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CENTRAL CIRCULATION BOOKSTACKS 

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TO RENEW CAll TELEPHONE CENTER, 333.8400 

UNIVERSITY OF IlllNOIS LIBRARY AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



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45 

N^^ Field Museum of Natural History. 

Publication 206. 
Report Series. Vol. V, No. 6. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 1920. 




Chicago, U. S. A. 
January, 1921. 



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Field Museum of Natural History. 

Publication 206. 

Report Series. Vol. V, No.:6. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 1920. 




Chicago, U. S. A. 
January, 1921. 

THE LIBRARY OF TiiE 

JAN 2 4^cibO 

(JNlVEP.C-in 






BEQUESTS. 

Bequests to Field Museum of Natural History may be made in 
securities, money, books or collections. For those desirous of making 
bequests to the Museum, the following form is suggested: 

y 

FORM OF BEQUEST. 

I do hereby give and bequeath to "Field Museum of Natural 
History" of the City of Chicago, State of IlHnois, 



Cash Contributions made within the taxable 
year to Field Museum of Natural History to an 
amount not in excess of IS% of the tax payer' s net 
income are allowable as deductions in computing 
net income under the Revenue Law. 



CONTENTS. 



Board of Trustees 372 

Officers and Committees 373 

Staff of Museum 374 

Report of the Director 375 

Maintenance 37° 

Moving Operations 378 

Publications 379 

Library . . : • 379 

Cataloguing, Inventorying, and Labeling 381 

Accessions 3o2 

Expeditions and Field Work 3^6 

Installation and Permanent Improvement 386 

The N. W. Harris Public School Extension 400 

Photography and Illustration 402 

Printing 402 

Attendance 403 

Balance Sheet 404 

List of Accessions 4^1 

Department of Anthropology 4II 

Department of Botany 4^2 

Department of Geology 4^3 

Department of Zoology 4^4 

Section of Photography 4^5 

The Library 4^5 

Articles of Incorporation 427 

Amended By-Laws 429 

List of Honorary Members and Patrons 435 

List of Corporate Members 436 

List of Life Members 437 

List of Annual Members 44© 



37^ Fir.LD .NfusEUM or Natcral History — Repobt5. Vof. V. 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



Edward E. Ayf.r. 
Watson F. Blair. 
John Bordf.n. 
Wii.i.iAM J. Chalmers. 
Marshall Field. 
Stanley Field. 
Prank W. Gunsaulus. 
Albert W. Harris. 
Arthur B. Jones, 



Chauncey Keep. 
Cyrus H. McCormi^k. 
George Manierre. 
Martin A. Ryerson. 
James Simpson. 
Frederick J. V. Skjff. 
Solomon A. Smith. 
Albert A. Sprague. 
William Wrigley, Je. 



HONORARY TRUSTEE. 
Owen F. Alois. 



Jan., 1921. 



Annual Report or the Director. 



373 



OFFICERS. 

Stanley Field, President. 

Martin A. Ryerson, First Vice-President. 
Watson F. Blair, Second Vice-President. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff, Secretary. 

D. C. Davies, Assistant Secretary and Auditor. 
Solomon A. Smith, Treasurer. 



Stanley Field. 
Edward E. Ayer. 
Watson F. Blair. 
William J. Chalmers. 

Watson F. Blair. 



COMMITTEES. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Marshall Field. 
Arthur B. Jones. 
George Manierre. 
Albert A. Sprague. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Arthur B. Jones. 
Martin A. Ryerson. 

BUILDING COMMITTEE. 



William J. Chalmers. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff. 



Cyrus H. McCormick. 
Albert A. Sprague. 



Stanley Field. 



SUB-COMMITTEE OF BUILDING COMMITTEE. 

Albert A. Sprague. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff. 



George Manierre. 

Edward E. Ayer. 
Watson F. Blair. 



Arthur B. Jones. 



AUDITING COMMITTEE. 

Arthur B. Jones. 

ADMINISTRATION COMMITTEE. 

Frank W. Gunsaulus. 
George Manierre, 
Chauncey Keep. 

PENSION COMMITTEE. 

Albert A. Sprague. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff. 



374 FiKLD Museum or Natueal !Iistoiy — Repoits, Vol. V. 



STAFF OF THE MUSEUM. 

OiNtCrON. 

Prf.derick J. V. Sufr. 

OCPAHTMINT OF ANTHRO^OCOOY. 

Br.RTHOLD Lauffb, Curator. 

Chaeles L. Owen, Assistant Curator Division of Arckmology. 

Fay Cooper Cole, Assistant Curator Physual Anthropology 
and Malayan Ethnology. 
Albert D. Lewis, Assistant Curator of African and Mtlancnan 

Ethnology. 
J. Alden Mason, Assistant Curator of Mexican and .South 
Amrrican Archaology. 
Helen C. Gunsaulus, Assistant Curator of Japantst 

Ethnology. 

OCPARTUCNT Of •OTAMV. 

CRAmLES F. Millspaugh, Curator. 

B. E. Dahlgren, Assistant Curator Economic Botany. 

Edward T. Harper, Assistant Curator of Cryptogamic Botany, 

OCPARTMENT Of OeOLOOV. 

Oliver C. Farrington, Cwrai^w. H. \V. Nichols, Assistant Curator. 
Elmer S. Ricgs, Assistant Curator of Paleontology. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOOV. 

Charles B. Cory, Curator. 
Wilfred H. Osgood, Assistant Curator of Mammalogy and Omfl fcg f o t/ . 
William J. Gerhard, Assistant Curator of Entomology. 
Edmond N. Gueret, Assistant Curator of Osteology. 
R. Magoon Barnes, Assistant Curator of Odlogy. 
Alfred C. Weed, Assitant Curator of Ichthyology and Herpetology. 

TME N. W. HARRIS PUM.)C tCHOOC CXTENtlOM. 

S. C. SIMMS, Curator. 

RECORDER. MtltTANT RECORDER 

D. C. Davies. Benj. Bridge 

TMt UMAMV. 

Elsie Lippincott, Librarian. 

Emily M. Wilcoxson, Assistant Librarian. 
JAQuary i. 1921. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR. 

1920 



To the Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History: 

I have the honor to present a report of the operations of the Museum 
for the year ending December 31, 1920. 

In every respect the year just closed must be considered as the most 
important and momentous in the history of the organization. The 
completion of the New Building, with the exception of the terrace, 
approximately five years from the date when construction operations 
were inaugurated, and its occupancy are two factors which make the 
period not alone noteworthy, but also establish a new epoch in the 
dissemination of scientific knowledge. The Building may be said to 
have been completed on or about June i, 1920, but the transfer by rail 
of the collections and equipment commenced on the 26th day of April 
and was practically concluded by June 4th. The actual moving op- 
erations by railroad thus consiuned thirty-four working days. The 
plans for moving and the organization for carrying on the task had 
been given careful consideration before work was begun and it is a 
matter of congratulation that the undertaking was carried through 
to its consummation without an untoward ocourence of any nature 
and without serious damage to the material transported. As it was 
thought advisable to move the heavier objects by motor trucks, this 
method of transfer was inaugurated early in March and continued 
with few interruptions daily until the beginning of September. In all 
354 loads were handled in this manner and these were carried with the 
same satisfactory result as the loads transported by railroad. As soon 
as moving operations were concluded, installation was immediately 
undertaken as reviewed elsewhere in this report. It may be said at this 
date that fully one-third of the exhibition cases in the Museimi have 
been finally placed, reinstalled and in a great many instances entirely 
relabeled. There is every indication that the entire exhibition area will 
be completely installed on or about the first of May 192 1, when it is 
intended that the Museimi shall be re-opened to the public. 

Dtiring the year the President of the Museiun, Mr. Stanley Field, 
contributed the sum of $100,000.00 toward the deficit in the New 

375 



370 liLLD Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

Building; Fund. The Board of Trustees in accepting this very generous 
gift, expressed their appreciation with more than ordinary emphasis. 

It is a plca.<auT also to announce that a contribution of $50,000.00 
in the form of 500 shares of 7% preferred stock has l)ccn made by 
Mr. Edward E. Aver, the income of which after the death of Mrs. Ayer 
and the donor is to be expended for the purchase o£ scientific books, 
pampl)!'*' '."'1 publications for the ^ji-ncral Library of the Mtiseum. 
Tliis pri . :i for the future dcvelot>ment of the Mu.scum Library is 
only anoUuT instance of Mr. Ayer's life-long devotion and g en erosity 
to the Museum. In view of the continued interest manifested by 
Mr. Ayer in the expansion of the Library- and especially on account of 
his contributions in money and books to the ornithological section, it 
has been decided to name the ornithological Library of the Musetmi the 
''Edward E. Ayer Ornithological Librar>'." 

Grateful acknowledgment is made of the contribution of the sum 
of lio.ooo.oo from the Honorable Charles R. Crane, or so much thereof 
as may be necessary to complete the publication of the work being 
prepared by the Curator of 2k>0logy on "The Birds of the Americas." 

The additions to the scientific staff and maintenance forces during 
the latter part of the year, ha\*ing caused a deficit in the available fimds 
for the operation of the Museum, amounting to $19,755.32, at the 
December meeting of the Board, the President announced that Mr. 
Marshall Field had volunteered to assume this deficit. 

P' ' --u Field has further contributed the sum of $1 ,000.00 toward 
thepv.. ..v.ttion of a "Record of the Life of the North American Indian," 
which is to consist of twenty volumes of text and illustrations and 
twenty accompanying portfolios of copper plates and photogravures, 
with the understanding that the Museum Library is to receive a set of 
the work when completed. 

The Corporate Members at a meeting held in May, decided to 
•mend the Articles of Incorporation, so as to provide for an increase 
in the Board of Trustees of the Museum from fifteen to twenty-one 
members. At this date four of the created vacancies have been filled by 
the election of Mr. John Borden, Mr. Albert W. Harris, Mr. Solomon A. 
Smith and Mr. James Simpson. 

Through the further efforts of President Field to increase the Life 
Memberships <rf the Institution, the following were elected during the 
y-ear: J. B. Lord, Thomas W. Hinde, Adolph Nathan, George D. 
McLaughlin, Lawrence M. Viles. D. W. Buchanan, Frank O. Wetmore, 
Alexander J^mith, Da\-id M. Yates, Clifford M. Leonard, Frank W. 
Porter, Charles H. Schweppc, William Wnplcy, Jr., Charles Piex, 
James B. Forgan, John McKinlay, Potter Palmer, Francis S. Peabody, 



Jan., 192 1. Annual Report or the Director. 377 

Charles H. Morse, Jr., George Alexander McKinlock, John C. Shaffer, 
Dorr E. Felt, A. Watson Armour, Theodore C. Keller, E. D. Hulbert, 
Frank S. Cunningham, Henry W. Famum, B. E. Sunny, John Barton 
Payne, Honore Palmer, Alfred Decker, David R. Forgan, George F. 
Getz, Clarence M. Woolley, John Bumham, Augustus S. Peabody, 
Samuel M. Hastings, P. D. Block, Joseph H. Defrees, Arthur T. Aldis, 
John F. Jelke, E. J. Lehmann, George L. Veatch, Eugene B. Clark, 
Oliver T. Wilson, Norman Bridge, W. H. Miner, Clive Runnells, 
N. Landon Hoyt, WilHam P. Martin, Robert Stuart, Robert W. Stewart, 
Henry P. Crowell, Gustavus S. Femald and William E. Clow. 

Mr. James Simpson was elected a Patron of the Museimi, in recog- 
nition of the eminent service he has rendered to the Institution. 

Amendments to the By-Laws made during the year have created 
two new classes of memberships. Associate Members and Sustaining 
Members, and have also provided additional privileges for all classes 
of memberships. These privileges are indicated in the revised By-Laws 
which will be found in this report. In this connection also, an agreement 
has been entered into with other contemporary institutions for an 
interchange of cotutesies and privileges for Life and Annual Members. 

The Board of Trustees had presented for their consideration during 
the year a proposal from the South Park Commissioners, asking the 
consent of the Trustees to the erection by the Commissioners of a 
Stadiiun, which it is proposed to construct on the south side of the 
Museum building and which would encroach one hundred and twenty 
feet, approximately, upon the restricted areas, which under the terms 
of the contract between the Museimi Trustees and the South Park 
Commissioners providing a site for the Museum building, it was agreed 
shovdd remain free of structures unless otherwise concurred in by the 
Musetun. After fvdl consideration of the request, the Trustees gave 
their consent to the construction of the Stadium as shown on the plans 
submitted. 

The ordinance under which the South Park Commissioners set aside 
a tract of land in Grant Park for the site of the new building, in con- 
sideration of which dedication the Institution is to be open free to the 
public three days in each week, having been brought to the attention of 
the Board of Trustees, it was decided that the Musetma should be open 
free to the public on Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays. 

Dtuing the year arrangements were made with the Illinois Central 
Railroad to construct a foot-bridge over the tracks of the railroad at 
Park Row which would permit foot passage from the Park Row station 
platform, or from the Park just outside of the retaining walls east and 
west of the tracks, the Musetun to assume the cost of the structure. 



37* FiKLO McbtuM vr Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

Thi3 hndKT has been completed and has greatly increased the means of 
access to the Musetun. 

The scope of the Stxmlcy Field Mujxnini Employes Poiiion Fund 
has been enlarged by its founder, the execution of an insurance contract 
with the Aetna Instirancc Comi>any covcrinR the lives of the peraoDnel 
of the Museum, ^-ith the prcmiimi paid out of this Fund, having been 
authorized. In this coiiLrnct it is stijnilatcd that continuous service for 
one complete year is prc-rcquisitc to .securing anv in?airance and that 
the in.s-urancc automatically ceases upon the term . . of the aervicM 
of the insured. Employes, who on February i, 1920, had not been in 
the service of the Museum for one complete year, automatically beoame 
insured at the conclusion of that period, and are progressively entitled 
to increasing benefits as set forth in the schedule adopted. This insur- 
ance i.'^ without cost to the insured and imposes no obligation not already 
attending the services of the employe. 

maintcmancc. — The stmi of $170,200.00 was appropriated by the 
Board of Trustees for the necessary expenses of maintenance during 
the fiscal year. The cost of maintenance, however, amounted to 
approximately $190,000.00, thus creating a deficit of approximately 
$20,000. which, as referred to elsewhere in this report, was contnbuted 
by Mr. Marshall Field. 

Movifto ortMATioNs. — Tlic following is a brief sxunmary of the 
extent and cost of the transfer of all collections, material and equipment 
from the old building in Jackson Park to the new building in Grant 
Park. 

Time: 

DiUTition of transportation by rail, April a6, 1920, to 
June 4, 1920, inclusive, omitting Sundays and onr 

holiday ^4 days 

Duration of transportation by auto truck (capacity five 

ton). March j, loro, to October 2, 1020 fnot continuous) 132 days 

Quantities: 

Number of freight cars loaded and unloaded 321 

Number of motor truck loads (loaded and unloaded) — 

capacity 5 tons 354 

Glazed and unglazed exhibition cases moved — average 

si7.e twelve feet m length and eight feet in height if?^? 

Number of cases "knockcd-down" and partly dismantled 98 



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Jan., 1921. Annual Report of the Director. 379 

Number of boxes, crates, barrels, packages, and other 
parcels specially prepared for transporting . . . 11,645 

Office furniture and effects, books and publications in 
carriers, maintenance equipment, photographic equip- 
ment, printing shop equipment, pieces and objects . 8,006 

Cost: 

Cost of packing supplies, covering a period of two years $ 4,897. 52 
Total cost of moving operations not to exceed — (some 
unrendered bills estimated) 70,000.00 

Damage : 

Repairing material damaged in actual transit . . . 1,250.00 

Repairing material damaged during packing operations 

including the replacing of all broken glass .... 2,800.00 

Remarks : 

The plan of the operation provided placing the cases and objects 
transported upon a definite floor area or in a particular room or a 
designated section, where it is intended they shall remain in the new 
biiilding. 

The number of checkers employed at loading platform at 

old building and at unloading platform at new building 1 1 

(All volunteered from the personnel of the Museum) 

Comparison of the loading sheets with the unloading sheets both 
by rail and truck, shows not one article or object has apparently been 
lost or misplaced in the process of the transfer. 

Estimated cost of glass moved, at present day prices $753,000.00 

Publications. — During the year one publication was issued, detail 
of which follows: 

Pub. 205. — Report Series, Vol. 5, No. 5. Annual Report of the Director 
for the year 1919. January 1920. 69 pages, 14 halftones, 
edition 2,000. 

THE Library. — Notwithstanding the limitations that existing con- 
ditions have imposed, the customary activities of the Library have been 
carried on with a fair measm^e of success. There have been received 
by gift, exchange and piirchase 1,088 books and pamphlets. The Lib- 
rary contains 73,824 books and pamphlets. Cards written and filed 
in the catalogues number 6,690. The transfer of the contents of the 
library to the new building was accomplished by using cartons, large 
wooden containers and motor trucks. The space at present assigned 



380 Field Museum of Natural Hihtoby — Repohts, Vol. V. 

to the office ol the Library and the stack room is on thr ^^find floor. 
The four departmental hl>raries are located on the third flcxir in rooms 
n ' X fach of the depii •*;. The task of installing the exhibi- 
tion luuls has employed all ii 1 wiuce av.-'-' '■ and the work of shelv- 
inK the lib'-i-i--: i; in alieyancc until t:.. — ick rooms can be oom- 
pictcd whc: . ; .il>Ie time and lal)or will be necessary to retetablish 
the sequence of the original classification. The decision to have all 
literature pertaining to the work of the departments placed in their 
respective libraries necessitates a numlxr of transfers and until these 
transfers arc effected and inventories taken it is not possible to ac- 
curately state the numlKT of books and pamphlets in each library. 
Tlie books of the anthrojxiioj^ical and botanical departments have been 
placed on the shelves. In the Dqmrtment of Anthropolojjy discarded 
exhibition cases were converted into lxx>k cases and used to good 
advantage. Tlie library's generous patron, Mr. Edward E. Aycr, pre- 
sented the rare eight volume edition of Audulxjn's Birds of North 
America. During the year Mr. Aycr caused to be ordered one hundred 
and fourteen volumes of ornithological works. Of these eighty-one 
volumes have been received, a number of which arc rare copies dating 
back to 1776, and all arc beautifully illustrated. A catalogue of all 
the ornithological works in the library is in preparation, at the request 
of Mr. Aycr, who has cxprcssc<l a desire to supplement his already 
RTili-Tuli.! collection until it provides workers and students with as 
C' .o an oniithological reference library as is obtainable. Gifts, 
gratefully received from other sources, are acknowledged as such in the 
list of accessions appended to the report. Exchanges were received 
from four hundred and ninety-six institutions and indi\iduals. The 
first consignment of the jniblications of the Museum, since pre-war days, 
was forwarded during the year to all countries where international 
exchange service has been resumed. The continued upward trend of the 
cost of all publications very seriously affects scientific literature. Various 
srx-ii tir^ that have existed mainly for the publication of the results of 
B' .  research have had to either .suspend publishing for the time 
being or discontinue exchange relations and ask for subscriptions to 
enable them to continue their work. Five new exchanges were effected 
with the following: Federated Malay States Museums, Kuala Lumpur; 
Musco de Etnologia y Antropologia de Chile, Santiago dc Chile; 
Omithf)' * ty of Japan, Tok>'o; Manchester Geographical 
Society ui uu^iiund, R. Academia de Ciencias y Artes, Barcelona. 
ComparatiNfly few purchases of books have '— " made as the time of 
the stafi ha- V.rcn wholly occupied w-i*h ir .;on work. Subscrip- 
tions were » 1 for seventy-eight 1 ■>.'.-. 



Jan., 192 1. Annual Report of the Director. 381 

Departmental Cataloguing, Inventorying, and Labeling. — During the year 
the work of cataloguing in the Department of Anthropology has been 
carried on as new accessions were acquired. In the division of Mexican 
and South American archaeology, the remainder of the Zavaleta collec- 
tion, as well as the material from Ecuador and the West Indies received 
last year, as an exchange, from the Museum of the American Indian, 
New York, has been catalogued. The total number of catalogue cards 
prepared amounts to 1,646. These cards are distributed over the 
divisions as follows: Southwest, Mexican and South American Archae- 
ology 1,501; North American Ethnology 4; Malayan Ethnology 118; 
China, Japan and India 16; Near East Archaeology and Ethnology 3; 
and African Ethnology 4. These cards have been entered in the inven- 
tory books of the Department, which now number thirty-eight. The 
nimiber of annual accessions amoiuits to twenty, eighteen of which 
have been entered. The total number of catalogue cards entered from 
the opening of the first volume amounts to 155,194. A new and vigorous 
campaign in label writing and printing was inaugurated during the 
last months of the year. The progress made so far has been entirely 
satisfactory, munerous new labels having been added to the exhibition 
cases. The total niimber of these labels amounts to 4,139, distributed 
as follows: North West Coast 96; New Guinea 870; Mexico and South 
America 2,316; Philippines 173; China, Tibet and Korea 442; Ainu 
and Siberia 239; Japan 3. There were 393 new label cards added to the 
label file. The printer suppHed the department with 975 catalogue cards. 

As very little new material has been added to the organized collec- 
tions in the Department of Botany during the year, on account of the 
necessities contingent upon moving, only 231 incidental entries have 
been made in the department catalogues, bringing the total entries up 
to 482,310. The card indices of the department have been augmented 
as follows: 

No. of Cards 
Augmented 1920 Total 

Index to Botanical Species 

Index to Common Names 

Index to Yucatan Plants 

Index to Euphorbiae 

Index to Department Labels 

Index to Geographic Localities 

Index to Collectors 

Index to Botanical Titles 

Index to Department Library 

Index to Illinois Flora 

Index to Hand Specimens of Wood 

Index t6 Installations 

Index to Photographs 



4-585 


156,618 


76 


20,375 


5 


6,367 


7 


4.232 


36 


3.136 


II 


2,767 


2 


9.864 


75 


1.575 




8,800 


no 


910 


1,646 


2,446 




595 




600 



38a FitLD MiSEiM or Natural History — Repobts, Vol. V. 



All acccssioru; in the Department ol Geology have been fully cat*> 
loy^ucd as received, the larRcsl number appended T ' 1 by the 

.1 ' ' • n of t* imens of the Frederick J. V. .^kiu cuucction. In 

paiiv..!^ or in-i.i ...^ the older collections specimens occasionally were 
found which had been overlooked in j>revious catalojruinfj, and the 
opportunity was improved to record these also. The total niunber <rf 
entries made during the year was 45a. During the installation of the 
cases in the new building, all missing or soilc<l labels have been replaced 
as fast as the cases were installed, by new ones. As considerable care 
was taken in packing the labels from the old installation so that loss 
or injury should be avoided, the instances where such labels needed 
replacement were fortunately few. New labels were also provided 
for any specimens added that had not previously been in.stalled, and 
the form, wording or size of some of the old labels was changed in 
instances where this seemed desirable. The total number of re-in.stalled 
cases completely labeled during the year s 70 and the total number of 
new labels that have been prepared is 668. 

Cataloguing in the Department of Zoology during the year was 
reduced to that which was absolutely necessary, namely 43 entries in 
Mammaloj^' and 247 in Omitholojr>'. Many exhibition labels have been 
prqiarcd, including an entirely new set for the large habitat groups oi 
mammals. 

The following table .shows the work performed on catalogues and 
inventorying accomplished: 



Department of .Anthropology. 
Department of Ii<.tany 
' ' ;'."»rtmcnt of (icf-lipy 
 "-♦Tientof Zo6k»gy 



■rary . 
of Pbo< 



bo Uun at Photography 



No. of 


TotAl N<x 


fUoord 


d EothMto 


Booka 


Dacai. 19*0 


38 


15s. 104 


5« 


4^i.3«o 


33 


UM72 


40 


1 01.304 


U 


117.766 


20 


121. .239 



Bath«a 


ToulNo. 


Dvnag 


Wrtttan 


i9ao 


I.«S46 


155.334 


2J4 


87.409 


45a 


8.456 


3ifO 


.V4.696 


6.690 


283.716 


39S 





AcctssioMs. — The most notable gift of the year in the Department 
of Anthropolog>' is the valuable collection of Indian baskets from British 
Columbia and California made by Mr. Homer E. Sargent in the course 
of fifteen years and presented by him to the Museimi. The present 
contribution of 342 baskets is merely the first in.stallment; there are 
several hundred more to come by next spring. This extensive collection 
comprises excellent and partially old specimens from the Hupa, Pomo, 
Paiutc, Panamint, Maidu, Mono, Chumashan, Diegeno, Chemehuevi, 
Navaho, and other tribes. Mr. Edward E. Aver presented to the 
department a kris from the Moro on the Philippines, a Pima basket 
from California, several interesting objects from the Tlingit and Eskimo 



Jan., 192 1. Annual Report of the Director. 383 

of Alaska, and a Pomo feather headband. Mr. George A. Crofts of 
Tientsin, China, remembered the Museum with a gift of two large, 
remarkable clay statuettes of the T'ang period (a.d. 618-906), which 
have been added to the Blackstone Collection, and are placed on 
exhibition in a case of mediaeval clay figures. The gift of Mr. and Mrs. 
Edwin F. Gillette of a set of Japanese dolls for the Dolls' Festival 
(H-ina Matsuri) is a distinct addition to the Division of Japanese 
Ethnology. The group, illustrated in this Report, consists of a painted 
screen and nine dolls representing the emperor and empress of Japan, 
the elder and younger ministers of state, and an orchestra of five court- 
musicians, exactly as it would appear in a Japanese home on the occasion 
of the Dolls' Festival held each year for the pleasure and instruction of 
little girls. Such sets, handed down as family heirlooms, are taken out 
of the storehouse annually, carefully unpacked, and displayed for a 
week on a series of shelves covered with scarlet cloth. There are gen- 
erally arrayed before the dolls miniature pieces of fumittu"e, various 
articles for the house reproduced oftentimes in gold lacquer or in porce- 
lain, such as tiny tables upon which are placed offerings of food prepared 
by the little girls, an act which in itself tends toward promoting a deep 
reverence for the emperor and a knowledge of the old court and its 
customs. The sixfold screen, which serves as a background, possesses 
great merits in color and decoration. Above a stream, near which grow 
iris, peonies, and a sturdy pine; a white crane flies downward toward two 
others standing on the bank. The golden-flecked clouds and the soft 
greens and reds in decoration blend admirably with the brocade cos- 
timies of the dolls immediately in front of the screen. These figures, 
made of enameled wood, are modeled with remarkable care, each 
expressing a distinct personality. As an illustration of the exactitude 
of execution, the hands and wrists of the old minister of state, which 
delineate real age, are truly of admirable workmanship. The costumes 
are all of brocade, probably a hundred years or more in age, which in 
itself is of value for the study of textiles and design. The head-dresses, 
of which there are three distinct types, besides the elaborate head-dress 
of the empress, are removable and exact copies of the style worn at 
court by the various characters here represented. The emperor and 
empress sit upon raised platforms, magnificently clothed, each possess- 
ing emblems characteristic of their offices. The empress holds a small 
folding-fan of wood painted with the favorite decoration of the crane 
flying above the pine, bamboo and plum, a combination emblematic of 
long life. The emperor, wearing a large sword, holds in his right hand 
a flat wooden baton of tablet shape (shaku), generally carried by all 
noblemen at the court. The old and young ministers are equipped with 



384 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

Ik)ws, arrows, and swords. Swords arc al.so ilirust in Uic belt of each of 
the five anirt-musicians, two of whom sit upon lacciucrcd stands while 
the other tlirce squat ujxsn the ^n"ound. The musical instruments, the 
flute, the hand-drum, and flat-dmm, arc faithfully reproduced in 
miniature. Under the auspices of Mr. William WriRlcy, Jr., the Museum 
entered into an aKTcemcnt with the Mu.scum of the American Indian 
of New York City, for the purpose of or^anizinR an extensive archso- 
lojjical sur\'ey of Catalina Island on the Califomian coast. The under- 
standing was that the material resulting; from this exploration shouJd 
be equally di\'ided between the two institutions. The field-work was 
placed in charge of Mr. George G. Hcye, Director of the Museum of 
the American Indian, and conducted during last summer. As a result 
of these exca\'ationB, the Mu.scum received from Mr. Heyc in November 
a large quantity of arch.Tological material, con.si.sting chiefly of pestles, 
mortars, and other implements of stone, particularly steatite, bone, 
shell, and clay. The collection is thoroughly representative of that 
culture-area. In order to make this collection more interesting and to 
illustrate some of the adjacent cultures in connection with it, Mr. Heye 
added to it as a gift to the Museum a considerable collection from San 
Nicholas and San Miguel islands, California, which contains a number 
of fine prehistoric shell and bone ornaments. 

The notable additions to the herbaria during the year are: the first 
installment of the E. T. and S. A. Harper mycologic collection, con- 
sisting of about 10,000 specimens; the Santa Catalina Island collections 
of C. F. Millspaugh (595) and L. W. Nuttall (946 specimens); Pennell's 
North American (55) and U. S. Colombian (a) Scrophulariacea?; Mrs. 
Wilcoxson's Massachusetts plants (95 s]xximens); Howe's distribution 
of Marine Algse, principally West Indian and Bahaman (146 speci- 
mens); Maxon &• Killip's Jamaican Plants (1,128 specimens); E. T. & 
S. A. Hanger's Virginia and Massachusetts fungi of 1920 (210 speci- 
mens) ; and Ames' Bomean Orchids. 

Of especial importance among the accessions of the year in the 
Department of Geolog>' the Curator of the department reports that 
the collection of ores and minerals presented by Dr. Frederick J. V. Skiff 
is of especial interest and value. The Curator states: "This collection 
contains not only many specimens unique in beauty and rarity, but 
also some which since they came from localities from which it would 
be impossible, at the present time, to obtain specimens, may be con- 
sidered priceless. Series of special interest and value in the collection 
are the following: A number of specimens of free gold, especially from 
South American localities and specimens of placer gold from Colorado 
and Idaho; other gold ores; platinum from the Urals; some fine sped- 



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Jan., 192 1. Annual Report of the Director. 385 

mens of amethyst; excellent specimens of turquois, tiger eye and 
thomsonite; some unique crystals of calcite from Joplin, Mo., show- 
ing a new crystal habit; silver ores showing free silver from several 
localities; and concentrates from various ores. The total niunber of 
specimens in the collection is 277." Mr. William J. Chalmers presented 
for addition to the William J. Chalmers crystal collection a remarkable 
pseudomorph of quartz after crystallized spodtmiene from Greenwood, 
Maine. Mr. Chalmers also presented a valuable book of photographs 
of the diamond mines at Kimberley, South Africa. This book contains 
114 original prints illustrating various phases of the processes of mining 
at the Kimberley mines and covering chronologically nearly the entire 
history of the mines. The United Verde Company and United Verde 
Extension Company of Bisbee, Arizona, and the New Cornelia Copper 
Company of Ajo, Arizona, presented full series of the various ores mined 
by them and specimens of the associated rocks. These series in connec- 
tion with specimens previously presented by the Utah Copper Company, 
afford material for fully illustrating the developments which have taken 
place in recent years in the utilization of the low-grade copper ores, 
usually known as "porphyry coppers," Specimens of both leaching 
and flotation ores are included in the series. These series all form 
important additions to the collection of copper ores. The kind offices of 
Mr. William J. Chalmers in assisting in prociiring these gifts are grate- 
fully acknowledged. A cast of the Yenberrie, Australia, iron meteorite 
was presented by the United States National Museum and a full-sized, 
polished section of the meteorite was purchased. Dr. A. de Chairmont 
presented nine individual aerolites of the Holbrook, Arizona, fall. By 
exchange with the University of Chicago a nearly complete skeleton in 
matrix of the rare Permian, lizard-like reptile, Varanosaurus, from 
Texas, was obtained, also from the same institution and in a similar 
way a prepared male skull and dentition of the extinct imgulate 
Diceratherium, from the Miocene of Nebraska. 

The principal accession in the Department of Zoology during the 
year was the collection of 676 specimens, chiefly mammals and birds, 
obtained by Assistant Curator Osgood and Mr. H. B. Conover on the 
expedition to Venezuela of which mention is made elsewhere. Mr. 
Conover also presented to the Museum skulls and scalps of one moose 
and two caribou from northwest Canada. An important addition to the 
exhibition collection of mammals was a moimted giraffe presented by 
Mrs. Mollie Netcher Newbury. A collection of 270 salt and fresh water 
fishes from Louisiana was received in exchange from the Southern 
Biological Supply Company of New Orleans. The invertebrates re- 
ceived during the year consisted of a donation of over 8,800 shells 



386 Field Mu« Lxm of Natural History — RirrnBT*;, Vol. V. 

and 40 sea-urchins, starfish, etc., mostly collected by the late Mrs. 
Faiiny Sonshine and presented to the Mu .turn by her dauKhlcr, MiM 
B. ^' '■■'■c. A tcTnjK)rar>' addition to the I^ivisifm of En.omoloRy con- 
sistcu vi ilic twenty-year dqxjsit of the Garr>' dc N. HouKh Collection 
of flics, roceivct! from the University of Chicaj^o. The value of this 
material is mainly due to the fact that it is rich in authcnticallv named 
sixvies of certain families of Euro|)can and North American mi; ke 

flii*s. This collection will prove useful for comparison when naming 
some i)f the Museum material. It will also l>c helpful to students who 
arc interested in the families rqjrescnted. 

ExptoiTioNs AND Field work. — Through the jjenerous co-operation of 
Mr. H. B. Conover it was possible to make one short but important 
expedition during the year. Assistant Curator Osgood, accompanied by 
Mr. Conover, left late in Januar>' for northwestern Venezuela and 
returned to the Museum in the latter part of May. They worked in the 
tropical lowlands surrounding Lake Maracaibo and in the Sierra de 
PerijA near the boundar>' between Venezuela and Colombia. Later 
they penetrated the interior .south of Lake Maracaibo to the highlands 
of the b^erra de Merida, working at various levels up to an eJe\'ation of 
15,000 feet. The collections and physical data obtained supplement the 
results of prc\'ious expeditions in an important way and make the 
Mu.seum collection of the vertel"- ■'■ - of this general region the most 
comprehensive in existence. In • uting this work, the members oC 

the exjjcdition were greatly ;: I by officials of the Caribbean Oil 

Company, notably Mr. F. R. Bartlctt. Tlicy were much indebted also 
to Scflor Juan E. Paris, a prominent and public-spirited citizen of 
Maracaibo. 

Installation, Rearnanoemcni. and Permanent Improvement. — The Depart- 
ment of Anthropology was mpaged during the fu^t half of the year in 
packing r '♦- '-•'il for removal to the new building. The method of 
packing a , i proved so efficient that no essential damage was done 
to any .specimen, whether large or small, during the removal. On moving 
into the new building in June, the stafl put in order and arranged the 
offices, work-rooms, store-rooms, and laboratories assigned to the depart- 
ment on the third f^oor. An immense ntmibcr of crates, boxes, and 
packages had been accxmiulated in Installation Room 34, during moWng- 
time. These were checked up with the records, sorted, and relegated to 
the various sections to which the material belongs. Cabinets for storage 
were placed in work-rooms, several storage racks and seven lajrout 
tables were made. Hundreds of exhibition cases were stripped of paring 



Jan., 1921. Annual Report of the Director. 387 

material, numerous crates and boxes were opened, and the material 
arranged either for exhibition or study and exchange collections. The 
best possible use has been made of the space available on the third 
floor. Rooms 65 and 66 are utilized for the storage of East Asiatic 
collections. Room 50 contains Japanese material, Room 48 Melanesian 
collections, the greater part of which are stored in the Installation Hall, 
Room 46 North American archaeology. Room 44 Indian blankets and 
baskets, Room 42 Hopi material. Room 43 Southwest, Navaho and 
Mission Indians material. Room 40 Mexican and South American 
archaeology, Room 33 Northwest Coast collections, and Room 34 
Malayan material. Exchange material is placed in Rooms 30 and 31. 
Room 28 is allotted to study collections. Work on actual installation 
of exhibition cases was begun on September 20th. During this brief 
period of three months a total of 249 cases was installed or re-installed. 
These cover all sections of the department. The Philippine Hall, 55 
cases, with the exception of the large group-cases, the Chinese collec- 
tions on the East Gallery Hall of the second floor, 64 cases, save several 
large wall cases, and the greater portion of the West Gallery Hall, can 
now be reported as being completely installed. Hopeful progress has 
been made in the Joseph N. Field Hall (Melanesia), the Mexican and 
South American Hall, the Southwest Hall, and the hall allotted to 
Egyptian and classical archaeology. In the Mexican and South Ameri- 
can Hall, nine cases have been newly installed; these illustrate Calchaqui 
stone work, ethnology of the Upper Amazon, Brazil, Paraguay, Peru, 
and Ecuador, and Maya and Mexican archaeology. In every instance, 
exhibition material was carefiilly sifted, and the new arrangement is 
considerably improved upon the old system. A special hall, located on 
the ground floor along the east side of the building, having been assigned 
to the department for the exhibition of primitive means of navigation, 
82 boats were placed and arranged in the hall during August. Five 
exhibition cases, two illustrating boat-models from China, two with 
boat-models and other means of transportation from India and Burma, 
and one with similar material from New Guinea, were moved in and 
placed at a somewhat later date. When completed this hall will prove an 
attractive featiu-e in the building. It was decided to discard from 
exhibition all table and upright cases which were found to be no longer 
serviceable and hardly in harmony with the character of the new halls. 
This step necessitated a complete vacating of these cases containing 
large storage bases in which a large quantity of material had been 
packed for transportation. This material has been temporarily stored 
in Room 45 on the third floor. The Departmental Library has been 
completely arranged and set in order in twenty-three cabinets in Room 



388 Field Museum op Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

39. With the co-opcration of the departmental staff, the Museum libra- 
rians completed this task within a few weeks. As all books pertaining 
to anthroix)lopy, also those formerly stacked in the main library, are 
now assi^icd to the departmental collection, it was necessary to prepare 
a new .set of catalogue cards in conformity with this new arrangement, 
and the number of the cabinet in which a book is placed has been added 
to each card, so that it is possible to promptly locate a volume. The 
BaRobo proup haslxxin completed and the figvu^of thcHopi boomerang- 
thrower remodeled. 

In the Department of Botany the entire staff of the department 
projxrr was employed during the first five months of the year in finishing 
preparation for moNnng into the halls and rooms set aside for it in the 
new building. The specimens in all those exhibition cases not prepared 
during the closing months of the previous year were secured in place, or 
jxicked in containers, and properly marked and lalx?led to designate 
the position they were destined to occupy. The entire herbaria and all 
other material, supplies, appliances, etc., were, in like manner, prepared 
for trans-portation. The month of May and part of June were employed 
in superintending the removal of the packed material from the old 
building and the placing of the same in position in the new. In Septem- 
ber re-installation began both in the exhibition halls and the working 
rooms. Since that date the books of the Department Library have 
been temporarily shelved and arranged, the phanerogamic herbarium 
fully organized, and most of the laboratories at least partly equipped 
for work. On account of alterations deemed cx]x?dient in the depart- 
mental arrangement as originally planned, it became necessary to 
change the installation of a large number of cases previously considered 
complete. These rc-installations have consumed a large amotmt of 
time and rendered re-installation far slower than was expected, setting 
back the anticipated completion of the department at least five months. 
Contributory to this extra work has been the elements of the unfinished 
character of the halls and the dust raised in the work of their completion. 
This has caused more cleaning of specimens and repainting of case 
interiors than could have Ixxni foreseen. In Hall 28 one hundred and 
ten case units have been placed. These arc devoted entirely to all 
those plant families the elements of which are on hand at this time. 
The installation will comprise plant reproductions and natural sfKxri- 
mens embracing the taxonomy of about 100 families. Of these 81 
are now installed. Hall 27, Foreign Woods: In this hall the cases 
have not yet been shifted to their intended position. They will require 
comparatively little interior arrangement when once set, as the 
contents are now in place. Hall 26, North American Trees: The 



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Jan., 1921. Annual Report of the Director. 389 

cases in this hall are in position. They will require little interior work 
done upon them. Halls 25 and 29, Economic Botany: The cases in 
these two halls are substantially all placed and 71 units have been 
re-installed complete. The herbarium, in its organization, had been 
separated into four great divisions: (i) Flowering Plants, completely 
organized; (2) Fungi; (3) Cryptogams in General, ferns, mosses, lichens, 
hepatics, etc.; (4) Plants of Illinois. Each of these herbaria occupy 
contiguous rooms. As the plants of Illinois are more frequently con- 
sulted by amateurs in botany than those of the general herbaria, it 
has been considered best to segregate them, thus securing the main 
herbaria against disorganization by untrained botanists. During the 
first four months of preparation for moving the Section of Plant Re- 
production continued its regular work with but little interruption. 
The months of May and June were then utilized entirely in the work 
of packing, dismembering, moving and re-establishment in the labora- 
tories in the new building. In July the work of the section was again 
established, though during the last few months of the year it has been 
greatly interfered with through the necessity of utilizing a large part 
of the effort of the staff in the re-installation of cases in the exhibition 
halls. No damage whatsoever was sustained by the large number of 
delicate models and reproductions packed, or secured against the 
anticipated rough handling of the cases and packages during trans- 
portation. Notwithstanding the large amount of time consumed in 
these necessary interruptions to the regular work of the staff, the 
section finished the following productions, all of which are now in- 
stalled in the exhibit cases of Hall 28: The Fig {Ficus carica). A 
natural size branch of the tree in full leaf and fruit; an enlarged section 
of the edible fig revealing the nimierous flowers enclosed within the 
fleshy, hollow receptacle; an enlarged section of the Caprifig with male 
and female flowers; an enlarged female flower in section; an enlarged 
male flower with its bracteal envelope; an enlarged gall-flower showing 
the female caprifying insect emerging; and full descriptive labels 
detailing "caprification." The Seven-year Apple {Casasia clusiifolia) . 
A small branch of the shrub with fully matured fruit fallaciously said to 
"require seven years to ripen." The Kaffir Orange (Strychnos spinosus). 
A flowering and fruiting portion of this shrub of the Strj^chnine Family. 
While nearly all species of this group are virulently poisonous this 
particular one develops an edible, spicy fruit. An enlarged flower of 
this plant reveals the essential organs characteristic in the family. 
Avocadoes or Alligator Pears {Per sea Persea): fruits of four charac- 
teristic varieties of this delicious "Salad Fruit " now becoming noticeable 
in our markets through its cultivation in southern Florida. The four 



390 Field Muskum of Natural Histomv — Repoets, Vol. V. 

vontiu s r'',riMliu'. .1 arc: The Wesi Indian; The C alan; TTie 

Mi'XK^n, und u hybrid s<TtinM by crcKsinn the GxiaLciiuiuin and the 
Mexican. The OK>»mit k iVi'i ntui/era): fnlarRcd male and female 
flowers toRcthcr wiih a s<viion of the female flower revealing iueMential 
characters. The Spider Lily {H ymcnocaUis cariba^a) : a full size flower- 
injj plant. Cotton plant {Gossypium horbodrnsf): an entire plant in full 
leaf, flower and ripe l>oll, natural size; an enlarged flower, in tectioa, 
revealing the essential organs. Zamia {Zamia floridana)'. enlarged 
spor- * and a fruiting cone of this s]xxncs illustrating the floral 

characi< of the < ' *' .^ocs (A/.. • a): three 

varictic><>; i iii> delicious imu ■•; un .-■umac Famiij, , ;!'>« ix.:,^ cultivated 
for the market in southern Florida: "The Mulgoba," "The Haden," 
and "The Amiri." A Green Alga {Ocdof^onium): eight enlargements 
illustrating reproduction in this group; whole mass of the plant, mag- 
nifunl; asi'xual reproduction, the o6gonia; the sperm cells; dwarf 
males; resting stage, o6s]x>re; germination, zoospores; fertilization. A 
Green Alga (UloOirix): four enlargements illustrating this genus: A 
piece of a filament, spore formation; swarm-spores, germination; con- 
j'i pores. More or less work has also been done on the 

foii"».;,v. >u..iies now in process of production: Coconut (Cocos nuci- 
fera); rniroduction of a natural size tree top in leaf, full flower and 
fruit. Zamia {Zamia floridana); a full size plant of this important 
starch-producing cycad. Four-'o-Clock (Afirabilis jalapa) ; a portion of 
a natural size plant and a number of various colored flowers, designed 
to illustrate Mendelian principles of heredity. Screw Pine {Pandantis 
Htilis); reproduction of a portion of the plant, natural size. Pride-<rf- 
India (Mdia Ascdaracha); an enlarged flower revealing the essential 
organs, to illustrate chara< ' s of the Mahogany Family. Alga 

(Bryopsis pluntvsa); an cnla:..- ■. iip of a frond. 

During the first i)art of the year i>acking in the Department of 
Geology of all material and cases intended for the new buildinr was 
completed. This included packing of the contents of forty-two 
tion cases remaining installed at the dose of last year, a large quantity 
of material bcl to the study collections, furniture and equipment 

of the offices and ialxiratories of the dq>artmcnt and some collections 
and  that for lack of exhibition space had been ' in the 

baaemcut. As noted in a previous report, the nature of nca: i" 'A:c 
spedniens in the exhibition cases made it necessary to remove liii : - m 
these cases in order to put them in a safe condition for transpona*. 
In some instances after being packed in proper receptacles, the S] 
mens were returned to the cases and the cases used as carriers, but 
it was found possible to move only three cases and contents without 



i 



Jan., 1921. Annual Report of the Director. 391 

removal of the specimens. During the period of packing as a whole 
two hundred and eighty exhibition cases were emptied of their con- 
tents and all fittings made fast so that there would be no danger of 
injury to any part in moving. It is gratifying to report that this work 
was so careftdly and thoroughly done that with the exception of one 
case which failed owing to faulty construction, no cases or contents 
suffered any breakage of glass or other marked injiuy during the moving 
to the new building and placing in position there. 

One of the most difficiilt specimens to prepare for moving was the 
skeleton of the large dinosaur. Because of its great weight and fragile 
nature this could not be transported as a whole. It was therefore 
necessar>^ to disarticulate the skeleton and handle each bone as a unit. 
The leg bones and most of the pelvic bones were crated separately 
without additional reinforcement. The foot bones and the smaller 
bones of the tail were separated and packed in tight boxes. The ribs 
required additional strengthening. Each rib was first wound spirally 
with tough paper to protect its finish. It was then covered with plaster 
and burlap, as fossils are treated for shipment from the field. In turn 
each rib V7as fiuther reinforced by means of iron rods, either bent to 
conform co the outHne or extending across the arc as a chord. The 
entire f.eries was then crated. The vertebrae were handled singl3^ 
Before removing from their position on the frame-work the spines and 
lateral processes were braced by means of light, iron rods. These braces, 
extending from each centrum to the lateral processes and thence to the 
crest of the spine of each vertebra, were attached by the use of plaster. 
This done, the screws holding each vertebra to the steel frame-work 
were removed, leaving the immediate support attached to the specimen. 
The vertebrae were then placed separately on light, wooden frame- 
works which acted as temporar\^ bases, and were firmly anchored to 
them in an upright position by means of wires attached to the four 
comers of the base and drawn tightly through the neural canal. The 
vertebrae were then placed, two each, in wheeled carriers padded at 
the bottom to protect from jar. Each vertebra was firmly attached to 
the bottom of the carrier by means of long screws driven through the 
temporary base. By the use of all these means the entire skeleton was 
well fjrotected and was transported to the new building with compara- 
tively little breakage. The steel framework on which the skeleton was 
installed was unbolted and moved as lengths of structural steel and 
the wooden base above the frame-vfork was taken apart and carefully 
crated for transportation. 

The safe transportation of the large fulgurite also presented a some- 
what difficult problem. The specimen is an exceedingly irregular hoUow 



tc: rmr .\fr5imr or S.ktcilkl Histokt — Reposts, Vol. V. 

cube c feet long and an inch in diazxieter, with v . u: 

the t ~^T!^ of an egg stdL This had ber 

ha ;: aboot six incfaes from the back o£ 

If :.-:-- Mippo » tiu g mj u deu rod ;. w^ii 

b ' '^'Hciag case. It was then wt 

m- .--;-- tn fin o£ tow and piasters. 

fr :i?eontbepa. f*oor to the sp e cim en, s 

it ntire length. At ^i^o^ pf rhapn a foot, a 

ring of tov and pliirfrr was abo pa d the sirfimm * 

it a e tuidv to the fin. The fiaffi i »ty p r ev e ul c 

by the piaster bat alao checked a lasterorc 

to any rough por ti oo s of the specssaea. iYouected in this xr 

was TtmStf m ounted and installed. 

Besides the rilril H li i Mi cases, the departmental material tiau a po. — . 
to the new >«ia'<^i<e was <—»»■"»*«< in 226barreis, 1,086 large boxes and 
crates and several t hous a nd small boxes and cartons. Packing, traaa- 
po i tati oo and ""f'***'"T of this material was accompfiriied with prac- 
tically no loss whatever from breakage or other injmy, a fact which gives 
proof of the care with whicfa the packing and handling was done. The 

years ago by Mr. Geor^ge Manierre and temporarily boosed at the Chi- 
cago Academy of Scienoes through the courtesy of that institutiaD, 
abo transferred to the new haiktmg. 

In order to fariTit a te placing of the ezhibitioo cases in the 
***H«iwig^ installation mmib er s were given to each hall of the portion of 
the tMa^Ciig ■mifrifd to the department and to each alcove in each 
haD. The cases designated for these alcoves were then 
■*"»»—<, so that on arrival at the new boilding each case 
directly to its assigDed alcove. Before installation all the ^ass of all the 
cases was rifanrd, the wood-work of the exteriors was rrfinirfrd and 
that of the interiors i ^^i^iit^i Any injuries to the exterior wood-work 
of the caaes that were too deep to be rubbed oot, were carefully rtmrlrrl 
oat and new wood inserted and the whole refinished in such a manner as 
to restore the cases to their original appearance. The cases formiqg the 
sides of the alcoves were carefully fitted to one another in such a manner 
as to make the line of joining as narrow and i iMnawyiifonas as po aa h ifc ' 
and they were then s e cur e ly fastmrd together. A greater rigidity and 
stability of the caaes was tfans gained, and a pleaang appearance of the 
caaes as seen from the aisle was prodnced. The nomber of cases so joined 
was 1 26. Twenty of the fiat cases having diown in moving that the 
tnrthnd of ■*****"■*—** of the legs was not as ncnre as was 




Jan., 192 1. Ax'xuAL Rzpoix or thz DrREcroa. 395 

these were thoroug^bly overhauled and stooit fastenings provided- Also, 
from fourteen of the cases in Frederick J. V. Skiff Hall the btiriap Hnings 
wbkh had become torn and disooks^ from long u^ge, were removed 
azid new, fr^hly dressed linings stibstitn-Ded. Bl-ocks ntrmbering 2,600 
used for mounting individual specimens and various other mounts used 
in this haU were also repainted and the shelves of many of the cases 
were braced with strong wooden supports so as to guard against possitle 
breakage of the shelves from the weight of specimens. A large number 
of other supports or fixtures, such as easels, frames, pedestals, etc, used 
in this and other "HhH'^ of the department were also repainted. 

The space assigned for the exhibition cases of the def^artment in 
the new building consists of five halls on the second flixir of the western 
section of the building. Four of these halls, 180 ft. by 4^ ft., in dirDen- 
asBL, have their greatest length in an east and west direction and one, 
317 ft. by 48 ft., has a principal north and south range. Of the four halls 
extending east and west, that on the north side of the building con- 
tains the s\-stematic collectaoai of minerals, the meteorite collecticn and 
part of a collection illustrating ph3rsical geology. The systematic 
nnnoal ocdlectkHi occupies the eastern h alf of the haH. It is installed 
in 32 cases, 16 of which are of a sloping-top type and 16 of a tall, upright 
tvpe. The cases are arranged on either side of the haH so as to form 
al?c ve? . each alcove esc^t the first being bounded by a tall case 'Du each 
i-iz a.i:i containing adoping-top case in the center. ZiiJi ilcove is 
irrelve feet deep and including the side cases, fonrteei feet wide. Each 
is Hghted by a pair of windows at CHie end. The sides of the alcoves are 
niade by the tail cases bang placed at right angles to the length of the 
hall, one end of each resting against a pilaster of the wall between the 
windows. A broad, middle aisle sixteen feet in width permits free passage 
throogji the coiter of the hall. The mineral coilection is arranged in 
tibese casK according to the order of Dana's system, a number on the 
label of each spedtnesi showing the position of the specimen in the sys- 
tem. For the mc^ part., ihe large specimens are shown in the tall cases 
at the sides of the alcoves and the smaller specimens in the lower, central 
cases. The re-instaUation of this collection was completed during the 
year, ^the ^leciinens bdng for the most part installed in the positions 
and cases which they had occupied in the old building, but some altera- 
tions necessitated by changes of orientation of the cases were made . The 
total number of specrmeis now on display in this collection is 4.470. 
In the re-installation of all the collectiaQS of the department, the system 
of TTgrrirrng described in a previous report, by which the position of each 
spedmen in installation was iodicated by a label wrapped with the 
specimen, proved ctf great a^stanoe in securing rapid and accurate 



394 Field Museum or Natural Histoby — Reports, Vol. V. 

placing <^*i the s|>ccimcns. PollowinK thus coll'^-'-'v. two cases o( a 
combJn«*'' •'•"■'■tht and flat form arc devoted to i... 'i.im T Phnlmrrs 
crj'stAl . 'in and two similar cases contain o ,: ig 

varitt;. . ' : .i:. i «r and ornamental objects carved fr ni-prpcious 

stones. FollownR these, six larjjc oblonjj cases, tl and 

two narrow, upright cases contain the meteorite collection. In the square 
c aw* arc placed larjje, single .«qx<nmcns of the Daxns Mts., Long Island 
and Brrnham falls, respectively, while the remaining meteorites which 
arc exhibited arc to be disposed on pyr ' -^ ' Ives in the other 
cases. The remainder of the hall is d i" i-»ur upright cases 

ar-'"'*<! in alcove form containing c i- of concretions and 

St,.„.. ..i, an'i ;nrrimrns illustrating glacial ; icna, weathering, etc 

Two large, . . >s from Kollcy Island and Amherst, Ohio, are 

to be installed on indi\'idual bases in opposite alcoves in connection with 
this scries. In the next hall .south there have been placed at the east end 
eight upright cases. These are to contain the collections illustrating 
various rock structures, such as dikes, veins, cave formations, rock 
markings, etc. These cases are arranged in alcove form disposed in a 
II similar to that already described for the cases containing the 

5 •.ic mineral collection. A case devoted to large g>'ps\un crystals 

a:. . . containing a fulgurite nine feet in length arc al.so placed in this 
hall. Following these, eight sloping-top cases are devoted to the cc^ 
tion of s>'stematic pctrolog>'. Each specimen in these cases is mounted 
on an individual block screwed to a pyramidal screen. The installation 
of this collection is complete, 872 specimens being now on display. The 
remainder of this hall extending eastward is to be devoted to the exhibi- 
tion of the map collection, consisting of about seventy-five relief and 
other maps, also globes and other geographic material. The maps are 
to be cxiiibitcd on tables which are to be arranged in positions similar 
to those of the cases which form the alcoves in other halls of the depart- 
ment. The maps have been unpacked and partially placed, but have 
not yet been finally installed. The following hall south contains collec- 
tions of an economic character, chiefly of coed, petroleum and other 
hydrocarbons, and sands, clays and soils. Of these collections, those of 
the first group will occupy the eastern half of the hall, those of the 
second group, the western half. The eastern half is installed according 
to the alcove plan, similar to that adopted in the department as a 
whole, eighteen upright cases forming nine alcoves. In these alcoves 
and ad'-^ ■"•  '^ *^^'*m ten table and other low cases n.To n!ared, and 
in one (i .... 1 alcove a large case containing an t of coal- 

tar products. A model of the original Rot r oil refinery- which, 



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Jan., 1921. Annual Report of the Director. 395 

from lack of space has not been shown for some years, will be placed in 
another alcove. In the sixteen-foot center aisle two table cases four by 
six feet in size are placed. These contain the diamond and part of the 
asphalt exhibits. Against the south wall of the hall and adjacent to the 
passage southward, a large section of an Australian coal seam will be 
placed. In the western half of the hall the installation is composed 
chiefly of table cases. As these do not readily lend themselves to a true 
alcove arrangement, distribution of the cases in a manner consistent 
with the alcove plan of the rest of the hall has been adopted. The cases 
are placed in pairs, each pair extending from the windows toward the 
center of the hall. There is left a twelve-foot center aisle and a narrower 
passage between the cases of each pair. The arrangement is broken in 
one place to give space for a diagrammatic collection of clays which 
requires a linear arrangement of four cases. Beyond this installation of 
twenty-two table cases at the extreme west of the hall, two square 
cases containing large specimens have been placed, and bordering the 
west wall an upright case and a large model of an iron mine. The 
specimens in the hall as a whole transferred from installation in the 
old building are to be re-installed in the same cases and with the 
same arrangement as before. There will also be added, however, 
many specimens which had been withdrawn from exhibition for several 
years on account of lack of room. The entire coal collection is one 
group of such material and substantial additions will also be made to 
the exhibited collections of clays, sands and soils. The most southerly 
of the halls of the department has been named Frederick J. V. Skiff 
Hall. The hall contains the principal economic collections of the 
department. It includes the ores of the precious and base metals, 
building stones and marbles and a part of the collection of non-metallic 
minerals of economic importance. The cases in the hall are arranged 
according to the alcove plan, broken for a space midway of the hall 
by the substitution of tall, square cases for the long, upright cases 
which outline the regular alcoves. These square cases are so disposed, 
however, that the general alcove effect is retained. A center aisle 
fourteen and a half feet wide has been left unobstructed through the 
entire length of the hall. The predominant type of cases used in the 
installation of the hall is that of those which form the sides of the 
alcoves. These are materially different in form from those employed 
in any other hall. They are designed to keep the specimens as near the 
eye of the spectator as possible even at sacrifice of capacity. They are 
seven feet high, and at a height of two feet from the floor the exhibition 
space is extended forward in a horizontal bay which not only keeps the 



39* Field Museum or Natural Histoby — Rcforts, Vol. V. 

gpedmens nearer the eye, but also afiords room for larger spedmens and 
those that should be examined from above. The Icn^ of the cases is 
twelve feet, cxccjH for .six which measure fourteen feet. Each alcove 
is outlined by two of these cases, one being placed on each side of a 
window. The cases stand with one end against the wall and extend 
toward the aisle in the center of the hall. Including the side cases, 
each alcove is fourteen feet wide, the open space in the center being 
four feet narrower. On the south .side of the hall, the alcoves are twelve 
feet deep. On the north side they are fourteen feet deep. In the center 
of each alcove one or two table ca.scs, four by .six feet, are placed, Mid- 
way of the hall, opposite the passage connecting with the next hall to 
the north, the character of the alcoves is varied, the principal change 
being the rc^ilaccment of some of the long cases by two tall cases, four 
feet square. These cases arc glazed on all sides, except the base, and 
contain massive specimens and materials of special character. There 
are twenty-six alcoves in the hall as a whole and they contain forty-two 
twelve-foot and forty-foxir other cases. The ores of the heavy metals 
and the building stone collections are for the most part re-installed in 
their original cases and in their original positions in the cases. The 
exigencies of rc-in.stallation have compelled .some changes, but they are 
relatively few. The addition of two cases again.st the east wall has made 
pojwiblc the rc-display of a case and a half of ores which had been 
withtlrawn from exhibition for a number of years on account of lade of 
space. Except for the building stones and alkalies, that part of the 
non-metallic economic collections which appears in upright cases in this 
hall has been tran.sfcrred to ca.scs of a different tN-pc from those formerly 
u.scd. This has made some re-arrangement neccs.sary, owing to the differ- 
ent capacities of the two t>'pes of cases, and withdrawal of some of the 
material has been unavoidable, but for the most part the original 
arrangement of the s^^ecimcns has been retained. It was necessary to 
spend much time and labor in cleaning the specimens of ores. The 
method employed has been first to remove the dust by use of a vacuum 
deaner, then to wa.sh and dr>' the specimens. As water alone or soap 
and water was found not to attack a sooty coating which had sometimes 
formed through exposure to a smok>* atmosphere, and as the more corro- 
sive detergents could not be used, some care in selecting a suitable deans- 
ing agent was found imperative. Sati.sfactor>* results were, however, 
secured by u.se of cold water containing a moderate quantity of carbonate 
oC ammonia. As the collections in this hall are now arranged, there are 
shown at the east end and extendi v' ♦''■ "a the cast entrance about half 
way down the hall, the ores of the ; . . - -i- <i base metals. These are 
arranged in the order of the installation <  cd in the old building ; 



Jan., 192 1, Annual Report of the Director. 397 

first, synoptic collections of gold, silver and lead minerals and ores and 
secondly, collections of these ores geographically arranged. Platinum 
ores occupy one table case at the head of the series. The gold, silver and 
lead collections are followed by ores of the other metals with the speci- 
mens geographically arranged under each metal. Interspersed with 
these ores at convenient points are placed models illustrating methods 
of mining and of extracting the metals from the ores. The metallurgy 
of some of the more important metals is also illustrated by specimens. 
Following the ore collections are placed those of the building stones and 
marbles. These are shown in the form of polished slabs in upright cases 
and of four-inch cubes in table cases. To them are added specimens of 
materials adapted to ornamental uses cut in forms intended to display 
their fitness for such uses. The western end of the hall is filled with a 
variety of minerals of economic interest, including mica, asbestos, and 
abrasive materials, and at the extreme end the alkali collections are 
placed. The western hall, which is the largest of the exhibition halls of 
the department, is devoted to the paleontological collections. This 
hall, as already stated, is 48 feet in width and 317 feet in length. Its 
size and proportions have enabled a unique installation of the paleonto- 
logical collections to be made, the most important feature being that it 
has been possible to place all the collections in the hall in chronological 
order. Thus an epitome of the history of life upon the earth, beginning 
with the remains of living forms of the earliest period and passing in 
order to the life of Recent time is presented to the observer. The 
characteristic fossils or life forms of any particular period can be seen in 
whatever portion of the hall corresponds in position to the place of the 
period in time, or the course and development of life as a whole can be 
studied. The earlier forms have been placed at the south end of the hall, 
and from this point the progression in time advances to the north end. 
Introductory to the series, two cases contain, one a collection illustrating 
methods of fossilization and the other a collection showing contrasting 
forms of ancient and modem plants and animals. As in the other 
halls of the department, the cases in this hall are arranged to form 
alcoves, the sides of the alcoves being made by upright cases twelve 
feet in length by eight feet in height and usually two feet in depth. Two 
of these placed back-to-back with ends resting against the pilasters 
which separate the windows of the hall form the alcoves. Within these 
alcoves for the most part, single sloping-top cases designed for specimens 
which require close inspection are placed. These cases occupy a floor 
space of four by five feet each, leaving an aisle three feet wide between 
them and the sides of the alcoves and four feet wide between them and 
the windows. Occasionally the alcove space is doubled or trebled in 



39* Field Museum of Natural Histobv — Reports, Vol. V. 

Ofder to ixrmit the placing of lar^c objc-cu. The u; : •. 1 * ( a < a .1 nUc 
contain larRc specimens, slab mounts and single sktli loi.s. Aliogethcr 
twenty-two alcoves of this form have been placed in the hall. A central 
aisle, twenty-two feet in width, passes through the hall between the 
alcoves, and this is utilized to some extent for the exhibition of large 
mounts, such as those of the two dinosaurs Apatosanis and Triccratops, 
the cast of the Megatherium skeleton and some single cases. The in- 
stallation of all cases in the hall, numlx>ring sixty-six, has been essen- 
tially completed. In general, the specimens were placed in the cases in 
the same order and f)ositions which they had occupied before removal, 
but wherever some improvement in sequence or appearance could be 
made this was carried out. The precaution which had been adopted to 
secure the safe transportation of some of the more fragile material, such, 
especially, as wrapping dinosaur and other bones with paper and cover- 
ing them with burlap and plaster, proved on unpacking to have been 
ver>' successful, practically no breakage having occurred and the 
appearance of the specimens not having been injured. This was espe- 
cially gTatif>'ing in the case of the large Tricerato^js skull, the thin, 
expanded bones of which were exceedingly fragile. The specimens yet 
to be installed in this hall arc chiefly large and massive ones, such as the 
gjeat dinosaur, Apatosaurus, the skeletons of the mastodon and mam- 
moth and some large casts. The iron frame-work for the dinosaur has 
been assembled but the erection of the specimen upon it has not yet 
been accomplished. The enerpies of the staff were devoted so largely 
to installation, that little opportunity was available for work upon the 
study collections or in the laboratories. The study collection of syste- 
matic minerals has, however, been placed in tra)*^, labeled and arranged 
in order in drawers contiguous to the exhibit scries. Work in the 
laboratories has largely been confined to repairs upon specimens, but 
in the early part of the year opportunity was found to remove from 
matrix and prepare for exhibition two large ribs, nine feet in length, 
of the t>'pc specimen of Brachiosaurus. This material , as it came from 
the field, is in so fragmentary a condition, that the task of preparing it 
is a difficult and tedious one, but the unique character of the material 
makes its preservation highly important. 

In the Department of ZoOlojj>', the year was devoted almost ex- 
clusively to the work in connection with the removal to the new building. 
P continued until April and was followed by the period of actual 

movuit during which members of the staff, office, and taxidermists' 
force were a ---"d to specific tasks in checking the pieces out of the old 
building ar. . :... . the new and in giving special care to such material 
as required it. The entire collections of the department were moved 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE LXXXII. 




Natal Plum. 

{Carissa grandiflora.) 

A reproduction of a branch of this attractive fruit, introduced into Florida in 1902, for 

its pleasant cranberry-like fruit and jasmine- scented flowers. 



Jan., 192 1. Annual Report of the Director. 399 

without serious damage. The smaller exhibition cases were transported 
intact with specimens of Hght weight in situ securely fastened to the 
shelves or to the floor. Even the extensive osteological exhibits traveled 
largel}^ in this way, although small skeletons and crania were specially 
packed in cartons and very large ones were crated. Heav>^ material, as 
corals and other fragile invertebrates, was removed from the cases and 
packed in boxes, cartons, and barrels. Exhibition cases of mediiim size 
(more than 4 feet in width) were transported after removal of all or 
part of the glass and with the specimens covered with a temporary 
protecting cloth. In this way certain habitat groups, as the hyaenas 
and warthogs, were handled simply and successfully. Very large cases, 
including many of the habitat groups, as moose, moimtain sheep, koodoo, 
zebra, etc., required the complete dismantling of the case and the dis- 
memberment of the group, the animals being placed individually on 
special temporary bases and the ground work and accessories being 
divided and crated. The African elephants, after removing the head of 
the one moimted v.dth its trtmk elevated, were placed on an open flat- 
car and came through without mishap. The study collections of mam- 
mals and birds packed in original containers offered no difficulty. 
Fishes and reptiles in glass jars, which were wrapped in corrugated 
cardboard and packed tightly in cartons, suffered no breakage what- 
ever. Even pinned insects, which were subjected to much \dbration, show 
no injiny so far as examined. Since removal to the new building steady 
progress has been made in the re-installation of the exhibition material. 
The first hall to be finished was the west colonnade (George M. Piillman 
Hall) which has been devoted to xmgulate mammals, the deer, antelope, 
sheep, goats, and wild oxen. These are mostly game animals of con- 
siderable popular interest and have been arranged to form a unit with 
allowance for slight expansion in the future. The hall of systematic 
mammals followed and then that of systematic birds and the habitat 
groups of birds. A number of groups of African mammals also were 
completely installed before the end of the year. Over two months were 
devoted to the re-installation of the shell exhibit. Besides re-instaUing 
the shells which were on exhibition in the old building, good progress 
has also been made on the installation of the four new A-cases that had 
not been in use heretofore. In order that there should be imiformity in 
color of aU the shell tablets and labels, it was decided to blacken the 
edges of the yellow shell tablets and to reprint all of the buff -colored 
labels in the six so-called table cases. Some progress has also been made 
ia the installation of the sponge and coral exhibit. There have now been 
re-installed and completed twelve A-cases of shells and two standard 
cases of sponges and corals. Several other cases also are far advanced 



40O FiFi-D Mrsri'M or Natubai. Histoby — Rr.roBTs, Voi V. 

toward completion. All of thr 'k<\- '■>:. '-in un[)ackixi and f<»ur 

cases have l)ccn installed and two arc umi The large skeletooi 

are being installed on liases in the exhibition iiikilA. 

ThK N. W. HAMNI9 PUM.IC SCHOOC EXTtNtlON O^ FiKLO MuSCUM O0 Hatxjual HifToirr. 

— At the end of the present year there were 677 cases available for 
circulation among the jnihlic schools of Chicago. Of this number, thirty- 
one were prepared during the year. This is a falling ofl from the previous 
annual production of ca-ses for circulation. This decrease in cases pre- 
pared is attributed to causes which the department could not avert. 
The princijxil causes ^"cre the resignation of an assistant taxidermist, 
and the transfer of a prcparator to another dqvirtmcnt. Another cause 
was the abandonment for several weeks of practically all productive 
work for preparations necessary for the removal from the old building 
to the new one, and the installation there of fixtures for office and 
work-rooms. The removal of the department to the new building was 
accomplished largely by the use of the delivery truck, and without the 
lets of a day in the deliver)' of cases to schools. Rather than increase 
the production of cases by sacrificing past standards, the usual care 
with the details of each was employed. When arranging the schedule 
for the loaning of cases to schools during the scholastic year of 1 920-192 1 , 
the latest issue (1919-1920) of the Dircctor>' of the Public Schools of 
the City of Chicago was used. In this directory the names and 
addresses of 23 high, and 255 main elementary schools were given. 
In compliance with a formal request made last year that cases be also 
loaned to high schools, seventeen were included in the present operating 
loan schedule. For the reason that six of the listed high schools have 
technical courses, cases are not loaned to them. Cases are loaned to 
255 main dementary schools. Because of the great distances to two of 
the main clcmentar>* schools, and of road conditions met with by the 
motor truck in delivering cases to them, they have been, it is hoped, 
only te m porarily deprived of the uses of the loan cases. In addition to 
making loans to the 253 main elementary schools, cases are also 
loaned to 18 branches of elementary schools. Besides the 288 
schools, made up of 17 high, 253 main elementary and 18 branch 
elementary schools, which are scheduled to receive cases, there are other 
schools to which cases are loaned when requested to do so. These are 
the practice, continuation and parental schools. Based on informatioa 
received from the office of the Superintendent of Schools as to the num- 
ber of pupnls attending public schools, it is confidently believed that 
cases will be loazied during the present scholastic year to schools having 
a combined enrollment of fully 344,000 pupils. This estimate is com- 



Jan., 1921. Annual Report of the Director. 401 

posed of 316,000 pupils of elementary and of 28,000 of high schools. 
In response to a formal request made by the Boys' Work Secretary of 
the Young Men's Christian Association for the loan of cases to that 
association's summer school, at 162 1 Division Street, several cases were 
sent. That these cases proved to be of educational value and interest 
is evident, for, from the same source there came a subsequent request 
for cases, but in this instance it was asked that cases be loaned period- 
ically throughout the year. This request is being complied with, and 
in doing so care has been and will be taken to prevent any interference 
with service to the public schools. The Supervisor of the Children's 
Department of the Chicago Public Library requested the loan of six 
cases of birds for the purpose of exhibiting them for a short time at the 
Public Library, to stimulate interest in books on birds. The cases were 
loaned, and it was reported that they rendered the service for which they 
were solicited. This year, as has been done during the past two years, 
twenty-four cases were on exhibition in the Art Gallery of the Municipal 
Pier during the months of July and August. 

Mrs. Charles L, Hutchinson, President, Chicago Chapter, Wild 
Flower Preservation Society of America, asked that four cases be dis- 
played at the annual exhibition held under the auspices of that society, 
at the Art Institute from the 6th to the 22nd of January 1920. This 
request was granted, as was a subsequent one for six cases for the same 
purpose, and at the same place from December i8th 1920 to January 
18th 192 1. In connection with a request for the temporary use of 
several cases for the purpose of rendering service in establishing a 
system of loaning cases to schools in St. Paul, Minnesota, the curator 
of the museum of Saint Paul Institute in that city wrote: — "While 
visiting the Field Museum some time ago, I was greatly impressed with 
the educational value of your school cases. The fact that they can be 
circulated through the various schools from time to time gives them 
added value." It is regretted that this request could not, at that time, 
be granted. The President of the San Diego Society of Natural History 
stated in a communication that a considerable donation had been made 
to that society for the purpose of popiilarizing natural history, especially 
in the schools of San Diego and, having seen this department's exhibit 
at the Panama-Pacific Exposition, he would like to have such data as 
would assist in establishing a similar system. It has since been learned 
that the museum of this society will build a number of small cases for 
containing birds, minerals, plants, etc., to loan to schools, as part of 
its educational work. Having in view the prospect of the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture aiding rural communities on subjects pertaining to 
agriculture, Professor Frank Lamson-Scribner, Special Agent and 



403 Field Mi-sr.i'ii of Natukal History — Reports, Vol. V. 

AKTositiloKist of that department, and two of his dci>artmcntal a<?v>- 
dates, conducted a careful examination of a gjcal many loan caaes, 
and made many inquiries as to methods employed in loaning and in 
recording them. 

After hav-ing made a most careful inspection of many cases oC 
luitural hislon.- subjects, Doctor Paul Bartsch, Curator, Division of 
Marine Invertebrates, U. S. National Museum, stated in a communica- 
tion to this department: ** I wish there might be some way to actually 
determine the amount of good enterprises of this kind bring about. To 
me it seems the very foundation of thiii^^ I am sure that the citizens 
of Chicago vnW show much greater interest in outdoor studies, and a 
much closer touch with nature, than other citizens where such work is 
not undertaken. These yo\ingstcrs do grow up so quickly, and it will 
only l>e a little while until the children that have had the benefit of your 
cflorts will become jmrents who will rejoice with the little ones for the 
opportunity you give them . . ." 

pmotoorapmv and Illustration. — A large part of the year was spent 
by this section in packing negatives, lantern slides and photographic 
apparatus for transportation to the new building and in unpacking and 
arranging negatives and lantern slides after the removal so as to be 
readily accessible when required. The following is a tabulation of the 
work i)erformed in this section: 

NcMBbOT of NwBiMr 

MMjill^M of PriBU 

l3^ Mad* 

GflDoml 313 6 

Anthropology . . 6 56 

ZfMogy ___ 115 

Totals 218 177 

Total number c4 Catalogue entries during year 19^0 395 

Total numt>er o( Catalogue entries to December 31, xgiv 121.259 

Total number of Record Books ao 

PRINT1NO. — The number of labels and other impressions made by the 
Section of Printing is as follows: 

BiUbitiaa Ckhm 
Ubab 



Anthropology 7.659 975 

Botany . 193 3.300 

Geology 970 500 

ZoStogy 376 500 

IJbrary .... 1. 500 

Harris Extcnstou 94 500 

Gcoeral .... ... 15,010 

Herewith are also submitted t aiancc sheet, lists of a cc essio n s, 

names of members, etc., etc. Feedesick J. V. Skiff, Director. 



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Jan., 1921. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



403 



ATTENDANCE FROM JANUARY 1, 1920, TO 
FEBRUARY 23, 1920. 



Paid Attendance: 

Adults 


Attendance 


443 
24 




Children 




467 


Free Admission on Pay Days 
School Children . 




93 

100 

22 

4 
2 

3 
9 

119 




Students 

Teachers 

Members .... 






Officers' Families 






Press 






Special 

Free admissions for one week following the dis- 
continuance of admission charges 


352 


Admissions on Free Days: 
Saturdays .... 






819 

575 
2,351 


Stmdays 




Total Attendance . 




.^.74..S 



404 Fitu) Museum of N'att-ral Histoky — Repoets, Vol. V. 



Balance Shhet 

December 31. 1920. 



ASSETS 



SnciAL Pi- won 



Marahall FicUl Bcquect Endowment Fund : 
Rral R»tatc 
InvcstmcnU 

Low from Sale of Invrv 
Cash 

Sinkif.,; !".:ti!: 
Invcilir.cnU 
C«ih . . 

Marahall Firld Dr<]ttrst nuildini; Fuml: 

Invest: • 

Loci fr of Invcslmmt.-; 

C«sh 



Pfckl for New Building cooctnirtion 



The Jame« Simpsrjn Theatre Fund: 



I3.200.000.00 
5M.469 7« 

100.00 $3,815,000.00 



I 47.290.00 
54 89 



% 2«Jh«56 II 

155777 37 

21.350.88 



47.344 89 



I 459.584.36 
6. 1 43.806 54 6.603.J90.90 



Coct C' rtion and r 
Stanley I— .'.;>;ficum Emp.- .. . . .„.,u 

Investments 

Cash 


date 
n FutkI: 

Fund— 


% 


'76.550 00 
708.69 


•6,157 31 

177.258 69 


Mrs. Sumtey Field I'iant Keproductioo 
Provisiooal: 
Imrcstmenta 

Lo« OQ mle of invesUneoU 
Cadi 


% 


143.770.00 

7.503 00 

496 39 


«5«.7«9.39 


Edward E. Ayer library Fund: 

Investments 
Life McmbcnJxips Fund: 

Investments 


i 


89.340 00 
507.64 


50,000.00 


Cash 




89.847 64 



Hunt-.n^t'.n W. J.i. '«;■;' in Library Fund: 
lovc«tir.cDt& 
Cash 



f 1. 82 1 50 
27.08 



l44S.St 



Jan., 1921. Annual Report of the Director. 405 

Balance Sheet 

December 31, 1920. 

LIABILITIES. ' 
Special Funds 

Marshall Field Bequest Endowment Fund . . $3,815,000.00 

Sinking Fund: 

Amount of Accumulated Fund to December 31, 

1920 $ 41,061.82 

Income from Investments 6,283.07 47,344.89 

Marshall Field Bequest Building Fund: 

Amount of Bequest $4,000,000.00 

Income from Investments 2,256,891.11 

U. S. Government Refund — account Hospital- 
ization 87,215.16 

New Building Salvage 7,311.86 

Building Sinking Fund — Income .... 5,635.66 

Advances by Woman's Temple Realization 

Fund 146,181.69 

Accrued Interest 155.42 

Deficit Fund : 
Contribution by Mr. Stanley Field .... 100,000.00 6,603,390.90 

The James Simpson Theatre Fund: 

Amount of Contribution to date .... $ 36,339.00 
Advances by Woman's Temple Realization 

Fund 49,818.31 86,157.31 

Stanley Field Museum Employes' Pension Fund: 

Contribution by Mr. Stanley Field .... $ 150,000.00 
Income transferred to Pension Fund . . . 25,000.00 

$ 175,000.00 

Balance of Income from Invest- 
ments for 1920 $5,891.30 

Less Group Insurance Premiums 

and Pensions 3,904.90 1,986.40 

Accrued Interest 272.29 177,258.69 

Mrs. Stanley Field Plant Reproduction Fund : 

Amount of Provisional Deposit . $ 150,000.00 

Net Income — 1920 .... $9,412.39 

Less Operating Costs for 1920 . 7,643.00 1,769.39 151,769.39 

(Continued on page 407. 



4o6 Field Mi-seum or Natieal History — Reports, Vol. V. 



$ 63.936 26 

3.068 a; 

39,000.00 

7.525 95 



New l\n:\ \\u,: y. \.: ,: .ui ! Furni-sinrnj Fund; 
Movinjj i- ■•;{•. p.i'. ' • ' »'■• 
New Funiiturc 
Investments 
C*ah 7.525 95 113.330 48 

Illinois Ccnlnd Foot-bridjfc Fund: 
Cost of Foot-bridge I7.«75 4* 

niiflou Trust ft Savings Bank stock— Liquidation 
Pxtnd: 
Cash 1436.00 

Sundry Funiis: 

InvestmenLs I 13.150 00 

Cash 833 68 13.973.68 



Gbnbral FxJtfD 

Investments 

Investments — in 
In Suspense: 

Cost of Fire Pump 

Unitetl Sutes Victory Loan Bonds 4>«% 
Purchased for account of employes 

C"-'--ns— cash purchases only 
i rary — books, pamphlets and binding 

Woman's Temple Realuatum Fund: 
Investments 
In suspense 
Advances to other fur. 

Building Fund .... 

James Simpson Theatre Fund 

Illinois Central Foot-bndge Fund 

Accrued interest 

Cash 



office furniture, etc. 
Printing presses and type 
Photographic eqtnpment 

Cash: 

Ocoeral Fund in Treanrer's ! 
Paymll Fund in Treasurer's hands 
I'ctty Cash in office .... 
In SuspeoM (Foreign Exchange) 



$ 1 30.024 67 
3.980 00 

8.864 II 



47460 133.343 38 



i 


733.790 88 






47.366 43 


781.157 3" 


i 


298.045 50 
139.613 61 

146.1.S1 '-) 

49.8 1^ M 

17.175 4^ 

427 71 






17 67 


641.278.97 


f 


348.104 43 
2.876 30 






3.804.83 


354.785 45 


$ 


6.094 85 

2.000.00 

739 95 






735 00 


9.569 80 






I13.087.666 95 



Jan., 1921. Annual Report of the Director. 407 

Edward E. Ayer Library Fund: 

Amount of Bequest 50,000 . 00 

Life Memberships Fund: 

Amount of Fees paid $ 79.6oo . 00 

Income from Investments 10,247.64 89,847.64 

Huntington W. Jackson Library Fund: 

Amount of Bequest $ 971 -So 

Income from Investments 877 . 08 i ,848 . 58 

New Building Moving and Furnishing Ftmd: 
Amount of Fvmd at December 31, 1920 . . $ 99.925-69 
Income from Investments 13,404.79 113,330.48 

Illinois Central Foot-bridge Fund: 
Advances by Woman's Temple Realization 

Fund 17,175.48 

Illinois Trust & Savings Bank Stock — Liquidation 
Ftmd: 
Interest Received 1,436.00 

Sundry Funds: 

Amount of Sundry Funds at December 31, 1920 12,972.68 

Capital 

Balance as at January I, 1920 $i.793.955-7i 

Less Deductions (Authorized) 20,742 . 57 



/ 



$I,773.2I3-I4 

Addition to Capital during 1920 .... 126,350.54 

Net Income for year 1920 — General Fund . . 9,199.44 

Woman's Temple Realization Fund — Income 

Accrued 11,371.79 1,920,134.91 



$13,087,666.95 



408 Field Museum or Natural IIistoby — Rkposts, Vol. V. 



STATbMKNT OF INCOME AND EXPENSHS. 
General Income Account Year Ending December 31, 1920. 



In< fiMK 



mkI Check RoooM 
DuM of AnmiAl Memben 
Sooth Pkrk Cuuinuuiuuei s 
Sundry Receipts 
DividcT>ls an<l Intrrcst i 
Wnman's Temple Rc&lu«i>'»i • 
Endowment Fund — Income 



''■ — General Fund 
and — Inctmir 



»35 70 





59000 




11.250.00 




Ul 3> 




1 1 .300 84 




15.135 00 


II37.I54 00 




5.500.00 


131. 654 00 



Less amount transferred to Sinking Fund for 1920 



>i 70.206. 85 

Cootnbution—Mardian Field 19-755 32 

GroM Income . I189.962.17 

ExPKShKS 

Salaries $ 82.690.60 

Guard and Janitor Service 26.670 . 70 

Fire Protection Service 3.199 79 

Heat and LiRht 26.581 99 

Packint; Supplies 1.736 6t 

Maintenance Force and Supplies 2 1 .933 . 95 

GcDer&l Expense 5.630.48 

Department Installation Siipplics 2.730.23 

Printing and Photognif^y Supplies t .696 . 32 

PobKcmtioos 7.892.06 i|p,762.73 

Net Income for Year carried to Capital Account $ 9.199 44 



Jan., 1921. Annual Report of the Director. 409 

THE N. W. HARRIS PUBLIC SCHOOL EXTENSION. 

BALANCE SHEET 
December 31, 1920. 

Assets 

Cases and Furniture $ 6,560.58 

Collections and Exhibits 1,195.72 

Investments — Endowment Furid ... 275,000.00 , 

Investments — Reserve Fund .... 29,080.00 

Cash: 

Endowment Fimd $748.47 

Reserve Fund 262 . 95 

Petty Cash 250.00 1,261.42 $313,097.72 

Liabilities 

Endowment Fimd $275,000.00 

Reserve Fund: 

Balance December 31, 1919 $8,120.78 

Income for the year 1920 1,209.67 

Amount transferred from Income Account . . , 3,663.74 12,994.19 

Surplus: 

Balance December 31, 1920 25,103.53 



$313,097-72 



STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSES FOR YEAR 1920. 

Income 

Interest and Dividends on Investments $13,434.48 

Interest on Bank Balances 71 -70 $13,506.18 

Expenses 

Group Accessories $ 20.39 

Field Work 44.08 

Expense of Distribution of Cases to Public Schools . . 2,018. 12 

Salaries and Expenses 7,176.10 9,258.69 

Gross Income $ 4,247 . 49 

Deduction from Income (Depreciation of Automobile 

Delivery Car) 583 . 75 

Balance transferred to Reserve Fund $ 3,663 . 74 



4XO Field Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 



CERTIFICAThS OF AUDIT 

January 12, igii. 

Wc have audiUxl the accounts and records of Field Museum of 
Natural History for the year cndinR December 31, loao, and certify 
that the forejioinR Balance Sheet and Income Account for the year are 
in accordance thcnnisnth. 

All the income from investments has been accounted for. The 
securities rcprcscntinK the invested portions of the various funds were 
verified by us and also the uninvested cash balances of the respective 
funds and petty cash funds. 

All disbursements for the year have been examined and found to 
be supported by properly authorized vouchers and warrants. 

ARTHUR YOUNG & COMPANY 

Certified Public Accountants. 

januaT>- 12, 192 1. 

Wc have audited the books of the N. VV. Harris Public School 
Ex' of Field Museum for the year ending rXx-cmber 31, 1920, and 

ccrUi> Liiat the foreRoinK Balance Sheet and Income Account for the 
year are in accordance thcrcwth. 

The investment securities have been verified by us. All income from 
these securities has been accounted for. The cash in bank and on hand 
at December 31, 1920, has been verified by us. 

We have examined all disbursements for the year and found them 
evidenced by^duly authorized vouchers and ^*arrants. 

ARTHUR YOUNG & COMPANY 

Certified Public Accountants. 



Jan., 1921. Annual Report of the Director. 411 



Accessions. 



DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 



AYER, E. E., Chicago, Illinois. 

I Moro kris in wooden sheath — Philippine Islands (gift). ' 
I Pima basket with black designs — California (gift). 

I steatite kettle, i ivory snow-knife, i Eskimo ivory tobacco-pipe, i modern 
oil dish, 2 Tlingit rattles — Eskimo and Tlingit, Alaska (gift). 

1 Pomo feather head-band — California (gift). 

BIGGAR, H. HOWARD, Bureau of Plant Industry, United States Department of 
Agriculture, Bloomington, Illinois. 
13 varieties of maize-cobs cultivated by American Indians (gift). 
CROFTS, GEORGE, Tientsin, China. 

2 clay statuettes of the T'ang period — China (gift). 
ELLIOTT, MRS. 

17 miscellaneous baskets and i coconut shell in net — Northwest Coast, 
California, Arizona, India, etc. (gift). 
ENGLISH, EVELYN, Chicago, IlHnois. 

I Navaho saddle-blanket obtained from Ute tribe (gift). 
I piece of Rio Grande Pueblo painted pottery — Santa Fe, New Mexico (gift). 
I piece of Rio Grande Pueblo black pottery — Santa Clara, New Mexico 
(gift). 
GILLETTE, MR. and MRS. EDWIN F., Chicago, Illinois. 

1 set of nine ancient dolls representing emperor and empress of Japan, 

surrounded by guards and orchestra of five musicians, all dressed in 
brocade, with painted screen as background — Tokyo, Japan (gift). 
HARPER, MRS. PAUL V., Chicago, Illinois. 
Collected by Bishop Vincent: 

2 Chimu pottery vases — North Coast, Peru (gift). 
HE YE, GEORGE G., New York City. 

239 specimens of archaeological material, chiefly of shell and bone — San 
Nicholas and San Miguel islands, California (gift). 
HUDSON, DR. J. W., Ukiah, California. 

I polished stone hatchet — Port Discovery, Washington (gift). 
McCAULEY, MRS. CHARLES A. H., Highland Park, Illinois. 

1 Sioux peace-pipe — Dakota (gift). 
MELCHIOR, J. E., Hankow, China. 

2 Chinese pottery jars — China (gift). 
RISDON, MRS. AMBROSE, Chicago, Illinois. 

I Japanese dagger (gift). 

I dagger and i bridle from Palestine (gift). 

1 clay lamp from Ephesus (gift). 

1 statuette and i necklace from Egypt (gift). 

2 glass-bead necklaces from Cairo (gift). 

4 fragmentary pieces of pottery — Mexico (gift). 



IJNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
LIBRARY 



4IJ Fi»in Nft'srt'v or NATrsAi. IIisthry — Rfpoets, Vol. V. 

SARGENT. HOMER E. i *. 

34} Inlian ti««keu t.iA an 1 tmuah Columbia (gift). 

SKIPP. DR F J. v.. Chi. ,. .noi*. 

3 prehwtohc flint AirowheAd*— RoncUre, IlUoaU (gift). 
THOMAS. CHARLES B.. ChioMto. Illinott. 

I ! - 't o( l>a»allic rock— Glcnwood. T" - - 'r-''^ 

TISSERA. . N'T L. (ilecoued). from W. N .x^r,, lUinou. 

I iilvcr jewel casket — Ceylon (jtift). 
WRU;LEY. WH.LIAM J.. J«. (fmm C/eonceO. Hcyc). Chicago. Illujou. 

600 (approximately) arcluDologic&l cpeamcos. chiefly implcmenta o( it«atit« 
aod other ttooe. bone, ihell and clay— Caulina Island. Caliloraia (fift). 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

ANTES. OAKES. Bussey Institute. Boston. Massachusetts.. 

57 hcrhariuni specimeiu of orchirls— North Borneo (ezcfaaag«). 
BAILY. ALBERT L.. Chicago. 

3 herbariuni specimens — Illinois Ofift). 
CHAMBERLAIN. CHARLES J.. Chicago. 

I hcrharium sjKcimcn — Univr- ' Chicago greenhouse (gift). 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL Hi Y. 

Collated by C. P. Millspaugh: 
91 herbarium specimens. 
Purchases: 

7 eoooom i c specimens — Lajolla. California. 
I Lyoopodium powder from drui; store. 

I economic specimen — Ceylon. 
400 b'^''' '- MTi specimens — Bolivia. 
Mrs Field Plant Reproduction Laboratory: 

1 1 herbanum spedmens — various localities. 

I reprodoctioo of enlarged flowera of Cooos nudf era. 

8 reprodoctioas of Algae. 

V II plant reproductions: cotton flower enlarged, cotton plant in flower and 
fruit, Strychnos. enlarxod flower. 2^mia. enlarged flower and fruit. 
Ulothrix. Alga (4 micro, enlaiiged). Mango: "Mulgoba" fruit. "Hadea" 
fruit. "Amiri" fruit. 
FISHER. GEORGE L.. Houston. Texas. 

6 herbarium specimens — Santa Catalina IsUnd. California (gift). 
GRAY HERBARIUM. Harvard University, r » - ' - ^' .ssachusetts. 

3 herbanum spedisens — various local . .. }. 

MINER LABORATORIES. Chicago. 

t economic speamen of Muchcrus gum (iriftV 
MOXLEY. GEORGE L.. Los Angeles. California. 

S herbarium spe dm ens— Santa Catalina Island. California (gift). 

12 herbarium spedmens — California (gift) 

NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN. Bronx Park. New York Oty. 
33 herbarium spedmeos (exchange). 
146 herbarium spedmens (esdiaage). 

Herbarium specimens — United States of Colombia (exdiaage). 
PANCOAST. THOMAS B.. Miami Beadi Derelopaiant Co.. liiami. Florida. 
I coooanut palm — Miami« Florida. 



Jan., 1921. Annual Report of the Director. 413 

SULTAN DRUG COMPANY, St. Louis, Missouri. 

I economic specimen of Cactina pillets — Mexico (gift). 
UNITED STATES NATIONAL HERBARIUM, Smithsonian Institution, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 
Herbarium specimens (exchange). 
610 herbarium specimens (exchange). 
518 herbarium specimens — Jamaica (exchange). 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA HERBARIUM, Berkeley, CaHfornia. 

6 herbarium specimens — Santa Catalina Island (exchange). 
WILCOXSON, MRS. E. M., Chicago. 

95 herbarium specimens — Massachusetts (gift). 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

ARNOLD, DR. L. H., Chicago. 

1 specimen of gypsum geode — Colorado Springs, Colorado (gift). 
AUMAN, JOHN P., Chicago. 

2 specimens of crude and nodulized blast furnace flue dust — South Chicago 

(gift). 
BASTIANI, D., Chicago. 

2 specimens of tufa — Tuscany, Italy (gift). 
CHALMERS, W. J., Chicago. 

I album of photographs of diamond mining — Kimberley, South Africa (gift). 

I specimen of crystallized quartz after spodumene — Greenwood, Maine 
(gift). 
CHAIRMONT, DR. A. de, Toledo, Ohio. 

9 specimens of Holbrook meteorite — Holbrook, Arizona (gift). 
COOPER, A. T., Webster, South Dakota. 

7 specimens of free gold in silicified andesite, i specimen of tetrahedritc 

Mills Mine, near Carbo, Sonora, Mexico (gift). 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Collected by H. W. Nichols: 

I specimen of concretion, i specimen of ore — Schumacher, Ontario. 
Purchases: 

I specimen section of Yenberrie meteorite — Yenberrie, North Australia. 
GUNSAULUS, HELEN C, Chicago. 

I specimen of weather banded limestone — Lakeside, Michigan (gift). 
NEW CORNELIA COPPER COMPANY, Ajo, Arizona. 
II specimens of copper ores — Ajo, Arizona (gift). 
PHILLIPS COMPANY, W. S., Chicago. 

I specimen of oil shale — Parachute Creek, Colorado (gift). 
I specimen of bituminous limestone — Blue Island, Illinois (gift). 
ROMANO, JOSPEH, Chicago. 

I specimen of pyrite — Jackson Park, Chicago (gift). 
SKIFF, DR. FREDERICK J. V., Chicago. 

277 specimens of ores and minerals — various localities (gift). 
UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM, Washington, D. C. 

I cast of Yenberrie meteorite — Yenberrie, North Australia (gift). 
UNITED VERDE COPPER COMPANY, Clarkdale, Arizona. 
6 specimens of copper ores — Clarkdale, Arizona (gift). 
6 specimens of copper ores — United Verde Mine, Jerome, Arizona (gift). 



V 



414 Finn Mrsr.m or Natural History — Reports, Vol. V. 

UMTKnVi:i; ' •IMN'""' <"'>M!'A.\Y, Jwwne, Arwoofc 

 '-' -r.r. Arvxooa (fift). 

UNIVi 

I ip«cimcn of prepftrad tkull o( Diceratherium. i ■pinSftwn iltntittim of 
Dicem- ! — A|pit«. Nebnuka (exchange). 

I tkeletosi ■■. . .«.'azK>cauntf— Texas (exchange). 

DEP.XRTMKN'T OP ZOULX)GY. 

ABBEY. E. S ' » • iRo. 

I rci cago (gift). 

ARNLSTRONG. EDWARD E.. Chicaga 

I fly— Chicago (gift). 
BAILEY. BERNARD. Elk River. Mmnc^.ta. 

I marmot, t pocket mouse, 6 baU (exdaaage). 
BR.\NDLER. CHARLES. Chicago. 

I roach — Grant Park. Chicago (gift). 
CONO\'ER. H. B.. Chicago. 

I mooae (skull an<1 scalp), a caribou (skulls and scalps) — Yukon Territory 
(gift). 
CORY. CHARLES B.. Chicago. 

I ' \ct\ hat — Monhalltown. Iowa (gift). 

FIELD ^: I OP NATURAL HISTORY, 

t V W. H. Osgood: 

I r— Rio Cognlk) (Pcrija), Venemda. 

(' . W. H. Osgood and H. B. Conover: 

4 ^Is- 32$ birds, 29 birds' eggs, 13 fishes, I frog— Venemela. 

LILJEBLAD. E.. Chicago. 

I moth (and gall) — Mineral Springs. Indiana (gift)/ 
I moth— Chicv„-» (gift). 
NARBO, DR. S.. Chicago. 

»o birds' eggs — Stavanger, Norway (gift). 
NEWBURY. MRS. MOLLIE NETCHER. Boston Store, Chicago. 

I mo\xnt<Nl giraffe fgift). 
OCHSNER. E. D.. Prainc du Sac. Wisconsin. 

I least wraMl (gift). 
RYERSON. MARTIN A., and C. B. PIKE. Chicago. 

I cd gopher — Lake Geneva, Wiaooosin (gift). 

SONSHINh. .\ii.-o ti., Chicago. 

8.886 shells, 3o sea urchins. 14 starfish. 13 sand-dollars. 3 barnacles — California 
(gift). 
YERES. GILBERT L . Luccna. Tr. i ,.> I ; ; pmc Islands. 

54 land shells — Philippine Islands (giitj. 
VIOSCA, PERCY. Near Orleans. Louisiana. 

270 sp ecim e n s of mli and freshwater fiihei Soulhani Louisiana (exdtaagc). 
WILL. MISS JUANITA, Chicago. 

I m (gift). 

WILLIAMSON. E. B.. Bluflton. Indiana. 

1 paroquet— W^estem Venenda (gift). 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. REPORTS, PLATE LXXXIV. 




I 




RESTORATION OF GlANT EXTINCT BIRD (MOA)FROM NEW ZEALAND. 

Height, 13 feet. 



»tfii«9 xvAU'^MeiifT* 



Jan., 1921. Annual Report of the Director. 415 

SECTION OF PHOTOGRAPHY. 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Made by Section : 

218 negatives, most of them made during moving period. 
177 prints. 

THE LIBRARY. 

BOOKS, PAMPHLETS, AND SERIALS. 
(accessions are by exchange unless otherwise designated.) 

AFRICA 

Durban Museum 

East Africa and Uganda Natural History Society, Nairobi 

Geological Society, Johannesburg 

Institut d'Egypte, Cairo 4 

Institut de Carthage, Tunis 

Rhodesia Scientific Association, Bulawayo 

Royal Society of South Africa, Cape Town 

South African Association for Advancement of Science, Cape Town 

South African Botanical Survey, Pretoria 

South African Department of Agriculture, Pretoria 2 

South African Museum, Cape Town 3 

ARGENTINA 

Ministerio de Obras Publicas de la Provincia. Direccidn de lab Obras de 

Ameghino, La Plata 2 

Museo de La Plata, Buenos Aires 5 

Sociedad Omitologica del Plata, Buenos Aires I 

AUSTRALIA , 

Australian Museum, Sydney 4 

Australian Ornithologists' Union, Melbourne i 

Botanic Gardens and Government Domains, Sydney i 

Commonwealth of Australia, Adelaide i 

Department of Agriculture, Adelaide i 

Department of Agriculture, Sydney I 

Department of Agriculture, Wellington i 

Department of Mines, Sydney 2 

Field Naturalists' Club, Melbourne 2 

Fish Commission of New South Wales, Sydney i 

Forestry Commission, Sydney (gift) 2 

Government of the Commonwealth, Melbourne I 

Institute of Science and Industry, Sydney i 

Linnean Society of New South Wales, Sydney 2 

Melbourne University I 

National Herbarium, Melbourne I 

Public Library, Musexim and Art Gallery, Adelaide I 

Public Library, Museums and National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne . i 

Queensland Museum, Brisbane I 

Queensland Royal Society, Brisbane I 

Royal Australasian Ornithologists' Union, Melbourne I 

Royal Society of New South Wales, Sydney i 



I 



4i6 FiKLD Museum or Natural Histoby — Reports, Vol. V. 

Rnyal Society ol South Austrmlia. Adelaide 3 

Royn! - v u( TaxmaniA, Hobart 4 

Royn! . »>( Victoria. Mclboomc 3 

Roya'. . «i( Western Aiivtmlia. Perth 1 

Royal ZoOk<n«-"*i Society. Sy ' i 

South Auxtralia OmitholofncaJ ^s«-■c^c'.v. A !»-;.i: !r i 

Tr*-hnol«itiral Museum o( New South Wales. Sylncy I 

Vut">n.i I Vj>artmctit of Ajfriculttire. MellxAjroe 3 

Western Australia Geological Survey, Perth 5 

BELGIUM 

Acad'' ^' %ale de P ' r, RmsaeU 3 

InsUt unique L< .1. BntSKls 

Janlin Dotaniquc dc I'Etat. Brussels 

MiuX'e du Conifo. Brussels 

Mus6c Royalc d'llistoirc Naturcllc. Brussels 
Sod^^ Royalc d'Arch^logic. Briisscls . . 

BRAZIL 

Bibliothcca Nacional. Rio dc Janeiro 

It ' ' ' .'Xf^ronomico dc Estado, Sao Paolo 

M > dc Aifriciiltura. Industria e Commercio. Rio dc Janeiro 

Museo Goeldi de Historia c Ethno|;raphia, Para 
ScrxMco Geologioo e MineraloKico, Rio de Janeiro . 

CANADA 

Chief Game Guardian ol Saskatchewan, Regioa 
C nmrniwi oo of Coowrvation. Otuwa 
Department of Agriculture, Ottawa 
Department of Agriculture. Victoria ... 
Department of Marine and Fisheries. Ottawa . 

Department of Mines. Ottawa 

Department of the Interior. Geolopcal Survey. Ottawa 
Entomological Society oi Ontario, Toronto 

Hamilton Asaodation 

Horticultural Societies of Ontario. Toronto 
Nova Scotian Institute of 5>cicnce. Halifax 
Ontario Minister of Education, Toronto 
Prov in cial Moseom, Victoria ... 
Royal Canadian Institute, Toronto 
Royal Society of Canada. Ottawa 
Sod^^ de G^ographie. Quebec 

CEYLON 

Colombo MtiMtun . 

Royal Botanic Garden. Fcndcntya 
CHIIJ; 

fiiblioteca Nacional, Santiago de Chile 

Muaeo de Etaologia y Antropologia dc Chile, Santiago de Chile 

CHINA 

Botany and Forestry Department, Hoot-Koog 

Canton Christian CoUcgc (gift) 

Royal Asiatic Sodety of North China. ^0^«g*»*i 



Jan., 1921. Annual Report of the Director. 417 

DENMARK 

Botanical Garden, Library, Copenhagen i 

Danske Kunstindustrimuseum, Copenhagen I 

K. Bibliothek, Copenhagen ' . . I 

Naturhistorisk Forening, Copenhagen 3 

Societas pro Fauna et Flora Fennica, Helsingfors 5 

Soci6te Botanique, Copenhagen i 

ECUADOR » 

Sociedad Ecuatoriana de Estudios Historicos Americanos, Quito ... 2 

FEDERATED MALAY STATES 

Federated Malay States Museum, Kuala Lumpur . 7 

FRANCE 

Academic des Sciences, Paris 2 

Ecole d 'Anthropologic; Paris > . . . 2 

Mus6e d'Histoire Naturelle, Marseille I 

Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris 2 

LaNature, Paris 2 

Soci^t^ d'Etudes Scientifiques, Angers i 

Soci^te d'Histoire Naturelle, Colmar 2 

Socidt6 d'Horticulture, Paris I 

Soci^t^ de G^ographie, Paris 2 

Soci6t6 de Geographic, Toulouse I 

Society des Am^ricanistes, Paris I 

Society Nationale d'Agriculture, Sciences et Arts, Angers i 

University de Montpellier, Cette I 

University de Rermes 7 

GERMANY 

Deutsche Dendrologische Gesellschaft, Bonn-Poppelsdorf 5 

Geographische Gesellschaft in Hamburg 3 

K. Sammlungen fur Kunst und Wissenschaften, Dresden 4 

Naturforschende Gesellschaft, Freiburg I 

Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein fur Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel I 

Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein fur Schwaben und Neuburg, Augsburg . . i 
Senckenbergische Naturforschende Gesellschaft, Frankfurt, a. M. . . .5 

GREAT BRITAIN 

Ashmolean Natural History Society of Oxfordshire, Oxford I 

Birmingham Natural History and Philosophical Society 14 

Bristol Museum and Gallery I 

British Museum (Natural History), London .13 

Cambridge Philosophical Society 2 

Cambridge University Library I 

Dove Marine Laboratory, CuUercoats 2 

Dumfriesshire and Galloway Natural History and Antiquarian Society, 

Dumfries I 

Fisheries Board, Edinburgh 2 

Geographical Society, London 2 

Geological Society, Edinburgh I 

Great Britain Geological Survey, London I 

Imperial Bureau of Entomology, London 2 

Imperial College of Science and Technology, London I 



4i8 Field Museum of Natural IIistoby — Reports, Vol. V. 

Lancashire Sea PUhene* Laboratories. Liverpool 

Liverpool Biolopca) Society 

Manchester Geographical Society 

Manchester Museum 

Marine Biolofncal Ajsociatioo. Pl)'Tnouth 

NaUonalV' ^ 

Natural I i ;.....--• I. . Glasgow 

Oxfonl University Museum 

Royal Botanic Gardenn. E^linburjfh 

Royal '" ' IS. Kcw 

Royal , , . 

Royal Horticultural Society 

Royal Scottish Museum, Edinburgh 

Royal Society. London 

Royal Society at Art*. London 

Royal Society of E<linbur);h 

South London Entomoloi^cal and Natural History Society 

Tfiag Zoological Museum . 

Zoological Society of London 

HUNGARY 

Magyar Ornith'l'v-ki Korjxint. Budapest 
Museum Nationalc Hungancum. Budapest 

INDIA 

Agri- Horticultural Society. Madras . 

Anthropological Society. Bombay 

Archsological Survey, Allahabad 

ArduBological Surve>-. Burma 

ArdMBologica] Survey, Calcutta 

ArduBological Survey, Eastern Circle, Patr.i 

Ardieological Survey, Frontier Circle. Prt '..lAar 

Botanical Survey. Calcutta ... 

Department of Agriculture. Bombay 

Department of Agriculture. Madras 

Department of Agriculture. Pusa 

Geological Survey. Calcutta 2 

Government, Calcutta . . 3 

Government Museum. Madras '5 

Indian Mu<;cum. Calcutta 3 

Jammer and Kashmir /Vrchcological Survey. Jammer i 

Jnao-Bhandar Museum. Dayal Bagh .... i 

Journal of Indian Botany i 

Natiooal Indian Association. Calcutta (gift) i 

TrigOQoroetrical Survey. Dehra Dun 2 

IRBLAND 

Natural History and Philosophical Society. Belfast i 

ITALY 

Accademia delle Sdense Fisiche e Matematiche. Naples 4 

Accademia Giomta de Sdenxe Naturali. Catania 3 

American Academy in Rome i 

Institoto G«ografico dc Agostuu. Nov.-ira i 



Jan., 1921. Annual Report of the Director. 419 

Laboratorio de Zoologia Generale e Agraria, Portici I 

Musei de Zoologia ed Anatomia Comparata, Turin 4 

Museo Civico di Storia Naturale, Genoa I 

R. Accademia delle Scienze, Turin 3 

Societa Geologica, Rome ^ .... I 

Societa Italiana d'Antropologia e Etnologia, Florence 2 

Societa Italiana de Scienze Naturali, Milan 2 

Society Romana di Antropologia, Rome I 

Societa Toscana di Scienze Naturali, Pisa I 

JAPAN 

Akita Mining College I 

Bureau of Productive Industry Fonnosa Government, Taihoku . . . . i 

Geological Society, Tokyo I 

Imperial University of Tokyo, College of Agriculture 2 

Imperial University of Tokyo, College of Science 2 

Tokyo Botanical Society 2 

JAVA 

Bataviaasch Genootschap van Kunsten en Wetenschappen, Batavia . . 4 

Department of Agriculture, Buitenzorg S 

Encyclopaedisch Bureau, Weltevreden 2 

Jardin Botanique, Buitenzorg 

K. Natuurkundige Vereeniging in Nederlandsch-Indie, Weltvreden . 

KOREA 

Government-General Chosen, Seoul 

MEXICO 

Director General de Estadistica, Mexico 

Instituto Geologico, Mexico 

Sociedad Cientifica " Antonio Alzate, " Mexico 

Sociedad Geologica, Mexico 

Sociedad Mexicana de Geografia y Estadistica, Mexico 

NETHERLANDS 

Bataafsch Genootschap der Proefondervindelijke Wijsbegeerte, Rotterdam 

K. Akademie van Wetenschappen, Amsterdam 

K. Bibliotheek, The Hague 

K. Instituut voor de Taal-Land-en Volkenktmde van Nederlandsch Indie, 
The Hague , 

K. Nederlandsch Aardijkundig Genootschap, Amsterdam 

Nederlandsche Dierktmdige Vereeniging, Leiden 

Rijks Ethnographisch Museum, Leiden 

Rijks Geologisch-Mineralogisch Museum, Leiden 

Rijks Museum van Natuurlijke Historic, Leiden 

Stadtsbibliotheek, Haarlem 

Universiteit van Amsterdam -• • 3 

NEW ZEALAND 

Acclimatisation Society, Wellington 

Auckland Institute and Museum, Wellington 

Department of Agriculture, Wellington 

Department of Mines, Wellington 3 

New Zealand Institute, Wellington 3 



4JO Field Museum of Natural History — Repoits, Vol. V. 

NORWAY 

Hrrvtrii N(u!i«ufn $ 

Ni>rv« ''■•■ ' "•"Jte Under»6|t«l«*. ChmliAni* i6 

l*hyi;i' *>: >• Porcninif. Chrutmni* « 

Tronwo Museum 8 

PERU 

Archi\'io Nacioaal i 

Biblinteca Nadooal, Lima i 

Cueqx) dc In(;eniem« de Mimu, Lnv i i 

T ' ) Ilistorico, Lima . . i 

POK. ..L 

Acidemia das Sdeodai de Lisboa . . i 

Biblioteca Narional, Lisbon i 

Sociedade de Liiboa i 

Sod^t^ Portttgaiw des Sciencea Naturelles, Listxjn > 

SPAIN 

Brotcha. Salamanca i 

Instituci6 Catalana d'Histoha Natural, Barcelona i 

Junta de Ciendes Naturals, Barcelona ... 5 

Muaeo Nadooal de Cicncias Naturalcs. Madrid 3 

R. Academia de Cicncias y Artes. Barcelona i 

R. Academia de Ciendas Exactaa, Pistcas y Naturalcs, Madrid 2 

Sodedad Eq>aiW>la de Historia Natural. Madrid . . 2 

SWEDEN 

K. Bibliotckct. Stockholm i 

K. Svcnska Vctcnskapsakailcmien. Stockholm 4 

K. Umvcrsitcts Bibliotckct. Uppsala i 

K- Vctcnskaps-och Vitterhct*-SamhAllc. GdtcboT]^ i 

K. Vittcrhcts Historic och Antikvitcts Akadcmicn. Stockholm i 

Svcn<;ka SAll&kapot f6r Antropologi och Geografi, Stockholm i 

SWITZERLAND 

Botanic Garden. Zurich ... .1 

Gcojjraphisch-Ethnojfraphischc Gcscllschaft. Zurich 4 

Historischcs Muse-— " -n . . i 

^(us<h: d'Histoire N ••. I^ausannc 2 

Naturforschende Gesellschaft, Bern . . 3 

Natxirforschcode Gesellschaft. Zurich 1 

Sod6t^ Entoax>k)gique, Bern .... 1 

Sod^t^ Pribtuseoise des Sdeoces Naturelles. Fnbour); 1 

Sod6t4 Hclvctiquc des Sdences NatureUea, Geoeva i 

Sod^t^ Ncuchatcloise de Geographic 2 
URUGUAY 

Archive General Administrativo, Montevideo (jtift) i 

WEST INDIES 

Academia Nadooal de Aries y Leiras, Havana (gift) t 

Biok>gical Statioo of Bermuda 1 

Imperial Department of Agriculture. Barbadoes 1 

Jamaica Institute, Kingston i 

Trimdad and Tobago Department oi Agnculturc, Port ot bpaio .2 

Unhretvdad de Habana ' 



Jan., 1921. Annual Report of the Director. 421 

Bertrand, Paul, Lille 10 

Boyd, William, Winnipeg 1 

Carpenter, G. H., Dublin I 

Dunod, H., Paris 2 

Gamble, J. S., Madras i 

Guppy, H. B., Exeter I 

Huard, V. A., Quebec 2 

Richter, Rudolf, Frankfurt a. M 10 

Rivet, P., Paris 3 

Rutot, A., Brussels 2 

Schinz, Hans, Zurich I 

Schlaginhaufen, Otto, Zurich I 

Schmidt, W., Vienna 2 

Schreiter, Rudolf o, Tucuman i 

Swarm, H. Kirke, London 2 

Wille, N., Christiania 6 

ALABAMA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Auburn i 

Alabama Anthropological Society, Montgomery i 

Alabama Geological Survey, University 2 

ARIZONA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Tucson 2 

CALIFORNIA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Berkeley i 

California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco i 

Cooper Ornithological Club, Hollywood I 

Fish and Game Commission, San Francisco i 

Leland Stanford Junior University, Stanford University 6 

Pomona College, Claremont i 

State Mining Bureau, Sacramento 4 

University of California, Berkeley 9 

COLORADO 

Bureau of Mines, Denver i 

Colorado Musetun of Natural History, Denver ........ i 

CONNECTICUT 

Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven 3 

American Oriental Society, New Haven I 

Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences, New Haven I 

Hartford Public Library '2 

State Board of Fisheries and Game, Hartford I 

State Forester, New Haven I 

Yale University, New Haven 2 

GEORGIA 

Geological Survey, Atlanta i 

HAWAIIAN ISLANDS 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Honolulu .1 

Board of Commissions of Agriculture and Forestry, Honolulu .... 2 

Hawaiian College, Honolulu i 

Hawaiian Entomological Society, Honolulu i 



433 PiELD Museum of Natural Histoey — Repokts, Vol. V. 

IDAHO 

Mining Inluctry. Boitt I 

Univmity U Idaho. Moacow 3 

ILLINOIS 

Ajrhcultunl Eipcrimcnt StAtion, Url>an.i 3 

Art If ' " I 

Chtca^. -^..:v . . i 

Dapwtnient c4 Natural Histnry, Urbn*. 1 1 

Game and Puh Commiwion. Sphiurii' ' '• 1 

HaitlwootI Record. Chicago (jfift) 1 

John Crcnu- Library, Chicafto 1 

Lake Pored College 1 

Lcwu Institute, Chicago 1 

Newberry Library, Chicago i 

North we«t em Universily. Evanston ... 1 

Open Court Publishing Company, Chicago . i 

State Board of Agriailture. Spring6eld i 

State Geological Survey, Urbana . . 6 

State Historical Library, Sprinpfield . 3 

State Museum, Springfield ... i 

Swrrt, Wallach and Company. Ch. .^,- <>rifl) . . i 

University of Chicago 4 

University of Illinois, Urbana 2 

INDIANA 

Agricultural Expcnmcnt Station. I^afayette 

Department of Geology and Natural Resources, Indianapolis 

Earlham College. Richmond 

Indiana Academy cA Science, Indianapolis . 

Indiana University, Bloomington ... 

Purdue Universily. Lafayette ... 

University of Notre Dame 

IOWA 

GcrOogical Sur%'c>*. IVs M inrs 

Iowa Academy of Scicr.rrs, ])••<. Miir<'- 

lowa State College. Am-- 

Iowa State Historical Dep.irtmrnt, I)rs M"ir.rs 

Universily erf Iowa, Iowa City .... 3 

KANSAS 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Manhatt.in 3 

Geological Survey, Lawrence 

State Board of Agriculture. Topelca . . 
Unhrenity ci Kansas, I>awrence . . 

KENTUCKY 

Drpartnient of Geology and Forestry. Frankfort 

LOUISIANA 

Agricultural Experiment Station. Baton Rouge ... 
State Mttaeom, New Orleans 

MAINE 

Agricultural Experiment Station. Orooo . . 

Bowdoin College, Brunswick ... . 

Portland Pubbc Library . 



Jan., 1921. Annual Report of the Director. 423 

MARYLAND 

Agricultural Experiment Station, College Park 2 

Horticultural Society, College Park I 

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore 2 

Maryland Institute, Baltimore I 

MASSACHUSETTS ^ 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Amherst I 

American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Boston I 

American Antiquarian Society, Boston I 

Amherst College I 

Archaeological Institute of America, Boston 2 

Boston Public Library I 

Boston Society of Natural History I 

Clark University, Worcester I 

Essex Institute, Salem 2 

Harvard Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge 3 

Harvard University, Arnold Arboretum, Jamaica Plain I 

Musetmi of Fine Arts, Boston 2 

New Bedford Public Library 2 

Peabody Institute 1 

Peabody Museum, Cambridge 2 

Peabody Muscam, Salem I 

Salem Public Library I 

Springfield City Library Association I 

Springfield Natural History Museum 1 

Williams College, Williamstown I 

MICHIGAN 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Agricultural College I 

Department of Parks and Boulevards, Detroit I 

Detroit Institute of Art I 

Grand Rapids Public Library 2 

Michigan College of Mines, Houghton I 

Michigan State Library, Lansing I 

State Board of Library Commissions, Lansing I 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 2 

MINNESOTA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, St. Paul 2 

Minneapolis Institute of Fine Arts I 

Minnesota Geological Survey, Miimeapolis I 

Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul 2 

St. Paul Institute 2 

University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 2 

MISSISSIPPI 

State Geological Survey, Jackson I 

MISSOURI 

Association of Engineering Societies, St. Louis I 

Bureau of Geology and Mines, Jefferson City I 

City Art Museum, St. Louis 2 

Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis I 

St. Louis Public Library I 



4J4 Field Museum OF Natub*t I?r<T.)RY — Reports, Vol. V. 

St IxniU Univerrily . . i 

St.itr Historical ■. ColumbtA 2 

W^-lunifton T't St I^xii* a 

NEBRASKA 

AKhcultunl Expcnmcnt Station. I.:: i 

University ai Nebraakm. Lincoln . 1 

NEVADA 

Agnctiltund Experiment Stfttioa. CArs«>n City . . 3 

NEW JERSEY 

Afhculturml Expenment Station. Trcntoo .6 

Department of Conaervattun and Dcv-clopmeat. Trenton i 

Newark Museum Association . . 3 

Princeton Univerwty i 

Str^—- '" titutc, Hoboken . . t 

NEW N! ) 

Sch«x)l of Mmc*. Sorocco .1 

NEW YORK 

Agncultural Expenment Station, Geneva 3 

American Geographical Society. New York . a 

American Hellenic Society. New York City (jtift) . 1 

American Institute of Mining V * York Ciiy 2 

American Museum of Natural :.. 1 ork City 18 

A^>ecto« and Mineral Corporation, New York City {gdl) X 
Brooklyn Botanic Garden .... .2 

Brooklyn Institute o( Arts and SdeiKxs 3 

Buflak> Society of Natural History i 
Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. New York City 

(gift) I 

Cohunbia University. New York City i 

Cooper Union for the Advancement of Scir:. -^ m ! .^rt. New York City i 

Cornell University. Ithaca 4 

Forest and Stream Pul : i:iy. New York City 1 

Inter-American Magaziii' . .'-.. ^ • -.rli. City i 

Japan Society. New York City ... i 

Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York City 2 

Museum of the American Indian. New York City 8 

New York Academy of Sacnces. New York City t 

New York Botanical Garden. New York City . 1 

New York Historical Society. New York City i 

Pratt Institute Free Library. Brooklyn 1 

Pubbc Library. New York City i 

State Library. Albany ... i 

State Museum. Albany 14 

Sutcn Island Institute a< Art* and Sdenoet, New York City 3 

Stone Publishing Cocnpany. New York Citv . . i 

Zoological Society, New York City 2 

NORTH C \A 

Elisha W\' rii Scientific Society. Chapel Hill l 

G<H-'ln({ical and Economic Sxirvry. Raleigh > 

NORTH DAKOTA 

University oi North Dakota, University t 



Jan., 1921. Annual Report of the Director. 425 

OHIO 

Academy of Sciences, Columbus I 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Wooster 2 

Cincinnati Museimi Association I 

Cleveland Museum of Art I 

Cleveland Public Library 2 

Denison University, Granville i 

Lloyd Library, Cincinnati 2 

Oberlin College Library 2 

State Archaeological and Historical Society, Columbus i 

State University, Columbus 1 1 

University of Cincinnati 6 

Wilson Ornithological Club, Oberlin I 

OREGON 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Corvallis . I 

University of Oregon, Eugene 2 

PENNSYLVANIA 

American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia i 

Aquatic Life 2 

Association of Engineering Societies, Philadelphia . I 

Bryn Mawr College I 

Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh . . . , 2 

Carnegie Library, Pittsburgh 3 

Carnegie Museum, Pittsburgh 2 

Delaware Ornithological Club, Philadelphia I 

Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art, Philadelphia . . . i 

Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences I 

Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science 2 

Philadelphia Commercial Museum i 

Sullivant Moss Society, Pittsburgh i 

Topographic and Geologic Survey, Harrisburg . . . I 

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 2 

University of Pennsylvania Museum, Philadelphia 2 

Wagner Free Institute of Science, Philadelphia i 

Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia 10 

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 

Bureau of Education, Manila I 

Department of Agriculture, Manila 2 

Department of Interior, Bureau of Science, Manila 5 

RHODE ISLAND 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Kingston (gift) I 

Park Museum, Providence I 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charleston Museum I 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Brookings I 

State Geological Survey, Madison I 

TENNESSEE 

State Board of Entomology, Nashville I 

State Geological Survey, Nashville 3 



436 Field Museum of Natural Histoiy — Repoets, Vol. V. 

TEXAS 

Africnlttml BxpcrimcDt o teti o n . CcHbye sta t ion j 

San ADtooto Scientific Sodcty i 

UTAH 

I'ntxrrnty U Uuh. Sutc School of Mines. Salt Lake City I 

VIRGINIA 

State Library. Richnxiod . i 

Vr.-.vrr-.-.w t f Virpria. Charlottesville i 

\ ' I V'-*l Survey. Charlottecville i 

\ -.0 I'ori-ster, Charlottesville . 3 

WASHINGTON 

^>ki|ncal Survey. Seattle Igiil) i 

\' ..^too University. Seattle 14 

\V.i.<;hinf;toa Uoivernty. Histoncal Society, Seattle 2 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 

American Mining CoofreH (gift) t 

National Academy of Scien c es 4 

National Education AModation (gift) i 

Pan American Union ... 2 

V ' ' States Gorcnunent ... . 340 

WIS«. 

Agricultural Experiment Station. Madisnn 2 

Archaeological Society, Milwaukee t 

Bcloit College 2 

Sute Histoncal Society. Madison i 

Sute Hortiailtural Society. Madison ... 2 

University of Wisconsin, Madison i 

Ayer. Edward E.. Chicago (gift) 89 

Barnes. Willuun. Decatur ... i 

Blatchlc>'. W. S.. Indiazupolis .... i 

Casey. Thomas. Washington. D. C. (gift) 2 

Chalmers. William J.. Chicago (gift) ... 2 

Cockerel. T. D. A.. BouUer . . 10 

Bifcaoiann. Carl H.. Bkxxnington i 

Brans. Alexander W.. New Haven 2 

Parwell. John V., Chicago (gift) i 

Gerhard. W. J.. Chicago 9 

Gmsaulus Collection of Personalia of Eminent Naturalists igiit) 3 

Holland. W. J.. Pittsburgh (gift) . 1 

Kroel)cr. A. L.. Berkcle>' 1 

Laufer. B.. Chicago . . 6 

MacCurdy. George Grant. Wa.^} nk,-. n. D. C. 3 

Malkxh. John R., Urbana (gift) 3 

Mason. John A.. Chicago 2 

MiUspwigh. C. P.. Chicago . . 30 

Morgan. P. G.. Wellington (gift) 6 

Morse. Edward S.. Salem . 3 

Qibora. Henry P.. New York City 2 

Porkney. Thocnas, Chicago (gift) . t 

Wood. Albert Casey. Chicago (gift) i 



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Jan., 192 1. Annual Report op the Director. 437 



Articles of Incorporation. 



STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

DEPARTUENT OF STATE. 

William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State. 
To All to Whom These Presents Shall Come, Greeting: 

Whereas, a Certificate duly signed and acknowledged having been filed in the 
oflBce of the Secretary of State, on the i6th day of September, a. d. 1893, for the 
organization of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO, under and in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of "An Act Concerning Corporations," approved 
April 18, 1872, and in force July i, 1872, and all acts amendatory thereof, a copy 
of which certificate is hereto attached. 

Now, therefore, I, William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State of the State of 
Illinois, by virtue of the powers and duties vested in me by law, do hereby certify 
that the said COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO is a legally organized 
Corporation under the laws of this State. 

In Testimony Whereof, I hereto set my hand and cause to be affixed the Great 
Seal of State. Done at the City of Springfield, this i6th day of September, in the 
year of our Lord one thousand eight htmdred and ninety-three, and of the Inde- 
pendence of the United States the one hundred and eighteenth. 

W. H. HINRICHSEN, 
[Seal.] Secretary of State. 

TO HON. WILLIAM H. HINRICHSEN, 

Secretary of State: 
Sir: 

We, the undersigned citizens of the United States, propose to form a corporation 
under an act of the General Assembly of the State of Illinois, entitled "An Act Con- 
cerning Corporations," approved April 18, 1872, and all acts amendatory thereof; 
and that for the purposes of such organization we hereby state as follows, to- wit: 

1. The name of such corporation is the "COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OP 
CHICAGO." 

2. The object for which it is formed is for the accumulation and dissemination 
of knowledge, and the preservation and exhibition of objects illustrating Art, Archae- 
ology, Science and History. 

3. The management of the aforesaid museum shall be vested in a Board of 
Fifteen (15) Trustees, five of whom are to be elected every year. 

4. The following named persons are hereby selected as the Trustees for the 
first year of its corporate existence: 

Edward E. Ayer, Charles B. Farwell, George E. Adams, George R. Davis, Charles 
L. Hutchinson, Daniel H. Bumham, John A. Roche, M. C. Bullock, Emil G. Hirsch, 



4>8 i^KLD Museum or Natubal Histoby — Repobts, Vol. V. 

James W. niUworth. AIIi«on V. Armour. O. P. Aldis. Edwin Walker. Joho C. BUck 
and Prank W. Gunjaulu*. 

5. The kxattoo <A the Muaeum is in the City o( Chicago. County at Cook, aod 
Sute ot lUioois. 

(Sipud). 

G€onr« B. AdAxns. C. D. Panrcil. Sidney C. Bastman. P. W. Putnam. Robert 
McMurdy, Andrew Prtcnion. L. J. GtLgc. ChAries L. Hutchinsoo. Bbcnenr Bockinf- 
ham. Andrew McNally, E<lwanl B. Ayer. John M. Clark. Hennaa R. T'^'tfut. 
George Schneider. Henry H. Getty. William R. Harper. Pranklin H. Head. B. 0. 
Kdth. J. Irving Pcarrc. Arcl P. Hatch, Henry Wade Rogers. Thomas B. Bryan. 
L. Z. Ldter. A. C. Bartletl. A. A. Spnijfuc. A. C McClurg. James W. Soott, Geo. P. 
Biasell. John R. Wal»h, Chan. Pitzjummons. John A. Roche. E. B. McCags. Owoa 
P. Aldis. Perdinand W. Peck. James H. Dole. Joseph Stockton. Edward B. Butler. 
John McConncll. R. A. W.a]ler. H. C. Chatfidd-Taylor. A. Crawford. Wm. Sooy 
Smith. P. S. PctcrBon. John C. Black. Jno. J. Mitchell. C. F '-•her. Geoffe R. 
Davis. Stephen A. Forl)«. RnJxsrt W. Patterson. Jr.. .M. C B ; ivdwin WaUnr, 

George M. Pullman. William E. Curtis, James W. Ellsworth. William E. Hala. 
Wm. T. Baker. M.irtin A. Rycrson. Huntington W. Jackson. N. B. Ream, Normao 
Williams, Mdviilc E. Stone. Br>'an Lathrop. Ehphalet W. Blatchford. Philip D. 
Armour. 

Statk of Illinois 

ss. 
Cook Cornry 

I. G. R. MiTciiKLL. a Notary Public in and for Mkl County, do hereby omtUf 
that the foregoing petitioners personally appeared before me and acknowtedgad 
severally that they signed the foregoing petition as tbdr free and voluntary act for 
the uses aod purposes therdo set forth. 

Given under my hand and notarial seal this 14th day of September, 1893. 

G. R. MITCHELL. 
(SkalI NoTAtY Public. Cook Couhty, III. 

CHANGE OP NAME. 

Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the corporate members held the 
»5th day of June. 1HQ4. the name of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM was changed to 
FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. A certificate to this effect was 6led June j6. 
1894. in the office of the Secretary of State for Illioois. 



CHANGE OP NAME. 
Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the corpor.ite mcmben held the 
8th day of November. 1905. the name of the FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM 
sras changed to FIELD MUSEUM OP NATURAL HISTORY. A certificate to 
this effect was filed November to. 1905. in the office of the Secretary of State for 
Illinois. 

CHANGE IN ARTICLE 3. 

Pursuant to a reeoluttoa at a me«- — • •' - ^'c members heW the loth 

&acT of May. 1920. the mamgement c Nf OP NATURAL HIS- 

TORY shall be invested in a Board of Twbkty-onb (si) TKcmBs. who shall be 
electol in •nich manner and for such time and ter ~ce as may be provided for 

by the By-Laws. 



Jan., 1921. Annual Report of the Director. 429 



AMENDED BY-LAWS. 



(January i, 192 i.) 



ARTICLE I. 

MEMBERS. 



Section i. Members shall be of seven classes, Corporate Members, Honorary 
Members, Patrons, Life Members, Associate Members, Sustaining Members, and 
Annual Members. 

Section 2. The Corporate Members shall consist of the persons named in 
the articles of incorporation, and of such other persons as shall be chosen from time 
to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, upon the recommendation 
of the Executive Committee; provided, that such person named in the articles of 
incorporation shall, within ninety days from the adoption of these By-Laws, and 
persons hereafter chosen as Corporate Members shall, within ninety days of their 
election, pay into the treasury the sum of twenty ($20.00) dollars or more. Corporate 
Members becoming Life Members, Patrons or Honorary Members shall be exempt 
from dues. Annual meetings of said Corporate Members shall be held at the same 
place and on the same day that the annual meeting of the Board of Trustees is held. 

Section 3. Honorary Members shall be chosen by the Board from among 
persons who have rendered eminent service to science, and only upon unanimous 
nomination of the Executive Committee. They shall be exempt from all dues. 

Section 4. Patrons shall be chosen by the Board upon recommendation of 
the Executive Committee from among persons who have rendered eminent service 
to the Museum. They shall be exempt from all dues, and, by virtue of their election 
as Patrons, shall also be Corporate Members. 

Section 5. Any person paying into the treasury the sum of five hundred 
($500.00) dollars, at any one time, shall, upon the unanimous vote of the Board, 
become a Life Member. Life Members shall be exempt from all dues, and shall 
enjoy all the privileges and courtesies of the Museum that are accorded to members 
of the Board of Trustees. 

Section 6. Any person paying into the treasury of the Museum the sum of 
one hundred ($100.00) dollars, at any one time, shall, upon the unanimous vote of 
the Board, become an Associate Member. Associate Members shall be entitled to: 
tickets admitting member and members of family, including non-resident home 
guests, all publications of the Museum, if so desired; reserved seats to all lectures 
and entertainments under the auspices of the Museum, provided reservation is 
requested in advance, and admission of holder of membership and accompanying 
party to all special exhibits and Museum functions day or evening. 

Section 7. Sustaining Members shall consist of such persons as are selected 
from time to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, and who shall 
pay an annual fee of twenty-five ($25.00) dollars, payable within thirty days after 



4JO Field ^lt^t.l;M or Natural Himoky — Reports, Vol. V. 

notice o( elect: ' within thirtjr day* after each recturiof •mmal date. Thia 

Sustaininc Mmi'tKTftiiip cnltlln the mcmbrr to free admiuion for the member and 
family to the Mtiaeuro oo any day and allows i$ H-^'tTrii oo up o m. which may b« 
oaad by any one. the Annual Report and waA other MuMam docnments or pnhlfaa 
tiona as may be requeetcd in writing. When a SustaininK Member ha* paid tha 
annual fee of $25.00 for nx years, such member shall be entitled to become an AaH>- 
ciate Mctnl>er. 

Skction 8. Annual Meml>ers shall cooiist of such pemoa as are selected from 
time to time by the Board ot Trustees at any of its meetiogs. and who shall pay an 
annual fee of ten (| 10.00) dollars, payable within thirty clays after each rccurrim 
annual date. An Annual Membership sliall entitle the member to a card of ■ilmJMinn 
for the memtter and fanuly durini; all hours when the Museum is open to the pnbUc, 
and free admission for the member and family to all Museum lectures or entertaiD> 
mentx. Tlii'i membership will also entitle the holder to the courtenet of the mem- 
bcrslup privileges of c\'cr>' Museum of note in the United States and ^^«*****. to 
long as the existing system of cooperative interchange of membenhip tickaU shall 
be maintained, including tickets for any lectures given under the auspices of any of 
the Museums during a visit to the aties in which the cooperative mnaaonM ar« 
located. 

ARTICLE II. 

BOABD OF TBUSTEES. 

SacnoN I . The Board of Trustees shall consist of twenty-one members. The 
respective members of the Board now in office, and those who shaD hanafter be 
electctl. shall hold office during life. Vacancies occurring in the Board shall be 
filled at a regular meeting of the Board, upon the nomination of the Executive Com- 
mittee made at a preceding regular meeting of the Board, by a majority vote of the 
members of the Board. 

SscnoN 3. Regular m ee tings of the Board shall be held on the third Monday 
of each month. Special meetings may be called at any time by the President, and 
shall be called by the Secretary upon the written request of three Trustees. Piva 
Tnstees shall constitute a quorum, except for the election of officers or the adoption 
of the Annual Budget, when seven Trustees shall be required, but meetings may be 
adjourned by any less number from day to day, or to a day fixed, previous to the 
next regular meeting. 

Section 3. Rcasonalile written tK>tice, designating the time and plaoe d 
*«««M*"g meetings, shall be given by the Secretary. 

ARTICLE III. 

BONORAKY TRt^TSIS. 

SRcnoN I. As a mark of respect, and in appreciate m of servicer performed 
for the Institution, those Trustees who by reason of inability, on account of change 
of residence, or for other cause or from iodispodtioo to serve longer in such capacity 
shall resign their place upon the Board, may be elected, by a majority of those 
present at any regular meeting of the Board, an Honorary Trustee for life. Sodi 
Honorary Trustee will reoehre notice of all meetings of the Board of Trustees, wfaadier 
regular or special, and will be expected to be present at all such meetings and partid- 
pate in the dclibcratiotts thereof, but an Honorary Trustee shall not have the right to 
vote. 



Jan., 1921. Annual Report of the Director. 431 

ARTICLE IV. 

OFFICERS. 

Section i. The officers shall be a President, a First Vice-President, a Second 
Vice-President, a Secretary, an Assistant Secretary and a Treasurer. They shall 
be chosen by ballot by the Board of Trustees, a majority of those present and voting 
being necessary to elect. The President, the First Vice-President, and the Second 
Vice-President shall be chosen from among the members of the Board of Trustees. 
The meeting for the election of officers shall be held on the third Monday of January 
of each year, and shall be called the Annual Meeting. 

Section 2. The officers shall hold office for one year, or until their successors 
are elected and qualified, but any officer may be removed at any regular meeting of 
the Board of Trustees by a vote of two-thirds of all the members of the Board. 
Vacancies in any office may be filled by the Board at any meeting. 

Section 3. The officers shall perform such duties as ordinarily appertain to 
their respective offices, and such as shall be prescribed by the By-Laws, or designated 
from time to time by the Board of Trustees. 



ARTICLE V. 

the treasurer. 

Section i. The Treasurer shall be custodian of the funds of the Corporation 
except as hereinafter provided. He shall make disbursements only upon warrants 
drawn by the Director and countersigned by the President. In the absence or 
inability of the Director, warrants may be signed by the Chairman of the Finance 
Committee, and in the absence or inability of the President, may be countersigned by 
one of the Vice-Presidents. But no warrant shall be issued, except in conformity with 
a regularly prepared voucher, giving the name of the payee and stating the occasion 
for the expenditure, and verified and approved as hereinafter prescribed. It shall 
be no part of the duties of the Treasurer to see that the warrants have been issued in 
conformity with such vouchers. 

Section 2. The securities and muniments of title belonging to the corporation 
shall be placed in the custody of some Trust Company of Chicago to be designated 
by the Board of Trustees, which Trust Company shall collect the income and principal 
of said securities as the same become due, and pay same to the Treasurer, except as 
hereinafter provided. Said Trust Company shall allow access to and deliver any or 
all securities or mtmiments of title to the joint order of the following officers, namely: 
The President or one of the Vice-Presidents, jointly with the Chairman, or one of the 
Vice-Chairmen, of the Finance Committee of the Museum. 

Section 3. The Treasurer shall give bond in such amount, and with such 
sureties as shall be approved by the Board of Trustees. 

Section 4. All vouchers executed for the payment of liabilities incurred in 
the administration of the Museum, shall be verified by the Auditor, and approved 
for payment by the Director, and a member of the Executive Committee. All 
vouchers executed for expenditures for the construction or reconstruction of the 
Museum building, or buildings, shall be verified by the Auditor and approved for pay- 
ment by the Chairman of the Building Committee. All vouchers executed in con- 
nection with the investments of the Corporation, or, in any way having to do with 



4j.' Field Musettm of Natural IIistoby — Reposts, Vol. V. 

the ctvlowrnctil fiirv!< <f the Coipormtion, thall l>c vmhoi l-y the Auditor and 
ap;— •■-' •' ' • •••••• •»— <"'».-. »...;y| o( ihc Finance Oimnullcc 

Savings Bank of Chicsfo thall be CwtodiMi 
ci "The N. W. Hams Public School Bxtcmion of Field MttMom" fund. The 
bank thall make diabuiieroents only upon w%rr .iwn by the Director aad 

oountenifned by the President. In the al>tence or ..... ■■* the Director, warruits 

may be ngned by the Chairman lA the Finance Cor and tn the >beeoc» or 

inahihty at the President, may be countcmicned by the Vice-PreMkota. But no 
warrant shaJl be ianied. except in o v with a r«fukrly preparad voodMr, 

giving the name of the payee and %u.:...^ -.he occanon for the expenditure, and 
vcnfird and approved by the Auditor, the Director, and a member of the Bxecuttve 
Committee. It shall be no part of the duties of the said Custodian to sec that the 
warrants have been iamed ia oonforrnity with locfa voacfaciB. 



ARTICLE VI. 

TBB DiaSCTO*. 

Sacnox I. The Board of Trustees shall elect a ' " . . 

who shall remain in office until his successor shall be ele> :\.x. •: urj-c- 

diate charge and supervision of the Museum, and shall control the operataoos of 
the Institution, subject to the authority of the Board of Trustees and its Com- 
mittees. The Director shall be the official medium of communication between the 
Board, or its Committees, and the scientific staff and maintenance force. 

SacnoM 3. There shall be four scientific departments of the Moseoni — 
Anthropo! - any. Creology and Zo6logy : each under the charge of a Curator, sub- 

ject to the .i ; . iity of the Dir--* - '^^r Curators shall be appointed by the Board 
upon the rcctnnmendation of t ' . and shall serve during the pleasure of the 

Board. SuMrriinate staff officers in the scientific departments shall be appointed and 
removed by the I>irector upon the recomr n of the Curators of the lespective 

Dcpartmcnu. Th" ^^'"-"-xox shall have av.; ,. ...ly to employ and remove aU other 
employees of the '• ' 

Sbction 3. The Director shall make report to the Board at each regular 
meeting, recounting the operations of the Museum for t ' lus month. At the 

Annual Meeting, the Director shall make an Annual Re, :. viewing the work of 
the Museum for the previous year, which Annual Report shall be published in pamph- 
let form for the information of the Trustees and Members, and for free distribution 
in such onmber as the Board may direct. 



ARTICLE VI r. 

AlDITOt. 

Sacnnx I. The Board shall appoint an Auditor, who shall hold his office 
daring the pleasure of the Board. He shall keep proper books of acoxint, seltinc 
forth the financial oonditioo and transactions of the Corporation, and of the Museum. 
and report thereon at each regular meeting, and at such other times as may be 
req uir e d by the Board. He shall certify to the correctpcsi of all Toach«« for the 
expenditure of the money of the CorporatiQO. 



Jan., 192 1. Annual Report of the Director. 433 

ARTICLE VIII. 

COMMITTEES. 

Section i. There shall be five Committees, as follows: Finance, Building, 
Auditing, Pension and Executive. 

Section 2. The Finance Committee shall consist of five members, the Auditing 
and Pension Committees shall each consist of three members, and the Building 
Committee shall consist of five members. All members of these four Committees shall 
be elected by ballot by the Board at the Annual Meeting, and shall hold office for 
one year, and until their successors are elected and qualified. In electing the members 
of these Committees, the Board shall designate the Chairman and Vice-Chairman by 
the order in which the members are named in the respective Committee; the first 
member named shall be Chairman, the second named the Vice-Chairman, and the 
third named. Second Vice-Chairman, succession to the Chairmanship being in this 
order in the event of the absence or disability of the Chairman. 

Section 3. The Executive Committee shall consist of the President of the 
Board, the Chairman of the Finance Committee, the Chairman of the Building 
Committee, the Chairman of the Auditing Committee, the Chairman of the Pension 
Committee, and three other members of the Board to be elected by ballot at the 
Annual Meeting. 

Section 4. Four members shall constitute a quorum of the Executive Com- 
mittee, and in all standing Committees two members shall constitute a quorum. 
In the event that, owing to the absence or inability of m.embers, a quonun of the 
regularly elected members cannot be present at any meeting of any Committee, then 
the Chairman thereof, or his successor, as herein provided, may summon any mem- 
bers of the Board of Trustees to act in place of the absentee. 

Section 5. The Finance Committee shall have supervision of investing the 
endowment and other permanent funds of the Corporation, and the care of such real 
estate as may become its property. It shall have authority to invest, sell, and reinvest 
funds, subject to the approval of the Board. 

Section 6. The Building Committee shall have supervision of the construction, 
reconstruction, and extension of any and all buildings used for Museum purposes. 

Section 7. The Executive Committee shall be called together from time to 
time as the Chairman may consider necessary, or as he may be requested to do by 
three members of the Committee, to act upon such matters affecting the administra- i 1 

tion of the Museum as cannot await consideration at the Regular Monthly Meetings y*, 

of the Board of Trustees. It shall, before the beginning of each fiscal year, prepare \^ i 
and submit to the Board an itemized Budget, setting forth the probable receipts '<ff y^ 
from all sources for the ensuing year, and make recommendations as to the expendi- 
tures which should be made for routine maintenance and fixed charges. Upon the 
adoption of the Budget by the Board, the expenditures as stated are authorized. 

Section 8. The Auditing Committee shall have supervision over all accounting \ 

and bookkeeping, and full control of the financial records. It shall cause the same, \ 
once each year, or oftener, to be examined by an expert individual or firm, and shall 
transmit the report of such expert individual or firm to the Board at the next ensuing 
regular meeting after such examination shall have taken place. 

Section 9. The Pension Committee shall determine by such means and 
processes as shall be established by the Board of Trustees to whom and in what 
amount the Pension Fund shall be distributed. These determinations or findings 
shall be subject to the approval of the Board of Trustees. 



/ 



434 Field Museum of Natueal History — Reports, Vol. V. 

SaCTlON lo. The Chainnan ai each Caamuttoe shall report the acts and 
procaxtingi th«reo( at the oest eoauiat racolar weaHnf of the BoanL 

Sbction II. The Prendent fthall be ex-oAdo a member o( all Conunittee* and 
Chairman ot the Executive Committee. Vacaodet occurring in any Committee may 
be filled by ballot at any regular meeting ci the Board. 



ARTICLE IX. 

NOMINATING COMMtTTSS. 

Sbction i. At the November mectinK of the Board, each year a Nc 
Committer of three ihall be chosen by lot. Said C ' '* shall make nominatioas 

for mcnit>orship of the Finance Committee, the Bun iin^ Committee, the Attditaiig 
Committee, and Uie Pension Committee, and for three memben of the Bsecuthre 
Committee, from among the Trustees, to be submitted at the ensuing 
meeting and voted upon at the following Annual Meeting in January. 



ARTICLE X. 

Sbction i . Whenex'cr the word " Museum " is employed in the By-Laws of tha 
Corporation, it shall be taken to mean the building in which the Musetmi as an 

Institution is located and < ' *' ' -natchal exhibited, the material in studjr 

collections, or in storage. : l-s. cases, tools, records, books, and all 

appurtenances of the Institution, and the workings, researches, installatinns, ex- 
penditures, field work, lab --. library, publicatioru. lecture coursea. and aU 
sderi*"''  ~~.\ maintenance .•■ i.> iLih. 

. . S3. These By-Laws may be amended at any regular meeting of the 
Board of Trustees by a two-thirtls vote of all the members present, provided the 
amendment shall have been proposed at a preceding regular meeting. 



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Jan., 192 1. Annual Report of the Director. 



435 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 

ayer, edward e. cory, charles b. 

blackstone, mrs. timothy b. field, stanley 

Mccormick, Stanley 



PATRONS. 



ARMOUR, ALLISON V. 
BUTLER, EDWARD B. 
COLLINS, ALFRED M. 
DAY, LEE GARNETT 
GRAHAM, ERNEST R. 
GUNSAULUS, FRANK W. 
HUTCHINSON, CHARLES L. 
KENNEDY, VERNON SHAW 



MANIERRE, GEORGE 
MARKHAM, CHARLES H. 
MILLER, JOHN S. 
PAYNE, JOHN BARTON 
SARGENT, HOMER E. 
SIMPSON, JAMES 
SKIFF, FREDERICK J. V. 
SMITH, WILLARD A. 
WILSON, JOHN P. 



436 Field Museum of Natural IIistohy — Reports, Vol. V. 



CORPORATE MEMBERS. 



ALOIS. OWEN P. 
ARMOUR. ALLISON V. 
AVER. EDWARD E. 

BARTLETT. A. C. 
BLAIR. WATS/^N F. 
noRDEN. JOHN 
BUTLER. EinVARn B. 

CHALMERS. W. J. 
CHATFIELD-TAYLOR. H. 
COLLINS. ALFRED M. 
CRANE. RICHARD T.. Jt. 

DAY. LEE GARNETT 

EASTMAN. SIDNEY C. 
ELUSWORTH. JAMES W. 

FIELD. MARSHALL 
FIELD. STANLEY 

GAGE. LYMAN J. 
GRAHAM. ERNEST R. 
GUNSAULUS. FRANK W. 



JONES. ARTHUR B. 

KEEP. CHAUNCEY 
KENNEDY. VERNON SHAW 
KOHUSAAT. HERMAN H. 

McCORMICK. CYRUS H. 
MANIERRE. GEORGE 
MARKHAM. CHARLES H. 
MILLER. JOHN S. 
MITCHELL. JOHN J. 

PAYNE. JOHN BARTON 
PECK. FERDINAND W. 
PORTER. GEORGE P. 

RYERSON. MARTIN A. 

SARGENT. HOMER E. 
SIMI^SON. JAMF^S 
SKIFF. FREDERICK J. V. 
SMITH. SOLOMON A. 
SMITH. WILLARD A. 
SPRAGUE. ALBERT A. 
STONE. MELVILLE E. 



HARRIS. ALBERT W. 
HUTCHINSON. CHARLES L. 



WIUSON. JOHN P. 
WRIGLEY. WILLIAM. J». 



DECEASED, 1920. 
GUNTHER. C. F. 



Jan., 1921. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



437 



LIFE MEMBERS. 



ALDIS, ARTHUR T. 
ALDIS, OWEN F. 
ALLEN, BENJAMIN 
ALLERTON, ROBERT H. 
ARMOUR, A. WATSON 

BAKER, MISS ISABELLE 
BANKS, ALEXANDER F. 
BARRELL, FINLEY 
BARRETT, MRS. A. D. 
BARRETT, ROBERT L. 
BARTLETT, A. C. 
BASSFORD, LOWELL C. 
BEALE, WILLIAM G. 
BECKER, A. G. 
BILLINGS, C. K. G. 
BILLINGS, FRANK 
BLACKSTONE, MRS. T. B. 
BLAINE, MRS. EMMONS 
BLAIR, HENRY A. 
BLAIR, WATSON F. 
BLOCK, P. D. 
BOOTH, W. VERNON 
BORDEN, JOHN 
BOYNTON, C. T. 
BRIDGE, NORMAN 
BREWSTER, WALTER S. 
BROWN, WILLIAM L. 
BUCHANAN, D. W. 
BUFFINGTON, EUGENE J. 
BURNHAM, JOHN 
BUTLER, EDWARD B. 
BYLLESBY, H. M. 

CARR, CLYDE M. 
CARRY, EDWARD F. 
CARTON, L. A. 
CHALMERS, WILLIAM J. 
CLARK, EUGENE B. 
CLAY, JOHN 
CLOW, WILLIAM E. 
COBE, IRA M. 
CRAMER, CORWITH 
CRANE, CHARLES RICHARD 
CRANE, RICHARD T., Jr. 



CROWELL, H. P. 
CUDAHY, JOSEPHjM. 
CUMMINGS, D. MARK 
CUNNINGHAM, FRANK S. 

DAU. J. J. 

DAWES. CHARLES G. 
DAY, ALBERT M. 
DECKER, ALFRED 
DEERING, CHARLES 
DEERING, JAMES 
DEFREES, JOSEPH H. 
DELANO, FREDERIC A. 
DICK, ALBERT BLAKE 
DONNELLEY, REUBEN H. 
DONNELLEY, THOMAS E. 
DRAKE, JOHN B. 
DRAKE, TRACY C. 

ECKHART, B. A. 

FAIR, ROBERT M. 
FARNUM, HENRY W. 
FARWELL, JOHN V. 
FARWELL, WALTER 
FAY, C. N. 
FELT, DORR E. 
FERNALD, GUSTAVUS S. 
FIELD, MARSHALL 
FIELD, STANLEY 
FORGAN, DAVID R. 
FORGAN, JAMES B. 
FORSYTH, ROBERT 

GARTZ, A. F. 
GARY, JOHN W. 
GETZ, GEORGE F. 
GODDARD, LEROY A. 
GOODMAN, WILLIAM O. 
GOODRICH, A. W. 
GRISCOM, CLEMENT A. 
GROMMES, JOHN B. 

HAMILL, ERNEST A. 
HASKELL, FREDERICK T. 



4,i8 Field Museum of Natural Hi«?toby — Reports, Vol. V. 

KL M. 



r  

1:...... ...K 

Hir r , LOUIS w. 

i THOMAS W. 

J I.. J. 

1: . ...:. L. J. 
HOXIK. MRS. JOHN R. 
IKiYT. N. IwWlXlN 
HIC.HITT. MARVIN 
HULBIvRT. E. I). 
HULnURO. CHARLES H 
1 JAMIvSC. 

til. 1 V 1 1 1 .-^.^lON , C L*. 

INSULL. SAMUEL 

JELKE. JOHN P. 

JOHNSON. MRS. ELIZABETH AVER TA^MER. I'OTTER 



K. CI^YTON 
TTN. WILLIAM P. 
WILLIAMS. 

MI.NKK. W. H. 

NT" 'MN J. 

N'. . ARDS. 

MORSE. CHARLES H.. J«. 

N' N.JOY 

^ • '"MK 

N \RLESA. 

N W AIX)LrH 

N i . <« I . i<L, A. D. 

ORR. ROBERT M. 

PALMER. HONORE 



I \NK S. 

! .Mv I nL'R B. 

j lUVIDB. 

JONES. THOMAS D. 

KF.EP. CHAUNCEY 

KI LLER. THEOIX1RE C. 

KKI.LEY. WILLIAM V. 

KINC. ' " »vLS 
KINr,. , O. 

KIRK. WALTER RADCLIFPE 

LAMONT. ROBERT P. 
LAWS^)N. VICT(3R P. 
I .E.J. 

I '•• ""ORD NL 

I.'  . K H. 

LORD. lOHN B. 

I :o. 

Li i i<'.^, i 1 1 . •% r~ I C. 

Mccormick, mrs. 

y 'K. CYRUS H. 

* »•' "VROLD P. 

KT H. 
McKINLAY. JOHN 
MrKINLr>rK. GEORGE 

alexander 
McLaughlin, frederic 

McI MN. GEO. D. 

?• n R. 

.' . LAF.AYETTE 

MacVBAGH. FRANKLIN 



PAM. MAX 
PATTEN. HENRY J. 
PAYNE. JOHN BARTON 
PEABODY. AU' S S. 

PEABODY. FRANui:^ S. 
PIEZ. CHARLES 
PINKERTON. WILLIAM A. 
I \K WINSLOW 

I ...I., .rgef. 

1 i<. H. H. 

RAWSON. V RICK H. 

REAM. MK >LINEP. 

REVELL. ALEXANDER H. 

p : M. 

I- RE W. 

K  . . . .S 

RUNNELLS. CLIVE 
I !.US. JOHN S. 

K • ''^^"NDA. 

K :<D P. 

RYERSON. MRS. CARRIE H. 
F RDL. 



.•i.tix I i 



N A. 



S( nWEPPE. CHARLES H. 

SCOTT. ' ;e E. 

SrnTT w. 

^ :nc. 

S JoHNG. 

b: _'ER 



SMITH. ORSON 



Jan., 192 1. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



439 



SMITH, SOLOMON A. 
SPOOR, JOHN A. 
SPRAGUE, ALBERT A. 
STEWART, ROBERT W. 
STOUT, FRANK D. 
STRAWN, SILAS H. 
STUART, ROBERT 
STURGES, GEORGE 
SUNNY, B. E. 
SWIFT, CHARLES H. 
SWIFT, EDWARD F. 
SWIFT, G. F., Jr. 
SWIFT, LOUIS F. 

THORNE, CHARLES H. 
THORNE, ROBERT J. 



VEATCH, GEORGE L. 
VILES, LAWRENCE M, 

WETMORE, FRANK O. 
WHEELER, CHARLES P. 
WILLARD, ALONZO J. 
WILLITS, WARD W. 
WILSON, OLIVER T. 
WILSON, THOMAS E. 
WILSON, WALTER H. 
WINSTON, GARRARD B. 
WINTER, WALLACE C. 
WOOLLEY, CLARENCE M. 
WRIGLEY, WILLIAM, Jr. 

YATES, DAVID M. 



DECEASED. 



FULLER, WILLIAM A. 
PIKE, EUGENE S. 



STILLWELL, HOMER A. 
THORNE, GEORGE R. 



440 FiKLu Museum or Natural History — Rkpoits, Vol. V. 



ANNUAL MEMl^ERS. 



Al).\\' - rvKL S H. 
.*' ' ' . MILWARI) 

JR. (iKORGE A. 

BAILEY. KinVARD P 
BELDEN. JOSKI'H G. 
BOAL. CHARLES T. 
BURLEY. CLARENCE A. 

C0MST(X:K. WILLIAM C. 
CCX)NLEY-WARI). MRS. L. A. 

< INGS. E. A. 

(^^.. ..d. FRANCES H. 

BISENDRATH. W. N. 

FRANK. HENRY L 
PULLER. O. P. 

GLF^'vSNHR. J. J. 
GREY. CHARLES P. 
GURLEY. W W. 

HITCHCOCK. R. M. 
HOLT. GEORGE H. 

JENKINS. GEORGE H. 
JONES. J. S. 

LAMB. FRANK H. 
LINCOLN. ROBERT T. 
LINN. W. R. 
Vic. AS. P. G. 



^, ----- • 7- : 

y... ....RY w. 

MA EL. 

MAVKK. LEVY 
MKYER. MRS. M. A. 
M(M)RE. N.G. 
MULLIKEN. A. H. 

NOLAN. JOHN H. 

PALMER. PERCIVAL B. 
PARKER. FRANCIS W. 
PEARS<^)N. EUGENE H. 

RIPLEY. MRS. E. P. 
ROSENPELD. MRS. MAURICE 

SCHMIDT. DR. O. L. 

RTZ. G A. 

• ' r.. JOHN L. 
; THE MISSES 

SOPER. JAMES P 
^ V!RS. ELIZABETH B. 

.S...V .. ...N. JOHN T. 

UIHLEIN. EDWARD G. 

WACKER. CHARLES H. 
WALKER. •*»" R. 
WALLER, i RDC. 

WHITEHEAD. W. M. 
Wn^s<»\. MRS. E. C. 
WII "N M. H. 
WUU i:R. MRS. C. H. 



PURST. CONRAD 
HIBBARI). WILLIAM G.. J«. 



DECEASED. 

MacFARLAND. HENRY J. 



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UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 



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