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Full text of "Annual report of the Director to the Board of Trustees for the year ..."

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i3lQ Field Muslum of Natural History. 

A Publication 20s. 

Vol. V. No. 5. 



Report Series. 



to 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 1919. 




Chicago, U. S. A. 
January, 1920. 



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Field Museum of Natural History. 

Publication 205. 

Report Series. Vol. V, No. 5, 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 1919. 




THE LIBRARY OF TKc 

JAN 2 .1 ^9t0 

'JNIVERSITY OF ILLINOI.^ 

Chicago, U. S. A. 

January, 1920. 



f ^ 5 




CONTENTS. 



Page 

Board of Trastees 300 

Officers and Committees 301 

Staff of the Museimi 302 

Report of the Director 303 

Maintenance 306 

Publications 306 

Library 307 

Cataloguing, Inventorying, and Labeling 308 

Accessions 310 

Expeditions and Field Work 318 

Installation and Permanent Improvement '. 319 

The N, W. Harris Public School Extension 328 

Photography and Illustration 330 

Printing 330 

Financial Statement 331 

Attendance and Receipts 333 

Accessions 334 

Department of Anthropology 334 

Department of Botany 335 

Department of Geology 337 

Department of Zoology 338 

Section of Photography . . . ' 340 

The Library 340 

Articles of Incorporation 354 

Amended By-Laws 356 

List of Honorary Members and Patrons 362 

List of Corporate Members 363 

List of Life Members 364 

List of Annual Members 366 



PiCLO Nf useuM or Natusal History — Repobts, Vol. V. 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



Cdwaid E. Ayrr. 
Watson F. Blair. 
WiLUAM J. Chalmers. 
Marshall Field. 
Stanley Field. 
Frank W. Gunsaolus. 
Abtbui D. Jones. 



ClIAUNCEY Kr.FP. 

George Manifrre. 
Cyrus H. McCormick. 
Martin A. Ryerson. 
Fredkrick J. V. Skiff. 
A. A. Sprague. 
William Wrigley, Jr. 



HONORARY TRUSTbE. 
Owen F. Aldis. 



DECEASED, 1919 
Harlow N. Higinbotiiam. 



Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 



301 



OFFICERS. 

Stanley Field, President. 

Martin A, Ryerson, First Vice-President. 
Watson F. Blair, Second Vice-President. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff, Secretary. 

D. C. Davies, Assistant Secretary and Auditor. 
Solomon A. Smith, Treasurer. 



COMMITTEES. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 



Stanley Field. 
Edward E. Ayer. 
Watson F. Blair. 
William J. Chalmers. 

Watson F. Blair. 



Marshall Field. 
Arthur B. Jones. 
George Manierre. 
A. A. Sprague. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE. 



Arthur B. Jones. 
Martin A. Ryerson. 



BUILDING COMMITTEE. 

William J. Chalmers. Cyrus H. McCormick. 

Frederick J. V. Skiff. A. A. Sprague. 



Stanley Field. 



SUB-COMMITTEE OF BUILDING COMMITTEE. 

A. A. Sprague, 
Frederick J. V. Skiff. 



George Manierre. 

Edward E. Ayer. 
Watson F. Blair. 



Arthur B. Jones. 



AUDITING COMMITTEE. 

Arthur B. Jones. 

ADMINISTRATION COMMITTEE. 

Frank W. Gunsaulus. 
George Manierre. 
Chauncey Keep. 

PENSION COMMITTEE. 

A. A. Sprague. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff. 



joj Field Muscum or Natural History — Repoets, Vol. V. 



STAFF OF THE MUSEUM. 

OmCCTON. 

Frederick J- V. Skiff. 

BrtmoLD Laufer, CuraUyr. 
CiiARLES L. Owen, Assistant Curator Division of Archeology. 

Fay Cooper Cole, Assistant Curator Physical Anthropology 
and Malayan Ethnology. 
Albert B. Lewis, Assistant Curator of African and Mdatusian 

Ethnology. 
J. Alden Mason, Assistant Curator of Mexican and South 
* American Archeology. 

Helen C. Gunsaulus, Assistant Curator of Japatust 

Ethnology. 

DEPARTMENT or BOTANY. 

Charles P. Miluspaccii, Curator. 

B. E. Daiilgren, Assistant Curator Economic Botany. 

Edward T. Harper, Assistant Curator of Cryptogamic Botany. 

DEPARTMENT OF OEOLOOY. 

Oliver C. Parrincton, Cwraior. H. W. NicnoLS, Assistant Curator. 
Elmer S. Riggs, Assistant Curator of Paleontology. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOOV. 

Charles B. Cory, Curator. 
Wilfred H. Osgood, Assistant Curator of Mammalogy and OrniAelogy, 
William J. Gerhard, Assistant Curator Division of Entomology. 
Edmosd N. Gueret, Assistant Curator Division of 0st4ology. 
R. Magoon Barnes, Assistant Curator Division of Odlogy. 

TNt N. W. MAKMlS FUBiiC SCHOOL EXTCNSION. 

S. C. SiMMS, Curator. 

MKCOnOEN AMitTANT RECOMOCR. 

D. C. Da\ies. Benj. Bridge. 

THE LIBRARY. 

Hi sir LiPPiNroTT, Li^fflnaw. 

Emily M. Wilcoxson, Assistant Librarian. 
jAflOBry t. 19^0. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR. 

1919 



To the Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History: 

I have the honor to present a report of the operations of the Museum 
for the year ending December 31, 1919. 

Uncertainty as to the date of removal to the new Museum building 
in Grant Park was as far as hiunanly possible dissipated at the close 
of the year, by the joint opinion of all parties and agencies concerned 
in the big task that this movement could safely begin the latter part of 
April, and it is upon this understanding that the personnel of the 
Museum will enter the new year; with over ninety per cent of the ma- 
terial ready for transportation and the building practically completed. 
All the contracts incident to this most important work will have been 
closed dtiring January and all arrangements perfected for the building 
of spxiT tracks from the Illinois Central Railroad to platforms to be 
constructed near the openings in each building provided for forwarding 
and receiving. It is now estimated that the transfer of all properties 
may be accomplished within sixty days and that before the end of 1920 
siifficient installation will have been completed to justify admission of 
the public to at least certain sections of the new building. 

After rather protracted negotiations, but without any serious dispute, 
the contract with the Government permitting the hospitalization of the 
new Museimi building was cancelled and the Museum accepted from the 
Government an allowance as fiill satisfaction of the expenses incurred 
and additional cost imposed during the time the Government controlled 
building operations. 

Mr. James Simpson, Vice-President of Marshall Field & Company 
and for many years the confidential associate of Marshall Field, donated 
to the Museum such a simi of money as wotild be required to construct 
the large assembly hall, or auditorium, in the new building. This gift 
was accepted with expressions which the circumstance would naturally 
invite. Subsequently, it was determined to dedicate this auditorium as 
" James Simpson Theatre of Field Museimi of Natural History. " 
It will accommodate one thousand people. A stage and its ordinary 
accompaniments, foot lights, orchestra stall, etc., are included in the 

303 



304 Pitu> Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

plan. T' '-..r irr.ii::u-nl "I i;ii i;; ,/• .villlx-Mn liarmony w*ith that 

o( ihr n.i :. : ;.'..:;,; .md it will be cquippc\i w»th every modem appliimce 
for fa».u;t'. a:. \ i <>:;;:'i.rt- 

Thc Tru. itxs luivc named the large hxdl along the east side of the 
Department o( BoUiny on the second 6oor of the new building in booor 
o( Mrs. Stanley F: : In this hall will be installed the collections in 
plant reproduction, for which expensive and elaborate work under the 
direction of the Department of Botany, Nfrs. Field has provided the 
e«ential funds. It v^-ill he known as Sara C. Field Hall. 

The plaster nxxlel of the new Mu.scum building, which has been oo 
exhibition in the Rotunda of the present building for several years, by 
vote of the Board of Trustees has been pre<%nted to the Architectural 
School of Armour Institute. 

The Woman's Temple building, located at the comer of La SaUe and 
Adams streets, mortgage upon which was given to the Museum by Mar- 
shall Field Ixiforc his death and which mortgage was foreclosed after 
years of default, was sold to the State Bank of Chicago during the month 
of May, and the proceeds added to the capital of the General Fund. 

In order to increase the income to a sum demanded by the extended 
9cr\'icc of the pul)lic schools by The N, W. Harris Public School Ex- 
tension of Field Museum of Natural History, the heirs of the late Nor- 
man W. Harris, who provided the foundation for the Extenaon, have 
donated to the Museum the simi of $25,000.00. 

Trustee William Wriglcy, Jr., having granted an exclusive pri\'ilcK'c 
to the Museum to sur\'ey, excavate and collect archaological material 
on Catalina Island, the Museimi, by permission of the grantor, entered 
in an arranj;cment with the Museum of the American Indian of New 
York City to prosecute scientific investigation on this island for the 
period of two years. An expedition for this purpose is to be com- 
missioned by Mr. George G. Hcye, President of the Museum of the 
American Indian, early in 1920. 

A gift of unusual interest came from President Field; a Chinese 
doisonn^ figure, perfect in execution and rich in color, about twenty- 
two inches high, representing a Grand Lama of the Buddhist Chiuch of 
Tibet. Upon comparison with other iniages, the statue is identified as a 
portrayal of Pal-dan-ye-she, a church dignitary only next in rank to 
the Dalai Lama of .Lhasa, and known as the Tashi Lama. Extended 
reference to this donation is made elsewhere. 

An important accession during the year consisted of the private bo- 
tanical coUection of Mr. Edward T. Harper of Geneseo, Illinois. This 
ooQection is composed of 10,000 fungi, x 0,000 flowering plants, over 
800 titles of books and pamphlets and approximately 1,500 photograph 



Jan., 1920 Annual Report op the Director. 305 

negatives. Mr. Harper desiring to continue his collecting and notes on 
this order of plants will remain in charge of this section in the Depart- 
ment of Botany, as Assistant Curator of Cryptogamic Botany. The 
transfer of the material will take place when the section which it is to 
occupy in the new building is ready for its reception. 

Mr. George Langford of Joliet, Illinois, presented to the Museum his 
unusual collection of remains of mastodons obtained in Minooka, Illi- 
nois, and also specimens of mosasatu"s from Kansas. The mastodon 
material includes remains of eight individuals. The expenses inciirred 
by Mr. Langford in connection with this transfer were borne by Trustee 
Chauncey Keep. 

The publication of "Sino-Iranica" by Dr. Berthold Laufer, Curator 
of the Department of Anthropology, funds for which were provided by 
Mrs. T. B. Blackstone and Mr. Charles R. Crane, has been completed 
and distributed. 

Mr. WilHam Wrigley, Jr. has presented to the Museum a notable 
collection of pre-Colombian gold ornaments from the United States of 
Colombia, excavated near the river Neshi, which is described in detail 
elsewhere. The gift comprises a brilliant and intrinsically valuable 
contribution to the rare material in the Museum. 

An advance in salaries and the allowance of generous bonuses for the 
year 19 19, recognized the increased cost of subsistence as well as the 
protracted and commendable services of the recipients. 

Mr. Stanley Field was unanimously elected by the Board of Trustees 
an Honorary Member of the Institution, in recognition of the eminent 
service he has rendered to science. 

Mr. John P. Wilson was elected a Patron of the Musetmi, in recog- 
nition of the eminent service he has rendered to the Institution. 

The continued efforts of President Field to increase the Life Member- 
ships of the Institution resulted in the election of the following diuing 
the year: Mark Morton, Silas H. Strawn, Edward S. Moore, Leroy A. 
Goddard, Robert H. Allerton, John V. Farwell, Ward W. WiUits, 
Frederic McLaughlin, John Borden, Lafayette McWilliams, Joy Morton, 
Solomon A. Smith, Charles P. Wheeler, Frederick T. Haskell, Thomas 
E. Wilson, George E. Scott, Frank Hibbard, Frank O. Lowden, William 
O. Goodman, C. K. G. Billings, John W. Scott, G. F. Swift, Jr., A. G. 
Becker, Garrard B. Winston, Henry C. Lytton, William A. Pinkerton, 
David B. Jones, A. W. Goodrich, Thomas D. Jones, James C. Hutchins, 
John B. Drake, L. J. Hopkins, John B. Lord, Thomas W. Hinde, Adolph 
Nathan, Wallace C. Winter. 

The death of Harlow N. Higinbotham, as a result of an automobile 
accident in New York City on April 18, 191 9, has to be announced. 



3o6 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

Mr. Hi^nnlx)iliAm took a very nctivc interest as President of the Colum- 
bian ICxjHWiiion in /for the Museum a vast quantity of material, 
which was the nucleus ui ibe cx>llcction5, and as Chainnan ol the Execu- 
tive Cooumttee of the Museum for fifteen years and as President o£ the 
Mn'a^"" for twelve yearSf aaoastrH ffT.-ctivcly in the up-building of the 
In ti. He presented the i m of Gems and Jewels now in- 
stalled in a hall named in his honor and gave other interesting but less 
costly material to the Museum. Mr. Hi^nbotham was succeeded as 
President by the incumlxrnt of that office in iqoq. 

At the last rcj^ular meeting of the year, the Trustees were informed 
that the r ' r of the Stanley Field Mu.scum Employes' Pension Fund 
had suK'K'^ i.c'j incorporating a s>-stcm of life insurance in the benefits 
of the pension plan and that the Committee in charge of pensions had 
worked out a scheme which commended itself to Mr. Field. The Board 
of Trustees gave its approval, and it is probable that by the first of 
Pcbruar>', 1920, life insurance will be written upon the employes of 
the Institution. 

KUiNTCNANcc. — The budf^ authorized by the Board of Trustees 
provided the sum of $156,380.00 for the maintenance of the Museum for 
the >*car. The amount expended was $132,252.00, which sum includes 
all expenditures made for preparing the entire contents of the Musetim 
for removal to the new building. A satisfactory' margin of $24,130.00 
appears as a result of the operations during the year. A further sum of 
$9,039.00 was expended by special order of the Board of Trustees for 
collections, bonuses referred to elsewhere, and expeditions, bringing 
the total approximately to $141,300.00. 

Pustic*Tiof«». — During the year four publications were issued, com- 
prising parts of foxu* volumes, details of which follow: 

Pub. 20I. — Anthropological Scries, Vol. XV, No. 3. Sino-Iranica, 
Chinese Contributions to the History of Ci\*ilization in 
Andent Iran with special reference to the History of 
Cultivated Plants and Products. By Bcrthold Laufcr. 
1 91 9. 446 r>ages. Edition 1,800. 

Pub. aoa. — Report Scries, Vol. V, No. 4. Annual Report of the Director 
fnr the Year 1918. January 1919. 69 pages, 26 halftones, 
•ion 1,950- 

Pub. 203. — Zoological Scries, Vol. XIII, Part II, No. 2. Catalogue of the 
Birds of the Americas. By Charles B. Cory. 293 pages. 
I colored plate. December 1919. Edition 1,200. 




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Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 307 

Pub. 204. — Botanical Series, Vol. IV, No. 2. Revision of the North 
American species of Xanthitim. By Charles F. Millspaugh 
and E. E. Sherff. April 1919. 41 pages. 7 halftones. 
Edition 1,000. 

In addition to the publications distributed for exchange purposes, 
two hundred and sixty-eight have been sold to various individuals who 
were not in a position to offer equivalent literature as an exchange. 

THE LIBRARY. — Thcrc havc been received by gift, exchange and pur- 
chase 1,716 books and pamphlets, an increase over last year's receipts. 
The library contains 72,736 bound and imbound books and pamphlets. 
The following list shows the number of titles in each Department: 

General Library 45i792 

Department of Anthropology 3.698 

Department of Botany 7.640 

Department of Geology 10,675 

Department of Zoology 4.931 

No especial event affecting the welfare of the library has occurred 
during the year; the endeavor has been to rotmd out the work along the 
usual lines. With the activities of the ctiratorial staff largely engaged in 
preparations for moving to the new building, their requests for books 
were comparatively few during the first half of the year. With the ces- 
sation of that work and time again devoted to research their requests 
were renewed for books necessary for the study of material for installa- 
tion ptuposes. For immediate use forty-three works were ptirchased. 
An important gift was received from Dr. Frank W. Gimsaulus of a 
rare and beautifully boimd copy of Autograph Letters of Charles 
Darwin, written to J. Jenner Weir during the year 1868; also auto- 
graphed copies by Louis Agassiz. These are the initial contributions 
to a very interesting collection to be known as, Gtmsaulus collection of 
personalia and souvenirs of eminent naturalists. Early in the year the 
first volimie of The Monograph of the Pheasants, by William Beebe, 
was published by the New York Zoological Society; a beautifully il- 
lustrated work of these gorgeous birds in their native haunts, to be 
complete in four volumes. When the attention of Mr. Edward E. Ayer 
was called to the work he immediately subscribed to the set for the Ayer 
Ornithological Library of the Museimi. Mr. Ayer has also presented 
copies of Seth-Smith's Handbook of the Imported Species (parakeets), 
and Whitaker's Birds of Tunisia. A niunber of desirable and valuable 
publications were received from contemporary institutions, both domes- 
tic and foreign, in exchange for the publications of the Museum. The 
number was especially noticeable because of the enormously enhanced 
cost of book-production. The Museum was most fortunate in receiving 



5o8 Fmu MtTStmi or Natckal History — REi»oaTS, Vol. V. 

from the Museum of Cor; .ir.iiivc Zoology, Harvard College, an alm06t 
oomplctc set of its Mcnii.irs, thirty-four volumes, covering the yean 
1864 to iqi6. From the Sullivant Moss Society, New York City, was 
received a set to date of its publication, The Bryologist, in sixteen vol- 
One hundred and seventeen books were bound during the 

r. While it ordinarily is unwise to keep separate numbers <tf serials 
and periodicals in an unbound condition, the prices of all materials 
used in binding ha\-ing increased nearly one hundred per cent in the 
past few years, binding at present prices seems prohibitive. There 
were written and filed in the catalogues 18,054 cards. The regular 
monthly insLallment of author cards was received from the John Crerar 
Librar>-. The Museum is unusually indebted this year to large libraries 
both in and out of Chicago for the loan of books that were necessary 
in the performance of its work; these courtesies are gratefully ac- 
knowledged, especially to the Library of Congress, the Library of the 
Department of Agriculture, the Surgeon General's Librar>-, the John 
Crerar Library' and the Library of the University of Chicago. A list of 
all accessions received by the Library during the year will be found 
dsewbere in this report. 

ot^AHTMtHTAL cataloouino. invcntoryinq. AND labelinq. — During the ycaT, 
in the Department of Anthropology, the work of CTi' ' has 

l)ccn carried on as new accessions were acquired, but L;i:i La>K was 
naturally eclip>scd by the necessary preparations for mo\'ing collections 
into the new building. The total number of catalogue cards prepared 
amounts to 577. These cards were distributed over the single divisions 
as follows: China, Jajxm, and India 117; Melancsian Ethnology 325; 
South-West, Mexican, and South American Archaeology 125; and 
North American Ethnology 10. All these cards have been entered in 
the inventory books of the Department, which now nimiber thirty- 
eight. The number of annual accessions amounts to twenty-five, 
nineteen of which have been entered. The total number of catalogue 
cards entered from the opening of the first volume amounts to 153,548. 
The photographer made 297 negatives and two enlargements, and sup- 
plied 370 prints to the Department, 160 of these referring to Japanese 
s^-ord-guards. Twenty-four prints were added to the photographic 
albums kept in the Department. The printer delivered to the Depart- 
ment a total of 5,419 labels for use in exhibition cases. These labels are 
distributed as follows: New Guinea 1,939; Eskimo and Northwest 
Coast 2,622; Mexico 841; and China 17. The printer further supplied 
the Department with 700 catalogue cards. 373 new label cards were 
added to the label file. 

In the Department of Botany the entries made number 4,586, 



Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 309 

bringing the total entries to 482,076, The card indexes have been aug- 
mented as follows: 

No. of Cards 
Augmented 191 9 Total 

Index of Botanical Species 4.383 152,033 

Index to Common Names of Plants 349 20,299 

Index to Yucatan Plants 6,362 

Index to Euphorbiaceae 4.225 

Index to Department Labels 3,100 

Index to Geographic Localities 6 2,756 

Index to Collectors and Collections 42 9.892 

Index to Botanical Titles 1,500 

Index to Department Library 8,800 

Index to Illinois Flora 900 

Index to Hand Specimens of Woods 800 

Index to Installed Cases 595 

Index to Photographs 600 

4,780 211,862 

In the Department of Geology all accessions have been catalogued 
in ftill as received, with the exception of the Langford collection, which, 
as it was already packed on its arrival at the Museum, it seemed in- 
advisable to unpack for final cataloguing until space should be available 
for its installation. The entries made during the year ntmiber 591. 
These were chiefly of specimens of the Klechner and Dahlgren col- 
lections. A few labels have been made to fill gaps in the series of ex- 
hibition labels. 

Owing to the inaccessibility of most of the study collections in the 
Department of Zoology, due to the preparation for removal to the new 
building, comparatively Httle cataloguing and labeUing has been pos- 
sible. The total entries made during the year number 553. There 
have been added 153 new entries in the Division of Ichthyology and 87 
in Herpetology. Data for these entries have been added to the card 
catalogue and the specimens have been duly labelled and tin-tagged. 
Labels have also been prepared for a considerable portion of the exhibi- 
tion collection in Ichthyology. Only 2 entries were made during the 
year in the Division of Osteology, an African elephant skull and a 
white rhinoceros skull received in exchange from the American Museimi 
of Natural History. These were catalogued and index cards written to 
complete the record. In the Division of Mammalogy 6 catalogue 
entries were made and in the Division of Ornithology 305. The total 
entries to date number 101,014. The cards written during the year 
number 193, making a total of 34,406. 

The following table shows the work performed on catalogues and 
the inventorying accompHshed: 



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Doputmcnt ot Anthropology . 
Dopartmcnt of BotAny 
Dop^ <4 G«ok>cy 

n« »i( Zoology 

Scctioo a< Photography 

AccctsioMt. — The most notable accession of the year in the 
mcnt of Anthropolof^y is represented by the generous and memorable 
gift of Mr. William WriRley, Jr., being the Rold treasure excavated from 
a mound on the river Nechi, in the province of Antifjxia, Colombia, 
South America. This remarkable and imiquc collection consists ai 36 
pre-Columbian gold ornaments, comprising; foxu- large embossed breest- 
plaics of pure gold, two collars of gold foil, two rectangular plates, two 
{ragmentar>' sheets of gold foil, one necklace of gold beads, four ptairs of 
gold ear-rings, three cast figures of a bird, and eighteen miscellaneous 
onuonents. The foiu" breastplates were beaten out on stone moulds 
car\-ed in relief ^^-ith the design required; they were apparently interred 
with women of high social standing, who were buried adorned with 
jcwclr>' and ornaments they had most prized during their lifetime. 
Two of these plates arc selected for illustration in this Report; also 
one of the birds and three of the ear-rings, which arc exquisite both as 
to artistic quality of design and perfection of technique. The gold coUco 
tion has lxx?n installed in the Gem Room, and isaccompanied by ageneral 
label setting forth itssignificancc. It has attracted a great deal of attention 
and given rise to many favorable comments, both in the press and on 
the part of archaeologists. Mr. Stanley Field made a notable gift to 
the Department by adding to its Tibetan collection a fine portrait- 
statue, 22 inches high, \^Tought in cl- '  enamel and representing a 
Grand Lama of the Buddhist Church oi i lixit. Comparison with other 
known images permits the establishment of the identity of this person- 
age. In all prolwibility it is a portrayal of Pal-dan-ye-she, a church 
dignitary- only next in rank to the Dalai Lama of Lhasa and having his 
seat in Tashilhunpo in central Tibet. He is known as the Tashi Lama, 
being famous for ha\nng been the first Tibetan, who in 1774 entered into 
negotiations with the Anglo-Indian Government through George B 
an emissary of Warren Hastings, Governor General of India. In his 
diar>' Bogle characterizes him thus: "His disposition is open, candid, 
and generous. He is extremely merry and entertaining in conversation, 
and tells a pl^tsant stor>- with a great deal of humor and action. I 
end eav or ed to find out in his character those defects which arc insepara- 
ble from htmianit y, but he is so tmi\*ersally beloved that I had no 1 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE LXV. 




Gold Breastplates from a Mound in Colombia, South America. 
Gift of Mr. \Vm. Wrigley, Jr. 



Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 311 

and not a man could find in his heart to speak ill of him. " Subsequently, 
he received an invitation from the Emperor of China to come to Peking, 
where he spent a year in one of the Lama temples, highly honored by the 
whole country. In 1780 he died a mysterious death, at the age of 
forty-two, officially of small-pox, but more probably of poison ad- 
ministered by imperial jealousy and disapproval of his intercourse with 
the EngHsh. Technically his image is a masterpiece and the finest 
specimen of cloisonne in the Institution. The background is yellow to 
indicate the robe of imperial yellow silk conferred upon the hierarch 
by the Emperor. The designs woven in this robe are all skillfully brought 
out by the process of inlaid enamels and represent the eight Buddhistic 
emblems of happy augury, — canopy, wheel of the law, conch, umbrella, 
lotus, vase, knotted cords, and double fish. The mitre is decorated 
with two red dragons soaring in clouds. The pedestal is ornamented in 
front with two Hons in green, playing with a ball, and two dragons piir- 
suing the flamed pearl; two elephants bearing tribute-gifts are shown on 
the sides, and three lotus-blossoms decorate the back of the base. Face 
and hands are gilt. Both composition and coloration are dignified and 
harmonious, and the statue conveys an excellent characterization of 
this historically interesting Grand Lama. Mr. Edward E. Ayer 
remembered the Department during the winter spent on the Pacific 
Coast, and a collection of six excellent krises, five from the Moham- 
medan Moro of the PhiHppines and one of Borneo manufacture, prob- 
ably from the Kenyah or Kayan, is due to his generosity. The Borneo 
blade is beautifully chased and inlaid with brass, while the ivory handle 
is decorated with elaborate carvings. Three of the PhiHppine knives 
have wavy blades, and two are of the straight blade variety. In the 
latter group is a specimen of particular interest, because it is inlaid with 
a conventionalized floral pattern next to the hilt. A feather head-band 
used in the white-deer dance of the Indians of California, a good stone 
mortar with pestle, and a metate with muller, used by a child, were like- 
wise presented by Mr. Ayer. His further contribution during the year 
is a Sioux woman's beaded dress of buckskin, taken by the late Lieut. 
Frederick Schwatka of the 3rd Cavalry from the village of the hostile 
Sioux chief, American Horse. This sleeveless, one-piece dress is probably 
imique owing to the large quantity of pink beads displayed over the back 
and breast extending onto the arms. This feature, together with its 
extraordinary state of preservation, makes it a museum specimen of 
the first order and now rarely encountered. A very unusual and 
beautifiil ancient slate carving of the Haida on Queen Charlotte 
Islands, B. C, likewise obtained by Lieut. Schwatka at Victoria, 
B. C, in 1 89 1, was presented by Mr. Martin A. Ryerson. It is a master- 



3t» Pl«LO MusECM Of VATr-Bu !Ti<;tory — Report^, Vol. V. 

piece of primitive sculpture, luring the year Mr. Homer E. SarRcnt 
made two notable additiotw to his pre\'ious extensive contribution of 
1917. These comprise two Pueblo squaw dresses secured about thirty 
years a^o, three excellent Navaho blankets of native wool and dyes, and 
a Salish blanket of mountain-shccp wool, all of which strt*ngthen the 
former gift. The last-named blanket is illu.«ftratcd in this Report. 
To the continued interest of Dr. Frank W. Gunsaulus the Mtuenm 
is fiuthcr indebted for four remarkable additions, — 6rst, a very 
tmportxuit and most interesting collection coming from the native 
tnlics of Formosa and lirouRht to this country by S. Lshii, who for 
fifteen years has been chief of the Ethnolo^ncal Sur\'ey of the Japaneee 
Govrmmcnt on that island. It is well known that the task of the 
traxxler and collector is fraught there u-ith difTicultics, cxpedally in 
view of the fact that the wild tritx^s arc .secluded in the hif;h mountainous 
rejjkms. There arc in this collection two complete costumes, one 
by a warrior chief on head-hunting expeditions, and a woman's 
Other prominent features arc throe fine necklaces of agate and colored 
Venetian beads, which arc highly prized by the natives and used for 
bartering purposes; several valuable wood car^nngs decorated with ar- 
tistic designs; large pieces of textiles; a sword with a wooden scabbard 
car\*ed with interesting ornaments; the model of a dugout, and several 
carved tobacco pipes and musical instruments. In \ncw of the dose 
aflSnity of the culture of the Pormosan tribes with that of the Philip- 
pines, especially northern Luzon, which, for instance, is brought out by 
the artistic decorations of these spedmcns, this new material is of con- 
siderable scientific interest. A number of interesting photographs and 
two albums illustrating scenes of native life arc added to the coUectioa, 
which, it is hoped, will be placed on exhibition in the new building and 
act as a stimulus for future research in Formosa. Dr. Gxmsaulus 
Ukewi<« presented a fine decorated metal shield from India and a 
ffJfKk^ fiower-vase in the shape of an elephant. Pour glazed, orna- 
mented porcelain tiles from Persia, due to his generosity, constitute a 
good beginning for a Persian collection. Mxsa Hden C. Gtmsaulus 
donated a Japanese dagger with decorated sheath and hilt. Nfrs. 
Henry J. Patten of Chicago presented an extraordinary ancient 
feather blanket from Rotorua, New Zealand, which was formerly the 
proper t y of a Maori chief. A collection of a specimens from China was 
received from Mrs. Morgan S. Woodward of Chicago, being collected 
by herself at Peking in 1900, after going through the siege of the British 
Legation by the Boxer rebels. Among these are some trophies captured 
by American soldiers from the Boxers, the most curious object being a 
large jingal, about sixty pounds in weight, and inscribed in Chineseashav^ 



Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 313 

ingbeen made in 1896 in the Arsenal of Tientsin; such jingals were carried 
by two soldiers on their shoulders and fired by a third man standing 
behind. Mr. G. L. Fitz-WiUiam, chemical and mining engineer of 
Hammond, Indiana, presented the Museimi with an important ethno- 
graphical collection from the San Bias Indians, whom he had visited 
and studied. At the donor's request, this collection is to be named, 
in honor of his son, the "William Fitz-WiUiam Collection." The 
material is an excellent and representative collection from a very 
interesting tribe on the Isthmus of Panama. While not far removed 
from contact with civilization, this people preserves its aboriginality 
and particularly its purity of blood tenaciously. While they have been 
much brought into the Hght of publicity of late, the San Bias are sel- 
dom visited, and their specimens are rarely seen in museums. The most 
interesting part of the collection consists of women's garments, which 
are composed of many layers of bright colored cloths cut out in char- 
acteristic designs. Mr. G. F. Vivian contributed seven bows and thirty- 
six arrows from the Arawak of British Guiana, South America, collected 
by Dr. Geo. D. B. Dods; this is good and representative material, and 
there are several new types of arrows not heretofore in the Museum 
collection. Assistant Curator Mason presented eighteen ethnological and 
archaeological objects from the Papago in Arizona, where he spent several 
weeks in the beginning of the year under a special leave of absence 
granted by the Institution. Mr. Joseph R. Morris of Deerfield, Illinois, 
donated twenty-three objects relating to Indian ethnology, collected at 
Fort Peck, Montana, in 1876. Among the prominent specimens in the 
lot are two choice blanket stripes, a buckskin gun-case, two splendid 
pouches, four knife-cases, and a netted wheel. Mr. Alfred R. Brown, 
Director of Education, Tonga, South Pacific, from whom the Museimi 
purchased an Andaman Island collection in 19 10, presented this year a 
small collection from the same group, which, while adding nothing new 
to the material on exhibition in the Museum, is of considerable scientific 
value. The technical culture of the aborigines of the Andaman Islands 
is not very rich, and at best yields a few weapons — chiefly bows and 
arrows, — some basketry, crude pottery, and scanty garments which are 
decorative and commemorative rather than for protection. All these 
are represented in this collection, and in addition a few modem imita- 
tions of the ancient bone-tipped arrows used in himting and warfare. 
Included in the gift are two wood-carved images from the Nicobar 
Islands. One of these, the figiure of a woman, is an excellent piece of 
native carving, and is a distinct addition to the exhibition collections. 
Such figures are believed to drive sickness and evil influences away 
from a house or village. While in Manokwari, Dutch New Guinea, in 



314 I'lELD Mu&cuM Of Natural History — Reports, Vol, V. 

Dcccmlicr, 191 a, Aaaistant Curator Lewis left a small sum in care of 
P. J. P. van Hassclt, a missionary stationed there, for the purpose of 
« TiR syx:<nmcns from the north coast of Dutch New Guinea. This 

I -V was in the habit of taking trips every year to various parts 

vi til ci -^i-sl, and staled that in the course of two or three years he could 
cii.<\\y r- ^ ■> .T fairly representative collection. Owing to long delays 
in ship; ; ,. lusctl by war conditions, the material arrived here only in 
July of this year. The collection comprises over three hundred speci- 
mens from various places along the north coast of Dutch New Guinea, 
including some fine large wooden figures, house ornaments, and about 
tv^-cnty-fivc ancestral images, called korwar. These are rare and valu- 
able. Weapons, implements, household utensils, clothing and orna- 
ments arc all well represented. This part of New Guinea has been more 
or less nsitcd by Europeans for many years, and very little of original 
native workmanship is at present to Ix; had. The influx of the nu- 
merous Chinese and Malays settled along the coast has also tended to 
destroy or modify the native industries. Hence, but little from this 
region can be obtained, and that often betrays foreign influence. 

The Department of Botany received the following important ad- 
ditions to its herbarium during the year: From the Philippine Bureau o£ 
Sciences 646 plants of the Philippines; Miss Anna King 300 spedmens 
from Illinois; Paul C. Standlcy 285 Mexican plants of Anuhie and 
Nicolas; B. F. Bush 70 plants of Missouri; Geological Survey of Canada 
348 Canadian plants; Mrs. Stanley Field Plant Reproduction Section 
10 J plants of Georgia and Florida; Bemice Pauhai Bishop Museum 
362 Hawaiian plants; The New York Botanical Garden 507 West 
Indian plants; C. F. Millspaugh 6$ Wisconsin plants; H. M. Denslow 
73 New England plants, and F. E. McDonald 63 plants of lUinois. 
The regional distribution of fully organized material to the herbarium 
in 1919 is shown in the following tabulation: 

lOCALITV. 

North America (in genanl) . 

AUska 

Canada 

Alberta 

Athabatca 

British America . 

British Columbia 

Queen Charlotte Island 

VanoooTcr Island 

Herschcn Island 

Mackcnxie 

Nova Scotia . 



1919 


^MrasHviB 


40 


123 


4 


1.350 


4 


909 


122 


1.273 


a 


3 


3 


3 


33 


1.486 


3 


toi 


48 


758 


1 


I 


1 


7 


8 


427 



I 



Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 



315 



LOCALITY. 

Ontario . 
Quebec . 

United States: 
Alabama . 
California 
Colorado . 
Carolina (South) 
Dakota (North) 
Florida . 
Georgia . 
Illinois 
Kansas 
Louisiana 
Maine 
Maryland 
Massachusetts . 
Michigan 
Missouri 
Nebraska 
Nevada . 
New Hampshire . 
New Jersey . 
New Mexico . 
New York 
Ohio . . . . 
Pennsylvania 
Tennessee 
Texas 

Utah . . . . 
Vermont . 
Virginia . 
Wisconsin 

Bahama Islands: 

New Providence 
West Indies: 

Cuba . . . . 

Grenada . 

Jamaica 

Porto Rico . 

St. Kitts . . . 

Trinidad . . . 
Mexico 
Yucatan 

Central America: 
Costa Rica . ' . 

Guatemala 
Honduras . . 



Added to 

Herbarium 

1919 


Total 

now in 

Herbarium 


39 


1,709 


18 


1,146 


34 


1,502 


544 


26,127 


22 


12,607 


5 


1,103 


I 


651 


74 


20,405 


5 


4,000 


494 


28,462 


5 


551 


40 


1,338 


12 


1,657 


7 


1,373 


7 


5,357 


I 


3,913 


86 


3,972 


I 


496 


13 


1,308 


19 


1,591 


42 


3,079 


127 


3,849 


79 


7,550 


6 


2,076 


8 


10,176 


2 


1,372 


4 


9,892 


732 


4,033 


19 


3,623 


2 


4,845 


65 


5,072 



II 

12 

5 



29 



17 
I 
I 



2,439 

10,969 
819 

7,695 

4,732 

14 

495 

31.605 

6,761 

629 

3.084 

273 



3i6 Fir-LP Mdsedm or Nattral History — Reports, Vol. V. 



lOCAilTY. 




A4<W1lo 


no* la 


Sovth AMKttCA: 




I9IQ 


HwtMftaa 


Hrx- ! . . . 




s 


596 


Ch.Jr 




2 


»55 


Cotncnbta 




507 


2.9J« 


Ecuador 




3 


85» 


Ilmnitr IU.in ! 




: 


2 


Veoosucla 




I 


7r>8 






I 


114 


Austn V 




$a 


7.796 


Pnuicc 




10 


«..1«2 


Gerrniiny 


. 


91 


8.7«7 


Great Briuin (in jjrtirnl) 






«^i3 


EngUnd . . 




97 


a.556 


Ireland 




1 


'7^ 


Itle of Man 




I 


1 


ScoiUnd . 




35 


5«7 


Wales 




16 


99 


Nonrajr 




5 


1. 213 


SardiniA 




I 


20 


Spain 




I 


635 


Sweden 





a 


9731 


SwitxerUuiii 




79 


3.717 


Asia: 








India 




i( 


l.oAi 


 •i^-j*^ ... 
0>-l'.n 




I 


69 


Palestine 




1 


6n 


Philuininps .... 




l.7<il 


12.4 41 


AnucA: 




• • * y  




Abyninia 




5 


226 






I 


1 


Sterra LffToa . . . 




I 


It 


OcSANtCA: 




** 


Anddand 




I 


1 


Borneo (British). 




2 


10 


NewZmUod 




5 


J.S33 


Sandwich IiUnds (in geoeral) 




26 


s6 


Kauai 




44 


49S 






38 


s8 


Mauai 




32 


«3 


Mnlnirai . 




32 


aa 


Oahu 




120 


613 


Samoa 




4 


67 


Horticultural 




68 


3J49 


lOaitratioQS mountod aa Hcrbahum sb«eU . 


40 


2,276 


The most imoortant aooessi 


aa received bv the E 


)c«utmcnt 


, of Geol- 



ogy during the >*car was a large ooUcctJon of Nxrtcbrate fossils presented 
by Mr. George Langford. This collection represents the results of 
many years of labor on the part of Mr. Langford, and is valuable, not 



Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 317 

only for the amount of the material contained in it, but also for its well- 
prepared condition. The collection consists of two principal series, 
one chiefly of remains of mastodons obtained in Minooka, Illinois, and 
the other of specimens of mosasaurs from Kansas. The mastodon 
material includes remains of eight individuals, which range in age from 
a young calf to an adult. Of one large, adiilt male, portions of the 
skull, complete lower jaws, many limb bones, vertebrae, ribs and foot 
bones are preserved, as well as a tusk nine feet in length, probably the 
largest tusk of an animal of this species ever f oimd. The other individu- 
als of this series are represented by various skeletal parts, an especially 
important feature being that the entire tooth development of the masto- 
don is shown by specimens ranging from the first mUk teeth to the 
ponderous, grinding molars of the male adult. Of the collection il- 
lustrating mosasaurs, the most important featiu-e is two nearly perfect 
skulls, one two feet, the other eighteen inches in length which have been 
carefully excavated from their matrix and moimted free. These display 
in remarkable completeness the characters of the heads of these extinct 
"sea serpents." Some vertebrae are also associated with these skulls. 
A large jaw of a Columbian mammoth and a head of the fossil fish, 
Gillicus, also are included in the collection. Three complete individuals 
from the meteorite fall which occurred at Cumberland Falls, Kentucky, 
in April of this year, have been added to the meteorite collection, one 
being the gift of Mr. W. R. Jillson. The meteorites of this fall are of 
peculiar interest on accoimt of their tmique composition and structiire. 
Of the meteorites of Richardton, North Dakota, which fell Jime 30, 19 18, 
four individuals, aggregating about ten poimds in weight, were ob- 
tained, partly by purchase and partly by exchange with Professor T. T. 
Quirke. By exchange with the British Museum, representative speci- 
mens of the Baroti, Kuttipuram and Warbreccan meteorites were 
seciu-ed. A specimen of amethyst showing remarkable distribution of 
color, and two valuable crystals of scheelite were presented by Mr. W. J. 
Chalmers as additions to the Chalmers crystal collection. Several 
specimens of high-grade gold ore from Cripple Creek, Colorado, showing 
considerable free gold, were presented with other material by Mrs. G. 
Mace, and a collection containing, among other specimens, several 
minerals used in optical work was received by gift from Dr. Geo. M. 
Gill. By exchange with Prof. M. E. Kleckner, about one hundred speci- 
mens of crystallized celestite, fluorite, calcite and sphalerite from locali- 
ties in Ohio and Michigan and of forms previously unrepresented in the 
Musevmi were obtained. Six specimens of typical Barbadoes earth 
and one of globigerina marl from the Barbadoes Islands were obtained 
by exchange with the University of Iowa. These illustrate deposits of 



3i8 FiFLD Mdsedm or Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

dcxp r^.i oriv^n which also ha\x industrial uaet. Dr. B. E. Dahlgrtsn 
duntu: his stay in Florida and other southern stales ooUocted for the 
dr]v.irtmcnt nl>out one hundred and thirty geological spedment diiefly 
from FI«inda, Imt also from localities in Kentucky and Tcnnettee. These 
include* "'^■t-n specimens of varieties of soils, maris, mudd tod HUlds 
cluirni • of certain jwrtions of Florida; several larj^ tp frimfn i o£ 

ctxjuina, illiistratinK the varieties and forms which characterize the 
structure of this peculiar aRKTCKate, and ninety specimens of inverte- 
brate fossils, partly from recent formations in Florida and partly from 
formations of Chester age in Kentucky and Tennessee, 

The principal accession during the year in the Di\-ision of Mammal- 
ogy was secured by pift from Col. Dale Bumstcad of Oak Park. It 
consi5Tts of throe well-prepared skins and skiills of the Lower California 
mountain sheep and several skulls of mule deer. The Divisioa ci 
Omitholo^' received 217 bird skins, 67 of which represent a part of the 
Mu.-^oum's share from the Collins- Day expedition. An African elephant 
skull and a white rhinoceros skull were received as an exchange from 
the American Museum of Natural History. Among the additions made 
to the shell c»:)llcction is a gift from Mr. Giuseppe Despott of the Natural 
HLstory Museum in Malta, which consists of 433 named and well labeled 
specimens from the Maltese I.slands. The fact that the Museum had 
few shells from these islands adds to the value of this acquisition. There 
were 949 shells and 10 crustaceans added to the Department during the 
>*car. A total of 63 specimens of insects was received, of which number 
57 were a gift and 6 an exchange. The accessions in the EM vision o£ 
Ichthyology and Herpetology consisted chiefly of gifts, totaling 284 
specimens. The most important of these is a collection of thirty amphi- 
bians and reptiles from the Mississippi River Valley, presented by 
Mr. J. W. Mackcldcn of St. Louis. Mr. Leon L. Pray, Mr. William J. 
CrtThard, Mr. Hcrlxrt L. Stoddard, and others, added a number of 
dc-sidcrata to the collection of Illinois and Indiana snakes. Mr. Stoddard 
also donated a collection of wall lizards, taken by him while in the service 
in France. Mr. J. G. Sinclair presented a few amphibians and reptiles 
from Arizona, Mr. M. H. Sacklieim three from New Mexico, and Mr. 
Charles L. Hubbs several from southern California. 

exFto«TK>Ns AMD FicLO woKK. — Finds of remains of mastodon at two 
localities, Mooee, Illinois, and Lciter's Ford, Indiana, were investigated 
by Assistant Curator Riggs. The mode of the occurrence of the bones at 
these k>calities was studied, some erpknution conducted at the sites and 
negotiations entered into with the owners of the specimens which may 
result in securing desirable material later. As a result of a trip to 
Porcupine, Ontario, r-anaHa^ gold-mining district, a number of typical 




0^ 



3 
O 
C! 

o 

tn 

'3 
a, 

<u 
w 



§i 

cu 
CO ^ 

Q. ^ 

— U-i 

1 O 

i-2 

< OJ 

z 
o 

o ^ 
CO c 






3 

o 



c 
o 

'a 

-t-> 

c 



Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. '319 

ores and rocks of the region were secured by Assistant Curator Nichols. 
Assistant Curator Hubbs carried on some local field work for the Depart- 
ment of Zoology, obtaining a ntmiber of specimens for mounting in 
small groups, as well as a series of certain species for the study collection. 
Installation, rearrangement, Permanent Improvement — Most of the 
time of the members of the staff of the Department of Anthropology 
was consumed by the complex preparations in connection with the 
moving operations, chiefly assembling, sorting, and arranging mate- 
rial for packing, dismantling and charting cases, preparing and labeling 
material for future installation in the new building, and keeping exact 
records of the location of packed material. As a sequel to this labor, all 
plans previously prepared for the halls of the new building were sub- 
jected to a thorough revision and to numerous modifications. Frequent 
visits were made to the new building by members of the staff, and the 
study of actual conditions permitted the visuaHzing of the situation 
more correctly than was possible from the floor plans. The total result 
of this year's packing in the Department of Anthropology may be 
siunmed up in dry figures as follows: 615 exhibition cases, 320 boxes, 
457 crates, 76 cartons, 80 bundles or packages in burlap, and 27 kegs 
and barrels. All these items have been properly labeled and numbered. 
The process of packing may be regarded as practically completed. 
There were prepared for installation in the new building loi cases, 
covering the Eskimo and the tribes of the northwest Coast of America, 
the Coast and Interior Salish, and the Plateau Indians. This required 
the complete or partial dismantling of 123 cases formerly on exhibi- 
tion. In conformity with the new principles of installation, all dupli- 
cate material was eliminated, which has resulted in a net saving of 
twenty-two cases. In the new arrangement, also a considerable quan- 
tity of material formerly in storage is placed on exhibition, while many 
large specimens which have stood in the open, or have been attached 
to the walls, are now safely sheltered behind glass. It has been the 
endeavor to arrange the material in geographical and cultural sequence 
using an adequate nvunber of specimens to illustrate the every-day, 
esthetic, and religious Hf e of the people. In the Divisions of Archaeology 
and Ethnology twenty-two cases were arranged for future installation 
in the new building. These refer to the archaeology of Colombia and 
Mexico and to the ethnology of the Upper Amazon, Central Brazil 
and Paraguay. In most instances, all available material was selected 
for exhibition, but surplus and duplicate objects have been relegated 
to study and exchange collections. Special care has been taken of the 
group cases. A detailed plan of each has been made to be utilized in 
the new building for the reconstruction of the groups. Reproductions 



3ao Ptrtn Mrsrcu or Natl'bal IIistosy — Repobts, Voi.. V. 

of three Ilopi altar-mosaics of the Powamu ceremony in papier-mach6 
and in thdr corrccl tvc been made, which may eventually 

replace the present i; 1. In view of the importance of the 

pocking operations, t lion of the Department was tempor- 

arily doaed until Oct- . i i. Careful attention was devoted to the 
treatment of the Egyptian sculptural stones in the Department, which 
was carried on under the supervision of the Curator of Geology. The 
retulU thus far obtained arc very satisfactory. Seventy-five cases 
were cleaned and poisoned during the year. The appointment ci Miss 
Helen C. Gun5yiulus as Assistant Curator of Japanese Ethnology, 
permits the systematic and intelligent study and disposition of con- 
siderable material in this division already in the pos sessi on of the De- 
partment of Anthropolojiy. Miss Gunsaulus brings to the work she 
has undertaken, studious habit and sp<-cial training, with enthusiasm 
and nntness for museum practice, as the work thus far done upon the 
Ci IS in this division gives evidence. 

The Department of Botany installed no cases during the year, 
the time of the staff being expended in packing for removal to the new 
building. All the exhibition cases in the department were securely 
packed for transportation; this packing being so done that the contents 
of each case may be returned thereto with a minimum of time expended. 
Such specimens as could not be fastened securely in situ in the cases, 
were enclosed in cartons and packed in the lockers of the cases to which 
they pertain. The base lockers in each case were utilized for packing. 
In them were placed all duplicate and study specimens, each in an 
individual paper box or corrugated paper parcel, and all bottles eodosed 
in "egg-case" partitioned cartons designed to 6t the bottles. 
Thus the specimens of each case remain with the case to which they 
pertain. Lockers not needed for the case contents were packed with 
bundles of mounted plants belonging to the herbarium collections. 
The exhibition cases arc now all ready for removal and labeled as to the 
hall and spot on the floor of e^ch hall that they arc to occupy in the new 
building. Notwithstanding this packing, a large nimiber of the 
cases arc still on creditable exhibit, not materially disturbed though fully 
ready for transportation. In addition to the exhibition case packing, 
over 480 numbered boxes and crates of material have been packed for 
remoN-al. In all cases a complete record has been kept of the packages 
and their contents. While the herbarium has not yet been disorganized, 
it has been made ready for packing while still referable. This and the 
appurtenances of the offices and laboratories can be prepared for 
removal promptly after transportation actually begins. The plant 
repfodoctioas made in the Mrs. Stanley Field Laboratories, have been 



V 



Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 321 

left on exhibition in their regular places in each case. These will remain 
so installed until the moving force begins operations. The work of the 
staff of the Mrs. Stanley Field Laboratories has not been interrupted. 
The first four and a half months of the year were spent in Miami, 
Florida, where the laboratory and garden of the Plant Introduction 
Station of the U. S. Department of Agriculture served as headquarters 
and furnished facilities and accommodation. For this the Museum is 
indebted to Mr. David Fairchild, Agricultural Explorer in charge of the 
Plant Introduction Biu-eau of Plant Industry in Washington, and to 
Mr. Edward Simmonds, Superintendent of the Garden and Field Station 
in Miami, to the former for liberally extending to the Museum the privi- 
leges of the laboratory and station, and to the latter for innumerable 
acts of kindness and assistance, which made it possible to pursue the 
work successfully here. Thanks are also due to Mrs. Simmonds and the 
members of the staff of the Department of Agriculture who were 
stationed at the Laboratory during the past winter, viz., Dr. J. Rosen- 
baimi, plant pathologist, Mr. Chas. E. Sando, plant physiologist, and 
Mr. Max Kisliuk, entomologist. The friendly and helpftil attitude of 
all these men was a matter greatly to be appreciated in the rather 
narrow quarters of the laboratory. The main object of transferring the 
work to Florida for the winter was to secure studies and material for 
certain desirable plants which could be had and handled there more 
readily and economically than anywhere, namely: the Cocoanut palm, 
the Banana, the Pineapple, the Florida Cycad (Zantia), etc. The 
material needed for the reproduction of the specimens was secured. 
The most perishable parts were cast and colored and plaster motilds 
were made of other parts, formalin material packed and sent to the 
Museum, and photographs, color sketches and detail studies secured 
for use after return. At the same time there were found in the Plant 
Introduction Garden a nimiber of interesting plants which fitted exactly 
into the plans for the Museum botanical exhibits. Such were, for in- 
stance, the South African Carissa or Natal Plimi, introduced into the 
United States in 190 1 by Mr. Fairchild and now grown as a hedge plant 
in many places in southern Florida. This is an excellent example of the 
type of plant which can scarcely be reproduced successfully except in 
the field, where it can be studied from day to day as the work progresses. 
The Silk Cotton tree, Bombax, with its large crimson flowers furnishes 
another such illustration. One of these flowers was made on the spot 
during the week or ten days the tree was in blossom. On the strength 
of this and the moulds which were made at the same time, a splendid 
branch of the Silk Cotton tree has been added to the exhibits. Another 
introduced South African plant of much interest found growing in the 



jiJ Field Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

subtropical pirdcn wms A scrubby tree of the Strychnine family, Strych- 
nos sfnnosus, with large green or >'cllow fruit supcr6cixJly resembling a 
grapefruit, but %«-ith a hard shell and chocolate colored pulp o( pleaaant 
taste and a clove like fr -. A flowering and fniiting branch of this 

has also been added to tu'j cAxiibiUi. One of the main lines of investig»> 
tion and experimental culture pursued at the garden concerns Avocadoet, 
or Alligator Pears. Numerous varieties from diverse localities are 
Ix'iiiK tried out here, with a view to the introduction into Florida of 
th«>sc found most suitable and valuable for general cultivation. Three 
thoroughly well-defined tv'pes, a Guatemalan, a Mexican and a West 
Indian, together \n-ith a Guatemalan-Mexican hybrid, were considered 
of sufl^icient public interest to be added to the collection. Of these 
rrjm xluctions were made. A number of other plants especially desired 
!>y the IX'partment for its exhibits were collected and cast or modded in 
p.^rt during the period in Miami. Such arc the Seven-year Apple 
(i'asasia), Pandanus, the Screw-pine, in flower; Casuarina Australian 
Pine or Beef-wood tree. Long staple Cotton, Water Hyacinth, etc 
A pitcher-plant of the southern large-leaved, yellow flowered species, 
Sarrcucnia fiavOf was collected on the return to Chicago in the latter part 
of May. A single pitcher of this plant, measuring 38 inches, has since 
been reproduced and placed on exhibition. Some tubers and plants 
which were brought back in a living condition arc being grown for the 
Mu5cum by the Garfield Park grecnhotise. Among these are a large 
Yam, a Zamia, etc. A Spider Lily {l{ymenocaUii caribcta) from Florida, 
grown at Garfield Park, has been reproduced as a type of Amaryllid lily. 
Within the last few months a Banana plant (a flowering and fruiting 
specimen) has been reproduced complete and has been installed tempora- 
rily on the gallery. Also a sprouted Cocoanut showing the relation of 
the seedling plant to the seed and old husk; a Cocoanut flower enlarged ; 
the flowers of Casuarina enlarged; enlarged flowers of Scrophularuj: 
enlarged flowers of Sagitkiria; a branch of a Quince from Fort Valley, 
Georgia; a witches '-broom on the Sand pine; a mounted dry specimen of 
air plant (Tillandsia) ; a reproduction of the Natal Plum, a branch with 
fruits and flowers. A set of tomatoes, parasitized by the different fungi 
tlvat constitute the main pests of this industry, were obtained at the 
Miami Laboratory, where this matter was being investigated, and were 
reproduced for the economic collections. At the same time pure cultures 
of the fungi in question were furnished by the plant-pathologist, and it 
U the intention of the Department to exhibit in connection with the 
affected fruit a model of each fungus si:"^' '1y enlarged to make its 
structure plain to the naked eye. A kxi^iiuuinal section of a common 
Fig enlarged, together with a c or res pondin g modd of the male fig, or 



Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 323 

capri-fig, has just been completed. It shows as plainly as such models 
can the interesting and peculiar story of the pollination of the fig, and 
the intricate life-history of the minute hymenopterous insect concerned. 
A flowering branch of Grevillea robusta Australian oak, with the enlarged 
flowers modeled last year, completes the illustration of the Proteaceae. 
A summary of the results of the year's work in this Section is as follows : 
Reproductions completed and placed on exhibition: Banana, entire 
plant in flower and leaf; Sprouting cocoanut, entire plant; Carissa 
grandiflora, fruit and flower branch of leaf; Cydonia japondas, branch 
in fruit and leaf; Scrophularia Marylandica, flower enlarged; Hymeno- 
calles carihoea, entire plant; Strychnos spinosus, fruit and flower in leaf; 
Sagittaria latifobia, flower enlarged; Casuarina equisetiJoUa, flower 
enlarged; Casasia clusiiflolia, branch fruiting and leafing; Bomhax 
grandiflora, branch flowering and leafing; Grevillea robusta, branch 
flowering and in leaf; Rhizoctonia solani, Macrosporium solani, Phyto- 
phtora infestans, Phoma destructiva, on Lycopersicum esculentum; also 
parts of Zamia, Cocoa, Amanas and Gossypium. 

In the Department of Geology some installation has been performed, 
chiefly for the purpose of putting some mounts into such condition that 
they could be moved with safety. To this end, mounting of a large skele- 
ton of Megacerops was completed and the mount placed in a case in which 
it is at present exhibited and can probably be transported. This skeleton 
is made up entirely of the bones of a single individual and is very nearly 
anatomically complete, only two or three vertebrae being missing. 
A few of the limb bones were modeled from corresponding parts on the 
opposite side, but this was done with entire accuracy by casting. The 
skeleton is the only one of this genus which has as yet been mounted in 
any museum, and is the flrst specimen to show that the members of the 
genus were long-tailed animals. It was among the most primitive of the 
Oligocene titanotheres and was about the size of the modem black 
rhinoceros. The skeleton is mounted in three-quarters relief. The 
matrix, base and background against which the skeleton is shown have 
been made of plaster, colored to imitate the greenish clay in which the 
specimen was found. The plaster has also been tooled in such a manner 
as to suggest the excavation of the skeleton from the matrix. The 
posture is that of an animal in life, the skeleton being supported on its 
feet. The head, neck, torso and right limbs are, however, connected 
with the background for support, and the feet are partially enclosed in 
the matrix. Iron rods, made as inconspicuous as possible, have been 
introduced to support the left limbs. The specimen was collected in 
South Dakota in 1898 by a Museiim expedition. After dismounting 
some of the dinosaur specimens for packing, the opportunity was im- 



3^4 Field Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

pTovc<l to make some modifications in the positions of the Umes which 
study had shown would more correctly represent their rclaiit)ns. Some 
rcodjustmcnls of the installation of the mctcroite collection have been 
„...!.. ;., ..- i.-r to introduce new spcdnuais and group more closely the 
^>scs. Packing of exhibited specimens has been carried 
on OS rapidly as possible during the year, and as a result the contents of 
two hundred and forty-one cases have been made ready for shipment, 
leaving only thirty-eight cases still to be packed. In addition, the work 
of packing the remaining study and stored collections has been carried 
on and brought to completion except for some specimens now stored in 
the basement. Practically all material exhibited on bases, such as the 
large fossil vertebrate mounts, has also, with the exception of the large 
dinosaur, been disassembled as far as was necessary and made ready for 
transportation. In choosing the sequence of collections for packing, 
those in halls somewhat removed from the main passageways were taken 
first, in order that the movements of visitors might be interfered with 
as little as possible while the work of packing was going on. All but 
three halls of the Department have now been closed to the public, and 
their contents packed. In these three remaining halls many of the 
specimens have been packed in such a way as to make them still available 
for observation. In packing, owing to uic weight and hardness of 
many of the specimens on exhibition in the Department, it was found 
necessary to remove most of them from the cases and place them in 
boxes of sizes and shapes suitable for their transportation. In so doing 
considerable attention was paid to recording the position of the speci- 
mens in the cases in such a way as to ensure their rapid and accurate 
reinstallation on their arrival at the new building. For this ptirpose 
each case was given an arbitrary number which includes the temporary 
number of the hall to which the case is to be sent in the new building. 
This number has also an absolute value, and is to be retained for the case 
even if another location for the case should be decided upon. Before remov- 
ing the specimens from the case, each specimen was given a number showing 
the location of the specimen within the case, the numbering being in a 
uniform order for each case, where the specimens were installed in such 
a Tnftnner as to permit. Thus a number 3-10 indicates that in rein- 
stallation the specimen is to be placed on the third shelf from the top 
of the case and tenth in position from the left end of the shelf. A label 
bearing this installation number is wrapped with each specimen and on 
the reverse side of the corresponding printed label a similar number is 
penciled. In some cases the installation numbers of the specimens were 
m arke d on slips which were then fastened in the cases in the positions 
vhich the specimens occupied. In other cases, especially where the 



Jan., 1920 Annual Report op the Director. 325 

installation did not fall into orderly lines, sketches were made on cross- 
section paper which showed in each case the amount and position of the 
space occupied by each specimen; the spaces were then numbered and 
corresponding numbers were wrapped with the specimens and penciled 
on the labels. The sketch itself was then in each instance fastened inside 
the corresponding case, so as to prevent its being transferred to any 
other exhibit. Specimens mounted upon tablets, which include most of 
the invertebrate fossils, were, for the most part, fastened securely in 
drawers underneath the cases. Sketches of the positions of the tablets 
in the cases were first made and nimibered and corresponding mmibers 
were penciled on the reverse sides of the tablets. Upon the outside of all 
packages and boxes containing specimens removed from cases, large 
department labels similar to those fastened inside the exhibition cases 
have been placed, giving the corresponding hall and case ntmibers, so as 
to insure constant connection of the specimens with the case. There 
is, further, painted on each package or box a brief label in the department 
color which describes the nature of the contents. A record has also 
been prepared in book form which shows in detail the numbers and forms 
of the exhibition cases and in adjoining coltmms the halls and alcoves 
in which the cases are to be placed. As containers for specimens to be 
packed, boxes and barrels were chiefly used, boxes of the size 36 x 20 
X 14" being found especially suitable. Several thousand cartons and 
small wooden boxes were also employed, either as shipment tmits or for 
enclosing individual specimens or groups of specimens in larger boxes. 
Specimens which would be injured by moving in any other than an 
upright position were fastened in the exhibition cases. The method 
for fastening usually adopted was that of screwing metal studs into 
the metal strips used for supporting brackets at the back of the case and 
fastening wooden strips on the front of the studs in such a manner as to 
firmly enclose the specimen and its accompaniment of packing mate- 
rial. Other specimens of such shape that their transportation in 
boxes would be unsafe, were similarly packed in the cases, and the speci- 
men labels have generally been packed in the cases in which they were 
originally exhibited. The packing of the fossil collections especially 
called for varied handling according to weight, mass and fragility. Much 
storage material which was still in the plaster and burlap wrapping in 
which it came from the field, was packed in strong boxes of yi inch 
lumber. The collections stored in wooden trays, consisting mostly of 
specimens that had partially been removed from the matrix, were packed 
in the trays. Specimens in smaller containers, such as paper trays, were 
wrapped with the trays, each with its label enclosed, and the whole 
packed snugly in wooden trays by the use of excelsior. These trays 



336 FitLo Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

were then ttacked to form units of 15 inches in hcJRht, the uppermost 
tray bcin^; turned bottom up so as to form a cover. The whole was then 
fonnod into a bale. This proved not only the quickest and most 
effcctiN'c nieans of packing, but had the advantage of keeping; the 
gpcci'T'-r . in the same trays which arc to serve as storai^ for them in the 
*. The lar^ casts, such as those of Megatherium and Had- 
luru taken down and crated in sections. The bead and legs 

removed, and the thorax rcenforccd by longitudinal rods lashed 
•cross the ril^ and secured at cither end. All were then crated in units 
of such size as to permit easy transportation. Smaller skeletons, 
such as those of the Irish Deer, Glyptodon and Uintatherium were 
crated on their bases, with the heads removed when too large to be 
readily enclosed. Smaller skeletons of a fraj:ile nature were, with their 
bases, placed in li^ht crates, and were secured by a scries of cordage stays 
running to the sides of the crates. Thus secured, the specimens were 
returned to the exhibition cases and fastened in position either by means 
of wires running to iron straps in the back of the case or by blocks 
screwed to the bottom of the case. Specimens packed in exhibition 
cases in this way are believed to be assured a safer handling than those 
placed in unprotected crates. Smaller specimens, such as skulls, were 
generally packed in paper cartons and secured in the exhibition cases 
either by blocks or by long, wooden braces fastened to iron studs screwed 
into the perforated and threaded strips designed to support the shcli- 
l In some instances, however, the cartons were packed in large, 

V. ■( ;. Ver>' large skulls, such as those of Titanotherixmi and 

r. •' re packed in special wooden crates and the whole returned 

to the exhibition cases to be moved in them. The Miocene camel 
skeleton was pcu:ked by disarticulating the legs, remo\'ing the head and 
pelns, and supporting the torso on short, upright rods attached to a 
temporary base. The whole was then fastened firmly in an exhibition 
case. A number of heaN-y and fragile objects, such as specimens of 
Daemonelix and dinosaur bones, required rc-cnfordng. This was aooom- 
plishcd by the use of plaster and bxirlap, plaster and iron rods or a 
combination of all these. Since the spirals of Daemondiz made up of 
kwidy-cemented sand, would little more than bear their own weight 
when in an upright position, they were, before removal from the ex- 
hibition ca.sc, rccnfoTced with plaster and strips of bxirlap. To guard 
against possible breakage and crumbling, four qiuuter-inch rods were 
laid across the spirals parallel to their main axes. The peripheries of 
the spirals were then wound with plaster bandages which, crossing the 
rods at every turn, bound the whole firmly together. The mounts of 
d in o wur limbs were taken down and each large bone crated separately. 



Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 327 

Previously to crating, the bones were covered with tissue paper to pre- 
vent the plaster from adhering to their finished surfaces, 2x4 inch timbers 
were fitted to the surfaces thus prepared, and all was lashed fast with 
plaster and burlap bandages. A similar treatment was given the large 
skull of Triceratops, which, owing to its thin and brittle substance, re- 
quired especial care. Secure packing of the six hundred specimens of 
crude petroleum also presented a problem of some difficiilty. These 
oils were exhibited in glass-stoppered bottles eighteen inches high and 
an inch and a quarter in diameter. No practicable method of sealing 
the stoppers oil-tight without defacing the bottles was found, since 
leakage was to be expected if the bottles were not maintained in an 
upright position. It was necessary also to avoid the use of excelsior 
or other finely divided packing material which might, in case of accident, 
become satiu-ated with oil. Accordingly the stoppers were secvu-ed against 
loosening by tying caps of cheesecloth over them. The bottles were then 
placed in light, wooden boxes each of a size to hold thirty and of a 
height to allow one-quarter of the length of each bottle to project. To 
each box two pieces of heavy straw board were fitted, one two inches 
from the bottom and one over the top, and in these boards holes slightly 
larger than the diameter of the bottles were cut. When the bottles were 
threaded through these holes they were held flexibly but securely in 
position, and the upper quarter of the bottles projecting above the box 
was covered by crating which permitted a free view of the character of 
the contents and will protect the box from being inverted or roughly 
handled. To further facilitate carrying the bottles in proper positions, 
each box was eqvdpped with suitable handles. The larger bottles of 
the collection, some of them eighteen inches in diameter, were similarly 
packed, though in specially made crates. Boxes of special sizes were 
also provided for the collection of marbles, the size chosen being such 
as to permit rapid packing and avoid too great weight. Of the series on 
exhibition in the West Court, the relief maps and the large model of 
the moon have been taken down and packed, leaving only the mete- 
orite, crystal and gem collections now on exhibition. 

Packing has been actively pursued in the Department of Zoology dur- 
ing the year. The only material in the Division of Mammalogy and 
Ornithology not ready for moving consists of the large habitat groups 
and the study collection of birds. The entire serial exhibition col- 
lections of mammals and birds have been secured in situ in their cases 
by means of cleats and braces or other devices to hold them securely in 
place. The study collection of mammals has been fully packed, mostly 
in original containers and the rooms in which they were kept have been 
dismantled. When not engaged in packing, one assistant has continued 



338 FitLD Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 



in the prepaxatioo ol plant munmoheB for the several large nMmmai 
f^roupet still unoompleted, the Olympic elk jrroiip, the bison RTOup, and 
the capybara (roup. The taxidermists have finished the prdiminary 
models and manikins for a single Alaska moose. A ^raffe and a hippo- 
potamus are partly finished and practically ready for installation. The 
entire collection of the Division of Ichthyolo^ and Herpetolofn^ was 
packed diirinj: the year and is now ready for shipment to the new build- 
inR. The Section of Taxidermy has prepared the a cceaa o ri es for a 
numlxn- of small groups of local fishes and has been engaf;cd in mounting 
certain fishes to fill in Raps in the s>'Tioptic scries, which it is plamied to 
make comparatively complete. In the Di\nsion of Entomology over 
three months at the bej^nning of the year were devoted to preparations 
for moving. As the entomological collections can be packed rather 
expeditiously and as it was unwise to render them inaccessible for any 
great length of time, the members of this Division assisted in the prepa- 
ration of other material for removal. A large part of the year has been 
devoted to the making of two insect groups for a new case that was 
designed and built to accommodate them. One of the groups will repre- 
sent the most conspicuous and cliaracteristic insects of the sand dune 
region at Miller, Indiana, and the other vnW show the well known and 
destructive tomato worm in all its sta;;es and with wax reproductions 
of its natural surroundings, etc. For specimens, casts of burrows, 
leaves and other accessory material, local field trips were made whenever 
they were considered necessary. While neither of the two groups has 
yet been finu;hed, both have been so far advanced toward completion 
that they will be ready for installation by the latter part of January. 
The Division of Osteology p>acked fifteen exhibition cases with mounted 
skeletons and eighty-nine crates and boxes of various sixes, such as those 
for the whale, elephant, rhinoceros, hippopotamus and camel, including 
small ones for small ligamcntary skeletons and skulls, which are now 
ready for removal. The skeletons, numlxrring twenty-seven (mostly 
Ugamentary), that could not be packed in the condition they were io, 
were remounted. 

Thi n. w. Harris Public School ExrcNtiON of Ficlo Museum of natural History. 
— At the dose ol the year there were 646 cases available for circulation 
amon^ the public schools of Chicago. In view of the painstaking me- 
thods employed in the taxidermy and accessory work of all zoological 
groups, it is with pride and pleasure that attention is called to the fact 
that of the total cases available for circulation, fifty-eight zoological 
cases were completed during the past year. 

When plans were being formulated for the actual loaning of cases to 
the pubUc schools, it was the opinion of a committee composed of school 



Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 329 

principals that only schools of elementary grades would be best served 
with loan cases. This idea has been followed out from the inauguration 
of the system up to the present time. During the next scholastic year 
the high schools, at the written request of Mr. J. E. Armstrong, Assistant 
Superintendent of Schools, wUl be scheduled to receive cases. In his 
request Mr. Armstrong said of the cases, "I have studied them with 
great interest and am firmly of the opinion that they would be of very 
great assistance in the high schools. " 

The Superintendent of the Municipal Pier formally requested cases 
be placed on exhibition on the pier during the period of school vacation, 
as was done last year. His request was granted and twenty-four cases 
were placed on exhibition there during the time specified. When the 
cases were returned to the Museum the Superintendent expressed his 
thanks and added, "I believe I am voicing the thanks also of a large 
body of visitors who foimd entertainment and instruction in leisurely 
contemplating your beautiful exhibits and the lessons they teach. " 

In reptile and similar branches of taxidermy the emplo3rment of the 
skin of a specimen for moimting has not given satisfactory results. The 
effects usually obtained being a shnmken and parchment-like surface 
and a fading and disappearance of the natural colors. As these faults 
seemed impossible to remedy, the use of the specimen's skin for moimt- 
ing purposes has practically been abandoned. Better, though not en- 
tirely approved results, have been derived by making, in plaster, cellu- 
loid and other materials, casts of specimens, which were afterwards 
painted to represent the natural colors. Painting on the surface of a skin 
or on a cast has never brought an effect comparable with the living 
model. In order to produce an effect more natural in appearance than 
that accomplished by the use of the skin or by casts, this Department 
has been, at intervals during the past year, experimenting with pyralin, 
celluloid and similar materials. With celluloid as a medium it is found 
possible to make reproductions of a character so closely resembling the 
structure and coloring of the skin of the living specimen as to eliminate 
the necessity of painting it, thus displacing the objectionable appearance 
of paint as it is usually employed. Experiments have also been made in 
foliage reproducing in celluloid, using electro-deposited metal molds 
which possess strength sufficient to withstand the pressure required in the 
molding operations. The strength and elasticity of the celluloid is such 
as to correct the objectionable necessity of making the artificial leaf 
unnaturally thick. 

During the year a request was received from Mr. H. Bolton, Director, 
Museum and Art Gallery, Bristol, England, and Secretary, Educational 
Section, The British Association for the Advancement of Science, for 



3.^0 FiiLD MrsEim or Natural History — Rkport*;, Vol. V. 



if.;. rTThH: :5 1 1 Tuvminj: t!.<- wcrk and scope of i; .:' cnt, the 

dau thu. ;r v.I I to be pUced before the AMocuttion's : * n^ at 

■St was made ' > vcral 

i the Chicago Pu;.uc Library. 

' n- 'MTlmcnt of Rush Medical Col- 



Boi: • 

The ^''^-'♦or of the Or 
lege, I'l- -: -y of ChicaRo, 
careful study of the cases on hand 



I )epartTncnt and after mnlrtng a 
^ted the loan from time to time 
of ae\'cral of them, stating that they would be very helpftd in instructing 
backward children, classes of which are conducted by that ooUege. The 
request was granted and two cases of economic material were loaned. 



pmotooiuphv ano iLLusTiunoM. — The following is a tabulation of the 
work perfonncd in this section: 



Anthropology 
Botany . . . 
Otology 
Zofilocr 

H.irris Extmaoo 
Dvstxibution 
Gift . . 
Sftk ... 



MBnuMf Of ri' 



Bb«-o( 



4S 

278 

6 

18 

98 

5 



146 

470 

339 

42 



23 
108 



Nobvotf 



rfsflUMV Of 



46 



Toub 450 i.ao7 

Total number of CaUk)gue entrie* daring year 1919 
Total number of Catalogue entries to December 31. ioiq 
Total number of Record Books 



46 



I 

t.706 
t2o,a44 

ao 



Prntmna. — The nxmibcr of labels and other impn^v^ion.s made by the 
Section of Printing is as follows: 

EihitwUnn Olbar 

Labala li^iMilaM 

AatfaxDpokigy 5.9" 1.M0 

Botany 91 4.650 

Geology 610 s.ioo 

Zo61ogy .... 4> 4.716 

Hani* BstaMioo ... .%55 800 

Omttni 16.350 

L4brary . 2.250 

Herewith are also submitted finanr-ial statements, list of accessions, 
iMffnw of members, etc, etc 

Frederick J. V. Skipp, Director. 



> 

X 



UJ 

< 



(/) 

I- 
a: 
O 
a. 

IT 



> 

cr 
o 

I- 



< 

D 
I- 
< 

Z 







Z 

o 

CO 

z 

UJ 

I- 

X 

hi 

_i 
O 

o 
I 
o 

CO 



CQ 

Z) 
CL 

— 
cr 
on 
< 

I 



I 3 



2; Q 

m _, 
o 

CO 

o 

_l 
CO 

Q. 

o 

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o 



UJ 
Q. 

> 



Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 331 



Financial Statement. 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS. 
January 1, 1919, to December 31, 1919. 



Receipts 

Cash in Treasurer's hands December 31, 1918: 

General Fund ?3,io3.i9 

Picture Postal Cards Fund 42 . 32 

Sinking Fund 347-96 $ 3.493-47 

Petty Cash on hand December 31, 1918 739-95 

Dues of Annual Members 750 . 00 

Dues of Life Members 17,600.00 

Admissions and Check Rooms 3,780.15 

South Park Commissioners 15,000.00 

Interest on Investments and Bank Balances 9,990-83 

Field Endowment Income 131,500.00 

Field Endowment Sinking Fund 4,573.68 

Field Endowment Sinking Fund — Income 1,567.27 

New Building Moving and Furnishing Fund 23,235.00 

Picture Postal Cards — Sales 693 . 32 

Mrs. Stanley Field Plant Reproduction Fund 8,490.00 

Sale of Publications — Special 468 . 88 

William J. Chalmers Crystal Collection 500 . 00 

Sundry Funds — Investment Income 7,026.60 

Donations — Special: 

Charles R. Crane $ 500.00 

Mrs. T. B. Blackstone 2,500.00 

Dr. Frank W. Gunsaulus 300 . 00 

Chauncey Keep 300 . 00 

Edward E. Ay er 100.00 

Martin A. Ryerson 25.00 3,725.00 

3233.134- 15 
Disbursements 

Salaries $ 78,823.06 

Guard Service . 11,981.60 

Janitor Service 7,016.15 

Fire Protection 3,817.10 

Heat and Light 19,912.61 

Repairs and Alterations 9,811.79 

Packing Supplies 1,531.84 



33* PiFLD Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

PurniV"- "'I Pixtuin: 

1 nCaaei . . f t68.oo 

Hrrtianum C«MS Sia.oo 680.OO 



The Ubnuy: 

Books And Pwiodk»b $ 628 83 

Difxling. etc 16796 79*81 



CoUcctions Purrhiucrl 47* IS 

Imtailation Supplies 887.21 

r 1.150.J0 

Ph<>i"i;r.., ; Printing Supplies , . 409-6I 

G«D«ral i: . 

Frdght. Ex\iTtmBg9 and Teaming {1.478-69 

S- -V. Postage and Telephooe 647 n 

I.  losurance 693 43 

Su: : ; .... . . 1.059 30 3.878 53 



Mrs. Sur : riint Rr^ r ^-JucUon Pund . . . 7,682.49 

Stanley I... ..t'. ; >:v F :• 1 5° <» 

WiUum J. Ch /.v.r. Crv.t.iH". llection Fund . . 280.25 

Joseph N. Picld South Pacific Islands Fund 286.20 

Bcnploye'^ ' " * \n Bonds I.399.60 

New BuiU..., ' • ^rt'^ rnrniihing Fund — Invest- 

monts 26.965 00 

Life Memberships Fund — Investment* 18.220.00 

0«o«rai Fund Imrartnients — Suspense . 17.600.00 

Suikinc Fund — IinreitmenU ... 6.265.00 

Picture Postal Cards Fund — In vwtm eots 800.00 

Sundfy Funds — Investments ... 1.150.00 

S22l,87l.20 

In Treasurer's hands. December 31. 1919: 

General Fund {9.590 90 

Picture Postal Cards Fund 12 to 

Poretgn Exdiance ... 92000 10.523.00 



Petty Cash on hand December 3 1. 1919 739 95 

I233.134.15 



Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 



333 



ATTENDANCE AND RECEIPTS FROM JANUARY 1, 1919, TO 

DECEMBER 31, 1919. 



ATTE^rDANCE 

Paid Attendance: 

Adults 

Children 

Free Admission on Pay Days: 

School Children 

Students 

Teachers 

Members 

Officers' Families 

Press 

Special 

Admission on Free Days: , 

Saturdays  

Sundays 

Total Attendance 

Highest Attendance on any one day (July 6, 191 9) 
Highest paid Attendance on any one day (September i , 

1919) 

Average Daily Admissions (363 days) . . . 
Average Paid Attendance (259 days) .... 

Receipts 

Articles checked — 7,560 at 5 cents each . , . 
Admissions 



13,069 




1,465 


14,534 


4.637 




2,645 




345 




52 




84 




8 




731 


8,502 






20,975 




79,788 


100,763 








123,799 




4,634 




667 




341 




56 


• 


$ 378.00 




3.402.15 







?3.78o.i5 



/ 



334 Piru) MusRCM or Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 



Accessions. 



DEPARTMENT OP ANTHROPOLOGY. 



ANDERSON. MARY LOUISE. Chicago. 

t piece d cartooace from mumniy-wrappinKS. 3 haoda and I low kf 
from • V — Egypt (jfif I). 

AVER. EDWARlJ ., . . liioigo. 

6 NLiLiyan kri«<<<< — BonMO and Palawan (gift). 
WhiU nonial feather head-band — Hoptt, Oififdraia 

(jfift). 
I Sioux beaded buckaldn drcsi — United States (gift). 
I ston<> mortar with peMle. i child's mctate with muller — SomU whi 
(■ 
BROWN. ALFhJiU KiiuiNALD. TonR.i. South Pacific. 

Ethnographical matchal. chiefly haskctry. weapons, headdrenea, 
ornaments. 2 wooden images. alt<j(;cther 113 specimens — Andaman! 
'I). 
JOSEPH N. I :! PACIFIC ISLANDS FUND. 

Wo -. weapons, implements, clothing. omamentS, 

and other ct 1 material — North Coast ai Dutch New 

c. • •>. 

FIELD. ST*  . w.cago. 

n6 portrait ttatne of a Tibetan Grand Lama, prfiwiMy Ptf- 
dan-yc>she (173^1780) — Pddng (gift). 
FIT^WILLIAM. G. L.. Hammond. Indiana, 

r.-r. •'^•hical objects frocn the San Bias Indians — Panama (gift). 
GUNSALi .KW..ancago. 

Bttmological objects: a oaatnmea. textilei, nwklarm. ocnaments. sword, 
wood carvings, etc — Forrooaa (gift). 
I decorated metal shield — India (gift). 
4 glased pottery tiles — Perva (gift). 
I cdadoo flower-vase in shape of an elephant — Jsp«ii (gift). 
GUNSAULUS. HELEN C, Oncago. 

t dagger with oraarooited shiath and hilt — Japan fgift). 
LORD. J. B.. Chtcaga 

Du'l<!ht.«t hroose sutnette — China (gift). 
MASON. J. A.. Chicago. 

Ethnological and arduBological material from the Papago Indians, 
Piman stock — Santa Rosa. Arixooa (gift). 
McCAULEY. MRS. CUAS. A. H.. Highland Park. Illinois. 

MisceUaoeous ethnographical ooUectioo from Philippines and American 
Indiaos — Philippines, Aden, America (gift). 
MORRIS. JOSEPH R.. DeerfieM. Illinois. 

EthnographiGal objects from Sioux Indians — Fort Peck. Montana (gift). 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE LXVIII. 




Salish Blanket made at Spuzzum, B. C, about 1863. 
Gift of Mr. Homer E. Sargent. 



Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 335 

PATTEN, MRS. HENRY J., Evanston, Illinois. 

Ancient feather blanket of Maori chief — Rotorua, New Zealand (gift). 
RYERSON, MARTIN A., Chicago. 

1 slate carving — Queen Charlotte Islands, B. C. (gift).' 
SARGENT, HOMER E., Pasadena, California. 

2 Navajo blankets (gift). 

4 blankets — Southwest and Northwest Coast, U. S. A. (gift). 
VIVIAN, G. P., Chicago. 

7 bows, 36 arrows — Demerara, British Guiana (gift). 
WOODWARD, MRS. MORGAN S., Chicago. 

I jingal, 5 rifles, 10 swords, 3 pistols, 3 cartridge-belts, 2 cannon-balls, 
2 spears, 2 flags, i fireman's coat, i bamboo jacket, i bow, i printing- 
block, 2 musical instruments — Peking, China (gift). 
WRIGLEY, WILLIAM JR., Chicago. 

Pre-Columbian gold ornaments — Motmd on Nechi River, Colombia 
(gift). 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 
BENKE, H. C, Elgin, Illinois. 

I herbarium specimen — Illinois (gift). 
BERNICE PAUAHI BISHOP MUSEUM, Honolulu, Hawaiian Isls. 

262 herbaritmi specimens — Hawaiian Isls (exchange). 
BUSH, B. F., Courtney, Missouri. 

102 herbarium specimens — Missouri (gift). 
COOK, A. T., Hyde Park, New York. 

I specimen potato seed balls — New York (gift). 
DAHLGREN, B. E., Chicago. 

1 fruit of Traveller's tree — Florida (gift). 
DEAM, CHARLES C, Bluffton, Indiana. 

22 herbarium specimens — Indiana and Michigan (gift). 
DENSLOW, H. M., New York City, New York. 

73 herbarium specimens — New York, Vermont and New Jersey 
(exchange) . 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Collected by E. T. Harper: 

Various fungi. 
Collected by C. F. Millspaugh: 

4 herbarium specimens — California. 
Purchases: 

285 herbaritmi specimens — Mexico. 
Mrs. Stanley Field Plant Reproduction Laboratory: 
135 herbarium and economic specimens — Miami, Florida. 
4 herbarium specimens — Georgia. 
16 models — various localities. 

Reproductions of Ficus carica, Cassasia clusifolia, Strychnos spinosus, 
Persea Persea. 
GAUMER, DR. GEO. F., Izamal, Mexico. 

2 herbarium specimens — Yucatan (gift). 
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA, Ottawa, Canada. 

248 herbarium specimens — various localities (exchange). 

23 herbarium specimens — various localities (gift). 



336 Field Musecm or Nattral Histoey — Repoits, Vol. V. 

HALL. ELIHU. TIIK FAMILY OP. Alhcn*. lUinoin 

I " I Hall — various localiUes (flit). 

JAPANESL V - W. C. E.. Chic«co. 

SO«p€^ 

JONES ARTHUR B.. Evanston. Ilhnni. 

I hrrt>anufo ipecunen — New York (£Ut). 
KINT. ANNA OtUw«. IlUnoU. 

ihum •pecixneos — IlUnoU (gift). 
LANSLSG, O. B.. JR.. Chicago. 

76 herbohum apacinMDS — Illinois (gift). 
LUDWIG. C. A.. WasWuftoo, D. C. 

a bcrbohum spednMU — Virginia (gift). 

McDonald, p. E.. Peoria. lUinois, 

6j herbarium tpcdroens — lUioois (gift). 
NfcLAlN. A. O.. Chicago. 

I section of bark of Big tree. 3 oooes of Coulter's pine — CalifornU (gift). 
M I LLSPA UGH. CHARLES P.. Chicago. 

7 seed* — ▼arioos localities (gift). 

a6 i" ''ins and descriptions (gift). 

65 ;. .... ..-n specimens — Wisconsin (gift). 

NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN. Bronx Park. New York City. 
507 herbarium specimeos — Colombia (exchange). 
1 1 herbarium tpeciroens — New Providence, Bahamas (exchange). 
PARKE. DAVIS & CO.. Detroit. Michigan. 

6 herbarium specimens — Michigan (gift). 
PETERSEN. N. P.. Reoo. Nevada. 

a herbarium specimens — Nevada (gift). 
PHILIPPINE BUREAU OP SCIENCES. Manila. P. I. 

180 bertMhum epccimem — Phihppine Isls. (exchange). 
466 herbarium specimens — various localities (exdunge). 

RIDGWAY. k ; . Olney. lUinois. 

5 herbarium specimens — Illinois (gift). 
SHERFP. EARL E.. Chicago. 

ao herbariom t*^«"— *■ — I'mvrrs-.ty of Chicago greenhouse (gift). 

8 herbarnun f*^"*^« — Illinois (gift). 

Original description of Taraiamm ceratophorom and Taraxacom 
Ijrratum (gift). 

7 original deacriplioos of Xanthiom (gift). 

I herbariom sperimw i — Chicago, Illinois (gift). 
Original deecription of genus Taraxacum (gfft). 
I deacription of Xanthium and 1 specimen of Xanthium — Kaiuas (gift), 
to herbarium tp»yim»ns — Illinois and Mexioo (gift). 

TONDUZ. ADOLPH. CoeU Ricm. 

6 herbaritun specimens — Coeta Rica (gift). 

UNITED STATES CUSTOMS HOUSE. APPRAISERS STORE. Chicago. 
3 samples gourd seed — Custom House (Africa) (gift). 

UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM. Washington. D. C 
94 herbarium specimens — varioos locaUtaea (exchange). 



Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 337 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY), London, England. 

4 specimens of Baroti, Kuttipuram and Warbreccan meteorities (exchange). 
BUCKSTAFF, RALPH, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. 

1 specimen obsidian — Mexico (gift). 

2 specimens Cumberland Falls meteorite — Cumberland Falls, Kentucky 

(gift). 
CHALMERS, W. J., Chicago. 

1 amethyst crystal — Mount Pleasant, Maine (gift). 

2 scheelite crystals — Arizona (gift). 
CHAMBERLAIN, MRS. COL., Los Gatos, CaUfomia. 

2 specimens fossil wood partly altered to lignite — Los Gatos, California 
(gift). 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. ^ 

Collected by B. E. Dahlgren: 
90 specimens invertebrate fossils, 35 specimens soils, coquina and products 
of weathering — Florida, Kentucky and Tennessee. 
Collected by H. W. Nichols: 

8 specimens of ores, minerals and rocks — Porcupine, Ontario. 
Purchases : 

1 specimen Richardton meteorite — Richardton, North Dakota. 

2 specimens Cumberland Falls meteorite — Cumberland Falls, Kentucky. 
GALLAGHER, J. F., Chicago. 

7 specimens mineral abrasives and roofing material — various localities 
(gift). 
GILL, DR. GEO. M., Chicago. 

10 specimens minerals (gift). 
JILLSON, W. R., Frankfort, Ky. 

1 specimen Cumberland Falls meteorite — Cumberland Falls, Kentucky. 
KANST, EDWIN A., Chicago. 

I group gypsum crystals in clay — 95th St. & Stony Id. Ave., Chicago 
(gift). 
KLECKNER, M. E., Tiffin, Ohio. 

109 specimens calcite, fluorite and celestite — Ohio and Michigan (exchange). 

LANGFORD GEORGE, Joliet, Ills. 

130 specimens of vertebrate fossils, chiefly remains of mastodons and 
mosasaurs — Illinois and Kansas (gift) . 
MACE, MRS. G., Oak Park, Ills. 

31 specimens of ores and minerals — various localities (gift). 
MARINER & HOSKINS, Chicago. 

I specimen arsenic crystals (gift). 

I group crystals of metallic arsenic — Chicago (artificial) (gift). 
MORRIS, J. R., Deerfield, Illinois. 

I fossil coral — Petoskey, Michigan (gift). 
QUIRKE, T. T., Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

3 specimens Richardton meteorite — Richardton, North Dakota 

(exchange). 
RENNINGER, EDW., Chicago. 

65 specimens fossils and concretions — various localities (gift). 



338 Field Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

< ilAEFER. WALTER. Chicago. 

I i pa riow B Calymene — Dear Lcoioat. lUinois (gift). 
SKINNER. \VM. G., South Porcupine. Ontario. 

3 (pccimcns bohte — Langmutr. near Porcuptnc. Ontano (gift). 
UNIVERSITY OP IOWA. Iowa City. Iowa. 

6 (pccirocxu Barbadoei earth. I (podmco Globigerioa marl — BartMuloes 
Idi. (exchange). 

DEPARTMENT OF Z<X)LOGY. 

AMI:RKAN .N M op natural history. New York City. 

SktilU • . .\... .iU elephant and white rhimxreros — (exchange). 
AVER. EDWARD E.. Chicaga 

t snake skin, without head — (gift). 
BBATY. W. L.. South Buitr. Montana. 

t Bpccimcn Am*'^' >" (^lahawk — South Butte. Montana (gift). 
BRANDLER. CHARI.; :ago. 

t tculptn — Lake Michigan (j^ft). 

3Uke^' •). 

BUMSTEAD. L lUinoi*. 

3 mount.'un sheep kulU). 3 deer (skulls) — Lower California 

COALE. HI- NRY K.. Hichlml P.irk. Illinoia. 

^ s{)c\-imcn-'» Jap.incsc l-inls — J.ipan (jfift). 
COOPER. A. R.. ChJcaRo. 

3 cottoid fi«he« — Port Credit. OnUrio (gift). 
CORY. CHARLF^ B.. Chicago. 

I ruffed grouse — Grandview. Wisconsin (gift). 
CROZIER. W. J.. Chicago. 

Shells of two ipedmens of CkiUm lu^rcul-Jut. h w.::,: t'-.r seventh 
an I --.v,,», valves fused — Cru«5 lUy. UcmiutU y^iil). 
DESPOTT. Gil !:. Malta, 

433 shdls — Maltese Islands (gift). 
FIELD MUSEUM OP NATURAL HISTORY. 
Collected by C. L. Hubbs and L. L. Pray: 

6 simfhtw of rare spedes — Jackson I^rk Lagoon. 
Collected by C L. Hubbs. L. L. Pray and L. L. Walters: 

37 fixhes for mownting — Jacksoo Park Lagooo. 
Transfer from Dcpartmcot ci Anthropology. 

I lixard — Egypt. 
Purchases: 

42 sperimciw mannc invertcbraies, marine fishes, trxxair^. frog, liiards. 
yoang alligator — Florida. 
I specimen gar —~ Wisooosm. 
37 specimens nematodes, centipedes. miUipodes and snakes — lUinois. 

STANLEY FIELD ORNITHOLOGY FUND. 

190 specamens birds — various locabtics (gift). 
3 rnammah (skins and skulls) — various localities (gift). 
FISHER. MRS. H. S.. Chicago 

500 shells (appnix.) — near St. Petersburg. Florida (gift). 



Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 339 

FORBIS, HOMER, Albany, Missouri. 

I ichneumon fly — Albany, Missouri (gift) . 

I cicada — Albany, Missouri (gift). 
FRIESSER, JULIUS, Chicago. 

3 turtles — Michigan (gift). 
FRISON, THEO. H., Champaign, Illinois. 

6 bumble-bees — Massachusetts, New York, Illinois and Nova Scotia 
(exchange) . 
GERHARD, WM. J., Chicago. 

I ribbon snake — northern Indiana (gift). 

9 garter snakes — Illinois (gift) . 

1 snake — New Lenox, Illinois (gift). 
GUERET, E. N., Chicago. 

2 robber-flies — Chicago (gift). 
12 sphinx moths — Chicago (gift). 

GUNSAULUS, HELEN C, Chicago. 

I snowy heron mounted in a frame with a curved, painted background — 
near Glen wood Springs, Colorado (gift). 
HAWKINS, F. P., Chicago. 

1 walrus skull and tusks — (gift). 
HUBBS, CHARLES L., San Diego, California. 

3 velvet ants — San Diego, California (gift). 

2 lizards, 5 snakes — San Diego County, California (gift). 
HUBBS, CARL L., Chicago. 

I garter snake — Chicago (gift) . 
I turtle — Chicago (gift). 
31 fishes, 3 snakes — Illinois (gift). 

3 waterbugs — Dune Park, Indiana (gift). 
20 waterbugs — Miller, Indiana (gift). 

HUBBS, C. L. & L. L. WALTERS, Chicago. 

25 fishes, 5 toads, i lizard — Lake County, Indiana (gift). 
HYMAN, C. H., Chicago. 

I king rail — Jackson Park, Chicago (gift). 
KLEINPASTE, J. B., Chicago. 

I praying mantis — in Chicago, on a load of lumber from the South (gift). 

LILJEBLAD, EMIL, Chicago. 

I lizard, 4 snakes, i bryozoan colony — Illinois (gift). 

MACKELDEN, J. W., St. Louis, Missouri. 

30 amphibians and reptiles — Mississippi basin (gift). 

McCAULEY, MRS. C. A. H., Highland Park, Illinois. 
I glass sponge — Philippine Islands (gift). 

MORRIS, JOSEPH R., Deerfield, IlUnois. 
12 shells — (gift). 

OLIVER, J. K., Monterey, California. 

I abalone shell — Monterey, California (gift). 

PEACOCK, CHARLES, Chicago. 

I mounted green turtle — southern Florida (gift). 

PRAY, LEON L., Chicago. 

I snake — Beverly Hills, Illinois (gift). 



34© Fir.LD Museum of Natural History — Repoits, Vol. V. 

REEVE. REX W . Chioifo. 

I mtik n*ke — Tranioot, lodiaiu (fif t). 
RENNINGER. BDW.. Qucafo. 

3 tb«Us — Plonda (gift). 
ROTHSCHILD ft CX)MPANY. Cbkaga 

I dchlid fi*h (jrift). 
SACKIIBIM. M. H.. Suiu Pe. New Mexico. 

3 Itsards — vidnity of Santa Pc. New Mexioo (jrift). 
SIEGEL. PRANK R.. Chicago. 

I mtaskalhinge weighing 42 pounds — Cat-fish Lake, Wtsoooan lglit^ 
SINCLAIR. J. C. Chicago. 

I spade-foot toad. 4 Usards, 1 snake — Arizona (gift). 

a scorpions. 10 bevtlea — Tocaon. Aiitona (gift). 
STODDARD. HERBERT L. Chicago. 

I garter nake — northern Indiana (gift). 

8 snakes, 3 lisards — northern Indiana (gift). 
35 wall lisards — Prance (ifift). 
TOWNSLEY. P. 0.. Yosemite City, California. 

I snake skin (gift). 
U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM. Wojihington. D C. 

7 mammals — various localities (exchange). 
WALTERS. LEON L.. Chicago. 

I girtcr snake — South (^cago. Illinois (gift). 
30 snakes, I turtle — Indiana and Illinois (gift). 
WELD. L. W., Evanstoo, Illinois. 

4 gall-insects {St 4 galls) — WiUiams, Arixona (gift). 
WESTPALL, C. C. Chicago. 

10 wood-boring isopods — Manchac pass, bet wee n Lakes Maorepas and 
Pootchartrain. I «otiisiana (gift). 
WOLCOTT, MRS. A. B.. Chicago. 
I spider — (gift). 

SECTION OF PHOTOGRAPHY. 

PIELD MUSEUM OP NATURAL HISTt)RY. 

Made by Mn. Sunley Pictd Plant Reproduction Expeditaoo: 
156 nagathree planU. view*, i^c, — Soutbtm Florida. 
Made by Section: 

1706 negatives and pnnts of Museum specimens. 
HIGGINS. JOHN A , University of Illinou C>>Uege of Medidne. 
I negative of Areca Catechu nuts — Philippine Islands. 

THE LIBR/XRY. 
BOOKS, 1»AMPHLBTS. AND SERIALS. 

(Aocunom aas bt bxcbaxcb uhlkss oniExwisE DutcNanco.) 
AFRICA 

Durban Moseom 

Bast Africa and Uganda Natanl Hiilofy Society. Nairobi 
Oflofcgical Society. Jc 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE LXIX. 




Cloisonne Enamel Statue of Pal-dan-ye-she, a famous Tibetan Hierarch. 

Gift of Mr. Stanley Field. 



Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 341 

Institut de Carthage, Tunis 

Rhodesia Scientific Association, Bulawayo 

Royal Society of South Africa, Cape Town 

South Africa Association for Advancement of Science, Cape Town . 

South African Museum, Cape Town 

ARGENTINA 

Academia de Ciencias, Cordoba 

Museo Nacional de Historia Natural, Buenos Aires 

Universidad Nacional, Facultad de Filosofia y Letras, Buenos Aires . . 
AUSTRALIA 

Australian Museum, Sydney 

Australian Ornithologists' Union, Melbourne 

Botanic Gardens and Government Domains, Sydney 

Department of Agriculture, Adelaide 

Department of Agriculture, Sydney 

Department of Agriculture, Wellington 

Department of Fisheries, Sydney 

Department of Mines, Sydney 

Field Naturalists' Club, Melbourne 

Forestry Commission, Sydney (gift) 

Geological Survey, Perth 

Government of the Commonwealth, Melbourne . . 

Institute of Science and Industry, Sydney 

Linnean Society of New South Wales, Sydney .... .... 

National Herbarium, Melbourne .... 

Public Library, Museum and Art Gallery, Adelaide ... ... 

Public Library, Museums and National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne 

Queensland Department of Mines, Brisbane 

Queensland Museum, Brisbane 

Royal Australasian Ornithologists' Union, Melbourne 

Royal Geographical Society of Australasia, Brisbane, Queensland . . . 

Royal Society of New South Wales, Sydney 

Royal Society of Queensland, Brisbane 

Royal Society of South Australia, Adelaide 2 

Royal Society of Tasmania, Hobart 2 

Royal Society of Victoria, Melbourne 2 

Royal Society of Western AustraUa, Perth 4 

South Australian Ornithological Society, Adelaide i 

University of Melbourne i 

Victoria Department of Agriculture, Melbourne 2 

Western Australia Geological Survey, Perth 2 

BELGIUM 

Acad^mie Royale de Belgique, Brussels 9 

Jardin Botanique de I'Etat, Brussels i 

Soci6t6 Royale d'Arch^ologie, Brussels i 

Soci6t6 Royale des Sciences, Li^ge 1 

BRAZIL 

BibHotheca Nacional, Rio de Janeiro 2 

Instituto Agronomico de Estado, Sao Paulo i 

Ministerio da Agricultura, Industria e Commercio, Rio de Janeiro . . . i 



J4J FiruD McsEVM OF Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 



Scrrico O«olodco e ' ^. Rio dc Janeiro 

CANADA 

Dap . 

Department at Mines, mu 

DepartnMOt '  • 

■.o. Toronto 
.iU UniverBty. Montreal ... 
 otixui Institute oi Science. Haluax 
Jr .:.,:-U Mtweum. Victoria .... 
R'.yal Canadian Institute. Toronto 

Rny.al Society of Caoada. Ottawa 

Sod^t^ de G^ogrmphie, Quebec 
CEYLON 

Colombo Museum . . 

Rnyal Botanic Garden. Pcri>lcnt> .k 

CHILE 

Bibboteca Nactonal. Santio^ dc Chile 

CHINA 

Botany an 1 F<;rcstr>* Drp.^rtmcnt. Hot-.,: K :• 

DENMARK 

Bot-inicAl G.\rdcn. Library. Copcnh.iKm 

K. BtMiotck. Crjpmlv.^Rcn 

'" tnrisk PorcninR. O'jxnih.ijjcn 

Koy.^lc ilea ,\ntiquiUis du N' r 1 ropenhagcn 

L'n:.vT.;tv <•( 0^fXTih,n(jpn ..... 
ECUArX)R 

Bibliotoca ('. . " > 

Sodedad Ecu-.:.:;-i:^i _;- i^studios Historicos Americanos. Quito. 
EGYPT 

Ministry of Public Works 4 

FIJI 

!y. Suv.v Fiji Islands (gift) > 

PR • 

e des ScJatom, Paris . ' 

■•({ucs Orientales V»v .• • i - .... 

t ovicDces, MarMlle . . ? 

y... ^toire NatareDt. MarKille . . i 

Museum Natiooal d'Histoire Naturellc. Paris 3 

3 
I 



-:J 

.{uc de France, Paris 



^. 



'.tudes Sdentifiqtic*. Angers ^ 



Soo^U des Sciences Naturetles. La Rocbdte 
Soci«M de Gtegnplae, Paris ... 
SodM de Otegnphie, Toulouse 
SodM Pnaoo^JapoosMe, Puis . 



Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 343 

Society Nationale d'Agriculture, Sciences et Arts, Angers I 

Society Zoologique, Paris 2 

Universite de Montpellier, Cette 2 

GERMANY 

K. Sachsische Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften, Leipzig 

K. Zoologisches und Anthropologisch-Ethnographisches Museum, Dresden . 

Naturforschende Gesellschaft, Freiburg 

Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein fur Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel 

GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND 

Ashmolean Natural History Society of Oxfordshire, Oxford 

Belfast Naturalists' Field Club 

Brighton and Hove Natural History and Philosophical Society, Brighton . 

Bristol Museum and Art Gallery 

British Association for the Advancement of Science, London .... 

British Museum (Natural History), London 

Cambridge Antiquarian Society 

Cambridge Philosophical Society 

Cambridge University Library 

Fisheries Board, Edinburgh 2 

Geographical Society, London 2 

Great Britain Geological Survey, London 2 

Imperial Bureau of Entomology, London 2 

Imperial College of Science and Technology, London I 

Lancashire Sea Fisheries Laboratories, Liverpool i 

Linnean Society, London 3 

Liverpool Biological Society 2 

Manchester Literary and Philosophical Society i 

Manchester Museum I 

Natural History Society of Northumberland, Durham and Newcastle-on- 

Tyne i 

National Museum of Wales, Cardiff i 

Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, London . . i 

Royal Botanic Gardens, Edinburgh i 

Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew 2 

Royal Colonial Institute, London i 

Royal Dublin Society 2 

Royal Horticultural Society, London i 

Royal Society, London 2 

Royal Society of Arts, London i 

Royal Society of Edinburgh 2 

South London Entomological and Natural History Society i 

Tring Zoological Museum . . . . • I 

Victoria and Albert Museum, London I 

Wellcome Chemical Research Laboratories, London 12 

Zoological Society of London i 

INDIA 

Anthropological Society, Bombay I 

Archaeological Survey, Calcutta 5 

Archaeological Survey, Lahore i 

Botanical Survey, Calcutta 2 



344 FitLo Museum of Natural Histoiy — Repoits, Vol. V. 

DvpartmoBt of Agnculture. BomtMiy . i 

Department of A{;- -. Madnu .3 

Dapartmer* ' * •. Vum i 

Gaoloficml ■-.*.. 4 

Gorcnuncot Museum. Madnu . . .1 

HjrdcratMMl Arch»< ^vxicty i 

lodun MuMum, C^. •^- 7 

NatkxM] IndiAn Aaociation. Calcutu (gift) 1 

SupehoUodaot Hindu and Buddhist Monumenu. Lahorr .1 

ITALY 

Accademia Giomia de Sdenxc Natundi. Catania 1 

American Academy in Rome 1 

Institute Botonico deH'Unirernta de Pavia .3 

Id5' "''eofrmfico de Afoctini. Novara ... t 

Lai ... : ) di Zoologia Geoerale e AgrariA. Portici 1 

MuMO Civico di Storia Naturale. Genoa 1 

R. Accademia cnxe. Turin 3 

R. Accademia di ^-^ irnic. Letter* ed Arli. Acireale i 

Sodcti dd Naturalist!. Naples 1 

Sodetl Geofrrafica luliana. Rome .1 

 ne .1 

;- ■.-■-A I'. V rrjpologii '■ ^•" ' r-a, Ploreocc i 

S-^irU It-i.. .cmeN.1" ' .n . . 1 

SodctA Toecana di Sdenie Naturali. Pisa 3 

JAPAN 

AkiU Mining College 1 

Anthropological Insutute. Tokyo .) 

Bureau of Productive Industry Fonnoaa Government . Tathoku . . . i 

Geological ~ Tokyo 2 

Imperial V v of Tokyo. College of Agriculture .3 

Imperial I' : .of Tokyo. College of Science . 3 

Toboku Impcnal Univernty. Seodai .1 

Tokyo Bouniad Society 1 

JAVA 

Bataviaaach Geoootachap van K\:: !' • . i 3 

Department of Agriculture. Ruitcnsorg . . . (> 

Eocyclopaadis- ' " - \m. Weltevreden 1 

Jardin Botanir; tentorg 3 

KOREA 

Government-General Cboaeo, Seoul .1 

MEXICO 

Director General de Ettadittica. Mexico . . . 3 

Instituto Geologico. Meiioo .... . . 3 

Sodedad Cientifica "Antonio AUate," Mr T. 1 

Sodedad Geotogico. Mexico 1 

Sodedad Mexicuia de Oeo^n^a v E.<tadistica. Mexico . . .3 

NETHERLANDS 

Bataafsch Geoootachap der Pr - \- i-hjke Wijsbegeerte, Rotterdam 2 
K. Instituut voor de T . Volkenkuode van Nederlaodach In^!ie. 
The Hague 3 



Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 



345 



K. Nederlandsch Aardijkundig Genootschap, Amsterdam ...'.. I 

Nederlandsche Dierkundige Vereeniging, Leiden I 

Rijks Ethnographisch Museum, Leiden I 

Rijks Herbarium, Leiden I 

Rijks Museum van Natuurlijke Historie, Leiden I 

Soci6t6 des Amis de I'Art Asiatique, Amsterdam l 

NEW ZEALAND 

Acclimatisation Society, Wellington I 

Auckland Institute and Museum, Wellington I 

Department of Agriculture, Wellington 2 

Department of Mines, Wellington 2 

New Zealand Institute, Wellington I 

PERU 

Cuerpo de Ingenieros de Minas, Lima i 

Sociedad Geografica de Lima I 

PORTUGAL 

Academia das Sciencias de Lisboa 2 

Institut6 d'Anatomie, Lisbon I 

Soci6t6 Portugaise des Sciences Naturelles, Lisbon 2 

SPAIN 

Broteria, Salamanca 2 

Instituci6 Catalana d'Historia Natural, Barcelona i 

Junta de Ciencies Naturals, Barcelona 8 

R. Academia de Ciencias Exactas, Fisicas y Naturales, Madrid .... 3 
Sociedad Espanola de Historia Natural, Madrid 2 

SWEDEN 

K. Biblioteket, Stockholm 4 

K. Svenska Vetenskapsakademien, Stockholm 6 

K. Universitets Biblioteket, Upsala 6 

K. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, Stockholm .... 2 

Svenska Sallskapet for Antropologi och Geografi, Stockholm 

Swedish Institute of Experimental Forestry, Stockholm 

SWITZERLAND 

Botanic Garden, Zurich 

Conservatoire et Jardin Botaniques, Geneva 

Mus6e d'Histoire Naturelle, Lausanne 

Naturforschende Gesellschaft, Basel 

Naturforschende Gesellschaft, Zurich 

Ostschweizerische Geograph.-Commerc. Gesellschaft, St. Gallen . , . . 

Soci6t6 Botanique de Geneve 

Soci^t6 de Physique et d'Histoire Naturelle, Geneva 

Soci^t6 Entomologique, Bern 

Soci^t6 Neuchateloise de Geographic 

URUGUAY 

Archivo General Administrativo, Montevideo (gift) 

VENEZUELA 

National Library of Venezuela, Caracas (gift) 

WEST INDIES 

Academia Nacional de Artes y Letras, Havana 2 

Biological Station of Bermuda 



I 



346 Fir.Lo Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

Imperii] Department o( Affhculturt, BarbftdocM i 

lottitato 6t ScfttMl* Boaeflanta. Havana . 

Jamaica Institute. KinKiton . . i 

Trinidad and Tobago Departmcot o( Agnculturc, Port nf S(>ain 

Utthranidad da Habana j 

Balfour. Henry . London J 

Bandrich. Johannes, Dreadeo 

Bladpnan. Aylward M.. London 

Bonaparte, Prince. Parix 

Carpenter. G. H.. Dublin 

Banadetti. Salvador. Buenoa Aires (g\U) 

Dsaprirt. Giuseppe, Malta 

Dtmod. H., Paris . . 

GiufTrida-RugKcri. Florence (pft) 

Olaerup. C. W. K.. Lund 

Heim. Albert. ZOrich . . 

mditch. John. Mancbester 

Huanl. V. A., Quebec .... 

Janicki. r St. Croix (gift) 

Maiden. ,. .. -y, N. S. W. 

Pirr* dc Lin oo, Pbrto (gift) 

Ruhtcf. Rudolt. Frankfurt a, M.. (gift) 3 

Rivrt. P.. P 4 

Roth. H. Lii„ ^land . 4 

Torres. Luis Maria. Buenos Aires i 



V rtuch. E. A.O ' 

Wjtiich. Ernesto. Mc\uw 



I 



AL.\nAMA 

Agricultural Experiment Station. Auburn » 

Alabama GaoloKioal Survey. Univeruty i 

ARIZONA 

Agricultural Experiment Station. Tucson 3 

CALIFORNIA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Berkeley . t 

Caltforma Academy at Sdencca, San Francisco 3 

Cooper Omitbological Chib. HoOywood ... 

Piab and Game Commission. San Fnncisoo 5 

I aland Stanford Junior Univeraity. Stanford University 

Ptoneer Wertcm L um ber ma n. Sacra m e nt o 

Pomona College. Claremont 

^ "1 Diego ? f Natural History 

.^.".ppalnst........ of Biological Reaearcb. La JoUa . 

Sute Board of Forestry. Sacramento 

.tc Mining Bureau. Sacramento 3 

L mversity of Caltfoniia, Beriodey >6 

COLORADO 

Borean of Mines, Denver i 

Colorado CoQcge. Colorado Spnrc' i 



Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 347 

Colorado Museum of Natural History, Denver i 

Colorado School of Mines, Denver i 

Colorado Scientific Society, Denver i 

State Agricultural College, Fort Collins I 

CONNECTICUT 

Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven i 

American Oriental Society, New Haven 1 

Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences, New Haven i 

Hartford Public Library 2 

Peabody Museum, New Haven 2 

State Geological and Natural History Survey, New Haven 2 

Wesleyan University, New Haven i 

Yale University, New Haven 2-- 

FLORIDA 

Florida Geological Survey, Tallahassee i 

GEORGIA 

Geological Survey, Atlanta .2 

HAWAIIAN ISLANDS 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Honolulu I 

Bemice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Honolulu 3 

Board oi Commissions of Agriculture and Forestry, Honolulu .... 2 

Hawaiian College, Honolulu 2 

Hawaiian Entomological Society, Honolulu i 

IDAHO 

Mining Industry, Boise I 

University of Idaho, Moscow i 

ILLINOIS 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Urbana i 

Armour Institute, Chicago i 

Art Institute of Chicago 2 

Chicago Historical Society 4 

Chicago Public Library 2 

Department of Natural History Survey, Urbana i 

Engineering and Cement World, Chicago (gift) i 

Geographic Society of Chicago i 

Hardwood Record, Chicago (gift) 1 

Industrial Survey, Springfield (gift) 1 

John Crerar Library, Chicago i 

Lake Forest College i 

Lewis Institute, Chicago I 

Newberry Library, Chicago 2 

Northwestern University, Evanston i 

State Academy of Science, Springfield I 

State Board of Agriculture, Springfield I 

State Historical Library, Springfield 2 

Sweet, Wallach and Company, Chicago (gift) i 

University of Chicago 4 

University of Illinois, Urbana 6 

INDIANA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Lafayette I 



348 Field Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

Purrlue Uaivernty. I^aycttc . 4 

Stat* Boftrd ot PoroBtry. IndiAivapolu i 

State Rntnmolofist, lodiAOApoUs (gilt) i 

rnivrrwty o( Noire Dame i 

IOWA 

(»«<i>lo^ric.il Survey. I")c« Mojncs . . . 3 

Iowa State r. "rxT Ames j 

Iowa State 1 tural Society, Dca Moir,< 3 

I'nivcrrity o( Iowa. Iowa City 3 

KANSAS 

Achctiltura) Ex; t Statioo, Manhattan 3 

Kanxax State Historical Society. Topcka } 
State Board of Agriculture. Topcka .... 
*"■ * ''^logiad Survey. Lawrence 

LOl; \ 

AffricultunU Experifnent Station, Baton Rouge 

Howranl Memorial Library. New Orleans 

State Museum, New Orleans 

MAINE 

Agricultural Experiment Station. Orono 
Bowdoin College. Brunswick . . 
DepartT"^* Ct^tc Lands and Forestry 
PortUal Library .... 

IVxtland Soaety ot Natural History 

MARYLAND 

Agricultural Experiment Statioo. College Park ... } 

Enoch I^ratt Free Library. Baltimore 2 

Johns Hopkins University. BalUmore 7 

V '  •  ire . I 

S. »>" i> -i; . "I i i.ii\-^\.tj, i>«ltunorc ■< 

MA«^^^'^»^ -SETTS 

:ral Experiment Station. Amherst 3 

Amencan Academy o( Arts and Science*, Boctoo 1 

American Antiqiiarian Society, Boatoo 1 

AmheratColkfa i 

Archaeological lostiiute of America. Boctoo i 

Boatoo MuMnim of Fine Arts 3 

Boatoo Public Library . . i 

Boatoo Sodety of Natural HiTrtnrr 1 

Clark Univenity. Woroeatcr i 

B«MS IriTtitutc. Salem .3 

H:ir\-aH Muwum of Comparative Zo6logy, Cambridge . .^6 

Hap.-ar<l University. Arnold Arboretum. Jamaica Plain t 

Harvard University. Gray Herbarium, Cambridge 3 

• V, Boatoo I 

:.. .....^ ... ...X. „. ..Abor-'*-'^' Woods Hole (gift) . i 

New Bedford Free Pub! ry ^ 

Pao Epifotic Uoioo of America, Boatoo (gift) .1 

Peabody Instatnte .1 

Peabody Moaeum. Cambridge i 



Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 349 

Peabody Museum, Salem 2 

Salem Public Library 2 

Springfield City Library Association i 

Springfield Natural History Museum I 

Tiifts College, Boston i 

Williams College, Williamstown 2 

Worcester County Horticultural Society, Worcester i 

MICHIGAN 

Academy of Sciences, Ann Arbor i 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Agricultural College 3 

Department of Parks and Boulevards, Detroit i 

Detroit Institute of Art I 

Geological and Biological Survey, Lansing 3 

Grand Rapids Public Library i 

Michigan College of Mines, Houghton i 

Michigan State Library, Lansing i 

State Board of Agriculture, Lansing i 

State Board of Library Commissions, Lansing i 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 6 

MINNESOTA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, St. Paul 5 

Minneapolis Institute of Fine Arts i 

Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul 3 

University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 7 

MISSISSIPPI 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Agricultural College i 

State Geological Survey, Jackson (gift) 2 

MISSOURI ' 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Columbia i 

Bureau of Geology and Mines, Jefferson City 2 

City Art Museum, St. Louis i 

Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis i 

Missouri Historical Society, Columbia 2 

St. Louis Academy of Sciences I 

St. Louis Natural History Museum Association (gift) i 

St. Louis Public Library i 

St. Louis University i 

State Historical Society, Columbia i 

Washington University, St. Louis 2 

MONTANA 

State Forester, Helena (gift) 3 

NEBRASKA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Lincoln i 

University of Nebraska, Lincoln 2 

NEVADA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Carson City 2 

State University, Reno 2 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Forestry Commission, Concord i 



3S0 FiFLD Museum or Natural IIistoey — Reports, Vol. V. 

NEW I 

Akc> .1. '.-il Bxperiment SuUoQ. Treotoo .... 58 

Deportment of CottMnrataoo and Devdopmcnt, Trantoo 3 

G«oU->|firal Survey. Trentoo 1 
Newark N! AmocuUoo .2 

Pnncrton I :iy i 

Sutc Museum. Trenton 1 

Slcv-ms Institute. Hoboken .... 1 

NEW ' O 

Nr.. ...o Mujcum, SanU Ftf . 1 

NEW YORK 

Aipicultuml Experiment Station. Geneva 3 

Aineriaui Geogrmphical Society. New York Ci^/ 3 

Aroeriaui Hdlcnic Society. New York City (£ :* j . i 

American Institute cl Mining Enjnnecn, New York City 1 

American Museum o( Natural History, New York City 15 

Brooklyn Botanic Garden 3 

Broukl)'n Institute of Arts and Sdencet . 3 
Caroeinc Foundation for the Advancement of Teadiifig. New York City (gift) . 1 

Or.'. .crsity, New York City 4 

Cov^-i <■ i»' ii tor the Advaoccmeot of Sdeoce and Art. New York City 1 

CoRldl Untvcrnty. IthacA \ 

Porsat and Stream Publishing Company. New York City i 

Inter-American Magaxinc, New York City (gift) 2 

Japan Sod"*- V'tr York City 1 

Metropoti: -cum of Art. New York City . 3 

MuKum of the American Indian. New York City . .1 

New York Academy of Sdences. New York City 1 

New York Botanical Garden. New York Tfv i 
New York Historical Society. New York « . .1 

Pratt Institute Free Library. Brookl>-n .1 

Public Library. New York City .1 

Rochester Academy of Sciences 1 

Rodcefdlcr Poundatioo, New York City i 

State College of Forestry, SyracuM . . .2 

Library, Albany . 1 

Nf uaeum. Albany 7 

Sutcn Island Institute of Artr i" ! > n - -. New York City 3 

Stone Publishing Company. New York City 1 

Zoological Society. New York City .3 

NORTH CAROLINA 

EUsha Mitchell Scientific Society. Chapel Hill .1 

Geological and Boooomic Survey. Ralagh . . i 

NORTH DAKOTA 

University of North Dakota, UnivcTBty i 

OHIO 

Agricultural Experiment Station. Wooster 3 

C;- ' ' «cum Associatioa .1 

^' .. . .'-iwiioun of Art i 

ind Public Library 2 



Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 351 

Denison University, Granville 

Geological Survey, Columbus 

State Archseological and Historical Society, Columbus 

State University, Columbus i 

University of Cincinnati 

Wilson Ornithological Club, Oberlin 

OREGON 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Corvallis 

University of Oregon, Eugene 

PENNSYLVANIA 

American Journal of Pharmacy, Philadelphia 

American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia 

Association of Engineering Societies, Philadelphia 

Bryn Mawr College 

Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh 

Carnegie Library, Pittsburgh 

Carnegie Museum, Pittsburgh 

Delaware County Institute of Science, Media 

Engineers' Society of Western Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh 

Franklin Institute, Philadelphia 

Numismatic and Antiquarian Society, Philadelphia 

Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art, Philadelphia . 

Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences 

Philadelphia Commercial Museum 

Sullivant Moss Society, Pittsburgh 16 

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 3 

University of Pennsylvania Museum, Philadelphia 2 

Wagner Free Institute of Science, Philadelphia 

Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia 20 

Wyoming Historical and Geological Society, Wilkes-Barre 

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 

Bureau of Education, Manila 

Department of Agriculture, Manila 

Department of Interior, Bureau of Science, Manila 

Department of Public Instruction, Manila 

RHODE ISLAND 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Kingston (gift) 

Park Museum, Providence 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charleston Museum .  

SOUTH DAKOTA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Brookings 

Geological and Natural History Survey, Vermilion 

South Dakota School of Sciences, Rapid City 

TENNESSEE 

State Board of Entomology, Nashville 

State Geological Survey, Nashville 

TEXAS 

Agricultural Experiment Station, College Station 



— S.S"" 



35 J Finn Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol, V. 

VIR(*.INIA 

I'tuvrr.ttv- (if V- <*'■--' ••.csnrillc . I 

V;ri;:n!.i r.«>.l>; kflottcirvnlii 2 

VtiTpnw State Furr-.tcr. Charli>ltcs>->nr 3 

WASHINGTON 

Lalioratory of Por«t P«tholo(fy. Sjx>kane » 

Piiicct Sound Biolofncal Sution. Waahinitton Untvenity. SeatUe 3 

Wa4)ungton Univcrrily. Seattle 3 

WaAhinirton Univerrity. Historical Society, Seattle « 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 

Amchcan Mining Coogre** ' 

Cantccie Eodowment f^' ^- '-Tiatioaal Peace (gift) . . i 

Federal Board ct Vocat lucatioD, Washington (gift) i 

Natiooal Education Aawdauoo (gift) 3 

NatkMial Zoological Park i 

V~~ * ■''An Union .2 

..cs Government 4^6 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Acncultural Experiment Station. Morgantown . . 3 

WISCONSIN 

Academy of Sdeoces. > ' ^ . . . 3 

Agricoltural Experime:    r^ Madison 3 

Ardwological Society. ' > 

Beloit College . > 

Stntc I^ * " ' laUiSon 3 

c. ,»-, t ^f.1dison • 

Ton » 

WYOMING 

Agricultiind Experiment Station. Laramie t 

Arthur. Joseph C. Punluc. hviiana I 

Ayer. Edward E.. Ch:..>K.) icft) 6 

Bergman. H. P.. W.vv.-.ncton. I>. C 4 

BUtchley. W. S.. In '.iin i{>oUs, Ind. in^ i 

Booy. Tbeodoor de, Yonken. New York 

BrandcfT'^ Tnwnshend S., Berkeley, C^hfomsa 1 

Cook. N: T.. New Brunswick. New Jersey 4 

Detmera. Freia. Columtms. Ohio ... 1 

Eigenm ' '' "'.oomington. Indiana 

Parweli. roit. Michiiran 

Gerhard. W.J. .Chicago. »3 

OokSnith. WtUiam M. (giit) . . 3 

Ooodq>eed. Edgar J. Chicago (gift) 

OttttMohta, Dr. P. W. (gift) 3 

Hall. Ivan C. Berkeley. California (gift) . 5 

Harper. Edward T.. Gcncseo, Illinois (gift) 

Harris. G. D.. Ithaca, New York (gift) 

Hubba. Carl L., Chicago 



6 
I 
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uj .^ 
Q -O 
LU r3 

I- O 

z ^ 

LLl -*-^ 

O X 

Q o: 

z =^ 

en 3 

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IT & 

< ^ 

H O 



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a 



9 rt 

o i- 

a 



c 



Hi 









Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 353 

Kroeber, A. L., Berkeley, California I 

Laufer, Berthold, Chicago 4 

McGregor, E. A., Chapel Hill, North Carolina (gift) i 

Mason, J. Alden, Chicago 3 

Millspaugh, C. F., Chicago 43 

Moorehead, Warren K., Andover, Massachusetts i 

Morse, Edward S., Salem, Massachusetts 2 

Muttkowski, Richard Anthony, Milwaukee, Wisconsin I 

Nichols, H. W., Chicago 4 

Osbom, Henry Fairfield, New York City 4 

Penrose, R. A. F., Jr., Philadelphia i 

Roberts, Thomas S., Minneapolis, Minnesota I 

Rowlee, W. W., Ithaca, New York (gift) 4 

Slonaker, James R., Palo Alto, Cahfornia (gift) 2 

Strong, R. M., Chicago (gift) 2 

Townsend, Charles H., New York City I 

Van Perborgh, Louis, New York City (gift) I 

Van Rippen, Bene, Cambridge 2 

Wolcott, A. B., Chicago (gift) i 

Weir, James R., Missoula, Montana (gift) 23 



354 Field Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 



Articles of Incorporation. 



STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

DErARmEHT Of STATS. 

William H. Hikricbsem. Seerttary of StaU. 

To All to Wnpu Thksk Pre^rxts Shall Comb, Grbbting: 

Whtnat, a Certificate duly signol and acknowl&lgod having been filed in the 
oflke al the Secretary of Sucr. on th'^ ' ly of .September, a. d. 1893. for the 

orguuntioo <A the COLU.MBIAN .M I OP CHICAGO, under and in ac- 

oordance with the proriaoof ot "An Act Concerning Corporatioiu," approired 
April 18. 1873. and in force July t. 187a, and all acts amendatory thereof, a copy 
of which certificate is hereto attached. 

Sow, therefor*, I. William H. Hinrichseo, Secretary of Sute of the Sute of 
Illinois, by virtue of the powers and duties vested in me by Law. do hereby certify 
that the said COLUMBIAN MU.'^EUM OP CHICAGO U a legally organised 
Corporatioa tmdcr the laws of this State. 

/• TtsHmiany Whereof, I hereto act ray hand and cause to be affixed the Great 
Seal of Sute. Done at the City of Springfield, this 16th day of September, in the 
year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three, and of the Ind^ 
pendeoce of the United States the one hundred and dghteenth. 

W. H. HINRICHSEN. 
(Seal.) Sscrstory of StaU. 

TO HON. WILLIAM H. HINRICHSEN. 

Sbcrbtart or Statr: 
Sir: 

We. the undersigned dtisens of the United Sutes. propoee to form a corporatioo 
oader an act of the General Aasembly of the State of Illinois, entitled " An Act Coo- 
ceming Corporations." approved April 18. 187a. and all acta amendatory thereof; 
and that for the purposes of such organisation we hereby state as follows, to- wit: 

I. The name of such corporation is the "COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OP 
CHICAGO." 

a. The object for which it is forme 1 n for the acoimul/i*; >n an \ l.v^urrr.natjon 
of knowledge, and the prceerrat'''^ r^ ' .-t' ^'ir^n of objects illuslratiog .Vn. Ardue- 
olofy, Sdenoe and History. 

5. The management of the aforesaid m-. lall be vested in a Board of 

FtrnttM (15) TttTSTSSS. five of whom are ' ' -ery year. 

4. The following named penoM are ...... .J as the Trastees for the 

firat year of its corporate existence: 

Ed wan! E. Ayer. Charles B. Parwdl. George E. Adamx. George R. Davis. Charles 
L. HutcfainaoQ, Damd H. Bumham. John A. Roche. M. C. Bullock. Emil G. Htracb. 



Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 355 

James W. Ellsworth, Allison V. Armour, O. F. Aldis, Edwin Walker, John C. Black 
and Frank W. Gunsaulus. 

5. The location of the Museum is in the City of Chicago, County of Cook, and 
State of Illinois. 

(Signed), 

George E. Adams, C. B. Farwell, Sidney C. Eastman, F. W. Putnam, Robert 
McMurdy, Andrew Peterson, L. J. Gage, Charles L. Hutchinson, Ebenezer Bucking- 
ham, Andrew McNally, Edward E. Ayer, John M. Clark, Herman H. Kohlsaat, 
George Schneider, Henry H. Getty, William R. Harper, Franklin H. Head, E. G. 
Keith, J. Irving Pearce, Azel F. Hatch, Henry Wade Rogers, Thomas B. Bryan, 
L. Z. Leiter, A. C. Bartlett, A. A. Sprague, A. C. McClurg, James W. Scott, Geo. F. 
Bissell, John R. Walsh, Chas. Fitzsimmons, John A. Roche, E. B. McCagg, Owen 
F. Aldis, Ferdinand W. Peck, James H. Dole, Joseph Stockton, Edward B. Butler, 
John McConnell, R. A. Waller, H. C. Chatfield-Taylor, A. Crawford, Wm. Sooy 
Smith, P. S. Peterson, John C. Black, Jno. J. Mitchell, C. F. Gunther, George R. 
Davis, Stephen A. Forbes, Robert W. Patterson, Jr., M. C. Bullock, Edwin Walker, 
George M. Pullman, WiUiam E. Curtis, James W. Ellsworth, William E. Hale, 
Wm. T. Baker, Martin A. Ryerson, Huntington W. Jackson, N. B. Ream, Norman 
Wilhams, Melville E. Stone, Bryan Lathrop, EHphalet W. Blatchford, Philip D. 
Armour. 

State of Illinois 

ss. 
Cook County 

I, G. R. Mitchell, a Notary Public in and for said County, do hereby certify 
that the foregoing petitioners personally appeared before me and acknowledged 
severally that they signed the foregoing petition as their free and voluntary act for 
the uses and purposes therein set forth. 

Given under my hand and notarial seal this 14th day of September, 1893. 

G. R. MITCHELL, 
[Seal.) Notary Public, Cook County, III. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 



Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the corporate members held the 
25th day of June, 1894, the name of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM was changed to 
FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. A certificate to this effect was filed June 26, 
1894, in the ofiBce of the Secretary of State for Illinois. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 



Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the corporate members held the 
8th day of November, 1905, the name of the FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM 
was changed to FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. A certificate to 
this effect was filed November 10, 1905, in the office of the Secretary of State for 
Illinois. 



iS6 Field Museum or Natural Histoby — Repobts, Vol. V. 



AMENDED BY-LAWS. 



(JfH» la. 1916.) 



ARTICLE I. 

MKHBEKS. 

Section i. Monbers shall be of five clAMet, AnouAl Membcrt, Corpormte 
Members, Life Monbert, Patrons aod HofK>rury Members. 

Sec. 3. Annual Mcmben shall ooosst of such penota as are selected from 
time to time by the Board of Trustees at any of iu meetings, aod who dtall pay an 
aUMal fee of ten dollars (Ito.oo), payable within thirty dajrs after notice of e l e cti oo. 
aod within thirty dajrs after each rccurhnK annual date. The failure of any person 
to make such initiatory pajrment and such annual payments within said time shall, 
at the option of the Board of Trustees, be sufficient grounds for the forfature of an 
nttonal mcmbcrahip. 

ThiH said annual membership shall entitle the member to: 

Airi/. — Free admittance for the member and family, to the Museum on any day. 

S^ond. — Ten tickets every year, admitting the bearer to the Moaeam on pay 



Tktri. — A copy of all ptihli.-,-ition5 of the Museum when reqoested. 

F<^urtk. — Invitations to all special exhibits, receptions, lectures, or other 
functions which may be given at the Maeeoni. 

Sec 3. The Corporate Members shall consist of the pereone named in the 
nrtkka of incorporation, and of such other persons as shall be dtoaen from time to 
time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, upon the r ec ommeodation 
of the Executive Committee: provided, that such pereooi named in the ar t ick i of 
in corporation shall, within ninety days from the adoption of these By-LAws. aod 
penoos hereafter choeeo as Corporate Members shall, within ninety days of their 
election, pay into the treasury the sum of twenty dollars (|30.oo) or more. The 
failure of any person to make such payment within said time, shall, at the option of 
the Board of Trustees, be ground for forfeiture of his corporate membership. Cor- 
porate Mamben >«*■*■"'"§ Life Members. Patrons or Uooorary Manben shall be 
escmpt from does. Auwal meetings of said Corporate Mcnbert dball be held at 
the nme place and on the same day that the annual meeting of the Board of Trustees 
is held. 

SSC 4. Any povm paying into the treasury the sum of five hundred dollar* 
(fsoo.oo). at any one time, shall, upon the onammooi irote of the Board, become a 
Life Member. Life Members shaO be exempt from all dues. 

Ssc. 5. Patrons shall be chosen by the Board upon recommendation of the 
Biocutive Coaumttee from among pe r s o o s who have rendered eminent service to 



Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 357 

the Museum. They shall be exempt from all dues, and, by virtue of their election 
as Patrons, shall also be Corporate Members. 

Sec. 6. Honorary Members shall be chosen by the Board from among persons 
who have rendered eminent service to science, and only upon unanimous nomination 
of the Executive Committee. They shall be exempt from all dues. 

ARTICLE II. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

Section i. The Board of Trustees shall consist of fifteen members. The 
respective members of the Board now in office, and those who shall hereafter be 
elected, shall hold office during life. Vacancies occurring in the Board shall be filled 
at a regular meeting of the Board, upon the nomination of the Executive Committee 
made at a preceding regular meeting, by a majority vote of the members of the 
Board present. 

Sec. 2. Regular meetings of the Board shall be held on the second Monday of 
each month. Special meetings may be called at any time by the President, and shall 
be called by the Secretary upon the written request of three Trustees. Five Trustees 
shall constitute a quorum, except for the election of officers or the adoption of the 
Annual Budget, when seven Trustees shall be required, but meetings may be ad- 
journed by any less number from day to day, or to a day fixed, previous to the next 
regular meeting. 

Sec. 3. Reasonable written notice, designating the time and place of holding 
meetings, shall be given by the Secretary. 

ARTICLE III. 

HONORARY TRUSTEES. 

Section i. As a mark of respect, and in appreciation of services performed 
for the Institution, those Trustees who by reason of inability, on account of change 
of residence, or for other cause or from indisposition to serve longer in such capacity 
shall resign their place upon the Board, may be elected, by a majority of those present 
at any regular meeting of the Board, an Honorary Trustee for life. Such Honorary 
Trustee will receive notice of all meetings of the Board of Trustees, whether regular 
or special, and will be expected to be present at all such meetings and participate in 
the deliberations thereof, but an Honorary Trustee shall not have the right to vote. 

ARTICLE IV. 
officers. 

Section i. The officers shall be a President, a First Vice-President, a Second 
Vice-President, a Secretary, an Assistant Secretary and a Treasurer. They shall bs 
chosen by ballot by the Board of Trustees, a majority of those present and voting 
being necessary to elect. The President, the First Vice-President, and the Second 
Vice-President shall be chosen from among the members of the Board of Trustees. 
The meeting for the election of officers shall be held on the second Monday of January 
of each year, and shall be called the Annual Meeting. 

Sec. 2. The officers shall hold office for one year, or until their successors are 
elected and qualified, but any officer may be removed at any regular meeting of the 



358 Field Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 



BoAfd ci Tnut— i by • vote ol two-thtrda of all the mmab&n of the Bo^rd. 
in Aoy oBka may be ftOed by the Board at aoy mcvtinf . 

Sac. y Tkw cActn ihaU per f onn tuch dutie* u ordinahly appcruio to their 
fwpective oflk«, mod Mch as ihall be prvKhbod by the By-Laws, or dwifiiitil 
from tkne to time by the Board of Tnistcca. 



ARTICLE V. 

TIIF. TVEASUKUL 

SacnoN I • The Treasurer shall be "iitliwlit" of the funds of the Corporatioo 
«K«pC as herdrukftet prorided. He shall omiIm dtsbnraemeots only upoa warrants 
drawn by the Director and coanterBgned by the PreMdcnt. In the absence or 
inabUity of the Director, warrants may be sifned by the Chairmui of the Finance 
Committee, and in the absence or inability of the President, may be rountswignwl 
by ons of the Vtce-Presidsnts. But no warranu shall be iasued. enept in coBfam ity 
with a rrgulariy prepared voucher, giving the name of the payee and stating the 
occasion (or the expenditure, and verifieil and approved as hereinafter prescribed. 
It shall be no part of the duties of the Treasurer to see that the warrants have bsso 
issoed in conformity with such v ouch ers. 

Sac a. The securities and mosiBMnts of title belonging to the oorponUioa 
shall be placed in the custody of some Trust Company of Chicago to be designated 
by the Board of Trustees, which Trust Company shall collect the income and prin- 
cipal of said securities as the same become due, and pay same to the Treasurer, except 
as hereinafter provided. Said Trtist Company shall allow access to and deliver any 
or all securities or muniments of title to the joint order of the following oflkere. 
aaindy: The Prrsi'lent or one of the Vice-Presidents, jointly with the Cbainnan. or 
one of the Vtce-Chairmen. of the Finance Committee of the Museum. 

Sic y The Treasurer shall give bond in such amount, and with such S BWti es 
m AnO be approved by the Board of Trustees. 

Sac 4. All vouchers executed for the payment of liabilities itKurred in the 
ndmiBistration of the Museum, shall be verified by the Auditor, and approved for 
payment by the Director, and the Chairman of the Administratioa Committee. 
AO yc uch sf s executed for eipenditar es for the ooostniction or rsooos tm ctioo of the 
MossaiB building, or bwldiflgs, shall be veriSed by the Aoditor and a p prova d for 
payment by the Chairman of the Building Committee. AD vouchers executed in 
connection with the investments of the Corporation, or, in any way having to do 
with the endowment funds of the Corporation, shall be verified by the Aoditor and 
approved for payment by the Chairman of the Finance Committee. 

Sac 5. The Harris Trust and Savings Bank of Chicago Aall be Custodian of 
"The N. W. Harris Public School Extension of Pidd Museum" fund. The Bank 
shall make dMburaements only upon warrants drawn by the Director and ooontcr- 
signad by the Presidsnt. In the abeence or inabiUty of the Director, warrants may 
be signed by the Chairman of the Firutnce Committee, and in the abaence or inability 
of the President, may be countersigned by one of the Vice-Presidents. But 00 war- 
lant sbaD be issued, except in conformity with a regularly prepared voucher, giving 
the name of the payee and suting the occasion for the expeoditure, and verified and 
appro ve d by the Auditor, the Director and Chairman of the Administration CoA- 
Btttaa. It shall be no part of the duties of the said Custodian to sss that tba war- 
lasts have been issued in c onf ormity with sudi voocfaera. 



Jan., 1920 Annual Report of the Director. 359 

ARTICLE VI. 

THE DIRECTOR. 

Section i. The Board of Trustees shall elect a Director of the Museum, who 
shall remain in ofiBce until his successor shall be elected. He shall have immediate 
charge and supervision of the Museum, and shall control the operations of the 
institution, subject to the authority of the Board of Trustees and its Committees. 
The Director shall be the official medium of communication between the Board, or 
its Committees, and the scientific stafiE and maintenance force. 

Sec. 2. There shall be four scientific departments of the Museum — Anthro- 
pology, Botany, Geology and Zo6logy, each under the charge of a Curator, subject 
to the authority of the Director. The Curators shall be appointed by the Board 
upon the recommendation of the Director, and shall serve during the pleasure of 
the Board. Subordinate staflf officers in the scientific departments shall be appointed 
and removed by the Director upon the recommendation of the Curators of the 
respective Departments. The Director shall have authority to employ and remove 
all other employees of the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The Director shall make report to the Board at each regular meeting, 
recounting the operations of the Museum for the previous month. At the Annual 
Meeting, the Director shall make an Annual Report, reviewing the work of the 
Museum for the previous year, which Annual Report shall be published in pamphlet 
form for the information of the Trustees and Members, and for free distribution in 
such number as the board may direct. 

ARTICLE VII. 

AUDITOR. 

Section i. The Board shall appoint an Auditor, who shall hold his office 
during the pleasure of the Board. He shall keep proper books of account, setting 
forth the financial condition and transactions of the Corporation, and of the Museum, 
and report thereon at each regular meeting, and at such other times as may be 
required by the Board. He shall certify to the correctness of all vouchers for the 
expenditure of the money of the corporation. 

ARTICLE VIII. 
committees. 

Section i. There shall be six Committees as follows: Finance, Building, 
Auditing, Pension, Administration and Executive. 

Sec. 2. The Finance, Auditing and Pension Committees shall each consist of 
three members, and the Building and Administration Committees shall each consist 
of five members. All members of these five Committees shall be elected by ballot 
by the Board at the Annual Meeting, and shall hold office for one year, and until 
their successors are elected and qualified. In electing the members of these Com- 
mittees, the Board shall designate the Chairman and Vice-Chairman by the order 
in which the members are named in the respective Committee; the first member 
named shall be Chairman, the second named the Vice-Chairman, and the third 
named, Second Vice-Chairman, succession to the Chairmanship being in this order 
in the event of the absence or disability of the Chairman. 

Sec. 3. The Executive Committee shall consist of the President of the Board, 
the Chairman of the Finance Committee, the Chairman of the Building Committee, 



360 PntLD MoBEUM or Natural Histoby — Reports, Vou V. 

the Chairman of the Admintstnitaoo CommittM, the Chainnan of the Auditiof Com- 
tntttcc. the Chainnao of the PcMioo CoaunitSM, and two other t amabm* ct the 
Board to be elected by ballot at the Animal Meettag. 

tec 4. Pbor merobera thaD ooosiuuur a quorum of the Bxecnthre Ooiiiiiittt««: 
three membcri ihall ooostitute a quorum of the Administratioo Comnittee, aod in 
all other ftanding Committcea. two membcn shall constitute a quorum. Ia the 
event that, owing to the abeeocc or inability of memben, a quorum of the regularly 
elected memben aumot be preeent at any meering of any Committee, then the 
Chairman thereof, or his succcnor. as herein provided, may wimmon any mamber of 
the Board of Trutteee to act in place of the abeentaa. 

Ssc S- The Pinanoe Committee shall have npenriaoo of investing the endow- 
meot and other permanent fundi of the Corporation, and the care of audi real 
•Mate as may become its property. It shall have authority to invest, eell, and r»> 
invest funds, subject to the approval of the Board. 

Ssc 6. The Building Committee shall have supervision of the ooditruc- 
tion. reconstruction , and extensioo of any and all buildings used for Museum 
purposes. 

Sbc. 7. The Executive Committee shall be called together from ttma to taoK 
as the Chairman may consider necessary, or as he may be requested to dn bf ttme 
OMmbers of the Committee, to act upon such matters affecting the administration 
of the MuKum as cannot await consideration at the Regular Nfonthly Meetings 

of the Board of Trustees. It shall, before the brr - ~ of each fiscal year, prepare 

•ad submit to the Board an itemised Budget, sett ii the probable receipts from 

aU sources for the ensuing year, and make reooouneodations as to the expenditures 
which should be made for routine maintenance and fixed charges. Upon the adoption 
of the Budget by the Board, the respective Coamiittees shall be rnos i der ed as 
authorised to make the expenditures detailed therein. No increase in the csp«odi> 
tures under any items of the Budget shall be made, except by authority of the Board 
of Trustees, but the r -. c Committee shall have authority, in cases of emer- 

gency, to expend a in. .„^i u.ul sum not noewling two fhotisand doUan in any one 
month. 

Sbc. 8. The Administration Committee shall have general supervision of the 
affairs of the Mujieum. The Ccwnmittec shall bold one meeting each month with 
the Director at the Museum within a week preceding each Monthly Mssfing of the 
Board of Trustees. 

Sac Q. The Auditing Committee shall have supervisioo over all ac- 
counting and bookkeeping, and full control of the financial reoofds. It shall 
cause the same, once each year, or oftener. to be rxamined by an expert indi- 
vidual or firm, and shall transmit the report of such espcrt individual or firm 
to the Board at the next ensuing regular meeting after such enmtnataoo dmll 
have taken place. 

Sbc. la The Pension Committee shall determine by such means and ytumm m 
as shall beestabtidied by the Board of Trustees to whom and in what amount the 
Fsnsion Pund shall be distributed. These determinattons or findings ihaU be subject 
to the approval of the Board of Trustees. 

Sbc tt. The Chairman of each Committee shall report the acu and proceed- 
ings thereof at the nest ensuing regular mreting of the Board. 

Sbc 13. The President shall be ex-officio a member of all Committees and 
Chairman of the Executive Committee. Vacancies occurring in any Committee may 
be filled by ballot at any regular mixing of the Board. 



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Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 361 

ARTICLE IX. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE. 

Section i. At the November meeting of the Board, each year a Nominating 
Committee of three shall be chosen by lot. Said Committee shall make nominations 
for membership of the Finance Committee, the Building Committee, the Administra- 
tion Committee, the Auditing Committee, and the Pension Committee, and for two 
members of the Executive Committee, from among the Trustees, to be submitted 
at the ensuing December meeting and voted upon at the following Annual Meeting 
in January. 

ARTICLE X. 

Section i. Whenever the word "Museum" is employed in the By-Laws of 
the Corporation, it shall be taken to mean the building in which the Museum as an 
Institution is located and operated, the material exhibited, the material in study 
collections, or in storage, furniture, fixtures, cases, tools, records, books, and all 
appurtenances of the Institution, and the workings, researches, installations, ex- 
penditures, field work, laboratories, library, publications, lecture courses, and all 
scientific and maintenance activities. 

Sec. 2. These By-Laws may be amended at any regular meeting of the Board 
of Trustees by a two-thirds vote of all the members present, provided the amend- 
ment shall have been proposed at a preceding regular meeting. 



363 Fir.i-D McsEm of Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 

EDWARH E. AVER CHARLES B. CORY 

MRS. TIMOTHY B. BLACKSTONE STANLEY FIELD 

STANLEY Mccormick 



DECEASED. 
HARLOW N. HIGINBOTHAM 



PATRONS. 



ALLISON V. ARMOUR 
EDWARD B. BUTLER 
ALFRED M. COLLINS 
LEE GARNETT PAY 
ERNEST R GRAHAM 
FRANK W. GUNSAULUS 
CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON 
VERNON SHAW KENNEDY 

JOHN 



GEORGE MANIERRE 
CHARLES H. MARKHAM 
JOHN S. MILLER 
JOHN BARTON PAYNE 
HOMER E. SARGENT 
JAMES SIMPSON 
FREDERICK J. V. SKIFF 
WILLARD A. SMITH 
WILSON 



Jan., 1920. Annual Report of the Director. 



363 



CORPORATE MEMBERS. 



ALDIS, OWEN F. 
ARMOUR, ALLISON V. 
AYER, EDWARD E. 

BARTLETT, A C. 
BLAIR, WATSON F. 
BUTLER, EDWARD B. 

CHALMERS, W. J. 
CHATFIELD-TAYLOR, H. C. 
COLLINS, ALFRED M. 
CRANE, RICHARD T. 

DAY, LEE GARNETT 

EASTMAN, SIDNEY C. 
ELLSWORTH, JAMES W. 

FIELD, MARSHALL 
FIELD, STANLEY 

GAGE, LYMAN J. 
GETTY, HENRY H. 
GRAHAM, ERNEST R. 
GUNSAULUS, FRANK W. 
GUNTHER, C. F. 

HUTCHINSON, CHARLES L. 



jones, arthur b. 

keep, chauncey 
kennedy, vernon shaw 
kohlsaat, herman h. 

Mccormick, gyrus h. 
markham, charles h. 
manierre, george 
miller, john s. 
mitchell, john j. 

payne, john barton 
peck, ferd w. 
porter, george f. 

ryerson, martin a. 

sargent, homer e. 
simpson, james 
skiff, frederick j. v. 
smith, willard a. 
sprague, a. a. 
stone, melville e. 

wilson, john p. 
wrigley, william, jr. 



DECEASED, 1919. 

HIGINBOTHAM, H. N. 



364 Field Museum of Natural History — RE^OBTS, Vol. V. 



LIFE MEMBERS. 



ALOIS. OWEN P. 
ALLKN. BENJAMIN 
ALLERTON. ROBERT H. 

BAKER. MISS ISABELLE 
BANKS. ALEXANDER P. 
BARRELL. FINLEY 
BARRETT. MRS. A. D. 
BARRETT. ROBERT L. 
HARTLETT. A. C. 
BA.^SFtmn. LOWELL C. 
BEALE. WILLIAM G. 
BECKER. A. G. 
BILLINGS. C. K. G. 
prt t tv - -■ FRANK 

i NE. MRS. T. B. 

BLAINE. MRS. EMMONS 
BLAIR. HENRY A. 
BLAIR. WATSON 'p. 
BOOTH. W. VERNON 
BORDEN. JOHN 
BOY' C. T. 

BRL :<. WALTER S. 

BROWN. WILLIAM L. 
BUPFINGTON. EUGENE J. 
BUTLER. EDWARP B. 
BYLLEiiBY. H. M. 

CARR. CLYDE M. 
CARRY. EDWARD P. 
CARTON. L. A. 
CHALMERS. WILLIAM J 
CLAY. JOHN 

c ;WITH 

CRANE. CHARLES RICHARD 

(  "   ■■-,•■!■ 

( ... .i M. 

( . . ). SIARK 

DAU. J. J. 

DAWES. CHARLES G. 



DAY. ALBERT M. 
DEERING CHARLBS 
DEERING. r • 
DELANO. FK... ...<IC A. 

DICK. ALBERT BLAKE 
DONNELLEY. REUBEN H. 
DONNELLEY. THOMAS E. 
DRAKE. JOHN B. 
DRAKE. TRACY C. 

ECKHART. B. A. 

PAIR. ROBERT M. 
PAR WELL. JDHN V. 
PARWELL. WALTER 
PAY. C. N. 
FIELD. MARSHALL 
FIELD. STANLEY 
FORSYTH. ROBERT 
PULLER. WILLIAM A. 

GARTZ. A. P. 

GARY. JOHN W 

GODDARD. LEROY A 

GOODMAN. WILLIAM O. 

GOODRICH. AW. 

G: • !. CLEMENT A. 

GkuMMES. JOHN B. 

HAMILL. ERNEST A. 
HASKELL, r RICK T. 

HIBBARD. I ....,*. 
HILL. LOUIS W. 
HINDE. THOMAS W. 
HOPKINS. L. J. 
HOROWITZ. L. J. 
HOXIB. MRS. JOHN R. 
HUGHITT. MARVIN 
HULBURD. CHARLES H. 
HUTCHINS. JAMES C 
HUTCHINSON. C. L. 

INSULL. SAMUEL 




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Jan., 1920. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



365 



JOHNSON, MRS. ELIZABETH 
AYER 

johnson, prank s. 
jones, arthur b. 
jones, david b. 
jones, thomas d. 

keep, chauncey 

kelley, william v. 

king, francis 

king, james g. 

kirk, walter radcliffe 

lamont, robert p. 
lawson, victor 
logan, spencer h. 
lord, john b. 
lowden, frank o. 
lytton, henry c. 

Mccormick, mrs. 
Mccormick, gyrus h. 
Mccormick, harold f. 

McELWEE, ROBERT H. 

Mclaughlin, frederic 

McLENNAN, D. R. 

mcwilliams, lafayette 
macveagh, franklin 
mark, clayton 
mason, william s. 
mitchell, john j. 
moore, edward s, 
morton, joy 
morton, mark 
munroe, charles a. 

nathan, adolph 
newell, a. b. 

orr, robert m. 

PAM, MAX 
PATTEN, HENRY J. 
PIKE, EUGENE S. 



PINKERTON, WILLIAM A. 
PORTER, GEORGE F. 
PORTER, H. H. 

RAWSON, FREDERICK H. 
REAM, MRS. CAROLINE P. 
REVELL, ALEXANDER H. 
REYNOLDS, GEORGE M. 
ROBINSON, THEODORE W. 
ROSENWALD, JULIUS 
RUNNELLS, JOHN S. 
RUSSELL, EDMUND A. 
RUSSELL, EDWARD P. 
RYERSON, MRS. CARRIE H. 
RYERSON, EDWARD L. 
RYERSON, MARTIN A. 

SCOTT, GEORGE E. 
SCOTT, JOHN W. 
SHEDD, JOHN G. 
SIMPSON, JAMES 
SMITH, ORSON 
SMITH, SOLOMON A. 
SPOOR, JOHN A. 
SPRAGUE, ALBERT A. 
STOUT, FRANK D. 
STRAWN, SILAS H. 
STURGES, GEORGE 
SWIFT, CHARLES H. 
SWIFT, EDWARD F. 
SWIFT, G. F., JR. 
SWIFT, LOUIS F. 

THORNE, CHARLES H. 
THORNE, ROBERT J. 

WHEELER, CHARLES P. 
WILLARD, ALONZO J. 
WILLITS, WARD W. 
WILSON, THOMAS E. 
WILSON, WALTER H. 
WINSTON, GARRARD B. 
WINTER, WALLACE C. 



366 Field Mcscum of Natueal History — Repoits, Vol. V. 



ANNUAL MEMBERS. 



A PA MS. CYRUS H. 
APANfS. MILWARD 

AM !:rt h. 

ARNi< ' «. i\, vnvv'rvoE A. 

BAILEY. EDWARD P. 
BECKER. A. G. 
nil. LINGS. C. K. G. 
BoAL. CHARLES T. 
Bl'RLEY. CLARENCE A. 

COMSTOCK. WILLIAM C. 
COONLEY WARD. MRS. L. A. 
CUM MINGS. E A. 
CURTLS. FRANCES H. 

EISENDRATH. W. N. 

FORGAN. JAMES B. 
PRANK. HENRY L. 

r R. cV F 

i - CONRAD 

GO il. A W. 

GORDON. EDWARD K. 
r.HEY. CHARLES F. 
GURLEY. W. W. 

HARRIS. JOHN F. 
HASKELL. FREDERICK T. 
HIBBARD. WILLIAM G.. J». 
HITCHCOCK. R. M. 
HOLT. GEORGE H. 

JENKIN.S. GEORGE H. 
jONBS. J. S. 

KBITH. W. SCOTT 

LAMB. FRANK H. 
LINCOLN. ROBERT T. 
LINN. W. R. 
LtXJAN. F. G. 
LORD. J. B. 



LOWDEN. FRANK O. 
LYTTON. HENRY C 

McCREA. W S. 
McWILLIAMS. LAFAYETTE 
MAtFARLAND. HENRY J 
MAGEE. HENRY W. 
MANSURE. E. L. 
MAYER. LEVY 
MEYER. MRS. M. A. 
MOORE. N. G. 
MULLIKEN. A. H. 

NATHAN. ADOLPH 
NOLAN. JOHN H. 
NORTON. O. W. 

PALMER. PERCIVAL B. 
PARKER. FRANCIS W. 
PEARSON. EUGENE H. 
PINKERTON. W. A. 

RIPLEY. E. P. 
ROSENBAUM. JOSEPH 
ROSENFELD, MRS. MAURICE 

SCHMIDT. DR. O. L. 
SCHWARTZ. G. A. 
SHORTALL. JOHN L. 
SKINNER. THE MISSES 
SOPER. JAMF^ P. 
SPENCE. MRS ELIZABETH E. 
STOCKTON. JOHN T. 
STUART. ROBERT 

UIHLEIN. EDWARD G. 

WACKER. CHARLES H. 
WALKER. JAMES R. 
WALKER. WILLIAM B. 
WALLER. EDWARD C 
WHITEHEAD. W. M. 
WIUSON. MRS. E. C. 
WILSON. M. H. 
WORCESTER. MRS. C H. 



DECEASED. 
SEIPP. MRS. C. 



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REPORTS, PLATE LXXV. 




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UNIVERSITY OF ILLIN0IS-UR8ANA 






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