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L I 

ILLINOIS 

507 
F45 




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UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



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LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 



Field Museum of Natural History. |O0Jfc— 



Publication 208. 



Report Series. 



Vol. VI, No. 1. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 



\ 



# 



^: 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 1921 




Chicago, U. S. A. 
January, 1922. 



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atutaVHi^ory Library 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS. PLATE I. 







THE LATE FREDERICK J. V. S*IFF. 

the Museum from Dnrmlier in |8ft3i '•" IV 
the date <>:' lm death. 



Field Museum of Natural History. 

Publication 208. 

Report Series. Vol. VI, No. I. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 

TO THE 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

FOR THE YEAR 1921. 




THfc LIBRARY Of- IHt 



Chicago, U. S. A. 
January, 1922. 






UNiVERs/ry of umo® 



BEQUESTS. 

Bequests to Field Museum of Natural History may be made in 
securities, money, books or collections. For those desirous of making 
bequests to the Museum, the following form is suggested : 

FORM OF BEQUEST 

I do hereby give and bequeath to "Field Museum of Natural 
History" of the City of Chicago, State of Illinois, 



Cash Contributions made within the taxable 
year to Field Museum of Natural History to an 
amount not in excess of 15% of the tax payer's 
net income are allowable as deductions in com- 
puting net income under the Revenue Law. 



CONTENTS. 



Board of Trustees ° 

Officers and Committees 7 



Staff of Museum. 



8 



Report of the Director 9 

Maintenance *5 

Publications l0 

Library • l6 

Cataloguing, Inventorying, and Labeling T 7 

Accessions ; I0 - 

Installation and Permanent Improvement 27 

Expeditions and Field Work 3° 

The N. W. Harris Public School Extension 38 

Photography and Illustration 4<> 

Printing 4 ° 

Statement of Income and Expenses 4 3 

Final Statement of Costs of Removal 43 

Attendance Statistics 40, 44 

List of Accessions : 4^ 

Department of Anthropology 45 

Department of Botany 4 ° 

Department of Geology 4 ° 

Department of Zoology ...50 

Section of Photography 52 

The Library & 

Articles of Incorporation 2 

Amended By-Laws 

List of Honorary Members and Patrons 7° 

List of Corporate Members ' 1 

List of Life Members 7 ^ 

List of Annual Members 7d 



M w oh '  wv — K . \ 1 



TIIK HOARD OF TRUST] 



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Hauy E Bybam 

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B. 
A I • 



Jr. 
N RARY TRUSTEE 



. I V Skiff. 



JAN., 1922. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



OFFICERS. 

Stanley Field, President. 

Martin A. Ryerson, First Vice-President. 
Watson F. Blair, Second Vice-President. 

Albert A. Sprague, Third Vice-President. 
D. C. Davies, Secretary. 

George Manierre, Assistant Secretary. 
Solomon A. Smith, Treasurer. 



Stanley Field. 
Watson F. Blair. 
William J. Chalmers. 
Arthur B. Jones. 

Watson F. Blair. 
Martin A. Ryerson. 



William J. Chalmers. 
William Wrigley, Jr. 



COMMITTEES. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Albert A. Sprague. 
Edward E. Ayer. 
Marshall Field. 
John Borden. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Arthur B. Jones. 
Chauncey Keep. 
Albert W. Harris. 

BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Cyrus H. McCormick.. 
Albert A. Sprague. 



Stanley Field. 



♦Frederick J. V. Skiff. 

SU8-COMMITTEE OF THE BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Albert A. Sprague. 
♦Frederick T. V. Skiff. 



Arthur B. {ones. 



Albert A. Sprague. 



^Deceased. 



AUDITING COMMITTEE 

George Manierre. 
William Wrigley, Jr. 

PENSION COMMITTEE 

♦Frank W. Gunsaulus. 
♦Frederick J. V. Skiff. 



 v: * m. n \ . i \ l 

ADMINIS1 i:M l\ E IND S< IEN1 ilk 
SI Mi < fF [HE MUSEUM 

ro* 
i> ( Dayi 

DJPAHTMINT Of ANTHROPOLOGY 

 

irolotv 

i - Malayan Kthnoi 

;' • 
.1 lolerv 

' « , • 1' 1 IM.'S •:. .. 

Of BOT 

i nun'. I Mn i si'ai°«.h, < mat 

H f |)*Hl urulor Fconemtt A. 

• . '.or 
\ Fli Mvitumr Taxonomy 

Dt OLOOY 

. .'Of 

Hkitby W Nl< ■< 

t i mi k S RlOCS, 1 • 9 of f'alfonloioiy 

\ ZOOLOGY 

\\ ii f US H 0* ><>i . c ur 

\\lili\M I 'i-i.l o< Mir ( umiot i 

Assistant Curators 

ty 

k Magoon lUhsEs — Oology 
\\in> A iiA^ t 

hv '• :mmal\ 

■di 

Division of 7\j- 
Jtins Fimn, in fkargr 

i '.1P»TM[N W HARRIS PUBLIC SCHOOL LXTENSlOU 

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TM[ LIBRARY 

•tt. Librarian 
w \ M U n ibrartan 



ORLXR AtOiTOH 

H I iMr Hi vj Mm; 

M.CTIOM Of PRINTING SOPtRlNTtNOCNT Of MAINTLN*'. | 

I ^ I lODO N, in (ho'ff ' < us I 

MCTION Of PHOTOGRAPHY -...UNiiR 

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lAiio i«ei 
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I in. I I I . ( urcJcr ,-< Zoology 

I lUfci-i. iiststani Curator of CrypUpimu Botany 

I 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 

1921 

To the Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History : 



FREDERICK J. V. SKIFF 

November 5, 1851 February 24, 1921 

Appointed Director December 16, 1893 

Since the last issue of the Annual Report the Museum has sus- 
tained an irreparable loss in the death of its Director, Frederick J. 
V. Skiff, which took place suddenly at Chicago, February 24, 1921, 
after two days' illness. On the Monday preceding his death, Dr. Skiff 
attended the regular monthly meeting of the Board of Trustees, and 
assisted in the proceedings with his accustomed vigor and enthusiasm. 

On such an occasion as this attention is invited more especially 

to the sterling character of Dr. Skiff, rather than to his achievements. 

The story of what he accomplished has been told. The memory of 

what he was is both uplifting and inspiring — the most loyal of friends, 

a lover of all good and beautiful things; a strenuous worker, a 

lively and entertaining talker, a patient and inspiring administrator, 

who infused his associates with his own zeal — he leaves in the 

hearts of all who knew him a bright and imperishable image, an 

ideal of faithful efficient service, combined with most amiable personal 

traits. And nothing in his life became him better than his last painful 

years. For sometime before his death he suffered from a distressing 

affliction which no remedy could arrest. His last years were lived in 

constant and sometimes almost unendurable physical agony, and in the 

knowledge that his silent fight could hardly be other than hopeless. 

And yet his courage, his faith in the virtue there is in life, his perfect 

confidence that all things work together for good, were unfaltering. 

He labored so unceasingly and through consideration of others hid 

his suffering so carefully, that few suspected the ordeals of bodily pain 

through which he passed with a quiet indomitable courage that was a 

marvel to the few who knew the truth about his real condition. His 

interest in the many activities of the Museum and in the numerous 

educational and social projects of the Country was unabated. Greater 

fortitude could not have been displayed. No apparent sign warned his 



to  i Vol. VI. 

r. although  
suddenness "i the end \v ther ui een b) himself .. 

mfidet 
When tlir In Museum irritten, it cannot 

I that rick SkitT will be placed fit 

the pioneers. . his i 

iture deprived him t>> botoi .• popular 

public i«» whoa life, but among tin- inunedi 

>r whom rx :ol and with whom 

« i men find i Mill I ,rn<-,| y those 

who h.i<l not the privili og I 'i Skirl intimati ill alw i 

i member his inspiring eloquence, tlx 
son ind Iii— faithful devotion t<> the Museum 

His more publk w lly in connection with th< 

century, must 1><- 1- 
I It in. i nrer, thai prior to hi> 

if the D • -hip <•! the Museum, Dr Slrifl I 

irs the risible ; I ( hief «»; l partmem 

Mi 'I Mining and I leral of thr Chicago I 

>:i of i tig to Chicago to enter ini 

.uid museum I >r. Skin i number i rs mas 

ted the Denver Tribune tssociated with him in this work were 
•in- Field, "Bill and (» II Rothad utd 

tinted Din 
Exhibits at the Paris I »n in 1898-1901; Direci 

• I nuis 1 1901 -1905 inted b 

ft, Un I to the Japai 

! in i<ii i ippointed Dii in-Chief of the Panama-P 

Int t-ri . ition of hi- jj 

ments and the benefits uing t' nn, 

^kitT hi idemic distinctions from many unii 

I lc.m itutions and decorations from pi dry all of 
5 of tin- world. 



1 have tl the 

ending I teceznber 31 . 1921 . 

The 'I the Museum was .'■ 

2, i<jji At this rime ai the extensive i<»lirctions, 

I from the old building iti Jackson f' 

- cmenl 
i in the ha 



Jan., 1922. Annual Report of the Director. ii 

strenuous effort on the part of all concerned everything was in read- 
iness for the renewal of the work for which the Museum had been 
established. It had been decided by the Board of Trustees to hold 
no exercises in connection with the re-opening of the Museum, but 
invitations to an informal reception during the afternoon of May 2nd 
were extended to a list of 10,000 individuals, which included prom- 
inent citizens, educators, army and navy officers and public officials. 
Approximately 8,000 of these invited guests accepted the invitation 
and expressions of general admiration for the building and its arrange- 
ment were heard on all sides. The following day the Museum was 
thrown open to the public and that the new building and new facilities 
which it provides have met with hearty approval is shown by the fact 
that at this time the average daily attendance is more than double that 
recorded at the old building in Jackson Park. 

The physical conditions of the Institution at the date of this 
review show but a small part of the actual work performed since 
the occupancy of the New Building. The scientific work in con- 
nection with the reinstallation has been of a nature that is not 
apparent to the casual observer and is concealed, as a matter of 
fact, from even the more critical visitors. The work in the labora- 
tories and the constant application of time and study to the tasks of 
identification, labeling and inventorying have pushed these essential 
features of Museum work distinctly forward. The vast amount of 
this labor suddenly devolving upon the Museum staff, as it did at 
the reopening of the Museum, would have dismayed those less 
earnest and confident. Thanks are due to the staff and to all classes 
of labor for the very excellent work accomplished. Those in the 
more responsible positions have had anxious and arduous times, but 
fortunately the Museum has men and women on whom it can depend 
and their loyal service is much appreciated. It would be bare justice 
to mention many by name, but it would be injustice to omit others, 
so in fairness all should be included. 

President Field, at the December meeting of the Board of Trus- 
tees, announced that he had decided to assume the entire deficit oc- 
curring in the Building Fund, towards which he has already con- 
tributed the sum of $150,000.00. To this deficit Mr. Potter Palmer 
has also contributed during the year the sum of $1,000.00. 

At the same meeting of the Board, the President intimated that 
Captain Marshall Field had volunteered to contribute the sum of 
$50,000.00 annually for a period of five years for the purpose of dis- 
patching expeditions into the field, defraying the cost of new exhibition 



!_• Field M .»kv — Refokts, Vol. VI 

: the publication oi manuscript! pn m c m b en of 

ntributed thr ram i wo.oo 

lit}.. The deficit in the ' ral fund for tbl II. 

ijui^it: r announ. 

thr year have been i tionally numei 'l valuable u will 1*.-  

m thr h-«: colons apjwndcd t" thr rc{«.rt. Mention lOOUld 

ol the contribution of O.OO made l>> Mr. Arthur I cs, 

. the < t of an ethnological survey in Mala) .r- 

:larlv in thr Malay Peninsula and the Dutch 

Up ruing thai the Museum contemplated increasing it? print- 

bop equipment, Mr. William V. Kel Berousrj <-ntrd the 

Institution with a new Miehle Cylinder E > ress l which My 

I printing thr publication! ol thr Mux-urn. 

Mr. Stanley Field presented to the Board ol Tnntcci ol the 

Museum an oil portrait of himself and al>o our of t).« late Dil 'r, 

r SkirF. Mr-. Richard T, Crane, Jr., presented an oil portrait 
of thr late Mr. Harlow N'. Higinbotham, and Mr. Edwa Aver 

ted an oil portrait ol himself. 
Miss Helen I Gunsauhu hai pr ese n t ed to the Museum, in nrrmr 
ory ol her father, Dr. Frank W. Gunsauros, her entire coll 

la; irimono. Thr Board of TlHStCCS has dedicated I hall 

• Dr. Frank W. Gunsaulus, in which tl Surimoi 

arc to \k exhibited. 

President Field has i rmntH the entire fxpensf ol furnishing the 
Tnist< n in the new building 

Mrs. Frederick J. V. Slrii ented I ; ol the late 

Dr. Skiff, which has been installed in M Fi k J. V. Sldff Hall" in 

the Department 

Mr. William Wrigtey, Jr., contributed the s U in 
the poj Buddhistic sculptun 

Mr. Edward E. A - ontributiot 

Edward 1 Library, details of which i 

- in this report. 
President Field pr< ted to th 
mal pieces in ulptured by Carl E. Akek 

1 h> urn h i mimeographing machine 

During the year \h- ; nj,' in the membership of the 

: Trust. re filled by the ek ' Richard 'I". I 

Mr . Mr. Harry n and Mr Ernest R. 

ham. 



Jan., 1922. Annual Report of the Director. 13 

Colonel Albert A. Sprague was elected Third Vice-President, the 
Board of Trustees having created this office by an amendment to 
Section I, Article IV of the By-Laws. 

Mr. D. C. Davies was elected Secretary of the Board to fill the 
vacancy existing, and Mr. George Manierre was elected Assistant 
Secretary. 

Mrs. Edward E. Ayer was chosen an Honorary Member of the 
Museum, in view of the eminent service she has rendered to science. 

The Life Members of the Institution were increased by the elec- 
tion of Mr. Frederic W. Upham, Mr. Francis C. Farwell and Mr. 
Colin C. H. Fyffe. Mr. Marvin B. Pool was elected an Associate 
Member of the Museum. 

At a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held December 19, 192 1, 
the present incumbent was appointed Director of the Museum to suc- 
ceed the late Doctor Frederick J. V. Skiff. 

At a special meeting of the Board, held March 1, 1921, Benjamin 
Bridge was appointed Auditor, and at the regular meeting of the 
Board in April, Henry F. Ditzel was appointed Recorder. 

The Museum sustained a signal loss in the death of Charles B. 
Cory, Curator of Zoology. Prof. Cory had been in the service of the 
Museum for twenty-eight years, during which period his conscientious, 
untiring devotion to his work and his cheerful presence had deeply 
impressed all his associates. Prof. Cory was first and foremost an 
ornithologist, and this was attributable to no lack of sympathy with the 
larger field, but because he recognized that the larger field could not 
be successfully covered by one man. His work on ''The Birds of 
the Americas," in preparation at the time of his death, furnishes 
abundant evidence of his remarkable knowledge of the literature of 
his subject and his ability to use it to the greatest advantage. The book 
is an elaborate catalogue and the special attributes essential for the 
production of such a work Prof. Cory possessed in a marked degree. 

To complete and edit this work the Museum has been enabled, 
through the generosity of Mr. Charles R. Crane, to secure the serv- 
ices of Dr. C. E. Hellmayr, one of the leading and best known Europ- 
ean ornithologists. Dr. Hellmayr is at present affiliated with the Uni- 
versity of Munich and will probably arrive in Chicago early in the 
summer of 1922 prepared to commence his duties. As Dr. Hellmayr's 
ornithological labors have been particularly directed to South America 
and as he is familiar also with the important collections of birds in 
Europe, the Museum is specially fortunate in having obtained his 
consent to undertake the completion of this monumental work. 



!; PXtLO III ttX M -'-HtV — RKrom VI 

I iirrmg the \»-.ir Weed tppoiofted Assistant Curator 

Iph Lint forth Air.' 

! StC in thr \r.tr \Vill'rr<! H <> . -'PI" 

Curator of Charles B. Coi ind William 

I Gerhai In the Dcpart- 

ment • log) . I [enrj W tor 

mrr S Kiggs Associate i.'urator of ontology. 

it J I- 1 

I '< taking 

January l» 1$ 

datum of the mmittee, Hall No 

3 I <•!) dedi I ind Hill .'■ been 

1 Pulbnan, t • : the 

Museum 

Tht th of 1 V\ ••'■%• I kmaaum • of 

the original Incorp d I'm f the Mu 

of the Ii oc curr ed durinf th- Pr. I ihu t> 

i the foundati thr Museum and from rim I 

ha d v valuable titution The Boa 

921, adopted the ing testimonial : 

'We Fello ird of Trustees of Field Museum 

tes and friend- of the late Frai 
W h^ |]| 

t : 
We rccogni/- 

it in his death thr World hfJ man ol mgh mora! worth, 

unusual breadth of intei' ofound human lympathy, unswerving 

• duty and unfailing rJOfl t< .univ and Mead 

I hat the Nation reft of . public-spirited and 

loyal nd A mer ic a n c and Art of a distinguished in- 

ind an earnest and it admiru.stra: 

1 hat Field Museum of Natural History and all Institutions 
ganized for the promotion of knowledge have lost a faithful and vri 
ing Q v.orker. 

We mourn his los on account of his high intcllet 

attainments and qualities, but also b< of broad 

, .thy and tend, r heart, of upright character and deep spintuaJ 
ernment. 

We extend to the mCSflbefl of his l*v :nlv in tl. 

of their affliction mi: rmpathy, and in token thereof have 

of th: on of our a; D transmit" 

them, and have hi-. lered it v ' ■• tlvr records of Fi 






FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE II. 




THE LATE FRANK W. GUNSAULUS. 

An Incorporator and Trustee of the Museum. 



Jan., 1922. Annual Report of the Director. 15 

Museum of Natural History, of which Institution our late associate 
was not only a devoted Trustee but also one of the original incor- 
porators." 

As important aids to the facilities for installation and mainten- 
ance, there have been added to the Carpenter Shop machinery a bench 
planer, variety saw and hollow chisel morticer, together with the 
necessary motor equipment. During the year the shop made and 
installed 1,606 lineal feet of book shelving of various depths, 11,676 
square feet of storage shelving, racks for 1,450 trays, 28 work benches 
of special designs with wood or soapstone top, fitted with drawers of 
various dimensions, cupboards and pigeon holes. Racks for 437 stor- 
age cans, three book stacks for the General Library and other mis- 
cellaneous work has also been executed for the working areas on 
third floor. The toning room and stock room in the Section of Pho- 
tography have been furnished with lead lined tanks, cupboards, work 
benches, shelving and window shutters. 

Considerable new apparatus has also been added to the Section of 
Photography, which will undoubtedly increase the efficiency of the 
work and enable the section to produce better and more accurate re- 
sults. This section is now producing the picture postal cards which 
are sold to visitors. 

Extensive additions have also been made to the equipment and 
facilities in the Section of Printing. The space on the fourth floor, 
formerly occupied by this section, was not considered suitable to ac- 
commodate the additional work of printing the publications of the 
Museum, all of which work, it has been decided, will be performed in 
the Museum in the future. The section was therefore transferred 
to a large, well-lighted room on the third floor, near which space 
for a commodious stock-room was provided. To carry the heavy 
load of the Miehle Cylinder Press and Automatic Paper Cutter a 
room in the south end of the ground floor was selected for this por- 
tion of the new equipment. In addition to the cylinder press and 
paper cutter, there have been installed in the printing shop a book 
sewing machine, stitcher, and motors for all machinery, including two 
motors for the platen presses. 

Owing to constant demand from visitors, a restaurant has been 
opened on the ground floor and the patronage thus far bestowed 
seems to justify this convenience. 

Income and Maintenance. — The budget approved by the Board of 
Trustees authorized the sum of $290,786.00 for the maintenance of 
the Museum for the year 1921. The actual income received during 



•:. Hi.sTwkY — ] VI. 

nounted 1 .he actual expenditures 

ounted to $a6i it of $65x100.00, which amoui 

! rlrv in this rejx>rt. was COOtribol 

irshall Field. As 1 matter of 1 
t he amount disbur r maintenance incl 

truction n third floor, when 

labor wi - required for the readaptation of ti 1 jtc 

for 1 

PwtLicATioNt -■- I Miring the year t ills 

of wh follow: 

Pub.ao6— R< VoLV t N< theDiractor 

for the year : -.11 half! 

Vol XIV, No 1 A Monograpl 
( n Marsupial, ' • Wilfred H. 

With a m of the P.rain 

rrick. M I 1 ;>, a 

half to 

rat Lwun. — Many valuable and intei 

! clurinp the y«-ar by g purchase 

mention. Presidem Field j 1 
and eleven portfolio iinieir ;i the North 

k \V. he 

In addition to the ninet 

during r for the 

 < trnithologkal Library, Mr "he 

rial Librai which • 1 fully 

bourv! incinnati ] 

It tnplete 

a nun. :hc fifteenth an 

lated Edinbui 

le historical interest, v. the 

 

library was made a 1 
- all future publi ent to tl the Mu-cum. T 

hr ilea and pamphlet number of dupl 

with the V. T. and S. A. 1 >n. 

rly in the year the Sm: 

public illy all of the internati. npc hurr. 

. during the 



u »»ess,TY C 



'U/JVo/s 



UKBANA 



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ni*r 





4 



I 



Jan., 1922. Annual Report of the Director. 17 

war for lack of transportation. These have been coming in steadily, 
but still further efforts will have to be made to secure the numbers 
that were issued in limited editions. Exchanges were received from six 
hundred and forty-two institutions and individuals. Publications from 
all sources reached a total of 3,647 books and pamphlets, a considerable 
increase over the receipts of any of the past four years. The books 
and pamphlets total 77,471. Purchases of books and periodicals were 
limited for the most part to the immediate needs of the staff. The cost 
of binding is gradually being lowered and two hundred and seventy 
books were bound. There have been written and inserted in the cat- 
alogues 11,600 cards. Early in the year the books of the general 
library were cleaned, restored to their classification and shelved in 
rooms at the southeast end of the building. Space has now been per- 
manently assigned for the library on the third floor. 

Departmental Cataloguing. Inventorying and Labeling. — During the year the 
work of cataloguing in the Department of Anthropology has progressed 
as the new accessions were acquired. The total number of cata- 
logue cards prepared amounts to 983, which includes the Japanese 
Surimono presented by Miss Helen C. Gunsaulus. These cards are 
distributed over the single divisions as follows : North American 
Ethnology 468 ; Southwest, Mexican and South American Archaeology 
21; Melanesian and African Ethnology 99; and Ethnology of China, 
India and Japan 395, and have been entered in the inventory 
books of the Department which now number 38. The number of 
annual accessions amounts to thirty-nine, twenty-eight of which have 
been entered. The total number of catalogue cards entered from the 
opening of the first volume amounts to 156,177. The Department 
has been supplied with a total of 4,984 printed labels. These are dis- 
tributed over the divisions- as follows: Stanley Field Hall, 315; 
Eskimo, Northwest Coast, etc., 854; Plains Indians, 1331 ; Indians 
of California, 96; South America, 1,038; Melanesia, 409; China, 
220; Tibet, 6; Korea, 215; Formosa, 77; Japan, 227; India, 100; 
and Higinbotham hall, 96. A total of 458 label cards was added to the 
label file and 156 prints were placed in the photographic albums. 

All newly accessioned specimens in the Department of Botany 
have been catalogued as fast as organized. A total of 14,058 entries 
has been made in the fifty-eight catalogue volumes, bringing the 
total number of catalogued specimens up to 496,367. Augmentation 
of the various card indexes during the past year has been necessarily 
slight, due to the preponderance of other work. Additional cards 
have been inserted as follows : 



U IhsriKY— | VI. 

 
AagM Total 

Index to I 4,8;o i<> 1.488 

hiflrx to (iimmon Seines 
ueatan PlUHS 

M 15 

In-!-  

. -- 10.144 

Ol to I'.-.unical Titles 
lex to Departrr- '-.*■.. 

Index t-> Illinois Flora 

Index to Hand Specimens <>i Wool . 1 ;\i, 

Index to Installat:- : 

Index to ! ffn 

Although 1 large numl otu has been n iring 

tfac year by the I >epartment of Geology, possibK 

catalogue all specunei ived Ti - i tal numbef 

new entria made dnriqg t! a i> 4.040, thr largest number of 

these, .v- being in invertebrate pal addl- 

ed from the In the -nil- division 

. 1 new em- re made, and to thr mineral catalogue 

171 numberi irerc added More than 2,<\xi labels were written. 
prii ind installed during the year in an < have all 

ecimeni uniformly labeled Some of these labels arc 
reprim 1 black cardboard of former buff labels, but t 
number relati to m imeni or are modi: iac or m 

01 both, of previous labels. In Vling every  .'>r 

omplete a before printing '•.'-•• • ny 

beJfl were descriptive and of i le Irtish. Labcll 

for some of the relief maps, for example. 

and 2.stx~> words, while that for historic diamonds consists of alnnit 
In choosin] 

Dowable without increasing too greatly the hulk of the lal>el 

re em;' in order to facilit. The cnt' 

temati ;c paleon: ' • • . ritUSB 

1 300 tn goo arete arritten for the Asphaltum 

tils, M "' ms, Teeth of the Mastodon and the 

and I it.mothcre Families. Of the new lahels of sinaller 
71' - brash • a f<-r the pet: 

lrr and i 6 for the paleontol 

Field Hall, and the remainder for n 

laneou the Departmental photograph albums twent 



Jan., 1922. Annual Report of the Director. 19 

eight prints have been added, making a total number of 2,939 prints 
in these albums. 

The reference collections in the Department of Zoology remained 
inaccessible during most of the year, and cataloguing, therefore, was 
impossible. The total number of entries made was 326, distributed 
as follows : Mammals, 5 ; Birds, 49 ; Eggs, 1 ; Fishes, 39 ; Reptiles and 
Batrachians, 226; Invertebrates, 6. Record cards written during the 
year number 490, principally those of an index to the systematic 
exhibit of birds. Very little labeling of specimens in the reference 
collections has been done; but a very large number of new exhibition 
labels were written and printed. These included a few for the 
mammals, a large number for the birds, a complete series for the 
habitat groups, for all the fishes and reptiles and for a large number 
of shells. 

The following shows the work performed on catalogues and 
the inventorying accomplished : 



Number of 
Record Books 

Department of Anthropology ... 38 

Department of Botany 58 

Department of Geology 22 

Department of Zoology 40 

The Library 14 

Section of Photography 20 

Accessions. — Through the generosity of Mr. Martin A. Ryerson 
and Mr. Homer E. Sargent, the Department of Anthropology is 
enabled to list, among its important acquisitions of the year, a col- 
lection of eighteen Mexican serapes gathered by Mr. Herbert J. 
Browne during a long sojourn in Mexico. The serape is made from 
two rectangular blankets of particularly fine texture and quality, sewn 
together lengthwise to form a square and having a short slit in the 
center through which the wearer may slip his head, the whole being 
worn over the shoulders in the same manner as the rubber poncho. 
The making of these blankets originated in Mexico shortly after the 
Spanish conquest and rapidly became a jealously guarded institution 
which flourished in certain parts of the country until 1850, a date 
which marks the beginning of a decline in that industry which proved 
even more rapid than the ascendancy. The exponents of the old 
art are now extinct, and while ordinary specimens are manufactured 
today in various sections of the country, the fine textiles with their 
brilliant colorings and exquisite patterns are rapidly disappearing, as 



Total No. 






of entries 


Entries 


Total No. 


to Dec. 


during 


of cards 


31, 1921 


1921 


written 


156,177 


983 


156,177 


496,060 


14,058 


224,764 


145,518 


4,046 


8,456 


101,631 


326 


34,8o6 


125,060 


7,294 


295,316 


123,720 


2,481 





20 Vol, VI. 

their nu: The present coll* 

of all tl. 
M< 1 one e- 

Chihuahua, Puebla, and Zacal 
thosr from Saltillo and San Miguel arc the LUtifal 

- ihe most valuable; t'<>r t : ivt th<- distinct] 

being the I* manufacture. The g 

 

ign in Stripes, the n 
minu* .• interlocked in r 

the one from the < )hrctfon Hacien 
having n tboul 1773 by 

from Salt illo who med tv. • the Hacien ind 

inj; t! rn and weaving the blanket 

Tl pink and Nile of tl blanket an 

• nally rare and add greatly t t of then nam- 

: ..\'.rr having n only a U 

I <>ut. San Miguel blankets have  char 

• diamond in the 1 This collection. her with 

m SaltiUo of exquisiti ag which 

Jned !>y pureha ted in Case 1 of Hall 8. Mr. 

}■'.. Aver iluable Navaho blanket, wh 

for ii in the case showing Indian blankets in 

Id I lall. an Eskin 

1 with hunting and whalii ; nd a Sioux 

buckskin pin- 1. An addition of 215 b 

different North American Indian tribes Was made to the 
already I n that has I Mr. Homer 

t. A com;' of rcprodii' a of prehistoric 

 I. H. M 
of Zoology, Columl York. These c in 

the n of the Pithecanthn 

and Chapcll- men, a 

jawa, all of which will he Dtflu good advantage in the new hall 

ihition o: anthropol • hue I 

interestin g e of tapa cloth from Suva in the Fiji Island 
donat- Mr. and Mrs Rohcrt B. 1 'ickinson of Chicapo. Ms 

*;h S. Gi presented an accurate intiful 

of the famous Taj Mahal at Apra. India, which ;n- 

nv Ion exhihition in Hall 3a. A > ollcction of nind 

seven ohjee Mr. Barbour I-vhrop of Chicag 1 



Jan., 1922. Annual Report of the Director. 21 

presented by him. The collection consists of objects coming chiefly 
from Java, Celebes, Timor Laut, and Dutch New Guinea, with a few 
pieces from Babber, Dammer, Letti and other small islands of that 
region. A large Korean cabinet with excellent brass fittings and a 
large number of knives, krises, spears, bows and arrows-, bark gar- 
ments and ornaments of shell and ivory are among the objects in the 
collection. Two of the Javanese krises, the blades of which are finely 
marked with inlaid silver and the handles surmounted by full figures 
in brass representing Hindu deities and studded with precious stones 
and beads, are worthy of special recognition. An exceptionally fine 
feast bowl of painted lacquer from Burma was received from Mr. 
Frederick R. Babcock of Wheaton, Illinois. This bowl is decorated 
all around with miniature paintings of exquisite quality, all of them 
representing scenes from the Indian epic poem, the Ramayana, and 
explained in Burmese legends. Mr. William J. Chalmers gave an 
excellent cloisonne-enamel jar from China which is remarkable be- 
cause of its harmonious design and coloring, and highly prized be- 
cause it was made in the latter part of the fifteenth century. A 
miscellaneous collection of eighty objects gathered on his travels 
in the Orient was received as a gift from Mr. Robert H. Fleming of 
Chicago. It is particularly rich in swords, daggers, and other weapons 
from China, Japan, India, Turkey, Spain, and Mexico. Of excep- 
tional interest are two batiks from Java and a remarkable, large em- 
broidered hanging from China, fifteen feet in length and nine and 
one-half feet in width. The latter bears a lengthy Chinese inscription 
from which it is ascertained that this embroidered picture was be- 
stowed upon a certain Mr. Hu in 1863 in commemoration of his 
seventieth birthday by the prefect of Lin-kiang in Kiang-si Province. 
Especially opportune are twelve Japanese swords and six sword- 
guards which will make more complete the exhibition of Japanese 
swords and their fittings now in the process of installation. There 
are examples of the various types of swords used on different occa- 
sions, such as the ornamental sword for parade purposes, the fighting 
sword, the small sword, the dagger, the small dagger for women, 
and the slung sword. An excellent collection of Japanese Suri- 
mono was presented by Miss Helen C. Gunsaulus in memory of 
her father, Dr. Frank Wakeley Gunsaulus, former trustee. Surimono 
are color print cards of greeting which are produced for special 
occasions such as New Year, birthdays, and other festival days. The 
great majority are prepared for private distribution only, and it is 
except on rare occasions that any are placed on public sale. They far 



Fl • HY— I VI 

bj th< 
I in much t! tanner, th furthei : with 

tufrage and tt metal 

and i ir .in inward r< 

the lured, r | 

• found in Am. 

[*0 tht • >gy 

thetC (Tints her with 

the value ;* 
tO I Itudy of thr J 
they *iho\s * wealth of detail the -:umc and popular 

• the important 
ten <lc! c 

into the household, an ' I court-It! pictured in d. 

tail; u from It • folk-lore, and I drar- 

ha n the the artists quite as frequt 'he 

flo the first tl the night i 

uni Fuji nating (•mattet 

their 

I trill contribute their th f Japan. 

\ further inl made to the collection! anese 

when three full costumei for women, typical examples of 

apparel worn by tlie military (Samurai) cla re purchased from 

Thr three costumes are: the winter 
-umm- ! the costume that 

i> worn <>ti the • The winter rn|>c is of he. ivy blue Canton 

h the family crest printed in white, and i- rml»- i with small 

i : worn with th ; - i lingular acqtrisiti 

made rown brocade and 

.-. '. • i bamt) wi tarn ind pheasant design in soft-color' 

threads The summer < 
of th<- Japanese ime It i of bine silk, .screen weave with em- 

broidered li!i«-s. .ind i- worn with a l>!ue and white -Ash which has a 
WS The strert co pe 

in • : blue, and has a hr -h These tliree costunv 

i dre>s worn at t. the latter l>ein£ 

quite a different type from the others, and which was donated to 

the Museum 1 Miss Helen WiDcii mbine to illu 

nuatrly the WOmefl oi the S.imtr 

TV I in a :ier on lift • tth 

a fact air-drr Mr 



UHWEHSffY OF llUHOrt 



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Jan., 1922. Annual Report of the Director. 23 

Gilbert Grosvenor, editor of the National Geographic Magazine, pre- 
sented six copies of a new map of Eastern Asia and six copies of a 
new map of South America, which will be utilized for exhibition 
purposes in the halls devoted to those subjects. The collection of 
photographs was greatly enriched by an interesting series of a 
hundred photographs taken by Mr. L. Winternitz of Chicago among 
the Seminole of Florida and in India, Burma, and other oriental 
countries, and which he presented to the Museum. 

Among the notable collections received by the Department of 
Botany during the past year is the balance of the Harper Herbarium, 
presented to the Museum by the late Dr. Edward T. Harper and 
Susan A. Harper. A well lighted room 21x63 ft. has been assigned 
for its organization and installation. This herbarium consists of about 
40,000 specimens, chiefly fungi ; 6,000 photographs of fungi ; a number 
of published exsiccati, and works of reference ; and a mass of data and 
manuscript pertaining to the collections. A Preparator has been ap- 
pointed to organize the material for cataloguing, and to date 6,585 
specimens have been catalogued. The exsiccati include, among others : 
Fungi Selecti and Myxomycetes — O. Jaap, (700 specimens) ; New 
York Fungi — Shear, (331 specimens) ; Fungi Selecti — Torrend, (400 
specimens) ; North American Fungi — Ellis and Everhart, (4,000 speci- 
mens) ; Microtheca Brasilensis — Ule, (2,000 specimens) ; Lichenes 
Boreali-Americani — Cummings, Williams and Seymour, (300 speci- 
mens) ; Uredineae — Arthur and Holway, (200 specimens) ; Central 
American Fungi — C. L. Smith, (224 specimens) ; Economic Fungi — 
Seymour and Earle, (661 specimens) ; Phycotheca Bor.— American — 
Collins, Holden and Setchell, (2,425 specimens); Fungi Europaei — 
Rabenhorst — Winter; Fungi Columbiani — Bartholomew, (5,324 speci- 
mens). Other important collections received during the year are: 
the Nuttall, the Knopf and the Millspaugh Santa Catalina plants 
(1,960) ; the Heller California and Oregon plants (517) ; Britton and 
Cowell Cuban plants (183); Britton, Britton and Hazen, Trinidad 
plants (148); Buchtien Bolivian plants (472); and the Maxon and 
Killip Jamaican collections (1,276). The regional distribution of fully 
organized material is shown in the following table. The tabulation in- 
cludes only such areas as have been augmented in 1921, and in nowise 
represents the entire herbarium. 

Added Total in Added Total in 

this Her- this Her- 

Locality Year barium Locality Year barium 

NORTH AMERICA Alberta 5 1,278 

Alaska 6 129 British Columbia 15 1,501 

Baranoff Island 1 15 New Brunswick 3 799 



History — Report:- VI. 



Loc i 



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Kan<a< 

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Wyoming 

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Austria- H . . . : 

Belgium 

•nark 

land 

60 

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AS 

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Jan., 1922. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



25 



Added Total in 

this Her- 

Year barium 

AFRICA : 

Algeria 1 565 

British East Africa.. 8 131 

Cape 70 1,788 

Mozambique 17 24 

MALAYA: 

Borneo, North 56 66 



Added Total in 

this Her- 

Year barium 



AUSTRALIA: 

New South Wales. 

Victoria 

OCEANIA: 

Samoa 



1 

6 

2 



2,237 
728 
436 

68 



The Department of Geology has been the recipient of an unusually 
large number of accessions during the year, nearly all being gifts. 
The continued interest of Mr. W. J. Chalmers has been evinced by 
his gift of a fine series of moss agates from Montana showing remark- 
able landscape effects, and the addition of sixteen specimens, a num- 
ber of which are of high gem quality, to the crystal collection. These 
specimens include crystals of beryl from Brazil, tourmaline from 
Maine, tourmaline and kunzite from Madagascar, and quartz from 
Japan. Another addition to the gem collection was received from 
Ezra C. Knopf, who gave twenty-four specimens of rough and cut 
catalinite which provide a good representation of this semi-precious 
stone. A collection of over three thousand specimens of invertebrate 
fossils, besides some minerals, was presented by Mr. J. C. Langtry. 
This collection was gathered by the late C. B. Dyer, a well-known 
paleontologist, and is particularly notable for the large variety of 
specimens in it and the careful preparation of each. Besides repre- 
sentatives of several hundred species, the collection contains two para- 
types. The material constituting the collection was gathered chiefly in 
Ohio, but other districts are represented. The collection includes a 
number of beautifully preserved specimens of crinoids and trilobites 
well adapted for exhibition, and all of the material is so well worked 
out that it will lend itself readily to further study. A number of 
specimens of minerals from localities now exhausted is another 
valuable feature. A fine series of fossil plants, containing repre- 
sentatives of nineteen species from Eocene beds of Louisiana and 
Texas, was presented by Prof. O. M. Ball of the Agricultural and 
Mechanical College of Texas. The excellent state of preservation 
of these fossils and the care with which they had been prepared, 
mounted and named by Prof. Ball gave especial value to the gift, 
both for the purposes of exhibition and study. The Standard Oil 
Company of Indiana kindly presented a collection of 168 specimens 
illustrating uses of petroleum wax, which shows many interesting 
and important substances derived from this product. This company 
also provided a large floor case built according to the Museum standard 



90 : »RV— : VL 

ir the install: irthcr tlhi 

n the 
clanh A lift 

bust in h: 

• •' be t ell-know 

Merit • i of the late, lamented I tor. A 

numb- at the meeting of the American Mi: 

gr- ::\ < hi r kin. !! 

mentioned thirty-four stx- 

\S'il<i' 
ter ,r » : thirti oil -hairs from 

! by the I fnited Stal ••. of N' 

•itcd by the Alaska Coin 
mi n.| !<.hn Ronan; and a numt>er i mem of in^. 

other mr the I olorado State P»ur» 

\ i  >!'•• tiotl of -: t B : ' n K ; l "t 

mi • lining was re- 

1 through the g- <>f Mr. B. ( lie re- 

ereral o f the 1 
rr; \y new and in nt among these wei 

iree of radium in thrraj>eutic treat- 
men:-; al>o fine : turq- chite. halotrichite U 
•r minerals. The I tancc of the Grim County Chamber of 
ugh i' ctary, Mr. Bttltou Bunch, in this con- 
nection i I. 11. ol radium 

were | . Radium 

It . ores 

an xellent spec:: ,k wrre pre JCnt l 

'incr and Hoskins. 

taring the feni in the rtmeni of cou- 

Hi ! chiefly o ; although a number of fishes a: 

rchased. chiefly in the local market- N teworthy among the g; 
was a collection of fifty-eight mounted birdl and mammals received 
by bequest from the estate of llfl Katherine Howe of go. 

Tins a large number ol interesting albinos and 

bil coloration c . Mr Nicholas Howe dur 

a per. rs in which, a >rirtor of the sports- 

bt h.i 1 especial i 
■:« h material important collr f albinos, 09 

I one mammal, was the gift of Mr 



Jan., 1922. Annual Report of the Director. 27 

Ruthven Deane of Chicago. This collection includes many specimens 
which have been described and recorded in ornithological journals, 
and it is, therefore, of considerable historical interest. The addition 
of these two collections- to those previously possessed by the Museum 
makes its collections of albinotic birds one of the largest, if not the 
largest, in America. In the Division of Mammals, the most important 
accessions were two Canadian mountain sheep presented by Mr. H. 
B. Conover, of Chicago, and twenty skulls and horns of South 
African game animals presented by Mr. A. A. Davidson, also of 
Chicago. A novel and valuable gift of three animal groups done in 
bronze by Carl Akeley was presented by President Field. The 
subjects of these bronzes are : "The Charging Herd," representing a 
herd of wild elephants ; "The Wounded Comrade," showing a wounded 
elephant being supported and assisted by two of his mates ; and 
"Lion and Buffalo," showing a bull buffalo attacked by a lion. The 
Division of Insects received the welcome donation of 131 specimens 
of named, Florida dragon-flies, collected and presented by Mr. J. 
Williamson of Bluffton, Indiana. Dr. Sven Narbo kindly volun- 
teered to collect insects in the vicinity of Stavanger, Norway, and 
has, so far, donated over 100 desirable specimens of various orders. 
The total number of accessions is 1,369, distributed as follows: Mam- 
mals, 75 ; Birds, 104; Birds' eggs, 4; Fishes, 54; Reptiles and 
Batrachians, 278; and Insects, 854. 

Installation. Rearrangement, and Permanent Improvement. — A total of 158 
exhibition cases was newly installed in the Department of Anthropology 
during the year, and 478 cases were re-installed with numerous changes 
and improvements, making a total of 636. The total number of cases 
now on exhibition in this Department is 702, distributed as follows : 
Stanley Field Hall, 12; Edward E. Ayer Hall, 62; Mary D. Sturges 
Hall, 42; Hall 4, 43; Hall 5, 54; Hall 6, 50; Hall 7, 50; Hall 8, 61 ; 
Hall 9, 58; Joseph N. Field Hall, 103; Hall 23, 8; Hall 24, 80; Hall 
32, 79 ; Hall 33, 1 ; Gem Room, 9. The plans, as mapped out in the 
old building were generally adhered to, and the installation was com- 
plete on the day of the reopening of the Museum, May 2. Higinbotham 
Hall, opened June 6, contains nine wall cases, showing Egypt- 
ian, Syrian and Algerian jewelry, gold and silver jewelry of India, 
and prehistoric American gold ornaments. On July 18, Hall 23 
was thrown open to the public. In this room are shown Chinese 
maps, tapestries, and screens obtained by the Blackstone Expedition. 
and two long painted scrolls, presented in 1912 by the Tuesday Art 



I I " - . . \ : . VI. 

("haw Three of the maps were actually 
j.t ;, thirt ( )ne, 

ubhing tal 
from an engrai 

in the 

Dddha, ' die sea. form tl. 

silk t i in the rig} 

The DQtabh achic. in inlaid feati 

:k arc led by which 

   
the chic f dr Dg formed by the bright blue feathers of the 

^fisher. The t f the Snog period 

, one illustrating the occupal 
of  in£ the life of a m 

with il nd tra:: land and . 360 Japanese 

en dh ided into four • 

n. Each group ■• to remain on view for a '.vo 

The first : the work by the well-kno . 

artist. Hoknsai, and hi> pupils. The nd aims to illustrate the 
New Y< w< -1! a> the games and pasthnei of the 

people. In the third are ItSOCiati :cti:i£ 

mythology, the pantheon of tin and !.• The fourth >< ries 

tltS featuril mestk architecture, the house and its fur- 

niture. SO that an important phase of Japanese life is broug':. 

by each exhibit. Prank W. Gunsaulua Hall w.i- op ened on the 2nd 

of May. showing the work of Hoi .nd the paint' 

• the Museum by the late Dr. GnnsanhM in 1919. < »nly two 

gr urimono have so far been placed on viev. 

: the walls made the do :' Gunsaulttl Hall necessary toward 

the middle oi ber. The Tinguian village group in Hall 9 has j 

n supplemented and completed I addition of J06 

lothei I by J. G. Prasuhn. Tl intend 

of a Tinguian vill tmer morning u the 

engaged in founding :ig 

pinning nd making re at the sprn 

filling their jars with U .in£ cl ": , while one is removing 

• from the granary. Ben< . cngar; 

in stripping tobacco, a load of whi I etng brought into the 

lent by meai old n tiring 

a ban while a companion just from the field sits 1 itch U 

talk. Thi furni.shii f the i . and the vari ni- 



LIBRARY 
UNIVCR8I1V Of , lu «oi8 
UKBANA 



2 



o 



4 



3 
w 

3 
O 










I 









Jan., 1922. Annual Report of the Director. 29 

mals scattered about the scene, give a very realistic atmosphere to 
it. Plans for the arrangement of storage material on the third floor 
were drawn up last May. Storage cases were set up in the work 
rooms opposite the offices of the assistant curators, and storage racks 
were built in rooms 29-31, 33, 34, 36, 55, 65 and 66, set aside for 
this purpose. The unpacking, shifting, sorting and permanent placing 
of this material absorbed the attention of the Department for six 
months. The assignment of the rooms is as follows: room 28, ex- 
change collections; room 29, pottery of Southwest North America; 
room 30, South America; rooms 31 and 33, India, Ceylon, Burma and 
Siam; room 34, Borneo, Java; room 36, Philippines; room 55, Mela- 
nesia; room 65, Tibet; and room 66, China. Two special cabinets were 
made for the safe keeping of Chinese and Tibetan scrolls. Two 
screen carriers for four-foot cases and eight lay-out tables were made 
for the purpose of installation. The Japanese sword-guards, not utilized 
for exhibition purposes, have been arranged in a cabinet to serve as a 
study collection. The office of the Assistant Curator of Malayan Eth- 
nology was transferred from room 36 to room 43, room 36 being 
utilized for storage purposes. The 170 exhibition cases, which in the 
beginning of the year were stored in the Boat Hall on the ground 
floor, were transferred to the fourth floor. It is gratifying to record that 
the methods of exhibition and labeling have met with universal ap- 
proval, and that wide use has been made of the collections for both 
study and practical purposes. 

Progress and achievement in the Department of Botany during 
the past year has been more than ordinarily satisfactory. The com- 
fort, convenience and facilities of the offices and work rooms in the 
new building have rendered the efforts of the staff more efficient than 
could possibly have resulted in the old. The first four months of the 
year were devoted entirely to the arrangement, reinstallation and com- 
pletion of the case installations after having been packed and moved. 
During this work a number of the case units were entirely readjusted 
and many new specimens added. Two cases were installed in Stanley 
Field Hall, as indexes to the character of the installations in the de- 
partment itself. For these a number of elements were specially pre- 
pared : for the case illustrating plant life a delicate model of the flowers 
of Sugar Cane was executed and for the plant economics case two 
branches of resin producing plants were added to the typical specimens 
of rare and attractive amber-like gums. Since the opening of the 
Museum building to the public the following new installations have 
been added to those which were already in place in Hall 28 — the 



30 1" ' M VI 

ill of I'lam Life: four unit ^ illii>t r.it inp t! nportant cereal 

y .  .  rv- ii turtl • : .1 ! itii n * • the I aim I afflilj . ■•. double v.w.\ 

was installed with a Hi n uf the Bowerii fruit- 
ing lop Of I { "lit I'.ilm, showing tl.' .srrs a 

:its from the unopened Bowct bod through chasten in all star 

'•>prnrn: t<> the mature fruit. A unit rating 

the 1 1 the Dog ncluding 

of tlie I-'li 'I in full ind 

nog lei • <1 interesting plaques were add es of 

mi ted to the green A! 

relopmenfl of Utothrix through «-ight stages of 

ual rej 

Hum, Brj rialimeda and Vancheri \11 of 

the installation* indie. I produced in the Sara 

Field Lab incut. In Hall - ntral trophy 

been mad a trunk of the- California i >d, 

•. ten ii •) diameter, this diameti i ng half the average 

tfl of ti In thll hall all the tree trunks are in tl 

th» - "trophy" i index of eon | ill 

rlc, pn 
wis, i- weD under v. - ing mainly of a lite-size plant of the 

Florida Coontie, Zamux jporophyl of the "1 

irdnaUs, to typify the Cycad Family; a full size Pi 
Plant in Bower and young n i r epresen t the Bromclia 

Family ; er head <>f the pine indicative of the pecu 

indanui Family, and a series of enlarged glass m ng 

■istie forn useful sw h 

inie. Hemp, etc 1 mpany the Redwood in Hal! n»- 

.'•(!" section SJ id  huge plank Of the trer are nearly hnUhed 

for installation I'rej r Handbook 

rtment, all of the exhibit renumbered in 

h a way that no confu and the storage 

locke: ntaining Itudy material, are rapidly heii 

with the new rearrange:: qoaitl 

Field Laboratorv boo h. 

titling and are l>eing rapidly equipped to increase 
plant lite The 

third floor, e phase of work ; 

from th< oratory through tl iss \\ Shop 

to that in which the AaatSBot iplcte the preparations for the 

The Departmental I ilrary room has been fitted a 



Jan., 1922. Annual Report of the Director. 31 

cases and made ready for the permanent arrangement of its volumes 
and pamphlets. The four Herbarium rooms are being installed as fast 
as cases can be obtained. The main, or Flowering Plant Herbarium, 
is fully organized and open for reference. 

During the early part of the year the attention of the Department 
of Geology was devoted chiefly to completing the installation of halls 
or parts of halls which had not been worked upon up to that time 
in order that the entire exhibition series of the Department might 
present a finished appearance upon the opening day. It is gratifying 
to report that by devoted labor on the part of the staff, including 
considerable overtime work, this result was accomplished. In Stan- 
ley Field Hall two wall cases and two floor cases were installed. Of 
these, one of the floor cases is devoted to the large Quinn Canyon 
meteorite, and the other to representative specimens of fossils. In 
one of the wall cases there was installed a collection of different 
varieties of quartz and in the other a collection of metalliferous 
minerals. In the upper part of the wall cases the specimens are 
installed on individual blocks fastened to the backs of the cases and 
these blocks also serve as supports for the labels. In the other cases, 
pedestals or the case floors serve as mounts. New bases carefully 
designed to bear the weight of the specimens and at the same time 
present a finished appearance, were built for two large glacial slabs 
in Hall 34 and the specimens installed upon them. New specimens 
received during the year for the Chalmers crystal collection in the 
same hall were placed on exhibition in the cases containing that 
collection and the entire collection rearranged and to some extent 
remounted. The collection of radium-bearing minerals shown in 
this hall was enlarged, rearranged and relabeled. In Hall 35, 16 
tables 14 feet long and from 5 to 7 feet wide, constructed in the 
Museum, were placed in the west half of the hall in alcove positions. 
On these 53 relief maps were installed, the maps being grouped in 
such a manner that neighboring localities or similar physiographic 
types are associated in position. Two tables of smaller size at the 
end of the hall are used to display rainfall and glacial maps of 
the United States. The model of the Virginia Natural Bridge 
was placed in the center of the hall. Eleven maps which had not 
been previously framed or glazed were provided with this protection 
and all the maps exhibited are now safe-guarded in this manner from 
dust or other injury. Eight upright cases containing collections illus- 
trating various features of physical geology were installed in the east- 
ern end of the hall. Two of these cases are devoted to volcanic phe- 



KAL HlSTOBY— RlfOM I . VI. 

men,  I other • • i of typical volcanoes 

bring In anothr- 

called, 

rt h.i\. nrn in a natural p<> 

r-marked and mud crack' 

tU illustrating faulting and folding, joi: 

•ur ot 
urn c ind thr large ful 

11. Thr installation of Hall j( 

the lines i To the 

.. which occupies the east I 
it rial acquired during thi Ided, the i Dt in- 

nt beil nun- :ing the use- :m, 

pr '. by thr . rd ( >i' (Indiana). Tl in- 

ch which rdi 

eff in the hall. The model of the 

levcland was thoro u ghly renovated 
led in an individual :i an al (joining the petroleum 

an Australia! ro- 

ly nni 1 it was pla 

north enti :' the hall. A model of  coal mine. 

the laying mine and the extr 

A model illustrating tl- 
marioi t in a glacial lal adjoining the 

In th- rn half of the hall there 1 installed in table cases 

the soil and • ' eral mil I those 

nd mineral pigment 
ri withdrawn for years >n on 

if lack rtunity to exhibit i- 

The U. S. Department of Agriculture's official 

I by a set cd 

from that Department They are shown in gla bicfa fill part 

of an upright ( iens of soils, arrangi ng 

tcr-know: . etc., occt: 

r table c. arc di I in shallow tra> Another 

table case cont modes of 

mt foods in 
The largest co! in th: :he clay collecti 

wl. r its «! thirteen table cases. These arc ar- 

ranged in tv. ght groups acc< m's c: .tion. the 

ng the south wall a line of ff 



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Jan., 1922. Annual Report of the Director. 33 

cases contains a synoptic collection which illustrates the group and 
serves as a key to the larger collection. The nature, origin and general 
character of the clays of each group are shown by labels and the 
relations of the groups to each other are indicated by diagrams 
painted on the floors of the cases, the lines of which connect with 
each specimen in such a manner as to make its relations to the other 
specimens evident. Numerous specimens of each group of clays are 
shown in eight adjoining cases. A briquette burned from the same 
clay as the specimen is frequently installed with the specimen in order 
to show the character of the material in its most used form. While 
the number of clay deposits is so great that anything like a complete 
collection is both impossible and undesirable, enough members of 
each group are shown to illustrate the great variety in character 
which different deposits of this useful substance assume. A collec- 
tion illustrating the different effects obtained by variations in the 
methods of burning clay, which was received during the year, has 
also been installed here. Several groups of specimens also illustrate 
the effect of various impurities and minor components of clay upon 
its character when burned, while the use of clay in pottery is illustrated 
by a series showing stages in the manufacture of Japanese pottery. 
Other cases in the hall contain collections of other earthy substances 
of economic interest. Thus a collection of natural and Portland 
cements fills half of one case and a collection of fuller's earths the 
other half. Another case contains a collection of various kinds of 
sands of industrial importance, such as molding and glass sands. 
Uses of silica in its various forms are illustrated synoptically in 
another case. Earthy pigments, including ochers and allied paint 
substances, occupy an upright case. Two square, upright cases contain 
large specimens of iron ore and fluorite and a large model of the 
Chandler iron mine has been installed at the west end of the hall. 
This model, before installation, was thoroughly renovated, missing 
timbering restored, a new head frame built and the whole model 
repainted. The installation of Skiff Hall had been practically com- 
pleted in 1920, but a few remaining details, such as the installation 
of miscellaneous labels and readjustment of the fastenings of the 
cases were accomplished during the past year. Some specimens 
received during the year were also installed among their respective 
groups. A mahogany pedestal was prepared for the bust of Dr. 
Skiff presented by Mrs. Skiff, and the bust, on this pedestal, was 
installed in the center of the hall. Installation of Higinbotham Hall 
was delayed about a month beyond that of the rest of the Museum, 
but owing to the isolated position of this hall, no inconvenience 



w > Museum or . t VI. 

1 lu- coll died in M\e floor 

this ball, the first ncwl) lined with silk, all glass care- 

i'u! 1 ;mil all woodwork rcfinished 

individual specimens were provided throughout, 760 mounts lx-jug used 

this purpose I he mount 
were provided for the unmounted specimens I 
previousl) exhibited, thei led tr* »n illustrating folk 

1 that of models of hi 
lened to the public on June 6 Installation in Mall 3S 
armed to mounting and placing tl 
the hall, although My th 1 

the Minooka Mastodons and the Itum !• ir the 

bu lied, the fore 

inner b 1 missing p 

in such a iiLinii' ith present knowledj 

inimaL \ hind 
mount thai it woul I alone, 

iously exhibited. 1 
limbs entrance to thr hall, 

ion to the pi tin ir • 

mount -ur. Apatasaunts, proi 

lerable magnitude, Inn by industriot 
mpletion before me opening day. Although, on the «h 

cimen Stood the jar and j 
moving well, some breaks occurred which retrain tir Among the 

:ts which had red injury w >CS 

the ribs and legs and pelvic Much of this fail 

m I- doe to the fa< 1 that the pla ment in preparii 

ifter twenty years, become weakened and brittle. Ha 
menting and refinishing of many of tl I to 

omplished before they could be placed in lif- 

liculty in mounti - due t<> the fact that t ien 

brought it 50 near the ceiling that ordinary hoi 

not Ik- employed. \11 l lirncuhi lually 

and an excellent mount complished. 

• n which it was mount) 
fully rcfinished, the metal framework repainted and a pr 1 til- 

OUl it. The mount i 
i. this 
the hall a nui animals of th< 

period v. ere ir 

Mam- 



Jan., 1922. Annual Report of the Director. 35 

todon and a restoration of the Moa. The Mastodon skeleton, which 
had been disarticulated for moving, was reassembled and, in remount- 
ing, some modifications were made. The tusks were reset so that 
instead of curving outward as formerly, they were given a position 
similar to that common to other members of the elephant family. 
Some additional supports were provided for other parts, and the 
entire skeleton was also cleaned and treated with shellac for the purpose 
of further hardening and preserving the bones. The base supporting 
the skeleton was refinished and all metal supports repainted. Adjoin- 
ing this was placed the skull of the Yorkville Mastodon previously 
exhibited and a skull of the northern Mammoth, which had not been 
before on exhibition. The latter specimen, obtained from Wood- 
chopper Creek, Alaska, where it had been found in gold mining at 
a depth of one hundred feet, was complete and in good preserva- 
tion except for one tusk. From the preserved tusk another was 
modeled, a base was constructed and an excellent mount thus ob- 
tained. The cast of Megatherium, which had been taken apart for 
moving, was, before mounting, joined together, several parts which 
had been broken for disjoining were restored and the whole cleaned, 
coated with shellac and recolored. The base was also thoroughly 
refinished. In the central isle of the hall the skeleton of the ex- 
tinct Irish deer, after reassembling and cleaning was installed, as 
was also a cast of the skull and tusks of the elephantine genus, 
Stegodon, which had not been exhibited for several years on ac- 
count of lack of space. This cast was thoroughly renovated before 
installation and mounted on a base remodeled from a previous use. 
Some renovations and repairs were also performed on other large 
mounts in the hall, such as those of the fossil turtle, Colossochelys, 
the jaws of the shark, Carcharodon, and the cast of the skull of 
Dinotherium. In the paleontological laboratory attention was chiefly 
devoted during the latter part of the year to preparation for exhibi- 
tion of the skeleton of the Columbian Mammoth presented some 
years ago by Mr. George Manierre. It was deemed desirable to 
reconstruct the mounting of the skeleton so that a more nearly 
normal position would be presented and to improve the prepara- 
tion of the parts. Several coats of paint with which the bones had 
previously been invested were removed by means of various sol- 
vents and tools and some hardening treatments were given the) 
parts, especially the excellent tusk. The skull of a modern ele- 
phant which had previously been used in mounting the specimen 
was discarded and a newly modeled one based on careful studies 
of a more closely allied form supplied. Nine dorsal and three 



U "i NaTUI m 1 I VI. 

imilarly supplied by modelling fn 
gwre sp onding forms, The work of reconstruction of this 

still in progre> I -t 1 1 it is hoped U Lee it soon COmpl A 

iplendid poif of lower jswi oi the Columbian Mammoth which « 

nnluded with the gift Sfli DTI 

esse with other bones of t! nmoth. Owing to nands, 

hut little time I: i available for WOrk Upon the Stud) OTS, 

bat opportunity was foun I to unpack ind install u 

tartaric li I study o >Uection nun.' , tad 

the collection of roda <>f Lake Superior numbering 

bdl were installed with the mens and 

the collectkmi provided. The itudy collections m 

tol ly unpacked and distributed in b or 

upon shelves, though the complete organization of this * 

not yet bo implished. 

Reinstallation of the exhibits in the Department of Zoology 
co n t in ued from January until the opening of the Museum, I ire 

• tf being engaged in this work continuously The great 

presented by the large habitat groups of birds and mamm. 
The^e bad been entirely dismantled for moving and. although 
:  ' . ind Bowers had been 

W1 :uently d: ted and required skillful r mblinaj. The 

tual groundwork of these a was inevitably d 

altered that in most cases it was n< . • : 

. such BJ those in the Polar I'.ear. Musk 
groups, -uttered especially and were completely redone. 
of African game animals, the Deer group, and others had been DOO- 

 graphed from various angles and these photographs sen 

m reinstalling the scenes in their original form. The work 1 

bed expeditiously and successfully at the expe: 
time and labor on the part of the taxidermists. New la!*!- were 
written and printed for all the larger groups and for much other 
material. < hving to the lack of -pare in any one hall for the entire 

tematk exhibit of mammals, this exhibit was divided by plac 
the ||ed '"horned and hoofed'' mammals in Pullman Hall and 

other mammals, from marsupials to ape- and monkeys, in the .. 
joining Hall i; Prom May until !«-r unsettl 

j r e ve nte d co nt i n uous work OH new exhibits of mammals and bir 
but sx> far I -lble the taxidermist - have modeled and prcpa: 

manik I r the group of < dvmpic Elk and have n I and rc- 

mnuir tor tl. hibit Field Hall. 

three new groups wer ! and installed. One of these shows a 




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Jan., 1922. Annual Report of the Director. 37 

Red Fox in a woodland setting pausing before a log and listening to 
several mice which are quarreling beneath it. Another shows a 
winter scene with a Horned Owl pouncing upon a rabbit and a third 
displays various species of Birds of Paradise. Although considerable 
preparation had been made before removal from the old building, 
it was found necessary in installing the exhibit of fishes to make 
what was practically a new exhibit with almost complete rearrange- 
ment. Much of the material was poorly mounted or poorly colored 
after mounting. Some of this was discarded and the rest repaired 
and refinished. After the opening of the Museum, work was continued 
on the fish exhibit and altogether thirty new mounts have been pre- 
pared, twenty-eight repaired or remade, and thirty-eight casts made 
and colored. In this work a new method was employed to a large 
extent involving the use of a cast of the body of the fish combined 
with the real fin and tail. This method has proved expeditious and has 
given very satisfactory results in all cases where fresh specimens 
have been available for use as models. The reptile exhibit, which had 
never been large was reduced by the elimination of imperfect and 
unworthy specimens to a total of three cases. In one is a single 
large alligator; another is devoted principally to turtles; and the 
third contains miscellaneous snakes and lizards. Preparations have 
been made for the improvement of this exhibit and a number of 
additional specimens have been prepared. Many snakes and nearly 
all frogs cannot be prepared satisfactorily by the usual methods and 
the specimens heretofore shown have been far from pleasing or real- 
istic. To overcome this the taxidermist has perfected a method by 
which these animals may be reproduced in celluloid so as to give an 
exceedingly lifelike appearance, far superior to anything accom- 
plished by previous methods. Work has already been completed on 
models of two frogs, one soft-shelled turtle, and four snakes and 
progress made on a number of others. During the first half of 
the year the Associate Curator was occupied continuously with the 
tedious and exacting task of reinstalling the exhibit of inverte- 
brates, including the very large collection of shells, some 1,200 
units of which were provided with new labels. For Stanley Field 
Hall, a new installation was prepared in a wall case showing some 
of the more interesting invertebrates, such as sponges, jelly-fishes, 
corals, star-fishes, sea-urchins, and a series of beautiful and useful 
shells. Later in the year considerable time was devoted to finishing 
a new case containing two habitat groups of insects. One of these 
groups represents a scene in the dune region near Miller, Indiana, 
and shows the characteristic insects of that region. The other illus- 



VI 

tr; ; tinted, bromide enlargement. 

rk and tl < 11- 

woraa moth After this case was finished, work « 
begun with iheO exhibit by the 

duplicates, i - tfros far in 

ibk without of effct t In the 

I >i illation, then 

mending and of 

th« of the whales, elephants, and other 

e mamm 'Hum- weft then installed in or* in the 

ha! : t<> tl -tain number, for lack of space, w 

". Similar work proceeded with small and medium- 
installed es. 
In the latter part of th- -eleton of a large adult Chim- 
remounted to replace an immature example, about 150 
.leaned, and a beginning was made in the work of un- 
king, classifying, and lal>eling the small unmounted ligament. 
skeletons of the reference collection in comparative o s teology The 
nee collection of fishes and reptiles w^ pl.t nd 
a beginning made toward getting the material into well classified and 

E'Uoitions — Under the patronage of Mr. William J. Wrigley, Jr. 
the Curator of the ment of Botany I the Gray Herbarium. 

Harvard, tl nscal Garden, and the United 

National Herbarium at Washington, for the purpose of studying the 
older Santa Catalina Island. California. He V 

accorded the privilege of examining the material in each institution 
and amassed data that will materially aid in the preparation of a 
Flora of the island. The Curator RSSO made two tr neseo, 

111: luring which he j the complete Harper Herbarium 

for shipment to the Museum; and a trip to Pharr, Louisiana, where he 
secured a complete serie .mens for installation, representing 

the production r through a in its extraction ftl 

Si llization. 

The N W Hahbis Puslic School Eitension or Fielo Museum of Natuhal Histo»» 

red during the past ted with th< 

ah vailable for loat the public schools. With the addit. 

of the The resignation of 

the chief taxidermist created that were, for the greater 

irt of tl roduc* Thooj 



Tan.. 1922. Annual Report of the Director. 39 

the department was fortunate in securing the services of a former as- 
sistant, his work was not of a wholly productive nature owing to 
the many demands made upon his time by the repairs that were 
necessary to entomological specimens and to group accessories. Sev- 
eral conferences were held with Mr. Dudley Grant Hays, Director 
of Visual Instruction in the public schools, for the purpose of dis- 
cussing the system of loaning cases to the schools and of the study of 
them while there. On Mr. Hays' recommendation, a list of case sub- 
jects available for school use was placed on file in the office of each 
principal where it could be consulted by the teachers with a view to 
making- selections which would correlate certain lessons. He also sent 
to all public schools and branches a bulletin containing directions for 
reaching the Museum, rules of admission to it, references to lunches 
and lunch room, and requests to teachers as to the care of loan 
cases. In many other helpful ways, Mr. Hays has taken active pan. 
The new chassis purchased during the school vacation and fitted to 
the old. but repaired and repainted deliver}- truck body, is better 
suited for the purposes of this department than the former one. 
With it. it has been possible to maintain a school day schedule since 
the beginning of its service. This schedule consists of collections 
of cases from ten schools and the delivery of them to the same number 
of schools. With the former chassis only eight collections and de- 
liveries could be made. The addition of thirty-two more schools to 
the previous schedule demanded this increased daily service. With 
this addition a total number of 320 schools is listed to receive the 
cases. Additional visits of inspection and inquiry were made by 
members of the bureau of exhibits of the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. Desirous of having in Pittsburgh a circu- 
lating system of loan cases similar to the Harris Extension, Mr. 
John A. Hollinger. Director of Visual Instruction in the public 
schools of that city visited the Chicago public schools for the pur- 
pose of getting first hand information as to the utilization of the 
cases of this department and the benefit derived from them. He 
also sought information of this department concerning its meth- 
ods of preparing and circulating its cases. Upon request twenty- 
five cases were loaned at one time to the Washburne Continuation 
School for its course during July and August. The three classes 
of students in this school are: the disabled soldiers assigned to it 
by the Federal Board of Vocational Education; apprentices in dif- 
ferent trades; and the fourteen to sixteen year old working boys who 
are required to attend school eight hours a week. In connection with 
the loan of the cases to this school, Mr. E. G. Bauman. in charge 



Field M VI. 

"11 . which you kii: 

summer created 10 much interest and ;>li gn tO our 

that the colta tion was i 

edv We hope that you pod 

our school on the list of I which COlU t from time 

This ichool 1 listed Mr Paul M. 

Rem, l r of the Cleveland Museum of Natural Hi 

. . . 

the purp supplementing a i itial ii 

by thai tut ion during this summer term. The retjmsl was 

.n<l a * ;i of the cast made hy Mr. Rfl ral 

were I lie Vhica. r of the Wild i I'res- 

er. America I annual exhibition. A 1< 

made to the itioo Committee o#jth- sW 

the Illinois F< Quba tor b <nd 
annual bird-bouse exhibit 

Photography and Illustration. -The following i^ a tabulation of the work 

performed in tin 'ii : 

Numtx-r •:' Nui 

Ijnlrm I' hi r!i . '« Pi 

Slides Made Made Made Mad* 

! 

:>ropolony 

itiy 

> 





Ft 



phinting -The number of labels and other impi — 

• by tl Printing for the various departmei I >l- 

low 

Ant! .... 



*6 







ATTCNDANce — It i- frratifj nd- 

e the removal of the collections to the new building. !>ur: g 









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Jan., 1922. Annual Report of the Director. 41 

the 241 days from May 2 to December 31, the total admissions were 
517,285 of which 425,001 were free and 92,284 were paid admissions, 
as against 328,321, the best total attendance for any one year in 
Jackson Park. The most encouraging figures, however, are those 
of the attendance of public school children, students and teachers. 
The figures in the period under review show a total attendance of 
21,928 as against a best total of 9,118 for any one year in Jackson 
Park. Details of the attendance record and the receipts from at- 
tendance will be found elsewhere in this report. 

Herewith are also submitted financial statements, lists of accessions, 
names of members, etc., etc. 

D. C. DAVIES, Director. 



BY— Rj VI 

STATEMEN1 I >F 1N« AND 

ling Decembei 31, 



$ 22, 1 18.95 

35.-* 

< 00.00 IJ9.80. 



...1 Held (.•.(««. OQ 



r $j8o t l. 

! Lighl j8> tog 10. 

:itenan. ie< 

' • 
duard and Jan: 4 

■\ Srrvu 1 
-•ntal Installation Supplies 

Printing and Pho t ographic Snpptta 1,461 141^ 



Net Income <r carried to Capita $ 17.000.55 



j HE N. W. HARRIS PUBUi .:< N >I. EXTENSA 

and Expense . i 



OMI 

Interest and tments $i^.;«/6.b6 

340-3V 



$1. 

ink Bal 



>..ij8.88 
Salai 



5 

Ooj 24 



$ -.7'3-66 



Jan., 1922. Annual Report of the Director. 43 

FINAL STATEMENT OF COSTS OF REMOVAL OF 
MUSEUM FROM JACKSON PARK TO GRANT PARK. 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company : 

Labor — cost of dismantling glass in large 

cases, packing and unpacking $6,649.96 

For specially constructed glass boxes .... $630.72 

Less Salvage 1 14.66 516.06 $ 7,166.02 

Fort Dearborn Storage Company : 

Labor — loaders, unloaders and clampers.. $30,790.81 

Truck hauling contract 6,028.59 36,819.40 

Illinois Central Railroad : 

Installation and removal of tracks $16,988.01 

Hauling 321 cars and demurrage 9,904.00 26,892.01 

City of Chicago 

Cost of restoring pavement at 58th Street, 

etc 255.67 

S. M. Hunter & Company: 

Dismantling large exhibition cases 806.10 

South Park Commissioners : 

Replacing roadways, sidewalks and re- 
sodding 1,865.57 

Chicago Surface Lines : 

Labor and material — installation of rail- 
road crossing at 58th Street and Stony 
Island Avenue 1,779-03 

Miscellaneous contractors : 

Building platforms and runways at Jack- 
son Park, hauling and! removing 
cinders for tracks $ 3,277.77 

Less Salvage 591.00 2,686.77 

Miscellaneous Items : 

Premiums on bonds $ 150.00 

Steel plates 69.00 

Plate glass insurance — two loads of glass 210.00 
Tarpaulins, wire rope, dolleys and access- 
ories $91383 

Less Salvage 130.00 783.83 

Rent of hoists 200.00 

Blue prints, advertising, printing, teaming, 

plates, etc 7-2-00 1,48483 

Total $79,755-40 



Cost of packing supplies used during a period 

of two years prior to moving $ 4,897.52 



PULO Ml . ai. HiM'-m— Kn'..xr>. \ "i. VI. 



IDAN< ttlSTN S 

IK - BlfBBI It, : 

•il Attendance j8; 

Paid Attendance 

I'rrr Admission on Paj 

l Children 

4  

Tcaohrr* 

Mrmkrs rate 

1 :c 

\nnual 

Families 



Special 4 

Adn. i ' 

Thi bVjJI 

• 

 q 



 Attendance 00 any day ( M.i : ) 28,588 

mcc "ii any clay ( I feCCtnbef i'<. lOjM ) 86 

ttendance (September 3 

rage Daily Admissions 2»IJ7 

Average Paid Admissions "■•* 

1 Id i 

lr* c heck ed 2> 

I :al Cards sold 



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Annual Report of the Director. 



45 



ACCESSIONS 



DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY 



AYER, EDWARD E., Chicago. 

1 Navaho blanket — Arizona and 
New Mexico (gift). 

I carved snow-beater of walrus 
ivory, 1 beaded buckskin gun- 
case — Eskimo and Sioux, 
Alaska and United States 
(gift). 

BABCOCK, FREDERICK R., 
Wheaton, Illinois. 
I polished stone axe, 1 circumci- 
sion flint knife in sheath — 
Australia (gift). 
1 decorated lacquer feast-bowl — 
Burma (gift). 

BODE, MRS., Chicago. 

1 metate with two mullers 
— Mexico (gift). 

BRAND, S. H., Chicago. 

I wood-carved figurine of St. 
Regis Indians — New York 
State (gift). 

BROWN, WILLIAM A. 

1 walrus tusk engraved with hunt- 
ing scenes — Eskimo, Alaska 
(gift). 

CHALMERS, WILLIAM J., Chicago. 
1 large cloisonne enameled jar, 
latter part of fifteenth century 
— China (gift). 

DICKINSON, MR. AND MRS. 
ROBERT BELVILLE, 
Chicago. 
1 piece of tapa cloth — Suva, Fiji 
Islands (gift). 

DIETERICH, REV. AND MRS. F. 
W., Nanking, China. 

I woman's hair ornament, 1 silver 
charm, 1 brass censer with 
base — China (gift). 

EMMONS, LIEUT. G. T., Greenholm, 
Princeton, New Jersey. 

1 wood-carved bark shredder, 1 
ladle of musk-ox horn, 1 
powder horn — Nishka, Tlingit 



and Eskimo, Northwest coast 
of America and Alaska (ex- 
change). 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL 
HISTORY. 

Purchases : 

4 busts and 8 casts of skulls and 
jaws of prehistoric men, from 
Professor J. H. McGregor of 
Columbia University, New 
York. 

1 winter ceremonial robe, 1 sash, 
1 winter coat, 1 summer cere- 
monial fancy robe, 1 sash, 1 
striped silk street robe, 1 
double sash, 1 crepe under- 
garment from Miss Michi 
Sato — Japan. 

1 serape (blanket) — Saltillo, 
Mexico. 

1 chief's robe of palm fiber — 

Basongo tribe, Congo, Africa, 
from Rev. J. F. Pieters, 
Springfield, Kentucky. 

FLEMING, ROBERT H., Chicago. 

45 swords, daggers, and other 
weapons, 5 embroideries, 2 
batiks, 6 sword-guards, 6 al- 
bums of color prints and 
paintings, 16 miscellaneous ob- 
jects — China, Japan, India, 
Turkey, North Africa, Tava 
(gift). 

FRIESSER, JULIUS, Chicago. 

2 pieces of pottery, 1 vessel of 

carved gourd — Ecuador and 
British Guiana, South America 
(gift). 

GALLAGHER, J. F., Chicago. 

1 grooved stone axe — Hot Springs, 
Garland County, Arkansas 
(gift). 

GOURLEY, W. J., Chicago. 

1 unfinished stone axe — Wauconda, 
Lake County, Illinois (gift). 






LD M U H\— \< \ 1 



KM. I'M - 

! <>f the Ta) 
(with . . 

rim 

H. Ml 

i Iuaso im 

• 

HAWDH 

FURGl 

i ba 

I \i HI 

chiefly 

 



1 baa 
tnd I 



Ua^ka 






• ;.. « hina 



PA1 

'lams 
Indians, Indian Territory, U 

r I).. Knox. In'! 



MINNIE, Lake 
MARTIN \. and 






I J I iV|P 






— Coa 

avadena. 

4ti tribe cent 

S v; 

i pair of i 
indal] v 
rering, I pair of straw 
lapan (gift 

t<t hair- 
Japan 

WILLIAM. 

I lart;r Mark an.! whi» 

'\ zona 

i Of 

* rock— 

Illu 

WILKINS, Mi ago. 

a 

WII ; <! HUGH ago. 

t gTC* i 

V 



PARTMENT '1 \NV 



AY! 

I hcrl>arium specimen U 

I . [thl rk 

I h« 









i Inland. 
Illu 



Jan., 1922. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



47 



CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY, 
Department of Natural Re- 
sources, Alberta, Canada. 
28 economic specimens, barley, 
oats, wheat, alfalfa, grass, 
clover, flax. — Alberta (gift). 

DAHLGREN, B. E., Chicago. 

15 economic specimens — various lo- 
calities (gift). 

DAVIDSON, DR. A., Los Angeles, 
California. 

1 herbarium specimen — Santa 

Catalina Island, California 
(gift). 

THE FIBRE PIPE COMPANY, 
Indianapolis, Indiana. 

2 economic specimens Bernice 

Fibre Pipe — Indiana (gift). 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL 
HISTORY. 

Collated by B. E. Dahlgren: 

1 herbarium specimen. 
Purchases : 

66 herbarium specimens — Maine. 

1 Lycopodium Powder from drug 
store. 

600 fungi specimens — various lo- 
calities. 

517 herbarium specimens — 
California and Oregon. 

1 fungus gall on cedar bark — 
Wisconsin. 

GRAY HERBARIUM, HARVARD 
UNIVERSITY, Cambridge. 
Massachusetts. 
1 photographic print of type plant 
Berlin Herbarium (exchange). 
78 herbarium specimens — Nova 
Scotia (exchange). 

IDAHO AGRICULTURE EXPERI- 
MENT STATION, Aberdeen. 
Idaho. 
17 barley, wheat and oat specimens 
—Idaho (gift). 

KNOPF, EZRA C, Santa Catalina 

Island, California. 
114 herbarium specimens — Santa 

Catalina Island, California 

(gift). 
101 herbarium specimens — Santa 

Catalina Island, California 

(gift). 
99 herbarium specimens — S a n t a 

Catalina Island, California 

(gift). 



MILLSPAUGH, DR. C. F., Chicago. 
20 herbarium specimens — S a n t a 
Catalina Island, California 
(gift).. 
555 herbarium specimens — various 
localities (gift). 

MOXLEY, GEO, L., Los Angeles, 
California. 
23 herbarium specimens — Santa 
Catalina Island, California 
(gift). 

MURRAY, W. H., Norwalk, Ohio. 

2 ramie fibre — Ohio (gift). 

NEW YORK BOTANICAL 

GARDEN, Bronx Park, New 

York. 
1 herbarium specimen — Cuba 

(exchange). 
1 herbarium specimen — Trinidad, 

W. I. (exchange). 
790 herbarium specimens — various 

localities (exchange). 

3 herbarium specimens (gift). 

1 fungus — B erry Islands (ex- 
change). 

NUTTALL, L. W.. Philipsburg, 
Pennsylvania. 
1250 herbarium specimens — Santa 
Catalina Island, California 
(gift). 

7 herbarium specimens — Santa 

Catalina Island, California 
(gift). 

PLITT, C. C, Baltimore, Maryland. 
25 herbarium specimens, lichens- 
Santa Catalina Island, 
California (exchange). 

RICE EXPERIMENT STATION, 
Crowley, Louisiana. 
3 economic specimens — Louisiana 
(gift). 

SHERFF, EARL E., Chicago. 

8 herbarium specimens — Chicago 

(gift). 

THE TERRITORY OF ALASKA. 

I economic specimen (wild grass) 

— Alaska (gift). 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRI- 
CULTURE, Bureau of Plant 
Industry, Washington, D. C. 

23 varieties of soy beans (gift). 

II varieties of wheat specimens — 

United States (gift). 






 VI. 



! b< 

 

I 

I I I 

.1 li 

 

. \ I. 

'.'. I. ( 

60 herbarium 



\'IA. 

lis 

1 - 

JK. WII 

I 

1 
\ a r f I ) . 



PARTMENT OF 



N Q 

MININ 

f ore — Alaska 

\ S 

\\ heel 

• and baritc 
1 ( lap, * 

PROD! THE, 

Ki\cr<lalr 

itch 
pr 

BR< 

I lead and riiu- 
i!cna. Illinois ( . f| 

R ••Jill N 
••in. 

11 iptcimcB <~rland 

nd Falls. 
•hi nt (exchanf 

riti I i 

l 1 ' 

1 H Mil 

'te — 

anil 
tana 

 

 

..... , , 



MX) I ft IR< 

0I0- 

If I] 

6 specimens of coal— Colora 

Jo 

1 

 il COAL I 

:ien of bitum: 
Mt lUrrn. 1 I 'olo- 

R, A. T.. V. 

1 

I 

vi K I li \Y Co. THE, 

ver. Color.i 
3 Ipecnncni < : fire clay— Golden. 
• !). 

FIELD III M I 'i N ATI 

HISTORY. 

^rrington: 
1 •! Mna<- 

.. I ' 

— 
ftnd 

Warrmittei \'. 

i I K. J 

l «•■   r - earth — 



Jan., 1922. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



49 



1 specimen of rock weathering — 
Arkansas (gift). 

1 specimen of chert — Hot Springs, 
Arkansas (gift). 

4 specimens of catlinite — Pipe- 
stone, Minnesota (gift). 

GATES, MYRON C. Gordon. 
Nebraska. 

6 specimens of sand-calcite crys- 

tals — Bad Lands, South 
Dakota (gift). 

GILBERT, B. C., Chicago. 

: specimen of torbernite — Silver 

City, New Mexico (gift)._ 
3 photographs taken by emanation 

from the specimen (gift). 
218 specimens of minerals, ores 
and fossils — New Mexico 
(gift). 
HEAD, R. EL, Salt Lake City, Utah. 
13 specimens of coals and ores 
—Utah (gift). 

HICKMAN. C. B., Silver City, New 
Mexico. 

7 specimens of fluorite — Gramma, 

New Mexico (gift). 

HUNTOON, J. F., Chicago. 

7 specimens of mica — Keystone. 
South Dakota (gift). 

HUTCHINSON, MRS. C. L., Chicago. 

1 specimen of bleached sandstone 

— Huron Mountain, Michigan 
(gift). 
KENT, C. A., Chicago. 

5 specimens of colored sands— 
MacGregor, Iowa (gift). 

KING, C. H., Chicago. 

2 specimens of fossil coral — Elk 

Lake, Michigan (gift). 

KNOPF. EZRA C. Avalon, California. 
1 specimen of water agate — Santa 
Catalina Island, California 

(gift). , c 

1 specimen of blister pearl — Santa 

Catalina Island. California 

(gif -°- t  11 

2 specimens of miscellaneous 

minerals — Santa Catalina 
Island, California (gift). 
24 specimens of catlinite — Santa 
Catalina Island, California 
(Rift). 

KONSBERG. A. V.. Chicago. 

1 specimen of tufa — Mammoth 



Hot Springs, Yellowstone 
Park (gift). 
I specimen of blende — Galena. 
Illinois (gift). 

LANGTRY, J. C, Chicago. 

32 specimens of minerals — various 

localities (gift). 
3161 specimens of fossils — various 

localities (gift). 

MARINER AND HOSKINS, Chicago, 

9 specimens of metallic arsenic —  

Chicago (gift). 
12 specimens of arsenic ores —  

Tonopah, Nevada (gift). 

MAUCELI, IGNAZIO, Chicago. 

1 specimen of fossil coral — • 
Burlington, Illinois (gift). 

PATEE, FRED, Casper, Wyoming. 
1 specimen of bentonite — Wyoming 
(gift). 
RADIUM INFORMATION SERV- 
ICE, New York City. 
3 specimens of carnotite — Long 
Park, Colorado (gift). 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN FUEL CO., 

Denver, Colorado. 
1 specimen of bituminous coal — 
Superior, Colorado (gift). 

RONAN, JOHN, Hyder, Alaska. 
29 specimens of ore — Salmon 

River District, Alaska (gift). 

ROYSE, R. L., Ogden, Utah. 

1 specimen of tschermigite — 
Wamsutter, Wyoming (gift) 

SKIFF, MRS. FREDERICK J. V.. 
Chicago. 
Bronze bust of Dr. Frederick J. 
V. Skiff (gift). 

SMITH, COLLINS C, Chicago. 

1 specimen of asbestus — Wisconsin 
(Rift). 

SMUGGLER UNION MINING CO.. 
Telluride, Colorado. 
3 specimens of concentrates— 
Telluride, Colorado (gift). 

STANDARD OIL CO. (Indiana), 
Chicago. 
10 specimens of fuller's earth— 
Olmstead, Pulaski Co.. Illinois 

(gift). 
168 specimens of petroleum wax 
and products (gift). 



Fn 



M I N 1 N 

•t ). 
R K 
4 specimens of fossil m< 

I  

Oder, 

 









ning 



\ l» L CO, 

Illn 

Di 

nir 

\ille. Illin 
\\ II 

Mr 

Louis 

 



PARTMEN I" < >F Z< M >D K'.Y 



• . nflj I '■•< 

 '-tlr. i moth Chicago («ift>. 
AMI - Kit \\ KMIAV 

ift). 

\YRES, H< 

• xchain 

I tl 

i, i prairie i 

I 

III 
••irtlrs- 
. Illinois (gift i. 

 

r lizard— I-akchn-! 
I n 

 



 

 
i ikull 

ft). 

i m irning 

ground 
a Mors 
ft), 

DAJ 

i rattlesnake 

I . 

-lammals 
—South Africa 

Rirrm icago. 

I albino squirrel 
I i mantis— Irving Park, 

nir ft). 

T. FUsdbm, Who 

i camel cricket— Haaelhu- 

I v loon-Harelht: 



Jan., 1922. Annual Report of the Director. 



Si 



FIELD, STANLEY, Chicago. 

3 bronze animal groups by Carl 

Akeley : 

A Charge of African 

Elephants ; 
The Wounded Comrade ; > gift 
Fight Between Lion 

and Buffalo. 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL 
HISTORY. 

Received from Museum Guard : 
1 least bittern. 

Collected by A. C. Weed : 

10 dragonfly nymphs — Dupage, 111. 

Collected by Wm. J. Gerhard : 
87 dragonflies, grasshoppers, bugs, 
ant-lions, butterflies, moths, 
flies, beetles, bees, wasps and 
parasites — northern Illinois and 
northern Indiana. 

Collected by E. Liljeblad: 
91 millipeds, centipedes, dragon- 
flies, ant-lions, bugs, grass- 
hoppers, butterflies, moths, 
flies, beetles, bees, wasps and 
parasites — northern Illinois and 
northern Indiana. 

Collected by A. C. Weed and L. L. 
Walters : 
73 specimens of reptiles and frogs 
— Chicago. 
Prepared by L. L. Walters 
Celluloid models of 1 turtle, 4 
snakes and 2 frogs — Chicago. 

Purchases : 

4 specimens of Cory's shearwater 

— Island of Pico, Azores. 
125 specimens of frogs — Minnesota. 
24 specimens of fishes — Chicago. 

FRENCH, G. H., Carbondale, 111. 
1 moth — Carbondale, 111. (gift). 

FRIESSER, J., Chicago. 

1 cicada, 1 fly — Chicago (gift). 

GEILHUFE, FRED, Chicago. 
1 centipede — Chicago (gift). 

GERHARD, WM. J., Chicago. 

370 dragonflies, grasshoppers, bugs, 
butterflies, moths, beetles, flies, 
bees, wasps and parasites — 
.lorthern Indiana and northern 
Illinois (gift). 

GREENLEE, MRS. R. S., Chicago. 
1 hawk's-bill turtle (gift). 



GUERET, E. N., Chicago. 

5 moths — Chicago (gift). 

GUNDER, J. D., Chicago. 

1 hemerobian — Yellowstone 
National Park (gift). 

HADA, STEPHEN, Chicago. 

1 lake herring — Chicago (gift). 

HAREBO, MRS. J. F., New Lisbon, 
Wisconsin. 
I blue-tailed skink — New Lisbon, 
Wisconsin (gift). 

HOUGAARD, MRS. C. S., Elmwood 
Park, Illinois. 
1 spider — Elmwood Park, Illinois 
(gift). 

KAEMPFER, FRED, Chicago. 

1 black tamarin marmoset (gift). 
KNOPF, EZRA C, Avalon, California. 

1 butterfly, 5 moths — Avalon, 
California (gift). 

LANGTRY, J. C, Chicago. 

1 pair elk horns (gift). 

LILJEBLAD, E., Chicago. 

18 dragonflies, ant-lions, bugs, 
beetles, flies, wasps and para- 
sites — northern Illinois and 
northern Indiana (gift). 

LOMEN, CARL J., Seattle, 
Washington. 

1 golden eagle — Alaska (gift). 
MASON, J. A., Chicago. 

1 young hognosed snake — Waverly 
Beach, Indiana (gift). 

NARBO, DR. SVEN, Stavanger, 

Norway. 
3 bird's eggs — Norway (gift). 
47 dragonflies, bugs, butterflies, 

flies, bees, parasites, beetles 

and moths — Norway (gift). 
23 beetles, caddice-flies, butterflies 

and moths — Norway (gift). 
35 shells — Norway (gift). 

OSGOOD, W. H., Chicago. 

35 mammals — Nebraska (gift). 

PEET, FRED N., Chicago. 

1 small mouth bass — Alma, 
Wisconsin (gift). 

POLZIN, GEO. P., Edison, California. 
1 scorpion — Edison, California 
(gift). 

PORTER, A. F., Decorah, Iowa. 

1 katydid, 2 mantis, 1 ant-lion, 1 






NATl  u i i:- :■ : \ '. \ I 



para»il  

UK D 

i raphidian,  dobaooa 1 1 1 

' *J. afmrcjtetta, 

j r- ttte, 

Michigan (gift). 

K' »MAV ». II > ; 

t ;• lnr4K'» (lift 

I }UARIUlf, 

( :• , . 

3 I - . • : ) . 

>vup. 

:). 
ITHERIN] r ATI- 

OF, ("hica. 
: mounted hird* (boCJMSt). 

«   : « m a 1 I mammals 

(beqac  
SCHWARZ, Eh Si i odt, Maatowl 

.1 motli*. -St. I M I ii r t 

ft). 

INGER, CARL, data 

j chi i — northern 1 1 1 i HO 1 1 

SHEWSKL U ke, Indiana. 

I r !-akc, 

gift ». 

SHELl ' a rk. 

i eon atria («it't). 



SMI l I.YDIA, North I 

N'rw \ 

York 

i ll . ih 1 - 
Utah. 

.•■■■ 
TARRANT. ROBERT, I 

t ring • 

■CO 
• mmon na* t< 
fr-v* Indiana i . ft 

WEED i 

i moth, i centipede 'lorthcrn 
Mil 

marah 

•»r. 
(Rift). 

\VI! LIAMS* >N. E P. . Pluf f too, 
India- 

i Hungarian pa' 

WII.I.I • ' '•'. T II. Pin ft ton. 
Indiana. 
rjt d 

troltna (gift). 

LOOTl ' 

■igs — Hessville, Indiana (. 

WOOD1 North I 

t large Rartc* oong 

th Root* 
. ft). 



OP PHOTOGRAPHY 
Wll riTZ, If. U Chicm GLASIER, PR! kockloa, 



100 pril minole, :rma. 

In ft ). 

LD MUSEUM OP NATURAL 

HIST- -KV 
Ma 

ktives, t/>7- print. 



MaaaachuM 

-Inctior. 
American India: 



THE LIBRARY 
LIST OF DONi >ks \nd EXCH US 

v ire by exchai c - rtherwi - 



: [I A 

v • > and I '• 



4nnt»h 
itfiral iro. 

In*titiit d'! 

I 



LU 



co 

!c 
O 

OL 
UJ 

cc 



> 
cc 

o 

I- 



< 

cc 

I- 
< 
Z 



s 

UJ 

2 










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73 




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cr 


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Jan., 1922. Annual Report of the Director. 



53 



Royal Society of South Africa, Cape 
Town. 

South African Association for Ad- 
vancement of Science, Cape Town. 

South African Department of Agri- 
culture, Pretoria. 

South African Museum, Cape Town. 

Transvaal Museum, Pretoria. 

Zoological Gardens of Ghizeh, Cairo. 

ARGENTINA: 

Museo de la Plata, Buenos Aires. 
Sociedad Ornitologica del Plata, 
Buenos Aires. 

AUSTRALIA: 

Australian Museum, Sydney. 

Botanic Gardens and Government 
Domains, Sydney. 

Commonwealth of Australia, Ade- 
laide. 

Department of Agriculture, Adelaide. 

Department of Agriculture, Sydney. 

Department of Agriculture, Welling- 
ton. 

Department of Mines, Sydney. 

Field Naturalists' Club, Melbourne. 

Fish Commission of New South 
Wales, Sydney. 

Forestry Commission, Sydney (gift) 

Geological Survey of Western Aus- 
tralia, Perth. 

Institute of Science and Industry. 
Sydney. 

Linnean Society of New South 
Wales, Sydney. 

Melbourne University. 

National Herbarium. Melbourne. 

National Herbarium, South Yarra. 

Parliament of the Commonwealth, 
Sydney. 

Public Library, Museum and Art 
Gallery, Adelaide. 

Public Library, Museums and Na- 
tional Gallery of Victoria, Mel- 
bourne. 

Queensland Museum, Brisbane. 

Royal Geographical Society of Aus- 
tralasia, Brisbane. 

Royal Society of New South Wales, 
Sydney. 

Royal Society of South Australia, 
Adelaide. 

Royal Society of Tasmania. Hobart 

Royal Society of Victoria, Mel- 
bourne. 

Roval Society of Western Australia, 

Perth. 
South Australian Ornithological So- 
ciety, Adelaide. 

Technological Museum of New 
South Wales, Sydney. 



Victoria Department of Agriculture, 
Melbourne. 

Western Australia, Geological Sur- 
vey, Perth. 

AUSTRIA: 

Anthropologische Gesellschaft in 
Wien. 

K. K. Naturhistorisches Museum, 
Vienna. 

K. K. Zoologisch-Botanische Gesell- 
schaft, Vienna. 

BELGIUM : 

Academie Royale de Belgique, Brus- 
sels. 

Institut Botanique Leo Errera, 
Brussels 

Jardin Botanique de l'Etat, Brussels 

Musee Royale d'Histoire Naturelle, 
Brussels 

Societe Royale d'Archeologie, Brus- 
sels. 

Societe Royale de Botanique, Brus- 
sels. 

Societe Royale des Sciences, Liege. 

BRAZIL: 

Biblioteca Nacional, Rio de Janeiro. 
Escola Superior de Agricultura e 

Medecina, Veterinaria, Rio de 

Janeiro. 
Instituto Agronomico de Estado, Sao 

Paulo. 
Museu Nacional, Rio de Janeiro. 

CANADA: 

Chief Game Guardian of Sas- 
katchewan, Regina. 

Commission of Conservation, Ottawa. 

Department of Agriculture, Ottawa. 

Department of Agriculture, Victoria. 

Department of Agriculture of 
Ontario, Toronto. 

Department of Marine and Fisher ies, 
Ottawa. 

Department of Mines, Ottawa. 

Department of the Interior, 
Geological Survey, Ottawa. 

Ontario Minister of Education, 
Toronto. 

Provincial Museum, Toronto. 

Provincial Museum, Victoria. 

Royal Canadian Institute, Toronto. 

Royal Society of Canada, Ottawa 

Societe de Geographie, Quebec. 

University of Toronto. 

BULGARIA: 

Musee Ethnographique National, 
Sofia. 






c. Santiago dc 

d For 

rg« »K 

>rth 

- 

potogis' Copen- 

ien. Library. Copen- 



 



Dan*ke K tins ti adusU ium scum. Copen • 
bagen. 
cralogkal 

Forming. Copen - 



BuO ai qu e , Copenha*: 

!)OR: 

a dc : 
: storico canos, Q 

FE! 
Federated V. 

i 

 

-chaeologkal Soa 

*&roaolog>e. Pai 
Mb 

M 

V ■£■■ d'H •• - . Sat :-■ lie, Lyoaa. 
Musee Gonnet. Pa: 

rurette. :  
Paris. 
- d'£tudes Sdesti6ques 

rdka, 



frograph 

- •  

.iences de x 

v»que d 
■c Linnernne. Bordcat 

onale d'Agriculturc. 
\ngers. 

I 

Bayerische Akadetnje d 
• ch. 

Provini 
Brandenburg. Ber 
Dr Dendrologische GeseU- 

". Bonr.-Poppebdc- 
Deutsche Geologiscfae < 



Da 



ft f 

»e und Urge- 



pologie, 
De be Ge- 

i. Bet 

<her I 
Deutsche* Entomologiscbes Institut 

Ber 
Georg August I .t. Gov 

g' 
Geographijche Gesellscfia::. Ham- 
bo rg. 
••;:* Gesellscnaft, Mur. 

Erdkunde, Be- 
Museur olkskunde. Ber 

■eaadttitea Beriia, 

•liothek. Marburg. 

Munich. 

biagaa. 

gisches Museum. Berlin. 

Mu*eu- Hamburg, 

ar- 
shaden. 

Sat ^ische Ge»dl*chaft. H 



 

logiscr- ellschaft 

•rischer Botaniscbcr Ve 

 • 



Jan., i _- 



Annual I 






tin far Erdkunde, Darmstadt. 
Zoologiscbes Museum, Hamburg. 

GREAT BRITAIN: 

Birmingham Natural History and 

Philosophical Soc. 
Br:. and Hove Natural H 

tory and Philosophical Sock 

Brighton. 
Bristol Museum and Gallery. 
British Museum (Natural H. : 

London. 
Cambridge Antiquarian Soc e 
Cambridge Philosophical Soc.- . 
Cambridge Di i ;• Librar 
Cardiff Naturalists Sock* 
Dove Marine Labocata rj CuHer- 

coats. 
Fisheries Board. Edinburgh. 
Geological Society, Edinburgh- 
Geological S - - -v, Edinburgh. 
Ureat Britain Geological Sur 

London. 
Hull Municipal Museum. 
Imperial Bureau of Entomology, 

London. 
Imperial College of Science and 

Technology. London. 
Institute of Oriental Studies London. 
Japan Society of London. 
Lar. . _ .- . . - r 5 ea Fisheries Labora- 
tories, Liverpool. 
Linnean Society of London. 
_ .erpool Biological Soc:- 
London Library. 

Manchester Literary and Philosoph- 
ical Socie: 
Manchester Museum. 
National Museum, Card:: 1 
Natural History and Philosophical 

5 -;iety, Croydon. 
Oxford Univer.-y. if 11 w i— 
Perthshire S :. -:_ : Na : . "- 

Sck Pert 

Royal Anthropological Instifate of 

Great Britain and Ireland, London. 
Royal Botanic Gardens, Edinburgh. 
Royal Botanic C Kew. 

Royal Colonial bstitMtc, London. 
Royal Cornwall F bet rjc Soc 

FaliiMilh 

Royal Geographical Society, London. 

Royal Hor: : _ tnral Society Lob ion. 

Royal Scottish \~ 

Royal Society, London. 

al Society of Arts, London. 

Royal Society of Edinbnrg 

S I London Entomological and 
Natural E - 

Tring Zoological Museum. 

Victoria and Albert Museum. Lon- 
don. 



Wellcome Chemical Research Lab . 

IxHidon. 
Zoologkal Society of London. 

HUNGARY : 

Magyar Termeszettudomanyi Ta- 

----. Budap- ' 
Museum Natdonale Hungaricnm, 

INDIA : 

deal Society, Bombay. 

ricai Survey, Allahabad. 
- ^tological Survey, Bombay. 
Archae olo gical Survey 3a . . 
.-.- . ecological S_ - 

Circle. Patna. 
Archaeological Saraey, rr.ntier 

Circle, Preshawar. 
Archaeological Survey Department, 

Mi kaa 
.-.rdiaeological Survey :f Burma, 

--. .: 
Department of Agriculture, Bon 
Department of Agrk re Ifadn 
Department of Agricaltarc Pusa. 
Geological Sac -; . Calcutta. 
Government. Cab tta 
Governmen: Cinchona Plants: 

Ca atffa 
-' — -.r- '. 
In fian M Calcutta. 

J _ urnal of Indian I :. 
al Indian As sc 

(gift). 

nes Museum and Lit'-.- - ""£*- 

pore. 

Aid aeology H. 

E B . zaai s D ominion s, Hyder- 

ibad 

perintendent of Aid . t ological 
Hindu and Bnddbist 

Monuments. La 
Ur - of Calcutta. 

IRELAND: 
Bdfasl T : : ZbaY. 

Natural History and TTiilii iiifiliii A 

Sock* I drasL 
Royal Irish Academy. Dublin. 

ITALY : 

Accadeana Idk frenze Fisich- - 
Mat nal Nai "es. 

I tankx Milan. 
tnto Geografico de Ag 

No vara. 
Laboratm i_- Z oolug i a Gent 

: Agraria E rtici. 
R Societi Geografica Italiaaa, 

- 
S ~:ieta Italia : pologia e 

z-T ::;_ .-.-.? :t 






Natubal Hisrofti — Ri VI. 



i Italian* d< 
Mi 

Romana i!i A: I 

trail, 

Pi 

li: 

N: 

[ndoatry 
i Coi ernmcot, Taihoku, 

ll Miivniin, . 

( .. Tol 

lmi>erial I'm. 

. 
tanical i 

ty, Tokyo. 

JAVA: 

GtPOOtSChaB TM Kiu.'trt) 

ea Wetenschappen, Bataria. 
Departnsenf of Agriculture, Huiten- 

rf. 
Kn. --.lisch Bureau, Wc h e r ad cm 

lardin Botanique, Buhena . 

Natuurkundigc Vereeniging in 
Nederlandscb-lndie, Wc U >redca. 

II E ' 
Institute- Geologico, Mexi i 

Alratf." Ilex. 

NETHERLANDS: 

K. Akadrmie wn Wetenschappen, 

Amsterdam. 
K lastitntH viKir cic Taal-1 an !-en 
lc van Nederlandtcb 
Indie. The Hague, 
K. Nedertandscfl Aardijkundig 

• chap, Amsterdam. 
Mr ARriculturf, Indu«try 

and Omimerce. The Hague. 
Vl . Landmen \'<>lkf nkunde 

Mantiem Museum "Trim 
Hendrik." Rotterdam. 

- Dicrhundc V c r c c ni gr 

int:. I ri 'en. 

<>Kraj>lmch Museum. 

srium, Leid 

- I and-Tuin-es Boi ca> 
I, Wageningen. 

'. tuurlijke 
len. 

Punedin. 

NEW ZEA1 ' 

Institute and Museum, 
Wcllir 



| riculturr. Welling' 

\ Y : 

:n. 
. '.. r r 

istiania. 
Nyt i  v 

- • r. Chritttai - 
'I r. Muaeona, 

PERU: 

v ' 'I -ma. 

 '. Lima. 

dc ll v -ia», 

I una. 
Institute Histot . Lima. 
iedad ' ><-■ ^r^:,. a de 1 

POLAND: 
Mu r; Polonid I! e Natal «le». 

Warsaw. 

PORTUGAL: 

:?ca Naci<»nal. Li*! 

STAIN: 

legio i1e Pa<aje. Ii '"mar' .. 
•:tiif i<> Catalans (THisI 
v . itural. Harrelona, 
InStitUtO 'iriirral y Trc:. 

Valencia. 
Junta de ("ienci<'< Natural'. - -- 
l"na. 

Laboratorio dc Hi ' nia 

i "la. Valencia. 

afttfCO National de ("in;, 
Naturales. Madrid. 

R. Acadcmta de i ien -« » * 

I'.arce! j 
R. Acadcaasi de Cienrias F.Tactv. 
v - . 'ralrs. J | , 
anoli de Historia 

' ai !nd. 

SWEDEN : 
Botaniska Notiaer, Land. 
K. Biblioteket, Stockboba, 
K. Svenaka Vet« 

khotm. 
K. Yittrrhets Historie ' •ik- 

vi # an ien, Si Ira. 

I unds Unhref h I 

•!ngi 
OCA Im. 

SWITZERLAND: 

ich. 

Bern. 

rhatel. 



""'^s^*** 



<**AN A ' U, «»* 



r 



•« 
5 







w ' 



Jan., 1922. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



57 



Naturforschende Gesellschaft, Bern. 

Naturforschende Gesellschaft, 
Zurich. 

Ostschweizerische Geograph - Com- 
mercielle Gesellschaft, St. Gallen. 

Schweizerische Naturforschende Ge- 
sellschaft, Bern. 

Societe de Physique et Histoire 
Naturelle, Geneva. 

Societe Entomologique, Bern. 

Societe Fribourgeoise des Sciences 
Naturelles, Fribourg. 

URUGUAY : 

Archivo General Administravo, 
Montevideo (gift). 

Museo de Historia Natural, Monte- 
video. 

WEST INDIES: 

Academia Nacional de Artes y 

Letras, Havana. 
Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Porto Rico. 
Biblioteca Nacional. Havana. 
Imperial Department of Agriculture, 

Barbados. 
Trinidad and Tobago Department of 

Agriculture, Port of Spain. 
Universidad de Habana. 

Carpenter, G. H., Dublin. 
Chodat, R., Geneva. 
Chrostowski, Tadensz, Warsaw. 
Dabbene, Roberto, Buenos Aires. 
Dunod, H., Paris. 
Gamble, J. S., London (gift). 
Gennep, Arnold van, Paris. 
Grandidier, M. G., Paris. 
Hartland, E. Sydney, Gloucester, 

England. 
Hommel, Fritz, Munich (gift). 
Huard, V. A., Quebec. 
Janet, Charles, Paris. 
Malinowski, Bronislaw. 
Martelli, U., Florence. 
Pospisil, Frantisek, Warsaw. 
Preuss, K., Berlin. 
Rivet, P., Paris. 
Rutot, A., Brussels. 
Santos, Jose Dos, Porto (gift). 
Schlaginhaufen, Otto, Zurich (gift). 
Schmidt, W., Modling. 
Strom, Kaare Miinster, Christiania 

(gift). 
Vischer, Wilhelm, Basel (gift). 
Zimanyi, Karoly, Budapest. 

ALABAMA: 

Agriculture Experiment Station, 
' Auburn. 
Alabama Geological Survey, 
University. 



Alabama University of Natural 

History, University. 
Anthropological Society, 

Montgomery. 
Department of Game and Fish, 

Montgomery. 

ARIZONA: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Tucson. 
University of Arizona, Tucson. 

CALIFORNIA: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Berkeley. 

California Academy of Sciences, San 
Francisco. 

Cooper Ornithological Club, Holly- 
wood. 

Fish and Game Commission, San 
Francisco. 

Leland Stanford Junior University, 
Stanford University. 

Pomona College, Claremont. 

San Diego Society of Natural 
History. 

Scripps Institution of Biological 
Research, La Jolla. 

Southwest Museum, Los Angeles. 

State Board of Forestry, Sacra- 
mento. 

State Mining Bureau, Sacramento. 

University of California, Berkeley. 

COLORADO : 

Bureau of Mines, Denver. 

Colorado College, Colorado Springs. 

Colorado Museum of Natural His- 
tory, Denver. 

Geological Survey, Boulder. 

State Historical and Natural History 
Society, Denver. 

CONNECTICUT: 
Agricultural Experiment Station, 

New Haven. 
American Oriental Society, New 

Haven. 
Connecticut Academy of Arts and 

Sciences, New Haven. 
Forestry Association. Hartford. 
Hartford Public Library. 
Peabody Museum, New Haven. 
State Geological and Natural History 

Survey, New Haven. 
Wesleyan University, MiddJetown. 
Yale University, New Haven. 

DELAWARE: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Newark. 

Hercules Powder Company, Wil- 
mington. 






•I 












AMI 

um, 
H 
Boa 

tUT'- 

Hawaiian 
On 

lulu 
\lic 

w. 

ILUN< 

Agricultural 



.".iral I 

. .. 

Hardwood 

ice. 

- 

ra t'u tOO. 

any, 

ol 
>{ Agriculture, 

.1 Librai r \<\ 

 

 

Uallarh 

[ANA 

:nmt 






In- 



 

- 

! Agriculture. Tov 

Agricultural nent 

;:ie. 

•logy a- 

rural -ncnt 

 II 



Tuits i 



 



-tte. 
tr« Da 



MAIN! 

tural 

l>- 

(land 1 

MA; M> 

tural Experiment Stat 

.Tt l-rcc Library, Bahur. 

 

Itural Experiment 

* 

ton I 

 

•n 
Har\a- wn- 

• "• . ' 
-\ar<l 

-  

itc 

 



Jan., 1922. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



59 



Springfield Natural History Museum. 

Tufts College. 

Williams College, Williamstown. 

MICHIGAN : 

Academy of Sciences, Ann Arbor. 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Agricultural College. 

Detroit Institute of Art. 

Geological and Natural History 
Survey, Lansing. 

Grand Rapids Public Library. 

Michigan College of Mines, Hough- 
ton. 

Michigan State Library, Lansing. 

State Board of Agriculture, Lansing. 

State Board of Library Commissions, 
Lansing. 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. 

MINNESOTA: 
Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Saint Paul. 
Minneapolis Institute of Arts. 
Minnesota Historical Society, Saint 

Paul. 
State Entomologist, Saint Paul. 
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. 

MISSISSIPPI: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Agricultural College. 

State Geological Survey, Jackson 
(gift). 
MISSOURI: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Columbia. 

City Art Museum, Saint Louis. 

Missouri Botanical Garden, Saint 
Louis. 

Missouri Historical Society, Colum- 
bia. 

Saint Louis Academy of Sciences. 

Saint Louis Public Library. 

Saint Louis University. 

Washington University, Saint Louis. 

MONTANA: 

State Forester, Helena (gift). 
University of Montana, Missoula. 

NEBRASKA : 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Lincoln. 
Geological Survey, Lincoln. 
University of Nebraska, Lincoln. 

NEVADA : 
Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Carson City. 
NEW JERSEY: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Trenton. 



Department of Conservation and 

Development, Trenton. 
Department of Plant Pathology, 

Trenton. 
Geological Survey, Trenton. 
Newark Museums Association. 
Princeton University. 
Stevens Institute, Hoboken. 

NEW MEXICO : 

New Mexico Historical Society, 

Santa Fe. 
New Mexico Museum, Santa Fe. 

NEW YORK: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Geneva. 

American Academy in Rome, New 
York City. 

American Geographical Society, New 
York City. 

American Institute of Mining En- 
gineers, New York City. 

American Museum of Natural 
History, New York City. 

Brooklyn Botanic Garden. 

Brooklyn Institute of Arts and 
Sciences. 

Carnegie Foundation for the Ad- 
vancement of Teaching, New York 
City (gift). 

Conservation Commission, Albany. 

Cooper Union for the Advancement 
of Science and Art, New York 
City. 

Cornell University, Ithaca. 

Forest and Stream Publishing Com- 
pany, New York City. 

Inter-American Magazine, New 
York City (gift). 

Japan Society, New York City. 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New 
York City. 

Museum of the American Indian, 
New York City. 

New York Academy of Sciences, 
New York City. 

New York Botanical Garden, New 
York City. 

New York Historical Society, New 
York City. 

New York Times, New York City, 

(gift.) 
Pratt Institute Free Library, New 

York City. 
Public Library, New York City. 
Rockefeller Foundation, New York 

City. 
State College of Forestry, Syracuse. 
State Library, Albany. 
State Museum, Albany. 
Staten Island Institute of Arts and 






it of Natvb/ VI. 



I 

Nrw 
. - Nrw 

v - 
. - 

Kill « rJtOUNAl 

. Mitchell S ci ca tH k 
il : H 

and i 

;:ill DAK -a 

- 



i 



- 



<»h: 

• 

tural ' -init 

W 

H Muttum Associat 
- i of Art. 
fi University, ' - te. 

State A: - - I Historical 

:-T>bu». 

tte Unrvc * oluabM. 

tnnati. 
Western Reserve Historical S<-.et>. 

- - - 
a Ornithological Ouh, ()Wr- 

l.n. 

OKLAHOMA] 

.. ral Survey, Norman. 

.. Historical Society, Okla- 
homa I 

OREGON i 

ltur»l Experiment Station, 
• slfis. 

l_'nivernt> 1 ugene. 

] . NNSVLVANIA: 

-' 
 - 
Ai F.ngineering Societies 

ia. 

' urk'h. 

• h. 
:ntv I: of 

Philadelphia. 

•ern 

-«h. 

 



Ifacbcth- 

4 .jarian 

-olemy i 

I •' 

Jk 

Ivania Mu cum, 
- 

Science, 
Phtladerphii 

- 

PHIUPPIN1 

Ma 
DeportaeM <>i Agriculture, Manila. 
Department of Interior. Bureau 

«-. Manila. 

RHODE ISLAM] 

Park Museum. I 

imi CAROLINA] 
v ariettas U i m. 

SOUTH DAKOTA] 

Agricultural lent 

. 
pea - Natural History 

. - n. 

1 taJu :a S< Mines, 

Kaj.id Ctl 

TEXAS 

Agricultural Fxperiment Station, 
,.' 

- ety of San Antonjo. 
Bty of Texas. Austin. 

• T: 
• •e Geologist, Burling: 

VIRGINIA: 

n • ' 
v.: 

Vil ' K'ical 

;lle. 

WASH 

Historical 

American Mining C< ngi 
Ari i has sad or. 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
URBAN* 




s 










-> 









Jan., 1922. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



61 



Carnegie Institution of Washington. 
Library of Congress. 
National Academy of Sciences. 
National Education Association 

(Rift). 
National Zoological Park. 
Pan American Union. 
United States Government. 

WISCONSIN: 

Wisconsin Experiment Station, 

Madison. 
Beloit College. 
Geological and Natural History 

Survey, Madison. 
University of Wisconsin, Madison. 

Ayer, Edward E., Chicago (gift). 

Baker, Frank C, Urbana. 

Barnes, William, Decatur. 

Bascom, Florence, Bryn Mawr (gift). 

Brandegee. Townsend S., Berkeley. 

Britton, Nathaniel L., New York. 

Bush, Benjamin F., (gift). 

Clarke, Thomas H., Cambridge (gift). 

Davies, D. C, Chicago (gift). 

Farwell, Oliver A., Detroit (gift). 

Field, Richard M., Jamaica Plain 

(gift). 
Field, Stanley, Chicago (gift). 
Gerhard, W. J., Chicago (gift). 
Hankinson, T. L., Ypsilanti (gift). 



Hanson, Herbert C, (gift). 

Hoyt, F. W., New York (gift). 

Hubbs, Carl L., Ann Arbor (gift). 

Jones, L. R., Madison. 

Kendall. William C, Washington, D.C. 

Laufer, Berthold, Chicago (gift). 

Manning, Warren H., North Bellerica 

(gift). 
Millspaugh, Charles F., Chicago. 
Morse, Edward S., Salem. 
Osborn, Henry Fairfield, New York 

City. 
Osgood, Wilfred H., Chicago (gift). 
Parshley, H. M., Northampton. 
Pennell, Francis W., New York City. 
Penrose, R. A. F., Philadelphia. 
Rostovtzeff, M., Madison. 
Rumsey, Winnie, Lake Forest (gift). 
Schmidt, Karl P., New York City 

(gift). 
Small, John K, New York City (gift). 
Speck, Frank G., Philadelphia (gift). 
Springer, Frank, Las Vegas. 
Starr, Frederick, Chicago. 
Todd, W. E. Clyde, Pittsburgh. 
Tompkins-Kiel Marble Company, New 

York City (gift). 
Trelease, William, Urbana. 
Woods, George, Chicago (gift). 



VI 



\KI 1< II - OF IN< ORPORA1 h 



STA1 II I I 

William H 

in the 

•1 the r -he 

■. 

ing Cbt 

I William M. Hinri 

! in me l>v law, «lo hcr> 
. I U i II 

!rr the 
/'i 1 here- to be affixed the 

ember. 
. ht hun | ol the 

tales the one hundi ith. 

w H H1NH 



• WII I IAN! II. HINfi 

U> tl f the Ui 

i 

. >«! all acl« 
amc- . an<l that for the pur; n we hei 

• 
. ]h. : IAN V. ' of 

< H 

h it i^ for the accumulation and d 

.4m! the il1u»- 

Ihr T- 

whom ire -«r. 

4 T (I a» ti 

• 



Jan., 1922. Annual Report of the Director. 63 

Edward E. Aver, Charles B. Farwell, George E. Adams, George R. Davis, 
Charles L. Hutchinson, Daniel H. Burnham, John A. Roche, M. C. Bullock, 
Emil G. Hir»ch, James W. Ellsworth, Allison V. Armour, O. F. Aldis, Edwin 
Walker, John C. Black and Frank W. Gunsaulus. 

5. The location of the Museum is in the City of Chicago, County of Cook, 
and State of Illinois. 

(Signed), 

George E. Adams, C. B. Farwell, Sidney C. Eastman, F. W. Putnam. Robert 
McCurdy, Andrew Peterson, L. J. Gage, Charles L. Hutchinson, Ebenezer 
Buckingham, Andrew McNally, Edward E. Ayer, John M. Clark, Herman H. 
Kohlsaat, George Schneider, Henry H. Getty, William R. Harper, Franklin H. 
Head, E. G. Keith, J. Irving Pearce, Azel F. Hatch, Henry Wade Rogers, 
Thomas B. Bryan, L. Z. Leiter, A. C. Bartlett, A. A. Sprague, A. C. McClurg, 
James W. Scott, Geo. F. Bissell, John R. Walsh, Chas. Fitzsimmons, John A. 
Roche, E. B. McCagg, Owen F. Aldis. Ferdinand W. Peck, James H. Dole, 
Joseph Stockton, Edward B. Butler, John McConnell, R. A. Waller, H. C. 
Chatfield-Taylor, A. Crawford, Wm. Sooy Smith, P. S. Peterson, John C. 
Black, Jno. J. Mitchell, C. F. Gunther, George R. Davis, Stephen A. Forbes, 
Robert W. Patterson, Jr., M. C. Bullock, Edwin Walker, George M. Pullman, 
William E. Curtis, James W. Ellsworth, William E. Hale, Wm. T. Baker, 
Martin A. Ryerson, Huntington W. Jackson, N. B. Ream, Norman Williams, 
Melville E. Stone, Bryan Lathrop, Eliphalet W. Blatchford, Philip D. Armour. 

State of Illinois 

ss 
Cook County 

I, G. R. Mitchell, a Notary Public in and for said County, do hereby 

certify that the foregoing petitioners personally appeared before me and 

acknowledged severally that they signed the foregoing petition as their free and 

voluntary act for the uses and purposes therein set forth. 

Given under my hand and notarial seal this 14th day of September, 1893. 

G. R. MITCHELL, 

[Seal] Notary Public, Cook County, III. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 

Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the corporate members held 
the 25th day of June, 1894, the name of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM was 
changed to FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. A certificate to this effect was 
filed June 26, 1894, in the office of the Secretary of State for Illinois. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 

Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the corporate members held 
the 8th day of November, 1905, the name of the FIELD COLUMBIAN 
MUSEUM was changed to FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
A certificate to this effect was filed November 10, 1905, in the office of the 
Secretary of State for Illinois. 

CHANGE IN ARTICLE 3. 

Pursuant to a resolution at a meeting of the corporate members held the 
10th day of May, 1920, the management of FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL 
HISTORY shall be invested in a Board of Twenty-one (21) Trustees, who 
shall be elected in such manner and for such time and term of office as may 
be provided for by the By-Laws. A certificate to this effect was filed May 21, 
1920, in the office of the Secretary of State for Illinois. 



History- VI 



AMENDED BY-LAW - 



• 



A • . 

u MNI, 

r i. 11 •  • - 

Mrm' us taming Mem- 
\nmul ' rn 

<<-n« umH tn 

the article* • tion. and of such -ill be i 

time to time by the Board of Tm it» meetings, upon the recotn- 

mer ch person 

•i shall, within i lavs fr.>m the ado; 

By-Law*, and ; ball. * 

ninety days of their  •■ • • 

rs becomir . 
shall !*• exempt from dtM uial meetings 

rid at the same \ ne day that 

the annual nirrling <>f th- Trustees is held 

rary Mem ng 

emine: OKC, and 01 n unanimous 

tl -rnpt from all 
Patron* shall be choaea bj the Board up en Lai 

the m anions persons who have rendered eminent 

am. I '1 l>e exempt from all 

«i as | 

'• ..,-.. 

• e time, shall. upon the utunimoi: •rd. 

ie a life Member. Life Meml-ers shall be exempt from all due*, and shall 
. all the prisilr. rum that are acceded to mem- 

l-ers of th' 

:m the sum 
one hundred (,$ ars, at any one time, shall upon the unanimous v. | 

the Boar ne an Ass.. ^hall be en" ' 

to: t admitting merr bd - I members - ily. including non-resident 

honr- . 

let f the Museum, provided 

-quested in advance; and admi membership and 

g party t<> all fcl CJ tad Museum functions I rung. 

sustaining Mem f such persons as are »ele< 

from tir -he Board tees a? - I its meetings, and who 

shall pay an annual fer ..f tv. - - * ithin thirty 

after r thin thirty days after M h recurring annual 

This Sustaining Mcmbr- titles the member |  -«■ admissior 

the member i any day a admission coupons. 



: 







3 I 






Jan., 1922. Annual Report of the Director. 65 

which may be used by any one, the Annual Report and such other Museum 
documents or publications as may be requested in writing. When a Sustaining 
Member has paid the annual fee of $25.00 for six years, such member shall 
be entitled to become an Associate Member. 

Section 8. Annual Members shall consist of such persons as are selected 
from time to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, and who 
shall pay an annual fee of ten ($10.00) dollars, payable within thirty days 
after each recurring annual date. An Annual Membership shall entitle the 
member to a card of admission for the member and family during all hours 
when the Museum is open to the public, and free admission for the member 
and family to all Museum lectures or entertainments. This membership will 
also entitle the holder to the courtesies of the membership privileges of every 
Museum of note in the United States and Canada, so long as the existing sys- 
tem of cooperative interchange of membership tickets shall be maintained, 
including tickets for any lectures given under the auspices of any of the 
Museums during a visit to the cities in which the cooperative museums are 
located. 

ARTICLE II. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

Section i. The Board of Trustees shall consist of twenty-one members. 
The respective members of the Board now in office, and those who shall here- 
after be elected, shall hold office during life. Vacancies occurring in the Board 
shall be filled at a regular meeting of the Board, upon the nomination of the 
Executive Committee made at a preceding regular meeting of the Board, by a 
majority vote of the members of the Board present. 

Section 2. Regular meetings of the Board shall be held monthly. Special 
meetings may be called at any time by the President, and shall be called by 
the Secretary upon the written request of three Trustees. Five Trustees shall 
constitute a quorum, except for the election of officers or the adoption of the 
Annual Budget, when seven Trustees shall be required, but meetings may be 
adjourned by any less number from day to day, or to a day fixed, previous 
to the next regular meeting. 

Section 3. Reasonable written notice, designating the time and place of 
holding meetings, shall be given by the Secretary. 

ARTICLE III. 

HONORARY TRUSTEES. 

Section i. As a mark of respect, and in appreciation of services performed 
for the Institution, those Trustees who by reason of inability, on account of 
change of residence, or for other cause or from indisposition to serve longer 
in such capacity shall resign their place upon the Board, may be elected, by a 
majority of those present at any regular meeting of the Board, an Honorary 
Trustee for life. Such Honorary Trustee will receive notice of all meetings 
of the Board of Trustees, whether regular or special, and will be expected to be 
present at all such meetings and participate in the deliberations thereof, but an 
Honorary Trustee shall not have the right to vote. 

ARTICLE IV. 

OFFICERS. 

Section i. The officers shall be a President, a First Vice-President, a 
Second Vice-President, a Third Vice-President, a Secretary, an Assistant Secre- 
tary and a Treasurer. They shall be chosen by ballot by the Board of Trustees, 
a majority of those present and voting being necessary to elect. The President, 



• ' ' KM H \ I 

r Thii 

long the n> thr Board of I 

thr etc ill tvr ! the third Monday of Jaana 

-hall l>r callr<! Ig. 

The offi »c- 

. r ...it it.- •> ••- ! *n ! |ual fied but an) " • ei ma) be : r "- vt ! ■»• lag rojpdtt 
mr two-third* of all thl mfmU 

the Board Vacancies in H any merit; 

.11 prrf m .  ■" 'ain 

heir rr^jx-ilur off I*- pr^ ,jr 

n lime to tim« 

\ 

I hr Tf ' <if the fu I the ( 

. onS 
upon a drawn h> the 

the • . ::ird by the cha 

man of th ind in I the Prr 

thr \ • warrant shall be 

With a regularly pi hrr. Rising th<- 

itmn t! nditurr. and v 

It shall he no part of thr the 

that thr warrant-, ha. I h such 

*nd munin- 

atkn shall Ix- pitied in the i mpany ago to 

b) thr Hoard of Tr which Trust Company shall 

thr ir. d prin M the me due. and . 

m to thr Treasurer, tereimfter | i Trust Comp- 

thall all->» l Idhrcf any or all MCttril :nunim<- 

- joint order 0( d I, namely 1 hr of thr 

\ with the Chairman, of the Yicr-Chairmrn. of 

- of the Museum 
The Trrasurrr shall Rive bond in such amount, and with %uch 
U *hall be appr -of Trustr. 

i All voucher* rxecut nent of lia rrvcurrtd in 

the admu \uditor. 

« member of the Fixe* 
Ml TO hires for I .nstruc* 

stt t thr Museum building, or bti shall l>r verified by the v 

4411 ,.mrnt In thr Chairman of the Bui' v 

•'•-. thr investments of thr I 
.sith thr endowment funds of the Corporation, »hall 
! b> thr Audit | the Chairman of the 

,-ns Tr 
. w Hi rtensioa 

Thr bank shall n  warrants drawn \<\ the Difl 

f the D 
.  . • . - urmaa of I 

dent, r signed v e-Pn 

• m 001 with a rrRul- 

gisiu. 
the expen I by the Auditor, thr Dirr 



Jan., 1922. Annual Report of the Director. 67 

member of the Executive Committee. It shall be no part of the duties of the 
said Custodian to see that the warrants have been issued in conformity with 
such vouchers. 

ARTICLE VI. 

THE DIRECTOR 

Section i. The Board of Trustees shall elect a Director of the Museum, 
who shall remain in office until his successor shall be elected. He shall have im- 
mediate charge and supervision of the Museum, and shall control the operations 
of the Institution, subject to the authority of the Board of Trustees and its 
Committees. The Director shall be the official medium of communication be- 
tween the Board, or its Committees, and the scientific staff and maintenance 
force. 

Section 2. There shall be fowr scientific departments of the Museum — 
Anthropology, Botany, Geology and Zoology; each under the charge of a 
Curator, subject to the authority of the Director. The Curators shall be ap- 
pointed by the Board upon the recommendation of the Director, and shall 
serve during the pleasure of the Board. Subordinate staff officers in the 
scientific departments shall be appointed and removed by the Director upon 
the recommendation of the Curators of the respective Departments. The 
Director shall have authority to employ and remove all other employees of the 
Museum. 

Section 3. The Director shall make report to the Board at each regular 
meeting, recounting the operations of the Museum for the previous month. At 
the Annual Meeting, the Director shall make an Annual Report, reviewing 
the work for the previous year, which Annual Report shall be published in 
pamphlet form for the information of the Trustees and Members, and for free 
distribution in such number as the Board may direct. 

ARTICLE VII. 

AUDITOR 

Section i. The Board shall appoint an Auditor, who shall hold his office 
during the pleasure of the Board. He shall keep proper books of account, setting 
forth the financial condition and transactions of the Corporation, and of the 
Museum, and report thereon at each regular meeting, and at such other times 
as may be required by the Board. He shall certify to the correctness of all 
vouchers for the expenditure of the money of the Corporation. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

COMMITTEES. 

Section I. There shall be five Committees, as follows: Finance, Building, 
Auditing, Pension and Executive. 

Section 2. The Finance Committee shall consist of five members, the 
Auditing and Pension Committees shall each consist of three members, and the 
Building Committee shall consist of five members. All members of these four 
Committees shall be elected by ballot by the Board at the Annual Meeting, and 
shall hold office for one year, and until their successors are elected and quali- 
fied. In electing the members of these Committees, the Board shall designate 
the Chairman and Vice-Chairman by the order in which the members are 
named in the respective Committee; the first member named shall be Chair- 
man, the second named the Vice-Chairman, and the third named, Second Vice- 
chairman, succession to the Chairmanship being in this order in the event of 
the absence or disability of the Chairman. 

Section 3. The Executive Committee shall consist of the President of the 



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Jan., 1922. Annual Report of the Director. 69 

ARTICLE X. 

Section i. Whenever the word "Museum" is employed in the By-Laws of 
the Corporation, it shall be taken to mean the building in which the Museum as 
an Institution is located and operated, the material exhibited, the material in 
study collections, or in storage, furniture, fixtures, cases, tools, records, books, 
and all appurtenances of the Institution and the workings, researches, installa- 
tions, expenditures, field work, laboratories, library, publications, lecture courses, 
and all scientific and maintenance activities. 

Section 2. These By-Laws may be amended at any regular meeting of the 
Board of Trustees by a two-thirds vote of all the members present, provided 
the amendment shall have been proposed at a preceding regular meeting. 






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7i 



CORPORATE MEMBERS. 



ALDIS, OWEN F. 
ARMOUR. ALLISON V. 
AVER, EDWARD E. 

BARTLETT, A. C. 
BLAIR, WATSON F. 
BORDEN, JOHN 
BUTLER, EDWARD B. 
BYRAM, HARRY E. 

CHALMERS, W. J. 
CHATFIELD-TAYLOR. H. C. 
COLLINS, ALFRED M. 
CRANE, Jr., RICHARD T. 

DAY, LEE GARNETT 

EASTMAN, SIDNEY C 
ELLSWORTH, JAMES W. 

FIELD, MARSHALL 
FIELD, STANLEY 

GAGE, LYMAN J. 
GRAHAM. ERNEST R. 

HARRIS. ALBERT W. 
HUTCHINSON, CHARLES L. 



JONES, ARTHUR B. 

KEEP, CHAUNCEY 
KENNEDY, VERNON SHAW 
KOHLSAAT, HERMAN H. 

McCORMICK, CYRUS H. 
MANIERRE, GEORGE 
MARKHAM, CHARLES H. 
MILLER, JOHN S. 
MITCHELL, JOHN J. 

PAYNE, JOHN BARTON 
PECK, FERDINAND W. 
PORTER, GEORGE F. 

RYERSON, MARTIN A. 

SARGENT, HOMER E. 
SIMPSON, JAMES 
SMITH, SOLOMON A. 
SMITH, WILLARD A. 
S PRAGUE, ALBERT A. 
STONE, MELVILLE E. 

WILSON, JOHN P. 
WRIGLEY, Jr., WILLIAM 



DECEASED IQ21 

GUNSAULUS, FRANK W. 
SKIFF, FREDERICK J. V. 






VI. 



LIFE MEMBERS 



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Jan., 1922. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



73 



HUTCHINS, JAMES C. 
HUTCHINSON, C. L. 

INSULL, SAMUF.L 

TELKE. JOHN F. 

JOHNSON, MRS. ELIZABETH 

AYER 
TOHNSON, FRANK S. 
JONES, ARTHUR B. 
JONES, DAVID B. 
JONES, THOMAS D. 

KEEP, CHAUNCEY 

KELLER, THEODORE C. 

KELLEY, WILLIAM V. 

KING, FRANCIS 

KING, JAMES G. 

KIRK, WALTER RADCLIFFE 

LAMONT, ROBERT P. 
LAWSON, VICTOR F. 
LEHMANN, E. T. 
LEONARD, CLIFFORD M. 
LOGAN, SPENCER H. 
LORD, JOHN B. 
LOWDEN, FRANK O. 
LYTTON, HENRY C. 

McCORMICK, MRS. 

Mccormick, cyrus h. 

McCORMICK, HAROLD F. 
McELWEE, ROBERT H. 
McKINLAY, JOHN 
McKINLOCK, GEORGE 

alexander 
Mclaughlin, frederic 
Mclaughlin, geo. d. 
Mclennan, d. r. 
mcwilliams, lafayette, 

MacVEAGH, FRANKLIN 
MARK, CLAYTON 
MARTIN, WILLIAM P. 
MASON, WILLIAM S. 
MINER, W. H. 
MITCHELL, JOHN J. 
MOORE, EDWARD S. 
MORSE, Jr., CHARLES H. 
MORTON, JOY 
MORTON, MARK 
MUNROE, CHARLES A. 

NATHAN, ADOLPH 
NEWELL, A. B. 

ORR, ROBERT M. 

PALMER, HONORE 
PALMER. POTTER 



PAM, MAX 
PATTEN, HENRY J. 
PAYNE, JOHN BARTON 
PEABODY, AUGUSTUS S. 
PEABODY, FRANCIS S. 
P1EZ, CHARLES 
PINKERTON, WILLIAM A. 
PORTER, FRANK WINSLOW 
PORTER, GEORGE F. 
PORTER, H. H. 

RAWSON, FREDERICK H. 
REAM, MRS. CAROLINE P. 
REVELL, ALEXANDER H. 
REYNOLDS, GEORGE M. 
ROBINSON, THEODORE W. 
ROSENWALD, JULIUS 
RUNNELLS, CLIVE 
RUNNELLS, TOHN S. 
RUSSELL, EDMUND A. 
RUSSELL. EDWARD P. 
RYERSON, MRS. CARRIE H. 
RYERSON, EDWARD L. 
RYERSON, MARTIN A. 

SCHWEPPE, CHARLES H. 
SCOTT, GEORGE E. 
SCOTT. JOHN W. 
SHAFFER, JOHN C. 
SHEDD, JOHN G. 
SIMPSON, TAMES 
SMITH. ALEXANDER 
SMITH, ORSON 
SMITH, SOLOMON A. 
SPOOR. JOHN A. 
SPRAGUE, ALBERT A. 
STEWART, ROBERT W. 
STOUT. FRANK D. 
STRAWN, SILAS H. 
STUART, ROBERT 
STURGES, GEORGE 
SUNNY, B. E. 
SWIFT, CHARLES H. 
SWIFT, EDWARD F. 
SWIFT, Jr., G. F. 
SWIFT, LOUIS F. 

THORNE, CHARLES H. 
THORNE. ROBERT J. 

UPHAM. FREDERIC W. 

VEATCH. GEORGE L. 
VILES, LAWRENCE M. 

WETMORE, FRANK O. 
WILLARD. ALONZO J. 
WILLITS. WARD W. 
WHEELER, CHARLES P. 






Vol. VI 





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Jan., 1922. Annual Report of the Director. 



75 



ANNUAL MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, CYRUS H. 
ADAMS, MILWARD 
ARMOUR, GEORGE A. 

BAILEY, EDWARD P. 
BELDEN, JOSEPH G. 
BOAL, CHARLES T. 
BURLEY, CLARENCE A. 

COMSTOCK, WILLIAM C. 
CUMMINGS, E. A. 
CURTIS. FRANCES H. 

EISENDRATH, W. N. 

FIELD, HENRY 
FRANK, HENRY L. 
FULLER, O. F. 

GLESSNER, J. J. 
GREY, CHARLES F. 
GURLEY, W. W. 

HITCHCOCK. R. M. 
HOLT, GEORGE H. 
HYRNEWETSKY, STEPHEN 

JENKINS, GEORGE H. 
JONES, J. S. 

LAMB, FRANK H. 
LINCOLN, ROBERT T. 
LINN. W. R. 
LOGAN. F. G. 



McCREA, W. S. 
MAGEE, HENRY W. 
MANSURE, E. L. 
MAYER, LEVY 
MEYER, MRS, M. A. 
MOORE. N. G. 
MULLIKEN, A. H. 

NOLAN, JOHN H. 

PALMER, PERCIVAL B. 
PARKER, FRANCIS W. 
PEARSON, MRS. EUGENE H. 

RIPLEY, MRS. E. P. 
ROSENFELD, MRS. MAURICE 

 

SCHMIDT. DR. O. L. 
SCHWARTZ, G. A. 
SHORTALL, JOHN L. 
SKINNER, THE MISSES 
SOPER, JAMES P. 
SPENCE, MRS. ELIZABETH E. 
STOCKTON, JOHN T. 

THROOP, GEORGE ENOS 

WACKER. CHARLES H. 
WALKER, JAMES R. 
WALLER, EDWARD C. 
WHITEHEAD, W. M. 
WILSON, MRS. E. CRANE 
WILSON, M. H. 
WORCESTER, MRS. CHARLES H. 



DECEASED Ip2I 

PEARSON, EUGENE H. 
UIHLEIN, EDWARD G. 



FHE LIBRARY Of IHt 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 



II 



III 









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