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THE UNIVERSITY 

OF ILLINOIS 

LIBRARY 



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THE UNIVERSITY 

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TO RENEW CAU TELEPHONE CENTER, 333 . 8 400 



MAR 1 3 1995 
JUN 1 3 1995 





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FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XLVII. 




WILLIAM J. CHALMERS. 
A TRUSTEE OF THE MUSEUM SINCE ITS ORGANIZATION, 
AND CHAIRMAN OF THE BUILDING COMMITTEE. 



Field Museum of Natural History. 



Publication 227. 



Report Series. 



Vol. VI, No. 4. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 1 924. 



















Chicago, U. S. A. 
January, 1925. 



F*5 






BEQUESTS 

Bequests to Field Museum of Natural History may be made in 
securities, money, books or collections. For those desirous of making 
bequests to the Museum, the following form is suggested : 

FORM OF BEQUEST 

I do hereby give and bequeath to "Field Museum of Natural 
History" of the Citv of Chicago, State of Illinois, 



Cash Contributions made within the taxable 
year to Field Museum of Naiurai Hisiory to an 
amount not in excess of 13% of the tax payer's 
net income are allowable as deductions in com- 
puting net income under the Revenue Law. 



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CONTENTS 



Board of Trustees 270 

Officers and Committees 271 

Staff of Museum 272 

Report of the Director 273 

General Lectures 277 

Entertainments for Children 279 

Publications 281 

Library 283 

Cataloguing, Inventorying and Labeling 286 

Accessions 288 

Expeditions and Field Work 297 

Installation and Permanent Improvement 303 

The N. W. Harris Public School Extension 322 

Guide-Lecturer 324 

Publicity 325 

Printing and Photography 328 

Photogravures 328 

Artist 329 

Attendance 329 

Attendance Statistics 330 

Financial Statements 33 1 

List of Accessions 333 

Department of Anthropology 333 

Department of Botany . 336 

Department of Geology 336 

Department of Zoology 338 

Section of Photography 342 

The Library 342 

Articles of Incorporation 353 

Amended By-Laws 355 

List of Honorary Members and Patrons 361 

List of Corporate Members 362 

List of Life Members 363 

List of Associate Members 366 

List of Sustaining Members 372 

List of Annual Members 376 



270 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Edward E. Ayer Albert W. Harris 

Watson F. Blair Arthur B. Jones 

John Borden Chauncey Keep 

Harry E. Byram Charles H. Markham 

William J. Chalmers Cyrus H. McCormick 

Richard T. Crane, Jr. Martin A. Ryerson 

D. C. Davies James Simpson 

Marshall Field Solomon A. Smith 

Stanley Field Albert A. Sprague 

Ernest R. Graham Silas H. Str awn- 
William Wrigley, Jr. 

HONORARY TRUSTEE 
Owen F. Aldis 



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FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XLVIII. 




THE LATE GEORGE MANIERRE 
SECRETARY OF THE MUSEUM CORPORATION FROM APRIL, 1894, TO MAY, 
AND CHAIRMAN OF THE AUDITING COMMITTEE. 



1907, 



Jan., 1925 



Annual Report of the Director. 



271 



OFFICERS 

Stanley Field, President 

Martin A. Ryerson, First Vice-President 

Watson F. Blair, Second Vice-President 

Albert A. Sprague, Third Vice-President 
D. C. Davies, Secretary 

Arthur B. Jones, Assistant Secretary 
Solomon A. Smith, Treasurer 

COMMITTEES 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



Stanley Field 
Watson F. Blair 
William J. Chalmers 
Arthur B. Jones 



Albert A. Sprague 
Edward E. Ayer 
Marshall Field 
John Borden 



Watson F. Blair 
Martin A. Ryerson 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 



Arthur B. Jones 
Chauncey Keep 



Albert W. Harris 



William J. Chalmers 
Cyrus H. McCormick 



Arthur B. Jones 



Albert A. Sprague 



BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Harry E. Byram 

AUDITING COMMITTEE 

Silas H. Strawn 

PENSION COMMITTEE 

James Simpson 



Albert A. Sprague 
Ernest R. Graham 



Charles H. Markham 



Solomon A. Smith 



272 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

ADMINISTRATIVE AND SCIENTIFIC STAFF 

DIRECTOR 
D. C. Davies 

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY 
Berthold Laufer, Curator 

Assistant Curators 

Charles L. Owen — Archaeology 

Albert B. Lewis — African and Melanesian Ethnology 

Helen C. Gunsaulus — Japanese Ethnology 

Ralph Linton — North American Ethnology 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY 
B. E. Dahlgren, Acting Curator 
Assistant Curator 
J. Francis Macbride — Taxonomy 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY 
O. C. Farrington, Curator 
Henry W. Nichols, Associate Curator 
Elmer S. Riggs, Associate Curator of Paleontology 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 

Wilfred H. Osgood, Curator 
William J. Gerhard, Associate Curator of Insects 
C. E. Hellmayr, Associate Curator of Birds 
H. B. Conover, Associate in Ornithology 

Assistant Curators 
Edmond N. Gueret — Osteology R. Magoon Barnes — Oology 

Alfred C. Weed — Fishes Edmund Heller — Mammals 

John T. Zimmer — Birds Karl P. Schmidt — Reptiles and Amphibians 

Division of Taxidermy 
Julius Friesser, Mammals Leon L. Walters, Reptiles and Amphibians 

L. L. Pray, Fishes Ashley Hine, Birds 

DEPARTMENT OF THE N. W. HARRIS PUBLIC SCHOOL EXTENSION 

S. C. Simms, Curator 

THE LIBRARY 

Elsie Lippincott, Librarian 

Emily M. Wilcoxson, Assistant Librarian 

REGISTRAR AUDITOR 

H. F. Ditzel Benj. Bridge 

RECORDER GUIDE LECTURERS 

Robert H. Thompson Dorothy Roberts Cockrell 

Elsie H. Thomas, Assistant Recorder Margaret L. Fisher H. E. Wheeler 

MEMBERSHIP SECTION SECTION OF PRINTING 

R. R. More, in charge U. A. Dohmen, in charge 

SECTION OF PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION 
C. H. Carpenter, Photographer Carl F. Gronemann, Artist 

A. A. Miller, Photo gravurist 

SUPERINTENDENT OF MAINTENANCE CHIEF ENGINEER 

John E. Glynn W. H. Corning 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 

1924 



To the Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History. 

I have the honor to present a report of the operations of the Museum 
for the year ending December 31, 1924. 

A marked increase of interest in the activities of the Institution is 
distinctly the outstanding feature of the year under review. The innu- 
merable advantages offered to the public by the Museum are being daily 
more appreciated. The tremendous impetus and inspiration which this 
appreciation gives to the scientific and maintenance forces of the Mu- 
seum augurs well for its future and signifies gratifying approval of its 
methods of disseminating knowledge and entertainment. 

Details which are given in the report indicate that the affairs of the 
Museum are in a healthy condition and give evidence of its wide influ- 
ence and extensive investigations in many fields. While the year has 
been a busy one and the results satisfactory, yet considering the increas- 
ing requirements and the constantly growing importance of the Museum, 
the fifth year of occupancy of the new building seems to demonstrate, 
as have each of the four previous years, the necessity for still greater 
effort. 

The expenses of the Museum under the head of maintenance have 
been in excess of the budget this year. However, the large amount that 
was expended for fittings for the work rooms, storage areas and the 
laboratories, and the refinishing of all exhibition cases in the Depart- 
ment of Botany, are not in a sense a proper'charge against maintenance. 
If this is taken into consideration, the expenditures have been below the 
budget allowance. It may seem from the evidence of this work that the 
building is being refurnished. This, as a matter of fact, is true in so far 
as the working areas on the third floor are concerned. These growing 
needs of the Museum and the extensive improvements and additions 
necessary to maintain the increasing demands of its departments, are an 
indication of the development of the entire Institution. More and more 
each year the Museum is becoming better equipped to perform all of 
its necessary labor, not only for technical and scientific purposes, but 



274 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

for the ordinary maintenance work as well. It is now only under un- 
usual circumstances that outside agencies need to be engaged. 

The excess of expenditures over the revenue shows a deficit of 
$33,000.00 for the year, which amount was voluntarily assumed by 
President Field. In addition to this Mr. Field has contributed during 
the year the sum of $78,576.00. A part of this was directed towards the 
deficit existing in the Building Fund and the remainder was the stated 
annuity provided for the work in the Plant Reproduction laboratory. 

Captain Marshall Field has increased his annuity to $100,000.00 
which enables the Museum to extend its expeditionary program and 
to increase the issue and enlarge the scope of its scientific publications. 
Of especial interest was the inauguration of two new series of publications, 
the first being the "Design" Series, of which two numbers were issued, and 
the other a publication designated as the "Memoirs" Series. The first 
number of the latter series was in press shortty before the end of the year. 

The benefactions of Mr. Edward E. Ayer to the library which has 
been named in his honor, have continued, reference to which is made 
elsewhere. Mr. Ayer has also made notable additions to the pewter col- 
lection which also bears his name, several very important examples of 
this alloy having been added to the original collection. A commodious 
room on the second floor has been alloted to this splendid exhibit. 

Mr. Arthur B. Jones has provided the funds for the purchase of an 
important Maori collection, which came from Captain T. E. Donne, a 
well-known citizen of New Zealand. 

An invitation to cooperate with the American Museum of Natural 
History in its important survey in Mongolia has been heartily welcomed. 
Under the arrangements already perfected, the Museum is to share in 
the results of the expedition. It is earnestly hoped that this undertaking 
marks a beginning of a consolidation of the interests of American 
museums, and that it will result not only in valuable cooperation, but 
in the elimination of wasteful duplication of efforts. 

An additional contribution of $100,000.00 to the Harris Extension 
Fund, made by the family of the late Norman W. Harris, was one of 
the most important gifts of the year, enabling this department to in- 
crease the distribution of exhibition cases to the public schools and to 
provide a new distributing car. This car was placed in operation at the 
beginning of the fall school term. This benefaction adds to the income 
of the Harris Extension Fund a sum slightly over $6,000.00 per annum. 

Mr. Charles R. Crane has continued his contributions towards the 
publication of the work on the "Birds of the Americas." The third 
part of this series was issued during the year. 



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Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 275 

The family of the late Mr. George Manierre presented to the Mu- 
seum a collection of specimens from North America, Mexico, Panama, 
Australia, Japan, Egypt, and Russia, consisting of prehistoric pottery, 
tobacco pipes, stone implements, baskets, etc., which is a most acceptable 
addition to the collections in the Department of Anthropology. 

In appreciation of Mr. Edward E. Ayer's life-long devotion to the 
work of the Museum and his great liberality in adding to its collections, 
Mr. and Mrs. Julius Rosenwald contributed to the Museum the sum 
of $25,000.00. The income from this contribution is to be used for the 
next ten years in filling gaps in the North American Indian collections 
in the Museum. At the end of this term, the income is to be devoted 
to the purchase of scientific books for the departmental libraries. 

The progress of the Museum is further encouraged by the support 
received from the tax levied by the South Park Commissioners. This 
income is used solely for maintenance, but is not sufficient by any 
means to meet the present and increasing needs of the Institution. 

Grateful acknowledgment is made of the courtesies extended by the 
Chicago Rapid Transit Company, the Illinois Central Railroad Com- 
pany, the Chicago Surface Lines, the Rock Island Railroad Company, 
the Aurora and Elgin Electric Lines, and the department stores of Chi- 
cago, in exhibiting posters and placards directing the attention of the 
public to the Museum and its work. 

The membership campaign inaugurated during the previous year 
has been highly successful. The activities in this direction have re- 
sulted in the following additions to the different classes of memberships : 

Life Members 28 

Associate Members 47 2 

vSustaining Members 283 

Annual Members 557 

The By-Laws have been amended for the purpose of adding three 
new classes of members, viz: Benefactors, Fellows, and Non-Resident 
Life. Reference to the memberships newly created will be found in 
the amended By-Laws included in this report. 

The gratifying increase in the attendance of visitors to the Museum 
may be accounted for in part by the canvass for memberships, but 
doubtless in greater measure by the publicity given to the Institution 
and its activities by the press and the transportation companies. 

The organization of a Live Wild Flower exhibit during the summer 
and autumn months attracted many people to the Museum and may be 
spoken of as successful beyond expectation. This exhibit was suggested 
by the Department of Botany and has been promoted under its direction. 



276 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

During the year the vacancies existing in the membership of the 
Board of Trustees were filled by the election of Mr. Charles H. Mark- 
ham and Mr. Silas H. Strawn. 

The Trustees have named the hall in which the ichthyological 
collections are exhibited the Albert W. Harris Hall, in honor of Mr. 
Albert W. Harris. 

The additions to the staff during the year were as follows; H. F. 
Ditzel, Registrar, R. H. Thompson, Recorder, and H. Boardman Conover, 
Associate in Ornithology. E. S. Abbey was appointed Sergeant of 
the Guard to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of Sergeant 
Brophy, who had been in the employ of the Museum since its inception, 
and who left behind him an unimpeachable record for faithfulness and 
devotion to duty. 

Other activities initiated during the year were the inauguration of a 
series of summer classes for the children of members ; the introduction 
of a series of Fellowships for research work; and the installation of a 
new system of lighting for habitat groups. 

The trouble and annoyance experienced by the constant leaking of 
the sky-lighted halls demanded prompt treatment, and made necessary 
the decision to roof over these areas. These skylights, covering an area 
of 38,500 square feet, have been insulated with a double thickness of 
Celotex overlaid with Ruberoid roofing. This work was begun August 
17, 1924 and was finished November 22nd, at a cost of $20,250.00. This 
expenditure was charged to the Building Fund and necessarily increased 
the deficit of that account, but this, as previously reported, was 
assumed by President Field. 

The roofing over of the skylights changed the method of lighting 
the halls from that of daylight to artificial lighting, but there is every 
indication that the artificial lighting is more suitable than daylight for 
the material exhibited in these areas. Not only is the illumination more 
uniform, but the fading effects of sunlight are avoided. 

All the windows in the exhibition areas have been curtained, and 
this has not only improved the interior appearance of the openings, but 
has added to their attractiveness from the outside. 

A surface drainage system has been laid in the terrace around the 
Museum building, and furnished with catch basins along the edge of the 
grass plot. The entire sidewalk surrounding the Museum has been 
overlaid with a top dressing of crushed limestone. 

The outside steps and the flag pole steps at the north entrance have 
been caulked with oakum and lead wool. The outside walls of the 
northeast central pavilion have been caulked with elastic cement, and 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 277 

the terrace balustrade and outside window sills have been repointed 
with Portland cement. 

The death of Mr. George Manierre, a member of the Board of Trus- 
tees for thirty years, closed a career of activity and usefulness in which 
the Museum very largely shared His loss is mourned by his fellow- 
trustees and is sorely felt by the members of the administrative and 
scientific staff of the Museum. As Chairman of the Auditing Committee 
for several years, Mr. Manierre made frequent visits to the Museum, and 
always manifested the greatest interest in the work of its departments. 
Through his frequent and intimate contact with the staff, its members 
learned to understand and appreciate him highly. 

General Lectures. — Two courses of lectures and three special 
lectures were given in the James Simpson Theatre during the year, 
bringing the total number of courses presented by the Museum to fortv- 
two. The interest of the public was fully manifested by large and 
attentive audiences. The ready cooperation of well-known scientific men 
and lecturers in this work is gratifying, and occasion is here taken to 
thank them for their participation in these courses. 

Following is the Forty-first Free Illustrated Lecture Course, with 
the subjects and lecturers, delivered during the months of March and 
April, 1924. 

March 1 — "Glimpses of Canada — Forest, Field and Mountains." 

Mr. Frank Yeigh, Lecturer and Author, Toronto, 
Canada. 
March 8 — "Explorations in the Malay Peninsula' ' (Arthur B . Jones 

Expedition, 1923). 
Dr. Fay-Cooper Cole, University of Chicago. 
March 15 — "The Royal Mummies." 

Dr. T. Wingate Todd, Western Reserve Univer- 
sity, Cleveland, Ohio. 
March 22 — "On the'Track of an Unknown Sheep." 

Mr. John B. Burnham, American Game Protective 
and Propagation Association, New York City. 
March 29 — "The Grand Canyon of the Colorado River." 

Mr. E. C. Larue, United States Geological Survey, 
Washington, D. C. 
April 5 — "On Darwin's Trail in South America" (Captain 

Marshall Field Expedition). 
Dr. Wilfred H. Osgood, Curator of Zoology, Field 
Museum of Natural History. 



278 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

April 12 — "Peruvian Trails." 

Dr. George S. Bryan, Department of Botany, 
University of Wisconsin. 
April 19 — "Journeyings in Brazil." 

Dr. Oliver C. Farrington, Curator of Geology, Field 
Museum of Natural History. 
April 26— "The Passing of the Old West." 

Lieut, Col. Charles Wellington Furlong, F. R. G. S., 
Boston, Mass. 

Following is the Forty-second Free Illustrated Lecture Course, 
with subjects and lecturers, delivered during the months of October, 
November and December, 1924: 

October 4 — "Wild Animals I Have Known." 

Mr. Ernest Thompson Seton, Greenwich, Con- 
necticut. 
October 1 1 — "The People of Japan." 

Dr. William Elliot Griffis, New York City. 

October 18 — "Six Thousand and One Minutes in Galapagos." 

Dr. William Beebe, Department of Tropical Re- 
search, New York Zoological Society. 
October 25 — "Tribes of Sumatra" (Arthur B. Jones Expedition, 

1923)- 
Dr. Fay-Cooper Cole, leader of the expedition. 

November 1 — "The Gateway of the Sahara." 

Lieut. Col. Charles Wellington Furlong, F. R. G. S., 
Boston, Mass. 

November 8— "The Wonders of Wood." 

Professor Samuel J. Record, Yale University, New 
Haven, Conn. 

November 15 — "Spain and the Alhambra." 

Mr. B. R. Baumgardt, Los Angeles, California. 

November 22 — "Babylon as a Center of Civilization, with Special 

Reference to the Excavations at Kish, under- 
taken by the Field Museum-Oxford University 
Joint Expedition under the auspices of Capt. 
Marshall Field." 
Professor Ira M. Price, University of Chicago. 
November 29 — "The Man-Eaters of Tsavo." 

Lieut. Col. J. H. Patterson, D. S. O., London. 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 279 

December 6 — "Among the Blackfeet Indians." 

Mr. Walter McClintock, M. A., Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania. 

The following are the three special lectures delivered during the year : 

March 30 — "Hunting Gorillas and Volcanoes in Kivu." 

Mr. Carl E. Akeley, American Museum of Natural 
History, New York. 
June 1 — "Where the Dinosaur Hid its Eggs." 

Mr. Roy Chapman Andrews, leader of the Third 
Asiatic Expedition, American Museum of Natural 
History, New York. 
December 20— "The Tomb of Tut-ankh-Amen." 

M. Jean Capart, Director, Royal Cinquantenaire 
Museums, Brussels, Belgium. 

Entertainments for Children. — Moving picture entertainments 
for children were given in the James Simpson Theatre on Saturday morn- 
ings during the Spring and Autumn months. The interest manifested in 
these pictures is indicated by the total attendance of 34,327 children. 
Beginning at 9 130 o'clock in the morning, the pictures were shown con- 
tinuously until 12:30 P.M. In connection with the Autumn course, 
twelve "Museum Stories for Children" were prepared and issued by the 
Museum. These stories were distributed to the children, one at each 
entertainment. Their three-fold purpose was, to supplement the films 
in the matter of information, to direct the children to Museum exhibits 
related to the subject of the films, and to provide the children with a 
souvenir of their visit to the Institution. 

The programs for the courses, including one special lecture, were as 
follows : 

March 1 — "Hunting Big Game in Africa." First five reels. 

March 8 — "Hunting Big Game in Africa." Last four reels. 

"Time— What It Really Is." 
March 15— "The Ant." 

'Birds of Prey." 
'Animal Camouflage." 
"Wild Animals and Their Young." 
"Earth and Moon." Part I. 

March 22 — "Wonders of the Sea." 

"Earth and Moon." Part II. 



"1 



April 



October 



5— 



April 


12 


April 


19 


April 


26 


May 


3 



280 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

March 29 — "First Families of America" (Hopi Indians). 
"Wild Life Studies: North America." 
"Forest Giants." 
"Nature's Craftsmen." 

"The Bee." 

"Our Four-footed Pals." 

"From Cocoon to Kimono" (The Silk Worm). 

"The American Fishhawk." 

"The Story of the Seasons— Why They Change." 

"The Great White North." 
"Aquatic Life." 

"Our Animals— How They Help Us." 

"The Spider." 

"The Microscope and Beyond." 

"The Cruise of the Spee jacks Around the World." 

Special Lecture : "Maoriland." 

Leila M. Blomfield, New Zealand. 

A Lecture: "Wild Animals I Have Known." 

Mr. Ernest Thompson Seton. 
*"Animal and Bird Life." 
"Bre'r Rabbit and His Pals." 
"White-tailed Deer." 

"Captain Kleinschmidt's Polar Adventure." 

"Children Here, There and Everywhere." 
"All Sorts of Jellyfish." 
"Some Well-known Snakes." 
"Hawks and Buzzards." 
"Sloths and Marmots." 

"Baby Songbirds at Mealtime." 
"Why Elephants Leave Home." 
"Pond Life." 
"Insects that Mimic." 

"Trailing African Wild Animals." 

"Along the Moonbeam Trail" (Prehistoric Animals). 
"Ant Lion." 
"Navaho Indians." 
"In a Drop of Water." 

"Birds of Passage." 

"Yosemite, the Valley of Enchantment." 



October 11- 
October 1 8- 



October 25- 



November 1- 
November 8- 



November 15 — 



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Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 281 

November 22 — "Lady Bird." 

"Lizards from Everywhere." 

"Hummingbirds and Eagles." 

"Butterfly." 

"How Plants are Born, Live and Die." 

November 29 — "The First Americans" (Plains and Hopi Indians). 

"Our Four-footed Helpers." 

"Odd Members of the Crab Family." 

"Parrots and Cuckoos." 

"Plants with Nerves and Stomachs." 
December 6 — "Columbus." 

December 13 — "Sea Worms and Sea Urchins." 

"Toad Traits." 

"All About Carrier Pigeons." 

"A Visit to the New York Zoo." 

"Finest on Four Feet" (Dogs). 
December 20 — "Nanook of the North." 

• Grateful acknowledgement is made to Doctor Thomas W. Roberts, Director of the Zoologi- 
cal Museum of the University of Minnesota, for the loan of moving pictures marked with an asterisk. 



PUBLICATIONS 

A new series of publications was inaugurated during the year, which 
is designated as the Design Series. It is intended to render accessible 
in convenient form the artistic designs of primitive and oriental peoples 
from the rich stores in the Museum collections. The series is especially 
planned for the needs of teachers and pupils of public, high, technical 
and art schools, but should also appeal to professional designers, crafts- 
men, manufacturers, and students of art. The series demonstrates also 
that the Museum is able to render service to the industrial arts. In the 
regular publication series eight numbers were issued, most of the num- 
bers being of the Zoological Series. In the new Design Series two num- 
bers were issued and seventeen numbers were added to the general 
leaflet series. 

Following is a list of the publications and leaflets issued during the 
year: 

Pub. 216 — Anthropological Series, Vol. XVI. Japanese Sword-Mounts. 
By Helen C. Gunsaulus. December, 1923. 196 pages. 61 
photogravures. Edition 1,065. 



282 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

Pub. 2 1 7 — Report Series, Vol. VI, No. 3. Annual Report of the Director 
for the year 1923. January, 1924. 99 pages. 16 photo- 
gravures, 1 zinc etching. Edition 3,000. 

Pub. 218 — Zoological Series, Vol. XII, No. 4. New Birds from Central 
Peru. By John T. Zimmer. April, 1924. 20 pages. Edition 

993- 
Pub. 219 — Zoological Series, Vol. XII, No. 5. New Birds from Chile. 
By C. E. Hellmayr. April, 1924. 8 pages. Edition 1,109. 

Pub. 220 — Zoological Series, Vol. XII, No. 6. Notes on Central 
American Crocodile. By Karl P. Schmidt. May, 1924. 16 
pages. 5 halftones. Edition 1,050. 

Pub. 221 — Zoological Series, Vol. XII, No. 7. New Salamanders of the 
Genus CEdipus with a Synoptical Key. By E. R. Dunn. 
May, 1924. 8 pages. Edition 1,000. 

Pub. 222 — Zoological Series, Vol. XIV, No. 2. Revision of Living 
Caenolestids with Description of a New Genus from Chile. 
By W. H. Osgood. October 20, 1925. 10 pages. 1 zinc 
etching. Edition 1,100. 

Pub. 223 — Zoological Series, Vol. XIII, Part III. Catalogue of Birds of 
the Americas. By C. B. Cory. Revised and continued by 
C. E. Hellmayr. November 20, 1924. 372 pages. 1 colored 
plate. Edition 1,547. 

DESIGN SERIES 

Anthropology Design Series, No. 1 . Block Prints from India for Textiles. 
By A. B. Lewis. 24 plates, 2 of which are in colors, and 2 text- 
figures. Edition 3,076. 

Anthropology Design Series, No. 2. Javanese Batik Design from Metal 
Stamps. By A. B. Lewis. 24 plates, 2 of which are in colors, and 
2 text-figures. Edition 3,050. 

LEAFLETS 

Anthropology, No. 12. Japanese Costume. By Helen C. Gunsaulus. 
4 photogravures. 26 pages. Edition 3,014. 

Anthropology, No. 13. Gods and Heroes of Japan. By Helen C. Gun- 
saulus. 4 photogravures. 24 pages. Edition 3,010. 

Anthropology, No. 14. Japanese Temples and Houses. By Helen 
C. Gunsaulus. 4 photogravures. 20 pages. Edition 3,010. 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 283 

Anthropology, No. 15. Use of Tobacco among North American Indians. 

By Ralph Linton. 6 photogravures. 27 pages. Edition 3060. 
Anthropology, No. 16. Use of Tobacco in Mexico and South America. 

By J. Alden Mason. 6 photogravures. 15 pages. Edition 3035. 

Anthropology, No. 17. Use of Tobacco in New Guinea and Neighboring 
Regions. By Albert B. Lewis. 2 photogravures. 10 pages. Edition 
3030. 

Anthropology, No. 18. Tobacco and Its Use in Asia. By Berthold 
Laufer. 10 photogravures. 39 pages. Edition 2984. 

Anthropology, No. 19. Introduction of Tobacco into Europe. By 
Berthold Laufer. 66 pages. Edition 3031. 

Anthropology, No. 20. The Japanese Sword and Its Decoration. By 
Helen C. Gunsaulus. 4 photogravures. 21 pages. Edition 3037. 

Botany, No. 4. Cacao. By B. E. Dahlgren. 2 photogravures. 3 text- 
figures. 14 pages. Edition 3037. 

Botany, No. 5. A Fossil Flower. By B. E. Dahlgren. 6 halftones. 4 
zinc etchings. 16 pages. Edition 3078. 

Botany, No. 6. The Cannon-Bail Tree. By B.E. Dahlgren. 6 photo- 
gravures. 8 pages. Edition 3050. 

Botany, No. 7. Spring Wild Flowers. By J. Francis Macbride. 2 photo- 
gravures. 28 halftones. 32 pages. Edition 6033. 

Botany No. 8. Spring and Early Summer Wild Flowers. By J. Francis 
Macbride. 2 photogravures. 28 halftones. 30 pages. Edition 6050. 

Botany, No. 9. Summer Wild Flowers. By J. Francis Macbride. 1 
color plate. 2 photogravures. 28 halftones. 30 pages. Edition 6050. 

Botany, No. 10. Autumn Flowers and Fruits. By J. Francis Macbride. 
1 color plate. 2 photogravures. 28 halftones. Edition 6025. 

Zoology, No. 6. The Wild Turkey. By John T. Zimmer. 1 photo- 
gravure. 15 pages. Edition 3055. 

LIBRARY 

There have been accessioned during the year 2,852 books and pam- 
phlets. The aggregate number at the close of the year was 84,555 . Many 
valuable and important books have been added to the Library by gift, 
purchase and exchange. Especially noteworthy has been the acquisition 
of various sets, for a long time among the desiderata of the Library, as 
follows: Report of H. M. S. Challenger Voyage 50 volumes; Transac- 
tions of the Zoological Society of London, 20 volumes; Der Naturforscher, 
10 volumes, 1 774-1 804; Dansk Ornithologisk Tidsskrift, 17 volumes; 



284 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

Mitteilungen des Ornithologischen Vereins in Wien, 20 volumes, 1877- 
190 1 ; Larousse, Grand dictionnaireuniverselle, 20 volumes; and Encyclo- 
paedia Americana, 30 volumes. The number of books purchased has 
exceeded that of recent years, and these very essential aids in their 
work have been greatly appreciated by the members of the staff. 
Among the important books purchased are the following : 

Hamilton, Maori Art. Ceramique Ancienne du Perou. 

Hobson, Art of the Chinese Potter. 

Binyon-Sexton, Japanese Color Prints. 

Durante, Herbario Nuovo, Rome, 1585. 

Knuth, Handbook of Plant Pollination. 

Gloger, Vogel Europas, 1834. 

Temminck, Histoire Naturelle des Pigeons, 1 813-15. 

Briinnich, Ornithologica Borealis, 1764. 

Through the continued generosity and interest of Mr. Edward E. 
Ayer, a number of rare and classic books in ornithology have been 
secured. A total of 473 volumes were added to the Edward E. Ayer 
Ornithological Library. Among those received are finely illustrated 
copies of the following : 

Mme. Knip, Les Pigeons, 2 volumes, 1838, 1843. 

Bonaparte, Iconographie des Pigeons, 1857. 

Thorburn, Game Birds and Wild Fowl of Great Britain, 1923. 

Edwards, Natural History of Birds, 1 743-1 751. 

Hahn, Deutschlands Vogel, 1835. 

Naumann, Naturgeschichte der Vogel Deutschlands, 14 vol- 
umes, 1822-1860. 

Reichenbach, Naturgeschichte der Vogel, 13 volumes, 1834-1863. 

Pennant, British Ornithology, 4th edition, 1776-1777. 

Vieillot, Histoire Naturelle des Plus Beaux Oiseaux Chanteurs, 
1805. 

Dawson, Birds of California, 4 volumes, 1924. 

Audubon, Ornithological Biography, 1831. 

Ruppell, Neue Wirbelthiere, 2 volumes, 1835- 1840. 

Mikan, Delectus Florae et Faunae Brasiliensis, 1820. 

Phillips, Natural History of the Ducks, 1922-1923. 

Mr. Ayer has also enlarged and enriched the ichthyological collection 
by the purchase of 147 volumes, among which are the following rare sets 
in complete volumes : 

Agassiz, Recherches sur les Poissons Fossiles, 10 volumes in 6. 



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Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 285 

Bleeker, Atlas icthyologique des Indes Orientalcs Neerlandaises, 

9 volumes, 1862-1872. 
Bloch, Ichthyologie ou Histoire Naturelle Generale et Parti- 

culierc, 1785-1797. 
Cuvier and Valenciennes, Histoire Naturelle des Poissons, 1828- 

1849. 
Boulenger, Zoology of Egypt: The Fishes of the Nile, 1907. 
Donovan, Natural History of the British Fishes, 1802-1808. 
Goode and Kilbourne, Game Fishes of the United States, 1879. 
Kroyer, Danmark's Fiske, 3 volumes in 4, 1826-1853. 
North, History of Esculent Fishes, 1794. 
Richardson, Zoology of the Voyage of H. M. S. Samarang. Fishes. 

1848. 
Russell, Descriptions and Figures of Two Hundred Fishes, 1803. 
Semon, Zoologische Forschungsreisen in Australien und dem 

Malayischen Archipel, 5 volumes in 7, 1893- 1903. 
Volta, Ittiolitologia Veronese del Museo Bozziano, 3 pts. in 2 

volumes, 1 706-1 809. 

These accumulating gifts, especially of the out of print works, are 
most useful to the present day scientist and they will undoubtedly prove 
of great value to the student and scholar in the years to come. In addi- 
tion to these important gifts, other valuable contributions have been 
received that, aside from their intrinsic value, are especially appreciated 
because of the interest thus evidenced in the welfare of the Museum 
Library. Exchange relations have been reestablished with practically all 
of the institutions on the publication mailing list, and publications have 
been received during the year from seven hundred and twenty-three 
governments, societies and individuals. 

There were written and inserted in the different catalogues 11,710 
cards. The growth of the departmental libraries necessitates the writing 
in duplicate of author cards for all the books sent to these libraries. 
Monthly installments of from four to six hundred cards have been re- 
ceived and filed from the John Crerar Library. 

Early in the year all of the books in the General Library were removed 
from the shelves and thoroughly cleaned. A general rearrangement of 
the books was necessary in order to accommodate current accessions. 
To further insure the preservation of the books in leather bindings ap- 
proximately fourteen thousand volumes were furbished and oiled. This 
work was done by expert bookbinders from the Monastery Bindery. 
There were sent to and returned from the bindery during the year 924 
volumes. 



286 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

The departmental libraries now present an appearance of order and 
system that, because of the exigencies of moving, has taken some time to 
attain. These libraries have been more conveniently located by moving 
them into rooms adjoining the offices of the Curators of the various 
departments. These rooms have all been freshly decorated and furnished 
with new stacks and cases which greatly add to their usefulness and 
appearance. 

DEPARTMENTAL CATALOGUING, INVENTORYING 

AND LABELING 

Anthropology. — In the Department of Anthropology the work of 
cataloguing has been continued as usual, the number of catalogue cards 
prepared during the year totaling 4,306. These cards are distributed 
geographically as follows: North American ethnology 65; South 
American archaeology and ethnology 1,455 '■> Polynesian ethnology 1,282 ; 
Tasmania and Africa 10; Federated Malay States 408; Ancient Egypt 
17; Greece and Miletos, Asia Minor 19; Kish, Mesopotamia 120; China, 
Japan, and Korea 747 ; Burma 1 ; and Edward E. Ayer pewter collection 
181. Of these cards 3,898 have been entered in the inventory books of 
the Department, which number 42. The 2,053 catalogue cards for ac- 
cessions received in 1923 were also entered, bringing the total of cat- 
alogue cards entered to 5,95 1 . The number of accessions received during 
the year amounts to 60, of which 30 have been entered. There were also 
20 accessions from previous years tabulated. The total number of 
catalogue cards entered from the opening of the first volume is 163,889. 
Several thousand labels for exhibition material were prepared and in- 
stalled in the cases, the number of labels supplied by the printer totaling 
3,226. These labels are distributed as follows: China 1,123; Edward E. 
Ayer pewter collection 739; American Indians 679; Kish, Mesopotamia 
307; Classical archaeology 218; Egypt 109; Malaysia 36; Japan 9 and 
miscellaneous 6. The printer supplied the department with 7,000 cat- 
alogue cards, 300 accession envelopes, 423 case numbers, and 526 cards 
for the study collections. There were prepared 450 label cards, which 
were added to the label-file. To the Departmental albums 182 photo- 
graphs were added and three new albums started; one for photographs 
from the Federated Malay States; one for postal cards, and one for the 
prints of lantern-slides. 

Botany. — In the Department of Botany catalogue, 16,761 entries 
were made during the year, and 4,067 carried over from the previous 
year, bringing the total number of catalogued specimens in the depart- 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 287 

ment to 550,076. The entries added to the department index to col- 
lectors number 217, and to the index of geographic localities 53. 

Many labels were prepared during the year and placed in the exhi- 
bition halls. In the herbarium thousands of labels and genus covers 
were provided, particularly for algae, lichens and fungi, in con- 
nection with the Cryptogamic Herbarium, and likewise for economic 
specimens. Of printed labels, 1,608 were received from the Section 
of Printing. 

Geology. — The catalogue entries in the Department of Geology 
during the year number 9,668. The majority of these were of inverte- 
brate fossils of the Borden collection, the cataloguing of this collection 
having been continued. Other series catalogued were a part of the 
specimens collected by the Curator in Brazil and all current accessions. 
Some previously unrecorded specimens found in revising the study col- 
lection were also entered. A total number of 649 labels were written, 
27 of these being descriptive. The descriptive labels related to exhibited 
minerals, phases of physical geology, fossils and some other newly placed 
exhibits, the smaller labels were for minerals, fossils, ores, etc. Sixty labels 
were provided for the maps and atlases filed in cases. Typewritten labels 
numbering several thousand were also prepared and placed with the 
corresponding specimens in the study collection. To the Department 
photograph albums 364 prints were added, making a total of 4,416. 
The additions were chiefly of photographs made by the Curator in 
Brazil. 

Zoology. — Considerable progress has been made during the year by 
the Department of Zoology in the cataloguing of specimens. The total 
number of regular entries made were 3,782 distributed as follows: Mam- 
mals, 1479; Birds, 154; Reptiles and Amphibians, 1,141; Fishes, 994; 
Insects, 14. In addition to these entries in the serial catalogues, there 
were made 2,390 entries in the index catalogue of reptiles and amphibians 
which is now complete for all the identified frogs, salamanders, turtles, 
crocodiles and lizards. A large number of cards were also written for the 
index catalogue of mammals, the number of entries in the different 
catalogues for the year thus reaching a total well over six thousand. 
Labeling specimens was to a large extent coincident with cataloguing 
and nearly all specimens recorded w r ere also labeled, as well as many 
others, especially in the divisions of mammals and of reptiles. Besides 
the skins of mammals labeled, all cleaned skulls were carefully numbered 
and labeled. Photographs and lantern slides to the number of 675 
were labeled and filed in the Department. 



288 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

The following table shows the work performed on catalogues and 
inventories in the various Departments : 

Total No. 

of entries Entries Total No. 

Number of to Dec. during of cards 

Record Books 31, 1924 1924 written 

Department of Anthropology. ... 42 163,889 5,95 1 164,297 

Department of Botany 63 550,076 20,828 8,400 

Department of Geology 26 163,588 9,672 6,822 

Department of Zoology 40 112,453 3,782 37.359 

The Library 14 145,245 11,601 329,627 



ACCESSIONS 

Anthropology. — The accessions received during the year by the 
Department of Anthropology amount to 60; of these, 50 are by gift, 3 
by exchange, 2 by purchase, 4 as the result of Museum expeditions, and 
1 representing loan material returned from Hull House. The most im- 
portant collection coming from an expedition represents the first results 
of the Field Museum-Oxford University Joint Expedition engaged in the 
excavation of Kish, Mesopotamia. The material received this year il- 
lustrates very vividly the life and earliest culture of the ancient Sumer- 
ians who preceded the Semites in the Euphrates Valley. It is particularly 
rich in pottery vessels, consisting of 82 complete jars and 166 sherds with 
stamped and incised designs, which promise to be of great significance 
for the study of primitive decorative art. Flint and other stone imple- 
ments, a stone door-post, a stone mortar with pestle, numerous copper 
tools, weapons, and dishes, bone and iron implements, a silver cup, 
silver bracelets and bosses worn as jewelry, 27 cylinder seals with en- 
graved designs, 14 necklaces of lapis lazuli, rock-crystal, agate and 
carnelian beads, 40 clay figures representing mythological subjects and 
animals, four large stamped bricks, and nine tablets and cones covered 
with cuneiform inscriptions are other prominent features of the collec- 
tion. One of the stamped bricks comes down from the twenty-first 
century B.C. and contains an inscription of Samsu-iluna, "king of 
Babylon and Kish, king of the four regions," who records his restoration 
of the stage-tower of Kish for the god Ilbaba and the goddess Ishtar. 
Reproductions of a stylus for writing, said to be the only writing instru- 
ment ever discovered in Babylonia, and of a pictographic stone tablet, 
both believed to date ca. 4,600 B.C., were sent by Prof. S. Langdon 
of Oxford. The total number of specimens received to date from this 
expedition amounts to 634. The last installment of the collections made 
in Colombia by former Assistant Curator Mason, under the auspices of 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 289 

Captain Marshall Field, and accessioned last year was received in March 
in 32 cases. The material includes a great number of large pottery vases 
and stone implements. A stone axe, a slate celt, and a projectile point 
coming from Chile were received from the Captain Marshall Field 
Zoological Expedition to Chile and Argentina. A human skull and five 
flint implements associated with it were found in the Territory of Santa 
Cruz, Argentina, by the Captain Marshall Field Palaeontological Ex- 
pedition to Argentina. 

A very important acquisition of the year is represented by the well- 
known New Zealand collection of Captain T. E. Donne, presented by 
Mr. Arthur B. Jones. It includes prominent examples of Maori feather 
and flax robes, wood carvings, ornaments and weapons, and an unusually 
complete series of stone implements. Many of the objects are of types 
no longer obtainable in New Zealand. The collection is especially rich 
in jade, there being no less than 563 ornaments and implements of this 
stone. These include practically all the known forms of Maori jade work, 
together with unfinished artifacts and the tools used in their manufac- 
ture. This accession, together with the collections formerly acquired by 
the Museum, places the institution in the foremost rank as to Maori 
collections in the United States. A large Maori adze of unusually fine 
green jade was purchased from Mrs. J. F. Hoffman. A carved gable 
ornament from a Maori house was received through exchange with 
Mr. W. C. Chandler. It is a rare old piece carved with stone tools. A 
fine old Hawaiian food bowl is the gift of Mrs. E. D. Hulbert. It is of 
the type used for eating pot, a gruel made from pounded taro. It was 
highly valued by its native owners, and has been skillfully repaired in 
several places with wooden patches, inset and polished down smoothly 
in the interior and exterior. 

Mr. Edward E. Ayer continued his efforts to make his collection of 
pewter as representative as possible, with the result that 115 objects 
were added to his already substantial gift of 324 specimens of pewters 
during the preceding year. These 115 objects were received in sixteen 
separate lots, covering a period from January 18th to December 10th. 
This indication of Mr. Ayer's unremitting enthusiasm in assembling 
such numerous and excellent examples from many parts of the world is 
gratefully acknowledged. England and Germany are represented with 
42 specimens in these new accessions, China with 66, Japan with 7. To 
these a pitcher from Strasbourg, Alsace, was added by Mrs. Edward E. 
Ayer. From an archaeological viewpoint the most interesting acquisition 
is a Chinese pewter tablet of rectangular shape found in a grave of Ho 
nan Province and covered with a lengthy inscription in incised char- 



290 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

acters, which yields the date a.d. 85 in the Han dynasty. An analysis 
made by Mr. H. W. Nichols reveals the fact that the alloy is composed 
of tin 19.2 per cent, lead 78.5 per cent, and zinc 1.5 per cent, and thus 
represents a real pewter. It was heretofore not known that pewter was 
manufactured in China at so early a date. This tablet may therefore 
claim the honor of being the oldest pewter object extant. The inscrip- 
tion engraved in the surface represents a deed or grant of land for the 
burial-place of the Governor of Tung-kiin, a great scholar, who was 
highly esteemed by his contemporaries and who died in a.d. 84. The 
new acquisitions comprise fine tea-caddies made by Yazaemon of Kyoto 
in the eighteenth century and a number of Chinese boxes, trays, and jars 
inlaid with designs, scenes, and figures in brass. These are all of a high 
degree of workmanship and of great artistic merit, and date in the Ming 
period (fifteenth and sixteenth centuries). The Edward E. Ayer collec- 
tion of Pewter has now grown to such proportions, that the development 
of Chinese pewter productions through five centuries can be clearly 
traced and studied to great advantage. 

A very interesting collection of Chinese gourds, pottery vessels and 
accessories for keeping singing and fighting insects was received from 
Mr. Robert E. Stevenson of Peking, China. Through an arrangement 
made by Mr. Edward E. Ayer, who acquired the collection of Chinese 
pewter made by the Blackstone Expedition in 19 10 for his pewter room, 
this new accession has been credited to the Blackstone Collections. A 
similar collection, relating to insects, was obtained by the Curator in 
China in 1923 ; it is now appropriately supplemented by this new acquisi- 
tion, which includes many ancient pieces of the eighteenth century and 
many carved gourds with elaborate covers of ivory and jade, all coming 
from the possession of old families. These two lots combined present a 
perfectly unique collection, such as does not exist elsewhere. They il- 
lustrate the sentimental qualities of the Chinese, their fondness of the 
insect musicians with studied methods of rearing and keeping them, and 
their keen interest in this harmless sport. A cricket-fight, especially one 
in which renowned champions take part, arouses great excitement and 
wagering, and stirs up as strong emotions among Chinese as a prize-fight 
in America. Mr. Stevenson presented to the Museum an ivory insect- 
cage, a gourd with ivory cover, an ivory box, and a glazed jar. 

A large embroidered cover of white silk made at Canton, China, in 
the beginning of the nineteenth century, was presented by Mrs. Fred- 
erick F. Bullen of Chicago. The embroidery, of white silk also, presents 
an elaborate composition of floral, animal, and bird designs, lions playing 
ball, kiosks, pavilions, and pagodas. A miscellaneous collection of small 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 291 

objects presented by Mrs. L. M. Kneeland, Chicago, includes two in- 
teresting Chinese fans of carved and painted ivory brought to this 
country by a sea-captain in 1800. A fine old brass image of a standing 
Buddha in the attitude of preaching, from Mandalay, Burma, is the 
gift of Mr. F. A. Hardy of Evanston, Illinois. It is a solid cast and a 
statue of unusually good quality. 

A notable addition was made to the Frank W. Gunsaulus Hall by 
Mrs. Koshichi Tsukamoto of this city, who presented the Institution 
with two completely dressed figures of Japanese women. They were 
made at Kyoto, Japan, under the direction of Mr. N. Sudzuka, whose 
conception of the figures is that of two unmarried sisters ; society girls, 
dressed for the occasion of a garden-party or ready to accompany friends 
on an outing. The figures are skillfully carved from the wood of the kiri 
tree {Paulownia imperialis) , and the faces show the aristocratic type of 
the best Japanese society. The color of the complexion is well reproduced 
by many coatings with gofun, a preparation of chalk mixed with pow- 
dered sea-shells, which yields a fine lustre effect. This is a laborious 
process that requires over a half year's time. The silk material for the 
dresses, of first quality, was especially woven for the occasion. The 
elder sister is clad with an outer garment of Kinsha-crepe decorated 
with colored designs partially woven in and partially embroidered. The 
designs represent a garden with pine and maples in an aristocratic 
residence, as it was popular a century ago in the Tokugawa period. The 
sash, the most prominent feature in a Japanese dress, is made of brocade 
decorated with designs of a white phoenix, chrysanthemums, and fan. 
The younger sister wears a dress of green Kinsha-crepe adorned with 
printed designs of cherry and wistaria, which were popular in the 
Fujiwara period. She carries a parasol of silk gauze painted with floral 
designs, while the elder sister is equipped with a fan and a crepe bag in 
lavender color. 

Miss Adele Barrett of Chicago presented a valuable Japanese suit of 
armor, which is by far the best example of this class now in the Museum 
collections. It evidently belonged to a high officer of the Samurai class. 
The suit is made of separate laminae of lacquered leather laced in green 
and red braid, and tied in place at the back and shoulders by heavy cords 
of red silk. Breastplate, helmet, and shoulder-pieces are decorated with 
painted leather and ornaments of silver and copper gilt. The front of 
the helmet is surmounted by the full figure of a falcon carved from silver. 
The sleeves are of chain-mail, and are provided with gauntlets of solid 
iron pieces fastened together by hinges of butterfly form. The face is 
covered by a mask of iron with a removable nose-piece. A signaling fan, 



292 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

a sword, and a spear complete the outfit. The left tace is inscribed with 
a date ("sixth year of the period Shohei") corresponding to our year 

A.D. 1351. 

A valuable collection of twenty-two old Japanese tobacco-pipes was 
presented by Mr. Homer E. Sargent of Pasadena. As the Museum had 
no pipes from Japan, this collection is especially appreciated. The pipes 
are of bamboo, brass, iron inlaid in silver and gold, and enamel ; they are 
of excellent workmanship and exhibit a great variety of forms and de- 
signs. Mr. Sargent likewise presented a moose shoulder-blade used for 
the moose-call, a bow with seven arrows, and a pair of snow-shoes from 
the Yukon Territory, Canada. A collection of eighty very interesting 
small ivory carvings made by the Eskimo of Labrador, Canada, was 
ptirchased by the Museum. 

Mrs. Joseph Adams presented several valuable miscellaneous objects 
consisting of a Navaho saddle blanket and silver necklace, a pair of silver 
ear-rings and a silver fillet of a Negro woman from Barbados, Trinidad, 
and baskets from China, Samoa, the Sudan, Chile, and Northwest 
Coast. 

A red obsidian spear-head from the Yurok tribe of Humboldt County, 
presented by Mr. Chauncey Keep, is a welcome addition to 
the obsidian blades contributed last year by Mr. Chauncey Keep 
and Mr. Watson F. Blair jointly, and illustrated in the Annual Report 
for the year 1923. Mr. L. Winternitz presented a garment of the 
Seminole Indians of Florida and four dolls showing the modes of 
dressing of the same tribe. 

A small American Indian collection was obtained through exchange 
with Mr. M. C. Chandler. It includes Iroquois garments and implements 
of types not previously represented in the Museum, and a number of 
objects from the Fox of Iowa. There are some fine examples of old bead 
and ribbon work, woven bags, and a feather necklace worn only by 
famous warriors. The complete paraphernalia of a Tlingit shaman, 
consisting of a bear-skin cloak, rattles, head-dresses, necklaces, and 
charms, was received through exchange with Lieutenant G. T. Emmons. 
The Museum has few ceremonial objects from this tribe, and the sha- 
man's outfit forms an important addition. A large Chilkat blanket, in 
perfect condition and differing in design from those in the possession 
of the Museum, was presented by Mrs. James W. Scott. A Comanche 
woman's costume of white-beaded buckskin was secured through 
exchange with A. Skinner. It is a novel type hitherto unrepresented 
in the collections. 



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Jan., 1925 Axxual Report of the Director 293 

Botany. — The largest accessions in the Department of Botany dur- 
ing the year were the Zenker, Kamerun, collection by purchase from 
Museum d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris, containing, approximately, 5,000 
specimens, and a collection of 4,000 Philippine plants from A. D. E. 
Elmer, Manila. Other collections acquired by purchase were 839 Peru- 
vian plants from Dr. A. Weberbauer of Lima; a collection of 539 
specimens from Santa Cruz, Bolivia, from Jose Steinbach; 548 plants of 
British Guiana from Dr. H. A. Gleason of New York Botanical Garden; 
302 specimens from Santa Cruz, collected by Dr. E. Werdermann of 
Santiago de Chile; 375 numbers from W. E. Broadway of Port of Spain, 
Trinidad; 206 Mexican plants from T. S. Brandegee, University of 
California; 360 of various European collectors from Theo. Weigel, and 
100 specimens from the Canaries from O. Burchard, Teneriffe. A gift 
of 150 herbarium specimens was received from Prof. E. B. Pay son, 
Laramie, Wyoming; 58 from Prof. S. J. Record of the Yale School of 
Forestry; 30 from Dr. C. R. Ball, Washington; 4 from Dr. J. N. Rose, 
Washington, and 12 from Dr. E. E. Sherff, Chicago. 

By exchange there were received during the year from the Gray 
Herbarium 587; the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, England, 335; and 
from the United States Department of Agriculture 1 ,634, making a total 
of 2,556 numbers. There were received 500 herbarium specimens from 
the Captain Marshall Field Paleontological Expedition in Patagonia 
collected by E. S. Riggs. The collections made by A. C. Persaud in 
British Guiana are also credited to a Captain Marshall Field Museum 
Expedition. Of the 772 specimens 87 are pieces of tropical woods of 
great value, being accompanied in each case by abundant herbarium 
material collected at the same time and from the identical tree yielding 
the wood. From Brazil 16 economic specimens, collected by Dr. O. C. 
Farrington on the Captain Marshall Field 1924 Brazilian Expedition, 
were received. The department sent out in exchange 2,266 herbarium 
specimens during the past year. Loans made to other herbaria number 
42, involving 4,349 specimens, while 1,202 herbarium sheaths were 
borrowed from 13 other institutions for study in the Museum. 

Geology. — The Department of Geology is indebted to Hon. Stephen 
T. Mather and Messrs. Ford and Byron Harvey for the gift of two 
valuable stone slabs showing fossil tracks. These slabs, having a total 
area of ten square feet, show well-preserved tracks of some amphibians of 
the Carboniferous period. They were collected on the Hermit Trail at 
Grand Canyon, Arizona. They are of interest, not only for their degree 
of preservation, but for their record of early amphibian life. It is a 



294 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

pleasure to acknowledge the kind offices of Mr. Edward E. Ayer in 
connection with this gift. By gift from Mr. William J. Chalmers 
twenty-eight specimens of crystallized minerals were added to his 
previous generous contributions to the collection of crystals. Especially 
worthy of mention are two fine specimens of the rare and beautiful 
mineral, dioptase. A cut Persian turquois of remarkable size, weighing 
234.7 carats, was presented by Mr. H. H. Topakyan. Two teeth of 
especially large size of the fossil mammoth found in Snake River, Idaho, 
were presented by Mr. H. S. Burroughs. The Indiana Limestone 
Quarrymen's Association presented a full series, numbering twenty-one 
specimens, of the varieties of Indiana limestone used in building. 
Before presenting the specimens the Association obtained full infor- 
mation from the Museum as to the size and finish desired, and prepared 
the exhibit in accordance with these specifications. Three specimens 
showing the interesting phenomena of stylolites were also presented by 
this Association. Several new varieties of candles and of oils presented by 
the Standard Oil Company (Indiana) make a desirable addition to the 
representation of petroleum products. A number of specimens of a new 
occurrence of axinite and some other minerals were collected by 
Associate Curator Nichols while on a trip to the Porcupine gold 
mining region, Canada, and a total number of nine specimens of telluride 
gold ores from the same region were presented by the Lake Shore Mines, 
Ltd. and the Wright-Hargreaves Mines, Ltd. 

By exchange with the U. S. National Museum a full-sized section of 
the Four Corners meteorite, and a cast of the same, were acquired, and 
by exchange with Henry E. Lee, 20 specimens of fossil plants of Lower 
Cretaceous age from South Dakota. 

The most important accession by purchase was that of three skeletons 
of duck-billed dinosaurs. These are forms which have not hitherto been 
represented in the Museum and come from a new faunal horizon, that of 
the Kirtland shales of Upper Cretaceous age in New Mexico. The 
skeletons are nearly complete and will provide good mounts. One skull 
is remarkable for its size, being four feet in length. A series of six casts 
representing restorations of fossil horses, obtained by purchase, aids 
in interpreting the relations of the incomplete specimens of these horses 
now on exhibition. To the meteorite collection an entire stone meteorite 
of a recent fall from Kansas weighing eleven pounds, was added by 
purchase, as well as an individual of the Ness City, Kansas, fall weighing 
three pounds. 

From the Capt. Marshall Field Paleontological Expedition to Argen- 
tina there were received during the year 82 boxes and 12 barrels of 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 295 

specimens collected by the Expedition. The shipments included archeo- 
logical, botanical and zoological specimens which were unpacked and 
distributed to the corresponding departments of the Museum. The 
remaining specimens for the most part have been retained in their 
original packages, and are being unpacked only as they are needed for 
preparation for exhibition. 

Zoology. — The total accessions in the Department of Zoology num- 
ber 10,414, the larger part being the result of gifts and purchases rather 
than expeditions, since no shipments arrived from the principal expedi- 
tion in the field during the year. The specimens accessioned comprise 
the following: Mammals, 571 ; birds, 3,155 ; eggs and nests, 165 ; reptiles 
and amphibians, 1,682 ; fishes, 955 ; insects, 3,876. Of the 218 mammals 
purchased, 104 were from central Europe, 62 from West Africa, and the 
remainder from South America. 

The most extensive gift received by the Division of Birds consisted 
of 880 birdskins, 43 sets of eggs and 30 nests, presented by Mr. J. 
Grafton Parker of Chicago. The collection was assembled from 1885 to 
1895 or 1897, mostly in Illinois, Indiana and Wisconsin, with some 
material from Texas, California, and scattered localities elsewhere. 
Many of the Illinois birds were taken in localities that now form solidly 
built sections of the city of Chicago. Besides those which thus have a 
historical interest, there are a number of local rarities and other desirable 
specimens, including two examples of the extinct Passenger Pigeon. 
Another gift of local interest is that of a nest and egg of the Passenger 
Pigeon, presented by Judge R. Magoon Barnes, one of the very few nests 
of this bird that are known to be preserved. 

Important purchases of birds include a collection of 390 specimens 
from northeastern Brazil, in which there is much material new to the 
Museum and some forms probably undescribed in ornithological litera- 
ture. Among the especially desirable species are Avocettula recurvirostris, 
Todirosirum illigeri, T. schulzi and Pachysylvia rubrifrons. A further 
purchase of 297 European birds was made, supplementing the larger 
collection obtained from the same region in 1923. Small lots of birds 
were received from various sources and, taken all together, the new bird 
material for the year represents a wide range of territory including the 
following countries: Australia, New Guinea, Japan, Korea, India, 
Ceylon, Formosa, Turkestan, Loo Choo Islands, Germany, Portuguese 
Guinea, Uganda, Cape Colony, West Indies, Costa Rica, Panama, 
Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Chile, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, 
British Guiana, Venezuela, Canada, and various parts of the United 
States. 



296 Field Museum of Natural History— Reports, Vol. VI. 

In the Division of Reptiles, important gifts were 115 living reptiles, 
together with vivaria and aquaria, from the Davis Dry Goods Company 
of Chicago; 150 specimens from Panama, presented by Dr. W. C. Allee 
of the University of Chicago; 3 salamanders from Robert B. Ekvall of 
Kansu, China; 78 salamanders from E. B. Steen and B. B. Crane of 
"Wabash College ; and two paratypes of a Santo Domingan tree frog from 
the American Aluseum of Natural History. 

Although no expeditions especially seeking reptiles were in the field, 
considerable accessions of this group of animals were received from ex- 
peditions having other things as their primary object. The Captain 
Marshall Field Expedition to Chile contributed 491 specimens, the 
Captain Marshall Field Geological Expedition to Brazil and Argentina 
44 specimens, and the Captain Marshall Field Expedition to Texas 55 
specimens. Chinese reptiles to the number of 158 were accessioned, 
being the first installment of a division of the collections of the Third 
Asiatic Expedition of the American Museum of Natural History. These 
specimens are from collections already made by the Expedition, and are 
being received in partial exchange for the work of Assistant Curator 
Schmidt in preparing a scientific report on them. Therefore, they are 
not necessarily concerned in any division of subsequent collections of 
the Third Asiatic Expedition under the cooperative agreement. 

Accessions of fishes were 955 specimens, not a large number for this 
group of animals, but the proportion that is especially preserved for 
exhibition purposes is unusually large. The Captain Alarshall Field 
Expedition to Texas obtained no less than 121 skins and casts from fresh 
examples, including several species of sharks, rays and other fishes of 
large size. These will make it possible to place in the exhibition series 
excellent examples of several groups of fishes which are not now avail- 
able for exhibition, or are only poorly represented. Many of the casts 
have a high scientific value because the method of casting retains struc- 
tural details in perfect condition for study. Through the courtesy of the 
Booth Fisheries Company, a cast was made of an exceptionally large 
Lake Sturgeon. This will make it possible to compare specimens of about 
equal size of the Lake Sturgeon, which practically loses its bony armor 
with age, and the Atlantic Sturgeon, in which this armor is fully devel- 
oped at all ages. Specimens of fishes were presented by the Davis Dry 
Goods Company, by the Lincoln Park Aquarium and by Dr. W. M. 
McCarty of Des Moines, Iowa. Small but important lots of fishes were ob- 
tained by purchase and exchange from New Jersey, Maryland and Florida. 

Of the 3,876 insects accessioned, two-thirds consisted of exotic spe- 
cies. The largest and most noteworthy acquisition was a purchase of 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 297 

2,160 insects of various orders from British New Guinea, the majority 
of them belonging to species new to the collections. Of special interest 
were several specimens of the largest known katydid, an insect five 
inches in length and having a wing expanse of nine inches. A welcome 
gift of 226 butterflies from Belgian Congo was received from Maj. A. M. 
Collins of Philadelphia. From the United States and Canada, gifts of 
insects included 135 butterflies and moths from Dr. C. E. Hellmayr, 
175 miscellaneous insects from Mr. A. B. Wolcott, and 45 especially 
desirable and rather rare butterflies and moths from Dr. William Barnes 
of Decatur, Illinois. 

EXPEDITIONS 

Anthropology. — The operations of the Field Museum-Oxford Uni- 
versity Joint Expedition to Kish, Mesopotamia, have been continued 
this year, apparently with good results. The expedition has been at 
work this season since October 8th, and has made progress with the 
fine Sumerian palace and the tablet hill. The discovery of more frag- 
ments of the fine inlay work found last year is reported by Ernest 
Mackay, field director and excavator, and some tablets have been re- 
covered from Mound "W." 

Botany. — While in Florida during the year, Dr. B. E. Dahlgren 
visited the Ten Thousand Islands region on the lower west coast of the 
peninsula. Through the generosity of the Florida West Coast Railway 
and Navigation Company, which placed a tug at his disposal, he was 
able to visit Cape Sable and the Big Mangrove at the mouth of Shark 
River. Some subsequent collecting in the Florida Keys yielded a 
number of interesting items for the Hah of Plant Life. 

During five months of the year the Museum's collector in Guiana 
continued the collection of woody plants, particularly forest trees. His 
wood-specimens associated with accompanying herbarium material will 
make it possible to study and to assign a definite botanical status to 
many species of tropical woods hitherto known only by vernacular names. 

Geology. — Field work of the Department of Geology has been con- 
fined during the year to that carried on by the Captain Marshall Field 
Expedition for Vertebrate Paleontology. The work of this Expedition 
has been throughout the year in Argentina and Bolivia. 

In the early part of the year, studies of and collections in the geo- 
logical formation known as the Deseado were carried on by the Expe- 
dition. Having finished with the locality of Coluhe Huapi, mentioned 
in last year's report, scouting parties were pushed northward to Rio 



298 Field Museum op Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

Chubut and northwestward through the San Bernardo range to the 
River Senguer, in quest of new collecting grounds. 

Various small and isolated deposits of fossil mammals were discov- 
ered. Some weeks were spent in exploring the San Bernardo Hills, 
where dinosaurs of Cretaceous age were found in three localities. Out 
of deference to the Museo de La Plata, which was carrying on research 
in the dinosaurs of Argentina, no collections of these fossils had hitherto 
been made. To preserve a record of this new field, a few representa- 
tive specimens of Cretaceous dinosaurs were here collected. A repre- 
sentative of the Museo de La Plata visited the Expedition and was 
allowed to make studies of these specimens and of the formation in 
which they were found. 

The collections were brought together at Colonia Sarmiento and 
then packed and forwarded to the Port of Commodoro Rivadavia. The 
heavier equipment was also forwarded to that port and preparations 
made to move southward to better known collecting grounds. Some 
reconnoissance was made in the vicinity of Los Heras, Santa Cruz, after 
which the party proceeded to the coastwise exposures south of the Gulf 
of St. George. At Punta Casamayor some collections were made of the 
earliest known fossil mammals of South America. The classic locality 
of Punta Nava was also visited, after which the party proceeded to 
the richer fossil beds at La Fleche, an inland basin south of the Rio 
Deseado. The months of March and April were spent in making col- 
lections from these localities. 

New fossil-bearing localities of the Deseado formation were discov- 
ered near Pico Truncado and near Cerro Madre y Higa. A fossil pine 
forest with tree trunks standing and prone, and with fossil pine cones 
and branches associated, was discovered in the Patagonian Beds near 
Cerro Madre y Higa. A valuable collection consisting of more than 
one hundred fossil pine cones and an equal number of specimens of 
associated fossil pine twigs, roots and branches was here made. The 
collections from the widely separated localities in the Territory of Santa 
Cruz were then forwarded to the Port of Deseado and made ready for 
shipment. 

Owing to the approach of the southern winter, it then became neces- 
sary to move northward. Snow and difficult roads were encountered on 
the high pampas of Chubut, but Collectors Sternberg and Abbott 
reached Buenos Aires in time to make connections for their return to 
the Museum. 

After the arrival of Associate Curator Riggs at Buenos Aires, the 
formality of inspecting the collections according to Argentine law, was 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 299 

carried out before a committee of museum directors and curators at 
the National Museum of Buenos Aires. The entire collection was taken 
to the museum, unpacked and the greater part of it unwrapped and 
displayed. Certain specimens were held on the grounds of being new 
to the local collections; others were detained to be studied and dupli- 
cated in plaster, with a promise of being later restored to Field Museum. 
The entire collection was then repacked in 5 1 shipping cases and freed 
for exportation. It was then shipped to the Museum, as were also 
6 packing cases containing Indian skeletons and artifacts, skins and 
skeletons of birds and mammals, bird's eggs, specimens in formalin, 
pressed plants and photographic negatives, all collected or made by the 
Expedition. 

The third and fourth field problems undertaken by the Expedition 
were to find profitable collecting grounds in, and to make collections 
of fossil mammals from, the Pliocene and Pleistocene deposits of Argen- 
tina and Bolivia. In pursuit of this purpose and while awaiting inspec- 
tion of the collections, a trip was made to the city of Parana in company 
with Sr. Alberto Lelong, and a reconnoissance of some thirty miles along 
the banks of the Parana River carried on in quest of profitable 
collecting grounds. Because of rising waters in the river, how- 
ever, it was found that the locality could not be profitably worked 
at that time. 

In order to carry on the work of collecting, it was then found neces- 
sary to move northward to a more favorable climate. Accordingly, 
the Expedition proceeded to Tarija, Bolivia, which was reached near 
the end of July. A promising collecting ground was soon discovered, 
and a party of native laborers under the direction of Sr. Jose Strocco 
was employed. Work was continued until the end of November, when 
the approach of the season of torrential rains made further collecting 
impracticable, but during the period when work could be done a large 
and valuable amount of material was secured. This was packed in 
34 cases, most of which were too heavy to be transported by pack ani- 
mals. The rains having made roads impassable for vehicles, transporta- 
tion of this collection to the railway was deferred until the close of the 
rainy season. 

Preparations for resuming collecting in the vicinity of Bahia Blanca, 
Argentina, were then made. The equipment was shipped to that point, 
the motor cars were made ready for service and all was placed in stor- 
age to await resumption of the work of the Expedition. 

The results attained by the Expedition during the year may be 
summarized as follows : From the Cretaceous formations, 3 specimens 



300 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

of dinosaurs; from the Deseado formations, 229 specimens of fos- 
sil mammals, 4 of fossil birds, 3 of fossil fish, and 3 of fossil plant 
impressions ; from the Patagonian Beds, 430 specimens of fossil shells, 
and 246 of fossil pine cones, branches and roots; from the Pliocene 
formations, 114 specimens of fossil shells, and from the Pleistocene for- 
mations, 121 specimens of fossil mammals and one of fossil birds. The 
majority of all these specimens are entirely new to the Museum col- 
lections. Twenty lithological and mineral specimens were collected, as 
were also 19 archeological specimens, including celts, potsherds and 
other artifacts, 50 pressed plants, 14 lizards in formalin and 3 skulls of 
modern mammals. One hundred and eighty photographic negatives 
and 1 1 five-meter cinema films were made. 

Other results attained consist of field notes, geological sections and 
maps, and many data bearing on fossil-bearing localities, which will be 
of value in guiding future work. 

Zoology. — The zoological expedition to Central Africa, which was 
despatched late in 1923, remained in the field throughout 1924 and, with 
some changes in the personnel, is continuing into 1925. This expedi- 
tion, which was organized under the joint auspices of Captain Marshall 
Field and Major A. M. Collins, was conducted at first by Maj. Collins 
and Assistant Curator Heller of the Museum staff, with the assistance 
of Mr. T. A. Barns. On July 10, Mr. Barns severed his connection with 
the expedition and, about two months later, Maj. Collins started on 
his return to the United States, leaving Mr. Heller still in the field where 
he was joined late in the year by his wife, Hilda Hempl Heller, who 
will assist him in continued work in 1925. 

During 1924, the party worked, principally, in the eastern part of 
Belgian Congo in or near the great rain forest of central Africa. They 
arrived at the port of Dar es Salaam January 3, and went inland by 
rail to Kigoma on Lake Tanganika and thence to Usumburu. Here they 
employed a short time in a trip to the edge of the forest to the north- 
east and obtained a small number of interesting animals, including sev- 
eral species of monkeys, a white forest hog and a yellow-backed duiker- 
buck. Thence they went to Lake Kivu and in mountains northeast 
of Kissenyi obtained their first specimen of the Chimpanzee. From 
Kissenyi, they organized a safari and traveled westward down into the 
heart of the Congo forest in quest of great apes, especially Gorillas. 
Three days' march beyond the village of Walikali and a very long dis- 
tance from the preserve established by the Belgian government, they 
found Gorillas and obtained two specimens, this being the limit per- 









£ 

v 



s* 







FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE Llll. 








QUEEN CRAPEMYRTLE (Lagerstroemia speciosa). 

A REPRODUCTION OF A FLOWERING AND FRUITING BRANCH 

IN THE HALL OF PLANT LIFE. 

(STANLEY FIELD LABORATORY). 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 301 

mitted by the Belgian authorities. One of the specimens was a very- 
large old male weighing 350 pounds and having an arm spread of over 
90 inches, one of the largest Gorillas ever recorded. In the same region 
a number of Chimpanzees, various species of smaller monkeys and other 
rare animals were obtained. Returning from Walikali to the mission 
of Katana on Lake Kivu, the expedition passed through country inhab- 
ited by hostile tribes and suffered the loss of three of its native bearers 
who were murdered in cold blood. 

After some weeks spent in Kissenyi, the party proceeded via Ama- 
kona and Beni to Irumu in the district of Ituri. Here Maj. Collins 
had some successful elephant hunting, and Mr. Heller devoted himself 
to general collecting until the arrival of Mrs. Heller late in the year. 
Among interesting specimens obtained in this region were several of 
the small red forest buffalo. At the end of the year a large consignment 
of specimens had been despatched to America but at this writing have 
not reached the Museum. 

The Captain Marshall Field Chilean Expedition continued to have 
one representative, Mr. C. C. Sanborn, in the field until August, 1924. 
After working in the north under favorable climatic conditions, he 
returned to south central Chile in order to make trips into the Andes 
which had previously been impractical on account of heavy snow in 
the passes. Two and a half months were spent in crossing the Andes 
via the Longimani Valley and over the border into Argentina. Much 
valuable material was secured here, and Mr. Sanborn then returned to 
the northern provinces, visiting Caldera and Gatico on the coast and then 
going inland to high altitudes east of Antofogasta. Further work was done 
at Pica in the Province of Tarapaca and at Arica, the northernmost 
port of Chile. Work was then concluded with several weeks spent in 
high mountains on the Bolivian border inland from Arica. The total 
Chilean collections of this expedition, all of which have now been 
received at the Museum, amount to 1,105 mammals, 1,437 birds, 
1,300 reptiles and amphibians and, in addition, various insects, fossils 
and anthropological material. Since very little well-organized work 
had been done previously in Chile, this is doubtless the best collection 
of Chilean vertebrates in existence. It has not yet been carefully 
studied, but among outstanding novelties four new species of birds 
and a new genus of mammals have been described in the publications 
of the Museum. 

An expedition of two months duration was made during the summer 
to the Gulf of Mexico on the coast of southern Texas, the particular 
object being subtropical fishes, especially sharks and rays, for exhibi- 



302 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

tion purposes. This was conducted by Assistant Curator Weed and 
Taxidermist Pray who cooperated in selecting suitable material, in 
taking color notes, measurements, and miscellaneous data for subse- 
quent use in the preparation of the specimens for exhibition. The 
larger fishes were mostly cast in plaster from freshly caught examples, 
thus preserving the most minute details of their form and structure. 
No less than 121 plaster casts and dried skins of fishes, mostly of large 
size, were secured. Included were twenty casts of sharks of various 
sizes and representing at least six species. There were also casts of 10 
rays belonging to the species known as Cow-nosed Rays, Leopard Rays 
and Butterfly Rays. In addition to the fishes, the expedition brought 
back 20 mammals, 93 birds, 55 reptiles and about 850 insects. 

Besides the foregoing regular expeditions under the auspices of 
Captain Marshall Field, a semi-official zoological expedition of con- 
siderable importance was conducted by Mr. H. B. Conover, Associate 
in Ornithology. In cooperation with Mr. Herbert Brandt of Cleve- 
land, Ohio, and a party from the U. S. Biological Survey, Mr. Conover 
went to central Alaska and, after a winter trip of 800 miles with dog 
sleds, reached the Bering Sea coast in the vicinity of Hooper Bay near 
the delta of the Yukon River. Here the early spring and summer 
months were spent in collecting specimens of the many rare species 
of waterfowl which have this remote region as their breeding ground. 
Certain parts of the collection made have been presented to the 
Museum, and the remainder, including many rare species and an 
especially valuable series of nestling and immature-plumaged birds, 
are deposited in Mr. Conover's collection where they are available for 
reference by the Museum staff. 

The following list indicates the various expeditions in the field 
during the year, all of which are partly or entirely under the auspices 
of Captain Marshall Field : 

Locality Collector Material 

Mesopotamia S. H. Langdon and Archaeological Collections 

E. Makay 

Argentina Elmer S. Riggs, Paleontological Collections 

Bolivia J. B. Abbott, and 

G. F. Sternberg 

Chile C. C. Sanborn Mammals, Birds and Reptiles 

Central Africa A. M. Collins Mammals 

Edmund Heller, and 
Hilda H. Heller 

Texas A. C. Weed, and Fishes 

L. L. Pray 

British Guiana A. C. Persaud Tropical Woods 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 303 

INSTALLATION, REARRANGEMENT AND 
PERMANENT IMPROVEMENT 

Anthropology — The activities of the Department of Anthro- 
pology were equally divided during the year between the instal- 
lation of new exhibition material and the arrangement of study, 
exchange and storage collections on the third and fourth floors and 
in the storage-room on the ground floor. A total of sixty newly 
installed cases were placed on exhibition during the year. 

Prompted by the desire to render accessible to the public the results 
of recent expeditions, several notable additions and^Changes have 
been made in Stanley Field Hall. At the south end of this hall were 
placed two standard cases (23 and 24) of brown mahogany. The 
exhibits illustrate state robes and other court ^paraphernalia of the 
extinct Manchu dynasty of China. These articles were secured by 
the Curator during the Captain Marshall Field Expedition to China 
in 1923. One of the cases contains an imperial costume of yellow silk 
tapestry, as worn by the emperors of the Manchu dynasty on cere- 
monial occasions; a sacrificial robe embroidered on yellow silk and 
worn by the emperor during worship or at the performance of sacrifices; 
the state robe of an empress, of yellow silk embroidered with eight 
five-clawed dragons in gold; and the state robe of a Manchu prince, of 
blue satin likewise embroidered with dragons. These four costumes 
come down from the K'ien-lung period (1736-95). In the case on the 
opposite side are displayed the ceremonial robe of an empress, of mid- 
night-blue silk with buttons carved from amber, the dress of a lad}* of 
the Manchu aristocracy, head-dresses of Manchu princesses formed by 
a combination of jade, coral, rose-quartz, pearls, and blue kingfisher 
feathers inlaid in silver, the velvet hat of an empress, satin hats and 
caps of princes, a yellow silk belt with white jade carving worn by the 
emperor, and five silk belts of different colors with jade buckles worn 
by the princes, as well as fans used by palace ladies on ceremonial 
occasions. One of these is a marvel of technical skill, being plaited 
from ivory threads held by a tortoise-shell rim and overlaid with 
colored ivory carvings of lilies, peonies, asters, and butterfly. Another 
court fan is of red silk tapestry in which fungus and orchids are woven 
in colors; it has an ivory handle on which the eight figures of the Im- 
mortals are engraved. String bags from New Guinea were removed 
from Case 16 of Stanley Field Hall and replaced with fabrics and ex- 
amples of metal ware selected from the collections of the Arthur B. 
Jones Expedition to Malaysia, 1923. A royal sarong of red silk bro- 
cade with geometric design in gold threads, worn by the late Sultan 



304 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

Iclris of Perak on the occasion of his last marriage (illustrated in last 
year's Report), and a bridal mat embroidered with floral designs in 
gold threads, on which the bride and groom sit in state during the 
wedding ceremony to receive the congratulations of their friends, 
testify to the accomplishments and skill of the Malayan artisans. 
No less interesting is the process of inlaid silver wire in the belt buckles as 
well as the fine filigree work in the women's ear-studs and breast-orna- 
ments. Jewelry, silver pillow-ends with gold mountings, a fine kris, 
and a betel-nut set are also shown in this case. Case 20 in Stanley 
Field Hall was stripped of American basketry and utilized for the dis- 
play of a selection of antiquities secured by the Field Museum-Oxford 
University Joint Expedition, representing the first results of the 
excavations carried on on the site of Kish, the oldest capital of Meso- 
potamia. The principal exhibits in this case are a series of fine neck- 
laces consisting of lapis-lazuli, rock-crystal, agate, and carnelian beads, 
jewelry in the shape of copper, silver and shell rings as well as silver 
bosses, stone and bone implements, flint saws, copper and iron weapons 
and tools, copper and silver dishes, cylinder seals of shell, hematite, 
and calcite engraved with interesting designs, clay figures and plaques, 
a large inscribed brick recording the restoration of the temple of Ilbaba, 
god of Kish, of the eleventh century B.C., inscribed clay cones and 
tablets, the reproduction of the only stylus for writing ever discovered, 
a series of pottery vessels glazed and unglazed, and pottery sherds 
with stamped and incised designs. 

A Persian embroidered tent made for the Sultan Aga Mohammed 
Shah (1785-97) was loaned by H. H. Topakyan, Vizir of Persia, and 
temporarily exhibited in Stanley Field Hall. 

A feat of technical engineering is represented by the reconstruc- 
tion of the two Mastaba tombs from Egypt in Hall J, which were com- 
pleted and opened to the public in October. They were excavated at 
Sakkara, the necropolis of ancient Memphis. One, the tomb of Unis- 
ankh, of the sixth dynasty (2600 B.C.), was presented by Mr. Martin 
A. Ryerson. The other, the tomb of User-neter, of the fifth dynasty 
(about 2700 B.C.), is a Museum purchase. The blocks of these two 
tombs reached Chicago in May, 1909, in 206 large cases weighing 
96 tons. The work of building up the tombs was placed in charge of 
the Superintendent of Maintenance, who acquitted himself of this 
difficult task with great ingenuity, after patient and careful study of 
the technical problems involved. The more prominent features of the 
work may briefly be placed on record, in the hope that the information 
may prove useful to other institutions confronted with a similar task. 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 305 

The lower courses of the stone slabs, to an average height of one 
meter, were not shipped to Chicago, as they were devoid of carvings, 
and were replaced with pre-cast cement blocks and channel steel frame- 
work. Wherever stones were missing in the upper courses, these were 
also replaced with pre-cast cement blocks. In order to prevent mois- 
ture coming into contact with the original stones, the replacements 
were dried and seasoned before the walls were laid up. In lieu of 
mortar the stones were bedded in lead strips a quarter inch thick, each 
stone being connected with the adjoining stone by dowels both on the 
horizontal and vertical joints and with additional metal clamps on the 
upper side of each course. As it is desirable to have the backs of the 
stones visible and accessible, each block is secured to a bracketed up- 
right steel channel. As there is little uniformity in the sizes of the 
blocks or regularity in the courses, each stone is bracketed and anchored 
with especially devised connections. This was a difficult task, for it 
was essential to avoid cutting away the backs of the stones or changing 
in any way their appearance. The illumination of the interior was 
effected by raising the ceiling 18 inches above the walls and placing 
the lights in a trough back from the face of the wall, so that they are 
not visible from the ground. Large view glasses are provided in such 
a way that visitors can walk into one chamber of each tomb. For a 
more intimate observation on the part of students, doors are provided 
so that it is possible to walk through the chambers. In the rear, the 
two tombs are sealed with a wall set 18 inches away from the stones 
and providing a passage-way completely around both tombs and 
furnishing access to the backs of the stones. The room back of the 
tombs is mechanically ventilated, and the arrangement of the lighting 
overcomes any possible tendency to humidity on either side of the 
stones. 

The following data may also be of interest. The height of both 
tombs to the top of the walls averages 11 feet. The main chamber in 
the tomb of User-neter is 12 feet long and 5 feet, 9 inches wide; the 
ante-chamber is 12 feet in length by 5 feet in width. The main cham- 
ber in the tomb of Unis-ankh is 17 feet long and 6 feet wide, while the 
ante-chamber is 8 feet, 8 inches by 5 feet. The stele in the same tomb 
is a monolith and weighs a little less than 7 tons. The stele in the 
tomb of User-neter is in seven pieces and weighs about 4^2 tons. 

Fifty of the miscellaneous Egyptian tomb-sculptures from Gizeh and 
Memphis, extending from the late third to the twentieth dynasty, 
were framed under glass and placed on the pilasters of the Egyptian 
Hall (J). Most of the sculptures have been provided with labels re- 



306 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

vised in the light of recent research. A reproduction of the famous 
Rosetta stone was likewise added to the exhibits. 

Six cases were installed in Aver Hall by Assistant Curator Owen: 
one of Etruscan wine-jars, one of Etruscan bronzes, two cases of Etrus- 
can cinerary urns; one case of vases from southern Italy, and one of 
Greek bronzes. Re-installations were made in several other exhibi- 
tion cases, and a general rearrangement of the cases in the Hall was 
made. 

Repeated additions made by Mr. Edward E. Ayer to his collection 
of pewter housed in Hall 23 at the north end of the second floor en- 
tailed a complete re-installation of the Ayer Pewter Collection last 
June. It is now arranged in eleven cases as follows: Cases 1-2 contain 
trays, communion and other plates from England, Germany, Holland, 
Austria, and Bohemia. In Cases 3-4 are exhibited lamps, candlesticks, 
flagons, flasks, tea-pots, milk-containers, plates, tureens, mugs, tank- 
ards, and guild-cups of Germany. In Case 5 are displayed examples 
of candlesticks, lamps, jugs, flasks, ewers, tea-pots, milk-pitchers, 
dishes, cups, and plates of England and France. Case 6 is devoted to 
tea-pots, trays, boxes from China, with a few tea-pots from Japan. 
It comprises a remarkable series of tea-pots of all imaginable forms 
with handle, spout and cover-knob of jade; those with body mounted 
on carved coconut-shell and fine bamboo plaiting are also rare pieces. 
Case 7 contains Chinese chafing-dishes, fruit-dishes, finger-bowls, 
wine-cups, and a set of 62 objects constituting the dower of a well-to-do 
Peking bride. Case 8 illustrates Chinese devices of illumination in 
the shape of four candelabra, an excellent series of figures representing 
the Eight Immortals combined with candlesticks, three different 
forms of the Twin Genii of Harmony and Union treated in the same 
manner, and other candlesticks with representations of dragons, stags, 
cranes, and lions. Case 9 is likewise given over to China with a notable 
sacrificial lamp inlaid with designs and figures in brass, of the Ming 
period (about sixteenth century), two figures of a water-buffalo with 
a boy playing a flute astride, several other cast figures, tall ewers 
and tea-pots, and three sets of altar-pieces used in ancestral worship. 
Case 10 contains a baptismal basin made in Germany in 17 17 and 
decorated with an etched design of John the Baptist baptizing Christ 
in the Jordan. In Case 1 1 are on view exceptionally fine tea-canisters 
from Japan (eighteenth century), two from China of the K'ang-hi 
period (1662-172 2), and the Han dynasty pewter tablet described on 
p. 2S9. The installation is now complete, save 18 pieces acquired 
during the last few months. 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 307 

Five cases of new exhibits were added to the Hall of Oriental The- 
atricals (Cases 29-33, Hall I, ground floor). They contain the actors' 
costumes obtained last year by the Curator in Peking. At that time 
Peking actors and actresses posed for him in these costumes before 
the camera, a characteristic scene or posture being selected for each, 
as prompted by the play in question. On the basis of the photographs 
thus secured Chinese students at the University of Chicago were 
picked and, as far as possible, matched for the characters they were 
to impersonate. Casts of their faces and hands were taken by the 
modeler in the department's modeling section. From these casts the 
heads, faces, and hands were modelled, and special attention was 
devoted to a life-like reproduction of the skin color. The figures were 
posed exactly as shown in the photographs, resulting in an accurate 
representation of the original stage-picture. In the previous theatrical 
exhibits it was mainly the religious and mythological drama of the 
Chinese that was emphasized. With the new additions all the prin- 
cipal varieties of stage-plays are shown: civilian, military or historical, 
and dance performances. The new exhibits are also instructive in 
presenting a contribution to the history of costume and permitting 
one to study the styles of the T'ang and Ming dynasties. Thus Yang 
Kwei-fei (Case 33, Hall I), a celebrated court-lady of the eighth century 
appears in a dress peculiar to the T'ang dynasty; and T'siu Hu, the 
hero of the play, "The Meeting in the Mulberry-Garden," is garbed 
in the characteristic apparel of the old-time scholar and official, which 
prevailed under the Ming. Of the numerous historical plays, the 
story of the Three Kingdoms is still the most popular, and in view of 
the fact that the best there is in Chinese character is typified in the 
great figures of the national heroes who form the backbone of that 
historical romance, it seemed appropriate to include them in this 
series of favorite casts. The three brothers-in-arms, Kwan Yii, Liu 
Pei, and Chang Fei, who were bound by a solemn compact to fight 
and die together, are grouped in Case 29, while in the adjoining Case 
30 appear the powerful hero Chu-ko Liang and the knight-errant 
Chao Yiin. In the same case is placed on exhibit the figure of a mili- 
tant heroine in martial dress, carrying four flags on her back as a 
symbol of military rank. Large pheasant feathers adorn her head- 
dress. In striking contrast with these exponents of warlike activity 
stands on the opposite side the mild goddess Ma Ku, engaged in the 
performance of a sacred dance which will initiate her into the mysteries 
of immortal life among the gods of the Taoist paradise. The flowers 
(made of silk) which she carries in a basket over her shoulder are 
emblematic of the blessings she has in store for mankind. 



308 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

Three cases were added to the Chinese collections in Hall 24 (east 
gallery), one of feather and gauze fans, one of writing-materials, and 
one illustrating the use of tobacco and smoking utensils. The exhibit 
of writing-materials includes all the manifold varieties of brushes for 
writing, drawing, and painting, artist's pigments, ink-cakes (ancient and 
modern) adorned with fine engravings, palettes, ink-stones and all 
implements used on the desk with specimens of letter-paper and enve- 
lopes. The imperial letter-paper used by the emperors of the Manchu 
dynasty is a special feature of the exhibit. The contents of the case 
illustrating the use of tobacco in China is fully explained in Leaflet 
18: it contains good series of long-stemmed pipes for dry tobacco, 
water-pipes of all descriptions from Shanghai, Suchow, Hangchow, 
and Canton, opium-pipe and opium-smoker's outfit, a fine series of 
old snuff -bottles, and samples of tobacco-leaves and snuffs. 

Three cases were installed with Chinese baskets and lacquer ware, 
and another with ivory carvings. These will be placed on exhibition 
shortly. The fact that China has also produced artistic basketry and 
that old baskets going back to the eighteenth century are still obtain- 
able, was hitherto unknown. The exhibits include baskets of high 
quality from almost every locality of central and southern China 
where this industry still flourishes. Among the lacquers will be found 
many rare and fine examples of early carved lacquer of the Ming 
period as well as lacquers painted with landscapes or inlaid in mother- 
of-pearl of the K'ang-hi and K'ien-lung periods. 

The two dressed figures of Japanese women presented by Mrs. 
Koshichi Tsukamoto are exhibited in Frank W. Gunsaulus Hall (Case 
10). The remarkable Japanese suit of armor presented by Miss Adele 
Barrett, on account of its dimensions, could not be accommodated in 
a standard case, but it is accessible to students interested in the sub- 
ject. The exhibitions of Surimono were changed four times during 
the year according to plan. 

Thirty-one cases were installed during the year by Assistant Curator 
Linton. Eleven of these, illustrating the ethnology of the Northwest 
Coast and Plateau tribes, have been placed on exhibition in Halls 3 
and 4. Of the remaining twenty cases, fourteen represent the eth- 
nology of Polynesia and six that of Micronesia. They have been placed 
in Hall F on the ground floor, which it is planned will be opened dur- 
ing the coming year as a Hall of Polynesian and Micronesian Eth- 
nology. Most of this material will be exhibited for the first time. 
It is proposed that the western end of the new hall will be occupied 
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Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 309 

It is a large, finely carved structure fourteen feet high and nearly 
sixty feet in length. This part of the hall will also contain a number 
of cases picturing the life and culture of the Maori of New Zealand. 
The southeastern quarter of the hall will be devoted to other parts 
of Polynesia and to Fiji. The northeastern quarter is to contain ex- 
hibits from the various Micronesian groups and from certain small 
islands on the eastern edge of Melanesia which are essentially Micro- 
nesian in culture. 

Two cases were installed by Assistant Curator Lewis, and have 
been added to Joseph N. Field Hall: one illustrates the ethnology of 
the Admiralty Islands, the other shows clothing and ornaments from 
Huon Gulf, New Guinea. 

A series of colored photographs made and loaned by Mr. L. Win- 
ternitz was temporarily exhibited this summer until August 8. They 
illustrated scenery, plant -life, and types of the Seminole Indians of 
Florida. 

A poisoning and storage room for the preservation of perishable 
material was constructed of compressed steel at the south end of the 
fourth floor, and in its essential features was completed toward the 
end of 1923. In the beginning of 1924 it was equipped with storage 
bins, cedar wood being the only lumber employed. The distribution 
of the five rooms from east to west is as follows: Room 1 serves for 
the laying-out and cleaning of specimens. Room 2 contains fabrics, 
costumes, and other perishable material from India, Tibet, China, 
and Korea. Room 3 is set aside for material from California, South- 
west, Mexico, and South America. Room 4 shelters material from the 
Plains Indians and Northwest Coast, and Room 5 collections from the 
South Sea Islands. Formaldehyde candles have been used for pur- 
poses of poisoning with good success, and the entire arrangement and 
equipment of the poisoning room may be characterized as eminently 
satisfactory. It insures with absolute safety the permanent preser- 
vation of destructible material. 

Storage racks were constructed during the year for Rooms 28, 30, 
34, and 36 on the third floor. The distribution of study collections is 
now as follows: Room 28 serves for the accommodation of material 
suitable for exchange, so that those interested in examining what the 
department has to offer in the line of duplicate specimens may have 
ready access to them. Polynesian and Micronesian collections not 
required for exhibition are stored in Room 30, which also contains 
overflow material from Africa and Australia. Room 31 harbors col- 
lections from India. In Rooms 33 and 34 are stored collections from 



310 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

the Northwest Coast. The Philippine collections in Room 36 were 
entirely rearranged by Assistant Curator Linton. Material from 
Sumatra, Borneo and Java formerly in Room 34 was transferred to 
Room 36, where now all Malayan collections are grouped together. 
Rooms 65 and 66 contain collections from China, Tibet, and Korea. 
All this material is properly grouped and classified, and is arranged in 
such a way that it can easily be located and taken out upon demand. 
A large room on the ground floor has been assigned to the department 
for storage purposes. It will ultimately absorb all American archaeologi- 
cal material, as far as not required for exhibition. In view of the fact 
that a hall of North American archaeology is planned on the ground 
floor, it is thought that in this manner the entire archaeological collec- 
tions of this continent will be kept conveniently together. 

A special label-card has been devised for the identification of study 
and storage collections. Each card indicates country, stock and tribe 
with a brief enumeration of the material in question, the room where 
it is located with the number of rack or shelf being given in the upper 
left corner. The size and form of the catalogue-cards (about 3x6 
inches) has been chosen for these labels, and several copies of each 
card are printed. One is attached to the shelf in the storage-rooms, 
the others are kept on file in the Curator's office, and when completed 
will serve as an index and finding list of the study-collections. This 
card-index will be arranged in triple form, according to localities, 
tribes, and material, and will be of assistance in locating any collection 
on which a demand may be made for study. The work performed 
on the storage of collections made heavy demands on the time of the 
staff and the preparators, as numerous exhibition-cases in which they 
were piled up heretofore had to be opened and emptied, and all 
material cleaned, sorted, and identified. The storage of Northwest 
Coast and American archaeological collections was begun, but not 
completed. 

In the Modeling Section the large house and two coconut palms 
for the model of the New Guinea village were completed. Ten casts 
of faces and as many pairs of hands were taken by the modeler from 
Chinese students, modeled and colored for the costumed actors' 
figures from Peking, and now on exhibition in Hall I. The presence of 
a Sioux Indian in the city afforded an opportunity of having casts 
taken of his face and hands. There were 174 specimens repaired. Ma- 
terial in fifty exhibition-cases was poisoned during the year. Twenty 
papier-mache forms for the exhibition of costumes were made and 12,528 
numbers were marked on specimens. 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 311 

Botany. — In the Department of Botany all of the exhibition cases 
were refinished during the year in a dark walnut color, greatly improv- 
ing the appearance of the halls. New installations and reinstallations 
were confined to the Hall of Plant Life, where the backgrounds are 
being changed as fast as possible from black to a light color. Rein- 
stallations are being made by the removal from this hall of a large part 
of the strictly economic material to provide space for the reproductions 
of plants and other exhibits of more distinctly botanical significance. 
Many additions were made to the latter exhibits during the year. Of 
native plants there were added reproductions of Blue Phlox, Trillium 
and the Shooting Star. For the remainder, the various new exhibits 
grew mostly out of the collections of the Stanley Field Guiana Expedi- 
tion of 1922. Among these, the Cannon-Bail Tree was completed early 
enough in the year to be illustrated in the last annual report. The other 
most important additions are a large specimen of a Banyan-like fig tree, 
Ficus Benjamina, and a group of Victoria regia. The former, althoug 
an Indian species, is more or less widely grown in warm countries and 
is plentifully represented in the Georgetown Botanic Gardens, where 
a trunk was secured through the kindness of the Superintendent and 
of the Director of Agriculture of British Guiana. This trunk in its fresh 
condition weighed approximately a ton, but is now dry and light enough 
to be moved easily by two men. Like the banyan and other figs on the 
rubber-plant order, it is remarkable for its masses of pendent aerial roots. 
With leaves and fruits replaced, it should prove to be an object of great 
interest in the hall. 

The Victoria regia group also furnishes a new exhibit of a striking 
character. This famous South American Water-lily forms one of the 
chief attractions of the Georgetown Botanic Gardens, where abundant 
opportunities are afforded for its study. A mould of one of the huge 
leaves in a canal was made by covering the floating leaf with thin coat- 
ings of plaster until it was sufficiently reinforced to allow the entire leaf 
to be lifted from the water without deformation, after which the mould 
was completed on land. It was broken into four pieces for convenience 
of packing and transportation. Reassembled two years later in the 
Museum, it has served for the production of the large leaves in the group. 
Moulds of the flowers were also made where they grew. The final work 
on this group has just been completed. With its large leaves, 
spiny buds and large showy flowers in the various stages of expansion 
characteristic of them on successive days, this gigantic aquatic makes 
a conspicious addition to the collection of plant forms represented in 
the hall. 



312 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

A reproduction of a flowering branch of a Barringtonia, an East 
Indian tree, also from the Georgetown Botanic Gardens, has been made 
and installed with the other exhibits of the Monkey-pot family. 

To represent the flowering structure and other botanical features of 
the Lace-bark Family, a flowering branch of the splendid Lager stroemia 
flos regina "the queen of flowers," has been reproduced. This also was 
prepared from material secured by the Stanley Field Guiana Expedition. 
The Cactus exhibit has been increased by the addition of a flowering 
and fruiting branch of a Pereskia the Barbados Gooseberry, a leafy rep- 
resentative of the Cactus Family, particularly curious on account of its 
leafy fruits. 

A flowering and fruiting branch of the Cashew, Anacardium, adds 
another type of edible fruit to the collection in the Sumach Family 
which includes such diverse plants as poison-ivy and mangoes. The 
Cashew is often described as a fruit with its seed hanging on the out- 
side, its fleshy portion being formed by the enlargement of the flower- 
stem and not extending to envelop the seed, the well-known Cashew nut. 

The exhibit of Spurges, already illustrated by a Castor Bean plant, 
has received an addition in a flowering branch of a cactus-like Euphor- 
bia, the so-called Sweet Aloe. 

A flowering branch of an African Combretum with its red flower 
cluster faithfully reproduced in glass, together with a single enlarged 
flower, has been added to the exhibit of the Combretum Family and 
serves to illustrate its floral characters. 

The room vacated by the transfer of the departmental library has 
been made the Cryptogamic Herbarium and the collections of lower 
plants have all been put in order and installed there. One of the most 
notable single accessions among these is the E. T. & S. A. Harper Col- 
lection of Fungi, which is now completely labeled, ordered into genera 
and catalogued. This work on the Harper Collection was done by Miss 
Grace McCrone who was attached to the staff for several years for this 
special purpose. The collection comprises about 23,500 specimens, and 
5,500 photographs, among them many stereoscopic, some of which are 
direct enlargements, the whole now for the first time entirely available 
for reference. The collection includes 10,248 numbers, particularly of 
fleshy fungi collected by E. T. Harper and, in addition, many standard 
series, e. g. Fungi Columbiana 5,324 numbers; Rabenhorst-Winter Fungi 
Europaei 1,849; Otto Jaap, 1,254; Phycotheca Boreali-Americana 
2,713 ; Ellis & Everhart 420; C. L. Shear N. Y. Fungi 302 ; Torrend 302 ; 
Central American Fungi by C. L. Smith 224; E. Ule Mycotheca 
brasiliensis 143. 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 313 

In response to the general interest in the native wild flowers an ex- 
periment was made early in the spring with an exhibit of living plants. 
These were planted in a case built on the order of a large-scale flower- 
box, installed in the Stanley Field Hall. The plan proved to be prac- 
ticable and was successful from the beginning. The plants survived 
transplanting and most of them appeared to thrive fairly well under the 
overhead light in the large central hall. Afew, however, such as the Spring 
Beauty, refused to open their flowers in the absence of direct sunlight. 

With the advance of the season, the case constructed was found to 
be inadequate for the display of the increasing number of plants coming 
into bloom. A larger case four times the size of the first one was there- 
fore built, which was large enough to permit of an approximate ecological 
arrangement of the plants. One corner of the case, with a somewhat 
elevated sandy ground, was made to serve for the sand-dune plants, an 
adjoining quarter, with better soil, was assigned to plants of dry woods, 
a lower quarter, surrounding a pool, served to accommodate moisture- 
loving vegetation, and the pool itself being devoted to aquatics. One end 
of the box, with heavier soil, provided suitable space for prairie plants. 

By bringing in fresh plants several times each week this indoor ex- 
hibit was maintained constantly in fresh condition, and kept pace with 
the progress of vegetation in the country surrounding Chicago. About 
five hundred species were shown during the season. No labels in the 
Museum were more thoroughly inspected than those giving the names 
of the plants in the Wild Flower bed. 

In connection with the Wild Flower exhibit, a series of illustrated 
leaflets were prepared, dealing in a non-technical manner with the com- 
mon plants of this region. Four of these have appeared to date, Spring 
Wild Flowers, Spring and Early Summer Wild Flowers, Summer Wild 
Flowers, and Autumn Wild Flowers and Fruits. 

The study of the Peruvian Collections, secured on the Captain Mar- 
shall Field Botanical Expeditions of 1922 and 1923, has been carried 
on with the generous cooperation of specialists on various plant families 
or groups. The results of this work are appearing in botanical maga- 
zines and institutional publications, and will be brought together under 
one cover upon the completion of the Peruvian exploration work by 
this Museum. Although only about one-half of the collections have been 
studied, a large number of undescribed species have been disclosed, some 
specialists reporting forty per cent of the material examined by them 
as representing undescribed plants. The type, that is, the original speci- 
men of each of the novelties, has been placed in the Museum herbarium, 
the specialist naming the species retaining for his institution the dupli- 



314 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

cate material when such exists. As a consequence, the herbarium of 
Peruvian plants is unusually rich in type specimens, making it one of 
the most valuable of its kind in the world. It is equalled only by the 
Peruvian collections at Berlin, which include those made by Dr. A. 
Weberbauer, the distinguished German phytogeographer. Eight hun- 
dred and thirty-nine duplicate specimens of Dr. Weberbauer's collec- 
tions have recently been acquired. 

The large number of new species reported by specialists is an indi- 
cation of the richness of the Peruvian flora and the great opportunity 
it presents for further exploration and botanical research. Evidently 
little relatively is as yet known regarding the herbs and trees of Peru. 
The present collections from there have been organized to the extent 
of placing them in families (and to some extent assigning them to 
genera), and were thus made available for study by the following 
specialists on particular groups: 

O. Ames, Ames Botanical Laboratory, Orchidaceae; S. F. Blake, U. S. 
Bureau of Plant Industry, Compositae (exclusive of groups listed else- 
where) Polygalaceae; G. S. Bryan, University of Wisconsin, and A. 
W. Evans, Yale University, Liverworts; Carl Epling, University of 
California, Southern Branch, Labiatae; H. A. Gleason, N. Y. Botani- 
cal Garden, Lobeliaceae, Vernonieae; J. M. Greenman, Missouri Botan- 
ical Garden, Senecio; A. S. Hitchcock, U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, 
Gramineae; M. A. Howe, N. Y. Botanical Garden, Marine Algae; I. 
M. Johnston, Gray Herbarium of Harvard University, Boraginaceae 
(excluding Cordia and Toumefortia) , Violaceae, Onagraceae, Euphor- 
biaceae, Araliaceae, Caricaceae, Hydrophylyaceae, Polemoniaceae, Mal- 
vaceae; E. P. Killip, U. S. National Museum, Bomarea, Cordia, Toum- 
efortia, Escalloniaceae, Passifloraceae, Urticaceae, Valerianaceae; K. K. 
Mackenzie, Maplewood, N. J., Cyperaceae; W. R. Maxon, U. S. 
National Museum, Filices; G. K. Merrill, Rockland, Me., Lichens; E. B. 
Payson, University of Wyoming, Cruciferae, Ranunculaceae; F. W. Pen- 
nell, Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia, Scrophulariaceae; C. 
V. Piper, U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, Phaseolus, Canavalia; B. L. Rob- 
inson, Gray Herbarium of Harvard University, Eupatorieae; J. N. 
Rose, U. S. National Museum, Cassia, Crotalaria, Lupinus, Cactaceae, 
Crassulaceae, Umbelliferae; J. H. Schaffner, Ohio State University, 
Equisetaceae; E. E. Sherff, University of Chicago, Bidens, Taraxacum; 
P. C. Standley, U. S. National Museum, Amaranthaceae, Chenopod- 
iaceae, Nyctaginaceae, Rubiaceae; W. Trelease, University of Illinois, 
Piperaceae; R. S. Williams, N. Y. Botanical Garden, Musci; T. G. 
Yuncker, DePauw University, Cuscuta. 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 315 

Some of the material not represented in the above list is being 
studied in the Museum. 

The Museum has been unable to contribute very materially to the 
study of these collections, as the large amount of routine and other 
work devolving on the small scientific staff in the department of Botany 
leaves little time for research. 

Geology. — The contents of the case of fossils in Stanley Field Hall 
were changed in part, the mounted skeleton of Dinictis being replaced 
by a series of models illustrating the evolution of the horse. Supple- 
menting this series, skulls and feet of early horses were installed. A res- 
toration of a fossil cycad flower prepared in the Stanley Field Plant 
Reproduction Laboratory, together with specimens of fossil cycad leaves, 
was also placed in this case. 

In the collection of systematic minerals in Hall 34, the installation 
of the specimens previously exhibited on shelves in four large cases was 
changed by placing them on sloping screens to which individual blocks 
were fastened. By this means the specimens are brought nearer to 
the eye of the observer and individual mounts are provided. The speci- 
mens of phosphates, arsenates, sulphates, hydrocarbons and pseudo- 
morphs, were mounted in this manner. After renovation of the 
interior, the contents of one case of the Chalmers crystal collection were 
rearranged, and additional labels provided so that they can be read 
from either side of the case. The case of amber was also cleaned, its 
contents rearranged and a collection of jet added. The exhibit of 
imitation gems, numbering 208 specimens, was reinstalled in trays newly 
lined with silk and new labels were provided. Rearrangements were also 
made of the contents of three cases of concretions and septaria in this 
hall, and a number of new specimens were added. A special installation 
was made of a specimen of quartz crystal containing water. This was 
installed in such a manner that by turning a button, movement of the 
water can be seen. 

The case containing the large fulgurite was moved from the west 
end of Hall 35 to a position adjoining the other fulgurites. One of the 
latter was mounted in a matrix of sand in order to aid in the interpre- 
tation of these bodies. The stalactites in the case of cave material were 
suspended from the top of the case in order that their natural positions 
might be represented. Several specimens were added to this series. 

The arrangement of the specimens of the systematic rock collection 
was improved by changing the position of three of the cases and rein- 
stalling one case. 



316 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

The large model of the Moon which was presented to the Museum 
in 1898, by the late Lewis Reese of Chicago, was installed at the west 
end of Hall 35. This model is without doubt the largest and most elab- 
orate representation of the moon ever made and affords an unparalleled 
opportunity for the study of the surface features of our satellite. Al- 
though the model was constructed a number of years ago, the details 
of the moon's surface large enough to be shown on it were at that time 
so fully known that later studies have not added materially to them. 
The model was constructed by Th. Dickert of Bonn under the immediate 
direction of Dr. J. F. Julius Schmidt, Director of the Observatory of 
Athens, Greece, and one of the most eminent of selenographers. The 
accuracy and completeness of the model can therefore be fully relied 
upon. The model is 19.2 feet in diameter and has a horizontal scale of 
1 : 600,000 and a vertical scale of 1 : 200,000. For its present installation 
it was carefully reassembled and its surface fully restored and refinished. 

The model of a cement plant which has been in preparation for some 
time was completed and placed on exhibition in Hall 36. This model, 
11^ by 3^2 feet in dimension, is a reproduction of the plant of the 
Marquette Cement Company at Oglesby, Illinois, and illustrates all 
stages of the manufacture of portland cement from the mining of the 
raw materials to the finished product. Crushers, kilns and other 
machinery, storage houses, methods of transportation and details of 
mining limestone and clay for the cement are shown in full detail. The 
model has been mounted in a case of the standard Museum pattern, six 
feet high, and placed adjoining the general cement exhibit. The model 
was constructed in the Museum laboratories by Associate Curator Nichols 
and Valerie Legault. To officials of the Marquette Cement Company 
the Museum is under obligation for information freely given and many 
courtesies extended during the construction of the model. 

The installation of the exhibit of candles in this hall in one of the 
cases devoted to petroleum products was enlarged and modified to add 
the candles presented during the year by the Standard Oil Company 
(Indiana) . Scenic backgrounds were provided in Skiff Hall for the series 
of three models illustrating the development of iron furnaces. These 
backgrounds were designed to show typical surroundings of successive 
types of iron furnaces and thus aid in visualizing the development of 
these furnaces. By the use of blocks giving more elevation to individual 
specimens, an improved installation was obtained for a large number of 
specimens in this hall. Exhibits to which this revision has been applied 
include those of asbestos, mica, phosphates, lime, gypsum, borax, abra- 
sives, salt, and part of the iron ores, comprising in all about 600 specimens. 






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Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 317 

The positions of several cases in this Hall were changed in order to give a 
better distribution of certain exhibits, but the contents of the cases were 
not materially changed. The series of twenty-one specimens of Indiana 
limestone, presented by the Indiana Limestone Quarrymen's Association, 
was installed in one of the cases containing building stones. Space was 
obtained by withdrawing specimens which were of lesser importance or out 
of date. A number of specimens of Canadian gold ores were added to the 
exhibit of these ores in the hall and the accompanying series rearranged. 

In order to replace the temporary base formerly used, a new and 
permanent base was constructed and placed in position for the restora- 
tion of the Moa on exhibition in Hall 38. The contents of two large 
cases of invertebrate fossils were transferred to other cases in order to 
make room for selected series of the Borden collection, and one of these 
cases was filled with the Borden fossils. The case containing the collec- 
tion of Paleozoic sponges, presented by Mr. William J. Chalmers and 
the late Byron L. Smith, was moved to the end of the hall, and an unoc- 
cupied case was then partly filled with fossils of the Borden collection. 
In order to improve their installation sloping screens with individual 
blocks were provided for a large number of Tertiary invertebrate fossils. 
Specimens of vertebrate fossils collected by the Capt. Marshall Field 
Expedition to Patagonia were installed in this hall during the year as fast 
as they were prepared for exhibition The specimens so installed included 
a series of four skulls of Nesodon, an animal resembling the rhinoceros 
in size. Two of the skulls were complete, the others are exhibited with 
the matrix only partially removed, in order to show the mode of occur- 
rence of these fossils. A complete skeleton of Interatherium, a small 
toxodont, a skull of a carnivore, Borhysenodon, and of a sloth, Hapolops, 
and a carapace with partial skeleton of an extinct armadillo, Proeutatus, 
were other fossils from the Patagonian Expedition which were prepared 
and placed on exhibition in this hall. A skull and fore and hind limbs 
of the fossil horse, Equus scotti, from Texas, and specimens of Toxodon 
and Megatherium, collected by the Curator in Brazil, were also added to 
the series on exhibition. 

A number of the gem specimens collected by the Curator in Brazil 
were installed in Higinbotham Hall. These additions included five spe- 
cimens of crystallized emerald, a number of cut and uncut Brazilian 
diamonds, a cut blue aquamarine weighing 189^ carats, several speci- 
mens of cut and uncut topaz, including one large crystal of gem quality 
weighing 89^ pounds, a carved specimen of amethyst and some uncut 
specimens of the same mineral, several varieties of cut tourmaline 
mounted in a bracelet, and a large, cut rubellite or red tourmaline. The 



318 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

large, cut Persian turquoise, presented by H. H. Topakyan, was also 
installed in the hall. 

The Departmental library has been installed in three rooms adjacent 
to the Curator's office. Substantial and well-finished stacks, fully sup- 
plied with shelving, have been built in these rooms, the style, design and 
finish of the stacks conforming to the space and lighting of the rooms. 
In these stacks the Departmental library, numbering about 10,000 
volumes, has been installed. 

Groupings of the volumes have been made to facilitate reference. 
In Room 124 have been placed bound serials and works on gems, meteor- 
ites, etc.; in Room 121, publications of the United States Geological 
Survey and other United States government publications, and in Room 
119, publications of state and foreign geological surveys. One thousand, 
three hundred and eighty-eight feet of shelving in all were provided and 
two of the rooms were furnished with tables and chairs. In addition, 
a room adjoining the library was fitted with shelving and other facilities 
for Departmental cataloguing, 102 feet of shelving having been provided 
for this purpose. 

Considerable progress was made in furnishing adequate installation 
for the study collections. Of the two large rooms and one small one 
on the third floor set aside for these collections, one is devoted to the 
study collection of fossil vertebrates, another to a part of the inverte- 
brate fossils, and the other to the remaining collections. In these rooms 
fourteen substantial stacks containing 2,074 trays were installed during 
the year. The stacks are arranged facing aisles leading to windows, 
thus affording good light. The stacks are 7 feet high and either 15 
or 1 8 feet long. The trays are of wood and of the uniform lateral dimen- 
sions of 18 by 27 inches, but have a variation in depth of 3, 6}4 and 
10 inches. The study collections illustrating systematic minerals, lith- 
ology, physical geology and economic geology have all been placed in 
these trays. For the most part the specimens are placed in smaller 
individual trays and labelled. The work of installation also included 
unpacking, cleaning and checking the record of each specimen as placed. 
The arrangement and distribution of these collections not only insures 
better preservation of the specimens and facilitates their study, but 
also enables more rapid and adequate selections to be made when speci- 
mens are desired for exhibition. Eight, well-finished oak tables 3 
by 9 feet each have been provided in these rooms in order to facili- 
tate the sorting and handling of the study collections, and in two of 
the rooms, sinks with drain boards and running water have been 
installed. 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 319 

After the return of Preparators Sternberg and Abbott from the field, 
preparation of the vertebrate fossils collected by the Captain Marshall 
Field Expedition in Patagonia was actively earned on by them in the 
paleontological laboratory. An electrically operated lathe with chucks, 
motor and flexible shaft was added to the equipment of this laboratory. 

Zoology. — In the Department of Zoology a case of North American 
Bears, prepared in 1923, including the Black, the Cinnamon and the 
Glacier Bear, was installed early in January in the systematic exhibit 
of mammals. This is the first of a new style of installation which it is 
proposed to introduce into this exhibit and to be developed gradually 
until the entire hall is reorganized. Although several species are included 
in a single case, those which are related are grouped together, and all are 
placed on a continuous natural groundwork instead of on separate 
wooden bases. Vegetation is introduced in a limited amount, and 
the realism of the groundwork is carried only to the point of the 
reproduction of general types of natural land formations. The feature 
of the installation is not only in the appearance of life given to the ani- 
mals when placed on natural rough surfaces instead of smooth polished 
ones, but in the opportunity it gives for attractive groupings and for 
varied poses and attitudes of individual animals. A second case (see 
PL LII) of this series was installed late in the year, containing six 
species of North American cats, Jaguar, Cougar, Lynx, Bobcat, Ocelot 
and Yaguarundi. A small case containing a temporary installation of 
an American Red Fox was removed from Stanley Field Hall and in its 
place was substituted a Chilean Pudu, one of the very tiny deer recently 
obtained by the Captain Marshall Field Chilean expedition. Owing to 
lack of cases and pending rearrangement of space, no further installa- 
tions of mammals were made, but a considerable number of specimens 
were mounted for use in the near future. Among these are White 
Mountain Sheep, Chilean Huemul, Brazilian Maned Wolf, Ouakari 
Monkey, Chinchilla, Peruvian Tayra, Argentine Viscacha, American 
Badger, and a series of small mammals from the vicinity of Chicago. 

A case of American birds of prey, including the better known hawks 
and owls, was installed for temporary display in Stanley Field Hall. In 
this hall, late in the year, a group of the extinct Passenger Pigeon was 
placed on exhibition. Eight birds and a nest and egg are shown in the 
upper branches of an oak stub, representing a scene in northern Illinois. 
The birds are the finest of a considerable series which has been accumu- 
lated over a period of years and presented to the Museum by President 
Stanley Field. Some of the specimens had been preserved for more 
than fifty years and their preparation in life-like positions was a matter 



320 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

of patient and skillful manipulation which was carried out very suc- 
cessfully by Taxidermist Hine. A feature of the group is the nest, which 
is a genuine one presented by R. M. Barnes, and one of the very few 
Passenger Pigeon's nests which are known to be preserved. Many other 
birds were mounted during the year to meet needs which will arise in 
the proposed revision of the systematic exhibit of birds. These are 
necessarily withheld from installation for a time until others properly 
belonging with them can be obtained. 

Models of a South American Anaconda and a Belize Crocodile were 
temporarily exhibited in the hall of reptiles, but were later removed for 
rearrangement since the Anaconda showed striking qualities which 
seemed to warrant the devotion of an entire case to it. Further models 
of reptiles have been made but not installed. These include a Florida 
King Snake, a Corn Snake, a Chicken Snake, a Glass Snake and a Gila 
Monster. The two American Crocodiles, begun in 1923, were completed, 
and only await delivery of a case for installation in a large group for 
which accessions are practically all prepared. 

A special case of recently mounted fishes was shown in Stanley Field 
Hall. One side of this was devoted to game fishes of our northern lakes 
and streams, especially pike, pickerel and muskellunge, showing the dis- 
tinctions between the scientifically recognizable varieties which are so 
often confused in the popular mind. On the other side of the case was 
displayed a collection of Pacific Coast food fishes, mostly from the vicin- 
ity of Catalina Island, and presented to the Museum by Mr. Keith 
Spaulding. Various other fish specimens were finished but not installed, 
and at the close of the year nearly 200 were on hand in partly prepared 
condition. 

Considerable progress, despite pressure of other work, was made on 
the determining and respreading of the North American butterflies and 
moths selected for exhibition, with the result that the installation of 
some of this material may be confidently expected in 1925. 

Two special exhibits of zoological pictures were carried out during 
the year. The first of these consisted of 72 oil paintings of fishes and 
angling scenes by Mr. Louis Rhead, which were on view in Room 1 2 for 
several months. Later, an exhibition was given of hand colored photo- 
graphs of birds by Mr. E. H. Matern of Detroit. 

In December, fourteen new exhibition cases of improved design were 
delivered, and arrangements were begun for their utilization at once in 
the systematic halls of birds and mammals. Old style cases, as released 
from the hall of mammals, were transferred to the hall of osteology to 
be used for the skeletons of large mammals heretofore shown on open 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 321 

stands. At the close of the year, these transfers and rearrangements 
were under way. 

Much needed equipment in the offices and work rooms of the De- 
partment was provided, especially in the divisions of Reptiles and Oste- 
ology, where built-in storage cases of good design were constructed. 
These have made possible the unpacking and transfer of collections 
from temporary to permanent quarters where permanent systems of 
arrangement and labeling may be put into effect. In the Division of 
Reptiles, especially, the arrangement of cases, trays, work tables, cata- 
logues, files and books is all that could be desired. Incoming material 
can be cared for promptly and without waste of time, while among the 
thousands of specimens stored, any one needed may be found at a 
moment's notice. 

The removal of the principal taxidermists' quarters from the ground 
floor to the fourth floor has proved highly successful. The conditions 
of accessibility, space, light and air in the new quarters are practically 
ideal, and fulfill to an unusual degree the rather exacting requirements 
of artist, sculptor and skin dresser. 

In the exhibition halls, the installation of a new system of artificial ' 
lighting by which all the large groups receive top light, has resulted in 
very great improvement. All the cases containing bird groups and 
others having painted backgrounds have been opened, and the speci- 
mens and accessories cleaned and renovated. Meanwhile, the back- 
grounds have been cleaned of stains, and considerable repainting has 
been done to overcome defects incurred through unavoidable exposure 
during and since moving them from the old Museum building. The 
African Elephants in Stanley Field Hall also were cleaned and their 
skins given such external treatment as seemed advisable to insure their 
further preservation in good condition. 

The continued generous contributions of Mr. Edward E. Aver to 
the zoological library, especially in the subjects of ornithology and ich- 
thyology, made it necessary to provide more shelf room for the rapidly 
growing collection of books. The crowded condition was relieved by 
the addition of three new cases which involved a complete rearrange- 
ment of all the books. This was carried out under the supervision of 
Associate Curator Gerhard with the assistance of several other members 
of the staff. The library is now well arranged under a uniform system 
of classification in which provision is made for considerable future 
expansion. 

Good progress was made during the year in the preparation of rough 
specimens received from recent expeditions. The taxidermists, when 



322 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

time could be spared from exhibition work, have prepared a consider- 
able number of mammal skins for the reference collection, and the skin 
dresser has been kept busy with the large amount of material needing 
his attention. The osteologist has cleaned some 800 skulls and a small 
number of skeletons in addition to the work of unpacking, classifying, 
and arranging the general osteological collections in the new storage 
cases. 

THE N. W. HARRIS PUBLIC SCHOOL EXTENSION 

At the close of the year, 830 cases were available for loaning to 
the schools of Chicago. This total is an increase of sixty cases over 
the preceding year. Several more cases would have been added to the 
series had there not been a delay on the part of the cabinet makers in 
delivering cases to the Department. Work on most of the new 
cases was started since the first of the year 1924, although preparation 
on a few of the cases that were finished began late in the year 1923. 
In addition to the cases completed a number are in various stages of 
preparation. 

The several hundred cases that have been in constant use in the 
schools during the 1 923-1 924 school year, were carefully inspected for 
such repairs to the cases and their contents as might be necessary. The 
number of cases requiring repairs was exceedingly small in comparison 
with the large number in circulation. 

The cooperation of Swift & Company enabled the Department to 
prepare six duplicated cases of "Beef and By-products." Under this 
heading are exhibited miniatures of a Hereford steer, and a side of beef 
outlined to show the various obtainable cuts, and specimens of thirty 
or more well-known by-products of cattle. It has been possible for 
this Department, through the aid of Sprague, Warner and Company, 
to prepare four interesting and attractive cases of Spanish Paprika. 
In preparing cases of natural history subjects it has been the purpose 
of this Department to use specimens that are to be found in and 
around Chicago. As a result of this endeavor there have been 
prepared cases of 290 such subjects. Of this number 173 are of differ- 
ent species of birds, 34 are of various insects, 17 of different fishes, 16 of 
mammals, 14 of reptiles, and 16 of plants. Many of these specimens 
are shown in habitat groups. 

A schedule which provides that two cases shall be continually in each 
school became effective at the beginning of the present school year. In 
accordance with this arrangement two cases are now delivered to each 
school and left there for ten school days. At the end of that period they 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 323 

are collected for delivery elsewhere and two other cases are substituted for 
them. By this procedure, 656 cases are kept in continuous circulation 
among the schools. During the school year the 328 schools on the 
schedule are loaned two cases on each of the seventeen deliveries that 
are made to each of the schools. This will insure to each school the 
use of thirty-four cases during the school year. 

An additional truck was placed in operation at the beginning of the 
present school year. With the two trucks now in use not onl} T a depend- 
able schedule is assured, but also the loaning of cases with greater fre- 
quency and promptness than heretofore, when requested by schools for 
specific purposes. The body of the new truck is similar in appearance 
and detail of construction to the one originally planned for this Depart- 
ment, which is still in use. 

During the year a requisition was made for one hundred new cases 
similar to those in use since the creation of this Department, which have 
met the many requirements demanded of them. 

Gads Hill Center, a community settlement at 191 9 West Cullerton 
Street, made application for the loan of cases, and this service has been 
extended by the Department. The Head Resident, of the Gads Hill 
Center in reporting the aid the cases had been to that institution, stated : 
"We keep the cases in our lobby. Last year we ran an attendance of 
90,000 and I think we are holding that average this year. Every one 
does not stop to look at the cases, but great numbers do, and because 
they do not come in crowds they have time to pause, pull out the slides 
and read. I know it all counts." 

During the past year, as in previous years, requests were received 
from sources other than schools of Chicago for the loan of cases. In 
response to these requests eight cases of natural history subjects were 
loaned to the Chicago Art Institute from June 30th to August 22nd, for 
use in its juvenile section; and ten cases were loaned for one month to 
the Chicago Chapter of the Wild Flowers Preservation Society of Amer- 
ica, for its annual exhibition held at the Art Institute. Again, the Secre- 
tary of Bureau of Parks, Playgrounds and Beaches requested a number 
of cases for exhibition on the Municipal Pier during the summer vacation 
period. In compliance with this request twenty-four cases were loaned. 
The Promotional Manager of the Central Y. M. C. A. school asked for, 
and was loaned, twelve cases for educational purposes. The Harris 
Trust and Savings Bank was loaned two cases of bird subjects. These 
cases were exhibited for a period of two weeks in a street window of 
the bank. To illustrate a lecture given at the New First Church to the 
Gnosis Club, two cases were loaned. The Rochester (Minnesota) Art 



324 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

Association was loaned four cases, and two cases were loaned to the 
Nashville (Tennessee) Art Gallery. 

Guide Lecturers. — As in former years, the guide-lecture service 
was extended to classes from public, parochial and private schools, to 
clubs, conventions, and other groups of visitors to the Museum. Dur- 
ing the year an assistant guide-lecturer was added to the staff and the 
service was expanded into several new fields. One of the first innova- 
tions was a Vacation Course of Instruction given during the Summer 
months for children recommended by members of the Museum. This 
course was composed of a series of ten lessons based on Museum exhib- 
its, supplemented by sets of lantern slides. It was attended by 26 
classes with an enrollment of 222 children. A further addition to the 
work was made by providing illustrated lectures in connection with the 
tours for women's clubs. These lectures served either as an introduc- 
tion to the Museum collections as a whole, or to the particular collec- 
tion to be studied by the club. The lecture on "Activities Behind the 
Scenes," in which the history of the Museum, its methods of making 
collections and the preparation of exhibits were described, was of par- 
ticular interest to the club members. There were 41 of these lectures 
given with an attendance of 900 individuals. School classes, numbering 
128, enjoyed the privilege of conducted tours through the collections 
correlating with their course of study. Towards the close of the year 
reprints of the "Outline of the Elementary Public School Curriculum 
and Museum Exhibits Showing the Correlation in Geography, His- 
tory, Science and Manual Arts" were distributed to all school princi- 
pals in the city, for the purpose of stimulating their interest in the Mu- 
seum guide lecture service. The clubs and conventions receiving guide- 
lecture service during the year numbered 98, with an attendance of 
2,410. There were 135 lectures on Museum exhibits given to general 
visitors, in accordance with the printed schedule. A total of 428 lectures 
were given by the guide-lecturers to 9,091 individuals. 



Art Research Classes. — During the year the classes in research 
from the Art Institute of Chicago visited the Museum daily. There were 
approximately 400 students enrolled in these classes under the direction 
of five instructors. The subjects studied inchided primitive design, 
Indian basketry, pottery, textiles and beadwork, Egyptian, Greek and 
Roman pottery, Chinese vase forms and designs, Javanese batik and 
Melanesian design and miscellaneous design. The nature studies con- 
sisted of leaves, flowers and seeds, birds, insects, reptiles, fish, shells, rock 
coloration and precious stones, large and small. Other subjects are 



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Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 325 

being introduced as the instructors become more acquainted with the 
exhibits and the vast wealth of material contained in the Institution. 

A portfolio on research "Design in Nature," compiled from the work 
of students, containing approximately 220 plates, showing about 3,000 
designs, is now being produced by the Museum Press. The work in this 
portfolio is highly illustrative of the educational advantages of such 
organized classes in the Museum. 

PUBLICITY 

General. — During the past year the scope of the Publicity work 
was enlarged to include the aims and purposes of the Museum organiza- 
tion, in order that they might be more clearly understood by the public. 
A larger geographic territory was covered, both by press notices and 
advertising, and as a result a correspondingly larger public was informed 
of the work accomplished by the Museum staff. 

The publicity during the early period of its work was largely confined 
to acquainting the public with the location, approaches and free days 
of the Museum. "While this was continued throughout the year, a 
larger number of press notices were sent out with a view to creating 
an interest in the personnel of the institution, and in the results of 
their research and laboratory' work. 

In the press notices the primary consideration was whether the stoiy 
would interest the public sufficiently to attract it to the Museum for 
further investigation of the exhibits on display. This necessarily led to 
the curtailment of articles of a more technical character. 

The advertising, with one exception, was changed from directional 
placards to posters of the exhibits on display at the Museum. The 
Institution is grateful to the transportation companies for their con- 
tribution of advertising space, and greatly indebted to them. 

Press Publicity. — An average of two newspaper notices were pub- 
lished each week in the local papers. Of the one hundred and twenty 
articles printed, thirty-eight were selected by the Associated Press or 
other news syndicates, and received a national circulation. Descriptive 
articles of the Museum expeditions to South America were sent to the 
South American press by the Associated and United Press Syndicate. 
The foreign language press of the city, which reaches over eight hun- 
dred thousand persons, was included this year for newspaper notices. 
These newspapers gave the Museum an unusual amount of space for 
general articles describing the departmental exhibits. 

Photographs from the expeditions being conducted by the Museum, 
and photographs of new exhibits, were printed by the Sunday Tribune, 



v.v _•/ v.\>w /_'••.••>• '\'''-'*v. . */♦ • 4, oao^ /:\\w///A\ 



326 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

Daily News, N. E. A. Service, Underwood and Underwood, Atlantic- 
Pacific, International News Service, and Popular Science Monthly, the 
news services of these syndicates covering the entire country. Reviews 
of the leaflet and design series of publications were published by the 
literary supplements of the local papers, New York Times and World, 
and popular scientific magazines. Notices of the lecture series were 
printed in the convention column of the daily press through the cour- 
tesy of the Chicago Association of Commerce. 

Advertising. — A total of 22,600 posters were distributed during the 
year to the transportation agencies, of which 8,300 were printed outside 
of the Museum at the expense of these companies. The others were 
printed by the Museum. 

A series of six color posters, representing Museum exhibits, were dis- 
played for one year in the Elevated Line Stations. Two larger posters 
of Museum exhibits were printed by the Chicago Rapid Transit Com- 
pany, at their expense, and displayed on the elevated platforms for four 
months. Placards announcing the lecture courses were also displayed 
by the Rapid Transit Company in the spring and fall. An additional 
general placard was placed on the station platforms in December. The 
Surface Lines printed, at their own expense, a number of overhead pos- 
ters advertising the Museum, which were placed on the cars in March 
and August. They also displayed lecture placards in the bulkheads 
of the cars during the spring and fall. This represented a total dis- 
play of 6,200 posters printed by the Museum. The Illinois Central, 
through the courtesy of the Inland Advertising Company, granted space 
for a year in their suburban service. Two posters were displayed for 
a period of six months each, and lecture programs were placed on the 
station platforms during the spring and autumn courses. The Rock 
Island Suburban Service, and the Aurora and Elgin Electric Lines also 
placed the Museum lecture programs on their station platforms during 
the spring and fall. 

Three-color posters of the Museum building, giving the hours, loca- 
tion and other information concerning the Institution were prominently 
placed during January and February by the following stores: Marshall 
Field & Co., Carson, Pirie, Scott & Co., Charles A. Stevens & Bros., Davis 
Dry Goods Co., Mandel Bros., The Hub, and Hillman's Department 
Store. For this purpose three hundred posters were used. 

Museum posters and direction folders, giving the correct motor 
routes to the Museum, were sent to all of the motor clubs in the central 
western states. These posters and cards were placed in their tourists' 
bureau for free distribution to motorists. 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 327 

General and directional advertisements were placed in six of the 
largest foreign language papers on Saturdays and Sundays for the month 
of August, and a similar advertisement for the Saturday and Sunday 
preceding Labor Day. Marshall Field and Company placed an editorial 
concerning the Museum in their advertising columns, which was shown 
for two days in all local newspapers. This gave the editorial a circula- 
tion of approximately 1,500,000. 

The Automobile Blue Book, Associated Tours Guide and TIB Auto 
Route Books published directions for reaching the Museum by motor. 
The Motor News in its September issue printed a special cover showing 
the Museum building. 

The Chicago Sunday Schools were added to the list of institutions 
displaying the lecture courses of the Museum on their bulletin boards. 

Radio. — Eleven radio talks were given on Friday nights during 
April, May and June by members of the scientific staff. Reports re- 
ceived from the WMAQ, Daily News Radio Station, show that these 
talks were enthusiastically received throughout the country. 

Newsreels. — Newsreels were made of the following subjects: 
Pathe: Cement Plant, Construction of Fulgurite, Presentation of 
Turquoise to Museum, Comparative sizes of Topaz, Turquoise and other 
stones, Construction of plaster cast models of face and hands of Chinese 
students and process of dressing manikin for exhibits of Chinese theatri- 
cal costumes, Film showing steps in new celluloid process. Interna- 
tional Newsreel: Film showing Topaz and Turquoise. Fox Film 
Corporation : Film of fossil eggs. 

Trade Papers. — Articles on economic exhibits in the Museum 
were published by the following trade and class journals: Paint, Oil 
and Chemical Review, Jeweler's Circular, Power Boating, Central Fur- 
rier, Furniture Journal, American Lumberman, Women's World, Drake- 
a-Day, Yellow Cab Taxigrams. Special articles on the Museum were 
printed by the following publications: Daily News Almanac, World's 
Almanac, Encyclopedia Americana and the Architectural Record. 

Direction Folders. — There were distributed to the information 
booths, hotels and railroad stations in Chicago 10,600 folders on "How 
to Reach Field Museum." A form letter has been sent each month to 
the chairman of all large conventions, offering them a supply of these 
direction folders. Eighteen conventions replied, and requested 10,000 
folders, which were supplied. 



328 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

Printing. — The total number of impressions made in the Section 
of Printing during the year amounted to approximately 1,000,000. 
The following publications were printed and bound during the year by 
this section: 

Regular publication series 9,807 

Design Series 6,126 

Leaflet Series 66,649 

General Guide 25,025 

Publication and leaflet price lists 447 

Geographic Society Year Book 1 ,829 

Total 109,883 



The number of labels and other impressions printed follows: 

Exhibition Other 

Labels Impressions 

Anthropology 3,226 8,226 

Botany 1.608 14.904 

Geology 434 I.950 

Zoology 358 5,750 

Harris Extension 45 1 3>"o 

General 291,857 

Geographic Society of Chicago 58,225 

Total 6,077 384,022 

The press work on two botanical leaflets, the two Art Design num- 
bers for Anthropology, and the catalogue of the Birds of the Americas 
was unusual in that an illustration of from two to four colors was used 
in each, these illustrations alone requiring 142,175 impressions. 



Section of Photography and Illustration. — The following tabu- 
lation sets forth the work performed in this section during the year: 



General 

Anthropology 

Botany 

Geology 

Zoology 161 

Harris Extension 

Sale 

Gift 



Number 






Number 




of 


Number 


Number 


of Negatives 




Lantern 


of 


of 


Developed 


Movie 


Slides 


Negatives 


Prints 


for Field 


Films 


Made 


Made 


Made 


Expeditions 


Made 


14 


512 


1,778 


24 


. . 


73 


535 


2,879 


. . . 


. . 


... 


180 


2,596 


72 


32 


386 


107 


1,141 


360 


. . 


161 


104 


828 


. . . 


15 




80 


273 


. . . 


. . 


10 


• • • 


38 


. . • 


. . 


7 




69 







Totals. 



651 1,518 



9,602 



456 



47 



Photogravures. — A photogravure power press has been added to 
the Section during the year. A room for the installation of this press 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 



329 



was provided on the ground floor, adjoining the press room. The num- 
ber of photogravures printed during the year is indicated below : 

Publication illustrations 48,000 

Leaflet illustrations 187,000 

Picture Post Card Albums 99,600 

Post Cards of Building 15,000 

Special 12,000 

Total 361,600 



Artist. — The following statement shows the work performed by 
this section during the year: 



ANTHROPOLOGY 

1 drawing of Japanese pagoda. 

1 drawing of a spear. 

1 4 Japanese and Chinese photographs 

retouched. 
3 rubbings retouched. 
24 photographs retouched and figures 

attached. 

GEOLOGY 

3 large backgrounds painted for the 
blast furnace models. 

Retouching and coloring of cement 
model. 

Retouching and placing figures 
on fossil horse and plants. 

Alterations and retouching for 
paleontological publication illus- 
trations. 

BOTANY 

2 enlarged photographs colored. 
2 photographs retouched. 

1 line drawing of cover design for 
Wild Flower leaflets. 
154 ink tracings; 17 figures. 

1 pen drawing of poison ivy seeds. 
28 petals of Victoria regia colored. 
1 seal redrawn. 

ZOOLOGY 

6 drawings of fish teeth. 

Lettering on 4 fish drawings. 
9 drawings of mammal skulls. 

Assisting in the hanging of picture 
exhibits in Hall 12. 



HARRIS EXTENSION 

8 enlarged photographs colored back- 
grounds. 
Colored guide lines on 11 charts 
for cases. 



PUBLICITY 

Cover design drawing for Motor 
News. 

Drawing of teepee for Surface 
Lines placard. 

Drawing of Museum building. 

Border design for direction cards. 

Line drawing of Egyptian hiero- 
glyphics. 
20 photographs retouched. 

GENERAL 

2 drawings of Membership certificate 

Color sketch for Trustees room. 
10 lantern slides colored. 
2 photographs retouched. 

Drawing and lettering for guide- 
lecture notices. 
Cuts repaired for Section of Print- 
ing. 
Letters renewed on books in 
Library. 



PHOTOGRAPHY 

2 8 photographs retouched and lantern 
slides blocked. 



Attendance: The total attendance for the year is 643,285, which 
is an increase of 157,518 over the previous year. An analysis of the 
admissions is made elsewhere in this report. 

Herewith are also submitted financial statement, list of accessions, 
names of members, etc. 

D. C. DA VIES, Director. 



330 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



ATTENDANCE STATISTICS 
FROM JANUARY i, 1924 TO DECEMBER 31, 1924- 



Total Attendance 643,459 

Paid Attendance 10x5,582 

Free Admissions on Pay Days: 

Students ",4" 

School Children 25,537 

Teachers 1,188 

Members 63 1 

Special 1,4" 

Admissions on Free Days: 

Thursdays (52) 74.548 

Saturdays (52)^ 161,752 

Sundays (52) 266,398 

Highest Attendance on any day (August 17, 1924) 1 1,501 

Lowest Attendance on any day (February 4, 1924) 89 

Highest Paid Attendance (September i, 1924) 4.557 

Average Daily Admissions (366 days) 1 ,758 

Average Paid Admissions (210 days) 479 

Number of Guides sold 13.240 

Number of Articles checked 18,844 

Number of Picture Post Cards sold 109,255 

Publications — Receipts $1,349.48 

Photographs and Sculpture Sets — Receipts 194-75 

Handbooks, Leaflets, etc.— Receipts 1,077.86 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 331 



GENERAL FUND 



STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1924 

Balance December 31, 1924 $ 45,651.20 

Receipts 

Income — Endowment, General and Door Receipts. . . .$ 249,285.40 

South Park Commissioners 1 19,924.87 

Sundry Receipts 23,247.78 

Memberships 64,490.00 

Contributions 242,504.84 

Sales of Securities 574,919.94 $1,274,372.83 

$1,320,024.03 

Disbursements 

Operating Expenses $ 427,431.95 

Expeditions 25,633.32 

Collections Purchased 10,312.16 

Furniture and Fixtures 12,156.1 1 

Expenditures on Building and Approaches 87,805.42 

Securities Purchased 703,524.54 

$1,266,863.50 
Transferred to Sinking Funds 9,600.00 $1,276,463.50 

Cash Balance December 31, 1924 $ 43,560.53 



532 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



THE N. W. HARRIS PUBLIC SCHOOL EXTENSION 
Statement of Income and Expenses for the Year 1924 

Interest and Dividends on Investments $ 21,577.84 

Operating Expenses 19,057.29 

$ 2,520.55 
Deduction from Income (Depreciation of Automobile Delivery Car) . . 602.24 

Balance transferred to Surplus $ 1,918.31 



STANLEY FIELD PLANT REPRODUCTION FUND 
Statement of Income and Expenses for the Year 1924 

Balance December 31, 1923 $ 880.39 

Contributions by Stanley Field during 1924 12,600,00 

$13,480.39 
Operating Expenses 1924 13,413.47 

Balance December 31, 1924 $ 66.92 



STANLEY FIELD MUSEUM EMPLOYES PENSION FUND 
Statement of Income and Expenses for the Year 1924 

Interest and Dividends on Investments $11,825.57 

Pensions and Group Insurance for 1924 8,545.14 

Balance added to Pension Fund $ 3,280.43 



Jan., 1925 



Annual Report of the Director 



333 



ACCESSIONS 



DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY 



ADAMS, MRS. JOSEPH, Chicago. 

1 Navaho double size saddle-blanket 
— Arizona, New Mexico (gift). 

19 objects: 1 basket, China; silver 
ear-rings and fillet of Negro 
woman, Trinidad; 1 silver neck- 
lace, Navaho; 1 Attu basket; 1 
Haida basket; 1 nest miniature 
baskets, 1 miniature covered 
basket, 1 small basket, minia- 
ture colored vessels, Chile; 1 
basket, Samoa; 1 metal brace- 
let, Africa; 1 brooch, N. W. 
Africa; 2 baskets and 1 dress 
ornament, Sudan; 3 necklaces of 
faience and stone beads, Egypt; 
— China; Trinidad; Navaho, 
Attu, Haida, United States; 
Chile; Samoa; Africa; Egypt 
(gift). 

AYER, EDWARD E., Chicago. 

22 pewter objects: plates, trays, 

bowls, coffee-pots, milk-pitchers, 

sugar-bowls, water-heater, 

candlesticks, etc. — England 

and Germany (gift). 
10 pewter objects: 4 tea-pots, 1 

tankard, 5 plates — England and 

Germany (gift). 
7 pewter objects: 1 baptismal basin, 

4 church utensils, 1 coffee-pot, 

1 bucket — England, Germany 

and France (gift). 
30 pewter objects: 18 candlesticks, 

1 pair figures, 10 tea-pots, 1 

tureen — China (gift). 
9 pewter objects: 1 pair of lamps, 

1 round box containing rosary, 

2 sets of three altar-pieces, 1 
buffalo figure, etc. — China (gift). 

3 pewter tea-pots and 1 soup-bowl — 

Canton, China (gift). 
1 pair of pewter candlesticks, 1 

pewter soup-bowl — Swatow, 

China (gift). 

3 pewter objects: 1 inscribed tablet 

of the Han period, 2 tea-can- 
isters — China (gift). 

4 pewter tea-canisters — Japan; 1 

pewter tray with inlaid brass 
designs — China (gift) . 



3 pewter tea-pots and 2 pewter plates 
— China and England (gift). 

12 pewter objects: 3 trays, 5 tea- 
pots, 1 small pitcher, 3 tea-can- 
isters — China and Japan (gift). 

1 pewter plate — Germany (gift). 

1 pewter dish inlaid with brass — 
China (gift). 

1 rectangular pewter box inlaid with 

brass — China (gift). 

2 pewter tea-canisters, 1 pewter 

chafing-dish — China (gift). 

1 small necklace of carnelian, glass 
and other beads — Ancient Egypt 
(gift). 

1 Babylonian clay tablet of Nergal, 
Governor of Kish, containing 
list of animals presented for 
sacrifices, ca. 2350 B.C. — 
Drehem, Mesopotamia (gift). 

AYER, MRS. EDWARD E., Chicago. 
1 pewter pitcher — Strasbourg, Al- 
sace, France (gift). 

BARRETT, MISS ADELE, Chicago. 
Suit of armor of Samurai complete 
with mask, sword, spear and 2 
fans (14th century) — Japan 
(gift). 

BENNETT, MISS HELEN B., Chicago. 
About 34 specimens from prehistoric 
Indian grave: 2 pieces of braided 
bark, 1 bark fiber cord, 1 coil of 
unbaked clay, corn cobs, corn 
stalks, and other plant remains, 
plum stone and pieces of wood, 

15 animal bones, 3 land snails, 
4 clam shells, accompanied by 

16 photographs showing grave 
and its location — Salts Bluff 
Rockshelter, Benton County, 
Arkansas (gift). 

BLACKSTONE, MRS. T. B., Chicago. 
About 200 gourds, pottery vessels 
and accessories for keeping sing- 
ing and fighting insects — Peking, 
China (gift). 



334 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



BULLEN, MRS. FREDERICK F., 
Chicago. 
Large embroidered cover of white 
silk. Beginning of 19th century 
—Canton, China (gift). 

CHANDLER, M. G., Chicago. 

19 objects: 3 women's appliqu£ 
robes, 1 woman's waist, 1 man's 
beaded shirt, 4 woven bags, 1 
rawhide bag, 5 pair leggings, 1 
woven burden strap, 1 knife, 
1 feather necklace, 1 pair moc- 
casins — Fox, Winnebago, Ara- 
Eaho, Iroquois, Maori, United 
tates and New Zealand (ex- 
change). 

DUNLAP, MRS. EVA W., Peking, 
China. 

62 popular woodcuts and color 
prints — Peking, China (gift). 

EMMONS, LIEUT. G. T.,iPrinceton, 
New Jersey. 
Outfit of Tsimshian shaman, Kwa- 
kiutl copper rattle, Tlingit trinket 
basket, 2 jade implements from 
Tlingit, roll of cherry bark from 
Salish — Tsimshian, Kwakiutl, 
Tlingit and Salish, British Co- 
lumbia and Alaska (exchange). 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL 
HISTORY. 

Collected by J. B. Abbott and G. F. 
Sternberg — Capt. Marshall Field 
Palaeontological Expedition to 
Argentina : 

1 human skull and 5 flint implements 
associated with it — Lago Colhue 
Huapi, Territory of Santa Cruz, 
Argentina. 
Collected by C. C. Sanborn. — Capt. 
Marshall Field Expedition to 
Chile and Argentina: 

1 prehistoric slate celt and 1 pre- 
historic slate projectile point — • 
Chiloe Island, Chile. 

1 stone axe with polished blade — 
Chile. 

Purchases: 

1 ancient jade adze — New Zealand, 
from Mrs. J. F. Hoffman, Whar- 
ton, New Jersey. 

80 ivory carvings — Eskimo, Lab- 
rador, Canada, from Howard J. 
Smith, Grand Rapids, Mich. 



FIELD MUSEUM-OXFORD UNI- 
VERSITY JOINT EXPEDI- 
TION (Capt. Marshall Field 
Fund). 
About 634 objects: Pottery vessels 
and sherds, clay figures, bricks, 
inscribed tablets, copper vessels, 
tools, weapons, and bracelets, 
silver cup and bracelets, iron, 
stone, bone and shell objects, 
necklaces, beads, and glass 
bottle — Kish, Mesopotamia. 

GRIMM, MRS. EMMA, Chicago. 
1 triangular axe of limestone, grooved 
on three sides — Sugar River 
near Brodhead, Rock County, 
Wisconsin (gift). 

HARDY, F. A., EVANSTON, ILL. 

1 large old brass image, solid cast, of 

standing Buddha on wooden 
base — Mandalay, Burma (gift). 

HELLMAYR, DR. C. E., Chicago. 

2 stone axe-heads — Jaru (Parintintin) 

Tufian Indians, Rio Machados, 
affluent of Rio Madeira, Brazil, 
South America (gift). 

HULBERT, MRS. E. D., Chicago. 
1 ancient poi bowl, 1 tray of cola 
wood — Hawaii (gift). 

HULL HOUSE, Chicago. 

1 Persian rug presented by H. H. 
Topakyan; 1 pair Chinese scales 
for weighing silk, presented by 
B. F. Schlessinger; 1 woolen 
embroidered Turkish saddle- 
bags; and 77 tassels purchased 
by Dr. U. Jahn — Persia, China, 
Turkey, and Europe (loan ma- 
terial returned). 

JONES, ARTHUR B., Chicago 

1284 objects of nephrite, stone, 
feather and flax robes, kilts and 
girdles, carved clubs, carved 
wooden boxes and Maori uten- 
sils — Maori and Moriori, New 
Zealand, Tasmania and Solomon 
Islands (gift). 

JUTZI, JOHN, and TOM LADD, Chi- 
cago. 
1 clay pot and 2 skeletons in frag- 
mentary condition — Town of 
Lake Hunting and Fishing Club, 
7 miles east of Momence, 
Illinois (gift). 

KEEP, CHAUNCEY, Chicago. 

1 red obsidian spear-head — Yurok, 
California (gift). 



3 



-  

S7 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE LVII. 




LARGE MALE GORILLA FROM BELGIAN CONGO. 
FIELD STUDY FROM CENTRAL AFRICAN EXPEDITION 
UNDER THE AUSPICES OF CAPTAIN MARSHALL FIELD AND MAJOR A. M. COLLINS. 
About one-sixth natural size. 



Jan., 1925 



Annual Report of the Director 



335 



KNEELAND, MRS. L. M., Chicago. 

10 objects: 1 fan and comb from 

Samoa: 2 Chinese ivory fans; 

1 Korean fan; 1 Egyptian fan; 

1 native hat, Kandy, Ceylon; 

2 beaded balls from Sioux; 1 
carved bowl and 1 carved cup 
from South America — Samoa, 
China, Korea, Ceylon, Egypt, 
North and South America, 
(gift). 

LO, D. H., W. Lafayette, Indiana. 
Rubbing from Chinese inscription 
on stone tablet, being hand- 
writing of Lo Yuan-hang — 
China (gift). 

LOO, CHING-TSAI, New York. 

1 foot-measure of the Chou dynasty 
(1122-247 b.c.) — Cheng-chou, 
Honan, China (gift). 

PLANTZ, HENRY F., Oconomowoc, 
Wisconsin. 
1 prehistoric bone needle from grave 
— Oconomowoc, Waukesha 
County, Wisconsin (gift). 

PLANTZ, H. W., Chicago. 

5 objects: 1 Eskimo coiled basket 
and 1 carved billiken, 1 Nootka 
trinket basket and 1 circular 
mat, 1 Middle Mesa coiled 
plaque — Nootka, Hopi, Eskimo, 
Vancouver Island, Arizona and 
Alaska (gift). 

ROCK, DR. JOSEPH F., Washington, 
D. C. 

Mo-so manuscript of five folios with 
colored pictographs — Li-kiang, 
Yiin-nan, China (gift). 

vSARGENT, HOMER E., Pasadena, 
California. 

1 shoulder blade of moose used for 
moose call, birch bow with 7 
arrows, pair of snowshoes — 
Aishihik tribe and Aborigines, 
Kluane Lake and Lake Teslin, 
Yukon Territory, Canada (gift). 

22 old tobacco-pipes — Japan (gift). 

SCOTT, MRS. JAMES W., Chicago. 
26 objects: 3 baskets, 1 cigarette 
case, 1 brass bell, 6 hats, 3 fans, 
1 lacquered tray, 1 pipe stem 
and 6 miscellaneous objects, 1 
painted Greek vase, 1 pair 
sadrllebags, 1 pair of moccasins, 
etc. — Alaska, Korea, Greece, 
and Palestine (gift). 



17 objects: 1 Chilkat blanket, 1 
bamboo cane, 1 silk bag, 1 
belt cord, 1 pair straw sandals, 
1 wooden doll, 2 strings of 
miniature dolls, 1 silk tassel, 1 
card game, 1 tobacco-pipe, 1 
thimble, 1 porcelain spoon, 
etc. — Alaska, Japan, Korea, 
China, Hawaii, Greece, North 
Africa (gift). 

SELLECK, E. R., Sterling, Illinois. 
1 pre-Columbian Indian skull dug 
up from an abandoned sand-pit 
— Sterling, Illinois (gift). 

SKINNER, A., Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 
Woman's buckskin dress, with pair 
of boot moccasins — Comanche, 
Oklahoma (exchange). 

STEVENSON, ROBERT E., Peking, 
China. 
4 objects: 1 ivory insect cage, 1 ivory 
box, 1 glazed jar, 1 gourd with 
ivory cover — Peking, China 
(gift). 

THOMAS, ESTATE OF ELEANOR 
M. H., Chicago. 

1 large decorated brass tray — 

Morocco, Africa (gift). 

TSUKAMOTO, MRS. KOSHICHI, 
Chicago. 

2 completely dressed carved wooden 

figures of Japanese women. 
Silk dresses in style of Tokugawa 
and Fujiwara periods — Kyoto, 
Japan (gift). 

WILLIAMS, MRS. C. HOWARD, 
Chicago. ;u 

Birchbark model of canoe decorated 
with porcupine quill designs — 
North Dakota (gift). 

WINSLOW, MISS SOPHY, Chicago. 

2 oil portraits representing chief of 

Blackfeet and his wife, by Carl 
Wimar — United States (gift). 

WINTERNITZ, # L., Grand Rapids, 
Michigan '. 
Male's cotton garment and ? i doll 
dressed as woman — Seminole, 
Florida (gift). 

3 dolls representing Seminole man, 

woman and girl — Florida (gift). 



336 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY 



ALLEN, F. S., Honolulu. 
i economic specimen (gift). 

BALL, C. R., Washington, D. C. 
30 herbarium specimens (gift). 

BLAKE, S. F., Washington, D. C. 
3 herbarium specimens (gift). 

DAHLGREN, B. E., Chicago, Illinois. 
13 economic specimens (gift). 

DUGGERT, MISS P., Chicago, Illinois. 
11 herbarium specimens (gift). 

EVANS, MISS P. A. 

1 herbarium specimen (gift). 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL 

HISTORY. 
Collected by A. C. Persaud (Capt. Mar- 
shall Field British Guiana Ex- 
pedition) : 
184 herbarium specimens. 
87 wood specimens. 
501 duplicate specimens. 

Collected by J. F. Macbride: 

5 herbarium specimens — Illinois and 
Indiana. 

Stanley Field Laboratory: 

20 models and reproductions of 
plants. 

Transfer from Department of Geology: 
500 herbarium specimens. 
16 economic specimens. 

Transfer from Department of Geology: 
5 herbarium specimens. 
1 economic specimen. 

Purchases: 

12,341 herbarium specimens — various 
localities. 



61 economic specimens — various lo- 
calities. 

GRAY HERBARIUM, Cambridge, 
Massachusetts. 
587 herbarium specimens (exchange). 

HYNES, J. A., Chicago, Illinois. 
1 economic specimen (gift). 

MURRAY, M. K., Chicago, Illinois. 
1 economic specimen (gift). 

PAYSON, PROF. E. B., Laramie, Wyo- 
ming. 
150 herbarium specimens (gift). 

RECORD, PROF. S. J., New Haven, 
Connecticut. 
58 herbarium specimens (gift). 
1 economic specimen (gift). 

ROSE, DR. J. N., Washington, D. C. 
4 herbarium specimens (gift). 

ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, Kew, 

England. 
335 herbarium specimens (exchange). 

SHERFF, E. E., Chicago, Illinois. 
12 herbarium specimens (gift). 

THORLAKSON, MISS G., Wheaton, 

Illinois. 
1 herbarium specimen (gift). 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICUL- 
TURE, Washington, D. C. 
80 herbarium specimens (exchange). 
4 herbarium specimens (gift). 

U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 
1 5 5 4 herbarium specimens (exchange) . 

WELLS, W. H. 

1 economic specimen (gift). 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY 



ADAMSON, GEO. H., Chicago. 

1 specimen svnthetic alexandrite 

(gift). 

AKERS, VIVIAN, W., Norway, Maine. 

2 photographs of Bennett Mine — 

Buckfield, Maine (gift). 

ARGETSINGER, MRS. E. H., Pipe- 
stone, Minnesota. 
1 specimen bleached quartzite — 
Pipestone, Minnesota (gift). 



BLOCHER, ARTHUR, Amboy, Illinois. 
9 specimens invertebrate fossils —  
Amboy, Illinois (gift). 

BURROUGHS, H. S., Chicago. 

2 teeth of fossil elephant — Snake 

River, Southern Idaho (gift). 

CHALMERS, WILLIAM J., Chicago' 
25 specimens crystallized minerals — 
Various localities (gift). 

3 specimens crystallized minerals — 

Prince of Wales Island, Alaska 
(gift). 



Jan., 1925 



Annual Report of the Director 



337 



COLLINS, FLOYD, Cave City, Ken- 
tucky. 
32 specimens stalactites and gypsum 
rosettes — Great Crystal Cave, 
Cave City, Kentucky (gift). 

DENNIS, BROSE, Joplin, Missouri. 

1 specimen blende with quartz — Jop- 

lin, Missouri (gift). 

ELWELL, WILBUR J., Danbury, Con 
necticut. 

2 specimens beryl — Branchville, 

Connecticut (gift). 

I specimen lithiophilite — Branch- 

ville, Connecticut (gift). 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL 

HISTORY. 
Collected by O. C. Farrington — Capt. 
Marshall Field Second Brazilian 
Expedition 1923: 
381 specimens minerals — Bahia, Bra- 
zil. 
Collected by H. W. Nichols: 

I I specimens axinite — Moneta Mine, 

Timmins, Ontario. 
Collected by C. C. Sanborn— Capt. 
Marshall Field Chilean Expedi- 
tion 1922-1923: 

1 specimen fossil brachiopod — Cal- 
dera, Chile. 

1 specimen halotrichite — Putre, Pro- 
vince of Tacna, Chile. 

Purchases : 

1 specimen bi-colored cut sapphire — 
Australia. 

6 specimens minerals — Arizona. 

6 specimens minerals — Buckfield and 
Greenwood, Maine. 

6 casts showing evolution of the horse. 

1 stone meteorite — Coldwater, Kan- 
sas. 

1 section of meteorite — Coldwater, 
Kansas. 

1 stone meteorite — Ness County, 
Kansas. 

57 microscopic slides of fossil fora- 
minifera — Chicago. 

FREDERICKS, F. G., Bessie, North 
Dakota. 
18 specimens minerals and septaria 
— North Dakota (gift). 

GREEN, U. D., Peebles, Ohio. 

1 specimen peridotite — Kentucky 
(gift). 

GREENLAND, C. W., Timmins, On- 
tario. 

3 specimens fouqueite — Rochester 

Mine, Timmins, Ontario (gift). 



HALL, LEO. G., Downer's Grove, Illi- 
nois. 

1 photograph of electric furnace 
(gift). 

6 specimens high temperature alloys 
and products (gift). 

HEDIN, STANLEY, Chicago. 

1 specimen fossil leaf in concretion — 
Mazon Creek, Illinois (gift). 

HOTHO, ALBERT, Chicago. 

21 specimens dendrites — Lake Gen- 
eva, Wisconsin (gift). 

4 specimens fossil coral — Lake Gen- 
eva, Wisconsin (gift). 

INDIANA LIMESTONE QUARRY- 
MEN'S ASSOCIATION, THE, 
Bedford, Indiana. 

2 1 finished specimens illustrating col- 
ors and textures of Indiana lime- 
stone — Lawrence and Monroe 
Counties, Indiana (gift). 

3 specimens stylolites — Bedford, 
"LawrenceCo'unty, Indiana (gift). 

KLIER, L., Chicago. 

1 specimen septarium — Evansville, 

Arkansas (gift). 

LAKE SHORE MINES, Ltd., Kirk- 
land Lake, Ontario. 

2 specimens telluride gold ores — 

Kirkland Lake, Ontario (gift). 

LAUDOLF, MATH J., Peebles, Wis- 
consin. 

3 specimens fossil brachiopods — Fond 

du Lac County, Wisconsin (gift). 

LAW, D. H., Dixon, Illinois. 

1 specimen fossil "honeycomb" coral 
— Dixon, Illinois (gift). 

LEE, HENRY E., Rapid City, South 
Dakota. 
20 specimens fossil plants — Lakota 
Formation, Blackhawk, South 
Dakota (exchange). 

MARTIN, THOS., Hoopeston, Illinois. 

1 specimen septarium — Starved 

Rock, Illinois (gift). 

MATHER, HON. STEPHEN T., 
Washington, D. C. and HAR- 
VEY, MESSRS. BYRON and 
FORD, Kansas City, Missouri. 

2 sandstone slabs showing fossil 

tracks — Hermit Trail, Grand 
Canyon, Arizona (gift). 



338 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



McCREA, W. S., Chicago. 

3 photographs of concretions — Mo- 
bridge, North Dakota (gift). 

MILLARD, F. L., Georgetown, British 
Guiana. 

i specimen melanterite— Venez- 
uela (gift). 

MORRISON, J. CAMPBELL, Detroit, 

Michigan. 
1 6 specimens peat briquettes (gift). 

NORTON, C. E., Chicago. 

i specimen fossil trilobite — Kanka- 
kee, Illinois (gift). 

OEFFINGER, ALBERT F., Whiting, 
Indiana. 
82 specimens agate and chalcedony 
— Pacific Ocean Beach, between 
Coos Bay and Coquille River, 
Oregon (gift). 

OHIO HYDRATE & SUPPLY CO., 
THE, Woodville, Ohio. 
12 specimens fossil clams — Near 
Woodville, Ohio (gift). 

PORCUPINE PAYMASTER MINES, 
Ltd. , South Porcupine, Ontario. 

1 specimen free gold in quartz — 

South Porcupine, Ontario (gift). 

RICH, MATT, Chicago. 

2 specimens fossil fish — Fossil, Wyo- 

ming (gift). 

ROYSE, R. L., Ogden, Utah. 

1 specimen silicified shells — Red Des- 
ert near Wamsutter, Wyoming 
(gift). 

RUGGLES, DR. W. L., Oak Park, Illi- 
nois. 
1 specimen baculite showing separate 
septa — Near Crawford, Nebra- 
ska (gift). 



STANDARD OIL CO. (INDIANA), 
Chicago. 
12 specimens "Travertine" candles, 
grease and oils (gift). 

STORTER, G. W., Everglades, Florida. 
5 specimens limestone — Everglades, 

Florida (gift). 
5 specimens sandstone — Everglades, 

Florida (gift). 

STROHRIGL, MICHAEL, Chicago. 
1 specimen lava — Kilauea, Hawaiian 
Islands (gift). 

SWANK, R. S., Chicago. 

1 specimen bleached sandstone con- 
taining native copper — Paola, 
Oklahoma (gift). 

TOPAKYAN, H. H., New York City, 
New York. 
1 large gem turquoise — Persia (gift). 

U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 
1 polished section of Four Corners 
meteorite — Four Corners, New 
Mexico (exchange). 

1 cast of Four Corners meteorite (ex- 

change). 

WALZ, C. D., Hermosa, Black Hills, 
South Dakota. 

2 specimens leached volcanic ash — 

Hermosa, Black Hills, South 
Dakota (gift). 

WIRICK, V. P., Chicago. 

1 mastodon vertebra — Dixon, Illi- 
nois (gift). 

WRIGHT-HARGREAVES MINES, 
Ltd., Kirkland Lake, Ontario. 
7 specimens tellurides of gold — Kirk- 
land Lake, Ontario (gift). 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 



ALLEE, DR. W. C, Chicago. 

4 fishes, 67 frogs, 29 tadpoles, 37 liz- 
ards, 10 snakes, 2 turtles, 1 cai- 
man head, 4 crocodile eggs — Ca- 
nal Zone, Panama (gift). 

ALLEN, C. A., San Geronimo, Cali- 
fornia. 

1 Gibbs' shrew — San Geronimo, Cali- 
fornia (gift). 



AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATUR- 
AL HISTORY, New York City. 

5 fishes — Various localities (ex- 
change). 
15 reptiles — China (exchange). 
2 frogs — San Domingo (gift). 

AYER, EDWARD E., Chicago. 

1 acorn store-house of California 
woodpecker — California (gift). 




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Jan., 1925 



Annual Report of the Director 



339 



BARNES, JUDGE R. M., Lacon, Illi- 
nois. 

1 passenger pigeon nest — Iowa (gift) . 

BARNES, DR. WILLIAM, Decatur, 
Illinois. 
45 butterflies and moths — United 
States (gift). 

BERTOLET, A. S., Thayer, Indiana. 

2 beetles — Thayer, Indiana (gift). 

BEZETT, HOWARD J., Baton Rouge, 
Louisiana. 
18 fishes — Louisiana (exchange). 

BOOSTER'S CLUB, Edgemont, South 
Dakota. 
1 badger, 4 ticks — Edgemont, South 
Dakota (gift). 

BOOTH FISHERIES COMPANY, Chi- 
cago. 

1 lake sturgeon — Grand Haven, 

Michigan (gift). 

BUTLER, A. L., Horsham, England. 

2 hummingbirds — Succha, Peru (ex- 

change). 

COALE, HENRY K., Highland Park, 
Illinois. 

1 skunk, 2 cottontail rabbits — High- 
land Park, Illinois (gift). 

1 chickadee — Lake County, Illinois 
(gift). 

121 birds — Various countries (ex- 
change). 

COLLINS, MAJOR A. M., Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 
226 butterflies — Belgian Congo, 
Africa (gift). 

CONOVER, H. B., Chicago. 

10 mallard eggs — Canada (gift). 
9 oystercatcher eggs — Chiloe Island, 
Chile (gift). 

DAVIS DRY GOODS COMPANY, 

Chicago. 
115 fishes, 8 lizards, 19 turtles, 88 
snakes, 2 aquaria, 6 snake vi- 
varia, 1 leaf insect — Various local- 
ities (gift). 

DAWSON, CHARLES W., Muskogee, 
Oklahoma. 
6 turtles — Muskogee, Oklahoma 
(gift). 

DICKEY, DONALD R., Pasadena, Cal- 
ifornia. 
1 California spotted owl — Humboldt 
County, California (exchange). 



DITZEL, H. F., Chicago. 
1 crane-fly — Chicago (gift). 

DOE, JOHN, Watervliet, Michigan. 
1 Baltimore oriole (gift). 

DOHMEN, U. A., Chicago. 
1 moth — Chicago (gift). 

DONNELLEY, MRS. R. R., Chicago. 
1 immature bald eagle — Chicago 
(gift). 

EKVALL, ROBERT B., Titao, Kansu, 
China. 
3 salamanders — Kansu, China (gift). 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL 
HISTORY. 
Collected by O. C. Farrington (Capt. 
Marshall Field Brazilian Expe- 
dition) : 

1 crab, 2 land shells, 69 insects, 16 

toads — Brazil. 

Collected by H. C. Holling: 

14 mammals — Eldridge, Montana. 

Collected by E. S. Riggs, G. F. Stern- 
berg, and J. B. Abbott (Capt. 
Marshall Field Patagonian Ex- 
pedition) : 

2 starfish, 46 shells, 1 beetle, 1 scor- 

pion, 2 frogs, 26 lizards, 17 birds, 
80 birds' eggs, 1 rhea nest, 23 
mammals — Patagonia. 

Collected by C. C. Sanborn (Capt. Mar- 
shall Field Chilean Expedition) : 
266 mammals, 574 birds, 3 fishes, 84 
lizards, 9 snakes, 320 frogs and 
toads, 14 beetles, 3 bugs, 2 spi- 
ders, 1 crayfish — Bolivia and 
Chile. 

Collected by C. C. Sanborn and F. J. 
W. Schmidt: 
12 mammals, 15 frogs, 1 salamander, 
1 turtle, 1 spider, 1 centipede — 
Highland Park, Illinois. 

Collected by A. C. Weed and L. L. 
Pray (Capt. Marshall Field Ex- 
pedition to Texas) : 
18 mammals, 32 birds, 1 bird's egg, 
162 fishes, 117 fish casts, 4 fish 
skins, 1 turtle, 1 snake, 40 liz- 
ards, 13 frogs and toads, 850 in- 
sects of various orders — South- 
ern Texas. 

Collected by K. P. Schmidt and others: 
2 salamanders, 27 frogs and toads, 3 
snakes — Chicago . 

Purchases: 

5 birds — Alberta, Canada. 

2 owls — Arizona. 

32 mammals — Bolivia. 

30 mammals — British Guiana. 



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34o Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



2160 insects — British New Guinea. 

21 frogs and toads, 11 salamanders, 
5 turtles, 25 snakes, 15 lizards — 
Brownsville, Texas. 

63 birds — Central and South Amer- 
ica and New Guinea. 

25 frogs, in salamanders, 12 lizards, 
1 snake, 5 turtles — Charleston, 
South Carolina. 

1 least weasel — Edmonton, Canada. 

297 birds — Europe. 

104 mammals, 49 birds — Europe and 
Asia. 

1 Rocky Mountain sheep — Fremont 

County, Wyoming. 

95 fishes — Gainesville, Florida. 

123 fishes — Laurel, Maryland. 

12 newts — Louisiana. 

390 birds — Brazil. 

12 frogs, 25 snakes, 65 lizards, 3 tur- 
tles — Santo Domingo. 

482 birds — South America. 

9 frogs, 2 salamanders, 6 lizards — 
South Carolina. 

77 frogs — Santa Catharina, Brazil. 

2 passenger pigeons — United States. 

15 antelopes, 5 mice, 3 bats, 20 mon- 

keys, 7 baboons, 2 chimpanzees 
— West Africa. 

FONSECA, JOSE PINTO DA, Sao 
Paulo, Brazil. 

16 birds — Sao Paulo, Brazil (ex- 

change) . 

GERHARD, W. J., Chicago. 

23 insects, 1 snake — Illinois and In- 
diana. 

GIRVIN, JOHN, Manistique, Michigan. 
1 eel pout — Manistique, Michigan 
(gift). 

GLYNN, JOHN, Chicago. 

1 red-tailed hawk — Lake County, 
Illinois (gift). 

GUERET, E. N., Chicago. 

8 fishes, 4 salamanders, 8 insects — 
Sawyer County, Wisconsin (gift). 

HALPIN, P., Chicago. 

1 tiger salamander — Riverdale, Illi- 
nois (gift). 

HARE, F. E., Manchester, Iowa. 
7 snakes — Manchester, Iowa (gift). 

HELLMAYR, MRS. C. E., Chicago. 
1 red headed woodpecker — Chicago 
(gift). 

HELLMAYR, DR. C. E., Chicago. 
134 insects — Canada (gift). 



HIGINBOTHAM, BRUCE, Evan- 
ston, Illinois. 
1 pilot black snake — Culver, Indi- 
ana (gift). 

HILL, MRS. FREDERICK, Westmont, 
Illinois. 
1 spider — Westmont, Illinois (gift). 

HINE, ASHLEY, Chicago. 

6 mammals, 2 owls — Alberta, Can- 
ada (gift). 

HOFERER, M. J., St. Stephens, Wyo- 
ming. 
1 magpie — St. Stephens, Wyoming 
(gift). 

HOLLING, H. C, Chicago. 
1 box turtle — Indiana (gift). 

JOHNSEN, CHARLES H., Harvey, 
Illinois. 

1 Baltimore oriole nest — Harvey, 

Illinois (gift). 

KAEMPFER, EMIL, Sanchez, Domini- 
can Republic. 

2 turtle eggs — Dominican Republic 

(gift). 

LILJEBLAD, E., Chicago. 
6 moths — Illinois (gift). 

LINCOLN PARK COMMISSION, 
Chicago. 
1 tayra, 2 squirrel monkeys — Pozuzo, 
Peru (gift). 

1 Montana grayling — Bozeman, 

Montana (gift). 
53 fishes — Illinois (gift). 

2 gars — Bellevue, Iowa (gift). 
229 aquarium fishes (gift). 

1 turtle — Kankakee River, Illinois 

(gift). 

LITTLE, LUTHER, Pasadena, Cali- 
fornia. 

2 bats (gift). 

LYON, W. I., Waukegan, Illinois. 

1 louse-fly — Waukegan, Illinois (gift). 

MACKINTOSH, L. J., Darjeeling, 
India. 
1 mammal, 7 birds, 1 grasshopper, 
4 bugs, 42 butterflies, 41 moths 
— India (gift). 

MADDREN, A. G., North Chevy Chase. 

Maryland. 
1 rabbit — Bolivia (gift). 

Mccarty, dr. william h., Des 

Moines, Iowa. 
1 porcupine fish — California (gift). 



Jan., 1925 



Annual Report op the Director 



34i 



McCORMICK, CYRUS, Lake Forest, 
Illinois. 
2 moths — Lake Forest, Illinois (gift). 

MUSEUM OF COMPARATIVE ZOO- 
OLOGY, Cambridge, Massachu- 
setts. 

2 caimans — South America (ex- 
change). 

30 birds — West Indies and South 
America (exchange). 

MYERS, GEORGE S., Jersey City, 
New Jersey. 
11 fishes — Various localities (ex- 
change). 

NARBO, DR. S., Sandnes, Norway. 
7 birds' eggs — Rot Island, Norway 
(gift). 

NASH, GUY, Wisconsin Rapids, Wis- 
consin. 
1 bug, 1 beetle — Wisconsin Rapids, 
Wisconsin (gift). 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF AU- 
DUBON SOCIETIES, New 
York City. 
105 bird plumes (gift). 

NATIONAL SOUTHEASTERN UNI- 
VERSITY, Nanking, China. 
1 salamander, 5 frogs — Nanking, 
China (gift). 

NORTON, MRS. G. B., Chicago. 

1 ruby-throated hummingbird — 
Chicago (gift). 

ORTENBURGER, PROF. A. I., Nor- 
man, Oklahoma. 
4 frogs — Norman, Oklahoma (gift). 

PARKER, J. GRAFTON, Chicago. 
880 birds, 43 birds' nests and eggs — 
Chicago and other localities 
(gift). 

PERRY, ARMSTRONG, Chicago. 
1 photograph of blue racer (gift). 

PINNEO, GEORGE N., Gary, Indiana. 
1 prairie rattlesnake — Mineral 
Springs, Indiana (gift). 

PRAY, L. L., Homewood, Illinois. 

1 red bat, 1 screech owl — Chicago 

(gift). 
35 bird lice — Wauconda, Illinois 
(gift). 

PRINCE, S. FRED, Manhattan, Kan- 
sas. 
1 ground skink, 1 wasp — Stone 
County, Missouri (gift). 



PSOTA, DR. F. J., Chicago. 

1 fly — Caracas Valley, Venezuela 

(gift). 

RHEAD, LOUIS, Brooklyn, New York. 

2 eastern brook pickerel — Long Is- 

land, New York (gift). 

RUDHMANN. Delhi, California. 

2 sand crickets— Delhi, California 
(gift). 

RUECKERT, ARTHUR G., Chicago. 

1 great-horned owl — Ringwood, Illi- 

nois (exchange). 

2 brown bats— Waukegan, Illinois 

(gift). 
1 water snake — Henry, Illinois (gift). 

SANBORN, COLIN C, Evanston, Illi- 
nois. 

1 pine mouse, 1 tree frog — Highland 

Park, Illinois (gift). 
5 birds — Lake County, Illinois (gift). 

SAN DIEGO SOCIETY OF NAT- 
URAL HISTORY, San Diego, 
California. 

2 lizards, 2 Pacific rattlesnakes, 3 red 

rattlesnakes — San Diego Coun- 
ty, California (exchange). 

SCHMIDT, KARL P., Homewood, Illi- 
nois. 
1 swamp tree frog — Homewood, Illi- 
nois (gift). 

STEEN, E. B. and GRAVE, B. H., 

Crawfordsville, Indiana. 
78 salamanders — Crawfordsville, In- 
diana (gift). 

STERN, LEON, Chicago. 

4 turtles — Whitehall, Michigan (gift). 

TERRILL, W. A., Norway, Michigan. 
1 hognose snake — Fai thorn, Michi- 
gan (gift). 

TIMBERS, WILLIAM, Chicago. 

3 cave crickets — Barren Countv, 

Kentucky (gift). 

TYLER, C. C, Eureka, Florida. 

1 beetle — Marion Countv, Florida 
(gift). 

8 tadpoles, 1 salamander, 1 lizard, 
1 snake — Marion County. Flor- 
ida (Gift). 

TYRRELL, W. B., Maywood, Illinois. 
5 ticks, 2 beetles— Wisconsin and Ill- 
inois (gift). 



342 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 
i marsupial — Matchu Picchu, Peru 
(exchange). 

WADDINGTON, MRS. A. H., West- 
mount, Illinois. 
10 hair worms — Westmount, Illinois 
(gift). 

WALSH, PATRICK, Chicago, 
i red bat — Chicago (gift). 



WALTERS, L. L., Chicago. 

17 frogs — Salamonia, Indiana (gift). 

WEED, A. C, Chicago. 

25 insects — Northern Illinois (gift). 

WOLCOTT, A. B., Chicago. 

1 louse-fly — Niles, Illinois (gift). 

9 frogs, 6 snakes, 1 lizard, 175 in- 
sects — Stone County, Missouri 
(gift). 



SECTION OF PHOTOGRAPHY 



BENNETT, MISS HELEN B., Chicago. 
16 prints of Indian grave. 

CHALMERS, W. J., Chicago. 

30 photographs — Egypt, Algeria 
and Tunesia. 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL 
HISTORY. 
Made by Section: 

9,602 prints, 1,518 negatives, 651 
lantern slides. 
Developed for Field Expeditions : 
456 negatives. 
47 moving picture films. 

FIELD, CAPTAIN MARSHALL, EX- 
PEDITIONS. 
To China: 

25 negatives of actors' costumes. 
To British Honduras: 

325 negatives of natives, landscapes 
and general views. 
To Brazil: 

525 negatives of natives, landscapes 
and general views. 

HEPPERLEY, J. F., Omaha, Nebraska. 
18 prints of Indian pictographs. 



HUNTINGTON LIBRARY AND ART 
GALLERY. 
2 photostat reproductions. 

JONES, ARTHUR B., MALAYAN 
EXPEDITION. 
1 moving picture reel. 

McCREA, W. S., Chicago. 

7 negatives of rock formations. 

PATHE REVIEW, New York City. 
1 moving picture reel. 

RYERSON, MARTIN A., Chicago. 
58 photographs of racial types of 

Mexico. 
27 photographs of racial types of 

Korea. 
49 photographs of racial types of 

Melanesia. 

10 photographs. 

WINTERNITZ, L., Fort Myers, Flor- 
ida. 
30 photographs of Seminole Indians. 
17 prints of Seminole Indians. 



THE LIBRARY 
LIST OF DONORS AND EXCHANGES 
(Accessions are made by exchange, unless otherwise designated) 



AFRICA: 

East Africa and Uganda Natural 

History, Nairobi. 
Geological Society, Johannesburg. 
Institut d'Egypte, Cairo. 
Ministry of Public Works, Cairo. 
Natal Museum, Pietermaritzburg. 
Natal Technical College, Durban. 
Rhodesia Scientific Society, Bulawayo. 
Royal Society of South Africa, Cape 

Town. 
Societe de Geographie d'Alger. 



Societe d'Histoire Naturelle de l'Af- 
rique du Nord, Algeria. 

Societe des Sciences Naturelles du 
Maroc, Rabat. 

South African Association for the 
Advancement of Science, Cape 
Town. 

South African Department of Agri- 
culture, Pretoria. 

South African Museum, Cape Town. 

Transvaal Museum, Pretoria. 



Jan., 1925 



Annual Report of the Director 



343 



ARGENTINA: 

Ministerio de Agricultura, Buenos 

Aires. 
Museo de La Plata. 
Museo Nacional, Buenos Aires. 
Sociedad Cientifica Argentina, Buenos 

Aires. 
Sociedad Ornitol6gica del Plata, 

Buenos Aires. 
Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 

Buenos Aires. 

AUSTRALIA: 

Australian Museum, Sydney. 

Botanic Gardens and Government 
Domains, Sydney. 

Commonwealth of Australia, Mel- 
bourne. 

Department of Agriculture, Adelaide. 

Department of Agriculture, Sydney. 

Department of Agriculture, Well- 
ington. 

Department of Mines, Brisbane. 

Department of Mines, Sydney. 

Field Naturalists' Club, Melbourne. 

Fish Commission of New South Wales, 
Sydney. 

Forestry Commission, Sydney (gift). 

Geological Survey of Western Austra- 
lia, Perth. 

Linnean Society of New South Wales, 
Sydney. 

Melbourne University. 

National Herbarium, Melbourne. 

Ornithological Society of South Aus- 
tralia, Adelaide. 

Public Library, Museum and Art Gal- 
lery, Adelaide. 

Public Library, Museum and National 
Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne. 

Queensland Geological Survey, Bris- 
bane. 

Queensland Museum, Brisbane. 

Royal Geographical Society of Aus- 
tralasia, Brisbane. 

Royal Society of New South Wales, 
Sydney. 

Royal Society of Queensland, Bris- 
bane. 

Royal Society of South Australia, Ade- 
laide. 

Royal Society of Tasmania, Hobart. 

Royal Society of Western Australia, 
Perth. 

Royal Zoological and Acclimatisation 
Society of Victoria, Melbourne. 

South Australian Museum, Adelaide. 

Technological Museum, Sydney. 
AUSTRIA: 

Naturhistorisches Museum, Vienna. 

Zoologisch-Botanische Gesellschaft, 
Vienna. 

Zoologisches Institut, Graz. 



BELGIUM: 

Academie Royale de Belgique, Brus- 
sels. 

Jardin Botanique de l'Etat, Brussels. 

Kruidkundig Genootschap Dodonea, 
Ghent. 

Nederlaudsche Phytopathologische 
(Plantenziekten) Vereeniging, Ghent. 

Societe de Botanique, Brussels. 

Societe Royale d'Archeologie, Brus- 
sels. 

Universite de Louvain. 

BORNEO: 

Sarawak Museum. 

BRAZIL: 

Academia Brasileira de Sciencias, Rio 

de Janeiro. 
Biblioteca Nacional, Rio de Janeiro. 
Escola Superior de Agricultura e Medi- 

cina, Veterinaria, Rio de Janeiro. 
Minister of Foreign Affairs of Brazil, 

Rio de Janeiro. 
Secretaria da Agricultura, Commercio 

e Obras Publicas, Sao Paulo. 
Servico Geologico e Mineralogica, Rio 

de Janeiro. 

BRITISH GUIANA: 

Board of Agriculture, Georgetown. 
Royal Agricultural and Commercial 
Society, Demerara. 

CANADA: 

Canadian Arctic Expedition, Ottawa 

(gift). 

Chief Game Guardian of Saskatche- 
wan, Regina. 

Department of Agriculture, Ottawa. 

Department of Agriculture, Victoria. 

Department of Indian Affairs, Ottawa. 

Department of Mines, Ontario, 
Toronto. 

Department of Mines, Ottawa. 

Department of the Interior, Geologi- 
cal Survey, Ottawa. 

Entomological Society of Ontario, 
Toronto. 

Hamilton Association. 

Horticultural Societies, Toronto. 

McGill University, Montreal. 

Minister of Education, Ontario, To- 
ronto. 

Nova Scotian Institute of Science, Hali- 
fax. 

Provincial Museum, Toronto. 

Provincial Museum, Victoria. 

Royal Canadian Institute, Toronto. 

Royal Society of Canada, Ottawa. 

Soci6te de Geographic Quebec. 

University of Toronto. 



344 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



CEYLON: 

Colombo Museum. 

CHILE: 

Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Valpar- 
aiso. 

Museo de Etnologia y Antropologia, 
Santiago. 

Museo Nacional de Chile, Santiago. 

CHINA: 

Botany and Forestry Department, 

Hong-Kong. 
Geological Survey, Pekin. 
Royal Asiatic Society of North China, 

Shanghai. 
Science Society of China, Shanghai 

(gift). 
University of Nanking. 

CZECHO-SLOVAKIA: 

Deutscher Naturwissenschaftlich- 

Medizinischer Verein fur Bohmen 

"Lotos", Prague. 
Plant Physiological Laboratory, 

Prague (gift). 
Societas Entomologica Bohemica, 

Prague. 

DENMARK: 

K. Bibliotek, Copenhagen. 

K. Nordiske Oldskriftselskab, Copen- 
hagen. 

Naturhistorisk Forening, Copenhagen. 

Royal Society of Northern Antiquar- 
ies, Copenhagen. 

Society Botanique, Copenhagen. 

ECUADOR: 

Academia Nacional de Historia, Quito. 

FEDERATED MALAY STATES: 
Federated Malay States Museum, 

Kuala Lumpur. 
Royal Asiatic Society, Malayan Branch, 

Singapore. 

FIJI ISLANDS: 
Fijian Society, Suva. 

FINLAND: 

Abo Akademi. 

Societas pro Fauna et Flora Fennica, 

Helsingfors. 
Suomen Museo, Helsingfors. 

FRANCE: 

Academie des Sciences, Paris. 
Ecole dAnthropologie, Paris. 
Faculte des Sciences, Marseille. 3 
Minister e de 1' Instruction Publique, 

Paris (gift). 
Mus£e Guimet, Paris. 



Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle, 
Paris. 

LaNature , Paris. 

Societe" d'Etudes Scientifiques, Angers. 

Society d'Histoire Naturelle, Tou- 
louse. 

Societe' d' Horticulture, Paris. 

Soci£t6 de Geographie, Paris. 

Soci6t6 des Americanistes, Paris. 

Societe Linguistique, Paris. 

Soci6t6 Nationale d'Horticulture de 
France, Paris. 

University de Rennes. 

GERMANY: 

Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaf- 
ten, Munich. 

Botanischer Garten und Botanisches 
Museum, Berlin. 

Botanischer Verein der Provinz Bran- 
denburg, Berlin. 

Deutsche Dendrologische Gesellschaft, 
Bonn-Poppelsdorf. 

Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Anthropo- 
logic, Ethnologie und Urgeschichte, 
Berlin. 

Deutsche Morgenlandische Gesell- 
schaft, Leipzig. 

Deutscher Seefischerei Verein, Berlin. 

Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, 
Berlin. 

Geographische Gesellschaft, Hamburg. 

Gesellschaft fur Erdkunde, Berlin. 

Hamburgische Universitat. 

Hessische Ludwigs-Universitat Gies- 
sen. 

K. Museum fur Volkskunde, Berlin. 

K. Preussische Akademie der Wissen- 
schaften, Berlin. 

K. Universitats Bibliothek, Marburg. 

K. Universitats Bibliothek, Munich. 

K. Zoologisches Anthropologisch- 
Ethnographgisches Museum, Dres- 
den. 

K. Zoologisches Museum, Berlin. 

Museum fur Lander-und Volkerkunde, 
Stuttgart. 

Museum fur Volkerkunde, Hamburg. 

Naturforschende Gesellschaft, Frei- 
burg. 

Naturhistorische Gesellschaft, Nurem- 
berg. 

Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein, Karls- 
ruhe. 

Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein fur 
Schwaben und Neuburg, Augsburg. 

Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein fur 
Steiermark, Graz. 

Ornithologische Gesellschaft in Bay- 
ern, Munich. 

Rheinische Missions-Gesellschaft, Bre- 
men. 



Jan., 1925 



Annual Report of the Director 



345 



Schlesische Gesellschaft fur Vater- 
landische Cultur, Breslau. 

Senckenbergische Naturforsehende 
Gesellschaft, Frankfurt a. M. 

Thuringischer Botanischer Verein, 
Weimar. 

Wurttembergische Gesellschaft zur 
Forderung der Wissenschaften, Tu- 
bingen. 

Zcologisches Museum, Berlin. 

Zoologisches Museum, Hamburg. 

GREAT BRITAIN: 

Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. 

Ashmolean Natural History Society, 
Oxford. 

Birmingham Natural History and Phi- 
losophical Society. 

Bristol Museum and Gallery. 

British Museum, London. 

British Museum (Natural History), 
London. 

Cambridge Antiquarian Society. 

Cambridge Philosophical Society. 

Cambridge University. 

Cardiff Naturalists' Society. 

Dove Marine Laboratory, Cullercoats. 

Dumfriesshire and Galloway Natural 
History and Antiquarian Society, 
Dumfries. 

Fisheries Board, Edinburgh. 

Geological Society, Edinburgh. 

Geological Society, Liverpool. 

Great Britain Geological Society, 
London. 

Homiman Museum and Library, 
London. 

Hull Municipal Museum. 

Imperial Bureau of Entomology, Lon- 
don. 

Japan Society of London. 

Imperial College of Science and Tech- 
nology, London. 

Lancashire Sea Fisheries Laboratory, 
Liverpool. 

Linnean Society, London. 

Liverpool Biological Society. 

Manchester Field Naturalists' and 
Archaeologists' Society. 

Manchester Geographical Society. 

Manchester Literary and Philosophi- 
cal Society. 

Manchester Museum. 

Marine Biological Association, Ply- 
mouth. 

Museum of Practical Geology, London. 

National Library of Wales, Aberyst- 
wyth. 

National Museum of Wales, Cardiff. 

Natural History and Philosophical 
Society, Brighton. 

Natural History Society, Glasgow. 



Natural History Society of Northum- 
berland, Durham and Newcastle-on- 
Tyne, Newcastle. 

Oriental Ceramic Society, London. 

Royal Anthropological Institute of 
Great Britain and Ireland, London. 

Royal Botanic Gardens, Edinburgh. 

Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. 

Royal Colonial Institute, London. 

Royal Geographical Society, London. 

Royal Horticultural Society, London . 

Royal Society, London. 

Royal Society of Arts, London. 

Royal Society of Edinburgh. 

South London Entomological and Na- 
tural History Society, London. 

Tring Zoological Museum. 

Zoological Society of London. 

HUNGARY: 

Hungarian Institute of Ornithology, 

Budapest. 
Magyar Termeszettudomanyi Tarsu- 

lat, Budapest. 

INDIA: 

Anthropological Society, Bombay. 

Archaeological Survey, Allahabad. 

Archaeological Survey, Burma, Ran- 
goon. 

Archaeological Survey, Calcutta. 

Archaeological Survey, Eastern Circle, 
Patna. 

Archaeological Survey, Frontier Circle, 
Peshawar. 

Archaeological Department, Madras. 

Archaeological Survey of Burma, La- 
hore. 

MEXICO: 

Instituto Geologico de Mexico. 

Museo Nacional de Arqueologia, His- 
toric y Etnografia, Mexico. 

Secretaria de Agricultura y Fomento, 
Direccion de Antropologia, Mexico. 

Sociedad Cientifica "Antonio Alzate," 
Mexico. 

Sociedad Geol6gica Mexicana, Mexico. 

Universidad Nacional, Mexico. 

NETHERLANDS: 

Bataafsch Genootschap der Proefon- 
dervindelijke Wijsbegeerte, Rotter- 
dam. 

Directie van den Landbouw, Hague, 

K. Academie van Wetenschappen, 
Amsterdam. 

K. Instituut voor de Taal-Land-en Vol- 
kenkunde van Nederlandsch Indie, 
Hague. 

K. Nederlandsch Aardijkundig Geno- 
otschap, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Dierkunde Vereeniging, 
Leiden. 



346 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



Nederlandsche Handel-Maatschappij , 
Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Phytopathologische 
Vereeniging, Wageningen. 

Rijks Ethnographisch Museum, Lei- 
den. 

Rijks Hoogere Land-Tuin-en Bosch- 
bouwschool, Wageningen. 

Rijks Museum van Natuurlijke His- 
torie, Leiden. 

Universiteit van Amsterdam, Biblio- 
thek. 

NEW ZEALAND: 

Acclimatisation Society, Wellington. 

Auckland Institute and Museum, Wel- 
lington. 

Canterbury Museum, Christchurch. 

Department of Agriculture, Welling- 
ton. 

Department of Mines, Wellington. 

Dominion Museum, Wellington. 

Geological Survey, Wellington. 

New Zealand Board of Science and Art, 
Wellington. 

NORWAY: 

Bergen Museum. 

Geologisk Museums Bibliothek, Kris- 

tiania. 
Norges Geologiske Undersokolse, Kris- 

tiania. 
Physiographiske Forening, Kristiania. 
Tromso Museum. 
Zoologiske Museum, Kristiania. 

PERU: 

Cuerpo de Ingenieros de Minas, Lima. 
Sociedad Geografica, Lima. 
Universidad Mayor de San Marcos, 
Lima. 

POLAND: 

Academy of Commerce, Warsaw. 

Bibliotheque de l'Ecole Superieure de 
Commerce, Warsaw. 

Musei Polonici Historiae Naturales, 
Warsaw. 

Soci6te Botanique de Pologne, War- 
saw. 

PORTUGAL: 

Biblioteca Nacional, Lisbon. 
Collegio de San Fiel, Braga. 
Instituto de Anatomia, Lisbon. 
Societe" Portugaise des Sciences Nat- 

urelles, Lisbon. 
Universidade de Lisboa. 
Asiatic Society of Bengal, Calcutta. 
Bihar and Orissa Research Society, 

Patna. 
Department of Agriculture, Bombay. 
Department of Agriculture, Madras. 
Department of Agriculture, Poona. 
Department of Agriculture, Pusa. 



Geological Survey, Calcutta. 

Government, Cinchona Plantation, 
Calcutta. 

Government of India, Calcutta. 

Government Museum, Madras. 

Indian Museum, Calcutta. 

Journal of Indian Botany, Madras. 

National Indian Association, Calcutta 
(gift). 

Nazim College, Archaeological Depart- 
ment, Hyderabad. 

Royal Botanic Garden, Calcutta. 

University of Calcutta. 

Zoological Survey of India, Calcutta. 

IRELAND: 

Belfast Naturalists' Field Club. 
Department of Agriculture, Scientific 

Investigations, Dublin. 
Geological Survey, Dublin. 
Royal Irish Academy, Dublin. 
Royal Dublin Society. 

ITALY: 

Istituto Botanica, Universita di Pavia. 
Istituto Geografico de Agostini, 

Novara. 
Musei Zoologiae ed Anatomia Com- 

parata, Turin. 
Museo Civico di Storia Naturale, 

Genoa. 
R. Accademia delle Scienze di Torino. 
R. Accademia Nazionale del Lincei, 

Rome. 
R. Orto Botanico Giardino Coloniale, 

Palermo. 
R. Scuola Superiore di Agricoltura, 

Portici. 
R. Societa Geografica Italiana, Rome. 
Societa dei Naturalisti, Naples. 
Societa di Scienze Naturali ed Econo- 

miche, Florence. 
Societa Italiana de Scienze Naturali, 

Milan. 
Societa Romana di Antropologia, 

Rome. 
Societa Toscana di Scienze Naturali, 

Pisa. 

JAPAN: 

Anthropological Society of Tokyo. 

Geological Society, Tokyo. 

Government Research Institute, Tai- 
hoku, Formosa. 

Imperial University, Taihoku, For- 
mosa. 

Imperial University of Tokyo, Col- 
lege of Science. 

Ornithological Society, Tokyo. 

Tokyo Botanical Society. 

JAVA: 

Bataviaasch Genootschap van Kun- 
sten en Wetenschappen, Batavia. 



Jan., 1925 



Annual Report of the Director 



347 



Department of Agriculture, Buiten- 

zorg. 
Encyclopaedisch Bureau, Weltevre- 

den. 
Jardin Botanique, Weltevreden. 
Java Instituut, Weltevreden. 
K. Natuurkundige Vereeniging in 

Nederlandsch-Indie, Weltevreden. 

RUSSIA: _ 

Acad^mie Imperiale des Sciences, Len- 
ingrad. 
Botanical Garden, Leningrad. 
Societe des Naturalistes de Petrograd. 
Universitat Dorpatensis. 

SPAIN: 

Collegio de Pasaje, La Guardia. 

Institucid Catalana d'Historia 
Natural, Barcelona. 

Instituto General y Tecnico, Valencia. 

Instituto Nacional de Ciencias, Madrid. 

Junta de Ciencias Naturals, Barcelona. 

Junta para Amplication de Estudious 
e Investigaciones Cientificas, Mad- 
rid. 

R. Academia de Ciencias y Arte, Bar- 
celona. 

R. Academia de Ciencias Exactas, Fisi- 
cas y Naturales, Madrid. 

Sociedad Espanola de Historia Nat- 
ural, Madrid. 

SWEDEN: 

K. Biblioteket, Stockholm. 

K. Svenska Vetenskapsakademien, 

Stockholm. 
K. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets 

Akademien, Stockholm. 
Lunds Universitet. 
Svenska Sallskapet for Antropologi 

och Geografi, Stockholm. 
Universitet Biblioteket, Upsala. 

SWITZERLAND: 

Botanischer Garten, Bern. 

Botanisches Museum, Zurich. 

Conservatoire et Jardin Botaniques, 
Geneva. 

Geographisch-Ethnographische Gesell- 
schaft, Zurich. 

Historisches Museum, Bern. 

Naturforschende Gesellschaft, Basel. 

Naturforschende Gesellschaft, Bern. 

Naturforschende Gesellschaft, Zurich. 

Musees d'Histoire Naturelle, Lau- 
sanne. 

Ostschweizerische Geograph-Commer- 
cielle Gesellschaft, St. Gallen. 

Soci6te de Physique et d'Histoire Nat- 
urelle, Geneva. 



Soci6te Entomologique, Bern. 
Societe Fribourgeoise des Sciences Nat- 

urelles, Fribourg. 
Societe Helvetique des Sciences Nat- 

urelles, Bern. 
Societe Neuchateloise de Geographie, 

Neuchatel. 
Universitat, Bern. 
Universitat, Botanisches Museum, 

Zurich. 

VENEZUELA: 

Cultura Venezolana, Caracas. 

WEST INDIES: 

Academia Nacional de Artes y Letras, 

Havana. 
Agricultural Experiment Station, Porto 

Rico. 
Biblioteca Nacional, Havana. 
Department of Agriculture of Jamaica, 

Kingston. 
Imperial Department of Agriculture, 

Barbados. 
Insular Experiment Station, Rio Pie- 

dras. 
Liceo de Costa Rica, San Jos6. 
Trinidad and Tobago Department of 

Agriculture, Port of Spain. 
Universidad de Habana. 

Ahl, Ernst, Berlin. 
Altobelle, G., (gift). 
Benson, Rex, London (gift). 
Brandstetter, Ren ward, Lucerne (gift). 
Carpenter, G. H., Dublin. 
Cook, Melville T., Pio Piedras. 
Dearness, John, London. 
Dunod, H., Paris. 
Faura y Sans, M., Tortosa. 
Forberg, Elof, Stockholm. 
Gamble, J. S., Madras. 
Gennep, Arnold van, Paris. 
Gleerup, C. W. K., Lund. 
Greslebin, Hector, Buenos Aires (gift). 
Hammerton, J. A., London (gift). 
Helbin, Hugo, Frankfurt a. M. (gift) . 
Herrera, Moises, Mexico. 
Herter, W., Berlin (gift). 
Huard, V. A., Quebec. 
Kindle, E. M., Ottawa (gift). 
Kishenouye, K., Tokyo (gift). 
Lavanden, L., Paris (gift). 
Lehmann, Walter., Berlin (gift). 
Loo, C. T., Paris (gift). 
MacKenzie, William C., Melbourne. 
MacRitchie, David., Edinburgh. 
Marelli, Carlos A., Buenos Aires (gift). 
Mertens, Robert, Frankfurt a. M. 
Miller, David, Wellington (gift). 
Nordenskiold, Erland, Goteborg (gift). 
Porter, Carlos E., Santiago de Chile. 



348 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



Richter, Rudolf, Frankfurt a. M. 

Rinne, Friedrich, Leipzig (gift). 

Rivet, P., Paris. 

Roig, Mario Sanchez, Havana (gift). 

Roule, Louis, Paris (gift). 

Sapir, E., Ottawa. 

Schinz, Hans, Zurich. 

Schlaginhaufen, Otto, Zurich. 

Schmidt, W., Wien. 

Shirogoroff, S. M., Leningrad (gift). 

Tobler, Leipzig. 

Watson, J. Henry, Manchester (gift). 

Welch, M. B., Sydney. 

ALABAMA: 

Anthropological Society, Montgomery. 

CALIFORNIA: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Berkeley. 

Board of Fish and Game Commission- 
ers, Sacramento. 

California Academy of Sciences, San 
Francisco. 

Citrus Experiment Station, Riverside. 

Cooper Ornithological Club, Holly- 
wood. 

Natural History Museum, San Diego 
(gift). 

Pomona College, Clarement. 

San Diego Society of Natural History. 

Scripps Institution of Biological Re- 
search, La Jolla. 

Southern Academy of Sciences, Los 
Angeles. 

Southwest Museum, Los Angeles. 

Stanford University. 

State Mining Bureau, Sacramento. 

University of California, Berkeley. 

COLORADO: 

Bureau of Mines, Denver. 
Colorado College, Colorado Springs. 
Colorado Museum of Natural History, 

Denver. 
Colorado Scientific Society, Denver. 
Colorado University, Boulder. 
• State Historical and Natural History 
Society, Denver. 

CONNECTICUT: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, New 

Haven. 
American Oriental Society, New 

Haven. 
Connecticut Academy of Arts and 

Sciences, New Haven. 
Hartford Public Library. 
Marsh Botanical Garden, New Haven. 
Osborn Botanical Laboratory, New 

Haven. 
Peabody Museum, New Haven. 
State Geological and Natural History 

Survey, Hartford. 



Storrs Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion. 
Wesleyan University, Middletown. 
Yale University, New Haven. 

FLORIDA: 

State Geological Survey, Tallahassee. 

HAWAII: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Honolulu. 

Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Hono- 
lulu. 

Board of Commissioners of Agricul- 
ture and Forestry, Honolulu. 

Hawaiian Entomological Society, 
Honolulu. 

Hawaiian Sugar Planters' Association, 
Honolulu. 

IDAHO: 

Mining Industry, Boise. 

State Historical Society of Idaho, 

Boise. 
University of Idaho, Moscow. 

ILLINOIS: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Ur- 
bana. 

Art Institute of Chicago. 

Audubon Society, Chicago. 

Board of Education, Chicago. 

Chicago Historical Society. 

Chicago Public Library. 

Division of Natural History Survey, 
Urbana. 

Hardwood Record, Chicago (gift). 

John Crerar Library, Chicago. 

Lake Forest College. 

Newberry Library, Chicago. 

Northwestern University, Evanston. 

Open Court Publishing Company, Chi- 
cago. 

State Academy of Science, Springfield. 

State Board of Agriculture, Springfield. 

State Geological Survey, Springfield. 

State Historical Library, Springfield. 

State Water Survey, Springfield. 

Sweet, Wallach and Company, Chi- 
cago (gift). 

University of Chicago. 

University of Illinois, Urbana. 

INDIANA: 

Academy of Science, Indianapolis. 

Department of Conservation, Indian- 
apolis. 

Indiana University, Bloomington. 

John Herron Art Institute, Indian- 
apolis. 

Legislative Reference Bureau, Indian- 
apolis. 

Purdue University, Lafayette. 

University of Notre Dame. 



*%j 



Of 



«** 






FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE LIX. 



tK. v ^ V..." 





IMPERIAL STATE ROBE OF THE MANCHU DYNASTY, OF YELLOW SILK WITH 
DESIGNS WOVEN IN. CHINA, K'lEN-LUNG PERIOD (1736-95). 
CAPTAIN MARSHALL FIELD EXPEDITION TO CHINA, 1923. 
About one-twelfth actual size. 



Jan., 1925 



Annual Report of the Director 



349 



IOWA: 

Academy of Science, Des Moines. 
Horticultural Society, Des Moines. 
Iowa Geological Survey, Des Moines. 
Iowa State College, Ames. 
University of Iowa, Iowa City. 

KANSAS: 

Academy of Science, Topeka. 
Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Manhattan. 
State Board of Agriculture, Topeka. 
State Geological Survey, Lawrence. 
State Historical Society, Topeka. 
University of Kansas, Lawrence. 

KENTUCKY: 

Academy of Science, Frankfort. 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Louisville. 

Kentucky Geological Survey, Frank- 
fort. 

LOUISIANA: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, Bat- 
on Rouge. 

Department of Conservation, New 
Orleans. 

State Museum, New Orleans. 

MAINE: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Orono. 
Bowdoin College, Brunswick. 

MARYLAND: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 

College Park. 
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore. 

MASSACHUSETTS: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Amherst. 

American Academy of Arts and Sci- 
ences, Boston. 

American Antiquarian Society, Wor- 
cester. 

Boston Public Library. 

Boston Society of Natural History. 

Children's Museum of Boston, Jama- 
ica Plain. 

Harvard College, Museum of Compar- 
ative Zoology, Cambridge. 

Harvard University. Arnold Arbor- 
etum, Jamaica Plain. 

Harvard University. Gray Herbarium, 
Cambridge. 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society, 
Boston. 

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. 

New Bedford Free Public Library. 

Peabody Institute. 

Peabody Museum, Cambridge. 

Peabody Museum, Salem. 



Phillips Academy, Andover. 

Salem Public Library. 

Smith College, Northampton. 

Springfield City Library Association. 

Springfield Natural History Museum. 

Tufts College. 

Williams College, Williamstown. 

MICHIGAN: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Agricultural College. 

Chamberlain Memorial Museum, 
Three Oaks. 

Department of Conservation. Geo- 
logical Survey Division, Lansing. 

Detroit Institute of Art. 

Geological and Natural History Sur- 
vey, Lansing. 

Grand Rapids Public Library. 

Michigan Academy of Science, Ann 
Arbor. 

Michigan College of Mines, Houghton. 

Michigan State Library, Lansing. 

State Board of Agriculture, Lansing. 

State Board of Library Commissions, 
Lansing. 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. 

MINNESOTA: 
Agricultural Experiment Station, 

University Farm. 
Minneapolis Institute of Arts. 
Minnesota Historical Society, Saint 

Paul. 
Saint Paul Institute. 
State Entomologist, University Farm. 
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. 

MISSISSIPPI: 
Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Agricultural College. 
Mississippi State Geological Survey, 

Jackson. 

MISSOURI: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Columbia. 
Bureau of Geology and Mines, Rolla. 
City Art Museum, Saint Louis. 
Missouri Botanic Garden, Saint Louis. 
Missouri Historical Society, Columbia. 
Saint Louis Academy of Science. 
Saint Louis Public Library. 
Saint Louis University. 
University of Missouri. School of 

Mines, Rolla. 
Washington University, Saint Louis. 

MONTANA: 

State Board of Horticulture, Missoula. 
University of Montana, Missoula. 

NEBRASKA: 
University of Nebraska, Lincoln. 



35° Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



NEVADA: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Reno. 

NEW JERSEY: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Trenton. 

Department of Conservation and De- 
velopment, Trenton. 

Newark Museums Association. 

Princeton University. 

NEW MEXICO: 

Historical Society, Santa Fe. 
New Mexico Museum, Santa Fe. 

NEW YORK: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Geneva. 

American Geographical Society, New 
York. 

American Museum of Natural History, 
New York. 

Asia Publishing Company, New York. 

Brooklyn Botanic Garden. 

Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sci- 
ences. 

Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences. 

Carnegie Foundation for the Advance- 
ment of Teaching, New York (gift). 

Cooper Union for the Advancement of 
Science and Art, New York. 

Cornell University, Ithaca. 

Forest and Stream Publishing Com- 
pany, New York. 

Inter-American Magazine, New York 
(gift). 

Japan Society, New York. 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New 
York. 

Museum of the American Indian, New 
York. 

New York Academy of Sciences, New 
York. 

New York Botanical Garden, New 
York. 

New York Historical Society, New 
York. 

Pratt Institute Free Library, New 
York. 

Public Library, New York. 

Rochester Academy of Science. 

Rockefeller Foundation, New York. 

State College of Forestry, Syracuse. 

State Library, Albany. 

State Museum, Albany. 

Staten Island Institute of Arts and 
Sciences, New York. 

Stone Publishing Company, New York. 

Syracuse University. 

University of the State of New York, 
Albany. 



Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 
Zoological Society, New York. 

NORTH CAROLINA: 

Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society, 
Chapel Hill. 

NORTH DAKOTA: 

Historical Society, Grand Forks. 
University of North Dakota, Univer- 
sity. 

OHIO: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Wooster. 

Cincinnati Museum Association. 

Cleveland Museum of Art. 

Cleveland Museum of Natural His- 
tory. 

Cleveland Public Library. 

Denison University, Granville. 

Geological Survey, Columbus. 

Ohio Academy of Science, Columbus. 

State Archaeological and Historical So- 
ciety, Columbus. 

State University, Columbus. 

University of Cincinnati. 

Wilson Ornithological Club, Oberlin. 

OKLAHOMA: 

University of Oklahoma, Norman. 

OREGON: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Corvallis. 
University of Oregon, Eugene. 

PENNSYLVANIA: 

American Philosophical Society, Phil- 
adelphia. 

Association of Engineering Societies, 
Philadelphia. 

Bryn Mawr College. 

Bureau of Topographic and Geological 
Survey, Harrisburg. 

Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh. 

Carnegie Library, Pittsburgh. 

Carnegie Museum, Pittsburgh. 

Dropsie College, Philadelphia. 

Engineers' Society of Western Penn- 
sylvania, Pittsburgh. 

Franklin Institute, Philadelphia. 

Numismatic and Antiquarian Society, 
Philadelphia. 

Pennsylvania Museum and School of 
Industrial Art, Philadelphia. 

Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sci- 
ences. 

Philadelphia College of Pharmacy. 

Philadelphia Commercial Museum. 

Sullivant Moss Society, Pittsburgh. 

University of Pennsylvania, Philadel- 
phia. 



Jan., 1925 



Annual Report of the Director 



35i 



University of Pennsylvania, Museum, 
Philadelphia. 

Wagner Free Institute of Science, Phil- 
adelphia. 

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: 

Bureau of Education, Manila. 

Department of Agriculture, Manila. 

Department of Agriculture and Nat- 
ural Resources, Manila. 

Department of Interior, Bureau of Sci- 
ence, Manila. 

RHODE ISLAND: 

Park Museum, Providence. 

SOUTH CAROLINA: 
Charleston Museum. 

SOUTH DAKOTA: 
Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Brookings. 
Geological and Natural History Sur- 
vey, Vermilion. 

TENNESSEE: 

Department of Education, Division of 
Geology, Nashville. 

TEXAS: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 

College Station. 
Scientific Society of San Antonio. 
University of Texas, Austin. 

VERMONT: 
Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Burlington. 
State Forester, Montpelier. 
State Geological Survey, Burlington. 

VIRGINIA: 

State Library, Richmond. 
University of Virginia, Charlottesville. 
Virginia Geological Survey, Charlottes- 
ville. 

WASHINGTON: 

Department of Conservation and De- 
velopment, Division of Geology, 
Olympia. 

Washington Geological Survey, Pull- 
man. 

Washington University, Seattle. 

Washington University, Historical So- 
ciety, Seattle. 

WASHINGTON, D. C: 

American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science (gift). 

American Mining Congress. 

Came?ie Institution of Washington 
(gift). 

Daily Science News Bulletin. 

Library of Congress. 



Nationl Academy of Sciences. 
National Education Association (gift). 
National Research Council. 
National Zoological Park. 
Pan American Union. 
Peruvian Arbitration Commission. 
Smithsonian Institution. 
United States Government. 
United States National Museum. 

WEST VIRGINIA: 

State Department of Agriculture, 
Charleston. 

West Virginia University Morgan- 
town. 

WISCONSIN: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Madison. 

Beloit College. 

Geological and Natural History Sur- 
vey, Madison. 

Public Museum of Milwaukee. 

State Horticultural Society, Madison. 

University of Wisconsin, Madison. 

Arthur, J. C, Lafayette. 
Ayer, Edward E., Chicago (gift). 
Baker, Frank C, Urbana. 
Ballard, James F., Saint Louis (gift). 
Bishop, Sherman C, Albany (gift). 
Blatchley, W. S., Indianapolis. 
Brandegee, Townshend S., Berkeley. 
Canfield, Frederick A., Dover (gift). 
Casey, Thomas L., Washington (gift). 
Cassius, S. E., Salem (gift). 
Cattell, J. McKeen, New York (gift). 
Cockerell, T. D. A., Boulder. 
Cook, Melville T., Porto Rico. 
Davies, D. C., Chicago (gift). 
Davis, William T., New Brighton (gift). 
DeLong, D wight M., Columbus (gift). 
Dengler, Hermann, New York. 
Evans, Alexander W., New Haven. 
Farwell, Oliver A., Detroit. 
Fassett, Norman C, New Haven (gift). 
Field, Stanley, Chicago (gift). 
Gates, Frank C, Manhattan (gift). 
Gerhard, W. J., Chicago (gift). 
Glessner, J. J., Chicago (gift). 
Hall, Harvey M., Berkeley (gift). 
Harshberger, John W., Philadelphia. 
Havnes, Caroline C, Highland (gift). 
Heilmavr, C. E., Chicago (gift). 
Holland, W. J., Pittsburgh. 
Jillson, Willard A., Frankfort (gift). 
Keyes, Charles R., Mt. Vernon (gift). 
Laufer, Berthold, Chicago (gift). 
Lewis, A. B., Chicago (gift). 
Love, Charles A., Aurora (gift). 
McClintock, Walter, Pittsburgh (gift). 
MacGowan, Kenneth, New York. 



352 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



McNair, James B., Chicago (gift). 
Mansfield, Howard, New York. 
Mason, J. Alden, New York (gift). 
Mills, William C, Columbus. 
Noe, A. C, Chicago. 
Osborn, Henry F., New York. 
Osborn, Herbert, Columbus. 
Osgood, Wilfred H., Chicago (gift). 
Pittier, H., Washington. 
Psota, Frank J., Chicago (gift). 
Record, Samuel J., New Haven (gift). 
Reed, Carlos S., Santiago de Chile (gift). 



Robb, Mrs. G. W., Borden (gift). 
Safford, W. E., Washington (gift). 
Saunders, Charles F., Pasadena. 
Schmidt, Karl P., Chicago (gift). 
Smith, Huron H., Milwaukee (gift). 
Sternberg, Charles M., Oakley (gift). 
Treadwell, A. L., Poughkeepsie (gift). 
Tuthill, Frank H., Chicago (gift). 
Tyrrell, W. B., Milwaukee (gift). 
Viosca, Percy, Jr., New Orleans (gift). 
Wilbour, Victor and Theodora, Brook- 
lyn (gift). 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 353 



ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION 



STATE OF ILLINOIS 

DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State. 
To All to Whom These Presents Shall Come, Greeting: 

Whereas, a Certificate duly signed and acknowledged having been filed in the 
office of the Secretary of State, on the 16th day of September, a. d. 1893, for the 
organization of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO, under and in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of "An Act Concerning Corporations," approved 
April 18, 1872, and in force July 1, 1872, and all acts amendatory thereof, a copy 
of which certificate is hereto attached. 

Now, therefore, I, William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State of the State of 
Illinois, by virtue of the powers and duties vested in me by law, do hereby certify 
that the said COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO is a legally organized 
Corporation under the laws of this State. 

In Testimony Whereof, I hereto set my hand and cause to be affixed the 
Great Seal of State. Done at the City of Springfield, this 16th day of September, 
in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three, and of the 
Independence of the United States the one hundred and eighteenth. 

W. H. HINRICHSEN, 
[Seal] Secretary of State. 



TO HON. WILLIAM H. HINRICHSEN, 

Secretary of State: 

Sir: 

We, the undersigned citizens of the United States, propose to form a cor- 
poration under an act of the General Assembly of the State of Illinois, entitled 
"An Act Concerning Corporations," approved April 18, 1-872, and all acts 
amendatory thereof; and that for the purposes of such organization we hereby 
state as follows, to-wit: 

1. The name of such corporation is the "COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF 
CHICAGO." 

2. The object for which it is formed is for the accumulation and dis- 
semination of knowledge, and the preservation and exhibition of objects illus- 
trating Art, Archaeology, Science and History. 

3. The management of the aforesaid museum shall be vested in a Board of 
Fifteen (15) Trustees, five of whom are to be elected every year. 

4. The following named persons are hereby selected as the Trustees for the 
first year of its corporate existence : 



354 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

Edward E. Ayer, Charles B. Farwell, George E. Adams, George R. Davis, 
Charles L. Hutchinson, Daniel H. Burnham, John A. Roche, M. C. Bullock, 
Emil G. Hirsch, James W. Ellsworth, Allison V. Armour, O. F. Aldis, Edwin 
Walker, John C. Black and Frank W. Gunsaulus. 

5. The location of the Museum is in the City of Chicago, County of Cook, 
and State of Illinois. 

(Signed), 

George E. Adams, C. B. Farwell, Sidney C. Eastman, F. W. Putnam, Robert 
McCurdy, Andrew Peterson, L. J. Gage, Charles L. Hutchinson, Ebenezer 
Buckingham, Andrew McNally, Edward E. Ayer, John M. Clark, Herman H. 
Kohlsaat, George Schneider, Henry H. Getty, William R. Harper, Franklin H. 
Head, E. G. Keith, J. Irving Pearce, Azel F. Hatch, Henry Wade Rogers, 
Thomas B. Bryan, L. Z. Leiter, A. C. Bartlett, A. A. Sprague, A. C. McClurg, 
James W. Scott, Geo. F. Bissell, John R. Walsh, Chas. Fitzsimmons, John A. 
Roche, E. B. McCagg, Owen F. Aldis, Ferdinand W. Peck, James H. Dole, 
Joseph Stockton, Edward B. Butler, John McConnell, R. A. Waller, H. C. 
Chatfield-Taylor, A. Crawford, Wm. Sooy Smith, P. S. Peterson, John C. 
Black, Jno. J. Mitchell, C. F. Gunther, George R. Davis, Stephen A. Forbes, 
Robert W. Patterson, Jr., M. C. Bullock, Edwin Walker, George M. Pullman, 
William E. Curtis, James W. Ellsworth, William E. Hale, Wm. T. Baker, 
Martin A. Ryerson, Huntington W. Jackson, N. B. Ream, Norman Williams, 
Melville E. Stone, Bryan Lathrop, Eliphalet W. Blatchford, Philip D. Armour. 

State of Illinois ) 

t ss 
Cook County J 

I, G. R. Mitchell, a Notary Public in and for said County, do hereby 
certify that the foregoing petitioners personally appeared before me and 
acknowledged severally that they signed the foregoing petition as their free and 
voluntary act for the uses and purposes therein set forth. 

Given under my hand and notarial seal this 14th day of September, 1893. 

G. R. MITCHELL, 
[Seal] Notary Public, Cook County, III. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 

Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the corporate members held 
the 25th day of June, 1894, the name of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM was 
changed to FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. A certificate to this effect was 
filed June 26, 1894, in the office of the Secretary of State for Illinois. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 

Persuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the corporate members held 
the 8th day of November, 1905, the name of the FIELD COLUMBIAN 
MUSEUM was changed to FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
A certificate to this effect was filed November 10, 1905, in the office of the 
Secretary of State for Illinois. 



CHANGE IN ARTICLE 3. 

Pursuant to a resolution at a meeting of the corporate members held the 
10th day of May, 1920, the management of FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL 
HISTORY shall be invested in a Board of Twenty-one (21) Trustees, who 
shall be elected in such manner and for such time and term of office as may 
be provided for by the By-Laws. A certificate to this effect was filed May 21, 
1920, in the office of the Secretary of State for Illinois. 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 355 



AMENDED BY-LAWS 



January 1925 
ARTICLE I. 

MEMBERS 

Section i. Members shall be of ten classes, Corporate Members, Honorary 
Members, Patrons, Benefactors, Fellows, Life Members, Non-Resident Life Mem- 
bers, Associate Members, Sustaining Members, and Annual Members. 

Section 2. The Corporate Members shall consist of the persons named in 
the articles of incorporation, and of such other persons as shall be chosen from 
time to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, upon the recom- 
mendation of the Executive Committee ; provided, that such person named in 
the articles of incorporation shall, within ninety days from the adoption of these 
By-Laws, and persons hereafter chosen as Corporate Members shall, within 
ninety days of their election, pay into the treasury the sum of twenty ($20.00) 
dollars or more. Corporate Members becoming Life Members, Patrons or Hon- 
orary Members shall be exempt from dues. Annual meetings of said Corporate 
Members shall be held at the same place and on the same day that the annual 
meeting of the Board of Trustees is held. 

Section 3. Honorary Members shall be chosen by the Board from among 
persons who have rendered eminent service to science, and only upon unanimous 
nomination of the Executive Commitce. They shall be exempt from all dues. 

Section 4. Patrons shall be chosen by the Board upon recommendation of 
the Executive Committee from among persons who have rendered eminent service 
to the Museum. They shall be exempt from all dues, and, by virtue of their 
election as Patrons, shall also be Corporate Members. 

Section 5. Any person contributing or devising the sum of One Hundred 
Thousand Dollars ($100,000.00) in cash, or securities, or property to the funds 
of the Museum, may be elected a Benefactor of the Museum. 

Section 6. Any person contributing the sum of Five Thousand Dollars 
($5,000.00) in cash or securities to the funds of the Museum, may be elected 
a Fellow of the Museum, who after being so elected shall have the right in 
perpetuity to appoint the successor in said Fellowship. 

Section 7. Any person paying into the treasury the sum of Five Hundred 
Dollars ($500.00), at any one time, shall, upon the unanimous vote of the Board, 
become a Life Member. Life Members shall be exempt from all dues, and shall 
enjoy all the privileges and courtesies of the Museum that are accorded to mem- 
bers of the Board of Trustees. Any person residing fifty miles or more from 
the city of Chicago, paying into the treasury the sum of One Hundred Dollars 
($100.00) at any one time, shall, upon the unanimous vote of the Board, become 
a Non-Resident Life Member. Non-Resident Life Members shall be exempt 
from all dues, and shall enjoy all the privileges and courtesies of the Museum 
that are accorded to members of the Board of Trustees. 

Section 8. Any person paying into the treasury of the Museum the sum 
of one hundred ($100.00) dollars, at any one time, shall upon the unanimous 



356 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

vote of the Board, become an Associate Member. Associate Members shall be 
entitled to : tickets admitting member and members of family, including non- 
resident home guests; all publications of the Museum, if so desired; reserved 
seats for all lectures and entertainments under the auspices of the Museum, pro- 
vided reservation is requested in advance; and admission of holder of membership 
and accompanying party to all special exhibits and Museum functions day or 
evening. 

Section 9. Sustaining Member shall consist of such persons as are selected 
from time to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, and who 
shall pay an annual fee of twenty-five ($25.00) dollars, payable within thirty 
days after notice of election and within thirty days after each recurring annual 
date. This Sustaining Membership entitles the member to free admission for 
the member and family to Museum on any day and allows 25 admission coupons, 
which may be used by any one, the Annual Report and such other Museum 
documents or publications as may be requested in writing. When a Sustaining 
Member has paid the annual fee of $25.00 for six years, such member shall be 
entitled to become an Associate Member. 

Section 10. Annual Members shall consist of such persons as are selected 
from time to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, and who 
shall pay an annual fee of ten ($10.00) dollars, payable within thirty days after 
each recurring annual date. An Annual Membership shall entitle the member 
to a card of admission for the member and family during all hours when the 
Museum is open to the public, and free admission for the member and family 
to all Museum lectures or entertainments. This membership will also entitle 
the holder to the courtesies of the membership privileges of every Museum of 
note in the United States and Canada, so long as the existing system of co- 
operative interchange of membership tickets shall be maintained, including tickets 
for any lectures given under the auspices of any of the Museums during a visit 
to the cities in which the cooperative museums are located. 

Section ii. All membership fees, excepting Sustaining and Annual, shall 
hereafter be applied to a permanent Membership Endowment Fund, the interest 
only of which shall be applied for the use of the Museum as the Board of 
Trustees may order. 

ARTICLE II. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Section i. The Board of Trustees shall consist of twenty-one members. 
The respective members of the Board now in office, and those who shall here- 
after be elected, shall hold office during life. Vacancies occurring in the Board 
shall be filled at a regular meeting of the Board, upon the nomination of the 
Executive Committee made at a preceding regular meeting of the Board, by a 
majority vote of the members of the Board present. 

Section 2. Regular meetings of the Board shall be held on the third Mon- 
day of each month. Special meetings may be called at any time by the President, 
and shall be called by the Secretary upon the written request of three Trustees. 
Five Trustees shall constitute a quorum, except for the election of officers or the 
adoption of the Annual Budget, when seven Trustees shall be required, but meet- 
ings may be adjourned by any less number from day to day, or to a day fixed, 
previous to the next regular meeting. 

Section 3. Reasonable written notice, designating the time and place of 
holding meetings, shall be given by the Secretary. 

ARTICLE III. 

HONORARY TRUSTEES 

Section i. As a mark of respect, and in appreciation of services performed 
for the Institution, those Trustees who by reason of inability, on account of 



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Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 357 

change of residence, or for other cause or from indisposition to serve longer 
in such capacity shall resign their place upon the Board, may be elected, by a 
majority of those present at any regular meeting of the Board, an Honorary 
Trustee for life. Such Honorary Trustee will receive notice of all meetings 
of the Board of Trustees, whether regular or special, and will be expected to be 
present at all such meetings and participate in the deliberations thereof, but an 
Honorary Trustee shall not have the right to vote. 

ARTICLE IV. 

OFFICERS 

Section i. The officers shall be a President, a First Vice-President, a 
Second Vice-President, a Third Vice-President, a Secretary, an Assistant Secre- 
tary and a Treasurer. They shall be chosen by ballot by the Board of Trustees, 
a majority of those present and voting being necessary to elect. The President, 
the First Vice-President, the Second Vice-President, and the Third Vice-Presi- 
dent shall be chosen from among the members of the Board of Trustees. The 
meeting for the election of officers shall be held on the third Monday of January 
of each year, and shall be called the Annual Meeting. 

Section 2. The officers shall hold office for one year, or until their suc- 
cessors are elected and qualified, but any officer may be removed at any regular 
meeting of the Board of Trustees by a vote of two-thirds of all the members 
of the Board. Vacancies in any office may be filled by the Board at any meeting. 

Section 3. The officers shall perform such duties as ordinarily appertain 
to their respective offices, and such as shall be prescribed by the By-Laws, or 
designated from time to time by the Board of Trustees. 

ARTICLE V. 

THE treasurer 

Section i. The Treasurer shall be custodian of the funds of the Corpor- 
aton except as hereinafter provided. He shall make disbursements only upon 
warrants drawn by the Director and countersigned by the President. In the 
absence or inability of the Director, warrants may be signed by the Chairman 
of the Finance Committee, and in the absence or inability of the President, may 
be countersigned by one of the Vice-Presidents, or any member of the Finance 
Committee. 

Section 2. The securities and muniments of title belonging to the cor- 
poration shall be placed in the custody of some Trust Company of Chicago to 
be designated by the Board of Trustees, which Trust Company shall collect 
the income and principal of said securities as the same become due, and pay 
same to the Treasurer, except as hereinafter provided. Said Trust Company 
shall allow access to and deliver any or all securities or muniments of title to 
the joint order of the following officers, namely The President or one of the 
Vice-Presidents, jointly with the Chairman, or one of the Vice-Chairmen, of the 
Finance Committee of the Museum. 

Section 3. The Treasurer shall give bond in such amount, and wjth such 
sureties as shall be approved by the Board of Trustees. 

Section 4. The Harris Trust & Savings Bank of Chicago shall be Cus- 
todian of "The N. W. Harris Public School Extension of Field Museum" fund. 
The bank shall make disbursements only upon warrants drawn by the Director 
and countersigned by the President. In the absence or inability of the Director, 
warrants may be signed by the Chairman of the Finance Committee, and in the 
absence or inability of the President, may be countersigned by one of the Vice- 
Presidents, or any member of the Finance Committee. 



£/Z*:*:av/;;."ow^:,:^^^^^ 



358 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

ARTICLE VI. 

THE DIRECTOR 

Section i. The Board of Trustees shall elect a Director of the Museum, 
who shall remain in office until his successor shall be elected. He shall have im- 
mediate charge and supervision of the Museum, and shall control the operations 
of the Institution, subject to the authority of the Board of Trustees and its 
Committees. The Director shall be the official medium of communication be- 
tween the Board, or its Committees, and the scientific staff and maintenance 
force. 

Section 2. There shall be four scientific departments of the Museum — 
Anthropology, Botany, Geology and Zoology; each under the charge of a 
Curator, subject to the authority of the Director. The Curators shall be ap- 
pointed by the Board upon the recommendation of the Director, and shall 
serve during the pleasure of the Board. Subordinate staff officers in the 
scientific departments shall be appointed and removed by the Director upon 
the recommendation of the Curators of the respective Departments. The 
Director shall have authority to employ and remove all other employees of the 
Museum. 

Section 3. The Director shall make report to the Board at each regular 
meeting, recounting the operations of the Museum for the previous month. At 
the Annual Meeting, the Director shall make an Annual Report, reviewing 
the work for the previous year, which Annual Report shall be published in 
pamphlet form for the information of the Trustees and Members, and for free 
distribution in such number as the Board may direct. 

ARTICLE VII. 

AUDITOR 

Section i. The Board shall appoint an Auditor, who shall hold his office 
during the pleasure of the Board. He shall keep proper books of account, set- 
ting forth the financial condition and transactions of the Corporation, and of the 
Museum, and report thereon at each regular meeting, and at such other times 
as may be required by the Board. He shall certify to the correctness of all 
bills rendered for the expenditure of the money of the Corporation. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

COMMITTEES 

Section i. There shall be five Committees, as follows : Finance, Building, 
Auditing, Pension and Executive. 

Section 2. The Finance Committee shall consist of five members, the 
Auditing and Pension Committees shall each consist of three members, and the 
Building Committee shall consist of five members. All members of these four 
Committees shall be elected by ballot by the Board at the Annual Meeting, and 
shall hold office for one year, and until their successors are elected and quali- 
fied. In electing the members of these Committees, the Board shall designate 
the Chairman and Vice-Chairman by the order in which the members are 
named in the respective Committee; the first member named shall be Chair- 
man, the second named the Vice-Chairman, and the third named, Second Vice- 
cihairman, succession to the Chairmanship being in this order in the event of 
the absence or disability of the Chairman. 

Section 3. The Executive Committee shall consist of the President of the 
Board, the Chairman of the Finance Committee, the Chairman of the Building 
Committee, the Chairman of the Auditing Committee, the Chairman of the 
Pension Committee, and three other members of the Board to be elected by 
ballot at the Annual Meeting. 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 359 

Section 4. Four members shall constitute a quorum of the Executive Com- 
mittee, and in all standing Committees two members shall constitute a quorum. 
In the event that, owing to the absence or inability of members, a quorum of 
the regularly elected members cannot be present at any meeting of any Com- 
mittee, then the Chairman thereof, or his successor, as herein provided, may 
summon any members of the Board of Trustees to act in place of the absentee. 

Section 5. The Finance Committee shall have supervision of investing the 
endowment and other permanent funds of the Corporation, and the care of such 
real estate as may become its property. It shall have authority to invest, sell, 
and reinvest funds, subject to the approval of the Board. 

Section 6. The Building Committee shall have supervision of the con- 
struction, reconstruction, and extension of any and all buildings used for 
Museum purposes. 

Section 7. The Executive Committee shall be called together from time 
to time as the Chairman may consider necessary, or as he may be requested 
to do by three members of the Committee, to act upon such matters affecting 
the administration of the Museum as cannot await consideration at the Regular 
Monthly Meetings of the Board of Trustees. It shall, before the beginning of 
each fiscal year, prepare and submit to the Board an itemized Budget, setting 
forth the probable receipts from all sources for the ensuing year, and make 
recommendations as to the expenditures which should be made for routine 
maintenance and fixed charges. Upon the adoption of the Budget by the 
Board, the expenditures as stated are authorized. 

Section 8. The Auditing Committee shall have supervision over all ac- 
counting and bookkeeping, and full control of the financial records. It shall 
cause the same, once each year, or oftener, to be examined by an expert indi- 
vidual or firm, and shall transmit the report of such expert individual or firm 
to the Board at the next ensuing regular meeting after such examination shall 
have taken place. 

Section 9. The Pension Committee shall determine by such means and 
processes as shall be established by the Board of Trustees to whom and in what 
amount the Pension Fund shall be distributed. These determinations or findings 
shall be subject to the approval of the Board of Trustees. 

Section 10. The Chairman of each Committee shall report the acts and 
proceedings thereof at the next ensuing regular meeting of the Board. 

Section ii. The President shall be ex-officio a member of all Committees 
and Chairman of the Executive Committee. Vacancies occurring in any Com- 
mittee may be filled by ballot at any regular meeting of the Board. 

ARTICLE IX. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Section 1. At the November meeting of the Board each year, a Nomi- 
nating Committee of three shall be chosen by lot. Said Committee shall make 
nominations for membership of the Finance Committee, the Building Commit- 
tee, the Auditing Committee, and the Pension Committee, and for three mem- 
bers of the Executive Committee, from among the Trustees, to be submitted 
at the ensuing December meeting and voted upon at the following Annual 
Meeting in January. 

ARTICLE X. 

Section i. Whenever the word "Museum" is employed in the By-Laws of 
the Corporation, it shall be taken to mean the building in which the Museum 



360 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 

as an Institution is located and operated, the material exhibited, the material in 
study collections, or in storage, furniture, fixtures, cases, tools, records, books, 
and all appurtenances of the Institution and the workings, researches, installations, 
expenditures, field work, laboratories, library, publications, lecture courses, and 
all scientific and maintenance activities. 

Section 2. These By-Laws may be amended at any regular meeting of the 
Board of Trustees by a two-thirds vote of all the members present, provided 
the amendment shall have been proposed at a preceding regular meeting. 



Jan., 1925 



Annual Report of the Director 



361 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



AYER, EDWARD E. 
AYER, MRS. EDWARD E. 
BLACKSTONE, MRS. T. B. 
CHALMERS, WILLIAM J. 
CRANE, CHARLES R. 
FIELD, MARSHALL 
FIELD, STANLEY 



graham, ernest r. 
harris, albert w. 
jones, arthur b. 
Mccormick, Stanley 
ryerson, martin a. 
simpson, james 
sprague, albert a. 



PATRONS 



ARMOUR, ALLISON V. 
BUTLER, EDWARD B. 
COLLINS, ALFRED M. 
CUMMINGS, MRS. ROBERT F. 
DAY, LEE GARNETT 
KELLEY, WILLIAM V. 



KENNEDY, VERNON SHAW 
KUNZ, GEORGE F. 
MARKHAM, CHARLES H. 
PAYNE, JOHN BARTON 
PROBST, EDWARD 
SARGENT, HOMER E. 



WHITE, HOWARD J. 



DECEASED I924 

ANDERSON, PEIRCE MANIERRE, GEORGE 

HUTCHINSON, CHARLES L. SMITH, WILLARD A. 



362 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



CORPORATE MEMBERS 



ALDIS, OWEN F. 
ARMOUR, ALLISON V. 
AYER, EDWARD E. 

BLAIR, WATSON F. 
BORDEN, JOHN 
BUTLER, EDWARD B. 
BYRAM, HARRY E. 

CHALMERS, W. J. 
CHATFIELD-TAYLOR, H. C. 
COLLINS, ALFRED M. 
CRANE, JR., RICHARD T. 
CUMMINGS, MRS. ROBERT F. 

DAVIES, D. C. 

DAY, LEE GARNETT 

EASTMAN, SIDNEY C. 
ELLSWORTH, JAMES W. 

FIELD, MARSHALL 
FIELD, STANLEY 



GAGE, LYMAN J. 
GRAHAM, ERNEST R. 



harris, albert w. 
jones, arthur b. 

keep, chauncey 
kelley, william v. 
kennedy, vernon shaw 
kunz, george f. 

Mccormick, cyrus h. 
markham, charles h. 
mitchell, john j. 

payne, john barton 
porter, george f. 
probst, edward 

ryerson, martin a. 

sargent, homer e. 
simpson, james 
smith, solomon a. 
sprague, albert a. 
stone, melville e. 
strawn, silas h. 



WHITE, HOWARD J. 
WRIGLEY, JR., WILLIAM 



DECEASED I924 

ANDERSON, PEIRCE MANIERRE, GEORGE 

HUTCHINSON, CHARLES L. PECK, FERDINAND W. 

KOHLSAAT, HERMAN H. SMITH, WILLARD A. 



Jan., 1925 



Annual Report of the Director 



3^3 



LIFE MEMBERS 



ABBOTT, ROBERT S. 
ALDIS, ARTHUR T. 
ALDIS, OWEN F. 
ALEXANDER, WILLIAM A. 
ALLERTON, ROBERT H. 
AMES, JAMES C. 
AMES, KNOWLTON L. 
ARMOUR, ALLISON V. 
ARMOUR, A. WATSON 
ARMOUR, J. OGDEN 
ARMOUR, LESTER 
AVERY, SEWELL L. 
AYER, EDWARD E. 

BABCOCK, FRED'K. R. 
BAKER, MISS ISABELLE 
BANCROFT, EDGAR A. 
BANKS, ALEXANDER F. 
BARRELL, FINLEY 
BARRETT, MRS. A. D. 
BARRETT, ROBERT L. 
BASSFORD. LOWELL C. 
BECKER, A. G. 
BILLINGS, C. K. G. 
BILLINGS, FRANK 
BLACKSTONE, MRS. T. B. 
BLAINE, MRS. EMMONS 
BLAIR, HENRY A. 
BLAIR, WATSON F. 
BLOCK, P. D. 
BOOTH, W. VERNON 
BORDEN, JOHN 
BORLAND, CHAUNCEY B. 
BREWSTER, WALTER S. 
BRIDGE, NORMAN 
BROWN, WILLIAM L. 
BUCHANAN, D. W. 
BUFFINGTON, EUGENE J. 
BURNHAM, JOHN 
BUTLER, EDWARD B. 
BYRAM, HARRY E. 

CARPENTER, A. A. 
CARPENTER, BENJ. 
CARR, ROBERT F. 
CARRY, EDWARD F. 



CARTON, L. A. 

CHALMERS, WILLIAM J. 

CLARK, EUGENE B. 

CLAY, JOHN 

CLOW, WILLIAM E. 

COBE, IRA M. 

COXOVER, H. BOARDMAN 

COPLEY, COL. IRA CLIFF (N.R.) 

CRAMER, CORWITH 

CRAMER, E. W. 

CRAMER, MRS. KATHARINE S. 

CRANE, CHARLES RICHARD 

CRANE, JR., RICHARD T. 

CROSSETT, EDWARD C. 

CROWELL, H. P. 

CUDAHY, JOSEPH M. 

CUMMINGS, D. MARK 

CUNNINGHAM, FRANK S. 

CUTTEN, ARTHUR W. 

DAU, J. J. 

DAWES, CHARLES G. 
DAY, ALBERT M. 
DECKER, ALFRED 
DEERING, CHARLES 
DEERING, JAMES 
DEFREES, JOSEPH H. 
DELANO, FREDERIC A. 
DICK, ALBERT BLAKE 
DIERSSEN, FERDINAND W. 
DONNELLEY, REUBEN H. 
DONNELLEY, THOMAS E. 
DOUGLAS, JAMES H. 
DRAKE, JOHN B, 
DRAKE, TRACY C. 

ECKHART, B. A. 
EDMUNDS, PHILIP S. 

FAIR, ROBERT M. 
FARNUM, HENRY W. 
FARR, MISS SHIRLEY 
FARWELL, ARTHUR L. 
FARWELL, FRANCIS C. 
FARWELL, JOHN V. 



364 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



FARWELL, WALTER 
FAY, C. N. 
FELT, DORR E. 
FENTON, HOWARD W. 
FERGUSON, LOUIS A. 
FERNALD, GUSTAVUS S. 
FERRY, MRS. ABBY FARWELL 
FIELD, II, JOSEPH NASH 
FIELD, MARSHALL 
FIELD, MRS. SARA CARROLL 
FIELD, STANLEY 
FINLEY, WILLIAM H. 
FLEMING, JOHN C. 
FORGAN, DAVID R. 
FORSYTH. ROBERT 
FYFFE, COLIN C. H. 

GARTZ, A. F. 
GETZ, GEORGE F. 
GLESSNER, JOHN J. 
GODDARD, LEROY A. 
GOODMAN, WILLIAM O. 
GOODRICH. A. W. 
GRAHAM, ERNEST R. 
GRISCOM, CLEMENT A. 

HAMILL, ERNEST A. 
HARRIS, ALBERT W. 
HASKELL, FREDERICK T. 
HASTINGS, SAMUEL M. 
HIBBARD, FRANK 
HILL, LOUIS W. 
HINDE, THOMAS W. 
HIPPACH, LOUIS A. 
HOPKINS, J. M. 
HOPKINS, L. J. 
HOROWITZ, L. J. 
HOYT, N. LANDON 
HUGHITT, MARVIN 
HULBURD, CHARLES H. 

INSULL, SAMUEL 

TELKE, JOHN F. 

JELKE, JR., JOHN F. 

JOHNSON, MRS. ELIZABETH 
AYER 

JONES, ARTHUR B. 

JONES, THOMAS D. 



KEEP, CHAUNCEY 
KELLER, THEODORE C. 
KELLEY, MRS. DAPHNE FIELD 
KELLEY, RUSSELL P. 
KELLEY, WILLIAM V. 
KING, CHARLES GARFIELD 
KING, FRANCIS 
KING, JAMES G. 
KIRK, WALTER RADCLIFFE 
KITTLE, C. M. 
KNICKERBOCKER, C. K. 
KUPPENHEIMER, LOUIS B. 

LAMONT, ROBERT P. 
LAWSON, VICTOR F. 
LANDON, MRS. JESSIE 
SPALDING (N.R.) 

LEHMANN, E. J. 
LEONARD, CLIFFORD M. 
LINN, W. R. 
LOGAN, SPENCER H. 
LORD, JOHN B. 
LOWDEN, FRANK O. 
LYTTON, HENRY C. 

MacDOWELL, CHARLES H. 
MacVEAGH, FRANKLIN 

mark, clayton 
markham, charles h. 
marshall, benjamin h. 
martin, william p. 
mason, william s. 
Mccormick, cyrus h. 
Mccormick, harold f. 
Mccormick, Stanley 

McELWEE, ROBERT H. 
McINNERNEY, THOS. H. 
McKINLAY, JOHN 
McKINLOCK, GEORGE 

alexander 
Mclaughlin, frederic 
Mclaughlin, geo. d. 

McLENNAN, D. R. 
McNULTY, T. J. 
McWILLIAMS, LAFAYETTE 
MEYNE, GEPHARDT F. 
MINER, W. H. 
MITCHELL, JOHN J. 
MOORE, EDWARD S. 



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J AX., 1925 



Annual Report of the Director 



365 



MORSE, JR., CHARLES H. 
MORTON, JOY 
MORTON, MARK 
MUNROE, CHARLES A. 

NEWELL, A. B. 
NIKOLAS, G. J. 
NOEL, JOSEPH R. 

O'BRIEN, JOHN J. 
ORR, ROBERT M. 

PALMER, HONORE 
PALMER, POTTER 
PAM, MAX 
PATTEN, HENRY J. 
PATTEN, MRS. JAMES A. 
PATTERSON, JOSEPH M. 
PAYNE, JOHN BARTON 
PAYSON, GEORGE S. 
PEABODY, AUGUSTUS S. 
PICK, ALBERT 
PIERCE, CHARLES I. 
P1EZ, CHARLES 
PIKE, CHARLES B. 
PIKE, EUGENE R. 
PORTER, FRANK WINSLOW 
PORTER, GEORGE F. 
PORTER, GILBERT E. 
PORTER, H. H. 

RAWSON, FREDERICK H. 

REA, MRS. ROBERT L. 

REVELL, ALEXANDER H. 

REYNOLDS, GEORGE M. 

ROBINSON, THEODORE W. 

ROBSON, MISS ALICE 

RODMAN, MRS. KATHERINE 
FIELD 

RODMAN, THOMAS CLIFFORD 

ROSENWALD, JULIUS 

RUNNELLS, CLIVE 

RUNNELLS, JOHN S. 

RUSSELL, EDMUND A. 

RUSSELL EDWARD P. 

RYERSON, MRS. CARRIE H. 

RYERSON, EDWARD L. 

RYERSON, MARTIN A. 



SCHWEPPE, CHARLES H. 
SCOTT, FRANK H. 
SCOTT, GEORGE E. 
SCOTT, HAROLD N. 
SCOTT, JOHN W. 
SHAFFER, JOHN C. 
SHEDD, JOHN G. 
SIMPSON, JAMES 
SMITH, ALEXANDER 
SMITH, SOLOMON A. 
SOPER, JAMES P. 
SPAULDING, JR., MRS. 
HOWARD H. 

SPALDING, KEITH 
SPOOR, JOHN A. 
SPRAGUE, ALBERT A. 
STEVENS, CHARLES A. 
STEWART, ROBERT W. 
STIRTON, ROBERT C. 
STOREY, W. B. 
STOUT, FRANK D. 
STRAWN, SILAS H. 
STUART, ROBERT 
STURGES, GEORGE 
SUNNY, B. E. 
SWIFT, CHARLES H. 
SWIFT, EDWARD F. 
SWIFT, JR., G. F. 
SWIFT, HAROLD H. 
SWIFT, LOUIS F. 

THORNE, CHARLES H. 
THORNE, ROBERT J. 
TRINZ, JOSEPH 

UPHAM, FREDERIC W. 

VAN VECHTEN, RALPH 
VEATCH, GEORGE L. 
VTLES, LAWRENCE M. 

WEBER, DAVID 
WELLING, JOHN P. 
WETMORE, FRANK O. 
WHEELER, CHARLES P. 
WHITE, F. EDSON 
WHITNEY, MRS. JULIA L. 
WICKWIRE, MRS. EDWARD L. 



366 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



WILLARD, ALONZO J. 
WILLITS, WARD W. 
WILSON, JR., JOHN P. 
WILSON, OLIVER T. 
WILSON, THOMAS E 
WILSON, WALTER H. 



WINSTON, GARRARD B. 
WINTER, WALLACE C 
WOOLLEY, CLARENCE M. 
WRIGLEY, JR., WILLIAM 

YATES. DAVID M. 



ALLEN, BENJAMIN 
BYLLESBY, H. M. 
FORGAN, JAMES B. 



DECEASED I924 

GARY, JOHN W. 
HUTCHINSON. C. L. 
MANIERRE, GEORGE 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 



ABBOTT, W. RUFUS 
ABRAMS, DUFF A. 
ACOMB, JESSE P. 
ADCOCK, MRS. BESSIE 
ADDLEMAN, SAMUEL W. 
AHLSCHLAGER, WALTER W. 
ALSCHULER, ALFRED S. 
ALSIP, CHARLES H. 
ANDREWS, ALFRED B. 
ARMBRUSTER, CHARLES A. 
ARMOUR, PHILIP D. 
ARMOUR, MRS. P. D. 
ARMSTRONG, MRS. FRANK H. 
ASHER, LOUIS E. 
ATWATER, WALTER HULL 
AUSTIN, HENRY W. 

BABSON, HENRY B. 
BACON, JR., EDWARD R. 
BAIRD, HARRY K. 
BAIRD, WYLLYS W. 
BAKER, L. K. 
BARNES, CECIL 
BARNES, JAMES M. 
BARTHOLOMAY, HENRY 
BARTLETT, MISS FLORENCE D. 
BATEMAN, FLOYD L. 
BATTEY, PAUL L. 



BECKER, BENJAMIN F. 
BECKER, BENJAMIN V. 
BECKER, HERMAN T. 
BECKER, LOUIS 
BEIDLER, II, FRANCIS 
BEIL, CARL 
BELL, LIONEL A. 
BELL, ROBERT W. 
BENDER, CHARLES J. 
BENSINGER, BENJAMIN E. 
BIDWELL, CHAS. W. 
BIGLER, MRS. ALBERT J. 
BLACKMAN, NATHAN L. 
BLAIR, EDWARD T. 
BLAKE, TIFFANY 
BLATCHFORD, SR., N. H. 
BLOCK, EMANUEL J. 
BLOCK, L. E. 
BLOME, RUDOLPH S. 
BLUM, HARRY H. 
BOAL, AYRES 
BODMAN, MRS. LUTHER 
BOLTER, JOSEPH C. 
BOOMER, DR. PAUL 
BOOTH, ALFRED V. 
BORN, MOSES 
BOTH, WILLIAM C. 
BOWEN, MRS. LOUISE de 
KOVEN 



Jan., 1925 



Annual Report of the Director 



367 



BOYNTON, MRS. C. T. 
BOYNTON, FREDERICK P. 
BRASSERT, HERMAN A. 
BRENNAN, BERNARD G. 
BRIGHAM, MISS FLORENCE M. 
BROCK, A. J. 
BROSS, MRS. MASON 
BROWN, A. W. 
BROWN, CHARLES EDWARD 
BROOME, THORNHILL 
BRUCKNER, WILLIAM T. 
BUCK, NELSON LEROY 
BUDLONG, JOSEPH J. 
BUFFINGTON, MRS. 

MARGARET A. 
BULLOCK, CARL C. 
BURLEY, CLARENCE A. 
BURNHAM, MRS. E. 
BURT, W. G. 
BUSBY, LEONARD A. 
BUSHNELL, CHARLES E. 
BUTLER, PAUL 
BUTLER, RUSH C. 
BUZZELL, EDGAR A. 



CAPPS, DR. JOSEPH A. 
CARON, O. j. 

CARPENTER, FREDERIC IVES 
CARPENTER, HUBBARD 
CARR, GEORGE R. 
CARR, WALTER S. 
CARRY, JOSEPH C. 
CARTON, ALFRED T. 
CHAPIN, MRS. CHARLES A. 
CHAPIN, HENRY KENT 
CHAPIN, HOMER C. 
CHATFIELD-TAYLOR, WAYNE 
CHEEVER, MRS. ARLINE V. 
CHISHOLM, GEORGE D. 
CLARK, MISS DOROTHY S. 
CLARK, EDWIN H. 
CLOUGH, WILLIAM H. 
CLOW, JR., WILLIAM E. 
CODY, ARTHUR B. 
COHEN, GEORGE B. 
COLEMAN, ADELBERT E. 
COLEMAN, DR. GEORGE H. 
COLEMAN, WM. OGDEN 
COLIANNI, PAUL V. 



COLVIN, SR., MRS. W. H. 
COMBES, MRS. DORA F. 
CONNOR, FRANK H. 
COOK, MISS ALICE B. 
COOLIDGE, E. CHANNING 
COONLEY, JOHN STUART 
COONLEY, PRENTISS L. 
COOPER, SAMUEL 
COX, JAMES A. 
COX, JAMES C. 
CUDAHY, JR., E. A. 
CUDAHY, EDWARD I. 
CUNNINGHAM JOHN T. 
CURTIS, AUGUSTUS D. 



DALHBERG, MRS. B. G. 
DAVIS, DR. CARL B. 
DAVIS, FRED M. 
DAVIS, JAMES 
DAVIS, J. C. 

DAVIS, III, DR. NATHAN 
DAY, MRS. MARK L. 
DEAHL, URIAH S. 
DENNEHY, THOMAS C. 
DENNIS, CHARLES H. 
DEUTSCH, JOSEPH 
DE VRIES, DAVID 
DE VRIES, PETER 
DIXON, GEORGE W. 
DIXON. WILLIAM WARREN 
DOBSON, GEORGE 
DOERING, OTTO C. 
DOLE, SR., ARTHUR 
DONAHUE, WILLIAM J 
DONNELLEY, MRS. R. R. 
DONOHUE, EDGAR T. 
DOUD, MRS. LEVI B. 
DUDLEY, LAURENCE H. 
DULANY, JR., GEORGE W. 
DULSKY, MRS. SAMUEL 
DUNHAM, MISS LUCY BELLE 
DUNHAM, MISS M. V. 
DURAND, SCOTT S. 



EASTMAN, R. M. 
ECKSTEIN, H. G. 
ECKSTEIN, LOUIS 
EDDY, MRS. ARTHUR J. 



368 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



EDDY, THOMAS H. 
EDWARDS, MISS EDITH E. 
EGAN, WILLIAM B. 
EHRMAN, EDWIN H. 
EISENDRATH, W. N. 
ELCOCK, EDWARD G. 
ELLBOGEN, ALBERT L. 
ELLSWORTH, MRS. E. O. 
ELTING, PHILIP L. F. 
ENGWALL, JOHN F. 
ERICSSON, HENRY 
EUSTICE, ALFRED L. 
EVANS, HON. EVAN A. 



FABRY, HERMAN 
FAHRNEY, E. C. 
FAHRNEY, E. H. 
FARNHAM, MRS. HARRY J. 
FAY, MISS AGNES M. 
FELLOWS, WILLIAM K. 
FENTRESS, CALVIN 
FERGUSON, CHARLES W. 
FINN, JOSEPH M. 
FOLEY, REV. WILLIAM M. 
FOREMAN, JR., EDWIN G. 
FORGAN, ROBERT D. 
FOSTER, VOLNEY 
FREEDMAN, DR. I. VAL. 
FREER, ARCHIBALD E. 
FREUND, CHARLES E. 
FRIEDMAN, OSCAR J. 
FRY, HENRY T. 
FULLER, LEROY W. 
FURST, EDUARD A. 



GABRIEL, CHARLES 
GALLAGHER, VINCENT G. 
GALLUP, ROCKWELL 
GALVIN, WILLIAM A. 
GARDNER, PAUL E. 
GARDNER, ROBERT A. 
GARNER, HARRY J. 
GARY, FRED ELBERT 
GATELY, RALPH M. 
GATZERT, AUGUST 
GETZOFF, E. B. 
GILBERT, MISS CLARA 
GILES, CARL C. 



GILLSON, LOUIS K. 
GLORE, CHARLES F. 
GOEDKE, CHAS. F. 
GOLDEN, DR. ISAAC J. K. 
GOLDENBERG, SIDNEY D. 
GOODMAN, MRS. HERBERT E. 
GOODMAN, MRS. KENNETH S. 
GOODROW, WILLIAM 
GOODSPEED, CHARLES B. 
GOSS, CHARLES O. 
GRADLE, DR. HARRY S. 
GRAF, ROBERT J. 
GRANGER, ALFRED 
GRIFFITH, ENOCH L. 
GUNTHORP, WALTER J. 



HAGGARD, JOHN D. 
HAIGHT, GEORGE I. 
HALDEMAN, WALTER S. 
HALE, AIRS. SAMUEL 
HALE, WILLIAM B. 
HAMILL, ALFRED E. 
HAMLIN, PAUL D. 
HARDIN, JOHN H. 
HARDING, GEORGE F. 
HARDING, RICHARD T. 
HARDINGE, FRANKLIN 
HARPER, ALFRED C. 
HARTWELL, FRED G. 
HARVEY, RICHARD M. 
HASKELL, MRS. GEORGE E. 
HECHT, JR., FRANK A. 
HEINEMAN, OSCAR 
HELLER, ALBERT 
HELLER, EUGENE H. 
HELLYER, WALTER 
HELMER, FRANK A. 
HENRY, OTTO 
HERRICK, WALTER D. 
HERRON, JAMES C. 
HERWIG, GEORGE 
HERWIG, JR., WILLIAM D. 
HISTED, J. ROLAND 
HOLDEN, EDWARD A. 
HOLLIS, WILLIAM D. 
HOOVER, FRANK K. 
HOOVER, RAY P. 
HOPKINS, FARLEY 
HORAX, DENNIS A. 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 



369 



HORCHER, WILLIAM W. 
HOWARD, HAROLD A. 
HOWELL, WILLIAM 
HUNTER, SAMUEL M. 
HURLEY, SR., EDWARD N. 
HUTCHINS, JAMES C. 
HUTCHINSON, SAMUEL S. 
HYNES, REV. JAMES A. 

ICKES, RAYMOND 
ILG, ROBERT A. 

JACKSON, W. J. 
JOHNSON, ALVIN O. 
JONES, FRANCIS W. 
JONES, MISS GWETHALYN 
JONES, G. HERBERT 
JOSEPH, LOUIS L. 
JOYCE, DAVID GAGE 
JOYCE, JOSEPH 
JUERGENS, H. PAUL 
JUERGENS, WM. F. 

KAHN, LOUIS 
KEENEY, ALBERT F. 
KEITH, STANLEY 
KLINETOP, MRS. CHARLES W. 
KOWALEWSKI, BRUNO F. 
KROEHL, HOWARD 
KROHMER, WILLIAM F. 

LANE, WALLACE R. 
LAUREN, NEWTON B. 
LAURITZEN, C. M. 
LAWSON, ARTHUR J. 
LEFENS, MISS KATHERINE J. 
LEGGE, ALEXANDER 
LEHMANN, MISS AUGUSTA E. 
LEVERONE, LOUIS E. 
LEWIS, DAVID R. 
LINGLE, BOWMAN C. 
LLOYD, WILLIAM BROSS 
LOGAN, JOHN I. 
LONG, WILLIAM E. 
LUCEY, PATRICK J. 
LUEDER, ARTHUR C. 
LUFKIN, WALLACE W. 
LYDON, MRS. WM. A. 
LYON, MRS. THOMAS R. 
LYTTON, GEORGE 



MAASS, J. EDWARD 
MACKINSON, DR. JOHN C. 
MacLEISH, JOHN E. 

magee, henry w. 
magnus, august c. 
magwire, mrs. mary f. 
main, walter d. 
m alone, william h. 
mandel, edwin f. 
manierre, francis e. 
manierre, louts 
mann, john p. 
mansure, edmund l. 
mariner, w. e. 
mark, anson 
marks, louis 
matthiessen, frank 
mauritzen, h. a. 
mcbride, mrs. walter j. 
McCarthy, edmond j. 
McCarthy, Joseph w. 
mcdougal, mrs. robert 
Mcdowell, dr. william s. i. 
mcilvaine, william b. 

McKAY, JAMES R. 

McKEEVER, BUELL 

McLENNAN, MRS. JOHN A. 

MERRILL, HENRY S. 

MERZ, EDWARD E. 

MEYER, ABRAHAM 

MEYER, ALBERT 

MEYER, E. F. 

MEYERCORD, G. R. 

MILLARD, FRANK H. 

MILLER, DR. JOSEPH L. 

MILLER, WALTER F. 

MILLS, ALLEN G. 

MINER, H. J. 

MODERWELL, C. M. 

MOELLER, REV. HERMAN H. 

MOFFATT, MRS. ELIZ. M. 

MOHR, DR. ALBERT 

MOHR, WM. J. 

MOLLOY, DAVID J. 

MONROE, WILLIAM S. 

MOODY, MRS. WILLIAM 
VAUGHN 

MOORE, PHILIP WYATT 

MOOS, JOSEPH B. 



37o Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



MORAND, SIMON J. 
MORGAN, ALDEN K. 
MORGAN, MRS. KENDRICK E. 
MORRISON, MRS. CHARLES E. 
MORTON, STERLING 
MOWRY, LOUIS C. 
MUDGE, JOHN B. 
MUELLER, A. M. 
MUELLER, PAUL H. 
MURPHY, ROBERT E. 
MURPHY, WALTER P. 

NASON, ALBERT J. 
NEELY, MISS CARRIE BLAIR 
NELSON, FRANK G. 
NELSON, NILS A. 
NICHOLS, GEORGE P. 
N'OONAN, EDWARD J. 
NOVAK, CHARLES J. 

OBERFELDER, HERBERT M. 
OBERFELDER, WALTER S. 
O'BRIEN, FRANK J. 
OCHSNER, DR. A. J. 
O'DONNELL, SIMON 
OFFIELD, JAMES R. 
O'KEEFE, MRS. DENNIS D. 
OLIVER, FRED S. 
OLIVER, MRS. PAUL 
OPPENHEIMER, MRS. 
HARRY D. 

OPPENHEIMER, JULIUS 
O'ROURKE, ALBERT 
ORTMAYER, DR. MARIE 
OTIS, MISS EMILY H. 
OTIS, JOSEPH E. 
OTIS, JR., JOSEPH E. 
OTIS, RAYMOND 
OTIS, STUART H. 

PAASCHE, JENS A. 
PAEPCKE, AIRS. ELIZABETH J. 
PAEPCKE, WALTER P. 
PARDRIDGE, ALBERT J. 
PARDRIDGE, MRS. E. W. 
PEABODY, MISS SUSAN W. 
PEACOCK, ROBERT E. 
PEACOCK, WALTER C. 
PEARSE, LANGDON 



PEART, WILLIAM 
PETERKIN, DANIEL 
PETERS, HARRY A. 
PETERSON, ALEXANDER B. 
PHEMISTER, DR. D. B. 
PLATT, HENRY RUSSELL 
POOL, MARVIN B. 
POOLE. GEORGE A. 
POPE, HERBERT 
POPPENHAGEN, HENRY 
POST, GORDON W. 
POST, MRS. PHILIP SIDNEY 
PRAHL, FREDERICK A. 
PUSEY, DR. WILLIAM ALLEN 

QUINLAN, CHARLES SHEPARD 

RANDLE, HANSON F. 
RASMUSSEN, GEORGE 
REDINGTON, F. B. 
REGNERY, WILLIAM H. 
REHM. FRANK A. 
RENWICK, EDWARD A. 
REYNOLDS, ARTHUR 
REYNOLDS, EARLE H. 
RICE, GEO. L. 
RIDGWAY, WILLIAM 
RIGNEY, WILLIAM T. 
RIPLEY, ROBERT H. 
RITTENHOUSE, CHARLES J. 
ROBERTS, CLARK T. 
ROBERTSON, WILLIAM 

ROBINSON, SR., MRS. 

MILTON E. 
ROBSON, MISS SARAH C. 
ROEHLING, C. E. 
ROEHLING, MRS. OTTO G. 
ROGERS, JR., BERNARD F. 
ROGERS, DR. CASSIUS C. 
ROMER, MISS DAGMAR E. 
ROTH, AARON 
ROTHSCHILD, MELVILLE N. 
ROWE, EDGAR C. 
RUBOVITS, TOBY 
RUSSELL, DR. JOSEPH W. 
RYERSON, JR., ED. L. 

SARGENT, JOHN R. W. 
SAUTER, FRED J. 



Jan., 1925 



Annual Report of the Director 



37i 



SCHAFFNER, ROBERT C. 
SCHERMERHORN, W. I. 
SCHMUTZ, MRS. ANNA 
SCHOELLKOPF, HENRY 
SCHULZE, WILLIAM 
SCHUYLER, JR., MRS. D. J. 
SEAMAN, GEORGE M. 
SEAVER, A. E. 
SEIP, EMIL G. 
SEIPP, EDWIN A. 
SEIPP, WILLIAM C. 
SENCENBAUGH, MRS. G. W. 
SENG, FRANK J. 
SENG, J. T. 

SHAMBAUGH, DR. GEORGE E. 
SHAPIRO, MEYER 
SHARP, WILLIAM N. 
SHEEHY, EDWARD 
SHELTON, DR. W. EUGENE 
SHEPERD, MRS. EDITH P. 
SHERIDAN, ALBERT D. 
SHOUP, A. D. 
SILVERTHORNE, GEO. M. 
SIMONEK, DR. B. K. 
SMITH, DOUGLAS 
SMITH, FRANKLIN P. 
SMITH, JESSE E. 
SMULSKI, JOHN F. 
SNOW, EDGAR M. 
SONNENSCHEIN, EDWARD 
STEARNS, CHARLES B. 
STEFFEY, DAVID R. 
STEIN, BENJAMIN F. 
STEIN, L. MONTEFIORE 
STEIN, SAMUEL M. 
STERN, DAVID B. 
STEVENS, HAROLD L. 
STEWART, MISS 

EGLANTINE DAISY 
STEWART, MISS M. GRAEME 
STIRLING, MISS DOROTHY 
STRAUS, DAVID 
STRICKFADEN, MISS ALMA E. 
STROTZ, LIAROLD C. 
STUART, R. DOUGLAS 
SULLIVAN, MRS. ROGER C. 
SULZBERGER, FRANK L. 
SUTCLIFFE, MRS. GARY 
SUTHERLAND, WM. 
SWAN, OSCAR H. 



SWANSON, JOSEPH E. 

TARRANT, ROBERT 
THOMAS, FRANK W. 
THOMPSON, DAVID P. 
THORNE, GEORGE A. 
THORNE, JAMES W. 
THORNTON, DR. FRANCIS E. 
TOBIAS, CLAYTON H. 
TRAINER, J. MILTON 
TRAYLOR, MELVIN A. 
TREDWELL, JOHN 
TRIPP, CHESTER D. 
TUTTLE, HENRY EMERSON 
TYLER, ALBERT S. 
TYLER, ORSON K. 
TYSON, RUSSELL 

UHLMANN, FRED 

VEEDER, MISS JESSIE 
VEHON, MORRIS 
VIERLING, LOUIS 
VOORHEES, CONDIT 
VOPICKA, CHARLES J. 

WAGNER, DR. G. W. 
WALLER, EDWARD C. 
WALLER, JR., JAMES B. 
WANNER, MRS. HENRY J. 
WARD, EDWARD J. E. 
WARE, MRS. LYMAN 
WARFIELD, EDWIN A. 
WARREN, J. LATHAM 
WATERMAN, DR. A. H. 
WEAVER, CHARLES A. 
WEBB, GEORGE D. 
WEBER, BERNARD F. 
WEBER, FRANK C. 
WEBSTER, ARTHUR L. 
WEISSENBACH, MRS. M. K. 
WELLS, THOMAS E. 
WENDELL, JR., BARRETT 
WHEALAN, EMMETT 
WIBORG, FRANK B. 
WILLEY, MRS. CHARLES B. 
WILLIAMS, MISS ANNA P. 
WILLIAMS, LUCIAN M. 



372 



Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



WILSON, MRS. JOHN R. 
WILSON, MISS LILLIAN M. 
WOJTALEWICZ, REV. F. M. 
WOLF, HENRY M. 
WOODWARD, CHARLES H. 
WORCESTER, AIRS. CHAS. H. 



WORK, ROBERT 
WRENN, MRS. EVERTS 

YONDORF, MILTON S. 
ZORK, DAVID 



DECEASED I924 

WINDSOR, H. H. 



SUSTAINING MEMBERS 



ABBOTT, WILLIAM L. 
ADAMICK, GUSTAV H. 
ADAMS, WILLIAM C. 
ALDRICH, PAUL I. 
ALEXANDER, WALTER 
ALFORD, WILLIAM H. 
ALLING, MRS. VAN WAGENEN 
ALMES, DR. HERMAN E. 
AMIDON, ALFRED T. 
ANDERSON, MRS. MARY 
ANDREWS, DR. ALBERT H. 
ARMBRUST, JOHN T. 
ARTINGSTALL, JR., SAM G. 
ARVEY, JACOB M. 
AUGUST, CHARLES 
AYER, MRS. BENJAMIN F. 
AYER, FORREST L. 
AYRES, HARRY M. 

BACH, JULIUS H. 
BAKER, FRANCIS S. 
BARNETT, OTTO R. 
BARNHART, MISS G. M. F. 
BARRY, THOMAS F. 
BASS, JOHN F. 
BECKLEY, WALTER L. 
BEEBE, MARVIN H. 
BELL, WILLIAM W. 
BENJAMIN, JACK A. 
BEREND, GEORGE F. 
BERRYMAN, JOHN B. 
BERTSCHINGER, DR. C. F. 
BLAIR, SAMUEL 



BLAKE, WILLIAM J. 
BOEDEKER, GEORGE A. 
BOERICKE, MRS. ANNA 
BOLM, MRS. ADOLPH 
BONDY, BERTHOLD 
BOHN, MRS. BERTHA BOWLBY 
BORLAND, MRS. JOHN J. 
BRONS, WILLIAM S. 
BROWN, CHARLES A. 
BROWN, IRA A. 
BUDD, BRITTON I. 
BUEHLER, CARL 
BULLOCK, MRS. JAMES E. 
BUNN, BENJAMIN H. 

BURGWEGER, MRS. META 

DEWES 
BURNETT, MISS MARION S. 
BURTCH, ALMON 
BUSCH, ALBERT 
BUTLER, EDWARD D. 
BUTLER, JOHN M. 
BYFIELD, JOSEPH 
BYMEL, ARTHUR 

CAHN, BERTRAM J. 
CAMPBELL, DELWIN M. 
CANODE, CHAS. H. 
CAPERTON, HUGH A. 
CAPES, LAWRENCE R. 
CARBERY, NORMAN A. 
CARMODY, WILLIAM F. 
CARNEY, WILLIAM ROY 
CARR, MRS. CLYDE M. 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE LXII. 




PEWTER JAR FOR TEA-LEAVES DECORATED WITH SCENES INLAID IN BRASS. 

CHINA, MING PERIOD (1368-1643). 

EDWARD E. AYER PEWTER COLLECTION. 



\f> 



a*** 1 



$v 



)J^ 



Jan., 1925 



Annual Report of the Director 



373 



CARR, EDMUND S. 
CHADWICK, CHARLES H. 
CHANCELLOR, JUSTUS 
CHATTIN, WILLIAM 
CHESNEY, JOHN W. 
CLARK, DR. J. WENDELL 
CLOW, MRS. JAMES C. 
COMPTON, FRANK E. 
CONDIT, J. SIDNEY 
CONNELL, PHILLIP G. 
COOKE, MISS FLORA J. 
COOKE, GEORGE ANDERSON 
COOMBS, JAMES F. 
COVERDALE, JOHN W. 
COWLES, THOMAS H. 
CREEDON, MRS. CLARA W. 
CRILLY, EDGAR 
CROMWELL, GEORGE O. 
CUNLIFF, HAROLD S. 
CURTIS, KENNETH 

DANIELS, H. L. 
DARDEL, CARL O. 
DASHIELL, C. R. 
DAVID, DR. VERNON C. 
DAVIES, WARREN T. 
DEICHES, SIGMUND 
DENT, GEORGE C. 
DICKSON, JOHN A. 
DICKINSON, JR., J. M. 
DIXON, ALAN C. 
DOUGLASS, WILLIAM A. 
DUGAN, ALPHONSO G. 
DUNCAN, JOSEPH S. 
DUNCAN, ROBERT CLARK 
DUX, JOSEPH G. 
DYCHE, WILLIAM A. 

EDMONDS, HARRY C. 
EIGER, OSCAR S. 
EITEL, MAX 
ELLIOTT, FRANK R. 
EMERSON, GUY L. V. 
ENGLISH, JOHN J. 
ENNIS, CALLISTUS S. 
EVANS, MORGAN R. 

FADER, A. L. 

FARR, NEWTON CAMP 

FAULKNER, MISS ELIZABETH 



FERGUS, ROBERT C. 
FISHER, HON. HARRY M. 
FLESCH, EUGENE W. P. 
FLOING, WILFRED O. 
FOREST, GEORGE D. 
FREUND, I. H. 
FRISBIE, CHAUNCEY O. 
FULLER, BENJAMIN C. 
FULLER, JUDSON M. 
FULTON, FRANK D. 
FULTON, JAMES L. 
FURRY, WILLIAM S. 

GABRIEL, HARRY F. 
GALHOUSE, LEONARD 
GALL, CHARLES H. 
GALLIE, SR., DR. DONALD M. 
GALLISTEL, ALBERT J. 
GALVIN, JOSEPH X. 
GARDEN, HUGH 
GARDNER, SR., ADDISON L., 
GARDNER, JAMES P. 
GARIBALDI, GIUSEPPE 
GAW, GEORGE T. 
GAY, DR. ROBERT J. 
GIBBONS, JOHN W. 
GILBERT, CHARLES E. 
GILLMAN, MORRIS 
GILMER, JAMES C. 
GILMER, DR. THOMAS L. 
GINTHER, MISS MINNIE C. 
GLASER, EDWARD L. 
GLASNER, RUDOLPH W. 
GLENDON, GEORGE L. 
GOODWIN, GEORGE S. 
GORMAN, GEORGE E. 
GOSHERT, J. FRED 
GOTTFRIED, CARL M. 
GRANT, E. RAY 
GRANT, FRANCIS B. 
GRANT, JOHN G. 
GRAVER, JAMES P. 
GRAVES, HOWARD B. 
GRAY, REV. JAMES N. 
GRAY, JOHN D. 
GREEN, SAMUEL 
GREENEBAUM, JAMES E. 
GREENLEE, JAMES A. 
GREENSFELDER, DR. LOUIS A. 
GROTENHUIS, MRS. WILLIAM J. 



374 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



HAAS, DR. RAOUL R. 
HAGEN, FRED J. 
HAJICEK, RUDOLPH F. 
HALL, WILLIAM L. 
HAMILTON, THOS. B. 
HAMM, EDWARD F. 
HAMMITT, MISS FRANCES M. 
HANSON, JAMES L. 
HARDIE, GEORGE F. 
HARRINGTON, BURTON 
HATMAKER, CHARLES F. 
HATTSTAEDT, WILLIAM O. J. 
HAUGAN, OSCAR H. 
HEDBERG, HENRY E. 
HEERMANS, THADDEUS W. 
HEIDKE, H. L. 
HEINE, MRS. ALBERT 
HENDERSON, DR. ELMER E. 
HENDERSON, THOMAS B. G. 
HENDRICKSON, MAGNUS 
HENEAGE, THOMAS H. 
HENKEL, FREDERICK W. 
HENNING, DR. ALBERT F. 
HENRI, WILLIAM B. 
HESS, JOHN L. 
HEWITT, MRS. CHARLES M. 
HILL, MRS. LYSANDER 
HIMROD, MRS. FRANK W. 
HINSBERG, STANLEY K. 
HOGAN, G. FRANK 
HOLLINGSHEAD, L. CARROLL 
HOLMES, WILLIAM N. 
HORNER, DR. DAVID A. 
HORNUNG, JOHN C. 
HORSTMAN, EDWARD F. 
HOSBEIN, LOUIS H. 
HOSMER, PHILIP B. 
HOTTINGER, ADOLPH 
HUGHES, JOHN W. 
HUNCKE, O. W. 
HURLEY, FRANK J. 



LA FORGE, DR. ALVIN W. 
LANSKI, JACOB 
LATHROP, GARDINER 
LAWTON, FRANK W. 
LINDQUIST, J. E. 
LOEB, LEO A. 



'MacRAE, THADDEUS B. 
MAGILL, ROBERT M. 
MARTIN, SAMUEL H. 
MAYER, OSCAR A. 
McAULEY, JOHN E. 
McCAUGHEY, FRANK J. 
McCRACKEN, MISS WILLIETTA 
McCONNELL, G. MALCOLM 
McCORMACK, PROF. HARRY 
McDIVITT, HERBERT J. 
McIVER, DANA T. 
McNEAL, MISS HELEN F. 
MEERHOFF, DR. CHARLES E. 
MEYER, JOSEPH S. 
MILHENING, JOSEPH 
MILLER, JOHN J. 
MILLER, JR., JOHN S. 
MILLER, RICHARD O. 
MITCHELL, JR., MRS. JOHN J. 
MITCHELL, WILLIAM H. 
MOHR, MISS HARRIET 
MOREY, CHARLES W. 
MORSE, MRS. CHARLES J. 
MOUAT, ANDREW 
MURPHY, J. H. 
MUNROE, MRS. DONALD G. 

NADLER, DR. WALTER H. 
NATHAN, CLAUDE 
NELSON, CHARLES G. 
NEUFFER, PAUL A. 
NICHOLS, S. F. 



JONES, J. HARRY 
JONES, W. CLYDE 
JOHNSTONE, DR. A. RALPH 



KELLER, DANIEL F. 
KRUTCKOFF, CHARLES 



OPPENHEIMER, ALFRED 
OVERTON, GEORGE W. 



PARKER, RALPH W. 
PARKER, WOODRUFF J. 
PECK, MRS. CHARLES G. 
PETERSON, AXEL A. 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 



375 



PIERCE, J. NORMAN 
PIOTROWSKI, NICHOLAS L. 
PITCHER, MRS. HENRY L. 
PLUNKETT, WILLIAM H. 
PORTER, JAMES F. 
POST, JR., FREDERICK 
POTTER, EDGAR A. 
PRESS. JACOB H. 
PROTHERO, DR. JAMES H. 
PRUSSING, MRS. GEORGE C. 
PURCELL, J. D. 
PUTNAM, MISS MABEL C. 

RANDALL, IRVING 
REA, DR. ALBERTINE L. 
REDINGTON, MRS. W. H. 
REEVE, FREDERICK E. 
REGENSTEINER, THEODORE 
RENSHAW, CHARLES C. 
RICKCORDS, FRANCIS 
RIES, DR. EMIL 
RITTER, MISS PAULA J. 
RIVKIN, MRS. E. A. 
ROACH, CHARLES H. 
ROBERTS, JOHN M. 
RUTHERFORD, JOHN J. 

SAWYER, DR. ALVAH L. 
SCHLITT, HERMAN J. 
SCHEUNEMANN, ROBT. G. 
SCHULENBURG, MRS. 

ADELAIDE 
SCHULZE, MRS. MATHILDE 
SILLS, CLARENCE W. 
SIMONDS, DR. JAMES P. 
SINCERE, CHARLES 
SLADER, THOMAS 
SMITH, CLAYTON F. 
SONNEVELD, JACOB 
SPALDING, MRS. CHARLES F. 



SPROGLE, MRS. HOWARD O. 
STEVENS, EDWARD J. 
STEVENS, EUGENE M. 
SWARTCHILD, EDWARD G. 

TAYLOR, CHARLES CORTLAND 
THORP, HARRY W. 
TILT, CHARLES A. 
TIMROTH, CHARLES E. 
TURNER, DR. B. S. 
TUTTLE, F. B. 

ULRICH, PERRY 

VAN DEVENTER. CHRIST. 
VAN SCHAICK, GERARD 

WALLERICH, G. W. 
WATSON, SR., OLIVER L. 
WEARY, ALLEN M. 
WEBSTER, DR. RALPH W. 
WEISSKOPF, MAURICE J. 
WEISSKOPF, DR. MAX A. 
WELLS, HARRY L. 
WESTRICH, MISS THERESA C. 
WILDER, JOHN E. 
WILLIAMS, J. M. 
WILLIS, THOMAS H. 
WINDSOR, JR., H. H. 
WINTERBOTHAM, JOHN H. 
WOLF, MRS. ALBERT H. 
WOLF, WALTER B. 
WOOD, JOHN G. 

YONKERS, EDWARD H. 
YOSHIDA, TANICHIRO 

ZERLER, CHARLES F. 
ZIELINSKI, THEODORE J. 



DECEASED I924 

BOTSCHEN, SR., ARTHUR JOHNSON, WILLIAM H. 



376 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



ANNUAL MEMBERS 



AARON, ELY M. 
ABBOTT, EDWIN H. 
ABBOTT, GUY H. 
ABERMAN, HARRY S. 
ABT, HUGO A. F. 
ACKERMAN, CHARLES N. 
ADAMS, ALBERT S. 
ADAMS, CHARLES B. 
ADLER, DR. HERMAN M. 
AFFLECK, BENJAMIN F. 
AHNFELT, JOHN 
ALDEN, W. T. 
ALEXANDER, WM. 
ALSCHULER, HON. SAMUEL 
AMES, ARTHUR R. 
AMES, EDWARD E. 
ANDREWS, DR. BENJAMIN F. 
ANTONOW, SAMUEL L. 
ARNEY, AURA J. 
ARNOLD, FRANCES M. 
ASCHER, NATHAN 
ASHCRAFT, R. M. 
AURELIUS, MRS. S. J. 
AYERS, BURLEY B. 

BACON, DR. CHARLES S. 
BAER, MRS. MERWIN K. 
BAGGE, CHRISTIAN U. 
BAILEY, EDWARD P. 
BAKER, ARTHUR R. 
BAKER, CHARLES J. 
BALLARD, MRS. E. S. 
BANGS, WILLIAM D. 
BARKER, MRS. FRANK W. 
BARTHOLOMAE, MRS. EMMA 
BARTHOLOMAY, JR., WILLIAM 
BASS, MRS. PERKINS 
BEACH, E. CHANDLER 
BEATON, JR., MATTHEW 
BEATTY, CLARENCE J. 
BECK, DR. E. G. 
BECK, H. FREDERIC 
BELDEN, JOSEPH C. 
BELLOWS, MRS. L. E. H. 
BENNETT, E. H. 
BENSLER, ERNEST 



BENSON, JOHN 
BENT, CHARLES M. 
BETTMAN, DR. RALPH 
BIDWELL, JOSEPH E. 
BLACK, HERMAN 
BLACK, W. J. 
BLISS, CHARLES F. 
BLITZSTEN, HARRY 
BLODGETT, EDGAR E. 
BLOMGREN, DR. WALTER L. 
BOLLENS, WALTER 
BOLTEN, PAUL H. 
BONK, JOSEPH P. 
BOORN, WILLIAM C. 
BORN, EDGAR A. 
BOTTS, GRAEME G. 
BOYD, MRS. WILLIAM J. 
BRAND, JR., EDWIN L. 
BREEN, JAMES W. 
BRENZA, MISS MARY 
BREWERTON, WILLIAM A. 
BRIGGS, MRS. ARTHUR A. 
BRODRIBB, LAWRENCE C. 
BRODSKY, JACOB J. 
BROOME, JOHN SPOOR 
BROWER, JULE F. 
BROWN, A. WILDER 
BROWN, CHARLES D. 
BROWN, CHARLES E. 
BROWN, J. RICE 
BROWN, STEWART R. 
BROWN, WALTER B. 
BROWN, W. GRAY 
BRUNDAGE, AVERY 
BUHMANN, GILBERT G. 
BURKHARDT, CHAS. E. 
BURMEISTER, EDWIN C. 
BURNHAM, DANIEL H. 
BURNHAM, HUBERT 
BURNS, JOHN J. 
BUSH, DAVID D. 
BUTTON, W. RUSSELL 
BUTZ, ROBERT T. 
BUTZ, THEO. C. 
BYRNE, THOMAS H. 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 



377 



CALDWELL, DR. CHARLES P. 
CALDWELL, LOUIS G. 
CALLNER, JOSEPH M. 
CAMERON, JOHN M. 
CAMP, CURTIS B. 
CAMPHAUSEX, FRED'K H. 
CAREY, FRANK L. 
CARPEXTER, JOHX A. 
CARRUTHERS, ARTHUR S. 
CASE, JR., CHARLES C. 
CASTEXHOLZ, W. B. 
CHAMBLESS, E. F. 
CHAXDLER, CHARLES H. 
CHAPMAN, ARTHUR E. 
CHAPMAN, DR. EDWARD D. 
CHASE, SAMUEL T. 
CHRISTIE, DR. ROY E. 
CHRITTON, GEORGE A. 
CHURAN, CHAS. A. 
CHURCHILL, RICHARD S. 
CLARK, CHARLES 
CLARKE. BROADUS J. 
CLAUSSEN, EDMUND J. 
CLEVELAND, PAUL W. 
CLONEY, T. W. 
COBURN, ALONZO J. 
COHEN, LEOPOLD 
COLLINS, ARTHUR W. 
COLLINS, WILLIAM M. 
CONNOR, DR. CHARLES H. 
COOK, MISS EDITH S. 
COOKE, JR., MRS. DAVID S. 
CORDELL, ARTHUR N. 
CORSANT, MRS. CHARLES K. 
COULTER, PROF. J. M. 
COWING, JOHN P. 
COWLEY, FREDERICK 
CREED, DANIEL A. 
CREGO, FRANK A. 
CROSBY, MRS. FREDERICK W. 
CUMMING, MISS EFFA H. 
CUMMINGS, JR., THOMAS A. 
CUNNINGHAM, THOMAS A. 
CURRAN, JR., O. P. 
CURRAN, PETER A. 
CURTIS, CHARLES E. 
CURTIS, MISS FRANCES H. 



DALLAS, CHARLES D. 
DANKOWSKI, I. F. 
DARROW, CLARENCE S. 
DAUGHADAY, HAMILTON 
DA VIES, WILLIAM B. 
DAVIS, CHARLES H. 
DAVIS, ROSS W. 
DAY, MRS. LEWIS J. 
DEGEN, DAVID 
DE LEE, DR. JOSEPH B. 
DICK, JR., ALBERT B. 
DICKINSON, PHIL S. 
DILKES, HOWARD B. 
DUCKGEISCHEL, HENRY J. 
DUNER, JOSEPH A. 
DUNLAP, GEORGE G. 

DUNNING, N. MAX 
DYER, JR., GEORGE T. 

EISENDRATH, ROBERT 
ELLBOGEN, MRS. MAX 
ELLINGSON, GIRARD A. 
EMIG, HOWARD A. 
ENGLAND, EDWARD L. 
ENGELHARD, BENJAMIN M. 
ERD, ARTHUR A. 
ERICKSON, ELMER 
ESTES, CLARENCE E. 
EUSTIS, PERCY S. 
EVANS, DR. JOS. K. 

FALKER, MILTON E. 
FANI, REV. CHARLES 
FANNING, CHARLES G. 
FARNSWORTH, GEORGE J. 
FERRIS, LESLIE C. 
FETZER, JUDGE WM. R. 
FETZER, WADE 
FIELD, HENRY 
FINK, GEORGE H. 
FORGAN, JR., JAMES B. 
FORTUNE, JOHN L. 
FOSTER, CHAUNCEY C. 
FOSTER, STEPHEN A. 
FOWLER, GORDON F. 
FRANK, HENRY L. 
FRANKENSTEIN, RUDOLPH 



378 Field Museum of Natural History— Reports, Vol. VI. 



FRIDSTEIN, MEYER 
FRIEDER, EDWARD N. 
FRIEDMAN, MRS. I. K. 
FURSE, DAVID S. 

GABEL, WALTER H. 
GABER, BENJAMIN 
GABRIEL, FRANK J. 
GADDIS, CYRUS J. 
GAITHER, OTHO S. 
GALE, ABRAM 
GALL, HARRY T. 
GALL, JAMES N. 
GALLANIS, JOHN A. 
GARBERS, CHRIST H. 
GARDNER, JR., ADDISON L. 
GARDNER, DR. EDGAR W. 
GARRISON, DR. LESTER E. 
GARRITY, EDMUND C. 
GARY, SIMON P. 
GASKILL, CHARLES H. 
GATES, ERRETT 
GEDDES, WILLIAM H. 
GERAGHTY, GERALD G. 
GERINGER, CHARLES M. 
GERTZ, RUDOLPH V. 
GIESSEL, HENRY 
GILES, MISS A. H. 
GILL, ADOLPH 
GILL, WALLACE 
GILLEN, CHRISTIAN J. 
GILLEN, JOSEPH F. 
GILLESPIE, ROBERT H. 
GILLILAND, FRANK 
GINSBURG, MRS. I. S. 
GINSBURG, SAMUEL 
GLADER, FRANK J. 
GLASSER, EDWARD 
GLASER, MORRIS R. 
GOLDFINE, DR. ASCHER H. C. 
GOLDSMITH, MOSES 
GOODNOW, E. H. 
GOODRICH, MRS. MARY A. 
GORDON, MRS. FRANK T. 
GORMLEY, WILLIAM J. 
GOSLEE, DR. HART J. 
GOSNEY, MARVIN L. 
GOSSELIN, FRANK X. 
GOTTLICH, OSCAR 
GOULD, GEORGE W. 



GOULD, MARC D. 
GRABER, HYMAN M. 
GRACE, PAUL 
GRADY, MRS. DAVID E. 
GRAFF, OSCAR C. 
GRAHAM, HARRY D. 
GRAMM, DR. CARL T. 
GRAVER, PHILIP S. 
GRAVES, ERNEST H. 
GRAY, ARTHUR L. 
GRAYDON, CHARLES E. 
GREEN, JOHN H. 
GREEN, ROBERT D. 
GREENE, BENJAMIN 
GREER, MRS. ERWIN 
GREGG, THOMAS A. 
GREGOR, PETER A. 
GREGORY, CHARLES E. 
GREGORY, CLIFFORD V. 
GREY, CHARLES F. 
GRIFFIN, BENNETT 
GRIFFIN, REED A. 
GRIGNON, GEORGE F. 
GRIMBLOT, SAMUEL A. 
GRIMM, WALTER H. 
GROAK, IRWIN D. 
GROEBE, LOUIS G. 
GROENWALD, FLORIAN A. 
GROMMES, JOHN B. 
GROOME, RICHARD L. 
GROSBERG, CHARLES 
GROSS, ERNEST W. 
GROSS, DR. HENRY R. 
GROSS, MISS MIRIAM 
GUNN, WALTER C 

HACHTEL, FRED C. 
HALL, ARTHUR B. 
HALL, CHARLES R. 
HALL, EDWARD B. 
HAMILTON, HUGO A. 
HAMMOND, HENRY W. 
HANLEY, MRS. H. L. 
HARDING, S. LAWRENCE 
HARGRAFT, STUART A. 
HARKNESS, LAUNCELOT A. 
HARLEV, ARTHUR G. 
HARMON, HUBERT R. 
HARMON, JOHN H. 
HARNER, GEORGE W. 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 



379 



HARRIMAN, FRANK B. 
HARRIMAN, MRS. KARL E. 
HARRINGTON, GAY R. 
HARRINGTON, JAMES H. 
HARRIS, DAVID J. 
HARRIS, EWART 
HARRIS, FRANK F. 
HARRIS, GORDON L. 
HARRIS, J. MAX 
HARRIS, WALLACE 
HARRIS, WILLIAM L. 
HARRIS, WILLIAM P. 
HARRISON, HARRY P. 
HARRISON, JAMES D. 
HARRISON, MARTIN L. 
HARRISON, THOMAS F. 
HARROLD, JAMES P. 
HART, ALVIN C. 
HART, GILBERT 
HART, HARRY 
HART, MRS. HELENA 
HART, HENRY D. 
HART, JAMES M. 
HART, LOUIS E. 
HART, THOMAS W. 
HART, WILLIAM N. 
HARTIGAN, CLAIRE 
HARTMANN, SR., HENRY 
HARTWICK, JESSE A. 
HARTWIG, OTTO J. 
HARWOOD, FREDERICK 
HARWOOD, THOMAS W. 
HASSETT, FRANK L. 
HASTERLIK, VICTOR C. 
HASTINGS, EDMUND A. 
HASTINGS, LOUIS M. 
HATCH, F. M. 
HAUSER, J. C. 
HAUSSE, RICHARD H. 
HAUGHY, JAMES M. 
HAUSMANN, FRANK W. 
HAVRANAK, ALBERT 
HAWKINS, FRANK P. 
HAWKINS, L. S. 
HAWKINS, THEODORE 
HAWLEY, ALBERT P. 
HAWTHORNE, VAUGHN R. 
HAYES, CHARLES A. 
HEALY, JOHN J. 
HEATH, MRS. MAY C. 



HEATON, HARRY E. 
HEBEL, HON. OSCAR 
HECHLER, VALENTINE 
HECK, JOHN 
HECKAMAN, SAMUEL D. 
HECKENDORF, R. A. 
HECKINGER, WM. J. 
HECKMANN, PHILIP W. 
HECTOR, WILLIAM S. 
HEDBERG, REV. VICTOR E. 
HEDGES, FLEMING D. 
HEDGES, DR. ROBT. N. 
HEDIGER, ADOLPH M. 
HEDMARK, JOHN 
HEDRICK, TUBMAN K. 
HEEREMA, GERRIT 
HEFFERN, WILLIAM H. 
HEFFERNAN, THOMAS F. 
HEFTER, MRS. ETHEL 
HEG, SR., ERNEST 
HEICK, HARRY E. 
HEIDBRINK, GEORGE F. 
HEIDEL, CARL 
HEIDEL, DR. CECIL T. 
HEIDKE, OTTO G. 
HEIDLER, FRANK J. 
HEIFETZ, SAMUEL 
HEILMAN, ADOLPH 
HEIN, GEORGE 
HEIN, SYLVESTER J. 
HEINEKE, CARL 
HEINEKAMP, MISS LILLIAN 
HEINEMANN, EARL 
HEINEMANN, GEORGE G. 
HEINEMANN, JOHN B. 
HEINFELDEN, CURT H. G. 
HEINZ, L. HERMAN 
HEISE, WILLIAM F. 
HELLER, BRUNO F. 
HELLER, DR. CHARLES 
HEMPSTEAD, JOSEPH L. 
HEMPSTED, JAMES G. 
HEMWALL, JOHN 
HENNEBERGER, JACOB G. 
HENNESSEY, WILLIAM S. 
HENRICKSON, OLOF B. 
HENRY, CHARLES W. 
HENRY, CLAUDE D. 
HENRY, C. DUFF 
HENRY, HUNTINGTON B. 



380 Field Museum of Natural History— Reports, Vol. VI. 



HENSCHIEN, H. PETER 
HENSEL, HERMAN E. 
HEPBURN, DAVID D. 
HERMANN, WILLIAM C. 
HERSHEY, J. CLARENCE 
HERTEL, HUGO S. 
HERTHEL, E. C. 
HERTZBERG, EDWARD 
HERZMAN, DR. MORRIS H. 
HESS, ARMIN E. 
HESS, EDWARD J. 
HESS, GEORGE F. 
HESS, JULIUS 
HESS, SOL H. 
HESSERT, GUSTAV 
HESSERT, DR. WM. 
HETMAN, WENCEAL F. 
HEUMOS, ALOIS 
HEWICKER, WILHELM 
HEWITT, OSCAR E. 
HIBBARD, FREDERICK C. 
HILDEBRAND, EUGENE 
HILLIS, DR. DAVID 
HILLYER, DWIGHT E. 
HILTON, HENRY H. 
HIMAN, CHARLES 
HIMMELSBACH, JOHN W. 
HINCKLEY, WILLIAM O. 
HINDMAN, ARTHUR S. 
HINDS, JOSEPH B. 
HINES, JOHN W. 
HINNERS, WILLIAM A. 
HIRD, FREDERIC H. 
HIRSCH, HENRY H. 
HIRSCH, JACKSON H. 
HIRSCH, MRS. MATILDA 
HISCOX, MORTON 
HITCHCOCK, R. M. 
HITE, HARRY A. 
HOCKADAY, MRS. B. B. 
HOCKERT, ERNEST L. 
HODGE, ALFRED R. 
HODGE, THOMAS P. 
HODGES, LOUIS A. 
HODGDON, WILLIAM 
HODSON, WILLIAM 
HOEFER, ERNEST 
HOELSCHER, HERMAN M. 



HOFFMAN, EDWARD W. 
HOFFMAN, JACOB 
HOFFMAN, MISS KATHARINE 
HOGG, HARRY H. 
HOJKA, ANTHONY J. 
HOLABIRD, JOHN A. 
HOLDEN, C. R. 
HOLLAND, DR. WILLIAM E. 
HOLLINGSWORTH, GEORGE K. 
HOLLMEYER, JOHN G. 
HOLLOW AY, OWEN B. 
HOLLOWELL, R. D. T. 
HOLM, GOTTFRIED 
HOLMAN, ALFRED L. 
HOLMAN, EDWARD 
HONNOLD, FRED C. 
HONOROFF, DR. HENRY A. 
HOODWIN, ROBERT 
HOOGE, DR. LUDWIG F. 
HOOPER, JR., HENRY 
HOOT, MISS EMILY M. 
HOPKINS, WALTER D. 
HORN, ALBIN O. 
HORN, DR. ALBERT T. 
HORNER, HON. HENRY 
HORNKOHL, A. C. 
HORSFALL, OLIN L. 
HORST, CURT A. 
HORSTING, WILLIAM F. 
HOSELY, MATT E. 
HOSFORD, WILLIAM R. 
HOTTEL, WILLIAM S. 
HOUGHTELING, MISS H. P. 
HOUK, WILLIAM D. 
HOWE, MRS. FANNY J. 
HURD, HARRY B. 
HURLEY, JR., EDWARD N. 
HURLEY, R. J. 

IGLEWSKI, JOHN 
IMBER, MISS STELLA 
INGRAM, HAROLD S. 
INGRAM, MISS LOTTIE 
INLANDER, SAMUEL 
IRISH,' DR. H. E. 
IRWIN, A. C. 
ISMOND, THOMAS A. 
IVENER, JOHN 
IVERSON, RALPH H. 



Jan., 1925 



Annual Report of the Director 



381 



JAMES, RAYMOND H. 
JAMES, DR. T. FRANKLIN 
JAMES, WILLIAM A. 
JENKINS, GEORGE H. 
JOHNSON, NELS J. 
JOHNSTON, BERNARD F. 
JOHNSTONE, GEORGE A. 
JONES, CHARLES J. 
JONES, J. S. 
JONES, DR. MARGARET M. 

KAHMANN, KARL W. 
KAHN, JOSEPH 
KAHN, MARCUS 
KANN, MAX 
KANNALLY, M. V. 
KAPSA, LADISLAV A. 
KARAMANOS, DR. ANGELOS K. 
KATZ, JACOB 
KELLOGG, JAMES G. 
KOTIN, GEORGE N. 
KOZICZYNSKI, DR. LUCIAN 
KUH, DR. SIDNEY 

LAMB, FRANK H. 
LANSDON, CHARLES H. 
LANSINGER, MRS. JOHN M. 
LA PIANA, VICTOR 
LA PIERRE, DR. FELIX J. 
LARSON, FRANK A. 
LASSAGNE, VICTOR F. 
LAWRENCE, B. E. 
LEVAN, REV. THOMAS F. 
LEVEY, C. J. 
LEVY, HARRY H. 
LINCOLN, ROBERT T. 
LINDHEIMER, JACOB 
LINDHEIMER, S. W. 
LIVINGSTON, MILTON L. 
LOGAN, F. G. 
LOVE, CHASE W. 
LUND, HJALMAR C. R. 
LUTTER, ALFRED W. 
LUTZOW, FRED H. 
LYNCH, BENJAMIN L. 
LYNDE, CORNELIUS 
MacRAE, ALBERT 



MAGILL, HENRY P. 
MANNING, MISS EMMA 
MANSON, WILLIAM 
MARRIOTT, ABRAHAM R. 
MARSH, EVERETT C. 
MARSHALL, RAPHAEL H. 
MARTIN, Z. E. 
MASSMANN, FRED H. 
MATLIS, L. 

matthews, francis e. 
maynard, mrs. ada e. 
McAllister, m. hall 

McARTHUR, DR. LEWIS L. 

McCarthy, rev. father 

GEO. T. 
McCONNELL, JOHN L. 
McCORD, DOWNER 
McCREA, W. S. 
McGARRY, JOHN A. 
McGOORTY, HON. J. P. 

McMillan, david e. 
McMillan, Walter j. 

McNERNY, MATHEW F. 
MEAD, HENRY C. A. 
MEDSKER, DR. ORA L. 
MEEKER, ARTHUR 
MILLER, MRS. CHARLES P. 
MOENG, EDWARD D. 
MONTGOMERY, MRS. FRANK 

HUGH 
MONTGOMERY, FREDERICK D. 
MOORE, N. G. 
MORRIS, EUGENE C. 
MULLIKEN, A. H. 

NASH, PATRICK A. 
NICHOLS, EDWIN G. 
NICHOLS, WARREN 
NONNENBRUCH, MAX 
NORCROSS, FREDERIC F. 

PALMER, PROF. CLAUDE 

IRWIN 
PALMER, PERCIVAL B. 
PARKER, GEORGE S. 
PAULDING, JOHN 
PAULEY, CLARENCE O. 
PAULING, EDWARD G. 
PEACOCK, CHARLES A. 
PERLSTEIN, BENJAMIN 



382 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. VI. 



pickard, mrs. w. a. 
pickell, j. ralph 
pickrell, harvey 
pincoffs, maurice 
polakoff, michael r. 
powell, miss nellie 
price, mrs. jean c. 
protheroe, daniel 
pruyn, jr., william henry 

raff, sr., william j. 
randall, rev. edwin j. 
ranson, j. otis 
rapaport, morris w. 
reed, mrs. mary l. 
reed, rufus m. 
renich, william e. 
richards, h. a. 
richards, marcus 
riddle, herbert h. 
rigali, john e. 
ripley, mrs. e. p. 
rittenhouse, mrs. moses f. 
roberts, jesse e. 
roden, carl b. 
rolfes, gerald a. 
rosenfeld, mrs. maurice 
rosenfeld, m. j. 
rosenthal, james 
rudolph, miss bertha 
russell, mildred a. 
ryan, john m. 
ryan, thomas c. 
ryerson, edwin d. 

sampson, h. j. 

sauter, leonard j. 

schmidt. dr. o. l. 

schnering, julius 

schnering, otto y. 

schwartz, g. a. 

schweizer, albert h. 

scott, dr. james 
Mcdonald 

scudder, j. arnold 
seabury, charles w. 
seip, fred 
senear, dr. f. e. 
sherman, mrs. francis c. 



SHOCKEY, MRS. WILLIS G. 
SHORTALL, JOHN L. 
SIMMONS, PARKE E. 
SIMPSON, DR. ELMER E. 
SKINNER, MISS FREDERIKA 
SMITH, DR. EDWIN M. 
SMITH, GILBERT M. 
SMITH, JENS 

SMITH, MISS MARY ROZET 
SNEDICOR, MARSHALL D. 
SOPER, HENRY M. 
STEARNS, FRED 
STERN, FELIX 
STERNBERG, MORRIS 
STOCKTON, MISS JOSEPHINE 
STODDART, CHARLES H. 
SWIFT, ALDEN B. 

TEICH, MAX L. 
TENNEY, HORACE KENT 
THROOP, GEORGE ENOS 
TIDD, FRED L. 
TIEKEN, DR. THEODORE 
TIPPETT, W. M. 
TOWLER, KENNETH F. 
TRENCH, MRS. DANIEL G. 
TUFTS, PROF. JAS. H. 
TURNER, ALFRED M. 
TUTHILL, RICHARD S. 
TUTTLE, CHARLES S. 
TUTTLE, W. F. 

VAN DELLEN, DR. ROBT. L. 
VOEGELI, MRS. JOHN J. 
VOLTZ, DANIEL W. 
VON KLEINWACHTER, DR. 
LUDWIG 

WACKER, CHARLES H. 
WAITE, MISS MURIEL W. 
WALKER, BERTRAND 
WALKER, JAMES R. 
WALLER, MISS KATHERINE 
WARREN, W. G. 
WECKER, WALTER A. 
WEGG, DONALD R. 
WEISS, SAMUEL H. 
WENTWORTH, JOHN 
WHEELER, LESLIE 
WHEELER, SEYMOUR 



Jan., 1925 Annual Report of the Director 



383 



WHINERY, CHARLES C. 
WHITE, CHARLES B. 
WHITEHEAD, W. M. 
WHITLOCK, AIRS. ELIZABETH C. 
WILD, RICHARD 
WILLIAMS, GAAR 
WILSON, MRS. E. CRANE 
WILSON, M. H. 
WITKOWSKY, MISS ESTHER 
WOLFF, CHRIS J. 



WOLFF, GEORGE F. 
WORTHY, MRS. S. W. 
WRIGHT, DR. JAMES A. 

YOUNG, GEORGE H. 

ZENOS, REV. ANDREW C. 
ZEUCH, DR. LUCIUS P. 
ZIMMERMANN, HERBERT P. 
ZINDER, BENJAMIN L. 



DECEASED 1923 

ARMOUR, GEORGE A. HEDMAN, CARL M. 

COMSTOCK, WILLIAM C. HEERWAGEN, DR. OSCAR W. 

FOIN, CHIN F. HOCH, JAMES J. 

GREENLEAF, GARDNER HOLT, GEORGE H. 

HARTER, GUSTAV A. SPENCE, MRS. ELIZABETH E. 

WOLTERSDORF, ERNEST