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Full text of "Annual report of the Director to the Board of Trustees for the year ..."

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THE UNIVERSITY 

OF ILLINOIS 

LIBRARY 

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CENTRAL CIRCULATION BOOKSTACKS 

£»n3ST? ^"^"S tWs material is re- 
fP° n , s ' b,e f Of lts «newal or its return to 
on'i k7 fr ° m which il was bo^S 
below Th« Ml',' l ° ,eS » Da,e S 'W 

TO RENEW CAU TEIEPHOM CENTO, M3-S.00 



MAR 1 3 1995 
JUN 1 3 1995 





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FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XXX. 




THE LATE CHARLES F. MILLSPAUGH. 

CURATOR OF THE DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY FROM NOVEMBER 1, 1893 

TO SEPTEMBER 15, 1923, THE DATE OF HIS DEATH. 



Field Museum of Natural History. 

Publication 217. 

Report Series. Vol. VI, No. 3. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 1923. 




MAY 2 3 ; r:, 4- 



Chicago, U. S. A. 
January, 1924. 



i 3 



BEQUESTS 

Bequests to Field Museum of Natural History may be made in 
securities, money, books or collections. For those desirous of making 
bequests to the Museum, the following form is suggested : 

FORM OF BEQUEST 

I do hereby give and bequeath to "Field Museum of Natural 
History" of the City of Chicago, State of Illinois, — . 



Cash Contributions made within the taxable 
year to Field Museum of Natural History to an 
amount not in excess of 15% of the tax payer's 
net income are allowable as deductions in com- 
puting net income under the Revenue Law. 



CONTENTS 



Board of Trustees 170 

Officers and Committees 171 

Staff of Museum 172 

Report of the Director 173 

General Lectures 179 

Entertainments for Children 180 

Publications 182 

Library 183 

Cataloguing, Inventorying and Labeling 184 

Accessions L 187 

Expeditions and Field Work 194 

Installation and Permanent Improvement 211 

The N. W. Harris Public School Extension 220 

Guide-Lecturer 221 

Publicity 222 

Printing and Photography 223 

Photogravures 224 

Attendance 224 

Attendance Statistics 225 

Balance Sheet 226 

List of Accession 227 

Department of Anthropology 227 

Department of Botany 229 

Department of Geology 231 

Department of Zoology 233 

Section of Photography 236 

The Library 236 

Articles of Incorporation 246 

Amended By-Laws 248 

List of Honorary Members and Patrons 253 

List of Corporate Members 254 

List of Life Members 255 

List of Associate Members 258 

List of Sustaining Members 260 

List of Annual Members 261 



170 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 






THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Edward E. Ayer 
Watson F. Blair 
John Borden 
Harry E. Byram 
William J. Chalmers 
Richard T. Crane, Jr. 
D. C. Da vies 
Marshall Field 
Stanley Field 
Ernest R. Graham 



Albert W. Harris 
Arthur B. Jones 
Chauncey Keep 
Cyrus H. McCormick 
George Manierre 
Martin A. Ryerson 
James Simpson 
Solomon A. Smith 
Albert A. Sprague 
William Wrigley, Jr. 



HONORARY TRUSTEE 
Owen F. Aldis 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 171 



OFFICERS 

Stanley Field, President 

Martin A. Ryerson, First Vice-President 

Watson F. Blair, Second Vice-President 

Albert A. Sprague, Third Vice-President 
D. C. Davies, Secretary 

George Manierre, Assistant Secretary 
Solomon A. Smith, Treasurer 

COMMITTEES 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Stanley Field Albert A. Sprague 

Watson F. Blair Edward E. Ayer 

William J. Chalmers Marshall Field 

Arthur B. Jones John Borden 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Watson F. Blair Arthur B. Jones 

Martin A. Ryerson Chauncey Keep 

Albert W. Harris 

BUILDING COMMITTEE 

William J. Chalmers Cyrus H. McCormick 

William Wrigley, Jr. Albert A. Sprague 

Ernest R. Graham 

AUDITING COMMITTEE 

Arthur B. Jones George Manierre 

William Wrigley, Jr. 

PENSION COMMITTEE 

Albert A. Sprague Solomon A. Smith 

James Simpson 



i/2 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

ADMINISTRATIVE AND SCIENTIFIC STAFF 

OF THE MUSEUM 

DIRECTOR 
D. C. Davies 

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY 
Berthold Laufer, Curator 

Assistant Curators 

Charles L. Owen — Archaeology 

TFay-Cooper Cole — Malayan Ethnology 

Albert B. Lewis — African and Melanesian Ethnology 

J. Alden Mason — Mexican and South American Archaeology 

Helen C. Gunsaulus — Japanese Ethnology 

Ralph Linton — North American Ethnology 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY 
*Charles F. Millspaugh, Curator 
B. E. Dahlgren, Associate Curator — Economic Botany 
Assistant Curator 
J. Francis Macbride — Taxonomy 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY 
O. C. Farrington, Curator 
Henry W. Nichols, Associate Curator 
Elmer S. Riggs, Associate Curator of Paleontology 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 
Wilfred H. Osgood, Curator 
William J. Gerhard, Associate Curator of Insects 
C. E. Hellmayr, Associate Curator of Birds 

Assistant Curators 
Edmond N. Gueret — Osteology R. Magoon Barnes — Oology 

Alfred C. Weed — Fishes Edmund Heller — Mammals 

John T. Zimmer — Birds Karl P. Schmidt — Reptiles and Amphibians 

Division of Taxidermy 

Julius Friesser, Mammals Leon L. Walters, Reptiles and Amphibians 

L. L. Pray, Fishes Ashley Hine, Birds 

DEPARTMENT OF THE N. W. HARRIS PUBLIC SCHOOL EXTENSION 

S. C. Simms, Curator 

THE LIBRARY 

Elsie Lippincott, Librarian 

Emily M. Wilcoxson, Assistant Librarian 

RECORDER AUDITOR 

H. F. Ditzel Benj. Bridge 

GUIDE LECTURER SECTION OF PUBLICITY 

Dorothy R. Cockrell R. R. More, in charge 

SECTION OF PRINTING 
U. A. Dohmen, in charge 

SECTION OF PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION 
C. H. Carpenter, Photographer Carl F. Gronemann, Artist 

A. A. Miller, Photogravurist 

SUPERINTENDENT OF MAINTENANCE CHIEF ENGINEER 

John E. Glynn W. H. Corning 

tResigned, October 31, 1923. 
*Deceased, September 15, 1923. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 

1923 



To the Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History : 

I have the honor to present a report of the operations of the Museum 
for the year ending December 31, 1923. 

During the past year, the thirtieth anniversary of the foundation of 
the Institution, the activities of the Museum were effectively maintained 
in all directions. The accumulation of material of great value from new- 
fields, obtained by expeditions dispatched to various parts of the world 
under the auspices of the Captain Marshall Field Fund, constituted the 
most important activity of the Museum for the year. The expeditions 
to China, to Brazil, to Chile, to British Honduras, the joint expedition 
of Oxford University and the Museum in Mesopotamia, the Riggs 
paleontological expedition to Argentina, the archaeological expedition 
in Colombia, and the collections made by ordinary Museum expeditions, 
have brought to the stores of the Institution the most valuable material 
from every point of view that any, year has recorded. The expedition 
to the Malayan Archipelago, conducted with funds contributed by 
Mr. Arthur B. Jones, returned during the year with a large quantity of 
excellent material. 

These expeditions have been conducted without serious interference 
to the work of labeling, rearranging and recasing previously acquired 
material and the installation of new specimens. The introduction of 
new material in the exhibition series in all departments, with the con- 
sequent extension of the geographic areas covered, has compelled a 
considerable rearrangement of material to conform to space require- 
ments and the transfer of many duplicates to the study collections. 
On account of the scientific discrimination and care with which this work 
was performed, the study collections have become more complete with- 
out detracting from the interest of the exhibited collections, at least 
from a popular standpoint. 

Increased storage facilities for duplicate and for exchange material 
have been provided in all the scientific departments} and the spaces for 
the accommodation of study collections are being enlarged and the 
system improved. 



i/4 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

Although the general subject of accessions is discussed in a subse- 
quent part of the report, special reference should be made here of the 
acquisition by gift of the well-known Borden Collection received from 
Mrs. George W. Robb of Borden, Indiana. This important collection 
consists of more than twenty thousand specimens of invertebrate 
paleozoic fossils, accompanied by the working library of the collector. 

Two important archaeological collections, consisting of 3,800 speci- 
mens, deposited by Mr. Martin A. Ryerson with the University of 
Chicago several years ago, were presented by Mr. Ryerson to the 
Museum. 

The progress made by the N. W. Harris Public School Extension 
during the past years and the interest that the public and the Chicago 
schools have manifested in this foundation, has encouraged the family 
of the founder of this philanthropy to increase the endowment from 
$250,000.00 to $375,000.00. 

Late in the month of November, Captain Marshall Field volunteered 
to increase his annual contribution to the Museum of $50,000.00 to 
$100,000.00 until further notice. Captain Field made no restrictions as 
to the use of this annuity, except the general suggestion that it should be 
used for the extension of the activities of the Institution. 

President Field has contributed during the year the sum of $63,630.00 
to the deficit existing in the Building Fund. The total contributions 
from Mr. Field towards this end amount to $263,000.00. A contribution 
towards this deficit was also received from Messrs. Graham, Anderson, 
Probst & White, architects of the new building, in the amount of 
$6,000.00. 

President Field has also continued his endowment of the work per- 
formed in the Stanley Field Plant Reproduction Laboratories. His 
contribution for the year 1923 being $12,000.00. 

The late Milward Adams, a Life Member of the Museum who had 
been interested in the Institution for a period of over twenty-five years, 
bequeathed to the Institution the sum of $5,000.00. 

Trustee James Simpson completed his payments towards the con- 
struction of the theatre which bears his name, at a total cost of ap- 
proximately $150,000.00. In addition to the actual cost of the theatre, 
Mr. Simpson assumed the expense of a canopy erected outside the 
entrance doors to the theatre, seven feet wide extending eighty feet to the 
drive, with a wide T opening along the sidewalk. 

The monumental work "The Sylva of North America" in fourteen 
volumes by Charles Sprague Sargent, and a considerable number of 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 175 

volumes of the Bulletin of Essex Institute, all constituting an important 
acquisition to the general library, were presented by Mr. John J. 
Glessner. 

President Field has also presented a life size bust in bronze 
of a large African gorilla, entitled "The Old Man of Mikeno" by 
Carl E. Akeley. 

A representative collection of pewter, numbering 326 specimens, was 
presented by Mr. Edward E. Ayer. This material is installed in Room 23 
on the second floor and has attracted much attention from visitors and 
students. 

As will be read elsewhere, Mr. Edward E. Ayer has continued his 
contributions of books to the Edward E. Ayer Ornithological Library 
and also to the Ichthyological Library. A catalogue is now in prepara- 
tion of the first mentioned library. 

Mr. Alfred M. Collins, a Patron of the Museum, invited the Institu- 
tion to participate in an expedition to the Belgian Congo for the purpose 
of collecting natural history specimens in a region not previously sub- 
jected to careful investigation, with the result that Mr. Edmund Heller, 
Assistant Curator of Mammals, was assigned to accompany Mr. Collins 
to Africa. The party sailed from New York late in November, and 
expected to reach their destination the first of January. The plans of 
the expedition will keep it in that country for approximately six 
months. 

The reports from Professor Stephen Langdon, in charge of the joint 
expedition in Mesopotamia, at least suggest the acquisition by the 
Museum of important archaeological examples. 

In accordance with the arrangement made with the Geographic 
Society of Chicago some time ago, whereby the Museum agreed to 
allocate office area for the headquarters of the Society, it was determined 
to assign Hall 33 for this purpose. The premises thus assigned have been 
attractively furnished, occupancy commencing early in the month of 
September. 

The physical additions to the building during the year included the 
construction of a Poisoning and Storage Room at the south end of the 
fourth floor, which provides excellent storage facilities for the Depart- 
ment of Anthropology. The restaurant on the ground floor was con- 
verted during the year into a cafeteria, where self-serving facilities are 
now available. The headquarters of the Guard force have been trans- 
ferred from the south side to the northwest corner of the building, 
where more comfortable accommodation is provided. 



176 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

As a means of controlling daylight in the exhibition areas, windows 
in Halls 22, 29 and 38 have been furnished with one hundred and eighty 
pairs of interlined Mohair curtains. These curtains are hung on brass 
poles and so arranged that the upper third or lower two-thirds can be 
drawn independently of each other. They are of a color to harmonize 
with the wall decoration. 

The filling in of the terrace and the unfinished marble steps at the 
east end of the building were completed, as were the approaches and 
sidewalks of the terrace. The shipping room and boiler room roofs were 
waterproofed and overlaid with cement. These approaches and roofs 
required the laying of 3,721 square yards of white cement to match the 
entrances. The sidewalk along the outer balustrade of the terrace, con- 
necting with the cement work to make a continuous walk around the 
building, required the laying of 2,400 feet of crushed limestone fifteen 
feet wide. Two ornamental grill openings have been fitted in the 
buttresses of the north entrance steps for fresh air intakes. The terrace 
steps have been repointed with cement and the entrance steps and 
buttresses have been caulked and pointed. The window sills have been 
carefully examined and more than one-third of them caulked and 
repointed. 

A fuming hood with exhaust for celluloid work and three fresh air 
inlets have been installed in the taxidermy shop. The bird taxidermist 
shop on the third floor and rooms 88 and 90 have been equipped with 
water, gas, air, work benches, storage cases for specimens and storage 
cases for working material. Window benches have been built in rooms 
81 and 88. On the third floor eleven rooms have been painted. 

In order to provide suitable space for the departmental library in 
Botany, Room 2, formerly a skylight, has been floored over and the 
partitions separating rooms 1 and 2 removed and the three rooms thrown 
into one large room. Somewhat similar arrangements were made for the 
Departmental library in Geology, with the exception that the partitions 
were not removed. In the latter library 1,388 lineal feet of shelving have 
been placed. 

The facilities in the Section of Printing have been increased by the 
addition of a 14 x 22 Universal Printing Press, equipped with a variable 
speed motor. This press is used chiefly for process color printing. It 
is adaptable for embossing work and for large labels or any printing too 
large for the two platen presses. 

Progress has been made during the year in the classification of the 
20,000 lantern slides. These slides were originally divided between the 
four departments under separate index systems, but have now been 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 177 

brought together under one central system. Five lantern slides file 
cabinets were purchased, with a total capacity of approximately 50,000 
slides. These cabinets were specially built for the storage of lantern 
slides, with grooved compartments along the interior of the drawers to 
secure a perfect division of the slides. 

A gratifying and increasing appreciation of the lecture courses pre- 
sented by the Museum is to be recorded, especially by children under 
sixteen years of age, for whom two courses were specially arranged. 
The programs for children consist chiefly of moving pictures and are 
given on Saturday mornings in March and April, October and Novem- 
ber. At first it was believed that one showing of the picture would be 
sufficient, but the children attracted to these entertainments on one 
Saturday morning numbered over seven thousand, with the consequence 
that the lecture had to be repeated five times. The attendance subse- 
quently dropped off slightly, due to the disappointment of many who 
could not even approach the doors of the theatre. 

The campaign of publicity regarding the Museum and its activities 
resulted in a marked increase in attendance within a few weeks of its 
inauguration. The Museum is indebted to the cooperation of the trans- 
portation companies in placing the placards relating to the Museum in 
their cars and station platforms. The motor clubs also assisted in dis- 
tributing folders containing information as to the correct motor roads 
leading to the Institution. 

The By-Laws, published elsewhere in this report, explain the differ- 
ent characters of memberships and discloses the conditions under which 
they may be secured. Under the direction of the Secretary of the Cor- 
poration nominations for memberships were and are being made in large 
numbers and thus far 142 Associate Members, 88 Sustaining Members, 
and 2 53 Annual Members have been elected. 

Besides securing to the Museum an effective constituency, these 
memberships provide a considerable annual revenue and it is believed 
that with proper efforts the number may be largely augmented from year 
to year. 

In recognition of the eminent service he has rendered to science,. Mr. 
Ernest R. Graham was elected an Honorary Member of the Museum. 
In recognition of the eminent service they have rendered to the Mu- 
seum, Mr. Peirce Anderson, Mr. Edward Probst, Mr. Howard J. White, 
Dr. George F. Kunz, and Mr. William V. Kelley were elected Patrons 
of the Institution. 

The following were elected Life Members: Mr. Sewell L. Avery, 
John F. Jelke, Jr., Miss Shirley Farr, Mrs. Julia L. Whitney, Mr. Harold 



178 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol VI. 

H. Swift, Mr. William H. Finley, Miss Alice Robson, Mr. F. Edson 
White, Mr. W. R. Linn, Mr. Augustus A. Carpenter, Mr. Charles K. 
Knickerbocker, Mr. Chas. A. Stevens, Mr. George S. Payson, Mr. 
Albert Pick, Mr. Benjamin Carpenter, Mr. Charles H. Markham, Mr. 
C. M. Kittle, and Mr. Kieth Spalding. 

An amendment to the By-Laws made during the early part of the 
year, concerned the method of disbursing the funds of the Institution; 
briefly, the voucher system heretofore in operation was partially aband- 
oned, a combination voucher and check being substituted. This change 
has materially reduced the clerical work in this connection. 

The Board of Trustees, after careful consideration, decided to 
abandon the suggestion to install in the new building the transportation 
collection at one time exhibited in the old building in Jackson Park. 

The founder of the Stanley Field Museum Employes Pension Fund, 
with the approval of the Pension Committee, authorized a handsome 
increase in the capital value of the life policies of those individuals who 
have been in the continuous service of the Museum for a period of 
twenty-five years or more. This action when put in operation affected 
twenty-one individuals. 

The Museum sustained a very serious loss during the year in the 
death of Dr. Charles F. Millspaugh, Curator of the Department of 
Botany since the inception of the Institution. The loss of Dr. 
Millspaugh to the Museum is expressed in the following resolutions 
adopted by the Board of Trustees : 

The announcement of the death of Doctor Charles Frederick 
Millspaugh, in Chicago on September 15, 1923, is received by the 
Board of Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History with feelings 
of deep regret. 

Beginning his career as a physician, Doctor Millspaugh early 
undertook the study of medicinal plants. While jthus engaged, 
botany gradually became his dominant interest and, in the end, his 
life work and profession, for which his practice of medicine was 
abandoned. He became in time one of the best known botanists of the 
day and his standing was unique, being equally notable in two distinct 
fields of his science, taxonomy and plant economics. 

He enjoyed the distinction of having been the first appointee on 
the museum staff and as such was associated with this institution 
from its very inception. For the first time in the history of Museums 
Botanical Science was given full recognition and an adequate amount of 
space for its display. The opportunity thus granted was utilized by 
Doctor Millspaugh to the fullest extent. 

The son of an artist, he wrought a knowledge of the principles and 
practice of art as well as of science into his work, and was thus able 
to impart rare attractiveness as well as scientific accuracy to his 
museum displays. It is conceded by those familiar with his museum 
installations that he initiated a new era for botanical exhibits. 

No less remarkable than his genius for museum display was his 
ability as a curator from the administrative and scientific standpoint. 



Jan., 19J4 Annual Report of the Director. 179 

In a relatively short period of time he built up the Herbarium of Field 
Museum until it ranks as one of the largest in the world, and through 
a system of cataloguing which he devised and carried into effect, its 
contents are so well organized that it is available for reference to a 
degree perhaps unequalled. 

In his personal relations as a member of the Museum Staff, Doctor 
Millspaugh was respected and admired by all. Especially noteworthy 
was his unfailing readiness to place at the service of his colleagues 
any or all of the treasures of wisdom with which his many years of 
wide experience had provided him. 

He traveled extensively both before and during his connection 
with the museum, visiting many foreign countries in the interests of 
his department, and in the course of his travels worked for a time in 
most of the botanical gardens of the world. 

Doctor Millspaugh was the author of a number of books, notably 
a West Virginia Flora, and the co-author of others, such as the 
recent Bahama Flora, in conjunction with his friend Doctor N. L. 
Britton. The last of his works, the Flora of Santa Catalina, gained 
universal approval as a model of its kind. His treatises on the plants 
of Yucatan, his botanical explorations in the Bahamas, and his work on 
the Spurges in particular, were accorded wide recognition. In botanical 
literature his name will always endure. 

His death is felt as a distinct loss by the Board of Trustees, and 
he is mourned by the staff of the museum, as well as by many who 
knew him only by name or as National President of the Wild Flower 
Preservation Society. 

The Board of Trustees desires to have this expression of their 
sorrow and appreciation of Doctor Millspaugh's work and career 
spread on the records of the institution and a duly attested copy sent 
to the members of his family. 



General Lectures. — On October 6th, the Museum resumed its 
series of free lecture courses discontinued since the Autumn of 19 13. 
The lectures were held in the James Simpson Theatre on Saturday after- 
noons, at three o'clock. Because of the varied nature of these lectures 
they were well attended. Since adults showed much interest in the 
program of moving pictures arranged for children, three programs 
were added to the regular series. These were the Martin Johnson film, 
"Trailing African Wild Animals;" "A Trip Through Egypt;" and the 
film "Nanook of the North." The total attendance for the course was 
8,293 persons. 

The following is the program of the Fortieth Free Lecture Course, 
delivered during the months of October and November, 1923 : 

October 6 — ' ' Unique Siam . " 

Professor James H. Gore, Founder and Life Trustee 
of National Geographic Societv, Washington, 
D. C. 

October 13 — 'Australia's Wild Northwest." 

Mr. M. P. Greenwood Adams, New York City. 



i8o 



Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



October 20— "The Music of the Red Man." 

Dr. Henry Purport Eames, Chicago, Illinois. 

October 27 — "Fishes and Fishing in South America." 

Dean Carl H. Eigenmann, Indiana University, 
Bloomington, Indiana. 

November 3 — "The Natives of the Marquesas Islands." 

Dr. Ralph H. Linton, Assistant Curator of North 
American Ethnology, Field Museum of Natural 
History. 

"Animal Life in the Jungles of South America." 

Mr. Edmund Heller, Assistant Curator of Mam- 
malogy, Field Museum of Natural History. 

"The National Park Service— What It Is Trying To 
Do for the American People." 
Hon. Stephen T. Mather, Director of the National 
Parks, Department of the Interior, Washington, 
D. C. 



November 10- 



November 17- 



November 24- 



On Beaten Paths in Europe; A Travel Talk." 

Professor J. Paul Goode, University of Chicago, 
Chicago, Illinois. 



Entertainments for Children. — Regular courses of lectures to 
school children have been given during the year in the James Simpson 
Theatre of the Museum. The main features of the entertainments were 
the moving pictures which added much to the interest of the children. 
There were two courses; the first series of ten entertainments being held 
in the spring and the second series of eight in the fall. Three of 
these fall programs were so enthusiastically received that they 
were repeated during the month of December. Many of the lectures 
were so popular, that the applications for seats were greatly in excess 
of the capacity of the Auditorium and it was necessary to extend the 
original lecture of one hour to a continuous program lasting from 9 :oo 
o'clock in the morning until 1 :oo o'clock in the afternoon. The total 
attendance for the two courses was 22,021 children. 

The programs were as follows: 

March 24 — Introduction. 

Moving Pictures: "The Four Seasons" (Animal Life). 

Museum Tour: Department of Zoology. 
March 31 — "Chipmunks and Their Relatives." 

*Moving Pictures: "Chipmunks and Other Animals." 

"Br'er Rabbit and His Pals." 

Museum Tour: Halls 15, 16 and 17. 












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Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 181 

April 7— "Birds of Lake Mighigan." 

♦Moving Pictures: "Water Birds." 

Museum Tour: Halls 20 and 21. 
April 14 — "The Folk Lore of Precious Gems." 

Moving Pictures: "Magic Gems." 

"Neptune's Neighbors." 

Museum Tour: H. N. Higinbotham Hall. 
April 21 — "How Birds Migrate." 

*Moving Pictures: "Familiar Birds." 

Museum Tour: Halls 20 and 21. 
April 28— "Primitive Fire Makers." 

*Moving Pictures: "Fire Making Without Matches." 

"Ants." 

"Bees." 

Museum Tour: Department of Anthropology. 
May 5 — "Children in Japan." 

Moving Pictures: "Nippon. The Boys' Festival." 

"Going to School in Japan." 

Museum Tour: F. W. Gunsaulus Hall. 
May 12 — "Home Life of Common Birds." 

*Moving Pictures: "Common Birds." 

Museum Tour: Halls 20 and 21. 
May 19 — "The Habits of the Moose and the White-tailed Deer." 

*Moving Pictures: "Wild Moose and Deer." 

"Man's Four-footed Helpers." 

Museum Tour: G. M. Pullman Hall and Hall 16. 
May 26— "What Sharp Eyes Can See." 

*Moving Pictures: "Wayside Natural History." 

Museum Tour: General. 

* N. B. — Grateful acknowledgement is made to Doctor Thomas W. Roberts, Director of the 
Zoological Museum of the University of Minnesota, for the loan of moving pictures marked with an 
asterisk. 

October 6 — Moving Pictures: "Trailing African Wild Animals." (The Martin 
Johnson Film). 
Museum Tour: African Game Animals. 
October 13 — Moving Pictures: 

*"Snowy Heron and Its Extermination." 
*"Non-game Bird-life in Louisiana." 
*"Game Bird-life." 
*"Wild Geese." 
Museum Tour: Birds. 
October 20 — Colored Slides and Moving Pictures: 
f'The Monarch Butterfly." 
f'The Samia Cecropia Moth." 
f'The Greenbottle Fly." 
Museum Tour: Insects. 
October 27 — Colored Slides and Moving Pictures: 
f'Pond and Stream." 
f 'Toads." 
Museum Tour: Fishes and Reptiles. 
November 3 — Colored Slides and Moving Pictures: 
f 'Field and Wayside." 
f'Bees." 
t" Wasps." 
Museum Tour: Insects. 
November 10 — Colored Slides and Moving Pictures: 
f 'Mosquitoes." 

f'The Black-and-yellow Spider." 
"Baby Song-birds at Meal-time." 
Museum Tour: Insects and Birds. 



182 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

November 17 — Moving Pictures: 

"A Trip to Egypt." 
"Egypt— The Road to the Pyramids." 
''Calling on the Sphinx." 
Museum Tour: Egyptian Archaeology. 

November 24 — Moving Pictures: "Nanook of the North." 
Museum Tour: Eskimo Collection. 

N. B. — Grateful acknowledgment is made to Mr. E. A. Mcllhenny of Avery Island, Louisiana, 
for the gift of moving pictures marked with an (*) and to the Society for Visual Education, Chicago, 
for the loan of moving pictures marked with a (t). 



PUBLICATIONS 

The following books have been published during the year : 

Pub. 212 — Botanical series, Vol. V, No. 1, The Flora of Santa Catalina 
Island. By Charles F. Millspaugh and L. W. Nuttall, 
January, 1923. 413 pages, 1 color plate, 25 halftones, 1 
map. Edition 1,031. 

Pub. 213 — Report Series, Vol. VI, No. 2. Annual Report of the Director 
for the year 1923. 81 pages, 13 halftones, Edition 2,028. 

Pub. 214 — Zoological Series Vol. X, No. 16. Contents and Index to 
Volume X (Nos. 1-15) 22 pages. December, 1923. Edition 
1,000. 

Pub. 215 — Zoological Series, Vol. XV. Marine Fishes of Panama. 
Part 1. By S. E. Meek and S. F. Hildebrand. December, 
1923. 342 pages. 24 halftones. Edition 1,500. 

A list of handbooks and leaflets published is given below : — 

Manual — 53 pages, edition 4,953. 

General Guide — 24 pages, edition 15,055. 

Guide to Oriential Theatricals, Part 1. By B. Laufer. Edition, 4,997. 
11 halftones. 59 pages. 

Leaflets — Anthropology, No. 7. Purification of the Sacred Bundles. 
By Ralph Linton. One photogravure. 11 pages. Edition 

Anthropology, No. 8. Annual Ceremony of the Pawnee 
Medicine Men. By Ralph Linton. 2 photogravures. 20 
pages. Edition 3,064. 

Anthropology, No. 9. The Use of Sago in New Guinea. By 
Albert B. Lewis. 4 photogravures. 3 figures. 9 pages. 
Edition 3,054. 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 183 

Anthropology, No. 10. Use of Human Skulls and Bones in 

Tibet. By B. Laufer. One halftone. 16 pages. Edition 

2,970. 

Anthropology, No. n. The Japanese New Year's Festival, 

Games and Pastimes. By Helen C. Gunsaulus. 8 halftones. 

18 pages. 

Geology, No. 3. Amber. By Oliver C. Farrington. 3 colored 

photogravures. 1 photogravure (monotone) 7 pages. Edition 

3»o5i- 

Geology, No. 4. Meteorites. By Oliver C. Farrington. 4 
photogravures. 11 pages. Edition 3,044. 
Zoology, No. 4. The Periodical Cicada. By William J. Ger- 
hard. 4 photogravures. 14 pages. Edition 3,128. 
Zoology, No. 5. The Alligator Gar. By Alfred C. Weed. 
3 photogravures. 16 pages. 

LIBRARY 

The location of the Library, on the third floor, to which it was 
transferred early last year has proved of great benefit to the staff of the 
Museum. The resources of the library have been constantly taxed, es- 
pecially by the returning members of the expeditionary forces who need 
authoritative works to identify, classify and label the material collected. 
The accessions of the year were 2,375 books and pamphlets and 
81 maps, bringing the total number of books and pamphlets in the 
library to 82,033. 

As in former years the library is again indebted to the generosity of 
Mr. Edward E. Ayer for valuable additions to the Ornithological Library 
bearing his name. This donation includes one hundred and fifty one 
works in seven hundred and twenty volumes, exceeding in number any 
of his previous gifts. Included in this collection were books long out of 
print or unusual in character. A special bookplate designed by the 
Museum's artist has been made to mark the books presented by Mr. 
Ayer. Mr. John J. Glessner presented the monumental work by Charles 
Sprague Sargent, The Silva of North America, in fourteen volumes, illus- 
trated by over seven hundred plates. Noteworthy accessions were also 
received from M. Henri Gadeau de Kerville, Paris — a Zoological Voyage 
through Syria; Mr. Ramirez Goyena, Nicaragua, the Flora of Nicaragua; 
Mr. E. A. Strehlneek, Shanghai, Chinese Pictorial Art; Mr. William J. 
Chalmers, works on China; Mr. J. A. Hammerton, London, Peoples of 
all Nations and Hon. John Barton Payne, Gamio, La Poblacion del Valle 
de Teotihuacan, three volumes. 



184 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

The fund available for the purchase of books was expended on 
works necessary to meet the requirements of the staff. Over two 
hundred and eighty-five books were purchased and orders for one hun- 
dred and twenty-nine volumes are still outstanding. Five hundred and 
seventy-nine volumes of books were bound and eleven thousand, four 
hundred and seventy-nine cards were alphabetically filed, together with 
the monthly installments of author cards from the John Crerar Library. 

Among a number of important sets of periodicals purchased are the 
following : 

Annals of the Association of American Geographers, eleven vol- 
umes. 

Avicultural Magazine, fifteen volumes. 

Buffon, Histoire naturelle, one hundred and twenty-seven vol- 
umes. 1798-1808. 

Chinese repository, twenty volumes, 1832-1857. 

Dictionnaire des Sciences Naturelles, thirty-six volumes. 

Engler and Drude's Vegetation der Erde, fourteen volumes. 

Gypsy Lore Society Journal, nine volumes. 

Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society, twenty-three 
volumes. 

K. K. Zoologisch-Botanische Gesellschaft, Verhandlungen, fifty- 
three volumes. 

Ornithologisches Jahrbuch, twenty-nine volumes. 

The principal asset in the growth of the library is the system of 
exchange, by means of which the publications of other scientific institu- 
tions are received in exchange for those issued by the museum. 
Exchanges were received this year from six hundred and seventy indi- 
viduals and contemporary institutions. Five new exchanges were 
effected with the following societies : Societe des Sciences Naturelles de 
l'Afrique du Nord, Societe Botanique de Pologne, Warsaw, Societe 
Scientifique de Poznan, Societe des Sciences Naturelles du Maroc and 
Societe de Geographie d' Alger. 

DEPARTMENTAL CATALOGUING, INVENTORYING AND 

LABELING 

Anthropology. — The work of cataloguing in the Department of 
Anthropology has been continued as usual during the current year, the 
number of catalogue cards prepared totaling 2,429. These cards are dis- 
tributed geographically as follows : South American and Mexican arche- 
ology 1553; North American ethnology 88; Australia and Africa 31; 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XXXII. 







PREHISTORIC GOLD ORNAMENTS EXCAVATED FROM GRAVES, 

SANTA MARTA, COLOMBIA. 

CAPT. MARSHALL FIELD EXPEDITION TO COLOMBIA, 1923. 

Three fifths actual size. Width of central figure 6% inches. 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 185 

China, Korea and Japan 552; Chinese pewter 20; European pewter 185. 
Of these cards 376 have been entered in the inventory books of the 
department, which number 39. The number of annual accessions 
amounts to 59, of which 26 have been catalogued. Two accessions of 
previous years were also tabulated. The total number of catalogue cards 
entered from the opening of the first volume is 157,938. Several thou- 
sand labels were prepared and installed during the year, the number of 
labels supplied by the printer totaling 5,036. These labels are distributed 
as follows: Plains Indians 2,261; Plateau Indians and Salish tribes 803; 
Mexico, Paraguay and Brazil 410; Ayer Pewter collection 570; Mela- 
nesia 96; Stanley Field Hall 48; Gem Room 3; Egypt 76; sculpture of 
India 120; Japan 638; miscellaneous 11. The printer further supplied 
the Department with 6,175 catalogue cards and 500 copies of a sketch 
map of the United States, to be used for exhibition purposes in the cases 
of Halls 4 and 5. Two hundred and twenty label cards were prepared 
and added to the label-file. The labels in this file serve as a cross 
check to the labels in the exhibition cases, so that any label desired may 
be found without delay. Three hundred and fifty-four photographs were 
added to the departmental albums, and a new album was begun. 

Botany. — Over 16,800 new entries were made during the year in 
the Department Catalogue, bringing the total number of catalogued 
specimens in the Department up to 529,991. Additions were made 
to the various Department card files as follows : 

No. of Cards 

1923 Total 

Index to Botanical Species 4,761 170,849 

Index to Common Names 607 24,106 

Index to Collectors 164 10,584 

Index to Geographical Localities 47 2,907 

Index to Euphorbiaceae 852 

A card catalogue index was begun of the 'economic' material in the 
Department, i. e., all of the exhibition and reference material other than 
the herbarium specimens. A total of 8,400 cards were written and 
indexed. 

Geology. — All accessions received in the Department of Geology 
have been carefully catalogued as received with the exception of the 
collections obtained by the Alberta expedition and part of those acquired 
by the Curator in Brazil. The cataloguing of these is not yet completed. 
The Borden collection is being catalogued as fast as it can be organized, 
but it will be several years before the work on this material is completed. 
A total of 6,245 new entries has been made during the year. Of these, 



186 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

5,246 represent additions to the Borden collection; 540 to the mineral 
and 147 to the economic collections. A total of 577 new labels were 
written during the year. A new process of printing, developed in the 
section of printing, has made possible the installation of mahogany 
guide labels over the cases in the halls of mineralogy, paleontology and 
dynamic and geographic geology. These labels are printed in gold ink 
on a veneer of mahogany board and thus harmonize completely with 
the framing of the cases. This system of case labeling, which is 
a distinct improvement over the old style labels, was originated several 
years ago and is now nearing completion. A total of 23 1 prints have been 
added to the Department photograph albums, which now contain 4,052 
labeled prints. 

Special labor was involved in the preparation of a series of large, oval, 
descriptive labels which have been placed at the ends of ten pyramidal 
cases in paleontology. They were printed with gold ink on mahogany 
veneer board. As it was found that a glass cover would interfere 
with their legibility, the mahogany board upon which they were printed 
was specially prepared to ensure durability of the printing. The effect 
of the labels as prepared and mounted in this manner is very pleasing 
and it is believed that they will be found to be durable. 

For the systematic mineral collection a series of large labels giving a 
description of important mineral groups, such as the micas, feldspars 
and garnets has been prepared and installed. 



Zoology. — The cataloguing of the accessions in the Department of 
Zoology has been continued. The total number of entries made was 
3,451, distributed as follows: Mammals, 132; Birds, 140; Fishes, 448; 
Insects, 425; Skeletons, 43; Reptiles and Amphibians, 2,262. The 
entries made in the last division represent the accumulated uncata- 
logued material, which has now been reduced to a minimum. The index 
of salamanders has been maintained and shows an increase of 22 
entries and an addition of five species new to the Museum's collections. 
In the Division of Fishes 500 additional entries have been made in old 
record books under numbers "assigned" but not previously used. In 
the improved index of fish specimens under the new catalogue system, 
103 new sheets have been made and new entries on these and other 
sheets total 337. All specimens have been thoroughly labeled. In the 
Division of Insects, the cataloguing has been confined mostly to the 
series of North American butterflies which were selected for future 
exhibition. New labels for 994 shells have been provided to replace the 
old style of labeling. In the Division of Osteology 1 2 new labels were 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XXXIII. 




GREAT GRAY OWL. 

TAXIDERMY BY ASHLEY HINE. 

One third natural size. 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 187 

prepared, framed and placed on metal supports in front of the large 
skeletons which are installed on open stands. A total of 2,016 lantern 
slides has been classified and labeled under the following headings: 
Zoology 782, maps and diagrams 108, physiography and scenery 1,136. 

The following table shows the work performed on catalogues and 
inventories in the various Departments. 

Total No. 

of entries Entries Total No. 

Number of to Dec. during of cards 

Record Books 31, 1923 1923 written 

Department of Anthropology 39 159,991 2,429 159,991 

Department of Botany 63 529,248 16,822 8,400 

Department of Geology 22 153,916 6,245 6,822 

Department of Zoology 40 108,671 3, 451 34,909 

The Library 14 142,393 ",499 317,917 

ACCESSIONS 

Anthropology. — The new accessions received during the past year 
by the Department of Anthropology have been extraordinarily large, due 
to the successful field expeditions. These accessions were received from 
almost all parts of the world and exceed in number and value the acces- 
sions obtained during the past twelve years. The total number of ac- 
cessions registered amounts to 59; of these, 45 are by gift, 4 by 
exchange, 6 by purchase, and 4 as the result of Museum expeditions. 

Several more shipments were received from the Captain Marshall 
Field Expedition to Colombia, containing large numbers of fine small 
objects, such as gold, beads, shell, stone and pottery, as well as ethnologi- 
cal objects from the Goajiro and Arhuaco Indians, consisting of knitted 
bags and hammocks, bows and arrows, pots, gourds, and many others 
illustrative of their culture and mode of life. The collections obtained 
by the Arthur B. Jones Expedition to Malaysia are particularly noted 
for the textiles and metal work, comprehensively representing the life 
of the Sakai, Semang, Yakun and Malay of the Federated Malay States, 
the Tobak Batak and Menangkabau of Sumatra, as well as the natives 
of Nias, Java and Borneo. The collections secured by the Captain Mar- 
shall Field Expedition to China conducted by the curator have been 
characterized under the heading "Expeditions." 

The most valuable accessions to the North American Indian collec- 
tions consist of a complete Menominee Indian woman's costume, pur- 
chased through the assistance of Mr. Alanson Skinner of the Public 
Museum of Milwaukee. Two Fox medicine bundles, three Fox medicine 
otters, three Iroquois pipes, and two Central Algonquian robes with silk 
applique were received through exchange with the Public Museum of 
Milwaukee. The examples of Indian applique work are especially 



188 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

valuable, as this form of decoration was highly developed among the 
Indians living in the neighborhood of Chicago during the early nine- 
teenth century and was not previously represented in the Museum col- 
lections. A small, but excellent collection of objects from the Alaskan 
Eskimo was presented by Mr. W. H. Roberts of Chicago. Mrs. C. M. 
Andersen of Chicago presented an Eskimo woman's suit consisting of an 
eider-down lined jacket, sealskin trousers and inner and outer sealskin 
boots, brought from Good Hope, Greenland. Mr. Edward E. Ayer 
presented a woman's dance skirt of buckskin decorated with shells and 
pendant beads of glass, shell, and abalone, from one of the tribes of 
northwestern California. A head-band of stuffed buckskin and a closely 
woven head-dress worn in the White Deerskin Dance are the gifts of 
Mr. Homer E. Sargent and were accompanied by a unique Navaho 
blanket in red, black, yellow and green colors made from native dyes. 
The history of the blanket, as far as obtainable, is that it was secured in 
the Navaho country about 1850 and remained in the possession of the 
same family until quite recently. The Museum, further, received 
from Mr. Sargent the fifth installment of his collection of baskets con- 
sisting of 27 specimens from Alaska, California, and Abyssinia. These, 
with his previous gifts of the same character, make a total of 665 
baskets he has presented to the Museum. Mr. Watson F. Blair and 
Mr. Chauncey Keep, trustees, presented two very large chipped obsidian 
blades from the Yurok tribe of Humboldt County, California, similar to 
those which were carried in the hands of the two leaders of the White 
Deerskin Dance, performed only in that region. A Salish blanket pur- 
chased by the Museum presents an unusual texture and technique, being 
decorated with a group of herringbone patterns. 

Seven accessions relate to Latin America, two from Mexico being 
considered the most important. The large Mexican collection formerly 
deposited in the University of Chicago was presented to the Museum by 
Mr. Martin A. Ryerson. This collection consists of about 3,000 
pieces, among them being some exceptionally fine specimens of 
pottery, stone carving, and work in obsidian, shell and copper. The 
Aztec, Toltec, Zapotec, Huaxtec and Tarascan cultures are well repre- 
sented, and the collection is eminently desirable to round out and im- 
prove the present Mexican exhibit. It also contains 400 objects relating 
to the archeology of the Southwest and 70 objects from Peru. Mr. 
Franklin Hollister presented an excellent small Mexican statue of lava 
with inset bone teeth of typical, but unusually fine technique. Two small 
collections were secured by the Museum's zoological expeditions to South 
America. One of these, a collection excavated and presented to the 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 189 

Museum by Mr. F. C. McNutt, is especially noteworthy for carved 
wooden objects and basketry. The arid climate of the Atacama desert, 
in the north central portion of Chile, has served to preserve these an- 
tiquities, which have been recovered in excellent condition. Unusual 
pieces of bronze, stone, textiles and pottery are also contained in the 
collection, which demonstrates affinities with both Peruvian and Cal- 
chaquian cultures. Among twelve copper pieces is included an extra- 
ordinary axe of Diaguite type, skillfully hafted. There are some 
remarkable wooden bells of oval shape with two holes for suspension, 
similar to the copper bells of Diaguite origin. 

The Egyptian collections were increased by the wrappings of a 
mumm}' and 18 Ushebti figures, presented by Mr. Edward E. Ayer. 
These, with the series donated on previous occasions, make a total of 95 
Ushebti figures. A lion-mane head-dress with two strips of white 
monkey-skin attached, from the Masai in British East Africa, was 
presented by Mr. A. Healy of Chicago. As this tribe is no longer per- 
mitted to engage in warfare, such head-gears have become quite scarce. 
Bows and arrows from the Congo region were given by Mr. W. J. 
Chalmers. Arm rings of ivory and brass wire, daggers, and foot-wear 
from Upper Nigeria were purchased by the Museum. Three good ex- 
amples of boomerangs from tribes of Central Australia, two being painted 
with native red ochre, and one of a rather unusual type, were presented 
by Mr. F. R. Babcock. While engaged on his expedition to China, the 
curator received many gifts to the museum, aggregating 206 objects. 
Fine jade carvings of the Han period, jade bowlders and ancient iron 
implements presented by Mr. P. J. Bahr of Shanghai, and an imperial 
jade emblem of the Sung period presented with four bits of Sung, Yuan, 
and Ming pottery by Mr. T. R. Abbott of Peking, are deserving of 
particular mention for their artistic value. 

At the beginning of the year, Mr. Edward E. Ayer presented an 
extensive collection of pewter objects comprising plates, tankards, jugs, 
mugs, tureens, guild-cups, teapots, lamps and candlesticks, which ori- 
ginated in China, England, the United States, Germany and Austria. 
This collection was immediately placed on exhibition in Hall 23 in 
9 cases. Since then, Mr. Ayer has completed his collection of ancient 
pewter by means of numerous additions. In the course of the year 139 
pewter objects of European, Chinese and Japanese origin were 
received from Mr. Ayer in order to strengthen the collection now on 
exhibition. With these novel additions, the pewter collection is made 
thoroughly comprehensive, embracing all countries and periods, and 
containing all articles ever made in this alloy. 



190 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

Dr. Ludwig Hektoen presented a very fine old blade from a Japanese 
fighting sword. This sword is presumably of sixteenth century work- 
manship, and is encased in a scabbard of unstained wood which is pro- 
tected by a brocade cover. A series of ten Japanese paintings illustrating 
the transience of human life are the gift of Mr. Frederick Gookin of 
Chicago. Three miniature Japanese masks of carved, painted wood, 
representing a peasant and two young noblemen, were received from Mr. 
Norman Beck of Chicago, and Mr. Charles Ailing of Chicago added an 
interesting surimono by Kunisada to the collection of Japanese prints. 

Botany. — The most important accessions to the Department of 
Botany were received from the Captain Marshall Field Expeditions. 
11,000 specimens, or 4,250 numbers were secured, of which 3,500 are 
flowering and 750 are non-flowering plants. Other collections of 
importance received during the year were the Andre Bolivian Collection 
of 1,000 plants secured from the Kew Gardens; the Robert H. and Rich- 
ard Schomburgk British Guiana collection of 315 specimens; the H. A. 
Gleason collection of 1,200 Guiana plants and the LaVarre-Lang collec- 
tions of 200 numbers; a collection made by A. C. Persaud of 1,300 
specimens or 445 numbers also from British Guiana; 496 Brazilian plants 
collected by Blanchet and Claussen; a miscellaneous collection of 502 
plants from the United States National Herbarium; another of 555 
specimens mostly from Pennsylvania, collected by R. R. Driesbach; a 
collection of 218 Wisconsin plants deposited by John R. Heddle. 

Geology. — Mrs. George W. Robb of Borden, Indiana, presented the 
Department of Geology with the most important addition to the original 
geological collections ever received by gift. This valuable collection 
forms an unusually complete series, estimated to contain about 30,000 
specimens of Devonian, Mississippian and Pennsylvanian fossils, from 
the well-known collecting grounds of southern Indiana and Kentucky. 
It contains also numerous specimens from other regions and periods. 

This collection is the result of many years' work by the prominent 
geologist, Prof. William W. Borden. To the result of his own labors 
Professor Borden added at a cost of thousands of dollars the best speci- 
mens he could secure from other collectors. He purchased the entire 
Harrod collection and others of lesser note and secured the most valuable 
material from such well known collections as the Greene. Although a 
substantial Museum building had been erected in Borden to house the 
collection, Mrs. Robb felt that its importance justified placing it in a 
larger institution where its intrinsic value could be appreciated by 
greater numbers. 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XXXIV. 





^B^^VCS* 



*N 



i 



CEREMONIAL OBSIDIAN BLADES OF YUROK, CALIFORNIA. 

PRESENTED BY CHAUNCEY KEEP AND WATSON F. BLAIR. 
Length 20% and 16% inches, respectively. 






(. fl 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 191 

The collection is especially noteworthy for the beauty and perfection 
of its crinoids and for the extreme care with which the specimens have 
been assembled. This acquisition has made it necessary to prepare for 
an extensive reorganization of the exhibits of invertebrate paleontology. 

Dr. William Bebb presented twelve specimens of fossil bird skulls 
from the La Brea asphalt beds. The Stanford University through the 
courtesy of Dr. David Starr Jordan, presented a slab containing fossils 
of the herring-like fish, Xyne. Twenty-three fossil shells from the 
Chilean Andes have been received from the Captain Marshall Field 
Chilean Expedition. Teeth from two of the great fossil sharks, collected 
in equatorial Africa, were presented by Mr. Anthony J. Wysche. A large 
collection of fossil shells from the San Pedro beds, California, was con- 
tributed by Mr. E. E. Halvorsen of Santa Barbara. Mrs. W. L. Crawford 
added to her former gifts an excellent plastron of a fossil turtle from 
Texas. Four fossil fish were gifts from Mrs. Walter C. Ellis. The 
head of a trilobite found by Mr. Quincy L. Dowd in Lombard, Illinois, 
and presented to the Museum, represents a larger species than is 
commonly found in this local area. 

The meteorite collection has been enlarged by the gift of a specimen 
of the W T araldi meteorite, presented by Mr. George W. Card of Australia. 
Professor Liversidge of Surrey, England, presented casts of the Bingera 
meteorite and Mr. Ralph Buckstaff gave a specimen of the Pitts 
meteorite. 

Mr. William J. Chalmers added 49 specimens of gems and choice 
crystals to the crystal collection bearing his name and also presented a 
number of Californian nuggets which are now in Higinbotham Hall. 
Mr. Wayne E. Douglas secured in southern Illinois some unusually 
attractive nuorites and presented them to the Museum. A group of 
minerals from well known collecting grounds in New England, was 
added to the collections by Mr. W. J. El well. In addition to his former 
gifts, Mr. F. J. Lean presented a large specimen of datolite and a number 
of native coppers of unusual forms. Mrs. Scott Jordan, Miss Fannye M. 
Neumann, Mrs. M. R. Rood and Mrs. D. N. Eisendrath have each 
presented collections which contain a variety of minerals. The Standard 
Oil Company (Indiana) has enlarged the petroleum exhibit by the 
addition of 86 candles. Mr. W. C. Flower filled a gap in the collection 
of gold and silver ores by the presentation of nine specimens from Oregon 
and Idaho, and a collection of ores and minerals from South Dakota was 
received from the Department of Immigration of that State. Through 
the good offices of Mr. William J. Chalmers, the Asbestos Corporation of 
Canada, Ltd., presented six fine specimens of Canadian asbestos. 



192 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

Specimens of minerals, ores and rocks, numbering 323, collected by 
the Captain Marshall Field Brazilian expedition of last year, reached 
the Museum during the year. A single topaz crystal of 90 pounds weight 
which is believed to be the largest topaz of gem quality in existence, was 
acquired by the Curator on his recent expedition to Brazil. 

The Museum acquired by exchange a series of 130 fossil shells col- 
lected in Mississippi and five minerals of exceptional quality from Nev- 
ada. Five individuals of the Ness Co., Kansas, meteorite were acquired 
by purchase. Other purchases were a specimen of troilite of terrestrial 
origin and a skull of the fossil Hipparion from Greece. 

Zoology. — A total of 26,298 specimens was added to the collections 
in the Department of Zoology. This includes the largest number of 
vertebrates received in one year in the history of the Department. 
The specimens are divided as follows: Mammals, 2,882; birds, 
5, 181; eggs and nests, 26; reptiles and amphibians, 3,848; fishes, 
12,995; insects, 1,336. The majority of these were received from 
the Captain Marshall Field Expeditions to Peru, Chile, Honduras, 
and Texas, all of the expeditions being unusually productive. This 
is especially true in the Division of Mammals where but few 
purchases were made, and the gifts, although valuable, were not 
numerous. Of the 2,882 mammals accessioned, 2,857 were received from 
Museum expeditions. These were mostly from Peru, Chile, Argentina 
and Brazil. Two skulls of wild-killed Elephants were contributed by the 
Arthur B. Jones Malay Archipelago Expedition. The principal gift was 
that of two well prepared specimens of the Fringe-eared Oryx from East 
Africa, collected and presented by Mr. F. S. Colburn and Mr. A. M. 
Lindsay. 

The accessions of birds amount to a total of 5, 18 1 specimens, of which 
2,519 were purchased, 2,498 were received from Museum expeditions, 
and 384 were obtained by exchange. These birds are from a wide geo- 
graphic range, coming as they do from Peru, Chile, Argentina, Brazil, 
Ecuador, Uruguay, Colombia, British Honduras, Dominican Republic, 
Austria, Germany, Norway, Canary Islands, Azores, New Guinea, and 
the United States. An important accession by purchase was the Fischer 
collection of German and Bavarian birds, consisting of 1,823 specimens 
especially well prepared and in adequate series . These formed a welcome 
addition to the Museum's collections, in which Old World birds had been 
inadequately represented. Other purchases included 202 birds from 
Ecuador, 129 from Argentina, and 263 from various parts of South 
America which, combined with the expedition material, added many 



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Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 193 

species of considerable rarity and many others not at present represented 
in the collections. Most noteworthy among the single specimens is a 
fine example of the Blue Bird of Paradise from New Guinea, one of the 
rarest and most beautiful of its family. 

In the Division of Reptiles and Amphibians, the accessions for the 
year reach a total of 3,848 specimens, by far the most important in the 
history of the Museum and actually increasing the total number pre- 
viously possessed by nearly one-half. Of these, 403 specimens were 
received by gift, 510 by purchase, and 2,935 from Museum expeditions. 
Important gifts are 103 specimens from St. John's college, Belize, British 
Honduras ; 1 73 specimens from Wisconsin, from assistant curator Karl P. 
Schmidt, and his brother, F. J. W. Schmidt; 38 from Texas from Col. 
M. L. Crimmins; 42 from Rothschild's Chicago Aquarium, through the 
courtesy of Mr. John Bichele; and 7 specimens from northern Peru from 
Mr. Axel Olssen of Gloversville, New York. Important purchases are 
300 exotic species from W. F. H. Rosenberg; 4 specimens of the peculiar 
African Soft-shelled Tortoise received from Mr. Arthur Loveridge ; and 
174 specimens collected in South Carolina by Mr. Edward A. Hyer. 
The Captain Marshall Field Expedition to Honduras obtained 1,275 
reptiles and amphibians; the expedition to Chile and Argentina 687 ; the 
expedition to Peru 97; and the expedition to Louisiana and Texas 758. 

Accessions of fishes were numerous and important, amounting to a 
total of 12,995 specimens, of which 10,342 were received from expedi- 
tions, 2,294 were gifts, 330 were purchased, and 29 were received in 
exchange. The largest single accessions were of 8,000 fishes from south- 
ern Texas and 2,000 from southeastern Louisiana, collected by the 
Captain Marshall Field expedition to those states. Some of these 
may prove to be new to science and many will serve to clear up disputed 
points in the classification of North American fishes. Other expeditions 
to South and Central America, although not primarily seeking fishes, 
secured considerable material from this territory, including new and un- 
described species. A collection of fishes from Marion County, Florida, 
was purchased and, since the locality is not one previously represented 
in the Museum's collections, the specimens will have considerable value. 
A very fine Red Snapper and a beautiful Lake Trout, for exhibition, were 
purchased from Mr. W. M. Walker. These two were practically gifts, 
since the specimens were ordered and selected especially for the purpose, 
and the charge made was nominal. Gifts of fishes include the following: 
700 specimens from Louisiana and the Gulf of Mexico from the Southern 
Biological Supply Company, through its president, Mr. Percy Viosca, 
Jr. ; a large specimen of the Pacific Wolf Eel from the Booth Fisheries 



194 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

Company; a hybrid pickerel from Mr. George McNeill; and various 
specimens, mainly sunfishes, from Lincoln Park Aquarium, through the 
courtesy of Mr. F. S. Young. The management of Rothschild's Aquar- 
ium has continued the practice of giving the Museum the more interest- 
ing of their fishes that die in the tanks. Nearly 140 specimens were 
received from this source. The New York State Conservation Com- 
mission and the Wisconsin Conservation Commission have assisted in 
obtaining material for a special exhibit of pikes, pickerels and muskal- 
onge. 

Two very interesting fishes were received in exchange. These were 
the Australian Lungfish, of which three specimens and a number of eggs 
were received from the Queensland Museum, Brisbane, Australia; and 
the Deep Sea Flounder (Pelecanichthys crumenalis) from the U. S. 
National Museum. Very few specimens of this flounder ever have been 
taken. It differs from all other known flounders in having a very long 
lower jaw, which carries a pouch suggesting that of a pelican. 

The insects accessioned consisted of 25 lots and include 1,366 
specimens. The largest and most noteworthy acquisition was the pur- 
chase of an authoritatively classified collection of 600 dragonflies, repre- 
senting 122 species from Brazil, a country from which the Museum had 
previously obtained but few specimens. Another desirable purchase con- 
sisted of 100 butterflies and 10 moths from southwestern India. Among 
the donations, the most valuable were 99 dragonflies from Central and 
South America, a gift from Mr. Jesse H. Williamson, Bluffton, Indiana; 
134 butterflies and moths collected in Colorado and presented by Dr. 
C. E. Hellmayr; and 178 insects of various orders from British Guiana, a 
gift from Dr. B. E. Dahlgren. On the Captain Marshall Field expedi- 
tions, 198 desirable scorpions, centipedes, spiders and insects were ob- 
tained from the southern United States, Central America, and South 
America. 

Accessions of skeletons include one hippopotamus and 30 other mam- 
mals, mostly South American, and one iguana and 2 crocodiles. 

EXPEDITIONS 

During the past year the Museum has carried on more active and 
successful expeditions than in any previous year of its existence. The 
wide geographical range of the exploration parties has meant a cor- 
responding increase in the number and importance of the additions to 
the collections. Of the twelve major expeditions in the field, seven 
operated in South America. The other expeditions carried on their re- 
search in China, the Malay Peninsula, Central America and the Gulf 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 195 

Region of the United States. Important results are being obtained from 
the joint expedition of Field Museum and Oxford University, England, 
which is operating at Kish in Mesopotamia. Recent excavations 
have shown that the workers have actually discovered the seat of the 
oldest empire known to history. 

The personnel of nine of the expeditions have returned to take charge 
of the classification of the material obtained in the field. Three of the 
exploration parties are still at work in the field, and another was dis- 
patched to Central Africa late in November. 

Anthropology. — The Department of Anthropology had four ex- 
peditions in the field during the year, covering China, Mesopotamia, 
Malaysia and Colombia. 

The curator of the department, Dr. Berthold Laufer, left in April for 
China, the expedition being under the auspices of Captain Marshall Field. 
Dr. Laufer had exceptional opportunities for studying private collections 
of prominent Chinese at Shanghai and Peking, and specialized in the study 
of Chinese civilization during the Sung period, that great age of Chinese 
renaissance in which the traditions of antiquity were revived and the 
foundation was laid for a truly national art. Great efforts were made to 
secure representative collections of Sung pottery and painting. Of the 
former, 170 specimens from kilns of both southern and northern China 
were obtained, including all types and glazes, among these 6 Chun yao, 
25 Ting yao, 44 Temmoku, and 13 Celadons, many being of great beauty 
and rarity. Three bits, a Kuan yao, a Ju yao, and a Ko yao, belong to 
the earliest products of Sung porcelain and are extremely rare. A large 
portion of this pottery was excavated in recent years on the site of the 
city Kii-lu in the southern part of the province of Chili, which was sub- 
merged by a flood in a.d. 1 108. All this pottery must have been made 
prior to that date and therefore can be safely placed as to period. Aside 
from its artistic value it will serve to illustrate many interesting features 
of Chinese daily life in a mediaeval community. From the same locality 
were obtained four carved wooden panels and a number of engraved 
wooden stamps or blocks for printing designs on textiles, which belong to 
the oldest printing-blocks in the history of this industry. Twenty-three 
paintings, half of this number from the Sung period, were obtained, all 
of superior quality and interest in subject matter. Five remarkable 
silk-woven tapestries, one of the Ming dynasty and four of the K'ien- 
lung period (1736-95), were secured, also silk brocades and cut velvets 
of this latter period. Extensive collections were made of artistic bas- 
kets (75) covering all localities of central and southern China where 



196 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

basketry is made; 84 pieces of old lacquer ware of the Ming, K'ang-hi 
and K'ien-lung periods, carved or painted with landscapes and designs 
in colors or gold, or inlaid with scenes in mother-of-pearl. Ancient 
glass, bone and ivory carvings, bamboo and wood carvings, weapons, 
fans, musical instruments, tobacco and smoking utensils were also 
obtained. Specimens were secured of ancient silver together with 
a remarkable cast figure of a water-buffalo. Many additions were 
made to the present collection of jade, the new acquisitions amounting 
to 185 specimens. Ceremonial knives and ornamented disks of 
enormous size, three unusually large tubes symbolizing the deity 
Earth, and a comprehensive assortment of jade and other stone imple- 
ments are deserving of particular mention. A red-lacquered and elabo- 
rately carved bridal chair or palanquin, in which the bride, on the day of 
marriage, is escorted into the bridegroom's house; a large dragon-boat 
of the same character, which is carried in religious processions, at 
the annual dragon-boat festival; and an imposing red and gold lac- 
quered bed, adorned with beautiful wood carvings in relief and open- 
work, of the K'ien-lung period, will make striking objects for exhibition. 
The curator made it a special point to gather relics of the Manchu 
dynasty and secured five exceedingly fine imperial costumes of the 
eighteenth century, of silk tapestry or silk embroidery, elaborate head- 
dresses of princes and princesses, a complete set of the silk girdles with 
white jade clasps conferred by the emperor on the princes of the imperial 
house, six bamboo shades with pictures formed by strips of silk wrapped 
around the fine bamboo rods and exclusively made for the palace, the 
dress of a lady of the Manchu aristocracy with the peculiar high coiffure 
complete with all jewelry, the armor of a Manchu general from the 
K'ang-hi period (166 2- 1722), a complete series of the bows used by the 
Manchu in military examinations for testing the strength of candidates, 
and fans used in court ceremonies and other objects. After a 
thorough study of the stage and drama in Peking, fourteen actors' 
costumes were selected, which will be added to the Hall of Oriental 
Theatricals. These are the five national heroes, Kwan-ti, Chang Fei, 
Chu-ko Liang, Liu Pei, and Chao Yiin, accompanied by four soldiers; 
Ma-ku, a benign goddess of blessing; Yang Kwei-fei, a famed court-lady 
of the T'ang dynasty; an amazon or military heroine; and two very 
popular figures, an official and his wife from the drama "The Meeting 
in the Mulberry Garden." All these costumes are complete with head- 
dresses, coiffures and all of the paraphernalia pertaining to them. It is 
estimated that the new acquisitions, which number over 2,000, not in- 
cluding the theatrical accessions, will require about 33 exhibition-cases. 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 197 

As a result of his researches, the curator is planning a publication on 
China's civilization in the age of the Sung, which will analyze all de- 
partments of art which flourished at that time, including novel contri- 
butions to the history of Sung pottery. 

Reports received during the year from Professor S. Langdon indicate 
that the joint expedition of Oxford University and Field Museum in 
Mesopotamia has made good progress in the work of excavation. Mr. 
E. Mackay, field director, has unearthed the south-east side of the 
temenos platform on which stood the temple of the prehistoric war-god, 
Ilbaba, and the goddess of war, Innini or Ishtar. This temple was 
known as Emeteursag, and beside it on the platform stood the lofty 
tower in seven stages known as "House of Admiration, the Far-famed 
Abode." It was hitherto a controversial point whether these lofty 
ruins which rise out of the plains east of Babylon really represent the 
site of Kish, the seat of the oldest Sumerian and Semitic rulers. The 
excavator has fortunately found a stamped brick of Samsuiluna, seventh 
king of the first dynasty of Babylon (2080-43 B.C.), the inscription on 
which settles the question definitely and proves that the expedition has 
actually come upon the lofty stage tower of the capital of the oldest 
kings and seat of the first empire known to history. Now that the temple 
of the war-god of ancient Sumer and Akkad has been definitely located, 
the excavators are rapidly advancing toward the inner temple, where 
they hope to come upon the temple library. In May, just before the in- 
tense heat compelled the cessation of the work, Mr. Mackay found walls 
built of plano-convex bricks, a positive indication of the oldest Sumerian 
period. Down to about 2900 b.c the masons invariably laid their 
walls with this type of brick, which is not made in moulds, but is fash- 
ioned by hand on a flat surface, the top being left convex, and each side 
bearing two of the mason's finger prints. Near these older walls was 
found black incised pottery inlaid with white designs. This method of 
decorating pottery by incrustation seems to have been a Sumerian in- 
vention, and provided a substitute for painted designs. A remarkable 
discovery was made in the tower mentioned above. The original 
height of the tower cannot have been less than 180 feet, and its four sides 
measured over 200 feet. The first stage of the tower, which is one of the 
best preserved of ancient Babylonia, has rows of chambers connected 
by- a corridor. Beneath the pavements of some of these chambers were 
found inscribed tablets. This is the first known discovery of a series of 
chambers within a stage tower. Beneath the ruins of a still larger and 
apparently more ancient mound, Ingharra, two miles east of Oheimer, 
lie supposedly the palaces of the early kings of Kish, who ruled all of 



198 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

Sumer and Akkad at various periods from 5000-2872 b.c. Excavations 
at Ingharra were begun September 15th in connection with those now 
in progress at Oheimer. The oldest temple ever discovered in Meso- 
potamia was found on this occasion. Professor S. Langdon left Oxford 
on December 13th to take personal charge of the expedition. 

The results of the work of the Arthur B. Jones expedition to 
Malaysia were reported last year with reference to the Federated 
Malay States. At the close of 1922, Dr. Cole, in charge of the 
expedition, transferred his activities to Central Sumatra to study 
the Menangkabau of the Padang Highlands. These people, the 
most advanced of all the Malay tribes, usually live in small villages, the 
members of which are of the same family or clan. Since the maternal 
family is the unit of government, it owns the land and controls mar- 
riage. The villages are surrounded by terraced fields in which rice, 
manihot and tobacco are grown, and extensive gardens maintained, 
while each settlement raises a considerable number of cinnamon trees. 
While agriculture is the chief occupation, the men are expert wood 
carvers, silver and gold smiths, and metal workers; the women weave 
and embroider in gold and silver thread. Careful studies of the social 
and economic life were carried on, and a collection of about 800 objects 
gathered, emphasis being laid on wood carving and textiles woven 
in gold and silver thread. The complete outfit of a bride and groom 
was secured, and a miniature village was constructed to scale. The Toba 
Batak of north central Sumatra were next visited, and a collection of 
more than 400 articles was obtained to illustrate that unique culture. 
These people, who are just emerging from cannibalism, have a highly 
developed ceremonial life, which centers in the rites of the magicians. 
Around these powerful individuals has been developed a cult distin- 
guished by the use of elaborately carved magical staffs, carved heads 
for the house fronts, a series of magical figures, and by many books of 
secret formulae. The metal work of this tribe is also of high excellence 
and their weaving is of good quality. The collection contains examples 
of their industries, together with the complete front of a carved house. 
The island of Nias was visited, and considerable material gathered, 
which represents its fast vanishing culture. 

While in Java, the expedition secured 450 specimens of Javanese work- 
manship to supplement the collection now on exhibition in the Museum. 
These specimens consist chiefly of metal work, weapons of former 
times, jewelry, and batik work. Finally, a scouting trip was made into 
the center of Borneo. Starting from Bandjermassin in southern Borneo, 
the expedition proceeded up the Barito river to a point just south of the 



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Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 199 

equator and then struck inland on foot into the country of the Siang 
Dyak. This tribe does not possess the rich culture found in northern 
Borneo, but nevertheless a very interesting collection of 200 objects was 
obtained. Of chief interest is a memorial pole, carved to represent a 
powerful chief who died some years ago. At the time of its erection a 
number of captives were sacrificed, and each year since then a human or 
animal sacrifice has been held in its honor. The collections from the 
Dutch Indies total more than 2,000 objects. Measurements were made 
on about 200 individuals; while about 500 photographs illustrate the 
regions visited. 

The work of the Captain Marshall Field Expedition to Colombia 
reported last year was continued by Assistant Curator Mason from Janu- 
ary until July 10th of this year. The investigator's attention was 
divided between archeological and ethnological research. He spent 
some time exploring the Sierra Nevada region, but the ancient city of 
Pocihueica supposed to be located there could not be discovered. He 
made also some ethnological and linguistic studies among the Arhuacos 
and Goajiros. The result of this year's work is represented by a collec- 
tion of 822 specimens, which, with the number of 2,851 obtained last 
year,, yield a total of 3,673. The archeological collection differs only in 
details from that reported in 1922. Stone axe-heads, small pottery ves- 
sels, fragments of relief from pottery vessels and carnelian beads are 
prominent. Special mention may be made of some fine black pottery 
vessels, an extraordinary black pottery whistle, a few small pendants 
and similar fine small stone objects, a number of objects of banded red- 
dish stone carved in the shape of spiral shells, several necklaces of un- 
usually fine beads, and a double ivory axe-head covered with gold mosaic, 
the two latter groups secured from the Goajiro Indians. The collection 
of Arhuaco ethnology is a small one and was secured with great difficulty, 
as the villages were practically inaccessible and mostly deserted, and 
the few natives disinclined to sell. Nevertheless, most of the native in- 
dustries, implements and ornaments are represented, except for their 
woven cloths and garments. The largest group of specimens obtained is 
the collection of knitted bags or mochilas. Those bags which bear 
geometric designs in color are the most striking for display pur- 
poses and art study. The large Goajiro collection was secured in a 
few days, as the Indian camps are but a short distance from Riohacha 
and the natives semi-civilized and eager to sell their objects. This col- 
lection contains practically all objects made and used by these Indians, 
except the more esoteric religious and ceremonial objects which, as in 
the case of the Arhuaco, cannot be secured on short acquaintance. The 



I 



200 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

largest group of objects is comprised of woven belts or fajas, arrows, 
necklaces of beads made from black coconut shell, bags of knitted 
maguey-fiber or cotton, pottery vessels, and small vessels of calabash. 
Especial mention should be made of the necklaces of fine ancient beads. 
Wherever traces of ancient occupation were found, notes of everything 
of importance were taken, but, except for the work at Teran, the first 
week of the year, little of interest was seen. A total of 383 negatives of 
archeological sites and other views were taken, also 50 phonographic 
records of Indian music and songs. 

Botany. — During the year the Captain Marshall Field botanical 
expedition to Peru, commenced in 1922, was continued by assistant 
curator J. F. Macbride and Dr. George S. Bryan of the University of 
Wisconsin. The latter sailed from New York February 22nd and was 
joined at Panama by Mr. Macbride, who, having sailed from New Or- 
leans February 14th, had spent the interim collecting in the Canal Zone. 
He obtained there 250 species, mostly in triplicate, including various 
interesting plant products of the Panama Republic. 

The work performed by the expedition was definitely divided; 
Dr. Bryan devoted his entire attention to photography and the non- 
flowering plants, mosses, lichens, liverworts and fungi, while Mr. Mac- 
bride secured the flowering groups. The collectors co-operated in obtain- 
ing the ferns. 

Lima, Peru, was reached March 6th, where the collectors were 
entertained by the physician-botanist, Dr. A. Aspiazu. Preparations 
for the work in the interior were completed by the nth, on which 
date actual collecting began at Chosica in the Andean foothills, an 
hour's train ride from Lima. 

As the heavier camp and botanical equipment had been stored at 
Huanuco, the base for last year's operations, the expedition proceeded 
to this town which lies 60 miles down the Huallaga River from Cerro 
de Pasco. Huanuco was reached April 5 with about 400 numbers col- 
lected, stops having been made en route at various altitudes from 8,000 
to 15,500 feet. These stops included the railroad stations of Matucana 
and Rio Blanco, on the coastal slope of the western Andes, and the Inter- 
Andean railroad terminals, La Oroya and Cerro de Pasco. At these two 
mining towns many courtesies were received from the officials of the 
Cerro de Pasco Copper Corporation, notably Mr. Colley, Mr. 
Miles Morgan and Mr. R. C. Philpott. The journey by pack-train 
from Cerro de Pasco was broken by short stops for collecting at La 
Quinua, Huariaca, Ambo and Huanuco. 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 201 

Mito and Cani, villages about 15 miles west of Huanuco, were next 
visited where some 300 numbers were collected, after which work was 
resumed at the base, Huanuco, and preparations made for a trip about 
100 miles east, by trail, to Pozuzo situated at an altitude of 2,200 feet. 
This journey took the expedition across the eastern Cordillera moun- 
tains at an altitude of about 12,000 feet. Collections, totaling over 1,500 
numbers of flowering and 500 non-flowering plants, were secured at 
twelve localities, the most important camps having been made at Piedra 
Grande, Muna, Tambo de Vaca and Cushi. These localities are in tropi- 
cal upper Amazonian country, which, with its mile-deep river canyons, 
offers much variety in vegetation. At Pozuzo the expedition was 
greatly indebted to the hospitality of Sr. Ismael Ballisteros. 

The collectors, accompanied by their three Peruvian helpers with 
12 cargo beasts, returned to Huanuco from Pozuzo on foot, reaching 
the base town July 10. There saddle horses were obtained, the party 
leaving July 1 5 for the Japanese hacienda Pampayacu which is located 
at the mouth of the Rio Chinchao about four days' trip below Huanuco. 
Collection en route was especially aided by the hospitality of Sr. E. Mala- 
testa at his hacienda Villcabamba. Through the courtesy of Mr. M. Sawa- 
da of Huanuco and his manager at Pampayacu, Mr. S. Kusumara, several 
days were spent in work at Pampayacu, which resulted in large collections. 

On August 6 the collectors were again in Huanuco and prepared for 
the return journey to the coast. At La Oroya, however, a side trip was 
made to La Merced, 60 miles farther in the interior, for the purpose of 
comparing the tropical vegetation there with that which had been 
studied at the more northern regions about Pozuzo and Chinchao. As 
Dr. Bryan had to resume his University work, he left on August 13, and 
after some collecting of marine algae near Lima sailed for New York 
August 29. Mr. Macbride continued the work at La Merced until Sep- 
tember 7, securing over 500 numbers. He was very hospitably 
entertained by a local naturalist, Sr. Carlos Schunke, who also aided 
him greatly in his work. Upon his return to La Oroya September 8, 
a hurried trip was made by rail to Huancayo where some interesting 
economic material, such as native foods, fibers and medicines, was 
obtained at the great fall market. Some days (September 13-25) 
were spent collecting in the hills about Lima, where he was kindly 
assisted by Dr. A. Weberbauer, the distinguished botanist. 

The expedition secured in all 4,250 numbers, or about 11,000 speci- 
mens, of which about 750 numbers are Cryptogamic. The latter, 
gathered by Dr. Bryan, probably constitute the largest single collec- 
tion of non-flowering plants ever made in South America. 



202 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

Geology. — Under the auspices of the Capt. Marshall Field Fund 
a second expedition to Brazil for the purpose of collecting gem, 
mineral and ore specimens was made by the Curator. Exploration 
on this trip was carried on chiefly in the state of Bahia. 

It was deemed especially desirable to visit a region about the head- 
waters of the Paraguassu river, where besides ordinary diamonds, prac- 
tically all the black diamonds or carbonados used in various industries 
are obtained. This district can ordinarily be reached directly from the 
city of Bahia by means of a few days travel by rail, steamer and mule, 
but on arriving at Bahia, it was learned that a serious epidemic of fever 
in the diam'ondiferous region made it inadvisable to visit it at that time. 
Accordingly a much more circuitous course was taken which enabled 
much of the region to be seen without passing through the infected 
district. 

At the city of Bahia, collections of typical rocks and minerals of the 
region were made, and from the State Exposition in progress at the time 
specimens of various ores and minerals obtained. Journey was then 
made by rail to Joazeiro, on the San Francisco river, manganese and 
chromium ores being collected on the way. 

The San Francisco was then ascended to Chique-Chique, a city 
located on the western border of the Chapada Diamantina or diamond- 
bearing district. By crossing this district in a south-easterly direction 
it was possible to traverse a large area where minerals are obtained at 
various points. Travel in this region is confined to walking or mule 
riding and as the latter method seemed preferable, at Chique-Chique 
an outfit of nine mules with drivers and supplies was secured. At 
Chique-Chique a number of good specimens of commercial rock 
crystal and other minerals were collected. San Ignacio was the 
next of the important producing districts visited. Here the first 
of the diamond-bearing conglomerates were seen and a number 
of specimens collected. At Gentio a well-known auriferous area 
was crossed and a number of samples taken. Subsequent to this an 
extensive limestone area was traversed which yielded little in the way 
of minerals but at the hamlet of Mulungu in this area a hitherto unknown 
deposit of fossil bones of an extinct giant ground-sloth and of other 
extinct animals was found. Though the expedition was not equipped 
for transporting large quantities of this material, a well preserved pelvis, 
a portion of a skull with teeth and some leg bones were successfully 
collected and transported. At the eastern edge of the Chapada Diaman- 
tina two important diamond-bearing localities, Palmeiras and Mucuji, 
were visited and good specimens of the various kinds of diamonds and 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 203 

the accompanying minerals occurring there were obtained. These 
specimens included ordinary diamonds, carbonados, a Balas diamond 
and typical, associated minerals. 

Journey was then made southward through the mining regions of 
Rio das Contas to Bom Jesus dos Meiras where some recently opened 
mines of emerald, topaz and other minerals were visited and valuable 
specimens, many of which were of gem quality, were obtained. 

The advent of the rainy season making it unadvisable to go farther 
into the interior, return was made to Bahia. While it is not possible as 
yet to fully tabulate the results of the trip, several hundred gem and 
mineral specimens were collected, besides ores and many specimens 
illustrating other geological features. Some zoological and botanical 
specimens were also collected. Several hundred photographs were made 
in the regions visited, some of the localities photographed being little 
if any known to science. The distance travelled on mule-back was 
about 700 miles and the time occupied three and a half months. 

The Curator was accompanied throughout the trip by Mr. E. Jacy 
Monteiro, an engineer of Rio de Janeiro, who rendered valuable service. 
Many courtesies and helpful cooperation were received from various 
residents of the regions visited, special acknowledgements being due to 
Coronel Manoel Alcantara de Carvalho of Gamaleiras, Coronel Agrario 
de Magalhaes Avelino of Chique-Chique, Coronel Jose Alvez of Palm- 
eiras and Mr. Frederick E. Johnson of the Central Brazil Presbyterian 
Mission. 

Previous to the Bahian trip the Curator spent some time in Rio de 
Janeiro in order to obtain information and make needed preparations. 

During this period he carried on negotiations which resulted in secur- 
ing for the Museum what is believed to be the largest specimen of gem 
topaz ever found. This is a single crystal weighing 90 lbs., which is 
practically all of gem quality. An entire meteorite from a previously 
unrepresented Brazilian locality was also obtained. This meteorite is a 
complete iron individual. Valuable specimens of Brazilian gems of un- 
usually large size and high quality were also obtained. These included 
an aquamarine of 180 carats, a large amethyst cameo, a bracelet of Bra- 
zilian tourmalines, a large rubellite and a blue topaz of 35 carats weight. 

Various Government and other officials as well as private individuals 
rendered generous assistance during this period, especial mention being 
due to Dr. Antonio Olyntho dos Santos Pires, Chief of the Brazilian 
Exposition, Drs. Horace E. Williams and Jorge B. de Araujo Ferraz of 
the Servico Geologico of Brazil, Dr. John H. Janney of the International 
Health Board and Mr. Wm. G. Homeyer of Kodak Brasiliera, Ltd. 



204 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol, VI. 

The Captain Marshall Field Expedition for Vertebrate Paleontology, 
with Associate Curator E. S. Riggs and Preparators G. F. Sternberg 
and J. B. Abbott, as chief personnel, has remained in Argentina through- 
out the year. 

Owing to the fact that Patagonia was probably during Cenozoic 
time an isolated continent, upon which a system of mammalian life 
which was quite distinct from that of the Northern Hemisphere flour- 
ished, and since the Museum has hitherto had only a small and frag- 
mentary series from a single period of this area, the party devoted itself 
chiefly to making as complete collections as possible of the fossil mam- 
mals of Patagonia. 

Work was begun in the southern extremity of that country, near the 
Port of Rio Gallegos, since in the Santa Cruzean formation there the extinct 
fauna was best known and specimens could be most readily obtained. 
Beginning with the first days of January, active collecting was carried 
on during the remainder of the southern summer. The shores of bays 
and inlets and the exposed sea-wall of the Atlantic proved to be the most 
fertile collecting grounds, and considerable material was obtained until 
the approach of winter and first falls of snow in May, made it advisable 
to find winter quarters. In search of more favorable conditions there- 
fore the party moved northward. In late summer however, a single 
digression was made in order to investigate a half -authentic report of 
a fossil "Tertiary man" and to visit an alleged "buried city." The 
former was found to be a concretion, and the latter a lava dike. 

The journey northward was undertaken by motor car, a geological 
reconnoissance being made en route from Santa Cruz to Commodoro 
Rivadavia. At the latter port, heavy snows, followed by rains and im- 
passable roads, arrested the progress of the expedition, at the middle of 
June. A winter camp was then established. Collectors Sternberg and 
Abbott carried on such work as weather permitted, while Associate 
Curator Riggs proceeded to Buenos Aires to arrange certain formalities 
preparatory to shipping the collections previously made. The latter 
task required securing permission from an Argentina National Commis- 
sion of Museum Directors. Repeated conferences were held with the 
members of the Commission, the collection was transported to the Museo 
de La Plata, and a large part of it unpacked, unwrapped, displayed, 
inspected, re-wrapped, re-packed and stored. After two months of such 
labors, and the seizure of such specimens as were recognized by the Com- 
mission as new to science, the necessary permit was granted. The collec- 
tion from the Santa Cruz formation, consisting of 43 boxes of fossils 
was thus freed, and in December was shipped to the Museum. 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 





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REPORTS, PLATE XXXVII. 




'FDIMENS WERE RECEIVED IN 1923. 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 205 

The second field problem undertaken by the expedition was to find 
fossil-bearing localities in, and make collections from, the geological 
formation designated as the Deseado. 

While stormy weather and impassable roads blocked for a time re- 
peated efforts of the collectors to move from winter quarters or to resume 
active work, late in August a region of high, snowy pampa lying to the 
northwest of Commodoro Rivadavia was successfully traversed and a 
camp was established on the Rio Chico of Chubut. Fossil-collecting 
was there resumed. During the period of enforced hibernation, some 
collections of fossil cetaceans, fossil invertebrates, and of recent birds 
and mammals, were made. 

A movement toward Lago Coluhe Huapi was arrested by recurring 
snows and heavy rains, and the party detained until the end of October. 
During that period a wide area to the westward of the Rio Chico was 
explored by means of horse transportation, this method having been 
heretofore impossible because of a shortage of feed. However, in a wide 
expanse of Tertian* hills in this area no fossil-bearing localities were 
discovered. 

In November the part}* moved by motor toward the region of Lakes 
Munsters and Coluhe Huapi. Collections were made from various lo- 
calities of the Deseado formation about the lakes and along the Rio 
Senger. The occurrence of dinosaurian fossils was noted, but it was not 
deemed advisable to collect these ponderous specimens from localities 
so far from the Museum. The San Bernardo Range (of hills) was recon- 
noitered in quest of new fossil-bearing localities and the complex geology 
of the region noted. 

The year ended with a movement to the north and west from Colonia 
Sarmiento. 

The results attained during the year may be enumerated as follows : 
From the Santa Cruzean and adjacent formations, to westward and 
northward of the Port of Rio Gallegos, a collection of 262 specimens of 
fossil mammals, 4 specimens of fossil birds, and 64 specimens of fossil 
shells, was made. A few lithological and archeological specimens, as 
well as a limited number of recent mammals, were also collected there. 

The occurrence of Sauropod Dinosaurs, comparable to those of the 
Northern Hemisphere, in the vicinity of Lake Cardiel, Territory of 
Santa Cruz, was determined. In the vicinity of Rio Gallegos and Rio 
Coyle, fifty negatives of geological and general interest, and nine rolls 
of cinema film were made. 



206 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

One fossil cetacean and 65 fossil invertebrates were collected from 
the Patagonian Beds near Commodoro Rivadavia, and eighteen nega- 
tives were made showing the geological features and the petroleum 
fields near the port. 

From the Deseado formation at various localities, 54 specimens of 
fossil mammals, one of fossil bird, four of fossil fish, and 37 of fossil 
invertebrates, and from the Cretaceous formation, one specimen of 
fossil reptile, were collected. 

Of recent animals there were collected five mammal skeletons, 7 
mammal skulls, 18 mammals in formalin, 9 lizards in formalin, 21 
marine invertebrates, 20 prepared bird skins, 2 rhea nests with eggs, 
and 1 martinet nest of eggs. 

Of archeological specimens, 64 finished Indian celts, 48 rough celts 
and scrapers, and 1 1 boladores, martels and axes were collected and of 
botanical specimens 450 pressed plants and 7 dried shrubs. 

Zoology. — Five zoological expeditions of major importance were in 
the field during the year. Two of these were continuing work begun in 
1922, two were completed in 1923, and one was organized and started 
late in December. 

At the beginning of the year, the Captain Marshall Field Peruvian 
Expedition was still engaged in collecting specimens native to central 
Peru. The expedition was divided into two groups, one, consisting of 
assistant curator Heller and Mrs. Heller, collected mammals, while assis- 
tant curator Zimmer devoted his time to the collection of birds. Using 
the towns of Huanuco and Ambo as bases, the expedition worked twenty 
localities along the Huallaga and Maranon valleys, differing in altitude 
from 4,000 to 14,000 feet. Shortly after the first of the year, Mr. Zimmer 
proceeded over the Andean mountains to the valley of the Chanchamayo 
River where additional material was collected. Leaving this valley, he 
proceeded by trail to Puerto Bermudez, the final collecting station. 
Starting on the Pichis River, Mr. Zimmer then worked toward the coast, 
making a few collections en route, touching also at the towns of Manaos 
and Para, on the lower stretches of the Amazon. Meanwhile, Mr. and 
Mrs. Heller after having worked down the Huallaga to Tingo Maria, 
returned to Huanuco and crossed by the difficult trail from Huanuco to 
Pozuzo, where extensive additions were made to the collections. They 
worked down the Pachitea River to the Ucayali and continued to Iquitos 
whence they took steamer down the Amazon. At Para, near the mouth 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 207 

of the Amazon, another stop was made and a number of important speci- 
mens were purchased. Here, also, additions were made to a collection 
of live animals which the expedition brought to Chicago for the Lincoln 
Park Zoo. 

The specimens of mammals and birds obtained by the Peruvian ex- 
pedition amount to a total of 3,500, forming one of the largest collections 
of vertebrates ever brought out of the Andean region. Careful study 
of the mammals has not yet been possible, but it is evident the collection 
contains various new species and others exceedingly rare. Many species 
of monkeys, usually difficult to secure, were obtained in large numbers. 
Among them are several specimens of two species of the Ouakaris or 
Bald-faced Monkeys, and one of the Imperial Marmoset, a very rare 
species characterized by a long flowing "moustache" of very suggestive 
appearance. 

The habitat was discovered of the large spotted rodent called Rucupi, 
a species of the genus Dinomys, only genus of the family Dinomyidae, and 
known mainly from a few scattered specimens in European museums. 
A series of sixteen skulls of this animal was obtained, together with 
seven skins and one living animal which was successfully transported to 
Chicago where it is now living in good health in the Lincoln Park Zoo, 
the first of its kind ever to enter the United States alive. 

The birds obtained by the expedition number some 400 species and 
subspecies, mostly new to the Museum's collections and including some 
rare forms not previously represented in any American museum, be- 
sides others quite new to science. Descriptions of ten of the new forms 
have been made for future publication. The collection is especially rich 
in humming birds, of which not less than thirty forms were obtained. 

The Captain Marshall Field Expedition to Chile and Argentina was 
well under way at the beginning of the year, having started from Chi- 
cago in November, 1922. As noted in the last annual report, this expedi- 
tion was in charge of the Curator of Zoology who was accompanied by 
Mr. C. C. Sanborn of the Division of Birds and Mr. Boardman Conover, 
volunteer associate. Through the courtesy of Dr. E. Moore, Director 
of the National Museum of Chile, the taxidermist of this museum, Sr. 
Luis Moreira, was granted leave of absence to enter the employ of the 
expedition for a period of three months. Valuable advice and assistance 
to the expedition were rendered also by Dr. Carlos Porter of the same 
institution, and by Mr. Alfred Houston of the Braden Copper Company. 
For many courtesies and privileges, special acknowledgment is due the 
officers and employees of the Compahia Industrial del Aysen. Work 
was begun on the island of Chiloe, on the well watered and heavily 



208 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

forested coast of south central Chile. Later, the party divided and 
various points in southern Chile were visited. An important trip was 
made southward through the Guaiteca Islands to the mouth of the Rio 
Aysen and thence inland across the mountains to the edge of the Pata- 
gonian pampas, near the Chile-Argentina boundary in about S. Lat. 45° 
50'. Returning northward, various points in central Chile were worked, 
and in Santiago some days were spent in studying the collections of the 
National Museum of Chile, especially in making careful notes on the 
important types of mammals preserved there. Late in May, Dr. Os- 
good and Mr. Conover passed on to Argentina via the Transandine Rail- 
road, leaving Mr. Sanborn to continue working northward in Chile. 
In Argentina, a series of short but very effective trips were made in the 
provinces of Mendoza, Buenos Aires, Tucuman, Jujuy, and Missiones, 
after which return to the United States was made in the month of Aug- 
ust with brief stops in Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 

At the end of the year, Mr. Sanborn was still working in northern 
Chile, having, passed successively from the province of Valparaiso to 
Coquimbo, Copiapo and Antofogasta. This took him into the desert 
region of northern Chile where conditions are unfavorable for collecting 
specimens in large quantities, but where the few that can be obtained 
are of very great interest and value. He passed from one isolated oasis 
to another, in each case making practically complete collections of all 
the vertebrates, mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians. 

The results of this expedition are too numerous and varied to be 
mentioned in detail. The number of specimens collected approximates 
3,000, equally divided among mammals, birds and cold-blooded verte- 
brates. Not only most of the species but most of the genera and not a 
few of the families represented are new to the Museum's collections, and 
they bring to the United States a basis for study and understanding of 
the whole fauna of the southern half of South America. The 
continued work in Chile from the deserts of the north to the forests of 
the south, and from the coast to the crest of the Andes has produced a 
collection of the animals of this country which is doubtless the most 
comprehensive in existence. Much desirable material for exhibition also 
was obtained, including nearly all the larger animals of Chile. Among 
interesting mammals are the tiny deer known as the Pudu, the large 
mountain deer called Huemul, the wild llama or Guanaco, the fur-bearing 
rodent Coypu or Nutria, the rare and beautiful Chinchilla, and the 
small blind armadillo called Pichiciego. The birds collected include the 
Black-necked Swan, the Andean Flamingo, the flightless Steamer Duck, 
the Torrent Duck, the Penguin, and many species of smaller size, among 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 209 

which are a number which preliminary study shows are new to science. 

The Captain Marshall Field Expedition to British Honduras and 
Honduras engaged the time of assistant curator Schmidt and taxidermist 
Walters from January 18th to June 2nd. The expedition sailed from 
New Orleans, landing at Belize on January 23rd. Five weeks were spent 
in British Honduras, principally at Belize and at the United Fruit Com- 
pany plantation at Middlesex. At Belize, a small crocodile was secured 
which proves to be a "lost" species not collected during the past fifty 
years. As this crocodile is strikingly different from the common Ameri- 
can crocodile, the Museum is fortunate in having not only the specimens 
but a plaster mold from which a celluloid model has been prepared by 
Mr. Walters. From Belize, the party sailed via schooner to Puerto 
Cortes, Honduras. In Honduras, the principal base of operations was 
San Pedro in the valley of Ulua and Chamelecon Rivers. The ranch of 
Mr. M. S. Miles, at the foot of the Espiritu Santo Mountains offered 
many facilities for work on plaster molds. The field work of the expedi- 
tion was further facilitated by the hospitality of Mr. Miles, as well as by 
the advice of Dr. S. M. Waller of San Pedro. The principal collections 
in Honduras were made in the tropical lowland at San Pedro and at 
Lake Ticamaya, east of San Pedro ; on the Espiritu Santo Mountains, 
west of San Pedro at altitudes above 4,500 feet, in a hardwood cloud- 
forest ; and in the course of a rapid transcontinental survey from Puerto 
Cortes via Lake Yojoa, Siguatepeque, and Tegucigalpa to San Lorenzo on 
the Gulf of Fonseca. Complete data and collections for a habitat group 
of the American Crocodile were secured at Lake Ticamaya, including 
plaster molds of crocodiles varying in size from four to eleven feet in 
length. These molds will be used later for reproduction in celluloid. 
The transportation of these large plaster molds was solved by con- 
structing special packing boxes and lashing the molds to an inside frame- 
work. The fifty-two molds secured by the expedition reached the 
Museum without breakage. A collection of tree-climbing salamanders, 
living almost entirely in the air-plants which cover the trees, together 
with three new species of tree frogs, was made in the mountain cloud- 
forest. One of the tree frogs is especially noteworthy as it breeds in the 
water contained in the leaf-whorls of the bromeliaceous air-plants. 
The collections secured at Lake Yojoa, Siguatepeque, and Tegucigalpa 
brought out the strong contrast between the faunas found along the 
Pacific side of Central America and those established along the Carib- 
bean sea. The total collections of the expedition number 1,275 speci- 
mens of amphibians and reptiles, 250 fishes, 50 bird-skins and 50 
mammals. 



210 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

The Captain Marshall Field Expedition to Louisiana and Texas was 
conducted by assistant curator Weed during July, August and Septem- 
ber. The first half of the time was spent in southeastern Louisiana, a 
region which has been very largely neglected by students of cold-blooded 
vertebrates. Owing to natural conditions, this region is inhabited by a 
very large number of species, perhaps the largest number in any region 
of similar size in North America. Unexpectedly heavy rain through the 
lower Mississippi valley made fish collecting difficult but helped mate- 
rially in the collecting of frogs and toads. Much assistance was rendered 
the expedition by Mr. Percy Viosca, Jr., of New Orleans, who has a very 
intimate knowledge of the country explored. In Texas, the region north 
and west of Brownsville was studied and a large number of fishes repre- 
senting most of the fresh-water species of the region were collected. The 
work in this region was materially aided by the cooperation of Mr. R. 
D. Camp of Brownsville. The results furnish a basis for much additional 
knowledge concerning the distribution and relationship of the fishes of 
the lower Mississippi valley. The specimens collected number 10,000 
fishes and 750 reptiles and amphibians. 

The final expedition of the year had Central Africa as its field 
and was despatched late in November. This expedition was organ- 
ized under the auspices of Captain Marshall Field and Mr. Alfred 
M. Collins of Philadelphia, a Patron of the Museum. The party con- 
sisted of Mr. Collins, assistant curator Heller of the Museum, and Mr. 
T. Alexander Barns of London. They sailed from England December 
5th for the port of Dar-es-Salaam on the east coast of Africa. They plan 
to push inland at once and work in little known parts of eastern Congo, 
making general zoological collections and passing northward to return 
via the Nile during the year 1924. The expedition will attempt to secure 
specimens of some of the rarer mammals of Central Africa, such as the 
White Rhino, the Okapi, the Bongo, the Giant Eland, and the Gorilla, 
any one of which would be of great value to the Museum in supplement- 
ing its present collections which are almost wholly from Somaliland and 
East Africa. 

The following list indicates the various expeditions in the field during 
the year. 

Locality Collector Material 

China Berthold Laufer Ethnological Collections 

Archaeological Collections 

Mesopotamia S. H. Langdon Archaeological Collections. 

Colombia J. Alden Mason Archaeological Collections. 

Malaysia Fay-Cooper Cole Ethnological Collections. 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XXXVIII. 




COMMON AND WHITE GYRFALCONS. 

TAXIDERMY BY ASHLEY HINE. 

One eighth natural size. 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 



211 



Peru . 



J. F. MacBride and 
Dr. George S. Bryan 



Herbarium and Economic Speci- 
mens. 







Gems, Ores and Minerals. 


Patagonia 

Chile, Argentine, 
and Brazil 


Elmer S. Riggs 
J. F. Abbott and 
G. F. Sternberg 

. W. H. Osgood 
Boardman Conover 


Paleontological Specimens. 
Mammals and Birds. 


Peru and Brazil . . 


. Edmund Heller 
Mrs. Heller 


Mammals. 




. C. C. Sanborn 


Mammals, Birds and Rept 


Peru and Brazil-. . 


. John T. Zimmer 


Birds. 


Honduras and 
British Honduras . 


. K. P. Schmidt 
L. L. Walters 


Reptiles and Batrachians. 


Louisiana and Texas 


. A. C. Weed 


Fishes and Batrachians. 


Central Africa. . . 


. Edmund Heller 
A. M. Collins 
T. A. Barns 


Mammals. 



INSTALLATION, RE-ARRANGEMENT AND PERMANENT 

IMPROVEMENT 

Anthropology. — Seventy-one new cases were installed during the 
year in the Department of Anthropology. 

Shortly before Christmas 1922, it was decided to open the Egyptian 
Hall to the public on January 20th. This left four weeks in which to 
complete the necessary work, placed in charge of Assistant Curator Owen. 
The nine standard cases previously brought from Ayer Hall required 
merery readjustment of the material, as displayed upon the shelves, but 
the 17 special cases containing mummies, in consequence of the plan to 
enlarge this exhibit, required a regrouping and expansion of the number 
of mummies into 22 cases. This necessitated the re-installation of 18 
of the cases in the mummy group. Eight frames containing papyri and 
39 framed mortuary textiles were placed upon the north wall of the hall, 
as well as 4 large frames containing complete mummy wrappings. A 
large case of limestone coffin covers was installed in the center of the 
hall. In the recesses of six pilasters were displayed 13 Mohammedan 
balcony gratings and colored-glass windows from old houses in Cairo. 
Two cases of plaster casts of rare portrait statuary, the originals of 
which are scattered in a number of museums of the Old World, were 
placed in the recesses of its two pilasters. The mortuary boat of 
Sesostris III, found in the sands near his pyramid at Dashur by de Mor- 
gan in 1894, was re-assembled and placed in a special case. The figures of 



212 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

four Sekhmets or Lion Goddesses were placed in the west end of the hall. 
This work accomplished, the hall was opened to the public, in conjunc- 
tion with the Hall of Oriental Theatricals. Later, three standard cases 
containing amulets, jewelry, and articles for the toilet, Ushebti figures, 
glazed and glass ware, tools and weapons and one case of ancient Egyp- 
tian weights and Coptic objects of bronze and iron were installed. A 
case of mummied birds and small mammals, wooden coffin covers and 
tomb furniture was likewise placed on exhibition. The cut leather corse- 
let of an Egyptian priest is shown in a small case especially built for 
it. Two Roman wine jars have been installed upon marble bases in 
the northeast and northwest corners of Stanley Field Hall. The two 
Roman mills from Bosco Reale, exhibited in Edward E. Ayer Hall, were 
transferred to a smaller case. Case 23, Stanley Field Hall, containing 
Indian blankets, was re-installed. In its new organization it is entirely 
given over to Navaho blankets, all of which were presented by Homer 
E. Sargent. 

The collection of 190 pewter objects presented by Mr. Ayer last 
January was labeled and installed by the curator in four square cases 
and two 6-foot wall cases placed in Ayer Hall, the installation of which 
is thereby completed. 

Thirty-seven cases of North American ethnology (Plains, Plateau 
and Salish tribes) have been installed and placed on exhibition this year 
by Assistant Curator Linton. This completes the re-installation of Hall 
5 and one-half of Hall 4. At the present time Hall 4 contains collections 
from nearly twenty tribes living in three distinct culture-areas and also 
the archeological material obtained from the Hopewell group of 
mounds. In the re-organization planned, the northwest quarter of the 
hall will be devoted to the Cree, Interior Salish, and other tribes of the 
Canadian Northwest. The northeastern quarter will be devoted to the 
Salish tribes of the north Pacific coast, whose culture represents a 
simple and attenuated form of the Northwest Coast culture illustrated 
in the eastern end of Hall 3. The southwestern quarter of the hall will 
be devoted to the eastern woodlands with small exhibits from the 
southeastern tribes and Iroquois and more extensive exhibits from the 
Central Algonquian tribes, especially the Sauk and Fox. These collec- 
tions will illustrate the arts and industries of the semi-sedentary agri- 
cultural tribes who occupied the state of Illinois at the time of the 
colonization. Special stress will be laid upon the features in which 
these tribes differed from the nomadic tribes of the Plains, whose life 
is represented in Hall 5. The projected exhibitions should be of great 
value to teachers of local history, as they are designed to give a correct 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 213 

picture of the life of the Indians in and about Chicago in the early- 
nineteenth century. The southeastern quarter of the hall will be 
devoted to the tribes of the Plateau culture area. These tribes had 
many features in common with those of the Plains area, but differed 
from them in several details, the most noticeable being their extensive 
use of basketry. 

Twenty cases were installed by Assistant Curator Lewis for exhi- 
bition in Joseph N. Field Hall. Seventeen of this number are re-instal- 
lations, and three cases contain new material. 

One of the Chinese screens presented by Mrs. Marshall Field, 
was removed from Hall 23, which is assigned to contain the Ayer 
collection of pewter, and was placed on the second floor at the north 
end of the stairway landing. 

Sculptures from India and Java were re-installed by the curator, 
the two cases being placed in Hall 32. 

Six stands holding a map of China and large labels giving chronologi- 
cal tables for the classification of Chinese antiquities have been installed 
in Hall 24. A new base was made for the case containing the model of 
the Taj Mahal in Hall 32. 

In Hall 9 five cases were changed in order to make a more suitable 
grouping according to tribes, as well as to gain more space for the 
Ifugao bench. The position of ten cases, including the seal-hunt group, 
was changed in Mary E. Sturges Hall, to make better aisles, grouping, 
and lighting, as well as additional space for a four-foot case of Tlingit 
basketry and a case of Athapascan clothing from the Yukon, which 
geographically fits in between the Eskimo and Tlingit, but which had 
been placed temporarily in Hall 4. In Hall 6 one four-foot case con- 
taining 13 Hupa storage baskets was emptied and the case transferred 
to Hall 3 for additional Tlingit baskets. The positions of eighteen 
cases were shifted, which results in an improved grouping according to 
tribes. 

Three cases were rebuilt for Egyptian mummies. A new case was 
made for the Egyptian leather corselet. One case was cut down in size 
for the two Roman mills in Edward E. Ayer Hall. A series of shelves 
was built at the north end of the fourth floor for storage of archeological 
material. Store rooms of compressed steel were built at the south end 
of the fourth floor and are now complete except for the shelving. 
Additional shelving was built in Room 66 for the storage of collections 
received from the Captain Marshall Field Expedition to China. 

The plaster busts of American Indians were unpacked and arranged 
on racks in Room 35. The numerous shipments received from the 



214 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

field made heavy demands on the time of the staff in checking and 
storing the new acquisitions. 

The carved and lacquered Chinese bed, the dragon-boat and the 
bridal palanquin obtained by the curator in China were assembled and 
the necessary repairs completed. 

A new type of screen for exhibition cases has been devised. It con- 
sists of boards of a three-ply veneer, i}i inches thick, while the old 
screen was 2 inches thick and proportionately heavy and unwieldy. It 
required the combined effort of four men to set up this screen, while 
the new one can easily be handled by a single man. It can be made 
within two or three days, while it required a week or longer to make 
one of the old type. 

In the modeling section, 93 damaged specimens were repaired, 11 
ancient Chinese iron objects treated, 6 papier-mache forms for the 
installation of costumes were completed and repair work was finished 
on the miniature group of the Pawnee sacred bundles ceremony. Work 
was continued on the New Guinea village group, which was largely 
confined to the making of coconut palms. Seventeen trunks which had 
to be modeled by hand are now ready. The modeler designed and 
constructed a machine for making celluloid coconut leaflets ; and also 
made a model and moulds of miniature nuts of 33 sizes. Two trees are 
practically completed, save for the final coloring of the leaflets. 

The Victor X-Ray Corporation of Chicago volunteered its services 
in taking radiographs of suitable museum objects, and under the 
direction of Mr. E. C. Jerman, 30 films 14 x 17 were taken of eight 
Peruvian and Egyptian mummies of three adult men, birds and small 
mammals. It is expected that investigations based on these radio- 
graphs will yield interesting results and that a study of the condition of 
the skeletons, as revealed by the radiographs, will excite the curiosity 
of both the physical anthropologist and the pathologist. 

Botany. — Early in the year the exhibits in the Department of 
Botany were rearranged. Wherever possible the bulk of economic plant 
material was separated from the more purely botanical exhibits, which 
include the reproductions and models of plants. These will eventually 
fill the large east hall, on the second floor, known as the Hall of Plant 
Life. By this change the arrangement of the economic plant material 
is simplified. Fibres and textiles are now placed together. The food 
products are grouped, beginning with the small grains, followed by 
starches, sugars, fats of vegetable origin, chocolate, coffee, tea and 
spices. Resins and gums, lac and lacquer, wood distillation products, 



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Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 215 

paper making materials and paper pulp products, tanning materials 
and dye woods, etc., are now also grouped, so that the visitor es- 
pecially interested in any one of these classes of raw materials, or their 
products, may find them assembled for comparison, rather than dis- 
tributed among the plant families to which they botanically belong. 
The new arrangement is at present in far from perfect order, since 
the installation in most cases was originally made with a view to a 
botanical sequence. 

The Palms among the larger plant families, alone have been selected 
for a comprehensive or monographic display, covering both their botanic 
and economic features. The Museum's collection of palms is now 
especially rich in both respects and the space required for the rather 
large specimens is now available. All of the palm material secured 
by the Stanley Field Guiana Expedition of 1922, named and catalogued, 
is ready for installation. 

In the Hall of Plant Life a decided change in appearance has been 
effected by painting the interior of cases with a light color. So much is 
to be said in favor of black as a background for many and varied 
classes of exhibits, particularly in point of economy and convenience 
of installation, that its use will be continued in all other halls of the 
department. However, it proved unsatisfactory as a setting for 
the reproductions of plants in which a lifelike appearance is desired. 
The reinstallation of the exhibits in this hall, required by the new 
plan of arrangement and by the change in background color, has been 
carried on as rapidly as possible. 

The exhibits have been increased by a number of new reproductions 
and models of plants. The Cycads are now represented by a repro- 
duction of the Comptie ( Zamia floridana) , one of the few Cycads 
native in the United States. A complete female plant is shown, 
bearing a ripe fruiting cone. Some models of the seed-bearing leaves 
of a Cycas have been added for purposes of comparison. 

For the representation of the adjoining fossil Cycads, a beginning 
has been made by the reconstruction, in the form of a model, of a 
fossil Cycad flower. This work has been carried on with the co-operation 
of Professor Wieland of Yale, the chief investigator of this extinct group. 
It is intended to illustrate it further, by the reconstruction of a 
branch of one of the small-leaved tree-like Cycadeoids and by some of 
the simpler "flowers" of these plants. 

The Verbena family has been illustrated by the "Black Mangrove," 
Avicennia, one of the principal members of the Mangrove formation of 
tropical shores, and biologically perhaps the most interesting of the 



216 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

plants of its family. An entire young tree with its remarkable clump 
of breathing roots was dug up, washed free of adhering clay and sent to 
the Museum by the Stanley Field Guiana Expedition of 1922. The 
foliage, flowers and fruits have been replaced by reproductions and the 
tree is now represented as it grew in the Guiana swamp, partly 
imbedded in mud. Being one of the so-called viviparous plants, its 
seedlings are of interest and are shown in various stages of growth on 
the ground below the tree. In the adjoining half of the case may be 
seen specimens of the peculiar aerial roots of the older trees. 

A Cacao or Chocolate tree from Guiana forms another noteworthy 
accession. The foliage, flower and fruits of this tree also have been 
restored and the result is a life-like representation of the tree as it grew 
on a Demerara cacao plantation. A new glass model of an enlarged 
flower of the Cacao has been added to the present exhibit. 

The Gamboge, or "vegetable tallow" family, has been illustrated by a 
reproduction of a flowering branch of the large-flowered Clusia, interest- 
ing on account of its showy magnolia-like flowers, and on account of the 
curious strangling habit of these trees, which has earned for them the 
appellation "Matapalo" or tree-killers. The Clusia, with its thick 
shining leaves and large white flowers, is undoubtedly one of the hand- 
somest of the flowering branches in the hall. As a further illustration 
of the fruit-characters in this family of plants, already represented 
by the Mangosteen, there has been added a fruiting branch of the well- 
known Mammea. 

To the Madder family a reproduction of a flowering branch 
of the East Indian "Silver Leaf" or "Princess Leaf" (Mussaenda) has 
been added. The interesting feature of this is the expansion of one of 
the calyx lobes of the small orange-red flower, into a large, white, leaf- 
like structure. In the Trumpet Vine family a reproduction of a 
fruiting branch of the Calabash tree adds another type of fruit to 
those already there. A reproduction, from material obtained from 
Texas, has also been completed of a clump of the common Mistletoe. 
The Orchid case has been enriched by a reproduction of a plant of 
the native Pink Lady Slipper (Cypripedium). For the exhibit of 
grasses, an enlarged model has been made of a germinating grain of 
Wheat. A series of Sweet Pea flowers has been modeled and colored 
to illustrate latent characters in heredity. 

A large part of the work required to restore a flowering and fruiting 
trunk of a Cannon-ball tree has been performed during the year, and 
progress has been made on several other reproductions of local and 
tropical plants. 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 217 

Geology. — The Borden collection of Indiana is being installed in 
Hall 34 as fast as it can be prepared. To make room for this exten- 
sive collection, material of the same periods and character but of less 
exhibition value is removed from the cases and transferred to the 
study collections. The fronts of four pyramidal cases have now been 
filled with specimens from this collection. 

Fifteen label stands specially designed to secure stability and yet 
present a neat and unobtrusive appearance, have been provided for the 
uncased skeletons and other floor mounts in this hall. These stands 
bring the labels to the height of the eye of the visitor and admit of 
adjustment to the angle most favorable for reading. 

A collection illustrating minerals that can be employed in crystal 
sets for radio communication was prepared and installed in Skiff Hall. 

An attractive addition to the exhibit illustrating the uses of petro- 
leum products is the candle collection. This is installed on a single 
screen which occupies half of a large case. Placed in the midst of the 
dull-colored petroleum and coal exhibits it adds a needed touch of 
color to this part of the hall. 

To illustrate the ornamental uses of gypsum, a figure of consider- 
able artistic merit was carved on a small block of alabaster, in such a 
way as to show both the rough stone and the finished figure. 

Work on the model of a cement plant was discontinued for the 
larger part of the year. The modelling was resumed during the late 
fall and the model is now complete except for some minor details, 
painting and some work that can be done only after the model is placed 
in its exhibition case. 

Four series of glass models illustrating the crystal form and colors 
of gem minerals have been remounted and relabelled. The replicas of 
famous diamonds in Higinbotham Hall have also received new labels. 
A tablet of gold nuggets from California, a gift from Mr. William J. 
Chalmers, has been prepared and is now exhibited in the same Hall. 

Further installation was confined to adding new specimens to the 
present collections and to numerous minor changes in arrangement of 
material, labels and cases. 

A modern still for distilling water has replaced one of antiquated 
type in the chemical laboratory. This not only provides the water 
required in the laboratory but also that for the stereopticons in Simp- 
son theatre -and for several of the work-rooms. Room no has been 
converted to a preparation room for the Borden collection. In it 
racks have been erected for all of the departmental storage trays. 



218 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

Sixty-six additional trays have been provided for the storage of the 
Borden collection. 

In the chemical laboratory the principal work has been confined 
to the transfer from the original packages to exhibition bottles and jars 
of several hundred petroleums, greases and waxes, a task that would 
have been difficult but for the excellent laboratory equipment. A num- 
ber of problems connected with the maintenance of the building have 
been solved by laboratory research. These include some fuel investiga- 
tions, and questions concerning the harmful character of a number of 
marble cleaning compounds. Identification of minerals received from 
Museum expeditions has also been carried forward during the year. 

Mr. F. C. Richardson of the Geological department of the Uni- 
versity of Chicago has made a detailed study of the Museum asbestos 
collections. 

Text for two guide leaflets, one on amber and one on meteorites, 
were prepared by the Curator and published during the year. 

Zoology. — Preparation of new material for exhibition purposes has 
steadily advanced and a considerable quantity is on hand, awaiting 
installation. The animals for the Olympic Elk group, begun some time 
ago, have been finished to the point of requiring only a few final touches. 
A case of bears, showing the color variation in the Black Bear group 
and including specimens of the Black, the Cinnamon, and Glacier 
Bears is practically ready for exhibition. A similar collection of the 
larger American cats, as the Cougar, Jaguar, Ocelot, Lynx, Bobcat, 
etc., is also in an advanced stage. A handsome specimen of the 
African Leopard was mounted and installed in the hall devoted to the 
systematic series of mammals ; and two small South American monkeys 
were also mounted for this series. The skin of a hippopotamus, 
received during the year, was preserved and carefully prepared for 
mounting. 

A collection of American raptorial birds, eagles, hawks and falcons 
has been prepared, the birds being mounted from fresh material or 
from thoroughly remodeled specimens and placed on appropriate natural 
stands instead of the perfunctory T-perches and wooden blocks used 
heretofore. This collection is designed to occupy an entire case and 
will be the first of a completely reorganized systematic and geographic 
exhibit of birds. New descriptive labels have been prepared for each 
species and a special case label has been devised to fit the case. Progress 
has been made also in mounting a series of American woodpeckers 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 219 

and material for other series has been prepared so that it will be 
available for future work. The exhibit of Birds of Paradise in Stanley 
Field Hall was improved by the addition of a Blue Bird of Paradise, 
one of the rarest and most beautiful of its family. The other birds in 
the case were renovated, and the entire installation modified by the 
reconstruction of the base. 

Preparation of material in the section of reptiles and amphibians 
advanced rapidly, and notable success has attended the application of 
the celluloid process to the reproduction of such large reptiles as croco- 
diles. The eight and a half foot specimen, the first of three for a pro- 
posed habitat group of the American Crocodile, sets a new standard for 
work of this kind and is so life-like as to be almost beyond criticism. 
A second model of the very different Belize Crocodile, rediscovered by 
the Museum's expedition to Central America, has also been completed. 
A large amount of work has been done on the two remaining molds of 
crocodiles, and these, therefore, can be finished at an early date in 1924. 
In furtherance of the plan to exhibit a case of the poisonous snakes 
of North America several molds have been made, of which the 
most noteworthy are a green, a black-tailed, and a cane-brake rattle- 
snake. 

In the Division of Fishes, one exhibition case was equipped with new 
labels, and on one side of the screen in this double case a new exhibition 
was installed, showing some of the fishes of the deeper parts of the sea. 
Where actual specimens were not available for reproduction, some of 
the rarer species have been shown by means of colored drawings in 
natural size, twelve such drawings having been prepared. Specimens of 
37 fishes were completely prepared and colored, and 75 others have 
passed the preliminary stages. 

The skeleton of the Sea Elephant was installed in Hall 1 7 during the 
month of January. New labels were printed and placed in frames, 
which were attached to special supports in front of the large skeletons 
exhibited, on open stands. Among these were the skeletons of the 
Right Whale, Bottle-nose Whale, Walrus, Sea Elephant and Bison. 

In the conchological exhibit, the shells in three A-cases were rein- 
stalled and, by the elimination of duplicates, it was possible to condense 
them into one third the space they formerly occupied. In this manner, 
two cases became available for the insect exhibit. The work of selecting, 
naming and remounting a series of North American butterflies for ex- 
hibition was advanced as much as possible, with the result that this 
preparatory work was nearly completed. 



220 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

THE N. W. HARRIS PUBLIC SCHOOL EXTENSION 

The activities of the Department during the year have largely been 
devoted to the improvement of methods of installation, and to the 
preparation of material for additional cases. At the end of the year 
1923, this Department had 770 cases available for loaning to the 
schools of Chicago. Several instructive cases of wild flowers growing in 
the Chicago region were prepared and are now ready for use in the 
schools. Considerable care was given to the methods of reproducing 
these flowers, as well as to the means of installing them so that they 
would be capable of withstanding damage from transporting them to 
the schools. Realism was added to the cases by the use of enlarged and 
colored photographs as backgrounds. Besides those cases ready for dis- 
tribution, several cases are still in various stages of completion. A 
noteworthy and attractive improvement was made in the cases of sev- 
eral habitat-groups of birds. Instead of placing the enlarged, colored 
photographs, used as environmental backgrounds, flat against the backs 
of the cases, they were curved. This curving gives added length to the 
background and a greater perspective to it. 

During the year several conferences were held with groups of prin- 
cipals from the public schools. As a result of these conferences a 
schedule of deliveries was adopted, which will enable the schools to 
have uninterrupted, daily use of the cases. The new schedule provides 
that each school shall receive two cases at the beginning of the school 
year. These two cases remain in the school for study for three weeks, 
and are replaced at the end of this period b}' two other cases. This 
procedure of distribution and collection, is maintained throughout the 
school year. This plan has been made possible by the steady in- 
crease in the number of cases. Under the abandoned system three 
cases were left at a school for three weeks' study but it was impossible 
to substitute others for them when they were collected. In carrying 
out the new schedule 648 cases are in circulation, an increase of 162 
over the previous schedule. There are 326 schools on the schedule to 
receive cases, 323 of which are public schools. 

Numerous applications were made for the loan of cases to other 
than public schools. The Chicago Normal College requested that it be 
included in the regular schedule. This was done and the' student 
teachers are given special instruction on the educational values of the 
cases. A similar request was made by the Michael Reese hospital and 
cases that would be of assistance in certain courses for student nurses 
were sent. Permission was given the Director of Visual Instruction of 
the Chicago Public Schools to make lantern slides and stereoscopic 



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FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XLI. 




DETAIL, (CRUSHER HOUSE), OF MODEL OF A PLANT FOR THE 
MANUFACTURE OF PORTLAND CEMENT. 

Two fifths actual size. 




DETAIL, (RAW GRINDING MILL), OF MODEL OF A PLANT FOR THE 
MANUFACTURE OF PORTLAND CEMENT. 

One fourth actual size. 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 221 

pictures of all of the cases of this Department. These slides and 
pictures will be used in the classrooms in conjunction with the regular 
study of the cases. 

Various institutions throughout the country have commended the 
work of this Department and requested the loan of cases. The Re- 
sources Museum Commission of Missouri asked for several cases to be 
shown the state legislature, in connection with school exhibits from 
various institutions. In a letter to the Museum, the Commission wrote, 
"your cases make by far the most attractive natural history exhibits 
received." 

Eight cases were sent on request to the Peoria County School 
Teachers' Institute, for exhibition at its regular meeting. Four 
were sent to Nashville to assist in establishing a children's museum of 
Natural History. The Louisville Library requested and was granted 
the loan of a case. The Progressive Educational Association exhibited 
a case of this Department at its annual meeting held at the Drake 
Hotel. Two cases were loaned to the San Antonio Museum. The U. S. 
Department of Agriculture selected sixteen cases and asked that they 
be sent there for inspection and discussion with the view of adopting 
similar types of cases for its extension work. While the cases were in 
Washington several of them were requested by and loaned to public 
schools there and other cases were loaned to the University of Maryland. 
Ten cases were on view at the Art Institute as part of the annual ex- 
hibition of the Illinois Chapter of the Wild Flowers Preservation 
Society of America. The Royal Ontario Museum of Zoology requested 
and received a case for examination. Seventy-five new cases were 
ordered and received by the Department. 

Guide-lecturer. — The chief activities of the guide-lecturer during 
the past year were centered on the plan to bring the Museum into closer 
touch with school children and teachers. Through consultation with 
the teachers, these lectures were closely correlated with the work done 
in the classroom. The increase in the attendance at these lectures has 
proven that this work is of practical importance. There were given to 
school classes 149 lectures, with a total attendance of 5,683 school 
children. Besides these lectures, the Museum has been the host, 
through the services of the guide-lecturer, to numerous clubs, con- 
ventions, societies and visitors. Over 80 lectures on the Museum 
exhibits were given to 519 general visitors and 58 lectures were given 
to clubs and conventions, with an attendance of 2,280. The total 
number of lecture tours given during the year was increased to 294 and 
the attendance approximately 9,000. 



222 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

Publicity. — It had become increasingly evident to the Museum 
management that the location, visiting hours, and free days, of the 
Museum were not sufficiently clear and definite in the minds of the 
public. There were three major causes that had led to this condition. 
First, the fact that the change from its old location in Jackson Park to 
its present site in Grant Park was accomplished immediately following 
the World War, and the public interest was therefore not centered upon 
this change. Second, the new Museum was built on newly made 
land, the existence and location of this new park being practically un- 
known in the outlying districts. Third, the approaches to the Museum 
were necessarily delayed, awaiting the completion of this outer park. 
This delay led to a confusion as to the proper approaches to the institu- 
tion. To give more thorough information to the public concerning the 
location and approaches, a campaign of public information was started. 

The work which was begun in May was confined for the most part to 
posters indicating the location and approaches to the Museum. These 
posters are all classed as an indirect type of public notice, since both the 
name of the Museum and that of the transportation company contri- 
buting the advertising space, have appeared on the placards. In placing 
these direction posters the Museum is greatly indebted to the co-oper- 
ation of the transportation companies, such as the Surface Lines, 
Elevated and Suburban Railroad Service. During the year a total of 
1 1, 880 posters were distributed to the transportation agencies of which 
4,35° were printed outside of the Museum at the expense of these 
companies, while the remaining 7,530 were printed by the Museum. 

During the spring and summer months the correct name and loca- 
tion of the Museum was inserted in the records of six road maps and 
direction folders. Illustrated folders, which contained information as 
to location, motor roads, visiting hours, etc., were furnished the Chicago 
Motor Club and the Illinois Motor Club. Taxi cab companies included 
the location and history of the Museum in their school instructions to 
new drivers. 

In order to explain the economic value of the Museum exhibits and 
bring the Museum into a closer contact with the people connected with 
these economic activities, 12 articles were edited by prominent trade 
journals, explaining this phase of Museum work. Articles on the ex- 
hibits were also published in eight of the house organs of the largest 
local concerns. 

Two news reels were made, Pathe on the Stanley Field plant repro- 
duction process, and International showing the children entering the 
Museum for one of the fall series of entertainments. 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 223 

Advance notices were sent to newspapers, public schools, universi- 
ties, libraries and similar institutions, announcing the fall series of 
lectures and entertainments. 

The newspaper clippings for the year totaled 2,225. There were ten 
major stories on the expeditions and Museum work. This averaged one 
article a month that received a good national circulation. 

Printing. — Since all of the printing is done in the Museum, the 
output of the section of printing has been greatly increased. The 
varied interests of the departments call for a large amount of printing 
of a diversified nature, and the work is now being performed with 
considerable economy to the Institution and a most satisfying saving 
of time to the departments. The total number of impressions made 
indicates the unusually heavy demand on this section. Of the regular 
series of publications 5,559 copies were printed and bound, and 58,771 
leaflets, guides and manuals were printed and bound during the year. 
The number of labels and other impressions printed follows : 



Anthropology 

Botany 

Geology 

Zoology 

Harris Extension 

General 

Geographic Society 

Total 

Several noteworthy additions were made to the printing equipment 
during the year. To facilitate the making up of type and illustrated 
pages, a complete assortment of steel furniture was installed. A most 
desirable acquisition was a 14 x 22 inch Universal Press with electric 
motor equipment. A combination cabinet table for ink, rollers and 
chases for the Universal press, and two large tables for the bindery 7 and 
for storing temporarily type pages were also provided. 

Photography and Illustration : — Through the generosity of Mr. 
George D. Pratt of Brooklyn, X. Y.. and Mr. E. A. Mcllhenny of 
Chicago, who contributed a number of interesting moving picture reels 
to the Museum, a Moving Picture Film Library was inaugurated. 
While the work of the Section of Photographs* has been of a routine 
nature, the large amount of prints furnished by this section is indica- 
tive of the extent of the researches of the museum. The section > 
fortunate in having an unusually well equipped photographic plant. 



xhibition 


Other 


Labels 


Impressions 


4.777 


12,600 


1,041 


23,757 


1,480 


3,Ol5 


1,617 


7,660 


377 


908 


594 


260,237 




24,400 


9,686 


332,577 



224 



Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



The 20,000 lantern slides that were formally distributed among 
the departments of the museum, have now been brought under one 
central system of classification and placed in the section of Photography 
ready for cataloguing. The following tabulation sets forth the work 
performed in this section during the past year: 



General 

Anthropology. . . 

Botany 

Geology 

Zoology 

Harris Extension . 

Sale 

Gift 

Totals 



Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 


of 


of 


of 


of Negatives 


Lantern 


Negatives 


Prints 


Developed 


Slides 


Made 


Made 


for Field 


Made 






Expeditions 


. . . 


45 


1,893 


... 


I05 


331 


1,546 


. . . 


. . . 


152 


1,873 


. . . 




66 


484 


66 


403 


43 


2,506 


222 


. . . 


15 


249 


36 


18 


. . . 


440 






28 


165 





526 



680 



9,156 



324 



Photogravures. — The great number of publications and leaflets 
printed during the year has meant also a decided advance in the out- 
put of this section. The number of photogravures printed during the 
year for various purposes is condensed into the following table: 

Publications 87,000 

Leaflets 159,000 

Postal Cards 8,000 

Membership Certificate Headings 1,500 

Total 255,500 



Attendance: It is gratifying to note the increase in attendance 
during the past year, indicating a steady growth of popular interest in 
the museum. A total of 496,767 persons visited the museum, of which 
414,944 were admitted on the free days, while 81,823 attended on the 
regular pay days. It is also encouraging to note an increase in the num- 
ber of school children who have attended the museum during the year. 

Herewith are also submitted financial statements, lists of accessions, 
names of members, etc., etc. 

D. C. DAVIES, Director. 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 225 



ATTENDANCE STATISTICS 
FROM JANUARY 1, 1923 TO DECEMBER 31, 1923. 



Total Attendance 496,767 

Paid Attendance 81,823 

Free Admissions on Pay Days: 

School Children 23,369 

Students 13,860 

Teachers 1,240 

Special 196 

Admissions on Free Days: 

Thursdays 62,199 

Saturdays 101,705 

Sundays 212,375 

Highest Attendance on any day (October 6, 1923) 8,166 

Lowest Attendance on any day (February 14, 1923) 123 

Highest Paid Attendance (September 3, 1923) 3,927 

Average Daily Admissions 1,361 

Average Paid Admissions 439 

Guides sold 17,206 

Articles checked 15,9*9 

Picture Postal Cards sold 1 13.457 



226 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



GENERAL FUND 



STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1923 

Balance December 31, 1922 $ 34i673-78 

Receipts 

Income — Endowment, General and Door Receipts $227,897.90 

South Park Commissioners 114,918.71 

Sundry Receipts 1 1,905.61 

Loans Repaid 29,450.48 

Memberships 14,725.00 

Contributions 180,038.01 

Sale of Securities 139,386.00 $718,321.71 

$752,995-49 
Disbursements 

Operating Expenses $352,745-5* 

Expeditions 63,335.02 

Collections Purchased 8,159.42 

Furniture and Fixtures 10,884.17 

Expenditures on Building and Approaches 64,286.42 

Securities Purchased 198,333-75 

$697,744.29 
Transferred to Sinking Funds 9,600.00 $707,344.29 

Cash Balance December 31, 1923 $ 45,651.20 

THE N. W. HARRIS PUBLIC SCHOOL EXTENSION 
Statement of Income and Expenses for the Year 1923 

Interest and Dividends on Investments $ 14,884.18 

Operating Expenses 13,380.86 

$ 1,503-32 
Deduction from Income (Depreciation of Automobile Delivery Car) 602.24 

Balance transferred to Surplus $ 901.08 




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Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 



227 



ACCESSIONS 



DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY 



ABBOTT, THOMAS R., Peking, China. 
1 jade imperial emblem of the Sung 
period, 1 green -glazed dish of 
the Ming period, 1 fragmentary 
bowl of the Yuan period, 1 snuff 
bottle, I Ting bowl of the Sung 
period, I jade ink slab, samples 
of incense — China (gift). 

ALLING, CHARLES, Chicago. 

1 color print (surimono) by Kunisada 
—Japan (gift). 

ANDERSEN, MRS. C. M., Chicago 

1 eider-down lined woman's jacket, 

i pair of woman's short sealskin 
trousers, 1 pair of woman's 
inner sealskin boots, 1 pair of 
woman's red outer boots — 
Eskimo, Good Hope, Greenland 
(gift). 

ARTHUR, J. J., Topeka, Kansas. 

2 prehistoric flint scrapers — Morris 

County, Kansas (gift). 

AYER, EDWARD E., Chicago. 

190 pewter plates, tankards, jugs, 
tureens, candlesticks, and other 
utensils — China, England, Ger- 
many, Austria (gift). 

4 pewter objects: plate, guild cup, 

flask, and ewer, of the 18th and 
19th centuries — Germany (gift). 

1 1 pewter plates, 1 pewter jug — 
England and France (gift). 

Wrappings of mummy — Egypt (gift). 

72 pewter objects — China (gift). 

5 pewter objects — Japan (gift). 

1 Chinese pewter object, 1 pewter 
tankard in the shape of round 
tower with turret — China and 
Germany (gift). 

8 pewter objects: 1 censer, 2 flower 
vases, 2 candlesticks, 2 teapots, 
and 1 figure of water buffalo 
with boy astride — China (gift). 

1 Chinese pewter candelabrum, 1 
buckskin dance skirt — China 
and Northwest California (gift). 



9 pewter objects: 2 plates, 2 trays, 1 
teapot, 4 mugs — Europe (gift). 

18 Ushebti figures — Ancient Egypt 
(gift). 

2 pewter bowls and 1 pair of pewter 

candlesticks — China (gift). 
New Year's gift in shape of Twin 

Genii of Harmony and Union, of 

pewter — China (gift). 
18 pewter objects: teapots, winepots, 

lamps and figures — China (gift). 

BABCOCK, F. R., Nice, France. 

3 boomerangs, 2 painted with native 

red ochre — Central Australia 
(gift). 

BAHR, PETER J., Shanghai, China. 
131 objects: 1 brick tea for Mongol 
market, 1 Ming dynasty paper 
note, 8 Hien-fung paper notes, 
11 bank drafts, 1 chain mail, 5 
clay figures, 2 jade bowlders, 
5 iron implements, 81 bone, 
bronze and stone implements 
and beads, 16 small jades of the 
Han period — China (gift). 

BECK, NORMAN, Chicago. 

3 painted miniature masks of carved 
wood — Japan (gift). 

BLAIR, WATSON P., Chicago. 

Large chipped obsidian blade — 
Yurok, Weitspekan, Humboldt 
County, California (gift). 

CHALMERS, W. J., Chicago. 

18 bows, arrows, walking sticks — 
Southwest Congo, Africa. 

CLARK, ALBERT B., La Porte, 

Indiana. 
3 baskets, 10 mats, 1 hat, 1 carved 
ornament, 2 gorgets, 2 shaman's 
rattles, 3 small masks, 1 small 
box, 1 paint brush — Queen 
Charlotte Islands and North- 
west Coast (gift). 



228 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



CORONA MUNDI, New York. 

50 flint implements of the neolithic 
period — Lake Piros, Novgorod 
District, Russia (exchange). 

CORY, MRS. CHARLES B., Chicago. 
1 bamboo quiver containing blow- 
gun arrow — Borneo (gift). 

DA YUI HENG TOBACCO COM- 
PANY, Shanghai, China. 
10 samples of tobacco leaves in 
bundles — Kiangsi and Chekiang 
Provinces, China (gift). 

FIELD, MARSHALL, AND COM- 
PANY, Chicago. 
4 painted Tientsin clay figures — 
China (gift). 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL 
HISTORY. 
Collected by B. Laufer. — Capt. Mar- 
shall Field Expedition to China: 
About 2,000 specimens of pottery, 
jade and other stone carvings, 
bronze, iron, ivory, paintings, 
costumes, etc. — China. 

Collected by W. H. Osgood.— Capt. 
Marshall Field South American 
Expedition: 
4 prehistoric stone celts and 1 club 
head, 1 long implement point. 
Quellon, Chiloe Island, Chile. 

Collected by J. T. Zimmer. — Capt. 
Marshall Field South American 
Expedition : 
9 pottery fragments: 6 knob heads, 
1 loop handle, and two painted 
sherds — Huanuco Viejo, Peru. 

Collected by Fay-Cooper Cole. — 
Arthur B. Jones Expedition to 
Malaysia: 
2400 objects: clothing, textiles, em- 
broideries, jewelry, brass, silver 
and wooden bowls and dishes, 
combs, baskets, bags, weapons, 
fish traps, agricultural and 
musical instruments, shadow- 
play figures, etc. — Federated 
Malay States, Sumatra, Nias, 
Java, Borneo. 

Purchases: 

21 specimens of Greek antiquities: 
1 marble hand from child's 
statue, i copper hand, 1 glass 
tear bottle, 3 clay lamps, 1 
copper ladle, 1 bronze figure, 1 
small painted vase, 7 clay fig- 
urines, etc. — Miletos, southwest 
coast of Asia Minor, from D. G. 
Peponis, Cincinnati, Ohio. 



60 samples of Indian textiles mount- 
ed in book, dated 1795 — North- 
east Bolivia, South America, 
from Carlos Doggenweiler, San- 
tiago, Chile. 

3 decorated ivory arm rings, 1 arm 
ring of brass wire, 2 daggers 
worn on lower left arm, 2 pairs 
of men's sandals, 1 pair of wo- 
man's slippers — Upper Nigeria, 
Africa, from Alexander Inglis, 
Chicago. 

i woman's silk applique skirt, 1 
woman's silk applique shawl, 1 
woman's calico waist with silk 
applique, 1 woven yarn bag, 
1 woven basswood fiber bag, 1 
tomahawk, 2 pairs of woman's 
leggings, 5 pairs of moccasins — 
Menomini, Keshena, Wisconsin, 
from A. Skinner, Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin. 

5 masks of Australian aborigines — 
from E. Eldridge, Adelaide, 
South Australia. 

1 mountain-sheep wool blanket 
— Puget Sound, Washington 
(Coast Salish), from D. Francis, 
Victoria, B. C. 

GOOKIN, F. W. Chicago. 

Set of ten paintings: moral illustra- 
tions of the transience of human 
life — Japan (gift). 

GROSSMAN, E. B., Chicago. 

13 pieces of armor and wapons 
— India (gift). 

HEALY, AUGUSTINE, Chicago. 

Lion mane headdress — Masai, Brit- 
ish East Africa (gift). 

HEKTOEN, PROFESSOR LUDWIG, 
Chicago. 
1 long sword — katana — of the 16th 
century — Japan (gift). 

HOLL-ISTER, FRANKLIN, Chicago. 
1 stone figure of dark lava rock — 
Probably Aztec, Mexico City, 
Mexico (gift). 

HOLMQUIST, GUSTAV, Chicago. 

25 objects: boat models, dishes, 

pipes, rattles, baskets, hooks, 

hat, and dagger — Tlingit and 

Yukon Athabascan, Alaska (gift) 

HORNBAKER, W. R., Lakeland, 
Florida. 
54 prehistoric flint projectile points 
and knives — Ripley Township, 
Montgomery County, Indiana 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 



229 



1 buffalo skull (fragmentary) — from 
the sands of Saskatchewan 
River, 12 miles above Edmonton, 
Canada (gift). 

KEEP, CHAUNCEY, Chicago. 

1 unusually large chipped obsidian 
blade — Yurok, Weitspekan, 
Humboldt County, California 
(gift). 

KWEN VOK-TSOO, Shanghai, China. 
1 album of photographs showing the 
actor Mei Lan-fang in different 
roles, 1 painting of a Peking 
dog by Tsiao Ping-chen — China 
(gift). 

MATTESON, RICHARD. 

1 silk cap lined with red felt and 

trimmed with fur — Korea (gift). 

McNUTT, FRED C, Youngstown, 
Ohio. 
About 225 specimens of pre-Colum- 
bian pottery, gourd vessels, 
wooden vessels and bells, objects 
of bone, wood and shell, bows, 
arrows in quivers, pack straps, 
sandals, turquois necklace, and 
12 copper pieces including an 
axe, stone-headed club, etc. 
— Calama, Antofagasta, Chile 
(gift). 

MELCHIOR, J. E., Shanghai, China. 
Prehistoric pottery water - jar — 
Hankow, China (gift). 

MILLER, PAUL, Chicago. 

Prehistoric steatite vessel — 50 miles 
south of Bitter Creek Station, 
southwest Wyoming (exchange). 

PUBLIC MUSEUM OF MILWAU- 
KEE, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

2 Fox medicine bundles, 3 Fox 

medicine otters, 1 Fox medicine 
bag of squirrel skin, 1 Fox 
applique woman's skirt — Sauk 
Indians, Tama Reservation, 
Iowa (exchange). 



ROBERTS, W. H, Chicago. 

27 Eskimo objects: bow-drill, knife, 
sinkers, adzes, and ivory carv- 
ings — Nome, Alaska (gift). 

SARGENT, HOMER E., Pasadena, 
California. 
1 Navaho blanket, 1 man's head- 
band, 1 ceremonial headdress 
— Navaho and Hupa, United 
States (gift). 
26 baskets and 1 basket mortar — 
California, Alaska, and Abys- 
sinia (gift). 

SKINNER, A., Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

1 Winnebago woman's robe, 3 

Iroquois pipes of a late period 

— Iroquois and Winnebago, New 

York and Wisconsin (exchange). 

STREHLNEEK.E. A., Shanghai, China. 
7 pottery jars and vases of Han, 
T'ang, and Sung periods, 1 
Pandean pipe — China (gift). 

UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO, Chicago. 
3000 objects Mexican archeology 
and 400 southwest archeology 
through M. A. Ryerson, 148 
specimens of physical anthropol- 
ogy > 9° casts and reproduc- 
tions, 35 objects from Swiss 
Lakes, 70 pieces of Peruvian 
archeology and ethnology, 6 
objects of African ethnology, 80 
miscellaneous stone implements, 
and a few modern Chinese, 
Japanese, and Korean articles 
of clothing — Mexico, Southwest 
United States, Switzerland, 
Peru, Africa, China, Japan, and 
Korea (gift). 

WANNIECK, L., Paris, France. 

13 small bronze fragments of the 
T'sin period (3rd century B. C), 
34 pottery fragments from 
buried cities of southern Mon- 
golia — China (gift). 

WARD, MRS. D. M. 

Modern pottery vase — Pueblo, 
United States (gift). 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY 



AMERICAN BALSA CO., Long Island 
City, New York. 
i economic specimen (gift). 

BARTHOLOMEW, ELAM, Stockton, 
Kansas. 
2 herbarium specimens (gift). 



BRITISH MUSEUM OF NATURAL 
HISTORY, London, England. 
795 herbarium specimens (exchange). 

BRITTON, N. L., New York City. 
1 herbarium specimen (gift). 



230 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



DE SELM, A. W., Kankakee, Illinois. 
25 herbarium specimens (gift). 

DREISBACH, ROBERT R., Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. 
555 herbarium specimens (exchange). 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL 
HISTORY. 
Collected by G. S. Bryan — Capt. 
Marshall Field Peruvian Expe- 
dition: 
750 cryptogamic specimens. 
1500 duplicates for exchange. 
Collected by J. F. Macbride — Capt. 
Marshall Field Peruvian Expe- 
dition: 
100 economic and exhibition speci- 
mens. 
3500 dried plants. 
1 1 000 duplicates for exchange. 
Purchases: 

444 herbarium specimens — Capt. 

Marshall Field 1923 Fund. 
2593 herbarium specimens. 
1 economic specimen. 
Stanley Field Laboratory: 

42 models and reproductions of 
plants. 
Stanley Field Guiana Expedition, 1922 : 

18 economic specimens. 
Transfer: 

3 economic specimens from Harris 

Extension. 

FULLER, GEORGE D., University of 
Chicago. 
153 herbarium specimens (gift). 

HEDDLE, JOHN R., Madison, Wis- 
consin. 
218 herbarium specimens (gift). 

HIRSCHY, N. C, Berea, Kentucky. 
1 herbarium specimen (gift). 

KAWAGOE, S., Kogoshima, Japan. 
1 economic specimen (gift). 

KAWAMURA, S., Tokyo, Japan. 
1 economic specimen (gift). 

KING, MISS ANNA, Chicago. 
5 herbarium specimens (gift). 

KNOPF, EZRA C, Avalon, Santa 
Catalina, California. _ 

4 herbarium specimens (gift). 

LA VARRE, W. J. AND LANG, H., 

New York City. 
200 herbarium specimens (gift). 

MERRILL, E. D., Manila, Philippine 
Islands. 
1 herbarium specimen (gift). 



MINER LABORATORIES, Chicago. 
1 economic specimen (gift). 

MULFORD AMAZONIAN EXPEDI- 
TION, H. H. Rusby, New York 
City. 

135 herbarium specimens (gift). 

10 economic specimens (gift). 

NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN, 
New York City. 
62 herbarium specimens (exchange). 

PATTEN, MISS CORA M., Chicago. 
84 herbarium specimens (gift). 

PAYSON, E. B., Laramie, Wyoming. 
10 herbarium specimens (gift). 

PERRY, GEORGE ELLIOT, Chicago. 
1 economic specimen (gift). 

PRAY, LEON L., Chicago. 
1 economic specimen (gift). 

REES, NAT. S., Chicago. _ 
1 economic specimen (gift). 

ROOD, MRS. M. R. 

12 economic specimens (gift). 

ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, Kew, 

England. 
405 herbarium specimens (exchange). 

SCHALLERT, P. O., Winston-Salem, 

North Carolina. 
162 herbarium specimens (exchange). 

SHAFFEE, LOLA M., Chicago. 
20 herbarium specimens (gift). 

SHERFF, EARL E., Chicago. 
49 herbarium specimens (gift). 

U. S. NATIONAL HERBARIUM, 
Washington, D. C. 
690 herbarium specimens (exchange). 

VISCOSE COMPANY, THE, Marcus 
Hook, Pennsylvania. 
3 economic specimens (gift). 

WEED, ALFRED C, Chicago. 

1 economic specimen (gift). 

WILSON, PERCY, New York City. 

2 herbarium specimens (gift). 

ZIMMER, JOHN T., Chicago. 
1 herbarium specimen (gift). 

ZOBEY, JOSEPH, Chicago. 
1 herbarium specimen (gift). 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 



.231 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY 



ARMSTRONG, H. M., Grand Junction, 
Colorado. 

3 specimens carnotite — Polar Butte, 

Utah (gift). 

ASBESTOS CORPORATION OF 
CANADA, LTD., Quebec, Can- 
ada. 
6 specimens asbestos and asbestos 
product — Quebec, Canada 
(gift). 

BEBB, DR. WILLIAM, Chicago. 

12 specimens fossil bird skulls — 
La Brea Beds, Hollywood, Cali- 
fornia (gift). 

BUCKSTAFF, RALPH N., Oshkosh, 
Wisconsin. 
1 specimen iron meteorite — Pitts, 
Georgia (gift). 

BULF, VALENTINE, Chicago. 
1 specimen fossil crinoid (gift). 

CARD, GEORGE W., Sydney, New- 
South Wales. 
1 specimen meteorite — Warialda, 
New South Wales (gift). 

CHALMERS, WILLIAM J., Chicago. 

1 specimen quartz crystal with 

chlorite inclusion (gift). 

2 specimens silver buttons — Califor- 

nia (gift). 

4 specimens minerals — California 

(gift). 

29 specimens gold nuggets and grains 
— California (gift). 

48 specimens gems and choice min- 
erals — South America (gift). 

CLARK, WALTER C, Vicksburg, 
Mississippi. 
1 30 specimens fossils — Mississippi 
(exchange). 

COLLINS, W. H., Chicago. 

5 specimens minerals and rocks — 

Loughbro, Ontario (gift). 

CRAWFORD, MRS. W. L., Dallas, 
Texas. 
1 plastron of fossil turtle — Dallas, 
Texas (gift). 

DEPARTMENT OF IMMIGRATION, 

Pierre, South Dakota. 
39 specimens minerals and ores 
—South Dakota (gift). 



DOUGLAS, WAYNE E., Chicago AND 
E. F. WALL, JR., Elizabethtown, 
Illinois. 
16 specimens fluorite — Hardin 
County, Illinois (gift). 

DOWD, QUINCY L., Lombard, Illinois. 
1 specimen trilobite head — Lombard, 
Illinois (gift). 

EDE, J. A., La Salle, Illinois. 

1 specimen tschermigite — Wamsutter, 
Wyoming (gift). 

EISENDRATH, MRS. D. N., Chicago. 
82 specimens minerals (gift). 

ELLIS, MRS. WALTER C, Sulphur 
Rock, Arkansas. 

4 specimens fossil fish — Sulphur 

Rock, Arkansas (gift). 

ELWELL, W. J., Danbury, Connecticut. 

8 specimens minerals — Connecticut 

(gift). 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL 
HISTORY. 

Collected by O. C. Farrington — Capt. 
Marshall Field Brazilian Expe- 
dition: 
323 specimens gems, minerals and 
ores—Brazil, South America. 

Collected by H. W. Nichols: 

1 specimen tourmaline and quartz 
vein — Deloro, Porcupine Dis- 
trict, Ontario, Canada. 

Collected by C. C. Sanborn — Capt. 
Marshall Field Chilean Expe- 
dition 1922-23: 
26 specimens fossils and 4 specimens 
conglomerate and sandstone — 
Paiguano, Province of Coquim- 
ba, Chile, South America. 

Purchases: 

1 specimen troilite — Del Monte 

County, California. 
1 skull of Hipparion gracile — Isle of 
Samos, Greece. 

5 individual stone meteorites — Ness 

County, Kansas. 

FLOWER, W. A., Halfway, Oregon. 

9 specimens gold and silver ores — 

Seven Devils District, Idaho 
(gift). 

GOURLEY, W. J., Chicago. 

1 specimen rock weathering — Near 
Wauconda, Lake County, Illi- 
nois (gift). 



232 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



GUNSAULUS, MRS, F. W.. Chicago. 

1 sepcimen fossil shell — Gonzales, 

California (gift). 

HALVORSEN, E. E., Santa Barbara, 
California. 
Collection of invertebrate fossils — 
San Pedro, California (gift). 

HEIKES, VICTOR C, U. S. Geological 
Survey, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

2 specimens minerals — Manhattan, 

Nevada (exchange). 
2 specimens tillite — Manhattan, 
Nevada (exchange). 

1 specimen microlite — Amelia Court 

House, Virginia (exchange). 

HORNBAKER, W. R., Lakeland, Flor- 
da. 
21 specimens fossils — Illinois and 
Indiana (gift). 

JORDAN, MRS. SCOTT, Chicago. 
16 specimens minerals (gift). 
32 specimens fossils (gift). 

LEAN, F. J., Calumet, Michigan. 

5 specimens minerals — Michigan 
(gift). 

LINKEY, HARRY, Chicago. 

16 specimens minerals — Yellowstone 
National Park, Wyoming (gift). 

LIVERSIDGE, PROF. A., Surrey, 
England. 

2 casts of Bingera meteorite — Aus- 

tralia (gift). 

MORONEY, JOHN J., Chicago. 
1 specimen diaspore (gift). 

MUMMS, CHESTER, Arkadelphia, 
Arkansas. 
1 specimen manganese ore — Arkadel- 
phia, Arkansas (gift). 

MURRAY, HUGH, Chicago. 

1 specimen septarium — Kibbie, 
Michigan (gift). 

NEUMANN, MISS FANNYE M., 
Chicago. 
50 specimens minerals — Lake Super- 
ior Region and Blue Ridge, 
North Carolina (gift). 

OFFER, W. C, South Porcupine, 
Ontario. 
1 specimen silver ore — Carmen, near 
Porcupine, Ontario (gift). 

RICHARDSON, S. A., Bonne Terre, 

Missouri. 
1 limestone drill core — Jefferson 
County, Illinois (gift). 



ROBB, MRS. GEORGE S., Borden, 
Indiana. 
The Borden Collection of inverte- 
brate paleozoic fossils, approxi- 
mately 30,000 specimens — Ken- 
tucky and Indiana (gift). 

ROOD, MRS. M. R., Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin. 
262 specimens fossils, minerals and 
ores — mostly north Michigan 
(gift). 

ROTHSTEIN, H., Denver, Colorado. 
1 specimen washegyite — Manhattan, 
Nevada (gift). 

RUHLING, F. E., Chicago. 

1 fossil cephalopod — Omena, Grand 
Traverse Bay, Michigan (gift). 

SCHEILER, H. W., Lincoln, Illinois. 
1 specimen concretion, — Lincoln, 

Illinois (gift). 
15 specimens fossil shells — Lincoln, 
Illinois (gift). 

SCHMANKE, EMIL C., Chicago. 

5 specimens concretion — Cotter, Ar- 

kansas (gift). 

SCOTT, G. S., New York City, New 
York. 
1 specimen orpiment and realgar — 
Manhattan, Nevada (exchange). 

STADLER, RAYMOND, Roberts, 

Illinois. 
1 specimen marcasite concretion — 
Roberts, Illinois (gift). 

STANDARD OIL COMPANY (INDI- 
ANA), Chicago. 

86 specimens fancy paraffine candles 
(gift). 

8 specimens fancy paraffine candle 
holders (gift). 

STANFORD UNIVERSITY, California 
1 slab fossil herring — Lompoc, Cali- 
fornia (gift). 

STUART, JAMES, San Francisco, 
California. 

1 specimen cinnabar on pyrite (gift). 

THOMAS, R. K., Navajo, Arizona. 
Collection of chromium minerals — 
Apache County, Arizona (gift). 

WOOD, F. E., Sioux City, Iowa. 

6 microscopic slides of rocks and 

minerals (gift). 

WYSCH, ANTHONY J., Chicago. 

2 fossil sharks' teeth — District of 

Arawina, Equatorial Africa 
(gift). 



/ 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XLIII. 




A CYCAD PLANT WITH ITS LARGE SEED-BEARING CONE. 
One tenth actual size. 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 



233 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 



AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NAT- 
URAL HISTORY, New York 
City. 
378 birds — mainly South American 
(exchange). 

2 birds — San Domingo (exchange). 

BOOTH FISHERIES COMPANY, 
Chicago. 
1 pickerel — (gift). 
1 wall-eyed pike---(gift). 

BRIGHT, J. C, Dubuque, Iowa. 
1 fresh-water mussel — Specks Ferry, 
Iowa (gift). 

CAHN, ALVIN R., Urbana, Illinois. 

3 grass pike — Fox River, Wisconsin 

(gift). 

CINCINNATI ZOOLOGICAL PARK 
ASSOCIATION, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. 
1 hippopotamus skin and skeleton — 
Africa (gift). 

COALE, HENRY K., Highland Park, 
Illinois. 
3'birds — New South Wales, Australia 
(exchange). 

COLBURN, FREDERICK S., Chicago. 
1 fringe-eared oryx — Tanganyika 
Colony, Africa (gift). 

CONOVER, H. B., Chicago. 

1 crested grebe — Krugliner Sea, 

Germany (gift). 

CRIMMINS, COL. M. L., Fort Bliss, 
Texas. 

2 turtles, 5 snakes, 31 lizards — Fort 

Bliss (gift). 

DAHLGREN, DR, B. E., Chicago. 
178 dragonflies, ant-lions, mantis, 
grasshoppers, bugs, flies, beetles, 
moths, butterflies, bees, wasps — 
British Guiana (gift). 

DOHMEN, U. A., Chicago. _ 

2 butterflies — Chicago (gift). 

EDE, GEORGE H., Austin, Illinois. 

1 rough-legged hawk — Illinois (gift). 

ENGELHARDT, GEORGE P., New 
York City. 

3 tree frogs — Florida (gift). 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL 
HISTORY. 
Collected by F. C. Cole (Arthur B. 
Jones Malay-Archipelago Ex- 
pedition) : 

2 Indian elephant skulls. 



Collected by B. E. Dahlgren (Stanley 
Field' Guiana Expedition) : 

1 agouti — British Guiana. 

Collected by W. J. Gerhard: 

21 grasshoppers, butterflies, moths, 
beetles, flies, bees, wasps and 
parasites — Northern Illinois and 
Indiana. 

Collected by Edmund Heller (Capt. 
Marshall Field Peruvian Ex- 
pedition) : 
58 birds — Brazil. 
1 741 mammals — Peru and Brazil. 

2 beetles, 10 frogs and toads, 21 liz- 

ards, 16 snakes, 14 birds — Peru. 

Collected by Ashley Hine: 

1 moth — Momence, Illinois. 
57 birds — Indiana and Illinois. 

Collected by S. E. Meek and S. F. 
Hildebrand: 
290 crustaceans — Panama Canal 
Zone. 

Collected by W. H. Osgood (Capt. 
Marshall Field Chilean Expedi- 
tion) : 
7 insects, 4 shells — Chile and Ar- 
gentina. 

2 snakes, 1 lizard, 10 frogs, 42 birds, 

195 mammals — Argentina. 

Collected by W. H. Osgood and C. C. 

Sanborn (Capt. Marshall Field 

Chilean Expedition) : 
1 lizard, n frogs, 6 bird's eggs and 

nests, 377 birds, 1047 mammal 

skins, skulls and skeletons — 

Chile. 
73 fishes — Chile and Argentina. 

Collected by W. H. Osgood, C. C. 
Sanborn, and H. B. Conover 
(Capt. Marshall Field Chilean 
Expedition) : 
23 snakes, 32 lizards, 332 frogs and 
toads — Chile. 

Collected by C. C. Sanborn (Capt. 
Marshall Field Chilean Expedi- 
tion) : 
23 bugs and beetles, 3 snakes, 121 
lizards, 151 frogs and toads, 7 
bird's eggs and nest, 583 birds, 
87 mammals — Chile. 

Collected by K. P. Schmidt and W. J. 
Gerhard: 
6 frogs, 7 toads, 3 lizards — Mineral 
Springs, Indiana. 



234 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



Collected by K. P. Schmidt and L. L. 
Walters (Capt. Marshall Field 
Honduras Expedition) : 

250 fishes, 1275 amphibians and 
reptiles, 47 birds — Honduras 
and British Honduras. 

369 leaches, snails, scorpions, centi- 
pedes, millipeds, ticks, spiders, 
dragonflies, roaches, bugs and 
beetles — Honduras and British 
Honduras. 

Collected by K. P. Schmidt and L. L. 

Walters : 
14 frogs, 72 salamanders — Chicago. 
1 lizard, 7 toads, 8 salamanders — 

Northern Illinois and Northern 

Indiana. 

Collected by Alfred C. Weed (Capt. 
Marshall Field Louisiana and 
Texas Expedition) : 

2000 fishes, 18 salamanders, 290 
frogs and toads, 1 turtle, 61 
snakes, 83 lizards — Louisiana. 

8000 fishes, 302 amphibians and rep- 
tiles — Cameron County, Texas. 

183 scorpions, centipedes, millipeds, 
spiders, dragonflies, bugs, bee- 
tles, moths and flies — Louisiana 
and Texas. 

Collected by John T. Zimmer (Capt. 
Marshall Field Peruvian Ex- 
pedition) : 
1492 birds, 140 mammal skins and 
skulls, 16 frogs and toads, 33 
lizards, 19 climbing catfish, 2 
insects — Peru. 

Purchases: 

129 birds — Argentina. 

1 woodchuck — Arkansas. 

44 birds — Austria, Norway, Canary 

Islands. 
14 mammal skins and skulls, 600 

dragonflies — Brazil. 
4 turtles — Tanganyika Territory, 

East Africa. 
7 birds — Dominican Republic. 
202 birds — S. W. Ecuador. 
1823 birds — Germany. 
no butterflies and moths — India. 

1 lake trout — Michigan. 

2 golden eagles — Nebraska. 

32 1 fishes — Marion County, Florida. 
2 butterflies, 2 moths — New Guinea. 
1 red lynx — 
25 birds — Shetland Islands, Cape 

Verde Islands, Azores. 
14 birds — South America. 
263 birds — South America and New 

Guinea. 



32 salamanders, 26 frogs, 29 toads, 

6 lizards, 48 snakes, 2 turtles — 

Mt. Pleasant, S. C. 
6 salamanders, 31 toads, 1 lizard, 2 

turtles — South Carolina. 
30 turtles— Tennessee, Missouri. 
10 birds — Uruguay. 
'300 snakes, lizards, frogs, 2 fishes — 

various localities. 
1 black bear — 
1 Pacific wolf fish — 
1 red snapper — 
1 flounder, 4 mackerels — 
1 rattlesnake — Louisiana. 

FIELD, STANLEY, Chicago. 

1 bronze bust of gorilla by Akeley — 
(gift). 

FREAR, A. EDWARD, Chicago. 
6 bear skulls — Alaska (gift). 

GUERET, E. N., Chicago. 
1 roach — Chicago (gift). 

GUILHUFE, F., Chicago. 
1 bat — Chicago (gift). 

HEALY, AUGUSTINE, Chicago. 

1 rhinoceros skull and scalp — British 
East Africa (gift). 

HELLMAYR, DR. C. E., Chicago. 
134 butterflies and moths — Colorado 

(gift). 
12 birds — Sa5 Paulo, Brazil (gift). 
1 wood pewee — Tremont, Indiana 

(gift). 

HEPP, FRANK, Berwick, Ohio. 
3 beetles — Berwick, Ohio (gift). 

HINE, ASHLEY, Chicago. 
1 moth — Chicago (gift). 
1 gerfalcon (gift). 

HUDSON, DR. J. W., Ukiah, California. 
1 photograph of California wood- 
pecker storehouse (gift). 

JONES, SARAH V. H., Sydney, 
Australia. 
1 scorpion, 5 centipedes, 6 lizards — 
Honolulu (gift). 

JORDAN, MRS. SCOTT, Chicago. 
1 emu egg, 535 star-fish, sea-urchins, 
corals, shells (gift). 

KEISTER, HENRY A., Meredosia, 
Illinois. 
45 sunfishes — Meredosia, Illinois 

(gift). 

KEITH, ELLSWORTH, Hinsdale, 
Illinois. 
1 white-throated sparrow — Hinsdale, 
Illinois (gift). 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 



235 



KNICKERBOCKER, C. K., Chicago. 

1 hybrid duck — Lake St. Croix, 

Wisconsin (gift). 

2 everglade kites with nest — Palm 

Beach, Florida (gift). 

KRANENBURG, H. J., Ardmore, 
Illinois. 
1 spider — North Ardmore, Illinois 
(gift). 

LEOPOLD, N. P., JR., Chicago. 
1 Cooper's hawk (exchange). 

LINCOLN PARK AQUARIUM, 
Chicago. 
1 turtle — Havana, Illinois (gift). 

1 brown trout (gift). 

5 sunfishes — Lincoln Park Lagoon 

2 minnows, 215 sunfishes — Fairport, 

Iowa (gift). 
1 axolotle (gift). 

LILJEBLAD, E., Chicago. 

1 butterfly — Canclos, Equador (gift). 

LINDSAY, ALEXANDER M., JR., 
Rochester, New York. 
1 fringe-eared oryx — Tanganyika 
Colony, Africa (gift). 

LINKEY, H., Chicago. 

1 worm shell — coast of California 
(gift). 

Mccormick, col. Robert r., 

Chicago. 
1 mounted ruffed bustard — Sahara 
Desert, Algeria (gift). 

McCREA, W. S., Chicago. 

7 gizzard shad, Illinois (gift). 

3 photographs of whale (gift). 

MOSS, REV. A. MILES, Para, Brazil. 
1 dragonfly — Para, Brazil (gift). 

NEW YORK CONSERVATION 
COMMISSION, Albany, New 
York. 
1 Chautauqua Lake muskallonge — 
New York (gift). 

OLSSON, AXEL, Gloversville, New 
York. 
5 lizards, 2 snakes — Piura, Peru 
(gift) 

OTTOFY, DR. LOUIS, Chicago. 

1 Korean spaniel (gift). 

PERRY, MRS. C. N., Chicago. 

2 shells — off coast of Florida (gift). 



PRAY, LEON L., Chicago. 

1 mud turtle — Homewood, Illinois 

(gift). 
1 hybrid pickerel — Ithaca, New 
York (gift). 

QUEENSLAND MUSEUM, Australia. 
3 Australian lung-fishes (exchange). 

ROTHSCHILD'S DEPT. STORE 

AQUARIUM, Chicago. 
117 fishes, 5 amphibians, 2 snakes, 

1 lizard, 7 insects (gift). 
1 small-mouth bass — Sandusky, 

Ohio (gift). 
31 salamanders, lizards, turtles, 

snakes — Florida, Texas, Arizona 

(gift). 

1 soft-shelled turtle — Phoenix, 

Arizona (gift). 

2 snakes — Florida (gift). 

RUDHMAN, MRS. E., Delhi, Cal- 
ifornia. 
5 sand crickets — Delhi, California 
(gift). 

ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, Belize, British 
Honduras. 
2 centipedes, 4 scorpions, 8 crusta- 
ceans, 30 fishes, 103 amphibians 
and reptiles, 5 mammals, 5 
mammal skulls, 6 bird's eggs — 
British Honduras (gift). 



W., Stanley, Wis- 
-Stanley, Wis- 



SCHMIDT, F. 

consin. 
1 ring-necked snake 

consin (gift). 
7 snakes, 27 frogs — Clark County, 

Wisconsin (gift). 



SCHMIDT, KARL P., Chicago. 

1 tree frog — Lakehurst, New Jersey, 

(gift). 
1 snake, 137 frogs, 475 fishes — Clark 

County, Wisconsin (gift). 

1 toad — Monte Cristi, Santo Do- 

mingo (gift). 
3 centepedes — Creston, Louisiana 
(gift). 

SHOLAR, WENCEL, Peru, Illinois. 

2 red-tailed hawks, Peru, Illinois 

(gift). 

SLAGG, PROF. W. E., Eau Clair, 
Wisconsin. 
1 Northern skink — Chippewa Falls, 
Wisconsin (gift). 

SOMMERMEYER, CLIFTON, River 
Forest, Illinois. 
1 hornet's nest — River Forest, Illi- 
nois (gift). 



236 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



SOUTHERN BIOLOGICAL SUPPLY 
COMPANY, New Orleans, 
Louisiana. 

80 fishes — Tammany Parish, Louisi- 
ana (gift). 

650 fishes — Louisiana and Gulf of 
Mexico (gift). 

TYRRELL, W. B., Chicago. 
1 bat — Chicago (gift). 

U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 
1 flounder — Oahu Island, Hawaii 
(exchange) 

WALLER, DR. S. M., San Pedro Sula, 
Honduras. 
3 birds— San Pedro Sula (gift). 

WEED, ALFRED C, Chicago. 

42 fishes, 15 cricket frogs, 6 tadpoles 

— New Lenox, Illinois (gift). 
367 fishes — Marley, Illinois (gift). 
9 mosquitoes, 3 frogs, 1 salamander 

larva — Chicago, Illinois (gift). 



WEED, A. C, SUM, G., AND 
BICHELE, J., Chicago. 
255 fishes — Marley, Illinois (gift). 

WICKS, L. A., Chicago. 

1 beetle — Waverly Beach, Indiana 
(gift). 

WILLIAMSON, JESSE, H., Bluffton, 
Indiana. 
99 dragonflies — Central and South 
America (gift). 

WISCONSIN CONSERVATION 
COMMISSION, Madison, Wis- 
consin. 
1 muskallonge — Vilas County, Wis- 
consin (gift). 

WOLCOTT, A. B., Chicago. 

1 fly, 3 moths — Chicago (gift). 

WYATT, ALEX K., Chicago. 

1 fly, Elizabeth, New Jersey (gift). 



SECTION OF PHOTOGRAPHY 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL 
HISTORY. 
Made by Section : 

9,156 prints, 1,004 negatives, 526 
lantern slides. 

Made by F. C. Cole: 

99 negatives of Malaysian natives, 
villages, landscapes. 
Made by J. A. Mason: 

60 films, negatives of Columbian 
natives, villages, landscapes. 

DE VRY CORPORATION. 

4 negatives of Egyptian subjects. 



ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO. 

18 photographs of types of natives 

of Australia. 
18 photographs of types of natives 

of India. 

McILHENNY, E. A., Chicago. 
1 moving picture reel. 

MILLSPAUGH, DR. C. F. 

2 negatives of beetles imbedded in 
Amber. 

PRATT, GEORGE D., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
14 moving picture reels. 



THE LIBRARY 



LIST OF DONORS AND EXCHANGES 

(Accessions are by exchange, unless otherwise designated) 



AFRICA: 

East Africa and Uganda Natural 

History Society, Nairobi. 
Geological Society, Johannesburg. 
Institut d' Egypte, Cairo. 
Ministry of Public Works, Cairo. 
Natal Museum, Pietermaritzburg. 
Rhodesia Scientific Society, Bulawayo. 
Royal Society of South Africa, Cape 

Town. 
Societe de Geographie d'Alger. 



Societe d'Histoire Naturelle de l'Afri- 
que du Nord, Algeria. 

Societe des Sciences Naturelles du 
Maroc. 

South African Association for the 
Advancement of Science, Cape 
Town. 

South African Department of Agricul- 
ture, Pretoria. 

South African Museum, Cape Town. 

Transvaal Museum, Pretoria. 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 



237 



ARGENTINA: 

Museo de La Plata. 

Museo Nacional, Buenos Aires. 

Sociedad Ornitologica del Plata, 

Buenos Aires. 
Universidad Nacional, Buenos Aires. 

AUSTRALIA: 

Australian Museum, Sydney. 

Botanic Gardens and Government 
Domains, Sydney. 

Commonwealth of Australia, Mel- 
bourne. 

Department of Agriculture, Adelaide. 

Department of Agriculture, Sydney. 

Department of Agriculture, Wellington. 

Department of Mines, Brisbane. 

Department of Mines, Sydney. 

Field Naturalists' Club, Melbourne. 

Fish Commission of New South Wales, 
Sydney. 

Forestry Commission, Sydney (gift). 

Geological Survey of Western Aus- 
tralia, Perth. 

Institute of Science and Industry, 
Sydney. 

Linnean Society of New South Wales, 
Sydney. 

Melbourne University. 

National Herbarium, Melbourne. 

Ornithological Society of South Aus- 
tralia, Adelaide. 

Public Library, Museum and Art 
Gallery, Adelaide. 

Public Library, Museum and National 
Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne. 

Queensland Museum, Brisbane. 

Royal Geographical Society of Aus- 
tralasia, Brisbane. 

Royal Society of New South Wales, 
Sydney. 

Royal Society of Queensland, Brisbane. 

Royal Society of South Australia, 
Adelaide. 

Royal Society of Tasmania, Hobart. 

Royal Society of Victoria, Melbourne. 

Roval Society of Western Australia, 

^ Perth. 

South Australian Museum, Adelaide. 

Victoria Department of Agriculture, 
Melbourne. 

Western Australia Geological Survey, 
Perth. 

AUSTRIA: 

Naturhistorisches Hofmuseum, 

Vienna. 
Naturhistorisches Landesmuseum 

von Karnten, Klagenfurt. 
Universitat, Vienna. 
Zoologisch-B ot anische G esellschaf t , 

Vienna. 
Zoologisches Institut, Graz. 



BELGIUM: 

Academie Royale de Belgique, Brus- 
sels. 

Institut Botanique Leo Errera, Brus- 
sels. 

Jardin Botanique de l'fitat, Brussels. 

Ministere des Colonies, Brussels. 

Musee Royale d'Histoire Naturelle, 
Brussels. 

Nederlandsche Phytopathologische 
(Plantenziekten)Vereeniging,Ghent. 

Societe de Botanique, Brussels. 

Society Royale d'Archeologie, Brus- 
sels. 

Vereenigingen Kruidkundig Genoot- 
schap Dodonaea, Ghent. 

BRAZIL: 

Academia Brasileira de Sciencias, 

Rio de Janeiro. 
Biblioteca Nacional, Rio de Janeiro. 
Escola Superior de Agricultura e 

Medicina, Veterinaria, Rio de 

Janeiro. 
Exposicao do Centenario, Rio de 

Janeiro. 
Jardim Botanico, Rio de Janeiro. 
Museu Nacional, Rio de Janeiro. 
Museu Paulista, Sao Paulo. 
Sociedade Brasileira de Sciencias, Rio 

de Janeiro. 

BRITISH GUIANA: 

Board of Agriculture, Georgetown. 
Royal Agricultural and Commercial 
Society, Demerara. 

CANADA: 

Canadian Arctic Expedition, Ottawa 
(gift). 

Chief Game Guardian of Saskatche- 
wan, Regina. 

Department of Agriculture, Ottawa. 

Department of Agriculture, Victoria. 

Department of Mines, Ontario, Tor- 
onto. 

Department of Mines, Ottawa. 

Department of the Interior, Geolog- 
ical Survey, Ottawa. 

Entomological Society of Ontario, 
Toronto. 

Hamilton Association. 

Horticultural Societies, Toronto. 

Minister of Education, Ontario, 
Toronto. 

Provincial Museum, Toronto. 

Provincial Museum, Victoria. 

Royal Canadian Institute, Toronto. 

Royal Society of Canada, Ottawa. 

Societe de Geographie, Quebec. 

University of Toronto. 

CEYLON: 
Colombo Museum. 



238 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



CHILE: 

Museo de Etnologia y Antropologia, 

Santiago. 
Museo Nacional de Chile, Santiago. 

CHINA: 

Botany and Forestry Department, 

Hong-Kong. 
Geological Survey, Pekin. 
Royal Asiatic Society of North China, 

Shanghai. 
Science Society of China, Shanghai 

(gift). 
University of Nanking. 

CZECHO-SLO VAKI A : 

National Museum Library, Prag. 
Societas Entomologica Bohemica, 

Prag. 
Universita Karlova, Prag. 

DENMARK: 

Danske Kunstindustrimuseum, Co- 
penhagen. 

Naturhistorisk Forening, Copenhagen. 

Royal Society of Northern Anti- 
quaries, Copenhagen. 

Societe Botanique, Copenhagen. 

ECUADOR: 

Academia Nacional de Historia, Quito. 

FEDERATED MALAY STATES: 

Federated Malay States Museum, 
Kuala Lumpur. 

FIJI ISLANDS: 

Fijian Society, Suva. 
FINLAND: 
Abo Akademi. 
Finnish Archaeological Society, 

Helsingfors. 
Societas pro Fauna et Flora Fennica, 
Helsingfors. 

FRANCE: 

Academie des Sciences, Paris. 
Ecole d'Anthropologie, Paris. 
Ministere de 1' Instruction Publique, 

Paris (gift). 
Musee Guimet, Paris. 
Museum National d'Histoire Na- 

turelle, Paris. 
La Nature, Paris. 
Societe d'Etude des Sciences Na- 

turelles, Reims. 
Societe d'Etudes Scientifiques, Angers. 
Societe d'Histoire Naturelle, Toulouse. 
Societe d'Horticulture, Paris. 
Societe de Geographie, Paris. 
Societe de Geographie, Toulouse. 
Societe des Americanistes, Paris. 
Societe' des Sciences Naturelles de 

Sadne-et-Loire, Chalon-sur Saone. 
Societe Geologique du Nord, Lille. 



Soci6te Linguistique de Paris. 
Society Linneenne, Bordeaux. 
Soci6te Nationale d'Agriculture, 

Sciences et Arts, Angers. 
Societe Nationale d'Horticulture de 

France, Paris. 
Societe Royale des Sciences,' Liege. 
Societe Zoologique, Paris. 
Universite de Montpellier. Institut de 

Zoologie, Cette. 
University de Rennes. 

GERMANY: 

Bayerische Akademie der Wissen- 
schaften, Munich. 

Botanischer Garten und Botanisches 
Museum, Berlin. 

Botanischer Verein der Provinz 
Brandenburg, Berlin. 

Deutsche Dendrologische Gesellschaft, 
Bonn-Poppelsdorf. 

Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Anthro- 
pologie, Ethnologie und Urge- 
schichte, Berlin. 

Deutsche Morgenlandische Gesell- 
schaft, Leipzig. 

Deutscher Seefischerei Verein, Berlin. 

Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, 
Berlin. 

Geographische Gesellschaft, Hamburg. 

Gesellschaft fur Erdkunde, Berlin. 

Gesellschaft zur Forderung der Ges- 
amten Naturwissenschaften, Mar- 
burg. 

Hamburgische Universitat. 

K. Museum fur Volkskunde, Berlin. 

K. Preussische Akademie der Wiss- 
enschaften, Berlin. 

K. Universitats Bibliothek, Marburg. 

K. Universitats Bibliothek, Munich. 

K. Zoologisches Anthropologisch- 
Ethnographisches Museum, Dres- 
den. 

K. Zoologisches Museum, Berlin. 

Museum fur Volkerkunde, Hamburg. 

Museum fur Volkerkunde, Leipzig. 

Nassauischer Verein fur Naturkunde, 
Wiesbaden. 

Naturforschende Gesellschaft, Frei- 
burg. 

Naturforschende Gesellschaft, Gorlitz. 

Naturhistorische Gesellschaft, Niirn- 
berg. 

Naturwissenschaftliche Gesellschaft, 
Dresden. 

Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein, Bre- 
men. 

Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein, Karls- 
ruhe. 

Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein fur 
Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel. 

Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein fur 
Steiermark, Graz. 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 



239 



Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein zu 

Osnabruck,. 
Ornithologische Gesellschaft in Bay- 

ern, Munich. 
Rheinische Mission-Gessellschaft, Bar- 
men. 
Schlesische Gesellschaft fur Vater- 

landische Cultur, Breslau. 
Senckenbergische Naturforschende 

Gesellschaft, Frankfurt a-M. 
Wurttembergische Gesellschaft zur 

Forderung der Wissenschaf ten , 

Tubingen. 
Zoologisches Museum, Hamburg. 

GREAT BRITAIN: 

Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. 

Birmingham Natural History and 
Philosophical Society. 

Bristol Museum and Gallery. 

British Museum, London. 

British Museum (Natural History), 
London. 

Cambridge Antiquarian Society. 

Cambridge Philosophical Society. 

Cambridge University. 

Cardiff Naturalists' Society. 

Challenger Society, London. 

Dove Marine Laboratory, Cullercoats. 

Dumfriesshire and Galloway Natural 
History and Antiquarian Society, 
Dumfries. 

Fisheries Board, Edinburgh. 

Geological Society, Edinburgh. 

Geological Society, Liverpool. 

Great Britain Geological Survey, 
London. 

Horniman Museum and Library, 
London. 

Hull Municipal Museum. 

Imperial Bureau of Entomology, 
London. 

Imperial College of Science and Tech- 
nology, London. 

Japan Society of London. 

Lancashire Sea Fisheries Laboratory, 
Liverpool. 

Linnean Society, London. 

Liverpool Biological Society. 

London Library. 

Manchester Field Naturalists' and 
Archaeologists' Society. 

Manchester Geographical Society. 

Manchester Literary and Philosophi- 
cal Society. 

Manchester Museum. 

Marine Biological Association, Ply- 
mouth. 

National Library of Wales, Aberyst- 
wyth. 

National Museum of Wales, Cardiff. 



Natural History and Philosophical 
Society, Brighton and Hove. 

Natural History and Philosophical 
Society, Croydon. 

Natural History Society, Glasgow. 

Natural History Society of North- 
umberland, Durham and Newcastle- 
on-Tyne, Newcastle. 

Oriental Ceramic Society, London. 

Royal Anthropological Institute of 
Great Britain and Ireland, London. 

Royal Botanic Gardens, Edinburgh. 

Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. 

Royal Colonial Institute, London. 

Royal Geographical Society, London. 

Royal Horticultural Society, London. 

Royal Scottish Museum, Edinburgh. 

Royal Society, London. 

Royal Society of Arts, London. 

Royal Society of Edinburgh. 

South London Entomological and 
Natural History Society, London. 

Tring Zoological Museum. 

Victoria and Albert Museum, London. 

Wellcome Chemical Research Labor- 
atories, London. 

Zoological Society of London. 

Zoological Society of Scotland. 

HUNGARY: 

Hungarian Institute of Ornithology, 

Budapest. 
Magyar Termeszettudomanyi Tarsu- 

lat, Budapest. 
Museum Nationale Hungaricum, 

Budapest. 

INDIA: 

Anthropological Society, Bombay. 

Archaeological Department, Madras. 

Archaeological Survey, Allahabad. 

Archaeological Survey, Burma, Ran- 
goon. 

Archaeological Survey, Calcutta. 

Archaeological Survey, Eastern Cir- 
cle, Patna. 

Archaeological Survey, Frontier Cir- 
cle, Peshawar. 

Archaeological Survey of Burma, 
Lahore. 

Asiatic Society of Bengal, Calcutta. 

Bihar and Orissa Research Society, 
Patna. 

Department of Agriculture, Bombay. 

Department of Agriculture, Madras. 

Department of Agriculture, Poona. 

Department of Agriculture, Pusa. 

Geological Survey, Calcutta. 

Government of India, Calcutta. 

Government, Cinchona Plantation, 
Calcutta. 

Government Museum, Madras. 

Indian Museum, Calcutta. 



240 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



Journal of Indian Botany, Madras. 

National Indian Association, Cal- 
cutta (gift). 

Royal Asiatic Society, North China 
Branch, Shanghai. 

Royal Asiatic Society, Straits Branch, 
Singapore. 

Royal Botanic Garden, Calcutta. 

University of Calcutta. 

Victoria and Albert Museum, Bombay. 

Zoological Survey of India, Calcutta. 

IRELAND: 

Belfast Naturalists'^ Field Club. 
Department of Agriculture, Scientific 

Investigations, Dublin. 
Geological Survey, Dublin. 
National Museum of Science and Art, 

Dublin. 
Natural History and Philosophical 

Society, Belfast. 
Royal Irish Academy, Dublin. 
Royal Dublin Society. 

ITALY: 
Accademia delle Scienze Fisiche e 

Matematiche, Naples. 
Accademia Gioenia di Scienze Naturali, 

Catania. 
Istituto Botanica, Universita di Pavia. 
Istituto Geografico de Agostini, 

Novara. 
Laboratorio di Zoologia Generale e 

Agraria, Portici. 
Musei Zoologiae ed Anatomia Com- 

parata, Turin. 
Museo Civico di Storia Naturale, 

Genoa. 
R. Accademia delle Scienze di Torino. 
R. Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei, 

Rome. 
R. Orto Botanico Giardino Coloniale, 

Palermo. 
R. Scuola Superiore di Agricoltura, 

Portici. 
R. Societa Geografica Italiana, Rome. 
Societa di Scienze Naturali ed Econo- 

miche, Palermo. 
Societa Geologica Italiana, Rome. 
Societa Italiana d'Antropologia e 

Etnologia, Florence. 
Societa Italiana de Scienze Naturali, 

Milan. 
Societa Toscana di Scienze Naturali, 

Pisa. 

JAPAN: 

Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Natur-und 
Volkerkunde Ostasiens, Tokyo. 

Educational Museum, Tokyo. 

Geological Society, Tokyo. 

Imperial University, Taihoku. 

Imperial University of Tokyo, College 
of Science. 



Ornithological Society, Tokyo. 
Tokyo Botanical Society. 

JAVA: 

Bataviaasch Genootschap van Kun- 

sten en Wetenschappen, Batavia. 
Department of Agriculture, Buiten- 

zorg. 
Encyclopaedisch Bureau, Weltevre- 

den. 
Jardin Botanique, Weltevreden. 
Java Instituut, Weltevreden. 
K. Natuurkundige Vereeniging in 

Nederlandsch-Indie, Weltevreden. 

MEXICO: 

Instituto Geologico de Mexico. 
Museo National de Arqueologia, His- 

toria y Etnografia, Mexico. 
Secretaria de Agricultura y Fomento. 

Direccion de Antropologia, Mexico. 
Sociedad Cientifica "Antonio Alzate," 

Mexico. 
Sociedad Geologica Mexicana, Mexico. 

NETHERLANDS: 

Directie van den Landbouw, Hague. 

Koloniaal Instituut, Amsterdam,. 

K. Akademie van Wetenschappen, 
Amsterdam. 

K. Instituut voor de Taal-Land-en 
Volkenkunde van Nederlandsch 
Indie, Hague. 

K. Nederlandsch Aardijkundig Ge- 
nootschap, Amsterdam. 

Museum voor Land-en Volkenkunde 
en Maritiem Museum "Prinz Hen- 
drik," Rotterdam. 

Nederlandsche Dierkunde Vereenig- 
ing, Leiden. 

Nederlandsche Phytopathologische 
Vereeniging, Wageningen. 

Rijks Ethnographisch Museum, Lei- 
den. 

Rijks Hoogere Land-Tuin-en Bosch- 
bouwschool, Wageningen. 

Rijks Musuem van Natuurlijke His- 
toric, Leiden. 

Universiteit van Amsterdam, Biblio- 
thek. 

NEW ZEALAND: 

Acclimatisation Society, Wellington. 

Auckland Institute and Museum, 
Wellington. 

Canterbury Museum, Christchurch. 

Department of Agriculture, Welling- 
ton. 

Department of Mines, Wellington. 

Dominion Museum, Wellington. 

Geological Survey, Wellington. 

New Zealand Board of Science and 
Art, Wellington. 



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Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 



241 



NORWAY: 

Bergen Museum. 

Norges Geologiske Underskoelse, 
Christiania. 

Physiographiske Forening i Christi- 
ania. 

Tromso Museum. 

PERU: 

Cuerpo de Ingenieros de Minas, Lima. 
Sociedad Geografka, Lima. 

POLAND: 

Musei Polonici Historiae Naturales, 
Warsaw. 

Societe Botanique de Pologne, War- 
saw. 

Societe Scientifique de Poznan. 

PORTUGAL: 

Biblioteca Nacional, Lisbon. 
Collegio de San Fiel, Braga. 
Societe Portugaise des Sciences Na- 
turelles, Lisbon. 

RUSSIA: 
Academie Imperiale des Sciences, 

Petrograd. 
Universitat Dorpatensis. 

SPAIN: 

Collegio de Pasaje, La Guardia. 

Institucio Catalana d'Historia Na- 
tural, Barcelona. 

Instituto General y Tecnico, Valencia. 

Junta de Ciencies Naturals, Barcelona. 

Junta para Ampliation de Estudios e 
Investigaciones Cientfficas, Madrid. 

R. Academia de Ciencias Exactas, 
Fisicas y Naturales, Madrid. 

R. Academia de Ciencias y Artes, 
Barcelona. 

Sociedad Espafiola de Historia Na- 
tural, Madrid. 

SWEDEN: 
K. Svenska Vetenskapsakademien, 

Stockholm. 
K. Vetenskaps-och Vitterhets Sam- 

halle, Goteborg. 
K. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets 

Akademien, Stockholm. 
Lunds Universitet. 
Regia Societas Scientiarum Upsal- 

iensis. 
Svenska Sallskapet for Antropologi 

och Geografi, Stockholm. 
Universitet Biblioteket, Upsala. 

SWITZERLAND: 

Botanisches Museum, Zurich. 
Conservatoire et Jardin Botaniques, 

Geneva. 
Geographisch-EthnographischeGesell- 

schaft, Zurich. 



Historisches Museum, Bern. 
Naturforschende Gesellschaft, Basel. 
Naturforschende Gesellschaft, Bern. 
Naturforschende Gesellschaft, Zurich. 
Naturhistorisches Museum, Basel. 
Ostschweizerische Geograph-Commer- 

cielle Gesellschaft, St. Gallen. 
Societe Helvetique des Sciences Na- 

turelles, Bern. 
Societe de Physique et d'Histoire 

Naturelle, Geneva. 
Societe Entomologique, Bern. 
Societe Fribourgeoise des Sciences 

Naturelles, Fribourg. 
Societe Neuchateloise de Geographic 
Universitat, Bern. 

VENEZUELA: 

Cultura Venezolana, Caracas. 

WEST INDIES: 

Academia Nacional de Artes y Letras, 

Havana. 
Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Porto Rico. 
Biblioteca Nacional, Havana. 
Department of Agriculture of Jamaica, 

Kingston. 
Imperial Department of Agriculture, 

Barbados. 
Trinidad and Tobago Department of 

Agriculture, Port of Spain. 
Universidad de Habana. 

Ahl, Ernst, Berlin. 

Amalgamated Press, London (gift). 

Berg, Bengt, Stockholm (gift). 

Beyer, Hermann, Mexico (gift). 

Boman, Eric, Buenos Aires (gift). 

Camus, A., Paris (gift). 

Carpenter, G. H., Dublin. 

Charlesworth and Company, Hay- 
wards Heath (gift). 

Dunod, H., Paris. 

Faura y Sans, M., Barcelona (gift). 

Fritsch, Karl, Graz. 

Gadeau de Kerville, Henri, Paris 
(gift). 

Gaumer, George F., Mexico (gift). 

Gleerup, C. W. K., Lund. 

Herrera, Alfonso L., Mexico. 

Huard, A., Quebec. 

Janet, Charles, Paris. 

Joyce, T. A., London. 

Koch-Grunberg, Theodor, Stuttgart 
(gift). 

Laubmann, A., Munich (gift). 

Loesener, T., (gift). 

Loubat, Due de, Paris. 

MacRitchie, David, Edinburgh. 

Maiden, J. H., Sydney. 

Martelli, Ugolini, Pisa. 

Outes, Felix F., Buenos Aires. 



242 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



Pittier, Henri, Caracas. 

Ramirez Goyena, Miguel, Managua 

(gift). 
Reyes, Cesar, Buenos Aires (gift). 
Richter, Rudolph, Frankfurt a. M. 

(gift). 
Rivas Vicuna, Francisco, Bern (gift). 
Rivet, P., Paris. 
Roth, Walter E., Georgetown. 
Sapir, Edward, Ottawa. 
Schinz, Hans, Zurich (gift). 
Strehlneek, E. A., Shanghai. 
Stresemann, E., Berlin. 
Weber, Friedrich, Leipzig (gift). 
Widder, Felix J., Graz (gift). 
Wulfing, E. A., Heidelberg. 
Zimanyi, Karoly, Budapest. 
Zulueta, Francis de, Oxford (gift). 

ALABAMA: 

Anthropological Society, Montgomery. 
Department of Conservation, Mont- 
gomery. 
Geological Survey, University. 

CALIFORNIA: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Berkeley. 

California Academy of Sciences, San 
Francisco. 

Citrus Experiment Station, Riverside. 

Cooper Ornithological Club, Holly- 
wood. 

Henry E. Huntington Library and 
Art Gallery, San Gabriel (gift). 

Pomona College, Claremont. _ 

Scripps Institution of Biological Re- 
search, La Jolla. 

Southern California Academy of Sci- 
ences, Los Angeles. 

Southwest Museum, Los Angeles. 

Stanford University. 

State Board of Forestry, Sacramento. 

State Mining Bureau, Sacramento. 

University of California, Berkeley. 

COLORADO: 

Bureau of Mines, Denver. 
Colorado College, Colorado Springs. 
Colorado Museum of Natural History, 

Denver. 
Colorado Scientific Society, Denver. 
Colorado University, Boulder. 
State Historical and Natural History 

Society, Denver. 

CONNECTICUT: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, New 

Haven. 
American Oriental Society, New 

Haven. 
Connecticut Academy of Arts and 

Sciences, New Haven. 



Hartford Public Library. 
Peabody Museum, New Haven. 
State Geological and Natural History 

Survey, Hartford. 
Wesleyan University, Middletown. 
Yale University, New Haven. 

GEORGIA: 

Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah 

(gift). 
Geological Survey, Atlanta. 

HAWAII: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Hon- 
olulu. 

Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, 
Honolulu. 

Board of Commissioners of Agriculture 
and Forestry, Honolulu. 

Hawaiian Entomological Society, 
Honolulu. 

Hawaiian Historical Society , Honolulu. 

IDAHO: 

Mining Industry, Boise. 

State Historical Society of Idaho, 

Boise. 
University of Idaho, Moscow. 

ILLINOIS: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Ur- 
bana. 

Art Institute of Chicago. 

Audubon Society, Chicago. 

Augustana College and Theological 
Seminary, Rock Island. 

Board of Education, Chicago. 

Chicago Historical Society. 

Chicago Public Library. 

Division of Natural History Survey, 
Urbana. 

Hardwood Record, Chicago (gift). 

John Crerar Library, Chicago. 

Lake Forest College. 

Newberry Library, Chicago. 

Northwestern University, Evanston. 

Open Court Publishing Company, 
Chicago. 

State Academy of Science, Springfield. 

State Board of Agriculture, Spring- 
field. 

State Geological Survey, Urbana. 

State Historical Library, Springfield. 

State Water Survey, Urbana. 

Superintendent of Public Instruction, 
Springfield. 

Sweet, Wallach and Company, Chi- 
cago (gift). 

University of Chicago. 

University of Illinois, Urbana. 

West Chicago Park Commissioners. 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 



243 



INDIANA: 

Academy of Science, Indianapolis. 

Department of Conservation, Indian- 
apolis. 

Indiana University, Bloomington. 

Legislative Reference Bureau, Indian- 
apolis. 

Purdue University, Lafayette. 

University of Notre Dame. 

IOWA: 
Academy of Science, Des Moines. 
Ames Forestry Club. 
Horticultural Society, Des Moines. 
Iowa Geological Survey, Des Moines. 
Iowa State College, Ames. 
University of Iowa, Iowa City. 

KANSAS: 
Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Manhattan. 
State Board of Agriculture, Topeka. 
State Geological Survey, Lawrence. 
University of Kansas, Lawrence. 

KENTUCKY: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Louisville. 

LOUISIANA: 
Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Baton Rouge. 
Department of Conservation, New 

Orleans. 

MAINE: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Orono. 
Bowdoin College, Brunswick. 
Portland Public Library. 

MARYLAND: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
College Park. 

Maryland Geological Survey, Balti- 
more. 

MASSACHUSETTS: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Am- 
herst. 

American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences, Boston. 

American Antiquarian Society, 
Worcester. 

Bermuda Biological Station, Cam- 
bridge. 

Boston Public Library. 

Boston Society of Natural History. 

Harvard College, Museum of Com- 
parative Zoology, Cambridge. 

Harvard University. Arnold Arbore- 
tum, Jamaica Plain. 

Harvard University. Gray Herba- 
rium, Cambridge. 



Massachusetts Horticultural Society, 

Boston. 
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. 
New Bedford Free Public Library. 
Peabody Institute. 
Peabody Museum, Cambridge. 
Peabody Museum, Salem. 
Phillips Academy, Andover. 
Salem Public Library. 
Smith College, Northampton. 
Springfield City Library Association. 
Springfield Natural History Museum. 
Tufts College. 
Williams College, Williamstown. 

MICHIGAN: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Agricultural College. 

Chamberlain Memorial Museum, 
Three Oaks. 

Detroit Institute of Art. 

Geological and Natural History Sur- 
vey, Lansing. 

Grand Rapids Public Library. 

Michigan Academy of Science, Ann 
Arbor. 

Michigan College of Mines, Houghton. 

Michigan State Library, Lansing. 

State Board of Agriculture, Lansing. 

State Board of Library Commissions, 
Lansing. 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. 

MINNESOTA: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
University Farm. 

Minneapolis Institute of Arts. 

Minnesota Geological Survey, Min- 
neapolis. 

Minnesota Historical Society, Saint 
Paul. 

Saint Paul Institute. 

State Entomologist, University Farm. 

University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. 

MISSISSIPPI: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Agricultural College. 

MISSOURI: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Columbia. 
City Art Museum, Saint Louis. 
Missouri Botanic Garden, Saint Louis. 
Missouri Historical Society, Columbia. 
Saint Louis Academy of Science. 
Saint Louis Public Library. 
Saint Louis University. _ 
University of Missouri. School of 

Mines, Rolla. 
Washington University, Saint Louis. 

MONTANA: 

University of Montana, Missoula. 



244 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



NEBRASKA: 

University of Nebraska, Lincoln. 



NEVADA: 
Agricultural 
Reno. 



Experiment Station, 



NEW JERSEY: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Trenton. 

Department of Conservation and De- 
velopment, Trenton. 

Newark Museums Association. 

Princeton University. 

NEW MEXICO: 

New Mexico Museum, Santa Fe. 

NEW YORK: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Geneva. 
American Geographical Society, New 

York City. 
American Museum of Natural History, 

New York City. 
Asia Publishing Company, New York 

City. 
Brooklyn Botanic Garden. 
Brooklyn Institute of Arts and 

Sciences-. 
Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences. 
Carnegie Foundation for the Ad- 
vancement of Teaching, New York 

City (gift). 
Cooper Union for the Advancement of 

Science and Art, New York City. 
Cornell University, Ithaca. 
Forest and Stream Publishing Com- 
pany, New York City. 
Inter-American Magazine, New York 

City (gift). 
Japan Society, New York City. 
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New 

York City. 
Museum of the American Indian, 

New York City. 
New York Academy of Sciences, New 

York City. 
New York Botanical Garden, New 

York City. 
New York Historical Society, New 

York City. 
Pratt Institute Free Library, New 

York City. 
Public Library, New York City. 
Rochester Academy of Science. 
Rockefeller Foundation, New York 

City. 
State College of Forestry, Syracuse. 
State Library, Albany. 
State Museum, Albany. 
Staten Island Institute of Arts and 

Sciences, New York City. 



Stone Publishing Company, New 

York City. 
University of the State of New York, 

Albany. 
Zoological Society, New York City. 

NORTH CAROLINA: 

Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society, 
Chapel Hill. 
NORTH DAKOTA: 

University of North Dakota, Univer- 
sity. 

OHIO: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Wooster. 
Cincinnati Museum Association. 
Cleveland Museum of Art. 
Cleveland Public Library. 
Denison University, Granville. 
Geological Survey, Columbus. 
State Archaeological and Historical 

Society, Columbus. 
State University, Columbus. 
University of Cincinnati. 
Wilson Ornithological Club, Oberlin. 

OREGON: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Cor- 

vallis. 
University of Oregon, Eugene. 

PENNSYLVANIA: 

American Philosophical Society, Phila- 
delphia. 

Association of Engineering Societies, 
Philadelphia. 

Bryn Mawr College. 

Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh. 

Carnegie Library, Pittsburgh. 

Carnegie Museum, Pittsburgh. 

Delaware County Institute of Science, 
Media. 

Dropsie College, Philadelphia. 

Engineers' Society of Western Penn- 
sylvania, Pittsburgh. 

Franklin Institute, Philadelphia. 

Numismatic and Antiquarian Society, 
Philadelphia. 

Pennsylvania Museum and School of 
Industrial Art, Philadelphia. 

Philadelphia Academy of Natural 
Snpnc6s 

Philadelphia College of Pharmacy. 

Philadelphia Commercial Museum. 

Sullivant Moss Society, Pittsburgh. 

University of Pennsylvania, Phila- 
delphia. 

University of Pennsylvania; Museum, 
Philadelphia. . 

Wagner Free Institute of Science, 
Philadelphia. 

Wyoming Historical and Geological 
Society, Wilkes-Barre. 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 



245 



PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: 
Bureau of Education, Manila. 
Department of Agriculture, Manila. 
Department of Agriculture and Nat- 
ural Resources, Manila. 
Department of Interior, Bureau of 
Science, Manila. 
RHODE ISLAND: 

Park Museum, Providence. 
SOUTH CAROLINA: 
Charleston Museum. 
SOUTH DAKOTA: 
Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Brookings. 
Geological and Natural History Sur- 
vey, Vermilion. 
TENNESSEE: 

Department of Education. Division of 
Geology, Nashville. 

TEXAS: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Col- 
lege Station. 
Scientific Society of San Antonio. 
University of Texas, Austin. 

VERMONT: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Bur- 
lington. 
State Forester, Montpelier. 

VIRGINIA: 

State Library, Richmond. 
University of Virginia, Charlottesville. 
Virginia Geological Survey, Char- 
lottesville. 
Virginia State Forester, Charlottesville. 

WASHINGTON: 

Department of Conservation and 
Development. Division of Geology, 
Olympia. 
Washington Geological Survey, Pull- 
man. 
Washington University, Seattle. 
Washington University, Historical 
Society, Seattle. 
WASHINGTON, D. C: 

American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science (gift). 
American Mining Congress. 
Association for the Study of Negro 

Life and History. 
Carnegie Institution of Washington 

(gift). 
Library of Congress. 
National Academy of Sciences. 
National Education Association (gift). 
National Zoological Park. 
Pan American Union. 
Smithsonian Institution. 
United States Government. 
United States National Museum. 



WEST VIRGINIA: 

State Department of Agriculture, 
Charleston. 

West Virginia University, Morgan- 
town. 

WISCONSIN: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Madison. 

Beloit College. 

Geological and Natural History Sur- 
vey, Madison. 

Public Museum of Milwaukee. 

State Horticultural Society, Madison. 

University of Wisconsin, Madison. 5 j 

Allen, Thomas G., Chicago (gift). 
Ames, Oakes, Boston. 
Ayer, Edward E., Chicago (gift). 
Bailey, L. H., Ithaca. 
Baker, Frank C, Urbana. 
Blatchley, W. S., Indianapolis. 
Brennan, George A., Chicago (gift). 
Britton, Elizabeth G., New York City 

(gift). 
Chalmers, W. J., Chicago (gift). 
Cockerell, T. D. A., Boulder. 
Cook, Melville T., Rio Piedras. 
Davies, D. C, Chicago (gift). 
Davis, William T., New Brighton (gift). 
Dixon, Roland B., Cambridge. 
Edgerton, William F., Chicago (gift). 
Engelmann, W. F., Chicago (gift). 
Evans, Alexander W., New Haven. 
Farwell, Oliver A., Detroit (gift). 
Field, Stanley, Chicago (gift). 
Gault, B. T., Glen Ellyn. 
Gerhard, W. J., Chicago (gift). 
Goldnamer, William E., Chicago (gift). 
Greenman, Jesse M., Saint Louis (gift). 
Gunsaulus, Helen C, Chicago (gift). 
Holzinger, J. M., Winona (gift). 
Lewis, A. B., Chicago. 
McCormick, L. Hamilton, Chicago (gift). 
MacCurdy, George Grant, New Haven. 
Macfarlane, J. M., Philadelphia (gift). 
Meyers, George S., Jersey City (gift). 
Millspaugh, C. F., Chicago. 
Millspaugh, Mrs. C. F., Chicago (gift). 
Osborn, Henry T., New York City. 
Payne, John Barton, Chicago (gift). 
Penrose, R. A. F., Philadelphia (gift). 
Ramey, Fred, East Saint Louis. 
Robb, Mrs. George W., Borden (gift). 
Schaffner, John F., Columbus (gift). 
Springer, Frank, Las Vegas. 
Strong, R. M., Chicago. 
Todd, W. E. C, Pittsburgh. 
Trelease, William, Urbana. 
Weed, Alfred C, Chicago (gift). 
Weiss, Harry B., New Jersey. 
Weld, Lewis H., Washington (gift). 
Wolcott, A. B., Chicago (gift). 



246 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION 



STATE OF ILLINOIS 

DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State. 
To All to Whom These Presents Shall Come, Greeting: 

Whereas, a Certificate duly signed and acknowledged having been filed in the 
office of the Secretary of State, on the 16th day of September, a. d. 1893, for the 
organization of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO, under and in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of "An Act Concerning Corporations," approved 
April 18, 1872, and in force July 1, 1872, and all acts amendatory thereof, a copy 
of which certificate is hereto attached. 

Now, therefore, I, William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State of the State of 
Illinois, by virtue of the powers and duties vested in me by law, do hereby certify 
that the said COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO is a legally organized 
Corporation under the laws of this State. 

In Testimony Whereof, I hereto set my hand and cause to be affixed the 
Great Seal of State. Done at the City of Springfield, this 16th day of September, 
in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three, and of the 
Independence of the United States the one hundred and eighteenth. 

W. H. HINRICHSEN, 
[Seal] Secretary of State. 



TO HON. WILLIAM H. HINRICHSEN, 

Secretary of State : 

Sir: 

We, the undersigned citizens of the United States, propose to form a cor- 
poration under an act of the General Assembly of the State of Illinois, entitled 
'An Act Concerning Corporations," approved April 18, 1872, _ and all acts 
amendatory thereof; and that for the purposes of such organization we hereby 
state as follows, to-wit : 

1. The name of such corporation is the "COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF 
CHICAGO." 

2. The object for which it is formed is for the accumulation and dis- 
semination of knowledge, and the preservation and exhibition of objects illus- 
trating Art, Archaeology, Science and History. 

3. The management of the aforesaid museum shall be vested in a Board of 
Fifteen (15) Trustees, five of whom are to be elected every year. 

4. The following named persons are hereby selected as the Trustees for the 
first year of its corporate existence : 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 247 

Edward E. Ayer, Charles B. Farwell, George E. Adams, George R. Davis, 
Charles L. Hutchinson, Daniel H. Burnham, John A. Roche, M. C. Bullock, 
Emil G. Hirsch, James W. Ellsworth, Allison V. Armour, O. F. Aldis, Edwin 
Walker, John C. Black and Frank W. Gunsaulus. 

5. The location of the Museum is in the City of Chicago, County of Cook, 
and State of Illinois. 

(Signed), 

George E. Adams, C. B. Farwell, Sidney C. Eastman, F. W. Putnam, Robert 
McCurdy, Andrew Peterson, L. J. Gage, Charles L. Hutchinson, Ebenezer 
Buckingham, Andrew McNally, Edward E. Ayer, John M. Clark, Herman H. 
Kohlsaat, George Schneider, Henry H. Getty, William R. Harper, Franklin H. 
Head, E. G. Keith, J. Irving Pearce, Azel F. Hatch, Henry Wade Rogers, 
Thomas B. Bryan, L. Z. Leiter, A. C. Bartlett, A. A. Sprague, A. C. McClurg, 
James W. Scott, Geo. F. Bissell, John R. Walsh, Chas. Fitzsimmons, John A. 
Roche, E. B. McCagg, Owen F. Aldis, Ferdinand W. Peck, James H. Dole, 
Joseph Stockton, Edward B. Butler, John McConnell, R. A. Waller, H. C. 
Chatfield-Taylor, A. Crawford, Wm. Sooy Smith, P. S. Peterson, John C. 
Black, Jno. J. Mitchell, G F. Gunther, George R. Davis, Stephen A. Forbes, 
Robert W. Patterson, Jr., M. C. Bullock, Edwin Walker, George M. Pullman, 
William E. Curtis, James W. Ellsworth, William E. Hale, Wm. T. Baker, 
Martin A. Ryerson, Huntington W. Jackson, N. B. Ream, Norman Williams, 
Melville E. Stone, Bryan Lathrop, Eliphalet W. Blatchford, Philip D. Armour. 

State of Illinois 1 

r SS 

Cook County J 
I, G. R. Mitchell, a Notary Public in and for said County, do hereby 
certify that the foregoing petitioners personally appeared before me and 
acknowledged severally that they signed the foregoing petition as their free and 
voluntary act for the uses and purposes therein set forth. 

Given under my hand and notarial seal this 14th day of September, 1893. 

G. R. MITCHELL, 
[Seal] Notary Public, Cook County, III. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 



Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the corporate members held 
the 25th day of June, 1894, the name of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM was 
changed to FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. A certificate to this effect was 
filed June 26, 1894, in the office of the Secretary of State for Illinois. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 



Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the corporate members held 
the 8th day of November, 1905, the name of the FIELD COLUMBIAN 
MUSEUM was changed to FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
A certificate to this effect was filed November 10, 1905, in the office of the 
Secretary of State for Illinois. 



CHANGE IN ARTICLE 3. 

Pursuant to a resolution at a meeting of the corporate members held the 
10th day of May, 1920, the management of FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL 
HISTORY shall be invested in a Board of Twenty-one (21) Trustees, who 
shall be elected in such manner and for such time and term of office as may 
be provided for by the By-Laws. A certificate to this effect was filed May 21, 
1920, in the office of the Secretary of State for Illinois. 



248 



Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



AMENDED BY-LAWS 



April 16, 1923 



ARTICLE 1. 

MEMBERS 

Section i. Members shall be of seven classes, Corporate Members, Hon- 
orary Members, Patrons, Life Members, Associate Members, Sustaining Mem- 
bers, and Annual Members. 

Section 2. The Corporate Members shall consist of the persons named in 
the articles of incorporation, and of such other persons as shall be chosen from 
time to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, upon the recom- 
mendation of the Executive Committee ; provided, that such person named in 
the articles of incorporation shall, within ninety days from the adoption of these 
By-Laws, and persons hereafter chosen as Corporate Members shall, within 
ninety days of their election, pay into the treasury the sum of twenty ($20.00) 
dollars or more. Corporate Members becoming Life Members, Patrons or 
Honorary Members shall be exempt from dues. Annual meetings of said 
Corporate Members shall be held at the same place and on the same day that 
the annual meeting of the Board of Trustees is held. 

Section 3. Honorary Members shall be chosen by the Board from among 
persons who have rendered eminent service to science, and only upon unanimous 
nomination of the Executive Committee. They shall be exempt from all dues. 

Section 4. Patrons shall be chosen by the Board upon recommendation of 
the Executive Committee from among persons who have rendered eminent 
service to the Museum. They shall be exempt from all dues, and, by virtue of 
their election as Patrons, shall also be Corporate Members. 

Section 5. Any person paying into the treasury the sum of five hundred 
($500.00) dollars, at any one time, shall, upon the unanimous vote of the Board, 
become a Life Member. Life Members shall be exempt from all dues, and shall 
enjoy all the privileges and courtesies of the Museum that are accorded to mem- 
bers of the Board of Trustees. 

Section 6. Any person paying into the treasury of the Museum the sum of 
one hundred ($100.00) dollars, at any one time, shall upon the unanimous vote of 
the Board, become an Associate Member. Associate Members shall be entitled 
to: tickets admitting member and members of family, including non-resident 
home guests ; all publications of the Museum, if so desired ; reserved seats to all 
lectures and entertainments under the auspices of the Museum, provided 
reservation is requested in advance ; and admission of holder of membership and 
accompanying party to all special exhibits and Museum functions day or evening. 

Section 7. Sustaining Members shall consist of such persons as are selected 
from time to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, and who 
shall pay an annual fee of twenty-five ($25.00) dollars, payable within thirty 
days after notice of election and within thirty days after each recurring annual 
date. This Sustaining Membership entitles the member to free admission for 
the member and family to Museum on any day and allows 25 admission coupons, 



TJJC * - 

- 

iLL!^D!5 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XLV. 




ROYAL SARONG OR SKIRT WOVEN IN GOLD THREADS, PERAK MALAY 

ARTHUR B. JONES EXPEDITION TO MALAYSIA 1922-23. 

78 x 36 inches. 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 249 

which may be used by any one, the Annual Report and such other Museum 
documents or publications as may be requested in writing. When a Sustaining 
Member has paid the annual fee of $25.00 for six years, such member shall 
be entitled to become an Associate Member. 

Section 8. Annual Members shall consist of such persons as are selected 
from time to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, and who 
shall pay an annual fee of ten ($10.00) dollars, payable within thirty days 
after each recurring annual date. An Annual Membership shall entitle the 
member to a card of admission for the member and family during all hours 
when the Museum is open to the public, and free admission for the member 
and family to all Museum lectures or entertainments. This membership will 
also entitle the holder to the courtesies of the membership privileges of every 
Museum of note in the United States and Canada, so long as the existing sys- 
tem of cooperative interchange of membership tickets shall be maintained, 
including tickets for any lectures given under the auspices of any of the 
Museums during a visit to the cities in which the cooperative museums are 
located. 

ARTICLE II. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Section i. The Board of Trustees shall consist of twenty-one members. 
The respective members of the Board now in office, and those who shall here- 
after be elected, shall hold office during life. Vacancies occurring in the Board 
shall be filled at a regular meeting of the Board, upon the nomination of the 
Executive Committee made at a preceding regular meeting of the Board, by a 
majority vote of the members of the Board present. 

Section 2. Regular meetings of the Board shall be held monthly. Special 
meetings may be called at any time by the President, and shall be called by 
the Secretary upon the written request of three Trustees. Five Trustees shall 
constitute a quorum, except for the election of officers or the adoption of the 
Annual Budget, when seven Trustees shall be required, but meetings may be 
adjourned by any less number from day to day, or to a day fixed, previous 
to the next regular meeting. 

Section 3. Reasonable written notice, "^ignating the time and place of 
holding meetings, shall be given by the Secretary. 

ARTICLE III. 

HONORARY TRUSTEES 

Section i. As a mark of respect, and in appreciation of services performed 
for the Institution, those Trustees who by reason of inability, on account of 
change of residence, or for other cause or from indisposition to serve longer 
in such capacity shall resign their place upon the Board, may be elected, by a 
majority of those present at any regular meeting of the Board, an Honorary 
Trustee for life. Such Honorary Trustee will receive notice of all meetings 
of the Board of Trustees, whether regular or special, and will be expected to be 
present at all such meetings and participate in the deliberations thereof, but an 
Honorary Trustee shall not have the right to vote. 

ARTICLE IV. 

OFFICERS 

Section i. The officers shall be a President, a First Vice-President, a 
Second Vice-President, a Third Vice-President, a Secretary, an Assistant Secre- 
tary and a Treasurer. They shall be. chosen by ballot by the Board of Trustees, 
a majority of those present and voting being necessary to elect. The President, 



2~o Field Museum of Natural History — Reports. Vol. VI. 

First Vice-Pi die Second Vice-President, and the Third Vice-Presi- 

dent shall be chosen from among the members of the Board of Trustees. The 
meeting for the election of officers shall be held on the third Monday of January 
of each year, and shall be called the Annual Meeting. 

Section 2. The officers shall hold office for one year, or until their suc- 
cessors are 1 and qualified, but any officer may be removed at any regular 
meeting of the Board of Trustees by a vote of two-thirds of all the members 
of the Board. Vacancies in any office may be filled by the Board at any meeting. 

Section 3. The officers shall perform such duties as ordinarily appertain 
to their respective offices, and such as shall be prescribed by the By-Laws, or 
des: 5 r,ated from time to time by the Board of Trustees. 

ARTICLE V. 

THE TREASURER 

Szctiox I. The Treasurer shall be custodian of the funds of the Corpor- 
aton except as hereinafter provided. He shall make disbursements only upon 
warrants drawn by the Director and countersigned by the President. In the 
absence or inability of the Director, warrants may be signed by the Chairman 
of the Finance Committee, and in the absence or inability of the President, may 
be countersigned by one of the Vice-Presidents, or any member of the Finance 
Committee. 

Section 2. The securities and muniments of title belonging to the cor- 
poration shall be placed in the custody of some Trust Company of Chicago to 
be designated by the Board of Trustees, which Trust Company shall collect 
the income and principal of said securities as the same become due. and pay 
same to the Treasurer, except as hereinafter provided. Said Trust Company 
shall allow access to and deliver any or all securities or muniments of title to 
the joint order of the following officers, namely The President or one of the 
lents, jointly with the Chairman, or one of the Vice-Chairmen, of the 
7: ranee Committee of the Museum. 

Section 5. The Treasurer shall give bond in such amount, and with such 
sureties as shall be approved by the Board of Trustees. 

Sz:t:::: 4. The Harris Trust & Savings Bank of Chicago shall be Cus- 
todian of "The X. W. Harris Public School Extension of Field Museum - ' fund. 
The bank shall make disbursements only upon warrants drawn by the Director 
and countersigned by the President. In the absence or inability of the Director, 
irrants may be signed by the Chairman of the Finance Committee, and in the 
absence or inability of the President, may be countersigned by one of the Vice- 
Presidents, or any member of the Finance Committee. 

ARTICLE VI. 
THE director 

Szctiox i. The Board of Trustees shall elect a Director of the Muse, 
who shall remain in office until his successor shall be elected. He shall have im- 
mediate charge and supervision of the Museum, and shall control the operations 
the Institution :t to the authority of the Board of Trustees and its 

Committees. The Director shall be the official medium of communication be- 
tween the Board, or its Committees, and the scientific staff and maintenance 
force. 

Section" 2. There shall be four scientific departments of the Museum — 
Anthropology, Botany, Geology and Zoology; each under the charge of a 
irator, subject to the authority of the Director. The Curators shall be ap- 
pointed by the Board upon the recommendation of the Director, and shall 
rve during the pleasure of the Board. Subordinate staff officers in the 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 251 

scientific departments shall be appointed and removed by the Director upon 
the recommendation of the Curators of the respective Departments. The 
Director shall have authority to employ and remove all other employees of the 
Museum. 

Section 3. The Director shall make report to the Board at each regular 
meeting, recounting the operations of the Museum for the previous month. At 
the Annual Meeting, the Director shall make an Annual Report, reviewing 
the work for the previous year, which Annual Report shall be published in 
pamphlet form for the information of the Trustees and Members, and for free 
distribution in such number as the Board may direct. 

ARTICLE VII. 

AUDITOR 

Section i. The Board shall appoint an Auditor, who shall hold his office 
during the pleasure of the Board. He shall keep proper books of account, set- 
ting forth the financial condition and tra: e Corporation, and of the 
Museum, and report thereon at each regular meeting, and at such other tirr.es 
as may be required by the Board. He shall certify to the correctness of all 
bills rendered for the expenditure of the money of the Corporation. 

ARTICLE MIL 

COM MITTI. 

- :tion 1. There shall be five Commit: follows: Finance. Building, 

Auditing. Pension and Executive. 

Section 2. The Finance Committee shall consist of five members, the 
Auditing and Pension Committees shall each consist of three members, and the 
Building Committee shall consist of five members. All members of these four 
Committees shall be elected by ballot by the Board at the Annual Meeting, and 
shall hold off.ce for one year, and until their successors are elected and quali- 
fied. In electing the members of these Committees, the Board shall designate 
the Chairman and Vice-Chairman by the order in which the members are 
named in the respective Committee; the first member named shall be Chair- 
man, the second named the Vice-Chairman , and the third named, Second Vice- 
chairman, succession to the Chairmanship being in this order in the event of 
the absence or disability of the Chairman. 

Section 3. The Executive Committee shall consist of the President of the 
Board, the Chairman of the Finance Committee, the Chairman of the Building 
Committee, the Chairman of the Auditing Committee, the Chairman of the 
Pension Committee, and three other members of the Board to be elected by 
ballot at the Annual Meeting. 

Section 4. Four members shall constitute a quorum of the Executive Com- 
mittee, and in all standing Committees two members shall constitute a quorum. 
In the event that, owing to the absence or inability of members, a quorum of 
the regularly elected members cannot be present at any meeting of any Com- 
mittee, then the Chairman thereof, or his successor, as herein provided, may 
summon any members of the Board of Trustees to act in place of the absentee. 

Section 5. The Finance Committee shall have supervision of investing the 
endowment and other permanent funds of the Corporation, and the care of such 
real estate as ma}- become its property. It shall have authority to invest, sell, 
and reinvest funds, subject to the approval of the Board. 

tion 6. The Building Committee shall have supervision of the con- 
struction, reconstruction, and extension of any and all buildings used for 
Museum purposes. 



252 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

Section 7. The Executive Committee shall be called together from time 
to time as the Chairman may consider necessary, or as he may be requested 
to do by three members of the Committee, to act upon such matters affecting 
the administration of the Museum as cannot await consideration at the Regular 
Monthly Meetings of the Board of Trustees. It shall, before the beginning of 
each fiscal year, prepare and submit to the Board an itemized Budget, setting 
forth the probable receipts from all sources for the ensuing year, and make 
recommendations as to the expenditures which should be made for routine 
maintenance and fixed charges. Upon the adoption of the Budget by the 
Board, the expenditures as stated are authorized. 

Section 8. The Auditing Committee shall have supervision over all ac- 
counting and bookkeeping, and full control of the financial records. It shall 
cause the same, once each year, or oftener, to be examined by an expert indi- 
vidual or firm, and shall transmit the report of such expert individual or firm 
to the Board at the next ensuing regular meeting after such examination shall 
have taken place. 

Section 9. The Pension Committee shall determine by such means and 
processes as shall be established by the Board of Trustees to whom and in what 
amount the Pension Fund shall be distributed. These determinations or findings 
shall be subject to the approval of the Board of Trustees. 

Section 10. The Chairman of each Committee shall report the acts and 
proceedings thereof at the next ensuing regular meeting of the Board. 

Section ii. The President shall be ex-officio a member of all Committees 
and Chairman of the Executive Committee. Vacancies occurring in any Com- 
mittee may be filled by ballot at any regular meeting of the Board. 

ARTICLE IX. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Section 1. At the November meeting of the Board each year, a Nomi- 
nating Committee of three shall be chosen by lot. Said Committee shall make 
nominations for membership of the Finance Committee, the Building Commit- 
tee, the Auditing Committee, and the Pension Committee, and for three mem- 
bers of the Executive Committee, from among the Trustees, to be submitted 
at the ensuing December meeting and voted upon at the following Annual 
Meeting in January. 

ARTICLE X. 

Section i. Whenever the word "Museum" is employed in the By-Laws of 
the Corporation, it shall be taken to mean the building in which the Museum 
as an Institution is located and operated, the material exhibited, the material in 
study collections, or in storage, furniture, fixtures, cases, tools, records, books, 
and all appurtenances of the Institution and the workings, researches, installations, 
expenditures, field work, laboratories, library, publications, lecture courses, and 
all scientific and maintenance activities. 

Section 2. These By-Laws may be amended at any regular meeting of the 
Board of Trustees by a two-thirds vote of all the members present, provided 
the amendment shall have been proposed at a preceding regular meeting. 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 



253 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



AYER, EDWARD E. 
AYER, MRS. EDWARD E. 
BLACKSTONE, MRS. T. B. 
CHALMERS, WILLIAM J. 
CRANE, CHARLES R. 
FIELD, MARSHALL 
FIELD, STANLEY 



GRAHAM, ERNEST R. 
HARRIS, ALBERT W. 
JONES, ARTHUR B. 
McCORMICK, STANLEY 
RYERSON, MARTIN A. 
SIMPSON, JAMES 
S PRAGUE, ALBERT A. 



PATRONS 



ANDERSON, PEIRCE 
ARMOUR, ALLISON V. 
BUTLER, EDWARD B. 
COLLINS, ALFRED M. 
CUMMINGS, MRS. ROBERT F. 
DAY, LEE GARNETT 
HUTCHINSON, CHARLES L. 
KELLEY, WILLIAM V. 

WHITE, 



KENNEDY, VERNON SHAW 
KUNZ, GEORGE F. 
MANIERRE, GEORGE 
MARKHAM, CHARLES H. 
PAYNE, JOHN BARTON 
PROBST, EDWARD 
SARGENT, HOMER E. 
SMITH, WILLARD A. 
HOWARD J. 



254 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



CORPORATE 

ALDIS, OWEN F. 
ANDERSON, PEIRCE 
ARMOUR, ALLISON V. 
AYER, EDWARD E. 

BLAIR, WATSON F. 
BORDEN, JOHN 
BUTLER, EDWARD B. 
BYRAM, HARRY E. 

CHALMERS, W. J. 
CHATFIELD-TAYLOR, H. C. 
COLLINS, ALFRED M. 
CRANE, Jr., RICHARD T. 
CUMMINGS, MRS. ROBERT F. 

DAVIES, D. C. 

DAY, LEE GARNETT 

EASTMAN, SIDNEY C. 
ELLSWORTH, JAMES W. 

FIELD, MARSHALL 
FIELD, STANLEY 

GAGE, LYMAN J. 
GRAHAM, ERNEST R. 

HARRIS, ALBERT W. 
HUTCHINSON, CHARLES L. 



MEMBERS 

JONES, ARTHUR B. 

KEEP, CHAUNCEY 
KELLEY, WILLIAM V. 
KENNEDY, VERNON SHAW 
KOHLSAAT, HERMAN H. 
KUNZ, GEORGE F. 

McCORMICK, CYRUS H. 
MANIERRE, GEORGE 
MARKHAM, CHARLES H. 
MITCHELL, JOHN J. 

PAYNE, JOHN BARTON 
PECK, FERDINAND W. 
PORTER, GEORGE F. 
PROBST, EDWARD 

RYERSON, MARTIN A. 

SARGENT, HOMER E. 
SIMPSON, JAMES 
SMITH, SOLOMON A. 
SMITH, WILLARD A. 
SPRAGUE, ALBERT A. 
STONE, MELVILLE E. 

WHITE, HOWARD J. 
WRIGLEY, Jr., WILLIAM 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 



2 DD 



LIFE MEMBERS 



ALDIS, ARTHUR T. 
ALDIS, OWEN F. 
ALEXANDER, WILLIAM A. 
ALLEN, BENJAMIN 
ALLERTON, ROBERT H. 
AMES, JAMES C. 
AMES, KNOWLTON L. 
ARMOUR, ALLISON V. 
ARMOUR, A. WATSON 
ARMOUR, J. OGDEN 
ARMOUR, LESTER 
AVERY, SEWELL L. 
AYER, EDWARD E. 

BABCOCK, FRED'K. R. 
BAKER, MISS ISABELLE 
BANCROFT, EDGAR A. 
BANKS, ALEXANDER F. 
BARRELL, FINLEY 
BARRETT, MRS. A. D. 
BARRETT, ROBERT L. 
BASSFORD. LOWELL C. 
BECKER, A. G. 
BILLINGS, C. K. G. 
BILLINGS, FRANK 
BLACKSTONE, MRS. T. B. 
BLAINE, MRS. EMMONS 
BLAIR, HENRY A. 
BLAIR, WATSON F. 
BLOCK, P. D. 
BOOTH, W. VERNON 
BORDEN, JOHN 
BORLAND, CHAUNCEY B. 
BREWSTER, WALTER S. 
BRIDGE, NORMAN 
BROWN, WILLIAM L. 
BUCHANAN, D. W. 
BUFFINGTON, EUGENE J. 
BURNHAM, JOHN 
BUTLER, EDWARD B. 
BYLLESBY, H. M. 

CARPENTER, A. A. 
CARPENTER, BENJ. 
CARR, ROBERT F. 



CARRY, EDWARD F. 
CARTON, L. A. 
CHALMERS, WILLIAM J. 
CLARK, EUGENE B. 
CLAY, JOHN 
CLOW, WILLIAM E. 
COBE, IRA M. 
CRAMER, CORWITH 
CRAMER, E. W. 
CRANE, CHARLES RICHARD 
CRANE, Jr., RICHARD T. 
CROWELL, H. P. 
CUDAHY, JOSEPH M. 
CUMMINGS, D. MARK 
CUNNINGHAM, FRANK S. 

DAU, J. J. 

DAWES, CHARLES G. 
DAY, ALBERT M. 
DECKER, ALFRED 
DEERING, CHARLES 
DEERING, JAMES 
DEFREES', JOSEPH H. 
DELANO, FREDERIC A. 
DICK, ALBERT BLAKE 
DONNELLEY, REUBEN H. 
DONNELLEY, THOMAS E. 
DOUGLAS, JAMES H. 
DRAKE, JOHN B. 
DRAKE, TRACY C. 

ECKHART, B. A. 
EDMUNDS, PHILIP S. 

FAIR, ROBERT M. 
FARNUM, HENRY W. 
FARR, MISS SHIRLEY 
FARWELL, ARTHUR L. 
FARWELL, FRANCIS C. 
FARWELL, JOHN V. 
FARWELL, WALTER 
FAY, C. N. 
FELT, DORR E. 
FENTON, HOWARD W. 
FERGUSON, LOUIS A. 



256 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



FERNALD, GUSTAVUS S. 
FIELD, MARSHALL 
FIELD, STANLEY 
FINLEY, WM. H. 
FORGAN, DAVID R. 
FORGAN, JAMES B. 
FORSYTH, ROBERT 
FYFFE, COLIN C. H. 

GARTZ, A. F. 
GARY, JOHN W. 
GETZ, GEORGE F. 
GLESSNER, JOHN J. 
GODDARD, LEROY A. 
GOODMAN, WILLIAM O. 
GOODRICH, A. W. 
GRAHAM, ERNEST R. 
GRISCOM, CLEMENT A. 

HAMILL, ERNEST A. 
HARRIS, ALBERT W. 
HASKELL, FREDERICK T. 
HASTINGS, SAMUEL M. 
HIBBARD, FRANK 
HILL, LOUIS W. 
HINDE, THOMAS W. 
HOPKINS, J. M. 
HOPKINS, L. J. 
HOROWITZ, L. J. 
HOYT, N. LANDON 
HUGHITT, MARVIN 
HULBURD, CHARLES H. 
HUTCHINSON, C. L. 

INSULL, SAMUEL 

JELKE, JOHN F. 

JELKE, JR., JOHN F. 

JOHNSON, MRS. ELIZABETH 
AYER 

JONES, ARTHUR B. 

JONES, THOMAS D. 

KEEP, CHAUNCEY 
KELLER, THEODORE C. 
KELLEY, WILLIAM V. 
KING, CHARLES GARFIELD 
KING, FRANCIS 



KING, JAMES G. 
KIRK, WALTER RADCLIFFE 
KITTLE, C. M. 
KNICKERBOCKER, C. K. 
KUPPENHEIMER, LOUIS B. 

LAMONT, ROBERT P. 
LAWSON, VICTOR F. 
LEHMANN, E. J. 
LEONARD, CLIFFORD M. 
LINN, W. R. 
LOGAN, SPENCER H. 
LORD, JOHN B. 
LOWDEN, FRANK O. 
LYTTON, HENRY C. 

MacVEAGH, FRANKLIN 

manierre, geo. 
mark, clayton 
markham, charles h. 
marshall, benjamin h. 
martin, william p. 
mason, william s. 
Mccormick, cyrus h. 

McCORMICK, HAROLD F. 
McCORMICK, STANLEY 
McELWEE, ROBERT H. 
McINNERNEY, THOS. H. 
McKINLAY, JOHN 
McKINLOCK, GEORGE 

alexander 
Mclaughlin, frederic 
Mclaughlin, geo. d. 

McLENNAN, D. R. 
McNULTY, T. J. 
McWILLIAMS, LAFAYETTE 
MINER, W. H. 
MITCHELL, JOHN J. 
MOORE, EDWARD S. 
MORSE, Jr., CHARLES H. 
MORTON, JOY 
MORTON, MARK 
MUNROE, CHARLES A. 

NEWELL, A. B. 
NOEL, JOSEPH R 

ORR, ROBERT M. 




en 
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Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 



257 



PALMER, HONORE 
PALMER, POTTER 
PAM, MAX 
PATTEN, HENRY J. 
PAYNE, JOHN BARTON 
PAYSON, GEO. S. 
PEABODY, AUGUSTUS S. 
PICK, ALBERT 
PIERCE, CHARLES I. 
PIEZ, CHARLES 
PIKE, CHARLES B. 
PORTER, FRANK WINSLOW 
PORTER, GEORGE F. 
PORTER, GILBERT E. 
PORTER, H. H. 

RAWSON, FREDERICK H. 
REVELL, ALEXANDER H. 
REYNOLDS, GEORGE M. 
ROBINSON, THEODORE W. 
ROBSON, MISS ALICE 
ROSENWALD, JULIUS 
RUNNELLS, CLIVE 
RUNNELLS, JOHN S. 
RUSSELL, EDMUND A. 
RUSSELL, 'EDWARD P. 
RYERSON, MRS. CARRIE H. 
RYERSON, EDWARD L. 
RYERSON, MARTIN A. 

SCHWEPPE, CHARLES H. 
SCOTT, FRANK H. 
SCOTT, GEORGE E. 
SCOTT, HAROLD N. 
SCOTT, JOHN W. 
SHAFFER, JOHN C. 
SHEDD, JOHN G. 
SIMPSON, JAMES 
SMITH, ALEXANDER 
SMITH, SOLOMON A. 

SOPER, JAMES P. 
SPALDING, KEITH 



SPOOR, JOHN A. 
SPRAGUE, ALBERT A. 
STEVENS, CHARLES A. 
STEWART, ROBERT W. 
STOREY, W. B. 
STOUT, FRANK D. 
STRAWN, SILAS H. 
STUART, ROBERT 
STURGES, GEORGE 
SUNNY, B. E. 
SWIFT, CHARLES H. 
SWIFT, EDWARD F. 
SWIFT, Jr., G. F. 
SWIFT, HAROLD H. 
SWIFT, LOUIS F. 

THORNE, CHARLES H. 
THORNE, ROBERT J. 

UPHAM, FREDERIC W. 

VAN VECHTEN, RALPH 
VEATCH, GEORGE L. 
VILES, LAWRENCE M. 

WETMORE, FRANK O. 
WHEELER, CHARLES P. 
WHITE, F. EDSON 
WHITNEY, MRS. JULIA L. 
WICKWIRE, MRS. EDWARD L. 
WILLARD, ALONZO J. 
WILLITS, WARD W. 
WILSON, JR., JOHN P. 
WILSON, OLIVER T. 
WILSON, THOMAS E 
WILSON, WALTER H. 
WINSTON, GARRARD B. 
WINTER, WALLACE C 
WOOLLEY, CLARENCE M. 
WRIGLEY, Jr., WILLIAM 

YATES. DAVID M. 



ADAMS, MILWARD 
BEALE, WILLIAM G. 
BOYNTOX, C. T. 



DECEASED I 923 

CARR. CLYDE M. 
HOXIE, MRS. JOHX R. 
HULBERT, E. D. 



258 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



jones, david b. 
marsh, frank a. 
Mccormick, mrs. 
nathan, adolph 



PEABODY, FRANCIS S. 
PINKERTON, WILLIAM A. 
REAM, MRS. CAROLINE P. 
SMITH, ORSON 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 



ABBOTT, W. RUFUS 
ABRAMS, DUFF A. 
ALSCHULER, ALFRED S. 
ANDREWS, ALFRED B. 
ARMBRUSTER, CHARLES A. 
ASHER, LOUIS E. 
ATWATER, WALTER HULL 

BARNES, CECIL 
BARTHOLOMAY, HENRY 
BATTEY, PAUL L. 
BECKER, BENJAMIN F. 
BECKER, HERMAN -T. 
BEIL, CARL 
BELL, LIONEL A. 
BELL, ROBERT W. 
BENDER, CHARLES J. 
BENSINGER, BENJAMIN E. 
BLOCK, EMANUEL J. 
BLOCK, L. E. 
BOTH, WILLIAM C. 
BOWEN, MRS. LOUISE de 

KOVEN 
BOYNTON, FREDERICK P. 
BRIGHAM, MISS FLORENCE M. 
BROCK, A. J. 
BROSS, MRS. MASON 
BROWN, CHARLES EDWARD 
BUDLONG, JOSEPH J. 
BURT, W. G. 
BUTLER, RUSH C. 

CARON, O. J. 

CARPENTER, FREDERIC IVES 

CARR, WALTER S. 

CARRY, JOSEPH C. 

CARTON, ALFRED T. 

CHEEVER, MRS. ARLINE V. 

CLARK, MISS DOROTHY S. 



COLVIN, SR., MRS. W. H. 
CONNER, FRANK H. 
COOLIDGE, E. CHANNING 
COONLEY, JOHN STUART 
COOPER, SAMUEL 
CUDAHY, JR., E. A. 
CUDAHY, EDWARD I. 
CUNNINGHAM JOHN T. 



DAVIS, FRED M. 
DEAHL, URIAH S. 
DENNEHY, THOMAS C. 
DEUTSCH, JOSEPH 
DE VRIES, DAVID 
DE VRIES, PETER 
DIXON, GEORGE W. 
DOBSON, GEORGE 
DOERING, OTTO C. 
DONAHUE, WILLIAM J 
DONOHUE, EDGAR T. 
DULANY, GEORGE W. JR. 
DURAND, SCOTT S. 



EGAN, WILLIAM B. 
EISENDRATH, W. N. 
ENGWALL, JOHN F. 
ERICSSON, HENRY 
EUSTICE, ALFRED L. 



FABRY, HERMAN 
FAHRNEY, E. C. 
FAY, MISS AGNES M. 
FELLOWS, WILLIAM K. 
FENTRESS, CALVIN 
FOREMAN, EDWIN G. JR. 
FOSTER, VOLNEY 
FREER, ARCHIBALD E. 






Jan., 1924 Annual Report of 

GABRIEL, CHARLES 
GALVIN, WILLIAM A. 
GARDNER, PAUL E. 
GARDNER, ROBERT A. 
GATELY, RALPH M. 
GATZERT, AUGUST 
GILBERT, MISS CLARA 
GILES, CARL C. 
GRANGER ALFRED 
GUNTHORP, WALTER J. 



the Director. 259 

NEELY, MISS CARRIE BLAIR 

OFFIELD, JAMES R. 
OLIVER, FRED S. 
OPPENHEIMER, JULIUS 

PARDRIDGE, MRS. E. W. 
PEACOCK, ROBERT E. 
POOL, MARVIN B. 
POPE, HERBERT 



HAMILL, ALFRED E. 
HAMLIN. PAUL D. 
HARDING, GEORGE F. 
HARTWELL, FRED G. 
HECHT, JR., FRANK A. 
HELLER, ALBERT 
HELLYER. WALTER 
HELMER, FRANK A. 
HERRICK, WALTER D. . 
HERWIG, GEORGE 
HERWIG, JR., WILLIAM D. 
HOLLIS, WILLIAM D. 
HUTCHINS, JAMES C. 
HYNES, REV. JAMES A. 



JACKSON, W. J. 
JONES, G. HERBERT 



KEENEY, ALBERT F. 
KEITH, STANLEY 



LANE, WALLACE R. 
LAUREN, NEWTON B. 
LAWSON, ARTHUR J. 
LEGGE, ALEXANDER 
LLOYD, WILLIAM BROSS 
LONG, WILLIAM E. 
LUCEY, PATRICK J. 
LYON, MRS. THOMAS R. 



MAGEE, HENRY W. 
MAGWIRE, MRS. MARY F. 
MANSURE, EDMUND L. 
McBRIDE, MRS. WALTER J. 



REYNOLDS, ARTHUR 

REYNOLDS, EARLE H. 

ROBERTSON, WILLIAM 

ROBINSON, MRS. MILTON E. 
SR. 

RUSSELL, DR. JOSEPH W. 

RYERSON, JR., ED. L. 

SEAMAN, GEORGE M. 
SHAMBAUGH, DR. GEORGE E. 
SHAPIRO, MEYER 
SHEEHY, EDWARD 
SHERIDAN, ALBERT D. 
SMULSKI, JOHN F. 
SNOW, EDGAR M. 
SULLIVAN, MRS. ROGER C. 

THOMPSON, DAVID P. 
THORNE, GEORGE A. 
THORNE, JAMES W. 
TOBIAS, CLAYTON H. 
TRAYLOR, MELVIN A. 
TREDWELL, JOHN 
TYSON, RUSSELL 

WALLER, EDWARD C. 

WARE, MRS. LYMAN 

WEISSENBACH, MRS. MINNA 
K. 

WENDELL, JR., BARRETT 

WILLIAMS, MISS ANNA P. 

WINDSOR, H. H. 

WORCESTER, MRS. CHARLES 
H. 

WORK, ROBERT 
YONDORF, MILTON S. 



260 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

SUSTAINING MEMBERS 



ALSIP, CHARLES H. 
ANDERSON, MRS. MARY 
ARMBRUST, JOHN T. 
AYRES, HARRY M. 

BAIRD, HARRY K. 
BARNETT, OTTO R. 
BEREND, GEORGE F. 
BERTSCHINGER, DR. C. F. 
BOTSCHEN, ARTHUR SR. 
BROWN, CHARLES A. 
BULLOCK, MRS. JAMES E. 
BURGWEGER, MRS. META 

DEWES 
BUTLER, JOHN M. 
BYFIELD, JOSEPH 

CHATFIELD-TAYLOR, WAYNE 
CLARK, DR. J. WENDELL 
CONDIT, J. SIDNEY 
COOKE, MISS FLORA J. 
COOKE, GEORGE ANDERSON 
COOMBS, JAMES F. 
COWLES, THOMAS H. 
CREEDON, MRS. CLARA W. 
CRILLY, EDGAR 

DANIELS, H. L. 
DARDEL, CARL O. 
DAVIS, DR. CARL B. 
DENNIS, CHARLES H. 
DUGAN, ALPHONSO G. 
DUNCAN, JOSEPH S. 

FADER, A. L. 
FARR, NEWTON CAMP 
FAULKNER, MISS ELIZABETH 
FISHER, JUDGE HARRY M. 
FREUND, I. H. 
FRISBIE, CHAUNCEY O. 
FULLER, JUDSON M. 
FURRY, WILLIAM S. 

GALHOUSE, LEONARD 
GALL, CHARLES H. 
GALLISTEL, ALBERT J. 
GALLUP, ROCKWELL 
GALVIN, JOSEPH X. 



GARDEN, HUGH 
GARDNER, ADDISON L., SR. 
GARDNER, JAMES P. 
GARY, FRED ELBERT 
GAW, GEORGE T. 
GORMAN, GEORGE E. 
GOTTFRIED, CARL M. 
GRADLE, DR. HARRY S. 
GRANT, E. RAY 
GRANT, FRANCIS B. 
GRANT, JOHN G. 
GRAVER, JAMES P. 
GRAVES, HOWARD B. 
GRAY, JOHN D. 
GREENEBAUM, JAMES E. 
GREENLEE, JAMES A. 
GREENSFELDER, LOUIS A. 

HANSON, JAMES L. 
HATMAKER, CHARLES F. 
HAUGAN, OSCAR H. 
HEERMANS, THADDEUS W. 
HENDERSON, THOMAS B. G. 
HINSBERG, STANLEY K. 
HOGAN, G. FRANK 
HOLMES, WILLIAM N. 
HUNTER, SAMUEL M. 

JOHNSON, WILLIAM H. 
JOHNSTONE, DR. A. RALPH 

LA FORGE, DR. ALVIN W. 
LANSKI, JACOB 
LATHROP, GARDINER 
LAURITZEN, C. M. 
LAWTON, FRANK W. 
LOGAN, JOHN I. 

MARTIN, SAMUEL H. 
MITCHELL, WILLIAM H. 

PEART, WILLIAM 
PECK, MRS. CHARLES G. 
PETERSON, AXEL A. 
PITCHER, MRS. HENRY L. 
PLUNKETT, WILLIAM H. 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 



261 



RANDALL, IRVING 
REEVE, FREDERICK E. 
RICKCORDS, FRANCIS 
RITTER, MISS PAULA J. 

SAWYER, DR. ALVAH L. 
SMITH, CLAYTON F. 
SPALDING, MRS. CHARLES F. 



SPROGLE, MRS. HOWARD C. 
STANLEY, W. EDWIN 

THORP, HARRY W. 

WATSON, OLIVER L., SR. 
WINTERBOTHAM, JOHN H. 
WRENN, MRS. EVERTS 



ANNUAL MEMBERS 



ADLER, DR. HERMAN M. 
AFFLECK, BENJAMIN F. 
AHNFELT, JOHN 
AMES, ARTHUR R. 
AMES, EDWARD E. 
ANDREWS, DR. BENJAMIN F. 
ARMOUR, GEORGE A. 
ARTINGSTALL, JR., SAMUEL G. 
ASCHER, NATHAN 
ASHCRAFT, R. M. 



BACON, DR. CHARLES S. 
BAGGE, CHRISTIAN U. 
BAILEY, EDWARD P. 
BARKER, MRS. FRANK W. 
BARTHOLOMAY, JR., WILLIAM 
BASS, JOHN F. 
BASS, MRS. PERKINS 
BATEMAN, FLOYD L. 
BEACH, E. CHANDLER 
BELDEN, JOSEPH C. 
BLACK, HERMAN 
BOAL, AYRES 
BRASSERT, HERMAN A. 
BREEN, JAMES W. 
BRIGGS, MRS. ARTHUR A. 
BRODRIBB, LAWRENCE C. 
BRODSKY, JACOB J. 
BURLEY, CLARENCE A. 
BURNHAM, DANIEL H. 
BUTZ, ROBERT T. 

CAMERON, JOHN M. 
CAMP, CURTIS B. 
CAPPS, DR. JOSEPH A. 
CASTENHOLZ, W. B. 
CHURCHILL, RICHARD S. 



COBURN, ALONZO J. 
COLEMAN, WILLIAM OGDEN 
COMSTOCK, WILLIAM C. 
CREGO, FRANK A. 
CROSBY, MRS. FREDERICK W. 
CUMMINGS, THOMAS A. JR. 
CURTIS, MISS FRANCES H. 

DARROW, CLARENCE S. 
DAUGHADAY, HAMILTON 
DUNNING, N. MAX 

EISENDRATH, ROBERT 
ELLBOGEN, MRS. MAX 
ESTES, CLARENCE E. 
EUSTIS, PERCY S. 
EVANS, MORGAN R. 

FALKNER, MILTON E. 
FANI, REV. CHARLES 
FANNING, CHARLES G. 
FARNHAM, MRS. HARRY J. 
FARNSWORTH, GEORGE J. 
FETZER, WADE 
FIELD, HENRY 
FISH, MRS. JOSEPH 
FOIN, CHIN F. 
FORTUNE, JOHN L. 
FRANK, HENRY L. 
FRIDSTEIN, MEYER 
FRIEDER, EDWARD N. 

GABER, BENJAMIN 
GABRIEL, HARRY F. 
GAITHER, OTHO S. 
GALE, ABRAM 
GALL, HARRY T. 
GALLANIS, JOHN A. 



262 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



GARBERS, CHRIST H. 
GARDNER, ADDISON L. 
GARDNER, DR. EDGAR W. 
GARNER, HARRY J. 
GARRISON, DR. LESTER E. 
GARRITY, EDMUND C. 
GARY, SIMON P. 
GASKILL, CHARLES H. 
GATES, ERRETT 
GEDDES, WILLIAM H. 
GERAGHTY, GERALD G. 
GIESSEL, HENRY 
GOLDFINE, DR. ASCHER H. C. 
GOLDSMITH, MOSES 
GORMLEY, WILLIAM J. 
GOSHERT, J. FRED 
GOSLEE, DR. HART J. 
GOSNEY, MARVIN L. 
GOSSELIN, FRANK X. 
GOTTLICH, OSCAR 
GOULD, GEORGE W. 
GRABER, HYMAN M. 
GRADY, MRS. DAVID E. 
GRAF, ROBERT J. 
GRAFF, OSCAR C. 
GRAMM, DR. CARL T. 
GRAVER, PHILIP S. 
GRAVES, ERNEST H. 
GRAY, ARTHUR L. 
GRAYDON, CHARLES E. 
GREEN, JOHN H. 
GREENE, BENJAMIN 
GREENLEAF, GARDNER 
GREER, EDWIN 
GREGG, THOMAS A. 
GREGOR, PETER A. 
GREGORY, CHARLES E. 
GREGORY, CLIFFORD V. 
GREY, CHARLES F. 
GRIFFIN, BENNETT 
GRIGNON, GEORGE F. 
GRIMBLOT, SAMUEL A. 
GRIMM, WALTER H. 
GROAK, IRWIN D. 
GROEBE, LOUIS G. 
GROENWALD, FLORIAN A. 
GROSBERG, CHARLES 
GROSS, ERNEST W. 
GROSS, DR. HENRY R. 



GROSS, MISS MIRIAM 
GUNN, WALTER C. 



HARDING, S. LAWRENCE 
HARGRAFT, STUART A. 
HARKNESS, LAUNCELOT A. 
HARLEV, ARTHUR G. 
HARMON, HUBERT R. 
HARMON. JOHN H. 
HARNER, GEORGE W. 
HARRIMAN, FRANK B. 
HARRIMAN, KARL E. 
HARRINGTON, GAY R. 
HARRINGTON, JAMES H. 
HARRIS, EWART 
HARRIS. FRANK F. 
HARRIS, GORDON L. 
HARRIS, J. MAX 
HARRIS, WILLIAM L. 
HARRIS, WILLIAM P. 
HARRISON, HARRY P. 
HARRISON, JAMES D. 
HARRISON, MARTIN L. 
HARRISON, THOMAS F. 
HART, ALVIN C. 
HART, HARRY 
HART, HENRY D. 
HART, JAMES M. 
HART, LOUIS E. 
HART, THOMAS W. 
HART, WILLIAM N. 
HARTER, GUSTAV A. 
HARTMANN, HENRY, SR. 
HARTWICK, JESSE A. 
HARTWIG, OTTO J. 
HARWOOD, FREDERICK 
HARWOOD, THOMAS W. 
HASSETT, FRANK L. 
HASTERLIK, VICTOR C. 
HASTINGS, EDMUND A. 
HASTINGS, LOUIS M. 
HATCH, F. M. 
HAUGHY, JAMES M. 
HAUSMANN, FRANK W. 
HAVRANAK, ALBERT 
HAWKINS, FRANK P. 
HAWKINS, L. S. 
HAWKINS, THEODORE 
HAWLEY, ALBERT P. 



Jan., 1924 Annual Report of the Director. 



263 



HAWTHORNE, VAUGHN R. 
HAYES, CHARLES A. 
HEALY, JOHN J. 
HEATON, HARRY E. 
HECK, JOHN 
HECKAMAN, SAMUEL D. 
HECKENDORF, R. A. 
HECKMANN, PHILIP \Y. 
HEDBERG, REV. VICTOR E. 
HEDIGER, ADOLPH M. 
HEDMAN, CARL M. 
HEDMARK, JOHN 
HEDRICK, TUBMAN K. 
HEERWAGEN, DR. OSCAR W. 
HEFFERN, WILLIAM H. 
HEFFERNAN, THOMAS F. 
HEFTER, MRS. ETHEL 
HEG, SR., ERNEST 
HEICK, HARRY E. 
HEIDBRINK, GEORGE F. 
HEIDEL, CARL 
HEIDEL, DR. CECIL T. 
HEIDKE, OTTO G. 
HEIDLER, FRANK J. 
HEIFETZ, SAMUEL 
HEIN, GEORGE 
HEIN, SYLVESTER J. 

HEINEKAMP, LILLIAN 
HEINEMANN, EARL 
HEINEMANN, GEORGE G. 
HEINEMANN, JOHN B. 
HEINFELDEN, CURT H. G. 
HEINZ, L. HERMAN 
HELLER, DR. CHARLES 
HEMPSTEAD, JOSEPH L. 
HEMPSTED, JAMES G. 
HEMWALL, JOHN 
HENRY, C. DUFF 
HENRY, HUNTINGTON B. 
HENSCHIEN, H. PETER 
HIBBARD, FREDERICK C. 
HILTON, HENRY H. 
HIMAN, CHARLES 
HIMMELSBACH, JOHN W. 
HINDS, JOSEPH B. 
HINES, JOHN W. 
HINNERS, WILLIAM A. 
HISCOX, MORTON 
HITCHCOCK. R. M. 



HOCH, JAMES J. 
HOCKERT, ERNEST L. 
HODGES, LOUIS A, 
HOEFER, ERNEST 
HOFFMAN, EDWARD W. 
HOGG, HARRY H. 
HOLABIRD, JOHN A. 
HOLDEN, MRS. CHARLES R. 
HOLLAND, DR. WILLIAM E. 
HOLLINGSWORTH, GEORGE K. 
HOLLOWAY, OWEN B. 
HOLMAN, ALFRED L. 
HOLT, GEORGE H. 
HOOPER, HENRY 
HOWE, MRS. FANNY J. 



JAMES, RAYMOND H. 
JAMES, WILLIAM A. 
JENKINS, GEORGE H. 
JOHNSON, NELS J. 
JOHNSTON, BERNARD F. 
JOHNSTONE, GEORGE A. 
JONES, CHARLES J. 
JONES, J. S. 

JONES, DR. MARGARET M. 
JOSEPH, LOUIS L. 



KAPSA, LADISLAV A. 
KARAMANOS, DR. ANGELOS K. 
KATZ, JACOB 
KELLOGG, JAMES G. 



LAMB, FRANK H. 
LANSINGER, MRS. JOHN M. 
LA PIERRE, DR. FELIX J. 
LASSAGNE, VICTOR F. 
LINCOLN, ROBERT T. 
LIVINGSTON, MILTON L. 
LOGAN, F. G. 

MARRIOTT, ABRAHAM R. 
MATLIS, L. 
McCREA, W. S. 
McNERNY, MATHEW F. 
MEEKER, ARTHUR 
MOORE, N. G. 
MULLIKEN, A. H. 



264 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



PALMER, PROF. CLAUDE IR- 
WIN 

PALMER, PERCIVAL B. 

RAPAPORT, MORRIS W. 

RICHARDS, H. A. 
RIDDLE, HERBERT H. 
RIGALI, JOHN E. 
RIPLEY, MRS. E. P. 
RITTENHOUSE, MRS. MOSES 

F. 
ROSENFELD, MRS. MAURICE 
RYAN, THOMAS C. 
RYERSON, EDWIN D. 

SAUTER, LEONARD J. 
SCHMIDT, DR. O. L. 
SCHWARTZ, G. A. 
SCUDDER, J. ARNOLD 
SEABURY, CHARLES W. 
SHORTALL, JOHN L. 



SKINNER MISS FREDERIKA 
SPENCE, MRS. ELIZABETH E. 



THROOP, GEORGE ENOS 
TOWLER, KENNETH F. 



VOLTZ, DANIEL W. 
VON KLEINWACHTER, DR. 
LUDWIG. 



WACKER, CHARLES H. 
WAITE, MISS MURIEL W. 
WALKER, BERTRAND 
WALKER, JAMES R. 
WHEELER, SEYMOUR 
WHINERY, CHARLES C. 
WHITEHEAD, W. M. 
WILD, RICHARD 
WILSON, MRS. E. CRANE 
WILSON, M. H. 



ADAMS, CYRUS H. 
FULLER, O. F. 



DECEASED I923 

PARKER, FRANCIS W. 
PEARSON, MRS. E. H. 
STOCKTON, JOHN T. 



may 2 3 m 









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