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Full text of "Annual report of the Director to the Board of Trustees for the year ..."

THE UNIVERSITY 

OF ILLINOIS 

LIBRARY 

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CENTRAL CIRCUIATION BOOKSTACKS 

SS™ '^rging this material is re 

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TO RENEW CAU TELEPHONE CENIEH. » M . m 





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FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XVII. 




ARTHUR B. JONES. 

MEMBER OF THE AUDITING COMMITTEE SINCE JANUARY 1894. 

MEMBER OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE SINCE JANUARY 1907. 



Field Museum of Natural History. 

Publication 213. 

Report Series. Vol. VI, No. 2. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 



to the 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 1922. 




1923 



Chicago, U. S. A. 
January, 1923. 



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BEQUESTS 

Bequests to Field Museum of Natural History may be made in 
securities, money, books or collections. For those desirous of making 
bequests to the Museum, the following- form is suggested : 

FORM OF BEQUEST 

I do hereby give and bequeath to "Field Museum of Natural 
History" of the City of Chicago, State of Illinois, - — 



Cash Contributions made within the taxable 
year to Field Museum of Natural History to an 
amount not in excess of 15% of the tax payer's 
net income are allowable as deductions in com- 
puting net income under the Revenue Laiv. 



CONTENTS 



Board of Trustees 82 

Officers and Committees 83 

Staff of Museum 84 

Report of the Director 85 

Maintenance 9 1 

Publications 9 1 

Library 92 

Cataloguing, Inventorying, and Labeling 94 

Accessions 97 

Expeditions and Field Work 106 

Installation and Permanent Improvement 115 

The N. W. Harris Public School Extension 127 

Printing, Photography and Photogravure 129 

Attendance 130 

Balance Sheet 13 1 

List of Accessions 132 

Department of Anthropology 132 

Department of Botany 134 

Department of Geology 135 

Department of Zoology 137 

The Library 140 

Articles of Incorporation 150 

Amended By-Laws 1 52 

List of Honorary Members and Patrons 158 

List of Corporate Members 159 

List of Life Members 160 

List of Annual Members 163 



82 



Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Edward E. Ayer. 
Watson F. Blair. 
John Borden. 
Harry E. Byram. 
William J. Chalmers. 
Richard T. Crane, Jr. 
D. C. Davies. 
Marshall Field. 
Stanley Field. 
Ernest R. Graham. 



Albert W. Harris. 
Arthur B. Jones. 
Chauncey Keep. 
Cyrus H. McCormick. 
George Manierre. 
Martin A. Ryerson. 
James Simpson. 
Solomon A. Smith. 
Albert A. Sprague. 
William Wrigley, Jr. 



HONORARY TRUSTEE 
Owen F. Aldis. 



[an., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 83 



OFFICERS 

Stanley Field, President. 

Martin A. Ryerson, First Vice-President. 

Watson F. Blair, Second Vice-President. 

Albert A. Sprague, Third Vice-President. 
D. C. Davies, Secretary. 

George Manierre, Assistant Secretary. 
Solomon A. Smith, Treasurer. 

COMMITTEES 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Stanley Field. Albert A. Sprague. 

Watson F. Blair. Edward E. Ayer. 

William J. Chalmers. Marshall Field. 

Arthur B. Jones. John Borden. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Watson F. Blair. Arthur B. Jones. 

Martin A. Ryerson. Chauncey Keep. 

Albert W. Harris. 

BUILDING COMMITTEE 

William J. Chalmers. Cyrus Ff. McCormick. 

William Wrigley, Jr. Albert A. Sprague. 

Ernest R. Graham. 

AUDITING COMMITTEE 

Arthur B. Jones. George Manierre. 

William Wrigley, Jr. 

pension committee 
Albert A. Sprague. Solomon A. Smith. 

James Simpson. 



84 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

ADMINISTRATIVE AND SCIENTIFIC 
STAFF OF THE MUSEUM 

DIRECTOR 
D. C. Davies 

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY 

Berthold Laufer, Curator 

Assistant Curators 
Charles L. Owen — Archaeology 
Fay-Cooper Cole — Malayan Ethnology 
Albert B. Lewis — African and Melanesian Ethnology 
J. Alden Mason — Mexican and South American Archaeology 
Helen C. Gunsaulus — Japanese Ethnology 
Ralph Linton — North American Ethnology 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY 

Charles F. Millspaugh, Curator 

B. E. Dahlgren, Associate Curator — Economic Botany 

Assistant Curator 
J. Francis Macbride — Taxonomy 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY 

O. C. Farrington, Curator 

Henry W. Nichols, Associate Curator 

Elmer S. Riggs, Associate Curator of Paleontology 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 

Wilfred H. Osgood, Curator 

William J. Gerhard, Associate Curator of Insects 

C. E. Hellmayr, Associate Curator of Birds 

Assistant Curators 
Edmond N. Gueret — Osteology 
R. Magoon Barnes — Oology 
Alfred C. Weed — Fishes 
Edmund Heller — Mammals 
John T. Zimmer — Birds 
Karl P. Schmidt — Reptiles and Amphibians 

Division of Taxidermy 
Julius Friesser, in charge 

DEPARTMENT OF THE N. W. HARRIS PUBLIC SCHOOL EXTENSION 

S. C. Simms, Curator 

THE LIBRARY 

Elsie Lippincott, Librarian 

Emily M. Wilcoxson, Assistant Librarian 

RECORDER GUIDE LECTURER AUDITOR 

H. F. Ditzel Dorothy A. Roberts Benj. Bridge 

SECTION OF PRINTING 

U. A. Dohmen, in charge 

SECTION OF PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION 

C. H. Carpenter, Photographer Carl F. Gronemann, Artist 

A. A. Miller, Photogravurisf 

SUPERINTENDENT OF MAINTENANCE CHIEF ENGINEER 

John E. Glynn W. H. Corning 

January i. 1923 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 

1922 



To the Trustees of the Field Museum of Natural History : 

I have the honor to present a report of the operations of the 
Museum for the year ending December 31, 1922. 

During the year the construction of the terrace, sixty feet wide, \ 
extending around the entire structure, and rising to a height of six feet | 
above the ground, was completed. It is constructed of the same marble 
as the building proper and is provided with wide and imposing stair- 
ways leading to the central doors. This marks the completion of the 
Museum building. 

The year was characterized not only by normal development but by 
an unprecedented activity and expansion which extended to practically 
all departments and sections of the Institution. After the arduous and 
anxious work of reinstallation and reorganization had been completed 
in 192 1 the staff, with largely increased scope for action and progress, 
and greatly improved facilities for performing its duties, resumed its 
normal scientific and departmental activities with renewed zest and 
vigor. 

This was particularly evidenced by the activity with which the pre- 
viously formed plans for scientific exploration and survey of South 
America were entered into. No fewer than eight expeditions, repre- 
senting each of the four Departments of the Museum, operated in 
that continent during the year, detailed accounts of which are given 
elsewhere. This activity in the field, so vital to the proper growth of 
an institution of this type, was made possible mainly by the generosity 
of Captain Marshall Field who, as was announced in last year's report, 
provided a contribution of $50,000.00 a year for a period of five years 
for this purpose. In addition to this President Field contributed 
$3,000.00 towards the expenses of a botanical expedition to British 
Guiana, and Mr. Arthur B. Jones provided the sum of $25,000.00 to 
meet the cost of an important expedition for an ethnological investi- 
gation of Malaysia. Much of the stimulus given to the staff of the 
Museum may be attributed to encouragement imparted by these gen- 



86 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

erous gifts which permit the accumulation of material of great value 
from new fields, often situated in remote and little known parts of 
the world. While the Museum has made phenomenal progress during 
the few years it has been in existence, the present increase of its scope 
and opportunities involves new needs and responsibilities. No greater 
service could be rendered to the Museum at this important period in 
its history than to make possible the extension of its expeditionary pro- 
gramme to insure that comprehensiveness and completeness of collec- 
tions which is expected of an institution of importance and standing. 
Indeed, in this age of intensive investigation and research in all the 
sciences, the expansion of activities in this direction becomes almost 
imperative. 

A further gift of $50,000.00 towards the deficit in the Building Fund 
was received from President Field. Furthermore, he continued his 
annual contribution of approximately $12,000.00 towards the work of 
plant reproduction in the Department of Botany, and added $2,000.00 
to the Harris Public School Extension Fund. Mr. James Simpson paid 
in to the Treasury of the Museum, during the year, a further sum of 
$25,000.00 towards the construction of the theatre which bears his name. 
Mrs. Robert F. Cummings has been good enough to indicate her inten- 
tion to provide $2,000.00 towards the cost of publishing the manuscript 
prepared by Assistant Curator Cole on "The Tinguian. Social, 
Religious and Economic Life of a Philippine Tribe." 

It is desired to make special mention of the interest which Mr. 
Edward E. Ayer has continuously evinced in the welfare of the Insti- 
tution. It was again demonstrated by his decision to transfer $100,- 
000.00 United States of America 4^4% Gold Bonds to the Museum, 
which will eventually be used to establish a permanent lecture founda- 
tion. The Board of Trustees has decided that the benefaction is to be 
forever known as "The Edward E. Ayer Lecture Foundation." Mr. 
Ayer has also provided a fund for the payment of a preparator in the 
Science and Art Museum of California, who will provide this Institu- 
tion with some duplicates of its extensive paleontological collection. 

Among the noteworthy gifts received by the Museum, during the 
period under review, were collections and specimens from Mr. Martin 
A. Ryerson, Mr. Keith Spalding, and Mr. William J. Chalmers. Gen- 
eral Charles G. Dawes has signified his intention of presenting to the 
Museum Library Dr. Manasseh Cutler's botanical manuscripts, notes 
and correspondence, together with notebooks and field observations. 



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Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 87 

These deal principally with economic plants observed by Dr. Cutler and 
form an interesting series of documents. 

The Museum is fortunate in the possession of many friends and 
benefactors, and it is fitting here to renew the expression of thanks to 
all who have contributed towards it in money and gifts during the year. 

An excellent bronze bust of the late Dr. Frank W. Gunsaulus. 
executed by John G. Prasuhn of the Department of Anthropology, was 
completed during the year and installed in Frank W. Gunsaulus Hall. 

The continued efforts of President Field to increase the Life Mem- 
berships of the Institution, resulted in the election of the following dur- 
ing the year : Mr. William A. Alexander, Mr. Charles Garfield King. 
Mr. Louis B. Kuppenheimer, Mr. Philip S. Edmunds, Mr. Thomas H. 
Mclnnerney, Mr. Arthur L. Farwell, Mr. James C. Ames, Mr. James 
P. Soper, Mr. Lester Armour, Mr. T. J. McNulty, Mr. Milward Adams, 
Mr. J. Ogden Armour, Mr. Knowlton L. Ames, Mr. Benjamin H. 
Marshall. Mr. J. M. Hopkins, Mr. Charles B. Pike, Mr. Edgar A. 
Bancroft, Mr. Harold N. Scott, Mr. Robert F. Carr, Mr. Ralph Van 
Vechten, Mr. E. W. Cramer, Mr. Joseph R. Noel, Mr. Howard W. 
Fenton, Mr.' W. B. Storey, Mr. Frederick R. Babcock, Mr. Chauncey 
B. Borland, Mr. Charles I. Pierce, Mr. Louis A. Ferguson, Mr. John 
J. Glessner, Mr. John P. Wilson, Jr., and Mr. Frank A. Marsh. 

During the year Mr. D. C. Davies became a Corporate Member of 
the Museum and was also elected a member of the Board of Trustees to 
fill a vacancy in the Board. 

The following gentlemen were elected Honorary Members of the 
Museum in recognition of the eminent service they have rendered to 
science: Mr. Martin A. Ryerson, Captain Marshall Field, Mr. Arthur 
B. Jones, Mr. James Simpson, Mr. Charles R. Crane, Colonel Albert A. 
Sprague, Mr. Albert W. Harris, and Mr. William J. Chalmers. 

Mrs. Robert F. Cummings was elected a Patron of the Museum, in 
recognition of the eminent service she has rendered to the Institution. 

One of the most important and significant steps taken during the 
year was the considerable addition made to the scientific staff ; Dr. 
Charles E. Hellmayr was appointed Associate Curator of Birds; Ed- 
mund Heller, Assistant Curator of Mammals ; Karl P. Schmidt, Assist- 
ant Curator of Reptiles and Batrachians; John T. Zimmer, Assistant 
Curator of Birds; J. Francis MacBride, Assistant Curator of Taxo- 
nomy. Assistant Curator Dahlgren was promoted to the post of Asso- \ 



88 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

date Curator of Economic Botany. The employment of Ashley Hine 
as Chief Bird Taxidermist; Colin C. Sanborn as Preparator in Birds; 
George M. Sternberg as Chief Preparator and Collector in Vertebrate 
Paleontology; John B. Abbott as Preparator in Vertebrate Paleontol- 
ogy ; Carl E. Gronemann as Artist, and A. W. Miller as Photogravurist, 
is reported. Miss Dorothy Roberts was appointed Guide-Lecturer 
early in the year. 

Several additions have also been made to the force in the Section 
of Printing, these additions being necessitated by the increased demands 
made by the production of the Museum publications. 

A series of leaflets, describing objects and collections in the Museum, 
was inaugurated during the year. Fourteen of these were published and 
distributed. A manual of the Museum, containing information con- 
cerning the foundation, the endowments, and the activities of the Insti- 
tution was published in November. A third edition of the Guide to the 
collections was brought up to date and issued late in the year. A Syn- 
opsis of the collections was also prepared and published, more especially 
for the use of the public schools. Reference is made elsewhere to the 
issuance of numbers in the regular publication series. 

It is interesting to note in view of the facilities provided by the Insti- 
tution that the Board of Trustees has granted permission to the Central 
Section of the Anthropological Association to designate Field Museum 
as the headquarters of the organization. The visit of the American 
Ornithologists' Union to Chicago, during the month of October, was a 
notable and interesting event, at which a large number of prominent 
ornithologists of the United States and Canada were present. An in- 
structive popular session, illustrated by motion pictures, was given in 
James Simpson Theatre by the Union. An interesting exhibit of selected 
paintings, drawings and photographs of birds, by several artists, was 
displayed during the week in Room 12, on the main floor, and was 
kept open to the public until the third of December, attracting an un- 
usual number of visitors. The American Society of Ichthyologists and 
Herpetologists also convened at the Museum during the same week. 
The regular monthly meeting of the Superintendents and Principals 
of the Chicago Public Schools was held in the James Simpson Theatre 
on November 4th, when ideas and suggestions were exchanged as to a 
closer cooperation between the Museum and the schools. The results 
were most satisfactory. 

The Museum was honored during the year by the visits of a consid- 
erable number of officers and students of American and foreign 



Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 89 

museums, .and it was gratifying to note their unanimous expression of 
admiration of the fitness and extent of the building for museum pur- 
poses, the adequate equipment for the scientific and working staffs, and 
the arrangement and interest of the exhibits. 

An important change in the method of recording the Museum 
departmental accessions was instituted by the Recorder in the month of 
June. The hand-written records in the accession books were replaced 
by typewritten cards kept in Rand Visible Files. Each drawer of these 
tiles contains 310 cards, showing at a glance the source of the material 
accessioned, its character, and the accession numbers. The hand-written 
indexes were substituted by a typewritten loose leaf system. The old 
manila jackets containing the accession records were also discarded, 
owing to their decay through chemical reaction, and approximately ten 
thousand new jackets of a more durable quality were typewritten, pro- 
viding suitable protection for all records of the accessions. 

It is with pleasure and satisfaction that record is made of the loyal 
cooperation and the willing service that all members of the staff have 
rendered during the past year, which has been especially encouraging 
in an individual sense, and proved, collectively, of much benefit to the 
Institution. 



The alterations and rearrangements of the ground floor were practi- 
cally completed during the year and the results have fully justified all 
anticipations. New exhibition area on this floor has been created to 
the extent of 125,000 square feet. An addition of importance was the 
construction of a small lecture hall intended to seat approximately two 
hundred and fifty persons. The hall has been equipped with stereopti- 
con, screen and arrangements for controlled light. The James Simpson 
Theatre was completed during the year, and was also equipped with a 
stereopticon and motion picture apparatus. 

The Library, Reading Room and Stack Room are now permanently 
established on the third floor, where they are conveniently placed in close 
proximity to the quarters of the scientific staff, which not only tends to 
increased efficiency, but has resulted in economy both of time and ex- 
pense. In making these arrangements the fullest consideration was 
given to the comfort and convenience of those using the Library and the 
Reading Room, the accommodation at their disposal having been largely 
increased. The library is now adequately equipped and furnished for 
the continuance of its widespread usefulness. 

The installation of a system for supplying the laboratories and lava- 
tories with hot water was completed during the year. Illuminated signs, 



90 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

indicating stairways, lavatories, restaurant, etc. were also provided. An 
elaborate system of ventilation for the ground floor was completed be- 
fore the end of the year. The large room, situated at the southeast 
corner of the main pavilion, assigned for the use of the President and 
the Board of Trustees, has been decorated and furnished, President 
Field assuming the entire expense thereof. 

Early in the year it was decided to establish a Photogravure Section 
for the production of illustrations for publications, leaflets, and postal 
cards. Space on the third floor was assigned for this work, in which 
were placed a large gas-heated oven for drying plates, a gas plate with 
boiler, work bench, trays and other appurtenances for preparing the 
coating. A 25" x 38" printing frame and stand, and a solar arc lamp 
of 3500 candle-power for copying the sensitized photogravure plates 
were also installed. A large galvanized iron sink, washing and lye tanks, 
drying racks, two stock tables and a hot water boiler to furnish vapor 
for the press room were placed in a room between the plate room and 
the press room. The first illustrations produced were for the Annual 
Report of the Director for the year 1921. Since then illustrations have 
been completed for eleven leaflets and for the publication "The Flora of 
the Santa Catalina Island." Approximately 20,000 postal cards were 
produced. 

To facilitate the manufacture of installation furniture and fixtures 
in the Department of Anthropology, there were installed in Room 38 
on the third floor a Crescent 24" variable speed planer, a Wallace 6" 
bench jointer, a Wallace 7" universal saw and a Moak single spindle 
horizontal boring machine ; all of this machinery is driven by individual 
motors. 

Four handsome bronze sign posts have been placed on Michigan 
Avenue at the entrances to Grant Park. These signs indicate the 
opening and closing hours of the Museum and have undoubtedly 
attracted the attention of strangers to the Museum. 

A change in the hours of closing the Museum was authorized by the 
Board at a meeting held February 20, 1922. The Museum is now open 
to the public during the following hours : January, November and 
December 10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.; February, March, April and 
October 10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.; May, June, July, August and 
September 10 :oo A.M. to 6 :oo P.M. Heretofore the Museum has been 
closed to the public on Thanksgiving Day and Christmas. The Board, 
at a meeting held November 6, 1922, determined that the Institution 
should now be open to the public every day in the year. 



Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 91 

Maintenance: The Budget approved by the Board of Trustees 
authorized the expenditure of the sum of $306,973 for the maintenance 
of the Museum during the year 1922. Budget expenditures amounted 
to $302,507, leaving a surplus of $4,466. Other appropriations 
amounted to $90,924, which were mostly met by special contributions. 



PUBLICATIONS 
The following books have been published' during the year: — 

Pub. 208 — Report Series, Vol. VI, No. 1. Annual Report of the Director 
for the Year 1921. 76 pages, 16 photogravures, edition 2,000. 

Pub. 209 — Anthropological Series, Vol. XIV, No. 2. The Tinguian. 
Social, Religious and Economic Life of a Philippine Tribe. 
By Fay-Cooper Cole. With a chapter on Music by Albert 
Gale. November, 1922. 267 pages. 83 halftones, 26 zinc 
etchings, edition 1,250. 

Pub. 210 — Zoological Series, Vol. XII, No. 3. Game Birds from North- 
western Venezuela. By W. H. Osgood and B. Conover. 
August, 1922. 32 pages, 1 colored plate, edition 1.020. 

Pub. 211 — Anthropological Series, Vol. VI, No. 5. The Hopewell 
Mound Group of Ohio. By Warren K. Moorehead. 126 
pages, 48 halftones, 68 zinc etchings, edition 1,268. 

A list of handbooks and leaflets published is given below : — 

Manual — 52 pages, edition 5,000. 

General Guide — 24 pages, edition 15,000. 

Synopsis of the Collections — 44 pages, edition 11,160. 

List and Prices of Publications — 16 pages, edition 750. 

Leaflets — Anthropology No. 1. Chinese Gateway. By B. Laufer. One 
photogravure, 3,044 copies. 

Anthropology No. 2. Philippine Forge Group. By F. C. Cole. 
One photogravure, 2,980 copies. 

Anthropology No. 3. Japanese Collections. By Helen C. 
Gunsaulus. 20 pages, 6 photogravures, 2,916 copies. 

Anthropology No. 4. New Guinea Masks. By A. B. Lewis. 
12 pages, 6 photogravures, 3,000 copies. 

Anthropology No. 5. The Thunder Ceremony of the Pawnee. 
By Ralph Linton. 20 pages, 4 photogravures, 3,103 copies. 



92 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

Anthropology No. 6. The Sacrifice to the Morning Star. By 
Ralph Linton. 20 pages, 1 photogravure, 3,073 copies. 

Botany No. 1. Figs. By B. E. Dahlgren. 8 pages, 1 photo- 
gravure, 3,088 copies. 

Botany No. 2. Coco Palm. By B. E. Dahlgren. 8 pages, 1 
photogravure, 3,088 copies. 

Botany No. 3. Wheat. By B. E. Dahlgren. 8 pages, 1 photo- 
gravure, 3,052 copies. 

Geology No. 1. Arizona Gold Mine. By H. W. Nichols. 12 
pages, 1 photogravure, 2,952 copies. 

Geology No. 2. Models of Blast Furnaces for Smelting Iron. 
By H. W. Nichols. 12 pages, 3 photogravures, 3,061 copies. 

Zoology No. 1. White-tailed Deer. By Wilfred H. Osgood. 
12 pages, 1 photogravure, 2,940 copies. 

Zoology No. 2. Chicago Winter Birds. By Colin C. Sanborn. 
12 pages, 1 photogravure, 3,099 copies. 

Zoology No. 3. The American Alligator. By Karl P. 
Schmidt. 16 pages, 2 photogravures, 3,122 copies. 

LIBRARY 

The Library was transferred early in the year to the third floor, thus 
bringing it into close proximity to the staff, which fully appreciates the 
greater convenience and accessibilty. Two thousand one hundred and 
eighty seven books and pamphlets, together with sixty maps have been 
received during the year, bringing the total number of books etc. in the 
library to 79,658. A number of valuable volumes, and some of historic 
importance, were given to the library by friends interested in the work 
of the Museum. Mr. Edward E. Ayer has, with his customary munif- 
icence, added two hundred and twelve books to the Ornithological 
Library which bears his name. Among them are several beautifully 
bound copies of early editions, including one of Horrebow's Natural 
History of Iceland, translated from the Danish original and published 
in London in 1758. The gift includes the following works: 

Blaauw Monograph of the cranes 

Buller Birds of New Zealand 

Butler Birds of Great Britain 6v. 

Dresser Monograph of the coraciidae 

Fritsch Birds of Europe 1877 



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Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 



93 



Jacquin 
Meyer 

Salvin & Broderick 
Schlegel & Verster 
Swainson & Richardson 
Swaysland 
Tschudi 



Beitnige zur geschichte der Vogel 1784 

Unser Auer,-Rackel-und Birkwold una 

seine abarten 

Falconry in the British Isles 1855 

Traite de fauconnerie 1844- 1853 

Fauna boreali-americana 1831 

Familiar wild birds 

Untersuchungen iiber die Fauna Peruana 

1 844- 1 846 

Mrs. Elmer S. Riggs presented seventeen volumes of magazines of 
unusual interest and of early date from the library of her late father, 
Mr. Frank Smith. Thirty five volumes on miscellaneous subjects in 
Natural History were received from Mrs. William M. Derby, Jr. The 
Governor General of Chosen forwarded seven illustrated volumes on the 
antiquities of Korea. From the Institucio Catalana d'Historia Natural, 
Barcelona, the Koloniaal Museum of Haarlem, the Cultura Venezolana. 
Caracas, the Colegio de Senoritas, San Jose, Costa Rica, and the Can- 
terbury Museum of New Zealand, were received complete sets of their 
publications, 
sions. 



Other gifts of interest are indicated in the list of acces- 



Among a number of much-needed older works purchased during the 



year are the following : 
Ammann 



Colmeiro 



Hortus Bosianus 
Supellex botanica 1675 

La botanica y los botanicos de la peninsula 
hispano-lusitana 1858 

Duparc & Tikono witch La platine et les gites platini feres de 

l'Oural et du monde 

History of voyages 1786 

Saggio sulla storia naturale del Chili 
1810 

Reglas de orthographia, diccionario del 
idioma Othomi 1767 

Travels in central Africa 1869 

Memoire sur les plantes qui croissent 
spontanement en figypte 1824 

Delle navigationi et viaggi raccolto & con 
molti vaghi discorsi 1555- 1558 



Forster 
Molina 

Neve and Molina 

Petherick 
Raffenau-Delile 

Ramusio 



94 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

Rochefort Histoire naturale et morale des iles An- 

tilles de l'Amerique 1665. 
Ruiz and Pavon Flora Peruviana et Chilensis 1798 

Valentyn Oud en Nieuw Oost Indien 1724- 1726 

Vesling De plantis Aegyptiis observationes et 

notae ad prosperum Alpinum 1638 

Among books of a later date are : 

Baker Calico painting and printing in the East 

Indies in the xvn and xvin centuries 
Phisalix Les animaux venimeux et venins 

Riviere Le ceramique dans l'art d'Extreme Orient 

The system of exchange has, as usual, caused considerable additions 
to be made to the library. The publications of the Museum are sent 
to all kindred institutions and societies at home and abroad, and publica- 
tions were received from six hundred and eighty-three institutions and 
individuals during the year. Eight new exchanges were effected with 
institutions having literature of value to the library. Five hundred and 
thirty-one volumes were bound. Increased accommodation for the vari- 
ous catalogues was provided by the addition of four sections to the 
card cabinets. Eleven thousand one hundred and twenty-two cards were 
written and filed during the year, together with the monthly installment 
of author cards from the John Crerar Library. The Museum is in- 
debted each year to libraries in and out of the city for the loan of neces- 
sary reference books. This year it is especially indebted to the Library 
of Congress and the Lloyd Library of Cincinnati for the loan of very 
rare books not obtainable elsewhere in this country. 

DEPARTMENTAL CATALOGUING, INVENTORYING AND 

LABELING 

Anthropology. — During the year the work of cataloguing in the 
Department of Anthropology was completed as soon as possible after the 
new accessions were received. Some older collections were also cata- 
logued. The total number of catalogue cards prepared amounts to 1,385, 
and are distributed geographically as follows: North America 688; 
Mexico and South America 39 ; India, Tibet, Burma. Siam and Annam 
491; China and Japan 142; Malaysia 11; Polynesia 3; Australia 2; 
Miscellaneous 9. All these cards have been entered in the Inventory 
Books of the Department, which number 38. The number of accessions 



Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 95 

received during the year was 43, of which 37 have been catalogued. Nine 
accessions of the previous year were also dealt with. The total number 
of catalogue cards entered from the opening of the first volume amounts 
to J 57-5 02 . Several thousand labels were prepared and installed during 
the year, the number of labels supplied by the printer to the Depart- 
ment totaling 6,047. These labels are distributed as follows : Plains 
Indians 1,917; Nootka, Bella Coola, Coast Salish, Kwakiutl, Iroquois, 
Sauk and Fox 655 ; Egypt 84 ; Roman Frescoes 72 ; Irish Antiquities 47 ; 
Busts of prehistoric man 30; India 326; Tibet 27; Java 277; China 764; 
Japan 1,574; Maps 16 and Miscellaneous 258. The printer, further, 
supplied the Department with 1,000 printed forms for measurements 
in physical anthropology, 1,000 catalogue cards and 600 cards for the 
label file. 418 label cards were added to the label file, which was ar- 
ranged in conformity with the installation or changes in the halls. The 
labels for each exhibition case are kept together, bearing the same num- 
ber as the exhibition case, so that any label desired may now be traced 
at a moment's notice. 588 prints were placed in the photographic 
albums, and five new albums were opened. Prints in several albums 
were provided with typewritten explanations. 

Botany. — All newly accessioned specimens in the Department of 
Botany have been catalogued as fast as they could be organized. 16,059 
entries were made in the sixty-two catalogue volumes, bringing the total 
number of catalogued specimens in the Department up to 512,426. Aug- 
mentation of the various card indexes during the past year is as 
follows : — 

No. of Cards 
Augmented 1922 Total 

Index to Botanical Species 4,640 166,088 

Index to Common Names 2,210 23,409 

Index to Collectors 246 10,420 

Index to Geographic Localities 51 2,860 

Geology. — All accessions were catalogued as received, with the ex- 
ception of the collections obtained by the Alberta expedition and part of 
those acquired by the Curator in Brazil, the cataloguing of which is not 
as yet complete. A total of 2,153 new entries have been made during 
the year. Of these, 1,045 represent additions to the mineral collection; 
550 to paleontology; and 412 to the economic series. Of the specimens 
collected by the Curator in Brazil 808 have thus far been catalogued. A 
total of 310 new labels were written during the year, five being large 
descriptive labels. Of the smaller labels, a series of 106 were prepared 
for the exhibit of petroleum products presented by the Standard Oil 



g6 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

Company (Indiana), and 90 for miscellaneous specimens of minerals 
and meteorites. Most of these labels have been printed and installed, 
and the labeling of the Department may be considered as nearly com- 
plete as that of any actively expanding collection can be expected to be. 
To the Department photograph albums 167 prints have been added dur- 
ing the year, making a total of 3,821 prints now in these albums. 

Zoology. — The accessions of the Department of Zoology, with the 
exception of the insects, were catalogued shortly after they were 
received. Some accessions that were received during the past few years 
and to which, at that time, the needed attention could not be given, were 
also properly catalogued. The total number of entries made was 3,589. 
They were distributed as follows : Birds, 2,704 ; Mammals, 365 ; 
Reptiles and Amphibians, 276; Fishes, 153; Insects, 75; Shells, 1 ; and 
Skeletons, 15. The making of the above entries, in most cases, also nec- 
essitated writing a label or tag with full data for each entry. The num- 
ber of catalogue cards written was small. This was due to the fact that 
ten or more entries were recorded on each card, a new one being writ- 
ten for a species new to the various collections. For some groups, also, 
instead of cards, a loose-leaf ledger index has been adopted, a change 
that appears to be an improvement on the card system. For the col- 
lection of fishes 592 of these sheets, containing 1,886 entries, were 
written. A similar index, comprising 151 entries, was also prepared for 
the entire collection of salamanders. As a shelf guide to the reference 
collection of fishes, 358 labels, each one with a different number and 
family name in large type, were printed and duly installed. Although 
a number of exhibition labels were prepared, particularly in the case of 
shells, a limited number only were printed and installed, namely, 17 for 
a cicada group and 116 for a screen exhibiting fishes. The actual num- 
ber of fish labels, however, is somewhat misleading, as they were first 
printed on black stock and later replaced by others that were printed on 
paper that is more in harmony with the new color adopted for fish 
screens. 

The following table shows the work performed on catalogues and in- 
ventories in the various Departments : 



Department of Anthropology 

Department of Botany 

Department of Geology 

Department of Zoology 

The Library 

Section of Photography . . . . 



Number of 
Record Books 


Total No. 

of entries 

to Dec. 

31, 1922 


Entries 

during 

1922 


Total No. 
of cards 
written 


38 




157,562 


1,385 


157,562 


62 




512,426 


16,059 


7,147 


22 




147,671 


2,153 


8,456 


40 




105,220 


3,589 


34,909 


14 




130,894 


11,120 


306,438 


20 




135.998 


12,278 





Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 97 

ACCESSIONS 



The Museum, during the year, has heen the recipient of a large 
number of important and valuable gifts. These, together with the 
extensive collections made by expeditions, have added very appreciably 
to the material and educational value of the exhibits of the institution. 

Anthropology. — In the Department of Anthropology the unusually 
large number of 43 accessions is registered, 2,3 of which are by gift, 3 by 
exchange, 6 by purchase and 1 as the result of the Captain Marshall 
Field Colombian Expedition. Mr. Martin Ryerson presented a very 
remarkable burial figure of green-glazed Han pottery, representing a 
powerful mastiff in the attitude of guarding his master's grave. Such 
figures were interred with sport-loving noblemen in ancient China about 
the time of the beginning of our era, and are rare types. The figure in 
question is of so high a quality in modeling and glazing that it was 
deemed worthy of being placed on exhibition in the case showing selected 
examples of Chinese Art in Stanley Field Hall. To Mrs. Marshall 
Field, Sr., are due two lacquered and painted Chinese screens (so-called 
coromandel screens), each consisting of twelve panels and carved on 
each side with an elaborate design. One of these screens is shown in 
Room 23 in the northeast corner of the second floor. Another Chinese 
screen, composed of sixteen square detachable panels and adorned with 
well-carved figures of the Eight Immortals, was presented by Mr. Oskar 
J. Friedman of Chicago. A very fine and interesting old suit of painted 
hide armor with helmet and sword, from the Lolo of western China, 
was presented by Mr. William Ayer McKinney, Chicago. This welcome 
gift was very timely, as it fits in with a collection of 58 Lolo specimens 
purchased by the Museum from Dr. C. Schneider a botanist who trav- 
elled and collected in southwestern China. The Lolo form one of the 
groups of aboriginal tribes which settled in southern and western China 
prior to the arrival of the Chinese who conquered and colonized their 
country. While they gradually succumbed to Chinese influence, they still 
preserve many characteristics of their ancient culture, particularly in 
weapons and armor. They also retain their peculiar language and 
script. As they are difficult of access, Lolo specimens are rarely found 
in museums. The entire collection is now exhibited in Case 37 of Hall 
24, and is particularly remarkable for its instructive series of hide 
armor. 

Mr. William Wrigley. Jr., and Mr. Arthur B. Jones contributed 
jointly to acquire a unique collection of stone sculptures from ancient 






98 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

India, the importance of which can hardly he exaggerated. Not only 
are most of these pieces exceedingly rare, but also most difficult to 
secure, as the exportation of antiquities from India is prohibited. It was 
solely due to a felicitous combination of circumstances that Mr. Alexan- 
der Scott, a well-known artist and traveller, who made the collection in 
the course of a many years' sojourn in India, was granted the privilege 
of taking it out of the country. The majority of the sculptures (27) 
belong to the so-called Gandhara period of the first two or three cen- 
turies of our era, being essentially Buddhistic in their religious char- 
acter and under Hellenistic influence in their artistic types and style. 
There are eight excellent full figures and heads of Buddhas and Bodhi- 
satvas, and twelve panels of friezes on which elaborate scenes are carved 
in high relief. Prominent among the latter are representations of 
Buddha's temptation by Mara, the spirit of evil, the first sermon 
preached by Buddha at Benares, and six figures of Greek composition 
presenting offerings to the Buddha. Seven other sculptures illustrate 
subjects of the purely Brahmanic religion or Hinduism, including a beau- 
tiful lava carving of the god Vishnu with his consort Lakshmi, and a 
frieze with four nautch-girls or bayaderes performing a sacred dance 
around a censer. The old religion of the Jaina, still flourishing among 
the merchants of India, is represented by a large marble statue of Parc- 
vanatha, one of the prophets or teachers of the Jains, who preceded 
Mahavira, the actual founder of the religion, and by a fine cast image of 
solid brass, portraying another of their prophets. 

In addition to this Indian collection, a valuable specimen from Tibet 
was purchased of Mr. Scott and is likewise due to the generosity of 
Mr. Arthur B. Jones. This is a ceremonial bone apron, consisting of 
forty-one plaques exquisitely carved, which was used in the sacred 
mystic ceremonies of the Tibetan Lamas. Such aprons are carefully 
guarded as temple treasures, and very few have crossed the borders of 
Tibet. Mr. Scott himself presented the Museum with a marble pedestal 
sculptured with a triad in high relief, representing Buddha seated in the 
center, supported by two Bodhisatvas with lotuses in their hands. This 
is a product of the third or fourth century a. p. A very interesting 
old Tibetan painting, depicting scenes from the life of the Buddha, is 
the gift of Miss Caroline Wicker, who added to it a number of other 
curious objects acquired during her travels in the Orient. An interest- 
ing cast image of solid gold, discovered in the jungle on the island of 
Mindanao, Philippines, was secured by purchase. It is presumably of 
Javanese workmanship, and was brought over to the Islands by 
traders. The type and style of the figure point to India. Mr. Edward 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XX. 




BURIAL FIGURE OF MASTIFF. HAN POTTERY, CHINA. 
GIFT OF MARTIN A. RYERSON. 



*to 



mor 



,lJ -UO!S 



*%*> 



*% 



^x 



-?■• 



Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 99 

E. Ayer presented breast ornaments, made of silver inlaid with plain and 
engraved stones, worn by a Dalmatian woman. 

A pair of Japanese bows was presented by Mr. H. J. Patten of 
Chicago. They are over seven feet in length, are lacquered black and 
i rimmed with red rattan bands. They are accompanied by a fur-covered 
quiver containing ten arrows, the quiver and bows fitting into a large 
black-lacquer brace with handles. Such sets were carried in processions 
of the former feudal lords or daimyo. The crest of Nabeshima, the 
powerful daimyo of the Province of Hizen, is impressed in black on the 
gilded leather bow-tips and quiver decorations. Mr. Junius Wood, the 
well-known correspondent of the Chicago Daily News, has donated a 
beautiful fighting sword or katana, with which is a scabbard of black 
lacquer decorated with designs of golden pine needles. The fittings are 
of gold, silver, and shakudo etched with a tendril design. Particular 
interest is attached to the blade which bears upon its tang the signature 
of Asafune Suyemoto and the date 1392. There were obtained in ex- 
change with the Logan Museum at Beloit College, Wisconsin, fifty- 
three potsherds, fragments of prehistoric pottery found in shell-heaps 
along the bay of Tokyo, Japan. They were originally exhibited at the 
World's Columbian Exposition by the Department of Anthropology 
of the Imperial University of Japan. 

A man's coat and a complete woman's costume, made by the Quiche 
Indians of Guatemala, have been acquired by purchase from Mr. E. W. 
Allstrom, who has promised to supplement this collection on his return 
to Guatemala. The woman's costume is of a type which has survived 
almost unchanged from prehistoric times, and is notable for its brilliant 
colors, its beautiful weaving, and its ornate embroidery. The Quiche are 
of the same stock as the prehistoric Maya, the most civilized nation of 
ancient America. In spite of their political conquest and their long con- 
tact with Europeans, they are still numerous and retain much of their 
ancient culture. An excellent collection of Chippewa material was 
acquired from the Public Museum of Milwaukee by means of exchange. 
The Chippewa are one of the largest tribes north of Mexico, and for- 
merly ranged along both shores of Lake Superior and as far west as 
North Dakota. In their industries and mode of life they closely re- 
sembled the tribes who occupied the state of Illinois during the early 
historic period. The collection includes numerous mats, birchbark 
utensils, and twined bags, together with raw materials and tools for 
their manufacture. Flag mats, used as thatch for winter dwellings, and 
a mat of cedar bark, are of especial interest. A birchbark canoe from 
the same tribe, in a good state of preservation, was received as a gift 



ioo Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

from Mr. F. W. Morgan of Chicago. Another birchbark canoe was 
given by Mr. C. H. Benjamin, West Lafayette, Indiana. 

A collection of Nambiquara material was received from the Museum 
Nacional of Rio de Janeiro by exchange. The Nambiquara are a forest 
tribe of southern Brazil who, at the time this collection was made, 
were still living under conditions similar to the peoples of the stone age. 
They are rapidly disappearing on contact with the European, and will 
probably be extinct in a few years. Among the most interesting ob- 
jects are arrows, clubs, bracelets made from the tail of the armadillo 
and a stone axe with its original haft. 

A number of ethnological specimens from the Kiowa and Hopi, col- 
lected by the late Dr. James Mooney, for many years a member of the 
Bureau of American Ethnology, were acquired from his sister, Mother 
Mary Agnes, F. O. They include numerous examples of beadwork and 
basketry, as well as ceremonial objects. Of special interest are specimens 
of peyote. The peyote is a small cactus, growing on the Lower Rio 
Grande and in northern Mexico, which contains a powerful narcotic 
drug. When eaten, it produces hallucinations similar to those of hash- 
eesh. An elaborate religious cult has been built up about its use by the 
Plains tribes. The collection is accompanied by a series of interesting 
photographs. 

A small collection of ethnological material, which was acquired by 
purchase, consists of examples of Sioux metal work, and a number of 
miscellaneous specimens from the Eskimo of southern Alaska. A fine 
beaded saddlebag of buckskin has been presented by Mrs. Willard R. 
Wiley of Chicago. This bag was Obtained many years ago by a relative 
of the donor, and is an unusually good example of Sioux beadwork. 
Two Mexican serapes or blankets made in the state of Oaxaca, Mexico, 
have been presented by Mr. P. M. Zulfer of Chicago, who for many 
years resided in Mexico. They are good examples of the present-day 
weaving, as practiced in that province, showing the combination of mod- 
ern and primitive designs which now prevails. A large rug of white al- 
paca fur made in La Paz, Bolivia, is due to the interest taken in the Mu- 
seum by Professor Archibald Gillis Baker. The Shasta Springs Hotel of 
Shasta Springs, California, presented through Mr. Edward E. Ayer a 
very interesting Indian mortar carved from lava. Mr. Alfred C. Dod- 
rhan, Jr., of New York, manifested his interest in the Institution by 
offering a valuable pre-Columbian gold figure discovered in Central 
America and representing a rare mythological image. It has been added 
to the exhibits of prehistoric American gold in H. N. Higinbotham 
Hall. The Art Institute of Chicago presented to the Museum a bronze 



Jan.. 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 



101 



bust of the Sioux Chief Sitting Bull modeled by Edward Kemeys. An 
interesting series of negatives taken by himself of the Seminoles of 
Florida, was donated by Mr. L. Winternitz of Grand Rapids. 

Botany. — Among the notable collections received by the Department 
of Botany during the past year is the complete private herbarium of 
Edouard Jeanpert, consisting of about 35,000 sheets. The late M. 
Jeanpert, at times an assistant in the herbarium Cosson, was particularly 
interested, from 1887 to 1920, in amassing as full an herbarium as possi- 
ble of the plants of the environs of Paris, both by extended field-work 
and by exchange. A search through ten of his 200 fascicles resulted in 
revealing the probability of his having secured large series of numerous 
French and Mediterranean Europe and Africa collectors. M. Jean- 
pert specialized in the Rubiads, Ranuncules, Saxafrages and the Ferns. 
His herbarium proved to be especially rich in these groups. Of the 
ferns, he evidently secured duplicates from all those collections repre- 
sented in the Paris herbarium and those of Cosson, Franqueville and 
Drake. A glance through a few of the many large fascicles in his herb- 
arium revealed, at least, plants of a large number of collections, many of 
which appear to be in complete series. Other collections of importance 
received during the year were Burchard's Plantae Canariensis; Knopf. 
Santa Catalina Island 500; Buchtien, Bolivia 158; Lloyd, Blinois 355; 
Clokey. Colorado 634; Peattie, Michigan, Indiana and Illinois 264; Gray 
Herbarium, New England and Nova Scotia 336 ; Dutton, Vermont, 587 ; 
Bush, Missouri 295; Blake, California 138; Ruth, Texas 529; Grant. 
Washington 145; and 3,205 South American Plants from the Herbier 
Museum l'Histoire Naturelle, Paris. The organized additions to the 
Herbarium and the total number of sheets of those localities to which 
additions have been made are as follows : 



Locality 

NORTH AMERICA 



Added Total in 

this Her- 

Year barium 



Locality 

United States : 



Added 

. this 

Year 



Alaska 23 152 

Agatta Island 5 5 

Atka Island 1 2 

Attu Island 1 3 

Baronoff Island. .. . 10 25 

Kodiak Island 1 1 

Kyska Island 1 1 

Saint Paul Island.. 5 216 

Unalaska Island. .. . 7 43 

Canada 1 91 1 

Mackenzie 1 8 

Nova Scotia 95 534 

Ontario 73 -474 



Alabama 10 

Arizona 28 

Arkansas 3 

California 423 

Catalina Island . . . . 1 ,967 

Carolina, North 32 

Carolina, South 58 

Colorado 75 1 

Connecticut 5 

Dakota, North 29 

Dakota, South 4 

Delaware 9 

District of Columbia. 31 



Total in 
Her- 
barium 



1,587 
8,252 

592 

26,783 

4,890 

4,831 

1,173 

13,694 

749 

693 
1,887 
1,384 
2,766 



io2 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



Added 

this 

Locality Year 

Florida 55 

Big Pine Key i 

Georgia 6 

Idaho 13 

Illinois 484 

Indiana 274 

Iowa 42 

Kansas 129 

Kentucky 14 

Louisiana 72. 

Maine 215 

Maryland 87 

Massachusetts 380 

Michigan 188 

Isle Royal 2 

Minnesota 7 

Mississippi 14 

Missouri 586 

Montana 25 

Nebraska 7 

Nevada 174 

New Hampshire .... 69 

New Jersey 101 

New Mexico 102 

New York 210 

Ohio 64 

Oklahoma 19 

Oregon 34 

Pennsylvania 24 

Rhode Island 15 

Tennessee 9 

Texas 605 

Utah 40 

Vermont 625 

Virginia 294 

Washington 185 

West Virginia 94 

Wisconsin 54 

Wyoming 4 

Bahama Islands: 

New Providence 10 

Turks Island 1 

West Indies 3 

Antigua 1 

Barbados 1 

Cuba 74 

Guadaloupe 1 

Jamaica 215 

Martinique 4 

Porto Rico 214 

Saba, Little 1 

Saint Martin 1 

Saint Thomas 2 

Santa Lucia 1 

Santo Domingo 4 

Tobago 11 

Tortola 1 



Total in 

Her- 
barium 

20,524 

4 

4,017 

3.703 

29,220 

7,286 
1,984 

1,435 
1,411 
1,467 

1,591 
1,816 

5,846 

4,155 
12 

2,392 
2,097 
4,802 
4,241 
1,068 
1,488 
1,679 
3,68o 
3,96i 
8,210 
2,225 
343 
9,049 
10,294 

617 

1,387 

10,632 

4,139 
4,304 
5,169 
7,951 
2,283 
5,334 
1,705 



2,459 
12 

22 

14 

346 

11,248 

1,036 

9,247 
624 

4,953 
I 

1 

622 

3 

1.327 

894 

80 



Added 
this 

Locality Year 

Mexico 138 

Lower California.... 12 

Coronados Islands. 11 

Magdalena Island.. 1 

San Benito Island. 1 

Yucatan 1 

CENTRAL AMERICA: 

Costa Rica 12 

Gautemala 19 

Nicaragua 1 

Panama 63 

Canal Zone 20 

San Salvador 4 

SOUTH AMERICA : 

Argentina 5 

Bolivia 162 

Brazil 259 

Chili 38 

Colombia 32 

Ecuador 11 

Galapagos Islands.. 3 

Albemarle Island.. 1 
Indefatigable 

Island 1 

Guiana, British 3 

Guiana, Dutch 14 

Guiana, French 3 

Patagonia 2 

Peru 70 

Uruguay 5 

Venezuela 26 

Curacao 1 

Trinidad 69 

EUROPE : 

Austria 300 

Belgium 52 

Denmark 6 

England 18 

Finland 60 

France 71 

Germany 1,509 

Greece 2 

Holland 8 

Italy 112 

Sardinia 14 

Montenegro 2 

Norway 16 

Portugal 160 

Russia 2 

Scotland 1 

Spain 3 

Sweden 23 

Switzerland 287 

Turkey 1 

Wales 2 



Total in 

Her- 
barium 

31,938 

1,697 
31 
35 
12 

6.762 



641 

3.102 

240 

242 

85 
30 



L378 

4,558 

981 

297 

3,003 

863 

4 
62 

9 
77 
18 

5 

29 

232 

175 
736 
102 
712 



8.255 
359 
389 

2,566 
180 

8,490 

10,779 
706 

30 

3,600 

47 

2 

1,235 

256 

1,629 

587 

638 

9,819 

4J7I 

22 

101 



Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 



10' 



Locality 

AFRICA: 

Abyssinia 

Algeria 

Canary Islands . . 

Palma Island . . 

Teneriffe Island 

Cape Colony 73 

Egypt 

Madeira Island 28 

Mozambique 

Nubia 

Soudan 

ASIA: 

Arabia 

China 

India 

Bengal 



Added 


Total in 


this 


Her- 


Year 


barium 


2 


162 


2 


228 


I 


566 


I 


47 


I 


1 


2 


114 


73 


1,901 


1 


47 


28 


135 


9 

5 


33 
16 


2 


2 


4 
7 


24 
2,267 


4 


1,077 


1 


3 



Locality 

Palestine 

Persia 

Siberia 

Syria 

Turkey 

AUSTRALIA: 

New South Wales. 

Victoria 

Tasmania 

OCEANIA : 
Java 



Added 

this 

Year 

3 
6 

4 
1 

5 
1 

26 

2 
1 



Samoa 
Timor 



HORTICULTURAL: 
ILLUSTRATIONS : 
1GNOTA: 



1 

15 

11 

.5,563 
12 



Total in 

Her- 
barium 

1,152 

56 

476 

466 

30 

2,238 

754 
438 
3ii 



119 
09 
19 

3,309 
7,315 
1,333 



Geology. Judge George Bedford of Morris, Illinois, presented 
the Department of Geology with 381 specimens of fossil plants from 
the beds of Mazon Creek, Illinois. These specimens exhibit the fine 
preservation characteristic of fossils from this locality, and, in con- 
sequence of lessening production of these beds, as well as the intrinsic 
value of the specimens, are highly prized additions. Eight specimens 
of ammonites and saurian remains from the Fort Benton beds of Kan- 
sas were presented by Mr. F. M. Jewell, and Mr. R. K. Thomas pre- 
sented 45 specimens of invertebrate fossils from Arizona. To the 
crystal collection, through the generosity of Mr. William J. Chalmers, 
281 crystal models, showing the ideal forms of as many natural crys- 
tals, were added. Mr. Edward E. Ayer presented a set of nine pho- 
tographs which illustrate methods of construction of a model of 
Yellowstone Park. These will be of assistance in preparing similar 
models here. The Standard Oil Company (Indiana) added, during the 
year, to the series of petroleum products which they had previously pre- 
sented, 182 specimens of lubricating oils, greases and candles. The 
same donors also provided glass containers for the exhibit. These, to- 
gether with the previous donations from this company form a complete 
series illustrating the various stages of the distillation of petroleum 
and the products obtained therefrom. 

Mr. Austin Q. Millar made a gift of 25 specimens of the typical 
diamond-bearing rocks of Arkansas and the minerals which accompany 
the diamond there. Mr. George Tollefson presented an unsual spec- 
imen of botryoidal malachite which he collected at a copper mine in 
the Belgian Congo, Africa. A peat from Russia given by Mr. Marcus 



104 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

Hill is a welcome addition to the peat collection, as it represents a 
locality where this material has recently come into extensive use. Mr. 
H. K. Thurber gave five specimens of high-grade radium and vanadium 
ores from Utah and Colorado. From the United States Gypsum Com- 
pany there was received a carefully prepared series numbering 48 
specimens, illustrating industrial products obtained from gypsum and 
their uses. This collection combines features of attractiveness and 
instruction in an unusual degree. The most important accession by 
purchase was that of an iron meteorite, from Navajo, Arizona. This 
is a mass weighing 3,306 lbs. and is the largest meteorite specimen 
now in this collection. In addition to its size, it has other interesting 
and unusual features. Another entire iron meteorite, a new fall weigh- 
ing 26 lbs., was obtained from Dungannon, Virginia. 

Zoology. The accessions in the Department of Zoology, though 
neither large nor numerous, were, nevertheless, of considerable value. 
The very extensive collections obtained by the Museum's expeditions 
in Peru have not yet been received. Among the mammals, the most 
noteworthy accessions were two Alaska mountain sheep, presented 
by Mr. William Rindsf 00s of Columbus, Ohio ; two mountain sheep 
obtained by Mr. W. J. Morden of Chicago, in the Yukon and given 
to the Museum ; and two Mexican mountain sheep, a gift from Dr. 
A. P. Chesterfield of Detroit, Michigan. Mr. Carl Akeley presented 
four white-tailed deer. Forty-seven mammals were obtained by the 
Museum's botanical expedition to British Guiana. The most valuable 
bird acquisition, by purchase, was a passenger pigeon, which was killed 
in Indiana about fifty-two years ago. This species, which only a 
generation ago was exceedingly abundant, is now extinct. The few 
specimens that are still in the hands of private owners are gradually 
being acquired by various museums. Another acquisition, also by 
purchase, was a collection of 132 birds from Illinois, Alaska and New 
Zealand. 

A notable gift from Mr. Ashley Hine consisted of fifty well pre- 
pared birds from western Canada. The greater part of this donation 
can be used to advantage in replacing some of the rather poorly 
mounted specimens in the exhibit of birds arranged systematically. 

Although most of the fishes acquired were obtained by means of 
expeditions, some very desirable acquisitions were received from other 
sources. An accession of 1,784 Panama salt-water fishes represents 
the final division of the results of the Museum's participation in 
the ichthyolosrical survey of the Isthmus of Panama. A collection 



Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 105 

consisting of 2,797 specimens was obtained on Museum expeditions 
working along the Dupage, Kankakee, Illinois and Mississippi Rivers. 
Important donations were made by the Booth Fisheries Company. 
One of these was a large "fat bass," weighing over three hundred 
pounds and measuring over six feet in length. It was taken at a depth 
of 1,476 feet in the Pacific Ocean. Other welcome gifts, from the 
same source, were a large halibut weighing, when dressed, a hundred 
and ten pounds; a king salmon caught in Lake Michigan, where this 
Pacific Coast species has been successfully introduced ; starry floun- 
ders, one of the most showy of the flounder group; and a rat-fish, a 
representative of a group probably older than the one containing the 
sharks. From the Tuna Club, Catalina Island, through the much ap- 
preciated kindness of Mr. Keith Spalding, some very interesting 
game fishes have been received, among them being a sheepshead, alba- 
core, California white bass, California yellow-tail, California barra- 
cuda and a skipjack. 

Over 290 specimens of reptiles and amphibians were received from 
Museum expeditions. Of this number, seventy-nine are to be credited 
to the botanical expedition to British Guiana; forty-nine to the work 
done by Mr. Weed and Mr. Pray on the Illinois and Mississippi Rivers, 
and 165 to local field work by various members of the Department. 
One of the important gifts, received from the Museum of Comparative 
Zoology, consisted of fifty lizards from the Fiji Islands. All of the 
species represented in this acquisition were new to the collection. 
Other noteworthy acquisitions were a gift of 106 specimens from 
Florida and Texas, received from the Aquarium of Rothschild's De- 
partment Store, through the courtesy of Mr. F. S. Young ; and 115 
specimens from Indiana, donated by Mr. L. L. Walters. Of the 
limited number of skeletons accessioned, ten were obtained through 
various expeditions, while five were gifts from various donors. 

Among the insects accessioned were several acquisitions worthy 
of mention. By purchase, there were received 225 specimens, mainly 
beetles, from South Cameroon, Africa. This lot included four perfect 
examples of the goliath beetle. The Museum's collection of hawk- 
moths was further increased by a donation of thirty specimens by 
Mr. B. Preston Clark of Boston. From Dr. C. E. Hellmayr sixty 
butterflies and four moths from the highlands of central Europe were 
received as a gift. By means of local field trips, some very desirable 
specimens were also obtained. The total number of accessions is 
6,666, distributed as follows : Mammals, 98 ; Birds, 268 ; Fishes, 4,850 ; 
Reptiles and Amphibians, 641 ; Skeletons, 15; Insects, 924. 



106 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

EXPEDITIONS 

The year was notable for an unprecedented activity in the field, 
the importance of which cannot easily be overestimated. As mam- 
as twelve expeditions of major importance, representing all the de- 
partments of the Museum were sent out, eight of which operated in 
South America which had been selected as a special field for explora- 
tion.' In addition to the expeditions previously mentioned, an expedition, 
in which Field Museum is cooperating with the University of Oxford, 
England, has been dispatched to Mesopotamia to explore and excavate 
the ancient city of Kish, from which important results are expected. 

Anthropology. The Department of Anthropology at present has 
three expeditions in the field. Assistant Curator J. Alden Mason left 
Chicago on the ioth of April for the purpose of making an archaeologi- 
cal survey of Colombia. Arriving at his destination at Santa Marta 
toward the end of April, he has since conducted a very active and suc- 
cessful campaign, travelling along the coast by canoe and over unbeaten 
tracks in the interior of the country. Near the Cape of San Juan de 
Guia he discovered the extensive ruins of an ancient city, which pos- 
sessed stone-paved roads, where he camped for three months. At the end 
of August, when the work on the best sites was completed, he proceeded 
by canoe to the bay of Gairaca, where he explored an old Indian ceme- 
tery in which he found an enormous number of burial urns of immense 
size, many of which contained fine objects of stone, shell, bone or metal. 
From there he proceeded to Nahuange, the next bay to the east, where 
three or four very large mounds yielded excellent results. He found 
a dozen pottery vessels of artistic quality, among which were the first 
jars with painted decorations he had so far discovered. They contained 
upwards of 8,000 carnelian beads, a number of exceptionally fine 
gold objects, and remarkable ornaments and figurines of a translucent 
mottled green stone which outwardly resembles jade. In early Decem- 
ber the expedition was based on Bonda, a small village, a few miles 
inland from Santa Marta', formerly the center of a large Indian popu- 
lation. Dr. Mason expects to remain in the field until the end of next 
April to continue and complete his work in Colombia, and particularly 
to undertake excavations in Pocigueca, the old capital of the Indians, 
which is situated in the mountains near Santa Marta. He has already 
made several shipments to the Museum amounting to some three 
thousand specimens, which include pottery, gold ornaments, necklaces 
of stone and shell beads, very fine stone implements, and carved fig- 
urines. Several hundred negatives have also been received. 



[an., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 107 

In view of the fact that the Museum possesses extensive collections 
from the Philippines on the one hand, and from the Melanesian Islands 
on the other, it was proposed as the next logical step to fill the gap 
between these two areas by engaging in intensive work in the Malay 
Archipelago. The culture of the Philippine tribes can be fully com- 
prehended only in connection with that of the other branches of the 
Malayan family, and must be correlated with the history of the entire 
stock. Research was therefore recommended in the Malay Penin- 
sula, Sumatra, Java, and Borneo for the purpose of shedding more 
light on the early history of the Philippines, and the movements and 
migrations of the Malayans in general. At the same time it was 
proposed to secure representative collections adequately illustrating the 
life, industries and religions of these peoples. 

In consideration of his former experiences in the Philippines, 
Assistant Curator Cole was appointed head of the Malaysian expedi- 
tion, which will remain in the field for a period of approximately 
eighteen months. Dr. Cole left Chicago on the 10th of June for a 
brief visit to England and Holland for the purpose of benefiting by 
the advice of ethnologists familiar with the Malayan field, and study- 
ing collections from this quarter in the museums abroad. He reached 
Singapore on the 7th of September and proceeded from there to Kuala 
Lumpur, the capital of the Federated Malay States. Accompanied by 
Dr. Robinson, director of the States Museum, he made an excursion 
into Pahang, the heart of the country of the Sakai, who live in small 
scattered groups in the high mountains. He spent ten days there 
gathering information and accumulating material. Subsequently he 
paid a visit to the state of Perak for the purpose of studying the 
Semang and the Malay. At Kuala Kangsar, the home of the Sultan 
of Perak, he succeeded in obtaining such beautiful material, as rich 
embroideries, fine sarongs and other cloths, some excellent silver, brass, 
and iron work, and even a royal sarong from the palace. A shipment 
of nine boxes has been advised by him. Afterwards, he proceeded to 
Batavia, and from there to Padang, Sumatra, where he is at present 
engaged in work among the Menangkabau. 

The Mesopotamia Expedition was organized to excavate the ancient 
capital of Sumer and Akkad, eight miles east of the city of Babylon. 
The ancient name of this locality was Kish ; at present it is known by its 
Arabic name Tell El-Ohemer. Kish was the seat of the oldest dynasty 
known in history, and was also the seat of three more powerful later 
dynasties which ruled all Western Asia from 4500 b.c. to 2800 B.C. 
After that period, Kish occupied a prominent place in the history of 



io8 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

Babylonia until Babylonian history came to a close in the fifth and 
fourth centuries B.C. The mounds of ancient Kish probably contain the 
remnants of one of the earliest periods of mankind and the relics of an 
ancient civilization extending over a span of more than four thousand 
years. It is expected that the work of this expedition will yield exceed- 
ingly interesting and important results, and will shed light on the earliest 
phase of the cultural life of mankind in Babylonia. It is also a novel 
departure for the Museum, in that the civilizations of Mesopotamia have 
not yet been represented in its collections. The expedition is under the 
supervision of Professor S. H. Langdon, head of the Department of 
Assyriology, Oxford University and a prominent scholar in Semitic 
philology. A party of excavators left England for Bagdad at the be- 
ginning of November, and is expected to remain in the East for a period 
of three years. 

Botany. Three expeditions of major importance were undertaken 
by the Department of Botany during the year. Mr. J. F. Macbride and 
Mr. William Featherstone were commissioned to collect botanical 
material in Peru. They sailed from New York, on March 22nd, and 
arrived at Lima, Peru, on April 3rd, where eight days were spent in 
making arrangements for work in the interior. During this time, ac- 
quaintance was made with Doctor A. Weberbauer, a Peruvian collector 
of many years' experience in the region, and also with Doctor R. 
Aspiazu and Mr. Albertio Peri. Much valuable assistance and infor- 
mation concerning the interior were obtained from these gentlemen. 
On April 12th the Expedition left for Matucana, six hours from Lima, 
and at an altitude of 8,000 feet. Five hundred (500) numbers were 
secured at this point, after which the Expedition joined that of the 
Department of Zoology in the hills at Chosica, where Mr. Macbride. 
finding the region very interesting from a botanical standpoint, re- 
mained, while Mr. Featherstone, with the heavier botanical equipment, 
went on with the Zoological party to establish a base at Huanuco, 
sixty miles down the Huallaga River from Cerro de Pasco. Mr. 
Macbride continued collecting at Viso and at Rio Blanco, 11,000 feet 
altitude. At these two points about 400 specimens were procured, 
after which he moved on to Casapalca from whence side trips were 
made to Morococha and Yauli. At the latter place snow and sleet fell 
daily. After three days' collecting, he moved on to La Oroya and 
later to Tarma and San Jose. Through the kindness of M. Paul 
Adrien and M. Jullier of the Huaron Mining Company, he was enabled 
to collect at Shelby, five hours distant. 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XXI. 




■MHRI 



A HUGE FRUIT CLUSTER OF Attalea PALM. 

THIS IMPRESSIVE SPECIMEN OF OVER 3,000 FRUITS WEIGHED 240 POUNDS. 

STANLEY FIELD BRITISH GUIANA EXPEDITION. 



Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 109 

At San Jose, Sr. Galjuf, a coal mine owner, very hospitably enter- 
tained Mr. Macbride, and generously made him a loan of four horses 
and an arriero to take him to Huanaco, 120 miles distant. During the 
journey, stops were made at Mina Ragra, (altitude 15,700 feet) and 
at Andachaca, Yanahuanca, Uspachaca, Hacienda Cabello, Hacienda 
Huertas, Hacienda Ambo and at Hacienda Chinche. A number of 
side trips were made from each of these stations, several of which 
necessitated remaining out on the plains over night in very cold 
weather. Reaching Huanaco, the arriero and horses were sent back to 
Sr. Galjuf, and work was continued at this point with side trips to 
Mito, collecting at the latter place until August 16th. A journey was 
also made from here, on foot, to Llata, sixty miles to the west on the 
river Maranon, returning September 1st. From Mito the upper Hual- 
laga river was followed to its source near Cerro de Pasco. The expe- 
dition returned from there to Huanaco, where preparations were made 
to proceed to the coast at Casma, instead of returning to Lima by rail. 
Leaving Mito on September 27th, the expedition proceeded on foot, - 
with three pack mules, over the trail to Huaraz on the western side 
of the Andes, where it arrived October 5th. Leaving Huaraz on 
October 7th, with horses, for Casma, the trip over the coastal desert 
region proved so hot that night travel became compulsory. Collections 
were secured at twenty-seven different localities between Mito and 
Casma. From there the expedition shipped on the nth of October 
on a local steamer for Callao, where it transhipped for New York on 
the 13th, arriving at the latter place on October 27th. The expedition 
secured in all 2,576 numbers, including about 7,000 specimens, of which 
100 were economic material such as native foods, fibers, sugars, 
"flours" used as bases for native drinks, as well as crude articles of 
native manufacture. 

An expedition, financed by the President of the Museum, was 
sent to British Guiana, particularly for the purpose of securing botan- 
ical exhibition material and studies for the plant reproductions in the 
Department of Botany. Doctor B. E. Dahlgren, with Mr. J. R. Millar 
as aid, were absent from the Museum for about six months. Grenada, 
Trinidad and Dutch Guiana were visited, but most of the time was spent 
in British Guiana. The privileges of the Botanic Garden at George- 
town were generously extended to the expedition, for which thanks 
are due, particularly to Mr. W. Francis, Acting Director, Department 
of Science and Agriculture, British Guiana, and to Mr. H. Ward. 
Superintendent of the Garden. Mr. Chester N. Davies, American 
Consul in Georgetown rendered efficient aid in connection with the 



i to Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

customs formalities. A small cottage within a short distance of the 
Botanic Garden was rented to serve as a laboratory and headquarters. 
A dark-room was improvised for the photographic work, and the bulk 
of the collections was assembled there. Large pieces which required 
more space for storage and facilities for handling, drying and packing 
were generously accommodated by Messrs. Sproston's Ltd., at their 
wood-working mills. 

Two hundred and thirty-five plaster moulds, 427 economic speci- 
mens and 52 branches were accumulated, which will serve as a basis 
for plant reconstructions or reproductions for the botanical exhibits. 
Among these subjects are such interesting forms as the Cannonball 
tree (Couroupita) ; the large flowered Clii.sia; the marantaceous Mucro 
(Ischnosiphon) , which furnishes the Guiana Indians with their prin- 
cipal basket material ; the curiously developed fruit of the Cashew 
with its seed hanging exposed below the fleshy, edible peduncle; Dil- 
lenia and Lagerstrcemia-, both East Indian trees, but found cultivated 
in the American tropics; a banyan-like Willow Fig (Fiats Bcnjaniina) ; 
and a small Courida tree with its remarkable aerial roots or pneumato- 
phores. A chocolate tree was secured from the Fernandes Estate at 
Coveden. A considerable number of herbarium specimens and economic 
material were collected in Georgetown and in Surinam, and 975 
negatives were made. Arrangements were made in Dutch Guiana 
for government cooperation in securing a collection of Surinam woods, 
and an agreement was made with a local collector in British Guiana to 
continue collecting herbarium and economic specimens for the Museum. 
Some geological and a number of zoological specimens were obtained, 
among them an Anaconda, a "labba" (Coelogenys) and an 'Agouti" 
(Dasyprocta) which were brought home alive. The two latter were 
presented by the Museum to the Lincoln Park Zoological Gardens. 
The bulky collections were most carefully packed and reached Chicago 
in excellent condition. 

As palms form a conspicuous feature of the flora of the Guianas, 
and the Botanic Garden and public grounds of Georgetown are rich 
in introduced species, advantage was taken of the opportunity to 
secure an extensive collection of dried flowering and fruiting palm 
spadices. which, together with leaves and photographs of each of some 
hundred species, form a most valuable and desirable accession to the 
exhibition and study collections. Conspicuous among them are an 
entire dried fruit cluster of the Ita Palm, dried flowering spadices and 
fruit clusters of two species of Attalea, and a perfect specimen of the 
rely seen male flowering spadix of the double or Seychelles coconut. 



Jan.. [923. Annual Report of the Director. hi 

The reason that such striking objects are seldom seen in museums 
is no doubt to be found, in the difficulties of drying and packing for 
shipment. Clusters of palm fruits, when drying, have a habit of 
shedding their fruits. It was found that this could be prevented to a 
large extent by a preliminary killing of the tissues by means of a brief 
boiling. A vat in a cooperage was utilized, thus rendering it possible 
to treat even the largest pieces in this manner. 

The Curator of the Department of Botany spent seven weeks, in 
September and October, working on South American plants in the 
herbaria at Paris and London. While at these institutions he was 
fortunate in arranging exchanges through which this Museum will 
receive a large amount of material of the earlier collectors in Colombia. 
Ecuador. Peru and Brazil. Of these, over 3,000 specimens have already 
been received. 

Geology. Earl}- in the year, the Curator of Geology visited 
Navajo, Arizona, to examine a meteorite that had been found there. 
It proved on examination to be a mass of much interest, and negotia- 
tions were entered into, which resulted in its being acquired by the 
Museum. The surroundings of the place of fall of the meteorite were 
carefully examined, and a full series of photographs of the locality 
was made. 

During the year the Curator spent several months collecting in 
Brazil. It was desired to secure as full a series as possible of the 
important minerals and ores of that country, and this object, so far 
as the opportunties afforded by a single season would permit, was fully 
attained. Starting from Rio de Janeiro with a companion, Ouro Preto, 
the former capital of the State of Minas Geraes, and the center of much 
of the mining industry was reached by rail. Here collections were 
made in the topaz district, and about the manganese mines of Burnier 
and the gold mines of Passagem and Morro Velho. Travel was then 
continued on mule-back for a distance of about 250 miles to Diamantina. 
passing through the vast iron ore fields about Itabira do Matto Dentro 
and Conceicao, visiting the aquamarine and other mines of the pegma- 
tites of Brejauba and Serro, and several more or less abandoned gold 
and diamond workings of the Caraca quartzite. Some of the diamond 
mines in the vicinity of Diamantina were visited and collections made 
of the typical diamond-bearing rocks and satellites of the diamond. 
Numerous specimens of optical and other quartzes from various 
localities in the Serra do Cabral were also collected. Returning to Rio 
de Janeiro, a journey was made to the basin of eruptive rocks in Caldas 



ii2 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

in the northern part of the state of Sao Paulo, where a full series 
of the remarkable deposits of zirkite and the syenitic rocks of that 
area were collected. In all, about 1,000 specimens of typical gems, 
minerals and ores of Brazil were collected. The specimens included 
large topazes, aquamarines, quartzes and citrines, and full representa- 
tions of the characteristic gold, iron, manganese and aluminum ores 
of the region. About one hundred and fifty negatives, illustrating min- 
eral occurrences or other features of the regions visited, were also 
made. 

Active collecting in vertebrate paleontology was also resumed. Two 
able and experienced collectors, Mr. George M. Sternberg and Mr. J. 
B. Abbott, were engaged, and under the direction of Associate Curator 
Riggs, two successive expeditions for collecting vertebrate fossils were 
made during the year. The first expedition, leaving the Museum in 
the latter part of May, operated in Canada for about three months. 
The purpose of this expedition was the acquisition of fossil dinosaurs 
in the basin of the Red Deer river in the Province of Alberta. Two 
nearly complete skeletons and some leg bones of several "duckbill" or 
Trachodont dinosaurs were secured, also a portion of a skeleton of a 
carnivorous dinosaur, a good skull of a "crested" dinosaur and an 
incomplete skull of what appears to be a hitherto unknown species of 
dinosaur. A fossil trunk of a Sequoia tree, 37 feet long and averaging 
about 18 inches in diameter, was another valuable specimen obtained, 
a peculiar feature of this specimen being, that while the heartwood or 
interior wood was silicified, the sapwood was in part changed to lignite. 
Carapaces and plastrons of four fossil turtles and about 100 specimens 
of invertebrate and plant fossils were also obtained in the region. Much 
of the material obtained was in localities so distant from established 
highways that considerable time and labor had to be devoted to build- 
ing temporary roads. The total weight of specimens, which have been 
received at the Museum as a result of the work of this expedition, is 
about ten tons. 

After returning from Alberta, Messrs. Riggs, Sternberg and Abbott 
sailed for Buenos Aires about the middle of November, for the purpose 
of collecting in Argentina specimens of the large Pleistocene vertebrates 
and their ancestors that are to be found in that country. During the 
southern summer the party proposes to visit southern Patagonia and 
work northward as the winter advances. As the party did not reach 
the field until the latter part of December, no results from this expe- 
dition can be reported as yet. 

Associate Curator Nichols spent about a week in the vicinity of 



Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 113 

LaSalle, Illinois, making photographs and securing data for construct- 
ing a model of a cement plant. Advantage was taken of the opportunity 
to obtain representative specimens of several forms of concretions, 
shales and limestones characteristic of the region. 

Zoology. Preparations for zoological expeditions were begun early 
in the year and it was decided to continue in Central Peru, work which 
was begun there in 19 12. Accordingly, Mr. J. T. Zimmer, Assistant 
Curator of Birds, sailed from New York on March 22nd, and three 
weeks later, on April 12th, Mr. Edmund Heller, Assistant Curator of 
Mammals, and Mrs. Hilda Hempel Heller sailed to join him. This 
party worked in cooperation with the botanical expedition to the same 
region conducted by Mr. J. F. Macbride and Mr. William* Featherstone. 
They sailed direct to Callao, Peru, and, after brief preliminary work 
on the arid western slopes of the Andes, proceeded by rail to the ele- 
vated mining town of Cerro de Pasco, and thence down the eastern 
slopes of the mountains. Having organized for travel, they worked 
independently, Mr. Heller devoting himself to the collection of mam- 
mals, Mrs. Heller assisting him and giving special attention to photog- 
raphy, while Mr. Zimmer made collections of birds. They arranged 
to work intensively in the region about the headwaters of the three 
important tributaries of the Amazon, the Maranon, the Huallaga and 
the Ucayali. Bases were, therefore, established at the small towns 
of Ambo and Huanuco and successive excursions were made into the 
valleys of the three rivers mentioned and to the partly isolated high- 
lands lying between them. It was thus possible to work from as 
great a height as 15,000 feet down to the hot forests on the Amazonian 
plain, covering a range of physical conditions of great variety. These 
plans were successfully carried out, and as this report is being written, 
the expedition is moving eastward to work in the Upper Amazon 
Valley above Iquitos, whence it is expected to return early in 1923. 
Owing to uncertainties of transportation in remote regions, it was 
deemed advisable to store the collections until they could be escorted 
to the railroad for shipment. Therefore, nothing has so far been 
received from the expedition. The importance of the collections can- 
not be fully judged until they have been studied, but, so far as re- 
ported, they will surpass, both in extent and importance, any similar 
collections previously made in Peru. They will, apparently, number 
3,000 or more actual specimens, among them being many rare and 
some unknown animals. 

In continuation of the Museum's exploration of South America, the 



ii4 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

Curator of Zoology, accompanied by Mr. C. C. Sanborn, Assistant in 
the Division of Birds, and Mr. Boardman Conover, sailed on November 
16th from New York, via Panama, for Valparaiso, Chile. This expe- 
dition will give its attention to the fauna of southern and central Chile, 
including some large, but little worked, islands along the coast. Mr. 
Sanborn will collect principally in Chile, and will remain in the field 
throughout the year 1923. The other members of the party, after 
working in Chile, will visit important points in Argentina, Uruguay and 
Brazil, and return to Chicago late in 1923. 

In addition to expeditions sent to distant regions, several were also 
made to neighboring districts. Worthy of special mention were the 
results of one, made by the Assistant Curator of Fishes and the fish 
taxidermist, along the Illinois and Mississippi Rivers. On this expe- 
dition, 1,080 specimens were obtained, as well as plaster casts and color 
notes needed to reproduce some of the most interesting species. 

The following list indicates the various expeditions sent out during 
the year : 

Colombia J. Alden Mason Archaeological Collections. 

Mesopotamia S. H. Langdon Archaeological Collections. 

MalaVasia Fay-Cooper Cole Ethnological Collections. 

Peru J. F. MacBride and Herbarium and Economic Speci- 

Wm. Featherstone mens. 

British Guiana B. E. Dahlgren Herbarium and Economic Speci- 

J. R. Millar mens. 

Alberta, Canada Elmer S. Riggs Paleontological Specimens. 

JT. B. Abbott and 
G. M. Sternberg 

Brazil O. C. Farrington Gems, Ores and Minerals. 

Patagonia Elmer S. Riggs Paleontological Specimens. 

J. F. Abbott and 
G. M. Sternberg 

Peru J. T. Zimmer Birds and Eggs. 

Peru Edmund Heller Mammals. 

Mrs. Hilda Hempel 
Heller 

Chile, Argentine, 

Uruguay and Brazil . . .W. H. Osgood Mammals and Birds. 

C. C. Sanborn and 

Boardman Conover 

Mississippi River A. C. Weed and Fishes and Reptiles. 

L. L. Pray 



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Jan.. 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 115 

J INSTALLATION, RE-ARRANGEM ENT, AND 
PERMA X ENT IMPROVEMENT 

Anthropology. In the Department of Anthropology ninety exhi- 
bition oases were newly installed during the year. The total number 
of cases at present on exhibition in the halls of the Department, inclu- 
sive of the new Halls I and J on the ground floor, amounts to 744. 
Busts of prehistoric races of man, modeled by Professor McGregor of 
Columbia University, have been installed in Case 3, Stanley Field 
Hall. The Pithecanthropus erectus of Java, the Neanderthal man of 
La Chapelle-aux- Saints and the Cro-magnon man of western Europe 
are shown there, together with a series of casts of skulls. Another 
addition made to Stanley Field Hall is the green-glazed pottery mastiff 
presented by Mr. Martin A. Ryerson, which is placed in Case 7. The 
Roman bath-tub formerly in Case 3 has been removed into Edward 
F. Aver Hall. 

In consequence of the new plan to concentrate all the Egyptian 
collections in a specially constructed room on the ground floor, Edward 
F. Aver Hall was subjected to a thorough revision. Nine standard 
cases containing Egyptian antiquities and seventeen special cases con- 
taining Egyptian mummies were conveyed from there to their new 
quarters. To take their place, five cases were newly installed, two 
containing reproductions of Irish antiquities, and three displaying 
Roman lamps and candelabra, and red-figured vases from Italy. While 
in the previous arrangement the cases were three abreast, they are now 
arranged in pairs, which has considerably improved the appearance 
of the hall, which now shelters 42 cases, instead of 62 as formerly. 
For the Roman frescoes, new labels were prepared and installed, and 
twenty-two reproductions of antique furniture on wooden bases have 
been distributed between the pilasters. 

In Hall 4, six cases containing Nootka, Athapascan and Coast 
Salish material were re-installed, and the labeling both in this and Mary 
D. Sturges Hall was completed. During the year the extensive Plains 
Indian collections of the Museum in Hall 5 have been re-organized, 
and in large part re-installed by Assistant Curator, Ralph Linton, who 
assumed his duties on February 1. Twenty-eight newly installed cases 
have thus far been placed on exhibition. The tribes of this region 
fall into three divisions. On the eastern edge of the Plains and along 
some of the rivers were settled tribes which tilled the ground, and 
whose culture had much in common with that of the tribes of the 
wooded country farther east. The central region was occupied by 



n6 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

nomadic tribes devoted to hunting, who practised little or no agriculture, 
and subsisted principally on the buffalo. Their culture was distinctive, 
and its affiliations have never been satisfactorily established. On the 
western edge of the Plains lived still other tribes whose culture was 
intermediate between that of the central tribes and that of the Indians 
of the Rocky Mountain plateau. The new arrangement of Hall 5 is 
designed to emphasize these differences, and to enable the visitor to 
receive and carry away a clear idea of the mode of life of each of 
these three divisions. The south section of the Hall is devoted to the 
hunting tribes of the central region, the Cheyenne and Arapaho being 
taken as typical representatives of this group. These two tribes were 
in close alliance for many years; their ordinary artifacts and method 
of life were identical. Beginning at the west end of the Hall, the 
visitor is shown, first, the utilitarian side of their culture, with exhibits 
illustrating their appliances for travel and hunting, their tools and 
utensils, their clothing, ornaments and weapons, as well as their dwell- 
ings and household furniture. Following these are exhibits which 
illustrate their religious life. Various objects used in the Sun Dance 
are displayed, together with a collection of the insignia of the men's 
and women's societies that is nearly complete. These insignia are of 
special interest, several of the objects being the only specimens of 
their kind now in existence. The last four cases on this side are 
devoted to the Crow, a tribe living to the north of the Cheyenne and 
Arapaho, and differing from them in minor details only. The collec- 
tion, has been so arranged as to emphasize these variations, which are 
most marked along the line of costume and decorative art. A new 
group, consisting of a Crow woman in festive dress leading a horse 
decorated with full trappings, has been installed in the central aisle. 
The northwest quarter of the Hall contains material from the Black- 
foot, Assiniboin and Dakota tribes of the Central Plains, which also 
differed in some respects from the Cheyenne and Arapaho. The ex- 
hibits are especially designed to illustrate these features which were 
distinctive in the culture of each tribe. The Dakota form a link 
between the tribes of the Central Plains and those of the eastern border, 
their western bands being nomadic hunters, and their eastern settled 
agriculturists. Because of the pressure of the whites, many of the 
eastern Dakota joined their nomadic relatives, and objects of eastern 
origin were thus carried far out into the Plains. A number of such 
objects is shown, including medicine bags of a form characteristic of 
the central Algonquins. The central portion of the north side of the 
Hall is devoted to the various village tribes of the Plains. The Osage 



Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 117 

have been chosen as typical of a number of Sioux tribes living on the 
eastern edge of the area. Many of their artifacts, notably their woven 
bags and sashes, bear a strong resemblance to those made by the 
Woodland tribes still farther east, which are shown in the adjoining 
section of Hall 4. The Arikara serve as representatives of a group 
of three settled tribes, the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara, who for- 
merly lived on the upper Missouri. They built large permanent houses, 
manufactured pottery, and also made a peculiar form of carrying 
basket, similar in its weaving to the basketry of the southeastern forest 
tribes. Examples of both their pottery and basketry are placed on 
exhibition. The life of the Pawnee and Wichita, tribes of the same 
linguistic stock as the Arikara, who lived farther to the south, is illus- 
trated by representative collections. These tribes were remarkable for 
the high development of their religious beliefs and ceremonial obser- 
vances, and the exhibits include sacred bundles and other objects of 
{paramount interest. Material from the Ute, Bannock, and Shoshone 
has been placed in the northeast section of the Hall, adjoining the 
collections from the Plateau tribes exhibited in Hall 4. These three 
tribes seem to have moved out into the Plains in comparatively recent 
times, and their culture shows a blend of features characteristic of the 
tribes of the Plains and Plateau area. They differ from the Central 
Plains tribes principally in their extensive use of basketry and in their 
retarded social and religious development. The arrangement of the 
collections attempts to demonstrate these diversities. In Hall 6 a case 
of Apache clothing has been re-installed more effectively. 

Twenty-one cases have been removed from Joseph N. Field Hall, 
for the purpose of obtaining more space and of opening up the cen- 
tral portion. All the old false-back cases will be eliminated and re- 
placed by screen or shelf cases. In order to retain the representative 
character of these valuable collections it will be necessary to reinstall 
most of the cases, but the material will be considerably condensed in 
the process. Three new cases dealing with New Ireland, the Admiralty 
and Solomon Islands have already been installed with material taken 
from six old cases. In this manner room will be made for several 
cases of new material, not yet exhibited, from New Guinea and some 
(if the surrounding islands. The installation of a special hall of 
Oriental Theatricals on the ground floor necessitated the removal of 
twelve cases from PTall 24. A quantity of Chinese material was 
also released from storage, and nine new cases were installed as fol- 
lows : Ancient bone carvings, seals and amulets; bronzes of the Sung, 
Ming and Manchu periods; decorative bronze, chiefly censers and 



n8 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

candlesticks illustrating representations of animals; cloisonne enamel, 
painted enamel, iron and bronze inlaid with gold and silver wire ; 
household objects of tin, including a set given as dower to a Peking 
bride ; carvings of wood, bamboo, roots, ivory and lacquer ; hide armor, 
weapons and utensils of the Lolo (cf. p. 97) ; Buddhist stone 
sculpture of the Sung, Ming and Manchu periods; and Buddhist votive 
figures of bronze, gilt bronze and clay of the early periods (Cases iA, 
22-24, 26, 37, 49, 56), The addition of these cases resulted in a new 
and improved arrangement of the Hall. Fifteen maps were placed 
in the twelve cases on the south gallery containing the models of Chi- 
nese pagodas, the locality of each pagoda being indicated on the map. 
One of the Chinese screens deposited by Mrs. Marshall Field, Sr.. is 
shown in Room 23. 

The William Wrigley and Arthur B. Jones collection of Indian 
sculpture will be assembled in a single standard case and placed in 
Hall 32 in order to ensure its proper geographical setting. The Tibetan 
bone apron, presented by Mr. Jones, will be found in Case 74. To this 
Hall was also added a new case containing the Tibetan stone sculpture 
obtained by the Blackstone Expedition. These pieces have not been 
exhibited before and are exceedingly rare. Owing to the removal of 
Japanese exhibits into Frank W. Gunsaulus Hall, it became necessary 
to modify the arrangement of the central portion of Hall 32. The 
gap was filled by two cases installed with shields and weapons, copper, 
brass and bidri ware from India. Four stone statues from Java, an 
old acquisition of the Museum, were likewise placed on exhibition, and 
the gold image,, received from the Philippines this year, is shown in H. 
N. Higinbotham Hall. All cases in this Hall, as well as in Hall 24. 
were renumbered. The moving of cases in the former Hall for the 
purpose of recalcimining the walls necessitated rearrangement of 
specimens in the nine wall-cases. 

Room 33 in the northwest corner of the second floor, formerly 
named Frank W. Gunsaulus Hall, proved too small to contain all the 
Japanese collections of the Museum. After the removal of the Library 
to the third floor, provision was made for this section to be accommodated 
in Hall 30 in the southeast corner of the second floor. These two rooms 
are now known as Frank W. Gunsaulus Hall, and were thrown open 
to the public on the 5th of August. Both the old and new acquisitions 
from Japan are here exhibited in thirteen cases, the smaller room being 
assigned to a display of surimono. The large tapestry representing 
a procession to the temples of Nikko, which had been withdrawn from 
exhibition for several years, has been re-instated to its former prom- 



Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 119 

inence. The Gunsaulus collection of Japanese sword mounts has been 
re-installed in two cases specially built in the Museum. This collection 
was received in 1916 and was installed by the curator in 1917 in two 
standard cases which held the entire collection. It was deemed advis- 
able, however, to adopt a selective method in dealing with them, and 
228 guards and 118 smaller mounts with six mounted swords of various 
forms were picked for exhibition. The sword-guards or tsuba exhibit- 
ed are arranged as far as possible in chronological order. The develop- 
ment of decorative design as applied to them may be traced from the 
sixteenth-century iron specimens, which are either plain or ornamented 
with open work, chiselling, or brass inlay, down to the eighteenth or 
nineteenth century, when they were often made of alloys and adorned 
with precious metals in relief. The specimens, which illustrate the 
work of almost all the important artists of sword mounts, are grouped 
according to schools and provinces. The remainder of the collection 
of sword mounts is classified and deposited in a cabinet in Room 51 
(third floor), where it is available for students. 

In Hall I located in the center of the ground floor, a new plan has 
been formulated in order to bring together the popular pastimes and 
theatrical performances as practised in Oriental countries. The object 
of these exhibits is to illustrate, as far as it is possible with the mate- 
rial at present in the Museum's possession, the development of dramatic- 
art in the Orient. The exhibits are grouped in geographical order as 
follows : stage scene from the greatest religious drama of the Chinese 
(Case 1, continued in Cases 2-4) ; the dance of the lions, China (Case 
5) ; actors' masks from a play formerly given in honor of an emperor's 
birthday, and representing the principal gods and goddesses of the 
Taoist religion, China '(Cases 6-7) ; the shadow-play, China (Cases 
8-9) ; masks used in mystery-plays of the Lamas, and costumed figures 
with masks, Tibet (Cases 10-17) ; puppet play, Java (Cases 18-19) ; 
orchestral instruments accompanying performances, Java (Cases 20- 
21); actors' masks, head-dresses and costumes. Java (Cases 22-25); 
Singhalese masks used by actors in pantomimes and comedies, and 
others used by sorcerers in the healing of disease (Cases 26-28). Of 
these 28 cases 16 were newly installed and labeled during the year. 
The Chinese stage scene was shown in the old building in a condensed 
manner in a case 13 x 7 feet. This case has been doubled in size, 
making it possible to display the figures and paraphernalia in exactly 
the same manner as shown on the Chinese stage. The blocks of two 
Mastaba tombs from Egypt were unpacked and laid out in order in 
the south hall of the ground floor. All of them were found in a 



120 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

surprisingly good condition and will require no treatment. Preparations 
are well under way to erect the tombs at the earliest opportunity. 

Four old cases have been remodeled and renovated, nine screens 
were built, and storage racks for the modeler's quarters and Room 35 
(physical anthropology) were erected. In Room 66 the Chinese paint- 
ings were systematically arranged in the cabinet specially built for their 
accommodation last year. The Indian baskets presented by Mr. Homer 
E. Sargent were tribally grouped and stored in the same room. Indian 
house models were stored in Room 36. The material shipped by Dr. 
Mason from Colombia was checked and stored in racks in Room 40, 
valuables being deposited in the office safe. Storage cases in the 
clerestories of the fourth floor were re-arranged. In the modeling, 
section of the Department three Japanese women's heads, hands, and 
feet were completed and utilized for the exhibition of Japanese cos- 
tumes. The small working model of a New Guinea village group was 
completed in July, and the foundation was built for the actual model 
to be made on the scale of 8'x8'. Fifty injured specimens required for 
exhibition were restored, and forty dummies were made for the exhi- 
bition of Plains Indians' costumes. Moulds and other accessories were 
arranged in the newly built storage racks. Material in 1 16 exhibition 
and storage cases was poisoned during the year. 

Botany. The Section of Plant Reproductions (Stanley Field 
Laboratories), completed and placed on exhibition during the past year 
the following plant studies : A complete natural size Pineapple Plant 
in full leaf and flower; a life size plant of the Water Hyacinth in 
flower ; a number of flowers of the Four o' Clock arranged to illustrate 
Mendelian inheritance; and a branch of Agatliis in fruit and one of 
Hymenaea were added to the amber-like resin case in Stanley Field 
Hall. Work was begun, and in some cases is near completion, on the 
following life size plant reproductions: The "Cajou" (Anacardium 
occidentale) , a branch in full leaf and fruit; Dillenia, a leafing, flower- 
ing and fruiting branch ; Chisia, a fruiting and flowering leafy branch ; 
edible Passion flower fruits ; Borassus Palm, a fruiting spadix ; 
"Cicana", a cucumber-like gourd similar in taste to a cantaloupe, and 
which has a delightful fragrance ; a complete plant of the Florida 
"Coontie", Zmnia floridana; an enlarged flower of the "Neem" or 
"Margosa" tree, Melia Asediracha; a whole plant of the Mistletoe in 
flower, leaf and fruit ; flowers of the Chocolate plant ; and a number 
of enlarged fibers of various economic fiber plants such as cotton, hemp, 
flax, ramie, jute and others. 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XXIII. 







IRON METEORITE FROM NAVAJO, ARIZONA. 

WEIGHT, 3,006 POUNDS. 



Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 121 

Four blocks of new steel cases have been added to the equipment 
of the Herbarium, which provide 768 additional pigeonholes for the 
accommodation of the collections. 

Geology. In the Department of Geology, tjie Navajo meteorite 
acquired during the year was installed in a floor case in Hall 34. Space 
for the installation was obtained by consolidating in one case specimens 
of the Canyon Diablo meteorites, which had previously occupied two 
cases. The installation of the entire meteorite collection was also 
improved during the year by mounting all the specimens on individual 
blocks. 

Reconstruction and mounting of the skeleton of Columbian mam- 
moth presented by Mr. George Manierre in 1914 was completed early in 
the year, and the mount placed on exhibition in Hall 38. The work of 
reconstruction, in addition to that mentioned in the report of last year, 
included modelling and coloring of some leg bones, ribs and foot bones. 
A new steel framework for supporting the skeleton was also constructed, 
this work being done in the Museum laboratories. In this construction 
a very satisfactory combination of lightness and strength was obtained. 
A new base was also prepared, this being of standard Museum pattern, 
but with an inset of plaster, modelled and colored to represent ground. 
The skeleton is posed in the attitude assumed by the animal in walking. 

A specimen of the head of a Devonian fish, Macropetalichthys, 
which had been dissected for examination by Dr. Erik Stensio of the 
University of Upsala, during a stay of ten days at the Museum, was 
reinstalled in such a manner as to make the dissected parts visible. In 
preparing this specimen for exhibition all the bony parts were given 
a thin stain of water-color of a brown tint which was characteristic of 
the bone of the specimen. The delicate veins and arteries were then 
picked out in a slightly lighter, and the nervous system in a slightly 
darker color. The matrix was given a gray stain similar to that of 
the original matrix. These stains, being approximately the color of 
the underlying material, do not materially affect the appearance of 
the specimen, beyond making its minute features more evident. The 
separate pieces used for study of the specimen were then assembled 
into a fewer number of larger ones, for which a special type of sup- 
port was prepared. This was done by covering the backs of the assem- 
bled specimens with a sheet of tin-foil. Over this foil a plaster sup- 
port was cast, and after it had hardened this was removed and the 
tin-foil discarded. The plaster was then trimmed, shellacked and 
colored. The specimen, thus mounted, makes a good exhibit, and yet 



122 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

may be readily dissembled for close study. The results of Dr. Stensio's 
study of the specimen, the publication of which is expected shortly, 
promise to furnish an important contribution to paleontology, since the 
specimen afforded for the first time an opportunity to obtain an exact 
and detailed knowledge of the shape of the brain and details of the 
nervous and circulatory system of the head of a vertebrate animal of 
this very early period. The preservation of these soft parts was so 
perfect that they could be studied almost as well as if it were a fresh 
specimen. 

Owing to modern advances in petroleum refining and developments 
in the products obtained, the larger part of the collection in Hall 36 
which illustrates pretoleum products and their uses has been reorganized. 
This reorganization involved not only withdrawing obsolete and sub- 
stituting it by modern material, but also making a new arrangement 
and classification. The new material, as well as glass containers and 
a large exhibition case, was presented by the Standard Oil Company 
(Indiana). The new case is six feet square and eight feet high and is 
glazed on all sides. Its interior is fitted with glass shelves mounted 
u])on glass pedestals. It has been placed in the center aisle in the east 
part of the hall. In it are shown lubricating oils and similar allied 
products of petroleum, the heavier and darker groups being placed in 
the lower part of the case and the lighter and lighter-colored groups 
above. This arrangement helps to bring out the full effect of the 
colors. From an adjoining case, part of the lubricating oils have been 
removed and a series of lubricating greases put in their place. Import- 
ant additions have also been made to the collection of petroleum jellies 
or vaselines. A collection, which had for many years been on exhibi- 
tion illustrating successive stages in the manufacture of finished oils 
according to the methods employed in utilizing Pennsylvania petroleums 
in 1802, has been completely discarded as obsolete and a new collection 
showing successive stages according to modern practice as employed 
by the Standard Oil Company ( Indiana) has been substituted. 

On account of the widespread interest evinced at the present time in 
oil-shales, a collection of specimens of these from several sources was 
assembled and placed on exhibition in Hall 35. The collection occupies 
one half of a floor case. The nucleus of the collection is a series 
presented last year by exhibitors at the American Mining Congress 
and by the U. S. Bureau of Alines. With these, specimens presented 
by Air. J. A. Ede and others, and specimens formerly exhibited under 
other groupings have been incorporated. Exhibits illustrating the use 
of coal-tar pitch as a binder have been added to the coal by-products 



I vn\. 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 123 

collection, where they demonstrate a group of uses for this material 
not before shown. The peat collections have been enlarged by the 
addition of a series of the peats of Minnesota. 

A collection illustrating various products and uses of gypsum, pre- 
sented by the United States Gypsum Company, has been installed in a 
floor case and part of a wall case in Skiff Hall. Several specimens of 
crude gypsum, representing important sources of supply not hitherto 
shown, have been added to the exhibited series. In order to provide 
room for these combined exhibits, the floor cases containing asbestos, 
which had previously occupied two alcoves, were assembled in one, 
and the floor case containing gypsum placed in the empty alcove. A 
collection of gypsum products acquired earlier was also exchanged with 
one exhibiting lime in order to assemble the gypsum exhibits in one 
alcove. 

The model of the Natural Bridge of Virginia has been provided 
with models to scale of an automobile and eighteen human figures. 
With these figures present for comparison, the great size of the bridge 
becomes more apparent. Seven models of human figures, one and 
one-half inches high, have also been made and placed in the models 
of the iron-smelting furnaces. These figures, to insure durability, were 
made of metal. Some of them were cast in Babbitt metal, but those 
last made have been carved directly from lead, this having been found 
i" cdve a quicker and easier means of obtaining the desired result. 

Some progress has been made in the construction of a model of a 
plant for the manufacture of Portland cement. It is proposed to exhibit 
this model in connection with the collection of these cements in Hall 
36. This model is designed to illustrate all stages of the production 
of cement from the mining of the raw materials to the final finished 
product. After some investigation and inquiry, the plant of the Mar- 
quette Cement Company at Oglesby, Illinois, seemed to be the best 
adapted for the purpose, and. with the hearty consent and active co- 
operation of the officials of the company, the modelling of this plant 
was undertaken. The scale of the model now under construction is 
twelve and one-half feet to the inch. When completed it will be ten 
feet long and four feet wide. Details of mining the limestone and clay 
for the cement will be shown, the methods of transportation, and also 
the crushers, kilns and other machinery of the mills. Some of the 
larger elements of the machinery will be shown in section as well as 
entire, so that all stages of the process may be clearly portrayed. The 
model is being made in two sections, to be joined later. The first of 
these sections is now nearly completed. 



124 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

Two attractive and substantial map filing cases have been made 
from plans prepared in the Department, which ensure the preserva- 
tion of the maps and render them readily available for reference. 
The cases contain drawers of two sizes, one suitable for the topographic 
maps and atlases of the U. S. Geological Survey, and the others for 
larger maps. The cases contain 70 drawers. In them there have been 
carefully filed, grouped alphabetically by states and alphabetically under 
each state, 2,856 maps of the U. S. Geological Survey. The atlases of 
the same Survey, numbering 213, have also been placed in the drawers 
in numerical order, and 27 large miscellaneous maps have been given 
adequate space. 

Some additions have been made to the equipment of the chemical 
laboratory, which will considerably facilitate work there, though much 
needs yet to be provided. Two permanent laboratory desks with stone 
tops and piped for gas, water and air were constructed, as well as a 
portion of a hood. A similar desk and part of a hood have been pro- 
vided for the Curator's laboratory. Some new apparatus, including 
a Parr calorimeter, with all accessories, Stokes still, drying oven of 
U. S. Bureau of Standards type, hand rock-crusher and bucking-board, 
has been obtained. During the year several calorimetric determinations 
of the heating value of the fuels used by the Museum have been made, 
as well as various analyses of substances used in the Museum or belong- 
ing to the collections. The patina of a number of Japanese sword 
guards belonging to the Japanese collection has been restored. To the 
equipment of the paleontological laboratory a drill-press and engine 
lathe, each with individual motors, have been added, and the forge 
was connected with a flue, making it available for operation. Use 
of this equipment made it possible to construct in the laboratory the 
steel framework on which the skeleton of the Mammoth was mounted, 
and to manufacture many tools and other articles needed for field- 
work. Text for two guide leaflets, one on the model of the Arizona 
gold mine and one on the models of the blast furnaces for the smelting 
of iron, were prepared by Associate Curator Nichols and published 
during the year. 

Zoology. The exhibition work in the Department of Zoology con- 
sisted mainly of the reinstallation of some of the cases, the preparation 
of specimens for groups, and the mounting of those species needed 
to fill gaps in the serial exhibit. In Hall 22, four cases containing the 
higher Primates were re-installed. The paired specimens were removed 
from their unsightly bases, thoroughly cleaned and otherwise improved. 



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Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 125 

Instead of installing each pair of animals on a separate base, they 
were placed on a new ground-work base that covered the entire bottom 
of the case. This change added much to the attractiveness of the 
exhibit of these interesting animals. For the contemplated group of 
American elk, the taxidermist modeled four animals and made plaster 
casts of them. The serial exhibit, it was believed, could be made more 
interesting by showing a complete series of some of the well known 
North American mammals. For this reason work was started on two 
cases, the one to contain a specimen of each of the large American 
cats; the other to show the bears of North America. For the case of 
cats, a jaguar and a mountain lion were modeled and cast, and the 
work on one specimen for the bear case has been advanced to a similar 
degree. 

Eight cases of the fish exhibit have been greatly improved by re- 
painting the black screens with a light neutral tint, similar to that used 
on the screens in the bird cases. The specimens were rearranged and 
augmented, with the result that the exhibit has been made much more 
attractive. Since black labels are not very satisfactory on light back- 
grounds, as an experiment, one case has been installed with labels more 
in harmony with the color of the screen. The taxidermist assigned 
to the Division of Fishes completed the mounting of the thirty-five 
specimens, work on wTiich was started last year. In addition, he has 
eighty or more specimens under way. These, on being completed, will 
be installed when there are enough in hand to fill a screen. He has also 
prepared a series of specimens showing the different stages of the art 
of mounting fishes by his greatly improved method. The taxidermist 
engaged in reproducing reptiles and amphibians by means of his cel- 
luloid process has secured remarkable results, several of his most recent 
reproductions being wonderfully life-like. The species that he has 
now reproduced in celluloid include, among the amphibians, two green 
tree frogs, a pickerel frog, four leopard frogs showing variation of 
color pattern, one toad, a mud puppy, a hell-bender and two western 
newts. Among the reptiles are a six-lined lizard, a turtle and eight 
snakes, of which the most notable are a pilot snake and a fourteen foot 
anaconda. A case containing the two habitat groups of insects, that 
were mentioned in the report for last year, was completed and placed 
on exhibition at the beginning of the year. Considerable progress has 
been made in condensing the shell collection. By eliminating duplicates, 
four cases have been reinstalled with a representative series of families 
that formerly filled over eight cases. 

As a preliminary step toward forming the long delayed exhibit of 



126 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

butterflies, a series of North American species have been selected and 
many of them remounted and relabeled. Whenever an empty case 
becomes available by condensing the shell exhibit, it will be utilized 
for the exhibition of butterflies or other insects. During the latter 
part of the year, there was installed in Hall 19 a panel exhibit, showing 
the well known periodical or seventeen-year cicada in its various stages. 
This insect was exceedingly abundant in northern Illinois during the 
early part of the summer and will not appear again for another seventeen 
years. A Leaflet on the same insect has also been prepared, and only 
awaits the completion of the drawings for a plate before it is submitted 
for publication. 

For the rearrangement of the exhibits, the Curator formulated plans 
and made diagrams showing tentative provisions for the growth and 
development of each division. In collaboration with Mr. Boardman 
Conover, he prepared a paper entitled "Game Birds from Northwestern 
Venezuela." This was issued by the Museum as Publication 210 of the 
Zoological Series. He also wrote a Leaflet on the "White-tailed Deer." 
As chairman of the local committee of the American Ornithologists' 
Union, which held its annual meeting in the Museum, he endeavored 
to make the meeting as successful as possible. During the absence in 
the field of the Assistant Curator of Birds, noteworthy progress in 
arranging the reference collection of birds and in labeling specimens 
was made. The Assistant in the Division of Birds prepared a Leaflet 
on the "Chicago Winter Birds." 

On assuming his duties in the Museum, Dr. C. E. Hellmayr, the 
Associate Curator of Birds, examined the entire collection, rearranged 
many of the families, and in many ways rendered the specimens more 
accessible and hence more useful. Besides naming several lots sent for 
determination by other museums, he has identified over 1,200 bird skins. 
He has, likewise, given considerable attention to desiderata for the 
Edward E. Ayer Ornithological Library. The reference collection of 
fishes was given some needed attention, but there still remain several 
large collections and some smaller groups that have not yet been dis- 
tributed. Specimens which could be so treated were placed on the 
shelves arranged in families and a finding list prepared for them. 
About one-third of the material so arranged has been relabeled and 
catalogued in an alphabetic index of genera and species. Shelf labels 
in large type, giving the name and number of the family or families 
represented on each shelf, were printed and installed. 

The work of accessioning and cataloguing the specimens in the 
Division of Reptiles and Amphibians was given first consideration. The 



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Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 127 

• 

Assistant Curator also prepared a Leaflet on "The American Alligator," 
identified a collection of lizards from the Fiji Islands, and gave atten- 
tion to the preparations for an expedition to British Honduras and 
Honduras early in 1923. Besides cleaning skulls and skeletons of both 
mammals and fishes, the Assistant Curator of Osteology dismounted 
and placed in the reference collection a number of skeletons. The sea 
elephant has been entirely remounted, and the fingers and toes have 
been wired so as to preclude the possibility of their being broken, if 
handled. 

THE N. W. HARRIS PUBLIC SCHOOL EXTENSION OF 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY 

At the end of the year 1922, this Department had 752 cases avail- 
able for distribution among the schools of Chicago. A scheme, by 
which three cases were loaned at regular intervals to each of 323 schools 
for a period of sixteen school-days, was systematically maintained 
during the year. The adoption of a new method, by which the delivery 
and collection of the cases are made at or near the principal's office, has 
greatly facilitated operations, which must be made during school hours 
in order that proper receipts may be obtained. In addition to sched- 
uled loans, many others were made at the requests of principals and 
teachers. As the demand was almost wholly for cases containing indus- 
trial and commercial exhibits, it was considered advisable to prepare a 
larger number than usual of cases of this character. This has been made 
possible by the temporary employment of a former preparator of this 
department. The subject of one of the cases is "Useful things ob- 
tained from Coal," and sixteen of the best known were selected from 
among its numerous products. In addition to the usual general and 
specimen labels, the case is provided with an attractive and unique 
diagram illustrating the products. 

Permission was obtained, in response to applications, to loan cases 
to schools other than public schools. These were the Francis W. 
Parker and the North Central High Schools, the latter being in charge 
of the Sisters of Charity. A similar request from the Concordia 
Evangelical Lutheran School was received too late for inclusion in the 
schedule of deliveries. A special loan of several cases was made to 
the main Chicago Public Library, and subsequently a request was made 
and granted, that the Library be placed on the schedule with the 
schools. At the annual convention of the National Education Associa- 
tion held in Chicago, February 27th to March 4th, several cases were, 



128 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

by request, placed on exhibition to illustrate the aspect of visual in- 
struction as presented by the Harris Extension, and lantern slides 
of other cases of the Extension were used in lectures. The Mid-winter 
institute for Teachers of MacLean County, Illinois, through Professor 
F. Dean McClusky, Instructor of Education at the University of Illi- 
nois, requested the loan of a number of cases for exhibition and dis- 
cussion during the three days' meeting of the Institute at Bloomington, 
the eight cases sent being much appreciated. 

At the request of the Administrative Secretary of the U. S. National 
Museum at Washington, D. C, a case was sent there for use in a 
lecture given by Dr. Paul Bartsch, Curator, Division of Marine Inver- 
tebrates, of that Institution. In a letter Dr. Bartsch said : "Your loan 
groups are windows, a view through which should create the desire to 
pass through the door into the larger field. " Ten cases were placed 
on exhibition at the south end of George M. Pullman Hall during the 
annual meeting of the American Ornithologists' Union. Cases were 
loaned to the Zoological Museum of the University of Minnesota and 
the Public Museum of Milwaukee as samples in making cases for a 
similar purpose. 

Guide-Lecturer. A Guide-Lecturer was appointed on February 
the 15th for the purpose of conducting school children, clubs, societies 
and other visitors through the Museum Halls, and giving information 
and lectures on the various exhibits. The scheme proved successful 
and it was decided to develop especially the elementary educational 
section. After consultation with Mr. Peter A. Mortensen, Superinten- 
dent of Chicago Public Schools, and Mr. Dudley Grant Hayes, Director 
of Visual Education, a programme was arranged by which lectures at 
the Museum were made to correlate with class-room work in all the 
grades. During the six months in which the schools were in session, 
lectures were given to 139 classes attended by a total of 4,927 children. 
The number of clubs and conventions that visited the Museum during 
the year was not large, but is increasing as wider publicity is given 
to the lectures. In all, 43 clubs and conventions, numbering 1,682 per- 
sons, availed themselves of the service. To meet the requirements of 
casual visitors, a programme of eight weekly tours was announced late 
in July, which were well attended during the tourist season. The 
number of tours conducted was 67, representing an attendance of 527. 
Members of the scientific staff cooperated actively to make this section 
a success. The total number of lectures given during the year was 
249, and the attendance amounted to approximately 10,000. 



Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 



129 



GENERAL 

Printing. As all publications, leaflets, and other matter are now 
printed in the Museum, the work of this section has considerably in- 
creased. 5,540 publications, 30,173 leaflets, and 11,910 special issues 
were printed and bound during the year. The number of labels and 
other impressions printed was as follows : 



Anthropology . . . 

Botany 

Geology 

Zoology 

Harris Extension* 
General 



Exhibition 


Other 


Labels 


Impressions 


6,047 


2,000 


133 


52,642 


711 


2,900 


636 


25,777 


326 


500 


312 


19,549 



Total 



8,165 103,368 



Photography. The following is a tabulation of the work done in 
this section : 



Number of Number of Number of Number of Number of Number of 



General 

Anthropology . . . 

Botany 

Geology 

Zoology 

Harris Extension, 

Sale , 

Gift 

Totals 



Lantern 


Post Cards 


Nega- 


Enlarge- 


Negatives 


Prints 


Slides 


Made 


tives 


ments 


Developed 


Made 


Made 




Made 


Made 


Field Exp. 




163 


3,352 


287 


30 


. . . 


746 






515 


27 




I,8lO 






109 






2.653 






51 




340 


1.328 


23 




144 




86 


143 






78 




. . . 


175 


35 










48 


10 










125 



231 



3,352 



1,184 



57 



426 



7,028 



Photogravure. The number of photogravures printed during the 
year for various purposes is given below : 

Publications 56,000 

Leaflets 96,000 

Postal Cards 20,000 



Total 172,000 

Herewith are also submitted financial statements, lists of accessions, 
names of members, etc., etc. 



D. C. DAVIES, Director. 



130 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 






ATTENDANCE STATISTICS 
FROM JANUARY i, 1922 TO DECEMBER 31, 1922 



Total Attendance 386,209 

Paid Attendance • • 74.339 

Free Admission on Pay Days : 

School Children 21,537 

Students 8,745 

Teachers 1.058 

Members — Corporate 25 

Life & 

Annual 33 

Officers' Families 20 

Press 46 

Special 447 

Admissions on Free Days : 

Thursdays 54> I 58 

Saturdays 60,507 

Sundays 165,322 

Highest Attendance on any day (June 25, 1922) 5,169 

Lowest Attendance on any day (December 18, 1922) 42 

Highest Paid Attendance (September 4, 1922) 2,140 

Average Daily Admissions 1,058 

Average Paid Admissions 359 

Guides sold 18,526 

Articles checked 13,854 

Picture Postal Cards sold 202,708 



Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 131 

GENERAL FUND 

STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1922 
Balance December 31, 1921 $16,237.20 

Receipts 

Income $187,165.04 

South Park Commissioners 100,500.00 

Admissions and Check Room 18,926.78 

Annual Members — Dues 520.00 

Sundry Receipts 11,896.82 

Sale of Securities 28,970.00 

Loans Repaid 4,5*9.33 

Contributions 62,962.76 $415,460.73 

$431,697-93 

Disbursements 

Departmental Expenses $ 37.78i.37 

Expeditions 34, J 82.97 

General Operating Expenses 249,214.33 

. Collections 25,058.18 

Furniture and Fixtures 39-919-98 

Securities Purchased 31,920.00 

Miscellaneous 2,808.54 

$420,885.37 
Transferred to Sinking Funds 9,000.00 $429,885.37 

Cash Balance Dec. 31, 1922 $ 1,812.56 

THE N. W. HARRIS PUBLIC SCHOOL EXTENSION 

Statement of Income and Expenses for the Year 1922 

Income 

Interest and Dividends on Investments $ 15,312.50 

Less Collection Charges 481.38 

$ 14,831.12 
Interest on Bank Balances 44-65 $ 14,875-77 

Expense of Distribution of Cases to Public Schools $ 2,721.13 

Expenses 

General Expense 225.62 

Salaries 8,058.57 $ 11,005.32 

3,870.45 
Deduction from Income (Depreciation of Automobile 

Delivery Car) 602.24 

Net Income for Year 3,268.21 

Less: Amount transferred to Reserve Fund February 2, 

1922 1,325.00 

Balance transferred to Surplus $ i,943-2i 



132 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



ACCESSIONS 



DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY 



ART INSTITUTE of Chicago. 

1 bronze bust of Sitting Bull, by 
Edward Kemeys, with pedestal 
(gift). 

AYER, EDWARD E., Chicago. 

1 woman's breast ornament of 
silver and plated silver, inlaid 
with plain and engraved stones 
— Dalmatia (gift). 

BAKER, PROFESSOR ARCHI- 
BALD GILLIS, Chicago. 
1 large rug of white alpaca fur 
— La Paz, Bolivia (gift). 

BANKS, COL. CHAS. E., Chicago. 
109 prehistoric stone arrowheads 
— Island of Martha's Vine- 
yard, Massachusetts (gift). 

BENJAMIN, C. H., West Lafayette, 
Indiana. 

1 birch-bark canoe — Chippewa, 
Ontario, Canada (gift). 

CHALMERS, WILLIAM J., 
Chicago. 
1 potter)' figurine of woman — 
Tarascan Culture, Michoacan, 
Mexico (gift). 

CROSBY, F. K., Chicago. 

4 tobacco-pipes, 2 war clubs, 1 
bow, 1 bow-case, 1 quiver, 8 
arrows, 1 saddle, 1 kris and 1 
knife — Hunkpapa Teton Sioux, 
Standing Rock Agency, North 
Dakota ; Moro, Philippine 
Islands (gift). 

DODMAN, ALFRED C, JR., New 
York City. 

1 pre-Columbian gold image — 
Central America (gift). 

DRAKE, MRS. TRACY, Chicago. 
1 feast bowl carved from a burl 
— Hawaii (gift). 



FALVEY, Harved P., Chicago. 

1 breast ornament carved from 

banded slate — Port Chesler, 
Indiana (gift). 

FIELD, MRS. MARSHALL, SR., 
Washington, D. C. 

2 lacquered and painted screens, 

each of twelve wooden panels 
— China (deposit). 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL 
HISTORY. 

Collected by J. Alden Mason. — Capt. 
Marshall Field Colombian Ex- 
pedition : 

1527 specimens of carnelian and 
agate beads, bracelets, anklets, 
and necklaces, stone imple- 
ments, pottery and gold orna- 
ments — Arhuaco, Colombia, 
South America. 
Purchases : 

1 gold image of a Hindu deity, 
probably of Javanese work- 
manship — Mindanao, Philip- 
pine Islands. 

58 specimens ethnographical ma- 
terial, chiefly clothing, weap- 
ons, armor, musical instru- 
ments and household utensils 
— Lolo, Sechuan, China, from 
Dr. Camillo Schneider, Char- 
lottenburg. 

1 bronze bust of Dr. Gunsaulus, 
from John G. Prasuhn, Chi- 
cago. 

37 specimens of baskets, arrows, 
belts, moccasins, pipes, and 
miscellaneous objects — Es- 
kimo, Sioux, Porno and Mari- 
copa, Alaska and United 
States — from Mrs. Fred 
Schwatka, Rock Island, Illi- 
nois. 

1 woollen coat, 1 woman's dress, 
embroidered (5 pieces) Quiche 
tribe, Guatemala, from E. W. 
Allstrom, New York City. 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XXVI. 




HEAD OF BODHISATVA, INDIA. GANDHARA PERIOD (SECOND CENTURY A.D.) 

GIFT OF WILLIAM WRIGLEY, JR. 



Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 



133 



45 specimens of buckskin, bead- 
work, basketry, and cere- 
monial objects — Apache, Che- 
rokee, Cheyenne, Hopi, Kiowa, 
Navajo, Paiute, Wichita, Ari- 
zona, Oklahoma and South- 
west United States, from 
Mother Mary Agnes, Chicago. 

FRIEDMAN, OSKAR J., Chicago. 
1 carved wood Chinese screen of 
fifteen panels — China (gift). 

GUNSAULUS, MISS HELEN C, 
Chicago. 

1 carved wood miniature Buddhist 
shrine, for household worship 
—Japan (gift). 

1 woman's belt of strung seeds- 
Hawaii (gift). 

JONES, ARTHUR B., Chicago. 

29 ancient stone sculptures of 
Gandhara and later periods, 1 
Jaina cast brass image, 1 Tib- 
etan ceremonial bone apron — 
India and Tibet (gift). 

LAGERQUIST, DR. A. W., China 

Inland Mission, Shanghai, 
China. 

1 silver enameled wedding ring — 
Laohokow, Hupeh, China 
(gift). 

LOGAN MUSEUM, BELOIT COL- 
LEGE, Beloit, Wisconsin. 
53 fragments of prehistoric pottery 
from shell mounds — Bay of 
Tokyo, Japan (exchange). 

McKINNEY, WILLIAM A Y E R, 
Chicago. 

I suit of hide armor with helmet 
and sword — Lolo, Sechuan, 
China (gift). 

MOESSNER, DR. FREDERICK, 
Chicago. 

63 specimens of arrowheads, ham- 
mers, and other prehistoric 
stone implements; also some 
historical relics (fragments of 
pottery, glass, and iron) — 
Madison, Wisconsin (gift). 

MORGAN, F. W., Chicago. 

1 birchbark canoe — Chippewa, On- 
tario, Canada (gift). 

MUSEU NACIONAL DE RIO DE 
JANEIRO, Brazil. 
33 specimens of bows, arrows, bas- 



kets, bead necklaces, stone axe, 
fiber aprons, bone bracelets — 
Nambiquara, Brazil (ex- 
change). 

NEWMAN, HENRY J., Chicago. 

2 grooved stone axes — Mound Re- 

gion near Cat Fish Creek, Du- 
buque, Iowa (gift). 

NITTA, The MISSES YOKAYAMA 
KAWAMOTO, Evanston, 

Illinois. 

3 pairs women's socks (tabi) — 

Japan (gift). 

NOZAKI, MRS., Chicago. 

3 silk cords for tying sash of 
woman's dress — Japan (gift). 

PATTEN, HENRY J., Chicago. 

1 pair of lacquered Daimyo bows 
on stand, with quiver contain- 
ing 10 arrows — Japan (gift). 

PUBLIC MUSEUM OF MILWAU- 
KEE, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 
56 specimens of woven bags, birch- 
bark vessels, baskets, mats, 
canoe paddle, etc. — Chippewa, 
United States (exchange). 

RYERSON, MARTIN A., Chicago. 

1 figure of mastiff of green-glazed 
Han pottery — China (gift). 

SCOTT, ALEXANDER, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 
1 marble pedestal with high-relief 
carving of triad, Gupta period 
— India (gift). 

SHASTA SPRINGS HOTEL, Shasta 
Springs, California. 
1 mortar carved from lava — Cali- 
fornia (gift). 

WICKER, MISS CAROLINE, Chi- 
cago. 

1 painting representing scenes 
from life of Buddha, 1 Bud- 
dhistic clay votive tablet, 1 Pali 
palm-leaf manuscript, flint and 
steel pouch with brass orna- 
ments — Tibet, China, Burma 
. (gift). 

1 tiger knife, 1 badge in shape of 
Garuda, 1 pair of slippers em- 
broidered with beads, 2 frag- 
ments of glazed pottery, 1 al- 
bum, 1 snake stick — Annam, 
Borneo, China, India, Japan, 
Siam (gift). 



134 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



i silver hat, i ivory seal, I brass 
bell, i cigar case, i lime box, 
3 textiles — Annam, Japan, Ja- 
va, Philippines, Siam (gift). 

WILEY, MRS. WILLARD, R„ Chi- 
cago, 
i pair beaded buckskin saddle-bags 
— Sioux, United States (gift). 

WOOD, JUNIUS, Chicago. 

i large fighting-sword in black- 
lacquered sheath and silk bag, 
I iron sword-guard with de- 



signs inlaid in silver, I fish- 
hook of mother-o'-pearl — 
Japan and Marshall Islands 
(gift). 

WRIGLEY, WILLIAM, JR., Chicago. 

6 Buddhistic stone sculptures of 
the Gandhara period — India 
(gift). 

ZULFER, P. M., Chicago. 

2 woollen blankets with colored 
designs — Teotitlean, State of 
Oaxaca, Mexico (gift). 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY 



ARTHUR, DR. J. C, Lafayette, In- 
diana, 
i herbarium specimen (gift). 

BARTHOLOMEW, ELAM, Stockton, 
Kansas. 

9 herbarium specimens (gift). 
BUCHTIEN, OTTO, La Paz, Bolivia. 

25 herbarium specimens (gift). 

CHALMERS, WILLIAM J., Chicago. 

26 photographs of herbarium speci- 

mens (gift). 

CLOKEY, I. W., Denver, Colorado. 
214 herbarium specimens (ex- 
change). 

CRUMP, DR. J. E., Winter Haven, 
Florida. 
1 economic specimen (gift). 

DAVIDSON, DR. A., Los Angeles, 
California. 
1 herbarium specimen (gift). 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL 
HISTORY. 
Collected by B. E. Dahlgren (Stanley 
Field Guiana Expedition) : 

375 economic and exhibition speci- 
mens. 

240 herbarium specimens. 

52 plants, branches in formalin 
and material for reproduction. 

235 plaster moulds. 

40 plaster casts. 

975 negatives. 
Collected by J. F. Macbride (Capt. 
Marshall Field Peruvian Ex- 
pedition) : 

121 economic and exhibition speci- 
mens. 

2463 dried plants. 

6000 duplicates for exchange. 



Collected by C. F. Millspaugh: 
30 specimens (expedition). 
469 specimens (collated). 
Purchased : 
36,429 herbarium specimens (Capt. 

Marshall Field 1922 Fund). 
17 economic specimens. 

A number of other purchases 
have not yet been organized. 

FULLER, G. D., University of Chi- 
cago. 
59 herbarium specimens (gift). 

GRANT, J. M., Langley, Washington. 
145 herbarium specimens (ex- 
change). 

GRAY HERBARIUM, Cambridge 
Massachusetts. 
346 herbarium specimens (ex- 
change). 

HAZLET, A. E., Sydney, Australia. 
26 photographs of plants (gift). 

HERBIER MUSEUM L'HISTOIRE 
NATURELLE, Paris, France. 
3205 herbarium specimens (ex- 
change). 

INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER 
COMPANY, Chicago. 

11 economic specimens (gift). 
KING, MISS ANNA, Chicago. 

83 herbarium specimens (gift). 

KNOPF, EZRA C, Avalon, Santa 
Catalina, California. 
4 herbarium specimens (gift). 

LLOYD, R. N., Chicago. 

368 herbarium specimens (gift). 

McCREA, R. M., Chicago. 

1 economic specimen (gift). 



Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 



135 



MILLSPAUGH, C. F., Chicago. 
25 specimens (gift). 

NEW YORK BOTANICAL GAR- 
DEN, New York City. 

3 herbarium specimens (gift). 
198 herbarium specimens (ex- 
change). 

PAYSON, E. B., Laramie, Wyoming. 
1 herbarium specimen (gift). 

PEATTIE, DONALD CULROSS, 

Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

264 herbarium specimens (gift). 

PIPER, C. V., Washington, D. C. 
1 herbarium specimen (gift). 

ROSE, DR. J. N., Washington, D. C. 
12 herbarium specimens (gift). 

R. M. McCREA ESTATE, Lake Gen- 
eva, Wisconsin. 
1 economic specimen (gift). 



SHERFF, EARL E., Chicago. 

8 herbarium specimens (gift). 
STRAUCH, F. E., Riverdale, Illinois. 

24 economic specimens (gift). 
TONDUZ, A., Guatemala. 

14 herbarium specimens (gift). 

TUTTLE, R. H., San Bernardino, Cal- 
ifornia. 
1 economic specimen (gift). 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, 
Berkeley, California. 

1 herbarium specimen (exchange). 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRI- 
CULTURE, Washington, D. C. 

1 herbarium specimen (gift). 

U. S. NATIONAL HERBARIUM, 
Washington, D. C. 
1951 herbarium specimens (ex- 
change). 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY 



AYER, EDWARD E., Chicago. 

9 photographs illustrating making 
of a model of Yellowstone 
Park (gift). 

BEDFORD, GEORGE, Morris, Ill- 
inois. 
381 specimens fossil plants. -Mazon 
Creek, Illinois (gift). 

BENTON, O. M., Courtland, Ohio. 
1 specimen petroleum — West Mec- 
ca, Trumbull Co., Ohio (gift). 

CHALMERS, WILLIAM J., Chicago. 
56 models of distorted and pseudo- 
symmetrical crystals (gift). 
225 crystal models (gift). 

CHRISTOPHERSON, A. E., Clar- 
ence, Iowa. 
1 specimen rock weathering — Clar- 
ence, Iowa (gift). 

EDE, J. A., La Salle, Illinois. 

1 specimen oil shale — Peru, Illinois 

(exchange). 
1 specimen smithsonite — Los 

Plumosos, Chihuahua, Mexico 

(exchange). 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL 
HISTORY. 

Collected by B. E. Dahlgren (Stan- 
ley Field Guiana Expedition) : 



1 specimen worked soapstone. 

5 specimens rocks and fossils — 

Guiana. 

Collected by O. C. Farrington (Capt. 
Marshall Field Brazil Ex- 
pedition) : 
808 specimens gems, minerals and 
ores — Brazil, S. A. 

3 specimens sandstone — Navajo, 

Arizona. 

Collected by H. W. Nichols : 

1 specimen river sand — Chicago. 

6 specimens hard-pan — Chicago. 

8 specimens brachiopods — Oglesby, 

Illinois. 
20 specimens gypsum — Oglesby, 

Illinois. 
24 specimens concretions, septaria, 

shales and limestones — La 

Salle, Illinois. 
Purchase : 

4 specimens minerals — Lanzada, 

Italy. 

1 iron meteorite — Dungannon, Vir- 
ginia. 

1 iron meteorite — Navajo, Ari- 
zona. 

1 fossil skull. 

FLEISCHLE, J. H., Springfield, Ill- 
inois. 

1 specimen s e r i c i t e — Arizona 
(gift). 



136 Field Museum of Natural IIistory — Reports, Vol. VI. 



GALLAGHER, J. R, Chicago. 

1 specimen wattevillite — Texas, 
(gift). 

G1LMORE, Dr. W. S., Owensboro, 
Kentucky. 

21 specimens limonite geodes — 
Green River, Kentucky (gift). 

HILL, MARCUS STOW, Chicago. 
1 specimen peat — Prov. of Novgo- 
rod, Russia (gift). 

HOLMES, THOMAS J., Chicago. 

14 specimens peat with fossil 
shells — Bremen, Illinois (gift). 

ILLINOIS CLAY PRODUCTS COM- 
PANY, Oglesby, Illinois. 

4 specimens fire clay — LaSalle Co., 
Illinois (gift). 

JEWELL, F. M., Carlinville, Illinois. 

8 specimens fossils — Fort Benton 

Beds, Kansas (gift). 

KLECKNER, M. E., Tiffin, Ohio. 

1 specimen variegated sandstone — 
Leesville, Ohio (gift). 

LEAN, F. J., Calumet, Michigan. 

24 specimens silver, agates and 
thomsonite — Calumet, Michi- 
gan (gift). 

29 specimens ores and minerals — 
Lake Superior Copper Dis- 
trict, Michigan (gift). 

MARBLEHEAD LIME CO., Chicago. 
1 specimen limestone — Marblehead, 

Illinois (gift). 
10 specimens lime — Marblehead, 

Illinois (gift). 

MARQUETTE CEMENT MFG. 
' COMPANY, Chicago. 
1 panoramic view of the LaSalle 
plant (gift). 

McKEEN, F. A., East Stoneham, 
Maine. 
1 specimen concretio n — East 
Stoneham, Maine (gift). 

MILLAR, A. Q., Murf reesboro. 
Arkansas. 

9 specimens rocks of the diamond 

fields — Pike Co., Arkansas 
(gift). 
1 lot minerals accompanying dia- 
monds — Pike Co., Arkansas 

(gift). 
29 specimens rough and cut gar- 
nets and peridots — Pike Co., 
Arkansas (gift). 



MOESSNER, DR. FREDERICK, 
Chicago. 
7 specimens septaria, concretions 

and stalagmite (gift). 
1 specimen tufa (gift). 
6 specimens fossils (gift). 
13 specimens minerals (gift). 

MORRISON, J. CAMPBELL, Detroit, 
Michigan. 
20 specimens peat — Michigan 
(gift). 

MOSCRIP, A. L., Chicago. 

1 specimen chalk — Scotia, Nebras- 
ka (gift). 

QUICK, ARTHUR C, Austin, Ill- 
inois. 
3 specimens slickensided sand- 
stone — Somerset Co., New Jer- 
sey (gift). 

SCHMITZ, JOSEPH A., Chicago. 

1 specimen petrified wood — 
Arizona (gift). 

STANDARD OIL COMPANY (In- 
diana), Chicago. 
S specimens paraffine (gift). 
47 specimens paraffine candles 

(gift). 
13S specimens petroleum oils and 
greases (gift). 

THOMAS, R. K., Navajo, Arizona. 
1 specimen barite — Seven Springs. 

Colorado (gift). 
5 specimens vertebrate fossils — 
Seven Springs, Colorado 

(gift). r ., 

40 specimens invertebrate fossus — 
Seven Springs, Colorado 
(gift). 
THURBER, H. K., Grand Junction, 
Colorado. 
5 specimens radium, uranium and 
vanadium ores — Utah and Col- 
orado (gift). 

TOLLEFSON, GEO., Chicago. 

1 specimen malachite — Kambove 
Mine, Belgian Congo, Africa 
(gift). 
UNITED STATES GYPSUM COM- 
PANY, Chicago. 
47 specimens illustrating the uses 
of gypsum (gift). 

WISCONSIN MINING SCHOOL, 

Platteville, Wisconsin. 
30 photographs showing all opera- 
tions of typical mine property 
(gift). 



Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 



137 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 



ABBEY, E. S., Chicago. 
1 roach — Chicago (gift). 

ABENDROTH, H., Chicago. 

1 cricket — Illinois. 

1 salamander — Wisconsin (gift). 

ADAMS, MRS. J., Wilmette, Illinois. 
1 oriole — South America (gift). 

AKELEY, CARL E., New York City. 
4 white-tailed deer — Michigan 
(gift). 
ALLEE, DR. W. C, Chicago. 

1 turtle (gift). 

ARCHIBALD, W., Milwaukee, Wis- 
consin. 

1 snake — Wisconsin (gift). 

BABCOCK, FREDERICK R., Wheat- 

on, Illinois. 

1 wart hog skull and scalp — Brit- 

ish East Africa (gift). 

BEST, SALLIE KEEP, Chicago. 

2 horned toads — California (gift). 

BIVANS, K. R., La Grange, Illinois. 
50 specimens of fishes — Michigan 
(gift). 

BOOTH FISHERIES COMPANY, 
Chicago. 

1 fat bass, 4 rat fishes, 4 starry 
flounders — Pacific Ocean 
(gift). 
BRADLEY, HERBERT E., Chicago. 

1 snake — Wisconsin (gift). 

BURNS AND COMPANY, F. J., 
Chicago. 

13 frogs (gift). 

CHESTERFIELD, DR. A. P., Detroit, 
Michigan. 

2 mountain sheep — Mexico (gift). 

CLARK, B. PRESTON, Boston, Mas- 
sachusetts. 

30 hawk-moths — Various parts of 
the world (gift). 

COALE, HENRY K., Highland Park, 
Illinois. 

2 Pacific fulmars — Washington. 

3 redpoll finches — Illinois. 
1 skunk — Illinois (gift). 

CONOVER, H. B., Chicago. 

1 grizzly bear skull — Yukon Ter- 
ritory (gift). 



COUNTRYMAN, MRS. C. E., Chi- 
cago. 
1 sponge — West Coast of Florida. 
1 specimen of coral — Florida 
(gift). 

CRIMMINS, COL. M. L, San Anto- 
nio, Texas. 
5 snakes, 2 rattle-snakes, 1 lizard, 
— Texas (gift). 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL 
HISTORY. 

Collected by W. I. Charlesworth : 
1 whip-scorpion. 
3 centipedes — Miami, Florida. 

Collected by Dr. B. E. Dahlgren : 

(Stanley Field Guiana Expe- 
dition.) 
1 crab-eating coon, 1 opossum, 1 
monkey skull, 7 bats, 6 Cai- 
man eggs, 1 anaconda, 1 ana- 
conda skin, 1 boa skin, 29 
marine toads, 3 snakes, 2 liz- 
ards, 36 frogs, 3 small soles, 
13 mammals, 25 bats, 1 bug, 

1 scorpion, 1 centipede, 15 
louse-flies, 130 insects — man- 
tis, bugs, butterflies, moths, 
bees, etc., 6 South American 
catfishes — British Guiana. 

Collected by W. J. Gerhard : 
70 spiders, bugs, crickets, butter- 
flies, beetles, flies, bees and 
parasites — Indiana and Illinois. 

Collected by E. Liljeblad: 

1 beetle, 11 butterflies, 1 moth — 
Indiana and Illinois. 
Collected by S. F. Hildebrand and 
S. E. Meek: 
1784 specimens of fishes — Panama. 

Collected by C. C. Sanborn : 
1 roach. 
1 beetle — Illinois. 

Collected by Karl P. Schmidt: 
15 frogs, 4 snakes, 2 salamanders, 

2 snakes — Indiana. 

Collected by L. L. Walters : 

1 turtle, 2 lizards, 12 snakes — 

Chicago. 
15 bifd-lice — Indiana. 
5 birds, 7 mammals — Illinois and 

Indiana. 

Collected by A. C Weed and L. L. 
Pray: 
7 birds, 2 toads, 7 frogs, 5 liz- 
ards, 1 snake — Illinois. 



i38 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



1080 specimens of fishes — Missis- 
sippi River, Illinois. 

Collected by A. C. Weed and K. R. 
Bivans : 
275 fishes, 4 dragonfly nymphs, 7 
frogs — Illinois. 

Collected by A. C. Weed and L. L. 
Walters : 

1 turtle, 2 garter snakes, 2 frogs 

— Indiana. 

2 garter snakes, 1 turtle — Illinois. 

2 lizards, 1 spreading adder — Indi- 

ana. 
14 toads, 1 tree toad, 1 garter 
snake, 2 lizards — Indiana. 

3 frogs, 5 American toads — Ill- 

inois. 

Collected by Weed, Walters and 
Scupham : 
837 fishes, 1 frog, 4 toads, 1 tur- 
tle, 5 snakes — Illinois and In- 
diana. 

Collected by Weed, Walters and 
Young : 
2 frogs, 7 turtles — Indiana. 
1 frog, 10 snakes — Illinois. 

Collected by A. C. Weed and F. S. 
Young : 
605 fishes — Illinois. 

Collected by Alfred C. Weed: 

1 water snake, 9 Cumberland ter- 
rapin, 12 map turtles, 1 soft 
shell turtle, 1 lizard — Illinois 
and Missouri. 
7 turtles. 

25 snakes, 12 frogs, 8 toads, 1 
turtle — Illinois. 

Purchases : 
16 birds — Argentina and British 

East Africa. 
9 bugs, 10 ants, 206 beetles — 

South Cameroon, Africa. 
132 birds — Illinois and Alaska. 
1 passenger pigeon — Indiana. 
54 market fishes. 

1 Chinese alligator — Wuhu, China. 

4 green tree toads, 3 coachwhip 

snakes, 2 western chicken 
snakes — Texas. 

2 black snakes, 1 leather snake, 3 

Muhlenberg's turtles, 8 green 
frogs — Pennsylvania. 

FRIESSER, J., Chicago. 

3 moths — Chicago (gift). 

GEILHUFE, F. H., Chicago. 
9 fishes — Chicago (gift). 



GERHARD, W. J., Chicago. 

1 snake — Illinois. 

2 snakes — Indiana. 

184 millipeds, dragonflies, caddice- 
flies, bugs, butterflies, moths, 
flies, beetles, bees, wasps and 
parasites — Indiana and Illinois 
(gift). 

GRAHAM, WILLIAM A, Chicago. 

1 mallard duck — Illinois (gift). 

GRONEMANN, C. F., Chicago. 

2 beetles — Illinois (gift). 

GUERET, E. N., Chicago. 

1 gray-cheeked thrush skeleton — 
Chicago (gift). 

HEEREY, WILLIAM, Chicago. 

1 young alligator — Florida (gift). 

HELLMAYR, DR. C. E., Chicago. 

4 moths. 

60 butterflies — C entral Europe 
(gift). 

HELLMAYR, MRS. C. E., Chicago. 

1 English sparrow — Chicago 

(gift). 

HINE, ASHLEY, Chicago. 

8 mammals. 

50 birds — Western Canada (gift). 

HOWELL, A. B., Pasadena, Calif. 

2 free-tailed bats — California 

(gift). 

HOYT, N. L., Chicago. 

1 case of mounted birds (gift). 

ILLINOIS STATE DEPARTMENT 
OF GAME AND FISH, 
Springfield, Illinois. 

3 spoonbill catfish — Illinois. 

2 turtles — Illinois (gift). 

JACOBS, JOHN SHIELDS, Chicago. 
1 rattle-snake (gift). 

JENSEN, MARTIN, Chicago. 
1 scorpion — Chicago (gift). 

KAEMPFER, FRED, Chicago. 

1 monkey — South America (gift). 

KNICKERBOCKER, C. K, Chicago. 
1 woodpecker — Minnesota (gift). 

LEWY, DR. ALFRED, Chicago. 
1 red-throated loon — Indiana 
(gift). 



Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 



139 



LILT EB LAD, E., Chicago. 

14 grasshoppers, flies, bugs and 
beetles — Michigan and Illinois 
(gift). 

LINDSEY, DR. A. W., Granville, 
Ohio. 
2 beetles — California (gift). 

MARSHALL, BYRON C, Imboden, 
Arkansas. 
5 insects, spiders and ticks — Ar- 
kansas (gift). 

MORDEN, W. J., Chicago. 

2 mountain sheep — Yukon, Canada 
(gift). 

MOREHEAD, MRS. E., Chicago. 

1 Sphinx moth — Georgia (gift). 

MUSEUM OF COMPARATIVE 
ZOOLOGY, Cambridge, Mas- 
sachusetts. 
50 lizards — Fiji Islands (gift). 

NARBO, DR. S., Stavanger, Norway. 

8 sets of eggs. 

2 nests — Norway (gift). 

NEW YORK STATE CONSERVA- 
TION COMMISSION, Al- 
bany, N. Y. 

2 Chautauqua Lake muskallonge — 

New York (gift). 

OSGOOD, DR. WILFRED H., 
Chicago. 
1 beetle — Illinois (gift). 

PATTERSON, IVAN D., Polo, 
Illinois. 

1 snake — Illinois (gift). 

PRAY, LEON L., Chicago. 

3 bird-lice — Michigan (gift). 

RINDSFOOS, WILLIAM, Columbus, 
Ohio. 

2 Alaskan white sheep — Alaska 

(gift). 

ROTHSCHILD'S DEPT. STORE 
AQUARIUM, Chicago. 
127 specimens of aquarium fishes, 
7 snakes — Florida, Texas and 
Arizona. 

4 salamanders, 5 frogs, 9 lizards, 

T7 turtles, 59 snakes — Various 
localities. 

3 horned toads — Texas. 

1 head of gar-pike — Illinois. 
1 frog — Louisiana (gift). 



SAGATAS, PETER, Glencoe, Illinois. 
1 hornet's nest — Illinois (gift). 

SANBORN, C. C, Chicago. 

20 bird-lice, 1 louse-fly, 1 water 
beetle, 18 mammals, 1 black- 
bellied plover, 1 toad, 7 frogs, 

1 blowing adder — Illinois 
(gift). 

SCUPHAM, E., Chicago. 
3 bird-lice. 

3 millipeds — Illinois (gift). 

•SEELIG, J. C, Chicago. 

1 tanned skin of large lizard — 

West Sumatra. 
1 skin of slow lemur — Padang, 

Sumatra (gift). 

SOUTHERN BIOLOGICAL SUP- 
PLY CO., New Orleans, 
Louisiana. 

4 tree frogs — Louisiana (gift). 

THOMAS, R. K., Navajo, Arizona. 
1 beetle. v 

SO shells — Arizona (gift). 

THOMPSON, G. C, Chicago. 

1 grasshopper, 1 beetle, 11 moths, 
15 rat fleas — Illinois (gift). 

TUNA CLUB, Catalina Island, 
California. 
9 game fish — California (gift). 

TYRRELL, W. B., Chicago. 
3 frogs — Michigan (gift). 

WALTERS, L. L., Chicago. 

3 toads, 1 lizard, 111 snakes — 
Indiana (gift). 

WEED, A. C, Chicago. 

9 flies — New York. 

6 bugs, 7 centipedes, 7 millipeds, 

2 beetle larvae, 1 snake — Illi- 
inois. 

1 water snake skull — New York 
(gift). 

WOLCOTT, A. B., Chicago. 

1 fly, 1 butterfly, 2 bugs, 2 ear- 
wigs, 3 moths, 3 beetles, 10 
bees, wasps and parasites — 
Illinois (gift). 

YOUNG, F. S., Chicago. 

5 snakes — Florida (gift). 



140 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



THE LIBRARY 

LIST OF DONORS AND EXCHANGES 
(Accessions are by exchange, unless otherwise designated) 



AFRICA : 

Durban Museum. 

East Africa and Uganda Natural 
History, Nairobi. 

Geological Society, Johannesburg. 

Government of Uganda Protectorate. 

Institut d'Egypte, Cairo. 

Ministry of Public Works, Cairo. 

Rhodesia Scientific Society, Bula. 
wayo. 

Royal Society of South Africa, Cape 
Town. 

South African Association for Ad- 
vancement of Science, Cape Town. 

South African Department of Agri- 
culture, Pretoria. 

South African Museum, Cape Town. 

ARGENTINA : 
Direccion Edicion Oficial Obras Con- 

pletas de Ameghino, La Plata. 
Museo de La Plata. 
Museo Nacional, Buenos Aires. 
Sociedad Argentina de Ciencias 

Naturales, Buenos Aires. 
Sociedad Ornithologica del Plata, 

Buenos Aires. 
Universidad Nacional, Buenos Aires. 

AUSTRALIA : 

Australian Museum, Sydney. 

Botanic Gardens and Government 
Domains, Sydney. 

Commonwealth of Australia, Mel- 
bourne. 

Department of Agriculture, Sydney. 

Department of Agricultuure, Ade- 
laide. 

Department of Agriculture, Wel- 
lington. 

Department of Mines, Brisbane. 

Department of Mines, Sydney. 

Field Naturalists' Club, Melbourne. 

Fish Commission of New South 
Wales, Sydney. 

Forestry Commission, Sydney (gift). 

Geological Survey of Western Aus- 
tralia, Perth. 

Institute of Science and Industry, 
Sydney. 

Linnean Society of New South 
Wales, Sydney. 

Melbourne University. 

National Herbarium, Melbourne. 

Public Library, Museum and Art 
Gallery, Adelaide'. 



Public Library, Museum and Na- 
tional Gallery of Victoria, Mel- 
bourne. 

Queensland Museum, Brisbane. 

Royal Geographical Society of Aus- 
tralasia, Brisbane. 

Royal Society of New South Wales, 
Sydney. 

Royal Society of Queensland, Bris- 
bane. 

Royal Society of South Australia, 
Adelaide. 

Royal Society of Tasmania, Hobart. 

Royal Society of Victoria, Mel- 
bourne. 

Roval Society of Western Australia, 
Perth. 

Royal Zoological Society of New 
South Wales, Sydney. 

South Australia Ornithological So- 
ciety, Adelaide. 

South Australian Museum, Adelaide. 

Tasmanian Museum, Hobart. 

Victoria Department of Agriculture, 
Melbourne. 

Western Australia Geological Sur- 
vey, Perth. 

AUSTRIA: 

Naturhistorisches Hofmuseum, 

Vienna. 
Naturhistorisches Landesmuseum 

von Karnten, Klagenfurt. 
Universitat, Vienna. 
Zoologisch-Botanischd Gesellschaft, 

Vienna. 

BRITISH GUIANA: 
Royal Agricultural and Commercial 
Society, Georgetown. 

BELGIUM : 

Academie Royale de Belgique, Brus- 
sels. 

Institut Botanique Leo Errera, Brus- 
sels. 

Jardin Botanique de l'Etat. Brussels. 

Musee Royale d'Histoire Naturelle, 
Brussels. 

Nederlandsche Phytopathologische 
(Plantenziekten) Vereeniging, 

Gent. 

Societe Royale d'Archeologie, Brus- 
sels. 

Societe de Botanique, Brussels. 

Vereenigingen Kruidkundig Genoot- 
schap Dodonaea, Gent. 



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[an., 19-23. Annual Report of the Director. 



141 



BRAZIL: 

Biblioteca Nacional, Rio de Janeiro. 
Escola Superior de Agricultura e 

Medecina, Veterinaria. Rio de 

Janeiro. 
Instituto Agronomico, Sao Paulo, 
lnstituto Sorotherapico de Butantun, 

Sao Paulo. 
Sociedade Brasileira de Sciencias, 

Rio de Janeiro. 
Museu Nacional, Rio de Janeiro. 
Jardin Botanique de Rio de Janeiro. 

Society, Demerara. 

BULGARIA: 
Musee Ethnographique National, 
Sofia. 

CANADA : 

Canadian Arctic Expedition, Ottawa 
(gift). 

Chief Game Guardian of Saskatche- 
wan, Regina. 

Commission de Geographie de Que- 
bec (gift). 

Department of Agriculture, Ottawa. 

Department of Agriculture, Victoria. 

Department of Mines, Ottawa. 

Department of Interior, Geological 
Survey, Ottawa. 

Entomological Society of Ontario, 
Toronto. 

Horticultural Societies, Toronto. 

Ontario Minister of Education, 
Toronto. 

Provincial Museum, Toronto. 

Provincial Museum, Victoria. 

Royal Canadian Institute, Toronto. 

Royal Society of Canada, Ottawa. 

Societe de Geographie, Quebec. 

University of Toronto. 

CENTRAL AMERICA: 
Colegio de Sonoritas, San Jose. 

CEYLON : 
Colombo Museum. 

CHINA : 

Botany and Forestry Department, 

Hong-Kong. 
Geological Survey, Pekin. 
Royal Asiatic Society of North 

China, Shanghai. 
Science Society of China, Shanghai 

(gift). 
University of Nanking. 

CZECHO-SLOVAKIA: 

Deutscher ^Naturwissenschaftlich 
Medizinischer Verein fur Bohmen 
"Lotos" Prag. 



Gesellschaft fiir Physiokratie in 

Bohmen, Prag. 
Societas Entomologica Bohemica. 

Prag. 
Universita Karlova, Prag. 

DENMARK : 

Danske Kunstindustrimuseum, Co- 
penhagen. 

Naturhistorisk Forening, Copen- 
hagen. 

Societe Botanique, Copenhagen. 

ECUADOR : 

Academia Nacional de Historia, 
Quito. 

FEDERATED MALAY STATES : 

Federated Malay States Museum, 
Kuala Lumpur. 

FIJI ISLANDS: 
Fijian Society, Suva. 

FINLAND : 

Abo Akademi. 

Finnish Archaeological Society, Hel- 

singfors. 
Finskt Museum, Helsingfors. 
Societas pro Fauna et Flora Fennica. 

Helsingfors. 

FRANCE : 

Academie des Sciences, Paris. 

Congres de Monaco, Paris (gift). 

Ecole d'Anthropologie, Paris. 

Ministere de I'Instruction Publique, 
Paris (gift). 

Musee Guimet, Paris. 

Museum National d'Histoire Na- 
turelle, Paris. 

La Nature, Paris. 

Societe d'fitudes Scientifiques, An- 
gers v 

Societe d'Histoire Naturelle, Toul- 
ouse. 

Societe d'Horticulture, Paris. 

Societe de Geographie, Paris. 

Societe de Geographie, Toulouse. 

Societe des Americanistes, Paris. 

Societe Linguistique de Paris. 

Societe Linneenne, Bordeaux. 

Societe Nationale d'Agriculture, 
Sciences et Arts, Angers. 

GERMANY : 

Bayerische Akademie der Wissen- 

schaften, Munich. 
Botanischer Garten und Botanisches 

Museum, Berlin. 
Botanischer Verein der Provinz 

Brandenburg, Berlin. 



i4-' Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



Deutsche Dendrologische Gesell- 
schaft, Bonn-Poppelsdorf. 

Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Anthro- 
pologie, Ethnologie und Urge- 
schichte, Berlin. 

Deutsche Morgenlandische Gesell- 
schaft. Leipzig. 

Deutscher Seefischerei Verein, 
Berlin. 

Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, 
Berlin. 

Geographische Gesellschaft, Ham- 
burg. 

Gesellschaft fiir Erdkunde, Berlin. 

Gesellschaft zur Forderung der Ges- 
amten Naturwissenschaften, Mar- 
burg. 

Hamburgische Universitat. 

K. Museum fiir Volkskunde. Berlin. 

K. Universitats Bibliothek, Marburg. 

K. Universitats Bibliothek, Munich. 

K. Zoologisches Museum, Berlin. 

Museum fiir Volkerkunde, Hamburg. 

Museum fiir Volkerkunde, Leipzig. 

Nassauischer Verein fiir Natur- 
kunde, Wiesbaden. 

Naturforschende Gesellschaft, Gor- 
litz. 

Naturwissenschaftliche Gesellschaft, 
Dresden. 

Naturwissenschaftlicher V erein, 
Karlsruhe. 

Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein fiir 
Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel. 

Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein fiir 
Steiermark, Graz. 

Ornithologische Gesellschaft in Bay- 
ern, Munich. 

Physikalisch-Medizinische Sozietat, 
Erlangen. 

Rheinische Missions-Gesellschaft, 
Barmen. 

Senckenbergische Naturforschende 
Gesellschaft, Frankfurt a-M. 

Stadtisches Museum fiir Volker- 
kunde, Leipzig. 

Verein fiir Vaterlandische Natur- 
kunde in Wiirttemberg. Stuttgart. 

Zoologisches Museum, Hamburg. 

GREAT BRITAIN: 

Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. 
Birmingham Natural History and 

Philosophical Society. 
Bristol Museum and Gallery. 
British Museum, London. 
British Museum (Natural History), 

London. 
Cambridge Antiquarian Society. 
Cambridge Philosophical Society. 
Cardiff Naturalists' Society. 



Challenger Society, London. 

Dove Marine Laboratory, Culler- 
coats. 

Dumfriesshire and Galloway Natural 
History and Antiquarian Society, 
Dumfries. 

Fisheries Board, Edinburgh. 

Geological Society, Edinburgh. 

Geological Society, Liverpool. 

Great Britain Geological Survey, 
London. 

Horniman Museum and Library, 
London. 

Hull Municipal Museum. 

Imperial Bureau of Entomology, 
London. 

Imperial College of Science and 
Technology, London. 

Japan Society of London. 

Lancashire Sea Fisheries Laboratory, 
Liverpool. 

Linnean Society of London. 

Liverpool Biological Society. 

London Library. 

Manchester Field Naturalists' and 
Archaeologists' Society. 

Manchester Geographical Society. 

Manchester Literary and Philosoph- 
ical Society. 

Manchester Museum. 

Marine Biological Association, Ply- 
mouth. 

Museum of Archaeology and Ethn- 
ology, Cambridge. 

National Museum of Wales, Cardiff. 

Natural History and Philosophical 
Society, Croydon. 

Natural History Society, Glasgow. 

Natural History Society of North- 
umberland, Durham and New- 
castle-on-Tyne, Newcastle. 

Royal Anthropological Institute of 
Great Britain and Ireland, London. 

Royal Botanic Gardens, Edinburgh. 

Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. 

Royal Colonial Institute, London. 

Royal Geographical Society, London. 

Royal Horticultural Society, London. 

Royal Scottish Museum, Edinburgh. 

Royal Society, London. 

Royal Society of Arts, London. 

Royal Society of Edinburgh. 

South London Entomological and 
Natural History Society, London. 

Tring Zoological Museum. 

Victoria and Albert Museum, Lon- 
don. 

Wellcome Chemical Research Lab- 
oratories, London. 

Zoological Society of London. 

Zoological Society of Scotland. 



Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 



143 



HUNGARY : 
Magyar Termeszettudomanyi Tarsu- 

lat, Budapest. 
Museum Nationale Hungaricum, 
Budapest. 

INDIA : 

Anthropological Society, Bombay. 

Archaeological Survey, Allahabad. 

Archaeological Survey, Calcutta. 

Archaeological Survey, Eastern Cir- 
cle, Patna. 

Archaeological Survey, Frontier Cir- 
cle, Peshawar. 

Archaeological Survey Department, 
Madras. 

Archaeological Survey of Burma. 
Lahore. 

Asiatic Society of Bengal, Calcutta. 

Bihar and Orissa Research Society, 
Patna. 

Department of Agriculture, Bombay. 

Department of Agriculture, Madras. 

Department of Agiculture, Poona. 

Department of Agriculture, Pusa. 

Geological Survey, Calcutta. 

Government of India, Calcutta. 

Government Cinchona Plantation, 
Calcutta. 

Government Museum, Madras. 

Indian Museum. Calcutta. 

Journal of Indian Botany, Madras. 

National Indian Association, Cal- 
cutta (gift). 

Royal Asiatic Society, Straits 
Branch, Singapore. 

Superintendent of Archaeology, 
Kashmir. 

Superintendent of Archaeology H. 
E. H. Nizam's Dominions, Hyder- 
abad. 

University of Calcutta. 

Zoological Survey of India, Calcutta. 

IRELAND: 

Belfast Naturalists' Field Club. 

Department of Agriculture, Scienti- 
fic Investigations, Dublin. 

Geological Survey, Dublin. 

National Museum of Science and 
Art, Dublin. 

Natural History and Philosophical 
Society. Belfast. 

Royal Irish Academy, Dublin. 

Royal Dublin Society. 

ITALY : 

Accademia delle Scienze Fisiche e 

Matimatiche, Naples. 
Istituto Botanica, Universita di 

Pavia. 



Instituto Geografico de Agostini, 

No vara. 
Musei Zoologiae Anatomia Com- 

parata, Turin. 
R. Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei, 

Rome. 
R. Accademia delle Scienze di 

Torino. 
R. Orto Botanico Giardrno Col- 

oniale, Palermo. 
R. Scuola Superiore di Agricoltura, 

Portici. 
R. Societa Geografica Italiana, Rome. 
Societa di Scienze Naturali ed Econ- 

omische, Palermo. 
Societa Italiana d'Antropologia e 

Etnologia, Florence. 
Societa Italiana de Scienze Naturali, 

Milan. 
Societa Toscana di Scienze Na- 
turali, Pisa. 

JAPAN : 

Anthropological Society, Tokyo. 
Educational Museum, Tokyo. 
Geological Society, Tokyo. 
Imperial University, Taihoku. 
Imperial University of Tokyo, Col- 
lege of Science. 
Ornithological Society, Tokyo. 
Tokyo Botanical Societ3 r . 

JAVA : 

Bataviaasch Genootschap van Kun- 

sten en Wetenschappen, Batavia. 
Department of Agriculture, Buiten- 

zorg. 
Encyclopaedisch Bureau, Welte- 

vreden. 
Jardin Botanique, Weltevreden. 
Java Instituut, Weltevreden. 
K. Natuurkundige Vereeniging itv 

Nederlandsch-Indie, Weltevreden. 

KOREA : 

Government General of Chosen, 
Keijo. 

MEXICO: 

Instituto Geologico de Mexico. 
Museo Nacional de Arqueologia, 

Historia y Etnografia, Mexico. 
Secretaria de Agricultura y Fo- 

mento. Direccion de Antropologia, 

Mexico. 
Sociedad Cientifica "Antonio Al- 

zate," Mexico. 

NETHERLANDS : 

Koloniaal Instituut Amsterdam. 
Kolonial Museum te Haarlem. 



144 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



K. Akademie van Wetenschappen, 
Amsterdam. 

K. Bibliothek, Hague. 

K. Instituut voor de Taal-Land-en 
Volkenkunde van Nederlandsch 
Indie, The Hague. 

K. Nederlandsch Aardijkundig Ge- 
nootschap, Amsterdam. 

Museum voor Land-en Volkenkunde 
en Maritiem Museum "Prinz 
Hendrik," Rotterdam. 

Nederlandsche Dierkunde Vereenig- 
ing, Leiden. 

Nederlandsche Phytopathologische 
Vereeniging, Wageningen. 

Rijks Ethnographisch Museum, Lei- 
den. 

Rijks Hoogere Land-Tuin-en Bosch- 
bouwschool, Wageningen. 

Rijks Museum van Natuurlijke His- 
toric, Leiden. 

Universiteit van Amsterdam, Biblio- 
thek. 

NEW ZEALAND : 

Acclimatisation Society, Wellington. 

Auckland Institute and Museum, 
Wellington. 

Canterbury Museum, Christchurch. 

Department of Agriculture, Welling- 
ton. 

Department of Mines, Wellington. 

Dominion Museum, Wellington. 

New Zealand Board of Science and 
Art, Wellington. 

New Zealand Institute, Wellington. 

NORWAY : 

Bergen Museum. 

Physiographiske Forening i Chris- 

tiania. 
Tromso Museum. 

PERU: 

Biblioteca Nacional, Lima. 

Cuerpo de Ingenicros de Minas, 

Lima. 
Cuzco Universidad. 
Instituto Historico, Lima. 
Sociedad Geografica, de Lima. 

POLAND : 
Musei Polonici Historiae Naturales, 
Warsaw. 

PORTUGAL : 
Societe Portuguaise des Sciences 

Naturelles, Lisbon. 
Universidade. Institute de Anatomia 

e Anthropologia, Lisbon. 



RUSSIA: 
Academie Imperiale des Sciences, 

Petrograd. 
Musee d'Anthropologie et d'Ethno- 

graphie, Petrograd. 
Universitat Dorpatensis. 

SPAIN : 

Collegio de Pasaje, La Guardia. 

Institucio Catalana d'Historia Na- 
tural, Barcelona. 

Instituto General y Tecnico, Val- 
encia. 

Junta de Ciencies Naturals, Bar- 
celona. 

Museo Nacional de Ciencias Na- 
turales, Madrid. 

R. Academia de Ciencias y Artes, 
Barcelona. 

R. Academia de Ciencias Exactas, 
Fisicas y Naturales, Madrid. 

Sociedad Espafiola de Historia Na- 
tural, Madrid. 

SWEDEN : 

HumanistikaVetenskapsfundet.Lund. 

K. Biblioteket, Stockholm. 

K. Svenska Vetenskapsakademien, 
Stockholm. 

K. Vetenskaps-och Vitterhets Sam- 
halle, Goteborg. 

K. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvi- 
tets Akademien, Stockholm. 

Lunds Universitet. 

Svenska Sallskapet for Antropologi 
och Geografi, Stockholm. 

Sveriges Offentliga Bibliotek, Stock- 
holm. 

Universitet. Biblioteket, Upsala. 

SWITZERLAND : 

Botanisches Museum, Zurich. 
Historisches Museum, Bern. 
Naturforschende Gesellschaft, Basel. 
Naturforschende Gesellschaft, Bern. 
Ostschweizerische Geograph-Com- 

mercielle Gesellschaft, St. Gallen. 
Societe de Physique et Historie Na- 

turelle, Geneva. 
Societe Entomologique, Bern. 
Societe Fribouegeoise des Sciences 

Naturelles, Fribourg. 
Societe Neuchateloise de Geographic 

VENEZUELA : 
Cultura Venezolana, Caracas. 

WEST INDIES: 

Academia Nacional de Artes y 
Letras, Havana. 



Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 



145 



Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Porto Rico. 

Biblioteca Nacional, Havana. 

Department of Agriculture of Ja- 
maica, Kingston. 

Imperial Department of Agriculture, 
Barbados. 

Oficina Nacional del Censo, Havana. 

Trinidad and Tobago Department of 
• Agriculture, Port of Spain. 

Universidad de Habana. 

Ballai, Karl, Budapest (gift). 

Bertoni, Moises S., Parana. 

Boman, Eric, Buenos Aires (gift). 

Brown, A. R., Cape Town (gift). 

Carpenter, G. H., Dublin. 

Dunod, H., Paris. 

Fyson, P. F., Madras. 

Gamio, Manuel, Mexico (gift). 

Gleerup, C. W. K., Lund. 

Hartland, Sidney, Gloucester. 

Herdman, William, Liverpool. 

Hill-Tout, Charles, Vancouver, (gift). 

Huard, A., Quebec. 

Jenness, D., Ottawa. 

Levy-Bruhl, L., Paris. 

Outes, Felix F., Buenos Aires. 

Preuss, K., Berlin. 

Rassers, W. H., Leiden (gift). 

Rinne, F, Leipzig (gift). 

Rivet, P., Paris. 

Snethlage, E., Berlin (gift). 

Tavares, J. S., Braga. 

ALABAMA : 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Auburn. 

Anthropological Society, Montgom- 
ery. 

ARIZONA: 
Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Tucson. 

CALIFORNIA : 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Berkeley. 

California Academy of Sciences, 
San Francisco. 

Cooper Ornithological Club, Holly- 
wood. 

Pomona College, Claremont. 

San Diego Society of Natural 
History. 

Scripps institution of Biological Re- 
search, La Jolla. 

Stanford University. 

State Board of Forestry, Sacra- 
mento. 

State Mining Bureau, Sacramento. 

University of California, Berkeley. 



World Metric Standardization Coun- 
cil, San Francisco. 

COLORADO : 

Bureau of Mines, Denver. 

Colorado College, Colorado Springs. 

Colorado Museum of Natural His- 
tory, Denver. 

Colorado Scientific Society, Denver. 

Colorado University, Boulder. 

State Historical and Natural History 
Society, Denver. 

CONNECTICUT: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 

New Haven. 
American Oriental Society, New 

Haven. 
Connecticut Academy of Arts and 

Sciences, New Haven. 
Hartford Public Library. 
Peabody Museum, New Haven. 
Wesleyan University, Middletown. 
Yale University, New Haven. 

DELAWARE: 
Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Newark. 

FLORIDA: 

Florida Geological Survey, Talla- 
hassee. 

GEORGIA : 
Geological Survey, Atlanta. 

HAWAII : 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Honolulu. 

Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum. 
Honolulu. 

Board of Commissions of Agricul- 
ture and Forestry, Honolulu. 

Hawaiian Entomological Society, 
Honolulu. 

Hawaiian Historical Society, Hono- 
lulu. 

IDAHO : 

Mining Industry, Boise. 
University of Idaho, Moscow. 

ILLINOIS : 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Urban a. 
Art Institute of Chicago. 
Audubon Society, Chicago. 
Board of Education, Chicago. 
Chicago Public Library. 
Division of Natural History Survey, 

Urbana. 
Hardwood Record, Chicago (gift). 
John Crerar Library, Chicago. 



146 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



Lake Forest College. 

Newberry Library, Chicago. 

Northwestern University, Evanston. 

Open Court Publishing Company, 
Chicago. 

State Academy of Science, Spring- 
field. 

State Board of Agriculture, Spring- 
field. 

State Geological Survey, Urbana. 

State Historical Library, Springfield. 

State Water Survey, Urbana. 

Sweet, Wallach and Company, 
Chicago (gift). 

University of Chicago. 

Universit}' of Illinois, Urbana. 

West Chicago Park Commissioners. 

INDIANA : 
Academy of Science, Indianapolis. 
Department of Conservation, Indi- 
anapolis. 
Indiana University, Bloomington. 
Legislative Reference Bureau, In- 
dianapolis. 
Purdue University, Lafayette. 
University of Notre Dame. 

IOWA: 

Iowa State College, Ames. 
University of Iowa, Iowa City. 

KANSAS: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Manhattan. 
State Board of Agriculture, Topeka. 
University of Kansas, Lawrence. 

KENTUCKY : 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Louisville. 

Department of Geology and For- 
estry, Frankfort. 

LOUISIANA : 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Baton Rouge. 

Department of Conservation, New 
Orleans. 

Louisiana State Museum, New Or- 
leans. 

MAINE : 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Orono. 
Bowdoin College, Brunswick. 
Portland Public Library. 

MASSACHUSETTS : 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Amherst. 



American Antiquarian Society, 
Worcester. 

Boston Public Library. 

Boston Society of Natural History. 

Department of Agriculture, Division 
of Ornithology, Boston. 

Essex Institute, Salem. 

Harvard College. Museum of Com- 
parative Zoology, Cambridge. 

Harvard University. Arnold Arbor- 
etum, Jamaica Plain. 

Harvard University. Gray Herbar- 
ium, Cambridge. 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society, 
Boston. 

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. 

New Bedford Free Public Library. 

Peabody Institute, Peabody. 

Peabody Museum, Cambridge. 

Phillips Academy, Andover. 

Salem Public Library. 

Smith College, Northampton. 

Springfield City Library Association. 

Springfield Natural History Mu- 
seum. 

Tufts College. 

Williams College, Williamstown. 

MICHIGAN: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Agricultural College. 

Detroit Institute of Art. 

Geological and Natural History Sur- 
vey, Lansing. 

Grand Rapids Public Library. 

Michigan College of Mines, 
Houghton. 

Michigan State Library, Lansing. 

State Board of Agriculture, Lansing. 

State Board of Library Commis- 
sions, Lansing. 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. 

MINNESOTA: 
Agricultural Experiment Station, 

University Farm. 
Minneapolis Institute of Arts. 
Minnesota Historical Society, Saint 

Paul. 
Saint Paul Institute. 
University of Minnesota, 

Minneapolis. 

MISSISSIPPI: 
Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Agricultural College. 
State Geological Survey, Jackson 
(gift). 
MISSOURI: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Columbia. 



[an., 1923. Axxial Report of the Director. 



147 



City Art Museum, Saint Louis. 
Missouri Botanic Garden, Saint 

Louis. 
Missouri Historical Society, 

Columbia. 
Saint Louis Public Library. 
Saint Louis University. 
University of Missouri. Scbool of 

Mines, Rolla. 
Washington University, Saint Louis. 

MONTANA: 
University of Montana, Missoula. 

NEBRASKA: 
University of Nebraska, Lincoln. 

NEVADA: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Car- 
son City. 

NEW JERSEY: 

Agricultural Station, Trenton. 
Department of Conservation and De- 
velopment, Trenton. 
Newark Museums Association. 
Princeton University. 
Stevens Institute, Hobokcn. 

NEW MEXICO: 

New Mexico Museum, Santa Fe. 

NEW YORK: 

' Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Geneva. 

Amalgamated Press, New York City. 

American Geographical Society, 
New York City. 

American Institute of Mining En- 
gineers, New York City. 

American Museum of Natural His- 
tory, New York City. 

Asia Publishing Company, New York 
City. 

Brooklyn Botanic Garden. 

Brooklyn Institute of Arts and 
Sciences. 

Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences. 

Carnegie Foundation for the Ad- 
vancement of Teaching, New York 
City (gift.) 

Cooper Union for the Advancement 
of Science and Art, New York 
City. 

Cornell University, Ithaca. 

Forest and Stream Publishing Com- 
pany, New York City. 

Inter-American Magazine, New 
York City (gift.) 

Japan Society, New York City. 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New 
York City. 



Museum of the American Indian, 

New York City. 
New York Academy of Sciences, 

New York City. 
New York Botanical Garden, New 

York City. 
New York Historical Society, New 

York City. 
Pratt Institute Free Library, New 

York City. 
Public Library, New York City. 
Rockefeller Foundation, New York 

City. 
State College of Forestry, Syracuse. 
State Library, Albany. 
State Museum, Albany. 
Staten Island Institute of Arts and 

Sciences, New York City. 
Stone Publishing Companv, New 

York City. 
University of the State of New York, 

Albany. 
Zoological Society, New York City. 

NORTH CAROLINA: 

Klisha Mitchell Scientific Societv, 
Chapel Hill. 

NORTH DAKOTA : 
University of North Dakota, Uni- 
versity. 

OHIO: 
Agricultural Experiment Station. 

Wooster. 
Cincinnati Museum Association. 
Cleveland Museum of Art. 
Cleveland Public Library. 
Denison University, Granville. 
Geological Survey, Columbus. 
State Archaeological and Historical 

Society, Columbus. 
State University, Columbus. 
University of Cincinnati. 
Wilson Ornithological Club, Oberlin. 

OREGON : 
Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Corvallis. 
University of Oregon, Eugene. 

PENNSYLVANIA : 
American Philosophical Societv. 

Philadelphia. 
Aquatic Life (gift.) 
Association of Engineering Societies, 

Philadelphia. 
Rryn Mawr College. 
Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh. 
Carnegie Library, Pittsburgh. 
Carnegie Museum, Pittsburgh. 
Delaware County Institute of 

Science, Madia. 



148 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



Dropsie College, Philadelphia. 

Engineers' Society of Western Penn- 
sylvania, Pittsburgh. 

Franklin Institute, Philadelphia. 

Numismatic and Antiquarian Society. 
Philadelphia. 

Pennsylvania Museum and School 
of Industrial Art, Philadelphia. 

Philadelphia Acadamy of Natural 
Society, VVilkes-Barre. 

Wyoming Historical and Geological 
Sciences. 

Philadelphia College of Pharmacy. 

Philadelphia Commercial Museum. 

Sullivant Moss Society, Pittsburgh. 

University of Pennsylvania, Phila- 
delphia. 

University of Pennsylvania, Museum, 
Philadelphia. 

Wagner Free Institute of Science, 
Philadelphia. 

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS. 

Bureau of Education, Manila. 

Department of Agriculture, Manila. 

Department of Agriculture and Na- 
tural Resources, Manila. 

Department of Interior, Bureau Of 
Science, Manila. 

RHODE ISLAND: 

Park Museum, Providence. 

SOUTH CAROLINA: 

Charleston Museum. 
SOUTH DAKOTA: 
Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Brookings. 
Geological and Natural History Sur- 
vey, Vermilion. 

TEXAS : 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 

College Station. 
University of Texas, Austin. 

VERMONT : 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Burlington. 
State Forester, Montpelier. 

VIRGIN ISLANDS: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, St. 
Croix. 

VIRGINIA : 

State Library, Richmond. 

University of Virginia, Charlottes- 
ville. 

Virginia Geological Survey, Char- 
lottesville. 

Virginia State Forester, Charlottes- 
ville. 



WASHINGTON : 

Department of Conservation and De- 
velopment. Division of Geology, 
Olympia. 

Pacific Northwest Bird and Mammal 
Club, Seattle. 

Washington Geological Survey, Pull- 
man. 

Washington University, Seattle. 

Washington University, Historical 
Society, Seattle. 

WASHINGTON, D. C, : 
American Mining Congress. 
Carnegie Institution of Washington 

(gift) 
Library of Congress. 
National Academy of Sciences. 
National Education Association 

(gift.) 
National Zoological Park. 
Pan American Union. 
Smithsonian Institute. 
United States Government. 
United States National Museum. 

WEST VIRGINIA: 

West Virginia University, Morgan- 
town. 

WISCONSIN : 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Madison. 
Beloit College. 

Geological and Natural History Sur- 
vey, Madison. 

Public Museum of Milwaukee. 

State Horticultural Society, Madison. 

University of Wisconsin, Madison. 

Ayer, Edward E., Chicago (gift). 
Arthur, J. C, Lafayette. 
Baker, Frank Collins, Urbana. 
Barnes, Claude T., Salt Lake City 

(gift). 
Boas, Pranz, New York City. 
Beyer, George E., New Orleans. 
Casey, Thomas L., Washington (gift). 
Chalmers, W. J., Chicago (gift). 
Cockerell, T. D. A., Boulder. 
Conover, H. B., Chicago, (gift). 
Cook, Melville T., New Brunswick. 
Crook, A. R., Springfield. 
Davies, D. C, Chicago (gift). 
Derby, Mrs. William M. Jr., Chicago 

(gift). 
Eigenmann, Carl H, Bloomington. 
Evans, Alexander W., New Haven. 
Farwell. Oliver A., Detroit (gift). 
Field, Stanley, Chicago (gift). 
Garland Manufacturing Company, 

Saco (gift). 

Gerhard, William J., Chicago (gift). 



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Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 



149 



Glessner, John J., Chicago (gift). 

Harris, G., Ithaca. 

Harrison, William J., Chicago (gift). 

Hay, Oliver P., Washington. 

Hrdlicka, Ales, Washington. 

Hubbs, Carl L., Ann Arbor. 

Kihu, W. Langdon, New York City 

(gift). 
Laufer, Berthold, Chicago (gift). 
Le Breton, Thomas L., Ambassador of 

Argentine, Washington (gift). 
Lewis, A. B., Chicago (gift). 
Liljeblad, Emil, Chicago (gift). 
Millspaugh, C. F., Chicago (gift). 
Morse, Edward S., Salem. 
Myer, Albert C, Philadelphia (gift). 



Osgood, W. H., Chicago (gift). 
Packard, E. L., Eugene (gift). 
Parish- Watson, New York City (gift). 
Penrose, R. A. F., Philadelphia. 
Richter, Gisela M. A., New York City 

(gift). 
Riggs, Mrs. Elmer S., Chicago (gift). 
Sargent, C. S., Jamaica Plain (gift). 
Steece, Henry M., Washington (gift). 
Tompkins-Kiel Marble Company, New 

York City (gift). 
Verner, S. P., 

Weiss, Harry B., New Brunswick. 
Wicker, Carolyn, Chicago (gift). 
Wolcott, A. B., Chicago (gift). 
Zimmer, John T., Chicago (gift). 



150 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION 



STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State. 
To All to Whom These Presents Shall Come, Greeting: 

Whereas, a Certificate duly signed and acknowledged having been filed in the 
office of the Secretary of State, on the 16th day of September, a. d. 1893, for the 
organization of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO, under and in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of "An Act Concerning Corporations," approved 
April 18, 1872, and in force July 1, 1872, and all acts amendatory thereof, a copy 
of which certificate is hereto attached. 

Now, therefore, I, William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State of the State of 
Illinois, by virtue of the powers and duties vested in me by law, do hereby certify 
that the said COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO is a legally organized 
Corporation under the laws of this State. 

In Testimony Whereof, I hereto set my hand and cause to be affixed the 
Great Seal of State. Done at the City of Springfield, this 16th day of September, 
in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three, and of the 
Independence of the United States the one hundred and eighteenth. 

W. H. HINRICHSEN, 
[Seal] Secretary of State. 



TO HON. WILLIAM H. HINRICHSEN, 

Secretary of State : 

Sir: 

We, the undersigned citizens of the United States, propose to form a cor- 
poration under an act of the General Assembly of the State of Illinois, entitled 
"An Act Concerning Corporations," approved April 18, 1872, and all acts 
amendatory thereof ; and that for the purposes of such organization we hereby 
state as follows, to-wit : 

1. The name of such corporation is the "COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF 
CHICAGO." 

2. The object for which it is formed is for the accumulation and dis- 
semination of knowledge, and the preservation and exhibition of objects illus- 
trating Art, Archaeology, Science and History. 

3. The management of the aforesaid museum shall be vested in a Board of 
Fifteen (15) Trustees, five of whom are to be elected every year. 

4. The following named persons are hereby selected as the Trustees for the 
first year of its corporate existence: 



Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 151 

Edward E. Aver, Charles B. Farwell, George E. Adams, George R. Davis, 
Charles L. Hutchinson, Daniel H. Bumham, John A. Roche, M. C. Bullock, 
Emil G. Hirsch, James W. Ellsworth, Allison V. Armour, O. F. Aldis, Edwin 
Walker, John C. Black and Frank W. Gunsaulus. 

5. The location of the Museum is in the City of Chicago, County of Cook, 
and State of Illinois. 

(Signed), 

George E. Adams, C. B. Farwell, Sidney C. Eastman, F. W. Putnam, Robert 
McCurdy, Andrew Peterson, L. J. Gage, Charles L. Hutchinson. Ebenezer 
Buckingham, Andrew McNally, Edward E. Ayer, John M. Clark, Herman H. 
Kohlsaat, George Schneider, Henry H. Getty, William R. Harper, Franklin H. 
Head, E. G. Keith, J. Irving Pearce, Azel F. Hatch, Henry Wade Rogers, 
Thomas B. Bryan, L. Z. Leiter, A. C. Bartlett, A. A. Sprague, A. C. McClurg, 
James W. Scott, Geo. F. Bissell, John R. Walsh, Chas. Fitzsimmons, John A. 
Roche, E. B. McCagg, Owen F. Aldis, Ferdinand W. Peck, James H. Dole, 
Joseph Stockton, Edward B. Butler, John McConnell, R. A. Waller, H. C. 
Chatfield-Taylor, A. Crawford, Wm. Sooy Smith, P. S. Peterson, John C. 
Black, Jno. J. Mitchell, C. F. Gunther, George R. Davis, Stephen A. Forbes, 
Robert W. Patterson, Jr., M. C. Bullock, Edwin Walker, George M. Pullman, 
William E. Curtis, James W. Ellsworth, William E. Hale, Wm. T. Baker, 
Martin A. Ryerson, Huntington W. Jackson, N. B. Ream, Norman Williams, 
Melville E. Stone, Bryan Lathrop, Eliphalet W. Blatchford, Philip D. Armour. 

State of Illinois ] 

r SS 
Cook County J 

I, G. R. Mitchell, a Notary Public in and for said County, do hereby 

certify that the foregoing petitioners personally appeared before me and 

acknowledged severally that they signed the foregoing petition as their free and 

voluntary act for the uses and purposes therein set forth. 

Given under my hand and notarial seal this 14th day of September, 1893. 

G. R. MITCHELL, 

[Seal] Notary Public, Cook County, III. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 

Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the corporate members held 
the 25th day of June, 1894, the name of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM was 
changed to FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. A certificate to this effect was 
filed June 26, 1894, in the office of the Secretary of State for Illinois. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 

Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the corporate members held 
the 8th day of November, 1905, the name of the FIELD COLUMBIAN 
MUSEUM was changed to FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
A certificate to this effect was filed November 10, 1905, in the office of the 
Secretary of State for Illinois. 



CHANGE IN ARTICLE 3. 

Pursuant to a resolution at a meeting of the corporate members held the 
10th day of May, 1920, the management of FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL 
HISTORY shall be invested in a Board of Twenty-one (21) Trustees, who 
shall be elected in such manner and for such time and term of office as may 
be provided for by the By-Laws. A certificate to this effect was filed May 21, 
1920, in the office of the Secretary of State for Illinois. 



152 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



AMENDED BY-LAWS 



(February 20, 1922.) 



ARTICLE 1. 

MEMBERS 



Section i. Members shall be of seven classes, Corporate Members, Hon- 
orary Members, Patrons, Life Members, Associate Members, Sustaining Mem- 
bers, and Annual Members. 

Section 2. The Corporate Members shall consist of the persons named in 
the articles of incorporation, and of such other persons as shall be chosen from 
time to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, upon the recom- 
mendation of the Executive Committee; provided, that such person named in 
the articles of incorporation shall, within ninety days from the adoption of these 
By-Laws, and persons hereafter chosen as Corporate Members shall, within 
ninety days of their election, pay into> the treasury the sum of twenty ($20.00) 
dollars or more. Corporate Members becoming Life Members, Patrons or 
Honorary Members shall be exempt from dues. Annual meetings of said 
Corporate Members shall be held at the same place and on the same day that 
the annual meeting of the Board of Trustees is held. 

Section 3. Honorary Members shall be chosen by the Board from among 
persons who have rendered eminent service to science, and only upon unanimous 
nomination of the Executive Committee. They shall be exempt from all dues. 

Section 4. Patrons shall be chosen by the Board upon recommendation of 
the Executive Committee from among persons who have rendered eminent 
service to the Museum. They shall be exempt from all dues, and, by virtue of 
their election as Patrons, shall also be Corporate Members. 

Section 5. Any person paying into the treasury the sum of five hundred 
($500.00) dollars, at any one time, shall, upon the unanimous vote of the Board, 
become a Life Member. Life Members shall be exempt from all dues, and shall 
enjoy ail the privileges and courtesies of the Museum that are accorded to mem- 
bers of the Board of Trustees. 

Section 6. Any person paying into the treasury of the Museum the sum of 
one hundred ($100.00) dollars, at any one time, shall upon the unanimous vote of 
the Board, become an Associate Member. Associate Members shall be entitled 
to: tickets admitting member and members of family, including non-resident 
home guests ; all publications of the Museum, if so desired ; reserved seats to all 
lectures and entertainments under the auspices of the Museum, provided 
reservation is requested in advance ; and admission of holder of membership and 
accompanying party to all special exhibits and Museum functions day or evening. 

Section 7. Sustaining Members shall consist of such persons as are selected 
from time to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, and who 
shall pay an annual fee of twenty-five ($25.00) dollars, payable within thirty 
days after notice of election and within thirty days after each recurring annual 
date. This Sustaining Membership entitles .the member to free admission for 
the member and family to Museum on any day and allows 25 admission coupons, 



Jan., 1923. Annual Retort of the Director. 153 

which may be used by any one, the Annual Report and such other Museum 
documents or publications as may be requested in writing. When a Sustaining 
Member has paid the annual fee of $25.00 for six years, such member shall 
be entitled to become an Associate Member. 

Section 8. Annual Members shall consist of such persons as are selected 
from time to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, and who 
shall pay an annual fee of ten ($10.00) dollars, payable within thirty days 
after each recurring annual date. An Annual Membership shall entitle the 
member to a card of admission for the member and family during all hours 
when the Museum is open to the public, and free admission for the member 
and family to all Museum lectures or entertainments. This membership will 
also entitle the holder to the courtesies of the membership privileges of every 
Museum of note in the United States and Canada, so long as the existing sys- 
tem of cooperative interchange of membership tickets shall be maintained, 
including tickets for any lectures given under the auspices of any of the 
Museums during a visit to the cities in which the cooperative museums are 
located. 

ARTICLE II. 

HOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

Section i. The Board of Trustees shall consist of twenty-one members. 
The respective members of the Board now in office, and those who shall here- 
after be elected, shall hold office during life. Vacancies occurring in the Board 
shall be filled at a regular meeting of the Board, upon the nomination of the 
Executive Committee made at a preceding regular meeting of the Board, by a 
majority vote of the members of the Board present. 

Section 2. Regular meetings of the Board shall be held monthly. Special 
meetings may be called at any time by the President, and shall be called by 
the Secretary upon the written request of three Trustees. Five Trustees shall 
constitute a quorum, except for the election of officers or the adoption of the 
Annual Budget, when seven Trustees shall be required, but meetings may be 
adjourned by any less number from day to day, or to a day fixed, previous 
to the next regular meeting. 

Section 3. Reasonable written notice, designating the time and place of 
holding meetings, shall be given by the Secretary. 

ARTICLE III. 

HONORARY TRUSTEES. 

Section i. As a mark of respect, and in appreciation of services performed 
for the Institution, those Trustees who by reason of inability, on account of 
change of residence, or for other cause or from indisposition to serve longer 
in such capacity shall resign their place upon the Board, may be elected, by a 
majority of those present at any regular meeting of the Board, an Honorary 
Trustee for life. Such Honorary Trustee will receive notice of all meetings 
of the Board of Trustees, whether regular or special, and will be expected to be 
present at all such meetings and participate in the deliberations thereof, but an 
Honorary Trustee shall not have the right to vote. 

ARTICLE IV. 

officers. 

Section i. The officers shall be a President, a First Vice-President, a 
Second Vice-President, a Third Vice-President, a Secretary, an Assistant Secre- 
tary and a Treasurer. They shall be chosen by ballot by the Board of Trustees. 
a majority of those present and voting being necessary to elect. The President, 



154 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

the First Vice-President, the Second Vice-President, and the Third Vice-Presi- 
dent shall be chosen from among the members of the Board of Trustees. The 
meeting for the election of officers shall be held on the third Monday of January 
of each year, and shall be called the Annual Meeting. 

Section 2. The officers shall hold office for one year, or until their suc- 
cessors are elected and qualified, but any officer may be removed at any regular 
meeting of the Board of Trustees by a vote of two-thirds of all the members 
of the Board. Vacancies in any office may be filled by the Board at any meeting. 

Section 3. The officers shall perform such duties as ordinarily appertain 
to their respective offices, and such as shall be prescribed by the By-Laws, or 
designated from time to time by the Board of Trustees. 

ARTICLE V. 

THE TREASURER. 

Section i. The Treasurer shall be custodian of the funds of the Cor- 
poration except as hereinafter provided. He shall make disbursements onlj 
upon warrants drawn by the Director and countersigned by the President. In 
the absence or inability of the Director, warrants may be signed by the chair- 
man of the Finance Committee, and in the absence or inability of the President, 
may be countersigned by one of the Vice-Presidents. But no warrant shall be 
issued, except in conformity with a regularly prepared voucher, giving the name 
of the payee and stating the occasion for the expenditure, and verified and 
approved as hereinafter prescribed. It shall be no part of the duties of the 
Treasurer to see that the warrants have been issued in conformity with such 
vouchers. 

Section 2. The securities and muniments of title belonging to the cor- 
poration shall be placed in the custody of some Trust Company of Chicago to 
be designated by the Board of Trustees, which Trust Company shall collect 
the income and principal of said securities as the same become due, and pay 
same to the Treasurer, except as hereinafter provided. Said Trust Company 
shall allow access to and deliver any or all securities or muniments of title to 
the joint order of the following officers, namely The President or one of the 
Vice-Presidents, jointly with the Chairman, or one of the Vice-Chairmen, of the 
Finance Committee of the Museum. 

Section 3. The Treasurer shall give bond in such amount, and with such 
sureties as shall be approved by the Board of Trustees. 

Section 4. All vouchers executed for the payment of liabilities incurred in 
the administration of the Museum, shall be verified by the Auditor, and ap- 
proved for payment by the Director, and a member of the Executive Commit- 
tee. All vouchers executed for expenditures for the construction or recon- 
struction of the Museum building, or buildings, shall be verified by the Auditor 
and approved for payment by the Chairman of the Building Committee. All 
vouchers executed in connection with the investments of the Corporation, or. in 
any way having to do with the endowment funds of the Corporation, shall 
be verified by the Auditor j.nd approved for payment by the Chairman of the 
Finance Committee. 

Section 5. The Harris Trust & Savings Bank of Chicago shall be Cus- 
todian of "The N. W. Harris Public School Extension of Field Museum" fund. 
The bank shall make disbursements only upon warrants drawn by the Director 
and countersigned by the President. In the absence or inability of the Director, 
warrants may be signed by- the Chairman of the Finance Committee, and in the 
absence or inability of the President, may be countersigned by the Vice-Presi- 
dents. But no warrant shall be issued, except in conformity with a regularly 
prepared voucher, giving the name of the payee and stating the occasion for 
the expenditure, and verified and approved by the Auditor, the Director, and a 



I ax., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 155 

member of the Executive Committee. It shall be no part of the duties of the 
said Custodian to see that the warrants have been issued in conformity with 
such vouchers. 

ARTICLE VI. 

THE DIRECTOR 

Section' i. The Board of Trustees shall elect a Director of the Museum, 
who shall remain in oftke until his successor shall be elected. He shall have im- 
mediate charge and supervision of the Museum, and shall control the operations 
of the Institution, subject to the authority of the Board of Trustees and its 
Committees. The Director shall be the official medium of communication be- 
tween the Board, or its Committees, and the scientific staff and maintenance 
force. 

Section 2. There shall be four scientific departments of the Museum — 
Anthropology, Botany, Geology and Zoology ; each under the charge of a 
Curator, subject to the authority of the Director. The Curators shall be ap- 
pointed by the Board upon the recommendation of the Director, and shall 
serve during the pleasure of the Board. Subordinate staff officers in the 
scientific departments shall be appointed and removed by the Director upon 
the recommendation of the Curators of the respective Departments. The 
Director shall have authority to employ and remove all other employees of the 
Museum. 

Section 3. The Director shall make report to the Board at each regular 
meeting, recounting the operations of the Museum for the previous month. At 
the Annual Meeting, the Director shall make an Annual Report, reviewing 
the work for the previous year, which Annual Report shall be published in 
pamphlet form for the information of the Trustees and Members, and for free 
distribution in such number as the Board may direct. 

ARTICLE VII. 

AUDITOR 

Section i. The Board shall appoint an Auditor, who shall hold his office 
during the pleasure of the Board. He shall keep proper books of account, setting 
rth the financial condition and transactions of the Corporation, and of the 
Museum, and report thereon at each regular meeting, and at such other times 
as may be required by the Board. He shall certify to the correctness of all 
vouchers for the expenditure of the money of the Corporation. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

committees. 

Section i. There shall be five Committees, as follows: Finance, Building, 
Auditing, Pension and Executive. 

Section 2. The Finance Committee shall consist of five members, the 
Auditing and Pension Committees shall each consist of three members, and the 
Building Committee shall consist of five members. All members of these four 
Committees shall be elected by ballot by the Board at the Annual Meeting, and 
shall hold office for one year, and until their successors are elected and quali- 
fied. In electing the members of these Committees, the Board shall designate 
the Chairman and Vice-Chairman by the order in which the members are 
named in the respective Committee; the first member named shall be Chair- 
man, the second named the Vice-Chairman, and the third named, Second Vice- 
chairman, succession to the Chairmanship being in this order in the event of 
the absence or disability of the Chairman. 

Section 3. The Executive Committee shall consist of the President of the 



156 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

Board, the Chairman of the Finance Committee, the Chairman of the Building 
Committee, the Chairman of the Auditing Committee, the Chairman of the 
Pension Committee, and three other members of the Board to be elected by 
ballot at the Annual Meeting. 

Section* 4. Four members shall constitute a quorum of the Executive Com- 
mittee, and in all standing Committees two members shall constitute a quorum. 
In the event that, owing to the absence or inability of members, a quorum of 
the regularly elected members cannot be present at any meeting of any Com- 
mittee, then the Chairman thereof, or his successor, as herein provided, may 
summon any members of the Board of Trustees to act in place of the absentee. 

Section 5. The Finance Committee shall have supervision of investing the 
endowment and other permanent funds of the Corporation, and the care of such 
real estate as may become its property. It shall have authority to invest, sell, 
and reinvest funds, subject to the approval of the Board. 

Section 6. The Building Committee shall have supervision of the con- 
struction, reconstruction, and extension of any and all buildings used for 
Museum purposes. 

Section 7. The Executive Committee shall be called together from time 
to time as the Chairman may consider necessary, or as he may be requested 
to do by three members of the Committee, to act upon such matters affecting 
the administration of the Museum as cannot await consideration at the Regular 
Monthly Meetings of the Board of Trustees. It shall, before the beginning of 
each fiscal year, prepare and submit to the Board an itemized Budget, setting 
forth the probable receipts from all sources for the ensuing year, and make 
recommendations as to the expenditures which should be made for routine 
maintenance and fixed charges. Upon the adoption of the Budget by the 
Board, the expenditures as stated are authorized. 

Section 8. The Auditing Committee shall have supervision over all ac- 
counting and bookkeeping, and full control of the financial records. It shall 
cause the same, once each year, or oftener, to be examined by an expert indi- 
vidual or firm, and shall transmit the report of such expert individual or firm 
to the Board at the next ensuing regular meeting after such examination shall 
have taken place. 

Section 9. The Pension Committee shall determine by such means and 
processes as shall be established by the Board of Trustees to whom and in what 
amount the Pension Fund shall be distributed. These determinations or findings 
shall be subject to the approval of the Board of Trustees. 

Section 10. The Chairman of each Committee shall report the acts and 
proceedings thereof at the next ensuing regular meeting of the Board. 

Section ii. The President shall be ex-officio a member of all Committees 
and Chairman of the Executive Committee. Vacancies occurring in any Com- 
mittee may be filled by ballot at any regular meeting of the Board. 

ARTICLE IX. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Section i. At the November meeting of the Board, each year a Nomi- 
nating Committee of three shall be chosen by lot. Said Committee shall make 
nominations for membership of the Finance Committee, the Building Commit- 
tee, the Auditing Committee, and the Pension Committee, and for three mem- 
bers of the Executive Committee, from among the Trustees, to be submitted 
at the ensuing December meeting and voted upon at the following Annual 
Meeting in January. 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XXIX. 




WATER HYACINTH (Piaropus crassipes). 

REPRODUCTION OF AN ENTIRE PLANT. 

STANLEY FIELD LABORATORIES, FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



wmm of mm* u %mi 



^9^9^^^°^ 



)\n.. [923. Annual Report of the Director. 157 

ARTICLE X. 

CTION i. Whenever the word "Museum" is employed in the By-Laws of 
the Corporation, it shall be taken to mean the building in which the Museum as 
an Institution is located and operated, the material exhibited, the material in 
study collections, or in storage, furniture, fixtures, cases, tools, records, books, 
and all appurtenances of the Institution and the workings, researches, installa- 
tions, expenditures, field work, laboratories, library, publications, lecture courses, 
and all scientific and maintenance activities. 

Section 2. These By-Laws may be amended at any regular meeting of the 
Board of Trustees by a two-thirds vote of all the members present, provided 
the amendment shall have been proposed at a preceding regular meeting. 



158 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



AVER, EDWARD E, 
AYER, MRS. EDWARD E. 
BLACKSTONE, MRS. T. B 
CHALMERS, WILLIAM J. 
CRANE, CHARLES R. 
FIELD, MARSHALL 
FIELD, STANLEY 



GRAHAM, ERNEST R. 
HARRIS, ALBERT W. 
JONES, ARTHUR B. 
McCORMICK, STANLEY 
RYERSON, MARTIN A. 
SIMPSON. JAMES 
S PRAGUE, ALBERT A. 



PATRONS 



ANDERSON, PEIRCE 
ARMOUR, ALLISON V. 
BUTLER, EDWARD B. 
COLLINS, ALFRED M. 
CUMMINGS, MRS. ROBERT F. 
DAY, LEE GARNETT 
HUTCHINSON, CHARLES L. 
KELLEY, WILLIAM V. 

WHITE. 



KENNEDY, VERNON SHAW 
KUNZ, GEORGE F. 
MANIERRE, GEORGE 
MARKHAM, CHARLES H. 
PAYNE, JOHN BARTON 
PROBST, EDWARD 
SARGENT, HOMER E. 
SMITH, WILLARD A. 
HOWARD J. 



DECEASED 1Q22 

MILLER, JOHN S. 
WILSON, JOHN P. 



Ian., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 



[59 



CORPORATE 

ALDIS, OWEN F. 
AXDERSON, PEIRCE 
ARMOUR. ALLISON V. 
AYER, EDWARD E. 

BLAIR, WATSON F. 
BORDEN, JOHN 
BUTLER, EDWARD B. 
BYRAM, HARRY E. 

CHALMERS, W. J. 
CHATFIELD-TAYLOR, H. C. 
COLLINS, ALFRED M. 
CRANE, Jr., RICHARD T. 
CUMMINGS, MRS. ROBERT F. 

DAVIES, D. C. 

DAY, LEE GARNETT 

EASTMAN, SIDNEY C. 
ELLSWORTH, JAMES W. 

FIELD, MARSHALL 
FIELD, STANLEY 

GAGE, LYMAN J. 
GRAHAM, ERNEST R. 

HARRIS, ALBERT W. 
HUTCHINSON, CHARLES L. 



MEMBERS 

JONES, ARTHUR B. 

KEEP, CHAUNCEY 
KELLEY, WILLIAM V. 
KENNEDY, VERNON SHAW 
KOHLSAAT, HERMAN H. 
KUNZ, GEORGE F. 

McCORMICK, CYRUS H. 
MANIERRE, GEORGE 
MARKHAM, CHARLES H. 
MITCHELL, JOHN J. 

PAYNE, JOHN BARTON 
PECK, FERDINAND W. 
PORTER, GEORGE F. 
PROBST, EDWARD 

RYERSON, MARTIN A. 

SARGENT, HOMER E. 
SIMPSON, JAMES 
SMITH, SOLOMON A. 
SMITH, WILLARD A. 
SPRAGUE, ALBERT A. 
STONE, MELVILLE E. 

WHITE, HOWARD J. 
WRIGLEY, Jr., WILLIAM 



DECEASED IQ22 

BARTLETT, A. C. 
MILLER, JOHN S. 
WILSON, JOHN P. 



i6o 



Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 






LIFE MEMBERS 



ADAMS, MILWARD 
ALDIS, ARTHUR T. 
ALDIS, OWEN F. 
ALEXANDER, WILLIAM A. 
ALLEN, BENJAMIN 
ALLERTON, ROBERT H. 
AMES, JAMES C. 
AMES, KNOWLTON L. 
ARMOUR, A. WATSON 
ARMOUR, J. OGDEN 
ARMOUR, LESTER 

BABCOCK, FRED'K: R. 
BAKER, MISS ISABELLE 
BANCROFT, EDGAR A. 
BANKS, ALEXANDER F. 
BARRELL, FINLEY 
BARRETT, MRS. A. D. 
BARRETT, ROBERT L. 
BASSFORD. LOWELL C. 
BEALE, WILLIAM G. 
BECKER, A. G. 
BILLINGS. C. K. G. 
BILLINGS, FRANK 
BLACKSTONE, MRS. T. B. 
BLAINE, MRS. EMMONS 
BLAIR, HENRY A. 
BLAIR, WATSON F. 
BLOCK, P. D. 
BOOTH, W. VERNON 
BORDEN, JOHN 
BORLAND, CHAUNCEY B. 
BOYNTON, C. T. 
BRIDGE, NORMAN 
BREWSTER, WALTER S. 
BROWN, WILLIAM L. 
BUCHANAN, D. W r . 
BUFFINGTON, EUGENE J. 
BURNHAM, JOHN 
BUTLER EDWARD B. 
BYLLESBY, H. M. 



CARRY, EDWARD F. 
CARR, CLYDE M. 
CARR, ROBERT F. 
CARTON, L. A. 
CHALMERS, WILLIAM J. 
CLARK, EUGENE B. 
CLAY, JOHN 
CLOW, WILLIAM E. 
COBE, IRA M. 
CRAMER, CORWITH 
CRAMER, E. W. 
CRANE, CHARLES RICHARD 
CRANE, Jr., RICHARD T. 
CROWELL, H. P. 
CUDAHY, JOSEPH M. 
CUM MINGS, D. MARK 
CUNNINGHAM, FRANK S. 

DAU, J. J. 

DAWES, CHARLES G. 
DAY, ALBERT M. 
DECKER, ALFRED 
DEERING, CHARLES 
DEERING, JAMES 
DEFREES, JOSEPH H. 
DELANO, FREDERIC A. 
DICK, ALBERT BLAKE 
DONNELLEY, REUBEN H. 
DONNELLEY, THOMAS E. 
DRAKE, JOHN B. 
DRAKE, TRACY C. 

ECKHART, B. A. 
EDMUNDS, PHILIP S. 

FAIR, ROBERT M. 
FARNUM, HENRY W. 
FARWELL, ARTHUR L. 
FARWELL, FRANCIS C. 
FARWELL, JOHN V. 
FARWELL, WALTER 
FAY, C. N. 



Jan., 1923. Annual Report of the Director. 



161 



FELT, DORR E. 
FENTON, HOWARD W. 
FERGUSON, LOUIS A. 
FERNALD, GUSTAVUS S. 
FIELD, MARSHALL 
FIELD, STANLEY 
FORGAN, DAVID R. 
FORGAN, JAMES B. 
FORSYTH. ROBERT 
FYFFE, COLIN C. H. 

GARTZ, A. F. 
GARY, JOHN W. 
GETZ, GEORGE F. 
GLESSNER, JOHN J. 
GODDARD, LEROY A. 
GOODMAN, WILLIAM O. 
GOODRICH, A. W. 
GRISCOM, CLEMENT A. 

HAM ILL, ERNEST A. 
HASKELL, FREDERICK T. 
HASTINGS, SAMUEL M. 
HIBBARD, FRANK 
HILL, LOUIS W. 
HINDE, THOMAS W. 
HOPKINS, J. M. 
HOPKINS, L. J. 
HOROWITZ, L. J. 
HOYT, N. LANDON 
HUGHITT, MARVIN 
HULBERT, E. D. 
HULBURD, CHARLES H. 
HUTCHINSON, C. L. 

INSULL, SAMUEL 

JELKE, JOHN F. 

JOHNSON, MRS. ELIZABETH 
AYER 

JONES, ARTHUR B. 

JONES, DAVID B. 

JONES, THOMAS D. 

KEEP, CHAUNCEY 
KELLER, THEODORE C. 
KELLEY, WILLIAM V. 
KING, CHARLES GARFIELD 
KING, FRANCIS 
KING, JAMES G. 



kirk, walter radcliffe 
kuppenheimer, louis b. 
lamont, robert p. 
lawson, victor f. 
lehmann, e. j. 
leonard, clifford m. 
logan, spencer h. 
lord, john b. 
lowden, frank o. 
lytton, henry c. 

Mccormick, mrs. 
Mccormick, cyrus h. 
Mccormick, harold f. 

McELWEE, ROBERT H. 
McINNERNEY, THOS. H. 
McKINLAY, JOHN 
McKINLOCK, GEORGE 

alexander 
Mclaughlin, frederic 
Mclaughlin, geo. d. 

McLENNAN, D. R, 
McNULTY, T. J. 
McWILLIAMS, LAFAYETTE 
MacVEAGH, FRANKLIN 
MARK, CLAYTON 
MARSH, FRANK A. 
MARSHALL, BENJAMIN. H. 
MARTIN, WILLIAM P. 
MASON, WILLIAM S. 
MINER, W. H. 
MITCHELL, JOHN J. 
MOORE, EDWARD S. 
MORSE, Jr., CHARLES H. 
MORTON, JOY 
MORTON, MARK 
MUNROE, CHARLES A. 

NEWELL, A. B. 
NOEL, JOSEPH R. 

ORR, ROBERT M. 

PALMER, HONORE 
PALMER, POTTER 
PAM, MAX 
PATTEN, HENRY J. 
PAYNE, JOHN BARTON 
PEABODY, AUGUSTUS S. 
PEABODY, FRANCIS S. 



162 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



PIERCE, CHARLES I. 
P1EZ, CHARLES 
PIKE, CHARLES B. 
PINKERTON, WILLIAM A. 
PORTER, FRANK WINSLOW 
PORTER, GEORGE F. 
PORTER, GILBERT E. 
PORTER, H. H. 

RAWSON, FREDERICK H. 
REAM, MRS. CAROLINE P. 
REVELL, ALEXANDER H. 
REYNOLDS, GEORGE M. 
ROBINSON, THEODORE W. 
ROSENWALD, JULIUS 
RUNNELLS, CLIVE 
RUNNELLS, JOHN S. 
RUSSELL, EDMUND A. 
RUSSELL. EDWARD P. 
RYERSON, MRS. CARRIE H. 
RYERSON, EDWARD L. 
RYERSON, MARTIN A. 

SCHWEPPE, CHARLES H. 
SCOTT, GEORGE E. 
SCOTT, HAROLD N. 
SCOTT, JOHN W. 
SHAFFER, JOHN C. 
SHEDD, JOHN G 
SIMPSON, JAMES 
SMITH, ALEXANDER 
SMITH, ORSON 
SMITH, SOLOMON A. 
SOPER, JAMES P. 
SPOOR, JOHN A. 



SPRAGUE, ALBERT A. 
STEWART, ROBERT W. 
STOREY, W. B. 
STOUT, FRANK D. 
STRAWN, SILAS H. 
STUART, ROBERT 
SPURGES. GEORGE 
SUNNY, B. E. 
SWIFT, CHARLES H. 
SWIFT, EDWARD F. 
SWIFT, Jr., G. F. 
SWIFT, LOUIS F. 

THORNE, CHARLES H. 
THORNE, ROBERT J. 

UPHAM, FREDERIC W. 

VAN VECHTEN, RALPH 
VEATCH, GEORGE L. 
VTLES, LAWRENCE M. 

WETMORE, FRANK O. 
WHEELER, CHARLES P. 
WILLARD, ALONZO J. 
WILLITS, WARD W. 
WILSON, JR., JOHN P. 
WILSON, OLIVER T. 
WILSON, THOMAS E. 
WILSON, WALTER H. 
WINSTON, GARRARD B. 
WINTER. WALLACE C 
WOOLLEY, CLARENCE M. 
WRIGLEY. Jr., WILLIAM 

YATES. DAVID M. 



DECEASED 1922 

BARTLETT. A. C. 

GROMMES, JOHN B. 

HOXIE, MRS. JOHN R. 

JOHNSON, FRANK S. 

NATHAN, ADOLPH 



ASSOCIATE MEMBER 

POOL, MARVIN B. 



Fan., 1923. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



163 



ANNUAL MEMBERS 



ADAMS, CYRUS H. 
ARMOUR, GEORGE A. 

BAILEY, EDWARD P. 
P.ELDEN, JOSEPH G. 
BOAL, CHARLES T. 
HURLEY, CLARENCE A. 

COMSTOCK, WILLIAM C. 
CURTIS, FRANCES H. 

EISENDRATH, W. N. 

FIELD, HENRY 
FRANK, HENRY L. 
FULLER, O. F. 

GREY, CHARLES F. 
GURLEY, W. W. 

HITCHCOCK, R. M. 
HOLT, GEORGE H. 
HYRNEWETSKY, STEPHEN 

JENKINS, GEORGE H. 
JONES, J. S. 

LAMB, FRANK H. 
LINCOLN, ROBERT T. 
LINN. W. R. 
LOGAN, F. G. 



McCREA, W. S. 
MAGEE, HENRY W. 
MANSURE, E. L. 
MOORE, N. G. 
MULLIKEN, A. H. 

NOLAN, JOHN H. 

PALMER, PERCIVAL B. 
PARKER, FRANCIS W. 
PEARSON, MRS. EUGENE H. 

RIPLEY, MRS. E. P. 
ROSENFELD, MRS. MAURICE 

SCHMIDT, DR. O. L. 
SCHWARTZ, G. A. 
SHORTALL, JOHN L. 
SKINNER MISS FREDERIKA 
SPENCE, MRS. ELIZABETH E. 

STOCKTON, JOHN T. 
THROOP, GEORGE ENOS 

WACKER, CHARLES H. 
WALKER, JAMES R. 
WALLER, EDWARD C. 
WHITEHEAD, W. M. 
WILSON, MRS. E. CRANE 
WILSON, M. H. 
WORCESTER, MRS. CHARLES H. 



DECEASED 1 922 

CUMMINGS, E. A. 

MAYER, LEVY 

MEYER, MRS. M. A. 

SKINNER, MISS 






Of ,,, 



'••% 



'■V.lX; 



1923 



■:■ 




 












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