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Full text of "Annual report of the Game and Fisheries Department of Ontario, 1921-34"

J^^ /(Le^6y^<^(i^^ 








Fifteenth Annual Report 

I 

OF THE 

;cGAME AND FISHERIES 
DEPARTMENT 

1921 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




TORONTO: 
led and Published by CLARKSON W. JAMES, Printer to the Kin^'e Most Excellent Majesty 

1922 



Printed by 

THE RYBRSOlN PRESS- 






Z^(^^ 






To His Honour Henry Cockshutt, Esc, 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May it Please Your Honour: 

I have the honour to submit herewith, for the information of Your Honour 
and the Legislative Assembh^, the Fifteenth Annual Report of the Game and Fish- 
eries Department of this Province. 

I have the honour to be, 

Your Honour's most obedient servant, 



Toronto, 1922 



H. Mills, 
Minister of Mines. 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Game and Fisheries Department of 

Ontario 



To the Honourable H. Mills, 

Minister of Mines. 

Sir, — I have the honour to place before you the Fifteenth Annual Report 
of the work of the Game and Fisheries Department for the fiscal 3-ear ending the 
.'Ust day of October, 1921. The net revenue of the Department continues to 
increase and for the first time it will be shown that the net surplus in the Department 
proper exceeds the total expenditures by 837,755.12, and the total net revenue 
for the year amounts to $379,739.16, of which amount the Department proper 
contributed S325,363.99, and the Sales Branch S54,375.17. A statement of the 
Sales Branch operations is shown elsewhere in this report. 

Comparative Statement of Revenue and Expenditure — 
1916-1921, Inc. as showTi in the Public Accounts. 

Revenue. Expenditure. Surplits. 

lOlf) §174,186 71 $157,68194 S16,.")04 77 

1917 219,442 94 1.54,055 17 65,:«7 77 

191S 258,67162 167,795 22 90,876 40 

1919 .346,197 14 185,247 72 160,949 42 

1920 466,550 86 2.39,978 1.3 226,.572 73 

1921 612,972 86 287,608 87 325,363 99 

Sales Branch. 

1921 §258,057 73 S203,682 56 .So4,375 17 

Statistics 

The different figures and .statements presented herein furnisliing statistics 
of the Department have been carefully prepared and pro\idcs very interesting 
and valuable information. 

Fish. 

Tlie ronnaercial fisheries of tlie I'rnviiicc are shown in comparison, as follows: — 

1919 

('.ill Nets licen.scd fvard.s) 5,960,1.>S 

Seines " 190 

Pound Nets " 1.144 

Hoop Nets " 1,417 

Dip iiiid Pioll N(!t.s licensed .36 

Spc:irs " 199 

Hooks " (;9.000 

\uiiil)er of men employed 4,1.56 

Number of Tu^s 123 

" riasoline Boats . . 768 

Sail or Row Boat.s. . 1.285 
Estimated value of boats, ice 

houses, wharves ;nul twine . . . . ?.3,f).'{9.682 flO 

.\pgrepate C'nteh in I'ouiuls .38,1 15. t")S 

Estimated value to fishermen . . . .'?2,72I,410 24 



1920 


1921 


5,.501,827 


6,181,883 


168 


180 


1 , 080 


1 ,0.52 


1,442 


1,445 


29 


41 


122 


116 


64,330 


78,66.3 


3,693 


3,600 


124 


116 


80.3 


924 


1 ,088 


1,100 


.S3,2tl9.97l 00 


.S.!,l5i,SlO 00 


.38,. 501,. 5.33 


:'.<i,444,372 


?2,69 1,093 74 


§2,656.775 82 



TJIE JJErOiiT UPON No. 14 



Angling. 

The fee for non-resident Angling permits was iricreased from $2.00 to .$5.00 
during the year, and from this source a substantial increase in revenue lias been 
ol)tained, while tlio reports received from ahnost ever}' district show that game 
fish arc still plentiful and furnishes ample sport to both resident and non-resident 
alike. 

Hatcheries. 

A large and modern Hatcheiy was built and equipped by the Department 
during the year at Saiilt Ste. Marie, and all necessary arrangements made to fill 
it to capacity with whitefish, salmon trout and speckled trout spawn to be hatched 
and delivered during the coming season. A Hatchery at this point will fill a long- 
felt need of the district, as it is in the centre of very valuable connnercial fisheries 
and also very accessible to many waters that abound in game fish, but which would 
soon become depleted without the assistance of artificial propagation. 1'he lo("i- 
tion of this hatchery also renders the collection of commercial and game fish si)avvn 
possible with a reasonable amount of energy and expense. 

A detailed report of the output of the various provincial hatcheries will be 
shown elsewhere in this repoi't, and the summary as compared with the previous 
year can be considered satisfactory, which is as follows: — 



Whitefish Fry 

Pickerel " 

Lake Trout " 

Herring " 

Speckled Trout Fingerlings and Fry 
Black Bass Fingerlings " 
Parent Bass 



T\w. domaiid for fry and fingerlings is greal(M- than the present available supply, 
and the l)(^partment should extend this work as far as any reasonable expenditure 
will permit. 

The total fry (lisli-il)uied yearly since 1912 is as follows: — 

1912 150,000 1917 2,1,56,928 

1913 173,815 1918 58,356,631 

1914 ,598,630 1919 22,.361,748 

1915 1,697,425 1920 77,783,360 

1916 1,570,4.50 1921 155,347,142 

Game Sanctuaries. 

At present only a few small areas are set aside by this Department, viz., — 

Miner Fami Sanctuary. 
Peasemarsh Farm Sanctuaiy. 
Nopiming Game Sanctuary. 
Eugenia Fish and Game Preserve. 

The lat[(>r has only been recently established and only made possil)le to a large 
extent by the co-o{)eration of the Hydro Electric Power Commission, who have 
given permission to use a large island exclusively for the rearing of water fowl 



1920 

43,985,000 

31,030,000 

1,134,000 

920,000 

286,700 

427,200 

460 


1921 

115,9.50.000 

27,625,000 

110.400 

9,740,000 

1,147.-500 

773,.500 

742 


77,783,360 


155,347,142 



1922 



GAME AND FISHEBIES. 



and other game birds and animals. The water on this Sanctuary will be protected 
and made attractive for water fowl of everj' specie while the collecting of speckled 
trout spawn at this point will prove beneficial when developed and distributed 
as fry to all suitable waters. 

Wild Celery and Wild Rice. 

Dm-ing the year the Department caused a quantity of wild celery plants 
and wild rice seed to be placed in suitable waters in the districts of Muskoka, 
Parr}' Sound and other districts as far west as Rainy River and Kenora, and the 
results obtained have shown the success of the undertaking and worthy of further 
work of this nature, which is given ever}' support by the many local fish and game 
associations. These plants reproduce and spread rapidly and will soon provide 
the needed food to attract water-fowl in the various districts. 

Game. 

Moose and Deer. — In issuing resident moose and deer licenses for the year, 
a questionaire was furnished with a view of ascertaining sportsmen's opinion on 
taking deer with dogs, and also as to open seasons. The results of this question- 
aire by Counties or Districts were as follows : — 



County or District 



Favoring use 
of Dogs 



Agamst use 
of Dogs 



Totals 



Local non-local Local non-local Favoring Against 
Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Dogs Dogs 



Addington 

Algoma 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Dundas 

Frontenac 

Grenville 

Haliburton 

Hastings 

Kenora 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Manitoulin 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Parry Sound 

Peterboro 

Rainy River 

Renfrew 

Russell and Prescott. 

Sudbury 

Timiskaming 

Thunder Bay 

Victoria 

Unclassified 



59 
337 

65 

113 

3 

318 

35 

55 
554 

49 

205 

1 

12 
317 
229 
596 
367 

20 
368 

26 
157 

55 

38 

73 



156 


41 


46 


215 


87 


163 


722 


140 


500 


862 


7 


23 


1 


72 


24 


24 


37 


1 


137 

3.. 
457 


38 


139 


108 


34 


142 


8 


2... 




43 


2 


287 


6 


53 


342 


59 


320 


251 


59 


874 


310 




166. . . 




49 


166 


49 


104 


4 


254 


108 






1 


1 


1 


45 


62 


19 


57 


81 


419 


77 


164 


736 


241 


655 


305 


278 


884 


583 


1,967 


438 


699 


2,563 


1,137 


402 


59 


116 


769 


175 


3 


105 


1 


23 


106 


167 


618 


103 


535 


721 


2... 






. . 28. . 




319 


367 


206 


476 


573 


31 


61 


38 


86 


99 


7 


329 


6 


45 


335 


21 


30 


11 


94 


41 


621 .. . 




272 


621 


272 



Summary 

Local Non-Local 

Hunters Hunters Total 

Favoring use of Dogs 4,052 5,812 9,864 

Against use of Dogs 3,911 2,252 6,163 

Number of local hunters questioned 7,963 

Number of non-local hunters questioned 8,064 



The questionaire was not submitted to settltrs who are entitled to one deer eseh season witliout a license. 



.'^ THE REPORT UPON " No. 14 

Number of hunters voting in favor of the present open seasons 

for deer 12,762 

Number of hunters voting against the present open seasons for 

deer 1,056 

Majority for present open seasons 11,706 

Both deer and moose are reported to be quite plentiful, and licenses were 
issued in comparison with the previous year as follows: — 

1920 1921 

Resident Moose 1,988 1,989 

Deer 16,943 18,689 

Non-resident Hunting 796 950 

Ruffed Grouse commonly known as Partridge. — An open season for these 
game birds was once more in effect, and the}^ have again become quite well es- 
tablished according to reports i-eceived from the districts where they are usually 
found. 

Quail and Pheasants are reported to a limited extent only in the south-western 
part of the province. 

Ducks and Geese are reported as plentiful and the season for same has been a 
satisfactory one to the sportsmen. 

Furs. 

The Fur market for the year has been quite satisfactory, and while it has been 
unsteady at times, yet inflated values were not obtained as in the previous year. 

1920 1921 

Licenses issued to Fur Dealers $34,850 27 $55,007 00 

" " Trappers 75,223 54 99,360 00 

These increases in revenue can be considered as satisfactory particularly when 
the market was such as to offer no extreme profits to either trapper or dealer, as 
was obtained during the early part of the 1920 season. 

Beaver. — Are still being taken in large numbers. 

Otter, Marten and Fisher. — Continue to be scarce. 

Muskrat. — Show a shght increase over the previous year. 

A comparison of pelts exported and tanned for the year as compared with the previous year 
is shown herewith: — 

1920 1921 

Exported and Tanned Exported and Tarmed 

Beaver 

Otter 

Fisher 

Marten 

Mink 

Muskrat 

Bear 

Fox (Cross) 

" (Red) 

" (Silver or Black) 

" (White) 

" (Not specified) 

Lynx 

Raccoon 



96,006 


95,479 


4,094 


4,759 


4,069 


2,602 


6,315 


6,533 


33,695 


42,667 


434,066 


479,866 


409x 


1,494 


39x 


287 


23 Ix 


5,282 


llx 


153 




351 


240x 


23 


170x 


591 


321x 


11,951 



1922 GAME AND FISHERIES. 



Skunk l,0S2x 47,121 

Weasel 3,095x 58,898 

W'ulverin ^ 12 



Total 583,843 758,009 

Tlic figures marked with x (;nver a period of only five months of the year 1920. The estimated 
value to the trapper base 1 on an average of the prices paid for the year is §3,268,967.50. 

Fur Farming. 

Dtiring the jTar ftir fanning permits were issued to keep for propagation 
purposes, appnj.xiiiiately the [(jhowing number of fur-bearing animals: — 

Beaver 2 Fox (Black) 103 

Fisher 3 Lvnx 2 

Fox (Cross) 240 Mink 83 

P'ox (Red) 132 Raccoon 37 

Fox (Silver) 593 Skunk 74 

Enforcement of Act. 

The re-organization of the outside service was in effect for the first con^plete 
year, and the results obtained were very satisfactory. With a continuation of 
the system now established, a better enforcement of the laws will be attained 
tliaii under the sj'stem discontinued in the fall of 1920. 

Acknowledgment. 

In closing this report I desire to state that the Department has received willing 
co-operation in all matters from the Federal Government, Railway Officials and 
from the members of all Fish and Game Protective Associations seeking to establish 
better conditions and conservation of all game and fish. The staff has been loyal 
and efficient, and to them considerable credit is due for the continued success of 
the Department. 

All statistics referred to will be found elsewhere in this report, togethor with 
many other statistics in detail. 

All of which is respectfull}^ submitted. 

I am, 
Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) D. McDonald, 
Deputy Minister of Game and Fisheries 



JO 



THE TJEPOT^T UPOX 



Xo. 14 



Statemknt of Revenue Received by Department of Game and Fisheries During 
Year Ending October 31, 1921 



GAME 



Royalty on Furs 

Royalty of Coupons 

Trapi)ors" Licenses 

Non-Piosident Hunting Licenses. . 

Resident Deer Licenses 

Resident Moose Licenses 

I'ur Dealers' Licenses 

Tanners' Licenses 

Game Dealers' Licenses 

Hotel and Restaurant Licenses etc. 

Cold Storage Licenses 

Guides' Licenses 

Fines — Game 

Sales — Game 



S 71,007 SS 

1()S.2GS S7 

o«i,947 4(1 

2:j,7;)() 00 

oG,0G7 00 

9,94", 00 

,jr,,29r, 00 
:59r, 00 
t)4r),oo 

412 00 
18o 00 
,S(J4 00 
12r) 44 



1, 

IS, 



12,449 2r, 

S 410,256 84 



FISHERIES 

Fishing Licenses 

Royalty, Fish 

Angling Permits 

I'lnes— Fish " 

Sales — Fish 

Miscellaneous 



128,850 00 
5,350 85 
56,565 00 
1,776 59 
2,523 79 
1,649 79 



$ 196,716.02 



GOVERNMENT FISH 

Salesof Fish, etc 258,057 73 S 258,057 73 

^^"^""^ i 871 ,030 59 



1922 



C4AME AND FISHERIES. 



11 



D. McDonald, Esq. 
Deputy Minister of Game and Fisheries, 
Parliament Buildings. 
Dear Sir: — 

I have pleasure in handing you herewith a financial report of the Sales Branch for the fiscal 
year ending October 31st, 1921, by which you will note that there has been a surplus of cash 
received over expenditures amounting to $54,375.17. 

The total fish purchased for the year amounts to 2,055,706 lbs. as against 2,269,401 lbs. 
of the previous year, and the municipalities supplied during the past year being 85 with 237 deal- 
ers, against 94 municipahties with 214 dealers for the previous year. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Yours truly, 

(Sgd) Geo. H. Rapsey, 

Superintendent. 



SALES BRANCH 



INCOME AND EXPENDITURE FOR YEAR ENDING 
OCTOBER 31st, 1921 

INCOME 

Cash, Paid Treasurer 

EXPENDITURE 

Paid Fishermen $ 111,961 56 

Express, freight and cartage 39,341 92 

Boxes and cases 10 , 501 79 

St. Thomas Warehouse charges 122 36 

Toronto Warehouse charges 20 , 321 16 

Wages, Packing and Shipping, Macdiarmid 5 , 981 58 

Salaries, Macdiarmid 2, 100 00 

Salaries, Toronto Ofl5ces 5 , 205 26 

Commission, — Purchasing 875 54 

Travelling Expenses 161 95 

Sundr}' Expense, Macdiarmid 2,013 92 

Sundry Expense, Toronto 72 35 

Ice 1,894 20 

Postage and Stationery 607 61 

Buildings, — Docks, Warehouse etc., Macdiarmid 553 07 

Equipment and supplies, Macdiarmid 619 61 

Horses, Vehicle and Motor Boat Expense 1 , 063 62 

Telephone & Telegraph 265 60 

MLscellaneous Expense 19 46 

$ 203,682 56 

Surplus Cash in Treasury over expenditure 54,375 17 



$ 258,057 73 



$ 258,057 73 



12 , THE FtEPORT UPON No. 14 

WATERS STOCKED 

QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1921. 

Black Bass Fry and Fingerlings. 

Waters County Quantity 

Kebesquashine: Lake Algoma 5 , 000 

Blue Lake. . . 7 Brant 2,000 

Purvis Lake Bruce 10 , 000 

Roval Milling Company's Pond " 10,000 

Krug Bvother'sPond " 10,000 

SconePond " 10,000 

Sharbot Lake Frontenac 10 , 000 

Chippego Lake " 10 , 000 

FishLake " 10,000 

Lake Mossonoga " 10,000 

McCall Lake Grev 2,500 

McCormick Lake " 2 , 500 

Cocklong Lake Haliburton 20 , 000 

Stoco Lake Hastings . . : 2 , 500 

Crow Lake " 5 ,000 

Oak Hill Lake " 5,000 

Beaver Creek " 2,500 

Deer River " 2,500 

MoiraRiver " 2,500 

Wolfe Lake " 2, 500 

Rat Portage Bav Kenora 2 , 500 

Black Lake. ..." Lanark 10,000 

Riven'sLake " 10,000 

Charleston Lake Leeds 10,000 

RideauLakes ■ " 10,000' 

South Lake " 10,000 

Sixteen Mile Creek Lincoln 3 , 500 

Fifteen Mile Creek " 1 , 500 

Thames River and Tributaries Middlesex 10 ,000 

Pond Mills " 10,000 

Whittaker Lake " 10,000 

BearCreek ,' 5,000 

" " 2,500 

Medway Creek '' 10,000 

Tobacco Lake Manitoulin 2 , 000 

Muskoka Lake Muskoka 20 , 000 

Lake Joseph " 20,000 

LakeofBays " 20,000 

Mary Lake " 10,000 

Lake Ro.s.seau " 20,000 

Sparrow Lake " 20,000 

Clear Lake " 5,000 

Clearwater Lake " 15,000 

GreenLake " 10,000 

BellaLake " 10, COO 

Cacho Lake, Algonquin Park Nipissing 50 , 000 

SmokeLake, " " " 25,000 

Grand Lake, •' " " 25 ,000 

Lake Nipi.ssing " 15,000 

Otter Lake " 10.000 

FourMileLake " 10,000 

Trout Lake " 10,000 

Lake Nosbinsing " 10,000 

Presque Isle Bav. Northumberland 5 . 000 

Cold Creek Mill Pond " 10,000 

Harris Lake Parrv Sound 10 , 000 

MeadesLake " ' " 5,000 

Whitefish Lake " " 10,000 

MillLake " " 7,500 

Roblins Lake Prince Edward 5,000 

Corisecori Lake " " 5,000 

Indian River Peterborough 10 , 000 

BalsamLake " 10,000 

Pigeon Lake " 10,000 

Buckhorn Lake " 10,000 



1922 GAME AND FISHERIES. K3 

WATERS STOCKED 

QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1921.— Co;/ aViu^c/. 

Black Bass Fry and FingerUngs 

Waters County Quantity 

Chcmong Lake Peterbarougih o , 000 

VictoriaLake Perth 10,000 

LakeDore Renfrew 10,000 

Little Lake Sinicoe 8 , 750 

Lake Semple " 1 . 250 

Clear Lake Sudbury " 2,500 

Lovering Lake " 2 , 500 

CrabbLake " 2,500 

Kaministiqua River Thunder Bay 2 , 000 

Grand River and Creek Waterloo 10,000 

Speed River " 20,000 

Hamilton Bay Wentworth 10,000 

Sturgeon Lake Victoria 10 , 000 

Cameron Lake " 10,000 

Lake Simcoe, Drough's Creek and Narrows at 

\therlv York, Simcoe, and 

Ontario 25,000 

Total 773,500 

Parent Black Bass 

Spruce Lake Kenora 125 

Rock Lake " 126 

GuvLake " 49 

Bob Lake '] 49 

Flambeau Lake " 49 

Pritchard Lake Kenora 49 

BooseLake " 49 

Lac des Mille Lacs Tlmnder Bay 246 

Total 742 

Speckled Trout Fry and FingerUngs 

Waters County Quantity 

LongLake .\lgoma 10,000 

Gorman's Spring Creek Brant 2,000 

Silver Creek Bruce 10,000 

Merchant's Creek •' 5,000 

Quiglcy Stream " 1 . 000 

Vance Stream " 1 - 000 

GUlespie Stream " 1 ,000 

Gibson's Creek " 2,500 

SpringCreek '• 10,000 

Cavan Creek Durham 24,500 

Canton Creek " 7,500 

Tvrone Creek " 15,000 

Wilmot's Creek " 10,000 

Manver's Creeks " 7,500 

Spring Creek Elgin 10,000 

Eagle Lake Frontenac 10 . 000 

Saugeen River Grey 10 , 000 

Rocky Saugeen " : 2,000 

Sydenham River. "Harri.son'sPark" " 25,000 

Holstein Mill Pond " 2,000 

Rilev'sCreek " :.. 2,500 

Henderson's Creek " 10.000 

Spring Creek, Cheslev " 5 , 000 

Tara Creek " " 5,000 

Little River " 10,000 

Both well's Creek " 2,500 

Big Creek Huron 10.000 

Eagle Lake Haliburton 2 , 500 

DragLake " 2,500 



14 THE EEPORT UPOX Xo. 14 

WATERS STOCKED 

QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1921— Continued. 

Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 

Waters County Quantitj' 

Redstone Lake " 5 . 000 

Fairy Lake Halton 20,000 

Main Creek " 5,000 

Squire's Creek Hastings 12 , 500 

Rawdon Creek " 7,500 

Burk's Creek " 5 ,000 

Duncrief s Creek Middlesex 10,000 

Currie'sPond " 10,000 

River Wye " 10 , 000 

Bear Creek " 5.000 

Douty Creek " 10,000 

Artificial Lake draining into Thames River " 5,000 

Lake Wolsley Channel Manitoulin 5 , 000 

Stream from Ice Lake " 5,000 

Barr'sCreek " 2.000 

ChalkLake Muskoka 5,000 

Muskoka River " 20 , 000 

Skeleton Lake " 5,000 

Fry'sLake " 10,000 

BassLake " 10,000 

Waters in vicinity of Simcoe Norfolk 10 , 000 

Patterson's, Kent's, Crane and Cattle Creeks " 23 ,000 

Lynn Vallev Creek " 10,000 

Beaupre's Creek " 10,000 

Deases Creek " 3,000 

Gleadall's Creek " 4,000 

Carpenter's Creek " 1 , 000 

Spooky Hollow Stream " 1 ,000 

Spring Valley Pond Northumberland 10 , 000 

Trout Creek " 10,000 

Barrett's Creek " 1 ,500 

Break-a-Wav Creek " 5.000 

Little Cold Creek " 5.000 

Fourth Concession Creeks " 10,000 

Baltimore Creek " 20,000 

Brooklin Stream '•' 10 ,000 

Spring Creeks Ontario 10 , 000 

Cedar Creek and Ponds Oxford 5,000 

Dower Creek " 5,000 

Streams in East and West Oxford " 5,000 

Sucker Lake Parry Sound 10,000 

Forest Lake " " 5 ,000 

Ouse and Pakenham Creeks Peterborough 10,000 

Deer Lake " 10,000 

Cold Creek Peel 3,000 

Spring Creek Perth 2,000 

Otter Creek " 10,000 

Eva Lake Rainv River 10,000 

French Lake " " " 5,000 

Coldwater River Simcoe 10.000 

McDonald's Creek " 1 . 500 

Sturgeon River " 10,000 

Lakes and Streams in Township of Hess Sudburv 40,000 

Spring Lake Creek ' " 5,000 

Hardwood Lake " 15,000 

McKenzie River Thunder Bav 20.000 

LakeWideman " "' 10,000 

Gurney River " " 10,000 

Lower Twin Lake " " 20,000 

Upper Twin Lake " " 10,000 

Loon Lake " " 10.000 

Silver Lake " " 10,000 

Pearl River " " 20 ,000 

Mclntvre Creek " " 10,000 



1922 GAVT. A.ND FISHERIES. 15 



1 iRS STOCKED 
QUANTITIES AND KD ; OF FISH PLANTED IN l92l~Confinued 
Speckl Trout Fry and Fingerlings 
Waters County Quantity 

Six Mile Creek " " 25,00^ 

Three Mile Creek " " 10,000 

Corbett's Creek " " 20,000 

Slate River " " 10,000 

Pine River " " 20,000 

Currant River '■ " 20,000 

Cedar Creek " " 10,000 

Silver Islet Creek " " 5,000 

McVicar's Creek " " 10,000 

Seven Mile Creek " " 5 , 000 

Neebing River " " 10,000 

Sunshine Creek " " o , 000 

Oliver Lake " " 15,000 

Brulu Creek " " 5,000 

Steel River " " 10,000 

Nipigon River " " 20,000 

Indian Creek Temiskaming 2 , 000 

Mill's and Blair's Creeks and Dam Waterloo and Wellington 25,000 

Sickle's Creek Waterloo 5 , 000 

Bowman's Creek " 10 , 000 

Havsville Stream " 10,000 

Philip,sburg Stream " 10,000 

Spring Creek and Pond " 15 , 000 

Krampean's Pond " 10 , 000 

McNallv's Creek " 5,000 

Wilkes Creek " 2,500 

Millgrove Creek Wentworth 10,000 

Grindstone Creek " 5,000 

Beverlev Creek " 10,000 

Little Saugeen Wellington. 10,000 

Eden Mills " 10,000 



Total 1,147,500 

Salmon Trout Fry and Fingerlings 

Waters County Quantity 

Lake Nipigon Thunder Bay 110,400 

Pickerel 

Waters County Quantity 

Lake Deschene Carleton 100,000 

Ottawa River " 100,000 

Rideau River " 500 , 000 

Scugog Lake Durham 200,000 

Sharbot Lake Frontenae 100,000 

Eagle Lake " 100,000 

Loborough Lake " 200,000 

Lake Mossonoga " 100 . 000 

Second Depot Lake " 100,000 

Mountain Lake Grey 100,000 

Lake Charles " 500,000 

Nation River Grenville 100,000 

Stoco Lake Hastings 200.000 

Crow Lake " 100,000 

Oak Hill Lake •' 100,000 

Beaver Creek " 50,000 

Deer River " 50,000 

Moira River " .'500.000 

Wolfe Lake " 100 , 000 

Frjiser Lake " 100 , 000 

Moira Lake " ;«)0 , 000 

Paudaah Lake " 100,000 

Indian Creek Lanark 100,000 



THE HEPOl^T UPOX 



No. 14 



WATERS STOCKED 
QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1921~Continued. 

Pickerel 



Waters 



Countv 



White Lake Lanark 

Otty Lake " 

Christie Lake '' 

Clyde River ' ' 

Charleston Lake Leeds 

Rideaii Lakes Leeds and Lanark 

Sand Lake Leeds 

Killenback Lake " 

Higlev Lake " 

AIud'Lake |' 

Lake Elida '' 

Thames River and tril)utaries Middlesex 

Aux Sauble River " 

Muskoka Lake Muskoka 

Lake Joseph " 

Lake of Bays " 

Lake Rosseau '' 

Sparrow Lake " 

Long Lake " 

Log Lake " 

Lake Nipissing , Nipissing 

Lake Erie Norfolk 

Crow Bay Northumberland 

Trent River " 

Coal Creek " 

Beaver River Ontario 

Mill Lake Parry Sound 

Magnetawan River " '" 

Ahmic Lake '' '' 

Bear Lake " " 

Canoe Lake Parry Sound 

Wolf Lake "^ ]| 

Loon Lake " " 

Shanty Lake '. " " 

Stoney Lake Peterborough 

Round Lake " 

Lake Dore Renfrew 

Bass Lake Simcoe 

Severn River " 

Clear Lake Sudbury 

Crabb Lake " 

Geneva Lake " 

Paradise Lake Waterloo 

Lake Ontario Wentworth, York, 

Halton and Lincoln 

Sturgeon Lake Victoria 

Lake Simcoe and Brough's Creek and Narrows at 

Atherle}' York, Simcoe and 

Ontario 



11 



Quantity 

100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
200,000 
1 , 000 , 000 
700,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
500 , 000 
100,000 
900,000 
900,000 
500,000 
900,000 
500,000 
100.000 
100,000 
900 ,000 
025 , 000 
50,000 
50,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
50,000 
50,000 
100,000 
50,000 
25,000 
25,000 
100,000 
200,000 
100,000 
200,000 
100,000 
800,000 
120,000 
140,000 
140,000 
100,000 

1,000,000 
200.000 



900,000 



Total . 



27,625,000 



Whitefish 



Waters 



County 



Lake Wabigoon Kenora 

Lake Erie Norfolk 

Elbow Lake Rainy River . 

Rainy Lake 



Quantity 

1,000,000 
40,000,000 

1,000,000 
17,950,000 



1923 



GAME AXD FISllEKJES. 



]7 



WATERS STOCKED 
QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IX l92l.~Con>inueJ. 



Whitefish 



Wate. 5 



Couutv 



Little Turtle Lake " " 

Mink Lake " " 

Crooked Lake ■ '' '' 

Lake Nipigon '* Thunder Bay 

Kashabowie Lake " '' 

Lake Shebandawan '" " 

Long Lake " " 

Whitefish Lake " " 

Little Long Lake '' " 

SavanneLake " '' 

Lake Ontario Wentworth, York, Halton 

and Lincoln 



Quantitj' 

1.000.000 
1.000,000 
1.000,000 
27.000.000 
1,000.000 
1.000.000 
1.000.000 
1,000,000 
1.000.000 
1,000,000 

20,000,000 



Total. 



115.9.50.000 



Herring 



Waters 



County 



Lake Erie Norfolk 

Lake Ontario ; Wentworth, York, 

Halton and Lincoln. 

Total 



Quantit}- 
7,740,000 
2,000,000 
9.740,000 



Black Bass Fry and Fingerlings ... 

Parent Black Bass 

Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 
Salmon Trout Fry and Fingerlings . 



Pickerel. . 
Whitefish . 
Herring. . 



SUMMARY 



'otal distribution . 



773,500 

742 

1,147.500 

110.400 

27 . 025 . 000 

115,950,000 

9,740,000 

155,847,142 



THE BEPORT UPON 



No. 14 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF DISTRIBUTION 

1919 1920 1921 

Black Bass Frv and Fingerlings 200 , 500 427 , 200 773 ,. 300 

Parent Black Bass 548 460 742 

Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 20 , 600 286 , 700 1 , 147 , 500 

Salmon Trout Frv and Fingerlings 1 , 050 , lOf 1 , 334 , 000 1 10 , 400 

Pickerel ' 2,550,00J 31,480,000 27,625,000 

Whitefish" 7,740,000 43,335,000 115,950,000 

Herring..' 10,800,000 920,000 9,740,000 

22,361,748 77,783,360 155,347,142 



I9J9 




22,361745 



1920 




77,783,360 



»92l 




155,347,142 



20 



THE HE PORT UPON 



Xo. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number (,f fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vesssls and boats, the 

industry during the j'ear 1920, in the Pubhc 



Fishing material 



Districts 



Tugs 



11 



12 



Kencira ami Hainy River. 



Lake of the Woods 

Rainy Lake 

Obabican, Lower Manitou, 

Shoal and Eagle 

tormy, Rowan, Big Sandy 
and Indian 

Feegan, Dogtooth, Bear and 
Long 

Wabigoon, Orang Outang, 
Dryberry and Harris 

Minnetakie, Big Sea Dan- 
iels, Kawseogama, Vermil- 
ion and Seul 

Rock, Pelican, Bays, Abra- 
ham, Scugonaga and Mc- 
Kenzie 

Stanzhikina, Sturgeon, Lost 
and Jackfish 

Six Mile, Loon, Kaiarskon? 
Turtle, Big Saw Mill and 
Pipestone 

Mannican, Clearwater Trout 
White Otter, Mainsville, 
Sam Weller and Vista. . . . 

Sanford. Pickerel, Manitou 
Jackfish, Dogfly. Mink 
and Black Sturgeon. . . 



Totals . 



Ton- 
nage 



Value 



9,000 
500 



1,700 



Men 



Gasoline Launches 



65 1 1 ,200 



No. 



Value Men 



15.650 
16,500 

5,500 

2,600 

1,500 

1,.300 

4,450 

500 



Sail or Row Boats 



50 



1,600 



No 


Value 


Men 




$ 




42 

28 


2,947 
1 .675 


12 
13 


9 


315 




1 


150 




1 


15 


1 


1 


30 


2 


5 


490 


6 


5 


300 


7 


2 


300 


3 


7 


560 


13 


4 


210 


2 


3 


200 


3 



Gil-Nets 



Yards 


Value 




$ 


51 ,090 
47 ,000 


10 .248 
9.227 


15 ,500 


2,950 


9,300 


1 ,850 


6,800 


1 ,470 


4,950 


1 ,000 


19 ,100 


3 .360 


7,300 


1 ,390 


4.400 


644 


10.900 


2.500 


15 .500 


3.725 



9 107 49.8001 16l| 108' 7.1921 62 1202,040 



1 ,955 
40,319 



Return of the kindSj quantities and values of fish caught 









J3 


J3 








_- * 


Districts 






'g'^ 
2 " 




.-a 
"Si: 


i^ 








c cs 




|1 


S^ 


c^ 
H " 




E 



10 



Kenora and Hainy River 
District 



Lake of the Woods . . . 

Rainy Lake 

Obatjican, Lower Man- 
itou, Shoal and Eagle 

Stormy, Rowan, Big 
andy and Indian . . 

Feegan. Dogtooth, 
Bear and Long 

Wabigoon, Orang Out- 
ang, Dryberry and 
Harris 

Minnetikie, Big Sea, 
Daniels, Kawseog- 
ama, Vermilion and 
Seul 

Rock, Pelican, Bays, 
Abraham, Minnitike 
Scugonaga and Mc- 
Kenzie 

Stanzhikina. Sturgeon 
Lost and Jackfish . . 

Six Mile, Loon. Kaiar.s- 
kons. Turtle, Big Saw 
Mill and Pipestone. . 

Mannican, Clearwater. 
Trout, White Otter, 
Mainville. Sam We 
ler and Vista 

Sanford Pickerel, Man- 
itou, Jackfish, Dog- 
fly, Mink and Black 
Sturgeon 



Totol 



Values . 



lbs. 



lbs. 



$ c. 



lbs. 
319 ,400 



319 ,400 



31,940 00 



lbs. 

95.291. 
31 .572. 

80.710. 

46 ,843. 

5.602. 

12.712. 

24 .980 . 

20 .600 . 
15.275. 

14.105. 
31 .356. 
19.069. 



lbs. 



398,115. 



lbs. 

10 ,657 
2,800 

15 ,473 

23.6001 

7,392 

3,770 

9,478 

1,100 
2,307 

6 .578 
22 .180 
17 ,897 



123 ,232 



12 ,323 20 



lbs. 

203 ,108 
120 ,225 

53 ,473 

3 ,862 

924I 

4 ,772 



lbs. 

250 ,206 
149 .597 

84 ,062 

6,389 

1 .323 

6 .922 



10 .917 44 .887 



3,350 
7,890 



11 ,700 
13,188 



9 ,413 37 ,332 



18 ,525 



12 ,998 



449 .457 



26.515 



16 .923 



649 .044 



$ c. $ c. 

22 .472 851 64 .904 40 



1923 



({AME AND FISHKJnKS. 



21 



FISHERIES. 

quantity and v.akiD of all fishing ipaterials an i other fixtures employed in the fishng 

Waters of Kenora and Rainy River Districts. 



Fishing material 



(Hhcr fixtures used in 
fishing. 



Seines 




Poun 


d Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip 


or Roll 
STets 


Night Lines 


Sp 


ears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 
30 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No.; Value 

! 






$ 


S 
6,530 


26 


1 .220 


$ 




S 


S 


1 S 

25l 9 .210 


26 
22 

S 


s 

6,215 








25 


10 ,885 














23 
7 
5 
3 

3 


7.250 

1 ,990 

500 

300 

350 

2,300 

750 
75 

625 

300 
350 


4,385 








9 


350 














1 ,350 
























2 150 




























1! 100 




























1 100 


























. 


9 
5 


C 125 




























3 1 .275 




























1 

3 

1 
o 


2 50 




























1 50 








7 


3.000 
















































































1 




62 


20 .385 


35 1 ,57ol 








....1 1 871 24.000 


72 


13.800 



during the 3'ear 1920, in the Public Waters of Kenora and Rainy River Districts. 



Sturgeon 


Eels 
Perch 


<u 

V 


5 


Carp 


Mixed and 
coarse fish 


03 

o 


Sturgeon 
Bladders 


I. 3 

|5 


c 
> 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 

49 ,094 
54,518 

2,177 

4.375 


lbs. 
51 .842 


lbs. 
9,441 


lbs. 

24 ,403 
125 ,246 

3,000 

2.300 


lbs. 


No. 


lbs. 


S 0. 

86.157 56 


7 480 




11,029 


379 198 




34 .946 99 






1,150 








21 .040 77 
















8 .230 80 


















1 ,477 90 








820 

2 ,417 

2.100 
3.768 

2.000 
5.164 
2.997 






1 .000 

800 

3.000 








2 .668 20 


















8 ,657 37 


















3 .7.33 50 


















3 .697 58 


'30 




673 
575 






13 ,590 

15.352 

2,518 








7 (117 19 


1 620 












5 .316 


1 .414 63 














6 319 34 




















9 ,3.30 




12 ,277 


129 ,430 


52,992 


9,441 


191 .209 


379 


198 


5.316 


194 .381 83 


5 c 
1 .119 60 


$ c. 


$ c. 

982 16 


$ c. 

7 .765 80 


$ r 

4 ,2.39 36 


$ c. 
377 64 


$ c. 

7 .64.S 36 


S 

379 00 


S 

99 


$ r 

318 96 


S c 
104 .3>;i 83 



THE EEPORT UPON 



No. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, 

fishing industry during the year 1920, 





Distriels 












Fishing 


material 










1 
Tugs 


Gasoline Launches 


Sail 


or Row Boats 


Gill-Nets 




No. 
6 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 


Men 


No. 

8 
1 
5 
1 

4 

1 


Value 


VIen 

17 

1 
8 

2 
1 


No. 

11 
4 
8 
3 
6 
1 

3 

1 

6 

5 

1 
1 


Value 


Men 

15 
5 

8 
4 
3 

1 

5 

10 


Yards 


Value 


\' 


Lake Superior 


292 


$ 
24 ,000 


79 


S 
4,800 
1,000 
3,050 

300 
2.500 

150 


S 

1,370 
180 
880 
370 
495 
50 

110 
120 

275 


287 ,460 

3,650 

38 ,100 

7,500 

40 ,500 

68 ,000 

4,200 
119.330 

33 .800 

10 ,130 

18 ,400 

129 ,500 


S 

22 .445 


2 


Pigeon River to Sturgeon Pt. 

Wliitefish and Sand Lakes 
Black Bay Pt., Pt. Magnet 

Pine and Arrow Lakes . . . 
Evelyn, Lamb. Spar and 


1 ,020 


3 
4 


1 


28 


7,500 


3 


6 ,185 
1 ,400 


5 
6 

7 


Rossport, Pays Platte Bay 
and Wilson Island 

Jackfish, Pt Caldwell, Mc- 
Kay and Twin Lakes .... 

Kashabowie, Sturgeon, 
Heathcote, .-jhebandowan 
Head and Greenwater 


3 
2 


47 
62 


9,000 
7.000 


8 
6 


12,400 
6,800 

575 


s 




9 


221J^ 


33.000 


57 


6 

7 
3 
3 

1 


9,600 
2,200 
4,700 
2,100 
400 


17 
17 

8 
11 

1 


26 ,255 


9 


• Gros Cap, Goulais Bay and 


3,025 


10 


iBatchawana Bay, Parisienne 










215 7 

75! 2 

1 
75 2 


510 


11 


Gargantua and Mamainse 
Point 


1 
4 

26 


36 
107}^ 


7,000 
22 .000 


5 
36 


11 ,600 


12 


Michipicoten and Richard- 
son's Harbour 


14 ,260 




Totals 


794 


109 ,500 


194 


40 


30 .800 


83 


5C 


4 ,215 62 


760 ,570 


106 .475 








1 





Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caught 



Districts 






in ^ 
42 (^ 



^- 



Lake Superior 



10 



Thunder Bay 

Pigeon River to Stur- 
geon Pt. and White- 
fish Lake 

B'ack Bay and Point 
Magnet Pine and 
Arrow Lakes .... 
Evelyn, Lamb, Spar 
and Shaganash Is- 
lands 

Rossport, Pays, Platte 
Bay and Wilson Is- 
land 

Jackfish, Pt. Coldwell 
McKay and Twin 

Lakes I 

Kashabowie, Sturgeon, 
Heathcote, Sheban- 
dowan Head and 
Greenwater Lakes . . 

Lake Nipigon 

Gros Cap, Goulais Bay 
and Wana Lake. . . . 
Batchawana Bay, Pa- 
risienne and Sandy 

Island 

Gargantau and Mam- 
ainse Point 

Michipicoten and Rich- 
ardson's Harbour 



lbs. 
497 ,401 



lbs. 
1 ,104 ,270 



8,000 



3,340 



lbs. 



118,800 



Totals 616.601 



141 ,600 



5.722 



400 



Values . 



30 .830 05 



6.400 



16 ,921 



200 



1 ,286 ,953 



64 ,347 65 



20.00 



lbs. 
61,911 

23 ,682 

55 .081 

600 

38 ,866 

2,193 

2,157 
1 ,399 ,390 

42 ,950 

45 ,680 

4,262 

27 ,961 



lbs. 
5,300 



23 ,600 

300 
i 

5,000 

8 

700 






1 ,704 .733 



170 .473 30 



200 



60 
110,000 



145 .700 



lbs. 
158,511 

600 

52,195 

18 ,160 

206 ,892 

20 ,911 

5001 
369 .675 

51 ,5251 

32 ,805 
130 ,632 
290 ,022 



lbs. 
625 

2,485 

3,571 

45 



lbs. 
3,229 



1 ,332 ,428 



S c. 

14 .570 00 



$ 0. 

133 ,242 80 



827 

1,356 
3,605 

500 

956 
1,301 



55 .078 
500 



15 ,271 



763 55 



1 ,870 

3,495 
35 ,525 

200 

14 ,899 
3,983 



118 ,779 



11 ,877 90 



1922 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



23 



FISHERIES 

the quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures emploj'ed in the 
in the Public Waters of Lake Superior. 













Fishing material 










Other fixtures used in 
fishing 


Seines 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip or Roll Night Lines 
Nets 


Spears 


Freezers and | Piers and 
Ice Houses j Wharves 


No. 1 Yards 


Value 


No. j Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks Value 


No. Value 


No. 


Value No. Value 




$ 






s 


S 




S 




S 




3 


7 
1 
4 


S 

5,220 

200 

1,210 


s 

6 2.000 












1 


60 














4 


600 








11 


8,300 
















870 
































6 
1 


1.800 
200 
















































4 

1 

1 

3 

2 

1 
5 


1,650 

100 
500 

175 

2.500 
300 


2 
2 


1 ,000 
























15 








10 
5 
14 


6,000 

5,000 

13 ,000 


















1 200 
























3 
2 
1 


750 
















1,300 
1 ,-300 


80 
100 






1 .300 






















500 








8 


4,000 
















3,150 3 


2,000 






























55 


38 ,300 1 


60 






2 ,600 180 






29 


15 ,005 25 9 .235 































during the year 1920, in the Public Waters of Lake Superior 



c 
o 


00 




o 


c! 

o 






u 

"> 

CS 


<X1 


« 3 


3 

"5 
> 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 
58 .917 

4.932 

41 .750 


lbs. 


No. 


lbs. 


S c. 

105 ,366 58 




















3 ,149 73 


627 


20 .496 














7,267 


23,171 81 
















1 ,958 25 














200 








38,123 80 


805 












22 






3,013 45 








50 






1.700 




754 00 


20995 










145 






183,303 65 


300 












1 ,000 
6.425 






9 ,928 50 


7,S80 












35 






10 .658 80 


















14 ,858 80 






















42 ,798 30 
























30,607 


20.496 




50 






114.924 


202 




7,267 


437 ,085 67 












S c. 

3 .672 84 


S c. 

2 .049 60 


S c. 


$ c. 
300 


S c. 


* c. 


$ c. 

4 .5' 6 96 


S c. 

202 00 




S c. 
436 02 


f c. 

437 .085 67 



2J 



THE HEPOET UPOX 



No. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, 

fishing industry during the year 1920, 





Districts 


Fishing material 








Tugs 




Gasoline Launches 


Sail or 


Row Boats 


Gill-Nets 




No. 

1 
1 

] 

6 

3 
1 

5 

1 
1 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 


Men 

4 
3 

3 

33 

12 
4 

25 

6 
6 


No. 

5 

5 

4 

3 
9 

1 

3 
3 


Value 


Men 

15 

8 

14 

8 

8 
20 

4 

10 
6 


No. 


^'alue 


Men 


Yards 


Value 


1 


North Channel, Lake Huron 


26 J^ 

27 J^ 

16 

142 

56 
20 

184 
29^2 


$ 
7,000 
4,500 

3,000 

39 ,200 

10 ,000 
4,000 

36 ,500 

8,000 
8,000 


$ 

3,600 
1 .700 

2,600 

1,700 

1 ,650 
4,550 

300 

1 ,625 
400 


13 
15 

7 

1 

6 

4 

4 

1 
1 


$ 

660 
1 ,230 

305 
50 

620 

485 

420 

100 
50 


11 

IS 

8 
2 

10 

6 

5 
2 


25 ,200 
19 .200 

12 ,300 
272 ,400 

68 ,800 
28 ,500 

149 ,500 

61 ,000 

69 ,000 


$ 
2.053 


2 


Spanish, St. Joseph Isles and 


3 ,900 


3 


Bruce Mines, Algonia Mills, 
Buswell's Pt and McKin- 


2,505 


4 
5 


Little Detroit Fitzwilliam, 

Squaw and Duck Islands . 

South Bay, Kagawong and 


45 ,000 
18 ,547 


6 




1 ,950 


7 
8 

9 


Meldrum, Providence, She- 
guindah and Gore Bay. . . . 

Manitowaning, MissLssauga, 
Tamarack Cove and Berry 
Islands 

Bedford and Cockburn Is- 
lands and Manitou 

Totals 


14 ,750 

8,240 
8,950 




20 


531 


120 ,200 


96 


40 


18,125 

• 


93 


52 


3 .920 


64 


705 ,900 


105 ,895 



Return of the kinds, quantities and values of the fish caught during 





Districts 


.5 


Herring, fresh 
Whitefish, salted 




Trout, salted 
Trout, fresh 




o 
Q 

u 

o 

1 




North Channel, Lake 
Huron 


lbs. 


lbs. 
6,076 
6,948 

2,548 


lbs. 


lbs. 
158,461 
5,330 

14 ,601 

92 ,203 

46 ,159 
366 ,131 

126 ,583 

70 ,133 
23 ,102 


lbs. 


lbs. 
62.839 
15.172 

13.919 

272 ,985 

265 ,562 
84,379 

205,441 

99 ,420 
88 ,054 


lbs. 
13 .894 
17,101 

10.513 


lbs. 
74 ,809 


2 


Spanish, St. Joseph Is- 








42 ,5.34 


3 

4 


Bruce Mines, Algoma 
Mills, Buswells Pt. 
and McKinnon 

Little Detro t, Fitzwil- 
liam, Squaw and 


35 


175 


50 

912 
5 


47 ,6;n't 

1 ,77.s 


5 


South Bay, Kagawong 






300 


4.741 
17 ,972 

2,243 

658 
1 ,378 


42 ,457 










10,107 


7 


Meldrum, Providence, 
Sheguiandah and 


120 


8,601 


77 


14 ,624 


8 


Manitowaning, Missis- 
sauga. Tamarack 


5,210 


9 


Bedford and Cockburn 
Islands and Manitou 

Tot^als ...... 

Values • • . . 








2,725 
















155 


24 ,173 


552 


902 ,703 


967 


1 ,107 ,771 


68 ,500 


242 ,003 




$ c. 
775 


$ c. 
1 ,208 65 


$ c. 
55 20 


$ c. 
90 .270 30 


$ c. 
96 70 


$ c. 
110,777 10 


$ c. 

3 .425 00 


$ c. 
24 ,200 30 



1f>S2 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



FISHERIES 



the quality and value of all fishing material and other fixtures eiaployed in the 
in the PiibUc Waters of North Channel 



Fishing nnaterial 



Other fixtures used in 



Seines 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip or Roll 

Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


NO. 


Value 


No. 

7 

7 

5 

2 

2 
1 

5 

1 

1 


Value 


No. 

8 
3 

o 


Value 






$ 


33 
18 

19 

21 

13 
31 

33 

12 
7 


$ 

15,200 

8,150 

8.100 

23 ,500 

9,000 
26 ,800 

22 ,400 

6,000 
4,500 




$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 
2,650 
820 

930 
1 500 


3,000 
750 

1 jy^n 








2 
5 


300 
250 




















































1 ' '""" 






















1 000 i ^ 


1,000 
1.000 

5,100 

300 
Ann 
























100 
2,000 

700 


i 
5 

1 




































































orifii 1 
































187 


123,650 


7 


550 














31 










1 










1 





the year 1920, in the Public Waters of North Channel, Lake Huron. 



Sturgeon 


Eels 


Perch 




Catfish 




Mixed and 
Coarse fi.sh 




C4 
S 

C 

o 
a 

Ef 

3 


Pickerel (Blue) 


c 


lbs. 
3.877 


lbs. 


lbs. 
1 ,774 
577 

740 


lbs. 


lbs. 


Ib.s. 
14 .099 
1 .430 

1 ,644 


lbs. 

121 .878 
88.119 

48 ,202 

2,235 

28,115 
4 .145 

81 ,559 

40 ,494 
6,044 


lbs. 
94 
37 


No. 


lbs. 


S c. 
36 ,749 64 
11 .345 29 

10 ,667 72 

30 .786 00 

38 .804 85 
47 .289 80 

38 .719 06 

19,185 40 

1 1 ,862 20 


1 .451 












2,539 






135 


















3,208 




3 ,369 
350 

799 

338 
468 


20 ,712 






7 











1.595 


40 






1 ,434 












245 
















1.050 
















13.804 




8.415 


20 .712 


1.730 


17 .213 


420 .791 


138 






251 ,409 96 










$ c. 

1 ,656 48 


% 


$ c. 
673 20 


$ c 

1 .242 72 


S c. 

138 40 


S c. 

688 52 


$ c. 
16 ,831 64 


S 
138 


$ 


$ c. 


S c. 

251 .409 96 



















26 



THE E.EPOET UPON 



No. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, the 

industry during the year 1920 





Districts 


Fishing material 




Tugs 


Gasoline Launches 


Sai 


or Row Boats 


Gill-Nets 




No. 

5 
2 
5 
3 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 

$ 

33 .000 

12 .000 

28 .000 

8.300 


Men 

23 
10 
22 
10 


No. 

13 
13 
31 
19 


Value 


Men 

23 
23 
62 
41 


No. 

12 
28 
11 
34 


Value 


Men 

19 
39 
12 
43 


Yards 


Value 


1 


Georgian Bay 
Parry Sound 


165 
48 

139 
55 


11 .800 

5,275 

18 ,845 

16 ,850 


$ 

1,220 

1,830 

575 

2,050 


345 ,000 
199 ,500 
345 ,300 
121 .500 


48 910 


2 


Simcoe and Muskoka 

Grey County 


19,256 
29 305 


4 


Bruce County 


11 195 




Totals 






15 


407 


81 .300 


65 


76 


52 ,770 


149 


85 


5,675 


113 


1 .011 ,300 


108 666 









Returns of the kinds, quantities and vakies of fish caught 





Districts. 


si 

"3 

01 


.5 


Whitefish, 
salted 


Whitefish, fresh 


Trout, salted 


o 




o 


1 


Georgian Bay 


lbs. 


lbs. 

1.900 
24 .221 
11 .211 
11 ,950 


lbs. 

2.300 
3.300 


lbs. 

376 ,464 

48 ,022 

1 ,590 

19 ,275 


lbs. 

650 
3.250 
6.850 
7.650 


lbs. 

200 ,112 
130 .617 
374 ,866 
266 ,563 


lbs. 

31 .609 
12 ,529 


lbs. 
58,233 


2 


Simcoe and Muskok. . 


400 


7,800 


4 


Bruce County 

Totals 


3,250 


300 


26 


274 




3.650 


49 ,282 


5.900 


445,351 


18.400 


972,158 


44 .164 


67,307 




Values 


$ c. 
182 50 


$ c. 
2.464 10 


S c. 
590 00 


$ c. 
44 ,535 10 


$ c. 
1 ,840 00 


S c. 
97 ,215 ?C 


$ c. 
2,2D 20 


$ c. 
7,730, 70 



1923 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



27 



FISHERIES 

quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fi.xtures employed in the 
in the public waters of Georgian Bay 













Fishing materia! 












Other fixtures used in 
fishing 


Seines 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets' Dip or RoU 
1 Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
lee Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 

6 

7 

10 

8 


Value 


No. 


Value 






S 


15 


$ 

14.600 


» 




S 


2,300 

5,300 

12,400 

8,800 


$ 

160 

280 

2.825 

1 ,240 




S 


S 

6.800 
1.400 
1.500 
1.400 


7 
4 
9 
8 


$ 

4 .300 


10 


810 


725 


28 


765 










1 .820 
















1 ,750 








8 


4.900 














1 .100 




















10 810 


725 


23 


19,500 


28 


765 






28 .800 


4.505 






31 


11 .100 


2Sl 8.970 










' 











during the year 1920, in the Public Waters of Georgian Bay. 



c 
o 

s. 


Eels 


"5 
o 


Tullibce 


Catfish 


a 

O 


■2-S 

eJ to 
_. a 
V £ 

^ O 


bi 

.9 

"> 

d 

o 


C m 

3 C3 


Pickerel (Blue) 


Value 


lbs. 
1 ,425 


lbs. 


lbs. lbs. 1 lbs. 

200j 75 

3 798' 2 I.tOi 9 340 


lbs. 


lbs. lbs. 
8 .000 30 


No. 


lbs. 


S c. 
66 ,094 35 


1 .230 




54 .319 


32 ,883 








25,412 12 






10( 


) 12.00( 
62.12^ 


) 










39 ,619 15 






1 




2,500 








33 ,994 94 




















2.655 




4,098 


76 .27' 


1 2 ,415 


54,319 


43 ,383 


30 






165,120 56 










$ c 

318 60 


$ c. 


$ c. 

327 8< 


S c 

I 4 .576 4 


$ c. 
1 193 20 


S c. 

2.172 76 


$ c. 

1 ,735 32 


$ 

30 


$ 


$ c. 


$ c. 

165,120 56 














28 



THE lU^PORT UPON 



Xo. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, ve.=!,sels and boats, 

fishing industry during the year 1920, 





Districts 


Fishing material 




Tugs 


Gasoline Launches 


Sail 


or Row Boats 


Gill-Nets 




No. 
8 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 


Men 
44 


No. 


Value 


Men 

43 
20 

39 


No. 

14 
5 

21 


Value 


Men 

19 
13 

29 


Yards 


Value 


1 


Lake Huron {Proper) 


174 


$ 
36 ,500 


18 
9 

23 


$ 

13 .500 
8,100 

9,650 


$ 

1 ,800 
590 

870 


277 ,335 


$ 

46 .650 







62.740 9.020 


3 


Lambton Co , including 
River St Clair 
















Totals 
















8 


174 


36 ,500 


44 


50 


31 ,250 


102 


40 


3,260 


61 


340 ,075 


55 ,670 













Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caught 





Districts 


1 
"3 

ti 

a 




-3 

"3 

ta 

o 


Wliitcfi.sh, fresh 


Trout, salted 


1 
o 




C 
c 


1 




Laki. Huron (Proper) 
Bruce County 


lbs. 
6.700 


lb.-.. 

35,478 
35 .900 

ini o.t;o 


lbs. 
900 


IJS. 

41 ,056 
5.700 

35 ,438 


lbs. 

55 ,850 
1,000 


lbs. 

664 ,454 
116.100 

9,614 


lbs. 
1,651 


lbs. 

264 
15.700 


3 


Lambton Co. (includ- 
ing River St. Clair) . 

Totals 


1 ,000 




3.344 


123.-^70 












7 ,700 172 ,630 


900 


82 ,194 


56 ,850 


790 .168 


4.995 


139 ,634 




$ C $ 0. 

385 00 S .631 50 


S c 
90 00 


S c 
8.219 40 


$ c 
5 ,685 00 


$ c. 
79 ,016 80 


$ c. 
249 75 


$ c. 
13 ,963 40 








1 









192: 



GAME AXD FLSIiEKlES. 



39 



FISHERIES 

the quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
in the public waters of Lake Huron (proper) 













Fishing material 












Other fixtures used in 
fishing 


Seines 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets Dip or Roll 
Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves. 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 

11 
10 

9 


Value 


No. 

6 
7 

2 


Value 






$ 


2 
10 

57 


$ 

600 
4,800 

35,150 




$ 




$ 


2,100 


$ 
175 


S 


S 

4,490 
3,300 

2.850 


S 

875 




















425 




605 


710 


2 


150 


2 


10 


200 


15 






800 










7 


605 


710' fiO 


40 550 ! 2 


1.^n! •?■ in 


2 300 


19(1 






30 


10,640 


15 


2,100 




1 i 


• 1 "': " 











during the year 1920, in the Public Waters of Lake Huron (Proper) 



















m 
























4) 
























T! 
























•a 


© 


















x; 




d 
























pa 


m 






o 

1 


n 


^ 




j: 
«= 


& 




.2 


B 

o 






c 


^ 


o 


o 


3 


s; 


d 


^O 


c5 


3 






« 


X 


- 




C. 


o 


C 


S^ 


O 


GO 


f^ 




> 


lbs. 


ibs. 


ibs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


No. 


lbs. 


$ c. 


30 




1 ,600 
119 ,097 

8,460 


193 ,146 
12.883 






7,625 
26 .459 

64 ,972 


12. . . . 






90 .481 21 


1 ,200 






71 






27.219 10 


7.946 




227 


3,988 


566... 




2.176 


27 .255 44 










9,176 




129 ,157 


206 .029 


227 


3.988 


99 ,056 


649.... 




2.176 


144 955 75 








$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


8 c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ 


S 0. 


s <■. 


1,101 12 




10 .332 56 


12,361 74 


18 16 


159 52 


3 ,962 24 


C49 00 




130 5fi 


i44 9.55 75 











30 



THE REPORT UPOX 



No. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats 

fishing industry during the year 1920 





Districts 












Fishing 


material 












Tugs 


Gasoline Launches 1 Sail 


or Row Boats 


Gill-Nets 




No. 


Ton- 
nage 


V alue 


Men 




No. 


Value [Men No. 


Value 


Men 

73 
30 
34 


Yards 


Value 


1 


Lake St. Clair, etc. 
Kent Co. (including River 




$ 


34 

4 

24 


$ 

14 ,800 
7,245 
2,150 


48 48 
37 30 
loi 17 


2.725 

1.970 

580 




$ 



















•^ 


















Totals 
























62 


24,195 


100| 95 


5.275 


137 

































Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caugh 





Districts. 


1 
'a 


§ 

X 


Whitefish, salted 


Whitefish, fresh 


Trout, saltcil 


J3 

3 
O 


Pike 


u 

u 
O 

Q 

s 

"3 

u 
o 


1 


Lake St. Clair, etc. 
Kent County, (includ- 


lbs. 


lbs. ! lbs. lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 

74 .429 

28.512 

4.635 


lbs. 
12 ,640 









466 3 ,i27 

4 ,200 






13 .603 


3 


Detroit River 









725 




Totals 




400 7 ,327 







107 .576 


26,968 
















$ c. 


S c. 
20 00 


$ c. 


$ c. 

732 70 


Sc. 


$ c. 


$ c. 

5 .378 80 


$ c. 

• 2 ,696 80 













1 







1922 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



31 



FISHERIES 

the quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
in the Public Waters of Lake St. Clair, etc. 



Fishing material 



Other fixtures used in 
fishing 





Seines 




Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets Dip or Roll 

^ 1 Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and' 
Wharves 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. Valu i No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 

29 
15 


Value 


No. 


Value 


30 


4.971 
2,225 
2,055 


$ 

4,295 
1,350 
2 ,345 


8 

Q 


S 

2,000 
9 Ann 


148 
81 


$ $ 

29,4001 ll 10 
10. 450'.... i 

! . i 


800 
600 
200 


S 

20. . 


$ 


S 

7,650 
6,775 


$ 

10 3.550 


g 


60 










17 




50. . 

















I 
















55 


9 251 


7,990 


14 


4.400 


229|.^i R.T^i 1 in 


1,600 


1 30. . 






44 


14 ,425 


10 


3,550 























during the year 1920, in the Public Waters of Lake St. Clair, etc. 



e 
o 

V 

3 


JS 


Perch 


Tullibee 




a 

u 
O 


.a 
ea o 

li 


o 


« 

•§ 

5 

C 
O 

o 

3 


"a? 

_3 

5 


a) 
_3 

> 


bs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 

133,111 

98,110 

400 


bs. 


lbs. 

60,105 

80 .817 

325 


lbs. 

274 .599 
78 ,438 
42 ,400 


lbs. 

419 ,608 

164 ,878 

18,650 


lbs. 


No. 


lbs. 

400 


$ c. 

48 .235 01 


12 704 






526 




29 215 88 


300 










3 ,260 25- 
















13,004 




231 ,621 




141 ,247 


395 ,437 


603 .136 


526 




400 


80,711 14 










S c. 

1 ,560 48 


$ c. 


$ c. 

18 ,529 68 


% c. 


S 0. 

11 .299 76 


$ c. 

15.817 48 


$ c. 

24 .125 44 


$ 

526 


S 


$ c. 

24 00 


$ c. 
80.711 14 











•y^ 



THE J^EPORT UPOX 



Xo. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, the 

fishing industry during the year 1920, 



D.stricts 



Lake Erie 

Essex County 

Kent County 

Elgin County 

Norfolk County 

Haldimand County (includ- 
ing Grand River) 

Welland County (includ- 
ing Upper Niagara River) 

Totals 



Fishing material 



Tugs 



50 



Ton- 



91 

72 

862 

417 

211 



1,653 



Value Men 



26 ,000 
25 .300 
189 ,357 
124 ,500 

54,000 



419.157 



12 

18 

139 

76 

38 



283 



Gasoline Launches 



No. Value Men 



166 



46,000 
36 .450 
18 ,900 
16 960 

9,600 

2,300 



130 .510 



87 

125 

80 

81 

48 



429 



Sail or Row Boats 



No. 1 Value Men 



185 



$ 

2,385 
2.505 
1 ,190 
2,520 

3 ,165 

1 ,110 



12 .875 



Gill-Nets 



Yards Value 



140 ,300; 31 .050 
63, 

577, 
365, 



.800 
,800 
,100 



243 
12 



1 .402 .600 200 .860 



8.225 
76.790 
49 ,675 



33 ,670 
1 ,450 



Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caught 





Districts 


Herring, salted 


c 




j: 
1 


Trout, salted 


c 


£ 


c 
c 


1 


Lake Erie 
Essex County 


lbs. 


lbs. 

186 .421 

1 .091 .145 
4.119.648 

2 .301 ,103 

1 ,907 .191 
45 .776 


lbs. 
20,000 


lbs. 

284 .744 
68 .632 
82 ,001 

141 ,719 

234 ,953 
6 ,255 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 

1 ,020 
32 ,368 
12.284 
63 .788 

549 
5,250 


lbs. 
75 .870 


9 


Kent Count V 






45 


43 .497 


3 


Elgin County 










23 ,021 


4 


Norfolk County 








722 

277 


8,996 


5 


Haldimand County(in- 
cluding Grand River 

Welland County (in- 
cludng Upper Nia- 
gara River) 









8,891 


6 








5,739 




Totals 
















9,651,284 


20 ,000 


818 ,304 




1,044 


115,259 


166 ,013 




Vaiue- 








$ c. 


$ c. 

482 ,564 20 


$ e. 
2 .000 00 


$ c. 

81 .830 40 


S c. 


$ c. 
104.40 


8 c. 
5 ,762 9 


$ c. 
16 ,601 30 













1922 



GAME AXD FISHERIES. 



FISHERIES 

quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
in the Public Waters of Lake Erie. 



Fishing material 



I Other fixtures ustii in 
i fishing 





Seines 




Pound Nets Hoop 


Nets 


Dip or Roll 
Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value No. 


Value 


No.. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 

11 


Value 


g 


1.725 
2 ,475 


$ 

2.200 
1 s.^n 


211 
223 


$ 

147 .000 1 
200 850 


$ 

25 


1 


$ 

5 


500 


S 
10 


S 


27 
34 


$ 

26 .600 
50 ,550 
22 .050 
17 .535 

4.300 

250 


5.500 


7 






21 9,900 






129 


127 .000 . . 




5 


75 


900 


20 






25 
16 

9 

2 


14 6,660 


31 


12.050 

885 
150 


10 ,025 

640 

60 


18 

50 

6 


8 .OOOi 25 
31 950 


670 






14 
3 


5.450 


6 


12 

1 


90 
15 










1 .050 


1 


3 000 




5.700 


165 






















53 


17 285' 1^ '"'' 


637 


517 800| "^6 


695 


19 


185 


7,100 


195 






113 


121 .285 


63 


28 .560 



























during the year 1920, in the Public Waters of Lake Erie. 



















£ 






















T3 


^^ 




















S 


















JS 




a 


















■3cc 




PQ 


^ 




c 










„ 




5 g 


a 


c 







u 
3 


_2 


J3 


3 


CC 






c3 


3 


a 
^ 


"5 


M 


« 


^ 


H 





U 


<• 





S 


£ 


^ 



lbs. 


lbs. 

3.743 

3i ,982 
17 


lbs. 

240 .459 
486 .405 
278 .226 
181 .904 

67 .745 
17 .442 


lb. 


bs. 

8.025 

679 

7,814 

25 .265 

113 
155 


lbs 

87 ,096 

76 ,719 

2,047 

203 ,194 

61 ,892 
916 


lbs. 

451 ,006 

141 ,143 

32 .909 

100 ,008 

121 ,386 
54,039 


lbs. 


No. 


lbs. 

432 ,990 
1 ,387 ,406 
1 ,208 .557 

115.621 

190 ,602 
19 .347 


c. 
115 .1S9 95 


67 








198 .326 65 


200 








317.415 86 






169 ,028 71 











143 ,994 98 












8.517 48 














267 


38 .742 


1,272,181 




42 ,051 


431 ,864 


900 ,491 






3 .354 ,523 


952 ,473 63 












S c. 

32 04 


8 c. 

3 .874 20 


S c. 
101 .774 48 


S c 


$ c. 

3 .364 08 


$ c. 

17,274 56 


$ c 

36 ,019 64 


$ 


$ 


$ c. 

201 .271 38 


$ c. 

952 ,473 63 















34 



THE EEPOET UPON" 



No. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, 

fishing industry during the year 1920, 





Districts 


Fishing material 




Tugs 


Gasoline Launches 


Sail or Row Boats 


Gill-Nets 




No. 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


Yards 


Value 


1 


Lake Ontario. 
Lincoln Coun;y 






S 




21 
4 

12 
3 

10 


$ 

11 .200 
2,900 
5,600 
1,800 
4 FtlF, 


34 

7 

22 

7 

19 

21 

22 

23 

116 

103 

16 
22 


6 
6 
3 

1 
5 
4 


$ 

205 
335 
200 
25 
350 
220 


18 
12 

4 
1 
3 
5 


84 ,550 
39 ,500 
71 ,000 
22 ,000 
36 ,800 
53 ,000 
59 ,600 
81 ,660 
360 ,652 
158 .200 

65 ,000 
26 .000 


$ 
8,460 


?. 


Wentworth County 










3 470 


4 












7 ,590 


4 


Peel County 










3 400 


5 


York County 






7 785 


6 


Ontario County 










12 4 .6.50 


6 ,690 


7 












10 
11 
64 
52 

10 
13 


7,050 

5.400 

23 ,591 

13 ,595 

2,180 
3 .7.'i0 


9 ,680 


8 


Northumberland County. . . 










15 
115 
103 

17 
29 


830 
5,505 
6,013 

1,060 
1.243 


25 
173 
181 

21 
31 


9 375 


9 


Prince Edward County 










39 ,867 


10 


Bav of Quinte (Proper) .... 










22 ,836 


11 

1?. 


Bay of Quinte (Eastern 

Channel 

Wolfe Island and Victnity. . 

Totals 










21 .995 
3.150 






















222 86 291 


412 


304 


15,986 


474 


1 ,057 .962 


144 ,298 

























Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caught 



Districts. 



Lake Ontario. 



Lincoln County. . . . 
Wentworth County. 

Halton County 

Peel 

York County 

Ontario County .... 
Durham County, . . 
Northumberland Co, 
Prince Edward County 
Bay of Quinte (Proper) 
Bay o f Quinte (Eastern 

Channel) 

Wolfe Island and vici- 

ity 



Totals . 



Values . 



lbs. 



1,000 



400 
1,500 



100 
650 



3,650 



182 50 



lbs. 

98 .724 
26 ,000 
79 ,200 
37 ,000 
13 ,400 
5001. 
1 ,500 . 
29 .050 . 
271 ,182| 
692 .1391 



lbs. 



1,000 



780 
370 



24 ,626 

14 .259 800 



1 ,287 ,580 



2.950 



64 ,379 00 295 00 



lbs. 

51, 

26 

26 

9 

53 

133 

211 

188 

785 

383 



,423 
,300 
,800 
,000 
,975 
.527 
.954 
.546 
.0151 
,842, 



lbs. 



134 ,273; 300 

19 ,403 3 ,050 



2 ,024 .058 



3 ,350 



202 ,405 801 



$ c, 
335 00 



lbs. 

11 ,479 
7,100 

36 ,275 
53 ,000 
10 .800 

4,765 
15,365 

37 ,226 
230 ,470 



lbs. 



100 

15 

100 



34 ,393 
17 ,790 



458 .663 



45.866 30 



28,150 

58.205 

195 ,627 

4.055 

24 ,719 



311 .432 



15,571 60 



lbs. 



879 
500 



800 
28 .450 



2.204 
3.718 



36,551 



3 .655 10 



1922 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



35 



FISHERIES 

the quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
in the Public Waters of Lake Ontario. 













Fish 


ing material 












Other fixtures used in 
fishing 


Seines 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip or Roll 
Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. i Value 


No. 1 Value 

1 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 

3 

1 
2 
1 


Value 


No. 


Value 


7 


690 


S 

1,650 




$ 




$ 




$ 


600 


$ 




$ 


$ 

1,000 

1,000 

250 

150 




$ 
























1 


100 

10 

200 

290 


75 

15 
180 
405 















45 


15 






2 750 


1 




















1 
























2 












20 










4 
. . 1 


975 
100 






































29 
155 
395 

8 
138 


1 315 
















1 
3 
9 

1 


100 


o 


105 


175 






5,485 
15,065 

390 
5,135 






4,520 
500 

1 ,200 


215 
20 

76 
15 






27 
5 

1 
5 


3,300 
680 

150 

825 


400 
















393 




















40 












1 


300 






850 












"^' 1 1 










14 


1,395 


2,500 






725-.?7 .-nQn! 1i 2nl 7.165 


364 






50 


8,030 


?? 


2,533 





























during the year 1920, in the Public Waters of Lake Ontario 





£ 




■a 




TJ 




d 








P3 




a 


S3 


o 


> 

a! 

o 


3 



lbs. 
500 


lbs. 
834 


lbs. 

550 

1,400 

95 


lbs. 


lbs. 
200 


lbs. 

6.550 

700 

8.000 


lbs. 

12.518 

1 .160 

200 

1 .025 

15.600 
6.400 
7.000 

29 .232 

93 .984 
201 .541 

6.470 

38 .711 


lbs. 
338 


No. 
240 


lbs. 

8.322 
1.245 


$ c. 

13 .242 74 






4 ,951 85 




50 








. 


10 ,713 10 














8,141 00 












12 ,000 
3,292 








8,251 50 






■ 70 




428 








14 ,304 77 














23 ,086 90 




2.100 
16 ,644 
49 ,022 

6,095 

17.187 


4,000 
14 ,150 
62 ,950 

2,680 

21 .488 




. . 18 .692 


500 
9,815 
9,075 

780 

14 ,962 








28,651 84 




300 


37 .739 
80 .819 

868 

31 .469 








128,181 33 








250 
25 


110,572 86 










19 ,740 89 










14 .559 68 












500 


91 .932 


107 .383 


300 


170 .215 


65 .674 


413 ,841 


338 


240 


9.842 


384 .398 46 


S c. 

60 00 


S c. 

9 .193 20 


S c. 

8 .590 64 


$ c. 

18 00 


$ c. 

13.617 20 


$ c. 

2 .626 96 


S c. 

16 .553 64 


$ 

338 


120 


S c. 
590 52 


S c. 

384 .398 46 



m 



THE REPORT UPOX 



Xo. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fi-hermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats 

fishing industry during the year 





D'stricts. 


Fishing material 








Tugs 


Gasoline Launches 


Sail 


or Row Boats 


Gill-Nets 




No. 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 


Men 


No. 

1 
4 

3 

1 

7 
5 
6 

13 


Value 


Men 

2 
7 

5 

1 

12 

18 
14 

27 


No. 

16 
64 

20 

20 

15 
18 


Value 


Men 

24 
74 

22 

27 

21 
18 


Yards Value 


1 


Inland Waters 
Frontenac County 




$ 


$ 

300 
1 ,150 

650 

15 

2,500 

' 3 ,750 

3 ,700 

8,400 


$ 

42U 
2,288 

400 

375 

355 
625 




$ 


2 


Lanark and Leeds Counties. 

Grenville, Dundas, Stormont 

and Glengarry Counties. . 














3 














4 


Prescott, Russell, Carleton 
and Renfrew Counties . . . 










1 ,030 


235 


5 


Peterborough and Victoria 
Counties 










6 


Lake Simcoe 














V 


Lake Nipissing 














S 


Temiskaming and Nipissing 
Districts 










16 


1,805 


13 


20 ,350 


4 370 




Totals 






















4ol "in stM\ 


86 


169 


6,268 


199 


21 .380 


4,605 





















Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish 





Districts 


Herring, salted 




Whitefish, salted 


Whitefisli, fresh 


■a 
2 


3 
O 




o 
o 

a 

c 

1 

c 
-a 

c 


1 


Inland Waters. 
Frontenac County. . . . 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 

10 ,552 
13 ,999 

1,055 

5.710 
1.450 


lbs. 


2 


Lanark and Leeds Co. 














3 


Grenville, Dundas, 
Stormont and Glen- 
garry Counties 
















4 


Prescott, Russell, Car- 
leton and Renfrew 
Counties 














2 040 


5 


Peterboro and Victoria 
Counties 
















6 


Lake Simcoe 




1,970 
28 ,490 

8,592 




8,200 
32 ,920 

29 ,913 




12 ,960 


1 ,100 


V 


Lake Nipissing 








19 .477 
55 ,289 


98 576 


8 


Temiskaming and Nip- 
issing Districts 

Totals 


400 




800 


618 


57 ,226 










400 


39 ,052 




71 ,033 


800 


13 .578 


107 ,532 


158 942 




Values 






$ c. 
20 00 


S c. 
1 .952 60 


$ c. 


$ c. ! $ c. 
7 103 30' sn (Wi 


$ c. 
1 ,357 80 


$ c. 
5,376 60 


S $. 
15 894 20 















1932 



GAME AXD FISHERiES. 



FISHERIES 

the quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
1920, in Inland Waters. 













Fish 


ing material 




• 








Other fixtures used in 
fiohin 


Seines 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip or Roll 

Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


Xo. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. Value 


No. Value 


1 


78 
314 

60 


S 

165 
517 

36 




....1 


47 
179 

21 

45 

29 
5 


S 

2,175 
4,855 

850 

1,390 

990 
100 




$ 




$ 




S , 




$ 




$ 


1? 










2.765 

6,000 

2,200 

600 
3 200 


270 
80 

115 
24 

no 














3 






4 


10 
























6 

4 
1 
3 

14 


515 

250 
1,500 
2,000 

7,750 






7 520 


450 
2,300 







2 


20 






1 
3 
3 

7 


25 


6 1 ,400 






122 


410 


900 




IS 
15 


7 ,200 , 
3,650 






1,800 








63 


1 ,750 














940 


























29 


2,372 


3 ,468] 33 


10 .850 


389 


12,110 6 


30 


14 ,765 


599 


122 


410 


28 


12 ,035 


14 


3, 66.=^ 



caught during the year 1920, in Inland Waters 





E 






o 






13 


^^ 




•v 






s 












PC 


C 










o 




> 




^ 


6 


w 





lbs. 



1.075 



6,670 



775. 



96 ,800: . 
4 ,308! . 



lbs. 



4 ,095 
10 ,570] 



3,350j 

2 ,650 
5 ,743 



3,980 
6.625 



610 



8,525 



800 
3,684 



5,391 



lbs. 



lbs. 



27,043 
57,845 



6,580 

12 ,275 
29 .615, 



lbs. 



1,035 



775 



1 ,165 



12 ,376 
115,476 



lbs 



28 ,524 
83 ,789 



3.185 



27 ,800 

43 ,768 

36 ,452 

7,891 

49 ,170 



lbs 



300 



30 



3,152 



No 



lbs. 



4 .559 90 
10,736 51 



1 ,951 75 



3,670 10 

5 ,325 76 

8,696 34 

30,631 59 

14,984 79 



109 .628 26 .408 



29 .615 



133 .358 



130 .827 



280 .579 



3.482 



80.556 74 



S c. Set $ c. 

13 ,155 36: 2 .640 80| 2 ,369 20 



S c 

10 ,668 64 



$ c. 

5.233 08 



11.223 16 



S 

3.482 



80.556 74 



THE EEPOBT UPON 



Xo. 14 



ONTARIO 

Recapitulation of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, 

industry during 













Fishing material 










Disr^cto. 


Tugs 


Gasoline Launches! 


Sail 


or Row Boats 


GiU-Nets 




No. 

5 
26 
20 
15 

8 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 


Men 

9 
194 
96 
65 
44 


No. 


Val ue 


Men 

161 

83 

93 

149 

102 

100 

429 

412 

86 


No. 

108 

50 

52 

85 

40 

95 

185 

304 

169 


Value 


Men 

62 

62 

64 

113 

61 

137 

215 

474 

199 


Yards 


Value 


Kenora and Rainy River 


65 
794 
531 
407 
174 


$ 

11 ,200 
109 ,500 
120 ,200 
81 ,300 
36 ,500 


107 
40 
40 
76 
50 
62 
166 
222 
40 


$ 

49 .800 

30 .800 
18.125 
52 ,770 

31 ,250 
24,195 

130,510 
86 ,291 
20 ,465 


$ 

7,192 
4.215 
3.920 
5,675 
3,260 
5.275 
12 ,875 
15.986 
6,268 


202 ,040 
760 ,570 
705 ,900 
1.011 .300 
340 .075 


40 ,319 




106 .475 


Lake Huron(North Channel) 


105 ,895 
108 .666 


Lake Huron (Proper) 

Lake St. Clair, etc 


55 ,670 




50 


1,653 


419,157 


283 


1 .402 .600 

1 .057 .962 

21 .380 


200 ,860 




144 ,298 












4,605 














Totals 


124 


3.624 


777 .857 


691 


803 


444 ,206 


1615 


1088 


64 ,666 


1387 


5 .501 ,827 


766 ,788 















Recapitulations of the kinds, quantities and values 











rs 










y 


























o 


"S 


"3 


S 


-a 


J3 




o 
Q 












































Districts 


a 


a 


efish 


efish, 


a 






o 


























<u 


o 




Whi 


o 

u 


O 
C-i 







1 Kenora and Rainy Ri- 

VPT Distript 


lbs. ! lbs. 

1 


lbs. 

319 .400 
200 

552 

5.900 

900 

"26.666 
2,950 


lbs. 

398,115 

1 ,704 .733 

902 .703 
445.351 
82 , 194 
7,327 
818 .304 

2 ,024 ,058 

71 ,033 


lbs. 


lbs. 

123 ,232 
1 ,332 ,428 

1 ,107 ,771 
972,158 
790 ,168 


lbs. 

449 .457 
15.271 

68 .500 
44 ,164 
4,995 
107 ,576 
115,259 
311,432 
107 .532 


lbs. 
649 ,044 


2 
3 

4 
5 


Lake Superior 

Lake Huron (North 

Channel) 

Georgian Bay 

Lake Huron (Proper) . 
Lake St Clair etc 


616 ,601 

155 
3,650 
7,700 


1 .286 ,953 

24,173 

49 ,282 

172 ,630 

400 

9 ,651 ,284 

1 ,287 ,580 

39 ,052 


145 ,700 

967 
18 ,400 
56 ,850 


118,779 

242 ,003 
67 ,307 

139 ,634 
26 ,968 


7 






" "3.356 
800 


1,044 

458 ,663 

13 ,578 


166 ,013 


8 




. . 3 ,650 


36 .551 


q 


Inland Waters 

Totals 


400 


158 .942 










632, 156 


12,511,354 


349 .902 


6 ,453 ,818 


226 ,067 


4 ,799 ,042 


1 ,224 ,186 


1 .605,241 




Values 






S c. 
31 ,607 80 


$ c. 
625,567 70 


$ c. 
34 ,990 20 


$ c. 
645,381 80 


» c. 

22,606 70 


$ c. 
479,904 20 


$ c. 
61 .209 30 


S c. 
160,524 10 



1922 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



39 



FISHERIES. 



the quantity and value of all fi.shing materials and other fixtures emploved in the 
year of 1920. 













Fishing material 












Other fixtures used in 
fishing 


- Seines 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip or Roll 
Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


I 
No. Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 

87 
29 
31 
31 


Value 


No. 

72 
9.=i 


Value 






S 


62 
55 

187 

23 
69 
14 

637 


$ 

20 .385 
38,300 

123 ,650 

19,500 

40,550 

4,400 

517 ,800 


35 

1 

7 

28 

2 

229 

26 

725 

389 


$ 

1.570 

60 

550 

765 


S 




i 


S 


24.000 
15.005 


$ 

13 ,800 












2.600 


180 






9 235 




6 : 












9 .900 26 
11 lOO' -28 


22 5,00 


tn 


10 

605 

9,251 

17 .285 

1 .395 

2,372 


725 

710 

7.990 

14 .275 

2.500 

3.468 






28.800 
2.300 
1 .600 
7,100 
7.165 

14 .765 


4.505 
190 
130 
195 
364 
599 






8 ,970 


7 


150 


2 


10 
10 
185 
20 
30 






30 10.640' 15 
44 14 .42.T 10 


2 ,100 


.■».=> 


39 .850 1 

695 19 

27 .390J 1 

12,110 6 






3 ,550 


53 






113 
50 

28 


121 .285 63 
8 .030 1 22 
12 .035j 14 


28 ,560 


14 






2 ,533 


29 


33 


10,850 


122 


410 


3,665 


168 


31 ,718 


29 .668 


1.080 


775 .435 


1 .442 


83 ,140 


29 


255 


64 .330 


6 .163 


122 


410 


443 


226 .420 


275 


94 ,963 



of fish caught during the year 1920 



eS o 
-3 E 

v a 
X o 









<u 




'O 




TJ 




d 








« 




C 


V 




cS 


to 


> 


3 



bs. 

9,330 
30 ,607 


lbs. 
"20,496 


lbs. 
12 ,277 


lbs. 

129 .430 

50 

20.712 

76 .274 

206 ,029 


lbs. 
52 .992 


lbs. 
9.441 


lbs. 

191 .209 
114.924 
420 .791 
43 ,383 
99.056 
603 ,136 
900 .491 
413.841 
280 .579 


lbs. 

379 
202 
138 
30 
649 
526 


No. 
198 


lbs. 

5.316 
7.267 


$ c. 

194 .381 83 
437 ,085 67 


13 .804 


8,415 

4,098 

129,157 

231 ,621 

1 ,272 .181 

107 .383 

29,615 


1,730 

2.415 

227 

141 .247 

42 .051 

170.215 

133 .358 


17.213 

54.319 

3.988 

395 .437 

431 .864 

65 .674 

130 .827 


251 .409 96 


2 ,655 








165,120 56 


'J ,176 




2.176 

400 

3 .354 .523 

9.842 


144 955 75 


13.004 


' .38 ,742 
91 ,932 
26 ,408 


SO .711 14 


267 


300 


952 .473 63 


500 
109 .628 


338 
3.482 


240 


384 .398 46 
80 .556 74 












188 .971 


177 .578 


1 ,794 .747 


432 ,795 


544 .235 


1 .108 .763 


3.067.410 


5.744 


438 


3 ,379 .524 


2 ,691 .093 74 


% c. 
22 .676 52 


$ c. 
17 ,757 SO 


$ c. 

143 .579 76 


$ c. 
25.967 70 


S c. 

43 .538 80 


S c. 
44 .350 52 


$ c. 
122 .696 40 


$ 
5.744 


S 

219 


$ c. 
202.771 44 


$ c 

2 .691 .093 74 



40 



THE ERPOPtT UPON 



No. 14 



Comparative Statement of yield for 1919-20, according to Districts. 



1919 



1920 



Increase 



Decrease 



Kenora and Rainj' River Districts: 
j^ Herring, Salted. . : Lbs. 

Herring, Fresh " . 

Whitefish, Salted " . 

Whitefish, Fresh " . 

Trout, Salted " . 

Trout, Fresh " 

Pike " . 

Pickerel (Dore) " . 

Sturgeon " . 

Eels " . 

Perch " . 

TuUibee " . 

Catfish " . 

Carp " . 

Mixed and Coarse Fish " . 

Caviare " 

Sturgeon Bladders No . 

Pickerel (Blue) Lbs. 



Lake Superior: 

Herring, Salted 

Herring, Fresh 

Whitefish, Salted 

Whitefish, Fresh 

Trout, Salted 

Trout, Fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

TuUibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse Fish. 

Caviare 

Pickerel Blue, 



North Channel, (Lake Huron) : 

Herring, Salted 

Herring, Fresh 

W;h;tefish, Salted 

Whitefish, Fresh 

Trout, Salted 

Trout, Fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

TuUibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse Fish 

Caviare 



Georgian Bay: 
H&rrin^t Salted. . 



1,100 

496,483 

.50 

90,807 

03.5,4 4 

837,049 

14,310 



319,400 
398,11.5 



123,232 

449,457 

049,044 

9,330 



9,717 

241,263 

76,754 

53,232 

259,972 

269 



.545,-3.50 

1,. 508, 157 

3,4.50 

2,029,699 

144,638 

1,960,222 

18,980 

140,966 

21,919 



840 



290,217 
152 



2,869 

28,506 

848 

799,330 

10,550 

1,-595,608 

160,639 

225,404 

13,523 



11,580 

25,996 

1,111 

1,020 

350,7-55 

86 



5,600 



12,277 

129,430 

52,992 

9,441 

191,209 

379 

198 

-5,316 



616,601 

l,28t),9.53 

200 

1,704,733 

145,700 

1,332,428 

15,271 

118,779 

30,607 

20,496 



50 



114,924 

202 

7,267 



155 

24,173 

552 

902,703 

967 

1,107,771 

68,500 

242,003 

13,804 



8,415 

20,712 

1,730 

17,213 

420,791 

138 



3,650 



318,300 



32,425 



2,560 



110 

198 
5,316 



71,251 



1,062 



8,688 
20,496 



50 
7,267 



103,-367 



16,599 
281 



619 

16,193 

70,036 

52 



98,368 
50 



185,947 

188,005 

4.980 



111,8.33 
23,762 
43,791 
68,763 



221,204 

3,250 

324,966 



627,794 

3,709 

22,187 



790 
175,293" 



2,714 

4,333 

296 



9,583 

487,837 

92,139 



3.615 
5.284 



1.950 



1922 



GAME AXD FISHEEIES. 



41 



Comparative Statement of yield for 1919-20, according to Districts — Continued. 



1919 



1920 



Increase 



Decrease 



Georgian Bay. — Continued: 

Herring, Fresh Lbs 

Whitefish, Salted " 

Whitefish, Fresh " 

Trout, Salted " 

Trout, Fresh " 

Pike " 

Pickerel (Dore) " 

Sturgeon " 

Eels " 

Perch " 

Tullibee " 

Catfish " 

Carp " 

ML\ed and Coarse Fish " 

Caviare " 

Pickerel (Blue) " 

Lake Huron (Proper) 

Herring, Salted " 

Herring, Fresh " 

Whitefish, Salted " 

Whitefish, Fresh " 

Trout, Salted " 

Trout, Fresh " 

Pike " 

Pickerel (Dore) " 

Sturgeon " 

Eels " 

Perch " 

Tullibee " 

Catfish " 

Carp " 

Mixed and Coarse Fish " 

Caviare " 

Pickerel, (Blue) " 



Lake St. Clair, Etc: 

Herring, Salted 

Herring, Salted 

Whitefish, Salted 

Whitefi.sh, Fresh 

Trout, Salted 

Trout, Fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse Fish . 

Caviare 

Pickerel (Blue) 



Lake Erie: 

Herring, Salted. .. 
Herring, Fresh . . . 
Whitefish, Salted. 



60,870 

9,650 

391,008 

26,300 

898,417 

28,341 

76,839 

1,778 

50 

6,076 

53,784 

4,948 

54,516 

81,277 

""266 



8,000 

143,017 

6,800 

90,619 

51,550 

827,722 

3,333 

182,562 

11,094 

25 

67,469 

170,165 

383 

6,910 

105,314 

1,023 

550 



13,300 



38,235 
60,319 
10,800 



140,147 



73,805 

294,440 

537,262 

478 

500 



7,425,713 



49,282 

5,900 

445,351 

18,400 

972,158 

44,164 

67,307 

2,655 



4,098 
76,274 

2,415 

54,319 

43,383 

30 



7,700 

172,630 

900 

82,194 

56,850 

790,168 

4,995 

139,634 

9,176 



129,157 

206,029 

227 

3,988 

99,056 

649 

2,176 



400 
7,327 



107,576 
26,968 
13,004 



231,621 



141,247 

395,437 

603,136 

526 

400 



9,651,284 
20,000 



54,343 



73,741 
15,823 



877 
22,496 



30 



29,613 



5,300 
1,662' 



61,688 
35,864 



1,626 



400 



69,341 
'2,264 



91,474 



67,442 

100,997 

65,874 

48 



2,225,571 
20,000 



11,588 
3,750 



7,900 



9,532 



50 
1,978 



2,533 
197 

37,894 



200 



300 



5,900 

8,425 



57,554 



42,928 

1,918 

25 



156 
2,922 
6,258 

374 



5,973 



33,351 



100 



42 



THE EEPOET UPOX 



Xo. 14 



Comparative Statement of yield f . r 1919-20, according to Districts. — Concluded. 



Lake Erie. — Continued: 

Whitefish, Fresh Lbs. 

Trout, Salted " . 

Trout, Fresh " . 

Pike ' . 

Pickerel (Dore) " . 

Sturgeon " . 

Eels " . 

Perch " . 

Tullibee " . 

Catfish " . 

Carp " . 

Mixed and Coarse Fish " 

Caviare " . 

Sturgeon Bladders No . 

Pickerel (Blue) Lbs. 

Lake Ontario: 

Herring, Salted " 

Herring, Fresh " 

Whitefish, Salted " 

Whitefish, Fresh " 

Trout, Salted " 

Trout, Fresh " 

Pike " 

Pickerel (Dore) " 

Sturgeon " 

Eels " 

Perch " 

Tullibee " 

Catfish " 

Carp " 

Mixed and Coarse Fish " 

Caviare " 

Sturgeon Bladders No . 

Pickerel (Blue) Lbs 



Inland Waters: 

Herring, Salted 

Herring, Fresh 

Whitefish, Salted 

Whitefish, Fresh 

Trout, Salted 

Trout, Fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse Fish . 
Caviare 



1919 



1,094,280 



1,528 

727,037 

144,323 

42,709 



1920 



818,304 



1,096,935 

1,323 

33,972 

378,380 

793,658 

1,827 1^ 

4 

2,387,787 



10,930 

1,709,412 

7,225 

1,586,333 

900 

553,203 

246,095 

40,459 



167,186 
158,802 

247,840 

169,471 

603,014 

202 



2,692 



75,056 

843 

94,330 

500 

12,335 

136,689 

214,079 

108,519 

20,842 

33,686 

11,564 

116,087 

194,080 

336,279 

3,020 



1,044 

115,259 

166,013 

267 

38,742 

1,272,181 



Increase 



42,051 
431,864 
900,491 



3,354,523 



3,650 

1,287,580 

2,950 

2,024,058 

3,350 

458,663 

311,432 

36,551 

500 

91,932 

107,383 

300 

170,215 

65,674 

413,841 

338 

240 

9,842 



400 
39,052 



71,033 
800 

13,578 
107,532 
158,94'i 
109,628 

26,408 

29,615 



133,358 

130,827 

280,579 

3,482 



21,690 



38.742 
175,246 



8,079 

53,484 

106,833 



966,736 



437,725 
2,450 



65,337 
" 500 



.300 



136 

240 
7,150 



400 



300 
1,243 



1,109 
5,566 



17,271 
"462 



Decrease 



275,976 



484 
611,778 



42,442 
1,323" 



1,827M 
4 



7,280 

421,832 

4,275 



94,540 
' '3,968" 



75,254 
51,419 



77,625 
103,797 
189,173 



36,004 

843 

23,297 



29,157 
55,137 



4,071 
11,564 



63,253 
55,700 



1922 



GAME AND FISHEKIES. 



-^3 



Statement of the Yield of the Fisheries of the Province of O^^^ARIo for the 
Year, 1920, as Furnished by the Fisherman's Annual Returns. 



Kinds of Fish 



Herring, Salted Lbs 

Herring, Fresh 

Whitefish, Salted 

Whitefish, Fresh 

Trout, Salted 

Trout, Fresh . 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse Fish 

Caviare 

Sturgeon Bladders No 

Pickerel (Blue) Lbs 

Total 



Quantity 



632,156 
12,511,354 

349,902 
6,453,818 

226.067 
4,799,042 
1,224,186 
1,605,241 

188,971 

177,578 
1, 794,747 

432,795 

544,235 

1,108,763 

3,067,410 

5,744 

438 

3,379,524 



Price 



•5 
5 
10 
10 
10 
10 
5 

10 

12 

10 

8 

6 

8 

4 

4 

00 

50 

6 



Value 



$ 31,607 80 

625,567 70 
34,990 20 

645,381 80 
22,606 70 

479,904 20 
61,209 30 

160,524 10 
22,676 52- 
17,757 80 

143,579 76 
25,967 70 
43,538 80 
44,350 52 

122,696 40 

5,744 00 

219 00 

202,771 44 



2,691,093 74 



Comparative Statement of the Yield of the Fisheries of the Province. 



1919 



1920 



Increase 



Dec ease 



Herring, Salted Lbs. 

Herring, Fresh 

Whitefish, Salted 

Whitefi.sh, Fresh 

Trout, Salted 

Trout, Fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse Fish 

Caviare 

Sturgeon Bladders No . 

Pickerel (Blue) lbs. 



Total Pounds 

Total Increase, Pounds, 1920. 



572,749 

10,950,731 

29,916 

6,595,388 

234,488 

5,939,842 

1,994,753 

1,922,000 

224,658 

188,103 

1,524,412 

504,935 

554,900 

1,152,049 

3,357,748 

7,057 M 

4 

2,391,729 



38,1 45,458 3-^ 



632,156 
12,511,354 

349,902 
6,453,818 

226,067 
4,799,042 
1,224,186 
1,605,241 

188,971 

177,578 
1,794,747 

432,795 

.544,235 

1,108,763 

3,067,410 

5,744 

438 

3,379,524 



59,407 

1,560,623 

319,986 



270,335 



434 

(87,795 



38,501,533 



356,074 ^i 



141,570 

8,421 

1,140,800 

770,567 

316,759 

35,687 

10,525 



72,140 

10,665 

43,286 

290,3.38 

1,313 'i 



44 



THE REPORT UPON 



Xo. 14 



Value of Ontario Fisheries From 1901 to 1920 Inclusive 



Years. Value. 

S c. 

1901 1,428,078 00 

1602 1,265,705 00 

1903 1,535,144 00 

1904 .- 1,793,524 00 

1905 1,708,963 00 

1906 1,734,865 00 

1907 ^ 1,935,024 90 

1908 2,100,078 63 

1909 2,237,544 41 

1910 2,348,2.9 57 



Years. 



Value. 



1911 2,419,178 21 

1912 2,842,877 09 

1913 2,674,686 76 

1914 2,755,293 11 

1915 3,341,181 41 

1916 2,658,993 43 

1917 2,866,424 00 

1918 3,175,110 32 

1919 2,721,440 24 

1920 2,6)1,093 74 



Statement of the Number and Value of the Tugs, Gasoline, Sail or Row Boats, Netp, 
Spears, Etc., Used in the FIshinq Lvdustrt o? the Province of Ontario DaRiNO the 
Year 1920. 



Number 



Value 



Tugs (3,624 tons) 

Gasoline Launches 

Sail or Row Boats 

GiUNets 

Seines (31,718 yards) . . . 

Pound Nets 

Hoop Nets 

Dip or Roll Nets 

Baited Hooks 

Spears 

Freezers and Ice Houses . 
Piers and Wharves 



124 

803 

1,088 

5,501,827 vards 

168' 

1,080 

1,442 

29 

64,330 

122 

443 

275 



777,857 

44,206 

64,666 

•. 66,788 

29,668 

775,435 

83,140 

255 

6,163 

410 

226,420 

94,963 



Total. 



3,269,971 



Number of men employed on Tugs 

" " " " Gasoline Launches. 

" " SaU or Row Boats. 



691 
1,615 
1,387 



Total 



3,693 



46 



THE KEPOET UPOX 



No. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, the 

fishing industry during the year 1921, in the Public 



District 












Fishing 


Material 










Tugs 


Gasoline Launches 


Sail or Row Boats 


Gill-Nets 


No. 

2 
2 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 

$ 

9,000 
1,300 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 

7 
7 

2 

3 

7 
4 

1 
4 
1 
6 


Yards, 


Value 


Kenora and Rainy River 
Lake of the Woods 


43 
17 


6 40 
5 24 


15,575 
9.290 


58 
35 

1 

11 


30 
25 

2 

6 

5 

8 

3 

4 

1 

6 


2,095 
1,270 

80 
230 
235 
530 
110 
180 

75 
375 


69,225 
40,200 

5,100 

12,800 

5,750 
29,930 
22,500 

6,500 
14,200 

8.530 


$ 

11,884 
7,735 


Manitou, Little Turtle, Kai- 
ofskons, Yoke and Elbow 

Trout, Clearwater, Pickerel, 
Pipestone and Noainicon . 

Sturgeon, Loon, Jackfish, 




1 400 
5 2.925 


1,200 










2,000 












700 


Sturgeon, Lac Suel, Eagle, 

Crow anil Vermillion 

Pipestone. Wabigoon, Shoal, 

Obabicon and Stormy. . . . 
Shikog, Feegan, Basketh, 

Minnitakie and Abraham 
MeKen2ie,.Stanghikini,Bear, 

Indian and Orang Outang 
Star, Keyes, Cedar, Sutana, 


1 
2 


18 
18 


6,000 
1,700 


2 

4 


17 
8 
1 


9.500 

4,050 

400 


27 

11 

2 

8 

1 


4,650 
3,600 
1,175 










1 
6 1.490 

1 300 


2,180 










2,205 












1 




7 


96 


18,000 


17 


103 


43.930 


154 


90 


5,180 


42 


214,735 


37,329 



Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caught 





District 


h 


c2 




1^ 


.T3 
3-2 




c 


Pickerel 
or Dore 


1 


Kenora and Rainy River 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 

80,085 
45,415 

8,055 

26,619 

2,243 
128,781 

65,125 

3,796 

7,648 
16.897 


lbs. 


lbs. 

6,991 
80 

8,252 

6.020 

671 
34,163 

19,489 

548 

2,100 


lbs. lbs. 
210,340 348,443 


? 












106.853 108,449 


3 


Manitou, Little Turtle, 
Kaiorskons, Yoke and 








978 


2,742 

22,550 

6.683 
59,122 

26.124 


2,642 


4 


Trout, Clearwater. Pick- 
erel , Pipestone aqd 








191,340 


6 


Sturgeon, Loon, Jack- 
fish, Crashed Pine and 
Vista 










3,496 


6 


Sturgeon, Lac Stul.Eagle 
Crow and Vermillion 

Pipestone, Wabigoon, 
.Shoal, Obabicon and 








179,039 


7 










106,665 


8 


Shikog, Feegan, Bas- 
keth, Minnitakie and 










11,308 23,629 


9 


McKenzie, Stanghikini, 
Bear, Indian and Or- 










1,357 4,610 


10 


Star, Keyes, Cedar, Sut- 






700 




1 i 
2,0281 4,091 3,864 




Totals 










1 









700 384,664 


978 


80.342 451, 170! 972,177 




Values 






1 • II 1 




% c. 


$ c. 1 $ c. 1 $ c. 1 $ c. $ c. 1 S c. 1 $ c. 
70 00 38,466 40 97 80l 8 ,034 20 22,558 50l 97,217 70 



1922 



GAME AXD FISHEKIES. 



FISHERIES 

■quantity and value of all fi^shing materials and other fixtures emplo\'ed in the 
Waters of Kenora and Rainy River Districts. 











Fishing Material 














Other fixtures used in 
fishing 


Seines ; Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip or Roll 
Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. : Value 

1 
1 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 






S 


30 
17 


$ 

6,700 
6,450 


33 


$ 

1,730 




$ 




i 




$ 


25 
26 

2 

6 

1 

14 

6 

2 


$ 

9,070 27 
5,400| 11 


$ 

5,725 




















1,220 
























300 
850 












3 


1,600 


















3 225 
























50 

5,025 

1,850 

600 

900 

200 


1 

10 

7 

2 


25 








1 
2i 1 nnn 


10 1 nnn 














4,460 




























870 




























200 




























5 
2 


5 500 




























2 125 


! ! 1 54 15,75ol 43 


2,730l.... 








89 


1 
24,245 68 13,350 



during the year 1921, in the Public \Yaters of Kenora and Rainy River Districts. 



5 
1 


1 

1 

1 ^ 


o 


Catfish 


1 
c. 


Mixed and 
coarse fisli 

1 


S3 
> 

03 




"Ho 


"5 
> 


lbs. lbs. 


lbs. 
1,194 


lbs. 

37,949 
33,352 


lbs. 
51,062 


lbs. 

7,305 
280 


lbs. 

32.433 
45.380 

6.950 

33,612 

4.909 
20,365 

15,759 

7,000 


lbs. 


No. 


lbs. 


S c. 

62,115 84 


665 


25 






25,152 21 


525 
652 


1 








2,495 80 




123 
200 


22,237 

500 
8.460 

2.747 

100 

2,857 
8,452 










26,292 IS 






. 






1,217 51 






1 
1 










38,476 60 


















21.229 28 




, 












3,648 70 
















1.675 07 




^ 














3,060 57 




















1,842^ ' 7,865 


116,654 


51,062 


7.585 


166,408 


25 






185,363 76 


1 






% cA $ c. 
221 04' 


» c. 

629 28 


$ c. 

6,999 24 


S c. 

4.084 96 


$ C 

303 40 


« 0. 

6,656 32 


S c. 

25 00 


$ c. 


S c. 




S c 

185,363 76 



THE REPORT UPON 



Xo. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, 

fishing industry during the year 1921, 





District 


Fishing material 




Tugs 


Gasoline Launches 


Sail or Row Boats 


Gill-Nets 




No. 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


Yards 


Value 


1 


Lake Superior 

Pigeon River to Sturgeon 

Point and Whitefish Lake 

Thunder Bay 






$ 




3 

11 

6 


$ 

1,250 
7,500 

3,075 


5 
26 

7 


3 

8 

4 

4 
8 
3 
3 

13 

2 


$ 

125 
475 

840 

315 
435 
225 
210 

685 

180 


3 

11 

6 

5 
5 
3 

20 
4 


39,000 
199,970 

23,300 

5,300 
106,345 

5,000 
108,000 

44,070 

197,200 


$ 
4,100 


7. 


4 


122 


27,000 


20 


26 , 350 


3 


Black Bay and Point Mag- 
net 


3,725 


4 


Crayfish, Arrow, North 
Lake and Shaganash Is- 










865 


5 

6 
7 


Rossport and Wilson Island 
Jackfish and Port Caldwell 


4 
1 

7 

1 
4 


89 

18 

203 

14 

130 


12,000 

2,000 

29,000 

4,000 

22,500 


12 

3 

44 

4 

30 


7 
1 
6 

6 

5 


3,325 

400 

12,000 

2,120 

4,600 


14 
2 
18 

11 

15 


26,175 

750 

12,325 


8 
9 


Gros Cap, Goulais Bay and 
Batchawana Bay 

Gargantua, Mamainse Point 
and Michipicoten 

Totals 


4,330 
19,250 




21 


576 


96,500 


113 


45 


34,270 


98 


48 


3,490l 57 


728,185: 97,870 



Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caught 





District 


■73 
V 

"a 
n 

'C 


v 

s 


1 
1 

ca 
o 


Whitcfish, fresh 


Trout, salted 


Trout, fresh 


Pike 


o 
C 

C 


1 


Lake Superior 
Pigeon River to Stur- 
geon Point and White- 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 

11.075 
102,828 

29,177 

3,124 

31.325 

18,107 
1,168,200 

42,996 
90,457 


lbs. 

800 
115 

300 
86,859 


lbs. 

55,047 
175,593 

9,779 

17,446 

204,866 

44,688 
427,825 

82,234 
495,464 


lbs. 

25 
15,802 

9,875 

2,040 
8.324 


lbs. 
1,095 







276.535 


403,051 
15,000 

335 
2,000 
3,040 


200 


68,717 


3 


Black Bay and Point 
Magnet 


18,560 


4 


Crayfish, Arrow, North 
Like and Shaganash 




100 


5 


Rossport and Wilson Is- 




2,883 


6 


Jackf^sh and Port Cald- 
well 




100 


7 








7,810 
3,081 

7.020 


91,765 


8 


Gros Cap, Goulais Bay 
and Batchawana Bay 

Gargantua, Mamainsne 
Point and Michipi- 
coten 




1,400 




250 
2,900 


12,508 


9 




3,480 




Totals 

Values 












276,535 


424,826 


200 


1,497,289 


91,224 


1,512,942 


53,977 


199,208 




$ c. 
13,826 75 


$ c. 

21,241 30 


$ c. 
20 00 


$ c. 
149,728 90 


$ c. 
9,122 40 


$ c. 
151,294 20 


S c 

2,698 85 


$ c. 
19.920 80 



1922 



GAME AND FISHEJJIES 



49 



FISHERIES 

the quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures emploj^ed in the 
in the Public Waters of Lake Superior. 







Fish 


ing material 
















Other fixtures used in 
fishing 


Seines 


Pound_Nets 


Hoop' Nets 


Dip or Roll 

Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


No. Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 




S 




$ 


1 


$ 

60 




$ 




$ 




S 


1 
2 

2 
3 


$ 

50 
1,600 

1,900 

225 
2,100 


1 
6 

2 


50 






2 
4 

2 

13 
2 
10 

15 

14 


2,500 
2,000 

400 

4.300 
1,800 
2,500 

5,650 

7,000 














1,625 






















300 












































3 


4 


750 
































































2,100 
2.500 


75 
125 






3 

4 


540 
2,600 


1 
•3 


100 


















1,450 




















1 i 


62 26,150 


1 


60 






4,600 


200 






18 


9,015 


17 


4,275 



during the year 1921, in the Public Waters of Lake Superior. 















s 




« 


















Ih 




■a 






















"0 


V 
















o 




S 


d 






































"2 




« 


n 


































O 


ai 

o 


(3 


1 


o 


<u 


"a 



lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 

7,299 
7,949 

46,235 

3,250 
1,500 


lbs. 


No. 


lbs. 


$ c. 
7,094 91 




















69,812 66 


532 










5,462 








9,127 07 








300 










2,383 75 


















33 169 50 


4,468 


















6,977 66 


20,775 














140 
25 






171,802 50 


330 












3,940 
2,786 




15.504 


15,175 29 


200 












59,716 54 






















26,305 






300 




5,462 


72,959 


165 




15,504 


375,259 88 












S c. 

3,156 60 


S 0. 


S c. 


$ c. 

18 00 


$ c. 


% c. 
218 48 


S c. 

2,918 36 


$ c. 

165 00 


$ c. 


S c. 
930 24 


S c. 
375,259 88 



THE EEPOET UPOX 



Xo. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, the 

industry during the year 1921, in the Public 





District 












Fishing material 












Tugs 


Gasoline Launches 


Sail or Row Boats Gill-Nets 




No. 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men Yards 


Value 


1 


Lake Huron, North Channel. 
Bruce Alines, St. Joseph's 






S 




1 
5 

6 

7 

1 
10 
15 
3 
5 
3 


$ 

250 
2,950 

4,200 
2,950 

800 

5,940 

11,025 

3,200 

4,650 

1,640 


2 
13 

16 
14 

23 

26 

6 

8 
5 


6 
14 

13 
15 

1 

4 

6 

1 

13 

10 


S 

310 
800 

1,520 
985 

50 

290 

24& 


Si 11,375 
17| 27,516 

1 
ll! 11,360 
13 S.-i . 940 


865 


? 












3,835 


3 
4 


Algoma Mills, Blind River, 
Pecard and Spragge 


1 
1 

4 

3 

4 


24 
27 

90 

64 

89 


7,000 
3,500 

28,000 

12,000 

37,000 


6 
3 

20 

17 

20 


1,554 
3,952 


5 
6 

7 
8 


Mississauga Sts., Cockburn, 
and Duck Islands 

Providence, South Bays, and 
Fitzwilliam Island 

Killarney, Squaw Island and 
Wekwemikong Bay 

Manitowaning and Sheguin- 


2 
6 
6 

o 


99,600 

206,500 

191,800 

2,000 

40,500 
146.450 


5,250 

20,775 

35,215 

200 


9 
10 


Little Current, Kagawong, 

and .Mindemoya 

Gore Bay, Meldrum Bay and 


3 
5 


59 
153 


10.000 
40.700 


13 
23 


685| 7 
490 i 6 


2,505 
16,745 




Totals 








21 


506 


138,200 


102 


56 


37,605 


113 


83 


5,453 


78 


771,041 


90,896 



Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caught 



District 






t' 



»•= 



-■3 



o o 






1 
? 


Lake Huron, North Channel. 
Bruce Mines, St. Joseph's Island 


lbs. 
100 


lbs. 
100 


lbs. 
50 


lbs. 

1,801 
35,529 

27,879 
4,293 

58.800 

19,535 
331,190 

27,351 
103,178 

55.440 


lbs. 

800 
500 

2,75i 
56 

1,000 


lbs. 

7,059 
61,776 

24,817 
7,534 

464,731 

399,613 

260,677 

19,347 

60 ,.813 

282,847 


lbs. 

7.733 
11,157 

24,813 
27,097 


lbs. 

1,315 
5,873 


3 


Algoma Alills, Blind River, Pe- 





7,235 
11,579 




67,455 


4 




540 


39,411 


5 


Mississauga Straits, Cockburn 




6 


Providence, South Bays and Fitz- 






600 
100 


6,008 
21,158 

2,116 
33.108 

1,514 


209 


7 


Killarney, Squaw Island and 






16,667 


8 


Manitowaning and Sheguindah 






4,726. 


9 


Little Current, Kagawong and 


265 


4,781 
39 




1,500 


23,686 


10 


Gore Bay, Meldrum Bay and 


1,377 




Totals 








905 


23,734 


2,250 


664,996 


5,110 


1,589,214 


134,704 


160,719- 




Values 






$ c. 
45 25 


$ c. 
1,186 70 


$ c. 
225 00 


$ c. 
66,499 60 


$ c. 
511 00 


$ c. 
158,921 40 


$ c. 
6,735 20 


« c. 
16„071 90 



1922 



GAME AXD FISHEKIES. 



51 



FISHERIES 

quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the fishing 
Waters of Lake Huron, North Channel. 











Fishing material 

















ther fixtures used in 
fishing 


Seines Pound Nets Hoop Nets 


Dip or Roll , Night Lines 
Nets 


Spears 


Freezers and; Piers and 
Ice Houses [ Wharves 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value No. 


Value 


No. 


Value No. 
Hooks. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. Value 






$ 


1 
15 

27 

30 

16 

1 

32 

14 

34 


S 

500 
6,600 

13,900 

14,900 

14,900 

600 

20,500 

7,000 

Ifi PflO 


2 
3 

5 


S 

60 
115 

265 




$ 




$ 


• 


S 


4 


$ 

.S60 


2 400 




















5 1.700 


4 800 




















5 

8 

1 


2,900 

1,650 

400 


5 5,500 




















51 3,300 
























1| 500 
















4,500| "."^n 
































1 


500 
200 


1 
1 


500 
























1 


1.500 
























5 1,265 
4 1,300 


7 1.400 








24 15.000 


















4 3,100 












1 














' i 194!ll0,800' lOl 440 . . . J 4,500' 750 






34 10.275 


30 17,000 



during the year 1921, in the Public Waters of Lake Huron, North Channel. 



a 
o 

3 

So 






1 

"a 


Catfish 


Carp 

_ __ . 


Mixed and 
coarse fish 


Caviare 

1 


IS 




9 

_3 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 

650 
764 

1.561 
1.922 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 

50 

4.187 

2.701 
2.983 


lbs. 

3.000 
34.478 

199.035 
65.787 


lbs. 


No. 


lbs. 


$ c. 

1,673 15 


394 














12,580 65 


3,571 




500 




155 
61 






22.425 34 


3,293 




200 






10,461 32 












52,353 10 








49,661 




16,703 
450 
23,035 
58,199 
10,913 








46,219 28 


369 




571 

695 

3.880 

1.820 


3.692 


806 


19 






62,381 46 


132 










6,241 04 


3,702 




40 

177 


30 
60 








23,762 40 


1,442 










35,065 77 
















12,903 




11,863 


50,161 


4.109 


10.817 


411,600 


235 






273,163 51 










S c. 
1,548 36 


$ c. 


$ c. 

949 04 


S c. 

3.009 66 


S c. 

328 72 


$ 0. 

432 68 


S c. 

16,464 00 


S c. 

235 00 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
273,163 51 



53 



THE KEPORT UPON 



Xo. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, 

fishing industry during the year 1921, 





District 


Fishing material 




Tugs 


Gasoline Launches 


Sail or Row Boats 


Gill-Nets 




No. 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


Yards 


Value 


1 


Georgian Bay 
Parry Sound 


5 
1 
3 
1 


164 
24 
66 
20 


$ 

27,000 
8,000 

12,000 
4,000 


27 
5 

14 
4 


19 
20 
26 
15 


17,825 

9,620 

27,750 

13,875 


42 
34 
59 
31 


18 
29 
12 
12 


% 

1,785 

1,665 

1,150 

980 


32 
38 

8 
14 


417,850 
160,900 
240,920 
115,145 


% 

42,945 
14,610 


2 
3 


Simcoe and Musk oka 

Grey County 


24,698 
11,030 


4 








Total 


10 


274 


51,000 


50 


80 


69,070 


166 


71 


5,680 


92 


934,815 


93,283 



Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caught during 



District 



Georgian Bay 



Parry Sound 

Simcoe and Muskoka . 

3 Grey County 

4 Bruce County 



Totals . 



Values . 



lbs. 



2,750 



2,750 



S c. 

137 50 



lbs. 

3,387, 
19.580 
17,150 
20,885 



lbs. 



2,065 
2,950 



61,002 



$ c. 

3,050 10 



5,015 



S c. 
501 50 



lbs. 

470,880 

57.048 

7,993 

14,494 



550,415 



55,041 50 



lbs. 

900 
8,330 
1,650 
7,100 



17,980 



1 , 798 00 



lbs. 

273,455 

92,316 

289,689 

253,506 



lbs. 



49,455 
36,882 



908,966 



90,896 60 



476 



86,813 



4,340 65 



lbs. 



18,530 
19,979 



42 



38,551 



$ c. 

3,855 10 



1922 



GAME AND FISHEEIES. 



53 



FISHERIES 

the quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
in the Pubhc Waters of Georgian Bay. 



Fishing material 


Other fixtures used in 
fishing 


Seines 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Rip or Roll 

Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 

11 
4 
8 

11 


Value 


I 


100 

1,660 

30 


$ 

25 

1,138 

25 


12 


s 

86,700 


1 
52 


S 

30 
1,240 




$ 


1,500 
9,900 
11,600 
6,900 


S 

32 

5,875 

1,560 

925 




$ 


9 
7 
6 
9 


$ 

6,950 

1,220 

875 

3,360 


$ 

4,225 


10 










1,235 


1 


3 


2,500 










1,425 
















1,600 


12 


1,790 


1,188 


15 


89,200 


53 


1,270 






29,900 


8,392 






31 


12,405 


34 


8,485 















the year 1921 , in the Public Waters of Georgian Bay 



E 




•o 


^^ 




a 




3 






pq 


« 






a 


^^ 












V 




M 


3 


o 


02 


(X, 



lbs. 
1 469 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 

2,006 
11,313 


lbs. 

2,600 
66,214 


lbs. 

12,173 

121,441 

600 

4,096 


lbs. 


No. 


lbs. 


$ c 

80,148 78 


1,055 




3,385 

50 

1,000 


1,800 
10,370 
70,150 


20 






29,959 54 






31,440 90 


105 




500 


13 








33,088 21 












2,629 




4,435 


82,320 


13,819 


68,727 


138,310 


20 






174,637 43 




$ c. 




f c. 

315 48 


$ c. 


$ c. 

354 80 


S c. 
4.939 20 


S c. 

1.105 52 


$ c. 

2,749 08 


$ c. 

5,532 40 


$ c. 

20 00 


$ c. 


$ c. 

174,637 43 













54 



THE REPORT UPON 



Xo. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, 

fishing industrj' during the year 1921, 





District 


Fishing material 




Tug3 


Gasoline Launches 


Sail or Row Boats 


GUI-Nets 




No. 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 


M^n 


No. 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


Yards 


Value 


1 


Lake Huron {Proper) 


5 


110 


$ 

20,000 


2S 


13 
11 

22 


$ 

9,800 
7,375 

10,050 


27 
22 

43 


10 


1,790 


13 


347,460 


S 

.•^■2.080 


? 


Huron County 




87,200; 14.200 


3 


Lambton(including St. Clair 
River) . . . 








20 


1,345 


16 








Totals 
















5 


110 


20.000 


28 


46 


27,225 


92 


30 


3,135 


29 


434,660 


46,280 



Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caught 



District 







-0 






-a 




1 


•s 




"i 


"m 




t 


























^ 


C3 


c 


t£ 


(S 


CS 






9 


s 












3 












K 




^ 


^ 


E- 



Lake Huron {Proper) 



Bruce County , 

Huron County 

Lambton (including St. 
River) 



Clair 



Totals . 



Values . 



lbs. 



lbs. 



4,400i 22,244 
10,604 



lbs 
6,350 



lbs. 
26,998 



1,700 71,043 



6,100 



$ c. 

305 00 



103,891 6,350 



43,145 



70,143 



lbs. I 

11,595 
500 



lbs. 



lbs. 



12,095 



$ c. : 

5.194 55 



$ c. ! $ c. S c. $ c. i $ c 

635 007.014 30il,209 50 67,808 20 353 35 



585,945 1,099 
82,911 3,000 



9,226 2,968 



678,082 7,067 



lbs. 



645 
250 



124,328 



125.223 



$ 



1922 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



55 



FISHERIES 

the quantity and value of aU fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
in the Public Waters of Lake Huron. (Properj 











Fishinfe material 














Other fixtures used in 
fishing 


Seines 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip or Roll 
Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 




S 




2 


$ 

600 




S 




$ 




$ 




$ 


13 

7 

12 


S 

3,075 
725 

2,440 


8 


% 

1,090 


























7 


810 


fil.T 


64 


.-^fi .=>7.=i 


2 


100 














2 


250 






















7 


810l 615 


66l 37,175 


2 


100 














32 


6.240' lol 1,340 



during the year 1921, in the Public Waters of Lake Huron. (Proper) 



E 




■o 


"S 


13 


3 


d 


a 


n 




c 












M 


^ 






3 


c^ 



lbs. 
28 


lbs. 


lbs. 

4,634 
109,509 

12.993 


lbs. 

112,773 
8,275 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 

547 
13,810 

87,568 


lbs. 


No. 


lbs. 


« c. 

71.702 79 














18,855 92 


8,260 




481 


3,518 


4,713 




546 


31.913 77 








8,288 




127,136 


121,048 


481 


3,518 


101,925 


4,713 




546 


122.472 48 








$ c. 

994 56 


$ c. 


S c. 

10,170 88 


$ c. 

7,262 88 


$ c. 

38 48 


$ c. 

140 72 


S c. 

4.077 00 


$ c. 

4.713 00 


$ c. 


8 c. 

32 76 


$ c 

122,472 48 



56 



THE REPOET UPON 



No. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, 

fishing industry during the year 1921, 





District 












Fishing material 












Tugs Gasoline Launches 


Sail or Row Boats 


Gill-Nets 




No. 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 


Men No. 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


Yards 


Value 


1 


Lake St. Clair, Etc. 
Kent County (Including 






$ 




34 

28 

1 


$ 

16,040 

10,395 

150 


40 

24 

2 


55 
34 
21 


S 

4,405 

4,640 

595 


63 
22 
36 




$ 


9 
















3 


















Totals 






















63 


26,585 


66 


110 


9,640' 121 






Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caught 



District 







"V 








•o 


-c 












tS 


£ 


T3 
































4 


Xi 


"3 




c 


tn 


w 


to 
















•E 








3 


3 


1 


K 


J3 


% 


O 





1 


Lake St. Clair, etc. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 
34,123 
14,922 

5,950 


lbs. 
26,102 









300 
25 




2,200 
200 






10,096 


^ 










1,400 




Total 














325 




2,400 






54,995 


37,598 




Values 












$ c. 


$ c. 
16 25 


$ c. 


$ c. 
240 00 


S c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 
2,749 75 


$ c. 
3,759 80 



1922 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



FISHERIES 

the quantity and value of all fi.shing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
in the Public Waters of Lake St. Clair, etc. 



Fishing material 



Other fixtures used in 
fishing 



Seines 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip or Roll 
Nets 


Night Lines ' 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


A'alue 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


31 


4,802 
2,225 
3,227 


$ 

4,205 
1,500 
1,962 




$ 


131 

87 


$ 

15,510 
10,725 




$ 


300 

1,100 

600 


S 

30 
155 




$ 


35 
19 


S 

9,675 
8,775 


26 

7 


S 

6,350 


8 


6 


2,125 






1 


300 


875 


'>o 


1 


2 


55 




























64 


10,254 


7,667 


6 


2,125 


218 


26,235 


1 


2I 2,000l 240l 1 


300 


54 


18,450 


33 


7,225 



during the year 1921, in the Public Waters of Lake St. Clair, etc. 















c 




























1 


? 
















•0 




pa 


n 




e 


a 




1 








0. 



B 

■H 







5 


■3 

s 



> 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 
89,004 
41,650 
650 


lbs. 


lbs. 
41,890 
24,458 

1,210 


lbs. 

182,368 

68,109 

66,240 


lbs. 

269,239 

152,356 

16,478 


lbs. 


No. 


lbs. 


$ c. 

32,852 15 


10 320 




3,741 
60 






21,077 34 


1 , .565 






160 


4,173 67 








11,885 




131,304 




67,558 


316,717 


438,073 


3,801 




160 


58,103 16 


S c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


S c. 


S c. 


$ c. 


S c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


1,426 20 




10,504 32 




5,404 64 


12,668 68 


17,522 92 


3,801 00 




9 60 


58,103 16 



.58 



THE REPORT UPON 



Xo. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, 

fishing industry during the year 1921, 



District 



Fishing material 



Tugs 



No. 



Ton- 
nage 



Value 



Men 



Gasoline Launches Sail or Row Boats 



No. 



Value 



Men 



No. Value 



Men 



Gill-Nets 



Yards 



Value 



Lake Erie 



Essex County , 

Kent County 

Elgin County 

Norfolk County 

Haldimand( including Grand 

River) 

Welland County (including 

upper Niagara River) .... 



101 
123 
793 
221 

198 



Totals . 



1,436 



S 

32,000 

24,400 

216,964 

45,500 

53,600 



372,464 



18 

13 

141 

47 



$ 
35,130 
44,750 
13,225 
15,395 

8,400 

1 , 200 



139 

82 
77 

32 

7 



$ 
4,785 
4,822 
3,031 
5,725 

5,250 

800 



126, 

85, 

741, 

302, 

229, 

17, 



$ 

12,838 

6,815 

100,030 

29,779 

24,100 

1,475 



263 



155 



118,100 



423 



200 



24,413 



154 



1,502,500 



175,037 



Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caught during 



District 



Lake Erie 



Essex County 

Kent County 

Elgin County 

Norfolk County 

Haldimand County (including 

Grand River) 

Welland County (iricluding upper 

Niagara River) 



Totals . 



Values . 



lbs. 



$ c. 





















s 


o 
















3 


3 




u 


O 


^ 


H 


E- 


£ 



lbs. 



37,413 
203,861 
1,129,730 1,851 
2,351,442 



lbs. 



1,479,7141 
23,140 



5,225,300 



$ c. $ 
261,265 00 185 10 



1,851 



lbs. 

247,634 

72,803 

200,838 

100,561 

335,433 

7,379 



964,648 



$ c. , 
96,464 80 



lbs. 



% c. 



lbs. 



391 
246 



637 



$ c. 

63 70 



lbs. 

5,137 

758 

2,650 

84 , 722 

945 

2,480 



96,692 



$ c. 
4,834 60 



lbs. 

80,330 

119,925 

89,159 

6,093 

14,654 

860 



311,021 



31,102 10 



1922 



GAME AXI) FISHERIES. 



59 



FISHERIES 

the quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
in the Public Waters of Lake Erie. 







FLshing materia 






Other fixtures used in 
fishing 


Seines 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip or Roll 
Nets 


Night 


Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and; Piers and 
Ice Houses | Wharves 


No. Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


10 


2,675 
1,675 


S 

2,530 
950 


202 

223 

127 

12 

58 

6 


S 

117,100 

193.900 

78,350 

8,500 

30.300 

3,000 


10 


$ 

5.025 




$ 


725 


$ 

85 




$ 


-28 
41 
25 
17 

11 

2 


18,525 


9 


S 

2,400 


5 


3 
3 

9 


10 
15 

142 

77 






79,900' 24 
28,305 12 


8,850 








1,570 
700 

600 

4.200 


629 
413 

300 

180 






fi SQ.-I 


31 


11,900 
640 


8,115 
955 


22 


475 






9,500j 15 i'.T^Ct 


5 






1 
5,000i 6 


1,260 












150 






















51 16.890 


12,550 


628 


431,150 


32 


5,500 


21 


244 


7,795 


1,607 






124 


141,380 66 


23,533 





























the year 1921. in the Public Waters of Lake Erie. 



o 
So 




(U 







c. 

u 


1* 


2 



1 

s 

S 


3 


"5 
£ 

1 

c 



s 
[3 


lbs. 


lbs. ' lbs. 
14,4.55' .'^90.270 


lbs. 


lbs. 

11.541 

6 

21,916 

10,850 

457 

812 


lbs. 

69,046 

36,416 

928 

147,638 

51,817 

39,582 


lbs. 

516,315 

272,147 

61,099 

114,925 

106 , 200 

850 


lbs. 


No. 


lbs. 

457,192 
2.533,984 
2,504,136 

376,180 

453. 386 
41.676 


$ c 

119 .360 24 






784,573 
500,671 
179.877 






256 651 63 






68 






280.344 08 




29 






180.847 08 




1 
10 91,126 

610 18,381 








149,917 73 










7 819 18 
















15,104: 1,964,898 


68' 45,582 


345.427 


1,071,536 






6.366.554 


994,939 94 










f c. 


$ c. 

1,510 40 


S c. 

157,191 84 


$ c. 8c. 
4 08 3. 648 .56 


$ e. 
13,817 08 


8 p. 

42,861 44 


8 c. 


8 c. 


8 c. 

381,993 24 


8 c. 

994 939 94 

















60 



THE REPORT UPON 



So. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fi.shermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, the 

industrj- during the year 1921, in the Public 







Fishing material 




District 


Tugs 


Gasoline Launches 


Sail or Row Boats 


Gill-Nets 




No. 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 


Men 


No. Value 


Men 


No. 1 Value 

1 


Men 


Yards 


Value 


1 


Lake Ontario. 






$ 




16 
5 
13 
2 
12 
15 
22 
29 
84 
69 

11 

12 


$ 

6,505 

3,200 

7,500 

1,200 

5.075 

5,750 

13.000 

12,650 

33,255 

24,000 

2,800 
3,675 


27 

10 

20 

5 

18 

27 

44 

53 

160 

138 

17 
17 


7 

6 

4 

1 

7 

3 

1 

14 

101 

144 

3 
31 


$ 

305 

400 

180 

35 

550 

70 

100 

895 

3.925 

7.897 

150 
1.231 


16 

9 

7 

3 

9 

3 

2 

24 

161 

237 

4 
41 


53,050 

43,200 

78 , 500 

12,000 

41,500 

63,800 

154,500 

124,800 

468,595 

418,450 

67,600 
42,000 


S 

6,805 


•> 












5,885 


s 












1 1 , 080 


4 


Peel County 










1,700 


5 












8,468 


6 












5,570 




Durham County 










15,265 


8 












13,300 


9 












49,241 


10 












36 , 225 


11 


Lennox and Addington . . . 










5,504 


1? 


Frontenac County 










4,220 




Totals 




















290 


118.610 


536 


322 


15,7.38 


516 


1,567,995 


163,263 

















Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caught 



District 







T3 


■o 




2 




























^ 


.£ 








tn 


ui 


tn j 


a 






■c 


■j^ 


-i-» 1 








B 




^ J 



Lake Ontario. 



Lincoln County 

Wentworth County 

Halton County 

Peel County 

York County 

I Ontario County 

Durham County 

Northumberland County 

9 Prince Edward County 

10, Bay of Quinte 

11 Lennox and Addington Counties 

12 Frontenac County. 



Totals . 



Values . 



lbs. 



500 

1.025 

350 



15 



2,186 



lbs. 

45.470 

25.400 

63.727 

6.000 

16.166 

961 

1.000 

10.305 

271.327 

562.860 

7.909 

3.294 



1.014.419 



So. S c. 

109 30 50.720 95 



lbs. 



3,868 
5,920 



10.488 



lbs. 

21.852 

29.200 

38.171 

4,000 

60.742 

86.161 

188.620 

217,842 

734.179 

626.654 

121,005 

28.560 



2.156,5 



lbs. 



400 
495 



200 

1,000 

40 

26.311 

257 



840 



29.543 



lbs. 

104 , 308 
9,350 
29,910 
46,000 
11,425 
3,493 
19,230 
49,999 

184.730 
16.914 
34.219 
19.715 



529,302 



S c. $ c. $ c. $ c. S c. $ c. 

1,048 80 215.698 602,954 30)52.930 20 11.657 15 7.330 -50 



lbs. 



550 
200 



320 



21,950 

39,. 301 

144,203 

1,500 

24,655 



233,143 



lbs. 
150 



100 

1,959 

66,231 

1,700 

2,340 



73,305 



1922 



GAME AXD FISHEEIES. 



61 



FISHERIES 

quantit}' and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the fishing 
Waters of Lake Ontario. 



Fishing material 


Other fixtures used in 
fishing 


Seines 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip or Roll 
Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


5 


516 


S 

500 




$ 




S 




S 


1,200 


$ 

345 




% 


2 

1 
2 


$ 

250 

1.000 

250 




% 
























? 


466 
75 
650 
300 
400 


266 




...:...i .- 
















7 
1 


1,466 


f, 


100 






















300 




640 
405 
200 














300 


7 












3 


















6 


875 




































. 


26 

148 
408 

2 
117 


1,636 

5,270 

12,785 

80 
4,145 






1,200 
5,468 


30 

487 






5 
32 


225 
4 . 285 


1 

7 


300 




225 

7 


125 
10 














630 












4,7901 151 






8 li285 6 


250 












300 
2,700 


8 














10 


25 










71 






8 i.356 


7 


910 


















21 


2,583 


2.205 


i 


701 


23,310 . . .. 


15,958' 1,099!... J 


64 9,520 29' 3,790 



during the" year 1921, in the Public Waters of Lake Ontario. 



Sturgeon 




Perch 


Eh 


■g 

"S 



& 

6 









a 

m 

a 


3 


3 

s 
1 




1 
> 


lbs. 
1,464 


lbs. 
849 


lbs. 

2,145 
1,125 


lbs. 


lbs. 
74 


lbs. 
8,250 


lbs. 

13,317 

1,475 

13,836 

17,200 

12,945 

5,884 

3,563 

43,259 

71,011 

200,308 


lbs. 
103 


No. 


lbs. 
8,824 


i c. 

16 856 42 






5.396 50 










1,895 
4,000 
9,656 
1,011 
500 






166 


10 721 49 
















6 158 00 




1.200 














9 049 04 




76 




654 






502 


9 413 77 












21 097 52 




4,775 
22,285 
53,654 

2,280 
27,183 


3,100 
6,705 

61,. 348 
140 

12,633 




3.100 

38,148 

120,396 

30 

21,227 






8.700 


31,661 71 


324 


475 


19,310 

11,875 

225 

6,145 






120,162 41 








4,908 


135 683 47 








16,413 45 






33.052 








13 608 68 












1,798 


112,226 


87,272 


475 


183,629 


62,867 


415.850 


103 




23,034 


396,222 46 


$ c. 

215 76 


% c. 

11,222 60 


$ c. 

6.981 76 


$ c. 

28 50 


S c. 

14,690 32 


$ c. 

2,514 68 


« c. 

16,634 00 


$ c. 

103 00 


S c. 


S c. 
1,382 04 


$ c. 
396,222 46 



62 



THE KEPOKT FPOX 



No. 14 



ONTARK 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boati 

fishing industry during the year 192: 





1 
2 
3 

4 

5 

6 

8 


District 


Fishing Material 




Tugs Gasoline Launches 


Sail or Row 


Boats 


Gill-nets 




No. 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


Yards 


Val 


1 

2 


Inland iValers 






$ 






$ 




27 
10 

23 

50 

22 
10 


$ 

895 
325 

444 

968 

525 
500 


44 
12 

5 

40 

33 

8 




S 


3 


Lanark and Leeds Counties. 
Grenville, Dundas, Stormont 










41 

15 

9 

6 
5 

4 

6 


13,430 

1,800 

1,750 

1,375 
2,950 
3,025 

4,000 


54 

15 

10 

9 
17 
11 

15 






4 
5 














6 
7 
8 
9 


Prescott, Russell, Carleton 

and Renfrew Counties . . . 

Peterborough and Victoria 


3 


9 


5,400 


6 


2,802 


5. 


10 
















11 
















12 


Temiskaming and Nipissing 










13 


1,150 


11 


25,150 


5,3( 




Totals 














3 


9 


5, 400 6 


86 


28,330 


131 


155 


4,807 


153 


27,952! 5,9< 



Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caugl 



District 







-3 
o 


^ 








"O 










































03 


£ 


jZ 


4 


"3 






ti 


ti 


■j: 




■^^ 




.2 


2 


■^ 


.ti 


3 


3 










JS, 


O 


o 




o 


^ 


^ 


^ 


H 


H 


Pik 



Inland WaUrs 



and 



Frontenac County 

Lanark and Leeds Counties. . . . 
Grenville, Dundas, Stormont 

Glengarry Counties 

Prescott, Russell, Carleton and Ren 

frew Counties 

Peterborough and Victoria Counties.. 

Lake Simcoe 

Lake Nipissing 

Temiskaming and Nipissing Districts 



Totals . 



« c. $ c. , 

Valuea 17 50 1 , 183 90 



lbs. 



350 



350 



lbs. 



lbs. 



2,500 



11,999 
9,179 



200 



lbs. 



2,013 
22,621 
23,504 



23,678 



2001 48,138 



lbs. 



100 



100 



8 c. $ c. 

20 0014,813 80l 



lbs. 



9,289 



1,519 



10,808 



$ c 

10 00 1,080 80 



lbs. 



19,208 
5,992 



800 



6,635 
10,751 



30,577 
45,305 



119,268 



$ c. 
5,963 40 



lbs 



2,21 



99,37 
47, 2C 



148, SC 



$ c 

14,880 C 



1022 



GAME AND FISHEEIES. 



6;-5 



FISHERIES 

the quantity and value of all fi.shing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
in Inland Waters. 











Fishing Material 














Other fixtures used in 
fishing 


Seines 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip or Roll 
Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharv.^. 


Xo. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


\alue 


No. 
Hooks. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


8 


80 
60 


$ 

310 
300 




$ 


72 
100 

1 

79 

95 
7 


$ 

3,. 390 
3,720 

35 

1,642 

2,320 
95 




$ 


600 
2,900 

3,585 

6,825 


S 

21 
185 

86 

167 




$ 


2 


S 

270 




$ 


3 
























1 

1 

9 
S 


2 
2 

24 
50 






3 
32 

4 


300 
990 
250 


1 


100 


















f, 


218 
1,900 


416 
3,850 














8 










115 


701 


105 3,828 
2 1,450 

6 1,950 


3 
3 

1 


1,.500 




17 
10 


6,400 
2,800 






1,500 










31 690 














300 




















25 


2,258 4,876 


27 


9,200 


385 11.892 


19 


78 


13,910-' 459 


115 


701 


154 9,038 


8 


3,400 



during the year 1921, in Inland Waters. 



c 
c 








Catfish 




Mixed and 
Coarse Fish 


0) 


il 






lbs. 


lbs. 

10,621 
10,444 

3,008 

3,964 
8,445 


lbs. 

5,685 
2,220 

50 

11,6.33 
2,703 


lbs. 


lbs. 

31.815 
45.460 

1,225 

16.S27 
36,347 


lbs. 
1,500 


lbs. 

54,911 
39,805 

300 


lbs. 


No. 


lbs. 


7.278 94 


1 510 










6,931 80 


7 956 




1,100 

4,185 

2.400 

2.50,521 


46 






1,499 .")2 






42..S93 20 
51 ,.5051 




100 


5.135 ti- 




ll, 790 K5 






.'■|3.143 
14.400 
43,049 


"1,857 






l.{.276 76 


59,813 










••:i,930 fm 






173 


500 










11.760 60 












69,279 


36,482 


22.46-1 


500 


131.674 


259,706 


300,096 


1,923 




100 


76,613 20 


$ r. 
^.313 48 


$ c. 

3,648 20 


S c. 

1,797 12 


$ r, 

30 00 


S c. 

10,533 92 


» c. 

10.388 24 


? p. 
12,003 ai 


% c. 
1,923 00 


t c. 


S c. 
6 00 


76,613 20 



64 



THE REPOET UPOX 



Xo. 14 



ONTARIO 

Recapitulation of tlie number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats 

fishing industry 





Districts. 




Fishing 


material 






Tugs 


Gasoline Launches 


Sail or Row Boats 


Gill-Nets 




No. 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


Yards 


Value 


1 


Kenora and Rainy River 


7 
21 
21 
10 

5 


96 
576 
506 
274 
110 


S 

18,000 
96,500 
1.38,200 
51,000 
20,000 


17 

113 

102 

50 

28 


103 
45 
56 
80 
46 
63 
155 
290 
86 


$ 

43,930 
34,270 
37,605 
69,070 
27,225 
26,585 
118,100 
118,610 
28,330 


1.54 

98 

113 

166 

92 

66 

423 

536 

131 


90 
48 
83 
71 
30 
110 
200 


$ 

5,180 
3,490 
5,453 
5,. 580 
3,135 
9,640 
•>4.413 


42 

57 

78 

92 

29 

121 

154 

516 

153 


214.735 
728,185 
771,041 
9.34,815 
434.660 


$ 
37,329 


■> 




97 , 870 


3 
4 


Lake Huron(North Channel) 


90.896 
93.283 


5 

6 


Lake Huron (Proper) 

Lake 8t. Clair dtc 


46,280 






49 


1,436 372 464 


263 


1.. 502, 500 175,037 


8 








.322 15.738 


1,567,995 163,263 


9 


Inland Waters 

Total.s 


3 


9 


5,400 


6 


155 


4,807 


27,9.52' 5,901 




116 


3,007 


701,564 


579 


924 


503,725 


1.779 1.109 


77.436 


1.242 


6,181.883 709.8.59 











Recapitulation of the kind.s, quantities and values 



Districts. 



Kenora and Rainy 
River Districts 

Lake Superior 

Lake Huron (North 
Channel) 

Georgian Bay 

Lake Huron (Proper) . . 

Lake St. Clair etc 

Lake Erie 

I^ake Ontario 

Inland Waters 



lbs. 



276,535 

905 
2,750 
6,100 



Tot.als . 



2.186 
3.50 



288,826 



A'niuos 11 



lbs. 



424,826j 

23,734! 

61,002 

103,891 

325 

5, 225,. 300 

1,014,419 

23,678 



6,877,175 



S c. S 

Ml 30 343,858 75 



lbs. 

700 
200 

2,2.50 
5,015 
6,. 350 

l^Soi 

10,488 

200 



27,0.54 



$ c. 

2,705 40 



384 , 664 
1,497,289 

664,996 

5.50,415 

70,143 

2.400 

964 , 648 

2,1.56,986 

48,1.38 



6,339,679 



633.967 90 



lbs. 

978 
91,224 

5,110 
17,980 
12,095 



29,543 
100 



157,030 



lbs. 

80,342 
1,512,942 

1,589,214 
908,966 
678,082 



637 

529,302 

10,808 



5,310,293 



$0. S 

15,703 001531,029 30 



lbs. 

451,170 
53,977 

134,704 

86.813 

7,067 

.54. 995 

96,692 

233,143 

119,268 



1,237,829 



$ c. $ 

61,891 45 206.660 



lbs. 



972, 
199, 

160, 
.38, 

125, 
37, 

311, 
73, 

148, 



177 
208 

719 
551 
223 
.598 
021 
305 
800 



2,066,602 



20 



1922 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



65 



FISHERIES 

the quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
during the year 1921. 













Fishing material 












Other fixtures used in 
fishing 


Seines 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip 


or Roll 

Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 






$ 


54 
62 

194 

15 

66 

6 

628 


S 

15,750 
26,150 

110,800 

89,200 

37,175 

2.125 

431,150 


43 

1 

10 

53 

2 

218 

32 

701 

385 


$ 

2,730 

60 

440 

1,270 

100 

26,235 

5,500 

23,310 

11,892 




$ 




$ 




S 


89 
18 
34 
31 
32 
54 

124 
64 

154 


$ 

24,245 
9,015 

10.275 

12,405 
6,240 

18,450 

141,380 

9,520 

9,038 


68 
17 
30 
34 
10 
33 
66 
29 
8 


$ 

13,350 












4,600 

4,500 

29,900 


200 

750 

8,392 






4,275 
















17,000 


^'> 


1,790 
810 
10,254 
16,890 
2,583 
2,258 


1,188 
615 
7,667 
12,550 
2,205 
4,876 










8,485 


7 










1,340 


64 
51 


21 


2 

244 


2,000 

7,795 

15,958 

13,910 


240 
1,607 
1,099 

459 


1 


300 


7,225 
23,533 


?1 






3.790 


25 


27 


9,200 


19 


78 


115 


701 


3,400 


180 


34,585 


29,101 


1,052 


721,550 


1,445 


71, 537 


41 


324 


78, 663 


12, 747 


116 


1,001 


600 


240, 568 


295 


82, 398 



of fish caught during the year 1921. 



s 
o 

u 

3 

So 


"ej 


1 




CC 

o 


c. 

o 


Mixed and 
coarse fish 


Caviare 


Pickerel (Blue) 


a) 

3 

> 


lbs. 

1,842 
26.305 


lbs. 


lbs. 
7,865 


lbs. 

116,654 
300 

50,161 
82,320 
121,048 

68 

475 
500 


lbs. 
51,062 

4,109 

13,819 

481 

67,558 

45,582 

183,629 

131,674 


lbs. 

7,585 
5,462 

10,817 

68,727 

3,518 

316,717 

345,427 

62,867 

259,706 


lbs. 

166,408 
72,959 

411,600 
138,310 
101,925 
4.38,073 
1,071,536 
415,850 
300,096 


lbs. 

25 
165 

235 

20 

4,713 

3,801 

ios 

1,923 


lbs. 
""151504 


$ C. 

185,363 76 
375,259 88 


12 903 




11.863 

4.435 

127.136 

131,304 

1,964.898 

87,272 

22,464 


273,163 51 


2 629 




174,637 43 


8,288 


546 


122.472 48 


11,885 


' isiioi 

112,226 
36,482 


160 58,103 16 
6,366,554 994,939 94 


1,798 
69,279 


23,034 396,222 46 
100 76,613 20 


134,929[ 163,812 


2,357,237 


371,526 


497,914 


1,080.826 3,116,757 


10,985 


6,405,898 2,656,775 82 


$ c. $ c. 
16,191 4816.381 20 


S c. 

188,578 96 


$ c. 

22,291 56 


S e. 

39,833 12 


$ c. $ c. 
43,233 04 124,670 28 


$ c. 

10,985 00 


$ c. 

384,. 353 88 2,656.775 82 



(j<\ 



THE EEPOET UPON 



Xo. 14 



Comparative Statement of yield for 1920-21,^ according to Districts 



1920 



1921 



Increase 



Decrease 



Kenora and Rainy River Districts: 

Herring, Salted lbs 

Herring, Fresh 

Whitefish, Salted 

Whitefish, Fresh 

Trout, Salted 

Trout, Fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

TulHbee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse! 

Caviare 

Sturgeon Bladders No 

Pickerel (Blue) lbs. 



Lake Superior: 

Herring, Salted lbs 

Herring, Fresh 

Whitefish, Salted 

Whitefish, Fresh 

Trout, Salted 

Trout, Fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse 

Caviare 

Pickerel (Dore) 

North Channel, Lake Huron: 

Herring, Salted lbs 

Herring, Fresh 

Whitefish, Salted 

Whitefish, Fresh 

Trout, Salted 

Trout, Fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse 

Caviare 



'Georgian Bay: 

Herring, Salted lbs. 

Herring, Fresh " 

Whitefish, Salted " 

Whitefish, Fresh " 



319,400 
398,115 



123,232 

449,457 

649,044 

9,330 



12,277 

129,430 

52,992 

9,441 

191,209 

379 

198 

5,316 



016,601 

1,286,953' 

200 

1,704,733 

145,700 

1,332,428 

15,271 

118.779 

30,607 

20,496 



50 



114,924 

202 
7 , 267 



155 

24 , 173 

552 

902,703 

967 

1,107,771 

68,500 

242,003 

13,804 



700 

384,664 

978 

80,342 

451,170 

972,177 

1,842 



7,865 

116.654 

51,062 

7,585 

166,408 

25 



276,535 

424,826 

200 

1,497,289 

91,224 

1,512,942 

53,977 

199 , 208 

26,305 



300 



8,415 

20,712 

1,730 

17,213 

420,791 

138 



3,650 

49 , 282 

5,900 

445,351 



5,462 

72,959 

165 

15,504 



905 

23,734 

2,250 

664,996 

5,110 

1,589,214 

134,704 

160,719 

12,903 



11,863 

50,161 

4,109 

10,817 

411,610 

235 



2,750 

61,002 

5,015 

550,415 



978 



1,713 
323 , 133 



180,514 
38,706 
80,429 



2.50 
5^462 



8,237 
750 



1,698 



4,143 

481,443 

66,204 



3,448 

29,449 

2,379 



97 



11,720 
105,064 



318,700 
13,451 

'42.890 



7,488 



4,412 

12,776 

1,930 

1,856 

24,801 

354 

198 

5,316 



340,066 
862,127 



207,444 
54,476 



4,302 
20,496 



41,965 
37 



439 

'237JO7' 



81.284 
901 



6,396 
9,181 



900 

885' 



1922 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



Comparative Statement of yield for 1920-1921, according to Districts — Continued. 



Georgian Bay — Continued: 

Trout, Salted lbs 

Trout, Fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse 

Caviare 

Lake Huron (Proper): 

Herring, Salted lbs 

Herring, Fresh 

Whitefish, Salted 

Whitefish, Fresh 

Trout, Salted 

Trout, Fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse 

Caviare 

Pickerel (Blue) 

Lake St. Clair, Etc.: 

Herring, Salted lbs 

Herring, Fresh 

Whitefish, Salted 

"Whitefish, Fresh 

Trout, Salted 

Trout, Fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse 

Caviare 

Pickerel (Blue) 

Lake Erie: 

Herring, Salted lbs 

Herring, Fresh 

Whitofi.sh, Salted 

Whitefish, Fresh 

Trout, Salted 

Trout, Fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) 



1920 



1921 



Increase 



18,400 

972,158 

44,164 

67,307 

2,655 



4,098 
76,274 

2,415 

54.319 

43,383 

30 



7,700 

172,630 

900 

82,194 

56,850 

790.168 

4.995 

139.634 

9,176 



129,157 

206,029 

227 

3,988 

99,056 

649 

2,176 



400 



7,327 



107,576 
26,968 
13,004 



231,621 



141,247 

395,437 

603,136 

526 

400 



9,651,284 

20.000 

818,304 



1.044 
115, 259 
166,013 



17,980 

908,966 

86,813 

38,551 

2,629 



4,435 

82,320 

13,819 

68,727 

138,310 

20 



6,100 

103,891 

6,350 

70,143 

12,095 

678,082 

7,067 

125,223 

8,288 



127,136 

121,048 

481 

3,518 

101,925 

4,713 

546 



325 
2^400 



54,995 
37,598 

11,885 



131,304 



67,558 

316,717 

438,073 

3,801 

160 



5,225,300 

1,851 

964,648 



637 

96,692 

311,021 



Decrease 



42,649 



337 

6,046 

11,404 

14,408 

94,927 



5,450 



2,072 



254 



2,869 
4,064 



10,630 



3,275 



420 
63,192 



28,756 
26 



10 



1,600 
68,739 



12,051 

44.755 

112,086 

i4!4ii' 

888 



2,021 

84,981 

"'476' 



1,630 



75 

4^927" 



52,581 
1,119 



100.317 



73,689 

78,720 

165,063 



240 



146,344 



4.425,984 
18,149 



145,008 ■. 



407 
18,567 



GS 



THE REPOET UPON 



Xo. 14 



Comparative Statement of yield for 1920-21, according to Districts — Continued 



1920 



1921 



Increase 



Decrease 



Lake Erie — Continued: 

Sturgeon lbs 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse 

Pickerel (Blue) 



Lake Ontario: 

Herring, Salted lbs. 

Herring, Fresh 

Whitefish, Salted 

Whitefish, Fresh 

Trout, Salted 

Trout, Fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse 

Caviare 

Sturgeon Bladders No 

Pickerel (Blue) lbs. 

Inland Waters : 

Herring, Salted lbs. 

Herring, Fresh 

Whitefish, Salted 

Whitefish, Fresh 

Trout, Salted 

Trout, Fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse 

Caviare 

Pickerel (Blue) 



267 

38,742 

1,272,181 



42,051 

431,864 

900,491 

3,354,523 



3,650 

1,287,580 

2,950 

2,024,058 

3,350 

458,663 

311,432 

36,551 

500 

91,932 

107,383 

300 

170,215 

65,674 

413.841 

338 

240 

9,842 



400 
39,052 



71,033 
800 

13,578 
107,532 
158,942 
109,628 

26,408 

29,615 



133,358 

130,827 

280,579 

3,482 



15,104 

1,964,898 

68 

45,582 

345,427 

1,071,536 

6,366,554 



2,186 

1,014,419 

10,488 

2,156,986 

29,543 

529,302 

233,143 

73,305 

1,798 

112,226 

87,272 

475 

183, 629 

62,867 

415,850 

103 



23,034 



350 

23,678 

200 

48,138 

100 

10,808 

119,268 

148,800 

69,279 

36,482 

22,464 

500 

131,674 

259,706 

300,096 

1,923 

100 



692,717 

68 

3,531 



171,045 
3,012,031 



7,538 

132,928 

26,193 

70,639 



36,754 

1,298 

20,294 



175 
13,414 

'2^009 



13,192 



200 



11,736 



10,074 
"500 



128,879 
19,517 



100 



267 
23,638 



86,437 



1,464 
273,161 



78,289 



20,111 



2,807 



235 
240 



50 
15,374 



22,895 

700 

2,770 



10,142 
40,349 



7,151 
'1^684' 



1,559 



1922 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



6'J 



Statement of the Yield of the Fisheries of the Province of Ontario for the Year 1921 
AS Furnished bt the Fishermen's Annual Returns 




Herring, Salted lbs 

Herring, Fresh 

Whitefish. Salted " .... 

Whitefish, Fresh " 


288,826 

6,877,175 

27,054 

6,339,679 

157,030 

5,310,293 

1,237,829 

2,066,602 

134,929 

163.812 

2,357,237 

371,526 

497,914 

1,080.826 

3,116,757 

10.985 

6.405.898 


S 05 
05 
10 
10 
10 
10 
05 
10 
12 
10 
08 
06 
08 
04 
04 
1 00 
06 


.? 14,441 30 

343,858 75 

2,705 40 

633,967 90 


Trout, Salted " 

Trout, Fresh " 

Pike " .... 

Pickerel (Dore).... " .... 

Sturgeon " .... 


15,703 00 
531,029 30 

61,891 45 
206,660 20 

16,191 48 


Eels 

Perch " .... 

Tullibee " .... 


16.381 20 

188,578 96 

22,291 56 


Catfish " .... 

Carp " .... 

Mixed and Coarse " .... 


39,833 12 

43,233 04 

124,670 28 


Caviare " . . . . 


10,985 00 


Pickerel (Blue) " .... 


384,353 88 


Totals - 


' ' 2,656,775 82 



CoMP.uiATivE Statement of the Yield of the Fisheries of the Provixpe. 



1920 



1921 



Increase 



Decrease 



Herring, Salted lbs. 

Herring, Fresh " 

Whitefish, Salted " 

Whitefish, Fresh " 

Trout, Salted " 

Trout, Fresh " 

Pike " 

Pickerel (Dore) " 

Sturgeon " 

Eels " 

Perch " 

Tullibee " 

Catfish " 

Carp " 

Mixed and Coarse " 

Caviare " 

Sturgeon Bladders No, 

Pickerel (Blue) lbs. 



Total Pounds 

Total Decrease, Pounds, 1921 



632,156 
12,511.354 

349.902 
6,453,818 

226,067 
4,799,042 
1,224,186 
1.605,241 

188,971 

177,578 
1,794,747 

432,795 

544,235 

1,108.763 

3,067,410 

5,744 

438 

3,379,524 



38.501,533 



288,826 

6.877,175 

27,054 

6.339,679 

157,030 

5,310,293 

1,237.829 

2,066,602 

134,929 

163,812 

2.357,237 

371,526 

497,914 

1,080,826 

3,116,757 

10,985 



6,405,898 



36,444,372 



511,251 

13,643 

461,361 



562,490 



49,347 
5,241 



3,026,374 



343,330 
5,634,179 

322,848 

114,139 

69,037 



54,042 
13,766 



61,269 
46.321 
27.937 



438 



2,057,161 



THE EEPOET UPON 



No. 14 



Value ok Ontario Fisheries from 1901 to 1921 Inclusive. 



Years. Value. 

$ c. 

1901 1,428,078 00 

1902 1,265,705 00 

1903 1,5.35,144 00 

1904 1,793,524 00 

1905 1,708,963 00 

1906 1,734,865 00 

1907 1,935,024 90 

1908 2, 100, 078 63 

1909 2,237,544 41 

1910 2,348,269 57 



Years. Value. 

1911 2,419,178 21 

1912 2,842,877 09 

1913 2,674,686 76 

1914 2,755,293 11 

1915 3,341,181 41 

1916 2,658,993 43 

1917 2,866,424 00 

1918 3,175,110 32 

1919 2,721,440 24 

1920 2,691,093 74 

1921 2,656,775 82 



Statement of the Number and Value of the Tugs, Gasoline, Sail or Row Boats, Nets, 
Spears, etc., Used in the Fishing Industry of the Province of Ontario During the; 
Year 1921. 



Tugs (3,007 tons) 

Gasoline Launches 

Sail or Row Boats 

GUI Nets 

Seines (34,585 yards) . . . 

Pound Nets 

Hoop Nets 

Dip or Roll Nets 

Baited Hooks 

Spears 

Freezers and Ice Houses. 
Piers and Wharves 



Total. 



Number 



116 

924 

1,109 

6,181,883 yards 

180 

1,052 

1,445 

41 

78,663 

116 

600 

295 



Value 



701.564 
503,725 

77,436 
709,859 

29,101 
721,. 5.50 

71,537 
324 

12,747 

1,001 

240,568 

82,398 



3,151,810 



Number of men employed on Tugs 

" " " Gasoline Launches . 

Sail or Row Boats. 



579 
1,779 
1,242 



3,600 



Sixteenth Annual Report 



OF THE 



GAME AND FISHERIES 
DEPARTMENT 

1922 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 
THE^LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




TORONTO: 

Printed and Published by^Clarkson W. James, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 2 3 



PRODUlcD bv 

lUnitcd Press] 

i^ - i - LI ^IT^ II "^rP 

|@,T0R0n>T0(^' 



To His Honour Henry Cockshutt, Esq., 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May It Please Your Honour: 

I have the honour to submit herewith, for the information of Your Honour 
and the Legislative Assembly, the Sixteenth Annual Report of the Game and 
Fisheries Department of this Province. 

I ha\'e the honour to be 

Your Honour's most obedient servant, 

H. Mills, 

Minister of Mines. 
Toronto, 1923. 



SIXTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Game and Fisheries Department of 

Ontario 



To the Honourable H. Mills, 

Minister. 

Sir, — I have the honour to place before you the Sixteenth Annual Report 
of the work of the Game and Fisheries Department for the fiscal year ending the 
31st day of October, 1922. The gross revenue received (aside from the receipts 
from the Sales Branch) amounted to 8737,519.65, and after deducting expendi- 
tures of both capital charges and ordinarv expenses, a net surplus was obtained 
of 8390,167.65. 

Comparative Statemext of Revexue axd Expenditure, 1916-1922 Ixc, 

AS SHOWX IX THE PUBLIC ACCOUNTS. 

Revenue. Expenditure. Surplus. 

1916 8174,186 71 8157,68194 8 16,504 77 

1917 219.442 94 154,055 17 65,387 77 

1918 258,671 62 167.795 22 90,876 40 

1919 346,197 14 185.247 72 160,949 42 

1920 466,550 86 239,978 13 226,572 73 

1921 612,972 86 287,608 87 325,363 99 

1922 737,519 65 347,352 00 390,167 65 

Sales Braxch. 

1922 824,825 39 852,133 05 

The Sales Branch was discontinued during the year. 

Statistics. 

The figures and statements presented herein, furnishing statistics of the 
various branches within the Department, have been carefully prepared and 
provide very interesting and valuable information. 

F'lSH. 

The statistics of the commercial fisheries of the Proxince are shown in 
comparison as follows: — 

1920 1921 1922 

Gill nets licensed (yards) 5,501,827 6,181,883 6,239,582 

Seines " 168 180 186 

Pound nets " 1,080 1,052 1,285 

Hoop nets " 1,442 1,445 1,282 

Dip and Roll nets licensed 29 41 59 

Spears " 122 116 151 

Hooks " 64,330 78,663 85,865 

Number of men employed 3,693 3,600 4,003 

Number of tugs 124 116 101 

Number of gasoline boats 803 924 946 

Number of sail or row boats 1,088 1,109 1,181 

\'alue of boats, ice-houses, wharves and 

twine 83,269,971 00 83,151,810 00 3,352,410 001 

Aggregate catch in pounds 38,501,533 36,444,372 38,022,017 

Value to fishermen 82,691.093 74 82,656,775 82 82,807,525 21 

7 



THE REPORT UPON No. 14 



x^NGLIXG. 

The fee for non-resident angling permits was maintained at $5.00, and all 
residents may angle without permit or charge, except on such territories as are 
legally prohibited. For the waters of Lake Nipigon and Nipigon River a special 
permit is required by both residents and non-residents. The fees collected for 
angling permits for the year amounted to $63,132.00, as compared with 
856,565.00 for the previous year. The reports received from issuers of permits 
and from anglers throughout the province show that game fish of all kinds are 
plentiful and no doubt due credit must be given to the distribution of fry and 
fingerlings by the provincial hatcheries for the past few years. 

Hatcheries. 

Since the year 1918, the Department has completed, equipped and main- 
tained three large and modern hatcheries for the propagation of both commercial 
and game fish, with the result that the distribution of fry and fingerlings has 
correspondingly increased and the public waters are now showing the benefits 
of these expenditures with gratification to the anglers as well as those who are 
catering to the transportation and other needs of the tourist trade. In order 
that this work may be further extended, a most suitable site for a large hatchery 
has been secured in the eastern part of the Province near the town of Picton, in 
Prince Edward county. . The property includes what is known as the "Lake-on- 
the-Mountain," which provides an ample and admirable water supply by gravity. 
This hatchery will fill a long felt need for the supply of game fish throughout the 
eastern part of the Province at the least possible transportation costs. 

A detailed report of the waters stocked will be shown elsewhere in this 
report, and the summary which is here shown can be considered very satisfactory, 
as compared with the previous year: — 

Whitefish Fry 

Pickerel Fry 

Salmon Trout Fry 

Steel Head Salmon Fry 

Herring Fry 

Rainbow Trout Fry 

Speckled Trout Fingerlings and Fry 

Black Bass Fingerlings and Fry 

Parent Black Bass 



1921 


1922 


115,950,000 


189,775,000 


27,625,000 


43,510,000 


110,400 


7,815,000 




5,300 


9,740,000 


26,250,000 




21,000 


1,147,500 


2,184,075 


773,500 


613,500 


742 


937 


155,347,142 


270,174,812 



The demand for fry and fingerlings increases year by year, and the demand 
exceeds the available supply in spite of the increased deliveries, which are sum- 
marized since the year 1912, as follows: — ■ 

1912 150,000 1918 58,356,631 

1913 173,815 1919 22,361,748 

1914 598,630 1920 77,783,360 

1915 1,697,425 1921 155,347,142 

1916 1,570,450 1922 270,174,812 

1917 2,156,928 

Game Sanctuaries. 

During the year an additional area was set aside as a game sanctuary under 
the authority of an Order-in-Council, and a complete list of all areas set aside 
by this Department is shown, as follows: — 



1923 GAME AND FISHERIES 9 

Miner Farm Sanctuary Essex County. 

Peasemarsh Farm Sanctuary Grey County. 

Xopiming Game Sanctuary Carleton and Renfrew Counties. 

Eugenia Fish and Game Preserve Grey County. 

Peel Game Preserve Peel County. 

The wild life of the Province of Ontario is considered, and has been definitely 
determined as one of the most valued assets of the Province, which must be 
protected , but not, however, to the exclusion of the pleasure of the sportsmen or 
the out-of-door enthusiast. As the population increases and the advance of 
civilization encroaches the covers and protective areas of all wild life, a pro- 
prietorial condition arises, that, of necessity, upsets the balance in nature, and 
the Department is forced to adopt various measures by which the perpetuity 
of wild life may be insured. Certain sections of the province with natural cover 
for fish and game, have, of recent years, been made more accessible to the fisher- 
men and hunters through the development of the automobile. This fact, together 
with the increased number of anglers and sportsmen, naturally calls for the 
establishment of more or less drastic measures and a strict enforcement of the 
Act, for the perpetuity of wild life, and it is such a condition that necessitates a 
close or extended close seasons upon our fish, game birds and animals when 
threatened with extermination, a cutting of bag limits, and the limiting of a 
season's kill or catch, the establishment and maintenance of Crown Game and 
Fish preserves, and any other means and methods that would be in the interests 
of wild-life preservation. 

Further suitable areas set aside as sanctuaries would be in the best interests 
of conser\'ation. Some improvement and development work has been carried 
on at the Eugenia preserve with provisions made for the care of birds, animals 
and equipment necessary for the display at the Canadian National Exhibition 
each year, as well as work carried on for the collection of speckled trout spawn 
and the rearing of English ringnecked pheasants. Approximately 3,000 pheasant 
eggs were produced, some of which were hatched on the preserve and a number 
of settings were furnished to sportsmen and farmers in various parts of the 
Province, with a view of establishing these fine game birds in various sections 
by what is considered to be the most effective method. Most of the birds 
reared on the preserve were kept for further propagation work, while a few were 
allowed full liberty in order that it could be determined whether these birds 
could be successfully established in most parts of the Province. All pheasant 
eggs distributed and birds derived therefrom remain the property of the Crown, 
and are subject to all the provisions of the Act and its regulations. 

Planting of Wild Rice. 

During the year a further supply of wild rice was furnished to each district 
warden, who instructed his overseers in regard to the waters in which same 
would be sown, and this work, which has been carried on for a number of years, 
has met with the full support and appreciation of the local game associations. 
A continuance of this policy would be advisable in view of the success attained 
and the benefits resulting therefrom. 

Game. 

Deer are still reported to be quite plentiful, although any relaxation in the 
enf(jrcement of the Act or in the present laws would seriously effect the continued 
supph'. 

Moose would appear to be less nimierous, and the ninnbcr of moose licenses 
sold has decreased. 



1920 


1921 


1922 


1,988 


1,989 


1,584 


16,943 


18,689 


20,504 


796 


950 


1,256 



10 THE REPORT UPON No. 14 

A comparison of the number of deer and moose licenses sold for three years 
is as follows: — 

Resident Moose 

Resident Deer 

Non-resident Hunting 

Ruffed Grouse, commonly known as partridge, are reported as being qm'te 
plentiful in all sections where they are usually found, and large numbers were 
taken by sportsmen. 

Quail are still protected by an entire close season, and are reported in fair 
numbers in the counties of Essex and Kent. 

Pheasants are still protected by an entire close season, and are reported in 
fair numbers throughout the Niagara peninsula. 

Ducks and Geese are still plentiful and the season has been a satisfactory 
one. 

Furs. 

The catch of fur-bearing animals continues to increase owing to the large 
number of trappers under license, although some varieties of animals are reported 
as becoming scarcer. 

Beaver continue to be taken in large numbers, but are reported as becoming 
scarce. 

Otter have been taken in approximately the same number, but are reported 
as becoming scarce. 

Fisher and Marten are reported as being scarce. 

Muskrat were taken in approximately the same number as in the year 
previous. 

Comparison of Pelts Exported and Tanned for the Years of 1920-1-2. 

Beaver 

Otter 

Fisher 

Marten 

Mink 

Muskrat 

Bear 

Fox (Cross) 

Fox (Red) 

Fox (Silver or Black) 

Fox (White) 

Fox (not specified) 

Lynx . 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Weasel 

\\ olverine 

583,843 758,069 947,343 

The figures marked with {'') cover a period of only five months of the year 
1920. The estimated value to the trapper for the pelts taken in 1922, based 
on an average of the prices paid for the year, is 84,489,288.79. 



1920 


1921 


1922 


96,006 


95,479 


93,971 


4,094 


4,759 


5,309 


4,069 


2,602 


2,657 


6,315 


6,533 


7,327 


33,695 


42,667 


78,487 


434,066 


479,866 


554,888 


409* 


1,494 


2,137 


39* 


287 


469 


231* 


5,282 


11,272 


11* 


153 


87 




351 


1,765 


240* 


23 


170 


170* 


591 


836 


321* 


11,951 


20,344 


1,082* 


47,121 


73,219 


3,095* 


58,898 


94,399 




12 


6 



1923 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



11 



Fur-Farmixg. 
Fur-farming permits were issued for 141 farms, which are stocked with: — 



Beaver 

Fisher. . . . 
Cross Fox . 
Red Fox. . 



4 

3 

270 

206 

Silver and Black Fox 1,088 

Lvnx 2 



Mink. . .. 
Opossum . 
Raccoon . 
Skunk . . . 



94 

6 

50 

82 

1,805 



Enforcement of Act. 

The enforcement of the Act by the wardens, special patrol ofificers and 
overseers was carried out generally with efficiency, and in the best interests of 
conservation. The earnest co-operation of the public and sportsmen is sought 
to bring about a better understanding in regard to the Department's efforts and 
to conserve all game and fish. 

Summary of Convictions, Fines .\nd Confisc.\tions for the Year. 

Convictions 982 

Fines collected S18.340 91 

Sale of confiscations 12,907 91 

Articles Confiscated. 

Pelts. Game and Fish. 

1.634 Muskrat pelts 4 Live Squirrel 

768 Beaver " 2 Live Coon 

499 Mink " 319 Partridge 

427 Weasel " 103 Ducks 

229 Skunk " 18 Rabbits 

113 Raccoon " 1 Goose 

42 Otter " 1 Pheasant 

6 Marten " 2 Quail 

1 Lynx " 49 Deer 

79 Red Fox " 16 Portions of Deer 

5 Cross Fox " 15 Portions of Moose 

18 Fisher " 2,100 lbs. Fish 

9 Bear " 31 Boxes Fish 
8 Wolf 
11 Squirrel " 
15 Deer Hides 
3 Moose Hides 



3,867 


Total Pelts. 

Accessories. 






144 Gill Nets (pieces) 


1 


Durant Motor Car 


63,300 


Yards Gill Net 


1 


Chevrolet Motor Car 


46 


Hoop Nets 


1 


Ford Motor Car 


8 


Dip Nets 


1 


Ford Truck 


8 


Seine Nets 


cSO 


Shotguns 


1 


Pound Nets 


102 


Rirtes 


25 


Spears 


6 


Revolvers 


120 


Night Lines, etc. 


679 


Steel Traps 


52 


Fishing Poles, Reels, etc. 


3 


Trunks 


8 


Jack Lights 


6 


Suitcases 


3 


Tugs 


2 


Hand Axes 


2 


Motor Boats 


2 


Hunting Knives 


1 


Skiff 


1 


Blanket 


7 


Canoes 


1 


( iround Sheet 


14 


Rowboats 


2 


Rolls Chicken Wire 


70 


Decoy Ducks 







All confiscations are sold at ad\ertised sales by tender, other than such 
articles as are sold by the Department to the former owner, when circumstances 
warrant. 



12 THE REPORT UPON No. 14 

Acknowledgment. 

In closing this report, I desire to state that the Department has received 
willing support and co-operation from the Federal Government, railway officials, 
and from the members of all fish and game protective associations who are 
striving to assist in conserving the fish and game of the Province. I wish also 
to express my due appreciation of the loyal support given by the staff of both 
the inside and outside service, and to whom a fair share of the credit must be 
given for any success that has been attained by the Department. 

All statistics referred to will be found elsewhere in this report, together with 
many other statistics in detail. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I am, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) D. McDonald, 
Deputy Minister of Game and Fisheries. 



1923 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



13 



STATEMENT OF REVENUE RECEIVED BY GAME AND FISHERIES DEPARTMENT, 
NOVEMBER 1st, 1921, TO OCTOBER 31st, 1922. 

GAME 



Royalty on Furs $89, 1 15 96 

Indian Coupons 65,954 00 

Trapper's Coupons 64.665 00 

Trapper's Licenses 71,833 25 

Non-Resident Hunting Licenses 31,400 00 

Resident Deer Licenses 61,651 00 

Resident Moose Licenses 7,920 00 

Pur Dealer's Licenses 77,862 00 

Fur Farmer's Permits 675 25 

Tanner's Licenses 280 00 

Game Dealer's Licenses 677 00 

Hotel and Restaurant Licenses 329 00 

Cold Storage Licenses 155 00 

Guide's Licenses 2,160 00 

Fines— Game 16,154 98 

Sales — Game 8,587 33 



$499,419 77 



FISHERIES 



Fishing Licenses $130,844 00 

Royalty— Fish 34,445 44 

Angling Permits 63,132 00 

Fines— Fish 2,185 93 

Sales— Fish 4,320 58 

Miscellaneous 3,171 93 



$238,099 88 



SALES BRANCH 



Sale of Fish, etc . 
Total . . 



$ 24,825 39 
$762,345 04 



THE REPORT UPON 




Portion of Exhibit at C. X. E., Toronto. 



1923 GAME AND FISHERIES 15 

WATERS STOCKED 

WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1922 

Black Bass Fry and Fingerlings 

Waters County or District Quantity 

Varty Lake Addington 5,000 

Beaver Lake " 5,000 

Deer Lake " ■ 2,500 

Scoot River " 2,500 

Lake Deborne Algoma 2,500 

Blue Lake Brant 5,000 

Fairchild's Creek " 10,000 

Lake Chesley Bruce 4,000 

Gould Lake '. " 8,000 

Funton Mill Dam " 2,500 

Pearl Lake " 4^000 

Sauble River " 4^000 

Saugeen River " 10,000 

Lake Deschene Carleton . 4,000 

Scugog Lake Durham 5,000 

Grand River Dufferin 5,000 

Cole's Lake Frontenac 5,000 

Eagle Lake " 5,000 

Loborough Lake " 5,000 

Big Clear Lake " 5^000 

Wickware Lake " 2,500 

Drysdale's Lake " 5^000 

Antoine Lake " 5,000 

Collin's Lake " 5,000 

Mountain Lake Grey 2,500 

Irish Lake " 2^500 

Lake St. Frances ■ ■ • • ■ Glengarry 5,000 

Maitland River Huron 2,500 

Cocklong Lake Haliburton 2,500 

Gull Lake " 4,000 

Barnam Lake " 2,500 

Miserable Lake " 2^500 

Kuskog Lakes " 2,500 

Beach Lake " 2^500 

Grass Lake " 2,500 

Grace Lake " 5,000 

Yankton Lake " 2,500 

Round Lake " 4^000 

Lake Medad Halton 5,000 

Stoco Lake Hastings 5,000 . 

Eagle Lake " 4,000 < 

Twin Lake " 2,500 • 

Crow Lake " 2,500 

Moira River " 5,000 

Burnt Lake " 5*000 

Rosses Lake " 5,000 

Grand River Haldimand 9,000 

Rondeau Bay Kent 4,000 

Mississippi Lake Lanark 5,000 

Otty Lake " 5,000 

Mississippi River " 2,500 

Robertson's Lake " 5,000 

Rideau Lakes Leeds 2,500 

Charleston Lake " 5,000 

Sand Lake " 5^000 

Indian Lake " 2,500 

Newboro Lake " 2,500 

Clear Lake " 2^500 

Gananor|uc Lake " 5,000 

Upper Be\erly Lake " 5,000 

Sixteen .Mile Creek Lincoln ' 5,000 

Lake Gibson " 2,000 

Pond Mills Middlesex 5,000 

Bear Creek " 4,000 

Foster Lake " 5,000 



T HE REPORT UPON ^o- ^ 

WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1922- Continued ■ 
Black Bass Fry and Fingeriings 
Waters County or District Quantity 

, ^ . . Middlesex *>^^^ 

Dingman s Creek Muskoka 5,000 

Lake of Bays • « 2,000 

Lake Vernon a 2,000 

Fairy Lake « ' 5,000 

Peninsular Lake « 5,000 

Oxtongue Lake « . . 5,000 

Severn River « ' ' ' 5,000 

Sparrow Lake « _ . 2,500 

Clearwater Lake „ 5,000 

Long Lake « 4,500 

Buck Lake « 2,000 

Near Cut « 2,500 

Stewart Lake „ 2,500 

Estella Lake ^- • ■ ;, M;,^;«c;no- ... 2,500 

Cache Lake "Algonquin Park" Nipissing 2,500 

Henry Lake "Algonquin Park ,^ 5 000 

Hill's Lake a 5,000 

George Lake « 5,000 

McLaughlin Lake „ 2,500 

Beaver Lake « . 2,500 

Wasa Lajce..^^ ■••••• ■Northumberland: : '. '. '. 4.000 

Presque Isle Bay « 5,000 

Trent River ■ « ■■''.'.'.'..... 5,000 

Cranache's Lake « " ' ' 5,000 

Little Lake of Cramahe n.-f^rrl 4,000 

Cedar Creek uxiorci 2, 500 

Mill Pond a '""..'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 5,000 

Lisgar Lake « 2,500 

Thames River and tributaries ^-^-^ ; ; ; ; ; ' ; ' ; ' 4,000 

Harris Lake •' « 5,000 

Whitefish Lake « 2,500 

Mill Lake « 2,000 

Magnetawan River „ 5,000 

Ahniic Lake « 2,500 

Bear Lake « 2,500 

Loon Lake « . 2,000 

Maple Lake « 2,500 

Pickerel Lake « 2,500 

Cecebe Lake « 2,500 

Trout Lake a 2,000 

Duck Lake « 2,000 

Marsh Lake « 2,500 

Doe Lake « 2,500 

Ruthe Lake « 2,500 

Blackstone Lake • ■ .^^^ Edward'.: : : : 5 000 

West Lake « 5,000 

East Lake p^^l .... 5,000 

Parson's Dam ■••■•• ' p,t,rborough 2 500 

Deer Lake « ... 5,000 

Stoney Lake « . 5,000 

Clear Lake « '::::: 2,500 

Lovesick Lake « 5,000 

Gannon's Narrows R^r,frf>w 5,000 

Muskrat Lake Kenirex^ ^ ^^^ 

Barry's Bay « ■' ' 5,000 

Kemiskeg Lakes Qimrne ^'500 

Severn River bimcoe ^ q^q 

Bass Lake „ . 5,000 

Little Lake « . . 7,500 

LakeSemple „ .. 5,000 

o^'^Lake-i; ::::sudburv.v.::::::::::::...- 2,000 

Ramsay Lake « - 2,000 

Bushy Lake « 2,000 

Red Pine Lake « "'::::'.:::: 5,000 

Apsey Lake 



1923 GAME Ax\D FISHERIES 1_7 

WATERS STOCKED 

WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1922— Continued 

Black Bass Fry and Fingerlings 

Waters County or District Quantity 

Bass Lake Sudbury 2,500 

Lee's Lake " 2,500 

Chapleau Lake " 2,500 

Cranberry Lake " 4,000 

Twin Lakes Timiskaming 5,000 

Lake Sesekinika " 5,000 

Big Water Lake " 5,000 

Sturgeon Lake Victoria 5,000 

Cameron Lake " 5,000 

Balsam Lake " 5,000 

Waterloo Dam Waterloo 2,500 

Grand River " 10,000 

Paradise Lake " 4,000 

New Dundas Dam " 5,000 

Wellesley Dam " 2,500 

Hamilton Bay Wentworth 5,000 

Dundas Waterworks Dam ; " 2,500 

Puslinch Lake Wellington 5,000 

Speed River " 5,000 

Grenadier Pond York 2,500 

Water Fowl Pond, "Centre Island," Toronto " 2,500 

Lake Simcoe " 5,000 



Total 613,500 

Parent Bass 

Waters County or District Quantity 

Achigan Lake Algoma 185 

Squaw Lake Kenora 252 

Second Lake " 250 

Masev Lake Thunder Bav 125 

Rogers Lake " " ' 125 



Total 937 

Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 

W^aters Count}- or District Quantity 

Trout Lake Algoma 10,000 

Green Lake " 5 ,000 

Johnson Lake " 5,000 

kerrs Lake " 5,000 

Mud Lake " 5,000 

Clear Lake " 5,000 

Moose Lake " 5,000 

Basswood Lake " 5,000 

Agaw I River " 5,000 

Mongoose Lake " 10, 000 

Spruce Lake " 10,000 

Loon Lake " 5,000 

Pine Lake " 5,000 

Hobon Lake " 10,000 

Herman Lake " 5,000 

Hawk Lake " 5.000 

South Chippewa River , " 10,000 

Sand Lake " 20,000 

Speckled Trout Brook " 10, 000 

Peak Lake " 5,000 

Emerald Lake " 5,000 

Round Lake " 5,000 

Lake No. 1 " 5,000 

Lake Elizabeth " 5,000 

Lake Maud " 5,000 

Silver Creek " 5,000 



TH^R^PORTJJPON 

WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUAX 



;TITIES and KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN ml-ConUnuei 



speckled Trout Tiy and Fingerlings 

Wate/ count, o.D-,s„la Q-nt.y 

Algoma 10,000 

Koshawang River « 10 000 

Richardson's Creek. « 15,000 

Harmony Spring Creek « ^ ^^^ 

Beryl Lake. .. ; " ^'qqq 

McCarroU's Lake « ^ qOQ 

Cloudy Lake " lo'oOO 

Dvment Lake « 10,000 

Stoney Creek " 500 

Carp Creek.. « 10,000 

Blueberry Lake . Brant 10,000 

Whiteman's Creek. . u 10,000 

German's Spring Creek « 10 000 

Switzer's Creek « ^|qqO 

Spring Creek. « 1000 

Fairchilds Creek « 2,000 

Barker's Creek Bruce 9,000 

Gibson's Creek « 5 OOO 

Spring Creeks. « 5 000 

Thomson's Creek « 5 OQO 

Monkman's Creek « and Grey -■ 10,000 

Sullivan Creek. « lo',000 

Rathwell's Spring. . " 10,000 

Elderslie Snake Creek «• 10,000 

Hammond Creek « 10,000 

Underwood Creek « 10,000 

Wolf Creek. •.•■•••■ " 1,000 

Barber's Spring Creek « \Ofi(iO 

Black Snake Creek « ^0,000 

Stoney SpringCreek. .^. ...•••■■■•••■• « 5 Ooo 

Creeks on Lot 20, Con. / , 8, 9 and lU Dufferin 5000 

Grand River.... .. .•■••■.•• " 2,500 

Credit River and tributaries « 2 500 

Hill Creek ■■■■;. " 2o',000 

Curtis Creek Durham • ■ ' 10,000 

Tvrone Creek . « 10,000 

Wilmot's Creek " 5000 

Courtice Creek. .... • " 5OOO 

Mount Pleasant Creek « 20 000 

For Hope Creek « li)'000 

Happv Valley Stream « ^0 000 

Braggs Creek " 10,000 

Havdon Stream " • ■ ■ 5 OOO 

Cotton Creek « 5 000 

Smith's Creek « lO 000 

Devitt's Creek " 5 OQO 

Spring Creek. . " lo'oOO 

Galbraith's Creek " 5^000 

Ganeraska . . " 5*000 

Pigeon Creek. .. " 5 OQO 

Mountjoy's Creek Frontenac 5 oOO 

Cole Creek ^- • • « lo'.OOO 

Judge's Spring Creek « ^ qqO 

Trout Lake Creek ■ « 4l',000 

Fall River ; ■ • V ; ' -■ ' . Grey lo'oOO 

Saugeen River and tributaries „> ^^.^^^ 

Rocky Saugeen. . .... ••.■••;• p ' 1 ',- " lo'oOO 

Sydenham River, ''Harrison s Park , 1U,U^^ 

Holstein Mill Pond « lo'oOO 

Indian River « lo'oOO 

Silver Creek. ^ •.• • • ■ • ■ ■ « 5'ooo 

Spring Creek (near Pnceville) « ^-^J^^ 

Petty's Creek " 5'ooo 

Varney Creek « 

Ciordon's Creek 



1923 GAME AND FISHERIES 19 

WATERS STOCKED 

WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN \9n~Continued 

Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 

Waters County or District Quantity 

Eugenia Crown Game and Fish Preserve Grey 122 000 

Stoney Creek " 10]000 

Gowin Creek " 10,000 

Beatty Saugeen River " 10]000 

Little Saugeen " 1 [oOO 

McCallum's Creek Huron 5,000 

Silver Creek " 10,000 

Sharp's Creek " 11,000 

Somerville Creek " 5,000 

Belgrave Creek " 5,000 

Farquar Lake Haliburton 10,000 

Twelve Mile Creek Halton 10^000 

Creek near Acton " 5,000 

Squire's Creek Hastings 15,000 

Rawdon Creek " 10,000 

Egan Creek " 5*000 

Spring Creek " 10,000 

Lett's Creek " 10,000 

Mason Creek " 10,000 

Mississippi River Lanark 5,000 

Dunn's Creek. . . -. Leeds 1,000 

Currie's Pond Middlesex 10,000 

Douty Creek " 10,000 

McFarland Spring Creek " 5,'000 

Blue Jay. . ]\Ianitoulin 20.000 

^Slanitou River " 20,000 

Norton's Creek. ......... ^ " 20,000 

^lills Creek , , " 5^000 

Spring Creek " 5^000 

Fry's Lake Muskoka 10,000 

Doty's Lake " 5,000 

White Lake " 5,000 

Patterson's Creek Norfolk 10^000 

Kent Creek " 10,000 

Crane Creek " 2^000 

Young's Creek " 20|000 

Winter's Creek " 1 o|oOO 

McMichael's Spring Creek " 5000 

Hay Creek , " lo',000 

River Lynn " 5 000 

Coal Creek Northumberland 10,000 

Spring Valley Pond " 1 1 qOO 

Break-a-way Creek " 10,000 

Baltimore Creek " 5 OOO 

Miller's Creek " 5,000 

Little Cole Creek " 10,000 

Proctor's Creek " lo|oOO 

Owen's Creek " ... 3,000 

Stoney Creek " ... 5000 

Cedar Creek " . . 5^000 

Tweedles Creek " . . 3 qoO 

Scriver's Creek " 2000 

Madison's Creek " 2^000 

Jackson's Creek " 10 000 

Black's Creek " 10]000 

Gunter's Creek " 1 'ooO 

Cole Creek " 20'000 

Piper Creek " 10^000 

Salern Canning Company's Creek " 10,000 

Bellamy's Creek " Io|o00 

Burnley Stream " 5,000 

Spring Creeks Ontario ] o|oOO 

Black Creek Pond " 10000 

Creek fed by springs in vicinity of Uxbridge " IJOOO 

Cold Springs Creek Oxford 10^000 



20 THE REPORT UPON No. 14 

WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1922— Continued 
Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 
Water County or District Quantity 

Ball Creek Oxford 5,000 

Venison Creek " ■^'i~;^ 

Clear Lake " 5,000 

Three-Mile Lake Parry Sound 5,000 

Distress Creek " " ^000 

Depot Creek " " ^-OCO 

Beggs Creek " " 5,000 

Round Lake Creek " " ^f-000 

Trout Creek Prince Edward 10,000 

Ouse Creek Peterborough 10,000 

Plot'sCreek ;; 0,000 

Cook's Creek " 10-000 

Sedgrick's Creek " 0,000 

Buchanan's Creek " 0,000 

Jack's Lake " ••••■ 0,00?. 

Little Ouse " 10,000 

Moffatt Stream Peel 2,000 

Fountain at Listowel Perth .(.nc,. 

Coldwater River Simcoe - V^^!: 

Vent's Creek " ^-000 

McDonald's Creek " -5,000 

Sturgeon River ;; ... 10,000 

Mad Creek " and Grey 5,000 

NoisvCreek " " " ^.000 

Prett'y Rivers " " " 5,00 

Avon Creek " 0,000 

Taffv Creek " 0.000 

Moon Creek " 10-000 

Silver Creek " and Grey 5,000 

Clear Lake Sudbury A^OU 

Crabb Lake " 2,^00 

Hanmer Creek " 0,000 



Massay Creek 



Trout Creek 



Lost Lake, 

Allen Lake Thunder Bay 



Lake Wideman 



Loon Lake 



Deception Lake 



10,000 



Norman Geneva Creek " lO-JjOO 



onoping River:: :;:::: - 10,000 



5,000 
10,000 



McKenzie River ::::::: : " " ' 10.000 



Lower Twin Lake:::::::::: " " lo.opo 



10,000 



10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
>7,500 
5,000 



Corbett's Creek: ::.:.... ^ I) }0,000 

Slate River " " 

Pme River ^ 

Cedar Creek 

SK^^fi^r:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: " - :::::::::::::: 10,000 

Brulu Creek " " 0,000 

Steel River " " 10-000 

^T- - T-1 • a « 97 SOU 

Nipigon River ^'-^^^ 

Duck Lake " " 5,000 

Charlotte Lake " " 5,000 

Big Duck Lake " " 5,000 

Whitefish River " " 0,000 

Stewart Lake " " 0,000 

Fraser Creek " " 0,000 

Gravel River " " 10-000 

Spring Creek " " 5,000 

Gravel Lake " " ^-000 

Castle Lake " " 5,000 

Clearwater Lake " " 5,000 



10,000 



Bukiii^;.::: ::::::::::::::::::: - - 5,000 

Sprint Creek Timiskaming lO.UUU 



1923 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



21 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUAXTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN \922~Continued 



Speckled Trout Fry and Fifigerlings 

Water County or District 

Dixon Creek Timiskaming 

Latour " 

Martin's Spring Creek Victoria 

Mill Creek Waterloo , 

Reist's Creek " 

Groff's Creek " 

IMcNallv's Creek " . . , 

Alder Creek " 

Jantze's Creek " 

Cedar Creek * " 

Boschardt Creek " 

Cressman Creek " 

Gingerich Creek " 

Bomberg Creek " 

Brubacher's Creek " 

Sunfish Creek " 

Millgrave Creek Wentworth 

Grindstone Creek " 

Beverley Creek " 

Streams in Township of Flamboro " 

Dundas Creek " 

Rathsay Creek Wellington 

Branch of Maitland River " 

Credit River " 

Pelham Spring Creek Welland 

Spring Creek York 



Total. 



Quantity 
20,000 
20,000 

5,000 
20,000 

2,000 

2,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
11,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 

5,000 

2,000 
20,000 
10,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
10,000 

1,000 
10,000 
10,000 

1,000 

2,184,075 



Salmon Trout Fry and Fingerlings 



Waters County or District 

Long Lake Algoma . 

Lake Superior 

North Channel 

Lake LaCloche 

Mud Lake 

Clear Lake 

Moose Lake 

Lake Elizabeth 

Lake Maud 

McCarroll's Lake 

Cloudy Lake 

Dyment Lake 

Little Trout Lake 

Desbarats Lake 

Matintinde Lake 

Mitchell Lake 

Island Lake 

Lake Louzon 

Chiblaw Lake 

Nettleton Lake 

Heyden Lake 

Rock Lake 

Root River 

Lonely Lake 

Lake Ann 

Haynes Lake 

Canoe Lake 

Sand Lake 

Cooley Pond Brant 

Gould Lake Frontenac . 

Eagle Lake " 

Trout Lake " 



Quan 

45, 

610, 

2,000, 
20, 
10, 
30, 
10 
20 
20 
10 
10 
10 
20 
20 
20 
20 
45 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
10 
10 
10 
20 
10 
15 
25 
25 



tity 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
000 
000 
000 
,000 
,000 
,000 



THE REPORT_UPON^ 

WATERS STOCKED 

WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN m2-Co„Hn«, 

Salmon Trout Fry and Fingerhngs 

Country or District 0"^"^^ 

Waters ,-u\ ^ 10,000 

Haliburton 20 000 

Drag Lake " lo'.OOO 

Blue Hawk Lake " 10 000 

Gull Lake. ■ " lo'.OOO 

Hurricane Lake jq qqq 

Delfiece Lake.. . ■■ • Hastings IS'OOO 

Westlenikoon Lake « IS'OOO 

Horseshoe Lake ; " ^ ^'qqq 

Eagle Lake ' ; " fs'ooo 

Salmon Lake 15,000 

Dickie's Lake " 15,000 

Jamerson Lake ' • " " lo',000 

Gull Lake " 100,000 

Bass Lake Kenora 50,000 

Mannitaki Lake .• « 100,000 

Armstrong Lake " 100,000 

AgenakLake « 10,000 

Pelican Lake Lanark 10,000 

Silver Lake ; " 5o',000 

Pike Lake Leeds 50 OOO 

Charleston Lake .• • « 15',000 

Rideau Lakes « 5 qqq 

Red Horse Lake « 5 qqq 

Loyada Lake . . ■ • • • " 60,000 

Temperance Lake Muskoka ^q qqq 

Lake of Bays « lo',000 

Lake Vernon " 10,000 

Fairy Lake .. " • 10,000 

Mary Lake. ... •• " 10,000 

Peninsular Lake " 10,000 

Oxtongue Lake " 10,000 

Bass Lake " 10,000 

Tooke's Lake " 10,000 

Pine Lake " 50,000 

Fox Lake ■ • •. • V,; V ., Nipissmg 20,000 

Cache Lake, "Algonqum Park « ^^-^^^ 

Four Mile Lake « 10,000 

Trout Lake " 100,000 

Clear Lake ... -Ip;,;!.'' " 100,000 

Rainy Lake, "Algonqum Jark « ^^^.^^^ 

Brule Lake, _, ^, " 100,000 

Canoe Lake _^ ,, " 50,000 

Joe Lake, „ „ " 20,000 

Source Lake, " " • 10,000 

Beaver Lake Parry Sound 10,000 

Whitefish Lake " " 10,000 

Magnetawan River " « 20,000 

Shanty Lake " " 10,000 

Horseshoe Lake « " 10,000 

Sand Lake " " 10,000 

Home Lake " " • • • 10,000 

Rock Lake ' .... " " 10,000 

Braye Lake " " 10,000 

Eagle Lake .... " " 10,000 

Lake Bernard .... « " 5,000 

Trout Lake Peterborough 5 qOQ 

Stoney Lake " 10,000 

Clear Lake .... " 10,000 

Catchacoma Lake " 50,000 

Gull Lake ... Rainy River 50,000 

Elbow Lake " " 100,000 

BarilLake ■ ... " " 50,000 

Rainy Lake - • ■ - " " 20,000 

Mink Lake • •••••• • • • • ' Renfrew 20,000 

Mink Lake • .••••.••••■■•■•••■ " 

Muskrat Lake ■ ■ 



1923 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



23 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH OUAXTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IX \921~Continned 



Salmon Trout Fry and Fingerlings 

W'aters County or District 

Barry's Bay Renfrew 

Kemiskeg Lakes " 

Lake Simcoe ; Simcoe 

Hardwood Lake Sudbury 

Ella Lake " 

Trout Lake " 

Ramsav Lake " 

Bushv Lake " 

Red Pine Lake " 

East Fox Lake " 

Lake Nipigon Thunder Bay . . , 

Kashabowie Lake " " . . . 

Lake Shebandawan " " . . . 

Long Lake '. . " " . . . 

Little Long Lake " " ... 

Arrow Lake " " ... 

Lake Hellen . : " " . . . 

Windigo Lake " " . . . 

Hazel Lake " " ... 

Lake Sesekinika Timiskaming. . . 

Wealthy Lakes. 

Lake Timiskaming • " . . . , 

Anima Xipissing Lake . " . . . . 

Little Trout Lake " 

Golden Lake " . • . . 



Total. 



Pickerel 

Waters County or District 

Varty Lake Addington 

Xapanee River " 

Sheldrake Lake " 

Loon Lake " 

Beaver Lake " 

Peters Pond " 

Pearl Lake Brant 

Grand River " 

Lake Chesley Bruce 

Rice Lake Durham 

Lake Ontario " 

Loborough Lake Frontenac 

Sydenham Lake " 

Chippego Lake " ■. 

Fish Lake " 

Devil Lake " 

Big Clear Lake " 

Salt Lake " 

Wickware Lake " 

Drvsdale's Lake " 

Stony Lake " 

Knolton Lake " 

Fifth Depot Lake " 

Buck Lake " 

Wolf Lake " 

Lake St. Frances Glengarry 

Cocklong Lake Halil)urton 

Lake Ontario ■. .Halton 

Stoco Lake v Hastings 

Twin Lake " ■.:... 

Crow Lake " 

Oak Hill Lake " 

Moira River " 

Beaver Creek " 



Quantity 

5,000 

5,000 

1,000,000 

30,000 

25,000 

25,000 

25,000 

20,000 

20,000 

5,000 

810,000 

100,000 

100,000 

100,000 

50,000 

100,000 

200,000 

50,000 

5,000 

20,000 

30,000 

30,000 

20,000 

10,000 

10,000 

7,815.000 



Quantity 

15,000\ 

50,000^ 

50,000 

50,000 

100,000 

100,000 

50,0C0 

500,000 

50,000 

400,000 

1,000,000 

100,000 

100,000 

100,000 

100,000 

100,000 

100,000 

25,000 

25,000 

25,000 

25,000 

100,000 

100,000 

100, 000 

100, 000 

100,000 

100,000 

2,000,000 

100,000 

25,000 

50,000 

100,000 

100,000 

25,000 



24 THE REPORT UPON No. 14 

WATERS STOCKED 

WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1922— Continued 

Pickerel 

Waters County or District Quantity 

Burnt Lake Hastings 100,000 

Grand River Haldimand 250,000 

Thames River Kent 200,000 

Christie Lake Lanark 50,000 

Mississippi River " 100,000 

Robertson's Lake " 100,000 

Patterson Lake " 50,000 

Charleston Lake ". .Leeds 350,000 

Rideau Lakes " 100,000 

KiUenback Lake " 100,000 

Higley Lake " 100,000 

Bass Lake " 10,000 

Lower Beverly Lake " 100,000 

Little Lake " 150,000 

Indian Lake " 100,000 

Lake Ontario Lincoln 100,000 

Lake Joseph Muskoka 1 ,000,000 

Lake of Bays " 500,000 

Wood Lake " 50,000 

Prospect Lake " 50,000 

Lake Rosseau " 1,000,000 

Lake Muskoka " 1 ,000,000 

Sparrow LaKe ■ " 1,000,000 

Long Lake " 50,000 

Axe Lake " 50,000 

Buck Lake " 100,000 

WatagonLake " 100,000 

Maenhood Lake " 100,000 

Toronto Lake No. 1 " 50,000 

Toronto Lake No. 2 " 50,000 

Leach Lake " 50,000 

Cache Lake, "Algonquin Park" Nipissing 50,000 

Lake Erie Norfolk 23,000,000 

Crow Bay " 50,000 

Trent River Northumberland 50,000 

Cold Creek " 100,000 

Lake Ontario Ontario 1,000,000 

Mill Pond Oxford 50,000 

Harris Lake Parry Sound 50,000 

Magnetawan River " " 50,000 

AhmicLake " " 50,000 

Commenda Lake " " 50,000 

Maple Lake " " 50,000 

Star Lake " " 50,000 

Pickerel Lake " " 50,000 

CecebeLake " " 50,000 

Indian River Peterborough 100,000 

Pigeon Lake " 200,000 

BuckhornLake " 200,000 

StoneyLake .....,..., " 400,000 

Oak Lake " 50,000 

Lake Ontario Peel 1,000,000 

Lake Dore Renfrew 50,000 

Muskrat Lake " 50,000 

Chain Lake " 50,000 

Barry's Bay " 25,000 

Kemiskeg Lakes " 25,000 

Golden Lake " 50,000 

White Lake " 50,000 

Lake Couchiching Simcoe 500,000 

Lake Simcoe " 500,000 

Bushy Lake Sudbury 50,000 

Red Pine Lake " 50,000 

Twin Lake " 50,000 

French River " 50,000 



1923 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



25 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN l922^Continued 

Pickerel 



Waters County or District 

Apsey Lake Sudbury. . 

Anima Nipissing Lake Temiskaming 

Sturgeon Lake Victoria 

Balsam Lake " 

Mud Lake " 

Waterloo Dam Waterloo 

Grand River " 

Lake Ontario Wentworth 

Hamilton Bay " 

Puslinch Lake Wellington 

Gibson Lake Welland 



Total. 



Total. 



Total 



O 



1, 



uantity 

50,000 

100,000 

200,000 

200,000 

100,000 

50,000 

100,000 

000,000 

100,000 

100,000 

50,000 



IVhitefish 

Waters County or District 

Lake Superior Algoma 

North Channel " 

Lake Ontario Durham 

Lake Ontario Halton 

Lake Wabigoon Kenora 

Eagle Lake '. " 

Lake Ontario Lincoln 

Lake Erie Norfolk 

Lake Ontario Northumberland . . 

Lake Ontario Ontario 

Lake Ontario Peel 

Elbow Lake Rainy River 

Rainy Lake " " 

Little Turtle Lake " " 

Mink Lake " " 

Lake Nipigon Thunder Bay 

Kashabowie Lake " " 

Lake Shebandawan " " 

Long Lake " 

Whitefish Lake " "^ 

Little Long Lake " " 

Arrow Lake ! " ' 

Lake Hellen " " 

Windigo Lake " ' .... 

Lake Ontario Wentworth 



Herring 
Waters County or District 

Lake Erie Norfolk 

Lake Ontario Durham 

Lake Ontario Halton 

Lake Ontario Wentworth 



Rainbow Trout 

Waters County or District 

Sault Ste. Marie Rapids Algoma 

Colpoy's Creek Bruce 

Eagle Lake Frontenac .* 

Glecian River (jrey 

Trout Lake Parry Sound 

Sturgeon Lake Victoria 

Lake Simcoe Simcoe 

Riverdalc Park, Toronto ^■ork 



43,510,000 



Quantitv 

46,275,000 

24,000,000 

2,000,000 

4,000,000 

■ 2,000,000 

2,000,000 

2,000,000 

74,000,000 

2,000,000 

2,000,000 

2,000,000 

500,000 
2,000,000 

500,000 

500,000 
10,000,000 
1,000,000 
2,000,000 
1,000,000 
2,000,000 

500,000 
2,000,000 
1,000,000 

500,000 
4,000,000 

189,775,000 



Quantity 
18,250,000 
2,000,000 
4,000,000 
2,000,000 

26,250,000 



)uantitv 
14,550 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,200 
250 



Total. 



21.000 



26 THE REPORT UPON No. 14 

WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1922— Continued 

Steel Head Salmon 

Waters County or District Quantity 

Lake Simcoe Simcoe 5,300 



SUMMARY 



Black Bass Fry and Fingerlings 613,500 

Parent Black Bass 937 

Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 2,134,075 

Salmon Trout Fry and Fingerlings 7,815,000 

Pickerel .' 43,510,000 

Whitefish 189,775,000 

Herring 26,250,000 

Rainbow Trout 21,000 

Steel Head Salmon 5,300 




Total distribution 270,174,812 

COMPARATI\'E STATEMENT OF DISTRIBUTION 

1921 1922 

Black Bass Fry and Fingerlings 

Parent Black Bass 

Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings .••••■.. 

Salmon Trout Fry and Fingerlings 

Pickerel 

Whitefish ' ' 

Herring 

Rainbow Trout 

Steel Head Salmon 



773,500 

742 

1,147,500 

110,400 

27,625,000 

115,950,000 

9,740,000 


613,500 

937 

2,184,075 

7,815,000 

43,510,000 

189,775,000 

26,250,000 

21,000 




5,300 






155,347,142 


270,174,812 



1923 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



27 




28 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 14 



OXTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, the 

industry during the \ear 1922, in the Public 





Districts 












Fishing material 












Tugs 


Gasoline Launches 


Sail or Row Boats 


Gill-Nets 




No. 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


Yards 


Value 


1 

9 


Kenora and Rainy River. 
Lake of the Woods 


4 


75 


11,200 


9 


45 
29 

2 
4 

2 

2 
4 

10 
8 

1 


S 

17,425 
11,650 

1,200 
2,650 

500 

450 
1,500 

3,950 
4,800 

250 


57 
45 

2 

7 

4 

1 
6 

12 

18 

1 


48 
22 

9 

2 

2 

4 
2 

4 
4 

3 


$ 

3,548 
970 

525 
80 

70 

180 
226 

115 
115 

125 


19 
10 

17 

5 

5 

8 
2 

2 
3 

4 


78,361 
43,210 

20,000 
15,500 

11,000 

6,127 
13,100 

15,700 
29,150 

5,000 


S 

11,785 
7,888 


3 


Namicon, Despair, Jack Fish, 
Clearwater, Loon and 










4,150 


4 

5 


V'ista, Six Mile, Kairston, 
Yoke and Shoal Lakes . . . 

Little Turtle, Pickerel, Trout, 
White Otter, Elbow and 


1 


13 


1,200 


2 


2,490 
1,688 


6 


Basket, Indian, Skikog, 
Sturgeon, McKenzie and 










994 


7 


Vermilion, Manitakie, Sandy, 










2,425 


8 


Manitou, Gull, Eagle, 
Obabicon and Wabigoon 










3,098 


9 


Rock, Deer, One Man, and 


2 


27 


8,000 


5 


3,660 


10 


Perrault, Keyes, Shoal, Win- 
nange and Black Sturgeon 


1,200 




Totals 














7 


115 


20,400 


16 


107 


44,375 


153 


100 


5,954 


75 


237,148 


39,378 









Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caught 





Districts 


Si 

X 


'B'i 

X 


1^ 




3 S 


It 


.a 

s 


- i) 
■^ o 


1 


Kenora and Rainy River 
Lake of the Woods 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


Ibs. 

116,855 
66,126 

32,628 
76,990 

8,499 

20,025 

41,094 

47,237 
177,276 

3,519 


lbs. 


Ibs. 

12,431 
145 

23,581 
6,988 

10,599 

5,104 

14,686 

8,351 
203 

5,695 


lbs. 

202,105 
157,898 

24,474 
13,205 

9,500 

7,706 

17,987 

26,190 
28,910 

385 


lbs. 
466,521 


?. 










154,836 


3 


Namicon, Despair, Jack 
Fish, Clearwater, Loon, 
and Pipestone Lakes. . . 








31,977 


4 


Vista, Six Mile, Kairston, 








92,233 


5 


Little Turtle, Pickerel, 
Trout, White Otter, 
Elbow, and Nora Lakes. 

Basket. Indian, Skikog. 
Sturgeon, McKenzie, 
and Stanghikina Lakes . 








17,374 


6 








18,049 


7 


Vermilion, Manitakie, 
Sandy, Feegan and Lost 








45,192 


8 


Manitou, Gull, Eagle. 
Obabicon and Wabi- 








56,246 


9 


Rock, Deer, One Man, and 








159,116 


10 


Perrault, Keyes, Shoal, 
Winnange and Black 








57 




Totals 


















590,249 




87,783 


488,360 


1,041,601 




Values 












S c. 


S c. 


c. 


S c. 
70,829 88 


$ c. 


S c. 
9,656 13 


S c. 
24,418 00 


S c. 
145,824 14 















1923 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



29 



FISHERIES. 

quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures emplo\ed in the fishing 
Waters of Kenora and Rainv River Districts. 











Fishing material 












Other fixtures used in 
fishing. 


Seines 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip or Roll 

Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No Value 






$ 


32 
22 

5 


S 

8,000 
■ 8,800 

1,000 


46 


$ 

1,442 




$ 




$ 




S 


36 

22 

1 
3 

3 

3 

7 

9 

13 

1 


$ 

11.045 
5,075 

150 
2,200 

450 

300 
1,300 

1,700 
5,100 

50 


34 

5 


S 

7 890 




















67S 
















































3 

2 

7 
4 

8 
10 

1 


4S0 




















' 








IJO 




























170 




























no 




























! ?^0 








2 


1,000 


















1 4'S 
























45 




































61 


18,800 


46 


1,442 














98 


27,370 


74 


12,255 





















during the year 1922, in the Public Waters of Kenora and Rain>- River Districts. 



s 
o 

55 


1 


'•J 

o 

a. 


o 
"5 




o. 
a 
U 


•3 j:: 

ii £ 
•- S 

S8 


o 

'> 

O 






"a 
> 


lbs. 
1,051 


lbs. 


lbs. 

245 
14.527 


lbs. 

43,722 
77,402 

3,860 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 

78.090 
53,198 

1,051 
11,139 

4,800 


lbs. 

12 
15 


N •. 


lbs. 


S c. 
96 476 98 


741 






2,640 




1,800 
1 snn 


44,688 71 


1,092 






17 901 15 












! 


24.025 91 


485 




448 


213 






9 




5 49 ' 6 3 






145 

4.500 

848 
84 










5 883 85 




















13 997 97 




















15 813 39 


800 










236 


100 






45,154 83 
1,075 96 




































4,169 




15,220 


130,774 




2,640 


148,514 


136 




3,600 












$ c. 

1,375 77 


$ c. 


$ c. 

761 00 


$ c. 

6,538 70 


$ c. 


S c. 
105 60 


$ c. 

5,940 56 


S c. 

217 60 


$ 


S c. 

144 00 


S c. 
265,811 38 









30 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, 

fishing industry during the year 1922, in 





Districts 












Fishing 


material 














Tugs 




Gasoline Lau 


nches 


Sail or Row Boats 


- Gill-Nets 




No. 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men. 


No. 


Value 


Men 


Yards 


Value 


1 


Lake Superior 

Pigeon River to Sturgeon 
Point and Wliitefish Lake 

Tliunder Bay 

Black Bay, Point Magnet, 
Welcome Islands 

Crayfish, Arrow, North 






$ 




2 
6 

9 


300 
2,350 

3.675 


4 
12 

19 


13 
9 

5 

4 

5 
5 

3 
2 

13 
9 


S 

670 
640 

360 

110 

395 
600 

140 
100 

1,515 
1,380 


23 
14 

6 

4 

5 
6 

5 

21 
16 


10,340 
203,900 

50,700 

2,600 

100,400 
58,250 

6,450 
97,000 

153,400 
27,160 


s 

1,635 


2 
3 

4 


5 

1 


138 

42 


13,000 
6,500 


45 
4 


14,189 

4,887 

350 


5 

6 

7 


Rossport, Wilson, Evelyn, 
Lamb and Shaganash Is- 
lands 

Jack Fish and Port Caldwell 

Beatty, Partridge, Eskag- 

anaga and Wawong 


3 

1 


43 
44 


9,000 
5,000 


6 

5 


12 
2 

1 

5 

4 
9 


4,650 

475 

250 
9,400 

2,675 
5,050 


12 
2 

3 
12 

9 
21 


10.695 
7,000 

90S 


8 




7 

2 
2 


164 

65 
40 


28,000 

9,500 
10,000 


44 

14 
8 


11,750 


9 
10 


Michipicoten to Copper- 
mine Pts. and Oba Lake. . 
Batchawana to Gros Cap. . . 

Totals 


21,940 
2,117 




21 


536 


81,000 


126 


50 


28,825 


94 


68 


5.910 


100 


710,200 


75,468 



Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caught 





Districts 


|1 


X 


■0 


'0 


?1 




.y 

£ 


Pickerel, 
or Dore 


1 


Lake Superior. 

Pigeon River to Sturgeon 
Pt. and Whitefish Lake 


lbs. 


lbs. 

1,000 
518,770 

52,265 


lbs. 
100 


lbs. 

24,495 
45,619 

43,908 

2,609 

44,747 
10,795 

10,626 
897,500 

55,652 
62,149 


lbs. 

6.2.35 
1,020 

68 

2,150 
200 

850 
1,200 


lbs. 

20,000 
290,981 

51,395 

1,771 

393,614 
232,883 

6,802 
389,035 

376,257 
109,583 


lbs. 

540 
696 

4,316 

1,075 

4,204 


lbs. 


2 
3 


Thunder Bay 

Black Bay. Point Magnet 

and Welcome Islands. 

Crayfish, Arrow, North, 


27,500 


6,332 
50,251 


4 






5 


Rossport, Wilson, Evelyn, 
Lamb and Shaganash 




100 


17,468 


6 


Jackfish and Port Caldwell 
Beatty, Partridge, Wa- 
wong, and Eskaganaga 




4,024 


7 






740 


5,326 
8,265 

3,896 
1,980 


8,509 


8 








62,440 


9 


Michipicoten to Copper- 
mine Points and Oba 








1,199 


10 






4,930 





13.969 




Totals 








27,500 


577,065 


840 


1,198,100 


11,723 


1,872,321 


30,298 


164.192 










$ c. 
1,650 00 


$ c. 
23,082 60 


$ c. 
100 80 


$ c. 
143,772 00 


$ c. 
1,289 53 


$ c. 
205,955 31 


$ c. 
1,514 90 


$ c. 
22.986 88 









1923 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



31 



FISHERIES. 

the quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
the Public Waters of Lake Superior. 











Fishing material 












Other fixtures used in 
fishing 


Seines 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip or Roll 
Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 






$ 




$ 




$ 




$ 




$ 




$ 


1 

2 

2 
4 

1 
4 

3 


$ 

295 
2,100 

1,600 

1.180 

700 
2,150 

300 




S 








3 
6 


1,300 
4,100 


















4 
2 
1 

2 
3 

1 


1,900 
600 














































20 








17 
7 


4,400 
1,850 


















300 
























800 
























50 
















































3,000 
6,000 


500 

375 






4 

5 


2,000 
2,250 


2 
3 


500 








20 


9,100 














3,625 


























53 


20,750 










9,000 


875 






26 


12,575 


18 


7,795 












■■■■| 



during the year 1922, in the Public Waters of Lake Superior. 



c 
o 

M 
3 










U 


"5 o 


o 
i- 
a 
"> 

U 


c <r 

»-. CO 


"So 

3 


3 
"a 
> 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 

34,608 
3,134 

34,055 

3,600 

1,989 


lbs. 


No. 


lbs. 
200 


S c. 

7 '84 5 7 


















61,041 83 
21,633 63 
7^1 5 


























78 












316 




162 




2,290 






50 


51 848 94 


2.724 










28 396 81 














3,080 








3 786 40 


13,086 


















163,967 08 

48,633 93 
25,630 70 














1,819 
31,087 








6,939 










4,897 


86 




















23,065 




162 


78 




7.187 


113,372 


86 




250 












S c. 

7,611 45 


S c. 


S c. 
8 10 


S c. 
3 90 


S c. 


S c. 

287 48 


S c. 

4.534 88 


S c. 
137 60 


S 


S c. 
10 00 


$ c. 

412,945 43 









32 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, 

fishing industry during the year 1922, in the 





Districts 








Fishing material 












Tugs 


Gasoline Launches 


Sail or Row Boats 


Gill-Nets 




No. 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


Yards 


Value 


1 


Lake Huron (Norlh 

Channel) 

Bruce Mines, Lake George, 






$ 




5 
12 

1 
8 


$ 

1,950 

7,400 

250 

2,500 


10 

27 

2 

16 


8 
16 

8 
15 

3 
12 
10 

1 


290 

3,320 

1.160 

1,065 

80 

760 

798 

50 


13 
12 
14 
16 

5 
11 
14 

2 


13.700 
42.020 
11,140 
16,100 
7,100 
9,100 
90,700 
95,900 


S 
1.000 


2 


Thessalon, Cummings Lake, 










3.825 


3 


Algoina Mills, Spragge and 
Cutler 










1.132 


4 
5 


Spanish River and Bay of 

Islands 

Bear, Whisky, Pecard and 


1 


18 


7,000 


6 


2.140 
815 


6 


Little Current, Shiquindah 










10 


7,600 


19 


985 


7 


Kagawong, Gore Bay and 


3 
4 


83 
123 


19,000 
20.000 


13 
20 


10.025 


8 


Meldrum Bay, Conkburn 


4 


2,850 


8 


17.785 




Totals 








8 


224 


46.000 


39 


40 


22,550 


82 


73 


7.523 


87 


285,760 


37.707 



Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caught during 





Districts 


it 




■0 


P 




5"-S 

o oj 






1 


Lake Huron {North 

Channel.) 

Bruce Mines. Lake George 


lbs. 


lbs. 
310 

7,054 
2,064 
8.188 


lbs. 
200 

750 


lbs. 
2.937 

92.895 

2.748 

3,942 

1.776 

60.956 

45.415 

42,459 


lbs. 
5,188 

450 


lbs. 
16.433 

132,094 
11,083 
15,110 
1.673 
35.889 
56.224 

379.448 


lbs. 
20,444 

8.299 
12.580 
19.540 

2,212 
34,446 

6,444 
193 


lbs. 
5,727 


2 


Thessalon. Cummings 
Lake. Mud and Blind 




35,971 


3 


Algoma Mills. Spragge and 
Cutler 


1.000 


1,645 


4 


Spanish River and Bay of 


53,809 


5 


Bear. Whisky, Pecard and 




5,286 


6 


Little Current. Shiquin- 
dah Manitowaning Bays 
Kagawong. Gore Bay, 








60,326 


7 




575 


200 


1,540 


8 


Meldrum Bay, Cockburn 
Island 




8 




Totals 












1.000 


18.191 


1.150 


253,128 


5.638 


647,954 


104,158 


164,312 




Values 


$ c. 
60 00 


$ c. 
727 64 


$ c. 
138 00 


$ c. 
30.375 36 


$ c. 
620 18 


$ c. 
71,274 94 


$ c. 
5,207 90 


S c. 
23,003 68 



1923 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



33 



FISHERIES. 

the quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
Public Waters of Lake Huron (North Channel). 



Fishing material 



Other fixtures used in 
fishing. 



Seines 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip or Roll 

Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No 


Value 






S 


6 
46 


S 

1,700 
21,810 


8 


S 
605 




$ 




S 




s 


7 

7 

5 

11 


$ 

895 
5,100 

875 
1,770 


3 
6 


$ 
300 




















6,400 








12 


1,075 






















28 


10,500 
















4 


2,525 
































30 
9 
10 


19,700 
3,600 
10,000 


















8 
4 
3 


4,400 
1,025 

775 


15 
3 
3 


2,250 
























3,200 
















2,000 


105 






2,050 






























129 


67,310l 20 


1,680 






2,000 


105 






45 


14,840 


34 


16,725 



























the year 1922, in the Public Waters of (North Channel), Lake Huron. 



c 
o 


W 






J2 

O 


c, 
U 




V 

a 
U 


§1 
I- a 

35 


SI'S' 


o 
3 

> 


lbs. 
530 


lbs. 


lbs. 
2,840 

489 
1,234 
5,378 


lbs. 


lbs. 

40 


lbs. 
5,350 

9,793 


lbs. 
53,766 

142,218 
33,581 
57,295 
4.081 
58,934 
50,770 


lbs. 


No. 


lbs. 


$ c. 
6 704 79 


3,222 






37 






39 298 82 














3,955 69 


3,783 








532 


17 






14,830 49 














1,411 03 


3,264 




3,076 
6,193 




48 


44 
640 


10 






25,039 85 


2,004 










15,296 11 
















46,845 13 


1 1 


















12,803 




19,210 




88 


16,359 


400,645 


64 




















$ c. 

4,224 99 


$ c. 


S c. 
960 50 


$ c. 




5 c 

6 16 


$ c. 

654 36 


S c. 
16,025 80 


S 

102 


c. 
40 


S 


S c. 


S c. 
153,381 91 













2 G.F. 



34 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, 

fishing industry during the year 1922, 



Districts 



Fishing material 



Tugs 



Ton- Value 
nage 



Gasoline Launches 



Men No. Value 



Sail or Row Boats 



No. 



Value 



Gill-Nets 



Yards 



Value 



Georgian Bay 

Parry Sound 

Simcoe and Muskoka 

Grey County 

Bruce County 

Manitoulin Isld., East Side 

Totals 



177 
30 

161 
20 

169 



557 



39,000 
2,000 

30,600 
6,000 

49,000 



126,600 



19,200 
4.593 
33,150 
16,750 
27,050 



4,255 
2.540 
560 
1.005 
1,290 



451,120 
145,300 
251,120 
84,120 
296,874 



44,805 
14.123 
23.380 
7.295 
33.414 



100,743 



206 



100 



9,650 



1,228,534 



123,017 



Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caught during 





Districts 




'l- en 




Whitcfish 
fresh 


Trout, 
salted 


2^ 




"3 i; 


1 


Georgian Bay 


lbs. 


lbs. 

5,729 
29,369 
17,800 
20,948 


lbs. 

108 
200 
200 


lbs. 

505,717 
36,818 
10,386 
12,546 

503,137 


lbs. 

1,000 

900 

4.950 

3,400 


Ibs. 

234.039 
103,506 
359,994 
291,878 

445,414 


lbs. 

57,364 
19,702 


lbs. 
92,065 


2 


Simcoe and Muskoka .... 


1,300 


12,409 


■1 








198 


5 


Manitoulin Island, East 




30,596 


16,920 




Totals 

Values 












1,300 


73,846 


508 


1,068,604 


10,250 


• 1,434,831 


107,662 


121,592 




S c. 
78 00 


S c. 
2.953 84 


S c. 
60 96 


$ c. 
128,232 48 


S c. 
1,127 50 


S c. 
157,831 41 


S c. 
5,383 10 


S c. 
17,022 88 



1923 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



35 



FISHERIES. 

the quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
in the Public Waters of Georgian Bay. 



Fishing material 



Other fixtures used in 
fishing. 



Seines 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip or Roll 

Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Whar\'es 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 






$ 


18 


S 

15,750 


3 
47 


S 

150 
1,016 




S 




S 




s 


8 
5 
9 
9 
4 


S 

6,025 
1,125 
650 
1,595 
1,300 


9 

4 

11 

11 

2 


S 
7,950 




1,030 


1,058 






3,900 
13,800 
8,700 
6,200 


140 
1,425 
1,350 

840 






900 




4 
13 
41 


3,000 

6.500 

38.400 










1,250 




















1,500 




















4,000 






















7 


1,030 


1,058 


76 


63,650 


50 


1,166 






32,600 


3,755 






35 


10,695 


37 


15,600 



















the year 1922, in the Public Waters of Georgian Bay. 



5 


1 






«3 


c 






^"5 




Value 


lbs. 
1.147 


lbs. 


lbs. 

34 
1,953 


lbs. 
706 


lbs. 


lbs. 

500 
49,942 


lbs. 

21.786 
55,521 


lbs. 


No. 


lbs. 


S c. 
103,846 70 


1,922 




5,361 


334 






25,762 04 






3,370 
49,089 

21.862 






42,294 66 


43 










400 
10,048 








37,336 38 


387 




160 












114.901 31 


















3,499 




2,147 


75.027 


5,361 


50.442 


87,755 


334 


















S c 

1,154 67 


S c. 


S c. 
107 35 


S c. 

3,751 35 


S c. 
375 27 


S c. 
2,017 68 


$ c. 
3,510 20 


S c. 

534 40 


$ 


$ c. 


S c. 
324,141 09 













36 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, 

fishing industry during the year 1922, 





Districts 


Fishing material 




Tugs 


Gasoline Launches 


Sail or Row Boats 


Gill-Nets 




No. 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


Yards 


Value 


1 


Lake Huron {Proper) 


5 


143 


S 
20,000 


28 


20 
14 

15 
9 


$ 

15,290 
10,575 

6,575 
4,125 


48 
32 

30 
18 


5 
2 

21 
11 


$ 

625 
70 

750 
710 


7 
38 

28 
10 


410,300 
80,335 


S 
40,769 


9 




8,477 


3 


Lambton County (including 
St. Clair River) 












4 




5 


140 


39,000 


27 


291,900 


34,725 




Totals 






10 


283 


59,000 


55 


58 


36,565 


128 


39 


2,155 


83 


782,535 


83,971 









Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caught 





Districts 


|1 




1| 
|1 











- m 


1 


Lake Huron {Proper) 


lbs. 

3,200 
100 


lbs. 

23,990 
16,068 

130,627 
6,486 


lbs. 
900 


lbs. 

21,645 
5,349 

20,012 
20.205 


lbs. 

17,629 
1,000 

""2475 


lbs. 

765,008 
95,719 

5,180 
820,544 


lbs. 

36 


lbs. 
1,338 


? 




15,057 


3 


Lambton County (includ- 


1,204 
3,844 


143,723 


4 






181 




Totals 








3,300 


177,171 


900 


67,211 


20,804 


1,686,451 


5,084 


160,299 










S c. 
198 00 


S c. 
7,086 84 


S c. 
108 00 


$ c. 
8,065 32 


$ c. 
2.288 44 


S c. 
185,509 61 


S c. 

254 20 


S c. 
22,441 86 









1923 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



37 



FISHERIES. 

the quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
in the Public Waters of Lake Huron (Proper). 













Fishing material 












Other fixtures used in 
fishing. 


Seines 


Pound Xets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip or Roll 

Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 






S 


2 
10 

50 
21 


$ 

800 
3,000 

28,100 
17,250 




S 




$ 

5 


3.000 


$ 
240 




S 


12 
10 

8 
2 


S 

3,850 
1,425 

1,075 
2,300 


7 
9 

2 
2 


$ 
675 


1 


30 
565 


15 
560 










350 


11 


3 


225 














175 
















3 000 


























12 


595 


575 


83 


49,150 


3 


225 




5 


3.000 740 






32 


8,650 


20 


4,200 



















during the year 1922, in the Public Waters of Lake Huron (Proper). 



o 
it 


1 




J! 
"3 


a 
U 


a 
a 


IS " 


.2 
'> 

a 
U 




Pickerel 
(Blue) 




lbs. 
131 


lbs. 


lbs. 

6,828 
113,846 

5,428 
225 


Ibs. 

129,903 
400 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 

1,450 
29.838 

73.302 
9,074 


lbs. 


No. 


lbs. 


S c. 
97 073 97 


1,155 




105 
1,150 




30 
604 






21,379 99 
36 ''07 03 


9,135 




3,140 




10,969 


30 




1,205 


93 845 03 


















10,451 




126,327 


131,508 


1,255 


3,140 


113,664 


634 




10,969 










S c. 
3,448 83 


$ c. 


$ c. 

6,316 35 


S c. 
6,575 40 


S c. 
87 85 


$ c. 
125 60 


S c. 
4,546 56 


$ c. 
1,014 40 


S 


S c. 
438 76 


$ c. 

248.506 02 



38 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, the 

fishing industry during the year 1922, 





Districts 


Fishing material 




Tugs 


Gasoline Launches 


Sail or Row Boats 


GiU-Xets 




No. 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


Yards 


\'alue 


1 


Lake Si. Clair 






$ 




29 

22 

1 


$ 

13.995 

8,250 

100 


50 

38 

1 


45 
34 
26 


S 

2.825 

1,750 

790 


82 
34 
39 




S 


1 
















s 


















Totals 
























52 


22,345 


89 


105 


5,365 


155 

























Return of the kinds, quantities and %alues of fish caught 





Districts 










-•a 


fj 


.u 




1 


Lake Si. Clair 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 

13,335 
4,391 
7,410 


lbs. 
30,029 


9 










3,370 
200 






26,134 


S 














975 




Totals 






















3,570 






25,136 


57,138 




















S c. 


S c. 


S c. 


S c. 
428.40 


S c. 


S c. 


S c. 
1,256 80 


S c. 
7,999 32 

















1923 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



39 



FISHERIES. 

quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
in the Public Waters of Lake St. Clair. 



Fishing material 



Other fixtures used in 
fishing. 



Seines 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip or Roll 

Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


27 


4.358 
1,310 
2,971 


$ 

4,370 

935 

1,858 


139 
86 


$ 

13,200 
10,725 


2 


$ 

60 




S 


550 

1,600 

300 


S 

22 

92 

5 




$ 


25 
17 


s 

13,560 
8,915 


25 
7 
4 


S 

4,020 


6 










2,675 


25 














930 


























58 


8 639 


7,163 


225 


23,925 


2 


60 






2,450 


119 






42 


22,475 


36 


7,625 






.... 













during the year 1922, in the Public Waters of Lake St. Clair. 



c 
c 
u 

X 


f 


f 


^ 


-§ 


O 




2 
'> 


73 




CJ 

> 


lbs. 
200 


lbs. 


lbs. 

59,165 

33,370 

3.650 


lbs. 


lbs. 

18,126 

13,233 

480 


lbs. 

228,461 
50.872 
33.933 


lbs. 

287,437 
115.750 
58,290 


lbs. 


No. 


lbs. 


S c. 
29,799 80 


7 1 19 




296 






16.365 27 


850 








2,400 


4,812 52 












8 169 




96.185 




31,839 


313,266 


461,477 


296 




2,400 










S c. 
2,695 77 


S c. 


S c. 
4,809 25 


$ c. 


S c. 

2.228 73 


$ c. 
12,530 64 


$ c. 

18,459 08 


S c. 
473 60 


S 


S c. 
96 00 


S c. 
50,977 59 









40 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, the 

fishing industry during the year 1922, 



Districts 



Fishing material 



Tugs 



Ton- 
No. nage Value Men 



Gasoline Launches 



No. Value Men 



Sail or Row Boats 



No. Value Men 



Gill-Nets 



Yards Value 



Lake Erie 



Essex County 

Kent County 

Elgin County 

Norfolk County 

Haldimand County (includ- 
ing Grand River) 

Welland County (including 
Upper Niagara River).. . . 



Totals . 



81 

50 

675 

167 

169 



42,000 

14,000 

166,108 

40.000 

60,000 



18 

16 

131 

46 

37 



37,300 
40,300 
14.100 
16,435 

16,200 

1,450 



104 

132 

82 

63 

47 

6 



6,140 
3,405 
1,033 
3,530 

1,577 

755 



134, 

92, 

567 

219 

335 



18,740 
11,990 
77,610 
21,359 

34,580 

1,455 



39 



1,142 



322,108 



16,440 



230 



1,362,748 



165,734 



Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caught 





Districts 




II 














1 


Lake Erie 


lbs. 


lbs. 

40,595 

190,226 

2,328,927 

2,079,149 

1,636,166 

31,255 


lbs. 
454 


lbs. 

168,516 
22,426 

178,340 
50,908 

326,458 
4,622 


lbs. 


lbs. 

4 


lbs. 

609 

25,375 
65,488 
41,928 

1,101 
9,235 


lbs. 
132,519 


9 






148,504 


T, 










162,045 


4 








321 
201 


11,172 


5 


Haldimand County (in- 




47,998 


6 


Welland County (includ- 
ing Upper Niagara 
River) 




2,832 




Totals 














6,306,318 


454 


751,270 




526 


143,736 


505,070 












S c. 


S c. 

252,252 72 


$ c. 

54 48 


S c. 
90,152 40 


S c. 


S c. 
57 86 


S c. 
7,186 80 


S c. 
70,709 80 











1923 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



41 



FISHERIES. 

quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
in the Public \\ aters of Lake Erie. 













Fishing material 














Other fixture 
fishing 


used in 


Seines 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip or Roll 

Nets 


Night Lines 


_ Freezers and 
Spears ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No 


Value 


6 


1,430 

2,275 


$ 

1,075 
1,475 


201 
215 
147 

22 

64 
6 


$ 

131,700 

473,200 

75,300 

13,000 

31,300 

3,000 


5 


$ 
225 


1 
1 
5 
1 

12 

11 


$ 

50 
10 
50 
10 

108 

66 


1,300 


$ 
190 




S 


1 S 
27 25.550 


14 


$ 

8.470 


7 








34 
25 
12 

13 

3 


80,810 

19,450 

7,254 

7,200 

300 


19 7.750 




2 
33 


100 
701 


1,815 
400 


98 
8 






12 
12 

7 


11,250 


79 


'9,845 
760 
30 


6.625 

522 

57 






4,025 


« 






1,610 


2 






4.475 


142 






















52 14.340 


9,754 


655 


727,500 


40 


1,026 


31 


294 


7.990 


438 






114 


140,564 


64 


33,105 





















during the year 1922, in the Public Waters of Lake Erie. 





"3 


Perch 


a 


'J 


c, 

U 


11 

2" 


a 

.2 
"> 

U 


c2 


Pickerel 
(Blue) 


Value 


lbs. 
18,917 


lbs. 


lbs. 

466,567 
801,381 
542.297 
198,110 

81.727 
18.945 


lbs. 


lbs. 

34,050 
1,365 

13,702 
9,116 

80 


lbs. 

55.801 

66,009 

956 

66.251 

4.1 119 


lbs. 

540.149 

293.461 

73,104 

127,184 

149,118 
44.154 


lbs. 

520 

52 

9 

66 

387 
433 


No. 


lbs. 

748.892 
2,357,006 
1,925,462 

520,930 

675,813 
84,486 


$ c. 

127.063 89 
181,882 09 
248,945 24 
132 540 70 


1.866 






1,083 






1,049 






8.039 


7 


153 505 34 


5,405 




8 1 790 


11,304 53 












36,359 7 


2,109,027 




58,321 


233.926 


1,227,170 


1,467 




6,312,589 












$ c. 

11,998 47 


S c. 
84 


S c. S c. S c. S c. 
105,451 35 4.082 47 9,357 04 

I 1 


$ c. 

49,086 80 


S c. 

2.347 20 


S 

.... 


$ c. 

252,503 56 


$ c. 

855,241 79 



42 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 14 



OXTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, 

fishing industry during the year 1922, 





Districts 










Fishing material 












Tugs 


Gasoline Launches 


Sail or Row Boats 


Gill-Nets 




No. 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


Yards 


Value 


1 


Lake Ontario 






s 




15 

5 

14 

6 

11 

14 

26 

29 

80 

105 

15 

16 


$ 

7.375 

4,100 

8.200 

4,500 

6.750 

5.685 

11.700 

13.175 

31.285 

32.925 

4.150 

5.392 


23 

9 

25 

11 

21 

23 

37 

57 

143 

197 

23 

28 


6 

4 
4 
1 
6 
4 


S 

305 
375 
170 

25 
360 

80 


17 
9 
6 
2 
6 
5 


92.500 

36,100 

138,200 

31,000 

38.700 

50,400 

128.080 

112.500 

429,851 

425,090 

76,200 

42,300 


9,325 


9 












• 4,814 


s 












8,135 


4 


Peel Countv 










3,550 


5 












6,207 


6 












4,570 














12.710 


8 












10 
100 
152 


480 
3.5.59 
6,775 


17 
153 
238 


11,100 


9 












35,324 


in 












36,369 


11 












7,093 


T* 












36 


1,620 


47 


3,797 




Totals 






















336 


134.637 


597 


323 


13,749 


500 


1,600,921 


142,994 

















Return of the kinds, quantities and \ahies of fish caught 





Districts 


Herring, 
salted 






yd 




H"^ 


o 

s 


"^1 

U I. 


1 


Lake Ontario 


lbs. 


lbs. 

17,220 

24,843 

33,520 

5,000 

1.700 

3.007 

3.239 

6.245 

115.256 

112.549 

7.120 

12,909 


lbs. 


1.475 
300 

21 


Ibs. 

56,696 

24.241 

88.763 

15.000 

33,099 

83.309 

146.866 

204.559 

651.804 

646,014 

113,710 

32,558 


lbs. 

• • 

i25 

100 

730 


lbs. 

50.892 
25.730 
46,511 
82,000 
10,011 
6,339 
25,252 
58,265 
328,714 
16,271 
45.835 
25.074 


lbs. 


lbs. 


7 










s 




2.247 


266 




/\ 






5 










6 






158 




7 








8 






17,018 

54,776 

149,206 

1,112 

27,689 


400 


9 

10 


Prince Edward County. . . 
Bav of Quinte 


250 
425 


7.390 
102.938 


11 




2.300 


12 


Frontenac County 

Totals 


300 


3.202 




3.222 


342.608 


1,796 


2.096,619 


955 


720,894 


250,225 


116.230 










S c. 
193 32 


S c. 
13.704 32 


S c. 
215 52 


S c. 
251,594 28 


S c. 
105 05 


S c. 
79,298 34 


$ c. 
12,511 25 


$ c. 
16,272 20 









1923 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



43 



FISHERIES 

the quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
in the Public Waters of Lake Ontario. 



Fishing material 



Other fixtures used in 
fishing. 



Seines 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip or Roll 

Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


V'alue 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


5 


525 
20 
200 
220 
370 
190 


S 

430 
10 
175 
110 
535 
175 




S 




S 


3 


S 
205 




S 




S 


4 


S 
900 


1 


S 
300 


1 




















2 






















1 
3 


150 
500 


4 

1 


1,300 


2 






















300 












1 


5 












2 










600 


6 






4 
1 


450 
100 






































24 
148 
480 


825 
4,830 
15,553 














3 400 
31 4.490 

7 825 






3 


475 
27 


335 
40 






3 
2 


16 
11 


6,625 
8.750 


277 
273 






5 

7 


430 


2 










555 














1 


20 


12 






139 


4.725 






1,800 


80 






12 3.450 


12 


2,940 


















23 


2.047 


1,822 






791 


25,933 


9 


237 


17,775 


636 






66 11.265 


30 


5,825 













(luring the year 1922, in the Public Waters of Lake Ontario. 



s 

X 


(d 


Perch 






c 


Mixed and 
coarse fish 


o 
U 






> 


lbs. 


lbs. 
339 


lbs. 

4,454 

750 

50 


lbs. 


lbs. 
300 


lbs. 

15,680 
6,629 


lbs. 

16.783 

365 

9,510 

7.160 

13.495 


lbs. 


No. 


lbs. 
28.706 


$ c 

15.821 58 










7.050 20 
















17.639 59 


















11,306 40 




459 
782 


100 
194 






14,276 
556 








6,312 01 






840 

2,078 

3,213 

30,385 

115,209 


290 

2.077 

23.589 

110.487 

209.217 

2.036 

53,619 








11.018 73 












20,759 74 




609 
38.051 
77.669 


576 

3.564 

50,910 




375 
60,839 
14,922 

300 
7,427 








33.398 28 


275 










136.779 47 


549 










134.834 71 


100 










19,475 89 


736 


28.937 


13,434 




25.751 








17,746 44 














1 660 


146.846 


74,032 




177.776 


121.004 


448,628 






28.706 














S c. 
547 80 


$ c. 

17,621 52 


S c. 

3.701 60 


S c. 


$ c. 

12.444 32 


$ c. 

4.840 16 


$ c. 
17,945 12 


S c. 


S 


S c. 

1.148 24 


S c. 
432,143 04 













44 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 14 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, 

fishing industry during the year 





Districts 


Fishing material 




Tugs 


Gasoline Launches 


Sail or Row Boats 


Gill-Nets 




No. 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


Yards 


Value 


1 


Itiland Waters 






$ 




4 
15 

5 

3 

1 
8 

10 


$ 

390 
3,450 

775 

900 

200 
4,500 

4.900 


8 
15 

6 

2 

2 
20 

21 


26 
58 

12 

33 

8 
18 

14 


$ 

660 
1,922 

194 

497 

275 
785 

765 


42 
79 

13 

23 

10 

18 

12 







9 
















3 


Grenville, Dundas. Stor- 

mont, Glengarry Counties 

Prescott, Russell. Carleton 














4 










786 


144 


5 


Peterboro and Victoria 












6 
















7 


Temiskaming and Nipissing 
Districts 










30,950 


4,901 




Totals 






















46 


15,115 


74 


169 


5.098 


197 


31.736 


5,045 

















Return of the kinds, quantities and values of fish caugh 





Districts 


Herring, 
salted 


Herring, 
fresh 


o'5 
|l 


- 


it 

21 


o 1> 






1 


Inland Waters 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 

20.076 
17,291 

500 
12,727 
4,016 


lbs. 


T 


Lanark and Leeds County 

Grenville. Dundas. Stor- 

mont. and Glengarry 

















3 
















4 


Prescott, Russell, Carleton 














2.980 


5 


Peterboro and Victoria 




2.665 
1,097 

8,246 


















700 


6.963 
37.673 




34,075 
9,090 




7 


Temiskaming and Nipis- 




50,560 


51.583 




Totals 










12.008 


700 


44,636 




43,165 


105,170 


54.563 












S c. 


S c. 

480 32 


S c. 
84 00 


S c. 
5.356 32 


S c. 


$ c. 
4.748 15 


S c. 
5,258 50 


S c. 
7.638 82 











1923 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



45 



FISHERIES. 

the quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
1922, in Inland Waters. 



Fishing material 


Other fixtures used in 
fishing. 


Seines 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip or Roll 
Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


7 


70 
224 

70 

20 

6 

2,621 


S 

210 
637 

115 

10 

5 
3,767 




$ 


85 
157 


$ 

3,843 
4,770 




$ 




S 




S 


2 
8 

2 

14 

2 
1 

8 


$ 

245 




$ 


13 






2 
2 


4 
3 


3,800 
4,500 
2,750 


73 
152 
63 






750 
200 

524 

100 
1,500 

16,885 


2 


105 


2 












1 






47 

23 

4 

14 


1,281 

800 
120 

505 










1 






10 

4 


56 
30 










10 










151 


1,054 


3 

7 


500 




3 


750 






890 






















34 


3,011 


4,744 


3 


750 


330 


11,319 


18 


93 


11,050 


288 


151 


1,054 


37 


20,204 


12 


1,495 



during the year 1922, in Inland Waters. 



c 
o 

0) 

u 

3 




'u 




O 


U 




.2 

6 


23 
7] 


Pickerel 
(Blue) 


3 


lbs. 


lbs. 

6,728 
10,558 

4,006 

2,049 

843 


lbs. 

3,638 
1,112 

1.890 
15,783 


lbs. 


lbs. 

53,214 
33,973 

1.335 

11,848 

8.024 
245 


lbs. 

516 
2,100 

1,200 

3,775 


lbs. 

71,759 
88,999 

2,660 

41,301 

32,928 
23,024 

55.759 


lbs. 


No. 


lbs. 


S c. 
8 609 04 


3,980 










9 5'' 58 


6,751 




6 






3,085 50 


315 








4,824 93 












2,287 36 




1,685 
896 




304,909 








17,846 41 


730 


8 










18,201 14 


















11,776 


24,192 


25.004 




108.639 


312,500 


316,430 


6 


















S c. 
3,886 08 


$ c. 
2,903 04 


$ c. 
1,250 20 


S c. 


S c. 
7,604 73 


S c. 
12,500 00 


S c. 
12.657 20 


S c. 
9 60 


S 


$ c. 


S c. 
64,376 96 











46 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 14 



ONTARIO 

Recapitulation of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, 

fishing industry during the 





Districts 


Fishing material 




Tugs 


Gasoline Launches 


Sail or Row Boats 


Gill-Nets 




No. 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


Yards 


Value 


1 


Kenora and Rainy River 


7 
21 

8 
21 
10 


115 
536 
224 
557 
283 


$ 

20,400 
81,000 
46,000 
126,600 
59,000 


16 
126 

39 
106 

55 


107 
50 
40 
99 
58 
52 
158 
336 
46 


44,375 

28,825 

22,550 

100,743 

36,565 

22,345 

125,785 

134,637 

15,115 


153 

94 

82 

206 

128 

89 

434 

597 

74 


100 

68 

73 

100 

39 

105 

204 

323 

169 


S 

5,954 
5,910 
7.523 
9,650 
2,155 
5,365 
16,440 
13,749 
5,098 


75 
100 

87 
129 

83 
155 
230 
500 
197 


237,148 
710,200 
285.760 
1,228,534 
782,535 


39,378 


T 




75,468 


3 
4 
5 
6 


Lalce Huron(Xorth Channel) 

Georgian Bay 

Lake Huron (Proper) 


37,707 

123,017 

83,971 


7 




39 


1.142 


322,108 


248 


1,362,748 

1,600,921 

31,736 


165,734 


s 




142,994 


Q 












5,045 




Totals 














106 


2,857 


655,108 


590 


946 


530.940 


1.857 


1.181 


71,844 


1.556 


6,239.582 


673.314 









Recapitulation of the kinds, quantities and values 





Districts 






1" 












1 


Kenora and Rainy River 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 

590,249 
1,198,100 

253.128 

1,068,604 

67,211 

3,570 

751,270 

2,096,619 

44,636 


lbs. 

1 1,723 

5,638 
10,250 
20,804 


lbs. 

87,783 
1,872,321 

647,954 
1,434,831 
1,686,451 


lbs. 

488,360 
30,298 

104,158 
107,662 
5,084 
25,136 
143,736 
250,225 
105,170 


lbs. 
1.041,601 


-> 




27,500 

1.000 
1,300 
3,300 


577,065 

18,191 

73.846 

177,171 


840 

1.150 
508 
900 


164,192. 


3 


Lake Huron (North Chan- 
nel) 


164,312 


4 




121,592 


5 
6 


Lake Huron (Proper) .... 
Lake St. Clair... 


160,299 
57,138 


7 






6,306.318 

342.608 

12,008 


454 

1,796 

700 


955 


526 
720,894 
43,165 


505,070 


S 




3,222 


116,230 


<) 




54.563 




Totals 








36,322 


7,507,207 


6,348 


6,073,387 


49,370 


6,493,925 


1,259,829 


2,384,997 




Values 






S c. 
2,179 32 


S c. 
300,288 28 


S c. 
761 76 


S c. 
728,806 44 


S c. 
5,430 70 


S c. 
714,331 75 


S c. 
62.991 45 


S c. 
333.899 58 









1923 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



47 



FISHERIES. 

the quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures empIo\ed in the 
the vear 1922. 



Fishing material 


Other fixtures used in 
fishiiig. 


Seines 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip or Roll 
Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 






S 


61 

53 

129 

76 

83 

225 

655 


s 

18,800 
20,750 
67.310 
63,650 
49.150 
23.925 
727,500 


46 


$ 
1.442 




S 




s 




S 


98 
26 
45 
35 
32 
42 
114 
66 
37 


S 

27,370 
12,575 
14,840 
10.695 
8,650 
22.475 
140.564 
11,265 
20,204 


74 
18 
34 
37 
20 
36 
64 
30 
12 


s 

12,255 












9,66o 

2,000 

32,600 

3,000 

2,450 

7,990 

17,775 

11.050 


875 
105 
3,755 
240 
119 
438 
636 
288 






7,795 








20 

50 

3 

2 

40 

791 

330 


1,680 

1,166 

225 

60 

1,026 

25.933 

11,319 










16,725 


7 


1,030 
595 
8,639 
14,340 
2,047 
3,011 


1,058 

575 
7,163 
9,754 
1,822 
4,744 










15,600 


12 


1 


5 






4,200 


58 






7.625 


52 


31 
9 
18 


294 

237 

93 






33,105 


23 






5,825 


34 


3 


750 


151 


1,054 


1,495 


186 


29,662 


25,116 


1,285 


971,835 


1,282 


42.851 


59 


629 


85,865 


6,456 


151 


1.054 


495 


268,638 


325 


104,625 



of fish caught during the year 1922. 



5 
if. 


•X 


Porch 


Tullibce 


a, 


U 


11 




7i~ 


Ci'o 

.11 


^ 
> 


lbs. 
4.169 


lbs. 


lbs. 

15,220 
162 

19,210 

2.147 

126,327 

96,185 

2,109.027 

74.032 

25.004 


lbs. 

130,774 
78 


lbs. 


lbs. 

2.640 
7.187 

16,359 
50.442 
3.140 
313.266 
233 926 
121.004 
,^2.500 


lbs. 

148,514 
113.372 

400,645 
87,755 
113,664 
461.477 
1.227.170 
44X.62X 
M6.4«) 


lbs. 

136 
86 

64 

334 

634 

296 

1.467 


No. 


lbs. 

3,600 
250 


S c. 
265 811 38 


23,065 






412,945 43 


12.803 




88 

5,361 

1.255 

31,839 

58.321 

1 n jid 

108.639 


153.381 91 


3.499 




75.027 
131,508 






324.141 09 


10.451 
8.169 




10,969 

2,400 

6,312.589 

28,706 


248.506 02 
50 977 59 


36.359 


7 

145.846 

24.192 




855.241 79 


1 .660 




432.143 04 


11.776 


6 




64.376 96 












111.951 


171,045 


1 1'. <1 1 337,387 


383.2 7'; 


Mi'.' . 




'-mi 




6.358.514 








S c. 

36.943 83 


S c. 

20,525 40 


S c. 
123,365 70 


$ c. 

16.869 35 


$ c. 

26.829 53 


S c. 
42.418 56 


S c. 
132,706 20 


S c. 
4.836 80 


$ 


$ c. 

254.340 56 


S c. 
2.807.525 21 



48 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 14 



Comparative Statement of the Yield of the Fisheries of the Province of Ontario 

according to Districts 



1921 
lbs. 



1922 
lbs. 



Increase 
lbs. 



Decrease 
lbs. 



Kenora and Rainy River Districts: 

Whitefish, salted 

Whitefish, fresh 

Trout, salted 

Trout, fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) 

Sturgeon 

Perch 

TuUibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse 

Caviare 

Pickerel (Blue) 



700 

384,664 

978 

80,342 

451,170 

972,177 

1,842 

7,865 

116,654 

51,062 

7,585 

166,408 

25 



590,249 



205,585 



700 
978 



87,783 

488,360 

1,041,601 

4,169 

15,220 

130,774 



7,441 
37,190 
69,424 

2,327 

7,355 

14,120 



2,640 

148,514 

136 

3,600 



51,062 

4,945 

17,894 



111 
3,600 



Total . 



2,241,472 



2,513,046 



271,574 



(net increase) 



Lake Superior: 

Herring, salted. . . . 

Herring, fresh 

Whitefish, salted. . 
Whitefish, fresh. . . 

Trout, salted 

Trout, fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) . . . 

Sturgeon 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse. 

Caviare 

Pickerel (Blue) 



276,535 

424,826 

200 

1,497,289 

91,224 

1,512,942 

53,977 

199,208 

26,305 



300 

5,462 

72,959 

165 
15,504 



27,500 

577,065 

840 

1,198,100 

11,723 

1,872,321 

30,298 

164,192 

23,065 

162 

78 

7,187 

113,372 

86 

250 



152,239 
640 



249, )35 



359,379 



299,189 
79,501 



162 



23,679 

35,016 

3,240 



222 



1,725 
40.413 



79 

15,254 



Total . 



4,176,896 



4,026,239 



(net decrease) 



150,657 



Lake Huron (North Channel): 

Herring, salted 

Herring, fresh 

Whitefish, salted 

Whitefish, fresh 

Trout, salted 

Trout, fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) 

Sturgeon 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coa se 

Caviare 



Total . 



905 

23,734 

2,250 

664,996 

5,110 

1,589,214 

134,704 

160,719 

12,903 

11,863 

50,161 

4,109 

10,817 

411,610 

235 

3,083,330 



1,000 

18,191 

1,150 

253,128 

5,638 

647,954 

104,158 

164,312 

12,803 

19,210 



95 



528 



5,543 

1,100 

411,868 



3,593 



941,260 
30,546 



100 



7,347 



88 

16,359 

400,645 

64 

1,644,700 



5,542 



50,161 
4,021 



(net decrease) 



10,965 
171 

1,438,630 



1923 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



49 



Comparative Statement of the Yield of the Fisheries of the Province of Ontario 
according to Districts. — Continued. 



1921 

lbs. 



1922 
lbs. 



Increase 
lbs. 



Decrease 

lbs. 



Georgian Bay: 

Herring, salted. . . . 

Herring, fresh 

Whitefish, salted. . 
Whitefish, fresh. . . 

Trout, salted 

Trout, fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) . . . 

Sturgeon 

Perch 

TuUibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse. 
Caviare 

Total 

Lake Huron (Proper) 
Herring, salted. . . . 

Herring, fresh 

Whitefish, salted. . 
Whitefish, fresh . . . 

Trout, salted 

Trout, fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) . . . 

Sturgeon 

Perch 

TuUihee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse. 

Caviare 

Pickerel (Blue).... 

Total 

Lake St. Clair: 

Herring, fresh 

Whitefish, fresh . . . 

Pike ... 

Pickerel (Dore) . . . 

Sturgeon 

Perch 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse. 

Caviare 

Pickerel (Blue).. . . 

Total 



2,750 

61,002 

5,015 

550,415 

17,980 

908,966 

86,813 

38,551 

2,629 

4,435 

82,320 

13,819 

68,727 

138,310 

20 



1 
73 

1,068 

10 

1,434 

107 

121 

3 

2 

75 

5 

50 



300 
846 
508 
604 
,250 
,831 
,662 
,592 
,499 
,147 
,027 
,361 
,442 
,755 
334 



12,844 



518,189 



525,865 

20,849 

83,041 

870 



1,450 
4,567 
7,730 



2,288 

7,293 

8,458 

18,285 

50,555 



314 



1,981,752 



3,043,158 



1,061,406 



(net increase) 



6,100 

103,891 

6,350 

70,143 

12,095 

678,082 

7,067 

125,223 

8,288 

127,136 

121,048 

481 

3,518 

101,925 

4,713 

546 



3,300 

177,171 

900 

67,211 

20,804 

1,686,451 

5,084 

160,299 

10,451 

126,327 

131,508 

1,255 

3,140 

113,664 

634 

10,969 



73,280 



2,800 



5,450 
2,932 



8,709 
1,008,369 



35,076 
2.163 



1,983 



809 



10,460 
774 



11,739 



10,423 



378 
4,079 



1.376,606 



2,519,168 



1,142,562 



(net increase) 



325 

2,400 

54,995 

37,598 

1 1 ,885 

131,304 

67,558 

316,71 

438,073 

3,801 

160 



325 



3,570 

25,136 

57,138 

8,169 

96,185 

31,839 

313.266 

461.477 

296 

2.400 



1,170 



19,540 



29,859 



23,404 



3,716 
35,119 
35,719 

3,451 



2,240 



3,505 



1,064,816 



999,476 



(net decrease) 



65,340 



50 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 14 



Comparati\e Statement of the Yield of the Fisheries of the Province of Ontario 
according to Districts. — Continued. 



Lake Erie: 

Herring, fresh 

Whitefish, salted. . 
Whitefish, fresh. . 

Trout, fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) . . . 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse. 

Caviare 

Pickerel (Blue).. . , 



1921 
lbs. 



5,225,300 

1,851 

964,648 

637 

96,692 

311,021 



15,104 

1,964,898 

68 

45,582 

345,427 

1,071,536 



6,366,554 



1922 
lbs. 



6,306,318 

4.54 

751,270 

526 

143,736 

505,070 

36,359 

7 

2,109,027 



58,321 

233,926 

1,227,170 

1,467 

6,312,589 



Increase 
lbs. 



1.081,018 



47,044 

194,049 

36.359 



144,129 
12,739 



155,634 
1,467 



Decrease 
lbs. 



1,397 

213,378 

111 



15,097 



111,501 



53,965 



Total . 



16,409,318 



17,686,240 



1.276.922 



(net increase) 



Lake Ontario: 

Herring, salted. . . . 

Herring, fresh 

Whitefish, salted. . 
Whitefish. fresh. . . 

Trout, salted 

Trout, fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) . . . 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse. 

Caviare 

Pickerel (Blue)... . 



Total 



2,186 

1,014,419 

10,488 

2,156,986 

29,543 

529,302 

233,143 

73,305 

1,798 

112,226 

87,272 

475 

183,629 

62,867 

415,850 

103 

23,034 



i,221 

342,608 

1,796 

2,096,619 

955 

720,894 

250,225 

116,230 

1,660 

146,846 

74,032 



1 ,036 



671,811 

8,692 

60,367 

28,588 



191,592 
17,082 
42.925 



138 



34,620 



177,776 
121,004 
448,628 



13,240 

475 

5,853 



58,137 
32,778 



103 



28,706 



5,672 



4,936,626 



4,531,201 



(net decrease' 



405,425 



Inland Waters: 
Herring, salted. . . . 

Herring, fresh 

Whitefish, salted. . 
Whitefish, fresh . . . 

Trout, salted 

Trout, fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) . . . 

Sturgeon 

Eels' 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse. 

Caviare 

Pickerel (Blue) . . . . 



Total . 



350 

23,678 

200 

48,138 

100 

10,808 

119,268 

148,800 

69,279 

36,482 

22,464 

500 

131,674 

259,706 

300,096 

1,923 

100 

1.173.566 



12,008 

700 

44,636 



350 
11,670 



43,165 
105,170 
54,563 
11,776 
24,192 
25,004 



500 
32,3.57 



3,502 
100 



14,098 
94,237 
57.503 
12,290 



2.540 



108,639 

312,500 

316,430 

6 



52,794 
16,334 



500 
23,035 



1,058,789 



(net decrease) 



1,917 
100 

114,777 



1923 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



51 



Comparative Statement of the Yield of the Fisheries of the Province of Ontario. 



Kind of Fish. 



Herring, salted. . . 
Herring, fresh. . . . 
Whitefish, salted. . 
Whitefish, fresh . . 
Trout, salted. . . . 

Trout, fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) . . 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse 

Caviare 

Pickerel (Blue).. . 

Total 



1921 

lbs. 



288 

6,877 

27 

6,339 

15 

5,310 

1,237 

2,066 

134 

163 

2,357 

371 

497 

1,080 

3,116 

10 

6,405 



826 
175 
,054 
,679 
,030 
293 
829 
,602 
929 
,812 
,237 
,526 
,914 
,826 
,757 
,985 
,898 



1922 
lbs. 



36, 

7,507, 

6, 

6,073, 

49, 

6,493, 

1,259, 

2,384, 

111, 

171, 

2,467 

337 

383, 

1,060, 

3,317 

3, 

6,358, 



322 
207 
348 
387 
370 
925 
829 
997 
951 
045 
314 
387 
279 
464 
655 
023 
514 



Increase 
lbs. 



630,032 



1,183,632 

22,000 

318,395 



7,233 
110,077 



200,898 



Decrease 
lbs. 



252,504 



20,706 
266,292 
107,660 



22,978 



34,139 

114,635 

20,362 



7,962 

47,384 



36,444,372 



38,022,017 



1,577,645 



(net increase) 



Statement of the Yield of Fisheries of the Province of Ontario for the Year 1922 
as Furnished b^■ the F"ishermen's Annual Returns. 



Kind of Fish 


Quantity- 
lbs. 


Price 
per lb. 


Value 


Herring, salted 

Herring, fresh 

Whitefish, salted. . . 

Whitefish, fresh 

Trout, salted 

Trout, fresh 

Pike 


36,322 

7,507,207 

6,348 

6,073,387 

49,370 
6,493,925 
1,259 829 


$0 06 
04 
12 
12 
11 
11 
05 

'A 

12 
05 
05 
07 
04 
04 
1 60 
04 


2,179 32 

300,288 28 

761 76 

728,806 44 

5,430 70 

714,331 75 

62,991 45 

333,899 58 

36,943 83 

20,525 40 

123,365 70 

16,869 35 

26,829 53 

42,418 56 

132,706 20 

4,836 80 

254,340 56 


Pickerel (Dore) .... 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 


2,384,997 
111,951 
171,045 

2,467,314 
337,387 
383,279 


Catfish 


Carp 

Mixed and Coarse. 

Caviare 

Pickerel (Blue) 


1,060,464 

3,317,655 

3,023 

6,358,514 


Total 


38,022,017 




2,807,525 21 







Prices based on figures furriisiied !;>■ tiic Dtjiiiiiiion i5uie,ui of Statistics. 



52 



THE REPORT UPON GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 14 



Year 



Value of Ontario Fisheries, Years 1901 to 1922, Inclusive. 



Value 



1901 1,428,078 00 

1902 1,265,705 00 

1903 1,535,144 00 

1904 1,793,524 00 

1905 1,708,963 00 

1906 1,734,865 00 

1907 1,935,024 90 

1908 2,100,078 63 

1909 2,237,544 41 

1910 2,348,269 57 

1911 2,419,178 21 



Year 



Value. 



1912 2,842,877 09 

1913 2,674,686 76 

1914 2,755,293 11 

1915 3,341,181 41 

1916 2,658,993 43 

1917 2,866,424 GO 

1918 3,175,110 32 

1919 2,721,440 24 

1920 2,691,093 74 

1921 2,656,775 82 

1922 2,807,525 21 



Statement of the Number and Value of the Tugs, Gasoline, Sail or Row Boats, Nets, 
Spears, Etc., Used in the Fishing Industry of the Province of Ontario During the 
Year 1922. 



Tugs (2,857 tons) 

Gasoline Launches 

Sail or Row Boats 

Gill Nets (6,239,582 yards) 
Seine Nets (29,662 \ ards) . . 

Pound Nets 

Hoop Nets 

Dip or Roll Nets 

Baited Hooks 

Spears 

Freezers and Ice Houses. . . 
Piers and Wharves 




Value 



655,108 00 

530,940 00 

71,844 00 

673,314 00 

25,116 00 

971,835 00 

42,851 00 

629 00 

6,456 00 

1,054 00 

268,638 00 

104,625 00 



Number of men employed on Tugs 

Number of men employed on Gasoline Launches . 
Number of men employed on Sail or Row Boats. 



590 

1,857 
1,556 



Seventeenth Annual Report 



OF THE 



GAME AND FISHERIES 
DEPARTMENT 

1923 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 
THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




TORONTO 
Printed and Published by Clarkson W. James, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 2 4 



PKM)UCeDBy 




SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Game and Fisheries Department of 

Ontario 



To the Honourable Charles McCrea, 

Minister of Mines. 

Sir, — I have the honour to place before you the Seventeenth Annual Report 
of the work of the Game and Fisheries Department for the fiscal year ending the 
31st day of October, 1923. The gross revenue received amounted to $621,148.08, 
and the total expenditures, which include capital expenditures as well as the 
ordinary expenses, were vS391,422.19, so that a net surplus for the year of 
$229,725.89 was obtained. 

Comparative Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, 1916-1923 Inc., 

AS SHOWN IN the PuBLIC ACCOUNTS. 

, Revenue Expenditure Surplus 

1916 $174,186 71 $157,681 94 $16,504 77 

1917 219,442.94 154,055.17 65,387.77 

1918 258,671.62 167,795 22 90,876 40 

1919 346,197.14 185,247 72 160,949 42 

1920 466,550 86 239,978 13 226,572 73 

1921 612,972 86 287,608 87 325,363 99 

1922 737,519 65 347,352 00 390,167 65 

1923 621,148 08 391,422 19 229,725 89 

It will be noted that the total revenue for the current year is lower than for 
the preceding year, and from the following figures you will note that it is almost 
entirely due to a smaller revenue in the game receipts. 

1922 1923 Decrease 

Revenue from Game $499,419 77 $383,477 09 $115,942 68 

Revenue from Fish 238,099 88 237,670 99 428 89 

By comparing the revenues of this year with the preceding year from 
royalties on pelts, trapping and fur dealers' licenses, you will note that the 
major part of the lower revenue may be attributed to a depression in the fur 
trade during the year, as fewer trapping licenses were sold, fewer pelts trapped 
and fewer fur dealers' licenses issued. 

Statistics. 

The statistics accompanying this report will show in detail the kinds, 
quantities and values of commercial fish taken, also the varieties, quantities 
and locations of fry and fingerlings distributed from Provincial hatcheries, 
together with other statistics pertaining to the fur trade, as well as other branches 
of the Department. All of which have been carefully prepared and afford 
interesting and valuable information. 



THE REPORT UPON No. 14 



1921 


1922 


1923 


6,181,883 


6,239,582 


6,018,801 


180 


186 


172 


1,052 


1,285 


1,265 


1,445 


1,282 


1,263 


41 


59 


36 


116 


151 


125 


78,663 


85,865 


71,336 


3,600 


4,003 


3,742 


116 


101 


100 


924 


946 


894 


1,109 


1,181 


1,080 


$3,151,810 00 


$3,352,410 00 


$2,807,368 00 


36,444,372 


38,022,017 


38,594,682 


S2, 656,775 82 


$2,807,525 21 


$2,886,398 76 


Angling. 







Fish. 

The statistics of the commercial fisheries of the Province are shown in 
comparison as follows : — 

Gill nets licensed (yards) 

Seines " 

Pound nets " 

Hoop " " 

Dip and Roll nets licensed 

Spears " 

Hooks " 

Number of men employed 

Number of tugs 

Number of gasoline boats 

Number of sail or row boats 

\alue of boats, ice-houses, wharves and 

twine 

Aggregate catch in pounds 

Value to fishermen 



The fee for a non-resident angling permit in the year 1920 was $2.00, while 

in 1921 the fee was raised to S5.00, and for comparison purposes the revenues 

received from this source from 1920 to 1923 inclusive, were as follows: — 

1920 1921 1922 1923 

Revenue from Angling Permits... . $30,706 85 $56,565 00 $63,132 00 $77,856 75 

Residents are permitted to angle without a permit or fee, except on such 
territories as are legally prohibited. Residents are charged a fee for angling in 
the waters of Lake Nipigon and Nipigon River. The reports received from 
anglers throughout the Province would show that game fish are becoming more 
plentiful and reflects the results obtained from the distribution of fry and finger- 
lings from the Provincial hatcheries in recent years. 

Hatcheries. 

During the year still further progress has been made towards the expansion 
of the Provincial hatchery systems by completing a modern hatchery at Glenora, 
which has now a larger capacity than any other hatchery in the Province. 
This hatchery is located oft the site purchased last year at Glenora in Prince 
Edward County, and as it has a dependable water supply by gravity a large 
distribution can be made from this point each year. This is the first hatchery 
built in the eastern part of the Province, and its capacity will supply the needs 
of a large area that has formerly been supplied from hatcheries at a greater 
distance. A complete report in detail of the waters stocked and the varieties 
distributed will be shown elsewhere in this report, but the following is a summary 
of this year's distribution, together with a summary of the previous year's 
distribution, which will show an increase that is gratifying. 

Whitefish Fry 

Pickerel Frj' 

Salmon Trout Fingerlings and Fry 

Steel Head Salmon Fry 

Herring Fry 

Rainbow Trout Fry 

Speckled Trout Fingerlings and Fry 

Black Bass Fingerlings and Fry 

Parent Black Bass 



1922 


1923 


189,775,000 


264,400,000 


43,510,000 


36,140,000 


7,815,000 


12,410,100 


5,300 




26,250,000 


24,000,000 


21,000 


1,100 


2,184,075 


2,328,800 


613,500 


785,000 


937 


997 


270,174,812 


340,065,997 



1924 GAME AND FISHERIES 5 

The demand for fry and fingerlings is still very great, and each year the 
demand is greater than the supply, although remarkable increased deliveries 
have been made, particularly since 1920, and for comparison purposes the follow- 
ing figures would show the total distribution from 1912 to 1923, inclusive: — 

1912 150,000 1918 58,356,631 

1913 173,815 1919 22,361,748 

1914. 598,630 1920 77,783,360 

1915 1,697,425 1921 155,347,142 

1916 1,570,450 1922 270,174,812 

1917 2,156,928 1923 340,065,997 

Game Sanctuaries. 

Further areas have been created during the year as Crown Game Preserves 
under the authority of Orders-in-Council, and aside from the Provincial Parks, 
the following is a complete list of the areas: — 

Miner Farm Sanctuary Essex County. 

Peasemarsh Farm Sanctuary Grey County. 

Nopiming Game Sanctuary Carleton and Renfrew Counties. 

Eugenia Fish and Game Preserve Grey County. 

Peel Game Preserve Peel County. 

Dumfries Game Preserve Waterloo and Brant Counties. 

Falcon Game Preserve District of Kenora. 

Chippewa Game Preserve District of Thunder Bay. 

Wilder Lake Preserve Grey County. 

Midland Game Preserve Simcoe County. 

The increase in the number of Crown Game Preserves from year to year 
will tend towards improving the supply of wild life in the localities in which 
they are located. Areas that have been set aside up to the present time are not 
extensive, and in some cases very few fur-bearing animals are located therein. 
I would, therefore, strongly recommend that immediate steps be taken to 
provide for one or more sanctuaries in that part of the Province that is suitable 
through natural conditions to provide for the apparent present need of conser- 
vation to all fur-bearing animals, and such area to be of sufficient size, as a 
natural increase therefrom would, to a great extent counter-balance the large 
number of pelts that have been taken out of the Province, particularly during 
the past few years. 

The propagation of English ring-necked pheasants on the Eugenia Crown 
Game Preserve is being continued with marked success, and this year approxim- 
ately 8,000 eggs were produced. 

Plantixg of Wild Rice. 

A supply of wild rice was again distributed to each district warden, who was 
responsible for the planting of same in waters to which the general public 
have access. The Department has received the co-operation and the appre- 
ciation of all sportsmen and local game associations in this work, and the planting 
of wild rice was successful in the majority of waters in which it has been sown, 
and I trust the policy of an annual distribution will be continued. 

Game. 

Deer are reported to be quite scarce in some districts, while quite plentiful in 
others, but on the whole it is considered that fewer deer were taken. Returns 
from sportsmen are not required by the Department and, therefore, definite 
figures cannot be obtained as to the quantity of game animals taken each year. 



THE REPORT UPON No. 14 



Moose are not reported as plentiful except in a few districts. 

A comparison of the number of deer and moose licenses sold for three years 

is as follows: — 

1921 1922 1923 

Resident Moose 1,989 1,584 1,098 

Resident Deer 18,689 20,504 17,877 

Non-resident Hunting 950 1,256 1,247 

Ruffed Grouse (commonly known as partridge) are reported to be very 
plentiful, and the "limit" in number was easily obtained. 

Sharp-tailed Grouse or Prairie Hen are reported to be very plentiful in the 
District of Rainy River, although there is no open season for the taking of these 
birds. 

Quail are still protected by a close season, and are reported to be in fair 
numbers in the Counties of Essex and Kent. 

Pheasants are protected by a close season, and are reported to be very 
plentiful in the Niagara Peninsula. 

Ducks and Geese are reported to be very plentiful and the season has been a 
satisfactory one. 

Furs. 

The catch of fur-bearing animals shows a decrease from the preceding 
year, and a general depression in the fur trade appears to be responsible to some 
extent, as a much smaller number of trappers obtained licenses and a corres- 
ponding fewer number of fur cfealers. 

Beaver. — Fewer beaver were taken than in the preceding year, and are 
reported to be scarce. 

Otter are reported to be becoming scarce. 

Mink and Fisher are still being taken in large numbers. 

Marten are reported to be becoming scarce. 

Muskrat. — A satisfactory catch of muskrat was taken despite the fact 
that there was a very late season last spring, and they are reported to be becoming 
quite plentiful. 

Comparison of Pelts Exported and Tanned for the Years 1921-2-3. 

1921 1922 1923 

Beaver 95,479 93,971 70,684 

Otter 4,759 5,309 3,997 

Fisher 2,602 2,657 2,239 

Marten 6,533 7,327 4,704 

Mink 42,667 78,487 58,634 

Muskrat 479,866 554,888 478,820 

Bear 1,494 2,137 1,447 

Fox (Cross) ? 287 469 1,154 

Fox (Red) 5,282 11,272 12,329 

Fox (Silver or Black) 153 87 205 

Fox (White) 351 1,765 1,501 

Fox (not specified) 23 170 34 

Lynx 591 836 1,177 

Raccoon 11,951 20,344 15,752 

Skunk 47,121 73,219 54,770 

Weasel 58,898 94,399 61,603 

Wolverine 12 6 20 

In addition to the above list there were, during the year, 395 ranch-raised 
fox that were either exported alive or the pelts therefrom exported or tanned. 

The estimated value to the trapper for the pelts taken in 1923, based on an 
average of the prices paid for the year, is !$3, 182 ,395.53. 



1924 GAME AND FISHERIES 7 

Fur Farming. 

Two hundred and eighty-four fur farming permits were issued for 1923, as 
compared with 141 permits issued for the previous year, and for comparison 
purposes the following is a list of animals stocked on fur farms for the years 
1922 and 1923. 

1922 1923 

Beaver 4 2 

Fisher 3 6 

Fox (Cross) 270 361 

Fox (Red) 206 323 

Fox (Silver black) 1,088 2,171 

Lvnx 2 2 

Mink 94 73 

Muskrat . . 163 

Opossum 6 

Raccoon 50 130 

Skunk 82 46 

1,805 3,277 

EXFORCEMEXT OF THE ACT. 

The services performed by the wardens, special patrol officers and overseers 
throughout the Province for the enforcement of the Act and Regulations, were 
carried out generally with efficiency, and with a view of co-operating with the 
Department's policy. 

During the year a steel patrol boat was purchased and equipped, in accord- 
ance with the needs of the patrol service. This boat has carried on very effective 
work on all of the Great Lakes during the year, and has filled a long felt want in 
the fisheries protective service. 

In regard to the enforcement of the Act and for the conservation of all wild 
life the earnest co-operation of the public sportsmen is requested. 

Summary of Convictions, Fine and Confiscations for the Year. 

Convictions 861 

Fines collected $18,155 29 

Sale of confiscations 10,253 86 

The articles confiscated include: 6,057 pelts, 15,711 pounds of fish, 29,769 
yards gill nets, 182 gill nets, 17 hoop nets, 25 dip nets, 4 seines, 18 pound nets, 
16 trap nets, 17 gasoline boats, 48 row-boats, 6 tugs, 6 motor cars, 600 traps and 
3 canoes. 

All confiscations are sold at advertised sales by tender, other than such 
articles as are sold by the Department to the former owner, when circumstances 
warrant. 

The thanks of the Department are due to the transportation companies 
that furnished assistance and co-operation in the distributing of fry, and I wish 
to also express appreciation of the co-operation of the Federal Government 
officials in all matters in which they are concerned, pertaining to fish and game 
and the enforcement of the Regulations in connection therewith. A number of 
fish and game protective associations have also rendered valuable assistance to 
the Department in their efforts to conserve the fish and game of the Province. 
The results obtained by the Department are to no' small extent due to the loyal 
support given by the staff, not only to those who are in the inside service, but 
also to those who are in the field in the outside service of the Department. 



8 THE REPORT UPON ; No. 14 

All statistics referred to will be found elsewhere in this report, together with 
many other statistics in detail. 

It is with deep regret that I have to report that during the year death has 
removed a most efficient officer in the person of Captain John Fleming, who 
occupied the position of District Warden with headquarters at Orillia. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I am, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) D. McDonald, 
Deputy Minister of Game and Fisheries. 



1924 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



REVENUE RECEIVED BY DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 
DURING YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31st, 1923. 



GAME 

Royalty $75,313 42 

Indian Coupons 55,199 00 

Trappers' Coupons 32,360 00 

Trappers' Licenses 51,227 05 

Non-Resident Hunting Licenses 31,175 00 

Resident Deer Licenses 53,633 50 

Resident Moose Licenses 5,490 00 

Fur Dealers' Licenses 51,001 80 

Fur Farmers' Permits 1,463 00 

Tanners' Licenses 190 00 

Game Dealers' Licenses 454 00 

Hotel and Restaurant Licenses, &c 408 00 

Cold Storage Licenses 140 00 

Guides' Licenses 2,068 00 

Fines 14,552 48 

Sales 8,801 84 



$383,477 09 



FISHERIES 

Fishing Licenses 115, 930 00 

Royalty 29,878 51 

Ana;ling Permits 77,856 75 

Fines 3,602 81 

Sales 1,452 02 

Miscellaneous 8,950 90 

Total 



§237,670 99 
$621,148 08 



10 



THE REPORT UPON No. 14 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1923 
Small-Mouthed Black Bass Fry and Fingerlings 



Waters 



Countv or District Quantity 

8,000 



Nettleton Lake Algoma 

Lake Deborne ^^ I'oOO 

Stringer Lake " c'qqq 

Blue Lake Brant 5,UUU 

I. L. Kitchen Lake 

Lake Chesley Bruce 

Poechmaur Lake ^^ 

Brunton Mill Dam • ^^ 10 000 

Lake Huron „ j5'qqq 

Saugeen River Carleton '."'.■■.. 10,000 

Rideau River ^aneton 

Scugog Lake Durham 

Kettle River Elgi" 

Lake Pinafore 

Sharbot Lake Frontenac 



4,000 



5,000 
8,000 
5,000 
2,500 



10,000 
5,000 
2,500 

10.000 

^ , T 1 - ....'.' 10,000 

Eagle Lake.. „ 10,000 

Loughborough Lake ^^ ^ qOq 

Shaw's Lake ^^ s'oOO 

Lucky Lake. Glen^arrv ■ • loioOO 

St. Lawrence River Olengarry ^.^^^ 



4,000 
10,000 
2,500 
5,000 
5,000 



Gorrie Pond Huron 

Grand River Ha dimand 

Gull Lake Haliburton 

Barnam Lake ^^ 

South Lake ^^ 2'500 

Cedar Lake ^^ ' ' ' 2 500 

Beach Lake. 
Devil's Lake 
Day's Lake. 
Dack's Lake 

Black Lake • ^^ 2500 

Wilbermere Lake ^^ 2500 

Percy Lake. ., , 2I5OO 

Lake of Islands „ 2 500 

Deer Lake 

Twelve Mile Creek Halton. . 

.Stoco Lake Hastings 

Crow Lake ^^ 

Moira River ^^ 

Two Sisters ,, 



2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
5,000 



8,000 
5,000 
8,000 
8,000 
4,000 
4,000 



Lake of Islands 1q OPO 

Rondeau Bay t 1 S 000 

Dalhousie Lake Lanark • ^^^^^ 

Black Lake ^^ 2 500 

Clayton Lake • „ 5^000 

Otty Lake „ 2,500 

Christie Lake ^^ 4 qOq 

Robertson's Lake ^, 2500 

Bennett's Lake ' • ' ; jqIoOO 

Charleston Lake Leeas 19,000 

Rideau Lakes ^^ 4000 

Sand Lake ^^ 5000 

Upper Beverly Lake ^^ 4000 

r,yYl":::;;;;;;:::;::::::::::::;;::;:::::un„o.&;«^i^^^^^^^^^^^^ f:^ 

Napanee River „ „ 2,000 

BeaverLake Middlesex - 10,000 

Thames River Middlesex y.^^ 

Clark's Mill Pond „ 2*500 

Pond Mills „ ; ; 2^500 

Currie's Pond ^^ 2,500 

Whittaker Lake „ 2 500 

Foster Lake Manitnnlin '.'■ 8^000 

Lake Manitou Alanitoulin 



1924 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



11 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1923— Continued 



Small-Mouthed Black Bass Fry and Fingerlings 

Waters County or District 

Beasley Lake iVI uskoka 

Peninsular Lake " 

Sparrow Lake " 

Three Mile Lake " 

RIuldrewLake " 

Shadow Lake " 

Long Lake " 

Koshee Lake " 

Buck Lake " 

Maenhood Lake " 

Stewart Lake " 

Cache Lake, Algonquin Park Nipissing 

Lake Nipissing " 

Four Mile Lake " 

Lake Nosbinsing " 

Crow Bay Northumberland .... 

Presque Isle Bav " .... 

Orland Mill Poiid.. " 

Trent River, including Cassidy's Bay " .... 

Cramahe's Lake " .... 

Rice Lake " 

Waterworks Pond Oxford 

Smith's Pond " 

Maplehurst Lake " 

North Lake Parry Sound 

Little Clam Lake " 

Harris Lake " 

Deer Lake " 

Ahmic Lake " 

Bolger Lake " 

Greater Doe Lake " 

Lovering Lake " 

Indian River Peterborough 

Pigeon Lake " 

Stoney Lake " 

Clear Lake " 

Chemong Lake " 

Otonabee River " 

Rice Lake " 

Credit River Peel 

Lake Dore Renfrew 

Mink Lake " 

Muskrat Lake " 

Calabogie Lake " 

Silver Lake " 

Green Lake " 

Bass Lake Simcoe 

Lake Couchiching " 

Severn River " 

Little Lake " 

Orr Lake " 

Park Lake " 

Kempenfeldt Bay (Lake Simcoe) " 

Clear Lake Sudbury 

Lovering Lake " 

Elbo Lake " 

Ramsay Lake " 

Chapleau Lake " 

Kenogami Lake Tin iskaming 

Twin LaKCS " 

Black River " 

Lake of Pines " 

Sturgeon Lake Victoria 

Cameron Lake " 

Balsam Lake " 



Quantity 

5.000 

7.500 

10.000 

5.000 

10.000 

2.500 

5.000 

5,000 

2,500 

2,500 

5,000 

5.000 

10,000 

5.000 

5.000 

2,500 

5,000 

2,500 

8,000 

2,500 

10,000 

2,500 

2,500 

2,500 

2,500 

2,500 

5,000 

2.500 

5,000 

2,500 

2.500 

2.500 

5.000 

10,000 

15,000 

5,000 

10.000 

5,000 

5,000 

10,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

5,000 

4,000 

4,000 

5,000 

10,000 

20,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

8,000 

4.000 

5,000 

5.000 

5.000 

5.000 

15.000 

10.000 

5,000 



12 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 14 



WATERS STOCKED 

WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1923— Continued 

Small-Mouthed Black Bass Fry and Fingerlings 



Waters County or District 

Big Mud Turtle Lai<e Victoria 

Pigeon Creek " 

Grand River Waterloo 

New Dundee Lake " 

Wellesley Dam " 

Bamburg Lake " 

Puslinch Lake Wellington 

Speed River " 

Gibson Lake Welland 

Hamilton Bay Wentworth 



Parent Black Bass 

Waters County or District 

Bad Vermilion Lake . . . ' Rainy River 

Ramsay Lake Sudbury 

Loon Lake Thunder Bay 

Nipigon Bay " " 



Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 

Waters County or District 

Lake Mabel Algoma 

St. Mary's River " 

Clear Lake " 

Agawa River " 

Morrison River " 

Mongoose Lake " 

Spruce Lake " 

Loon Lake " 

Pine Lake " 

Hobon Lake " 

Frater Lake " 

South Chippewa River " 

Batchewana River " 

Sand Lake " 

Speckled Trout Brook " 

Lake Elizabeth " 

Silver Creek " 

Driving Creek " 

Beryl Lake " 

Coldwater Creek " 

Root River " 

Lonely Lake " 

Little Carp Creek " 

St. Ann " 

Switzer's Creek Brant 

Barker's Creek " 

Black River Bruce 

Thomson's Creek " 

Monkman's Creek " 

Sullivan Creek " 

Wolf Creek " 

Judge's Creek " 

Kirkland's Creek " 

Rourke's Creek " 

Formosa Spring Creek " 

Stoney Spring Creek " 

Cavan Creek tributary Durham 

Tyrone Creek and tributaries " 

Wilmot's Creek " 

Courtice Creek " 

Haydon Stream tributary " 

Smith's Creek " 

Devitt's Creek " 







uantity 
5,000 
5,000 

10,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5.000 
5.000 
5,000 
4,000 

10,000 



Quantity 
250 
250 
243 
254 



Quantity 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

60,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

20,000 

10,000 

10,000 

30,000 

10,000 

10,000 

7,000 

24,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

10,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

12,500 

5,000 

5,000 

2,500 

4,500 

2,000 



1924 GAME AND FISHERIES 13 

WATERS STOCKED 

WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1923— Continued 

Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 

Waters County or District Quantity 

Spring Creek Durham 5,000 

Pigeon Creek tributary " 5,000 

Mountjoy's Creek . . . ." " 2,000 

Steven's Creek and tributaries " 12,500 

Thompson's Creek " 2,500 

Glass Greek " 5,000 

Kendal Creek " 5,000 

Cawker's Creek " 2,500 

Tucker's Creek " 2,500 

Wintermute Stream " 10,000 

Baldwin Creek " 2,000 

Brown's Pond " 1,000 

Esson's Creek. Dufferin 6,000 

Hill Creek " 5,000 

Curt-s Creek " 5,000 

Phillip's Creek " 5,000 

Boyles Creek " 6,000 

Credit River " 6,000 

Grand River " 10,000 

Buck Creek Elgin 5,000 

Spring Creek " 10,000 

Gunstone Creek " 5,000 

Smith's Spring Creek " 10,000 

Cole Creek Frontenac 10,000 

Skunk Creek Grev 3,000 

Patterson's Creek " 2,000 

Wm. McGregor's Stream " 2,000 

Saugeen River and tr'butar-es " 34,000 

Beaver River " 5,000 

Ed. Heft's Stream " 2.000 

Park's Lake " 2.000 

Sydenham River, "Harrison's Park" " 40,000 

Holstein Mill Pond " 2,000 

Spring Creek, near Pricevillc " 2,000 

Pettv's Creek " 2,000 

Varney Creek " 2,000 

Eugenia Crown Game and Fish Preserve Lake. ... " 100,000 

Beattv Saugeen River " 2,000 

Stream near Meaford " 5,000 

Spring Brook (Meaford) " 5,000 

Hamel's Creek " 2,000 

Lake on Lot 5, Concession 3 " 2,000 

Branch Big Head River " 10,000 

Spring Creek '.... " 2,000 

Maitland River tributary " 5,000 

Sharp's Creek Huron 5,000 

Patterson's Creek " 5,000 

McMichael's Creek " 5,000 

Murray's Creek " 5,000 

Benmil'ler Stream " 5,000 

Nine Mile River " 7,500 

Naftel's Creek " 5,000 

Hollow Lake Haliburton 8,000 

Clement Lake " 2,000 

Twelve Mile Creek Halton 10,000 

Creeks near Acton . " 5,000 

Lake St. Peter Hastings 5,00a 

Squire's Creek " 10,000 

Rawdon Creek " 15,000 

Spring Creek " 5,000 

McAvov Stream " 5,000 

Mayhew's Mill Pond " 4,800 

Carls Creek " 5,000 

Sager's Creek " 5,000 

Sand Lake Leeds 10,000 



U THE REPORT UPON No. 14 

WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN \92i— Continued 

Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 

Waters County or District Quantity 

Twenty Mile Creek Lincoln 2,000 

Duncrief's Creek Middlesex 7,000 

Spring Brooks " 7,000 

Thames River tributary " 8,000 

Clark's Mill Pond " 5,000 

Mill Creek " 7,000 

Douty Creek " 7,000 

River Lynn " 7,000 

Blue Jay River Manitoulin 20,000 

Grimesthorpe Creek " 5,000 

Muskoka River tributary Muskoka 5,000 

Patterson's Creek Norfolk 5,000 

Kent Creek " 10,000 

Winter's Creek " 10,000 

McMichael's Spring Creek " 7,000 

Black Creek " 5,000 

Gravel Pit Pond " 5,000 

Lake Hunger Outlet Creek " 5,000 

Dower Creek " 5,000 

Castleton Creek Northumberland 5,000 

W^oodland Creek " 5,000 

Eddistone Creek " 6,000 

Mutton's Creek " 8,000 

Allen's Creek " 2,000 

Coal Creek « 2,000 

Spring Valley Reservoir " 2,000 

West Creek " 2,000 

Cronk's Creek " 2,000 

Montgomery Stream " 5,000 

Miller's Creek " 2,000 

Owen's Creek " 2,000 

Cedar Creek " 2,000 

Tweedle's Creek " 2,000 

Jackson's Creek " 2,000 

Cole Creek " 4,000 

Piper Creek " 2,000 

Burnley Stream " 5,000 

Hayden's Creek " 5,000 

Camborne Creek " 5,000 

Smylle Creek " 5,000 

Syke's Creek " 5,000 

Bredin's Creek " 5,000 

Shelter Valley Creek " 2,000 

Spring Creek, near Brighton " 5,000 

Large Creek, near Brighton " 2,000 

Snelgrove's Creek " 2,000 

Hodgson Creek tributary " 5,000 

Maple Grove Creek " 2,000 

Dawson Creek " 2,000 

Valentine's Creek " 2,000 

McGregor's Creek " 2,000 

Warren's Creek " 2,000 

Hannah's Creek " 2,000 

Forestell's Creek " 2,000 

Wamsley Creek " 2,000 

Spring Creek Ontario 10,000 

Black Creek " 10,000 

Cedar Creek Oxford 8,000 

Deer Creek " 8,000 

Brooksdale Stream " 8,000 

Cooley Pond " 5,000 

Venison Creek " 8,000 

Black Lake Parry Sound 2,000 

Lake Bernard " " 4,000 

Trout Lake " " 2,C00 



1924 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



15 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 192^— Continued 



Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 

Waters County or District 

Trout Creek Prince Edward .... 

Stinson's Mill Creek " " .... 

Ouse Creek Peterborough 

Spillsbury's Creek " 

Plato Creek " 

Moffat Stream Peel 

Columbia Stream " 

Mason's Creek " 

Bingham's Creek " 

Dohertv's Creek " 

Coffey's Creek " 

Humber River " 

Spring Creek on Wm. Sutherland's Perth 

Hill's Pond " 

Silver Spring Dam " 

MacKay's Creek " 

Pipestone River Rainy River 

Little Canoe River " " 

Heart Lake Renfrew 

Mad River Simcoe 

Boyne River " 

Cold water River " 

Sturgeon River " 

Noisy River " 

Nottawasaga River " 

Parker's Creek " 

Pretty Rivers " 

Avon River " 

Spring Ponds " 

Lafontaine Creek 7 " 

Willow Creek " 

Silver Creek " 

Twin Lakes Sudbury 

Ruff's Creek " 

Massey Creek " 

Nelson River " 

Movien Lake " 

Allen Lake Thunder Bav 

Trout Lake 

Shebandawan Ri\er " " 

Lake Wideman " " 

Lower Twin Lake " " 

Upper Twin Lake " " 

Loon Lake * " " 

Silver Lake " " 

Pitch Creek " " 

Whitewood Creek " " 

Pitt's Creek " " 

Corbett's Creek " " 

Slate River " " 

Pine River " " 

Cedar Creek " " 

Neebing River " " 

Sunshine Creek " " 

Oliver Lake " " 

Brulu Creek " " 

Nipigon River " " 

Stewart Lake ' " " 

Gravel Lake " " 

Castle Lake " " 

Clearwater Lake " " 

Anderson Lake " " 

Grass Lake " " 

Windy Lake " " 

Niagara Lake " " 



Quan 

5, 

10 

10 

10 

10 

6 

5 

5 

5 

5, 

5 

5 

5 

10 

5 

10 
5 
5 

10 
5 
5 
5 

10 
5 
2 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 

15 
10 
20 
20 
10 
10 
25 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
20 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10, 
10, 
10 
10 
10 
10 
200 
25 
10 
10 
20 
10 
10 
10 
10 



tity 

,000<^=r- 

,000 ^l__ 

,000^ 

,000 

,000 

000 

,000 

.000 

,000 

,000 

,000 

,000 

000 

,000 

,000 

,000 

,000 

,000 

,000^:17 

,000 

000 

000 

,000 

,000 

,000 

,000 

,000 

,000 

,000 

,000 

,000 

,000 

.000 

,000 

,000 

,000 

,000 

,000 

,000 

,000 

000 

,000 

,000 

000 

000 

000 

.000 

000 

000 

000 

000 

000 

000 

000 

000 

000 

000 

000 

000 

000 

000 

000 

000 

000 

000 



16 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 14 



WATERS STOCKED 



WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1923— Continued 



Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 

Waters County or District 

Spirit Lake Thunder Bay 

Hilma Lake " " 

Sunday Creek Timiskaming 

Potter's Lake '. " 

Long Lake " 

Fairy Lake " 

Lake Timagami " 

Mill Creek Waterloo 

Sweitzer's Dam " 

Schmidt's Stream " 

Schnarr's Creek " 

Cook's Creek " 

Patterson's Creek " 

Bloomingdale Creek " 

Beverley Creek Wentworth 

Strabane Creek " 

Dundas Creek " 

Britton Creek " 

Binkley Creek " 

Moir's Creek Wellington 

Eden Mills' Stream " 

Rothsay Creek " 

Rea's Creek " 

McDonald's Creek " 

Henderson 's Creek " 

Rodger's Creek " 

Speed River " 

Credit River " 

Hanlon's Stream " 

Spring Creeks Welland 

Spring Creeks York 

Eastern Black River " 



Quantitv 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

15,000 

15,000 

10,000 

10,000 

5,000 

5.000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

10,000 

20,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

5,000 

8,000 

8,000 

10,000 

5,000 

5,000 

8,000 

5,000 

5,000 

4,000 

20,000 

10,000 

10,000 



Salmon Trout Fry and Fingerlings 

Waters County or District 

Trout Lake Algoma 

Lake Superior " 

North Channel " 

Lake La Cloche " 

Mud Lake " 

Basswood Lake " 

Round Lake " • 

Lake Maud " 

Matintinde Lake " 

Mitchell Lake " 

Island Lake " 

Lake Louzon " 

Lonely Lake " 

Canoe Lake " 

Echo Lake " 

Hunter Lake " 

Weashcog Lake " 

Mississagagon Lake ' Frontenac 

Sharbot Lake " 

Upper St. Andrews Lake " 

Trout Lake " 

Big Lake " 

Grindstone Lake " 

Buckshot Lake " 

Brule -Lake " 

Kashamaganog Lake Haliburton , 

Drag Lake " 

Spruce Lake " 



Quantity 
10,000 
3,440,000 
2,930,000 
40,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25.000 
10,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 
10,000 
25,000 
10,000 
25,000 
15,000 
35,000 
10,000 
10,000 
20,000 
25,000 
30,000 
40,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 



1924 GAME AND FISHERIES 17 

WATERS STOCKED 

WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1913,— Continued 

Salmon Trout Fry and Fingerlings 

Waters Countv or District Quantity 

Gull Lake Haliburton 10,000 

Davis Lake " 10,000 

East Lake " • 10,000 

Mountain Lake " 10,000 

Papineau Lake Hastings 10,000 

Eagle Lake " 10,000 

BaptisteLake " 10,000 

Trout Lake " 10,000 

L'Aniable Lake " 10.000 

Upper Manitou Lake Kenora 50,000 

Lake Lulu " 10.000 

Minnitako Lake " 50,000 

Agenak Lake " 50,000 

Pelican Lake " 50,000 

Silver Lake Lanark 10,000 

Pike Lake " 10,000 

Rideau Lakes " 25,000 

Rideau Lakes Leeds 25.000 

Charleston Lake " 25,000 

Red Horse Lake " 10,000 

Grippen Lake " 10,000 

Beaver Lake Lennox and Addington 10,000 

Westlemkoon Lake " " 10,000 

Muskoka Lake Muskoka 25,000 

Joseph Lake " 25,000 

LakeofBavs " 15,000 

Prospect Lake " 10.000 

Lake Rosseau " 25.000 

Clear Lake " 20,000 

Cache Lake, Algonquin Park Nipissing ■ 250,000 

Four Mile Lake " 10,000 

Trout Lake " 10,000 

Little Trout Lake, Algonquin Park " 25,000 

Clear Lake, Algonquin Park " 50,000 

Doe Lake, Algonquin Park " 40,000 

Rainv Lake, Algonquin Park " 25,000 

Hilliard Lake, Algonquin Park " 50,000 

Brule Lake, Algonquin Park " 50,000 

Cranberry Lake, Algonquin Park " 50,000 

Canoe Lake, Algonquin Park " 100,000 

Joe Lake, Algonquin Park " 50,000 

Lady Joe Lake, Algonquin Park " 25,000 

Source Lake, Algonquin Park " 100,000 

Islet Lake, Algonquin Park " 150,000 

Buck Lake, Algonquin Park " 35,000 

Horseshoe Lake Parry Sound 10,000 

Three Mile Lake "' " 15,000 

Eagle Lake " " 10,000 

Lake Bernard " " 15,000 

Loon Lake Peterboro : 100 

Elbow Lake Rainv River 50.000 

Steep Rock Lake " ' " 50,000 

Baril Lake " " 50,000 

Rainy Lake " " 50,000 

Mink Lake " " 50,000 

Laurawell Lake Renfrew 10,000 

Lake Dore " 15.000 

Muskrat Lake " 15,000 

Calabogie Lake " 10,000 

Golden Lake " 10,000 

Lake Simcoe Sinicoe 20,000 

Trout Lake Sudbury 10,000 

Bigwood Lake " 15,000 

Lake Nipigon Thunder Bay 1 ,000.000 

Kashabowie Lake " • " 50.000 



WATERS STOCKED 
.,TH QUAXT,T.HS ANO KINDS O. F.SH PLANTED >X m3-«.« 

Salmon Trout Fry and Fingerhngs 

County or District 
. .Thunder Bay 



lied 



Waters 



Long Lac • 

Lake Shebandawan «' . 

Little Long Lake •; « ^^ . 

Arrow Lake " 

LakeHellen • " ;; 

Windigo Lake " 

HaselLake « 

Lake Superior Timiskaming . 

Kenogami Lake ' ' ' / " 

Twin Lakes ' " 

Long Lake 

McLeod Lake " 

Hill's Lake 



Pickerel 



Algoma 

Lake La Cloche Bruce 

Lake Chesley Carleton 

Rideau River ' Durham 

Scugog Lake ... Frontenac 

fSharbot Lake " 

-Loon Lake " 

\Lake Mississagagon « 

Sand Lake " 

;Devil Lake " 

Cranberry Lake " 

fLong Lake Glengarry 

Lake St. Frances Grey 

Pearl Lake Haliburton 

^onkell Lake Hastings 

jStoco Lake " 

\Crow Lake .... " 

aVIoira River « 

\ipunter Lake ... " 

'Wadsworth Lake « 

(Deer Lake _ « 

VJrent River Huron 

Maitland River Lanark 

Dalhousie Lake « 

Mississippi Lake « 

Christie Lake " 

Patterson Lake " 

Bennett's Lake " 

Rideau River " 

Rideau Lakes Leeds 

Rideau Lakes « 

Charleston Lake " 

Killenback Lake " 

Higley Lake ... " 

LakeEloida " 

Bass Lake " 

Green's Lake " ' 

Lyndhurst Lake « 

Atkinson's Lake " « ..■■.■ ■ •, ;^- 

Jerome's Lake Lennox and Addmgton. 

Beaver Lake . . Middlesex 

Thames River . " 

Pond Mills .... " 

Aux Saubles River Muskoka 

Beasley Lake ' " 

North Lake " 

Sparrow Lake ' ' " 

Gull Lake 



Quantity 

50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
2,005,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 
10,000 



50,000 
50,000 
200,000 
500,000 
200,000 
100,000 
100,000 
50,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
200,000 
50,000 
100,000 
20,000 
200,000 
200,000 
100,000 
100,000 
150,000 
400,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
150,000 
100,000 
150,000 
100,000 
250,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
100,000 
250,000 
100,000 
200.000 
50,000 
50,000 
250,000 
50,000 



1924 GAME AND FISHERIES 19 

WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1923—Conlimied 

Pickerel. 

Waters Countv or District Qupptifx' 

Long Lake Muskoka 300,000 

Musquash River " 50,000 

Leech Lake " 100,000 

Deer Lake " 50,000 

HenshawLake " 100.000 

Hartt'sLake " 100,000 

Cache Lake, Algonquin Park Nipissing 150,000 

Lake Nosbinsing " 50,000 

Trent River Northumberland 100,000 

Mud Lake Ontario 50,000 

Poole Lake Parrv Sound 50,000 

Harris Lake "' " 50,000 

AhmicLake " " 50,000 

Wolf Lake " " 50,000 

CecebeLake " " 50,000 

RutheLake " " 50,000 

Manitawaba Lake " " 50,000 

Kashegabagamog Lake " " 50,000 

Rice Lake Peterborough 200,000 

StonevLake ^^^ 1,100,000 

Clear'Lake " 100,000 

Jack's Lake " 100,000 

Little Canoe River Rainy River 3,250,000 

RainvLake " " 20,320,000 

Muck's Lake Renfrew 50,000 

Ottawa River " 50,000 

Pike Lake - " 50,000 

LakeDore " 50,000 

Mink Lake " 50.000 

MuskratLake " 50,000 

Golden Lake " 100,000 

Silver Lake " 100,000 

Petawawa River " 50,000 

Lake Couchiching Simcoe 100,000 

Severn River " 300,000 

Cook's Lake " 50.000 

Loon Lake Sudbury 100,000 

ApseyLake " 200,000 

Kashabowie Lake Thunder Bay 750,000 

Sturgeon Lake Victoria 750,000 

Balsam Lake " •■ . . 100,000 

Grand River Waterloo 200,000 

Hamilton Bay Wentworth 500,000 

Whitefish 

• Waters Countv or District Ouantitv 

Lake Superior Algoma 32,000,000 

North Channel " 41,000,000 

Lake Ontario Durham 2,000,000 

Lake Ontario Halton 6,000,000 

Eagle Lake Kenora 500,000 

Wabigoon Lake " 2,500.000 

Lake Ontario Lincoln 2,000.000 

Lake Erie Norfolk 87.500,000 

Lake Ontario Northumberland 2,000.000 

Lake Ontario Ontario 2.000.000 

Lake Ontario Peel 2.000.000 

Rainy Lake Rainy River 25,725.000 

Mink Lake " " 500,000 

Little Turtle Lake " " 1,200,000 

Elbow Lake " " 1,000,000 

BarilLake " " 500.000 

Arrow Lake Thunder Bay 1,000.000 

HaselLake " " 100,000 



20 THE REPORT UPON No. 14 

WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1923— Continued 

Whitefish 

Waters Countv or District Quantity 

Kashabowie Lake Thunder Bav 1,000,000 

Shebandowan Lake " " 1,000,000 

Lake Superior : " " 37,475,000 

Lake Hellen " " 1,000,000 

Lake Nipigon " " 10,000,000 

Little Long Lake " " 500,000 

Long Lake " " 1,000,000 

Lake Ontario Wentworth . . ' 2,000,000 

Herring 

Waters Count\' or District Quantity 

Lake Ontario Durham 2,000,000 

Lake Ontario Halton 4,000,000 

Lake Erie Norfolk 16,000,000 

Lake Ontario Wentworth 2,000,000 

Raifiboxv Trout 

Waters County or District Quantity 

Kaministiquia River Thunder Bay 1,100 



SUMMARY 



Black Bass Fry and Fingerlings 785,000 

Parent Black Bass 997 

Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 2,328,800 

Salmon Trout Fry and Fingerlings 12,410,100 

Pickerel 36,140,000 

Whitefish 264,400,000 

Herring 24,000.000 

Rainbow Trout 1,100 



Total distribution 340,065,997 



COMPARATI\'E STATEMENT OF DISTRIBUTION 

1921 1922 1923 

Small-mouthed Black Bass Fry and Fingerlings. 773,500 613,500 785,000 

Parent Small-mouthed Black Bass 742 937 997 

Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 1,147,500 2,184,075 2,328,800 

Salmon Trout Fry and Fingerlings 110,400 7,815,000 12,410,100 

Pickerel 27,625,000 43,510,000 36,140,000 

Whitefish 115,950,000 189,775,000 264,400,000 

Herring 9,740,000 26,250,000 24,000,000 

Rainbow Trout 21,000 1,100 

Steel Head Salmon 5,300 



155,347,142 270,174,812 340,065,997 



22 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 14 



ONTARIO 

Recapitulation of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boals> 

fishing industry during 





Districts 






Fishing 


material 








Tugs 


Gasoline Launches 


Sail or Row Boats 


Gill-Nets 




No. 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


Yards 


Value 


1 


Kenora and Rainy River 
District 


5 
20 

6 
22 
11 

2 
34 


lOfl 
472 
110 
575 
313 
12 
898 


S . 

11,230 
81,300 
23.000 

132.400 

66.212 

1.580 

231,000 


13 
115 

26 
106 

56 

4 

217 


110 
44 
29 
96 
67 
55 
136 
312 
45 


S 

49.185 
23,350 
18,850 
83.770 
47,416 
21,905 
104,950 
123.350 
20,850 


153 

77 

55 

197 

125 

77 

369 

572 

80 


67 
70 
49 
80 

43 

87 

201 

328 

155 


$ 

2,526 
6,475 
3.685 
5.727 
2,592 
4,955 
17.195 
17,229 
4,679 


47 
101 

49 
124 

82 

85 
197 
500 
315 


253.619 
878.810 
246.380 
1,190,227 
782,000 


S 

35,234 


2 
3 
4 
5 
6 


Lake Superior and District. 
North Channe!(Lake Huron) 
Georgian Bay (Lalce Huron) 

Lake Huron (Proper) 

Lake St. Clair 


79,418 

19,282 

118,257 

91,460 




1.164,416 

1,467,364 

35,985 


171,009 


8 




141.586 


q 












6,088 




Totals 














100 


2,480 


546,722 


537 


894 


493.626 


1,705 


1,080 


65,063 


1,500 


6,018,801 


662,334 



Recapitulation of the kinds, quantities and values 





Districts 


h 




X 


Whitcfisli 
fresh 




^ 





- a 


1 


Kenora and Rainy River 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 

603.612 
1.267,377 

175,487 

1,213,681 

127.909 

2,140 

536.123 

2,563,764 

25.872 


lbs. 

'2,346 

1 ,665 

9,935 
9.848 


lbs. 

73,044 
1,956.211 

357.970 

1.344,676 
1,694,660 


lbs. 

455.191 
22.809 

77.656 

105.897 

13.505 

22.941 

129.585 

280.800 

87,846 


lbs. 
1.151.748 


2 
3 


Lake Superior and district 
North Channel (Lake 


18,000 

385 

1,140 
4,000 


1.078,958 

10.382 

71.314 
147.583 


1,000 

28 

825 
1,000 


158.705 
143,626 


4 


Georgian Bay (Lake Hur- 


120,318 


5 
6 


Lake Huron (Proper) . . . . 


219,133 
72,431 


7 






9.241.118 

249.635 

7,370 


'2.356 
940 


""6,169 


239 

748,781 

34,814 


602,564 


8 




6,427 


167,985 


9 




54,685 




Totals 








29,952 


10.806,360 


6,143 


6,515,965 


29.957 


6.210,395 


1.196.230 


2,691,195 










S c. 

1,797 12 


S c. 

432,254 40 


$ c. 

737 16 


S c. 
781,915 80 


S c. 

3.295 27 


$ c. 
683.143 45 


S c. 
59.811 50 


$ c. 
376.767 30 









1924 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



23 



FISHERIES. 

the quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the 
the vear 1923. 



Fishing material 


Other fixtures used in 
fishing. 


Seines 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip or Roll 

Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 






S 


56 
52 
90 
82 
108 
216 
658 


S 

11.761 
20,545 
39,000 
69,800 
67,050 
25,635 
410,150 


30 

5 

25 

34 

2 

2 

76 

772 

317 


$ 

871 

30 

2,060 

718 

150 

40 

2,219 

24,923 

10,054 




$ 




$ 




$ 


93 
21 
31 
36 
32 
40 
103 
66 
34 


S 

25,793 
10,600 

8,815 
18,900 
10,200 
13,650 
130,435 
12,235 

4,485 


65 
24 
26 
31 
24 
13 
57 
31 
8 


$ 

7,225 












2.500 


225 






9,954 
















11,800 


1? 


935 

535 

7,050 

12,025 

1,566 

3,648 


478 
422 
4,893 
8,229 
1,444 
5,350 






30.241 
3,035 
4,100 
6,910 

15,750 
8,800 


3,851 
342 
127 
207 
677 
384 


1 


1 


14,950 


8 






7 300 


34 










8,475 


47 


18 

5 

13 


168 

254 

53 






25,523 


21 






4,820 


50 


3 


650 


124 


867 


835 


172 


25,759 


20,816 


1,265 


644.591 


1,263 


41,065 


36 


475 


71.336 


5,813 


125 


868 


456 


235,113 


279 


90,882 



ofjfish caught during the year 1923 



Sturgeon 


"3 


IX 


1; 


a 
U 


0. 


Mixed and 
coarse fish 


.2 
U 


35 


•S5 


3 


lbs. 
14,023 


lbs. 


lbs. 
4,684 


lbs. 

111.692 
600 


lbs. 


lbs. 

13,814 
4,732 

122 
52,303 
6,474 
304,871 
286,319 
102,989 
361,697 


lbs. 

131,267 
49,665 

394,478 
51,548 
101,494 
351,786 
1,286,587 
377,544 
269,950 


lbs. 

543 
10 

25 

345 

927 

700 

1,837 

56 

26 


No. 


lbs. 
3,835 


$ c. 

281,744 38 


27,238 






446,453 74 


8.322 


2 


20,810 

3,615 

118,022 

56,773 

2,396,778 

82,703 

17,537 


50 

7,300 

399 

43,228 

57,765 

180,761 

107,605 






104,664 97 


5.371 


81,568 
121,004 






331,056 88 


11,766 
22.543 


195 




3,550 

3,325 

3,193.677 

49.868 

500 


262,291 48 
52,367 27 


40,888 


510 

123,940 

19,998 




855,883 19 


2,948 
10,766 


217 


492,857 65 
59,079 20 








143,865 


144.645 


2,700,922 


315,081 


397,108 


1,133,321 


3,014,319 


4,469 




3,254.755 








$ c. 

47,475 45 


« c. 
17,357 40 


$ c. 
135,046 10 


$ c. 

15.754 05 


$ c. 

27,797 56 


$ c. 

45.332 84 


$ c. 
120,572 76 


$ c. 
7.150 40 


$ 


$ c. 
130.190 20 


$ c. 

2,886,398 76 



24 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 14 



Comparative Statement of the Yield of the Fisheries of the Province of Ontario 
according to Districts. 



1922 
lbs. 



1923 
lbs. 



Increase 
lbs. 



Decrease 
lbs. 



Kenora and Rainy River Districts: 

Whitefish, fresh 

Trout, fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) 

Sturgeon 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse 

Caviare 

Pickerel (Blue) 



590,249 

87,783 

488,360 

1,041,601 

4,169 

15,220 

130,774 

2,640 

148,514 

136 

3,600 



603,612 

73,044 

455,191 

1,151,748 

14,023 

4,684 

111,692 

13,814 

131,267 

543 

3,835 



13.363 



110,147 
9,854 



14,739 
33,169 



11,174 



10,536 
19,082 



407 
235 



17,247 



Total , 



2,513,046 



2,563,453 



50,407 



(net increase) 



Lake Superior: 

Herring, salted . . . . 

Herring, fresh 

Whitefish, salted. . 
Whitefish, fresh. . . 

Trout, salted 

Trout, fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) . . . 

Sturgeon 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse. 

Caviare 

Pickerel (Blue) . . . . 



27,500 

577,065 

840 

1,198,100 

11,723 

1,872,321 

30,298 

164,192 

23,065 

162 

78 

7,187 

113,372 

86 

250 



18,000 

1,078,958 

1,000 

1,267,377 

2,340 

1,956,211 

22,809 

158,705 

27,238 



600 

4,732 

49,665 

10 



501,893 

160 

69,277 



9,500 



9.383 



83,890 



4,173 
' 522 



7,489 

5,487 



162 



2,455 

63,707 

76 

250 



Total . 



4,026,239 



4,587,645 



561,406 



(net increase) 



Lake Huron (North Channel) : 

Herring, salted 

Herring, fresh 

Whitefish, salted 

Whitefish, fresh 

Trout, salted 

Trout, fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse 

Caviare 



Total . 



1,000 

18,191 

1,150 

253,128 

5,638 

647,954 

104,158 

164,312 

12,803 



19,210 

88 

16,359 

400,645 

64 

1,644,700 



385 

10,382 

28 

175,487 

1,665 

357,970 

77,656 

143,626 

8,322 

2 

20,810 

50 

122 

394,478 

25 

1,191,008 



2 
1,600 



615 

7,809 

1,122 

77,641 

3,973 

289,984 

26,502 

20,686 

4,481 



(net decrease) 



38 

16,237 

6,167 

39 

453,692 



1924 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



25 



Comparative Statement of the Yield of the Fisheries of the Province of Ontario 
according to Districts. — Continued 



1922 
lbs. 



1923 
lbs. 



Increase 
lbs. 



Decrease 
IbF. 



Georgian Bay: 

Herring, salted . . . . 

Herring, fresh 

Whitefish, salted. . 
WTiitefish, fresh. . . 

Trout, salted 

Trout, fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) . . . 

Sturgeon 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse. 
Cav'are 



1,300 

73,846 

508 

1,068,604, 

10,250 

1,434,831 

107,662 

121,592 

3,499 

2,147 

75,027 

5,361 

50,442 

87,755 

334 



1,140 
71,314 

825 

1,213.681 

9,935 

1,344,676 

105,897 

120,318 

5,371 

3,615 

81,568 

7,300 

52,303 

51,548 

345 



317 
145,077 



160 
2,532 



315 

90,155 

1.765 

1,274 



1,872 
1,468 
6,541 
1,939 
1,861 



11 



36,207 



Total , 



3,043,158 



3,069,836 



26,678 



(net increase) 



Lake Huron (Proper) 
Herring, salted. . . . 

Herring, fresh 

Whitefish, salted. . 
WTiitefish, fresh. . . 

Trout, salted 

Trout, fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore). . . 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse. 

Caviare 

Pickerel (Blue) 



Total 



3,300 

177,171 

900 

67,211 

20,804 

1,686,451 

5,084 

160,299 

10,451 



126,327 

131,508 

1,255 

3,140 

113,664 

634 

10,969 



4.000 

147,583 

1,000 

127,909 

9,848 

1,694.660 

13,505 

219,133 

11,766 

195 

118,022 

121,004 

399 

6,474 

101,494 

927 

3,550 



2,519,168 



2,581,469 



700 



100 
60,698 



8,209 

8,421 

58,834 

1,315 

195 



29,588 
10,956 



8,305 

10,504 

856 



3,334 
"293 



12,170 
' 7,419 



62,301 



(net increase) 



Lake St. Clair: 

Whitefish, fresh. . . 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) . . . 

Sturgeon 

Perch 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse. 

Caviare 

Pickerel (Blue) 

Total 



3,570 

25,136 

57,138 

8,169 

96,185 

31,839 

313,266 

461,477 

296 

2,400 

999,476 



2,140 

22,941 

72,431 

22,543 

56,773 

43,228 

304,871 

351,786 

700 

3,325 

880,738 



15,293 
14,374 



1.430 
2.195 



11,389 



39,412 



404 
925 

(net decrease) 



8,395 
109,691 



118.738 



26 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 14 



Comparative Statement of the Yield of the Fisheries of the Province of Ontario 
according to Districts.- — Continued. 



1922 
lbs. 



1923 
lbs. 



Increase 
lbs. 



Decrease 
lbs. 



Lake Erie: 

Herring, fresh 

Whitefish, salted. . 
Whitefish, fresh . . . 

Trout, fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse. 

Caviare 

Pickerel (Blue) . . . . 



6,306.318 

454 

751,270 

526 

143,736 

505,070 

36,359 

7 

2,109,027 

58,321 

233,926 

1,227,170 

1,467 

6,312,589 



9,241,118 



2,934.800 



536,123 

239 

129,585 

602,564 

40,888 

510 

2,396,778 

57,765 

286,319 

1,286,587 

1,837 

3,193,677 



97,494 

4,529 

503 

287,751 



454 

215,147 

287 

14,151 



556 



52,393 

59,417 

370 



3,118,912 



Total . 



17,686,240 



17,773,990 



87,750 



(net increase) 



Lake Ontario: 

Herring, salted. . . . 

Herring, fresh 

Whitefish, salted. . 
Whitefish, fresh . . . 

Trout, salted 

Trout, fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) . . . 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse. 

Caviare 

Pickerel (Blue).... 



3,222 

342,608 

1,796 

2,096,619 

955 

720,894 

250,225 

116,230 

1,660 

146,846 

74,032 



177,776 
121,004 
448,628 



28,706 



6,427 

249,635 

2,350 

2,563,764 

6,169 

748,781 

280,800 

167,985 

2,948 

123,940 

82,703 

217 

180,761 

102,989 

377,544 

56 

49,868 



3,205 



554 

467,145 

5,214 

27,887 

30,575 

51,755 

1,288 



92,973 



22,906 



8,671 

217 

2,985 



18,015 
71,084 



56 
21,162 



Total , 



4,531,201 



4,946,937 



415,736 



(net increase) 



Inland Waters: 

Herring, fresh 

Whitefish, salted. . 
Whitefish, fresh. . . 

Trout, fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore).. . . 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse. 

Caviare 

Pickerel (Blue) . . . . 



12,008 

700 

44,636 

43,165 

105,170 

54,563 

11,776 

24,192 

25,004 

108,639 

312,500 

316,430 

6 



7,370 

940 

25,872 

34,814 

87,846 

54,685 

10,766 

19,998 

17,537 

107,605 

361,697 

269,950 

26 

500 



240 



4,638 



18,764 

8,351 

17,324 



122 



49,197 



1,010 
4,194 
7,467 
1,034 



46,480 



20 
500 



Total . 



1,058,789 



999,606 (net decrease) 



59,183 



1924 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



27 



Comparative Statement of the Yield of the Fisheries of the Province of Ontario. 



1922 
lbs. 



1923 
lbs. 



Increase 
lbs. 



Decrease 
lbs. 



Herring, salted. . . 
Herring, fresh .... 
Whitefish, salted. . 
Whitefish, fresh. . 

Trout, salted 

Trout, fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) . . , 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

TuUibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse 

Caviare 

Pickerel (Blue) . . . 

Total 



36 
507 

6 
,073 
49 
,493 
259 
384 
111 
171 
,467 
337 
383 
,060 
,317 

3 
,358 



322 
207 
348 
387 
370 
,925 
,829 
,997 
,951 
,045 
,314 
,387 
,279 
,464 
655 
,023 
,514 



29,952 

10,806,360 

6,143 

6,515,965 

29,957 

6.210,395 

1,196,230 

2,691,195 

143.865 

144,645 

2,700,922 

315,081 

397,108 

1,133,321 

3,014,319 

4,469 

3,254,755 



3,299,153 

442,578 



306,198 
31,914 



233,608 



13,829 
72,857 



1,446 



6,370 
"205 



19,413 

283,530 

63,599 



26,400 
22,306 



303,336 
'3,103,759 



38,022,017 



38,594,682 



572,665 



(net increase) 



Statement of the Yield of the Fisheries of the Province of Ontario for the Year 1923, 
as furnished by the Fishermen's Annual Returns. 



Kind of Fish. 



Quantitv 
lbs. 



Price 
per lb. 



\'alue 



Herring, salted. . . 
Herring, fresh. . . . 
Whitefish, salted. . 
Whitefish, fresh. . . 

Trout, salted 

Trout, fresh 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore). . . 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse 

Caviare 

Pickerel (Blue)... 

Total 



29,952 

10,806,360 

6,143 

6,515,965 

29,957 

6,210,395 

1,196,230 

2,691,195 

143,865 

144,645 

2,700,922 

315,081 

397,108 

1,133,321 

3,014,319 

4,469 

3,254,755 



c. 
06 
04 
12 
12 
11 
11 
05 
14 
33 
12 
05 
05 
07 
04 
04 
60 
04 



S c. 

1,797 12 

432,254 40 

737 16 

781,915 80 

3,295 27 

683,143 45 

59,811 50 

376,767 30 

47,475 45 

17,357 40 

135,046 10 

15,754 05 

27,797 56 

45,332 84 

120.572 76 

7,150 40 

130,190 20 



38,594,682 



2,886,398 76 



28 



THE REPORT UPON GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 14 



Value of Ontario Fisheries for a Period of Twenty Years, 1904 to 1923 inclusive. 



Year Value 

$ c. 

1904 1,793,524 00 

1905 1,708,963 00 

1906 1,734,865 00 

1907 1,935,024 90 

1908 2,100,078 63 

1909 2,237,544 41 

1910 2,348,269 57 

1911 2,419,178 21 

1912 2,842,877 09 

1913 2,674,686 76 



Year 



Value 



$ c. 

1914 2,755,293 11 

1915 3,341,181 41 

1916 2,658,993 43 

1917 2,866,424 00 

1918 3,175,110 32 

1919 2,721,440 24 

1920 2,691,093 74 

1921 2,656,775 82 

1922 2,807,525 21 

1923 2,886,398 76 



Statement of the Equipment and its Value used in the Fishing Industry of the Province 

OF Ontario, During the Year 1923. 



Value 




Tugs (2,480 tons) 

Gasoline Launches 

Sail or Row Boats 

Gill Nets (6,018,801 yards) 
Seine Nets (25,759 yards). 

Pound Nets 

Hoop Nets 

Dip or Roll Nets 

Baited Hooks 

Spears 

Freezers and Ice Houses.. . 
Piers and Wharves 



546,722 00 

493,626 00 

65,063 00 

662,334 00 

20,816 00 

644,591 00 

41,065 00 

475 00 

5,813 00 

868 00 

235,113 00 

90,882 00 

2,807,368 00 



Number of men employed on Tugs 537 

Number of men employed on Gasoline Launches 1,705 

Number of men employed on Sail or Row Boats 1,500 



3.742 



Eighteenth Annual Report 



OF THE 



GAME AND FISHERIES 
DEPARTMENT 

♦ 

1924 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 
THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




TORONTO 

Printed and Published by Clarkson W. James, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 2 5 



To His Honour Hexry Cockshutt, Esq., 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May It Please Your Honour: 

I have the honour to submit herewith, for the information of Your Honour 
and the Legislative Assembly, the Eighteenth Annual Report of the Game and 
Fisheries Department of this Province. 

I have the honour to be 

^'our Honour's most obedient servant, 

Charles McCrea, 

Minister of Mines. 

Toronto, 1925. 



12] 



EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Game and Fisheries Department of 

Ontario 



To THE Honourable Charles McCrea, 

Minister of Mines. 

Sir: — I have the honour to place before you the Eighteenth Annual Report 
of the work of the Game and Fisheries Department for the fiscal year ending 
the 31st day of October, 1924. A gross revenue of $667,227.96 was received, 
while the expenditures totalled $336,826.96, so that a surplus of $330,401 was 
obtained. 

Comparative Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, 1916-1924 Inc., 
AS Shown in the Public Account. 

Revenue Expenditure Surplus 

1916 $174,186 71 $157,681 94 v<?16,504 77 

1917 219,442 94 154,055 17 65,387 77 

1918 258,67162 167,795 22 90,876 40 

1919 346,197 14 185,247 72 160,949 42 

1920 466,550 86 239,978 13 226,572 73 

1921 " 612,972 86 287,608 87 325,363 99 

1922 737,519 65 347,352 00 390,167 65 

1923 621,148 08 391,422 19 229,725 89 

1924 667,227 96 336,826 96 330,401 00 

It will be noted that the revenue was increased over the previous year by 
vS46,079.88, while the expenditure was decreased by $54,595.23, thereby increasing 
the surplus of the previous year by $100,675.11. 

For comparative purposes, I beg to show separately the re\enue recei\ed 
from Game and Fish for the past two years. 

Revenue from game 

Revenue from fish 



1923 


1924 




S383,477 09 


$372,142 54 


§11,334 55— Dec, 


237,670 99 


295,085 42 


57,414 43— Inc. 



It will be noted from the detailed revenue statement published elsewhere 
in this report that while there has been an increase in the revenue from com- 
mercial fishing, yet a decided increase in revenue has been received from the 
sale of angling licenses, as the receipts from this source now show the sum of 
$105,862.50. 

Statistics 

The statistics accompanying this report will show in detail the kinds, 
quantities and values of commercial fish taken, also the varieties, quantities 
and locations of fry and fingerlings distributed from Provincial Hatcheries, 
together with other statistics pertaining to the fur trade, as well as other branches 
of the Department. All of which has been carefully prepared and afTords 
interesting and \aluablc information. 

13] 



THE REPORT UPON No. 13 



Fish 

The statistics of the commercial fisheries of the Province are sho\v^n in 

comparison as follows: — 

1922 1923 1924 

Gill nets licensed (yards) 6,239,582 6,018,801 6,502,736 

Seines " 186 172 208 

Pound nets" 1,285 1,265 1,323 

Hoop " " 1,282 1,263 1,256 

Dip and roll nets licensed 59 36 70 

Spears " 151 125 126 

Hooks " 85,865 71.336 78,685 

Number of men employed 4,003 3,742 4,267 

Number of tugs 101 100 103 

Number of gasoline boats •'946 894 975 

Number of sail or row boats 1,181 1,080 1,177 

\'alue of boats, ice-houses, wharves, and 

twine . $3,352,410 00 $2,807,368 00 $2,995,362 00 

Aggregate catch in pounds 38,022,017 38,594,682 41,732,664 

Value to fishermen $2,807,525 21 $2,886,398 76 $3,139,279 03 

Angling 

While the fee for non-resident angling licenses remains the same, the 
revenue has shown a decided increase over any former year, as will be shown 
by the following comparisons: — 

1922 1923 1924 

Revenue from Angling Licenses $63,132 00 $77,856 75 $105,862 50 

Although game fishing is reported as good in various parts of the Province, 
it can be readily seen that the yearly toll is fast increasing and places a demand 
on the hatcheries that will require the maximum production to maintain a 
supply that will satisfy the steadily increasing resident and non-resident anglers. 

Hatcheries 

Elsewhere in this report will be found in detail the quantities and varieties 
of fry and fingerlings placed in various waters of the Province from hatcheries 
located at Mount Pleasant, Glenora, Sault Ste. Marie, Normandale, Port 
Carling, Port Arthur and Fort Frances, and for comparative purposes with 
the previous year, the following figures show a summary of total distributions: — 

Whitefish Fry 

Pickerel Fry 

Salmon Trout Fingerlings and Fry 

Herring Fry 

Rainbow Trout Fry 

Speckled Trout Fingerlings and Fry 

Black Bass Fingerlings and Fry ;...-, 

Parent Black Bass 



The demand from the public for a supply of fry and fingerlings is very 
great, and the demand for game fish is much greater than the supply, although 
every effort is being made to improve conditions, and I would draw your atten- 
tion to the rapid growth of work done by the Provincial Hatcheries. In the 
year 1912, only 150,000 fry were distributed, and in 1918, 58,356,631 fry were 
planted, while during 1924, 560,247,611 fry were placed in public waters. 



1923 


1924 


264,400,000 


437,469,000 


36,140,000 


80,250,000 


12,410,100 


7,801.000 


24,000,000 


32,475,000 


1,100 


15,000 


2,328,800 


1,898,500 


785,000 


338,000 


997 


1,111 


340,065,997 


560,247,611 



1925 GAME AND FISHERIES 



Game Sanctuaries 

The propagation of English Ring-necked Pheasants is still being carried 
on at the Eugenia Crown Game Preserve with considerable success, and the 
public interest is increasing in this undertaking. Aside from the hundreds of 
pheasants reared on the preserve over 17,000 eggs were placed with farmers 
and sportsmen for hatching purposes during the year, and from reports received 
these game birds can be successfully bred in all parts of the Province, including 
the most westerly districts of Kenora, Rainy River and Thunder Bay. 

In order to meet a demand for further game sanctuaries of considerable 
size, there has been created the Superior Game Sanctuary which includes islands 
and mainland between Port Arthur and Schreiber along the north shore of Lake 
Superior. This territory possesses considerable large game and fur-bearing 
animals and with proper control and destruction of vermin, should prove of 
value to that district. I am of the opinion that another large sanctuary should 
be established in the middle of the north-west part of the Province in view of 
the decrease in certain fur-bearing animals and owing to the ever increasing 
number of sportsmen hunting big game. 

Planting of Wild Rice 

The practice of planting wild rice seed in public waters in all parts of the 
Province has been continued with success and the demand is much greater than 
the supply obtainable. 

Game 

Deer. — No means are available to show the exact number of deer taken 
during the year, but from reports received deer were taken in the usual numbers. 

Moose are reported as plentiful in a number of areas. The following is a 

comparison of big game hunting licenses issued for the past four years: — 

1921 1922 1923 1924 

Resident Moose 1,989 1,584 1,098 1,385 

Resident Deer 18,689 20,504 17,877 19,517 

Non-resident Hunting 950 1,256 1,247 1,651 

Ruffed Grouse (commonly known as partridge). In 1923 these game birds 
were plentiful in all suitable localities, and so far as it has been possible to 
ascertain the birds wintered well during the winter of 1923 and 1924, but for 
some unaccountable reason during the summer of 1924 the decrease in numbers 
of these birds was so enormous that a close season was advocated by a number of 
sportsmen. Many reasons for this scarcity were advanced, but the true cause 
will probably remain a mystery. A short open season was permitted, and with 
normal conditions following, these birds should become well established again. 

Sharp-tailed Grouse or Prairie lien are plentiful in the western part of the 
Province, and appear to be working eastward as the district of Thunder Bay 
is reported to have a large number. 

Quail are still protected by a close season, and are to be found in larger 
numbers in the Counties of Kent and Essex than elsewhere. 

Pheasants are protected by a close season, and are to be found in almost 
every county owing to the distribution of eggs by the Department from the 
Eugenia Crown Game Preserve. In the Counties of Lincoln and Welland these 
birds were so plentiful as to make it possible to provide for a one-day shoot 
for a limited number of male birds. This arrangement was well received by the 
sportsmen of the Province, and excellent shooting was enjoyed. 

Ducks and Geese are plentiful in all parts of the Province, and the season 
was a satisfactory one to all sportsmen. 



THE REPORT UPON No. 13 



Furs 

The total catch of fur-bearing animals shows an increase over the preceding 
year both in numbers and in value to the trapper, but the decrease in beaver 
taken for two successive years gives cause for some action to be taken to further 
preserve these animals. 

Beaver. — The figures published below show the rapid decline that has taken 
place in the two years just past. 

Otter. — Not shown to have decreased for some years. 

Mink were taken in larger numbers than for some years. 

Marten and Fisher are quite scarce. 

Muskrat have been steady in production for some years. 

Comparison of Pelts Exported and Tanned During 1921-2-3-4 

1921 1922 1923 1924 

Beaver 95,479 93,971 70,684 50,233 

Otter 4,759 5,309 3,997 5,096 

Fisher 2,602 2,657 2,339 1,910 

Marten 6,533 7,327 4,704 3,661 

Mink 42,667 78,487 58,634 82,446 

Muskrat v 479,866 554,888 478,820 533,256 

Bear 1,494 2,137 1,447 1,399 

Fox (Cross) 287 469 1,154 1,082 

Fox (Red) 5,282 11,272 12,329 14,695 

Fox (Silver or Black) 153 87 205 167 

Fox (White) 351 1,765 1,501 362 

Fox (not specified) 23 170 34 28 

Lynx 591 836 1,177 2,332 

Raccoon 11,951 20,344 15,752 21,976 

Skunk 47,121 73,219 54,770 58,130 

Weasel 58,898 94,399 61,603 51,163 

Wolverine 12 6 20 12 

Total 762,069 947,343 769,070 827,948 

In addition to the above list there were during the year 1924, 628 ranch- 
raised foxes that were either exported alive or the pelts exported or tanned. 
The value of pelts taken during the year amounted to $3,234,946.62 to 
the trapper. The value of pelts produced in the entire Dominion in 1924 was 
$15,643,817, and Ontario's value of fur-bearing animals was higher than any 
other Province and exceeded the "second place" Province by over a million 
dollars. 

Fur Farming 
There still continues to be a steady increase in the issue of fur farmers' 
licenses, and the public are demanding information and statistics concerning 
this branch of the fur industry. 

1922 1923 1924 

Fur farmers' licenses issued 141 284 392 

Animals stocked on licensed farms : — 

1922 1923 1924 

Beaver 4 2 10 

Fisher 3 6 6 

Fox (Cross) 270 361 386 

Fox (Red) 206 323 347 

Fox (Silver Black) 1,088 2,171 3,006 

Lynx 2 2 2 

Mink 94 73 97 

Muskrat ... 163 2,904 

Opossum 6 ... ... 

Raccoon 50 130 149 

Skunk 82 46 138 

Bear ... ... 11 

1,805 3,277 7,056 



1925 GAME AND FISHERIES 7 

Enforcement of the Act 

The district wardens, special patrol officers and overseers in all parts of 
the Province ha\e rendered efficient service in enforcing the provisions of the 
Act and Regulations. 

During the year two gasoline boats were purchased to patrol areas on the 
Great Lakes and connecting waters, and these additions filled a demand for a 
better water patrol service. 

Summary of Convictions, Fines and Confiscations for the Year 

Convictions 933 

Fines collected $14,754 10 

Sale of confiscations 11,715 45 

A great many articles were confiscated during the year, including: — 

5,056 Pelts 13 Trap nets 1 Horse and waggon 

15,880 pounds fish 42 Spears 2 Motor trucks 

20,081 yards gill net 62 Rods and lines 2 Motor cars 

837 pieces gill net 502 Traps 14 Deer 

39 Dip nets 232 Fire-arms 54 pounds venison 

15 Hoop nets 10 Gasoline boats 5 Moose 

8 Seine nets 2 Scows 69 Partridge 

2 Roll nets 21 Row-boats 69 Ducks 

5 Pound nets 3 Canoes 67 Decoys 

All confiscations are sold at ad\-ertised sales by tender, other than such 
articles as are sold by the Department to the former owner, when circumstances 
warrant. 

Acknowledgments 

The Department desires to thank the transportation companies who have 
rendered every assistance in the distribution of fry in the various waters of the 
Province. Appreciation is also expressed for the co-operation of officials of the 
federal, provincial and state governments with whom conferences have been 
held. The success of the year's operations has been due to the loyalty and work 
of all members of the staff, both on the inside service and those engaged in the 
field and hatchery work. 

All statistics referred to will be found elsewhere in this report, together 
with many other statistics in detail. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I am, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

D. McDON.\LD, 

Deputy Minister of Game and Fisheries. 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 13 



REVENUE RECEIVED BY DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 
DURING YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31st, 1924 



GAME 

Royalty 

Commissions 

Trappers' Licenses 

Non-resident Hunting Licenses 

Deer Licenses 

Aloose Licenses 

Fur Dealers' Licenses 

Fur Farmers' Permits 

Tanners' Licenses 

Game Dealers' Licenses 

Hotel and Restaurant Licenses, etc 

Cold Storage Licenses .....,.:. 

Guides' Licenses 

Fines 

Sales 

FISHERIES 

Fishing Licenses 

Royalty 

Angling Permits 

Fines 

Sales 

Miscellaneous 



$140,704 89 

813 00 

47,676 41 

43,425 00 

58,680 00 

6,903 50 

48,639 00 

2,045 00 

190 00 

532 00 

259 00 

240 00 

2,868 00 

12,772 30 

6,394 44 



$123,893 50 

45,663 64 

105,862 50 

1,981 80 

5,321 01 

12.362 97 



$372,142 54 



$295,085 42 
$667,227 96 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1924 



Small-mouthed Black Bass Fry and 

Addington : 

Cedar Lake 

Beaver Lake 



Algoma : 

Hunter Lake. 

Bruce : 

Lake Isaac. . . 
Berford Lake. 
Lake Chesley. 
Gould Lake. . 



Carleton : 

Rideau River. 

Durham: 

Rice Lake. . . . 



Frontenac: 

Sharbot Lake. . . 

Cross Lake 

White Lake. . . . 

Bob's Lake 

Red Pine Lake . 
Big Clean Lake. 

Rock Lake 

Marble Lake. . . 
Long Lake 

Grey: 

Sauble River. . . 
Mountain Lake. 



Haliburton: 

Kashamagamog Lake. 

Drag Lake 

Spruce Lake 

Bob Lake 



yingerlings 

Quantitv 
5,000 
5,000 

10,000 

2,500 
2.500 
2,500 
2,500 

2,500 

5,000 

5,000 
2,500 
5,000 
7,500 
2.500 
5,000 
2,500 
2,500 
5,000 

5,000 
4,000 

5,000 
5,000 
2,500 
2,500 



Haliburton: 

Gull Lake 

Mountain Lake. . 
Devil's Lake. . . . 

Days Lake 

Grace Lake 

Dacks Lake 

Percy Lake 

Deer Lake 

Rock Lake 

North Lake 

Little Gull Lake. , 
Blue Lake. ...... 

Boskung Lake . . . 

Hastings: 

Stoco Lake. ..":.. 

Moira River 

Marmora Lake . . 

Lanark: 

Dalhousie Lake. . 

Mississippi Lake. , 

Black Lake 

Otty Lake 

- White Lake 

Christie Lake. . . . 

Bass Lake 

Mississippi River. 

Robertson's Lake. 

Bennett's Lake.. . 

Middlesex: 

Thames River. . . 

Muskoka: 

Lake \'ernon .... 

Silver Lake 

McCrea's Lake. . 



Quantity 
2,500 
5,000 
2,500 
2,000 
5,000 
2,000 
2,000 
1,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,500 
1,000 
5,000 

5,000 
2,000 
5,000 

7,500 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
. 5,000 
2,500 
5,000 
2.500 
5,000 

2,500 

5,000 
2,500 
2,500 



1925 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1924- 



-Continiied 



Small-mouthed Black Bass Fry and Fingerlings 



Muskoka: 

Brook's Lake. . . 
Muldrew Lake. . 

Long Lake 

Heck's Lake. . . 
Crotch Lake. . . . 
Henshaw Lake. 

Nipissing: 

Lake Nipissing. 
Trout Lake. . . . 

Northumberland : 

Crow Bay 

Trent River. . . . 

O.xford : 

Smiths Pond. . . 

Parry Sound: 

Long Lake 

Ahmic Lake. . . . 

Clear Lake 

Pickerel Lake. . . 
Cecebe Lake. . . 

Otter Lake 

Dalhousie Lake. 
Bittern Lake. . . 



Peterborough : 
Swamp Lake. . 
Pigeon Lake. . . 
Stoney Lake. . . 
Chemong Lake. 
Round Lake. . . 



Simcoe: 

Bass I/ike 

Lake Couchiching. 

Sudbury : 

Lovering Lake. . . . 
Ramsay Lake. . . . 

Apsey Lake 

Lees Lake 

Chapleau Lake. . . 



Victoria : 

Sturgeon Lake 

Wellington: 

Little Saugeen River. 

York: 

Lake Simcoe 



Grey: 

Wilders Lake. 



Parent Bass 



Kenora: 

West Hawk Lake. 

Rainy River: 

Si.K Mile Lake. . . 



Thunder Bay: 
Nipigon Bay. 
Blend Lake. . 



Edmonton, Alberta: 
Ministick Lake. . . 



Quantitv 
2,500 
5,000 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 



5,000 
2,500 

2,500 
7,500 

2,500 

2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 

5,000 
10,000 
5,000 
5,000 
2,500 

2,500 
5,000 

5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 

10,000 

2,500 

2,500 



30 

155 

200 

500 
30 

196 



Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 

Algoma: Quan 

Trout Lake 5 

Clear Lake 10 

Moose Lake 5 

Agawa River 5 

Mongoose Lake 15 

Spruce Lake 10 

Loon Lake 5 

Pine Lake 11 

Hobon Lake 5 

Alva Lake 5 

South Chippewa River 5 

Sand Lake and Creek 15 

Speckled Trout Brook 5 

Deer Lake 5 

Carpenter Lake 5 

Martz Lake 5 

Silver Creek 10 

Lilv Lake 5 

Gull Lake 5 

Beryl Lake 5 

Gargantua Creek 5 

Heron Lake 5 

Darle Lake 5 

Root River 5 

Lonely Lake 5 

Little Carp Creek 5 

Bruce: 

Rusk Creek 

Silver Creek 

Black River 

Weirs Creek 

Willow Creek 

Vance .Stream 

Sang's Creek 

Phillip's Creek 

Thomson's Creek 

Monkman's Creek 

Sullivan Creek 

Teeswater River 

Hammond Creek 

Colpoys Creek 

Kirkland 's Creek 

Rourke's Creek 

Formosa Creek 

Stoney Creek 



Durham: 

Tippet's Creek 

Caven Creek and Mill Pond. . 

Canton Creek 

Campbell Stream 

Tyrone Creek and tributaries. 

Wilmot's Creek 

Decker Hollow 

Dick Williams' Creek 

Dean's Creek 

Colwill's Creek 

Britain Creek 

Suxon Creek 

Beatty's Creek 

Wilson's Creek 

Smith's Stream 

Morton's Stream 

Moon's Creek 

Cusland's Creek 

Pigeon Creek and tributary. . . 



titv 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
.000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 



500 
,000 
500 
500 
,500 
500 
,500 
,500 
,500 
500 
500 
000 
300 
500 
,500 
,500 
500 
500 



2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
5,000 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
5,000 
3,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 



10 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 13 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1924- 



-Con tinned 



Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings. 



Durham: 

Campbellcroft Stream 

Steven's Creek tributaries. . . . 

Bees Creek 

Bell Hill Stream 

Kendal Creek 

Knox Creek 

Power Stream , 

Allen's Creek 

AIcKindley's Creek 

Brown's Creek 

Robinson's Stream 

Walter's Creek 

Cann's Creek 

Hampton Creek and tributaries. 

Liskard Creek 

Shield's Creek 

Deacon 's Creek 

English Creek 

I-ifford Creek 

Millpond near Millbrook 

Millbrook Creek 

Mash Wood's Creek 

DufiFerin : 

Esson's Creek 

White's Creek 

Silver Creek 

Elgin: 

Ichenborg Creek 

Frontenac: 

Cole Creek 



Grey : 

Skunk Creek 

Saugeen River and tributaries. . 

Bea\er River 

Sydenham Creek 

Sydenham River 

Pfeffer's Creek 

Shallow Lake 

Spey River 

Spring Bank Creek 

Indian River 

McKean's Creek 

Silver Creek 

Wiley's Pond 

Eugenia Crown Game Preserve. 

Stream at Bangor 

Oxenden Creek 

Camp's Creek 

Beatty Saugeen River 

Swanston Creek 

Mud Lake Creek 

Grenville: 

Nation River 



Huron : 

Clinton Spring Creek. 

Elliott's Creek 

Cemetary Creek 

Sharp's Creek 

Ben Miller Creek. . . . 
Mcllwain's Creek. . . . 

Stoltz Creek 

Wawanosk Creek. . . . 

Aux Sable River 

Nine Mile River 



Quantity 
2,500 
7,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
3,500 
2,500 
2,500 
1,000 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
. 5,000 
2,500 
2,500 
1,000 
1,000 
2,500 
2,500 
5,000 
5,000 

5,000 
5,000 
5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

2,500 
20,000 
10,000 
2,500 
12.500 
5,000 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
5,000 
2,500 
50,000 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
5,000 
2,500 
2,500 

10,000 

2,500 
5.000 
5.000 
7.500 
10.000 
5,000 
5.000 
5.000 
5,000 
5,000 



Haliburton : 

Farquar Lake 

Redstone River 

Halton : 

Limehouse Pond 

Twelve Mile Creek 

Hastings: 

Squire's Creek 

Rawdon Creek 

Egan Creek 

Maloney Creek 

Nobbo Lake 

Mason Creek 

Quinlan and Robertson's Pond. 
Mayhew's Creek 

Lanark: 

Paul's Creek 

Allan's Brook 



Middlesex: 

Thames River 

Caradoc Mill Pond. 
Oxbow Creek 



Manitoulin: 

Blue Jay River. . . 

Muskoka: 

Muskoka River. . 
Little East River. 



Norfolk : 

Patterson's Creek 

Kent Creek 

\'enison Creek and tributary 

Little Lake Outlet '. 

Big Creek 

River Lynn 



Northumberland : 

Woodland Creek 

Strong's Creek 

Mutton's Creek 

Allen's Creek 

Trout Creek 

Burd's Creek 

Baltimore Creek 

Russel Creek 

Bogg's Farm Creek. . 

Half Way Creek 

Massie Creek 

Dartford Creek 

Summit Creek 

Raby Creek 

Dark Creek. 

Harper's Creek 

Lean Creek 

Brophy's Creek 

Hopkin's Creek 

Burnley Stream 

Hayden's Creek 

Camborne Creek 

Harden 's Creek 

Philip's Creek 

Sykes' Creek 

Bredin's Creek 

Shelter Valley Creek. 

Dawson Creek 

Forestell's Creek. . . . 



Quantitv 
5,000 
5,000 

5,000 
5,000 

5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
2,500 
5,000 



5,000 
5,000 



15,000 
2,500 
2,500 

5,000 



5,000 
10.000 



10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

5,000 

5.000 

5,000 

2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2.500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
5,000 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
5,000 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 



1925 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



11 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 19 2i~Contimied 



Speckled Trotct Fry and Fingerlings 



Ontario: 

Brown's Creek. 
Black Creek. . . 



Oxford : 

Dower Creek 

Springwater Creek and Pond. 

Wright's Creek 

South Norwich Creek 

Deer Lick 



Parr\' Sound : 

Magnetawan River 

Bolger Lake tributary 

Sugar Lake Creek 

Trout Stream at Sundridge. 
Camp Stream at Sundridge. 

Stoney Lake 

Sword's Creek 

South River 



Peel: 

Credit River 

Cold Creek 

Moflfatt Stream. . 
Lockton Creek. . . 
Columbia Stream. 
Marshall's Creek. 
Doherty's Creek. . 
Coffey's Creek. . . 
Humber River. . . 



Perth: 
Avon River. 



Rainy River: 

Clearwater Lake. 
Pine River 



Renfrew: 

Brindle's Creek. . 
Brennan's Creek. 



Simcoe: 

Bass Lake, tributary. 

Mad River 

Coldwater River 

Copeland's Creek. . . . 

Sturgeon River 

Noisy River 

Nottawasaga River. . 

Mad Creek 

Parker's Creek 

Batteau Creek 

Pretty Rivers 

Black Ash Creek. . . . 

Moon Creek 

Hart Creek 

Sucker Creek 

Jeanette's Creek 

McMahon Creek. . . . 

Marl Creek 

O'Neill's Creek 

Shanahan's Creek. . . 
Mathinson's Creek. . 

Stoney Creek 

Reformatory Creek. . 



Quantitv 
5,000 
2,500 



5,000 
15,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5.000 



5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
2,500 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 



20,000 
5.000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
7,500 
5,000 



10,000 



2,500 
5,000 



5,000 
5,000 



000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
500 
000 
000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,500 
500 
000 
,000 
500 



Sudbury: 

Clear Lake 

Hardwood Lake. . . 

Apsey Lake 

Massey Creek 

Trout Creek 

Howey Creek 

Emery Creek 

Bertrand's Creek. . 

Rapid River 

Mountain Creek. . 

Post Creek 

Chelmsford Creek. 

Pump Creek 

Wilson Lake 

Burnt Creek 

Rock Lake 

Anderson Lake. . . . 
Sixty Nine Lake. . 
Three Mile Lake. . 
Windermere Lake. 
Hill Burn 



Q 



Thunder Bay: 

Allen Lake 

Trout Lake - 

Moose Lake 

McKenzie River 

Lake Wideman 

Twin Lake 

Upper Twin Lake 

Loon Lake 

Silver Lake 

Pearl River 

North Branch 

Pitch Creek 

Six Mile Creek 

Whitewood Creek 

Three Mile Creek 

Corbett's Creek 

Currant River 

Ree's Lake 

Fox Lake 

McV'icar's Creek 

South Twin Lake 

Neebing River 

Oliver Lake 

Bruly Creek 

Steel River 

Coldwater Creek 

Nipigon River 

Wolf River 

Grassy Lake 

Whilefish River 

Whitesand River 

Stewart Lake 

Eraser Creek 

Fleming River 

Gravel River 

Onaniakanash Lake, tributary 

Castle Lake 

Anderson Lake 

Windy Lake 

Niagara Lake 

Helma Lake 



Timiskaming: 

Watabeag Creek. . 

\'ictoria: 

Cannington Creek. 



uantity 

15,000 

10,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

5,000 

15,000 

2.500 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

20,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10.000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10.000 

10,000 

5,000 

10,000 

2,500 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

85,000 

10,000 

2,500 

10,000 

50,000 

10,000 

20,000 

50,000 

10.000 

5,000 

5,000 

10,000 

2,500 

2,500 

2,500 

5,000 

2,. 500 



12 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 13 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN I92i— Continued 



Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 



Waterloo: 

Betzner's Creek 

St. Agatha Creek 

Conestoga Creek 

Grand River 

Stream near Hespeler. 
Stream near Waterloo. 

Petersburg Creek 

Sol Kocha Stream 

Egerdel's Stream 

Ephion Rust Creek. . . 

Bamberg Creek 

Schmidt's Stream 

Wentworth: 

Ireland Creek 

Millgrove Creek 

Strabane Creek 

Martin's Creek 

Britton Creek 

Binkley Creek 



Q 



Wellington: 

Little Saugeen River. 

Rea's Creek 

Bilton's Creek 

Irwin River. ........ 

Moore's Creek 



Welland: 

St. John's Brook 

York: 

Ferguson Stream 

Black River 

Stream and Pond at Glenville. 



uantitv 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 

5,000 
5,000 
5.000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 

2,500 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

15,000 



Salmon Trout Fry. 
Algoma: Quan 

Trout Lake 35 

Lake Superior L215 

North Channel L421 



Lake La Cloche. 

Ophir Lake 

Ore Lakes 

Sugar Lake 

Mud Lake 

Herman Lake. . . . 

Hawk Lake 

Sand Lake 

McCarroll's Lake. 

Cloudy Lake 

Diamond Lake. . . 
Desbarat's Lake. . 

Mitchell Lake 

Island Lake 

Lake Lauzon 

Keichel Lake 

Lonely Lake 

Echo Bav 



titv 
,000 
,000 
,000 
000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
000 
,000 
,000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 



Frontenac: 
Sharbot Lake . 
Gould Lake. . 
Eagle Lake. . . 
Crow Lake. . . 
White Lake. . , 
Trout Lake. . . 
Devil Lake. . . 



100,000 
15,000 
15,000 
25,000 
25,000 
50,000 
25,000 



Frontenac: 

Big Clear Lake. 
Brule Lake. . . . 

Long Lake 

Lucky Lake. . . . 

Grey: 

Saugeen River. 



Haliburton : 

Kashamaganog Lake. 

Drag Lake 

Sayer Lake 

Redstone Lake 

Spruce Lake 

Blue Hawk Lake 

Bob Lakes 

Gull Lake 

Monmouth Lake 

Davis Lake 

Kuskog Lakes 

Deer Lake 

Monk Lake 

McFadden's Lake. . . . 

Otter Lake 

Clear Lake 

Hall's Lake 

Ross Lake 

Bushkonk Lake 

Sayer's Lake 

Buck Lake 



Hastings: 

Papineau Lake 

Westlemkoon Lake. 

Lake St. Peter 

Eagle Lake 

Poudash Lake 

Jameison Lake 

Cannon's Lake 



Kenora: 

Upper Manitou Lake, 

Malachi Lake 

Minnitako Lake 

Rat Portage Bay 

Eagle Lake 

Agenak Lake 

Pelican Lake 

Lanark: 

Dalhousie Lake 

Silver Lake 

Pike Lake 



Leeds: 

Charlestone Lake . 
Rideau Lakes. . . . 

Otter Lake ; 

Bass Lake 

Indian Lake 



Muskoka: 

Lake of Bays . . . 
Lake Vernon . . . . 

Fairy Lake 

North Lake 

Sparrow Lake . . . 

Clear Lake 

Bella Lake 

Long Lake 

Red Chalk Lake . 



Quantity 
25,000 
15,000 
10,000 
15,000 

10,000 

10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 

20,000 
25,000 
10,000 
25,000 
10,000 
20,000 
10,000 

10,000 
10,000 
10.000 
25,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 

20,000 
20,000 
20,000 



100,000 
20,000 
10,000 
20,000 
20,000 

610,000 
20,000 
10,000 
20,000 
25,000 
30,000 
10,000 
30,000 
10,000 



1925 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



13 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1924- 



-Continued 



Salmon Trout Fry 



Muskoka: 

Jingo Lake 

Skeleton Lake 

Walker's Lake . . . . 
Rebecca Lake . . . . , 
Upper Twin Lake . 
Lower Twin Lake . 
Deer Lake 



Nipissing: 

Cache Lake 

Smoke Lake .... 
Island Lake . . . . , 

Otter Lake 

Four Mile Lake. 
Canoe Lake .... 
Source Lake . . . . 



Parr>^ Sound: 

Magnetawan River . 

Ahmic Lake 

Wolf Lake 

Clear Lake 

Sugar Lake 

Sand Lake 

Big Clam 

Kate's Lake 

Spring Lake 

Maple Lake 

Pickerel River 

Martin's Lake 

Bacon Lake 

Three Mile Lake. .. 

Storm Lake 

Diamond Lake 

Pike Lake 

Chain of Lakes .... 

Eagle Lake 

Lake Bernard 

Trout Lake 

Bay Lake 

Round Lake 



Peterborough: 
Swamp Lake , 
Stoney Lake . 

Rainy River: 
Elbow Lake. 
Rainy Lake . 
Alwin Lake . . 



Renfrew: 
.^;Clear Lake 

Golden Lake . . . 

Chemaun Lake . 

Long Lake 

Bobs Lake 

Matthew Lake . 

F"ish Lake 

Whitefish Lake . 

Carson's Lake. . 

Gauldt's Lake. . 

Gun Lake 

Stringer's Lake, 

Sinicoe: 

Edward's Lake 



Quantity 
10,000 
30,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 



100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
10,000 
20,000 
100,000 
100,000 



.5, 

10 
10 
50 
20 
20 
10 
5 
20 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
30 
25 
10 
5 
5 



,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
000 
,000 
000 
,000 
000 
000 
000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 



10,000 
50,000 



25,000 
25,000 
25,000 



10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10.000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 



10,000 



Quantity 

20,000 

20,000 

20,000 

25,000 

20,000 

20,000 

20,000 

10.000 

20,000 

Thunder Bay: 

Lake Nipigon 1,000,000 



Sudbury: 

Fairbanks Lake. 

Bell Lake 

Long Lake 

Ramsay Lake . . 
French River . . . 

Otter Lake 

Trout Lake .... 

Judd Lake 

Bigwood Lake. . 



Kashabowie Lake. 
Lake Shebandawan . 

Long Lake 

Little Long Lake. . . 
South Twin Lake . . 

Baril River 

Keemle Lake 

Lake Helen 

Hasel Lake 



20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
10,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 

10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
20,000 
20,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
25,000 
10,000 

20,000 
20,000 
20,000 

Wentworth: 

Lake Ontario 380,000 



\ \ Pickerel. 

Addington: 

Cedar Lake 100,000 

Beaver Lake 200,000 

Sand Lake 100,000 



Timiskaming: 

Kenogami Lake 

Twin Lakes 

Munro Lake 

Perry Lake 

Watabeag Lake 

Morgan Lake 

Grave Lake 

Three Nations Lake . 

Lake Timagami 

Frere Lake 

\'ictoria : 

Sturgeon Lake 

Balsam Lake 

Four Mile Lake 



Algoma: 

Lake La Cloche . 

Bruce: 

Shouldice Lake . 
Miller Lake . . . . 
Lake Chesley . . . 



100,000 

50,000 

50,000 

50,000 

Durham: 

Scugog Lake 1,000,000 

Rice Lake 500,000 

Pigeon River 500,000 

Frontcnac: 

Clear Lake 100,000 

Cole's Lake 100,000 

Crow Lake 100,000 

Svdenham Lake 100,000 

Bob's Lake 200,000 

Green Bay Lake 100,000 

Barr's Lake 100,000 

Third Lake 100,000 

Long Lake 200,000 



14 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 13 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1924- 



-Continued 



Pickerel. 



Grey: 

McCaslin's Lake. 
Hastie's Lake.. . . 
Mountain Lake.. 
Lake Charles. . . . 
Lake Francis . . . . 
Sheppard's Lake. 
Stewart's Lake. . . 



Quantity 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 



Grenville: 

Nation River 100,000 

Glengarry: 

Lake St. Francis 300,000 

St. Lawrence River 300,000 

Ilaliburton: 

Cedar Lake 200,000 

Devil's Lake 100,000 

Hastings: 

^/Crow Lake 200,000 

^^ Jarvis Lake 100,000 

Salmon River 100,000 

Crivyea Lake 100,000 

Bass Lake 10,000 

Gunter Lake 100,000 

Lanark: 

Dalhousie Lake 200,000 

Mississippi Lake 200,000 

Black Lake 100,000 

^TWhite Lake 100,000 

' ^Christie Lake . , 100,000 

Mississippi River 100,000 

Patterson Lake 100,000 

Bennett's Lake 100,000 

Leeds \ 

Charleston Lake 500,000 

Sand Lake 50,000 

Opinicon Lake 100,000 

Bass Lake 100,000 

Little Lake 50,000 

Middlesex: 

Thames River 100,000 

Clark's Mill Pond 100,000 

Pond Mills 100,000 

Muskoka: 

Lake Muskoka 1,000,000 

Lake Joseph 1,000,000 

Lake of Bays 1,000,000 

Lake Rosseau 1,000,000 

Sparrow Lake 1,000,000 

Clearwater Lake 100,000 

Muldrew Lake 100,000 

Long Lake 100,000 

Helve Lake 100,000 

Deer Lake 100,000 

Nipissing: 

Lake Nipissing 700,000 

Green Lake 100,000 

Trout Lake 100,000 

Norfolk: 

Lake Erie 950,000 

Northumberland: 

Coal Creek 100,000 

Codrington Stream 50,000 



Oxford: 

Maplehurst Lake . 



Quantity 
50,000 

Parrv Sound: 

Magnetawan River 100,000 

Ahmic Lake 100,000 

Wolf Lake 100,000 

Star Lake 100,000 

Pickerel Lake 150,000 

Cecebe Lake 100,000 

Eagle Lake 100,000 

Doe Lake 100,000 

Owl Lake 50,000 

Stuart's Lake 50,000 

Goo.se Lake 100,000 

Whitestone Lake 200,000 

Isabella Lake 100,000 

KasheeLake 100,000 

Bay Lake 100,000 

Key Lake 100,000 

Compass Lake 100,000 

Georgian Bay 100,000 

Prince Edward: 

Consecon Lake 100,000 

East Lake 100,000 

Bay of Quinte 40,040,000 

South Bay 500,000 

Peterborough: 

Stoney Lake 250,000 

Clear Lake 250,000 

Belmont Lake 100,000 

Chemong Lake 500,000 

Gull Lake 100,000 

Loon Lake 100,000 

Otonabee River 100,000 

Rainy River: 

Rainy Lake 13,950,000 

Ren f rev/: 

Golden Lake 100,000 

.; Petawawa River 100,000 

^/Murphy's Lake 100,000 

Simcoe: 

Bass Lake 100,000 

Lake Couchiching 700,000 

Severn River 500,000 

Edward's Lake 300,000 

First Lake 100,000 

Sudburv: 

French River 200,000 

Apsev Lake 200,000 

SkillLake 100,000 

Rock Lake 150,000 

Timiskaming: 

Three Nations Lake 50,000 

Lake Timiskaming 250,000 

Round Lake 100,000 

Lake Abitibi 250,000 

Commando Lake 50,000 

Menan Lake 50,000 

Painkiller Lake 100,000 

Sanborn Lake 100,000 

Victoria: 

Sturgeon Lake 500,000 

Cameron Lake 500,000 

Balsam Lake 500,000 

Mud Lake 100,000 

Trent Canal 50,000 



1925 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



15 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN l9H—Conti7tued 



Pickerel. 

Waterloo: Quantity 

Sunfish Lake 100,000 

Grand River 100,000 

Wentworth: 

Hamilton Bay 300,000 

York: 

Lake Simcoe 1,000,000 

Shadow Lake 100,000 

Bond Lake 100,000 

Whitefish 
Algoma: 

Lake Superior 54,825,000 

North Channel 29,500,000 

Kenora : 

Upper Manitou Lake 500,000 

Lake Wabigoon 2,000,000 

Pelican Lake 5,000,000 

Norfolk: 

Lake Erie 



115,469,000 

Prince Edward: 

Bay of Quinte 126,000,000 

Rainy River: 

Elbow Lake 500,000 

Baril Lake 500,000 

Rainy Lake 39,675,000 

Little Turtle Lake 500,000 

Abwin Lake 500,000 



Thunder Bay: 

Lake Nipigon 

Kashabowie Lake. . 
Lake Shebandawan 

Long Lake 

Little Long Lake . . . 
Lake Helen 



Timiskaming: 

Lake Timiskaming. 
Lake Abitibi 



Wentworth: 
Lake Ontario. 



Norfolk: 
Lake Erie , 



Herring 



Prince Edward: 
Bay of Quinte . 

Wentworth: 
Lake Ontario . 



Rainbow Trout 
Sudbury: 

Wahnapitae River 



Thunder Bay: 

Lac-Des-Mille-Lacs . 



Quantitv 
10,000,000 
1,000,000 
1,000,000 
1,000,000 
1,000,000 
1,000,000 

500,000 
500,000 

46,500,000 



11,975,000 

3,500,000 

17,000,000 

10,000 
5,000 



SUMMARY Quantity 

Small-mouthed Black Bass Fry and Fingerlings 338,000 

Parent Small-mouthed Black Bass 1,111 

Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 1,898,500 

Salmon Trout Frv 7,801,000 

Pickerel Frv • 80,250,000 

Whitefish Fry 437,469,000 

Herring Fry 32,475,000 

Rainbow Trout 15,000 

Total 560,247,611 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF DISTRIBUTION 



Small-mouthed Black Bass Fry and Fingerlings. 

Parent Sm:ill-mouthed Black Bass 

Speckled Trout 

Salmon Trout 

Pickerel 

Whitefish 

Herring 

Rainbow Trout 

Steel Head Salmon 

Total all species 



1922 

613,500 

937 

2,184.075 

7.815,000 

43,510,000 

189,775,000 

26,250,000 

21,000 

5,300 



1923 

785,000 

997 

2,328,800 

12,410,100 

36,140,000 

264,400,000 

24,000,000 

1,100 



1924 

338,000 

1,111 

1,898,500 

7,801,000 

80,250,000 

437,469,000 

32,475,000 

15,000 



270,174,812 340,065,997 560,247,611 



16 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 13 



GAME AND FISHERIES 

Recapitulation of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, 

industry during 





Districts 




Fishing ma 


terial 








Tugs 


Gasoline Launches 


Sail or Row Boats 


Gill-Nets 




No. 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


No. 


Value 


Men 


Yards 


Value 


1 


Kenora and Rainy River Dis- 
tricts, including Lake of 


3 
12 

5 
20 
17 


55 
294 
101 
464 
363 


S 

9,700 

50,500 

23,500 

165,200 

86,915 


8 
73 
21 
98 
88 


118 
38 
33 

115 
71 

51 

135 

357 
57 


S 

51,600 
14,610 
21,215 
89,790 
41.300 

18,760 

124,500 

141,140 
28,410 


194 

63 

53 

218 

136 

73 

354 

648 
115 


75 
66 
51 
83 
43 

88 

196 

372 
203 


$ 

3,187 
5,105 
3,380 
5,695 
3,495 

5.125 

19,900 

19,124 
7,590 


47 
108 

35 
180 

85 

134 

242 

571 
435 


256,582 
766,613 
176,975 
1,136,202 
977,570 


$ 

37,383 

66,840 

16,301 

115,824 

104,925 


7 




3 

4 


North Cliannel (Lake Huron) 
Georgian Bay 


5 
6 


Lake Huron (Proper) 

Lake St. Clair, St. Clair River 
and Detroit River 


7 


Lake Erie, including Upper 


37 


1.013 


278,500 


241 


1,319,616 
1,679,528 

189,650 


151,031 
155 139 


8 


Lake Ontario, including Low- 
er Niagara and St. Law- 
rence River 


9 


Inland Waters, including 
Lake Nipigon, Lake Nipis- 
sing. Lake Simcoe and 
Ottawa River . . . 


9 


149 


34,500 


47 


24 709 










103 


2.439 


648,815 


576 


975 


531.325 


1,854 


1.177 


72,601 


1,837 


6.502,736 


671,652 







Recapitulation of the kinds, quantities and 



Districts 



Kenora and Rainy River Districts, in- 
cluding Lake of The Woods 

Lake Superior 

North Channel (Lake Huron) 

Georgian Bay 

Lake Huron (Proper) 

St. Clair River, Lake St. Clair and Detroit 
River 

Lake Erie, including Upper Niagara 
River 

Lake Ontario, including Lower Niagara 
and St. Lawrence Rivers 

Inland Waters, including Lake Nipigon, 
Lake Nipissing, Lake Simcoe and 
Ottawa River 



Totals. 



Values . 



Herring 



1,049,573 

7,428 

37,522 

210,185 

300 

10,907,928 

263,135 

25,262 

12,501.333 

$ c 
500.053 32 



Whitefish 



lbs. 

735,380 
282,806 
200,023 
1,082,546 
193,122 

1,150 

580.356 

2,653,810 

962,567 
6,691,760 



Trout 



lbs. 

86,351 

l,flll,028 

382,719 

1,534,986 

1,872,077 



511 
938,994 

355,476 

6,882.142 

$ c. 
757.035 62 



Pike 



lbs. 

602,703 
19,480 
90,887 

100,191 
3,898 

23,237 

71,696 

255,982 

125.262 
1.293.336 



Pickerel 
(Dore) 



lbs. 

1,398,444 

81,167 

207,619 

116,095 

178,734 

67,026 

614,821 

121,604 

179,082 

2,964,592 

S c. 
415,042 88 



Sturgeon 



lbs. 

43,100 
3,677 
9,353 
5,298 
7,532 

18.591 

43,778 
6,541 

143,285 



92,781 15 



1925 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



17 



DEPARTMENT, ONTARIO 

the quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the fishing 
the year 1924. 













Fishin 


g material 












Other fixtures 
fishing. 


used in 


Seines 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip or Roll 
Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


Ko. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 






$ 


72 
56 

107 
86 

103 

220 
642 


S 

19,405 
26,350 
48,650 
55,350 
63,250 

26,800 

385,400 


35 


S 
1,630 




S 




$ 




$ 


94 
17 
33 
37 
41 

42 

107 

80 
66 


$ 

35,385 
12,500 

9,120 
20,505 

9,735 

13,025 
127,365 

13,235 
12,961 


64 
23 
28 
39 
23 

24 

55 

40 
26 


$ 
11,150 












500 


25 






10,200 








24 

40 

2 

2 

62 

812 
279 


2,750 
920 
100 

60 

1,673 

27,527 
10,450 










12,595 


11 


1,125 
100 

8,630 

12,481 

1,529 
5,402 


680 
50 

6,325 

9,278 

1,761 
8.102 






31.246 
5.067 

5.600 

7,090 

23,632 
5,550 


3,771 
455 

332 

501 

1,059 
193 


6 


19 


13,850 


1 


7 


24 


8,630 


47 






8.925 


SI 


10 

7 

46 


70 
362 

384 






24,535 


28 






6,975 


70 


37 


12,100 


120 


857 


3,615 


208 


29,267 


26,196 


1,323 


637,305 


1,256 


45,110 


70 


840 


78,685 


6,336 


126 


876 


517 


253,831 


322 


100,475 



values of fish caught during the year 1924 



Eels 


Perch 


Tullibee 


Catfish 


Carp 


Mixed and 
Coarse Fish 


Caviare 


Pickerel 
(Blue) 


Total 
Production 


Value 


lbs. 


lbs. 

9,862 

57 

12,369 

3,151 
92,857 

101,311 

2,191,730 

79,963 

24,532 


lbs. 

255,373 

959 

404 

95,897 

144,715 


lbs. 


lbs. 

14,484 
1,974 
1,213 

45,759 
3,486 

376,927 

288,598 

78,464 

301,404 


lbs. 

207.999 
65.133 


lbs. 
1.397 


lbs. 
3.902 


lbs. 

3,358,995 
3,215,854 
1,373,624 
3,108,798 
2,781,026 

1,013,139 

18,977,289 

5,183.006 

2,720,933 


S c. 
362,436 87 






280,418 59 




500 

5.764 

506 

39,978 

57,199 

161,766 

107,148 


460,970 
79,590 
73,263 

371,.?06 

1,231,170 

446.523 

465.636 


139 

289 
651 

413 

1.381 

47 

1,213 




122.479 84 




1.710 


334.166 69 




281,239 31 




12,900 

2,988,097 

47,801 

5,688 


55,800 65 


24 




906,240 04 


1^8 376 




517,967 74 


21.343 


3,035 


278,529 30 


149.743 


2,515,832 


500,383 


372,861 


1.112,309 


3.401.590 


5,530 


3,060.098 


41,732,664 






S c. 
17.969 16 


S c. 

125.791 60 


S c. 

25.019 15 


$ c. 
26.100 27 


$ c. 

44.492 36 


S c. 
136.063 60 


S c. 

8.848 00 


S c. 

122.403 92 




S c. 
3,139,279 03 



18 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 13 



A Comparative Statement of the Yield of the Fisheries of the Province of Ontario 



Kind of Fish 



1923 
lbs. 



1924 
lbs. 



Increase 
lbs. 



Decrease 

lbs. 



Herring 

Whitefish 

Trout 

Pike 

Pickerel (Dore) 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Coarse fish .... 

Caviare 

Pickerel (Blue) , 

Totals 



10,836,312 

6,522,108 

6,240,352 

1,196,230 

2,691,195 

143,865 

144,645 

2,700,922 

315,081 

397,108 

1,133,321 

3,014,319 

4,469 

3,254,755 



12,501,333 

6,691,760 

6,882,142 

1,293,336 

2,964,592 

281,155 

149,743 

2,515,832 

500,383 

372,861 

1,112,309 

3,401,590 

5,530 

3,060,098 



1,665,021 

169,652 

641,790 

97,106 

273,397 

137,290 

5,098 



185,302 



387,271 
1,061 



185,090 



24,247 
21,012 



194.657 



38,594,682 



41,732.664 



3,137,982 



(net increase) 



Statement of the Yield of the Fisheries of the Province of Ontario for the Year 
1924 AS Furnished by the Fishermen's Annual Returns 



Kind of Fish 


Quantity 


Price 
per lb. 


Values 


Herring 


12,501,333 

6,691,760 

6,882,142 

1,293,336 

2,964,592 

281,155 

149,743 

2,515,832 

500,383 

372,861 

1,112,309 

3,401,590 

5,530 

3,060,098 


$ c. 
04 
12 
11 
05 
14 
33 
12 
05 
05 
07 
04 
04 

1 60 
04 


S c. 
500,053 32 


Whitefish 


803,011 20 


Trout 


757,035 62 


Pike 


64,666 80 


Pickerel (Dore) 


415,042 88 


Sturgeon .... . . 


92,781 15 


Eels 


17,969 16 


Perch . . . 


125,791 60 


Tullibee » 


25,019 15 


Catfish 


26,100 27 


Caro 


44,492 36 


Coarse fish 


136,063 60 


Caviare 


8,848 00 


Pickerel (Blue) 


122,403 92 






Total 


41,732,664 




3,139,279 03 









V^ALUE OF Ontario Fisheries for a Period of Twenty Years, 1905 to 1924 Inclusive 



Year 



Vail 



1905 1,708,963 00 

1906 1,734,865 00 

1907 1,935,024 90 

1908 2,100,078 63 

1909 2,237,544 41 

1910 2,348,269 57 

1911 2,419,178 21 

1912 2,842,877 09 

1913 2,674,686 76 

1914 2,755,293 11 



Year 



Value 



1915 3,341,181 41 

1916 2,658,993 43 

1917 2,866,424 00 

1918 3,175,110 32 

1919 2,721,440 24 

1920 2,691,093 74 

1921 2,656,775 82 

1922 2,807,525 21 

1923 2,836,398 76 

1924 3,139,279 03 



1925 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



19 



Statement of the Equipment and its \'alue, Used in the Fishing Industry of the Province 
OF Ontario, During the Year 1924 



\'alues 



Tugs (2,439 tons) 

Gasoline Boats 

Sail or Row Boats 

Gill nets (6,502,736 yards), 
Seine Nets (29,267 yards) . 

Pound Nets 

Hoop Nets 

Dip or Roll Nets 

Baited Hooks 

Spears 

Freezers and Ice Houses. . 
Piers and Wharves 





S c. 


103 


648,815 00 


975 


531,325 00 


1,177 


72,601 00 




671,652 00 


208 


26,196 00 


1,323 


637.305 00 


1,256 


45,110 00 


70 


840 00 


78,685 


6,336 00 


126 


876 00 


517 


253,831 00 


322 


100,475 00 



Number of men employed on tugs 576 

Number of men employed on gasoline boats 1,854 

Number of men employed on sail or row boats 1,837 



Total number of men employed ^ 4,267 



Nineteenth Annual Report 



OF THE 



GAME AND FISHERIES 
DEPARTMENT 

1925 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 
THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




ONTARIO 



TORONTO 
Printed and Published by Clarkson W. James, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 2 6 



To His Honour Hexry Cockshutt, Esq., 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May It Please Your Hoxour: 

I have the honour to sobmit herewith, for the information of Your Honour 
and the Legislative Assembly, the Nineteenth Annual Report of the Game and 
Fisheries Department of this Province. 

I have the honour to be 

Your Honour's most obedient servant, 

Charles McCrea, 

Minister of Alines. 

Toronto, 1926. 



[2] 



NINETEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Game and Fisheries Department of 

Ontario 



To THE Honourable Charles McCrea, 

Minister of Mines. 

Sir: — I have the honour of placing before you the Nineteenth Annual 
Report of the work of the Game and Fisheries Department for the fiscal year 
ending on October 31st, 1925. 

Revenue 

A gross revenue of 8709,455.73 was received and expenditures made of 
8354,736.09, leaving a net surplus for the year of 8354,719.64. The revenue for 
the year was the second largest in the Department's history, and exceeded the 
previous year by 842,227.77. 

C0MP.A.RATIVE Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, 1923-1925 Inclusive, 
AS Shown in the Public Accounts 

Revenue Expenditure Surplus 

1923 $521, US 08 8391,422 19 S229.725 89 

1924 667,227 96 336,826 96 330,401 00 

1925 709,455 73 354.736 09 354,719 64 

In addition to the general expenditures, the administration of the Wolf 
Bounty Act comes under the Department's control, and bounties were paid for 
the year as follows: 

Wolf bounties 825,465 62 

For comparative purposes, the revenue received from Game and Fish for 
the past two years were as follows: 

1924 1925 

Revenue from game 8372,142 54 8402.314 19 830,171 65— Inc. 

Revenue from fish 295,085 42 307,14154 12,056 12— Inc. 

In a previous report attention was drawn to the steady increase of revenue 
from the sale of Angling Licenses which now totals 8128,115.00, and for the first 
time has exceeded the license fees received from the entire commercial fisheries 
of the Province. 

Statistics 

The statistics accompanying this report will show in detail the kinds, 
quantities and values of commercial fish, also the varieties, quantities and 
locations of fry and fingerlings distributed from Provincial Hatcheries, together 
with other statistics pertaining to the fur trade, as well as other branches of the 
Department. All of which has been carefully prepared and affords interesting 
and valuable information. 

[3] 



THE REPORT UPON No. 9 



1923 


1924 


1925 


6,018,801 


6,502,736 


6,877,398 


172 


208 


139 


1,265 


1,323 


1,334 


1,263 


1,256 


1,195 


36 


70 


43 


125 


126 


144 


71,336 


78,685 


98,607 


3,742 


4,267 


4,263 


100 


103 


112 


894 


975 


1,018 


1,080 


1,177 


1,086 


$2,807,368 00 


$2,995,362 00 


$3,235,510 00 


38,594,682 


41,732,664 


34,385,335 


$2,886,398 76 


$3,139,279 03 


$2,858,854 79 


Angling 


. 





Fish 

The statistics of the commercial fisheries of the Province are shown in 
comparison as follows: — 

Gill nets licensed (yards) . . . 

Seines " 

Pound nets " 

Hoop nets " 

Dip and roll nets licensed 

Spears " 

Hooks " . 

Number of men employed 

Number of tugs 

Number of gasoline boats 

Number of sail or row boats 

Value of boats, ice-houses, wharves and 

twine 

Aggregate catch in pounds 

Value to fishermen 



There was an unusual demand for non-resident Anghng Licenses this year, 
and for a number of years a steady increase in revenue from this source has 
taken place, as will be shown by the following comparisons: — 

1922 1923 1924 1925 

Revenue from Angling Licenses. $63,132 00 $77,856 75 $105,862 50 $128,115 00 

Although game fishing is reported as good in various parts of the Province, 
it can be readily seen that the yearly toll is fast increasing and places a demand 
on the hatcheries that will require the maximum production to maintain a supply 
that will satisfy the steadily increasing resident and non-resident anglers. 

Hatcheries 

Elsewhere in this report will be found in detail the quantities and varieties 
of fry and fingerlings placed in various waters of the Province from hatcheries 
located at Mount Pleasant, Glenora, Sault Ste. Marie, Normandale, Port 
Carling, Port Arthur and Fort Frances, and for comparative purposes with the 
previous year, the following figures show a summary of total distribution: — 

Whitefish Fry 

Pickerel Fry 

Salmon Trout Fingerlings and Fry 

Herring Fry 

Rainbow Trout Fry and Fingerlings 

Speckled Trout Fingerlings and Fry 

Black Bass Fingerlings and Fry 

Parent Black Bass 

340,065,997 560,247,611 348,191,736 

The public are demanding every year a distribution of fry and fingerlings 
much in excess of the possible supply obtainable from the Provincial Hatcheries, 
and this is particularly so in regard to Game Fish. The distribution of small- 
mouthed black bass is made from fry and fingerlings obtained by placing parent 
fish in artificial ponds, but as this was an abnormal season and the weather 
unusually cold, the hatch of small-mouthed black bass resulted in a total failure, 
and all applicants for such fry and fingerlings were disappointed. In order 



1923 


1924 


1925 


264,400,000 


437,469,000 


246,125,500 


36,140,000 


80,250,000 


49,015,000 


12,410,100 


7,801,000 


7,320,425 


24,000,000 


32,475,000 


45,050,500 


1,100 


15,000 


3,000 


2,328,800 


1,898,500 


676,700 


785,000 


338,000 


Nil 


997 


1,111 


611 



1926 GAME AND FISHERIES 5 

that a greater and more dependable supply of speckled trout can be obtained, 
the Department has commenced work on Normandale Creek, where ponds and 
other facilities are being constructed, and from satisfactory results so far 
obtained, it would appear to fully warrant the expenditure undertaken. From 
fry placed in these waters in the spring of 1924, the Department has now a 
quantity of strong, healthy fish measuring from 6 inches to 10 inches, and it is 
anticipated that three-quarters of a million speckled trout spawn will be obtain- 
able during the fall collection. This result is beyond our earlier expectations, 
and many million of spawn should be collectable from these waters when fully 
developed. 

Game Preserves 

The propagation of English Ring-necked Pheasants was again successfully 
carried on at the Eugenia Crown Game Preserve. A number of small areas 
were created as Crown Game Preserves during the year, as well as the large game 
preserve known as "The Chapleau Game Preserve," located west and north of 
Chapleau, and such preserve contains approximately 2,850 square miles. This 
has been advocated by the Department for a number of years, and with proper 
administration will prove of great value in conserving both fish and game in 
that district, as well as provide an attraction for the tourist. 

During the year considerable wild rice seed was planted in public waters 
throughout the Province, and from reports obtained the planting from previous 
years has been successful in improving depleted rice beds and in establishing 
new rice beds as feeding grounds for wild life. 

Game 

Deer and Moose. — Big game continues to be plentiful, and another success- 
ful hunting season has been reported. For comparative purposes the following 
figures show the number of hunting licenses issued for the past five years: — 

Resident Moose 

Resident Deer 

Non-resident Hunting. . . 

Ruffed Grouse {Partridge) .—The scarcity of these game birds warranted a 
continued close season for the year, and they are reported as being very scarce 
particularly in the northwesterly part of the Province. 

Sharp-tailed Grouse or Prairie Hen are now quite well established in the 
District of Thunder Bay and west thereof. 

Quail are not found in any great numbers except in the southwest part of 
the Province where conditions warranted an open season of three days in the 
Counties of Essex and Kent. 

Pheasants are now reported in a large number of counties, but not in large 
numbers, except in the Counties of Lincoln and Welland, where conditions 
warranted an open season for one day for a limited number of male birds. 

Ducks and Geese continue to be plentiful. 

Furs 

The value of the pelts on which royalty was paid during the year is in 
excess of the previous year, although the number of pelts is somewhat lower. 

Beaver show a further decline, although not nearly as great a decline as for 
the preceding year. 



1921 


1922 


1923 


1924 


1925 


1,989 


1,584 


1,098 


1,385 


1,291 


18,689 


20,504 


17,877 


19,517 


17,034 


950 


1,256 


1,247 


1,651 


1,581 



THE REPORT UPON No. 9 



Otter show a steady catch for a number of years. 
Mink show a much smaller catch than last year. 
Marten and Fisher are becoming scarcer each year. 
Muskrat show a steady catch for a number of years. 

Comparison of Pelts Exported and Tanned for Five Years 

1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 

Beaver 95,479 93,971 70,684 50,233 48,364 

Otter 4,759 5,309 3,997 5,096 4,522 

Fisher 2,602 2,657 2,339 1,910 1,936 

Marten 6,533 7,327 4,704 3,661 3.125 

Mink 42,667 78,487 58,634 82,446 68,138 

Muskrat 479,866 554,888 478,820 533,256 534,739 

Bear 1,494 2,137 1,447 1,399 2,014 

Fox (Cross) 287 469 1,154 1,082 2,601 

Fox (Red) 5,282 11,272 12,329 14,695 22,198 

Fox (Silver or Black) 153 87 205 167 433 

Fox (White) 351 1,765 1,501 362 974 

Fox (not specified) 23 170 34 28 61 

Lynx 591 836 1,177 2,332 2,200 

Raccoon 11,951 20,344 15,752 21,976 22,157 

Skunk 47,121 73,219 54,770 58,130 67,100 

Weasel 58,898 94,399 61,603 51,163 34,365 

Wolverine 12 6 20 12 8 



Total 762,069 947,343 769,070 827,948 814,935 

To be added to the above are 1,134 ranch-raised fox pelts which were 
tanned or exported without payment of royalty, under the terms of Fur Farmers' 
Licenses. 

The value of pelts to the trapper shown for the year on above list is $3,383,- 
060.57, and the Federal Statistics show Ontario to far exceed the fur production 
of any other Province. 

Fur Farming 

A continued interest is shown for information pertaining to Fur Farming, 
and a corresponding increase in licenses for the-year has resulted. 

1922 1923 1924 1925 

Fur Farmers' Licenses issued 141 284 392 624 

Animals stocked on licensed farms: — 

1922 1923 1924 1925 

Beaver 4 2 10 29 

Fisher 3 6 6 2 

Fox (Cross) 

Fox (Red) 

Fox (Silver Black) 

Fox (Blue) 

Lynx 

Mink 

Muskrat 

Opossum 

Raccoon *. 

Skunk 

Bear 

Marten 

Total 1.805 3,277 7,056 13,936 



270 


361 


386 


459 


206 


323 


347 


725 


1,088 


2,171 


3,006 


4,940 
40 


2 


2 


2 


2 


94 


73 


97 


136 




163 


2,904 


7,182 


6 








50 


130 


149 


306 


82 


46 


136 


100 






11 


13 
2 



1926 GAME AND FISHERIES 7 

Enforcement of the Act 

The district wardens and officers in the outside service have enforced the 
provisions of the Act and Regulations to the best of their abiHty, and the follow- 
ing figures will be of interest: — 

Summary of Convictions and Fines 

Convictions reported 728 

Fines collected $15,630 86 

A great many articles were confiscated during the year, including: — 

3,524 Pelts 15 Trap nets 1 Truck 

18 Deer and Moose hides 47 Spears 2 Motor cars 

24 Live animals 62 Rods and lines 13 Jack-lights & Lanterns 

9,290 pounds fish 655 Traps 27 Deer 

1,276 yards gill nets 181 Fire-arms 414 pounds venison 

655 pieces gill nets 10 Gasoline boats 7 Moose 

24 Dip nets 17 Row-boats 1,040 pounds Moose meat 

11 Hoop nets 3 Canoes 24 Partridge 

10 Seine nets 1 Steam tug 82 Ducks 

5 Roll nets 6 Punts 6 Pheasants 

102 Decoys 

All confiscations are sold at advertised sales by tender, other than such 
articles as are sold by the Department to the former owner, when circumstances 
warrant. 

Acknowledgments 

Before closing my report I must publicly express my appreciation for the 
assistance and support rendered to the Department during the year, not only 
for the loyalty of the staff of both the inside and outside service, but for the 
assistance of the transportation companies who helped our officers in their 
duties pertaining to the enforcement of the Act and with the distribution of 
fry, whether by baggage car or by the official car "Beaver." 

All statistics referred to will be found elsewhere in this report, together with 
many other statistics in detail. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I am. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

D. McDonald, 

Deputy Minister of Game and Fisheries. 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



REVENUE RECEIVED BY DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 
DURING YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31st, 1925 

GAME 

Royalty $146,846 66 

Trappers' Licenses 46,73 1 1 2 

Non-resident Hunting Licenses 56,505 00 

Deer Licenses 60,281 50 

Moose Licenses < 6,669 50 

Fur Dealers' Licenses 54,146 00 

Fur Farmers' Licenses 3,280 00 

Tanners' Licenses 190 00 

Game Dealers' Licenses 496 00 

Hotel and Restaurant Licenses, etc 431 00 

Cold Storage Licenses 225 00 

Guides' Licenses 3,087 50 

Fines, Game and Fish 15,630 86 

Sales 6,157 15 

Commissions 1,636 90 



FISHERIES 

Fishing Licenses $128,033 00 

Royalty 39,189 13 

Angling Licenses 128,115 00 

Sales 6,708 61 

Rentals 2,780 00 

Miscellaneous 2,315 80 

Total 



$402,314 19 



$307,141 54 
$709,455 73 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1925 



Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 
Algoma: Quantity 



Moose Lake 

Trout Lake 

Agawa Lake 

Mongoose Lake 

Spruce Lake 

Loon Lake 

Pine Lake 

Hobon Lake 

Alva Lake 

Hawk Lake 

Chippawa River 

Sand Lake and Creek. . 

Deer Lake 

Carpenter Lake 

Wartz Lake 

Lily Lake 

Island Lake 

Clearwater Creek 

Camp Lake Stream. . . . 
Speckled Trout Lake. . . 

Magpie River 

Little Groundhog River. 

John Creek 

Oba River 



Brant: 

Ausbrook Stream . 

Bruce: 

Vance Creek. . . . , 
Phillip's Creek . . 
Park Head Creek. 



2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
4,000 
4,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
7,000 



500 



500 

2,000 

500 



Bruce: 

Thomson's Creek 
Teeswater River. 
Hammond Creek. 

Wolf Creek 

Elphick's Creek . 

Plum Creek 

Unnamed Creek. . 
Judges Creek. . . . 
Kirklands Creek. 
Lang's Creek ... 
Bowles' Creek . . . 
Potter's Creek . . . 
Crawford Creek. . 
Coles Creek 



Durham: 

Canton Creek . . 

Tyrene Creek and Tributaries. 

Wilmot's Creek 

Dick William's Creek 

Britain Creek 

Haydon Creek 

Wilson's Creek 

Smith Creek 

Spring Creek 

Cedarvale Creek 

Mountjoy's Creek 

Steven's Creek 

Bees Creek 

Bell Hill Stream . . 

Kendal Creek and Tributaries. 

McKindley's Creek 

Robinson's Creek 



Quantity 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 



1,500 
4,500 
1,500 

500 
1,500 
4,500 
3,000 
1,500 

400 
1,500 
4,500 
3,000 
1,500 
1,500 
7,500 
1,500 
1,500 



1926 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1925— Continued 



Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 



Durham — Continued 

Walter's Creek 

Liskard Creek 

English Creek 

Millbrook Pond 

Mastwood's Creek 

Nichol's Creek 

Langstaff Creek 

Gibson Creek 

Little's Creek 

Brimacombe Creek 

Community Park Stream. 

Pasture Creek 

Orono Creek 

Falls Creek 

Clarke East Creek 

Squirrel Creek 

McMillan's Creek 

Austin's Creek 

Bran's Creek 

Crossland's Creek 

Muldune Creek 

Moore's Creek 

Elizabethville Creek 

Sowdon's Creek 

DeLong Creek 

Perry town Creek 

Caldwell Creek 

Patterson's Creek 

Ball Creek 



Q 



Dufferin: 

Funston's River . . . . 
Spitting John River. 

Cross River 

Unnamed Creeks. . . . 



Elgin: 

Stanley Creek. 



Frontenac: 

Trout Lake Creek. 
Eagle Creek 



Grey: 

Bell Lake 

Saugeen River. . . . 

Silver Creek 

Lawrence Creek. . 

Styx River 

Weidendorf Creek. 
Bontick Creek. . . . 



Huron: 

Stoltz Creek 

Nine Mile River. . . 

Raus Creek 

Johnston's Creek . . 

Blythe Creek 

Wright's Creek . . . . 

Bells Creek 

Bridgewater Creek. 
Scotts Creek 



uantity 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
3,000 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
500 
400 



500 
500 
500 
500 



Halton: 

Twelve Mile Creek. 



500 



1,500 
1.500 



500 
5,500 
2,000 
500 
500 
500 
500 



500 

500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 



500 



Hastings: 

Deer River 

Rawdon Creek. . . 
Unnamed Creeks. 
Gowdy Creek 



Lanark: 

Pauls Creek 

Allan's Brook . . . . 

Jims Creek 

Grant's Creek . . . . 

Middlesex: 

Duncrief's Creek. . 

River Wye 

Crow Creek 

Aux Sauble River. 
Dettv Creek 



Manitoulin: 

Mindemeya River. 

Muskoka : 

Muskoka River.. . 

White Lake 

Chub Lake 

Wasoca Lake 

Harp Lake 

Menominee Lake. 
Chisholm's Lake . . 

Pages Lake 

Spring Lake 

McMaster Lake. ., 
Echo Lake 



Nipissing: 

Four Mile Creek. 
North River 



Norfolk: 

Patterson's Creek . . 
Kent Creek. ...... 

North Creek 

Venison Creek 

St. William's Creek 

Outlet Stream 

Big Creek 

Deer Lick 

Dowger Creek 



Northumberland: 
Woodland Creek. . . 
Mutton's Creek . . . 

Allen's Creek 

West Creek 

Tweedle's Creek . . 

Dark Creek 

Harper's Creek . . . 
I iopkins' Creek . . . 

Burnley Creek 

Russ Creek 

Camborne Creek. . 
Smylie's Creek ... 
Philip's Creek .... 
Warren's Creek . . . 
Forestell's Creek . . 
Dumbel Mill Pond 
Davey's Creek . . . . 
Harris' Creek 



Quantity 
3,000 
4,500 
1,500 
1,500 



1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 



500 
500 
1,000 
500 
500 



2,000 



4,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



2,500 
2,500 



1,000 
500 
400 
400 
500 
500 
400 
500 
500 



,500 
,000 
,500 
,500 
,500 
,500 
,500 
,500 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,500 
,000 
,500 
,500 
500 
000 
500 



10 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1925— Continued 



Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 
Continued 



Northumberland- 
Ingram's Creek 

Braden Creek 

Cobourg Creek 

Staple's Creek 

Standley Farm Creek 

Bellyon Creek 

Hardy's Creek 

Durran's Creek 

Trent Bridge Creek. . 

Oxford : 

Unnamed Creeks. . . . 

Wright's Creek 

Whiting Creek 

Five Points Creek . . 



Quan 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



Parry Sound: 

Magnetawan River 

Bolger Lake Tributaries. 

Sword's Creek 

Rouches' Lake 

Black Creek 

Lake Bernard Inlet 

Pool Lake Outlet 

Genesse Creek 



Peterboro: 

Ouse Creek 

Leary's Creek . . . 
Dixon's Creek . . . 
Best's Creek .... 
Jamieson's Creek 
Sunset Creek. . . . 
Little Ouse 



Peel: 

Credit River and Tributaries. 

Cold Creek 

H umber River 



Renfrew: 

Brindle's Creek. 



Simcoe: 

Mad River 

Boyne River 

Coldwater River. . . . 

Sturgeon River 

Noisy River 

Nottawasaga River. 

Batteau Creek 

Pretty Rivers 

Black Ash Creek. . . 
O'Neil's Creek .... 

Pilon Creek 

Port Racheal Creek. 
Wilson's Creek .... 

Bear Creek 

Painswick Creek. . . 

Rooker Creek 

Hukling Creek 

Rose Creek 

Big Creek 



tity 
,500 
,500 
,500 
,500 
,500 
,500 
,500 
,500 
,500 



Sudbury: 

Onaping River. 
Emery Creek. . 



2,000 
500 
500 
500 



2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2.000 



1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,900 
500 
1,500 



3, "000 

500 

2,000 



2,000 



2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
4,000 
2,000 
2,000 



5,000 
5,000 



Sudbury — Continued 

Rapid River 

Post River 

Rock Lake 

Junction Creek McKinn. 

Veuve Creek 

Ashgaming Lake 

Three Mile Creek 



Thunder Pay: 

Allen Lake 

Kashabowie Lake. 

Long Lake 

Moose Lake 

McKenzie River. . 
Lake Wideman . . . 
Lower Twin Lake. 
Upper Twin Lake. 

Silver Lake 

North Branch. . . . 
Mclntyre Creek. . 

Rees Lake 

Steel River 

Nipigon River. . . . 

Stewart Lake 

Eraser Creek 

Gravel River 

Deception Lake. . , 
Anderson Lake. . . 

Caribou Lake 

Sunset Lake 

Cascade Stream . . 
McKenzie Lake. . 

Clegg Lake , 

Maud Lake 

Rapsay Lake. . . . 
McComb Lake. . . 

Franz Lake 

Tesky Lake. . ... 

Luck Lake 

Gagnon Lake 

Blacklock Lake. . 
Schreiber Lake. . . 
Wolf Lake 



Trowbridge Stream . 

Timiskaming: 

Mofifat Creek 



Waterloo: 

Erbsville Creek. . . . 
Hespeler Stream. . . 

Reist's Creek 

Grundig Dam 

Hamacher's Creek . 

Jantz Creek 

Cressman Dam. . . . 

Cedar Creek 

Beschardt Creek. . . 
Musselman's Creek 

Hamel Creek 

Gingrech Creek. . . . 
Sweitzers Creek. . . . 
Bamberg Creek. . . . 
Snider's Creek .... 
Bridgeport Creek. . 
Canagagigue Creek. 
Mickie's Creek .... 

Miller Creek 

Breslau Dam 



Quantity 
5,000 
5,000 
10,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 



5, 
5, 
5, 
5, 
5, 
5 
5, 
5, 
5 
5 
5 
5 
20 
40 
5 
20 
10 
10 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 

10 
5 



,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 



2.000 



500 
400 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
400 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
1,000 
500 
500 
500 



1926 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



11 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1925- 



-Continued 



Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 



Wentworth : 


Q' 


jantity 


Millgrove Creek 




500 


Gunbv Creek 




500 


Beverlev Creek 




500 


Strabane Creek 


. ^ ^ 


500 


Martin's Creek 




500 


Britton Creek 




500 


Binkley Creek 




500 


Wellington: 






Guelph Mill Creek 




500 


York: 






Glenville Pond 




1,500 



Salmon Trout Fry and Fingerlings 

Great Lakes: Quantity 

Lake Ontario 1,571,425 



Addington: 
Bass Lake. 



Algoma: 

Trout Lake. . . 
Lake Superior. 
Ophir Lake. . . . 
Sand Lake. . . . 
Mitchell Lake. 
Island Lake. . . 

Oba Lake 

Lake Anjiganii. 
Hunter Lake. . 



Prontenac: 

Sharbot Lake 

Crow Lake 

Loughborough Lake. 
Trout Lake 



Haliburton: 

Kashamagamog Lake. 

Gull Lake 

Farquar Lake 

McFadden's Lake. . . . 

Otter Lake 

Hall's Lake 

Ross Lake 

Bow Lake 

Bare Lake 

Stormv Lake 

Wolf Lake 

Pine Lake 

Kinnisis Lake 

Paint Lake 

Kingscott Lake 

Haliburton Lake 

McClarence Lake. . . . 



Hastings: 

Long Lake 

Papineau Lake. . . . 
Westlemkoon Lake. 

Baptiste Lake 

Salmon Lake 

Wadsworth Lake . . . 



15,000 



25,000 
200,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 
50,000 
25,000 
25,000 



50,000 
25,000 
50,000 
50,000 



15,000 
20,000 
15,000 
20,000 
15,000 
30,000 
15,000 
20,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
15,000 
15.000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 



15,000 
20,000 
40,000 
15,000 
20,000 
20,000 



Kenora: 

Gun Lake 

Fox Lake 

Lake of the Woods. 

Eagle Lake 

Armstrong Lake. . . 



Lanark: 

Silver Lake 

Robertson's Lake. 
Pike Lake 



Leeds: 

Charleston Lake. 
Rideau Lakes. . . , 
Opinicon Lake. . . 
Crosby Lake. . . . 

Indian Lake 

Basin Lake 



Manitoulin: 
Lake Manitou . 



Muskoka: 

Lake of Bays. . 
Lake \'ernon. . 
Mary Lake. . . . 
Sparrow Lake. . 

Gull Lake 

Clear Lake. . . . 
Skeleton Lake. 
Walker's Lake. 
Buck Lake. . . . 
Near Cut Lake. 
Surprise Lake. . 
Lake Nipissing. 

Nipissing: 

Trout Lake. . . , 
Turtle Lake. . . 
Talon Lake. . . , 
Crooked Lake. , 
Lake Miron. . . 
Gilmour Lake. . 



Parry Sound: 

Long Lake 

Deer Lake 

Clear Lake 

Sugar Lake 

Sand Lake 

Home Lake 

Kate's Lake 

Spring Lake 

Maple Lake 

Braye Lake 

Eagle Lake 

Lake Bernard 

Round Lake 

Bittern Lake 

Peter's Lake 

Lynx Lake 

Bartlett's Lake 

Oliver Lake 

Paisle\' Lake 

Three Legged Lake. . . 
Ka-Wig-A-Mog Lake. 



Quantity 
25,000 
25,000 
750,000 
25,000 
25,000 



20,000 
25,000 
20,000 



100,000 

100,000 

50,000 

25,000 

100,000 

25,000 



50,000 



500,000 
20,000 
20,000 
25,000 
20,000 
40,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20.000 
10,000 
20,000 
4,000 



25,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 
10,000 
25,000 



20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 



12 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1925- 



-Continued 



Salmon Trout Fry and Fingerlings 



Peterborough : 

Swamp Lake 

Upper Stoney Lake. 

Thunder Bay: 

Baril Lake 



Rainy River: 

Bad \'ermillion Lake. 

Renfrew: 

Muskrat Lake 

Carson's Lake 

Rough Lake 

Trout Lake 



Simcoe: 

Edward's Lake. 

Sudbury: 

Trout Lake. . . 
Ramsay Lake. . 

Bass Lake 

Richard Lake. . 
Boland Lake. . , 



Thunder Bay: 

Lake Xipigon 

Kashabowie Lake. . 
Lake Shebandawin. 
Lac Des iVIille Lacs. 
Lake Hellen 



Timiskaming: 
Kenogami Lake. 
Twin Lakes. . . . 

Free Lake 

Lake Temagami. 
Kirkland Lake. . 
Crystal Lake. . . 



York: 

Lake Simcoe. 



Pickerel Fry 



Addington: 
Loon Lake. 



Quantity 

15,000 

100.000 



25,000 



25,000 



20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 



10,000 



25.000 
50,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 



1,250,000 
25.000 
25,000 
50,000 
25,000 



50,000 
25,000 
25,000 
50,000 
10,000 
10,000 



150,000 



Quantity 
100,000 



Algoma: 

Desbarats Lake 250,000 

George Lake 1,000,000 

Marsh Lake 250,000 

Echo Lake 18,455,000 



Bruce: 

Shouldice Lake. . 

Miller Lake 

Teeswater River. 
Cameron Lake. . . 
Curtise Lake. . . . 
Lake Chesley . . . . 
Pearl Lake 



Durham: 

Lake Scugog. 
Rice Lake. . . 



50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 



250,000 
700,000 



Frontenac: 
Gull Lake.. 
Clear Lake. 
Eagle Lake. 
Crow Lake. 



Quantity 

100,000 

100,000 

100,000 

100,000 

Loughborough Lake 1,000.000 



Bob's Lake. 
Green Bay Lake. 
Lake Massongen. 
Marble Lake. . . . 

Bass Lake 

Elbow Lake 

Big Gull Lake. . . 

Crotch Lake 

Long Lake 



Grey: 

AlcCaslin's Lake 

McCollLake 

Hastie's Lake 

Mountain Lakp 

Lak Francis 

Sheppard's Lake 

Townsend's Lake. . . . 

Black Lake 

Monk Lake 

Wilcock's Lake 

Westfhol's Lake 

Pottawattamie River. 
Twamlev's Lake 



100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
200,000 



50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
100,000 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
50.000 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 



Grenville: 

Burritt's Rapids 250,000 

Nation River 1,000,000 



Glengarry: 

Lake St. Francis. . . 
St. Lawrence River. 

Haliburton: 

Bob Lakes 

Davis Lake 

Cedar Lake 

Devil's Lake 

Duck Lake 

Dark Lake 

Trooper's Lake. . . . 
Contaws Lake 



Hastings: 

Stoco Lake 

Twin Lake 

Moira River 

Moira Lake 

Salmon River. . . . 
Crivyea Lake. . . . 
Wadsworth Lake. 



Banker Lake. 



Lambton: 

Sydenham River. 

Lanark: 

Dalhousie Lake. . 
Mississippi Lake. 

Black Lake 

Silver Lake 

Clayton Lake. . . . 
Christie Lake. . . . 



200,000 
200,000 



50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
100,000 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 



100,000 
100,000 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
100,000 



150,000 



200,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 



1926 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



13 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1925— Continued 



Pickerel Fry 
Lanark — Continued 

Mississippi River 

Patterson Lake 

Joe's Lake 

Bennett's Lake 



Leeds: 

Charleston Lake. . . . 

Rideau Lakes 

Sand Lake 

Opinicon Lake 

Bass Lake 

Lower Beverly Lake. 

Crosby Lake 

Newboro Lake 



Quantity 
400,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 



500,000 
400.000 
200,000 
100,000 
100.000 
100.000 
100.000 
100,000 



Peterborough : 
Indian River. . . 

Ball Lake 

Pigeon Lake. . . . 
Buckhorn Lake. 
Stoney Lake. . . . 
Chemong Lake. 



Quantity 

ioo,ooa 

100,000 

loo.ooa 

100,000 
100.000 

loo.ooa 



Rainv River: 

Lake Warsaw 1,000,000 



Renfrew: 

Muskrat Lake. . . 
Petawawa River. 

Pough Lake 

Lake Onago 



50.000 

100,000 

50,000 

50,000 



Middlesex: 

Thames River. . . 
Aux Sable River. 



400,000 
100,000 



Muskoka: 

Lake Muskoka 1,000,000 

Lake Joseph 1,000,000 

Lake Rosseau 1,000,000 

Sparrow Lake 1,250,000 



McL rea's Lake . 

Gull Lake 

Muldrew Lake 

Musquash River.. . 

Trout Lake 

Chub Lake 

Devine Lake 

Garter Snake Lake. 



100,000 
150,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
50,000 
50,000 
100,000 



Nipissing: i 

Lake Nipissing. . 1,600,000 

Ethier's Lake 100,000 

Trout Lake 100,000 

Hogarth Lake 100,000 

Turtle Lake 100,000 



Northumberland: 

Crow Bay 

Trent River. . . 
Crow River. . . 



Oxford : 

Maplehurst Lake. 



Parrv Sound: 

Mill Lake 

Magnetawan River. . . 

Belger Lake 

Star Lake 

Kashagacagomg Lake. 

Bay Lake 

Compass Lake 

South Sequin River. . 



Prince Edward: 
Smith's Bay. . . 
Consecon Lake. 
West Lake. . . . 
Waller's Bay. . 

East I:ilke 

South Bav. . . . 



100,000 
200,000 
100,000 



50,000 



100,000 
100,000 

100, noo 

100,000 
100.000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 



200,000 
200,000 
200,000 
200,000 
200,000 
200,000 



Russell: 

Castor River. 



Simcoe: 

Lake Couchiching. 

Severn River 

Edward's River. . . 
Wilson's Lake. . . . 
Long Lake 



Sudbury: 

Assey Lake 

Lady McDonald Lake. 

McLaren Lake 

Clare Bell Lake 



50,000 



200,000 

200,000 

100,000 

50,000 

10,000 



100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 



Thunder Bav: 

Kashabow'ie Lake 1,000,000 

Lake Shebandawin 1,000,000 

Long Lake 500,000 

Little Long Lake 500,000 



Timiskaming: 

Commanda Lake. 
Hector Lake 



Cochrane: 

Minard's Lake. 
Buskegan Lake. 
Bob's Lake 



100,000 
100,000 



100,000 
100,000 
100,000 



\'ictoria: 

Sturgeon Lake 100.000 

Cameron Lake 1 ,000,000 

Balsam Lake 500,000 

Big Mud Turtle Lake 100,000 

Round Lake 100,000 



Waterloo: 
.Sun fish Lake. 
Grand River. 



Wentworth: 
Hamilton Bay 

Wellington: 
Puslinch Lake. 



York: 

Shadowmere Lake. 
Bond Lake 



50,000 
150,000 



200,000 
50,000 



100,000 
100,000 



14 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1925— Continued 



White fish Fry 

Great Lakes: Quantity 

Lake Superior 21,500,000 

Lake Erie 37,550,000 

Lake Ontario 60,000,000 

Algoma: 

North Channel 15,048,000 

Prince Edward County: 
-Bay of Quinte 57,999,500 

Rainv River District: 

Rainy Lake 33,028,000 

Thunder Bav District: 

Lake Nipigon 10,000,000 

Lake Hellen 1,000,000 

Herring Fry 
Great Lakes: 

Lake Erie 29,000,000 

Lake Ontario 13,000,000 



Lanark: 

Dalhousie Lake. 
Silver Lake 



50,000 
50,000 



Leeds: 

Rideau Lakes 



Quantity 
50,000 



Prince Edward County: 

/B2Ly of Quinte 1,850,000 

Rainv River: 

Bad X'ermillion Lake 50,000 

Rainy Lake 1,000,500 



Parent Bass 



Rainy River: 
Rainy Lake. 

Sudbury: 
Dog Lake. . . 



Waterloo: 

Waterloo Dam. 



Rainbow Trout Fingerlings 
Sudbury: 

Onaping River 

Fox Lake ^ . . . 

Post River 

Wahnapitae River 



240 



270 



101 



1,000 
500 
500 

1,000 



1926 GAME AND FISHERIES IS 



SUMMARY Quantity 

Parent small-mouthed Black Bass 611 

Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 676,700 

Salmon Trout Frv and Fingerlings 7,320,425 

Pickerel Frv. . . . .' 49,015,000 

Whitefish Fry 246,126,500 

Herring Fry 45,050,500 

Rainbow Trout Fingerlings 3,000 



Total 348,191,736 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF DISTRIBUTION 



Small-mouthed Black Bass Fr\- and Fingerlings 

Parent Small-mouthed Black Bass 

Speckled Trout 

Salmon Trout 

Pickerel 

Whitefish 

Herring 

Rainbow Trout 



1923 


1924 


1925 


785,000 


338,000 


Nil 


997 


1,111 


611 


2,328,800 


1,898,500 


676,700 


12,410,100 


7,801,000 


7,320,425 


36,140,000 


80,250,000 


49,015,000 


264,400,000 


437,469,000 


246,125,500 


24,000,000 


32,475,000 


45,050,500 


1,100 


15,000 


3,000 


340,065,997 


560,247,611 


348,191,736 



16 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



GAME AND FISHERIES 

Return of the Number of Fishermen, Tonnage and Value of Tugs, Vessels and Boats, 

industry during 













Fishing Material 










Tugs 


Gasoline 
Launches 


Sail or Row 
Boats 


Men 
Em- 
ployed 


Gill Nets 




No. 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


Yards 


Value 


Kenora and Rainy River Dis- 


4 
12 
10 
24 
17 


45 
297 
237 
615 
409 


$ 

12,200 
48.500 
44.500 
193.500 
97,615 


122 
48 
49 

123 
76 

51 

156 

335 
58 


$ 

55,755 
23,210 
28,645 
83,965 
38.775 

19,285 

155,690 

138,452 
29.240 


77 
73 
55 
91 
36 

94 

172 

295 
193 


$ 

2,960 
5,015 
3,915 
6,438 
2,325 

5,685 

13,790 

15.489 
7.104 


318 
272 
166 
501 
341 

146 

853 

1,018 
648 


312,874 
779.490 
220,393 
1.350.880 
840.521 


$ 

46.472 




70.650 


North Channel 


23.760 




136,938 




94.411 


Lake St. Clair District and St. 




Lake Erie, including Upper Niag- 
ara River 


37 


1,060 


336,500 


1,532.895 

1.677,035 
163.310 


194.128 


Lake Ontario, including Lower 
Niagara and St. Lawrence 


152,712 


Inland Waters, including Ottawa 
River 


8 


175 


34,500 


23,132 






Totals 


112 


2,838 


767,315 


1,018 


573,017 


1,086 


62,721 


4,263 


6.877.398 


742.203 



Recapitulation of the kinds, quantities and 





Herring 


Whitefish 


Trout 


Pike 


Pickerel 
(Dore) 


Sturgeon 




lbs. 


lbs. 

736.969 
346,696 
240.473 

1,255.408 

121.524 

595 

1.033,077 

1.926.367 
1,397,077 


lbs. 

129.578 
1,867.519 

469.525 
1,588.982 
1,739,468 

" 588 

1,053.304 
466.734 


lbs. 

730.308 
12.013 
78.220 

118.302 

840 

22.115 

28.700 

191.842 
133,985 


lbs. 

1,454.127 
94.370 
204,744 
121,442 
173,897 
44,822 
224,105 

70,982 
179,278 


lbs. 
17,028 




1,146,638 

9.372 

30.241 

202.117 

1.200 

2.839.625 

294.107 
32.173 


2,527 


North Channel 


9,577 




3.458 




8.752 


Lake St. Clair District and St. Clair Rivers 
Lake Erie, including Lower Niagara River. 
Lake Ontario, including Lower Niagara 


14,639 
41.685 

6.033 


Inland Waters, including Ottawa River.. . . 


141,763 


Totals, pounds 


4.555.473 


7,058.186 


7,325.698 


1,316.325 


2,567,767 


245,462 






Values 


$ c. 
182.218 92 


$ c. 

846.982 32 


$ c. 
805,826 78 


$ c. 
65,816 25 


$ c. 
359,487 38 


$ c. 
81.002 46 







1926 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



17 



DEPARTMENT, ONTARIO 

the Quantity and Value of all Fishing Materials and other Fixtures Employed in the fishing 



the 


year 


1925. 


































Fi 


shing 


MUiriil 








Other fixtures used in 
fishing 


Seines 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip or Roll 

Nets 


Night 


Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 






$ 


60 

51 

127 

84 

97 

229 

646 


$ 

14.330 
25.000 
59,750 
76,700 
56.650 

27.225 

398.850 


56 


$ 

2,218 




$ 




$ 




$ 


107 
14 
35 
42 
42 

36 

109 

60 
59 


$ 

36,975 
9,100 
12,430 
22,025 
12,620 

11,150 

131.500 

13.150 
12.310 


73 
20 
35 
46 
18 

16 

53 

35 
13 


10,005 












3.666 

7,000 

40.454 

13.628 

3,800 

4,950 

20,350 
5,425 


95 
1.200 
5.566 
2,339 

207 

230 

1,430 
155 






6.615 








17 

27 
2 

1 

65 

694 
333 


2.200 

640 

70 

15 

1.371 

23.814 
11,346 










15.375 


4 


800 


1,043 






17 


66 


9.400 








6,100 


38 


7.658 
12.590 

1,110 
6.610 


5,805 
9.700 

890 
8.070 










4,600 


37 


2 

2 
39 


7 

40 
795 






16,250 


11 






5,280 


49 


40 


13.400 


127 


960 


3,192 


139 


28.768 


25.508 


1.334 


671,905 


1,195 


41.674 


43 


842 


98.607 


11,222 


144 


1.026 


504 


261,260 


309 


76,817 



values of fish caught during the year 1925. 



Eels 


Perch 


Tullibee 


Catfish 


Carp 


Mixed and 
Coarse Fish 


Caviare 


Pickerel 
(Blue) 


Total 
Production 


Value 


lbs. 


lbs. 
8.521 


lbs. 

460.565 
369 


lbs. 


lbs. 
9,600 


lbs. 

271,214 
94,448 

459.250 

111.845 
89.228 

327.846 
1.057.976 

382.171 
487,987 


lbs. 

679 

11 

89 

30 

1.360 

366 

816 

" 1.456 


lbs. 


lbs. 

3,818,589 
3,564,591 
1,477,907 
3,394,753 
2,729.166 
675.618 
10.997,529 

4.351,983 
3.375.199 


$ c. 

384.175 54 








311.356 46 




6,573 

4.236 

63,292 

66 353 




84 

43.966 

2.272 

174.788 

244.019 

29.635 
310,318 




135.459 37 


700 


108. 789 
320,173 


7,354 

643 

22,894 

36.746 

122.414 
154,714 




363,235 21 


5.600 




267.011 04 




3 7.942 29 




2.060.262 

90.423 
31.969 




3.429.930 
15.380 


580,352 59 


159,325 




430,708 80 


16 845 


20.900 


348,613 49 








182.470 


2,331.629 


910.796 


344,765 


814,682 


3,281.965 


4.807 


3,445,310 


34.385,335 




, 


$ c. 
21.896 40 


$ c. 

116.581 45 


$ c. 

45,539 80 


$ c. 

24.133 55 


$ c. 

32,587 28 


$ c. 
131.278 60 


$ c. 

7,691 20 


$ c. 

137.812 40 




$ c. 

2.858,854 79 







18 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



A Comparative Statement of the Yield of the Fisheries of the Province of Ontario 



Kind 



Herring 

Whitefish 

Trout 

Pike 

Pickerel (dore) 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed fish 

Caviare 

Pickerel (blue) 

Total 



1924 



lbs. 

12,501,333 

6,691,760 

6,882,142 

1,293,336 

2,964,592 

281,155 

149,743 

2,515,832 

500,383 

372,861 

1,112,309 

3,401.590 

5,530 

3,060,098 



41,732,664 



1925 



lbs. 

4,555,473 

7,058,186 

7,325,698 

1,316,325 

2,567,767 

245,462 

182,470 

2,331,629 

910,796 

344,765 

814,682 

3,281,965 

4,807 

3,445,310 



34,385,335 



Increase 



lbs. 



366,426 

443,556 

22,989 



32,727 
410,413 



385.212 



(net decre 



Decrease 



lbs. 
7,945,860 



396,825 
35,693 



184,203 



28,096 
297,627 
119,625 

723 



ase) 7,347,329 



Statement of the Yield of the Fisheries of the Province of Ontario for the Year 
1925 AS Furnished by the Fishermen's Annual Returns 



Kind 



Quantity 



Price 
per lb. 



Value 



Herring 

Whitefish 

Trout 

Pike 

Pickerel (dore) . . . . 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed fish 

Caviare 

Pickerel (blue) . . . . 

Total 



lbs. 
,555,473 
,058,186 
,325,698 
,316,325 
,567,767 
245,462 
182,470 
,331,629 
910,796 
344,765 
814,682 
,281,965 
4,807 
,445,310 



34,385,335 



c. 
04 
12 
11 
05 
14 
33 
12 
05 
05 
07 
04 
04 
60 
04 



$ c. 

182,218 92 

846,982 32 

805,826 78 

65,816 25 

359,487 38 

81,002 46 

21,896 40 

116,581 45 

45,539 80 

24,133 55 

32,587 28 

131,278 60 

7,691 20 

137,812 40 



2,858,854 79 



Value of Ontario Fisheries for a Period of Twenty Years. 1906 to 1925 Inclusive 



Year 



Value 



1906 1,734,865 00 

1907 1,935,024 90 

1908 2,100,078 63 

1909 2,237,544 41 

1910 2,348,269 57 

1911 2,419,178 21 

1912 2,842,877 09 

1913 2,674,686 76 

1914 2,755,293 11 

1915 3,341,181 41 



Year Value 

$ c 

1916 2,658,993 43 

1917 2,866,424 00 

1918 3,175,110 32 

1919 2,721,440 24 

1920 2,691,093 74 

1921 2,656,775 82 

1922 2,807,525 21 

1923 2,886,398 76 

1924 3,139,279 03 

1925 2,858,854 79 



1926 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



19 



Statement of the Equipment and its Value, used in the Fishing Industry of the Province 
OF Ontario, During the Year 1925 



Tugs (2,838 tons) 

Gasoline Boats 

Sail or Row Boats . 

Gill Nets (6.877,398 yards) 

Seine Nets (28,768 yards) 

Pound Xets 

Hoop Xets 

Dip or Roll Nets 

Baited Hooks 

Spears 

Freezers and Ice Houses 

Piers and Wharves 

Number of Men employed in Fishing Industry 



Number 



Values 





S c. 


112 


767,315 00 


1,018 


573,017 00 


1,086 


62,721 00 




742,203 00 


139 


25,508 00 


1,334 


671,905 00 


1,195 


41,674 00 


43 


842 00 


98,607 


11,222 00 


144 


1,026 00 


504 


261,260 00 


309 


76,817 00 


4,263 





Jnitcd Pressl 



Twentieth Annual Report 



OF THE 



GAME AND FISHERIES 
DEPARTMENT 

1926 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 
THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




ONTARIO 



TORONTO 

Printed and Published by the Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 2 7 



To His Honour W. D. Ross, Esq., 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May It Please Your Honour: 

I have the honour to submit herewith, for the information of Your Honour 
and the Legislative Assembly, the Twentieth Annual Report of the Game and 
Fisheries Department of this Province. 

I have the honour to be 

Your Honour's most obedient servant, 

Charles McCrea, 

Minister of Mijies. 

Toronto, 1927. 



[2] 



TWENTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Game and Fisheries Department of 

Ontario 



To THE Honourable Charles McCrea, 

Minister of Mines. 

Sir: — I have the honour of placing before you the Twentieth Annual 
Report of the worJc of the Game and Fisheries Department for the fiscal year 
ending on October 31st, 1926. 

Revenue 

A net revenue of S682, 063. 32 was received, and a total expenditure made 
of $399,744.24, leaving a net surplus for the year of $282,319.08. 

In addition to the general expenditures, the administration of the Wolf 
Bounty Act comes under the Department's control, and bounties and expenses 
in connection therewith were paid for the year as follows: 

Wolf bounties and expenses in connection therewith $51,994 42 

Comparative Statement of Wolf Skins Received and Bounties Paid 

Timber Brush Pups Total Bounties 

For fiscal year ending October 31st, 1925 831 1,066 21 1,918 825,465 62 

For fiscal year ending October 31st, 1926 1,022 2,690 107 3,819 51,994 42 

Statistics 

The statistics accompanying this report will show in detail the kinds, 
quantities and values of commercial fish, also the varieties, quantities and 
locations of fry and fingerlings distributed from Provincial Hatcheries, together 
with other statistics pertaining to the fur trade, as well as other branches of 
the Department. All of which has been carefully prepared and affords interest- 
ing and valuable information. 

Fish 

The statistics of the commercial fisheries of the Pro\'ince are shown as 
follows: — 

1924 1925 1926 

Gill nets licensed (yards) 6,502,736 6,877,398 7,001,130 

Seines " 208 139 131 

Pound nets " 1,323 1,334 1,306 

Hoop nets " 1,256 1,195 1,134 

Dip and roll nets licensed 70 43 44 

Spears licensed 126 144 140 

Hooks " 78,685 98.607 124,023 

Number of men employed 4,267 4,263 4,145 

Number of tugs 103 112 119 

Xamljer of gasoline boats 975 1,018 1,003 

Number of sail or row boats 1,177 1,086 1,022 

V'alite of boats, ice-houses, wharves 

and twine.". $2,995,362 00 83,235,510 00 $3,337,737 00 

Aggregate catch in pounds 41,732,664 34,385,335 32,261,019 

Values to fishermen 83,139,279 03 82,858,854 79 82,643,686 28 

1-^1 



THE REPORT UPON No. 9 



Angling 

The demand for non-resident angling licenses is increasing yearly, and the 
revenue received from this source forms no mean part of the total revenue 
received from the fisheries of the Province. The heavy demand on the game 
fish may best be shown by a comparison of the revenues received from the 
sale of non-resident angling licenses as follows: — 

1923 1924 1925 1926 

Revnues from Angling Licenses. . . $77,856 75 $105,862 50 $128,115 00 $145,913 50 

To cope with the heavy demand made by the anglers for game fish, it will 
be necessary for the Department to use the existing hatcheries to their utmost 
capacity, as well as to use every means within its power towards conservation 
by the prevention of the pollution of waters, and the taking of fish illegally 
and during the time prohibited by law. 

Hatcheries 

Elsewhere in this report will be found in detail the quantities and varieties 
of fry and fingerlings placed in various w^aters of the Province from hatcheries 
located at Mount Pleasant, Glenora, Sault Ste. Marie, Normandale, Port 
Carling, Port Arthur and Fort Frances, and for comparative purposes with 
previous years, the following figures show a summary of total distribution: — 

1924 1925 1926 

Whitefish Fry 437,469,000 246,125,500 260,575,000 

Pickerel Fry 80,250,000 49,015,000 13,820,000 

Salmon Troui Fingerlings and Fry 7,801,000 7,320,425 8,501,000 

Herring Fry 32,475,000 45,050,500 11,225,000 

Rainbow Trout Fry and Fingerlings 15,000 3,000 1,800 

Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 1,898,500 676,700 1,085,300 

Black Bass Fry and Fingerlings 338,000 12,500 

Parent Black Bass 1,111 611 1,569 

Parent Speckled Trout 300 

560,247,611 348,191,736 295,222,469 

On July 1st, 1926, the Federal Government discontinued the propagation 
of fish in eight hatcheries located at:— 

Coliingwood Sarnia 

Wiarton Southampton 

Port Arthur Kingsville 

Kenora Belleville 

The operation of same, however, was continuous, as the Province of Ontario 
assumed control as soon as operations were discontinued by the Federal Govern- 
ment and after the distribution of fry and fingerlings was made. The collection 
of speckled trout spawn from the Normandale Creek ponds still continues to 
be of a satisfactory nature, and the undertaking has been so successful that it 
is now advisable to have further ponds established, in order that an increased 
quantity of speckled trout, fry and fingerlings may be distributed throughout 
the Province; the demand for which far exceeds the present production. 

Biological Investigations 

The Department of Game and Fisheries receives annually hundreds of 
applications for fish in various stages of development (fry, fingerlings and 
adults), and before distribution is made from the Provincial Hatcheries each 



1927 GAME AND FISHERIES 5 

application must be considered on its merits. As it was impossible to make 
a thorough study during the past two summers of all the waters requested to be 
restocked, before making recommendations many applications were disposed 
of on the strength of the information given by the applicants, and also on the 
basis of a knowledge of existing conditions in the neighbouring waters of the 
same system. 

Limnobiological studies were carried out on twenty-one inland waters 
during the summer of 1925, and on fifty-eight during the summer of 1926, with 
a view to determining their possibilities for fish production. The programme 
of the studies carried out on these waters with certain modifications for streams, 
included three fairly well-defined, and yet correlated lines of investigation: — 

(1) Fish fauna of the waters and their relative abundance. 

(2) Plankton on which either directly or indirectly fish depend for their 
food supply was collected from various depths for quantitative and 
qualitative studies in the laboratory. The quantity and character 
of the plankton are good indications of the productivity of any body 
of water. (Observations were made on the available macroscopic 
food supply, for example, molluscs, crustaceans, insects and insect 
larvae.) 

(3) A study of the physical and chemical properties of the water. 

(a) Physical properties, namely, depths, colour, transparency and 
temperatures. 

(b) Chemical properties, namely, dissolved gases (oxygen and 
carbon dioxide), bicarbonate, alkalinity and hydrogen ion con- 
centration. 

The above factors determine very largely the abundance of the plankton. 

The biology of the fishes of Lake Simcoe was gone into more intensively, 
and to this end eleven gill-nets, each fifty yards long and five feet deep, and 
with mesh ranging from one and one-half inches to five inches were emplo^'ed. 
By this means data were obtained on the relative abundance, distribution, 
rate of growth, food and spawning conditions of the various fishes inhabiting the 
lake. Extensive seine hauls were made over ecologically different areas in order 
td obtain data on the young fry and minnow population. 

By means of an Ekmann dredge covering an area of eighty-one square 
inches the life on the bottom of the lake was collected and preserved. Mr. 
Donald S. Rawson, B.A. is making a special study of this material in the Depart- 
ment of Biology, University of Toronto. 

Determining the suitability of any body of water, in advance of stocking, 
and in the light of the present day knowledge of the criteria to employ for the 
purpose, is one means of preventing undue loss in planting fish. However, 
applicants may render most important service by following the instructions 
issued with each lot of fish sent to them. The most important points to 
remember in this regard are — firstly, to plant where the natural food supply is 
adequate, and secondly, to plant out of the reach of enemies. Instructions are 
issued to applicants having these two important principles in view. It should 
be borne in mind that planting points vary according to the life history and 
habits of the species planted, and the life history and habits of its enemies. 
By means of propaganda these facts may be driven home to applicants. 

By biological surveys, legislation and education, steps are being taken by 
the Department to preser\e the game fish in waters not already depleted for 
the perpetual use of the |)ul)lic. compatible with chaneini.' conditions in nature. 



THE REPORT UPON No. 9 



1922 


1923 


1924 


1925 


1926 


1,584 


1,098 


1,385 


1,291 


1,359 


20,504 


17,677 


19,517 


17,034 


23,392 


1,256 


1,247 


1,651 


1,581 


1,347 



This is the ultimate aim of all our biological endeavours. When waters cannot 
be reclaimed by native species the policy is to substitute other species more 
suitable to the existing conditions. 

Game Preserves 

During the year a number of Crown Game Preserves were established 
throughout the Province, so that at present there are between five and six 
million acres of territory set aside in which hunting and trapping is forbidden 
for the sole purpose of conservation. 

The Crown Game Preserve at Eugenia, which is utilized for the purpose of 
propagating English Ring-necked Pheasants, commenced operations in 1922. 
Seven hundred and eighty-seven live birds and 33,000 eggs were distributed 
last year, as compared with 606 birds and 29,460 eggs for the previous year. 
The demand for settings of pheasant eggs still continues to be in excess of the 
available supply. 

Game 

Big Game continues to be plentiful, and the majority of hunting parties 
report a successful season. For comparative purposes, the following figures 
show the number of hunting licenses issued for the past five years: — 

Resident Moose 

Resident Deer 

Non-resident Hunting. 

In explanation of the Increased number of resident deer licenses sold it 
may be stated that for the first time, farmers in the northern parts of the Province 
were obliged to pay the sum of $1.00 for a deer license, whereas heretofore 
resident farmers in certain districts could secure one deer for their personal 
use without securing a license. 

Rtiffed Grouse {Partridge). — The scarcity of these game birds continues 
and warranted the continued close season, which should be maintained until 
they become re-established in fair quantities. 

Sharp-tailed Grouse or Prairie Hen are confined to the northwestern part 
of the Province, and are to be found there in considerable numbers. 

Quail are mainly confined to the southwestern part of the Province, and in 
the Counties of Essex and Kent, they are thriving to such an extent that a 
short open season of three days was permitted. 

Pheasants have, for a number of years, been plentiful in the Niagara 
Peninsula, and an open season for two days for a limited number of male birds 
was permitted. In other parts of the Province, owing to the general distribution 
of settings of eggs from the Eugenia Crown Game Preserve, they are reported 
as becoming well established, particularly in the southeastern part of the 
Province. 

Ducks and Geese were obtained in goodly numbers, and afforded the usual 
excellent hunting. 

Furs 

The total number of pelts on which royalty was paid during the year is 
somewhat lower than for the preceding year, although the value to the trapper 
is slightly greater. 



1927 GAME AND FISHERIES 7 

Beaver show a decided decline, although the drop in the number taken is 
practically accounted for by the restricted period in which same may be legally 
taken, and further, they can only be legally trapped by resident Indians. 

Otter still continue to be caught in approximately the same numbers over 
a period of years. 

Mink show a slightly smaller catch than for the preceding year. 

Fisher are quite plentiful, and the catch for this year is greater than in any 
period since 1922. 

Marten were taken in approximately the same quantity as for the preceding 
year, although much lower in number than formerly. 

Muskrat show a much lower catch than in former years, although it may be 
accounted for from the fact that weather conditions were not favourable during 
the open season. 

Red Fox have increased rapidly, and the catch for the year exceeds that of 
any former similar period. 

Skunk shows a steady catch for a number of years; the year's catch being 
slightly in excess of the previous year. 

Comparison of Pelts Exported and Tanned for Five Years 

1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 

Beaver 93,971 70,684 50,233 48,364 27,597 

Otter 5,309 3,997 5,096 4,622 4,304 

Fisher 2.657 2,339 1,910 1,936 2,618 

Marten 7,327 4,704 3,661 3,125 3.177 

Mink 78,487 58,634 82,466 68,138 65.299 

Muskrat 554,888 478,820 533,256 534,739 387,022 

Bear 2,137 1,447 1,399 2,014 1,635 

Fox (Cross) 469 1,154 1,082 2,801 4,175 

Fox (Red) 11,272 12,329 14,695 22,198 30,535 

Fox (Silver or Black) 87 205 167 433 620 

Fox (White) 1,765 1,501 362 974 226 

Fox (not specified) 170 34 28 61 165 

Lynx 836 1,177 2,332 2,200 3,884 

Raccoon 20,344 15,752 21,976 22.157 21,002 

Skunk 73,219 54,770 58,130 67,100 75,503 

Weasel 94,399 61,603 51,163 34,365 63,599 

Wolverine 6 20 12 8 11 



Total 947,343 769,070 827,948 814,935 691,372 

To be added to the above are 1,367 ranch-raised fox pelts which were tanned 
or exported without payment of royalty, under the terms of Fur Farmers' 
Licenses. 

The value of pelts, as shown in the above list, to the trapper, is 83,391,012.69, 
which places this Pro\-ince far in the lead in the production of fur-bearing animals. 

Fur Farming 

Fur farming still continues to receive a great deal of attention from the 
public, and while formerly it was largely confined to fox farming, inquiries are 
now being received concerning the possibilities of farming every species of fur- 
bearing animals native to the Province. 

Realizing that it is the duty of the Province to conserve our fur-bearing 
animals from depletion or extinction as it is to preserve any other natural 
resource, the Department has recently undertaken to conduct an Experimental 
Fur Ranch in the vicinity of Balsam Lake, where it is aimed to furnish the 
public with economical methods by which the various species can be raised 



THE REPORT UPON No. 9 



1924 


1925 


1926 


10 


29 


100 


6 


2 


28 


386 


459 


397 


347 


725 


397 


3,006 


4,940 


7,095 




40 


49 


2 


2 


3 


97 


136 


468 


2,904 


7,182 




149 


306 


290 


136 


100 


49 


11 


13 


4 




2 


7 



profitably and produce good fur; to develop by selective breeding improved 
strains of promising species; and to investigate diseases and parasites for the 
purpose of determining methods of prevention and treatment. 

The production of fur-bearing animals in captivity is comparatively a 
recent enterprise, and is, therefore, not supported by the exhaustive experimental 
and research data enjoyed by similar industries. 

1923 1924 1925 1926 
Fur Farmers' Licenses issued, 284 392 624 783 

Animals stocked on licensed farms: — 

1923 

Beaver 2 

Fisher 6 

Fox (Cross) 361 

Fox (Red) 323 

Fox (Silver Black) 2,171 

Fox (Blue) 

Lynx 2 

Mink 73 

Muskrat 163 

Opossum 

Raccoon 130 

Skunk • 46 

Bear 

Marten 

Total 3,277 7,056 13,936 *8,887 

*Exclusive of Muskrat. 



Enforcement of the Act 

The district wardens and officers in the outside service have enforced the 
provisions of the Act and the Regulations to the best of their ability, and during 
the year seasonal overseers have been engaged for the better protection of 
fish during the spawning period and for the protection of big game during the 
hunting season. 

Summary of Convictions and Fines 

Convictions reported 588 

Fines collected $11,563.00 

A great many articles were confiscated during the year, including: — 

1,483 Pelts 38 Spears 4 Motorcars 

34 Deer and Moose hides 84 Rods and lines 17 Jack-lights and lanterns 

5 Live animals 488 Traps 27 Deer 

6,791 Pounds fish 145 Fire-arms 40 Pounds venison 

506 Pieces gill nets 5 Gasoline boats 7 Moose 

23 Dip nets 6 Row boats 28 Pounds Moose meat 

17 Hoop nets 4 Canoes 54 Partridge 

14 Seine nets 1 Steam tug 35 Ducks 

3 Roll nets 7 Punts 4 Pheasants 

6 Trap nets 2 Trucks 81 Decoys 

All confiscations are sold at advertised sales by tender, other than such 
articles as are sold by the Department to the former owner, when circumstances 
warrant. 



1927 GAME AXD FISHERIES 9 

Acknowledgments 

In conclusion, I desire to publicly express my appreciation for the assistance 
and support rendered to the Department throughout the year, not only for the 
loyalty of the staff of both the inside and outside service but for the assistance 
of the transportation companies and the Fish and Game Protective Associations, 
whose officials and employees assisted our officers in the performance of their 
duties. 

All statistics referred to will be found elsewhere in this report, together 
with many other statistics in detail. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I am. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

D. McDonald, 

Deputy Minister of Game and Fisheries. 



10 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



REVENUE RECEIVED BY DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 
DURING YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31st, 1926 

Royalty, Game $131,092 99 

Trappers' Licenses 42,464 55 

Non-resident Licenses 61,614 5o 

Deer Licenses 59,548 60 

Moose Licenses 7,435 50 

Gun Licenses 3,423 00 

Fur Dealers' Licenses 50,044 25 

Fur Farmers' Licenses 4,031 25 

Tanners' Licenses 220 00 

Game Dealers' Licenses 521 50 

Hotel and Restaurant Licenses, etc 390 00 

Cold Storage Licenses 165 00 

Guides' Licenses 3,298 00 

Fines, Game and Fish 11,786 51 

Sales, Game 5,913 85 

Commissions 2,001 80 

Commercial Fishing Licenses 130,205 00 

Royalty, Fish 20,327 67 

Angling Licenses 146,312 00 

Court Losts 1,455 64 

Sales, Fish 6,770 37 

Rentals 3,260 00 

Miscellaneous 15,812 30 

Total $708,094 2& 



WATERS STOCKED WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF 
FISH PLANTED IN 1926 



Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 

Addington: Quantity 

Little Creek 2,000 

Algoma: 

Long Lake 3,000 

Johnson Lake 3,000 

Kerr's Lake 3,000 

Moose Lake 3,000 

Agawa River 3,000 

Mongoose Lake 3,000 

Hobon Lake 3,000 

Alva Lake 3,000 

Hawk Lake 3,000 

Cheppewa River 6,000 

Sana Lake and Creek 6,000 

Deer Lake 3,000 

Carpenter Lake 3,000 

Wartz Lake 3,000 

Lily Lake 3,000 

Magpie River 3,000 

Bear Creek 6,000 

Silver Lake 3,000 

Lower Lake 3,000 

Mountain Lake 3,000 

Stony Portage 3,000 

Brant: 

Blue Lake Creek 2,500 

Lawrason's Creek 2,500 

Barker's Creek 2,000 

Bruce: 

Thomson's Creek 2,000 

Wolf Creek 2,000 

Plum Creek 2,000 

Colpoy's Creek 2,000 



Bruce: Quantity 

Gagnon's Creek 2,000 

Smith's Creek 2,000 

Sanger Creek 2,000 

Matheson Creek 2,000 

Durham: 

Cavan Creek 2,000 

Tyrone Creek 800 

Decker Hollow 2,000 

Manver's Creek 2,000 

Dick William's Creek 2,000 

Mount Pleasant Creek 2,000 

Britain Creek 2,000 

Haydon Stream 200 

Wilson's Creek 6,000 

Moon's Creek. 2,000 

Pigeon Creek and Tributary. . . 6,000 

Mountjoy's Creeks 2,200 

Steven s Creek and Tributaries 800 

Bees Creek 2,000 

Bell Hill Stream 2,000 

Power Stream 2,000 

McKindley's Creek 2,000 

Leskard Creek 4,000 

Lifford Creek 2,000 

Millbrook Creek 4,000 

Mashwood's Creek 2,000 

Briinacombe Creek 2,000 

Pasture Creek 4,000 

McMillen's Creek 2,000 

Brand's Creek 2,000 

Crossland's Stream 2,000 

Elizabethville Creek 2,000 

Sowden's Creek 2,000 

DeLong Creek 2,000 

Perrytown Creek 2,000 



1927 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



11 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN \92G— Continued 



Speckled Trout Fry and Fitigerlings 



Durham — Continued 

Caldwell's Creek. . . 

Patterson's Creek. . 

Thurtle Lreek 

Solina Creek 

Park Screa.ii 

Puttie Creek. 

Muldrew Creek 

Harten's Creek 

Lockie's Creek 

Hams Creek 

Bickle Creek 

Taylor Creek 

Cody's Creek 

Janetville Pond 

Tenth Line Creek. . . 
. Vance Spring Creek. 

Mercer's Pond 

Generaska River. . . . 



Dufferin: 

Esson's Creek. . . 
Funston's River. 

Cress River 

Rooker Creek. . . 

Pine River 

Rookery Creek. . 
Bayne River. . . . 
Boyne River. . . . 
Brown's River. . 
Mono Creek. . . . 



Elgin: 

Stanley Spring Creek. 
Silver Brook 



Frontenac: 

Trout Lake Creek 

Clear Lake Creek 

Cataraqui Creek 

Creek near Mountain Grove. 
Sharbot Lake Creek 



Grey : 

Saugeen River 

Rocky Sajgeen River 

Beaver River and Tributaries. 

Sydenham Creek 

Park's Lake 

Sydenham River 

Silver Creek 

Camp's Creek 

Bell's Creek 

Tobermory Lake 

New England Creek 

Maple Creek 

Swinton Park Creek 

Meadow Creek 

Salem Creek 

Peter Black's Creek 

Palmer Pond 



Huron: 

Big Creek 

Johnston's Creek. 
ra> lor's Creek. . . 
David Bell Creek. 
Duke's Creek 



Q 



uant ty 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
3,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



,000 
,000 
,000 
000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
000 
000 
000 



2,000 
2,000 

4,000 
4,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 

14,000 
2,000 
6,000 
2,000 
1,000 
4,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 

2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,000 



Haliburton: 

Ross Lake 

Boskung Lake. . , 

Bill's C reek 

Cardiff Creek. . . . 

Gull Creek 

Fish Lake 

Pocket Creek. . . . 
Rattling Creek. . 
Mountain Creek. 

Bare Creek 

Bark Lake 

Mink Lake 



Halton: 

Limehouse Pond. . . 
Sixteen Mile Creek. 
Twelve Mile Creek. 



Hastings: 

Deer River 

Rawdon Creek 

Spring Creek 

Alayhew's Creek. . . . 
Spring Brook Creek. 
Allen Creek 



Kenora: 

Hodge Lake. 



Lambton: 

Hungry Hollow Creek. 



Lanark: 

Paul's Creek. . 
Allan's Brook. 
Grant's Creek. 
Gibb's Creek. . 



Lincoln: 

Unnamed Creek. 



Middlesex: 

Duncreaf's Creek. 

Ri\er W'ye 

Medway Creek. . . 
McFarland Creek. 

Muskoka: 

Muskoka River. . . 

White U'lke 

Menominee Lake. 

Pages Lake 

Rat Lake 

Deep Lake 



Norfolk: 

Patterson's Creek. 

So ith Stream 

Derelict Creek. . . . 



Northumberland: 
Woodland Creek. . . 

Allen's Creek 

Trout Creek 

Baltimore Creek. . . 
Bogg's Farm Creek. 



Quantity 
2,000 
2,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



2,000 
4,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



5,000 



2,500 



2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



2,500 



2,000 
2,500 
2,000 
2,500 



6,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
1,000 



2,000 
2,000 

2,ooa 



2,000 
2,000 
4,000 
2,000 
2,000 



12 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1926- 



-Ccntinued 



Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 



Northumberland — Contimied 

Halfway Creek 

Cold Creek 

Dartford Creek , 

Summit Creek 

Gunter's Creek 

Cole Creek 

Hopkin's Creek . . . . 

Burnley Stream 

Russ Creek 

Phillips Creek , 

Shelter Valley Creek 

Dawson Creek 

Forestell's Creek 

Staples Creek 

Glenburnie Creek 

Mile Valley Creek 

Livingstone Creek 

Eastwood Creek 

Ball's Creek 

Spring Creek 

Colton Creek 

Buckley Creek 

Hefferone Creek 

Dempsey Creek 

Rattan's Creek 



Q 



Ontario: 

Beaver River. . . . 

Black Creek 

Johnston's Creek. 
Duffin's Creek. . . 
Smalley's Creek. 



Beaverbrook Creek. 



Oxford : 

Waterworks Pond. 

Dower Creek 

Unnamed Stream. . 
Wright's Creek. . . . 
Whiting Creek. . . . 
Brooksdale Stream . 
Five Points Creek. 
Youngeville Creek. 
Oi.tlet Stream. . . . 



Parr}' Sound District: 
Magnetawan River. . . 
Sugar Lake Creek. . . . 

Distress Creek 

Sword's Creek 

South River 

Barton's Creek 

Diamond Lake Creek. 
Wolf Creek 



Prince Edward: 
Waring's Creek. 



Peterborough : 

Plato Creek 

Sedgrick's Creek. . 
Buchanan's Creek. 



uantity 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
4,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



2,000 
4,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



1,000 
2,000 
400 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



2,500 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
2,500 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



3,000 



2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



Peel: 

Montgomery Creek 

Credit River and Tributaries. 

Genor's Creek 

Cold Creek 

Humber River and Tributary. 

Renfrew: 

Schutt's Creek 

Brindle's Creek 

Brennan's Creek 

Gultz Creek 

Burwell Creek 

Coughlin Creek 

Kitt's Creek 

Hurd's Creek 

McGregor Creek 

Lougheed Creek 

Crozier Creek 

Cormac Creek 



Sinicoe: 

Mad River 

Pine River 

Coldwater River. . . . 
Copeland's Creek. . . 

Sturgeon River 

Noisy River 

Nottawasaga River. 

Batteau Creek 

Pretty Rivers 

Black Ash Creek. . . . 

A\-on River 

Hart Creek 

Bear Creek 

Bruff's Creek 

Maple V'alley Creek. 

Jobbit's Creek 

Lisle Creek 

Mill Creek 

Hog Creek 

Kelley's Creek 



Sudbury: 

Ella Lake 

Bass Lake 

Bertrand's Creek. 

Rapid River 

Burnt Creek 

Veuve Creek 

Devil's Lake 

Lake Penage 

Whitefish Creek. . 
Meatbird Creek. . 



Thunder Bay: 

Allen Lake 

Long Lake 

Moose Lake 

McKenzie River. . 
Lake Wideman. . . 
Upper Twin Lake. 

Silver Lake 

Mclntyre Creek. . 
Corbett's Creek. . . 
Current River. . . . 
McVicar's Creek. . 
Neebing River. . . . 



Quantity 
2,000 
22,000 
2,000 
2,000 
5,000 



2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



2,000 
4,000 
2,000 
2,000 
6,000 
2,000 
7,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
4,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 



5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
10,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 



1927 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



13 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUAXTITIESIAND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN \91G— Continued 



Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 



Thunder Bay — Continued 

Oliver Lake 

Brulu Creek 

Steel River 

Nipigon River , 

Stewart Lake 

Fraser Creek 

Gravel River 

Blend Lake 

Castle Lake 

Deception Lake 

Sunset Lake 

McKenzie Lake 

Clegg Lake 

Schreiber Lake 

Sweetwater Creek 

Sa\ign>s Creek 

Mirror Lake 

Crystal Lake 

Beck Creek 

Lake Ada 

Tenier Lake 

Blend River 

Anderson Lake 



Q 



Timiskan.ing: 
Moffatt Creek. . 
Blanche River. . 
Cheque Creek. . . 
Unnamed Creek. 
Hudson Creek. . 
Pine Creek 



Waterloo: 

Erhsville Creek 

Reist's Creek 

Jantzi's Creek 

Cressnian Dam 

Bamberg Creek 

Canagagigue Stream . 

Mickus Creek 

Miller Creek 

Lautenslaeger Creek. 
Schwindt's Creek. . . . 

Forster Creek 

Betzner Cook Creek. 

Wilino Creek 

St. Jacob's Creek. . . . 

Cedar Creek 

Cressn.an Creek 



Went worth: 

Martin's Creek. 
Binkley Creek. 



Wellington: 
Cox Creek. . . 
Herd's Creek. 



luantity 
5,000 
5,000 

20,000 

149,400 

5,000 

10,000 

10,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 

10,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 



3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 



000 
000 
,000 
000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 



York: 

Black River. 



2,000 
2,000 



2,500 
2,000 



2,000 



Salmon Trout Fry and Fingerlings 

Great Lakes: Quantitv 

Lake Ontario 600,000 

Lake Superior 2,246,000 

North Channel 950,000 

Lake Huron 250,000 



Addington: 

Lpon Lake 

Bass Lake 

Sharbot Lake 

Little Weslemkoom Lake. 

Rock Lake 

White Lake 

Spring Lake 



Algoma: 

frout Lake. . . . 
Long Lake. . . . 

Sand Lake 

Island Lake. . . 
Keichel Lake. . 

Oba Lake 

Lonely Lake. . . 
Granary L^ke. 
Canoe Lake. . . 
Achigan Lake. . 
Lake Anjigami. 



Frontenac: 

Crow Lake 

Trout Lake 

Wolf Lake 

Grindstone Lake. 

Brule Lake 

Bay Lake 



Haliburton: 

Drag Lake 

Spruce Lake 

Gull Lake 

Davis Lake 

Farquar Lake 

Mountain Lake 

Hollow Lake 

Kuskog Lake 

Lake oi Islands 

Clear Lake 

Long Lake 

Bear Lake 

Horn Lake 

Maple Lake 

Lipsey Lake : . 

Stragle Lake 

Kashagahnigen.ong Lake. 
Paudash Lake 



Hastings: 

Papineau Lake. . 

Ea;jile Lake 

Lake of Islands. 
Salmon Lake. . . 
Dickie's Lake. . . 
Coppeway Lake. 
Clear Lake 



30,000 
15.000 
25,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 



30,000 
25,000 
15,000 
25,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
25,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 



15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 



15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 



25,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
30,000 



14 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1926- 



- Continued 



Saltnon Trout Fry and Fingerlings 



Kenora: 

Lake Wabigoon . . . . 

Beaver Lake 

Lake of the Woods. 
Eagle Lake 



Lanark: 

Silver Lake 

Otty Lake 

Christie Lake. . . . 
Robinson's Lake. 
Pike Lake 



Leeds: 

Charleston Lake. 
Rideau Lakes. . . . 
Killenback Lake. 

Muskoka: 

Lake Muskoka. . . 

Lake Joseph 

Lake of Bays. . . . 
Lake Vernon .... 

Fairy Lake 

Mary Lake 

Peninsular Lake. . 
Lake Rosseau . . . . 

Gull Lake 

Clear Lake 

Clearwater Lake. 

Long Lake 

Koshee Lake .... 
Red Chalk Lake. 

Jingo Lake 

Skeleton Lake. . . 

Doty's Lake 

Menominee Lake. 

Page's Lake 

Echo Lake 

Devine Lake. ■ . . . 
Oneida Lipke. 



Eighteen Mile Lake. 



Nipissing: 
Cache Lake. . 
Trout Lake. . . 
Turtle Lake. . 
Talon Lake. . . 
Murray Lake. 



Ontario: 
Lake St. 



John. 



Parry Sound: 

Deer Lake 

Mill Lake 

Ahmic Lake. . . 
Sugar Lake. . . . 
Spring Lake. . . 
Maple Lake. . . 
Martin's Lake. 

Pike Lake 

Eagle Lake. . . . 
Duck Lake. . . . 
Ruthe Lake. . . 



Quantity 

25,000 

25,000 

100,000 

50,000 



15,000 
15,000 
25,000 
15,000 
15,000 



100,000 

150,000 

15,000 



40,000 

150,000 

250,000 

40,000 

40,000 

40,000 

25,000 

150,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

30,000 

15,000 

15,000 

5,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

5,000 

15,000 



15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 



10,000 



15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
30,000 
15,000 
15,000 
30,000 
15,000 
5,000 



Parry Sound — Continued 

Isabella Lake 

Otter Lake 

Camp Lake 

Lake of Many Islands. 

Prince Edward: 

Smith's Bay 



Peterborough: 
Stoney Lake . . . 
Belmont Lake. 

Eel's Lake 

Tallan's Lake. . 
Loon Lake. . . . 



Rainy River: 
Baril Lake. . . 
Crystal Lake. 



Renfrew: 

Clear Lake. . . . 
Mink Lake. . . , 
Barry's Bay. . . 
Long Lake. . . . 
Carson's Lake. 
Albert Lake. . , 
Birchem Lake. 
Haley's I^ake. . 
Moore Lake. . . 



Simcoe: 

Edward's Lake. 



.Sudbury: 

Trout Lake 

Big Pagamasing Lake. 
Wahnapitae Lake. . . . 



Thunder Bay: 

Trout Lake 

Lake Nipigon 

Kashabowie Lake. . 
Lake Shebandawan. 

Keemle Lake 

Lac des Mille Lacs. 

Li^ke Helen 

Rapsey Lake 

Cloud Lake 

Unnamed Lake 

D'Arcy Lake 

Surprise Lake 

Loftquist Lake 



Timiskaming: 

Twin Lakes 

Lake Timagami. 
Crystal Lake . . . 
Wilson Lake. . . . 

Miller Lake 

Larder Lake. . . . 
Nellie Lake 



Quantity 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 



50,000 



10,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 



25,000 
25.000 



15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 



York: 

Lake Simcoe. 



5,000 



15,000 
25,000 
15,000 



20,000 
500,000 
25,000 
25,000 
20,000 
50,000 
25,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
20,000 
10,000 
15,000 



15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15.000 
15,000 
15,000 



565,000 



1927 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



15 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1926- 



-Continued 



Pickerel Fry 



Addington: 

South Beaver Lake. 

Carleton: 

Ottawa River 



Durham: 
Rice Lake. 



Frontenac: 

Eagle Lake 

Crow Lake 

Loughborough Lake. 

Bob's Lake 

Bass Lake 

Wolf Lake 

Crotch Lake 

Beaver Lake 

Bav Lake 



Glengarry: 

St. Lawrence River. 

Haliburton: 

Deer Lake 

Clear Lake 

Rock Lake 

Little Gull Lake 

Pine Lake 

Marsh Lake 

Cardiff Lake 

Butt Lake 

Dennies Lake 

Long Lake 



Hastings: 

Moira River 

Baptiste Lake. . . . 

Moira Lake 

Salmon River. . . . 
Wadsworth Lake. 
Castleman Lake.. 



Kenora: 

Beaver Lake. . . . 
Long Pine Lake. 



Quantitv 
100,000 



100,000 
500,000 



50,000 

50,000 
250,000 

50.000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
200,000 

50,000 



100,000 



100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100.000 
100,000 
50,000 



100,000 
200,000 
300,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 



100,000 
100.000 



Muskoka: 

Lake Rosseau . . . . 
Sparrow Lake. . . . 
Three Mile Lake. 
Muldrew Lake. . . 

Long Lake 

Koshee Lake. . . . , 

Loon Lake 

Rose Lake 



Nipissing: 

Lake 5sipissing. 
Ethier's Lake. . 
Trout Lake. . . . 
Hogarth L^ke. . 
Tuitle Lake. . . 



Northumberland : 
Trent River. . . 



Parry Sound: 

Long Lake 

Mill Lake .. . 

Magnetawan River. 

Ahmic Lake 

Pickerel River 

Cecebe Lake 

Ruthe Lake 

Blackstone Lake. . . 
Whitestone Lake. . . 

Poole Lake 

Lake Bain 

Wilson's L«ike 



Prince Edward: 
Roblin's Lake. . 
Smith's Bay. . . 
Consecon Lake. 
East Lake 



Peterborough: 
Eel's Lake. . 
Alder Lake . 



Perth: 

Maitland River. 



Quantity 
500,000 
100,000 
100.000 
100,000 
100,000 
100.000 
100.000 
100,000 



300,000 
200,000 
200,000 
200,000 
200,000 



300,000 



100,000 
100,000 
200,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
150,000 
200,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 



100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 



100,000 
100,000 



70,000 



Lanark: 

Dalhousie Lake. . 
Mississippi Lake. 

Black Lake 

Otty Lake 

Clyde River 

Mississippi River. 
Patterson Lake. . . 

Joe's Lake 

Bennett's Lake. . . 

Kerr's Lake 

Karr's L ake 

Baycroft Lake. . . 



Leeds: 
Charleston Lake. 

Higley Lake 

Lamb's Pond. . . . 



100,000 
300,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
500,000 
100.000 
200,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100.000 
100,000 



250,000 

100,000 

50,000 



Renfrew: 

Hurds Lake. . . 
,.-- Norway Lake. 

Muskrat Lake. 

Barry's Bay. . . 
,,,^reen Lake. . . 
^- Long Lake. . . 
hat's Lake. 



Simcoe: 

Severn River. . 
Eld ward's Lake. 
Hendrie Lake. . 



Sudbury: 

Apsey Lake. . . . 
McLaren Lake. 



100,000 
100.000 
100.000 

50,000 
100,000 

50,000 
100,000 



1,000,000 
50,000 
50,000 



100,000 
200,000 



16 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1926- 



-Continued 



Pickerel Frv 



Timiskaming: 

Lake Sesekinika. . 
Commando Lake. 

Hector Lake 

Minard's Lake. . . 
Buskegau Lake. . 

Fairy Lake 

Dore Lake 



Victoria: 

Four Mile Lake. 
Pigeon River . . . 



Waterloo: 
Grand River. 



Great Lakes: 

Lake Ontario (Dead Man's Bay) 



Quantity 
100,000 
50,000 
50.000 
50,000 
50,000 
100,000 
50,000 



200,000 
100,000 



200,000 
50,000 



Whitefish Fry 
Great Lakes: 

Lake Superior 10,440,000 

Lake Erie 81,970,000 

Lake Ontario 50,000,000 

Prince Edward : 

Bay of Quinte 90,500,000 

Rainy River: 

Rainy Lake 17,265,000 

Thunder Bav: 

Lake Nipigon 10,400,000 

Herring Fry 

Great Lpkes: 

Lake Erie 5,725,000 

Lake Ontario 5,500,000 

Bass Fry and Fingerlings 



Algoma: 

Second Lake. 



Brant: 

Nith River 

Pinehurst Lake. 

Carleton: 

Ottawa River. . 
Rideau River. . , 



1,000 



500 
500 



500 
1,000 



Diifterin: 

Mono Centre Lake. 

Nipissing: 

Cache Lake 



Norfolk: 

Little Lake. . 

Peterborough: 
Pigeon Lake. 



Victoria: 

Sturgeon Lake. 
Pigeon Lake. . . 



Waterloo: 

Waterloo Dam 

Grand River , 

Paradise Lake 

New Dundas Dam. 
Long Lake 



Wentworth: 
Hamilton Bay. 

Wellington: 
Puslinch Lake. 



York: 

Lake Simcoe. 
Shadow Lake. 



Parent Bass 



Algoma: 

Lake Missinabie. 

Rainy River: 
Rainy Lake 



Sudbury: 

Crooked Lake. 



Parent Trout 



Thunder Bay: 
Nipigon River. 



Quantitv 
500 



500 



Rainbow Trout Fingerlings 



Sudbury: 

Rapid River 

Wahnapitae River. 
Spanish River 



500 



500 



500 
500 



500 
1,500 
500 
500 
500 



500 



1,000 



500 
500 



1,000 



292 



277 



300 



600 
600 
600 



1927 GAME AND FISHERIES 17 



SUMMARY, 1926 

Quantity 

Small-mouthed Black Bass Fry and Fingerlings 12,500 

Speckled Trout Frj- and Fingerlings 1,085,300 

Salmon Trout Fry 8,501,000 

Pickerel Frv 13,820,000 

Whitefish Fry 260,575,000 

Herring Fry 11,225,000 

Rainbow Trout Fingerlings 1 ,800 

Parent Speckled Trout 300 

Parent Bass ; 1,569 

Total 295,222,469 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF DISTRIBUTION 

1924 1925 1926 

Small-mouthed Black Bass Frv and Fingerlings 338,000 12,500 

Speckled Trout Frv and Fingerlings 1,898,500 676,700 1,085,300 

Salmon Trout Fry' 7,801,000 7,320,425 8,501,000 

Pickerel Frv 80,250,000 49,015,000 13,820,000 

Whitefish Fry 437,469,000 246,125,500 260,575,000 

Herring Frv. 32,475,000 45,050,500 11,225,000 

Rainbow Trout Fjngerlings 15,000 3,000 1,800 

Parent Speckled Trout 300 

Parent Bass 1,111 611 1,569 

560,247,611 348,191,736 295,222,469 



18 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



GAME AND FISHERIES 

Return of the Number of Fishermen, Tonnage and V'alue of Tugs, Vessels and Boats, 

industry during 













Fishing Material 










No. 

of 

Men 


Tugs 


Gasoline 
Launches 


Sail and Row 
Boats 


Gill Nets 




No. 


Ton- 
nage 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


Yards 


Value 


Kenora and Rainy River Districts. 

Lake Superior 

North Channel (Lake Huron) 

Georgian Bay (Lake Huron) 


320 
286 
201 
513 
307 

142 

800 

906 

670 


5 
15 
10 
24 
18 


87 
350 
245 
569 
436 


S 

13,700 

58.300 

56,795 

182,000 

140,505 


139 
48 
42 

127 
76 

45 
149 
329 

48 


S 

69,890 
25,375 
27,975 
9^,805 
42,610 

16.400 
147,960 
134,805 

22,125 


78 
58 
64 
93 

45 

81 
155 
253 
195 


$ 

3,252 
4,930 
3,960 
5,410 
2,895 

4.275 

11,800 

13,421 

12,308 


283,150 
927,506 
278,353 
1,293,410 
717,750 


$ 

50,777 

84,487 

32,850 

136.85 7 

109,365 


Lake St. Clair, River St. Clair and 
Detroit River 




Lake Erie, including Upper Niagara 


37 


1,043 


316,000 


1,652,296 

1.531,650 

317,015 


198,177 


Lake Ontario, including Lower 


138.881 


Inland waters, including Ottawa 
River 


10 


214 


40,500 


34,446 






Totals 


4.145 


119 


2,944 


807.800 


1,003 


585.945 


1.022 


62,251 


7,001,130 


785.840 







Recapitulation of the kinds, quantities and 



Herring 



Whitefish 



Pike 



Pickerel 
(Blue) 



Pickerel 
(Dore) 



Kenora and Rainy River Districts 

Lake Superior 

North Channel (Lake Huron) 

Georgian Bay (Lake Huron) 

Lake Huron (proper) 

Lake St. Clair, River St. Clair and Detroit 

River 

Lake Erie, including Upper Niagara River. . 
Lake Ontario, including Lower Niagara and 

St. Lawrence Rivers 

Inland Waters, including Ottawa River 



Total pounds . 



Values . 



lbs. 



1,818,531 

11,653 

91,834 

247,292 

2,136 
1,573,093 

638.168 
29,466 



lbs. 

671.407 
317,024 
238,268 
1,126,787 
155,351 

1,275 
868,137 

1,822,444 
1,204,159 



lbs. 

143.818 
1,966,007 

743,909 
1,482,257 
1,441.194 



784,333 
350,761, 



lbs. 

838,734 

5,807 

62,932 

92.506 

1,276 

24,930 
19,603 

159.041 
90,657 



lbs. 



2,700 
350 



47,449 
300 



4,975 
2,975,121 



7,443 
210 



4,412,173 



176.486 92 



6,404.852 



768.582 24 



6,912,725 



760.399 75 



1.295.486 



64.774 30 



3.038,548 



lbs. 

1.409,195 
95,712 

135,021 
41.110 

127,772 

55,231 
192.501 

61,793 
188,847 



2,307.182 



323,005 48 



1927 



GAME AXD FISHERIES 



19 



DEPARTMENT, ONTARIO 

the Quantity and \'alue of all Fishing Materials and other Fixtures Employed in the fishing 
the year 1926 



Fishing Material 


Other fixtures used in 
fishing 




Seine Nets 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip and 
Roll Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


Total 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 








S 


59 
49 
130 
85 
94 

217 

641 


$ 

16.925 
24.775 
63.100 
70.270 
53.300 

25,650 

354,300 


62 


S 

3,390 




$ 




S 




S 


114 
18 
43 
36 
42 

34 

98 

66 

61 


S 

35.820 
8.260 
16.255 
34.545 
13,735 

12,075 

121.035 

13.485 

12,860 


85 
19 
38 
39 
20 

20 

55 

,43 

21 


S 
11.520 

6.350 
22,500 
18,835 
36,215 

4,925 

19,100 

5,041 

3,619 


S 

205 ^74 












2,502 
14,000 
43,459 
28,322 

5,300 

4,375 

19,175 

6,890 


305 
3,800 
5,394 
6,226 

561 

150 

1,517 

186 






21'' 78' 








10 
33 


500 
931 










2'7 735 


4 


700 


497 






19 


79 


553 623 








404,851 
69 771 


37 


6.645 

12,800 

445 

5,562 


5,885 

10,450 

470 

7,716 














39 


53 
699 
277 


1,251 

21,570 

6,044 


1 

4 

39 


2 
385 
186 


1,180.225 


5 






329 575 


46 


31 


13,000 


121 


911 


153.901 


131 


26.152 


25.018 


1.306 


621,320 


1,134 


33,686 


44 


573 


124.023 


18.139 


140 


990 


512 


268.070 


340 


128.105 


3.337.737 



values of fish caught during the year 1926. 



Sturgeon 


Eels 


Perch 


Tullibee 


Catfish 


Carp 


Mixed 
Coarse 


Caviare 


Total 
Production 


\'alue 


lbs. 
18.484 


lbs. 


lbs. 

12,373 

300 

19,7 73 

4.088 

90,858 

88,926 

1,715,919 

113,201 
22,270 


lbs. 

558,904 

28 

560 

181.974 

447,485 


lbs. 


lbs. 
5.972 


lbs. 

366,890 

105,917 

375.575 

127.829 

111,213 

242.396 

1,132,282 

327,411 
435,118 


lbs. 
1.028 

4 

59 
5 72 

523 

1.817 

20 
1.271 


lbs. 

4.029,505 
4.310.701 
1,600.411 
3,246,339 
2,636.291 

687.048 

8,751.871 

4.226,901 
2,771,952 


S c. 
386,943 67 
345,340 25 
152.510 82 
332.085 33 
240,127 08 

41.399 65 

474 190 25 


1.025 






10.408 




4.852 

1 .589 

52.846 

26.186 

139.976 
103,638 


2,. 308 

41,468 

3,629 

197,421 

196,787 

43.191 
251,327 


4.126 




7.760 
16.389 




49.569 


410 

122,859 
26,691 




7,021 




^94 771 88 


59,417 


8,120 


276,317 35 


174.199 


149.960 


2,067,708 


1.197.071 


329,087 


742.103 


3,224,631 


5.294 


32,261.019 








$ c. 
57,485 67 


$ c. 
17,995 20 


$ c. 

103.385 40 


S c. 

59,853 55 


S c. 
23,036 09 


S c. 

29,684 12 


$ c. 
128,985 24 


S c. 
8,470 40 




S c. 
2,643,686 28 



20 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



Comparative Statement of the Yield of the Fisheries of the Province of Ontario 



Kind 


1925 


1926 


Increase 


Decrease 


Herring 


lbs. 

4,555,473 

7,058,186 

7,325,698 

1,316,325 

3,445,310 

2,567,767 

245,462 

182,470 

2,331,629 

910,796 

344,765 

814,682 

3,281,965 

4,807 


lbs. 

4,412,173 

6,404,852 

6,912,725 

1,295,486 

3,038,548 

2,307,182 

174,199 

149,960 

2,067,708 

1,197,071 

329,087 

742,103 

3,224,631 

5,294 


lbs. 

' '286,275 
487 


lbs. 
143,300 


Whitefish 


653,334 


Trout 


412,973 


Pike 


20,839 


Blue Pickerel 


406,762 


Pickerel Dore 


260,585 


Sturgeon 


71,263 


Eels 


32,510 


Perch 


263,921 


TuUibee 




Catfish 


15,678 


Carp 


72,579 


Mixed Fish 


57,334 


Caviare 








Total 


34,385,335 


32,261,019 


(net decre 


ase) 2,124,316 







Statement of the Yield of the Fisheries of the Province of Oj^tario for the Year 
1926 as Furnished by the Fishermen's Annual Returns 



Kind 


Quantity 


Price 
per lb. 


Value 


Herring 


lbs. 

4,412,173 

6,404,852 

6,912,725 

1,295,486 

3,038,548 

2,307,182 

174,199 

149,960 

2,067,708 

1,197,071 

329,087 

742,103 

3,224,631 

5,294 


$ c. 
04 
12 
11 
05 
04 
14 
33 
12 
05 
05 
07 
04 
04 
1 60 


$ c. 
176,486 92 


Whitehsh. 


768,582 24 


Trout . ... 


760,399 75 


Pike 


64,774 30 


Blue Pickerel 


121,541 92 


Pickerel Dore x • • • 


323,005 48 


Sturgeon 


57,485 67 


Eels 


17,995 20 


Perch 


103,385 40 


Tullibee 


59,853 55 


Catfish 

Carp 

Coarse Fish 

Caviare 


23,036 09 

29,684 12 

128,985 24 

8,470 40 






Total 


32,261,019 




$2,643,686 28 







Value of Ontario Fisheries for a Period of Twenty Years, 1907 to 1926, Inclusive 



Year 



Value 



1907 1,935,024 90 

1908 2,100,078 63 

1909 2,237,544 41 

1910 2,348,269 57 

1911 2,419,178 21 

1912 2,842,877 09 

1913 2,674,686 76 

1914 2,755,293 11 

1915 3,341,181 41 

1916 2,658,993 43 



Year 



Value 



1917 2,866,424 00 

1918 3,175,110 32 

1919 2,721,440 24 

1920 2,691,093 74 

1921 2,656,775 82 

1922 2,807,525 21 

1923 2,886,398 76 

1924 3,139,279 03 

1925 2,858,854 79 

1926 2,643,686 28 



1927 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



21 



Statement of the Equipment and its Value, used in the Fishing Industry of the Province 
OF Ontario, During the Year 1926 




Values 



Tugs (2,944 tons).... 

Gasoline boats 

Sail or Row Boats 

Gill nets (7,001,130 yards), 
Seine Nets (26,152 yards). 

Pound Nets 

Hoop Nets 

Dip Nets 

Baited Hooks 

Spears 

Freezers and Ice Houses. . . 

Piers and Wharves 

Men Employed 



S c. 

807,800 00 

585,945 00 

62,251 00 

785,840 00 

25,018 00 

621,320 00 

33,686 00 

573 00 

18,139 00 

990 00 

268,070 00 

128,105 00 



Total Value of Equipment $3,337,737 00 



Twenty-First Annual Report 



OF THE 



GAME AND FISHERIES 
DEPARTMENT 

1927 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 
THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




ONTARIO 



TORONTO 
Printed and Published by the Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 2 8 



To His Honour W. D. Ross, Esq., 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May It Please Your Honour: 

I have the honour to submit herewith, for the information of Your Honour 
and the Legislativ^e Assembly, the Twenty-first Annual Report of the Game 
and Fisheries Department of this Province. 

I have the honour to be 

Your Honour's most obedient servant, 

Charles McCrea, 

Minister of Mines. 
Toronto, 1928. 



TWENTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Game and Fisheries Department of 

Ontario 



To THE Honourable Charles McCrea, 
Minister of Mines. 

Sir: — I have the honour of placing before you the Twenty-first Annual 
Report of the work of the Game and Fisheries Department for the fiscal year 
ending on October 31st, 1927. 

Revenue 

A net re\'enue of 8721,576.25 was received and the total expenditure made 
of 8492,472.88, leaving a net surplus for the year of $229,103.37. 

Comparative Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, 1923-1927 Inclusive, as Shown 

BY THE Public Accounts 

Revenue Expenditure Surplus 

1923 $621,148 08 $391,422 19 $229,725 89 

1924 667,227 96 336,826 96 330,401 00 

1925 709,455 73 354,736 09 354,719 64 

1926 682,063 32 399,744 24 282,319 08 

1927 721,576 25 492,472 88 229,103 37 

It will be noted that both the re\'enue and the expenditure increased over 
those of the previous year, although the increase in re^•enue was not proportionate 
compared with the increase in expenditure, resulting in a somewhat diminished 
surplus in 1927. 

Statistics 

The statistical tables accompanying this report show in detail the kinds, 
quantities and values of game fish, also the varieties and quantities of fry and 
hngerlings raised in the Provincial Hatcheries and the locations of the waters 
in which these fry and fingerlings were distributed. In addition, there will be 
found statistics pertaining to the fur trade as well as other branches of the 
Department's work. These figures have been very carefulh- i:)repared and afford 
interesting and \aluable information. 

Fish 

The statistics of the commercial fisheries of the Proxince arc in accordance 

with the following table: — 

1925 1926 1927 

(iill nets licensed (yards) 6,877,398 7,001,130 7,172,456 

Seines " 139 131 144 

Pound nets " 1,334 1,306 1,224 

Hoop nets " 1,195 1,134 959 

Uip and roll nets licensed 43 44 47 

Sjjears licensed 144 140 123 

Hooks " 98,607 124,023 100,632 

[3] 



THE REPORT UPON No. 9 



1925 1926 1927 

Number of men employed 4,263 4,145 4,156 

Number of tugs 112 119 118 

Number of gasoline boats 1,018 1,003 1,006 

Number of sail or row boats 1,086 1,022 1,040 

Value of boats, ice-houses, wharves 

and twine $3,235,510 00 $3,337,737 00 $3,257,190 00 

Aggregate catch in pounds 34,385,335 32,261,019 34,896,975 

Values to fishermen $2,858,854 79 $2,643,686 28 $3,229,143 57 

A perusal of the detailed Re\enue Statement published elsewhere in this 

report will reveal the fact that during 1927 the revenue derived from angling 

licenses was in excess of that obtained from the commercial fishermen in license 

fees and royalties, which was chiefly due to the substantially increased revenue 

secured under the issue of angling licenses. The following statement of revenues 

derived from the sale of angling licenses during the years 1924 to 1927 inclusive 

will be of interest. 

1924 1925 1926 1927 

Revenues from angling licenses $105,862 50 $128,115 00 $145,913 50 $172,327 25 

Hatcheries 

As has been stated elsewhere, accompanying this report will be found 
statistical tables showing in detail the quantities and varieties of fry and fingerling 
deposited in the various waters of the Province from the Department's hatcheries 
located at Mount Pleasant, Glenora, SaultSte. Marie, Normandale, Port Carling, 
Port Arthur, Fort Frances, CoUingwood, Wiarton, Kenora, Sarnia, Southampton, 
Kingsville and Belleville and for comparative purposes, the following figures 
show a summary of total distribution for the past three years. 

1925 1926 1927 

Maskinonge Frv and Fingerlings 68,000 

Whitefish Frv.'. 246,125,500 260,575,000 448,789,750 

Pickerel Frv '. 49,015,000 13,820,000 223,945.000 

Salmon Trout Frv and Fingerlings. . 7,320,425 8,501,000 21,465,375 

Herring Fry. ... .' 45,050,500 11,225,000 18,410,000 

Rainbow Trout Fry and Fingerlings 3,000 1,800 

3ipeckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 676,700 1,085,300 1,444,050 

Black Bass Fingerlings 12,500 5,425 

Parent Black Bass 611 1,569 

Parent SpeckledjTrout 300 606 

348,191,736 295,222,469 714,128,206 

Biological Ixvestigatiox.s 

During the summer of 1927, biological surveys were carried out on two hun- 
dred and thirty-three {233) lakes and streams in the province, and, to date of 
writing, biological data ha\"e been accumulated from a total of three hundred 
and twelve (312) waters. 

The purpose of these studies is to determine the species of fish best suited 
to the waters and to make such recommendations for restocking as will assist 
in using them to their best possible adx'antage. 

We estimate the numbers of fish to be planted, after coordinating the follow- 
ing data: — 

(a) Biological, physical and chemical characters of the waters. 

(b) The size of fish planted. 

(c) Area of the water. 

(d) The extent of fishing. This is not an arbitrary estimate, but one based 
on the recent findings of scientific investigators, 



1928 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



The recommendations for the waters in\-estigated during the current year 
as regards species were as follows: Speckled trout, 66; lake trout, 24; brown 
trout, 3; small-mouth black bass, 80: large-mouth black bass, 12; pickerel, 2; 
pike, 2 ; maskinonge, 1 ; number of waters considered unsuitable for game fish, 46; 
number of waters closed, 6. In some cases, two species of fish have been 
suggested for the same waters and this accounts for the apparent discrepancy in 
the total number of waters investigated. 



\4 




V 



Fig. 1. — A series of vvhitefis'i (Coregonus clupeaformis-Mitchill) si.eciiiiens — age, one year — 
reared at Glenora Hatcliery. Actual lengths vary from 2Jj inches to 3' he inches. 



Biological studies were continued on Lake Simcoe at con\enieni interxals 
during the summer. A special study of the cause of carp mortality in the lake 
was undertaken. In this regard the F'ish Culture Branch worked in cooperation 
with the Department of Public Health Laboratories and some interesting results 
have been obtained. I^xperimental work is still in progress. 

Bif)logical studies of the Thames watershed were commenced and plans are 
being made to continue the work more intensively next year. 



6 THE REPORT UPON No. 9 

A study of the probable destruction of lake trout spawn by ling was carried 
out on Silver Lake, South Sherbrooke, Lanark County. Following is a quotation 
from a report submitted on this subject: — 

"A string of gill nets was set at various places in the lake to determine the spawning grounds 
of the trout. When these were found, nets were set over and in the vicinity of them throughout 
the period. Other settings at various places in the lake were made to determine the movements, 
if any, of the fish during this time. 

The results of the settings would seem to show that the order of abundance of the fish in 
this lake is as follows: Lake trout, pike, suckers, ling, rock bass. However, the lake trout figures 
were obtained when they were on the spawning grounds. Approximately eighty per cent. (80%) 
of the trout caught was liberated carefully and in good condition at the time of lifting. 

"Sixteen ling in all were obtained from fourteen gill net settings, as compared with 77 trout, 
36 pike, 30 suckers, 13 black bass. It would appear, therefore, that the ling are not .far in excess 
of the other fish in this lake. 

"A careful analysis of the stomach contents of these ling revealed no fish eggs of any kind. 
However, it did show that eighty-five (85%) per cent, of the stomach contents of the ling consisted 
of fish and fish remains; of which thirty-four per cent. (34%) of the identifiable material was 
ciscoes. Thus, they comjjete with the lake trout for food. Of the remainder of the stomach 
contents, fourteen per cent. (14%) consisted of one of the varieties of whitefish food. 

"Analyses of ling stomachs from several other points in Ontario have also been made — 
thirty-eight in all — twenty-six of which came from Lake Nipigon. The summary of these would 
indicate that approximately ninety per cent. (90%) of the stomach contents was of fish origin. 
A large percentage of this was ciscoes. Many cisco eggs were present, liberated in the digestive 
processes, probably from the ciscoes eaten. I'he only other eggs found were, three whitefish eggs. 

"Because of the few specimens caught in Silver Lake, it is suggested that an effort be made 
to secure more specimens of ling during the spawning period of 1928, in order that a more complete 
report may be made." 

Investigations were conducted on the Scugog River below Lindsay; the 
Thames River below Chatham ; Sydenham River below Wallaceburg and Sixteen- 
mile Creek below Milton, as a result of specific complaints in regard to objection- 
able stream pollution. Corrective measures were suggested in order to control 
tlie various trade wastes entering the waters in question. 




Fig. 2. — Scale taken from white- 
fish (Coregonus clupeaformis- 
Mitchill), reared at Glenora 
Hatchery. Age, one year. 
One winter band indicated. 

Investigations were made on that portion of Newboro Lake known as 
"The Bog," and recommendations made in regard to setting it aside as a Game 
and Fish Preserve. 

The muskrat situation, along the Severn River, was studied and it was 
recommended that a constant water level be maintained, by allowing more 
water to escape at periods of high water and less during periods of drought. 

Outstanding work in fish culture was carried on with whitefish and 
maskinonge. The manager of the Glenora Hatchery, after much persistent 
endeavour and experimentation with artificial feeding, has succeeded in rearing 
whitefish in the hatchery up to three years of age. Some first year specimens 



1928 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



/r 



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8 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



measured from 2}^ to 3\f inches. (Fig. 1.) A specimen which had attained its 
second year measured 6tV inches. (Fig. 3.) Photographs of scales show the rate 
of growth of these specimens. (Figs. 2 and 4.) Preliminary experimental work 
was carried out in regard to the artificial hatching of maskinonge. A portable 
hatchery was located on the Pigeon River, near Omemee, and the results were 
most promising and instructive. The hatch amounted to 70,000 fry. This hatch 
was obtained from three females and nine males. 

Bass propagation during the past year was disappointing. Thorough 
enquiry has been made in regard to bass culture in virtually every state that has 
a bass hatchery in the United States, and a review of the statistics accumulated 
convinces us that the pond culture of bass cannot of itself improve the bass 
situation in our provincial waters. The pond culture of bass is most uncertain. 




Fig. 4. — Scale showing two winter 1 ands taken 
from whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis- 
Mitchill), reared at Glenora Hatchery. 
Age, two years. 



The chief drawback is that black bass do not permit of artificial culture like the 
trouts, and, after constructing ponds, building nests for the bass, etc., the 
output, annually, is not large enough to meet a small fraction of the demand 
for small-mouth black bass. The output is interfered with on account of canna- 
balism among the bass, changing temperatures — which sometimes are so variable 
during spawning season as to cause a total loss — and the lack of proper food 
staples. A graph showing a representative series of temperatures, taken at 
8 a.m. and 6 p.m. from bass pond No. 7, Mount Pleasant Hatchery, is included 
in the report. The graph (Fig. 6) illustrates the fluctuating temperatures which 
during the spawning season are such as to prove disastrous in bass culture. 
Before this report went to press, experimental work with bass was resumed at 
Mount Pleasant for 1928, and it was found that closing off the water supply- 
ing the individual ponds at 6 p.m. and turning it on at 9 a.m. the following 
morning if the sun was shining and if the weather continued mild and warm 
reduced temperature fluctuations very considerably. 



1928 



GAME AND FISHERIES 




10 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



Now, the question is: "What can be done to improve the bass fishing in 
waters satisfactory for the species?" We do not wish to discredit hatchery 
practice with bass, but we are convinced that it cannot alone satisfy the demand 
nor save the situation, since the output from year to year is relatively small and 
cannot be relied on definitely. However, conserving the bass supply of our lakes 
and streams may be brought about in the following w^ays: 

(1) By setting apart natural spawning areas. The success of this method is 
said to be well established in the State of Minnesota, United States. 




•-*•/» 



T7f-il Sr*/^ 3k.m.^J «./», Tlr-^.r^.,..!^ «-<l*7/.7:w «>«.../- V./.^.y. 



(2) By setting aside lakes in certain districts for propagation purposes. 
The eflficacy of this method was tried out by the Department in Long Lake in 
1903. Four hundred and sixty adult bass were introduced into the lake and it 
was closed for a period of years. This has been responsible for the natural 
restocking of the Lake of the Woods and the restocking of other lakes in the 
district. Fox Lake, also, in Kenora District, was stocked with fingerlings in 
1913 and 1915 and the success of this was phenomenal. This lake has been used 
solely for propagation purposes and supplies bass to other lakes in the district. 
A number of lakes have been studied since in order to determine their suitability 
for bass propagation. 

(3) By protecting the bass during their spawning period. The Department 
is convinced that the validity of the law which prohibits fishing for bass before 
July 1st, should show itself in no uncertain fashion in a few years. The closed 
season may be extended, in certain waters, when scientific evidence demonstrates 
the necessity of such a step. The only argument which will be instrumental in 



1928 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



11 



changing the views of those opposed to this law will be the practical one of the 
increase of bass and, consequently, good fishing. 

(4) By further restricting the bag limit. 

Artificial culture of speckled trout is progressing favourably. The total 
number of shipments of fish in various stages of development for the year was 
six hundred and ninety-eight, and of these there were two hundred and ninety -one 
shipments of speckled trout. At the headwaters of Normandale Creek the 
Department maintains a series of ponds, covering a total area of approximately 
twelve acres. During the past year speckled trout measuring five inches in 
length were distributed to public waters from this hatchery. The hatcheries at 






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MoiRit Pleasant, Sault Ste. Marie, Wiarton and Southampton, were successful 
in propagating fingerlings up to three inches in length. On the whole the class 
of fish planted was good. Sixty-nine per cent, of the speckled trout planted 
could be classed as fingerlings of various grades. Complaints registered 
against the class of fish planted were negligible. Speckled trout plantings made 
in certain waters for the first time are being carefully followed up in order 
to try to estimate the number of possible surxixors. 

Three graduates in honour biology of the Lhiiversity of Toronto, assisted 
the Department's i)iologist during the summer months. Dr. G. I. Hoo\er, 
a graduate in chemistr\-, rnixersity of Toronto and Cambridge, England, also 
assisted with field work during the summer. 



j^ THE REPORT UPON No. 9 

Crown Game Preserves 

During the past year the Department continued to develop its system of 
Crown Game Preserves and the following table will show the Crown Game 
Preserves now established, with their locations and areas. 

Area 

Preserve County or District (acres) 

Bobcaygeon Game Preserve Victoria and Peterborough 1,700 

Boyd Game Preserve York 300 

Chapleau Game Preserve Algoma and Sudbury 1,824,000 

Chippewa Game Preserve Thunder Bay 2,728 

Conroy Marsh Game Preserve Renfrew 3,300 

Dumfries Game Preserve Waterloo and Brant 25,000 

Dundas Marsh Game Preserve Wentworth 2,750 

Darlington Game Preserve Durham 298 

Eden Game Preserve Wellington 1,470 

Eugenia Game Preserve Grey 5,200 

Falcon Game Preserve Kenora 15,000 

Glendale Game Preserve Wentworth 450 

Gloucester Game Preserve Carleton 200 

Hiawatha Game Preserve Algoma 160 

Hope Game Preserve Durham 1,920 

Huron Game Preserve Huron 1,000 

Innisfree Game Preserve Simcoe 4,000 

Iroquois Game Preserve Manitoulin 150 

Loch Garry Game Preserve Glengarry 6,400 

Longford Game Preserve Victoria 43,726 

Marmora Game Preserve Hastings 10,300 

Masonville Game Preserve Middlesex 6,500 

Meadowvale Game Preserve Peel 200 

Miner Game Preserve Essex 1 ,280 

Midland Game Preserve Simcoe 1,500 

Nopiming Game Preserve Renfrew and Carleton 1,540 

Nottawasaga Game Preserve Simcoe 1,200 

Peasemarsh Game Preserve Grey 300 

Peel Game Preserve Peel 2,225 

Puslinch Game Preserve Wellington 704 

Pickering Game Preserve Ontario 5,060 

Richmond Game Preserve Parry Sound 56 

Southwold Game Preserve Elgin 200 

Sudbury Game Preserve Sudbury 15,300 

Superior Game Preserve Thunder Bay 575,000 

Silver Lake Game Preserve Norfolk 3,100 

Township 82 Game Preserve Sudbury 5,760 

Wilder Lake Game Preserve Cirey 371 

York Game Preserve York 1 15,000 



Total 2,685,348 

Game 

Big game. The majority of hunters reported a successful season. For 
comparative purposes, the following figures show the number of hunting licenses 
issued for the past six years. 

1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 

Resident Moose 1,584 1,098 1,385 1,291 1,359 1,379 

Resident Deer 20,504 17,677 19,517 17,034 23,392 21,111 

Non-resident Hunting 1,256 1,247 1,651 1,581 1,698 2,237 

Ruffed Grouse {Partridge). — The scarcity of these game birds warranted 
the close season and until this species becomes re-established in fair quantities, 
a continuance of this close season is desired. 

Sharp-tailed Grouse {Prairie Hen). — This species is confined to the north- 
western portion of the province and they are found there in considerable numbers. 



1928 GAME AND FISHERIES 13 

Quail. — These birds are mainly confined to the south-western portion of 
the province, chiefly in the Counties of Essex and Kent where their numbers are 
increasing. 

Ducks were obtained in goodly numbers and the hunting of these birds 
was a source of satisfaction to large numbers of sportsmen. 

Pheasants {English Ring-neck). — These birds are reported to be on the 
increase in various sections of eastern Ontario and especially in the Niagara 
Peninsula. The propagation of pheasants has been carried on by the Department 
since 1922 at the Bird Farm located on the Eugenia Crown Game Preserve, 
and last year from this Bird Farm the Department distributed 981 live birds 
and 26,280 eggs. The demand for settings of pheasant eggs continues in excess 
of the supply we have for distribution. 



Furs 

The total number of pelts on which royalty was paid during the year was 
somewhat in excess of that of the previous year, although general conditions 
respecting fur-bearing animals do not show any noticeable improvement. 

Bear. — While the catch decreased, this species would appear to be holding 
its own. 

Beaver show a further decline in spite of the restrictions which have been 
placed on the trapping of these animals. 

Fisher would appear to be quite plentiful; this species apparently being one 
of the few which are increasing in number. 

Fox. — The different varieties of this species, namely, cross, red and silver 
and black, would appear to be on the decline. 

Lynx. — Conditions would indicate that this is another animal which is 
on the increase. 

Marten would appear to be about the same, the numbers remaining 
practically stationary. 

Mink.— The catch of 1927 shows a considerable decrease and the decline 
of these animals is evident. 

Muskrat. — While the succeeding table would show an increased catch last 
year, the catch is not a true indication of conditions and this is another species 
on the decrease. 

Otter. — Conditions would seem to indicate quite a decline in these animals. 

Raccoon. — The diminished catch is an indication of the declining numbers 
of these animals. 

Skunk. — The catch shows quite a decrease compared with that of the 
previous year, althf>ugh the nimibers of these animals would appear to be about 
the same. 



14 THE REPORT UPON No. 8 

Comparison of Phlts, Other than Ranch-raised, Exported and Tanned for Six Years 

1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 

Bear 2,137 1,447 1,399 2,014 1,635 1,472 

Beaver 93,971 70,684 50,233 48,364 27,597 20,738 

Fisher 2,657 2,339 1,910 1,936 2,618 3,904 

Fox (Cross) 469 1,154 1,082 2,801 4,175 3,502 

Fox (Red) 11,272 12,329 14,695 22,198 30,535 26,112 

Fox (Silver or Black) 87 205 167 433 620 403 

Fox (White) 1,765 1,501 362 974 226 977 

Fox (not specified) 170 34 28 61 165 136 

Lynx 836 1,177 2,332 2,200 3,884 4,568 

Marten 7,327 4,704 3,661 3,125 3,177 3,261 

Mink 78,487 58,634 82,466 68,138 65,299 37,628 

Muskrat 554,888 478,820 533,256 534,739 387,022 469,947 

Otter 5,309 3,997 5.096 4,622 4,304 3,168 

Raccoon 20,344 15,752 21,976 22,157 21,002 15,958 

Skunk 73,219 54,770 58.130 67,100 75,503 59,488 

Weasel 94,399 61,603 51,163 34,365 63.599 72,645 

Wolverine 6 20 12 8 11 15 



Total 947,343 769,070 827,948 814,935 691,372 723,922 

The value of the pelts as shown in the abov^e list, to the trapper, is 
$3,559,697.23, which places this province as a producer of fur, as compared with 
the other provinces of the Dominion, in the lead by fully $1,000,000. 

To be added to the above are 2,432 ranch-raised fox pelts of which 2,027 
were exported and 405 tanned in the province, and which pelts, under the terms 
of Fur Farmers* Licenses, are exempt from the payment of royalty. 

Fur Farming 

Fur farming still continues to receive a great deal of attention from the 
public and while formerly it was largely confined to fox farming, numerous 
inquiries are now being received concerning possibilities of raising, in captivity, 
other species of fur-bearing animals, particularly muskrat and beaver. In view 
of the inquiries which have been made, and in order to be in a position to properly 
advise prospective fur farmers, the Department established an Experimental 
Fur Farm at Balsam Lake in the County of Victoria, and the first bulletin arising 
out of the work being carried on at this Experimental Fur Farm under the 
heading of "Practical Observations on the Fox and Proven Treatises of Common 
Ailments" is now being published, and when the same is available for distribution, 
a copy will be forwarded, free of charge, to all the licensed fur farmers in the 
province. 

Fur Farmers' Licenses issued 



1923 


1924 


1925 


1926 


1927 


284 


392 


624 


783 


986 



Animals Stocked on Licensed Farms at December 31st 



Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (Cross) 

Fox (Red) 

Fox (Silver Black) , 

Fox (Blue) 

Lynx 

Mink 

Muskrat 

Opossum 



1924 


1925 


1926 


1927 


10 


29 


100 


142 


6 


2 


28 


48 


386 


459 


397 


444 


347 


725 


397 


314 


3,006 


4,940 


7,095 


9,664 




40 


49 


56 


2 


2 


3 


2 


97 


136 


468 


826 


2,904 


7,182 




1,107 



1928 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



15 



Raccoon 

Skunk 

Bear 

Marten 

Weasel (Ermine) 

Total 

*Exciusive of Muskrat. 

tincludes only pen-raised muskrats. 



1924 


1925 


1926 


1927 


149 


306 


290 


619 


136 


100 


49 


91 


11 


13 


4 


7 




2 


7 


21 
4 



7,056 13,936 *8,887 tl3,345 



Wolf Bounties 

The number of applications for wolf bounty increased to a very great 
extent over the previous year. Fur buyers found that there was a great demand 
for wolf fur for trimming, thus increasing the price of the wolf pelt, which, 
added to the bounty, would bring to the trapper in many instances $30 or $40. 
The use of the snare has also been a great assistance to the trapper. A diagram 
of how to make a snare can be procured from the Department. 

There were received during the past year, applications for wolf bounty for 
5,514 wolf skins, being an increase over the previous year of 1,695 wolf skins. 
Most of these applications, upon examination, were found to be in accordance 
with the Wolf Bounty Act, and the bounty paid. In some instances, however, 
the skins accompanying the application were found to be those of dog, fox or 
animal other than a wolf and the application for bounty was in consequence 
refused. 



Comparative Statement of Wolf Skins Received and Bounties Paid 



For fiscal year ending October 31st, 1925. 
For fiscal year ending October 31st, 1926. 
For fiscal year ending October 31st, 1927. 



Timber 


Brush 


Pups 


Total 


Bounties 


831 


1,066 


21 


1,918 


$25,465 62 


1,022 


2,690 


107 


3,819 


51,994 42 


1,041 


4,414 


59 


5,514 


82,970 07 



Enforcement of The Act 

The enforcement of the provisions and regulations of the Ontario Game 
and Fisheries Act under the various district wardens and local overseers has 
been performed in a very satisfactory manner, and these officers received capable 
assistance during the spring and fall seasons by the seasonal overseers who were 
appointed at these periods for the better protection of fish and game. 



Summary of Convictions and Fines 

Convictions reported 723 

Fines collected $9,635 41 

A great man\- articles were confiscated during the \"car, including: — 



2,354 Pelts 

47 Deer and moose hides 

1 10 I,i\e animals 
5,711 Pounds fish 

207 Pieces gill nets 
7,485 Yards gill nets 

20 Dip nets 
10 Hoop nets 

21 Seine nets 
1 Pound net 

23 Trap nets 



2,340 Hooks 

4 Grapples 
2 (^.affs 

55 Spears 
102 Rods and lines 
763 Trajjs 
246 Fire-arms 
1 1 Ga.soline boats 
16 Row boats 

5 Canoes 
15 Punts 

4 Trucks 



MoLor C'lrs 

21 Jack-lights and lanterns 

29 Deer 
310 Pounds \enison 
240 Pounds moose meat 

40 Partridge 
6 Ducks 

25 Plieasants 
175 Decoys 

1 Steam yacht 
45 Miscellaneous 



16 THE REPORT UPON No. 9 

All confiscations are sold at advertised sales by tender, other than such 
articles as are sold by the Department to the former owner, when circumstances 
warrant. 

Acknowledgments 

In conclusion, I desire to publicly express my appreciation for the assistance 
and support rendered to the Department throughout the year, not only for the 
loyalty of the staff of both the inside and outside service, but for the assistance 
of the transportation companies and the Fish and Game Protective Associations, 
whose officials and employees assisted our officers in the performance of their 
duties. 

Several statistical tables will be found appended to this report. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I am, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

D. McDonald, 
Deputy Minister of Game and Fisheries. 



1928 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



17 



APPENDIX No. 1 



WATERS STOCKED WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF 
FISH PLANTED IN 1927 



Speckled Trout Fiy and Fingerlings 

Algoma: Quantity 

Trout Lake 5,000 

Moose Lake 5,000 

Agawa River 5,000 

Mongoose River 5,000 

Spruce Lake 5,000 

Loon Lake 10,000 

Hobon Lake 5,000 

Alva Lake 5,000 

Sand Lake 5,000 

Deer Lake 5,000 

Carpenter Lake 15,000 

WartzLake 5,000 

Beryl Lake 5,000 

Island Lake 5,000 

Magpie River 5,000 

Mountain Lake 5,000 

Fish Lake 5,000 

Teal Lake -. 5,000 

Michipicoten River 5,000 

Montreal River 5,000 

Chippewa River 5,000 

Brant: 

St. George's Mill Pond 3,500 

Bruce: 

Phillips Creek 10,000 

Sullivan Creek 5,000 

Colpoy's Creek 5,000 

Judges Creek 5,000 

Rourke's Creek 5,000 

Langside Creek 5,000 

Markman Creek 5,000 

Muskrat Creek 1,000 

Sharp's Springs 1,000 

Thacker Creek 1,000 

Pettigrew Springs 1,000 

Durham: 

Mount Pleasant Creek 5,000 

Moons Creek 5,000 

Mount jovs Creek 1,000 

Glass Creek 3,500 

Kendal Creek 5,000 

Tucker's Creek 5,000 

Allen's Creek 3,500 

Liskard Creek 3,500 

Mill Pond near Millbrook 5,000 

Langstaffe Stream 5,000 

Pasture Creek 5,000 

Orono Creek 3,500 

Patterson's Creek 3,500 

Muldrew's Stream 5,000 

Johnson's Creek 5,000 

Soper's Stream 5,000 

Hall's Creek 5,000 

Barton's Creek 5.000 

Unnamed waters 5,000 

Gifford's -Stream 5,000 

Elliott's Stream 5.000 

Sculthorp's Stream 5,000 

Broadfoot's Creek 5,000 

Rutherford's Creek 3,500 



Dufferin: Quantity 

Cemetery Creek 5,000 

Nottawa Creek 5,000 

Elgin: 

Silver Brook 3,500 

Golden Brook .. 3,500 

Fanning Brook 3,500 

Alward Creek 3,500 

Wintermute Creek 2,000 

Frontenac: 

Sharbot Lake 5,000 

Trout Lake Creek 5,000 

Charlton Creek 5,000 

Grey: 

Beaver River : 5,000 

Svdenham River. ..;;...; 11 ,000 

Silver Creek 8,500 

Palmer Pond 5,000 

Markdale Waterworks Stream 

and Pond 5,000 

Huron: 

Sharp's Creek 15,000 

Stoltz Creek 5,000 

Johnston's Creek 5,000 

Porter's Creek 5,000 

Haliburton: 

Blue Lake 1,000 

Gold Spring Lake 5,000 

Fletcher Lake 5,000 

Halton: 

Bronte Creek 5,000 

Murray's Creek 3,500 

Twelve Mile Creek 5,000 

Hastings: 

Lake St. Peter 10,000 

Baptiste Lake 2,700 

Rawdon Creek 5,000 

Burk's Creek 5,000 

Mayhew's Millpond and Creek 5,000 

Spring Brook Creek 10,000 

Bird's Lake 5,000 

Black Jack Creek 5,000 

1 lawkin's Creek 5,000 

Lanark: 

Paul's Lake 2,800 

Clyde River 5,000 

Middlesex: 

Duncrief's Creek 3,500 

Manitoulin: 

Hluc Jay Creek 3,500 

Muskoka: 

Lake \ernon 1.000 

Fairy Lake 1.000 

East River 1.000 

Echo Lake 1-000 



18 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1927- 



-Continued 



Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 

Niplssing: 

Otter Lake 

Crooked Lake 

Four Mile Creek 

North River 

Fatty Lake 

Crystal Lake 

Twin Lakes 

Harrington Lake 

Lake Alexander 



Norfolk: 

South Creek 

Forest v'i lie Creek. 
Sterling Creek. . . 



Northumberland : 

Woodland Creek 

Muttons Creek 

Trout Creek 

West Creek 

Barrett's Creek 

Baltimore Creek 

Cold Creek 

Dartford Creek 

Jackson's Creek 

Burnley Stream 

Russ Creek 

Philip's Creek 

Shelter Valley Creek. 

Dawson Creek 

Forestell's Creek 

Braden Creek 

Staple's Creek 

Colton Creek 

Hefferons Creek 

Dempsey Creek 

Rowes Creek 

Big Creek 

Hess Creek 

Colborne Creek 

Coheen Creek 

Haynes Creek 

Crosby Creek 

Goodfellow Creek. . . . 

Grill's Creek 

Simpson Creek 

Mitchell's Creek 

Robert Shread Creek. 

Salt Creek 

McQuoid's Creek. . . . 
Burnley Bay 



Ontario: 

Spring Creek on Meadow Brook 

Farm 

Community Lake 

Lount Stream 

Fitzpatrick Stream 



Oxford: 

Brooksdale Creek. 
Folden's Creek. . . 



Parry Sound: 
Rock Lake . . . . 
Bacon Lake. . . 
Distress River. 



Quantity 
5,000 
3,000 
5,000 
5,000 
3,500 
5,000 
5,000 
5.000 
5,000 



1,000 
3,000 
3,000 

5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 

10,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
3,500 
6,000 
5,000 
5,000 
1,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 

10,000 
5,000 
5,000 
6,000 
5,000 
5,000 
3,500 
3,500 
1,000 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



5,000 
3,500 



3,500 
3,500 
3,500 



Parry Sound — Continued 

Eagle Lake 

South River 

Lynx Creek 

Hughes Lake 

Baldick's Creek 

Muris Creek 

Barrett's Creek 

Beaver Lake 



Peterborough : 

Ouse Creek 

Spillsbury Creek. . 

Plats Creek 

Sedgrick's Creek. . 
Buchanan's Creek. 
Sunset Stream. . . . 
Birdsall Stream. . . 
Comstock Creek. . 



Peel: 

Montgomery Creek, 

Credit River 

Spring Creek 

Fergeson Creek. . . . 

Perth: 

Creek on farm of 
Lot D, Con. 8. . 



Renfrew: 

Brennan's Creek. 

Gultz Creek 

Rapid Creek. . . . 
Malone's Creek. . 
Contant Creek. . . 
Rodden's Creek. . 



W. Jeffery, 



Simcoe: 

Pine River 

Boyne River 

Coldwater River. . . 
Copeland's Creek. . 
Sturgeon Kiver. . . . 
Nottawasaga River. 

Pretty Rivers 

Bear Creek 

Hog Creek 

Dummond Creek. . 

Hark Creek 

Baxter Creek 

McTague's Creek. . 
Solomon Creek .... 



Sudbury: 

Massey Creek. 
Emery Creek. 
Rapid River. . , 
Pump Creek. . 
Geneva Creek. 

Markstay 

Silver Creek. . 



Thunder Bay: 

Allen Creek 

Trout Lake 

Long Lake 

Moose Lake 

McKenzie River. 
Lake Wideman . . 



Quantity 
7,000 
5,500 
3,500 
3,500 
3,500 
3,500 
3,500 
1,000 



5,000 
3,500 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
15,000 
5,000 
3,500 



3,500 

28,500 

3,500 

3.500 



3,500 

1,000 
1,000 
1.000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 

3.500 
3.500 
5.000 
5.000 
3.500 
13,500 
3,500 
8,500 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
3,500 
3,500 
1,000 



5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
1,000 



27,000 

10,000 

7,000 

7,000 

2,0000 

7,000 



>\ 



1928 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



19 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN \921~Continued 



Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 



Thunf'er Bay — Continued 

Twin Lake 

Lower Twin Lake 

Upper Twin Lake 

Silver Lake 

Pearl River 

Mclntyre Creek 

Three Mile Creek , 

Mc\'icar's Creek 

Cold water Creek 

Stewart Lake , 

Spring Creek 

Deception Lake 

Anderson Lake 

Currant River 

Neebing River 

Nipigon River 

Eraser Creek 

Castle Lake 

Sunset Lake 

McKenzie Lake 

Clegg Lake 

Mirror Lake 

Lake Ada 

Whitehorse Lake 

Biggar Lake 

Pratt Lake 

Mountain Lake 

Gulch Lake 

Lost Lake 



Q 



Timiskaming: 

Moffatt Creek 

Hudson Creek 

Matagami River. . . 

Red Stone 

Bristol Creek 

Craft's Creek 

Shaw's Creek 

Water Cress Creek. 

Mount Joy 

Grassy Creek 

Red Sucker Creek. , 
Kamascotia River. 
St. Jean Baptist. . . 



Waterloo: 

Mill's and Blair's Creek and 

Dam 

Bowman's Creek 

Lautenslaeger Creek 

Cook's Creek 

Mill Lake Blair 

Goettings Creek 

Enny's Creek 

Duniart's Creek 

Wentworth: 

Mclntyre's Creek 

Leslie's Creek 

Spencer Creek 



Wellington: 

Gaynor's Stream 

Farewell Creek 

Ponds at Ontario Reformatory 



uantitv 

10,000 

7,000 

7,000 

30,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

7.000 

10,000 

10,000 

30,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

17,000 

7,000 

10,000 

10,000 

7,000 

7.000 

7,000 

10,000 

10,000 

7,000 



5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
6.000 



50 
3,500 
1,000 
3,500 
2,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



5,000 
5,000 
1 ,000 



5,000 
1,000 
5,000 



Parent Speckled Trout 

Durham: 

Boys' Training School Creek. . 

Grey : 

Holland Lake 



Quantity 
150 



150 



Norfolk: 

Patterson's Creek 

Spooky Hollow Stream, 
Silver Lake 



Wellington: 

Prison Farm Creek. 



50 

50 
56 



150 



Salmon Trout Fry and Fingerlings 

Great Lakes: 

Lake Ontario 3,015,000 

Lake Superior 5,700,875 

North Channel 1,-144,000 

Lake Huron 4,770,000 



Addington: 

Loon Lake 

Bass Lake 

Little Weslemkoona Lake. 

Algoma: 

Trout Lake 

Basswood Lake 

Sand Lake 

Island Lake 

Chiblau Lake 

Keichel Lake 

Oba Lake 

Lonely Lake 

Achigan Lake 

Lake Anjigami 

Lake Constant 

Bull Lake 



Frontenac: 
Sharbot Lake. 
Cross Lake. . . . 
Crow Lake. . . . 
Trout Lake. . . 
Brule Lake. . . . 
Canonto Lake . 
Indian Lake. . . 
Buck Lake. . . . 



Haliburton: 

Drag Lake 

Spruce Lake 

Daves Lake 

Gull Lake 

Mountain Lake. . . . 

Hollow Lake 

Deer Lake 

Clear Lake 

Bare Lake 

Wolf Lake 

Pine Lake 

Paint Lake 

Paudash Lake 

Twelve Mile Creek. 

Centre Lake 

Stormv Lake 



15,000 
15,000 
30,000 



30,000 
30,000 
15,000 
30,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 

25,000 
15,000 
15.000 
30,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 



15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15.000 
15.000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15.000 
15,000 
30,000 
30,000 
15.000 
15,000 



20 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1927— Continued 



Salmon Trout Fry and Fingerlings 



Hastings: 

Eagle Lake 

Baptiste Lake. . . 
Lake of Islands. . 
Dickies Lake. . . . 

Burnt Lake 

Bass Lake 

Trout Lake 

L'Amable Lake. . 
Capoway Lake. . . 

Clear Lake 

Crooked Lake . . . 

Cedar Lake 

Fongamong Lake . 



Kenora: 

Lake of the Woods. 
Eagle Lake 



Lanark: 

Silver Lake. . . 
Christie Lake. 



Leeds: 

Charleston Lake. 
Rideau Lakes. . . , 
Otter Lake 



Muskoka: 

Lake \'ernon ... 

Fairy Lake 

Mary Lake 

Peninsular Lake. 

Clear Lake , 

Bella Lake 

Long Lake 

Skelton Lake. . . 
Rebecca Lake. . . 

White Lake. 

Fo.x Lake 

Doty's Lake. ... 
Waeosa Lake. . . 



Nipissing: 

Trout Lake. . . 
Crooked Lake. 

Fatty Lake 

Tasso Lake. . . , 



Parry Sound: 

Deer Lake 

Ahmic Lake 

Clear Lake 

Sugar Lake and Creek. 

Sand Lake 

Home Lake 

Maple Lake 

Bacon Lake 

Eagle Lake 

Duck Lake 

Kashee Lake 

Bay Lake. 



Quantity 
15,000 
30,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 



25,000 
25,000 



15,000 
15,000 



40,000 
85,000 
15,000 



15,000 
30,000 
30,000 
15,000 
30,000 
15,000 
15,000 
30.000 
15,000 
30,000 
15,000 
30,000 
15,000 



25,000 
15,000 
30,000 
15,000 



15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
45,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 

Georgian Bay 3,340,500 

Otter Lake 30,000 

East Lake 15,000 

Raven Lake 15,000 



Renfrew: 

Clear Lake 

Barry's Bay 

Golden Lake. . . . 

Long Lake ...... 

Wadsworth Lake. 
Trout Lake 



Sudbury: 

Long Lake 

Trout Lake 

Wahnapitae Lake. 

Devils Lake 

Pike Lake 

Marion Lake 



Thunder Bay: 

Lake Nipigon 

Lake Shebandawan. 

Keemle Lake 

Lac des Mille Lacs. 

Hasel Lake 

Cloud Lake 

Little Dog Lake. . . 
Sturgeon Lake 

Timiskaming: 

Twin Lakes 

Lake Timagami. . . . 

F"rere Lake 

Crystal Lake 

Clear Lake 



York: 

Lake Simcoe. 



Pickerel 
Addington: 

Beaver Lake 

South Beaver Lake 



Quantity 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 



15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 



945,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 



15,000 
25.000 
30,000 
15,000 
15,000 

25,000 



100,000 
100,000 



Algoma: 

Echo Lake 10,625,000 

Lake of the Mountain 50,000 

Cataract Lake 50,000 

Cataract River 50,000 

Bruce: 

Lake Huron 57,050,000 



Durham: 
Rice Lake. 



Frontenac: 

Clear Lake 

Sharbot Lake 

Cross Lake 

Crow Lake 

Sydenham Lake 

Bobs Lake 

Elbow Lake 

Fall River 

Crotch Lake 

Long Lake 

Warren's Lake 

Thompson Lake 

Milk Lake 

Fourteen Island Lake. 

Beaver Creek 

Salmon River 



100.000 



100,000 
200,000 
200,000 
100,000 
100,000 
400,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
50,000 
100,000 



1928 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



21 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AXD KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1927— Continued 



Pickerel 



Grey: 

Sauble River. . . . 
McCaslin's Lake. 
Hasties Creek. . . 



Glengarry: 
St. Lawrence. 

Haliburton: 
Clear Lake. . . 
Brady's Lake. 



Hastings: 

Stoco Lake. . . . 
Eagle Lake. . . . 
Moira Lake. . . 
Salmon River. 
Burnt Lake. . . 
Hawkin's Bay. 



Quantity 

300,000 

50,000 

50,000 



200,000 



100,000 
100,000 



100,000 
100,000 
200,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 



Kenora: 

Lake of the Woods 59,700,000 

Eagle Lake 200,000 

Lake Niagara 200,000 



Lambton: 

Sydenham Ri\'er. 



Lanark: 

Dalhousie Lake. . 
Mississippi Lake. 

Black Lake 

Otty Lake 

Christie Lake. . . . 
Mississippi River. 
Patterson Lake. . 
Bennett's Lake. . 
Kerr's Lake 



Leeds: 

Rideau Lakes 

Lower Beverley Lake. 



100,000 



200,000 
200,000 
100,000 
100,000 
200,000 
500,000 
100,000 
100,000 
200,000 



400,000 
100,000 



Muskoka: 

Muskoka Lake 275,000 

Joseph Lake 250,000 

Lake Rosseau 275,000 

Sparrow Lake 1,000,000 

Three Mile Lake 100,000 

Muldrew Lake 100.000 

Koshee Lake 100,000 



Nipissing: 

Lake Nipissing. 
Ethier's Lake. . 
Trout Lake. . . 
Hogarth Lake. 
Tanner Lake. . 



Northumberlan*!: 

Crow Bay 

Trent River. . . . 
Colter's Bay. . . 



Ontario: 

Lake St. John. 



200,000 
50.000 
50,000 
50,000 

100,000 



100,000 
600,000 
100,000 



100,000 



Parry Sound: 

Magnetawan River. 

Ahmic Lake 

Star Lake 

Distress River 

Doe Lake 

Blackstone Lake. . . 
Wliitestone Lake. . . 
Isabella Lake 



Quantity 

100,000 

250,000 

100,000 

100.000 

100,000 

100,000 

100,000 

100,000 

Georgian Bay 4,600.000 



Crane Lake. 
Wah-Wah-Keish Lake. 
St. Bernard's Lake. . . . 

McQuaby's Lake 

Poverty Bay 

Shawanga 

Hardy Bay 



100,000 
100,000 

10,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 

50,000 



Prince Edward: 

Consecon Lake 100,000 

West Lake 100,000 

East Lake 100,000 

Bay of Quinte 27,900,000 

Peterborough: 

Deer Lake 

Oak Lake 

Otonabee River 



10,000 
100,000 
100,000 



Rainv River: 

Rainv Lake 45,050,000 



Renfrew: 

Barry's Bay 

Petawawa River. 
Cormac Creek. . . 



100,000 
100,000 
100,000 



Simcoe: 

Lake Couchiching 1,000,000 

Severn River 3,100,000 



Sudbury: 

Trout Lake 

Apsey Lake 

Matagamasi Lake. 

Thunder Bay: 

Sturgeon Lake. . . . 



Timiskaming: 
Lake Seskinika. 

Echo Lake 

Lillabelle Lake. 



100,000 
100,000 
100,000 

200,000 

200,000 
100.000 
100,000 



\irtoria: 

.Sturgeon Lake 1,000,000 

Balsam Lake 250,000 

Lake Dalrymple 200,000 

Waterloo: 

Grand River and Creek 100,000 



Whitefish Fry 

Great Lakes: Quantity 

Lake Superior 3,500,000 

North Channel 1,815,000 

Lake Huron 13,250,000 

Lake Erie 75,895,000 

Lake Ontario 41.000,000 

Algoma: 

Oba Lake 500,000 



22 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



WATERS STOCKED 
WITH QUANTITIES AND KINDS OF FISH PLANTED IN 1927^Continued 



Whitefish Fry 

Kenora: Quantity 

Lake of the Woods 12,950,000 

Eagle Lake 2,000,000 

Parry Sound: 

Georgian Bay 64,800,000 

Prince Edward: 

Bay of Quinte ■.-...■.... 208,209,500 

Rainy River: 

Rainy Lake 16,870,250 

Thunder Bay: 

Lake Nipigon 8,000,000 



Herring Fry 
Great Lakes: 

Lake Erie 770,000 

Lake Ontario 3,500,000 



Frontenac: 
White Lake. 

Leeds: 

Bass Lake. . 



Parry Sound: 
Lake Bernard . 



50,000 



50,000 



50,000 



Prince Edward: 

Bay of Quinte 13,990,000 



Frontenac: 

Cranberry Lake. 

Hastings: 

Crow Lake 



Lanark: 

Dalhousie Lake. 
Christie Lake. . . 



Middlesex: 

Dingman's Creek. 

Muskoka: 

Sparrow Lake. . . . 



Nipissing: 

Lake Nipissing. 

Parry Sound: 
Ahmic Lake. . . 



Peterborough: 
Pigeon Lake. 
Stoney Lake. 



Simcoe: 

Severn River. 
Little Lake. . - 



Sudbury: 

Ramsay Lake . 

Victoria: 

Balsam Lake. 



Quantity 
300 



200 



200 
500 



125 



200 



500 



200 



200 
200 



800 
500 



300 



200 



Bass Fingerlings 
Addington: 

South Beaver Lake 

Sharbot Lake 



Durham: 

Scugog Lake . 
Rice Lake 



200 
200 



200 
200 



Wellington: 

Puslinch Lake. 



Maskinonge Fry 



Victoria: 

Pigeon River. 



200 



86,000 



24 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



APPENDIX 

GAME AND FISHERIES 

Statistics of the Fishing Industry in the Public Waters of the 

EcuiP 



No. 



District 



Lake of the Woods, Kenora and Rainy 
River Districts, Inland Waters 

Lake Superior 

North Channel 

Georgian Bay 

Lake Huron 

River St. Clair, Lake St. Clair and 
Detroit River 

Lake Erie and Upper Niagara River. . . 

Lake Ontario, Lower Niagara and St. 
Lawrence Rivers 

Sundry Inland Waters 



Totals 4,156 



No. 

of 

Men 



312 
300 
198 

572 
305 

127 
769 

878 
695 



Tugs 



No. Tons Value 



23 
411 
258 
715 
396 



3 
227 



2,959 



4,700 

56,600 

71,000 

221,500 

100,755 



250 
45,500 



797.305 



Gasoline 
Launches 



No. Value 



141 
62 
41 

141 
76 

40 
147 

298 
60 

1,006 



69,300 
37,480 
21,275 
103,080 
54,960 

15,500 
150,715 

137,250 
28.460 

618.020 



Sail and Row 
Boats 



No. Value 



115 
79 
65 
92 
37 

75 
140 

245 
192 



4,962 
6,045 
4,30/) 
4,640 
2,460 

4,630 
8,734 

12,384 
7,712 

55,867 



Gill Nets 



Yards Value 



350,940 
1,021,740 

334,04 
1,492,050 

808,155 



1,406,655 
326,254 



7,172.456 



49,924 

92,989 

43,170 

155,184 

101,805 



193,453 



142,439 
36,635 



QU.\NTITIES OF 



No. 


District 


Herring 


Whitef^sh 


Trout 


Pike 


Pickerel 
(Blue) 


Pickerel 

(Dore) 


1 


Lake of the Woods. Kenora and Rainy 


lbs. 


lbs. 

628,454 
336,675 
214,400 
1,559,583 
191,494 

531 
747,964 

1,503,272 
983,301 


lbs. 

121,583 
2,196.726 

756,225 
1.726,272 
1,669.572 


lbs. 

941,692 

7,014 

111,085 

91,910 

305 

30,792 
8,371 

124,351 
84,610 


lbs. 
26,987 


lbs. 
1,162,697 


2 




2,459,357 

10,144 

19,417 

253.746 

55 
2.308.686 

730,822 
27,692 


78,801 


3 






112,529 


4 




56 
158 

3,783 
3,078,085 

8,137 


96,551 


S 




187.864 


6 


River St. Clair, Lake St. Clair and Detroit 


44.005 


7 
8 


Lake Erie and Upper Niagara River. . . . 
Lower Niagara, Lake Ontario and St. 


179 

713,497 
313,691 


166,995 
40,878 






226,011 




Totals 








5.809,919 


6,165,674 


7,497.745 


1,400.130 


3,117,206 


2.116.331 










$ c. 
348,595 14 


$ c. 
801,537 62 


$ c. 

974.706 85 


$ c. 
98.009 10 


$ c. 

187,032 36 


$ c. 

275.123 03 









1928 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



25 



No. 2 

DEPARTMENT, ONTARIO 

Province of Ontario, for year en ling December 31st, 1927 

MEXT 



Seine Nets 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip and 
Roll Nets 


Night 


Lines 


Sp 


ears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


Total 
Value 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


V^alue 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 








$ 


65 

44 
127 

81 
119 

206 

543 


$ 

17,995 
15,785 
9,767 
76,550 
66,400 

23,750 
303,700 


60 


S 

2,330 




S 




$ 




S 


118 
20 
32 
46 
40 

31 
86 

64 
49 


38,130 
9,125 

15,755 
32,235 
15,750 

11,650 
120,500 

14,350 
14,140 


96 

24 
32 
44 
21 

17 
51 

42 
19 


$ 

16,340 

8,815 

22,325 

12,370 

6,550 

3,215 
15,625 

9,530 
3,385 


S 
203,681 












1,204 

5,000 

38,982 

26,416 

4,350 
2.300 

17.525 
4.855 


110 
1,200 
7,233 
5,046 

383 
142 

653 
170 






226,949 








10 

22 


350 
510 










189,142 


4 


600 


530 






15 


71 


613,903 








353,726 


32 


5,945 
11,500 

955 
6,920 


3,830 
8,825 

995 
7,745 














62,958 


39 


45 

597 
225 


1,110 

21,809 
7,655 


2 

4 
41 


4 

360 
287 






1,099,808 


8 






340,020 


61 


39 


14,475 


108 


839 


167,003 


144 


25,920 


21,925 


1.224 


528,422 


959 


33,764 


47 


651 


100.632 


14,937 


123 


910 


486 


271,635 


346 


98,155 


3,257,190 



Fish Taken 



Sturgeon 


Eels 


Perch 


Tullibee 


Catfish 


Carp 


Mixed 
Coarse 


Caviare 


Total 


Value 


lbs. 
16 062 


lbs. 


lbs. 

23,892 

16 

14.534 

4.231 

93,972 

66,695 
2.490,555 

100,770 
23,344 


lbs. 

540,396 

1,201 

1 ,359 

265,437 

713,776 


lbs. 
119,905 


lbs. 

12,412 
1,475 
4,063 

50,229 
1.544 

140.279 
196,972 

68,536 
293,148 


lbs. 

211,536 
70,050 
414,629 
150.416 
121.044 

194,745 
985,901 

325.135 
482.979 


lbs. 

787 

12 
222 
705 

434 
1.812 

610 
1,081 


lbs. 

3.806.403 
5.151.563 
1,649,059 
3,969,778 
3,245.658 

548.642 
10,068.657 

3.842.161 
2,615,054 


$ c. 
381.340 56 


248 




490.698 64 


10,064 


. 


15 

1,255 

662 

57.859 
42.395 

107,029 
80,206 


170.988 89 


4,199 




476.679 40 


10,816 




347,222 45 


9,464 




35,829 17 


40,742 






662,978 51 


5.667 
55,641 


110,908 
16.095 


2,549 
27,255 


389,504 81 
273,901 14 


152.903 


127.003 


2,818,009 


1,551,973 


409,326 


768,658 


2,956,435 


5.663 


34,896,975 








S c. 

61.161 20 


S c. 
10.160 24 


S c. 
169.080 54 


S c. 

108.638 11 


S c. 

32.746 08 


S c. 

38,432 90 


S c. 

118.257 40 


$ c. 
5,663 00 




$ c. 

3,229,143 57 



26 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



APPENDIX No. 3 
Comparative Statement of the Yield of the Fisheries of the Provinxe of Ontario 



Kind 



1926 



1927 



Increase 



Decrease 



Herring 

Whitefish 

Trout 

Pike 

Blue Pickerel. . 
Pickerel (Dore) 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Coarse Fish . . . 
Caviare 

Total. 



4,412,173 

6,404,852 

6,912,725 

1,295,486 

3,038,548 

2,307,182 

174,199 

149,960 

2,067,708 

1,197,071 

329,087 

742,103 

3,224,631 

5,294 



5,809,919 

6,165,674 

7,497,745 

1,400,130 

3,117,206 

2,116,331 

152,903 

127,003 

2,818,009 

1,551,973 

409,326 

768,658 

2,956,435 

5,663 



1,397,746 

' 585,020 

104,644 

78,658 



750,301 

354,902 

80,239 

26,555 

'369 



32,261,019 



34,896,975 



*2. 635,956 



239,178 



190,851 
21,296 
22,957 



268,196 



*Net increase. 



APPENDIX No. 4 



Statement of the Yield of the Fisheries of the Province of Ontario for the Year 
1927 Compiled from the Fisherman's Annu.\l Returns 



Kind 


Quantity 


Price per 
Pound 


\'alue 


Herring 


lbs. 

5,809,919 

6,165,674 

7,497,745 

1,400,130 

3.117.206 

2.116,331 

152,903 

127,003 

2,818.009 

1,551,973 

409.326 

768,658 

2,956.435 

5,663 


$ c. 

06 
13 
13 
07 
06 
13 
40 
08 
06 
07 
08 
05 
04 

1 00 


$ c. 
348,595 14 


Whitefish 

Trout 

Pike 


801,537 62 

974,706 85 

98,009 10 


Blue Pickerel 


187,032 36 


Pickerel (Dore) 


275,123 03 


Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee. 


61,161 20 

10.160 24 

169,080 54 

108,638 11 


Catfish 

Carp 


32,746 08 
38,432 90 


Coarse Fish 


118,257 40 


Caviare 


5,663 00 






Total 


34,896,975 




3,229,143 57 



1928 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



27 



APPENDIX Xo. 5 
Value of Ontario Fisheries for a Period of Twenty Years, 1908 to 1927, Inclusive 



Year 



\'ahie 



1908 2,100.078 63 

1909 2,237,544 41 

1910 2,348,269 57 

1911 2,419,178 21 

1912 2,842,877 09 

1913 2,674,686 76 

1914 2,755,293 11 

1915 3,341.181 41 

1916 2,658,993 43 

1917 2,866,424 00 



Year 



Value 



1918 3,175.110 32 

1919 2,721.440 24 

1920 2,691,093 74 

1921 2,656.775 82 

1922 2,807,525 21 

1923 2,886,398 76 

1924 3,139.279 03 

1925 2.858,854 79 

1926 2.643.686 28 

1927 3,229,143 57 



PRODUCeDBV 




Twenty -Second Annual Report 



OF THE 



GAME AND FISHERIES 
DEPARTMENT 

1928 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 
THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 9, 1929 




ONTARIO 



TORONTO 
Printed and Published by the Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 2 9 



THE REPORT UPON No. 9 



Following is a comparative table in which is outlined total annual revenue 

and expenditure of the Department during the past five years, 1924 to 1928, 

and the surplus in each year: 

Revenue Expenditure Surplus 

1924 $667,227 96 $336,826 96 $330,401 00 

1925 709,455 73 354,736 09 354,719 64 

1926 682,063 32 399,744 24 282,319 08 

1927 721,576 25 492,472 88 229,103 37 

1928 733,259 75 518,054 96 215,204 79 

As in the two years previous, the Department, during 1928, continued to 
increase its work along enforcement and conservation lines, with the result 
that expenditures were greater. While the revenue collected continued to 
show an increase during the year, such increase was not sufficient to take care 
of the additional expenditure, with the result that the surplus during the period 
reported upon shows a slight decline. 

Statistics 

Accompanying this report will be found statistical tables showing in detail 
varieties and quantities of fry and fingerlings of the various species of fish 
raised in the Provincial hatcheries; and the designation and location of the 
waters in which such fry and fingerlings were deposited. Likewise there will 
be found statistics pertaining to fishing and the fur trade, as well as other branches 
of the Department's work. The figures referred to have been carefully 
prepared, and afford interesting and valuable information. 

Fish 
Statistics with reference to commercial fishing in the Province are as follows: 

1926 1927 1928 

Gill nets licensed (yards) 7,001,130 7,172,456 7,269,528 

Seines licensed 131 144 160 

Pound nets licensed 1,306 1,224 1,225 

Hoop nets licensed 1,134 959 880 

Dip and roll nets licensed 44 47 58 

Spears licensed 140 123 88 

Hooks licensed 124,023 100,632 52,467 

Number of men employed 4,145 4,156 4,128 

Number of tugs 119 118 114 

Number of gasoline boats 1 ,003 1 ,006 959 

Number of sail or row boats 1,022 1,040 1,018 

Value of boats, ice-houses, wharves and 

twine $3,337,737.00 $3,257,190.00 $3,432,528.00 

Aggregate catch in pounds 32,261,019 34,896,975 33,381,704 

Values to fishermen $2,643,686.28 $3,229,143.57 $3,033,924.42 

Reference to the statement of revenue, which appears elsewhere in this 
report, shows that the sum of $314,413.58 was derived as a result of fishery 
activities in the Province, which may roughly be classified as $185,445 from 
angling, non-resident license fees and the balance of $128,968.08 from com- 
mercial fishermen in payment of license fees and royalty, angling for the second 
consecutive year being responsible for the greater proportion of this income. 

Ontario is rapidly becoming popular on account of the splendid opportun- 
ities it affords for satisfactory angling. Undoubtedly the increasing numbers 
of anglers who derive their sport in this Province are taking their toll of our 
resources, but this Department is not neglecting the restocking and conservation 
problems, which are receiving continually increasing attention both from the 
practical and biological viewpoints. 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1928 



Hatcheries 

At the Department's hatcheries located at Mount Pleasant, Glenora, 
Sault Ste. Marie. Normandale, Port Carling, Port Arthur, Fort Frances, Colling- 
wood, Wiarton, Kenora, Sarnia. Southampton, Kingsville and Belleville, the 
work of fish culture is carried on, with various species of fish. The following 
table shows the results obtained at these hatcheries during the past three years. 

1926 1927 1928 

Maskinonge Fry and Fingerlings 68,000 53,000 

Whitefish Frv 260,575,000 448,789,750 346,172,000 

Pickerel Frv 13,820,000 223,945,000 155,921,750 

Salmon Trout Frv' and Fingerlings 8,501,000 21,465,375 22,806,090 

Herring Fry 11,225.000 18,410,000 17,830,000 

Rainbow Trout Fry and Fingerlings 1,800 419 

Speckled Trout Frv and Fingerlings 1,085.300 1,444,050 1,669,600 

Black Bass Fingerlings 12.500 5,425 60,833 

Parent Black Bass 1,569 90 

Parent Speckled Trotit 300 606 200 

295,222,469 714,128,206 544,513,982 

The distribution of the 1928 production is detailed on other pages of this 
report. In all, six hundred and fifty-eight shipments were required to complete 
this distribution, as follows: — 

Number of Shipments 

Speckled Trout Fingerlings 166 

Speckled Trout Fry Ill 

Speckled Trout, Parent 2 

279 

Lake Trout 134 

Pickerel 125 

Whitefish 50 

Herring 13 

Bass Fingerlings 42 

Bass Fry 8 

Bass, Parent 3 

53 

Maskinonge 2 

Rainbow Trout Fingerlings 2 

658 shipments. 

Biological Studies 

Biological surveys of lakes and streams and specific problems of importance 
to fisheries were continued under the supervision of the Department's Biologist, 
Mr. H. H. MacKay. In this work he was assisted by Messrs. R. A. McKenzie 
and K. Hamilton, graduates in biology of the University of Toronto, and by 
Messrs. W. L. Dibbon (2), J. .Savage (1), A. E. Allin (3),' R. F. Cain (2), R. J. 
Perkin (1), undergraduates in biological courses at the University of Toronto; 
and by Messrs. G. W. McCracken (4), G. C. Toner (4). R. w'. Peavoy (4), 
undergraduates of Queen's University, Kingston, in biology, or in a course 
combined with biology. The number after each name signifies the student's 
year at university. 

There is a very great scarcity of qualified men available for field work. 
Nevertheless, with the ever-increasing interest, increasing demand and possi- 
bilities for such work, future prospects for trained men for fisheries' investiga- 
tions are hopeful. In future it is desirable that sufficient graduates maybe 
available and that the Department ma>- also secure for summer's work the 
services of active university teachers, especially qualified in fisheries' 
investigations. 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



In studying the various lakes and streams standardized methods of procedure 
have been employed. Lake and stream cards illustrated on pages six, seven, 
eight and nine, indicate in condensed form the data obtained. These methods 
have been compared with ones in vogue in certain states of the United States. 
The methods are so designed that the various waters may be compared physic- 
ally, chemically and biologically. In this way a fund of information is obtained 
that is invaluable and forms a comprehensive basis for restocking. The informa- 
tion must be obtained as quickly as possible and at the same time be consistent 
with accuracy. 

As pointed out in previous annual reports, the purpose of biological surveys 
is to gain a knowledge of the fish best suited to the environment; the number 
of fish which should be planted according to the conditions of food and shelter; 
the most satisfactory places to plant the fish ; the most satisfactory period to 
plant fish of different sizes and ages. The latter depends on the food habits of 
the fish. The available food supply is fundamentally important and must be 
studied as carefully and as extensively as possible. 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME & FISHERIES STREAM CARD 



NAME 



SYSTETM 
MAPS 



TOWNSHIP 



CONCESSION 



INVESTIGATOR 



MIDDLE PART 



VOLUME OF FLOW 



VELOCITY OF FLOW 



VEGETATION, MARGINAL 



VEGETATION, SUBMERGED 



WATER. COLOUR 



WATETi, TURBIDITY 



WATER, TEMPERATURE 



AIR, TEMPERATURE 



DISSOLVED OXYGEN 



NATURAL FOOD 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1928 



POOL CONDITIONS AND COVER 



POLLUTION 



postetd areas 



PHOTOGRAPHS (INDEX NO J 



OBSTRUCTIONS 



SPAWNING GROUNDS 



PLANTING PLACES 



MILEAGE AVAILABLE FOR STOCKING 



STOCKING POLICY PER MILE 



SPECIES OF FISH PLANTED 



SPECIES 


1927 


1928 


1929 


1930 


1931 




D 


A 


L 


NO. 


D 


A 


L 


NO. 


D 


A 


L 


NO. 


D 


A 


L 


NO. 


D 


A 


L 


NO. 


SPECKLED TROUT 










BROWN TROUT 













RAINBOW TROUT 











PICKEREL 






S. M. BASS 













L. -M. BASS 















MASKINONGE 


— 




























SPECIES 


1932 


1933 


1934 


1935 


1936 




J^ 


A 


L 


NO. 


D 


A 


L 


NO. 


D 


A 


L 


NO. 


D 


A 


L 


NO. 


D 


A 


L 


NO. 


SPECKLED TROUT 












BROWN TROUT 










RAINBOW TROUT 













PICKEREL 











S. M. BASS 











L. M. BASS 









MASKINONGE 


































ABBREVIATIONS: D — DATE; A — AGE; L — LENGTH 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME & FISHERIES 

COUNTY TOWN 



LAKE CARD 

VALUE 



SYSTEM 


TOWNSHIP 


CONCESSION 


INVESTIGATOR 




MAPS 


BOOK NO. 


ROUTE 


DATE 








GEOLOGY 










AREA 


DEPTH, MAXIMUM 




DEPTH, AVERAGE 






INLETS 










OUTLETS 


SPRINGS 


SHORES 










BOTTOM 










VEGETATION, MARGINAL 










VEGETATION, SUBMERGED 


WATER, COLOUR 


WATER, TURBIDITY 


WATER, TRANSPARENCY 










WATER, TEMPERATURE 




AIR, TEMPERATURE 






DISSOLVED OXYGEN 


PH 




NATURAL FOOD 




POLLUTION 


POSTED AREAS 




PHOTOGRAPHS (iNDEX NO.) 






OBSTRUCTIONS 


SPAWNING GROUNDS 


FISH 












PLANTING PLACES 


REMARKS 















SPECIES OF FISH 


PLA 


lNT 


ED 




















SPECIES 


1927 


1928 


1929 


1930 


1931 




D 


A 




L 


NO. 


D 


A 


L 


NO. 


D 


A 


L 


NO. 


D 


A 


L 


NO. 


D 


A 


L 




NO. 


WHITEFISH 












HERRING 












LAKE TROUT 












SPECKLED TROUT 












BROWN TROUT 












RAINBOW TROUT 












PICKEREL 












S. M. BASS 












L. M. BASS 





























NL\SKINONGE 





































GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1928 



SPECIES 


1932 


1933 


1934 


1935 


1936 




D 


A 


L 


NO. 


D 


A 


L 


NO. 


D 


A 


L 


NO. 


D 


A 


L 


NO. 


D 


A 


L 


NO. 


WHITEFISH 













HERRING 










LAKE TROUT 












SPECKLED TROLT 












BRO\\-X TROUT 












RAINBOW TROUT 












PICKEREL 












S. M. BASS 












L. M. BASS 












^L\sKI^•o^-GE 




















— 










1 









ABBREVIATION'S: n D.^TE; A .\GE; L LENGTH 



Biological surveys were carried out on seven hundred and seven (707) 
lakes and streams in 1928, which is four hundred and seventy-four (474) more 
than in 1927. This brings the total of individual studies to one thousand and 
nineteen (1,019). The number of waters studied in the various counties and 
districts of the Province so far is as follows: — 



Table I. — Biological Surveys of Waters 



Algoma 18 

Brant 5 

Bruce 21 

Carleton 1 

Dufferin 3 

Durham 13 

Elgin 5 

Frontenac 29 

Glengarry 1 

Grey 18 

Haliburton 56 

Halton 6 

Hastings 26 

Lambton 1 

Lanark 6 



Leeds 4 

Lennox and Addington. 6 

Lincoln 2 

Kenora 1 

Middlesex 5 

Muskoka 58 

Nipissing 10 

Norfolk 8 

Northumberland 10 

Ontario 3 

Oxford 13 

Parry Sound 38 

Peel 3 

Perth 3 



Peterborough 24 

Prince Edward 2 

Rainy River 6 

Renfrew 29 

Simcoe 57 

Sudbury 13 

Temiskaming 3 

Thames Watershed .... 472 

Thunder Bay 8 

Victoria 7 

Waterloo 13 

Welland 2 

Wellington 4 

Wentworth 4 

York 2 



Total 1,019 



The biological surveys tabulated above include studies of all the lakes 
and streams in the township of Oakley in Muskoka, and in the township of 
Matchedash in Simcoe county. 

The planting of fish is one which demands painstaking thoroughness. For 
the waters so far studied the most suitable planting places have been defined as 
far as possible. However, it is obvious that it is a very difficult matter to 
define in words the most suitable locations for planting. Considerable education 
along these lines is necessary, unless the planting of the fish is taken over by 
the hatchery officials and the Biologist of the Department and his assistants, 
entirely. Plans are being made to hold meetings in the various districts of the 
Province, in order to explain the purpose and importance of biological surveys 
of lakes and streams, the principles underlying a practical stocking policy, and 
the methods which should be employed in planting fry, fingerling and adult 
fish. 



10 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



Applications for fish for the year 1927-28 numbered 1,142. 
disposed of as follows: — 

Table II. — Disposition of Applications for Fish, 1927-28 



Speckled Trout. 
Lake Trout .... 
Rainbow Trout . 
Brown Trout . . 

Black Bass 

Pickerel 

Whitefish 

Herring 

♦Pike 

Maskinonge . . . . 



No. of 
Applications 

456 

207 

18 

2 

177 

204 

55 

20 

2 

1 

1,142 



No. 
Filled 

283 

138 

2 

58 
124 

52 
13 



670 



No. 
Cancelled 
Waters 
Unsuitable 
50 
35 
8 
1 
34 
5 



182 



No. 
Cancelled 
Duplicate 
Applications 
11 
14 
1 

io 

5 



These were 



No. Brought 

Forward 

(Biological 

Studies 

Necessary) 

112 

20 

7 

1 

75 

24 

2 

6 



247 



♦Applications not granted, since pike are not propagated by the Department. 

In addition to the general lake and stream surveys, the following special 
problems were undertaken: — 

Messrs. H. H. MacKay and R. A. McKenzie commenced a study of the 
effect of hoop-netting on game fish in the waters of the Rideau System and 
Lake Ontario. Considerable information of a statistical nature has been com- 
piled ^ and for the ensuing year the fishermen will be provided with blank forms, 
as shown on page ten, in order that we may follow the trend of the fisheries 
and make regulations accordingly. District wardens and overseers will check 
up the recording of this valuable information. Doubtless, there will be some 
objections to this taken by the fishermen, but with the assistance of the overseers 
the difficulties, if any, should be overcome. Studies in connection with hoop- 
netting may be extended to include, — firstly, the interdependence of coarse fish 
in these waters with the game fish, and secondly, a study of the spawning periods, 
and thirdly, the most satisfactory mesh of netting to use which will protect 
the fish requiring protection. 

ONTARIO 

GAME & FISHERIES DEPARTMENT 

Biological Branch 



Date 

Set 



Date 

Lifted 



Air 
Temp. 



Water 
Temp. 



oa 


CQ 


rt 


oa 


P5 


CQ 


:§ 


i 


O 

o 


</) 


J 


05 



rt 





















l'^ 




j: 




tfi 


u 








ii 
.id 


i) 


« 


O) 


tC 


^ 


C 






E 




_rt 


a 


o 
Q 


'1 


55 







Location Bag No 

Character of bottom Depth of water 

Sworn before me at I. the undersigned, do make oath and say that the 

County of above returns are correct to the best of my knowledge 

This day of 192. . and belief. 

Signature of Owner 

Commissioner or J. P. 
Note. — Each bag should be numbered and this number retained for the entire season. S.M.B.B. — Small- 
mouthed Black Bass. L.M.B.B. = Large-mouthed Black Bass. Speckled or Calico Bass. 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1928 11 

Mr. G. C. Toner undertook studies in connection with,^ — 

1. The pickerel versus the sucker during the spawning season of the former. 

2. Bass and bass fishing in the Georgian Bay. 

Mr. R. F. Cain carried on observations on Long Point Bay, Lake F2rie, 
prior to, during and after the spawning season of the small-mouthed black bass. 
Mr. R. J. Perkin carried out similar studies in the waters adjacent to Pelee 
Island, Lake Erie. 

Mr. R. W. Peavoy, commenced a study on the early life-history of the 
maskinonge in Pigeon Lake and Sturgeon Lake (Kawartha Lakes' District) and 
later in the season followed up the spawning habits of the black bass. Mr. 
Peavoy kept daily records of water levels, at chosen stations on both lakes, 
and endeavoured to determine the effect of falling water levels on deposited 
ova and young fry. 

During the summer a survey was made of the eastern end of Lake Erie to 
determine, if possible, the reason for the decline of its fisheries. The survey 
was under the joint auspices of the Federal Go\'ernment of the United .States, 
the State of New York, the Ontario Government Department of Game and 
Fisheries, the city of Buffalo, and the Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences. 
The work of these various bodies was co-ordinated by Dr. Charles J. Fish, 
Director of the Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences, and the laboratories of the 
new Buffalo Museum of Science w^ere opened for their use. In connection 
with this survey, Mr. A. E. Allin studied the intermediate stages of fish taken 
by the various gear employed. Messrs. H. H. MacKay and A. E. Allin studied 
the distribution of fish and the food of the fishes in the shallow waters of Long 
Point Bay, Lake Erie. Messrs. R. A. McKenzie, G. \V. McCracken and R. W. 
Peavoy studied from the critical and experimental standpoints the spawning 
operations carried out on whitefish and herring in Lake Erie. A number of 
whitefish were tagged off Nanticoke in order to study their movements and their 
rate of growth. Lake Erie fishermen have been advised to return tagged fish, 
if still alive and uninjured, to the water and, if dead, to remove a few scales 
from the fish, record its length, girth, weight and sex and return this information 
along with the tag to the Department. 

In regard to the results of the investigations, the following concise references 
appear to sum up the situation in reference to the reason for the decline of the 
fisheries in Lake Erie: — 

"The question is not yet conclusively answered, but concerning all of the eastern end 
of the lake, except its waters near the shores, it has been established that none of the causes 
usually ascribed for the failure of the fisheries exists; the waters are pure and uncontami- 
nated, bottom conditions are favourable, and there is an abundance of food for more fish 
than ever were known to be in the lake." 

and, — 

"Concerning the general results of the survey, we can safely say that Lake Erie is 
capable of supporting as many open lake fish as ever. The depletion appears to have 
resulted from over-fishing and unwise fishing, and as such the remedy must lie in the hands 
of those legislative bodies having jurisdiction over the lakes." 

A general survey of the Thames Watershed was made by Messrs. H. H. 
MacKay, R. A. McKenzie and R. F. Cain. Mr. Cain is making a special study 
of the ecology of the higher aquatic plants in streams and their economic 
importance to fish. 

Mr. G. \V. McCracken made preliminary studies of the carp in Lake Simcoe 
with special reference to their spawning habits and their relationship to black 
bass. 



12 THE REPORT UPON GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1928 No. 9 

The effect of three-inch mesh gill net on lake trout in Lake Huron and 
Georgian Bay was made the subject of preliminary study by Mr. G. W. 
McCracken. 

Messrs. H. H. MacKay and R. A. McKenzie studied the effects of trade 
wastes on fish life in Puce's Creek (Essex County), Sydenham River (Lambton 
County), Thames River, Sturgeon River (Nipissing), and the Winnipeg River. 

Specific complaints in regard to obstruction to fish migration in the Humber 
River at Lambton Mills and the Nonquon River, near Port Perry, were investi- 
gated. The latter investigation is not completed. 

Mr. H. H. MacKay studied a parasitic infection of speckled trout from 
MacKay 's Lake, Algoma, and mortality among goldfish at the Goldfish Supply 
Company, Toronto. The exact identity of flat-worms parasitic on pickerel 
sent to the Department from Clearwater Lake, Kenora, and fluke-worms para- 
sitic on speckled trout sent to the Department from Norwood, Ontario, were 
determined by Mr. George W. Hunter, of the Rensslaer Polytechnic Institute, 
Troy, New York. In collaboration with Dr. Read, Professor of Bacteriology, 
Queen's University, Kingston, Messrs. R. A. McKenzie and G. W. McCracken, 
studied an epidemic disease among suckers in Long Lake, Portland Township, 
Frontenac County. 

Mr. A. VV. McLeod, Director of Hatcheries, and Mr. H. H. MacKay, 
Biologist, and his field assistants, investigated twelve sites suggested for the 
propagation of bass, or for bass and maskinonge, and seven sites for the propa- 
gation of speckled trout. 

Noteworthy progress has been made in the culture of speckled trout. In 
Table III, following, the number, age and size of speckled trout dis- 
tributed are given. There is considerable variation in the size of fish taken 
from different hatcheries. Available rearing ponds at Normandale and Mount 
Pleasant place the fish of these hatcheries at a decided advantage, over those 
retained in hatchery troughs and fed exclusively on artificial food until they 
are distributed. Stream and pond conditions at Mount Pleasant and Norman- 
dale are as natural as might be expected, and the fish reared under these condi- 
tions have considerable natural food at their disposal. Small-mouthed black 
bass distribution is outKned in Table I\'. In Mount Pleasant hatchery ponds 
during the past year production of fry amounted to approximately 100,000, or 
a production of 6,250 per fertile nest. Half the fry were distributed as fry, 
and of those retained, a distribution of 10,833 fingerlings of the sizes and ages 
shown in Table I\' resulted. 



14 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



Table III. — Speckled Trout 



Hatchery 


Length of 

Fish 

inches 


Eyed 
Eggs 


Fry 


Age in 




2-2^ 


3-33^ 


3 


4 


Port Arthur 




60,000 


' 285,000 
190,000 


221,000 


115,000 














Mount Pleasant 














« « 


1-2 
1-2 

1-2 H 

m-2^ 

lM-2 

2-21.^ 

2Ji 

2M 

2^ 

2J^ 

2^-2M 

2-3 

2K-3% 

2^-4 

2H-4^ 

2% 

3 

3-4 ,^ 

3-5 

3-5 

3-6 

3H-4^ 

12-16 










80,000 


« « 










25,000 




« u 










5,000 


u « 












155,000 


Sault Ste Marie 












110,000 


(( « 












Southampton 

Wiarton 


























(( 




























Sault Ste. Marie 














Mount Pleasant 













40,000 


« « 












25,000 


(( « 














« « 










* 


5,000 


Southampton 


























Mount Pleasant 














U (( 










































« (( 












5,000 




*(1002H 


years an 


d 100 2% 


years) 














60,000 


475,000 


221,000 


115,000 


25,000 


425.000 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1928 



15 



Distribution — 1928 



months 



4H 


5 


5y2 


5H 


6 


6M 


7 


10 


Total 


















396,000 


















285,000 


















190,000 


















80,000 


















25,000 


! 














5,000 


1 














155,000 


















110,000 


75,000 
















75,000 










5,000 
45,000 








5,000 










5,000 






50,000 










10,000 




10,000 






55,000 


5,000 








60,000 


5,000 


26,000 










31,000 
















40,000 


















25,000 




11,000 
27,500 














11,000 
















32,500 








15,000 
50,000 








15,000 
















50,000 




5,000 












5,000 








2,100 








2,100 














3,000 


3,000 










4,000 






4,000 
















5,000 


















200 




















80,000 


69,500 


55,000 


5,000 


121,100 


5,000 


10,000 


3,000 
*200 


1,669,800 



16 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



Table IV. — Small-mouthed Black Bass Distribution — 1928 
(Mount Pleasant Hatchery) 



Inches 


Fry 


3 Months 


4 Months 




50,000 


"566 

800 

5,483 

3,600 

' ' 260 




lJ^-2 




1^-2 J^ 






2 






2-3 






2-6 




250 


3-5 














50,000 


10,583 


250— Total Fry and Fingerlings 60,833 
Adults 30 




60,863— Parent lot not 
— disposed of, 1,600 



Crown Ga me Preserves 

At the present time there are some forty Crown Game Preserves, established 
in accordance with the Department's policy of creating sanctuaries where advis- 
able and desirable for the protection of wild life. The Chapleau Preserve, 
District of Sudbury, 1,824,000 acres; and the Superior Preserve, District of 
Thunder Bay, 575,000 acres; represent a substantial percentage of the 2,642,347 
acres included in these Preserves. During 1928 the following Preserves were 
established : — 



Preserve County 

Glen Elm Game Preserve Halton 

Hughes Game Preserv^e Bruce 



Area (acres) 
325 
400 



Game 

This Province continues to enjoy popularity among resident and non- 
resident hunters. Licenses for the taking of big game continue in demand as 
is evidenced by the table appended herewith, showing comparative figures for 
the past five years: — 

1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 

Resident Moose 1,385 1,291 1,359 1,379 1.371 

Resident Deer 19,517 17,034 23,392 21,111 21,867 

Non-resident Hunting 1,651 1,581 1,698 2,237 1,721 

It is reported that the majority of these licensees were successful in securing their animals. 

Ruffed Grouse {Partridge). — This species continues to be found only in very 
limited numbers, and a continuance of the close season on these birds which 
has been in effect during recent years is most desirable, in order that they have 
an opportunity to re-establish themselves. 

Sharp-tailed Grouse {Prairie Hen). — More or less native to the northwestern 
portion of the Province, though their numbers would appear to be extending 
easterly. 

Quail. — Confined to the counties in the southwestern section of the Province, 
where they appear to be becoming well established. 

Ducks. — Continue to make their appearance in sufficient numbers to make 
the hunting of them a source of considerable satisfaction to a large number of 
hunters. 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1928 17 

Pheasants {English Ring-necked). — Continue to increase in various sections 
of southern Ontario, particularly in the Niagara district, which seems adapted 
to the raising of these birds. Since 1922 the Department has carried on the 
propagation of this species at its Bird Farm, at Eugenia. From this farm last 
year, 1.209 live birds were liberated in Southern Ontario, and some 16,995 eggs 
were also distributed. The demand for settings of these eggs is in excess of 
the supply. 

Furs 

The number of pelts on which royalty was paid during 1928 was somewhat 
in excess of that of the previous >ear, although it is again found necessary to 
report that general conditions respecting fur-bearing animals do not show much 
noticeable improvement. 

Bear. — Catch remains practically stationary, an indication that this species 
continues to hold its own. 

Beaver. — Catch during 1928 shows some increase. It appears advisable to 
continue present restrictions as to the taking of these animals. 

Fisher. — Would appear to be somewhat more numerous in view^ of reports 
and increased catch, though still scarce. 

Fox. — There would appear to be slight decline in the different varieties of 
this animal. Catch for the year remained practically stationary. 

Lynx. — Conditions remain unchanged. This species is rather scarce. 

Marten. — Conditions similar to those which describe lynx would appear to 
prevail regarding these animals. 

Mink. — Continued decrease in catch. Would appear to be getting scarcer. 

Miiskrat. — The increased catch in 1928 is not a correct indication of con- 
ditions governing this species. Their numbers appear to be decreasing. 

Otter. — Catch increased considerably during 1928, but this species continues 
scarce. 

Raccoon. — Generally speaking, these anim.als would appear to be gradually 
losing ground. 

Skunk. — During 1928 the catch shows a considerable increase. This is 
one of the few species which are holding up. 

Weasel. — Increased catch of 1928 and reports generally indicate a slight 
improvement in conditions here. 

The following table compares for the past six years, pelts of fur-bearing 

animals, other than those which were ranch-raised, on which royalty was paid: — 

1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 

Bear 1,447 1,399 2,014 1,635 1,472 1,575 

Beaver 70,684 50.233 48,364 27,597 20,738 22,040 

Fisher 2,339 1,910 1,936 2,618 3,904 5,400 

Fox (Cross) 1,154 1,082 2,801 4,175 3,502 4,116 

Fox (Red) 12,329 14,695 22,198 30,535 26,112 25,943 

Fox (Silver or Black) 205 167 433 620 403 646 

Fox (White) 1,501 362 974 226 977 590 

Fox (not specified) 34 28 61 165 136 160 

Lynx 1,177 2,332 2,200 3,884 4,568 3,845 

Marten 4,704 3,661 3,125 3,177 3,261 3.492 

Mink 58,634 82,466 68,138 65,299 37,628 32,009 

Muskrat 478.820 533,256 534,739 387,022 469,947 514,161 

Otter 3.997 5,096 4,622 4.304 3,168 4,510 

Raccoon 15,752 21,976 22,157 21,002 15,958 13,513 

Skunk 54.770 58,130 67,100 75.503 59,488 79.442 

Weasel 61,603 51,163 34,365 63,599 72.645 79,425 

Wolverine 20 12 8 11 15 19 

Total 769,070 827,948 814,935 691,372 723,922 790,886 



18 THE REPORT UPON No. 9 

The value of the above pelts to the trapper was $3,927,506.28, and this 
Province continues to set the pace as the leading producer of fur among the 
provinces of the Dominion. 

In addition to the above the total of ranch-raised foxes, on which no royalty 
is payable, which passed through the fur farms of the Province was 3,433 of 
which 2,566 were exported and the balance of 867 dressed in Ontario. These 
had a value of $379,751.18. 



Fur Farming 

This branch of industry continues to show expansion due to increasing 
interest on the part of the general public, and in view of conditions as they at 
present affect the wild fur-bearing animals in the Province, there would appear 
to be future possibilities in this branch. 

Fur Farmers' Licenses issued by the Department during the past five years 
are as follows: — 



1924 


1925 


1926 


1927 


1928 


392 


624 


783 


986 


1,148 



and while efforts in this line were originally confined practically to the fox, the 
appended table shows the extended scope it is assuming, and the increasing 
number of species with which the 1,148 fur farmers of the Province are experi- 
menting. 

Animals Stocked ox Licensed Farms at December 31st 

1925 

Beaver 29 

Fisher 2 

Fox (Cross) 459 

Fox (Red) 725 

Fox (Silver Black) 4,940 

Fox (Blue) 40 

Lynx 2 

Mink 136 

Muskrat 7,182 

Oppossum .... 

Raccoon 306 

Skunk 100 

Bear 13 

Marten 2 

Weasel (Ermine) .... 

Badger .... 



1926 


1927 


1928 


100 


142 


98 


28 


48 


54 


397 


444 


353 


397 


314 


365 


7,095 


9,664 


12,555 


49 


56 


60 


3 


2 


6 


468 


826 


1,247 




1,107 


2,016 


290 


619 


831 


49 


91 


62 


4 


7 


13 


7 


21 


20 




4 


2 

4 



Total 13,936 *8,887 tl3,345 117,686 

*ExcIusive of Muskrat. 

flncludes only pen-raised muskrats. 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1928 19 



EXPERIMENTAL FUR FARMING 

The first general report in connection with this branch of the Department's 
activities is set forth herewith, for general information: — 

"It can be said without fear of contradiction that the Experimental Fur Farm 
is the most comprehensive plant in existence conducted for the scientific study 
of fur farming. The farm has an area of one hundred acres, which is roughly 
divided into three portions, arable land, marsh and bush. 

"The whole acreage is enclosed by a fence with an overhang which serves 
the double purpose of preventing any animal inside the fence from escaping and 
also prevents undesirable animals from gaining access to the breeding grounds 
of the muskrats and beaver. 

"Modern dwellings have been erected for the help with every convenience 
installed. Buildings have been provided to facilitate the care and feeding of 
the animals, including a cook-house, meat-house, work shop and barn. For 
the study of diseases a laboratory has been established, with up-to-date equip- 
ment, for research w^ork. 

"The creek which flows through the farm has been bridged and every 
portion of the enclosed area is accessible. One of the most desirable features 
of the farm is the marsh, which can be said to be almost ideal for the propagation 
of muskrat in the natural state and contains a heavy growth of aquatic plants 
of many varieties. 

"On the farm will be found a very unique collection of animals, including 
silver, black, white, red, and cross fox, fisher, lynx, mink, marten, skunk, rac- 
coon, beaver, muskrat, moose and deer; also wild ducks, swans and Canada 
geese. Two wolves are also kept for exhibition purposes. 

"Oiie of the first problems facing the breeder of fur-bearing animals is that 
of suitable housing, and considerable experimental work has been done along 
this line and is still in progress. All species of fur-bearing animals require warm 
dry nests, dampness or draughts are invariably fatal over a period of time. 

"It has been found with beaver that they require a pen so constructed that 
they have access to the water at all times. Beaver kept on dry land quickly 
show the effect, the fur becomes dry and harsh and a condition of a purulent 
nature affects the eyes. The most satisfactory pen for beaver consists of a dark 
house, from which leads a tunnel into the water. The house must be high and 
dry, as well as damp and draught proof. 

"Fox pens of different styles have been built in order to determine the most 
suitable arrangement, taking into consideration, mainly, the need for shade and 
the best material for flooring. 

"It was found that the foxes raised in pens providing partial shade had a 
better texture to the fur than those raised in open pens without shade. Due 
to the ever-increasing mortality among foxes from parasitic infection, three 
different types of floors have been installed, viz.: wood, cement, and gravel, in 
order to ascertain which of these three materials is the most efficient in prevent- 
ing the hatching out of the eggs laid by the adult parasites, and which in turn 
infect the fox. 

"The Experimental Fur Farm is finding that the wood and cement floors 
are much more efi^ective than the gravel ones. 

"Mink and muskrat houses featuring a central alley with the nest boxes 
and feed pans under cover, and the wire runs extending from both sides of the 
alley have been built, and are a big improvement over open pens entirely exposed 



20 THE REPORT UPON No. 9 

to the weather. It is possible with this type of house to observe the animals 
without disturbing the entire nest, which is not the case where the den is placed 
in an open pen and covered with straw. 

"With the many different varieties of animals on hand, the study of the 
most suitable and economical rations occupies a very important place in the 
experimental work carried on at the farm, and will continue to do so for many 
years to come. 

"The fur farmei is faced with many new problems in this respect not encount- 
ered by the breedeis of domestic animals, who have years of experience and 
experimental data to draw from. At all times the effect of various feeds on the 
colour and texture of the prime pelt has to be carefully considered. At the 
Experimental Fur Farm very definite data has been obtained with the colour 
phase of silver fox. While cereals such as corn meal, rolled oats and whole 
wheat flour may be fed the year round, if such food is continued through the 
summer months the colour of the pelt is decidedly affected. Any feed containing 
large quantities of fat, including whole milk, tends to produce a rusty pelt in 
late fall. It is also becoming evident that fur farmers as a rule are feeding too 
much meat, heavy meat feeding having a tendency to produce off-colour pelts. 
"The question of how far fish can be substituted for meat with fur-bearing 
animals will be thoroughly investigated this year and it is hoped that reliable 
data will be secured on this point. 

"It is found that animals will thrive on feed that cannot in any way be said 
to be their natuial feed. Beaver, for example, will do well on a diet of roots 
and grain, and are very fond of bread. The fur farmer cannot, when operating 
on a commercial basis, feed the natural feed of the animal, and extensive experi- 
ments are required to find out how far it is possible to go from the natural 
without depreciating the pelt value and affecting production of young. ' 

"Many problems in regard to breeding have arisen in the fur farming indus- 
try, particularly to in-breeding and line breeding. It is claimed by some that 
the mating of closely related animals is detrimental to the offspring; while 
others, again, claim that it is the only possible method by which a unifoim strain 
of animal, showing desirable characteristics, can be bred. 

"Results at the Fur Farm tend to show that where judgment is used, 
in-breeding is a desirable method of producing high-class stock, but the greatest 
care must be taken that only the best animals be used for such purposes, as the 
bad as well as the good points of the parents are intensified. It will take con- 
siderable time to find out how far it is possible to in-breed a certain family, and 
still produce healthy, virile stock. Such experiments are now in progress at 
the Fur Farm. 

"There is a steadily-growing demand for advice and help to combat the 
various diseases that are being found among fur-bearing animals. It is only 
to be expected as the number of animals kept in captivity increases and fur 
farms become more congested that new diseases will arise that at present are 
unknown or go unrecognized by the owner. 

"In the past it has been the short-sighted policy of many fur farmers to 
keep a secret any deaths among their stock; particulaily has this been the case 
where the sale of breeding stock has been bringing high prices. To date, the 
greatest detriment to the health of fur-bearing animals comes mainly from two 
sources — parasitic and dietetic. These animals are particularly susceptible to 
parasites, due to their being kept in small enclosures, with the result that the 
ground becomes completely saturated with the infection, and medicinal remedies 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1928 21 

have only a temporary effect as the animal in a short time becomes re-infected. 
This continual sapping of their vitality by parasites is very apparent on many 
ranches, both in production and pelt depreciation. 

Parasitic infection has become the most serious hazard the fox rancher has 
to face to-day and it is a question whether many of them are going to be able to 
overcome the conditions already established in their ranches and still remain in 
the business. 

"Researches at the Experimental Fur Farm are being carried on. especially 
on the lungworm. It is interesting to note that foxes sent to Western Canada 
quickly recover from this woim and the disease is unknown in the Prairie Prov- 
inces. Due to its location in the lungs and windpipe, this worm is impossible 
to kill by direct medication, and is being attacked from other angles, by sanitary 
flooring of pens by which it is hoped the hatching of eggs will be prevented. 

"The hook and round worm are found to be present in 95 per cent, of foxes 
sent for examination and also cause a large annual loss to the fur farmer. It is 
found that most fur bearers harbour parasites, including muskrats, mink, marten, 
lynx, raccoon, fisher, and rabbits, and specimens from each have been identified. 

"Where wild animals are taken direct from the wilds and placed in captivity 
and have to eat whatever is given to them, it is to be expected that some dietetic 
troubles will arise. The fur farmer may leave out something that is essential 
for their welfare though it may be needed in only very small quantities. Espec- 
ially is this true of young animals born in captivity. Rickets, scur\'y and an 
acid condition of the blood are all met with. Considerable investigation as to 
feeds counteracting these conditions are being carried out. It has been found 
with mink that a straight cereal and meat diet produces a condition which 
resembles acidosis. This can be quickly relieved by feeding small quantities of 
lettuce and canned tomatoes, which seem to reduce the blood to normal. 

"Enquiries on every subject connected with fur farming are received, and 
whenever possible suitable information is supplied. Many post-mortem exami- 
nations have been carried out and the findings reported to the owners. Through- 
out the summer months, numerous live animals are brought to the farm for 
treatment. There appears to be an ever-increasing demand for such services 
on the part of the public. 

"Fur farming is attracting a wide-spread interest. The correspondence 
received comes from everj^ Province in the Dominion and especially the Prairie 
Provinces." 

Wolf Bounties 

During 1928 the Department received applications for the payment of 
bounty on 5,988 wolves, an increase of nine per cent, over the number of appli- 
cations received in the previous year. The Kenora, Rainy River and Thunder 
Bay Districts supplied 4,862 of these applications, or over 80 per cent, of the 
total. 

In addition to the above, bounties were paid on approximately two hundred 
wolf pelts received in the Department during the fiscal year ending October 31st, 
1927, but too late for payment in that period. 

Comparative Statement of Wolf Skins Received and Bounties Paid 

For fiscal year ending October 31st, 1925. 
For fiscal year ending October 31st, 1926. , 
For fiscal year ending October 31st, 1927. . 
For fiscal year ending October 31st, 1928. . 



Timber 


Brush 


Pups 


Total 


Bounties 


831 


1,066 


21 


1,918 


$25,465 62 


1,022 


2,690 


107 


3,819 


51,994 42 


1,041 


4,414 


59 


5,514 


82,970 07 


1,231 


4,878 


64 


6,173 


91,297 27 



22 THE REPORT ITPON No. 9 

Enforcement of the Act 

The enforcement of the provisions and regulations of the Ontario Game 
and Fisheries Act was performed in a satisfactory manner by the field officers 
charged with this work; and the service rendered by the District Wardens and 
the various overseers under their respective jurisdictions was capably augmented 
during the Spring and Fall spawning, and deer-hunting seasons by additional 
seasonal overseers appointed during these periods for the better protection of 
fish and game and enforcement of the Act. 

In nine hundred and sixteen cases in which parties were charged with fish 
and game violations, convictions were secured. Fines and costs assessed in 
these cases amounted to $18,933.35. 

In eight hundred and ninety-three of these cases seizures of goods and 
equipment were made, which summarized may be set forth as follows: — 

Pelts 2,512 Fire-arms 290 

Deer and Moose hides 15 Gasoline boats 10 

Live animals 26 Row boats 10 

Fish 5,650 lbs. Canoes 22 

Gill nets 123 pieces Punts 12 

2,075 yds. Motor cars 3 

Dip nets 20 Jack lights and lanterns 9 

Hoop nets 14 Deer and Moose 10 

Seine nets 16 Venison 450 lbs. 

Bull nets 9 Moose meat 435 lbs. 

Trap nets 3 Partridge 10 

Hooks 3,799 Geese and ducks 23 

Grapples 1 Pheasants 10 

Gaffs 2 Quail 32 

Spears 37 Decoys 45 

Rods and lines 122 Miscellaneous 45 

Traps 1,200 

In accordance with the usual practice, confiscated articles were disposed of 
by tender at sales which were advertised in the press, except in cases where 
articles were sold to the former owner where circumstances warranted. The 
amount received from these sales is shown in the statement of revenue which 
appears at the beginning of this report. 

Acknowledgments 

In conclusion, I desire to publicly express my appreciation of the assistance 
and support which has been rendered to the Department throughout the year. 

The members of the staff, both of the inside and outside services, have 
faithfully and zealously carried out any and all duties which have been allotted 
to them, and the spirit of loyal co-operation in the performance of the work has 
at all times been evident. 

Our work has been made more pleasant and attractive by reason of the 
assistance rendered by the transportation companies and Fish and Game Pro- 
tective x'\ssociations, the officers of which organizations having at all times 
co-operated with the Department in an earnest endeavour to secure a proper 
observation of the provisions of the Ontario Game and Fisheries Act. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I am. .Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

D. McDonald, 

Deputy Minister of Game and Fisheries. 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1928 



23 



APPENDIX No. 1 
SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS— 1928 



Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 



Algoma: 

Trout Lake Inlet 

Long Lake 

Moose Lake 

Mongoose Lake 

Spruce Lake 

Loon Lake 

South Chippewa River. 
Batchewana River .... 

Sand River 

Wartz Lake 

Gull Lake 

Achigan Brook 

Lower Lake 

Mountain Lake 

Fish Lake 

Michipicoten River.. . . 
Little Thessalon River. 

Spring Creek 

Jackfish River 



Q 



Brant: 

Spring Creek 

St. George Mill Stream, 



Bruce: 

Willow Creek 

Monkman's Creek. 

Plum Creek 

Kirklands Creek. . 
Matheson Creek. . 
Curlings Creek. . . 

Spring Creek 

Otter Creek 

Ainsworth Springs. 

Hogs Creek 

Stoney Creek 

Silver Creek 



Durham: 

Cav^n Creek 

Devitt's Creek 

Mountjoys Creek 

Millbrook Creek 

Orono Creek 

Fallis Creek 

Park Stream 

Barkwell's Stream 

McGill's Creek 

Robbins Creek 

Parr's Creek 

Kelly's Brook 

Thornton's Creek 

Tamblyn Creek 

Hamm Creek 

Village Creek No.l (twp. Cavan ) 
Village Creek No. 2 f twp. Cavan) 

Butternut Creek 

Robb Creek 

Dufferin: 

Funston's Creek 

Boyne River 

Nottawa Creek 

Credit River 

H umber River 

Nottawasaga River , 



uantity 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
10,000 



500 
500 



5,000 
5,000 
5,000 

10,000 
3,000 

30,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
3,000 
3,000 



10,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
3,000 



5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
15,000 
1,000 
5,000 



Elgin: 

Baker Brook. 



Frontenac: 
Beaver Creek. 



Grey: 

Beaver River. . . . 
Sydenham River. 
Indian River. . . . 
Spring Brook. . . . 
Meadow Creek. . 
Jamieson's Creek. 
Spring Stream. . . 
Pepper Creek. . . . 
Sullivan Creek. . . 



Huron: 

B. Creek (twp. Hullett). 



Haliburton: 

Paint Lake 

Upper Fletcher Lake 

McCue Creek 

Spring tributaries to Tallow Lk. 

Halton: 

Murray's Creek 

Sixteen-Mile Creek 



Hastings: 

Tee Creek 

Egan Creek 

Spring Brook Creek. 

Steen's Creek 

Colburn's Creek. . . . 

Deer Creek 

Robertson Lake 

Cedar Creek 

McConnell's Creek. , 

Green's Creek 

Sidnev Creek 



Middlesex: 

Duncrief's Creek. 
Spring Ponds. . . . 



Muskoka: 

Lake of Bays 

Muskoka River. . . 
Little East River. . 
Near Cut Lake. . . 

Dotty's Lake 

Menominee Lake . 

Echo Lake 

Deep Lake 

Turtle Lake 

Nelson's Creek.. . . 
Gipsy Bells Creek. 
Big East Creek. . . 
Holinshead Creek. 
Jessop's Creek. . . . 

Black River 

Bigwin Creek 



Nipissing: 

Otter Lake 

Four-Mile Creek. 
North River 



Quantity 
5,000 



1,000 



3,000 

50,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

10,000 

5,000 

500 

500 



5,000 



5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 



5,000 
5,000 



5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
10,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
6,000 



5,000 
10,000 



10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

5,000 

10.000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 



5,000 
5,000 
5,000 



24 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WhTKRS— 192^— Continued. 



Speckled Trout, Fry and Fingerlings — Cont'd 
Norfolk: Quantity 



Patterson Lake . 
Pettit Stream. . 



Northumberland : 
Woodland Creek. . . . 

Allen's Creek 

Trout Creek 

West Creek 

Barrett's Creek 

Cold Creek 

Jackson's Creek 

Burnley Stream 

Philips Creek 

Forestell's Creek. . . . 

Buckley Creek 

Keeler Spring Creek. 
Castleton Creek 



Ontario: 

Spring Creek on Meadow Brook 

Farm 

U.xbridge Brook 

Altona Mill Pond and Stream . 

Oxford: 

Brooksdale Creek 

Spring Creek 

Campbell's Creek 



Parry Sound: 

Loon Lake 

Sugar Lake Creek 

Sand Lake 

Distress River 

Eagle Lake 

South River 

South Sequin River 

Buck Lake 

Maganetawan Riv. (twp. Perryj 

Couchi Lake 

Burton's Creek 

Ragged Creek 

Beggsboro River 

Prince Edward: 

Stinson's Mill Creek 

Waring's Creek 

Haight's Creek 

Peterborough : 

Ouse Creek 

Little Ouse Creek 

Plato Creek 

Cook's Creek 

Sedgwick's Creek 

Buchanan's Creek 

Garbutt Stream 

Webber's Brook 

Carver's Creek 



Peel: 

Montgomery Creek. 

Credit River 

Lockton Creek 

Columbia Stream. . 
Marshall's Creek. . . 

Coffey's Creek 

Mutton's Stream. . . 
H umber River 



5,000 
1,000 



5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
10,000 
10,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 



5,000 
5.000 
5,000 

5,000 
5,000 
5,000 

3,000 

5,000 

5,000 

10,000 

15,000 

5,000 

15,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 
1,000 
5,000 



5,000 
5,000 
10,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 

5,000 
10,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
10,000 



Perth: 
Flat Creek, 



Renfrew: 

Brindles Creek 

Gultz Creek 

McGregor Creek 

Crozier Creek 

Constant Creek 

Twohey's Lake Creek. 

Dooner's Creek 

Peever's Creek 

Moonbeam Creek. . . . 

Moran's Creek 

Burns Lake Creek. . . . 
Goshen Creek 



Simcoe: 

Pine River 

Coldwater River. . . 
Sturgeon River . . . . 

Noisy River 

Batteau Creek 

Pretty Rivers 

Black Ash Creek... 

Avon River 

Jobbit's Creek 

Dumond Creek. . . . 

Hark Creek 

Silver Creek 

Thunder Bay 

Colwell Creek 

Speer's Creek 

Goodwin's Creek. . . 

Woody Creek 

Black Creek 

Fresh Water Creek. 
Copeland's Creek. . 



Sudbury: 

Major Lake 

' Cold Springs 

Trout Lake Creek. 
Wolf Lake 



Thunder Bay: 

Allen Lake 

Trout Lake 

Lake Nipigon 

Long Lake 

Moose Creek 

Moose Lake 

McKenzie River . . 
Lake Wideman . . . 

Twin Lake 

Lower Twin Lake . 
Upper Twin Laie.. 

Pearl River 

Six-Mile Creek.. . . 
Current River. . . . 
McVicar's Creek. . 
Neebing River. . . . 
Big Duck Lake. . . 

Stewart Lake 

Nipigon River. . . . 

Eraser Creek 

Anderson Lake . . . 
McKenzie Lake. . . 

Clegg Lake 

Mountain Lake. . . 



Quantity 
5,000 



5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5.000 



,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 



500 
500 
500 
500 



10,000 
10,000 
25,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
20,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
1,000 
20,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
65,000 
25,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1928 



25 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS— 1928— Con/iMMetf. 



Speckled Trout Fry and Finger! inos — Cont'd. 



Thunder Bay: — Co7i. 

Gulch Lake 

Anderson's Creek. 
Helma Lake ...... 

Cavern Lake . . .\ . 
Bleude River 



Timiskaming: 

Moffatt Creek 

Metagami River. . 

Red Stone 

Bristol Creek 

Croft's Creek 

Shaw's Creek 

Mount Joy Creek. 

Grassy Creek 

Red Sucker River. 
Kamascotia River. 
Water Hen Creek. 

Duff Creek 

Ada Creek 



Waterloo: 

Sunfish Lake Stream , 

Mill Creek 

Moffatt Creek 



Wentworth: 

Strabane Creek. . . . 
Spring Bank Creek. 
Twelve-Mile Creek. 
Gallagher's Creek. . 



York: 

Black River 

Franklin Creek 

Stream in twp. E. Gwillimbury 

Mackie's Pond 

Refills.... 32,500 

Paretit Speckled Trout 
Grey: 

Jamieson's Creek 

York: 

Pond on upper waters of Hy- 
land Creek 



Quantity 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 



5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
3,000 
5,000 



5,000 

5,000 

10,000 

1,000 

5,000 

5,000 

100 



5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

10,000 



100 



100 



Lake Trout Fry and Fingerlings 

Great Lakes: Quantity 

Lake Ontario 2,835,000 

Lake Superior 5,005,790 

North Channel 1,300,000 

Lake Huron 6,607,000 



Addington: 

Weslemkoon Lake. 



Algoma: 

Trout Lake (24R-12) 

Sand Lake 

Carpenter Lake 

Island Lake 

Rack Lake 

Lonely Lake 

Achigan Lake 

Iron Lake 

Trout Lake (twp. Aweres). 



15,000 



15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 



Frontenac: 

Sharbot Lake . . . . 

Gould Lake 

Eagle Lake 

Crow Lake 

Trout Lake 

Brule Lake 

Canohto Lake . . . 

Indian Lake 

Queen Bay Lake. 



Haliburton: 

Kashamaganog. . . 

Gull Lake 

Hollow Lake 

Hall's Lake 

Boskung Lake .... 

Stormj^ Lake 

Wolf Lake 

Pine Lake 

Big Bear Lake. . . . 

Maple Lake 

Paudash Lake .... 
Twelve-Mile Lake. 
Horseshoe Lake. . . 
Kushog Lake 



Hastings: 

Papineau Lake 

Baptiste Lake 

Lake of Islands 

Dickie's Lake 

Big Burnt Lake 

Little Burnt Lake 

Bass Lake 

Trout Lake 

Copeway Lake 

Clear Lake (twp. Lake) 

Clear Lake (twp. Dungannon). 

Cedar Lajce 

Fohgamong Lake 

Island Lake. . 

Jack's Lake 

Thompson's Lake 

Kamaniskeg Lake 

West Lake 

Kenora: 

Eagle Lake 



Leeds: 

Rideau Lakes. 



Muskoka: 

Lake of Bays. 
Lake Vernon . 
Fairy Lake. . . 
Clear Lake. . . 
Bella Lake ... 
Long Lake ... 
Skeleton Lake . 
Buck Lake. . . 
White Lake. . 

Fox Lake 

Oxbow Lake . . 



Nipissing: 
Trout Lake.. 
Turtle Lake. 



Quantity 
25,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
50,000 
25,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 



15,000 
30,000 
15,000 
30,000 
30,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 



35,000 
25,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
35,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 



25,000 



100,000 



50,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 



15,000 
15,000 



26 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS— 1928— Continued. 



Lake Trout Fry and Fingerlings — Continued 



Parry Sound: 

Deer Lake 

Ahmic Lake. . . . 

Sugar Lake 

Sand Lake 

Home Lake . . . . 

Maple Lake 

Eagle Lake 

Trout Lake 

Ruthe Lake. . . . 
Georgian Bay. . . 

Otter Lake 

McQuaby Lake. 
Cariboo Lake. . . 
Star Lake 



Peterborough : 
Oak Lake. . 
Eels Lake. . 
Loon Lake . 



Renfrew: 

Long Lake 

Carson's Lake . . . 

Rough Lake 

Wadsworth Lake. 
Diamond Lake . . 



Quantity 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 

3,568,300 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 



15,000 
15,000 
15,000 



5,000 
25,000 
15,000 
15,000 

5,000 



Thunder Bay: 

Long Lake 20,000 

Keemle Lake 20,000 

Lac des Mille Lacs 20,000 

Lake Nipigon 1,810,000 



Timiskaming: 
Twin Lakes. . 
Crystal Lake . 
Fairy Lake. . 



Pickerel 
Addington: 

Beaver Lake 

South Beaver Lake 



15,000 
15,000 
15,000 



Quantitv 
100,000 
100,000 



Algoma: 

Echo Lake 6,261,750 



Brant: 

Lower Oakland Ponds . 



50,000 



Bruce: 

Sauble River 300,000 

Lake Huron 43,850,000 



Dundas: 
St. Lawrence River. 



Frontenac: 

Big Clear Lake 

Clear Lake (Twp. Kennebec) 

Clear Lake (Twp. Oso) 

Sharbot Lake 

Crow Lake 

Bob's Lake 

Green Bay Lake 

Long Lake 

St. Lawrence River 



100,000 



100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
200,000 
100,000 
100,000 



Hastings: 

Stoco Lake. . . 
Moira River. . 
Salmon River. 
Oak Lake .... 



Quantity 

100,000 

100,000 

100,000 

50,000 



Kenora: 

Upper Manitou Lake 100,000 

Wabigoon Lake 200,000 

Lake of the Woods 22,600,000 

Eagle Lake 100,000 

Tawatinaw Lake 100,000 



Lambton: 

Sydenham River. 

Lanark: 

Dalhousie Lake. . 
Christie Lake. . . . 



Leeds: 

Rideau Lakes. . 

Muskoka: 

Muskoka Lake. 
Lake Joseph. . . 
Lake Rosseau . . 
Sparrow Lake . . 
Muldrew Lake. 
Koshee Lake . . . 
Muskosh River. 



Pickerel 
Nipissing: 

Lake Nipissing 

Trout Lake 

Lake Nosbonsing 

Talon Lake 

Lake, Concession No. 1, Twp. 
Badgerow 



Northumberland: 

Rice LaJce 

Crow Bay 

Trent River . . . 
Crow River. . . 
Heeley Falls. . . 
Middle Falls.. . 



Ontario: 

Nonquon River. 



Parry Sound: 

Deer Lake 

Mill Lake 

Maganetawan River (Twp. Bur- 
ton) 

Ahmic Lake 

Bear Lake 

Cecebe Lake 

Trout Lake 

Doe Lake 

Owl Lake 

Isabella Lake 

Georgian Bay 

Wilson's Lake 

Crane Lake 

Shawanaga River 



50,000 



200,000 
100,000 



500,000 



1,000,000 
1,000,000 
600,000 
500,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 



Quantity 
100,000 
200,000 
100,000 
100,000 

100,000 



100,000 
100,000 
300,000 
150,000 
50,000 
50,000 



50,000 



100,000 
100,000 

100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
200,000 
200,000 
100,000 
300,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1928 



27 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 

WATERS— \92S~Continued. 



Pickerel — Continued 

Parry Sound — Con. 

Osier's Lake 

Cariboo Lake. . . . 

Swan Lake 

Ryan's Lake. . . . 
Squaw Lake 



Quantity 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 



Prince Edward: 

West Lake 100,000 

Bay of Quinte 16,800,000 



Peterborough: 
Otonabee River. 

Rainy River: 
Rainy Lake. . . . 



Renfrew : 

Lake Dore 

Mink Lake 

Madawaska River. 
Sturgeon Lake. . . . 
Ottawa River 



Russell: 

Castor River. 



200,000 



50,160,000 



250,000 
250,000 
50,000 
100,000 
550,000 



50,000 



Simcoe: 

Gloucester Pool 1,000,000 

Severn River 200,000 

Nottawasaga River 1,050,000 

Cook's Lake 50,000 

Deep Bay Lake 100,000 



Stormont: 

St. Lawrence River. 
Bergins Lake 



Sudbury: 

French River. 
Ted's Lake . . . 
Cutler Lake . . 



Thunder Bay: 
Baril Lake . . 



Timiskaming: 

Kenogami Lake. . 
Sesekinika Lake. . 
Commando Lake. 
Minard's Lake . . 
Lillabelle Lake. . . 
Nelson's Lake . . . 



Waterloo: 

River Nith . . . 

Wentworth: 
Lake Ontario. 



100,000 
100,000 



500,000 
100,000 
100,000 



100,000 



100,000 
200,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 



50,000 
100,000 



Whitefish 
Great Lakes: 

Lake Superior 14,211,000 

North Channel 13,250.000 

Lake Huron 27,500,000 

Lake Erie 44,100,000 

Lake Ontario 20,600,000 



Kenora: Quantitv 

Lake of the Woods 6,846,000 

Eagle Lake 1,000,000 

Tawatinaw Lake 100,000 



Parry Sound: 
Georgian Bay. 

Prince Edward: 
Bay of Quinte. 

Rainy River: 
Rainy Lake . . 



63,920,000 



146,740,000 



7,105,000 



Thunder Bay: 
Sturgeon Lake. 
Lake Nipigon. . 



500,000 
300,000 



Herring 
Great Lakes: 

Lake Erie 6,250,000 

Lake Ontario 3,500,000 



Addington: 
Bass Lake. 



Prince Edward: 
Bay of Quinte . 

Rainy Lake: 
Rainy Lake . . 



Bass Fry and Fingerlings 



Addington: 

South Beaver Lake. 



Frontenac: 
Crow Lake. 
Bobs Lake . 



50,000 
5,030,000 
3,000,000 

200 



5,000 
5,000 



Hastings: 

Moira River. 
Oak Lake. . . 



Kent: 

Rondeau Bay. 



Lanark: 

Dalhousie Lake. . 
Mississippi Lake . 
Christie Lake. . . . 



Leeds: 

Rideau Lakes. . 

Muskoka: 

Muldrew Lake. 
Dickies Lake . . 
Long's Lake. . . 



Nipissing: 
Trout Lake. 
Pine Lake. . 



Parry Sound: 
Deer Lake . . 
Maple Lake . 
Cecebe Lake 



200 
200 



10,000 



200 
200 
200 



10,000 



200 
200 
200 



200 
200 



200 
200 
400 



28 



THE REPORT UPON GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1928 No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 

WATERS— 1928— Continued. 



Bass Fry and Fingerlings — Continued 

Parry Sound — Con. 

Duck Lake 

Otter Lake 

Cariboo Lake 

Star Lake 

Powell's Lake 

Peterborough: 

Pigeon Lake 

Buckhorn Lake 

Stoney Lake 

Belmont Lake 

Round Lake 

Square Lake 

Renfrew: 

Mink Lake 

Barry's Bay 

Carson's Lake 



Simcoe: 

Gloucester Pool. 

Little Lake 

Sturgeon Bay. . . 

Sudbury: 

French River. . . 



Victoria: 

Sturgeon Lake. 
Cameron Lake. 
Balsam Lake. . 
Goose Lake . . . 



Quantity 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 



1,000 
283 
500 
200 
200 
200 



200 
200 
200 



5,000 

5,000 

200 



400 



1.400 
500 

5,500 
200 



Waterloo: 

Fisher Mill Dam. . 
Conestoga Stream. 
Grand River 



Wellington : 
Puslinch Lake , 



Parent Bass 
Halton: 

Fairy Lake (Large-mouth). . . . 

Lanark: 

Patterson Lake (Small-mouth) 

York: . 

Grenadier Pond (Large-mouth) 



Maskinonge 



Victoria: 

Pigeon River. 
Scugog River. 



Quantity 

5,000 

200 

200 



250 



Rainbow Trout Fingerlings 



Sudbury: 

Rapid River 

Wahnapitae Lake. 



30 
30 
30 



6,000 
47,000 



209 

210 



30 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 9 



APPENDIX 

GAME AND FISHERIES 

Statistics of the Fishing Industry in the Public Waters 

Equip 



No 


District 


No. 


Tugs 


Ga 

Lau 


soline 
nches 


Sail and P.ow 
Boats 


Gill Nets 




Men 






No. 


Tons 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


Yards 


Value 


1 

? 


Kenora and Rainy River Districts. . . . 


313 
401 
176 
594 
302 

124 
808 

776 
634 


1 
15 
11 
27 
15 


10 
474 
306 
677 
407 


$ 

2,500 

66.300 

76,000 

213.825 

96.0Q0 


144 
65 
34 

138 
80 

40 
145 

256 

57 


S 

77,500 
32.423 
22.075 
98.570 
65.625 

13.725 
165.290 

117.330 
24,310 


107 
75 
55 

114 
40 

69 

151 

227 
180 


$ 

4,332 
6.245 
4.350 
5.700 
2,480 

3.710 
9.235 

13.421 
8.901 


356,235 
1,091,542 

395,570 
1,453,980 

904,886 


$ 

52,974 
94 529 


^ 


North Channel 


51 S81 


4 


Georgian Bay 


157,896 
127.584 


S 


Lake Huron . . 


6 


Lake St. Clair, St. Clair and Detroit 
Rivers 


7 
8 


Lake Erie and Upper Niagara River . 

Lake Ontario, Lower Niagara and St 

Lawrence Rivers 


36 


921 


286,000 


1.463,655 

1.257,910 
345.750 


207,186 
127,141 


9 


Sundry Inland Waters 


9 


202 


25,500 


25,551 




Totals 






4.128 


114 


2,997 


766.125 


959 


616.848 


1.018 


58.374 


7,269,528 


844.442 









Quantities of 



No. 



District 



Herring 



Whitefish 



Trout 



Pike 



Pickerel 
(Blue) 



Pickerel 
(Dore) 



Kenora and Rainy River Districts 

Latce Superior 

North Channel 

Georgian Bay 

Lake Huron 

Lake St. Clair, St. Clair and Detroit 

Rivers 

Lake Erie and Upper Niagara River .... 
Lake Ontario. Lower Niagara and St. 

Lawrence Rivers 

Sundry Inland Watres 



Totals. 



Values . 



lbs 



2,969.984 

9,177 

16.456 

314,011 

70 

1,273,348 

705,822 
11,651 

5.300.519 



318.031.14 



lbs. 

478.522 
326.988 
210.531 
1.357.736 
224,262 

455 
987,889 

1,068,399 
1,168,666 



75/,048.24 



lbs. 
85,651 
1,914,230 

637,380 
1.583.168 
1.460.179 



805.959 
172,842 



6,659,465 



lbs. 

866.867 

8.798 

48.784 

56.748 

814 

23,337 
15.020 

132.018 
94,413 

1.246,799 



87,275.93 



lbs. 
26,011 



100 
900 



4.825 
2.103.794 



14.017 



2,149.647 



$ c. 

128,978.82 



lbs. 
1,018,219 
108,721 
107,760 
82.444 
184.142 

53.295 
182,024 

33,360 
231.323 

2.001,288 



260.167.44 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1928 



31 



No. 2 

DEPARTMENT, ONTARIO 

of Ontario, for year ending December 31st, 1928 

MENT 



Seine N 


ets 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip and 
Roll Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


Total 
\'alue 


No 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hook 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 








$ 


42 
52 

130 
86 

123 

206 

549 


$ 

12.075 
22.950 
62.900 
150.000 
69,350 

25.455 
317.300 


37 


1.720 




$ 




$ 




$ 


127 
21 
30 
48 
45 

33 
94 

53 
51 


$ 

41,030 
10;455 
15.500 
31.722 
20.150 

13.275 
148,200 

10,695 
10,930 


93 
31 
23 
52 
20 

20 
61 

31 
19 


S 

16,480 

8,140 

25,300 

23.410 

6,550 

3,930 
22,010 

3.602 

2.805 


S 

208,611 








16 


40 






241.082 
















257.706 


7 


1.100 


1.093 


27 


500 






27,389 

12 

3,455 
3.440 

12.810 
5,345 


4.672 
51 

121 
124 

525 
195 


15 


564 


687.952 
387.790 


^0 


5.895 
12,900 

2,315 
6,578 


3,482 
9.896 

1,965 
6.415 


2 
29 

560 

225 


300 
510 

18.510 
7,632 


3 

5 
SO 


11 

505 
374 






63.998 


49 






1,165.762 


H 


73 


570 


293,694 


61 


37 


12.750 


125.933 


160 


28.788 


22.851 


1.225 


672.780 


880 


29,172 


58 


890 


52.467 


5.728 


88 


1.134 


502 


301,957 


350 


112.227 


3.432.528 



Fish Taken 



Sturgeon 


Eels 


Perch 


Tullibee 


Catfish 


Carp 


Mixed 
Coarse 


Caviare 


Total 


Value 


lbs. 
19.677 
1.203 


lbs. 

8.500 
36 

92.366 
21,895 


lbs. 

20.764 

90 

13.437 

4.962 

64.960 

71,980 
4.330.376 

163.415 
23.418 


lbs. 

262.312 
3,737 


lbs. 
129.114 


lbs. 

6.289 

1.031 

166 

54.789 

1.610 

135.587 
214.915 

120,616 
189,035 


lbs. 

224.252 
65.674 
390.736 
190.256 
110,347 

186,056 
1 ,090,646 

334,352 
459,140 


lbs. 
820 

59 

15 

806 

438 
1;734 

20 
519 


lbs. 
3,138.498 
5.400.456 
1.427,786 
3.530.338 
2.839,605 

552,660 
10,295,543 

3.588,629 
2,608,189 


S c. 

315.864 44 
487.733 67 


9.656 




148.574 09 


2,266 
9.544 

11.958 


176.779 
466.891 


4.719 
1.139 

56.159 
53.324 

112,508 
77.845 


422.315 82 
30V.656 50 

37.849 10 


42.381 




692.925 24 


5,777 




348.365.44 


36.735 


120,707 


272.640 12 


139.197 


122,797 


4.693.402 


1,030.426 


434.808 


724.038 


3,051,459 


4,411 


33,381.704 








$ c. 

55.678 80 


$ c. 

9.823 76 


$ c. 

281.604 12 


$ c. 

72.129 82 


$ c. 

34.784 64 


$ c. 

36.201 90 


$ c. 

122.058 36 


$ c. 

4.411 OO 




$ c. 
3.033.924 42 









32 



REPORT UPON GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1928 No. 9 



APPENDIX No. 3 
Comparative Statement of the Yield of the Fisheries of the Province of Ontario 



Kind 



1927 



1928 



Increase 



Decrease 



Herring 

Whitefish 

Trotit 

Pike 

Blue Pickerel. 
Pickerel Dore. 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Coarse Fish . . 
Caviare 

Total 



lbs. 

5,809,919 

6,165,674 

7,497,745 

1,400,130 

3,117,206 

2,116,331 

152,903 

127,003 

2,818,009 

1,551,973 

409,326 

768,658 

2,956,435 

5,663 



lbs. 

5,300,519 

5,823,448 

6,659,465 

1,246,799 

2,149,647 

2,001,288 

139,197 

122,797 

4,693,402 

1,030,426 

434,808 

724,038 

3,051,459 

4,411 



lbs. 



1,875,393 
25,482 
95,024 



lbs. 
509,400 
342,226 
838,280 
153,331 
967,559 
115,043 
13,706 
4,206 

521*547 

44,620 

1,252 



34,896,975 



33,381,704 



*1,515,271 



*Net decrease. 



APPENDIX No. 4 



Statement of the Yield of the Fisheries of the Province of Ontario for the Year 1928 
Compiled from the Fishermen's Annual Returns 



Kind 


Quantity 


Price per 
Pound 


Estimated 
\'alue 


Herring 


lbs. 

5,300,519 

5,823,448 

6,659,465 

1,246,799 

2,149,647 

2,001,288 

139,197 

122,797 

4,693,402 

1,030,426 

434,808 

724,038 

3,051,459 

4,411 


$ c. 

06 
13 
13 
07 
06 
13 
40 
08 
06 
07 
08 
05 
04 

1 00 


$ c. 
318,031 14 


Whitefish 


757,048 24 


Trout 


865,730 45 


Pike 


87,275 93 


Blue Pickerel 


128,978 82 


Pickerel Dore 


260,167 44 


Sturgeon 


55,678 80 


Eels "" 


9,823 76 


Perch 


281,604 12 


Tullibee 


72,129 82 


Catfish 


34,784 64 


Carp 


36,201 90 


Coarse Fish 


122,058 36 




4,411 00 






Total 


33,381,704 




3,033,924 42 







APPENDIX No. 5 
Value of Ontario Fisheries for a Period of Twenty Years, 1909 to 1928, Inclusive. 



Year 

1909. 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 
1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



V^alue 

$ c. 

2,237,544 41 

2,348,269 57 

2.419,178 21 

2,842,877 09 

2,674,686 76 

2,755,293 11 

3,341,181 41 

2,658,992 43 

2,866,424 00 

3,175,110 32 



Year 



Value 



1919 2,721,440 24 

1920 2,691,093 74 



2,656,775 82 

2,807,525 21 

2,886,398 76 

3,139,279 03 

2,858,854 79 

2,643,686 28 

1927 3,229,143 57 

1928 3,033,944 42 



1921. 
1922. 
1923. 
1924. 
1925. 
1926. 



Twenty-Third Annual Report 



OF THE 



GAME AND FISHERIES 
DEPARTMENT 

1929 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 
THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36, 1930 




ONTARIO 



TORONTO: 
Printed and Published by Herbert H. Ball, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

1930 



CONTENTS 



Annual Report 

Game and Fisheries Dept Pages 1 to 40 

Committee Report 

Game Fish Situation Pages 1 to 122 



[3 



To His Honour W. D. Ross, Esq., 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May It Please Your Honour: 

I have the honour to submit herewith, for the information of Your Honour 
and the Legislative Assembly, the Twenty-third Annual Report of the Game 
and Fisheries Department of this Province. 

I have the honour to be, 

Your Honour's most obedient servant, 

C. McCrea, 

Minister of Mines. 
Toronto, 1930. 



4] 



TWENTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Game and Fisheries Department of 

Ontario 



To THE Honourable Charles McCrea, 
Minister of Mines. 

Sir: — I have the honour to place before you this Twenty-third Annual 
Report of the Department of Game and Fisheries of Ontario, covering the 
year 1929. 

Financial 

The subjoined table will show in detail the various sources from which the 
Department derived its revenue during the fiscal year ending October 31st, 
1929. 

• Revenue for Fiscal Year 1929 

ORDINARY 
Game — 

Royalty $110,091 70 

Licenses- 
Trapping $51,190 00 

Non-resident hunting 69,380 00 

Deer 64,983 63 

jMoose 7,458 00 

Gun 29,032 95 

Fur Dealers 48,112 00 

Fur farmers 7,298 50 

Tanners 200 00 

Cold Storage 155 00 

277,810 08 

$387,901 78 

Fisheries — 

Royalty 15,765 12 

Licenses — 

Fishing $112,363 10 

Angling 214,470 25 

326,833 35 

Sales — Spawn taking 3,377 61 

345,976 08 

General — 

Guides Licenses $5,862 00 

Fines 15,193 85 

Costs 1,384 29 

Sales— Confiscated Articles, etc 12,321 68 

Rent 3,933 00 

Commission 3,098 55 

$41,793 37 
Less miscellaneous refunds 715 13 

41,078 24 

Experimental Fur Farm — 

Sale of milk 1 70 

$774,957 80 
CAPITAL 

Experimental Fur Farm — 

Sale of Pelts 417 00 

$775,374 80 

[5] 



THE REPORT UPON No. 36 



The following comparative table outlines the annual revenues and expendi- 
tures of this Department in each of the past five years, 1925 to 1929, as well as 
showing the surplus in the years mentioned: 

Revenue Expenditure Surplus 

1925 $709,455 73 $354,736 09 $354,719 64 

1926 682,063 32 399,744 24 282,319 08 

1927 721,576 25 492,472 88 229,103 37 

1928 733,259 75 518,054 96 215,204 79 

1929 775,374 80 607,835 95 167,538 85 

It will be observed that the year 1929 continued the succession of annually 
increasing revenues, but this increase, while constituting a considerable amount 
in itself, was not sufficient to balance the 1929 increase in expenditure over 1928, 
consequent upon the enlarging activities of the Department in its different 
branches, and more particularly as these activities were affected by the work 
of fish and game propagation and the enforcement of the provisions of the Act 
and Regulations. As a result we find that the surplus this year is very much 
reduced in comparison with the surplus of previous years. 



Statistics 

Appended to this report will be found statistical tables showing in detail 
the varieties and quantities of fry and fingerlings of the various species of fish 
raised in the several Provincial fish hatcheries; as well as the designation and 
location of the waters in which such fry and fingerlings have been deposited. 
In addition there are also statistical tables in connection with the commercial 
fishing industry, the fur trade and other branches of Departmental work. The 
figures in all cases have been very carefully prepared and afford most interesting 
and valuable information. 

Game 

Pursuit of the larger native game animals continued its attraction last 
year, as a perusal of the appended comparative table showing the number of 
hunting licenses issued during the past five years will indicate. 

1925 

Resident Moose 1.291 

Resident Deer 17,034 

Non-resident Hunting 1,581 

In this connection it is interesting to note that reports reaching the Depart- 
ment are to the effect that the majority of these hunters brought their activities 
for the season to a successful conclusion. 

According to reports received from the District Superintendents it appears 
that deer and moose are more than holding their own in the northern and north- 
western portions of the province, while increasing numbers of caribou .n those 
sections would seem to justify the close season on this species which went mto 
effect in 1929. 

Ruffed Grouse (Par/r^Wgc).— Apparently, during 1929, conditions showed 
marked improvement in all sections of the Province and reports are that these 
birds are to be found in considerably increased numbers. 



1926 


1927 


1928 


1929 


1,359 

23,392 

1,698 


1,379 

21,111 

2,237 


1,371 

21,867 

1,721 


1,356 

22,164 
1,975 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1929 



Sharp-tailed Grouse {Prairie Hen). — As in the last annual report, it must 
be said that these birds are confined to the northwestern section of the Province. 
Not much change in conditions, though a little improved. 

Quail. — This species is confined to the southwestern counties. Reports 
are that numbers are not sufficient as yet to warrant a regular open season. 

Ducks. — Continue to make their appearance in sufficient numbers to make 
the hunting of them a source of considerable satisfaction to a large number of 
hunters. 

Pheasaiits {Ring-necked). — This species continues to thrive and increase 
its numbers in the most southerly sections of Ontario and is becoming very 
popular. The propagation of these birds is carried on at the bird farm at 
Eugenia and by interested individuals throughout the Province to whom settings 
of eggs are shipped on application. During 1929, from the Eugenia Bird Farm, 
some 16,000 eggs were shipped for hatchery purposes, practically 1,100 chicks 
were raised to maturity, and 1,345 adult birds liberated. 

Hungarian Partridge. — Accommodation has been prepared at Normandale 
to make provision at that point for the propagation of this species along the 
lines carried on at Eugenia in connection with the ring-necked pheasant. The 
small supply secured by the Department last year was received too late in the 
season to obtain results. 

Furs 

While there was again an increase in the number of pelts on which royalty 
was paid, accounted for by increase in number of muskrat pelts, generally 
speaking conditions aft'ecting our fur bearers showed little, if any, improvement. 
This condition is largely attributable to the intensive trapping carried on in 
the past, but strict enforcement of present regulations and observance by all 
concerned of existing close seasons will assist in the re-establishment of our 
fur-bearing animals. 

Bear. — Catch shows a little increase, possibly accounted for by slightly 
increased prevalence of these animals. 

Beaver. — Catch shows marked decrease. In that section of the Province 
in which close season prevails there is noticeable improvement in the conditions 
affecting this species. Restrictions on the taking of beaver are evidently justified. 

Fisher. — Apparently holding its own even though catch was somewhat 
diminished as compared with previous year. 

Fox. — The annually diminishing catch is an indication that this animal is 
decreasing in numbers. 

L; nx. — Conditions show no improvement. Becoming scarce throughout 
the Province. 

Marten. — As in the case of lynx, this species is becoming very scarce. 

Mink. — Reports are to the effect that numbers of mink are diminishing in 
practically all sections. 



THE REPORT UPON No. 36 



Muskrat. — Remarkable increase in number taken in 1929 as compared 
with previous year does not correctly indicate conditions. Rather than improv- 
ing its position numerically, this species is decreasing. 

Otter. — Catch practically stationary. Similar remarks as applied to beaver 
would apply in this case. Otter are very scarce. 

Raccoon. — This species is no more than holding its own. Catch remained 
stationary. 

Skunk. — Showing improvement in its position, though there was some 
decrease in the catch. 

Weasel. — One of the few species which shows an improved condition as 
evidenced by increased catch. 

The following table compares for the past six years, pelts of fur-bearing 
animals, other than those which were ranch-raised, on which royalty was paid: 

1924 

Bear 1,399 

Beaver 50,233 

Fisher 1,910 

Fox (Cross) 1,082 

Fox (Red) 14,695 

Fox (Silver or Black) 167 

Fox (White) 362 

Fox (not specified) 28 

Lynx 2,332 

Marten 3,661 

Mink 82,466 

Muskrat 533,256 

Otter 5,096 

Raccoon 21,976 

Skunk 58,130 

Weasel 51,163 

Wolverine 12 

Total 827,948 814,935 691,372 723,922 790,886 999,495 

The value of these pelts to the trapper, amounting to $3,719,582.72, is 
somewhat below the 1928 figure, though Ontario continues to lead the Provinces 
of the Dominion as a producer of fur. 

In addition to the above, the total of ranch-raised silver and black foxes, 
dressed or exported, on which no royalty is payable, and which were raised on 
the Hcensed fur farms of the Province, was 5,767; 4,610 of which were exported, 
and the balance of 1,157 were dressed in the Province. These pelts had a 
value of $537,311.39. 

Fur Farming 

A reference to the subjoined table giving the numbers of fur farming licenses 
issued by the Department annually for the past five years, will show that 
activities in this connection during 1929 continued to extend, and as the interest 
of the individual fur farmer becomes more firmly established the success obtained 
in the raising of fur-bearing animals in captivity or semi-captivity is more 
assured. Every fur-bearer, native of the Province, is now included in the list of 
animals being propagated on these farms. 



1925 


1926 


1927 


1928 


1929 


2,014 


1,635 


1,472 


1,575 


1,888 


48,364 


27,597 


20,738 


22,040 


17,348 


1,936 


2,618 


3,904 


5,400 


4,343 


2,601 


4,175 


3,502 


4,116 


1,606 


22,198 


30,535 


26,112 


25,943 


14,550 


433 


620 


403 


646 


197 


974 


226 


977 


590 


16 


61 


165 


136 


160 


132 


2,200 


3,884 


4,568 


3,845 


1,718 


3,125 


3,177 


3,261 


3,492 


2,738 


68,138 


65,299 


37,628 


32,009 


29,893 


534,739 


387,022 


469,947 


514,161 


714,019 


4,522 


4,304 


3,168 


4,510 


4,562 


22,157 


21,002 


15,958 


13,513 


13,653 


67,100 


75,503 


59,488 


79,442 


75,773 


34,365 


63,599 


72,645 


79,425 


117,053 


8 


11 


15 


19 


6 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1929 



Fur farmers' licenses issued by the Department during the past five years 

are as follows: 

1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 

624 783 986 1,148 1,360 

Animals Stocked on Licensed Farms at December 31st 

1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 

Beaver 29 100 142 98 93 

Fisher.' 2 28 48 54 67 

Fitch 

Fox (Cross) 

Fox (Red) 

Fox (Silver Black) 

Fox (Blue) 

Lynx 

Mink 

Muskrat 

Otter 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Bear 

Marten 

Weasel (Ermine) 

Badger 

Total 13,936 *8,887 tl3,345 tl7,686 t24,255 

*Exclusive of Muskrat. 

tExclusive of muskrat and beaver in semi-captivity. 



459 


397 


444 


353 


385 


725 


397 


314 


365 


489 


4,940 


7,095 


9,664 


12,555 


16,457 


40 


49 


56 


60 


107 


2 


3 


2 


6 


5 


136 


468 


826 


1,247 


3,068 


7,182 




1,107 


2,016 


2,163 
2 


'"306 


'290 


'619 


831 


1,337 


100 


49 


91 


62 


22 


13 


4 


7 


13 


13 


2 


7 


21 


20 









4 


2 
4 


37 

7 



Experimental Fur Farm 

Considerable progress was made during the year 1929 in the various lines 
of activity carried on at the Experimental Fur Farm. Silver fox, cross fox 
and red fox, beaver, raccoon, mink and skunk were all successfully bred and 
raised to maturity. The beaver are among the first reported to be bred in 
captivity. The wild life at large on the Farm, including red deer, Canada geese 
and wild ducks, also reared young. 

The Farm this year was in the position to pelt for revenue fifty-seven 
foxes and thirty-nine raccoon, the maximum number of these animals which 
is considered desirable to keep for breeding stock having been retained. Fifty 
pairs of foxes, including red, white, silver and cross fox, are on hand. Raccoon, 
at present pelt prices, would not appear to be a profitable branch of fur farming. 
Feed costs and overhead expenses absorb any profit from the sale of pelts. 

Mink raising is attracting wide-spread attention from all parts of the 
Dominion and is rapidly becoming one of the major branches of research work. 

During the year two pair of marten were added to the stock and will be 
studied in regard to their breeding habits and nutritional requirements. 

Many enquiries are received in connection with muskrats, both for the pen 
and enclosed area type of farming. At the present time, the Farm is not in a 
position to encourage the pen farming of muskrats. Heavy losses in breeding 
stock having been met with due to parasitic infections, which are very commonly 
found in muskrats in the vicinity of the Fur Farm. The enclosed marsh is still 
purely a speculative enterprise, and if overcrowding of the animals takes place, 
disease can be expected to take a serious toll of the muskrat population. 

While the initial construction work connected with the Farm is completed, 
additional fox and mink pens were built to accommodate the increase in young. 
It was also found necessary to extend the laboratory facilities in order to meet 



10 THE REPORT UPON No. 36 

the ever-increasing demand for advanced research with the diseases of fur- 
bearing animals. An exhibition pen and look-out tower were built at the 
entrance to the Farm. The pen contains one specimen of animal of each variety 
kept, so that the general public, other than fur farmers, may have an oppor- 
tunity of observing them and becoming familiar with their characteristics. 

Inbreeding experiments from previous years were carried on with silver 
foxes. It has been found that where brother and sister were mated together 
for the third generation there was a decided decline in prolificacy; the number 
of pups per litter showing a distinct decrease from year to year. On the other 
hand, line-breeding, mother to son, father to daughter, produced exceptionally 
high quality pups. 

Interesting but not conclusive results were obtained in the breeding of cross 
foxes. With red females mated to silver black males variable results were 
obtained. In some cases the progeny were well marked high class cross fox, 
in others the progeny were either red or pointed. In this connection one valuable 
observation has been made, namely, that cross fox trapped in the open invariably 
produce pups with the cross marking when mated either with silvers or red 
foxes. It may be possible through the use of these foxes to establish a true 
breeding strain of fox. These experiments are being carried on and it is hoped 
to establish definite data in this respect within a few years. 

Breeding experiments with mink were confined to general observations on 
their habits and the most satisfactory method of handling them during the 
breeding season. The polygamous system, whereby the male is introduced to 
the female daily until she breeds, is considered more satisfactory than pairing 
them off for the season. Not only can fewer males be kept but definite data 
can be obtained on the breeding qualities of both the male and female. One 
vigorous male mink can mate at least with four females. Some males are timid 
and are frightened if the female is at all vicious. When the polygamous mating 
is used such males can be eliminated with a consequently higher percentage of 
producing females. The gestation period with mink is very irregular, ranging 
from forty-three to sixty-two days with the stock at the Fur Farm. A number 
of the females will accept the male from the eighth to the eleventh day after the 
first mating, consequently it is safer to try them out at this date regardless of 
whether the first mating was successful or not. The females are excellent 
mothers, attending to their young with great care, and if properly handled 
show little fear of the attendant. The breeding season with mink appears to 
commence on the third of March. 

Satisfactory results were obtained with raccoon, thirty-one young were 
born from five breeding females, one raccoon having a litter of eight. It is 
necessary to separate the females before the young are born. Raccoons will 
eat each other's young whenever a chance is provided. One male can be paired 
off with at least four females during the winter. 

Somewhat radical changes from the customary methods of ^'ceding fox 
pups were made this year. The prevalent idea that fresh meat should be 
excluded from the diet of the female when she commences to carry feed to her 
young was entirely disregarded. Under natural conditions the fox would bring 
into the den, rabbits, mice and other small carnivore. Consequently fresh 
meat and small bones would constitute the first meals of the young pup. Follow- 
ing this line of reasoning, the standard ration consisting of raw meat or fish, 
ground bone-meal, raw vegetables and cereals was fed through the entire nursing 
and weaning period to the female. After weaning, the pups were placed on the 
same ration, with the exception that one egg per day for four pups was added. 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1929 11 



The results were highly successful. Not only did the pups develop into strong- 
boned, well-grown foxes, but there was an entire absence of any intestinal 
troubles so common among young fox pups, and which officials at the Experi- 
mental Fur Farm attribute to the over-feeding of semi-liquid feeds, in the 
form of cereals and milk and eggs, and a lack of fresh meat. 

It was definitely established that an over-abundance of the anti-rachitic 
vitamins can produce the very trouble that they are given to prevent, viz., 
ricketts. Eggs, milk and cod oil are all abundant in anti-rachitic substances, 
and should be fed only in small quantities. Eggs have a putrefactive effect 
on the intestines of fox pups and should be mixed with solid feeds. Spectacular 
results were obtained with fox pups suffering from malnutrition through excess 
feeding of soft feeds when they were placed on the standard ration. 

The effect of feeding horse meat during the summer and early fall months 
was carefully compared with the results obtained with beef and beef offal. 
There was no doubt but that the effect was detrimental to the colour of the 
pelt. Foxes which in previous years had shown good, clear colour took on a 
decidedly brown tinge to the fur. It was also noted that when horse meat 
was discontinued, and the rations consisted mainly of beef offal (such as tripe, 
beef hearts and liver), there was decided improvement in the colour of the pelt. 

No critical feeding experiments were attempted with mink. The animals 
were fed the standard ration and raised their young with complete success from a 
nutritional point of view. The young thrived and developed to maturity on 
the same ration. Future experimenting will take place with mink on the effects 
of various combinations of feed on the quality of the fur. 

Mink farmers are frequently corresponding with the Fur Farm regarding 
a dietetic condition. This condition is characterized by swellings of the hind 
legs and profuse urination in the male and female. In all cases the diet is 
defective, in that it does not contain fresh feed, particularly in the winter months. 
By the addition of fresh vegetables, such as canned tomatoes, and small quan- 
tities of yeast, the disease is overcome. 

The investigation of all types of diseases in fur bearing animals takes an 
important place in the work. Routine examinations of feces, post-mortems, 
and treatment of sick animals are rapidly growing. During the spring and 
summer months animals are brought to the Farm daily for a large variety of 
conditions — parasitic infestations, broken legs, obstetrical operations, wounds 
and a number of the more common organic diseases, such as pneumonia and 
all classes of gastro-intestinal disturbances. Research on the use of board 
floors for the eradication of the internal parasites was continued. It was 
definitely shown that the use of well-drained board-floored pens is of the utmost 
value in eradicating the lung worm in pups. Pups born from parents both of 
which are ir ""ected with the disease, do not become infected if born on the board 
floor pen. It has also a noticeable effect on the hook" worm, but is not effective 
against the round worm. The grossest infections of lung and hook worm are 
found in foxes run on grass-bottomed pens. The grass and loose state of the 
earth created an ideal environment for the development of the eggs of the 
parasite to the infective stage. It has been noted that the bladder worm is 
apparently increasing in Ontario foxes and further work is needed to find a 
measure to control this menace. 

For the first time, two well-defined cases of tuberculosis were found in 
foxes. The fox has always been considered more or less immune to this disease. 



12 THE REPORT UPON No. 36 

The internal parasites continue to be the main source of mortality with 
fur-bearing animals. Practically no animals trapped in the wilds appear to be 
free from them. Different species have been identified in the fox, mink, 
lynx, raccoon, fisher, beaver, wolf and muskrat. 

The mink is much subject to the trematode species and no doubt becomes 
infested through his aquatic habits. Fish and snails are probably the inter- 
mediate host of a number of mink parasites. Three different species of treraa- 
todes have been identified in the mink. One new species, the Parametorchis 
canadaensis, was discovered at the Fur Farm. This species is found in the gall- 
bladder. The Plagiorchis proximus is found in the duodenum. A very small 
trematode which appears to be related to the salmon poisoning fluke, Nano- 
phyetus salmincola, is found in the small intestines. A worm of microscopic 
proportions of the Capillaria sp., and a new species of tapeworm, not as yet 
named, are also found in the small intestines. Two worms of particular interest, 
one of the Dioctophyme renale, and one of the Oslerus, or a related form, have 
been found in mink. The Dioctophyme renale inhabits the kidney and causes 
large deposits of bony substances in that organ. This worm is particularly 
destructive. The Oslerus infests the pulmonary veins and has a peculiar knot- 
like structure and seems to adhere firmly to the outer membrane of the vein. 

With the muskrat, two types of flukes, intestinal and liver, are very com- 
monly found. The Echinostomum coalitum infests the intestines and is 
found in enormous quantities. One interesting parasite infesting the muskrat 
are larval cestodes, found in the peritoneal cavity of the Taenia sp. The 
Cysticercus fascolaris, the larval form of taenia Taeniaeformis, is commonly 
met with, also H. evaginata. 

Ascaris sp. have been identified in the raccoon, also the immature form 
of the Physaloptera sp. 

In the lynx, Toxocaris mystax, the round worm of the cat, was found. 

Two trematodes, of the species Echinostoma and Hemistomum, were 
found in the fisher. 

Platypsyllus castoris, a type of parasitic beetle, was removed from beaver. 

Crown Game Preserves 

Following is a list giving description, location and area of the Crown Game 
Preserves in Ontario as at December 31st, 1929: 

Crown Game Preserve Location Acreage 

Abbey Dawn Frontenac County 300 

Anderdon Township Essex County 1,200 

Bobcaygeon Victoria and Peterborough Counties 1,700 

Boyd York County 300 

Caverly Elgin County 25 

Chapleau Algoma and Sudbury Districts 1,824,000 

Chippewa Thunder Bay District 2,728 

Conroy Marsh Renfrew County ooo 

Darlington Durham County 298 

Dumfries Waterloo and Brant Counties 7cn 

Dundas Marsh Wentworth County ^'I^n 

Eden Wellington County 1 .*70 

Eugenia Grey County if nnn 

Falcon Kenora District ^^'.rl 

Glendale Wentworth County. 

Glen Elm Halton County 

Gloucester Carleton County . . . 

Hiawatha Algoma District. 



450 
325 
200 
160 



Hope Durham County 1,920 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1929 13 

Crown Game Preserve Location Acreage 

Hughes Bruce County 400 

Huron Huron County 1 ,000 

Innisfree Simcoe County 400 

Iroquois Manitoulin District 150 

Loch Garry Glengarry County 6,400 

Mallard Lake Grey County 100 

Marmora Hastings County 10,300 

Masonville Middlesex County 6,500 

Meadowvale Peel County 300 

Miner Essex County 1,280 

Nipissing Nipissing District 155,500 

Nopiming Renfrew and Carleton Counties 1,540 

Nottawasaga Simcoe County 1,200 

Peasemarsh Grey County 300 

Peel Peel County 2,400 

Proton Grey County 6,240 

Puslinch Wellington County 704 

Richmond Parry Sound District 56 

Rockcliffe Park Carleton County 500 

Shirley Bay Carleton County 2,700 

Silver Lake Norfolk County 3,100 

Southwold Elgin County 200 

Sudbury Sudbury District. . 15,500 

Superior Thunder Bay District 575,000 

Township 82 Sudbury District 5,760 

Toronto Township Peel County 3,000 

Wilder Lake Grey County 4,000 

York York County 115,000 



Total 2,805,856 

Of these Crown Game Preserves, the following were established during 
the year reported upon: Mallard Lake, Caverly, Toronto Township, x'\bbey 
Dawn, Rockcliffe Park, Nipissing, Shirley Bay, Proton and Anderdon Town- 
ship, while the boundaries of the Wilder Lake and Peel preserves which had 
previously existed were extended. The Pickering Crown Game Preserve, 
located in the county of Ontario, ceased to exist. 

The objects for which these Game Preserves are established are most 
commendable, and their existence is having a very beneficial effect on conserva- 
tion and propagation of game animals and birds in the districts in which they 
are located. The Department regards with satisfaction the general observance 
of the Regulations in this connection and the increasing interest of the public 
in the creation of additional Game Preserves in order that the wild life of the 
Province may be provided with some adequate means of sanctuary for its pro- 
tection. 

Wolf Bounties 

During 1929 the Department received applications for the payment of 
bounty on 3,588 wolves, which it will be noted was considerably less than the 
number received in the previous year. As usual the large majority of the 
applications had their origin for animals taken in the extreme northwestern 
section of the Province. 

Comparative Statement of Wolf Skins Received and Bounties Paid 

For fiscal ye^ .nding October 31st, 1925. 
For fiscal yeix. ending October 31st, 1926. 
For fiscal year ending October 31st, 1927. 
For fiscal year ending October 31st, 1928. 
For fiscal year ending October 31st, 1929. 



Timber 


Brush 


Pups 


Total 


Bounties 


831 


1,066 


21 


1,918 


$25,465 62 


1,022 


2,690 


107 


3,819 


51,994 42 


1,041 


4,414 


59 


5,514 


82,970 07 


1,231 


4,878 


64 


6,173 


91,297 27 


1,165 


2,389 


34 


3,588 


53,495 13 



14 ' THE REPORT UPON No. 36 

Enforcement of the Act and Regulations 

The enforcement of the provisions and regulations of the Ontario Game 
and Fisheries Act was performed in a very satisfactory manner by the field 
officers charged with the work. The service rendered by the District Superin- 
tendents and the Overseers under their respective jurisdictions was capably 
augmented during the Spring and Fall spawning, and deer hunting seasons, by 
numerous seasonal overseers appointed for duty during their periods for the 
better protection of fish and game and enforcement of the Act. 

In this connection we would like to make reference to the services along 
these lines which are rendered by the Deputy Game and Fishery Wardens. 
Last year there were 265 such appointments granted to public-spirited citizens, 
interested in the conservation of our wild life and the observance of the legis- 
lative provisions and regulations. These Deputy Game Wardens act without 
remuneration and perform their services in an unselfish manner in order to 
render whatever help they may to maintain the wild life resources of the 
Province. In practically all cases their assistance has been valuable in pro- 
moting the objects of our legislation. 

In 972 cases in which parties were charged with violations of fish and game 
regulations, convictions were secured. Fines and costs in these cases amounted 
to $16,949.05. 

In 1,102 cases, seizures of goods and equipment were made, which sum- 
marized may be set forth as follows: 

Pelts 1,942 Fire-arms 331 

Deer and Moose hides 10 Gasoline boats 8 

Live animals 38 Row boats 14 

Fish (lbs.) 5,612 Canoes 4 

Gill nets (pieces) 681 Punts 10 

(yards) 1,972 Motor cars 7 

Dip nets 20 Jack lights and lanterns 13 

Hood nets 12 Deer and Moose 12 

Seine nets 18 Venison (lbs.) 400 

Pound nets 3 Moose Meat (lbs.) 280 

Trap nets 4 Partridges . . 45 

pjooks 3,306 Geese and ducks o4 

Grapples' and gaffs.' 4 Pheasants 23 

Spears 58 Decoys y^J 

Rods and lines 80 Frogs' legs (lbs.) 25 

Traps 1.191 Miscellaneous 62 

In accordance with the usual practice, confiscated articles were disposed of 
by tender at sales which were given publicity through the medium of the press 
and our district offices, except in those cases in which the confiscated articles 
were sold to the former owner where the circumstances warranted. The amount 
received from these sales appears in the statement of revenue which appears at 
the commencement of this report. 

Report of the Fish Culture Branch 

During the past year a new branch of the Department of Game and Fisheries, 
known as the Biological and Fish Culture Branch, was created. This new 
departure will unify the biological and fish cultural activities of the Depart- 
ment by bringing together the more practical and scientific lines of endeavour 
so that it may be possible to apply scientific findings or the results of biological 
inquiries to the fish cultural activities of our hatcheries. 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1929 15 



The functions of the Branch pertain to all matters, either directly or indi- 
rectly, related to fish culture and the fisheries of Ontario. 

The biological field work is done during the summer months when graduates 
and undergraduates of our provincial universities in good standing, (that is, 
with the necessary background for fisheries' investigations), may be drawn 
into the service to work on various freshwater fishery problems. A limited 
number of qualified men is available each year from the Department of Biology, 
University of Toronto. Queen's University, Kingston, and the University of 
Western Ontario, London, are also developing their departments of biology 
along similar lines and, although available qualified men are scarce at present, 
each year there is a decided improvement and this is largely due, probably, to 
the possibilities offered in this line of work. Men who have gained experience 
with the Department in connection with biological investigations are encouraged 
to continue the following year or years. 

In addition to the permanent stafiF of the Branch, which consists of a 
Director, who is also Chief Biologist, a Hatchery Supervisor, or practical fish 
culturist, and two assistant biologists (temporary appointments), the personnel 
of the field staff was as follows: Professor J. D. Detwiler, Associate Professor 
of Zoolog\% University of Western Ontario, London; Messrs. G. Adams, M.A., 
Honour Biology- and Chemistry, Queen's University, '29; W. H. R. Werner, 
M.A., Biology, Western University, '29; A. E. AUin, B.A., Biology and Medicine, 
University of Toronto, '29; S. J. Bochner, B.A., Biology and Medicine, Uni- 
versity of Toronto, '29; H. J. Dignan, B.A., Honour Biology, University of 
Toronto, '29; E. O. Ebersole, B.A., Biology and Chemistry, Queen's University, 
'29; A. H. Louden. B.A., Biology and Chemistry, Queen's University, '29; 
D. C. G. MacKay, B.A., Biology, Queen's University, '29; Roy F. Cain, Third 
year. Biology, University of Toronto; W. L. Dibbon, third year, General Science, 
University of Toronto; P. L. MacLachlan, third year. Honour Biology and 
Chemistry, Queen's University; W. R. Cameron, second year, Biology and 
Medicine, University of Toronto; H. J. Perkin, second year, PhysiologA- and 
Biochemistry, University of Toronto; J. Savage, second year. Honour Biology, 
University of Toronto. 

Biological Surveys — General: 

In order to regulate our game and commercial fishing and to improve the 
fishing, and after all the only argument which will be instrumental in changing 
the views opposed to such regulation will be the practical one of more and better 
fish, it is absolutely necessary for us to know the conditions, (physical, chemical 
and biological), under which fish of all species five and thrive. The required 
knowledge is made possible to some extent at least by biological surveys of 
waters, which give us a clue to the fish best adapted to the waters, according to 
known criteria, either physical, chemical or biological. Such studies will help to 
increase our knowledge regarding the most suitable places to plant fish and the 
means we might adopt to maintain good fishing. The latter necessitates studies 
regarding size limits, which involve special studies of rate of growth, maturity 
and spawning conditions. 

Furthermore, a knowledge of the entire life history of all species of fish is 
necessar\^ for the best results in the culture of these species, either naturally or 
artificially. When we know conditions under which eggs, fry, fingerlings, 
yearlings and adults live, our problems in connection with fish culture will 



16 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 36 



be much easier than they are to-day. Life history studies form a part of the 
schedule of studies of fisheries' research departments of our universities. 

During the past year the work of the investigators was organized according 
to districts which are supervised by District Superintendents. 

The number of waters investigated in the Province to date from the stand- 
point of their limnobiology and suitability for fish of various species is as follows: 



Biological Surveys of Waters 



Algoma 


32 


Leeds 

Lennox and Addington . 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 


4 


Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

DufTerin 


7 

30 

1 

5 


. 7 
2 
3 
6 


Durham 

Elgin 

Frontenac 


17 

7 

43 


63 

'?1 


Norfolk 

Northumberland 

Ontario 


11 


Glengarry 

Grey , 

Haldimand 

Haliburton , 


1 

28 

1 

56 


26 
10 


Oxford 

Parry Sound 


14 
S4 


Halton 

Hastings 


12 

27 


Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Prince Edward 


4 
4 


Kenora 

Lambton 

Lanark 


11 

2 

6 


32 
2 



Rainy River 9 

Renfrew 29 

Simcoe 66 

Sudbury 28 

Temiskaming 11 

Thames Watershed ... . 472 

Thunder Bay 26 

Victoria 10 

Waterloo 14 

Welland 3 

Wellington 6 

Wentworth 4 

York 3 

Huron 3 

Total 1,233 



The progress made in connection with these surveys may be better under- 
stood by the following comparisons: 



Number of waters Number of 



Year 
1925... 
1926... 
1927... 
1928... 
1929... 



studied 


Investigators 


21 


1 


58 


2 


233 


5 


707 


9 


214 


18 



1,233 



The apparent drop between 1928 and 1929 is due to two factors. In the 
first place 472 waters of the Thames watershed were included in the 1928 total, 
and in 1929 the waters of the Grand River watershed were omitted, since only 
meagre and preliminary surveys were made. Furthermore, there has been a 
development of more specialized study apart from general biological surveys. 
The more specialized studies are described later. The number of investigators 
also affected the results, but this does not apply in 1928 and 1929, since groups 
of two worked together in connection with general biological surveys. 

Biological Surveys — Particular: 
Lake Erie: 

The survey of the eastern end of Lake Erie commenced in 1928, under 
the joint auspices of the United States Bureau of Fisheries, the New York State 
Conservation Department, the Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences, the State of 
Ohio, and the Department of Game and Fisheries of the Province of Ontario, 
was extended this year to include the entire lake. In this connection the 
Department supplied a competent investigator, Mr. A. H. Louden, B.A., of 
Queen's University, Kingston, to study more particularly the fishes of the lake 
past the larval stages, since studies in connection with prelarval stages were 
being undertaken by another investigator in connection with the same survey. 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1929 17 

Provision was made for liberal facilities in the museum of Natural Sciences at 
Buffalo, and the "Shearwater," the boat used, was equipped with fairly adequate 
laboratory facilities, which permitted a great deal of work to be done on board. 
Mr. Louden studied the post-larval stages of the fish, their distribution and 
economic importance, both from the marketable standpoint and as food for 
other fish. Forty-seven different species of fish were identified and eighty-six 
stomachs of the different species taken were analyzed for food composition. 

In a summary at the end of his report Mr. Louden makes the following 
remarks : 

"1. The work of two summers has proven that the lake as a whole is 
remarkably free from pollution. There are isolated regions, harbours, etc., 
where pollution does occur, but nowhere in the 'open' lake is objectionable 
pollution found and the cry of the general populace, that the lake has been 
polluted by industrial waste, sewage, etc., is absolutely unfounded. 

"2. Knowing that the chemistry of Lake Erie is the normal chemistry of 
lake water, it is not a surprising feature that plankton is prolifically abundant. 

"Substantiating the findings of the previous summer and extending them 
over the entire lake, we found that, while the fish supply has diminished, the 
food supply has not, and that Lake Erie is easily capable of supporting a much 
larger fish fauna than now exists. 

"3. Why then has there been such a rapid decline in Lake Erie Fisheries? 

"Undoubtedly, the trouble can be traced and is still applicable to the 
fishermen themselves. I have talked with active and retired fishing boat captains 
in every port on the lake and with their men, and I find that 80 per cent, of 
them are honest enough to admit that they have themselves to blame. One 
has but to listen to accurate tales of tons of fish brought in by a single fishing 
tug, of which only a small percentage ever reached the market, of the wholesale 
burning of herring in the early days as a source of fertilizer, and of the long- 
continued practice of 'capture by any method,' but never think of preservation, 
to readily see that regardless of its phenomenal productivity, and ideal con- 
ditions. Lake Erie was doomed. 

"Obviously, the only thing that can save the situation is 'uniform legis- 
lative action'." 

Uniform Regulations on the Great Lakes: 

Regarding uniform regulations on Lake Erie in particular, and the Great 
Lakes in general, a third Great Lakes Fisheries Conference was held at Lansing, 
Michigan, December 5th, 1928, in response to a call issued by Governor Fred 
\V. Green. Representatives of the Federal Bureau of Fisheries at Washington^ 
D.C., the States of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, New York, Ohio, and Wisconsin, 
the Department of Game and Fisheries of Ontario and the Department cf 
Marine and Fisheries of Canada, met in the executive office at Lansing, 
Michigan, for the purpose of discussing uniform regulations by lakes for the 
protection of the fishing industry on the Great Lakes. 

The discussion included the following subjects: 

Size limits on fish, species of fish protected, closed seasons, mesh of gill 
nets, mesh of pound nets, methods of measuring mesh, statistics, reversion 
of legal weight into legal length after satisfactory biological studies, reviews of 
biological studies for the year. 

The outcome of these conferences has been the development of a better 
understanding among the various states of the United States and the Province 



18 THE REPORT UPON No. 36 

of Ontario, since each was in a position to explain its requirements and views. 
A certain amount of sacrifice is required on the part of all the fishermen involved, 
if the fishing industry is to be maintained, and the majority, it is believed, 
recognize this fact. 

Long Point Bay, Lake Erie: 

In addition to the activities of the Branch in connection with the Lake 
Erie Fisheries' Survey this year, a temporary fisheries' research laboratory 
was established at Port Dover, a port of considerable importance from the 
standpoint of commercial fishing. The field laboratory was established primarily 
for the purpose of making an intensive study of the limnobiology of Long Point 
Bay. These studies resulted in the capture and identification of fifty different 
species of fish inhabiting the bay, their abundance, age, sex, measurements, 
food, and the general limnology of their habitat. Knowing certain conditions 
at least, the Department is in a better position to regulate both game and com- 
mercial fishing carried on there. 

Biological Survey of Trent River Watershed: 

One of the field parties spent an entire summer making a biological survey 
of the chain of lakes included in that part of the Trent Canal System from 
Lake Simcoe to Lake Ontario as follows: Balsam Lake, Cameron Lake, 
Sturgeon Lake, Pigeon Lake, Buckhorn Lake, Deer Bay, Upper and Lower 
Stony Lake, Clear Lake, Trent River, Crow Bay, and Percy Reach. 

From two to five days were spent on each body of water in the chain and 
during three weeks in September a more intensive study of Stony Lake was 
made, especially the upper part. 

The general plan of study was similar to that used in limnobiological 
studies described in the report for 1928. 

Grand River Watershed: 

A very general survey of the Grand River System was made, as a point 
of departure for more intensive biological studies next year. 

Fishways: 

This year a systematic examination of obstructions along many of our 
water courses was made, in order to determine whether the present fishways are 
suitable or desirable and what steps should be taken to correct existing conditions 
injuriously affecting fish life. Before erecting a fishway, the height of the dam 
or obstruction must be considered, and also the possibility of a suitable location 
for the same. The standard fishway used by the Department appears, from the 
observations of our field men to be suitable. The feasibility of a fishway depends 
not only on the height of the obstruction, whether natural or artificial, but also 
on the importance and value of the migratory species in the stream. The 
available spawning and feeding grounds for migratory species, both above and 
below an obstruction, must be considered also, in determining the desirability 
of introducing a fishway. 

Streams containing rainbow trout should not be obstructed, since they 
have a tendency to migrate downstream from smaller streams to the deeper 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1929 19 



net portions of rivers, and into larger lakes while immature, but they return to 
the smaller streams to spawn, hence the necessity of keeping such streams free 
from obstructions. 

On the other hand, providing the upper reaches of a system are well supplied 
with speckled trout and are separated by an obstruction, natural or otherwise, 
from the lower warmer reaches containing only coarse fish, it is not feasible 
to run the risk of infesting the trout waters with the coarser varieties of fish 
by opening up a fishway through the obstruction. 

Fish Measurements: 

Considerable work is being done in connection with measurements of 
fish, particularly commercial varieties, in order to convert "legal weight" into 
terms of "legal length." It is necessary to take thousands of measurements 
for each species at different periods of the year, their age, sex, sexual maturity, 
etc., in order to arrive at a fair and undisputed standard. In this connection, 
it has been found that a standard length used for a species in one of the Great 
Lakes, or, in one inland lake where commercial fishing is carried on, is not true for 
the same species of the same age in a different lake. In other words, the rates 
of growth of the same species differ in different lakes. 

Fish Tagging: 

Six hundred and thirty-five Lake Erie fish have been tagged including 
steelhead trout, whiefish, herring, white bass, yellow pickerel, blue pickerel, 
and small-mouthed black bass, in order to study their movements, distribution 
and rates of growth. 

The tag, which is non-corrosive metal No. 3, is stamped on one side with 
the letters O.D.G.F. "Ontario Department (of) Game (and) Fisheries" and on 
the other with a serial number. 

During the tagging process, the fish, which is preferably of illegal size, is 
retained in fresh water in a tank of convenient size in which to work on board 
boat. The tank has the bottom or sides, or both, marked off in inches and 
fractions thereof in order that the length of the fish tagged may be easily obtained 
and also its depth in inches. In order to determine the age of the fish tagged, 
two or three scales are removed from that portion of the body ventral to the 
dorsal fin, and the area from which the scales are removed is bathed with a 
solution of potassium permanganate. The weight of the fish is determined and 
it is then released. 

By means of a circular letter the Canadian fishermen on Lake Erie have 
been informed regarding the methods to be adopted in making returns to the 
Department. A few returns have been made, but it is too premature to make a 
pronouncement regarding the results of these experiments. 

Pollution: 

Studies in connection with pollution require more specialized and intensive 
work. During the past year very little was done in this direction excepting 
investigations of local disturbances at Lindsay, Bridgeport, Owen Sound, and 
general observations made in the Spanish, Mattagami and Wabigoon rivers, 
during biological surveys. However, preliminary surveys help appreciably in 



20 THE REPORT UPON No. 36 

bringing untoward conditions regarding pollution of our lakes and streams to 
the notice of the Department and lead to more intensive studies and corrective 
measures. 

Pound- Netting: 

The subject of pound-netting, on which there has been considerable dis- 
cussion and controversy between gill net fishermen on one hand and pound net 
fishermen on the other, was studied particularly in the vicinity of Rondeau, 
Lake Erie, where experimental nets with meshes in the backs of the cribs, ranging 
in size from 1^ inches to 33^ inches, have been run throughout the summer. 
In addition, the methods employed by the fishermen in their operation of pound 
nets were studied along the entire north shore of the lake. 

To be ideal the crib of a pound net should have a mesh sufficiently large 
to allow all immature fish to escape. Such a condition also reduces the extent 
to which such fish are handled during the sorting process. It is not unreasonable 
to believe that if the above conditions are met, the mortality among the immature 
fish will be greatly reduced. However, it has been found that a large mesh in 
the crib gills a certain proportion of marketable fish which reduces their value 
to the fishermen, and that in some instances fish of legal size may escape through 
the meshes. At least another season's experimentation with nets is necessary 
before final recommendations can be made regarding the mesh or meshes of 
netting in the crib, in order to be satisfactory from most, if not from all angles. 

Coarse Fish and Hoop-Netting: 

The advisability of taking coarse fish from our waters requires a lengthy 
discussion, but an answer to the wholesale destruction of predatory fish resolves 
itself to this — if these fish are not interdependent with game fish, either directly 
or indirectly, or exist in such abundant numbers that it appears impossible 
for game fish to re-establish themselves, a reduction in the number of coarse 
fish is considered a wise policy. One reason for granting hoop net licenses is 
to help, theoretically, in maintaining a balance between game fish and coarse fish. 

Certain fish like the gar-pike and dog-fish are of little value as food and 
are known to eat the more useful kinds. However, it is not wise to condemn 
any species without exact knowledge. An interdependence exists among 
the different forms of life in lakes or streams, which cannot be overlooked. 
For example, the species of minnow, namely, the golden shiner (Notemigonus 
crysoleucas) provides food for the black bass from the lime the bass is large 
enough to eat fish. In fact, this species is used in the culture of bass in the 
United States, and this year we have made its culture an adjunct to our hatcheries. 
Nevertheless, if a nest is left unguarded by a bass which may wander temporarily 
from its nest, the golden shiner has been known to approach the nest and eat 
deposited spawn. This knowledge, however, would not lead us to exterminate 
the valuable food of the bass which this species of minnow provides. The 
same principle applies to the value of the immature sucker as food for pike, 
pickerel and bass. 

Considerable criticism has come from anglers in regard to the operation 
of hoop nets in certain of our waters, and this led to a study of the effect of 
hoop-netting on game fish in the waters of the Rideau System and Lake Ontario. 

Initial studies have not shown that hoop-netting as such interferes with 
our game fish before the first of May when the latter commence to move into 
shallow water. These studies were supplemented by statistics collected from hoop- 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1929 21 



fishermen throughout the Province regarding the composition of the daily 
catch by species, weight, etc. The information sought was outlined in the 
Annual Report of the Department of Game and Fisheries for 1928. Although 
there was some opposition, the assistance rendered by government overseers in 
explaining the forms and purpose of the information helped considerably to 
allay any suspicions or fears. 

Studies in connection with hoop-netting are being extended to include a 
study of the spawning period of all species, the interdependence of coarse fish 
with game fish, and the most satisfactory mesh of netting to use which will 
protect the fish requiring protection. The ultimate aim of studies along these 
lines is to serve commercial and game fishing interests compatible with the 
principles of conservation. Such studies may show where the fishermen may 
fish with impunity and to advantage. 

Hatcheries: 

Our hatchery policy is a progressive one and has grown as a result of the 
need to replenish lakes and streams in order to supplement the work of 
nature in maintaining good fishing. 

In 1926 the Province had six hatcheries devoted to the propagation of 
both game and commercial fish, and in that year eight additional hatcheries 
located in the Province under the control of the Dominion, and used exclusively 
for the propagation of commercial fish, were taken over. Provincial hatcheries, 
under provincial jurisdiction, were the first to go into the propagation of game 
fish intensively. Our holdings now include fifteen hatcheries, all of which may 
be used for propagation of one or more of the following species — speckled trout, 
rainbow trout, brown trout, bass, lake trout, pickerel, whitefish, and herring. 
In addition, temporary hatcheries have been in operation in connection with the 
artificial propagation of maskinonge. 

Fish culture is a highly technical problem. By means of biological studies 
and experimentation, we are endeavouring by increments to make a careful 
study of each step in the process from the time the spawn and milt are taken 
until the fish are liberated in suitable waters. There is, after that, the infinitely 
important study, namely, the question of survival. In this connection, some 
work was done by Mr. H. C. White, while in the employ of the Biological Board 
of Canada, and the following significant statements were published in "A Pre- 
liminary Report on Trout Investigations in Forbes Brook in 1925 and 1926" 
in the Contributions to Canadian Biology and Fisheries, 1927, regarding survival 
and the method of seining for recovering the planted fry. 

"Although a survival of only 27.5 per cent, is shown by the experiment on 
this creek, undoubtedly with improved methods in the planting, a much higher 
percentage might have been obtained with the same fry. 

"In 1926 an attempt was made to expose equal numbers of fry to single 
classes of enemies or competitors. Four sections of Forbes brook were selected 
and screened with fine meshed screen. These sections were then seined to 
remove all the fish, but care had to be taken to conserve as much as possible 
the natural condition of the stream and the food organisms. 

"Seining under such conditions is far more difficult than where it is not 
necessary to take such precaution, and I think could not be carried out with 
any degree of thoroughness except in specially favourable portions of a stream." 

The entire problem requires considerably more experimentation, both 
intensively and extensively, under natural conditions or as near to natural 
conditions as possible for all species of fish handled. 



22 THE REPORT UPON No. 36 

Our own skilled hatchery officers collect spawn to a large extent in suitable 
fields and their work is carefully organized in advance. Commercial fishermen 
also collect spawn and are supplied with the necessary equipment and instructions 
regarding spawning methods, by the managers of hatcheries in the vicinity of 
the fishing grounds. 

This year, a survey was made in regard to the methods used by the various 
fishermen, in connection with the spawning of whitefish in Lake Erie, and 
these methods were checked with the actual hatch. The percentage of fertile 
eggs sent in by each fishery was as follows: 63, 62.5, 53, 45, 75, 40, 50, 7, 39. 
The 39 per cent, was from fish taken in gill nets and the remainder from pound 
nets. In almost every case the method of spawning was reflected in the 
results. 

It is relatively an easy matter to rear fish up to the feeding stage, but 
from the time fish commence to feed trouble begins. It is then that losses 
commence to be apparent, and in this connection there is no factor apart from 
the water supply of such importance as food. Trouble in rearing fish, providing 
the water supply is satisfactory, can be traced to improper diet. Fish culturists 
are far from reaching a universal agreement regarding what constitutes the most 
satisfactory diet for trout, but our knowledge is rapidly improving and when 
biologists, biochemists and physiologists combine to attack the problem, more 
exact information will be forthcoming. Considerations regarding food supply 
of fish involve cost, supply available, palatability and the health and vigour 
produced in the fish. Our own experience has shown that beef liver excels all 
other fresh meat foods in the diet of small fingerling trout, and that the cheaper 
products, namely sheep's plucks, pig liver, etc., may be fed satisfactorily to 
larger fish. 

During the summer Professor J. D. Detwiler, Associate Professor of 
Zoolog>', University of Western Ontario, commenced a study of the relative 
importance of fresh meat, fish, and foods of animal and vegetable origin in the 
diet of trout. 

Speckled Trout: 

By consulting the records on the distribution of speckled trout for the 
year, it will be observed that there is a decrease in the total number planted, 
but by considering the class of fish distributed, the difference is more than 
compensated for, and this is shown by the following comparison : 

Speckled Trout Distribution 
1928 vs. 1929 

Eyed Eggs Fry Fingerlings Yearlings Adults 

(1 inch to 4K inches) 

1928 60,000 475,000 1,134,600 200 

1929 30,000 1,105,750 28,860 2,572 

Furthermore, at the time of writing there is on hand at the Normandale 
and Mount Pleasant hatcheries a stock of approximately 90,000 yearlings, which 
is the product of fingerlings retained in rearing ponds from the spring of 1929. 
Losses among these at the Mount Pleasant hatchery amounted to less than 
one per cent, and at the Normandale Trout ponds the losses were insginificant. 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1929 23 



The location of deep-seated springs in the vicinity of the Mount Pleasant 
ponds may undoubtedly lead to the possibility of retaining speckled trout in 
suitably constructed raceways or rearing ponds to the advanced fingerling and 
yearling stages. 

The Fish Culture Branch has experienced a record year as regards the 
collection of speckled trout eggs. From our collecting field on Lake Nipigon 
in the neighbourhood of one million eggs were taken. In addition to this over 
six million eggs were collected from well-matured parent fish at Normandale 
Trout Ponds. 

Rainbow Trout: 

The distribution of this species for the year amounted to 35,030 fingerhngs. 
At the time of writing there is on hand approximately 19,000 which is the product 
of fingerlings retained in rearing ponds from the spring of 1929. Losses among 
these at the Mount Pleasant hatchery amounted to approximately 12 per cent. 

The parent stock are provided with a suitable natural pond in the lower 
waters of Normandale Creek, and a spawning tank has been provided at the 
inlet to the pond. The water in the lower Normandale hatchery has been 
found satisfactory for the rearing of rainbow trout to the fingerling stage, but 
unsatisfactory' for speckled trout on account of high summer temperatures. 

The Branch anticipates, providing the collection of eggs from our domesti- 
cated stock is successful, that more extensive plants of this species may be 
made in our waters. Their introduction, however, must be carefully controlled. 

Brown Trout: 

The success in rearing brown trout at Mount Pleasant hatchery is decidedly 
promising. This foreign species adapts itself to waters having temperatures 
which are too high for the satisfactory growth and development of speckled 
trout, and this is probably one reason for the success resulting at Mount Pleasant. 

During the year a total of 2,590 adult brown trout were planted in Big 
Clear Lake, Frontenac; Eagle Lake, Peterborough; Nepahwin Lake, Sudbury; 
and Muskoka Lake, Muskoka District. The success of the introduction of 
this foreign species to these waters will be checked closely. 

Prior to the development of biological surveys, very few plants of speckled 
trout were made in the County of Frontenac. Biological surveys, however, 
have led to experimentation along this line. In 1926 Clear Lake Creek (Kellar's 
Creek), a tributary of Big Clear Lake, was stocked with 4,000 speckled trout 
fry, for the first time. Trout were not formerly native to this stream. The 
original plant in Big Clear Lake Creek was a success and quite a number of 
legal-sized trout was caught this year. However, the tributary and outlet 
streams of the lake are more suitable for brown trout on account of the fact 
that optimum conditions for speckled trout prevail only at the headwaters. 

The results of biological surveys carried on by the State of New York, 
over a period of years, tend to show that it is possible to extend the fishing 
possibilities in streams by the introduction of brown trout to those sections 
which are no longer suitable for speckled trout on account of high water 
temperatures, during the summer months, which are outside the optimum 
conditions for speckled trout. Brown trout were rarely encountered in streams 
having temperatures below 65°F. and occurred in greatest abundance in water 
having a temperature range between 68°F. and 75°F, according to New York 



24 THE REPORT UPON No. 36 

surveys on the Genesee River system. It may be possible ^hen to extend the 
fishing range for trout in many waters in the Province of Ontario for the above 
reasons. The Fish Culture Branch, however, will not introduce brown trout 
into waters distinctly suited throughout their entire course for speckled trout, 
and the introduction of brown trout to our waters will be strictly controlled. 
The results of a number of plantings will have to be known before we shall be 
in a position to make a pronouncement regarding a definite stocking policy. 

No extensive plants have been made with this species, but with the parent 
stock on hand and the success of this year's collection of eggs, which was in 
the neighbourhood of 900,000, more extensive plantings are assured. 

Changes in the Kenora Fish Hatchery this year may permit of the rearing 
of brown trout fry to be distributed in suitable waters in the districts of Kenora 
and Rainy River. This work, however, is in the experimental stage only since 
in these districts trout streams are either non-existent or almost negligible. 

Maskinonge: 

The artificial propagation of maskinonge will be continued, and we expect 
better success when more spawners and milters are obtainable simultaneously 
on localized spawning grounds. So far only subsidiary or temporary hatcheries 
have been operated in the Pigeon River at Omemee, and at the entrance to 
Sturgeon Lake on the Scugog River. 

Small-mouthed Black Bass: 

Considering the extent of our holdings, it is not a difficult matter to rear 
fry, providing we have optimum conditions as regards breeders and temperature, 
but the successful rearing of bass fry to fingerlings or yearlings is we under- 
stand a universal difficulty, so far as output is concerned. Bass cannot be 
stripped of their eggs and milt in a manner similar to trout, pickerel, maskinonge, 
etc.; the egg production is small, and the output is small in camparison with 
the trout. 

For the rearing of bass, comparatively large pcnds containing the suitable 
and abundant food staples for fingerlings are necessary, but the cost of con- 
structing and maintaining these ponds is tremendous. Furthermore, the 
difficulties encountered in securing favourable sites for such developments are 
manifold. In view of these considerations, it is necessary to view the main- 
tenance of this species from other angles: — 

1. Harvesting from Natural Waters: 

This year the method of harvesting fingerlings and yearlings from suitable 
bass lakes was undertaken. The lakes tested out were: Four Mile Lake, County 
of Victoria; Green Lake and Golden Lake, County of Renfrew; Potspoon Lake, 
County of Frontenac; Trout Lake, District of Sudbury; Herridge Lake, District 
of Nipissing. 

This primary step was taken in order to determine the practicability of 
closing any or all of the above lakes for the purpose of obtaining supplies of 
yearling bass for restocking purposes. Developments in this venture take 
time and considerable field work in advance, in order to locate the most favourable 
breeding areas, but on the whole this method of restocking appears feasible. 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1929 25 



2. The Lake on the Mountain [Natural Breeding Ground): 

The introduction of parent fish to the Lake on the Mountain has provided 
the Fish Culture Branch with a small supply of bass fry for cultural purposes, 
and pending a further development of the pond culture of bass, this lake will 
undoubtedly be a good source of supply for fry. 

3. Detached Rearing Stations: 

In addition to the common practice of pond culture, the Branch is making 
preparation for the detached pond method for rearing purposes. A pond of 
twelve acres in the vicinity of Ingersoll will be in readiness this year for the 
purpose. The pond is spring-fed, and has all the requirements for bass culture. 
Further construction is necessary to drain or lower the water into a collecting 
basin in which the bass fingerlings or yearlings may be collected in a most con- 
venient manner for distribution. When this is done we shall have at least 
one station from which it is believed good results will be derived. 

4. Closed Season: 

The extension of the closed season for bass from June 15th to July 1st 
as developed by biological surveys will protect the bass more adequately, 
particularly in our warmer and more southerly waters. From the standpoint 
of protection this law is not all inclusive, since it was determined that many 
bass in the Georgian Bay spawn after July 1st. On the whole, our bass policy 
is similar in principle to that existing in the State of New York and when all is 
said and done, it is believed that in the free waters of the Province natural restocking 
by bass is the most effective replenishment. 

Lake Trout, Herring, Whitefish and Pickerel: 

With the exception of a slight decrease in this year's distribution of pickerel, 
there was an increased distribution of all the species named above. 

Generally speaking, with the exception of lake trout, which may be retained 
in our hatcheries to fingerling grade, fry of the commercial species, such as 
whitefish, herring and yellow pickerel are planted. The Fish Culture Branch 
is not aware of any hatchery on this continent where these species are reared 
beyond the fry stage. No reason has yet been given why we should not plant 
fry of commercial species, since no accurate quantitative study of the survival 
of planted fry of these species has been made. The necessity and economy 
of rearing these to the fingerling stage has yet to be proven. Life history 
studies, however, by the fisheries' research departments of our universities for 
all species mentioned will undoubtedly cast more light on the subject of survival 
of artificially reared fish, on which there is little or no quantitative knowledge 
at the present time. The Fish Culture Branch will do everything possible to 
encourage studies of this nature. 

Experiments carried on by the various states of the United States and the 
Federal Government to rear pickerel, whitefish and herring to the fingerling 
size have been shown to be impracticable. 

Educational Propaganda: 

Illustrated addresses pertaining to fish culture in Ontario and ways and 
means of preserving the fisheries were given by the Director of the Fish Culture 
Branch in a number of cities and towns of Ontario during the year. An extension 



26 THE REPORT UPON No. 36 

of this work is necessary not only for the purpose of explaining the advantages 
to be gained by fish culture and restocking, but also those derived by preserving 
forests, purity of streams, and ways of reclaiming streams for trout. 

Closed Waters 

The following waters are closed to all fishing: 
■ Fox Lake — Kenora, 12 miles from Kenora, in unsurveyed territory. 

Beryl Lake — North half of section 26, Twp. Vankoughnet, Algoma. 

Trout Lake — Twp. of Cosby, Sudbury. 

Herridge Lake — Nipissing, for bass propagation. 

Sucker Lake — Manitoulin Island, Twp. Assiginack. for propagation of bass. 

Lake on the Mountain — Glenora, Prince Edward County, for hatchery 
purposes and bass propagation. 

Eagle Lake — Peterborough County, Twp. Anstruther, for brown trout pro- 
pagation. 

The following are examples of special cases where game fish are protected 
and where fish propagation may be carried on at the discretion of the Department. 

(a) Quoting from the conditions governing licensees we have under condi- 
tion 18 the following statement re Bay of Quinte: 

"No one shall fish with nets during the months of June, July and 
August in that portion of the waters of the Bay of Quinte, lying west- 
ward of a line drawn from Green Point, in the County of Prince Edward, 
to the eastern limit of the Town of Deseronto, in the County of Hast- 
ings. That portion of the Bay of Quinte westward of a line drawn 
across the bay from Horse Point on the southern shore to the Lehigh 
Cement Works' wharf opposite on the northern shore to the Belleville 
Highway Bridge is hereby set apart and reserved for fishing for hatchery 
purposes." 

Condition 19 states: 

"No nets shall be set in that portion of the waters of Georgian Bay 
east of a line drawn northwesterly from the most westerly point of 
Moore's Point; thence northwesterly to the most southwesterly point of 
Beausolill Island ; then continuing northwesterly to Gin Island ; to 
Smooth Island; to Whaleback Beacon; to Eshpadekong Island; to 
the easterly side of Pine Island; to Phillemore Rock; to Bass Group 
Islands; to Barbara Rock; to Campbell's Rock; to the most easterly 
end of Sandy Island; to the westerly side of Pancake Island to the 
most westerly point of Franklin Island ; to Twin Island ; to Groundhog 
Island; to Hang Dog Island; to Champlain Island; to Tie Island; and 
to the mouth of French River." 

In regard to Gill nets authorized for Lake Nipigon, one of the 
conditions reads as follows: 

"Gill nets authorized in this license shall not be set, placed or 
located within 1,000 yards of the mouth of any tributary, river, creek 
or stream, nor within two miles from Virgin Falls, and no nets shall be 
set on Speckled Trout spawning grounds or on grounds set aside for 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1929 27 



the taking of spawn by the Department, viz.: West Bay, Chief Bay, 
Ombabika Bay, Black Sturgeon Bay, south of Long Point in South 
Bay, and those waters lying east of a line drawn from one mile west of 
Poplar Point to one mile west of High Hill River or in other waters as 
directed." 
(b) The following waters are closed to commercial fishing except in the 
instances noted : 

Lake of the Woods — 

Sabaskong Bay — (maskinonge sanctuary). The section of the bay from 

the boundary line of the Township of Mathieu and following a line 

20° east of the true north and south. 
Lohstick Bay — Closed especially for hatchery purposes. (Whitefish.) 
j Clearwater Bay — 
[White Partridge Bay — In this instance the line is drawn across from 

Zigzag Point south of 105P; thence to I.R., 38a. 
[Little Vermilion Lake — 
[Pelican Lake — Kenora (near Pelican on the C.N.R.); lake trout and 

pickerel propagation. 
Rainy Lake — Stanjikoming Bay. 
Nipigon Bay — Closed permanently. (Lake Superior). 

Georgian Bay Waters: 

Colpoys Bay — Closed to commercial fishing permanently. Used for 
lake trout propagation. 

Matchedash Bay — Closed July and August. 

Killarney Bay — 

McGregor Bay — 

Whitefish Bay — 

Entrance to the Spanish River — 
Echo Lake — Township of Kehoe. Closed for hatchery purposes (pickerel.) 

Algoma District. 
Mitchell's Bay of Lake St. Clair — Closed to commercial fishing during the 

months of May, June, July, and August. 
Inner Bay of Long Point Bay {Lake Erie) — Closed to commercial fishing 

with the exception of seining and hoop netting, which must not be 

carried on during the spawning season of black bass. Fishing of this 

nature is prohibited during the months of May, June, July, and August. 
Kagawong Lake, Manitou Lake, Mindemoya Lake, located on Manitoiilin 
Island. 

Acknowledgments 

In conclusion, I desire to publicly express my appreciation of the assistance 
and support which has been rendered to the Department throughout the year. 

The members of the staff, both of the inside and outside service, have 
faithfully and zealously carried out any and all duties which have been allotted 
to them, and the spirit of loyal co-operation in the performance of the work has 
at all times been evident. 



I 



28 THE REPORT UPON No. 36 

Our work has been made more pleasant and attractive by reason of the 
assistance rendered by the transportation companies and Fish and Game Pro- 
tective Associations, the officers of which organizations having at all times 
co-operated with the Department in an earnest endeavour to secure a proper 
observance of the provisions of the Ontario Game and Fisheries Act. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I am, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

D. McDonald, 

Deputy Minister of Game and Fisheries. 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1929 



29 



APPENDIX No. 1 
SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS— 1929 



Speckled Trout Eyed Eggs 
Thunder Bay: Quantity 

Moose Lake 7,500 

Lower Twin Lake 7,500 

Upper Twin Lake 7,500 

Anderson Lake 7,500 



Dufferin: 



Speckled Trout Fingerlings 

Addington: 

Barnons Creek 



Algoma: 

Trout Lake Inlet. . . 

Moose Lake 

Mongoose Lake. . . . 

Spruce Lake 

Loon Lake 

Batchewana River . 

Sand River 

Wartz Lake 

Silver Creek 

Driving Creek 

Gull Lake 

Heyden Creek 

Coldwater Creek. . . 

Root River 

Little Carp Creek. . 
Mountain Lake. . . . 

Fish Lake 

Michipicoten River. 

Trout Lake 

Spring Creek 

Crystal Lake 

Harmony River. . . . 

Mud Creek 

Johnson's Creek . . . 
Bridgeland River. . . 

Hoyle's Creek 

Kent's Creek 

McQueen's Creek. . 

Cannon Creek 

Dunn's Creek 

Grave! River 

Iron River 

Stokeiy Creek 

Twin Lakes 

Victoria Creek 

White's Creek 



Brant: 

Spring Lake. . . . 
Artificial Lake. . 

Bruce: 

Langside Creek. 
Muskrat Creek. 
Otter Creek . . . . 
Main Creek. . . . 



Durham: 

Cavan Creek 

Tyrone Creek 

Leskard Creek 

Gibson Creek 

Irwin Farrow's Creek. 
Wm. Hooey's Creek. . 



2,000 



000 
,000 
000 
,000 
000 
000 
000 
,000 
,000 
000 
,000 
,000 
000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
.000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
.000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
.000 
,000 



50 
250 



10,000 

10,000 

500 

2,000 



6,000 

14,?<00 

2,000 

500 

500 

2,000 



Esson's Creek 

Pine River 

Cemetery Creek 

Ferguson's Soring Creek, 
Johnny Raw's Creek. . . 

Credit River 

Humber River 

Nottawasaga River 



Elgin: 

Caverly Creek 

Grange Hall Creek. 

Frontenac: 

Brule Lake 

Cataraqui Creek. . , 

Beaver Creek 

Black Creek 



Grey: 

Saugeen River 

Rocky Saugeen 

Sydenham River 

Maple Creek 

Swinton Park Creek 

Meadow Creek 

Jamieson's Creek 

Pepper Creek 

Rockside Park Creek 

Caseman's Creek 

Walter's Brook Trout Stream. 

Priddle's Spring Creek 

Middle- Wake Stream 

Sullivan Creek 



Huron: 

Middleton Creek. 
Johnston's Creek. 
Springhill Creek. 



Haliburton: 
Bare Creek. . . 
Fletcher Lake. 
McCue Creek. 
Beaver Lake. . 
Auger Lake. . . 
Black River. . 



Halton: 

Murray's Creek. . . . 

Acton Creek 

Sixteen Mile Creek. 



Hastings: 

Rawdon Creek 

Birds Creek 

Colburn's Creek 

Robertson Creek 

Little Papineau Lake. 

Cleak's Lake 

Carlton's Creek 



Lambton: 

Hungry Hollow Creek. 

Middlesex: 

Duncrief's Creek 



Quan tity 

15,000 

2,000 

250 

500 

500 

51,250 

3,000 

10,000 



1,000 
1,000 



10,000 

1,000 

10,000 

10,000 



1,000 

2,000 

10,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

1,000 

10,000 

10,000 

5,000 

5,000 

1,000 

1,000 

5,000 



1,000 

600 

1.000 



500 
2,000 
9,000 
10,000 
2,000 
1.000 



3.000 

1.000 

10.000 



2,500 
5,000 
5,000 
4,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



300 
10,000 



30 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 36 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS— 1929— Contiv lied. 



Speckled Trout Fingerlings- 

Manitoulin: 

Manitou River 



-continued 



Muskoka: 

Lake Vernon 

Clear Lake 

Bella Lake 

Muskoka River. . . 
Big East River. . . 
Gipsy Bells Creek. 
Holinshead Creek. 

Black River 

May's Lake 

Fetterley's Creek. . 

East River 

Goodwin's Creek. . 
Casselman's Creek. 
Black Creek 



Nipissing: 

North River 

Duschesne Creek. 
Baskie Creek . . . . 
Chippewa Creek. 
Doran's Creek. . . 



Norfolk: 

Deer Lick. . . . 
South Stream. 
Hay Creek . . . 



Quantity 
10,000 



10,000 
2,000 
5,000 
2,500 
5,000 

10,000 
5,000 
1,000 

10,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 

10,000 



2,000 
20,000 
2,000 
3,000 
1,000 



20,000 

6,500 

500 



Northumberland: 

Mutton's Creek 

Allen's Creek 

Baltimore Creek 

Cold Creek 

Dartford Creek 

Dark Creek 

Piper Creek 

Burnley Stream 

Philip's Creek 

Spring Creek 

Dawson Creek 

Hefferman's Creek 

Callahan's Creek 

Larry's Pond 

Keeler Spring Creek 

Creek in Township of Haldimand 

Ashby's Creek 

Vardy's Creek 

Mallery Creek 

Ontario: 

Black Creek 

Smalley's Creek 

Altona Mill Pond 

Bowerman Pond 

Mill Creek 



Parry Sound: 

Deer Lake 

South Sequin River. 

Black Creek 

Murr's Creek 

Barrett's Creek. . . . 

Jenkin's Creek 

Thomas Creek 



1,200 

1,000 

3,700 

3,000 

2,000 

700 

500 

5,000 

700 

1,000 

2,000 

1,000 

100 

2,000 

1,000 

3,700 

500 

500 

1,000 



1,000 
4,000 
2,000 
5,000 
500 



5,000 
10,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
10,000 
5,000 



Peterborough: 

Ouse River 

Warr's Creek. . . 
Lundy's Creek. . 
Blizzard's Creek. 



Peel: 

Montgomery Creek. 
Moffatt Stream 



Renfrew: 

Brennan's Creek. 

Albert Lake 

Crozier Creek. . . . 
Diamond Lake. . . 

Byers Creek 

Corrigan Creek. . 
Jesse's Creek. . . . 
Dam Lake Creek. 
Black's Creek. . . . 
Murphy Creek. . . 
Kearney Creek. . 
Spring Creek. . . . 
Mill Creek 



Quantity 
2,000 
5,000 
1,000 
2,000 



5,000 
10,000 



10,000 
5,000 
2,000 
5,000 
5,000 

10,000 
5,000 
5,000 
2,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 

10,000 



Simcoe: 

Gilmore Creek 

Black Ash Creek 

Silver Creek (Tp. Nottawasaga 

and CoUingwood) 

Warner's Creek 

Chewett's Creek 

Hawkestone Creek 

Seldom Seen Creek 

Quantz Creek 

Silver Creek (Tp. Orillia) 

Hospital Reservoir 

Sudbury: 

Massey Creek 

Rapid River 

Trout Lake Creek 

Mowat Creek 



Thunder Bay: 

Allen Creek 

Allen Lake 

Silver Lake 

Pearl River 

Six Mile Creek.. . . 
Three Mile Creek. 
Currant River . . . . 

Rees Lake 

McVicar's Creek. . 
Neebing River. . . . 
Coldwater Creek. . 

Spring Creek 

Deception Lake . . 
Kowkash River . . . 

Flint River , 

Johnson Creek. . . . 
Walker's Lake. . . 
Lake Billie 



Timiskaming: 

Black River Tributary. 

Watabeag River 

Hudson Creek 



500 

5,000 

2,000 
5,000 
1,000 
3,500 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
500 



2,000 

10,000 

500 

2,000 



10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
15,000 
15,000 
10,000 
10,000 
15,000 

5,000 
10,000 

5,000 
10,000 
10,000 



2,000 
6,000 
2.000 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1929 



31 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS— 1929— Continued. 



Speckled Trout Fingerlings — continued 



Timis'^aming: — Con. 

Metagami 

Bristol Creek 

Croft's Creek 

Shaw's Creek 

Grassy River. . . . . 
Red Sucker River. 
Kamascotia River. 
Waterhen Creek. . 
Fuller's Creek. . . . 

Pearl Lake 

Hay den Creek. . . . 



Waterloo: 

Erbsville Creek 

Sunfish Lake Creek. , 
Schantz's Creek. ... 

Bamberg Creek 

Bussard's Stream. . . 
Lautenslager Creek. 

Betzner's Creek 

Mill Creek 

Bearinger Creek. . . . 
Wilemsburg Stream . 
Seagram's Creek ... 



Quantity 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



21,000 
2,150 
5,000 

20,000 
5,000 
1,000 
2,000 
1,000 
2,000 
2,000 
4,000 



Wentworth : 

Twelve Mile Creek. 
Waterdown Creek. . 



Wellington: 

Martin's Creek. 
Credit River. . . 



Speckled Trout Yearlings 
Addington: 

Shibagan Creek 

Bruce: 
Otter Creek 



Durham: 

Mill Pond 

Jamieson Pond. 

Dufferin: 

Credit River. . . 



Frontenac: 

Shibley's Creek. . . 
McCausland Lake. 



Grey : 

Holland Lake 

Creek in Township of Egremont 

Haliburton: 

Sawyer Lake 



Muskoka: 

Oxtongue Lake. 
Walker's Lake. 
Echo Lake .... 
Shoe Lake 



5,000 
2,000 



10,000 
32,000 



300 



500 



200 
500 



500 



500 
500 



2,000 
600 



500 



250 
500 
500 
100 



Nipissing: 

Four Mile Creek. 

North River 

Lake Timagami. . 



Oxford: 

Brooksdale Stream . 
Campbell's Creek. . 



Parry Sound: 

South River 

George's Lake . . . 
Little East River. 

Peterborough: 

Little Ooze 

Leary's Creek . . . 



Peel: 

Coffey's Creek. 

Renfrew: 

Cormac Creek . 
Jack Creek. . . . 



Simcoe: 

Sturgeon River . 
Pretty River. . . 
Bear Creek. . . . 
Black Creek. . . 
Rawn's Creek. . 



Thunder Bay: 
Nipigon River. 



Waterloo: 

Greenfield Spring Creek. 
Lautenslager Creek . . . . 

Moffatt Creek 

Elmira Creek 



Wentworth : 

Strabane Creek . 
Dundas Creek. . 
Mclntvre Creek. 



York: 

Mimico Fountain, 



Quantity 

300 

300 

7,000 



250 
250 



Speckled Trout Adults 
Muskoka: 

Lake of Bays 

Nipissing: 

Lake Timagami 



Norfolk: 
Spring Creek Mill Pond. 

Sudbury: 

Ramsay Lake 



Thunder Bay: 
Nipigon River. 



Wellington: 

Prison Farm Creek. 



500 
100 
500 



500 
100 



300 



500 
500 



500 
500 
500 
500 
250 



5,000 



300 
500 
500 
500 



500 
500 
250 



10 

772 
500 
200 
500 
500 
100 



32 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 36 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS— 1929— CowiiKwed. 



Lake Trout Fry and Fingerlings 
Great Lakes: Quantity 

Lake Ontario 5,789,000 

Lake Suoerior 5,272,300 

North Channel 400,000 

Lake Huron 7,999,000 



Algoma: 

Trout Lake (24-R12) 

Big Basswood Lake , 

Herman Lake 

Sand Lake 

Carpenter Lake 

McCarroU's Lake 

Cloudy Lake 

Island Lake 

Achigan Lake 

Trout Lake (Aweres) 

Trout Lake (Montgomery) 
Patton Lake 



Frontenac: 

Sharbot Lake. . . . 

Crow Lake 

White Lake 

Trout Lake 

Brule Lake 

Canonto Lake. . . 
Mazinaw Lake . . 
Palmerston Lake. 



Haliburton: 

Kashamaganog Lake. 

Drag Lake 

Gull Lake 

East Lake 

Mountain Lake 

Hollow Lake 

Kushog Lake 

Halls Lake 

Boskung Lake 

Bare Lake 

Stormy Lake 

Wolf Lake 

Pine Lake 

Maple Lake 

Twelve Mile Lake... 



Hastings: 

Papineau Lake 

Little Weslemkoon . 

Weslemkoon 

Lake St. Peter 

Eagle Lake 

Salmon Lake , 

Island Lake 

Devil Lake 

Lavelle Lake 



Kenora : 
Eagle Lake. 

Lanark: 

Silver Lake. 



Leeds: 

Charleston Lake, 
Rideau Lakes. . . 



20,000 
20,000 
10,000 
10,000 
20,000 
5,000 
5,000 
20,000 
20,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 



20,000 
10,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 



15,000 

10,000 

20,000 

5,000 

21,000 

10,000 

20,000 

15,000 

25,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

15,000 

10,000 



15,000 
10,000 
15,000 

5,000 
10,000 
20,000 
15,000 
15,000 

5,000 



100,000 
10,000 



50,000 
25,000 



Muskoka: 

Muskoka Lake. 
Lake Joseph . . . 
Lake of Bays. . 
Lake Vernon . . 
Fairy Lake. . . . 
Mary Lake. . . . 
Lake Rosseau. . 
Oxtongue Lake . 
Clear Lake. . . . 
Skeleton Lake . 
Walkers Lake. . 
Pine Lake 



Nipissing: 

Turtle Lake . . . . 

Trout Lake 

Aylen Lake 

Lowell Lake. . . . 
Lake Timagami. 



Quantity 
10,000 
10,000 
50,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
10,000 
15,000 
10,000 
20,000 
15,000 
5,000 

10,000 

20,000 

10,000 

5,000 

280,000 



Parry Sound: 

Whitefish Lake 15,000 

Ahmic Lake 25,000 

Clear Lake 15,000 

Sugar Lake 5,000 

Sand Lake 10,000 

Soring Lake 5,000 

Maple Lake 5,000 

Eagle Lake 5,000 

Duck Lake 5,000 

Round Lake 5,000 

Georgian Bay 3,482,000 

Otter Lake 15,000 

Lake of Many Islands 5,000 

Cariboo Lake 15,000 

Little Deer Lake 5,000 



Rainy River: 

Straw Hat Lake. 
Mercury Lake. . 



Renfrew: 

Barry's Bay. . . 
Long Lake .... 
Carson Lake. . . 
Pough Lake . . . 
Diamond Lake. 
Clear Lake .... 



Sudbury: 

Trout Lake. . . 
Ramsay Lake. 



5,000 
5,000 



15,000 
15,000 
10,000 
15,000 
10,000 
10,000 



10,000 
20,000 



Thunder Bay: 

Lake Nipigon 1,375,000 



Kashabowie Lake. 
Long Lake ........ 

Lac des Mille Lacs. 

Cloud Lake 

Sturgeon Lake 

Baril Lake 



Timiskaming: 
Twin Lakes. . 
Crystal Lake. 
Larder Lake. 
Fairy Lake . . 
Pike Lake. . . , 



10,000 
20,000 
100,000 
10,000 
50,000 
50,000 



5,000 
5,000 
15,000 
5,000 
5,000 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1929 



33 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS— 1929— Continued. 



Lake Trout Fry and Fingerlings- 
York: 

Lake Simcoe 



Pickerel 
Addington: 

South Beaver Lake 

White Lake 

Salmon River 

Bay of Quinte 



Algoma: 
Echo Lake. 
White Lake . 



Dundas: 

St. Lawrence River. 



Frontenac: 

Sharbot Lake 

Crow Lake 

Loughborough Lake. . 

Long Lake 

Milk Lake 

Fourteen Island Lake. 

Silver Lake 

Elbow Lake 



Grey: 

Black Lake. 



Grenville: 

Long Reach on Rideau , 

Hastings: 

Stoco Lake 

Moira River 

Salmon River 



-Continued 
Quantity 
120,000 



15,000 

15,000 

10,000 

4,350,000 



1,630,000 
15,000 



100,000 



100,000 
50,000 

200,000 
25,000 
50,000 
15,000 
10,000 
10,000 



10,000 
100,000 



100,000 
50,000 
50,000 



Kenora: 

Lake Wabigoon 200,000 

Lake of the Woods 65,000,000 

Eagle Lake 200,000 

Tawatinaw Lake 100,000 

Stanzhikima Lake 100,000 

Sturgeon Lake 50,000 

Lambton: 

Sydenham River 50,000 

Lake Huron 24,950,000 



Lanark: 

Dalhousie Lake. . 
Christie Lake. . . . 
Mississippi River. 
Tay River 



Leeds: 

Rideau Lakes. 
Bass Lake. . . . 
Green's Lake. 



Muskoka: 

Muskoka Lake. 
Lake Joseph . . . 
Lake Rosseau. . 
Sparrow Lake . 
Muldrew Lake. 
2 O.F. 



100,000 
150,000 
100,000 
100,000 



150,000 
50,000 
10,000 



600,000 
700,000 
700,000 
100,000 
100,000 



Nipissing: Quantity 

Lake Nipissing 5,500,000 



Turtle Lake. 

Talon Lake 

Pine Lake 

Trout Lake 

Lake Timagami. 

Northumberland: 
Trent River . . . . 



Ontario: 

Lake St. John, 



Parry Sound: 

Mill Lake 

Maganetawan River (Burton) , 

Ahmic Lake 

Deep Bay and Wolf Lake .... 

Commenda Lake 

Pickerel River 

Isabella Lake 

Wilson Lake 

Crane Lake 

Osier's Lake 

Cariboo Lake 

Bat Lake 

Belle Lake 

Healey Lake 

Maganetawan River (Croft) . . 

Prince Edward: 

Lake Consecon 



20,000 
100,000 

20,000 
100,000 
200,000 



100,000 



50,000 



50,000 
200,000 
100,000 
100,000 

30,000 
100,000 
100,000 

50,000 
100,000 

50,000 

50,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 

50,000 



50,000 



Rainy River: 

Rainy Lake 26,300,000 

Wasaw Lake 5,000 



Renfrew: 

Norway Lake. 
Barry's Bay. . 
Pough Lake . . 



Russell: 

Castor River. 



25,000 
50,000 
25,000 



50,000 



Simcoe: 

Lake Couchiching 100,000 

Severn River 100,000 

Gloucester Pool Lake 500,000 

Nottawasaga Bay 11,125,000 



Sudbury: 

French River. 
Birch Lake. . . 
Maple Lake. . 
Spanish Lake. 



Timiskaming: 

Lake Sesekinika 
Lake Abitibi. . . . 
Larder Lake. . . . 

King Lake 

Margurue Lake. 
Diamond Lake.. 
Fork Lake 



200,000 
50,000 
50,000 

200,000 



50,000 
250,000 
50,000 
15,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 



34 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 36 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 

WATERS— 1929— Continued. 



Pickerel — Continued 
Victoria: 

Youngs Lake 



York: 

Lake Simcoe. 



Quantity 
15,000 



100,000 



Whitefish 
Great Lakes: Quantity 

Lake Superior 4,654,000 

North Channel 9,000,000 

Lake Huron 43,500,000 

Lake Erie 34,505,000 

Lake Ontario 45,000,000 

Kenora: 

Lake of the Woods 36,500,000 

Eagle Lake 500,000 

Tawatinaw Lake 200,000 

Stanzhikima Lake 200,000 

Parry Sound: 

Georgian Bay 67,300,000 

Prince Edward: 

Bay of Quinte 141,950,000 

Rainy River: 

Rainy Lake 26,775,000 

Thunder Bay: 

Lake Nipigon 16,000,000 

Sturgeon Lake 1,000,000 

Herritig 
Great Lakes: 

Lake Erie 8,085,000 

Lake Ontario 3,500,000 



Haliburton: 
Paudash Lake, 



100,000 



Prince Edward: 

Bay of Quinte 10,995,000 



Bass Fry 
Addington: 

South Beaver Lake 

White Lake 



Frontenac: 

Clear Lake 

Sydenham Lake. 
Green Bay Lake . 

Long Lake 

Victoria Lake. . . 



Haliburton: 
Paudash Lake . 

Hastings: 

Stoco Lake ... 
Moira River. . 
Bass Lake .... 
North Lake. . 



Bass Fingerlings 
Bruce: 

Cameron Lake 



5,000 
5,000 



5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 



5,000 

5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 



1,000 



Elgin: 

Pinafore Lake . 

Grey: 

Saugeen River. 
Wilcocks Lake. 

Kent: 

Mitchell's Bay. 



Lambton: 

Sydenham River. 

Nipissing: 

Cache Lake 

Lake Nipissing.. . 



Oxford: 

Horner's Creek , 

Parry Sound : 
Ahmic Lake . . . 



Simcoe: 

Gloucester Pool Lake. 
Boyne River 



Sudbury: 

Minisinakwa Lake. 
Cutler Lake 



York: 

Lake Simcoe. 



Bass Yearlings 
Frontenac: 

Sharbot Lake , 

Crow Lake 

Crotch Lake 

Silver Lake 

West Rideau Lake 

Fishing Lake 



Hastings: 

Stiner's Lake. 



Lanark: 

Dalhousie Lake. 

Otty Lake 

Christie Lake. . . 



Nipissing: 
Cache Lake . 



Northumberland : 
Trent River . . . 



Prince Edward: 
Consecon Lake, 

Peterborough : 
Stony Lake . . . 



Renfrew: 
White Lake . 



Simcoe ; 

Lake Couchiching. 



Quantity 
1,000 



1,000 
1,000 



1,000 

1,000 

40 
2,000 

1,000 

1,000 



1,000 
1,000 



2,000 
40 



1,000 



160 
50 
50 
50 
50 
30 



30 



50 
50 
50 



25 



60 



100 



125 



50 



100 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1929 



35 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS— 1929— ConhnweJ. 



Bass Yearlings — Continued 



\'ictoria: 

Sturgeon Lake. 
Cameron Lake. 



Bass Adults 



Quantity 

90 

125 



Nipissing: 

Cache Lake 

Sudbury: 

Windy Lake 

Cutler Lake 

Rainbow Trout Fingerlings 
Halton: 

Bronte Creek 

Simcoe: 

Stony Creek 



Sudbury: 

Pumphouse Creek. 
Geneva Creek . . . . 
Windv Creek 



35 



60 
50 



10,000 
5,000 



5,000 

5,000 

10,000 



Timiskaming: 

Hollinger Mine Waters. 



Brown Trout Adults 
Frontenac: 

Big Clear Lake 



Peterborough : 
Eagle Lake . 



Muskoka: 

Muskoka Lake. 

Sudbury: 
-y Nepahwin 



Maskinonge Fry 
Victoria : 

Pigeon River 



Quantity 
30 



400 

1,000 

800 

390 

20,000 



Appexdi.x \o 2 — Disposition of Applications for Fish, 1929 



No. of 
Applications 

Bass 236 

Herring 20 

Lake Trout 230 

Pickerel 154 

Rainbow Trout. 20 

Speckled Trout. 524 

Whitefish 65 

Brown Trout. . . 8 

Maskinonge .... 9 

Miscellaneous. . 2 











No. Brought 










Forward 










to 1930 




No. 


No. 




(Biological 


No. 


Cancelled 


Cancelled 


No. 


Studies 


Filled 


Unsuitable 


Duplicates 


Suitable 


Necessary) 


51 


23 


1 


137 


24 


13 






7 




174 


14 


2 


20 


20 


98 


30 


3 


8 


15 


7 


9 




2 


2 


332 


63 


8 


59 


62 


58 




4 


3 




4 


i 





1 


2 


1 


3 
1 




4 

1 


1 



1.268 



738 



144 



18 



242 



126 



36 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 36 



Appendix No. 3 — Distribution of 





Eyed Eggs 


Age in 


Length of Fish in Inches 


3 


33^ 


4 


5 




30,000 










1 


701,850 


8,000 






lU-2 




20,000 
38,000 




2-3 










2-33^ 








105,050 


2-41^ 












214-3 












3 










7,600 


3-33.^ 












3-4 












3A}4 












4 












4-41.^ 












41^ 












414-614 












12-20 


























30,000 


701,850 


8,000 


58,000 


112,650 



Appendix No. 4 — Distribution of Fish According to Species, 1926-1929 



1926 



1927 



1928 



1929 



Lake Trout Fry and Fingerlings 

Speckled Trout Eyed Eggs 

Speckled Trout Fry and Fingerlings 

Speckled Trout Yearlings 

Speckled Trout Adult 

Rainbow Trout Fry and Fingerlings 

Brown Trout Adult 

Black Bass Fry 

Black Bass Fingerlings 

Black Bass Yearlings 

Black Bass Adults 

Maskinonge Fry 

Pickerel Fry 

Whitefish Fry 

Herring 



8,501,000 
'1,085,300 



300 
1,800 



21,465,375 

"1,444,656 

666 



22,806,090 



t 1,669, 600 



200 
419 



12,500 
" 1,569 



5,425 



50,000 
10,833 



13,820,000 

260,575,000 

11,225,000 



68,000 

223,945,000 

448,789,750 

18,410,000 



90 

53,000 

155,921,750 

346,172,000 

17,830,000 



26,238,300 

30,000 

*1, 105,750 

28,860 

2,572 

♦35,030 

2,590 

60,000 

15,080 

1,245 

145 

20,000 

147,155,000 

427,084,000 

22,680,000 



295,222,469 



714,128,206 



544,513,982 



624,458,572 



flncluding 60,000 eyed eggs. 
*Fingerlings only. 



GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1929 



37 



Speckled Trout — 1929 



months 


Yearlings 


Adults 




6 


6V2 


7 


73^ 


Total 














30,000 














709,850 














20,000 














38,000 


'29,000 












134,050 






53,250 


4,900 






58,150 




42,000 
2,000 






42,000 


2,000 










11,600 


2,500 










2,500 






2,000 
10,000 








2,000 












10,000 


100 










100 


73,500 












73,500 




4,000 










4,000 








28,860 




28,860 










2,572 


2,572 














107,100 


48,000 


65,250 


4,900 


28,860 


2,572 


1,167,182 



Appendix No. 5 — Number of Shipments 

1928 

Speckled Trout Eyed Eggs 

Speckled Trout Fry Ill 

Speckled Trout Fingerlings 166 

Speckled Trout Yearlings 

Speckled Trout Adults 2 

279 332 

Lake Trout 134 174 

Pickerel 125 98 

Whitefish 50 58 

Herring 13 13 

Bass Fry 8 13 

Bass Fingerlings 42 14 

Bass Yearlings 22 

Bass Adults 3 2 

53 51 

Maskinonge 2 1 

Rainbow Trout Fingerlings 2 7 

Brown Trout 4 

Total number of shipments 658 738 



38 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 36 



APPENDIX 

GAME AND FISHERIES 

Statistics of the Fishing Industry in the Public Waters 

Equip 



No 


District 


No. 

of 

Men 


Tugs 


Gasoline 
Launches 


Sail and Row 
Boats 


Gill Nets 




No. 


Tons 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


Yards 


Value 


1 


Kenora and Rainy River Districts. . . . 


311 
392 
165 
598 
309 

142 
802 

731 
593 






$ 


142 
85 
35 

161 

74 

39 
156 

243 

54 


$ 

79,275 
46,540 
25,050 
117,820 
63,425 

13,385 
171,870 

118,107 
29,450 


128 
63 
61 

114 
36 

82 
140 

207 
174 


$ 

5,310 
5,760 
6.085 
6.260 
3.185 

4.807 
8.935 

9.257 
9.022 


345.315 
1.106.325 

443.608 
1.574.607 
1.057,300 


$ 

50,626 
107,241 

52.615 
163,384 
139.436 


9 


15 
12 
29 

18 


480 
347 
772 
508 


67.800 

72,500 

209,740 

113.840 


3 




4 




S 




6 


Lake St. Clair, St. Clair and Detroit 
Rivers 


7 
8 


Lake Erie and Upper Niagara Rivi^r. . . 
Lake Ontario, Lower Niagara and St. 


30 


730 


262.800 


1.414.342 

1.162.370 
346.150 


215,729 

110,881 
31 627 


9 


Sundry Inland Waters 


9 


221 


41,800 










4.043 


113 


3.0S8 


768,480 


989 


664.922 


1,00.S 


58.621 


7.450.017 


871.539 







APPENDIX 
Quantities of 



No. 


District 


Herring 


VVhitefish 


Trout 


Pike 


Pickerel 
(Blue) 


Pickerel 
(Dore) 


1 


Kenora and Rainy River Districts 


lbs. 


lbs. 

710.280 
389.330 
295.341 
1.089.975 
204.761 

350 
1,267,485 

843.095 
1.358.397 


lbs. 

117.175 
1.746,607 

412.447 
1.622,443 
1.680.338 


lbs. 

858.444 

6.698 

60.460 

84.258 

475 

22.183 
30.516 

128.589 
119.689 


lbs. 
19,815 


lbs. 
1.095.039 


2 


Lake Superior 


2.525.753 

9.861 

22.035 

550.936 


92.728 


3 


North Channel 




133 652 


4 




260 


89 763 


5 


Lake Huron 


139,777 


6 


Lake St. Clair, St. Clair and Detroit 
Rivers 


10.715 
2.538,256 

13.592 

472 


25,825 


7 
8 


Lake Erie and Upper Niagara River .... 

Lake Ontario. Lower Niagara and St. 

Lawrence Rivers 


360,962 

1,394,412 
48,736 


3.155 

555.679 
116.875 


134,977 
31,814 


9 


Sundry Inland Waters 


245,400 










Totals 


4.912,695 


6.159.014 


6,254.719 


1.311,312 


2.583.110 


1,988,975 










Values 


$ c. 
294.761.70 


$ c. 
800.671.82 


$ c. 
813.113.47 


$ c. 
91.791.84 


S c. 

154.986.60 


$ c. 
258,566.75 









GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1929 



39 



No. 6 

DEPARTMENT, ONTARIO 

of Ontario, for year ending December 31st, 1929 

MENT 



Seine Nets 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip and 
Roll Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers an 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


Total 


No. 


Yards 


\'alue 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


V'alue 


No. 


Value 


No, 


Value 


No. 


Value 








$ 


42 
59 

136 
94 

117 

189 
585 


S 
13,000 
29,150 


58 


$ 

3,040 




$ 




$ 




$ 


120 
26 
29 
55 
41 

31 
91 

45 
58 


$ 

37,630 
13,750 
10,605 
32,685 
17,575 

12,125 
143,638 

10,350 
11,725 


91 
34 
29 

57 
14 

15 

55 

22 
24 

341 


$ 

13,615 
11,175 
23,000 
19,570 
9,175 

3,850 
29,625 

3,010 
3,175 


S 

202,496 












22 


100 






281,516 








63,200 

112,050 

71,150 

21,930 
326,900 














253,055 


7 


1,300 


1,350 


31 


715 


1 


6 


35,885 
14 

5,600 
4,900 

9,830 
3.925 


4,088 
23 

340 
147 

390 

278 


7 


38 


667,706 
417.809 


?7 


5,395 
11,900 

1.745 
6,607 


3,338 
9.335 

1,630 
6 904 














59,775 


41 


22 

563 
218 


410 

18,990 
7,990 


5 
66 


25 

1,019 
359 






1,169,414 


14 






273,634 


62 


34 


11,280 


68 


488 


154,098 


151 


26.947 


22,557 


1,256 


648.660 


892 


31,145 


79 


1,409 


60.176 


5,366 


75 


526 


496 


290,083 


116,195 


3,479,503 



No. 7 

Fish Taken 



Sturgeon 


Eels 


Perch 


Tullibee 


Catfish 


Carp 


Mi.xed 
Coarse 


Caviare 


Total 


Value 


lbs. 
22,849 
1,306 
12,320 


lbs. 

ii 

74.612 
15,332 


lbs. 
12,850 
150 
7,569 


lbs. 

254.582 
2,744 


lbs. 
75,939 

125 


lbs. 

10,443 

1,119 

819 

67,804 

2,631 

60,993 
194,603 

89,450 
181,862 


lbs. 

249,871 
89,989 
353,017 
146.138 
101,435 

147,736 
895,830 

277,649 
441,158 


lbs. 
900 

34 

1.013 

340 
1.073 

295 


lbs. 
3.428,187 
4,856,549 
1,285,486 
3,229.533 
2.941.264 

369,446 
11.260,105 

3,691,027 
2,793,695 


S c. 

356,427 65 
446,129 48 
133,754 83 


2.299 
9,926 

12.886 


5,894 
35,776 

62,224 
5,689,210 

154,610 
33,870 


94,932 
213,222 


3,698 
974 

26,194 
116.950 

122,617 
71,734 


389,003 33 
322,645 66 

25.880 91 


27,076 




766 995 72 


2.968 
29,664 


1.940 
130.211 


321,414 29 
292,030 34 


121,294 


89,956 


6.002,153 


697,631 


418,231 


609,724 


2,702.823 


3.655 


33,855,292 








$ c. 

48,517 60 


$ c. 

7,196 48 


S c. 
360,129 18 


S c. 

48,834 17 


S c. 

33.458 48 


$ c. 

30,486 20 


$ c. 
108.112 92 


$ c. 
3.655 00 


$ c. 


$ c. 

3,054,282 21 









40 



THE REPORT UPON GAME AND FISHERIES FOR 1929 No. 36 



APPENDIX No. 8 
Comparative Statement of the Yield of the Fisheries of the Province of Ontario 



Kind 



Herring 

Whitefish .... 

Trout 

Pike 

Blue Pickerel. 
Pickerel Dore. 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Coarse Fish . . 
Caviare 

Total 



1928 



lbs. 

5,300,519 

5,823,448 

6,659,465 

1,246,799 

2,149,647 

2,001,288 

139,197 

122,797 

4,693,402 

1,030,426 

434,808 

724,038 

3,051,459 

4,411 



33,381,704 



1929 



lbs. 

4,912,695 

6,159,014 

6,254,719 

1,311,312 

2,583,110 

1,988,975 

121,294 

89,956 

6,002,153 

697,631 

418,231 

609,724 

2,702,823 

3,655 



33,855,292 



Increase 



lbs. 

' 335,566 

"64,513 
433,463 

1,308,751 



"473,588 



Decrease 



lbs. 
387,824 

404,746 



12,313 
17,903 
32,841 

332,795 

16,577 

114,314 

348,636 

756 



*Net increase. 



APPENDIX No. 9 



Statement of the Yield of the Fisheries of the Province of Ontario for year 1929 
Compiled from the Fishermen's Annual Returns 



Kind 



Quantity 



Price per 
Pound 



Estimated 
Value 



Herring 

Whitefish 

Trout 

Pike 

Blue Pickerel 
Pickerel Dore. 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Coarse Fish . . . 
Caviare 

Total 



lbs.. 
912,695 
159,014 
,254,719 
311,312 
583,110 
988,975 
121,294 

89,956 
002,153 
697,631 
418,231 
609,724 
.702,823 
3,655 



33,855,292 



$ c. 

06 
13 
13 
07 
06 
13 
40 
08 
06 
07 
08 
05 
04 

1 00 



294,761 70 

800,671 82 

813,113 47 

91,791 84 

154,986 60 

258,566 75 

48,517 60 

7,196 48 

360,129 18 

48,834 17 

33,458 48 

30,486 20 

108,112 92 

3,655 00 



3,054,282 21 



APPENDIX No. 10 



Value of Ontario Fisheries for a Period of Twenty Years, 1910 to 1929, Inclusive. 



Year Value 

$ c. 

1910 2,348,269 57 

1911 2,419,178 21 

1912 2,842,877 09 

1913 2,674,686 76 

1914 2,755,293 11 

1915 3,341,181 41 

1916 2,658,992 43 

1917 2,866,424 00 

1918 3,175,110 32 

1919 2,721,440 24 



Year 



Value 



1920 2,691,093 74 

1921 2,656,775 82 

1922 2,807,525 21 

1923 2,886,398 76 

1924 3,139,279 03 

1925 2,858,854 79 

1926 2,643,686 28 

1927 3,229,143 57 

1928 3,033,944 42 

1929 3,054,282 2 



Twenty-Fourth Annual Report 



OF THE 



Game and Fisheries 
Department 

1930 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 9. 1931 




ONTARIO 



TORONTO 
Printed and Published by Herbert H. Ball, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

193 I 



To His Honour W. D. Ross, Esq., 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May It Please Your Honour: 

I have the honour to submit herewith, for the information of Your Honour 
and the Legislative Assembly, the Twenty-fourth Annual Report of the Game 
and Fisheries Department of this Province. 

I have the honour to be. 

Your Honour's most obedient servant, 

CiiAS. McCrea, 

Minister of Mines. 
Toronto, 1931. 



TWENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Game and Fisheries Department of 

Ontario 



To THE Honourable Charles McCrea, 
Minister of Mines. 

Sir: — I have the honour to place before you this Twenty-fourth Annual 
Report of the Department of Game and Fisheries of Ontario, covering the year 
1930. 

FINANCIAL 

The table subjoined hereto shows in detail the various sources from which 
this Department derived its revenue during the fiscal year ending October 31st, 
1930. 

Revenue for Fiscal Year 1930 
Game — 

Royalty $96,81 1 . 80 

Licenses — ' 

Trapping $50,969.00 

Non-resident hunting 72,140.00 

Deer 75,961.30 

Moose 7,832.00 

Gun 52,756.00 

Fur dealers 36,273.00 

Fur farmers 8,439.50 

Tanners 170.00 

Cold storage 1 75 . 00 

304,715.80 

$401,527.60 

Fisheries — 

Royalty $16,378.56 

Licenses — 

Fishing $105,748 13 

Angling 209.019. 75 

314,767.88 

Sales — spawn taking 667 25 

331,813.69 

General — 

Guides' licenses $6,2 1 2 . 00 

Fines 16,415. 70 

Costs 1,764.29 

Sales — confiscated articles, etc 7,270 89 

Rent 5,004 . 00 

Commission 3,438.65 

Miscellaneous 1,429.52 

— 41,535.05 

Experimental Fir Far.m 986. 50 

$775,862.84 

The following comparative table outlines the annual revenues and expendi- 
tures of the Department in each of the past five years, 1926 to 1930, inclusive, 
as well as showing the surplus in each of the years mentioned: 

[1] 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 





Revenue 


Expenditure 


Surplus 


1926 

1927 

1928 

1929 

1930 


$682,063.32 
721,576.25 
733,259.75 
775,374.80 
775,862.84 


$399,744.24 

492,472.88 
518,054.96 
607,835.95 
687,545.90 


$282,319.08 

229,103.37 

215,204.79 

167,538.85 

88,316.94 



During the year 1930, possibly owing to existing general conditions, little 
increase in the revenue collected was shown, and with the increased expenditures, 
attributable to the expanding activities of the Department, the surplus of revenue 
over expenditure continued to show a reduction. In view of the character of 
the work with the administration and performance of which this Department is 
charged from year to year, it becomes increasingly evident that the time is not 
far distant when the current expenditures will equal and possibly surpass the 
amount of the annual revenue at present collected. 

STATISTICS 

Ai)pended to this report will be found statistical tables giving details of the 
various species and quantities of fry and fingerlings raised in our several Provincial 
fish hatcheries, as well as the designation and location of the waters in which 
such fry and fingerlings have been deposited. 

In addition there are statistical tables in connection with the commercial 
fishing industry. 

There will also be noted throughout this report statistics respecting the fur 
trade and other branches of Departmental work. 

These figures have all been most carefully assembled and prepared, and 
aff"ord \ery interesting and valuable information to those concerned. 



GAME 

The following table shows the number of large game hunting licenses which 
have been issued throughout Ontario during the past five years: 



Resident moose 

Resident deer 

Non-resident hunting 



1926 



1,359 

23,392 

1,698 



1927 



1,379 

21,111 

2,237 



1928 



1,371 

21,867 

1,721 



1929 



1,356 

22,164 

1,975 



1930 



1,424 

26,213 

2,015 



A comparative study of these figures reveals the fact that the hunting 
features of this Province continue to attract to our great outdoors at that most 
glorious period of our year — the fall — thousands of sportsmen, and in numbers 
which are not at all diminishing, to participate in the opportunities afforded 
and enjoy the benefits which are derived from a vacation in the woods, 
communing with nature on its best behaviour, and returning the better equipped 
physically to combat the approaching rigours of a winter season. 

The following is a brief summary of conditions throughout the year under 
review as they affected game birds and animals, compiled from the reports sub- 
mitted by the District Superintendents of the Department: 



1931 ANNUAL REPORT. 1930 3 

Deer. — In the extreme northwestern section of the Province, i.e. the districts 
of Rain}' River and Kenora, and in that portion of southern Ontario in which 
there has been an absolute close season on these animals, conditions have shown 
improvement, while in the northerly sections of southern Ontario, and the 
southerly sections of the eastern end of northern Ontario, where possibly the 
most intensive deer hunting takes place, the most optimistic statement would 
be that conditions are about the same as in the past few years. 

Moose. — Some slight improxement is noticed here, especially in tiie north- 
western portion of the Province. 

Caribou. — There is a clo'se season throughout the Province on this species 
at present. Conditions are improving and numbers on the increase in the north. 

Ruffed Grouse or Partridge. — This species has increased in numbers very 
considerably, the improvement undoubtedly being attributable to the close 
season which has been in existence in late years. 

Sharp-tailed Grouse or Prairie Hen. — These birds are prevalent only in the 
northwestern section of the Province, from where it is reported that they are 
increasing in number. 

Quail. — Owing to climatic conditions these birds have not been as plentiful, 
and at present are found only in the southwestern counties. 

Ducks. — These birds continue to be plentiful, and to afford good hunting. 

Pheasants {Ring-necked) . — Doing extremeh' well in the southwestern portion 
of the Province. They are now also found in the southern portions of the 
central and eastern counties, though the success which will attend their intro- 
duction to this last-mentioned section will depend very largely on climatic 
conditions. During the year, arrangements were considered, having in mind the 
transfer of the pheasant propagation activities of the Department from the Bird 
Farm at Eugenia, to the property acquired at Codrington. in the county of 
Northumberland. 

The general public continues to show a very keen interest in the work of 
getting this species established where conditions are conducive to success, as 
is evidenced by the fact that in 1930, some 12,000 pheasant eggs were distributed 
to 679 applicants. The birds hatched from these settings, when capable of 
taking care of themselves, are liberated. The co-operation received along these 
lines is very deeply appreciated. 

Supplementing this work, 1,578 adult live ring-necked pheasants were 
liberated at various points by the Department, from stock raised at the Bird 
Farms at Eugenia and Normandale. 

Hungarian Partridge. — There are some signs of improvement apparent in 
conditions as they affect these birds in the central counties where the introduction 
has been undertaken. 

Plover and Snipe. — These birds are extreme!}' scarce. 

FURS 

There was a considerable decline in the number of pelts on which royalty 
was paid during 1930. Market conditions and the j)revailing low prices f)ossibly 
had the effect of impressing upon trapfjers the advisability of curtailing ojierations 

2— G & F 



4 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 

in a season when financial returns would be somewhat below the average. The 
wisdom of such a course will be evident in the increased number of fur-bearers 
available when price conditions improve. However to maintain the output 
at its present point it would appear to be absolutely essential that strict obser- 
vance of all regulations, and more particuarly as they affect close seasons, should 
be enforced, and in view of the fact that these regulations are not unreasonable, 
the Department does not anticipate any great difificulty in securing the desired 
co-operation. 

Summary of conditions as applied to fur-bearing animals is as follows: 

Bear. — Decreased catch, though numbers increased, especially in the north. 

Beaver. — Catch remained practically stationary. In the closed areas 
numbers are apparently increasing, though in the areas where an open season 
exists, conditions are not improving. A continuation of the restrictions on the 
taking of this species is most desirable. 

Fisher. — Catch shows considerable decrease, and while the numbers may 
not be decreasing, there is little, if any, improvement in conditions. 

Fox. — Catch shows considerable decrease. Undoubtedly the numbers of 
these animals are decreasing, but it is anticipated that the close season provided 
by the enactment of 1930, and the protection afforded to this species thereunder, 
will have a beneficial effect on future conditions. 

Lynx. — This species is becoming very scarce throughout the Province, as 
evidenced by the annually diminishing catch. 

Marten. — Another species which is losing ground. Catch decreasing 
annually. No improvement is evident except possibly in Algoma district. They 
require all the protection now afforded. 

Mink. — Catch about stationary, or slightly increased. Conditions remain 
about as usual, though in some districts, widely separated, some improvement 
is shown. 

Muskrat. — Catch shows ten per cent, decline. Conditions improved 
somewhat during the year in southern Ontario, though numbers continue to be 
very scarce in the north. 

0//er.^Catch considerably decreased during the year. Conditions remain 
about the same as in the past few years, with some improvement shown in the 
northern portion of southern Ontario and in the central part of northern Ontario. 
Remarks on close season and restrictions on taking of beaver apply to otter. 

Raccoon. — Catch remained stationary. This species is prevalent in southern 
Ontario only, where, generally speaking, conditions 'show slight improvement. 

Skunk. — Catch continued to decrease, though numbers are still reported 
plentiful. 

Weasel. — Catch declined substantially, though numbers are reported 
plentiful. 

Wolf. — Numbers would appear to be decreasing. (See Wolf Bounties.) 



1931 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1030 



The following table compares, for the past six years, pelts of fur-bearing 
animals, other than those which were ranch-raised, on which royalty was paid: 



Bear 

Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (cross) 

Fox (red) 

Fox (silver or black) 

Fox (white) 

Fox (not specified). . 

Lynx 

Marten 

Mink 

Muskrat 

Otter 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Weasel 

Wolverine 

Total 



1925 



2 

3 

68 

534 

4 

22 

67 

34 



,014 
,364 
,936 
,601 
,198 
433 
974 
61 
,200 
,125 
,138 
,739 
,522 
,157 
,100 
,365 



814,935 



1926 



1,635 

27,597 

2,618 

4,175 

30,535 

620 

226 

165 

3,884 

3,177 

65,299 

387,022 

4,304 

21,002 

75,503 

63,599 

11 



691,372 



1927 



1,472 

20,738 

3,904 

3,502 

26,112 

403 

977 

136 

4,568 

3,261 

37,628 

469,947 

3,168 

15.958 

59,488 

72,645 

15 



723,922 



1928 



1,575 

22,040 

5,400 

4,116 

25,943 

646 

590 

160 

3,845 

3,492 

32,009 

514,161 

4,510 

13,513 

79,442 

79,425 

19 



790,886 



1929 



1,888 

17,348 

4,343 

1,606 

14,550 

197 

16 

132 

1,718 

2,738 

29,893 

714,019 

4,562 

13,653 

75,773 

117,053 

6 



999,495 



1930 



1,594 

17,493 

2,510 

1,188 

11,076 

154 

116 

106 

871 

1,770 

30,226 

643,999 

3,986 

13,757 

72,667 

99,704 

9 



901,226 



The value of these pelts in 1930 to the trapper amounted to $2,410,987.79, 
which is a total considerably lower than that of the preceding year, though, as 
previously stated, this reduction can very largely be attributed to the unfavour-. 
ably low values which applied to the fur industry due to a period of extreme 
business depression. 

In addition to the above, the total of ranch-raised silver and black foxes, 
dressed or exported, on which no royalty is payable, and which were raised on 
the licensed fur farms of the Province, was 6,446; 4,906 of which were exported 
and the balance of 1,540 were dressed in the Province. It is estimated that these 
pelts had a value of $430,786.18. 

FUR FARMING 

The possibilities which the successful raising in captivity of fur-bearing 
animals on properties operated as fur farms under license from this Department 
continue to attract increasing attention from interested parties in many sections; 
and as the interest of the individual fur farmer becomes more firmly established 
in his own particular operation, generally speaking the fur-farming industry 
throughout the Province receives additional assurance of future success. At 
this time it is interesting to note that every fur-bearer which is native to Ontario 
is now included in the list of animals with which these licensed fur farms are 
stocked for propagation purposes. 

Fur farmers' licenses issued during the past five years are as follows: 



1926 


1927 


1928 


1929 


1930 


783 


986 


1,148 


i,360 


1,557 



The following is a table showing the list of animals reported to be stocked 
on thete licensed fur farms as at December 31st, in each of the years repori^^d 
upon: 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



Animals Stocked on Licensed Fir Farms as at "December 31st 



*Exclusive of muskrat. 

fExclusive of muskrat and beaver in semi-captivity. 



EXPERIMENTAL FUR FARM 





1926 


1927 


1928 


1929 


1930 


Beaver 


100 
28 


142 
48 


98 
54 


93 

67 

3 

385 

489 

16,457 

107 

5 

3,068 

2,163 

2 

1,337 

22 

13 


66 


Fisher 


57 


Fitch 




Fox (cross) 


397 

397 

7,095 

49 

3 

468 


444 

314 

9,664 

56 

2 

826 

1,107 


353 

365 

12,555 

60 

6 

1,247 

2,016 


501 


Fox (red) 


561 


Fox (silver black) 


20,026 


Fox (blue) 

Lynx 


94 
6 


Mink 


7,184 


Aluskrat 


1,821 


Otter 






Raccoon 

Skunk 


290 

49 

4 

7 


619 

91 

7 

21 

4 


831 

62 

13 

20 

2 

4 


1,481 
9 


Bear 


9 
30 


Weasel (ermine) 


37 
7 




Badger 




9 










Total 


*8,887 


tl3,345 


tl7,686 


t24,255 


131,854 



Investigations dealing with many problems connected with fur-farming 
were carried out during the year. Owing to the appearance of several outbreaks 
of contagious disease among Ontario foxes, considerable time was spent in 
finding the causes and possible treatment for two of them. 

At the present time at least five contagious diseases are recognized among 
foxes, namely distemper, contagious pneumonia, hemorrhagic septicemia, 
encephalitis, and paratyphoid. The Experimental Fur Farm investigated dis- 
temper and contagious pneumonia. 

Parasites and parasitic diseases continue to be of major importance. 
Parasitic infestation among the fur-bearers of the Dominion appears to be 
widespread. This applies not only to ranch-bred animals, but also to animals 
taken directly from their natural environment. From the data gathered it is 
found that fur-bearers in the wilds invariably harbour one or more parasites. 
Particularly is this true of the animals that frequent sluggish waters and feed 
upon the fish that live in these waters. To what extent parasitism may be 
responsible for heavy annual losses among our fur-bearing animals offers a wide 
field for investigation. 

Observations were continued with regard to the most suitable feeds and 
methods of feeding for the large variety of animals on hand. This subject has 
now to be studied not only from the nutritional point of view but from the econo- 
mic as well. With the fox industry largely dependent upon the sale of pelts for 
revenue, the question of overhead expenses is becoming more important yearly. 

Throughout the year there has been a marked increase in correspondence. 
Enquiries were received from every province and many foreign countries con- 
cerning every phase of fur-farming. During the summer and fall months 
interviews take place daily with fur farmers regarding their various difficulties. 
Frequently sick and injured animals are brought for treatment. 



1931 ANNUAL REPORT, 1930 7 

Two bulletins were issued, namely. "Feeding and Diseases of the Fox," and 
''The Mink in Captivity." Both publications are meeting with a steady demand. 

At the request of the Ontario Fox Breeders' Association the technical staff, 
in conjunction with the lecturers of the Ontario Veterinary College, gave a series 
of lectures and practical demonstrations at the Summer School held in Guelph, 
Ont. The course was well recei\ed by the breeders present. 

Four hundred and two autopsies were performed and findings reported to 
the owners. One hundred and four animals were treated for sickness and 
injuries. Eight hundred tests to determine parasitic infections were done. 

Observations ox Feed 

Two bulletins were published dealing with the feeds and feeding of the fox 
and mink. Both were written from the practical viewpoint. The methods 
advised are in daily use at the Experimental Fur Farm and, while subject to 
revision, they have proven to be satisfactory. There is much to be said for and 
against the publication of feed charts, giving exact quantities fed daily per 
animal. Feed charts are only a guide to the novice, and should be accepted as 
such. When more experience is gained in feeding he can adjust his charts 
to meet the individual requirements and particular environment of his animals. 
Feed charts do, however, prevent serious errors in diet and in the quanti- 
ties fed. 

The Fur Farm has consistently advocated a high meat ration for adults 
and pups. The latter should receive meat with the first feed. Heavy cereal 
rations are entirely unsuited for the fox. 

A number of observations on the digestibility of a variety of feeds used for 
foxes were made this year. These were pelting foxes, and examinations were 
carried out at varying intervals after feeding. 

Meat and Fish. — Meat and fish appear to be about equal in digestibility, 
and are by far the most thoroughly digested of all the feeds fed. Herring fed 
whole were better digested than when ground. 

Cereals. — A variety of cereals were used; all of them were held for longer 
periods in the stomach than meat or fish, and digestion in the intestines was 
very slow. A large residue of undigested material was found in the intestines. 

Vegetables. — Unless finely ground to a pulp, vegetables are practicalh" in- 
digestible for the fox. Even when finely ground a large residue remains in the 
intestines. Canned tomatoes were found to be superior to either beets or carrots. 

Eggs and Milk. — When fed without the addition of other feeds, eggs and 
milk are not assimilated to any extent by the fox. If mixed with bread and 
other solids, their digestibility is increased. 

These observations are confirmed with practical experience in the living 
animal. Foxes to obtain maximum development require a high meat protein 
diet and cereals should be looked upon as purely supplementary feed and not 
used to replace meat or fish. Pups are unable to handle bulky cereal feeds in 
large quantities. To obtain maximum nourishment easily digested food is 
essential. 

Eggs and milk should be fed mixed with other food and not as a single item 
of diet. Sick foxes should not receive either eggs or milk, but should be fed 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



raw meat or blood. Coarsely ground vegetables are of little nutritive value, 
but may be beneficial as a roughage, helping to prevent constipation. 

There is still a tendency with beginners to overfeed in the summer months. 
Especially is this the case with farmers accustomed to handling domestic 
animals and taking a pride in having them in good shape. It is apparently 
difficult for them to realize that it is natural for the fox to appear ragged and 
thin during the summer months and that this condition is not due to lack of feed. 

Feed Costs 

With fur-farming now being considered as a commercial proposition, the 
cost of overhead expense is an important item. When animals were valued 
only as expensive breeding stock the feed cost was not as important as today, 
when most ranches are operating on a strictly pelt basis. 



Z-25 
2-00 
1-75 
1-50 



1-25 



1-00 



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Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. 



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Graph of 1930 feed costs. The figures at the left show the average monthly 
cost each; those at the right the average yearly cost. 

In the records kept at the Experimental Fur Farm an endeavour is made 
to account for each ounce of feed fed daily to each animal on the premises. 
These amounts are totalled monthly and a careful check kept on the cost. 
During the past fiscal year (November 1st, 1929, to October 31st, 1930) the 
following amounts of feed were consumed by the various animals kept on the 
farm. 



Horses 28 

Meat lbs. 21,027 



Frozen fish . 
Canned fox meat. 

Hay 

Grain 

Fox bread 

Fox biscuits 

Fox meal 



4,000 

500 

11,540 

8,300 

7,819 

400 

300 



Powdered yeast lbs. 224 

Powdered milk " 95 

Milk qts. 500 

Eggs doz. 1 1 9 

Root vegetables tons 6 

Canned tomatoes gals. 30 

Cranberries cases 2 

Raisins " 1 

Poplar wood loads 8 



1931 ANNUAL REPORT, 1930 9 

The average monthly cost per animal is obtained by dividing the total 
monthly cost by the number of animals on hand. The average monthly cost 
per animal totalled for the year equals the cost of feeding one animal of that species 
during 1930. The column on the left of the above graph shows the average cost 
per animal and on the right is the total average yearly cost per animal. 

Young animals are not listed until July, when it is estimated that they 
consume as much food per head as the adults. This accounts for the sharp 
elevations in May and June when the females require large amounts of nourishing 
food and the pups as well are eating a certain quantity. The drop in July is 
when the youngsters first appear as adults in the records. The second rise in 
September and October is due to the meat ration being increased as is advocated 
in the bulletin for that time of the year. Although the meat ration continues 
to be heavy in November and December, horse meat constitutes a large part 
of the meat ration for all breeding stock. Horse meat purchased locally is far 
below abattoir prices of beef fox meat. This would appear to closely coincide 
with ranch practice throughout the Province. Owing to feeding two tons of 
frozen fish, purchased at a reasonable price, the costs may be a little low during 
the winter months but on the whole they should compare favourably with ranches 
elsewhere. Raccoon hibernate during January, February, and March, and 
eat little during November and December. This will account for the graph of 
feed costs being low for these animals during the above-mentioned periods. 

Fox.— The average cost of feed for one fox at the Experimental Fur Farm 
during 1930 was S17.01. The cost of a pair and their young up to the age of 
three months would be $34.02 for the year. The pups are figured separately 
as adults in the amount of food consumption after June 30th. Each pup 
cost $7.70 to feed from three months up to pelting time. The cost of feed for a 
pair of foxes and three pups for the year 1930 would be $57.12. As the adult 
pair must be carried over each year or pups substituted for breeders, the cost of 
feed for each pup raised to pelting maturity would be $19.04. This is for an 
average of three pups to the litter, which is more than ideal for most ranches. 
As well as the cost of feed for each animal pelted, labour and overhead on pen 
construction must be considered. Compared to other ventures in live stock, 
fox-ranching would appear to be a legitimate enterprise, even at present pelt 
values. 

Mink. — The average feed cost for each mink in 1930 was $8.60. As the 
general practice is to keep one male for every three females, the cost of a unit 
would be $34.40. An average of ten young to a unit would cost $3.51 each or 
$35.10. The total feed cost of a unit of four mink and ten young would be 
S60.50. As the adults are carried over or substituted, each mink raised to pelting 
maturity would cost $6.95 for feed. Mink-raising is remunerative from a pelt 
basis providing the overhead cost of pen construction and labour is not too high. 
In comparison to the fox, the mink will consume a surprising amount of feed for 
such a small animal. 

Raccoon. — Notwithstanding the fact that the raccoons hibernated for at 
least three months and ate but little in two other months and were fed as 
economically as possible without sacrificing a nourishing breeding ration, the 
cost of feed for 1930 was $7.55 per coon. A unit of one male and three females 
would cost $30.20; youngsters $3.53 each so that an average unit of twelve 
young and four adults would cost $72.56 for the year. The feed cost to raise 
each young coon up to December 31st, 1930, was $6.05. However, raccoon 



J^ DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

do not mature the first year and should he kept over until the following pelting 
period before they are suitable as good pelters. The young as a rule do not 
breed until they are two years old so that they cannot be expected to produce 
any further young while being kept over the second year. If they are kept over 
there would be an additional cost of S7.55 each, which brings the cost up to 
$13.60. 

Whether the young are pelted the first year at low prices or kept over until 
the second year and sold at top market price, the cost of feed alone is as much as 
could be expected from the sale of pelts. When the cost of pen construction, 
time, and labour are also added it would appear that at present pelt prices the 
raising of raccoon would not be a profitable venture unless an extremely low- 
priced feed were available. 



Housing of Animals 

There appears to be a tendency to overlook the necessity for providing fur- 
bearing animals with warm, dry nests. It is safe to say that many losses are 
encountered annually due to neglecting this important factor. 

Mink are very susceptible to cold and damp quarters, particularly during 
seasons when the weather is changeable. In October and November, the Fur 
Farm received for examination a number of cases dying with pneumonia. 

If the nest-box is packed full of straw or hay, the mink will make a twisting 
tunnel, leading from the entrance into his nest. This nest is about the size of a 
robin's and is completely covered and hidden from view. Shavings are not 
recommended except during the summer months. If the weather is wet and 
stormy frequent changes of straw are necessary to insure comfortable sleeping 
quarters and healthy surroundings. 

The mink, otter, and beaver can normally swim for hours in the coldest 
waters without any ill effect. Under natural conditions, the strong oily guard 
fur completely protects the soft underfur. The latter will be found to be 
perfectly dry on examination. This is not the case with mink in captivity and 
repeated soaking with rain will gradually penetrate the underfur, producing a 
chilling effect on the body. If this effect is further accentuated by sleeping in 
wet, cold nest-boxes, the resistance to disease is lowered with resulting losses 
from pneumonia. Tail-sloughing appears to be the direct result of insufficient 
and unsuitable bedding at times when the weather is alternately freezing and 
thawing. The skin becomes irritated and infected through constantly rubbing 
on wet and freezing bedding. 

Foxes should be provided with shelter against rain. Not only is the fur adverse- 
ly affected but repeated wettings are injurious to foxes affected with lung worm. 
Lung-worm pneumonia is particularly prevalent in the changeable seasons. 
Adult foxes can withstand the coldest weather, but this is not the case with pups. 
Many new-born pups are lost owing to cold nest-boxes improperly constructed. 
It will pay through the winter months to inspect the nests repeatedly. 

Some adults will chew through the sides and top of the boxes, and the 
packing material will become lost and scattered. Many ranchers now favour a 
nest with a depression on the floor. The pups are thus kept together and 
cannot wander off to the sides of the box and become chilled. The use of heavy 
compressed-paper fabrics for insulating the nest-box is meeting with favour. 



1931 ANNUAL REPORT, 1930 11 

Notes ox Breeding 

Breeding operations have been carried out along strictly practical lines. 
Selective mating and the continued concentration of the descendants of superior 
foxes has resulted in a steady improvement in the pups and pelts. 

Foxes which are not producing a satisfactory quality of pups are being 
rapidly eliminated. 

Cross foxes are attracting considerable attention and many enquiries have 
been received regarding possible results from given matings. Before definite 
statements can be made, thorough investigation of the subject is required. 

So far, reds mated to silver blacks have produced a predominance of red 
pups. A majority of these pups have bluish-black markings on the chest and 
throat. They produce pups with a distinct cross marking, and produce cross 
pups when mated to silvers and black foxes. 

Those engaged in cross fox-breeding are advised to carry on to the second 
generation at least. Particularly is this the case if the pups have the markings 
referred to. 

Distemper of Foxes 

During the past year we had the opportunity of investigating a number of 
outbreaks of infectious diseases among silver foxes. Several of these resembled 
distemper of the dog and were later found to be transmissible from dogs to foxes. 

The foxes were observed on the ranches where the disease occurred and every 
assistance was given the staff in making observations and securing laboratory 
material. 

Cause 

Distemper is a highly contagious disease affecting animals and is due to a 
filtrable virus. The susceptibility of the fox to canine distemper has been a 
subject of considerable controversy among fox ranchers and veterinarians. In 
one particular outbreak, two dogs, obviously suffering from distemper, were 
at liberty in the ranch cook-house. We were of the opinion that it was necessary 
to eliminate or confirm the possibility of the foxes having contracted the disease 
from these dogs. 

With this objective in view, two healthy scrub foxes were shipped to the 
\'eterinary Hospital conducted by Dr. J. A. Campbell, Toronto. They were 
placed in the isolation distemper ward in pens adjacent to dogs manifesting 
all stages of virulent distemper. Both foxes were dead within a month and 
showed similar post-mortem lesions observed later in our investigations. 

Course and Characteristics 

In the epidemics observed, the disease originated in one or two pens, and 
did not break out simultaneously from all quarters of the ranches. Where it 
was not checked, however, in a few weeks a general epidemic was in force. 

The heaviest mortality was among the pups. This is to be expected consider- 
ing the general practice of running the litters in the same pens for the greater 
part of the summer. One infected pup will quickly give the contagion to his 
litter mates. Where pups are housed in sheds a rapid spread can be looked for. 

The thermometer offers little assistance in diagnosing the disease in the 
incubation period, the period when the fox may be sickening but does not show 
any definite symptoms. Even with normal foxes, the excitement of catching 
and handling will elevate the temperature. Once the temperature drops to 
subnormal, i.e. below 100 degrees, death can be expected in a short time. 

3— G & F 



12 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

Symptoms 

A change in the colour and consistency of the feces is an early symptom. At 
first the appetite is irregular, but not entirely lost. A purulent discharge from 
the eyes and nose is usually present and becomes more prominent in the later 
stages. The fox suffers from extreme thirst judging by the craving for water. 
There is a rapid decline in condition, accompanied by a harsh dry pelt. The 
individual hairs tend to stand on end. 

All sense of direction is lost as demonstrated by the fact that the fox walks 
blindly against the kennel and sides of the pen. A tendency to walk in circles 
is very noticeable. Some foxes occasionally emit an unusual sighing sound. 
The odour peculiar to distemper is prevalent and is soon recognized by those 
having experience with the disease in dogs. In the final stages the eye becomes 
sunken in the head, severe twitchings of the extremities develop, and the fox 
dies in a coma, which may last as long as twenty-four hours. 

PosT-MoRTEM Findings 

Post-mortem examinations of foxes frequently show no pathological changes. 
This may be true of cases that have shown severe symptoms for two weeks. 
The carcass is usually emaciated. The emaciation may not be so marked 
in foxes dying rapidly. The most constant change is found in the brain, which 
may be inflamed and contain fluid under its coverings. 

A pale tallow-coloured liver, friable and easily broken, is characteristic. 
Other abnormal conditions, due to systemic infection, such as inflammation of 
the kidneys, lymph glands, intestines, and occasionally the heart muscle, may 
be found. 

Differential Diagnosis 

Encephalitis. — Death occurs within two days, often with no symptoms 
having been noticed. Frequently the fox is picked up dead by the keeper. The 
eyes are prominent and the animals die in convulsions. The carcass is in a 
good state of nutrition. If any discharge is present from the eyes and nostrils, 
it is thin and watery. 

Distemper. — Death may not occur for one to three weeks. The eyes are 
sunken in the head. The carcass is emaciated. There is a purulent discharge 
from eyes and nostrils. The fox dies in coma. 

Prevention 

Canine distemper of the dog is transmissible to foxes. The dangers of 
taking the infection from dogs into the fox ranch are obvious. As a rule 
distemper afl'ects dogs from three to nine months of age. It would be a wise 
precaution to buy only adults for household pets or watch dogs. 

Should the rancher commence losing a fox or two during the winter months- 
it is advisable to determine the exact cause of death. Epidemics appear to have 
commenced in this manner, the disease not assuming alarming proportions until 
the pups are attacked in the early summer. Fox ranches are more or less isolated 
units, and this favourable factor should be fully employed to prevent exposure to 
disease. 

Any foxes purchased or exhibited should be kept isolated from the main 
ranch. 



1931 ANNUAL REPORT, 1930 13 

Treatment 

Once the disease appears, strict sanitation and isolation are the two weapons 
the rancher has to depend upon to fight the disease. Attendants should enter 
the pen only when absolutely necessary. This rule should hold good, even at 
the expense of pen cleaning. It is advisable to feed and water through the wire. 
Foxes showing definite symptoms should be destroyed and the carcasses burned 
or deeply buried. 

Medicinal treatment of the sick individual is of no avail. In the observation 
of over two hundred cases not one fox recovered. 

The attendant handling sick foxes for treatment opens another avenue of 
spreading the infection to healthy foxes. 

Isolation of all foxes that have been in contact with or located in pens near 
the sick ones is imperative. These isolated foxes should be placed in the remotest 
portion of the ranch and watched carefully for any developments. When pen 
space is available, not more than two foxes should be kept together and better 
still one fox to a pen. 

These foxes should have a separate attendant, but if this is not possible the 
hands and footwear must be disinfected when going from one group to the other. 
A shallow pan about half filled with bran and then poured full of disinfectant can 
be left at convenient places for this purpose. If it is necessary to handle sick or 
contact foxes a light coat which can be boiled is useful. 

BlOLOGICS 

The prevention of distemper by the use of biologies has been attempted 
experimentally with encouraging results. Sufficient data, however, have not 
been obtained to warrant specific statements as to their efficiency. Seven foxes 
injected simultaneously with 10 c.c. Laidlaw-Dunkin anti-canine distemper 
serum and 5 c.c. vaccine were exposed to infection and remained healthy. The 
use of 10 c.c. doses of the serum alone appears to check the infection for some two 
to three weeks and would, therefore, need to be repeated every three weeks or 
less to insure protection until the infection subsides. It is to be hoped that 
further research will settle the case of the usefulness of biologies in fox distemper. 

Comment 

While several authorities have stated that canine distemper may be trans- 
mitted to foxes, there has been considerable controversy among men associated 
with the fox industry on this subject. We have found that foxes when exposed 
to natural infection by being placed in pens adjoining dogs suffering from clinical 
distemper came down with the disease. It would appear that the early and 
severe symptoms and the rapid fatal termination rather than the slower course 
followed in dogs is due to the highly nervous constitution of the fox. The fox 
being a wild animal has not been exposed to repeated infections as has the dog 
and would therefore not have any natural immunity against distemper. The 
infection appears to affect the central nervous system, and cases in foxes could 
be likened to the so-called nervous form of distemper in dogs. In over 200 
observed cases of fox distemper not one animal made a recovery. It would thus 
appear that foxes have no natural resistance against the disease. 

Labor.\tory Procedures 

Bacteriological Examination. — Carcasses of foxes dead within 12 hours were 
obtained and blood agar plates planted from the various organs. No patho- 



14 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

genie organisms were isolated with the exception of a pure culture of streptococci 
from two cases. Injections of this organism in foxes and other experimental 
animals failed to give rise to any disease. It would, therefore, appear to be a 
secondary invader of a non-virulent type and certainly not responsible for the 
outbreaks. Smears and cultures of the heart's blood failed to show any organisms, 
nor did the injection of heart's blood intravenously in the ear veins of rabbits 
and subcutaneously and intraperitoneally in guinea pigs give rise to any 
symptoms of disease. Emulsions of ground-up spleen and brain also failed to 
produce the disease in rabbits and guinea pigs. 

Transmission to Foxes. — The clinical picture presented by sick foxes at the 
ranch closely resembled that of canine distemper, which is known to be caused 
by a filtrable virus. As no pathogenic organisms could be isolated, experiments 
were made in infecting fox pups. Intramuscular injections with 2 c.c. of an 
emulsion of the spleen and brain hypodermically produced the disease without 
fail. The material for injections was obtained from a fresh carcass of a fox 
dead of the disease on the affected ranch. 

A Berkefeld filtrate of the brain and spleen of a fox dead of the disease 
was obtained, using a 6- by 1-inch "M" candle. This was plated on blood agar 
to be sure it contained no organisms and was injected intramuscularly and 
produced the disease in its typical form. 

By the use of fox pups for experimental animals the incubation period 
was determined as being from two to three weeks with death in three to four 
weeks. The disease has been proved to be due to a filtrable virus. 

Transmission to Ferrets. — Encephalitis is the only other present known in- 
fectious disease of foxes caused by a filtrable virus. Green ^ states definitely 
that fox encephalitis does not afifect ferrets, nor was he successful in transmitting 
encephalitis to ferrets by injections with the virus of fox encephalitis. It is 
well established that the virus of canine distemper is virulent to ferrets. 

Healthy three-month-old ferrets not previously exposed to distemper were 
secured and injected intramuscularly with an emulsion of the ground-up spleen 
and brain of one of the foxes dying after the above experimental injections. They 
developed typical canine distemper symptoms and also those of fox distemper, 
viz. purulent discharge from the eyes and nose, rapid emaciation, rigours, coma, 
and death. 

A Berkefeld filtrate prepared as outlined above was also injected in a second 
series of ferrets and likewise produced the disease. 

Summary. — A severe infectious disease of foxes has been studied over a 
period of two months. Some 200 cases have been observed and the opportunity 
was afforded of post-morteming numerous carcasses as well as some 20 foxes 
dead within 12 hours for ideal bacterial examination. The disease has been 
proved to be caused by a filtrable virus and is not transmissible to rabbits or 
guinea pigs but is virulent to ferrets. From the symptoms, post-mortem, its 
highly infectious character, transmission to ferrets and its being caused by a 
filtrable virus the disease would appear to be analagous to canine distemper. 

Infectious Pneumonia 

Several severe outbreaks of pneumonia have been reported in the Province 
during the past year. There appears to be two separate types of infection. 
Lobar pneumonia affects fox pups causing a peracute fatal pneumonia. It is 

ijour. of Hygiene, July, 1930. 



1931 ANNUAL REPORT, 1930 15 

to be noted that in the outbreaks under observation no adults contracted the 
disease although many were equally exposed to the infection. The second type 
is that of broncho-pneumonia, and both pups and adults may be equally 
affected. The fox appears to have little resistance to either type and clinical 
cases seldom recover. If the infection is unchecked the mortality is extremely 
heavy, often reaching from 60 to 100 per cent, of the exposed susceptible animals. 

LOBAR PNEUMONIA 

Cause. — A virulent hemolytic streptococcus has been isolated from all cases 
examined. The infection is found in pure culture in the lungs. Smears of the 
bloody serum oozing from the cut surface of the lesions when stained will be found 
to be swarming with gram-positive short-chain streptococci organisms. 

Courseand Characteristics. — In our experience only pup foxes will be attacked. 
Dr.F.W.Schofield^ also reports this to be true in an outbreak investigated in 1929. 
Sometimes the entire litter of four- to five-month old pups will be wiped out while 
the female in the same pen remains healthy. Cases may appear suddenly but can 
generally be traced to one or two pens from where the infection has spread or 
been carried to several parts of the ranch. The history is usually that one or 
two pups of a litter have died but the owner has not been alarmed until the 
infection appeared in several adjacent pens. It is to be noted that outbreaks 
studied have always occurred on ranches where there was lung-worm parasitism. 
Lung worm and weak pups will often be the first cases. 

Symptoms. — Pups may be picked up dead without showing any previous 
symptoms. Usually, however, pups in excellent health and with previous good 
appetites will be noticed to miss their feed. In a few hours they will stand about 
with heaving sides and in apparent distress. The breathing is heavy and 
laboured and especially will this be noticeable if they are chased about the pen 
for catching. Bloody froth may appear at the nose. The affected pups become 
weaker and finally die in a coma. Most cases die in 24 hours but some few may 
last for a week. 

Autopsy. — The carcass is usually in excellent condition unless the fox has 
lasted longer than the usual one to two days. If the animal has been sick for a 
week or more the carcass will be thin and emaciated. Bloody froth drops from 
the nose if the carcass is elevated by the hind legs. On opening the thoracic 
cavity bloody wine-red serus fluid is often present. The entire lung tissue will 
be greatly swollen and congested. The colour is dark red from the engorged 
blood which makes the lung tissue appear like liver-red hepatization. Bloody 
serum oozes from the cut surface of the lung. The thoracic lymph glands are 
enlarged and acutely inflamed. The other body organs are usually normal. 
The characteristic post-mortem with the engorged lung tissue is diagnostic. 

BRONCHO-PNEUMONIA 

Cause. — A mixed infection is present with a virulent streptococcus as the 
predominant organism accompanied by staphylococcus and colon. 

Course and Characteristics. — The disease is a typical pneumonia with sickness 
lasting about three days to one week in adults. When pups are attacked they 
succumb in a few days. Foxes of all ages will contract the disease if equally 
exposed to infection. The history is usually that a few adult foxes have been 

lOntario \'eterinary College Report, 1929. 



16 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

lost during the early spring but the owner has paid no attention until the infection 
has spread and cases suddenly appear in all parts of the ranch. When the pups 
are thus exposed they appear more susceptible and the owner may lose all of 
them before he realizes the seriousness of the situation or has time to take any 
precautions. When the pups are exposed they do not last long and also help to 
spread the infection to the rest of the adults. When once exposed, the adults 
appear just as susceptible as the pups but they will not succumb as quickly 
The adults may last two days to one week. 

Symptoms. — A number of animals will be affected suddenly, as opposed to 
the gradual onset of secondary lung-worm pneumonia or verminous bronchitis. 
The breathing is laboured with a distinct rattling sound in the trachea. This 
peculiar sound is produced by each breath being forced past the large amounts of 
pus that accumulate in the upper air passages. A purulent discharge may drip 
from the nose and sometimes small amounts will collect in the corners of the 
eyes. The appetite is fair at first but gradually lessens. The stools are normal 
at the outset but later and just prior to death the feces become liquid and foul- 
smelling. The foxes become weaker and die in a coma. 

Autopsy. — Post-mortem findings are characteristic of broncho-pneumonia. 
Areas of pneumonia are found throughout the lung tissue. The lungs are 
enlarged but the pneumonic areas are distinct and do not tend to run together 
or involve the entire lung. The bronchioles and trachea are inflamed and filled 
with much purulent material. The cut surface of the lung tissue will ooze 
greenish pus from ever\' tiny air passage. The lower bowel may show 
slight traces of inflammation from the severe diarrhoea in the last stages of the 
disease. The other organs show no lesions. The carcass is usually in good con- 
dition but this will depend on the length of sickness. Emaciation is seldom 
present. 

TREATMENT AND PREVENTION 

The two pneumonias will be considered together as to treatment and preven- 
tions. Their differentiation is not of importance to fox ranchers. Medicinal 
treatment of the aftected foxes is not advisable. Any clinical cases and also all 
foxes in the same pen as those showing symptoms or in pens where other foxes 
have died should be immediately isolated in special pens or placed in the remotest 
part of the ranch and watched for development. Care should be exercised not 
to carry the infection to other parts of the ranch on the feet or with the feed. 
The foxes should be fed and watered from outside the pens and the pens should 
not be entered unless absolutely necessary. 

Whenever foxes die from an unknown cause the carcasses should be sent 
immediately after death to a pathologist for post-mortem examination. Once 
a definite diagnosis is given steps can be taken immediately to stop the spread 
of further infection. Once the disease is found in several parts of the ranch 
the difficulty of stopping further losses is more than doubled. Ranchers would 
be well advised to have every death on the ranch accounted for as soon after 
death as posible. 

When a definite diagnosis of infectious pneumonia is arrived at and the 
causative organisms isolated an autogenous bacterin may be prepared at the 
laboratory. With proper facilities this will take two or three days to prepare. 
Injections will be found to be of great benefit in stopping the spread of further 
infection. Eacterin treatments of sick animals mav also be of value. If the 



1931 ANNUAL REPORT, 1930 i7 

ranch has sufifered outbreaks on successive years it will be well to have a con- 
siderable quantity of the bacterin prepared and to inject the foxes each year. 

LABORATORY PROCEDURES 
Lobar Pneumonia 

Bacteriological Findings. — Stained smear of the bloody exudate oozing from 
the cut lung surface shows gram-positive cocci both singly and in short chains. 
A stained smear of the trachea shows both short-chain streptococci and grouped 
gram-positive staphylococci. 

Blood agar culture plates of the cut lung surface showed pure culture of a 
markedly hemolytic organism. Colonies are grey, tiny discrete and are sur- 
rounded by a lake of hemolysis. Plates of the trachea show both hemolytic 
and staphylococcus colonies. 

Animal Inoculation. — Rabbits injected intravenously in the ear vein with a 
drop of the exudate oozing from the cut lung tissue died in 36 hours. A stained 
smear of their heart's blood shows numerous gram-positive cocci arranged singly 
and in short chains. An injection with heart's blood intravenously into two more 
rabbits caused death in 18 hours. 

Cultural Characteristics. — The cultural characteristics are as follows: 

Agar slants — No perceptible growth. 

Blood agar — -Tiny discrete grey colonies in the centre of a lake of marked hemolysis. 

Colonies tend to remain separate, no spreading. 
Broth- — Not good growth unless serum added, sediment. 
Gelatin stab — Slight growth on surface, no liquefaction. 
Litmus milk^Ac'id reaction, no curdling. 
Potato slants — No growth. 
Sugar reactions — Ferments dextrose, lactose, salicin with acid but no gas. No 

action in mannite, maltose, saccharose. 
Staining — Gram-positive cocci. In tissue form short chains. 

Autogenous Bacterin. — Four blood agar slants and one tube of serum broth 
planted with the hemolytic streptococcus isolated in pure culture from the lungs. 
One agar slant of the Staphylococcus aureus isolated from the trachea. Growth 
for 24 hours and then slants washed off with normal saline and mixed with the 
broth tubes in sealed ampules and heated in water bath for one hour at 65° C. 
A few drops of each ampule planted on blood agar plates as test for sterility. 
No growth in 24 hours. Diluted with sterile normal saline to the required 
strength and placed in sterile containers with rubber needle caps and 0.5 per 
cent, phenol added as a preservative. 

The dose is 3^ c.c. two days apart to all exposed foxes. 

Control. — Injected fox pup placed in pen with a sick fox. The pup 
showed no signs of disease although the sick pup died about 10 days after of 
hemolytic streptococcus pneumonia. Shortly after the injections 7 immunized 
pups escaped from their pen and dug into a pen where four pups had died of 
pneumonia, the last one the day prior. The pups ate what feed remained in the 
pen and stayed in the kennel over night, but all remained healthy. After the 
entire ranch had been inoculated no further cases developed, although two pups 
died while the bacterin was being prepared. One hundred and twenty-five 
exposed fox pups and a few adults were treated with two 14 c.c. doses of the 
bacterin given two days apart. 



18 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

Conclusion. — An outbreak of infectious pneumonia in silver foxes has been 
studied and found to be caused by a hemolytic streptococcus. It would appear 
to be a virulent organism causing the death of fox pups with a severe lobar 
pneumonia. Age immunity is marked in adult foxes. Although several adult 
females were equally exposed to the infection none developed the disease. The 
outbreak was checked after a mortality of 10 per cent, in the pups before treat- 
ment was commenced. Immediate isolation of sick and contact animals and 
rigid sanitation was advised and an autogenous bacterin prepared. The bacterin 
appeared to be of great benefit and gave an immediate positive immunity. 
Injected control fox pups placed with sick animals were 100 per cent, protected. 
As with all outbreaks of infectious disease, this one may have been self-limiting 
but the controls favour good results from the bacterin. The above outbreak 
appears to be similar to that of one studied by Dr. F. W. Schofield and recorded 
in the Ontario \ eterinary College Report, 1929. 

Broncho- Pneumonia 

The outbreak occurred on a modern, well-kept ranch causing a total loss 
of 67 foxes which included all the pups, some 45 in number, and 22 adults of all 
ages. Two visits v/ere paid to the ranch but no error in management could be 
detected. The pens were almost all completely board-floored and no serious 
trouble had occurred from lung-worm infection. Several adults had died from 
time to time and the losses were increasing when the pups arrived. The pups 
all died within a short period. The remaining adults were then affected in 
epidemic proportions. Cases had occurred in all parts of the ranch showing that 
the infection was widespread. 

Bacteriological Findings. — Stained smears of the cut lung tissue oozing with 
pus from the tiny bronchioles showed several organisms. When plated out on 
blood agar, streptococci, staphylococci, and colon bacilli were isolated. 

Injections of the pus from the lungs intravenously into the ear veins of 
rabbits caused death in 48 hours. Both streptococcus and staphylococcus 
organisms were present in stained smears of the heart's blood of the injected 
rabbits. Ferrets injected subcutaneously with pus from the fox lungs came 
down with a typical broncho-pneumonia similar to that of the foxes and died 
in ten days. The same organisms were isolated from the ferret lungs as were 
found present in the fox-lung lesions. 

An autogenous bacterin containing all three organisms was prepared and 
all the remaining foxes injected with 3^ c.c. doses two days apart. Three more 
animals died while the bacterin was being prepared, but no further losses occurred 
after ten days from the first injections. Apparently the three foxes died before 
they had time to work up sufficient immunity. One of these foxes was given 
3^ c.c. injections of bacterin every two days, but although it lasted some three 
weeks and appeared well on the way to recovery it finally succumbed. 

Summary. — An outbreak of infectious disease in silver foxes has been 
studied and would appear to be a severe broncho-pneumonia caused by a mixed 
infection with streptococci, staphylococci, and colon. Cultures of the intestines 
failed to show any paratyphoid organisms, which have been recorded as causing 
somewhat similar outbreaks. The infection had been well established before 
it was brought to our attention and the mortality was high with a loss of 67 foxes 
out of 89 on the ranch. An autogenous bacterin was prepared and its injection 
appeared to stop further losses. Broncho-pneumonia is the predominant 
symptom and post-mortem lesion. 



1931 ANNUAL REPORT. 1930 19 

It is to be regretted that we were not able to investigate the outbreak 
sooner when the bacterin could have been of use in keeping down the losses. 
Ranchers would be well advised to call in qualified assistance as soon as possible 
in cases of infectious disease. Once the infection becomes well established the 
difficulty in stopping its spread is more than doubled. Outbreaks may run 
their course and subside after the losses reach a certain maximum. In this 
instance the value of the prepared bacterin may be only an assumption. 

Tuberculosis in a Wild Raccoon 
History 

Three wild raccoon were sent to the Fur Farm on May 28th (seizure No. 
7,951 — Legault). Three months later, on August 28th, one that had been in 
poor condition for some time died. 

Autopsy 

The carcass was in a generally poor condition, with a total absence of body 
fat, which is most unusual in this species of animal. The abdominal cavity was 
greatly distended with ascitic fluid. The peritoneum presented a par-boiled 
appearance. The stomach was found to contain numerous blood-sucking 
nematodes, later identified as Physaloptera sp. The lining mucosa was inflamed 
where the parasites had been attached. The outer wall of the stomach, 
omentum, and spleen were involved in a huge abscess-tumour formation. 
Intestinal lymphatic glands were enlarged and somewhat caseous. Lungs and 
heart were normal and showed no lesions. 

Laboratory Diagnosis 

A smear of the pus from the spleen was stained with Gram's method but 
showed up no pathogens. An acid-fast stain was also attempted for tubercle 
bacilli but none could be demonstrated. Blood agar culture plates were negative. 

Animal Inoculation. — The possibility of tuberculosis could not be over- 
looked, so a guinea pig was injected hypodermically with an emulsion of the 
ground-up spleen in normal saline. On September 25th, the injected guinea pig 
died in an emaciated condition. The autopsy showed a perfect picture of 
miliary tubercular lesions throughout the entire intestinal organs and lymphatic 
glands. The spleen was enlarged and showed areas of caseation. The peritoneum 
was studded with a multitude of tiny tubercles. Acid-fast stain revealed the 
presence of long curved acid-fast bacilli. Culture was attempted on egg media 
but was unsuccessful. Two more guinea pigs were injected subcutaneously 
with an emulsion of the ground-up spleen of the dead guinea pig. One of these 
died on October 22nd, and showed lesions identical with the above. The mate 
was seen to be emaciated and likely to die so it was sent to Dr. Neil McKinnon, 
pathologist at the Connaught Laboratories, Toronto, for positive diagnosis and 
type determination. 

The second guinea pig died on November 11th and was given for autopsy 
to Dr. M. H. Brown, who reported as follows: 

Inguinal lymph glands enlarged and caseous. Direct smear shows numerous long curved 
and beaded acid-fast bacilli. Greater omentum was a much enlarged mass of coalesced tubercles. 
Lesser omentum studded with small yellow-grey tubercles. Retroperitoneal glands enlarged and 
caseous. Spleen enlarged three times its usual size, red in colour and with large yellow necrotic 
areas. Smears from all lesions show acid-fast tubercle bacilli. Lungs were studded with isolated 



20 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

yellowish areas 2 to 4 m.m. in diameter. Small tubercles present along the insertion of the 
diaphragm. Tracheo-bronchial glands enlarged and caseous when cut into. Smears show acid- 
fast bacilli. A small growth was successfully obtained on egg media after five weeks' culture. 

Diagnosis. — Tuberculosis. 

Type. — Not determined at date of writing. 

Summary 

A case of tuberculosis has been met with in a wild coon. The diagnosis 
was difficult but the inoculation of guinea pigs brought out the fresh lesions 
with more numerous bacilli. Infection may have been caused from eating a 
tubercular chicken or from being fed milk from a tubercular cow. 

We wish to acknowledge the kindness of Dr. Neil McKinnon and Dr. M. 
H. Brown of the Connaught Laboratories for confirming the tuberculosis diagnosis 
and determination of the type. 

Lung-Worm Pneumonic Bacterin 

Secondary broncho-pneumonia following lung-worm parasitism is by far 
the most common cause of death in foxes sent to the Experimental Fur Farm 
for autopsy. Lung worms present in the trachea and bronchioles of parasitized 
foxes set up a continual irritation and the resulting inflammation thereby weakens 
the lungs. Foxes so affected are most susceptible to infections, and secondary 
pneumonia is a common sequence. Broncho-pneumonia or catarrh is the 
common clinical symptom of lung-worm parasitism. The severity differs from 
a slight bronchial catarrh to pneumonia involving the entire lung substance. 
It is noted that the number of cases received at the Experimental Fur Farm 
are increased during and following adverse weather conditions. Pup foxes 
have less resistance and will often succumb quickly, while affected adults may 
appear healthy except for the harsh bronchial cough. On certain ranches where 
parasitism with lung worms is heavy the owner may lose considerable numbers of 
pups each year from lung complications following lung-worm infection. 

Routine bacteriological examination of autopsied lung-worm fox carcasses 
reveals that a number of organisms may be involved. Those commonly present 
include Staphylococcus aureus and albus, several streptococci, Alcaligines 
bronchisepticus, and Escherichia coli communis. Several other organisms may 
be included. Staphylococcus is the predominant organism. It is well 
known that staphylococcic bacterins give good results both as a preven- 
tative and in clearing up pus conditions. \Mth this object in mind, 
bacterins were prepared containing large amounts of staphylococcus and 
in proportion the other organisms listed above. All were isolated from cases 
of secondary broncho-pneumonia or so called lung-worm pneumonia of foxes. 
Some 1,500 c.c. was prepared and given to nearby ranchers that have had trouble 
from lung-worm infections each year. The ranchers reported excellent results 
and several severe cases brought to the farm for treatment were kept over and 
treated with gratifying results. 

The bacterin will not get rid of the lung worms and is not intended for 
that purpose. It will, however, clean up the pus condition that is usually 
present in the trachea and lungs. It is doubtful if the ordinary infection with 
lung worms alone will cause serious trouble to the fox. But it is the weakened 
condition of the lungs that leaves the animal susceptible to secondary infections 
that cause pneumonia and bronchitis, which often lead to death. The 
pneumonia is the real cause of death and not the lung worm. By cleaning up 
the existing pus condition the animal is enabled to breathe properly and to 



1931 ANNUAL REPORT, 1930 21 

fight off the possible pneumonia. The danger of pneumonia is lessened and the 
fox is able to breathe without difficulty and may be tided over until pelting time. 

Injections appear to be of great value in treating litters of pups that first 
show lung-worm symptoms. If the pups are kept healthy until the cold weather 
arrives, the danger of more lung-worm infection is lessened and by the next spring 
the fox is old enough to have developed a certain amount of resistance to the 
lung worm and as a rule will not show any further ill-effects. Fox pups that are 
known by feces test to have lung worms may be given one or two injections as a 
preventative. On ranches where losses from lung-worm complications run high 
each year it might be wise to inject all the pups several times each year. 

Fox ranchers that have been given generous trial amounts of the bacterin 
are enthusiastic in its praise. They say that it is surprising how a sick fox will 
brighten up and its appetite increase after a few injections. Ranchers that have 
had serious losses each year with pups dying from lung-worm pneumonia report 
a marked lessening in mortalities. Affected foxes will soon breathe easily, 
increase in weight, and usually grow good pelts by fall. A few experimental 
cases brought to the farm responded to injections of the bacterin, and carefully 
checked cases reported from nearby ranches prove the value of autogenous 
bacterin injections. 

It is to be noted that autogenous bacterins give consistently better results 
than stock preparations. That is to say if a rancher loses a fox from lung- worm 
pneumonia and brings in the fresh carcass, a bacterin may then be prepared 
that contains the special type of infection existing on his ranch. 

Bacterins prepared from the organisms most commonly found present in 
the lungs and trachea of foxes dying from verminous bronchitis or so-called 
lung-worm pneumonia are found to be of great merit in cleaning up the pus 
condition in the lungs. Pneumonia that usually follows lung-worm infection 
may be treated effectively or prevented by its injections. Autogenous bacterins 
appear to be more efficacious than stock preparations. 

Snuffles 

This disease of rabbits appears to be more or less prevalent in many parts 
of the Province. In the future, should rabbit-raising become seriously com- 
mercialized, as is now the case in the United States, the disease would be of 
economic importance. 

Snuffles has been studied over a lengthy period and our findings would 
correspond, in the main, to those already voiced by previous scientific workers. 
There are two forms of the disease, viz. the chronic or common type, which 
resembles a cold in the head, and a septicemia which causes death in forty-eight 
hours. We have found that chronic sore hocks, following an outbreak of snuffles, 
may be due to a latent infection localizing as abscess formations on the hocks 
and other locations. SnufHes is not hereditary as was formally believed by many 
rabbit breeders. The supposition has arisen from the fact that some healthy 
ral)bits may harbour the snuffle organism in their nasal passages. They may, 
however, pass the disease to other rabbits or to their young after weaning, and 
this accounts for the failure of certain animals to raise healthy young and also 
for the repeated losses following an initial outbreak of the disease. As exposure 
to dampness and cold reduces their vitality, rabbits are more susceptible to 
snuffles in the late fall and early spring months. 

Medicinal treatment is of little value in established cases. It would be 
advisable to immediately destroy the first cases rather than attempt treatment 



22 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

and risk the spreading of snuffles to other parts of the rabbitry. Following 
outbreaks any rabbits suffering from sore hocks or any does that repeatedly 
fail to raise healthy young should be eliminated. 

Board Floors for the Prevention of Lung Worm 

Board floors were first constructed in twenty pens at the Experimental 
Fur Farm in November, 1928. By that time, tests of the foxes showed that 
lung-worm infection was increasing and if left unchecked would likely become 
a serious problem. Periodical tests for the presence of parasites are carried out 
regularly as routine work at the farm. Preliminary tests of the first pups 
born from infected parents kept on board floors were so conclusive that twenty- 
four additional double pens were remodelled and board-floored in November, 

1929. Of the fifty fox pens at the farm, all are now board-floored with the 
exception of three concrete and three gravel pens, which are kept especially 
for experimental work with parasites. 

Construction. — First experiences show that the floor should be built with a 
decided slope and with the lumber laid lengthways with the slope. Boards 
should be straight-edged and laid close together. In time, the warping and 
shrinkage will leave a slight crack between the boards. Rapid and perfect 
drainage is thus provided. The floor should have a 6-inch drop in each 20 feet 
and should be so constructed as to leave plenty of space, at least 13^ to 2 feet, 
between it and the ground. This allow^s space for a good circulation of air 
under the floor and assists in the rapid drying out of the floor after a heavy rain. 
Most parasitic eggs require a certain amount of moisture for their development. 
It is the lack of moisture on properly constructed board floors that stops the 
lung-worm eggs from developing. 

Four of the pens were floored in 1928 with lumber resting on 2- by 4-inch 
scantlings laid on the gravel bottoms of old pens. These pens were later found 
to be useless in the prevention of lung worm. Pups born here were found to 
be just as badly infested as those from infected parents born on dirt or gravel 
pens. Apparently the floor was too close to the ground and the moisture kept 
the floors in a state of dampness sufficient for parasitic development. Such 
floors do not dry out as rapidly after rains as is necessary. 

Pups. — In 1929, a total of 53 pups were born to known infected foxes 
that had been placed in board-floored pens in November, 1928. These pups 
were raised to maturity on boards and showed consistently negative tests for 
lung-worm eggs throughout the entire year. Some of these pups were pelted 
that December and contained no lung worms. An exception is noted of twelve 
additional fox pups that were born from infected parents kept in the renovated 
pens where the floors were laid too close to the ground as mentioned above. 

Thirty-nine pups were born to infected parents kept on board floors in 

1930. They were also negative in every case for lung-worm eggs. These pups 
also showed a marked decrease in hook-worm infestation. Very few pups showed 
any hook-worm eggs throughout the entire four tests performed during the year. 
A number of these pups were pelted in December and autopsies revealed very 
few cases of hook worms and no lung worms, but round worms were still present 
in the pups that had not been wormed. Board floors do not appear to be of 
any appreciable value in preventing round worms. 



1931 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1930 



23 



Tests of Adult Foxes on Board Floors 





1928 


1929 


1930 


Pelted 


Tattoo No. 


Nov. 


May 


July 


Sept. 


Nov. 


May 


July 


Sept. 


Nov. 


P.M. 


ZF 2 C 


+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 


+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 


+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 


+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 


+ 
+ 
+ 



+ 


+ 
+ 
+ 
















BRT 2 C 


+ 


SL4 B 










+ 


PC 56 C 


+ 













10 D SL 





B 32 










+ 


B 26 



+ 

























B 21 





VA 2 





JP3 B 










Adults. — The above table illustrates the lung-worm tests of ten adult foxes 
placed on board floors in November, 1928. While only ten foxes are shown, 
the results are the same for the 32 foxes. Eight of the foxes were finally 
pelted and a post-mortem examination confirmed the tests and is also recorded 
in the last column. Positive test is denoted by "-f" and negative for lung- 
worm eggs by "0." 

Known infected adults were placed in board-floored pens in November, 
1928. All of the 32 still tested positive in the spring of 1929. Tests during 
1929 show that some few adults gradually became free of lung worms by 
November, but the majority were not clean until the spring of 1930. Two 
foxes still tested positive with a light infection in May, but were both 
clean by July of 1930. All the adult foxes still on the ranch that had been 
placed in properly constructed board-floored pens were clean by test in July. 
1930. This applies only to the foxes continually kept on boards, as one or two 
foxes when testing clean were placed back in gravel pens and were reinfested 
within three months. Board floors stop reinfestation but the parasites then in 
the fox remain alive for some time. All the foxes were clean after a twenty 
months' continuous period on board floors. Hook-worm infestation is also at a 
minimum by this method of pen flooring. Examination of the carcasses of 
numerous foxes pelted this fall show a remarkably light hook-worm infection 
and no lung worm in foxes kept on board floors. 

Concrete Floors. — Three pens were floored with concrete as an experiment to 
ascertain its efficiency in parasitic prevention. Pups born in these pens 
in 1929 were negative for lung worm. In the fall of 1929, a shade roof was con- 
structed over the pens as they were thought to be rather hot for the foxes. In 
1930, a total of 11 pups were born to infected foxes in these pens but all were 
found to be heavily infested with lung worm. Round and hook worms were 
also present in considerable numbers, which necessitated repeated pilling of the 
pups. Except for a few cases of round worms, none of the pups raised on board 
floors has been pilled since the floors were first constructed. Apparently the 
shade roof prevented the concrete from drying off as rapidly as was necessary. 
Enough moisture was left in the tiny crevices to give the required degree 
of dampness necessary for egg development. Perhaps if the concrete had been 
finished smoothly this would not have been the case. 

Conclusion. — Board floors of proper construction will prevent lung-worm 
infestation in pups born from infected parents. Adults will in time clean up, 



24 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

but it takes about two years. Hook-worm infection is lessened, but round worms 
are not affected. Concrete floors are of questionable value. 

Injurious Parasites 

Autopsy findings invariably reveal one or more parasites in ranch-bred 
animals and also in those brought directly from the wilds. Some of these worms 
have little significance in adversely affecting the health of the host. Others are 
highly injurious and result in losses. 

Armed Lung Worm of Fox 

This dangerous worm (Crenosoma decoratum) was found for the first time 
in Ontario in two red foxes forwarded to the farm directly from the trap lines. 
They were in poor condition and did not eat well, and a purulent discharge 
from the eyes and nostrils was observed. 

On autopsy, lung worms were found in the trachea (wind-pipe) and deeper 
lung tissue. An area of inflammation with exudates of pus surrounded each 
individual worm. It is easily recognized, being shorter and much heavier than 
the common lung worm. The armed lung worm does not lay eggs, in the manner 
of the common lung worm, but deposits living larvae in the intestines of the 
fox. These pass to the ground, develop, and ultimately reinfect him. 

The symptoms may be confused with some of the infectious diseases, and 
the fox should be isolated until a diagnosis is made. 

The use of wire floors raised some two feet off' the ground is advocated for 
treatment. This will allow the larvae-infested droppings to pass to the ground 
and at the same time prevent the fox from coming in contact with them. Single 
boards placed around the inside wall of the pen will allow the fox considerable 
scope for exercise and he will quickly learn to make use of them. 

Laboratory Diagnosis.- — The sugar or salt flotation test for the detection of 
worm eggs is not satisfactory for larvae. The best results are obtained with the 
Baermann isolation apparatus. If it is not available, the larvae can be recovered 
by sedimentation. 

The feces are mixed with several times their volume in water and strained 
through a fine screen to eliminate the coarser elements, the sediment being 
allowed to settle. A small amount of the latter is taken up with a pipette and 
examined under the low-power microscope. 

Kidney Worm 

This worm {Dioctopliyme renalis) has been found to be prevalent among 
wild mink in the vicinity of the Experimental Fur Farm. It has also been found 
in ranch-bred mink. Frequently a number of animals in the same ranch will be 
affected. During the trapping season, trappers have been good enough to send 
many carcasses to the farm. This has been of great help in studying parasitic 
conditions among wild animals. 

The kidney worm must be considered as a very injurious one, and of much 
economic importance to the fur trade. It is easily recognized, being one of 
the largest of the round worms, ranging from 4 to 18 inches in length in the 
mink. It is blood-red in colour. The favourite location is the centre of the 
kidney, though we have found it, in mink, in the thoracic and abdominal cavity. 
Given time the worm completely digests the kidney tissue, which becomes a 
mere shell or capsule to house the worm. The worm is usually associated with 
a bony deposit. 



1931 ANNUAL REPORT, 1930 25 

The worm can sometimes be detected in the living mink; the enlarged 
capsule can be felt as an enormously enlarged kidney. Pen-raised mink infested 
with the worm may show a tendency to drag the hindquarters, and may become 
paralyzed. Fits, emaciation, and loss of appetite are also noticeable. The egg 
laid by the worm is ovoid in shape and dark-brown in colour and has a well- 
defined capsule. It can be recovered in the urine and occasionally in the feces 
through contamination. 

Treatment for the elimination of the worm is not possible, owing to the 
location in the kidney. Prevention is, however, practicable and easily accom- 
plished. 

Prevention. — From evidence gathered this year, mink ranchers are advised 
to cook fish taken from sluggish waters for at least ten minutes in boiling water. 
The catfish appears to be a large factor in spreading the disease. The immature 
or larval form of the worm lives in freshwater fish at some stage of its existence 
and develops to maturity when swallowed by the mink. Of the many fish 
inhabiting sluggish streams we can only discriminate against the catfish species 
at the present time, though further studies may reveal that others carry the 
larv^al form of the kidney worm. 

Tapeworms 

The tapeworms {Di phyllohrothrium latum and Diphyllohrothriiim cordatum) 
have not been considered a serious problem in foxes and have seldom been found 
in foxes sent to the Fur Farm for post-mortem. This year, however, they were 
found in forty-five examinations. Two species have been identified, D. latum 
and D. cordatum. The life cycle of D. latum has been fully worked out, and 
D. cordatum is in every likelihood similar. 

In the fox they were from 2 to 14 inches in length according to the stage of 
development reached, and were found inhabiting the lower portion of the 
intestines. With minor differences, they are typical tapeworms, being flat and 
distinctly segmented. 

It has been definitely established that the infection is acquired through eating 
fish, the final larval stage having been found in pike, lake herring, perch, and 
many others. If fish are eaten in the raw state, the young worms locate in 
the intestinal tract of the fox and reach maturity in from five to six weeks. It is 
altogether likely that in certain areas the fish are much more heavily infested 
than in others. If post-mortems are done on pelting foxes and they are found 
to be infested with these tapeworms it would be advisable to cook the fish in 
boiling water for ten minutes. 

Treatment. — Arecoline hydrobromide given by the mouth was found to 
remove tapeworms in foxes. However, it should be kept clearly in mind that 
this is a dangerous drug, if not used with proper precautions. It should not be 
given to foxes suffering with heavy lung-worm infestation as it has a tendency 
to affect respiration. Normal foxes can tolerate a dose of 1/4 grain, but not more 
than 1/8 grain is recommended if lung worm is at all prevalent. 

After treatment, the fox should be placed in a clean crate and the feces 
examined for the expelled tapeworm. This is best accomplished by stirring the 
feces in several times their volume of water. The tapeworms will be noticed 
in the disintegrated fecal matter. 

Physaloptera Sp. 

Worms belonging to this genus are frequently found in raccoon, and from 
external appearances are very similar to the ordinary round worm. They 



26 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



chiefly occur in the stomach, where they attach themselves to the lining in 
large numbers. These worms are blood suckers. The lips are provided with 
"teeth" and produce a considerable irritation of the stomach wall. 

If raccoon remain thin in spite of good feeding, the presence of parasites 
may be suspected. At the Fur Farm adult raccoons have been given 8 m.m. 
and kittens 3 m.m. of tetrachlorethylene without toxic results. 



CROWN GAME PRESERVES 

In the following list will be found the title, location, and area of the existing 
Crown Game Preserves in Ontario, as at December 31st, 1930: 



Crown Game Preserve 



Location 



Acreage 



Abbey Dawn 

Anderdon township 

Bobcaygeon 

Boyd 

Caverly 

Chapleau 

Chippewa 

Cobourg 

Conroy marsh 

Darlington 

Dumfries 

Dundas marsh 

Eden 

Eugenia 

Falcon 

Glendale 

Glen Elm 

Gloucester 

Goulais River-Ranger lake . 

Hiawatha 

Hope 

Hughes 

Huron 

Innisfree 

Iroquois 

Loch Garry 

Mallard lake 

Masonville 

Meadowvale 

Miner 

Mississauga-White river. . 

Nipissing 

Nopiming 

Nottawasaga 

Peasemarsh 

Peel 

Proton 

Puslinch 

■ Richmond 

Rockcliffe Park 

Shirley bay 

Silver lake 

Southwold 

Sudbury 

Superior 

Township 82 

Toronto township 

Wilder lake 

Woodlands 

York 



Frontenac county 

Essex county 

Victoria and Peterborough counties. 

York county 

Elgin county 

Algoma and Sudbury districts 

Thunder Bay district 

Northumberland county 

Renfrew county 

Durham county 

Waterloo and Brant counties 

Wentworth county 

Wellington county 

Grey county 

Kenora district 

Wentworth county 

Halton county 

Carleton county 

Algoma district 

Algoma district 

Durham county 

Bruce county 

Huron county 

Simcoe county 

Manitoulin district 

Glengarry county 

Grey county 

Middlesex county 

Peel county 

Essex county 

Algoma 

Nipissing district 

Renfrew and Carklon counties 

Simcoe county 

Grey county 

Peel county 

Grey county 

Wellington county 

Parry Sound district 

Carleton county 

Carleton county 

Norfolk county 

Elgin county 

Sudbury district 

Thunder Bay district 

Sudbury district 

Peel county 

Grey county 

Halton county 

York county 



Total . 



300 

1,200 

1,700 

300 

25 

1,824,000 

2,728 

200 

3,300 

298 

25,000 

2,750 

1,470 

5,200 

15,000 

450 

325 

200 

345,600 

160 

1,920 

400 

1,000 

400 

150 

6,400 

100 

6,500 

300 

1,280 

358,400 

155,500 

1,540 

1,200 

300 

2,400 

6,240 

704 

56 

500 

2,700 

3,100 

200 

15,500 

575,000 

5,760 

3,000 

4,000 

460 

115,000 

3,500,216 



1931 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1930 



27 



During the year the following were established: Goulais River-Ranger 
Lake, Mississauga-White River, Woodlands, and Cobourg. The first two are 
extensive areas set aside in the district of Algoma for the natural protection of 
game, birds, and fur-bearing animals, and will be organized along the lines of 
the Chapleau Game Preserve. It is anticipated that the results to be achieved 
from this action will, in the future, as in the case of the Chapleau Game Preserve, 
justify the creation of these two additional Crown Game Preserves. 

In addition the townships of Medora and Wood, in the district of Muskoka, 
were closed during the year to hunting and trapping for a period of four years, 
continuing and extending a regulation of the previous year, which had closed 
these two townships for a one-year period. 

Similar restrictions covering a one-year period were ordered for the town- 
ship of Cardwell, adjoining Medora and Wood, in accordance with a request 
from the municipal authorities. 

During the year, the Order-in-Council which established the Marmora 
Crown Game Preserve, in the county of Hastings, was rescinded at the request 
of the landowners involved, and this Crown Game Preserve ceased to exist. 

In this connection all our reports are to the effect that not only sportsmen, 
but the general public as well, are realizing more and more the increasing value 
of these sanctuaries as places of refuge for our wild life, and the extent of the 
benefits to be derived by the surrounding country from the establishment of 
these Game Preserves. In cases where privately owned lands are involved, 
one can only be impressed with the splendid spirit of co-operation which is 
e ;emplified by the landowners concerned. 

WOLF BOUNTIES 

During 1930, the Department received applications for the payment of 
bounty on 2,551 wolves, which marked a considerable decrease compared with 
the total of the previous year, notwithstanding the provision which became 
effective during the year for the payment of an increased bounty where certain 
conditions as to the localities where the animals were taken could be 
complied with. As usual the large majority of the applications covered pelts 
from animals which had been taken in the extreme northwestern section of 
the Province. 

Comparative Statement of Wolf Skins Received and Bounties Paid 



Timber 



Brush 



Pups 



Total 



Bounties 



For fiscal year ending October 31st, 1926. 
For fiscal year ending October 31st, 1927 . 
For fiscal year ending October 31st, 1928. 
For fiscal year ending October 31st, 1929. 
For fiscal year ending October 31st, 1930. 



1,022 
1,041 
1,231 
1,165 
1,070 



2,690 
4,414 
4,878 
2,389 
1,458 



107 
59 
64 
34 
23 



3,819 
5,514 
6,173 
3,588 
2,551 



$51,994.42 
82,970.07 
91,297.27 
53,495.13 
38,074.77 



ENFORCEMENT OF THE ACT 

The enforcement of the provisions and regulations of the Ontario Game and 
Fisheries Act was performed in a very satisfactory manner by the field oflftcers 
charged with the work. The service rendered by the District Superintendents 
and the Overseers under their respective jurisdictions was satisfactorily 
augmented during the spring and fall spawning and deer-hunting seasons by 



28 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

numerous seasonal overseers appointed for duty during these periods for the 
better protection of fish and game and enforcement of the Act. 

In this connection we would like to take advantage of this opportunity to 
make favourable mention of the services rendered by the 358 parties who received 
appointments throughout the year as Deputy Game and Fisheries Wardens. 
These Deputy Wardens, many of whom are members of the Fish and Game 
Protective Associations of the Province, and all of whom are very much interested 
in the work of conservation and enforcement, as is evidenced by their willing- 
ness to act, accept the appointment without remuneration, and perform their 
services in an unselfish manner, rendering a degree of assistance and co-operation 
which it would be difficult to replace, and which is, as a result, very much, 
appreciated. 

In 1,253 cases in which parties were charged with violations of fish and 
game regulations, convictions were secured, and fines and costs assessed, as S2t 
forth in the statement of revenue given in a previous section of this report. 

In 1,635 cases, seizures of goods and equipment were made. A summary of 
the articles is as follows: 

Pelts 4,019 Traps 1,885 

Deer and mocse hides 31 Fire-arms 552 

Live animals 29 Gasoline boats 12 

Fish lbs. 4,063 Row boats 18 

Fish no. 1,277 Canoes 12 

Gill nets pieces 186 Punts 15 

Gill nets yds. 11,473 Tugs 2 

Dip nets 35 Motor cars 7 

Hoop nets 25 Jack-lights and lanterns 40 

Seine nets 30 Deer and moose 24 

Pound nets 11 X'enison lbs. 1,229 

Trap nets 10 Moosemeat " 864 

Bull nets 20 Partridges 102 

Bag nets 1 Geese and ducks 127 

Hooks 1 ,561 Pheasants 23 

Spears 87 Decoys 1 24 

Rods and lines 97 Ammunition (rounds) 797 

Creels 17 Miscellaneous 34 

Fishing-tackle boxes 11 

In accordance with the usual practice, confiscated articles, except in those 
cases in which they were sold to the former owners, were disposed of by tender 
at sales which were given publicity and advertised in the press. Notice of these 
sales was also given through our district offices. The amount derived from these 
sales is shown in the statement of revenue included in this report. 

REPORT OF THE FISH CULTURE BRANCH 

The Biological and Fish Culture Branch, of the Department of Game and 
Fisheries for Ontario, was created officially in 1928, one of its functions being to 
effect the application of scientific findings, both Canadian and foreign, whenever 
possible and practicable, to fish culture and the fisheries of Ontario. 

In recent years a vast amount of literature has accumulated on the subject, 
and that part which is the result of scientific enquiry is used to the best advantage. 
In other words, the general trend of the activities of the Branch is to conform 
to ideas substantiated by scientific facts. 

Although there remains always that realm of deep-seated obscurity, difficult 
of penetration, nevertheless, as a result of patient and accurate experimentation 
in field and laboratory studies, our knowledge broadens. Biological findings 
cannot be forced and years may pass before we see concrete evidences of 



A 



1931 ANNUAL REPORT, 1930 29 

progress in certain phases of fisheries' investigations, since we are deaHng with 
elusive creatures, in a medium different from our own and outside anything but 
our most indirect control. Furthermore, although the structure representing the 
work accomplished is never completed, we are constantly working up to an ideal, 
and the scientific attitude is reflected in the results achieved. 

A perusal of the following report and previous reports will show that satis- 
factory and unmistakable progress has been made in the investigational and 
practical sides of fish culture. 

The Staff 

The Branch has openings for a limited amount of service of an investigational 
nature during the months of June, July, August and September, the permanent 
staff being responsible for the development and encouragement of research in 
fisheries throughout the year, either by the work of its own members or by 
referring research problems to other interested bodies, such as the Ontario 
Fisheries' Research Laboratory of the Department of Biology, L^niversity of 
Toronto, since the fisheries' research work of the latter is chiefly confined within 
the geographical boundaries of the Province of Ontario. 

Every year a limited number of qualified men is available from the biological 
departments of the University of Toronto, Queen's University, Kingston, and 
the University of Western Ontario, London. In connection with seasonal 
appointments the attitude of the Branch is that only those who have the necessary 
qualifications for fishery investigations of a technical kind are fitted to undertake 
studies relating to the suitability of streams for fish-planting operations; the 
natural productivity of waters; the efi^ect of natural and artificial barriers; the 
success or failure of former plantings and, if possible, the reasons therefor; 
technical studies regarding the culture of the difi'erent species of fish handled, 
for example, food, water supply, disease, etc.; and others too numerous to 
mention. "Necessary qualifications" may be taken to mean postgraduate 
studies of fishery topics and practical field experience in connection with scientific 
investigations; in other words, the correlation of experimental laboratory and 
field work. Investigators who have served one year or more with the Branch 
are encouraged to continue their field investigations and during an interim to 
pursue such fishery courses and problems as will enable them to fulfil their duties 
from year to year with an enlarged vision and knowledge of the subject and its 
literature. 

The personnel of the seasonal field staff for 1929-30 was as follows: 

Gordon A. Adams, M.A., Department of Biochemistry, University of Western Ontario, London. 

Hugh D. Branion, M.A., Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto. 

William R. Cameron, third year Biological and Medical Sciences, Department of Medicine, 

University of Toronto. 
I. L. ChaikofT, M.A., Ph.D., M.D., Departments of Physiology and Biochemistry, University 

of Toronto. 
W. \\ . Cook, B.A., Department of Biology, Queen's University, Kingston. 
John D. Detwiler, M.A., Ph.D., Head of the Department of Applied Biology, University of 

Western Ontario, London. 
William L. Dibbon, B.A., Department of Biology, University of Toronto. 
Howard J. Dignan, F^.A., Ontario College of Education, Toronto (graduate in Biology, University 

of Toronto, '29). 
Edgerton O. Ebersole, B.A., Department of Biology, Queen's University, Kingston. 
A. C. Green, B.A. (Biological and Medical Sciences), University of Toronto. 
Robert D. \\. Heard, ALA., Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto. 
A. H. Louden, ALA. (Biology and Chemistry), Queen's University, Kingston. 
P. L. MacLachlan, B.A. (Biology and Chemistry), Queen's University, Kingston. 
H. S. Pearce, third year Honour Biology, University of Toronto. 
H. J. Perkin, third year Physiology and Biochemistry, University of Toronto. 



30 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



John Savage, third year Honour Biology, University of Toronto. 

P. W. Smith, M.S. (Wis.), Department of Botany, University of Toronto. 

George C. Toner, fourth j'ear Biology, Queen's University, Kingston. 

Five of the above are undergraduates, but it should be noted that four of 
these had one or two years' field experience in connection with fisheries' investi- 
gations. 

During the year, the following qualified assistants entered the services of 
the Branch on a full-time basis, namely, Miss Margaret Wilton, B.A., '22, 
Queen's University, Kingston, as technical laboratory assistant; Mr. W. H. R. 
Werner, M.A. (Biology), '29, University of Western Ontario, London, as 
Assistant Biologist; and Mr. John Gall as Assistant Supervisor of Hatcheries. 

Biological Surveys 

Stream and lake surveys were organized, as in the previous year, according 
to districts supervised by District Superintendents, and the number of waters 
investigated in the Province from the standpoint of their present suitability for 
fish-planting operations, which depends on their physical, chemical and biological 
characteristics, and possible productivity from a game-fish or fishery standpoint 
was two hundred and thirtv-seven. 



Algoma 48 

Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Dufferin 

Durham 

Elgin 

Essex 

Frontenac 

Glengarry 

Grenville 

Grey 

Haldimand 

Haliburton 

Halton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kenora 



8 

35 

1 

7 

26 

11 

1 

46 

1 

1 

n 

2 
95 
17 
27 

6 
16 



Biological Surveys of Waters 

Kent 2 

Lambton 2 

Lanark 12 

Leeds 12 

Lennox and Addington 9 

Lincoln 4 

Manitoulin 3 

Middlesex 11 

Muskoka 66 

Nipissing 26 

Norfolk 17 

Northumberland. ... 31 

Ontario 11 

Oxford 15 

Parry Sound 57 

Peel 10 

Perth 4 

Peterborough 36 



Prince Edward .... 

Rainy River 

Renfrew 

Simcoe 

Stormont 

Sudbury 

Timiskaming 

Thames watershed. 

Thunder Bay 

V'ictoria 

Waterloo 

Welland 

Wellington 

Wentworth 

York 



2 

9 

29 

73 

1 

36 

42 

472 

41 

11 

20 

3 

9 

6 



Total 1.470 



The following comparative statement of waters studied indicates the progress 
that has taken place since the inception of a biological component in the 
organization of the Department: 



Year 




Number of waters 
studied 


Number of 
investigators 


1925 


21 

58 
233 
707* 
214 
237 


1 


1926... 
1927... 
1928... 
1929... 
1930... 




2 

5 

9 

18 

18 


Total 


1,470 





*See report for 1928. 

It should be remembered that the above figures do not include special 
studies on certain phases of fisheries' problems. 



1931 ANNUAL REPORT, 1930 31 

With the exception of the Thames and Grand River systems, biological 
surveys have been confined to individual lakes or streams and to counties and 
townships. When this preliminary pioneer work is completed, more compre- 
hensive watershed surveys will be in order. 

FiSHWAYS 

During the past two seasons, fifty-nine investigations were made of dams 
and other barriers across water-courses to determine the extent to which they 
might obstruct or prevent the free movements of fish and particularly their 
migration during the spawning seasons. 

Recommendations were based en the principles set forth on pages 18 and 19 
of the Annual Report and in the section on "Fishways" on pages 51 to 53 in the 
"Report of a Special Committee on the Game-Fish Situation, 1928-30." 

It was pointed out in the Annual Report for 1929 that fishways are not 
always practicable, their practicability depending on the height of the dam or 
falls, conditions in lower and upper reaches respecting the same, and the species 
of fish affected. 

In order to determine by comparisons whether the construction of the 
standard fishway, shown on the insert facing page 32, might be improved upon 
or revised, illustrations and plans of fishways in use in the United States and 
Canada and information on their success or failure have been collected and are 
being carefully studied. 

Uniform Regulations on the Great Lakes 

Although there may appear to be no definite outcome of the third conference 
on uniform regulations on the Great Lakes, which convened at Lansing, Mich., 
December 5th, 1928, it was understood that each of the states concerned is making 
studies of various aspects of the problem similar to those being carried on by 
the Province of Ontario pertaining to the species of fish requiring protection by 
size limits, closed season or closed areas, and mesh of net. Biological studies 
of each phase of the question require considerable time, and when sufficient 
data have been collected and the results noted, another general conference may 
be warranted. 

On Friday, December 20th, 1929, a conference between State of Michigan 
and Province of Ontario ofificials was held in Room D, East Block, Parliament 
Buildings, Toronto, with reference to Lake Huron fisheries. The following 
were present: 

Wm. H. Loutitt, Chairman, Department of Conservation, Grand Haven, Mich. 

Geo. R. Hogarth, Director, Department of Conservation, Lansing, Mich. 

F. A. W'esterman, Fish Division, Department of Conservation, Lansing, Mich. 

Chas. J. Allen, Fish Supervisor, Commercial Fishing, Department of Conservation, Chebo^-gan, 

Mich. 
Dr. John Van Oosten, in charge Great Lakes Investigation, U.S. Bureau of Fisheries, Ann Arbor, 

Mich. 
VVm. J. Lambert, Secretary, Commercial Fishermen's Association, Bay City, Mich. 
J. A. Rodd, Director of Fish Culture, Department of Marine and Fisheries, Ottawa. 
D. McDonald, Deputy Minister, Game and Fisheries, Ontario. 
J. Farrington, Assistant to Deputy Minister, Game and Fisheries, Ontario. 
H. H. MacKay, Director of Fish Culture and Biologist, Ontario. 
A. W. McLeod, Supervisor of Hatcheries, Ontario. 
J. T. Simpson, representing Lake Huron and Georgian Bay F"ishermen's Association. 

The conference dealt chiefly with size limits of fish and mesh of nets, in 
order to find a basis of uniformity for the State of Michigan and the Province of 
Ontario on Lake Huron. The proposals continue to be subject to enquiry. 



32 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

Pollution 

During the year studies were carried out on suspected polluted stream or 
lake areas at the following centres: Sarnia, Chatham, Bridgeport, Burlington 
bay, Bridgeburg, Lindsay, Peterborough, Midland, Huntsville, Sturgeon Falls, 
Timiskaming, Haileybury, Timmins, Iroquois Falls, Smooth Rock Falls, 
Kapuskasing, Sault Ste. Marie, and Kenora. 

In these studies standardized field methods were used for the purpose of 
satisfactory comparisons. The studies included determinations in lineal series 
above and below the source of suspected pollution, as follows: Water analyses,^ 
for dissolved oxygen (Nessler's method); dissolved carbon dioxide; alkalinity; 
total acidity; pH (Standard Colorimetric Method); plankton, qualitatively and 
quantitatively, using the Juday plankton net; bottom fauna, using the Ekmann 
dredge; character of the aquatic plants, emergent and submerged types; the fish 
present in the various zones chosen for study, obtained by use of suitable gill 
nets, seines, or dip nets. 

The conclusions from the investigations may be briefly summed up as 
follows : 

1. Water samples taken from four waters suspected of being polluted showed 
severe oxygen reduction, six showed slight oxygen reduction, and seven showed 
no oxygen reduction. 

2. In one case the pH showed an extreme lowering to the acid side of 
neutrality. 

3. Pollution planktonts such as certain infusoria, namely, Paramoecium, 
Colpidium, Carchesium, and Vorticella, and the amoeboid protozoan Difflugia, 
and the flagellate Euglena viridis, were not present excepting in one instance, 
at Iroquois Falls, where Vorticella occurs frequently in pulp and bark polluted 
waters The amoeboid protozoan, Arcella vulgaris, was also found frequently 
in this instance. The latter is usually found on bottom sediments or ad- 
hering to decomposing plants.^ 

Plankton studies in the waters of the Winnipeg river by Mr. R. A. McKenzie, 
formerly Field Investigator for the Department of Game and Fisheries, appear to 
show some relationship between plankton and the amount of waste matter, 
qualitatively and quantitatively. The same condition appears to hold for the 
waters examined at Iroquois Falls. 

The rotifer Anuraea considered by Purdy^ to be a clean water organism was 
found in every case where the plankton was examined. 

4. The presence or absence of bottom organisms appears to be the best 
general index of pollution or contamination. Chironomus plumosus and Ascellus 
sp., forms tolerant to a reduced oxygen supply, occurred in three instances. 

5. Vegetation was definitely discoloured or killed in eight instances. 

6. Fish were killed in two instances, namely, carp at Bridgeburg and suckers, 
bass, and catfish at Bridgeport. 

7. Where definite steps had not been taken by industrial plants to remedy 
existing pollution, practical recommendations were suggested. It would appear 
that one solution for controlling wastes of organic, chemical, or mechanical 
types is the economical utilization of the wastes by the industries concerned. 

lA Kem merer water bottle was used for collecting water samples below surface depths. 

2W. C. Purdy, "A Study of the Pollution and Natural Purification of the Ohio River — 1. 
The Plankton and Related Organisms," Washington Government Printing Office, 1923; and 
"Investigation of the Pollution and Sanitary Conditions of the Potomac Watershed — Plankton 
Studies," by W. C. Purdy, Hygienic Laboratory, Bulletin No. 104. 

30p. cit. 




to be covered wit/) Z R^ i 
mesh poultry netting. \ 

\ 



SEC" 





head, which may be mulliplied ' 
any desired height. 

Each pool is 1 [oot 1^ inches higher than chc 
one below, 5 feet 6 inches wide, & (cet 6 inches 



pools should he about < 



; toward the upper 



The fishway including bulkheads should be 
built out of J-inch timber and framed on 4- by 
4-inch cross-beams and 2- by 4-inch cleats, witli 
6- by 6'inch posts, centres S feet 6 inches, braced 



ever, that the lower end of the iishway be t 
placed thai the entrance to the stream shall 1 
at a point where the fiah tn asccndinK the strea: 



1931 ANNUAL REPORT, 1930 33 

Provision for screening out fibrous materials, or filtering harmful substances, or 
ponding in case of effluents containing harmful substances for the purpose of 
precipitating them or aerating the efifluents, is recommended in each case where 
necessary. It should be remembered, however, that the actual structure of such 
devices or research along these lines is the work of mechanical engineers as well 
as biologists. 

Under the direction and supervision of the Director of the Branch, the 
majority of the field examinations were made by Mr. H. J. Dignan, B.A., 
Instructor, Port Hope High School; and Mr. P. \V. Smith, M.S. formerly of the 
Department of Botany, University of Toronto. 

Removal of Coarse Fish 

Numerous applications are received annually to remove coarse fish from 
public waters, presumably with the idea of bringing about a more natural 
balance between game fish and non-game fish, thus lessening food competition 
to the advantage of the former. The attitude of the Fish Culture Branch towards 
this subject is, in general, the same as that outlined in the preceding report of 
the Department. The views of the Special Committee on the Game-Fish 
Situation, 1928-30, coincide with the conceptions of the Department in this 
respect. 

For a number of years the Department has authorized the removal of pike 
(Esox lucius Linnaeus) from the Nipigon river for the purpose of giving the 
native speckled trout, for which the river is famous, a better chance to survive. 
Although the species in question may be protected in certain localities, its 
removal from trout waters is amply justified. 

Gar pike {Lepidosteus osseus Linnaeus) and dogfish (Amia calva Linnaeus) are 
of little value as food and are known to eat the more useful kinds. These are 
subject to removal from game-fish waters. 

The removal of the carp and ling from game-fish waters, and their control in 
all waters, is our objective. 

At the present time the carp has a definite commercial rating. In any 
waters to which it has access it rapidly multiplies, particularly on account of its 
excessive fecundity and rapid rate of growth. It competes with bass and other 
game-fish varieties which subsist on insects to some extent. It is not of any 
great importance as a forage fish, excepting in the fingerling stage, on account of 
its rapid rate of growth. It has a habit of roiling the water in areas where it 
dwells, and for this reason it is an unfavourable species in waters frequented by 
clear-water-loving kinds, such as bass. For these reasons, it is highly undesir- 
able. The spread of carp in inland waters and in the inshore waters of the Great 
Lakes is a prelude to the use of implements of capture such as seines, which 
wrought havoc to game-fish ; and means of preventing the introduction or increase 
of carp in game-fish areas for this and other reasons cited, are adopted. 

The ling (Lota maculosa Le Sueur) is the only member of the cod family 
found in fresh water. It is widely distributed throughout the Great Lakes and 
in the larger lakes of Canada and of the northern states of the United States. 
Its average weight is somewhere in the neighbourhood of from two to five pounds, 
but specimens weighing ten pounds are not uncommon. It may be caught with 
the usual implements of capture used for whitefish, herring, and lake trout, 
such as gill nets, hooks, and pound nets. It very often does considerable damage 
to fishermen's gill nets. 



34 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

The food of mature ling consists of pike, perch, pike-perch, and ciscoes. It 
is claimed that they follow whitefish to their spawning grounds and destroy 
their spawn, but this has not been proved to the extent of the damage usually 
ascribed to them in this respect. 

The possibility of establishing a market for ling has been before the Depart- 
ment for some time. As a result of careful experimentation, it has been found 
to be a palatable fish; and if a market could be secured after a thorough educa- 
tional campaign pointing out its value and suitability as food, this would doubtless 
be the best way of ridding our lakes of excessive numbers of this species, to the 
advantage of the lake trout, with which it competes directly, and of more 
desirable species, such as pike, pike-perch, perch, herring, and whitefish, upon 
which it preys. 

During the past few years, Mr. Hugh D. Branion, M.A., of the Department 
of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, and others have been making a thorough 

Courtesy of Royal Ontario Museum of /oology. 



Ling or burbot {Lota Maculosa Le Sueur). 

study of the possibilities of ling (burbot) as food, fertilizer, and a source of liver 
oil; and during the summer of 1930, Mr. Branion's services were secured by the 
Department to make a study of the possibilities of placing ling on the market 
as a wholesome and desirable food. The following is a section of Mr. Branion's 
report submitted to the Department, which may be published in popular form 
later: 

There are three possible ways in which burbot may be utilized, first as food, secondly as 
fish meal or as fertilizer, and thirdly there is the possibility of using its liver and liver oil. From 
an economic viewpoint the utilization of burbot as edible food is the most important. The qualities 
of this fish as food have been in dispute for years. Until recently the concensus of opinion in 
America has been against it. There is no doubt that popular prejudice has been built up against 
burbot because of its repulsive appearance. The fact remains, however, that the European burbot 
is considered a "delicately flavoured fish" with an excellent market. The liver and roe have always 
been considered delicacies. In the United States, through a campaign conducted by the Bureau 
of Fisheries, a market has been established. During the Great War burbot was to be found on 
the Canadian markets, but as soon as the scarcity of meat was alleviated no further attempt to 
cpntinue the market was made. 

/ In 1928 cooking experiments were conducted in the Department of Household Science of 
the University of Toronto by Miss Margaret Templin under the direction of Dr. A. Willard and 
the writer. Miss Templin reported that fried burbot was "quite palatable, tender, juicy, and had 
a delicate flavour." Fish loaf made from boiled burbot was "just as edible as that made from 



1931 ANNUAL REPORT. 1930 35 

cod." She also made fish cakes from burbot and reported that they had "a fresh, delicate flavour 
and were as good as, or superior to those made from cod." However, in view of its repulsive 
appearance she considered that burbot in its "natural" state could not be commercialized success- 
fully, but "if it were filleted and sold under a trade name there is no reason why, through its fine 
flavour and te.xture, it should not become very popular." 

Burbot was also sent to various homes in the city where several methods of cooking were 
used by the housewives, including baking, frying, broiling, and steaming. In some cases the fish 
were filleted and made into special dishes. AH reported that the fish was very tasty^ 

There is also the possibility of creating a market for burbot livers. They are of large size, 
being about 10 per cent, of the round weight of the fish. Excellent recipes for the canning and 
cooking of burbot livers served as soups, toasts, liver loaf, and as fillings for tomatoes and so on, 
have been prepared by Dr. A. Marlatt of the Home Economics Department of the University 
of Wisconsin. Investigations into the effect of burbot livers in dietaries, with particular regard 
to pernicious anaemia, are being carried on in the Toronto General Hospital. 

Miss Templin has shown that burbot roe is a delicacy. To quote her words, "and this when 
placed on hot buttered toast and seasoned, seemed as attractive as any roe. Thus the roe of the 
burbot which occurs in great abundance, might be used to as great an extent as any other.'J*< 

This brought to an end what might be termed the experimental stage in the utilization of 
burbot. This summer . . . the Fish Culture Branch, of the Department of Game and Fisheries, made 
possible the next step — the utilization of burbot on a commercial basis. Realizing the importance 
of this problem and the necessity for government assistance in its continuation . . . made it 
possible for the writer to make a survey of the available supply of burbot in the Great Lakes and 
to look into those local markets where burbot was sold, in an attempt to decide which method 
of handling is most feasible. At the same time the co-operation of the Great Lakes' fishermen in 
creating a market was obtained. 

/ Burbot, cleaned and skinned, were supplied to various hotels and restaurants in Toronto. 
Their chefs were asked to cook these fish and to forward their opinions to the Department. The 
following quotation from one of these expressions of opinion will serve as an example of their 
conclusions, "The burbot which you sent me were excellent and compare very favourably with 
any fish which I have obtained from the wholesalers^^^ It is obviously possible, therefore, to 
put burbot on the market as edible food. To avoid tire disadvantage of its repulsive appearance 
it will be necessary to skin the fish, but this can be done easily and rapidly. A pamphlet containing 
a short account of the history of burbot and recipes for the serving of burbot as food is now being 
prepared. Plans for its marketing . . . are being considered. 

/Other than the backbone, burbot is boneless and excellent fillets can be made from it. It 
can be salted as ocean cod is salted and is equally good. Burbot can also be pickled or preserved 
as "strip fish" and in some instances has been smoked successfuUy./Frozen fillets made by rapid 
brine freezing as de\"eloped by the Biological Board of Canada would be a means of preser\ing 
any, surplus. 

X Fish meal was made from burbot by Mr. W. Stewart of the Atlantic Fisheries' Experimental 
Station and on chemical analysis compared favourably with commercial fish meal. It seems safe 
to predict a movement for the manufacture of by-products, such as fish meal, in the Great Lakes' 
fishing industry. This would be one method for disposal of burbot./^ 

Since the burbot is a relative of the cod, it was considered that the liver oil might ser\e 
medicinally as cod liver oil. The therapeutic effect of cod liver oil lies in its content of two fat- 
soluble vitamins, A and D, which are necessary for normal growth, for the formation of good 
teeth and bones and to aid the body to resist infection. ^The writer extracted oil from burbot 
livers by the direct steam method, which is now generally used in the manufacture of medicinal 
cod liver oil. The yield, colour, and taste of the oil compares very favourably with cod liver oil. 
The vitamin A potency of the oil. tested biologically, is about 500 units per gram or better, and 
compares excellently with medicinal cod liver oil obtained in the open market. The vitamin D 
potency of burbot liver oil was also shown to be as good as, if not better than medicinal cod liver 
oil. Dr. Marlatt, at about the same time, working at Wisconsin, reported that, "burbot liver 
oil may be classed with cod liver oil as an excellent source of the antirachitic vitamin". .^. 

The prospect for future marketing of burbot looks bright and without doubt this fish can 
be turned into a source of profit to the fishermen. Its edible qualities can no longer be disputed, 
and as an added source of profit the liver oil might be manufactured while the liver itself may find 
a profitable market. 

The Cinderella of the Fish World, disguised because of its homely appearance, should take 
its proper place among the recognized profitable commercial fish. 

Annually the Branch receives numerous representations to remove blue-gills, 
perch, rock bass, calico bass, and catfish, and also rare requests to commence 
culturing the same by artificial or semi-artificial methods. It is sufficient to 
say, and this is equally true of all species, that they should not be removed until 
a very thorough biological study of each situation warrants such a course. A 
glance at the Fourth Biennial Report. 1927-1928, Conservation Department for 
the vState of Michigan, and the Twentieth Annual Report, State of New York 



36 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

Conservation Department, shows that the culture and distribution of one or all 
of the above species are being carried on. This indicates with what care and 
discretion their removal should be exercised and controlled. Fortunately their 
culture is not required at the present time in Ontario, but in order to avoid 
such a circumstance their exploitation commercially or otherwise is being 
prevented. 

Pound Netting in Lake Erie 

A second season was spent in studying the pound-net situation in Lake 
Erie in order to determine the mesh of netting in the crib which v/ould release 
the largest number of immature fish, which would reduce or entirely eradicate 
the sorting of fish, that is, the legal from the illegal-sized, and which would 
prevent gilling of legal-sized fish in the crib or retainer. 

Seven experimental nets were set, and each of these was controlled on either 
side by a commercial net in current use, that is, one having a 2-inch mesh through- 
out the crib. In each case, the experimental nets were the same as the com- 
mercial nets, with the exception that each of the former had twine of varying 
mesh set in the backs of the cribs, namely, l^^-inch, 23^-inch, 23/^-inch, 23^-inch, 
3-inch, and 334-inch. One crib was made up of mesh similar to that used in 
the back and sides of the trap nets in the State of Ohio and instituted by law for 
1929. This was done merely for comparative purposes and not with the remotest 
desire or object of recommending such nets for the Canadian portion of Lake 
Erie. 

Each day an accurate record was made of the fish retained in the cribs of 
the seven experimental nets and the eighteen controls as follows: species, weight, 
size, number, percentage gilled, and total catch. The daily records were arranged 
diagrammatically so that each record corresponded to the position of a net 
relative to each of the others. 

The measurements given above are for new twine. When the twine is 
tarred and subjected to the action of water it shrinks from 18 to 25 per cent. 
The true size of the mesh when in use was, however, recorded. 

Until the results are gone over very carefully, no definite conclusion can 
be stated, but it would appear that a l^^-'mch mesh in the crib is the most 
satisfactory from the standpoint of the preservation of immature fish. On the 
other hand, a minimum number is gilled in the l^^^-inch and 2-inch mesh; but 
these meshes retain fish of all sizes, and the sorting of fish with its innumerable 
abuses creeps in. A crib which allows immature fish to escape and thus provides 
a minimum sorting is looked upon with favour by the Fish Culture Branch. 

Investigations on the Georgian Bay 

During the past summer our investigations on the Georgian bay centred 
around (1) the use of lake trout hooks by commercial fishermen and their 
detrimental effects, if any; (2) the justification for establishing new lines 
protecting inshore waters and prohibiting commercial fishing in the areas enclosed 
by such lines; (3) the effect of the operation of pound nets on the south shore of 
Georgian bay on game fish and commercial fish, such as lake trout, which are 
prized by anglers in that section. 

Without more complete findings it is impossible to state that licensed trout 
hooks are taking an undue proportion of immature trout. It is also impossible to 
state at this juncture whether bait fishermen engaged in hook fishing are damaging 
the food supply of the trout by removing quantities of bait-fish. 



1931 ANNUAL REPORT. 1930 37 

Investigations in regard to the establishment of new lines protecting inshore 
waters and prohibiting commercial fishing in the areas enclosed by such lines 
show (1) that areas already closed should not be interferred with, since the 
factors which caused their closure are still in operation; (2) that a line on the 
south shore of the Georgian bay would act as an effective spawning sanctuary 
for commercial fish, such as lake trout, game fish, or any variety sought after 
by anglers, and would also provide a spawning sanctuary for pike, maskinonge. 
and pickerel in the southeastern section of the bay; (3) that an extension of the 
present closed area on the northeast shore, if extended outwards and in a north- 
westerly direction to take in the inshore waters of the north shore, would act as 
an adequate spawning area for whitefish, pickerel, and bass. 

Fishermen operating in such areas have certain claims which would require 
a hearing and remedial measures. 

IXTERXATIONAL COXVEXTIOX OF GaME-FiSH AXD CoXSERVATIOX CoMMISSIOXERS 

The twenty-fourth annual convention of the International Association of 
Game-Fish and Conservation Commissioners convened at the Royal \ ork 
Hotel, Toronto, August 25th and 26th, 1930. Mr. Hoyes Lloyd, of Ottawa, 
presided over the meeting. 

Many interesting papers were presented by representatives ot the states of 
the United States and the provinces of Canada, and constructive suggestions 
were offered and ideas exchanged regarding many phases of conservational 
problems, including the rearing and distribution of game birds and the protection, 
winter feeding, and habitats of game animals. 

Sixtieth Axxual Meetixg of the Americax Fisheries' Society 

The sixtieth annual meeting of the American Fisheries' Society convened 
at the Royal York Hotel, Toronto, August 27th, 28th, and 29th, 1930. Dr. 
David L. Belding, of Boston, Mass., the president, presided over the meeting 
with the late Mr. Carlos Avery, secretary and treasurer. 

An address of welcome was tendered by the Honourable Charles McCrea, 
Minister of Mines, Game and Fisheries for Ontario. 

On Wednesday, August 27th at 12.30 p.m. the members of the American 
Fisheries' Society were guests of the Province of Ontario at a luncheon at the 
Royal York Hotel and during the afternoon and evening at the Canadian 
National Exhibition. 

Numerous papers were presented at the meeting under the following major 
headings: Fish Culture, Nutrition, Diseases, Research, Pollution, Commercial 
Fisheries, and Miscellaneous Subjects. In all, forty-eight papers by authorities 
were listed on the programme, but only thirty-seven were read and discussed, 
the remainder being read by title on account of the absence of the authors. 

The meeting was well attended by representatives of the majority of the 
states of the United States and the provinces of Canada. The following 
institutions or agencies in Canada more or lessdirectly concerned with the theory 
and practice of fish culture and fishery problems were represented: the Biological 
Board of Canada; the Department of Biology. University of Toronto; Depart- 
ment of Marine and Fisheries for Canada; and the Department of <jame and 
Fisheries for Ontario. 

The following papers were presented by officials and seasonal investigators 
of the Biological and Fish Culture Branch, Department of Game and Fisheries, 



38 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



Ontario: (1) The Present Status of Fish Culture in Ontario; (2) Thirty-six 
Years' Experience in Fish Culture; (3) Investigations on the Nutrition of 
Speckled Trout; (4) Pollution Problems; (5) The Marketing of Ling (Burbot). 

The next meeting of the Society will be held at Hot Springs, Arkansas, 
September 21st to 23rd, 1931. 

In order to avoid any possible overlapping of fisheries' investigations carried 
on by the Ontario Fisheries' Research Laboratory, Department of Biology, 
University of Toronto, and the Biological component of the Department of 
Game and Fisheries, officials of both departments held a meeting on March 31st, 
1930, to discuss the various problems undertaken with a view to more direct 



^«fSfmt:.^me 







A section of the interior of the Ontario Government Hatchery, Kenora. 

cc-operation along such lines, and the application of scientific findings to fish 
culture and the fisheries of Ontario. The meetings will be held biennially. 



Fish Culture 

It is not difficult to conceive of so many anglers on a body of water, that 
natural production alone cannot support good fishing. Since restriction of the 
number of anglers is next to impossible, re-stocking and restrictions on size 
limit, bag limit, and season are thfe only possible solvents, and it is believed that 
artificial propagation as carried out by the Biological and Fish Culture Branch of 
the Department, that is by co-operation between science and practice, will 
continue to yield progressively fruitful results by maintaining the fisheries of 
Ontario and increasing its usefulness. 

In 1926 the Province had seven hatcheries (including Port Carling) devoted 
to the propagation of both game and commercial fish, and in 1926 eight additional 



1931 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1930 



39 



hatcheries located in the Province under the control of the Dominion Government 
and used exclusively for the propagation of commercial fish were taken over. 
Since then a number of these hatcheries have been used for the propagation of 
game fish, and in this connection it should be noted that Provincial hatcheries 
under Provincial jurisdiction were the first to go into the propagation of game 
fish extensively, that being their original objective. The work in this connection 
was limited to the culture of game-fish fry and early fingerlings until the establish- 
ment and development of the Normandale trout ponds opened the way for the 
culture of large trout fingerlings in raceways suitable for the purpose. 

At present the Department's holdings include sixteen hatcheries, five trout- 
rearing stations, and two large bass ponds. These ponds, as well as the series 
at the Mount Pleasant hatchery, are used for the propagation of small-mouthed 
black bass. 




A section of Codrington Trout-rearing Station. 

The construction of four trout-rearing stations, in addition to the Normandale 
trout ponds, was commenced during the year; and in 1930 three of these were 
used for the culture of trout to large fingerlings. These rearing stations are 
located at (1) the headwaters of Coldwater creek, near Sault Ste. Marie, district 
of Algoma; (2) deep-seated springs, Petawawa township, near Pembroke, 
Renfrew county; (3) headwater springs supplying Marsh creek, near Codrington, 
Northumberland county; (4) headwater springs supplying Gibson's creek, 
Provincial Government Reforestry Farm, Charlotteville township, Norfolk 
county. 

In addition a large trout-rearing station is now under construction at the 
headwaters of Spring creek near Dorion, Thunder Bay district. 

The greatest care was exercised in making each site an individual subject of 
study from all angles. All of the sites chosen are accessible, so that speedy 
transportation by truck and rail may be effected. 



40 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



The water supply at each station varies, being most voluminous at the 
trout-rearing stations at Dorion and Sault Ste. Marie. In each case the quality 
of the water, physically, chemically, and biologically, is highly satisfactory. 

The development of trout-rearing stations is the outcome of a great and 
insistent demand for more and larger fish; and in the populated districts where 
waters are more heavily fished, the consistent introduction of large fish appears 
to be the only practical means of maintaining good fishing. A glance at Appendix 
No. 4 shows that the general trend in the culture of trout is in this direction, but 
it should be noted that there is not yet sufficient scientific evidence of a quanti- 
tative nature on the survival of deposited fry to discredit their introduction in 
suitable small tributary streams. 




Yearling speckled trout, Xormandale trout ponds. 



The establishment of District Rearing Stations is, we believe, a step in the 
right direction, for two reasons at least: 

1. Long-distance hauls are curtailed or eliminated. This is important 
economically and also from the standpoint of the health and vigour of the fish 
on arrival at their destination. 

2. Trout are being reared in waters which flow over or through the same 
rock formation as waters in which the fish will be ultimately introduced, provided 

e waters are suitable biologically. 

This method, though reasonable from the standpoint of transportation 
id protection of trout from injury due to long hauls and from sudden change 
a the reactio* )r chemical content of the water as opposed to that in which the 
trout were r ed, may not be of any significance as regards the possibility of 
the fish sur^ . g in waters differing widely in chemical composition, as shown in 
compariso .ade of a number of waters supplying hatcheries located in the 
various t of rock formations. 



) il 



1931 



ANNUAL REPORT. 1930 



41 



The analyses indicate (1) that sedimentary rocks contain a higher mineral 
content than igneous rocks. Mount Pleasant waters being the richest on account 
of the fact that the artesian wells, from which a certain amount of the water 
supply is obtained, flow through rocks heavily impregnated with calcium and 
magnesium salts; (2) that the water supplies are practically free from albuminoid 
substances and are. therefore, free from pollution; (3) that, although there is a 
very great difference in the chemical content of the water, speckled trout are 
able to endure any of these conditions and thrive satisfactorily; (4) that the 
number of fish produced at each station, per cubic foot of water, may differ 
widely and should be determined. 

The process of carrying the fish through the complete cycle from the egg 
to the adult stage is possible at the Normandale trout ponds and is a principle 
which has received the support of many leading fish culturists. At the 
Normandale trout ponds, from acclimatized and domesticated trout, the Depart- 
ment obtains the largest proportion of the trout egg supply for the hatcheries. 
The Department plans to incorporate this same method in the District 
Rearing Stations whenever and w'herever practicable, and this will lead to the 
decentralization of Normandale as the only and major source of fertilized trout 
eggs from domesticated stock. 

The diagrams and photographs inserted in this report indicate the general 
principles of rearing-station construction. The raceways are constructed so as 
to take care of a graded stock, fr\- being retained in the smaller raceways until 
they are feeding well, when they are transferred to larger raceways. This 
structure is basic to general hatchery principles, the small raceways simulating 
the natural running feeders and streams in which trout fry live in a state of nature. 
The raceways and rearing tanks in general use range in size from 2 to 10 feet in 
width and from 20 to 100 feet in length. Raceways for fingerlings in general are 
not over 5 feet in width or 75 feet in length. The raceways are of durable wood 
construction, and the bottom is covered with sand or gravel. When the water 
supply warrants, raceways are separately fed and separately drained, and in all 
cases at our new rearing stations provision is made for a supply of fresh water 
to those raceways containing running water used previously. The bottoms of 
the raceways are sloped only slightly, and an effort is made to have the water in 
the lower end not more than twelve inches or thereabouts, since we have found 
that this condition allows for the equal distribution of the fish over the bottom, 
a condition which most fish culturists aim to obtain in order to give the fish a 
more equal opportunity. 

SPECKLED TROUT 

Appendix No. 4 shows by comparison with previous years and Appendix 
No. 3 shows in detail the progress that has been made in the culture and distri- 
bution of trout. 



Comparative Statement of Speckled Trout Distribltion 





Eyed eggs 


Fry 


Fingerlings 


Yearlings 


Adults 


1928 


60,000 
30,000 
95,000 


475.000 


1,134,600 
1,105,750 
2,436,029 




200 


1929 


28,860 
60.257 


2,572 
913 


1930 









42 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

The distribution of speckled trout was more than twice that of the previous 
year, and our objective for next year is to distribute in the neighbourhood 
of five million fingerlings. 

RAINBOW TROUT 

More than twice as many rainbow trout fingerlings were distributed in 
1930 as in 1929; ten thousand yearlings were also distributed. It should be 
stated that no general distribution is anticipated, but a controlled distribution is 
under way, and the plantings made will be followed up in order to determine the 
most satisfactory basis for future stocking. The experimental work so far 
includes the following waters: 

1. The waters of Bronte creek, Halton county, a stream in the agricultural 
section of southern Ontario, which at present is almost barren of trout and whose 
lower reaches are not suitable on account of high summer temperatures, were 
planted with rainbow trout. Waters of this type are impounded by dams, but 
it is alleged by certain authorities that, in view of the absence of fishways, in 
the second or third year the trout will migrate to the lake and be lost permanently 
to the stream. The rainbow trout introduced so far have done exceptional/ 
well, and the work is worth while from the experimental standpoint, though no 
other striking results accrue, to determine what will actually happen to rainbow 
trout carefully planted in waters of this character and whether domesticate J 
stock will show any depressed migratory- instinct, such as is shown by the Pine 
River (Simcoe county) breed. 

2. Rainbow trout were planted in Stoney creek, a tributary of the Coldwater 
river, Simcoe county. This is a spring stream that does not contain speckled 
trout but is suitable for them and is cut off from the speckled trout system by an 
impassable barrier. If the planting be successful, the lower reaches of the main 
stream will become stocked. 

3. Rapid river, Geneva creek. Windy creek, and Pumphouse creek, large, 
cold, spring-fed streams in Sudbury district, northern Ontario, were planted with 
rainbow trout. 

4. Rainbow trout were introduced into Lake Simcoe and other landlocked 
lakes of large area containing lake trout in the main body of the lake and speckled 
trout in the streams, a few of the latter being available for spawning by the 
rainbow trout, but the majority cut off by impassable dams. A very careful 
biological study was carried out on Lake Simcoe, and the possibilities for rainbow 
trout appear to be very favourable. Yearling trout of large size were introduced 
into the main body of the lake at various points around its circumference and 
also into Brough's creek, a suitable trout stream giving direct and natural access 
to and from the lake. Late fingerlings were also distributed in suitable parts of 
the stream, which is closed to all fishing, thereby giving the fish a better oppor- 
tunity to become established and to reproduce their kind without interference. 
This experiment will also be the means of determining the efifect of the introduc- 
tion of rainbow trout on the native brook trout in the stream. 

BROWN TROUT 

The stocking policy for brown trout was outlined in the previous report and 
will be adhered to until more information on the subject is obtained through 
biological surveys. 

Seventy thousand fingerlings were introduced into a number of suitable lake- 
trout lakes in Kenora district to determine whether they will thrive in lakes in 
that district, since trout streams are either negligible or non-existent there. 



1931 ANNUAL REPORT. 1930 43 

LAKE TROUT 

The reduction in the output of lake trout as compared with the previous 
year was due to the prolonged and extremely stormy weather on Georgian bay 
and Lake Huron during the fall spawning operations for the year 1930. The 
output is fair, however, when compared with that of 1927 and 1928. 

During the year a total of 3,658,967 fingerlings were distributed. Of the 
total distribution of fry and fingerlings, 15,636,702 were deposited in commercially 
fished waters and 3,501,300 in game-fish waters. 

YELLOW PICKEREL 
(Pike-Perch or Dore) 

A comparison of the pickerel distribution for 1930 with that of 1929 shows a 
decided increase; on analysing this increase, it is found that the provincial 
hatcheries at Kenora and Fort Frances made a very creditable contribution. 

Of the total production, 189,630,000 were deposited in commercially fished 
waters and 22,915,000 in game-fish waters. 

WHITEFISH 

The decline in the total number of whitefish distributed in 1930 as compared 
with the previous years was due to the weather conditions on Lake Erie, which 
entirely prevented spawning operations. 

LAKE HERRING 

There was an increase of nearly four million in the output of herring in 1930 
as compared with that of 1929. 

MASKINONGE 

The artificial propagation of maskinonge was carried out at Omemee, on 
the Pigeon river, by using a portable hatchery as in previous years. Consider- 
able basic work in this connection has been accomplished by the hatchery officials 
in charge, and the knowledge gained should open up the way to greater success 
in the future. 

SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

Restocking depleted waters with small-mouthed black bass must be viewed 
from many angles, particularly on account of the large extent of the waters 
with which we have to deal. The introduction of small quantities of bass fry 
or fingerlings to inshore waters of the Great Lakes and such large inland lakes 
as Nipissing and Simcoe appears unnecessary when we consider the numbers of 
bass fry produced in these waters annually by natural propagation. Suitable 
restrictive measures on inshore w-aters and large inland lakes pertaining to bag 
limit, size limit, season, and closed areas should suffice. No one remedy would 
succeed in attaining our objective, namely, to maintain and, if possible, toimprove 
the bass fishing in provincial waters. The courses being pursued to effect this 
are: 

1. Protection of Fish during Spawning Season. — Although the closed 
season to July 1st is a sufficient protection in southern Ontario, it is not so 
4— G &. F 



44 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

effective in the lakes of northern Ontario and Georgian bay, where male bass 
may still be guarding their nests on and after July 1st. 

One strong means of protection is by educating the public and obtaining 
their support in a campaign to protect the male bass while they are guarding 
their netts, and also to follow the law as set forth in the regulations. 

2. Closure. — Depleted waters may become rehabilitated by closure and the 
introduction of parent bass. 

3. Harvesting. — The harvesting of bass from productive bass lakes, although 
robbing one lake to feed another, is an additional means by which restocking 
of depleted waters may be effected. 

During the open season the following bass lakes were tested by hatchery 
officers by the use of trap nets and seines to determine their suitability as bases 
of supply for bass fingerlings and yearlings: 

Green lake, Brougham township, Renfrew county. 

Cocwayong lake, near Donald, Haliburton county. 

Cat lake, Blair township, Parry Sound district. 

Herridge lake, townships of Strathcona and Law, Nipissing district. 

Bass lake, Purdom and Booth townships. Thunder Bay district. 

Fox lake, 12 miles from Kenora, Kenora district. 

All the lakes named, with the exception of Cocwayong lake, are closed to all 
fishing (see list of closed waters on pages 53, 54, and 55). 

Bass lake in Thunder Bay district and Cat lake in Nipissing district, 
require time to recuperate from the drain to which they were subjected during 
the years previous to closure before any results from harvesting will be apparent. 
The latter is suitable for bass propagation, as shown by biological survey. 

Herridge lake, Nipissing district, is suitable as a base of supply for adults, 
which may be introduced into depleted waters prior to their spawning season. 
On account of the steep declivity of the shores, it is not suitable for seining out 
fingerling bass. It is quite possible, however, from the past year's observations, 
to collect bass fry in large numbers when they rise from their nests. 

Green lake, Renfrew county, yielded 1,192 yearlings and two-year-old 
small-mouthed black bass by harvesting; it is an exceptionally fine lake from 
which to obtain a supply of bass. 

Cocwayong lake, Haliburton county, yielded 2,500 small-mouthed black 
bass from 2 to 8 inches in length. 

Fox lake, Kenora district, yielded 340 small-mouthed black bass from 2 to 
12 inches in length. It may be noted that bass were not originally native to 
Fox lake; it was stocked with fingerling small-mouthed black bass by the 
Department in 1913 and 1915. 

Pond Culture 

Lake on the Mountain. — The small-mouthed black bass introduced into the 
Lake on the Mountain nested naturally on the gravel nests provided, and 123,000 
small-mouthed black bass fry were collected and introduced into protected areas 
(among aquatic vegetation in shallow water) -of suitable small-mouthed black- 
bass lakes, in the county of Prince Edward and neighbouring counties. 

Ingersoll Pond. — Provision has been made under lease for a suitable rearing 
pond for bass at Ingersoll, Ont. The pond covers an area of approximately 
twelve acres and is so constructed that it may be drained. The satisfactory 
drainage of such a large pond is one of the difficulties with which we have to 
contend, and for this reason smaller rearing ponds are preferable. 



1931 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1930 



45 



The IngersoU pond, however, has many favourable characteristics: It is 
a suitable bass environment, the crustacean plankton is abundant, and the 
introduction of golden shiners to provide food for the large fingerling and yearling 
bass has proved a success. 

A quantity of suitable aquatic plants were introduced into the pond, and 
the margin was fertilized with fourteen loads of horse manur'^. 

There is no reason why bass should not thrive in the pond, and in time it 
should yield good results. 

Mount Pleasant Ponds.— At Mount Pleasant Hatchery six ponds were avail- 
able for bass during the year. All the ponds were renovated during the fall of 




Section of a bass pond being refilled with water, Ontario 
Government Hatchery, Mount Pleasant. 



1929 and again in the spring of 1930, that is, the ponds were drained and exposed 
to the sun in order to sweeten the bottom by the oxidation of toxic substances. 

Two ponds were used exclusively for breeding, and four were used exclusively 
for rearing. Two of the rearing or nursery ponds were fertilized with horse 
manure and two with sheep manure in order to compare the relative value of 
each fertilizer on the production of plankton and other aquatic life, and indirectly 
on the production of bass. 

Golden shiners {Notemigomis crysoleucas) were introduced in advance of 
the bass, approximately 100 adults to each rearing pond, in order to provide 
suitable forage for the bass when they reached a length of two inches or more. 

In the breeding ponds Nos. 1 and 2, 131 parent small-mouthed black bass, 
consisting of 63 males and 68 females, were used. Altogether 63 nests were set 
to accommodate the 63 males. The number of fertile nests in pond No. 1 was 
sixteen and in pond No. 2, eighteen. These 34 fertile nests produced in the 



46 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

neighbourhood of 300,000 fry, of which 241,590 odd were planted in suitable 
waters. 

The three ponds used as nurseries have a total area of approximately 1.4 
acres; when they were drained in the fall, 6,353 fingerlings were taken out. 
The majority of the bass were four inches in length. 

This year the bass in one pond were from domesticated stock, but there 
was no indication that the yield from these was superior to that obtained from 
wild bass introduced into the second pond used. In fact, the hatchery manager 
stated that the opposite was true. It may be that the domesticated stock was 
not sufficiently well fed during the winter and spring months to be in the best 
condition for reproduction. 

During the present year systematic observations were made on the limno- 
biological features of all the Mount Pleasant ponds and collections of bass for 
stomach analyses were made at frequent intervals. When this material is 
examined and the results correlated, we should be in a position to state more 
accurately what our ponds should produce per acre. 

In order to rear fingerling bass in larger quantities a much larger number 
of nursery ponds is required, and also ponds for the culture of golden shiners 
and daphnids, the principal forage of bass. 

FEEDING EXPERIMENTS WITH SPECKLED OR BROOK TROUT 

Apart from the general character of the water supply, there is nothing 
more important than diet in the culture of fish, and in order to study properly 
the nutritional requirements of trout, an experimental laboratory was established 
at Mount Pleasant Fish Hatchery in 1929. The initial work in this connection 
was done by Professor J. D. Detwiler, of the University of Western Ontario, 
London; during the current year Professor Detwiler, Dr. I. L. Chaikoff, formerly 
of the Department of Physiology, University of Toronto, and Mr, R. D. Heard, 
M.A., formerly of the Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, in 
collaboration with the Director of the Branch, continued the problem and the 
results obtained were presented before the American Fisheries' Society in session 
at the Royal York Hotel, Toronto, August 27th, 28th, and 29th, 1930, by Professor 
Detwiler and Mr. Heard. 

One part of the investigation, a brief account of which is given below, was 
to check the relative values of different kinds of food fed to trout in the hatchery 
at Mount Pleasant, and also to experiment with other foods with a view to 
obtaining a more economical diet, which at the same time would be of such 
nutritional value as to produce good growth and vigorous and healthy fish. 

Experiments with the diets were run in duplicate and included the following; 

Beef liver. 

Beef heart. 

Beef liver and beef heart, half and half. 

Horse meat. 

Beef liver plus dry skim milk, in a ratio of 80 to 20. 

Beef liver plus clam meal, half and half. 

Horse meat plus clam meal, half and half. 

Horse meat plus clam meal plus dry skim milk, in a 

proportion of 60 to 20 to 20. 
Beef melt. 
Cooked tripe. 

The fish used in these experiments were hatched during the latter part of 
February, 1930, from eggs obtained from domesticated stock, Normandale 
Trout Ponds, near Normandale, Ont. In selecting the fish for these experiments, 
the largest and the smallest were rejected. 



1931 ANNUAL REPORT, 1930 47 

As beef liver is generally accepted as one of the most satisfactory foods for 
trout at the age of those experimented upon, it was taken as a standard or check. 

The fish were fed at intervals of three hours; by beginning at 7.30 a.m., five 
daily feedings could be accomplished conveniently. Increase in weight was 
taken to indicate the rate of growth. 

"Before the fish were taken over for these experiments they had been fed 
on beef heart to which a little beef liver was added, the proportion as estimated 
by the hatchery manager being nine parts of heart to one part of liver." The 
effect of the change of food, with the exception of beef heart, beef liver and beef 
heart, beef liver and dry skim milk, caused a slower rate of growth as compared 
with that later on. The change to beef liver alone appeared to cause a rather 
unexpectedly large initial lag. 

"Horse meat did not prove to be a satisfactory food when compared with 
beef liver, beef heart, or even beef melt." The addition of clam meal seemed to 
make it less desirable, but when dry skim milk as well as clam meal was added to 
horse meat, a very good growth was obtained. As it is difficult to feed just 
the right amount of food to fish at the age experimented upon, it is possible 
that they did not have to rely very much on the horse meat ingredient. 

Beef melt gave good growth after the initial lag was overcome. The trout 
took to this food readily and ate considerable quantities, and it appeared to keep 
their bowels in good condition. 

From the results obtained with beef melt, it merits consideration as a 
constituent of fish diet. Although the proportion in the diet giving good results 
was high, the actual cost at 2.5 cents per pound is low. 

"The cooked tripe was quite unsatisfactory." It appeared to be very 
distasteful, and the fish lost considerable weight at first and the mortality was 
high. 

Addition of clam meal to the diet gave good results and produced nearly 
as good growth as that of beef liver and dry skim milk. Unfortunately, the 
supply of meal in bulk at the present time cannot be depended upon. 

The experiments performed with trout showed that the order of the diets 
according to their relative values was as follows: (1) beef liver and dry skim 
milk; (2) beef liver and clam meal; (3) beef liver; (4) beef liver and beef heart; 
(5) horse meat and dry skim milk and clam meal; (6) beef heart; and (7) horse 
meat. Considerable irregularity in the growth curves were shown with the 
diets, horse meat plus clam meal, beef melt, and tripe. 

A study of the weights of the fish seemed to show a tendency of groups of 
fish having an initial advantage in weight though small, not only to retain this 
advantage but to produce an accelerated rate of growth as compared with those 
in duplicate troughs with slightly lower weight. Of the nine pairs of troughs, 
five pairs showed this tendency. 

"This tendency would appear to show the necessity of careful selection of 
fish for feeding experiments in order to get them as nearly equal in size as possible. 
Incidentally, this may also show a racial difference in fish, a view which careful 
observations of growing fish undoubtedly support. There is little doubt that 
selective breeding, even that of mass selection, would materially raise the quality 
of the fish." 

A record of the amount of food fed was also kept, but as the experiments 
were conducted for so short a time and that during the period of the life of the fish 
when it is difficult to estimate the optimum amount of food, the calculated 
efficiency of the diets is no doubt lower than it should be. 



48 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

The feeding experiments outlined abov^e commenced July 10th. 1930, and 
were concluded September 13th, 1930. It is realized that such experiments 
should extend over a considerably longer period of time, but since rather funda- 
mental tendencies are indicated by the outline of the work gi\'en above, the 
results are submitted with this in mind. 

In addition to the experiments carried out by Dr. J. D. Detwiler on the 
nutrition of speckled trout, from the viewpoint of fresh meat diets, another 
series of experiments were performed by Dr. I. L. Chaikoff and Mr. R. D. Heard, 
M.A., on the feeding of synthetic diets to speckled trout. A brief abstract of 
the paper prepared by Mr. Heard is as follows: 

Two lines of investigation were adopted, in order to determine: (1) the 
effect of feeding liver which has been fractionated by the use of solvents and 
residues; and (2) the effect of variations of the proteins and protein content of 
diets. 

First, with a basal diet, as described in the work of McCay, Bing and Dilley^ 
(1927), and a fresh liver diet as two separate controls, various extracts and 
residues of liver were added to the basal diet to form a series of diets. The 
solvents used were ether, alcohol, and acetone. In no case was the temperature 
of the constituents of these diets allowed to rise above body temperature (37.5°C.) 

With regard to the second method various proteins were added to the con- 
stituents of the basal diet or some of these constituents were replaced by proteins. 
Six different diets were tried. Before preparation, the proteins used were heated 
for two hours at 150'C. to destroy any factor H content. 

Ten fingerlings were chosen for each experimental group, and each group 
was confined in a separate trough 6 inches wide by 30 inches long. The water 
was maintained at a depth of 6 inches and each trough was supplied with water 
from a common head trough. Diets were mixed into a stiff paste with water and 
the fish were fed four times daily, the troughs being cleaned each day. 

The results of the experiments were as follows: 

1. The basal diet when supplemented either by extracts or residues of liver 
gave as good results as when supplemented by raw liver. In this connection 
Mr. Heard points out: 

McCay, Dilley and CrowelF (1928) have attempted to activate a similar basal diet with 
extracts of liver, but have observed negative results. They have concluded that factor H, the 
agent believed to be the most active in stimulating the growth of trout, was not extracted by 
alcohol or ether. In view of the fact that McCay and Dilley* (1927) showed this factor to be 
thermolabile, it was considered advisable to repeat the use of these solvents in the fractionation 
of liver and adhere more rigidly to temperature conditions. McCay, Dilley and CrowelH (1928) 
employed a maximum temperature of 65°C. in the concentration of the extracts. No records 
were given in regard to the effect produced by feeding the residues of the liver. 

The extract and residue preparations used in this instance were not subjected to a temperature 
in excess of that of the body, i.e., 37.5°C. 

2. The use of the basal diet itself shows no growth. 

3. The use of the basal diet when supplemented by gelatin, egg albumin, or 
both, shows good growth, and the activation again compares favourably with 
that produced by raw liver and in this case can only be due to the protein. 

These experiments covered only a short period of time; and while they were 
quite satisfactory, no definite conclusions can be reached until further work has 
been done along similar lines. 

^McCay, Bing and Dilley, "The effect of Variations in V'itamins, Protein, Fat and Mineral 
Matter in the Diet upon the Growth and Mortality of Eastern Brook Trout," Trans. Amer. 
Fish. Soc, 1927. 

^McCay, Dilley and Crowell, "Growth Rates of Brook Trout Reared upon Puirfied Rations, 
upon Drv^ Skim Milk Diets and upon Feed Combinations of Cereal Grains," 1928. 

^McCay and Dilley, Factor H in the Nutrition of Trout, Trans. Amer. Fish. Soc, 1927. 

^ McCay, Dilley and Crowell, op. cit. 



1931 



ANNUAL REPORT. 1930 



49 



LOCATION OF HATCHERIES 

The names of the hatcheries, their locations, and the species propagated 
are as follows: 



Hatchery 


District or 


county 


Species propagated 


Kenora Hatchery 


Kenora . . 




Brown trout, lake trout, pickerel, whitefish. 


Fort Frances Hatchery 


Rainv River .... 


Pickerel, whitefish. 


Port Arthur (P) Hatcherv. . . 


Thunder 


Bav . . . 


Speckled trout, lake trout, whitefish. 


Port Arthur (F) Hatcherv. . . 


Thunder Bay. . . 


Lake trout, pickerel, whitefish. 


Dorion Trout-rearing Station 


Thunder 


Bay . . . 


Speckled trout (1931). 


Sault Ste. Marie Hatchery. . . 


Algoma . 




Lake trout, pickerel, whitefish. 


Sault Ste. Marie Trout-rear- 








ing Station 

Pembroke Trout-rearing Sta- 


Algoma . 




Speckled trout. 






tion, Pembroke ... . 


Renfrew. 




Speckled trout. 

Lake trout, pickerel, whitefish, herring. 


Belleville Hatcherv 


Hastings 




Codrington Trout-rearingSta- 








tion, Codrington 


Northumberland 


Speckled trout. 


Glenora Hatchery 


Prince Edward . . 


Speckled trout, lake trout, pickerel, whitefish, 
herring. 








Lake on the Mountain (Glen- 








ora Hatchery) 


Prince Edward . . 


Small-mouthed black bass. 


Mount Pleasant Hatchery. . . 


Brant. . . 




Speckled trout, brown trout, small-mouthed 
black bass. 


Normandale Trout Ponds and 








Hatcher>' No. 1 


Norfolk . 




Speckled trout. 


Normandale Hatchery No. 2. 
Gibson's Creek Trout-rearing 


Norfolk . 




Rainbow trout, whitefish, herring. 






Station 


Norfolk . 




Speckled trout. 


Ingersoll Bass-rearing Pond.. 


Oxford.. 




Small-mouthed black bass. 


Kingsville Hatcherv 


Essex . . . 




Whitefish, herring. 


Sarnia Hatchery 


Lambton 




Pickerel, whitefish, herring. 


Southampton Hatchery 


Bruce. . . 




Lake trout. 


W iarton Hatcherv 


Bruce. . . 




Lake trout. 


Collingu'ood Hatchery- 


Simcoe. . 




Pickerel, whitefish, herring. 



P = Provincial. 
F = Federal. 



TRANSPORTATION OF FISH 



Among the problems of the Biological and Fish Culture Branch of the 
Department of Game and Fisheries for Ontario, the transportation of fish is 
one of major importance, requiring for successful results, the most careful 
organization and advance preparations. 

Fry of commercial fish reared in hatcheries located at strategic points along 
the shores of the Great Lakes are transported very expeditiously by boat to 
favourable planting places in these waters. In many instances, where the 
hatchery is located near a favourite spawning ground of the fish reared, the latter 
are transported in scows. The scows are so constructed that the fish are con- 
tinuously supplied with normal lake water and may be liberated at any planting 
location with the greatest ease. In this Instance also, distribution may cover a 
very large area. For long distance runs by boat, fry and fingerlings are generally 
transported in cans having a carrying capacity of ten gallons. The number of 
fish carried in this way is governed by the size of the fish. Crowding is avoided, 
so as to prevent too rapid deoxygenation of the water. ^ 

With the rapid development of game-fish rearing, the use of trucks for 
distribution has been found most satisfactory and economical. Their use is 
possible in the southern portion of the Province on account of the development 
of good roads and highways, and will gradually extend to previously inacce.ssible 



50 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



areas as these highways penetrate north and west. Such development mtl es 
lakes and streams more accessible to fishermen, and as a result they are mere 
rapidly depleted. The use of the truck in the service of the Fish Culture 
Branch is a rapid way of meeting the necessity of restocking and acts as t n 
opposing force to depletion. At the present time the maintenance of a truck 
transportation system is an important adjunct to two of the major game-fish- 
rearing establishments of the Province and will be increased with the develop- 
ment of rearing stations in other districts. Long distance trips, if feasible, are 
made by trucks. 

In many instances rail shipments are advantageous. As in the case of trucks, 
the fish are carried in suitable cans or tanks depending on the size and age of the 
fish. In the case of rail shipments arrangements are made in advance with the 




Trucks play an iniporiant part in the distribution of hsh. 



applicant, a public-spirited citizen or member of a Game and Fish Protective 
Association, to meet the shipment with a car, truck, or other conveyance, so 
that the fish may be conveyed to the planting locations as quickly as possible. 
In every instance, hatchery officials accompany the fish to the planting locations, 
and it is their responsibility to see that the proper technique is practised in plant- 
ing, so that the chance of survival will be more assured. 

When distribution is made to lakes and large streams, provision is made to 
have a boat available to carry the fish to the planting locations. When adult 
fish are introduced into suitable inland waters, the fish are transported by 
pontoons, when larger boats which could carry fish tanks are not available. 

One of the most novel means of transportation is by aeroplane. During 
the year the Department took advantage of this method to transport, expedi- 
tiously and successfully. 25,000 lake trout fingerlings to Dogtooth lake in the 
district of Kenora. 



1931 ANNUAL REPORT. 1 '30 51 

Handling of fish prior to transportation requires the utmost care and skill. 
The surface layer of the body of a fish is very delicate, and touching with dry 
hands, or causing the slightest abrasion leaves the way open to infection by 
bacteria or fungus. The greatest care must be exercised in handling fish with 
dip net, trap, or seine, or whatever type of net is used in coralling the fish for 
shipment, and in transferring them to the cans or tanks in which they are carried. 
It is unlikely that the effects of mishandling will be evident at first, but the 
elimination of such a condition means the removal of at least one factor operating 
against successful survival. 

The cans or tanks in common use are constructed of durable galv^anized 
iron. The ordinary fish cans have a carrying capacity of ten gallons and the 
tanks of seventy-five gallons. The former are painted green on the outside, 
numbered and labelled in white with the name of the Provincial Government 
hatchery. When the fish have to be carried for a considerable distance inland, 
cans of light aluminium ware may be used and are so constructed that they fit 
the curve of the back. 

The water in the cans in which the fish are transported is maintained at a 
low temperature. In this way, provision is made for more satisfactory aeration 
or oxygenation. The amount of oxygen which will dissolve in water depends 
upon temperature and pressure. If we take distilled water and force oxygen 
into it, we find that the number of cubic centimetres of oxygen taken up by a 
litre of water measured at normal temperature and pressure, will decrease with 
an increase in the temperature of the water. It is necessary, therefore, when 
we place fish in fresh water in cans or tanks at a hatchery, in preparation for 
transportation, to make provision for maintaining the water at a low temperature, 
so that satisfactory aeration or oxygenation may be assured. This is done by 
having the cans and tanks provided with receptacles which fit into the top in 
which broken pieces of ice may be carried. The bottom of each type of receptacle 
is perforated, and as the ice melts the ice-water trickles or drops into the water 
in the can, keeping it at a low and constant temperature. The more constant 
the temperature the better, since fish are extremely sensitive to sudden changes. 
In order to maintain an even temperature, fish cans may be surrounded by canvas 
insulation, but if plenty of ice is available and transportation rapid, this is 
unnecessary. Tanks carried in trucks are covered with a suitable tarpaulin. 

If the water in which the fish are carried is maintained at a low temperature, 
the motion of the water during transit either by rail or in trucks has been found 
sufficient for satisfactory oxygenation. Hatchery attendants have very little 
difficulty, providing they check the temperature in the cans regularly and have 
a supply of ice on hand when required. If the cans are left standing at a railroad 
station for any length of time, a good way to assist in aeration is to load the cans 
on one of the platform trucks, and to move it backwards and forwards. This 
causes sufficient motion of the water to effect suitable aeration. In the case of 
large tanks, the use of compressed air and oxy-tanks may at times be resorted 
to. Disturbing the fish by removing water from the can with a dipper and allow- 
ing it to fall from a height is recommended only in urgent cases, and at all times 
should be performed with the utmost caution. It is a dangerous practice to use 
with tiny fry on account of possible injury by forceful impact. In any case, 
this method excites the fish, with the result that they use up more oxygen and 
the very end which is being sought is defeated. 

Fish are generally fed the night before shipment is made, in order to avoid 
the accumulation of excrement in the cans, which would occur if the fish were fed 
on the day they were shipped. Accumulations of excrement would lead to a 



52 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

diminution of the oxygen supply and to pollution of the water, on account of 
the small volume carried. 

Hatchery ofificials are responsible for the effective transportation and 
planting of all classes of fish and are directed in their efforts by the Biological 
and Fish Culture Branch of the Department of Game and Fisheries. 

Eleven hundred and ninety-two shipments of fish were made during the year, 
and of these only five reached their destinations in poor condition. 

PLANTING OF FISH 

Hatchery officials are responsible for the planting of fish of all species, acting 
under requisitions and definite instructions from the Branch. 

Nevertheless, the Branch advises applicants regarding the necessary 
technique required in planting operations, on requisitions issued. 

Successful planting depends on the knowledge of the requirements of the 
fish, and this may be obtained only by close observation and study of the life- 
history of each species. Dr. Lawson Hart and Dr. Andrew Pritchard, formerly 
of the Department of Biology, University of Toronto, have made special contri- 
butions to the knowledge of the life-history of the whitefish (Coregonus clupea- 
formis Mitchill) and the herring (Leucichthys artedi), respectively, by studies 
carried out on the Bay of Quinte, Lake Ontario, under the auspices of the 
Fisheries' Research Laboratory of the Department of Biology, University of 
Toronto. The information, which is of an exact kind and the result of inquiry 
over a considerable period of time, gives a clue to the most suitable location in 
which to deposit whitefish and herring fry. 

Mr. J. H. Fox, Science Master, Windsor Collegiate Institute, commenced 
an investigation during the year under the direction of the Director of the 
Branch regarding the most suitable natural environment for lake trout fingerlings. 
Lake trout fingerlings were placed in wire cages, 15 by 12 by 8 inches, in various 
positions in Lake Ontario, opposite Port Bowmanville, and examined once a 
week to determine the percentage of mortality. At the same time water samples, 
plankton, temperature records, and bottom fauna were taken in the vicinity of 
the cages. 

The first series of experiments showed that in an unprotected cage, water 
currents, as a controlling factor in mortality, overshadow all other factors. 

In the second series of experiments the effect of currents was largely 
eliminated by using cages with a band of galvanized iron around four sides, 
leaving only the top and bottom open, and instead of being suspended, the cages 
were allowed to rest on the bottom. By such an arrangement the effect of 
strong water currents was minimized. 

The experiments indicated that the smallest daily mortality among lake trout 
fingerlings occurs at a depth of 24.5 metres (80.4 feet). 

More prolonged experiments, using larger numbers of fish, may be under- 
taken by the Branch in 1931. 

CLOSED WATERS 

The following waters are closed to all fishing: 

Bass Lake, townships of Purdom and Booth, district of Thunder Bay; indefinite closure by 

Order-in-Council of April 29th, 1930, for bass propagation. 
Beryl Lake, north half of section 26, township of Yankoughnet, district of Algoma; closed until 

May 1st, 1931, by Order-in-Council of December 20th, 1927. 
Brough's Creek, township of South Orillia, county of Simcoe; closed until June 2nd, 1934, by 

Order-in-Council of August 14th, 1930, for rainbow trout propagation. 



1931 ANNUAL REPORT, 1930 53 

Cat, or Finger Lake, concessions 19, 20, 21, township of Blair, couaty of Parry Sound; indefinite 
closure by Order-in-Council of August 14rth, 1930, for bass propagation. 

Cedar Creek, Pitch Creek, and Whitewood Creek, district of Tfiuad^r Bay; closad until May 31st, 
1933, by Order-in-Council, February 26th, 1930, for spackled trout propagation. 

Crooked Lake, district of Sudbury, Missinahi Lake, districts of Sudbury and Algoma, and that 
portion of Dog Lake lying north of the right-of-way of the Canadian Pacific Railway and 
located in the districts of Algoma and Sudbury; all closed until July 1st, 1932, by Order-in- 
Council of February 26th, 1930, for bass propagation. 

Eagle Lake, township of Anstruther, county of Peterborough, closed for three years co.iimencing 
August 1st, 1929, by Order-in-Council of August 14th, 1929, for brown trout propagation. 

Esnagami Lake, townships of Esnagami, Rupert, and Alpha, and unsurveyed territory; Kawjsh- 
kagami Lake^ township of Sexton; Fleming River, township of Sexton; Fleming Lake, townships 
of Sexton, Danford, and unsurveyed territory; Kawashkagami Creek, lying between Fleming 
lake and Island lake, in unsurveyed territory — all in the district of Thunder Bay; closed 
indefinitely by Order-in-Council of November 19th, 1930, for speckled trout propagation. 

Fox Lake, twelve miles from Kenora, in unsurveyed territory of the district of Kenora; closed 
indefinitely by Order-in-Council of October 20th, 1927, for bass propagation. 

Green Lake, concessions 6, 7 and 8, township of Brougham, county of Renfrew; indefinite closure 
by Order-in-Council of September 16th, 1930, for bass propagation. 

Herridge Lake, townships oi Strathcona and Law, district of Nipissing; indefinite closure by 
Order-in-Council, February 26th, 1930, for bass propagation. 

Lake on the Mountain, at Glenora, Prince Edward county; owned by the Crown and closed for 
hatchery purposes and for bass propagation. 

Sucker Lake, township of Assiginack, district of Manitoulin; indefinite closure by Order-in- 
Council of November 6th, 1929, for bass propagation. 

Trout Lake, township of McKim, district of Sudbury; indefinite closure by Order-in-Council of 
August 14th, 1930. 

The following are examples of cases where game fish are protected, and 
where propagation may be carried on at the discretion of the Department: 

Lake of the Woods: 
i. Clearwater Bay. 

2. Woodchiick Bay. 

3. Andrews Bay. 

4. Bigstone Bay. 

5. Rat Portage. 

6. Popular Bay. 

7. Lobstick Bay, closed especially for hatchery purposes. 

8. Sabaskong Bay (maskinonge sanctuary).^This includes all the waters in the bay, and 

inlets and bays tributary thereto lying east of a line drawn northeast from the 
west side of Brule point to the westerly extremity of Rabbit point. 

9. White Partridge Bay. — In this instance the line is drawn across from Zigzag point south of 

105P; thence to I.R. 38a. 

Kenora District: 

i. Little Vermilion Lake, township of Vermilion, District of Kenora. 

2. Pelican Lake, Kenora (near Pelican on C.N.R.); lake trout and pickerel propagation. 

Rainy River District: 
Stanjikoming Bay. 

Lake Nipigon: 

In regard to gill nets authorized for Lake Nipigon, one of the conditions reads as follows: "Gill 
nets authorized in the license shall not be set, placed, or located within one thousand 
yards of the mouth of any tributary, river, creek, or stream, nor within two miles from 
Virgin falls, and no nets shall be set on speckled trout spawning grounds, or on grounds 
set aside for the taking of spawn by the Department, namely: West bay. Chief bay, 
Ombabika bay. Black Sturgeon bay, south of Long point in South bay, and those 
waters lying east of a line drawn from one mile west of Poplar point to one mile west 
of High Hill river, or in other waters as directed." 



54 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

Lake Superior: 

Nipigon Bay, closed permanently. 

Algoma District: 

Echo Lake, township of Kehoe; closed for hatchery purposes (pickerel). 

Manitoulin Island: 

1. Kagawong Lake. 

2. Manitou Lake. 

3. Mindemoya Lake. 

Georgian Bay Waters: 

/. Entrance to Spanish River. 

2. Whitefish Bay, closed indefinitely. 

3. McGregor Bay, closed indefinitely. 

4. Killarney Bay, closed indefinitely. 

5. East Shore. Condition 19 of the conditions governing licensees states: No nets shall be 

set in that portion of the waters of Georgian bay east of a line drawn northwesterly 
from the most westerly point of Moore's point; thence northwesterly to the most 
southwesterly point of Beausoleil island; then continuing northwesterly to Gin island; to 
Smooth island; to Whaleback Beacon; to Eshpadekong island; to the easterly side of 
Pine island; to Phillimore rock; to Bass Group islands; to Barbara rock; to Campbell's 
island; to the most easterly end of Sandy island; to the westerly side of Pancake island; 
to the most westerly point of Franklin island; to Twin island; to Groundhog island; to 
Hang Dog island; to Champlain island; to Tie island, and to the mouth of the French 
river. 

6. Matchedash Bay, closed July and August. 

7. Colpoy's Bay, closed to commercial fishing permanently; used for lake trout propagation. 

Lake St. Clair: 

Mitchell's Bay, closed to commercial fishing during the months of May, June, July, and August 

Lake Erie: 

Inner Bay of Long Point Bay, closed to commercial fishing with the exception of seining and 
hoop netting, which must not be carried on during the spawning season of black bass. 
Fishing of this nature is prohibited during the months of May, June, July, and August. 

Bay^of Quinte: 

Quoting from the conditions governing licensees, we have under condition 18 the follow- 
ing statement: "No one shall fish with nets duringthemonthsof June, July, and August, 
in that portion of the waters of the Bay of Quinte lying westward of a line drawn from 
Green point, in the county of Prince Edward, to the eastern limit of the town of 
Deseronto, in the county of Hastings. That portion of the Bay of Quinte westward of 
a line drawn across the bay from Horse point on the southern shore to the Lehigh 
Cement Works' wharf opposite on the northern shore to the Belleville Highway bridge, 
is hereby set apart and reserved for fishing for hatchery purposes." 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

In conclusion, I desire to publicly express my appreciation of the assistance 
and support which has been rendered to the Department throughout the year. 

The members of the staff, of both the inside and outside services, have 
faithfully and zealously carried out any and all duties which have been allotted 
to them, and the spirit of loyal co-operation in the performance of the work has 
at all timt-a been evident. 

Our work has been made more pleasant and attractive by reason of the 
assistance and co-operation rendered by the transportation companies and the 
various Fish and Game Protective Associations throughout the Province, the 



1931 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1930 55 



officers and members of which latter organizations havmg at all times worked 
in conjunction with the Department and its various officers in an_ earnest 
endeavour to secure a proper observance of the provisions of the Ontario Game 
and Fisheries Act. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 
I am, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

D. McDonald, 
Deputy Minister of Game and Fisheries, 



56 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



APPENDIX No. 1 

SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS, 1930 

Note. — (C) Before the figure indicates Commercially Fished Waters. 



Speckled Trout Eggs 
Sinicoe: 

Pratt's rearing ponds 50,000 

Thunder Bay: 

Long lake 5,000 

Wideman lake 5,000 

Lower Twin lake 5,000 

Upper Twin lake 5,000 

Anderson lake 5,000 

McKenzielake 5,000 

Clegglake 5,000 

Elbow lake .. 5,000 

Department Marine and Fish- 
eries, Ottawa 5,000 

Speckled Trout Fingerlings 
Addington: 

Tontia Wanta creek 10,000 

Algoma: 

Trout Lake inlet 1,000 

Moose lake 4,000 

Agawa river 10,000 

Mongoose lake 4,000 

Spruce lake 5,000 

Loon lake 4,000 

Chippewa river 10,000 

Batchewana river 4,000 

Sand lake and creek 4,000 

Wartz lake 4,000 

Snowshoe lake 2,000 

Silver creek 7,000 

Gull lake 4,000 

Upper Pine lake 2,000 

Little Trout lake 5,000 

Jones lake 2,000 

Root river 4,000 

Heyden lake 2,000 

Boyle's creek 2,000 

Walker lake 2,000 

Burrough's lake 2,000 

Ashigan creek 15,000 

Bear creek 2,000 

Mountain lake 5,000 

Michipicoten river 20,000 

Loon lake 2,000 

Spring creek 5,000 

Harmony river 2,000 

Mud creek 2,000 

Johnson's creek 2.000 

Bridgeland river 4,000 

Kent's creek 2,000 

McQueen's creek 2,000 

Cannon creek 2,000 

Dunn's creek 2,000 

Iron river 2,000 

Stokely creek 2,000 

Twin lakes 2,000 

Victoria creek 2,000 

Fairy lake 2,000 

McVeigh creek 8,000 

Spider lake 8.000 

Lost lake 8,000 



Algoma — Continued 

Hart lake 

Lower Island lake 

Dam creek 

Murphy lake 

Trout creek 

Trout lake 

Broad lake 

Barn's creek 

Lake Franklin 

Big Carp creek 

Bruce: 

Willow creek 

Vance stream 

Stoney Spring creek 

Plum creek 

Colpoy's creek 

Silver creek 

Barrow Bay creek 

Silver creek 

Dufferin: 

White's creek 

Unnamed creek 

Pine river and tributaries 

Cemetary creek 

Greenwood creek 

Warne's creek 

Piatt creek 

Bowling Green river 

Hunter's creek 

Credit river and tributaries. . . . 
Nottawasaga river 

Durham: 

Cavan creek and tributaries. . . 
Tyron creek and tributaries. . . 

Mount Pleasant creek 

Hayden's stream and tributaries 

Ganaraska river 

McKinley's creek 

Liskard creek 

Harris creek 

Farrow's creek 

McLaughlin's creek 

Cale's creek 

Squair's creek 

W. J. Lytle stream 

Bert Reid cree'< 

Chandler creek 

Gardner pond 

Nicholson creek 

Elgin: 

Ball creek 

Wolfe creek 

Howie creek 

Frontenac: 

Trout lake 

Cataraqui creek 

Grenville: 

Kemptville Agricultural School 



6,000 
6,500 
4,000 
4,000 
5,000 
4,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
2,000 



7,000 
5,000 
3,000 
3.000 
1,500 
6,000 
5,000 
561 



5,000 

2,000 

10,000 

10,000 

20,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

40,000 

15,000 



10,000 

10,000 

30,000 

10,000 

20,000 

10,000 

10,000 

2,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

2,000 



2,000 

1,000 

500 



20,000 
10,000 



25 



1931 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1930 



57 



SPECIES AND OUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IX PROVINCIAL 
WATERS, \930-~Continued 



Grey : 

Saugeen river and tributaries. . 10,000 

Rocky Saugeen 12,000 

Beaver river and trioatariss. . . 15,000 

Sydenham river 10,000 

Oxenden creek 1,500 

Creeks on lots 1 and 2, concas- 

sionXXII 8,000 

Priddle's Spring creek 15,000 

Mulocklake 2,000 

Haliburton: 

Glidden's creek 2,500 

Holland's creek 1,000 

Bonham's creek 2,500 

North lake 10.000 

Colburne's creek 10,000 

Fish lake 10.000 

McCue creek 10.000 

Ross Lake creek 10,000 

Bear Lake creek 20.000 

Elephant creek 10,000 

Wren lake 10,000 

Torch lake and creek 1,000 

Halton: 

Murray's creek 2,000 

Acton creek 5,000 

Ballinifad 2.000 

Clancv's creek 700 

Nicholl's creek 3,000 

Hastings: 

Deer river 20,000 

Rawdon creek 10,000 

Egan creek 10,000 

Cedar creek 5.000 

Little Papineau creek 10,000 

Two Mile creek 10,000 

Upper Crosier creek 10,000 

Papineau creek 10,000 

Moore's lake 10,000 

Huron: 

Clinton Spring creek 1,000 

Patterson's creek 2,000 

Johnson's creek 7,000 

Middleton's creek 4,000 

Spring Hill creek 7,000 

Crawford's creek 500 

Maitland river 2,000 

Kent: 

Henry creek 1.000 

Lambton : 

Hungry Hollow creek 2,000 

Manitoulin: 

Mindemoya river, lake, and 

creek 1.000 

Blue Jay creek -i.OOO 

Manitou river 5,000 

Norton creek 2,000 



Middlesex: 

Spring ponds 

McFarland's Spring creek. . . . 

Wye creek 

Humphry creek 

Dorman's creek 

Muskoka: 

Fairy lake 

Oxtongue lake 

Clear lake 

Outlet creek 

Walker's lake 

Hock Rock creek 

Echo creek 

Little East river 

Buck's creek 

White lake 

Echo lake 

Nelson's creek 

Casselman's creek 

Muskoka river 

Joyce's creek 

Ten Mile bay (Lake of Bays). 

Nipissing: 

McKenzie creek 

Amable.du Fond 

Four Mile creek 

North river 

Duschesne creek 

Chippewa creek 

Doran's creek 

Bear creek 

Norfolk: 

Kelly's stream 

Patterson's creek 

Cattle creek 

\'enison creek 

Cowan creek 

Beech Lane creek 

Northumberland : 

Woodland creek 

Mutton creek 

Salem creek 

Telephone creek 

West creek 

Barrett's creek 

Cold creek 

Piper creek 

Burnley's creek 

Spring creek • • ■ ■ 

Dawson creek 

Brickley creek 

Hefferman's creek 

Callahan's creek 

Keeler Spring creek 

Ashby's creek 

Sandy Flat creek 

Ontario: 

Raglan pond and stream 

Duffin's creek 

Smalley's creek 

Altona mill pond 



1,000 
250 
1,000 
2,500 
1,000 



10,000 

10,500 

7,000 

2,000 

10.000 

10.000 

2,000 

18,700 

10,000 

5.500 

2,000 

10,000 

10,000 

11.200 

10,000 

10,000 



500 
5,000 
5,500 
5,000 
5,500 
5,000 
5,000 

500 



2,500 
5,000 
3.000 
5,000 
1,000 
700 



10,000 

5,000 

1,000 

1,000 

10,000 

1,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5.000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

10,000 



7,500 

15,000 

4,000 

2,000 



58 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS, 1930— Continued 



Oxford: 

Wren creek . 



Parry Sound: 

Deer lake 

Trout creek 

Bolger Spring creek 

Loon lake and Magnetawan 

river 

Clear lake 

Big Clam lake 

Distress river 

Eagle lake 

Lake Bernard 

South river 

South Sequin river 

Paisley lake 

Black creek 

Genesee creek and lake 

Barrett's creek 

Ragged creek 

Jenkin's creek 

Steel's creek 

Fleming lake 

Little East river 

Peel: 

Montgomery creek 

Credit river and tributaries. . . . 

Cold creek 

Columbia stream 

Humber river 



Peterborough: 

Laing's creek 

Needle's Low Mill creel- 
Sucker Lake creek .... 

Plato creek 

Sedgwick's creek 

Buchanan's creek 

Leary's pond 

Sunset stream 

Archer's creek 

Blizzard's creek 

Springville creek 

Prince Edward: 

Trout creek 

Waring creek 

Haight's creek 

Foster's creek 

Masten's creek 

Williams creek 

Yarwood's creek 



Renfrew: 

Robinson Lake creak 

Little Madawaska river 

Carson's lake 

Brennan's creek 

Gultz creek 

Malone's creek 

Contant creek 

Brynen's creek 

Donohue's creek 

Sack's creek 

Shaw creek 

Caldwell creek 

Dolan's creek 

Pembroke Trout Rearing Pond 



2,000 

10,000 
9,000 
1,200 

10,000 
10.000 

500 

500 

10,000 

15,000 

25,000 

5,000 

500 

10,000 

10,000 

4,000 

10,000 

600 
10,000 

500 
7,500 

5,000 
20,000 

1,500 

500 

20,000 

10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
20,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 

10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
20,000 
10,000 
10,000 

10.000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
800 



Simcoe: 

Fourth Line creek. 
Coldwater river . . . 
Sturgeon river. . . . 
Lafontaine creels . . 
O'Neill's creek. . . . 

Hog creek 

Silver creek 

Second lake 



Sudbury: 

Spring creek. . . 
Nelson river. . . 
Bertrand's cree 
Post creek . . . . 
Veuve river . . . 
Cold spring . . . 
Second lake . . 



Thunder Bay: 

Allen lake 

Allen creek 

Trout lake 

Arnold creek 

Lake Nipigon and Nipigon river 

Rainbow lake 

Moose creek 

Spring creek 

McGregor creek 

McKenzie river 

Dufault lake 

Creeks mile posts 17 and 13 . . . 

Billy lake 

Consineau's lake 

Pearl river 

Mclntyre river 

Pitch creek 

Six Mile creek 

Whitewocd creek 

Black creek (Paska) 

Golden Gate lake 

Current river 

Cedar creek 

Golden Spring creek 

McVicar's creek 

Neebing river 

Oliver lake. . . ." 

Bruley creek 

Coldwater creek 

McGregor lake 

Longworth lake 

Small McKenzie lake 

Wilgar creek 

Deception lake 

Hilma lake 

Maud lake 

Surprise lake 

Mirror lake 

Crystal creek 

Mcintosh lake 

Johnson creek 

Ring lake 

McKenzie creek 

Timiskaming: 

Latour creek 

W^atabeag river (Hooker and 
Welcome creeks) 



1,000 

25,000 

10,000 

2,000 

5,000 

1,000 

850 

2,000 



5,000 
5,000 
1,200 
5,000 
5,000 
1,200 
500 



10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

5,000 

136,000 

5,000 

5,000 

10,000 

5,000 

10,000 

10,000 

20,000 

10,000 

5,000 

10,000 

10,000 

5,000 

10,000 

5,000 

10,000 

20,000 

20,000 

5,000 

1,000 

10,000 

20,000 

5,000 

5,000 

25,000 

5,000 

5,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 



1,000 
8,000 



1931 



ANNUAL REPORT. 1930 



59 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS, 1930— Continued 



Timiskaming — Continued 

Kamiscotia creek LOGO 

Moffatt creek LOOO 

Blanche river 4,000 

Hudson creek LOOO 

Croft's creek 5,000 

Shaw's creek 2,500 

Grassy creek LOOO 

Red Sucker river 2,500 

St. Jean de Baptiste Cizzx LOOO 

Water Hen creek 5,000 

Hayden creek 2,500 

Thompson creek LOOO 

Wabi river '. LOOO 

Taylor's creek 1,000 

Graham creek 1,000 

Otter creek 1,000 

McKenzie's creek LOOO 

Bear creek 1,000 

Maiden creek LOOO 

Crocodile creek 1,000 

Waterloo: 

Erbsville creek 3,600 

Hopewell creek 3,600 

Mannheim creek 2,700 

Silver Spring creek 1,000 

Jedborough dam 4,000 

Streams, concession I and 11.. . 500 

Jim Bradley's creek 2,000 

Schwindt's creek 5,000 

Welland: 

Effington stream LOOO 

Sulphur springs 1,000 

Wentworth : 

Scott's Spring creek 5,000 

Wellington: 

Howlett creek 5,000 

Everton stream 2,000 

Bell's creek 1,000 

York: 

Osier's pond 4,000 

Experimental: 

Mt. Pleasant hatchery 143 

Speckled Trout Yearlings 

Addington: 

Shibagau 500 

Brant: 

Private aquarium 5 

Bruce: 

Willow creek LOOO 

Spring creek 500 

Silver creek 500 

DufTerin: 

Esson's creek 1 ,000 

Nottawa creek 500 



Durham: 

Cavan creek and tributaries. . . 
Tyrone creek and tributaries. . 

Gibson creek 

Mill pond 

Wm. Hooey's cres'.v 

Cadmas creek 

Barker's creek 

Hall creek 

Grey : 

Saugeen river and tributaries. . 

Rocky Saugeen 

Beaver river and tributarias. . . 
Creeks on lots 1 and 2, coices- 

sionXXII. 

Priddle's Spring creek 

Haliburton: 

Buck lake 

Moose lake 

Halton: 

Acton creek 

Parks creek 

Hastings: 

Lake St. Peter 

Rawdon creek 

Baragar lake 

Huron: 

Johnston's creek 

Middlesex: 

Duncrief s creek 

Muskoka: 

Lake of Bays 

Lake Vernon 

Fairy lake 

Clear lake 

Walker's lake 

Pine lake 

Big East river 

Shoe lake 

Nipissing: 

Four \Iile creek 

North river 

Chippewa creek 

Doran's creek 

Norfolk: 

Clear creek 

Spooky Hollow creek 

Hay creek 

Vittoria creek 

Northumberland: 

Brophy's creek 

Burnley stream and creek 

Ontario: 

Black creek 

Oatmeal pond 

Elgin pond 



500 
500 
200 
250 
50 
450 
500 
500 



1,250 

250 

1,500 

200 
500 



1.200 
1,200 



416 
250 



600 

112 
600 



1,350 



350 



5,000 

500 

500 

LOOO 

LOOO 

1,200 

LOOO 

500 



500 
500 
500 
500 



500 
500 
600 
500 



1,200 
500 



LOOO 
250 
500 



60 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS, 1930— Continued 



Parry Sound: 

Sugar lake and creek . 

Depot creek 

South Sequin river. . . 
Magnetawan river . . . 

Ragged creek 

Slaughterhouse creek. 
Little East river 



Peel: 

Credit river and tributaries. 
Humber river 



Perth: 

Maitland river. 



Simcoe: 

Sturgeon river. . . . 

Willow creek 

Silver creek 

Black creek 

Hawkestone creek . 

Silver creek 

Nottawasaga river . 

Timiskaming: 

Lake Timagami . . . 



Waterloo: 
Speed river . . . 
Wilkes creek . 
Cedar creek. . 

Mill creek 

Moffatt creek. 
Private pool . . 



Wellington: 

Deagle property . 
Bell's creek 



Speckled Trout Adults 



Muskoka: 

Lake of Bays . 

Peterborough: 
Stony lake . . . 



Wellington : 

Prison Farm creek . 



Lake Trout Eggs 

Department Marine and Fish- 
eries, Ottawa 

Georgian bay (C) 

State Fish Hatchery, Vermont, 

U.S.A 

(Brown trout eyed eggs 
received in exchange.) 

L.\KE Trout Fry 
Algoma : 

Clear lake 

Chiblaw lake 

Patton lake 

Shookum lake 

Jobammeghia lake 

Basswood lake 



500 

500 

2,000 

1,500 

500 

500 

1,500 



2,000 
2,500 



750 



1,000 
250 
500 
250 

1,000 
250 
500 



3,750 



1,000 
500 

1,500 

500 

500 

24 



500 
1,000 



660 

158 

95 



200,000 
266,000 

100,000 



5,000 

35,000 

5,000 

5,000 

10,000 

10,000 



Frontenac: 
Sharbot lake . 
Crow lake. . . . 
Trout lake . . . 
Brule lake. . . . 
Canonto lake. 



Haliburton: 

Kashagawigamog . . 

Drag lake 

Sayer lake 

Spruce lake 

Bob lakes 

Gull lake 

East lake 

Hollow lake 

Kushog lake 

Boskung lake 

Haliburton lake. . . . 

Maple lake 

Twelve Mile lake. . 

Beaver lake 

Oblong lake 

Little Boskung lake . 

Hastings: 

Papineau lake , 

Lake St. Peter 

Salmon lake 

Bass lake 

L'Amable lake , 

Big Salmon lake ... 



Kenora: 

Eagle lake 

Little \'ermilion lake. 

Lanark: 

Silver lake 



(C) 



Leeds: 

Charleston lake 

Rideau lakes (C) 

Muskoka: 

Lake \'ernon 

Fairy lake 

Peninsula lake 

Clear lake 

Walker's lake 

Rebecca lake 

Doty's lake 



Parry Sound : 

Georgian bay (C) 

McQuaby's lake 

Peterborough : 

Gull lake 

Loon lake 



Rainy River: 
Narrow lake . 
Long lake. . . 



Thunder Bay: 

Lac des Mille Lacs 

Savant lake (C) 

Long lake 



35,000 
10,000 
10,000 
12,500 
10,000 



10,000 
20,000 
15,000 

5,000 

5,000 
15,000 

5,000 
10,000 
20,000 

5,000 
25,000 

6,000 
10,000 

5,000 
10,000 

5,000 



20,000 
20,000 
25,000 
30,000 
10,000 
20,000 



100,000 
25,000 



10,000 



25,000 
100,000 



20,000 
25,000 
35,000 
10,000 
10,000 
20.000 
20,000 



3,237,035 
10,000 



50,000 
10,000 



5,000 
10,000 



20,000 
28,000 
25,000 



1931 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1930 



61 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS, l930-~Continued 



Tinjiskaming: 

Lake Timagami 100,000 

York : 

Lake Simcoe (C) 100,000 

Great Lakes: 

Lake Superior (C) 4,430,000 

Lake Huron (C) 5,385,500 

North Channel (C) 2 10,000 

Lake Ontario (C) 449,000 

Lake Trout Fingerlings 
Algoma : 

Trout Lake inlet 25,000 

Mud lake 15,000 

Basswood lake 50,000 

Loon lake 15,000 

Sand lake and creek 25,000 

Carpenter lake 25,000 

McCarroU's lake 10,000 

Cloudvlake 10.000 

Diamond lake 15.000 

Cummings lake 25.000 

Mud lake (Day-Gladstone) .... 25,000 

Island lake 25,000 

Lake Lauzon 50.000 

Island lake (Aberdeen) 25,000 

Lonely lake 25,000 

Achigan lake 25,000 

Petangen lake 5,000 

Lake Dundorn 25.000 

Trout lake (Aweres) 25,000 

Patton lake 25,000 

Haliburton: 

Clear lake 10,000 

Bear lake 2,500 

Stony lake : 2,500 

Wolf lake 2.500 

Pine lake 7,500 

Twelve Mile lake 10,000 

Lake Kashagani 15,000 

Hastings: 

Baptiste lake 15,000 

Kenora : 

Fox lake 100,000 

Lake of the Woods (C) 500,000 

Tawatinaw lake (C) 25.000 

Stanzhikimi lake (C) 25,000 

Dogtooth lake 12,800 

Cedar lake 100,000 

Blue lake 100,000 

Leeds: 

Charleston lake 10,000 

Muskoka: 

Muskokalake 60,000 

Lake Joseph 65,000 

Lake of Bays 175,000 

Mary lake 50,000 

Lake Rosseau 65,000 

Skeleton lake 30,000 



Nipissing: 

L'pper French river 25,000 

Turtle lake 15,000 

Talon lake 15,000 

Wickstead lake 15,000 

French river 100,000 

Trout lake 15,000 

Oxbow lake 15,000 

Marten lake 25,000 

Bear lake 15,000 

Parry Sound: 

Ahmic lake 20,000 

Clear lake 10,000 

Sugar lake and creek 25,000 

Horseshoe lake 15,000 

Spring lake 10,000 

Maple lake 25,000 

Eagle lake 60,000 

Otter lake 15.000 

Cariboo lake 15,000 

Lake of Many Islands 10,000 

Peterborough : 

Belmont lake 20,000 

Oak lake 20,000 

Rainy River: 

Straw Hat lake 7,500 

Mercury lake 7,500 

Renfrew : 

Clear lake 10.000 

Barry's bay 10,000 

Carson's lake 10,000 

Rough lake 10,000 

Wadsworth lake 10,000 

Trout lake 10,000 

Diamond lake and creek 10,000 

Blackfish bay 10,000 

Sudbury: 

Ramsay lake 15,000 

Birch lake 10,000 

Trout lake 10,000 

Thunder Bay: 

Lake Nipigon (C) 30,000 

Kashabowie lake 20,000 

Lake ShebUndowin 20,000 

Long lake 40,000 

McKenzie river 10,000 

Baril river 20,000 

One Island lake 35,000 

Anderson lake 10,000 

Timiskaming: 

Sesekinika lake 15,000 

Perry lake 10,000 

Lake Timagami 200,000 

Cr>'stal lake 10,000 

Nellie's lake 10,000 

Rib lake 10,000 

York: 

Lake Simcoe (C) 10,000 



62 



DEPARTxMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS, 1930—Conthiued 



Great Lakes: 

Lake Superior (C) 216,500 

Lake Huron (C) 510,000 

Lake Ontario (C) 14,667 



Rainbow Trout Fingerlings 
Grey: 

Jamieson lake 

Halton: 

Bronte creek 



Simcoe: 

Stoney creek . 



Sudbury: 

Rapid river 

Windy creek .... 
Sandcherry creek . 
Fairbank creek. . 



York : 

Lake Simcoe . 



1,000 
10,000 
10,000 



10,000 

10,000 

5,000 

1,000 



24.500 



Rainbow Trout Yearlings 
Brant: 

Private aquarium 

York: 
Lake Simcoe 



Brown Trout Fingerlings 
Grey: 

Jamieson lake 

Kenora : 

Armstrong lake 

Blue lake 

Granite lake 

Trout lake (Pellatt) 

Clearwater lake 

Trout lake 

Shoal lake 



10,000 



500 



10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10.000 
10,000 



Whitefish 
Kenora: 

Lake of the Woods 27,500,000 

Parry Sound : 

Georgian bay 57,370,000 

Prince Edward: 

Bay of Quinte 103,440,000 

Rainy River: 

Rainy lake 16,560,000 



Sudbury: 
Windy lake . 



500,000 



Thunder Bav: 

Lake Nipigon 6,000,000 

Savant lake 100,000 



Timiskaming: 

Lake Timiskaming. 



Great Lakes: 

Lake Superior 10,688,000 

Lake Huron 1,500,000 

North Channel 6,000,000 

Lake Erie 32,417,000 

Lake Ontario 15,000,000 



Peterborough : 
Stonv lake . . 



Maskinonge 



Victoria: 

Sturgeon lake. 
Balsam lake. . 
Pigeon river . . 
Young's lake . 



Haliburton: 
Beaver lake . 



Herring 



Parry Sound: 

Georgian bay 1 

Peterborough : 

Loon lake 



Prince Edward: 

Bay of Quinte IS 

Timiskaming: 

Lake Timiskaming 



Great Lakes: 

Lake Huron 7 

Lake Erie 

Pickerel 
Addington: 

South Beaver lake 

White lake 

Indian lake 



Algoma: 

Desbarats lake. 
Keichel lake . . . 
Cataract lake. . 



Carleton: 

Constance creek . 



Frontenac: 
Mississagagon 
Sharbot lake . . 
Cross lake. . . . 
Crow lake. . . . 
Bobs lake .... 
Millar's lake. . 



Hastings: 
Stoco lake. . . 
Moira lake . . 
Salmon river . 



20,000 



20,000 

2,000 

18,000 

10,000 



100,000 

,000,000 

50,000 

,035,000 

75,000 

,000,000 
397,000 



25,000 
30,000 
25,000 

125,000 

100,000 

50,000 



25,000 

40,000 
500,000 

50,000 
100,000 
100,000 

20,000 



150,000 
250,000 
500,000 



25,000 



Kenora : 

Lake Wabigoon (O 5,000,000 

Lake of the Woods (C) 53,190,000 

Eagle lake (C) 3,000,000 

Armstrong lake 25,000 

Tawatinaw (C) 500,000 

Stanzhikimi lake (C) 500,000 



1931 



ANNa'AL REPORT. 1930 



63 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS, i93Q— Continued 



Lambton : 

Sydenham river 200.000 

T 3.n3.T*k * 

Christie lake 150,000 

Tay river 50,000 

Leeds '. 

Rideau lakes (C) 400,000 

Sand lake 100,000 

Crosby lake 25.000 

Muskoka lake 1.385,000 

Joseph lake 750,000 

Lake Rosseau 750,000 

Bala bav 25.000 

Three Mile lake 100,000 

Muldrew lake 100,000 

Robinson lake 25,000 

Nipissing: 

Upper French river 500.000 

Lake Nipissing (C) 1.000,000 

Tilden lake 100,000 

Nosbonsing lake 200,000 

Turtle lake 100,000 

Talon lake 100,000 

Wickstead lake 200,000 

Trout lake 200,000 

Marten lake 200,000 

Northumberland : 

Crow bay 100,000 

Trent river 100,000 

Healey falls 100,000 

Ontario: 

Lake St. John 25,000 

Mud lake 15,000 

Parr>' Sound : 

Brophy lake 250,000 

Magnetawan river 400.000 

Ahmic lake 200.000 

Stewart's lake 25,000 

McKeown's lake 25.000 

Commanda lake 50,000 

Cecebe lake 200,000 

Blackstone lake 150,000 

Manitawabin lake (C) 100,000 

Owl lake 25,000 

Kashegabagamog lake 100,000 

Whitestone lake 250,000 

Isabella lake 300,000 

Georgian bay (O 1,000,000 

Wilson's lake 100,000 

Crane lake 150,000 

Osier's lake 200,000 

Caribou lake 200,000 

Peterborough : 

Otonabee river 500,000 

Prince Edward: 

West lake (C) 1,000,000 

East lake (C) 1,000,000 

Bay of Quinte (C) 18.810.000 



Rainv River: 

Rainv lake (C) 48,250.000 

Red Gut bay (C) 2,000,000 

Renfrew: 

Norway lake 50,000 

Ottawa river (C) 200,000 

Simcoe: 

Severn river 1,000,000 

Sturgeon River bay 500,000 

Nottawasaga river (C) 1,830,000 

Sudbury: 

Cutler lake 50,000 

Thunder Bay: 

Lake Nipigon (C) 5,000,000 

Lake Shebandowin (C) 2,000,000 

Long lake 2,000,000 

Lac des Mille Lacs 2,000,000 

Sturgeon lake (C) 500.000 

Timiskaming: 

Sesekinika lake 250,000 

Lake Timiskaming (C) 250,000 

Barber's bay 100.000 

\'ictoria: 

Trent canal 500.000 

Big Mud Turtle lake 100.000 

Lake Dalrymple (Mud) 300.000 

Young's lake 25,000 

Waterloo : 

Grand river and creek 200,000 

Lake Superior (C) 22,500,000 

Lake Huron (.C) 21,600,000 

Pickerel Eyed Egos 

Muskoka: 

Sparrow lake 5,000,000 

Bass Fry 
Brant: 

Big creek 10.000 

Bruce: 

Cameron lake 5,000 

Taylor's lake 5,000 

Cyprus lake 5,000 

Silver lake 5,000 

Sauble river 5,000 

Saugeen river 5.000 

Durham: 

Scugog lake 5.000 

Frontenac: 

Sharbot lake 5.000 

Loughborough lake 5,000 

Haldimand: 

Grand river 5.000 



64 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS, 1930— Continued 



Haliburton: 

Kashagawigamog lake . 

Gull lake 

Kushog lake 

Rock lake 

Paudash lake 



Hastings: 
Stoco lake. . . 
Crow lake. . . 
Moira river. 
Moira lake. . 
Salmon lake. 
Crow river. . 



Lambton: 

Sydenham river. 

Leeds: 

Big Rideau lake. 



Middlesex: 

Thames river (North branch). 

Muskoka: 

Sparrow lake 



Nipissing: 

Lake Nipissing. 
Turtle lake. . . . 
French river. . . 
Trout lake. . . . 



Ontario: 

Lake St. John 
Lake Simcoe . . 



Parry Sound: 

Blackwater lake. . 

Ahmic lake 

Maple lake 

Cecebe lake 

Storm lake 

Diamond lake .... 

Duck lake 

Isabella lake 

Magnetawan river. 

Peterborough: 

Pigeon lake 

Stony lake 

Belmont lake 

Round lake 

Loon lake 

Little lake 



Prince Edward: 
Roblin's lake . 
West lake. . . . 
East lake . . . . 



Simcoe: 

Severn river . . 
Lake Semple . 
Sparrow lake. 
Lake Simcoe . 



Timiskaming: 
Lake Timaganii. 



5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 



5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 



5,000 

3,000 

5,000 

10,000 



12,000 
1,500 
3,000 
1,500 



5,000 
25,000 



5,000 
4,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
10,000 
5,000 
5,000 



10,000 
20,000 
10,000 
15,000 
5,000 
5,000 



5,000 
5,000 
5,000 



15,000 
5,000 
5,000 

10,000 



3,500 



Victoria: 

Sturgeon lake. 
Cameron lake. 
Balsam lake. . 
Mud lake. . . . 
Head lake. . . . 



Waterloo : 
Grand river. 

York: 

Wilco.x lake . 



Bass Fingerlings 



Brant: 

Whiteman's creek. 
Grand river 



Haliburton: 

West lake 

Big Bob lake. . . 

Gull lake 

South lake 

Kushog lake. . . . 

Beach lake 

Lake of Islands. 

Duck lake 

Straggle lake. . . 
Brady's lake. . . . 



Muskoka: 

Wood lake 

Sand lake 

Three Mile lake. 

Gull lake 

Muldrew lake. . 

Pine lake 

Dickie's lake. . . 

Long's lake 

Long lake 



Parry Sound: 
Ahmic lake. . . . 
Bolger lake. . . . 
Restoule creek. 



Peterborough: 
Belmont lake. 
Round lake. . 
Oak lake 



Victoria : 

Mud Turtle lake. 



Experimental: 

Mount Pleasant hatchery. 



Bass (One to Four Years Old) 

Carleton : 

Constance creek 



Frontenac: 
White lake. 
Long lake. . 



2,500 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 



5,000 
5,000 



500 
500 



325 
250 

20 
225 

35 
340 
350 

95 
200 
130 



500 
500 
100 
100 
100 
100 
500 
100 
100 



100 
200 
111 



900 
800 
600 



500 

•■244 

100 



100 
100 



*244 = 91 fry plus 153 fingerlings. 



1931 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1930 



65 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROM NCI AL 
WATERS, 1930— Continued 



Haliburton: 

Gull lake 

Kushog lakes. . 
Beach lake. . . . 

Duck lake 

Brady's lake. . . 
Cranberry lake . 
Head lake 

Leeds: 

Sand lake 

Newboro lake . . 

Peterborough : 
Indian river. . . 
Oak lake 



Bass Adults 
Addington: 

Bass lake 

South Beaver lake 

White lake 



80 

115 

60 

30 

45 

100 

100 



50 
100 



100 

35 



20 
40 
20 



Frontenac: 

Sharbot lake 100 

Eagle lake 40 

Cross lake 46 

Crow lake 40 

Wolfe lake 25 

Kenora : 

Armstrong lake 40 

Dogtooth lake 200 

Winnipeg river 100 

Lanark: 

Dalhousie lake 100 

Otty lake 50 

Robertson's lake 40 

Patterson lake 46 

Pike lake 50 

Leeds: 

Newboro lake 25 

Peterborough : 

Oak lake 25 



66 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 





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DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



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70 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



APPENDIX 

GAME AND FISHERIES 
Statistics of the Fishing Industry in the Public Waters 

Equip 



District 


No. 
of 
men 


Tugs 


Gasoline 
launches 


Sail and row 
boats 


Gill nets 




No. 


Tons 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Va/ue 


Yards 


Value 




423 
364 
156 
542 
278 
142 
786 

736 
647 








135 
73 
33 

156 
75 
38 

152 

247 
53 


$71,345 
38,765 
25,000 

117,165 
59,375 
12,525 

209,905 

137,215 
30,690 


167 
87 
51 

114 
28 
86 

160 

205 
158 


$7,477 
4,815 
4,440 
5.640 
1.715 
3.950 

12.850 

10.385 
7,179 


375,080 
1.005.456 

383.950 
1.433,085 
1.009,446 


$58,851 




15 
11 
29 
17 


551 
298 
620 
520 


$71,300 

71.500 

196.500 

133.500 


108,012 




39,935 




146,108 




139,580 






Lake Erie and Upper Niagara river 

Lake Ontario. Lower Niagara and St. 


29 


790 


226.500 


1,337,152 

1,230,920 
314,550 


199,348 
123,765 




9 


195 


39,500 


31.195 






Total 


4.074 


110 


2,974 


$738,800 


962 


$701,985 


1,056 


$58,451 


7,089,639 


$846,794 







APPENDIX 
QUANTITIES OF 



District 


Herring 


Whitefish 


Trout 


Pike 


Pickerel 
(blue) 


Pickerel 

(dore) 




lbs. 


lbs. 

675.597 
371.679 
192.446 
993.873 
246.551 
668 
1.087.689 

551.910 
1.422.835 


lbs. 

137.994 
1.530.189 

351.323 
1.317.134 
1.266.306 


lbs. 

782,269 
9,913 
76,249 
80,077 
2,093 
28,189 
41.557 

133.142 
63.903 


lbs. 


lbs. 
1,200,155 




2.743.533 

5.830 

42.625 

328.386 

65 

506.639 

2.319.890 
10.435 


702 


66.649 




110.823 






58,898 






153,168 




3,555 
5,899,140 

25,035 


30,004 


Lake Erie and Upper Niagara river 

Lake Ontario. Lower Niagara and St. 
Lawrence rivers 


11.077 

363,661 
142,798 


274,638 

23,695 
173,280 








Totals 


5.957.403 


5.543,248 


5,120,482 


1,217,392 


5.928,432 


2,091.30 


Values 


$297,870.15 


$609,757.28 


$563,253.02 


$73,043.52 


$296,421.60 


$230,044 10 



1931 



ANNUAL REPORT. 1930 



71 



No. 6 

DEPARTMENT, ONTARIO 

of Ontario, for the Year Ending December 31st, 1930 

ME NT 



Seine nets 


Pound nets 


Hoop nets 


Dip and 

roll nets 


Night lines 


Spears 


Freezers 

and 

Ice houses 


Piers and 
wharves 


Total 
value 


Xo. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 










40 
60 
115 
96 
122 
153 
560 


$12,400 
26,300 
54,200 
91,150 
75,000 
16.675 

337.650 


54 


$2,495 














130 
21 
27 
46 
48 
24 

100 

47 
44 


$35,460 
10,475 
15,915 
26,080 
25,410 
10,050 

135,600 

13,650 
13,155 


95 
32 
28 
61 
16 
13 
62 

25 
18 


$14,990 
10.250 
21.300 
20,190 
5,125 
2,950 
29,200 

4,445 
2,235 


$ 

$203,018 










20 


S3 7 






269,954 




















232.290 


8 


1,200 


$935 


47 


1,66s 


1 


$3 


22,883 

24 

8,350 

3,000 

9,850 
5,950 


4,025 

88 

464 

100 

455 
301 


7 


S36 


608.837 
439.793 


44 


6,485 
13,436 

795 
6,941 


4,911 
9,360 

660 
6,881 














51.525 


55 


27 

541 
180 


492 

13,520 
5,835 


3 

3 
63 


13 

700 

317 






1.161,018 


6 






309.795 


70 


35 


8.850 


86 


644 


146.782 


183 


28,857 


$22,747 


1,181 


$622,225 


849 


$28,347 


70 


$1,033 


50,077 


$5,470 


93 


$680 


487 


$285,795 


350 


$110,685 


$3,423,012 



No. 7 

FISH TAKEN 



Sturgeon 


Eels 


Perch 


Tullibee 


Catfish 


Carp 


Mixed 
coarse 


Caviare 


Total 


Value 


lbs. 
15.322 
2.653 


lbs. 

5 

99.176 
10,780 


lbs. 

11,978 

7 

8,875 

4,219 

30.603 

70.172 

3,419,680 

135,082 
18,299 


lbs. 

264,299 
1,063 

77,790 

573,341 


lbs. 
64,010 


lbs. 

3,134 

50 

658 

81,481 

4,899 

125,264 

277,773 

57.622 
174.148 


lbs. 
206.609 

34.088 
321.403 

93.612 

396,247 

212,465 

1,032,062 

243,361 
412,852 


lbs. 
764 

41 

41 

772 

466 

1,042 

22 
449 


lbs. 

3.362.131 
4.760,526 
1,082,386 
2,757.584 
3.010.768 
523,812 
12,681,060 

4,101,016 
2,674.498 


$303,273.61 
356.493.87 


14,675 
1,551 
8.136 

20.258 


63 

6,283 

266 

32,706 

102,710 

145,046 
86.087 


92.906.34 
280,550.22 
251,918.28 

32,577.69 


27,048 




709,769.67 


3.374 




265.407.66 


34.573 


124,059 


247,007.57 


127.590 


109,961 


3,698,915 


1.040,552 


437,171 


725.029 


2,952,699 


3,597 


34.953.781 


$2,539,904.91 


$51,036 00 


$7,697.27 


$184,945.75 


$62,433.12 


$34,973.68 


$36,251.45 


$88,580.97 


$3,597 













72 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



APPENDIX No. 8 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE YIELD OF 

OF ONTARIO 


THE FISHERIES 


Kind 


1929 


1930 


Increase 


Decrease 


Herring 


lbs. 

4,912,695 

6,159,014 

6,254,719 

1,311,312 

2,583,110 

1,988.975 

121,294 

89,956 

6,002,153 

697,631 

418,231 

609,724 

2,702,823 

3,655 


lbs. 

5,957,403 

5,543,248 

5,120,482 

1,217,392 

5,928,432 

2,091,310 

127,590 

109,961 

3,698,915 

1,040,552 

437,171 

725,029 

2,952,699 

3.597 


lbs. 
1,044,708 


lbs. 


Whitefish 


615 766 


Trout 




1 134 237 


Pike 




93,920 


Blue pickerel 


3,345,322 

102,335 

6,296 

20,005 


Pickerel (dore) 




Sturgeon 




Eels 




Perch 


2,303,238 


TuUibee 


342,921 

18,940 

115,305 

249,876 




Catfish 




Carp 




Coarse fish 




Caviare 


58 








Total 


33,855,292 


34,953,781 


*1,098,489 









*Net increase. 

APPENDIX No. 9 
STATEMENT OF YIELD OF THE FISHERIES OF ONTARIO, 1930 
Compiled from the Fishermen's Annual Returns 



Kind 


Quantity 


Price per 
pound 


Estimated 
value 


Herring 


lbs. 

5,957,403 

5,543,248 

5,120,482 

1,217,392 

5,928,432 

2,091,310 

127,590 

109,961 

3,698,915 

1,040,552 

437,171 

725,029 

2,952,699 

3,597 


$0.05 
.11 
.11 
.06 
.05 
.11 
.40 
.07 
.05 
.06 
.08 
.05 
.03 
1.00 


$297,870.15 


Whitefish . 


609,757.28 


Trout 


563,253.02 


Pike 


73,043.52 


Blue pickerel 


296,421.60 


Pickerel (dore) 


230,044.10 


Sturgeon 


51,036.00 


Eels 


7,697.27 


Perch 


184,945.75 


Tullibee 


62,433.12 


Catfish 


34,973.68 


Carp 


36,251.45 


Coarse fish 


88,580.97 


Caviare 


3,597.00 






Total 


34,953,781 




$2,539,904.91 









APPENDIX No. 10 

VALUE OF ONTARIO FISHERIES FOR A PERIOD OF TWENTY 
1911 TO 1930, INCLUSIVE 



YEARS, 



1911 $2,419,178.21 

1912 2,842,877.09 

1913 2,674,686.76 

1914 2,755,293.11 

1915 3,341,181.41 

1916 2,658,992.43 

1917 2,866,424.00 

1918 3,175,110.32 

1919 2,721,440.24 

1920 2,691,093.74 



1921 $2,656,775,82 

1922 2,807,525.21 

1923 2,886,398.76 

1924 3,139,279.03 

1925 2,858,854.79 

1926 2,643,686.28 

1927 3,229,143.57 

1928 3,033,944.42 

1929 3,054,282.02 

1930 2,539,904.91 



Twenty-Fifth Annual Report 



OF THE 



Game and Fisheries 
Department 

1931 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 9, 1932 




ONTARIO 



TORONTO 
Printed and Published by Herbert H. Ball, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

1932 



To The Right Honourable Sir William Mulock, K.C, M.G., 

Administrator of the Government of the Province of Ontario. 

May It Please Your Honour: 

I have the honour to submit herewith, for the information of Your Honour 
and the Legislative Assembly, the Twenty-fifth Annual Report of the Game 
and Fisheries Department of this Province. 

I have the honour to be, 

Your Honour's most obedient servant, 

Chas. McCrea, 

Minister in charge of 
Game and Fisheries Department. 
Toronto, 1932. 



TWENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Game and Fisheries Department of 

Ontario 



To The Honourable Charles IVIcCrea, 

Minister in charge, Department of Game and Fisheries. 

Sir: — I have the honour to place before you this Twenty-fifth Annual 
Report of the Department of Game and Fisheries of Ontario, covering the year 
1931. 

FINANCIAL 

The table subjoined hereto shows in detail the various sources from which 
this Department derived its revenue during the fiscal year ended October 31st, 
1931. 

Revenue for Fiscal Year, 1931 
Game — 

Royalty $89,844.95 

Licenses — 

Trapping $41,525 .50 

Non-resident Hunting 62,300.00 

Deer 75,016 50 

Moose 7,953.00 

Gun 51,237.75 

Fur Dealers 30,482.00 

Fur Farmers 8,555 . 00 

Tanners 160.00 

Cold Storage 215.00 

Hotel, etc 160 . 00 

277,604.75 

$367,449.70 

FiSHEJilES — 

Royalty $13 ,940 . 76 

Licenses — 

Fishing $101,611.77 

Angling 186,448 . 65 

288,060.42 

Sales — spawn taking 777 .54 

■ 302,778.72 

General — 

Guides' Licenses $6,086 . 00 

Fines 16,674 50 

Costs 1,441 . 35 

Sales — Confiscated Articles, etc 11,126 .44 

Rent 4,986. 00 

Commission 3,015 .45 

Miscellaneous 737 . 17 

— 44,066.91 

Experimental Fur Farm 1,167.50 

$715,462.83 
[1] 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



For information and purposes of comparison, the following table sets forth 
a statement of total revenues and expenditures of the Department in each of 
the past five years, 1927 to 1931, inclusive: 





Revenue 


Expenditure 


Surplus 


1927 


$721,576.25 
733,259.75 
775,374.80 
775,862 84 
715,462.83 


$492,472.88 
518,054.96 
607,835.95 
687,545.90 
744,069.96 


$229,103.37 


1928 


215,204.79 


1929 '. 


167,538.85 


1930 


88,316 94 


1931 









From the foregoing table it will be noted that during the year reported 
upon, owing to considerably decreased revenues and increased expenditures, 
the latter attributable to the expanding activities and undertakings of the 
Department, there was an adverse balance of some $28,607.13, though had the 
usual annual revenues collected by us been maintained at the level of the two 
previous years, they would have been sufficient to provide for the expenditures 
required for all our operations. A study of the detailed figures indicates that 
more than one-half of the reduction in revenue collected in 1931 as compared 
with 1930 is accounted for in the reduction of the amount collected from the 
sale of non-resident hunting and angling licenses to visitors to this Province, 
for we find that while in 1930 some $281,159.75 was received from this source, 
this amount had decreased to $248,748.65 in 1931. Comment on the reason for 
this particular reduction would be superfluous. 

STATISTICS 

Various statistical tables will be found appended to this report, which tables 
are informative to the extent that they contain details as to the several species 
and quantities of fish fry and fingerlings raised in the hatcheries maintained 
and operated under the supervision of the Fish Culture Branch of this Depart- 
ment. In addition, there is information as to the designation and location of 
the many waters in which these fry and fingerlings have been deposited for 
re-stocking purposes. 

There are also statistical tables in connection with the commercial branch 
of our fisheries. 

At various places throughout the report will be noted statistics regarding 
many other aspects of Departmental activities. 

All of these figures have been most carefully assembled and prepared, and 
will be of considerable interest and value to those concerned. 



GAME 

The following table shows the number of large game hunting licenses which 
have been issued throughout Ontario during the past five years. 



1927 



1928 



1929 



1930 



1931 



Resident moose 

Resident deer 

Non-resident hunting 



1,379 

21,111 

2,237 



1,371 

21,867 

1,721 



1,356 

22,164 

1,975 



1,424 

26,213 

2,015 



1,446 

26,436 

1,766 



1932 ANNUAL REPORT. 1931 



One could be excused if from a study of these figures the decision arrived 
at was to the effect that this Province offered many opportunities to the sports- 
man to gratify his hunting instinct and fulfil his desire along these lines. 

The following is a brief summary of conditions throughout the year under 
review as they have affected game birds and animals, and which has been com- 
piled from reports prepared and submitted by the District Superintendents of 
the Department: 

Deer. — Apparently there is little general change in conditions affecting 
deer, though reports do indicate improvement in the northwestern sections. 
These animals are also increasing in number in the closed areas of Southern 
Ontario. In the more accessible portions of the Province in which deer hunting 
is permitted there is a noticeable reduction in the numbers of these animals. 

Moose. — Conditions remained fairly steady, the northwestern section 
accounting for the larger percentage of the hunting of this species. 

Caribou. — The close season has continued, and in view of the fact that 
little, if any, improvement is noticeable, such close season on these animals would 
appear to be necessary and desirable. 

Ruffed Grouse {Partridge). — Reports from all sections contain the informa- 
tion that these birds are plentiful, and that conditions during the year showed 
improvement. 

Sharp-tailed Grouse {Prairie Chicken). — Reports are to the effect that 
members of this species are to be found in Northwestern Ontario as well as the 
northern portion of the District of Cochrane, in which sections their numbers 
would appear to be increasing. 

Quail. — Reported only in the southwestern counties of Southern Ontario 
where conditions have shown some slight improvement. 

Ducks. — While numbers show some fluctuation in various sections, generally 
speaking there was not much change in conditions affecting these birds in 
Ontario. The mild weather which was prevalent during the regular hunting 
season was to a large extent responsible for the restricted catch. 

Pheasaftts {Ring-necked) . — These birds are becoming very widely distributed 
in all the southern counties of Western Ontario, and improvement in conditions 
and increase in numbers have been reported. Present evidences of the existence 
of these birds would indicate that the efforts to provide for their extended 
distribution is meeting with favourable results, especially in the more southerly 
and southeasterly sections of the Province. 

During the year under review, arrangements were completed for the transfer 
of the Departmental work of propagation from Eugenia (Gre>- County) and 
with the establishment of the Bird Farm at Codrington (Northumberland 
County) this work will now be undertaken at the latter place and distribution of 
eggs and birds undertaken from that point. 

It is quite conceivable that the success which has thus far been attained 
in the establishment of this species in our Province would not have followed the 
efforts of the Department had it not been for the willingness of interested private 
indixiduals to co-operate to the extent of j^roviding facilities for the hatching 
of the eggs and care of the young t)irds until they were in a position to pro\'ide 
for themselves, and a reference to the records shows that in 1931 more than 



4 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. Q 

14,000 pheasant eggs were distributed to 857 applicants, while live birds liberated 
at various points last year numbered three hundred and thirty. 

Hungarian Partridge. — The work of propagating this species for establish- 
ment in this Province is still largely in the experimental stage, being carried on 
as yet principally at the Bird Farm at Normandale (Norfolk County), and 
supplemented with such work on a smaller scale at the Bird Farm previously 
referred to, at Codrington. A few of these birds were also distributed at various 
points during the year. 

Plover and Snipe. — These birds continue to be very scarce. 

Rabbits. — Conditions fluctuated and while their numbers appear to have 
decreased in the southwestern counties, in the remainder of the Province, 
generally speaking, conditions have shown some improvement. 

FURS 

While the total number of pelts taken during 1931 showed an increase over 
the preceding year, that increase is not a true indication of conditions, as in 
practically all species save muskrat and mink, the catch showed a considerable 
decline. Some of the decrease would, of course, be attributable to the fact 
that there were fewer trappers in the field, the deflated value of pelts probably 
having an effect in this direction. However, it would appear to be essential 
that strict observance of all existing trapping and close season regulations 
should be required and enforced if the present output of fur from this Province 
is to be maintained, and it is not anticipated that any difficulty will be encount- 
ered in securing the necessary co-operation to this end, especially in view of the 
fact that these regulations are neither arduous nor unreasonable. 

The following is a summary of conditions as they apply to fur-bearing 
animals as reported by District Superintendents: 

Bear.— The number of this species taken again shows some decrease, though 
conditions as to their existence would indicate increasing numbers, especially 
in the northern and northwestern sections of the Province. 

Beaver. — Catch shows some decline. Reports this year, as in previous 
years, indicate increasing numbers in that section of the Province in which the 
protection of an entire close season is provided, while conditions in that portion 
of Ontario in which trapping is permitted during an open season point to 
diminishing numbers therein. 

Fisher. — Catch again shows decrease and it would appear that conditions 
as they affect this species are unfavourable. Reports are to the effect that 
numbers are diminishing practically throughout the entire Province. 

Fox. — Catch again shows considerable decline and from reports received 
the numbers of fox are decreasing in practically every section. 

Lynx. — Very scarce in all sections, with annual catch continuing to decrease. 

Marten. — Very few of this species now taken. Numbers are decreasing in 
practically all sections, and everywhere they are very scarce. 

Mink. — Conditions respecting this species show slight improvement in 
some districts, and while their numbers are not too plentiful, more were taken 
during the year now reported on than in the three previous years. 



1932 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 



Muskrat. — Generally speaking, conditions showed some improvement 
during this year, as is indicated by the increased catch which compares very 
favourably with that of previous seasons. 

Otter. — The catch during the year showed twenty-five per cent, decrease. 
As in the case of beaver, there is some slight improvement in protected areas 
which is not evident in the far north of the Province where an open season is 
provided. 

Raccoon. — This species prevails only in that portion of the Province to 
the south of the French and Mattawa Rivers and Lake Nipissing where con- 
ditions during the year were rather unfavourable so far as increasing numbers 
are concerned. Catch declined very noticeably. 

Skunk. — The catch of this species declined very considerably, and while 
in certain portions of the southern section of the Province conditions show 
some improvement, such conditions do not apply in a general way. 

Weasel. — The catch has declined rapidly in the past two years, indicating 
decreasing numbers of this species. 

The following table compares, for the past six years, pelts of fur-bearing 
animals, other than those which were ranch-raised, on which royalty was paid: 



1926 



1927 



1928 



1929 



1930 



1931 



Bear 

Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (cross) 

Fox (red) 

Fox (silver or black) 

Fox (white,) 

Fox (not specified). . 

Lynx 

Marten 

Mink 

Mluskrat 

Otter 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Weasel 

Wolverine 

Total 



1,635 

27,597 

2,618 

4,175 

30,535 

620 

226 

165 

3,884 

3,177 

65,299 

387,022 

4,304 

21,002 

75,503 

63,599 

11 



691,372 



1,472 

20,738 

3,904 

3,502 

26,112 

403 

977 

136 

4,568 

3,261 

37,628 

469,947 

3,168 

15,958 

59,488 

72,645 

15 



1,575 

22,040 

5,400 

4,116 

25,943 

646 

590 

160 

3,845 

3,492 

32,009 

514,161 

4,510 

13,513 

79,442 

79,425 

19 



1,888 

17,348 

4,343 

1,606 

14,550 

197 

16 

132 

1,718 

2,738 

29,893 

714,019 

4,562 

13,653 

75,773 

117,053 

6 



1,594 

17,493 

2,510 

1,188 

11,076 

154 

116 

106 

871 

1,770 

30,226 

643,999- 

3,986 

13,757 

72,667 

99,704 

9 



723,922 



790,886 



999,495 



901,226 



883 

15,304 

1,544 

799 

8,441 

97 

620 

107 

799 

1,191 

34,271 

723,525 

2,998 

10,871 

55,734 

74,295 

9 



931,282 



Information received by the Department shows that these 1931 pelts 
were worth to the trapper some $1,756,979.32, again showing a considerable 
reduction in value. 

In addition to the above, the total of ranch-raised silver and black foxes, 
dressed or exported, and upon which royalty is not payable, was 10,600; 8,233 
of which were exported from the Province, the balance of 2,367 being dressed 
in Ontario. It is estimated that these pelts had a value of vS397,818.00, which 
also marks a reduction in value in comparison with the previous year. 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



FUR FARMING 

This is a branch of industry authorized and licensed under the provisions 
of the Game and Fisheries Act, and while this work is but of recent origin in 
this Province, there w^ould appear to be every indication that it is developing 
along sound lines and becoming very thoroughly established. The number of 
licensed premises operating as fur farms has shown a steady increase from year 
to year, and in 1931 there were 1,609 such farms licensed under our jurisdiction. 
It is interesting to note that every fur-bearing animal, which is native to the 
Province, is now represented on these farms. 

An Experimental Fur Farm is maintained by the Department at Kirkfield 
(Victoria County) to which institution the fur-farmer is welcome to bring his 
problems and difificulties for advice. The work of this Experimental Fur Farm 
will be submitted in another section of this report. 

Fur Farmers' licenses issued during the past five years are as follows: 



1927 


1928 


1929 


1930 


1931 


986 


1,148 


1,360 


1,557 


1,609 



and the following is a table which shows the numbers of the various animals 
reported to be stocked on these licensed fur farms as at December 31st, in each 
of the years specified: 



Animals Stocked on Licensed Fur Farms as at December 31st 





1927 


1928 


1929 


1930 


1931 


Beaver 


142 
48 

444 

314 

9,664 

56 

2 

826 

1,107 

619 

91 

7 

21 

4 


98 
54 

' ' '353 

365 

12,555 

60 

6 

1,247 

2,016 

"831 

62 

13 

20 

2 

4 


93 

67 

3 

385 

489 

16,457 

107 

5 

3,068 

2,163 

2 

1,337 

22 

13 

""37 

7 


66 

57 

"501 

561 

20,026 

94 

6 

7,184 

1,821 

' 1,481 

9 

9 

30 

9 


58 


Fisher 


74 


Fitch 


89 


Fox (cross) 


582 


Fox fred) 


562 


Fox (silver black) 


17 414 


Fox (blue) 


42 


Lvnx 


4 


Mink 


7 198 


Muskrat 


1,359 


Otter 


Raccoon 


1,486 
12 


Skunk 


Bear 


25 


Marten 


40 


Weasel (ermine) 




Badger 


6 






Total 


* 13 ,345 


*17,686 


*24,255 


*3 1,854 


*28,951 





''Exclusive of muskrat and beaver in semi-captivity 



CROWN GAME PRESER\'ES 

The system of setting apart lands as Crown Game Preserves for the complete 
protection of all game, birds and animals, with the exception of vermin, thereon 
was originally instituted in this Province during the year 1917, when the Pease- 
marsh and Miner Crown Game Preserves were established. In the intervening 
period there has been considerable expansion of this policy so that to-day we 



1932 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 



find that there are 3,756,464 acres within the confines of the present existing 
fifty-six Crown Game Preser\es throughout Ontario, in which the protection 
to which previous reference has been made is now provided. Of this amount, 
an area of 259,650 acres was included in the following seven Game Preserves 
established during 1931. viz.: — Abitibi (District of Cochrane), Mud Branch 
(Count)- of Oxford). Quinte (County of Hastings). Rideau (Counties of Grenville, 
Carleton and Lanark), The Bog (County of Leeds), Westmount (County of 
Middlesex), and Yarmouth (County of Elgin); while extension of the existing 
Rockcliffe, Masonville and Innisfree Game Preserves was responsible for the 
addition during the year of a further 1,798 acres. 

Reports of our field officers are to the effect that these Sanctuaries are of 
increasing value to the various sections in which they are located as affording 
refuge for wild life and thereby an opportunity to develop and increase in number; 
and the continued expansion of the work would indicate a growing realization 
of the benefits which are to be derived therefrom. 



WOLF BOUNTIES 

During 1931, the Department received applications for the payment of 
bounty on 2,751 wolves, an increase of some eight per cent, over the total of 
the previous year. The increase in bounty to S25.00 per pelt on wolves over the 
age of three months, which had been provided where the animals had been 
taken under certain conditions during 1930, was made applicable to all such 
wolf pelts taken in the Province from and after June 1st, 1931, with the result 
that the total amount paid for bounty during the year was considerably in 
excess of the amount thus paid in the previous year. Under present existing 
conditions wolf trapping is possibly the most remunerative branch of the industry 
so far as the trapper himself is concerned. Reference must again be made to 
the fact that the large majority of wolf pelts upon which applications for bounty 
are received by the Department are from animals taken in the extreme north- 
western section of the Province. 

Following is a comparative statement of pelts received and bounties paid 
during the past five years: 





Timber 


Brush 


Pups 


Total 


Bounties 


For fiscal year ending October 3 1st, 1927 .... 
For fiscal year ending October 31st, 1928. . . . 
For fiscal year ending October 3 1st, 1929 .... 
For fiscal year ending October 31st, 1930. . . . 
-For fiscal year ending October 3 1st, 1931 . . . . 


1,041 
1,231 
1,165 
1,070 
1,376 


4,414 
4,878 
2,389 
1,458 
1,336 


59 
64 
34 
23 
39 


5,514 
6,173 
3,588 
2,551 
2,751 


$82,970 07 
91,297.27 
53,495.13 
38,074.77 
55,873.80 



ENFORCEMEXT OF THE ACT 

For purposes of administration and enforcement, there are seven divisions 
of the Province, each under the direct supervision of a District Superintendent, 
headquarters of which officials are located, respectively, at London, Orillia, 
Ottawa, North Bay, Sault Ste. Marie, Fort William and Sioux Lookout. During 
the year, the enforcement of the provisions and regulations of The Ontario 
Game and Fisheries Act was, generally speaking, performed in an efficient 
and satisfactory manner by the o\erseers whose particular duties are along 
these lines. The number of officers charged with the general work of enforcement 



8 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

is supplemented by several seasonal officers, engaged for limited periods during 
the Spring and Fall spawning and deer hunting seasons, when more adequate 
supervision of fishing and hunting activities is demanded. 

In addition to the duties which are performed by these paid officers, the 
Department finds it necessary to appoint Deputy Game and Fishery Wardens 
to assist in the work of securing observance of our regulations. During 1931 
there were four hundred and five such appointments, and the voluntary duties 
undertaken by these appointees and the splendid co-operation rendered by them 
is of inestimable value to the enforcement service. A goodly proportion of 
these appointees are members of Fish and Game Protective Associations, and 
their interest in the advancement of departmental activities is responsible for 
a measure of assistance which it would be difficult to duplicate, and which is, 
therefore, greatly appreciated. 

In 1,276 cases in which parties were apprehended and charged with violations 
of fish and game regulations, convictions were secured, and fines and costs 
assessed, as set forth in the statement of revenue submitted previously in this 
report. 

In 1,768 cases seizures of goods and equipment were made, and a summary 
of the articles involved is as follows: 

Pelts 5,228 Fire-arms.... 523 

Deer and Moose hides 27 Boats, — gasoline 10 

Live Animals and Birds 60 row 27 

Fish lbs. 11,766 Canoes 5 

Fish no. 1,813 Punts 10 

Gill nets pes. 407 Motor cars 14 

Gill nets yds. 10,090 Jack-lights and lanterns 58 

Dip nets 52 Deer and Moose 26 

Hoop nets 20 Venison lbs. 560 

Seine nets 31 Moose-meat lbs. 1,040 

Trap nets 9 Partridges 309 

Roll nets 14 Geese and Ducks 43 

Hooks 3,744 Pheasants 35 

Spears 142 Decoys 66 

Rods and lines 110 Ammunition (rounds) 470 

Creels 6 Rabbits 35 

Tackle Boxes 11 Squirrels 21 

Traps 1,882 Miscellaneous 81 

In accordance with the usual practice, confiscated articles, except in those 
cases in which they were sold to the former owners, were disposed of by tender 
at sales which were given publicity and advertised in the press. Notice of these 
sales was also given through the offices of our District Superintendents. The 
amount derived from these sales is shown in the statement of revenue included 
in this report. 

REPORT OF THE EXPERIMENTAL FUR FARM 

In spite of the decline in pelt values during the past two years, there has 
been a steady and increasing demand for technical information from those 
interested in fur farming. Economic conditions, however, have forcibly brought 
attention to the necessity of reducing overhead expenses in many directions. 
There are many indications that foxes and other animals having inferior 
productive qualities and pelts of low value have been retained from year to 
year throughout the fur farms of the Province. The time has arrived when 
such animals must be strictly eliminated, if operations are to continue at a 
profit, and in some cases the purchase of individuals of higher grade in order 



1932 ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 9 

to raise the prevailing standards of quality, is timely. Feeding is also being 
reduced to the essential elements required for satisfactory nutrition. There 
has been a steady improvement in feeding methods employed by fox breeders 
during the past few years, both in the uniformity of the ration and from a 
realization of the dangers of feeding contaminated and spoiled food. Compared 
with previous years, very few cases of food poisoning are now reported or sent 
for autopsy to the Fur Farm. 

On the other hand, many specimens examined from mink ranches indicate 
that beginners have not yet grasped the significance of feeding only pure food. 
It is becoming apparent that mink are subject to a number of conditions requiring 
investigation. Distemper, while not prevalent, has made its appearance from 
time to time during the year. Another disease which appears to be connected 
with a deficiency in the diet, is frequently met with. Preliminary investigations 
of this condition have given encouraging results. These investigations will be 
continued in the hope that control measures will ultimately be found. Con- 
siderable work has been accomplished regarding the nutritional requirements 
of mink and will be continued during 1932. 

An attempt to identify and provide a workable key to the more common 
internal parasites found in fur-bearing animals was undertaken during the year. 
This was considered necessary as the first step towards prevention and possible 
elimination of these parasites in ranch-bred animals. Considerable attention 
has been given to some of the common parasites affecting foxes, with the object 
of applying preventive methods to the best advantage. 

Pneumonia in AT ink 

Respiratory diseases are frequently met with in mink. Congestion of the 
lungs is common in the summer months and lobar pneumonia in the late fall 
and spring, when the weather is variable with somewhat alternating periods 
of rain and frost. 

Symptoms . — These are somewhat similar to those occurring in congestion 
of the lungs. The mink, previously in apparently good health, suddenly refuses 
to eat and dies within twenty-four to forty-eight hours. Shallow, quick breathing 
has been noticed in some cases, and also a decided weakness in the hind quarters. 
Brain symptoms, characterized by stupor and walking or chasing in circles 
may also be present. The owner, however, may notice very few, if any, symptoms, 
due to the mink's habit of remaining in the nest box when sick. Generally his 
first and only indication of trouble is to find the animal dead in the nest box. 

Post-mortem. — The lungs are usually distended with areas of consolidation, 
which are firm and easily cut. Other areas are mottled in appearance and have 
a granular texture when cut. The impression of the ribs is often seen on the 
lung tissue. The bronchial glands are swollen and grayish in colour. The bronchi 
and trachea, in all cases examined, were filled with a blood-stained exudate. A 
serous fluid in the thoracic cavity may be present and the blood vessels of the 
heart are prominent, due to engorgement with blood. The intestines and stomach 
are often empty or contain very little food. A slight gastrointestinal catarrh is 
frequently present. 

Prevention. — The condition is brought about by the mink running in and 
out of the nest box during wet, cold weather. The bedding subsequently becomes 
wet and damp and the mink chilled. Once the resistance of the animal is lowered, 
pneumonia takes place. Every effort has to be made during these periods to 
keep the bedding changed frequently and the nest box dry. Alterations in the 



10 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

construction of the mink house are sometimes advisable to provide better 
protection from the weather. 

Iodine Poisoning in Mink 

Recently our attention has been drawn to a toxic condition occurring in 
mink caused by the excessive use of iodine. The use of this drug has been widely 
advocated among fox and mink breeders as a preventive against certain diet 
deficiency conditions. 

These conditions are claimed to be caused by a lack of iodine in the system, 
due to the improper functioning of the thymus gland. This gland supplies the 
necessary iodine required for normal nutritional metabolism, and if lacking, 
nervousness, and an enlargement of the glands, particularly the thyroid, result. 
It is also advocated that a sufficient quantity of iodine is necessary to counteract 
poisons which may form in the body during the digestion of food. 

There appears to be little evidence either practical or experimental that 
fur-bearing animals are subject to iodine deficiency, and if it be used in the daily 
rations it should be administered with care and precision. 

The following correspondence is typical of a number of cases dealt with 
during the past year. "I am operating a fur farm and last spring I was advised 
to feed my mink at least one drop each daily of tincture of iodine and was told 
that I could feed one drop three times a day with safety. This advice was 
given by a person who should have a fair knowledge of the amount and effect 
of iodine when used as a drug for mink. 

I fed each mink one drop daily all last spring and summer and several of 
my largest feeders, which would probably get more than one drop became 
nearly naked, in fact one lost all of his fur and was as hairless as when born. 
One yearling lost his teeth and several of them died near fall. Would this 
condition be caused by the iodine I have been giving my mink?" 

If iodine in practically any form is given to any animal in fairly large doses 
and for a considerable period of time, toxic effects may be manifested or a 
condition termed "iodism" may result. This is evidenced by a dry scurfy 
condition of the skin, the fur becomes harsh, dry and stairy in appearance. 
The eyes are reddened and watery, the appetite becomes dull and the affected 
animal will abstain from taking water. 

On post-mortem the tissue appears to be somewhat dried out. A slight 
inflammation and catarrhal condition of the nasal passages and pharynx are in 
evidence. The lining of the stomach and intestines show inflammation, also a 
slight gelatinous substance may be found adhering to the mucosa, which indicates 
a catarrhal condition. The stomach appears contracted and contains no food. 
The intestines also appear somewhat shrunken and may contain soft watery 
faeces. 

If mink owners are of the opinion that their mink require iodine in order 
to maintain the proper functioning of the body, "potassium iodide" is perhaps 
the best form of iodine to use. It may be prepared for mink as follows: Take 
one ounce of potassium iodide and dissolve in one quart of water. Take one 
ounce of this solution and make up to one quart with water. One ounce of this 
weak solution is probably sufficient for the daily iodine requirements of thirty 
to forty mink. This can be mixed with the ration in any way which suits a 
particular method of feeding, but if possible, attempts should be made to mix 
it thoroughly with the food. 

Food Poisoning in Mink 
Food poisoning appears to be the most common source of mortality among 
mink at the present time. A few years ago, it was also very common among 



1932 ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 11 

foxes; but due to improved methods of feeding it has largely disappeared on 
the better managed ranches. No doubt as mink breeders acquire a better under- 
standing of the underlying causes of diseases, it will tend to become less frequent 
among their animals. 

Food poisoning occurs very suddenly and only two or three animals may 
be affected at one time. Where several mink are affected, the owner may think 
that he has to deal with a contagious disease. The mink, in all probability, have 
been in good health and suddenly two or three will be found dead in the nest 
boxes. The condition may disappear for three or four weeks or even for several 
months, or it may even have the appearance of a seasonal occurrence. The 
history and circumstances surrounding the deaths are difficult to explain and 
the rancher is at a complete loss to understand them. 

Food poisoning is a condition which affects animals and is caused by the 
formation of toxic or poisonous substances in food material, usually by bacteria 
and moulds. When eaten, these bacteria and moulds often cause digestive 
disturbances of varying degrees of severity. 

The blood, flesh, or any organ of an animal may acquire poisonous properties 
through the products of bacterial growth. These poisons can be explained in 
part by the growth of bacteria in the food stuff and the formation of poisonous 
products. It should also be understood that under certain conditions, food, 
which to the eye or nose is not spoiled, may already contain bacteria which 
may de^•elop in the stomach and intestines of the individual eating the food, 
resulting in food poisoning. 

Meat poisoning can occur after the ingestion of meat derived from horses, 
cattle, or calves which have died, or have been slaughtered at the point of death, 
usually as the result of some disease. If the disease is of bacterial origin the 
danger of feeding such meat is obvious, but there is considerable evidence that 
such animals are frequently used as food. 

Another group of food poisoning cases is associated with putrefactive 
changes, which, unlike the former group, are quite noticeable to the feeder. The 
meat or fish, as the case may be, is obviously bad; it has a slimy appearance 
and an offensive odour. This is apt to take place with meat or fish that has been 
repeatedly thawed out and frozen in periods of changeable weather during 
early fall and late spring. In some cases only small areas may be affected but 
these are sufficient to kill two or three mink. During these periods of repeated 
thawings, the chemical composition of the meat will become changed and form 
a media favourable for the growth of poisonous bacteria which have been kept 
in check by freezing. This is especially true of horse meat on account of its 
high sugar content. 

Ranchers may argue that decomposed meat has been fed with no bad 
results. This may be true in some cases if bacteria of a poisonous nature have 
not developed in the meat, but the odds against this happening are much too 
great for the rancher to take the risk. 

Animals pre\iously treated with drugs such as coal oil, turpentine, str>chnine 
and other stimulants, which become diffused through the flesh in a short time 
after administration, when fed to mink may cause death. Such meats are usually 
difficult to keep from spoiling. 

Alouldy and ropy bread is one of the most insidious forms of food poisoning 
encountered in mink. Bread may, to all external appearances, appear to be 
(|uite fit for food but in realty may be very dangerous. 

Ropy bread when rolled between the fingers will be moist and stick\- and 
have a sickly, sourcdour. It spreads into small fine threads which have a spider 
web appearance. When mixed with milk and allowed to stand for a while, it 



12 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

soon ferments, the milk becoming curdled. This is especially the case if it is 
left in the sun. The condition is caused by bacteria in the bread. Flour kept 
in large bakeries has been known to contain the organism and when made into 
bread, the bread becomes ropy. The bacterium is claimed to be harmless to 
humans, but severe outbreaks of a convulsive nature have occurred among 
foxes and mink soon after consuming ropy bread and biscuits known to contain 
the organism. 

Moulds in bread or meat produce poisonous substances and when the bread 
or meat is eaten, symptoms of intoxication follow. 

Mink have the habit of storing food in their nest boxes, which in time 
becomes spoiled and consequently leads to food poisoning. In cases of outbreaks 
among mink the history usually indicates spoiled food as the cause and the 
symptom.s are fairly constant. The following extracts describing observations 
in connection with mink that have died of food poisoning bring out the history 
of such cases very clearly. "Mink appeared very active and was looking well 
but seemed to take an attack of indigestion, by the way it acted. It was fed 
frozen herrings that were noticed to be very soft and have a slight foul odour, 
but they were washed before being fed to make them fresh. The herrings were 
obtained in a frozen state from a commercial house. At the ranch they were 
kept in a refrigerator which would only keep them cool, in a little time they 
would become soft." Another extract states: "Two apparently died suddenly 
as they were found dead in the nest box. The other one showed sickness for 
two days. Worms or food poisoning suspected as being the cause of death. 
Old bear meat had been added to the diet for the two days just previous to the 
death of the mink. Other mink on ranch were normal." The following case 
is quite typical of food poisoning: "Mink apparently all right as far as could 
tell. It was always ready for its feed and ate its evening meal. Was found 
dead in the nest box the next morning. Some time ago I had two other mink 
die suddenly. They were also found dead in the nest box. One showed a variable 
appetite, at times would eat a little food and appear all right." 

The history of another form of food poisoning which is sometimes met 
with in mink is as follows: "Two females for about ten days were doing a lot 
of running about their pens. In a few days they took fits, would run around the 
pen, roll over a few times and then curl up as if in great pain. During this spasm, 
their feet and body would be kept in motion. In a few moments the body would 
relax, then maybe they would get up and walk around the pen for a few minutes 
after which they would curl up and go to sleep." 

The symptoms shown in mink affected with food poisoning vary according 
to the conditions under which the infection takes place. Mink may die without 
showing any symptoms whatsoever; in these cases they are usually found dead 
in their pens or nest boxes or they may be seen playing about their pens only 
to be found dead in a few hours afterwards. Such is the case when very large 
amounts of toxic materials have been taken into the body. In these cases very 
few lesions are found on post-mortem examination. Animals may sicken suddenly, 
often exhibiting manifestations of abdominal pain. These may be so sharp and 
severe as to lead to maniacal attacks. The symptoms may be accompanied 
by great prostration; the animal may lie on the floor, stupefied and motionless, 
or may go into convulsions. Dizziness, muscular contractions, frothing at the 
mouth are also symptomatic. In prolonged or chronic cases the appetite becomes 
variable; some meals are taken in a normal manner, then again there may be 
an entire absence of appetite. Thirst may be either diminished or increased, 
some animals taking only fresh cool water, others again taking contaminated 
stale water. Vomiting is sometimes manifested and often occurs after the 



1932 ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 13 

ingestion of food and water. After vomiting, the condition of the animal may 
seem to improve. Sometimes the animal greedily licks unpalatable, indigestible, 
bitter, repulsive material, or it may accept only certain kinds of food. Such 
animals soon appear dull, and manifest nervous disturbances. They may become 
indifferent to their surroundings, are feeble, do not like to move and often lie 
quietly in one place. The eyes become sunken and the fur appears dry and rough. 
The post-mortem findings depend somewhat upon the severity of the 
disease and the kind of toxin causing the disturbance and the length of time 
the animal has been ill. In those cases where the animal has been ill only a 
few hours, very few lesions may be apparent. The carcass may show considerable 
fat and a good state of nutrition. In the more prolonged cases discernible, 
pathological lesions are usually evident, and the carcass appears rather thin 
and emaciated. On opening the abdominal cavity, the blood vessels appear 
dark and prominent due to engorgement. The stomach may or may not contain 
food. If the animal died within a very short time after eating, the entire meal 
may be found in the stomach without apparently any digestive changes having 
taken place, due to paralysis of the stomach walls. Likewise, the same action 
takes place in the intestinal tract providing the poison has reached that part 
of the body. 

Inflammatory Reactions. — The stomach mucosa may show very slight areas 
of inflammation usually of a rose-coloured tint. On the other hand, the entire 
mucosa may show severe inflammation, especially in the region of the pylorus. 
(Inflammation of the stomach due to food poisoning must not be confused 
with the natural pinkish tinge of the stomach mucosa caused by the filling of 
the capillaries with blood which becomes quite marked during digestion.) The 
stomach wall becomes greatly distended. This is usually an antemortem condition 
due to certain organisms being present which produce gas. The organism on 
gaining entrance to the stomach, finds a place where the temperature is ideal 
for development. Gas formation takes place distending the stomach wall, causing 
great pain to the animal, and death takes place very suddenly if the condition 
is not relieved. In those cases where a small amount or no food is present in 
the stomach, digestion has taken place to a greater or lesser extent before the 
poison has exerted its action on the system. The stomach mucosa is likely to 
be covered with a sticky, gelatinous exudate which has a debilitating affect on 
the body organs and will also coat the food or be mixed with it to some extent. 
In prolonged cases, lasting for some days, the stomach may be devoid of food 
but may contain foreign material such as stones, dirt, chewed wood, leaves, 
straw, etc. The stomach wall may show erosions in these cases. 

When the toxic substances reach the intestines, inflammation is set up. 
Small areas, portions, or the entire length of the intestine may be involved. 
As a rule the duodenum is the portion of the small intestine most frequently 
aff^ected. Inflammation in the intestines caused from food poisoning assumes 
colour characteristics similar to those of the stomach mucosa. The areas may 
become so severely inflammed that it appears as a deep bloody, jelly-like mass, 
and small hemorrhagic areas may be seen on the external wall of the intestine. In 
some cases the intestinal wall may appear thickened, the mucosa having a white 
soft velvety appearance; the substance responsible for this can be scraped from 
the underlying tissue. 

The body organs become debilitated in consequence of the severe circulatory 
disturbances, absorption of toxic, split products of bacterial endotoxins, and 
of bacteria. The bacteria and toxic substances become absorbed, the epithelium 
of the gastric and intestinal mucosa is greatly degenerated, the digestion is 
arrested, and the inflammation extends into the submucosa which is well supplied 



U DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

with lymph vessels. The toxic substances having reached the digestive tract 
are then absorbed because they cannot be destroyed by the intestinal epithelial 
cells, or by the digestive enzymes, because they are present in such very great 
quantities. The absorption of the bacterial endotoxins and of the products of 
motion cleavage give rise to injuries affecting the parenchymatous cells. The 
bacteria which enter the general circulation without being dissolved immediately, 
may produce local inflammation in distant organs. Hence we may find small 
petechial hemorrhages in the spleen, kidneys and heart which are very common 
lesions in these organs when the animal has died from food poisoning. When 
pathological lesions are present in these organs they are caused by the patho'renic 
bacteria or their toxins being picked up by the blood stream and carried to 
these organs where they exert an injurious effect of varying degrees upon the 
organ tissue. The absence of lesions in these organs indicates that the causative 
bacteria or their toxins have not been able to reach the more distant organs 
through the circulation because the action on the animal organism has been 
so severe that death ensued before they had reached such organs as the spleen, 
kidneys, etc. 

In some cases the spleen may show small petechial hemorrhages or it may 
be enlarged to four times its normal size, greatly thickened and of a tarry black 
colour. The kidneys may show inflammation and petechial hemorrhages. The 
liver may be enlarged, swollen, soft and friable, its capsule being broken when 
handled. Its colour may range from a dark chocolate brown to an ash gray 
colour or a mottled appearance. The lobules may show quite prominently. 
It may also show hemorrhagic areas. Small hemorrhagic areas may be found 
on the heart muscle especially near its base or along the course of the coronary 
artery. A straw-coloured fluid is cften present in the pericardial sac. 

Pathology. — Marked hemorrhages and profuse extra\'asations of red blood 
cells into the surrounding tissues is the most prominent feature seen on micro- 
scopic examination of sections of tissues taken from mink that died of acute 
food poisoning. There is a marked engorgement of the blood vessels; their 
walls appear thin and stretched and in many places they have been destroyed, 
leaving openings through which a profuse pouring of red blood cells into the 
surrounding tissues has taken place. 

In the stomach and intestine, in most places, the points of the crypts are 
destroyed and in many areas destruction of the entire crypt has taken place. 
The spaces above are occluded with debris, composed of broken down tissue and 
red blood cells that have been poured out in huge quantities from between the 
crypts. 

The kidney tissue shows cloudy swelling. The cells of the convoluted and 
collecting tubules are broken from their base and the cellular cytoplasm is 
seen in various stages of disintegration, the lumen of the tubule becoming 
obliterated. Extravasation of red blood cells is found throughout the kidney 
tissue. Marked hemorrhages in many of the glomeruli are noticed. 

In affected parts of the liver tissue the cytoplasm of the cords in the lobules 
have lost their definite structure and are for the most part destroyed. 
Hemorrhages from the blood vessels are present. The central vein and sinusoides 
are engorged with blood and in many instances to such an extent as to cause 
the destruction of their characteristic structure. 

In a spleen that is enlarged, thickened and black in colour, microscopic 
examination reveals the blood vessels to be extremely engorged and numerous 
hemorrhages occurring. The cellular differentiation is obliterated. The cytoplasm 
stains a very deep red colour. 



1932 ANNUAL REPORT. 1931 15 

The lung tissue shows marked engorgement of all blood vessels. The lobules 
are separated from one another due to the engorgement of the capillaries. The 
intense filling of the capillaries causes a stretching of the capillary wall which 
often ends in its rupture. Extravasation of red blood cells into the surrounding 
tissue from the ruptured capillary wall takes place. Often a rupture in the walls 
of the alveoli or air sacs has occurred, and extravasation of red blood cells occurs 
into the air sac, in some instances completely filling it. 

Distemper in Mixk 

An infectious disease of m.ink in many respects closely resembling distemper 
as seen in the ferret and fitch was reported during the year from several points. 

One particular outbreak undoubtedly resulted from the introduction of 
infected fitch into the mink ranch. The ranch is a model one and the animals 
are given the best of care and attention. No disease had ever been experienced 
until the fitch were brcught in. Two or three days after the fitch arrived one 
was noticed to be sick with distemper symptoms. The destruction of the fitch, 
and "torch" and disinfection of the nest boxes and mink house was advised. 
This was done, but frcm eight to ten days later several mink were taken sick 
and died. A number of these were nursing females with litters of young. 

The symptomiS were very varied as is always the case with epidemics among 
fur-bearing animals. In some cases there is a distinct swelling around the eyes 
which may become mucopurulent. In others there is a localization of pus 
above the eye but it does not affect the eye proper. The vulva in a number of 
females becomes swollen and red and the feet have a tendency to swell. This 
swelling is of an emphysematous nature. The guard and underfur in most cases 
shed off from the base of the neck to the shoulder. This symptom is characteristic 
of other diseases affecting mink and is often found in malnutrition cases. With 
some, the appetite is affected but little, and they will eat up to a few hours 
before death. Diarrhoea is noticeable. The duration of the disease is very 
irregular. One animal may appear to be quite normal and suddenly give forth 
a piercing screech, go into convulsions and die in an hour or two. Others may 
drag on for as long as five weeks. These cases invariably develop severe chorea 
and die in convulsions. In some cases an emphysematous swelling is seen around 
the nostrils and in others there is a profuse purulent discharge from the eyes 
and nostrils. The incubation period appears to be within ten to fourteen days, 
but this is difficult to estimate under field conditions. The mortality is high, 
at least thirty per cent., even where strictest precautions regarding isolation 
and disinfection are taken. A few mink recover after showing symptoms, but 
the percentage is very small. 

Post-mortem examinations on fur-bearing animals dying from distemper 
are very unsatisfactory and the lesions remarkable by their absence. The fact 
that definite lesions are absent can almost be accepted as diagnostic. The 
carcass may be thin and emaciated or on the other hand in a good state of 
nutrition. The brain in some cases appears to be inflamed and the blood 
vessels engorged, but sections made from these cases showed no microscopic 
lesions. \A here diarrhoea is present the intestines are inflamed as would be 
expected. The liver may be yellow and ver\' friable, but this is a common 
condition in many ailments of the mink. 

Four ferrets were infected with a brain and spleen emulsion from the 
infected mink. These animals died showing all symptoms of true distemper 
as it affects ferrets. 



16 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

Treatment. — Removal of all infected and contact animals and thorough 

disinfection of the premises with "torch" and disinfectants are advised. If, 

however, the epidemic should take place during the whelping season this is 

difficult to secure owing to the danger of disturbing the females at this period. 

The Laidlaw-Dunkin vaccine and serum should be used on all animals showing 

symptoms of the disease. While we have no data showing the efficiency of the 

vaccine and serum under controlled experiments, results in the field show 

sufficient promise to warrant their use without delay. Medicinal treatment is 

quite useless. 

REFERENCES 

(1) Rudolf, J.— Deutsche Tierarztliche Wochenschrift, 38, 1930, pp. 728. "Beitrag zur 
Staupe beim Silberfuchf, Nerz und Waschbaren. 

(2) Wood, F. W.— J.of the Amer. Vet. Med. Assoc, Vol. LXXVII., N.S. 30, No. 5, 
November, 1930, pp. 569-586. "Recent Advances in the Prophylaxis and Treatment of Canine 
Distemper." . . , ,, 

(3) Dalling, T. — Veterinary Record, Vol. XI, No. 42, pp. 1051-1052. "Distemper m Fitch. 

Tuberculosis in Raccoon 

Last November, the carcass of a raccoon was brought to the Ontario 
Experimental Fur Farm for autopsy to see if the cause of death might be 
determined. The owner stated that several of his raccoon were acting in a 
manner similar to the one that had died. They all seemed to be wasting away 
in flesh and were unthrifty. Some were in a very thin condition, while during 
the summer they all appeared to be healthy and in a good state of nutrition. 
Their appetite appeared variable, fur dry and roughened, and their eyes appeared 
dull. All of the animals seemed to have a pronounced hacking cough and some 
had difficulty in breathing. The raccoon were given all the milk they would 
drink. This was kept before them in pans all the time, as the owner stated that 
raccoon seemed to have a preference for milk. 

The dead raccoon, on autopsy, showed that the carcass was thin. The 
external body tissue was yellow and jaundiced. On opening the abdominal 
cavity, a peculiar, flat, sickening odour was noticed. The omentum was a pink 
red colour with numerous tubercular nodules throughout, their size ranging 
from an eighth of an inch to one half an inch in diameter, yellow-gray in colour. 
The mesenteric chain of lymphatic glands was also infected. A large tubercular 
abscess, about two and one-half inches in diameter, was located in the small 
intestine. The thoracic cavity was filled with a serous fluid. The lungs were 
covered with numerous small nodules about the size of pin heads. The sub- 
maxillary lymph glands were enlarged. The carcass appeared hydremic 
throughout. 

In discussing this case with the owner, he stated that he owned one cow 
which did not appear to be doing well. She was hard to keep in good condition, 
in spite of the fact that she was well fed and was given a tonic in her feed as a 
conditioner. During the past year she had frequent attacks of indigestion 
and at times would become bloated. This cow's milk was used to supply the 
family, which besides the owner and his wife, consisted of three small children, 
a baby about one year old, one child three years old and one seven years old. 
All of the children were fond of milk and drank a considerable amount of it 
daily. The balance of the milk was used to feed the raccoon. 

The symptoms shown by the cow are quite diagnostic of bovine tuberculosis. 
Since the milk from this cow was being fed in large quantities to the raccoon, 
it is likely they became infected from it. 

The owner was urgently advised to cease using the milk in his home without 
delay and to secure milk from a source known to be free from tuberculosis until 
he could have his own cow tested for tuberculosis. 



1932 ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 \7 

Principles of Breeding 

In the past very little consideration has been given to the principles of 
breeding fur-bearing animals. The accepted principles of breeding adapt them- 
selves very readily to the improvement in the quality of mink, fox and other 
fur-bearing animals. The principles of selection and line breeding can be 
followed with excellent results by those who have a knowledge of the subject. 
Much of the literature written on breeding is highly technical and consequently 
confusing to many readers. However, if certain principles are clearly understood 
the practical rancher should experience very little difficulty in putting them 
into operation with his own breeding stock. 

When one considers the mating of two animals, he tries to determine what 
characteristics the offspring from the mating will possess. The results obtained 
depend upon the ability of the breeder to select two animals which are capable 
of producing young which will at least be equal in merit to themselves and with 
the expectations that they may be better. The skilful breeder has the ability, 
through his knowledge and experience in selecting animals, to detect defects 
in the parents as well as the desirable points. Until this ability has been acquired 
there is little hope of continued and steady improvement in the quality of the 
animals at hand. 

The important factor which should be given due consideration when selecting 
stock for mating purposes, is a knowledge of the blood lines of the animals that 
are to be mated together. This is of great value because it gives a clue to 
the weak and the strong points found in the different ancestors of the individual 
animals. we are attempting to select. If there are weak points of a similar nature 
found in the ancestors of both the male and the female we are going to mate 
together, it can readily be seen that it would be inadvisable to mate them; 
the weak points have a double chance of becoming intensified in the offspring. 
On the other hand strong or desirable points have the same chance of showing 
up in the offspring. 

\^ery little progress in breeding can be made unless proper attention is 
given to the feeding and care of the animals. Undeveloped, weak, narrow 
chested and deformed individuals have very little resistance to disease and 
parasites, because of improper care and ill-nourishment. The breeding of such 
animals would be folly in an attempt to improve the quality of the stock. 

In animal breeding, specific characters are often transmitted with great 
exactness from generation to generation. We often observe a distinct peculiarity 
or likeness such as a certain size, shape or colour repeatedly passed from a parent 
to its offspring or as this characteristic is often spoken of as "running in the 
family." This resemblance among individuals related by descent is called 
heredity. The resemblance between the members of groups of various sizes, 
races, families or small groups of individuals can often be shown to be due 
chiefly to relationship and hence to heredity. Whatever characteristics an 
animal possesses so far as inheritance is concerned, are traceable to its parents. 

Inheritance is from the race and not from any individual or group of 
individuals. Inherited characteristics come from both parents and have been 
passed down the line of descent with each succeeding generation. The\' are 
handed down unchanged from generation to generation. Females which have 
a tendency to produce a large number of young at a birth are dependent to some 
extent on the inheritance from the mother. Such a quality is very desirable 
in selecting breeding stock and should not be lost sight of when choosing 
breeding stock. 

In animal breeding, we have the term "variation" which is the tendency 
to depart or differ in any particular, from others of their kind. X'ariation is said 



18 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

to create new kinds of living things; heredity preserves them. All progress in 
breeding is based on the law of variation. No two animals are exactly alike; 
a close examination will always re^•eal that they differ to some degree. By 
making good use of these differences the breeder can turn them to his own 
advantage. It is this variation in the individual that enables us to 
select parents possessing the characteristics we desire to obtain in 
the offspring. This method is termed selection and is one of the safest for 
gradually raising the standard of the ranch. It is a very poor policy to mate 
a good animal to a poor one, with the idea of getting fair, average stock. The 
outstanding males and females should be mated together and from the results 
of such matings, careful selection, accompanied by line and in-breeding, can 
then be attempted. 

A great deal of confusion exists among breeders regarding these two terms, 
for the very good reason that no two writers on the subject appear to make 
use of the same definitions. Generally speaking two methods may be employed: 
one where in-breeding is confined to the mating of some degree of cousins; the 
other where the relationship becomes closer, such as sire to daughter, dame 
to son and brother to sister. It is immaterial from a practical standpoint 
what either system is called; the main point for the breeder to grasp is that 
it is not advisable to breed brothers and sisters or animals that are too closely 
related. Experienced breeders, who are first class judges of their animals and 
know what true value to place upon a pedigree, may practise close-in breeding 
on occasions and secure excellent results in some cases, but it is not to be recom- 
mended for the average rancher. Close in-breeding can only meet with success 
if the owner has the ability to determine -whether or not the desirable qualities 
expected will offset any defects that will tend to become concentrated in the 
offspring. 

The safer method is to mate no closer relationship than first cousins. For 
example, there may be two outstanding females on the ranch, full sisters to each 
other and mated with two males of good quality. The pups from the mating 
are first cousins and provided they show desirable qualities, they can be inte.- 
mated with each other. By mating these cousins we are concentrating what 
appears to be high-class breeding stock. From this generation we can carry 
on indefinitely the mating of animals not closer than cousins, and yet having 
common ancestry behind them of known worth. 

This method of breeding, combined with the culling of all low grade animals 
which inevitably appear from time to time in the best of stock, will result in a 
steady improvement in ranches where it is practised. 

These ideas are not only applicable for the improvement in pelt value, but 
can be used to eliminate undesirable characteristics as small producers, pup 
carrying, indifferent mothers, cannibalism, and noisy nervous foxes, etc. Such 
traits can be intensified or eliminated to a great extent by selection and wise 
breeding. 

Congestion of the Lungs in Mink 

This condition became very prevalent among mink during the extreme 
heat waves experienced in the months of July and August. Mink carcasses 
were received for examination from all parts of the Province of Ontario and the 
Maritimes, showing a pronounced congestion of the lungs due to heat stroke 
and heat prostration. 

Symptoms. — The majority of these cases were females that had been left 
with their young and in some cases were still nursing. Some of them were 



1932 ANNUAL REPORT. 1931 19 

evidently in a run down condition and quite thin. The mink had previously 
been in normal health, becoming dull and showing a distinct disinclination for 
food. A weakness in the hind quarters may develop and convulsions may 
set in a few hours before death. Others may die in a comatic condition. The 
mink is usually found lying stretched out on its side in the nest box. In most 
fatalities the body assumes a curled-up position. 

Autopsy. — The thoracic cavity is invariably filled with a blood-tinged 
serous fluid. The lungs are swollen and red; when incised, a frothy, blood- 
stained exudate oozes out. Trachea and bronchi are often partially filled 
\vith the same exudate. Other organs are usually normal. 

Prevention. — The construction of many mink houses afforded no protection 
from the direct rays of the sun, other than the nest box. In hot weather the 
nest box becomes over-heated and humid, the mink succumbing to heat 
prostration. Should the mink remain in the unprotected run, sun stroke with 
accompanying congestion of the lungs occurs. If possible, natural shade should 
be provided for the house, but if it is not available, artificial shade should be 
erected. It is essential that fresh, clean drinking water be provided at all 
times. The young should be weaned from the female at seven to eight weeks 
and not allowed to run in the same pen with her. 

Lymphatic Leukemia in the Raccoon 

An autopsy made on a male raccoon at the time of pelting revealed the 
presence of a greatly enlarged spleen. The surface appeared roughened, due 
to irregularly defined elevations, the summits of which appeared white. On 
cutting into the organ it seemed to be somewhat harder than normal. The 
cut surface was a pale brownish-red colour, permeated with white, the hard 
areas measuring from about one-eighth inch to a quarter of an inch in diameter. 
Sections examined microscopically revealed practically no normal spleenic 
tissue. This was replaced by areas having no definite structure surrounded by 
trabecula. The weight of this organ was 33.3 grams as compared with 41 
grams, which is the normal weight of the spleen from an animal of the same 
weight. The liver was pale red in colour, slightly enlarged, somewhat firmer 
than normal and contained a number of well defined white areas. The intestines 
and kidneys appeared anemic. 

The animal which appeared to be in failing health, was small in size and 
had a stunted unthrifty appearance. It belonged to a litter of four raccoon 
born last spring. The other three were thrifty and well developed for their 
age. They, along with their mother, were caught in the wilds and sent to 
the Ontario Experimental Fur Farm last September where they were kept 
together in a pen until pelted. 

Mink Post-Mortem Diagnoses 

No. of Animals Dia^aosis 

20 Pneumonia 

22 Congestion of the lungs 

19 Parasitism 

23 Food poisoning 

2 Ulcerated stomach 

2 Nephritis 

14 Distemper 

2 Rachitis 

2 Metritis 

1 Peritonitis 

5 Oedema of the sheath 

3 Dental conditions 



20 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

Parasites of Fur-Bearing Animals 

The economic importance which fur farming has assumed during the past 
decade makes it highly desirable that a survey of parasites affecting fur-bearing 
animals of Ontario should be made. This publication is an attempt to further 
the existing knowledge of the subject. During the past four years, numerous 
post-mortem examinations have been done on both trapped and ranch-raised 
animals. 

The following descriptions and drawings are made from parasites which 
have been found chiefly in mink and muskrats. The authors are of the opinion 
that due to the inaccessibility and scantiness of the literature pertaining to 
fur-bearing animals, much of which is out of print, they are justified in duplicating 
any work along this line which has been done previously by other workers in 
the field. Experience has shown that both the mink and muskrat are heavily 
parasitized, and very seldom is one of them found free from worms, in the wild 
state. Some of these worms, particularly Dioctophyme renale, Filarioides 
bronchialis and certain others, must take a heavy toll among mink in the wild 
state; but their control or eradication would seem to be practical only under 
ranching conditions. Fur farmers are mainly interested in the preventive 
point of view, but the first step in this direction must be a thorough knowledge 
of the extent and types of worms affecting their animals. It is hoped that 
this report will achieve something in this respect. 

To Dr. Maurice C. Hall and Dr. Emmett W. Price, Zoological Division, 
Bureau of Animal Industry, Washington, D.C., we are deeply indebted for the 
identification of these worms and without their aid it would have been impossible 
to attempt this publication. We are also indebted to them for the reading of 
the manuscript and for many helpful suggestions and assistance given to us 
during the past four years. 




a ^1^ 


1 FB 


r -.7 




\ 




\'4 


L. 



Fig. 1. — Filarioides bronchialis: fb., Worms in situ; h., Heart; !., Lungs; pa., Pulmonary 
artery. (Original, Law and Kennedy.) 



1932 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 



21 



Filarioides bronchialis (Gmelin 1790) {Filarioides mustelarum Rud., 1819). 

These parasites are commonly found in trapped mink and occur as a small 
knot of closely intertwined worms lying below the mucosa of the trachea and 
bronchi and also on the surface of the pulmonary vein. Great difficulty is 
encountered in the removal and clearing of these w^orms and a study of their 
morphology has not been attempted. The worm is viviparous. 

The uterine eggs measure from 0.067 mm. to 0.078 mm. in length by 
0.042 mm. to 0.045 mm. in breadth. They are ellipsoidal in shape, thin-shelled 
and contain undeveloped larvae. 



iOX 




'^"^ fer 



Fig. 2. — -Plagiorchis proximns: os., Oral sucker; ph., Pharynx; ce., Ceca; gp., Genital 
pore; cs., Cirrus sac; vs., \'entral sucker; ov., Ovary ; ut.. Uterus; t., Testes; vit., X'itellaria. 
(Original, Law and Kennedy.) 



Plagiorchis proximus. Barker, 1915. 

Frequently found in duodenum of mink and muskrat trapped in the vicinity 
of Kirkfield, Ontario. Length 1.32 mm. to 1.51 mm., width anterior to testes 
0.45 mm. to 0.65 mm. elongate piriform, tapering anteriorly. Testes are rounded 
and lie obliquely to each other in the posterior region, measuring 0.126 mm. to 
0.145 mm. long by 0.097 mm. in width. Ovary round, situated laterally and 
anterior to testes, 0.145 mm. to 0.155 mm. in diameter; vitellaria e.xtends 
anterior to ventral sucker to the posterior end of body. Oral sucker 0.174 mm. 
to 0.194 mm. in diameter; ventral sucker 0.076 mm. in diameter. Cirrus sac 
narrow and long, terminating near the xentral sucker. Pharynx and oesophagus 
of equal length, 0.067 mm. to 0.065 mm. 

Eggs pale yellow in colour with a well defined shell, measuring from 0.033 mm. 
to 0.036 mm. in length by 0.020 mm. to 0.022 mm. in width. 



22 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



UT 



GP 




Fig. 3. — Euparyphhim meiis: os., Oral 
sucker; p., Pharynx; d., Spines; e., 
Oesophagus; c, Cirrus sac; sv., Seminal 
vesicle; vs., Ventral sucker; ce., Ceca; 
ut., Uterus; gp., Mehlis gland; t., Testes; 
ov., Ovary; vit., \'itellaria. (Original, 
Law and Kennedy.) 



1932 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 



23 



Eiiparyphium melis. Schrank, 1788. 

Found in duodenum of mink in the vicinity of Kirkfield, Ontario. Length 
5.52 mm. to 6.01 mm., width anterior to testes, 1.057 mm. to 1.076 mm. Oral 
sucker well defined and muscular; length 0.300 mm. to 0.329 mm., width 
0.329 mm. to 0.358 mm. Head crown has a double row of spines. Pharynx 
short and bulbous; length 0.213 mm. to 0.223 mm., width 0.184 mm. to 0.194 
mm. Oesophagus length 0.426 mm. to 0.446 mm. X'entral sucker well de- 




ORlOIN/iU 



DCPT Of- GAME ANO nSHCRlCS 

ONTARIO 



Fig. 4. — Nudacotyle novicia: os., Oral sucker; oes., Oesophagus; ce.,Ceca; ut., Uterus; 
vit., Vitellaria; cs. Cirrus sac; t., Testes; sg., Shell gland: ov., Ovary. (Original, Law and 
Kennedy.) 



veloped, length 0.679 mm. to 0.776 mm., width 0.620 mm. to 0.776 mm. Testes 
tandem, elliptical ; length 0.543 mm. to 0.582 mm., width 0.523 mm. to 0.552 mm. 
Anterior testis situated about the equator of the body with posterior testis 
extending into the posterior region of the body. Ovary situated in the median 
line and lying in the indentation of anterior testis, length 0.114 mm., width 
0.349 mm. Vitellaria extending from the posterior end of the body to a short 
distance posterior to the ventral sucker. Cirrus sac pouch-like, terminating 
anterior to ventral sucker. Cuticle covered with small spines from the anterior 
end of the body to the posterior end of the ventral sucker. 



24 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

Eggs not numerous, yellow in colour, situated between the ventral sucker 
and the anterior testis, length 0.077 mm. to 0.126 mm., width 0.048 mm. to 
0.097 mm. 

Niidacotyle novicia. Barker. 1916. 

A very small monostome found frequently in the duodenum of muskrats, 
0.708 mm. to 0.727 mm. long by 0.329 mm. to 0.388 mm. wide. The anterior 
end is rounded, tapering towards a small oral sucker. Posteriorly the body 
terminates very bluntly. It is distinctly convex dorsally. The oral sucker is 
cone-shaped and connected to the ceca by a short fleshy oesophagus. The ceca 
are comparatively large and bifurcate in a bell-shaped manner, ending in the middle 
region of the body. Testes situated opposite to each other in the postero- 
lateral region of the body. The ovary lies between the testes, with shell gland 
anterior to it. The cirrus sac is large and lies transversely slightly below the 
middle region of the body. The uterine loops occupy the entire width of the 
body for some distance anterior to the cirrus sac. 

The eggs measure from 0.020 mm. to 0.023 mm. long by 0.011 mm. to 
0.012 mm. wide. 

Catatropis filamentis. Barker, 1915. 

Transparent monostome found in the small intestines of muskrats. Fresh 
specimens measure from 2.15 mm. to 3.05 mm. in length by 0.873 mm. to 
0.970 mm. in width. Oral sucker subterminal from 0.116 mm. to 0.145 mm. in 
diameter. Oesophagus 0.107 mm. to 0.130 mm. in length. Three rows of flat 
papillae on ventral surface. Cecum bifurcates a short distance anterior to the 
genital pore, continuing in an undulating manner to the posterior end of the 
body. Cirrus sac long and narrow. Uterine loops occupy the intercecal space 
between the base of the cirrus and the shell gland. Mtellaria extracecal extend 
from slightly posterior to middle of body and end in front of the testis. The 
testes are dendritic in shape located opposite to each other in the posterior 
region and are extracecal. Ovary rounded to oval and is directly between the 
testes. The shell gland large and anterior to the ov'ary. Excretory canal 
irregular in shape and posterior to the ovary. 

Eggs small and transparent measuring from 0.020 mm. to 0.022 mm. in 
length by 0.010 mm. to 0.011 mm. in width. 

Notocotyle qiiinqiieserilae. Barker and Laughlin, 1915. 

Transparent monostomes found in the small intestines and cecum of musk- 
rats, measure from 2.08 mm. to 3.06 mm. in length, and from 0.54 mm. to 
0.82 mm. in width in fresh specimens. The body tapers to the oral sucker and 
rounds quite bluntly. A prominent characteristic is five longitudinal rows 
of papillae situated on the ventral surface. The oral sucker subterminal from 
0.223 mm. to 0.271 mm. in diameter. Pharynx absent. Ceca undulating, 
arising a short distance below the oral sucker terminating bluntly in the posterior 
region. Cirrus sac long and narrow. Vitellaria scanty, situated in posterior 
half of body and covering a space of approximately 0.63 mm. Testes lobed, 
measuring 0.329 mm. in length. The ovary, round or oval, situated between 
the testes, with shell gland round and directly in front of it. Uterine loops 
bounded laterally by the vitellaria and occupying approximately the same 
length of space. 

Eggs, thin shelled and transparent, measure from 0.018 mm. to 0.022 mm. 
in length by 0.009 mm. to 0.013 mm. in width. 



1932 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 



25 




Fig. 5. — Catatropis filamen- 
tis: OS., Oral sucker; eso., Oesop- 
hagus; gp., Genital pore; va., 
X'agina; cr., Cirrus sac; ce., 
Ceca; ut., Uterus; vit., \'itel- 
laria; sg., Shell gland; ov., 
Ovary; t., Testes; ex., Excre- 
tory pore. (Original, Law and 
Kennedy.) 



26 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



Wardius zihethicus. Barker and East, 1915. 

Only two specimens have been found in the duodenum of muskrats trapped 
in the vicinity of the Experimental Fur Farm. Fresh specimens, reddish white 
in colour with rounded margins. Cuticle smooth and spineless. The body 
tapers slightly towards the oral sucker. The posterior sucker is situated at the 
extreme posterior end of the body, measuring from 4.7 mm. to 5.8 mm. long by 
1.16 mm. to 1.95 mm. wide. Oral sucker subterminal 0.485 mm. in diameter. 



av 


/ //*^ 




/ *// IS^ 




/ '' M 


CR 


/ Jr\\ 




Fig. 6. — Notocotyle qtiinqueseriale: os., 
Oral sucker; gp., Genital pore ;va., Vagina; 
cr., Cirrus sac; ce., Ceca; cp., Cirrus 
pouch; pap., Papillae; ut., Uterus; vit., 
X'iteiiaria: sg., Shell gland; t., Testes; ov., 
Ovary. (Original, Law and Kennedy.) 



(-RGL .■'^ahK) 



Pharynx divided into two distinct pockets. Oesophagus well marked and 
tubular. Ceca prominent, undulating, ending anterior to posterior sucker. 
Testis situated tandem fashion in the median line, dendritic in shape. Ovary 
lies in the median line in the posterior region of the body, rounded to oval in 
shape. Shell gland anterior to ovary. Vitellaria extracecal extending from the 
oral sucker to the middle of the posterior sucker. Uterine coil arises anterior to 
the ovary and proceeds on the median line, to a short distance below the bifurca- 
tion of the ceca ending at the genital pore. 

Eggs oval from 0.014 mm. to 0.015 mm. long by 0.009 mm. to 0.013 mm. 
wide. 



1932 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 



27 




"* fisheries . 



Fig. 7. — Wardius zibethicus: os., Oral sucker; ph., Pharynx; vit., \'itellaria; gp., Genital 
pore; t., Testes; ut., Uterus; sg., Shell gland; ov., Ovary; ps., Posterior sucker. (Original, 



28 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 




^^ S0%. 
Orlfitia.} 

Oni Dept of Gdme 
a Vishenes 



Et.V 



Fig. S.—Psilustomum oniatrae: os., Oral sucker; ph., Pharynx; eso., Oseophagus; ce., 
Ceca; cs., Cirrus sac; vit., Vitellaria; vs., Ventral sucker; ut., Uterus; ov., Ovary; t., Testis; 
ex. p.. Excretory pore. (Original, Law and Kennedy.) 



1932 ANNUAL REPORT. 1931 29 

Psilostomum ondatrae. Price, 1931. 

Collected from the liver of a muskrat in the vicinity of the Experimental 
F'ur Farm and forwarded to Dr. Emmett W. Price, Zoological Division, Bureau 
of Animal Industry, Washington, D.C., who described it as a new species. Pro- 
ceedings U.S. National Museum, Vol. 79, Art. 4, as follows: 

Body ovoid, 1.6 mm. to 2 mm. long by 0.315 mm. to 0.961 mm. wide in 
the region of the anterior testis, flattened dorsoventrally. Cuticular spines 
were not found on specimens from the muskrat. Oral sucker subterminal, 
0.150 mm. to 0.155 mm. in diameter; oral aperture slitlike to oval in shape. 
Acetabulum transversely elongated to almost circular in shape, strongly mus- 
cular, 0.220 mm. to 0.300 mm. by 0.300 mm. to 0.375 mm., situated 0.525 mm. 
to 0.537 mm. from the anterior end of the body. Prepharynx 0.38 mm. to 
0.75 mm. long, the length depending on the amount of contraction of the anterior 
part of the body. Pharynx strongly muscular, 0.112 mm. to 0.127 mm. long 
by 0.82 mm. to 0.105 mm. wide. Oesophagus slender, 0.75 mm. to 0.112 mm. 
long; intestinal ceca simple, extending to within a short distance of the posterior 
end of the body. Excretory pore terminal. Testis large, elongated transversely, 
postequatorial and tandem in position. The anterior testis is 0.262 mm. to 
0.375 mm. long by 0.412 mm. to 0.712 mm. wide and the posterior testis 0.262 mm. 
to 0.275 mm. long by 0.337 mm. to 0.750 mm. wide. Cirrus pouch piriform, 
its posterior end never extending beyond the centre of the acetabulum; it con- 
tains a voluminous seminal vesicle and a long, slender, unarmed cirrus. The 
genital pore is situated in the median line about midway betwesn the bifurcation 
of the intestine and anterior margin of the acetabulum. Ov^ary ovoid, 0.75 mm. 
by 0.150 mm., situated a short distance in front of the anterior testis and to 
the median line. Shell gland well developed, dorsal of ovary. Laurer's canal 
present. Receptaculum seminis apparently absent. The vitellaria are com- 
posed of large follicles situated laterally and forming a wreathlike mass extending 
from the level of the pharynx to the posterior end of the body. Uterus relatively 
short, consisting of irregular coils occupying the intercecal space between the 
anterior margin of the anterior testis and the acetabulum, and terminating in a 
moderately de\'eloped metraterm. The metraterm extends along the left side 
of the cirrus pouch and opens into the genital sinus immediately anterior to 
the male aperture. 

Eggs oval, 0.82 mm. to 0.90 mm. long by 0.45 mm. to 0.48 mm. wide, yellowish 
i)rown in colour. 

Echinostomum coalitum. Barker and Beaver, 1915. 

Found in the duodenum of muskrats in the vicinity of Kirkfield, Ontario. 
This is one of the longest trematodes infesting muskrats. The body is long and 
narrow, length 16 mm. to 23 mm. Width anterior to testis 1.21 mm. to 1.98 mm. 
Head collar, kidney shaped, well developed, equijjped with double row of spines. 
Prepharynx connects with oral sucker, which is 0.291 mm. to 0.35 mm. in diameter. 
Oesophagus comparatively long, 1.14 mm. in length. Ventral sucker large and 
muscular, 1.14 mm. to 1.30 mm. long by 0.97 mm. to 1.01 mm. wide. Cirrus 
sac prominent, terminating above ventral sucker, containing well developed 
cirrus. Ovary broader than long and well marked, width 0.485 mm. to 0.399 mm., 
length 0.399 mm., situated in median line, directly anterior to testis. Testis 
tandem, more or less elliptical with indented margins, situated in posterior end 
of body; length 1.28 mm. to 0.873 mm., width 0.485 mm. to 0.582 mm. \'itel- 
laria extend from short distance posterior to ventral sucker, gradually becoming 



30 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 




Fig. 9. — Echinostomum coali- 
tum: OS., Oral sucker; ph., 
Pharynx; oes., Oesophagus; cs.. 
Cirrus sac; vit., V'itellaria; ut., 
Uterus; ov., Ovary; t., Testis. 
(Original, Law and Kennedy.) 



1932 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 



31 







Fig. 10. — Echinostomum callawayensis: 
OS., Oral sucker; ph.. Pharynx; oes., Oeso- 
phagus; c. Cirrus sac; vs.. Ventral sucker; 
ce.,Ceca; ut., Uterus; vit., Vitellaria; ov., 
Ovary; t.. Testis; ex.c, Excretory canal. 
(Original, Law and Kennedy.) 




ONTA M I O 



32_ DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

heavier posterior to the testis, and completely filling the extreme posterior end 
of body. Ceca bifurcate anterior to ventral sucker and continue in a wavy 
manner to posterior end of body. 

Eggs elliptical in shape, straw-coloured, length 0.105 mm. to 0.114 mm. 
by 0.030 mm. to 0.044 mm. wide. 

Echinostomnm callawayensis. Barker and Noll, 1015. 

Commonly found in duodenum of muskrats; length 4.98 mm. to 7.01 mm., 
width 1.02 m.m. to 1.50 mm. Body tapers anteriorly, posterior end bluntly 
rounded. Head collar provided with double row of spines. Oral sucker 0.07 mm. 
to 0.15 mm. long by 0.11 mm. to 0.16 mm. wide. Pharynx short and bulbous. 
Oesophagus bifurcates in front of ventral sucker; ceca ending blindly a short 
distance below posterior testis. Ventral sucker muscular and well developed. 
Cirrus sac anterior to ventral sucker; cirrus and prostate gland prominent. 

Ovary rounded to oval, situated in median line a short distance in front of 
anterior testis. Vitellaria extend from posterior of ventral sucker to end of 
body becoming heavier below posterior testis. Vitelline duct crosses trans- 
versely at anterior margin of anterior testis. Excretory canal "Y" shaped at 
posterior end of body. 

Eggs numerous, situated in region between ovar\' and posterior margin ot 
ventral sucker, 0.0804 mm. to 0.101 mm. long by 0.041 mm. to 0.062 mm. wide. 

*Echiv.ochasnnis schwartzi. Price, 1931. 

Found in the intestines of muskrats in Ontario and described by Dr. Emmett 
W. Price, Proceedings U.S. National Museum, Vol. 79, Art. 4, as follows: 

Body spindle-shaped in outline 1.5 mm. to 2.1 mm. long by 0.449 mm. to 
0.620 mm. wide in the region of the anterior testis. Cuticular spines are present 
in the anterior part of the body. These spines are scalelike and arranged in 
alternating, transverse rows; the rows anterior to the acetabulum are close 
together, while posterior to the acetabulum the rows are progressively farther 
apart and the number of spines decreases; spines finally disappear near the level 
of the posterior margin of the posterior testis. In specimens from the muskrat 
most of the cuticular spines were missing owing to the fact that the worms had 
been dead for several hours before fixation. Oral sucker subterminal, 0.93 mm. 
wide, surrounded by a well-defined reniform collar, 0.248 mm. to 0.279 mm. 
wide. The collar bears twenty-two spines arranged in a single row which is 
interrupted dorsally by a space as wide as the oral sucker. Four of these spines, 
two on each ventral lobe, are slightly more aboral than the others; the more 
median of these spines is 0.37 mm. to 0.41 mm. long by 0.11 mm. to 0.15 mm. 
wide at their bases. Acetabulum circular, 0.170 mm. to 0.186 mm. in diameter 
situated 0.542 mm. to 0.775 mm. from the anterior end of the body. Prepharynx 
0.46 mm. to 0.93 mm. long, the length depending on the amount of contraction 
of the anterior part of the body. Pharynx muscular, 0.108 mm. to 0.155 mm. 
long by 0.93 mm. to 0.108 mm. wide. Oesophagus 0.124 mm. to 0.248 mm. 
long; intestinal ceca simple and extending to near the posterior end of the body. 
Genital pore situated immediately caudad to intestinal bifurcation. Cirrus 
pouch poorly developed, somewhat piriform in shape, extending caudad to 
near the posterior margin of the acetabulum and containing a large seminal 
vesicle showing a distinct constriction near its anterior end, a poorly defined 
prostate, and a short ductus ejaculatorius. Testis largely postequatorial and 
tandem in position; the anterior testis is almost rectangular in shape, 0.155 mm. 



1932 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 



33 




Ont Dept. of Ga/we 
5- Fisheries . 



Fig. 11. — Echinochasmus schwarlzi: os., Oral sucker; ph., I'Jiarynx; eso., Oesophagus; 
cs., Cirrus sac; vs., \'entral sucker; ce.,Ceca; ut., Uterus; ov., Ovary; sg. , Shell gland; t., Testis; 



34 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

to 0.279 mm. long by 0.310 mm. to 0.434 mm. wide; the posterior testis is 
irregular to almost spherical in outline, 0.186 mm. to 0.310 mm. long by 0.263 mm. 
to 0.372 mm. wide. Ovary ovoid, 0.108 mm. to 0.124 mm. by 0.124 mm. to 
0.170 mm., situated slightly to the right of the median line and with its long 
axis diagonal to the long axis of the body. The vitellaria are composed of large 
follicles distributed as in the other members of the genus; the follicles extend 
anteriorly to the level of the posterior margin of the acetabulum or slightly 
beyond, but never farther forward than the anterior margin of the acetabulum. 
Uterus short, consisting of a few irregular coils almost filling the intercecal space 
between the anterior testis and acetabulum, and containing from 4 to 40 eggs. 

Eggs oval, 0.68 mm. long by 0.4.5 mm. wide with yellow^ish brown, thin shells.. 

Parametorchis canadensis. Price, 1929. 

Collected from the gall bladder of a mink in the vicinity of the Experimental 
Fur Farm, Kirkfield, and submitted to Dr. Emmett \\\ Price, Zoological Division, 
Bureau of Animal Industry, Washington, D.C., and described by him as a new- 
species, Proceedings National Museum, Vol. 76, Art. 12, as follows: 

Bod\' linguiform, transparent, 1.7 mm. to 2 mm. long. 0.590 mm. to 0.687 
mm. wide in the region of the anterior testis. Oral sucker terminal, 0.93 mm. 
to 0.108 mm. long by 0.140 mm. to 0.155 mm. wide. Prepharynx absent; 
pharynx muscular, 0.108 mm. to 0.140 mm. long by 0.62 mm. to 0.93 mm. wide. 
Oesophagus very short; intestinal ceca slightly sinuous terminating 0.70 mm. 
to 0.90 mm. from the posterior end of the body. Acetabulum 0.125 mm. long 
by 0.140 mm. wide, weakly muscular, and situated about 0.470 mm. from the 
anterior end. Testis oval or slightly indented, and situated tandem in the 
posterior half of body; they are about equal in size, 0.186 mm. long by 0.125 mm. 
wide. Cirrus pouch absent. Seminal vesicle slender and sinuous, its posterior 
end lying on a level with the centre of the acetabulum. Ovary trilobed, small, 
and situated about twice its own length in front of the bifurcation of the excretory 
vesicle. Receptaculum seminis large and piriform, and situated to the right 
and caudad to the ovary. X'itellaria lateral, extending from a short distance 
caudad to the oesophagus bifurcation to the level of the ovary. Uterus composed 
of close transverse coils which are filled w^ith small eggs. The genital pore is 
situated 0.400 mm. to 0.600 mm. from the anterior end of body. Excretory 
system similar to that in other species of the genus. 

Eggs oval, 0.22 mm. long by 0.11 mm. wide, and yellowish brown in color. 

Echinoparyphium contigiium. Barker and Bastron, 1915. 

Commonh' found in the duodenum of muskrats. Body tapers at the 
anterior end, bluntly rounded posteriorly; length 3.55 mm. to 4 mm., breadth 
at level of acetabulum 0.426 mm. Head collar bears two rows of spines, which 
nearly surround the oral sucker. Prepharynx present. Pharynx bulbous. 
Oesophagus comparatively long, bifurcating in front of ventral sucker. Ceca 
proceed to posterior end of body. \'entral sucker placed anteriorly and 
prominent, 0.271 mm. to 0.291 mm. in diameter. Cirrus sac arises behind 
ventral sucker and proceeds anteriorly. Mtelline glands extend from posterior 
of acetabulum to end of body, tending to become more massive below posterior 
testis. Ovary small and round placed slightly off median line to the left, 
measuring 0.15 mm. in diameter. Testis large and ovoid situated tandem fashion 



1932 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 



35 




'^'Of fox- 



DCPT or GAME AND riSHCRICS 

ONTARIO 



Fig. 12. — Parametorchis canadensis: os., Oral sucker; ph., Pharynx; oes.. Oesophagus; 
vit., Vitellaria; vs., X'entral sucker; ut.. Uterus; ce.,Ceca; ov.. Ovary; t., Testis. (Original, 

I 1 ¥^ _ I \ ./ ' I vol 



36 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 




Fig. 13. — Echinoparyphiitm con- 
iiguum: OS., Oral sucker; ph., Pharynx; 
oes., Oesophagus; cs., Cirrus sac; vs., 
Ventral sucker; ut.. Uterus; ov., 
Ovary; cs., Ceca; vit., \'itellaria; t., 
Testis; ex. c, Excretory canal. 
(Original, Law and Kennedy.) 



omClNAt, 

('RGX'ini A.HK.) 



F- GAME AND FISHERIES 
ONTARIO 



1932 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 



37 



in posterior half of body; 0.388 mm. long by 0.194 mm. wide. Excretory canal 
well developed and "Y" shaped. 

Eggs scanty, yellowish brown in colour, 0.086 mm. to 0.107 mm. long by 
0.054 mm. to 0.068 mm. wide. 

Dioctophyme renale (Goeze, 1782), (Stiles, 1901). 

The largest and most frequently found nematode affecting mink. Females 
blood red, from 150 mm. to 650 mm. in length. Males brown, from 90 mm. to 
150 mm. in length. Inhabits the kidney and occasionally the abdominal and 
thoracic cavities. In the later stages of infestation the kidney is greatly 
encysted. The cyst is filled with a brownish fluid containing from one to six 
worms which are associated with a characteristic bony deposit. 







Fig. 14. — Dioctophyme renale: Two males and four females. Cystic kidney showing bony 
deposits. (Original, Law and Kennedy.) 

The following taxonomic description is according to Yorke and Maplestone: 
Male: bursa copulatrix bell-shaped, muscular and not supported by rays; 

spicule single and long. Female: tail blunt; anus terminal; \'ulva in the anterior 

part of the body; one ovary. 

Oviparous, eggs ellipsoidal, brown in colour, shell thick and co\"ered by 

small depressions except at the poles which are homogeneous, they contain a 

segmented ovum at the time of deposition. 



Echinostomiim armigerum. Barker and Irvine, 1915. 

Commonly found in the duodenum of muskrats. Varies considerably in 
length and breadth in different specimens; length 10.0 mm. to 13.0 mm., width 
1.0 mm. to 2.25 mm. Body tapers slightly at anterior end, posterior ^nd being 
bluntly rounded; flesh-coloured and comparatively heavy. Oral sucker, 0.291 
mm. in diameter surrounded by a kidney-shaped head collar with numerous 
spines. Pharynx muscular, length 0.271 mm., width 0.222 mm., connected with 



38 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 




Fig. 15. — Echinostomum armigenim: os., 
Oral sucker; ph., Pharynx; oes., Oesophagus; 
cs., Cirrus sac; vs., \'entral sucker; vit., \'itel- 
laria; ce., Ceca; sg., Shell gland; ov.. Ovary; 
t.. Testis. (Original, Law and Kennedy.) 



S FI5H£RiES. 



1932 ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 39 

oral sucker by short prepharynx. X'entral sucker in the anterior portion of the 
body, 0.873 mm. to 0.979 mm. in diameter, large and muscular. Cirrus sac 
prominent, containing a well developed cirrus, situated anterior to the ventral 
sucker. Ovary oval or round; length 0.388 mm., width 0.585 mm. to 0.640 mm., 
situated in median line a short distance anterior to testis. Shell gland occupies 
the space between testis and ovary. Testis longer than wide, close together, 
situated in the median line; anterior testis length 0.804 mm., width 0.611 mm.; 
posterior testis length 0.989 mm., width 0.640 mm. Mtellaria extend from 
posterior margin of ventral sucker to posterior end of body and converge a short 
distance from posterior end. Excretory bladder well marked. Ceca bifurcate 
in front of ventral sucker and end blindly near posterior region. 

Eggs numerous in the space posterior to ventral sucker and anterior to 
ovary; length 0.097 mm. to 0.087 mm., width 0.063 mm. to 0.077 mm. 



Alaria mustelae. Bosma, 1931. 

Frequently found in the duodenum of mink. Body from 1.037 mm. to 
1.22 mm. in length, concave dorsally tapering anteriorly towards oral sucker, 
at whose sides are two projections; in living specimens these projections are seen 
as round, pointed, retractile feelers. A short distance posterior to pharynx 
there is a large adhesive organ which broadens to a width of 0.446 mm. to 0.485 
mm., becoming constricted at about the posterior third of the body, gradually 
tapering to the end where it rounds off bluntly. Uterus containing eggs, extends 
into adhesive organ. On each side in the caudad region there is a large bilobe 
testis. The bursa copulatrix situated in the posterior end of body posterior 
to the testis. \'itellaria converge posterior to adhesive organ and appear to be 
absent in posterior region. Ceca short, bifurcating from the pharynx and 
appearing to end at anterior border of adhesive organ. 

Eggs yellow in colour, few in number, 0.116 mm. long and 0.067 mm. wide. 



Alaria americana. Hall and Wigdor, 1918. 

Found in the intestinal tract of foxes and wolves trapped in Ontario and 
show the characteristics common to the familv. The following excerpts are 
taken from Hall, 1918 A.\'.M.A. Journal, X'oI.'LHI., N.S. Vol. 6, No. 5, pp. 
616-626: 

Mounted specimens less than 3 mm. long; li\e specimens appear to be 
between 4 mm. and 5 mm. long. The oral sucker and pharynx are quite distinct. 
Oral sucker, 0.090 mm. to 0.137 mm. in diameter; pharynx, 0.120 mm. to 0.196 
mm. long. The ventral sucker is relatively well forward, less than its own 
diameter from the angle formed by the intestinal ceca, measures from 0.070 mm. 
to 0.176 mm. in diameter. Some distance posterior of the \entral sucker is the 
attaching apparatus, a high structure, the anterior end is smoothly rounded. 
In the median line of the vitellaria in the attaching apparatus, there is a series 
of apparent cavities. On each side of the oral sucker are cresentic projections. 
There is a large bilobed testis on each side of the posterior bod\-. The ovarx- 
appears to lie partly anterior to and partly posterior to the line of union of the 
lateral lamellar margins of the anterior body. The bursa copulatrix is less than 
twice the diameter of the ventral sucker. The eggs in the uterus are 0.09 mm. 
to 0.012 mm. bv 0.080 mm. to 0.086 mm. in diameter. 



40 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



Alaria arisaemoides. Augustine and Uribe, 1927. 

Found in small intestines of fox trapped in Ontario; pink to white in colour, 
measures from 7 mm. to 10 mm. in length. The body is divided into two distinct 
regions, cephalic and caudal. Oral sucker lies between two wing-like structures 
situated at the anterior end of the parasite. The ventral sucker is posterior to 




DEPT or GAME AND FISHERIES 

ONTARIO 



Off/G IN/> L. 



V \}.g- /6-— l-'ur^'a "r"5/f/a?.- os., Oral sucker; ph., Pharynx; ce., Ceca; ad., Adhesive organ: 
It., Vitellana; vs.. Ventral sucker; ut., Uterus; t., Testis. (Original, Law and Kennedy.) 



oral sucker in the median line. The adhesive organ is well developed occupying 
the greater portion of the cephalic region. 

A thin transparent membrane covers the entire body. The testes are lobed 
situated in tandem fashion in the caudad region. Anterior testis smaller than 



ANNUAL REPORT. 1931 




tla? SOJ. 
ori)i«< I 

Ont Dcpt Of- G«mc 
L- 4 Fisheries 



pi„ n —Alaria arisaemoides: os., Oral sucker; ph., Pharynx; ce.,Ceca; vs., Ventral 
sucker; ep./Excretory pore; gp., Genital pore; sv., Seminal vesicle; ut. Uterus; ov., Ovary; 
mg Mehlis gland; vit.,Vitellaria; if., Lamellar folds. (Origmal, Law and Kennedy.) 



42 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

the posterior one; the latter occupying nearly the entire width of the parasite. 
Ovary is lobed, 0.37 mm. long by 0.51 mm. wide. Mehlis gland prominent to 
the right of anterior testis. Ceca bifurcate from pharynx to below the ventral 
sucker where they curve backwards for a short distance and then continue to 
the posterior end of body ending blindly near the genital pore. The uterine 
coils take a greatly convoluted course and finally proceed between the ceca to 
the posterior end of the body to form the common genital duct. Ova numerous, 
oval in shape from 0.140 mm. long to 0.090 mm. wide. 

Hemistomum crateriim. Barker and Noll, 1915. 

This is one of the smallest parasites found in the duodenum of the mink 
and muskrat. Fresh specimens measure 0.95 mm. to 2 mm. long by 0.58 mm. 
to 0.62 mm. wide. Oral sucker rounded and subterminal. Ventral sucker 
prominent, in the median line directly anterior to adhesive organ. Adhesive 
organ large and round, 0.23 mm. in diameter. Two pair of intestinal ceca 
appear to be present. The ceca arise at the posterior end of the pharynx and 
appear to disappear behind the adhesive organ. Ovary round, lying to right 
of median line, anterior to right testis. Shell gland opposite to ovary and 
slightly to left of median line. Testis oval, in posterior region of body and 
perceptibly oblique. Excretory pore comparatively large and directly between 
testis. Vitellaria coarsely scattered from level of ventral sucker to a short 
distance anterior to ovary. 

No eggs were found in three specimens studied. 

The following internal parasites have been found in Ontario fur-bearing 
animals, examined at the Experimental Fur Farm. 

FOX 
Nematoda 

Toxocaris canis, Werner, \782.^Belascaris marginata, Rud., 1802 Intestines 

Uncinaria stenocephahi, Raillet, 1884 Intestines 

Eiicoleus aerophilus, Creplin, 1839 Trachea, Bronchi, Lungs 

Capillaria plica, Rudolphi, 1819; Raiiiet, 1915 Urinary bladder 

Crenosoma decoratum, CrepHn, 1847; Stoss, 1898 Lungs and Trachea 

Toxascaris limhata, Raillet and Henry, 1911 Intestines 

Trematoda 

Alaria americana, Hall and Wigdor, 1918 Intestines 

Alaria arisaemoides, Augustine and Uribe, 1927 Intestines 

Cestoda 

Diphyllobothrium latum, Linnaeus, 1758 Intestines 

Diphyllobolhrium cordalum, Leuckart, 1863 Intestines 

MINK 

Nematoda 

D ioctophyme renale, Goeze, 1782; Stiles, 1901 Kidney, Body cavities 

Filaroides bronchialis , Gemlin, 1790. = Filarotdes mustelarum, Rud., 1819. 

Trachea and Bronchi 

Capillaria sp Intestines 

Strongloides sp Intestines 

Ascaris sp Intestines 

Filaria sp Trachea 

Trematoda 

Plagiorchis proximus. Barker, 1915 Intestines 

Euparyphiiim melts, Shrank, 1788 Intestines 

Alaria miistelae, Bosma, 193 1 Intestines 

Parametorchis canadensis, Price, 1929 Gall Bladder 

Euparyphiiim inerme, Fuhrmann, 1904 Intestines 



1931 ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 43 

Cestoda 

Taenia sp Intestines 

LYNX 

Nematoda 

Toxocara mystax, Zeder, 1800 Intestines 

Physaioptera sp Intestines 

MUSKRAT 
Trematoda 

Nudacotxle novicia, Barker, 1916 Intestines 

Echinostomiim coalitiim, Barker, 191,5 Intestines 

Echinostomiim callaivavensis, Barker and Noll, 1915 Intestines 

Plagiorchis proximus, Barker, 19 15 Intestines 

Echinoparvphium contiguum, Barker and Bastron, 1913 Intestines 

Notocotvlequinqueseriale, Barker and Laughlin, 1915 Intestines and Cecum 

Catatro'pis li lament is, Barker, 1915 Intestines and Cecum 

Wardius zibethicus, Barker and East, 1915 Intestines 

Hemistomiim craterum, Barker and Noll, 1915 Intestines and Cecum 

Philostomum ondatrae, Price, 193 1 Liver 

Echinochasmus schivartzi, Price, 193 1 Intestines 

Alaria mustelae, Bosma, 193 1 Intestines 

Echinostomiim armigeriim, Barker and Irvine, 19 15 Intestines 

Cestoda 

Hymenolepis evaginata, Barker and Andrews, 1915 Intestines 

Cysticercus fasciolaris = Taenia taeniaeformis Li\-er 

Nematoda 

Hepalicota hepatica, Bancroft, 1893 Liver 

Sporozoa 

Eimeria stiedae, Lindemann, 1865 Liver 

WOLF 
Trematoda 

Alaria americana, Hall and Wigdor, 1918 Intestines 

Cestoda 

Taenia pisiformis, Bloch, 1780 Intestines 

RACCOON 
Nematoda 

Ascaris sp Intestines 

Phvsaloptera sp Intestines 

Ca'pillaria sp Intestines 

BEAVER 

Trematoda 

Cladorchis subtriquetrus, Rud., 1814; Fischoeder, 1901 Intestines 

REPORT OF THE BIOLOGICAL AND FISH CULTURE BRANCH 

The chief function of the Biological and Fish Culture Branch of the Ontario 
Department of Game and Fisheries is to apply the science of biology to all 
problems affecting the production, maintenance and usefulness of fish. How 
this function is carried out will be best understood by reading the descriptions 
and explanations set forth in the paragraphs which follow. 

In recent years there has been a progressive development of a scientific 
or technical component centralized in the Department and covering at least the 
immediate and practical requirements of the fisheries and fish cultural services. 
On account of the routine nature of the work, the fisheries laboratory does not 
presume to enter into research problems which are more fittingly carried out in 
university laboratories; for example, problems which involve research in organic 
chemistry over a period of years. The same thing applies to life-history studies 



44 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

of fish. In other words, the work of the Department's fisheries' laboratory is 
more or less confined to the following studies: 

(1) Diagnosis, treatment and control of fish parasites and diseases. 

(2) Natural food of fish and the importance of the inter-relationships of 
food-cycles and food-chains as regards the welfare of the fish. The significance 
of food studies is a most important factor in connection with the methods of 
planting both game and commercial species. 

(3) Nutrition and artificial feeding of hatchery reared fish. This subject 
will be discussed under the title, "Fish Culture." 

Biological Surveys 

A matter of fundamental importance in any satisfactory programme which 
has as its objective the rehabilitation of waters with suitable game, commercial 
or forage fish is a close study of the stream or lake itself in order that suitable^ 
accurate, and sufficient information may be obtained regarding the conditions 
of life therein, such as quality of water, cover and food. These inquiries fall 
into three main and characteristic groups: 

(a) Physical conditions of the water, for example, temperature, trans- 
parency, colour, turbidity, permanency, depth and bottom. 

(6)*Chemical conditions of the water, for example, alkalinity, acidity, pH, 
oxygen, carbon dioxide and hardness. 

(c) Biological conditions of the water, for example, plankton, bottom 
fauna, fish and higher vegetation. All these factors after correlation act as 
indices or criteria of the suitability of waters for diff^erent species of fish. In 
other words they help to specify whether a lake or stream is suitable for trout; 
trout and pickerel; bass; bass and pike; etc. 

There is another side to these studies, which is of primary importance and 
that is by means of a study of the environment, the fish, and the fish food we 
are in a position to state the type of environment that may best provide or be 
expected to provide the necessary requirements for different sizes and ages of 
fish distributed from our Provincial fish hatcheries and rearing stations. 

Studies of this nature are carried out, during the summer months when 
growth and reproduction are at their height, when highest temperatures are 
recorded, and when water-levels due to evaporation effects are lowest. The 
investigations are carried out by university men who have a proper background 
of information pertaining to the natural and physical sciences, and who have 
received special training in fisheries studies as a result of laboratory or field 
experience or both. The summer survey staff during 1931 numbered twenty- 
one. Seven of these were undergraduates, two of whom had previous field 
experience with the Department. All others engaged had university degrees 
qualifying them for work of this nature. 

The personnel of the staff was as follows: 

Allmark, M. G., third year, Biology and Chemistr\', Queen's University, Kingston. 

Cameron, W. R., fourth year, Biology and Medicine, University of Toronto. 

Cook, W. W., M.A., Department of Biology, Queen's University, Kingston. 

Detwiler, J. D., Ph.D., Head of the Department of Applied Biology, University of Western 

Ontario, London. 
Dibbon,W. L., B. A., Ontario College of Education (Graduate in Biolog>-), University of Toronto. 
Dignan, H. J., B.A., High School Teacher, Port Hope (Graduate in Biologv'), University of 

Toronto. 
Ebersole, E. O., doing M.A. work, Department of Biology, Queen's University, Kingston. 

*These conditions may embrace certain physical qualities also. 



1932 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 



45 



Fox, J. H., M.A., High School Teacher, Windsor (Graduate in Biology), University of Western 
Ontario, London. 

Green, A. C, B.A. iBiolog>' and Medical Sciences), University of Toronto; Department of Bio- 
chemistry-, University of Manitoba. 

Horn, W. R., first year, Chemistr\- and Mineralogy, Queen's University, Kingston. 

Louden, A. H., B.A. (Biolog\- and Chemistry-), Queen's University, Kingston; Teacher at Picker- 
ing College, Newmarket. 

Miller, W. F., third year (Biology- and Chemistry), Queen's University, Kingston. 

Mc\'icar, G. A., ^LA. (Department of Biochemistry), University of Toronto. 

Oughton, J. P., fourth year. Department of Biology, University of Toronto. 
^'Pearce, H. S., B.A., Department of Biology, University of Toronto. 




The results of a seine haul in the Thames River 
for scientific purposes. 

Perkin, H. J., li.A., Department of Physiology' and Biochemistry', University of Toronto. 
Savage, J., B.A., Department of Biology, llniversity of Toronto. 
Smith, P. W., \LS. (Wisconsin), Ontario College of Education, Toronto. 
Toner, G. C, fourth year. Biology, Queen's University, Kingston. 
Ward, J. W., fourth year. Biology and Chemistry, Queen's University, Kingston. 
Werner, W. H. R., .^LA., I'niversity of Western Ontario, London; Assistant Biologist, Depart- 
"y^ ment of Game and Fisheries, Ontario. 



Since 1925, when biological surveys of Ontario's waters were first undertaken 
by the Department, in the neighbourhood of seventeen hundred and sixty-four 
individual lakes and streams have been investigated from the "suitability" 
standpoint. 



46 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



The following comparative statement shows the progress that has taken 
place in connection with the work of biological surveys in recent years: 



Year 


Number of waters 
studied 


Number of 
Investigators 


1925 


21 

58 
233 
707* 
214 
237 
294 


1 


1926 


2 


1927 


5 


1928 


9 


1929 


18 


1930 


18 


1931 


21 




Total 






1,764 


74 



*See report for 1928. 



Special Studies 



In addition to the summer survey work outlined above, the Department's 
temporary and permanent staff of fish culturists, biologists and technicians 
investigated problems relating to fish culture and the fisheries pertaining to — 



1. Closure of water areas. 
3. Removal of coarse fish, and transfers of 
fish from one body of water to another. 
6. Pollution. 
8. Water-levels. 



2. Sites for hatcheries and rearing stations. 

4. Mortality of fish. 

5. Operation of commercial nets and hooks. 
7. Dams, screens, and fishways. 

9. Miscellaneous subjects. 



(a) A preliminary report on the individual weights of lake herring (L. artedi) taken in pound 

nets off the county of Lambton, Lake Huron. 

(b) Feeding experiments with speckled trout. 

(c) An investigation of the most suitable natural environment for lake trout fingerlings 

(continued from 1930). 

1. Closure of Water Areas 



The question of sanctuaries for fish and in fact for all wild life, is one which 
is gaining more and more public interest, attention, and support. A fish sanctuary 
may be defined as an area which is closed permanently to all fishing in order 
that the fish and all other life in the area may have an opportunity to live and 
thrive unhampered by the encroachment of man. These sanctuaries act as, — 

1. Sources of replenishment for immediately adjacent water areas. In 
other words, the fish multiplying in these favourable areas would spread to 
other parts of the same waters. 

2. Areas where spawning fish, both game and commercial species, may 
spawn unmolested. Such an arrangement, to a large extent at least, obviates 
the necessity of establishing closed seasons for commercial fish, which may 
vary from year to year and from lake to lake according to the latitude and 
altitude. By such means we prevent depletion of the permanent breeding 
stock, taking each year only the natural increase from it. 

3. With sanctuaries at our disposal we are in a better position to study 
the factors involved in natural productivity and allied phenomena. 

Before areas are set apart they are subjected to the strong light of biological 
investigation to determine the advantage of closure against commercial fishing, 
game fishing or both. During the year, nine specific inland water-areas were 
studied from this standpoint and in addition, the inshore waters along the 



1932 ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 47 

south shore of the Georgian Bay, bordering the counties of Bruce, Grey and 
Simcoe. 

Certain shoals off the west shore of the Bruce Peninsula are important 
spawning grounds for lake trout and in view of the absence of a closed season 
in this area, the protection of inshore bays, reefs and shoals would give this 
species an opportunity to spawn unmolested. Such an area should also act 
as a base for a reserve supply of lake trout from which adjacent and external 
water-areas might be replenished. From the standpoint of game-fish interests 
it might be added that certain centres lying within this zone are in the develop- 
mental stage and are becoming more attractive to the summer resident population 
each year. 

No commercial fishing licenses have been granted in Colpoy's bay for several 
years. It is an important reserve ground for lake trout and herring, and also 
has importance as an angling area. 

Whitefish spawn off the shores from Cape Commodore to \Marton and 
from Cape Commodore into Owen Sound bay. 

Licenses have not been issued to commercial fishermen in Owen Sound 
bay for some time south of a line drawn from Presqu'Ile Point to Pine Point, 
in order to protect and encourage the game-fishing interests. 

With the exception of pound netters between X'ail's Point and Cape Rich 
during the past year commercial fishermen have been prohibited from fishing 
inside a mile limit on the shores abutting the townships of St. Vincent and 
CoUingwood in order to protect the fish inside this limit prior to November 1st. 
This is important from the standpoint of spawning fish. 

2. Sites for Hatcheries and Rearing Stations 

Twenty-two sites for the possible establishment of hatcheries and rearing 
stations for trout and bass were studied and reported upon during the year. 
A number of the requests came from public organizations and individuals who 
were desirous of developing certain streams and ponds to the greatest possible 
extent for game-fish. 

The expenses incurred in connection with the examination of private waters 
where public fishing is prohibited were met by the individual. There is evidence 
of a more wide-spread public interest in the possibilities of ponds and streams 
for fish cultural activities. 

3. Removal of Coarse Fish and Transfers of Fish from 
One Body of Water to Another 

A more intelligent view is abroad regarding the advisability of removing 
so-called coarse fish from our waters. At present the prevailing attitude appears 
to be that the subject is, in the main, one for biological inquiry and rightly so. 
It is unreasonable to remove any species of fish without proper knowledge of 
the conditions and sufficient proof that they are detrimental. The Department 
is at the present time chiefly concerned with the removal of predatory fish 
such as pike from trout waters; for example, the Nipigon river, and ling from 
game-fish waters; for example, the Rideau lakes and Otter lake and Wolfe lake 
in Leeds county. Extensive data on the feeding habits of the ling have been 
collected from the latter sources. 

The removal of quantities of coarse fish, when they are in excessive numbers 
is warranted, but this must be done with discretion in order not to interfere with 



48 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

the available food supply or forage of the finer varieties of fish ; in other words, 
from the standpoint of the economy of any lake, the relationship of one species 
to another must be determined. The harmful characteristics of each species 
must be weighed against its useful or good characteristics. 

Cat, or Finger lake, located in the township of Blair, county of Parry Sound, 
was closed indefinitely in 1930 for the purpose of bass propagation after a 
biological survey indicated that such a step was feasible. 

In order to reduce competitor fish, steps were taken to remove the pike, 
maskinonge and pickerel from the lake. These operations extended from June 
13 to June 22, 1931, pound nets being used to capture the fish. The catch 
recorded over this period was as follows: bass 62, pike 19, maskinonge 10, 
suckers 4. sunfish 2. The pike and maskinonge were removed and planted in 
the French river. The studies revealed that bass predominate, but the removal 
of large predatory pike and maskinonge should improve conditions for bass 
as regards food and survival. 

4. Mortality of Fish 

Investigations concerning the causes of fish mortality in Manitou creek 
(Manitoulin), Weslemkoon lake (Lennox and Addington), lake Semple (near 
Midland) and Rice lake were investigated and reported upon by officials of the 
Branch. 

5. Operations of Commercial Nets and Hooks 

Before nets are licensed for new areas, the Branch biologists investigate 
and report thereon. During the past year three inland water areas were studied 
from this angle. 

An investigation of the use of hooks and bait nets by commercial fishermen 
in the Georgian bay was commenced in 1930 and was continued in 1931. Gangs 
of hooks and bait nets were examined periodically. The studies reveal : 

(1) In bottom line fishing 20 per cent, of the trout taken are of illegal 
size and weight. 

(2) The floating line takes only a small percentage of illegal trout, but 
its use should not be encouraged, since the reserve supply of trout which 
cannot be captured in nets is attacked by such a contrivance. 

(3) Vertical movements of trout are quite apparent as the water 
temperatures rise, deeper water being sought. In the fall they appear in 
10 to 20 fathoms and after the spawning season is over, they appear near 
the surface. Smaller trout under two pounds in the round seem to prefer 
about 20 to 45 fathoms of water, the greatest number being taken at these 
depths. 

(4) The proportion of whitefish and herring species taken in bait nets 
is roughly as follows: bloater (L. hoyi) 70 per cent.; lake herring (L. artedi) 
2 per cent. ; tullibee 2 per cent. ; round whitefish 1 per cent. 

Bloaters or L. hoyi are used extensively by many fishermen whole 
and with the swim.-bladder inflated. Lake herring (L. artedi) and tullibee 
are cut into several pieces when used as bait. There does not appear to 
be a diminution of the supply of the bloater. It is not important as a 
marketable fish on account of its small size and watery flesh, but it enters 
extensively into the diet of lake trout and for this reason its wasteful use 



1932 ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 49 

must be rigorously controlled. The lake herring travel in schools and are 
of considerable commercial importance. 

(5) Trout hooks take large quantities of ling. 

6. Pollution 

Systematic studies of suspected sources of pollution, particularly in cities 
and towns of Ontario, are underway with a view to improving conditions for 
fish in waters located at such centres wherever improvements are possible and 
practicable. 

This year pollution studies were carried out at Lindsay, Sarnia. Kitchener, 
Waterloo, Chatham, Acton, Oakville, Trenton, South River, Coutland and 
Moore's Cove near Haileybury. The forms of alleged pollution encountered 
were as follows: Acids, tannery wastes, paper-mill wastes (straw and wood 
pulp), milk wastes, cyanide, commercial alcohol, creosote, sewage and sugar- 
beet wastes. 

In the majority of these instances the pollution was found to be either 
comparatively harmless or the effluents causing the pollution have been eliminated 
or so treated as to neutralize their harmful effects. Sugar-beet wastes, however, 
have proved to be especially difficult to control. The same difficulty has been 
encountered by our neighbours in the State of Michigan. Decomposition of 
the effluents from these factories requires a great deal of oxygen present in the 
water of the stream into which the wastes are dumped. In other words, there 
is a high oxygen demand, and consequently this problem is not easily solved. 
However, the sugar factories concerned have shown a fine spirit of co-operation 
and e\ery effort is being made to eliminate these troublesome wastes. 



7. Dams, Screens and Fishways 

During the year an organized survey of dams and other barriers across 
water-courses to determine the feasibility of introducing fishways was under- 
taken in the following districts: Algoma, Dufferin, Elgin, Frontenac, Lennox 
and Addington, Nipissing, Parry Sound, Peel, Simcoe, Timiskaming, Sudbury 
and \'ictoria. 

The entire question of screening waters which flow through pri\ate lands 
is at present under consideration with a view to arranging a definite policy of 
treating such cases. The feasibility of such screens was the subject of study 
in waters located in Grey and Peterborough counties. 

The law regarding the erection or maintenance of screens or other 
obstructions across water-courses is defined in Section 41 of the Dominion 
Fisheries Act. 

8. Water-Levels 

The water-Ie\els of the Rideau canal system at vSmith's Falls were 
investigated and reported upon, the following areas receiving special attention: 

(a) Reach between Graham lock and Dalton lock; 

(b) Reach between Dalton lock and Killmarnock lock. 



50 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



9. Miscellaneous Studies 

(a) A Preliminary Report on the Individual Weights of Lake Herring (L. artedi) 
Taken in Pound Nets off the County of Lamb ton, Lake Huron. 

The investigation was carried out as the result of complaints registered by 
the fishermen who stated that the six ounce weight limit is too high to make 
fishing profitable. The fishermen feel that this weight limit is an unnecessary 
and great hardship on them, especially when their American neighbours, only 
about 25 miles across the lake from them, are allowed to take all the herring 
in their crib. They also claim that herring when liberated from their pound 
net cribs, even with the greatest care, have lost so many scales when trying to 
force their way through the back of the crib, etc., that they die very shortly 
afterwards. The scales of herring are very easily rubbed off and hence the 
statement of the fishermen has considerable truth in it. 

The fish measured were taken from the pound nets located at a depth of 
16 to 20 feet and scattered fairly well over the pound net fishing grounds of 
that locality. 

The following data were collected : 

Length from (1) Tip of snout to last caudal vertebra. 
(2) Tip of snout to fork of tail. 
(2) Tip of snout to tip of tail. 
(4) Last caudal vertebra to tip of tail. 

The results of this investigation, as viewed in this preliminary report, 
support the argument of the fishermen quite strongly. Table I shows that 
63.95 per cent, of the 2,000 fish examined are under five ounces in weight, 
whereas only 8.50 per cent, are six ounces or over, that is, of legal weight under 
the present law. One of the latter fish weighed 16j^ ounces. 

TABLE L 



Weight in Ounces 


No. of Fish 


Per Cent. 


2 to 2^ 


9 

144 

1126 

551 

131 

29 

8 

1 

1 


0,451 

7 . 20 63 , 95 


3 to 3^ 


4 to 43^ 


56.30j 


5 to 5>^ 


27.55 


6 to 67/^ 


6.55^ 

1.45 

0.40 

0.05 

0.05 




7 to 7^ 




8 to W% 


8.50 


10 to 10% 




161^ 











The relation between age and weight is shown in Table II. It will be noted 
that: 

1. In this case there are only 55 per cent, under five ounces as against 
63.9 per cent, shown in Table I, and 9 per cent, six ounces or over as against 
8.5 per cent, in the same table. This is due to the fact that only the first hundred 
fish are taken into consideration in Table II, whereas the full 2,000 are considered 
in Table I. 

2. Only 2 per cent, of the fish examined to date have not reached their 
third year and might thus be considered immature, whereas 77 per cent, are in 
their fourth year or older. 



1932 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 



51 



TABLE II. 
Number of Fish or Percentage in Each Weight Class 



Age 


ounces 


ounces 


5-5 J^ 
ounces 


6—63^ 
ounces 


7-7% 
ounces 


Total in 
each year 


In 2nd year. . . 


2 

1 
2 


"s" 

34 

7 
1 


" l" 

24 

9 

1 


' "l" 

1 
5 


1 

1 


2 


In 3rd year 


11 


In 4th year 


62 


In 5th year 

In 6th year 


23* 
2 






Total in each weight class 


5 


50 


35 


7 


2 


100* 



*One fish in its fifth year, weighed 163^ ounces and is not shown in the table except in the 
totals. 

Of the first 100 fish the scales of which have been examined, 53 per cent, 
were males and 47 per cent, females. Of the 2,000 fish measured, 1,108 (55.4 
per cent.) were males and 884 (44.2 per cent.) females. The sex was not 
determined for eight. All of the fish actually dissected (35 to 40 per cent, 
were so treated) appeared to be sexually mature. 

To summarize, the following facts stand out: 

(1) By far the greater percentage of the fish examined (91.5 per cent.) 
were under the legal weight limit. 

(2) Of the first hundred fish examined, 98 per cent, were in their third 
year or older and hence can be definitely considered mature. 

(3) All fish actually dissected appeared to be sexually mature. 



(b) Feeding Experiments with Speckled Trout 

On account of the paramount importance of diet of artificially reared trout, 
feeding experiments were renewed at the Provincial Government Fish Hatchery 
at Mount Pleasant during the summer of 1931 and were conducted along lines 
similar to those of the previous summer. The results, however, were more 
satisfactory, since the experiments extended over a longer period of time. 

The following abstract of Professor J. D. Detwiler's report on the feeding 
experiments conducted at the Mount Pleasant Hatchery during the summer 
of 1931 should be of considerable value to fish culturists: 

Two series of experiments were carried on; one was begun early in June 
and the second, a supplementary one, during the latter part of July. The 
former was closed on September 12th and the latter on September 14th. Each 
series involved 2,000 fingerlings. 

The diets and their constituent proportions were as follows: 

Series I— (1) beef liver 100; (2) beef liver 60 and ration A 40; (3) beef 
heart 60 and clam meal 40; (4) beef heart 60 and ration B 40; (5) ration B 50 
and ration C 50; (6) beef melts 50 and ration C 50; (7) hog melts 50 and ration 
C 50; (8) beef liver 60 and ration D 40; (9) beef liver 60 and ration E 40; (10) 
ration F 100. 

Series H— (11) beef liver 100; (12) hog melts 60 and clam meal 40; (13) 
ration F 100; (14) ration E 100. In each series the beef liver was taken as a 
standard of comparison. 

The percentage mortality and the final results are given in the following 
table : 



52 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



Diet No. 


Mortality 
per 100 


Gain per 100 
fish during 
last 74 days 


Food and 
gain ratio 


Cost per 
100 grams 


Diet No. 


1 


4.0 
2.0 
6.0 
10 
3.5 
9 
11 
0.0 
0.0 
8.5 
1.0 
2.8 
0.6 
7.6 


828 grams 
879 " 
624 " 
535 " 
845 " 
495 " 
698 " 
856 " 
1017 " 
*766 " 


4.3 : 1 

2.8 : 1 
4.6 : 1 

5.1 : 1 
3.1:1 

3^9 :'l 
3.5 : 1 

6.2 : 1 
4.0 : 1 

3.9 : 1 
5.8 : 1 

Food changed 


9.57c 
5.27c 
5.62c 
9.22c 

7.34c 

6 '.24c 
6.92c 
6.79c 
8.80c 
4.27c 
6 . 39c 
during experi 


1 


2 

3 

4 


2 
3 
4 


5 

6 


5 
6 


7 

8 


7 
8 


9 


9 


10 

11 


10 
11 


12 




12 


13 




13 


14 




ment 14 









*This result is in part calculated since the experiment did not run quite 74 days. 

The mortality was high as compared with that of 1930. This was partly 
due, at least, to infection and for some unknown reason the fish fed on diets 
5, 6, 7 and 10 appeared to be particularly susceptible to it. The percentage of 
deaths given in the mortality column does not really show this since the time 
is not given. When the time of death is plotted against the number an epidemic 
period is distinctly indicated and it is in this period that the deaths, occurring 
under the diets referred to, chiefly fall. Furthermore, the mortalities do not 
indicate the condition the fish were in when the experiments were terminated, 
and for these same fish it was, on the whole, quite unsatisfactory. Consequently, 
the calculated data for these particular diets are not of much value. On this 
account some have been omitted. 

The calculations for diet number 10 were made on the weights obtained 
at the last weighing when the fish still appeared to be well. 

The food and gain ratio might be called the food equivalent since it represents 
the relative weights of the different diets required to produce a unit gain in 
weight of the fish. The costs per 100 grams gain in weight were calculated 
on the basis of the following prices per pound: ratio F 5c., beef liver lOc, beef 
heart 7c., beef melts 6c., clam meal 3.5., ration A 6.5c., hog melts 6c., ration 
B lOc, ration C lie, ration D 3.25c., ration E 7.5c. With the exception of 
the raw meats these prices do not include shipping. 

A study of the data will show that diet number 9 produced extraordinary 
growth and that the relative cost of production was considerably lower than 
that of the beef liver. There was no mortality and the fish were in excellent 
condition. Diet number 2 also gave good results; the food equivalent was 
very low as also the relative cost of production when compared with that of 
beef liver. Diet number 8 should be recommended as well, for it showed itself 
to be superior to beef liver alone. 

Ration F and ration C were both highly recommended. For some reason, 
however, both proved to be disappointing. The former contains considerable 
moisture and this accounts, in part, for its unfavourable food equivalent, but 
the same reasoning may be applied to the beef liver, for it also contains a high 
percentage of water. Ration C produces excellent colouration in the fingerlings, 
approximating that found in the wild state. The clam meal combinations 
did not prove entirely satisfactory. The writer feels, nevertheless, that this 
food has possibilities as an ingredient of brook trout diets. 



1932 ANNUAL REPORT. 1931 53 

The results obtained in the second series checked up very- well with those 
of the first wherever experiments were duplicated. The food equivalents were 
slightly lower in these duplications but this may be due to more efficient feeding 
with the older fingerlings. Ration E when used as a complete diet gave instructive 
information. Feeding was begun on July 21st and although the fish did not 
do well the mortality remained very low until about the last of August when 
it rose rapidly, so much, in fact, that a change was decided upon. Beef liver 
was then added, changing the diet to that of number 9. After two days no 
more deaths occurred and the fish did well to the end. These results support 
those obtained from diet number 9 and taken as a whole in conjunction with 
those from beef liver, show that ration E and beef liver may be considered 
complementary foods and that taken together they constitute an efficient and 
economical diet for brook trout fingerlings. 

A second series of experiments was conducted by G. A. Mc\^icar following 
that of R. D. H. Heard of the previous year. A brief abstract of Mr. AlcVicar's 
valuable findings is as follows: 

Renewed observations were made on the effect of various proteins in the 
diets, and on the activation of a basal diet with extracts and extraction residues 
from fresh liver. Additional studies were made with some other foods. 

In each experimental trough twenty selected brook trout were used. The 
troughs were adequately supplied with fresh water and were cleaned once a 
day. The fish were fed regularly four times a day. 

Addition of alcohol and acetone extracts of fresh liver and the residue 
from the alcohol extraction were found to give increased growth, comparable 
to that produced by a supplement of raw liver, when added at a 20 per cent 
level to a basal diet consisting of casein 20 per cent., starch 70 per cent., and 
mineral salts 5 per cent. Negative results were obtained with ether extracts, 
ether and acetone residues. In the preparation of these liver fractions tempera- 
tures above 37.5° C. were not used to avoid destruction of any thermo-labile 
"Factor H" present. 

In common with R. D. H. Heard, who performed these e.xperiments the 
previous summer, the beneficial eff"ects of these liver fractions are not considered 
due to their content of Factor H but to presence in the extract of some protein 
or other food material not provided by the basal diet. Mr. Heard, in his final 
report, points out that addition of dried liver also in the long run activated 
the basal diet to a similar extent. This view is supported by additional experi- 
ments in which the liver extracts were added to a basal diet of dried liver, and 
caused no marked activation, although raw liver did. The dried liver presumably 
lacks only the Factor H of fresh liver, and the liver extracts failed to supply 
this. 

Additional experiments with other foods as supplements to this dried liver 
basal diet showed that hog melts or calf thymus did not cause activation, while 
salmon egg meal or yeast supplements did show activating properties. Yeast 
and salmon egg meal apparently supply appreciable amounts of Factor H. 

Experiments with protein diets showed again that gelatin or albumen were 
totally inadequate as the sole protein of a diet. It was not found possible, 
however, to confirm Mr. Heard's findings that these two proteins improved the 
basal diet of casein, starch and mineral salts to any extent. 

Additional experiments with dried skim milk as a basal diet showed no 
marked increase with gelatin as a supplement. Dried skim milk itself gives 
poor growth, but low mortality, and seems of value as a basal diet in these 
protein experiments. A very marked increase in growth was caused by addition 



54 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

of an unpurified preparation of nucleoprotein (from calf thymus) to the dried 
skim milk diet. The resultant growth was of the same order as that caused 
by a diet consisting wholly of raw liver, a result obtained with none of the other 
experimental diets. This points to the possible importance of phosphorus to 
the growth of fish. Fish eggs are noteworthy in their content of nucleoprotein, 
and this also would suggest the importance of this complex phosphate-containing 
protein to fish. 

It seems probable from this work that salmon egg meal and dried skim 
milk may prove of value as ingredients of hatchery diets. Further work seems 
indicated on the conditions causing disappearance of Factor H from raw liver, 
its distribution in other food materials, and on the value of nucleoprotein and 
phosphorus in fish nutrition. 

(c) An Investigation of the Most Suitable Natural Environment for 
Lake Trout Fingerlings (Continued from 1930) 

Work on the experiments involved in this investigation was commenced 
in 1930 by J. H. Fox, Science Master, Windsor Collegiate Institute, under the 
supervision of the Biologist and Director of the Branch. The work was continued 
in 1931 by J. H. Fox' and H. J. Perkin. 

The experiments were carried out ofif Port Bowmanville, Lake Ontario, and 
the following abstracts taken from Mr. Fox's report explain the methods followed 
and the results of the problem: 

"Lake trout fingerlings were placed in cages constructed of galvanized 
iron with No. 20 galvanized iron wire mesh, eight to an inch, on the top and 
bottom. The wire riveted to the frame-work. A galvanized iron shield extended 
two inches below the bottom of each cage. The cages were of two sizes, the 
large ones being 18 inches long, 15 inches wide and 10 inches deep; and the 
smaller ones 15 inches long, 12 inches wide and 8 inches deep. They were 
allowed to rest upon the bottom, excepting in the open water experiments, 
being anchored at one end and attached to a buoy at the other. These cages 
were placed in various positions in Lake Ontario opposite Port Bowmanville 
and examined once a week to determine the rate of mortality and general 
condition of the enclosed fish. At each examination live specimens were removed 
for stomach analysis. At the same time water samples for analysis were taken 
in the vicinity of each cage. Plankton collections and temperature records were 
also taken at the time of each examination. Bottom dredges were made from 
time to time. 

Plankton collections were made with a vertical closing net consisting of an 
upper truncated cone of heavy cotton and a lower straining cone of No. 20 
silk bolting cloth, about 6,000 meshes to the square centimetre with openings 
of 0.001 to 0.003 square millimetres. The lower end of the straining cone bore a 
cylindrical metal bucket, the lower end of which was covered with No. 20 silk 
bolting cloth. A vertical haul was made near each cage at the time of examination. 
The length of the haul was ten metres except where the water was too shallow. 
It began as close to the bottom as the apparatus would permit and proceeded 
at the approximate rate of one-half metre per second. 

A Negretti-Zambra reversing thermometer was used for the temperature 
records. Bottom samples were obtained with an Ekman dredge and washed 
through screens in the usual manner. 

The hydrogen ion content of the water was determined by the colorimetric 
method immediately after the sample was taken. Other water samples were 



1932 ANNUAL REPORT. 1Q31 55 

taken in 250 c.c. glass-stoppered bottles, and immediately packed in ice for 
laboratory analysis. Analyses were made for oxygen, normal carbonates and 
hydroxides, bicarbonates, etc. For methods see the thirty-eighth annual report, 
Provincial Board of Health, Ontario, 1919. 

Experiments were divided into two series known as Series I and Series II. 
Each experiment was conducted in duplicate to reduce accidental errors and 
to provide a check on the results obtained. Duplicates were lettered "A" and 
"B." Cage "A" was located east of cage "B." 

Careful precautions were taken in lowering and raising the fish in the water. 
The temperature of the water from the bottom to the eight-metre level was 
recorded at four-metre intervals and at two-metre intervals from the eight- 
metre level to the surface. The rate of lowering and raising was adjusted so 
that the fish did not experience a temperature change more rapid than one 
centigrade degree per minute. Raising and lowering was not done continuously, 
several rest periods being allowed to enable the fish to adjust themselves to 
the new pressures. The cages were lowered and raised by means of a windlass 
with an eight to one ratio. 

Counts to determine the distribution of copepods were made. The con- 
centrated plankton haul was gently but thoroughly agitated and a 5 c.c. sample 
was removed. The copepods in this sample were counted under a binocular 
microscope and the total number in the haul was then calculated. The sample 
was then returned to the bottle which was sent to the Department for 
confirmation. 

Enough fish stomachs were analysed to give the writer an idea of what 
was being eaten at each location. The remainder were sent to the Department 
for analysis. 

To understand the lake conditions one must consider the normal and 
unusual movements of the water. Under the influence of westerly winds, there 
is usually a marked west to east drift along the shore. This is characterized 
by clear, cold water with a definite thermocline. It bears an abundant copepod 
fauna whose region of maximum density is usually about eight metres below 
the surface. This region rises or lowers with changing conditions; light and 
temperature being the two most apparent factors. 

Occasionally in the early summer and more often in the late summer, 
easterly winds set up an unusual east to west drift of water along the shore. 
As a rule such a drift lasts from a few days to a week but this year an east to 
west drift began on August 2nd and continued without interruption until August 
16th. On August 16th strong westerly winds reversed it, but it changed back 
again on August 19th and flowed east to west without interruption until the 
time of writing (August 26th). 

This drift brought large quantities of warm water toward the shore. The 
thermocline gradually lowered and then disappeared. By August 13th the 
water, at 16 metres depth, one mile from shore, had reached a temperature of 
20.6 degrees C. at the bottom and 20.7 degrees C. at the top. The warm water 
first lowered the region of maximum copepod density and later reduced the 
copepod population to less than 20 per cent, of what it had been under normal 
conditions. The return to a normal drift on August 16th was followed by a 
marked increase in the copepod population. During the east to west drift 
the water was more turbid than usual. 

The bottom of the lake slopes downward at the rate of about 16 metres 
per mile. Close to the shore it is composed of sand and silt and a certain amount 
of debris. Opposite the headlands there are many stones ranging in size up 



56 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

to large boulders. These are evidently derived from the glacial deposits common 
along the shore. At a depth of a little over 5 metres the silt disappears and at 
8 metres depth the bottom is composed of clean sand. Between 8 and 12 metres 
depth, the sandy bottom gives way to black, porous rock sometimes bare and 
sometimes covered with a thin layer of sand. This type of bottom continues 
to a depth of at least 32 metres. The bottom fauna is fairly abundant at a 
depth of 5 metres, not so abundant at 8 metres and beyond the latter depth 
only stray forms are found. 

During the normal drift of water, the most favourable environment for 
the fish held in cages on the bottom was found to be at a depth of 8 metres. 
In deeper water, mortality rates became progressively higher and they 
were slightly higher at a depth of 5 metres. At 8 metres depth the 
region of maximum copepod density is close to the bottom and there 
is a considerable bottom fauna. The water is usually clear and cold. 
It is deep enough to be free of most of the silvering movements found in shallower 
water and a headland to the west protects the region from the sweeping currents 
that make the bottom so inhospitable in deeper water. At 12 metres depth and 
over, the bottom fauna is scarce and most of the copepods are to be found a 
considerable distance above the bottom. At 5 metres depth food is abundant 
but the water often becomes warm and turbid. 

During the east to west drift the mortality rate was lowest in deep water, 
a depth of 20 metres providing the most favourable environment. Closer to 
shore the water was warm and turbid and the food supply was reduced. At 
20 metres depth the water was cool, the thermocline was close to the bottom 
and a greater number of copepods had been forced into the deeper water. 

This investigation has indicated quite definitely the location of the best 
environments for fish confined in cages on the bottom. If the fish were free to 
move around, the range of suitable environment would be much greater. In 
cages, they must wait for their food to come to them. If they were free, they 
could follow the movements of the food supply and live in places where food 
was not so limited. Fish that come from the hatchery in good condition do 
not eat much during the first week after liberation. Daphnia are usually the 
first choice of food but by the second week copepods have become the main 
diet. Since copepods live in open water, lake trout fingerlings may live there 
also. As has been pointed out, the open water experiments were not successful 
because of mechanical difficulties. If these fish require the protection of a 
quiet bottom, the 8-metre depth is the best place for them. 

It is recommended that under similar conditions to those found normally 
in Lake Ontario at Port Bowmanville, lake trout fingerlings be liberated below 
the thermocline in water about 8 metres deep. Under such conditions as 
prevailed during the time of the east to west drift, it is recommended that they 
be liberated close to the bottom in water about 20 metres deep. It might be 
safe to combine these recommendations by advising that the fish be liberated 
below the thermocline and close to the bottom. 

The investigation might be continued with profit along three lines. Trolling 
might be done in the regions found by experiment to provide the most favourable 
environment, in an attempt to find lake trout fingerlings and also to find out 
what enemies live in these areas. A more complete survey of the movements 
of the copepod fauna would be instructive. An investigation of the region just 
above the bottom, in water whose depth was 5 metres or less, would add 
considerably to the information at hand." 



1932 ANNUAL REPORT. 1931 57^ 

FISH CULTURE 

Satisfactory progress is being made in the fish cultural work of the 
Department by means of its numerous hatcheries and rearing stations. 

Quantity of fish distributed is often considered the index of progress in 
fish culture, but this is only true when the quality, that is, the fitness of the 
fish to withstand the vicissitudes and struggle for existence in open waters is 
considered, and when the planting methods are in accordance with existing 
knowledge. 

Provincial fish hatcheries under Provincial jurisdiction were the first to 
go into the propagation of game-fish and that, by the way, was their original 
objective. This programme was slightly altered in 1926 when eight hatcheries 
located in Ontario and under the control of the Dominion Government were 
taken over. Although these are chiefly concerned with the propagation of com- 
mercial fish, whenever suitable arrangements or modifications can be made to 
assist in the production of fingerling fish as in the case of trout such facilities 
are established. However, with the development of rearing stations for the 
culture of larger trout at strategic points throughout the Province the propa- 
gation of game-fish species at commercial fish hatcheries with the possible 
exceptions of lake trout, maskinonge and pickerel will be more or less abandoned. 
The centralization of the culture of speckled trout at rearing stations leaves 
commercial fish hatcheries free to carry on lake trout to the fingerling grade, 
that is, in limited numbers and providing the water supplying the hatchery is 
suitable for the purpose. 

Speckled Trout 

The limitations set on the culture of trout excepting as fry and early finger- 
lings were overcome by the establishment of the Normandale Trout Ponds in 
1924. This station acts as a focal point for speckled trout eggs supplied to 
rearing stations in southern Ontario. A rearing station is a semi-natural or 
artificial enclosure of wood construction placed along a stream run in sequence 
or battery arrangement. Before a site is chosen it is given a rigorous inspection 
by officials of the Biological and Fish Culture Branch of the Department and, 
briefly, must meet the following requirements — a spring source under absolute 
control; control of the major portion of the stream run; excellent physical and 
chemical conditions of the water including temperature control throughout the 
year; proper requirements of volume and gradient; accessibility must be such 
that speedy delivery of fish by truck and rail is made possible. 

Three subsidiary and two major trout rearing stations meeting with the 
above requirements were established during the past two years. The subsidiary 
stations are located (1) at the headwater springs supplying Gibson's creek. 
Provincial Government Reforestry Farm, Charlotteville township, Norfolk 
county; (2) headwater springs supplying Marsh creek, near Codrington, North- 
umberland county; (3) deep-seated springs, Petawawa township, near Pembroke, 
Renfrew county. These three stations will be able to handle at least one and 
a half million fingerling trout. The new major stations are located at the 
headwaters of Coldwater creek, near Sault Ste. Marie, District of Algoma, and 
at the headwaters of Spring Creek, near Dorion, Thunder Bay District. 

The water supply at the Sault Ste. Marie Trout Rearing Station is excellent 
from the standpoint of temperature, quality and volume, the latter measuring 



58 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

well over 1,200 gallons per minute. During the year one million and nine 
thousand (1,009,000) speckled trout fingerlings measuring from three to five 
inches were successfully reared and distributed from this station, and it is 
possible to rear at least one million and a half speckled trout from the egg stage 
to the large or late fingerling stage. Suitable pond space is available for adult 
fish from which spawn is obtained for supplying the station in question. 
Distribution will be confined largely to Algoma and adjacent easterly districts. 
Dorion Trout Rearing Station is seven miles from the village of Dorion, 
located on the Canadian National and Canadian Pacific Railways. There are 
good roads to the headwaters of Spring Creek on which the station is built and 
the volume of water obtained is more or less phenomenal, being in the neighbour- 
hood of 4,000 gallons per minute. The temperature and quality of this water 
are also excellent. Distribution from this station will be confined to the District 
of Thunder Bay and westerly districts. Present arrangements are such that 
at least one million and a half speckled trout fingerlings may be handled there. 



m 

i 




^^T^^^^^M^^^^B 


















o --» _ _ j_^ 






■■- 




V 1 il 


^■j 




1 W' >: 


m 1 


k 


IrJ 


my'' 


^»4 


■K? 1 


_^jMM 


i*% 


-X-I'- 



A typical speckled trout pool. 

These facilities for the culture of trout which the Government has brought 
into being provide for a possible distribution of five million fingerling and large 
trout in the very near future, barring accidents and disease which fish, like all 
other animals, are heir to. 

In 1930 the total distribution of speckled trout amounted to 2,592,199 
approximately, and in 1931 to 2,842,840. 

Brown Trout 

The stocking policy regarding the experimental plantings of brown trout 
as outlined in two previous annual reports is being followed, that is, brown 
trout distribution will be restricted to definite locations investigated by our 
biological staff and reported upon as suitable, in order that the success or failure 
of their introduction may be properly studied and accounted for. 

The culture of brown trout is confined to the Provincial Fish Hatchery 
at Mount Pleasant, where a permanent breeding stock is maintained. Facilities 



1932 ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 59 

are provided at the Provincial Fish Hatchery at Kenora for the handHng of 
this species to the fry stage for distribution in suitable trout lakes in that district. 
Whether this introduction will meet with success must still be proven. Should 
success attend these efforts, the Dorion Trout Rearing Station will be in a 
position to handle brown trout for distribution in suitable waters of Kenora 
and Rainy River districts. 

Brown trout distribution increased from 70,500 in 1930 to 900,600 in 1931. 

Rainbow Trout 

The rainbow trout distribution increased from 81,505 in 1930 to 193,925 
in 1931. No general distribution of this species in the waters of Ontario is 
contemplated, but a controlled distribution is underway, the locations of which 
are indicated in Appendix No. 1 of this report. 

At the present time rainbow trout culture is confined to the Normandale 
Hatchery, where facilities are provided for rearing fingerling fish for distribution. 
The permanent breeding stock are maintained in a pond on the course of the 
Normandale stream. 

If the distribution of this species to the larger trout streams and lakes of 
northern Ontario is undertaken, the Sault Ste. Marie Trout Rearing Station 
will be in a position to handle this distribution. 

Lake Trout 

The output of the lake trout fry and fingerlings increased from 19,138,002 
in 1930 to 22.108,900 in 1931. 

During the year a total of 18,179,925 fingerlings were distributed as opposed 
to 3,928,975 fry. Of the total distribution of fry and fingerlings 20,512,400 
were deposited in commercially-fished waters and 1,596.500 in game-fish waters. 

Yellow Pickerel (Pike-Perch or Dore) 

The decline in the total number of pickerel distributed in 1931 as compared 
with the previous year was largely due to the unsuccessful spawn-taking 
operations at the Manitou Rapids, Rainy River district. The nets were set in 
places where good catches of fish in proper conditions for spawning had been 
obtained before. 

Low water conditions existed to a greater extent than in previous springs 
and this may have had some effect on the course taken by the pickerel, that is, 
causing them to run in the deeper channel along the American shore. It was 
observed that the fish remained in swift water where it was impossible to set 
pound nets on account of the rocky nature of the bottom. It was also observed 
that very few females were taken; of a total of 200 fish taken in the pound net, 
10 were females, and the fish in general were much smaller than those which 
usually constitute the run during the spawning period. An additional dis- 
advantage at this station was that the eggs matured at different periods. 

Spawn-taking operations for pickerel at Beaverhouse lake. Rainy River 
district, were successful. The yield from this area in 1930 amounted to 30,000,000 
eggs and in 1931 to 38,100,000 eggs. Of the total production 110,660,000 were 



60 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

deposited in commercially-fished waters and 23,790,000 in game-fish waters. 
In addition, 2,000,000 eyed eggs were supplied Sparrow lake hatchery. 

The unsatisfactory season at the Bay of Quinte station, operated from the 
Glenora Hatchery, also contributed to the reduced output. 

Whitefish 

The increase in the distribution of whitefish fry from 277,100,000 in 1930 
to 342,107,000 in 1931 was due, in the main, to the favourable weather conditions 
in Lake Superior, Georgian Bay, Lakes Erie and Ontario, the hatcheries at 
Port Arthur, Collingwood, Normandale, Belleville, and Glenora, located on 
these waters, contributing towards successful spawn-taking operations and 
increased output. 1,000,000 eyed whitefish eggs were exchanged and 500,000 
distributed. See Appendix 1, page 76. 

Lake Herring 

A glance at Appendix No. 3 will reveal that the distribution of lake herring 
fry is on the up-grade. Since 1926 a gradual improvement has been evident, 
the increase in 1931 over that of 1930 being 9,738,000. The successful spawn- 
taking operations carried on by the hatcheries at Belleville and Glenora have 
been largely responsible for this improvement. 

Maskinonge 

The artificial propagation of maskinonge fry is carried out each spring in 
a portable type of hatchery located on the Pigeon river at Omemee in Victoria 
county. The bulk of the fry reared has been planted in the Pigeon river and 
suitable waters in the counties of Victoria and Peterborough. During the year 
a bulletin entitled "The Maskinonge and Its Conservation" was published by 
the Department. This deals with the interesting subject of maskinonge culture 
and may be obtained from the Department on request. 

Black Bass 

The subject of black bass propagation is one which has been given the 
closest possible attention by the Biological and Fish Culture Branch. The 
small-mouthed black bass holds the admiration of most anglers and is ranked 
as the gamest fish that swims. 

Re-stocking depleted waters with small-mouthed black bass or large- 
mouthed black bass must be viewed from many angles, particularly on account 
of the large extent of the waters with which we have to deal. The introduction 
of small quantities of bass-fry or fingerlings to inshore waters of the Great 
Lakes and such large inland lakes as Nipissing and Simcoe appears unnecessary 
when we consider the numbers of bass fry produced in these waters annually 
by natural propagation. Suitable restrictive measures on inshore waters and 
large inland lakes pertaining to bag limit, size limit, season and closed areas 
should suffice. No one remedy will succeed in reaching our objective, namely, 
to maintain and, if possible, to improve the bass fishing in Provincial waters. 
The courses being pursued to establish such conditions are: 



1932 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 



61 



(1) The protection of the bass during the spawning season. A closed 
season on bass previous to July 1st and after October 15th is in operation. 
This closed season has undoubtedly saved many a male bass from capture 
while guarding its nest and in this way has provided protection for multitudes 
of eggs which would otherwise fall a prey to enemies. 

(2) Closure of depleted waters in order to give them a chance to become 
rehabilitated. 

(3) Successful operations for the harvesting of small-mouthed black bass 
were carried out in the following waters: 

Bass lake in Purdom and Booth townships of Thunder Bay district yielded 
277 fingerlings and 684 yearlings and adults. 




The shores of a typical small-mouthed black bass lake. 



Fox lake, 12 miles from Kenora in Kenora district, yielded 514 yearlings 
and adults. Bass were introduced to Fox lake by the Department in 1913. 

Herridge lake in the townships of Strathcona and Law, Nipissing district, 
yielded 1,800 fingerlings. 

Green lake. Brougham township, Renfrew county, yielded 2,008 fingerlings 
and 1,322 yearlings and adults. Thus it has given an even greater yield than 
last year. 

Operations were carried out on Little Gull lake, near Minden in Haliburton 
county, for the first time with the result that 2,840 yearlings and adults were 
obtained. Evidently, this is an excellent lake for harvesting operations. 

For the purpose of comparing the distribution of harvested bass in 1930 
and 1931, it will be interesting to note that 21,500 fry and 1,970 small-mouthed 
black bass fingerlings were distributed in 1930. The fingerling distribution 



62 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



was increased to 4,085 in 1931. By such means also 2,062 yearling and adult 
small-mouthed black bass were distributed in 1930 and this was increased to 
5,630* in 1931. 

Successful operations for the harvesting of large-mouthed black bass were 
carried out on Wiltse creek, Lansdowne and -Leeds townships in Leeds county, 
another water used for this purpose for the first time; it yielded 330 fingerlings 
and 3,943 yearlings and adults. This is another excellent water for harvesting 
operations. 

In addition to the waters in which actual operations were carried out, the 
following were tested as possible sites for future use: Smudge lake, near Uphill, 




A maskinonge-pike-large-mouthed black bass environment. 



Victoria county; Salmon lake, Cavendish township, Peterborough county; 
Pigeon lake, near Minden, Haliburton county; Jumping Caribou lake, Olive 
and Law townships, Nipissing district. All are impracticable sites with the 
exception of Salmon lake, which offers some possibilities. 

(4) Pond culture — Small-mouthed black bass reared in and distributed 
from Ontario Government ponds were as follows: 



1930 



1931 



Fry 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings and Adults 

Total . . 



364,591 

6,464 

60 



371,115 



332,500 

88,900 

289 



421,689 



*This figure includes 270 adult small-mouthed black bass harvested for propagatory 
purposes. 



1932 ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 63 

Pond culture of large-mouthed black bass was commenced in 1931 and 
from one small experimental pond 35,000 fry and 18,310 fingerlings were 
distributed. 

These figures show that the pond culture of bass is in no sense of the word 
at a standstill and as soon as a suitable location and funds are available more 
extensive propagation of bass will be the next major step in the itinerary of 
the Branch. 

It may be interesting to note in passing that the propagation of golden 
shiners as forage for bass is also underway and gives every hope of success. 

FOURTH GREAT LAKES FISHERIES CONFERENCE 

The Fourth Great Lakes Fisheries Conference was held at the Buffalo 
Museum of Science, Humboldt Park, Buffalo, New York, October 12, 1931. 
William C. Adams, Chief of the Division of Fish and Game, New York State 
Conservation Department, presided at the meeting. The representatives of 
the States of the United States bordering the Great Lakes and the Province 
of Ontario in attendance at the meeting were as follows: 

Chairman, William C. Adams, Chief of Division of Fish and Game, New 
York State Conservation Department. 

Pennsylvania: 

Commissioner O. J. Deibler. 
Ohio: 

Mr. E. L. Wickliff, Chief, Bureau of Scientific Research. 

Dr. T. H. Langlois, Chief, Bureau of Fish Propagation. 

Mr. Charles E. Lay, Member of the Conservation Council, Division of 
Conservation. 

Mr. Harry Crossley, Chief of Bureau, Lake Erie Supervision, Ohio Division 
of Conservation. 
Michigan: 

Mr. W. H. Loutit, Chairman, Conservation Commission. 

Mr. W. J. Lambert, Secretary and Manager, Michigan Commercial Fisher- 
men's Association. 
Province of Ontario: 

Mr. H. H. MacKay, Biologist and Director, Fish Culture Branch, repre- 
senting the Department of Game and Fisheries. 
United States Bureau of Fisheries: 

Mr. Lewis Radcliffe. Deputy Commissioner. 

Mr. Glen C. Leach, Chief Division of Fish Culture. 

Mr. Elmer Higgins, Chief, Division of Scientific Inquiry. 

Dr. John Van Oosten, in charge of Great Lakes Investigations. 

Mr. J. P. Snyder, in charge of Fish Cultural Operations in New York. 
New York State: 

Dr. Emmeline Moore, Investigator in Fish Culture. 

Dr. Geo. C. Embody, Professor of Aquiculture, Cornell University. 

Mr. Summer H. Cowden, Superintendent of Fish Culture, Division of Fish 
and Game. 

Mr. Morris W. Brackett, Chief Inspector of New York State. 

Mr. W. E. Tillman, Inspector, Buffalo District. 

Mr. Justin T. Mahoney, Superintendent, Inland Fisheries. 



64 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

The condition of the lakes' fisheries and methods of control and improve- 
ment were discussed. One of the important results of the meeting was the 
formation of a small advisory committee to go into the various contentious 
points pertaining to uniform regulations on the various lakes. In this way a 
better understanding of the requirements and meaning of uniform regulations 
will result and more definite progress will be made. 

EDUCATIONAL PROPAGANDA 

During the year two pamphlets on the maskinonge and bass and their 
conservation were published by the Department. These pamphlets, which 
were prepared at the request of the Ontario Federation of Anglers, have had a 
wide circulation and have been favourably and appreciatively received. 

During the year, also, officials of the Branch have been actively engaged 
in placing before game and fish societies and other organizations the fish cultural 
work carried on by the Department, the interpretation of the regulations, and 
the advantages of conservation. At the present time there prevails, probably 
more than ever before, a deep sense of the need of conservation and a more 
heartfelt conception of the elements which constitute true sportsmanship. The 
desire to destroy wild life is being slowly but surely replaced by a greater desire 
to enjoy its beauties and manifold charms from the naturalist's point of view. 

CLOSED WATERS 

The following waters are closed to all fishing: 

Bass Lake, townships of Purdom and Booth, district of Thunder Bay; indefinite closure for bass 
propagation. 

Beryl Lake, north half of section 26, township of \"ankoughnet, district of Algoma; closed until 

May 1st, 1931. 
Brough's Creek, township of South Orillia, county of Simcoe; closed until June 2nd, 1934, for 

rainbow trout propagation. 
Cat, or Finger Lake, concessions 19, 20, 21, township of Blair, county of Parry Sound; indefinite 

closure for bass propagation. 
Cedar Creek, Pitch Creek, and Whitewood Creek, district of Thunder Bay; closed until May 31st, 

1933, for speckled trout propagation. 
Crooked Lake, district of Sudbury, Missinabi Lake, districts of Sudbury and Algoma, and that 

portion of Dog Lake lying north of the right-of-way of the Canadian Pacific Railway and 

located in the districts of Algoma and Sudbury; all closed until July 1st, 1932, for bass 

propagation. 

Eagle Lake, township of Anstruther, county of Peterborough, closed for three years commencing 

August 1st, 1929, for brown trout propagation. 
Esnaganii Lake, townships of Esnagami, Rupert and Alpha, and unsurveyed territory; Kawash- 

kagamiLake, township of Sexton ; Fleming River, township of Sexton ; Fleming Lake, townships 

of Sexton, Danford, and unsurveyed territory; Kawashkagami Creek, lying between Fleming 

lake and Island lake, in unsurveyed territory — all in the district of Thunder Bay; closed 

indefinitely, for speckled trout propagation. 
Fox Lake, twelve miles from Kenora, in unsurveyed territory of the district of Kenora; closed 

indefinitely, for bass propagation. 
Green Lake, concessions 6, 7 and 8, township of Brougham, county of Renfrew; indefinite closure, 

for bass propagation. 
Herridge Lake, townships of Strathcona and Law, district of Nipissing; indefinite closure, for 

bass propagation. 
Lake on the Mountain, at Glenora, Prince Edward County; owned by the Crown and closed for 

hatchery purposes and for bass propagation. 
Sucker Lake, township of Assiginack, district of Manitoulin ; indefinite closure for bass propagation 
Needing River (near Fort William), Current River (north branch). District of Thunder Bay, 

closed to all fishing. 



1932 ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 65 

The following are examples of cases where game fish are protected, and 
where propagation may be carried on at the discretion of the Department: 

*Lake of the Woods: 

1. Clearwater Bay. 4. Bigstone Bay. 

2. Woodchiick Bay. 5. Rat Portage. 

3. Andrews Bay. 6. Popular Bay. 

7. Lobstick Bay, closed especially for hatchery purposes. 

8. Sabaskong Bay (maskinonge sanctuary'). — This includes all the waters in the bay, and 

inlets and bays tributary thereto lying east of a line drawn northeast from the west 
side of Brule point to the westerly extremity of Rabbit point. 

9. White Partridge Bav. — In this instance the line is drawn across from Zigzag point south of 

105P; thence to I.R. 38a. 

Kenora District: 

1. Little Vermilion Lake, township of \'ermilion, district of Kenora. 

2. Pelican Lake, Kenora (near Pelican on C.N.R.); lake trout and pickerel propagation. 

Rainy River District: 

Stanjikoming Bay. ^ 

Lake Nipigon: 

In regard to gill nets authorized for Lake Nipigon , one of the conditions reads as follows : ' 'Gill 
nets authorized in the license shall not be set, placed, or located within one thousand 
yards of the mouth of any tributary, river, creek, or stream, nor within two miles from 
\'irgin falls, and no nets shall be set on speckled trout spawning grounds, or on grounds 
set aside for the taking of spawn by the Department, namely: West bay. Chief bay, 
Ombabika bay. Black Sturgeon bay, south of Long point in South bay, and those 
waters lying east of a line drawn from one mile west of Poplar point to one mile west 
of High Hill river, or in other waters as directed." 

Lake Superior: 

Nipigon Bay, closed permanently. 

Algoma District: 

Echo Lake, township of Kehoe; closed for hatchery purposes (pickerel). 

Manitoulin Island: 

1. Kagawong Lake. 2. Manitoii Lake. 3. Mindemoya Lake. 

Georgian Bay Waters: 

\. Entrance to Spanish River. 3. McGregor Bay, closed indefinitely. 

2. Whitefish Bay, closed indefinitely. 4. Killarney Bay, closed indefinitely. 

5. East Shore. Condition 19 of the conditions governing licensees states: "No nets shall be 

set in that portion of the waters of Georgian bay east of a line drawn northwesterly 
from the most westerly point of Moore's point; thence northwesterly to the most 
southwesterly point of Beausoleil island ; then continuing northwesterly to Gin Island ; to 
Smooth island; to Whaleback Beacon; to Eshpadekong island; to the easterly side of 
Pine island; to Phillimore rock; to Bass Group islands; to Barbara rock; to Campbell's 
island ; to the most easterly end of Sandy island ; to the westerly side of Pancake island ; 
to the most westerly point of Franklin island; to Twin island; to Groundhog island; to 
Hang Dog island; to Champlain island; to Tie island, and to the mouth of the French 
river." 

6. Matchedash Bay, closed July and August. 

7. Colpoy's Bay, closed to commercial fishing permanently; used for lake trout propagation. 

Lake St. Clair: 

Mitchell's Bay, closed to commercial fishing during the months of May, June, July, and 
August. 

Lake Erie : 

Inner Bay of Long Point; Bay, closed to commercial fishing with the exception of seining and 
hoop netting, which must not be carried on during the spawiiing season of black bass. 
Fishing of this nature is prohibited during the months of May, June, July, and August. 

*Lakeof the Woods. See pages 112, 113 of 1931 revision of Ontario Game and Fisheries Laws. 



66 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

In conclusion, I desire to publicly express my appreciation of the assistance 
and support which has been rendered to the Department throughout the year. 

The members of the staff, of both the inside and outside services, have 
faithfully and zealously carried out any and all duties which have been allotted 
to them, and the spirit of loyal co-operation in the performance of the work 
has at all times been evident. 

Our work has been made more pleasant and attractive by reason of the 
assistance and co-operation rendered by the transportation companies and the 
various Fish and Game Protective Associations throughout the Province, the 
officers and members of which latter organizations having at all times worked 
in conjunction v/ith the Department and its various officers, in an earnest 
endeavour to secure a proper observance of the provisions of The Ontario Game 
and Fisheries Act. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I am. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

D. McDonald, 

Deputy Minister of Game and Fisheries. 



1932 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 



67 



APPENDIX No. 1 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS, 1931 

Note. — "C" before the figures indicates Commercially Fished Waters. 



Black Bass Fry 
Addington : 

Little Weslemkoom lake .... 



Bruce: 

Cameron lake . 

Durham: 
Rice lake .... 



Elgin : 

Lake Pinafore 

City Reservoir (St. Thomas). 

Grey: 

Mountain lake 



Haldimand: 

McKenzie creek. 

Hastings: 

Devil lake 

Island lake 

Moira river. . . . 
Paudash lake . . . 
Snow lake 



Lambton : 

Sydenham river (C) 

Lanark: 

Otty lake 



Manitoulin : 

Dingman's creek. 



Muskoka: 

Devine lake 

Dickie's lake 

Fawn lake 

Koshee lake 

Long lake (Muskoka) . 

Long's lake 

Morrison lake 

Muldrew lake 

Sparrow lake 

Webster lake 



Northumberland : 

Crow bay 

Little lake (Cramahe) 



Ontario: 

Lake St. John . 
Wagner's lake . 



Oxford: 

Homer's creek . 

Peterborough: 
Belmont lake. . 

Clear lake 

Chemong lake . 

Oak lake 

Round lake . . . 
Stoney lake. . . 



2,500 

10,000 

5,000 



5,000 
5,000 



10,000 
5,000 



5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 



10,000 



5,000 



5,000 



10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
20,000 
10,000 
10,000 



5,000 
5,000 



10,000 
10,000 



5,000 



5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 



Simcoe: 

Bass lake and tributaries 

Boyne river 

Couchiching lake (C) 

Severn river 

\'ictoria : 

Trent canal (C) 

Went worth : 

Hamilton bay 



York: 

Black river (C) 

Lake Simcoe (C) 

Lake Wilcox 



10,000 

5,000 

10,000 

40,000 



5,000 



5,000 



10,000 
10,000 
10,000 



367,500 



Black Bass Fingerlings 
Addington : 

Lime lake 

South Beaver lake 

White lake 

Brant: 

Mohawk lake 



Bruce: 

Miller lake 

Teeswater river. 



Carleton : 

Constance creek. 

Durham: 

Rice lake 

Scugog lake .... 



Frontenac: 

Draper's lake 

Eagle lake 

Elbow lake 

Fishing lake 

Long lake (Barrie-Clarendon). 
" (Hinchinbrooke).. . 

(Portland) 

Mississagon lake 

Sand lake (Clarendon) 

Sharbot lake 

White lake 

Wolf lake 



Grey: 

Mulock'slake (Sale). 

Glengarry : 

St. Lawrence river. . 



Haliburton: 

East Moore's lake. 
Percy lake 



Hastings: 
Moira lake. 
Stoco lake . 



83 
50 
50 



5,000 



1,000 
1,000 



75 



2,000 
100 



60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
280 
60 
60 



2,000 



135 



2,000 
2,000 



50 
50 



68 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS, i93l~Continued 



Kenora: 

Big Vermilion lake (C) 



Kent: 

Rondeau bay . 



(C) 



Lanark: 

Christie lake. . 
Dalhousie lake. 
Patterson lake. 

Pike lake 

White lake 



Leeds: 

Charleston lake 

Otter lake 

Rideau lake (C) 

Sand Lake (North Crosby) .... 
" (South Crosby) . . . . 

Troy lake 

Whitefishlake (C) 



Lincoln : 

Si.xteen Mile creek. 
Twenty Mile creek. 



Middlesex: 
Thames river. 

Muskoka: 

Bass lake . . . . 
Brook's lake . , 
Buck lake. . . . 
Rose lake . . . . 



Ni pissing: 

Cache lake 

Pine lake 

Nosbonsing lake 

Lake Nipissing (C) 

Tilden lake 

Traverse lake 

Turtle lake 



Northumberland : 

Little lake (Cramahe) 
Percy Reach lake .... 
Trent river 



Ontario: 

Lake St. John . 
Wagner's lake . 

Oxford: 

Horner's creek. 



Parr\- Sound: 

Bill's lake 

Burnt lake 

Blackwater lake . . 

Caribou lake 

Cecebe lake 

Commanda lake . . 

Duck lake 

Limestone lake . . . 
Little Clam lake. . 

Long lake 

Magnetawan lake. 
Maple lake 



Ill 



5,000 



120 
60 
50 

100 
60 



62 

60 
720 

60 
102 
150 

50 



500 
500 



1,260 



1,000 
2,000 
2,000 
1,000 



225 
215 
150 
250 
150 
1,000 
235 



2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



2,000 
1,000 



2,000 



2,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
500 
1,000 
1,000 



Parry Sound — Continued 

Mary Jane lake 

Mill lake 

Otter lake 

Pickerel river 

Powell's lake 

Star lake 

Whitefish lake 



Peel: 

Credit river. 



Perth: 

Maitland river and tributaries (C) 
Victoria lake 

Peterborough : 

Belmont lake 

Buckhom lake 

Chemong lake 

Clear lake 

Little Bald lake 

Loon lake 

Lovesick lake 

Round lake 



Renfrew: 

Kurd's lake. . 
Golden lake . . 
Muskrat lake. 



Simcoe: 

Cook's lake 

Couchiching lake (C) 

Little lake 

Orr lake 

Sturgeon bay (C) 

Thunder Bay: 

Kashabowie lake 

Lac des Mille Lacs 

Two Island lake 



Timiskaming: 
Lake Temagami . 
Twin lake 



Victoria: 

Balsam lake 

Big Mud Turtle lake. 

Cameron lake 

Head lake 

Pigeon lake 

Sturgeon lake 



Waterloo : 

Sunfish lake. . 

Wellington : 
Pike lake. . . . 
Puslinch lake. 



2,000 
1,000 
2,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



500 



3,000 
5,000 



2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
500 
1,000 
2,000 
2,000 



390 
50 

75 



100 
2,000 
410 
100 
100 



160 
98 
19 



125 
275 



3,000 
500 

2,000 
500 

3,000 

3,000 



1,000 



1,000 
5,000 



111,625 
Black Bass 

From One to Six Years Old 
Algoma : 

Keichel lake 132 (Transfer) 

Marion lake 100 (Transfer) 



1932 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 



69 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS, 1931— Continued 



Frontenac: 

Kirkham's lake . 
Miller's lake. . . 



Haliburton: 

Cranberry lake 

Gull lake 

Horseshoe lake 

Kashamagamog lake . 

Kashalong lake 

Monmouth lake 

Long lake 

Loon lake 

Paudash lake 

Pollewog 

West lake. : 

Yankton lake 



Kenora : 

Eagle lake (C) 

Fox lake 

Malachi lake 

Thunder lake 

Waskesin lake 

Lanark: 

Christie lake 

Mississippi river 



Leeds: 

Charleston lake 

Delta lake 

Higley lake 

Kellenbeck lake 

Newboro lake 

Opinecon lake 

Long lake 

Otter lake 

Rideau lake 

Sand lake (South Crosby) 

Singleton lake 

Troy lake 

Upper Beverley lake (C) 



Kent: 

Lake St. Clair. 



Nipissing: 

Lake Nipissing. 

Peterboro : 

Belmont lake. . 
Chemong lake . 
Round lake. . . 
Stoney lake . . . 
Loon lake 



(C) 



(C) 



Rainy River: 

Clearwater lake 

Mercury lake 

Rainy lake (C) 

Straw Hat lake 

Simcoe: 

Little lake 



Thunder Bay: 

Bass lake 

Kashabowie lake . 



129 
126 



150 
300 
500 
250 
75 
100 
150 
150 
140 
100 
100 
100 



60 
60 
60 
62 
36 



120 
180 



60 
365 
148 
250 
551 
307 
145 
200 
208 
344 
120 
200 
108 



180 



175 



100 
100 
100 
2,029 
100 



22 
26 
51 
26 



15 



103 
90 



Thunder Bay — Continued. 

Lac des Mille Lacs 

Loon lake . . 

Two Island lake 



Victoria: 

Balsam lake. . 
Pigeon river. . 
Sturgeon lake. 



Golden Shiners 



Prince Edward: 

Lake on the Mountain . 



Maskinonc/e 



Durham: 

Lake Scugog . 



Northumberland : 
Trent river. . . . 



Peterborough : 
Stoney lake . 



Victoria: 

Balsam lake. . 
Cameron lake . 
Pigeon river. . 
Pigeon lake . . 
Sturgeon lake. 



Herring 



Frontenac: 
Silver lake. 



Hastings: 

Baptiste lake. 

Peterborough : 
Loon lake . . . . 



87 
109 
295 



100 
100 
100 



10,094 

1,000 

5,000 
10,000 
10,000 



10,000 

5,000 

10,000 

10,000 

5,000 



65,000 

50.000 

25,000 

100,000 



Prince Edward : 

Bay of Quinte (C) 17,470,000 

Great Lakes: 

Lake Huron 5,500,000 

" Erie 2,000,000 

" Ontario 11,250,000 



36,395,000 



Perch 

Middlesex: 

Lukin pond 400 (Transfer) 



Pickerel Eyed-Eggs 

Muskoka: 
Sparrow Lake 2,000,000 



70 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS, 1931— Continued 



Pickerel Fry 
Addington : 

Napanee River (C) 

Salmon River 

South Beaver Lake 

White Lake 

Algoma : 

Echo Lake (Kehoe) 

" " (Indian Reserve).. . 

Fawn Lake 

Gouiais River 

JacqueHne Lake 



Bruce: 

Burford lake . 



Carleton : 

Constance creek. 
Mississippi river. 

Durham: 
Rice lake 



Frontenac: 

Cross lake. 

Crow lake 

Elbow lake 

Big Gull lake 

Long Lake (Hinchinbrooke) 

" (Portland) 

Sharbot Lake 

White Lake 



Grey : 

Lake Monroe (McCullough'sj. 
Mountain lake 



Glengarry: 

Lake St. Francis. . 
St. Lawrence river. 

Haliburton : 

Gross lake. ...... 



(O 
(C) 



2,000,000 

100,000 

25,000 

25,000 



L500,000 

1,500,000 

250,000 

250,000 

250,000 



100,000 



100,000 
100,000 



500,000 



50,000 

50,000 
325,000 
300,000 
320,000 

25,000 
125,000 

50,000 



20,000 
100,000 



250,000 
1,500,000 



45,000 



Hastings: 

Latta Creek (Moira Lake) .... 25,000 

Moira River 50,000 

Salmon river 450,000 

Kenora : 

Big Vermillion 3,000,000 

Eagle Lake (Vermillion Bay)(C) 4,000,000 

Lac Seul (C) 5,000,000 

Lake of the Woods (C) 39,000,000 

Murchison Lake 250,000 

Nile & Trop Lakes (Tributaries 

to Wabigoon) 250,000 

Stanzikimi lake (C) 500,000 

Upper Manitou lake (C) 1,000,000 

Wabigoon lake (C) 2,000,000 



Lambton : 

Sydenham river. 

Lanark: 

Bennett's lake. . 
Christie's lake. . 
Kerr's lake 



(C) 250,000 



20,000 
50,000 
10,000 



Lanark — Continued 
Mississippi lake. . 
White lake 



Leeds: 
Sand lake . 



250,000 
100,000 



100,000 



Muskoka Lake: 

Muskoka lake 1,350,000 

Sparrow lake 1,000,000 

Three Mile lake 200,000 



Nipissing: 

Net Lake 

Nosbonsing lake. 
Talon lake 



Northumberland : 
Trent river 



Ontario: 

Lake St. John 



Parry Sound: 

Ahmic lake 

Caribou lake 

Cecebe lake 

Deer Lake 

Doe lake 

Isabelle lake 

Magnetawan lake. 

Osier lake 

Owl lake 

Pickerel lake 

Pickerel river 

McKeown's lake. . 

Ryan's lake 

Stewart's lake. . . . 



Peel : 
Credit river. 



Peterborough : 
Otonabee river. 



50,000 
300,000 
200,000 



500,000 



200,000 



250,000 
200,000 
250,000 
100,000 
100,000 
200,000 
750,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
50,000 



200,000 



200,000 



Prince Edward : 

Bay of Quinte (C) 3,080,000 

Rainy River: 

Rainy lake (C) 30,100,000 



Russell: 

Castor river. 



Simcoe: 

Lake Couchiching (C) 

Gloucester pool 

Nottawasaga Bay (C) 

Sturgeon Bay (Matchedash)(C) 
Severn river 



25,000 



500,000 
250,000 
250,000 
250,000 
750,000 



Sudbury: 

Maple lake 100,000 

Lake Penage 3,000,000 



Timiskaming: 
Barber's Bay. 
Long Lake . . . 
Larder Lake. . 



100,000 

50,000 

250,000 



1932 



ANNUAL REPORT. 1931 



71 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS, \9i].— Continued 



Timiskaming — Continued. 

Montreal River 250,000 

Mortimer lake No. 1 25,000 

Lake Temagami 250,000 

Lake Timiskaming (Q 500,000 

Lake Sesekinika 300,000 

Victoria : 

Big Mud Turtle lake 100,000 

Mud lake 200,000 

Trent canal 500,000 

Waterloo : 

Grand River creek 275,000 

Great Lakes: 

Lake Huron (C) 11,275,000 

Georgian Bay (C) 1,205,000 

136,450,000 



Brown Trout Fingerlings 

Carleton : 

Mississippi river 15,000 

Elgin : 

Otter lake 20,000 

Frontenac : 

Big Clear lake 1 10,000 

Clear Lake creek 10,000 

Grey : 

Saugeen river 15,000 

Haliburton : 

Eagle lake 10,000 

Horn lake 15,000 

Maple lake 15,000 

Kenora: 

Blue lake 66,000 

Clearwater lake (C) 66,000 

Granite lake 66,000 

Shoal lake (C) 20,000 

Summit lake 25,000 

Trout lake 86,000 

Leeds '. 

Charleston lake (C) 20,000 

Otter lake 20,000 

Muskoka: 

Muskoka lake 15,000 

Muskoka river 8,000 

Beaver creek 8,500 

Brandy creek 25,000 

East river 20,000 

Echo creek 5 ,000 

Hoc-Roc creek 15,000 

Little Koshe lake 10,000 

Rosseau river 8,000 

Shadow river 8,600 

Sharp's Creek 23,500 

Perth: 

Maitland river 10,000 



Peterborough : 
Eagle lake . . 
Oak lake . . . . 



Lake Trout Fry 



125,000 
40,000 



900,600 



Frontenac 

Brule lake 25,000 

Canontolake 10,000 

Crow lake 10,000 

Sharbot lake 70,000 

Haliburton : 

Boskung lake 15,000 

Clear lake 10,000 

Drag lake 30,000 

Gull lake 25,000 

Haliburton lake 15,000 

Hollow lake (Kunagama) 15,000 

Horseshoe lake 10,000 

Kashamagamog lake 15,000 

Maple lake 5,000 

Pine lake 10,000 

Twelve Mile lake 5,000 

Oxtongue lake 10,000 

Hastings: 

Baptists lake 10,000 

Bass lake 10,000 

Island lake 20,000 

Lake St. Peter 10,000 

Papineau lake 10,000 

Leeds i 

Charleston lake (C) 20,000 

Otter lake 10,000 

Rideaulake 145,000 

Muskoka: 

Doty'slake 5,000 

Fair>'Lake 10,000 

Lake of Bays 20,000 

Lake Vernon 10,000 

Mary lake 15,000 

Peninsula lake 10,000 

Rebecca lake 5,000 

Renfrew: 

Carson's lake 15,000 

Clear lake 15.000 

Rough lake 15,000 

York: 

Lake Simcoe (C) 60,000 

Great Lakes: 

Lake Huron (C) 200,000 

" Ontario (O 3,033,975 



3,928,975 



Lake Trout Fingerlings 

Algoma . 

Achigan lake (R. 11) 5,000 

" (Mame) 15.000 

Carpenter's lake 5,000 



72 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS, 1931— Continued 



Algoma — Continued. 

Chiblow lake 10,000 

Clear lake 20,000 

Basswood lake (Day) 10,000 

" " (Kirkwood).... 10,000 

Diamond lake 15,000 

Dubome lake 15,000 

Cummings lake 15,000 

Hilton lake. 15,000 

Jobammeghia lake 10,000 

Island lake (Aberdeen) 7,000 

" " (McMahon) 8,000 

" " (Aweres) 15,000 

Lauzon lake 15,000 

Lonely lake 20,000 

Loon (Desroche) 10,000 

Mud lake 15,000 

Ophirlake 5,000 

Patton Lake 20,000 

Sand lake (28 R.) 10,000 

Trout lake (24 R. 12) . .- . 10,000 

" " (Aweres).. 20,000 

Frontenac. ^ 

Buck lake 5,000 

Long lake (Barrie & Clarendon) 15,000 

Loughborough lake 5,000 

Upper Rock lake 10,000 

Franklin lake 500 

Haliburton: 

Bear lake 25,000 

Devil's lake 10,000 

Horn lake 15,000 

Horseshoe lake 18,000 

Lipsevlake 15,000 

Maple lake...-. 15,000 

Pine lake 10,000 

Stormy lake 10,000 

Wolf lake 10,000 

Kenora: 

Eagle lake (Vermilion) (C) 80,000 

Lake of the Woods (C) 703,100 

Little Vermilion 25,000 

Silver lake 25,000 

Stanzikimi lake (C) 10,000 

Wabigoon lake (C) 50.000 

Upper Manitou (C) 5,000 

Lanark: 

Silver lake 5,000 

Muskoka: 

Lake Joseph 10,000 

Lake of Bays 20,000 

Lake Rosseau 20,000 

Pine lake 10,000 

Skeleton lake 10,000 

Walker's lake 10,000 

Nipissing: 

Morton lake 15,000 

Net lake 5,000 

Talon lake 15,000 

Trout lake 20,000 

Upper French river 25,000 

White Bear lake 10,000 



Parry Sound: 

Clear lake 5,000 

Deer lake 10,000 

Eagle lake (Machar) 25,000 

Horn lake 5,000 

Maple lake 5,000 

McQuaby lake 5,000 

Sand lake 5,000 

Six Mile lake (Gull) 5,000 

Sugar lake and creek 10,000 

Three Mile lake 10,000 

Otter lake 10,000 

Rainy River: 

Mercur>' lake 5,000 

Steep Rock lake 10,000 

Straw Hat lake 5,000 

Renfrew: 

Barry's bay 10,000 

Clear lake 10,006 

Long lake 5,000 

Round lake 5,000 

Trout lake (Jones) 10,000 

Timiskaming: 

Fair>'lake 5,000 

Lake Timiskaming 15,000 

Lake Temagami bO,000 

Larder lake 5,000 

Perrvlake 5,000 

Rib lake 5,000 

Twin lake 5,000 

Watabeag lake 15,000 

Field Service (Experimental) .... 3,000 

Great Lakes: 

Georgian bav (C) 3,393,000 

Lake Huron'. (C) 7,993,000 

North channel (C) - 70,000 

Lake Ontario (C) 499,400 

Lake Superior (C) 4,414,925 



18,179,925 



R.\iNBOw Trout Fingerlings 

Bruce: 

Gillies lake . 7,500 

Frontenac: 

Franklin lake (Sale) 500 

Silver lake 2,000 

Haliburton : 

Bums lake 7,500 

Sudbury: 

Fairbank creek 7,500 

French river 7,500 

Rapid river 7,500 

Sandcherr>' creek 7,500 

Windy creek 7,500 

York- 

LakeSimcoe 128,000 



1932 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1931 



73 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCL\L 
WATERS, \92,\— Continued 



(Eleven Months) 
York: 

Brough's Creek 

Lake Simcoe 



3,000 
7,925 



193,925 

Speckled Trout Eggs 

Thunder Bav: 

Alexander lake 5 ,000 

Anderson lake 5,000 

Cleggslake 5,000 

Rhapsey lake 5 ,000 

Two Island lake 5,000 

Long lake 5,000 

Lower Twin lake 5,000 

Upper Twin lake 5 ,000 

Wideman lake 5 ,000 



Speckled Trout Fry 

Haliburton : 
Torch lake creek 

Hastings: 

Baragar lake 

Green's creek 

Little Papineau creek 

Ren frew : 
Bums lake 



50,000 



10,000 



10,000 

10,000 
10,000 



10,000 



50,000 

Speckled Trout Fingerlings 

Algoma : 

Boundry lake 5,000 

Agawa river 5 ,000 

Achigan creek 5,500 

" lake (Gaudette) 5,000 

« " (Brooke) 5,000 

Beaver creek. . . 10,000 

" lake 5,000 

Big Carp creek 10,000 

Bervllake 10,000 

Boyle's creek 15,000 

Burrough's lake 15,000 

Carp river 15,000 

Cannon creek 5,000 

Centre lake 5 ,000 

Chippewa river (Tilley) 15,000 

" " (R. 11) 10,000 

Clear lake 15,000 

Dam creek 5,000 

Dunn's creek 5,000 

Deer lake 10,000 

Goulais river 10,000 

Hayden lake 20,000 

Hart lake 15,000 

Harmony river 10,000 

Gull lake. . 10,000 

Hendrickson's creek 5,000 

Horse lake 15,000 

Hubert lake 10,000 

Iron river 15,000 

Island lake (No. 17) 10,000 



Algoma — Continued. 

Jimmy lake 5,000 

Jones lake 15 ,000 

Johnson creek 7,000 

Kent creek 5 ,000 

Loon lake (188 I.F.) 15,000 

" " (24 R. 13) 10,000 

" " (Desrochers) 5,000 

Lower Island lake 20,000 

Moose lake 10,000 

Mongoose lake 10,000 

Michipicoten river 10,000 

Mud creek (Van Koughnet) . . . 5,000 

Mountain lake 5 ,000 

Matchewana river 10,000 

McQueen's creek 5,000 

Mc\'eigh's creek 10,000 

Newt lake 5 ,000 

Otter lake 5,000 

Peak Lake creek 5,000 

Silver creek . 5,000 

Root river (Aweres) 5,000 

" " (Tarentorus) 5,000 

Spring creek 5 ,000 

Stokely creek 5 ,000 

Snoeshoe creek 15,000 

Rocky Island lake 5 ,000 

St. Marys River rapids 5,000 

Trout lake and inlet 5,000 

Twin lake 15,000 

Tawabinasay lake 5,000 

Upper Pine lake 9,500 

" Island lake 10,000 

Walker's creek 5,000 

Wannamaker's creek 5,000 

Whitman creek 10,000 

Whitefish lake 10,000 

Walker lake 15,000 

Warts lake 10,000 

Victoria creek 5,000 

Sand lake (26 R.) 10,000 

Spruce lake 10,000 

Bridgland river 20,000 

Brant: 

Brantford Golf and Country 

Club 2,000 

DufFerin : 

Buchanan's stream 2,000 

Carleton creek 1,000 

Cundy stream 5,000 

Hunter's creek 1,000 

Pine river and tributaries 2,000 

Piatt's c