified, but any officer may be r e m ov e d at any regular me> 

Board of Trustees by a vote of two-thirds of all the members of the Board. Va c an cies 

in any office may be filled by the Board at any meeting. 

Sac. 3. The officers shall perform such duties as ordinarily appertain to their 

respective offices, and such as shall be prescribed by the By-Laws, or designated from 

time to time by the Board of Trustees. 



Jan., 1917. Annual Report of the Director. 137 

ARTICLE V. 

THE TREASURER. 

Section i. The Treasurer shall be custodian of the funds of the Corporation, 
except as hereinafter provided. He shall make disbursements only upon warrants 
drawn by the Director and countersigned by the President. In the absence or 
inability of the Director, warrants may be signed by the Chairman of the Finance 
Committee, and in the absence or inability of the President, may be countersigned 
by one of the Vice-Presidents. But no warrants shall be issued, except in conformity 
with a regularly prepared voucher, giving the name of the payee and stating the 
occasion for the expenditure, and verified and approved as hereinafter prescribed. 
It shall be no part of the duties of the Treasurer to see that the warrants have been 
issued in conformity with such vouchers. 

Sec. 2. The securities and muniments of title belonging to the corporation shall 
be placed in the custody of some Trust Company of Chicago to be designated by the 
Board of Trustees, which Trust Company shall collect the income and principal of 
said securities as the same become due, and pay same to the Treasurer, except as 
hereinafter provided. Said Trust Company shall allow access to and deliver any or 
all securities or muniments of title to the joint order of the following officers, namely: 
The President or one of the Vice-Presidents, jointly with the Chairman, or one of 
the Vice-Chairmen, of the Finance Committee of the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The Treasurer shall give bond in such amount, and with such sureties, 
as shall be approved by the Board of Trustees. 

Sec. 4. All vouchers executed for the payment of liabilities incurred in the 
administration of the Museum, shall be verified by the Auditor, and approved for 
payment by the Director, and the Chairman of the Administration Committee. 
All vouchers executed for expenditures for the construction or reconstruction of the 
Museum building, or buildings, shall be verified by the Auditor and approved for 
payment by the Chairman of the Building Committee. All vouchers executed in 
connection with the investments of the Corporation, or in any way having to do 
with the endowment funds of the Corporation, shall be verified by the Auditor and 
approved for payment by the Chairman of the Finance Committee. 

Sec. 5. The Harris Trust and Savings Bank of Chicago shall be Custodian of 
"The N. W. Harris Public School Extension of Field Museum" fund. The Bank 
shall make disbursements only upon warrants drawn by the Director and counter- 
signed b3 r the President. In the absence or inability of the Director, warrants may 
be signed by the Chairman of the Finance Committee, and in the absence or inability 
of the President, may be countersigned by one of the Vice-Presidents. But no 
warrant shall be issued except in conformity with a regularly prepared voucher, 
giving the name of the payee and stating the occasion for the expenditure, and veri- 
fied and approved by the Auditor, the Director and Chairman of the Administration 
Committee. It shall be no part of the duties of the said Custodian to see that the 
warrants have been issued in conformity with such vouchers. 

ARTICLE VI. 

THE DIRECTOR. 

Section i. The Board of Trustees shall elect a Director of the Museum, who 
shall remain in office until his successor shall be elected. He shall have immediate 
charge and supervision of the Museum, and shall control the operations of the insti- 
tution, subject to the authority of the Board of Trustees and its Committees. The 



Pn i D MUSEUM N . — Ki . V. 

r sh.il! im of commur 

ic mo: 'cc 

There lb. i departments of rum — An' 

rge of a Curator, subject to 

:oo 

! shall sen he pleasure of I 

officers -partments shall be appointed 

recommendation • uraiors of the 

respect'. Is. Th r shall hav mploy and r emove 

all 

The I Hoard at each regular mer* 

rec' the operations f the M - h. At the Annual 

^. the Director reviewing the work of the 

r the previous year, wh -hall be published in pamphlet 

Trustees and Member ■■*: distribution 

in such number as the Bo> ect. 

. :i. 

R. 

ROM I The Board shall appoint an A who shall hold his office dt: 

Me shall keep proper books of account, setting f 

M and 

report ' ■:. and a* H may be required 

Hesha less of all vouchers for the exp<: 

of the mor. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

COMUI 

n N i There shall be six Coi I ling. A' 

Sf 
three members, and th on Committees shall each 

of five members. All members of these five Committees shall be elected by ballot 
bytheBoa- car, and until t : 

successors are < r% of these Com- 

Board an and airman by the order in w: 

. the respective Cor ember named shall 

be Ch.i '.he second named the Vice-O and th. named. Second 

i cession to the -> order in the event of 

an. 

tee shall consist of the President of the Board. 

the -.cc Con tee. 

the utn of  man of the Auditing 

Cc- nan of the Pension Cor and two other members of the 

ballot at the Annual V 
ibers shall constitute a quorum of the Executive Committee; 
three members shall constitute a quorum of the Administration Committee, and 
Ul other standing Committees, two members shall constitute a quorum. In the 
event that, owing to the absence or inability of members, a quorum of the regul. 



Jan., 1917. Annual Report of the Director. 139 

elected members cannot be present at any meeting of any Committee, then the 
Chairman thereof, or his successor, as herein provided, may summon any member of 
the Board of Trustees to act in place of the absentee. 

Sec. 5. The Finance Committee shall have supervision of investing the en- 
dowment and other permanent funds of the Corporation, and the care of such real 
estate as may become its property. It shall have authority to invest, sell, and 
reinvest funds, subject to the approval of the Board. 

Sec. 6. The Building Committee shall have supervision of the construc- 
tion, reconstruction, and extension of any and all buildings used for Museum 
purposes. 

Sec. 7. The Executive Committee shall be called together from time to time 
as the Chairman may consider necessary, or as he may be requested to do bv three 
members of the Committee, to act upon such matters affecting the administration 
of the Museum as cannot await consideration at the Regular Monthly Meetings of 
the Board of Trustees. It shall, before the beginning of each fiscal year, prepare 
and submit to the Board an itemized Budget, setting forth the probable receipts 
from all sources for the ensuing year, and make recommendations as to the ex- 
penditures which should be made for routine maintenance and fixed charges. Upon 
the adoption of the Budget by the Board, the respective Committees shall be con- 
sidered as authorized to make the expenditures detailed therein. No increase in 
the expenditures under any items of the Budget shall be made, except by authority 
of the Board of Trustees, but the Executive Committee shall have authority, in 
cases of emergency, to expend a further total sum not exceeding two thousand 
dollars in any one month. 

Sec. 8. The Administration Committee shall have general supervision of the 
affairs of the Museum. The Committee shall hold one meeting each month with 
the Director at the Museum within a week preceding each Monthly Meeting of 
the Board of Trustees. 

Sec. 9. The Auditing Committee shall have supervision over all accounting 
and bookkeeping, and full control of the financial records. It shall cause the same, 
once each year, or oftener, to be examined by an expert individual or firm, and shall 
transmit the report of such expert individual or firm to the Board at the next ensuing 
regular meeting after such examination shall have taken place. 

Sec. 10. The Pension Committee shall determine by such means and processes 
as shall be established by the Board of Trustees to whom and in what amount the 
Pension Fund shall be distributed. These determinations or findings shall be subject 
to the approval of the Board of Trustees. 

Sec. 11. The Chairman of each Committee shall report the acts and proceed- 
ings thereof at the next ensuing regular meeting of the Board. 

Sec. 12. The President shall be ex-officio a member of all Committees and Chair- 
man of the Executive Committee. Vacancies occurring in any Committee may be 
filled by ballot at any regular meeting of the Board. 

ARTICLE IX. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE. 

Section 1. At the November meeting of the Board, each year, a Nominating 
Committee of three shall be chosen by lot. Said Committee shall make nomina- 
tions for membership of the Finance Committee, the Building Committee, the Ad- 
ministration Committee, the Auditing Committee, and the Pension Committee, and 



Mo V. 

- wo mc- -n among the Trustees, to be sub- 

upoo at the following Annual 
K' . January. 

AK 

< i Whenever the word "Mum e-1 in I ijwt of 

the rhtch the Mu -rum as an 

is located and operate tl m »t 

collections, or in storage, fur- ires, cases, tools, records, books, and all 

searches, installations. 
. lecture courses, and all 

Sec. 3. Thes' nded a* .;ular meeting of the Board 

of Trustees by a two ' 'if all the members present, provided the amend* 

ment shall have been proposed at a ; rig regular meeting. 



""'VBWiry of , LLIN0/S 
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Jan., 1917. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



141 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 

edward e. ayer charles b. cory 

mrs. timothy b. blackstone harlow n. higinbotham 

Stanley Mccormick 

DECEASED, 1916. 

NORMAN W. HARRIS 



PATRONS. 



ALLISON V. ARMOUR 
EDWARD B. BUTLER 
ALBERT M. COLLINS 
LEE GARNET DAY 
ERNEST R. GRAHAM 
FRANK W. GUNSAULUS 
CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON 
VERNON SHAW KENNEDY 

DECEASED, 

NORMAN W. 



GEORGE MANIERRE 
CHARLES H. MARKHAM 
JOHN S. MILLER 
JOHN BARTON PAYNE 
HOMER E. SARGENT 
FREDERICK J. V. SKIFF 
WILLARD A. SMITH 

1916. 
HARRIS 



t4-' Pixld Museum oi Natueai Histoby — Rspoii I v. 



COI«T( IRATE MEMBEF 



ALD1 v i>\V . 

MOUR, ' N V 

AY: WARD B 

BARXLBTT, A 

MR. W . P. 

HITLER. •:!) B 

CUM.MKK^ W J. 
CHATPSLD-I 
\KK. JOHN M 

BBRT M 
BARD T. 

PAY. ; \RNKT 

 

TH. JAMK -V 

ILD, HBNRY 

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ORAHAN R 

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HIGINI " H N 

 

ARTHUR B 
CHAUN 

DY, v: HAW 

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B 
RKHAM. CHARLES H 
I NIBRi 
MII.I.KR. JOHN 
MTTCHBLL, JOHN 

UN BAR" 

RTBR, p 

RVI V MARTIN A 

NT. HOMBB 
PRBDBR1 V 

:th. wim.ard 

  tm 
MBLVIL1 . 



DECEASED 1916, 

LATHROP. PRY 



Jan., 191 7. Annual Report of the Director. 



i43 



LIFE MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, GEORGE E. 
ALDIS, OWEN F. 
ALLEN, BENJAMIN 

BANKS, ALEXANDER F. 
BARRELL, FINLEY 
BARRETT, MRS. A. D. 
BARRETT, ROBERT L. 
BARTLETT, A. C. 
BASSFORD, LOWELL C. 
BEALE, WILLIAM G. 
BILLINGS, FRANK 
BLACKSTONE, MRS. TIMOTHY B. 
BLAINE, MRS. EMMONS 
BLAIR, HENRY A. 
BLAIR, WATSON F. 
BOOTH, VERNON 
BOYNTON, C. T. 
BREWSTER, WALTER S. 
BROWN, WILLIAM L. 
BUFFINGTON, EUGENE J. 
BUTLER, EDWARD B. 
BYLLESBY, H. M. 

CARR, CLYDE M. 
CARRY, EDWARD F. 
CARTON, L. A. 
CHALMERS, WILLIAM J. 
CLAY, JOHN 
COBE, IRA M. 
CRAMER, CORWITH 
CRANE, CHARLES RICHARD 
CRANE, RICHARD T. 
CUDAHY, JOSEPH M. 
CUMMINGS, D. MARK 
CURTIS, MRS. ROBERT 

DAU, J. J. 

DAWES, CHARLES G. 
DAY, ALBERT M. 
DEERING, CHARLES 
DEERING, JAMES 
DELANO, FREDERIC A. 
DICK, ALBERT BLAKE 
DONNELLEY, REUBEN H. 
DONNELLEY, THOMAS E. 
DRAKE, TRACY C. 

ECKHART, B. A. 

FAIR, ROBERT M. 
FARWELL, WALTER 
FAY, C. N. 
FIELD, HENRY 



FIELD, MARSHALL 
FIELD, STANLEY 
FORSYTH, ROBERT 
FRANTZIUS, FRITZ VON 
FULLER, WILLIAM A. 

GARTZ, A. F. 
GARY, JOHN W. 
GRISCOM, CLEMENT A. 
GROMMES, JOHN B. 

HAMILL, ERNEST A. 
HILL, LOUIS W. 
HOROWITZ, L. J. 
HOXIE, MRS. JOHN R. 
HUGHITT, MARVIN 
HULBURD, CHARLES H. 
HUTCHINSON, C. L. 

INSULL, SAMUEL 
ISHAM, MRS. KATHERINE 
PORTER 

johnson, mrs. elizabeth ayer 
johnson, frank s. 
jones, arthur b. 

keep, chauncey 

kelley, william v. 

king, francis 

king, james g. 

kirk, walter radcliffe 

lamont, robert p. 
lawson, victor 
logan, spencer h. 

Mccormick, mrs. 
Mccormick, cyrus h. 
Mccormick, harold f. 

McELWEE, ROBERT H. 
McLENNAN, D. R. 
MacVEAGH, FRANKLIN 
MARK, CLAYTON 
MASON, WILLIAM S. 
MITCHELL, J. J. 
MUNROE, CHARLES A. 

NEWELL, A. B. 

ORR, ROBERT M. 

PAM, MAX 
PATTEN, HENRY J. 



Pn i n Mi I rt'RAi History — R 



pii 

H II 

PRBDBRICK H. 

.... 

II. 

ROBIN 

R< 
Rl 

RY1 
RYI 
RYER 



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A 
I) P. 
CARRIE H. 

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THORNS, CHARLES 11 

R. 
TH'»R- RT J. 






< II. 



Jan., 1917. Annual Report of the Director. 



145 



ANNUAL MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, CYRUS H. 
ADAMS, MILWARD 
ALLERTON, ROBERT H. 
ARMOUR, GEORGE A. 

BAILEY, EDWARD P. 
BECKER, A. G. 
BILLINGS, C. K. G. 
BILLINGS, DR. FRANK 
BOAL, CHARLES T. 
BROWN, WILLIAM L. 
BURLEY, CLARENCE A. 

COMSTOCK, WILLIAM C. 
COONLEY-WARD, MRS. L. A. 
CUMMINGS, E. A. 
CURTIS, D. H. 

DAY, A. M. 
DEERING, JAMES 

EISENDRATH, W. N. 

FAIR, R. M. 
FORGAN, JAMES B. 
FORSYTH, ROBERT 
FRANK, HENRY L. 
FULLER, O. F. 
FURST, CONRAD 

GAYLORD, FREDERIC 
GLESSNER, J. J. 
GOODRICH, A. W. 
GORDON, EDWARD K. 
GREY, CHARLES F. 
GURLEY, W. W. 

HARRIS, GEORGE B. 
HARRIS, JOHN F. 
HASKELL, FREDERICK T. 
HIBBARD, WILLIAM G., Jr. 
HITCHCOCK, R. M. 
HOLT, GEORGE H. 



HOPKINS, JOHN P. 

INSULL, SAMUEL 

JENKINS, GEORGE H. 
JONES, J. S. 

KEITH, W. SCOTT 
KIMBALL, EUGENE S. 
KIMBALL, MRS. MARK 

LAMB, FRANK H. 
LAY, A. TRACY 
LEE, BLEWETT 
LEIGH, EDWARD B. 
LINCOLN, ROBERT T. 
LINN, W. R. 
LOGAN, F. G. 
LORD, J. B. 
LOWDEN, FRANK O. 
LYTTON, HENRY C. 

McCREA, W. S. 
McWILLIAMS, LAFAYETTE 
MacFARLAND, HENRY J. 
MAGEE, HENRY W. 
MANSURE, E. L. 
MAYER, LEVY 
MERRYWEATHER, GEORGE 
MEYER, MRS. M. A. 
MOORE, N. G. 
MULLIKEN, A. H. 

NATHAN, ADOLPH 
NOLAN, JOHN H. 
NORTON, O. W. 

OSBORN, HENRY A. 

PALMER, PERCIVAL B. 
PARKER, FRANCIS W. 
PEARSON, EUGENE H. 
PINKERTON, W. A. 



146 M M \\rtK\l HlSTOlY — K t i 



  

Rir: P 

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s 

" »K. J 

'■ T. 

111! 



SCHMIDT, DR L 
\ 
IPP, MB 
SHBDD, |OHN 

RTALL, JOHN 
SKINNER. THE M 
•PER, J • M P 

[WELL II 



KER. K 

WALKER, wii.t.IAM B 

:.li:k. 
WHITE " RD 

WHITEHEAD 
WIL 
WI1 H. 



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