(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the Game and Fisheries Department of Ontario, 1935-46"

lC?L\^ 



v/ 




jU^' A '/f 




ftts^vvikV V^e.po<=^ 



Twenty-Ninth Annual Report 



OF THE 



-)^Game and Fisheries 
Department 

1935-1936 

WITH WHICH IS INCLUDED THE REPORT FOR THE 
FIVE MONTHS' PERIOD ENDING MARCH 31st, 1935. 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 9, 1937 




ONTARIO 



TORONTO 

Printed and Published by T. E. Bowman, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 3 7 



^^.-. f .- :• r -' 



» * 



TO THE HONOURABLE HERBERT ALEXANDER BRUCE, 

a Colonel in the Royal Army Medical Corps, P\R.C.S. (Eng. ) 
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

MAY IT PLEASE YOUR HONOUR: 

I have the honour to submit herewith for the information of Your Honour and 
the Legislative Assembly, the Twenty-Ninth Annual Report of the Game and 
Fisheries Department of this Province, for the year ended March 31st, 1936. 

I have the honour to be, 

Your Honour's most obedient servant, 

H. C. NIXON, 

Minister in Charge, 
Department of Game and Fisheries 

Toronto, 1937. 



s 



■^ 



(U) 



TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Game and Fisheries Department of 

Ontario 

("With which is included the Report covering the 
five months' period ended March 31st, 1935.) 



TO: THE HONOURABLE H. C. NIXON, 
Minister in charge. 
Department of Game and Fisheries. 

SIR: — I have the honour to submit to you this, the Twenty-Ninth Annual 
Report of the Department of Game and Fisheries, outlining the various departmental 
activities for the year ended March 31st, 1936. 

Comparative tables in this report will generally omit reference to those in- 
cluded in the previous report and which covered the transition five month period 
existing by reason of the change in the provincial fiscal year, which as noted above 
is included herein. 

FINANCIAL 

The subjoined table shows the total revenue of the Department during the 
year reported upon, and details the various sources of revenue with the amount 
derived therefrom in each instance. 

REVENUE FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1936. 
GAME— 

Royalty $110,884.40 

Licenses — 

Trapping $28,315.15 

Non-resident Hunting 53,080.'00 

Deer 56,544.05 

Moose 2,728.00 

Gun 69,635.93 

Dog 3,239.35 

Fur Dealers 27,186.00 

Fur Farmers 6,940.00 

Tanners 170.00 

Cold Storage 109.00 

Hotel & Restaurant 20.00 

247,967.48 

$358,851.88 

FISHERIES— 

Royalty $ 7,600.50 

Licenses — 

Fishing $ 89,381.10 

Angling 20'0,641.65 

290,022.75 

Sales — spawn taking 241.50 

297,864.75 

GENERAL — 

Guides' Licenses 5,630.0*0 

Fines 9,018.40 

Sales — Confiscated articles etc 7,162.45 

Rent 3,096.50 

Commission 1,952.40 

Miscellaneous 362.34 

27,222.09 

$683,938.72 
(1) 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



The total amount of this revenue exceeds by $139,200.25 the amount collected 
during the period of the last fiscal year reported upon, i.e., ending October 31st, 
1934, and represents an increase of more than twenty-five per cent. By far the 
greater proportion of this additional revenue resulted from the increased issue of 
non-resident licenses, an increase amounting to practically $100,000.00, — more than 
$72,000.00 from the sale of additional non-resident angling licenses, and more 
than $27,0'00.00, from the sale of additional non-resident hunting licenses. Resi- 
dent hunting licenses, which this year for the first time included licenses to use 
dogs to hunt deer, netted an additional $22,500.00, while revenue from fines and 
sales of confiscated articles, resulting from the operations of the enforcement ser- 
vice, also increased by more than $7,800.00. 

The total expenditures of the Department for this financial year, including both 
ordinary and capital, amounted to $451,041.91, and it will be noted that our opera- 
tions showed a surplus of revenue over expenditures totalling $232,896.81. Com- 
pared with the previous twelve-month period reported upon, expenditures show a 
decrease of somewhat in excess of $105,000.00, and while the figures quoted are an 
evidence of the considerably improved financial position of the Department, such a 
desirable condition has been attained not through any curtailment of necessary ser- 
vices or interference with departmental activities, but rather because of close and 
careful scrutiny and the resulting elimination of any unnecessary items of 
expenditure. 

STATISTICS 

Various tables of statistics are included as appendices to this report. They 
contain in detail considerable information with reference to the output of the fish 
hatcheries and rearing stations maintained and operated by the Department under 
the Fish Culture Branch, as well as information as to the distribution of the product 
of these hatcheries and rearing stations and the waters re-stocked therewith. 
Tables are also provided giving information with reference to the commercial fish- 
eries of the Province, while interspersed throughout the actual report are statis- 
tical facts which refer to other branches of departmental activity, assembled, com- 
piled and included herein for information, and all of which may be considered to 
be of value and interest. 

GAME 

The following table gives details as to the numbers of the various hunting 
licenses, both resident and non-resident, issued during the year, as compared with 
similar information for the two preceding years, and which figures it will be ob- 
served indicate increases in practically all instances, and substantiate the comments 
made earlier in this report concerning the improvement in our revenue collections: — 



1933 



1934 



1935-36 



Resident Moose 

Resident Deer 

Resident Camp (Deer) . . 

Resident Farmers' (Deer) 

Resident Gun 

Non-resident small game 

Non-resident deer 

Non-resident "General" . . 



673 
12,756 

165 

5,113 

97,561 

318 
634 



512 

12,89*0 

175 

4,902 

76,210 

489 

475 
457 



496 

14,779 

258 

5,221 

85,884 

686 
652 
680 



We shall now endeavour to summarize conditions as they apply to our game 
life, animal and bird, — as compiled from reports submitted by the oflBcers of the 
departmental field service stationed in various sections of the Province: — 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1935-36 



DKER: — In the eastern portion of northern Ontario these animals are not too 
plentiful, and little, if any, improvement was in evidence. In the western portion 
of the northern division, including Rainy River and Kenora Districts and the west- 
erly half of the District of Thunder Bay conditions are splendid and the animals 
quite numerous. So far as the easterly portion of Thunder Bay is concerned, while 
conditions are not as favorable as in the westerly portion, reports indicated that 
their numbers are increasing. In southern Ontario or south of the French and 
Mattawa Rivers and Lake Nipissing, they appear to be increasing in the counties 
in the western and eastern sections where the protection of an entire closed season 
has been effective in recent years, particularly in those areas in which favourable 
habitat is available. They do not exist in the most southerly counties of the central 
portion of southern Ontario, in which there has not been the same protection, and 
which areas are of course quite closely settled. In those sections of southern Ontario 
in which these animals are subject to the most intensive hunting during the open 
season, reports indicate that speaking generally, existing conditions are favourable 
and somewhat improved. 

MOOSE: — Are found in fair numbers in various parts of the north and appar- 
ently increasing in the eastern portion, though in southern Ontario they are very 
scarce and may be found only in scattered and remote sections. 

OARIBOU: — These animals are extremely scarce. The herds are few and 
scattered and reported only in the eastern and western districts of the far northern 
part of the Province. 

ELK (Wapiti) : — As stated in previous reports this species has been introduced 
here by the importation of these animals from western Canada, with the co-opera- 
tion of the Federal Authorities. Herds were previously liberated in the Nipigon- 
Onaman, Chapleau, Goulais River-Ranger Lake, Burwash and Pembroke Game Pre- 
serves, while transfer was undertaken of some of the animals at Pembroke to 
Algonquin Park and the Bruce Peninsula. While the animals may possibly be 
increasing in number nothing of a reliable nature may as yet be stated as to the 
success or otherwise of this experiment. 

RUFFED GROUSE (Partridge): — These birds according to all reports were 
considerably less than normal in number in practically every section of the Prov- 
ince, particularly the north. 

SHARP-TAILED GROUSE (Prairie Chicken): — Found only in extreme north- 
western and northeastern portions, and there only in reduced numbers. 

PTARMIGAN: — Conditions as they apply to this species are very similar to 
those reported for Sharp-tailed Grouse. 

QUAIL: — Generally speaking, these birds may be found only in the extreme 
southwestern region, principally Essex, Kent and adjacent Counties, and reports in- 
dicate some improvement in this area. They are also noted as existing in some 
isolated spots in a few eastern Counties. The Department liberated live birds of 
this species, numbering 200 in all, principally in the Counties of Essex, Kent and 
Middlesex, in which the special open season prevailed. 

DUCKS: — About the same as a general rule, with varying conditions in evid- 
ence in different sections, i.e. improvement and diminished numbers in intermingled 
areas. 

GEESE: — Good along the James Bay shore, particularly in the vicinity of 
Moosonee. Conditions about the same along the routes of migration which follow 
through the north, and thence along the Counties bordering Georgian Bay, Essex 
and Kent, or through eastern Ontario. 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 



PLOVER and SNIPE: — Neither of these two species is in any way plentiful. 
Conditions remained about the same in a general way, with slight improvement 
reported from widely separated areas. Present protective regulations quite 
necessary. 

PHEASANTS (ring-necked): — Through departmental efforts these birds are 
now well established in the southwesterly Counties, and in the Counties bordering 
the western part of Lake Ontario. To the east of this they are showing some im- 
provement and increase in number. Details of distribution show that during the 
year live birds numbering 1,122 were released, for the most part within the Counties 
in which the limited open season provided, particulars of which are given further 
on in this report, had prevailed, while 112 birds were taken and transferred 
from Point Pelee to other sections of Essex County. In addition 17,430 pheasant 
eggs were distributed to various applicants therefor, which included many settings 
to Game Protective Associations, to be hatched, and the chicks reared and liberated 
at the proper time for re-stocking. And again the Department is deeply grateful to 
those providing such co-operation in the matter of propagating and establishing 
this fine species of game bird. It is quite probable that this bird is now established 
in every section in which hope for its continued existence may be held. 

HUNGARIAN PARTRIDGE: — The work of establishing this bird has been 
somewhat limited, and as a result they may be found only in a few scattered sections, 
where environment is suitable. They are not suflBciently established yet to justify 
the expectation of noticeable improvement. 

WOODCOCK: — While conditions are fairly good in some sections, reports in- 
dicate they are not generally prevalent but are found in suflQcient numbers for 
hunting purposes only in a few scattered districts. 

RABBITS: — All species, including the cotton-tail, the snow-shoe and the 
European Hare or Jack Rabbit, are plentiful and provided good shooting during the 
late fall and early winter in practically all sections of southern Ontario, south of 
Muskoka, Victoria and Peterborough and east of Hastings. North and east of this, 
these animals showed quite a decrease in number and are somewhat scarce. In 
northern Ontario the jack rabbit does not exist, but the other species were scarce 
west of Algoma, but reported to be plentiful in the eastern section. 

At this point reference is made to the special open seasons provided by regula- 
tion during the year, details of which follow: — 

For deer in the Counties of Grey and Bruce November 18 to 23, and in that 
part of Carleton County west of the Rideau River, November 5 to 20. 

For Moose in the County of Renfrew, November 5 to 20. 

For partridge in southern Ontario, October 24, 25 and 26. 

For pheasants on Pelee Island, October 23 and 24; and in the Counties of 
Haldimand, Lincoln, Welland, Durham, Northumberland, Leeds and Prince Edward- 
Lennox, November 1 and 2. 

For pheasants and quail in the County of Middlesex, November 1 and 2. 

For pheasants, quail and Hungarian partridge in the Counties of Essex and 
Kent, November 1 and 2. 

Before closing this section of the report mention might reasonably be made 
of the Regulation which prohibits the feeding of migratory water-fowl for shooting 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1935-36 



purposes, and which was effective for the first time during the open season which 
prevailed this year. 

FURS 

Conditions as they affect fur-bearing animals throughout the Province, and 
as they have been reported to the Department, may be summarized as follows ; — 

BEAK: — Conditions remained about the same. These animals would appear 
to be fairly plentiful in northern Ontario, and the more northerly parts of southern 
Ontario. 



BEAVER: — Showing some improvement in northerly portion of southern Ont- 
ario and in westerly part of northern Ontario, while to the east they are still scarc«. 
The protection of an entire closed season which has been in effect in a large portion 
of the Province for the past few years was extended to include all of Ontario, so 
that the trapping of these animals is now prohibited throughout the Provinde the 
year round. 

FISHER: — These animals are apparently extremely scarce, though there are 
indications of some improvement in the northerly part of the Province. 

FOX: — This species is very plentiful and greatly increased in numbers, par- 
ticularly in the north. In the southern portion of Ontario they are quite plentiful 
in the sections to the north and east, though somewhat scarce in the Counties to 
the west and south. 

LYNX: — So far as the northern sections are concerned, while scarce, there is 
reported to be some slight improvement, particularly towards the east. In the 
southern section they are extremely scarce, being unknown in many areas. 

MARTEN: — While the figures in the subjoined table show a little increase over 
the figures of the previous comparative period, indications are that this species is 
becoming scarcer throughout the entire Province. 

MINK: — Indications and reports are to the effect that the numbers of these 
animals are diminishing, and more particularly would this appear to be the case 
in southern Ontario. 

MUSKRAT: — Conditions which govern the welfare of this species have not been 
at all favourable during the past few years, with the result that these animals are 
adversely affected. A considerable decline in the catch is indicated by the figures 
included in the succeeding table, and reports generally indicate a noticeable decrease 
in all sections, except possibly the eastern section of northern Ontario. 

OTTER: — General conditions are about the same so far as Otter are concerned, 
with possibly some improvement in the northeastern part of tke Province. 

RACCOON: — This species is practically unknown in northern Ontario. In 
southern Ontario conditions which apply are not much changed, even though the 
total catch as reported shows some decline. 

SKUNK: — These objectionable little nuisances continue to be very plentiful in 
practically all sections, and the reduction in the numbers taken may be attributed 
to the lack of demand for the pelts and the low prices prevailing therefor, which 
apparently are not suflBcient recompense for the trouble and inconvenience trapping 
of the same entails. 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



WEASEL: — Continue to be rather plentiful, though their numbers are possibly 
somewhat reduced. The figures evidence a considerable decrease in the numberg 
trapped, but as in the case of skunk prevailing prices for the pelts do not encourage 
operations for the trapping of this species. 

SQUIRREIiS (black and grey): — These animals are reported to be on the in- 
crease in southern Ontario, especially in the western and eastern Counties. Their 
numbers were sufficient to warrant a two-day open hunting season south of the 
French and Mattawa Rivers and Lake Nipissing, i.e. on October 24th, and 25th. 

Operations by licensed trappers are carried on very intensively throughout 
Ontario during the periods of the various open seasons, and In a general sense the 
fur-bearing animals native to the Province are as a result encountering more than 
a little difficulty maintaining the several species at levels existing in recent years. 
Restrictive regulations imposed for their protection, particularly in the way of 
closed periods, undoubtedly require continuation, and the active co-operation of all 
concerned in observing and complying therewith is urgently needed. 

The following comparative table shows the numbers of pelts of the different 
species of fur-bearers exported from the Province and dressed within the Province 
during the years 1933, 1934 and 1936, and upon which royalty was paid as required 
by the Game and Fisheries Act. 





1932-33 


1933-34 


1935-36 




556 

10,799 

1,203 

1,495 

9,198 

132 

82 

111 

1,400 

1,376 

52,795 

637,348 

3,264 

12,109 

67,797 

92,036 

3 


341 

10,336 

1,297 

2,224 

13,534 

280 

89 

85 

2,138 

1,096 

63.615 

521,751 

3,330 

18,673 

73,721 

68,164 

5 


411 




6,785 


F^ishpr 


2,137 


F'ov frro<!a^ 


5,424 


Fox (red) 


37,044 


Fox (silver or black) 


5*00 


Fox r white) 


883 


Fox (not specified) 


495 


Lynx 


2,642 


Marten 


1,282 


Mink 


47,057 


Muskrat 


398,043 


Otter 


3,701 


Raccoon 


13,259 


Skunk 


50,747 


Weasel 


42,643 


Wolverine 


4 








891,7'04 


780,679 


613,057 



Based on the average prices as computed by the Department from information 
secured from reliable sources, the value to the trapper of the fur catch of the 
1935-36 season is estimated at $1,906,121.'04, appreciated values accounting for 
the increase over the previous comparative period. These figures do not take into 
consideration silver, black and blue foxes and mink the product of our licensed fur 
farms, the pelts of which animals are exempt from the royalty provisions of the 
Game and Fisheries Act. During the year reported upon a total of 21,318 silver 
and black fox pelts were either exported from the Province or tanned, as well as 
15 blue fox pelts and 9,641 mink pelts. The estimated total value of all these pelts 
was $827,451.11, which, of course, accrued to fur farmers licensed under the reg- 
ulations which govern such operations. 



FUR FARMING 

At this time a short resume of this branch of industry in Ontario during the 
past few years, as well as its present status should be of interest. 



ANNUAL, REPORT, 1935-36 



Following the economic conditions which developed in 1930, values declined 
severely, forcing a revaluation and a corresponding reduction of breeding stocks on 
fur farms. 29,331 animals were pelted in 1931, as compared with 13,140 in 1930; 
8,149 in 1929; and 5,427 in 1928. The increase over the normal production further 
adversely influenced prices in the fur market and caused some severe financial losses 
to individuals. There were, however, some factors which compensated the industry 
as a whole. In the process of reduction, the quality of breeding stocks was im- 
proved, creating a new standard of excellence. The lower values of breeding stocks 
attracted additional capital and new farms were established. While the reduction 
of breeding stock continued, the number of farms actually increased until a peak 
was reached in 1931, when 1,609 farms were licensed. A slight annual decline 
subsequently developed until 1934, when only 1,217 farms were licensed. The in- 
dustry is again showing progress both in the number of farms and the breeding 
stock kept. There were 1,239 farms licensed this year and breeding stocks in- 
creased by eighteen per cent. The propagation of mink is now commanding con- 
siderable attention, live stock having increased almost fifty per cent, whereas the 
silver fox, the other principal species, increased only twelve per cent. 

SUMMARY OF BREEDING STOCK ON LICENSED FUR FARMS 
AS AT JANUARY 1ST 



1934 



1935 



1936 



Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (cross) 

Fox (red) 

Fox (silver or black) 

Fox (blue) 

Lynx 

Mink , 

Muskrat 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Bear 

Marten 



60 


78 


70 


18 


19 


16 


443 


434 


367 


360 


286 


228 


16,826 


19,314 


21,645 


10 


10 


5 


2 


2 


2 


6,190 


8,605 


12,332 


499 


447 


375 


989 


799 


524 


2 


•0 


3 


14 


11 


21 


22 


9 


4 



The work at the Experimental Fur Farm continued, and the following is a short 
summary thereof: — 

EXPERIMENTAL FUR FARM 

Further investigations were carried out regarding the feeding of raw cereals 
to pup foxes after weaning at around eight to nine weeks of age. It was found that 
in an uncooked stage raw cereals were not only very improperly digested but that 
they were actually detrimental to the health of the pups. Scouring, bloating and 
intestinal disorders could be traced directly to this soujce. Once the raw cereal- 
fed pups were placed on a diet containing thoroughly cooked cereals these objec- 
tionable symptoms entirely disappeared. 



Due to the number of enquries from mink ranchers regarding the substitution 
of fresh meat and fish with dehydrated products, like meat meals and fish meals, 
feeding experiments were carried out to attempt to ascertain how far this might cor- 
rectly be done. A summary of these experiments shows that fresh products cannot 
be entirely replaced by dried ones. Where animals were fed fish meals there was 
a steady decline in the haemoglobin of the blood resulting in mutritional anaemia. 
If liver meal was added to the fish meal diet the anaemia was arrested and finally 
disappeared. This was also the case with meat meals unless one third of the ration 
consisted of liver meal. 



8 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AJ^D FISHERIES No. 9 

Apart from the nutritional condition of the animals there was a distinct tend- 
ency for the fur to be dry and scanty. It appears that quantities of fresh food must 
be fed to fur-bearing animals if the best results are to be obtained. Particularly 
does this apply to breeding stock, for if females are fed mainly on dried products 
they may breed and give birth to pups but they will invariably dry up during the 
lactation period and many pups will die at the fourth week as a result. 

During the summer, regional meetings were held at Guelph, Owen Sound, ,Am- 
prior, Ridgetown and St. Mary's which were well attended and many and varied 
discussions arose during these meetings. In October a Field day was held , at the 
Experimental Fur Farm at which time the foxes and mink were judged for. quality 
and value by competent authorities on the subject. This meeting was highly suc- 
cessful and breeders attended from all parts of the Province. 

CROWN GAME PRESERVES 

The idea of Crown Game Preserves had its origin in the desire to prptect and 
perpetuate the natural' wild life resources of the country. The Department lias not 
been slow in recognizing the value of protected areas for the natural propagation of 
game, and has continued to give increased attention to this phase of its conservation 
programme. In Northern Ontario, where the population is still sparse, and big game 
as a consequence more abundant, advantage has been taken of the fact that much 
Crown Land was available and large areas were in previous years established as 
Game Preserves. The ten largest of these, viz; — The Abitibi, Burwash, Chapleau, 
Goulais River-Ranger Lake, Lake of the Woods, Mississauga-White River, Nipigon- 
Onaman, Nipissing, Pipestone Lake and Superior, represent a total area of approx- 
imately 8,593 square miles. At the present time there are some 84 Crown Game Pre- 
serves in the Province, representing a protected area of close to six million acres. 

During the period under review the Department has extended its game preserve 
policy to include a larger portion of southern Ontario. It is intended with the co- 
operation of private land owners to set aside as Game Preserves a number of small 
areas, each of about one thousand acres or so, located at strategic points in each 
County. While all species of game will be protected in these areas, they will be 
primarily useful as refuges for game birds, (migratory and non-migratory). The 
underlying idea in connection with these small Preserves is the same as in the case 
of the larger areas where big game is being successfully propagated. Given pro- 
tection for a period of years game birds and animals, provided there is a foundation 
stock in the area, will increase in numbers and the overflow will serve to populate 
the surrounding districts. Fourteen of these Preserves have already been established 
in various Counties, (see tabulation). All of these areas are well suited for the 
purpose and most of them are already supplied with upland game birds. It is the 
intention of the Department however, to place the larger portion of its available 
adult birds on these Preserves for re-stocking purposes. 

It is generally acknowledged that where the wild life is allowed to propagate 
with a minimum of human interference and in surroundings which provide natural 
food and cover, there will in time be a return to the normal conditions set up by 
nature. This means not olily increased game in the protected areas but a general 
Improvement in conditions throughout the Province. 

So far as the general public is concerned these Preserves serve a dual purpose. 
From the standpoint of the sportsman they provide more game of all kinds and 
therefore better hunting. For those whose chief pleasure in the wild life is aesthetic. 
Crown Game Preserves will increase their pleasures by providing havens for the 
different species where they may be found in their natural state. In addition they 
will ensure that future generations will not be deprived of either the recreational or 
the aesthetic advantages which we now enjoy. 

The following tabulation shows the Preserves added during the year in addi- 
tion to several which have been either renewed or amended. 



ANNUAL REPORT,. 1935^36 



Name 



County 



Extent in 
Acres 



x.i North Ea&thope ., ^ .•»•••••• • •':• • » 

;x: Wilder Lake . 

:x: Woodlands 

X Decew Falls (formerly Power Glen) 

Camden 

Dresden 

Colchester South . 

Tilbury West 

Cultus 

Enniskillen , . 

Erin . 

Horner . 

Komoka 

Strathroy 

Newbury ^ 

Malahide ....... . . ; . . . . .■ , . . 

Murray 

Stamford 



Perth ; 

G^rey „ ^ . , . 

Haltbn * ' 

Lincoln 

Kent 

Kent 

Essex 

Essex 

Norfolk 

Lambton . 

Wellingtoii 

Oxford 

Middlesex 

Middlesex 

Middlesex 

Elgin 

Northumberland 

Welland 



8,300 
4,480 

460 
2,-000 

300 
1,200 

800 
1,200 

600 
1,100 

800 
2,4t)0 

500 
1,009 
1.60'0 
1,000 

680. 
1.100 



..}. 1 



;x: — Renewed 
X — Amended 



WOLF BOUNTIES 



During the year under review, 1935-36, 2,0*04 claims for bounty, involving the 
pelts of 2,905 wolves, were dealt with. Rather more than fifty per cent of these 
wolves were killed in the four western districts of northern Ontario, of which about 
sixty-five per cent were brush wolves. A slightly higher ratio of timber wolves was 
taken in Algoma, Sudbury and Nipissing Districts, while only twelve per cent of 
these animals which were taken in the District of Cochrane were brush wolves. The 
following table details the sources of origin of the pelts submitted for bounty: — 



SUMMARY OF PELTS 



District or County 



Algoma 

Bruce 

Cochrane 

Frontenac 

Haldimand 

Haliburton 

Hastings 

Kenora 

Lanark 

Lennox & Addington 

Manitoulin 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Norfolk 

Ontario 

Parry Sound 

Patricia 

Peterborough 

Rainy River 

Renfrew 

Simcoe 

Sudbury 

Thunder Bay 

Temiskaming 

Victoria 

York 



Total 



No. of Adult Wolves 



Timber Brush 



124 
12 

37 

7 

1 

18 

8 

225 

5 

11 

27 

9 

79 



1 

89 

88 

3 

125 

27 

12 

108 

138 

4 

1 



1,159 



157 
9 
5 
1 
3 

1 

447 
1 


130 

5 

42 

4 

3 

16 

136 
1 

231 
1 
6 

168 

336 
7 
1 
2 

1,713 



Number 
of Pups 



7 





6 
1 


4 

5 
1 
•0 
1 
2 

1 



5 




33 



Total 



288 

21 

42 

8 

4 

18 

15 

673 

6 

11 

161 

14 

126 

5 

4 

106 

226 

4 

357 

28 

18 

276 

479 

11 

2 

2 

2,905 



It) 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SeveDteen claims were not granted including 20 pelts of dogs and other animals 
which were not eligible for bounty. 

Following is a comparative table of wolf bounty statistics covering the three 
last complete financial years: — 



Period 


Timber 


Brush 


Pups 


Total 


Bounty & 
Expenses 


For year ending October 31, 1933. . . 
For year ending October 31, 1934. . . 
For year ending March 31, 1936 


1,112 

990 

1,159 


1,229 

812 

1,713 


43 
57 
33 


2,384 
1,859 
2,905 


$53,433.88 
27,t)80.65 
42,399.89 



Of the 1935-36 amount shown above, viz: — $42,399.89, $41,995.00 was the 
amount paid for bounty. Details of bounty paid are as follows: 



Brush Wolves 


(Counties) 
(Districts) 

(Counties) 
(Districts) 

(Counties) 
(Districts) 


3*0 
1,666 


@ $ 6.00 
@ $15.00 

@ $ 6.00 
@ $15.00 

@ $ 2.00 
@ $ 5.00 

pelts 


$ 180.00 
$24,990.00 




Total Brush 
Timber Wolves 


1,696 

73 
1,D84 


$ 438.00 
$16,260.00 


$25,170.00 


Total Timber 
Pups 


1,157 

1 
25 

26 

2.879 


$ 2.0t) 
$ 125.00 


$16,698.00 


Total 




$ 127.00 


Total 


$41.995.'00 



In respect to wolves killed in provisional judicial districts, bounty was paid by 
the Provincial Treasury, but for wolves killed in Counties it was paid by the County 
Treasury, of which forty per cent was rebated by the Province. 

ENFORCEMENT SERVICE 

Perhaps one of the most important services provided by the Department is 
the work of maintaining adequate respect for and proper observance of provisions 
of the Game and Fisheries Act and the regulations provided thereunder, as well as 
the various regulations applicable to Ontario adopted under the Fisheries Act, 
(Federal) and the Migratory Birds Convention Act. Generally speaking, this branch 
of activity is assigned to the members of the Field Service Staff, whose regular num- 
bers were augmented by the appointment of additional Seasonal Overseers for special 
duty during the hunting seasons, and also during the critical fish spawning periods. 
This work is also included among the duties performed by members of the Prov- 
incial Police Force, a policy which was inaugurated during the latter part of 1934, 
and which assistance has been of considerable value. A word of appreciation may be 
expressed for the co-operation in this work which is provided by the many Deputy 
Game and Fishery Wardens, whose interest in the preservation of our game and 
fish resources is sufficient to encourage them to volunteer their services without 
remuneration, and who under such appointments are authorized to act in the cap- 
acity of enforcement officers for purposes of the Game and Fisheries Act. During 
the calendar year 1935 Deputy Game and Fishery Warden appointments totalled 836, 
and one hesitates to estimate the value of the service and co-operation the Department 
received from these honorary oflQcers, and the least that may be said is that it would 
be difficult to replace or duplicate the services which they rendered. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1935-36 11 



Notwithstanding the fact that these enforcement services are provided, there 
are still those who, in the case of the Game and Fisheries Act as in the case of other 
regulatory legislation, will either knowingly or otherwise infringe and who there- 
fore are confronted with inconvenience and difficulty if contacted by the enforce- 
ment service when the violations occur. 

During 1935-36 there were 1,216 cases in which offences were committed and 
in which the offenders were relieved by various officers of their equipment and the 
unlawful game or fish which might have been in their possession on these occasions. 
An examination of the reports of these seizures of equipment and goods shows that 
in 987 cases action was provided by Game and Fisheries Overseers; in 144 cases 
by Deputy Game and Fishery Wardens; in 36 cases by members of the Ontario 
Provincial Police Force and in 46 cases by co-operative action. Overseers, Deputy 
Game Wardens and Provincial Police working in conjunction with each other; while 
in three cases the action was taken by Municipal Police. 

A condensed summary of the articles thus seized is submitted herewith: — 

Description No. 

Fire-arms and ammunition 440 

Fishing equipment 308 

Fish 197 

Game 154 

Pelts 121 

Trapping equipment 118 

Angling equipment 62 

Water craft 38 

Lights (artificial) 37 

Live animals 16 

Motor vehicles 9 

Miscellaneous 412 

Duplicate entries on one seizure, such as fire-arms and game; Angling equip- 
ment and fish; trapping equipment and pelts; and other combinations of a similar na- 
ture account for the apparent discrepancy in the total of the above table, viz. — 1,542 
as compared with the 1,216 actual seizure reports. 

Departmental records contain evidence of the fact that during the year under 
review there were some 967 cases in which offenders against our legislation and 
regulations were prosecuted in the courts, and in which convictions were registered 
against such offenders. As in the case of the actual seizures these court cases were 
somewhat varied as to origin, as follows: — In 806 cases Game and Fisheries 
Overseers were responsible for the prosecution; Provincial Police in 51 cases; Deputy 
Game and Fishery Wardens in 42 cases, and in 66 cases the prosecutions were by 
Overseers, Deputy Game Wardens and Provincial Police acting in conjunction with 
«ach other; while in 2 cases Municipal Police undertook the action. 

REPORT OF THE FISH CULTURE BRANCH 

Ontario's commercial fishing industry is an important factor in our industrial 
life. In point of annual marketed value of production Ontario stands first among 
the provinces. In the four year period 1926-1929, before the world-wide disruption 
of economic conditions was felt, the average marketed value of Ontario's fish was 
13,693,000. In the four year period, 1930-33, the average marketed value of the 
catch was slightly in excess of $2,500,000 and in 1934 the marketed value was 
$2,316,965., and in 1935, $2,633,512.90. These figures are cited to emphasize the 
value of our commercial fishing industry, the hopeful signs of recent increasing 
values and the importance of maintaining this industry on a proper basis. 



i2 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 



' Qii' the other hand, Ontario's game-fishing interests are vitally important to 
every petiBon in the Province, and the conservation of these interests is becoming 
of practical concern to increasing thousands of our citizens. This is not difficult to 
explain, when we consider the recreational and health advantages, and the direct 
and indirect financial benefits of a large and ever-increasing tourist trade, em- 
bracing as it does in one way or another every branch of industry, thus increasing 
•employment. It is estimated that 10, St) 0,0 00 tourists from the United States and 
other countries entered Canada in 1935, and left behind $200,'000,000. in cash; of 
this total Ontario received $84,000,000. Emphasis is placed on the importance 
of the tourist trade, for it is generally conceded that the chief attraction to the 
tourist is our excellent fishing. 

There are many complex factors involved in the maintenance of fisheries 
Interests and a few of the more important may be cited: 

1. Scientific inquiry. 

2. Re-stocking measures of a practial nature. 

3. Protection. 

4. The spread and development of the ideals of true sportsmanship. 

All these factors are inseparably linked together in the problem of fisheries 
management. 

HATCHERIES AND REARING STATIONS: 

The Department operates twenty-two fish cultural stations. This number in- 
cludes all the major and subsidiary rearing stations. The actual number of hatch- 
eries is nineteen; trout rearing stations, nine; bass rearing stations, three; in addi- 
tion to the facilities for hatching bass in the Lake on the Mountain, Glenora 
Hatchery. 

During the year, a new trout rearing station was built in the vicinity of Chats- 
worth, comprising the hatchery for hatching and culture to the advanced fry stage, 
and four rearing ponds, all of which are separately fed and drained. Two excellent 
sources of spring water supply the hatchery and ponds, and a very important advan- 
tage in the arrangement is that the hatchery supply and the supply to the main 
rearing ponds are separate. The water itself is of satisfactory composition and of 
low and approximately constant temperature 45 °F. The total volume of water 
delivered is approximately 2100 gallons per minute. The constant and relatively 
high winter temperature induces early hatching, so that the fish are strong and well 
advanced for transfer to the rearing ponds in early summer. 

The Department acquired a series of four ponds at Midhurst Reforestry Sta- 
tion. These were renovated and trout carried over winter. Additional improve- 
ments will be made on these ponds next year. 

SPECKLED TROUT: 

The Department's objective is to increase the number of sizable trout distri- 
buted to suitable waters year by year. This is necessary if we are to maintain the 
supply on account of the increasing intensity of the fishing. Furthermore, there 
are numerous streams in southern Ontario, in which the food supply for trout fry 
and fingerlings has diminished and cannot meet the requirements imposed on the 
stream by the introduction of additional supplies of baby fish. This condition is due 
to the rapid industrialization of the Province by agricultural, lumbering, manufac- 
turing, and other interests, all of which have been instrumental in changing the 
character of our lakes and streams. It is clear to anyone, for example, how effective 
scouring freshets, and bulging streams heavily laden with silt are, in changing the 
quantity and quality of the food supply. During prolonged periods of drought, 
also, the shallow muddy shoals and backwaters, the home of minute life on which 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1935-36 13 



young trout feed, become dried up. It is clear, therefore, that under such circum- 
stances planting yearling and older fish which feed on the larger forms of terrestrial 
and aquatic life, insects, shellfish, and fish will have a better chance to survive. It 
is true that if fry and small flngerlings are carefully distributed in protected head- 
waters, a percentage will survive, but we may plant. yearlings in the main streams of 
creeks with much greater impunity and with greater hope of success since fish of this 
age can more easily search out favourable sections of the stream for food and shelter. 
There are numerous lakes, also, where on account of the limitations of food supply, 
the planting of fry and fingerlings is undesirable. For example, lakes with both 
shallow and deep water, should produce more trout food for immature and mature 
trout than those with precipitous shores, where the shallow water fauna are 
extremely limited. In the latter case the planting of larger trout is desirable. 

We must remember that the productiveness of any natural body of water is fixed 
by nature and our objective is to prevent fishing from reaching a low level. When 
a body of water becomes depleted to too low a level the increase of undesirables 
often goes on to such an extent that it becomes increasingly diflBcult for trout, 
especially young trout, to survive. The introduction of yearling and older trout, in 
such cases, is obviously a more practical procedure. 

The following table illustrates the progress being made in the distribution of 
larger trout to suitable lakes and streams throughout the Province: 

Length in Inches 1934 193? 

3 to- 7 inches 913,315 2,464,987 

4 to 9 inches 19,538 

4 to 16 inches 3,876 189,156 

BROWN TROUT: 

Brown trout are native to lakes and streams in the temperate portions of Great 
Britain, France, Germany, and other central European countries. The Loch Leven 
trout is a form of brown trout inhabiting Loch Leven in Scotland. 

Brown trout have been introduced and are now fairly abundant in certain waters 
of the Great Lakes watershed. They have been propagated in Michigan since about 
1880. Most of the early plantings of brown trout were in the fry stage, as a result 
of which they are now rather widely distributed especially in the lower peninsula. 
Brown trout are now being reared to the fingerling stage in Michigan and good 
results are claimed from these pri&,ntings to date. Brown trout are also established 
in the more southerly sections of Wisco'nsin and Minnesota, and also in New York 
State. 

Conditions suitable for brown trout are closely parallel to those suitable for 
speckled trout, excepting that brown trout according to the experience of those best 
qualified to judge will endure much higher water temperatures than speckled trout, 
and hence are valuable for re-stocking lower stretches of streams which are no longer 
suitable for the latter on account of temperatures in excess of 75 "F. 

In a biological survey of the Genesee River system, in New York State, it was 
observed that with few exceptions brown trout were found in every stream in- 
habited by brook trout. However, in the colder brook trout streams, showing tem- 
peratures below 65°F. they were rarely encountered. They reached maximum size 
and abundance in streams ranging from about 68 to 75°F., and occurred in many 
others attaining temperatures as high as 80''F. 

Our policy, and the general concensus of opinion of those who have had ex- 
perience with this trout in America is that it should not be introduced into any 
waters where conditions are still suitable for native speckled trout, as experience 



14 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

has shown that the brown trout become predominant, eventually, and replace brooks. 
They not only compete with brooks for food, but they spawn about the same time 
and are known to monopolize the spawning beds. 

The lower reaches of many streams in southern Ontario do not possess suitable 
conditions for speckled trout. The headwaters of some of these streams, still pro- 
vide suitable conditions for a limited number of small trout, but, on the whole, they 
could be more profitably stocked with browns. After careful survey and selection, 
a number of promising streams have been stocked in old Ontario and favourable 
reports have been received on some of these. 

Brown trout are much more notional in their feeding habits than our native 
trout and hence are not so easily taken. They are considered a night feeder, and 
probably the best catches are made about dark, although there are many excep- 
tions and good catches have been made during the day time. In view of the diflB- 
culties experienced in catching brown trout, they withstand heavy fishing pressure, 
and hence are valuable for re-stocking waters in populated areas. 

There are several examples which testify to the fact that brown trout will live 
in lakes, but on account of the diflftculty of capture in such an environment, from the 
standpoint of sport fishing, re-stocking seems impracticable. However, for the pur- 
pose of establishing natural sources of supply for brown trout eggs, the introduction 
to suitable and controlled areas is worth a trial. This was the Department's objec- 
tive in re-stocking Brewer Lake, in Algonquin Park, as noted in the report of the 
Department for 1934. 

A biological study of the lake was first carried out by setting test gill nets, 
etc., to determine the inhabitants of the lake, their relative abundance and their 
feeding habits. The lake was then intensively netted for mature trout, predatory 
and competitive fish. The catch was chiefly comprised of lake trout, speckled trout, 
suckers and ling. When the netting was completed, the outlet of the lake was suit- 
ably screened off and brown trout introduced. In addition to favourable biological 
features, the lake is also accessible and easily controlled. 

RAINBOW TROUT: 

A study similar to that conducted for brown trout was made on Costello Lake, 
located Immediately below Brewer Lake and Into which Brewer Lake drains. After 
screening the outlet, rainbow trout yearlings were planted directly Into suitable 
parts of the lake and fingerllngs were planted In the stream connecting Brewer 
and Costello. 

The object of this work Is to establish. If possible, a source of supply for col- 
lecting spawn In order to overcome the expense Incurred In retaining domesticated 
stock In ponds. 

The rainbow trout distributed In our waters show a strong migratory instinct 
to drop down to larger waters while they are yet Immature. In this way they 
become lost to the stream In which they were originally planted, except during their 
return for spawning purposes. During the year fingerllngs have been distributed 
in ponds, lakes and streams where the best possible results may be obtained. Care 
was taken to plant the rainbows In waters where spawning facilities were available 
and tributary to larger suitable waters. 

As an Illustration of some success of the Introduction of rainbow trout, may 
we quote the result of planting rainbow trout fingerllngs in Burnt Lake, Townships 
of Sherbourne and McCllntock, District of Hallburton, In 1932: 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1935-36 15 



"The development of Rainbow Trout in this water has been most satis- 
factory and the following is a record of fish taken during 1934, 35: 
J. M. Guide — 5 from 15 to 18 inches long; B. B., Dorset — 1, 2^4 lbs. 
in weight; A.M., Dorset, 3 about 16 inches long; A. T. W., Dorset, 3 
about 16 to 18 inches long; L. R., Rochester, N.Y., 5 that were weighed 
at Robertson's stores and averaged 2% lbs." 

We have a supply of fall spawning rainbow trout breeders but how closely 
they will follow the fall spawning habit is questionable. It is reported officially, 
however, that this particular strain has a tendency to remain in the waters in which 
they are planted; they grow rapidly and withstand high temperatures. Spawn will 
not be collected from these fish until the fall of 1937, when they will be three 
years old If any revert to a spring spawning habit, they will be segregated. 

KAMLOOPS TROUT: 

This species, described in a previous report, was introduced for the first time 
to a few specially chosen waters and these plantings will be carefully followed up 
to determine the results. 

Kamloops trout spawn in streams and in lakes on bars at the mouths of spring 
streams. Although these fish do not spawn until April, May, or June, they are 
cultured similarly to speckled trout and in British Columbia live and thrive in waters 
suitable for speckled trout. 

LAND-LOCKED SALMON: 

The land-locked salmon or ouananiche was described in a previous report. 
The Department succeeded in planting 13,648 yearlings in specially chosen waters, 
and the results of these plantings will be carefully followed up. Lakes suitable for 
lake trout were chosen, since a closely related form thrives exceedingly well in a 
lake trout environment. The ouananiche, the chief centre of which is Lake St. John 
in Quebec, spawns in tributaries to that lake. 

LAKE TROUT: 

The number of eyed lake trout eggs distributed, set forth in the report 
November 1st, 1934 to March 31st, 1935, was nearly five times the number dis- 
tributed in 19 34. 

More than six times as many fry were distributed in 1935 and over one million 
were planted in inland waters. 

Half a million more fingerlings were distributed as compared with the previous 
year and nearly half the total distribution of lake trout fingerlings was planted 
in inland waters, thereby succeeding in the drive prophesied in the preceding 
report. 

WHITEFISH: 

Including that quantity of whitefish distributed between November 1st, 1934, 
and March 31, 1935, there was an increase in the 1935 planting amounting to 
slightly more than 13 per cent. 

It should be stated that this distribution was exceeded only in 1924 and 1927. 

HERRING: 

There was an increase of 66.4 per cent, in the distribution of herring fry over 
that of the previous year, including one hundred thousand included in the report 
of the five months, November 1, 1934, to March 31, 1935. 



16 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

YELLOW PICKEREL: 

There was a decrease in the distribution of pickerel fry to the extent of 
approximately 48,8 41,000 due to an unsatisfactory run of pickerel in the Bay of 
Quinte. 

Large numbers of fry were distributed to suitable inland game fishing areas. 

SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS: 

There was a percentage increase in fry distribution over the previous year 
amounting to approximately 47 per cent. The Department was also successful in 
distributing more than four times as many fingerlings, that is an increase of over 
one hundred and seventeen thousand, in addition to 3,435 yearlings and adults, as 
compared with 420 adults in 1934. 

LARGE-MOUTHED : 

From one pond devoted to the culture of this species at the Mount Pleasant 
Hatchery, ISO.'OOO fry and 2,153 fingerlings were distributed. 

MASKINONGE: 

As a result of the Department's operations on the Pigeon River at Omemee, 
460,000 maskinonge fry were distributed to suitable waters. 

The chief diflSculties attending our operations this year were adverse weather 
conditions, that is sudden lowering of temperature from a gradually rising one 
and, also, the scarcity of ripe males and females. Abundance of eggs and a small 
amount of milt results in high fertility. 

We have already discussed the unsuccessful attempts made on this Continent 
to rear maskinonge to the fingerling stage in appreciable numbers. Millions of fry 
have been produced in New York and Wisconsin hatcheries and Ontario can do 
likewise when suflQcient spawning fish are available and when favourable spawning 
and hatching temperatures are actualities. 

SANCTUARIES: 

There is a trenmendous demand for more and more black bass and maskinonge 
for maintaining the supply in our inland waters, since both of these species have a 
very great appeal to anglers. Our rearing ponds and hatcheries are doing good 
work, but considering the extent of Ontario's bass and maskinonge waters and the 
enormous resident and non-resident fishing population, we can scarcely hope to 
produce an adequate number of these species by pond culture to close the gap 
between supply and demand. 

In addition to the imposition of suitable closed seasons, sane creel limits, the 
control of competitive and predatory species, and pollution, there is probably no 
more promising method of bass and maskinonge conservation than the establishment 
of sanctuaries, that is setting aside in certain suitable waters, a number of bays in 
which fishing of any kind is prohibited. The bass and maskinonge multiply in 
these areas without interference and spread to other parts of the said lake or stream, 
thus preventing depletion. By such means we may be approaching the ideal of 
maintaining a permanent breeding stock and taking each year only the natural 
increase from it. 

In many areas of this kind maskinonge and large-mouthed black bass live and 
thrive. In many, also, there are mixed environmental conditions, so that small- 
mouthed black bass is a frequent inhabitant also. Closures of this nature will be 
followed up from time to time to determine the results and if there are deficiencies 
in these closed areas, we propose to remedy them, if possible. For example, condi- 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1935-36 17 



tions in certain areas may be vastly improved by eliminating useless competitors 
or enemies, and a number of areas may show distinct possibilities for rearing lunge 
and bass under controlled natural conditions. 

In view of an ever-increasing tourist trade, fishing for bass and maskinonge 
is becoming more and more intensive and considering the accessibility the ease and 
speed with which many of our waters may be invaded, it becomes increasingly 
evident that sanctuaries of this nature are necessary. 

It is diflficult to draw any hard and fast line between sanctuaries and closed 
areas enumerated below. In many of these and in many waters formerly closed, 
the sanctuary principle is evident. In many instances, however, the object of closure 
of an entire body of water is for stock and supply. Such an area is closed per- 
manently to public fishing, so that quantities of bass may be removed each year 
by harvesting methods for re-stocking suitable waters in the vicinity. This type 
of closure is slightly different from the principle embodied in establishing 
sanctuaries but the same objective, namely practical re-stocking, is involved. 

CLOSED WATERS: 

The following waters were closed to all fishing during the year for the purpose 
and for the period specified: 

Creamery Creek and Trout Rearing: Pond in Harrison Park, Owen Sound — 

Located in the Township of Derby, County of Grey, — closed until May 1st, 1939, 
for brown trout propagation. 

North Lakes or Gravel Lakes and their connecting streams and Creek flowing from 
Fourth Gravel Lake to Wliiteftsh Lake — 

Located in unsurveyed territory west of the Township of Strange, District of 
Thunder Bay, — closed until August 22, 19 38, for speckled trout propagation. 

Silver Islet Creek — 

Located in the Township of Sibley, District of Thunder Bay, — closed to all 
fishing until September 11, 19 37, for speckled trout propagation. 

A large number of waters were closed in 19 36, and for information concerning 
these the Game and Fisheries Laws should be consulted. 

REMOVAL OF COARSE FISH: 

Between April 1, 1935, and March 31, 1936, hoop nets and tra^ nets were 
operated in the following lakes in Leeds and Lanark Counties, namely: Bennett, 
Christie, Pike, Otty, Rideau, Crow, and the Mississippi River, and a total of 1,818 
•ling were removed. Taking five pounds for the average weight of the ling from 
all of these lakes, 9,090 pounds were removed. Adverse weather conditions slowed 
up the work to a considerable extent. Blocked roads in the district prevented our 
officers from getting to the lakes as effectively as during previous winters when 
such work was undertaken. 

Similar work was conducted on Lake Manitou, Manitoulin Island, where gill 
nets were set and a total of 2,416 pounds of ling were removed; the average weight 
of the ling was 4 lbs. / a-'Ue?' ^d\^ 

In order to have a more complete picture of the removal of ling from our inland 
waters, reference should be made to the report for the five month period, November 
1st, 1934, to March 31, 1935. 



18 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



WATER LEVELS: 

In view of the shallowness of the water in which maskinonge, pike, black bass 
and forage fish spawn, sudden fluctuations in water levels over natural spawning 
beds are inimical. The Department has appealed to all those responsible for such 
operations and the Department of Railways and Canals was supplied with the follow- 
ing data on the waters on which they operate dams for power and navigation pur- 
poses, namely, the fish frequenting the waters, the spawning dates of the various 
species and the spawning depths. As a result we look for definite improvement 
along these lines. Judging from information received from our field oflacers, con- 
siderable improvement is evident. 

NUTRITION OF TROUT: 

During the fall, winter and spring of 1935-36 a number of feeding experiments 
were conducted in the Department's experimental hatchery in the Parliament 
Buildings, Toronto. The object of these experiments was to find a suitable food or 
mixture of foods that would produce healthy and vigorous trout at a lower cost 
than the food generally used, namely beef liver. 

Previous investigations of this nature have been conducted by the Department 
and a short account of this was given in a report of December 21, 193 5, entitled 
'Ontario's Problems in Fisheries and Status of Research,' published in the proceed- 
ings of the Conference on Fresh Water Fish Culture, Ottawa, January 3rd, 1936. 

The experimental hatchery contains four large glass aquaria 5' x 3' x 26" of 
water; six galvanized iron troughs, 2'4" x 6" x 6" of water; and four troughs, 
5' x IOV2" X 5" of water. (The small galvanized iron and wooden troughs were 
painted on the inside with paraffin varnish). Thus the experiments were divided 
into three groups and in each unit of each group, similar conditions prevailed. In 
each group a control unit was set up in which beef liver was used as a standard 
for comparison with the other feedings. Two per cent, by weight of cod-liver oil 
was added to all feedings. The diets used are tabulated below, indicating any 
changes made during the course of the experiments. 

The diets used in the experiment and the percentages of the various constit- 
uents were as follows: 





Diet No. 


Food 


Percentage 






1 


Beef Liver 


100 




Group A 
Glass 


2a 
2b 


Beef Liver 
Alewives 

Beef Liver 
Alewives 


75 
25 

50 
50 


Feb. 3/36 


Tanks 


3a 
3b 


Beef Liver 
Soybean Meal 

Beef Liver 
Soybean Meal 
Pigmeal 


75 

25 

Jan. 27 

40 
10 
50 


Jan. 81 Feb. 4 

50 50 
— 10 
50 40 




4 


Beef Liver 
Pilchard Meal 
Ling 


50 
25 
25 


Sucker substituted for 
Ling April 27, 1936. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1935-36 



19 





Diet Xo. 


Pood 


Percentage 






5 


Beef Liver 


100 






6 


Beef Liver 
Salmon Egg Meal 


75 
25 


Lake trout egg meal used 
until Jan. 10th when sal- 
mon egg meal arrived. 




7 


Beef Liver 
Pilchard Meal 


75 

25 




Group B 

Tin 
Troughs 


8 


Beef Liver 
Beef Heart 
Salmon Egg Meal 
Fish Mixture 


20 
14 
17 
34 


Lake trout egg meal sub- 
stituted for salmon egg 
meal until Jan. 10/36. 




9 


Beef Liver 
Beef Heart 
Pilchard Meal 
Fish Mixture 


20 
14 
17 
34 






10 


Beef Liver 
Hog Melts 
Pilchard Meal 
Fish Mixture 


25 
25 
25 
25 




• 


11 


Beef Liver 
Hog Melts 
Ling 


50 
25 
25 




Group C 


12 


Beef Liver 
Hog Melts 
Fish Mixture 


50 
25 

25 




Wooden 
Troughs 


13a 
13b 


Beef Liver 
Hog Melts 

Beef Liver 
Hog Melts 
Salmon Egg Meal 


75 

25 

Jan. 18, 1936 

50 
25 

25 






14 


Beef Liver 


100 





The fish mixture referred to was a mixture of equal weights of the flesh of the 
common sucker and ling. In the case of the alewife and gizzard shad, the entire 
fish was ground up. 

Each unit of each group was fed the same weight of food and the amount fed 
was regulated in such a way that a minimum of uneaten particles was left on the 
bottom of the tank or troughs. Since there is no accurate way of measuring this 
waste food and since it was fairly uniform in each unit of each group, it was not 
included in the calculations. 



At regular intervals the fish were weighed and the weight increase for that 
period was obtained. From this, the increase in weight for 100 fish could be 



2t) DEPARTMENT OF CiAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 



calculated and by taking the total increase in weight per 100 fish for the duration 
of the experiment and dividing it into the total amount of food fed per 100 fish 
the number of grams (or pounds) of food required to produce one gram (or pound) 
increase in weight of the fish was determined. This figure is called the 'eflBciency 
factor.' Naturally, the lower this figure is, the more eflBcient the food. 

Summarizing the details of the experiment we have the following results: 

1. Diets 3a and 3b cannot be considered since, after feeding for a period of 132 
days the fish began to die from an intestinal disorder which could only be 
blamed on the diet. 

2. Diet No. 4 cannot truly be compared with the other diets of group A, since 
rainbow trout were fed, whereas the other diets of the group were fed to 

speckled trout. A different growth rate would be expected. However, it should 
be stated that these fish progressed in health and weight very satisfactorily and 
there was every reason to believe that the diet was a good one. 

3. Diets 2a and 2b excelled diet No. 1, namely the liver control, as shown in the 
following table: 

Ck)st for one pound increase in fish weight 
Diet No. Diets 2a and 2b Liver Control for same 

and 2a+2b Period 

2 a 62.5c 84.0c 

2 b 69.2c 107.1c 

2a+2b 67.4 95.5c 

4. In Grroup B the diets appear in the following order from the standpoint of 
economy, namely, 8, It), 7, 9, 6, and 5 (liver control). 

5. In Group C diet 13a is the only one that showed any improvement over the liver 
control diet No. 14. The addition of salmon egg meal to this diet apparently 
proved uneconomical in this case. 

6. Diet 2 appears to have excellent possibilities as an economical trout food. In 
view of the absence of suitable refrigeration facilities, at trout rearing stations, 
the use of raw fish products as food, during the summer months, is surrounded 

by many practical difficulties. During the winter, this difiiculty can be over- 
come to a considerable extent, but there is the additional difficulty of keeping 
the fish in a wholesome condition for long periods. Processing the whole fish 
into a meal is a practical way of handling this food, and obviates the 
possibility of transferring fish parasites in the raw fish food. We have had 
several tons of alewives processed and found the meal mixed with raw beef liver 
equally as good as the fresh fish. The question of drying the fish has been 
considered, but this method has not been used to date, for the reason that 
quantities of alewives were difficult to obtain during that period when air drying 
would be most practicable. 

Diet 13a should also be considered as well as the diets of Group B. Diets 8, 9, 
and 10 of this group include fresh fish and would present the same problem 
regarding preservation as diet 2. Diets 6 and 7 do not present these difficulties. 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

In conclusion I desire to publicly express my appreciation of the assistance and 
support received by the Department from many sources during the year 1935-36. 

Our work, which at times may be somewhat difficult and perhaps onerous, has 
been made the more pleasant and enjoyable by reason of the continued co-operation 
of interested persons and the various Fish and Game Protective Associations which 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1935-36 21 



exist throughout the Province, and the personal contacts of myself with the officers 
and members of many of these organizations, and the assurances derived therefrom, 
are an evidence of the fact that the genuine sportsmen of this Province are interested 
in the work of the Department in every line of its endeavour, and more particularly 
in the policy and practice being followed to ensure a perpetuation for the mutual 
advantage of all our people of the wild life natural resources of this Province. 

Mention might also be made of the fact that generally speaking, members of 
the staff, both the inside and the outside service, have conducted themselves and 
performed the duties assigned to them in the best interests of the Department and 
its varied activities. 

All of Which is respectfully submitted. 

I am. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

D. J. TAYLOR, 

Deputy Minister of Gatne and Fisheries 

Toronto, March 10, 1937. 



22 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1935-36 



23 



APPENDIX No. 1 

SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OP FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS, 1935-36 



LARGE-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

FRY 

Bruce: 

Boat Lake 5,000 

Durham: 

Lake Scugog 15,000 

Muskoka: 

Butterfly Lake 5,000 

Leach Lake 5,00'0 

Norfolk: 

Little Lake 5,000 

Parry Sound: 

Crawford Lake, also called 

Otter Lake 5,000 

Deer Lake (Lount) also 

called Ferry Lake 5,000 

Peterborough: 

Round Lake 10,00'0 

Pearson's Lake, also called 
Wright's Lake 5,000 

Simcoe: 

Boyne River 10,00'0 

Little Lake (Tay Tp.) ... 25,000 

Lake Simcoe 15,000 

Orr Lake 10,000 

Victoria: 

Mud Lake, also called Dal- 

rymple Lake 10,'000 

FINGERLINGS 



Lincoln: 

Twenty Mile Creek, also 
called Jordan Pond 


1,000 


Norfolk: 

Little Lake 


1,153 


ADULTS 


Carleton: 

McKay Creek, also called 
Hemlock Creek 


6 


Kent: 

Rondeau Bay 


15 


Waterloo: 

Grand River 


6 



SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

FRY 



Bruce: 

Boat Lake . . . 
Cameron Lake 



5,00'0 
2,500 



Bruce — Cont. 

Cyprus Lake 2,500 

Gould Lake 10,00-0 

Lake Isaac 5,000 

Sauble River 10,000 

Carleton: 

Rideau River 25,000 

Elgin: 

Pinafore Lake 10,t)00 

Union Pond 5,000 

Frontenac: 

Antoine Lake 5,000 

Bull Lake 5,000 

Collins Lake 5,000 

Crow Lake 2,50t) 

Loughboro Lake 10,000 

Mississagagon Lake 5,000 

Reed's Lake 5,00-0 

Sharbot Lake 10,00*0 

Sydenham Lake 2,500 

Grey: 

Saugeen River 25,000 

Wilcox Lake 5,000 

Hastings: 

Crow Lake 5,000 

Deer River l.-OOO 

Kamaniskeg Lake 10,000 

Moira River 10,000 

Huron: 

Bluevale River 10,00*0 

' Bennett's Lake 5,0*00 

Black Lake 5,000 

Christie Lake 5,000 

Mississippi Lake 10,000 

Otty Lake 10,0*00 

Pike Lake 5,000 

Silver Lake 5,000 

Leeds: 

Cranberry Lake 5,00*0 

Gananoque Lake 10,0*00 

Grippen Lake 5,000 

Rideau Lake (Wolfe Lake) 25,000 

Sand Lake 5,0*00 

Troy Lake 5,00*0 

Lincoln: 

Twelve Mile Creek 10,000 

Muskoka: 

Bass Lake 5,000 

Big Rat Lake 5,00*0 

Black Creek 5,0*00 

Bull Head Lake 5,000 

Deer Lake (Stephenson) . . 5,000 

Koshee Lake 5,00*0 

Leonard Lake 5,000 

Muskoka Lake 2*0,000 

Poverty Lake 5,000 

Riley's Lake 5,0*00 



24 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS, 1935-36 — Continued 



SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

— Continued 

Muskoka — Cont. 

Rosseau Lake 20,000 

Six Mile Lake 10,000 

Sucker Creek 5,000 

Three Mile Lake 5,000 

Wood Lake 5,000 

Norfolk : 

Waterford Pond 5,000 

Northumberland: 

Brighton Bay 5,000 

Crow River 5,000 

Ontario: 

Lake St. John 5,000 

Parry Sound: 

Ahmic Lake 10,'000 

Bear Lake S.DOO 

Beaver Lake 5,000 

Blue Lake 5,000 

Commanda Lake 5,00*0 

Crane Lake 5,000 

Deer Lake (McKenzie) also 

called Wah-Wash-Kesh ... 10,000 

Deer Lake (Lount) also 

called Ferry Lake 10,1)00 

Doe Lake 10,000 

Jack's Lake 5,000 

Lake of Many Islands . . . 5,000 

Limestone Lake 5,000 

Little Clam Lake 1'0,000 

Lynch Lake 5,000 

Magnetawan River 10,000 

Manitowaba River 5,000 

Mill Lake 5,'000 

Restoule Lake 10,000 

Rausch Lake, also called 

Long Lake 5,000 

Stormy Lake 5,000 

Sucker Lake 5,000 

Trout Lake (McDougall) . 5,000 

Trout Lake (Humphrey) . 10,000 

Whitestone Lake 5,000 

Wilson Lake 5,000 

Wolf River 10,000 

Prince Edward: 

Consecon Lake 5,000 

Renfrew: 

Corry Lake, also called 

Chalk Lake 5,000 

Simcoe: 

Lake Couchiching 15,000 

Severn River 20,000 

Victoria: 

Mud Lake, also called Dal- 

rymple Lake 10,000 

Waterloo: 

Grand River 15,000 



New Dundee Creek, 
called Alden Creek . 
Speed River 



also 



FINGERLINGS 



Addington: 

Beaver Lake 

White Lake 

Algoma: 

Basswood Lake, also called 

Waquekobing Lake 

Clear Lake, also called Wa- 

komata Lake 

Gawas Bay (North Chan- 
nel) 

Pipe Lake 

Stuart Lake 

Lake George, St. Joseph's 
Channel, and Pine Island . 
(St. Mary's River) 



5.'000 
10,000 



800 
800 



2,000 

2,000 

2,'000 
l.DOO 
1,000 

6,000 



Brant: 

Big Creek 7.000 

Bruce: 

Chesley Lake 5,00t) 

Durham: 

Rice Lake 2,00t) 

Elgin: 

Lake Pinafore 765 

Frontenac: 

Black Lake 500 

Elbow Lake 500 

Gull Lake 5,000 

Long Lake (Portland) ... 500 
Long Lake (Clarendon.) al- 
so called Kash-wak-a-mak 5t)0 

Potspoon Lake 50*0 

Shawenigog Lake, also cal- 
led McClintock Lake 500 

White Lake 1,000 

Glengarry: 

St, Lawrence River 3,000 

Haliburton: 

Miserable Lake 1,000 

Hastings: 

Baptiste Lake l.O'O'O 

Gunter Lake 500 

Little Salmon Lake 500 

Loon Lake (Bangor Twp.) 500 
Moira Lake, also called Hog 

Lake 1,000 

Otter Lake 500 

Tongamong Lake 501) 

Trout Lake 500 

Weslemkoon Lake 500 

York River 500 

Kent: 

Rondeau Bay 15,000 

Lanark: 

Round Lake 1.000 



ANNUAL REPORT. 1935-36 



25 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS, 1935-36— Continued 



SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

— Continued 

Leeds: 

Charleston Lake 1,500 

Cranberry Lake 1,00X) 

Grippen Lake 1,000 

Otter Lake 1,000 

South Lake 1,000 

Whitefish Lake 1,000 

Manitoulin: 

Tobacco Lake 2,5*00 

Middlesex: 

Pond Mills 1,000 

Thames River 12,200 

Muskoka: 

Duck Lake 1,000 

Joseph Lake 2,000 

Long Lake 1,000 

Pine Lake 10,000 

Lake Rosseau 2,000 

Sparrow Lake 10,000 

Northumberland : 

Crow Bay 500 

Crow River 1,51)0 

Trent River 1,00*0 



Parry Sound: 

Deer Lake, also called 
Wah-Wash-Kesh Lake, 



Simcoe: 

Little Lake (Vespra) 



1,000 



Peterborough : 

Belmont Lake 1,000 

Deer Lake (Belmont) . . . 1,000 

Deer Lake (Cavendish) . . 1,000 
Jack's Lake, also called 

White's Lake 1,'000 

Lovesick Lake 1,000 

Oak Lake 1,000 

Round Lake 1,000 

Renfrew: 

Andrews Lake, also called 

Rosebank Lake 5*00 

Gould Lake 500 

Kurd's Lake also called 

Hond's Lake 501) 

Maves Lake 500 



1,000 



Victoria: 

Balsam Lake 2,000 

Cameron Lake 1,000 

Pigeon Lake 1,0 O'O 

Round Lake 1,000 

Sturgeon Lake 2,000 

Waterloo: 

Conestoga Stream 1,000 

River Nith 1,000 

Grand River 15,500 

Wellington: 

Puslinch Lake 1,000 



YEARLINGS 

Manitoulin: 

Tobacco Lake 

Kagawong Lake 

Middlesex: 

Thames River 

Waterloo: 

Grand River 

ADULTS 

Carleton: 

McKay Creek, also called 
Hemlock Creek 

Kent: 

Rondeau Bay 

Middlesex: 

Thames River 

Rainy River: 

Clearwater Lake, also called 

Burdette Lake 

Jackfish Lake 

Waterloo: 

Grand River . 



56 
800 



161 



44 



12 

7 



39 



Sudbury: 
Miscellaneous planting — Fingerlings, 
Adults, and Yearlings 

Windy Lake 300 

Lake Penage 2,000 

MASKINONGE 

Durham: 

Rice Lake 5'0,0D0 

Hastings: 

Crow Lake 50,000 

Northumberland: 

Crow Bay 20,000 

Trent River 45,000 

Peterborough: 

Chemong Lake 25,0D0 

Clear Lake 50,000 

Round Lake 20,000 

Victoria: 

Balsam Lake 50,000 

Stump Lake (Pigeon 

River) 100,000 

Sturgeon Lake 50,000 

PICKEREL 

Addington: 

Beaver Lake 150,00D 

White Lake 250,000 

Algoma: 

Basswood Lake, also called 

Waquikobing Lake 125,000 

Crane Lake 50,00D 

Echo Lake 1,754,000 



26 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FtSH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS. 1935-36 — Continued 



Pickerel — Continued 

Algoma — Cont. 

Gordon Lake 125,000 

Keichel Lake SOO.O'Ot) 

Little Clear Lake 125,000 

Mississauga River 1,000,000 

Rock Lake 125,t)00 

St. Mary's River 2,500,000 

Bruce: 

Boat Lake 250,000 

Lake Chesley 100,0'0'0 

Lake Isaac 250,000 

Carleton: 

Ottawa River 900,000 

Rideau River 75t);000 

Durham: 

Rice Lake 2,000,000 

Frontenac: 

Bass Lake, also called 

Victoria Lake 200,000 

Bull Lake 150,000 

Crow Lake 100,000 

Gull Lake 500,000 

Loughborough Lake .... 500,000 

Mississagagon Lake 250,000 

Sharbot Lake 200,000 

Seeley's Bay 500,000 

Thirteen Island Lake .... 200,000 

Grey: 

Saugeen River 250,000 

Haliburton: 

Long Lake (Lutterworth). 50,0'0'0 

Paudash Lake 500,000 

Hastings: 

Bear Lake (Limerick) . . . 100,000 

Deer River 100,'000 

Hog Lake 250,000 

Lakeview Lake 150,000 

Latta's Creek, also called 

Moira, or Sayer's River. 150,000 

Malord's Lake 1'0'0,000 

Papineau Creek 250,000 

Salmon Trout Lake, also 

called Bartlett's Lake.. 150,000 

Tongamong Lake 250,000 

Kenora: 

Big Vermilion Lake 5,000,000 

Eagle Lake 2,500,000 

Gun Lake 500,000 

Marchington Lake 2,00'0,'000 

Stanzihikimi Lake 2,000,000 

Lake of the Woods 26,000,000 

Lanark: 

Beaver Lake 2'00,000 

Bennett's Lake 300,000 

Black Lake 100,000 

Christie Lake 250,000 

Dalhousie Lake 200,000 

Pipe Lake 150,000 

White Lake also called 

Wabalak Lake 5'0t),000 



Leeds: 

Bass Lake 100,000 

Green's Lake, also called 

Red Horse Lake 100,000 

Rideau Lake 1,500,000 

Sand Lake 100,000 

Lincoln: 

Twelve Mile Creek 500,000 

Manitoulin: 

Mudge Bay S'O'O.OOO 

Muskoka: 

Allan's Lake 50,000 

Axe Lake 200,000 

Black Lake 200, Ot)"© 

Brandy Creek, also called 

Sucker Creek 50,000 

Leonard Lake 100,000 

Mootes Lake S'O.'OOO 

Muskoka Lake 1,000,000 

Riley Lake 200,000 

Rosseau Lake 1,90*0 ,000 

Six Mile Lake 500,000 

Sparrow Lake 2,000,000 eggs 

Nipissing: 

Jumping Caribou Lake. . . 150 ,"000 

Lake Timagami 2,000,000 

Morton Lake 250,000 

Nosbonsing Lake 500,'000 

Red Cedar Lake 250,000 

Talon Lake 250,000 

Tilden Lake 100,0'00 

Tomiko Lake 300,000 

Trout Lake (Widdifield) . . 250,000 

Turtle Lake 20'0,'000 

Wickstead Lake 250,000 

Wilson Lake 100,000 

Northumberland : 

Crow Bay 200,0t)0 

Crow River 500,000 

Trent River 1,200,000 

Ontario: 

Lake St. John 2'0'0,000 

Parry Sound: 

Crawford, or Otter Lake. . 50,000 

Ahmic Lake 1,000,000 

Bain Lake 50,00t) 

Bass Lake (Patterson) .. 200,000 

Boundry Lake 200,000 

Chain of Lakes (Monteith) 15t),000 

Commanda Lake 200,000 

Crane Lake 200,000 

Deer Lake, also called 

Wah-Wash-Kesh 

(McKenzie) 30t),000 

Deer Lake, also called 

Ferry Lake (Ferry Twp.) 250,000 

Doe Lake 300,000 

Dogfish Lake 250, OOt) 

Georgian Bay 2,000,000 

Jack's Lake, also called 

Murphy's Lake, and Ratz 

Bay 50,000 

Isabella Lake lt)0.000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1935-36 



27 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OP FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS, 19 35-36 — Continued 



PICKEREL — Continued 

Parry Sound — Cont. 

Kagiwong, also called Pick- 
erel River or Dollar 

Lake 100,000 

Lake of Many Islands . . . 250,000 

Oastler's Lake 100,000 

Otter Lake (Foley) 250,000 

Portage Lake 250,000 

Rainy Lake 50,000 

Restoule Lake 200,000 

Sequin River 200,000 

Shawanaga Lake 250,0'00 

Stormy Lake 100,000 

Whitestone Lake 200,000 

Wilson Lake 50,000 

Wolf River 250,000 

Peterborough: 

Belmont Lake 500,000 

Chemong Lake 500, 0*00 

Deer Lake (Belmont) . . . 100,000 

North River 450,000 

Oak Lake 200,'000 

Otonabee River, and 

Little Lake 300,000 

Round Lake 200,000 

Seeright's Bay 50,000 

Indian River 250,000 

Prince Edward: 

Bay of Quinte 2,250,000 

Rainy River: 

Beaverhouse Lake lOO.'OO'O 

Clearwater, or Burdette 

Lake 2,000,000 

Off Lake 1,000, 0*00 

Quill, or Feather Lake . . . 2,000,000 

Rainy Lake 82,900,00'0 

Red Gut Bay 2,000,000 

Windigoostigwan Lake, or 

Windigo Lake 500,0'0'0 

Renfrew: 

Madawaska River 300,000 

Norway Lake 150,000 

Nakine Lake 20'0,'000 

White Lake 200,000 

York Branch River 250,000 

Simcoe: 

Cook's Lake, or Farlan's 

Lake 250,000 

Couchiching Lake 3;000,000 

Little Lake (Vespra) .... 250,000 

Matchedash Bay 2,300,000 

Nottawasaga Bay 750,000 

Severn River (Cloucester 

Pool) 2,000,000 

Sudbury: 

Charles Billies Lake .... 100,t)00 
Long Lake, or Walker Lake 500,000 
Lost Lake, or Ramsay Lake 500,000 

French River 1,000,000 

Lake Penage 2,000,000 

Murray Lake 150,000 

Veuvenue, or Ratter Lake 250,000 

Wahnapitae Lake 500,000 

Washigama Lake 200,000 



Thunder Bay: 

Lake Shebandowan 2,000,000 

Temiskaming: 

("C" indicates Cochrane District) 

C. Barbers Bay 250,0'00 

Bay Lake, Montreal River 200,000 

C. Big Water Lake 200,00'0 

C. Reid Lake 50,0'00 

Sesekinika Lake 500,000 

Lake Temiskaming 500,000 

C. Wilson Lake 50,0'00 

Victoria: 

Little Mud Turtle Lake . . 100,000 
Mud Lake, or Dalrymple 

Lake 250,000 

Round Lake 5'0,00'0 

Young's Lake 50,000 

Waterloo: 

Grand River 2,000,000 

Welland: 

Patterson Lake 50'0,00'0 

Great Lakes: 

Lake Huron 16,700,000 

North Channel 5,000,00'0 

Lake Superior 14,425,00*0 

BROWN TROUT 

FINGERLINGS 
Bruce: 

Formosa Creek (Culross) . 3,000 

Formosa Pond (Carrick) . 2,000 

Durham: 

Baldwin's, or Wilmott's 

Creek 5,'000 

Baxter's Creek 5,000 

Cavan Creek 5,'000 

Orono Creek, and Mill 

Pond 3,000 

Grey: 

Saugeen River 20,000 

Snipe Creek 5,0'00 

Sydenham River 5,000 

Haldimand: 

Grand River 3,0X10 

Hastings: 

Squire's Pond 5,000 

Muskoka: 

Sage Creek 5,000 

Sharp's Creek 5,000 

Norfolk: 

Brown Creek: 3,000 

Northumberland : 

Brown's Pond 2,000 

Oxford: 

Whiteman's Creek 10,000 



28 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS, 1935-36— Continued 



15ROWN TROUT — CJontinued 

Peterborough: 

Dickson's Creek 3,000 

Jack's Creek 5,000 

Temiskaming: 

Larder Lake 10,00'0 

Waterloo: 

Grand River 5,000 

ADULTS 

Carleton: 

Rideau River (from Ottawa 

Exhibition) 6 

YEARLINGS 



Brant: 

Branch Creek 


1,000 


Bruce: 

Vogt's, or Adamsville Creek 


1,000 


Elgin: 

Little Otter River 


i.oo-o 


Grey: 

Beaver River 

Big Head River 


1,000 
l.OOt) 


Sydenham River 


1,D00 


Halton : 

Sixteen Mile Creek 


500 


Hastings: 

Rawdon's Creek 


X,000 


Waterloo: 

Bridgeport Mill Dam .... 

Fisher Mill Creek 

Experimental purposes . . . 


300 
700 

lot) 


Wellington: 

River Sneed 


5*00 


York: 

Humber River 


550 


LAKE TROUT 





FRY 

Addington: 

Black Lake 10,000 

White Lake 25,000 

Frontenac: 

Buck Lake 10,000 

Dog Lake 25,00*0 

Gould Lake 15,000 

Grindstone Lake 5,000 

Loughborough Lake 30,000 

Mississagagon Lake 25,00*0 

Schooner Lake 25,000 

Sharbot Lake 20,000 

Trout Lake, or Palmerston 

Lake 25,000 



Haliburton: 

Boskung Lake 20.0t)0 

Davis Lake 5,000 

Devil's Lake 15.000 

Drag Lake 20,000 

Gull Lake 30,0*00 

Paudash Lake 15,001) 

Pine Lake 10,000 

Twelve Mile Lake 10,000 

Sheldon's Lake 5,00*0 

Hastings: 

Baptiste Lake 50,000 

Big Salmon Lake 5,000 

Eagle Lake 15,000 

Jamieson Lake 10,000 

John's Lake 10,000 

Hardwood Lake 10,000 

Papineau Lake 10,000 

Salmon Lake 5,'000 

St. Peter Lake 15.000 

Sylva Lake 5.000 

Tongamong Lake 15,000 

Weslemkoon Lake St), 000 

Leeds: 

Red Horse Lake 25,01)0 

Rideau Lake 15D,000 

Muskoka: 

Mary Lake 25.000 

Nipissing: 

Morton Lake 50,000 

Red Cedar Lake 50.0D0 

Sturgeon Lake 25.000 

Trout Lake 50.000 

Turtle Lake 15,000 

Parry Sound: 

Sollman Lake 25,00D 

Peterborough: 

Belmont Lake 15.000 

Loon Lake 15,000 

Trout Lake 10.000 

Renfrew: 

Lake Clear 25,000 

Thunder Bay: 

Lake Nipigon 50,000 

York: 

Lake Simcoe 100,000 

Great Lakes: 

Lake Ontario 767.1)00 

Lake Huron 600,000 

North Channel 1,000,000 

Lake Superior 4,251,034 

FINGERLINGS 

Algoma: 

Achigan Lake 30,000 

Basswood, or Waquikobing 

Lake 35,000 

Chub Lake 15,00D 

Clear, or Wakomata Lake. 50,000 

Cummings Lake IS.OOD 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1935-36 



29 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS, 1935-36— Continued 



LAK£ TROUT — Continued 

Algoma — Cont. 

Deep Lake 10,000 

Diamond Lake 5,0*00 

Hawk Lake 10,000 

Hobon Lake 15,0'00 

Jobammeghia, or Boundry 

Lake 25,000 

Lake of the Mountains . . 20,000 

Long Bear Lake 30,000 

Loon, or Northland Lake 

(Deroche) 10, 0*00 

Magog, or Granny Lake . . 25,000 

Patton Lake 15,000 

Pickerel Lake 10,000 

Sand, Lake 30,000 

Trout Lake (Aweres) . . . 10,0*00 

Trout Lake (24-R-12) ... 25;000 

Upper Island Lake 5,000 

Bruce: 

Gillies Lake 50,000 

Haliburton: 

Bear Lake (Livingstone) . . 10,000 
Clearwater, or Hardwood 

Lake 5,000 

Crooked Lake (Guilford) . 15,-000 

East Lake 5,00*0 

Raven Lake 10,000 

Spruce Lake 5,000 

Kenora: 

Big Vermilion Lake 50,000 

Dogtooth Lake 50,000 

Eagle Lake 50,000 

Gun Lake 25,000 

Lake of the Woods 895,000 

Minnitaki Lake 50,00*0 

Red Deer Lake 25,'000 

Silver Lake 50,000 

Trout Lake (Pellatt) . . . 15,000 

Vermilion (Little) Lake . . 25,000 

Lanark: 

Pike Lake 15,000 

Charleston Lake 50,'000 

Muskoka: 

Bruce's Lake 10,000 

Clear Lake (Ridout) 15,000 

Haley's Lake 10,000 

Lake Rosseau 50,000 

Lake of Bays 25,000 

Muskoka Lake 10,000 

Skeleton Lake 25,000 

St. Mary's Lake, or Paint 

Lake 5,000 

Nipissing: 

Bear Lake 25,000 

Camp Lake 10,000 

Lake Timagami 200,000 

Oxbow, or Fatty's Lake.. 15,000 

Tasso Lake 15,000 

Trout Lake (Widdifield) . . 2,400 



Parry Sound: ' " 

Bay Lake 10,000 

Clear Lake (Perry) 15,00*0 

Deer Lake 10,0*00 

Georgian Bay 4,520,000 

Horseshoe Lake, or 

Pak-She-Gong-Ga 10,000 

Maple Lake 15,*000 

Otter Lake 15,0*00 

Round Lake 10,000 

Salmon Lake 25,000 

Sand Lake 15,000 

Sucker Lake lO.OO-O 

Spring Lake 15,000 

Three Legged Lake 25,000 

Rainy River: 

Steeprock Lake 50,000 

Sudbury: 

Ella Lake 15,0*00 

Loon Lake, or Borden Lake 15,000 

Lake Penage 40,000 

Ramsay Lake, or Lost 

Lake 50,000 

Windy Lake 25,00*0 

Thunder Bay: 

Oliver Lake 10,00*0 

White Lake and River. . . 25,000 

Temiskaming: 

Crystal Lake 5,000 

Larder Lake 1,600 

Nellie Lake 10,00*0 

Perry Lake 10,000 

Rib Lake 10,000 

Sesekinika Lake 15,000 

Lake Temiskaming 2 5, '000 

Watabeag Lake 20,000 

Great Lakes: 

Lake Superior 680,000 

North Channel 100,000 

Lake Huron 6,555,000 

LANDLOCKED SALMON 

YEARLINGS 
Bruce: 

, Gillies Lake 1,500 

Grey: 

Bass Lake 1,000 

Mary Lake 310 

Muskoka: 

Skeleton 'Lake 1,500 

Fairy Lake 750 

Muskoka River 1,180 

Peninsula Lake 750 

Pine Lake 1,250 

Nipissing: 

Trout Lake 1,70*0 

Sudbury: 

Wahnapitae Lake 1,700 

York: 

Lake Simcoe 2,000 



St) 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS, 1935-36 — Continued 



KAMLOOPS TROUT 

FINGERLINGS 



Algoma: 

Constance Lake 

Trout Lake (Aweres) . . . 


42,464 
43,000 


YEARLINGS 




Muskoka: 

Echo Lake 


7,796 


Nipissing: 

Bloom Lake 


3.000 



RAINBOW TROUT 

Bruce: 

Teeswater River — Little 

Dam 5,000 

Dufferin: 

Pine River 4,000 

Elgin: 

Howes Pond 575 

St. Thomas City Reservoir. 20,000 

Grey: 

Leake's Pond 1,500 

Minke's Lake «... 5,000 

Sheppard's Lake 8,00'0 

Stewart's Lake 5,000 

Sydenham River 5,0'00 

Townsend's Lake 1,500 

Leeds: 

South Lake 3,000 

Norfolk: 

Black Creek 12,50*0 

Simcoe: 

Bear Creek 4,000 

Brough's Creek 5,000 

Coldwater River 11,5*00 

Sturgeon River 6,50*0 

York: 

Doan's Pond 5,000 

Humber River 13,'000 

Lake Simcoe 13,000 

Private waters (Sales) . . 5,000 



YEARLINGS AND ADULTS 

Carleton: 

Rideau River 6 

Thunder Bay: 

Mirror Lake 3 

York: 

Humber River 5 

Private waters (Sales) ... 3*00 



SPECKLED TROUT 

FRY 

Haliburton: 

Fletcher Lake 100,000 

Hollow River 50,000 

Slipper Lake 20,000 

Wolf Lake 15,01)0 

Hastings: 

Baptiste Lake 100,000 

Bear Creek (Dungannon) . 5,000 

Diamond Lake 15,000 

Egan Creek 10,000 

Lake St. Peter 100.000 

Muskoka: 

Bella Lake St), 000 

Dotty's Lake 50,00D 

Echo Lake 20.000 

Lake of Bays 450,000 

Loon Lake Creek 10.0'Ot) 

Mary Lake 50,000 

Muskoka River 150,000 

Rebecca Creek 75,000 

Rill Lake 7,t)00 

Shoe Lake (Ridout Tp.).. 10,000 

Skeleton Lake 50,000 

Tooke's Lake 25,000 

St. Mary's Lake 50,00'0 

Nipissing: 

Oxbow Lake 25,000 

Parry Sound: 

Barrett's Creek 15,000 

Cottingham Creek 10,000 

Deer Lake (Perry Tp.) . . . 10,'0'00 

James Creek 10,000 

Lynx Lake 15,000 

Poole Lake 15,000 

Magnetawan River 50,00'0 

Ragged Creek 15,000 

Rat Lake 5,000 

Scharnehorn Lake 25,000 

Peel: 

Humber River 6,00t) 

(Sale) 2.000 

FINGERLINGS 

Algoma: 

Achigan Lake 10,000 

Agawa Lake 50,000 

Alva Lake 7,000 

Anjigami Creek 10,000 

Batchewana River 15,000 

Bellevue Creek 5,000 

Boundry Lake 5,00'0 

Boyles Creek 3,'000 

Bridgeland River 29,500 

Caldwell's Lake 5,000 

Camp 8 Creek 10,000 

Canoe Lake 10,000 

Centre Lake 5,000 

Chub Lake 15,000 

Chippewa River 45,000 

Driving, or Victoria Creek 15,000 

Foot Lake 5,00t) 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1935-36 



31 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS, 1935-36 — Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT — Continued 

Algoma — Cont. 

Garden River 10,000 

Gavar Lake 7,500 

Goulais River 35,000 

Gravel River 8,730 

Harmony River 10,000 

Havilah Lake 5,000 

Hawk Lake 10,000 

Hoath Lake 5,000 

Hobon Lake 15,000 

Hubert Lake 16,000 

Island Lake 10,000 

Jackfish Lake 5,0'00 

Jobammeghia Lake 15,00'0 

Kennedy Lake 5,000 

Lavar Lake 1,000 

Loon Lake (24-R-13) 10,000 

Loon Lake (Kirkwood) . . rO,0'00 

Loon Lake (Deroches) . . . 10,000 

Loon Lake Creek 5,000 

Loonskin Lake 15,000 

Mashagami Lake 20,000 

Michipicoten River 15, '000 

Mile 58 Lake 5,000 

Mongoose Lake (25-R-14) 10,000 

Moose Lake (25-R-13)... 10,000 

Mountain Lake 5,000 

McCormack Lake 5,000 

Mclntyre Lake 1,000 

McVeigh Creek 20,00'0 

One Lake 5,000 

Peak Lake 5,000 

Pine Lake (2 4-R-13) 7,000 

Pine, or Prugh Lake 

(24-R-12) 7,000 

Pinkney Lake 5,000 

Reserve Lake 1'0,0'00 

Sand Lake Creek 15,000 

Sand River 15,000 

Scarbo Lake 5,000 

Snowshoe Creek 7,000 

Speckled Trout Lake .... 10,000 

Speckled Trout Pond .... 2,500 

Spruce Lake 10,000 

St. Mary's River 25,0'00 

Tamarack, or Quintnel 

Lake 5,000 

Tawabinasay Lake 10,000 

Triple Lake 5,000 

Trout Lake (Aweres) . . . 15,000 

Trout Lake (24-R-12) ... 2,000 
Upper and Lower Twin 

Lakes 10,000 

Unnamed stream (Shields 

Tp.) 7,000 

Wa-Wa Lake 10,000 

Walker Lake 5,000 

Wallace Lake 5,000 

Waterhole Lake 10,000 

Wartz Lake 20,000 

White River 50,000 

Winchell Lake 1,00*0 

Wyel Lake 1,000 

Brant: 

Moody and Lyons Creeks. 5,000 

Bruce: 

Judges Creek 20,000 



Mullins Pond 3,0'0'0 

Spring Creek (Carrick Tp.) 2,000 

Spring Creek (Amabel Tp.) 15,000 

Sparrows Creek 2,000 

Dufferin: 

Beaver Meadow Stream... 5,000 

Butler's Creek TO ,1)00 

Caldwell Creek 2,000 

Pine River 15,000 

Durham: 

Allen's Creek 1,000 

Ard's Creek 500 

Arnott's Creek 10,0'0'0 

Best's Stream 5,000 

Brinscombe Creek 1,000 

Butter's Creek 500 

Cavan Creek 15,000 

DeLong Creek 5,'0'00 

Jamieson Pond 3,000 

Harris Creek 2,000 

Haydon Stream 5,000 

Ganaraska River 5,000 

Gardner's Pond 7,0'0'0 

Mercer's Pond 3,200 

McKindley's Creek 5,000 

McLaughlin Creek 4,000 

Nicholson Creek 1,000 

Orono Creek 500 

Rutherford's Creek 1,000 

Smith's Creek 3,000 

Snowden's Creek 2,500 

Elgin: 

Ball Creek 20,000 

Goodwillie Creek 5,000 

Orange Hall Creek 5,000 

Frontenac: 

Trout Lake 50,000 

White Lake (Bedford) 

Creek 2,500 

Grey: 

Bell's Creek 5,000 

Bell's Lake 5,000 

Big Head River 5'0,000 

Camps Creek 5,000 

English Lake 15,000 

Gardner Lake 15,000 

Glen Creek 20,000 

Hydro Waters (Eugenia 

Pond) 3'0,'000 

Maxwell Creek 10,000 

Miller Creek 5,000 

Morton's Creek 5,000 

Pepper's Creek 6,000 

Priddle's Spring Creek . . . rO,'000 

Rob Roy Creek 10,000 

Rocky Saugeen River 10,000 

Saugeen River 55,000 

Sydenham River 35,00t) 

Trout Creek (Sydenham) . 25,000 

Williams Lake 10,000 

Haliburton: 

Bear Creek (Glamorgan) . 5,000 

Blue Lake 5,00*0 

Hollow Lake 100,00*0 

Kimball Lake 30,000 



32 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS, 1935-36 — Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT — Continued 

Haliburton — Cont. 

McCue Creek 10, 00*0 

McFadden's Lake IS.OOt) 

Otter Lake 25,000 

Percy Lake 25,000 

Ross Lake 5,00*0 

Round Lake 30,00*0 

Spring Lake (Livingstone) 10,000 

Hastings: 

Baptiste Lake 75,000 

Brett's Lake 5,0*00 

Cedar Creek 15,000 

Crooked Lake 50,000 

Diamond Lake 15,000 

Echo Lake 75,000 

Egan Creek 2t),00'0 

Fraser Creek 15,000 

Geen's Creek 10,000 

Green's Lake 20,000 

Hick's Lake 25,*000 

Little Papineau Creek . . . 10,000 

Long Lake 25,000 

Squire's Creek 7,000 

St. Peter Lake 75,000 

Trout Creek (Rawdon Tp.) 5,000 

Huron: 

Porter's Creek 7,00*0 

Stoney, or Coates' Creek.. 2,000 

Kenora: 

Harris River 5,000 

Lennox-Addington : 

Beaver Creek 15,*000 

Manitoulin: 

Blue Jay River 6,000 

Manitou River 6,000 

Mindemoya River 25,000 

Middlesex: 

Centre Road Creek 2,500 

Muskoka: 

Beaver Creek 2,500 

Big East River 7,50*0 

Buck Lake 15,000 

Clear Lake 95,000 

Crotch Lake 20,000 

Eighteen Mile Lake 30,00*0 

Fairy Lake 50,000 

Grindstone Lake 10,00*0 

Martin Lake 7,000 

Muskoka River 15,*000 

Lake Vernon 100,000 

Little East River 12,000 

Peninsula Lak^ 75,000 

Poverty Lake 2,500 

Red Chalk Lake 10,t)00 

Split Rock Lake 2,500 

Spring Creek (Watt Tp.). 1,000 

Wolf Lake 5,-000 

Miscellaneous streams run- 
ning into Lake of Bays, 
Mary Lake, Fairy Lake, 
Peninsula Lake, and Ver- 
non Lake 50,000 



Nipissing: 

Anderson Lake 5,0*00 

Black Creek 5,000 

Chippewa Creek 7,500 

Clear Lake 5,00*0 

Dorans Creek 7,500 

Duschene Creek 7,500 

Four Mile Creek 7,5t)0 

George Lake 5,000 

Giroux Creek 3,00'0 

Hoover's Lake 7,000 

Lake Timagami 30,000 

Mosquito Creek 7,500 

McCarty Creek 5,00*0 

Nelson Lake 10,000 

Noble Creek 10,000 

North River 15,00*0 

Oxbow Lake 25,'000 

Poor Man's Creek 5,000 

Robert Creek 5,000 

Toad Lake 10,0*00 

Tomiko Lake 7,500 

Traverse Creek 6,0*00 

White Partridge Creek . . 9,000 

Norfolk: 

Clear Creek 2,500 

Mather Creek 2,50*0 

Nanticoke Creek 10,000 

Venison Creek 20,*000 

Northumberland : 

Baltimore Creek 7,500 

Beaman Creek 5,000 

Big Creek 1,835 

Black's Creek 6,800 

Bowen's Pond 5,000 

Brighton Mill Creek 4,000 

Burnley Stream 17,500 

Chidley's Creek 2,50*0 

Dartford Creek 7,500 

Duncan Creek 2,500 

Heffernan's Creek 2,000 

Little Cole's Creek It), 000 

Mill Pond 10,*000 

McComb's Creek 7,500 

Piper Creek 2,500 

Quinn's Creek 2,500 

Robin's Creek 2,500 

Salt, or Dawson Creek... 15,000 

Sandy Flats Creek 15,000 

Simpson Creek 5,000 

Smithfield Creek 5,000 

Taylor Creek 2,500 

Trout Creek 10,000 

Valleau Creek 2,500 

Woodland Creek 5,000 

Ontario: 

Black Creek 9,000 

Chubtown Creek 12,000 

Elgin Pond, or lake 6,0*00 

Glenhodson Creek 2,500 

McLean's Creek 3,000 

Oxford: 

McCabe's Creek 500 

Sutherland's Pond and 

creek 2,00*0 



ANNUAL. REPORT, 1935-36 



33 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF PISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS, 1935-36 — Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT — Continued 

Parry Sound: 

Big Clam Lake 15,000 

Canoe Lake 10,000 

Cashman's Lake ........ 2,500 

Comfort Lake 6,000 

Deer River 25,000 

Eagle Lake 100,000 

Ge^esee Creek 15,0*00 

. Lake Bernard 25,000 

Peel :: 

. Credit River 13,000 

. Spring, or Secret Creek. . 1,*000 

Peterborough: 

Buchanan's Creek 5,000 

.North River 25,0*00 

; Norwood Creek 3,000 

Ouse River 30,000 

Otter Creek S.ODO 

;Plato Cre<3k 15,000 

, Scott's Creek 5,000 

Renfrew: 

.Benoit Lake 3,000 

Black Donald Creek 10,000 

Birchim Lake T.-OOO 

. ;Burns Lake 25,00*0 

Calhane Creek lO.^OOO 

Christink Lake 10,000 

: Dam Lake Creek 15,000 

Dan's Lake 8,t)00 

Dodge Lake 3,000 

Dominic Lake 3,'000 

German Lake 5,000 

Gun Lake 5,000 

, Highland Creek 15.000 

. Johnson's Lake 6,000 

Little Madawaska River. . 9,00*0 

Lake Clear 6,000 

Lower and Upper Long 

. . Lake 15,000 

. Madawaska River 20,000 

Mason Lake 5,000 

McMaster Lake 6,000 

Nadeau Creek 10,000 

Paddy's Lake 6,000 

Petawawa River 12,00*0 

. Rock Lake 4,000 

Trout Lake (Head) 5,000 

Young's Lake 5,000 

Simcoe: 

Creek in Tecumseh 5,000 

Silver Creek 2*0,000 

Sudbury: 

Clear Lake 31,000 

Garson Creek 12,000 

Post Creek 10,000 

Poulin Creek 15,000 

Sandcherry Creek 12,0*00 

Trout Lake (Roberts Tp.) 20,000 

Trout Lake #6 5,000 

Veuve River 15,000 

Thunder Bay: 

Ada Lake 10,00*0 

Ann Lake : 10,000 



Allen Creek 5,000 

Allen Lake 10,000 

Anderson's Creek 2,'000 

Anderson Lake 5,000 

Bass Lake 5,0*00 

Bender Lake 2,000 

Big Duck Creek 3,000 

Brule Creek 4,000 

Caribou Creek 4,000 

Caribou Island Lake .... 3,000 

Charlotte Lake 5,000 

Clearwater Lake 3,000 

Corinne Lake 4,'000 

Coldwater River 47,000 

Cousineau Lake 5,000 

Current River 62,700 

Deep Lake 7,000 

Deception Lake 7,000 

Echo Lake 5,'000 

Fox Lake 5,00*0 

Fraser Creek 114,000 

Grange Lake 4,900 

Gravel Lake 6,000 

Ham Lake 3,000 

Hilma Lake 5,'0'00 

Kajander Lake 5,000 

Kowkash and Squaw 

Rivers 50,000 

Loon Lake (McTavish) . . 15,000 

Loon Creek 1,50*0 

Loftquist Lake 15,0*0*0 

Little Lake 5,000 

Mac's Lake 2,000 

Mirror Lake 5,000 

Moose Lake, near 

Schreiber 3,000 

Moose Lake, near Pearl. . 1,5*0*0 

Mclntyre Creek 20,000 

Mclntyre River 22,000 

McKenzie River 16,000 

McVicar's Creek 10,00*0 

McVicar's Lake 5,*000 

Neebing River 10,000 

Nipigon Lake 100,00*0 

Nipigon River 164,000 

Ninety Minute Lake 5,00*0 

Pitch Creek 6,000 

Pearl River 52,000 

Servais Lake 2,000 

Silver Lake 5,000 

Silver Islet Creek 1*0,000 

Small McKenzie Lake . . . 5,000 

Strawberry Creek 9,5*00 

. Sunset Lake 7,000 

Trout Lake (Gorham) . . . 5,000 

Twin Creek 2,000 

Twin Lake 1,'000 

Webb Lake 10,0*00 

White River 10,000 

Wigan Lake 3,000 

Wideman Lake 7,000 

Whitewood Creek 6,0*00 

Wolf River 3,000 

Temiskaming: 

(Prefix "C" indicates Cochrane 
District) 

Blanche River 5,000 

C. Charlebois Lake 5,000 

C. Croft's Creek 5,0*00 



34 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS, 1935-36 — Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT — CJontinued 

Temiskaming — Cont. 

Crooked Creek 5,000 

C. Dandurant Creek 5,000 

Dickson Creek 2,500 

C. Dome Creek 2,500 

C. Fuller's Creek 7.500 

Gleason Creek 7,500 

C. Grassy River 7,50X) 

Hairway Lake 5,000 

C. Hooker Creek 5,000 

Johnston Lake 5,00*0 

Latour Creek ll,50t) 

C. Legare Creek 5,000 

C. Metagami River 7,500 

Munroe Lake 5,000 

C. Mclnytre Pond 2,500 

Pike Creek 4,000 

C. Red Sucker Creek and 

River 7,500 

C. Rowley Lake 5,'000 

C. Ramsbottom Creek 5,t)00 

Sesekinika Lake 7,500 

C. Shaw's Creek 5,000 

Small Spot Creek 7,500 

Spring Creek (Firstbrook) 4,500 

Watabeag River 15,000 

C. Water Hen Creek 5,00*0 

Waterloo: 

Elora Creek 10,000 

Erbsville Creek 20,000 

Grand River 15,0t)0 

Jedburgh Dam 3,0t)0 

Groves Creek 10,000 

Mannheim Creek 20,000 

Speed River 10,0*00 

St. Jacob's Creek 3,000 

Welland: 

Sulphur Springs 5,000 

Twelve Mile Creek 7,000 

Wellington: 

Creek in Luther Twp 5, "000 

Ospringe Creek 5,0*00 

Private Waters (Sales) ... 3,637 

Demonstration 29 

ADULTS 

Algoma: 

St. Mary's River 584 

Island Lake (Aweres Tp.) 764 

Lanark: 

Paul's Creek 12 

Norfolk: 

Crane Creek 45 

Gravel Pit Pond 295 

Northumberland : 

Marsh Creek (Yearlings 

and Adults) 311 

Thunder Bay: 

Mirror Lake 2,675 

Private waters (Sales and 

demonstration) 734 



YEARLINGS 

Algoma: 

Achigan Creek 1,000 

Bridgland River 1,000 

Chub Lake 1,000 

Deer Lake l.OOt) 

Garden River 1,0*00 

Gravel River 1,000 

Harmony River 1,000 

Heyden Lake 1,000 

Kaskowan River 1,'000 

Lower Island Lake 50t) 

McLeod's Creek 1,000 

Pancake River 1,000 

Patton River 1,000 

Skookum Lake 1,000 

Trout Lake (Aweres) ... l.WO 
Upper Island Lake 

(Aweres) 500 

Upper Island Lake (176). 1,000 

Grey: 

Bell's Creek 1,000 

Beaver River 1,000 

Norfolk: 

Crane Creek 166 

Ontario: 

Glenhodson Creek 486 

Peel: 

Humber River S 

Thunder Bay: 

Cedar Creek l,0t)t) 

Current River 1,000 

Deception Lake 1,000 

Ghost Lake 250 

Golden Gate Lake 300 

Loon Lake (McTavish) . . l,00t) 

Lost Lake l,t)00 

Mirror Lake 6,011 

Mosquito Creek 1,000 

Mclntyre River 1,000 

McVicars Creek 2,0t)0 

Neebing River 1,000 

Waterloo: 

Private waters (Sales and 

demonstration) 212 



WHITEFISH 

Kenora: 

Eagle Lake l.DOO.OOO 

Lake of the Woods 8, 500, 0*00 

Manitoulin: 

Bay Finn (McGregor Bay) 2,000,000 

Parry Sound: 

Georgian Bay 82,040,t)0t) 

Prince Edward: 

Bay of Quinte 92,000,000 

Wentworth: 

Lake Ontario 16,180,00'0 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1935-36 



35 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
WATERS, 1935-36 — Continued 

WHITEFISH — Continued Peterboro: 

Loon Lake (Chandos) . . . 500,000 
Great Lakes: 

Lake Erie 44, 942, 0*00 Prince Edward: 

Lake Huron 31,720,000 Bay of Quinte 36,76'0,000 

North Channel 4,540,00D 

Lake Superior 13,560,000 

GOLDE]^ SHINERS 

296,482,000 Frontenac: 

White Lake (Olden) 500 

HERRING 

Frontenac: i>i?wrrn 

White Lake (Olden) 1,-000,000 riiiK^ti 

xT«o*««««. Great Lakes: 

""^laptfsie Lake 50t),000 ^^^^ ^"« 53,031,40t) 

Lake St. Peter 1,000,000 

Charleston Lake l,000,t)00 

Rideau Lake 3,000,t)00 



36 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 



ANNUAL REPORT, 19^36-36 



37 



APPENDIX No. 2 

ONTARIO DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 
DISTRIBUTION OF FISH ACCORDING TO SPECIES — 1933 TO 1935, INCLUSIVE. 



1933 



1934 



1935-36 



Large-mouthed 

Black Bass — Fry 

Fingerlings , 

Yearlings & Adults 

Small-mouthed 

Black Bass — Fry 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings & Adults. 

Maskinonge — Fry 

Perch — Fry 

Pickerel — Eyed Eggs 

Fry 

Brown Trout — Fingerlings 

Yearlings 

Adults 

Lake Trout — Eyed Eggs 

Fry 

Fingerlings 

Land-locked 

Salmon Yearlings 

(Ouananiche) — 

Rainbow Trout — Eyed Eggs 

Fry 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings 

Kamloops Trout — Fingerlings 

Yearlings 

Speckled Trout — "fcyed Eggs 

Fry 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings 

Adults . . 

Whitefish — Fry 

Herring — Fry 

Golden Shiners — 

TOTALS — 



856 



545,00t) 

25,750 

3.471 



20,500,t)00 

483,016 
674 



200.000 

1.4t)0,000 

16.012.70'0 



27,016 



506.000 

725,000 

5,950,255 

28,237 

1,549 

372.111,000 



22,805,000 



441,325.524 



35,250 

4,250 

197 



365,500 

35,750 

420 

909,500 

95,0*00,000 

5,t)00,000 
278,470,000 

138,000 

14,500 

689 

402,000 

1,265,000 

14,045,450 



1,000 

4,480 

312,512 

25.014 



6,257.267 

34,762 

1,652 

376,777,000 



17,512,000 
7,000 

796,619,193 



130,000 

2,153 

27 



696,'000 

153,065 

3,435 

460,0*00 

53,031,400 

2,000,000 
229,629,'000 

109.000 

9,650 

6 



7,773,034 
14,564,000 



13,640 



134,t)75 
314 

85.464 
10.796 



1,645.000 

5,013.831 

35,421 

5,420 

296,482,00*0 



43,760,000 
500 

655,747,231 



Note: The 1935-36 total does not include the distribution for the five months 
period — Nov. 1, 1934, to March 31, 1935. 



38 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



APPENDIX 

GAME AND FISHERIES 
Statistics of the Fishing Industry in the Public Waters 

EQUIP 



District 



No. 

of 

Men 



Tugs 



No. 



Tons 



Value 



Gasoline 
Launches 



No. 



Sail and 
Row Boats 



Value No. Value 



Gill Nets 



Yards 



Value 



Northern Inland Waters 

Lake Superior 

North Channel 

Georgrian Bay 

Lalee Huron 

Lake St. Clair 

Lake Erie 

Lake Ontario 

Southern Inland Waters 

Totals 



447 
322 
196 
482 
375 
145 
883 
674 
464 



3,988 



22 
379 
170 
449 
490 



$ 7,000 

53,000 

48,000 

142,750 

121,500 



28 



878 



210,500 
6,500 



156 

52 

38 

129 

124 

54 

212 

199 

16 



84 



2.396 



$589,250 980 



I 71,450 


330 $ 11,8831 


29,525 


1 62 3.6901 


32,555 


761 5,6041 


109,570 


941 6,6351 


81,680 


48 


3.095 


13,480 


88 


3.995 


200,900 


182 


10.707 


85,940 


214 


6.862 


4,960 


169 


5.244 


$630,060 


1.263 


$57,715 



$ 444,025 $ 

832.880 

397.850 

1.096.295 

1,023.075 



1.525,400 
937,700 



58,725 

84,075 

52,100 

111,839 

133,385 

i76i825 
81,805 



$6,257,225 



$698,754 













APPENDIX 

QUANTITIES OF 


District 


Herring 


Whitefish 


Trout 


Pike 


Pickerel 

(Blue) 


Pickerel 
(Dore) 




lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 




572 

1,296,789 

574 

21.168 

271.255 

125 

96,162 

835.687 

6,676 


1,303,630 

377.416 

304,084 

1.292.228 

340,327 

1,605 

1,190,121 

657.403 

11,621 


213,710 
1,518.439 

710,907 
1.475.312 
2,069.223 


885.070 

9.669 

88.431 

70,010 

934 

20.579 

8,175 

111.758 

21,9961 

1 


18.858 


1,549.426 
72.894 
65.627 
88,380 


Lake Superior . . 


North Channel 




Georgian Bay 






1.315 

525 

5.064.296 

38,428 

75 


275.352 


Lake St Clair ... 


34,503 

319.311 

28.526 

2,924 


Lake Erie 


333 

244.862 

23,550 


Lake Ontario 


Southern Inland Waters 




Totals 


2.528.958 


5,478,435 


6,256.336 


1.216.622 

1 


5.122.997 


2,431,943 




Values 


$126,447.90 


$602,627.86 


$688,196.96 


$72,997.32 


$256,149.85 


$267,513.73 



















ANNUAL REPORT, 1935-36 



39 



No. 3 

DEPARTMENT, ONTARIO 

of Ontario, for the Year Ending December 31st, 1935. 

MBNT 



S«ine Nets 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip and 
Roll Nets 


Night Unes 


Spears 


Freezers & 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


Total 
Value 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No 


Value 






566 

80 

9.810 

14,600 

2,840 

7,290 


....... 

675 
30 
4,927 
9.440 
1,245 
5.735 


42 
34 
110 
86 
120 
112 
590 


$13,060 
10.485 
49,100 
80,700 
84,200 
11,635 

303,750 


37 


$1,115 






1.200 



$ 200 






150 
36 
43 
60 
68 
30 

114 
33 
37 


$ 31,810 
21,525 
12,305 
15,875 


120 
46 
34 
61 


$ 14.670 

11,185 

13,875 

33,380 

8,710 

1.650 

51,235 

5,005 

286 


$ 209,913 
213,485 
213.561 
506,661 




"3 
17 




*"*22 

82 


5 


39 

14 

757 
227 


520 


"306 

15,460 

5.038 


"'2 

8 
32 


2 

40 

9.9.(i 




29,046 
19,690 
2,550 
3,450 
5,500 
9,510 


4,635 

2,070 

170 

74 

218 

290 




24,475 

9.175 

138,135 

8.375 

1,803 


29 
10 
80 
29 

7 


459,145 

45,034 

1,101,912 

211,639 
25,150 


46 






55 






14 






61 


64 274 

1 


190 


1,520 


182 


$35,120 


1 
$22,052 1,094 


1 1 1 
552,930 1.074 22,439 106 $ 545 


1 
70,946 $7,657 


210 $1,624 


571J263,478 

1 


416 


$139,996|$2,986,500 

1 



No. 4 



FISH TAKEN 





Sturgeon 


Eels 


Perch 


Tullibee 


Catfish 


Carp 


Mixed 
Coarse 


Caviare 


Total 


Value 




lbs. 


lbs. 


n>s. 


lbs. 


lbs. 
1 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 






58.278 

71 

10.801 

967 

4.585 

7,943 

22,433 

4,816 

576 




23,2181 150,689 


41,5071 1.227 


249,614 
93.226 

212.205 

102.202 
51,214 

226.370 
1.411,217 

272.637 


1,150 


4.496,4491 U^(i.Q2H.lR 






3601 90Q nio 




140 

2.346 

16,849 

3,788 

326,738 

618.981 

200.864 


3.577.994 

1.433,426 

3,275.206 

3.669.718 

697,283 

14,429,303 

2.784.723 

851,885 


297,372.06 
137,299.38 






5.039 

2.634 

178,235 

38,967 

5.633,452 

143,128 

14.680 


32.884 
206,069 
472,322 


500 

4,337 

780 

39,587 

64,096 

185,666 


28 

50 

388 

341 

726 

11 






336,048.31 






350,285.05 






37,000.63 






794,372.59 




60,937 
14,010 




199,233.22 







166,306 


309,5731 279,898 

1 


44 972 Qa 











110.470 


1 
74,947 6,039,713 


1,071,004 


502,779 


1,480,506 


2.898,583 


2,694 


35,215,987 




$44,188.00 


$5,246.29 $301,985.65 


$64,260.24 


$40,222.32 


$74,025.30 


$86,957.49 


$2,694.00 




$2,633,512.90 



i4'0 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



APPENDIX No. 5 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE YIELD OF THE FISHERIES 

OF ONTARIO 



♦Net Increase 



Kind 1934 1935 

1 


Increase 


Decrease 


Herring 


Pounds 

2,876,121 

4,922,996 

5,295,174 

1,095,911 

2,432,093 

2,292,094 

89,884 

63,65*0 

6,018,541 

1,105,158 

356,665 

1,520,848 

3,161,229 

2,613 


Pounds 
2,528,958 
5,478,435 
6,256,336 
1,216,622 
5,122,997 
2,431,943 

110,470 

74.947 

6,039,713 

1,071,004 

502,779 

1,480,506 

2,898,583 

2,694 


' '555,439 

961,162 

120,711 

2,690,904 

139,849 

20.586 

11,297 

21.172 

"iieiiii 
si 


847,163 


Whitefish 


Trout 




Pike 




Pickerel (blue) . . . 
Pickerel (dore) . . . 




Eels 




Perch 




Tullibee 


34,154 


Catfish 




Carp ; 


40,342 


Mixed and Coarse . 
Caviare 


262.646 




31,232,977 


35.215,987 


*3,983,01t) 





APPENDIX No. 6 



STATEMENT OF YIELD OF THE FISHERIES OF ONTARIO 

1935 



KIND 



Quantity 
Pounds 



Price per 
Pound 



Estimated 
Value 



Herring 

Whitefish 

Trout 

Pike 

Pickerel (blue) 
Pickerel (dore) 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse 
Caviare 

TOTALS . . , 



2,528,958 
5.478,435 
6,256,336 
1.216.622 
5,122,997 
2,413.943 

110,470 

74,947 

6,039,713 

1,071,004 

502,779 

1,480,506 

2,898,583 

2,694 



.05 
.11 
.11 
.06 
.05 
.11 
.40 
.07 
.05 
.06 
.•08 
.05 
.03 
1.00 



126,447.90 

602,627.85 

688,196.96 

72,997.32 

256,149.85 

267,513.73 

44,188.0*0 

5,246.29 

301,985.65 

64,260.24 

40,222.32 

74,025.30 

86,957.49 

2,694.00 



35,215.987 



$2,633,512.9*0 



APPENDIX No. 7 

ESTIMATED VALUE OF ONTARIO FISHERIES FOR A PERIOD OF 
TWENTY YEARS 1916-1935 INCLUSIVE 



1916 $ 2,658,992.43 

1917 2,866,424.00 

1918 3,175,110.32 

1919 2,721,440.24 

1920 2,691,093.74 

1921 2,656,775.82 

1922 2,807,525.21 

1923 2,886,398.76 

1924 3,139,279.03 

1925 2,858,854.79 



1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 



2.643,686.28 
3,229,143.57 
3,033,944.42 
3,054,282.02 



1930 2,539,904.91 

1931 2,442,7*03.55 

1932 2,286,573.50 

1933 2,186.083.74 

1934 2,316,965.50 

1935 2,633,512.90 



Report 



OF THE 



Game and Fisheries 
Department 



FOR THE FIVE MONTHS' PERIOD 
ENDING MARCH 31st, 1935. 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 9, 1936 




ONTARIO 



TORONTO 

Printed and Published by T. E. Bowman, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 3 7 



TO THE HONOURABLE HERBERT ALEXANDER BRUCE. 

a Colonel in the Royal Army Medical Corps, F.R.C.S. (Eng.), 
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province oi Ontario. 

MAY IT PLEASE YOUR HONOUR: 

I have the honour to submit herewith for the information of Your Honour and 
the Legislative Assembly, Report of the Game and Fisheries Department of this 
Province for the Five Months' Period ended March 31, 1935. 

I have the honour to be. 

Your Honour's most obedient servant. 



H. C. NIXON, 

Minister in Charge, 
Department oi Game and Fiaheriea. 



Toronto, April 2, 1936. 



Report of the Department of Game 

and Fisheries 

- OF ONTARIO - 

For the Five Months Period ended 
March 31, 1935 



TO: THE HONOURABLE H. C. NIXON, 
Minister in chargm, 
Department of Game and Fisheries. 

SIR: — I have the honour to place before you this Report of the activities of 
the Department of Grame and Fisheries during the five months' period, commencing 
November 1st, 1934, and ending March 31st, 1935. 

In this report it will, of course, be impracticable to attempt comparative state- 
ments for obvious reasons, though statistical tables for the period under review have 
been prepared and are incorporated herein. 

FINANCIAL 

The revenue collected by the Department amounted to $258,348.'04, and details 
of the various sources from which it was derived are as set forth in the subjoined 
table. 

REVENUE FOR THE FIVE MONTH PERIOD ENDING MARCH 31, 1935 
GAME — 

Royalty $ 34,307.15 

Licenses — 

Trapping $ 14,07'0.90 

Non-resident Hunting 30,315.45 

Deer 48,684.40 

Moose 2,194.50 

Gun 39,564.72 

Fur Dealers 14,536.00 

Fur Farmers 5,585.00 

Tanners 156.00 

Cold Storage 64.'00 

155,170.97 

$189,478.12 

FISHERIES — 

Royalty $ 1,101.67 

Licenses — 

Fishing 49,243.90 

Angling 7,338.85 

56,582.75 
Sales — spawn taking 61.00 



I 



57,745.42 
(43) 



44 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 



GENERAL — 

Guides' Licenses 37D.00 

Fines 3,761.00 

Sales — Confiscated Articles, etc 3,696.84 

Rent » 1,635. St) 

Commission 849.87 

Miscellaneous •• -• 811.29 



11,124.50 

$258,348.04 

Quite naturally, the game division brought in by far the greater percentage of 
this revenue, — fishing, and more particularly angling, by reason of the weather con- 
ditions which prevail during this period being very extensively curtailed. It will be 
of interest to state that this revenue exceeded the amount which it was estimated 
would be collected. 

The exercise of judicious supervision over expenditures was very essential; and 
while the total in this respect amounted only to $168,202.67, it is submitted that 
the various results achieved were creditable, and that the proportionately reduced ex- 
penditures did not noticeably interfere with the proper performance of Departmental 
activities or the provision of necessary services. . . : 

GAME 

In all, some 18,767 licenses to hunt big game, i.e. deer and moose, were issued 
under the following divisions: — 

Resident licenses to hunt deer 17,584 

Resident licenses to hunt moose 399 

Non-resident general licenses 397 

Non-resident deer licenses 387 

In addition we also issued some 317 non-resident licenses to hunt small game 
animals and birds. 

The foregoing figures are an indication that the attractions which the game of 
this Province affords to the interested sportsman and hunter have a prominent place 
in our scheme. 

A limited distribution of game birds was undertaken during this period, — 417 
English ring-necked pheasants and 597 Hungarian Partridge according to De- 
partmental records being liberated in different sections of the Province in which 
suitable environment for these desirable species of game birds was available. 

In the matter of Crown Game Preserves, while much preliminary work was done 
in connection with suitable areas which have been subsequently established as Game 
Preserves, in only one case, that of the Pond Mills Crown Game Preserve, in the 
County of Middlesex, was final action provided, and this was the only Crown Game 
Preserve established during the period under review. 

FUR 

Active trapping operations were, of course, carried on during this period, though 
it would include but a very short portion of the open season for the taking of 
muskrat, one of the principal mainstays of our trapping industry. 

The following table will show the number of pelts of various fur-bearing ani- 
mals taken by trapping and sold to licensed fur buyers, as well as the numbers ex- 
ported from the Province and dressed within the Province respectively. 



REPORT FOR FIVE MONTHS ENDING MARCH 31st, 1935 



45 




Pelts 
Tanned 



Bear 

Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (cross) .... 

Fox (red) 

Fox (silver black) 
Fox (white) .... 
Fox (not specified) 

Lynx 

Marten 

Mink 

Muskrat 

Otter 

Raccoon 

Skunk . 

Weasel , 

Wolverine 



180 

4,356 

1,451 

5,160 

27,501 

560 

904 

432 

2,180 

943 

62,162 

28,340 

2,439 

11,919 

48,204 

36,904 

1 



60 

2,055 

869 

3,951 

21,109 

381 

31 

315 

1,039 

574 

53,606 

12,762 

1,066 

5,764 

23,243 

26,975 

1 



105 

33 

4 

63 

1,699 

16 

1 

6 

9 

12 

1,171 

15,002 

7 

6,036 

16,124 

433 



Revenue from royalties actually received on the pelts exported and tanned, as 
indicated on the statement of revenue included in this Report amounted to $34,307.15. 
This figure does not represent the total amount actually due, for the reason that the 
large fur companies operating numerous posts in the extreme northern portion of 
the Province, under an agreement with the Department, balance their fur royalty 
account at the end of the season, thus certain royalties due on pelts exported and 
tanned by these companies during the period under review were not received in the 
Department until after the expiration of this particular period. 

Based on average prices which it is believed are reasonably accurate and fair. 
It has been estimated that for the pelts as shown in column 1 of the above table, 
trappers would receive from the sale thereof in all a total sum of $1,024,888.28. 

The previous table does not include pelts of silver, black and blue foxes raised 
on licensed fur farms, which are exempt from the payment of royalty. According to 
the fur records branch, 15,829 such pelts were exported and 1,587 tanned in the 
Province, and it has been estimated that in the case of these pelts, the sale of the 
same secured in excess of $615,0'00.0'0 for the fur farmers responsible for producing 
the same. 



FUR FARMING 

Details of live animals stocked on licensed fur farms as at January 1st, 
together with similar figures for other years are tabulated below. 

ANIMALS STOCKED ON LICENSED FUR FARMS 
As at January 1st 



1935, 





1933 


1934 


1935 


Beaver 


44 

50 

559 

448 

15,938 

13 

2 

6,170 

511 

1,202 

10 

16 

37 

4 


60 

18 

443 

360 

16,826 

10 

2 

6,190 

499 

989 

2 

14 

22 


78 


Fisher 


19 


Fox (cross) 


434 


Fox (red ) 


286 


Fox (silver black) 


19,314 


Fox (blue) 


10 


Lynx 


2 


Mink 


8,605 


Muskrat 


447 


Raccoon 


799 


Skunk 




Bear 


11 


Marten 


9 


Badger 









46 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

The number of Fur Farmers' licenses issued during the period was I'OSl, 
chiefly comprised of renewals of existing licenses which expired December 31st, 1934. 

WOLF BOUNTIES 

During the period the Department paid bounty in respect of 1,859 wolves, 
which is exactly the same number of pelts upon which bounty was paid during the 
preceding fiscal year. The basic rate of bounty was $15.00 for an adult wolf and 
$5.00 for a pup. In respect to wolves killed in any County, the bounty is paid by 
the County Treasurer and the Government rebates 40% of the amount to the County. 

Details of the expenditures incurred in this connection are as follows: — 

1,787 adult wolves at $15.00 $26,805.00 

X 66 adult wolves at 6.00 396.00 

4 pup wolves at 5.00 20.00 

X 2 pup wolves at 2.00 4.00 

1,859 Amount of bounty $27,225.00 

Expenses 102.58 

Total Expenditures $27,327.58 

X Killed in Counties. 

ENFORCEMENT 

It was encouraging to observe the improvement which has been evident in this 
particular division of our work. The services of the regular staff of Overseers 
maintained by the Department to secure observance of the provisions of the Game 
and Fisheries Act and Regulations was appreciably augmented by the co-operation 
which was provided by members of the Ontario Provincial Police Force, and which 
co-operation is now a permanent feature of this branch of our activity. In addition 
to this particular improvement, we find an increasing desire on the part of interested 
sportsmen, both hunters and anglers, to co-operate with us in assisting our regular 
Overseers to maintain a proper degree of respect for our Game and Fisheries 
Regulations, even to the extent that in many cases in order to provide themselves 
with credentials of authority they accept appointments as Deputy Game Wardens, 
acting without renumeration, rendering co-operation, and providing a measure 
of service, the value of which, particularly from the moral point of view, it would 
be exceedingly diflacult for us to estimate, and it is fitting and proper at this point 
in the report that expression should be given to our appreciation of this invaluable 
assistance and co-operation. 

Records show that during the period under review there were 414 cases of in- 
fractions in which the offenders were prosecuted in the courts and in which con- 
victions were secured and penalties imposed. In 267 of these cases, the action was 
originated by Game and Fisheries Overseers; in 104 by members of the Provincial 
Police force; in 13 by Deputy Game Wardens; and in 30 by co-operative action. 
Overseers, Deputy Game Wardens and Provincial Police acting in conjunction. 

In all there was a total of 455 cases in which seizure of goods and equipment 
was involved. Here again it is shown that the action was provided by Game and Fish- 
eries Overseers in 313 of these cases; by members of the Provincial Police Force in 52 
cases; by Deputy Game Wardens in 58 cases; and in the remaining 32 cases by the 
co-operative action as previously set forth. 

A condensed summary of the articles thus seized shows the following: — 
Description Number of 

of Articles Seizures 

Live Animals 5 

Birds, Animals and Game Meat 64 

Fire-arms and Ammunition 211 

Fish 21 

Fishing Equipment (Nets &c.) 69 

Miscellaneous Articles 12 

Pelts 84 

Trapping equipment 61 

Water Craft and Motor Cars 11 



REPORT FOR FIVE MONTHS ENDING MARCH 31st, 1935 47 



While the total of this table would indicate 538 seizures, some of the actual 
455 seizure cases would be duplicated in these entries; such as one seizure might 
report fire-arms, as well as birds etc.; another, fish and fishing equipment; while 
still others would include traps and pelts, and the apparent discrepancy is therefore 
accounted for by these various duplicate entries from one seizure report. 

EXPERIMENTAL FUR FARM 

During the period under review, an investigation was carried out regarding 
the digestibility of various cereal foods for foxes. The first problem investigated 
was the place of raw and uncooked cereals in the diet. The use of raw cereals 
finely ground has been widely advocated from time to time as a time and labour- 
saving method. However, the experimental data secured with test foxes receiving 
raw ground oatmeal, rice, whole wheat flour and corn meal, revealed quite definitely 
that they were not properly digested either singly or in combination with one an- 
other. The feces showed considerable quantities of undigested starch, thus demon- 
strating that the fox is unable to reduce starch to an assimilable form in the raw 
state. On the other hand, when the cereals mentioned above were thoroughly cook- 
ed for the period of one hour or so, the foxes were able to digest it very thoroughly. 
No raw starch could be demonstrated in the feces of these animals. 

Further studies were carried out with the round worm and its relation to patho- 
logical conditions which are often found in the lungs of young fox pups from one to 
two weeks of age. From the time the egg is swallowed by the fox it is 51 to 52 days 
until the female worm reaches naturity and is producing eggs. Once the larvae hatch, 
they migrate through the body and cause a serious disturbance in the blood cells. 
This disturbance reaches the peak around the 12th day. It has been definitely 
established that pups become infected with round larvae previous to birth and 
that the pregnant female, if infected with larvae, can pass them to the pups by way 
of the blood stream. An examination of many pups which died in early age show 
that the small blood vessels of the lungs have been ruptured by the larvae, leading 
to serious pneumonia complications and often death. It is obvious that fur farmers, 
(once the cold weather has commmenced in the Fall, and which weather conditions 
prevents parasitic eggs from developing) should make serious efforts to rid all fe- 
males of adult worms by the use of capsules containing worm-destroying properties. 
A more detailed account of these experiments has been published in the fur farm- 
ing press and the results have also been extended to fur farmers by lectures de- 
livered at regional meetings held throughout the Province. 

Apart from this work, the customary routine and post mortem examinations of 
animals sent from ranches for diagnostic purposes were carried out. 

FISH CULTURE BRANCH 
(See Pages 11, 12 and 13.) 

REPORT OF THE BIOLOGICAL AND FISH CULTURE BRANCH 

COLLECTION OF SPAWN 

Generally speaking, the spawning season of lake trout, whitefish, and herring 
in the Great Lakes falls to some extent within the period of this report. The 
spawning season varies according to the species and the geographical, climatic, and 
limnobiological conditions existing in the various areas. 

It would be out of place to go into a discussion of spawning seasons within the 
compass of this report. It is sufficient to say that during the fall spawntaking crews 
are organized for the purpose of collecting spawn of the commercial species for our 
various hatcheries which are located at strategic points along the Great Lakes' 
chain. In addition to the work of the hatchery crews, the Department has received 



48 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

excellent co-operation in this respect from the commercial fishermen under the direc- 
tion and guidance of the Branch. This team play resulted in a satisfactory produc- 
tion of eggs of commercial species and their resultant fry for re-stocking suitable 
sections of the Great Lakes and commercially fished inland waters. Lake trout are 
sought after by anglers to a considerable extent in the inland waters of the Province; 
these waters also receive necessary replenishment from time to time with hatchery 
stock. 

It should be pointed out that an important principle is involved in the estab- 
lishment of hatcheries on the various Great Lakes and connecting waters, namely, 
that the eggs collected from such areas are cultured in water of similar composition 
to that in which the species cultured live and thrive in a natural state, and in which 
the fry artificially cultured will ultimately be planted. Behind the establishment 
of district hatcheries there is also the same underlying principle. 

The temperature of the water in these commercial fish hatcheries is, general- 
ly speaking, the same as the water over the natural spawning grounds where the 
young fish are developing from the time the eggs are laid on these grounds in the 
fall, during the winter, and until they hatch in early spring. In the hatchery, how- 
ever, the eggs are protected from the hazards of a natural environment and are, 
therefore, carried over a critical period in the life-history of the fish. 

Speckled trout spawn was collected from breeders retained in our breeding ponds 
at Dorion, Sault Ste. Marie, and Normandale. Brown trout eggs were collected from 
a breeding stock at Mount Pleasant and rainbow trout eggs from a breeding stock 
at Normandale. 

DISTRIBUTION 

Very little distribution is done at this period of the year, but during an ad- 
vanced spring the fry of the whitefish and herring, especially the former, hatch 
rapidly and must be distributed, since they can be held in the tanks in the hatchery 
for a limited period only. The distribution made in accordance with directions is- 
sued by the Branch was as follows: 

Whitefish 

Lake of the Woods 4,0'00,00t) fry 

Lake Erie 96,620,000 " 

Lake Ontario (proper) 10,000,000 " 

Bay of Quinte 20,000,000 " 

Total 130,620,000 " 

Herring 

Lake Erie 100,000 fry 

The following distribution of lake trout eyed eggs was carried out on an ex- 
change basis: 

Federal Hatchery at Banff, Alta lOO.-OOO eyed eggs 

Federal Hatchery at Middleton, N. S 1*02,800 

Hatchery at French River, U. S. A 700,000 " 

Pendleton Oreille Hatchery 1*00, 0*00 " 

Hatchery at Colville, Washington 200,000 " 

State Fish Hatchery, Canaan, Vermont 209,80*0 " 

Government Hill Hatchery, Augusta, Maine . 102,800 

State Fish Hatchery, Colebrook, N. H 308,400 " 

Monmouth Hatchery, Monmouth, Maine . . . 102,800 " " 

Total 1,926,600 " 

The arrangement with the Canadian Hatcheries was made through the De- 
partment of Fisheries, Ottawa, whereby eyed lake trout eggs were exchanged for 
10*0,000 eyed Kamloops trout eggs from Kamloops hatchery, British Columbia. 
The exchange with the United States hatcheries was on the basis of an equal quantity 
of eyed speckled trout eggs in return for an equal quantity of lake trout eggs. 



REPORT FOR FIVE MONTHS ENDING MARCH 31st, 1935 



49 



In addition to the above, the following distribution of game-fish was made: 

Brown Trout 

Experimental purposes . 100 yearlings 

Rainbow Trout 

Experimental purposes 2,000 eggs 

Private waters (sale) 3,000 fingerlings 

REMOVAL OF NOXIOUS FISH 

From January 29, 1935, to March 12, 1935, hoop nets and gill nets were op- 
erated in suitable parts of Lake Mindemoya and Lake Manitou, Manitoulin Island, 
for the purpose of removing ling during their spawning season. As a result, 2,431 
ling were removed from Lake Manitou and 80 from Lake Mindemoya. The average 
weight of the ling taken from these lakes was 6 pounds and the total weight of ling 
removed was 15,066 pounds. 

From December 21, 1934, to January 28, 1935, similar work was conducted 
in the following waters in Leeds and Lanark counties with the following results: 





No. of Ling 
Removed 


Average 
Weight 


Total 
Weight 


Pike Lake 


727 
199 
334 
718 
26 
415 


8 
5 
8 
3 
4 
5 


5,816 


Rennet's Lake 


995 


Christie's Lake 


2,672 


Ottv Lake 


2,154 


Otter Lake 


1'04 


Rideau Lake 


2,075 








13,816 



The removal of ling from these waters is valuable, in view of their known de- 
predations on game-fish. 

EXPERIMENTAL HATCHERY 

In conjunction with the Branch laboratory, facilities were provided for carry- 
ing over limited quantities of fish in an experimental hatchery, a miniature of the 
standard hatchery provided with standard hatchery equipment. The hatchery was 
established for the purpose of continuing studies on the nutritional requirements 
of trout, the diseases of fish, and to check various phases of hatchery practice. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

In conclusion I desire to express my appreciation of the assistance and sup- 
port rendered to the Department during this period. More particularly would I 
mention the various Fish and Game Protective Associations and allied organizations 
throughout the Province, the officers and members of which have at all times dis- 
played keen interest in our work and exhibited a desire to see that the legislation 
for the administration of which we are responsible is equally fair to all concerned, 
and to this extent have therefore encouraged the Department in its efforts by an im- 
partial administration to secure, as far as possible, proper observance of Game and 
(fisheries Regulations and thus promote improved conditions in the Province. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I am, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

D. J. TAYLOR, 

Deputy Minister of Game and Fisheries. 

Toronto, April 2nd, 1936. 



Thirtieth Annual Report 



OF THE 



Game and Fisheries 
Department 

1936-1937 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 9, 1938 




ONTARIO 



TORONTO 

Printed and PubliBhed by T. E. Bowman, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 3 8 



TO THE HONOURABLE ALBERT MATTHEWS, 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 



MAY IT PLEASE YOUR HONOUR: 

I have the honour to submit herewith for the information of Your Honour 
and the Legislative Assembly, the Thirtieth Annual Report of the Game and 
Fisheries Department of this Province, for the year ended March 31st, 1937. 

I have the honour to be. 

Your Honour's most obedient servant, 

H. C. NIXON, 

Minister in Charge, 
Department of Game and Fisheries^ 

Toronto, 1938. 



(ii) 



THIRTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Game and Fisheries Department of 

Ontario 



TO: THE HONOURABLE H. C. NIXON, 
Minister in charge. 
Department oi Game and Fisheries. 

SIR: — 

I have the honour to submit to you in this and the following pages the Thirtieth 
Annual Report of the Department of Game and Fisheries, outlining the activities 
of Departmental services for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1937. The various 
comparative tables included in this Report, and the appendices thereto will be of 
interest when read in conjunction with other portions of the Report as an indication 
of the success and progress which has been made in the administration of the 
wild life division of the provincial natural resources. 

FINANCIAL 

At the outset it is perhaps advisable to refer to the financial position of the 
Department, and it gives me a great deal of pleasure to present herewith the 
statement of revenue produced under this Department during the fiscal year reported 
upon, specifying the various sources from which this revenue is secured together 
with the sum derived therefrom in each instance. 

ORDINARY REVENUE FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING MARCH THIRTY-FIRST, 

1937. 
GAME — 

Royalty $80,830.70 

Licenses — 

Trapping $28,371.25 

Non-resident Hunting 73,937.50 

Deer 59,351.25 

Moose 2,981.00 

Gun 71,526.01 

Dog 3,955.30 

Fur Dealers 29,737.00 

Fur Farmers 7,335.50 

Tanners 190.00 

Cold Storage 133.00 

Hotel and Restaurant 10.00 

277,527.81 

$358,358.51 
FISHERIES — 

Royalty 10,526.10 

Licenses — 

Fishing $100,924.34 

Angling 272,690.50 

373,614.84 
Sales — spawn taking 216.61 

384,357.55 
(1) 



2 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

GENERAL — 

Tourist Licenses $4,950.00 

Guides' Licenses 6,716.00 

Fines 11,271.15 

Sales — Confiscated articles, etc 10,279.12 

Rent 3,222.58 

Commission 2.113.69 

Miscellaneous 949.03 



$39,501.57 
$782,217.63 

The total receipts in the previous year amounted to $683,938.72 and it will 
thus be noted that the revenue for 1936-37 shows an improvement of $98,278.91. 
Of this increase $83,592.09 is attributable to the enlarged sale of non-resident 
angling licenses, while in the game division improvements in some branches were 
completely nullified by reason of the fact that revenue from royalties, principally 
on the pelts of fur-bearing animals, showed a decline in excess of $30,000.00, and 
a large proportion of which decline may be attributed to the entire close season 
which prevailed on beaver with the resulting lack of royalty revenue accruing from 
pelts of this particular species of fur-bearer. The complete picture, nevertheless, 
is a notable one and it might here be stated that the revenue collected this year 
has never been excelled in any previous year. 

Departmental expenditures totalled $474,128.95, so that our operations for 
the year resulted in a surplus of $318,088.68. Principal expenditures were made 
on the enforcement service, $188,810.36; fish hatcheries $141,263.55; construction 
$27,997.38, work being undertaken at the Trout Rearing Stations at Chatsworth 
and North Bay, Ingersoll Ponds, Manitoulin Bass Ponds, Midhurst Ponds, and the 
Sarnia and Wiarton Fish Hatcheries; Bird Farms and Experimental Fur Farm 
$9,197.15; and Wolf Bounty $33,360.63. 

It is generally conceded that the excellent fishing and to a somewhat lesser 
degree (which may possibly be attributed to the more vigorous weather conditions 
which prevail in the season) the hunting which are available in Ontario to the 
visiting sportsman are among the attractions responsible for the current increase 
in tourist traffic to the Province, and the importance of this tourist business is quite 
obvious. Money spent by our visitors is neither localized nor centralized but accrues 
in some measure to the benefit of every man, woman and child in the Province. 
Therefore, it is at present, and will continue to be an objective of this Department, 
by means of an extensive and intelligent re-stocking programme, and by reasonable 
protective measures designed to conserve the supply to perpetuate the resources and 
privileges which now encourage non-resident tourists to vacation within our borders. 

GAME 

The table which follows will show in detail what various hunting licenses, 
resident and non-resident, were issued during the year compared with information 
of a similar nature covering recent previous years. Noticeable increase will be 
observed in the number of non-resident hunting licenses which were issued during 
the year when compared with the number issued in 1935-36. This increase resulted 
in the collection of additional revenue from this particular branch of our activity 
amounting to $20,857.50. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1936-37 





1933 


1934 


1935-36 


1936-37 


Resident Moose 


673 

12,756 

165 

5,113 

97,561 

318 
634 


512 
12,890 

175 

4,902 

76,210 

489 
475 
457 


496 

14,779 

258 

5,221 

85,884 

686 
652 
680 


542 


Resident Deer 


15,394 


Resident Camp (Deer) 


262 


Resident Farmers' (Deer) 

Resident Gun 


5,386 
79,531 


Non-resident small game 

Non-resident deer 


1,129 

848 


Non-resident "General" 


878 







The following pages will contain a summary of conditions as they apply to 

both our animal and bird game life, and which information has been compiled 

from the reports of these conditions submitted by various members of the field 
service staff of the Department stationed throughout the Province: — 

DEER: — So far as the northern and northwestern portions of the Province are 
concerned reports to the Department indicate that, while the situation there has 
many problems peculiar to the area itself, conditions as they existed during the 
period under review were quite satisfactory, with some possible improvement and 
increase in numbers in certain sections. 

In the southwestern part of the lower portion of the Province, some increase 
is reported, probably due to the protection which has been afforded to them over 
a period of years, and while they are most numerous in the Counties of Simcoe, 
Grey, Bruce and Huron, there are evidences that these animals are to be found in 
practically every County in the section to which this reference pertains, and in 
the not too distant future may possibly reach the point where they may constitute 
a source of trouble to farmers and market gardeners. While the conservation 
measures now in effect have been provided for the purpose of protection they do not 
contemplate the development of our deer resources to such an extremity as is here 
indicated. In the central Counties they may be found in fair numbers only in 
Peterborough and Victoria, with slight improvement though continued scarcity re- 
ported from Halton, Peel, Northumberland and the north part of Ontario Counties. 
East of and including Hastings conditions were better, and they are to be found in 
numbers providing fairly satisfactory hunting in practically all the areas here in 
which an open season prevails. In the section in which the most intensive con- 
centration of deer hunters occurs during the regular open season, i.e. Parry Sound, 
Muskoka and Haliburton, conditions are reported to be satisfactory and as yet good 
hunting is available there. 



Undoubtedly the restrictions which apply to deer hunting continue to be neces- 
sary and must be observed and regulate the conduct of hunters if we are to preserve 
and improve our deer herds throughout the Province, and which condition is essen- 
tial in order to guarantee and justify a continuation of the fall hunting season in 
which many of the sports loving public are privileged to participate. 

In recent seasons we have been seeking the co-operation of deer hunters by 
asking them to submit a return to the Department of the result of their hunting 
together with comments. In the past the number of hunters making this return 
has been disappointing. Seeking an explanation for this apparent indifference 
on the part of sportsmen we came across a letter from a hunter which reads 
in part; "A lot of the boys won't make this return because they are afraid you 
will use the information to send tourists or others to their favourite hunting 
grounds. Why don't you tell them the real reason for the return?" The answer 
to this query is that it is necessary the Department should know the number of 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 



deer of both sexes killed annually, the locations where they are to be found in 
largest numbers, and the territories where they are obviously scarce, in order that 
suitable regulations for their conservation may be framed. With over twenty 
thousand hunters in the bush each fall a means is provided for obtaining reliable 
information of our deer herds not otherwise available. A brief reflection will 
convince the hunter that this information is wholly in the interest of sport. 

MOOSE: — These animals are not at all plentiful in any part of the Province 
and little improvement is evident even in the southern part where they have had 
the complete protection of an entire close season for the past several years. Reports 
from this Section are to the effect that if there be any increase such conditions can 
be attributed to any overflow from Algonquin Park. From northern Ontario where 
hunting of moose has been permitted in conjunction with the deer season reports 
reaching the Department indicate some scarcity and the desirability of the additional 
protection of an extended close season in some areas to preserve and thereby provide 
for improvement and increase in the numbers of this species. 

CARIBOU: — These animals are very scarce and are to be found only in the 
extreme north. Herds are reported only in the northern portion of the Cochrane 
District and in a few scattered sections of the Thunder Bay and Kenora Districts. 

ELK: — The original shipments of these animals to Ontario from Western 
Canada were supervised by the Federal National Parks Branch, and on arrival 
here were placed in the following Crown Game Preserves, viz; — Pembroke, Burwash, 
Chapleau, Nipigon-Onaman and Goulais River-Ranger Lake. Reports indicate there 
has been more or less improvement in all instances save possibly among those placed 
in the Nipigon-Onaman Preserve. From the herd at Pembroke certain animals 
have been distributed to suitable areas in Algonquin Park and on the Bruce Penin- 
sula, while a number of Elk on the Burwash Preserve were liberated in that area, 
and as far as possible the animals so transferred were set at liberty some con- 
siderable distance from farm property. Improvement in numbers has been observed 
among the animals transferred to Algonguin Park and the Bruce Peninsula, while 
from Pembroke is reported a fair increase, and a fine showing of young animals 
from Burwash. 

RABBITS: — All varieties were reported to be rather scarce throughout the 
northern areas. Reports received from the various portions of southern Ontario re- 
veal there is no scarcity of either the cotton-tail rabbit or the European hare (com- 
monly called the jack rabbit) in the western Counties, and some satisfactory hunting 
was enjoyed here. Conditions, however, were not as favourable as this in the central 
Counties, while a noticeable lack of numbers was reported from the east and the 
northern districts of Parry Sound, Muskoka and Haliburton. 

It is interesting to note from these reports that the jack rabbit is migrating 
northwards. Existence of this species in Muskoka has been observed and it is 
possible that the pleasure and recreation which the pursuit of this creature of the 
wild has provided to sportsmen in the southwestern Counties may soon be available 
to the interested hunters farther afield. 

PARTRIDGE: — Ruffed grouse are reported to be scarce in practically every 
section of the Province though some increase in their numbers was noted in the 
eastern portion of northern Ontario, and in some scattered areas in the western 
portion of the north. 

The sharp-tailed grouse, or prairie chicken, display conditions which are no 
better, but pratically similar to those which exist with reference to the ruffed 
grouse. 

The complete close season which has prevailed on partridge is absolutely 
necessary in order that the various species may have an opportunity for re- 
plenishment. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1936-37 



The condition of scarcity existing at this time is one which prevails perodically 
and has been the subject of many investigations and reports. Quite recently a 
paper dealing with fluctuations in the numbers of ruffed grouse and having special 
reference to this condition in Ontario, was prepared by C. H. Douglas Clarke, of the 
University of Toronto, Department of Biology. From this report it would appear 
that these periods of diminution do not occur simultaneously throughout the country, 
and even in this Province there are local differences of at least three years in the 
time at which diminution commences. Each period of diminution is preceded by 
comparative abundance and followed by comparative scarcity so that the conditions 
of the ruffed grouse population over the sixty years for which data are available may 
be expressed as a periodic cycle of between nine and ten years. 

QUAIL: — These birds occur in only a small portion of the Province. They are 
reported to be fairly numerous and their numbers increasing in some Counties in the 
southwestern peninsula, notably Essex, Kent, Elgin, Middlesex and Lambton. Reports 
of their existence in other portions of southern Ontario do not indicate any improve- 
ment, and it is quite probable that there are few, if any, areas outside of the Counties 
enumerated in which these birds may be encountered. A few pairs of these birds 
were distributed during the year by the Department in the Counties of Essex, 
Middlesex and Norfolk. 

PHEASANT: — The Department continued its work along the lines of the estab- 
ment of this excellent upland game bird in areas suitable to its existence. This 
branch of activity included the distribution of eggs and the liberation of live birds 
in proper areas, with more concentration and emphasis on the live bird phase of 
this activity. Records show that some 1,146 settings of eggs, or 17,190 eggs in 
all, were shipped to various applicants. Of these, 6 40 settings were sent to parties 
located in southwestern Counties and 280 settings to parties in Counties along the 
northern shore of Lake Ontario and the River St. Lawrence. The remainder was 
practically all distributed in Counties immediately north of these areas. 

A total of 2,803 live birds, including a few of the mutant variety, were liberated 
in connection with this branch of our re-stocking activities, and of this total 1,401, 
or fifty percent, were placed in the southwestern Counties, 9 46 in the southerly 
eastern Counties, and the balance in areas immediately adjoining these Counties 
to the north. 

This distribution of live birds was augmented by reason of certain conditional 
loans to breeders under which live birds raised by them to the number of 1,287, 
included in the distribution figures above set forth, were made available to the 
Department for use in connection with our general programme of re-stocking. 

The Department is deeply appreciative of a donation of mutant pheasants re- 
ceived from the Ohio State Department of Conservation, and which birds were 
liberated on Pelee Island. 

It is believed that the value to the farmer of the various species of upland 
game bird is becoming more obvious as we learn of the life history and activity 
of these birds. They provide the farmer with efficient and effective service as 
insect killers and weed destroyers. It is therefore apparent that game birds on the 
farm are a real asset, both from the standpoint of service and that of beautifying 
the farm. To be effective, however, they must be given consideration with regard 
to food and coverage, and in addition to this must be controlled against over- 
population consistent with the available supply of food lest they become a pest. 
This control is best exercised by legalized and seasonable fall shooting restricted 
as to season and bag limits established in accordance with the number of birds 
available. This control is a matter for mutual understanding between the sports- 
man and the farmer, for the game is the property of neither the farmer nor the 
sportsman, but with the proper spirit of co-operation is available with advantage 
to both. 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 



DUCKS: — Reports indicate that these birds provided good sport throughout 
the Province, notwithstanding that general conditions which applied to their 
propagation throughout the Dominion as a whole resulted in additional restrictions 
being imposed by the Federal Government under the Migratory Birds Convention 
Act, which is the legislation applicable to these birds, such as a more limited open 
season, a reduction in the daily bag limit from 15 birds to 12 birds, and a provision 
under which the use of live birds as decoys was prohibited. Conditions were 
perhaps somewhat improved as a whole, notwithstanding some reports to the con- 
trary from a few sections. 

GEESE: — This species provides shooting in only a very few sections of the 
Province, particularly in the extreme north, along the James Bay shore, and in 
the southwestern Counties, from which areas favourable reports are received. The 
Federal restrictions as referred to in the case of ducks were also applicable to geese, 
though these regulations as promulgated permitted a limit of catch in the case of 
geese of five birds per day and not more than fifty per season. 

PLOVER: — This bird continues to be very scarce in every section of the Pro- 
vince. But little improvement has been reported and only in a few scattered areas. 

SNIPE: — Reports show extreme scarcity of this species in northern Ontario, 
though there is some evidence they are more prevalent and show some improve- 
ment in the southern end of the Province, and particularly in the eastern portion. 

HUNGARIAN PARTRIDGE: — This, of course, is not a native species, but was 
Introduced to the Province some years ago, and liberated in various sections with the 
idea of providing additional shooting for sportsmen. No active re-stocking was 
undertaken by the Department during the year under review, and there is little 
evidence of improvement except in scattered areas in some eastern and southwestern 
Counties from which reports of increased numbers have been received. 

WOODCOCK: — This species is reported to be fairly plentiful in various sections, 
particularly in the central and western portions of the southwestern peninsula, 
notably Elgin, Essex, Norfolk and Oxford, and in some of the eastern Counties. 



Before closing this section of the report reference is made to the fact that regu- 
lations were passed which provided special open seasons and established conditions 
to govern, as follows: — 

(a) Pheasants — Pelee Island, October 22nd, 23rd, 29th and 30th. 
Limit of five birds per day. 

(b) Pheasants and Quail — Essex, Kent and Middlesex Counties, 
October 22nd and 23rd. Limits of catch, two pheasants and 
three quail per day. 

(c) Pheasants — Lincoln, Welland and Haldimand Counties, Octo- 
ber 22nd and 23rd. Limit of two birds per day. 

(d) Deer — Carleton County west of the Rideau River, November 
5th to 20th. General deer hunting regulations applied. 

(e) Deer — Townships of St. Edmunds, Lindsay, Eastnor and Alb- 
emarle on the Bruce Peninsula, November 16th to 21st. Gen- 
eral deer hunting regulations applied except that the use of 
dogs was forbidden. 

FUR BEARERS 

Conditions as they apply to fur-bearing animals throughout the Province and 
as they have been briefly summarized from reports received in the Department are 
set forth in the following references: — 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1936-37 



i 

m 

V 
ft 



BEAR: — These animals were reported to be quite numerous throughout the 
entire northern portion of the Province as well as in the more northerly areas of 
southern Ontario, which provided a degree of hunting much appreciated by those 
interested in this branch of the sport. 

BEAVER: — The sectional close season of previous years was made effective 
throughout the entire Province, and the increase in the numbers of these animals 
which has been reported from various districts can in all probability be attributed 
to this protective action. In practically all areas in which beaver have existed in 
the more recent years there has been some improvement in the conditions applicable 
to this desirable species of fur-bearing animal and in consequence of the complete 
protection which is now being provided this improvement should not only continue 
but become more evident. 

FISHER: — Existing conditions which apply to this species of valuable fur- 
bearer are not at all favourable in any area. These animals are, generally speaking, 
very few in number and the sections in which any improvement has been observed 
and reported are but few and scattered. 

FOX: — ^The several varieties of this species, in the wild, i.e., red, cross and 
silver, continue to be generally about the same as in recent years. Quite naturally 
conditions vary in the different portions of the Province and while improvement is 
noted in some parts this has served only to balance the reduction in their numbers 
which has been reported from other areas. 

LYNX: — Here, as in the case of the fisher, conditions are not at all favour- 
able, though it should be stated in reference to this species that no protection in the 
way of a close season is provided, and they may be taken any time during the 
period covered by the general trapping season. While some slight improvement is 
reported from Northern Ontario, general conditions do indicate that this particular 
species is doing no more than maintaining the levels of recent years. 

MARTEN: — These animals are practically extinct in the southern portion of 
the Province, and they continue to be extremely scarce in northern Ontario, with 
some slight improvement being reported from the eastern section thereof. 

MINK: — Reports from practically every section of Ontario warrant the as- 
sumption that mink are becoming less plentiful. Comparisons show that the catch of 
mink taken by licensed trappers again shows a considerable decline during the 
season reported upon. 

MUSKRAT: — There is no doubt that in many areas which have previously sup- 
ported this desirable little fur-bearer, natural conditions are becoming unfavourable. 
The fluctuation of water-levels and possible lack of food supply are having an 
adverse effect. Conditions may be described as only fair, and throughout the 
Province generally show no improvement. There has been a progressive decline 
in the number of the annual catch in recent years, as an examination of the sub- 
joined comparative table will show. 

OTTER: — Conditions here continued to be about the same as in more recent 
years. While these animals are still scarce they appear to be holding their own 
under the existing regulations which apply, and as a result a special Order was 
provided declaring an open season on this species extending from November 1st, 
1936, to February 28th, 1937, and which open season, of course, coincided with that 
provided in the Game and Fisheries Act in the case of mink and fisher, as well as 
fox and marten. 

RACCOON: — These animals are found only in Southern Ontario, and general 
conditions here are about as usual. While reports from some areas indicate 
improvement, this is not generally the case, for in many southwestern counties 
their numbers are reported to be somewhat limited and possibly diminishing. 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES Nq. 9 



SKUNK: — The catch as reported to the Department through the regular 
channels shows quite an increase as compared with that of the previous year, and 
this pestiferous and objectionable little creature continues to be quite plentiful 
throughout the Province. Market prices which have prevailed for their pelts 
have not been suflEiciently attractive to encourage any extensive trapping operations in 
the case of this particular species. 

WEASEL*: — This species continues to be plentiful. While the pelt is of con- 
siderably less value than was formerly the case, the catch shows a decided increase 
over that of the previous year. Nevertheless a review of reports to the Department 
reveals the fact that this condition does not justify the belief that there has been 
any great general increase in their numbers throughout the Province. 

SQUIRREIi (BIa«k and Grey): — These animals are quite numerous in the 
southern Counties and more particularly is this applicable to the western portion. 
They were afforded the protection of an entire close season which condition in 
all probability contributed in a large extent to the improvement evident in the 
numbers of these varieties of the squirrel species. 

At this point it is desired to make some general comments on trapping con- 
ditions. 

So far as Southern Ontario is concerned, except for a few scattered districts, 
trapping can no longer be regarded as providing remunerative employment to any 
great extent. Fox-hunting as a sport is enjoyed in many sections as is evidenced 
by the large number of special permits which are issued for this purpose and while 
considerable numbers of skunk and weasel are taken the financial returns received 
from the sale of these pelts by the trappers concerned are not at all impressive. The 
more valuable, and therefore the more desirable, species are becoming very scarce. 
Lynx, marten and fisher are practically non-existent in the south; beaver which ap- 
pear to be improving are, of course, provided the protection of a complete close 
season throughout the entire Province; while conditions which apply to mink, otter 
and raccoon are not at all favourable. Fox, as has been previously stated, are re- 
sponsible for some good hunting in addition to the trapping made available by 
their numbers, and in some scattered sections fairly good muskrat trapping is still 
available if satisfactory weather conditions prevail just previous to and during the 
open season. 

In Northern Ontario during the year reported upon while conditions were 
naturally better than those reported from Southern Ontario, they showed no im- 
provement over those which have been in evidence there in the more recent years. 
Licensed trappers in this northern section are restricted as to the area in which 
they may carry on their trapping operations, each being allotted a specific territory 
for his own use. It is anticipated that this system will encourage each individual 
trapper to practice conservation and protection in his own territory, as a means 
of assisting to perpetuate the various species of fur bearers therein. 

The protection which present Regulations provide for the more desirable classes 
of fur-bearing animals, particularly along the line of short and restricted open 
seasons during which periods only they may be lawfully trapped, is very necessary, 
and furthermore the compliance of all concerned with the various Regulations 
which govern is not only essential but must be forthcoming, and while the experienced 
trapper may not in all instances be favourably disposed to the various restrictions 
which now apply to fur-bearing animals and the trapping thereof, full co-operation 
with the Department along these lines is absolutely necessary if we are to be expected 
to maintain these animals at their present levels, without imppsing further restric- 
tions. 

The following comparative table shows the numbers of pelts of the various 
species of fur-bearing animals exported from and dressed within the Province 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1936-37 



during the year now reported upon and the two years previous, and upon which 
royalty was paid as required by provisions of the Game and Fisheries Act: — 



1933-34 



1935-36 



1936-37 



Bear 

Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (cross) 

Fox (red) 

Fox (silver or black) 

Fox (white) 

Fox (not specified) 

Lynx 

Marten 

Mink 

Muskrat 

Otter 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Weasel 

Wolverine 



2 

1 

63 

521 

3 

18 

73 

68 



341 
,336 
,297 
,224 
,534 

280 

89 

85 

,138 

,096 

,615 

,751 

,330 

,673 

,721 

,164 

5 



780,679 



411 

6,785 

2,137 

5,424 

37,044 

500 

883 

495 

2,642 

1,282 

47,057 

398,043 

3,701 

13,259 

50,747 

42,643 

4 

613,057 



476 

238 

2,117 

4,156 

35,232 

360 
17 

276 
2,081 
1.464 



33.930 

370,239 

3,779 

14,243 

87,950 

78,643 

2 

635.203 



From information which was secured from reliable sources the Department has 
computed the value of these pelts to be some $1,902,407.90, which was practically 
the same, (as a matter of fact only four thousand dollars less), as the figure pro- 
duced by the catch of the previous year. This figure, of course, is the actual value 
of the fur catch to the trapper. 

This total does not include the product of licensed fur farms from silver, black 
and blue foxes and mink, the pelts of which ranch raised animals are exempt from 
the payment of royalty, under the Game and Fisheries Act. It will be of interest 
to note that during the year 1936-37 licensed fur farmers marketed 28,619 silver 
and black fox pelts, 24,297 exported and 4,322 tanned; and 15,691 mink, 15,623 
exported and 5 3 tanned; which pelts together with the few blue fox pelts marketed 
have been computed to have realized the total sum of $1,067,848.32 on behalf of our 
fur-farmers. 



* 



FUR FARMING 

The propagation of fur bearing animals in captivity on licensed fur farms has 
been established and developed as an industry to the stage where in point of values 
accruing from the product thereof it is beginning to threaten the production of 
fur from our wild life natural resources, and the time is probably not far distant 
now when the value of the anual product of our licensed fur farms will exceed 
that of the catch of our licensed trappers from the wild. Some native species can 
be successfully propagated in captivity, and while the results which have been 
evident to date perhaps do not suggest much in the way of economic possibilities, 
experiments still continue though undoubtedly not to the same extent as in previous 
years. It has been found that other species are not adaptable to domestic propa- 
gation with a corresponding absence of satisfactory results. Consequently, for the 
present, fur farmers would appear to be devoting the major portion of their efforts 
to work with foxes principally silver and black, and to mink, they being the only 
species raised in substantial quantities. 

While the prices which furs brought in the open market did not offer much 
encouragement to prospective fur farmers, faith in the future of the industry 
induced some to commence operations, which is apparent from the fact that the 
number of fur farms operating under license during the year 1936 increased practi- 



10 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



cally nine percent, there being 1,348 licenses issued, while breeding stock figures 
show an increase of ten percent in silver foxes, and an increase in excess of twenty- 
six percent in mink. 

SUMMARY OF BREEDING STOCK ON LICENSED FUR FARMS 
AS AT JANUARY 1ST 



1935 



1936 



1937 



Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (cross) 

Fox (red) 

Fox (silver or black) 

Fox (blue) 

Lynx 

Mink 

Muskrat 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Bear 

Marten 



78 


70 


21 


19 


16 


20 


434 


367 


257 


286 


228 


207 


19,314 


21,645 


23,869 


10 


5 





2 


2 


2 


8,605 


12,332 


15,539 


447 


375 


351 


799 


524 


358 





3 


5 


11 


21 


15 


9 


4 


4 



Much of the research and experimental work previously performed at the 
Provincial Experimental Fur Farm at Kirkfield has been curtailed or discontinued. 
All laboratory equipment was transferred to the Ontario Veterinary College, at 
Guelph, which is more favourably located, and at which institution facilities have 
been made available for such biological and post mortem services as may be re- 
quired by the licensed fur farmers. 

CROWN GAME PRESERVES 

During the period under review the work of establishing small game preserves 
in Southern Ontario was continued. Through the co-operation of the landowners, 
sportsmen and the Protective Associations excellent progress was made in selecting 
suitable areas. As a result some twenty-six preserves were set aside in seventeen 
different Counties. In addition a preserve of approximately 100,000 acres was 
established in the District of Nipissing. This brings the total preserve areas in 
the Province to 111 with an area of approximately 6,061,289 acres, or 9,471 
square miles. 

The Preserves set aside have been properly posted with metal signs and the 
publicity given them has resulted in a larger measure of protection from both the 
public and the interested landowner. Considerable stocking of ring-necked 
pheasants was carried out in these new areas with good results from the standpoint 
of propagation. 

The following tabulation shows the Preserves added during the year: — 



Designation 



County 



Extent in 
Acres 



Holmedale . . . . 

Paris 

Kinloss 

West Lome . . 
Wyandotte 

Ojibway 

Sheppards Lake 

Keppel 

Holland 



Brant 

Brant 

Bruce 

Elgin 

Essex 

Essex 

Grey 

Grey 

Grey 



270 

860 
1,000 
3,300 
1,017 
1,440 

200 
1,650 

845 



ANNUAL REPORT, 19 36-37 



11 



Designation 



County 



Extent in 
Acres 



Wallaceburg 

Brigden 

Niagara 

Thorndale 

W. E. Saunders Sanctuary 

Jocko 

Varency 

Turkey Point 

Mud Branch 

Cedar Creek 

Petawawa Point 

Conestogo 

Guelph 

Humberstone 

Willoughby Park 

Bertie 

Markham 



Kent 
Lambton 
Lincoln 
Middlesex 
Middlesex 

District of Nipissing 
Norfolk & Haldimand 
Norfolk 
Oxford 
Oxford 
Renfrew- 
Wellington 
Wellington 
Welland 
Welland 
Welland 
York 



1,400 

5,750 

400 

850 

614 

100,000 

1,300 

1,200 

2,000 

800 

500 

1,475 

1,000 

900 

1,200 

1,000 

2,000 



WOLF BOUNTIES 

The following is a comparative table of condensed wolf bounty statistics 
covering the four last fiscal years: — 



Period 


Timber 


Brush 


Pups 


Total 


Bounty & 
Expenses 


For year ending Oct. 31, 19 33. 
For year ending Oct. 31, 1934. 
For year ending Mar. 31, 1936. 
For year ending Mar. 31, 1937 . 


1,112 

990 

1,159 

1.090 


1,229 

812 

1,713 

1,197 


43 
57 
33 
31 


2,384 
1,859 
2,905 
2,318 


$53,433.88 
27,080.65 
42,399.89 
33,360.63 



During the year some 1,699 claims for wolf bounty in respect of 2,347 wolf 
pelts, were submitted to the Department for consideration. Fifteen claims, involv- 
ing 29 pelts were disallowed for various reasons, including seven in which pelts 
proved to be those of dogs, five fox pelts, six unborn pups taken from the carcass 
of the mother by the claimant, and five coyotes imported from the Western Provin- 
ces, the claimant in this case being prosecuted and convicted. Details as to the 
sources of origin of the pelts submitted for bounty are outlined in the succeeding 
table — 



SUMMARY OF PELTS RECEIVED 



I 





Adult 


Wolves 


Pups 




District or County 


Timber 


Brush 


Total 


Algoma 


93 

23 

2 

19 

10 



18 

3 



235 



2 

14 

12 


166 
13 
2 
1 

3 

4 
1 

276 
2 
4 


119 


3 








1 



9 


262 


Bruce . 


36 


Carleton 


4 


Cochrane 


20 


Frontenac 


10 


Haldimand 


3 


Haliburton 


18 


Hastings 


7 


Huron 


1 


Kenora 


512 


Lambton 


2 


Lanark 


6 


Lennox & Addington 


14 


Manitoulin 


140 







12 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SUMMARY OF PELTS— (Continued) 



District or County 



Muskoka . . . 
Middlesex 
Nipissing . . . 
Norfolk . . . . 
Ontario . . . . 
Parry Sound 
Patricia . . . . 
Peterborough 
Rainy River 
Renfrew . . . 

Simcoe 

Sudbury . . . . 
Thunder Bay 
Temiskaming 
Victoria . . . . 
Welland . . . . 
York 

Totals 



Adult Wolves 



Timber 



28 


71 

1 

82 

62 

3 

133 

28 
6 

86 
148 

12 
1 



1,092 



Brush 



2 

2 

36 

5 



8 

57 



214 

1 

3 

131 

157 

4 

1 

1 

1 

1,214 



Pups 





6 



5 

6 
1 


10 





41 



Total 



30 

2 

113 

5 

1 

90 

124 

3 

353 

30 

9 

217 

315 

16 

2 

1 

1 

2,347 



It will be noted that the total amount expended was $33,360.63 of which the 
sum of $33,287.00 was the amount actually paid to bounty claimants, as shown 
by the following statement: 



Brush Wolves (Counties) 
(Districts) 


41 
1,156 


@ $ 6.00 
@ $15.00 

@ $ 6.00 
@ $15.00 

@ $ 2.00 
@ $ 5.00 

pelts 


$ 246.00 
$17,340.00 

$ 534.00 
$15,015.00 

$ 2.00 
$ 150.00 




Total Brush 

Timber Wolves (Counties) 
(Districts) 


1,197 

89 

1,001 


$17,586.00 


Total Timber 
Pups (Counties) 
(Districts) 


1,090 

1 

30 


$15,549.00 




31 
2,318 




$ 152.00 


Total 


$33,287.00 



Payment of the full bounty of $15.00 is assumed by the Provincial Treasury 
in respect of wolves destroyed in provisional judicial districts, while in the case 
of these animals which are destroyed in the southern counties the bounty is 
paid by the County Treasurer, forty percent of the amount being assumed by the 
Province and subsequently rebated to the Counties. 

Trappers and farmers are responsible for eighty percent of the wolf pelts 
forwarded for bounty, while an examination of the reports as to the methods which 
were adopted for capturing the animals reveals that forty-five percent were snared, 
twenty-five percent trapped, and nineteen percent shot, while the authorized use 
of poison was responsible for the taking of only two percent. 



NEW DEVEIX)PMENTS 

MONTHLY BULLETIN 

In August, 1936, the first issue of what was proposed to be a regular periodical 
bulletin was issued and distributed among provincial newspapers, officers of Game 
and Fish Protective Associations and sportsmen who have been sufficiently interested 
to ask that their names be included on the mailing list. The Honourable Mr. 
Nixon's letter which introduced this publication and which appeared in the first 
issue contained the following references viz: — 



I 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1936-37 13 



"In presenting this, the first of what we hope will be a monthly bulletin, we 
have in mind an extension of the publicity work by which we are endeavouring to 
make the people of the Province more deeply conscious of the valuable heritage 
we posses in our wild life natural resources, and the necessity for conserving these 
resources. 

"We appreciate the co-operation of the Sportsmen's Associations thoughout 
the Province, as well as the individual co-operation of all those who, from an 
aesthetic or recreational standpoint, are interested in the wild life. 

"With a view to fostering this spirit of co-operation it is our desire to convey 
to the public all the information in the possession of the Department concerning 
wild life resources of our forests, lakes and streams, and we hope that a wider 
knowledge of conditions will result in a keener realization by the individual of his 
own responsibility for the protection of these important assets." 

Various interesting extracts from the material which was published in the 
issues of this publication during the months now being reviewed have been in- 
corporated, with advantage, in this particular annual report of Departmental 
activities, and indicative of the interesting information which appears in this 
Monthly Bulletin is the following extract from the issue of January, 19 37 — 
"Non-resident Angling Licenses: The value of the Tourist Industry to the Province 
has been emphasized in a previous issue of the Bulletin. Its importance becomes 
more and more evident each year as records are made available and data in con- 
nection therewith is systematically tabulated. The Department of Game and 
Fisheries exacts a license fee from non-residents who desire to fish in the Province. 
A tabulation of the licenses issued divulge some very interesting information. Re- 
turns show that a total of 48,09 7 non-resident angling licenses were issued during 
1936. This total does not by any means represent the number of visitors fishing 
within the Province. It is provided by the regulations that 'Children under the 
age of twelve years may angle without a license, when accompanied by a member 
of his or her family who is in possession of a non-resident angling license.' 
Further provision is made for the issuing of a special Family License covering a 
husband, his wife and their children not over the age of twenty-one years, at a fee 
somewhat higher than that for an individual license. Of the total number of 
licenses issued 12,810 were Family Licenses, 

"As each licensee furnishes the Department with his name and address it is 
possible to compile a distribution of the different States and countries represented 
by the license holders. It is interesting to note that every State in the American 
Union with the exception of Idaho, Oregon, Utah and Wyoming had representatives 
fishing in Ontario during the summer of 1936. The nearby States of Ohio, Michigan, 
New York, Pennsylvania and Illinois sent us thousands of sportsmen, the others 
contributed lesser numbers in direct ratio to their geographical locations. The 
Provinces of Canada, from British Columbia to Quebec supplied their quotas of 
visiting anglers but the Maritimes are not represented. Most interesting of all, 
however, is the information that fishing licenses were sold to visitors from such 
widely separated parts of the world as England, Java, Porto Rico, Australia, East 
Africa, Panama, Hawaii, India and the West Indies." 

Owing to the provisions of the Regulations under which non-resident angling 
licenses are issued, and more particularly the conditions which govern the use of 
these licenses to which previous reference has been made, figures are not available 
showing the actual number of non-resident anglers, though it has been estimated 
that under the licenses issued during the year a grand total of more than 68,000 
non-residents legally enjoyed the recreational advantages of the excellent fishing 
which is available in the waters of this Province. 

TOURIST OUTFITTERS' CAMP LICENSES: 

In accordance with a suggestion which was submitted for the consideration 
-of the Fish and Game Committee of the Legislative Assembly by the organized 



14 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

tourist outfitters, provision was made for the first time to license tourist outfitters 
operating throughout northern Ontario and in those portions of the Districts of 
Parry Sound, Nipissing and Haliburton and the County of Renfrew lying north of 
the line of the Canadian National Railway from Parry Sound to Pembroke. In all 
some four hundred and twenty-seven camps were licensed, eighty-three in the District 
of Kenora, twenty-seven in the District of Rainy River, two in the District of Patricia, 
nineteen in the District of Thunder Bay, sixty-six in the District of Algoma, thirty- 
eight in the District of Sudbury, thirty-two in the District of Manitoulin, seventy- 
nine in the District of Nipissing, seventy-four in the District of Parry Sound, and 
seven in the County of Renfrew. Of this total three hundred and eighty-eight were 
operated by residents of the Province under license issued at a fee of $10.00 each, 
while the balance of thirty-nine were operated under license issued to non-residents 
at a fee of $25.00 each. 

The regulation of these camps will be of a supervisory nature, while a degree ' 
of protection from undue encroachment will be afforded those who already have 
made large investments in the establishment of permanent camps. The licensing 
of these camps will also be of much assistance to the Department in the protection 
of the fish and game resources, because it places an added responsibility on the 
owners to see that law observance is maintained so far as each individual camp is 
concerned. As the license is renewable yearly it is obviously in the interest of the 
licensee to see that his operations are conducted in such a manner that the best 
possible service and accommodation will be afforded the tourist at rates consistent 
with the class of service rendered. 

From the standpoint of the owner or operator much benefit should accrue. 
Embodied in each application for a license is a questionnaire asking for information 
in connection with the camp which might be available for the Department to dis- 
seminate to tourists. The answers provide information as to the number and kind 
of cabins, the various kinds of boats, number of available guides, names of adjacent 
lakes and rivers, kind of fishing, adjacent hunting territory, species of game to 
be had, nearest Provincial Highway and distance therefrom, nearest railway, and 
any other general information the operator may care to supply. This information 
when received is not only tabulated for the use of the Department of Game and 
Fisheries but is also passed on by us to the Provincial Tourist and Publicity Bureau 
which features the tourist advertising work for the Province and responds to 
thousands of enquiries yearly for just such information as will now be systematically 
available from the camp operators. This service should prove of very great benefit 
to those engaged in the operation of tourist camps in that portion of Ontario which 
is affected, and the supervision exercised under the license will ensure protection 
for the visitor. 

AMENDMENTS TO THE ACT: 

Amendments enacted by the Legislative Assembly and which became effective 
during the year included: 

Changes in the regulations which apply to the hunting of deer provided for 
an additional division comprising the southern portions of the Districts of Algoma 
and Sudbury and the open seasons which would be effective therein, also for a 
change in the dates of the open season on Manitoulin Island and made provision 
for the use of do/^s in more liberal proportion. 

Prohibited the carrying of high-powered rifies during the deer season in areas 
inhabited by these animals under the authority of any hunting license except the 
one issued for the taking of deer, as well as prohibiting the use of snares in any 
part of the Province during the deer season. 

Established by legislation different divisions of the Province in respect to the 
trapping of muskrats and provided the various open seasons to be applicable therein. 

Provided protection for and made unlawful the shooting of ospreys and eagles. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1936-37 15 



ft 



Changes in the regulations which applied to the open season for migratory- 
water fowl, i.e. wild ducks and wild geese, and which changes were practically 
nullified by the subsequent regulations provided by the Federal Authorities under 
the Migratory Birds Convention Act and Regulations, which last mentioned Regu- 
lations definitely apply to such hunting. 

And, finally, as set forth under the previous sub-heading, provided for the 
licensing of tourist outfitters' camps, and established the license fees therefor. 

ENFORCEMENT SERVICE 

The Department maintains a regular staff of field officers which numbered 
some eighty members during the year 19 36-37, whose duty it is to enforce and 
secure proper observance of the various provisions of the Game and Fisheries Act 
and Regulations, the Dominion Special Fishery Regulations for the Province of 
Ontario and those Provisions of the Migratory Birds Convention Act and Regu- 
lations which are effective in this Province. The services of this regular Field Staff 
are augmented by the assistance and co-operation of members of the Ontario 
Provincial Police force and certain seasonal officers whose services are engaged 
in connection with the matter of providing adequate patrol service along important 
waters during the spring and fall fish spawning periods and during the various 
open hunting seasons. The seasonal overseers employed during the 19 36-37 period 
numbered eighty-three in all, and were engaged for varying periods of time, fifteen 
for general enforcement purposes, seventeen in connection with the open season for 
pheasants and other birds, five during the deer season, and forty-six during the 
critical spring and fall fish spawning periods. 

That interested sportmen are concerned in this branch of activity is noted by 
the fact that during this year some 927 offered and were appointed as Deputy Game 
and Fisheries Wardens and as such were authorized to assist in the matter of 
securing proper observance of the Game and Fisheries Regulations. While there will 
probably always be a number of necessary prosecutions it is felt that this, in minor 
cases, is not a desirable method of securing observance of the Act. It is believed 
that many infractions are the result of thoughtlessness, and a lack of knowledge 
concerning the real worth of our wild life heritage. 

The activities of the Game Warden are dictated by the necessity for the pro- 
tection of our resources and the elimination from our sporting activities of the 
elements of unfairness which characterizes infractions of the Regulations. The good 
sportsman is always careful to observe the letter and spirit of the law. In doing 
so he naturally has to curb his desires and restrict his pleasures. It exasperates 
him, therefore, to see others with less pronounced scruples calmly ignoring the 
regulations and making light of their actions. 

The laws regulate the wise use of available resources, be it game or fish, and 
an accumulation of minor infractions may be serious for any species or district. 
The Game Warden is invariably courteous in the handling of what is, after all, a 
difficult job. He deserves the co-operation of every sportsman and the backing of 
every law-abiding citizen. 

During 19 36-37 there were 1,448 cases in which offences against the Game 
and Fisheries Regulations were committed and in which the offenders concerned 
were relieved by various officers of articles of sporting equipment as well as the 
unlawful game or fish which may have been in their possession on these particular 
occasions. An examination of the reports of these seizures as submitted to the 
Department reveals that the action was provided by Game and Fisheries Overseers 
in 1,193 cases, by Deputy Game Wardens in 137 cases, by Provincial Police OflScers 
in 34 cases, and in 84 cases by co-operative action as between our regular overseers, 
deputy game wardens, and police officers. 



16 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

A condensed summary of the material thus seized is submitted herewith: — 

Live animals in 14 cases 

Birds, game animals and meat in 177 cases 

Fire-arms and ammunition in 491 cases 

Fish in 241 cases 

Fishing equipment in 309 cases 

Angling equipment in 71 cases 

Pelts and hides in 197 cases 

Traps and equipment in 148 cases 

Water craft in 35 cases 

Motor vehicles in 11 cases 

Poison in 3 cases 

Lights (artificial) in 32 cases 

Spears .in 47 cases 

Miscellaneous articles in 50 cases 

Duplicate entries on one report of seizure, such as fire-arms and game; angling 
equipment and fish; trapping equipment and pelts, and other combinations of a 
similar nature account for the apparent discrepancy in the total shown by the above 
table, viz: — 1826, as compared with the actual seizure reports which number 1448. 

Departmental records contain evidence of the fact that during the year under 
review some 1,154 cases were prosecuted through the courts, and convictions were 
registered in 1,092 of these cases, the charges in the remaining 62 cases being dis- 
missed by the presiding Magistrates. It will be of interest to set forth the following 
details concerning the responsibility for the prosecutions in which convictions were 
registered, viz: — Game and Fisheries Overseers in 929 cases, Deputy Game Wardens 
in 18 cases. Provincial Police Officers in 76 cases, while co-operative action as among 
overseers, deputy game wardens and police was responsible in 69 cases. 

While each officer is required to be impartial and efficient in the carrying out 
of his duties he is also required to use common sense and courtesy in his treatment 
of the public. In this respect we would like to express a word of appreciation by 
saying that we believe those virtues are exemplified by the average field officer in 
the discharge of his duties. On their behalf and as proof of this, we would like 
to quote part of a letter recently received from one of our non-resident hunters. 
It is but one of many the Department receives from time to time acknowledging the 
courtesy of the average Game and Fisheries Officer. 

The letter is dated November 25th, 1936, and is in part as follows: 

"I cannot refrain from referring to the marked degree of courtesy experienced 
when one has anything to do with Canadian Officials. I would even go so far as to 
say that when one gets on this side of the Peace Bridge the change is quite notice- 
able. Some distance north of Toronto we were held up by two of your officers 
and our game record and licenses examined, as was proper, but all of it was done 
with such perfect courtesy that the experience, so far from being unpleasant, strongly 
inclined the hunter to co-operate to the fullest possible extent. The fact that a day 
before a group of American sportsmen had been caught in a bunch of lies, without 
sufficient hunting licenses, and had parts of one deer sewed inside the carcass of 
another, indicated that underneath the courtesy there was no lack of efficiency. 

"It is no wonder that 99 percent of American sportsmen who go to Canada 
feel about it as I do. Out of many years of this sort of thing has come my associ- 
ation with Rod and Gun and my sense of gratitude has urged me to write for it 
without compensation as some small return for the good times and treatment I 
have experienced in Canada." 



I 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1936-37 17 



THE FISH CULTURE BRANCH 

For the purpose of assisting in the maintenance of the fish supply, the De- 
partment has launched a vigorous and progressive fish cultural programme. The 
value and importance of such action is obvious. 

Ontario's game-fishing interests are vitally important, and the maintenance 
of these interests by protecting the normal fish population and by replenishing this 
population by fish cultural means, wherever necessary, is becoming of practical 
concern to increasing thousands of our citizens. The healthful and recreational 
advantages of game-fishing are of extraordinary importance coupled as they are 
with the direct and indirect financial benefits of the tourist trade, which penetrates 
almost every branch of industry, thus increasing employment. 

The necessity of supplementing the work of nature in maintaining the important 
commercial fisheries of the Great Lakes and internationally connecting waters is, 
also, of vital importance. The interest shown by the commercial fishermen them- 
selves is increasingly evident. By means of their able assistance and the efficient 
work of the Department's spawn-taking crews, the egg collection is becoming more 
and more successful each year. 

This applies equally well to the actual planting or distribution of game-fish 
and commercial varieties. Methods of planting are based on the information 
available regarding the life-history of the species propagated. Although our 
hatchery officers are responsible for this distribution, the assistance rendered in 
various ways by commercial fishermen, angling fraternities, and individuals in- 
terested in the replenishment of our waters is considerable. 

HATCHERIES AND REARING STATIONS 

During the year a new trout rearing station was constructed in the District 
of Nipissing, approximately twenty miles north-east of North Bay, off the new 
Timiskaming highway. This station comprises a hatchery, which will take care of 
trout from the egg stage to the advanced fry stage. Five raceways are provided 
for taking care of fingerlings and two large ponds for fingerlings and yearlings. 
This rearing station will be a most valuable and important asset to this district 
from the standpoint of more adequate replenishment of suitable waters. Long 
haulage will be avoided and the fish will be planted in the same watershed and 
in waters of similar composition to that in which they are reared. 

Two additional ponds 50 feet wide by 300 feet long were added to the series 
at the Chatsworth Trout Rearing Station. This expansion will give a greater 
opportunity to increase production of sizable trout before they are distributed. 

Three small ponds, located on the grounds of the Reforesti^^ Station at Mid- 
hurst, were renovated and new and more satisfactory outlet dams were constructed. 
These ponds are used for wintering trout. 

SPECKLED TROUT: 

This year the Department adopted a policy of rearing large numbers of trout 
to yearling and older stage before distribution to natural and suitable waters. The 
results of this plan were eminently satisfactory and more than 563,000 yearlings 
and older trout were planted, whereas in the preceding year approximately 35,400 
were planted. 

In addition to this, 1,053,000 fingerlings were distributed. The entire abandon- 
ment of future fry and fingerling distribution is contemplated with the exception 
of surplus numbers which it might not be possible to accommodate in our nurseries. 



18 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

A small number of eyed eggs were planted on an experimental basis in inaccess- 
ible streams in Thunder Bay District and a few eyed eggs were supplied to the 
Department of Biology, University of Toronto, for experimental study. 

BROWN TROUT: 

The Department's plan regarding the re-stocking of streams in southern Ontario 
with brown trout was outlined in some detail in the previous report. Since brown 
trout are notional in their habits and difficult to catch, they are valuable for re- 
stocking suitable waters in thickly populated areas. 

Every year more encouraging reports of angling for this species are received 
and intensive re-stocking of streams in southern Ontario will undoubtedly give 
good results in the near future. 

Our fingerling distribution exceeded that of the previous year by approximately 
38,000 and this number would have been trebled except that 100,000 fingerlings 
were retained over winter for distribution as yearlings the following year. Propa- 
gatory work with brown trout will be intensified. 

RAINBOW TROUT: 

(a) Steelhead — 

Practically the same number of steelhead fingerlings were planted this year 
as in the one preceding. These were distributed in streams having direct access to 
larger streams or lakes, since this species has a strong migratory tendency to leave 
smaller streams in which they are planted in their second or third year. Efforts 
have been made to establish this species in the lower reaches of trout streams which 
are no longer suitable for trout on account of the high water temperature prevailing 
in summer. Trout streams tributary to lakes, somewhat land-locked in character, 
for example Lake Simcoe, have also been stocked, care being taken to introduce 
them to streams where dams or other barriers will not interfere with the annual 
migration to suitable spawning grounds. Large streams in Northern Ontario in 
which this species has become established are also being stocked. 

(b) Fall Spawning Rainbow Trout — 

Approximately 3,500 fall-spawning yearlings and older rainbow trout were 
distributed to waters suitable for them, that' is the larger, lower reaches of trout 
streams. Experience in re-stocking with this strain in waters in the State of 
Minnesota has shown that it will thrive in the larger and warmer portions of trout 
streams which are no longer suitable throughout their entire courses for speckled 
trout and they do not show the same tendency to migrate as the closely related 
form, the steelhead. 

(c) Kamloops Trout — 

A fairly large number of adults of this species have been carried over 
successfully in ponds at Normandale. At the moment it is difficult to state how 
successful collection of spawn from these breeders will be; this will depend on the 
fertility of the sexes. 

If this close relative of the rainbow trout, which has been described in previous 
reports, can be established in our lakes, it will be quite desirable, since it is an ex- 
cellent sporting fish taken on the fly and by trolling. These trout, except during 
the hot weather of summer, are usually to be taken near the surface. They show 
no tendency to migrate from the lakes in which they are planted. Lakes suitable 
for speckled trout supplied with cold spring water from running brooks are con- 
sidered suitable for Kamloops trout. 

LAND-LOCKED SALMON: 

The Department was able to secure only a few eyed eggs of this species during 
the preceding year, and the fish cultured therefrom are being retained. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1936-37 19 



Some work is being done on a close relative, the Atlantic salmon, to determine 
whether it will become established in land-locked bodies of water which are suitable 
for lake trout. 

LAKE TROUT: 

The majority of the lake trout fry were retained to fingerling size for distri- 
bution, and as a result the number distributed exceeded that of the previous year 
by nearly 3,700,000. 

WHITEFISH: 

There was an increase of approximately 44.5 per cent over the distribution 
of the previous year. 

HERRING: 

An increase of 28.2 per cent, approximately, in the distribution of herring fry 
over that of the previous year was obtained. A greater production of spawn of 
the Lake Erie herring or Cisco would undoubtedly assist in the replenishment of 
this important species in that body of water. 

YELLOW PICKEREL: 

There was an increase in the distribution of pickerel fry amounting to 31 per 
cent over that of the previous year. 

Following previous practice, two million eyed eggs (potential fry) were handled 
by the Sparrow Lake Hatchery, the fry therefrom being distributed in suitable areas 
in Sparrow Lake. 

SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS: 

There was an increase of approximately 12 per cent in fry distribution as com- 
pared with that of the previous year. Although there was a decrease in the number 
of fingerlings as a result of a reduction in the yield from IngersoU Pond, there was 
a fair increase in the number of adults distributed. 

LARGE-MOUTHED BLACK BASS: 

Following the previous year's practice, one pond was operated for large- 
mouthed black bass production and although there was a decrease in the number 
of fry, there was a substantial increase in the number of fingerlings produced by 
this pond, when it is considered that the pond in question is less than one acre in 
extent. 

YELLOW PERCH: 

The yellow perch is among the more important commercial species of fish taken 
in Lake Erie. All the perch spawn collected by the commercial fishermen was 
cultured in the Kingsville Fish Hatchery and the fry resulting therefrom were 
planted in suitable habitats in Lake Erie. 

MASKINONGE: 

There was a reduction in the total number of maskinonge fry planted as com- 
pared with that of the previous year. This was due primarily to reduced collection 
of eggs as a result of such unfavourable factors as unsatisfactory weather con- 
ditions, paucity of breeding males, resulting to some extent in ineffective fertili- 
zation. Among the chief prerequisites to success of maskinonge propagation is to 
have a suitable number of males and females spawning simultaneously and a gently 
rising temperature. Sharp fluctuations in the temperature of the water are detri- 
mental to successful results. 

On this Continent unsuccessful attempts have been made to rear lunge to the 
fingerling stage in appreciable numbers. According to authentic statistics the record 
number of maskinonge fingerlings produced as a result of pond culture by one of 
the States of the United States foremost in this field of fish culture was 4,125 in 



20 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

1931. These fingerlings measured from 3 to 8 inches in length. During subsequent 
years this number has not been approximated and, in fact, none of the States 
culturing maskinonge in their hatcheries has since produced in excess of 2,000 
maskinonge fingerlings by the pond cultural method. 

As a result of a study of this problem in Ontario, it was found that the factors 
chiefly responsible for unsuccessful attempts to rear maskinonge in appreciable 
numbers were twofold. 

1. The difficulty of supplying adequate and suitable food requisites. 

2. The problem of cannibalism. 

These two factors must be surmounted and the only way in which this can be done 
is to study the problem in a practical manner, by experimental rearing in ponds of 
the fish themselves and of the forms of life which they require for their sustenance. 

SANCTUARIES 

In view of the limitations of bass and maskinonge culture and to fulfill the re- 
quirements of these important species in our waters, their protection in a natural 
state is essential. 

From the fisheries standpoint the sanctuary principle consists in having an area 
completely removed from public or private use. In view of an ever-increasing 
tourist trade, fishing for the species under discussion will become more and more 
intensive and, considering the inaccessibility, ease and speed with which our waters 
may be fished, it becomes increasingly evident that sanctuaries are necessary. Fish 
sanctuaries fulfill three important purposes: 

1. They give the fish a chance to grow. Fish do not grow by magic and if we 
want larger and better fish, we must give them a chance to grow and repro- 
duce normally. 

2. Sanctuaries act as bases of supply for replenishing outer or adjacent fishing 
waters. 

3. They may be very useful for stock and supply. 

It is only within comparatively recent years that this fundamental factor in 
fisheries' management has been pursued with vigor and during the past few 
years the Department has made marked progress along these lines. 

With these facts and also the conservational principles already discussed in 
mind, the Department's objective is to bring all feasible measures to bear on the 
problem of maskinonge and bass maintenance and protection, in order to shorten 
any gap between supply and demand. 

During the past spring and summer a biological survey of the Kawartha Lakes 
was conducted in order to dertemine the most suitable water areas adjacent to 
lakes and streams to set aside as sanctuaries for bass and maskinonge. As a resiiU. 
the following areas were established on this basis: 

(a) In Peterborough County: 

Black Duck Lake (Deer Bay), located in the Township of Harvey; Chemong 
Lake, that portion located in the Township of Smith, Concession 4, Lots 1-3, 
inclusive; 

Duck Ponds (Stony Lake) located immediately east of Gilchrist Bay, between 
McCracken's Landing and Crow Landing, located in the Township of Dummer; 

Katchiwano Lake, that portion located in the vicinity of Lakefield, south of a 
line drawn from Haig's Point to Webster's Farm, in the Township of Smith; 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1936-37 21 

Little Mud Lake (Chemong Lake) located in the Township of Smith; 

Sandy Creek Bay (Buckhorn Lake), located in the Township of Harvey; 

Searight's Bay (North River), located in the Township of Belmont; 

South Bay (Stony Lake), located in the Township of Dummer; 

Taylor's Bay and Munn's Bay (Belmont Lake), located in the Township of 
Belmont. 

(b) Victoria County: 

Chemong Lake, that portion located in the Township of Emily, Concession 4, 
Lot 23, and Concession 5, Lots 22 and 23; 

Goose Lake, located in the Township of Fenelon; 

Goose Lake, located in the Townships of Fenelon and Somerville, 

Fishing of any kind is prohibited in these areas, and we believe that they will 
act as perennial sources of replenishment for the outer waters. In many of the 
closed areas lunge and large-mouthed black bass live and thrive. In some instances 
there are mixed environmental conditions, so that small-mouthed black bass is a 
frequent inhabitant also. 

We propose to follow up the action taken by studying the results of this 
closure from time to time. If there are deficiencies in these closed areas, we propose 
to remedy these, if possible. For example, conditions in certain areas may be vastly 
improved by eliminating useless competitors or enemies? A number of areas show 
distinct possibilities for rearing lunge and bass under controlled conditions. 



CLOSED WATERS 

In addition to the waters closed for purposes of bass and maskinonge propa- 
gation, as stated on pages 20 and 21 the following waters were closed for the pro- 
tection and natural propagation of the species specified, namely: 

(a) For Maskinonge Propagation: 
BEAVER CREEK: 

Township of Marmora, County of Hastings; from Fidlar's Rapids to the outlet 
at Crow River. (This stream was also closed for the propagation of black bass). 

BERRY CREEK: 

Located on Crown Lands and on Indian Reserve, Territory 32A, before entering 
Long Bay of the Lake of the Woods, District of Kenora. 

(b) For Speckled Trout Propagation: 
BEAVER CREEK: 

Township of Barrie, County of Frontenac, and in the Townships of Anglesea 
and Kaladar, County of Lennox and Addington. 

CHIPPEWA CREEK: 

Township of Widdifield, District of Nipissing. 

CRAFT'S CREEK: 

Townships of Mountjoy, Jessop, and Murphy, District of Timiskaming. 

DUCHESNEY CREEK: 

Townships of Commanda and Widdifield, District of Nipissing. 

ELORA CREEK: 

Township of Woolwich, County of Waterloo. 

FINN'S CREEK: 

Township of Sullivan, County of Grey. 



22 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 



ERASER CREEK: 

Township of Cashel, County of Hastings, and in the Township of Effingham, 
County of Lennox and Addington. 

LEE'S CREEK: 

Township of Keppel, County of Grey. 

LITTLE OUSE RIVER: 

Township of Dummer, County of Peterborough. 

NIGGER CREEK: 

Township of Holland, County of Grey. 

RAWDON CREEK: 

Townships of Huntingdon and Rawdon, County of Hastings. 

ST. JACOB'S CREEK: 

Township of Waterloo, County of Waterloo. 

SARGENT'S LAKE: 

Township of Holland, County of Grey. 

SPENCER CREEK: 

Townships of Beverly and Flamboro, County of Wentworth. 

STURGEON RIVER: 

Townships of Medonte and Tay, County of Simcoe. 

(This stream is also closed for the propagation of rainbow trout). 

TRIBUTARIES TO WILLIAMS LAKE: 

Township of Holland, County of Grey. 

(c) For Aurora Trout Proi)agation : 
WHITE PINE LAKE: 

Township of Gamble, Timagami Forest Reserve, District of Timiskaming. 

WATER LEVELS 

In view of the shallowness of the water in which maskinonge, pike, black bass, 
sunfish, minnows and other forage fish spawn, appreciable fluctuations in water 
levels over such natural spawning areas are detrimental. The Department has 
appealed to all those responsible for such operations and the Department of 
Railways and Canals, which has jurisdiction over the Trent Valley Canal System, 
was supplied with the following data on the waters under their jurisdiction, namely, 
the fish frequenting the waters, the spawning dates of the various species, and 
the spawning depths. As a result we look for definite improvement along these 
lines and information received from our field officers, or those best qualified to 
judge, indicate that during the past season considerable improvement was evident 
along these lines. 

REMOVAL OF COARSE FISH: 

Between December 19, 1936, and January 31, 1937, hoop nets were operated 
for the removal of ling from the following waters: 

(a) In Leeds County: 

Rideau Lake (vicinity of Portland, 

Rideau Ferry and Sand Island); 

Beverly, Charleston, Crosby, Otter, Sand and Wolf Lakes. 

(b) In Lanark County: 

Tay River, Otty, and Pike Lakes. 

(c) In Frontenac County: 

Crow and Bob's Lakes. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 19 36-37 



23 



The total number of ling removed from these waters was 12,315. The average 
weight of the ling taken was four pounds; therefore, the total amount of ling 
removed was in the neighbourhood of twenty-five tons. 

FISH PLANTING SURVEYS 

The following fish planting surveys were carried out during the year: 



WATERS 



COUNTY 



TOWNSHIP 



Almond Creek 

Earnshaw Creek 

Ferguson's Pond 

(on Earnshaw Cr.) 

Grange Hall Creek 

Little Otter Creek 

Mitchell or Lanner Stream 

Crawford Lake 

Wye Creek 

Echo Lake 

Sparrow Lake 

Eckert or Manery's Creek. 

Leach Creek 

Unnamed Creek 

(near Courtland) 

Five Point Stream 

Hodges Mill Pond 

McCabe's Creek 

Tottle Lake 

Deer River 

Eels Creek 

Mississauga River 

Mary Lake 

Old Holland River 

Pond at Richmond Hill. . . 



Elgin 
Elgin 

Elgin 

Elgin 

Elgin 

Norfolk 

Elgin 

Halton 

Middlesex 

Muskoka 
Muskoka 
Simcoe 

Norfolk 
Norfolk 

Norfolk 

Oxford 
Oxford 
Oxford 
Oxford 

Peterborough 
Peterborough 
Peterborough 

York 
York 
York 



Bayham 
Southwold 

Southwold 

Malahide 

Bayham 

Houghton 

Bayham 

Nassagaweya 

Nissouri W. 

McLean 
Morrison 
Matchedash, Orillia 

Middleton 
Houghton 

Middleton 

Oxford W. 
Oxford E. 
Norwich S. 
Blenheim 

Harvey, Burleigh 
Burleigh, Anstruther 
Harvey 

King 

Gwillimbury E. 
Vaughan 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

In conclusion I desire to give expression to my appreciation of the valuable 
assistance and co-operation received by the Department from many sources during 
the year. 

Our work which at times is unquestionably somewhat difficult has been made 
the more pleasant and enjoyable by reason of the continued co-operation of interested 
individuals and the various Fish and Game Protective Associations throughout the 
Province. My contacts with officers and members of many of these organizations 
encourages a thought that the work of these Associations has become so well 
known and their usefulnes so apparent that there is no question as to the place 
they occupy in the sphere of game and fish conservation. 

An obvious result of the gathering together of any group or organization of 
men to discuss measures for the benefit of all, will be a spread of knowledge re- 
sulting in a more enlightened type of citizen, and incidentally a better community 
to live in. A Sportsmen's Organization accomplishes these things, and, while it is 
concerned with the conservation of fish and game throughout the Province, it is 



24 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 



primarily interested in seeing that everything possible is done to ensure satisfactory 
local conditions. 

We believe that the work of the Protective Associations throughout the 
Province is of very great value, and are therefore anxious to encourage the organi- 
zation and development of these associations wherever possible. The fact of 
membership in a Fish and Game Protective Association implies good sportsmanship, 
and good sportsmanship is the key to a liberal enjoyment of those healthful pleasures 
which are our heritage. 

Mention is also made of the fact that generally speaking, members of the 
staff, both the inside and the outside service, have conducted themselves and per- 
formed the duties assigned to them in the best interests of the Department and its 
varied activities. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I am. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

D. J. TAYLOR, 

Deputy Minister of Game and Fisheries 

Toronto 2, March 9th, 1938. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1936-37 



25 



APPENDIX No. 1 

SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1936, to March 31st, 1937 



LARGE-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

FRY 

Bruce: 

Agar Lake 15,000 

Arran Lake 10,000 

Grey: 

McNab Lake 20,000 

FINGERLINGS 
Lanark : 

Clayton Lake 1,000 

Leeds: 

Bass Lake 1,000 

Gananoque Lake 138* 

Lower Beverley Lake .... 2,000 

Sand Lake 1,200 

Whitefish Lake 1,000 

Norfolk: 

Little Lake 560 

Parry Sound: 

Manitowaba Lake 500 

Peterborough: 

Rice Lake 1,000 

* Adults 

SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

FRY 

Bruce: 

Britain Lake 5,000 

Cameron Lake 10,000 

Chesley Lake 15,000 

Cyprus Lake 10,000 

Gould Lake 15,000 

Isaac Lake 15,000 

Miller Lake 10,000 

Sauble River 45,000 

Saugeen River 30,000 

Shouldice Lake 10,000 

Silver Lake 10,000 

Frontenac: 

Bass Lake 5,000 

Big Clear Lake 5,000 

Bobs Lake 10,000 

Bull Lake 5,000 

Cross Lake 5,000 

Crotch Lake 10,000 

Crow Lake 5,000 

Eagle Lake 5,000 

Kashwakamak Lake 5,000 

Long Lake (Hinchin- 

brooke) 5,000 

Horseshoe Lake 5,000 

Marble Lake 5,000 

Mississagagon Lake 5,000 

Rock Lake 5,000 



Sharbot Lake 10,000 

Grey: 

Francis Lake 5,000 

Wilcox Lake 7,500 

Haldimand: 

Grand River 25,000 

Haliburton: 

Paudash Lake 10,000 

Hastings: 

Baptiste Lake 5,000 

Bass Lake 5,000 

Crow Lake and river 5,000 

Gunter Lake 5,000 

Little Salmon Lake 5,000 

Moira Lake 5,000 

Moira River 10,000 

Oak Hill Lake 5,000 

Pine Lake 5,000 

Stoco Lake 10,000 

Wadsworth Lake 5,000 

West Lake 5,000 

Huron: 

Bluevale River 15,000 

Lanark: 

Pagan's Lake 5,000 

Otty Lake 5,000 

Leeds : 

Big Rideau Lake 5,000 

Charleston Lake 10,000 

Crosby Lake 5,000 

Otter Lake 5,000 

Sand Lake 5,000 

Wolfe Lake 5,000 

Lennox-Addington : 

Beaver Lake 5,000 

Varty Lake 5,000 

Muskoka: 

Bass Lake 10,000 

Buck Lake 10,000 

Dickie Lake 10,000 

Duck Lake 10,000 

Henshaw Lake 10.000 

Lake Rosseau 40,000 

MacKay's Lake 15,000 

Pine Lake 15,000 

Riley Lake 10,000 

Silver Lake 10,000 

Sucker Lake 10,000 

Three Mile Lake 20,000 

Northumberland : 

Crow Bay 5,000 

Trent River 10,000 



26 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF nSH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1936, to March 31st, 1937 — Continued 



SMAIilv-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

— Continued 

Parry Sound: 

Bass Lake 10,000 

Peterborough: 

Belmont Lake 2,500 

Buckhorn Lake 5,000 

Clear Lake 5,000 

Deer Lake 5,000 

Little Cedar Lake 5,000 

Loon Lake 10,000 

Otonabee River 5,000 

Pigeon Lake 5,000 

Quarry Lake 5,000 

Rice Lake 5,000 

Round Lake 5,000 

Sandy Lake 5,000 

Prince Edward: 

Consecon Lake 5,000 

Roblin's Lake 5,000 

Stormont: 

St. Lawrence River 5,000 

Victoria: 

Sturgeon Lake 5,000 

Waterloo: 

Conestoga River 25,000 

Grand River 25,000 



FINGERLINGS 

Carleton: 

Ottawa River 

Frontenac: 

Bear Lake 

Canonto Lake 

Chippego Lake 

Crotch Lake 

Desert Lake 

Draper Lake 

Long Lake (Clarendon). 
Long Lake (Portland).. 
Loughborough Lake . . . . 

Lucky Lake 

Mazinaw Lake 

Pine Lake 

Schooner Lake 

Silver Lake 

Spectacle Lake 

Sydenham Lake 

Thirteen Island Lake . . . . 

Thirty Island Lake 

White Lake 

Halton: 

Bronte Creek 

Oakville Creek 

Hastings: 

Bow Lake 



1,000 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
500 
1,000 
1,000 
1.030 



1,000 
1,000 



1.000 



Loon Lake 

Kent: 

Rondeau Bay 

Lanark: 

Bartram Lake 

Christie Lake 

Dalhousie Lake .... 

Long Lake 

Mississippi Lake . . . 
Mississippi River . . . 
Pike Lake 

Leeds: 

Benson Lake 

Crow Lake 

Gananoque Lake . . . 
Newborough Lake . . 

Troy Lake 

Whitefish Lake .... 

Lennox-Addington : 

Long Lake 

South Beaver Lake . . 
White Lake 

MUSKOKA: 

Lake Joseph 

Lake Stewart 

Little Sand Lake ... 

Long Lake 

Muskoka Lake 

Nine Mile Lake .... 

Norfolk: 

Nanticoke Creek . . . 

Parry Sound: 

Ahmic Lake 

Beaver Lake 

Bella Lake 

Bells Lake 

Bilson Lake 

Blackburn Lake . . . 

Cecebe Lake 

Clear Lake 

Cummings Lake ... 
Darlington Lake ... 
Deer Lake (Lount) 

Devolve Lake 

Doe Lake 

Head of Lake Joseph 
Lake of Many Islands 
Little Clam Lake. . . 
Little Deer Lake. . . . 
Magnetawan River . 
Manitowaba Lake . . . 

Maple Lake 

Mary Jane Lake . . . 
McGowan Lake .... 

Neighick Lake 

Pickerel Lake 

Portage Lake 

Plumtree Lake 



1,000 



350 



1,000 
500 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
500 



1.000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



1,000 
1,000 
500 
1,000 
1,000 
1.000 



500 



500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

1,000 

500 

500 

1.000 

1.000 

500 

1.000 

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

1.000 

500 

500 

500 

1.000 

1.000 

1,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1936-37 



27 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OP FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1936, to March 31st, 1937 — Continued 



SMAIili-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

— Continued 



Parry Sound — Cont. 

Rainy Lake 

Rankin's Lake 

Sequin River 

Shawanaga Lake 

Shebeshekong Lake 

Turtle Lake 

Whitefish Lake 

Whitestone Lake 

Renfrew: 

Moccasin Lake 

White Lake 

Russell: 

Castor River 

ADULTS 

Haliburton: 

Beach Lake 

Black Lake 

Brady Lake 

Davis Lake 

Grace Lake 

Gull Lake 

Hurricane Lake 

Kashagawigamog Lake . . 

Saskatchewan Lake 

Soyer Lake 

Kenora: 

Long Lake 

Kent: 

Rondeau Bay 

Leeds: 

Beverley Lake 

Gananoque Lake 

Lennox and Addington: 

Weslemkoon Lake 

Muskoka: 

Deep Bay (Sparrow Lake) 

Rainy River: 

Clearwater Lake 

Jackfish Lake 

One-sided Lake 

Pipestone Lake 

Sudbury: 

French River 

Victoria: 

Pigeon Lake 

Sturgeon Lake 

Wellington: 

Reformatory Pond 



500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
1,000 
1,000 
500 



1,000 
1,000 



500 



300 
300 
300 
300 
600 
300 
300 
300 
300 
300 



43 



160 



115 
100 



114 



150 



240 
25 

200 
25 



30 



300 
300 



100 



NOTE: All adult bass were harvested 
from natural waters in the areas or 
districts specified, excepting the last 
item. 

MASKINONGE 

FRY 
Hastings: 

Crow River 10,000 

Northumberland : 

Crow Bay 5^000 

Rice Lake 30,000 

Trent River 27,000 

Peterborough: 

Buckhorn Lake 5,000 

Chemong Lake 20,000 

Clear Lake 5,000 

Deer Bay 10,000 

Katchawanooka Lake .... 10,000 

Lovesick Lake 10,000 

Otonabee River 5,000 

Pigeon Lake 25,000 

Trent River 10,000 

Prince Edward: 

Muscote Bay 12,000 

Simcoe: 

Holland River 25,000 

Victoria: 

Balsam Lake 30,000 

Pigeon River 30,000 

Sturgeon Lake 5,000 

PERCH 

Essex: 

Lake Erie 46,080,000 

PICKEREL 

Algoma: 

Alma Lake 200,000 

Bright Lake 500,000 

Clear Lake 250,000 

Cummings Lake 500,000 

Desbarats Lake 500,000 

Echo Lake 410,000 

Gordon Lake 500,000 

Little Bass Lake 500,000 

Little Clear Lake 250,000 

Long Lake 1,000,000 

Mississauga Lake 1,000,000 

Rock Lake 500,000 

Brant: 

Grand River 500,000 

Bruce: 

Chesley Lake 100,000 

Isaac Lake 500,000 

Saugeen River 1,500,000 

Silver Lake 200,000 



28 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1936, to March 31st, 1937 — Continued 



PICKEREL — Continued 

Carleton: 

Ottawa River 400,000 

Rideau River 300,000 

Cochrane: 

Barber's Bay 250,000 

Mortimer Lake 250,000 

Reid Lake 250,000 

Remi Lake 500,000 

Wilson Lake 250,000 

Frontenac: 

Big Clear Lake 250,000 

Bobs Lake 500,000 

Bull Lake 250,000 

Clear Lake 100,000 

Crow Lake 200,000 

Devil Lake 100,000 

Fourteen Island Lake. . . . 300,000 

Green Lake 100,000 

Gull Lake 500,000 

Horseshoe Lake 100,000 

Kashwakamak Lake 500,000 

Lake Chippego 200,000 

(Little) Mississagagon 

Lake 200,000 

Long Lake (Hinchin- 

brooke) 200,000 

Long Lake (Portland)... 500,000 

Malcolm Lake 100,000 

Marble Lake 200,000 

Mississagagon Lake 200,000 

Mississippi River 500,000 

Rock Lake 300,000 

Salmon River 100,000 

Sand Lake 500,000 

Sharbot Lake 700,000 

Silver Lake 100,000 

Grenville: 

Nation River 100,000 

Grey: 

Mountain Lake 100,000 

Haliburton: 

Paudash Lake 400,000 

Hastings: 

Eraser Lake 200,000 

Moira Lake 300,000 

Moira River 200,000 

Soyers Lake 200,000 

Stoco Lake 300,000 

York River 200,000 

Huron: 

Fordwich Mill Pond 200,000 

Kenora: 

Berry Lake 100,000 

Big Vermilion Lake 2,500,000 

Dogtooth Lake 150,000 



Eagle Lake 2,500,000 

Granite Lake 100,000 

Lake of the Woods 18,200,000 

Long Pine Lake 200,000 

Lulu Lake 1,000,000 

Marchington Lake 2,000,000 

Stanzikihimi Lake 2,000,000 

Wabigoon Lake 500,000 

Lanark: 

Bennet's Lake 300,000 

Big Rideau Lake 1,300,000 

Black Lake 200,000 

Christies Lake 200,000 

Dalhousie Lake 700,000 

Joe's Lake 100,000 

Lower Rideau 1,500,000 

Mississippi Lake 300,000 

Mississippi River 500,000 

Patterson's Lake 200,000 

Rideau River 500,000 

Leeds: 

Bass Lake 500,000 

Crosby Lake 200,000 

Higley Lake 500,000 

Opinicon Lake 400,000 

Sand Lake 100,000 

West Rideau Lake 500,000 

Lennox and Addington: 

Bass Lake 100,000 

Long Lake 400,000 

Napanee River 250,000 

South Beaver Lake 250,000 

White Lake 400,000 

Manitoulin: 

Kagawong Lake 2,000,000 

Lake Mindemoya 1,000,000 

Muskoka: 

Allan's Lake 100,000 

Bins Lake 100,000 

Henshaw Lake 100,000 

Kahshe Lake 250,000 

Lake Muskoka 1,000.000 

Lake Rosseau 1,400,000 

Long Lake 100,000 

Longford Lake. South 400,000 

Mootes Lake 100,000 

Silver Lake 100,000 

Six Mile Lake 500,000 

Sparrow Lake 2,000,000 

(eggs) 

Spence Lake 100,000 

Spring Lake 50,000 

Sucker Lake 100,000 

Three Mile Lake 200,000 

Nipissing: 

Bruce Lake 100,000 

Cache Lake 150,000 

Champlain Lake 500,000 

Finlayson Lake 100,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1936-37 



29 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1936, to March 31st, 1937 — Continued 



PICKEREL — Continued 

Nipissing — Continued 

Jumping Caribou Lake . . . 200,000 

Lake Nosbonsing 500,000 

Lake Talon 250,000 

Lake Timagami 1,700,000 

Martin Lake 300,000 

McPhee Lake 100,000 

Red Cedar Lake 300,000 

Tilden Lake 100,000 

Wasing Lake 300,000 

Wickstead Lake 300,000 

Wilson Lake 100,000 

Northumberland : 

Crow Bay 250,000 

Mud Lake 250,000 

Presqu'ile Bay 500,000 

Rice Lake I,2p0.000 

Trent River 1,000,000 

Oxford: 

Lake Lisgar 500,000 

Parry Sound: 

Ahmic Lake 1,000,000 

Axe Lake 200,000 

Barton Lake 100,000 

Beaver Lake 100,000 

Commanda Lake 200,000 

Dobbs Lake 100,000 

Doe Lake 300,000 

Isabella Lake 200,000 

Head of Lake Joseph 500,000 

Lake Cecebe 200,000 

Lake of Many Islands .... 250,000 

Little Deer Lake 250,000 

Magnetawan River 250,000 

McQuaby's Lake 100,000 

Osier's Lake 400,000 

Otter Lake 400,000 

Pickerel Lake 100,000 

Portage Lake 250,000 

Restoule Lake 200,000 

Sand Lake 100,000 

Sequin River 200,000 

Shawanaga Lake 250,000 

Shebeshekong Lake 100,000 

Squaw Lake 200,000 

Stanley Lake 100,000 

Stormy Lake 100,000 

Sucker Lake 250,000 

Wah-Wash-Kesh Lake . . . 300,000 

Whitstone Lake 200,000 

Wolf Lake 100,000 

Wolf River 300,000 

Wilson Lake 100,000 

Peterborough: 

Indian River 250,000 

Otonabee River and 

Little Lake 1,200,000 

Quarry Lake 410,000 

Rice Lake and Trent River 250,000 



Prince Edward: 

Bay of Quinte 10,502,000 

Consecon Lake 500,000 

East Lake 500,000 

Rainy River: 

Beaverhouse Lake 1,000,000 

Clearwater Lake 2,000,000 

Off Lake 1,000,000 

Quill Lake 2,000,000 

Rainy Lake 77,000,000 

Windigo Lake 1,000,000 

Renfrew: 

Blackfish Lake 200,000 

Chats Lake 1,000,000 

Golden Lake 1,000,000 

Madawaska River 1,000,000 

Norway Lake 300,000 

Ottawa River 200.000 

Petawawa River 900,000 

Sturgeon Lake 600,000 

Russell: 

Castor River 100,000 

Simcoe: 

Gloucester Pool 2,500,000 

Lake Couchicing 4,000,000 

Little Lake 400,000 

Matchedash Bay 2,000,000 

Nottawasaga River 500,000 

Severn River 500,000 

Stormont: 

Nation River 100,000 

St. Lawrence River 2,037,500 

Sudbury: 

Bear Lake 500,000 

Birch Lake 250,000 

Lake Penage 3,000,000 

Matagamasi Lake 250,000 

Onaping Lake 1,000,000 

Ox Lake 1,000,000 

Ramsay Lake 1,000,000 

Trout Lake 250,000 

Unnamed Lake 200,000 

Wanapitei Lake 1,000,000 

Thunder Bay: 

Baril Lake 100,000 

Cordingley Lake 250,000 

Lake of the Flats 100,000 

Lake Shebandowan 200,000 

Timiskaming: 

Hound Chutes 100,000 

Lake Timiskaming 500,000 

Montreal River 200,000 

Net Lake 100,000 

Rib Lake 100,000 

Round Lake 100,000 

Sesekinika Lake 800,000 

Trout Lake 100,000 

Twin Lake 100,000 



30 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1936, to March 31st, 1937 — Continued 



PICKEREL — Continued 

Victoria: 

Lake Dalrymple 500,000 

Mud Turtle Lake 100,000 

Round Lake 500,000 

Young's Lake 200,000 

Great Lakes: 

Lake Huron 64,500,000 

Georgian Bay 2,000,000 

North Channel 4,300,000 

Lake Superior 20,150,000 

NOTE: Planting for Lake Ontario listed 
under Bay of Quinte (Prince Edward 
County) 



BROWN TROUT 

FINGERLINGS 

Brant: 

Whiteman's Creek 5,000 

Bruce: 

Cameron Lake 5,000 

Crane Lake 5,000 

Crane River 5,000 

Cyprus Lake 5,000 

Saugeen River 10,000 

Vogt's Creek 5,000 

Carleton: 

Mississippi River 2,000 

Durham: 

Baxter's Creek 1,500 

Elgin: 

Little Otter River 5,000 

Grey: 

Big Head River 10,000 

Creamery Creek 2,000 

Harrison Park Creek .... 5,000 

Potawatami River 12,000 

Saugeen River 15,000 

Styx River 5,000 

Sydenham River 5,000 

Weatherspoon Creek 3,000 

Haldimand: 

Grand River 5,000 

Halton: 

N. Branch Sixteen Mile 

Creek 7,000 

Manitoulin: 

River Manitou 10,000 

Norfolk: 

Nanticoke Creek 1,000 



Peterborough: 

Deer Bay Creek 1,500 

Dickson's Creek 1,500 

Eel's Creek 1,000 

Jack's Creek 1,500 

Mississauga River 1,500 

Nogies Creek 1,500 

Simcoe: 

Nottawasaga River 10,000 

Demonstration purposes .... 50 

YEARLINGS 

Brant: 

Whiteman's Creek 1,000 

Elgin: 

Little Otter River 1,000 

Grey: 

Beaver River (lower 

reaches) 1,120 

Big Head River 1,125 

Simcoe: 

Nottawasaga River 3,000 

Demonstration purposes ... 45 



liAKE TROUT 

FRY 

Frontenac: 

Big Gull Lake 50,000 

Buckshot Lake 4,000 

Camp Lake 4,000 

Canonto Lake 4,000 

Crow Lake 15,000 

Devil Lake 20,000 

Draper Lake 10,000 

Long Lake 25,000 

Mackie Lake 4,000 

Mississagagon Lake 4,000 

Palmerston Lake 4,000 

Rock Lake 4,000 

Thirty Island Lake 55,000 

Leeds: 

Big Rideau 25,000 

Charleston Lake 45,000 

Indian Lake 10,000 

Otter Lake 15,000 

Red Horse Lake 30,000 

Lennox-Addington : 

Mazinaw Lake 25,000 

Otter Lake 10,000 

Silver Lake 10,000 

White Lake 5,000 

Great Lakes: 

Lake Ontario 1,187,000 

Lake Huron and North 

Channel 100,000 

Lake Superior 2,500,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1936-37 



31 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1936, to March 31st, 1937 — Continued 



Lake Trout — Continued 

EYED EGGS 

Exchange 3,200,000 

Demonstration purposes .... 9,400 

FINGERLINGS 

Algoma: 

Achigan Lake 20,000 

Basswood Lake 25,000 

Big Bear Lake 15,000 

Chiblow Lake 50,000 

Clear Lake (188) 70,000 

Gumming Lake 10,000 

Deep Lake 10,000 

Grey Trout Lake 10,000 

Hawk Lake 10,000 

Hobon Lake 15,000 

Jobammeghia Lake 15,000 

Lake Matinenda . . .' 25,000 

Lake Tendinenda 25,000 

Lake of the Mountains... 10,000 

Lonely Lake 10,000 

Loon Lake 10,000 

Moose Lake 25,000 

McCarroU's Lake 10,000 

Patten Lake 25,000 

Pickerel Lake 10,000 

Rainbow Lake 15,000 

Raw Hide Lake 30,000 

Red Deer Lake 10,000 

Sand Lake 25,000 

Stuart Lake 25,000 

Trout Lake (Aweres) . . . 10,000 

Trout Lake (24-R-12) ... 10,000 

Upper Island Lake 10,000 

Weckstrom's Lake 5,000 

Bruce: 

Gillies Lake 27,000 

Cochrane: 

Chapman Lake 10,000 

Nellies Lake 10,000 

Perry Lake 10,000 

Frontenac: 

Canonto Lake 4,000 

Crotch Lake 4,000 

Eagle Lake 4,000 

Green Lake 5,000 

Grindstone Lake 4,000 

Sharbot Lake . 4,000 

Haliburton: 

Bear Lake (Glamorgan) . . 5,000 

Bear Lake (Livingstone) . . 4,000 

Beech Lake 5,000 

Big Boskung Lake 10,000 

Bow Lake 5,000 

Clearwater Lake 4,000 

Davis Lake 5,000 

Drag Lake 10,000 

Eagle Lake 5,000 



East Lake 4,000 

Fletcher Lake 4,000 

Gull Lake 15,000 

Haliburton Lake 15,000 

Hall's Lake 10,000 

Hawke Lake 4,000 

Hollow Lake 8,000 

Horseshoe Lake 5,000 

Kashawigamog Lake 10,000 

Kimball Lake 4,000 

Kushog Lake 10,000 

Little Boskung Lake 10,000 

Little Hawke Lake 10,000 

Maple Lake 5,000 

Moose Lake 5,000 

Mountain Lake 10,000 

McFadden Lake 4,000 

Oblong Lake 5,000 

Otter Lake 10,000 

Paudash Lake 4,000 

Pine Lake 5,000 

Redstone Lake 10,000 

South Bay 5,000 

Spruce Lake 4,000 

Stormy Lake 5,000 

St. Norah's Lake 4,000 

Twelve Mile Lake 10,000 

White Trout Lake 4,000 

Wolf Lake 5,000 

Hastings: 

Baptiste Lake 80,000 

Bass Lake 4,000 

Bay Lake 4,000 

Big Egan Lake 4,000 

Big Salmon Lake 4,000 

Clear Lake (Herschel) . . . 60,000 

Clear Lake (Lake) 4,000 

Eagle Lake 4,000 

Jamieson Lake 4,000 

Kaminiskeg Lake 25,000 

Limestone Lake 2,000 

Little Salmon Lake 4,000 

Lavelle Lake 4,000 

Long Lake (Mayo) 6,000 

Quinlan Lake 2,000 

Robinson Lake 2,000 

Trout Lake (Herschel) .. 60,000 

Weslemkoon Lake 4,000 

Kenora: 

Armstrong Lake 50,000 

Big Stone Lake 6,000 

Big Vermilion Lake 110,000 

Clearwater Bay 125,000 

Cul de Sac Lake 50,000 

Dogtooth Lake 50,000 

Eagle Lake 50,000 

Granite Lake 50,000 

Silver Lake 50,000 

Trout Lake 50,000 

Whitefish Bay 75,000 

Lanark: 

Lower Rideau 30,000 

Silver Lake 30,000 



32 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 

April 1st, 1936, to March 31st, 1937 — Continued 



Lake Trout — Continued 

Manitoulin: 

Kagawong Lake 25,000 

Manitou Lake 2 5,000 

Muskoka: 

Bass Lake 4,000 

Bella Lake 4,000 

Benson's Lake 4,000 

Big Twin Lake 4,000 

Britannia Bay 4,000 

Bruce's Lake 4,000 

Clear Lake (McLean) .... 4,000 

Clear Lake (Ridout) 4,000 

Clear Lake (Sinclair).... 4,000 

Fairy Lake 8,000 

Fox Lake 4,000 

Haystack Bay 4,000 

Lake of Bays 16,000 

Lake Joseph 16,000 

Lake Muskoka 18,000 

Lake Rosseau 24,000 

Little Clear Lake 4,000 

Little Twin Lake 4,000 

Long Lake 4,000 

Loon Lake 4,000 

Mary's Lake 4,000 

McCrea's Lake 4,000 

Peninsula Lake 8,000 

Portage Bay and Narrows 4,000 

Poverty Lake 4,000 

Rebecca Lake 4,000 

St. Mary's Lake 4,000 

Skeleton Lake 16,000 

Sucker Lake 4,000 

Ten Mile Lake 4,000 

Trout Lake 4,000 

Vernon Lake 8,000 

Waseosa Lake 4,000 

Nipissing: 

Buck Lake 5,000 

Cameron Lake 10^000 

Canoe Lake 8,000 

Cross Lake 10,000 

Dotty's Lake 4,000 

Jumping Caribou Lake . . . 15,000 

Lake Timagami 50,000 

Martin Lake 15,000 

Moore's Lake 10,000 

Oxbow Lake 4,000 

Red Cedar Lake 15,000 

Round Lake 4,000 

Smoke Lake 8,000 

South Tea Lake 8,000 

Sturgeon Lake 10,000 

Trout Lake 45,000 

Turtle Lake 15,000 

Two Rivers Lake 10,000 

Whitney Lake 10,000 

Wilson Lake 15,000 

Parry Sound: 

Bay Lake 4,000 

Clear Lake (Perry) 4,000 



Clear Lake (Humphry) . . 4,000 

Eagle Lake 8,000 

Eleanor Lake 4,000 

Foley Lake 4,000 

Head of Lake Joseph 4,000 

Horn Lake 8,000 

Lorimer Lake 8,000 

Otter Lake 8,000 

Portage Lake 4,000 

Sand Lake 8,000 

Star Lake 4,000 

Three Legged Lake 8,000 

Trout Lake 4,000 

Whitefish Lake 4,000 

Renfrew: 

Bark Lake 25,000 

Barry's Bay 10,000 

Blackfish Bay 10,000 

Carson Lake 10,000 

Condon Lake 10,000 

Diamond Lake 10,000 

Greenan's Lake 5,000 

Lake Clear 25,000 

Long Lake 25,000 

Lower Carson Lake 10,000 

Pog Lake . 15,000 

Round Lake 10,000 

Trout Lake (Griffith) ... 15,000 

Trout Lake (Sherwood) . . 10,000 

Wadsworth's Lake 20,000 

Simcoe: 

Lake Simcoe 34,000 

Sudbury: 

Bell Lake 50,000 

Ella Lake 10,000 

Lake Penage 25,000 

Long Lake 10,000 

Loon Lake 25,000 

Ramsay Lake 10,000 

Trout Lake 15,000 

Wanapitei Lake 25,000 

Weiquid Lake 25,000 

Windy Lake 25,000 

Thunder Bay: 

Baril Lake 50,000 

Brown Lake 25,000 

Jarvis Bay 100,000 

Lac Des Mille Lacs 50,000 

McKenzie Lake 50,000 

Surprise Lake 20.000 

Twin Lakes 75,000 

Wawon Lake 25,000 

Timiskaming: 

Larder Lake 25,000 

Net Lake 10,000 

Rib Lake 15,000 

Twin Lake 15,000 

Trout Lake 15,000 

Watabeag Lake 15,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1936-37 



33 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1936, to March 31st, 1937 — Continued 



Lake Trout — Continued 

Victoria: 

Birch Bark Lake 5,000 

Great Lakes: 

Georgian Bay 4,509,000 

Lake Huron and North 

Channel 6,470,000 

Lake Superior 3,765,000 

Lake Ontario 45,244 



RAINBOW TROUT 

FINGERLINGS 



Algoma: 

Chippewa River 

Bruce: 

Teeswater River 



Dufferin: 

Lower Nottawasaga River 

Elgin: 

St. Thomas Reservoir .... 



2,000 
10,000 
10,000 

2,000 



Grey: 

Sheppard's Lake 17,000 

Sydenham River 30,000 

Norfolk: 

Black Creek 10,000 

Lynn River 5,000 

North Creek 4,000 

Young's Creek 5,000 

Simcoe: 

Brough's Creek 5,000 

Sudbury: 

Emery Creek 5,000 

Sauble River 2,000 

York: 

Humber River 20,000 

Sales 6,000 



YEARLINGS 

Grey: 

Sydenham River 501* 

Simcoe: 

Brough's Creek 1,740 

York: 

Humber River 238 

Demonstration purposes and 

sale 1,028** 

^^ 

^K * Surplus adults.... 9 6 



SPECKLED TROUT 

FRY 

Hastings: 

Eraser Creek 25,000 

Squire's Creek 25,000 

Northumberland: 

Black's Creek 25,000 

Dawson Creek 40,000 

Heffernan's Creek 25,000 

Pegman's Creek 25,000 

Parry Sound: 

Howard Stream 7,000 

Prince Edward: 

Warings Creek 10,000 



EYED EGGS 

Thunder Bay: 

Bear Lake 

Clegg Lake 

Fork Lake 

Hilma Lake 

Himdick Lake 

Moose Lake 

Pine Lake 

Sand Beach Lake 

Demonstration purposes . 



2,000 
5,000 
2,000 
5,000 
2,000 
5,000 
2,000 
2,000 

3.600 



FINGERLINGS 

Algoma: 

Arnill Lake 5,000 

Bellevue Creek 5,000 

Boundary Lake 1,500 

Burnt Island Lake 15,000 

Centre Lake 1,500 

Franklin Lake 1,500 

Havilah Lake 1,500 

McKinnon's Creek 1,500 

Pine Lake (25-R-ll) 5,000 

Tookenay Lake 15,000 

Trout Lake Inlet 1,000 

Bruce: 

Big Bay Swamp Creek . . . 2,000 

Colpoy's Creek 2,000 

Dickie's Creek 5,000 

Foster Moffatt Creek .... 5,000 

Judge's Creek 10,000 

Sharp's Creek 2,000 

Sparrow Creek 1,000 

Spring Creek (Carrick) . . 5,000 

Cochrane: 

Charlebois Lake 1,000 

Croft's Creek 1,000 

Dalton Lake 1,000 

Dandurand Creek 1,000 

Fuller's Creek 1,000 



34 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1936, to March 31st, 1937 — Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT — Continued 

Cochrane — Continued 

Grassy River 1,000 

Halfway Lake 1,000 

Hooker Creek 1,000 

Lake of Bays 1.000 

Legare Creek 1,000 

Mclntyre Lake 1,000 

Metagami River 1,000 

Munro Lake 1,000 

Ramsbottom Creek 1,000 

Red Sucker Creek 1,000 

Rowley Lake 1,000 

Waterhen Creek 1,000 

Dufferin: 

Cemetery Creek 6,000 

Credit River 6,000 

Nottawasaga River 7,000 

Pine River 8,000 

Durham: 

Bert Reid Creek 1,000 

Brown's Creek 1,000 

Carl Billings Creek 1,000 

Cedar Springs 1,000 

Cedar Spring Creek 1,000 

Cowper's Creek 1,000 

DeLong's Stream 500 

Hale's Creek 1,000 

Luxon's Creek . 2,000 

Mercer's Creek 1,000 

Millson Creek 1,000 

Moffatt's Creek 1.000 

Patton's Stream 1,000 

Rowe's Stream 500 

Sowden's Stream 1.000 

Sowper's Creek 1.000 

Spring Creek 1,000 

Thompson's Creek 1,000 

Elgin: 

Ball Creek 10,000 

Venison Creek 10,000 

Frontenac: 

Grindstone Lake 5,000 

Grey: 

Beatty River 6,000 

Camp Creek 7,500 

Deer Creek 6,000 

Fairbairn's Creek 5,000 

Firth's Creek 5,000 

Gravel Pit Creek 5,000 

McCartney's Lake 3,000 

Mountain Creek 2,000 

Mitchell's Creek 1,000 

Noble Creek 5,000 

Rob Roy Creek 10,000 

Tributaries Camp Creek.. 12,500 

Tributaries Rocky Saugeen 5,000 

Tributaries Big Head River 5,000 



Haliburton: 

Cardiff Lake 2,500 

Cross Lake 10,000 

Farquhar Lake 2,500 

Otta Creek 5,000 

Otter Lake 15,000 

Round Lake 5,000 

Slipper Lake 5,000 

Halton: 

Black Creek 8,000 

Hastings: 

Crooked Lake 10,000 

Green's Lake 10,000 

Little Mississippi River. . . 5,000 

Rawdon Creek 12,000 

Trout Creek 5,000 

Huron: 

Blyth Creek 7,000 

Porter's Creek 7,000 

St. Helen's Creek 1,000 

Lanark: 

Clyde River 7,000 

Jerry's Creek 3,000 

Leeds: 

Willies Brook 1,000 

Lennox-Addington : 

Smiths Lake 5,000 

White Lake 10,000 

Manitoulin: 

Blue Jay Creek 10,000 

Hare's Creek 1,000 

Muskoka: 

Axe Creek 7,000 

Fairy Lake 7,000 

Gipsy Bells Creek 5,000 

Helve Creek 8,000 

Lake Waseosa 8,000 

Loon Lake 3,000 

Menominee Lake 10,000 

Spring Creek (Sinclair) . . 2,000 
Streams-Rat Lake and 

Lake of Bays 1,000 

Nipissing: 

Brule Creek 2,000 

Crooked Lake 3,500 

McMaster Lake 3,000 

Smoky Creek 4,000 

Timagami Lake 3,400 

Whitney Lake 1,000 

Norfolk: 

Nanticoke Creek 8,000 

Spooky Hollow Stream ... 750 

Northumberland: 

Callahan's Creek 3,000 

DeLong's Creek 500 



ANNUAL REPORT, 19 36-37 



35 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1936, to March 31st, 1937 — Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT — Continued 

Northumberland — Continued 

Goodrich Creek 15,000 

Taylor's Creek 1,000 

Valleau Creek 1,000 

Oxford: 

Manuel Creek 1,000 

Sutherland Pond 2,000 

Whiting Creek 3,000 

Parry Sound: 

Boyne River 10,000 

Howard Stream 1,000 

Sequin River 5,000 

Peel: 

Kress Stream 14,000 

Stream — East Garafraxa. . 1,000 

Renfrew: 

Bass Lake 4,000 

Black Donald Creek 10,000 

Brennan's Creek 4,000 

Egan's Lake 10,000 

Grant Lake 4,500 

Gun Lake 3,000 

Gunning Lake 2,000 

Heeney's Creek 4,500 

Jack's Creek 10,000 

Johnson Lake 10,000 

Nadeau Creek 10,000 

Reserve Lake 10,000 

Round Lake 10,000 

Trout Lake 10,000 

Twin Lakes 10,000 

Wylie Creek 10,000 

Sudbury: 

Anderson Lake 1,000 

Johns Creek 7,000 

Karl Creek 1,000 

McLeod's Creek 5,000 

Shenango Creek 1,500 

Waddell Lake 1,500 

Thunder Bay: 

Arnold Creek 5,000 

Bender Lake 1,200 

Binaback Lake 1,500 

Bruce Lake 3,000 

Bruley Creek 5,000 

Canyon Lake 2,000 

Caribou Island Lake 3,000 

Cedar Creek 15,000 

Center Lake 2,000 

Clegg Lake 2,500 

Coldwater River 25,000 

• Deception Lake 15,000 

Dixon Lake 3,000 

Fork Lake 2,000 

Gold Lake 1,500 

Grand Lake 2,000 

Grange Lake 2,500 

Ham Lake 1,000 

Hilmar Lake 2,000 



Himdick Lake 3,000 

Hymers Lake 2,500 

Johnston Lake 2,500 

Kowkash River 15,000 

Loon Creek 2,000 

Mackintosh Lakes 20,000 

Mclntyre River 25,000 

Neebing River 15,000 

Pass Lake 5,000 

Pearl River 25,000 

Pitch Creek 10,000 

Rainbow Lake 2,000 

Sandy Beach Lake 2,000 

Silver Lake 15,000 

Spring Lake 5,000 

Squaw Lake 3,000 

Sunset Lake 2,000 

Upper Pass Lake 5,000 

Whitewood Creek 5,000 

Wideman Lake 5,000 

Wigan Lake 4,600 

Wigwam Lake 3,500 

Timiskaming: 

Crystal Lake 2,000 

Fairy Lake 3,000 

Jean Baptiste Lake 2,000 

Latour Creek 3,000 

Loon Creek 1,000 

Maiden Creek 1,000 

Moffatt Creek 3,000 

Moloney Creek 1,000 

Pike Creek 2,000 

Small Spot Creek 1,000 

Spring Creek 2,000 

Sesekinika Creek 2,000 

Trout Creek 1,600 

Wabi Creek 2,000 

Watabeag River 2,000 

Waterloo: 

Flora Stream 5,000 

Erbsville Creek 7,000 

Groves Creek 1,000 

Idyle Wild Stream 5,000 

Mannheim Stream 7,000 

Welland: 

Effingham Stream 9,000 

Sulphur Springs 9,000 

Wellington: 

Beley's Creek 2,000 

Bell's Creek 10,000 

Bradley Creek 5,000 

Erin Mill Pond 6,000 

Ospringe Creek 2,500 

Saugeen River 6,000 

Speed River 5,000 

Sales 3,000 

YEARLINGS 

Algoma: 

Achigan Creek 3,000 

Achigan Lake 2,000 



36 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1936, to March 31st, 1937 — Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT — Continued 

Algoma — Continued 

Agawa River 4,000 

Alva Lake 1,000 

Anjigami Creek 2,000 

Basswood Lake 1,500 

Batchewana River 4,000 

Bull Creek 500 

Burrough's Lake 500 

Caldwell's Lake 500 

Camp 8 Creek 1,000 

Caribou Lake 3,000 

Chippewa River 4,000 

Clear Lake Creek 1,000 

Clearwater Creek 2,000 

Driving Creek 3,000 

East Twin Lake 500 

Garden River 3,000 

Goulais River 3,000 

Gravel River 500 

Hawk Lake 1,000 

Hoath Lake 3,000 

Hobon Lake 2,000 

Hubert Lake 2,000 

Jobammeghia Lake 2,000 

Lafoe Creek 500 

Long Lake 500 

Loon Lake Creek 200 

Loon Lake (Deroche) .... 3,000 

Loon Lake (Kirkwood) . . . 300 

Loon Lake (24-R-13) 2,000 

Loonskin Lake 2,000 

Lower Island Lake 3,000 

McCormick Lake 1,000 

McVeigh Lake 1,000 

Mashagami Lake 4,000 

Michipicoten River 4,000 

Mile 58 Lake 1,000 

Mississauga River 5,000 

Mongoose Lake 2,000 

Moose Lake 2,000 

Mountain Lake 3,000 

Osborne Creek 500 

Patten Lake 3,000 

Pine Lake (24-R-13) 1,000 

Pine Lake (25-R-ll) 1,000 

Pinkney Lake 1,000 

Rapid River 1,000 

Root River 3,000 

Sand Lake Creek 2,000 

Sand River 1,000 

Sharp Sand River 1,500 

Silver Creek 3,000 

Snowshoe Creek 2,000 

Speckled Trout Lake 3,000 

Spruce Lake 2,000 

Tamarack Lake 500 

Tawabinasay Lake 2,000 

Tea Lake 2,000 

Tendinenda Lake 1,000 

Thessalon (Little) River.. 1,000 

Triple Lake 500 

Trout Lake (62) 2,000 

Trout Lake (Aweres) .... 3,000 



Twin Lake 

Upper Island Lake 

Wa Wa Lake 

Walker Lake 

Wallace Lake 

Wartz Lake 

Weckstrom's Lake 

West Twin Lake 

Bruce: 

Spring Creek (Amabel) . . 

Stoney Creek 

Willow Creek 

Dufferin: 

Huxtable Creek 

Durham: 

Best Pond 

Burk's Pond 

Cavan Stream 

Elizabethville Creek 

Jamieson Pond 

Leskard Creek 

North Orono Stream 

Park Stream 

White Pond 

Frontenac: 

Black Creek 

Creek from Mountain Grove 
to Clear Lake (Olden) . . 

Sharbot Creek 

Trout Lake 

Grey: 

Beatty River 

Beaver River 

Berkeley Lake 

Binns Creek 

Boyd's Lake 

Caseman's Creek 

Christie Creek 

Eugenia Lake 

Firth's Creek 

Glen Creek 

Lee's Creek 

Miller Creek 

Nigger Creek 

Rocky River 

Sargent's Lake 

Styx River 

Sydenham River 

Williams Lake 

Haliburton: 

Bear Creek 

East River 

Hawk River 

Hollow River 

Little Black River 

McCue Creek 

Hastings: 

Bartlett Creek 



4,000 
3,000 
2,000 
1,500 

500 
2,000 
1,500 

500 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



1,000 



250 

500 

3,000 

1.000 

250 

700 

300 

1,000 

500 



2,400 

1,200 
3,800 
2,400 



500 

3,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

500 

500 

2,050 

1,100 

375 

500 

1,000 

500 

1,000 

2,500 

1,000 

2,585 

1,000 



1,500 
1,250 
1,000 
1,250 
1,000 
1,500 



1.000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1936-37 



37 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1936, to March 31st, 1937 — Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT — Continued 

Hastings — Continued 

Brett's Lake 100 

Carleton Creek 200 

Cedar Creek 2,400 

Deer River 400 

Echo Lake 1,250 

Egan Creek 3,200 

Eraser Creek 4,800 

Hick's Lake 1,250 

Lake St. Peter 2,500 

Limestone Lake 1,000 

Little Papineau Creek. . . . 2,400 

Lott's Pond 1,000 

Otter Creek 600 

Peel's Lake 500 

Rawdon Creek 4,800 

Shire Creek 1,600 

Springbrook Creek 4,800 

Squire's Creek 3,000 

Trout Creek 1,050 

Walterhouse Creek 1,050 

Walterhouse Lake 2,100 

Lanark: 

Paul's Creek 1,025 

Leeds: 

Wilton Creek 500 

Lennox-Addington : 

Ashby Lake 2,400 

Beaver Creek 2,400 

Enterprise Creek 1,300 

Little Spring Creek 2,400 

Manitoulin: 

Barr's Creek 1,000 

Blue Jay Creek 5,000 

Minderaoya River 2,000 

Srigley Creek 2,000 

Muskoka: 

Bella Lake 1,250 

Big East River 2,500 

Breckenridge Lake 2,000 

Kay's Creek 300 

Lake of Bays 2,000 

Little East River 3,000 

Muskoka River 1,600 

Oxtongue River 1,250 

Rebecca Lake 1,250 

Skeleton Lake 1,250 

Spring Creek (Watt) 100 

Nipissing: 

Balsam Creek 1,500 

Chippewa Creek 2,012 

Dorans Creek 1,500 

Duschene Creek 1,936 

j Little Jocko River 3,000 

Northumberland : 

Baltimore Creek 3,000 

Burnley Creek 1,000 



Chidley's Creek 500 

Dartford Creek 3,000 

Dawson Creek 1,000 

Duncan's Creek 1,000 

Mill Creek 500 

O'Grady's Creek 1,500 

Piper's Creek 500 

Robin's Creek 500 

Sandy Flats Creek 3,000 

Woodlands Creek 1,000 

Peterborough: 

Big Ouse River 1,000 

Buchanan's Creek 1,500 

Little Ouse River 2,000 

Long's Creek 3,000 

Plateau Creek 1.500 

Simcoe: 

Black Creek 10,000 

Coldwater River 1,000 

Sheldon Creek 3,000 

Silver Creek 2,000 

Sturgeon River 2,000 

Tenth Creek 200 

Sudbury: 

Anderson Lake 1,000 

Bertrand Creek 1,000 

Green Lake 1,000 

Veuve River 1,500 

Thunder Bay: 

Ada Lake 500 

Allen Lake 3,000 

Anderson Creek 2,000 

Anna Lake 500 

Arnold Creek 2,000 

Bat Lake 2,000 

Big Mackenzie River 6,000 

Birch Lake 2,000 

Bruley Creek 7,000 

Catharine Lake 2,000 

Cedar Creek 4,000 

Coldwater River 4,000 

Corbett Creek 500 

Current River 10,800 

Echo Lake 2,000 

Elbow Lake 4,000 

Golden Gate Lake 500 

Gravel Lake 6,000 

Gulch Lake 2,000 

Hoodoo Creek 1,000 

Kaministiquia River 6,000 

Kowkash River 1,000 

Little Ozone Creek 2,000 

Loftquist Lake 5,000 

Loon Lake 12,000 

Loutit Lake 1,000 

Mclntyre River 5,000 

Mac's Lake 2,000 

Maud Lake 1,000 

Mine Lake 500 

Neebing River 4,800 

Nipigon River 56,800 



38 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1936, to Marcl-; -^i: ''t, 1937 — Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT — Continued 



Thunder Bay — Continued 

Oliver Lake 

Pearl River 

Pickerel Lake 

Pitch Creek 

Randolph Creek 

Rangers Lake 

Rocky Shore River . . . 

Spectacle Lake 

Spring Lake 

Squaw Creek 

Squaw River 

Trout Lake (Gorham) 
Trout Lake (Stirling) . 

Walker's Lake 

Whitewood Creek .... 
Wolf River 



Wellington: 
Erin Pond 



Wentworth: 
Spencer Creek 



Sales 



ADULTS 



Algoma: 

Basswood Lake 

Bridgland River .... 

Heyden Lake 

Lower Island Lake . . 
Trout Lake (Aweres) 



3,000 
5,000 
4,000 
4,000 
1,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
6,000 
6,000 
1,000 

12,000 
2,000 
2,000 
4,000 

11,610 



1,000 



2,500 
5,287 



400 
700 
400 
400 
400 






LaK. Simcoe 3,000,000 



Great Lakes: 

Lake Superior 1,257,000 

North Channel 25,510,000 

Georgian Bay 74,760,000 

Lake Huron 31,990,000 

Lake Erie 131,160,000 

Lake Ontario 77,100,000 



EYED EGGS 
Demonstration purposes . 



HERRING 



112,500 



FRY 

Frontenac: 

White Lake 1,000,000 

Leeds: 

Charleston Lake 1,000,000 

Rideau Lake 3,000,000 



Prince Edward: 
Bay of Quinte 



730,000 



Great Lakes: 

Lake Erie 22,890,000 

Lake Ontario 27,500,000 



Grey: 

Firth's Creek . 
Mary's Lake . 
Williams Lake 



100 

230 

2,175 



Nipissing: 

Chippewa and Duschene 
Creeks (surplus 
breeders) 

Norfolk: 

Walsingham Pond 

Northumberland : 

Glenfurnte Stream .... 
Sales 



55 
100 



796 
325 



WHITE FISH 

FRY 
Kenora: 

Lake of the Woods 13,800,000 

Prince Edward: 

Bay of Quinte 55,500,000 

Rainy River: 

Rainy Lake 14,325,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1936-37 



39 



APPENDIX No. 2 



ONTARIO DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 
DISTRIBUTION OF FISH ACCORDING TO SPECIES — 1933 TO 1936, INCLUSIVE 



TO 



1933 



1934 



193i 



1936 



Large-mouthed Black Bass 
Fry 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings and Adults 



;56 



Small-mouthed Black Bass 

Fry 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings and Adults. 



545,000 

25,750 

3,471 



Maskinonge- 
Perch — Fry 



-Fry 



Pickerel — Eyed eggs 
Fry 



Brown Trout — Fingerlings 

Yearlings 

Adults 



20,500,000 

483,016 
674 



Lake Trout — Eyed eggs, 

Fry 

Fingerlings .... 



200,000 

1,400,000 

16,012,700 



Landlocked Salmon (Ouanan- 
iche) (Yearlings) . . . 



35,250 

4,250 

197 



365,500 

35,750 

420 

909,500 

95,000,000 

5,000,000 
278,470,000 

138,000 

14,500 

689 

402,000 

1,265,000 

14,045,450 



130,000 
2,153 

27 = 



696,000 

153,065 

3,433 

460,000 

53,031,400 

2,000,000 
229,629,000 

109,000 
9,650 
6* 



7,773,034 
14,564,000 



Rainbow Trout — Eyed Eggs 

Fry 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings 



27,016 



Kamloops Trout- 
Yearlings 



-Fingerlings 



Speckled Trout — Eyed eggs. 

Fry 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings 

Adults 



506,000 

725,000 

5,950,255 

28,237 

1,549 



1,000 

4,480 

312,512 

25,014 



13,640 



134,075 
314 

85,464 
10,796 



6,257,267 

34,762 

1,652 



Whitefish — Fry . 
Eyed Eggs 



372,111,000 I 376,777,000 
I 



1,645,000 

5,013,831 

35,421 

5,420 

296,482,000 



Herring — Fry . 
Golden Shiners 



22,805,000 



1 

I 17,512,000 



7,000 



TOTALS 



441,325,524 | 796,619,193 



43,760,000 
500 



45,000 
8,398 



780,000 

69,380 

5,202 

274,000 

46,080,000 

2,000,000 
300,759,500 

147,050 
7,290 



3,209,400 

4,165,000 

18,253,244 



133,000 
3,507 



28,600 

182,000 

1,053,050 

557,270 

6,081 

428,402,000 
112,500 

56,120,000 



655,747,231** | 862,401,472 

I 



* Exhibition fish 

* This total does not include a distribution of 132,646,600 fry and eyed eggs during 
the five months immediately preceding the said report. 



40 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



APPENDIX 

GAME AND FISHERIES 
Statistics of the Fishing Industry in the Public Waters of 

EQUIP 



District 



No. 

of 

Men 



Tugs 



No. Tons Value 



Gasoline 
Launches 



No. 



Value 



Sail and 
Row Boats 



No. Value 



Gill Nets 



Yards 



Value 



Northern Inland Water 

Lake Superior 

North Channel 

Georgian Bay 

'jake Huron 

Lake St. Clair 

Lake Erie 

Lake Ontario 

Southern Inland Waters 

Totals 



544 

384 
195 
497 
426 
161 
876 
742 
455 



204 
356 
272 
435 
518 



33 



978 



$ 17,000 

54,000 

63,000 

119.250 

147.500 



240,200 



160 

85 

43 

136 

127 

57 

210 

220 

20 



71,885 

39,285 

35,575 

112,578 

80,325 

15,050) 

171,6701 

100,540 

4,8251 

I 



I 
3171$ 11,955 



110| 
1511 

222 

1571 

I 



4,495 
4,518 
4,445 
2,165 

4,685] 

7,3471 

7,024 

4,871) 

I 



531,065 

856,885 

432,375 

1,010,750 

1,328,800 



66,544 

85,790 

50,275 

109,690 

168,305 



1,829,170] 225,232 
1,239,4401 106,631 
I 

I 



4,280 



97 



I I i 

2,763| $640,9501 1,058| 

I I i 



$631,7331 1,243) $51,505| 

I II 



7.228,4851 $812,467 
I 













APPENDIX 

QUANTITIES OF 


District 


Herring 


Whitefish 


Trout 


Pike 


Pickerel 
(Blue) 


Pickerel 
(Dore) 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


Northern Inland Waters 


1,414 

2,683,724 

569 

27,274 

170,178 

325 

78,805 

1,332,450 

3.823 


1,633,840 

319.482 

260,247 

983,783 

235,304 

1,100 

1.767.741 

576.196 

12.710 


277,418 

1,596.181 

704.657 

1.472.586 

2.137.519 




919,198 

5,895 

58,051 

46,054 

777 

13,199 

1,576 

100,632 

12,963 




1,484,510 






83.966 
64.214 
90.701 

275,405 
37,934 

326,095 


North Channel 




CJeorgian Bay 








Lake St Clair 


6.875 

6.878,919 

18.707 


Lake Erie 


200 

226.549 

43.620 


Lake Ontario 


26.288 
4 065 


Southern Inland Waters 








Totals 


4,298,562 


5,790,403 


6,458,730 


1,158,345 


6,899.501 


2.393,178 




Price per pound ••• 


.05 


.11 


.11 


.06 


.05 


11 






Values 


$214,928.10 


$636,944.33 


$710,460.80 


$69,500.70 


$344,975.05 


$263,249.58 



















ANNUAL REPORT, 1936-37 



41 



No. 3 

DEPARTMENT, ONTARIO 

Province of Ontario, for the Year Ending December 31st, 1936, 

MENT 



Seine Nets 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip and 
Roll Nets 


N!ght Lines 


Spears 


Freezers & 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


Total 
Value 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. ^, , 
Hooks Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 










49 
47 
113 
96 
151 
136 
559 


$15,760 
12,803 
58,790 
79.400 
88.500 
13.225 

274,000 


, 53 


$1,864 




. . 


1,200$ 167 
6 15 






143 
37 
45 
55 
74 
23 
91 
38 
29 


$ 30.895 

16.875 

12,360 

15,805 

30,400 

5,260 

87,445 

8,475 

2.255 


116 
40 
35 
67 
28 
11 
75 
24 
3 


$ 13,430 


S 229.502 








1 






12,5051 225,768 









... 








1 
23 

1 


10 

112 

20 


17,0251 241.553 


5 


900 


695 


42 


510 


'. ', 




57,814 10,735 
10,236 1.685 
4.500 215 
3,250 79 
4,358 208 
7,050 218 


29,845 
10,980 

1,020 
29,810 

5,355 
200 


483,065 
529.880 


39 


11.450 

13,800 

1,550 

6,870 


6,130 
8.215 
1,195 
5,298 










45,585 


50 


12 
736 
249 


195 
15,195 


6 
26 
45 


30 
112 
220 






1,044,228 


13 






244,735 


61 






206 


1.545 


26,317 








1 




168 


34,570 


$21,533 


1.151 


$542,478 


$ 

1.092 24.649 

1 


78 


$ 364 


$ 
88,414 13.322 
1 


231 


$1,687 


535 


$209,770 


399 


$120,170 


$3,070,628 



No. 4 



FISH TAKEN 





Sturgeon 


Eels 


Perch 


Tullibee 


Catfish 


Carp 


Mixed 
Coarse 


Caviare 


Total 


Value 




lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 






64,351 

476 

10,074 

1,601 

4,454 

6,760 

12.486 

6.440 

226 






246,499 
104,772 
13,675 
131,864 
423,345 


62,595 


1 1 
1.2501 190.Q95I R78 


4.882.948 
4.899.391 
1.417.018 
2.861,728 
3,510,447 

649.869 

11.953.533 

3.154.485 

925.194 


$480,965.35 










104.895 
299,787 
70,990 
139,153 
209,051 
1,201,610 
287,196 
9.<J8 S-t^l 


' 


364,122.66 
130.898.60 
297,187.80 
337,598.56 

34,848.59 
706,376.09 
211,814.88 

50,935.96 






5,688 

3,272 

115,785 

32,501 

1,254,087 

164,796 

10,830 


' 




56 

7 

130 

217 

607 

11 






11,694 

1,399 

49,666 

70,899 

191,556 

221,679 


21.902 
6.998 
292.241 
360.508 
174.908 
308.903 












53,'7*56 
8,024 






















106,868 


61.780 


1,586,959 920.155 

1 


609,488 


1.166,710 2,802,028 


1.906 


34,254,613 






.40 


.07 


.05 


.06 


.08 


.05 


.03 


1.= 






III II 

1 $42,747,201 $4,324,601 $ 79,347.95| $55.209.30| $48,759.04 


$58,335.50 


$84,060,84 


$1,906.00 




$2,614,748.49 



L 



42 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



APPENDIX No. 5 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE YIELD OF THE FISHERIES 

OF ONTARIO 



Kind 



1934 
Pounds 



1935 
Pounds 



1936 
Pounds 



Herring 

Whitefish . . . . 

Trout 

Pike 

Pickerel (Blue) 
Pickerel (Dore) 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and ^ .> 
Caviare 

TOTALS . 



2,876,121 

4,922,996 

5,295,174 

1,095,911 

2,432,093 

2,292,094 

89,884 

63,650 

6,018,541 

1,105,158 

356,665 

1,520,848 

3,161,229 

2,613 



2,528.958 
5,478,435 
6,256,336 
1,216,622 
5,122,997 
2,431,943 

110,470 

74,947 

6,039,713 

1,071,004 

502,779 

1,480,506 

2,898,583 

2.694 



4,298,562 

5,790,403 

6,458,730 

1,158,345 

6,899,501 

2.393,178 

106,868 

61,780 

1,586,959 

920.155 

609.488 

1.166.710 

2.802.028 

1.906 



I 
31,232,977 | 35,215,987 

I 



34,254,613 



APPENDIX No. 6 

STATEMENT OF ESTIMATED VALUE OF THE FISHERIES OF ONTARIO 

1936 



Kind 



Quantity 
Pounds 



Price per 
Pound 



Estimated 
Value 



Herring 

Whitefish 

Trout 

Pike 

Pickerel (Blue) . 
Pickerel (Dore) . 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 7 . 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse 
Caviare 

TOTALS . . . 



4,298, 

5,790. 

6,458. 

1,158. 

6.899, 

2,393, 

106, 

61, 

1,586, 

920, 

609, 

1,166, 

2,802, 

1, 



^62 
403 
730 
345 
^01 
178 
868 
780 
959 
155 
488 
710 
028 
9 06 



.05 
.11 
.11 
.06 
.05 
.11 
.40 
.07 
.05 
.06 
.08 
.05 
.03 
1.00 



214,928.10 

636,944.33 

710,460.30 

69,500.70 

344,975.05 

263,249.58 

42,747.20 

4,324.60 

79.347.95 

55.209.30 

48.759.04 

58,335.50 

84,060.84 

1,906.00 



I 
34,254.613 | 



$2,614,748.49 



1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 



APPENDIX No. 7 

ESTIMATED VALUE OF FISH TAKEN FROM THE WATERS 

OF THE PROVINCE 

1917—1936 INCLUSIVE 



2.866.424.00 
3.175,110.32 
2.721,440.24 
2.691.093.74 



1921 2,656.775.82 

1922 2,807.525.21 

1923 2,886,398.76 

1924 3,139,279.03 

1925 2,858,854.79 

1926 2.643,686.28 



1927 3.229.143.57 

1928 3,033,944.42 

1929 3,054,282.02 

1930 2,539,904.91 

1931 2,442,703.55 

1932 2,286,573.50 

1933 2,186,083.74 

1934 2,316,965.50 

1935 2,633,512.90 

1936 2.614,748.49 



Thirty-First Annual Report 



OF THE 



Game and Fisheries 
Department 

1937-1938 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 9, 1939 




ONTARIO 



TORONTO 

Printed and Published by T. E. Bowman, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 3 9 



TO THE HONOURABLE ALBERT MATTHEWS, 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 



MAY IT PLEASE YOUR HONOUR: 

I have the honour to submit herewith for the information of Your Honour 
and the Legislative Assembly, the Thirty-first Annual Report of the Game and 
Fisheries Department of this Province, for the year ended March 31st, 19 38. 

I have the honour to be. 



Your Honour's most obedient servant, 

H. C. NIXON, 

Minister in Charge, 
Department of Game and Fisheries 

Toronto, 1939. 



(ii) 



THIRTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Game and Fisheries Department of 

Ontario 



TO: THE HONOURABLE H. C. NIXON, 
Minister in charge. 
Department of Game and Fisheries. 

SIR: — 

I have the honour to submit to you in this and the following pages the Thirty- 
first Annual Report of the Department of Game and Fisheries, outlining the 
activities of Departmental services and including statistical and comparative tables 
for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 19 38. 



INTRODUCTORY 

The wild life of the Province of Ontario constitutes a resource of tremendous 
importance and value. It is a heritage of the Crown administered by this Department 
and the policies which govern the administration of this trust are based on the 
premise that every citizen has an equity in these resources. 

The natural resources of any country are the basis of its national wealth and in 
evaluating the true worth of our wild life natural resources, it is pertinent to point 
out that these form a vital part of our economic structure. Analyzing these 
thoughts we find the following facts: 

The fur trade of Canada is closely associated with the development of the 
country, for the trappers and fur buyers were pioneers in opening up the north 
and the west. In the Province of Ontario trapping is still more or less extensively 
carried on. During the year under review trappers in excess of sixty-five hundred 
were licensed and operating in Ontario, while fur dealers' license fees contributed 
$27,438.75 to Departmental revenues, which last fact indicates that the trapper is 
plentifully supplied with avenues for the disposal of his catch. During the same 
period royalty to the amount of $63,632.70 was paid to the Department on furs 
while the value to the trapper of his season's fur catch is estimated at $9 66,552.92. 
Ih addition to these figures it is pointed out that private fur farmers raised and 
disposed of 33,2 35 silver and black fox pelts, 233 cross fox pelts, and 2 4,864 mink 
pelts of an estimated value of $896,963.15. 

It should be noted that in Northern Ontario where the lands are mostly still in 
the Crown, it is the policy to allot a separate area, consisting of a township or 
part of a township, to each trapper. While much of the north country is still un- 
surveyed it is hoped that in the very near future eighty per cent of the trappers 
will have their trap lines on a defined zone. Each trapper will then be responsible 
for taking care of the fur-bearing animals in his own area, because his future 
earnings will depend on his conservation of the supply within the zone. 

The commercial fishing industry of the Province employed some 4,440 men 
during the year ending March 31st, 1938, and had approximately $3,277,701 
Invested in gear and equipment, while the sum of $2,644,163.49 was derived by these 
commercial fishermen from their operations. 

(1) 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 



From the economic standpoint, however, the greatest worth of our game and 
fish resources lies in their attraction to tourists. The seasonal influx of visitors 
from all parts of the world has developed into an industry of major importance and 
it is estimated that $117,029,099.00 was circulated by tourists in Ontario during 
the year under review. This Province has, of course, many attractions, but the 
lodestone which exercises the greatest drawing power is the excellent fishing to be 
had in our many lakes and streams. It will be apparent that the natural resources 
which are the backbone of such an important industry are of very real economic 
value. 

Again, the importance of bird life as an aid to agriculture is beyond com- 
putation. Insect control is essential to crop success. Much of this burden is lifted 
from the shoulders of the farmers by the migratory and non-migratory birds which 
are a part of our wild life assets. 

From the standpoint of the sportsman this wild life heritage has a recreational 
value which cannot be measured in terms of dollars and cents. Fishing and hunt- 
ing are perhaps the very finest of the health-giving and recreational sports available 
to the people of this Province. The incentive which wild life provides for enjoying 
the great outdoors is of inestimable value in the development of character and 
good citizenship. 

It is therefore obvious from the foregoing comments and observations that 
our wild life heritage is a trust of great economic and moral worth, and being a 
common heritage its preservation and wise use is the care of every resident within 
our borders. How this Department has administered this trust on behalf of the 
people of this Province during the period under review is detailed in these pages 
for the information of all concerned. 

FINANCIAL 

ORDINARY REVENUE FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING MARCH Slat. 1938. 

ORDINARY — 

MAIN OFFICE — 

GAME — 

Licenses — 

Trapping $ 29,167.60 

Non-resident Hunting 92,370.00 

Deer 72,320.10 

Moose 3,179.00 

Gun 77,780.81 

Dog 4,636.10 

Fur Dealers 27,438.75 

Fur Farmers 8,737.50 

Tanners 140.00 

Cold Storage 157.00 

$ 315,926.86 

Royalty 63,632.70 

1 379,559.56 

FISHERIES — 
Licenses — 

Fishing $ 103,408.66 

Angling 331,430.45 

$ 434,839.11 
Sales — Spawn taking 72.70 

Royalty 10,849.95 

$ 445,761.76 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1937-38 



GENER. 

Licenses — 

Tourist Outfitters $ 5,790.00 

Guides 7,782.00 



$ 13.572.00 



Fines 11,561.50 

Costs 664.62 

Sales — Confiscated articles 10,683.74 

Rent 3,229.00 

Commission 1,959.63 

Miscellaneous 231.00 



$ 41,901.49 



$ 867,222.81 



EXPERIMENTAL FUR FARM — 

Sales — Pelts 1,258.08 



Gross Ordinary Revenue $ 868,480.89 

DEDUCT — 

Revenue applied in reduction of Expenditures — 

Main Office — Costs $ 664.62 

Experimental Fur Farm — Sale of Pelts .... 1,258.08 



1,922.70 



Net Ordinary Revenue $ 866,558.19 

Again I am privileged to report an increase in the amount of the total ordinary 
revenue which was collected by this department during the year under review. The 
total figure of $866,558.19 is the largest yet produced in any one fiscal year, and is 
$84,340.56 in excess of the previous high total, viz: — that of $782,217.63 collected 
in 1936-37. 

This increase is attributable principally to the larger revenue derived from the 
sale of non-resident angling and hunting licenses in 1937-38 as compared with the 
figures for 1936-37. The sale of such angling licenses in 1936-37 produced 
$272,690.50 as compared with a total of $331,430.45 from a similar source in 
1937-38, an increase of practically sixty thousand dollars. This is an interesting 
and encouraging sign. The tourist is evidently finding out what the resident 
fisherman already knows, that as a result of the energetic restocking of the past 
few years, Ontario waters keep on improving, despite the intensity with which 
they are being fished. The economic possibilities of this seasonal business loom 
larger than ever before, and we believe the people of the Province are becoming 
increasingly conscious of the necessity for conserving and continually renewing the 
fish and game resources which add so much to the attractiveness of this Province 
as a vacation resort. From the sale of non-resident hunting licenses in 19 37-38 
we derived $18,432.50 in excess of the revenue derived from that source in the 
previous fiscal year, so that of the total increase of $84,340.56 to which previous 
reference has been made, the sum of $77,172.45 was due to the increased sale of 
various non-resident hunting and angling licenses. 

Revenue exceeded expenditure, both ordinary and capital, by $302,619.86. 
Ordinary expenditures totalled $513,383.80, some of the principal items of this 
expenditure being $212,038.54 on the work of enforcing provisions of the Game 
and Fisheries Act, and $166,939.91 on Fish Hatchery Service. Other items of 
ordinary expenditure include $10,662.43 spent in connection with the propagation of 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



game birds and animals and $4,182.98 at the Experimental Fur Farm at Kirkfield 
(Victoria County). Expenditures in connection with the payment of wolf bounties 
totalled $27,474.24, while grants to various individuals and organizations amounted 
to $8,400.00. The total amount paid out for capital expenditures was $50,554,53, 
the greater proportion of which amount was spent on projects which were necessary 
in connection with the expansion of our fish culture services. Some of the principal 
items were as follows: — Manitoulin Bass Ponds, $12,911.92; North Bay Trout 
Rearing Station, $15,811.04; and White Lake (additional ponds), $12,465.33. 

GAME 

The comparative table which follows will show in detail the various hunting 
licenses, both resident and non-resident, which were issued during the year under 
review, and such figures for the three previous years. While reference has already 
been made to the increased revenue derived in 1937-38 from the sale of non-resident 
hunting licenses, it will be of interest to state that the revenue derived from the 
Bale of resident hunting licenses — deer, moose and gun, — in 1937-38 was in excess 
of that collected from the same sources in the previous year by the sum of $19,419.65. 





1934 


1935-36 


1936-37 


1937-38 


Resident Moose 


512 
12,890 

175 

4,902 

76,210 

489 
475 
457 


496 
14,779 

258 
5,221 

85,884 

686 
652 
680 


542 
15,394 

262 

5,386 

79,531 

1,129 

848 
878 


580 


Resident Deer 


18,672 
283 


Resident Deer (Camp) 


Resident Deer (Farmers) 

Resident Gun 


6,503 
90,756 


Non-resident Small Game 

Non-resident Deer 


1,634 
1,036 
1.043 


Non-resident "General" 





The sportsman to-day is not so much interested in the kill as in the chase, 
although his pleasure is increased when his efforts are rewarded. Meat, however, 
is not the primary consideration. Health and "the pursuit of happiness" are the 
lures which beckon the good sportsman from the artificialities of life to the soothing 
influence and restful atmosphere of nature. Wild life is but a means to an end, 
an incentive to physical and mental relaxation. 

The following pages contain a summary of conditions as they apply to the 
game life of the province. — both animal and bird, and which information is com- 
piled from reports submitted by the various members of the field service staff of 
the Department: — 

DEER: — This particularly fine species of game animal continues to be fairly 
plentiful in various sections of the Province and while the hunting of these animals 
during the regular open season supplies an exhilarating brand of recreation for the 
interested sportsman there is no doubt, notwithstanding the fact that there was 
provision for some minor moderation of the regulations which had previously applied 
to restrict the taking of does and fawns, that the preservation and possible improve- 
ment of the existing deer herds depends very largely upon the protection which the 
existing provisions of the Game and Fisheries Act provide and the observance of 
such restrictions by all concerned. 

Reports submitted by members of the Field Service staff indicate that so far 
as the northern and northwestern portions of the Province are concerned generally 
speaking conditions are quite favourable, though there are various scattered sections 
throughout this region where such is not the case. The northern districts in the 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1937-38 



southern portion of the Province continue to attract the majority of hunters seeking 
deer, and it would appear that these animals are still sufficiently plentiful and 
showing some increase in numbers in some sections of these areas, i.e. Parry Sound, 
Muskoka, Haliburton, Renfrew and the northern portions of Victoria, Peterborough, 
Hastings, Addington, Frontenac and Lanark, to warrant the belief that this branch of 
sporting activity will long be available here. In the Counties included in the 
southwestern peninsula and in certain eastern counties there has been an entire 
close season on deer for the past several years, and even though these particular 
counties represent the most settled portions of the entire Province we are able to 
state that the complete protection which prevails here is resulting in the number of 
deer increasing in most of these counties. This has been particularly the case in 
the counties of Bruce and Grey where conditions have been so favourable as to 
warrant the Department providing a short open season there. 

The open season for deer during the year reported on was a highly successful 
one. Reports to the Department from sportsmen and overseers indicated that as 
a general rule deer were more numerous in certain sections than was the case in the 
previous season. While this may in some measure be attributable to a natural move- 
ment of the herd, it is reasonable to assume that the comparatively mild winters of 
the past two years, together with the protective measures in force have resulted in 
increased reproduction. We are referring, of course, to those areas in which hunting 
was legal. The Department's Inspector, who was stationed at a strategic point on the 
highway to check hunters on their return from the north, reported that the con- 
sensus of opinion was that there were more deer seen than ever before. A Deputy 
Game Warden with whom we were discussing the hunt said, — "I have been hunting 
deer for seventeen years and never saw them so thick as they were this year," Such 
reports are encouraging, indicating as they do that the deer herd, with a reasonable 
measure of protection, is capable of replenishing itself despite natural and unnatural 
enemies. 

MOOSE: — This splendid monarch of the Ontario forest is to be found only 
in the northern portion of the Province though scattered specimens are to be found 
in Muskoka, Parry Sound, Renfrew and in the sections immediately to the south of 
Algonquin Provincial Park. Nowhere in Ontario are they plentiful and there is no 
douDt that the various regulations which exist for the protection of these magnificent 
animals are absolutely necessary for the welfare of this species. It is only 
in a few sections that their numbers are reported to be even fairly plentiful, and 
nowhere has any decided improvement in numbers been observed. 

CARIBOU: — These animals are extremely scarce and are reported only from the 
Districts of Rainy River, Kenora and Thunder Bay, also from the northern portions 
of Algoma and Cochrane. Some slight increase has been observed in the eastern 
portion of Thunder Bay and in the Chapleau Game Preserve, which is located in the 
Districts of Sudbury and Algoma. 

EliK: — As has been outlined in previous reports the elk which are to be 
found in Ontario at present are those which were imported to the Province from 
Western Canada, and their progeny. The original shipments were made with the 
approval and co-operation of the Dominion National Parks Branch, and on arrival 
here were placed on the following Crown Game Preserves, viz: — Pembroke, Burwash, 
Chapleau, Nipigon-Onaman and Goulais River-Ranger Lake. 

There has been some improvement in practically all instances save one, — 
those liberated on the Nipigon-Onaman Crown Game Preserve. Elk from the herd at 
Pembroke have been placed in Algonquin Park and on the Bruce Peninsula, while 
some animals from the herd at Burwash were liberated in territory immediately 
adjacent thereto. It is reported that their numbers have increased in the Chapleau 
and Burwash Game Preserves and also on the Bruce Peninsula, while some of these 
animals have been observed on Beausoleil Island in Georgian Bay off Simcoe County. 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 



BEAR: — These animals are both hunted and trapped but not verj' extensively, 
though there is an indication that increasing numbers of non-resident hunters are 
becoming interested in the spring hunt which has been provided during the months 
of April and May. They are available in varying numbers throughout the entire 
northern portion of the Province and are reported to be quite plentiful in many 
sections, and to a lesser extent in Parry Sound, Muskoka, Haliburton, Renfrew and 
the northern part of Hastings County. 

RABBITS: — Rabbits continue to provide many opportunities which are favour- 
able from the sportsman's point of view, and more particularly is this so in the 
southern counties. In this section of the Province cotton-tail rabbits are available 
in satisfactory numbers, while the jack rabbit (European Hare) is pretty well 
confined to the western counties though this species is slowly extending its numbers 
to the east and north. In northern Ontario snow shoe rabbits are the prevailing 
species and although they are reported to be quite scarce there are indications of 
improvement in some districts. 

Rabbit hunting is a favourable activity of Ontario sportsmen during the 
fall and winter months. The "jack" is probably the most popular of the species 
because of its size and the open country it inhabits. Its long and powerful legs 
propel it at tremendous speed and the difficulty of hitting such a fast moving target 
intensifies the pleasure of the hunt. The "jack" does not readily capitulate. It has 
power and stamina which provide an excellent defense against all but the most 
experienced. The varying hare or snowshoe rabbit on the other hand has quite a 
burst of speed, but lacks the reserve power and physical courage of the "jack". 
It succumbs readily. 

The cotton tail and the hare are in about the same class from the sporting 
standpoint, although the former provides a measure of additional sport to those who 
enjoy hunting with ferrets. 

Hunters should realize that there is just as much danger of exterminating 
the rabbit through needless waste as any other species of game. This is particularly 
true in the more populous areas, where hunting is heavy and habitat restricted. Game 
which provides such healthy outdoor recreation at a minimum of expense is worth 
conserving. 

SQUIRREL (Black and Grey): — These animals are quite numerous in the 
southern counties and particularly is this applicable to the western portion. They 
were afforded the protection of an entire close season which in all probability con- 
tributed largely to the improvement evident in the numbers of these varieties of 
squirrel. 

PARTRIDGE: — Conditions as they applied to the various species of this 
desirable game bird were not sufficiently favourable to justify any action along 
the lines of an open season. 

The sharp-tailed grouse or prairie chicken is found only in the northwestern 
districts and while scarce they showed signs of some increase. 

As far as ruffed grouse are concerned, these birds exist throughout the 
Province, though their numbers are, of course, quite limited in the more settled 
sections. However, as previously stated in no section were they in any way numerous 
though reports received by the Department advised that improvement was noticeable 
principally in Northern Ontario and the northern districts and eastern counties of 
the southern part of the Province. 

QUAIL: — These birds are found principally in the counties of Essex, Kent, 
Lambton and Middlesex, and in counties immediately adjacent to the eastern 
boundaries thereof, and in which section they are fairly plentiful. Scattered bevies 
of quail are reported also in some eastern counties, that is Stormont, Dundas and 
Glengarry. 



ANNUAI^ REPORT, 1937-38 



PHEASANT: — During the year reported upon the Department intensified its 
pheasant re-stocking activities insofar as they applied to live birds, with the 
result that the distribution of eggs was to that extent curtailed. Departmental 
records reveal the fact that only 303 settings, or 4,545 eggs, were distributed to 
interested applicants, while live pheasants numbering 5,076 in all were liberated 
in suitable areas, 4,703 of which birds were placed in various Regulated Game Pre- 
serve areas, a scheme of protected areas inaugurated during the year, and to which 
scheme detailed reference is made later on in this Report. 

The following references concerning the earlier efforts in connection with 
the re-stocking of pheasants will probably be of sufficient interest to warrant 
inclusion in this Report. 

It seems rather a hopeless task to definitely determine the time and circum- 
stances when the English ring-necked pheasant was first introduced into this 
Province. The only official record to be found is in the published reports for the 
Department. It is strange that while reference is made in some of them to con- 
ditions, no information is included as to when they were planted or by whom. The 
first reference found is in a report of the Ontario Game and Fish Commissioners for 
1895, and concerns Mongolian and English pheasants, viz:^ — 

"There is an increasing feeling among sportsmen that further and greater 
efforts must be made in the near future looking towards the restocking of game 
covers, and quail seems to be the only bird which offers a fair compensation for 
the outlay of time and money. As is well known, none of the other native birds 
admit of propagation so that restocking with them is out of the question. Some 
ardent sportsmen have introduced the Mongolian pheasant and also the English 
pheasant but sufficient time has not yet elapsed in which to test the success of 
the experiment." 

The report of the same organization for 1896 mentions the fact that a number 
of English pheasants, about 120, were reared at Rondeau during the year. 

And again in 1901: — "It has been suggested in consequence of the English 
pheasants that have been liberated on Point Pelee having done so well, that the 
Point should be made a preserve and no shooting or hunting at any time be allowed 
on the Point." 

Finally.-^reference is made to an open season, and the following is quoted 
from the Ontario Game and Fisheries Commission (Special Committee) Final Report, 
1910, — "The open season for pheasants which was declared during the past year, 
resulted apparently in the satisfactory discovery that the birds were more plentiful 
than had been supposed, and most excellent sport would appear to have been 
enjoyed. Sufficient time, however, has not yet elapsed to enable a determination 
to be arrived at in regard to the advisability of repeating the experiment of an 
open season during 1911. Careful investigation should be made at this point by the 
proper authorities, for the pheasants in some localities have become so well acclima- 
tized and are thriving to such an extent that it would be a grievous mistake to 
allow their numbers to become unduly diminished." 

HUNGARIAN PARTRIDGE: — These birds are not very plentiful anywhere in 
the Province. So far as the north is concerned their numbers are negligible though 
evidence of their existence is reported from certain sections of Thunder Bay, Algoma 
and Temiskaming. They are most numerous in the very extreme southwestern 
counties, while reports indicate they are becoming more plentiful in some of the 
eastern counties. During the year 102 of these birds were distributed by the 
Department in selected areas. 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 



DUCKS: — Generally speaking this species of migratory waterfowl provides 
quite a large proportion of the sport which is available to the hunter during any 
season, and the present restrictions which apply for their protection are providing 
a measure of conservation which will undoubtedly be beneficial and result in main- 
taining the supply for the enjoyment of sportsmen in future years. Reports from 
practically every section of the Province are quite favourable, though there are 
some areas in the north in which conditions are not too good. 

GEESE: — There are not many areas in Ontario in which these birds may be 
successfully hunted, and while they are observed in flight during the fall and spring 
migrations in numerous sections the conditions which prevail during these migrations 
are such that during the open season which is provided any hunting which is 
available is pretty well restricted to the James Bay shore in the far north, and to a 
few of the extreme southwestern counties. 

WOODCOCK: — This species is extremely scarce in Northern Ontario, and is 
none too plentiful in the southern portion of the Province. From reports to the 
Department it is apparent that most favourable locations are in some of the counties 
along the north shore of Lake Erie. 

SNIPE: — As in the case of the woodcock, snipe are extremely scarce in the 
northern districts. They are reported to be somewhat plentiful in a number of the 
eastern counties, and while some improvement was observed in scattered areas 
throughout the southern counties as a general rule their numbers are sufl&cient to 
provide nothing more than fair shooting. 

PLOVER: — Continues to be very scarce in practically every section of the 
Province, and no improvement indicated by reports. 

During the year under review Regulations were approved which provided for 
special open seasons, details of which are as follows: — 

(a) Deer in that portion of Carleton County lying west of the 
Rideau River, — from November 5th to 20th, inclusive. General 
deer hunting regulations applied. 

(b) Deer in the counties of Bruce and Grey, — from November 8th 
to 13th, inclusive. General deer hunting regulations applied 
except that the use of dogs was not permitted. 

(c) Pheasants — Pelee Island, October 28th and 29th. Five birds 
per day. Special municipal license $3. 

(d) Pheasants, quail and Hungarian Partridge, — The counties of 
Essex and Kent, October 28th and 29th. Three pheasants, 
three quail and two Hungarian Partridge per day. 

(e) Pheasants, — in the following Townships, which were establish- 
ed as Regulated Game Preserve Areas, viz: — Markham, Nel- 
son, Trafalgar, Flamborough, E., Beverley, Ancaster, Saltfleet, 
Binbrook, Barton, Humberstone, Canborough, Dunn, Cayuga 
North, Cayuga South, Oneida and Seneca, October 28th and 
29th. Three birds per day. Special municipal license $1. 
per day. 

(f ) Pheasants, — in the following Townships, which were establish- 
ed as Regulated Game Preserve Areas, viz: — Grimsby North, 
Clinton, Louth, Grantham, Niagara, Caistor, Willoughby and 
Bertie, October 28th. Three birds per day. Special municipal 
license $1.00. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 19 37-38 



FUR BEARERS 

Conditions as they apply to fur bearing animals throughout the Province 
are set forth in the following references, as summarized from reports of the Field 
Service staff to the Department: — 

BEAVER: — These animals had the protection of an entire close season, though 
it was found necessary to open the season on Manitoulin Island for the first fifteen 
days of November. Trapping of these animals under the regulations which prevailed 
restricted such operations to trappers and farmers actually resident on Manitoulin, 
limited the catch of each person to not more than ten beaver, and required that 
pelts so taken be disposed of under supervision of the Department. The close 
season which has been in effect has resulted in a noticeable increase in the numbers 
of these animals practically throughout the entire Province. 

FISHER: — This species is extremely scarce throughout the Province and few 
if any are taken anywhere south of the French and Mattawa Rivers. 

FOX: — Conditions remained pretty much the same in the various sections in 
which these animals have been found, with improvement and decreasing numbers 
reported from different districts. There was unquestionably no general increase, 
which would appear to be supported by the fact that there was quite a noticeable 
decrease in the numbers of the various species of fox taken during the season. Silver 
fox now are very seldom taken in the wild. 

LYNX: — This species also is extremely scarce everywhere in the Province, 
and while the pelt is one of the most valuable of those taken in the wild the trapper 
does not derive much of his revenue therefrom. 

MARTEN: — Very scarce, and while there was an increase in the number of 
pelts taken during the season, such increase should not be regarded as an indication 
of any permanent or general improvement. 

MINK: — There would appear to be no doubt that this species is becoming 
less numerous in many areas. There were few sections in which conditions were 
favourable or any improvement observed. 

MUSKRAT: — Conditions in Northern Ontario particularly were not at all good, 
and while there were some sections in Southern Ontario from which favourable 
reports were received, generally speaking conditions here were only comparatively 
fair. The decline in the annual catch which has now been progressing over a number 
of years continued during the season reported upon. 

OTTER: — These animals are to be found chiefly in Northern Ontario, and even 
there they are not particularly numerous. Conditions remained about the same 
as is indicated by the annual take. While continuing scarce some improvement was 
reported in scattered areas. 

RACCOON: — This species does not inhabit the north. General conditions in 
southern Ontario remained about the same. They are not plentiful anywhere, and 
reports indicate that generally speaking their numbers are possibly decreasing to 
some extent. 

SKUNK: — While these animals were reported to be very plentiful throughout 
the entire Province there was quite an extensive decrease in the number taken by- 
trappers during the season. 

WEASEL: — This species continues to be very plentiful in every portion of 
the Province, with the possible exception of certain counties in the southwestern 
peninsula. The catch was about the same as in the previous year. 



10 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



There can be no question as to the necessity of the present restrictions which 
are provided by the Game and Fisheries Act as a means of protecting existing fur 
bearing animals in this Province, and while in some particular instances these 
regulations may appear to be unnecessary appearances of such a nature are deceptive. 
As a general rule the more desirable species of fur bearers are diminishing in 
number, no doubt attributable for the most part to decreased suitable and available 
habitat as well as to the intensified trapping operations to which these animals 
have been subjected in past years. In Northern Ontario all the species of fur-bearing 
animals mentioned in this report are to be found in varying numbers while in 
Southern Ontario at the present time fur bearing animals would include fox, mink, 
muskrat, raccoon, skunk and weasel, and, to a lesser extent beaver and otter, the 
other species herein referred to being practically extinct in this section. 

There is no doubt that the year under review was an extremely difficult one for 
the trapper, because as will be observed from the following comparative statement 
not only was there a considerable decrease in the number of pelts actually taken 
and disposed of but the prices which these pelts commanded on the open market 
were indeed quite low, and much below what has been recorded as average in more 
recent years. 

This comparative table shows the numbers of pelts of the various species of 
fur bearing animals which were exported from or dressed within the Province, during 
the year under review as well as in the two years immediately preceding: — 



Bear 

Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (cross) 

Fox (red) 

Fox (silver or black) 

Fox (white) 

Lynx 

Marten 

Mink 

Muskrat 

Otter 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Weasel 

Wolverine 



1935-36 


1936-37 


1937-38 


411 


476 


496 


6,785 


238 


235 


2,137 


2,117 


1,463 


5,424 


4,156 


2,426 


37,044 


35,232 


24,912 


500 


360 


201 


883 


17 


47 


2,642 


2,081 


1,284 


1,282 


1,464 


1,709 


47,057 


33,930 


22,766 


398,043 


370,239 


343,972 


3,701 


3,779 


3,737 


13,259 


14,243 


13,194 


50,747 


87,950 


61,576 


42,643 


78,643 


79,853 


4 


2 


5 


613,057 


635,203 


557,876 



Information compiled in the Department shows that these furs were worth 
to the trappers responsible for taking the same, the sum of $966,552.92, which is 
but little more than fifty per cent of the amount realized from such sales in the 
previous year. 

To these figures should be added statistics as they apply to the product 
of licensed fur farms not subject to the payment of royalty, including silver, black 
and cross foxes and mink. Furs disposed of during the year by these fur farmers 
included 33,235 silver fox pelts worth $683,643.95, 26,480 of which were exported 
and the remaining 6,755 dressed in the Province; 24,864 mink pelts worth 
$209,852.16, 24,381 of which were exported and the remaining 483 dressed in the 
Province; and 233 cross fox pelts worth $3,467.04, 192 of which were exported and 
the remaining 41 dressed in the Province. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1937-38 



11 



FUR FARMING 

During the year there were 1,536 licenses issued to authorize fur farming 
operations. Of this number some 331 were new licenses. As compared with the 
previous year there was a net increase in the number of licensed fur farms under 
operation totalling 188. The records show that silver foxes were raised on 986 of 
these fur farms, cross foxes on 103 fur farms, red foxes on 133 fur farms, mink on 
614 fur farms, and raccoon on 91 fur farms. There were 859 fur farms on which 
operations were confined to foxes, 451 fur farms on which only mink were raised, 
while on 38 fur farms only raccoon were propagated. On the remaining 188 fur 
farms operations were not limited to any one species. 

The subjoined comparative table shows the total breeding stock retained on 
these licensed fur farms as on the first day of January in each of the years included 
therein: — 

SUMMARY OF BREEDING STOCK ON LICENSED FUR FARMS 
AS AT JANUARY 1ST 



Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (cross) 

Fox (red) 

Fox (silver or black) 

Fox (blue) 

Lynx 

Mink 

Muskrat 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Bear 

Marten 



1936 



70 

16 

367 

228 

21,645 

5 

2 

12 332 

375 

524 

3 

21 

4 



1937 



21 

20 

257 

207 

23,869 



2 

15,539 

351 

358 

5 

15 

4 



1938 



25 

16 

235 

140 

24,848 



2 

21,982 

302 

351 

9 

15 

11 



It will be observed that silver fox and mink represent by far the greater 
proportion of the activities which are carried on by the operators of these licensed 
fur farms, and though in each instance an increase is indicated, that in the case 
of mink far exceeded the increase in silver fox. The raising of mink is rapidly 
becoming an important branch of the fur farming industry. One can realize the 
truth of this statement when it is noted that the stock of mink maintained on these 
fur farms increased from 8,605 to 21,982 in a period of only three years. 

CROWN GAME PRESERVES 

One of the first measures taken to preserve the game in the Province of Ontario 
was the setting aside of large areas of land as Provincial Parks. In these Parks no 
hunting or trapping is permitted and the wild life is given a chance to increase and 
develop under natural conditions and without molestation from man. These pro- 
tective areas proved so successful that the idea was extended and large areas of 
crown lands in Northern Ontario have been set aside for the same purpose under 
the Department of Game and Fisheries. These areas are known as Crown Game 
Preserves. At the present time there are 116 such Crown Game Preserves with an 
area of approximately 6,068,914 acres. 

While the largest portion of this area is situated in Northern Ontario it has 
been possible to establish a number of preserve areas in the southern part of the 
Province with the co-operation of owners of private property. These areas will be 
primarily useful for the protection and propagation of upland game birds, although 
all species of desirable game will be protected. 



12 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 



It is generally acknowledged that where wild life is allowed to propagate 
with a minimum of human interference and in surroundings which provide natural 
food and cover there will in time be a return to the normal conditions set up by 
nature. This means not only increased game in the protected areas but a general 
improvement in conditions throughout the Province. 

During the year five additional Crown Game Preserves were established in 
southwestern Ontario in accordance with the schedule appended hereto, and changes 
were made in the boundaries of the Jocko Crown Game Preserve in the District of 
Nipissing and in the Peasemarsh Crown Game Preserve, in the County of Grey. 



Designation 


County 


Extent in 
Acres 


Crossbill Crown Game Preserve 

Hiffhsate " " " 


Waterloo 

Kent 

Peel 

Welland 

Norfolk 


1,200 
575 


Long Branch " " " 


450 


Wainfleet " " "... 


5,000 
400 


Windham " " " 







REGULATED GAME PRESERVE AREAS 

The year saw a new development in the matter of the control of indiscriminate 
hunting. In line with the desire to provide better hunting and to maintain in large 
measure the privilege which sportsmen have enjoyed for generations of using 
private lands in the pursuit of game, arrangements were entered into between the 
Department and some twenty-seven Townships whereby hunting in these Townships 
would be restricted to certain open seasons for pheasants and rabbits, and that only 
those who had the necessary hunting license issued by the Municipality would be 
authorized to take advantage of the open dates. This had the effect of creating these 
areas as Regulated Game Preserves because of the fact that hunting was prohibited 
except on open dates as proclaimed on the recommendation of the Department. 
These open dates were limited to a two-day pheasant shoot and a seasonal period 
during the winter for rabbit hunting. It had an additional effect of preventing 
an influx of non-residents to the area because the number of special licenses issued 
was based on the number of available pheasants and only those with a pheasant 
license were permitted to partake in the rabbit hunting. The Municipality collected 
a small fee for the license. The Department stocked these areas with several 
thousand live birds and hopes to largely increase its pheasant production for the 
restocking of these Regulated Areas. 

By concentrating the restocking of pheasants on these Regulated Areas, rather 
than scattering the available birds over a large section of Southern Ontario and 
thereby thinning the numbers in most counties below the point where hunting is 
desirable, it is believed a sufficient quantity of birds will be raised to warrant 
an open season. The bag limit which would apply during an open season would 
permit the taking of cock birds only. Continuous replenishment of the stock will be 
part of the plan so that an open season simply means a temporary reduction of the 
surplus stock. In other words protecting the hens will maintain an ever increasing 
brood stock and the surplus destroyed during a shoot will be replaced to take care 
of the next open season. 

Several specific and important results are anticipated from this arrangement. 
First, and quite important, is the fact that the farmer will not be subject to the 
expense and inconvenience of having irresponsible hunters tramping over his lands 
and damaging property during the whole gun license season. It is well known that 
the actions of a few have brought about a feeling of animosity between the farmer and 
the sportsman, a situation which threatens to put an end to free hunting. Those who 



ANNUAL REPORT, 19 37-38 



13 



obtain a license during the open season will be readily identified, and abuse of the 
privilege will mean prosecution and cancellation of any future privileges. As the 
carrying of fire-arms for hunting purposes within such Regulated Areas is forbidden, 
except during such open seasons as may be prescribed and then only under the 
authority of a special license, it is hoped to eliminate practically all of the poaching 
which otherwise takes place. 

It is pleasing to learn that the open seasons established in these Regulated 
Townships were quite successful and have done much to stay the epidemic of land 
posting which threatened so seriously to curtail the opportunity for hunting over 
private lands. It is not suggested, of course, that the present arrangements are 
perfect, experience will doubtless bring minor changes in control and regulation 
but the inauguration of such a scheme will, we believe, receive the approbation of 
every sportsman when its underlying benefits become better known. 

The various townships which entered this scheme of Regulated Game Pre- 
serve Areas during the year are as follows: — 

The Township of Markham, in York County; 

The Townships of Nelson and Trafalgar, in Halton County; 

The Townships of Flamborough East, Beverley, Ancaster, Saltfleet, Barton and 
Binbrook, in Wentworth County; 

The Townships of Grimsby North, Clinton, Louth, Grantham, Niagara and 
Caistor, in Lincoln County; 

The Townships of Stamford, Willoughby, Bertie and Humberstone, in Welland 
County; 

The Townships of Canborough, Dunn, Cayuga South, Cayuga North, Oneida 
and Seneca, in Haldimand County. 

Part of the Township of Westminister, in Middlesex County; 

The Township of Bayham, in Elgin County. 

WOLF BOUNTIES 

The following is a comparative table of condensed wolf bounty statistics 
covering the last four fiscal years: — 



Period 


Timber 


Brush 


Pups 


Total 


Bounty & 
Expenses 


For year ending Oct. 31, 1934. 
For year ending Mar. 31, 1936 . 
For year ending Mar. 31, 1937. 
For year ending Mar. 31, 1938. 


990 
1,159 
1,090 
1,022 


812 
1,713 
1,197 

837 


57 
33 
31 
30 


1,859 
2,905 
2,318 
1,889 


$27,080.65 
42,399.89 
33,360.63 
27,474.24 



During the year 1,380 claims for wolf bounty were paid in respect of 1,889 
wolves as shown above, in addition to which 19 claims were disallowed for various 
reasons. Bounty was paid to 1,109 different persons, 735 of whom applied in 
connection with only one wolf each. Applicants submitting claims on two wolves 
numbered 179. The remainder of the applicants had claims for varying numbers, 
while the largest total bounty paid to any one person amounted to $210. 

Details as to the sources of origin of the pelts submitted for bounty are set 
forth in the following table: — 



14 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



REPORT OF WOLF BOUNTY CLAIMS 



District or County 



Algoma 

Bruce 

Cochrane 

Frontenac 

Grey 

Haliburton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kenora 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Manitoulin 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Norfolk 

Lennox & Addington 

Parry Sound 

Patricia 

Peterboro 

Rainy River 

Renfrew 

Simcoe 

Sudbury 

Temiskaming 

Thunder Bay 

Waterloo 

Welland 

York 

Totals 



Adult Wolves 



Timber 



82 

13 

38 

6 



8 

8 

1 

263 



1 

1 

13 

12 

38 



7 

59 

59 

1 

155 

24 

11 

62 

2 

161 

1 







1,026 



Brush 



109 
6 
2 

2 

4 


144 

4 

. 1 



111 
6 
11 
1 
1 
3 
21 


188 

1 

114 
2 

112 

1 
1 



845 



Pups 





4 



6 

16 



1 





2 

3 
1 



3 






36 



Total 



191 

19 

44 

6 

2 

8 

18 

1 

423 

4 

2 

1 

125 

18 

49 

1 

8 

62 

82 

1 

346 

25 

12 

176 

4 

276 

1 

1 

1 



1,907 



While the total expenditures incurred in connection with the administration of 
the Wolf Bounty Act amounted to $27,474.24, actual bounty payments accounted 
for $27,204.00 of this total, details of which are contained in the following 
statement: — 



Brush Wolves (Counties) 
(Districts) 


21 
816 


@ 

@ 
@ 

@ 
@ 


$ 6.00 
$15.00 

$ 6.00 
$15.00 

$ 2.00 
$ 5.00 


$ 126.00 
$12,240.00 




Total Brush Wolves 

Timber Wolves (Counties) 
(Districts) 


837 

71 
951 


$ 426.00 
$14,265.00 


$12,366.00 


Total Timber Wolves 

Pups (Counties) 
(Districts) 


1,022 

1 
29 


$ 2.00 
$ 145.00 


$14,691.00 


Total Pups 


30 

1,889 


$ 147.00 


Grand Total 


$27,204.00 



In the northern districts the Province pays the entire bounty, but so far as 
claims originating in the southern counties are concerned, bounty is paid by the 
County Treasurers and forty per cent rebated to the counties by the Province. 

Trappers and farmers were responsible for taking more than eighty per cent 
of the wolf pelts submitted for bounty, while it is reported that forty-five per cent 
of the animals were snared, twenty-six per cent trapped, twenty-one per cent shot, 
and the authorized use of poison was responsible for taking only three per cent. 
The remaining five per cent were taken by miscellaneous means. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1937-38 15 



GENERAL 

GAME & FISHERIES ACT. 

The Game and Fisheries Laws are an important part of the Department's pro- 
gramme to properly conserve the heritage with which it is entrusted. They are 
not merely regulatory or restrictive but are, in reality, the controlling factors 
which determine the abundance or otherwise of our wild life resources. They are 
the result of biological knowledge and practical experience, and have been framed 
with due regard to the life history of the various species, particularly that phase 
of it which determines perpetuation. These laws have many classifications but in 
general they are intended to develop all classes of desirable wild life while per- 
mitting the greatest possible use of these resources, and to discourage certain 
undesirable forms which do not fit into the economic scheme of things. 

A study of the laws and regulations will convince the most skeptical that they 
are an important part of the programme necessary for the conservation of our 
fish and game resources and that when the public is urged to observe the laws it is 
a request for co-operation in the management of a valuable trust. Non-observance 
of the regulations, however unimportant the details may seem, is unfair to that 
ever-increasing family of sportsmen and nature lovers who conscientiously obey the 
laws and pursue their recreational pleasures from the highest standard of sports- 
manship. 

Amendments enacted by the Legislative Assembly and which became effective 
during the year included the following provisions: — 

(a) Open season and other regulations governing the hunting of 
woodcock, snipe, ducks, geese and other migratory water-fowl 
to be as provided by the Migratory Birds Convention Act 
(Canada). 

(b) Parties of non-resident hunters to engage licensed guides 
when hunting moose. 

(c) Non-resident bear hunting license for the months of April and 
May at a fee of $5.25. 

(d) Adjustment of royalties on the pelts of certain fur-bearing 
animals, — lynx, mink, otter and skunk. Ranch raised cross 
fox exempted from royalty. 

(e) Taking of does and fawns permitted in the proportion of one 
doe or fawn for each two hunters in the party. 

(f ) Use of snares prohibited in Peel and Carleton Counties. 

(g) Permitting use of an automatic shot gun when so permanently 
reconstructed and plugged as to be capable of holding not 
more than two shells at any one time. 

Amendments to the Fisheries Regulations adopted during the year included 
the following provisions: — 

(a) Minor changes in the open seasons for pickerel, lake trout and 
whitefish in certain northern districts. 

(b) Persons engaging licensed guides while angling not to include 
such guide as one of their number when computing the num- 
ber or quantity of fish they are entitled to take. 

(c) Exportation of maskinonge by non-resident anglers restricted 
to one day's catch. 

TOURIST OUTFITTERS. 

Complete reference to the system of licensing tourist outfitters operating in 
the northern portion of the Province was embodied in the previous Annual Report. 
The following analysis shows the distribution by Districts of the 498 camps which 
were licensed to operate during the year under review: — 



16 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES Nq. 9 

TOURIST OUTFITTERS CAMP LICENSES 
SUMMARY 

Algoma 7 3 

Cochrane 2 

Kenora 103 

Manitoulin 37 

Nipissing 91 

Parry Sound 90 

Patricia 1 

Rainy River 28 

Renfrew 10 

Sudbury 47 

Thunder Bay 15 

Temiskaming 1 

Total 498 

Four hundred and fifty-six of these camps were operated by residents of Ontario, 
the remaining forty-two by non-residents. 

EDUCATIONAL. 

In a previous report reference was made to the preparation and distribution of a 
Monthly Bulletin. This publication was originally produced wholly in the Department 
and took the form of a mimeographed booklet. Because of the work entailed 
it had necessarily a limited circulation, although many requests for copies were 
received. To ensure a wider distribution and to take care of the increasing demands 
for copies from Protective Associations, schools and private individuals, it was found 
desirable to have the material printed. Beginning with the May, 1937, issue, 
therefore, the Bulletin assumed a new form, and a greater significance as an 
educational medium in the sphere of wild life conservation. The original issue 
amounted to about 600 copies monthly, under the new scheme of publication the 
circulation immediately doubled and since then it has continued to increase with 
each issue. 

In this connection we quote the following editorial comment from the June, 
1937, issue of this Monthly Bulletin: — 

"Education is the foundation of all intelligent thought and action. It is the 
most important factor entering into the conservation of our wild life and other 
natural resources. Such progress as has been made in protecting, propagating and 
re-stocking is due to the practical knowledge and scientific attainment. Practical 
knowledge of wild life conditions is the result of experience gained in actual personal 
contact and observations under natural conditions. It is not always reliable taken 
alone because unwarranted conclusions are frequently drawn from certain conditions 
or experiences which are open to several explanations. However, the practical 
value of such first-hand information is of very great importance as it serves to 
confirm the conclusions arrived at through scientific investigation. The combination 
of these two sources of knowledge is the basis of our conservation programme." 

"Knowledge, however, is progressive. It knows no limitation. The ideas of 
yesterday are but the stepping-stones to future enlightenment and creative effort. 
In the field of wild life conservation moie attention is being paid to the scientific 
investigation of life history and environmental conditions. The idea that our wild 
life resources are inexhaustible passed on with the horse and buggy and the 
carrier pigeon. Nature provided certain fundamental conditions necessary to wild 
life perpetuation. We have unwittingly disturbed these conditions and so, in order 
to keep pace with modern demands, we must take advantage of modern knowledge 
and experience. This means wise conservation laws based on biological knowledge 
and practical experience; the investigation of life history and natural conditions; 
the operation of hatcheries for intensive stocking; the setting aside of preserve 
areas for natural propagation and development, and the passing on of the knowledge 
acquired to the public through means of education and publicity. These things, the 
Department of Game and Fisheries is attempting to do. The results so far have 
justified the effort." 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1937-38 17 



"The sportsman can do much to foster these plans by co-operating wherever 
practicable and by lending his aid to put across the ideals of conservation. These 
ideals have been developed over a long period of years. They embody the results of 
progressive thought and scientific knowledge, therefore they are modern and worth 
while. They proclaim individual responsibility as necessary to success, and or- 
ganized effort the best method of accomplishing the greatest good for the greatest 
number. In short, conservation is education practically applied, and is the care 
of everyone interested in wild life preservation or better hunting and fishing." 

ENFORCEMENT SERVICE 

Many people, who take but a superficial view of the matter, believe that all 
that is necessary to eliminate and control the ills which afflict organized society, 
is to enact regulatory laws designed to take care of the problem or problems 
involved. Laws are essential and necessary to good government, but they are not 
in themselves a panacea for all the troubles which beset our social and economic 
systems. Experience has demonstrated that the fewer the laws and the simpler 
their enactments to cover any particular subject the more effective is their enforce- 
ment. 

The Game and Fisheries Laws are necessary to the proper administration and 
perpetuation of our wild life. They are designed with a view to providing the 
greatest possible individual liberty consistent with the wise use of the resources 
involved. These laws are respected by a large majority of the citizens of the 
Province and their observance becomes more and more a passport to good sportsman- 
ship. However, despite their simplicity, we still have the law breaker, the man 
who continues to ignore legal restrictions and thereby takes unfair advantage of 
those who "play the game". It is too much to hope that we can entirely eliminate 
this offender, but there is good reason to believe that through our united efforts 
we can do much to show the careless and the thoughtless that observance of and 
respect for the Game and Fisheries Laws is quite an important feature in the 
protection and development of our wild life natural resources. 

To administer and enforce the provisions of the Game and Fisheries Act the 
Department maintains a regular staff of Field officers throughout the Province. 
These men are designated Overseers or Game Wardens, and their duties consist of 
securing observance of the laws and regulations pertaining to fishing, hunting and 
trapping. Their task is a difficult one though they are invariably courteous but 
firm in carrying out their duties. These permanent members of our field staff 
constitute an important section of the protective service. However, their services 
are augmented by the assistance and co-operation of members of the Ontario 
Provincial Police Force as well as certain seasonal officers who are retained for 
varying periods in the matter of providing adequate patrol service along certain 
waters during the spring and fall fish spawning periods and protective work during 
the various hunting seasons. 

Interested sportsmen also play a large part in the work of protecting our 
fish and game resources. During the year some 876 sportsmen conservationists 
offered their services and were accepted as Deputy Game Wardens, and as such 
are authorized to assist in obtaining proper observance of the Act and Regulations. 
The practical support and moral effect of this army of voluntary workers is of very 
great importance in preventing abuses of the privileges enjoyed by sportsmen. 

The Department deplores the fact that it is necessary to prosecute in order to 
obtain proper observance of the Game and Fisheries Laws. It is hoped that through 
education, an enlightened public opinion, and a general knowledge of the value of our 
resources the law breaker will become so unpopular that his depredations will be 
considerably reduced. In the meantime, however, the poacher, the unscrupulous 
trapper and the petty lawbreaker still keep the enforcement officers busy. 

During 19 37-38 there were some 136 2 cases in which offenders against pro- 
visions of the Game and Fisheries Act and Regulations were apprehended in their 
offences by members of the Field Service Staff who promptly relieved those involved 
of the articles of sporting equipment they carried as well as the unlawful game or 
fish they might have had in their possession on such occasions. From an examination 
of the reports supplied in these cases it is learned that action was provided by 



18 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

Game and Fisheries Overseers in 1157 of these cases, by Deputy Game Wardens in 
62 cases, by members of the Ontario Provincial Police Force in 48 cases, and in the 
remaining 95 cases by co-operative action amongst Overseers, Deputy Game Wardens, 
and Provincial Police Constables. 

A condensed summary of the material confiscated shows the following: — 

Live animals in 7 cases 

Birds, game animals and meat in 160 cases 

Firearms and ammunition in 460 cases 

Fish in 209 cases 

Nets and fishing equipment in 213 cases 

Angling equipment in 8 4 cases 

Pelts and hides in 228 cases 

Traps and equipment in 166 cases 

Water craft in 29 cases 

Motor vehicles in 11 cases 

Lights in 21 cases 

Spears in 66 cases 

Miscellaneous in 52 cases 

Duplicate entries on one seizure report, such as firearms and game; angling 
equipment and fish; trapping equipment and pelts, and other combinations of a 
similar nature account for the apparent discrepancy in the total shown by the 
foregoing table, viz, 1706, as compared with seizure reports numbering 1362. 

Departmental records disclose the fact that during the year reported upon 
some 1108 cases were prosecuted through the courts, and that convictions were 
registered in 1045 of these cases, while charges in the remaining 63 cases were 
dismissed by the Magistrates who presided thereon. Game and Fisheries Overseers 
prosecuted in 960 cases and were successful in 913; Provincial Police Constables 
in 67 cases and secured convictions in 62; Deputy Game Wardens in 18 cases in 16 
of which convictions were registered; while co-operative action by Overseers, 
Provincial Police and Deputy Game Wardens resulted in 54 convictions out of the 
63 cases prosecuted. 

While each officer is required to be impartial and eflBcient in the carrying out 
of his duties he is also required to use common sense and display courtesy in his 
treatment of the general public with whom he conies into contact. We believe that 
as a general rule the members of our enforcement service are guided by these 
requirements at all times. Public service is synonymous with criticism rather 
than commendation. The control which is essential to the proper administration 
of a trust, such as our wild life resources, is often irksome to those who object 
to anything in the nature of restrictions on their so-called "liberties". As a 
consequence enforcement frequently results in irritation. For this reason we are 
always glad to receive letters such as the following from one of our United States 
visitors who resides in the State of Ohio. He writes, "For ten years I have been 
coming to your Province to do my fishing and the courtesy and consideration ex- 
tended to me by the ofiicials of your bureau and the citizens of the various com- 
munities visited has been very gratifying to me." 

THE FISH CULTURE BRANCH 

Waters abounding in fish are an asset to any community. Increased fishing 
possibilities mean increased tourist travel; this stabilizes various business enter- 
prises, especially in recreation centres noted for their game-fish. Apart, however, 
from the direct and indirect financial benefits of a rapidly increasing tourist trade, 
the healthful and recreational advantages associated with game-fishing are of 
inestimable value. 

The maintenance of the commercial fishing industry is also of vital importance 
to the Province. Information regarding the value of this enterprise is summed up 
in the statistics of the fishing industry for the year in appendices 3 and 4. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1937-38 19 



The successful maintenance and increased usefulness of these interests are 
being developed in a variety of ways and the re-stocking of lakes and streams in a 
practical manner is of outstanding importance in this connection. To this end a 
vigorous fish cultural programme is being pursued with satisfactory results. 

HATCHERIES AND REARING STATIONS 

During the year the Department operated twenty-four fish cultural stations. 
The actual number of hatcheries operated was twenty; trout rearing stations, eleven; 
bass rearing stations, four, and additional facilities were provided as outlined in 
the following paragraphs. 

At the Fort Frances hatchery facilities were provided for carrying lake trout 
to the fry and early fingerling stages. 

An excellent site for bass rearing ponds was located at the outlet of Lake 
Manitou, Manitoulin Island, in the vicinity of Sandfield. One pond was completed 
before the end of the year and was used, successfully, for wintering trout fingerlings 
to the yearling stage. 

A second bass rearing pond, approximately one acre in area, was provided 
at the White Lake Station, Frontenac County. Speckled trout were wintered in this 
new pond very successfully. 

An additional trout pond was added to the series of three on the property of 
the Ontario Government Reforestry Station at Midhurst, and acquired for use by the 
Department. 

The water supply from Waring's Creek, located one and one-half miles west 
of Picton, was used for rearing trout fingerlings. This station was provided with 
outside rearing troughs of portable construction. 

SPECKLED TROUT: 

The Department continued the policy of rearing large numbers of trout 
to yearling and older stages for distribution to suitable public waters. The results 
of this plan have been successful. 

The following comparative distribution figures indicate the progress that 
is being made: 

1936 1937 

Yearlings 557,270 1,167,073 

Adults 6,081 16,150 

In addition, 384,725 fingerling trout were planted, slightly more than one-third 
the number planted the previous year. The entire abandonment of the distribution 
of trout fry and fingerlings is contemplated, with the exception of any surplus which 
cannot be accommodated in our rearing stations. 

BROWN TROUT: 

Excellent progress was made in regard to rearing brown trout to the yearling 
stage. During the year 97,484 yearling and older brown trout were distributed as 
compared with 7,290 during a similar period in the preceding year. 

Encouraging reports of successful angling for this species have been received and 
intensive re-stocking of suitable streams in southern Ontario is being pursued on 
the basis set forth in the two preceding reports. 

RAINBOW TROUT: 

(a) Steelhead Trout — 

The waters chosen for the planting of steelhead trout were such as to fulfil 
the natural requirements of this species; the number of steelhead rainbows planted 
was somewhat less than the number planted in 1936, but the number of Kamloops 
trout (an allied species) distributed made up for this deficit. 



20 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 



(b) Kamloops trout — 

This variety of rainbow trout is native to a number of lakes in the interior of 
British Columbia. It is an excellent sporting fish and may be taken on the fly and 
by trolling. Excepting during hot summer weather they are usually taken near the 
surface. One important characteristic is that they show very little tendency, if any, 
to migrate from the lakes in which they are planted. 

Speckled trout lakes supplied with good tributary streams are considered 
suitable for Kamloops trout. 

Eighty thousand fingerlings of this species were planted during the year. 

Returns from previous plantings in Echo Lake (Muskoka) and a small lake 
adjacent to Lake Timagami, are, we hope, forerunners of greater success to be 
achieved from the distribution of this important variety to a number of our lakes. 

LAND-LOCKED SALMON: 

The Department was unable to secure any eggs of this species from the Pro- 
vince of Quebec or elsewhere. The land-locked salmon hatchery at St. Felicien, 
Quebec, has not operated for some time. 

A small number of fry of the Atlantic salmon, a closely related species, were 
planted on an experimental basis. 

A few excellent specimens of land-locked salmon planted in Skeleton Lake, 
Muskoka District, have been caught by angling. 

LAKE TROUT: 

There was an increase in the distribution of eyed eggs and fry over the number 
distributed in the preceding year amounting to 7 per cent. There was a decrease 
in the distribution of fingerlings amounting to 13.6 per cent. For the egg collection, 
the Department depends on the co-operation of the fishermen and the work of our 
own spawntaking crews. Stormy weather in the fall, either continuously or inter- 
mittently, interferes with the work; this condition was particularly detrimental 
during the fall of 1937. 

WHITEFISH: 

There was a decrease of approximately 9.6 per cent in the distribution of 
whitefish as compared with that of the previous year; this was due to the reduced 
collection of spawn from the North Channel and Lake Ontario whitefish. 

HERRING: 

The large decrease in the distribution of herring fry was due in the main 
to the reduction in the collection of eggs from Lake Ontario herring and a greater 
reduction in the collection from Lake Erie herring, the latter collection being prac- 
tically negligible. There are very hopeful signs that the population of herring in 
Lake Erie is gradually increasing after the disastrous decline in 1925. If the present 
population is permitted to spawn at least once, and preferably twice, before they 
are taken commercially, there will be a decided increase of this very important 
commercial species. As a result large collections of spawn should be available in 
future years. 

YELLOW PICKEREL: 

There was a decrease of 12.4 per cent in the distribution of pickerel fry as 
compared with that of the preceding year, due primarily to the reduced collection 
of pickerel spawn in the southern portion of Lake Huron. 

Following the usual practice, two million eyed eggs were handled by the 
Sparrow Lake hatchery, the fry being distributed to suitable areas of Sparrow Lake. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1937-38 21 



SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS: 

Excellent results were obtained in connection with the culture of small-mouthed 
black bass; the increased production of fry and fingerlings was 63.4 per cent and 
104.5 per cent, respectively, over that of the previous year. 

There was also a slight increase in the distribution of yearlings and older bass, 
as a result of bass harvesting from natural areas; a limited amount of this work 
is conducted by our hatchery officers, annually. 

LARGE-MOUTHED BLACK BASS: 

Following the previous year's practice, one pond was operated for the pro- 
duction of this species with satisfactory results. This pond, which is 0.64 acres in 
area, produced 135,000 fry and 4,120 fingerlings. 

YELLOW PERCH: 

Due to a diminished run of spawning fish, there was considerable reduction in 
the number of perch eggs collected by the commercial fishermen in the vicinity of 
the Kingsville hatchery, where the eggs are cultured to the fry stage. 

BLUE PICKEREL: 

Blue pickerel spawn was collected in the west end of Lake Erie and cultured 
to the fry stage in the Kingsville hatchery; this was the first time that such work 
was undertaken by our Department. 

This is a species of considerable commercial value in Lake Erie, and artificial 
culture is one way by which its maintenance may be assisted. 

MASKINONGE: 

The distribution of maskinonge fry was increased 53.5 per cent over that 
of the preceding year, due largely to a much more satisfactory collection of eggs. 
One chief drawback was prevailing cold weather during the incubation period, which 
retarded development. This condition was followed by a sharp rise in temperature, 
causing too rapid development and hatching. 

The difficulties surrounding the culture of this important species were outlined 
in the previous year's report, and the information given applies with equal force 
to the results obtained in 1937. 

In Wisconsin the culture of maskinonge has been pursued for thirty to 
forty years. A large number of eggs are collected from areas where the parent fish 
are abundant, and a large number of fry are planted annually, but the rearing 
of fingerlings is a much more difficult matter; Wisconsin is reported to have 
reared 1,417 fingerlings of this species in 1937. New York State has likewise 
pursued the culture of maskinonge for over thirty years. This work is concentrated 
on Lake Chautauqua where parent maskinonge are plentiful and, therefore, egg 
collection and fry production large; in 1937 it is recorded that New York State 
planted 856 maskinonge fingerlings. In Minnesota progress along these lines has 
been slow on account of the scarcity of the breeding fish. Small numbers of fry 
have been distributed, but there is no authentic or definite record of the number 
of fingerlings actually reared up to and including 1937. 

In Ontario these activities are concentrated in the Kawartha Lakes region 
and for good reasons. In the first place, these waters have the necessary or essential 
conditions for producing maskinonge. Secondly, this area requires intensive re- 
stocking on account of the intensity of the fishing. A good indication of the 
capacity of these lakes to produce maskinonge is given in the statistics of catch 
from 1892 to 1901, when this important species was taken in large numbers, com- 
mercially. 



22 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 



The Department is endeavouring to maintain and to build up the maskinonge 
supply in a variety of ways, which may be summed up in a more or less concise 
manner as follows: 

1. Restricted bag limit and restricted number of days' fishing. 

2. Protection of the normal population in sanctuary areas, taking in waters 
adjacent and outside these areas only the natural increase from them. An ex- 
planation of the purposes of these sanctuaries was given in detail in the 
previous year's report. 

3. The planting of fry in suitable areas. 

4. Further studies regarding the possibilities of rearing fry to the fingerling 
stage. 

CLOSED WATERS 

In addition to those waters already closed for the natural protection and 
propagation of fish, the following closures were autnorized during the year. 

(a) For Speckled Ti-out Propagation: 

DUCHESNEY CREEK, 

Townships of Commanda and Widdifield, District of Nipissing. 

IDLWYLD STREAM, 

Township of Waterloo, County of Waterloo. 

JOHNSON CREEK, 

Townships of Kowkash, Paska, and Rupert, District of Thunder Bay. 

LITTLE JOCKO RIVER, 

From Morrow's Dam, east to its outlet into Big Jocko River, District of Nipissing. 

MALTA LAKE, 

Township of Boulter, District of Nipissing. 

NELLIE LAKE, 

Townships of Calver and Aurora, District of Cochrane. 

PATTERSON'S CREEK, 

Townships of Wawanosh and HuUett, County of Huron. 

PUMPHOUSE CREEK, 

Townships of Hart and Cartier, District of Sudbury. 

WHITEHEAD'S CREEK, 

Township 67, District of Algoma. 

(b) For Black Bass Propagation: 

ARCAND LAKE, 

Township of McBeth, District of Sudbury. 

FOUR MILE LAKE, 

Township of Widdifield, District of Nipissing. 

GEORGIAN BAY (Portion), 

(a) An area approximately 1 mile square lying west of Electric Island. 

(b) An area approximately 1 mile square lying west of Lot 51, Concession VIII., 
Township of Harrison, District of Parry Sound. 

(c) An area lying east of and extending approximately 2 miles along the shore 
line opposite Concessions XIII. and XIV., Township of Harrison, District of 
Parry Sound. 

TWELVE MILE CREEK, 

Townships of Nelson and Trafalgar, County of Halton. 

(c) For Lake Trout Proimgation, 

OTTER LAKE, 

Township of Foley, District of Parry Sound (Effective from the 16th day of 
November in each year to the 15th day of May next following). 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1937-38 23 



» 



WATER LEVELS 

During the past three years, marked improvement has been shown in regar<? 
to the control of water levels. Biologically, proper control is of the greatest im- 
portance, especially when we consider that bass, maskinonge, pike, sunfish, minnows, 
and many other species spawn in shallow water, and that their immature stages, 
or adult stages, or both, live in comparatively shallow water. The fall spawning 
fish such as lake trout, herring, and whitefish run into comparatively shallow 
water and spawn on suitable shoals or grounds. The spawning depth of water 
for these fall spawners is much greater than that required by black bass, which 
is about two feet, or by minnows, which is only a few inches. The withdrawal of 
water from these shallows is menacing to the eggs of the spawning fish, this 
depending on the spawning depth and the drop in water level, but quite apart from 
this, the withdrawal of water from the shallows destroys myriad forms of life, for 
example, those of sedentary habit, those temporarily attached, the algae which 
harbour minute life, shellfish, and insects, and aquatic plants of various kinds. 

REMOVAL OF COARSE FISH 

Between December 20th and January 16th hoop nets were operated for the 
removal of ling from the following waters: 

(a) In Leeds County, — 

Charleston, Grippen, Wolfe, and Otter Lakes. 

(b) In Lanark County, — 

Tay River and Otty Lake. 

The total number of ling removed from these waters was 6,520; the average 
weight of the ling was 7 pounds, and the total weight of ling removed was in the 
neighbourhood of 45,640 pounds or 22.8 tons. 

Similar operations were conducted on Lake Manitou, Manitoulin Island. During 
the whitefish spawntaking operations in the lake 4068 pounds of ling were taken in 
pound nets. The average weight of each ling was approximately six pounds. Night 
lines were used experimentally without satisfactory results. 

During the latter part of February and in March of 19 38, hoop nets and 
gill nets were operated and 2270 pounds of ling taken. Each of these averaged 
four pounds in weight. 

BIOLOGICAL SURVEYS 

Pollution surveys were conducted on the Rainy River, Maitland River, 
(Goderich), and the Niagara River. 

Fish planting surveys were carried out on the Holland River, Bradford, 
and Waterworks Pond at Richmond Hill. 

Extensive surveys were conducted in connection with suitable sites for black 
bass rearing ponds on Manitoulin Island, Muskoka District, and Peterborough 
County. Surveys were also conducted in the Timiskaming District in regard to a 
suitable site for a trout rearing station. 

With the exceptions noted above, all the work of a biological nature was con- 
centrated on the fish cultural activities carried on in our hatcheries and rearing 
stations. 

The Ontario Fisheries Research Laboratory of the Department of Biology, 
University of Toronto, conducted field investigations, coupled with laboratory studies 
on a number of waters in Algonquin Park during the season 1937-38, and the 
following is a concise account of this important work: 

"One of the principal functions of this laboratory is to examine the conditions in 
game fish producing lakes and streams. Information obtained in this way gives 
a better understanding of how rapidly fish grow and how a good supply can be 
maintained. During 1937-38 the work was carried on in the lakes and streams 
of Algonquin Park. 



24 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 

The major studies undertaken during the year included an investigation of 
the vertical distribution of the young of the yellow perch in relation to their 
availability as food for lake trout. The food of the young perch was studied in 
order to learn what governed the supply of this important source of trout food. 
The food was found to consist of 85% Daphnia or water fleas, 10% small insect 
larvae and 5% sunfish fry. 

Other studies were directed to the production of insects in the lakes and 
streams from the point of view of their value as food for fish. 

The collection of angling statistics was continued and extended. These figures 
are now extensive enough to make possible a preliminary estimate of the natural 
productivity of the Algonquin Park lakes with respect to lake trout. They have 
also proven their value in following the trend of speckled trout production in Red 
Rock lake, and have made possible the application of measures designed to keep 
up production in this important lake. 

During the year about 200 adult lake trout were transferred to Cache lake, 
some by truck and some by air, with satisfactory ease and economy. Some 2,000,000 
perch fry, 100,000 lake herring fry, and some minnows were planted in Cache 
lake. These forage fish were introduced for the purpose of increasing the food 
for the bass and the lake trout." 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

In conclusion I desire to give expression to my appreciation of the valuable 
assistance and co-operation rendered the Department from many sources during 
the year, and more particularly from the various Fish and Game Protective As- 
sociations as such and the individual members of these organizations. The sphere 
of activity of these Protective Associations is extending and the interest and 
influence of the members of these organizations and other sincere sportsmen is 
sufficiently evident to warrant the assertion that it is practically impossible to 
estimate the benefits derived by the Department therefrom in our efforts along 
the lines of providing an efficient administration and supervision of the wild life 
natural resources of this Province. Such a measure of co-operation encourages 
us to intensify our endeavours to preserve unimpaired and possibly improve the 
opportunities which exist in this Province to those who so desire to enjoy such 
healthly recreation which our fish and game make available. 

It might also be stated that, generally speaking, members of the Staff, both 
the inside and outside service, have conducted themselves and performed the duties 
assigned to them in the best interests of the Department and its varied activities. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I am. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

D. J. TAYLOR, 

Deputy Minister of Game and Fisheries 
Toronto, April 12th, 1939. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1937-38 



25 



APPENDIX No. 1 

SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1937 to March 31st, 1938 



LARGE-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

FRY 
Bruce: 

Marie Lake 5,000 

Maryville Lake 10,000 

Saugeen Lake 10,000 

Grey: 

Mountain Lake 10,000 

Saugeen River 15,000 

Muskoka: 

Bass Lake 5,000 

Black Lake 10,000 

Wood Lake 10,000 

Parry Sound: 

Limestone Lake 5,000 

Little Lake 5,000 

Wolf River 10,000 

Simcoe: 

Gloucester Pool 25,000 

York: 

Lake Simcoe 15,000 

FINGERLINGS 
Durham: 

Lake Scugog 1,000 

Haliburton: 

Black Lake 500 

Nipissing: 

Blackwater Lake 1,000 

Norfolk: 

Little Lake 500 

Teeterville Poad 500 

York: 

Mary Lake 510 

Waterworks Pond 110 

ADULTS 
Oxford: 

Lakeside Lake 42 

Maplehurst Lake 50 

SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

FRY 
Bruce: 

Britain Lake 5,000 

Burford Lake 10,000 

Cameron Lake 10,000 

Chesley Lake 10,000 

Gould Lake 10,000 

Isaac Lake 15,000 

Miller Lake 10,000 

Pearl Lake 5,000 

Saugeen River 15,000 

Shouldice Lake 10,000 

Silver Lake 10,000 



Carleton : 

Ottawa River 15,000 

Rideau River 10,000 

Frontenac: 

Big Gull Lake 10,000 

Clear Lake (Kennebec) . . 5,000 

Fortune Lake 5,000 

Long Lake (Clarendon) . . 5,000 

Mink Lake 5,000 

Pine Lake 5,000 

Sand Lake 5,000 

Sharbot Lake 10,000 

Sunday Lake 5,000 

Grenville: 

Nine Mile Reach 5,000 

Hastings: 

Baptiste Lake 15,000 

Crow Lake 10,000 

Gunter Lake 5,000 

Little Salmon River 5,000 

Moira River 10,000 

Stoco Lake 10,000 

Tongamong Lake 5,000 

Lanark : 

Rennet's Lake 5,000 

Black Lake 5,000 

Christie Lake 10,000 

Clear Lake 5,000 

Dalhousie Lake 5,000 

Mississippi Lake 10,000 

Fagan's Lake 5,000 

Otty Lake 5,000 

Pike Lake 5,000 

Leeds : 

Beverley Lake (lower) . . 10,000 

Big Rideau Lake 40,000 

Charleston Lake 10,000 

Clear Lake 5,000 

Crosby Lake 5,000 

Gananoque Lake 10,000 

Grippen Lake 5,000 

Indian Lake 10,000 

Newboro Lake 5,000 

Opinicon Lake 10,000 

Sand Lake 5,000 

South Lake 5,000 

Troy Lake 5,000 

Lennox: 

Lime Lake 5,000 

Long Lake 5,000 

Slave Lake 5,000 

South Beaver Lake 5,000 

Muskoka: 

Beaver Lake 5,000 

Buck Lake 5,000 

Clear Lake 5,000 

Dickie Lake 10,000 

Kahshe Lake 5,000 



26 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1937, to March 31st, 1938 — Continued 



SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

— Continued 

Muskoka — Continued 

Lake Joseph 25,000 

Lake Stewart 15,000 

Leech Lake 5,000 

Morrison Lake 10,000 

Rat Lake 5,000 

Silver Lake 5,000 

Wood Lake 10,000 

Northumberland : 

Bidy Lake 5,000 

CroAV Bay 5,000 

Crow River 10,000 

Rice Lake 15,000 

Trent River 10,000 

Ontario: 

Lake St. John 20,000 

Parry Sound: 

Balsam Lake 10,000 

Bass Lake (Humphrey) . 5,000 

Bass Lake (Patterson) . . 10,000 

Beaver Lake (Foley) 5,000 

Blackstone Lake 10,000 

Blackwater Lake 5,000 

Clear Lake (Humphrey) . 5,000 

Clear Lake (Patterson) .. 5,000 

Commanda Lake 10,000 

Crane Lake 5,000 

Crooked Lake 10,000 

Deer Lake (Lount) 10,000 

Deer Lake (McKenzie) . . 5,000 

Diamond Lake 5,000 

Horseshoe Lake 10,000 

Jackson Lake 5,000 

Lake Joseph 10,000 

Little Long Lake 10,000 

Manitowaba Lake 10,000 

Mary Jane Lake 5,000 

Mill Lake 10,000 

Pickerel River 10,000 

Rankins Lake 10,000 

Restoule Lake 10,000 

Ruth Lake 10,000 

Sequin River 10,000 

Shawanaga River 10,000 

Shebeshekong Lake 5,000 

Shoal Lake 5,000 

Stormy Lake 5,000 

Toad Lake 5,000 

Trout Lake (Humphrey) . 5,000 

Turtle Lake 5,000 

Whitefish Lake 5,000 

Whitestone Lake 10,000 

Wilson Lake 5,000 

Wolf River 10,000 

Peterborough: 

Belmont Lake 5,000 

Deer Lake (Cavendish) . . 5,000 

Katchawanooka Lake .... 15,000 

Pigeon Lake 15,000 

Stony Lake 10,000 



Prince Edward: 

East Lake 5,000 

West Lake 5,000 

Simcoe: 

Cook's Lake 10,000 

Gloucester Pool 40,000 

Kempenfeldt Bay 25,000 

Little Lake (Vespra) 5,000 

Park Lake (Tay) 10,000 

Stormont: 

Nation River 15,000 

Victoria: 

Balsam Lake 25,000 

Big Mud Turtle Lake 10,000 

Burnt River 15,000 

Cameron Lake 25,000 

Dalrymple Lake 15,000 

Head Lake 15,000 

Little Mud Turtle Lake . . 10,000 

Pigeon Lake 25,000 

Round Lake 5,000 

Silver Lake 10,000 

Sturgeon Lake 25,000 

York: 

Lake Simcoe 25,000 

FINGERLINGS 



Algoma: 

Batchewana Bay 

Dean Lake 

Desbarats Lake 

Gawas Bay 

Gordon Lake 

Goulais Bay 

Harmony Bay 

Haviland Bay 

Keichel Lake 

Little Basswood Lake . . 

Otter Lake 

Pipe Lake 

Rock Lake 

Round Lake 

St. Joseph Channel .... 
Stuart Lake 

Brant: 

Big Creek 

Grand River 

Gravel Pit at Scotland . 

Cochrane: 

Sesekinika Lake 

Frontenac: 

Cox's Lake 

Cross Lake (Kennebec) 
(jross Lake (Palmerston) 

Crow Lake 

Dog Lake 

Elbow Lake 

Farm Lake 



3,750 
2,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
3,750 
3,750 
3,750 
500 
1,000 
500 
500 
1,000 
1,500 
4,000 
1.000 



1,000 

2,000 

800 



1,000 



500 

500 
2,000 

500 
1,000 
1,000 

500 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1937-38 



27 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1937, to March 31st, 1938 — Continued 



SMAIiL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

— Continued 



Frontenac — Continued 
Horseshoe Lake . . . . . 

Hotel Lake 

Long Lake (Hinchin- 

brooke) 

Loughborough Lake . 

Marble Lake 

Mazinaw Lake 

Mississagagon Lake . . . 

Salmon River 

Swamp Lake 

White Lake (Bedford) 

Grey: 

Connell's Lake 

Francis Lake 

Haliburton: 

Beech Lake 

Big Boskung Lake . . . 

Davis Lake 

Dennies Lake 

Devils Lake 

Elephant Lake 

Grass Lake 

Gull Lake 

Head Lake 

Kashagawigamog Lake 

Koshlong Lake 

Long Lake (Dudley) . 
Long Lake (Dysart) . . 

Maple Lake 

Mink Lake 

Misquahbenish Lake . . 

North Lake 

Pine Lake 

Pond Lilly Lake 

South Lake 

West Lake 

West Straggle Lake . . 

Halton: 

Bronte River 

Hastings: 

Bass Lake 

Moira Lake 

Pine Lake 

Wadsworth Lake 

Lanark: 

McGowan's Lake 

Lennox-Addington : 

Cedar Lake 

Loon Lake 

Pringle Lake 

Sheldrake Lake 

Varty Lake 

Middlesex: 

Thames River 

Muskoka: 

Bass Lake 



500 
500 

500 

2,000 

500 

1,000 

500 

500 

500 

1.000 



1,000 
1,000 



500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
1,000 
500 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 



1,000 



500 
500 
500 
500 



500 



500 
1,000 
1,000 

500 
1,000 



2.000 



1,000 



Devine Lake 1,000 

Casswell Lake 1,000 

Clearwater Lake 1,000 

Gull Lake 1,000 

Lake McKay 1,000 

Lake Rosseau 1,000 

Nipissing: 

Bear Lake 1,000 

Bruce Lake 1,000 

Cache Lake 500 

Deer Lake 500 

Finlayson Lake 1,000 

McPhee Lake 1,000 

Muskosung Lake 500 

Nosbonsing Lake 500 

Talon Lake 500 

Timagami Lake 1,000 

Trout Lake 2,500 

Turtle Lake 1,500 

Wickstead Lake 1,500 

Wis-Wassie Lake 500 

Oxford: 

Thames River 1,000 

Parry Sound: 

Ahmic Lake 1,000 

Bear Lake 2,000 

Beaver Lake (Bethune) . . 2,000 

Beaver Lake (Spence) . . . 1,000 

Burden Lake 1,000 

Crawford Lake 1,000 

Doe Lake 2,000 

Lake Cecile 1,000 

Lake of Many Islands . . . 1,000 

Little Clam Lake 1,000 

Little Deer Lake 1,000 

Magnetawan River 1,000 

Mogonosh Lake 1,000 

Pickerel Lake 1,000 

Rainy Lake 2,000 

Spring Lake 1.000 

Peel: 

Credit River 2,000 

Peterborough: 

Burleigh Falls Stream . . . 500 

Chemong Lake 500 

Clear Lake (Smith) 500 

Clear Lake (Cavendish) . 500 

Crab Lake 500 

Jack's Lake 500 

Loon Lake 500 

Lovesick Lake 500 

Quarry Lake 500 

White Lake 500 

Simcoe: 

Lake Couchiching 1,000 

Lake Simcoe 1,000 

Nottawasaga Lake 1,000 

Severn River 1,000 



28 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1937, to March 31st, 1938 — Continued 



SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

— Continued 



Sudbury: 

Badger Lake 

Bass Lake 

Frood Lake 

Lacloche Lake 

Lake Agnew 

Metagamasi Lake 

Ratter Lake 

Ted's Lake 

Trout Lake (Cherriman) . 

Timiskaming: 

Lake Timagami 

Victoria: 

Cranberry Lake 

Hurricane Lake 

Waterloo: 

Conestoga River 

Grand River 

Paradise Lake 

Wellington: 

Puslinch Lake 

York: 

Grenadier Pond 

YEARLINGS and ADULTS 

Haldimand: 

Grand River 

Halton: 

Crawford's Lake 

Hastings: 

Bennett Lake 

Kenora: 

Basket Lake 

Birch Lake 

Black Sturgeon Lake .... 

Dogtooth Lake 

Lawrenson's Lake 

Long Lake 

Longbow Lake 

Round Lake 

Kent: 

Rondeau Bay 

Middlesex: 

Thames River 

Norfolk: 

Waterford Pond 

Oxford: 

Cedar Creek 

Peterborough: 

Stony Lake 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
500 
2,000 
1,000 



1,000 



500 
500 



2,000 
1,000 
1,000 



1,000 
100 

100 
50 
85 



81 
82 
80 
81 
40 
74 
147 
40 



89 
230 
100 
100 
100 



Renfrew: 

Black Bay 190 

Blackfish Bay 100 

Bonnechere River 100 

Bourgneau, or Snake Lake 102 

Coldingham, or Green Lake 110 

Colton Lake 108 

Corry Lake 95 

Devils Lake 100 

Foster Lake 25 

Genrick's Lake 100 

Hurd's Lake 100 

Hyde's Bay 8 5 

Jack's Lake 90 

Jamieson Lake 100 

Kaminiskeg Lake 100 

Lake Johnnie 96 

Long Lake 100 

Maskalonge Lake 96 

McMaster Lake 100 

Moccasin Lake 100 

Muskrat River 204 

Nakiks Lake (Madawaska 

River) 100 

Norway Lake 100 

Olmstead Lake 100 

Round Lake and 

Stoney Lake 90 

White Lake (McNab) 100 

White Lake (Raglan) ... 100 

Whitefish Lake 100 

Thunder Bay: 

Cloud Lake 110 

Fox Lake 200 

Gull Lake 145 

Kashabowie Lake 100 

Lac Des Mille Lacs 100 

Loon Lake 110 

McKay Lake 175 

O'Brein Lake 180 

Poulin Treble Lakes 110 

Shebandowan Lake 150 

Silver Lake 115 

York: 

Grenadier Pond 28 

MASKINONGE 

FRY 
Hastings: 

Crow Lake 20,000 

Crow River 10,000 

Moira Lake 10,000 

Moira River 5,000 

Sears Lake 5,000 

Stoco Lake 10,000 

Whitestone Lake 10,000 

Leeds : 

Rideau River 10,000 

St. Lawrence River 20,000 

Northumberland: 

Cassidy's Bay 10,000 

Crow Bay 10,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1937-38 



29 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1937, to March 31st, 1938 — Continued 



MASKIXONGE — Continued 

Northumberland — Continued 

Crow River 10,000 

Rice Lake 20,000 

Trent River 40,000 

Peterborough: 

Belmont Lake 10,000 

Buckhorn Lake 10,000 

Chemong Lake 15,000 

Deer Bay 15,000 

Deer Lake 10,000 

Katchawanooka Lake .... 15,000 

Lovesick Lake 15,000 

Otonabee River 10,000 

Pigeon Lake 30,000 

Round Lake 10,000 

Stony Lake 15,000 

Trent River 10,000 

Prince Edward: 

Bay of Quinte 5,000 

Muscote Bay 5,700 

Stormont: 

St. Lawrence River 10,000 

Victoria: 

Balsam Lake 10,000 

Burnt River 10,000 

Mill Pond 10,000 

Sturgeon Lake 15,000 

PERCH 

FRY 

Lake Erie 9,150,000 

YELLOW PICKEREL (Pike-perch) 

FRY 

Algoma: 

Cummings Lake 150,000 

Desbarats Lake 150,000 

Duborne Lake 150,000 

Echo Lake 418,400 

Gordon Lake 200,000 

Keichel Lake 400,000 

Marion Lake 150,000 

Mud Lake 150,000 

Otter Lake 100,000 

Pipe Lake 150,000 

Randolph Lake 100,000 

Rock Lake 200,000 

Round Lake 100,000 

St. Mary River 700,000 

Bruce: 

Berry's Lake 100,000 

Chesley Lake 250,000 

Gauley's Bay 500,000 

Isaac Lake 250,000 

Miller Lake 100,000 

Sauble River 325,000 

Saugeen River 625,000 

Saugeen River — N. Branch 250,000 



Carleton: 

Ottawa River 800,000 

Rideau River 400,000 

Cochrane: 

Bigwater Lake 200,000 

Mortimer Lake 250,000 

Reid Lake 250,000 

Remi Lake 500,000 

Unnamed lake — Fauquier 

Tp 200,000 

Wilson Lake 250,000 

Frontenac: 

Big Gull Lake 700,000 

Bobs Lake 600,000 

Clear Lake 200,000 

Collins Bay 200,000 

Cross Lake (Palmerston) . 700,000 

Crotch Lake (Kennebec) . 100,000 

Crow Lake 400,000 

Elbow Lake 100,000 

First Depot Lake 100,000 

Horseshoe Lake 100,000 

Little Mississagagon 100,000 

Long Lake (Kennebec) . . 50,000 

Long Lake (Clarendon) . 600,000 

Long Lake (Portland) . . . 600,000 
Long Lake (Hinchin- 

brooke) 100,000 

Mississagagon Lake 400,000 

Mississippi Lake 750,000 

Rideau Lake 500,000 

Rock Lake 500,000 

St. Lawrence River 250,000 

Sharbot Lake 400,000 

Sydenham Lake 250,000 

Thompson Lake 100,000 

Grenville: 

Rideau River 1,500,000 

Grey: 

Mountain Lake 250,000 

Nottawasaga River 500,000 

Haldimand: 

Grand River 2,000,000 

Haliburton: 

Paudash Lake 1,200,000 

Hastings: 

Moira Lake 500,000 

Moira River 750,000 

Sears Lake 100,000 

Stoco Lake 250,000 

Kenora: 

Black Sturgeon Lake .... 1,000,000 

Eagle Lake 3,000,000 

Lake of the Woods .... 42,985,000 

Log Bay 1,750,000 

Marchington Lake 1,000,000 

Matheson Bay 4,800,000 

Stanzikihimi Lake 1,000,000 

Wabigoon Lake 1,000,000 

Willard Lake 840,000 

Kent: 

Rondeau Bay 250,000 



30 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1937, to March 31st, 1938 — Continued 



YELLOW PICKEREL (Pike-Perch) 
— Continue<l 

Lanark: 

Black Lake 200,000 

Christies Lake 200,000 

Clear Lake 450,000 

Fagan's Lake 100,000 

Mississippi Lake 400,000 

Otty Lake 200,000 

Leeds: 

Big Rideau Lake 700,000 

Higley Lake 250,000 

Killembeck Lake 250,000 

Little Rideau Lake 150,000 

Sand Lake 700,000 

St. Lawrence River 1,000,000 

Lennox-Addington : 

Long Lake 400,000 

Napanee River 2,000,000 

South Beaver Lake 400,000 

White Lake 400,000 

Manitoulin: 

Eraser Bay 2,000,000 

Lake Helen 1,000,000 

Linda Lake 500,000 

MacGregor Bay, & 

Bay Finn 4,000,000 

Muskoka: 

Allen's Lake 100,000 

Bala Bay 500,000 

Bass Lake 50,000 

Brandy Lake 200,000 

Buck Lake 200.000 

Kahshe Lake 300,000 

Lake Rosseau 1,300,000 

Muskoka River 500,000 

Musquash River 500,000 

Six Mile Lake 500,000 

Sparrow Lake *2, 000, 000 

Three Mile Lake 500,000 

Nipissing: 

Bruce Lake 100,000 

Finlayson Lake 100,000 

Herridge Lake 100,000 

Jumping Caribou Lake . . 250,000 

Lake Chebogamog 100,000 

Lake Nosbonsing 250,000 

Lake Temagami 500,000 

Marion Lake 250,000 

Martin Lake 250,000 

McPhee Lake 100,000 

Olive Lake 100,000 

Red Cedar Lake 250,000 

Talon Lake 250,000 

Tilden Lake 100,000 

Tomiko Lake 250,000 

Wickstead Lake 250,000 

Wilson Lake 100,000 

Wis-Wassie Lake 250,000 



Norfolk: 

Waterford, or Nanticoke 

Creek 250,000 

Northumberland : 

Rice Lake 1,200,000 

Trent River 3,250,000 

Ontario: 

Lake St. John 250,000 

Oxford: 

Lakeside Lake 500,000 

Parry Sound: 

Ahmic Lake 500,000 

Bass Lake 150,000 

Blackstone Lake 100,000 

Burden Lake 500,000 

Clear Lake 250,000 

Commanda Lake 200,000 

Crane Lake 200,000 

Crawford Lake 100,000 

Crooked Lake 250,000 

Deer Lake 250,000 

Doe Lake 300,000 

French River 1,000,000 

Horseshoe Lake 150,000 

Isabella Lake 200,000 

Jack's Lake 50,000 

Lake Joseph 300,000 

Lake Rosseau 1,000,000 

Little Long Lake 100,000 

Long Lake 250,000 

Magnetawan River 500,000 

Manitowaba Lake 150,000 

McKeown Lake 100,000 

Mill Lake 150,000 

Otter Lake 300,000 

Owl Lake 100,000 

Pickerel River 150,000 

Restoule Lake 200,000 

Sequin River 250,000 

Shawanaga Lake 250,000 

Shebeshekong Lake 150,000 

Shoal Lake 150,000 

Stewart Lake 100,000 

Stormy Lake 200,000 

Whitestone Lake 250,000 

Wolf River 250,000 

Peterborough: 

Little Lake 250,000 

Otonabee River 1,200,000 

Rice Lake 1,200,000 

Trent River 600,000 

Prince Edward: 

Bay of Quinte 5,200,000 

Consecon Lake 600,000 

East Lake 600,000 

West Lake 500,000 

Rainy River: 

Beaverhouse Lake 2,000,000 

Clearwater Lake 2,000,000 

Off Lake 1,000,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1937-38 



31 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1937, to March 31st, 1938 — Continued 



YELLOW PICKEREL (Pike-Perch) 
— Continued 

Rainy River — Continued 

One Sided Lake 1,000,000 

Quill Lake 2,000,000 

Rainy Lake 65,000,000 

Sabaskong Bay 3,000,000 

Windigoostigwam Lake . . 1,000,000 

Castor River 1,000,000 

Simcoe: 

Gloucester Pool 1,250,000 

Little Lake 500,000 

Sturgeon Bay 1,000,000 

Stormont: 

Nation River 500,000 

St. Lawrence River 2,400,000 

Sudbury: 

Birch Lake 150,000 

Charlton Lake 250,000 

Cranberry Lake 500,000 

Frood Lake 250,000 

Ivanhoe Lake 250,000 

Lacloche Lake 300,000 

Lake Penage 3,000,000 

Mattagamasi Lake 200,000 

McLaren Lake 300,000 

Ramsay Lake 1,000,000 

Wanapitei Lake 1,000,000 

Whitefish Falls Bay & 

River 5,000,000 

Wolseley Bay 500,000 

Unnamed Lake 200,000 

Thunder Bay: 

Baril Lake 1,000,000 

Cordingley Lake 500,000 

Lake of Flats 200,000 

Lake Shebandowan 2,000,000 

Savant Lake 1,000,000 

Thunder Bay 1,500,000 

Timiskaming: 

Granite Lake 250,000 

Lady Evelyn Lake 2 50,000 

Lake Timagami 500.000 

Lake Timiskaming 500,000 

Net Lake 250,000 

Rib Lake 200,000 

Sesekinika Lake 500,000 

Twin Lake 250,000 

Victoria: 

Lake Dalrymple 500,000 

Young's Lake 250,000 

Great Lakes: 

Lake Superior 1,000,000 

North Channel 4,000,000 

Lake Huron 22,750,000 

Lake Ontario 750,000 

*Eyed eggs supplied, and planted as fry 
from Sparrow Lake hatchery. 



BLUE PICKEREL 

FRY 

Essex: 

Lake Erie 1,000,000 

BROWN TROUT 

YEARLINGS 
Brant: 

Branch Creek 1,000 

Whiteman's Creek 1,000 

Bruce: 

Crane River 1,200 

Saugeen River 2,300 

Sucker Creek 1,000 

Vogt's Creek 1,500 

Carleton: 

Mississippi River 3,000 

Rideau River 1,200 

Durham: 

Baldwin Creek 1,200 

Baxter Creek 1,500 

Cavan Stream 2,400 

Elgin: 

Big Creek 2,200 

Little Otter 4,000 

Frontenac: 

Clyde River 1,500 

Grey: 

Big Head River 3,000 

Maxwell's Creek 1,200 

Potawatami River 1,000 

Saugeen River 8,000 

Styx River 3,000 

Sydenham River 3,900 

Weatherspoon Creek .... 500 

Haldimand: 

Rogers Creek 1,006 

Halton: 

Bronte River 2,200 

Hastings: 

Beaver Creek 1,000 

Black Creek 1,200 

Little Mississippi River . . 1,200 

Rawdon Creek 2,000 

Huron: 

Nine Mile River 1,100 

Lanark: 

Mississippi River 3,000 

Middlesex: 

Medway Creek 1,200 



32 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1937, to March 31st, 1938 — Continued 



BROWN TROUT — Continued 

Muskoka: 

Indian River 1,200 

Kahshe River 800 

Norfolk: 

Big Creek 1,000 

Nanticoke Creek 1,500 

Northumberland : 

Bowens Pond 1,200 

Glenfurnte Stream 4,600 

Oxford: 

Horner's Creek 600 

Whiteman Creek 1,500 

Perth : 

Halfway Stream 1,100 

Upper Avon River 1,100 

Peterborough: 

Deer Bay Creek 3,000 

Dickson's Creek 1,500 

Eel's Creek 1,000 

Lower Cavan Creek 600 

Mississauga River 1,500 

Nogies Creek 1,500 

Simcoe: 

Nottawasaga River and 

tributaries 6,874 

Waterloo: 

Alderside Pond 600 

Bridgeport Dam 500 

Dentinger Creek 1,000 

Wellington: 

Gerrie Creek 600 

Speed River 1,200 

York: 

Humber River 3,000 

Private waters (Sale) ... 510 

LAK£ TROUT 

FRY 
Frontenac: 

Buckshot Lake 20,000 

Crotch Lake 25,000 

Crow Lake 25,000 

Desert Lake 15,000 

Dog Lake 20,000 

Grindstone Lake 10,000 

Knowlton Lake 10,000 

Long Lake 15,000 

Loughborough Lake 45,000 

Mackie Lake 10,000 

Mississagagon Lake 15,000 

Reid's Lake 10,000 

Sand Lake 5,000 

Schooner Lake 15,000 



Sharbot Lake 25,000 

Wolf Lake 10,000 

Hastings: 

Baptiste Lake 35,000 

Bass Lake 10,000 

Big Salmon Lake 25,000 

Cedar Lake 10,000 

Devil Lake 10,000 

Dickey Lake 20,000 

Eagle Lake 10,000 

Gunter Lake 10,000 

Jamieson Lake 10,000 

Johns Lake 10,000 

Lake Papineau 25,000 

Lake St. Peter 25,000 

L'Amable Lake 10,000 

Little Bass Lake 10,000 

Little Salmon Lake 10,000 

Little Weslemkoon Lake . 10,000 

Long Lake (Mayo) 10,000 

Long Lake (Dungannon) .' 10,000 

Quinlan Lake 10,000 

Wadsworth Lake 10,000 

Weslemkoon Lake 15,000 

Lanark: 

Silver Lake 15,000 

Leeds: 

Big Rideau Lake 50,000 

Charleston Lake 60,000 

Clear Lake 10,000 

Indian Lake 10,000 

Red Horse Lake 15,000 

Lennox-Addington : 

Bark Lake 10,000 

Big Lake 20,000 

Burns Lake 10,000 

Finch Lake 10,000 

Little Cedar Lake 10,000 

Loon Lake 30,000 

Mazinaw Lake 5,000 

Otter Lake 20,000 

Spring Lake 10,000 

Peterborough: 

Catchacoma Lake 10,000 

Gull Lake 10,000 

Jack's Lake 25,000 

Long Lake 10,000 

Loon Lake 20,000 

Sandy Lake 10,000 

Towens Lake 5,000 

Trout Lake 10,000 

West Lake 5,000 

Great Lakes: 

Lake Superior 1,800,000 

North Channel 550,000 

Lake Huron 1,000,000 

Lake Ontario 357,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1937-38 



33 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1937, to March 31st, 1938 — Continued 



LAKE TROUT — Continued 

FINGERLINGS 
Algoma: 

Achigan Lake 6,000 

Axe Lake 11,000 

Basswood Lake 6,000 

Chiblow Lake 6,000 

Clear Lake 18,000 

Constin, or Trout Lake . . 6,000 

Cumming Lake 6,000 

Duborne Lake 6,000 

Grev Trout Lake 6,000 

Havilah Lake 6,000 

Hawk Lake 5,750 

Hobon Lake 5,750 

Huston Lake 10,750 

Island Lake . 6,000 

Long Lake 6,000 

Loon Lake (Deroche) . . . 6,000 

Loon Lake (Borden) .... 6,000 

Matinenda Lake 6,000 

Mud Lake 6,000 

Patton Lake 6,000 

Petanguin Lake 6,000 

Pickerel Lake . 6,000 

Rainbow Lake 6,000 

Rand Lake 6,000 

Raw Hide Lake 6,000 

Red Deer Lake 6,000 

Sand Lake 6,000 

Stuart Lake 6,000 

Tookenay Lake 6,000 

Trout Lake (Aweres) .... 6,000 

Trout Lake (24-12) 6,000 

Upper Island Lake 6,000 

Bruce: 

Dyer Bay 15,000 

Gillies Lake 15,000 

Cochrane: 

Nellie Lake 6,000 

Perry Lake 6,000 

Watabeag Lake 6,000 

Frontenac: 

Crotch Lake 5,000 

Desert Lake 5,000 

Dog Lake 5,000 

Eagle Lake 5,000 

Loughborough Lake 5,000 

Lucky Lake 10,000 

Sharbot Lake 5,000 

Haliburton: 

Bear Lake (Guilford) . . . 5,000 

Bear Lake (Glamorgan) . 5,000 

Big Boskung Lake 10,000 

Davis Lake 5,000 

Deer Lake 5,000 

Drag Lake 10,000 

Eagle Lake 10,000 

East Lake 5,000 

Gull Lake 10,000 

Haliburton Lake 10,000 

Hawke Lake 5,000 



Hollow Lake 10,000 

Horseshoe Lake 5,000 

Hurricane Lake 5,000 

Kashagawigamog Lake . . . 5,000 

Kingscote Lake 5,000 

Kushog Lake 10,000 

Little Boskung Lake 5,000 

Long Lake 5,000 

Maple Lake 5,000 

Moose Lake 5,000 

Mountain Lake 5,000 

Oblong Lake 5,000 

Pine Lake 5,000 

Redstone Lake 10,000 

Ross's Lake . 5,000 

South Bay 5,000 

Stormy Lake 5,000 

Twelve Mile Lake 5,000 

Hastings: 

Clear Lake 5,000 

Lake of Islands 5,000 

LaValley Lake 5,000 

Long Lake (Lutterworth) 5,000 

Papineau Lake 5,000 

Robinson Lake 5,000 

Trout Lake (Faraday) . . 5,000 

Kenora: 

Bigstone Bay 40,000 

Blue Lake 25,000 

Boulder Dam 50,000 

Clearwater Bay 90,000 

Cul de Sac Lake 25,000 

Dogtooth Lake 50,000 

Eagle Lake 100,000 

Gibbi Lake 50,000 

Granite Lake 25,000 

Lake of the Woods 72,000 

Little Vermilion Lake . . . 50,000 

Rice Lake 10,000 

Silver Lake 25,000 

Thunder Lake 25,000 

Trout Lake 25,000 

Whitefish Bay 90,000 

Willard Lake 35,000 

Lanark: 

Rideau Lake 2,000 

Lennox-Addington : 

Thirty Island Lake 5,000 

White Lake 2,000 

Manitoulin: 

Fraser Bay 25,000 

Lake Manitou 33,000 

Muskoka: 

Bala Bay 15,000 

Bella Lake 5,000 

Clear Lake 5,000 

Fairy Lake & tributaries . 5,000 
Lake of Bays & 

tributaries 28,000 

Long Lake 5,000 

Muskoka Lake 15,000 



34 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1937, to March 31st, 1938 — Continued 



LAKE TROUT — Continued 

Muskoka — Continued 

Oxtongue Lake 5,000 

Peninsula Lake & 

tributaries 15,000 

Rebecca Lake 5,000 

Rosseau Lake 27,000 

Skeleton Lake 10,000 

Trout Lake (Watt) 5,000 

Vernon Lake 15,000 

Waseosa Lake 5,000 

Nipissing: 

Aylen Lake 5,000 

Martin Lake 6,000 

Red Cedar Lake 6,000 

Source Lake 10,000 

Trout Lake 6,000 

Parry Sound: 

Bay Lake 10,000 

Bella Lake (Ferguson) . . 5,000 

Bernard Lake 10,000 

Big Clam Lake 5,000 

Clear Lake (Humphrey) . 7,500 

Clear Lake (Perry) 10,000 

Five Mile Bay 2,000 

Horn Lake 15,000 

Lake Joseph 5,000 

Lorimer Lake 15,000 

Maple Lake 10,000 

Otter Lake 10,000 

Portage Lake 5,000 

Round Lake 5,000 

Salmon Lake 10,000 

Sand Lake 10,000 

Spring Lake 10,000 

Sucker Lake 5,000 

Sugar Lake 10,000 

Tea Lake 5,000 

Three Legged Lake 10,000 

Whitefish Lake 7,500 

Renfrew: 

Bark Lake 6,000 

Blacknsh Bay 5,000 

Bradley Lake 10,000 

Carson Lake 6,000 

Clear Lake 5,000 

Cross Lake 6,000 

Diamond Lake 5,000 

Kaminiskeg Lake 5,000 

Long Lake 5,000 

Pog Lake 6,000 

Round Lake 6,000 

Trout Lake 6,000 

Wadsworth Lake 6,000 

Simcoe: 

Kempenfeldt Bay 20,000 

Sudbury: 

Ella Lake 6,000 

Long Lake (Broder) .... 6,000 

Long Lake (Harrow) .... 6,000 

Nelson Lake 6,000 

Penage Lake 6,000 



Ramsay Lake 6,000 

Trout Lake 6,000 

Wanapitae Lake 6.000 

Windy Lake 6,000 

Thunder Bay: 

Baril Bay 50,000 

Brown Lake 50,000 

Jarvis Bay 50,000 

Lac Des Mille Lacs 50,000 

Lake Nipigon 50,000 

McKenzie Lake 50,000 

Surprise Lake 10,000 

Twin Lakes 50,000 

Wawon Lake 25,000 

Timiskaming: 

Bartle Lake 6,000 

Lake Timagami 6,000 

Lake Timiskaming 6,000 

Net Lake 6,000 

Rib Lake 6,000 

Trout Lake 6,000 

Twin Lake 6,000 

York: 

Lake Simcoe 40,000 

Great Lakes: 

Lake Superior 3,675,000 

North Channel 250,000 

Georgian Bay 3.933,000 

Lake Huron 5,501,100 

Lake Ontario 50,000 

EYED EGGS 

Exchange 3,225,000 



ATLANTIC SALMON 

FRY 
For demonstration purposes 



7.200 



KAMLOOPS TROUT 

FINGERLINGS 

Bruce: 

Gillies Lake 20,000 

Grey: 

Bass Lake 20,000 

Muskoka: 

Echo Lake 20,000 

Waseosa Lake 20,000 

RAINBOW TROUT 

FINGERLINGS 
Algoma: 

Clear Lake 5,000 

Garden River 5,000 

Mississagi River 5,000 

St. Mary River 2,000 

White River 6,440 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1937-38 



35 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1937, to March 31st, 1938 — Continued 



RAINBOW TROUT — Continued 

Bruce: 

Sauble River 10,000 

Dufferin: 

Nottawasaga River 7,000 

Elgin: 

St. Thomas City Reservoir 5,000 

Grey: 

Sheppard's Lake 10,600 

Haliburton: 

Burnt Lake 5,000 

McFadden's Lake 5,000 

Muskoka: 

Indian River 7,000 

Long Lake 3,000 

Norfolk: 

Patterson's Creek 3,000 

Simcoe: 

Coldwater River 3,600 

Kempenfeldt Bay 7,000 

Sturgeon River 3,600 

Sudbury: 

Unnamed lake 4,000 

York: 

Humber River 5,000 

Private Waters (Sale) ... 3,000 

SPECKLED TROUT 

FINGERLINGS 
Algoma: 

Aubinadong Lake 8,500 

Batchewana River 5,000 

Big Bear Lake 10,000 

Blue Lake 15,000 

Camp 12 Lake 8,500 

Canoe Lake 10,000 

Caribou Lake 15,000 

Carp River 3,000 

Chippewa River 5,000 

Christman Lake 5,000 

Deer Lake 4,000 

Horseshoe Lake 1,500 

Iron River 3,000 

Island Lake (176) 4,000 

Jobammeghia Lake 2,000 

Kashawong Lake 3,000 

Kawagama River 4,000 

Laughing Lake 7,000 

Loon Lake (Deroche) . . . 7,000 

Lower Island Lake 1,600 

Mashagami Lake 10,000 

Moose Lake 400 

Pancake River 5,000 

Quinn Lake 100 

Ranger Lake 8,500 

Reserve Lake 10,000 



Root River 2,400 

Saddle Lake 1,000 

Speckled Trout Lake (176) 1,000 

Speckled Trout Creek .... 600 

Trout Lake (Aweres) .... 2,000 

Twin Lake 7,000 

Upper Island Lake 1,600 

Wartz Lake 5,000 

Weashkog Lake 10,000 

White River 8,000 

Cochrane: 

Charlebois Lake 500 

Croft Creek 600 

Dalton's Lake 500 

Dandurand Creek 800 

Fuller Creek 500 

Grassy River 500 

Lake of Bays 800 

Legare Creek 800 

Mclntyre Lake 500 

Metagami River 500 

Ramsbottom Creek 500 

Red Sucker River 500 

Rowley Lake 800 

Shaw's Creek 400 

Waterhen Creek 500 

Wealthy Creek 500 

Norfolk: 

Vittoria Creek 100 

Renfrew: 

Nadeau Creek 175 

Thunder Bay: 

Allen Lake 6,000 

Blend River 8,000 

Cedar Creek 11,000 

Cummings Lake 12,Q00 

Current River 24,000 

Hilma Lake 2,000 

Johnston Lake 2,000 

Kaministiquia River 10,000 

Lenora Lake 6,000 

Lesage Lake 5,000 

Lower Pass Lake 4,500 

Mclntyre River 10,000 

McKenzie River 9,000 

Mount Stephen Lake .... 6,000 

Neebing River 12,000 

North Enders I^ake 6,000 

Ozone Waters 12,000 

Partridge Lake 5,000 

Pitch Creek 14,000 

Trout Creek 12,000 

Whitewood Creek 3,000 

Timiskaming: 

Small Spot Creek 800 

Private waters (Sale) ... 250 

YEARLINGS 
Algoma: 

Achigan Lake 2,000 

Achigan Creek 3,000 

Agawa River 1,000 



36 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1937, to March 31st, 1938 — Continued 



SPB("KLED TROUT — Continued 

Algoma — Continued 

Alva Lake 1,000 

Anjigami Creek 2,000 

Appleby Lake 2,000 

Arnill Lake 1,500 

Aubinadong Lake 1,000 

Aweres Lake 4,000 

Bamagesic Lake 2,000 

Basswood Lake 2,000 

Batchewana River 8,000 

Bellevue Creek 1,500 

Boyles Creek 2,000 

Bridgeland River 4,000 

Burrows Lake 2,000 

Caldwell Lake 500 

Camp Lake 1,500 

Camp 8 Creek 1,000 

Capp Lake 1,000 

Caribou Lake 2,000 

Chiblow Lake 2,000 

Chippewa River 4,000 

Chub Lake 4,000 

Clear Lake (Aweres) .... 2,000 

Clear Lake Creek ( Scarf e) 1,000 

Corston Lake 1,500 

Dam Creek 1,000 

Dam Lake 4,000 

Deer Lake 2,000 

Devil Lake 1,000 

Diamond Lake 3,000 

Driving Creek 3,000 

Emerald Lake 1,500 

Foot Lake 2,000 

Franklin Lake 1,500 

Garden Lake 1,000 

Garden River 7,000 

Goodwin Lake 2,000 

Goulais River 3,000 

Green Lake 1,500 

Harmony River 1,500 

Hawk Lake 2,000 

Hoath, or Heydon Lake . . 1,000 

Hobon Lake 2,000 

Hubert Lake 2,000 

Island Lake (Aberdeen) . . 1,500 

Island Lake (176) 2,000 

Jobammeghia Lake 3,200 

Kennedy Lake 1,500 

Kinoch Lake 1,500 

Laughing Lake 3,000 

Little Blind River 1,000 

Little White River 5,000 

Lonely Lake 2,000 

Long Lake ( Jarvis) 1,000 

Long Lake (Meredith) .. 3,000 

Loon Lake (Deroche) . . . 3,000 

Loon Lake (24 R.13) 2,000 

Loon Lake (Kirkwood) . . 4,000 

Loonskin Lake 2,000 

Lower Island Lake 7,000 

Mashagami Lake 1,500 

McCormick Lake 4,000 

McCrea Lake 1,500 

McGill Creek 1,000 

McGrath Creek 2,000 

McKinnon Creek 1,500 

McVeigh Creek 1,500 



Michipicoten River 


6,000 


Mile 58 Lake 


1,000 


Miltelm Lake 


1,000 


Mongoose Lake 


2,000 


Moose Lake (25 R.13) . . . 


2,000 


Mountain Lake 


500 


Mud Lake 


2,500 


Ned's Lake 


1,500 


Patton Lake 


2,000 


Pine Lake (24-R-13) 


2,000 


Pine Lake (U.) 


500 


Pine Lake (25-R-ll), or 




Prugh 


2,000 


Pinkney Lake 


1,000 


Rand Lake 


2.000 


Ranger Lake 


1,500 


Reserve Dam Creek 


1,000 


Richardson Creek 


1,500 


Rock Lake 


1,000 


Root River 


7,000 


Round Lake (Grassett) . . 


1,500 


Round Lake (1 A.) 


500 


St. Mary River 


1,000 


Sand Lake Creek 


2,000 


Sand River 


2,000 


Sausabic Lake . 


1,500 


Scarbo Lake 


1,000 


Silver Creek . 


7,000 


Sister Lake No. 1 


500 


Sister Lake No. 2 


500 


Speckled Trout Lake 




(1 A.) 


2,000 


Speckled Trout Lake 




(176) 


1,500 


Speckled Trout Lake 




(28-R-16) 


500 


Spruce Lake 


1,500 


Sucker Lake 


2,000 


Summit Lake 


2,000 


Tamarack Lake 


500 


Tawabinasay Lake 


2,000 


Tea Lake 


2,500 


Triple Lake 


1.000 


Trout Lake (62) 


2,000 


Trout Lake (167) 


1,000 


Trout Lake (Aweres) . . . 


3,000 


Trout Lake Inlet 


500 


Twin Lakes 


5,000 


Two Tree River 


1,500 


Upper Island Lake 


7.000 


Wallace Lake 


500 


Wartz Lake 


2.000 


Waterhole Lake 


2,000 


Wawa Lake 


2,000 


White River 


1.000 


Whitehead's Creek 


1.500 



Brant: 

Moody and Lyons Creek 

Bruce: 

Big Bay Swamp 

Colpoy Creek 

French Bay Creek . . . . 

Hill's Spring 

Judge's Creek 

Nine Mile River 

Pettigrew Spring 

Sauble River 



200 



300 
450 
450 
450 
900 
800 
450 
900 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1937-38 



37 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1937, to March 31st, 1938 — Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT — Continued 



Bruce — Continued 

Sharp's Spring 

Silver Creek 

Spring Creek (Amabel) 
Spring Creek (Carrick) 
Stream entering into 

Paddis Bay 

Tucker's Spring 

Vance's Creek 

Willow Creek 

Wilson Creek 

Cochrane: 

Liniment Lake 

Morgan Lake 

Sesekinika Creek 

Dufferin: 

Boyle's Creek , 

Cemetery Creek 

Credit River 

Grand River 

Nottawasaga River . . . 

Pine River , 

Sanderson Creek , 

Durham: 

Ard's Creek 

Austim's Creek 

Barton's Creek 

Beatty Creek 

Brook's Creek 

Burk's Pond , 

Cain's Stream 

Carscadden Creek . . . 

Cowper's Creek , 

DeLong's Stream 

Drew's Creek 

Goodman's Creek 

Graham's Creek , 

Harris Creek . , 

Hayden's Creek 

Luxton Creek 

McKindley's Creek , . . , 
McLaughlin's Creek . . . 

Mercer's Creek 

Miller Creek 

Muldrew's Creek , 

Orono Park Pond . . , . , 
Patterson's Creek . , . . 

Patton's Stream 

Powell's Creek 

Quantreuil's Creek . . . . 

Rowe's Pond 

Sowden's Creek 

Sowper's Creek 

Stream at Manvers . . . . 

Strong's Creek , 

Thompson's Creek . . . , 

Elgin: 

Ball Creek 

Bassell Creek 

Beaver Creek 

Buck Creek , 

Campbell Creek 

Clear Creek 



1,350 

1,000 

1,800 

900 

200 
900 
450 
800 
450 



150 
150 
200 



500 
200 
3,100 
1,800 
2,700 
1,800 
200 



200 
500 
100 
200 
500 

1,000 

1,400 
200 
200 
400 
200 
500 
100 
200 

2,500 
500 

1,000 
500 
200 
500 
100 
500 
500 
100 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 

1,500 
100 
200 



1,500 
500 
500 
250 
500 

3,000 



Deer Creek 500 

Eckert Creek 500 

Godwillie Creek 500 

Grange Hall Creek 500 

Howey Creek 500 

Leitch Creek 500 

Matthews Creek 500 

Sisken Creek 500 

Venison Creek 3,000 

Wolfe Creek 500 

Frontenac: 

Black Creek 2,400 

Camp Lake 2,400 

Grindstone Lake 4,800 

Knowlton Lake 500 

Lucky Lake 250 

Sharbot Creek 250 

Spring Creek entering 

Buckshot Lake ..... 500 

Trout Lake 500 

Grey: 

Beatty Saugeen River .... 3,600 

Beaver River 7,800 

Beirness Stream 250 

Bell's Lake 2,700 

Big Head River 1,800 

Boyd's Lake 1,800 

Boyne River 2,700 

Caseman Creek 900 

Christies Creek 1,800 

Cook's Creek 500 

Deer Creek 1,800 

English Lake 2,700 

Esplen Pond 900 

Eugenia Pond 7,400 

Ewart's Lake 1,800 

Fairbairn Creek 1,800 

Ferguson Creek 1,800 

Finn's Creek 450 

Firth's Creek 2,400 

Glen Creek 2,700 

Grand River 500 

Lawrence Creek 1,350 

Manx Creek 900 

McCartney's Lake 1,800 

McConnell Creek 1,000 

Meino Creek 1,800 

Miller Creek 1,000 

Mitchell's Mill Stream . . . 1,800 

Mountain Lake 500 

Munshaw Lake 1,800 

Nigger Creek 2,500 

Oxenden Creek 3,000 

Pearce Creek 250 

Penner's Creek 450 

Riley Creek 250 

Rob Roy Creek 1,800 

Saugeen River 5,400 

Spey River 2,700 

Sulphur Springs 200 

Sydenham River 3,100 

Unnamed Creek 

(Egremont) 900 

Wilcox Lake 900 

Williams Spring 3,700 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1937, to March 31st, 1938 — Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT — Continued 



Haliburton: 

Bear Lake (Livingstone) 

Bitter Lake 

Blue Lake 

Burnt River 

Catchacoma Lake 

Diamond Lake 

Drag River 

Eagle Lake 

Fletcher Lake 

Glidden Creek 

Holland Creek , 

Hollow Lake 

Hurricane Lake 

Kimball Lake 

Millichamp Lake 

Moon's Creek 

Oblong River 

Otter Lake 

Partridge Lake 

Poverty Lake 

Raven Lake 

Redstone River 

Round Lake 

Slipper Lake 

Halton: 

Crawford Lake 

Hastings: 

Alexander Creek 

Bartlett Creek 

Brett's Lake 

Carleton Creek 

Cedar Creek 

Deer River 

Diamond Lake 

East Lake 

Echo Lake 

Egan Creek 

Foster's Lake 

Eraser's Creek 

Geen's Creek 

Gin Creek 

Hinze's Lake 

Horse Lake . . 

Little Mississippi Lake . 
Little Papineau Lake . . 

McCormick Lake 

Mud Turtle Lake 

Nobs Lake 

Peel's Lake 

Rawdon Creek 

Shaw Lake 

Shire Creek 

Spurr Lake 

Squire's Creek 

Vanderbeck Lake 

Waterhouse Lake 

York River 

Huron: 

Patterson's Creek 

Porter's Creek 

St. Helen's Creek 

Wilson's Creek 



250 
250 
250 

1,200 
600 
400 
750 
500 

2,950 
900 
250 

2,700 
500 
250 
900 

1,200 

1,400 
900 
250 
900 

1,800 
500 
250 
250 



900 



1,000 
4,400 
3,400 

500 
4,800 
2,000 
1,000 

500 
4,800 
3,400 

500 
1,500 
1,500 

500 
2,400 

500 

500 
1,200 
3,600 

500 

500 
1,000 
4,800 

500 
3,400 
1,400 
4,800 
4,800 
4,800 

500 



3,000 

1,500 

250 

900 



Kenora: 

Raleigh Creek 

Lanark: 

Clyde River 

Paul's Creek 

Lennox-Addington: 

Beaver Creek 

Big Lake 

Burns Lake 

Graham's Lake 

Green Lake 

Hyde's Creek 

Little Long Lake .... 

Rainy Lake 

Rock Lake 

Ruttan's Lake 

Shiner Lake Creek . . . 

Smith's Lake 

Snake Creek 

Thirty Island Creek . . 
Unnamed stream 

(Denbigh) 

White Lake 

Yeoman's Creek 

Manitoulin: 

Blue Jay Creek 

Harris Creek 

Mindemoya River . . . . 

Middlesex: 

Cody Creek 

Stream — C.13 lot 31 

London Tp 

Wye Creek 

Muskoka: 

Big East River 

Bigwind Lake 

Bird Lake 

Black Creek 

Boyne Creek 

Clear Lake (Sinclair) 
Clear Lake (Oakley) . 
Creeks running into 

Fairy Lake 

Creeks running into 

Peninsula Lake . . 
Creeks running into 

Muskoka River 

Creeks running into 

Vernon Lake . . . 

Eastails Lake 

Echo Lake 

Fox Lake 

Eraser's Lake 

High Lake 

Jessups Creek 

Lake Joseph 

Lake of Bays 

Lake Rosseau ....... 

Little Clear Lake . . . . 

Little East River 

Long Lake (Cardwell) 
Long Lake (Franklin) 



1,500 



4,800 
4,800 



4,800 

2,400 

250 

2,400 

1,000 

4,800 

250 

2,400 

250 

2,400 

250 

250 

500 

250 

250 
250 
250 



1,500 
1,500 
1,500 



2,190 

500 
1,000 



9,000 

900 

900 

2,000 

2,000 

1,200 

900 

4,000 

4,000 

6,000 

4,000 

900 

2,700 

3,000 

900 

900 

2,000 

2,800 

5,400 

2,000 

600 

3,000 

1,105 

900 



ANNUAL REPORT, 19 37-38 



39 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1937, to March 31st, 1938 — Continued 



SPECKLrED TROUT — Continuetl 



Muskoka — Continued 
Long Lake (Ridout) 

Loon Lake 

Loon Lake Creek . . 

Martin Lake 

McReynold's Lake . 
Monahan Lake . . . . 

Muskoka Lake 

Muskoka River .... 
Oxtongue Lake .... 
Oxtongue River . . . 

Pine Lake 

Poverty Lake 

Rebecca Lake 

Rill Lake 

Shoe Lake 

Skeleton Lake .... 
Split Rock Lake . . . 

Tooke's Lake 

Wolf Lake 



Ni pissing: 

Boat Lake 

Bourdeaux Lake 

Cedar Lake 

Clear Lake (Lyell) 

Clear Lake (Gooderham) . 

Crooked Lake 

Frog Lake 

Gorge Lake 

Hoover's Lake 

Little Madawaska River . . 

Little Tyne River 

Long Lake 

Magnetawan River 

McNorton Lake 

Montreauil Lake 

Nelson's Lake 

North River 

Red Rock Lake 

Rocky Lake 

Rowan Lake 

Unnamed stream running 

into McPhee Lake . . 
White Lake 



Norfolk: 

Big Creek 

Forestville Creek 
Hay Creek . . . . 
Kent Creek . . . . 
Nanticoke Creek 
Vittoria Creek . . 
Winter's Creek . 



Northumberland: 

Big Creek 

Biltmore Creek . 
Black's Creek . . , 
Burnley Creek . . , 
Chidley's Creek . 
Dartford Creek . , 
Dawson's Creek . 
DeLong's Creek 
Duncan's Creek 
Heffernan's Creek 
Little Cole Creek 



900 
900 
350 
900 
900 
900 

1,500 

3,000 
900 

3,000 
900 
900 

1,350 

1,055 
900 

2,500 
900 

1,055 
900 



600 
300 
250 
500 
500 
100 
500 
100 
900 
500 
100 
600 
200 
800 
500 
900 
1,000 
200 
500 
150 

500 
150 



1,500 
1,250 
1,150 
1,500 
1,250 
10 
1,100 



500 
3,000 
3,000 
6,000 

100 
3,000 
1,500 

500 
1.500 
1,000 
1,000 



Mayhew's Creek . 
O'Grady's Creek . 
Pegnan's Creek . 
Piper's Creek . . . 
Quinn's Creek . , . 
Robin's Creek , . . 
Sandy Flats Creek 
Spring Creek . . . 
Taylor's Creek . . 
Trout Creek .... 
Valleau Creek . . . 



Ontario: 

Black Creek 

Electric Light Pond 
Elgin Park Pond . , 



Parry Sound: 

Barrett's Creek 

Bear Lake 

Beatty Creek 

Begsboro Creek .... 

Big Clam Lake 

Birch Lake 

Black Creek (Strong) 
Black Creek (Gurd) 
Cashman's Creek .... 
Clear Lake 

(S. Himsworth) 
Clear Lake (Perry) . 
Clear Lake (Wilson) 
Clear Lake (Armour) 
Commanda Creek . . . 

Compass Lake 

Cummings Lake .... 
Deer River (Lount) . 

Distress River 

Dunkers Creek 

Eagle Lake 

Genesee Creek 

Home Lake 

James Creek 

King Lake 

Little Lake 

Little East River .... 
Little Pickerel River 

Long Lake 

Lynx Lake 

Magnetawan River . . 

Owl Lake 

Pine Lake 

Ragged Creek 

Rat Lake 

Reasin Lake 

Rock Lake 

Russell's Creek .... 

Ryan's Creek 

Shadow River 

Shell's Lake 

South River 

Stellar Creek 

Stirling River 

Stoney Lake 

Three Mile Lake . . . 

Trout Creek 

Tug-of-War Creek . . 



500 
1,500 
2,000 

100 
1,000 

200 
2,000 

300 

500 
3,000 
1,000 



1,000 
500 
500 



1,000 

200 

1,250 

2,500 

200 

1,250 

2,500 

1,250 

200 

500 

1,800 

125 

200 

2,500 

360 

250 

450 

1,250 

1,250 

125 

3,000 

200 

360 

125 

100 

900 

125 

900 

400 

4,310 

200 

100 

360 

360 

'200 

200 

1,250 

400 

1,200 

100 

2,500 

1,250 

1,000 

500 

200 

1,350 

200 



40 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1937, to March 31st, 1938 — Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT — Continued 



Peel: 

Caledon Lake 

Credit River 

Temple Stream 

Perth: 

Avon River 

Peterborough: 

Big Ouse River 

Buchanan Creek 

Cavan Stream 

Little Ouse 

Mount Pleasant 

Trennum's Creek 

Renfrew: 

Battery Lake 

Black Lake 

Carson Lake 

Colton Lake 

Dam Lake 

Eady's Lake 

Foy's Creek 

Godin's Lake 

Johnson Lake 

Loche Lake, or 

Goshen Creek 

Long Lake 

MacKay Creek 

Nadeau Creek 

Paddy's Lake 

Rock Lake 

Round Lake 

Schooner Lake 

Smith Lake 

Snake Lake 

Spring Creek 

Trout Lake 

Turner Creek 

Wylie Creek 

Simcoe: 

Black Creek 

Boyne River 

Corbett Creek 

Greenlaw Pond 

Mathewson's Creek 

Sheldon Creek 

Silver Creek 

Sturgeon River 

Tenth Creek 

Willow Creek 

Sudbury: 

Bertrand Creek 

Ella Lake 

Pumphouse Creek 

Sauble River 

Shiner Lake 

Thunder Bay: 

Allen Creek 

Anderson Creek 

Anderson Lake (McTavish) 



1,000 

1,900 

500 



3,000 



5,000 
1,000 
3,000 
6,000 
1,000 
1,500 



1,000 

500 
1,000 

500 
1,000 

500 
1,000 

500 
1.250 

2,000 
1,250 
1,200 

700 
2,500 

500 

500 
1,250 

500 
1,250 
1,000 
1,000 

170 
1,800 



300 
1,200 
1,800 

100 
1,200 
3,000 
2,000 
7,000 

500 
1,200 



1,200 
1,050 
1,000 
1,500 
1,000 



1,000 
1,500 
1,462 



Anderson Lake 

(St. Ignace) 1,500 

Arrow River 2,000 

Bass Creek 4,000 

Bat Lake 2,000 

Beaver Lake 2,000 

Bertha Lake 1,000 

Big Duck River 4,000 

Big MacKenzie River .... 14,000 

Boulevard Lake 3,000 

Bruley Creek 7,000 

Camp Lake 4,000 

Cedar Creek 11,000 

Centre Lake 1,000 

Coldwater River 3,000 

Corbett Creek 5,000 

Cousineau Lake 1,000 

Crockers Lake 1,500 

Current River 14,000 

Deception Lake 7,000 

Echo Lake 3,000 

Fall Lake 3,000 

Fawn Lake 1,500 

Five Mile Lake 1,500 

Fog Lake 2,000 

High Bluff Lake 500 

Hogan Lake 1,500 

Kaministiquia River 7,000 

Kowkash River 1,500 

Langley's Lake 2,500 

Little MacKenzie River . . 2,000 

Little Lake 1,000 

Little Whitefish River . . . 2,000 

Loftquist Lake 14,000 

Loon Creek 1,500 

Loon Lake 3,000 

Loon River 5,000 

Lower Pearl River 2,000 

Lower Hunter Lake 1,500 

Mac's Lake 1,000 

Maxwell Creek 1,500 

Mclntyre River 7,000 

McGregor Lake 1,000 

McVicar Creek 3,000 

Mirror Lake 1,500 

Missed Lake 1,500 

Moose Lake 

(near Rossport) .... 1,500 
Moose Lake 

(McTavish Tp.) 3,000 

Morgan Creek 1,500 

Neebing River 7,000 

Nipigon River 28,000 

Oliver Lake 7,000 

Paquette Lake 2,500 

Pass Lake 7,000 

Paysplatt River 3,000 

Pearl River 2,000 

Pickerel Lake 2,500 

Pitch Creek 7,000 

Raft Lake 2,000 

Randolph Creek 500 

Rock Lake 1,500 

Rock River , 5,000 

Round Lake 1,000 

Samec Lake 1,000 

Sand Lake 2,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1937-88 



41 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1937, to March 31st, 1938 — Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT — Continued 

Thunder Bay — Continued 
Sand Lake (near 

Schreiber) 1.500 

Silver Lake '^OO 

Silver Islet Creek 1, 

Skillen Lake 2,000 

Spectacle Lake 2,000 

Spring Creek (Dorion) . . 2,000 

Spring Creek No. 1 2,500 

Spring Creek No. 2 2,500 

Spring Lake (Adrian) . . . 1,000 

Squaw Creek 4,000 

Trap Lake 1,000 

Trout Lake (Gorham) . . . 7,000 

Trout Lake (Stirling) . . . 12,500 

Upper Hunter Lake 1,500 

Upper Pearl Lake 2,000 

Wanogi Lake Creek 7,000 

Walker Lake 2,000 

Welch Lake 1,000 

White Sand Creek 6,500 

Whitewood Creek 7,000 

Wideman Lake 1,500 

Wolf River 3,000 

Timiskaming: 

Bartle Lake 500 

Belle Isle Lake 500 

Crystal Lake 1,000 

Fairy Lake 1,500 

Gleason Creek 500 

Halfway Lake 400 

Hooker Creek 400 

Jean Baptiste Lake 500 

Lake Timagami 2,500 

Little Otter Lake 500 

Moffatt Creek 500 

Munro Lake 400 

Pike Creek 1,250 

South Wabi Lake 500 

Spring Creek 1,250 

Trout Creek 500 

Ward Creek 500 

Watabeag River 500 

Welcome Creek 500 

Whitney Lake 500 

Victoria: 

Corbin's Creek 100 

Waterloo: 

Flora Stream 1,500 

Erbsville Creek 3,000 

Idyle Wild Stream 300 

Mannheim Stream 3,000 

Welland: 

Effingham Stream 1,500 

Sulphur Springs 1,500 

Wellington: 

Bell's Creek 3,000 

Bunyan Creek 2,400 

Esson Creek 500 

O'Dwyer's Creek 700 

Saugeen River 3,000 



W^entworth : 

Spencer Creek 4,000 

Twelve Mile Creek 800 

York: 

Doan's Pond 500 

Private waters — 

Sale and demonstration 8,626 

ADULTS 

Algoma: 

Batchewana River 250 

Harmony River 250 

Heydon Lake 500 

Island Lake (Aweres) . . . 330 

Lower Island Lake 800 

Root River 690 

Trout Lake (Aweres) .... 700 

Grey: 

Woodland Spring 200 

Thunder Bay: 

Bass Creek 800 

Bruley Creek 1,000 

Coldwater River 1,000 

Current River 1,500 

Kaministiquia River .... 800 

Loon Lake 781 

Lower Pass Lake 900 

Mattawin River 800 

Neebing River 800 

Pearl River 900 

Pitch Creek 1,000 

Spring Creek (Dorion) . . 145 

Trout Lake (Gorham) . . . 800 

Trout Lake (Stirling) 800 

Private waters (Sale and 

demonstration) 404 

WHITEFISH 

FRY 

Hastings: 

Bay of Quinte 12,000,000 

Kenora: 

Eagle Lake 1,000,000 

Lake of the Woods 32,132,500 

Marchington Lake 250,000 

Separation Lake 500,000 

Stanzihikimi Lake 250,000 

Prince Edward: 

Bay of Quinte 39,000,000 

Rainy River: 

Rainy Lake 10,260,000 

Thunder Bay: 

Nipigon Lake 225,000 



42 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES Nq^ 9 

SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1937, to March 31st, 1938 — Continued 

WHITEFISH — Continued 

York: 

Lake Couchiching 1,400,000 

Lake Simcoe 2,200,000 

Great Lakes: 

Lake Superior 725,000 

North Channel 4,291,400 

Georgian Bay 46,240,000 

Lake Erie 139,000,000 

Lake Huron 20,210,000 

Lake Ontario 74,000,000 

EYED EGGS 
Exchange 4,000,000 

HERRIXG 

FRY 

Frontenac: 

Palmerston Lake 250,000 

Lennox-Addington : 

Weslemkoon Lake 250,000 

Peterborough: 

Loon Lake 250,000 

Prince Edward: 

Bay of Quinte 1,100,000 

Great Lakes: 

Lake Erie 470,000 

Lake Ontario 2,800,000 

Miscellaneous: 

Demonstration Purposes . 150,000 

EYED EGGS 
Demonstration purposes . 30,000 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Demonstration purposes . 3,053 



ANNUAL REPORT, 19 37-38 



43 



APPENDIX No. 2 

ONTARIO DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 
DISTRIBUTION OF FISH ACCORDING TO SPECIES — 1933 TO 1937, INCLUSIVE 



1933 



1934 



1935 



1936 



1937 



Large-mouthed Black Bass 

Fry 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings & Adults 

Small-mouthed Black Bass 

Fry 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings & Adults 

Maskinonge — Fry 

Perch — Fry 

Pickerel — Eyed Eggs 

(Yellow) Fry 

Pickerel (Blue) Fry 

Brown Trout — Fingerlings 

Yearlings 

Adults 

Lake Trout — Eyed Eggs 

Fry 

Fingerlings 

Landlocked Salmon (Ouananiche) 
(Yearlings) 

Atlantic Salmon Fry 

Rainbow Trout — Eyed Eggs 

Fry 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings 

Kamloops Trout — Fingerlings . . . 
Yearlings 

Speckled Trout— Eyed Eggs 

Fry 

Fingerlings 

Yeailings 

Adults 

"Whitefish— Fry 

Eyed Eggs 

Herring— Fry 

Eyed Eggs 

Golden Shiners , 

Miscellaneous 

TOTALS 



545,000 

25,750 

3.471 



20,500.000 



483,016 
674 



200,000 

1,400,000 

16,012,700 



27. OK 



506,000 

725.000 

5,950,255 

28.237 

1.549 

372,111.000 



22,805,000 



55,250 

4,250 

197 



55,500 

55,750 

420 



441.325,524 



909,500 
95,000,000 



5.000,000 
278,470,000 



138,000 

14,500 

689 

402,000 

1,265,000 

14.045,450 



1,000 

4,480 

312,512 

25,014 



6,257,267 

34,762 

1,652 

376.777.000 



17.512,000 
7,000 



796,619,193 



130,000 
2,153 
27* 



696,000 

153.065 

3,433 



460,000 
53,031,400 



2,000,000 
229,629,000 



109,000 
9,650 



7,773.034 
14,564,000 



13,640 



134,075 
314 



85.464 
10.796 



1.645,000 

5,013.831 

35.421 

5,420 

296.482,000 



43.760,000 



655. 747.231** 



45.000 



780.000 

69.380 

5,202 

274,000 

46,080,000 

2,000,000 
300,759,500 



147,050 
7,290 



3,209,400 

4,165,000 

18.253,244 



133.000 
3,507 



28,600 

182.000 

1.053,050 

557.270 

6.081 

428.402.000 
112.500 

56.120.000 



862,401,472 



135,000 

4,120 

92 



1.275.000 

141.900 

5.893 

420.700 

9,150.000 

2.000.000 
263.743.400 

1.000.000 



97,484 



3,225,000 

4,667,000 

15,782,350 



7,200 



105,240 



80,000 



384,725 

1.167.073 

16.150 

383.683.900 
4.000.000 

5.270.000 
30.000 



3,053 



696.395.280 



* Exhibition fish 
*♦ This total does not include a distribution of 132.646,600 fry and eyed eggs during the five months 
immediately preceding the said report. 



44 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



APPENDIX 

GAME AND FISHERIES 

Statistics of the Fishing Industry in the Public Waters of 

EQUIP 



District 


No. 

of 

Men 


Tugs 


Gasoline 
Launches 


Sail and 
Row Boats 


Gill Nets 






No. 


Tons 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


Yards 


Value 


Northern Inland Waters 


666 H 


50 
239 
219 
377 
463 


$ 17,500 

50,000 

65,300 

99.638 

136,695 


148 
118 

58 
161 
144 

44 
177 
226 

16 


$ 72,140 

52.350 

32,975 

108,447 

96,180 

11,266 

203,995 

108,500 

3.075 


1 
283 S linfil 


560,831 

875,425 

603,784 

1,249,740 

1,867,623 


$ 69.930 




422 
227 
530 
442 
139 
864 


9 
11 
16 

17 


79 

62 

115 

35 

88 

152 

194 

138 


4,312 
3,205 
7,192 
1,680 
3,975 
6,852 
7,431 
4,547 


110.119 

88.900 

115.442 

242,442 


North Channel 

Georgian Bay 


Lake St Clair 


Lake Erie 


31 


877 


228,500 


1,835.460 


9.1 « 17ft 


Lake Ontario . ... 


727 
423 




1 357 7501 iia afil 


Southern Inland Waters 

























Totals 


4.440 


89 


2,225 


$597,633 1.092 


$688,928 


1,146 


$50,255 


8.350,613 


$959,367 











APPENDIX 

QUANTITIES OF 



District 


Herring 


Whitefish 


Trout 


Pike 


Pickerel 
(Blue) 


Pickerel 
(Dore) 




lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 




528 

2.246.952 

2.790 

26.896 

199,772 

99.447 

1,572.911 

4.286 


1,592.185 

300.816 

254,235 

1,122,895 

286,981 

355 

1,401,016 

551.550 

8.355 


280.573 
1.698,585 

644,025 
1,504,194 
1,753,699 

151 

204,955 

12,811 


756.353 

7.356 

56.727 

49.916 

806 

16.734 

2,750 

141,368 

8.930 


41.277 
5.872 


1,154,287 


Lake Superior 


61.832 


North Channel 


71.271 


Georgian Bay , 


20.982 

500 

9.354,687 

26,203 


129.767 


Lake Huron 


197.683 


Lake St. Clair 


47,240 


Lake Erie 


448.957 




21.785 




3,355 








Totals 


4.153.582 


5.518.388 


6.098.993 


1,040.940 


9,449,521 


2,136,177 






Price per pound , 


.05 


.11 


.11 


.06 


.05 


.11 






Values 


$207,679.10 


$607,022.68 


$670,889.23 


$62,456.40 


$472,476.05 


$ 234,979.47 







ANNUAL REPORT, 1937-38 



45 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT, ONTARIO 

Province of Ontario, for the Year Ending December 31st, 1937. 

MENT 



Seine Nets 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip and 
Roll Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers & 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


Total 
Value 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 




1 1 

._ 1 


51 

50 

96 

84 

137 

126 

549 


$14,935 
25.455 
38.077 
76.660 
81.450 
12.300 

306.800 


1 
64|$2.480 

i 


2 





1,700 


$274 
134 




130 
39 


$27,555 

15.230 

13.380 

14.785 

27.545 

6.150 

141.375 

8.405 

2.140 


1 
89 $9,500 


$ 225,377 








28 




30 
38 
62 
34 


12,223 

18.300 


269.823 


' 












1 





260.137 


A 


700 


$ 525 


50 


745 


1 


28,870 
11,139 


4,145 

1,387 

136 

64 

188 

138 


6 


23 


27,7551 455,357 




1 




71 
18 
98 
38 
26 


9.7401 597.119 


45 


10 200 


A 7Q1 


5 

13 

733 

233 


500 

1195 

15.592 

6.261 


3 3 

2 1 4 
30 i 918 


2.850 
2.550 

K 1 Sa 






9| 1.6251 40,746 


50 


13 6001 8 370 






78| 26.2901 1.142.615 


q 


2.710 
fi 89?; 


990 
7,415 







26 
3 


6.5401 261,928 


62 






49 1 243 1 5.650 

1 1 


80 


580 


2001 24,599 


l' 








1 1 
170| 34.035l$22,091 

1 1 


1.093 


$555,677 


1.098 


$ 
26,773 


i 1 
86 1 $1,170 1 57.920 

1 ! 


$6,466 


se 


603 


527 


$256,565 


369 


1 
$112,173|$3,277.701 

1 



No. 4 

FISH TAKEN 




















Sturgeon 


Eels 


Perch 


TuUibee 


Catfish 


Carp 


Mixed 
Coarse 


Caviare 


Total 


Value 




lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 






43.152 
1.637 
9.078 
1 041 




15.117 


210.972 

131.070 

6.563 

91.709 

506.806 


35,680 


3,646 

580 

2,688 

29,059 

8,207 

288,753 

337,898 

153,027 

262,549 


312,048 

54.292 

253,677 

114,480 

58,520 

289,600 

1,258,095 

271,877 

i 292,862 


1.137 


4.446,955 

4.508,992 

1.307,470 

3.079,087 

3,188,770 

766,308 

14,664,735 

3.376.545 

754.010 


$424,656.49 
349.994.95 
122.294.89 










6,355 

4,388 

145,589 

31.582 

1,691,074 

147.986 

8,035 


49 

4,736 

82,105 

81,729 

56,687 

210,798 

143,908 


12 

6 

395 

249 

656 

73 

1 , 






319,004.49 
300.613.15 

41.582.96 
826.094.55 
222.022.57 

37.899.44 


1 7'225 






9,566 
13.317 

8.025 












65.987 
8,919 
















93.041 


74,906 


2,050.126 


947,120 


535.692 


1,086,407 


2,905.451 


2.528 


36.092.872 




1 






.40 


.07 


.05 


.06 


.08 


.05 


.03 


1.00 








$37,216.40 


$5,243.42 


$102,506.30 


$56,827.20 


$42,855.36 


$54,320.35 


$87,163.53 


$2,528.00 




$2,644,163.49 



46 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



APPENDIX No. 5 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE YIELD OF THE FISHERIES OF ONTARIO 



Kind 



1936 
Pounds 



1937 
Pounds 



Increase 
Pounds 



Decrease 
Pounds 



Herring 

Whitefish 

Trout 

Pike 

Pickerel (blue) . 
Pickerel (dore) , 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse 
Caviare 

TOTALS 



298,562 

790.403 

458,730 

158,345 

899,501 

393,178 

106,868 

61,780 

1,586,959 

920,155 

609,488 

1,166,710 

2,802,028 

1,906 



4,153,582 

5,518,388 

6,098,993 

1,040,940 

9,449,521 

2,136,177 

93,041 

74,906 

2,050,126 

947,120 

535,692 

1,086,407 

2,905,451 

2,528 



2,550,020 



13,126 

463,167 

26,965 



103.423 

622 



144,980 
272,015 
359,737 
117,405 

257!66i 
13,827 



73.796 
80.303 



34,254,613 36,092,872 *1, 838, 259 

! I 



* Net Increase 



APPENDIX No. 6 

STATEMENT OF YIELD OF THE FISHERIES OF ONTARIO 

1937 



Kind 



Quantity 
Pounds 



Price per 
Pound 



Estimated 
Value 



Herring 

Whitefish 

Trout 

Pike 

Pickerel (blue) 
Pickerel (dore) 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and coarse 
Caviare 

TOTALS 



4,153 

5,518 

6,098 

1,040 

9,449 

2,136 

93 

74 

2,050 

947 

535 

1,086 

2,905 

2 



,582 
,388 
,993 
.940 
.521 
,177 
,041 
,906 
,126 
.120 
.692 
.407 
,451 
.528 



.05 
.11 
.11 
.06 
.05 
.11 
.40 
.07 
.05 
.06 
.08 
.05 
.03 
1.00 



207.679.10 

607,022.68 

670,889.23 

62,456.40 

472,476.05 

234,979.47 

37,216.40 

5.243.42 

102,506.30 

56,827.20 

42.855.36 

54,320.35 

87,163.53 

2.528.00 



36.092,872 



$2,644,163.49 



APPENDIX No. 7 

ESTIMATED VALUE OF ONTARIO FISHERIES FOR A PERIOD 

OF TWENTY YEARS 

1918—1937 INCLUSIVE 



1918 $ 3.175,110.32 

1919 2,721,440.24 

1920 2,691,093.74 

1921 2,656,775.82 

1922 2,807,525.21 

1923 2,886,398.76 

1924 3,139,279.03 

1925 2,858,854.79 

1926 2,643,686.28 

1927 3,229,143.57 



1928 $ 3,033,944.42 

1929 3,054,282.02 

1930 2,539,904.91 

1931 2.442.703.55 

1932 2,286,573.50 

1933 2,186.083.74 

1934 2,316,965.50 

1935 2,633,512.90 

1936 2,614,748.49 

1937 2.644,163.49 



Thirty-Second Annual Report 



OF THE 



Gome and Fisheries 
Department 

1938-1939 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 9, 1940 




ONTARIO 



TORONTO 

Printed and Published by T. E. Bowman, Printer to the King's Moat Excellent Majesty 

19 4 



TO THE HONORABLE ALBERT MATTHEWS. 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 



MAY IT PLEASE YOUR HONOUR: 



I have the honour to submit herewith for the information of Your Honour 
and the Legislative Assembly, the Thirty-Second Annual Report of the Game and 
Fisheries Department of this Province, for the year ended March 31st, 1939. 

I have the honour to be. 

Your Honour's most obedient servant, 

H. C. NIXON, 

Minister in Cfiarge, 
Department of Game and Fisheries 

Toronto, 1940. 



(11) 



THIRTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Game and Fisheries Department of Ontario 



TO: THE HONOURABLE H. C. NIXON: 
Minister in charge. 
Department oi Game and Fisheries. 

SIR: — 

I have the honour to submit to you in this and the following pages the Thirty- 
second Annual Report of the Department of Game and Fisheries, outlining the 
activities of Departmental services and including various statistical and comparative 
tables for the fiscal year ended March Slst, 1939. 

INTRODUCTORY 

The wild life of Ontario is a public legacy which for purposes of administration 
has been entrusted to the Department of Game and Fisheries. It has a value which 
outranks its material worth, because, besides being an integral part of our economic 
system, it is of tremendous importance from a recreational standpoint. 

It is well to remember that the problem of administration is complicated by 
the destructive effects of modern civilization. Nature populated our forests with game 
and fur-bearing animals, our fields, woods and marshes with game and insectivorous 
birds and our waters with a variety and abundance of fishes not excelled elsewhere. 
In the scheme of nature a proper balance as to numbers was maintained through 
natural instinct. In addition, provision appears to have been made for checking 
over-abundance by means of disease which periodically attacks such species as 
rabbits, grouse, etc. This provision of nature for setting up a proper balance has 
been completely upset through a variety of causes. These are mostly the result of 
the encroachment of civilization and the economic development which is an essential 
part of human existence. These are some of the conditions which complicate the 
problem of conserving wild life and have upset the balance set up by nature. 

While it is part of the conservation programme to restore as far as possible 
natural environmental conditions, it will be obvious that much of the difficulty 
Is of a permanent nature incidental to our economic development. If these important 
facts are kept in mind the necessity for an intensive programme of conservation 
will be obvious and the need for adapting the work of rehabilitation to meet 
existing conditions apparent. 

Summing up we find that we have in our wild life resources an asset of 
tremendous importance. It is a resource which, if used wisely, will keep on 
renewing itself from year to year. The conservation programme of the Department 
of Game and Fisheries is intended to stimulate this reproduction through protection, 
and to assist nature through artificial propagation. To be successful, such a programme 
requires the co-operation of every citizen. This assistance is best rendered by 
personal observance of the regulations and by discouraging illegal practices in others. 

The general situation throughout the Province with regard to game and 
fish is reasonably satisfactory. During the open season deer were reported to be 
more numerous in many sections than they had been for many years. It is altogether 

(1) 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



likely that the comparatively mild winters of the past two or three years and the 
added protection which has been afforded them has resulted in a large increase in 
numbers. Hunters are evidently finding this sport just as interesting as ever. In 
the sections of the Province where closed seasons have prevailed for years, deer 
have become very numerous; in fact, in many places they are so plentiful as to 
be the cause of complaints to the Department. 

In the sphere of upland game, conditions are also very gratifying. Partridge 
were numerous enough to warrant an open season, and pheasants and Hungarian 
Partridge have become well established over a large section of the southern part 
of the Province. Rabbits still afford excellent winter hunting and the Jack has now 
spread over a very wide area. 

The duck situation has improved considerably all over the continent, although 
Ontario hunters found no scarcity of wild fowl last year. 

By reason of the fact that the water areas of the Province are so extensive 
and the varieties of fish available so numerous, it is difficult to do more than 
comment in a general way on the fishing situation. Angling for speckled trout and 
brown trout has improved considerably and many suitable streams in old Ontario, 
which for years have been more or less depleted, are once more providing excellent 
sport. 



Bass fishing in many sections was the best it has been for a number of 



years. 



The pictures and stories of large pike and maskinonge taken by anglers which 
have appeared in the press are proof that big fish are still to be had in reasonable 
numbers. 

In short, we believe that this Province still provides scores of thousands of 
hunters and anglers with the finest in sport and health-giving exercise, and that 
the general situation from the sportsman's standpoint is good. 



FINANCIAL 



Upon the advent of the present Administration, and as you are aware, a change 
was made in the financial period, and commencing in 1935 provision was made 
under which the fiscal year extended from April 1st to March 31st, and each succeeding 
year since that time has provided an increased revenue as collected by this Depart- 
ment. It is believed that the following table of revenue, expenditure and surplus, 
for the present and preceding three years will be of interest. 





Revenue 


Expenditure 
(Ordinary & Capital) 


Surplus 


1935-36 


$683,938.72 
782,217.63 
866.558.19 
914.475.24 


$451,041.91 
474.128.95 
563,938.33 
575,437.79 


$232,896.81 


1936-37 


318,088.68 


1937-38 


302,619.86 


1938-39 


339,037 45 







ANNUAL REPORT, 1938-39 



REVENUE FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING MARCH 31ST. 1939 

ORDINARY- 
MAIN OFFICE- 
GAME— 

Licenses — 

Trapping $ 26,265.30 

Non-Resident Hunting 80,415.00 

Deer 83,526.55 

Moose 2,574.00 

Gun 95,788.45 

Dog 5,348.35 

Fur Dealers 22,007.75 

Fur Farmers 9,550.00 

Tanners : 200.00 

Cold Storage 147.00 

$ 325,822.40 
Royalty 74,064.75 

$ 399,887.15 

FISHERIES— 
Licenses — 

Fishing (Commercial) $ 88,568.00 

Angling 339,450.05 

$ 428,018.05 

Sales — Spawn taking 311.47 

Royalty 13,519.87 

441,849.39 

GENERAL— 
Licenses — 

Tourist Camps $ 6,855.00 

Guides 7,928.00 

$14,783.00 

Fines 26,245.40 

Costs Collected (Enforcement of Game Act) 979.90 

Sales — Confiscated articles, etc 21,605.29 

Rent 3,675.07 

Commission retained by Province on sale of licenses 1,824.00 

Miscellaneous 725.59 

69,838.25 

EXPERIMENTAL FUR FARM— 

Sales— Pelts 2,900.45 

Net Ordinary Revenue $ 914,475.24 

With reference to our financial operations during the year under review, and 
as previously stated, it will be observed that the total revenue collected by this 
Department shows a substantial increase over that of the previous year, and which 
increase amounts to a total of $47,917.05. The principal specific increases to which 
this splendid showing may be attributed include an additional $29,214.09 from the 
sale of resident deer and gun licenses, $14,683.90 more fines imposed on those appre- 
hended while violating various provisions of the Game and Fisheries Act and Regula- 
tions, an indication of the increased activity of the staff of enforcement officers, 
while the sales of confiscated articles produced $10,921.55 in excess of the amount 
realized from the same source in the preceding year. 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



Expenditures, both capital and ordinary, amounted to a total of $575,437.79, 
which left an operating surplus for the year of $339,037.45 as shown in a previous 
statistical table. Some of the principal items of expenditure which go to make 
up this total include the sum of $226,716.29 necessary to maintain the staff of 
enforcement officers operating under this Department, and some $186,911.00 in 
connection with the propagation and distribution of fish by the Fish Hatchery 
Service of the Biological and Fish Culture Branch. Expenditures in connection 
with the payment of Wolf Bounties totalled the sum of $25,435.24, while grants to 
assist in the work of research conducted by various Associations and individuals 
amounted to $8,900.00. The sum of $19,973.00 was expended for game birds and 
animals, principally in connection with the propagation, purchase and distribution 
of pheasants. For the purchase of and repairs to boats, boathouses and vehicles 
it was necessary to expend in all a total of $12,898.31. while a total capital expenditure 
of $16,902.91 was made to take care of additional fish culture ponds and dams, and 
bird farm buildings, the greater proportion of this amount being spent on improve- 
ments at the Codrington Bird Farm. Excluding the aforementioned capital expenditure 
the net ordinary expenditure therefore totalled $558,534.88. 

GAME 

The comparative table next following details the various resident and non- 
resident hunting licenses which were issued during the period under review, as 
well as similar statistics for the preceding three years. While there was a noticeable 
reduction in the sale of non-resident general hunting licenses this may be attributed 
to the fact that following the legislative action provided at the 1938 Session there 
was no open season for moose in certain areas easily accessible to non-resident 
visitors, that is the southeastern and southwestern portions of Northern Ontario, 
but this decrease to a large extent was nullified by the increase in the number 
of non-resident deer licenses which were issued. Reference has previously 
been made to the greater number of resident deer and gun licenses which were 
issued this year. 





1935-36 


1936-37 


1937-38 


1938-39 


R-P^idPTit MoosG 


496 

14,779 

258 

5,221 

85,884 

686 
652 
680 


542 
15,394 

262 

5,386 

79,531 

1,129 
848 
878 


580 
18.672 

283 

6.503 

90,756 

1,634 
1.036 
1,043 


471 


RpRidGiit Deer 


21,762 


Rpsidpnt Deer fCaniD) 


307 


Resident Deer (Farmers) 


7,719 


Resident Gun 


114,580 


Non-resident Small Game 


1,618 


Non-resident Deer 


1,329 


Non-resident "General" 


569 







Conservation and co-operation loom large on the educational horizon of the 
sportsman. The two are being emphasized as the key to a fuller enjoyment of 
that wonderful heritage, — our wild-life resources, — with which nature has so bounti- 
fully blessed us. Conservation in its broadest sense and as applied to wild life 
is the effort to keep pace with modern conditions; to profit from past experiences 
resulting from misuse, and through wise management maintain an adequate supply 
for present and future needs; to provide proper control and protection based on 
knowledge and experience; to restore natural conditions wherever possible and to 
ensure development through natural and artificial propagation. It is a general 
programme so obviously essential to good management that it should appeal to 
everyone interested in the safeguarding of a valuable asset. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1938-39 



In the carrying out of such a programme of conservation the Department, 
due to the difficulties which arise from time to time, requires the full co-operation 
of the sportsman and which co-operation can best be provided by a complete 
observance of the laws himself, and by his assistance in educating others to the 
necessity for so doing. The Game and Fisheries Laws have the approbation of 
every good sportsman. They are restrictive only to the extent necessary to provide 
better sport. They embody the result of knowledge and experience and are con- 
servation measures of the utmost importance. 

Following is a summary of conditions as they apply to the game life of the 
Province, — both animal and bird, — compiled from information supplied in reports 
submitted by the various members of the Field Service Staff of the Department: — 

UEEK: — Reports received in the Department are to the effect that the deer 
herds in Northern Ontario are more than holding their own despite more intensive 
hunting than has been the case in previous seasons. There is every indication that 
these animals are, generally speaking, quite plentiful in the various districts in 
Northern Ontario, though there are some scattered and isolated sections in the 
various northern divisions where such is not the case, largely due to the fact 
that conditions are not quite favourable. Similar observations would be applicable 
in the several Districts and Counties in the more northerly portion of Southern 
Ontario, viz.: — Parry Sound, Muskoka, Haliburton and Renfrew, as well as the northern 
portion of Victoria, Peterborough, Hastings, Frontenac and Lanark. 

The value of conservation measures for the protection of wild life perhaps 
has no better illustration than in the case of deer in the southwestern and southeastern 
counties. Years ago it became quite evident that the number of deer in these 
sections of the southern portion of the Province was rapidly diminishing and their 
numbers becoming quite scarce, and with a view to their restoration the protection 
of an entire closed season was provided. 

Quite obviously the deer have permanently disappeared from the most thickly 
settled areas, but there is every indication, according to communications and news- 
paper reports reaching the Department, that they are more prevalent in largely 
increased numbers in the sections adjacent to the centres of densest population, and 
where they are now more numerous than they have been for the past several 
years. 

Whatever may be the future of the deer in those areas where settlement and 
population have made the greatest inroads one thing is certain, — the perpetuation and 
development of our wild life resources can be definitely assured if we will but 
unite to afford them that measure of protection and proper control which is 
necessary to our wise use of them. 

MOOSE: — Nowhere in Ontario are these animals to be found in numbers 
which may be classified as plentiful. There has been an entire close season on 
this species for several years in Southern Ontario, and reports indicate some 
improvement in Muskoka, Haliburton, Frontenac and northeastern Renfrew. In 
Northern Ontario conditions were about the same with some increase in scattered 
sections of Cochrane and Sudbury Districts. An entire close season existed in 
the northern part of Nipissing, the southern part of Temiskaming and the south- 
eastern part of Sudbury in the east, and in the District of Rainy River and that 
part of the District of Kenora south of the main transcontinental line of the C.N.R., 
in the west and reports would indicate slight improvement in these two protected 
areas. 

CARIBOU: — An entire close season prevails on this species, a few of which 
may be found in scattered and widely separated sections in northwestern Cochrane, 



DEPARTMENT OP GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 



northern Sudbury, Algoma (particularly the Chapleau Game Preserve), Lake Nipigon 
section of Thunder Bay, and the Lake of the Woods section. 

ELK: — This species also is provided the protection of an entire close season. 
The original herds were imported from Western Canada. In southern Ontario there 
are a few specimens on the Bruce Peninsula and on Beausoliel Island in the 
Georgian Bay, as well as on the Petawawa Crown Game Preserve in Renfrew County, 
Their numbers in Northern Ontario are principally to be found within such Crown 
Game Preserves as Nipissing, Burwash, Chapleau, Ranger Lake and Onaman River. 
Some improvement is reported. 

BEAK: — These animals are reported to be quite plentiful in many sections, — 
particularly in Northern Ontario, — as well as in the northern portion of Southern 
Ontario. It would appear from reports to the Department that increasing numbers 
of sportsmen, both resident and non-resident, participate in the sport which the 
hunting of these animals provides. 

RABBITS: — The interested hunter knows that in Ontario excellent sport is 
provided by the hunting of rabbits during the late fall and winter months. In the 
southern counties the cottontail is quite plentiful practically throughout, though 
reports indicate they are none too plentiful in some of the eastern sections. The 
jack-rabbit or European hare is plentiful in the southwest as well as in some counties 
to the north. It is found apparently as far east as Northumberland and north to 
Bruce, Grey, Dufferin, Simcoe, Victoria and Peterborough. The snowshoe rabbit is avail- 
able in the northern portion of Southern Ontario and in Northern Ontario, though condi- 
tions as to the prevalence of this particular species vary considerably. In Parry Sound, 
Muskoka, Haliburton and Renfrew while not too plentiful they are reported to be 
increasing numerically, and somewhat similar conditions exist in sections throughout 
the north. 

SQUIRREL (Black and Grey) :— These animals are reported to be quite pre- 
valent in the southern and western counties. Sufficiently numerous to warrant the 
provision of a limited open season and restricted catch. 

PARTRIDGE: — This season the hunter had an opportunity of taking this 
fine sporting bird. The increase in numbers of the ruffed grouse justified an open 
season which was divided into two parts to afford a wider enjoyment of the sport. 
Sportsmen are more or less familiar with the cycle of abundance and scarcity which 
appears to be one of the characteristics of the life history of this bird, and which 
is one of the primary reasons why open seasons on partridge are not more numerous. 
The species known as the prairie chicken, or sharp-tailed grouse, is found only in the 
extreme north and west and their numbers were not too plentiful even in these 
sections. 

QUAIL: — These birds inhabit only the extreme southwestern counties of 

Essex, Kent, Elgin, Lambton and Middlesex, from where reports are to the effect 

that conditions and prevalence are quite favorable. They are also reported, though 
not plentiful, from Dundas, Stormont and Glengarry. 

PHEASANT: — These fine game birds are found chiefly in the areas in which 
Departmental re-stocking has been provided, in the counties at the western end 
of Lake Ontario and along the north shore of Lake Erie. The continued development 
of the scheme of Regulated Game Preserve Areas, — that is the Townships in which 
hunting is controlled, — necessitated an intensification of distribution. The distribution 
of pheasant eggs was entirely eliminated and our efforts along these lines were 
confined to the actual distribution of the birds themselves. During the year approxi- 
mately 20,000 live pheasants were distributed, the greater proportion of which were 
liberated in the forty-nine Townships included in the scheme of Regulated Game 
Preserve Areas. 



ANNUAL REPORT. 1938-39 



HUNGARIAN PARTRIDGE :— This bird as the name implies is a non-native. 
The development of this species has been rather an enigma. His progress in Ontario 
cannot be considered spectacular, but reports from certain sections, particularly the 
southwestern and southeastern counties, seem to indicate that the birds are steadily 
becoming more numerous. The following report from one of our Field Officers 
may be of interest: — 

"Concerning the shipment of ten Hungarian partridges which you sent 
to me last Spring (1938) to be liberated, I thought probably you would be 
interested to know that at present we have two nice flocks of these birds 
wintering near my place. One flock consists of about thirty-five birds 
and the other of about twenty birds. There may still be others around that 
I do not know of. These birds seem to be very hardy and so far appear 
to be quite capable of surviving the tough winter and deep snow of this 
district." 

DUCKS: — Reports from various members of the Field Staff indicate that 
this fine game bird continues to provide enjoyable sport during the regular open 
season in practically every section of the Province, though as has been observed 
in previous reports the restrictions which govern the open season and limits of 
catch as at present existing will require to be continued to maintain the degree 
of hunting which now prevails. 

GEESE: — There are but few sections of Ontario in which goose shooting is 
available. The James Bay shore in the far northern portion of the Province affords 
perhaps the best opportunity for this sport, but during the southern Fall migration 
apparently the only section in which hunting is available is in the extreme south- 
western counties. 

WOODCOCK: — These birds are not very plentiful anywhere in the Province 
and are extremely scarce in the north. It would appear from reports that in some 
eastern Counties and along the Lake Erie shore the most favourable conditions 
prevail. 

SNIPE: — While these birds are somewhat more numerous than the woodcock, 
practically the same conditions apply, though there are more sections in which 
their numbers provide desirable sport. 

PLOVER: — Continues quite scarce throughout the entire Province, though some 
slight improvement is reported from different areas in the extreme southerly counties. 

During the year under review Regulations were adopted which provided for 
special open seasons, details of which are as follows: — 

(a) Deer in that portion of Carleton County lying west of the Rideau 
River, — from November 5th to 19th, inclusive. General deer 
hunting regulations governed. 

(b) Deer in the Counties of Grey, Bruce and Simcoe, from November 
14th to 19th, inclusive. General deer hunting regulations gov- 
erned, except that the use of dogs was not permitted. 

(c) Pheasants on Pelee Island, on October 21st and 22nd, and 
October 28th and 29th. Limit of five birds per day. Special 
Municipal hunting license $5.00, October 21st and 22nd; $3.00, 
October 28th and 29th. 

(d) Pheasants in the Regulated Game Preserve Areas in the Coun- 
ties of York, Halton, Wentworth, Lincoln and Welland, on 
October 21st, 22nd and 29th. Limit of three cock birds per day. 
Special Municipal hunting license $1.00 per day 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 



(e) Pheasants in Westminster Township (Middlesex) Regulated 
Game Preserve Area, on October 21st and 29th and November 5th. 
Limit of three cock birds per day. Special Municipal hunting 
license $1.00 per day. 

(f) Pheasants in the Regulated Game Preserve Areas in the Counties 
of Peel, Haldimand, Brant, Norfolk and Elgin, Metcalfe Township 
(Middlesex), and Amherst Island (Lennox), on October 21st 
and 22nd. Limit of catch three cock birds per day. Special 
Municipal hunting license $1.00 per day. 

(g) Pheasants, quail and Hungarian Partridge, in the Counties of 
Essex (excluding Pelee Island) and Kent, on October 21st, 22nd 
and 29th. Limit of three cock pheasants, four quail and two 
Hungarian Partridge per day. 

(h) Partridge throughout the Province, (except Regulated Game Pre- 
serve Areas), from October 10th to 15th inclusive, and from 
November 5th to 10th inclusive. Limit of five birds per day 
and not more than fifteen during the two periods specified. 

(i) Black and grey squirrel throughout the Province, on October 
21st and 22nd. Limit of four per day. 

FUR BEARERS 

Conditions as they apply to fur-bearing animals throughout the Province are 
set forth in the following references, as summarized from reports of members of 
the Field Service Staff: — 

BEAVER: — This species has enjoyed the protection of an entire close season 
with resulting improvement in many sections, particularly in tlie northern portion 
of the Province. 

FISHER: — This animal as a species is extremely scarce, and the number trapped 
in any one season is very limited. 

FOX: — There are indications that fox continues to be quite plentiful in many 
sections and while the figures contained in the following table show a decrease, 
this may possibly be due to the fact that prices are not sufficient to warrant 
the trapper taking these animals at this time. 

LYNX: — This species is undoubtedly becoming extremely scarce throughout. 
Reports do not refer to improvement anywhere. 

MARTEN: — Also very scarce. As in the case of lynx there are no reports 
of improvement. 

MINK: — These animals are becoming quite scarce in the southern counties. In 
Northern Ontario conditions remained about usual with some slight improvement 
in scattered and widely separated areas. 

MUSKRAT: — Reports are to the effect that there are many sections in the 
Province where conditions are favourable and as a result this species was fairly 
plentiful. It will be noted that there was an increase in the number of these 
animals which were trapped during the open season in the year under review, but 
there is no doubt this species will continue to require the protection which has 
been provided in more recent years. 

OTTER: — This species is very scarce in practically every section of Ontario. 
The annual catch has remained fairly steady, and generally speaking they are available 
only in Northern Ontario. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1938-39 



RACCOON: — There was quite a noticeable decrease in the catch of raccoon 
during the open season which prevailed in 1938, though reports indicate that conditions 
affecting this species remained fairly normal. These animals are found only in the 
southern counties. 

SKUNK: — Reported to be quite plentiful in practically every section of South- 
ern Ontario, though there are a few sections in the north in which they are not so 
numerous and while the catch during the year shows a large increase, there is 
no doubt the prices paid for the pelts discourages the average trapper from making 
any special effort to take these animals. 

WEASEL: — Except in southwestern counties reported to be fairly plentiful. 
While there was an increased catch in 1938-39, the value of the pelt to the trapper 
is not sufficient to warrant any particular activity for the taking of these animals. 

The following comparative table shows the numbers of pelts of various species 
of fur-bearing animals which were exported from and dressed within the Province, 
during the year under review as well as in the three years immediately preceding: — 



Rear 

Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (cross) 

Fox (red) 

Fox (silver or black) 

Fox (white) 

Lynx 

Marten 

Mink 

Muskrat 

Otter 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Weasel 

Wolverine 



1935-36 



2 

1, 

47, 

398 

3 

13 

50, 

42, 



411 

,785 
,137 
,424 
,044 
500 
883 
642 
282 
057 
,043 
701 
259 
,747 
643 
4 



1936-37 



476 

238 

2.117 

4,156 

35,232 

360 

17 

2,081 

1,464 

33,930 

370,239 

3,779 

14,243 

87,950 

78,643 

2 



1937-38 



496 

235 

1,463 

2,426 

24,912 

201 

47 

1,284 

1.709 

22.766 

343.972 

3,737 

13.194 

61,576 

79.853 

5 



1938-39 



363 

1,366 

1,467 

2,164 

22,366 

131 

142 

785 

2,074 

25,111 

508,893 

3,764 

9,493 

89,100 

93,488 

3 



Information compiled in the Department shows that these furs were worth 
to the trapper the sum of $1,168,409.40 and while this figure is slightly more than 
$200,000.00 in excess of a similar compilation for the previous year, the increase is 
largely attributable to the fact that the catch of muskrats in 1938-39 exceeded by 
165,000 the catch in 1937-38. 

It is again necessary to state that present restrictions which are provided for 
the protection of the more desirable fur-bearing animals are essential for the main- 
tenance and development of existing conditions which apply. 

The fur farmer is gradually supplying the trade with certain classes of pelts 
which are becoming scarce in the wild, and in this connection the following statistics 
are supplied in the matter of the product of licensed fur farms which were marketed 
during the year: Cross fox pelts to the number of 293 were disposed of, 258 of which 
were exported and 35 dressed in the Province, the value of which was $4,058.05; 
silver and black fox numbering 38,234 were disposed of, 30,963 exported and 7,271 
dressed in the Province, all of which were valued at $658,770.82; and 35,918 mink 



10 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



were disposed of, of which 35,491 were exported and 427 dressed within the Province, 
all of which were worth $280,519.58 to the fur farmers. Thus the entire fur production 
within the Province produced the sum of $2,111,757.85 for trappers and licensed fur 
farmers. The furs above mentioned, and which were prodnced on fur farms were 
not subject to the payment of royalty in accordance with the exemption provided 
in the Game and Fisheries Act. 

FUR FARMING 

During the year 1,791 fur farmers' licenses were issued, an increase of 255 
or more than sixteen percent, the largest annual increase for ten years. These 
farms may be classified to show 837 as fox farms, 708 as mink farms, 202 mixed 
farms, (principally fox and mink) and 44 miscellaneous farms. 

The subjoined comparative table shows the total breeding stock retained on 
these licensed premises as at the first day of January in each of the four years 
enumerated: — 



Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (cross) 

Fox (red) 

Fox (silver or black) 

Fox (blue) 

Lynx 

Mink 

Muskrat 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Bear 

Marten 



1936 



70 

16 

367 

228 

21,645 

5 

2 

12.332 

375 

524 

3 

21 

4 



1937 



21 

20 

257 

207 

23,869 



2 

15.539 

351 

358 

5 

15 

4 



1938 



25 

16 

235 

140 

24,848 



2 

21,982 

302 

351 

9 

15 

11 



1939 



2 

19 

197 

120 

22,923 

98 

2 

30.378 

267 

284 

6 

15 

15 



From the foregoing statistical table it will be observed that silver fox and mink 
represent the greater proportion of the operations thus carried on, while of these 
mink is rapidly assuming a role of major importance. 

The general location of these fur farms is shown in the following table: — 

County or District Number of Farms 

Algoma 35 

Brant 10 

Bruce 69 

Carleton 44 

Cochrane 13 

Dufferin 8 

Dundas 5 

Durham 20 

Elgin 11 

Essex 9 

Frontenac 47 

Glengarry 5 

Grenville 7 

Grey 125 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1938-39 11 



County or District Number of Farms 

Haldimand 27 

Haliburton 1 

Halton 24 

Hastings 20 

Huron 73 

Kenora 30 

Kent 22 

Lambton 28 

Lanark Ill 

Leeds 50 

Lennox & Addington 1 

Lincoln 4 

Manitoulin 67 

Muskoka 36 

Middlesex 47 

Nipissing 18 

Norfolk 34 

Northumberland 8 

Ontario 44 

Oxford 33 

Parry Sound 24 

Patricia 3 

Peel 15 

Perth 57 

Peterborough 10 

Prescott 12 

Prince Edward 7 

Rainy River 31 

Renfrew 93 

Russell 9 

Simcoe 102 

Stormont 11 

Sudbury 13 

Temiskaming 11 

Thunder Bay 71 

Victoria 21 

Waterloo 53 

Welland 13 

Wellington 34 

Wentworth 18 

York 97 

Total 1,791 

CROWN GAME PRESERVES 

During the year an important addition was made to the game preserves of 
the Province by the establishment of a waterfowl sanctuary at Hannah Bay in the 
James Bay District. 

This refuge embraces one of the finest nesting and feeding grounds in the 
district, and will prevent undue destruction at the source of supply. It has an 
area of some seventy square miles and extends south from the line projected from 
East Point on Hannah Bay to the Ontario-Quebec Interprovincial boundary, and north 
of a line projected from the south bank of the Mississikabe River where it enters 
Hannah Bay to the Quebec boundary. 



12 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



A change was made in the boundaries of the Dumfries Game Preserve by 
withdrawing therefrom all that portion of South Dumfries Township located within 
the area. This was made desirable by the fact that the whole township of South 
Dumfries was established as a Regulated Game Preserve Area. 

At the same time a small Crown Game Preserve was set up within the Township 
of South Dumfries. 

The designation, location and approximate size of the areas are as follows: — 



DESIGNATION 



Hannah Bay Waterfowl Sanctuary . . . 

xDumfries Game Preserve 

South Dumfries Crown Game Preserve 



COUNTY 



Cochrane District 

Waterloo 

Brant 



EXTENT IN ACRES 



44,800 approx. 
14,000 
1,200 



X Reduced in size. 



REGULATED GAME PRESERVE AREAS 

In introducing the subject, it seems desirable to say a few words as to the 
reasons for the inauguration in 1937 of this system of further control in connection 
with hunting. 

For many generations the sportsmen of the Province have been privileged 
through the goodwill of the landowners, to make free use of private property in 
their pursuit of game. It should be noted, however, that while game is a common 
heritage, the land which it inhabits, particularly in Southern Ontario, is mostly 
privately owned. To reduce the game to possession, the hunter must have the good- 
will of the landowner, failing which, a spirit of antagonism is set up between the 
two which results in the cancellation of the privileges of entering upon the lands 
to hunt game. Recognizing this fact, and feeling that any plan which would have 
the effect of eliminating the grievances of the farmer through more rigid control of 
the hunter would be in the best interests of the sport, the Department formulated a 
plan for the establishment of regulated shooting areas in certain Townships. 

To better understand the conditions which apply, it should be noted that in 
most of these areas the available hunting consists of upland game birds, rabbits 
and ducks. The latter two are fairly plentiful and provide most of the hunting. 
For many years the Department has been endeavouring to stock suitable areas of the 
Province with English Ringneck Pheasants and although the results in certain 
counties were sufficiently successful to warrant open seasons, in others development 
was somewhat slow. Most of these latter areas never were opened to pheasant 
hunting and the good sportsman refrained from molesting the birds. 

The opening of a short pheasant season in a few districts such as the Niagara 
Peninsula also resulted in a large influx of hunters to these areas. A congestion of 
hunters in any district leads to many complications and much unfavourable publicity, 
and in any case, where facilities are limited and many desire to take part, the result 
is usually unsatisfactory. 

Another situation which frequently created a great deal of annoyance to rural 
residents was the heavy influx of hunters from urban centres who literally swept over 
the countryside on jack rabbit drives. These drives were not always well conducted 
or carried out with a proper regard for the property rights of the farmer. As a 
result friction sprang up and bad feeling ensued. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1938-39 13 



All of these factors were taken into consideration in devising the scheme of 
Township Regulated Shooting Areas. 

What are the advantages of such regulated areas? In the first place, the 
control exercised through limiting the number of non-residents who may hunt in 
the area, and the protection afforded the farmer, as well as the wild life, through 
the closing of the area to all hunting except during a small portion of the year, 
has brought about a better spirit of co-operation between the farmer and the sportsman. 
The former is willing to open his lands to such reasonable demands, and the latter 
has reasonable assurance that when he has bought a license he will not be embar- 
rassed by being ordered off the land, unless it is privately posted against trespass, 
and that through the extensive planting of birds within the area he will be reasonably 
sure of at least the opportunity of obtaining some game. 

Reports received by the Department from Municipalities which have had the 
opportunity of trying out the scheme are unanimous in designating it a success. 

This experiment in controlled areas for hunting, particularly in regard to 
pheasants, received a great deal of publicity. Some fifty townships were involved 
in 1938 and in order that there might be sufficient pheasants to justify an open 
season, the Department distributed within the regulated areas close to 16,000 of these 
birds in such proportions as the size of the area warranted. Here it should be noted 
that the birds were raised or purchased for the purpose of providing a shoot, by 
means of funds supplied by the sportsman himself in the form of licenses of one 
kind or another. The pheasants released in each township, added to the existing 
natural stock, created a supply sufficient to warrant an open season and give 
the hunter reasonable assurance of good sport. 

For the benefit of those who may be under the impression that such extensive 
shooting would probably result in near extinction of the species it is pointed out 
that under the conditions involved the birds should become more numerous than ever 
before. To appreciate this contention it is necessary to remember that the pheasants 
released by the Department were in almost equal proportions in so far as sex is con- 
cerned. During the open season only cock birds were included in the bag limit, which 
left the hen birds, amounting to fifty per cent of the additional stocking, for breeding 
purposes. 

The pheasant is a prolific breeder, each nest consisting of from fifteen to 
twenty or more eggs, and two hatches per year being quite common. Obviously, 
therefore, if suitable habitat is available the stock will replenish itself, despite the 
toll of the hunter during a brief open season. 

In view of all the facts, as disclosed by these reports, it is apparent that 
regulated shoots can be organized without in any way providing a menace to life 
or property or seriously interfering with the development of the species concerned. 
It is essentially a matter of co-operation. In this respect the Department acknowledges 
with pleasure the splendid co-operation of the municipal authorities, the landowners 
and the sportsmen in making the scheme an unqualified success from the standpoint 
of order, good will and recreational pleasure. 

The following is a schedule of the Townships which were included in this 
scheme of Regulated Game Preserve Areas, during 1938: — 

The Townships of Markham, King, East Gwillimbury and Scarborough in the 
County of York. 

The Townships of Caledon and Chinguacousy in the County of Peel. 

The Townships of Nelson and Trafalgar in the County of Halton, 



14 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



The Townships of Ancaster, Barton, Beverley, Binbrook, East Flamboro and 
Saltfleet in the County of Wentworth. 

The Townships of Caistor, Clinton, Gainsboro, Grantham, Louth, Niagara, North 
Grimsby and South Grimsby in the County of Lincoln. 

The Townships of Bertie, Humberstone, Willoughby, Pelham, Thorold, Crowland, 
Wainfleet and Stamford in the County of Welland. 

The Townships of Canboro, Dunn, North Cayuga, Oneida, Rainham, Seneca, 
South Cayuga, Walpole, Moulton and Sherbrooke in the County of Haldimand. 

The Townships of Onondaga and South Dumfries in the County of Brant. 

The Townships of Townsend and Windham in the County of Norfolk. 

The Township of Dereham in the County of Oxford. 

The Townships of Bayham and South Dorchester in the County of Elgin. 

The Township of Metcalfe and a portion of the Township of Westminster in 
the County of Middlesex. 



WOLF BOUNTIES 

The following is a comparative table of condensed wolf bounty statistics for the 
current fiscal year and the three years preceding: — 



Period 



For year ending Mar. 31, 1936 
For year ending Mar. 31, 1937 
For year ending Mar. 31, 1938 
For year ending Mar. 31, 1939 



Timber 



1,159 
1,090 
1,022 
1,031 



Brush 



1,713 

1,197 

837 

723 



Pups 



33 
31 
30 
41 



Total 



2.905 
2,318 
1,889 
1,795 



Bounty & 
Expenses 



42.399.89 
33,360.63 
27,474.24 
25,357.00 



During the year 1,341 applications for wolf bounty were considered in respect 
of some 1,837 wolves. Bounty was paid on 1.311 of these claims representing 1,795 
wolves as enumerated in the preceding table, while the claims for bounty of twenty- 
seven applicants involving some forty-two supposed wolf pelts were rejected. 

The payment of bounty under the provisions of the Wolf Bounty Act continued 
at basic rates of $15.00 for adult wolves and $5.00 for pups under the age of three 
months. 



The following table sets forth in detail the sources of origin of the various 
pelts for which application for bounty was made: — 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1938-39 



15 



ANALYSIS OF APPLICATIONS FOR WOLF BOUNTY 



County or District 



Algoma 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Cochrane 

Essex 

Frontenac 

Grey 

Haldimand 

Hastings 

Haliburton 

Kenora 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Lennox & Addington 

Manitoulin 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Norfolk 

Northumberland . . . . 

Ontario 

Parry Sound 

Patricia 

Peterborough 

Rainy River 

Renfrew 

Simcoe 

Sudbury 

Temiskaming , 

Thunder Bay 

Victoria 

Welland 

York 



Number 
of Timber 



120 
20 

28 

2 



274 



f^'-<P 



4 
18 
34 
56 



1 
51 
42 

5 

125 

31 

4 
63 

2 
141 

3 



1.047 



Number 
of Brush 



110 
13 
4 
4 
1 
4 
5 
1 



2 
1 
3 

79 
3 

21 
5 
1 
1 
4 

13 

i53 
1 
1 

91 
8 

79 
4 
4 
1 



741 



Number 
of Pups 



10 

io 



49 



Total 
Pelts 



234 

33 

4 

32 

1 

13 

5 

1 

21 

12 

397 

2 

1 

7 

106 

37 

77 

5 

1 

2 

55 

55 

5 

278 

32 

15 

154 

10 

230 

7 

4 

1 



1.837 



Total expenditures which were incurred in the administration of the Wolf 
Bounty Act were the sum of $25,435.24, of which, as has been previously stated, the 
sum of $25,357.00 was actually paid out as bounty, and details of which payments are 
set forth in the following statistical table: — 

Brush Wolves 50 @ $ 6.00 $ 300.00 

673 (g) $15.00 $10,095.00 

723 $10,395.00 

Timber Wolves 73 @ $ 6.00 $ 438.00 

958 @ $15.00 $14,370.00 

1,031 $14,808.00 

Pups 17 @ $ 2.00 $ 34.00 

24 © $ 5.00 $ 120.00 

41 $ 154.00 

TOTAL 1,795 $25,357.00 

In respect to wolves killed in a County, bounty is paid by the County Treasurer, 
and forty per cent of the amount is rebated to the Counties by the Provincial 
Treasurer. In the Northern Districts the total amount of bounty is paid by the 
Province. 

It is of interest to note that 59% of the wolves killed in 1938-39 were 
classified as timber wolves, whereas the ratio was 55% in 1937-38, 48% in 1936-37 
and 40% in 1935-36. 



16 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



GENERAL 

TOURIST OUTFITTERS: 

The following is an analysis of the distribution by Districts of the camps 
of tourist outfitters licensed to operate in Ontario during the year: — 



District 



Algoma 

Cochrane . . . 

Kenora 

Manitoulin . . 
Nipissing . . . 
Parry Sound 
Patricia .... 
Rainy River . 
Renfrew . . . . 
Sudbury . . . . 
Temiskaming 
Thunder Bay 

Total 





Licenses 




Non-Resident 


Resident 


Total 


7 


73 


80 





3 


3 


17 


97 


114 


3 


43 


46 


9 


88 


97 


5 


102 


107 





3 


3 


4 


23 


27 





9 


9 


2 


60 


62 





3 


3 


4 


20 


24 


51 


524 


575 



DEPARTMENTAL BULLETIN: 

With reference to the publication of the "Bulletin" and the purpose for which 
it is prepared and distributed we quote the following extract from the issue of April, 
1938: — 

"With this number we conclude volume two of the Bulletin, being the first 
of the series in its present form. During the year we have attempted to keep 
before us the fact that the Bulletin has a special mission to perform, viz, the stimu- 
lation of interest in the conservation of our wild life natural resources, and the 
education of the public in the wise use of this valuable heritage. No attempt has 
been made to usurp the place of the sporting magazines, which are doing a valuable 
work along the same line, nor to enter the field of romance and story in con- 
nection with the recreational pleasures of hunting and fishing. It has been our object 
to present as simply, and as pithily as possible, the many difficult and complex 
problems with which the conservation of our wild life is bound up; to give in 
everyday language brief facts concerning the life history of many species of fish 
and game; to point out the responsibility of the individual in connection with the 
protection of our natural resources, and to encourage the work of the Sportsmen's 
Protective Associations and all other organized effort which has for its object the 
Restoration, Preservation and Perpetuation of our wild life. The activities of the 
Department have not been forgotten and we hope that the information which is 
published from time to time will serve to keep the, sportsmen informed as to what 
is being done in their interest. 



And now, with the experience of the first two volumes behind us we would 
like to expand our opportunities for effective service by a closer contact with 
sportsmen and sportsmen's associations. We therefore invite our readers to assist 
us by contributing such personal experiences while hunting or fishing as might 
help us to a better understanding of the relationship which exists between birds, 
beasts, fish and plant life; or other ideas of non-controversial nature along conserva- 
tional lines — obviously matters of Departmental policy cannot be discussed in the 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1938-39 17 



Bulletin. Association Secretaries might also keep us informed of their activities 
so that proper reference could be made. 

We acknowledge our indebtedness to the press for the additional publicity 
given to many of the atricles appearing in the Bulletin, and hope that Editors will 
feel free to use any material they may find suitable for republication. 

As a result of the educational and publicity work which is being carried 
on by sportsmen's organizations, nature clubs, the press, sporting magazines and 
the Department, the public is to-day more conservation-minded than ever before 
and this fact augurs well for the future of the movement. We believe that more 
real success can be attained through education than through prosecution, although 
human nature is such that enforcement will always be essential for protective 
purposes. With this in mind we pass from the old to the new, conscious of our 
shortcomings, but with the hope that our efforts to stimulate interest have not 
been entirely in vain." 

GAME AND FISHERIES ACT: — 

The present laws and regulations are a most important part of the general 
programme for the conservation of our fish and game resources. They are the 
result of practical experience plus the biological knowledge acquired after years 
of research. They are restrictive only in so far as is necessary to ensure proper 
use and a continuous supply. Close seasons are provided in the interest of natural 
reproduction and are determined from a study of the life history of the various 
species. Bag limits and limits of size are intended to ensure an equitable distribution 
of the available resources. Obviously limiting the take helps prevent waste. 

In every walk of life there are certain laws and conventions which govern, 
and these we must know and observe or suffer the consequences. The observance 
of the laws which regulate the taking of fish and game is of major importance 
in securing for every citizen the opportunity to enjoy the recreational pleasures which 
wild life affords. It is the duty of every sportsman, therefore, to make himself 
familiar with these laws and, having done so, see that his actions afield are in keeping 
therewith. Co-operation in this regard will help to conserve a valuable heritage. 

What impresses one at meetings of the Legislative Fish and Game Committee 
is the evident sincerity in the cause of wild life conservation of the delegates 
who attend to present recommendations, and the entire absence of requests that might 
be termed selfish or shortsighted. The success of the conservation movement lies 
in the development of this spirit of co-operation through individual and organized 
effort, and if the tone of the representations which are made before this Committee 
is a reflection of the attitude of the public, then a new conception of individual 
responsibility for the protection and restoration of our game and fish resources 
has been born, and this will undoubtedly be an important factor in providing and 
maintaining better hunting and fishing. 

Amendments enacted by the Legislative Assembly and which became effective 
during the year included the following provisions: 

(a) Rescinding the definition of the word "monitor," as used by duck hunters. 

(b) Authorizing the issue of special hunting licenses by Municipal authorities 
to be valid in Regulated Game Preserve Areas. 

(c) Providing an entire close season for moose in portions of Sudbury, Nipissing 
and Temiskaming, in the southeastern part of Northern Ontario, and in Rainy 
River and that part of Kenora south of the main transcontinental line of the 
Canadian National Railway in the southwestern part of Northern Ontario. 



18 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 



(d) Providing that the open season for muskrat be annually established by 
Regulation. 

(e) Changes in the provisions which govern the operation and licensing of 
Tourist Outfitter's Camps. 

(f) Providing that non-resident hunters shall engage the services of licensed 
guides while hunting deer in the Districts of Rainy River and Kenora. 

(g) Providing a limit of catch on cotton tail rabbits in the Counties of Essex 
and Kent, and prohibiting the purchase and sale of these animals in these 
two Counties. 

(h) Permitting the use of automatic shotguns by hunters when such firearms 
are permanently plugged to hold not more than three shells. 

(i) Mining camps included among the places where it is unlawful to possess 
or carry firearms. 

(j) Permitting non-resident anglers to export the lawful catch of two days' 
fishing of all game fish species. (One day's catch only in the case of 
Maskinonge.) 

Amendments to the Fisheries Regulations adopted during the year include the 
following provisions: — 

(a) Rescinding the definition of the term "one day." 

(b) Including Hog's Back Dam, on the Ottawa River, among the waters in 
which it is prohibited to use spears and dip nets to take coarse fish 
during April and May. 

(c) Changes in the open seasons for Maskinonge, Pickerel and Whitefish. 

(d) Changes in the special regulation which applies to fishing in the waters 
of Victoria, Peterborough, Northumberland and Durham. 



ENFORCEMENT SERVICE 

Years ago the enforcement of laws in connection with hunting and fishing 
was almost negligible. There were few Game Wardens, and those who held the 
appointments were paid so poorly that they could not devote their full time to the 
work, and found it more advantageous to close their eyes to much that took place. 
As a result of this condition, law observance was at a low ebb and wild life suffered 
thereby. Gradually, however, an efficient and effective protective service has been 
built up and is doing splendid work in connection with the enforcement of the 
Game and Fisheries Act. 

The work of the Overseer, or Game Warden, is beset with many difficulties. 
In the first place, he must of necessity cover an extensive territory, much of it off 
the beaten track; and in the second place, he is faced with an attitude on the 
part of a section of the public which implies a lack of any serious moral qualms over 
non-observance of the Game and Fisheries Laws. 

The Game Warden in invariably courteous in carrying out his duties, but his 
task would be much easier if all those who hunt and fish would recognize that 
the laws are intended to ensure the greatest pleasure for the greatest number and 
that to disregard the rules of the game is to deprive posterity of its rightful share. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1938-39 19 



At the present time there are some ninety permanent Wardens devoting their 
full time to enforcement work. The services of this field staff are augmented by the 
assistance of the Provincial Police Force, as well as certain seasonal officers who 
are employed for varying periods in order to provide adequate patrol service along 
certain waters during the spring and fall fish spawning periods, as well as enforcement 
work during the various hunting seasons. 

We are happy to report that the general body of sportsmen never were so 
conservation-minded as they are to-day. As proof of this we would point to the 
fact that in 1938 more than 1,500 sportsmen voluntarily offered their services to, 
and were accepted by the Department as Deputy Game Wardens, in addition to 
633 who were provided with such appointments at the request of Municipal organiza- 
tions to assist in enforcing the regulations which govern in the Townships created 
as Regulated Game Preserve Areas. These men are clothed with all the authority 
necessary to enforce observance of the Act. It is obvious that the practical support 
and moral effect of this army of voluntary workers is of very great importance in 
preventing abuses of the privileges enjoyed by sportsmen. 

During 1938-39 there were some 1,878 cases in which offenders against 
provisions of the Game and Fisheries Act and Regulations were apprehended by 
Game and Fisheries Overseers and others authorized to act in the way of securing 
observance of these provisions, and in which cases various articles of hunting, 
trapping and fishing equipment and the product thereof were confiscated at the 
time of apprehension. A compilation of the various reports of seizure submitted 
by the officers concerned shows that such action was provided by Game and Fisheries 
Overseers in 1,638 of these cases, by members of the Ontario Provincial Police Force 
in 78 cases, by Deputy Game and Fishery Wardens in 69 cases, and in the remaining 
93 cases seizures were made by co-operative action of Overseers, Provincial Police 
and Deputy Game Wardens. 

A condensed summary of the articles confiscated shows the following: — 

Live animals in 32 cases 

Birds, game animals a:nd meat in 226 cases 

Firearms and ammunition in 760 cases 

Fish in 275 cases 

Nets and Fishing equipment in 327 cases 

Angling equipment in 114 cases 

Pelts and hides in 287 cases 

Traps and equipment in 132 cases 

Water craft in 51 cases 

Motor Vehicles in 17 cases 

Lights in 42 cases 

Spears in 63 cases 

Miscellaneous articles in 56 cases 

This total of 2,382 does not correspond with the actual number of seizures, 
viz:— 1,878 by reason of various entries on some seizures. For instance an irrespon- 
sible hunter might lose a gun and some birds or game animals, a trapper operating 
contrary to the regulations some traps and pelts, an indiscreet angler his fishing 
rod and some speckled trout or bass, while there would be instances where spears, 
lights and fish would be involved in each case, as well as other combinations which 
would account for the apparent discrepancy. 

Included among the pelts confiscated were 947 beaver, 2 fisher, 89 fox, 8 
marten, 32 mink, 501 muskrat, 16 otter, 68 raccoon and 304 weasel. 

The following comments, extracted from issues of the Bulletin, concerning 
the sales of confiscated articles and furs, will be of interest. 



20 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



Those who have any doubts as to the efficiency of the work which is being 
done to curb law breaking, or the need for eternal vigilance to protect a common 
heritage, would do well to arrange to visit one of the sales of confiscated articles 
conducted by the Department and, in viewing the multiplicity of weapons seized 
for illegal use, read the story of why conservation is necessary for the perpetuation 
of wild life. The rows of firearms stacked so menacingly around the room remind 
one forcibly that their late owners failed to play the game, and in doing so not 
only broke the law but menaced the rights of others. The weapons include almost 
every make and calibre of gun, from the toy .22 to the deadly automatic and the 
modern "pump." Each of them has a story of its own, a story of deliberate law 
breaking and swift retribution. 

There are those of ancient vintage which attracted attention, principally 
because they lack the refinements of the modern firearm, or because they conjure 
up memories which are probably better forgotten. 

There is a long line of those efficient little nomads, the- .22. They run the 
gamut of make and style, from the cheap little toy to the high-powered repeater. 
Most of them are in good shape, but there are a few whose general appearance 
shows a lack of care. 

In addition to the firearms there is a miscellaneous collection of fishing 
rods, reels, lines, baits, minnow pails, axes, flashlights, lanterns, haversacks and 
traps. As showing the extent of the illegal destruction which takes place and 
as a pleasing commentary on the work of the protective officers, we would add that 
there were some 940 traps in the various lots offered in the sale held in September 
1938. 

The following is a summary of the confiscated articles offered at this sale. 
Shotguns 67, rifles 45, .22 rifles 106, fishing poles 39, miscellaneous items 34, traps 
940. When it is remembered that in almost every case a fine or alternative gaol 
sentence was imposed, in addition to the loss occasioned by the confiscation of equip- 
ment, it should be a stern warning that "the way of the transgressor is hard!" 



For several days in February, 1939, the Department vault and storage room 
resembled a fur warehouse. Exposed for the inspection of buyers was the largest 
collection of confiscated pelts the Department has ever handled in any one year. This 
collection included the following pelts: — 



Beaver 993 

Muskrats 778 

Fisher 3 

Lynx 2 

Otter 14 

Fox (cross) 9 

Marten 14 



Mink 35 

Weasel 96 

Squirrel 87 

Raccoon 62 

Skunk 2 

Wolves 3 

Fox (red) 25 



In addition to this record assortment of confiscated furs there was a collection 
of silver fox pelts together with some red fox and mink from the Fur Farm, and 
a small mixed group taken in Provincial Parks and included by the Department 
of Lands and Forests. 



For the benefit of prospective buyers the furs were open to inspection for 
four days, and during that period they were constantly being turned over, examined 
and appraised by keen-eyed, shrewd buyers. Bidding for the various lots was in 
the form of sealed tender, so that those interested had to go over them carefully 
and determine finally what they were worth to them in a competitive market. The 
result of the sale surpassed the expectations of the Department and added considerably 
to the annual revenue. For example, the 993 beaver pelts brought a total of $14,535. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1938-39 21 



while the balance of the seized furs sold for $1,700.85. The confiscated furs therefore 
brought a total of $16,235.85. 

Around this brief mention of the fur sale is a story of never-ending vigilance 
on the part of the field force; that silent but effective group of Overseers whose 
mission is to enforce the Game and Fisheries Laws and see that the wild life 
resources of the Province are protected from the pilfering propensities of the poacher. 
A glance at the summary of confiscated pelts given herein will convince the 
most indifferent that there is a real necessity for such keen watchfulness. Take 
the case of the beaver for example. These animals were destroyed during a year 
when there was a completely closed season on beaver, and in addition a large 
percentage of them had been purchased from poachers by unscrupulous fur buyers, 
who, in turn, would be forced to dispose of them by further dishonest manipulations. 
The irony of these extensive seizures of beaver pelts is that the season was closed 
because it was felt that the animals required protection against trapping for a 
period, in order to increase their numbers, and the good trapper, realizing that 
such a measure was in his own interest, respected the restriction. The poacher, 
on the other hand, apparently found in the restriction an opportunity to enlarge 
his activities, aided and abetted by certain irresponsible buyers. 

As showing the widespread nature of these illegal practices we mention 
the fact that 80 beaver came from the Patricia District; 41 from Algoma; 17 
from Renfrew and 51 were seized in Toronto. The balance in small numbers came 
from all over the Province. 

The same general remarks apply with regard to the other furs. They were 
seized for a variety of reasons, but in all cases breaches of the act were involved. 

It is but fair to add that, despite this tale of unlawful taking, the score 
is not all bad. It has been noted, for example, that some 32 beaver accidentally 
caught in traps set for other legal fur, were forwarded to the Department for 
disposal, by the trappers themselves. 

Notwithstanding the fact that the general public is becoming more informed 
on the value of wild life and the necessity for ensuring its conservation the poacher 
and the illegal taker are still in our midst. 

As a result of the vigilance of protective officers we find that during the 
year under review there were some 1709 cases of violations prosecuted through 
the Courts, and in 1581 of which cases convictions were registered and fines collected 
totalling in all the record sum of $26,245.40. 

An analysis of these cases shows that Game and Fisheries Overseers were 
responsible for the charges in 1510 instances, members of the Provincial Police 
Force in 98 cases, Deputy Game Wardens in 21 cases; while co-operative action was 
responsible in 80 cases. Particulars of some of the more glaring cases which 
were prosecuted through the year are as follows: 

(a) Illegal trafficking in partridge, in the County of Carleton, convicted and 
fined $1,000 and costs; 

(b) Illegal possession, sale and purchase of partridge, in the County of 
Carleton, three persons involved, convictions registered in all cases, total 
fines of $400 and costs; 

(c) Illegal trafficking in pheasants, in the County of Middlesex, 34 birds seized, 
convicted and fined $340 and costs; 

(d) Unlawful killing of Hungarian partridge, in the County of Wentworth, 
10 birds seized, convicted and fined $100 an costs; 



22 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 



(e) Possession of more than legal catch of pheasants, on Pelee Island, 16 birds 
seized, convicted and fined $160 and costs; 

(f) Taking excessive numbers of undersized speckled trout, in the District 
of Parry Sound, five persons apprehended, — convicted, penalties in all totalled 
$123.75; 

(g) Taking excessive numbers of undersized speckled trout, in the County of 
Renfrew, three persons apprehended, — convicted, total penalties in each of 
the three cases $126.75; and 

(h) Illegal possession of beaver, involving a licensed fur dealer, in Northern 
Ontario, — 23 charges, convicted and fined a total of $16,395 or in default 
of payment to be confined for two years and six months, less one day in 
a Reformatory. In addition to this sentence there were seized from the 
offender, 444 beaver, 10 otter, 7 marten, 1 fisher, 2 mink, 2 cross fox and 
31 muskrat. 

We ask the sportsmen to notice two things in connection with these various 
offences. The first is that no stone is being left unturned by the Department 
to bring the law-breakers to justice. The second is that illegal depredations, if 
unchecked, may assume extensive proportions; as is evidenced by details of the 
cases above noted. 

THE FISH CULTURE BRANCH 

The vast waters of our Province, among the finest in the world, constitute 
our most widely distributed recreational agencies, and their importance from the 
recreational and health standpoints is of immeasurable value to our people. This 
attraction lies in the entrancing beauty of our lakes and streams, and the excellent 
fishing which they provide. The development and maintenance of these game fishing 
interests in a practical manner is one of the primary functions of the Department. 

Ontario's commercial fishing industry is also of considerable economic im- 
portance, and in point of annual marketed value of fresh water fish, Ontario stands 
first among the Provinces. In appendices 3 and 4, information pertaining to this 
valuable enterprise is compiled for reference purposes. 

In its wider and truer meaning fish culture is closely linked to aquatic 
biology, physics, commercial fishing and angling, and it is difficult to give a comprehen- 
sive definition of the term. However, for all practical purposes it may be said that a 
progressive fish culturist is one who measures his success in terms of the good 
fishing resulting from his labours, and in view of the results being achieved in 
this connection fish culturists should be very optimistic about future possibilities 
in this field. 

During the regular open seasons there is a tremendous drain on the fish 
supply, particularly in the more populated areas where waters are more readily 
accessible. The menace of over-fishing which is one of the major causes of depletion 
has become more seriously apparent since the development of the automobile and 
motor boat; these two useful contrivances have made it possible for a much larger 
percentage of the population to go fishing. In view of these conditions, a practical 
restocking policy is followed by such regulations and practical measures as are 
consistent with the conservation of the fisheries. The eminently reasonable aim of 
fish laws is to ensure a plentiful supply of commercial and game-fish to future 
generations of Canadians. 

Conservation means wise use. Fish do not grow by magic and in order to 
obtain larger and better fish, they must be permitted to grow and reproduce normally; 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1938-39 23 



nature is wonderfully endowed with recuperative powers and, if given a chance, 
it is surprising how quickly fish will multiply under properly balanced conditions 
of food and shelter. On the other hand, if a suitable number of adults is not 
left to reproduce we should not be surprised to find an increase of undesirable 
species. It is wise for fishermen to remember that a body of water produces a 
definite number of adult fish, depending on the food, natural enemies and possi- 
bilities of reproduction. Fishermen generally are beginning to realize the importance 
of this fundamental factor and many are content with the minimum, rather than 
the maximum creel limit. 

Within the compass of this report the salient features of the progress made 
during the year in connection with fish cultural practice are set forth. 

HATCHERIES AND REARING STATIONS 

During the year the Department operated twenty-six hatcheries and rearing 
stations. The actual number of hatcheries operated was twenty; trout rearing stations, 
fifteen; and bass rearing stations, five. 

New and additional facilities for hatching and rearing fish during the fiscal 
year 1938-39 were provided for in a very satisfactory manner as follows: 

1. Additional raceways were constructed at the Dorion trout rearing station. 
Thunder Bay district, to increase the carrying capacity of the hatchery. 

2. A trout rearing station subsidiary to the Glenora fish hatchery was operated 
on Waring's creek. Prince Edward county. 

3. Two additional ponds were constructed at the Chatsworth trout rearing 
station and a subsidiary station was developed on Nicholson's creek, in the same 
vicinity. 

4. Construction of a new trout rearing station at Hill's Lake, vicinity of Charlton, 
district of Temiskaming, was commenced. 

5. Three additional bass ponds, making a total of five, were completed at 
Sandfield, Manitoulin Island; four of these ponds were used for wintering trout 
in 1938-39. 

6. Five bass ponds and a pickerel hatchery were constructed at Skeleton 
lake, vicinity of Ulls water, Muskoka district; four of these ponds were used for 
wintering trout in 1938-39. 

7. Three ponds were completed at Deer lake, vicinity of Havelock, Peterborough 
county, for the rearing of black bass, maskinonge and forage fish; a hatchery for 
maskinonge and pickerel was also completed at this site. Two of these ponds were 
used for wintering trout in 1938-39. 

THE CULTURE AND DISTRIBUTION OF FISH 

Speckled Trout: 

The policy of rearing large numbers of trout to yearling and older stages 
for distribution to suitable public waters which require restocking was vigorously 
pursued. The following comparative distribution figures show the successful results 
obtained and the definite progress that is being made: 

1936 557,270 

1937 1,167,073 

1938 2,083.538 



24 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 



In addition, 373,314 fingerlings were planted, slightly fewer than the number 
planted the previous year. The policy of planting fry and small fingerlings will 
be abandoned, unless a surplus is available or crowded conditions warrant distribution. 

Brown Trout: 

The Department continued the policy of rearing brown trout yearlings for re- 
stocking suitable streams in southern Ontario, and the results are most encouraging. 

During the year approximately 59,600 sizeable yearlings were planted and plans 
are under way for increasing facilities for handling larger numbers of this species. 

Rainbow Trout: 

(a) Steelhead trout — 

Excellent progress was made in connection with the rearing of rainbow trout 
fingerlings; an increased production of 205.5 per cent was obtained. In addition 
to this 6,727 yearling and adult rainbows were distributed. 

(b) Kamloops trout — 

The advantages to be derived from planting this variety of rainbow trout in 
sipring fed lakes, which show similar characteristics to those inhabited by speckled 
trout, were set forth in the previous report of the Department. 

Twenty-five thousand eight hundred fingerlings of this variety were planted 
during the year. As soon as a plan can be developed, a substantial number of 
yearlings will be planted annually in conjunction with surplus fingerlings which can- 
not be carried over winter. Annual egg production will depend on a domesticated 
breeding stock which is being developed. 

Lake Trout: 

The total distribution of eyed eggs and fry was approximately 28 per cent 
greater than the previous year. There was a decrease of 33 per cent in the distri- 
bution of fingerlings. 

The successful collection of large numbers of lake trout eggs in the fall 
of the year by commercial fishermen working in conjunction with the Department's 
spawntaking crews, depends primarily on weather conditions. It is obvious that 
the technique governing the successful collection of spawn cannot be carried out 
in a most satisfactory manner during rough and stormy weather on the Great 
Lakes. Conditions of this nature existed during the spawning season of lake trout 
in 1938. 

Whitefish: 

There was a decrease of approximately 15.6 per cent in the distribution of 
whitefish fry as compared with that of the previous year; this was due to two 
factors, firstly the spawntaking harvest in the vicinities of Kenora and Fort Frances 
was greatly reduced on account of an early freeze-up, and secondly the spawning 
run of fish in the Bay of Quinte area, Lake Ontario, was much smaller than in 
previous years. 

Herring: 

The distribution of herring fry was more than nine times that of the preceding 
year. This distribution was due in the main to the increased collection of spawn 
on the Bay of Quinte area. Lake Ontario. Small collections were made on Lake 
Erie but, as was pointed out in the previous year's report, there are many hopeful 
signs of the return of the herring or Cisco in Lake Erie. The reason for this may 
be ascribed, in part at least, to the effective legislation imposed and enforced In 
regard to commercial fishing in this lake. If the present population of herring in 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1938-39 25 



the lake is permitted to spawn once, and preferably twice, before being taken 
commercially there will, undoubtedly, be a very decided increase in the production 
of this valuable commercial fish. As was pointed out in the introduction to this 
report, nature is wonderfully endowed with recuperative powers and if given a 
chance it is amazing what can be accomplished. Much larger collections of spawn 
are anticipated in succeeding years. 

Yellow Pickerel: 

There was an increased distribution of fry amounting to approximately 3 per 
cent over that of the previous year. 

Following the usual practice approximately two million eyed eggs were handled 
by the Sparrow Lake hatchery, the fry being distributed over suitable areas in Sparrow 
lake. 

8 mall -mouthed Black Bass: 

Although there was a decrease of 37 per cent in the distribution of small- 
mouthed black bass fry, this was greatly offset by an increase of 19.7 per cent in 
the distribution of fingerlings. 

There was also an increased distribution of yearlings and older bass, amounting 
to 1,840, as a result of bass harvesting from the following lakes, — Cook's lake (Thunder 
Bay district), Lake Charlotte (Renfrew county) and Little Gull lake (Haliburton 
county). 

Larg-e-monthed Black Bass: 

Following the practice of previous years, one pond was set apart at Mount 

Pleasant for the culture of large-mouthed black bass. This pond produced 57,500 fry 

and 8,035 fingerlings. Since this pond is only 0.64 acres in area, the production 
record is an excellent one. 

Yellow Perch: 

During the spawning run of the perch in the spring of the year, spawn is 
collected by commercial fishermen working in conjunction with our own hatchery, 
officers. This work is conducted at the west end of Lake Erie near Kingsville. 
The eggs are cultured in the hatchery in that vicinity and the resulting fry are 
widely distributed over natural spawning areas in the lake. This work is of the 
utmost importance considering the commercial value of perch fishing in Lake Erie. 

The distribution of perch fry was over six times that of the previous year, due 
to a much larger spawning run of this desirable species in the vicinity in question. 

Blue Pickerel: 

The blue pickerel is of considerable commercial value in Lake Erie and it is 
desirable to supplement the work of nature in maintaining production on a proper 
basis. For the second season spawn was collected at the west end of Lake Erie 
and approximately one-half million blue pickerel fry were liberated. 

Masklnonfire: 

The distribution of maskinonge fry was approximately 376.5 per cent greater 
than the previous year. 

The difficulties attending the collection of spawn and the culture of this 
important species were pointed out in the previous year's report. This report also 
gave an outline of the work being done by New York, Wisconsin and Minnesota along 
similar lines. The ways and means by which the Department is undertaking to 
maintain this important species are, — 



26 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 



1. Restriction of bag limit and number of days' fishing. 

2. Protection of the normal population in sanctuary areas. The report for 
1936-37 contains an explanation of the purpose of such sanctuaries. 

3. The planting of fry in suitable areas. 

4. Further studies regarding the possibilities of rearing fry to the fingerling 
stage. 

With reference to item 4. facilities will be provided during the next fiscal 
year to experiment on a proper basis with the culture of maskinonge from the fry 
to the fingerling stage. For this purpose, a hatchery and pond have been constructed 
at the outlet of Deer Lake, Belmont township, Peterborough county. The water 
supply is adequate and of suitable composition. A minnow pond for the production 
of forage fish for the growing maskinonge is also available at this site. 

In addition to this, a large natural area will be set aside in the Kawartha lakes 
district for the purpose of studying in an experimental way the conditions required 
for the successful propagation of maskinonge in natural areas. 

CLOSED WATERS 

In addition to the waters already closed for the natural protection and 
propagation of fish, the following water areas were closed during the year, April 
1, 1938, to March 31, 1939: 

BERRY CREEK, tributary to Long Bay, Lake of the Woods, District of Kenora. 

BLACK DUCK LAKE, 

Township of Harvey, County of Peterborough. 

CHEMONG LAKE (Portion) 

Township of Emily, County of Victoria. 

CHEMONG LAKE (Portion) 

Township of Smith, County of Peterborough. 

DUCK PONDS, 

Township of Dummer, County of Peterborough. 

GOOSE LAKE, 

Township of Fenelon, County of Victoria. 

GOOSE LAKE, 

Townships of Fenelon and Somerville, County of Victoria. 

KATCHIWANO LAKE. 

Township of Smith, County of Peterborough. 

LITTLE MUD LAKE (Chemong Lake) 

Township of Smith, County of Peterborough. 

McVICAR'S CREEK, 

Within limits of city of Port Arthur, Thunder Bay District. 

SEARIGHT'S BAY (North River), 

Township of Belmont, County of Peterborough. 

SOUTH BAY (Stony Lake), 

Township of Dummer, County of Peterborough. 

TAYLOR'S BAY and MUNN'S BAY (Belmont Lake), 
Township of Belmont, County of Peterborough. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1938-39 27 



WHITEFISH, BASS and CLEAR LAKES, 

Township of Humphrey, District of Parry Sound, during the period January 23, 
1939, to April 30, 1939. 

REMOVAL OF COARSE FISH 

Between December 16, 1938, and February 4, 1939, twenty-seven hoop nets 
were operated for the removal of ling from waters located as follows: 

(a) In Leeds County — Rideau Lake, Bass Lake, Red Horse Lake, Outlet of 
Charleston Lake and Barker's Creek. 

(b) In Lanark County — Bennett's Lake and the Tay River. 

The total number of ling taken was 3,305; the average weight of the ling was 
.6 pounds, making the total weight of ling removed 19,830 pounds, or approximately 
10 tons. 

BIOLOGICAL SURVEYS 

Biological surveys were conducted in Thunder Bay district on Northern Light 
lake, located approximately twelve miles south of Moss township, on the Pigeon 
river, Whitefish lake (Strange township). Arrow lake, located approximately six 
miles south-west of Strange township, and Shikag lake, which is located about 
seven miles north-east of Tannin. The purpose of these studies was to determine 
the advisability of permitting commercial fishing on these lakes. Studies were 
conducted on the following waters, with a view to determining their suitability as 
sanctuaries for black bass, namely, — Hart lake, Stonehouse lake. Upper Rock lake, 
Lower Rock lake, located in the township of Storrington, Frontenac county; Crow 
lake (Crow's Nest lake) and Lake Opinicon, township of South Crosby, Leeds county; 
and a water area in the vicinity of Portland, Big Rideau lake, township of Bastard, 
Leeds county. 

Dams on the Beaver river, township of CoUingwood, Grey county, and at the 
outlet of West Lake, township of Hallowell, Prince Edward county, were examined 
with reference to the obstructions created by these dams to migratory fish, and 
the biological effects resulting from changing water levels in the latter instance. 

Pollution surveys were conducted on a branch of the Aux Sables river, town- 
ship of Usborne, Huron county; Smith creek, township of Blenheim, Oxford county, 
and the St. Lawrence river, vicinity of Cornwall, Stormont county. 

The Ontario Fisheries Research Laboratory of the Department of Biology, 
University of Toronto, continued field and laboratory studies of lakes and streams 
in Algonquin Park during 1938-39, and the following is a concise account of this 
important work: 

"The anglers fishing in the Park have cooperated by suipplying a record of 
the fish which they caught. Such information is now available from a good many 
lakes for the last four years. 



Year 

Number of lakes for which anglers have reported 
Number of lake trout recorded 



936 


1937 


1938 


1939 


23 


51 


41 


59 


414 


3856 


3083 


4681 



In addition to recording the number of fish caught, the anglers also report the 
size of the fish and the length of time it takes to catch a given number. It was 
found that the length of the lake trout caught varied from a minimum of eight inches 



28 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES . No. 9 



to a maximum of thirty-six inches. In some lakes the lake trout are mostly small 
and in other lakes there is a preponderance of large trout, while still other lakes 
contain trout varying in size from small to large. The size and number of trout 
in a lake is related to the available food and the amount of fishing. This infor- 
mation which has been made available as a result of the cooperation of the anglers 
and the biological investigations of these lakes has made possible the carrying out 
of experiments of value in fish culture. 

In these lakes where the food scarcity is the controlling factor arrangements 
are being carried out to improve the food condition by introducing small food fish. 
In those lakes where excessive fishing is depleting the stock of lake trout, two kinds 
of experiments are being undertaken. In lakes adjacent to the highway or in the 
vicinity of cottages trout of different sizes are being planted and the result of 
this stocking will be determined. Some lakes which are remote from the highway 
are being closed to fishing in alternate years and the improvement in fishing resulting 
from this closure is being measured during the years in which those lakes are open 
to angling. 

It is most desirable to have definite information on the trout population in 
lakes. The particular relationship of White lake to Big Trout lake in Algonquin 
Park makes it possible to ascertain the trout population of White lake for at least 
part of the year. These two lakes are joined by a narrow channel 100 feet wide 
and about 12 feet deep. White lake with an area of 1040 acres and a maximum depth 
of 40 feet has lake trout in it during the fall, winter and spring. As it warms up 
during the summer, the lake trout all move out into Big Trout lake which is much 
deeper. In the spring and early summer of 1939 all of the lake trout moving out of 
White lake were captured in a fyke net, measured, and released into Big Trout lake. 
By July 10 all of the lake trout had moved out. There were 813 between twelve 
and twenty-eight inches in length, with a total weight of about 2177 pounds. Thus 
White lake with an area of 1040 acres supports about one lake trout of fishable 
size per acre or about two pounds of available lake trout per acre. 

The young speckled trout in Algonquin Park waters live in the stream during 
the early part of their lives. Here they feed upon aquatic insects. Studies of these 
insect populations have given astonishingly large numbers for the production of this 
trout food. From May 17 to September 11, 1939, one square yard of water in a 
typical trout stream inhabited by trout was found to produce during the summer 
550 mayflies, 700 stoneflies, 466 caddis flies and 4,400 blackflies and midges, as well 
as some other aquatic insects, all of which constitute excellent trout food. 

Bass from some lakes and rivers in the Park have fish parasites. None of 
the fish parasites are injurious to man but they are unpleasant for the angler to 
find while cleaning the fish. A study of the distribution of these parasites has been 
carried out to find where they occur most abundantly. With this information at 
hand the danger of transferring parasites from one body of water to another can 
be reduced to a minimum. 

A small hatchery has been established near Algonquin Park headquarters, 
where fish which have been raised in the rearing stations of the Ontario Department of 
Game and Fisheries may be held for some time and from where they may be con- 
viently distributed to any desired water in the Park." 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

The assistance and co-operation rendered during the year, particularly by 
Fish and Game Protective Associations and members thereof, have indeed been very 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1938-39 29 



gratifying and are deeply appreciated. Such valuable cooperation encourages us 
in our efforts on behalf of the protection and development of the wild life natural 
resources of the Province, in order that those interested may continue to enjoy a 
participation in the privilege and healthy excerise which pursuit of the same provides. 

Members of the Staff, both the inside and outside service, generally speaking, 
have conducted themselves and performed the duties assigned to them in the best 
interests of the Department and its varied activities. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I am, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 



D. J. TAYLOR, 

Deputy Minister of Game and Fisheries 



Toronto 2. 



30 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



APPENDIX No. 1 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 

April 1st, 1938, to March 31st, 1939 



LARGE-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 



FRY 



Bruce : 
Berry's Lake 
Little's Lake 
Marl Lake . . 
Paddy's Lake 
Seep's Lake . 



Grey: 

Davis Lake 

Saugeen River — S. Branch 
Sheppard's Lake 



Haliburton: 
Round Lake 



5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 



5,000 
5,000 
5,000 



5,000 



Saugeen River 

Shouldice Lake 

Frontenac: 
Clear Lake (Kennebec) 

Collins Lake 

Cross Lake (Kennebec) 
Little Mississagagon . . . 
Loughborough Lake . . . 

McClintock Lake 

Mississagagon Lake . . . 

Pine Lake 

Rideau Lake 

Schooner Lake 

Sharbot Lake 

Trout Lake 

Twin Lakes 



9,000 
10,000 



10,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

15,000 

10,000 

10,000 

5,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

5,000 



Lincoln: 
Jordan Pond 

Muskoka: 
Kahshe Lake 

Norfolk : 

Sutton's Pond 



FINGERLINGS 
Middlesex: 

Sydenham River 



Nipissing: 
Blackwater Lake 

Norfolk: 
Hunger Lake . . . . 

Little Lake 

Teeterville Pond 

Wentworth : 
Hamilton Bay . . . 



2,500 
5,000 
5,000 

126x 
500 



100 
100 
210 



York: 

Shadow Lake 

xThis number includes twenty-six 



5,000 

2,025 
adults. 



SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

FRY 

Bruce: 



Arran Lake . 
Bereford Lake 
Boat Lake . . . 
Britain Lake 
Cameron Lake 
Chesley Lake 
Cyprus Lake 
Gould Lake . 
Isaac Lake . . 
Lake George . 
Miller Lake . . 
Pearl Lake . . 
Sauble River . 



5,000 

10,000 

10,000 

5,000 

2,500 

5,000 

2,500 

10,000 

15,000 

5,000 

20,000 

5,000 

15.000 



Haldimand : 
Grand River 

Haliburton: 

Black Lake 

Blue Hawk Lake 

Davis Lake 

Grass Lake 

Gull Lake 

Head Lake 

Hurricane Lake 

Kashawigamog Lake 

Long Lake (Dysart) 

Mink Lake 

Misiwabi Lake 

Mountain Lake (Minden) . . . 

Paradise Lake 

Pine Lake 

Portage Lake 

Unnamed lake (Lutterworth) 

West Lake 

Wylie's Lake 

Halton: 
Bronte River 



Hastings: 

Crow Lake 

Crow River 

Gunter Lake 

Little Salmon Lake 

Moira Lake , 

Moira River 

Oak Lake 

Pine Lake 

Wadsworth Lake . 



Leeds: 
Crow Lake . . . 
Sand Lake . . . 
Troy Lake . . . 
Whitefish Lake 



Lincoln: 
Twelve Mile Creek 



20.000 



5,000 

10,000 
5,000 
5,000 

10,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 

10,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 

10,000 
5,000 



2,500 



5,000 
5,000 
10,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5.000 
5.000 



5.000 
5.000 
5,000 
5,000 



2.500 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1938-39 



31 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1938, to March 31st, 1939— Continued 



SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

— Continued 

Manitoulin: 

Big Lake 10,000 

Lake Manitou 10,000 

Middlesex: 

Thames River 10,000 

Muskoka: 

Bon View Lake 20,000 

Bruces Lake 10,000 

Deer Lake 10,000 

Dickie Lake 10,000 

Kahshe Lake 10,000 

Lake Muskoka 30,000 

MacKay's Lake 10,000 

Menominee Lake 20,000 

Prospect Lake 20,000 

Tookes Lake 10,000 

Wood Lake 10,000 



Norfolk: 
Waterford's Gravel Pit Pond 



10,000 



Northumberland : 

Trent River 5,000 

Ontario: 

Lake St. John 10,000 

Oxford: 

Thames River *. 10,000 

Peterborough: 

Belmont Lake 5,000 

Stony Lake 5,000 

Simcoe: 

Kempenfeldt Bay 10,000 

Lake Couchiching 15,000 

Little Lake (Vespra) 10,000 

Sparrow Lake 15,000 

Victoria: 

Balsam Lake 10,000 

Burnt River 5,000 

Gull River 5,000 

Little Mud Turtle Lake .... 5,000 

Mud Turtle Lake 5,000 

Pigeon Lake 10,000 

Round Lake 5,000 

Silver Lake 5,000 

Sturgeon Lake 25,000 

FINGERLINGS 
Algoma: 

Alma Lake 500 

Appleby Lake 500 

Blind River 1,000 

Caribou Lake 500 

Cummings Lake 1,000 

Darrell Lake 1,000 



Desbarats Lake 

Diamond Lake 

Duborne Lake 

Gordon Lake 

Keichel Lake 

Little Bass Lake 

Lost Lake 

McCarroll's Lake 

Mine Lake 

Moose Lake 

Mud Lake 

O'Neill Lake 

Pipe Lake 

Rock Lake 

Stuart Lake 

Unnamed lake (U. Tp.) . . 
Walker Lake 

Bruce: 
Clam Lake 

Carleton: 

Ottawa River 

Rideau River 

Cochrane: 
Baart's Lake 

Frontenac: 

Canonto Lake 

Crotch Lake (Palmerston) 

Crow Lake 

Elbow Lake 

Fourteen Island Lake .... 
Long Lake (Portland) .... 
Rock Lake (Portland) . . . 

St. George's Lake 

Sunday Lake 

Grenville: 
Rideau River 

Grey: 
Lake Francis 

Haliburton: 

Canning Lake 

Koshlong Lake 

Little Mud Turtle Lake . . 
Mountain Lake (Dysart) . . 

Hastings : 

Baptiste Lake 

Bass Lake 

Lake Louis 

Huron: 
Maitland River 

Lanark: 

Bennett's Lake 

Black Creek 

Christie Lake 

Dalhousie Lake 

MisslBsippi Lake 



500 

500 

1,000 

500 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

500 

500 

500 

500 

1,000 

1,000 

500 

1,000 

1,000 

1,500 



1,000 



2,000 
2,000 



1.000 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
500 
500 
1,000 



,000 
500 



1,000 
750 

1,000 
750 



1,000 

1,000 

500 



500 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
2.000 



32 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1938, to March 31st, 1939— Continued 



SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 
— Continned 

Lanark — Continued 

Pike Lake 1.000 

Rideau Lake 1,500 

Silver Lake 500 

Leeds: 

Gananoque Lake 100 

St. Lawrence River 100 

Lennox-Addington : 

Beaver Lake 1,000 

Beaver Lake — south 500 

Lime Lake 500 

Long Lake 1,000 

White Lake 1,000 

Manitoulin: 

Kagawong Lake 3,000 

Lilly Lake 3,000 

Linda Lake 3,000 

Loon Lake 2,000 

Mindemoya Lake 2,000 

South Bay 2,000 

Muskoka: 

Burns Lake 1,000 

Henshaw Lake 500 

Indian River 500 

Lake Joseph 500 

Lake Rosseau 500 

MacKay's Lake 2,000 

Musquash River 500 

North Lake 1,000 

Silver Lake 500 

Six Mile Lake 1,000 

Sparrow Lake 1,000 

Torrance Lake 1,000 

Nipissing: 

Bear and Poplar Lakes 500 

Cache Lake 500 

Champlain Lake 500 

Finlayson Lake 500 

Herridge Lake 1,000 

Lake Nipissing 500 

Lake Noshonsing 500 

Lake Timagami 500 

Martin River 500 

Moore Lake 500 

Shanty Bay (Lake Nipissing) 500 

Talon Lake 2,000 

Tomiko Lake 500 

Trout Lake 500 

Turtle Lake 500 

Wilson Lake 500 

Northumberland: 

Rice Lake 1,200 

Parry Sound: 

Ahmic Lake 500 

Arthur Lake 500 

Bain Lake 500 



Balsam Lake 

Bass Lake 

Bear Lake 

Beaver Lake 

Bittern Lake 

Blackwater Lake 

Canoe Lake 

Caribou Lake 

Clear Lake (Humphrey) . . 
Clear Lake (Patterson) . . 

Cole Lake 

Commanda Lake 

Crane Lake 

Deer Lake (Ferrie Tp.) . . 
Deer Lake (Lount Tp.) . . 
Deer Lake (McKenzie Tp.) 

Deer Lake (Mills Tp.) 

Deer Lake (Wilson Tp.) . . 

Distress River 

Doe Lake 

Duck Lake 

Eagle Lake 

Horseshoe Lake 

Island Lake 

Jack Lake 

Key River 

Lake of Many Islands .... 

Lennon's Lake 

Little Long Lake 

Loch Urn Lake 

Long Lake (Fereruson Tp.) 
Long Lake (Wilson Tp.) . 

Magnetawan River 

Manson Lake 

Mary Jane Lake 

McVeety Lake 

Neighick Lake 

Pickerel Lake 

Pickerel River 

Pigeon Lake 

Pine Lake 

Portage Lake 

Rankin Lake 

Restoule Lake 

Rosseau Lake 

Ruth Lake 

Sea Gull Lake 

Shawanaga Lake 

Shebeshekong Lake 

Shoal Lake 

Snakeskin Lake 

Spring Lake 

Star Lake 

Stormy Lake 

Toad Lake 

Trout Lake (Humphrey) . 

Turtle Lake 

Whitestone Lake 

Wilson Lake 

Wolf Lake 

Wolf River 

Woodcock Lake 

Peel: 
Credit River 



500 

1,000 

1,000 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 

1,000 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 

1.000 
500 
500 
500 

1,000 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 

1.000 
500 
500 
500 
500 

1,000 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 



500 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1938-39 



33 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1938, to March 31st, 1939— Continued 



SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

— Continued 

Prince Edward: 

Consecon Lake 500 

Roblins Lake 1,000 

West Lake 1,200 

Renfrew: 

Black Bay 2,000 

Foster Lake 500 

Green Lake (Radcliffe) 500 

Hyde's Bay 1,500 

Lake Dore 1,000 

LeClaire Lake 1,000 

Madawaska River 1,000 

Mink Lake 1,000 

Ottawa River 2,000 

Petawawa River 2,000 

Simcoe: 

Bass Lake 500 

Gloucester Pool 500 

Little Lake (Tay) 500 

Nottawasaga River 500 

Severn River 1,500 

Sudbury: 

Agnew Lake 3,000 

Devils Lake 500 

Dry Pine Bay 500 

French River 500 

Lake Penache 3,000 

Ramsay Lake 3,000 

AVanapitei Lake 3,000' 

Whitson Lake 2,000 

Timiskaming: 

Babs Lake 1,500 

Butler Lake 500 

Davis Lake 500 

Emerald Lake 500 

Granite Lake 500 

Sesekinika Lake 1,000 

Victoria: 

Lake Dalrymple 500 

Waterloo: 

Conestoga River 1,000 

Grand River 600 

Paradise Lake 600 

York: 

Lake Simcoe 1,000 

Musselmans Lake 500 



YEARLINGS AND ADULTS 

Algoma: 

Friendly Lake 120 

Gravel Lake 150 

Knob Lake 150 

Picnic Lake 145 



Brant: 

Gravel Pit Pond at Scotland 100 

Frontenac : 

Bob's Lake 100 

Clear Lake (Hinchinbrooke) . 100 

Clear Lake (Kennebec) .... 40 

Crotch Lake (Kennebec) . . 40 

Dog Lake 100 

Gull Lake 60 

Kashwakaniak Lake 25 

Mink Lake 25 

Mississippi River 25 

Otter Lake 50 

Rideau Lake 100 

Sydenham Lake 50 

Haliburton: 

Elephant Lake 100 

Gull Lake 100 

Koshlong Lake 100 

Hastings: 

Big Salmon Lake 50 

Burnt Lake 25 

Dickey Lake 38 

Gull Lake 50 

Jordon Lake 50 

Kaminiskeg Lake 100 

Lake of Islands 30 

Parker Creek 100 

West Lake 100 

York River 100 

Huron: 

Maitland River 20 

Kenora: 

Lake Agimac 140 

Lake McNamara 135 

Kent: 
Lake St. Clair (Mitchell's 

Bay) 100 

Rondeau Bay 70 

Leeds: 

Big Rideau Lake 100 

Charleston Lake 2()0 

Crosby Lake 100 

Grippen Lake 100 

Little Rideau Lake 100 

Newborough Lake 100 

Sand Lake 100 

St. Lawrence River 100 

Traynor Lake 100 

Lennox-Addington : 

Cedar Lake 100 

Otter Lake 50 

Weslemkoon Lake 50 

Peterborough: 

Black Lake 100 

Buckhorn Lake 100 



34 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OP FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1938, to March 31st, 1939— Continued 



SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

— Continued 

PETERBOROUGH— Continued 

Chemong Lake 100 

Clear Lake 100 

Crab Lake 100 

Deer Bay 100 

Indian River 100 

Jack's Lake 100 

Katchawanooka Lake 100 

Little Cedar Lake • 100 

Long Lake 100 

Loon Lake 200 

Lovesick Lake 100 

Sandy Lake 100 

Stony Lake 100 

Trout Lake 100 

White Lake 100 

Renfrew: 

Calabogie Lake 100 

Corry Lake 100 

Green Lake (Horton) 175 

Moccasin Lake 100 

White Lake 100 

Stormont: 

St. Lav^rrence River 200 

Thunder Bay: 

Gull Lake 150 

Hazlewood Lake 190 

Island Lake 150 

Loon Lake 150 

One Island Lake 165 

Shebandowan Lake 220 

Williams Lake 50 

Victoria: 

Sturgeon Lake 100 



MASKINONGE 

FRY 
Frontenac : 

Sydenham Lake 15,000 

Hastings: 

Crow Lake 25,000 

Crow River 25,000 

Moira Lake 25,000 

Moira River 25,000 

Sears Lake 10,000 

Trent River '. 25,000 

Leeds: 

St. Lawrence River 10,000 

Muskoka: 
Kahshe Lake 15,000 

Nipissing: 
Lake Nipissing 10,000 



Shanty Bay — south arm 

Lake Nipissing 5,000 

Northumberland: 

Crow Bay 20,000 

Mud Lake 50,000 

Rice Lake 100,000 

Trent River 115,000 

Unnamed Stream at Cod- 

rington 10,000 

Parry Sound: 

Naskoten Lake 5,000 

Nipissing Lake 5,000 

Restoule Lake 5,000 

Peterborough: 

Belmont Lake 50,000 

Buckhorn Lake 50,000 

Chemong Lake 50,000 

Clear Lake 290,000 

Deer Bay 50,000 

Indian River 40,000 

Katchawanooka Lake 40,000 

Little Lake 15,000 

Little Mud Lake 25,000 

Lovesick Lake 50,000 

Otonabee River 50,000 

Pigeon Lake 50,000 

Round Lake 25,000 

Stony Lake 75,000 

Trent River 10,000 

White Lake 25,000 

Prince Edward: 

Bay of Quinte 30,000 

Muscote Bay 55,000 

West Lake 10,000 

Renfrew: 

Corry Lake 5,000 

Cushene Lake 5,000 

Lafleur Lake 5,000 

Maskalonge Lake 5,000 

Simcoe : 

Gloucester Pool 25,000 

Lake Couchiching 25,000 

Stormont: 

St. Lawrence River 10,000 

Thunder Bay: 

Lac des Mille Lacs 5,000 

Victoria: 

Balsam Lake 50,000 

Burnt River 25,000 

Dalrymple Lake 15,000 

Little Mud Turtle 10,000 

Mud Turtle Lake 10,000 

Pigeon Lake 150,000 

Pigeon River 100,000 

Sturgeon Lake 50,000 

Young's Lake 15,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1938-39 



35 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1938, to March 3l8t, 1939— Continued 



MASKINONGE— Continued 



Welland: 
Niagara River 



PERCH 

FRY 
Norfolk: 
Waterford Gravel Pit Pond. 



5,000 



150,000 



Great Lakes: 

Lake Erie 59,000,000 



PICKEREL FRY 

Algoma : 

Appleby Lake 50,000 

Bright Lake 700,000 

Clear Lake 250,000 

Cummings Lake 250,000 

Desbarats Lake 150,000 

Echo Lake 12,880,000 

Gordon Lake 2,000,000 

Little Bass Lake 250,000 

Little Basswood Lake 500,000 

Little Clear Lake 

(Gladstone) 300,000 

Little Clear Lake 

(Kirkwood) 500,000 

Mississagi Lake 1,000,000 

Portlock Bay 50,000 

Rock Lake 500,000 

Brant: 

Grand River 250,000 

Bruce: 

Boat Lake 250,000 

Chesley Lake 387,500 

Gould Lake 100,000 

Isaac Lake 125,000 

Sauble River 250,000 

Saugeen River 325,000 

Teeswater River 100,000 

Carleton: 

Constance Bay 200,000 

Ottawa River 400,000 

Rideau River 450,000 

Cochrane: 

Big Water Lake 100,000 

Bobs Lake 200,000 

Boulder Lake 100,000 

Boundary Lake 100,000 

Charlebois Lake 200,000 

Mooseen Lake 100,000 

Mortimer Lake 200,000 

Reid Lake 200,000 

Rem] Lake 400,000 

Sand Lake 100,000 

Small Lake 100,000 

Unnamed lake— O'Brien Tp. 150,000 

Wilson Lake 200,000 



Durham : 

Lake Scugog 500,000 

Frontenac: 

Big Gull Lake 500,000 

Bobs Lake 500,000 

Clear Lake 500,000 

Crow Lake 250,000 

Elbow Lake 100,000 

Fifth Lake 250,000 

Fourteen Island La.ce 300,000 

Green Lake 250,000 

Jack's Lake 100,000 

Kashwakamak Lake 1,250,000 

Long Lake (Olden) 100,000 

Long Lake (Portland) 300,000 

Malcolm Lake 250,000 

Marble Lake 250,000 

Mink Lake 250,000 

Mississagagon Lake 500,000 

Mississippi River 1,250,000 

Morgan Lake 150,000 

Navy Bay 250,000 

Norway Lake 250,000 

Rock Lake (Portland) 300,000 

Salmon River 150,000 

Sydenham Lake 350,000 

West Rideau Lake 500,000 

Grenville: 

Nation River 1,000,000 

Rideau River 1,250,000 

Haldimand: 

Grand River 250,000 

Haliburton: 

Clear Lake 250,000 

Sam's Lake 250,000 

Hastings: 

Baptiste Lake 650,000 

Eraser Lake 200,000 

Jack Lake 100,000 

Lake Louis 200,000 

Lime Lake 100,000 

Mallard's Lake 200,000 

Moira Lake 1,250,000 

Moira River 1,250,000 

Moxam's Lake 100,000 

Trent River 1,250,000 

York River 100,000 

Kenora: 

Big Vermilion Lake 1,000,000 

Black Sturgeon Lake 1,250,000 

Blindfold Lake 1,250,000 

Bowden Lake 1,000,000 

Cache Lake 500,000 

Lake of the Woods 22,150,000 

Lake of Two Mountains . . . 1,000,000 

Long Bow Lake 1,250,000 

Mack Lake 1,250,000 

Marchington Lake 1,000,000 

Separation Lake 1,000.000 



36 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April Ist, 1938, to March 31st, 1939— Continued 



PICKEREL FRY— Continued 

KENORA— Continued 

Spruce Lake 1,000,000 

Wabigoon Lake 1,000,000 

Winnipeg River 1,000,000 

Lanark: 

Rennet's Lake 650,000 

Black Lake 300,000 

Christie Lake 650,000 

Dalhousie Lake 800,000 

Fournier Mud Lake 100,000 

Long Lake 150,000 

Lower Rideau 500,000 

Mississippi Lake 200,000 

Otty Lake 600,000 

Patterson's Lake 100,000 

Pike Lake 300,000 

Rivens Lake 100,000 

Widow's Lake 150,000 

Leeds : 

Bass Lake 600,000 

Crosby Lake 500,000 

Devil's Lake 150,000 

Green Lake 650,000 

Higgley Lake 250,000 

Little Rideau Lake 1,250,000 

Sand Lake 500,000 

St. Lawrence River 2,000,000 

Traynor Lake 250,000 

Lennox-Addington : 

Beaver Lake 500,000 

Cedar Lake 400,000 

Clare River 750,000 

Douglas Lake 150,000 

Long Lake 400,000 

Mazinaw Lake 800,000 

Napanee River 2,500,000 

South Beaver Lake 450.000 

White Lake 400,000 

Lincoln : 

Twelve Mile Creek 250,000 



Manitoulin: 
Falls, and Burnett Lake 



150,000 



Muskoka: 

Allen's Lake 150,000 

Axel's Lake 150,000 

Bigelow's Lake 150,000 

Brandy Lake 200,000 

Buck Lake 200,000 

Duck Lake 150,000 

Gull Lake 300,000 

Kahshe Lake 300,000 

Lake Muskoka 1,900,000 

Long Lake 150,000 

Mootes Lake 150,000 

Severn River 250,000 

Six Mile Lake 250.000 

Sparrow Lake eggs 2,012,500 



Spence Lake 150,000 

Three Mile Lake 300,000 

Nipissing: 

Bebees Lake 100,000 

Bruce Lake 100,000 

Champlain Lake . 250,000 

Finlayson Lake 200,000 

Lake Nipissing 500,000 

Lake Nosbonsing 400,000 

Lake Timagami 800,000 

Little Martin Lake 100,000 

Marten Lake 150,000 

McPhee Lake 100,000 

Talon Lake 600,000 

Tilden Lake 350,000 

Tomiko Lake 500,000 

Upper French River 500,000 

Wassi Lake 300,000 

Wickstead Lake 100,000 

Northumberland: 

MacKenzie Channel 1,250,000 

Pickerel Bay 1,250,000 

Presqu'ile Bay 100,000 

Rice Lake 1,250,000 

Trent River 6,250,000 

Ontario: 

Lake St. John 200,000 

Oxford: 

Lakeside Lake 250,000 

Lake Lisgar 200,000 

Parry Sound: 

Ahmic Lake 300,000 

Bass Lake 100,000 

Caribou Lake 200,000 

Cecebe Lake 250,000 

Clear Lake 100,000 

Commanda Lake 200.000 

Crane Lake 200,000 

Deer Lake (Ferrie) 200,000 

Deer Lake (MacKenzie) 250,000 

Doe Lake 200,000 

Duck Lake 100,000 

Footes Lake 100,000 

Isabella Lake 400.000 

Jack Lake (Armour) 100,000 

Jack's Lake (Mills) 100.000 

Key River 400.000 

Lake of Many Islands 200.000 

Lake Rosseau 850,000 

Lennon's Lake 100,000 

Little Long Lake 100,000 

Long Lake 100,000 

Loon Bay 400.000 

Magnetawan River 1,100.000 

Manitowaba Lake 200.000 

McKeown Lake 100.000 

Milton Lake 100,000 

Minerva Lake 150,000 

Neighick Lake 200,000 

Oastler Lake 500.000 

Otter Lake 700,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1938-39 



37 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1938, to March 31st, 1939— Continued 



PICKEREL FRY— Continued 

Parry Sound — Continued 

Owl Lake 200,000 

Pickerel Lake 200,000 

Pickerel River 200,000 

Pigeon Lake 100,000 

Restoule Lake 200,000 

Ruth Lake 200,000 

Shawanaga Lake 350,000 

Shebeshekong Lake 200,000 

Shoal Lake 100.000 

Squaw Lake 200,000 

Stewart's Lake 150,000 

Stormy Lake 100,000 

Whitestone Lake 200,000 

Wilson Lake 100,000 

Wolf River 200,000 

Peterborough : 

Belmont Lake 1,250,000 

Little Cedar Lake 250,000 

Little Lake 200,000 

Long Lake 1,000,000 

Loon Lake 200,000 

Otonabee River 800,000 

Rice Lake 1,000,000 

Trent River 1,000,000 

Prince Edward: 

Bay of Quinte 33,360,000 

Consecon Lake 1,250,000 

East Lake 540,000 

West Lake 750,000 

Rainy River: 

Clearwater Lake 5,000,000 

Lake of the Woods 1,000,000 

One-Sided Lake 2,500,000 

Rainy Lake 31,000,000 

Sabaskong Bay 4,000,000 

Steeprock Lake 1,000,000 

Renfrew: 

Aird's Lake 250,000 

Black Bay 350,000 

Blackfish Bay 100,000 

Constant Lake 250,000 

Cushene Lake 100,000 

Golden Lake 250,000 

Greenan Lake 200,000 

Hurd's Lake 200,000 

Joe's Lake 100,000 

Madawaska River 1,350,000 

Maskalonge Bay 200,000 

Meilleur's Bay 100,000 

Muskrat Lake 200,000 

Ottawa River 250,000 

Petawawa River 350,000 

Pike Lake 50,000 

Round Lake 100,000 

Snake Lake 100,000 

White Lake (McNab) 550,000 

White Lake (Raglan) 250,000 

York River 500.000 



Russell: 

Castor River 1.250,000 

Simcoe: 

Gloucester Pool 1,000,000 

Little Lake 150,000 

Nottawasaga River 100,000 

Severn River 375,000 

Sturgeon Bay 400,000 

Stormont: 

St. Lawrence River 1,250,000 

Sudbury: 

Agnew Lake 750.000 

Birch Lake 250.000 

Dry Pine Bay (French River) 1,000,000 

LaCloche Lake 750,000 

Lake Penache 1.000.000 

Long Lake 750,000 

Onaping Lake 500,000 

Raft Lake 250,000 

Ramsay Lake 1,000,000 

Unnamed Lake 250,000 

Wanapitei Lake 1,000,000 

Washagami Lake 1,000,000 

Thunder Bay: 

One-sided Lake 250,000 

Whitefish Lake 500,000 

Timiskaming: 

Bass Lake 250,000 

Gillies Lake 200,000 

Gowganda Lake 400,000 

Granite Lake 200,000 

Hound Chutes 200,000 

Kenogami Lake 300,000 

Lady Evelyn Lake 200,000 

Lake Timiskaming 400,000 

Long Lake 400,000 

Net Lake 200,000 

Ottese Lake 200,000 

Portage Lake 200,000 

Rib Lake 400.000 

Sesekinika Lake 200.000 

Sharpe Lake 200,000 

Wendigo Lake 400,000 

Victoria: 

Dalrymple Lake 225,000 

Little Turtle Lake 450,000 

Long Lake 250,000 

Young's Lake 200,000 

York: 

Lake Simcoe 500,000 

Great Lakes: 

North Channel 17,550.000 

Georgian Bay 1,000.000 

Lake Huron 13,500,000 

Lake Ontario 1,350,000 

BLUE PICKEREL FRY 

Lake Erie 500,000 



38 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
April 1st, 1938, to March 31st, 1939— Continued 



WATERS 



BROWN TROUT 

YEARLINGS AND ADULTS 

Brant: 

Gravel Pit Pond 

Whiteman's Creek 

Bruce: 

Crane River 

Lockerby Creek 

Park Head Creek 

Plum Creek 

Saugeen River 

Snake Creek 

Spring Creek 

Sucker Creek 

Vogt's Creek 

Elgin: 

Big Creek 

Little Otter 

Grey: 

Big Head River 

Keough Creek 

Maxwell's Creek 

Potawatami River 

Saugeen River 

Stony Creek 

Styx River 

Sydenham River 

Weatherspoon Creek 

Haldlmand: 
Rogers Creek 

Halton: 
Sixteen Mile Creek 

Hastings: 

Beaver Creek 

Squire's Creek 

Huron: 

Nine Mile River 

Wroxeter Dam-Maitland 
River 

Middlesex: 

Medway Creek 

Pond Mills 

Norfolk : 
Young's Creek 

Northumberland : 

Bowen's Pond 

Coles Pond 

Dudley's Pond 

Ontario: 
Chubtown Creek 



100 
1,000 



1,200 
500 

400 
700 
1,800 
1,500 
900 
750 
750 



1,500 
1,400 



1,200 
300 
600 
900 

6,750 
300 

2,250 

1,515 
300 



700 



500 



2,000 
1.000 



1,200 
200 



1,000 
1,000 



300 



100 

85 

100 



400 



Perth: 
Upper Avon River 1,200 

Peterborough: 

Baxter Creek 1,000 

Cavan Stream 1,000 

Deer Bay Creek 1,000 

Eel's Creek 1,000 

Jack's Creek 1,000 

Mississauga Creek 1,000 

Simcoe: 
Nottawasaga River 3,400 

Waterloo: 

Bridgeport Dam 100 

Dentinger Creek 750 

Wellington: 

Speed River 1,200 

Wilson Creek 250 

Wentworth : 

Bronte River 1,800 

York: 
Humber River 7,100 

Sales — Demonstration and pro- 
pagation purpose 2,592 



LAKE TROUT 

FRY 

Frontenac: 

Brule Lake 20,000 

Buckshot Lake 30,000 

Camp Lake 10,000 

Crow Lake 20,000 

Green Lake 10,000 

Grindstone Lake 10,000 

Kaswakamak Lake 26,000 

Loughborough Lake 35,000 

Mackie Lake 10,000 

Mississagagon Lake 30,000 

Mosquito Lake 10,000 

Sand Lake 25,000 

Schooner Lake 15,000 

Trout Lake 25,000 

Wolfe Lake 30,000 

Hastings: 

Bass Lake 10,000 

Big Salmon Lake 15,000 

Burnt Lake 5,000 

Cedar Lake 5,000 

Clear Lake 10,000 

Devil Lake 5,000 

Dickey Lake 20,000 

Eagle Lake 20,000 

Gunter Lake 10,000 

Jamieson Lake 12,500 

La Valley Lake 10,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1938-39 



39 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1938, to March 31st, 1939— Continued 



LAKE TROUT— Continued 

Hastings — Continued 

Lake of Islands 10,000 

Lake St. Peter 22,500 

Little Salmon Lake 5,000 

Long Lake (Dungannon) . . 7,500 

O'Grady Lake 7,500 

Papineau Lake 17,500 

Wadsworth Lake 10,000 

Lanark: 

Rideau Lake 40,000 

Silver Lake 15,000 

Leeds : 

Big Rideau 55,000 

Charleston Lake 45,000 

Devil Lake 25,000 

Lower Beverley Lake 7,500 

Red Horse Lake 10,000 

Lennox- Addington : 

Bark Lake 5,000 

Elbow Lake 5,000 

Finch Lake 5,000 

Little Weslemkoon Lake 20,000 

Otter Lake 15,000 

Thirty Island Lake 5,000 

Weslemkoon Lake 30,000 

White Lake 10,000 

Peterborough: 

Catchacoma Lake 10,000 

Gull Lake 10,000 

Jack's Lake 10,000 

Little Cedar Lake 10,000 

Long Lake 10,000 

Loon Lake (Chandos) 20,000 

Trout Lake (Burleigh) 10,000 

Renfrew: 

Trout Lake 10,000 

Great Lakes: 

Lake Superior 325,000 

North Channel 155,000 

Lake Huron 6,195,000 

Lake Ontario 100,000 

FINGERLINGS 

Algoma: 

Achigan Lake 5,000 

Axe Lake 5,000 

Basswood Lake 10,000 

Belle Lake 5,000 

Bull Lake 5,000 

Caribou Lake 5,000 

Chiblow Lake 10,000 

Chub Lake 5,000 

Clear Lake (Gould) 10,000 

Clear Lake (Scarfe) 5,000 

Cooper Lake 10,000 

Cummings Lake 10,000 



Dalton Lake 25,000 

Diamond Lake 4,000 

Garden Lake 5,000 

Grainery Lake 8,000 

Grey Trout Lake 10,000 

Hawk Lake 5,000 

Hobon Lake 8,000 

Howard Lake 5,000 

Island Lake (McMahon) 10,000 

Jobammeghia Lake 5,000 

Lake of the Mountains 15,000 

Lonely Lake 10,000 

Long Lake 10,000 

Long Lake (Patton) 5,000 

Martinendale Lake 10,000 

McCarroll's Lake 4,000 

Megginson Lake 10,000 

Patton Lake 10,000 

Pickerel Lake 5,000 

Rainbow Lake 10,000 

Rand Lake 5,000 

Ranger Lake 15,000 

Raw Hide Lake 5,000 

Red Deer Lake 5,000 

Rose Lake 5,000 

Sand Lake 18,000 

Tookenay Lake 25,000 

Trout Lake 5,000 

Wakomata Lake 10,000 

Wawa Lake 5,000 

Cochrane: 

Remi Lake 10,000 

Haliburton: 

Bear Lake (Guilford) 5,000 

Big Boskung Lake 10,000 

Crooked Lake 20,000 

Davis Lake 10,000 

Drag Lake 35,000 

Eagle Lake 5,000 

East Lake 5,000 

Gull Lake 20,000 

Hurricane Lake 5,000 

Kashagawigamog Lake 15,000 

Kingscote Lake 2,500 

Kushog Lake 10,000 

Little Boskung Lake 10,000 

Little Hawke Lake 10,000 

Mountain Lake 5,000 

Oblong Lake 5,000 

Redstone Lake 10,000 

St. Nora's Lake 10,000 

South Bay 5,000 

Spruce Lake 5,000 

Twelve Mile Lake 20,000 

Hastings: 

Baptiste Lake 10,000 

Kaminiskeg Lake 10,000 

Limestone Lake 2,500 

Long Lake 2,500 

Kenora: 

Big Vermilion Lake 40,000 

Blue Lake 20,000 

Cache Lake 20,000 



40 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1938, to March 31st, 1939— Continued 



LAKE TROUT— Continued 

Kenora — Continued 

Crow Lake 25,000 

Cut Stone Lake 20,000 

Dogtooth Lake 50,000 

Gibbi Lake 20,000 

Lake of the Mountain 20,000 

Lake of the Woods 360,900 

Little Vermilion Lake 40,000 

Rice Lake 10,000 

Rosamond Lake 20,000 

Round Lake 10,000 

Sturgeon Lake 20,000 

Thunder Lake 20,000 

Trout Lake 25,000 

Wlllard Lake 50,000 

Manitoulin: 

Lake Manitou 20,000 

Muskoka: 

Bella Lake 10,000 

Clear Lake (McLean) 5,000 

Clear Lake (Rldout) 5,000 

Fairy Lake 25,000 

Fox Lake 10,000 

Haley's Lake 10,000 

Heeney Lake 10.000 

Indian River 5,000 

Lake of Bays 45,000 

Lake Joseph 12,500 

Long Lake 5,000 

Loon Lake 5,000 

Mary Lake 30,000 

Muskoka Lake 55,000 

Paint Lake 5,000 

Peninsula Lake 30,000 

Rat Lake 5,000 

Rebecca Lake 10,000 

Skeleton Lake 20,000 

Spring Lake 5,000 

Trout Lake 5,000 

Vernon Lake 20,000 

Walker Lake 10,000 

Nipissing: 

Cache Lake 3,000 

Canoe Lake 3,000 

Herridge Lake 10,000 

Joe Lake 3,000 

Lake of Two Rivers 3,000 

Lake Timagami 20,000 

Lowell Lake 5,000 

McMaster Lake 13,000 

Moore's Lake 6,000 

Opeongo Lake 2,000 

Smoke Lake 3,000 

Source Lake 3,000 

South Lake (South Tea) . . . 3,000 

Talon Lake 20,000 

Trout Lake 16,000 

Parry Sound: 

Bella Lake 10,000 

Big Joseph Lake 12,500 



Big Loon Lake 5,000 

Black Lake 7,500 

Davison Lake 10,000 

Eagle Lake 15,000 

High Lake 7,500 

Horn Lake 20,000 

Horner's Lake 5,000 

Horseshoe Lake 15.000 

Lake Memesagamesi 10,000 

Lake Rosseau 20,000 

Little Lake Joseph 10,000 

Little Whitefish Lake 5.000 

Loon Bay 5,000 

Lorimer Lake 15,000 

Otter Lake 10,000 

Ruth Lake : . . . 5,000 

Salmon Lake 10,000 

Spring Lake 10,000 

Sucker Lake 15,000 

Tea Lake 10,000 

Three Legged Lake 10,000 

Whitefish Lake 10,000 

Peterborough: 

Loon Lake (Chandos) 10.000 

Sandy Lake 5,000 

Rainy River: 

Ash Bay 13,800 

Bad Vermilion 40,000 

Burnt Lake 75,000 

Crow Lake 90,000 

Eva Lake 20.000 

Kishkutena Lake 15.000 

Narrow Lake 25,000 

Pipestone Lake 75,000 

Sphene Lake 30,000 

Spring Lake 20,000 

Steeprock Lake 40,000 

Renfrew: 

Bark Lake 6,000 

Barrys Bay 2,000 

Brewster Lake 10.000 

Carson Lake 2.000 

Centre Lake 9,000 

Cross Lake 8,000 

Diamond Lake 10,000 

Lake Clear 4,000 

Long Lake 10.000 

Round Lake 5,000 

Schaven Lake 5,000 

Tea Lake 2,000 

Trout Lake 2,000 

Tusaw Lake 2,000 

Wadsworth Lake 3,000 

Slmcoe: 

Kemipenfeldt Bay 30.000 

Sudbury: 

Birch Lake 8,000 

Bull Lake 5,000 

Ella Lake 10,000 

Geneva Lake 10,000 

Lake Agnew 10,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1938-39 



41 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1938, to March 31st, 1939— Continued 



LAKE TROUT— Continued 

Sudbury — Continued 

Lake Penache 10,000 

Long Lake (Broder) 15,000 

Long Lake (Harrow) 10,000 

Nelson Lake 10,000 

Ramsay Lake 10,000 

Second Trout Lake 5,000 

Wanapitei Lake 15,000 

Windermere Lake 5,000 

Windy Lake 10,000 

Thunder Bay: 

Baril Lake 30,000 

Brown Lake 20,000 

Lake Nipigon 50,000 

Surprise Lake 20,000 

Timiskaming: 

Anima Nipissing 5,000 

Larder Lake 10,000 

Montreal River 10,000 

Nellie Lake 5,000 

Net Lake 5,000 

Perry Lake 5,000 

Pine Lake 5,000 

Rib Lake 15,000 

Trout Lake 5,000 

Twin Lakes 5,000 

Watabeag Lake 10,000 

York: 

Lake Simcoe 30,000 

Great Lakes: 

Lake Superior 3,285,000 

North Channel 150,000 

Georgian Bay 2,850,000 

Lake Huron 1,220,000 

Lake Ontario 25,000 

EYED EGGS 

Exchange 2,437,000 



RAi:VBOW TROUT 

FINGERLINGS 

Algoma : 

Batchawana River 3,000 

Chippewa River 3,350 

Clear Lake 5,000 

Garden River 3,000 

Huston Lake 5,000 

Jobammeghia Lake 500 

Keegos Lake 5.000 

Mississagi River 10,000 

Montreal River 18,000 

North Lake 5,000 

Serpent River 2,000 

Snowshoe Creek 5,000 

West Lake 5,000 

White River 10,000 



Bruce: 

Sauble River 10,000 

Dufferin: 

Nottawasaga River 17,600 

Pine River 10,000 

Grey: 

Saugeen River 20,000 

Haliburton: 

Burnt Lake 20.000 

McFadden's Lake 10,000 

North Lake 5,000 

Muskoka: 

Indian River 10,000 

Long Lake 10,000 

Norfolk: 

Black Creek 5,000 

North Creek 5,000 

Patterson's Creek 5,000 

Young's Creek 1,000 

Renfrew: 

Coldwater River 10,000 

Kempenfeldt Bay 10,000 

Lake Simcoe & Brough's 

Creek 30,000 

Sturgeon River 20,000 

Sudbury: 

Nelson River 5,000 

Onaping River 5,000 

Unnamed Lake — 

Ermatinger Tp 5,000 

Windermere Lake 5,000 

Wellington: 

Saugeen River 10,000 

York: 
number River 10,000 

Sales — Demonstration and pro- 
pagation purposes 3,150 

YEARLINGS and ADULTS 

Elgin: 
St. Thomas Reservoir 1,000 

Grey: 
Saugeen River 800 

Simcoe: 
Sturgeon River 2,600 

Sales — Demonstration and pro- 
pagation purposes 2,327 



42 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1938, to March 31st, 1939— Continued 



KAMLOOPS TROUT 

FINGERLINGS and ADULTS 

Muskoka: 
Waseosa Lake 

Nipissing: 
Lake Timagami 

Parry Sound: 

Bernard Lake 

Poole Lake 

Miscellaneous: 

Demonstration and propaga- 
tion purposes 



ATLANTIC SALMON 

YEARLINGS 



Bruce: 
Gillies Lake 



SPECKLED TROUT 

FINGERLINGS 

Algoma : 

Batchawana River 

Big Stony Lake 

Blue Lake (ID.-IC.) 

Boundary Lake 

Burns Lake (176) 

Carp River 

Chippewa River — north 

Christman Lake 

Fern Lake 

Horseshoe Lake 

Iron River 

Island Lake (Aweres) 

Island Lake (McMahon) . . . . 

Little White River 

Loon Lake (Deroche) 

McDonald Creek 

Pancake River 

Robertson Lake 

Root River 

Stony Portage 

Trout Lake (Aweres) 

Unnamed Lake (Lascelles) . 

Vixon Lake 

Wartz Lake 

Weashkog Lake 

White Bear Lake 

Durham: 
Ganaraska River 

Elgin: 
Almond Creek 



7,800 
4,000 



7,000 
7,000 



21 



4,800 



6.000 
5,000 
5,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
3,000 
1,000 
6,000 
12,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
1,000 
6,000 
6.000 
6.000 
5.000 
6,000 
1,500 
3,000 
6,000 
6.000 
1,000 



3.000 



1,000 



Haliburton : 

Bear Lake 4.000 

Fletcher Lake 4.000 

McFadden Lake 4.000 

Round Lake 4.000 

Muskoka: 

Axel's Creek 4,000 

Bella Lake 4,000 

Bradford Creek 4.000 

Clear Lake 2.000 

Fax Lake 4.000 

Long Lake 4.000 

Martin Lake 4.000 

Mary Lake 4.000 

Muskoka River 4.000 

Peninsula Lake 2,000 

Rebecca Lake 4.000 

Red Chalk Lake 2,000 

Rill Lake 4,000 

Vernon Lake tributary 

creeks 2,000 

Norfolk: 

Big Creek 3,000 

Kent Creek 3.000 

Stony Creek 3,000 

Parry Sound: 

Clear Lake (Perry) 4,000 

Sand Lake 5.000 

Renfrew: 

Westmeath Creek 614 

Simcoe: 

Black Creek 200 

Thunder Bay: 

Allen Lake 1,000 

Big MacKenzie River 5,000 

Blind Creek 5.000 

Brule Creek 2.500 

Cedar Creek 2.500 

Clegg Lake 1,000 

Coldwater River 5,000 

Deception Lake 6,000 

Elgin Lake 3,000 

Gerow Lake 2,500 

Half Moon Lake 3.000 

Kaministiquia River 10,000 

Kenney Lake 2.500 

King Lake 2,500 

Lake Hilma 1,000 

Legault Lake 2.500 

Lost Lake 3.000 

Mclntyre River 6.000 

Mileage 5— Cahill 5.000 

Mirror Lake 5.000 

Moonshine Lake 3.000 

Moose Creek 5.000 

Neebing River 6,000 

Nipigon River 18,000 

North Enders Stream 5.000 

Pearl River 5.000 

Pitch Creek 5,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1938-39 



43 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1938, to March 31st, 1939— Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT— Continued 

Thunder Bay— Continued 

Thunder Bay 1,000 

Trout Creek 5,000 

Trout Lake (Stirling) 10,000 

Upper Pass Lake 10,000 

York: 

Sales — Demonstration and pro- 
pagation purposes 6,000 



EYED EGGS 

York: 
Demonstration purposes 

YEARLINGS 



1,000 



Algoma: 

Achigan Creek 2,000 

Achigan Lake 2,400 

Agawa River 4,800 

Alva Lake 1.600 

Anjigami Creek 1,600 

Arnill Creek 1.500 

Aubinadong Lake 2,000 

Austin Lake 1,250 

Baker's Lake 1.000 

Baltimore Lake 1.000 

Bamagesic Lake 1,600 

Basswood Lake 3,200 

Batchawana River 12,000 

Birch Lake 1,000 

Blue Lake (near Thessalon) 1,600 

Boundary Lake 1,500 

Boyles Creek 3,200 

Bridgeland River 5,000 

Burns Lake 2,500 

Burnt Island Lake 1,000 

Burrough's Lake 3,200 

Caldwell Lake 800 

Camp 8 Bay 2,000 

Camp 8 Creek 3,000 

Camp Lake 1,000 

Canoe Lake 1,000 

Cedar Creek 1,000 

Chiblow Lake 1,000 

Chipman Lake 2,000 

Chippewa River North 12,000 

Chippewa River South 12,000 

Chub Lake 2,000 

Clear Lake 4,000 

Coffey Creek 2,500 

Coldwater Creek 2,000 

Copp Lake 1,000 

Crooked Lake 4,000 

Darriel Creek 1,000 

Deer Lake 3.000 

Devils Lake 2,000 

Echo Lake 1,000 

Fern Lake 1,000 

Garden Lake 4,000 

Goulais River 3,000 

Gravel Lake 5,700 

Grey Trout Lake 1,000 



Guest Lake 1.000 

Harmony Creek 2,500 

Harmony River 3,600 

Hawk Lake 1,600 

Hayden Lake 3,000 

Hearst Lake 2,500 

Hoath Lake 500 

Hobon Lake 2,400 

Horn Lake 1.000 

Horse Lake 1.250 

Horseshoe Lake 1,400 

Howard Lake 1.000 

Hubert Lake 2,400 

Island Lake (176) 3,000 

Island Lake (McMahon) 5,000 

Jackfish River 3,250 

Jarvis Lake 2,000 

Jimmie Lake 3,200 

Jobammeghia Lake 1,600 

Jones Creek 5,000 

Kashawong River 2,500 

Kelly's Lake 750 

Khora Lake 2,000 

Lafoe Creek 3,200 

Lake Maude 1,900 

Laughing Lake 2,000 

Little Island Lake 8,000 

Little Thessalon River 3,200 

Little White River 3,000 

Lonely Lake 6,800 

Long Lake (Aweres) 3,000 

Long Lake (Jarvis) 4,000 

Long Lake (Meredith) 9,800 

Loon Lake (Deroche) 1,400 

Loon Lake (Kirkwood) 1,600 

Loon Lake (24-R.13) 1,600 

Loonskin Lake 2,400 

Lower Island Lake 4,000 

Marion Lake 1,250 

McCormick's Lake 1,600 

McCrea Creek 2,500 

Mclntyre Lake 750 

McLeod's Creek 1,250 

McVeigh Creek 1,600 

Merchant Lake 1.000 

Meshagami Lake 2,800 

Michipicoten River 6,400 

Mile 58 Lake 1,600 

Mongoose Lake 2,400 

Moose Lake (Wells) 2,500 

Moose Lake (25-R.13) 2,400 

Mountain Lake (188) 800 

Mountain Lake (McMahon) 500 

Mountain Lake (1-A.U.) ... 2,000 

Mud Creek (Vankoughnet) . 7,600 

Mud Lake (l.A.) 1,000 

Newcomb's Lake 3,000 

Newt Lake 1,000 

Nixon Lake 1,000 

Obakamiga River 2,000 

Paquette Lake 2,000 

Pearl Lake 600 

Pine Lake (Aweres) 5,500 

Pine Lake (24-R-13) 4,800 

Pine or Prugh Lake (25 R.) 1,600 

Pinkney Lake 1,600 

Prospect Lake 3,200 

Rand Lake 1,600 



44 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April Ist, 1938, to March Slst, 1939— Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT— Continued 



Algoma— Continued 

Ranger Lake 

Rapid River 

Reserve Lake 

Richardson Creek 

Robertson Lake 

Root River 

Round Lake (Aweres) . . . 

Round Lake (l.A) 

Round Lake (Grassett) . . 

Sand Lake 

Sand Lake Creek 

Sand River 

Sausabic Lake 

Saymo Bay 

Saymo Lake 

Seventeen Mile Creek 

Shekak River 

Shumka Lake 

Speckled Trout Lake (176) 
Speckled Trout Lake 

(28-R.16) 

Speckled Trout Lake (1-A.) 

Snowshoe Creek 

Spruce Lake 

Station Lake 

Stokely Creek 

Stony Portage 

Sucker Lake 

Tamarack Lake 

Tawabinasay Lake 

Tea Lake 

Triple Lake 

Trout Lake (Aweres) 

Trout Lake Inlet 

Twin Lakes 

Twin Sister #1 

Two Tree River 

Upper Root River 

Walker Lake 

Wallace Lake 

Wartz Lake 

Waterman Lake 

Wawa Lake 

Whitewood Creek 

White River 

Woods Creek 

Demonstration purposes . . 

Bruce: 

Big Bay Swamp Creek 

Colpoy Creek 

Crystal Lake 

Curres Creek 

Gillies Lake 

Hoffart's Neck 

Klrkland's Creek 

Klondike Creek 

Silver Stream (Amabel) . . . 
Silver Stream (Carrick) . . 

Spring Creek 

Teeswater River 

Willow Creek 

Wilson's, or Forbes Creek . 



20,800 
4.100 
2,000 
2.500 
4,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1.500 
3.200 
2,000 
2.400 
2,400 
1,000 
1,000 
4.000 
1,250 
2,000 
1.300 
750 

800 
1.500 
2.000 
1.600 
1.000 
9.000 
2.000 
1.600 

800 
2,400 
1,000 

800 
6,000 

400 
6,000 
1.500 
2,500 
3,600 
2,500 

800 
2,400 
2.000 
2,400 
1.500 
3.000 
2,500 

150 



400 

400 

900 

900 

1,500 

1,200 

900 

750 

1,800 

1,400 

1,800 

1,800 

1,400 

900 



Cochrane: 

Crooked Creek 


800 


Dandurant Creek 


850 


Ferrier Lake 


2,200 


Hannah Lake 


800 


Junction Lake 


1.000 


Legare Creek 


1,200 


Liniment Lake 


1,200 


Shaw Creek 


1,000 


Sheration Lake 


1.000 


Spring Lake 


1.000 


Dufferin: 


Boyles Creek 


500 


Butler's Creek 


1,800 


Caledon Lake 


1,800 


Cemetery Creek 


950 


Credit River 


1,600 


Curtis Creek 


1.800 


Easson Creek 


1.000 


Nottawasaga River 


3,900 


Pine River 


3.900 


Springbrook Creek 


500 


Unnamed Stream, Mono. Tp. 


1.200 


Durham : 




Armstrongs Creek 


100 


Arnot's- Creek 


2.400 


Aude Stream 


100 


Ball's Stream 


100 


Beatty's Creek 


1.200 


Burk's Pond 


1.500 


Butter's Stream 


100 


Cain's Creek 


2,400 


Carscadden Creek 


800 


Chapman Creek 


100 


Cowan's Creek 


100 


Cowper's Creek 


800 


DeLong's Creek 


2,400 


Dyer's Stream 


1,800 


Frew's Creek 


300 


Ganaraska River 


1,000 
600 


John Mercer's Pond 


Leskard Creek 


100 


Luxton's Creek 


1,600 


Mountjoy Creek 


2 400 


iviuiurews Creek 


900 


Neal's Creek 


100 


Powell's Creek 


300 


Quantreuil's Creek 


900 


Robbin's Creek 


100 


Robinson's Creek 


100 


Roy Mercer's Creek 


800 


Rowe's Pond 


100 


Sowden's Creek 


1,200 


Sowpers Creek 


1.600 


Squirrel Creek 


1,000 


Stream above White's Pond 


900 


Thompson's Creek 


800 


Tyrone Pond 


800 


Elgin: 
Ball Creek 


1,500 
1,000 


Bassell Creek 


Beaver Creek 


1,000 


Buck Creek 


1.500 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1938-39 



45 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1938, to March 31st, 1939— Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT— Continued 



Elgin — Continued 

Campbell Creek 

Clear Creek 

Deer Creek 

Eckert Creek 

Goodwillie Creek 

Grange Hall Creek 

Howey Creek 

Leitch Creek 

Synden Creek 

Wolfe Creek 

Frontenac : 

Beaver Creek 

Black Creek 

Buckshot Creek 

Camp Lake 

Craig's Creek 

Creek entering Buckshot 

Lake 

Eagle Creek 

Grindstone Lake 

Mallory Creek 

McCausland Lake 

Quackenbush Lake 

Reid's Creek 

Round Lake 

Sand Lake 

Shibley Creek 

Trout Lake 

Grey: 

Anderson's Lake 

Bass Lake 

Beatty Saugeen 

Beaver River 

Bell's Lake 

Bett's Creek 

Bighead Creek 

Bighead River 

Black's Beach 

Black Creek 

Blind Creek 

Boyd's Lake 

Boyne River 

Camp Creek 

Caseman's Creek 

Comber's Creek 

Corlett's Creek 

Cotter's Creek 

Craig's Creek 

Creek in Bentinck Tp. . . 

Deer Creek 

Dodsworth Creek 

Duncan Lake 

Ellis Creek 

English Lake 

Ewart's Lake 

Ferguson's Creek 

Firth's Creek 

Gagnon's Creek 

Glen Creek 

Hall's Lake 

Harbottle Creek 

Highland Creek 



500 
4,300 
4,600 

500 
1,000 
1,500 

500 
1,000 

500 

500 



4,800 
1,000 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 

2,400 
1,800 
4,800 
4,800 
4,800 
2,400 
2,400 
312 
2,400 
1,000 
4.800 



1,800 

2,500 

3,600 

9,450 

3,600 

500 

1,800 

4,400 

4,500 

1,600 

950 

6,400 

1,800 

1,400 

1,200 

450 

100 

900 

300 

300 

3,600 

900 

1,000 

1,800 

3,600 

1,800 

900 

1,800 

500 

1.800 

900 

900 

500 



Hollinger Creek 900 

Howey's Stream 1,950 

Hydro Pond 7,800 

Lamont's Stream 900 

Lawrence Creek 900 

Manx Creek 1,800 

McCaslin Creek 600 

McConnell's Creek 1,200 

McCullough Creek 300 

McGowan Dam 1,600 

McGregor's Creek 900 

Mcintosh's Lake 1,950 

McMullen's Creek 500 

Mitchell's Creek 5,850 

Mitchell's Pond 500 

Moffatt's Creek 900 

Munshaw Lake 500 

Niemo Creek 1,500 

Nigger Creek 3,300 

Oxenden Creek 2,800 

Parks Lake 900 

Priddles Creek 1.950 

Rob Roy Creek 1.600 

Rocky Saugeen 2,950 

Saugeen River 8,200 

Schultz Creek 1,800 

Spey River 450 

Spring Creek (Town of Dur- 
ham) 900 

Spring Lake 1,800 

Stream at Markdale 900 

Sulphur Springs 200 

Sydenham River 29,900 

Tannery Creek 900 

Townsend's Lake 2,400 

West's Creek 1.200 

Wilcox Lake 500 

Wiley's Creek 1.800 

Williams Lake 14,750 

Unnamed Stream — Egremont 1,800 

Unnamed Stream — Glenelg . 300 

Haliburton 

Blue Lake 500 

Blue Lake River 500 

Bones Lake 500 

Burnt River 1,400 

Deer Lake 800 

Dog Lake 500 

Drag River 1,000 

Eagle Lake River 500 

East Lake 2,400 

Gull River 1,800 

Hawke River 1,000 

Hollow Lake 400 

Oblong River 1,000 

Otter Lake 400 

Pine Lake River 400 

Portage Lake 900 

Raven Lake 400 

Red Pine Lake 400 

Redstone Lake 1,400 

St. Nora's Lake 400 

White Trout Lake 400 

Halton 

Black Creek 900 

Ontario Reformatory 500 



46 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1938, to March 31st, 1939— Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT— Continued 



Hastings 

Alexander Creek 

Baptiste Lake 

Barrager's Lake 

Bartlett Creek 

Brett Lake 

Cannon's Lake 

Canoe Lake 

Cedar Creek 

Cockburn Creek 

Deer River 

Diamond Lake 

Eagle Lake 

East Lake 

Egan Creek 

Faulkner Creek 

Eraser Lake 

Geen's Creek 

Green Lake 

Horseshoe Lake 

Jardison Lake 

Lake St. Peter 

Little Lighthouse Lake 
Little Mississippi River 
Long Lake (Herschel) . 
Long Lake (Mayo) .... 

McCormick Lake 

McGare Creek 

Mirror Lake 

Mud Lake 

Mud Turtle Lake 

Noisy Creek 

Paplneau Creek 

Rawdon Creek 

Shaw Lake 

Shire Creek 

Squire's Creek 

Sylvia Lake 

Williams Lake 

Huron 

Porter's Creek 

Sharp's Creek 

Spring Creek 

St. Helen's Creek 

Kenora 

Cedar Lake 

Closs Lake 

English River , 

Little Vermilion 

Lambton 
Bear Creek 

Lanark 

Clyde's River 

' Murray's Lake 

Musquito Lake 

Paul's Creek 

Lennox -Addington 

Brown's Lake 

Burns Lake 



2,400 
4,800 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
5,700 
1,000 
4,800 
3,000 
4,800 
4,800 
2,400 

900 
4,800 
1,000 
1,000 
2,400 
4,800 

500 
2,400 
9,600 

500 
4,800 

600 

400 
3,800 
4,800 

400 

900 
1,800 
1,000 
4,800 
4,800 
1,000 
6,000 
4,800 
4,800 
2,400 



1,800 
3,600 
1,800 
1,800 



750 

750 

1,500 

5,500 



500 



4.800 
4.800 
2,400 
3.800 



4,800 
2.400 



Conner's Lake 2,400 

Copeland Lake 2,400 

Dafoe Lake 1,000 

Enterprise Creek i,000 

Fox Lake 2,400 

King Lake 2,400 

Long Lake i,000 

MacKenzie Lake i,000 

Mallory Creek 550 

Rock Lake (Abinger) 590 

Rock Lake (Ashby) 1,500 

Shiner Lake 1,000 

Smith Lake 2,000 

Thirty Island Creek 2.800 

Tonawanda Creek 1,000 

White Lake 4.8OO 

Manitoulin 

Barr's Creek 2,000 

Bluejay River 15,000 

Bonnie Doone Creek 1,000 

Hare's Creek 1,000 

Manitou River 17,581 

Mindemoya River 15,000 

Srigley Creek 3,000 

Middlesex 

Cody Creek 600 

Wye Creek 3,000 

Muskoka 

Ballantyne Creek 500 

Bella Lake 1,800 

Big East River 36,000 

Deep Lake 4,000 

Echo Lake 500 

Fairy Lake 4,000 

Eraser's Lake 1,200 

Gipsy Creek 500 

Goose Lake 900 

Grindstone Lake 500 

Helve Lake 900 

Jessops Creek 2,000 

Little East River 12,000 

Loon Lake 1,800 

Loon Lake Creek 900 

Muskoka River 7,700 

Peninsula Lake 4,000 

Round Lake 4,000 

Shoe Lake 900 

Skeleton Lake 1,200 

Vernon Lake 4,000 

Wolf Lake 500 

Nipissing 

Alexander Lake 1,000 

Antoine Creek 2,000 

Aumond Creek 3,000 

Austin Lake 1,400 

Balsam Creek 2,000 

Bay Lake 1,600 

Beaudry Lake 1,400 

Blue Sea Creek 5,000 

Boulter Tp. Lakes: Boat, 

Long and Loon 3,200 

Bug Lake 1,000 

Cauchon Lake 1,000 

Cedar Lake 1,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1938-39 



47 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1938, to March 31st, 1939— Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT— Continued 

Nipissing — Continued 

Cheney Creek 800 

Clear Lake (Antoine) 5,000 

Clear Lake (Lyell) 1,000 

Clear Lake (near Timagami) 1,200 

Crooked Lake 1,000 

Crystal Lake 2,400 

Devils Lake 1,100 

Doran's Creek 2,800 

Emerald Lake 1,400 

Four Mile Creek 3,000 

Green Lake 1,000 

Guppy Lake 1,000 

Half Mile Lake 1,000 

Iron Lake 1,000 

Jocko River 15,000 

Kioshqua Lake 3,000 

Lake Timagami 2,600 

Little Cedar Lake 1,000 

Little Jocko River 5,000 

Loon Lake 1,000 

North River 13,200 

O'Connell Lake 1,400 

Sparks Creek 5,000 

Spawning Lake 1,000 

Tomiko River 3,200 

Twenty Minute Lake 4.800 

Ukalet Lake 1,600 

Unnamed Creek, running from 

Clear to Wilfrid Lakes, 

(Kenny Tp.) 3,200 

Unnamed Stream — C.5, on 

Hurdman Creek 1,000 

Unnamed Stream 30 m. S.W. 

of Timagami 700 

White Partridge Lake 1,000 

Wolf Lake 1,400 

Norfolk 

Ball Creek 1,000 

Boston Creek 2,100 

Cattle Creek 1,800 

Ellison Creek 1,800 

Glen Creek 1,800 

Matthews Creek 2,800 

McCool Creek 400 

McMichael Creek 1,800 

Nanticoke Creek 700 

Patterson Creek 800 

Northumberland 

Baltimore Creek 4,000 

Bergmans Creek 4,000 

Black's Creek 4,000 

Burnley Creek 8,000 

Chidley's Creek 100 

Dartford Creek 2,400 

DeLong's Creek 2,000 

Dawson Creek 8,000 

Duncan's Creek 1,500 

Heffernan's Creek 2,800 

Hortop-Prentice Creek 4,000 

Little Cole Creek 4,000 

Mill Creek 200 

O'Grady's Lake 4,000 

Piper's Creek 100 



Quinn's Creek 

Robin's Creek 

Sandy Plat Creek 


2,000 

200 

2,400 


Taylor's Creek 

Valleau's Creek 

West's Creek 

Williams Pond 

Ontario 

Black Creek— north 

Black Creek— south , 

Electric Light Pond 

White's Mill Pond 

Oxford 

Sutherland's Pond 

Parry Sound 

Barrett's Creek 

Barton's Creek 


100 
1,000 
2,000 

600 

400 

400 

1,600 

500 

1,000 

1,500 
800 


Bay Lake 


1 400 


Beaver Lake 


1 750 


Bernard Lake 

Big Clam Lake 


1,500 
1 400 


Big Mink Lake 

Black Creek 


1,000 
1,500 


Boyne River 

Bradford's Creek 

Cheer Lake 

Clear Lake (Laurier) 

Clear Lake (Perry) 

Clear Lake (Wilson) .... 
Cummings Lake 


750 
750 
750 
2,200 
3,400 
750 
750 


Deer Lake 

Deer Lake Creek 

Deer River 

Eagle Lake 

East Creek 

Goose Lake 

Henry Lake 

Hughes Lake 


1,400 
1,400 

750 
2,250 

800 

500 
1,200 

800 


Hungry Lake Creek 

James Creek 

Jordon's Creek 

Little East River 

Long Lake 

Lynx Lake 

Magnetawan River 

Mink Lake 


800 
1,000 

500 
1,800 
1,500 
1,400 
11,800 
3,000 


Mud Creek 

Owl Lake 


750 
1,500 


Poole Lake 


750 


Ragged Creek 

Rat Lake 

Rock Lake 

Round Lake 

Roussel's Creek 

Sand Lake 

Sequin River 

Sharp's Pond 

Shells Lake 

Spring Lake Creek 


1,000 

2,200 

1,000 

2,800 

1,000 

2,500 

3,000 

800 

981 

750 


Stirling River 

Three Mile Creek , 

Three Mile Lake 

Welch Lake 


1.500 

500 

2,000 

1,000 


Widgen Lake 


750 


Wolf Creek 


750 



48 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1938, to March 31st, 1939— Continued 



SPECKLE!) TKOUT— Continued 

Peel 

Credit River 2,800 

Horan's Stream 1,800 

Peterborough 

Bethany Stream 1,000 

Big Ouse River 9,600 

Cavan Stream 8,600 

Eel's Creek 4,800 

Little Ouse River 4,800 

Ouse Creek, and Upper Mill 

Pond 500 

Renfrevy^ 

Bass Lake 500 

Battery Lake 1,000 

Biggs Creek 4,900 

Big Tucker Creek 3,000 

Bissett Creek 3,000 

Black Creek 2,500 

Blackfish Bay 3,000 

Black Lake 1,000 

Black Donald Creek 1,500 

Buck Lake 500 

Buriman Creek 3,000 

Cameron Lake 500 

Carson Lake 4,000 

Centers Lake 3,000 

Cochrane Creek 1,500 

Colton Lake 500 

Cotnam Creek 1,000 

Cross Lake 3,000 

Crozier Creek 3,000 

Dam Lake 1,500 

Deep Lake 2,000 

Deux Rivieres Creek 3,800 

Devils Creek 1,000 

Dora Bay Creek 2,000 

Eady's Lake 2,500 

Echo Lake 1,500 

Fountain Lake 2,000 

Gardez Pieds Lake 3,400 

Gareau Creek 2,000 

German Lake 1,500 

Godin's Creek 1,000 

Grant Creek 3,500 

Green Lake 1,500 

Green Lake Creek 3,000 

Guardapia Creek 1,500 

Gun Lake 2.500 

Harvey Creek 1.500 

Heart Lake 2.000 

Heenan's Creek 1.500 

Helmers Lake 3.000 

Hency Creek 3.300 

Hope Lake 2.000 

Indian River 12,500 

Jack's Lake 2,400 

Josie Creek 3,500 

Kawchaw's Creek 1,000 

Kelly Creek 3,600 

Little Tucker Creek 1,000 

Locksley Creek 4,400 

Long Lake 1.000 

Mackey Creek (Head) 5,500 



Mackie Creek (Clara) 500 

Morphy's Lake 500 

Nadeau Creek 2.200 

Paddy's Lake 3.000 

Petawawa Creek 224 

Red Pine Lake 1,000 

Rock Lake (Algona) 300 

Rocky Lake (Matawatchan) . 2,400 

Rocky Lake 1,000 

Round Lake 2.000 

Smith's Creek 4.400 

Smith Lake 1.000 

Spring Creek (Wilberforce) . 1.500 

Stewart Creek 3.000 

Thompson Lake 2,400 

Toohey Lake 1,500 

Turner Creek 5.400 

Twin Lakes 2.400 

Wendigo Lake 3,000 

Wylie Creek 11,400 

Simcoe 

Bear Creek 1.200 

Black Creek 2,787 

Boyne River 1.200 

Catawampus Creek 600 

Mathewson.'s Creek 2.000 

Sheldon Creek 1.820 

Sturgeon River 1.200 

Tenth Creek 450 

Willow Creek 4,913 

Sudbury 

Bertrand's Creek 4,000 

Bull Lake 1,000 

Corston Lake 2,000 

Ella Lake 5,000 

Fournier Creek 4,000 

Green Lake 2.000 

McLanders Creek 1.000 

Pumphouse Creek 15,000 

Rapid River 4,000 

Sandcherry Creek 4,000 

Sauble River 1,000 

Trout Lake 1,000 

Veuve River 3,400 

Wavy Creek 4,000 

Thunder Bay 

Allen Creek 1,500 

Allen Lake 2.000 

Anderson Creek 1.500 

Anderson Lake 2.500 

Arnold Creek 1.500 

Arrow River 2,000 

Bass Creek 4,000 

Bear Trap Lake 2.000 

Beardmore Lake 2.000 

Beaver Creek 2.000 

Big Duck Creek 4,000 

Big Duck Lake 4,000 

Big MacKenzie River 14.000 

Binabeck Lake 1.500 

Bishop Lake 2.000 

Blend River 3.000 

Blind Creek 1.000 

Boulevard Lake 3.000 

Brule Creek 7,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1938-39 



49 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1938, to March 31st, 1939— Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT— Continued 

Tliiinder Bay — Continued 

Cedar Creek 13,000 

Clegg Lake 1,500 

Cliff Lake 4,000 

Coldwater Creek 3,000 

Coldwater River 6,000 

Corbett's Creek 3,000 

Cousineau Lake 2,000 

Current River 14.000 

Deception Lake 2,500 

Elgin Lake 3,000 

Fall Lake 1,000 

Fawn Lake 2,000 

Gravel Lake 6,000 

Hidden Lake 2,000 

High Bluff Lake 1,000 

High Lake 1,000 

Howcum Lake 1,500 

Kaministiquia River 6,000 

Knobel Lake 2,500 

Lake Ada 500 

Lake Eva 2,000 

Little Lake 1,000 

Little Partridge Lake 1,000 

Little Paysplatt River 1,000 

Little Whitefish River 2,000 

Loftquist Lake 12,000 

Longworth Lake 2,000 

Loon Creek 1,500 

Loon Lake 10,000 

Lower Hunter Lake 1,500 

Lower Pass Lake 3,000 

Lower Pearl Lake 2,000 

Lynx Lake 2,000 

Mac's Lake 1,000 

McGregor Lakes 3,000 

Mclntyre River 6,000 

McVicar's Creek 5,500 

Mine Lake 2,000 

Mirror Lake 3,000 

Moose Creek 3,000 

Moose Lake 3,000 

Morgan Creek 2,000 

Mountain Lake 500 

Navilus Lake 2,000 

Neebing River 12,000 

Nichaun Lake 1,000 

Nipigon River 18,000 

Oliver Lake 6,000 

Parsons Lake 2,000 

Partridge Lake 1,000 

Pass Lake 6,000 

Pearl River 6,000 

Pickerel Lake 2.900 

Pitch Creek 7.000 

Rainbow Lake 2,000 

Ring Lake 500 

Rock Lake 5,000 

Sand Lake 2,500 

Sawmill Lakes 2,000 

Setting Duck Lake 2,500 

Silver Falls Creek 2,000 

Silver Islet and Creek 3,000 

Silver Lake 1,500 

Spectacle Lake 2.000 

Spring Lake (Conmee) 1,500 



Spring Lake (Dorion) 3 

Spring Lake (Leduc) 2 

Squaw Creek 4 

Surprise Lake 2 

Trout Lake (Gorham) 6 

Trout Lake (Stirling) 17 

Twin Lakes 2 

Twist Lake 2 

Upper Hunter's Lake 1 

Upper Morgan's Creek 2 

Upper Pass Lake 7 

Upper Pearl Lake 2 

Walker Lake 2 

Warnford Creek 2 

Warnica Lake 1 

Whitefish River 1 

Whitewood Creek 6 

Wideman Lake 2 

Wild Goose Creek 1 

Timiskaming 

Beaver Lake 

Belle Lake 1 

Charlotte Lake 1 

Crystal Lake 2 

Dellmur's Lake 2 

Driftwood Creek 1 

Emerald Lake 4 

Fairy Lake 1 

Gleason Creek 1 

Graham Creek 1 

Halfway Lake 1 

Hooker Creek 1 

Jean Baptiste Lake 1 

Lake of Bays 

Latour Creek 1 

Little Otter Lake 1 

Loon Lake 2 

Lundy Creek 1 

Moffatt Creek 1 

Munro Lake 

Pike Creek 1 

Rowley Lake 

Small Spot Creek 

South Wabi Creek 1 

Spring Creek 1 

Spring Lake 4 

Trout Lake 5 

Watabeag River 

Webb Lake 5 

Whiskey Jack Creek 

Whitney Lake 1 

Victoria 

Corbin's Creek 

Davis Lake 

Union Creek 

Waterloo 

Cedar Creek 1.500 

Elora Creek 750 

Erbsville Creek 750 

Mannheim Creek 400 

Welland 

Effingham Stream 

Sulphur Stream 



!,000 
!,500 
,000 
!,000 
.000 
',000 
,000 
,000 
,500 
,000 
'.000 
!.000 
!,000 
,000 
,500 
,500 
,000 
!,500 
.000 



700 

,000 
.,000 

.400 
5,200 

,200 
1,200 
,000 

,000 
,000 
L,200 
L,200 

,000 

850 
L,000 

.000 
5.800 
..000 
1,000 

800 
,000 

850 

800 
,000 
.000 
,200 
,000 

800 

;,ooo 

700 
,000 



200 
500 
900 



800 
400 



50 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1938, to March 31st, 1939— Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT— Conthined 

Wellington 

Bell's Creek 3,000 

Credit River 1,200 

O'Dwyer's Creek 300 

Rothsay Creek 1,000 

Saugeen River 7,200 

Speed River 1,000 

York 

Doan's Pond 600 

Sales — Demonstration & pro- 
pagation purposes 16,530 



ADULTS 

Algoma 

Island Lake (Aweres) 400 

Island Lake (McMahon) . . . 1,097 

Grey 

Bass Lake 100 

Mary Lake 100 

Thunder Bay 
Coldwater River, Spring, 
Cedar, Tontan, Cold and 
Moose Creeks 2,300 

Wellington 
Keenan's Pond 100 

York 
Sales — Demonstration & pro- 
pagation purposes 355 



WHITEFISH FRY 

Kenora 

Eagle Lake 1,000,000 

Lake of the Woods 17,307,500 

Separation Lake 1,000,000 

Sydney Lake 1,000,000 

Prince EJdward 
Bay of Quinte 42,500,000 

Rainy River 
Rainy Lake 36,700,000 

Thunder Bay 

Lake Nipigon 1,500,000 

Savant Lake 1,000,000 

York 
Lake Sinicoe 2,500,000 

Great Lakes: 

Lake Superior 9,493,000 

Lake Huron 31,650,000 

North Channel 14,250.000 

Georgian Bay 73,550,000 

Lake Ontario 40,250,000 

Lake Erie 50,000,000 



HERRING FRY 

Frontenac 

Palmerston Lake 500,000 

Snake Island, St. Lawrence 

River 1,250,000 

Wolf Lake 500,000 

Hastings 
Paudash Lake 1,000,000 

Lennox- Addington 

Otter Lake 625.000 

Weslemkoon Lake 625,000 

Prince Edward 
Bay of Quinte 3,700,000 

Great Lakes: 

Lake Erie 5,625,000 

Lake Ontario 35,900,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1938-39 



51 



APPENDIX No. 2 

DISTRIBUTION OF FISH ACCORDING TO SPECIES — 1934 TO 1938, INCLUSIVE 



Large-mouthed Black Bass 

Fry 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings & Adults 

Small-mouthed Black Bass 

Fiy 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings & Adults 



Maskinonge — Fry 
Perch— Fry 



Pickerel (Yellow) 

Eyed Eggs 
Fry 



Pickerel (Blue) 

Fry 



Brown Trout 

Fingerlings 
Yearlings 
Adults . . . . 



Lake Trout 

Eyed Eggs 

Fry 

Fingerlings 



Landlocked Salmon (Ouananiche) 
Yearlings 



Atlantic Salmon — Fry 
Yearlings 



Rainbow Trout 

Eyed Eggs 

Fi-y 

Fingerlings 
Yearlings . 



tKamloops Trout 
Yearlings 
Sc 



-Fingerlings 



Speckled Trout 

Eyed Eggs 

Fi-y 

Fingerlings 
Yearlings . 
Adults 



rhitefish— Fry 
Eyed E^gs 



[erring — Fry . 

Eyed Eggs 



Golden Shiners 



MLacellaneous 



1934 



35.250 

4.250 

197 



365.500 

35.750 

420 

909.500 

95.000.000 



5.000.000 
278,470.000 



138.000 

14,500 

689 



402.000 

1.265.000 

14.045.450 



1.000 

4.480 

312.512 

25.014 



6.257,267 

34.762 

1.652 

376.777,000 

17,512,000 

7,000 



TOTALS 796.619.198 655,747.231** 862.401,472 696.395.280 733.265,643 



1935 



130.000 
2.153 
27* 



696.000 

153.065 

3.435 



460.000 
53,031,400 



2,000,000 
229,629,000 



109.000 
9.650 
6* 



7.773.034 
14.564.000 



13.640 



134.075 
314 



85.464 
10.796 



1.645,000 

5,018,831 

35,421 

5,420 

296,482,000 



43.760.000 



500 



1936 



45,000 



780,000 

69.380 

5.202 

274,000 

46.080,000 



2.000.000 
300.759.500 



147.050 
7.290 



3.209.400 

4.165,000 

18.253.244 



133.000 
3.507 



28.600 

182.000 

1.053.050 

557.270 

6.081 

428.402.000 
112,500 

56,120,000 



1937 



135.000 

4.120 

92 



1.275.000 

141.900 

5.893 

420.700 

9.150.000 



2.000.000 
263.743.400 



1.000.000 



97,484 



3,225.000 
4.667.000 
15,782.350 



7.200 



105,240 



80,000 



384.725 

1.167.073 

16.150 

383.683.900 
4.000,000 

5.270.000 
30.000 



3.053 



1938 



57.500 
8.061 



804.000 

169.800 

7.738 

2.005.000 

59.150.000 



2.012.500 
271.567.500 



500.000 



59.592 



2.437.000 

7.665.000 

10.575.200 



4.800 



821.600 / 
6.727 



25,821 



1,000 



373.314 

2.083.538 

4.452 

323,700.500 



49.725.000 



• Exhibition fish 

♦• This total does not include a distribution of 132.646.600 fry and eyed eggs during the five months 
immediately preceding the said report. 



52 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



APPENDIX 



GAME AND FISHERIES 
Statistics of the Fishing Industry in the Public Waters of 

EQUIP 



District 


No. 
of 

Men 


Tugs 


(•RRoline 
Launches 


Sail and 
Row Boats 


Gill 


Nets 






No. 


Tons 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


Yards 


Value 


Northern Inland Waters 


693 
339 
236 
465 
413 
127 
893 
656 
348 


4 

8 

12 

17 

18 


64 
300 
212 
447 
437 


$ 11,500 

51,500 

74,700 

120,810 

141,074 


149 
108 

62 
140 
130 

45 
173 
215 

14 


$ 67,055 

44,530 

38,865 

109,561 

96,564 

12,736 

187,935 

106,770 

2,910 


262 

58 

58 

130 

40 

65 

126 

152 

117 


$ 9.633 
3.485 
4.030 
6.262 
1.685 
3,385 
5.987 
5.252 
3,973 


530.053 

784,929 

622.921 

1.239,047 

1.742.567 


$ 62.804 

91.159 

75.249 

123,404 

195.261 


i^ake Superior 


North Channel 

Georgian Bay 

Lake Huron 

I^ke St. Clair 


Lake Erie 


40 


1,080 


272,900 


1.996.313 

1.334.910 

900 


239.694 

115.858 

45 




Southern Inland Waters 


















Totals 


4,170 


99 


2.540 


$672,484 


1036 


$666,926 


1,008 


43.692 


8.251,640 


903.474 















APPENDIX 

QUANTITIES OF 



District 


Herrinff 


Whitefish 


Trout 


Pike 


Pickerel 
(Blue) 


Pickerel 
(Dore) 




lbs. 


lbs. 


ma. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 




2.384 

1,855,500 

1.723 

47.293 

186,714 

1,37*4', 499 

1,230,559 

4,245 


1,433,479 

311,718 

186.682 

1.196.159 

205.230 

150 

1.001,788 

602,337 

11,136 


271.052 
1,667,822 

626,072 
1,426.874 
1,747,281 


710,402 

8,174 

85,460 

43,077 

94 

21.537 

20.231 

104.636 

10.176 


82,594 
14,205 


1,302,169 

75.534 

53,467 

124.626 


Lake Superior 


North Channel 


Georgian Bay 




T4)k^ Huron .... , . 


2,027 

1.100 

7.157.666 

59,522 

10 


180.419 


Lake St. Clair 


47.706 


Lake Erie 


29 

275.811 

25,530 


509,495 


Lake Ontario , 


14,976 


Southern Inland Waters 


4.440 






Totals 


4,702,917 


4,947,679 


6.040.471 


1,003,787 


7,317,124 


2.S12.8S0 








.05 


.11 


.11 


.06 


.05 


.11 






Values , 


1235,145.85 


$544,244.69 


$664,451.81 


$60,277.22 


$365,856.20 


$254,411.30 





ANNUAL REPORT. 1938-39 



53 



[0.3 



DEPARTMENT, ONTARIO 

Province of Ontario, for the Year Ending December 31st, 1938. 

MENT 



Seine Nets 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip and 
Roll Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers & 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


Total 
Value 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 




J 


1 
451$ 14,710 
57 27,650 
941 39,350 
82] 72,545 
114f 74-aKn 


1 
63 $2,135 






2.400 


$490 






143 
42 

47 
57 
55 
15 
104 
38 
38 


$32,600 

16,725 

14,245 

14,850 

23,505 

6,775 

131,660 

9,510 

2,814 


113 
37 
37 
60 
31 
10 
76 
29 
6 


$12,173 

9,825 

14,180 

30,606 

7.160 

1,850 

25,075 

6,320 

496 


$213,100 




















244,874 
260.619 






















5 


900 


$ 770 


48 


720 






27,004 

13,536 

.^.fiOft 


3,595 

2,689 

241 

49 

388 
98 


4 


$ 17 


483,140 









542,288 






4,017 

8,605 

485 

2,935 


102 

618 


10,425 
295.550 


3 

10 

588 

167 




450 

1,500 

12.800 

4,514 


1 

1 

23 

39 


$ 1 






39,880 


44 12,200 

5; 410 
451 4,162 

1 


3 1 2,100 
110 1 2,550 
178 1 3,350 

1 






1.168,958 
257,493 










115 


967 


18,930 










1311 24,772|$16,812 

1 1 


1 
$1,112|$534,580 

1 


1$ 
879122.119 

1 


64 


$292 1 54,540|$7.550 

1 1 


119 


$984 


539 


1 
$252,6841399 

1 


$107,685^$3,229,282 

1 



No. 4 

FISH TAKEN 





Sturgeon 


Eels 


Perch 


Tullibee 


Catfish 


Carp 


Mixed 
Coarse 


Caviare 


Total 


Value 




lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 






111,681 
2,586 
6,553 
2,110 
3,761 
9,127 
16,480 
5.284 




19,996 
672 


245.877 

fil Q9.7 


8,367 


1,560 


1 1 1 

1 406.4101 9. A9A\ A RQR AnA\ tAK9 !IQH 7T 







603i -"^R -"^917 




4,057,268 
1 1Q4 rtnn 


326,608.41 
110.281.53 
819,067.52 
280,582.22 

37,019.09 
797.444.93 
212.472.95 

36,770.55 






6.497I 9.'?9 


36 

7,729 

2,940 

63,112 

78,294 

191,242 

122,338 


764 

44,585 

3.707 

261,041 


227.100 
107.050 
161.816 

93.^ KA9 


37 







4.512 

140.818 

29.455 

2.595.484 

169.427 

10.985 


77.670 
373.365 


87 3.081,771 
295 3,008.467 
117 AftB aan 












373.930i 1,373.'076 
144.1741 245.769 
241.706 276.053 


860 
21 


14,501.832 

3.086.044 

716,939 






42,286 
10,320 














157,582 52,606 

1 


2.977,846 


759.778 


474,058 


1.072,070 3,091,352 

1 


3,841 


34,918.941 










.40 


.07 


.05 


.06 


.08 


.05 .03 


1.0A 






1 


1 i 






1 ' 1 

$63,032,801 $3,682.42 $148,892.30 

1 


$45,586.68 


$37,924.64 


$53,603.50 


$92,740.56 $3,841.00 

1 





$2,573,640.97 



54 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 



APPENDIX No. 5 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE YIELD OF THE FISHERIES OF ONTARIO 



Kind 



1937 
Pounds 



1938 
Pounds 



Increase 
Pounds 



Decrease 
Pounds 



Herring 

Whitefish 

Trout 

Pike 

Pickerel (Blue) . 
Pickerel (Dore) . 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse 
Caviare 



4,153,582 

5,518,388 

6,098,993 

1,040,940 

9,449,521 

2,136,177 

9 3,041 

74,906 

2.050,126 

947,120 

535,692 

1,086,407 

2,905,451 

2,528 



4,702 

4,947 

6,040 

1,003 

7,317 

2,312 

157 

52 

2,977 

759 

474 

1,072 

3,091 

3 



,917 
,679 
.471 
,787 
,124 
.830 
,582 
,606 
,846 
,778 
,058 
.070 
.352 
,841 



549,335 



176,653 
64,541 

V2V,720 



185.901 
1,313 



570.709 

58,522 

37,153 

2,132,397 



22,300 

V8V,342 
61,634 
14,337 



TOTALS 36,092,872 34,913,941 



♦1,178,931 



* Net Decrease 



APPENDIX No. 6 



STATEMENT OF YIELD OF THE FISHERIES OF ONTARIO 

1938. 



Kind 



Herring 

Whitefish 

Trout 

Pike 

Pickerel (Blue) 
Pickerel (Dore) , 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse 
Caviare 

TOTALS 



Quantity 
Pounds 



4,702,917 

4,947,679 

6,040,471 

1,003,787 

7,317,124 

2,312,830 

157,582 

52,606 

2,977,846 

759.778 

474.058 

1,072.070 

3,091.352 

3,841 



34,913,941 



Price per 
Pound 



$ .05 
.11 
.11 
.06 
.05 
.11 
.40 
.07 
.05 
.06 
.08 
.05 
.03 
1.00 



Estimated 
Value 



$235 

544 

664 

60 

365 

254 

63 

3 

148 

45 

37 

53 

92 

3 



,145.85 
,244.69 
,451.81 
,227.22 
,856.20 
,411.30 
,032.80 
,682.42 
,892.30 
,586.68 
,924.64 
,603.50 
,740.56 
,841.00 



$2,573,640.97 



APPENDIX No. 7 

ESTIMATED VALUE OF FISH TAKEN FROM THE WATERS 

OF THE PROVINCE 

1919—1938 INCLUSIVE 



1919 $2,721,440.24 

1920 2,691,093.74 

1921 2,656,775.82 

1922 2,807,525.21 

1923 2,886,398.76 

1924 3,139,279.03 

1925 2,858,854.79 

1926 2,643,686.28 

1927 3,229,143.57 

1928 3,033,944.42 



1929 $3,054,282.02 

1930 2,539,904.91 

1931 2,442,703.55 

1932 2,286,573.50 

1933 2,186,083.74 

1934 2,316,965.50 

1935 2,633,512.90 

1936 2,614,748.49 

1937 2,644,163.49 

1938 2,573,640.97 



Thirty-Third Annual Report 



OF THE 



Game and Fisheries 
Department 

1939-1940 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 9, 1941 




ONTARIO 



TORONTO 

Printed and Published by T. E. Bowman, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 4 1 



TO THE HONORABLE ALBERT MATTHEWS, 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 



MAY IT PLEASE YOUR HONOUR: 



I have the honour to submit herewith for the information of Your Honour 
and the Legislative Assembly, the Thirty-Third Annual Report of the Game and 
Fisheries Department of this Province, for the year ended March 31st, 1940. 



I have the honour to be. 

Your Honour's most obedient servant, 

H. C. NIXON, 

Minister in Charge, 
Department of Game and Fisheries. 

Toronto, 1941. 



(li) 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Game and Fisheries Department of Ontario 



TO: THE HONOURABLE H. C. NIXON, 
Minister in charge. 
Department of Game and Fisheries. 

SIR: — 

I have the honour to submit to you in this and the following pages the Thirty- 
third Annual Report of the Department of Game and Fisheries, outlining the activities 
of various Departmental services and including statistical and comparative tables 
for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1940. 

INTRODUCTORY 

More than ever before the conservation of our natural resources is of para- 
mount importance, and wilful waste becomes a serious menace. 

During the period under review the grim spectre of war, whose ugly form had 
on previous occasions cast a dark shadow over us, became a reality, and the peaceful 
pursuits of our normal lives have once more been directed, in large measure, to the 
prosecution of the war. Uppermost in our minds, perhaps, is the picture of a war- 
torn world in which sorrow, suffering and anxiety predominate; yet even this 
dreary picture is brightened somewhat by the heroism and self-sacrifice of those 
who are so bravely striving to maintain and strengthen their right to live in ac- 
cordance with their national traditions. 

The sportsman knows the economic value of our wildlife heritage, and is 
familiar with the part that wealth plays in the prosecution of a war. Therefore he 
has a definite and personal responsibility to see that these resources shall not be 
dissipated through unlawful means. 

Possibly, there never was a time in the history of wildlife administration 
when the sportsmen of this Province were more deeply conscious of the necessity 
for exercising restraint, observing regulations and playing the game according to 
the best traditions, than just now. Education and organized effort have done much 
to bring about this happy state of affairs. No longer is it considered smart to 
disregard the provisions of the regulations which govern, for waste attributable 
to the display of such disregard destroys much more quickly than subsequent re- 
medial measures can restore. Conservation as it affects the individual is more than 
law observance, although the latter is of primary importance, and is therefore 
mandatory. The ethics which apply are not written on the statute books, but are a 
voluntary contribution representing personal restraint and an attitude of mind 
which reflects true sportsmanship. Conservation and sportsmanship are closely 
allied. 

It is a splendid sign to find sportsmen themselves through representative or- 
ganizations pointing out to fellow sportsmen certain laws and fundamental 
principles with regard to their sport. Law observance is so essential to good govern- 

(1) 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1941) 



ment and wise administration that the thoughtful man needs no special reminder 
of his duty in that regard. To the sportsman the laws which govern his sport are 
so necessary to its perpetuation that their observance is the best contribution the in- 
dividual can make to the protection of the resources which make such sport possible. 



We are anxious 
the country have not 
sign is still displayed 
that instead of taxing 
quite a saving during 
supplies are sufficient 
cerned there has been 
resources. 



to make it clear to our American friends that the laws of 
changed so far as tourists are concerned, that the welcome 
at our ports of entry and applies to all but enemy aliens, 
American money there is a premium on same, which means 
a prolonged stay and that despite war conditions our food 
for all requirements. Insofar as hunting and fishing are con- 
no recession in our plans for maintaining and developing our 



Ontario's facilities for hunting and fishing are unsurpassed, and the regula- 
tions which apply provide a minimum of restriction and a maximum of sporting 
possibilities. These facts are well known to the thousands of visitors who annually 
sojourn among us and require no elaboration. However, it seems necessary to 
emphasize the fact that our hospitality is still unimpaired and our forests and 
waterways have lost none of their attractiveness. In short, visitors are assured of 
the same courteous reception and treatment as heretofore, and the war angle will 
but add to the thrill of the visit. 

The tourist traffic has become one of the largest industries of the Province 
and its ramifications are such that, directly or indirectly, both urban and rural 
districts share in the revenue derived therefrom. This particular business has its 
stock-in-trade in those physical attractions and natural resources which are a part 
of our heritage, and from which we secure a great deal of material wealth. 

Insofar as the Department of Game and Fisheries is concerned the year was 
one of progressive development. Fish culture operations were further expanded 
through the addition of more hatcheries and rearing pond facilities, and more 
pheasants wore released than during the previous year. The fish and game resources 
of the Province are in better shape than they have been for a considerable period, 
and this is confirmed by the fact that departmental revenues reached the highest 
peak in our history. 



FINANCIAL 





Revenue 


Expenditure 
( Ordinary & Capital) 


Surplus 


1935-36 


$ 683,938.72 

782,217.63 

866,558.19 

914,475.24 

1,015,350.82 


$451,041.91 
474,128.95 
563,938.33 
575,437.79 
568,198.55 


$232,896.81 


1936-37 


318,088.68 


1937-38 


302,619.86 


1938-39 


339,037.45 


1939-40 


447,152.27 







The statistical table above set forth shows the total revenue and expenditure 
of the Department for the year reported on and for the four preceding fiscal 
years. It will be observed that there has been in each year a succeeding increase in 
revenue, climaxed in 19 39-40 with a revenue exceeding the one million dollar mark, 
the first in the history of the Department. Details of the various sources from 
which this revenue was derived are indicated in the statement which follows: — 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1939-40 



I 



» 



REVENUE FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING MARCH 31ST, 19 40 

ORDINARY — 

MAIN OFFICE — 

GAME — 

Licenses — 

Trapping $ 39,772.30 

Non-resident Hunting 84,590.00 

Deer 81,882.00 

Moose 2,733.50 

Gun 94,882.18 

Dog 5,550.00 

Fur Dealers 25,446.00 

Fur Farmers 9,583.50 

Tanners 100.00 

Cold Storage 168.00 

$ 344,707.48 

Royalty 116,520.40 

$ 461,227.88 

FISHERIES — 
Licenses — 

Fishing (Commercial) $ 86,858.00 

Angling 391,504.00 

$ 478,362.00 

Sales — Spawn taking 168.93 

Royalty 12,140.09 

490,671.02 

GENERAL — 

Licenses — 

Tourist Camps $ 7,445.00 

Guides 8,276.00 

$ 15,721.00 

Fines 16,521.74 

Costs Collected (Enforcement of Game Act) . . . 726.11 

Sales — Confiscated articles, etc 23,901.02 

Rent 3,738.65 

Commission retained by Province on sale of lie. 2,328.90 

Miscellaneous 243.42 

63,180.84 

EXPERIMENAL FUR FARM — 

Sales — Pelts 271.08 

Net Ordinary Revenue $1,015,350.82 

. Upon reference to the five-year revenue statement it will be observed that as 
compared with that of the previous year the revenue in 1939-40 shows an increase 
in excess of one hundred thousand dollars. The principal sources which contributed 
to this large increase were the revenues derived from fur royalties, the sale of trap- 
ping licenses and the sale of non-resident angling licenses. Increased revenue from fur 
royalties amounting to $42,455.65, and trapping licenses amounting to a sum some- 
what in excess of $13,500.00, or more than fifty per cent in excess of the sum derived 
from this source in the previous year, was to a great extent due to the fact that 
after an entire close season of several years two limited periods of open season were 
provided for the taking of beaver, during which open season there was a catch of 
33,530 of these animals upon which a royalty of $1.00 per pelt was collected by the 
Department in accordance with existing provisions of the Game and Fisheries Act, 
and greatly increased catches during the regular open seasons which prevailed in 
the case of mink and muskrat were also factors in the increased revenue from this 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1941) 



source. The sale of non-resident angling licenses resulted in the collection of the 
total sum of $391,504.00, an increase of more than $52,000.00 as compared with 
the figure from the same source in 19 38-39. 

Total expenditures for the year, including both ordinary and capital, amounted 
in all to a sum of $568,198.55, showing an operating surplus of $447,152.27 for 
the period under review. Capital expenditures totalled $10,095.43, of which amount 
$3,933.47 was spent on improvements at the Departmental bird farms located at 
Normandale and Codrington, while the balance of $6,161.96 was expended on various 
fish hatchery properties. The principal items of ordinary expenditure were $219,- 
211.11 on the maintenance of the staff of regular and seasonal officers engaged in 
the work of providing enforcement of provisions of the Game and Fisheries Act and 
additional patrols during the fish spawning periods; and the sum of $211,142.44 
for the operation of the various fish hatcheries and rearing stations maintained by 
the Department in connection with the propagation and distribution of fish by the 
Fish Culture Branch, the details of this service being enumerated further along in 
this report. Expenditures additional to the two principal items to which reference 
has just been made include $27,399.50 spent in connection with the purchase and 
distribution of game birds and animals for re-stocking purposes, $21,506.20 of this 
total being for the purchase of some 26,500 live pheasants, which were liberated 
principally in the various Townships in southwestern Ontario counties established as 
Regular Game Preserve Areas; expenses under the Wolf Bounty Act were $25,- 
058.12, actual bounty payments being in all $24,905.00; while special grants paid by 
the Department in accordance with appropriations provided by the Legislature 
amounted to $7,400.00, details of which are as follows: $2,000.00 expended under 
the supervision of Professor W. J. K. Harkness in connection with biological sur- 
veys and research work in fisheries, particularly on waters in Algonquin Provincial 
Park; $2,500.00 to the Ontario Fur Farmers' Association to assist the services of 
this organization in the development of the fur farming industry throughout the 
Province; $1,000.00 to the Ontario Federation of Anglers to be expended in con- 
nection with their educational campaign to secure more improved co-operation 
along the lines of closer observance of provisions of the Fisheries Regulations; while 
the balance of $1,900.00 was allotted to Mr. Jack Miner, Mr. Thomas N. Jones, and 
Miss Edith L. Marsh to encourage these interested naturalists in their work of bird 
protection on the sanctuaries maintained by them in the Counties of Essex, Elgin 
and Grey respectively. 



GAME 

The following table shows comparative details of the various hunting licenses, 
both resident and non-resident, which were issued during the seasons which prevail- 
ed, together with similar information for preceding years, and from which it will 
be observed that there was but little change in the numbers of such licenses which 
were disposed of during the year reported upon as compared with the numbers sold 
in the previous year: 





1936-37 


1937-38 


1938-39 


1939-40 


Resident Deer 


15,394 

262 

5,386 

542 

79,531 

848 

878 

1,129 


18,672 

283 

6,503 

580 

90,756 

1,036 

1,043 

1,634 

30 


21,762 

307 

7,719 

471 

114,580 

1,329 

569 

1,618 

49 


21,416 


Resident Deer (Camp) 


323 


Resident Deer (Farmers) 


7,722 


Resident Moose 


497 


Resident Gun 


113,992 


Non-Resident Deer 


1,492 


Non-Resident "General" 


593 


Non-Resident Small Game 

Non-Resident Bear (Spring season). 


1,567 
108 



~^S 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1939-40 



At this point I desire to draw attention to the effort now being made by the 
Department to develop the interest of non-resident hunters in the possibilities of a 
successful bear hunt in this Province during the period between April 1st and June 
15th, and, while the numbers of such licenses which have been sold for this privilege 
during the three years this has been in effect are not substantial, there are indica- 
tions that knowledge of the policy is becoming somewhat more widespread, and 
there is ever^ reason to believe that the increasing numbers of inquiries being re- 
ceived from interested hunters will eventually mean that considerably larger num- 
bers will avail themselves of the opportunity for a splendid spring outing which is 
thus provided- 

The following is a summary of conditions which apply to the various species 
of game animals and birds of the Province, compiled from reports received in the 
Department fiom the officers of the Enforcement Service: — 

DEER: — The white-tailed or Virginia deer common to this part of the Con- 
tinent continues to be quite plentiful in many sections of the Province, and the 
hunting- of this species during the regular open season which prevails provides an 
opportunity for the sportsman to partake in a most enjoyable form of recreation. 
Reports indicate that so far as the northern and northwestern portions of the Pro- 
vince are concerned, generally speaking, conditions are quite favourable. There 
are, however, certain scattered sections in which the habitat is not conducive to 
the existence of deer and in which areas the herd is not at all plentiful. By reason 
of its easy accessibility extensive hunting is carried on in the northern districts of 
the southern part of the Province, nevertheless, deer in these areas continue to be 
plentiful, and in fact are showing quite an increase in their numbers in some areas. 

In the counties included in the southwestern peninsula and in certain eastern 
counties there has been an entire close season on deer for the past several years. 
This complete protection has resulted in deer in these areas becoming quite numer- 
ous, and it is no unusual occurrence to see these animals as one travels along our 
highways. In Bruce and Grey Counties the increase has been so favourable as to 
warrant the provision of a limited open season there. 

Hunters returning from the north have reported a satisfactory deer season. 
The general opinion was the deer were quite plentiful, increasing numbers of does 
and fawns being observed. This is the natural result of the present regulations 
which provide a large measure of protection to does and their young, while in ad- 
dition to this protective measure the past few winters have been reasonably mild, 
and this has been an important factor in maintaining and developing the herd. 

With a reasonable measure of protection and the co-operation of the general 
public to that end, the deer herd is quite capable of replenishing itself and taking 
care of all reasonable demands. 

MOOSE: — The moose is the largest of the deer tribe found on the American 
continent. It is of majestic appearance, and a large spread of antlers adds to its 
value as a sporting trophy. It is to be found in the northern portions of the Pro- 
vince, though a f e^^^ specimens are frequently seen in the districts of Muskoka, 
Parry Sound, Renfrew as well as in the sections immediately adjacent to Algonquin 
Park. Nowhere in Ontario, however, can they be described as plentiful, and restric- 
tions for their protection which are in effect are necessary to ensure the perpetuation 
and rehabilitation of this species. In certain sections, such as the Districts of 
Cochrane, the northern portions of the Districts of Sudbury and Algoma, and the 
Districts of Thunder Bay, Rainy River and Kenora, they are reported to be fairly 
plentiful, but their future development will depend on many factors, particularly 
environment, for even the great northland is opening up before the ever progressive 
advance of civilization. 



6 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1941) 

CARIBOU: — The caribou is a near relative of the reindeer of northern Europe 
and is the most useful though not the most comely of its race. It has few of the 
prepossessing physical endowments of the elk and none of the grace of the deer. 
Caribou are extremely scarce in the Province and are reported only from the 
Districts of Kenora, and Thunder Bay, as well as from the northern portions of 
the Districts of Algoma, Sudbury and Cochrane. Perhaps because of the fact that 
they have been completely protected for a number of years some slight increase 
has been noted in the eastern portion of the Thunder Bay District, more particular- 
ly in the territory which comprises the Superior Game Preserve, and in the Chapleau 
Crown Game Preserve located in the Districts of Algoma and Sudbury. 

ELK: — The wapiti or North American elk is one of the largest specimens of 
the deer tribe. He is also without doubt the most beautiful and stately animal in 
all the deer family. Although of extremely large proportions his physical appear- 
ance is such as to immediately attract attention. The magnificent antlers often 
measure six feet in length and these added to a graceful and compact body give 
it a stately appearance. 

The elk which are found in Ontario at present are those which were imported 
to the Province from Western Canada, and their progeny. The original shipments 
on arrival here were placed on the following Crown Game Preserves, viz: Pem- 
broke, located in the county of Renfrew; Burwash, located in the District of Sud- 
bury; Chapleau, located in the Districts of Sudbury and Algoma; Goulais River- 
Ranger Lake, located in the District of Algoma; and Nipigon-Onaman, located in the 
District of Thunder Bay. 

There has been some improvement in practically all instances save one, — 
those liberated in the Nipigon-Onaman Crown Game Preserve. Specimens from 
the herd at Pembroke have previously been placed in Algonquin Provincial Park 
and on the Bruce Peninsula, and during the year under review others were liberated 
in the Nipissing and Peterborough Crown Game Preserves, while some animals from 
the herd at Burwash were liberated in territory adjacent thereto. It is reported 
that their numbers have increased in the Chapleau and Burwash Crown Game Pre- 
serves and also on the Bruce Peninsula, while some of these animals have been ob- 
served on Beausoleil Island in Georgian Bay. 

BEAR: — Black bear are common throughout the northern portion of the Pro- 
vince, and are found to a lesser extent in many other sections specially among which 
are the Districts of Parry Sound, Muskoka, Haliburton, Renfrew, the northern part 
of Hastings County and in the Bruce Peninsula. These animals are both hunted and 
trapped though not extensively, but there is an indication that increasing numbers 
of non-resident hunters are becoming interested in the spring hunt for which pro- 
vision has been made. Unquestionably the sportsman gets a great thrill out of bear 
hunting. 

RABBITS: — Rabbits continue to provide many opportunities for wholesome 
recreation and sport, and more particularly is this so in the southern portion of the 
Province. In these southern counties cotton-tail rabbits are available in satisfactory 
numbers although bag limits have been introduced and the sale or purchase pro- 
hibited in some of these counties. The jack-rabbit (European* Hare) is pretty well 
confined to the western counties, though this species is gradually extending its 
range to the east and north. The varying hare or snowshoe rabbit is to be found 
in most districts although it alone is the prevailing species in Northern Ontario, and 
while it is reported to be quite scarce in that area there are indications of some 
improvements from many sections there. 

Rabbit hunting is a favourite activity of Ontario sportsmen during the fall 
and winter months. The "jack" is probably the most popular of the species because 
of its size, its great speed and the fact that it is to be found in open country which 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1939-40 



makes the hunting easier. Its speed is its chief defence and it is not easily sub- 
dued. 

Hunters should note that while rabbits are quite prolific breeders there is 
just as much danger of exterminating them through needless waste as any other 
species of game. This is particularly true in the more populous areas, where hunt- 
ing is heavy and habitat restricted. Control is necessary to prevent damage to 
property, but game which provides such healthy outdoor sport at a minimum of ex- 
pense is worth conserving. 

PARTRIDGE: — The ruffed grouse, or partridge as it is more generally called, 
is a native bird and is found in varying numbers throughout the Province. In the 
more settled sections its numbers are very limited, and it is further subject to a 
cycle of scarcity and abundance which materially affects its permanent develop- 
ment. However, at the present time, the cycle appears to be on the up swing again 
and improvem^ent has been noted, particularly throughout Northern Ontario, as well 
as in the northern section of the southern part of the Province. 

The sharp-tailed grouse or prairie chicken is prevalent only in the north- 
western districts and even there this species is comparatively scarce. 

The ruffed grouse is perhaps the fastest and most elusive of our upland game 
birds. 

QUAIL: — These birds are found principally in the southwestern counties 
of Essex, Kent, Lambton and Middlesex and in the counties immediately adjacent 
to the eastern boundaries thereof, in which section they are fairly plentiful. Scat- 
tered bevies are also reported in some eastern counties, that is Stormont, Dundas 
and Glengarry. 

PHEASANT: — The English ring-necked pheasant is a non-native bird. It was 
originally introduced to Ontario about half a century ago and since then has under- 
gone a process of natural and artificial development which has served to firmly 
establish it in certain areas, — particularly in the southwestern part of the Province 
where the climate is not too rigorous. Because of the fact that climatic conditions 
are extreme over much of the Province it is unlikely that the pheasant will have 
an extended range. However, it has done so well where it has become established 
that open seasons have been the rule for a number of years. 

In recent years the Department has enlarged and intensified its operations 
in connection with the propagation and distribution of pheasants and during the 
year reported on adult pheasants and poults numbering 30,39 6 were liberated in 
areas suitable for their development. Of this number 27,373 were distributed in 
Townships established as Regulated Game Preserve Areas, and the balance, 3,023 
birds, in Counties not included in this Regulated scheme, principally Essex and Kent. 
The birds were allotted as they were available according to the area of the Town- 
ships concerned and the conditions prevailing therein. Details of the distribution 
are as follows: — 

Regulated Game Preserve Areas: County of Brant, two Townships, 801 birds; 
County of Elgin, four Townships, 1813 birds; County of Haldimand, ten Townships, 
3,824 birds; County of Halton, four Townships, 1909 birds; County of Lennox and 
Addington, one Township, 140 birds; County of Lincoln, eight Townships, 3,043 
birds; County of Middlesex, two Townships, 1270 birds; County of Norfolk, four 
Townships, 1,940 birds; County of Ontario, three Townships, 1,185 birds; County 
of Oxford, one Township, 546 birds; County of Peel, four Townships, 1,797 birds; 
County of Prince Edward, one Township, 340 birds; County of Welland, eight 
Townships, 3,173 birds; County of Wellington, one Township, 370 birds; County of 
Wentworth, six Townships, 1,871 birds; and the County of York, six Townships, 
3,351 birds. 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1941) 



General: — County of Essex, 1,970 birds, of which 1,582 were liberated on the 
mainland and 388 on Pelee Island; County of Kent, 929 birds; and the remaining 
124 birds were distributed in four other areas. 

HUNGARIAN PARTRIDGE:— These birds were also introduced to the Pro- 
vince from Europe, but have not yet become plentiful anywhere. So far as the north 
is concerned their numbers are negligible though evidence of their existence is re- 
ported from certain sections of Temiskaming, Algoma and Thunder Bay. They are 
most numerous in the very extreme southwestern counties, while reports indicate 
that they are becoming more plentiful in some of the eastern counties. 

DUCKS: — Generally speaking, this species of migratory water-fowl provides 
quite a large proportion of the sport which is available to the hunter during any 
season, and the season is a reasonably long one. Practically every section of the 
Province has its quota of ducks during the period of migration. Restrictions affecting 
the taking of ducks have recently been provided with a view of affording greater 
protection. The results have been very beneficial and reports indicate that their 
numbers have increased. Regulations for the taking of ducks are provided by the 
Federal Government under the terms of the Migratory Birds Convention Act, a 
Treaty applicable in the United States and Mexico as well as in Canada. 

Few have more than a passing acquaintance with the various species of North 
American ducks with the exception of one or two of the most common. Not 
all of these species are to be found in Ontario, but there is a wide variety, including 
the Mallard, Black duck, Gadwall or Grey duck. Pintail, Widgeon-Baldpate, Shoveller, 
Blue-winged Teal, Green-winged Teal, Wood duck, Bluebill, Lesser Scaup, Canvas- 
back, Red-head, Golden-eye-Whistler, Bufflehead, Long-tailed duck. Old Squaw, 
Black Scoter, Velvet Scoter, Ruddy duck and Eider duck, some of which are quite 
common and others not at all plentiful. Of the various species herein enumerated 
only the Wood duck is provided the protection of an entire close season. 

GEESE: — There are not many areas in Ontario in which these birds may be 
successfully hunted, and while they are observed in flight during the fall and spring 
migrations, in numerous sections the conditions which prevail during these migra- 
tions are such that during the open season which is provided, any hunting which is 
available is pretty well restricted to the James Bay shore in the far north, and to a 
few of the extreme southwestern counties. There are several different species of 
geese, of which the Canada Goose is perhaps the best known. 

WOODCOCK: — This species is extremely scarce in Northern Ontario, and is 
none too plentiful in the southern portion of the Province. Reports from Depart- 
mental officers show the most favourable locations to be certain of the counties 
along the north side of Lake Erie. 

SNIPE: — As in the case of woodcock, this species is quite scarce in Northern 
Ontario. They are reported to be somewhat plentiful in several southern counties, 
while increasing numbers are recorded in scattered areas a little farther north. 

PLOTER: — These birds continue to be quite scarce throughout the entire 
Province though some slight improvement is reported from different areas in the 
most southerly counties. 

During the year under review special Regulations were provided, details of 
which are as follows: — 

(a) An open season for deer in that portion of the County of 
Carleton lying west of the Rideau River, from November 6th 
to November 20th, both days inclusive. General deer hunting 
regulations were effective. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1939-40 



(b) An open season for deer in the Townships of Amabel, 
Albemarle, Eastnor, Lindsay and St. Edmund, in the County 
of Bruce, extending from November 13th to November 18th, 
both days inclusive. General deer hunting regulations were 
in effect during this period, except that the use of dogs was 
not permitted. 

(c) An open season for cock pheasants on Pelee Island, October 
2 7th and 28th. Limit of five birds per day. Special municipal 
hunting license $5.00. 

(d) An open season for cock pheasants in the various Township 
Regulated Game Preserve Areas, and in the various Town- 
ships in the County of Oxford, October 20th, 21st and 28th. 
Limit of three birds per day. Special municipal hunting 
license $1.00 per day. 

(e) An open season for cock pheasants, quail and Hungarian 
partridge in the Counties of Essex (excluding Pelee Island) 
and Kent, October 20th, 21st and 28th. Limit of three cock 
pheasants, four quail and two Hungarian partridge per day. 

(f) An open season for partridge throughout the Province (ex- 
cepting the Counties of Essex and Kent and the various Town- 
ship Regulated Game Preserve Areas), — October 9th to 
October 14th, both days inclusive, and November 6th to 
November 11th, both days inclusive. Limit of five birds 
per day, and not more than fifteen during the two periods 
specified. 

(g) Prohibiting the hunting or shooting of any game on Pelee 
Island during the period October 21st to October 26th, both 
days inclusive. 

(h) Prohibiting the hunting of deer during the year. 19 39 in the 
Counties of Durham, Northumberland and Prince Edward, 
and in concessions IX and X of the Township of Cambridge in 
the County of Russell. 

FUR-BEARING ANIMALS 

Conditions as they apply to fur-bearing animals throughout the Province 
are summarized in the following references from reports submitted to the Department 
by members of the Field Service Staff: — 

BEAYER: — Conditions as they affected this species of splendid fur bearer fol- 
lowing the period of complete protection which had prevailed for the past few years 
were sufficiently satisfactory to warrant the provision of two short periods of open 
season. The regulations which governed the taking of beaver during these periods 
provided: — 

(a) An open season from March 25th to April 15th, 1939, ef- 
fective in that part of Ontario north and west of the French 
and Mattawa Rivers and Lake Nipissing, (including the 
District of Manitoulin) and in the Districts of Parry Sound, 
Muskoka, and Nipissing (south of the Mattawa River) and 
the Counties of Victoria, Haliburton, Hastings, Renfrew, 
Lennox and Addington, Frontenac and Lanark. Trappers were 
authorized to take not more than ten beaver, and pelts so 
taken were to be disposed of by them not later than ten days 
after the termination of the open season. 



10 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1941) 



(b) An open season from December 1st to December 21st, 1939, 
effective in that part of Ontario north and west of the French 
and Mattawa Rivers and Lake Nipissing (including the Dis- 
trict of Manitoulin), and in the Districts of Parry Sound, 
Muskoka and Nipissing (south of the Mattawa River) and 
the Counties of Grey, Victoria, Haliburton, Hastings, Renfrew, 
Lennox and Addington, Frontenac and Lanark. Similar pro- 
vision as in (a) as to limits of catch and disposition prevailed. 

A total of 33,5 30 beaver were reported to have been taken during these 
periods, and, while this would naturally decrease the stock, sufficient numbers re- 
mained for purposes of replenishment. 

FISHER: — This animal is practically extinct in Southern Ontario, and is ex- 
tremely scarce in Northern Ontario. Very few taken in any single trapping season, 

FOX: — Reported to be quite plentiful and showing signs of increasing in all 
parts of Southern Ontario except in the lower counties in the southwestern peninsula 
where they are reported to be scarce. They are not at all plentiful in the northern 
portion of the Province, though there are scattered showings of improvement. 

LYNX: — Prevalent only in the northern section of the Province, and even 
there its numbers are extremely rare. Reports received indicate no favourable 
change anywhere. 

MARTEN: — Conditions similar to those for fisher and lynx. It is extremely 
scarce in every section of the Province and there is no improvement reported. 

MINK: — While there was a considerable increase in the number of pelts taken 
during the season, this condition cannot be construed as representing an important 
increase in the numbers of mink which exist throughout the Province. They are not 
too plentiful anywhere and while reports of increasing numbers have been received 
from some areas, there has been no general improvement and conditions were about 
normal. 

MUSKRAT: — Muskrat continues to provide a very substantial portion of the 
revenue derived by trappers. The catch as compared with that of the previous year 
showed an increase of more than 35%, possibly attributable to somewhat improved 
conditions affecting the species and the fact that favourable weather conditions 
prevailed during the trapping season, which was provided by special regulation 
and at different periods in different areas. Notwithstanding the decided increase 
in the take of muskrats this species requires continued protection to assist in its 
development. 

OTTER: — Found only in Northern Ontario and the more northerly areas of 
Southern Ontario. It is not too plentiful in any section and the annual catch is 
limited. 

RACCOON: — Inhabits only Southern Ontario, where numbers remained about 
the same with probable slight improvement in some areas. The catch during the 
open season which prevailed was about normal. 

SKUNK: — While this animal continues plentiful, prevailing market prices do 
not encourage trappers to make any special effort for the taking of the same. 

WEASEL: — This species is still very plentiful throughout the entire Pro- 
vince, though it would appear not to be increasing to any great extent. However, 
as in the case of skunk, prevailing market prices are not sufficient return to en- 
courage trappers in the taking of weasel. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1939-40 



11 



Generally speaking trappers had a fairly profitable season, particularly in 
areas where the special open season for beaver prevailed and having in mind the 
increased muskrat catch. 

The following comparative table shows the numbers of pelts of various species 
of fur-bearing animals which were exported from and dressed within the Province 
during the year under review in addition to the three years immediately preceding. 



Bear 

Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (cross) 

Fox (red) 

Fox (silver or black) 

Fox (white) 

Lynx 

Marten 

Mink 

Muskrat 

Otter 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Weasel 

Wolverine 



1936-37 



476 

238 

2,117 

4,156 

35,232 

360 

17 

2,081 

1,464 

33,930 

170,239 

3,779 

14,243 

87,950 

78,643 

2 



1937-38 



496 

235 

1,463 

2,426 

24,912 

201 

•47 

1,284 

1,709 

22,766 

343,972 

3,737 

13,194 

61,576 

79,853 

5 



1938-39 



363 

1,366 

1,467 

2,164 

22,366 

131 

142 

785 

2,074 

25,111 

508,893 

3,764 

9,493 

89,100 

93,488 

3 



1939-40 



295 

33,530 

1,382 

981 

19,925 

101 

36 

514 

1,790 

36,518 

689,706 

4,101 

14,493 

74,176 

95,832 

2 



According to information compiled in the Department from reports received 
from various fur dealers it has been estimated that fur taken by trappers during the 
season of 1939-40 was worth the total sum of $2,343,648.95, which is more than 
twice as much as the proceeds of trapping operations produced in the previous 
season. A large percentage of this increase was of course attributable to the proceeds 
received from the sale of 33,530 beaver pelts involved which pelts have been es- 
timated to be worth $581,745.50, and it may be interesting to note that practically 
all these beaver pelts were exported from the Province. 

In addition to the $2,343,648.95 derived from the sale of pelts taken by trap- 
pers, it has been estimated that the sum of $1,050,463.55 was received by fur 
farmers from the sale of their product, so that in all the entire fur production of the 
Province was worth $3,394,112.50 



FUR FARMING 

During the year this industry continued to flourish, 1920 fur farms being 
licensed, an increase of seven per cent over the premises licensed in the previous 
year. Declaration of war just prior to the pelting season created some uncertainty 
and while only a few ceased operating entirely there was a general tendency to 
reduce breeding stock, especially silver fox. 

Fur farming comprises, almost entirely, the propagation of foxes and mink. 
This year the mink gained an ascendancy over the silver fox. There were 1,000 fur 
farmers raising silver foxes in 1938 and 906 raising mink, whereas in 1939 there 
were 1,116 raising mink and only 918 raising silver fox, and while breeding stocks 
of silver foxes were reduced by twenty per cent mink increased in excess of five 



12 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1941) 



per cent, and it is interesting to speculate the increase there might have been had 
normalcy prevailed. 

The subjoined comparative table shows the total breeding stock retained on 
these licensed premises as at the first days of January in each of the four years 
enumerated :- 



1937 



1938 



1939 



1940 



Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (cross) 

Fox (red) 

Fox (silver or black) 

Fox (blue) 

Lynx 

Mink 

Muskrat 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Bear 

Marten 

Otter 



21 

20 

257 

207 

23,869 



2 

15,539 

351 

358 

5 

15 

4 





25 

16 

235 

140 

24,848 



2 

21,982 

302 

351 

9 

15 

11 





2 

19 

197 

120 

22,923 

98 

2 

30,378 

267 

284 

6 

15 

15 





4 

27 

168 

96 

18,327 

209 

2 

31,989 

235 

243 

10 

15 

19 

2 



The fur records of the Department show that licensed fur farmers during the 
year disposed of the following pelts taken from stock raised by them, viz: — 

205 cross fox, 128 of which were exported and 77 tanned. 

38,889 silver and black fox, 23,399 of which were exported and 15,490 tanned. 

73 blue fox, 61 of which were exported and 12 tanned. 

60,355 mink, 57,630 of which were exported and 2,725 tanned. 



CROWN GAME PRESERVES 

During the year four Crown Game Preserves were established in southwestern 
Ontario in accordance with the schedule appended hereto. In addition the area of the 
Peasemarsh Crown Game Preserve, located in the County of Grey, was enlarged. The 
number of these Crown Game Preserves in the Province now totals 121 covering an area 
of approximately 6,101,029 acres. 



Designation 


County 


Extent in Acres 


Roselands Crown Game Preserve 

Oakland Crown Game Preserve 

xPeasemarsh Crown Game Preserve . . 

Waterloo Crown Game Preserve 

J. W. Crow Sanctuary 


Halton 

Brant 

Grey 

Waterloo 

Norfolk 


1,200 
1,200 
1,050 
1,000 
800 



X Enlarged. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1939-40 13 



REGULATED GAME PRESERVE AREAS 

The setting aside of certain townships as Regulated Areas had a two-fold 
purpose, viz: — to ensure a larger measure of co-operation between the farmer and the 
sportsman through establishing an additional amount of control and avoiding excessive 
hunting in any one area; and the development of upland game birds, principally 
pheasants, through intensive propagation and the added degree of protection which 
pertains in these areas. Co-operation is stimulated by the fact that hunting in these 
regulated townships is restricted, and control is exercised by the simple expedient of 
requiring the hunter to provide himself with a special township license. These are 
limited in numbers so far as non-residents of the township are concerned, so that 
the general influx of outsiders to any one district is checked. 

It should be noted that these Regulated Townships have been set aside at the 
request of the municipal authorities concerned, and that they have endorsed the regu- 
lations provided as tending to eliminate the friction which previously existed. The 
Township Councils, in view of the restrictons in force, are discouraging the posting 
of private lands as the success of the scheme depends upon the generous provision of 
hunting facilities during prescribed open seasons. 

As some confusion still exists in the mind of the sportsman as to the regula- 
tions which apply, let us briefly summarize these. In the first place, these regulated 
areas are closed to hunting except as prescribed by the Department. Provision has 
therefore been made to provide an open season for pheasants and the necessary special 
licenses are issued for this purpose. Intense propagation of pheasants has been carried 
on by the Department and hundreds of birds released in each Regulated Township, in 
order to ensure the success of this open season. Hunters, however, must provide 
themselves with one of the special licenses for the township in which they desire to 
hunt, and must confine their pheasant shooting to the township for which the license 
has been purchased. 

In addition to the pheasant hunting this special township license entitles the 
holder to hunt rabbits between November 1st and February 28th in any regulated 
township within the same county as that for which he possesses a pheasant license. 

It will be obvious that such a Regulation provides a measure of control against 
overcrowding, while at the same time it offers the sportsman extensive hunting facil- 
ities within a defined area. 

Other forms of hunting in these regulated townships are at the discretion of 
the controlling organization. Groundhog shooting, for example, may be indulged in 
only with the written consent of the controlling organization which is usually the 
township council, and the possession of the groundhog license issued by the Department. 

The controlling organization in each area may also authorize the shooting of 
woodcock during the open season for same, but the hunter must be in possession of 
the regular gun license issued by the Department and the written approval of the con- 
trolling organization. 

There is only one exception to the restrictions. It provides that nothing in the 
regulations "bhall in any way apply to prohibit the hunting of wild ducks and wild 
geese on any Regulated Game Preserve Area where such hunting is carried on in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of the Migratory Birds Convention Act and Regulations 
and the Game and Fisheries Act; and except that this provision shall not apply in the 
Township of Scarborough, County of York." The Township of Scarborough is part 
of the York Sanctuary for Migratory Birds. The onus of proof that he was duck 
hunting would be on the hunter and the suitability of the area for such must be 
established. 

The restrictions in these areas do not apply to the trapping of fur-bearing 
animals, provided such is carried on in accordance with the provisions of the Game and 
Fisheries Act, and no firearms are used for the purpose. 



14 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1941) 



We hope it will be clear to the sportsman that regulations and restrictions such 
as are enumerated are the result of changed conditions which must continually be 
faced. The land is no longer virgin forest; the public domain continues to shrink; and 
private ownership has rights which must not be abused. Then, too, as the country- 
develops the population increases, and the numbers of those interested in hunting 
grows apace. This combination of circumstances does not lend itself to that freedom 
of movement in pursuit of game which has been our privilege for generations past. 
Gradually, therefore, we have experienced a tightening up in the interest of the game 
as well as the hunter. In the case of the regulated townships a compromise has been 
effected, which, if it receives the co-operation of all those most concerned, will do much 
to foster the good relations which should exist between farmer and hunter. 

Additional Townships incorporated into the scheme of Regulated Game Preserve 
areas during the year 1939, are as follows: — 

The Township of Marysburg South, in the County of Prince EMward; 

The Townships of Pickering, Whitby, and Whitby East in the County of Ontario; 

The Townships of Gwillimbury North and Vaughan in the County of York; 

The Townships of Albion and Toronto Gore in the County of Peel; 

The Townships of Esquesing and Nassagaweya in the County of Halton; 

The Township of Puslinch in the County of Wellington; 

The Townships of Middleton and Walsingham North in the County of Norfolk; 



and 



The Townships of Aldborough and Malahide in the County of Elgin. 



WOLF BOUNTIES 

The following is a comparative table of condensed wolf bounty statistics for the 
current fiscal year and the three years preceding: — 



Period 



For year ending Mar. 31, 1937 
For year ending Mar. 31, 1938 
For year ending Mar. 31, 1939 
For year ending Mar. 31, 1940 



Timber 



1,090 
1,022 
1,031 
1.107 



Brush 



1,197 
837 
723 
614 



Pups 



31 
30 
41 
22 



Total 



2,318 
1,889 
1,795 
1,743 



Bounty & 
Expenses 



$33,360.63 
27,474.24 
25,357.00 
25,058.12 



Bounty is paid under the authority of the Wolf Bounty Act, R.S.O. 1937, chapter 
355, which provides for basic rates of bounty, the same as in recent years, viz: — $15.00 
on an adult and $5.00 on pups under the age of three months. In respect to wolves 
killed in a County, bounty is paid by the County Treasurer, and forty per cent of 
such bounty is rebated to the Counties by the Provincial Treasurer. In the northern 
Districts the total bounty is paid by the Province. 

During the fiscal year under review 1,316 claims were considered, in which 
1,301 claims were paid. Fifteen claims on animals other than wolves or in cases 
where insufficient evidence was submitted were rejected. 

Bounty was collected by 1,012 persons, who received $25,925.00 of which $1,020.00 
was paid by Counties and $24,905.00 by the Province. 

Application for bounty was made on 1,753 wolves, 474 of which were killed by 
farmers, 443 by trappers, 405 by Indians, and the balance by rangers, guides, etc. It 
has been ascertained from information supplied with the various applications for 
bounty that 837 of the wolves were taken by snares, 387 by trap, 347 were shot, 84 
by methods not reported, and the balance by poison and misadventure. Of the pelts 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1939-40 



15 



submitted for bounty sixty-three per cent were timber wolves, thirty-five per cent 
brush wolves, and two per cent were pups. 

The following table sets forth in detail the sources of origin of the various 
pelts for which application for bounty was made: — 



ANALYSIS OF APPLICATIONS FOR WOLF BOUNTY 



County or District 



Algoma 

Bruce 

Cochrane 

Elgin 

Frontenac 

Grey 

Haliburton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kenora 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Lennox and Addington 

Manitoulin 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Norfolk 

Ontario 

Parry Sound 

Patricia 

Perth 

Peterboro 

Rainy River 

Renfrew 

Simcoe 

Sudbury 

Thunder Bay 

Victoria 

Wellington 

Totals 



Number 
of Timber 



143 
6 

24 
1 
3 
2 

22 
9 

272 



11 

22 

32 

111 



80 
28 

"e 

95 
20 
12 
67 
137 



1,111 



Number 
of Brush 



85 
6 
1 

*4 
3 
2 

*i 

94 
1 
2 

"l 
87 
2 
27 
4 
1 
2 



123 
1 

4 
85 
64 

3 

1 



620 



Number 
of Pups 



11 



22 



Total 
Pelts 



231 

12 

25 

1 

7 

6 

24 

9 

1 

373 

1 

2 

8 

18 

120 

34 

138 

4 

1 

82 

37 

1 

6 

218 

21 

16 

152 

201 

3 

1 



1,753 



Total expenditures which were incurred in connection with the administration of 
the Wolf Bounty Act were the sum of $25,058.12, of which as has been previously 
stated, the sum of $24,905.00 was actually paid out as bounty, and details of which 
payments are set forth in the following table: — 

Brush Wolves 38 @ $ 6.00 $ 228.00 

576 @ $15.00 8,640.00 

614 $8,868.00 

Timber Wolves 75 (g) $ 6.00 $ 450.00 

1,032 @ $15.00 15,480.00 

1,107 $15,930.00 

Pups 1 @ $ 2.00 $ 2.00 

21 @ $ 5.00 105.00 

22 .TTTTTT! $ 107.00 

TOTAL 1,743 $24,905.00 



16 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1941) 



GENERAL 

TOURIST OUTFITTERS: 

The licensing of camps in Northern Ontario, in the area provided by the Game 
and Fisheries Act was continued. The demand for accommodation encouraged some 
expansion. Sixty-five permits were issued authorizing the establishment of new camps. 
Six hundred and forty-two camps were licensed — a net increase of twelve per cent. 



District 



Licenses 



Non-Resident Resident 



Total 



Algoma . . . . 
Cochrane . . . 

Kenora 

Manitoulin . 
Nipissing . . . 
Parry Sound 
Patricia . . . . 
Rainy River 
Renfrew . . . . 
Sudbury . . . . 
Temiskaming 
Thunder Bay 

Total 



22 
3 
9 
6 

5 

3 

3 

60 



83 

5 

123 

52 

90 

107 

2 

22 

10 

59 

3 

26 

582 



92 

5 

145 

55 

99 

113 

2 

27 

10 

62 

3 

29 

642 



DEPARTMENTAL BULLETIN:— 

Conservation, as applied to wildlife, depends for its success upon public ap- 
preciation of wildlife values and an understanding of the necessity for co-operation 
with the Department in the many phases of its activities designed to ensure that these 
values will not be impaired. As a means of developing and encouraging both of these 
factors, the Department prepares and publishes a Bulletin covering all aspects of the 
conservation programme. It deals with the work of propagation and restoration and 
the many problems incidental to the protection and development of wildlife. It is 
intended to be educational as well as informative and contains life history sketches of 
the more important species of fish and game, as well as editorials emphasizing the 
value of conservation and the part the public is expected to play in supporting the 
work of the Department. It is non-technical in language and as a consequence has a 
wider public appeal. During the year it appeared at regular bi-monthly intervals with 
a circulation of over 1600 per issue which included the newspapers of the Province 
and an extensive mailing list of sportsmen and other individuals. As the material 
published in the Bulletin is frequently quoted in the press its sphere of influence 
extends beyond the limits of its mailing list. 

GAME AND FISHERIES ACT: — 

The Game and Fisheries Laws are an important part of the general programme 
of conservation. They are intended not only to regulate supply and demand, but also 
to ensure that natural reproductive periods will not be interfered with. Where closed 
seasons are in effect there is a sound biological or practical reason for same, and 
where open seasons are restricted it is because the particular species involved will not 
stand any excessive take over a lengthy period. Limits of catch and size where such 
are involved, are regulatory measures intended to control by providing for a reason- 
ably equitable distribution of the available resources. A moment's thought will con- 
vince even the most indifferent that these regulations are of primary importance In 
the interest of the sportsman himself and the administration of the resources. That 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1939-40 



17 



being so, it is essential that the public should be familiar with them, and that all 
those who hunt or fish should strictly observe the regulations. To play the game 
fairly according to the rules is the first essential to good sportsmanship. When, there- 
fore, the public is urged to observe the laws it is a request for co-operation in the 
management of a valuable trust. Non-observance of the regulations, however unim- 
portant the details may seem, is unfair to that ever-increasing family of sportsmen 
and nature lovers who conscientiously obey the laws and pursue their recreational 
pleasures from the highest standard of sportsmanship. 

There is an additional reason why the public should accept an ever-increasing" 
share of the responsibility for the protection and proper use of of our wildlife re- 
sources: we refer to their value — material and recreational. The material worth of 
this important heritage cannot be properly computed but it is not too much to suggest 
that thousands of our citizens derive their livelihood either directly or indirectly from 
this natural resource. The commercial fishing industry, the fur business, transporta- 
tion companies and tourist caterers — all these are directly interested, but in addition: 
there are the allied industries which supply food, equipment and the requirements of 
transportation and accommodation. This natural heritage is rich in material wealth, 
and, being capable of renewing itself, becomes a perpetual annuity which only our 
own shortsightedness will dissipate. 

Amendments enacted by the Legislative Assembly and which became effective 
during the year included the following provisions: — 

(a) The pelts of bears taken by licensed hunters not to be subject to the pay- 
ment of royalty when exported or tanned. 

(b) Prohibiting the use of snares for any purpose in the Counties of Dundas, 
Durham, Glengarry, Lanark and Stormont. 

(c) Applicable in the Counties of Elgin, Haldimand, Middlesex, Oxford, Waterloo, 
Lambton and Welland, a daily limit of catch of six cotton-tail rabbits and 
prohibiting the sale or purchase of these animals. 

(d) Prohibited hours for shooting to extend during the period between one-half 
hour after sunset and one-half hour before sunrise. 

• (e) Permitting the use for hunting purposes of an automatic shotgun so per- 
manently plugged as to be capable of holding not more than three shells at 
one time. 

(f) Prohibiting the possession or use of rifles during the open season for 
pheasants in areas where the said open season prevails. 

(g) To provide that shipping coupons be attached to deer and moose hides dur- 
ing transportation. 

(h) To provide for the issuing of special permits to authorize the transportation 
of the skins or pelts of fur-bearing animals by aeroplane or by any other 
manner other than by express or parcel post; and providing a penalty for 
any violation of this Section. 

(i) Authorizing non-residents to include not more than fifty wild geese lawfully 
killed by them among the game they are entitled to export in any one 
season. 

(j) Providing a penalty of not less than $10.00 and not more than $100.00 for 
each maskinonge taken contrary to the Regulations which apply. 

(k) Making it necessary to secure the approval of the Department before any 
lease may be issued subsequent to the promulgation of this Regulation 
granting exclusive fishing rights to any person in any stream or lake which 
has been stocked with fish by the Department at any time after May 1st, 1934. 



18 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1941) 



ENFORCEMENT SERVICE 

To protect the resources which make hunting and fishing possible it is neces- 
sary to maintain a large number of law enforcement officers. To curb game law 
violators is just as essential as restocking our lakes and streams, and the pity is that 
it should be necessary. The regulations are restrictive only as necessity demands, 
while the limits are generous enough to satisfy all reasonable requirements. That 
being so there appears to be little reason for violations, and yet the toll of destruction 
by illegal means is too high to lightly pass over. 

It will be obvious to the sportsman who is concerned with the future of his 
sport that waste and extravagance are unnecessary evils which tax to the limit the 
reproductive capacity of our wild life, aided by artificial propagation, to maintain a 
normal supply to meet what, after all, is an abnormal demand. In order that our fish 
and game resources may be wisely used for the benefit of the greatest number, pro- 
tective measures, and protective officers to enforce these regulations are necessary, 
but these can only function effectively when backed by the co-operation of the sports- 
man and the weight of public opinion. 

This enforcement service is provided by a staff of some ninety regular overseers, 
whose services are augmented by the co-operation of members of the Ontario Pro- 
vincial Police Force, while during the critical spring spawning period and in the fall 
hunting season the services of sixty-two seasonal employees were retained to provide 
additional patrol in the more important spawning and hunting areas. 

Appointments as Deputy Game and Fisheries Wardens were provided to more 
than nineteen hundred sportsmen who interest themselves in providing whatever 
assistance it is possible for them to render in securing effective observance of the 
various provisions of the Game and Fisheries Act and Regulations in the areas in which 
they reside and visit for recreational purposes, and the value of this co-operation 
in controlling and preventing the abuse of sporting privileges it is difficult to estimate. 

During 1939-40 there were some 1,779 cases in which offenders were appre- 
hended by the various enforcement officers and in which cases various articles of 
fishing, hunting and trapping equipment, game, fish and the pelts of lur-bearing 
animals were seized at the time of apprehension. Reference to the various reports 
of seizure submitted to the Department by the officers concerned indicates that such 
seizures were made by Game and Fisheries Overseers in 1,578 cases, by Deputy Game 
and Fisheries Wardens in 75 cases, by members of the Ontario Provincial Police force 
in 32 cases, while in the remaining 94 cases the seizures were undertaken by co- 
operative action among Overseers, Deputy Game Wardens and Provincial Police. 

Summarized the articles confiscated are as follows: — 

Live animals in 11 cases 

Birds, game animals and meat in 189 cases 

Firearms and ammunition in 651 cases 

Fish in 235 cases 

Nets and Fishing equipment in 257 cases 

Fishing tackle (angling) in 130 cases 

Pelts and Hides in 346 cases 

Traps and Trapping equipment in 179 cases 

Water Craft in 28 cases 

Motor Vehicles in 9 cases 

Lights in 26 cases 

Spears in 71 cases 

Miscellaneous articles in 60 cases 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1939-40 19 



^ 



By reason of the fact that various entries are included on some seizures there 
is some apparent discrepancy in these figures when compared with the actual number 
of seizures reported. This is explained when it is understood that reports in many 
cases include traps and pelts, firearms and game, fishing tackle and fish, commercial 
fishing nets and boats, furs and motor vehicles, traps and pelts, and lights, spears 
and fish. 

Included among the furs which were seized were 325 beaver, 29 fox, 97 mink, 
1,067 muskrats, 11 otter, 53 raccoon, 80 weasel and smaller lots of skunk, fisher, 
marten and bear, while some 82 deer hides were also seized. 

The firearms seized included 103 heavy calibre rifles, 286 .22 calibre rifles, 115 
single barrel shotguns, 118 double barrel shotguns, 44 repeating shotguns, 2 automatic 
shotguns, 3 revolvers and 15 air guns. 

Prosecution was undertaken in 1,387 cases, the actions being instituted by Game 
and Fisheries Overseers in 1,315 cases, by Provincial Police in 56 cases, by Deputy 
Game Wardens in 13 cases and by co-operative action in 3 cases. In 1,303 of these 
actions convictions were registered, 6 9 charges were dismissed, and in 15 cases the 
charges were withdrawn. 

THE FISH CULTURE BRANCH 

Fish art of absorbing interest to many people. The small boy takes as much 
pride in his string of perch or catfish as the man in his trout or black bass. Even 
th^ angler who has patiently endeavoured to land a fish and returns home empty- 
handed, carries with him the memory of pleasant and beautiful surroundings. Peace- 
ful hours spent in hopeful vigilance are a wonderful mental incentive and the 
imagination is given valuable exercise. 

The hardy fisherman who wrestles a livelihood from the vast waters of the 
Great Lakes and other commercially fished waters is chiefly concerned with the size 
and maintenance of the catch, amount and condition of gear, market value of fish, 
price of ice, salt, gasoline, and the state of the weather. 

Among others interested in Ontario's fish and fisheries are the retailer, consumer 
and government agencies. 

Our Department has been careful to see that the fish are properly conserved 
and, by means of protective and propagatory measures, the supply has been main- 
tained at a high level. 



HATCHERIES AND REARING STATIONS 

Facilities were provided during the fiscal year 1939-40 for the hatching, rearing 
and distribution of fish in a satisfactory and effective manner. 

During the year the Department operated twenty-seven hatcheries and rearing 
stations. 

The new trout rearing station at Hill's Lake, vicinity of Charlton, Timiskaming 
district, was operated for the first time. This station includes a modern fish hatchery 
of adequate dimensions, consistent with an adequate and suitable water supply. The 
hatchery proper can accommodate three million trout eggs in a satisfactory manner. 
Fifteen raceways and four ponds are provided for rearing large numbers of trout to 
the fingerling and yearling stages. In addition to these a pond is provided for parent 
trout in order to maintain a satisfactory egg supply, thus making the hatchery self- 
sustaining. 



20 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1941) 



Temporary and subsidiary ponds were constructed in the vicinity of Brighton, 
Northumberland county, to accommodate surplus trout during the fry and fingerling 
stages. 

The Belleville fish hatchery was dismantled since the operations conducted 
there can be carried out more economically and effectively at the Glenora fish hatchery, 
by making use of the Belleville equipment. 

The construction of ponds for bass propagation is of very great value by sup- 
plementing the work of nature in maintaining this very desirable game fish. Three 
additional ponds were used for bass propagation at the Sandfield station, Manitoulin 
Island, five at the Skeleton Lake station, Ullswater, Muskoka district, and one in the 
vicinity of Havelock, Peterborough county. Nine of these ponds were used for wintering 
trout fingerlings for distribution as yearlings the following spring. 

A hatchery and pond located at the outlet of Deer Lake, vicinity of Havelock, 
Peterborough county, were successfully used for the first time for the propagation of 
maskinonge, in conjunction with a minnow forage pond. In addition to this, a suitable 
area comprising approximately ten acres was set aside on Stoijy Lake, Peterborough 
county, for the purpose of studying in an experimental way the conditions required 
for the successful production of maskinonge in natural areas. 

THE CULTURE AND DISTRIBUTION OF FISH 

Generally speaking, excellent progress was made in the culture and distribution 
of the various species of fish handled. In this regard particular mention is made 
of speckled trout, brown trout, small-mouthed black bass, maskinonge and yellow 
pickerel, since the year's distribution of these species surpassed all previous records. 
For the first time in the history of the Department, maskinonge were reared to sizeable 
fingerlings by the pond method. 

Speckled Trout: 

The following statistics indicate the success being achieved and the progress 
made in regard to the culture and distribution of yearling and older stages of this 
important native fish. 

1936 563,351 

1937 1,183,223 

1938 2,087,990 

1939 2,982,874 

In 1939, three hundred and thirty-seven thousand fingerlings were also dis- 
tributed^ The distribution of fingerlings is undertaken if the number on hand cannot 
1)6 accommodated in the hatcheries. 

Brown Trout: 

During the year, 375,070 yearlings and 29,954 fingerlings were planted in suit- 
able streams in southern Ontario. The number of yearlings planted was more than 
six times that of the previous year. A comparatively small number of fingerlings 
were also planted. The result of the distribution of brown trout on the fishing in 
streams of southern Ontario is most encouraging. 

EaJnbow Trout: 

(a) Steelhead trout 

Good progress was made in regard to the rearing of rainbow trout yearlings; 
an increased production of 244 per cent was obtained as compared with that of the 
previous year. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1939-40 21 



(b) Kamloops trout 

An increased distribution of fingerlings of this valuable game fish, amounting 
to 306.6 per cent, was obtained. The plan suggested in the previous annual report 
of the Department, namely, to plant yearlings of this variety is being developed 
satisfactorily and may be realized next year. 

Lake Trout: 

There was a decrease of 10 per cent in the distribution of the sum total of eyed 
eggs and fry; and a decrease of 5.8 per cent in the distribution of fingerlings. 

Rough and stormy weather on the Great Lakes in the fall of 1938 was respon- 
sible to a great extent for this reduction. The Department relies entirely on the 
collection of lake trout spawn by the commercial fishermen, assisted by the Depart- 
ment's hatchery officers and spawntaking crews. 

Whitefish : 

There was an increase of approximately 0.9 per cent in the distribution of 
whitefish fry as compared with that of the previous year. 

Herring: 

The distribution of herring fry was reduced by 22.5 per cent. Fluctuations in the 
number of herring fry available from year to year may be correlated with the size of 
the run and weather conditions. 

Yellow Pickerel: 

There was an increased distribution of fry amounting to approximately 20.6 per 
cent over that of the previous year. 

Following the usual practice approximately two million eyed eggs were handled 
by the Sparrow lake hatchery, the fry being distributed in suitable places in Sparrow 
lake. 

Eyed pickerel eggs were exchanged with the State of Pennsylvania for eyed 
brown trout eggs. 

Small-mouthed Black Bass: 

Exceptionally good progress was made in the culture of small-mouthed black 
bass. The percentage increases of fry and fingerlings were 72.4 and 33.3 per cent, 
respectively. 

As a rtsult of bass harvesting operations, approximately the same number of 
yearlings and adults were distributed as in the previous year. The harvesting operations 
were carried out on Fox Lake, Kenora district; Bass lake. Rainy River district; and 
Little Gull Lake, Haliburton county. 

A number of large-mouthed black bass fingerlings were harvested from Wiltse 
Creek, Leeds county, and Stony lake, Peterborough county. 

Yellow Perch: 

The distribution of perch fry showed an increase of 22.3 per cent over that 
of the previous year, due to a good run of this desirable commercial species in the 
vicinity of their natural spawning grounds at the west end of Lake Erie. 

The perch eggs were collected in the vicinity of Kingsville under supervision 
of our hatchery officers, and cultured to the fry stage in the Kingsville hatchery. In 
view of the commercial value of the perch, this work is of considerable importance. 



22 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1941) 



Maskinonge: 

The distribution of maskinonge fry was approximately 33.4 per cent greater than 
that of the previous year. This was due to the successful operation of the new hatchery 
located at the outlet of Deer Lake, vicinity of Havelock, Peterborough county. 

For the first time in the history of the Department, maskinonge fingerlings 
(three to eight inches in length) were reared by the pond method. Although the num- 
ber reared, namely 1,300, appears small, it should be remembered that this was an 
initial trial, and gives promise of greater success in the future. 

Our previous experiments revealed that there were two important factors which 
should not be overlooked in the culture of maskinonge, namely: 

(1) Providing a suitable and abundant food supply 

(2) Preventing cannibalism, which invariably occurs in the absence of pro- 
tection or lack of proper food staples. 

A culture of Daphnia was introduced and the pond was fertilized with suitable 
quantities of sheep manure and superphosphate throughout the season. A typical 
maskinonge environment was simulated as closely as possible by planting aquatic 
and semi-aquatic vegetation. Special efforts were made to provide as much leafy 
vegetation as possible in order to protect the young maskinonge from each other and 
from other predators. 

A small pond adjacent to the maskinonge pond was used for the culture of the 
blackhead minnow. The progeny of this important forage fish was used as food for 
the growing maskinonge throughout the season. It was found necessary to supplement 
the food requirements with minnows harvested from natural waters. 

In addition to this experiment, an effort was made to determine the possibilities 
of rearing maskinonge to fingerling sizes in a natural area. Dr. Paul F. Elson of the 
Department of Biology, University of Toronto, undertook this particular phase of the 
field work under the supervision of the Department. The area selected was a marshy 
bay about ten acres in extent, located on Stony Lake in the vicinity of Burleigh Falls, 
Peterborough county. The area was closed off from adjacent waters by barriers across 
the two ends, which were respectively 50 feet and 150 feet wide. Screens 
were placed in the barriers to allow circulation of water. The area is a natural 
spawning ground for maskinonge and, hence, should be suitable for raising these 
fish. The water throughout the area is from three to five feet deep; the bottom is 
deep muck, permitting a rich growth of weeds. When the area was closed off, coarse 
fish and other predators were netted out, sometime before and after the maskinonge 
fry were planted. Altogether 17,883 coarse fish and 563 turtles were removed from the 
area. Less than one-third of the coarse fish, and slightly over one-half of the turtles, 
were removed previous to the planting of the maskinonge fry. On June 4th, 100,000 
maskinonge fry, about three weeks old, and approximately five-eighths of an inch 
long, were planted throughout the area in locations where natural food was most 
abundant. At this time they were feeding on small aquatic animals, including water 
fleas. These Crustacea were present in vast swarms near patches of cat-tail and 
marsh grass. About mid-June the maskingonge commenced to feed on minnow fry, 
which were abundant. Growth of the young maskinonge under natural conditions is 
amazing, as is indicated by the following table: 

Date June 6 July 5 Aug. 1 Sept. 1 Oct. 1 Nov. 1 

Length of fish 

in inches %" 3"-5" 4"-7" 6"-8" 7"-9" 8"-lli^" 

Seventeen fish taken in November averaged between 9i^ to 10 inches in length. 
The results of the first season's work may be summed up as follows: 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1939-40 



23 



1. The rate of growth is very rapid during the first six months, the fish 
reaching a length of approximately ten inches by that time. 

2. A study of the food of the growing maskinonge showed that the areas fur- 
nished abundant food for the very young and more advanced stages. 

3. The young maskinonge remain in the area until the first of November which 
indicates the advisability of planting hatchery raised fish in such areas. 

4. Large numbers of undesirable predators occur in such areas. 

5. Eighty-one advanced fingerlings were recovered, that is, a yield of 0.8 
advanced fingerlings for each 1,000 fry planted. It is believed that a con- 
siderable number of fingerlings were not recovered. Many predator fish, 
namely, perch and rock bass remained in the area throughout much of the 
experiment and these would undoubtedly cut down the yield. 

6. It is safe to say that while the results obtained the first year of the experi- 
ment were promising, much better results might be expected. 

7. There is evidence to show that there is a migration of fish from such areas 
in the fall and that sometime during the first year the maskinonge move 
out, and that these movements might be used to advantage for harvesting 
purposes. 



CLOSED WATERS 

One of the most promising methods of conserving the breeding stock of black 
bass and maskinonge is to set aside portions of natural water areas. In these areas 
the fish thrive without interference and spread to other parts of the same stream 
or lake. In this way a permanent breeding stock is set up and we take each year only 
the natural increase from it. 

Closures of all such areas (with one exception) in the Kawartha watershed 
were extended for a further period, and the same principle is being extended to im- 
portant sections of the Rideau watershed. 

In addition to the waters already closed for the natural protection and pro- 
pagation of fish, the following were closed during the year, April 1, 1939, to March 31, 
1940: 

BLACK RIVER, 

Townships of Charlottenburg, County of Glengarry, Annual Closure, May 15 to 
June 20, inclusive. 

CRAFT'S CREEK, 

Townships of Mountjoy, Jessop and Murphy, District of Cochrane. 

DEEP BAY, 

Township of Matchedash, County of Simcoe. 

EMERALD LAKE, 

Township of Parkman, District of Nipissing. 

FINNIE'S CREEK, 

Townships of Charlottenburg and Lancaster, County of Glengarry, Annual 
closure. May 15 to June 20, inclusive. 

LITTLE JOCKO RIVER, 

West from Timiskaming Road, known as Morrow's Dam, east to the outlet in 
the big Jocko River, District of Timiskaming. 

NASH'S CREEK or HOASIE'S CREEK 

Township of Williamsburg, County of Dundas, during the closed season for 
black bass. 



24 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1941) 



OPINICON LAKE (Portion locally known as Drowned Land), 
Township of Crosby South, County of Leeds. 

OSBORNE, RAINBOW and HILL LAKES, 

Township of Bridgland, District of Algoma. 

PUMPHOUSE CREEK, 

Townships of Cartier and Hart, District of Sudbury. 

SUTHERLAND'S CREEK, 

Township of Lancaster, County of Glengarry, 
Annual closure. May 15 to June 20, inclusive. 

WOODCOCK LAKE, 

West of Restoule Lake in the Township of Patterson, District of Parry Sound. 

BIOLOGICAL SURVEYS 

Biological surveys were conducted in Timiskamin^ district on Bear, Beaverhouse, 
Butler, Crystal, Dorothy, Joyce, Lawgraves, Mousseau and Sinkhole lakes, tributaries 
and headwaters of Boston creek, tributary of Crooked creek; in Coclirane district on 
Bobs, Elexo, Fahy, Graves, Horseshoe, Jean, Mary and Tom lakes, Jacob's creek; and 
in Peel county on Caledon lakes, Caledon township. 

The lagoons of Toronto Islands were studied to determine their suitability for 
large-mouthed black bass. 

Catfish creek in the vicinity of Aylmer was studied from the standpoint of the 
effects of effluents from gas wells on fish life. 

A study was made of the effect of a dam at the outlet of Buck Lake, Bedford 
township, Frontenac county, on the fish and aquatic life in the lake. 

The Ontario Fisheries Research Laboratory of the Department of Biology, Uni- 
versity of Toronto, continued field and laboratory studies of lakes and streams in 
Algonquin Park during 1939-40. An account of this important work was embodied 
in the report of the previous year. 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

It is but fitting that acknowledgment be made of the splendid co-operation and 
assistance received from the many Fish and Game Protective Associations throughout 
the Province as well as from the Northern Ontario Tourist Trade Association, and the 
members of both groups. The result of this organized effort among those directly in- 
terested in our fish and game resources is refiected in the general attitude of sports- 
men towards the protection of this division of our Provincial natural resources. 
Never before has the public generally been more conservation minded, and the part 
played by these Associations in bringing about this happy state of affairs is greatly 
appreciated. 

Members of the inside staff as well as the field service of the Department have 
as a general rule performed their duties conscientiously, and in their dealings with the 
public have been courteous and helpful, having in mind the various interests and 
activities of the Department. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 
I am, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

Toronto, D. J. TAYLOR, 

March 31st, 1941. Deputy Minister of Game and Fisheries 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1939-40 



25 



APPENDIX No. 1 

SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
APRIL 1st, 1939, to MARCH 31st, 1940. 



LARGE-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

FINGERLINGS 
Halton: 

Twelve Mile Creek 1,200 

Peterborough : 

Upper Stony Lake 690 

ADULTS 
Peterborough: 

Stony Lake 497 



SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

FRY 
Bruce: 

Chesley Lake 10,000 

Saugeen River 10,000 

Carleton: 

Ottawa River 15,000 

Frontenac: 

Crow Lake 5,000 

Loughborough Lake 5,000 

Sydenham Lake 5,000 

Hastings : 

Baptiste Lake 10,000 

Bass Lake 10,000 

Big Salmon Lake 5,000 

Burnt Lake 5,000 

Crow River 5,000 

Gull Lake 5,000 

Gunter Lake 5,000 

Jordon Lake 5,000 

Moira Lake 10,000 

Moira River 10,000 

Oak Lake 10,000 

Otter Lake. 10,000 

Parks Creek 5,000 

Pine Lake 5,000 

Spring Lake 5,000 

Stoco Lake 5,000 

Tongamong Lake 5,000 

Trent River 10,000 

Trout Lake 5,000 

Wadsworth Lake 5,000 

Woods Lake 5,000 

Huron: 

Lake Lakelet 10,000 

Lambton: 

Sydenham River 20,000 

Lanark : 

Long Lake 5,000 

Mississippi Lake 10,000 

Mississippi River 5,000 

Pike Lake 5,000 



Lennox-Addington : 

Beaver Lake (South) 5,000 

Cedar Lake 5,000 

Donohue Lake 5,000 

Duck Lake 5,000 

Lime Lake 5,000 

Loon Lake 5,000 

Salmon River 5,000 

Shircliff Lake 5,000 

Weslemkoon Lake 5,000 

White Lake 5,000 

Muskoka: 

MacKay Lake 5,000 

Prospect Lake 5,000 

Norfolk: 

Little Lake 10,000 

Northumberland : 

Silver Lake 20,000 

Trent River 60,000 

Ontario: 

Lake St. John 20,000 

Parry Sound: 

Bass Lake 5,000 

Blackstone Lake 5,000 

Clear Lake 5,000 

Crane Lake 5,000 

Hamers Lake 5,000 

Horseshoe Lake 5,000 

Isabella Lake 5,000 

Lake Joseph 5,000 

Lake Rosseau 5,000 

Lynch Lake 5,000 

Massie Lake 5,000 

Portage Lake 5,000 

Rainey Lake 5,000 

Rankins Lake 5,000 

Ruth Lake 5,000 

Silver Lake 5,000 

Sucker Lake 5,000 

Trout Lake 5,000 

Turtle Lake 5,000 

Wolf Lake 5,000 

Peterborough: 

Barney's Lake 5,000 

Big Beaver Lake 5,000 

Big Cedar Lake 5,000 

Buckhorn Lake 15,000 

Catchacoma Lake 5,000 

Chemong Lake 10,000 

Clear Lake 10,000 

Connelly Lake 5,000 

Cox Lake 5,000 

Crab Lake 5,000 

Crystal Lake 10,000 

Deer Bay 10,000 

Deer Lake 5,000 



26 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1941) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940. 



SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

— Continued 

Peterborough — Continued 

Eel's Lake 15,000 

Indian River 5,000 

Jack's Lake 15,000 

Kashnabog Lake 10,000 

Katchawanooka Lake 5,000 

Little Lake 10,000 

Little Cedar Lake 5,000 

Little Mud Lake 5,000 

Little Trout Lake 10,000 

Long Lake 5,000 

Loon Lake 10,000 

Lovesick Lake 10,000 

Mississauga Lake 5,000 

Mississauga River 5,000 

Oak Lake 10,000 

Otonabee River 5,000 

Pencil Lake 5,000 

Pigeon Lake 10,000 

Salmon Lake 20,000 

Sandy Lake 5,000 

Stony Lake 5,000 

Trent River 5,000 

Trout Lake 5,000 

Twin Lakes 5,000 

White Lake 10,000 

Prince Edward: 

Black Lake 10,000 

Roblins Lake 5,000 

West Lake 10,000 

Renfrew: 

Barry's Bay 10,000 

Calabogie Lake 10,000 

Constant Lake 5,000 

Hurd's Lake 10,000 

Jack's Chutes 15,000 

Madawaska River 

(Hydes' Bay) 10,000 

Mink Lake 10,000 

Simcoe: 

Black Lake 10,000 

Deep Bay Sanctuary 20,000 

Gloucester Pool 20,000 

Kempenfeldt Bay 20,000 

Little Lake 20,000 

Six Mile Lake 20,000 

Sudbury: 

Ella Lake 6,000 

Fairbanks Lake 5,000 

Johnny Lake 5,000 

Lake Agnew 7,500 

Lake Penage 10,000 

Whitewater Lake 7,500 

Victoria: 

Balsam Lake 20,000 

Burnt River 20,000 

Cameron Lake 40,000 

Head Lake 10,000 

Lake Dalrymple 30,000 



Mud Turtle Lake 30,000 

Pigeon Creek 20,000 

Pigeon Lake 20,000 

Silver Lake 10,000 

Smudge Lake 20,000 

Sturgeon Lake 30,000 

Waterloo: 

Grand River 10,000 

Paradise Lake 10,000 

River Nith 10,000 

Wellington: 

Allan's Dam 10,000 

Puslinch Lake 10,00C 

River Speed 10,000 

York: 

Lake Simcoe 20,000 

FINGERLINGS 



Algoma: 

Alma Lake 

Appleby Lake 

Bass Lake (Aberdeen) . 
Bass Lake (Striker) . . . 

Birch Lake 

Boundary Lake 

Caribou Lake 

Carpenter Lake 

Cloudy Lake 

Cummings Lake 

Darrell Lake 

Desbarats Lake 

Diamond Lake 

Duborne Lake 

Duck Lake 

Elbow Lake 

Friendly Lake 

Gordon Lake 

Iron Lake 

Lauzon Lake 

Little Clear Lake 

Lonely Lake 

Lost Lake 

Marie Lake 

McCarroll Lake 

Miller Lake 

Mine Lake 

Mountain Lake 

Prospect Lake 

Rock Lake 

Stuart Lake 

Unnamed Lake (U. Tp.) 

Brant: 

Grand River 

Mohawk Lake 

Bruce: 

Berry's Lake 

Boat Lake 

Isaac Lake 

Pine River 

Saugeen River 



500 
500 
750 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
750 
500 
500 
500 
500 
750 
1,000 
750 
500 
500 
750 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 



65 

2,000 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1939-40 



27 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 19-59, to March 31st, 1940— Continued 



SMALL-MOUTHtD BLACK BASS 
— Continued 

Cochrane: 

Departure Lake 500 

Durham: 

Pigeon River 1,000 

Elgin: 

Pinafore Lake 500 

Union Pond 500 

F'-ontenac : 

Bass Lake (Olden) 500 

Bass Lake (Bedford) 1,000 

Big Clear Lake 1,000 

Big Gull Lake 1,000 

Big Lake 750 

Black Lake 750 

Blue Lake 500 

Bobs Lake 1,000 

Brule Lake 1,000 

Buck Lake 3,000 

Collins Lake 1,000 

Cranberry Lake 1,000 

Cross Lake 1,000 

Crotch Lake 1,000 

Crow Lake 1,000 

Draper Lake 1,000 

Eagle Lake 1,750 

Fortune Lake 1,000 

Green Bay 500 

Gull Lake 1,250 

Horseshoe Lake 1,000 

Kashwakamak Lake 1,000 

Long Lake (Olden) 1,000 

Long Lake (Portland) 500 

Loughborough Lake 1,000 

Mink Lake 500 

Mississagagon Lake 2,000 

Pine Lake 750 

Rock Lake 500 

St. George Lake 500 

Salmon River 1,000 

Sand Lake 1,000 

Sharbot Lake 1,000 

Spectacle Lake 500 

Sunday Lake 1,000 

Sydenham Lake 1,000 

Wolfe Lake 1,000 

Grey: 

Mountain Lake 1,000 

Haldimand: 

Grand River 3,000 

Haliburton: 

Black Lake 750 

Devils Lake 500 

Gull Lake 500 

Halton: 

Twelve Mile Creek 2,000 



Hastings: 

Bow Lake 500 

Gunter Lake 500 

Little Salmon Lake 500 

Huron : 

Maitland River 1,000 

Lanark: 

Bennet Lake 1,000 

Black Lake 750 

Christie Lake 1,000 

Clear Lake 500 

Dalhousie Lake 750 

Kerr's Lake 750 

Patterson's Lake 750 

Rideau Lake 1,000 

Robertson Lake 500 

Round Lake 750 

Silver Lake 1,000 

Spectacle Lake 500 

Leeds: 

Benson Lake 1,000 

Big Rideau 750 

Charleston Lake 1,000 

Crow Lake 750 

Gananoque Lake 750 

Grippen Lake 750 

Little Cranberry Lake 1,000 

Little Rideau 500 

Loon Lake 750 

Lower Beverley Lake 750 

Lower Rideau 1,000 

Newboro Lake 1,000 

Opinicon Lake 1,000 

St. Lawrence River 2,500 

Sand Lake 1,500 

Singleton Lake 500 

South Lake 750 

Traynor Lake 750 

Whitefish Lake 1,000 

Lennox-Addington : 

Mazinaw Lake 1,000 

Manitoulin: 

Manitou Lake 1,000 

McGregor Bay 2,000 

Middlesex 

Thames River 10,000 

Muskoka : 

Bass Lake 750 

Clearwater Lake 750 

Crooked Lake 2,000 

Dickie Lake 1,000 

Kahshe Lake 500 

Leonard Lake 500 

Long Lake 500 

Longford Lake 2,000 

Menominee Lake 1,000 



28 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1941) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940— Continued 



SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 
— Continued 

Muskoka — Continued 

Muskoka Lake 500 

Riley Lake 500 

Round Lake 1,000 

Severn River 2,000 

Six Mile Lake 2,000 

Tookes Lake 1,000 

Trading Lake 200 

Nipissing: 

Bear Lake 1,500 

Blackwater Lake 500 

Bruce Lake 1,000 

Cache Lake 500 

Champlain Lake 500 

Chibosamog Lake 500 

French River 1,500 

Little Martin Lake 1,000 

Long Lake 1,000 

Martin Lake 1,000 

McPhee Lake 1,000 

Moore Lake 500 

Muskosung Lake 500 

Nipissing Lake 2,500 

Nosbonsing Lake 500 

Opechee Lake 1,000 

Poplar Lake 1,000 

Rainey Lake 500 

Rock Island Lake 1,000 

Sawyer Lake 500 

Spruce Lake 1,000 

Talon Lake 1,000 

Tilden Lake 1,000 

Timagami Lake 1,000 

Tomiko Lake 1,000 

Turtle Lake 500 

Wickstead Lake 1,000 

Norfolk: 

Oakland Pond 210 

Sutton's Pond 3,000 

Ontario: 

Mud Lake 1,000 

Severn River 1,000 

Parry Sound: 

Ahmic Lake 500 

Arthur Lake 500 

Bass Lake 750 

Beaver Lake (Bethune) 500 

Beaver Lake (Croft) 500 

Beaver Lake (Foley) 500 

Blackwater Lake 500 

Brimson Lake 500 

Burnt Lake 500 

Caribou Lake 500 

Cecebe Lake 500 

Charter Lake 750 

Clear Lake 750 

Coles Lake 500 

Commanda Lake 750 

Crooked Lake 750 



Deer Lake (Ferry) 

Deer Lake (Lount) 

Deer Lake (Wilson) 

Dobbs Lake 

Doe Lake 

Duck Lake 

Eagle Lake 

Etta Lake 

Horseshoe Lake 

Island Lake 

Kawigamog Lake 

Kidd Lake 

Little Clam Lake 

Little Long Lake 

Long Lake 

Manitowaba Lake 

Many Island Lake 

Mary Jane Lake 

McQuaby Lake 

McVeety Lake 

Memesagamesi Lake 

Miners Lake 

Moose Lake 

Morgan's Bay 

Mud Lake 

Nipissing Lake 

Pickerel Lake 

Pickerel River 

Pipe Lake 

Portage Lake 

Rainey Lake 

Restoule Lake 

Round Lake 

Seagull Lake 

Sequin River 

Shebeshekong Lake 

Shells Lake 

Shoal Lake 

Spring Lake 

Stanley Lake 

Stormy Lake 

Tea Lake 

Toad Lake 

Wilson Lake 

Wolf River 

Woodcock Lake 

Peterborough: 

Belmont Lake 

Buckhorn Lake 

Round Lake 

Stony Lake 

Renfrew: 

Green Lake 

Lake Dore 

Olmstead Lake 

Simcoe: 

Gloucester Pool 

Nottawasaga River 

Park Lake (Tay Township) 

Stormont: 

St. Lawrence River 



500 

1,000 
500 
750 
500 
500 

2,000 
500 
500 
750 
500 
500 
500 
500 
750 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 

1,000 
750 
500 

1,000 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
750 
750 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
750 
500 
750 
750 
750 
500 
500 
500 
500 



850 
1,000 
1,000 
2,000 



750 
1,000 
1,000 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



1,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1939-40 



29 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940— Continued 



SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 
— Continued 

Sudbury: 

Beaver Lake 500 

Bowes Lake 500 

Charlton Lake 500 

Cranberry Lake 500 

Cutler Lake 500 

Emerald Lake 1,000 

French River 1,000 

Frood Lake 500 

LaCloche Lake 500 

Maple Lake 500 

Nepahawin Lake 500 

Nipissing Lake 500 

Ramsay Lake 500 

Third Lake 750 

Trout Lake 500 

Wanapitei River 500 

Whitson Lake 500 

Timiskaming: 

Baarts Lake 500 

Bass Lake 500 

Beaverhouse Lake 500 

Butler Lake 500 

Davis Lake 500 

Emerald Lake 500 

Herridge Lake 500 

Sesekinika Lake 500 

Victoria Lake 500 

Waterloo: 

Dean's Lake 1,000 

York: 

Lake Simcoe 750 



YEARLINGS AND ADULTS 

Bruce: 

Wiarton Bay 150 

Haliburton: 

Big Bob Lake 125 

Blue Hawk Lake 125 

Bradys Lake 125 

Canning Lake 125 

Cranberry Lake 125 

Davis Lake 125 

Deer Lake 90 

Elephant Lake 130 

Grass Lake 125 

Grass River 125 

Head Lake 130 

Horseshoe Lake 125 

Hurricane Lake 130 

Kashagawigamog Lake 225 

Koshlong Lake 125 

Rainbow Lake 130 



Kenora: 

Birch Lake 

Corner Lake 

Dryberry Lake 

Eva Lake 

Laurenson's Lake 

Long Lake 

Longbow Lake 

Mack Lake 

Sabaskong Bay 

Landlocked Lake — Winnipeg 
River 

Manitoulin: 

Lake Manitou 

Muskoka: 

Buck Lake 

Clearwater Lake 

Deer Lake 

Lake Muskoka 

Lake Rosseau 

Skeleton Lake 

Wood Lake 

Norfolk : 

Gravel Pit Pond 

Little Lake 

Oakland Pond 

Sutton's Pond 

Waterford Gravel Pit Pond 
Waterford Pond 

Parry Sound: 

Beaver Lake 

Gooseneck Lake 

Jack's Lake 

Limestone Lake 

Loon Lake 

Magnetawan River 

Manson Lake 

Shawanaga Lake 

Trout Lake 

Wawashkesh Lake 

Whitestone Lake 

Peterborough: 

Belmont Lake 

Deer Lake 

Round Lake 

Stony Lake 

Rainy River: 

Clearwater Lake 

Little Pete Lake 

One-Sided Lake 

Thunder Bay: 
Kashabowie Lake 



100 
38 
78 
80 
60 
37 
98 
113 
399 

85 



468 



100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
220 
100 



50 

56 

23 

100 

100 

100 



100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 



53 
52 
51 

17 



125 
360 
206 



135 



30 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1941) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940— Continued 



MASKINONGE 

EGGS 

Peterborough: 
Experimental purposes . . 



120,000 



FRY 

Carleton: 

Rideau River 25,000 

Grenville: 

Rideau River 25,000 

Hastings: 

Bay of Quinte 10,000 

Crow River 15,000 

Ketcheson Creek 5,000 

Moira Lake 25,000 

Moira River 25,000 

Sears Lake 15,000 

Stoco Lake 25,000 

Tongamong River 25,000 

Trent River 25,000 

Unamed Stream near 

Frankford 5,000 

Whetstone River 25,000 

Leeds : 

St. Lawrence River 25,000 

Muskoka: 

Kahshe Lake 25,000 

Sparrow Lake 25,000 

Nipissing: 

Lake Nipissing 25,000 

Northumberland : 

Rice Lake 100,000 

Trent River 130,000 

Ontario: 

Lake St. John 20,000 

Peterborough: 

Belmont Lake 50,000 

Buckhorn Lake 50,000 

Clear Lake 200,000 

Deer Bay 100,000 

Indian River 50,000 

Kashabog Lake 25,000 

Katchawanooka Lake 65,000 

Lake Chemong 100,000 

Little Lake 10,000 

Little Mud Lake 25,000 

Lovesick Lake 50,000 

Otonabee River 50,000 

Pigeon Lake 100,000 

Round Lake 50,000 

Stony Lake 100,000 

Trent River & Rice Lake . . . 50,000 

White Lake 25,000 



Prince Edward: 

Muscote Bay 25,000 

Smith's Bay 25,000 

West Lake 15,000 

Renfrew: 

Bass Lake 10,000 

Black Lake 15,000 

Cory Lake 15,000 

Cushene Lake 15,000 

Otterson Lake 10,000 

Petawawa River 10,000 

Redbridge Lake 20,000 

Simcoe: 

Severn River 50,000 

Thunder Bay: 

Lac des Mille Lacs 5,000 

Victoria: 

Balsam Lake 50,000 

Burnt River 25,000 

Cameron Lake 75,000 

Gull River 25,000 

Lake Dalrymple 25,000 

Mud Turtle Lake 25,000 

Pigeon Creek 50,000 

Pigeon Lake 50,000 

Pigeon River 200,000 

Scugog Lake 50,000 

Silver Lake 15,000 

Sturgeon Lake 150,000 

Waterloo: 

Nith River 15,000 

Wentworth : 

Hamilton Bay 5,000 



FINGERLINGS 



Peterborough: 

Belmont Lake 

Clear Lake 

Katchawanooka Lake 

Pigeon Lake 

Stony Lake 



PEBCH 

FRY 



30 

70 
500 
500 
200 



Lake Erie 70,360,000 

Lake St. Clair 2,000,000 



PICKEREL 

EYED EGGS 

Exchange 5,000,000 

Sparrow Lake 2,000,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1939-40 



31 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940— Continued 



PICKEREL— Continued 

FRY 
Algoma: 

Allan Lake 700,000 

Anjigami Lake 200,000 

Bear Lake 400,000 

Bright Lake 250,000 

Caribou Lake 200,000 

Cummings Lake 250,000 

Dean Lake 100,000 

Desbarats Lake 150,000 

Echo Lake 100,000 

Gordon Lake 400,000 

Goulais River . 300,000 

Granary Lake 500,000 

Hill Lake 150,000 

Horseshoe Lake 250,000 

Lake of the Mountains 300,000 

Little Basswood Lake 500,000 

Little Clear Lake 500,000 

Pipe Lake 250,000 

Rock Lake 450,000 

Round Lake 100,000 

Spanish River 500,000 

Sugar Lake 250,000 

Bruce: 

Agar Lake 500,000 

Boat Lake 250,000 

Chesley Lake 500,000 

Isaac Lake 500,000 

Sky Lake 250,000 

Carleton: 

Ottawa River 500,000 

Cochrane: 

Carman Bay 60,000 

Frederick House Lake 80,000 

Frederick House River 250,000 

Night Hawk River 80,000 

Redstone River 60,000 

Reid Lake 70,000 

Remi Lake 200,000 

Silver Queen Lake 80,000 

Frontenac: 

Antoine Lake 250,000 

Bass Lake 200,000 

Big Clear Lake 300,000 

Big Gull Lake 850,000 

Big Lake 200,000 

Bobs Lake 750,000 

Crosby Lake 500,000 

Cross Lake 300,000 

Crotch Lake (Kennebec) ... 200,000 

Crotch Lake (Palmerston) . . 800,000 

Crow Lake 250,000 

Green Lake 300,000 

Green Bay Lake 250,000 

Gull Lake 850,000 

Horseshoe Lake 200,000 

Kashwakamak Lake 1,250,000 

Long Lake (Olden) 200,000 



Long Lake (Portland) 250,000 

Malcolm Lake 300,000 

Mink Lake 500,000 

Mississagagon Lake 500,000 

Mississippi River 1,000,000 

Red Pine Lake 250,000 

Round Lake 250,000 

Sand Lake 250,000 

Second Depot Lake 100,000 

Sydenham Lake 400,000 

Upper Rideau 1,000,000 

West Rideau 250,000 

Grenville: 

Nation River 500,000 

Rideau River 500,000 

Grey: 

Mountain Lake 250,000 

Haldimand: 

Grand River 1,000,000 

Haliburton: 

Cauntaus Lake 1,000,000 

Elephant Lake 1,000,000 

Paudash Lake 1,500,000 

Wolf Lake 1,000,000 

Hastings: 

Baptiste Lake 800,000 

Bartlett's Lake 150,000 

Crow La}^e 1,500,000 

Eraser Lake 200,000 

Lime Lake 100,000 

Mallard Lake 200,000 

Moira Lake 800,000 

Moira River 1,000,000 

Salmon Trout Lake 200,000 

Sears Lake 100,000 

Stoco Lake 300,000 

Trent River 1,000,000 

Kenora: 

Black Sturgeon Lake 6,000,000 

Blindfold Lake 3,000,000 

Bowden Lake 750,000 

Cache Lake 500,000 

Eagle Lake 2,000,000 

Gun Lake 1,000,000 

Lake Lulu 1,500,000 

Lake of Two Mountains 1,500,000 

Lake of the Woods 29,000,000 

Long Bow Lake 1,500,000 

Separation Lake 750,000 

Shoal Lake 6,000,000 

Wabigoon Lake 2,000,000 

Winnipeg River 4,500,000 

Lanark : 

Barbers Lake 200,000 

Beaver Lake 300,000 

Bennet's Lake 425,000 

Black Lake 250,000 



32 DEPARTIMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1941) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940— Continued 



PICKEREL— Continued 

Lanark — Continued 

Caldwell Lake 200,000 

Christie Lake 500,000 

Clear Lake 250,000 

Dalhousie Lake 325,000 

Gillies Lake 250,000 

Horns Lake 200,000 

Kerrs Lake 400,000 

Little Joe's Lake 200,000 

Mississippi Lake 600,000 

Mississippi River 650,000 

Otty Lake 600,000 

Patterson's Lake 300,000 

Rivens Lake 200,000 

Robertson Lake 200,000 

Spectacle Lake 250,000 

Leeds : 

Bass Lake 400,000 

Crow Lake 200,000 

Higgley Lake 500,000 

Little Rideau 600,000 

Loon Lake 200,000 

St. Lawrence River 1,000,000 

Sand Lake 250,000 

Traynor Lake 200,000 

Wolfe Lake 250,000 

Lennox-Addington : 

Beaver Lake 200,000 

Duck Lake 200,000 

Long Lake 600,000 

Mazinaw Lake 600,000 

Napanee River 4,000,000 

North Beaver Lake 350,000 

Salmon Lake 1,000,000 

Sixth Lake 600,000 

South Beaver Lake 350,000 

White Lake 350,000 

Manitoulin: 

Burnt Lake 500,000 

Mindemoya Lake 1,500,000 

South Bay 500,000 

Muskoka: 

Axel's Lake 100,000 

Bala Bay 1,000,000 

Bear Trail Lake 50,000 

Brandy Lake 500,000 

Crooked Lake 500,000 

Gull Lake 500,000 

Indian River 250,000 

Kahshe Lake 250,000 

Leonard Lake 450,000 

Long Lake 30,000 

Mootes Lake 50,000 

Muskoka Lake 300,000 

North Lake 50,000 

Riley Lake 250,000 

Severn River 750,000 

Three Mile Lake 500,000 

Webster Lake 250,000 



Nipissing: 

Bouleau River 200,000 

Bruce Lake 250,000 

Diamond Lake 140,000 

French River 2,000,000 

Gull Lake 140,000 

Horseshoe Lake 70,000 

Lake Champlain 50,000 

Lake Nipissing 2,250,000 

Lake Timagami 2,000,000 

Marion Lake 70,000 

Martin Lake (Gladman) 500,000 

Martin Lake (Sisk.) 250,000 

Martin River 280,000 

McPhee Lake 300,000 

Moose Lake 70,000 

Nosbonsing Lake 80,000 

Opechee Lake 250,000 

Pimisi Lake 200,000 

Sheeby Lake 70,000 

Talon Lake 80,000 

Tilden Lake 50,000 

Tomiko Lake 280,000 

Twin Lakes 250,000 

Wasaksina Lake 140,000 

Wickstead Lake 500,000 

Northumberland : 

Mud Lake 400,000 

Rice Lake 1,500,000 

Trent River 4,600,000 

Ontario: 

Lake St. John 250,000 

Mud Lake 250,000 

Severn River 500,000 

Parry Sound: 

Ahmic Lake 100,000 

Bass Lake 200,000 

Beaver Lake (Croft) 50,000 

Blackstone Lake 600,000 

Brimson Lake 200,000 

Callander Bay 1,500,000 

Caribou Lake 30,000 

Cecebe Lake 80,000 

Clear Lake 200,000 

Commanda Lake 250.000 

Crane Lake 200,000 

Crooked Lake 200.000 

Deer Lake 50.000 

Dobbs Lake 50,000 

Doe Lake 100,000 

Duck Lake 20,000 

Isabella Lake 300,000 

Jacks Lake 80,000 

Kawigamog Lake 80,000 

Lake of Many Islands 50,000 

Lennon Lake 200,000 

Little Long Lac 30,000 

Long Lake 50,000 

Loon Bay 500,000 

Magnetawan River 280,000 

Manitowaba Lake 500,000 

Manson Lake 250,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1939-40 



33 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940— Continued 



PICKEREL— Continued 

Parry Sound — Continued 

McKellar Lake 400,000 

McKeown Lake 100,000 

McVeety Lake 200,000 

Memesagamesi Lake 100,000 

Minerva Lake 200,000 

Nipissing Lake 2,900,000 

Oastler Lake 500,000 

Otter Lake 750,000 

Owl Lake 300,000 

Pickerel Lake 200,000 

Pickerel River 130,000 

Potage Lake 500,000 

Rainy Lake 250,000 

Restoule Lake 700,000 

Rosseau Lake 1,500,000 

Ruth Lake 100,000 

Shawanaga Lake 100,000 

Shebeshekong Lake 70,000 

Shoal Lake 200,000 

Six Mile Lake 70,000 

Squaw Lake 400,000 

Stanley Lake 50,000 

Stewart Lake 200,000 

Stormy Lake 200,000 

Tea Lake 150,000 

Third Lake 200,000 

Wawashkesh Lake 1,500,000 

Whitestone Lake 300,000 

Wilson Lake 60,000 

Wolfe River 30,000 

Peterborough: 

Belmont Lake 1,500,000 

Chemong Lake 1,000,000 

Connolly's Lake 500,000 

Deer Bay 500,000 

Deer Lake 2,000,000 

Deer River 2,300,000 

Indian River 1,500,000 

Little Cedar Lake 500,000 

Little Lake 200,000 

Long Lake 1,000,000 

Loon Lake 1,500,000 

Lovesick Lake 500,000 

North River 1,000,000 

Oak Lake 1,500,000 

Otonabee River 3,000,000 

Pigeon Lake 1,000,000 

Round Lake 1,500,000 

Trent River 400,000 

Twin Lakes 150,000 

Prince Edward: 

Bay of Quinte 6,150,000 

Consecon Lake 900,000 

Smith's Bay 1,250,000 

West Lake 300,000 

Rainy River: 

Clearwater Lake 3,000,000 

Lake of the Woods 24,000,000 

One-sided Lake 3,000,000 



Pine Lake 1,500,000 

Rainy Lake 8,000,000 

Sabaskong Bay 12,000,000 

Steeprock Lake 6,000,000 

Renfrew : 

Black's Bay 500,000 

Calabogie Lake 500,000 

Coulas Lake 225,000 

Cushene Lake 125,000 

Golden Lake 625,000 

Hazel Bay 250,000 

Hond's Lake 125,000 

Madawaska River 125,000. 

Meilleur's Bay 250,000 

Muskrat Lake 500,000 

Norway Lake 125,000 

Petawawa River 250,000 

Sturgeon Lake 250,000 

T. Lake 250,000 

White Lake, 500,000 

Simcoe : 

Black Lake 250,000 

Gloucester Pool 1,250,000 

Little Lake 250,000 

Nottawasaga River 100,000 

Severn River 675,000 

Six Mile Lake 500,000 

Stormont: 

St. Lawrence River 1,850,000 

Sudbury: 

Agnew Lake 750,000 

Bisco Lake 500,000 

Charlton Lake 400,000 

Cranberry Lake 300,000 

Crooked Lake 250,000 

Cross Lake 250,000 

French River 2,300,000 

Frood Lake 250,000 

Hanna Lake 250,000 

La Cloche Lake 200,000 

Long Lake 700,000 

Makido Lake 500,000 

Maple Lake 250,000 

Middle Lake 250,000 

Minisinakwa Lake 500,000 

Moose Lake 200,000 

Murray Lake 300,000 

Nepiwasy Lake 150,000 

Onaping Lake 1,000,000 

Pashy Lake 500,000 

Penage Lake 1,750,000 

Peterson's Bay 750,000 

Ramsay Lake 1,000,000 

Silver Lake 300,000 

Slaterock Lake 500,000 

Spanish River 750,000 

Trout Lake (Cherriman) . . 250,000 

Trout Lake (Tilton) 250,000 

Upper Sturgeon 200,000 

Wanapitei Lake 1,000,000 

Whitson Lake 250,000 



34 



DEPARTMENT OP GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1941) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940— Continued 



PICKEREL— Continued 

Timiskaming: 

Gillies Lake 140,000 

Giroux Lake 30,000 

Granite Lake 50,000 

Kenogami Lake 200,000 

Lady Evelyn Lake 70,000 

Long Lake 80,000 

Montreal River 80,000 

Mortimer Lake 70,000 

Net Lake 50,000 

Obuskong Lake 140,000 

Reid Lake 70,000 

Rib Lake 170,000 

Round Chute 30,000 

Round Lake 80,000 

Petersen Lake 80,000 

Sesekinika Lake 250,000 

Sharpe Lake 70,000 

Timiskaming Lake 640,000 

Twin Lakes ' 60,000 

Victoria Lake 80,000 

Wendigo Lake 100,000 

Wilson Lake 70,000 

Victoria : 

Burnt River 150,000 

Dalrymple Lake 250,000 

Head Lake 250,000 

Little Turtle Lake 500,000 

Mud Turtle Lake 250,000 

Great Lakes: 

North Channel 7,300,000 

Georgian Bay 425,000 

Lake Huron 41,450,000 

Lake Superior 1,500,000 



BROWN TROUT 

FINGERLINGS 

Grey: 
Feeders Saugeen River . . . 
Feeders Styx River 



19,954 
10,000 



YEARLINGS 
Brant: 

Branch Creek 5,700 

Whiteman's Creek 9,600 

Bruce: 

Austin Fladd Mill Dam 1,800 

Crane River 3,900 

Lockerby Creek 7,600 

Plum Creek 5,400 

Saugeen River 10,800 

Snake Creek 5,700 

Sucker Creek 1,900 

Teeswater River 3,600 

Vogt's Creek 2,700 

Willow Creek 1,800 



Durham : 

Baldwin's Creek 1,260 

Bowmanville Pond 2,400 

Laing's Stream 800 

Stephen's Creek 2,400 

Elgin: 

Big Creek 3,000 

Big Otter 3,600 

Grey: 

Big Head River 14,400 

Lueck's Mill Pond 8,400 

Potawatami River 3,600 

Saugeen River 11,700 

Styx River 8,100 

Sydenham River 8,100 

Weatherspoon Creek 1,000 

Haldimand: 

Rogers Creek 1,000 

Halton: 

Sixteen Mile Creek 10,800 

Twelve Mile Creek 10,800 

Hastings: 

Beaver Creek 3,200 

Black Creek 3,200 

Little Mississippi River 3,200 

Rawdon Creek 3,400 

Squire's Creek 3,200 

Huron: 

Maitland River 9,000 

Nine Mile River 3,600 

Lambton: 

Bear Creek 2,000 

Lincoln: 

Effingham Stream 1,000 

Twelve Mile Creek 225 

Middlesex: 

Medway Creek 7,210 

Norfolk : 

Big Creek 9,900 

Little Otter Creek 10,800 

Nanticoke Creek 8,150 

Northumberland: 

Bowen's Pond 1.900 

Cole's Pond 1,500 

Dudley's Pond 1,900 

Ontario: 

Chubtown Creek 3,000 

Oxford : 

Burns Creek 1,800 

Horner's Creek 3,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1939-40 



35 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940— Continued 



BROWN TROUT— Continued 

Peel: 

Credit River 3,100 

Perth: 

Avon River 5,000 

Halfway House Creek 700 

Peterborough: 

Baxter Creek 6,000 

Cavan Creek 3,000 

Deer Bay Creek 9,000 

Eel's Creek 9,600 

Jack's Creek 9,600 

Mississauga Creek 6,000 

Mississauga River 6,400 

Mount Pleasant Creek 2,000 

North River 6,400 

Otter Creek 1,400 

Simcoe: 

Boyne River 2,100 

Nottawasaga River 21,600 

. Willow Creek 13,350 

Waterloo: 

Bridgeport Dam 1,800 

Dentinger Creek 3,000 

Fisher Mill Dam 1,800 

Welland: 

Lyon's Creek 6,000 

Wellington: 

Guelph Waterworks Stream 75 

Speed River 10,800 

Wentworth : 

Spencer Creek 2,100 

York: 

Hoover's Pond 200 

Humber River 10,900 

Miscellaneous: 
Private waters 

(Experimental) 100 



LAKE TROUT 

EYED EGGS 
Exchange 1,845,850 

FRY 

Frontenac: 

Big Gull Lake 60,000 

Blue Lake 10,000 

Brule Lake 20,000 

Buck Lake (Barrie) 25,000 

Buck Lake (Bedford) 10,000 

Buckshot Lake 30,000 



Camp Lake 15,000 

Crotch Lake 35,000 

Crow Lake 20,000 

Desert Lake 10,000 

Devil Lake 20,000 

Dog Lake 20,000 

Draper Lake 15,000 

Eagle Lake 60,000 

Fortune Lake 30,000 

Grindstone Lake 30^00 

Kashwakamak Lake 40,000 

Little Rock Lake 15,000 

Little Salmon Lake 15,000 

Loughborough Lake 40,000 

Lucky Lake 15,000 

Mackie Lake 15,000 

Mississagon Lake 25,000 

Palmerston Lake 25,000 

Reid's Lake 15,000 

Rock Lake 15,000 

Round Schooner Lake 15,000 

Sharbot Lake 30,000 

West Rideau Lake 30,000 

Hastings: 

Baptiste Lake 90,000 

Bass Lake 10,000 

Big Salmon Lake 30,000 

Burnt Lake 10,000 

Cedar Lake 30,000 

Clear Lake 10,000 

Crooked Lake 20,000 

Devil Lake 10,000 

Dickie Lake 20,000 

Eagle Lake 25,000 

Gunter Lake 10,000 

Jamieson Lake 10,000 

Lake St. Peter 30,000 

La Valley Lake 10,000 

Limestone Lake 5,000 

Little Salmon Lake 10,000 

Little Salmon River 5,000 

Long Lake 5,000 

O'Grady Lake 10,000 

Papineau Lake 20,000 

Peets Lake 10,000 

Robinson Lake 15,000 

Trout Lake (Faraday) 10,000 

Trout Lake (Lake) 25,000 

Wadsworth Lake 10,000 

Weslemkoon Lake 30,000 

Lanark: 

Big Rideau Lake 100,000 

Silver Lake 10,000 

Leeds: 

Charleston Lake 50,000 

Indian Lake 30,000 

Otter Lake 10,000 

Red Horse Lake 10,000 

Lennox-Addington : 

Elbow Lake 15,000 

Finch Lake 20,000 



36 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1941) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940— Continued 



LAKE TROUT— Continued 

FRY 

Lennox- Addlngton — Continued 

Little Cedar Lake 10,000 

Little Weslomkoon Lake 10,000 

Loon Lake 50,000 

Otter Lake 30,000 

Simpson Lake 5,000 

Spoon Lake 10,000 

Thirty Island Lake 20,000 

White Lake 20,000 

Peterborough: 

Big Cedar Lake 10,000 

Bottle Lake 10,000 

Eagle Lake 30,000 

Eel's Lake 30,000 

Jack's Lake 30,000 

Lake Catchacoma 20,000 

Little Cedar Lake 10,000 

Long Lake 10,000 

Loon Lake 90,000 

Mississauga Lake 20,000 

Oak Lake 15,000 

Trout Lake 30,000 

Twin Lake 15,000 

Rainy River: 

Ash Bay 24,900 

Bad Vermilion Lake 80,000 

Burnt Lake 20,000 

Kakagi Lake 135,000 

Lake Kishkutena 45,000 

Narrow Lake 20,000 

Pipestone Lake 20,000 

Steeprock Lake 60,000 

Great Lakes: 

North Channel 140,000 

Georgian Bay 1,750,000 

Lake Huron 2,480,000 

Lake Ontario 567,000 

FINGERLINGS 
Algoma : 

Achigan Lake 10,000 

Axe Lake 15,000 

Bass Lake 10,000 

Basswood Lake 15,000 

Caribou Lake 7,000 

Chiblow Lake 5,000 

Chub Lake 20,000 

Cummings Lake 15,000 

Denman Lake 7,000 

Fleck Lake 7,000 

Garden Lake 10,000 

Grev Trout Lake 6,000 

Hawk Lake 10,000 

Hobon Lake 10,000 

Howard Lake S,000 

Island Lake " 5,000 

Jobammeghia Lake 15,000 

Lake Lauzon 6,000 



Lake of the Mountains 4,000 

Long Lake 15,000 

Madawonsing Lake 5,000 

Matinenda Lake 5,000 

Mountain Lake 6,000 

Patton Lake 10,000 

Penage Lake 15,000 

Pickerel Lake 5,000 

Rand Lake 10,000 

Ranger Lake 10,000 

Raw Hide Lake 6,000 

Red Deer Lake 6.000 

Robertson Lake 15,000 

Rose Marie Lake 6,000 

Sand Lake . . . ; 10,000 

Spruce Lake 10,000 

Trout Lake 10,000 

Wakomata Lake 15,000 

Windermere Lake 7,000 

Bruce: 

Gillies Lake 25,000 

Cochrane: 

Remi Lake 6,000 

Haliburton: 

Bear Lake 5,000 

Big Bear Lake 3,000 

Big Bob Lake 5,000 

Boskung Lake 10,000 

Clear Lake 4,000 

Clearwater Lake 5.000 

Davis Lake 9,000 

Drag Lake 15,000 

Eagle Lake 5,000 

East Lake 5,000 

Fishtail Lake 4,000 

Gull Lake 10,000 

Gun Lake 5,000 

Hollow Lake 5,000 

Horseshoe Lake 3,000 

Hurricane Lake 5,000 

Kashagawigamog 10,000 

Kennisis Lake 10,000 

Kimball Lake 5,000 

Kushog Lake 10,000 

• Little Hawke Lake 5,000 

Maple Lake 5.000 

Moose Lake 5,000 

Mountain Lake 5,000 

Oblong Lake 5,000 

Oxtongue Lake 5,000 

Paudash Lake 3,000 

Pine Lake 3,000 

Redstone Lake 10,000 

South Lake 5,000 

Spruce Lake 5,000 

Stormy Lake ; 3,000 

St. Nora's Lake 5,000 

Trout Lake 8,000 

Twelve Mile Lake 10,000 

White Trout Lake 5,000 

Wolfe Lake 3,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1939-40 



37 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940— Continued 



LAKE TROUT— Continned 

Kenora : 

Blue Lake 12,500 

Cliff Lake 25,000 

Cobble Lake 50,000 

Cul-de-Sac Lake 105,000 

Dogtooth Lake 50,000 

Eagle Lake 14,700 

Gee Jay Lake 25,000 

Rosamond Lake 20,000 

Sturgeon Lake 50,000 

Thunder Lake 20,000 

Trout Lake 25,000 

Whitefish Bay 75,000 

Manitoulin : 

Lake Manitou 20,000 

Muskoka : 

Bala Bay 15,000 

Bella Lake 10,000 

Big Twin Lake 2,500 

Bruce's Lake 5,000 

Clear Lake (McLean) 10,000 

Clear Lake (Ridout) 10,000 

Fairy Lake 15,000 

Haley's Lake 10,000 

Lake of Bays 50,000 

Lake Joseph 10,000 

Little Clear Lake 2,500 

Long Lake 10,000 

Loon Lake 5,000 

Mary Lake 30,000 

Muskoka Lake 40,000 

Near Cut Lake 5,000 

Paint Lake 7,500 

Peninsula Lake 15,000 

Pine Lake 15,000 

Rebecca Lake 12,500 

Rosseau Lake 10,000 

Six Mile Lake 5,000 

Skeleton Lake 40,000 

Solitaire Lake 5,000 

Tasso Lake 5,000 

Vernon Lake 20,000 

Nlpissing: 

Aylen Lake 3,000 

Bear Lake 6,000 

Cache Lake 3,000 

Cameron Lake 8,000 

Cedar Lake 10,000 

Diamond Lake 3,000 

Dotty Lake 5,000 

Fatty Lake 5,000 

Gull Lake 3,000 

Little Martin Lake 6,000 

Martin Lake 6,000 

Moore's Lake 3,000 

Smoke Lake 3,000 

Source Lake 3,000 

South Tea Lake 3,000 

Talon Lake 8,000 

Timagami Lake 3,000 



Tomiko Lake 

Trout Lake 

Wasaksina Lake 

Wickstead Lake 

Parry Sound: 

Bay Lake 

Black Lake 

Caribou Lake 

Clear Lake 

Eagle Lake 

High Lake 

Horn Lake 

Lake Joseph 

Lake Rosseau 

Little Lake Joseph 

Little Whitefish Lake . . . 

Loon Bay 

Loon Lake 

Lorimer Lake 

Memesagamesi Lake . . . 

Otter Lake 

Portage Lake 

Round Lake 

Ruth Lake 

Salmon Lake 

Sand Lake 

Sucker Lake 

Tea Lake 

Three Legged Lake .... 

Three Mile Lake 

Trout Lake (Hagerman) 
Trout Lake (McDougall) 
Whitefish Lake 

Peterborough: 

Crystal Lake 

Lake Talon 

Renfrew: 

Bark Lake 

Barry's Bay 

Birchim Lake 

Blackfish Bay 

Centers Lake 

Clear Lake 

Cross Lake 

Diamond Lake 

Kaminiskeg Lake 

Long Lake (Radcliffe) . 

Long Lake (Wylie) 

Pog Lake 

Round Lake (Lyell) 

Round Lake (Richards) 

Tea Lake 

Trout Lake 

Upper Carson Lake .... 
Wadsworth Lake 

Simcoe: 
Kempenfeldt Bay 

Sudbury: 

Agnew Lake 

Clearwater Lake 



8,000 

12,000 

3,000 

6,000 



10,000 

2,500 

5,000 

10,000 

15,000 

7,500 

15,000 

5,000 

15,000 

10,000 

5,000 

20,000 

5,000 

15,000 

20,000 

10,000 

5,000 

5,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

15,000 

5,000 

10,000 

5,000 

5,000 

10,000 

10.000 



8,000 
3,000 



8,000 
8,000 
5,000 
8,000 
6,000 

15,000 
8,000 
4,000 
7,000 
7,000 
6,000 
8,000 
7,000 

14,000 
6,000 

10,000 

10,000 
7,000 



30,000 



10,000 
10.000 



38 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1941) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940— Continued 



LAKE TROUT— Continued 

Sudbury — Continued 

Emerald Lake 14,000 

Fairbanks Lake 8,000 

Kuba Lake 8,000 

Lang Lake 7,000 

Little Penage Lake 8,000 

Long Lake (Broder) 10,000 

Long Lake (Harrow) 5,000 

Mesomikenda Lake 8,000 

Millard Lake 12,000 

Miller Lake 5,000 

Ministic Lake 7,000 

Nepahwin Lake 10,000 

Onaping Lake 14,000 

Ramsay Lake 10,000 

Trout Lake 10,000 

Wanapitei Lake 15,000 

West Bay 7,000 

Windy Lake 14,000 

Thunder Bay: 

Windigoostigwan Lake 40,000 

Timiskaming : 

Anima Nipissing Lake 8,000 

Crystal- Lake 6,000 

Gowganda Lake 3,000 

Herridge Lake 5,000 

Justine Lake 3,000 

Larder Lake 6,000 

Long Lake 5,000 

Nellie Lake 6,000 

Net Lake 3,000 

Perry Lake 9,000 

Pike Lake 3,00,0 

Pine Lake 3,000 

Rib Lake 3,000 

Trout Lake 3,000 

Twin Lake 3,000 

Watabeag Lake 10,000 

Wendigo Lake 3,000 

York: 

Lake Simcoe 30,000 

Great Lakes: 

Lake Superior 2,460,000 

North Channel 74,000 

Georgian Bay 1,769,000 

Lake Huron 3,293,200 



Mississagi River 10,000 

Montreal River 10,000 

North Lake 5,000 

West Lake 5,000 

White River 10,000 

Sudbury: 

Onaping River 15,000 

Timiskaming: 

Choppin Lake 5,000 

Miscellaneous: 

Sale 50 



YEARLINGS and ADULTS 

Bruce: 

Saugeen River 1,800 

Dufferin: 

Nottawasaga River 6,085 

Pine River 1,500 

Elgin: 

St. Thomas Reservoir 850 

Grey: 
Sydenham River 500 

Norfolk : 

Big Creek 350 

Simcoe: 

Kempenfeldt Bay 1.500 

Lake Simcoe 1,500 

Sturgeon River 5,000 

Wellington: 
Saugeen River 1,500 

York: 
number River 1,500 

Miscellaneous: 

Sales — Demonstration and 
propagation purposes 2,069 



RAINBOW TROUT 

FINGERINGS 
Algoma: 

Batchawana River 7,585 

Chippewa River 7,000 

Hamburg Creek 5,000 

Huston Lake 5,000 

Jobammeghia Lake 10,000 

Keegos Lake 5,000 

Loon Lake 10,000 



KAMLOOPS TROUT 

FINGERLINGS 

Algoma: 

Blue Lake 19,000 

Devils Lake ; 18,000 

Lake Constance 20,000 

Trout Lake 20,000 

Muskoka: 

Echo Lake 10,000 



ANNUAL REPORT. 1939-40 



39 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940— Continued 



KA3IL00PS TROUT— Continued 

Nipissing: 

Lake Timagami 8,000 



Parry Sound: 

Lake Bernard 10,000 

Miscellaneous: 

Demonstration purposes .... 41 

SPECKLED TROUT 

FINGERLINGS 

Durham : 

Squirrel Creek 4,000 

Taylor's Creek 4,000 

Frontenac: 

Black Creek 10,000 

Bolton Creek 15,000 

McCausland Creek 10,000 

Sharbot Lake Creek 15,000 

Hastings: 

Baptiste Lake 28,000 

Bartlett Creek 5,000 

Bentley Creek 5,000 

Diamond Lake 8,000 

T. Lake 5,000 

Lennox-Addington : 

Mill Stream 10,000 

Simpson Lake 10,000 

Spoon Lake 10,000 

Spring Lake 5,000 

White Lake 15,000 

Nipissing: 

Duschene Creek 15,000 

Four Mile Creek 25,000 

Rainey Lake 8,000 

Spring Lake 25,000 

Twenty Minute Lake 25,000 

Wolf Lake 25,000 

Northumberland : 

Burnley Creek 10,000 

Chidley Creek 3,000 

Dartford Creek 3,000 

DeLong's Creek 3,000 

Duncan Creek 4,000 

Pegman's Creek 3,000 

Quinn's Creek 3,000 

Robin's Creek 3,000 

Sandy Flat Creek 4,000 

Valleau's Creek 10,000 

Peterborough: 

Carver's Creek 8,000 

Miscellaneous: 

Sales — Demonstration and 

propagation purposes 1,000 



YEARLINGS 
Algoma: 

Achigan Creek 2,500 

Achigan Lake 3,200 

Agawa River _ 9,600 

Alona Bay Creek 1,500 

Alva Lake 1,600 

Anjigami Creek 1,600 

Arnett Lake 1,600 

Aubinadong Bay 2,400 

Aubinadong Lake 2,400 

Austin Lake 1,500 

Basswood Lake 2,000 

Batchawana River 9,600 

Beaver Lake 1,600 

Big Lake 2,000 

Black Creek 1,000 

Boat Lake 1,000 

Boundary Lake 2,400 

Boyd's Creek 3,200 

Buckboard Lake 1,000 

Burns Lake 2,500 

Burrows Lake 3,200 

Caldwell's Lake 800 

Cameron Creek 1,000 

Camp 8 Bay 2,400 

Canoe Lake 500 

Carpenter Lake 3,200 

Cedar Creek 800 

Chippewa River 27,200 

Chub Lake 5,200 

Clear Lake (Mack) 1,000 

Clear Lake (Vankoughnet) . . 3,200 

Coffee Creek 2,500 

Copp Lake 5,200 

Cram Lake 500 

Crystal Creek 1,500 

Crystal Lake 2,000 

Cummings Lake 1,200 

Deer Lake 2,500 

Diamond Lake 2,000 

Driving Creek 5,000 

Driving Lake 1,000 

Echo Lake 1,500 

Eleven Mile Creek 3,200 

Elizabeth Lake 1,000 

Fairbank Creek 10,000 

Fern Lake 1,600 

Fish Lake 1,600 

Foot Lake 2,500 

Garden Lake 4,800 

Garden River 1,000 

Gilmore Lake 750 

Goodwins Lake 1,500 

Goulais River 5,250 

Gravel Lake 3,500 

Harmony Creek 5,100 

Harmony River 3,000 

Hawk Lake 1,600 

Heart Lake 6,700 

Herman Lake 3,200 

Heyden Lake 5,100 

Hidden Portage Lake 2,400 

High Lake 1,000 

Hills Creek 1,500 

Hoath Lake 1,600 



40 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1941) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940— Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT— Continued 

Algoma — Continued 

Hobon Lake 3,200 

Horn Lake 1,600 

Horse Lake 1,250 

Horseshoe Lake 1,500 

Hubert Lake 2,400 

Island Lake (Aberdeen) .... 2,500 

Island Lake (Aweres) 3,000 

Island Lake (176) 5,700 

Jackfish River 3,000 

Jimmy Lake 800 

Jobammeghia Lake 1,600 

Kaskawong River 2,400 

Kelly Lake 1,000 

Kendogami River 3,200 

Lake One 1,000 

Laughing Lake Bay 2,400 

Lessley Lake 1,500 

Little High Lake 1,000 

Little White River 2,400 

Lonely Lake 3,000 

Long Lake (Meredith) 1,500 

Long Lake (Whitman) 1,000 

Loon Lake (Deroche) 2,500 

Loon Lake (24-R-13) 4,700 

Loonskin Lake 3,200 

Lower Island Lake 2,000 

Lower Pine Lake 1,600 

Lower Twin Lake 1,600 

Mader Lake 1,600 

Mamainse Harbor 1,000 

Mary Ann Lake 1,000 

Mashagama Lake 5,400 

Merchant Lake 3,000 

Mica Bay Creek 750 

Mile 58 Lake 1,600 

Mill Creek 1,600 

Minnow Lake 3,000 

Maude Lake 750 

Maunshe Megoose Lake .... 1,600 

McCauley Lake 1,200 

McCormick Lake 1,600 

McCrea Lake 2,400 

McDonald Stream 1,000 

McLeod Creek 1,250 

McVeigh Creek 1,600 

Michipicoten River 8,000 

Mongoose Lake 3,200 

Moose Lake (25-R-13) 3,200 

Moose Lake (Wells) 1,600 

Mountain Lake (lA.) 3,200 

Mountain Lake (Gould) 1,600 

Mountain Lake (McMahon) . . 1,600 

Mud Creek (Vankoughnet) . . 2,500 

Mud Lake (lA.) 1,300 

Murphy Creek 1,100 

Odowbi Lake 800 

Ozone Creek 3,000 

Pancake River 3,800 

Paquette Lake 5,600 

Peter Lake 1,500 

Pike Lake 1,200 

Pine Lake (lA.) 1,600 

Pine Lake (25-R-ll) 1,600 



Pinkney Lake 

Rainbow Lake 

Rand Lake 

Ranger Lake 

Red Deer Lake 

Red Rock Lake 

Richardson Lake 

Robertson Lake 

Rock Lake 

Root River 

Round Lake (lA.) 

Round Lake (Grassett) 

St. Joseph Island Streams . . 

Sand Lake 

Sand River 

Saymo Bay 

Saymo River 

Sesabic Lake 

Sharp Sand River 

Shumka Lake 

Silver Creek 

Silver Lake 

Sister Lake No, 1 

Sister Lake No. 2 

Snowshoe Creek 

Speckled Trout Lake (lA.) . . 
Speckled Trout Lake (28-R-16) 
Speckled Trout Pond (176) . 

Spring Creek 

Spruce Lake 

Storehouse Creek 

Sucker Lake 

Summitt Lake 

Tamarack Lake 

Tawabinasay Lake 

Tea Lake 

Thessalon River 

Triple Lake 

Trout Creek 

Trout Lake (Aweres) 

Trout Lake (Montgomery) . . 

Trout Lake (62) 

Trout Lake (25-R-14) 

Trout Lake Creek 

Trout Lake Inlet 

Two Tree River 

Unnamed Lake (Larkin) . . . 

Upper Pine Lake 

Upper Twin Lake 

Victoria Creek 

Vixon Lake 

Wallace Lake 

Wartz Lake 

Wawa Lake 

Weashog Lake 

White River 

Williams Creek 

Wonashin Lake 

Woods Creek 

Brant: 

St. George Lake 

Bruce: 

Barrow Bay Creek 

Formosa Creek 

Nine Mile Creek 



1,600 
2,000 
1,600 
1,000 

800 
1,000 
2,400 
4,700 

800 
6,G00 

800 
3,200 
3,000 
3,200 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
3,500 
1,500 
2,500 
3,000 
1,000 

800 
1,600 
2,200 
2,400 
1,600 
1,000 
2,000 
2.400 
2,000 
1,600 
4,850 

800 
3,200 
1,800 
4,200 
1,600 
1,000 
2,000 
1,500 
3,000 
3,800 
1,000 
2,350 
4,400 
1,000 
1,600 
2,000 
3,000 
3,200 

800 
2,400 
5,200 

526 
4,400 
1,500 
1,600 
2.400 



500 

3,300 

100 

1,600 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1939-40 



41 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940— Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT— Continued 

Bruce — Continued. 

Silver Stream (Amabel) 3,600 

Silver Stream (Carrick) 1,400 

Spring Creek 3,600 

Vance's Creek 200 

Willow Creek 750 

Cochrane: 

Big Gully Creek 1,000 

Elsie Lake 1,000 

Grassy River 1,000 

Junction Lake 900 

Legare Lake 1,200 

MacDonald Lake 900 

Paradise Creek 1,000 

Red Stone River 2,600 

Red Sucker River 2,600 

Round Lake 1,200 

Rushton Lake 1,000 

Thunder " Creek 900 

Unnamed Lake (Bristol Tp.) 900 

Unnamed Lake (Deloro Tp.) 2,700 

Unnamed Lake (German Tp.) 800 

Unnamed Lake (Macklem Tp.) 2,100 

Unnamed Lake (Tisdale Tp.) 1,700 

Dufferin: 

Cemetery Creek 2,700 

Credit River 8,300 

McKitrick Stream 1,800 

Mulmur Lake 1,400 

Nottawasaga River 7,200 

Pine River 3,750 

Durham : 

Ard's Creek 100 

Ball's Creek 100 

Beatty's Creek 200 

Carveth Creek 100 

Charlie Awde Stream 100 

Cowan Stream 700 

Dawson's Creek 500 

DeLong Creek 900 

Dyer's Creek 1,100 

Frew's Creek 200 

Goodman's Pond 200 

Hall's Stream 200 

Harris Creek 300 

Laing's Stream 100 

Luxton's Creek 1,000 

Mercer's Creek 200 

Millson Creek 100 

Muldrew Creek 200 

Powell's Creek 200 

Sowden Stream 200 

Unnamed Creek 400 

Frontenac: 

Camp Lake 2,400 

Crotch Lake 1,500 

Gibson Lake 4,800 

Grindstone Lake 4,800 

Lucky Lake 2,400 



Mackie Lake 2,000 

Mallory Creek 4,800 

Quackenbush Lake 2,000 

Reid's Lake 2,400 

Rock Lake 2,400 

Round Schooner Lake 1,000 

Schooner Lake 1,800 

Spring Creek 1,000 

Grey: 

Bass Lake 3,000 

Beatty Saugeen River 4,300 

Beaver River 4,600 

Bells Creek 600 

Big Head River 3,600 

Black's Beach 3,600 

Black Creek 1,000 

Boyds Lake 5,400 

Boyne River 4,100 

Caseman's Creek 200 

Christie Lake 2,550 

Cotter's Creek 300 

Craigs Creek 300 

Cullen Lake 100 

Deer Creek 1,800 

Ewart Lake 6,600 

Ferguson Creek 950 

Firths Creek 1,800 

Glen Creek 1,800 

Hayward Falls 1,200 

Hydro Pond 7,200 

Lamont's Creek 100 

Lawrence Creek 950 

Manx Creek 1,800 

Mary Lake 200 

McCaslin Creek 200 

McConnell Creek 1,000 

McGowans Dam 1,800 

Mcintosh Lake 1,000 

McLean's Creek 200 

McMullen's Creek 950 

Munshaw Lake 500 

Oxenden Creek 3,300 

Paddy's Creek 3,600 

Rocky Saugeen 4,800 

Saugeen River 18,850 

Spey River 2,500 

Spring Creek 650 

Stream at Markdale 1,000 

Styx River 650 

Sydenham River 11,800 

Tannery Creek 650 

Walker Creek 300 

Williams Lake 3,000 

Youngs Lake 1,500 

Haliburton: 

Bear Creek 500 

Bitter Lake 1,200 

Clear Lake 2,400 

Cranberry Lake 1,000 

Davis Lake 400 

Fletcher Lake 1,000 

Gull River 1,000 

Gun Lake 4,800 



42 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1941) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940— Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT— Continued 

Haliburton — Continued. 

Harvey Lake 350 

Hawke River 500 

Hollow Lake 4,800 

McCue Creek 1,500 

Oxtongue Lake 1,500 

Partridge Lake 500 

Pen Lake 1,500 

Raven Lake 2,750 

Round Lake 350 

Scotch Line Creek 500 

Stormy Creek 500 

Sunken Lake 500 

Welcome Lake 1,500 

Hastings: 

Alexander Creek 1,500 

Banker Lake 3,600 

Bob Whyte Lake 800 

Brett Lake 2,400 

Buck Lake 2,400 

Cannon's Lake 1,200 

Canoe Lake 2,400 

Cockburn Lake 2,400 

Deer River 9,600 

Devil Lake 2,400 

Diamond Lake 4,800 

Echo Lake 3,000 

Egan Creek 14,400 

Faulkner's Creek 1,500 

Fraser Creek 4,800 

Eraser Lake 2,400 

Geens Creek 2,400 

Green Lake (Bangor) 3,000 

Green Lake (Cashel) 2,400 

Hineses Lake 1,600 

Jardison Lake 1,200 

Little Lighthouse Lake 1,200 

Little Mississippi Lake 4,800 

Long Lake (Herschel) 1,200 

Long Lake (Mayo) 2,000 

MacKenzie Lake 2,400 

Mill Creek 4,200 

Mud Lake 1,200 

Mud Turtle Lake 2,400 

Oak Lake 3,000 

Papineau Creek 4,800 

Potter Lake 2,400 

Rawdon Creek 7,200 

Shire Creek 4,800 

Smiths Lake 5,400 

Squires Creek 9,600 

Stoney Lake 2,400 

Thirty Island Creek 2,400 

Huron: 

Belgrave Creek 300 

Foster Creek 500 

Glaziers Creek 300 

Maitland River 2,400 

St. Helen's Creek 500 

Spring Creek 300 



Kenora: - 

Elbow Lake 

Little Vermilion Lake and 

Streams 

Silver Lake 

Lanark: 

Craigs Creek 

Paul's Creek 

Long Sue Creek 

Lennox-Addington : 

Beaver Creek 

Brown's Lake 

Burns Lake 

Conner's Lake 

Copeland Lake 

Dafoe Lake 

Douglas Lake 

East Lake 

Green Lake 

Kilborn Lake 

Long Lake 

Loon Lake 

Rattan Lake 

Rock Lake 

Shiner Creek 

Snake Creek 

White Lake 

Lincoln: 

St. Davids Spring Creek . . 



2,500 

7,800 
2,500 



1,500 
3,600 
1,200 



4,800 
3,200 
3,200 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
1,600 
1,600 
4,800 
1,000 
2,400 
1,000 
4,800 
2,400 
2,400 
4,800 
9,600 



2,000 



Manitoulin: 

Badger Creek 3,500 

Barr's Creek 6,600 

Bluejay Creek 30.000 

Bonnie Doone Creek 1,600 

Hare's Creek 2,600 

Manitou River 25,000 

Mindemoya River 30,000 

Nortons Creek 2,000 

Silver Creek 1,600 

Srigley Creek 5,200 

Spring Creek 6,000 

Middlesex: 

Fanshaw Creek 2,150 

Wye Creek 3,000 

Muskoka: 

Atkinson Lake 800 

Axles Lake 2,400 

Beaver Creek 6,000 

Bella Lake 6,000 

Bells Lake 2,000 

Big East River 24,000 

Big Turtle Lake 1,600 

Big Wind Lake 1,600 

Bird Lake 1,600 

Black Creek 6,000 

Black River 3,200 

Bradford Creek 1,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1939-40 



43 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940— Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT— Continued 

Muskoka — Continued 

Buck Lake 3,200 

Clear Lake (McLean) 1,600 

Clear Lake (Oakley) 3,000 

Clear Lake (Ridout) 5,000 

Clear Lake (Sinclair) 3,000 

Coopers Lake 4,000 

Deep Lake 3,200 

Dog Lake 3,000 

East River 3,000 

Eastall Lake 2,000 

Echo Lake 11,000 

Fairy Lake Creeks 6,000 

Fox Lake 6,000 

Eraser Lake 1,000 

Gibbs Lake 4,000 

Goose Lake 6,000 

Grants Lake 3,200 

Grindstone Lake 1,600 

Gull Lake 3,200 

Hecks Lake 4,000 

Helve Lake 2,000 

High Lake 2,000 

Jessops Creek 3,000 

Lake of Bays 19,200 

Limpers Lake 1,600 

Little East River 12,000 

Little Turtle Lake 1,600 

Little Vernon Lake 1,000 

Long Lake 3,200 

Loon Lake 1,000 

Loon Lake Creek 2,000 

Mary Lake 6,000 

Muskoka River 49,200 

Peninsula Lake 12,000 

Rebecca Lake 6,000 

Red Chalk Lake 5,000 

Round Lake 6,000 

Shoe Lake 1,500 

Skeleton River 5,500 

Solitaire Lake 6,000 

Sparks Lake 1,000 

Split Rock Lake 2,000 

Trout Lake 600 

Upper Shewfelt Lake 800 

Vernon Lake Creek 6,000 

Waseosa Lake 6,000 

White Lake 3,200 

Wolf Lake 1,500 

Nipissing: 

Acanthus Lake 250 

Antoine Creek 3,400 

Bakers Creek 1,500 

Balsam Creek 3,400 

Bastien Creek 1,500 

Billy Lake 1,000 

Billy Neil Creek 1,500 

Blue Lake 250 

Burnt Creek 2,000 

Burnt Island Lake 3,000 

Burrett's Creek 3,000 

Cache Lake 2,500 



Callahan Lake 1,500 

Canisbay Lake 1,000 

Canoe Lake 2,500 

Cauchon Lake 250 

Cedar Lake 250 

Chippewa Creek 3,400 

Clark Lake 500 

Clear Lake (Chambers) 800 

Clear Lake (Field) 3,000 

Clear Lake (Lyell) 500 

Clear Lake (Notman) 1,000 

Cold Stream 500 

Coon Lake 1,000 

Crane Lake 1,000 

Crooked Lake 200 

Cutler Lake 1,600 

Devils Lake 800 

Dorans Creek 4,000 

Emerald Lake 2,500 

Finlayson Lake 1,500 

Found Lake 1,000 

Four Mile Creek 8,000 

Gauthier Lake 250 

Gauthier Pond 750 

Gilmour Lake 250 

Gorman Creek 1,500 

Grand Lake 250 

Green Lake 500 

Guppy Lake 800 

Henderson Lake 1,500 

Heron Lake 500 

Hot Lake 1,000 

Jocko River 12,800 

Jubilee Lake 1,000 

Kioshqua Lake 250 

Lake St. Andrew 250 

Lake of Two Rivers 2,000 

Little Island Lake 1,000 

Little Jocko River 6,400 

Loon Lake 800 

Lost Lake 1,000 

McDonald Lake 1,500 

McGee Creek 1,500 

Mew Lake 500 

Moores Lake 2,000 

North River 13,350 

Opeongo River 250 

Opinicon Creek 2,800 

Park Lake 1,000 

Radiant Lake 250 

Red Rock Lake 250 

Robitaille Lake 500 

Rock Lake 500 

Smoke Lake 2,000 

Smoky Creek 3,750 

Source Lake 1,500 

South Tea Lake 1,000 

Spawning Lake 800 

Speckled Trout Lake 500 

Spring Lake (McLaren) 3,400 

Spring Lake (Sisk) 1,500 

Stony Creek (Lyman) 1,000 

Stony Creek (Notman) 500 

Sturgeon Lake 3,400 

Tanamakoon Lake 2,000 

Timagami Lake 2,800 



44 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1941) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940— Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT— Continued 

Nipissing — Continued. 

Trout Lake 800 

Trout Lake (Parkman) 1,000 

Twenty Minute Lake 1,600 

Webb Lake 1,800 

Whitefish Lake 3,000 

White Partridge Lake 250 

Whitney Lake 2,600 

Wolf Lake 8,000 

Norfolk: 

Almond Creek 500 

Bassels Creek 500 

Big Creek 1,540 

Campbell Creek 500 

Eckardt Creek 500 

Howey Creek 500 

Kent Creek 2,000 

Nanticoke Creek 3,000 

Patterson Creek 1,000 

Ryerse Creek 1,000 

Synden Creek 500 

Venison Creek 3,000 

Wolfe Creek 500 

Northumberland : 

Baltimore Creek 2,800 

Big Creek 4,000 

Burnley Creek 4,800 

Chidleys Creek 100 

Dartford Creek 2,400 

Dawson Creek 1,500 

DeLong's Creek 1,600 

Duncan's Creek 800 

Little Cole Creek 4,000 

Little Lake 3,600 

Mill Creek 200 

O'Grady's Creek 2,700 

Pegman's Creek 1,600 

Quinn's Creek 800 

Robins Creek 200 

Sandy Flat Creek 1,600 

Valleau's Creek 800 

Ontario: 

Beaver River 2,400 

Cameron Creek 1,000 

Elgin Park Pond 1,000 

Parry Sound: 

Bar Lake Creek 500 

Barrett's Creek 1,200 

Barton Creek 1,500 

Beaver Lake 1,200 

Big Clam Lake 800 

Big Mink Lake 3,200 

Black Creek (Gurd) 1,500 

Black Creek (Strong) 2,200 

Bradford Creek 600 

Buck Lake 500 

Burley's Creek 500 

Cheer Lake 500 

Clear Lake (Armour) 1,000 

Clear Lake (Laurier) 2,500 



Clear Lake 

(South Himsworth) 500 

Clear Lake (Wilson) 700 

Commanda Lake 1,600 

Crooked Lake 4,200 

Cummings Lake 600 

Deer Creek 700 

Deer Lake 700 

Deer River 1,700 

Distress River 2,800 

Dunkers Creek 1,000 

Eagle Lake 1,000 

Fagans Creek 600 

Fleming Lake 1,300 

Franks Lake 1,000 

Genesee Creek 1,200 

Gorge Lake 750 

Gull Lake 500 

Haggerty Creek 500 

Hog Lake 800 

Horn Lake 1,800 

Hughes Lake 2,250 

Hungry Lake Creek 750 

Island Lake 600 

Jacks Lake Creek 400 

James Creek 900 

Jordons Creek 600 

Lemmons Creek 100 

Little Mink Lake 2,250 

Lynx Lake 800 

Madill Creek 500 

Magnetawan River 11,500 

McCullough Creek 2,400 

Otter Lake 1,300 

Owl Lake 600 

Paisley Creek 1,300 

Pool Lake 900 

Proudfoot Creek 500 

Ragged Creek 900 

Rainy Lake 3,000 

Rat Lake 1,700 

Round Lake 1,750 

Roussel's Creek 500 

Sand Lake 3,400 

Smiths Creek 1.300 

South River 2,400 

Spring Creek (Chapman) . . . 1,500 

Spring Creek (Lount) 6,500 

Steels Creek 1,500 

Stellars Creek 600 

Stoney Lake 2,800 

Stream in Ryerson Township 1,700 

Surprise Creek 750 

Tea Lake 1,000 

Three Mile Creek 1,400 

Trout Creek (Himsworth) . . 3,400 

Trout Creek (Laurier) 2,700 

Peel: 

Credit River 5,200 

Humber River 2,100 

Peterborough: 

Big Ouse River 4,800 

Carvers Creek 1,500 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1939-40 



45 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940— Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT— Continued 

Peterborough — Continued 

Cavan Stream 6,800 

Eel's Creek 3,200 

Little Ouse River 4,800 

Mount Pleasant Stream 3,200 

Otter Creek 2,600 

Plateau Creek 2,600 

Sophies Lake 1,600 

Union Creek 4,800 

Renfrew : 

Barbout Creek 2,000 

Battery Creek 500 

Bear Lake 1,500 

Biggs Creek 2,000 

Big Round Lake 2,000 

Bissett Creek 3,250 

Blueberry Lake 2,000 

Brennan's Creek 1,500 

Byers Creek 2,500 

Caldwell Creek 1,000 

Centers Lake 4,000 

Clarkes Creek 1,500 

Cochrane Creek 1,500 

Crooked Lake Creek 1,000 

Cross Lake 1,500 

Crozier Creek 2,500 

Deux Riviere Creek 2,500 

Devils Lake 1,000 

Diamond Lake Creek 1,500 

Dodge Lake 2,000 

Dominick Lake 1,500 

Finley Creek 1,500 

Gardez Pieds Creek 4,500 

Godin Creek 250 

Grant Creek 3,250 

Green Lake Creek 1,500 

Gultz Creek 1,500 

Hammel Lake 200 

Hart Lake 1,500 

Harvey Creek 3,000 

Heney Creek 2,000 

Horton Creek 500 

Hughey Creek 1,000 

Indian River 3,000 

Johnson Lake 500 

Josie Creek 1,500 

Kelly Lake Creek 3,500 

Koehls Creek 1,500 

Lake in the Hills 1,000 

Locksley Lake Creek 2,500 

Lost Lake 1,500 

MacKay Creek 4,500 

Marrow Lake 3,000 

McDermott's Creek 1,250 

Meilleur Lake 1,000 

Miller's Lake 1,500 

Nadeau Creek 1,500 

Paugh Lake 3,000 

Pumaile Lake ^ . . . 1,500 

Quadville Creek 1,500 

Rattery Lake 1,500 

Reserve Creek 1,000 



Rockingham Creek 

Round Lake 

Siroski's Creek 

Smith Creek 

Spring Creek 

Stewart Creek 

Toohey Lake 

Trout Lake 

Tucker Creek 

Turner Creek 

Unnamed Creek, Brougham 
Wylie Creek 

Simcoe: 

Black Creek 

Boyne River 

Colwell's Creek 

Hill's Creek 

Matheson Creek 



1,500 
4,000 
3,000 
2,500 
1,500 
3,000 
3,000 
1,500 
3,000 
4,500 
1,000 
3,000 



1,500 
1,000 
1,500 
1,500 
1.500 



Sudbury: 

Anderson Lake 5,000 

Awry Creek 6,000 

Barley Creek 15,000 

Bertrand Creek 5,000 

Bull Lake 19,000 

Cameron Creek 2,000 

Coniston Creek 5,000 

Crystal Lake 3,000 

Ella Lake 10,000 

Emery Creek 5,000 

Farm Lake 3,000 

Fournier Creek 20,000 

Geneva Creek 15,000 

Green Lake 10,000 

Johns Creek 30,000 

Junction Creek 5,000 

Karl Creek 2,000 

Long Lake (Harrow) 1,000 

Long Lake (Strathearn) .... 1,500 

M'CLanders Creek 7,000 

McLeod Creek 3,000 

Michauds Creek 10,000 

Moose Creek 4,000 

Post Creek 4,000 

Poulin Creek 10,000 

Pumphouse Creek 30,000 

Rapid River 9,000 

Rock Lake 2,500 

Round Lake 5,000 

Sandcherry Creek 10,000 

Sauble River 50,000 

Second Lake 3,500 

Shenango Creek 1,450 

Shoal Lake Creek 1,000 

Trout Creek 3,000 

Trout Lake 2,500 

Trout Lake (5-6) 4,000 

Twin Lake 1,500 

Veuve River 20,000 

Waddell Creek 9,000 

Wavy Creek 10,000 

Windy Creek 20,000 



46 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 (1941) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940~Continued 



SPECKLED TKOUT— Continued 

Thunder Bay: 

Anderson Creek 2,400 

Arnold Creek 1,000 

Arrow River 3,000 

Bass Creek 3,000 

Bat Lake 2,000 

Beardmore Creek 3,000 

Bear Trap Lake 3,000 

Beaver Lake 3,000 

Big Duck Lake 4,000 

Big McKenzie River 12,000 

Big Partridge Lake 3,000 

Billy Creek 1,500 

Bishop Lake 2,000 

Blind River 7,500 

Bluff Lake • 2,000 

Boulevard Lake 3^000 

Brule Creek 7^000 

Canadian National Rly. Lake 

Mile 51 1,500 

Cavern Creek 4,000 

Cedar Creek 15,000 

Clearwater Creek 1,500 

Clearwater Lake 500 

Coldwater River 14,000 

Corbett Creek 5,000 

Cousineau Lake 2,000 

Current River 12,000 

Dan's Lake 2,400 

Deception Lake 2*000 

Deep Lake 1^000 

Devils Lake 2,000 

Dublin Creek 4^000 

Duck Lake 2^000 

Fall Lake 2^000 

Fire Lake 'goO 

Fire Hill Lake 1,000 

Fischer Lake 4*000 

Fraser Creek 6^000 

Golden Gate Lake 4*000 

Good Morning Lake 10^000 

Gowganda Creek 2,000 

Grand Lake 2*000 

Granite Lake 3^000 

Grass Lake 1^500 

Gravel Lake SJOOO 

Gravel River 6000 

Green Lake 3|ooo 

Gunderson Lake 1,000 

Hackle Lake 2^000 

Half Moon Lake 2ioOO 

Hazelwood Creek 6,000 

Hemdick Lake 4,000 

Hidden Lake 3,000 

Hornblend Lake 2,000 

Indian Lake 1,000 

Jackpine Lake 3,000 

Jackpine River 1,000 

Jackson Lake 2,000 

Johnson Lake 100 

Kaministiquia River 6,000 

Lake Ada 2,000 

Lake Eva 3,500 

La Saga Lake 3,000 



Little Lake 2,000 

Little Partridge Lake 2,400 

Little Whitefish River 3,000 

Loftquist Lake 18,500 

Log Lake 600 

Lonely Island Lake 2,000 

Loon Creek 2,000 

Loon Lake 27,400 

Lost Lake 2,400 

Lower Good Morning Lake . . 5,000 

Lower Pass Lake 3,000 

Lower Twin Lake 2,400 

Lower Wiggins Lake 5,000 

Mac's Lake 800 

MacGregor Lake 1,400 

Maggot River 1,000 

Mclntyre River 14,000 

McLean's Lake 2,500 

McVicars Creek 9,000 

Mine Lake 3,500 

Mirror Lake 3,000 

Moonshine Lake 2,750 

Moose Creek 3.000 

Moose Lake 3,000 

Morgan's Creek 2,000 

Mountain Lake 500 

Mud Lake 308 

Neebing River 28,500 

Nilson Lake 2,000 

Nipigon River 58,400 

Nishin Lake 6,000 

Oliver Lake ' 12,500 

Ozone Creek 2,900 

Paradise Lake 2,000 

Park Lake 1,500 

Parsons Lake 4,000 

Pass Lake 12,000 

Pearl River 6,000 

Pickerel Lake 2,000 

Pitch Creek 6,000 

Pocket Lake 500 

Rainbow Lake 3,000 

Rat Lake 1,600 

Ring Lake 6,400 

Ross Lake 3,000 

Round Lake 2,000 

Sameco Lake 2,000 

Sand Lake 6,400 

Selim River 1,000 

Silver Islet Lake 3,000 

Silver Lake 7,000 

Single Lake 3,000 

South Sucker Creek 5,000 

Sox Lake 2,500 

Spring Creek 6,000 

Spring Lake (Leduc) 2,000 

Spring Lake (McTavish) 400 

Squaw Creek 3,000 

Star Lake 3,000 

Strawberry Creek 6,000 

Surprise Lake 1,500 

Trout Creek 5,000 

Trout Lake (Jacques, etc.) . . 28,000 

Trout Lake (Stirling) 24,000 

Twin Lakes 3,000 

Uncle Tom's Lake 3,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1939-40 



47 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940— Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT— Continued 



Thunder Bay — Continued. 
Unnamed Lakes and Creeks 

Upper Morgan Creek 

Upper Pass Lake 

Upper Pearl River 

Upper Twin Lakes 

Walker Lake 

Wanoga Lake 

Warnford Creek 

Whitefish River 

Whitewood Creek 

Wideman Lake 

Wild Goose Creek 

Wolf Lake 

Wolf Pup Lake 

Temiskaming: 

Beaver Lake 

Belle Lake 

Boston Creek 

Butler Lake 

Calcite Creek 

Charlotte Lake 

Collacutt Lake 

Crooked Creek 

Crystal Lake 

Dandurand Creek 

Gleason Creek 

Graham Lake 

Green Lake 

Halfway Creek 

Hooker Creek 

Jean Baptiste Lake 

Lake of Bays 

Latour Creek 

Leacock Creek 

Legare Creek 

Linnament Lake 

Little Otter 

Loon Lake , 

Moffat Creek 

Munro Lake 

Nellie Lake 

Pike Creek 

Rowley Lake 

St. Anthony Creek 

Small Spot Creek 

South Wabi Creek 

Spring Creek , 

Sunshine Lake 

Wabi Creek 

Watabeag River 

Wendigo Creek 

Whiskey Jack Creek 

Victoria: 

Corbin's Creek , 

Crego's Creek , 

Waterloo: 

Elora Creek , 

Erbsville Creek 

Mannheim Creek 



2,500 
2,000 
3,000 
6,000 
3,000 
6,000 
1,500 
3,000 
6,000 
6,500 
6,000 
1,500 
3,000 
3,000 



800 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,500 
1,500 
1,000 
1,000 
5,000 
1,200 
1,000 
1,000 
1,200 

800 

800 
1,000 
1,300 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 

800 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 

800 
1,200 
1,500 
1,300 
1,000 

800 
1,000 
1,500 
1,500 
1,000 

800 
1,000 
1.800. 



300 

300 



2,000 
1,200 
1.200 



Wellington: 

Bell's Creek 3,600 

Dwyer Creek 300 

Mallot's Creek 500 

Mill Creek 600 

Ospring Creek 600 

Saugeen River 7,200 

York: 

Doan's Pond 150 

Miscellaneous: 

Sales — Demonstration and 

propagation purposes 9,035 



ADULTS 

Algoma: 

Island Lake 1,100 

Lake Elizabeth 150 

Lake Maude 150 

Thunder Bay: 

Cedar Creek 200 

Coldwater River 985 

Half Moon Lake 200 

Loftquist Lake 800 

Loon Lake 400 

Moose Creek 200 

Nipigon River 240 

Spring Creek 250 

Squaw Creek 300 

Trout Creek 300 

Trout Lake 800 

Miscellaneous: 
Sales — Demonstration and 

propagation purposes 240 



HERRING FRY 

Frontenac: 

Rideau Lake 1,000,000 

Prince Edward: 

Bay of Quinte 2,425,000 

Great Lakes: 

Lake Erie 33,750,000 

Lake Ontario 1,375,000 



WHITEFISH FRY 

Kenora: 

Eagle Lake 1,000,000 

Lake of the Woods 15,894,000 

Red Lake 500,000 

Separation Lake 500,000 

Trout Lake 600,000 



48 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1941) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940— Continued 

WHITEFISH FRY— Continued 

Manitoulin: 

Manitou Lake 1,250,000 

Prince Edward: 

Bay of Quinte 61,100,000 

Rainy River: 
Rainy Lake 19,300,000 

Thunder Bay: 

Lake Nipigon 1,000,000 

York: 

Lake Simcoe 1,500,000 

Great Lakes: 

Lake Superior 6,465,000 

North Channel 18,800,000 

Georgian Bay 60,520,000 

Lake Huron 26,015,000 

Lake Erie 83,588,000 

Lake Ontario 28,625,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1939-40 



49 



APPENDIX No. 2 
DISTRIBUTION OF FISH ACCORDING TO SPECIES— 1935 TO 1939, INCLUSIVE 



1935 



1936 



1937 



1938 



1939 



Large-mouthed Black Bass 

Fry 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings & Adults 

Small-mouthed Black Bass 

Fi-y 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings & Adults 



Maskinonge 

Eyed Eggs 

Fry 

Fingerlings 



Perch— Fry 



Pickerel (Yellow) 

Eyed Eggs 
Fit 



Pickerel (Blue) 
Fry 



Brown Trout 

Fingerlings 
Yearlings 
Adults . . . . 



Lake Trout 

Eyed Eggs 
Fry 

Fingerlings 



Landlocked Salmon (Ouananiche) 
Yearlings 



A-tlantic Salmon- 
Yearlings . 



-Fry 



Rainbow Trout 

Eyed Eggs 

Fi-y 

Fingerlings 
Yearlings . 
Adults 



Kamloops Trout — Fingerlings 
Yearlings 



Speckled Trout 
Eyed Eggs 

Fry 

Fingerlings 
Yearlings . 
Adults . . . . 



Whitefish 
Eyed 

t ry , 



Eggs 



Herring 

Eyed Eggs 
Fiy 



Golden Shiners 
Miscellaneous 
TOTALS 



130,000 
2.153 
27* 



696,000 

153,065 

3,435 



460,000 
53,031,400 



2.000,000 
229,629,000 



109,000 
9,650 
6* 



7,773,034 
14,564,000 



13,640 



45,000 



780,000 

69,380 

5,202 



274,000 
,080,000 



2,000,000 
300,759,500 



147,050 
7,290 



3,209,400 

4,165,000 

18,253,244 



134,075 
314 



85,464 
10,796 



1,645,000 

5,013,831 

35,421 

5,420 



296,482,000 



43,760,000 
500 



655,747,231** 



133,000 
3,507 



28,600 

182,000 

1,053,050 

557,270 

6,081 



112,500 
428,402,000 



56,120,000 



862.401,472 



135.000 

4,120 

92 



1,275,000 

141,900 

5,893 



420,700 
9,150,000 



2,000,000 
263,743,400 



1,000,000 



97,484 



3,225.000 

4,667,000 

15,782,350 



7,200 



105,240 



80,000 



384,725 

1,167,073 

16,150 



4,000,000 
383,683,900 



30,000 
5,270.000 



3,053 
696,395,280 



57,500 
8,061 



804,000 

169,800 

7,738 



2,005,000 
59,150,000 



2,012,500 
271,567,500 



500,000 



59,592 



2,437,000 

7,665,000 

10,575,200 



4,800 



321,600 
6,727 



25.821 



1,000 



373,314 

2,083,538 

4,452 



323,700,500 



49,725,000 



733,265,643 



1.890 
497 



1,386,000 

226,325 

7,739 



120,000 

2,675,000 

1,300 

72,360,000 



7,000,000 
327.500,000 



29,954 
375,070 



1,845,850 
7.236,900 
9,964,400 



109,635 

23,145 

1,009 

105,000 



337,000 

2,976,559 

6,315 



326,657,000 



J, 550, 000 



41 
799,496,629 



Exhibition fish 

This total does not include a distribution of 132, 

immediately preceding the said report. 



3,600 fry and eyed eggs during the five months 



50 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1941) 



APPENDIX 



GAME AND FISHERIES 
Statistics of the Fishing Industry in the Public Waters of 

EQUIP 



District 



No. 

of 

Men 



Tugs 



No. Tons 



Value 



Gasoline 
Launches 



No. 



Value 



Sail and 
Row Boats 



No. 



Value 



Gill Neta 



Yards 



Value 



Northern Inland Waters 

Lake Superior , 

North Channel 

Georgian Bay 

Lake Huron 

Lake St. Clair 

Lake Erie 

Lake Ontario 

Southern Inland Waters 

Tota-ls 



825 



! I 

3 

10 



432 
389 
132 
943 
612 
328 



15 
328 
118 
490 
454 



$ 10,200 

63.000 

45,200 

110,624 

122,556 



786 



276,400 



143 

122 

55 

130 

122 

55 

188 

219 

14 



67,245 

45,075 

32,680 

109,740 

79,110 

13,460 

221,375 

120,375 

2,770 



272 

43 

45 

134 

32 

75 

125 

129 

107 



$13,802 
2,825 
2.780 
5,955 
1,975 
3,875 
6,530 
4,682 
3,828 



I 

539,2951 

891,1281 

631.6681 

1,329.3951 

1.589.8621 



$ 65,160 

99.067 

74.811 

137.282 

166,881 



2,100,6631 
1.406.0041 



249.146 
126,590 



4.2061 92 

I 



2, 1911 $627,980 

1 



I i 

1048 I $691,8801 

I I 



962 



46,2521 8,488,0151 918,937 
I I 



APPENDIX 

QUANTITIES OF 



District 


Herring 


Whitefish 


Trout 


Pike 


Pickerel 
(Blue) 


Pickerel 
(Dore) 




lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 




897 

1.398,408 

5.133 

54.007 

263.127 


1,649.657 

339.609 

157.238 

1,118.017 

115.061 

650 

2.312.167 

664.595 

9.979 


258,818 
1.307.365 

504.365 
1.448,917 
1.250,115 


744.792 

8.985 

64.028 

25,565 

616 

32,587 

97,217 

87,794 

1,685 


125,066 
11.983 


1,294.169 
93 962 






33 '^6'' 






608 

4.844 

4.075 

5,910,769 

100.538 

1,566 


103,538 




213,410 




54.935 




1.973.355 

1,626,994 

305 


25 

268.835 

37,362 


586.100 




10.259 




4,587 






TnfjilH 


5,322,226 


6,366,973 


5,075,802 


1,068,269 


6.157,383 


2,389,635 








.05 


.11 


.11 


.06 


.05 


.11 






Values 


$266,111.80 


$700,367.03 


$558,338.22 


$68,796.14 


$807,869.15 


$262,859.85 







ANNUAL REPORT, 1939-40 



51 



No. 3 

DEPARTMENT, ONTARIO 

Province of Ontario, for the Year Ending December 31st, 1939. 

MENT 



Seine Nets 


Pound Nets 


Hoop Nets 


Dip and 
Roll Nets 


Night Lines 


Spears 


Freezers & 
Ice Houses 


Piers and 
Wharves 


Total 
Value 


No. 
\ 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 




I 1 




1 

46 $ 14,035 

50 16,550 

56 23.100 

79 84.050 

1311 78.250 

124| 13.100 

6391 311.700 


56 


$1,985 






3,400 
18 


$360 






1 1 
119 $27,480| 9.^ 


$10,322 

9,060 

12,400 

31,731 

6,520 

3,725 

36,035 

7,010 

285 


$210,589 













50 






42 14,085 
411 12.500 


38 
29 
63 
29 
12 
93 
32 
6 


249,712 



















203,471 


4 EOO 


$585 


55 


755 






16.562 

in AOA 


4.134 

2,855 
214 




. . 


65 
68 
18 
104 
34 


18,765 

26,300 

5,700 

107,025 

7,515 

1,514 


503,621 






1 

2 

6 

24 

35 




$ 6 







484,452 


30 




6,700 

13,900 

620 

4,295 


3,943 

7,410 

654 

12,312 






102| 3.300 


44,119 


39 




10 
419 
220 


1.000 

10.680 

5.517 


301 2.5001 52 
1371 2.400| 1.020 
17f;l fiool 210 






1,216,073 


12 


. 




278,663 


52 




lOfi 


875 


27,486 




1 


III! 




137 


26.015 


24,904 


1 
1.121|$540.185 

1 


$ 
760 19.937 


68 


$4491 39,184 $8,895| 105| $875 

1 1 1 


1 
513|$220,884 395 

1 


$117,088 $3,218,816 

1 



No. 4 

FISH TAKEN 





Sturgeon 


Eels 


Perch 


Tullibee 


Catfish 


Garp 


Mixed 
Coarse 


Caviare 


Total 


Value 




lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 




1 

166,940 
3,173 
1 4,231 
1 1,225 
1 2.951 
1 8.834 
1 18.169 
7,973 


1 

1 


23,924 

185 

10,062 

5,982 

291,552 

39,349 

1,407,232 

153,048 

4.041 


198,258 

36,629 

3,983 


1 
1,048| 34,435 

1 


1 
383 8181 1 79Q 


4,883,551 

3,307,237 

959.683 

2 988 821 


$498,193.32 

269,245.94 

88,348.1$ 

.11 n 199 !m 





106,938 
176 673 


1 




fill fift? 


A^ 





98,4831 8,7671 47,664 
210,512 K SQ.^l n ncf? 


76,005] 43 

132,3261 243 

331,3231 344 

1.535,4221 903 

230 4291 «ft 





2,495,9521 220,493.01 
784 2991 '11 K14 «« 







61,5311 250,671 
110.3571 312,295 

87,4581 251.295 
102 066| 242.019 







14.264,011 

3.512,040 

654,695 


867,889.51 
234,437.83 


22.742 




1,566 4,587 




9.c;l CiHF, 


1 


34,272.18 


1 




1 1 


1 




i 1 

1 215,062 27,329 


1 1 1 
1,935,3751 547 865| 379 6811 i ^^'> '«'* 


3.224,019 3,387 


33,850.289 






1 i 







1 
.401 .07 


.05 


1 
.061 .08 


.05 


1 
.031 1.00 

1 




! 


1 


1 

1 $86,024,801 $1,913.03 

1 1 


1 1 
$96,768.75 $32,871.90| $30,374.48 

1 


1 ! 1 

57.114.151 96,720.571 3,387.00 

1 1 


2,564,516.37 



52 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1941) 

APPENDIX No. 5 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE YIELD OF THE FISHERIES OF ONTARIO 



Kind 



Herring 

Whitefish 

Trout 

Pike 

Pickerel (Blue) . . 
Pickerel (Dore) . 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Course 
Caviare 



TOTALS 34,913,941 33,850,289 



1938 
Pounds 



4,702 
4,947 
6,040 



1,003 

7,317 

2,312 

157 

52 

2,977 

759 

474 

1,072 

3,091 

3 



917 
679 
471 

787 
124 
830 
582 
606 
846 
778 
058 
070 
352 
841 



1939 
Pounds 



5,322,226 

6,366,973 

5,075,802 

1,063,269 

6,157,383 

2,389,635 

215,062 

27,329 

1,935,375 

547,865 

379,681 

1,142,283 

3,224,019 

3,387 



Increase 
Pounds 



619,309 
1,419.294 

* "5V,482 

' '76,8 6 5 

57,480 



70,213 
132,667 



Decrease 
Pounds 



964,669 
1,1*5 9,741 



25,277 

1,042,471 

211,913 

94,377 



454 



*1, 063, 652 



* Net Decrease 

APPENDIX No. 6 

STATEMENT OF THE YIELD OF THE FISHERIES OF ONTARIO 

1939 



Kind 



Quantity 
Pounds 



Price per 
Pound 



Estimated 
Value 



Herring 

Whitefish 

Trout 

Pike 

Pickerel (Blue) . 
Pickerel (Dore) 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Course 
Caviare 

TOTALS 



5,322 

6,366 

5,075 

1,063 

6,157 

2,389 

215 

27 

1,935 

547 

379 

1,142 

3,224 

3 



,226 
,973 
,802 
,269 
,383 
,635 
,062 
,329 
,375 
,865 
,681 
,283 
,019 
,387 



.05 
.11 
.11 
.06 
.05 
.11 
.40 
.07 
.05 
.06 
.08 
.05 
.03 
1.00 



$266 

700 

558 

63 

307 

262 

86 

1 

96 

32 

30 

57 

96 

3 



,111.30 
,367.03 
,338.22 
,796.14 
,869.15 
,859.85 
,024.80 
,913.03 
,768.75 
,871.90 
,374.48 
,114.15 
,720.57 
,387.00 



33,850,289 



$2,564,516.37 



APPENDIX No. 7 

ESTIMATED VALUE OF FISH TAKEN FROM THE WATERS 

OF THE PROVINCE 

1920 — 1939 INCLUSIVE 



1920 $2,691,093.74 

1921 2,656,775.82 

1922 2,807,525.21 

1923 2,886,398.76 

1924 3,139,279.03 

1925 2,858,854.79 

1926 2,643,686.28 

1927 3.229,143.57 

1928 3.033,944.42 

1929 3,054,282.02 



1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 



12,539 
2.442 
2.286 
2.186 
2.316 
2.633 
2.614 
2.644 
2.573 
2.564 



,904.91 
,703.55 
573.50 
083.74 
,965.50 
512.90 
748.49 
,163.49 
,640.97 
,516.37 



Thirty-Fourth Annual Report 



OF THE 



Game and Fisheries 
Department 

1940- 1941 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 9, 1942 




ONTARIO 



TORONTO 
Printed and Published by T. E. Bowman, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 4 2 



TO THE HONORABLE ALBERT MATTHEWS, 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 



MAY IT PLEASE YOUR HONOUR: 

I have the honour to submit herewith for the information of Your Honour 
and the Legislative Assembly, the Thirty-Fourth Annual Report of the Game and 
Fisheries Department of this Province, for the year ended March 31st, 1941. 

I have the honour to be. 

Your Honour's most obedient servant, 

H. C. NIXON, 

Minister in Charge, 
Department of Game and Fisheries 
Toronto, 1942. 



(ii) 



THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Game and Fisheries Department of Ontario 



TO: THE HONOURABLE H. C. NIXON, 
Minister in charge, 
Department oi Game and Fisheries. 

SIR:- 

I have the honour to submit to you herewith the Thirty-fourth Annual Report 
of the Department of Game and Fisheries, outlining a summary of the activities of 
various Departmental services, and including statistical tables for the fiscal year 
ended March 31st, 1941, as well as tables of comparison. 

INTRODUCTORY 

The Province of Ontario has been endowed with a wealth of natural charm, with 
which have been incorporated many opportunities for the enjoyment of outdoor recrea- 
tional pleasures. Its extensive water areas, virgin forests and wild lands all combine 
to make this Province a tremendous reservoir for the development of wild life. Not- 
withstanding the many physical changes that have taken place in past years it has 
been possible to maintain this outstanding characteristic in large measure, particularly 
in the northern hinterland. 

In the development of the Province its vacation and recreational possibilities 
have not been neglected and the protection and propagation of fish and game have 
been maintained and extended so as to keep pace with material development. The 
excellent fishing and hunting which are available within our borders are undoubtedly 
important factors in promoting tourist trade, and the economic value of this seasonal 
industry is too obvious to require any comment except that it provides a living for 
thousands of our citizens, and in the present emergency plays a prominent part in 
establishing foreign exchange for the purchase of essential war materials. 

This Department co-operated with the Provincial Travel and Publicity Bureau 
in providing an interesting and outstanding exhibit at the Sport Shows conducted 
in Chicago and Detroit during the months of February and March, 1941, with the object 
of endeavouring to attract increased numbers of American tourists to the Province. In 
each case considerable interest was displayed in the exhibit and the available literature 
was eagerly taken up, A special attraction at this exhibit was the regular showing 
of coloured moving pictures, replete with action, and demonstrating that the claim 
that Ontario is a sportsman's paradise was no idle boast. The friendly spirit of the 
people was very evident and, from the standpoint of improving the agreeable relations 
between two good neighbours, apart altogether from the economic value, the exhibit 
was quite successful. 

The general protective programme has recognized the various phases affecting 
supply and demand and made provision to maintain a proper balance. Large areas 
of suitable land have been set aside as sanctuaries for game, ensuring reproduction 
and perpetuation. Small game has been intensively propagated and released to re-stock 
forest and field. Hundreds of millions of fish are artificially raised in the various 

(1) 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1942) 



Departmental hatcheries and annually deposited in provincial waters, and in the 
ensuing pages it is indicated to what extent this programme was carried out during 
the period under review. 

Legislation is effective only to the extent that the provisions thereof have the 
complete support of those for whose benefit it is provided, and the success of the 
conservation programme instituted by the Department in conjunction with legislation 
depends upon the full and active co-operation of all who are interested in our wild 
life resources. The general public can and does assist the Department in many ways, 
but chiefly by preventing waste and by a careful compliance with the provisions of 
the Game and Fisheries Act and the various regulations provided under this and 
affiliated legislation. 

FINANCIAL 

Since the change in the period of the fiscal year inaugurated by the present 
Administration in 1935, the total annual revenue collected from various sources by 
the Department of Game and Fisheries has, previous to the year under review, shown 
an increase each succeeding year, and it is only natural to expect that such a notable 
showing would eventually be terminated by a decreased collection in some particular 
fiscal year. Such decrease it is necessary to record for the year 1940-41, as is shown 
in the subjoined statistical table of revenues and expenditures for the past six years: — 





Revenue 


Expenditure 
(Ordinary & Capital) 


Surplus 


1935-36 


$ 683,938.72 
782,217.63 
866,558.19 
914,475.24 
1,015,350.82 
984,800.69 


$451,041.91 
474,128.95 
563,938.33 
575,437.79 
568,198.55 
512,834.70 


$232,896.81 


1936-37 


318,088.68 


1937-38 


302,619.86 


1938-39 


339,037.45 


1939-40 


447,152.27 


1940-41 


471,965.99 







It will be observed that as compared with the revenue derived in 1939-40 that 
collected during the year covered by this report shows a reduction in the amount of 
$30,550.13. This decrease is not of sufficient proportions to cause concern and may 
be attributed principally to reduced collections from fur royalties in the neighborhood 
of $15,000.00, and a reduction in fees secured from the sale of resident hunting licenses, 
slightly in excess of $12,000.00, and from the sale of non-resident angling licenses, 
approximately $7,000.00. 

The following table of revenue collected shows the various sources from which 
it was derived and the respective amounts attributable thereto: — 



REVENUE FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st, 1941. 

ORDINARY — 

MAIN OFFICE- 
GAME— 

lyicenses — 

". ' Trapping , $ 35,795.50 

Non-resident hunting 84,265.00 

Deer J:.';; .^ 1 . . . . .^=v^ .^i . vVVV. 77,469.40 

Moose ,, 2,948'.00 

V i 1 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1940-41 



REVENUE FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st, 19 41 — Continued 

Licenses — Continued 

Gun 86,527.85 

Dog 5,746.10 

Fur Dealers 27,323.00 

Fur Farmers 8,637.50 

Tanners 160.00 

Cold Storage 178.00 

$ 329,050.35 

Royalty 101,599.18 

$ 430,649.53 

FISHERIES — 
Licenses — 

Fishing (Commercial) $ 85,914.00 

Angling 384,675.00 

$ 470,589.00 

Sales — Spawn taking 226.95 

Royalty 12,066.22 

■ $ 482,882.17 

GENERAL— 
Licenses — 

Tourist Camps $ 7,345.00 

Guides 7,456.00 

$ 14,801.00 

Fines 25,416.28 

Costs Collected (Enforcement of Game Act)... 786.78 

Sales — Confiscated articles, etc 2 4,309.12 

Rent 3,301.75 

Commission retained by Province on sale of lie. 2,170.30 

Miscellaneous 48 3.76 

$ 71,268.99 

Net Ordinary Revenue $ 984,800.69 

One fact that is worthy of comment is the large proportion of the total amount 
of $984,800.69 which was derived from the sale of non-resident licenses, both angling 
and hunting. Some forty-seven and a half per cent of the entire total, or $468,940.00 
was collected in this way, and this must be considered to be a remarkable showing 
when studied in conjunction with the feeling of uncertainty and dismay which 
generally prevailed in the summer of 1940 following the disastrous collapse of the 
French armies then engaged as our allies in the tremendous struggle against the Axis 
powers. The satisfactory conditions which are prevalent in the wildlife natural 
resources of Ontario's forests, streams and lakes, and which are an attraction and 
recreational benefit not only to our own sportsmen but also to non-resident 
anglers and hunters, are reflected to a remarkable degree in this excellent result. 

Reference has already been made to the reduced departmental revenue, as com- 
pared with that of the previous year when for the first time since the establishment 
of the Department of Game and Fisheries it exceeded the one million dollar total, and 
to the fact that the decrease was not one to cause undue concern. In explanation it 
will be noted that the figure for 1940-41 was exceeded only once during the past six 
years, viz — in the preceding fiscal year, 1939-40, and the collection of revenue in that 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1942) 



year showed an extremely remarkable increase of more than $100,000.00 over that of 
1938-39. 

As previously indicated the principal reduction in revenue may be attributed 
to the lesser amount of fur royalties which were collected during the year, and the 
sale of fewer resident hunting licenses and non-resident angling licenses. To a large 
extent reduced fur royalties could be assigned to a smaller catch of beaver, on the 
pelts of which animals the royalty is $1.00, collected when they are exported from the 
Province or tanned. In 1939-40 two limited periods of open season were provided for 
the taking of beaver, and in which two periods 33,530 pelts were taken. This total re- 
presented some 12,000 pelts more than were taken in the open season which prevailed 
in 1940-41 in which year only one period for the taking of beaver was provided. In 
addition to this there was also a considerable reduction in the number of red fox which 
were taken in the 1940-41 season as compared with the season of 1939-40. Reduced 
revenue from the sale of resident hunting licenses may reasonably be assigned to the 
intensification of industry in connection with the manufacture of materials necessary 
for the effective conduct of the war in which our nation is now engaged which un- 
doubtedly resulted in many who formerly participated in the sport which our hunting 
provides finding themselves without sufficient leisure for the pursuit of game to war- 
rant their purchase of hunting licenses. The general feeling of uncertaifity regarding 
the unfavourable war situation which prevailed throughout the summer of 1940 was no 
doubt responsible for the sale of fewer non-resident angling licenses, but the small 
total of this decrease warrants the statement that this reduction was due 
to the reason just stated rather than to any serious diminution in the quality or quan- 
tity of the diversified fishing privileges which are available in the waters of this 
Province. 

However, the complete financial statement of revenue and expenditure is prob- 
ably one of the best ever recorded by the Department. As compared with expenditures, 
both ordinary and capital, the revenue showed a surplus of $471,965.99 during the 
period under review. This favourable showing was achieved by the exercise of rigid 
control of expenditures, and the elimination of all unnecessary expense. Capital 
expenditures were reduced to practically an absolute minimum, only a total sum of 
$3,823.70 being spent under this classification. The largest capital expenditure 
amounted to $1,846.18, for the installation of a concrete whiteflsh and herring battery 
at the Provincial Fish Hatchery at Glenora, in Prince Edward County. For the erec- 
tion of a cabin at the Martin River Camp, in the Temagami area, for the use of the 
local Game and Fisheries enforcement officer, was spent the sum of $541.58. The 
balance of $1,435.94 was used to provide necessary alterations and improvements at 
a few of the fish hatcheries. 

As has now been the case for many years the most important items of ordinary 
expenditure have resulted from the maintenance in the field of the officers whose 
services are retained to provide enforcement of the various provisions of the Game 
and Fisheries Act and Regulations, and the operation of the Fish Hatcheries and dis- 
tribution of fish under the Fish Culture Branch. Enforcement cost $210,536.88, while 
$184,121.76 was expended in connection with the work of the Fish Culture Branch. Other 
items of expenditure include, $13,963.71 for the purchase and distribution of pheasants, 
particularly in the Townships which have been designated as Regulated Game Preserve 
Areas, and in other areas in which suitable conditions prevail; $16,477.43 for the 
payment of wolf bounties and sundry expenditures incidental thereto, and of which 
amount the sum of $16,410.00 was actually paid as bounty; as well as $6,400.00 for 
various grants, details of which are as follows: — $1,000.00 for fisheries research work, 
particularly in the waters of Algonquin Park, under the supervision of Professor 
W. J. K. Harkness of the University of Toronto staff, $2,500.00 to the Ontario Fur 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1940-41 



Farmers' Association to assist them in their endeavours to develop the fur farming 
industry throughout the Province, $1,000.00 to the Ontario Federation of Anglers to 
enable this organization to continue its campaign to secure better compliance with and, 
observance of provisions of the Fisheries Regulations, and $1,900.00 to Messrs. Jack 
Miner and Thomas N. Jones and Miss Edith L. Marsh to encourage their efforts along 
the lines of providing a measure of protection for birds on sanctuaries maintained by 
them on their respective properties in the Counties of Essex, Elgin and Grey. 



GAME 

The following table shows the comparative details of the various resident and 
non-resident hunting licenses which were issued for use during the open seasons which 
were provided during the year, together with information of a similar character for 
the three preceding years. Details of the reduced numbers which were sold, to which 
previous reference has been made will be noted, though some increase will be observed 
in the following instances, viz: — resident "moose", non-resident "general" and non- 
resident "bear (spring season)". 



Resident Deer 

Resident Deer (Camp) 

Resident Deer (Farmers) 

Resident Moose 

Resident Gun , 

Non-Resident Deer 

Non-Resident "General" 

Non-Resident Small Game 

Non-Resident Bear (Spring Season) 



1937-38 



18,672 

283 

6,503 

580 

90,756 

1,036 

1,043 

1,634 

30 



1938-39 



21,762 

307 

7,719 

471 

114,580 

1,329 

569 

1,618 

49 



1939-40 



21,416 

323 

7,722 

497 

113,992 

1,492 
593 

1,567 
108 



1940-41 



20,219 

310 

6,486 

536 

97,218 

1,291 
755 

1,377 
161 



The conservation of wild life is not something peculiar to that particular re- 
source. It is common to every phase of our existence. It is the sensible practice of 
making the best use of every resource with which we have been so lavishly endowed 
by Nature, and by ensuring that these resources will not be wilfully dissipated as a 
result of our own shortsightedness. Wild life is a public heritage, and the laws and 
regulations which are now in effect to govern hunting within the Province embody 
the results of years of practical experience and research. They afford protection dur- 
ing the reproductive periods, provide for limited open seasons and restrict the sea- 
sonal take to correspond with the available resources. These laws are quite com- 
prehensive because the resources, territory and climatic conditions are extremely 
varied, yet a moment of reflection will readily supply the reasons for every restriction. 

The following is a summary of conditions which apply to the various species of 
game animals and birds which are prevalent in Ontario, and which summary is com- 
piled from reports submitted by Game and Fisheries Overseers throughout the 
Province: — 

DEER: — This species is quite plentiful throughout the northern portion of the 
Province and in the more northerly districts of Southern Ontario, and in these sections 
continues to provide excellent sport for interested hunters during the fall open season. 
The protection of an entire close season which has been provided for the past several 
years in certain southwestern and eastern counties has resulted in quite a noticeable 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1942) 



increase in the herds in many of these counties and more particularly in Grey and 
Bruce. The regulations which at present exist for the protection of deer and a con- 
tinuation of the existing co-operation on the part of the general public will undoubt- 
edly ensure perpetuation and possible improvement of the deer herds which now in- 
habit Ontario. During the year under review provision was made to have the general 
open season in the most southerly division extend for a period of nineteen days, as 
has been the case in previous years, but commencing on the first Monday in November. 
The hunting of deer was also permitted during the period from November 11th to Nov- 
ember 16th, inclusive, in the Townships of Amabel. Albemarle, Eastnor, Lindsay and 
St. Edmund in the Bruce Peninsula, though the use of dogs for such hunting during 
this open season in these five Townships was not permitted. An open season for deer 
was provided in that portion of the County of Carleton lying west of the Rideau River 
conforming with the general season in Southern Ontario and extending from November 
4th to 19th, inclusive. And, further, a Regulation was provided to prohibit any hunting 
of deer during 1940 in the Counties of Durham, Northumberland and Prince Edward. 

MOOSE: — Conditions are such with reference to moose that the hunting of this species 
is confined to that portion of the Province lying north and west of the French and 
Mattawa Rivers and Lake Nipissing. Moose is not too plentiful in any section of this 
northern portion of the Province, though some improvement is reported from various 
Districts, particularly in the two areas in the northwest and east in which all hunting 
of moose was prohibited during the preceding two years and which improvement re- 
sulted in the provision of an open season in these two areas, extending from October 
15th to November 25th, inclusive, and which action was taken in accordance with a pop- 
ular demand therefor. There are but few areas in Southern Ontario in which moose 
are to be found, and even in these sections their numbers are extremely limited and 
scarce. Some increase, though very slight, is reported from North Renfrew, North 
Addington and North Muskoka. 

CARIBOU: — Caribou are extremely scarce throughout the Province. None are to be 
noticed in the southern portion of the Province, and the same condition applies in the 
Districts of Nipissing, Temiskaming and Manitoulin. In the remaining territory their 
numbers are negligible, and little or no improvement was reported from any place. 
They are protected by a close season throughout the entire year, and the present 
condition of this particular species demands a continuation of this complete protection 
for its perpetuation even in limited proportions. 

ELK: — The only elk in Ontario are those which were originally imported from Western 
Canada several years ago in co-operation with the National Parks Branch of the 
Federal Department of Mines and Resources, and the subsequent natural increase. 
Some few specimens are located in Bruce County, on Beausoleil Island in Georgian 
Bay off the shore of Simcoe County, and on the Peterborough and Petawawa Crown 
Game Preserves in the Counties of Peterborough and Renfrew respectively, though 
reports from these areas indicate but little improvement. Additional numbers were 
placed on Crown Game Preserves in the Districts of Nipissing, Temiskaming, Sudbury, 
Algoma and Thunder Bay, and in the majority of these instances some increase in 
their numbers has been noticed. During 1940 a shipment of eight of these animals 
was completed from the Petawawa Crown Game Preserve to the Nipissing Crown Game 
Preserve. The hunting of elk is prohibited throughout the entire year. 

BUFFALO: — With the co-operation of the Department of Mines and Resources of 
Canada, (National Parks Branch) a car-load of buffalo, consisting of sixteen heifers 
and four bulls, was imported from Alberta and these animals were placed on the 
Burwash Crown Game Preserve, in the District of Sudbury. While reproduction has 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1940-41 ^^^i^'^Q 



I 



been small there has been but little mortality among the animals which were originally 
introduced. 

BEAR: — These animals are reported to be quite plentiful throughout the various 
Northern Ontario Districts, and in the Districts of Parry Sound, Muskoka and Haliburton 
and in the County of Renfrew. They may be hunted or trapped under the authority 
of the proper licenses and there is no doubt many enjoy the pleasure which the hunting 
of these animals provides. During the spring bear season of 1940, that is from April 
1st to June loth, the Department issued one hundred and sixty-one (161) non-resident 
hunting licenses, and it may be of interest to say that since the inauguration of this 
particular season, some four years ago, there has been an increasing interest displayed 
by non-resident hunters in the possibilities for recreation and relaxation thus made 
available. 

RABBITS: — Reviewing reports with reference to rabbits it would appear that with the 
exception of a very few counties the various species continue to be fairly plentiful in 
the southern areas. In general terms the prevailing species in the extreme southern 
and southwestern portions of the Province are cotton-tail rabbits and European hare, 
the latter commonly known as the jack-rabbit, — while the snowshoe rabbit, or varying 
hare, exists in the eastern counties and in the areas to the north. Conditions applicable 
to rabbits were quite favourable throughout the season, except in Northern Ontario, 
where these animals were reported to be not too plentiful though probably increasing 
in number. Rabbit hunting is a favourite sport of Ontario hunters during the late fall 
and winter months, and a large percentage avail themselves of the pleasure which Is 
to be derived from this splendid type of healthy exercise. The restricted daily catch 
of cotton-tail rabbits which is now effective in several of the southwestern counties 
has probably assisted in some measure in the increase which has been reported from 
these areas. 

PARTRIDCJE: — The improvement which has been observed in more recent years con- 
tinued during the period covered by this report, and considerable increase was reported 
from many sections principally in the case of ruffed grouse. The sharp-tailed grouse, 
or prairie chicken, is confined to the extreme northern and northwestern portions, 
though their numbers could not be described as plentiful. However, general conditions 
throughout were sufficiently satisfactory to warrant the declaration of a short open 
season. Two periods were included in this open season, viz: — October 1st to October 
15th, inclusive, and November 4th to November 16th, inclusive. Limits of catch were 
five birds per day, and twenty-five birds in all during the two periods. This open 
season did not apply in the Counties of Essex and Kent nor in the Townships established 
as Regulated Game Preserve Areas. In these last mentioned Counties and Townships 
the open season for partridge coincided with the open season for pheasants. 

PHEASANT: — Climatic conditions restrict the area in which pheasants can be 
successfully introduced with any certain hope of permanent establishment therein. 
While it is not native to the Province it has been possible through intensive re-sto3k- 
ing in areas providing favourable conditions to sufficiently develop the pheasant pop- 
ulation in such areas to assure such a measure of successful hunting as to warrant 
a limited open season for the taking of this splendid game bird. In recent years the 
Department has proceeded with a scheme of Regulated Game Preserve Areas in 
which all hunting is controlled and where these birds are liberated, and which scheme 
in 1940 included some seventy-one Townships or parts of Townships situated in the 
Counties of Lambton, Middlesex, Elgin, Oxford, Norfolk, Brant, Haldimand, Welland, 
Lincoln, Wentworth, Wellington, Halton, Peel, York, Ontario and Prince Eldward. 
Conditions favourable to the propagation of these birds also prevail in areas other 
than these Regulated Townships, particularly in the County of Essex, including Pelee 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1942) 



Island, and in the County of Kent, and in which Counties provision lias also been made 
for the distribution of these birds. Details of this distribution which was made in 
1940 are indicated by the following statistics: — adult pheasants and poults totalling 
16,688 were distributed, 14,963 in the Regulated Townships and 1,725 for general re- 
stocking outside of these areas, — County of Brant (three Townships) 664 birds; County 
of Elgin (five Townships) 1,000 birds; County of Haldimand (ten Townships) 1,862 
birds; County of Halton (four Townships) 1,315 birds; County of Lambton (one 
Township) 200 birds; County of Lincoln (eight Townships) 1,650 birds; County of 
Middlesex (two Townships) 425 birds; County of Norfolk (four Townships) 820 birds; 
County of Ontario (three Townships) 750 birds; County of Oxford (one Township) 200 
birds; County of Peel (five Townships) 940 birds; County of Prince Edward (one 
Township) 120 birds; County of Welland (eight Townships) 1,685 birds; County of 
Wellington (one Township) 200 birds; County of Wentworth (eight Townships) 1,459 
birds; and County of York (seven Townships) 1,673 birds. The record of the general 
re-stocking additional to the foregoing shows 1,000 birds liberated in the County of 
Essex, 400 of which were placed on Pelee Island, 600 birds in the County of Kent, 
75 birds in the County of Huron and 50 birds in the County of Brant. The regulations 
governing the open season fixed October 31st and November 1st on Pelee Island, with 
a limit of five birds per day, or ten for the season, with the provision that three of 
the total take could be hen birds conditional upon the payment of $1.00 each for such 
hens. In the Regulated Game Preserve Areas the open season was October 25th and 
26th, and an additional day, November 1st, provided the Municipal authorities in any 
Township issued their special hunting licenses therefor. In fifty-two Townships the 
two-day season prevailed, while the three-day season was in effect in nineteen Town- 
ships. Limits of catch were three cock birds per day. The same three-day open 
season was provided for the County of Essex (excluding Pelee Island) and the County 
of Kent, as well as the limit of three cock birds per day. 

HUNGARIAN PARTRIDGE:— The efforts of the Department to secure the establish- 
ment of this species in the Province have up to the present not been very successful, 
except in a few areas. The only localities in which they are found to any extent are 
in a few of the southwestern and extreme eastern counties, and even in these areas 
their numbers are not too plentiful. Improvement is reported only from the eastern 
counties. The open season in 1940, viz, October 25th and 26th and November 1st 
applied only in Essex (excluding Pelee Island) and Kent. Two birds per day 
constituted the limit of catch. 

QUAIL: — Only in a few of the most extreme southwesterly counties are these birds to 
be found where they are not very numerous, though localized increases have been 
reported. The only section in which an open season was provided was in the County 
of Essex (excluding Pelee Island) and the County of Kent, on October 25th and 26th 
and November 1st. The bag limit during this open season was four birds per day. 

DUCKS: — Reports from many sections, particularly in Southern Ontario, would seem 
to indicate some considerable improvement in the number and variety of ducks avail- 
able during the open season, which generally resulted in a successful season for a 
majority of those sportsmen who participate in the hunting thus provided. Since 1935 
the hunting regulations which are provided by the Federal authorities under the 
Migratory Birds Convention Act, have been made more restrictive and an active pro- 
gramme to provide refuges and improved nesting conditions in the far north has been 
carried on, all of which factors have contributed to the increase previously mentioned, 
and provided there is no natural set-back should continue to prove effective in 
maintaining and possibly improving the existing conditions as they apply to this variety 
of wild water-fowl. 



J 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1940-41 



I 



GEESE: — This species does not play an important part in the general scheme of hunting 
in Ontario. Conditions remained pretty much the same as has been stated in Depart- 
mental annual reports for the past several years. Successful hunting of this variety 
of wild water-fowl is restricted, in Ontario, to the shores of James Bay in the far north 
and to the extreme southwestern Counties. In other sections they are seen only in 
flight during the fall and spring migration periods and provide very little sport in 
the way of hunting. 

WOODCOCK: — While these birds, generally speaking, are not too plentiful, they con- 
tinue to provide a measure of satisfactory sport for interested hunters in various 
sections of the Province, and more particularly in some of the Counties along the 
shore of Lake Erie and immediately to the north thereof as well as in the southeastern 
counties. 

SMPE: — These birds are not very plentiful in any portion of Ontario and are there- 
fore not hunted very extensively. While general conditions are not favourable reports 
state there has been some improvement and resulting increased numbers in a few 
widely separated areas. 

PLOVER: — There are but few sections in which these birds can be described as any- 
thing but scarce, and little improvement has been observed. Plover are protected 
throughout the year by regulations provided under the Migratory Birds Convention 
Act. 

FUR-BEARING ANIMALS 

Conditions as they apply to fur-bearing animals throughout the Province are 
summarized in the following references from reports submitted to the Department 
by members of the Field Service Staff: — 

BEAVER: — This very desirable species of fur-bearer is quite prevalent in most sec- 
tions of the Province except some of the counties in the extreme southwestern 
peninsula and in eastern Ontario. In Northern Ontario and in some of the northern 
districts in Southern Ontario reports would appear to indicate that conditions were 
such as to warrant the provision of a limited open season and restricted catch. The 
regulations governing this open season specified that it would be effective from 
December 1st to December 21st, 1940, both days inclusive in the territory lying north 
and west of the French and Mattawa Rivers and Lake Nipissing, including the District 
of Manitoulin, as well as in the Districts of Parry Sound and Muskoka. Licensed 
trappers were permitted to take not more than ten pelts during this open season and 
it was further specified that trappers were to dispose of the pelts taken on or before 
December 31st. According to returns submitted to the Department some 21,605 beaver 
pelts were taken during this open season, and it has been estimated that the value 
of these pelts to the various trappers concerned was in the neighborhood of half a 
million dollars. 

FISHER: — These animals are extremely scarce throughout the entire Province, and 
reports indicate that they are practically extinct in the southern portion. The catch 
is diminishing quite rapidly. 

FOX: — Generally speaking it would appear that this species was not too plentiful 
during the year under review, though reports show some increase in different sections. 
There was quite a reduced catch in comparison with previous years. 

LYNX: — This species has become non-existent in Southern Ontario, and it is extremely 
scarce in the north. No improvement is reported from any section, and the annual 
take continues to show a decrease. 



10 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1942) 

MARTEN: — As in the case of fisher and lynx, marten are extremely scarce, and no 
improvement has been reported. The catch in the case of this species also shows a 
decided reduction. 

MINK: — While these animals are reported to be not too plentiful there are indications 
that their numbers are increasing in many areas, though probably not to any material 
extent. The slight increase in the number taken during the open season may be 
attributed to improved conditions to which previous reference has been made. 

MUSKRAT: — It is again possible to report an increase in the catch of this species, 
some fifty thousand more pelts being taken than was the case in the previous year, 
though conditions which applied to muskrat remained practically the same. The open 
season is provided by Regulation and this arrangement is perhaps the most satis- 
factory in that it is possible to take advantage of propitious weather conditions, and 
thus confine the season to a limited period in which there would be little or no 
interference with natural propagation. These pelts do not bring an exceptional price 
on the market, but by reason of the fact they can be caught in large numbers the 
returns to the trapper are of substantial worth. It has been estimated that the 
740,000 pelts taken in 1940 were worth approximately $1,500,000.00, or more than half 
the value of the total fur catch of the year. 

OTTER: — Some improvement is reported from sections in the northern portion of the 
Province, and, while otter are not too plentiful, the catch for the year covered by 
this report was better than the average for the past ten years, and was exceeded 
in that time only by the catch in the preceding year, 1939-40. 

RACCOON: — There was a decided decrease in the take of raccoon as compared with 
that of the previous year. It is found only in the more southerly portions of the 
Province, due to the extreme cold weather which prevails during the winter months 
in the north. Conditions with regard to this species remain unchanged. 

SKUNK: — Continues to be very plentiful, but their obnoxious methods of defence, 
coupled with a low market v^lue, discourage any general efforts by trappers for the 
taking of this species. 

WEASEL: — There was a decided decrease in the number of weasel which were 
trapped during 1940, as compared with the number taken in the previous year. This 
cannot be attributed to any substantial decrease in the numbers available, and is 
iprobably due to the diminished demand for these pelts, and the resulting poor prices 
derived from the sale thereof. 

The following comparative table shows the numbers of pelts of the various 
species of fur-bearing animals which were exported from and dressed within the 
Province during the year under review in addition to the three years immediately 
preceding: — 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1940-41 



11 



Bear 

Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (Cross) 

Fox (red) 

Fox (silver or black) 

Fox (white) 

Lynx 

Marten 

Mink 

Muskrat 

Otter 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Weasel 

Wolverine 



1937-38 



496 

235 

1,463 

2,426 

24,912 

201 

47 

1,284 

1,709 

22,766 

343,972 

3,737 

13,194 

61,576 

79,853 

5 



1938-39 



363 

1,366 

1,467 

2,164 

22,366 

131 

142 

785 

074 

111 

893 

764 

493 

89,100 

93,488 

3 



2 

25 

508 

3 

9 



1939-40 



295 

33,530 

1,382 

981 

19,925 

101 

36 

514 

1,790 

36,518 

689,706 

4,101 

14,493 

74,176 

95,832 

2 



1940-41 



274 

21,605 

858 

722 

15,059 

67 

91 

383 

1,439 

38,976 

739,224 

3,931 

11,973 

72,005 

53,719 

2 



From reports received from various licensed fur dealers it has been possible for 
the Department to estimate that trappers received a total of $2,677,211.26 from the 
catch of fur during 1940-41, an increase of some fourteen per cent over the previous 
year, and which increase may be assigned to the general improvement in muskrats, 
both take and market value. 

The product of licensed fur farms, comprised wholly of fox and mink, disposed 
of during the year by such fur farm operators had an estimated value of $1,246,847.66, 
an increase of almost $200,000 over the previous year, making the value of the total 
fur production of the Province in 1940-41 the sum of $3,924,058.92. 



FUR FARMING 

The propagation of fur bearing animals in captivity continues to be an industry 
of considerable economic importance, particularly during war time, as a large per- 
centage of the fur production is exported thereby establishing valuable foreign 
exchange. Due to the prevailing uncertainty as regards future markets and the rising 
cost of feed some recession was recorded, though 1841 fur farms were licensed during 
the calendar year of 1940, the period covered by such licenses, a reduction of only four 
per cent. 



The subjoined comparative table shows the total breeding stock retained on 
these licensed premises as at the first day of January in each of the four years therein 
enumerated, and from which it will be noted that these operations are restricted 
principally to silver fox and mink: — 



12 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1942) 



Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (cross) 

Fox (red) 

Fox (silver or black) 

Fox (blue) 

Lynx 

Mink 

Muskrat 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Marten 

Otter 



1938 



25 

16 

235 

140 

24,848 



2 

21,982 

302 

351 

9 

11 





1939 



2 

19 

197 

120 

22,923 

98 

2 

30,378 

267 

284 

6 

15 





1940 



4 

27 

168 

96 

18,327 

209 

2 

31,989 

235 

243 

10 

19 

2 



1941 



13 

26 

134 

65 

16,034 

397 

2 

34,277 

179 

139 

7 

16 

2 



This breeding stock retained on licensed fur farms as at January 1st, 1941, was 
estimated to have a replacement value of $2,094,341.00. 

Departmental compilation of fur records shows that licensed fur farmers during 
the year 1940-41 disposed of the following pelts from stock raised on their premises, 
viz: — 

62.281 mink, 59,790 of which were exported and the remaining 2,491 dressed in 
the Province. 

34.282 silver and black fox, of which 25,001 were exported and the remaining 
9,281 dressed in the Province. 

285 blue fox, of which 282 were exported, and the remaining 3 dressed in the 
Province. 

202 cross fox, of which 111 were exported and the remaining 91 dressed in 
the Province. 



CROWN GAME PRESERVES 

Practical protection has been afforded wild life through the setting aside of 
extensive areas of land as sanctuary for game. At the present time the various Game 
Preserves scattered throughout the Province have a combined area of approximately 
thirteen thousand five hundred square miles. Much of this land is still in the Crown, 
particularly in Northern Ontario, but many of the smaller areas have been set aside 
with the consent of the land-owners. Much of the land is wild land, particularly 
suited for the development of large and small game, while in the southern section 
of the Province they are well adapted to the protection and propagation of upland 
game, including birds. 

During the period under review only one new Game Preserve was established. 
This was the Kapisko Beaver Sanctuary, situated in the District of Patricia. The 
primary function of this Sanctuary is to enable the Department, with the co-operation 
of the Hudson's Bay Company, to restock the area with beaver, control the annual 
take, and provide a restricted trapping ground for the benefit of Indians resident in 
the Province. The trapping of fur-bearing animals other than beaver will be permitted 
to resident Indians. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1940-41 



13 



The following changes and renewals were made in the case of existing Game 
Preserves: 

The boundaries of the Nipissing Crown Game Preserve were altered to conform 
with changes in the location of Provincial Highway No. 11 which forms the western 
boundary of this Game Preserve. 

The boundaries of the Waterloo Crown Game Preserve, situated in the County 
of Waterloo, were revised and some additional land included in the area. 

The Wilder Lake Crown Game Preserve, located in the Township of Egremont, 
County of Grey, and the Woodlands Crown Game Preserve, located in the Township 
of Trafalgar, County of Halton, were renewed for a further period of five years, to 
November, 1945. 

A further measure of protection and control is afforded through the scheme of 
Regulated Townships. The regulations provide that those who hunt in these regulated 
areas must have special hunting licenses issued by the respective Municipal Councils,, 
with the approval of the Department, in addition »to the regular hunting licenses re- 
quired under the provisions of the Game and Fisheries Act, and which has the effect 
of restricting the number of hunters who may operate in any particular area and thus 
avoid congestion. During the year the following Townships were incorporated in the 
scheme, viz: Township of Whitchurch in York County, that part of the Township of 
Toronto lying north of the Queen Elizabeth Highway in Peel County, Townships of 
Flamboro West and Glanford in Wentworth County, Township of Dunwich in Elgin 
County, and the Township of Plympton in Lambton County. The total number of 
Townships included in the scheme following these additions was seventy-one. 

WOLF BOUNTIES 

The following is a comparative table of condensed wolf bounty payments and 
statistics for the current fiscal year and the preceding four years: — 



Period 


Timber 


Brush 


Pups 


Total 


Bounty & 
Expenses 


For year ending Mar. 31, 1937 
For year ending Mar. 31, 1938 
For year ending Mar. 31, 1939 
For year ending Mar. 31, 1940 
For year ending Mar. 31, 1941 


1,090 
1,022 
1,031 
1,107 
738 


1,197 
837 
723 
614 
400 


31 
30 
41 

22 
8 


2,318 
1,889 
1,795 
1,743 
1,146 


$33,360.63 
27,474.24 
25,357.00 
25,058.12 
16,477.43 



Since 1933 the rate of bounty has been $15.00 on adult wolves and $5.00 oa 
wolves under the age of three months. An amendment to the Wolf Bounty Act, under 
which these payments are made, and which was enacted during the 1941 Session of 
the Legislature, provided that the bounty to be paid on wolves killed after March 
1st, 1941, shall be $25.00 on adults and $5.00 on wolves under the age of three months. 

Reference to the previous table indicates a progressive reduction in the number 
of wolves destroyed each year and on which bounty was paid, and it is quite possible 
that the increased bounty provided might stimulate operations which have as their 
object the destruction of these predators. 

During the year 1940-41 nine hundred claims for bounty were submitted for 
consideration. These claims were in respect to a total of 1,162 pelts, though claims for 
bounty on some sixteen of these pelts, which were not wolves, were refused. 



14 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1942) 



Bounty was paid to 752 persons who collected a total of $17,550.00, of which the 
sum of $1,140.00 was paid by County Treasurers on wolves killed within such Counties, 
the bounty in such cases being paid by the Counties, forty per cent thereof being 
rebated by the Department. 

From information supplied on the applications for bounty it would appear that 
500 of these animals were taken by wire snares, 293 were shot, 279 were trapped, and 
the balance by methods not indicated on the claims. It has been ascertained that 
Indians were responsible for the killing of 341 of these wolves, 319 were killed by 
farmers, 199 by fur trappers, and the balance by park rangers, guides, hunters, etc. 

The following table sets forth in detail the sources of origin and variety of the 
wolf pelts for which application for bounty was made: — 

ANALYSIS OF APPLICATIONS FOR WOLF BOUNTY 



County or District 



Algoma 

Bruce 

Cochrane 

Frontenac 

Haliburton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Grey 

Kenora 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox & Addington 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Norfolk 

Northumberland . . . 

Ontario 

Parry Sound 

Patricia 

Peel 

Peterboro 

Rainy River 

Renfrew 

Sudbury 

Simcoe 

Temiskaming 

Thunder Bay 

Victoria 

Wellington 

Totals 



Number 
of Timber 



70 

12 

18 

2 

10 

6 

1 

167 



10 

2 
15 

19 
66 



2 
41 
30 

1 

2 
73 
26 
62 
11 

6 
88 

5 



745 



Number 
of Brush 



38 

4 



2 
1 
5 

72 
1 
2 

1 
5 

67 
4 
4 

12 
7 
1 
7 
1 
6 



60 
2 

52 
3 

40 
5 
1 

409 



Number 
of Pups 



Total 
Pelts 



112 

16 

18 

8 

10 

8 

2 

5 

243 

1 

2 

10 

1 

7 

82 

4 

23 

78 

7 

1 

9 

42 

36 

1 

2 

133 

28 

114 

14 

6 

128 

10 

1 

1,162 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1940-41 15 



Administration of the Wolf Bounty Act during the year under review resulted 
in a total expenditure of $16,447,43, of which the sum of $16,410.00 was actually paid 
as bounty. Details of this expenditure are as follows: — 

Brush Wolves 51 @ $ 6.00 $ 806.00 

334 @ $15.00 5,010.00 

15 @ $25.00 375.00 

400 $ 5,691.00 

Timber Wolves 69 @ $6.00 $ 414.00 

4 @ $10.00 40.00 

640 (g) $15.00 9,600.00 

25 @ $25.00 625.00 

738 $10,679.00 

Pups 8 @ $ 5.00 $ 40.00 

8 $ 40.00 

TOTAL 1,146 $16,410.00 

Expenses 67.43 

Total Cost $16,477.43 

GENERAL 

TOURIST OUTFITTERS: — 

The licensing of hunting and fishing camps catering to the tourist trade in 
Northern Ontario (north and west of the line of the Canadian National Railway 
running between Parry Sound and Pembroke) was continued. Notwithstanding some 
uncertainty as to the tourist trade during war time, twenty-five more camps were 
licensed than in the previous year. Of the 667 camps operated under license, 615 
were owned by residents of Ontario and 52 by non-residents. These camps were 
located as set forth in the following table: — 

Algoma 95 

Cochrane 6 

Kenora 157 

Manitoulin 58 

Nipissing 96 

Parry Sound 117 

Patricia 2 

Rainy River 32 

Renfrew 13 

Sudbury 57 

Temiskaming 4 

Thunder Bay 30 

Total 667 

THE BULLETIN: — 

An enlightened public opinion is the best means of securing that co-operation 
without which no law can be a success. With this in mind the Department has con- 
tinued to issue its bi-monthly Bulletin. This publication in addition to providing 



16 DEPARTMEN!D OKI iSAl^IE JANDl FISHERIES ^q, 9 (1942) 



information concefiriiig Departmental activities; icbVemttaa:^: phases 'of BaturaV history 
and contains other articles of an educational nature. ; It circulates to the press, the 
Sportsmen's Organizations, and to an extensive list of private individuals, teachers, 
etc., which list has been built up over a period of years through personal application. 
Over eighteen hundred copies are mailed each issue. Jbut because of the nature of the 
mailing list it is safe to assume that its sphere ol, usefulness and influence as an 
educational medium is much greater than the circulation would imply. 

GAME AND FISHERIES ACT:— ■ • ^^ 

There were no amendments to the Game and Fisheries Act enacted durlhg the 
session of the Legislative Assembly held in 1940, though special regulations were 
adopted by Order^n-Council in accordance with the, provisions of subsection 1 of 
Section 6 of the saidiAtet, as iollows:-- 00.32? @ 3S 

^q(|>. The period of the spring bear season was extended, and is in effect from 
April 1st to June 15th. 

uo.Of t . '^it.G I 0- ^ "■ 

(b) Licenses to _ authorize the use of fire-arms for hunting purposes in the 
OO.Oi^ Counties of Essex and Kent, restricted as to period, and are valid only from 
October 1st to January 31st, next following. 

^^(8)f¥^iiihitingthe use of snares for the taking of beaver at any tlmy.*'^ 

8i^.T9 ... •:-..->qx:i 

(d) P rohibiting the use of snares for any purpose in the Counties of York and 
Si'.TTiOntario. _ ,, ...oD IrIoT 

(e) Providing a limit of catch on cotton-tail rabbits of six per day in the County 
of Lincoln. JAHSMaO 

(f) Prohibiting the purchase or sale of cotton-tail ra^bitsrimttJ© ^e^Htyof^ 

ni sbjsi) Januoj orli ot sni-isiBo zqmao §niflail bnfi snilnud to siiianeail sriT 
^Bwllufl IjsfloiifiK nerfiBfiBD 9rfi lo onlf orfj io Jdsv/ bns riiion) oiiBJnO marfiio'/. 
9mo8 anibnB^tariiiwJoVl ^^'^ L'^iv\TI^AiJ?yiL^ l^'^^ivjU^^'^'^ L.^'[s'\/V/^iii^'^' XTifi*^ naawjsd gainnin 
^i9w aqrafio 9Tom 9vft-^)nlrw7 ,9TiTn^Tlr^"^^i 9riJ oi bjs x^nrBii9Dnu 

■9 .9aBtgftal»^^l^ife^^SOth^i^%^'tcR#oi^^W<ihoi^^h6^^a^'^^ed^^irf^ ^^gPg'^tff 
1^# elft81*'^me«f;^and^VhV*min%''and 'ris^^rf^ 931r%i^9ei3<V&^^iyi? i'f'^is^'^^B'^^^e^lMt 
the various provisions of the Game and I^^lft?ri^S'My*^na'^V^MB'}is^'*Mrg^ofel^!^k 
belongs to that ,^ervice whose ceaseless watching is a necessary .p^t of our scheme 
of life. But for. liis persistent activity the wild life of the Prcmncej^'ould soon suffer 
severely from iUega'rdestfuctidri. During the year under review diere were between 
eighty and ninety of h'cers pefmaneritly' engaged in this work .of ns^r^Jl and supervision, 
and whose services were augmented by temporary officers ^"^RUffiid, ^l?^ varying periods 
when their assistance was most desirable. In addition the pejm^ment also receives 
the close co-op^rati'ori of " Provincial Police constables in the. work of enforcement. 
There are also ji^nclreds of Deputy Game and Fisheries ^?^®9S*o§fivate individuals 
who sufficientlygmterest thehiselVes in this work of protection ta secure the authority 
provided under ai^ch' appointments to enable them' to acriridivjcj^ua^lv^ in conjunction 
with the regular Overseers in the matter of preventing offences against the Game 
and Fisheries A^et. .^ .,j ^, u -"'VV 

Due to the extensive land and water areas of the Province each Overseer must 
of necessity covje^i a large territory, but despite long patirq^ {these field officers are 
quite active in the discharge of their duties. 

The Department would, of course, prefer to find law observance ^«o complete 
4 hat seizures: and pro&eeutions would ; be 1 unnecessaxy* jfeut, a 1 jaajfinoritF . f^ i mfire\0T less 
thoughfeless.and, fnequent^yr unscrupulous ,persQns;jwlij9s«' a<5tivities ;dr9[ :afl mewajciErrto 
:A;onservation make ^constant vigilance imperative; : 



, . And in, this . connection Dep«,ytnxeiit^l records s)?^w that, dumg l940-il there 
r^ere 1S»45 ins-tanqes in which off endieijs were apprehended by various members of th^ 
enforcement: services, and on wWcli. occasions equipment being used unlawfully,, ^^ffd 
fish, game and pelts, taken contrary to the regulations, were confiscated from t^hp^^e 
apprehended. In 1176 of these cases the seizures were made by Game and Fisheries 
Overseers, Deputy Game and Fisheries Wardens were responsible ^f or the a.ction in.67 
.cases, seizures were made in 26 cases by Provincial Police constableis, .while in tljje 
rem^ijoi^g 76, caqfis .corogeratiye. action, .by .ftverseqrs,^ Deguty ^anijej W^|:deiis^^an,d 
Provincial Police resulted in the seizures. Ibisd &i 

The following is a summary of the articles confiscated: — 

Live anim|J»)T^.^.c5Q..3.<^.jYj^.yj,^..Hg.|q..2.M--m 5 cases 

Birds, game animals and meat in 166 cases 

snfiB9i bnB Fire-arm8;ajfc4/«»a9MHii4;ioitei^'i^o.Jn9ioi.i«Qda. eri^jin 401 cases -inja 
-PAiBz fi ni iWish/ '.iiiu'. :'^i.'4. i'^i-'il .V\ .y.iiUiUj. ^'^d^ -f^^^ cases?! .saoii&is 

Nets and fishing equipment v>£iH*in 224 cases iHB -^loJoKi 

Angling equipment in 118 cases 

-raoi> 9rfj !o |i^i^g '^^(j jji^gg .aoa/ri9rip^^^ cases- '^Q^- 

visjiBd WBii fr^^g arid trapping 'equiprtiehV.".: '?:^^^^^ ^o noijslq 

Canoes, rowboats & motor boats .. .J.«. .^???^.^lg.^ lift -WWfee^aaatirf'/r lol 

Outboard motors in 15 cases 

Automobiles and trucks in 19 cases 

f lashMgl^s) ^pt-fligh^ [^ ,laftt<|r^575/^ . aHtJTVI*? O^^q^^s 

Spears in 57 cases 

xas lo jBxIl MisceUaneot£S.> a^^iCle^^e. ^;Aai?^y. .^P. .rf3i3. Jio. /iQUfl*iT45; case^ 9dT 
-Ufims ^niJfjdiijaii) bus sni'iujluo ni 9bBfn asi'u ap.Q'i-goiq ingllaoxa /ms/, auotvoiq 

with the actual number of seizures carried out would be the fact^^^f^tfi^v^4^f•'l-S^^^?^® 
reports would in many cases apply to more than one article, i.e. some reports would 
cover traps and pelts, fire-arms and game, fishing tackle and fish, lightsp-.ShdofeitMia, 
i^fey^lfjjft^, atfe^rj^og^J^ff^t^g.j aysxso-tq yiU sSB-yiinii aoDaiJBia sniv/oHol 9uT 

inciuSia i^^^tg^'^^^i^^ci'iiiiem iMiiM%i%^^Mh'^mm\i'm''^fimB 

reported are eleven havfyg^%(^,s and packsacks, ten suitca^g^^and trunks, one hundred 
and seventeen duck decg^jpsg^'i? axes, one. battery, and t|?g-<eg ferrets. 

Seized pelts incluieS'H'^'| heave'r, 39' f6x(viHdUs splliis) 77 mink, 1817 muskrat, 
22 otter, 38 raccoon, IS s"kimk,"98" squitrfel,' 80* Weas6r,l fi^er and 1 lynx, in addition 
to 95 hides of deer, moose, efc. 

nBrii -^'^MBm'^d'me'^kvm''M?i stk te?i«wfe¥-^m^^f^^m'fe.^<B6"w^av^^Mlflrt•'E nfies. 
-s^mE^^ b^^rei^Wotfciiis': f§^M^{^\m^%hmi^^^^vem'k^'im!iva^,^ im- 
mune shotguns, 4 pistols and vMmiH^d''^' ^^PWni? ^^'■^^^'''^^^ -^'^^ "^ ^^^^^>^^ 

Subsequent prosecutions were provided in 1,138 cases, the action bel^^m^WHled 

p}iyilGajfm1 afrid',2Pifeh0rafiBrnOyeiFp?erfeMin r.lJiS^i.of thj8ifeficasflH,c4)y-')BiX)t*netal>i^olifce con- 

^stkbieB iav-^ai caeeB^i by! Oep^ty Ijlamie. !Wa)r6©Qsiinr'. l)4.'pHBe^p'«iid> b]^ coiro^edatlvel) a«ti<m 

oln- 10' «afee3,':{while^ dn-) one casB tbeoc-Harges wea-ei.iHid^ by-r<a;;il)Vivatei JlndivMuaih* in'a, 

trespass case under Section 65 ^ of the 'Game and FisUerids ^A«tM In- il}078 eases kioii- 

victions were registered, 47 charges were dismissed, and in 13 cases the charges 

were withdrawn by the officers responsible therefor. -.^uoit ^w>dnif,5l 

tnOlJ bG0f{[9978 ffi> 

Upon reference to the statement of revenue which appears earlier in this 
'T«port«'itrwill be observed that iiilfes am 0untiiife^rttD.i$a5i416t28. were* dollbcted dtffing the 
fiscal year ending March 31s,t^;ilft41,' as. a result. oC these pfosecratiprife^) and ©ft this 
anlGiint ^11,990.00 was paid by some eleven persons ; apprehend e^'.wiith^'Uiilauwftii'bieai^iir 



18 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1942) 



pelts in their possession. The fines in these specific cases varied from $100.00 to 
$3,630.00 according to the number of pelts involved in each violation. Not only were 
these fines assessed but the beaver pelts found in their possession, and totalling 487, 
were also confiscated and included in the sales of furs conducted by the Department, 
the proceeds of which sales are also public funds. Beaver pelts included in the Depart- 
mental sale conducted in the month of October, 1940, averaged approximately $20.00 per 
pelt, so that in addition to their fines these offenders also forfeited to the Crown 
some $9,740.00 derived from the sale of their pelts. Verily, the way of the transgressor 
is hard! 



THE FISH CULTURE BRANCH 

During the year the Department operated twenty-seven hatcheries and rearing 
stations. By means of these facilities the culture of fish was carried out in a satis- 
factory and effective manner. 

Apart from maintenance, additional hatchery construction consisted of the com- 
pletion of the Hill Lake Trout Rearing Station and the construction of a new battery 
for whitefish, herring and pickerel at the Glenora hatchery. 



THE CULTURE AND DISTRIBUTION OF FISH 

The total distribution of fish of various sizes and ages exceeded that of any 
previous year. Excellent progress was made in culturing and distributing small- 
mouthed black bass, large-mouthed black bass, maskinonge, pickerel, speckled trout, 
herring and whitefish. 

Speckled Trout: 

The following statistics indicate the progress being made in the culture and 
distribution of yearling and older stages of this valuable native game fish. 

1936 563,351 

1937 1,183,223 

1938 • 2,087,990 

1939 2,982,874 

1940 3,285,264 

The production of yearling speckled trout in 1940 was 10 per cent higher than 
that of the previous year. In addition, 611,000 fingerlings which could not be accom- 
modated in the hatcheries or ponds were distributed. 

Brown Trout: 

In excess of one-quarter million yearlings and approximately 182,000 fingerlings 
were distributed. Favourable reports of successful angling in the larger, lower reaches 
of certain southern Ontario streams, where brown trout have been introduced, are 
indicative of the success being achieved with this species. 

Rainbow Trout: 

(a) Steelhead trout — 

The small increase in the number of yearlings distributed was compensated 
by the fingerling distribution, which was more than double that of the previous year. 
Distribution was made in water areas in which this species has become established. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1940-41 19 



(b) Kamloops trout — 

The Kamloops trout is the common trout of the interior of British Columbia, 
occurring throughout the Fraser river drainage above Hell's Gate canyon and through- 
out most of the basin of the Columbia river in British Columbia. Unlike its close 
relative, the rainbow trout, it does not descend to the sea. Considerable differences 
exist in the characteristics of the species from different habitats, as to colouration, 
size, markings, etc., and even in large lakes confusing differences occur among 
individuals of the same species. 

Generally speaking, they mature and spawn in their fourth year, although under 
certain conditions they might not spawn until their fifth year. Spawning takes place 
in creeks from April to June. It is stated that some of them spawn on the beaches 
of lakes at the mouths of streams tributary to the lakes. In some cases, Kamloops 
trout spend their whole lives in streams. 

Only a limited amount of authentic information is available on the feeding 
habits of Kamloops trout. It is reasonable to expect that insects form the bulk of 
the food of specimens under sixteen inches at all seasons, but the staple food of the 
larger specimens is probably fish. The kokanee, a diminutive salmon, occurs in very 
large numbers in most lakes where the Kamloops trout reaches any considerable 
size, and is preyed upon by the latter. 

The Kamloops trout is an excellent game fish, and is taken on the fly and by 
trolling. When caught it makes a terrific fight for freedom, combining a series of mad 
rushes and violent leaps with violent shaking of the head. It fights like the steelhead 
trout and requires considerable skill to land. The best fly fishing is obtained in 
streams and small lakes and at the mouths of streams flowing into larger rivers and 
lakes. The usual weight of the fish taken is from three to four pounds, although they 
grow to a much larger size; there are records up to thirty-five pounds. 

Small consignments of eyed Kamloops trout eggs were imported from Kamloops, 
B.C., each summer from 1934 to 1937, inclusive. The largest losses were experienced 
immediately after arrival, particularly in hatchery waters in which a rapid upward 
surge in temperature occurred. The original importation to the Pembroke Trout 
Rearing Station was experimental but it is evident from later observations that Kam- 
loops trout eggs hatch normally and without serious loss in spring water of approx- 
imately constant temperature, for example, at the Sault Ste. Marie and Chatsworth 
Trout Rearing Stations. 

Normandale ponds were used for rearing parent fish, since it was expected that 
the location and climatic conditions would be congenial for the species. In 1938 the 
Kamloops breeders at Normandale spawned for the first time, and limited numbers 
of eggs were collected at that time and during subsequent spawning seasons. Special 
mention is made of this fact since it was an accomplishment not previously recorded 
in eastern North America. It was reported on good authority that this experiment 
was made in a pond in the east prior to 1938 but was not successful. 

Previous annual reports contain information on the distribution of Kamloops 
trout in Ontario. Successful angling has been reported from Echo lake, in the district 
of Muskoka, and Bloom lake, in the district of Nipissing. 

On account of its excellent game qualities and the fact that it becomes established 
in an environment similar to that inhabited by our eastern or native brook trout, 
and since, unlike its close relative the rainbow, it is non-migratory, controlled dis- 
tribution in Ontario was recommended. Twenty-six thousand five hundred yearlings 



M DEPART JJM^jQjg^^^^ftQigg Jib» g^^t P^HE RIES No, 9 (1942) 

were distributed this year. The previous distribution oir~yfe'^Ail^^"^'^^i^^*^pecies 

"WsaditofmSBSiaiJi'ia 3o 'lo'neini siU lo iuoii noinrno^ siii ai iuoii eqoolmfiyl 9dT 

-dsuoirii bns no^rixjo eieO e'lIsH svocfe 9§BniBib isvii isbbi'^ sdi 3i/orisuoiri} sninuooo 

^?0f J ^/?"^*/iiln'J .iiidiniiloO ilsWriH. ni lav'n BidmuIoO sdi lo niaiid 9rij 'lo Jaom ijjo 

ee >/i viTfesre ^Kft&i4iBa?imcireasft)rPf9/li5 (fief,fP0»Jt,nnMJ|eft4W^ributiftftjot^^iifB4r9Bl |!yyij%l^ 

^iide»rfifts!erio£r>26;^; perjsiceBb i»ijt^ftej^st<yiibHtipn. iC^riing?rHpg^ija:.i9j.>Bqijfj.j eriJ ni Jeizs 

^xi(H'i •n/:)00 gsjrisisJJib arreijlrioo r/j;{«i y^'Ji-I lii nyve bne ..JiJa .aaniMicm ,9sie 

.«9fo9ffa 9m/i8 3ili 1o glfinblvibn; 
An increase of 23.5 per cent in the distribution of whitefish fry as compared 

with." that; of the previous ye:^r:.was achieved,. This conijepend^jile .mcfe!^e,,.w:^s due 

to the splendid cooperativ^e efforts of , our hatcher^y off^cwSirrPPjft,AWPtflJ^i^I>/(?5§>^gj£^i^, 

conimerci«,l : fishermen. ;o -^,,-0^ .-jii L:-Ji.ta ^1 ji .ijxrjjL oj li-qA mo-ij giiasiL* ni 

^: j r;;i:H .ygai: ;i{bI srIJ ol xifi^i^di'i:f BfnsaiJs So erIJuom 9£lj i£ 89iBl lo 

.^imnoTta nr S97il oloriv/ Tiorfj bnsqg :Jno-!} 
The distribution of herring fry was 27 per cent more than the previous year, 

%>yery, .creditable showing, gi noucmfoiai oUnsdJuu lo jnuoms bojirnii js vinO 
Yeltow Pickerel {Pike-Perch): „ ^ , . , r . , 

VI9V 3ilif iPerqent^^^, increas^i/^^^tl^ ,^?m^m ^if^^^^.9^ ffJ^^^^^'^MiMmn^m^n 
ijDfal^ly .th^ ,sai^^ ^^..itlWLt, r^ejcpr^ei|.,4,if?;i?ig^ tj^e. P!PEiy4ous^jr^r,jj^^ef5r, ^Q,^ jif^ fi^if^^i 

Following the customary procedure, 2,000,(100' eyed' eggs' were handled ^y the 
Sparrow Lake, hatchery, and the fry were distributed over suitable natural spawning 

ny£:ti K> p^>n9? £ ^fTinKuiiO'j ,niob99Ti lol iri§ft oilfii9J js 89ifBm Ji irfsuBo aedW .snilloii 
^WaiUMouthed Blkck Bassi^ -br.-D:! 9r(j 3o S"i>^£ii8 .trigloi'/ riiiw gq/sgl in^lori has, ted&ni 

'" Exceptionally good 'i)r?)|Ykr^^as^ffiAe^ln-¥Sl ^Aft^^^M^Sm^lifel^^^^ 

bass. The percentage increased distribution of fry and finger!fii^ ^^siM'^and^S.^ 

per cent, respectively: '■'''■' '^ ^^'s^^'^ ^^'^^^^ ^''^ ■^'''''^' 

; m7 9vil-YJ'iidi oi qu ebioosi 9Tb eigrii ;9si8 isgiBl riDura b oJ woia 

Large-Mouthed Black Bass: 

.eqc-o!^-^ fttih'dr^d*^^^lftW,f«C^^sM'^^fiP?,«8}/9 

r^6ared and distributed froin t\Vd srnlll p6ri'ds 'at M6unt''^iya^arit-^'S? A?^'*ife?niii^^da-bW 

distribution considering the limited pond areas under cWtivatiiyri'.'^ '^'^'^^ Xle^fcibomnii 

:dm94 mii oi iioUaiioqmi iBnisiio 9dT .b9'i'iiJDoo 9'iuJBi9qm9i ni 9SiU8 

Yellow Perc/KiioiJBvioado 79jbI raoil *n9bi79 ei H iud lBin9mli9qx9 8Bv/ noiJfiJS anriB9H 

-y-' The niitaib^ ^f ^i^^chiel^^ Amimie^iWHm ^iMnl^^df^'Hlrfgi^vi'l^le-qiMteto-y, Idk^' 
Etife, is subjfetit^ tti' •wke^J^u^itikfioW^ -est^h '^fiH'>: ''TW^ ^i^bdiafctroA ' Vri^'^^itt^itt* 'Id^ir^' 
in 1940 than in the two years immediately preceding, but higher 'th'aTi'"'iiii'9S?.^^ UunT 

Jfirij iGottsidering?/tllie90cniimdPcialfi'raJijeaofijfehe p^^dlv.ithariacolletetioqp xif iBpaana-ln the 

adJteiB(£$ lofii b, ctosedqaeai^c^nrtdib iinpostanit.9d bluow 8noiiibno:> oiJBmilD bnB noi^Bool 9/U 

h'i9dinrfi b9Ji/niI bni; .oiriiJ J«iQ 9iiJ 'loi bsnwfiqs 9lBbnB/mo'/[ JB 8i9b99'rd 8qooImB>I 

^i^ft'(!^"^^'fios£9r; snifiv/Bqe ineupoadua jJiiriub bn/j emii jxiriJ jb b9};;9[lo/ 9-197/ h?^?,o 5o 

preceding, year, but this; iW#ft!jgr|5«My iftffq^jilM^^>9n:,4»crflasej.9^i ,7,^vB »^,^eR^^j|iB|h/?f 
distribution of fmgerlipgs-^ joii «£;// tui ^r.CI 0I noi-ia r^.i-y orU iii Jiao-i >; nl ohnrn f ii v 

.,. ..?^9!:i t?^^ f^^9^^. >Vme .m^tl^e l>J^tpj^^.^g^^^Jh^^;I^^^artmenp,.,m^sk^^^^ 
Q| >iz95bl^_; proportions were, reare^j,W.,the,^y ^^t^od, ^^mel^,^^^,300.,^iu^^f^3a, ^^nd. 
2,333 in 1940. This work wa^^^p^^tjip^ ^^ #MUK«tKP^i&Wi§§l^^^ri^?M-^8nr// 

L9deiIdBJ89 89moc»9d Jl 3&ili jQBl^iin.Wt^y<yiJJXi;ui,L^i£;jL bH lo inuooDB nO 

,iuo-ti jfooid eviJBn lo ineihB^ tjVo v.a 1> (lifTifrfn iBnj oJ iBlimis Jn9mnoiivii9 lu. ... 
-8lb iC^i^POftie^-'ifliSlst^t'ottiiaiir^ metft6d«j*« ti<ihs*tvlrig' the" breefditfg ' stock? df flsh^ 
ig"tb''clfei§e^1iii?t^' bf' fiatiii*k'r ^^r-atter' Sreft'^' t'o^ fishf^g; m these arfeas tli^ fish thriVe* 



(SJ^6I) e .oVI s^m^uAnNXDOL HiEeou'EtoiSRiOdaaiTHAqaa ^% 



Uritiioutiiiitei-fefdnc&^andlSBiSeafleioIjotb^ar pactte ofcstlseoBiumie ri-Ketevorsiakdo lE^ such 
means a permanent toreediug-catxxaEliJsiti^ '»f»,.5andZtllereoisqfeaken»/feacbiye9asiOHiyjIatb«i 
natural increase from it. jj.oi.t .!>Ii>i -lo'i .71 .oZ !.»ri/j ,;G'i9jli>jq lo't .rl oX 

In addition to the waters already closed for the natural protection and propa- 
gation of fish, the tollo^^Xr^'^^iS^^paCeiCC) di^ringlAH^CB^ISIl^Pril 1, 1940, to March 
31, 1941: 

r-;yv/ .' ,; ^M ' r. , r ^--'1 uuoii , I i 'U .>^ viiJii'ids'I oj ,0^ei J2 i9dm9D9a rao'i'I 

sriT Jx®,Y94jPw°«,#l?J|y|S?°Mya?nI^.%*??H'"M^ bns bsibnuri sviS bnaauori) saO 

2. CEDAR'CREEK (Part),'^^ ^-'^'^■^ -^^^ ^ ^^^^ ei^iljm btiB sail ddi io Jrigiaw 9se'i9V£ 

Township of Dumfries North, County of Waterloo. 

3. OHEMONG LAKE (Part^,YaVHU8 .TADIDOJOia 

4. DEEP BAY (Pai^t of Sparrow Lake)',--Ji^'8 ?-^'^ 'i J^^^'^ Ij3Jiioibni ,y9iO 'Io x^^nuoo 

Township of Matchedash, County of Simcoe. „ , , 

fcii -eme'ia ij;.!.,..^ • rratsb oj b9GimBX9 ajsv/- :§o§ua8 95IbJ 

S5>«^JQ^(3SE!I LAKE (Part of S'Cugog Rivei^, esprit 5o 9n0 .9§fl0fli3faBm lol 89nBuJ'jiiB2 
•9*t%Kvtt8hip of Perielott, County of Victoria. -'^sd a'saivl is isilJo edi bna bn^lsi 

;6. 'GOOSE LAKE, -'bI fIp,uo-iodi'lgjjOv.l bun hAbI jibH nosv/Jsd niBb b lol gjig A 

* Townships of FettelieHi^lianStt'Somei^iiJ^ CJsarfityi od^i^ictoHaidBiissh ai iiiBb grU 

7;,.HARVEY GREEK or NOGIE'S CREEK^ tir,.,-,-, <,,() 'io f[-.rjfi-tf a 'to noUuIIo^ 

• ;i' c- (From the dam at Bass Lake to the dam near Pigeon Lake)gi esw ,noJffiH Io 

.iiinUi i^Townships of Galway)jaadc:Hari?ey,.iGo^ntyrolj ^ciarl)oriough.rijuog iaut ifonBid 

.bela-^lj^Dvin oj;!£ feiiv/ levi'i Biiol/I 9fIJ 3o noi:fjjIIoq sriT 

8. LITTLE MUD LAKE, 

r/soIoiciTdwnship of Sniith^,i€k)ulity of jReterhOroUgheasH eeiiedel'K oiiBJnO 9riT 
aifiBsiJ- i.::i, - ■; V ' i ;;is vioJB'iodBl bnn bloi'i boi/fiiinoo .oJno'ioT Io xil^^eyil1'J 

9. MASKINONGE CREEK. ^^^^ ni^pnosIA ni 

(From Maskinonge Lake to Little Vermilion Lake, and part of Maskmonge and 

V10 JB'io^Littl-ef' Vermilion: ;:Lakefl>, •ib9'{ feuoivo'iq odi 'Jo eiubeooiq sdi ;^niwoIIo1 

Xd bsbiWo^nshipS of '. Buefceffeft^lHJglatfe ^i*:ri^^ iSatfiotuPf KeHQfltw b9:>Bi9qooD 

nr bsbjff-inr :•?. '..J x.i.- f-oi-fj-! srfT .eshorfsi'? bax; f-m/jO ''o In^fri-t-iBCToa ohfiinO 9fli 
^(^ MpINTYRE RIVER, from mouth to John Street Road, Port Arthur, and ^ . 

^.,,,,N:fcE^BtNG RIVER, from mouth to First bridge gii Arthur Street, t'prt William. 

ff. ^^feWficfec^ LAKE (P^rt^,^^^'^ b9qqijjp9 ss/f gAouii jIibH sril 5o 9ao ib9X airiT .ntt 
819JBY/ ^HIWH^i^'of ■Ci-(isb5r4^rteeted>t!tefcy^iS*)%ftli,^6^^^ ^'^^ iioqanBiJ 

io 89onBiIo 7i9(lj o} vj:. 9-1:2 bbB bir.'oria rl-)iri[v/ .looo sJiup IliJ8 g'ryv/" 39>fBl 9fli io 
t4.9dDBlNI€ON LAKE (Part . looaHy.rknpwn'.ap 'IPifo^^e^ ^Mehne ai n .iBviviua 
n99J 9vTdwnship of GjPosbyiSquthiiCounty Qfl.-L^d^nid,:.! Hno^n^q IIb bnB ,8snUnBfq 

9dJ loi T.©r>n»Wpt/;ftloepSm^>»J^i GpuMyn^fl E8terl?§r^^J^<£lq lulaagooua iaift 91IT 
E!'''^m!AM'co^ne^iig'^^i'ls& k^'wSW^'^J^er'' «"^^ bBdailqmoDOB bbw ii;o.; 
Township of Crosby North, County of Leeds. 

.lu'lbHO-joua ioa aBW 819}bw 
>X9 9rfi oJ saiwo xMBmi/g 
16. TWELVE MILE GREEK* (Part soiith-eastqof Highway! tNf).{)5)^n'3UBO 9i9W rlguong 
Townships of Nelson and Trafalgar, County of Halton. 

eril iiir.y. ■;.--,. ,.;i;.,o ;,;,; •;<;■;- .- .r .hI .ct^Ai^l yjllHiWi 3d1 5o 99iriT 

l/7t)9^WHJTEFISH, BASS' aiMii<JLSAJlLAKES,niri8il i9«o Jon ob rioiriw bnB xB'^d-gid 
Townahipi!of;H«m|>hrfey, District of Parryt SooncbJiB na bnR JuoiJ lol 9ldBJrr;g 




22 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1942) 



All of the waters enumerated above are closed to protect black bass and 
maskinonge, with the exception of No. 2, for speckled trout, No. 10, for rainbow trout, 
No. 14, for pickerel, and No. 17, for lake trout. 



REMOVAL OF COARSE FISH 

From December 27, 1940, to February 8, 1941, hoop nets and trap nets were 
operated in Ahmic lake and tributary waters, for the removal of ling and suckers. 
One thousand five hundred and twenty-seven ling and 234 suckers were caught. The 
average weight of the ling and suckers was 5 lbs. and 2V^ lbs., respectively. 

BIOLOGICAL SURVEYS 

A biological survey of Curley lake, concession VI, lot 26, township of Glenelg, 
county of Grey, indicated that it was suitable for large-mouthed black bass. 

Lake Scugog was examined to determine the suitability of certain areas as 
sanctuaries for maskinonge. One of these areas is located at the south tip of Scugog 
island and the other at King's bay, located at the northwest side of the lake. 

A site for a dam between Hart lake and Loughborough lake was investigated; 
the dam is desirable in order to keep Loughborough lake at a more normal level. 

Pollution of a branch of the Credit river, in the township of Esquesing, county 
of Halton, was investigated. A small stream flowing through Georgetown enters this 
branch just south of the town, carrying with it wastes from a paper processing plant. 
The pollution of the Moira river was also investigated. 

The Ontario Fisheries Research Laboratory of the Department of Biology, 
University of Toronto, continued field and laboratory studies of lakes and streams 
in Algonquin Park. 

Following the procedure of the previous year the members of the laboratory 
cooperated with the Park staff in distributing speckled trout yearlings provided by 
the Ontario Department of Game and Fisheries. The lakes stocked are included in 
the lists in Appendix No. 1, under the district of Nipissing. Speckled trout planted 
in Brewer, Cache, Costello and Opeongo lakes were marked by removal of the adipose 
fin. This year one of the Park trucks was equipped with tanks making it possible to 
transport the fish earlier in the season and to plant them while the surface waters 
of the lakes were still quite cool, which should add greatly to their chances of 
survival. It is extremely important that we should measure the success of these 
plantings, and all persons fishing in the lakes in which speckled trout have been 
planted are urged to report their catches through the medium of the creel census. 

The first successful planting of lake herring in lake Opeongo as food for the 
trout was accomplished this year by transferring 250 six inch lake herring from Mary 
river near Huntsville. 

The transport of adult lake trout from more inaccessible to heavily fished 
waters was not successful. The pound nets were set in White Trout lake, but pre- 
sumably owing to the extremely backward season the trout did not run and not 
enough were caught to warrant the expense of continued fishing. 

Three of the smaller lakes, Jacks, Sproule and Sunday, accessible from the 
highway and which do not offer fishing at present were investigated. These seem 
suitable for trout and an attempt to develop fishing in them is planned. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1940-41 23 



In all, twenty-one lakes were closed to fishing in 1940. These lakes will be 
open in 1941. Raven, Head and Merchant lakes, which were closed in 1939 were open 
in 1940. No creel census reports were received from Raven lake but the fishing in 
both Head and Merchant showed the benefit of the year's respite. The availability 
of lake trout in Head lake was almost twice as great in 1940 as in 1938. The situation 
in Merchant lake is more complicated owing to the history of the fishery there but 
there is no doubt that the fishing was substantially improved by closure. Owing 
apparently to a slow growth rate, a single year's closure does not make a marked 
change in the size composition of lake trout catches, but it does in the case of 
speckled trout. Merchant lake which was famous for the size of its speckled trout 
in the past, but which had more recently been disappointing in this respect, again 
yielded some nice catches in 1940. The Ontario Fisheries Research Laboratory is 
anxious to receive full reports of fishing in these lakes through the creel census 
in order to assess the benefits of closure. 

It was not possible to carry on as extensive a creel census in 1940 as in previous 
years. It is of interest to note that 1940 is the first year in which bass were reported 
in any numbers from Happyisle lake, although they were known to occur there. This 
rise of a bass population to a fishable level is a further and, it is to be hoped, a last 
spread of this species in the Opeongo drainage. The creel census of lake Opeongo 
has now been carried on for five years. The accumulated data have not only enabled 
the investigators to follow the trend of the lake trout fishery there but are now also 
sufficient to make a first approximation of the spawning escapement. It remains 
to be seen whether the escapement in 1936 was sufficient to maintain the stock. An 
answer to this should be found in the next two years when the young fish resulting 
from the 1936 spawning will be entering the fishery. Enough creel census returns 
for bass have now been received to make possible a classification of the bass fisheries 
similar to that established for the lake trout. Bass lakes in which the average length 
of the fish captured is between eleven and twelve inches produce the greatest 
availability of these fish. Most of the creel census work was confined to Algonquin 
South but records were also gathered for lake Traverse and vicinity. This is of 
particular importance since lake Traverse is the only lake in the Park offering lunge 
fishing. 

The investigations of the food habits of the game and forage fish were con- 
tinued. The work on the food and growth of the yellow perch is almost completed. 
The routine examination of the stomach contents of lake trout, speckled trout and 
bass was continued at lake Opeongo. 

The study of the whitefish population in lake Opeongo was continued; there 
are dwarf individuals which mature at two years as well as the more usual individuals 
that grow to three pounds, or more, and mature at four years. 

Studies were made on the quantitative methods of sampling the plankton 
population of certain lakes. Tests were made on the use of a smaller and more con- 
venient form of the tube sampler which has proved to be more accurate than other 
samplers currently in use. 

Stream studies, carried out from early May until mid-September were con- 
cerned with the insect fauna and the speckled trout. Two locations were selected, 
Mud creek, a tributary of the Madawaska river near the east gate of the Park, and 
the rapids below Tea lake dam on the Oxtongue river. At the former location the 
quantitative distribution of aquatic insects on different types of bottom and in 
different reaches of the stream was studied. Changes in the fauna of a rapids flooded 
out by a beaver pond last year were followed, showing some interesting results 
which were reported at the meeting of the American Fisheries Society held at 



24 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1942) 



Toronto in September. At Tea lake dam an opportunity was afforded of investigating 
the feeding of speckled trout. Quantitative collections of the insects emerging from 
the water which form a large percentage of the trout food were made and trout were 
taken and their stomach contents are being examined to find what elements of the 
food available to the trout are eaten by them at different times of the day and year. 
During this study it was noted that the trout were absent from the rapids^,below the 
dam from approximately the 20th of July to September 1st. 

Work carried on in the experimental laboratory at Opeongo was concerned with 
various ways in which environment may affect or limit the activitie^s of fish. An 
investigation of immediate practical importance to our technique of restocking was 
to ascertain what surface temperatures might be considered unfavourably high for 
Hhe planting of speckled trout. It was found that speckled trout, straight from the 
holding troughs, would die within twenty-four hours if placed in water at 73° F. 
Further, the gradual equalizing of the temperature of the water in the fish can to 
that of the bath over a period of fifteen minutes gave no appreciable benefits. How- 
ever, by first exposing the fish to a moderately high temperature for twelve hours 
(65° F.) it was possible to raise the lethal temperature from 73° F. to 79° F., even 
although the fish had been returned to cooler water over night. A study of the lethal 
temperatures of the various species of fish in the waters of the Park was begun. 

Studies on the respiratory tolerance of fish were continued, and experiments on 
the circulatory capacity of fish were conducted by measuring the volume of blood 
passed by the heart at each stroke. This apparently differs widely in different species 
of fish and we believe it may be one of the differences between those fish which 
can live in warm water and those which cannot. 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

The Department is indebted to the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters 
and its many constituent Fish and Game Protective Associations throughout the 
Province and to the Northern Ontario Tourist Trade Association, as well as to 
interested sportsmen and conservationists for their active co-operation and splendid 
assistance in the protection of the provincial fish and game resources. . The activ- 
ities of these Associations and individuals have undoubtedly played a prominent part 
in developing the spirit of conservation now prevalent in the Province, and have 
materially helped to make our work in the Department more agreeable and pleasant. 

In closing this report I desire to make reference to the work of the staff. 
Members of the service, both inside and outside, generally have been conscientious 
in the performance of their work, and courteous in their contacts with the public, 
in an endeavour to assure the best results. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I am, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

D. J. TAYLOR, 

Deputy Minister of Game and Fisheries. 



ANNUAL REPORT. 19 40-41 



25 



APPENDIX No. 1 

SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
APRIL 1st, 1940, to MARCH 31st, 1941. 



LARGE-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

FRY 
Brant: 

Fairchild's Creek 15,000 

Frontenac : 

Bear Lake 5,000 

Coles Lake 5,000 

Dog Lake 5,000 

Lower Trout Lake 5,000 

McCliQtock Lake 5,000 

Mud Lake 5,000 

Spectacle Lake 5,000 

rialiburton: 

Black Lake 15,000 

Lanark: 

Silver Lake (Sherbrooke) . . 5,000 

Leeds: 

Benson Lake 5,000 

Cranberry Lake 5,000 

Gananoque Lake 5,000 

Graham Lake 5,000 

Loon Lake 5,000 

Lyndhurst Lake 5,000 

Newboro Lake 5,000 

Sand Lake 5,000 

South Lake 5,000 

Whiteflsh Lake 5,000 

Ontario: 

Wagner Lake 10,000 

Peterborough: 

Crystal Lake 15,000 

Lovesick Lake 10,000 

Salmon Lake 15,000 

Spence Lake 10,000 

White Lake 15,000 

White Duck Lake 15,000 

Victoria: 

Scugog River 10,000 

Waterloo: 

Conestogo River 10,000 



Huron : 
Mountain Lake 

Simcoe: 

Orr Lake 



York: 

Toronto Island Lagoons 

ADULTS 

Brant: 

Oakland Pond 

Norfolk: 

Milford Pond 

Oxford: 

Maplehurst Lake 



1,000 
1,000 

1,000 

52 
50 



50 



FINGERLINGS 




Pike Lake 

Potomac Lake 


Bruce : 




Stuart Lake 


Desbarats Creek 


500 


Turtle Lake 


Marl Lake 


500 


Twenty-five Cent Lake 

Unnamed lake in U Tp 


Grey: 






Curley Lake 


1,000 


Brant: 


Saugeen River 


500 


Scotland Pit Pond 



SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

FRY 
Algoma: 

Allan Lake 7,500 

Alma Lake 5,000 

Appleby Lake 5,000 

Bass Lake (Striker) 7,500 

Bass Lake (168) 7,500 

Basswood Lake 5,000 

Boundary Lake 7,500 

Bright Lake 5,000 

Carpenter Lake 7,500 

Cummlngs Lake 7,500 

Darren Lake 7,500 

Dean Lake 15,000 

Duck Lake 5,000 

Foot Lake 5,000 

Grassy Lake 5,000 

Green Lake 5,000 

Horn Lake 5,000 

Lake of the Mountains 15,000 

Lauzon Lake 10,000 

Long Lake (Patton) 7,500 

Lost Lake 7,500 

McKee's Lake 15,000 

Meikel Lake 5,000 

Mine Lake 5,000 

Mississagi Lake 15,000 

Mountain Lake 5,000 

5,000 
12,000 
7,500 
5,000 
5,000 
7.500 



15,000 



26 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1942) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941— Continued 



SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

— Continued 

Elgin: 

Pinafore Lake 10,000 

Union Pond 10,000 

Frontenac : 

Collins Lake 10,000 

Mississippi River 10,000 

Pine Lake 10,000 

Shircliff Lake 5,000 

Grenville: 

Rideau River 10,000 

Grey: 

McCulloch Lake 2,000 

Haldimand: 

Grand River 45,000 

Haliburton: 

Big Bob Lake 15,000 

Elephant Lake 15,000 

Gull Lake 15,000 

Head Lake 15,000 

Koshlong Lake 15,000 

Kushog Lake 15,000 

Mink Lake 15,000 

Miserable Lake 15,000 

Monk Lake 15,000 

Mountain Lake 15,000 

Paradise Lake 15,000 

Placid Lake 15,000 

Round Lake 15,000 

South Lake 15,000 

Halton: 

Twelve Mile Creek 10,000 

Hastings: 

Baptiste Lake 15,000 

Bass Lake 10,000 

Beaver Creek 5,000 

Bennett Lake 20,000 

Big Salmon Lake 10,000 

Burnt Lake 5,000 

Crow Lake 5,000 

Crow River 5,000 

Eraser Lake 5,000 

Gull Lake. 5,000 

' Gunter Lake 5,000 

Jordan Lake 5,000 

Little Salmon Lake 5,000 

Moira Lake 20,000 

Moira River ; . 10,000 

Oak Lake 10,000 

Parks Creek 10,000 

Pine Lake 5,000 

Spring Lake 10,000 

Trent River 10,000 



Wadsworth Lake 5,000 

Weslemkoon Lake 10,000 

Lanark: 

Bennett Lake 10,000 

Black Lake 10,000 

Christie Lake 10,000 

Clear Lake 5,000 

Otty Lake 10,000 

Pike Lake 10,000 

Silver Lake 10,000 

Leeds: 

Benson Lake 5,000 

Cranberry Lake 5,000 

Little Long Lake 5,000 

Little Rideau Lake 10,000 

Lyndhurst Lake 5,000 

Newboro Lake 10,000 

Opinicon Lake 5,000 

St. Lawrence River 25,000 

Sand Lake 10,000 

Singleton Lake 10,000 

Traynor Lake , 5,000 

Whitefish Lake 5,000 

Lennox-Addington : 

Bass Lake 5,000 

Beaver Lake 5,000 

Buckshot Lake 10,000 

Cedar Lake 5,000 

Duck Lake 5,000 

Lime Lake 5,000 

Long Lake 10,000 

Loon Lake 15,000 

Otter Lake 5,000 

White Lake 5,000 

Manitoulin: 

Bass Lake 15,000 

Kagawong Lake 15,000 

Middlesex: 

Thames River 20,000 

Muskoka: 

Camels Lake 5,000 

Clearwater Lake 5,000 

Davis Lake 5,000 

Deer Lake 5,000 

Devine Lake 5,000 

Dickie Lake 5,000 

Duck Lake 5,000 

Gillies Lake 5,000 

Haleys Lake 5,000 

Kashe Lake 15,000 

Lake Joseph 5,000 

Leach Lake ' 5,000 

Little Sand Lake 5,000 

Long Lake (Draper) 5,000 

Long Lake (Stephenson) . . . 5,000 

MacKay Lake 5,000 

Mainhoods Lake 5,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 19 40-41 



27 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941 — Continued 



SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 
— Continued 

Muskoka — Continued 

Martin Lake 5,000 

Muskoka Lake 30,000 

Muskoka River 5,000 

Poverty Lake 5,000 

Rosseau Lake 5,000 

Three Mile Lake 5,000 

Tookes Lake 5,000 

Wood Lake 5,000 

Nipissing: 

Beaver Lake 5,000 

Bruce Lake 5,000 

Herridge Lake 5,000 

Lake Champlain 5,000 

Little Martin Lake 5,000 

Martin Lake 5,000 

Martin River 5,000 

McPhee Lake 5,000 

Nosbonsing Lake 5,000 

Olive Lake 5,000 

Opechee Lake 5,000 

Talon Lake 5,000 

Wasing Lake 5,000 

Wickstead Lake 5,000 

Northumberland : 

Rice Lake 20,000 

Trent River 35,000 



Ontario: 

Severn River (N. Branch) 



20,000 



Parry Sound: 

Ahmic Lake 20,000 

Arthur Lake 5,000 

Bain Lake 5,000 

Barton Lake 5,000 

Bass Lake (Humphrey) . . . 5,000 

Beaver Lake (Bethune) . . . 5,000 

Billies Lake 5,000 

Blackwater Lake 15,000 

Caribou Lake 5,000 

Cecebe Lake 10,000 

Charter Lake 5,000 

Clear Lake 5,000 

Coles Lake 5,000 

Commanda Lake 5,000 

Deer Lake (Lount) 25,000 

Deer Lake (Wilson) 5,000 

Doe Lake 5,000 

Eagle Lake 5,000 

Hamers Lake 5,000 

Jack's Lake (Armour) 10,000 

Jack's Lake (Mills) 5,000 

Kawigamog Lake 5,000 

Kelcey's Bay 5.000 

Lake Joseph 5,000 

Lake of Many Islands 30,000 



Lake of the Woods 5,000 

Limestone Lake 5,000 

Little Clam Lake 5,000 

Little Lake Joseph 5,000 

Little Long Lake 5,000 

Long Lake (Mills-Wilson) . . 10,000 

Louisa Lake 5,000 

Lynch Lake 10,000 

Maganetawan River 10,000 

Manitowaba Lake 5,000 

Manson Lake 5,000 

Maple Lake 5,000 

Mary Jane Lake 5,000 

M'cQuaby Lake 5,000 

Memesagamesi Lake 5,000 

Mill Lake 5,000 

Neighick Lake 10,000 

Pickerel Lake 20,000 

Portage Lake (Humphrey) . . 5,000 

Portage Lake (McDougall) . . 5,000 

Rankin Lake 5,000 

Restoule Lake 5,000 

Rosseau Lake 5,000 

Ruth Lake 5,000 

Sharrows Lake 5,000 

Shawanaga Lake 5,000 

Shebeshekong Lake 5,000 

Silver Lake 5,000 

Six Mile Lake 5,000 

Spring Lake (Lount) 10,000 

Squaw Lake 5,000 

Stanley Lake 5,000 

Star Lake 5,000 

Stormy Lake 5,000 

Sucker Lake 5,000 

Ten Mile Lake 5,000 

Toad Lake 5,000 

Trout Lake (Humphrey) . . . 5,000 

Turtle Lake 5,000 

W^hitefish Lake 5,000 

Whitestone Lake 5,000 

Wilson Lake (Hagerman) . . 5,000 

Wilson Lake (Wilson) .... 5,000 

Wolf Lake 5,000 

Wolf River 5,000 

Woodcock Lake 5,000 

Peel: 

Credit River 10,000 

Peterborough: 

Big Cedar Lake 5,000 

Chemong Lake 15,000 

Clear Lake 10,000 

Deer Bay 10,000 

Indian River 10,000 

Jack's Lake 10,000 

Katchiwano Lake 10,000 

Little Cedar Lake 5,000 

Little Lake 5,000 

Long Lake (Burleigh) 10,000 

Long Lake (Douro) 5,000 

Loon Lake 10,000 



28 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1942) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941— Continued 



SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 
— Continued 

Peterborough — Continued 

Lovesick Lake 10,000 

Otonabee River 20,000 

Pigeon Lake 15,000 

Stony Lake 20,000 

Trent River 5,000 

White Lake 5,000 

Prince Edward: 

Consecon Lake 8,000 

Roblins Lake 8,000 

West Lake 8,000 

Renfrew: 

Bonnechere River 10,000 

, Hurds Lake 10,000 

U., Olmstead Lake 10,000 

Simcoe: 

Deep Bay Sanctuary 30,000 

Stormont: 

St. Lawrence River 15,000 

Sudbury: 

Agnew Lake 30,000 

Metagamesi Lake 15,000 

Nepahawin Lake 12,000 

Penage Lake 40,000 

Ratter Lake 10,000 

Spanish River 30,000 

Wanapitei Lake 30,000 

Whitewater Lake 15,000 

Timiskaming: 

Lake Timagami 10,000 

Victoria : 

Balsam Lake 25,000 

Burnt River 15,000 

Crooked Lake 15,000 

Dalrymple Lake 20,000 

Pigeon Creek 10,000 

Round Lake 15,000 

Silver Lake 10,000 

Sturgeon River 20,000 

Waterloo: 

Black River 10,000 

Grand River 10,000 

Nith River 10,000 

Paradise Lake 10,000 

Wellington : 

Puslinch Lake 20,000 



FINGERLINGS 

Algoma: 

Aberdeen Lake 2,000 

Alma Lake 3,000 

Bear Head Lake 1,000 

Caribou Lake 2,000 

Cloudy Lake 2,000 

Cooper Lake 2,000 

Desbarats Lake 2,000 

Diamond Lake 2,000 

Elbo Lake 4,000 

Friendly Lake 4,000 

Gordon Lake 2,000 

Iron Lake 2,000 

Jiggery Lake 500 

Kapuskasing Lake 1,000 

Keichel Lake 1,000 

Lonely Lake 2,000 

Long Lake (Victoria) 1,000 

Marie Lake 2,000 

Marion Lake 1,000 

McCarroll Lake 2,000 

Miller Marsh Lake 2,000 

Patton Lake 2,000 

Pipe Lake 1,000 

Rock Lake 2,000 

Unnamed lake in U Tp 3,000 

Windfall Lake 5,000 

Brant: 

Grand River 600 

Oakland Pond 500 

Bruce: 

Arran Lake 3,000 

Boat Lake 3,000 

Chesley Lake 4,000 

Isaac Lake 2,000 

Sauble River 3,000 

Saugeen River 2,000 

Silver Lake 1,000 

Carleton: 

Ottawa River 1,000 

Cochrane: 

Baart's Lake 500 

Frontenac: 

Bass Lake (Loughborough). 1,000 

Big Clear Lake 1,000 

Bobs Lake 2,000 

Brule Lake 1,000 

Buck Lake (Bedford) 1,000 

Buck Lake (Kennebec) 1,000 

Collins Lake 1,000 

Cranberry Lake 1,000 

Cross Lake 1,000 

Crotch Lake 1,000 

Crow Lake 1,000 

Devil Lake 1,000 

Eagle Lake 3,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1940-41 



29 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL 
April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941— Continued 



WATERS 



SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

— Continned 



Frontenac — Continued 

Farm Lake 

Fortune Lake 

Gull Lake (Clarendon) 

Horseshoe Lake 

Indian Lake 

Kashwakamak Lake 

Long Lake (Olden) 

Long Lake (Portland) 

Loughborough Lake 

Marble Lake 

Mazinaw Lake 

Mink Lake 

Mississagagon Lake 

Quebec Lake 

Riley Lake 

Rock Lake 

Salmon Lake 

Sand Lake 

Sharbot Lake 

Shaw Lake 

Sydenham Lake 

Varty Lake 

White Lake 

Grenville: 

Nation River 

Rideau River 

Grey: 

Francis Lake 

Mountain Lake 

Pearl Lake 

Haliburton: 

Bark Lake 

Bat Lake 

Bay at mouth of Buck Lake 

Cameron Lake 

Cranberry Lake 

Kashagawigamog Lake .... 

Long Lake 

Maple Lake 

Moore Lake 

Paul Lake 

Pete Lake 

Seeton Lake 

Third Lake 

Hastings: 

Baptiste Lake 

Crow River 

Hinchcliff Lake 

Loon Lake 

Moira Lake 

Tongamong Lake 

Whetstone Lake 

Huron: 

Maitland River 



1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

500 

1,000 

2,500 

1,000 

1,000 

4,000 

500 

1,000 

1,000 

2,000 

500 

500 

500 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 



1,000 
1,000 



3,000 
1,000 
1,000 



1,000 

2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
500 
2,000 
3,000 
2,000 
3,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



1,500 
1,000 
1,000 
500 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



1,000 



Lanark: 

Dalhousie Lake 1,000 

Gillies Lake 500 

Horn Lake 500 

Kerr Lake 1,000 

Mississippi River 1,000 

Patterson Lake 1,000 

Round Lake 1,000 

Leeds: 

Charleston Lake 1,500 

Gananoque Lake 1,000 

Lower Beverley Lake 1,000 

Red Horse Lake 1,000 

Rideau Lake 1,000 

Sand Lake 1,000 

Whitefish Lake 1,000 

Manitoulin: 

Bayfield Sound 7,500 

Big Lake 3,000 

Ice Lake 6,000 

Lilly Lake 5,000 

Loon Lake 5,000 

Manitou Lake 6,500 

McGregor Bay 1,200 

Mindemoya Lake 12,000 

Silver Lake 6,000 

South Bay 20,000 

Tobacco Lake 6,000 

Whitefish Lake 2,500 

Muskoka: 

Abbs Lake 1,000 

Crooked Lake 1,000 

McKay Lake 1,000 

Six Mile Lake 1,000 

Walker Lake 1,000 

Nipissing: 

Bear Lake 500 

Cache Lake 3,000 

Clear Lake 500 

Cowley Lake 500 

French River 2,250 

Kaibuskong Lake 500 

Little Sturgeon Lake 500 

Lower Twin Lake 500 

Moore Lake 500 

Muskosung Lake 3,000 

Nipissing Lake 4,500 

Poplar Lake 500 

Spruce Lake 500 

Talon Lake 500 

Tomiko Lake 6,000 

Trout Lake 10,000 

Turtle Lake 500 

Wistiwasing Lake 500 



Norfolk: 
Waterford Gravel Pit Pond 



600 



30 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1942) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941— Continued 



SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 
— Continued 

Northumberland : 

Rice Lake 800 

Ontario: 

Lake St. John 

Parry Sound: 

Bass Lake (Hardy) 

Bass Lake (Patterson) 

Big Lake 

Blue Lake 

Crane Lake 

Crooked Lake 

Devolve Lake 

Eagle Lake 

Goose-neck Lake 

Haynes Lake 

Horseshoe Lake 

Irish Lake 

Lennon Lake 

Long Lake 

Loon Lake 

Maganetawan River 

McVeety Lake 

Milton Lake 

Moffat Lake 

Mud Lake 

Kipissing Lake 

Oastler Lake 

Orange Lake 

Rainy Lake 

Shoal Lake 

Smith Bay 

Spring Lake 

Trout Lake (McDougall) . . 

Watt Lake 

Wiggins Lake 

Wolf Lake 

Wright Lake 

Peterborough: 

Bald Lake 900 

Bass Lake 800 

Belmont Lake 800 

Bottle Lake 900 

Buck Lake 1,500 

Catchacoma Lake 1,500 

Chemong Lake 1,000 

Crab Lake 800 

Crystal Lake 800 

Duck Lake 800 

Eagle Lake 1,800 

Gold Lake 900 

Jack's Lake 800 

Kashabog Lake 1,000 

Katchiwano Lake 1,000 

Little Mud Lake 500 

Little Trout Lake 1,000 

Lovesick Lake 1,200 



1,000 



500 

1,000 

500 

500 

1,000 

1,000 

500 

1,000 

1,000 

500 

1,000 

500 

1,000 

500 

500 

500 

1,000 

500 

500 

1,000 

2,000 

500 

500 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

500 

500 

500 



Mississauga Lake 1,000 

Oak Lake 1,000 

Round Lake 2,654 

Sandy Lake 900 

Stony Lake 2,000 

Talon Lake 800 

Trout Lake 800 

Twin Lake 1,000 

Wolf Lake 800 

Renfrew: 

Calabogie Lake 1,000 

Chats Lake 1,000 

Constant Lake 1,000 

Ferguson Lake 1,000 

Frederick Bay 1,000 

Green Lake 500 

Hyde Bay 500 

Loon Lake 500 

Mink Lake 1,000 

Moccasin Lake 500 

Morans Lake 500 

Round Lake 1,000 

Smiths Lake 500 

Stones Lake 1,000 

White Lake 1,000 

Simcoe: 

Bass Lake 2,000 

Cook's Lake 2,000 

Couchiching Lake 2,000 

Gloucester Pool 3,000 

Kempenfeldt Bay 2,000 

Nottawasaga River 2,500 

Park Lake 3,000 

Sudbury: 

Bass Lake (Dennison) 2,500 

Bass Lake (36-37) 3,000 

Charlton Lake 2,500 

Cranberry Lake 3,000 

Cross Lake 750 

Edith Lake 750 

French River 1,750 

Frood Lake 2,500 

Howry Lake 1,500 

Ivanhoe Lake 750 

LaCloche Lake 1,000 

Maple Lake 1,000 

McCharles Lake 2,500 

Nelson Lake 1,500 

Nipissing Lake 500 

Penage Lake 4,000 

Poulin Lake 3,000 

Shanty Bay 1,000 

Tower Lake 3,000 

Trout Lake 1,250 

Vermilion Lake 1,000 

Thunder Bay: 

Boulevard Lake 6,000 

Selwyn Lake 3.000 

Shebandowan Lake 3,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 19 40-41 



31 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941— Continued 



SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 
— Continued 



Timiskaming : 

Bear Lake 

Beaverhouse Lake . . 

Bloom Lake 

Emerald Lake 

Hanging Stone River 

Lake Timagami 

• Sesekinika Lake . . . 

Shanty Lake 

Victoria: 

Cameron Lake 

Head Lake 

Mud Turtle Lake . . . 
Round Lake 

Wellington: 

Allan's Dam 

Armstrong Dam .... 

York: 

Lake Simcoe 

Miscellaneous: 

Sales 



YEARLINGS AND ADULTS 

Brant: 

Burford Lake 

Grand River 

Scotland Pit Pond 

Hastings : 

Crow Lake 

Manitoulin: 

Perch Lake 

Middlesex: 

Sydenham River 

Muskoka : 
Skeleton Lake 

Norfolk : 

Waterford Pond 

Peterborough: 
Belmont Lake 

Great Lakes: 

North Channel 



500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
1,000 
500 



2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



1,500 
2.000 



2.000 



5,000 



110 

73 

100 



100 
24 
107 
542 
105 
100 
410 



MASKIIVONGE 

FRY 
Carleton: 

Ottawa River 25,000 

Frontenac : 

St. Lawrence River 20,000 

Haldimand: 

Grand River 10,000 

Hastings : 

Bay of Quinte 35,000 

Beaver Creek 20,000 

Crow Lake 20,000 

Crow River 20,000 

Moira Lake 20,000 

Moira River 35,000 

Sears Lake 10,000 

Stoco Lake 15,000 

Tongamong Lake 20,000 

Trent River 40,000 

Twin Lakes 5,000 

Whetstone Lake 10,000 

Leeds: 

St. Lawrence River 30,000 

Muskoka: 

Kahshe Lake 15,000 

Sparrow Lake 20,000 

Nipissing: 

Lake Nipissing 30,000 

Lake Traverse 5,000 

Wolseley Bay 30,000 

Northumberland : 

Rice Lake 75,000 

Trent River 140,000 

Ontario: 

Lake St. John 10,000 

Parry Sound: 

Lake Nipissing 20,000 

Pickerel River 10,000 

Peterborough: 

Bald Lake 10,000 

Belmont Lake 50,000 

Buckhorn Lake 25,000 

Chemong Lake 80,000 

Clear Lake 80,000 

Deer Bay 80,000 

Deer Lake 5,000 

Gilchrist Bay 20,000 

Indian River 15,000 

Kashabog Lake 20,000 

Katchiwano Lake 120,000 

Little Lake 10,000 



32 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1942) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941— Continued 



MASKINONGE— Continued 

Peterborough — Continued 

Little Mud Lake 20,000 

Little Trout Lake 50,000 

Lovesick Lake 40,000 

Otonabee River 40,000 

Pigeon Lake 50,000 

Rice Lake 20,000 

Round Lake 50,000 

Sandy Lake 15,000 

Stony Lake 250,000 

Trent River 20,000 

Twin Lake 5,000 

White Lake 15,000 

Prince Edward: 

East Lake 10,000 

West Lake 15,000 

Renfrew: 

Black Bay 10,000 

Cory Lake 10,000 

Cushene Lake 10,000 

James Lake 15,000 

Lac du Bois Dur 10,000 

Montgomery Lake 15,000 

Redbridge Lake 15,000 

Stephenson Lake 5,000 

Simcoe: 

Gloucester Pool 20,000 

Lake Simcoe 25,000 

Stormont: 

St. Lawrence River 20,000 

Sudbury: 

French River 20,000 

Thunder Bay: 

Lac des Mille Lacs 5,000 

Victoria: 

Balsam Lake 40,000 

Burnt River 15,000 

Cameron Lake 20,000 

Dalrymple Lake •, . . . 15,000 

?Jud Turtle Lake 15,000 

Pigeon Creek 40,000 

Pigeon Lake 60,000 

Pigeon River 80,000 

Scugog Lake 40,000 

Scugog River 10,000 

Silver Lake 10,000 

Young's Lake 10,000 

Waterloo: 

Nith River 5,000 



FINGERLINGS 

Peterborough : 

Belmont Lake 

Buckhorn Lake 

Clear Lake 

Gilchrist Bay 

Katchawanooka River . . . 

Rice Lake 

Searight Bay 

Stony Lake 

Simcoe: 
Lake Couchiching 

Victoria: 

Pigeon River 

Sturgeon River 



200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
23 
510 



200 



200 
200 



PERCH 

FRY 
Lake Erie 13,000,000 

PICKEREL 

EYED EGGS 

Sparrow Lake 2,000,000 

FRY 

Algoma: 

Allan Lake 500,000 

Anjigami Lake 1,000,000 

Arnill Lake 500,000 

Bright Lake 500,000 

Canoe Lake 1,000,000 

Caribou Lake 500,000 

Clear Lake 1,000,000 

Crab Lake 100,000 

Cummings Lake 500,000 

Dean Lake 250,000 

Desbarats Lake 1,500,000 

Gordon Lake 500,000 

Granary Lake 350,000 

Keichel Lake 500,000 

Lake of the Mountains 150,000 

Lauzon Lake 500,000 

Lillyget Lake 500,000 

Little Basswood Lake 500,000 

Little Clear Lake 500,000 

Marion Lake 250,000 

Mississauga River 500,000 

Pipe Lake 500,000 

Rock Lake 500,000 

Spanish River 500,000 

White Lake 500,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1940-41 



33 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941— Continued 



PICKEREL— Continued 

Bruce: 

Berry's Lake 750,000 

Boat Lake ; 1,000,000 

Chesley Lake 1,000,000 

Isaac Lake 1,000,000 

Sauble River 1,000,000 

Saugeen River 750,000 

Seips Lake 300,000 

Silver Lake 200,000 

Sky Lake 1,000,000 

Spry Lake . 250,000 

Carleton: 

Ottawa River 500,000 

Cochrane: 

Bigwater Lake 200,000 

Bobs Lake 200,000 

Nighthawk River 200,000 

Round Lake 100,000 

Whitefish River 300,000 

Frontenac: 

Bass Lake 250,000 

Big Clear Lake 200,000 

Big Gull Lake 700,000 

Big Lake . 200,000 

Bobs Lake 1,950,000 

Cross Lake (Kennebec) ..... 700,000 

Crotch Lake (Palmerston) . . 500,000 

Crow Lake 300,000 

Dean Lake 100,000 

Fourteen Island Lake 100,000 

Green Bay Lake 200,000 

Green Lake 500,000 

Gull Lake 700,000 

Horseshoe Lake 100,000 

Kashwakamak Lake 1,850,000 

Long Lake (Olden) 250,000 

Long Lake (Portland) 450,000 

Malcolm Lake 500,000 

Marble Lake 200,000 

Mazinaw Lake 500,000 

McClintock Lake 100,000 

Mink Lake 100,000 

Mississagagon Lake 750,000 

Mississippi River 800,000 

Otter Lake 100,000 

Red Pine Lake 300,000 

Salmon Lake 300,000 

Sharbot Lake 500,000 

Varty Lake 100,000 

Grenville: 

Nation River 400,000 

Rideau River 1.000,000 

Grey: 

Mountain Lake 750,000 

Haldimand: 

Grand River 1,500,000 



Haliburton: 

Cauntaus Lake 500,000 

Elephant Lake 1,000,000 

Mink Lake 150,000 

Otter Lake 250,000 

Paudash Lake 1,000,000 

Wolf Lake 500,000 

Hastings: 

Baptiste Lake 800,000 

Bow Lake 200,000 

Crow Lake 1,000,000 

Crow River 200,000 

Lime Lake 100,000 

Mallard Lake 200,000 

Moira Lake 500,000 

Moira River 300,000 

Rock Lake 500,000 

Salmon Trout Lake 100,000 

Sears Lake 100,000 

Silent Lake 250,000 

Tongamong Lake 1,000,000 

Trent River 500,000 

Kenora: 

Andy Lake 250,000 

Berry Lake 1,500,000 

Blindfold Lake 1,500,000 

Bowden Lake 750,000 

Clay Lake 750,000 

Corner Lake 1,500,000 

Eagle Lake 3,000,000 

Ely Lake 250,000 

Lake of the Woods 58,175,000 

Long Bow Lake 1,500,000 

Lulu Lake 1,500,000 

Marchington Lake 3,000,000 

Silver Lake 1,000,000 

Vermilion Bay 1,000,000 

Wabigoon Lake 1,000,000 

Winnipeg River 1,000,000 

Lanark : 

Barbers Lake 200,000 

Bennett Lake 400,000 

Black Lake 150,000 

Christie Lake 800,000 

Dalhousie Lake 500,000 

Gillies Lake 200,000 

Keatings Lake 100,000 

Kerr Lake 500,000 

Long Lake 100,000 

Mississippi Lake 700,000 

Mississippi River 1,300,000 

Otty Lake 300,000 

Patterson Lake 500,000 

Round Lake 200,000 

Spectacle Lake 500,000 

Whites Lake 450,000 

Leeds: 

Clear Lake 200,000 

Crosby Lake 500,000 



34 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1942) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941— Continued 



PICKEREL— Continued 

Leeds — Continued 

Devil Lake 250,000 

Graham Lake 100,000 

Higgley Lake 150,000 

Loon Lake 200,000 

Opinicon Lake 800,000 

St. Lawrence River 1,700,000 

Sand Lake 750,000 

Traynor Lake 150,0^0 

Upper Rideau 1,000,000 

Wolf Lake 500,000 

Lennox-Addington : 

Beaver Lake 1,000,000 

Camel Lake 500,000 

Cedar Lake 300,000 

Duck Lake 200,000 

Long Lake 500,000 

Loon Lake 500,000 

Mazinaw Lake 600,000 

Van's Lake 100,000 

White Lake 100,000 

Manitoulin: 

Burnt Lake 1,000,000 

Manitowaning Bay 500,000 

Mindemoya Lake 4,000,000 

South Bay 500,000 

West Bay 1,500,000 

Muskoka: 

Allen's Lake 300,000 

Axel's Lake 150,000 

Crooked Lake 750,000 

Kahshe Lake 250,000 

Lake Muskoka 800,000 

Long Lake (McLean) 250,000 

Mootes Lake 150,000 

Silver Lake 250,000 

Six Mile Lake 750,000 

Skeleton Lake 250,000 

Nipissing: 

Beaver Lake 200,000 

Bruce Lake 200,000 

Cedar Lake 500,000 

. French River 1,000,000 

Kaibuskong Lake 100,000 

Lake Champlain 200,000 

Lake iNipissing 4,100,000 

Lake Timagami 1,000,000 

Little Martin Lake 100,000 

Lower Twin Lake 200,000 

Marion Lake 400,000 

Martin Lake 800,000 

Martin River 600,000 

McPhee Lake 200,000 

Moore Lake 250,000 

Net Lake 200,000 

Nosbonsing Lake 1,000,000 

Opechee Lake 150,000 



Red Cedar Lake 200,000 

Rib Lake 200,000 

Talon Lake 500,000 

Tilden Lake ; 200,000 

Tomiko Lake 1,000,000 

Twin Lake 100,000 

Wasaki Lake 200,000 

Wasing Lake 200,000 

Wickstead Bay 500,000 

Wolseley Bay 1,000,000 

Northumberland: 

Crow Bay 500,000 

Crow River 500,000 

Rice Lake 1,000,000 

Trent River 3,000,000 

Ontario: 

Lake St. John 1,000,000 

Mud Lake 1,000,000 

Severn River 1,500,000 

Oxford: 

Lakeside Lake 1,000,000 

Nith River 1,000,000 

Parry Sound: 

Ahmic Lake 650,000 

Barton Lake 200,000 

Bass Lake 200,000 

Billie Lake 100,000 

Burnt Lake 100,000 

Cecebe Lake 300,000 

Charter Lake 200,000 

Clear Lake (Mills) 100,000 

Clear Lake (Watts) 200,000 

Commanda Lake 250,000 

Cranberry Lake 100,000 

Crooked Lake 200,000 

Doe Lake 600,000 

Duck Lake 100,000 

Haynes Lake 150,000 

Isabella Lake 300,000 

Jacks Lake 100,000 

Kawigamog Lake 450,000 

Lake Joseph 400,000 

Lake Nipissing 2,000,000 

Lake of Many Islands 100,000 

Lake Rosseau 2,700,000 

Little Lake Joseph 250,000 

Little Long Lake 100,000 

Long Lake (Mills) 100,000 

Long Lake (Patterson) 200,000 

Long Lake (Wilson) 100,000 

Loon Bay 500,000 

Maganetawan River 450.000 

McKeown Lake 100,000 

McQuaby Lake 100,000 

McVeety Lake 100,000 

Memesagamesi Lake 1,100,000 

Merrick's Lake 50.000 

Mill Lake 200,000 

Naiscot Lake 500,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1940-41 



35 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941— Continued 



PIC KEREL— Continued 

Parry Sound — Continued 

Neighick Lake 100,000 

Oastler Lake 800,000 

Pickerel Lake 250,000 

Pickerel River 500,000 

Portage Lake 450,000 

Rainy Lake 200,000 

Restoule Lake 600,000 

Ruth Lake 100,000 

Ryans Lake 100,000 

Sharrows Lake 100,000 

Shawanaga Lake 300,000 

Shebeshekong Lake 100,000 

Shoal Lake 200,000 

Silver Lake 100,000 

Snakeskin Lake 100,000 

Squaw Lake 400,000 

Stanley Lake 150,000 

Stewarts Lake 200,000 

Stormy Lake 100,000 

Sucker Lake (Humphrey) .. 300,000 

Sucker Lake (Mills) 100,000 

Theodelite Lake 100,000 

Toad Lake 200,000 

Wahwashkesh Lake 1,000,000 

Whitestone Lake 300,000 

Wilson Lake 150,000 

Wolf River 1,500,000 

Manitowaba Lake 200,000 

Peterborough: 

Belmont Lake 1,000,000 

Buckhorn Lake 1,000,000 

Concession Lake 100,000 

Connolly's Lake 500,000 

Deer Lake 500,000 

Indian River 500,000 

Little Cedar Lake 500,000 

Little Trout Lake 500,000 

Long Lake (Burleigh) 1,000,000 

Loon Lake (Chandos) 1,000,000 

North River 500,000 

Oak Lake 1,000,000 

Otonabee River 500,000 

Rice Lake 2,000,000 

Round Lake 1,000,000 

Trent River 1,000,000 

Twin Lakes 1,000,000 

Prince Edward: 

Consecon Lake 300,000 

West Lake 300,000 

Rainy River: 

Clearwater Lake 6,000,000 

Lake of the Woods 1,500,000 

One-sided Lake 4,500,000 

Quill Lake 3,000,000 

Rainy Lake 58,000,000 

Sabaskong Bay (Lake of 

the Woods) 15,000,000 

Steeprock Lake 2,000,000 



Renfrew : 

Black Bay 300,000 

Calabogie Lake 200,000" 

Chats Lake 500,000 

Constant Lake 250,000 

Cushene Lake 100,000 

Dempsey's Lake 100,000 

Dore Lake 500,000 

Golden Lake 500,000 

Hardwood Lake 200,000 

Hazel Bay 250,000 

Hurds Lake 200,000 

Jones Lake 100,000 

Lafleur Lake 100,000 

Madawaska River 400,000 

Muskrat Lake 250,000 

Norway Lake 450,000 

Olmstead Lake 250,000 

Otterson Lake 100,000 

Petawawa River 500,000 

Stephenson Lake 100,000 

Sturgeon Lake 250,000 

Westmeath Lake 250,000 

White Lake (McNab) 500,000 

White Lake (Raglan) 250,000 

York River 200,000 

Russell: 

Castor River 1,000,000 

Simcoe: 

Gloucester Pool 4,000,000 

Little Lake 500,000 

North River 2,500,000 

Nottawasaga River 600,000 

Severn River 2,000-,000 

Six Mile Lake 750,000 

Stormont: 

St. Lawrence River 1,600,000 

Sudbury: 

Agnew Lake 1,000,000 

Cameron Lake 100,000 

Charlton Lake 500,000 

Clear Lake 100,000 

Crooked Lake 250,000 

Cutler Lake 250,000 

French River 3,000,000 

Ivanhoe Lake 500.000 

La Cloche Lake 1,000,000 

Lake Penage 2,000,000 

Long Lake 750,000 

Lovering Lake 100,000 

Makido Lake '. . . 1,000,000 

Matagamasi Lake 400,000 

McFarlane Lake 200,000 

Minisinakwa Lake 1,000,000 

Moose Lake 250,000 

Nepiwasy Lake 500,000 

Richards Lake 200,000 

Shanty Bay 1,000,000 

Wanapitei Lake 1,000,000 



36 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1942) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF PISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941— Continued 



PICKEREL— Continued 

Sudbury — Continued 

Wliitewater Lake 200,000 

Tliunder Bay: 

Lake Windigoostigwan 500,000 

Timiskaming: 

Bear Lake 250,000 

Beaverhouse Lake 250,000 

Blue Lake 200,000 

Cedar Lake 75,000 

Gillies Lake 75,000 

Granite Lake 75,000 

Hound Chute 75,000 

Kenogami Lake 300,000 

Lake Timagami 2,000,000 

Net Lake 100,000 

Portage Lake 75,000 

Round Lake 100,000 

Tomiko Lake 75,000 

Twin Lake 100,000 

Victoria Lake 100,000 

Wendigo Lake 250,000 

Victoria: 

Little Turtle Lake : 1,000,000 

Mud Turtle Lake 500,000 

Great Lakes: 

Lake Superior 3,000,000 

North Channel 19,000,000 

Lake Huron 23,862,000 



ADULTS 



Middlesex: 

Sydenham River 



100 



BROWN TROUT 

FINGERLINGS 
Brant: 

Whiteman's Creek 10,000 

Elgin : 

Big Creek 15,000 

Grey: 

Potawatami River 10,000 

Saugeen River 20,000 

Styx River 10,000 

Muskoka: 

Indian River 5,000 

Kahshe Lake 5,000 

Norfolk: 

Big Creek 10,000 



Little Otter 15,000 

Nanticoke Creek 10,000 

Unnamed Stream 2,000 

Northumberland : 

Bowens Pond 725 

Peel: 

Credit River 10,000 

Simcoe: 

Nottawasaga River 40,000 

Wellington: 

Speed River 10,000 

York: 

Humher River 10,000 



YEARLINGS 

Brant: 

Scotland Pit Pond 500 

Whiteman's Creek 3,600 

Bruce: 

Albermarle Creek 1,200 

Fladd's Dam 500 

Lockerby Creek 3,600 

Plum Creek 3,600 

Saugeen River 7,250 

Snake Creek 1,800 

Spring Creek 1,000 

Sucker Creek 1,600 

Teeswater River 3,600 

Vogt's Creek 1,000 

Willow Creek 1,600 

Cochrane: 

Mattagami River 2,500 

Durham : 

Bowmanville Pond 1,500 

Ganaraska River 2,000 

Mordens Creek 1,500 

Rowe's Pond 500 

Stephens Creek 1,500 

Vanstone's Pond 1,500 

Elgin: 

Big Creek 3,600 

Deer Creek 500 

Little Otter 3,600 

Otter Creek 500 

Grey: 

Beaver River 1,500 

Big Head River 10,800 

Lueck's Mill Pond 3,000 

Potawatami River 2,700 

Sauble River L800 



i 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1940-41 



37 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941— Continued 



I 



BROWN TROUT— Continued 

Grey — Continued 

Saugeen River 12,600 

Styx River 3,600 

Sydenham River 4,400 

Haldimand: 

Rogers Creek 1,800 

Halton: 

Sixteen Mile Creek 2,000 

Twelve Mile Creek 13,300 

Hastings: 

Rawdon Creek 3,600 

Huron: 

Maitland River 9,000 

Nine Mile River 3,600 

Lambton: 

Bear Creek 1,000 

Lincoln: 

Effingham Stream 1,500 

Twelve Mile Creek 1,000 

Middlesex: 

Caddy Creek 500 

Medway Creek 2,200 

Norfolk : 

Big Creek 10,800 

Clear Lake 1,500 

Little Otter 3,000 

Nanticoke Creek 3,800 

Stony Creek 400 

Venison Creek 1,500 

Northumberland : 

Cavan Stream 2,700 

Cole's Pond 500 

Dudley's Pond 250 

Ontario: 

Chubtown Creek 1,500 

Oxford: 

Burns Creek 1,000 

Horner's Creek 1,000 

Peel: 
Credit River 3,000 

Perth: 

Avon River 2,100 

Halfway House Creek 2,100 



Peterborough: 

Deer Bay Creek 8,000 

Eel's Creek 9,600 

Jack's Creek 3,700 

Mississauga River 7,000 

Mount Pleasant Stream 1,500 

Simcoe: 

Boyne River 3,700 

Nottawasag^ River 16,800 

Willow Creek 3,000 

Waterloo: 

Bridgeport Dam 1,500 

Cedar Creek 1,000 

Dentinger Creek 2,200 

Fisher Mill Dam 1,500 

Gingerich Creek 1,000 

Welland : 

Lyons Creek 8,000 

Wellington : 

Conestogo River 2,200 

Everton Stream 1,500 

Speed River 6,300 

Wentworth : 

Bronte Creek 2,100 

York : 

Hoover Pond 300 

number River 6,000 



Exchange 



LAKE TROUT 

EYED EGGS 



FRY 



575,000 



Frontenac : 

Big Gull Lake 20,000 

Brule Lake 5,000 

Buck Lake 20,000 

Buckshot Lake 30,000 

Camp Lake 5,000 

Canoe Lake 5,000 

Canonto Lake 15,000 

Chambers Lake 5,000 

Crotch Lake 35,000 

Crow Lake 20,000 

Draper Lake 15,000 

Eagle Lake 10,000 

Granite Lake 5,000 

Green Lake 20,000 

Grindstone Lake 10,000 

Kashwakamak Lake 10,000 

Loughborough Lake 15,000 

Mackie Lake 15,000 



38 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1942) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941— Continued 



LAKE TROUT— Continued 

Frontenac — Continued 

Mississauga Lake 10,000 

Palmerston Lake 25,000 

Reid's Lake 15,000 

Schooner Lake 25,000 

Sharbot Lake 30,000 

Haliburton: 

Deer Lake 5,000 

Drag Lake 25,000 

Eagle Lake 10.000 

East Lake 5,000 

Parquhar Lake 10,000 

Fishtail Lake 5,000 

Hurricane Lake 5,000 

Kashagawigamog Lake 10,000 

Kushog Lake 10,000 

Long Lake 5,000 

Moose Lake 10,000 

Paudash Lake 5,000 

Pine Lake 5,000 

Redstone Lake 35,000 

Ritchie's Lake 5,000 

Spruce Lake 5,000 

Hastings: 

Baptiste Lake 60,000 

Bass Lake 15,000 

Big Salmon Lake 10,000 

Burnt Lake 3,000 

Cedar Lake 10,000 

Clear Lake 5,000 

Devil Lake 5,000 

Dickie Lake 7,000 

Eagle Lake 30,000 

Gunter Lake 5,000 

Jamieson Lake 5,000 

Kaminiskeg Lake 10,000 

La Vallee Lake 5,000 

Limestone Lake 5,000 

Little Salmon Lake 20,000 

McKenzie Lake 5,000 

Robinson Lake 30,000 

Silver Lake 10,000 

Trout Lake 5,000 

Wadsworth Lake 5,000 

Lanark: 

Rideau Lake 60,000 

Rob's Lake 5,000 

Silver Lake 15,000 

Leeds : 

Charleston Lake 15,000 

Indian Lake 20,000 

Red Horse Lake 15.000 

Wolf Lake 20,000 

Lennox-Addington : 

Buckshot Lake 30.000 

Elbow Lake 15,000 



Little Weslemkoon Lake . . . 5,000- 

Loon Lake 60,000 

Otter Lake 10,000 

Thirty Island Lake 20,000 

Weslemkoon Lake 10,000 

White Lake 10,000 

Peterborough: 

Belmont Lake 20,000 

Big Cedar Lake 10,000 

Bottle Lake 10,000 

Catchacoma Lake 25,000 

Crystal Lake 10,000 

Eagle Lake 30,000 

Eel's Lake 30,000 

Gold Lake 10,000 

Jack's Lake 30,000- 

Little Cedar Lake 10,000 

Long Lake 10,000 

Loon Lake (Chandos) 60,000 

Mississauga Lake 30,000 

Oak Lake 20,000 

Sandy Lake 15,000 

Trout Lake 30,000 

Twin Lake 10,000 

Wolf Lake 10,000 

Great Lakes: 

North Channel 2,654,000 

Georgian Bay 960,000 

Lake Huron 640,000 

Lake Ontario 1,860,000 



FINGERLINGS 

Algoma : 

Achigan Lake 10,000 

Axe Lake 5,000 

Bass Lake 25,000 

Basswood Lake 42,500 

Bevins Lake 10,000 

Big Clear Lake 10,000 

Bull Lake 4,000 

Burn Lake 5,000 

Canoe Lake 1,000 

Caribou Lake 5,000 

Carry Lake 3,000 

Chiblow Lake 30,000 

Clear Lake (Scarfe) 5,000 

Clear Lake (188) 5.000 

Cobri Lake 5.000 

Coffee Lake 7.000 

Cummings Lake 15.000 

Deep Lake 5,000 

Diamond Lake 5,000 

Goetz Lake 5,000 

Grey Trout Lake 10,000 

Hawk Lake 10,000 

Hobon Lake 10.000 

Howard Lake 10,000 

.Tobammeghia Lake 3,000 

Lake of the Mountains 5,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1940-41 



39 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941— Continued 



LAKE TROUT— Continued 

Algoma — Continued 

Little Chiblow Lake 5,000 

Little Pickerel Lake 5,000 

Long Lake 15,000 

Loon Lake 5,000 

Madawonsing Lake 4,000 

Matinenda Lake 22,500 

Miller Lake 4,000 

Moon Lake 7,000 

Patton Lake 5,000 

Rackey Lake 5,000 

Rand Lake 10,000 

Ranger Lake 25,000 

Raw Hide Lake 35,000 

Red Deer Lake 10,000 

Robertson Lake 10,000 

Sand Lake 10,000 

Saymo Lake 15,000 

Spruce Lake 10,000 

Tookenay Lake 50,000 

Trout Lake (Aweres) 5,000 

Trout Lake (24-R-62) 10,000 

Upper Island Lake 5,000 

Wakomata Lake 25,000 

White Lake 10,000 

Bruce : 

Gillies Lake 15,000 

Cochrane: 

Bigwater Lake 5,000 

Bobs Lake 5,000 

Mary Lake 5,000 

Nellie Lake 10,000 

Perry Lake 6,000 

Remi Lake 20,000 

Three Nation Lake 5,000 

Watabeag Lake 10,000 

Haliburton: 

Big Bear Lake 10,000 

Big Bob Lake 5,000 

Boskung Lake 15,000 

Bow Lake 5,000 

Clear Lake 5,000 

Crozier Lake 5,000 

Dack's Lake 5,000 

Deer Lake 10,000 

Farquhar Lake 10,000 

Gull Lake 10,000 

Haliburton Lake 5,000 

Hall's Lake 5,000 

Hardwood Lake 5,000 

Hollow Lake 35,000 

Horseshoe Lake 10,000 

Kashagawigamog Lake 15,000 

Kimball Lake 5,000 

Leaf Lake 5,000 

Little Bear Lake 5,000 

Little Boskung Lake 5,000 

Little Hawk Lake 5.000 



Maple Lake 10,000 

Moore Lake 5,000 

Oblong Lake 5,000 

Pine Lake 10,000 

St. Nora's Lake 5,000 

Stocking Lake 5,000 

Stormy Lake 8,000 

Twelve Mile Lake 5,000 

White Trout Lake 5,000 

Wolf Lake 7,000 

Kenora: 

Blue Lake 25,000 

Canyon Lake 30,000 

Cedar Bough Lake 5,000 

Clearwater Bay (Lake of 

the Woods) 50,000 

Cul de Sac Lake 60,000 

Dogtooth Lake 30,000 

Dryberry Lake 30,000 

Eagle Lake 45,000 

Granite Lake 10,000 

Lake of Two Mountains 15,000 

Little Vermilion Lake 15,000 

Mameigwess Lake 11,700 

Sturgeon Lake 30,000 

Thunder Lake 20,000 

Trout Lake 30,000 

Vermilion Bay 25,000 

Whitefish Bay (Lake of 

the Woods) 40,000 

Manitoulin: 

Mantiowaning Bay 12,000 

West Bay 12,000 

Muskoka: 

Bella Lake 5,000 

Big Twin Lake 1,000 

Clear Lake (Ridout) 10,000 

Fairy Lake 5,000 

Fox Lake 5,000 

Lake of Bays 47,000 

Lake Joseph 15,000 

Lake Muskoka 25,000 

Lake Rosseau 35,000 

Long Lake (Cardwell) 5,000 

Long Lake (Chaffey) 1,000 

Long Lake (Oakley) 5,000 

Loon Lake (Sinclair) 5,000 

Oxtongue Lake 5,000 

Paint Lake 10,000 

Peninsula Lake 5,000 

Pine Lake 10,000 

Rebecca Lake 10,000 

Skeleton Lake 20,000 

Solitaire Lake 4,000 

Stoney Lake 5,000 

Surprise Lake 5,000 

Vernon Lake 10,000 

Nipissing: 

Ababika Lake 10,000 



m 



DEPARTME3>BT:rOFrGAMIBa .AIDU3/FIJSHERIES No. 9 (1942) 



Apnttii»t;)i«ft(>;ito-'Marrih'i81feti.:194atf^G(anlilrae(i 



000,01 LAKE TROUT^ContiilHddtilqiil/ 

000,5 ^-AlA 9700I/: 

Ni^issing— tContinued. . . . y^fsJ gnohfO 

B'e^V Lake •. . •. •. •. . . . . . •. -. •. •• . n^^^ ^BJ6tiO 

' '<5kirney Lak-e • •• •. ; •. •. •. .^^^v^. .8>'io>' 5,tj^0 

^•^'edar Lake • •. •. •. •. •. •. •. •. •. . ^^f^A . S«i>'-^5,000 
*'<Ctfess Lake • •. ■. -. ■. •. •. •. •. -. •. . ??^A4 '^^^ 5,000 
"rWamond Lake •.-.•. .Vl^^k ?M¥ ^'^^'4,060 
"<til(/tty Lake • . -. -. •. •. . r^?:\ AHQiT 9Ji2,000 
' ' 'Fatty Lake • •. •. •. •. -. •. •. •. •. •. •. •. •. .V!^^ ■>t2,0<)0 

Herridge Lake 5,000 

Jumping Caribou Lake 2,000 

cKailDuskong Lake >,> :».;...; 1,000 

* J^ake Timagami >.,,., .wjljsa no 10,000 

Martin Lake . ^MlsJ-.tlv^uoQ i;; 5,000 

Moore Lake'io. esf^av .^R'd .t^uvv^! 5,000 

Net Lake ^hUqq'H 5,000 

Noble Lake ojl£.L oJi8 ah 5,000 

' Hib Lake ewta.!. jUoo 5,000 

Spring Lake . > , , .oi-'is J. :ri-i') 1,000 

Talon Lake... ^ifisJ t 5,000 

tnTomiko Lake ..,-.4»;fua oJi;:5,000 

(t'Wikstead Lakeiui^utiioy. j^'jvX Jo 5,000 
•'*■";,. ' -''-.l noilinnoV ol^.^i 

?afi^ Sound: ''^^^^ ^^^^u■^l^mn]/. 

'^^ Lake .V.^l^irfW;Obo 

;;;^;ig: Loon Lake •.•.•.•./. .^Vf^^.^,' 5,000 

^p'lear Lake ..'.•. •.•.•.•.•.•.•• ^^P.,, 5,000 

"^feagle Lakfe- •.•.V.V.-.n---^-"^- 5,000 

High Lake J^?.??f^rP. J.^?. e*^!^'^ 5,000 

Horseshoe Lake ....■.•...:... 5,000 

Hughes Lake 5,000 

Lake Joseph •."'-10,000 

^'^IL'akfe Rosseau .-. .'i^^. .^iiin^v/oii*5,000 
^'^Mtle Lake Joseph •. •. -. ■. •. •. . /.■ ■ 5;000 

Lorimer Lake 25,000 

Memesagamesi Lake '• a^-lo^^u: 

< < .Otter Lake . e And dOMO 

'liMafnkin Lak.e. ................ -s^b J. tiiv/T ^MO 

(-<Rutai Lake .(.tiiofjiJi) . e>fijJ -i; 5,000 

< (Bolmon Lake. ................. .9i{i3 J '(iMOO 

(MjSe^nd Lake . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .9:1x5 J 10,000 

(.(SpTJng Lake .axKa. lo iv,5i000 

(HS^ilJcer Lake .riqe^o I '; &,000 

0(!rea: Lake fi-AoAi^aU 'j MOO 

(•(Three-legged. X.ake. .... . j.'ca^.rio}l 'ilO.OOO 

(riTrout hs^^e ...i..i,rJib-iJi:X).eoinJ 45.000 
0(T)Tenty-eight .LaUe]Ufl3). o^t^J ^^iMPO 

OOO.r, (V'^jInO) 9y? fjJ ^/K.J 

Rainy River: . (•■iiji.iriS) s-AbA u.r, i 

Ash Bay (Rainy .I^?iKei:f*kl . s>:jsii,50^000 
. ,B?»d VermiliooJUake. ...... .9>l« J j §0.000 

it<Burnt Lake ....... .-^.^jg J. -iJiiJii ;. 50,000 

(((Height of Land. .lvalue. ...... .9:4b J 30,000 

(KKakagi LaHQ . ................ .^AsA. bd '40,900 

(.(liipon Lake . • .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 9-Afiti .nojt I5r000 

(-tl^atrrow Lake . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 9>Ifi J • s-iir; MMO 

(■(Pipestone Lake. .............. .sjfK.l v^ 50,000 

i.(Rainy Lake .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 9j/eJ; • o^r. 3,900 

,..:Steeprock Lake. ............. .&;ffiv,I /kj.60,QO0 



Bergeteoinlialse* . i.JUilT. JLdi.l 5,000 

Blackfish Bay 10,000 

Center Lake , . hsdiaUiwD- ii^MO. 

Cle.ar Lake .... ^^c^j 'yn.fkHtiD '.5^,^00 
Crpss Lake • ; .. .^ileri •tifi-d-ADi'i 4^»:000 

Diamond Lake^ ^j[q [ 10^000 

Gun Lake . . . ' ' . . ' '. '. '. '. ". ". ^j^u^} 10,000 
Long Lake (Radcliffe)['.'^j^4io 10.000 

Pough Lake -rAti:!- irfjii; ; 15,000 

Round Lake (Hagarty) . .j.,h. j 10,000 
Round Lake (Lyell) .". ..o>'«f 15,000 
Round Lake (Richards)' *>i,tl\ 10.000 

Tea Lake' ,j^^i y.. 20,000 

Trout Lake ...'...'.'.'.'.... g^g f j., 5,000 
Wadsworth Lake '. ". '. '. '. '. '^.v. t ' 10,000 
Young Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . .". . 10,000 

Simcoe: r^j uooJ-. / 

Kempenfeldt Bay ...... .'^ .9>[ii J 135.000 

Lake Simcoe , .9As*l qiMMO 

. . eilnJ. eoiri<- 

Sudbury: l^AgJl vcno/Iof r 

Baby Lake . . •. . mV.rV/A .?.>;- -' =5,000 
Black Lake . . .(Sa-H:^Sh?.?P'^ ^.1<0,OOO 
Cranberry Lake •. .^.^^J. toivl i^-SiOOO 
Ella Lake ......... .9^/^^^ .■; -'5,000 

Hunter Lake . ........nA-i 5,000 

Lake Penage 10,000 

Lamothe Lake : 8,000: 

Long Lake (Broder). ....... ^j^AnA >:svii§iO0O 

Long Lake (Harrow) 4,000 

Mesomikenda Lake ,, 16^000; 

Nelson Lake . . . . . . . .,,,^j. -,s,^ „ ?#« 

\epiwasy Lake ^vjp j iB^'^P^ 

Raoine Lake V. //.V.V.V/. .f^^^ M'^^ 
Trout Lake (Cosby) •.-.•. .^'^^^^ .,:,tdD0 
Trout Lake (McKiin) .-. .^^^j y.^^^OpO 
Wanapitei Lake . '. ". '. '. '. '. '. . ^^^^ j i;^^iJP^ 
,.. Windermere l^ake'^^^j.-^^^jj^T^ ^^1^000 
iMh^y Lake . . . . . . ; . ^^^.^j •^se^^.niW^ 



Thunder Bay: 
,^^,t}i]:geon River 



Renfrew: 
Bark Lake . ^. 



:§ni8eiqi 
9;IjU . fi/ii<aOjaO0 



,-r":MM<^ 

J,i ('..r. . 9-AiiJL c 

timi^BKaming: ^^j^j ,, 

. tAnima Nipissing Lake. ...... .^rffij 9.0,000 

Beauty Lake .•••»>.'eJ -u^.OOO 

Crystal Lake sjifij -i-. iP^OO 

Justine Lake ,. .93ffiJ t. 5,000 

Lady Evelyn Lake .......... -arfK.' 20,000 

Lake Timagami . , ... . ^ji^.j . ,£.; 100,000 

Larder Lake ..... , .. .. .. .. .. .. . srfB.l ?-^>000 

Long Lake .......... .^x'Btl- •ff<«>ij;ii.^»000 

Matachewan Lake .. .. .. .. .. .. -^tIh. t 5,000 

McLeod Lake .. .. .^lUvl- ixx) 500 

, Net Lake ........ .. .. .. .; .. .. .. .9'A&A :5»000 

Pine Lake .. . . .. .. .. .. .. . ©jlc^I • ©o.^; 5,000 

Trout Lake . .^.,'jsJ. .i»offwv»ii//h' . 5,000 
Twin Lakes ... .. .. .. /.i .. .9j(bJ. IIj: ^r^iPPO 

Wendigo Lake ................... .9>riJ J ij?!*PPO 

. 9?!b.I ibsH 9lJ; J 

Great Lakes: -rAiiJ. gnu^eoa siJJi.i 

Lake Superior . ., .3>J«J. Xv?fi}Il,OB0;0DO 



(^IHt) 9 .OVT ?:KIJ][3HAN!NUJ^ KKPORTV019;40-ia:TnA4aa 



^ 






LAKE TROUT— CoHtamiedi I ^ a i iv 



Great Lakes — Continued 

North Channel 

Georgian Bay 

Lake Huron 8ilZLlH/-3Y. 



Algoma: 

Basswood Lake . . . 

Batchawana River . 

Big Garden River . 

Clear Lake 

Deer Lake 

^ Huston Lake 

Jobammeghia Lake 

Ke«gos Lake 

Loon Lake 

Mississauga River 

Montreal River , . . . 

North Lake 

Rainbow Lake . . . . 

Serpent River , . . . 

Showshoe Creek . . 

Thessalon River . . 
'"West Lake ....■..•.-. 
00^,^- 

r^ai^fblk : 

': tlnnamed Streams 



85,000 

50,000 

3,111,000 

: Bmo^IA 
ifi^iiiDA 



RAINBOW TROtJ* 

-'r/iR Bw.'BgA 

FINGERLINGS ,.'..7 .vr.^ 



15,000 

7,000 

. 8,000 

4,000 

2,000 

5,000 

20,000 

30,000 

10,000 

..v.... 30,000 

...v>'pj vumo 

20,000 

8,000 

10,000 

.. . 30,000 

' 15,000 






^^0 




Sudbury: eilBd uodiii^O 

^. ,, „» . • ■ ojIbJ 'leinm 

, Rapid River -fsstO -i^-S'r 

,;S^ndcherry Creel^ .•.•'•i^^m' wolT 
, .^ indermere Lalie . ^^^^r^ . ^.^q^j^j 

>'.i SJfBj iBall 

('00. r 

<'!Sauble River q'A&J. egnj rriffJ«2f>0 

:•''?,. r . . --■'■ ' '--'-rfiG 

I>ti£f6rin: , . .' ^G 

"Nottawasaga River . ... MOO 

'tHne River ;..vv..;....^vu^ ; 1,500 






Elgin: ;j 

Ht., Thomas City Re^ertbir.., ^00 



)9i0 9in.' 



i^^enham River 



1,200 



Halliburton: ''{ 

,,Bnrnt Lake 1,200 

■Ponds (Caledon Township).. ; MOO 
'•\- - ... , . -.i.;.i ,.,v;i]i 

Simcoe: rlaJ iVJby.ull 

Kempenfeldt Bay v-^'p^X xiBm-g^O 

Sturgeon River J'^^^vi. PS.£LJ.ip5 nsbfijf^O 



Wellih^ohirio >--T'J05IT <I3J:- ^ 

Saugeen River . ..... 1,200 

beuaiino'J - . 

Jm^' 9JlB.i y: 

OOfilrhber River isyIH. ojiri?/^ (.1,200 

000.'. (9xIoo'i9Q) Ci-AnA :.. ■ 

]^|s^ellaneous : . ;' " 

({Sales — Demonstration :;and 

OOOJropagation purposes .... 2,524 

OOS.S 

002,8 

OOOT KAMLOOPS TROUT 

OOO.T 



YEARLINGS 



Bruce : 

Gillies Lake 

Grey : 
Bass Lake '. 



Muskoka: 

Echo Lake 

Red Chalk Lake 

Rill Lake 

Waseosa Lake 



4,000 



4,500 



5,000 
4,000 
4,000 
2,500 



Parry Sound: Mo-iD i 

Bernard Lake /ba'iO ;^: 2^00 

Poole Lake ^^O'i 'loySOO 

, : . j1 jfasfO le3 

ooo.osi -.' •.:... 

(^(■(^8 ATLANTIC SALMON-- '- 

ooo.s iL'9'i') >^^;i ■'■ -' 

OOO.ca . . .FINGERLING§,i£j ^^i,,^j 

000.0 AeerJ vj3-nrj]/. 

4*W»a: cj-AfiJ siiVi 

Ranger Lake 9,935 



Durham : 
j^ijj^ilmot Creek 



.... jIobiU s nirioTT 

FWntenac: '^^oiO snadopjja 

*%^ Clear Lake •.;;;:;; J?y?^ ^^^^00 



Simcoe: :l;-f:£i-i9(fi; 

KeMpenfeldt Bay Aosi'. 

... As-nO Yfi 
^^(^Uury: 

o44i»Jce Penage 

(K)0,3i: 

000,01 

000.01 
000. ' 
00 IV 



) ia,s6o 

1 i : 'i ' ; J { 
15,000 



SPECKLED TROUT 

PINGERLLXGS 



4.)(^6ma : 

,,^higan Creek . . . 

-jUona Bay Creek 

Ji^PA^ndary Lake . . 

^^.Brown's Creek . . , 
Harmony Creek . , 
Kashawong Creek 
Lake One 

Lake Two ;;;;;;. 



7,000 
7,000 
14,000 
2,500 
3,500 
7,000 
2,500 
2,500 



42 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1942) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941— Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT— Continued 

Algoma — Continued 

Leslie Lake 7,000 

Little White River 14,000 

Loon Lake (Deroche) 7,000 

McCrea Creek 3,500 

Mica Bay Creek 7,000 

Pancake River 7,000 

Richards Creek 3,500 

Two Tree River 3,500 

Williams Creek 7,000 

Woods Creek 7,000 

Durham: 

Beatty Creek 7,500 

Carscadden Creek 10,500 

Muldrews Creek 9,500 

Quantreuil Creek 7,500 

Roy Mercer Creek 9,500 

Trews Creek 7,500 

Grey: 

Boyd Lake 20,000 

Christie Creek 5,000 

Copps Lake 20,000 

Cotter Creek 7,000 

Craig Creek 7,000 

Deer Creek 5,000 

Eel Creek 10,000 

Harrison Lake 20,000 

Kreig Lake 8,000 

Louisa Creek 5,000 

Louisa Lake 35,000 

Murray Creek 6,000 

Pine Lake 20,000 

Nipissing: 

Balsam Creek 7,500 

Doran's Creek 7,500 

Duschene Creek 6,150 

North River 7,500 

Northumberland : 

Big Creek 15,000 

Burnley Creek 46,000 

Dartford Creek 25,000 

Dawson Creek 36,000 

DeLong Creek 26,000 

Heffernan Creek 10,000 

Hortop-Prentice Stream 10,000 

Little Cole Creek 15,000 

Mills Creek 3,000 

O'Grady Creek 20,000 

Quinn Creek 6,000 

Robin Creek 3,500 

Sandy Flats Creek 20,525 

Valleau Creek 5,000 

West's Creek 5,000 

Thunder Bay: 

Hensis Lake 2,000 



Miscellaneous: 

Sales — Demonstration and 
propagation purposes 



2,200 



YEARLINGS 

Algoma: 

Achigan Lake 4,800 

Agawa River 9,600 

Alva Lake 1,600 

Anjigami Creek 1,600 

Aubinadong Bay 3,000 

Aubinadong Lake 1,500 

Ausburn Lake 1.200 

Baker Lake 3,200 

Batchawana River 19,200 

Beaver Lake (Parkinson) . . 600 

Beaver Lake (#2 Tp.) 1,600 

Black Lake 1,200 

Blue Lake 1,400 

Blueberry Lake 1,200 

Boyles Creek 1,200 

Bridge Lake 1,500 

Bulgers Lake 2,400 

Bull Lake 1,000 

Burns Lake 3,000 

Burrough Lake 2,400 

Caldwell Lake 800 

Camp 2 Lake 2,400 

Camp 8 River 3,200 

Camp 23 Lake 2,000 

Canoe Lake 1,200 

Caribou Lake 2,500 

Carpenter Lake 4,800 

Cedar Creek 2,400 

Chiblow River 1,600 

Chippewa Creek 31,600 

Clear Lake 1,800 

Copp Lake 3,200 

Cotton Creek 1,000 

Crystal Lake 600 

Cummings Lake 600 

Darriel Lake 1,600 

Deer Lake 1,500 

Devils Lake 1.200 

Dougal Lake 4,800 

Driving Creek 3,000 

Dunns Creek 3,000 

Echo Lake (Grasett) 2,400 

Echo Lake (R. 62) 1,350 

Eleven Mile Creek 2,400 

Elizabeth Lake 1.200 

Fern Lake 4,800 

Fish Lake 2,300 

Foot Lake 1,600 

Grassy Lake 1,200 

Hamburg Creek 1,600 

Harmony Creek 2,700 

Harris Creek 800 

Hawk Lake 2,400 

Hayden Lake 2,400 

Herman Lake 4,800 

Hidden Portage Lake 4,800 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1940-41 



43 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941— Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT— Continued 

Algoma — Continued 



High Bank Lake 


1,400 
1,600 


Hoath Lake 


Hobon Lake 


4,800 


Horn Lake 


1,600 


Horseshoe Lake (1 C.) 


1,200 


Horseshoe Lake (R. 62) 


1,350 


Hubert Lake 


4,800 


Island Lake (McMahon) 


3,200 


Island Lake (R. 176) 


3,000 


Jewel Lake 


1,600 


Jimmie Lake . . 


3,200 
4,800 


Jobammeghia Lake 


Karkowan Creek 


1,200 


Kendogami River 


7,200 


Lafoe Creek 


2,400 


Lake One 


500 


Little Thessalon River 


2,400 


Little White River 


2,400 


Lonely Lake 


1,200 


Long Lake (McDonald) 


1,200 


Long Lake (R. 168) 


1,200 


Loon Lake (Near Thessalon) 


3,200 


Loon Lake (24 R. 13) 


1,600 


Loon Lake (R. 62) 


1,250 


Loonskin Lake 


4,000 


Lower Pine Lake 


2,500 


Mader Lake 


2,400 


Mashagama Lake 


2,400 


Matinenda Lake 


1,800 


Maude Lake 


1,200 


Maunshe Megoose Lake 


3,200 


McCormick Lake 


2,400 


McKinnon Creek 


3,000 


McVeigh Creek 


2,400 


Merchants Lake 


2,500 


Michipicoten River 


9,600 


Mile 58 Lake 


1,200 


Mileage 48 Lake 


300 


Mongoose Lake 


4,800 


Montreal River 


2,400 


Moores Lake 


2,400 


Moose Lake (Wells) 


1,000 


Moose Lake (25 R. 13) 


4,800 


Mountain Lake (Aberdeen).. 


1,600 


Mountain Lake (Gould) 


1,600 


Mud Lake 


1,600 


Newcomb Lake 


3,750 


Odowbi Lake 


1,600 


Osborne Creek 


4,800 


Pine Lake (25 R. 13) 


1,600 


Pinkney Lake 


2,400 


Pond Lake 


1,200 


Prospect Lake 


3,200 


Rand Lake 


1,600 


Ranger Lake 


500 


Rapid River 


2,400 


Reception Lake 


2,400 


Red Deer Lake 


1,000 


Red Rock Lake 


1,200 


Reed's Creek 


1,200 



Reserve Lake 

Robertson Lake 

Rock Lake (Aweres) 

Rock Lake (Wells) 

Rock Lake (168) 

Root River 

Rose Marie Lake 

Round Lake (Grasett) 

Round Lake (Whitman) 

Round Lake (1 A.) 

Sand Lake Creek 

Sand River 

Sauble Lake 

Sausabic Lake 

Saymo Lake 

Scarbo Lake 

Sharp Sand River 

Shumka Lake 

Snowshow Creek (188) 

Speckled Trout Creek 

Speckled Trout Lake (1 A.) . . 
Speckled Trout Lake 

(28-R-14) 

Speckled Trout Lake (176) . . 

Spring Creek 

Spring Lake (IF.) 

Spruce Lake 

Stokely Creek 

Tamarack Lake 

Tawabinasay Lake 

Tea Lake (near Thessalon) 

Tea Lake (1 A.) 

Thessalon River 

Tookenay Lake 

Triple Lake 

Trout Lake (Aweres) 

Trout Lake (25 R. 14) 

Trout Lake Inlet 

Tv/in Lakes (Deroche) 

Twin Lakes (IB.) 

Twin Lakes (176) 

Two Dollar Lake 

Upper Pine Lake 

Upper Silver Creek 

Wallace Lake 

Wawa Lake 

Wartz Lake 

White Creek 

White River (2 A.-l B.) 

White River (176) 

Wolf Lake 

Wonashin Lake 

Woods Creek 

Brant: 

Mill Pond 

Scotland Creek 



Bruce: 
Angle Creek .... 
Crowes Creek . . 
Falconer's Creek 
Formosa Pond . . 



1,500 
3,200 
2,000 
1,200 
1,200 
600 
2,400 
1,200 
2,400 
1,600 
4,800 
2,400 
4,000 
1,200 
4,500 
1,200 
2,400 
1,200 
1,600 
2,400 
4,800 

3,200 
1,500 
1,600 
1,500 
4,800 
5,400 
2,400 
4,800 
3,200 

800 
4,800 
2,500 
1,600 
1,200 
2,400 

100 
1,200 
2,000 
3,000 

800 
3,300 

500 

800 
4,800 
4,800 
1,700 
4,000 
3,000 

900 
2,400 
1,500 



500 
500 



900 
900 
200 
100 



^^ DEPARTMBN/iy OF. laAJk^ JVNIX -FISHERIES No. 9 (1942) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OFFISH iRLANTEB INiPROVlNGJIAi. WATERS 
April 1st, 1940; to Maifcki,91st; ISM'l^.ectitiimed 



OOa tSPECKLED TROUT— Coiitlnued 

Oeil.C ,.'-■■• ifO;r. : 

Bruce — Continued 1 ^tJiswA) sTisd lioon 
Judge's Creek . .i^'[Wf). PA^A Jf^^OO 
Mullin's Pond ... .i^H) .?HfiA ^^'1r,feOO 
Nine Mile Creek •.■.-.•.•.•.. 7?Yi^ ^o<ls400 

Silver Creek . . .'Pt^. .9^^py^ 9^^«^a,000 

Spring Creek ( AvoiiJ ^.). P.-.-.4 bnuoJioO 
Spring Creek (CArrick) ?A^.4 ^ni^^^^feOO 

Vogt's Creek . .'. . [i . ?^.-P.I. l:ni;o;]BOO 

: 30':0 !?>^nJ f?n:?3 

Cochrane: le/iSi bai^H 

Bbbs Lake ....... •..-.•. .|?£H..f^^^^'i00 

Bristol Creek ....... . .^?^i^ .a^^^^^'i.OOO 

Croft Creek :....:::.\^^^^. ^"^'■I^POO 

Crooked Creek . . . . .•.;^^.f.^'?^°^'^^^O00 

, Dandurant Creek :?::^?^ ,^"'?? .^"^^^^^^^ 
; EHesco Lake •.;-.:..•./. ?i^A. ^.^^"^'^00 



CO 



Grassy ] 
Groves Lake 



^3,,^Fakey Lake .';V'.V.^".r.V^^r.'\°:"^'"^600 
^^f ^ass^RTyfr^^ '^^'^'^ ^"^'^'^ ^'^I^^^^^ 



Tialfway Cr^ek :..*.' 



:-::i?(-?-8S)iooo 



Hersey^ i:ak4' ?.l^'?.?'f9JT. ^^^^^^'^00 

Hooker Creek .::-.:, f?^?P^ snm^-^OO 

Horseshoe Lake .^;?.?! .^f?t^ ^^"'''^rooo 

^"jacob Creek ..•.•..-..•.•.■ ./.^^^. ^,^7'^i;^500 

.., ;jean Lak6 ..•.•.•.•.•.-.•.•.•. f???P, .^t»^'>^:^00 

, .Lake of Bays •.-.•.•.•.•, ?^.^.4. ^P.^'^^^'^XOOO 

■ Legare Creek ■:.-^/['^^. :^/.^.''.^.'^/^'^'toOO 

,^ IX'iniment Lake ';'.'. . :'.\^.".> .??f ^^ ^-^toOO 

o Xittle Paradise Cree'k^. Z^- • • v ^^^^LOOO 

MacDonald Lake/.-. ??7,!? ".«.^^«f *€oOO 

Mountjoy Creek •.•.;. ??^^.4.X^«^;^«%000 

..Munro Lake -..;.•.• .^■.•. v.. ^^^^4//'!^'^^^^ 

^ b|ellie Lake--.J,??^^yi^j.^^?t? "^[^OOO 

^^ Red Sucker ltfsfer^,.^9, .^.^,^^, ^"oi^ooo 

^'-^-ound Lake ■—:. ??Jf^? .^.^^^^ ^^P^T^BOO 

owley CreeW'^.'^^.«,'^.^?> ???*,V «^^^ff000 



0( 



?.'a'i)* 'aVjffij nMi:i 



^^i^ound Lake 

. JiShiallspot Creek-. l/ii^V ^^^V "^"^^500 
^ ^Watabeag- Lake ;. ^^J}}, ???^,f.J «^''^£ooo 
,^^!water Hen Creelc ??^.«^, .T^^jQ ^^''^OOO 
^^^Vaterworks Creek ?^^A .^" J "^^Q^IJOOO 
X'^?Unnamed- Lake • (mAStm^l^^ T^Qq^tBoo 
",?Unnamed- Lake (TisdfiaS^p.f^^^f^^^OOO 



om 



i>M-:;;::;:::;;:::::2^ 



Si7BW 



OOOQredit RiYer(.a. f^.-A 



>ieaTOs.ixI^J^^^ 



"McAllisters Springjjf^r^e^jj, siiri^f^ 
f)Nottawasaga River . . . . . ^^jgj jiow^^" 
pPower liouse Stfeafri.'jl^.j .^^jj.j^^jj^Y;300 

Durham : 

)0 



Cameron Creek .^^f 



^,,^eLong Stream » . . „.. ,^00 

\':Garden Hill creek ..-.;.• .•.v?"°^,,"'i'.-000 
Lang Creek . . .• .- ." . . . f??}?. P."^^^^-^'qOO 

Luxton Creek 1,000 

McGill Creek : »^^I,0(JO 

'McLaughlin Creek iesiD 9l3na>,300 

^''Mercer Creek iUi3.iiy .g9WOT2jl00 

C">-Miller Creek 'A99.i3 .3'3»nooIi}M650 

00 lOrono Creek baoH. .Raofmdlii200 



Rabbin; Greek T.lOaT. .(I -Ua.) J 'I'' 1,200 

Smith Creek 1,000 

Sowden Creek J)3JiaUxiaO — Bmo;g5(K) 

OOlSpwper Stream ,.,...• ^.+)»J.:rfHfia xfiiifpOO 
OO.Sfluirrel Creek .....,.., .^rfc^i tim^MOO 
OoThompson Creek ....... .«^>[fij. noaoI^OO 

ti'.Tyrone Creek ,.••••• -r-.ir.d in^^^O 

n!j<_U'nnamed streams jn Ma:nvQi)Si;D.^vioH 
(;^i;;. and Darlington; i tovf^afaifi^i^s ^idiJpSO 
(vYdrtues Creek ........ . . ,. ,; . • o^frrP^OO 

'>0a.. ,!offiiL'> .:, 9/IbJ bncial 

•JPi^ohtenac : . {0\L M) djCbJ biiBlal 

'^•^'■felack Creek ..-.•.•.•.•.•.•.•. /l^^":^ .^^'^11200 



^ ;Pamp Lake ...'...;. 



;*J 'eini.i; 



800 



!,Chambers Lake 



>rj'.viO 11 — '■■■ ■ 






J^^^rindstone Lake 

'ijittle Mississippi v.^-. ... -i^v/v 

tLucky Lake ......... .\?^7? »^ 1^00 

i'lyiackie Lake . ..,.\ ....:. PP^ '^' iJeOO 

' *1V!cCausland Lake '. i^/^-'^^'^A- ^^-9,600 
""Reid Lake ....... V.^^..'^V.V/ ^"^ l.«00 

Rock Lake . .;.•.■.•.•/.•.•, P:A^J. '''^'^' ' 2^^00 
Sand Lake . . il^".«.V?.|;l . ?r.V '-^''1,'600 
Schooner hake ^M^. .rA .'l^J.^i^ J^-^" 2:400 
Sharbot Creek' ^C^.\ X?? ^^-^ M'1^ "^^'S^OOO 
Star Lake ..:F\\:'^.}.').P:M^^ ^'^'"2,-400 
Trout Lake . .-. .'rA .-P. \ . VH.V "^^'^^200 
,Unnamed lakes- in- MilW nrjlRnooJ 
'•''■; - township ■..•.•.-.•. ??-.M .^.«'.1 i9'>'olrj000 

'■ • o>IbJ lebrA:. 

U^- . "i'AsiJ BmB^BffaBl/: 

S^^^y- rrAiU BbironiJsT/I 

:^' .Bass Lake .......... ..... ... •.f:iisj[. a:)i;.4/i"00 

, vB^atty Saug^efi^i i^y^r^^^M- srlsnui'M^^ 
00 {Reaver River. ..... .^y'ntV 'A-jimiolW^^ 

00(>P!ell Lake ................ .j?9.j73- nonni>l4'200 

OOlvpig Head . River . . .j(.„,9. .rf3i97.)7/200 
OOil^lack's. Beach ...... .^^^j. •3>nBrian4^<><> 

OOOBjlack Creek ...... ^^^yj •n3>o-jlqfd:)ife?0^ 

OOSPloyd Lake. .. ........ .....^rfa J. ^^, elif^^^ 

OorJBoyne Ri.v.er .......... ^jf^^^. g^. ^3^90^/600 



0;^mp Creek ........ .^^^^. 3^^031 

Oo^sema.n .Creek ... -r^vtfl • fcaiinol 
Oo^(lhristie .Creek .........-.•.• sif-sd • ESioot/^^^ 

OOOQiiristie .Lake .. <af[^v^)- s^fsJ 9POof^$2n 
OoaQolter .Creek (^i.,^.^^^y ^-itsA eeooK^^^^ 



Oo;)Qraig Creek^ Wi/oO) -arfuLl -nrBtniror/i??? 



Eel Creek- ..;.•.•.;. .^^I'^V il'T^f '^^SOO 

Ferguson Cree^ •.•.•.•...'! .^^. ."^^f ^450 

^irth Creek :^:,::JSll9.,V\''^^fM0 

[leasort Creek' ^f .?. .^.\l .»^l?'^ --21700 



rth Creek .-.::-:L:?^?:;t'i-»^^:sooo 

- > 9 

arbottle Creek- •..•. .n^^X .Y^ciifir igso 

[ay ward Fails •.•.-.•.•.•.•.•. .^.^^-} ^>"'^ ^500 

'^'^■'Hydro Creek -.-.•.•..•.>.>( ^4. .J?9qsoT8]400 

' ' ^Lamont Greek • .• .• .• .- .- .. .- . .^Jf « J b ri r.lJOOO 

'"Lawrence Creek .......3>l6J. .i^""^ '450 

'"'Louise Creek 'tav.iH b;r: -'(600 

' -Lueck's Mill Pond ^jIkJ. «aiicc 1,800 
HjuMacLean's Lake ....... >)^«^I .-^'^eCl f '500 

' ' ::Manx River . . . .. . . oiU\I . ricoH [^ -ItSOO 

0')i:McConneU Creek . :499i3. z'bj^i^^^ 



(S^ei) e .c7[ ^3.ui^H^x^nWA^■K^PbK%>lT4^-^41^^1^^^:i(l '4^ 



SPECIES ANO :aUA;NTIITaiES OP FXSH riPILAN^EB: IN iBICOLVilNeiAL WATERS 



SPECKLED TROUT^Cantmueiba 

■■ ■ - ...^a 

Orey — Continued 'jiinJi. jasli st^' 

' M«Gowan Dam •. . •. •. JVA^. ^?^^ Si^goo 

'''Meino Stream .-.% -.v. •.-.•. -..^^^f J '^'15,800 

"* Mitchell Pond . •. •. ■. •. •. •. . '/^Y 1? >^^«^ tOO 

^0%funshaw Lakel'V^n^. M^M^^ ^-- 400 

'Murray Creek .'.'',% ^'H ^9.'. ?M^ 'f^'- 300 

North Louise LdfefeP^l^i.P.^A'J^ i^"' ^00 

Nuhn Pond . . . ;'.^J?P/S). djibJ iBti 400 

' Oxenden Creek . . . . -. . ?A^A . 8'i9<I<^"2',400 

^'^•^tiddle Spring Creek- .4?^7? T^'^SOO 

''"ilt)cky Saugeen River . . . ?A^A <T 13,800 

Skugeen River . . . . . •. •. •• . . r^t^-^ >15,000 

Spey River .....•.•.-.•.•.•.•. .^^t^ ^^^1,800 

Spring Creek- ■.:■..■.'.■. A^^^. ?^^^^^^ijOOO 

' Styx River • . •. •. •. •. •. •. •. -. -. •. . sj^.^.a od;i3oO 

"Sydenham Rird^'t^iV. I\«fi. PXV Xi20,800 

Tannery Creek' ?V'^nJ M^.^^'^J ^i^OOO 

"'Williams Lake -.•..•.•.•. .Q^fM i^^^^^^t^OO 

''^'^oungs Lake .•..-.•.•.•..•.•.•. M^J li '2,200 

"Oi-'C sjIbJ. ilcBli 

mijburton: t?V u^^l^r 

;,, JBear Creek •'%PT9-8qorv+j200 

, , Blue Lake; V-V-V-V-V./^vwa-lo d^h JOO 
...Burnt River ...... .^3vra-*i?!sa 9I rP^^ 



.:Clear Lake 



'{ilsffirn?3) 'eUGd srr 



u?'|500 



,£ranberry Lak^.^^^^^r^) . ^.^.^j ^,,0 «00 
K-Crozier Lake . -(^ur^irim 'sAb.! ?a.M22 
.grag River , ,,.,.,,,., ^^.j «,,^1,J00 
.gagle Lake _ River ^^^^-r^j.^^^j „, 



600 



^st Lake; •'.V-.'-V.j.j-fjnO^BJ no< 



;,3,600 
„.,@etcher Lake; '/r/^^^r'^^^^ainS^ 

ori^*dden Creek ..... .^^^■,^. sAoHsulM^^ 

00!^«n Lake ... .^^g. ^^,,^^. .^,j^j,jgj4|00 

Oo^^arvey Ij^^^^^j,^ -ftnc-e^fB-J •Lioln^.^^J 

Oo;gq and Creek ...... . • ^^irgi^,rnl^:200 

.,;.go ow Lake ,,..,,.,... .^^j^j ^^^j 

•M.^Sollow River ,.,.,.. .^^^^. .^ ^,^^, 
OO^an Lake ........... 33J3J ,^ 

Oo^^^g^.^/. Lake .... .^^^^. ^^^^^^ 

„0(§mball Lake .... .g^j^j. .^j.^^^ j,^ 

„o;iV|.cCue. Creek ^5j^j jj^ 

O.^Ulichamp Lake . ^^^j ^^ 

oo^^untain Lake tribut^gsj -nojalai^^^ 
Oo#)long mVer- . .•.•.;.•. ^^^^^ .^^^^^^^ -- 
rM,:Atter Lake .,,.,. . .^^^^ .^.^j^^ji, 
ooP^tongue Lake ,,, .^^^.j. .^^^^ ^jj. 

no^Penn Lake aifjBd- sni~ 

online Lake-.^-^,3.-^-.^^j.3,j.j^ 991?!^^,^ 

,nedstona:.WHH) -bnn- ^7^ffJ• nofiT'?^!?? 



,,.;f^pund Lake 



"^TiBLi '68093 6 



00 



t&lipper Lake .'.■.'.■.*. . . . . .-^-. t Vfnvi^OO 

Stormy Creek ' •.•.•.•.•.-.•.•.•. .!?f^ ^^^ ^^00 
Twin Lakes . . . 



9>(sJ 8urfJni5oA 



^" I 

^^«^^»gs: 3,^^j eol xd£a 

'>:^aptiste Lake .,., .9iIfi.L T9VB*aB00 

^.O^ferrager. Lake . .. .^AbJ, .xn^alxja s2si)00 



BsWAirfltiieifeefi lOHT. .(IXJH3:i*I81,200 

Bob Whyte Lake 800 

Brett Lake : Ai^i^H 

Buck Lake . . , , , .. , , , .. .. . gji^i 9 luJ^OO 

Byers Lake ................... .-rfesqO si/iisPOO 

Cannon Lake. .... .>t99'40. .^>{bJ rio9-^00 

Canoe Lake , . ..... .519919.9 hS ^jjic^OO 

Cockburn Creek .......... jfee^o [fjjj<#00 

Deer River 8,000 

Devil Lake *1,600 



■^3l6J* 'aebiiii 



Diamond Lake .. 
Douglas Creek .. 

Echo Lake .-,.,. . 

Egan Creek -.".^.ISO'^jA-zoii 

Fraser Creek •. •. . •. •. •. •. -. •. .^^^l^ tb^^oq 

\Fraser Lake . •. . •. •. . •. . M^X^. . is'^fil^feOO 

' Geen Creek ..-.•.•.•..•.•.•. .?#vl « wo 1^00 

' Ooudy Creek • •. •. -. •. . .^^A^.^Q . JodajIoii^oO 

' Green Lake ..■.■.■....■.■.'. M^4 J^niiS^OO 

Kineses Lake . . •. •. •. •. •. M^4. isnn(i:^00 
Jardison Lake ...... aA^4. PP^'^ -i^OO 

■battle Lighthouse Lake ^A^^ ^oi^OO 
'^^fittle Mississippi River .^.^.^.'J. ^^^00 
^^Sng Lake (Bangor) .^^§^^. ,«^"^?; 
Long Lake (Hershel) . . ?r,^A, -"^^^ ^ 
::5viud Lake .............. .^J^L^i^ 

;;,^u^ Turtle Lak^V.V.V^-^^^1 

. .Oxbow Lake s^u'j ^«r' 

,„Papineau Creek; ;.B:jtfiJ-}ooi^9riil^£ 

M.Potter l^^^e ••('■t.j^nM^yBitnJL -gnc^^ 

O^Rainy l^a^e ..^r^j^^^^y.^^^ -nJ?^^ 

o€^wdon Cre^^BrfgKiyiQ>.9jfBa ^nM^^ 

(Roses LakQ .......... .93{£j. .ekaai-Io'^^POO 

.'Shire Creek .9j(bJ. .^cioIfB^/SOO 

uOSilent Lake ajTuJ. nsJi^DOO 

■: o.-Biiver Lake . (lOj^xiidA). .sjIbJ jfocajlOO 
"*'^quire Creek CrlatcTntja.). aM^J. AooS^OO 
•'•^^oney -LakeMtWl.3aia:ta). AJ{«J ^y<fi',a00 
■■%ea Lake- .•.•.•.....•.-.•.•.•... .9?i^4 89«oi^00 
' '"Adders Lake- •.•.•.•.•.-.•.•. .4?nQ. leniil^oO 
" '^^illiams Lake- •.•.•.•.•.•.-.•. AA^4 d^in^OO 
;*;; V^tes Lake- .■.:■.. -.-.y.^^flj ^^^f^OO 

r*(+a- 89MbJ nfvyT 



on : 

''''^'rmstrohg' Drain Cffefek^?.^.^ ^^^^^'^^350 

Belgrave Creek , ,1, 

Bolt Drain Creek [nHuoJitt 

*;">i:aitland River- •.-. .^??7?. .Xf^oiasfafi 
^'''kiddleton Creek •.•.-.•••. .J??*?? "^v-- 
Murray Creek y.v.^^.V.^.X'^^. ^"SoO 
•Redden Ci-eek^'?^^?. ?^^^. ^fn;^o?- 

Wine rrPPk ^^''-^ n99Msf^ 

OiMppring ureeK }T5iJio q^bI: 

'-'PP^amed s£ream;s-i^.,^^>«^-^^ 

„Oo.«nosh and Turnberr3f3.,jjj uoHnM^^ 

oo.KOtownships .... .,,,i.^. ^yo-msbnrf^^J 

oo()2ioung Creek ,,,,.,,. .^5^,3. „oiioVf^<^ 

<J00,<) >:997D -197113 

m^}^^^' >{99i3 x^a sniiaa 

OOflCifedar Bpugh . L^l?^. .. .A^si'd- y^jiiit'^OO 

Dryberry River 2,000 

Little Vermilion Lake itiAo-AiL^W 

On;Btlver Lake ........ .. .. .. .^dsiO 93?/p00 



46 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES Nq. 9 (1942) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
Apri-1 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941— Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT— Continued 

Lanark: 

Bottle Lake 500 

Craig Creek 750 

Green Lake Creek 750 

Long Sue Creek 1,500 

Paul Creek 3,200 

Leeds: 

Camden Lake 600 

Lennox-Addington : 

Bear Creek 1,000 

Beaver Creek 4,800 

Brown Lake 3,600 

Buckshot Creek 2,400 

Burns Lake 2,400 

Conner Lake 2,400 

Copeland Lake 2,400 

Dafoe Lake 2,400 

East Lake 2,400 

Feeny's Lake 1,000 

Flake Lake 800 

Green Lake 5,400 

Hyde Creek 3,200 

Kilborn Lake 1,600 

King Lake 4,800 

Leather-root Lake 800 

Long Lake (Abinger) 600 

Long Lake (Ashby) 2,400 

Long Lake (Effingham) . . . 1,200 

MacKenzie Lake 1,200 

Mallory Lake 1,600 

Ratten Lake 4,800 

Rock Lake (Abinger) 1,600 

Rock Lake (Denbigh) 800 

Rock Lake (Effingham) 2,400 

Roses Lake 800 

Shiner Creek 1,200 

Smith Lake 2,400 

Snake Creek 3,000 

Thirty Island Lake 2,400 

Twin Lakes 600 

White Lake 4,800 

Manitoulin : 

Badgerow Creek 6,000 

Barr Creek 3,000 

Blue Jay Creek 25,000 

Bonnie Doone Creek 2,000 

Eighteen Lake 2,000 

Hare Creek 1,000 

Kagawong River 1,000 

Manitou River 25,000 

Mindemoya River 20,000 

Norton Creek 7,000 

Silver Creek 6,000 

Spring Bay Creek 9,000 

Srigley Creek 5,000 

Muskoka: 

Axe Creek 3,600 



Beaver Creek 3,600 

Bella Lake 7,200 

Big East Lake 3,600 

Big East River 32,600 

Bird Lake 3,600 

Black River 7,200 

Buck Lake and tributaries . . - 7,200 

Clear Lake (Oakley) 2,400 

Clear Lake (Ridout) 3,200 

Clear Lake (Sinclair) 2,400 

Coopers Lake 3,600 

Daley Creek 1,800 

Deep Lake 1,800 

Dog Lake 1,800 

Dotty Lake 1,800 

Eastails Lake 1,200 

Echo Lake 13,200 

Fairy Lake and tributaries . . 13,200 

Fox Lake and tributaries . . 10,000 

Eraser Lake 800 

Gull Lake 3,200 

Heck Lake 3,600 

Helva Lake 1,800 

Island Lake 1,600 

Jessops Creek 1,800 

Lake of Bays 9,000 

Little East River 23,200 

Long Lake (Cardwell) 2,400 

Long Lake (Chaffey) 1,800 

Long Lake (Ridout) 1,600 

Loon Lake 3,600 

Loon Lake Creek 3,600 

Loon Lake Outlet 1,800 

Martin Lake 2,400 

Mud Lake 1,800 

Muskoka River 26,400 

Muskoka River Bay 3,200 

Penfold Lake and tributaries 3,600 
Peninsula Lake and 

tributaries 19,600 

Pine Lake 2,400 

Poverty Lake 1.800 

Rat Lake 3,600 

Rebecca Lake 7,200 

Red Chalk Lake 6,000 

Rill Lake 4,800 

Rosseau Lake Bay 1,200 

Shoe Lake 3,200 

Skeleton Lake 6,200 

Skeleton River 4,000 

Solitaire Lake 3,600 

Split Rock Lake 1,800 

Spring Lake 2,400 

Three Mile Lake Creek 800 

Turtle Lake 3,600 

Vernon Lake and tributaries 19,600 

Waseosa Lake . . : 3.600 

Wolf Lake 2,400 

Nipissing: 

Acanthus Lake 1,000 

Baby Joe Lake 500 

Beaver Lake 350 

Big Balsam Lake 1,500 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1940-41 



47 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941— Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT— Continued 

Nipissing — Continued 

Big Mink Lake 1,400 

Big Spring Lake 3,500 

Birch Lake 250 

Blue Lake 1,500 

Blueberry Lake 2,100 

Bonanza Lake 250 

Bonnechere River 1,000 

Brock River 1,200 

Broom Lake 1,000 

Brule Lake 500 

Buck Lake 500 

Burnt Island Lake 2,000 

Cache Lake 3,000 

Camp Lake 1,200 

Canisbay Lake 500 

Canoe Lake (Peck) 2,000 

Canoe Lake (Widdifield) ... 1,400 

Carcajou Lake 500 

Carney Lake 1,500 

Cauchon Lake 850 

Cedar Lake 1,000 

Clear Lake (Boulter) 1,000 

Clear Lake (Chambers) 1,000 

Clear Lake (Gladman) 1,400 

Clear Lake (Notman) 1,400 

Clearwater Lake (Pentland) . 1,000 

Coon Lake 500 

Crooked Lake 2,800 

Cutler Lake 2,100 

Daly Lake 500 

Desrochers Lake 250 

Devils Lake 1,000 

Duchesne Creek 1,500 

Eighty Acre Lake 1,500 

Ethel Lake 2,100 

Eva Lake 1,400 

Finlayson Lake 3,500 

Four Mile Creek 7,000 

Foirney Lake 2,400 

Galeairy Lake 2,000 

Gauthier Lake 1,000 

Gilmour Lake 1,000 

Gooderham Lake 3,500 

Grand Lake 1,000 

Green Lake 500 

Head Lake 500 

Jacks Lake 250 

James Creek 1,500 

Jimmie Lake 1,200 

Jocko River 7,500 

Joe Lake 1,000 

Kioshkoqui Lake 1,000 

Koko Lake 7,750 

L'Amable Creek 500 

Latrey Lake 3,500 

Laveille Creek 500 

Little Island Lake 1,000 

Little Madawaska Lake .... 500 

Little McAuley Lake 500 

Little Mink Lake 1,400 

Little Otter Lake 1,400 



Little Trout Lake 

Long Lake 

Long Spur Lake 

Madawaska River 

Magee Creek 

Mcintosh Lake 

Moon Lake 

Moose Lake 

Mosquito Creek 

Mountain Lake 

Muskosung Lake Stream . 

Noble Creek 

North Lake 

North River 

Opeongo Lake 

Opinicon Creek 

Oxtongue River 

Petawawa River 

Price Lake 

Ravineau Lake 

Robitaille Lake 

Round Lake 

St. Andrew Lake 

Shanty Lake 

Shirley Lake 

Snake Lake 

Source Lake 

South Tea Lake 

Speckled Trout Lake 

Spring Lake (Gooderham) 

Spring Lake (Sisk) 

Sproule Lake 

Stoney Creek 

Sundash Lake 

Sunday Lake 

Tanamakoon Lake 

Trout Lake (Parkman) . . 

Turtle Lake 

Twenty Minute Lake 

Two Rivers Lake 

Unnamed Lake (Niven) . . 
Unnamed Lake (White) ... 

Welcome Lake 

Whitefish Lake 

Norfolk: 

Kent Creek 

Mineral Creek 

Trout Creek 

Northumberland: 

Baltimore Creek 

Burnley Creek 

Cavan Stream 

Chidley Creek 

Dartford Creek 

Dawson Creek 

DeLong Creek 

Duncan Creek 

Lakeport Creek 

Mill Creek 

Mount Pleasant Stream . . . 
O'Grady Creek 



250 

2,000 

250 

500 

1,200 

1,500 

3,000 

1,000 

3,000 

1,000 

100 

350 

750 

6,507 

3,000 

3,500 

3,000 

500 

3,500 

500 

500 

500 

1,000 

1,000 

500 

2,000 

1,000 

1,000 

500 

2,100 

3,000 

250 

1,400 

250 

250 

1,000 

2,700 

1,000 

5,100 

2,000 

250 

250 

1,000 

1,000 



1,200 
500 

600 



4,900 

2,400 

8,600 

1,300 

1,600 

3,000 

800 

800 

1,500 

800 

4,200 

2,400 



48 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1942) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941— Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT— Continued 

Northumberland — Continued 

Pegman Creek 

Quinn Creek 

Robin Creek 

Sandy Flats Creek 

Valleau Creek 

Ontario: 

Bickle Creek 

Black Creek 

Elgin Park Pond 

McLean Creek 

Thompson's Spring Creek . . 

Parry Sound: 

Barrett Creek 

Barton Creek 

Bernard Lake 

Big Clam Lake 

Big Loon Lake 

Black Creek (Guid) 

Black Creek (Strong) 

Black Lake 

Bradford Creek 

Cacheman Creek 

Cheer Lake 

Clear Lake (Armour) 

Clear Lake (Laurier) 

Clear Lake (Perry) 

Clear Lake Creek 

Crozier Lake 

Cummings Lake 

Darlington Lake 

Deer Lake 

Deer Lake Creek 

Depot Creek 

Distress River 

Eagle Lake 

East Creek 

Edgecombe Creek 

Fagan Creek 

Fisher Lake 

Fleming Lake 

Forest Lake 

Forsythe Lake 

Franks Lake 

Genesee Lake 

Gull Lake 

Ham Lake 

Hammel Creek 

Happy Lake Creek 

Horn Lake 

Island Lake Creek 

Jack's Lake Creek 

James Creek 

Jordon Creek 

Little Lake 

Little Pickerel Lake 

Long Lake (Perry) 

Lynx Lake 

Madill Creek 



3,400 
1,600 

800 
1,600 

800 



1,500 

600 

600 

1,000 

2,000 



3,000 
2,800 
2,800 
1,000 
1,500 
1,000 
1,400 
3,600 
1,000 
1,500 
1,400 

900 
1,000 
1,000 

500 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,250 

500 
1,400 
2,800 
2,800 
1,200 
1,400 
1,300 
1,500 
1,400 
1,400 

500 

500 
3,000 
2,100 
2,800 

500 
1,200 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
2,000 
2,000 

500 
2,500 
5,800 
1,000 

500 



Maganetawan River 14,100 

McCullough Creek 2,800 

McQuoid Lake 1,000 

Otter Lake 1,400 

Owl Lake 500 

Paisley Lake 1,400 

Poole Lake 1,400 

Ragged Creek 1,500 

Rat Lake 1,250 

Rock Lake 1,200 

Round Lake 500 

Roussell Creek 800 

Sand Lake (Ballantyne) ... 700 

Sand Lake (Proudfoot) 1,500 

Seguin River 1,500 

Shadow River 1,200 

Shells Lake 500 

Smith Creek 2,800 

Stewart Creek 1,000 

Stirling River 2,400 

Surprise Lake 2,500 

Tee Lake Creek 500 

Three Mile Creek 500 

Three Mile Lake 1,900 

Williams Lake 1,500 

Peel: 

Credit River 6,200 

Smith Creek 1.200 

Watson Creek 1,200 

Perth: 

Avon River 1,500 

Fullerton Creek 500 

McKnight Stream 1,500 

Peterborough: 

Archer Creek 200 

Big Ouse River 8,400 

Birdsall Creek 3,200 

Buchanan Creek 3,200 

Carvers Creek 2,800 

Cavan Stream 8,000 

Deer Bay Creek 3,200 

Deer River 1,200 

Dunbar Creek 1,600 

Eel Creek 8,600 

Harding's Creek 800 

Jack's Creek 3,200 

Little Ouse River 5,400 

Mlllbrook Stream 1,000 

Mississauga River 6,400 

Mount Pleasant Stream 3,200 

Plateau Creek 8,250 

Sophies Creek 1,000 

Renfrew: 

Angling Lake 800 

Annie Lake 1.500 

Barry Lake 800 

Battery Lake 500 

Bear Lake 2,500 

Belanger Lake 800 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1940-41 



49 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF PISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941— Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT— Continued 

Renfrew — Continued 

Bergeron Lake 1,000 

Big Round Lake 1,000 

Bissett Creek 3,000 

Black Lake 2,000 

Black Donald Lake 1,000 

Brennan Creek 1,000 

Burns Lake 3,000 

Byers Creek 3,000 

Clarkes Creek 1,000 

Cochrane Creek 4,200 

Colton Creek (Admaston) . . 500 

Colton Lake 3,500 

Constant Creek 1,500 

Costello Creek 1,000 

Coulton Creek (Matawatchan) 1,500 

Cranberry Lake 1,000 

Crooked Lake Creek 1,000 

Cross Lake 3,000 

Crotch Lake 1,000 

Crozier Creek 3,500 

Deer Lake 1,500 

Deux Rivieres Creek 1,500 

Devils Lake Creek 1,000 

Diamond Lake Creek 1,000 

Dodge Lake 500 

Dominic Lake 2,000 

Elmer Lake 800 

Finley Creek 1,000 

Gardez Pieds Creek 1,000 

Geen Lake 1,000 

Grant Creek 1,250 

Greenan Lake 1,500 

Hamwolds Creek 1,000 

Hart Lake 1,000 

Harvey Creek 1,000 

Helmers Lake 1,000 

Heney Creek 1,250 

Hughey Lake 1,000 

Indian River 4,000 

Jerry Lake 500 

Josie Creek 1,000 

Kelly Lake Creek 1,000 

Leckie Creek 1,000 

Little Madawaska River 3,000 

Little Mason Lake 200 

Little Spring Creek 250 

Locksley Creek 1,000 

Long Lake (Lyell) 2,000 

Long Lake Creek (Griffith) 1,000 

MacKay Creek 1,000 

Mares Lake 500 

McCool Lake 1,000 

McDermid Creek 1,000 

Nadeau Creek 500 

Paugh Lake 3,00^ 

Pichette Creek 500 

Quadville Creek 1,000 

Red Pine Lake 500 

Rockingham Creek 3,000 

Rocky Lake 2,500 

Round Lake and Creek .... 1,300 



Schaven Lake 500 

School Creek 500 

Scott Creek 1,000 

Siroski Creek 1,200 

Smith Creek 1,000 

Snake Creek 1,000 

Spring Creek 1,000 

Stewart Creek 1,000 

Sullivan Lake 1,200 

Toohey Lake 1,500 

Trout Lake (Head) 1,000 

Trout Lake (Raglan) 1,000 

Tucker Creek 1,200 

Turner Creek 1,000 

Twin Lakes 4,500 

Unnamed Lakes (Vicinity of 

Griffith) 1,200 

Wadsworth Creek 500 

Wendigo Lake 3,000 

White Lake Creek 250 

Wylie Creek 4,000 

Zielany Lake 1,500 

Simcoe: 

Black River 1,000 

Boyne River 3,000 

Colwell Creek 1,000 

Hill Creek 1.000 

Mathewson Creek 3,000 

Willow Creek 1,500 

Sudbury: 

Austin Lake 3,000 

Awry Creek 10,000 

Bailey Creek 15,000 

Bertrand Creek 7,500 

Clear Lake 15,000 

Clearwater Lake Creek .... 15,000 

Cold Spring Creek 10,000 

Coniston Creek 17,500 

Crystal Lake 5,000 

Devil Lake Creek 10,000 

Dublin Creek 500 

Ella Lake 7,500 

Emery Creek 10,000 

Fairbank Creek 10,000 

Farm Lake 5,000 

Fournier Creek 15,000 

Fox Lake 1,250 

Garson Creek 6,000 

Geneva Creek 15,000 

Goodwins Lake 4,500 

Green Lake 10,000 

Hunter Creek 1,000 

Johns Creek 30,000 

Johnston Creek 10,000 

Junction Creek 7,500 

Karl Creek 4,000 

Landlocked Lake 1,250 

McLanders Creek 15,000 

McLeod Creek 7,500 

Nelson River 8,000 

Post Creek 4,000 



50 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES Nq. 9 (1942) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941— Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT— Continued 

Sudbury— Continued 

Poulin Creek 15,000 

Pumphouse Creek 30,000 

Rapid River 15,000 

Rock Lake 2,000 

Round Lake 500 

Round Lake (Borden) 10,000 

Sandcherry Creek 10,000 

Sauble River 45,000 

Second Lake 3,000 

Shoal Lake Creek 1,000 

Spring Creek 10,000 

Sprout Creek 15,000 

Storehouse Creek 2,000 

Trout Lake 3,000 

Trout Lake Creek 6,000 

Unnamed Lake (Hoskin Tp.) 2,000 

Unnamed Lake (Morgan) . . 17,500 

Veuve River 30,000 

Waddell Creek 7,500 

Wanapitei Lake 10,000 

Wavy Creek 10,000 

West Lake 2,500 

Windy Creek 20,000 

Thunder Bay: 

Ada Lake 1,000 

Alt Lake 2,000 

Anderson Lake 3,000 

Anne Lake 1,000 

Arnold Creek 3,000 

Arrow River 4,000 

Bass Creek 6,000 

Bat Lake 5,000 

Bear Lake 1,750 

Bear Trap Lake 6,850 

Beaver Dam Creek 4,800 

Big Duck Lake 3,000 

Billy Creek 4,500 

Birch Grove Lake 1,500 

Bishop Lake 1,500 

Blend Creek 4,000 

Bluff Lake 2,000 

Brule Creek 10,000 

Buckaday Lake 3,000 

Cavern Creek 1,500 

Cavern Lake 2,600 

Cedar Creek 25,000 

Charlotte Lake 4,800 

Coldwater River 20,300 

Corbett Creek 5,000 

Cousineau Dam 5,000 

Couture Lake 1,500 

Current River 20,000 

Dan's Lake 1,200 

Dublin Lake Creek 500 

Fall Lake 2,000 

Fire Lake 2,000 

Firesteel River 5,000 

Florence Lake 1,500 

Eraser Creek 6,000 

Golden Gate Lake 1,000 



Grassy Lake 4,000 

Gravel River 13^200 

Half Moon Lake 3,000 

Hay Lake 2^500 

Hazelwood Creek 7,000 

Hogan Lake 2^000 

Hornblende Lake 1,200 

Indian Lake 1,000 

Inwood Lake 1,250 

Island Lake 3,000 

Jackpine River 4,000 

Jim's Lake 2,000 

Kaministiquia Lake 5,000 

Knobel Lake 5,100 

Krumle' Lake 5,800 

Langley's Creek 2,000 

Le Sarge Lake 2,000 

Little Lake 1,200 

Little Partridge Lake 2,400 

Little Whitefish River 3,000 

Loftquist Lake 15,000 

Loon Lake 23,000 

Lost Lake 2,400 

Love Island Lake 1,200 

Lower Pass Lake 6,000 

Lukinto Lake 2,000 

Lynx Lake 1,800 

Maggot River 4,400 

Mclntyre Creek 7,000 

Mclntyre River 6,000 

McKenzie River 4,000 

McLean Creek 2,400 

McVicar Creek 4,000 

Mine Lake 4,200 

Mink Lake 3,600 

Mirror Lake 3,000 

Moose Creek 2,000 

Moose Lake 3,500 

Mountain Lake 4,000 

Neebing River 17,800 

Nipigon River 55,600 

Nishin Lake 9,650 

Oliver Lake 7,000 

One Isle Lake 1,000 

Ozone Creek 4,750 

Park Lake 4,000 

Parsons Lake 2,900 

Partridge Lake 4,900 

Pass Lake 5,000 

Peach Lake 4,200 

Pearl River 15.000 

Pitch Creek 18,400 

Rainbow Lake 2,000 

Range Lake 1,200 

Reed Lake 2,000 

Ring Lake 1,000 

Ringer Lake 1,000 

Rope Lake 4,000 

Ross Lake 2,400 

Selim River 2,000 

Setting Duck Lake 3,000 

Shoepack Lake 3,600 

Silver Creek 2,000 

Silver Islet Creek 2,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1940-41 



51 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941— Continued 



SPECKLED TROUT— Continned 

Thunder Bay — Continued 

Spar Lake 2,000 

Spring Creek (Dorion) 8,700 

Spring Lake (Leduc) 7,000 

Squaw Creek 4,000 

Star Lake 2,000 

Stillwater Creek 1,000 

Strawberry Creek 7,000 

Sturgeon River 2,000 

Surprise Lake 4,000 

Three Mile Lake 3,000 

Tomlinson Lake 1,250 

Trout Creek (Lyon) 4,000 

Trout Creek (McTavish) . . : 700 

Trout Creek (Nipigon) 2,000 

Trout Lake (Gorham, etc.) . . 26,000 

Trout Lake (Stirling) .... 22,000 

Tujack Lake 2,000 

Twin Lakes 5,500 

Uncle Tom's Lake 2,400 

Unnamed Creek (Dorion) . . 1,000 

Unnamed Lake (Eva) 2,000 

L^pper Pass Lake 6,000 

Wabasta Lake 3,000 

Walker Lake 8,150 

Vv^hitefish River 8,000 

Whitewood Creek 1^,600 

Wideman Lake 3,000 

Timiskaming: 

Belle Isle Lake 1,200 

Boston Creek 1,000 

Butler Lake 1,000 

Charlotte Lake 2,000 

Crooked Creek 1,000 

Crystal Lake (Bayly) 1,500 

Crystal Lake (Lebel) 2,000 

Emerald Lake 2,400 

Fairy Lake 1,000 

Gleason Creek 1,200 

Graham Creek 1,500 

Jean Baptiste Lake . 1,000 

Largreaves Lake 1,000 

Latour Creek 1,200 

Leacock Creek 1,000 

Little Otter Lake 1,500 

Loon Lake 1,200 

Mearow Lake 1,000 

Moffat Creek 1,000 

Mousseau Lake 1,000 

Pike Creek 1,200 

St. Anthony Creek 1,000 

Sink Hole Lake 500 

Spring Creek 1,200 

Spring Lake 3,000 

Stock Lake 2,000 

Twin Lakes 3,000 

Wahi Creek 1,000 

Wapoose Creek 500 

Welcome Lake 1,000 



Victoria: 

Corbin Creek 


200 


Crego Creek 


1,600 
1,500 


Union Creek 


Waterloo: 




Bamburg Stream 

Elora Creek 


2,400 

2,000 

1,200 

600 


Erbsville Creek 

Mannheim Creek 


Wellington: 

Bell's Creek 


900 


Credit River 

Mallot's Creek 

O'Dwyer's Creek 

Ospring Creek 

Saugeen River 

Stanley Park Stream 


1,200 
500 
300 
600 

1,200 
300 


York: 




Doan's Pond 


300 


Miscellaneous: qjIuJ. r 




Sales — Demonstration and 
propagation purposes 


13,207 


ADULTS 




Algoma: 

Garden River 

Heyden Lake 

Lower Island Lake 

Root River 

Upper Island Lake 


1,000 
400 
350 

4,650 
750 



WHITEFISH FRY 

Kenora: 

Eagle Lake 1,000,000 

Portage Bay 2,000,000 

Separation Lake 500,000 

Lake of the Woods 35,105,000 

Manitoulin: 
Lake Manitowaning 1,000,000 

Prince Edward: 

Bay of .Quinte 89,000,000 

Rainy River: 
Rainy Lake 28,000,000 

Simcoe: 
Lake Simcoe 1,500,000 

Thunder Bay: 

Lake Nipigon 500,000 



52 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1942) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941— Continued 

WHITEFISH FRY— Continued 

Great Lakes: 

Lake Superior 15,750,000 

North Channel 23,040,000 

Georgian Bay 62,322,000 

Lake Huron 43,460,000 

Lake Erie 91,912,000 

Lake Ontario 8,250,000 

HERRING FRY 

Frontenac: 

Brule Lake 300,000 

Camp Lake 200,000 

Haliburton: 

Drag Lake 250,000 

Spruce Lake 250,000 

Hastings: 

Salmon Lake 250,000 

Weslemkoon Lake 350,000 

Lanark: 

Dalhousie Lake 250,000 

Leeds : 

Rideau Lake 750,000 

Lennox-Addington : 

Little Weslemkoon Lake . . . 100,000 

Otter Lake 200,000 

White Lake 100,000 

Peterborough: 

Jack's Lake 250,000 

Trout Lake 250,000 

Prince Edward: 

Bay of Quinte 2,900,000 

Simcoe: 
Nottawasaga Bay 7,750,000 

Sudbury: 

Windy Lake 500,000 

Great Lakes: 

North Channel 1,500,000 

Georgian Bay 1,000,000 

Lake Erie .* 29,650,000 

Lake Ontario 2,250,000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1940-41 



53 



APPENDIX No. 2 
DISTRIBUTION OF FISH ACCORDING TO SPECIES— 1936 TO 1940, INCLUSIVE 



liarge-mouthed Black Bass 
Fry 

Finger lings 

Yearlings & Adults 

Small-mouthed Black Bass 

Fry 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings & Adults 



Maskinonge 

Eyed Eggs 

Fry 

Fingerlings 



Perch — Fry 



Pickerel (Yellow) 

Eyed Eggs 

Fit 

Adults 



Pickerel (Blue) 

Fry 



Brown Trout 

Fingerlings 
Yearlings 

Lake Trout 

Eyed Eggs 



Fingerlings 
Yearlings . 

Rainbow Trout 

Fingerlings 
Yearlings . 
Adults 



Kamloops Trout 

Fingerlings 
Yearlings . 

Speckled Trout 

Eyed Eggs 

Fry 

Fingerlings 
Yearlings . 
Adults 



Whitefish 

Eyed Eggs 



Fry 



Herrins: 

Eyed Eggs 
Fry 



Miscellaneous 



1936 



45.000 



780,000 

69,380 

5.202 



274.000 



46,080.000 



2.000.000 
300.759,500 



147,050 
7,290 



3.209,400 
4.165.000 



Fry 

Fingerlings 18,253.244 



Atlantic Salmon 

Fry 



133,000 
3,507 



1937 



28.600 

182,000 

1.053.050 

557.270 

6,081 



112.500 
428,402,000 



TOTALS 



56,120,000 



135,000 

4,120 

92 



1.275.000 

141,900 

5.893 



420.700 
9.150,000 



2,000,000 
263,743,400 



1.000,000 



97,484 



3,225.000 

4.667.000 

15,782.350 



1938 



1939 



862.401,472 



7.200 



105,240 



80,000 



384,725 

1,167.073 

16,150 



4,000.000 
383.683.900 



30,000 
5,270.000 



3.053 
696,395,280 



57.500 
8,061 



804,000 

169,800 

7,738 



2,005,000 



59.150.000 



2.012.500 
271.567.500 



500.000 



59.592* 



2.437.000 

7.665,000 

10.575,200 



4,800 



321.600 
6.727 



25.821 



1.000 

"37V, 314 

2,083,538 

4,452 



323.700,500 



49,725,000 



733.265,643 



1,890 
497 



1,386,000 

226,325 

7.739 



120.000 

2.675,000 

1.300 

72.360,000 



7,000,000 
327.500.000 



29.954 
375.070 



1.845.850 
7.236.900 
9.964,400 



1940 



109.635 

23.145 

1,009 



105.000 



337,000 

2,976,559 

6.315 



326,657.000 

ss'.Vso'.ooo 

41 
799,496.629 



230,000 

5.500 

152 



2.512,500 

449,154 

1,671 



2.345.000 
2,333 



13.000.000 



2.000.000 

393.887,000 

100 



182.725 
252,000 



575,000 
7,564.000 
7.312.100 



46.385 



298.420 
19.724 



26,500 



611.375 

3,278.114 

7.150 



403.339.000 



49.050.000 



886.995.903 



Yearlings and adults 



54 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1942) 



APPENDIX 



GAME AND FISHERIES 
Statistics of the Fishing Industry in the Public Waters of 

EQUIP 



District 


No. 

of 

Men 


Tugs 


Gasoline 
Launches 


Sail and 
Row Boats 


Gill Nets 




No. 


Tons 


Value 


No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


Yards Value 


Northern Inland Waters 


806 ^ 


40 
318 
111 
377 
482 


$ 10,500 

54,400 

36,700 

109,500 

115,400 


147 
109 

48 
131 
100 

42 
170 
206 

10 


$ 71,170 

43.735 

24,825 

122.860 

75,040 

12,025 

193,435 

107,420 

2,107 


276 
53 
47 

120 
27 
71 

130 

115 
82 


$ 8,843 
3.735 
2,455 
5,392 
1.377 
3,605 
11,415 
4,050 
2,783 


566,1201 $ 82.817 




398 
155 
463 
328 


10 

6 

16 

15 


North Channel 

Georgian Bay 

Liake Huron 


528,969 
1,327,250 
1,487,200 


60.430 
138.860 
188 63(1 




125 
933 

574 
238 






Lake Erie 


41 


965 


285,300 


2,134,951 

1,250,380 




281.383 
1 1 R »fic^ 


















1 


! 


Totals ■ 


4,020 92 


2,293 


$611,800 


963 


$652,617 


921 


$43,655 


1 
8,282,8341 $976. 68."^ 













APPENDIX 

QUANTITIES OF 



District 



Northern Inland Waters 

Lake Superior 

North Channel 

Georgian Bay 

Lake Huron 

Lake St. Clair 

Lake Erie 

Lake Ontario 

Southern Inland Waters 



Herring 



lbs. 



Whitefish 



lt)3. 



Trout 



lbs. 



Pike 



lbs. 



Pickerel 
(Blue) 



lbs. 



13.7811 1,339,2371 



1.201,163! 

3.480| 

26.9771 

148.968 



585,062 

1.618.219 

135 



385.024 

118,847 

887.235 

92.403 

645 

3,136.5561 

403.5961 

5,0741 



163.702 
1.261.211 

354,058 
1,334.033 
1,038.7761 



21 

187.400 

24,870 



I 

963,885 

6.901 

66.166 

58.447 

783 

24.972 

29.642 

64,3091 

1,129 . 



Pickerel 
(Do re) 



2,971 
5.2171 
I 



6 

277 

1.500 

2,012,345 

96.067 



ib8. 



.556.60'> 

155.136 

23.800 

82.586 

214.275 

52.420 

426.291 

4.271 



Totals 



! I 

3,597.7851 6,368,6171 4,364.071 1,216,2341 2,118,383 



2,515,381 



Price per pound. 



.051 



.11: 



.111 



.061 



.05 



Values 



' I I 

$179,889,251 $700,547.87|$480.047.81| $72.974.04| $105,919.15] $276,691.91 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1940-41 



55 



No. 3 

DEPARTMENT, ONTARIO 

the Province of Ontario,, for the Year Ending December 31st, ,1940. 

MENT 



Seine Nets 



1 
No. I Yards 



Value No. 

I 



Pound Nets 



Value 



Hoop Nets 



No. 



Dip and 
Roll Nets 



Value No. Value 

i I 



Night Lines 



No. L^ , 
Hooks r aJ^^e 



Spears 



No. 



Value 



Freezers & 
Ice Houses 



No. 



Value 



Piers and 
Wharves 



No 



Total 
Value 



• ■ • 










7. 1.200 

*42i "e'.iso 

37| 10.300 

71 570 

45j 3,920 


$1,075 


3.420 

7,110 

545 

6.216 



451 

461 
521 
lOOl 
105| 
105| 
650! 



$15,610 
15,250 
19,400 
81.490 
65.200 
10,340 

300.200 



57 



I 1 I 

$1,825 3 



57 



4 

10 

391 

114 



805 



600 
2.000 
9.925 
2,725 



$ 5 3,250 $S05| 1 124 



15 



83! 
235 



2| 25,223 
.1 5,4061 
4| 3, 3001 
2,300| 
2,100| 
6001 



1,985 
925 
198 

48! 
102! 

15! 



$525 



! 17 

!113! 

I 58! 

101 

I 



$34,010 

15.450 45 

8.000 30 

16,900 

29,925 

6,285 

151,935! 82! 

7.030! 28 1 

700! 4| 

I I 



$12, 

10, 

11 

31, 

7, 

3 

31, 

5 



805 
755 
075 
656 
738 
125 
500 
210 
3351 
I 



$237,890 

251,534 

162,885 

510,525 

484,235 

39,602 

1,264,416 

250.734 

15.641 



i ! ! I I 

138! 22,140|$18,366! 1,103|$507,490| 



:$ I 

633117,880! 



I ! 

59! $419! 42,182 

•I I 



$3,5931 68 



$525|531 



I I I 

$270,235!394l$114,199!$3,217,462 



No. 4 



FISH TAKEN 





Sturgeon 


Eels 


Perch 


Tullibee 


Catfish 


Carp 


Mixed 
Coarse 


Caviare 


Total 


Value 




■ 
lbs. 






lbs. 






lbs. 


lbs. 








lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 






101.942 
4.001 
3,752 
1,329 
4.762 
8.130 
15,947 
7.280 


! 


22.504 

900 

28.417 

2.363 

265.861 

35.101 

1,993,542 

117.650 

5.144 


172,666 

240,352 
2,546 

102,478 
1 288.418 
1 


6,220 

6 

4,192 
21,745 
92,113 
129,375 
90.650 
57.633 


5,506 

80 

268 

59.137 

17,716 

303.279 

297.573 

181,680 

254,299 


1 

881,821 
58,920 
190.744 
100.001 
117,233 
316.893 
1.140.237 
235.319 
258,697 


3,203 









4,734,040 
3,318,905 

792,124 
2,658,792 
2,211,467 

835.429 
9.767.998 
3.039.498 

608,703 


$462,912.70 






276,721.99 






40 
8 
250 
376 
970 
101 


67,632.12 






271,378.58 
194 404 49 






44 833 30 






! 437 

1 

1 


690,052.23 

189.650.20 

28,832.57 




32,956 
1,722 






1 






t 147,143 


1 

34.678 


2.471.482 


806,897 


401,934 


1,119,538 


2,799.865 


4.948 


27.966,956 






.40 


.07 


.05 


.06 


.08 


.05 


.03 


1.00 












$58,857.20 


$2,427.46 


$123,574.10 


$48,413.82 


$32,154.72 


$55,976.90 


$83,995.95 


$4,948.00 




$2,226,418.18 



56 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1942) 



APPENDIX No. 5 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE YIELD OF THE FISHERIES OF ONTARIO 



Species 



Herring 

Whitefish 

Trout 

Pike 

Pickerel Blue . . . 
Pickerel Dore . . . 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse 
Caviare 



TOTALS 33,850,289 27,966,956 



1939 
Pounds 



5,322 

6,366 

5,075 

1,063 

6,157 

2,389 

215 

27 

1,935 

547 

379 

1,142 

3,224 

3 



,226 
,973 
,802 
,269 
,383 
,635 
,062 
,329 
,375 
,865 
,681 
,283 
,019 
.387 



1940 
Pounds 



597 
368 
364 
216 
118 
515 
147 
34 
471 
806 
401 
119 
799 
4 



,785 
,617 
,071 
,234 
,383 
,381 
,143 
,678 
,482 
,897 
,934 
,538 
,865 
,948 



Increase 
Pounds 



1,644 

152,965 

125,746 

7,349 

536,107 

259,032 

22,253 

1,561 



Decrease 
Pounds 



1,724,441 

711,731 

4, 03 9,000 

67,919 



22,745 
424,154 



5,883,333 



* Net Decrease 

APPENDIX No. 6 

STATEMENT OF THE YIELD OF THE FISHERIES OF ONTARIO 

1940 



Species 



Herring 

Whitefish 

Trout 

Pike 

Pickerel Blue . . . 
Pickerel Dore . . . 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed and Coarse 
Caviare 

TOTALS 



Quantity 


Price per 


Estimated 


Pounds 


Pound 


Value 


3,597,785 


.05 


$179,889.25 


6,368,617 


.11 


700,547.87 


4,364,071 


.11 


480,047.81 


1,216,234 


.06 


72,974.04 


2,118,383 


.05 


105,919.15 


2,515,381 


.11 


276,691.91 


147,143 


.40 


58,857.20 


34,678 


.07 


2,427.46 


2,471,482 


.05 


123,574.10 


806,897 


.06 


48,413.82 


401,934 


.08 


32.154.72 


1,119,538 


.05 


55,976.90 


2,799,865 


.03 


83,995.95 


4,948 


1.00 


4,948.00 


27,966,956 




$2,226,418.18 



APPENDIX No. 7 

ESTIMATED VALUE OF FISH TAKEN FROM THE WATERS 
OF THE PROVINCE 
1921—1940 INCLUSIVE 



1921 $2,656,775.82 

1922 2,807,525.21 

1923 2,886,398.76 

1924 3,139,279.03 

1925 2.858,854.79 

1926 2,643,686.28 

1927 3,229.143.57 

1928 3,033,944.42 

1929 3,054,282.02 

1930 2,539,904.91 



1931 $2,442,703.55 

1932 2,286.573.50 

1933 2.186,083.74 

1934 ; . . . 2,316,965.50 

1935 2,633,512.90 



1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 
1940 



,614,748.49 
,644,163.49 
,573,640.97 
,564,516.37 
,226,418.18 



Thirty-Fifth Annual Report 



OF THE 



Game ond Fisheries 
De parfment 



1941 - 1942 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 9, 1943 




ONTARtO 



TORONTO 

Printed and Published by T. E. Bowman, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 4 3 



I 



ii^'- -5^ lounnA. tiiYi'^'^xitiiil 



TO THE HONOURABLE ALBERT MATTHEWS, 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province oi Ontario. 



MAY IT PLEASE YOUR HONOUR: 

I have the honour to submit herewith for the information of Your Honour 
and the Legislative Assembly, the Thirty-Fifth Annual Report of the Game and 
Fisheries Department of this Province, for the year ended March 31st, 1942. 



I have the honour to be. 

Your Honour's most obedient servant, 

G. D. CONANT, 

Minister in Charge, 
Department oi Game and Fisheries. 
TORONTO 2, 

March 15th, 1943. 



fe. 




THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Department of Game and Fisheries of Ontario 



TO: THE HONOURABLE G. D. CONANT, K.C., 
Prime Minister and Attorney-General, 
Minister in Charge, 
Department of Game and Fisheries. 

SIR: — 

I have the honour to submit to you herewith tlie Thirty-fifth Annual Report of 
the Department of Game and Fisheries, outlining a summary of the activities of the 
various Departmental services, and including condensed statistics for the fiscal year 
ended March 31st, 1942, as well as certain comparative tables. 

INTRODUCTORY 

The problems involved in providing a successful programme of conservation ia 
connection with the wealth of the wild life natural resources with which this Province 
has been endowed are many and varied and have been repeatedly emphasized on many 
opportune occsisions. A permanent solution of the existing problems is to a very large 
extent dependent upon the complete co-operation of every one who is interested in the 
maintenance and preservation of this valuable heritage. In the early days fish and 
game were quite abundant in the lakes and streams and in the forests throughout our 
virgin territory, and the provision of nature for maintaining the supply was sufficiently 
adequate. However, the process of developing a country does of necessity entail the 
removal of forests and the clearing of land in connection with the establishment and 
growth of a very essential agricultural industry, and the damming of rivers for the 
provision of electrical power necessary for industrial requirements, as well as many 
other infringements upon the habitat and environment of wild life, and a considerable 
reduction of this valuable heritage has been the subsequent result. The demand on 
these resources has continued to grow as their value from an economic and recreational 
standpoint became more widely known and appreciated. Over a period of years 
resident hunters and anglers have increased innumerably, and the tourist trade, stim- 
ulated and encouraged by the activities of the Department, has in recent years become 
one of our largest industries. 

The policy of protection has recognized the different phases affecting supply and 
demand and has been developed in an effort to maintain a proper balance. Legislative 
enactments and regulations have designated specific periods of the year only during 
which it is lawful to take various species of our more desirable fish and game and re- 
stricted the number or quantity of such fish and game which may be taken. Suitable 
areas have been designated as sanctuaries for game and fish, thus ensuring repro- 
duction and perpetuation therein and in the territory immediately adjacent to such 
sanctuaries. Small game has been intensively propagated and released for re-stocking 
purposes, and hundreds of millions of fish are raised artificially in more than a score 
of fish hatcheries and this production is annually deposited in provincial waters. The 
game and fish regulations otherwise embody the results of biological and practical 
experience, and the enforcement of these regulations is provided by a. staff of game and 
fisheries overseers. 

(1) 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1943) 



The success of this organized effort along the lines of conservation is in pro- 
portion to the support and co-operation which is provided and in this connection it is 
pleasing to note and record the increasing interest being taken by sportsmen, tourist 
camp operators and guides as is reflected in the many splendid associations which are 
giving active assistance in implementing the Departmental conservation programme. 
With a continuation of such co-operation the work and efforts of the Department will 
undoubtedly prove of lasting benefit to sportsmen in particular and the public generally. 

FINANCIAL 

The following is a complete table of the revenue collected during the period 
under review and shows the various sources from which this total was derived and the 
respective amounts attributable thereto: — 

REVENUE FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st, 1942. 

GAME— 

Licenses — 

Trapping $ 45,128.50 

Non-Resident Hunting 124,365.00 

Deer 94,923.90 

Moose 3,278.00 

Gun 97,768.84 

Dog 6,196.05 

Fur Dealers 28,476.00 

Fur Farmers 7,244.00 

Tanners 170.00 

Cold Storage 227.00 

$ 407,777.29 

Royalty 130,686.60 

1 538,463.89 

FISHERIES— 
Licenses — 

Fishing (Commercial) $ 87,831.00 

Angling 476,519.95 

$ 564,350.95 

Sales — Spawn taking 170.07 

Royalty 10,279.03 

$ 574,800.05 

GENERAI^— 

Licenses — 

Tourist Camps $ 7,840.00 

Guides 7,690.00 

$ 15,530.00 

Fines ^ 21,119.26 

Costs Collected (Enforcement of Game Act) 757.96 

Sales— Confiscated articles, etc 27,069.63 

Rent 3,113.50 

Commission retained by Province on sale of lie 2,067.24 

Miscellaneous 347.76 

$ 70,005.35 

Net Ordinary Revenue $ 1,183,269.29 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1941-42 



The amount collected during this period was the largest recorded in any one 
particular year during the entire existence of the Department, and exceeds by prac- 
tically $200,000.00 the revenue of the previous year. It is also $168,000.00 in excess of 
the total amount collected in the previous best financial year, i.e. 1939-40, when for the 
first time our revenue exceeded the one million dollar mark. 

One significant fact which merits favourable comment and more than cursory 
attention is the amount derived from the sale of non-resident angling and hunting 
licenses. Upon reference to the foregoing statement of revenue it will be noted that 
the sum derived from these sources totalled $600,884.95, which is more than fifty per 
cent of the revenue collected by the Department from all sources during this period, 
and almost $132,000.00 in excess of the revenue collected from these sources in the pre- 
vious fiscal year. By far the greater proportion of this total would result from the 
sale of such licenses to visitors from the United States, which is an indication of the 
importance of the tourist trade to the country generally, as this sum would represent 
but a small percentage of the total funds such visitors would of necessity have to expend 
for transportation, meals, accommodation and entertainment or recreation additional 
to hunting and fishing during the period of their visits within the Province. The efforts 
devoted by the Government to attract visitors to Ontario and thus develop the tourist 
traffic within the Province were showing substantial dividends, but it is altogether prob- 
able that the entry of the United States, on December 8th, 1941, into the present con- 
flict, will undoubtedly be followed by a noticeable retrogression of this traffic due to 
diminished numbers of American citizens visiting this country for vacation purposes, 
particularly during the period in which the existing restrictions governing travel and 
transportation conditions prevail. Other sources from which increased revenue was 
derived include the fees received from the sale of the various resident licenses 
required for hunting purposes, from the sale of trapping licenses and from the collection 
of fur royalties. 

The subjoined table will be of interest by reason of the fact that it depicts com- 
parative revenues derived from these sources during the year under review, the two 
previous fiscal years, and the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1936, the first complete 
twelve-month period under the present regime: — 



Non-resident Licenses 


1935-36 


1939-40 


1940-41 


1941-42 


Angling 


$ 200,641.65 
53,080.00 


$ 391,504.00 
84,590.00 


$ 384,675.00 
84,265.00 


$ 476,519.75 


Hunting 


124,365.00 






Resident Licenses 

(Hunting) 

Deer 


$ 253,721.65 

$ 56,544.05 

2,728.00 

69,635.93 

3,239.35 


$ 476,094.00 

$ 81,882.00 

2,733.50 

94,882.18 

5,550.00 


$ 468,940.00 

$ 77,469.40 

2,948.00 

86,527.85 

5,746.10 


$ 600,884.75 
$ 94,923.90 


Moose 


3,278.00 


Gun 


97,768.00 


Dog 


6,196.05 






Trapping Licenses 


$132,147.33 

$ 28,315.15 
110,884.40* 


$185,047.68 

$ 39,772.30 
116,520.40 


$172,691.35 

$ 35,795.50 
101.599.18 


$202,165.95 
$ 45,128.50 


Royalty (Fur) 


130,686.60 


♦ No open season for beaver. 





DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1943) 



Details of expenditures, both ordinary and capital, are in accordance with the 
following tabulation: — 

EXPENDITURE FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st, 1942. 

ORDINARY— 

Main Office $ 57,091.61 

General / 3,489.62 

Enforcement 217,374.13 

Game Animals and Birds 17,809.99 

Macdiarmid 2,576.94 

Biological and Fish Culture Branch 206,186.84 

Grants 5,400.00 

Wolf Bounty , 40,593.77 

Special Warrants, — 

Cost of Living Bonus $ 23,768.51 

Unemployment Insurance . . 11.67 



23,780.18 

Total — Ordinary . . . .^ ..y^^^^^.j ,^ $ 574,231.08 

Capital 2,531.18 



Total Expenditure ..,...$ 576,762.26 

The complete financial statement for the year shows a very desirable condition in 
that a surplus of $606,507.03 was derived from our operations and the statement is by 
far the best ever submitted by the Department of Game and Fisheries. 

As will have been observed the heaviest expenses are those incurred in connection 
with enforcement for the maintenance of the Field Officers whose duties are to provide 
patrol service throughout the Province to secure proper and adequate observance of the 
various provisions of the Game and Fisheries Act and Regulations, as well as those 
which are incurred to provide the various services of the Biological and Fish Culture 
Branch under the supervision of which Branch the provincial fish hatcheries are operated. 

The increased bounty on wolves which was continued during the year quite 
possibly encouraged trappers to devote more time and energy to the destruction of 
this vicious predator which probably accounts for the considerable increase in the 
number taken and therefore the greater amount necessary to take care of the sub- 
sequent applications for the payment of bounty. 

Regarding the payment of grants, one of $2,500.00 was made to the Ontario Fur 
Breeders' Association to assist this organization in their efforts to develop the industry 
of fur farming within the Province. Three grants totalling $1,900.00 were paid to Mr. 
Jack Miner, Mr. Thomas N. Jones and Miss Edith L. Marsh in appreciation of their 
efforts to provide sanctuaries for migratory and native birds on their own properties 
located in the counties of Essex, Elgin and Grey respectively. A grant of $500.00 was 
made to Professor W. J. K. Harkness to enable him to continue research work with a 
view to supplementing the existing practice in fish culture operations, and a grant of 
$500.00 was made available to the Ontario Federation of Anglers to be used by them 
along educational lines, and more particularly with a view to securing better observance 
of the provisions of the Fisheries Regulations. 

Capital expenditures were kept under rigid control and only such sums were ex- 
pended as were absolutely necessary to maintain present buildings, principally on fish 
hatchery properties, in a proper state of repair. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1941-42 



The table which follows shows the total revenue, expenditure and surplus from 
Departmental activities during the present and the six preceding years: — 





Revenue 


Expenditure 
(Ordinary & Capital) 


Surplus 


1935-36 


$ 683,938.72 
782,217.63 
866,558.19 
914,475.24 

1,015,350.82 
984,800.69 

1,183,269.29 


$ 451,041.91 
474,128.95 
563,938.33 
575,437.79 
568,198.55 
512,834.70 
576,762.26 


$ 232,896.81 
318,088.68 
302,619.86 
339,037.45 
447,152.27 
471,965.99 
606,507.03 


1936-37 


1937-38 


1938-39 

1939-40 


1940-41 


1941-42 





GAME 

In the following table information is given regarding the number of hunting 
licenses of all varieties, both resident and non-resident, which were sold during the 
period under review as well as a comparison with the totals disposed of in the three 
previous years: — 





1938-39 


1939-40 


1940-41 


1941-42 


Resident Deer 


21,762 

307 

7,719 

471 

114,580 

1,329 

569 

1,618 

49 


21,416 
323 

7,722 

497 

113,992 

1,492 

593 

1,567 

108 


20,219 
310 

6,486 

536 

97,218 

1,291 
755 

1,377 
161 


25,225 
333 


Resident Deer (Camp) 


•Resident Deer (Farmers) 


7,353 
611 


Resident Moose 


Resident Gun 


116,622 

2,028 

1,115 

1,876 

189 


Non-Resident Deer ^ . . . 

Non-Resident "General" 


Non-Resident Small Game 


Non-Resid-ent Bear (Spring Season) 



In every instance there was an increase in the number sold in 1941-42 as com- 
pared with those sold in the previous year. 

Herewith is a summary of conditions as they apply to the various species of game 
animals and birds which are to be found in Ontario, and which information is compiled 
from reports submitted by officers of the enforcement service throughout the Province. 

DEER: — Throughout the northerly portion of Southern Ontario and in Northern Ontario 
generally deer continued to be sufficiently plentiful to warrant the statement that the 
hunting of this species of fine game animal provides a source of relaxation for thou- 
sands of interested hunters unequalled by any other division of the sport. The 
limited extent of the open season and the various restrictions which are in effect during 
this period of open season, as well as the protection which is provided during that 
period of the year in which no hunting of deer is permitted, have all contributed in 
some measure to the maintenance of the deer herds of the Province in their present 
satisfactory state. Reports from the various counties in Southern Ontario in which 
an entire closed season has prevailed for many years are to the effect that this complete 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1943) 



protection which has been provided has resulted in a considerable increase in the num- 
bers of these animals which now inhabit many of these areas, though this improve- 
ment has not been sufficiently extensive to warrant the provision of general regulations 
for the hunting of deer in the^e areas. However, conditions were such in the Counties 
of Bruce and Carleton that special regulations were promulgated in connection with 
the hunting of deer therein, details of which are as follows: — 

(a) An open season in the County of Bruce, from November 10th to November 
18th, 1941, both days inclusive, though the use of dogs during this hunting season 
was prohibited. 

(b) An open season in that part of the County of Carleton lying west of the 
Rideau River, from November 3rd to November 18th, 1941, both days inclusive. 
The general regulations which govern the hunting of deer were in effect. 

In Division (D), Southern Ontario, a special regulation establishing the 
period of the open season for deer provided that such open season would extend 
from November 3rd to November 18th, 1941, both days inclusive. 

In accordance with local recommendations received in the Department it was 
further provided that it would be unlawful for any person to hunt deer in the 
Counties of Durham, Northumberland and Prince Edward and in the Township 
of Cambridge, in the County of Russell, at any time during the year 1941, thus 
eliminating the open season in these areas which is established by the general 
provisions of the Game and Fisheries Act. 

MOOSE: — Generally speaking this species of game animal is not plentiful anywhere 
in this Province, though there are some areas in which rather favourable conditions 
do prevail. An entire closed season on these animals has been effective for the past 
several years in that portion of Ontario lying south of the French and Mattawa 
Rivers and Lake Nipissing, and this prolonged period of entire protection has not re- 
sulted in any general increase in the numbers of moose which exist in this part of the 
Province, though some slight improvement is reported from the County of Renfrew 
and the District of Muskoka. Advice from various northern Ontario sections indicates 
conditions practically similar to those which have existed there in more recent years, 
with slight improvement in scattered areas. Hunting was permitted during the usual 
open seasons in accordance with provisions of the Game and Fisheries Act, while a 
restricted period of open season, extending from October 15th to October 31st, 1941, 
was provided in that area in northwestern Ontario, west of the Superior Junction-Fort 
William Branch of the Canadian National Railway, including the district of Rainy River 
and portions of the districts of Kenora and Thunder Bay, and in that area in the south- 
eastern part of northern Ontario, lying north of North Bay and east of Sudbury, and in- 
cluding portions of the districts of Nipissing, Temiskaming and Sudbury. 

CARIBOU: — But very few specimens of this variety of game animal exist in Ontario 
at this time. Naturally they are reported only from locations in northern Ontario and in 
all instances the information received is to the effect that they are very scarce. They 
are probably most prevalent, though not plentiful even there, on the larger islands in 
Lake Superior located along the shore fronting the district of Thunder Bay. Existing 
conditions demand a continuation of the protection of a closed season throughout the 
entire year, and which has now prevailed for quite a period of years, if this species is to 
have an opportunity to maintain itself even in its present limited proportions. 

ELK: — The elk which are to be found in Ontario at the present time are those which 
were originally imported by this Department from Western Canada with the co-opera- 
tion of the National Parks Branch of the Department of Mines and Resources of Canada, 
and their subsequent off-spring. During the summer of 1941 six of these animals, three 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1941-42 



bulls and three cows, were transferred from their range on the Petawawa Crown Game 
Preserve in the county of Renfrew, and liberated in a suitable area in the county of Peter- 
borough. Little if any improvement was reported from the localities in which elk have 
been liberated on different occasions in previous years in the counties of Bruce, Simcoe 
and Peterborough, and in the districts of Nipissing, Sudbury, Algoma and Thunder Bay. 
These are the only sections in the Province in which these animals are to be observed, 
in addition to those on the Petawawa Crown Game Preserve. 

BUFFALO: — Little change has occurred in the small herd of buffalo, comprised of 
sixteen heifers and four bulls, which was imported from Alberta in 1939, and placed 
on lands in the Burwash Crown Game Preserve in the district of Sudbury. 

BEAR: — There would appear to have been some increase in the number of black bear in. 
many parts of Ontario. They are reported to be quite numerous in many parts of northern 
Ontario and in the districts of Parry Sound and^Muskoka and the counties of Haliburton 
and Renfrew. The demand for the pelts of these animals is at present negligible and 
as a result of this condition there is no encouragement for the trapping of bear. How- 
ever, much healthy recreation may result from the hunting of these animals, and no 
doubt many hunters take advantage of the opportunity for sport thus provided. It will 
be of interest to report that during the spring bear season from April 1st to June 15th, 
1941, some one hundred and eighty-nine (189) hunting licenses were issued to non- 
residents of the Province for the taking of bear, again recording an increase in the 
number of such licenses issued as compared with those sold during this season in the 
previous fiscal year. 

RABBITS: — The following varieties of rabbits are to be found in different sections of 
the Province, viz: — cottontail rabbits, European hare (or jack rabbits) and the vary- 
ing hare (or snowshoe rabbits). 

Cottontail rabbits are reported from all southern Ontario counties with the ex- 
ception of Renfrew, Haliburton, Muskoka and Parry Sound. Generally speaking, con- 
ditions as they applied to this variety were very good and some increase was evident. 
However, conditions were not favourable in several of the eastern counties as well as 
in the counties of Grey and Bruce. 

The European hare. Or jack rabbit as it is more familiarly known, is confined 
to the extreme southwesterly portion of the Province, lying south of the district of 
Muskoka and the county of Haliburton and west of the county of Hastings. With but 
few exceptions reports indicated that they were quite plentiful throughout this section. 

The' varying hare, or snowshoe rabbit, is prevalent in many of the eastern 
counties and northern districts of southern Ontario and throughout that portion of 
the Province lying north and west of the French and Mattawa Rivers and Lake Nipissing. 
They were reported to be not too plentiful in any of these areas except possibly in the 
far northwestern districts, though a slight general improvement in their numbers was 
observed. 

There is no doubt that the hunting of rabbits is the favourite sport of a large 
percentage of hunters throughout the Province, particularly in the late fall and early 
winter, and there are many who participate in the enjoyable and healthy recreation de- 
rived from such hunting. 

PARTRIDGE: — Satisfactory conditions with reference to both ruffed grouse and sharp- 
tailed grouse continued to prevail in the areas in which suitable environment exists, 
more particularly in the northern districts of the Province. The sharp-tailed variety 
of partridge are the western Canada species and are found in Ontario only in the 
northwestern districts. Special regulations were adopted to provide for an open season 
during the fall of 1941, details of which are as follows: — 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1943) 



The general open season consisted of two periods extending from October 4th to 
October 14th, and from November 3rd to November 12th. Limits of catch provided by 
the Regulation which governed in this case were not more than five (5) birds per day 
and not more than twenty-five (25) birds in all during the two periods. This applied 
throughout the Province except in the counties of Essex and Kent and in the townships 
established as Regulated Game Preserve Areas. In these areas mentioned in this ex- 
ception to the general Regulation the dates on which the hunting of partridge was 
permitted were October 24th, 25th "and 29th and November 1st, and the limits of catch 
were five (5) birds per day. 

HUNGARIAN PARTRIDGE :— This species of game bird is not native to the Province. 
The present stock is the result of importations, principally from central European 
countries several years ago, and which were later liberated in suitable areas. They are 
reported to exist, though not at all plentiful, in many southern counties, and small flocks 
have been observed in isolated and scattered sections of southern Algoma, eastern 
Thunder Bay and Rainy River. They are possibly more numerous in counties in the ex- 
treme southwest and extreme southeast portions of the Province. The open season 
provided in 1941 was in effect only in the counties of Essex and Kent on October 24th, 
25th and 29th and November 1st, and the limits of catch were established at two (2) 
birds per day. 

PHEASANTS: — During the year 1941 the Department undertook the distribution of 
21,168 pheasants, comprising 19,684 poults, 1,122 adult hens and 362 adult cocks. These 
birds were purchased at a cost of $16,514.85, and were liberated under the supervision 
of field officers of the Department, 18,259 in the townships established as Regulated 
Game Preserve Areas and 2,909 in a few counties additional thereto. Following are 
details of this distribution, and in all cases except as is indicated the birds liberated 
were poults: — 

Regulated Game Preserve Areas: — County of Brant, (three townships, — Bur- 
lord, South Dumfries and Onondaga), 760 birds; County of Elgin, (five townships, — 
Aldbcrough. Eayham, Dorchester South, Dunwich and Malahide), 1,000 birds; County of 
Haldimand, (ten townships, — Canboro, Dunn, Moulton, Cayuga North, Cayuga South, 
Oneida, Rainham, Seneca, Sherbrooke and Walpole), 1,263 birds, of which 13 were adults; 
County of Halton, (four townships, — Esquesing, Nassagaweya, Nelson and Trafalgar), 
1,641 birds of which 191 were adults; County of Lambton, (one township, — Plympton), 
200 birds; County of Lincoln, (eight townships, — Caistor, Clinton, Gainsboro, Grimsby 
North, Grimsby South, Grantham, Louth and Niagara), 2,670 birds of which 270 were 
adults; County of Middlesex, (two townships, — Westminster (part) and Metcalfe), 500 
birds; County of Norfolk, (four townships, — Middleton, Townsend, Walsingham and 
Windham), 640 birds; County of Ontario, (three townships, — Pickering, Whitby East and 
Whitby West), 750 birds; County of Oxford, (one township, — Dereham), 300 birds; 
County of Peel, (five townships, — Albion, Caledon, Chinguacousy, Toronto (part) and 
Toronto Gore), 1,652 birds of which 289 were adults; county of Prince Edward, (one 
township, — Marysburgh South), 100 birds; County of Welland, (eight townships, — 
Bertie, Crowland, Humberstone, Pelham, Stamford, Thorold, Wainfleet and Willoughby), 
1,800 birds; County of Wellington, (one township, — Puslinch), 300 birds; County of 
Wentworth, (eight townships, — Ancaster, Barton, Beverley, Binbrook, Glanford, Flam- 
boro East, Flamboro West and Saltfleet), 1,783 birds of which 24 were adults; County 
of York, (seven townships, — Gwillimbury East, Gwillimbury North, King, Markham, 
Scarboro, Vaughan and Whitchurch), 2,900 birds, of which 650 were adults. 

(General:— County of Essex, 1,221 birds,— 700 on the mainland and 521 (of which 
47 were adults) on Pelee Island; County of Huron, 50 birds; County of Kent, 700 birds; 
County of Lambton, 25 birds; County of Leeds, 50 birds; County of Northumberland, 
213 birds; County of Oxford, 600 birds; and County of Perth, 50 birds. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1941-42 



The Regulations which prescribed the open season for the taking of pheasants in 
1941 established October 30th and 31st, and November 7th and 8th as the effective 
dates on Pelee Island with a limit of catch of five (5) birds per day and a possession 
limit of ten (10) birds during each of the two two-day periods, with the further pro- 
vision that in each two-day period hunters could include in their possession 
limit of ten (10) birds not more than three (3) hen birds conditional 
upon the payment of $1.00 each for such hens to the Departmental repre- 
sentative on the Island. In the Township Regulated Game Preserve Areas the dates 
of this open season were October 24th and 25th, and two additional days, viz: — October 
29th and November 1st, provided the municipal authorities in any township issued their 
special hunting licenses therefor. The limits of catch provided were three (3) cock 
birds per day. Hunters who participated in this open season on Pelee Island and in the 
Regulated Game Preserve Areas were required to provide themselves with the special 
hunting license which the municipal councils were authorized by the Regulations to 
issue, as well as the hunting license required under the Game and Fisheries Act. In 
the County of Essex (excluding Pelee Island) and the County of Kent the dates of the 
open season were October 24th, 25th and 29th and November 1st, with a limit of catch 
of three (3) cock birds per day. 

While in the areas in which the open season prevailed conditions have been 
conductive to the introduction and successful establishment of this species, and were 
sufficiently satisfactory to warrant provision of the hunting which was permitted in 
the fall of 1941, it is quite possible that any future extension which may be contemplated 
will be restricted to areas in which weather conditions are not too severe. Efforts under- 
taken by the Department in previous years with a view to securing establishment of 
these birds in areas immediately to the east and north of the section concerned have 
not been particularly successful, and while some birds may yet be found in these 
areas there has not been any noticeable increase in their numbers according to the re- 
ports of our field officers stationed therein. 

QUAIL: — The only portion of the Province in which these birds are reported to be 
found in sufficient numbers to assure any measure of success in the hunting of same 
would appear to be in a few counties in the extreme southwestern end of the Province, 
though a few isolated small bevies have been observed in some of the eastern counties. 
A special open season was provided by Regulation in the counties of Essex (excluding 
Pelee Island) and Kent on October 24th, 25th and 29th and November 1st, 1941, with 
a limit of catch of four (4) such birds per day. 

BUCKS: — There is every indication that the several varieties of ducks which cross 
Ontario along the route of their southerly migration during the fall of the year provide 
a good measure of sport for those who find recreation in the hunting of this species of 
game bird. They were fairly plentiful and appeared in increased numbers in many 
areas, particularly those in which favourable feeding conditions exist. The various 
provisions which govern the hunting of ducks are provided by the Federal Government 
in co-operation with the various Provinces under the Migratory Birds Convention Act 
and Regulations. The restrictions which have been in effect in more recent years for 
the protection of wild ducks have undoubtedly reacted favourably and resulted in 
creating conditions necessary for the improvement now reported and which has been 
the objective towards which our efforts have been directed. The present desirable condi- 
tions will probably continue providing the existing restrictions are maintained. 

GEESE: — This species is of little importance in the general scheme of hunting in On- 
tario. Conditions remained about the same as has been indicated in Departmental an- 
nual reports for the past several years. Successful hunting of wild geese may be en- 
joyed only along the shores of James Bay, in the far northern end of the Province, and 
in the extreme southwestern counties. In other sections they are observed only in flight 



10 DEPARTMENT OP GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1943) 



during the fall and spring migration periods. As in the case of wild ducks the regula- 
tions which are authorized for the hunting and protection of wild geese are provided 
under the Migratory Birds Convention Act. 

WOODCOCK: — As a general rule these birds are not very plentiful, and in most sections 
from which they are reported their numbers are quite limited. The only possible excep- 
tions to this general rule are a few counties along the north shore of Lake Erie and 
immediately to the north thereof, as well as in some of the counties in the southeastern 
end of the Province. The Migratory Birds Convention Act governs, and in 1941 the open 
season extended over a period of only one month, in the northern division from Sep- 
tember 20th to October 20th, and in the southern division from October 1st to 
October 31st. The bag limit was eight (8) per day and not more than one hundred (100) 
for the season. 

SXIPE: — There are but few sections in Ontario in which these birds are found in suffi- 
cient number to warrant any extensive hunting of the same, and it is quite probable 
that not many hunters make any particular effort to take them. This is another species 
protected by the Migratory Birds Convention Act and Regulations. 

PLOVER: — Conditions with respect to these birds are varied, and while unfavourable 
reports predominate and indicate that a not too satisfactory state generally prevails, 
there are some sections from which some improvement has been reported. Under the 
Migratory Birds Convention Act and Regulations plover are provided the protection 
of an entire closed season. 



PUR-BEARING ANIMALS 

The following is a summary of conditions which apply to fur-bearing animals 
throughout the Province, and which information has been prepared from reports sub- 
mitted by officers of the Field Service Staff: — 

BEAVER: — The reports which have been received regarding beaver would indicate 
that these animals exist in fairly satisfactory numbers throughout Ontario, except in 
some of the counties situated in the southwestern and southeastern portions of the 
Province, though a slight increase in their numbers is reported from some of these 
counties. While the necessity for the present regulations for the protection of this 
species is apparent, existing conditions did warrant the provision of a short open 
season with a restricted limit of catch, and the open season provided covered the 
period from December 1st to December 21st, 1941, and was in effect in that portion of 
the Province lying north and w^est of the French and Mattawa Rivers and Lake 
Nipissing (except the area lying west of the line of the Canadian National Railway from 
Fort Willam to Superior Junction and south of the main transcontinental line of the 
Canadian National Railway from Superior Junction to the Manitoba Boundary), in the 
districts of Manitoulin, Parry Sound and Muskoka, and that part of the district of Nipis- 
sing lying south of the Mattawa River (excluding Algonquin Park), and in the counties of 
Victoria, Haliburton, Peterborough, Hastings, Lennox and Addington, Frontenac and 
Renfrew. Under the regulations which governed all persons who trapped beaver during 
this open season, including farmers trapping on their own lands, were required to 
secure trapping licenses, and each trapper was authorized to take not more than ten 
(10) beaver during this open season. Returns received in the Department show that 
some 25,197 pelts were taken during this period of open season, and it has been es- 
timated that the value of these pelts to the trappers concerned was in excess of 
$530,000.00. 

FISHER: — The annual catch of these animals is indeed very small. Conditions with 
reference to this species are not good in any part of Ontario. It is practically extinct 
in that part of the Province lying south of the French and Mattawa Rivers and Lake 
Nipissing. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1941-42 11 



FOX: — The red variety of this species showed a remarkable increase, particularly in 
southern Ontario during the period covered by this report. As a matter of fact the 
total catch of 32,215 was more than double the catch of the previous year, and has not 
been exceeded since the season of 1936-37. This condition resulted in the receipt of 
many complaints from farmers to the effect that they were losing considerable num- 
bers of their poultry due to the depredations of these predators and which complaints 
influenced the Department to instruct field officers that no action was to be taken to 
prevent trappers and hunters from taking foxes for a period of fifteen days following 
the end of the regular open season, or until March 15th, 1942. This condition also re- 
sulted in action by the Municipal Councils of some of the thickly settled townships in 
the counties of Peel, York and Ontario to provide for the payment of a bounty on foxes 
which were killed within the limits of such townships. While other varieties of wild 
fox, — cross, silver or black and white, — are not nearly so numerous as are red fox, a 
substantial increase in the seasonal catch of each variety was recorded. 

LYNX: — In this case there was also an increase recorded in the total catch reported 
during the year, though the number taken was very srhall. They are trapped principally 
in northern Ontario, and while there are reports of their existence in some scattered 
portions of southern Ontario, in all sections the condition of this species can be des- 
cribed only as extremely scarce. 

MARTEN: — As in the case of lynx these animals are extremely scarce and few of this 
species are found other than in northern Ontario. Some small improvement is reported 
from the district of Cochrane and the northern portion of the district of Algoma. There 
was an increase in the season's catch. 

MINK: — Conditions as they affected this species showed improvement in practically 
every section of the Province. While this improvement would no doubt result in a pro- 
portional increase in the total catch during the open season which prevailed, to this 
improvement could not be attributed in its entirety the very substantial increase 
which was reported. The total catch of 63,996 mink represented an increase in excess 
of sixty-four per cent as compared with the catch of the previous year. This total has 
not been exceeded by the take of any one season since 1926. Exceptionally favourable 
trapping conditions during the period of the open season were unquestionably very 
largely responsible for this remarkable increase. 

MUSKRAT: — It is again possible to report that fairly satisfactory conditions prevailed 
in respect to muskrat. While there were local increases and declines in the existing 
numbers of these animals, generally speaking a normal average was maintained as is 
indicated by the number trapped during the open season which was again provided by 
Regulation. Different periods of open season were established to coincide with favour- 
able weather conditions in the sections concerned. The principal source of general 
revenue accruing to licensed trappers is derived from the sale of their muskrat pelts. 
It has been calculated that trappers received the approximate sum of $1,445,000.00 from 
muskrat pelts marketed by them, which-' was forty-five per cent of the estimated value 
of the total catch of fur taken during the various open seasons of 1941-42. 

OTTER: — This species is not too plentiful in any section of Ontario, though there are 
a few sections in the northern part of tlie Province from which improvement has been 
reported. The number trapped during the open season was about average. 

RACCOON: — General conditions with reference to raccoon would appear to be deterior- 
ating. They exist only in the lower section of the Province, and while the annual catch 
showed an increase when compared with the figure for the previous year, this impres- 
sion of improvement is not substantiated by the reports of our field officers, the majority 
of whom advise that conditions are unchanged or that there has been some decrease 
in their numbers. 



12 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1943) 



SKU\K: — This is a species of fur-bearing animal which continues to experience no 
difficulty in maintaining itself in practically undiminished numbers. They are reported 
to be quite plentiful in practically every section of Ontario and there was a considerable 
increase in the numbers which were taken during the trapping season of 1941-42. They 
may be taken at any time during the period in which trapping licenses are valid. 

WEASEL: — The prevalence of this species varies in different sections. As in the case 
of skunk they may be taken at any time during the general trapping season. The total 
catch during the season of 1941-42 was just average, and it is quite possible that the 
small returns derived from the sale of these pelts did not encourage trappers in their 
efforts to take these animals. 

The following is a comparative table showing the numbers of pelts of the several 
varieties of fur-bearing animals taken by licensed trappers, and which were either ex- 
ported or dressed, during the fiscal period covered by this report, as well as similar 
figures for the three preceding years: — 



Bear 

Beaver 

Fisher . . , 

Fox (Cross) 

Fox (Red) 

Fox (Silver or Black) 

Fox (White) 

Lynx 

Marten 

Mink 

Muskrat 

Otter 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Weasel 

Wolverine 



1938-39 



363 

1,366 

1,467 

2,164 

22,366 

131 

142 

785 

2,074 

25,111 

508,893 

3,764 

9,493 

89,100 

93,488 

3 



1939-40 



295 

33,530 

1,382 

981 

19,925 

101 

36 

514 

1,790 

36,518 

689,706 

4,101 

14,493 

74,176 

95,832 

2 



1940-41 



274 

21,605 

858 

722 

15,059 

67 

91 

383 

1,439 

38,976 

739,224 

3,931 

11 973 

72.005 

53,719 

2 



1941-42 



384 

25,197 

884 

1,780 

32,215 

206 

114 

537 

1,652 

63,996 

722,387 

3,880 

13,499 

94,656 

80,776 

3 



Some ten thousand licenses were issued by the Department of Game and Fisheries 
during the 1941-42 season to authorize the trapping of fur-bearing animals, and from 
reports received by the Department from various licensed fur dealers it has been esti- 
mated that such trappers received a total of $3,170,790.45 for the various pelts taken 
by them during this trapping season, which is an increase of more than eighteen per 
cent over the estimated valuation for the previous year. In order of importance the 
principal sources of this increase were mink, fox, skunk, beaver and weasel. 

Pelts taken from animals raised on licensed fur farms, viz: — fox (silver or black, 
blue and cross), and mink, and disposed of during the year by such fur farm licensees 
have been estimated to have realized the sum of $1,036,354.08, a decrease of some 
$210 000.00 as compared with the operations of the previous year, making the value of 
the total fur production of the Province for the year 1941-42 the sum of $4,207,144.53. 



FUR FARMING 

The propagation of fur-bearing animals in captivity continued during the year, 
though these operations were confined principally to mink and foxes. Disturbing in- 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1941-42 



13 



fluences such as restricted markets for fur, rising costs of feeds and the uncertainty 
of supplies, attributable to the state of war in which our country is involved, caused 
some reduction in the number of fur-farm licenses which were issued during the year, 
and there was a decrease of some ten thousand, or practically thirty per cent in the 
number of silver and black fox pelts which were marketed by licensed fur farmers 
during the year as compared with the number marketed during the previous year. There 
were 1,613 fur farms licensed during 1941, a reduction of twelve per cent. 

The following comparative table shows the total number of animals retained as 
breeding stock on licensed fur farm premises as at the first day of January in each of 
the four years included in the comparison: — 



Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (Cross) 

Fox (Red) 

Fox (Silver or Black) 

Fox (Blue) 

Lynx 

Mink 

Muskrat 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Marten 

Otter 



1939 



2 

19 

197 

120 

22,923 

98 

2 

30,378 

267 

284 

6 

15 





1940 



4 

27 

168 

96 

18,327 

209 

2 

31,989 

235 

243 

10 

19 

2 



1941 



13 

26 

134 

65 

16,034 

397 

2 

34,277 

179 

139 

7 

16 

2 



1942 



18 

16 

112 

73 

15,630 

644 

2 

38,650 

119 

124 

5 

19 





It has been estimated that this breeding stock as at January 1st, 1942, had a 
repliacement value of $1 994,815.00. 

A compilation of fur records undertaken by the Department shows that licensed 
fur farmers duj'ing the year 1941-42 disposed of the following pelts from stock raised 
on these establishments, viz: — 

63,580 mink, 61,303 of which were exported, and the remaining 2,277 dressed 
within the Province. 

24,410 silver and black fox, 16,466 of whi^h were exported, and the remaining 
7,944 dressed within the Province. 

524 blue fox, 503 of which were exported, and the remaining 21 dressed within 
the Province. 

164 cross fox, 109 of which were exported, and the remaining 55 dressed within 
the Province. 



CROWN GAME PRESERVES 

The various Crown Game Preserves which had existed in the previous year were 
continued without change in any case either as regards the area involved or the con- 
ditions pertaining thereto. Similar comment applies also to the several townships 
which were previously established as Regulated Game Preserve Areas. 



14 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1943) 

Only one new Crown Game Preserve was established during 1941-42, and this was 
the Kesagami Beaver and Fur Sanctuary. The area included therein is located in the 
district of Cochrane lying west of the Ontario-Quebec interprovincial boundary, east 
of the Moose and the North French Rivers, south of the southern shore of James Bay, 
and north of the northern boundaries of the townships of Inglis, Swartman, McQuibban, 
Tweed and Blakelock and the easterly extension thereof to the Ontario-Quebec inter- 
provincial boundary. The regulation which provided for the establishment of this 
Sanctuary was adopted at the request of the Department of Mines and Resources for 
Canada, primarily to enable the Department of Game and Fisheries with the co-operation 
of the Federal Department of Mines and Resources to re-stock the area with beaver 
during the years specified, control the annual take of beaver therein, if and when such 
trapping is permitted, and provided a restricted and controlled trapping ground for the 
benefit of Indian residents in Ontario. The regulation further provides for the trapping 
in this area by resident Indians only of fur-bearing animals other than beaver. This is 
the second such Sanctuary now established. 



WOLF BOUNTIES 

The following is a comparative statement showing annual wolf bounty statistics 
and payments for a period of five years ending with the 1941-42 fiscal period: — 



Period 


Timber 


Brush 


Pups 


Total 


Bounty & 
Expenses 


For year ending Mar. 31, 1938 
For year ending Mar. 31, 1939 
For year ending Mar. 31, 1940 
For year ending Mar. 31, 1941 
For year ending Mar. 31, 1942 


1,022 
1,031 
1,107 
738 
1,199 


837 
723 
614 

400 

577 


30 
41 
22 
8 
37 


1,889 
1,795 
1,743 
1,146 
1,813 


$27,474.24 
25,357.00 
25,058.12 
16,477.43 
40,593.77 



The basic rate of bounty on adult wolves, viz: — $25.00, which was provided by 
regulation dated March 1st, 1941, was in effect in 1941-42, while the bounty on wolf 
pups (animals under the age of three months) remained at $5.00. 

This increased bounty was probably the principal incentive to the intensified 
hunting and trapping of these animals which resulted in an extremely large increase 
in the number of wolves killed and the subsequent applications for the payment of 
bounty. It will be observed upon reference to the foregoing comparative table that 
bounty was paid on a total of 1,813 wolves, which represented an increase of 58 per cent 
over the number on which bounty was paid in the preceding fiscal year. It will also 
be noted that this is the largest number of wolves on which bounty has been paid since 
the year ending March 31st, 1938. 

During the year 1941-42 the Department received 1,350 claims for the payment of 
bounty on a total of 1,834 wolves, twelve of which claims in respect of seventeen pelts 
were refused for various reasons. 



The following is a summary showing in detail the sources of origin and the 
variety of pelts on which application for bounty was made: — 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1941-42 



15 



SUMMARY OF APPLICATIONS FOR WOLF BOUNTY 



County 



Timber 



Brush 



Pups 



Bruce 

Dufferin 

Essex 

Frontenac 

Grey 

Hastings 

Kent 

Lambton , 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox & Addington 

Middlesex 

Norfolk 

Northumberland . . . . 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Peterboro 

Renfrew 

Simcoe 

Stormont 

Victoria 



Total County 



DISTRICT 



Algoma 

Cochrane . . . 
Haliburton . 

Kenora 

Manitoulin . . 
Muskoka . . . . 
Nipissing . . . 
Parry Sound 

Patricia 

Rainy River 
Sudbury , . . . 
Temiskaming 
Thunder Bay 



Total District 



Grand Total 



151 



98 

14 

9 

352 
26 
37 
92 
50 
51 

108 

66 

6 

141 

1,050 



10 


11 








1 








1 





10 


22 








4 





12 


5 


12 


1 


1 





1 


4 





10 


2 








1 





20 


5 








1 








10 


9 





1 





9 


6 








2 





10 


1 





52 


8 





5 


12 


6 


1 








10 


16 






1,201 



114 



65 
4 
7 

92 
102 
6 
9 
4 
6 

57 

84 


43 

479 



27 






12 
1 









13 



593 



40 



Information assembled from the applications for bounty as submitted to the 
Department shows that 525 of these wolves were destroyed by farmers, 511 by Indians, 
330 by trappers, and the remainder by guides, hunters and park rangers. It would 
appear that the use of wire snares was responsible for the taking of practically one 
half of the total, and the remaining half principally by trapping and shooting. 



16 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1943) 



The bounty on wolves which were destroyed in the counties indicated are origin- 
ally paid, in accordance with the provisions of the Wolf Bounty Act, by the county 
authorities, and the Department then remits forty per cent of such bounty pay- 
ments to the county authorities concerned. 

As previously shown the total payments for bounty and incidental expenses 
amounted to $40,593.77, of which $40,529.00 was actual bounty, and the remaining $64.77 
was expenses. 

GENERAL 
TOURIST OUTFITTERS: — 

It is generally admitted that the variety of good fishing and hunting available In 
the Province are not the least of our attractions for tourist visitors. The economic 
value of good hunting and fishing is apparent when it is remembered that the tourist 
trade is one of the leading industries of the Province, and in this connection it is well 
to remember that the intensive efforts which have been made to increase the volume 
of this tourist business is part of our war effort and as such demands the complete 
co-operation of every citizen. 

The regulation and control of hunting and fishing camps which provide accom- 
modation to the tourist trade in northern Ontario was continued in 1941-42. The neces- 
sary licenses to operate were issued to 665 proprietors of such camps, and notwith- 
standing the uncertainty of existing conditions this was a reduction of only two from 
the number of such camps which were provided with licenses in the previous year. Of 
these 610 were issued to resident operators and 55 to non-resident operators. 

These camps are located as set forth in the following tabulation: — 

Algoma 92 

Cochrane 7 

Kenora 158 

Manitoulin 56 

Nipissing 93 

Parry Sound 109 

Patricia 2 

Rainy River 37 

Renfrew 14 

Sudbury 59 

Temiskaming 6 

Thunder Bay 32 

Total 665 

THE BULLETIN: — 

Publication of the Bulletin issued periodically by the Department since August, 
1936, was suspended because of prevailing economic conditions. The final number of 
this very interesting publication was issued for the months of November-December, 
1941. We do anticipate that this suspension is but a temporary measure and that the 
publication of the Bulletin will be recommenced when normal conditions have returned 
to a war-torn world. 

The closing comment of the Editor contained in the last issue is quoted herewith: — 
"We take this opportunity of expressing thanks to all those who 
helped to make the editorial road comparatively smooth, and trust 
our combined efforts have succeeded in stimulating interest in the 
conservation of our Wildlife Natural Resources." 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1941-42 17 



I 



GAME AND FISHERIES ACT: — 

The only amendments adopted applied to the Fisheries Regulations, and the 
principal changes included, — 

(a) (Minor alterations in the dates of the open seasons for pike, yellow pickerel 
and lake trout; 

(b) The provision of minimum size limits with respect to yellow pickerel when 
taken by angling, 13 inches, and for maskinonge, 24 inches; and 

(c) A daily limit of catch was provided to apply to perch when taken by angling, — 
viz: — fifteen (15) per day for the waters of Lake Mindemoya (district of 
Manitoulin), and twenty-five (25) per day for other provincial waters. 

Regulations provided during the year by Order-in-Council not elsewhere referred 
to in this Report included: — 

(a) The issue of permits to authorize the operations of those engaged in the sale 
of gill nets, in accordance with Section 17 of the Game and Fisheries Act, 
and requiring submission to the Department by such permittees of monthly 
returns showing such sales; 

(b) Authorizing the issue of a non-resident angling license for a restricted period 
of time, viz: — three consecutive days, at a fee of $2.00. 

(c) To prohibit the hunting of deer and moose in the territory lying within a 
distance of one and one-half miles on either side of Highway No. 70, between 
Kenora and Fort Frances; and 

(d) An open season for black and grey squirrels in southern Ontario, south of the 
French and Mattawa Rivers and Lake Nipissing, except in the counties of 
Essex and Kent, October 24th, 25th and 29th, and November 1st, and in the 
counties of Essex and Kent, October 24th and 25th, and providing limits of 
catch not to exceed five (5) such animals per day. 



ENFORCEMENT 

The Department's field officers are an essential part of the administration services 
which are provided, and they play an important role in the conservation of the resources 
with the supervision of which we are charged. Every member of this service has an 
extensive district to cover and their work is made less onerous by reason of the co- 
operation they receive from interested sportsmen who devote a measure of their en- 
deavours to seeing that the depredations of the poacher and the law breaker are neither 
countenanced nor permitted. Valuable assistance in this work of enforcement is also 
received from the many members of the Provincial Police force. 

A voluntary group of sportsmen and nature lovers known as Deputy Game and 
Fishery Wardens lend a great deal of moral and practical support in checking and pre- 
venting violations of the provisions which are in effect. These honourary officers are 
supplied with proper identification and under their appointments are provided with the 
necessary authority to take individual action where such is demanded in the instances 
which come under their observation. 

The Department would naturally prefer to find respect for the law so complete 
that prosecutions would not be necessary, but until such a condition does obtain vigor- 
ous action to discourage infractions, minor or otherwise, will continue to be taken. 

In addition to the work of the regular enforcement officers, Provincial Police, 
and Deputy Game and Fishery Wardens a great deal of co-operation and support is 



18 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1943) 



given by the Game and Fish Protective Associations throughout the Province. There 
are close to two hundred of such organizations and they represent the organized effort 
of sportsmen to conserve and protect the provincial wild life resources through edu- 
cational and practical means. They are of great benefit and assistance in consolidat- 
ing public opinion towards a proper appreciation of the value of these resources and 
respect for the legislation and regulations which govern their administration, and from 
the personal experience of their individual members furnish a great deal of practical 
knowledge valuable in the framing of proper and effective laws. 

It should be appreciated that the difficulties of protecting these resources scat- 
tered over such a vast extent of territory are very considerable, and that only the com- 
plete co-operation of the general public will ensure the success of our efforts. The 
majority of sportsmen were never more conservation-minded than they are at present, 
and sporting ideals have reached a high plane. This is a splendid augury for the 
future success not only of the sports of hunting and fishing, as well as of the trapping 
industry, but also for the protection and development of the resources which make 
them possible. 

In the usual performance of their patrol service enforcement officers found it 
necessary to place under seizure various articles of hunting, fishing and trapping 
equipment, as well as game, fish and the pelts of fur-bearing animals taken, in 1,525 
cases in which they had evidence of violations of provisions of the Game and Fisheries 
Act and Regulations. Game and Fisheries Overseers were responsible for this action 
in 1,339 cases. Deputy Game Wardens in 84 cases, Provincial Police Constables in 15 
cases, and in the remaining 87 cases the action was provided by Overseers, Police or 
Deputy Game Wardens acting in co-operation with each other. 

The following is a summary of the articles which were confiscated: — 

Live animals and birds in 10 cases 

Birds, game animals and meat in 147 cases 

Fire-arms and ammunition In 645 cases 

Fish in 162 cases 

Nets and fishing equipment in 167 cases 

Angling equipment in 86 cases 

Pelts and hides in 291 cases 

Traps and trapping equipment in 186 cases 

Canoes, rowboats and motor boats in 33 cases 

Outboard motors in 10 cases 

Motor vehicles in 5 cases 

Flashlights and lanterns in 23 cases 

Spears in 58 cases 

Miscellaneous articles in 32 cases 

The fact that more than one item was reported seized in many of these cases, — 
such as fire-arms and game, venison and deer hides, nets, fish and boats, fishing tackle 
and fish, traps and pelts, spears and lights, as well as other combinations, would be re- 
sponsible for the apparent discrepancy as between the actual number of cases in which 
seizures were reported and the total cases reported in the previous table. 

Confiscated firearms were as follows: — 283 .22 calibre rifles (single shot and re- 
peaters), 11 25-20 rifles, 92 heavy calibre rifles, 203 shotguns (single barrel and double 
barrel), 34 repeating shotguns, 2 automatic shotguns, 3 combination weapons (rifle and 
shotgun barrels), 4 revolvers and 63 air or spring guns. 

Confiscated pelts of fur-bearing animals were as follows: — 335 beaver, 2 fisher, 
42 fox (black, cross and red), 96 mink, 726 muskrat, 4 otter, 4 rabbit, 54 raccoon, 60 
skunk, 12 squirrel and 54 weasel, as well as 37 deer and moose hides. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1941-42 19 



Included among the miscellaneous articles which were seized are three axes, one 
suitcase, one trunk, eight packsacks and haversacks, one tent, thirty-seven duck decoys, 
one box of tools, four batteries, three hounds and two ferrets. 

Charges were laid and prosecutions undertaken in 1,201 cases involving violations 
of provisions of the Game and Fisheries Act and Regulations. Convictions were regis- 
tered and penalties imposed in 1,117 of these cases, in 70 cases the charges were dis- 
missed by the presiding Magistrates, and in 14 cases the charges were subsequently 
withdrawn. These prosecutions were undertaken by Game and Fisheries Officers in 
1,144 cases, by the Provincial Police in 28 cases, in 18 cases by Game and Fisheries 
Officers and Provincial Police Constables acting in co-operation with each other, and 
in 11 cases in which trespass was involved by the property owners concerned. 

REPORT OF THE FISH CULTURE BRANCH 

During the year the department operated twenty-seven hatcheries and rearing 
stations in a satisfactory manner. With the exception of maintenance and necessary 
repairs, additional hatchery construction was not undertaken. 

THE CULTURE AND DISTRIBUTION OF FISH 

speckled Trout: 

In keeping with the objective, in excess of 3,000,000 yearling speckled trout were 
planted in suitable waters. In addition, 16,732 adults and 394,000 fingerlings, which 
could not be accommodated in the hatcheries and ponds, were distributed. 

Brown Trout: • 

The distribution of brown trout yearlings was 37.4 per cent, greater than that 
of the preceding year. 

Brown trout are not planted in waters which continue to support native 
trout in a satisfactory manner. For the most part the distribution of browns has been 
confined to streams in Southern Ontario which have been giving promising results. 
Since 1934 planting in lakes and streams of northern Ontario has been avoided, with 
two or three exceptions; in those particular exceptions speckled trout would not be 
affected. 

Rainbow Trout: 

(a) Steelhead trout — 

Distribution of fingerlings and yearlings of this species was 45 and 40 per cent., 
respectively, lower than that of the preceding year. 

This species is strongly migratory and descends from small streams in which 
it is planted to larger waters. For example, rainbows planted in streams flowing into 
the Great Lakes migrate to the latter probably before their third year and, after sexual 
maturity, return to the streams, spawn and soon after return to the lake again. Ex- 
cepting in the large rivers and lakes where they remain after planting, and these cases 
are apparently few, their value from the angling standpoint is open to question. Plant- 
ing is confined to suitable and large, torrential rivers of the north and also to the 
large, warm rivers of the south where interference with speckled trout is nil or nearly so. 

It is desirable that a check be made in regard to the waters stocked with this 
species to determine the validity of further planting. 

(b) Kamloops trout — 

A concise account of this species was given in the report for 1940. Briefly, it 



20 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1943) 



has excellent game fish possibilities. It will become established in an environment 
similar to that of speckled trout and it is non-migratory. We have evidence to show 
that it has become established in a satisfactory manner in some of the lakes to which 
it has been introduced. 

During the year substantial plantings were made, namely, 88,000 fingerlings and 
25,000 yearlings. 

Lake Trout: 

The total distribution of eyed eggs, fry and fingerling lake trout was 78 per cent, 
greater than in 1940. Progress made in regard to the distribution of fingerlings was 
particularly commendable, namely, 147 per cent, increase over that of the previous year. 

Whitefish: 

There was a decrease in the amount of whitefish fry planted, amounting to 6.8 per 
cent. The decrease was due to weather conditions in Hay Bay, (vicinity of the Bay of 
Quinte). Storms interfered with the operation of nets to such an extent 
that many of the trapped whitefish were liberated. Heavy storms at Little Cur- 
rent and on Lake Wanapitei also interfered with spawn-taking operations. At Kenora 
ice formed on the nets and on the sides of the pounds; this forced the retainers under 
water and liberated 50 per cent, of the whitefish. Immediately after the storm it was 
necessary to remove the nets as the lake was freezing over. At Fort Frances the nets 
were in a protected area but due to ice formation it was necessary to remove them and 
to liberate the fish before spawn-taking operations were completed. On Lake Erie in 
the vicinity of Port Dover, spawn-taking operations have become reduced in recent 
years. Normal conditions will undoubtedly be re-established after the war. 

Fortunately, spawn-taking operations at the west end of Lake Erie, namely, at 
Kingsville were very satisfactory. Moreover, distribution took place sufficiently early 
in the spring of 1942 to be included in the statistics of the fiscal year to which this 
report has reference; otherwise, the decrease in distribution of whitefish fry would 
have greatly exceeded 6.8 per cent. 

Herring: 

The collection of herring eggs is confined to the Bay of Quinte region, Lake 
Ontario, and to Lake Erie. For reasons similar to those cited in the discussion under 
whitefish, distribution of herring fry was 82.4 per cent, lower than that of the previous 
year. 

Yellow Pickerel (Pike-Perch): 

The distribution of pickerel fry was 43 per cent, less than that of the previous 
year. At Glenora hatchery the collection was reduced to about one-third the 1940 take 
due to a storm which destroyed the nets used to collect the pickerel. At Little Cur- 
rent the collection was about average. At Kenora and Fort Frances the collection was 
about 60 per cent, less, due to unusually hot weather prior to the usual spawning time. 
When spawning operations commenced the water temperature was high and, in fact, 
40 per cent, of the pickerel handled had spawned naturally. 

Small-Mouthed Black Bass: 

The greatest effort was put forward to increase the number of black bass finger- 
lings planted, consistent with the facilities available. Reference to Appendix No. 2 
will indicate how successful those efforts have been. The distribution of fingerlings 
was 54 per cent, greater than that of the previous year. At the same time the number 
of fry planted was substantial. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1941-42 21 



Large- Mouthed Black Bass: 

The distribution of large-mouthed black bass fingerlings was 5,500 in 1940 and 
17,700 in 1941. 

It should be stated that only two small ponds were used for this work. 

Yellow Perch: 

The number of perch eggs collected in the vicinity of the Kingsville hatchery, 
Lake Erie, is subject to wide fluctuations each year. Although much lower than some 
previous collections, the 1941 take was 143 per cent, greater than the take of 1940. 

Maskinonge: 

The distribution of maskinonge fry was 10 per cent, less than that of the pre- 
ceding year. In addition, 1,494 fingerlings were planted. 

In the culture of maskinonge, provided the temperature gradient is rising with 
no sudden or serious drops, a good yield of eggs should be obtained and a good hatch 
of fry result. Since the establishment of a maskinonge hatchery at Deer Lake, Peter- 
borough County, much better results have been obtained, as the temperature of the 
water is more constant during the developing and hatching period. 

After feeding starts, the chief obstacles which have not been surmounted, entirely, 
are cannibalism, inadequate food supply and predators. Cannibalism has been over- 
come to some extent at least by encouraging the development of vegetation in the pond; 
this helps to protect the fish from one another. The supply of adequate amounts of 
natural food, since maskinonge fry will not take artificial food, is another means of 
reducing cannibalism. As is well known, maskinonge are voracious feeders and large 
amounts of natural food varying in size from minute water fleas and insects to minnows 
must be provided. Minnows are taken by the maskinonge before the latter are two 
inches in length. The pond is fertilized to stimulate the growth of aquatic life and 
vegetation, thereby increasing the food supply, and facilities are available for raising 
minnows. It was found, however, that these facilities were not sufficient, and it was 
necessary to harvest minnows from adjacent waters. One difficulty in supplying min- 
nows is that they are not always available early enough to keep pace with the require- 
ments of the maskinonge. The forage minnow which was used, although very satis- 
factory from some standpoints, is too late in spawning to be of use in the early feeding 
of the young maskinonge. In order to overcome this difficulty the silvery minnow, an 
early spawner, is now being cultured. 

Aquatic vegetation in a pond acts as a refuge for valuable insects as well as for 
predatory insects. During the year under discussion large numbers of nymphs of the 
large water bug, and also a smaller variety of water bug, developed in the pond. These 
bugs are so constructed that they are difficult to observe among the aquatic vege- 
tation as they have considerable protective resemblance to the neighbouring vegetation 
and to the environment, generally. They are predaceous and have mouth parts adapted 
for piercing and sucking, and they attack not only small fry but sizable fingerlings. 
The nymphs are air breathers and, as it is necessary for them to come to the surface 
of the water to breathe, in order to exterminate them the surface of the water was 
covered with a thin film of gasoline (kerosene or coal oil is equally effective). When 
the larvae were exposed to this treatment for an hour they were destroyed. 

CLOSED WATERS 

One of the practical methods of conserving the breeding stock of fish is to close 
natural water areas to all fishing permanently, or for different periods of time, and in 
these areas the fish thrive without interference and spread to other parts of the same 



22 DEPARTMENT OP GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1943) 



lake or river. By such means a permanent breeding stock is set up, and there is taken 
each year only the natural increase from it. 

In addition to the waters already closed for the natural protection and propa- 
gation of fish, the following were closed during the year, April 1, 1941, to March 31, 1942: 

BEAVER RIVER, 

From the boat houses to the eastern limit of the village of Beaverton, common- 
ly known as "Bass Spawning Beds", closed during the closed season for black 
bass. 

GEORGIAN BAY (Portion located as follows) : 

(a) An area approximately 1 mile square lying west of Electric Island; 

(b) An area approximately 1 mile square lying west of lot 51, concession VIII, 
Township of Harrison, District of Parry Sound; 

(c) An area lying east of and extending approximately 2 miles along the shore 
line opposite concessions XIII and XIV, Township of Harrison, District 
of Parry Sound. 

OSBORNE, RAINBOW, HILL, PROSPECT, TEA and MINK LAKES, 
Township of Bridgland, District of Algoma. 

KEKEKWA LAKE, 

Southeast of Eagle Lake and north of Upper Manitou Lake, District of Kenora. 

TWIN LAKES, 

Township of Hudson, District of Timiskaming; closed to angling May 20 to 
June 28, in each year, to protect black bass. 

WHITBFISH, BASS and CLEAR LAKES, 

Township of Humphrey, District of Parry Sound; prohibiting winter fishing. 

WHITE PINE LAKE, 

Township of Gamble, Timagami Forest Reserve, District of Timiskaming. 

REMOVAL OF COARSE FISH 

During their spawning run, ling were harvested from Crow Lake, Oso Township, 
and Fish Creek (Bobs Lake), Township of Bedford, County of Frontenac, and Otty Lake, 
Township of North Elmsley, County of Lanark. The take was as follows: 

Number of Ling Average Weight Total Weight 

Crow Lake 512 8 lbs. 4,096 lbs. 

Bobs Lake 2,109 9 lbs. 18,981 lbs. 

Otty Lake 79 2 lbs. 158 lbs. 



Total 23,235 lbs., 

or 11.6 tons. 

A thaw set in after the net was set in Gibbs Creek (Otty Lake) which interfered 
with the effectiveness of the operations. 

BIOLOGICAL SURVEYS 

A biological survey of Tanner's Lake, concession VII, lot 31, N. Dumfries Town- 
ship, County of Waterloo, indicated that it was suitable for large-mouthed black bass. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1941-42 23 



A pond at the water-works pumping station in the City of Guelph was suggested 
as a rearing pond for brown trout by the Wellington County Fish and Game Protective 
Association. It was recommended that this pond should be given an experimental trial 
but not on a large scale, as its value for the purpose is doubtful. 

Union Creek, concessions X to XV, Galway Township, County of Peterborough, 
was studied from the standpoint of its suitability for fish and it was recommended as 
being suitable for brown trout. 

The power dam at Healey Falls was examined regarding fish drawn into the 
penstocks. This dam is located on the Trent River near Campbellford. It was recom- 
mended that a grating be installed some distance away from the penstocks. 

The Lynn River, Woodhouse Township, County of Norfolk, was examined for 
possible pollution and its suitability for brown trout. At the time of the in- 
vestigation there was no evidence of active pollution. 

An investigation of the pollution of Guncotton Bay, on the Georgian Bay, vicinity 
of Nobel, was made. It was found that the effluent repelled the fish from the area. If 
it is found necessary to precipitate the toxic substances from solution, thorough fil- 
tration or settling-out methods must be used in order to prevent any permanent dam- 
age to this particular water-area. The damage being done at the time of the investi- 
gation was only of a temporary nature and had no permanent effect on the bottom 
condition of the bay. 

MacGregor Creek, a tributary of the Thames River, in the vicinity of Chatham, 
was investigated and it was found that commercial effluents from industrial plants 
and domestic sewage cause the pollution which should be controlled or eliminated. 

Early in August, residents of Rockland and Clarence reported dead fish of all 
sizes and species on the shores of the Ottawa River. A joint investigation was con- 
ducted by officials of the provinces of Ontario and Quebec, and recommendations were 
submitted on the basis of the enquiry. 

Pollution of the Moira River between Corbyville and Belleville was investigated 
and was found to be caused by industrial wastes, and recommendations were made with 
a view to controlling the wastes in question. The precipitation and settling-out of 
the wastes were not efficient due to the shallowness of the settling basins and the 
porous rock underneath. It was recommended that the use of molasses in the oper- 
ations should be confined to winter months when the water is colder and in greater 
volume. 

An investigation was made in regard to washings of clay and mud into a stream 
from a gravel pit at the northern city limits of Waterloo. It was found that 
the stream bed was covered with clay and mud, that settling basins of adequate capacity 
were required, and that the basins should be dredged out at intervals. Satisfactory 
control of this particular pollution problem was undertaken by those responsible for it. 

During the period, September 8 to 12, 1941, nets of various mesh were set off 
Port Maitland, Lake Erie, for the purpose of determining the efficiency of the different 
mesh for the taking of perch. 

The Ontario Fisheries Research Laboratory of the Department of Zoology, Uni- 
versity of Toronto, continued field and laboratory studies of lakes and streams in 
Algonquin Park, 

Yearling speckled trout were provided by the Ontario Department of Game and 
T'^isheries and were distributed through the co-operation of the Park staff and the 



24 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1943) 



members of the Laboratory. The lakes which were stocked are included in the list in 
Appendix No. 1 under the District of Nipissing. 

The experiment on the alternate annual closure of lakes was continued. The 
purpose of the experiment was to determine the value of the alternate annual closure 
of lakes as a means of increasing and maintaining the stock of game fish in those 
waters. As a part of this plan, lakes adjacent to one another are closed in altern- 
ate years so that any area will have lakes open to fishing each year, and lakes which 
are closed and in which the stock is given every opportunity to increase. In this way 
anglers taking a trip through the Park will find waters open to angling along any 
canoe route which they wish to travel. 

The 21 lakes which were closed in 1940 were open in 1941, and in 1941 there 
were 17 other lakes closed which will in turn be open to fishing in 1942. 

The results of the closures are now becoming evident. The speckled trout are 
showing an immediate favorable response, and the lake trout are responding favorably, 
but more slowly because of their slower rate of growth. The total result is that there 
is an increase in the number of fish available to the angler and the fish are showing 
an increase in size as a result of the closure. These favorable results are much more 
marked in some lakes than in others. 

It is most desirable to carry on this procedure for some time yet on the experi- 
mental basis to properly evaluate its influence upon both the speckled trout and the 
lake trout in the different lakes. 

The rate at which speckled trout grow is quite well known as they have been 
raised in hatcheries where they are often kept for years and the growth of wild trout 
has been determined by studies of the rings formed on the scales. Little is known 
about the rate of growth of lake trout and yet this information is necessary if we are 
to understand the results of the closure of lakes on the lake trout fishery. To this 
end a study of the rate of growth of lake trout in two Algonquin Park lakes has been 
started by Dr. Fry who has found in general that lake trout show approximately the 
following age-length relations: 

Age in years Length in inches 

3 8 

4 10.5 

5 11.5 

6 12.5 

7 13.5 

In order to evaluate more completely the stocking of the lakes and the alternate 
annual closure it is most important that the anglers continue their co-operation as 
they have in the past with the collection of complete creel census of all species of fish 
taken in all the waters of Algonquin Park. 

With the demands of war taking its toll upon the staff of the Fisheries Laboratory 
this co-operation of the anglers is increasingly important and valuable as the reduced 
staff of the Laboratory is finding it increasingly difficult to carry out all the work 
necessary to measure these fish cultural activities, so that we look to the anglers for 
increased assistance in this field. 

The stocking of the lakes, the alternate annual closure, and the measurement 
of the results of these methods are the most important fish cultural activities of the 
Laboratory as a war measure. Most of the other activities have been reduced to a 
minimum for the duration. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1941-42 25 



Work on the insect population of streams as food supply for speckled trout was 
continued on a reduced scale as also was the study of the food of the lake trout and 
the factors responsible for the movement of the game fish at different seasons of the 
year." 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

I cannot close this report without expressing my appreciation of the valuable 
co-operation which was provided throughout the year by the Ontario Federation of 
Anglers and Hunters, and the many local Game and Fish Protective Associations which 
comprise the Federation and by the Northern Ontario Tourist Trade Association. The 
organized efforts of these Federations to develop the spirit of conservation has been 
of inestimable assistance and has resulted in many pleasant and desirable connections. 
Favourable mention might also be made of the genuine assistance and co-operation 
which has at all times been provided by the Township Councils or the Controlling 
Organizations in the Regulated Game Preserves. The success which this scheme has 
attained would probably not have resulted without such co-operation. 

My concluding comments concern the work of the staff. Members of the Depart- 
mental service, both at Toronto and throughout the Province, have been quite con- 
scientious in the performance of their duties, and generally courteous in their contacts 
with the public in their efforts to secure the best results. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I am. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

D. J. TAYLOR, 

Deputy Minister of Game and Fisheries. 



26 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1943) 



APPENDIX No. 1 

SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS, 
APRIL 1st, 1941, to MARCH 31st, 1942. 



LARGE-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

FRY 



Bruce 

Frontenac 

Huron 

Leeds 

Peterborough 
Victoria 



20,000 
10,000 
10,000 
50,000 
10,000 
10,000 



Total 



FINGERLINGS 

Bruce 

Grey 

Lincoln 

Muskoka 

Northumberland 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Simcoe 

Victoria 



Total 



ADULTS 



Oxford 
York . 



Total 



110,000 



500 
500 
1,500 
2,000 
500 
1,300 
8,400 
1,000 
2,000 

17,700 

28 
81 

109 



SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

FRY 



Bruce 

Frontenac 

Grenville 

Haliburton 

Hastings 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox, Addington 

Manitoulin 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Ontario 

Parry Sound 

Peterborough 

Renfrew 

Simcoe 

Stormont 

Sudbury 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

Wellington 



40,000 

35,000 

20,000 

105,000 

60,000 

45.000 

30,000 

25,000 

114,000 

185,000 

80 000 

40.000 

370 000 

167 500 

30.000 

120.000 

5,000 

180 000 

160 000 

80,000 

20,000 



Total 1.911 500 



FINGERLINGS 



Algoma . . 
Brant . . . 
Bruce . . . 
Carleton . 
Cochrane 



112,250 

1,000 

8 600 

1 000 

500 



Elgin 

Frontenac 

Grey 

Haldimand 

Haliburton 

Halton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox, Addington 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Peel 

Peterborough 

Prince Edward . . . 

Renfrew 

Simcoe 

Sudbury 

Thunder Bay 

Timiskaming 

Victoria 

York 



Total 



3,000 

21,200 
2,000 
1.500 
5,500 
1,250 

16,600 
3,800 

10,750 
4,600 
8,000 

79,000 
4,400 

11,000 

122,700 

1,000 

41,000 
1,000 

25.100 
7,500 

10,700 

11,700 
156,775 
8.000 
1,500 
6 000 
3,000 

691 925 



YEARLINGS AND ADULTS 

Algoma 

Brant 

Carleton 

Frontenac 

Hastings 

Lanark 

Leeds : 

Lennox, Addington 

Middlesex ' 

Muskoka 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Peterborough 

Miscellaneous 



Total 



]^fASKINO^GE 



367 
36 
25 
86 

550 
20 
79 

300 
70 

195 
84 

150 

220 
72 



FRY 



Carleton 

Grenville 

Haldimand .... 
Haliburton .... 

Hastings 

Leeds 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Northumberland 

Ontario 

Parry Sound 



2.254 



25 000 
.•^0 000 
10.000 
10,000 

180,000 
40 000 
45 000 
40.000 

165,000 
45 000 
10.000 



Peterborough 1.060 000 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1941-42 



27 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1941, to March 31st, 1942— Continued 



MASKINONGE— Continued 



Prince Edward 

Renfrew 

Simcoe 

Stormont 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

York 



25,000 
50,000 
35,000 
20,000 
280,000 
5,000 
25,000 



Total 2,100,000 

FINGERLINGS 
Nipissing 



r 



Peterborough 
Victoria .... 



300 
794 
400 



Total 



1,494 



PEBCH 

FRY 

Lake Erie 30,600,000 

Lake St. Clair 1,000,000 



Total 31,600,000 

PICKEREL 

EYED EGGS 

Exchange 2,000,000 

Kenora 500,000 

Muskoka 2,000,000 



Total 4,500,000 

FRY 

Algoma 19,700,000 

Bruce 2,200,000 

Carleton 1,500,000 

Cochrane 3,500,000 

Essex 500,000 

Frontenac 9,350,000 

Grenville 1,250,000 

Grey 800.000 

Haldimand 750,000 

Haliburton 1,450,000 

Hastings 5,250,000 

Kenora 20,900,000 

Lanark 6,700,000 

Leeds 3,250,000 

Lennox, Addington 2,050,000 

Manitoulin 9,100,000 

Middlesex 4,500,000 

Muskoka 3,250.000 

Nipissing 8,000,000 

Northumberland 2,800,000 

Ontario 650,000 

Parry Sound 13,050,000 

Peterborough 16,050,000 

Prince Edward 9,790,000 

Rainy River 22,500,000 

Renfrew 6,800 000 

Russell 1,000,000 

Simcoe 7,000 000 

Stormont 500,000 



Sudbury 12,400,000 

Thunder Bay 1,500,000 

Timiskaming 5,850,000 

Victoria 1,100,000 

Great Lakes 18,500,000 



Total 223,490,000 



BROWN TROUT 

FINGERLINGS 



Brant . . . 
Elgin . . . 
Norfolk . 

Total 



YEARLINGS 



Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Durham 

Elgin 

Grey 

Haldimand .... 
Haliburton . . . . 

Halton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Lincoln 

Middlesex 

Norfolk 

Northumberland 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough . . 

Simcoe 

Timiskaming . . 

Waterloo 

Welland 

Wellington .... 
Wentworth .... 

York 

Miscellaneous . 



Total 



Exchange 



LAKE TROUT 

EYED EGGS 



FRY 

Frontenac 

Hastings 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox, Addington . . . 

Peterborough 

Rainy River 

Thunder Bay 

Great Lakes 



Total 



10,000 
40,000 
10,000 



60,000 



17,800 

32,800 
3,600 
6,200 

24,750 

47,700 

1,000 

150 

26,400 
9,800 

12,000 
1,000 
2,000 
1,000 
3,850 

28.050 
5,300 
1,800 

10 200 
5400 
3.600 

15,790 

36,000 
1,800 

10,800 
4,100 

24,100 

1.200 

7,600 

698 



346,188 



800,000 



161,000 

102.500 

8,000 

17,500 

34,000 

80,000 

330,000 

120.000 

60,000 



913,000 



28 



DEPARTMENT OP GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1943) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OP PISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1941, to March 31st, 1942— Continued 



LAKE TROUT— Continued 

PINGERLINGS 

Algoma 636,200 

Cochrane 60,000 

Haliburton 290,500 

Hastings 40,000 

Kenora 345,000 

Leeds 5,000 

Lennox, Addin^ton 10,000 

Manitoulin 90,000 

Muskoka 350,000 

Nipissing 220,000 

Parry Sound 295,000 

Peterborough 5,000 

Rainy River 205,200 

Renfrew 180.000 

Simcoe 75.000 

Sudbury 210,000 

Timiskaming 144.000 

Great Lakes 14.905,500 



Total 18,066,400 



RAINBOW TROUT 

PINGERLINGS 

Algoma 

Nipissing 

Sudbury 

Timiskaming 

Miscellaneous 



Total 



YEARLINGS 



100,000 

5,000 

33,500 

24,000 

1,500 



Dufferin 

Elgin 

Haliburton . . 

Norfolk 

Simcoe 

Miscellaneous 



164,000 



3,600 
500 
1,500 
2,500 
1,500 
2,150 



Total 



Algoma . 
Sudbury 

Total 



KAMLOOPS TROUT 

PINGERLINGS 



11,750 



84,650 
3,500 



YEARLINGS 



Bruce 

Grey 

Muskoka . . . . 
Parry Sound 
Peterborough 
Timiskaming 
Miscellaneous 

Total . . . 



88,150 



1,500 
2.900 
13,500 
3,300 
1,500 
2,000 
300 



SPECKLED TROUT 

PINGERLINGS 

Algoma 105,000 

Grey 22,000 

Muskoka 1,000 

Nipissing 5,000 

Northumberland 110,000 

Peel 150,000 

Miscellaneous 1,000 



Total 



YEARLINGS 



Algoma •. 

Brant 

Bruce 

Cochrane . .♦ 

Dufferin 

Durham 

Elgin 

Prontenac 

Grey 

Haliburton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kenora 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox, Addington 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Norfolk 

Northumberland 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Peel 

Peterborough 

Renfrew 

Simcoe 

Sudbury 

Thunder Bay 

Timiskaming 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

Wellington 

York 

Miscellaneous ... 



394,000 



514,150 

500 

16,000 

176,700 

33,700 

18,250 

2,600 

48,526 

167,400 

43,300 

113,480 

7,100 

9,000 

13,200 

1,600 

"41,500 

1,000 

100,000 

160,000 

194,220 

7,350 

21,950 

12,000 

750 

162,400 

12,800 

48,191 

119,020 

27,500 

338,900 

494,800 

136,600 

1,100 

2,550 

5,100 

500 

17,237 



Total 3,060,174 



ADULT 



Algoma 

Thunder Bay 
Timiskaming 
Miscellaneous 



4,250 

5,287 

6,620 

575 



25,000 



Total 



16,732 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1941-42 



29 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
April 1st, 1941, to March 31st, 1942— Continued 



WHITEFISH 

FRY 

Kenora 18,180,000 

Prince Elward 16,000,000 

Rainy River 11,811,000 

Simcoe 3,000,000 

Thunder Bay 250,000 

Great Lakes 326,719,500 



HERRING 

FRY 

Carleton 500,000 

Frontenac 300,000 

Hastings 200,000 

Lennox, Addington 900,000 

Prince Edward 3,000,000 

Great Lakes 3,730,000 



Total 375,960,500 



Total 8,630,000 



30 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1943) 

APPENDIX No. 2 
DISTRIBUTION OF FISH ACCORDING TO SPECIES— 1937 TO 1941, INCLUSIVE 



Larsre-mouthed Black Bass 

Fry 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings & Adults 

Small-mouthed Black Bass 

Fi-y 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings & Adults 



Maskinonge 

Eyed Eggs 

Fry 

Fingerlings 



Perch— Fry 



Pickerel (Yellow) 
Eyed Eggs 

Fry 

Adults 



Pickerel (Bloc) 
Fry 



Brown Trout 

Fingerlings 
Yearlings 

Lake Trout 

Eyed Eggs 

Fry 

Fingerlings 



Atlantic Salmon 

Fry 

Fingerlings 
Yearlings . 

Rainbow Trout 

Fingerlings 
Yearlings . 
Adults 



Kamloops Trout 

Fingerlings 
Yearlings . 

Speckled Trout 

Eyed Eggs 
Fingerlings 
Yearlings . 
Adults 



Whitefish 



Eyed Eggs 
Fry 



Herring 

Eyed Eggs 
Fry 



Miscellaneous 



TOTALS 



1937 



135.000 

4,120 

92 



1,275,000 

141,900 

5,893 



420,700 



9,150,000 



2,000,000 
263,743,400 



1.000,000 



97.484 



8,225,000 

4,667.000 

15,782,350 



7,200 



105,240 



80,000 



884.725 

L. 167.073 

16.150 



4.000.000 
383.683.900 



80.000 
5,270,000 



3,053 



1938 



57,500 
8.061 



804,000 

169,800 

7,738 



2,005,000 



59,150,000 



2,012,500 
271,567,500 



500,000 



59,592* 



2,487,000 

7,665,000 

10,575,200 



4,800 



321,600 
6,727 



25,821 



1,000 

873,314 

2.083.538 

4.452 



823,700.500 



49.725,000 



1939 



1,890 
497 



1,386,000 

226.825 

7,739 



120,000 

2.675,000 

1,300 

72.360.000 



7.000.000 
327.500.000 



29,954 
375.070 



1.845.850 
7,236.900 
9.964.400 



109.635 

23,145 

1.009 



105.000 



337.000 

2.97&.559 

6.315 



826,657.000 



88.550.000 
41 



696,395.280 733,265.643 799.496,629 886,995,903 



1940 



230.000 

5.500 

152 



2,512.500 

449.154 

1.671 



2.345.000 
2.333 

13.000.000 



2,000.000 

393.887.000 

100 



182,725 
252,000 



575,000 
7.564.000 
7.812.100 



46.385 



298.420 
19.724 



26,500 



611.375 

3.278,114 

7,150 



403.389.000 



49.050,000 



1941 



110,000 

17.700 

109 



1.911.500 

691.925 

2.254 



2.100.000 
1.494 



31.600,000 



4,500.000 
223.490.000 



60.000 
346,188 



800.000 

913.000 

18.066.400 



164.000 
11.750 



88.150 
25.000 



394,000 

3.060.174 

16,732 



175,960,500 



8,630,000 



672,960,876 



♦ Yearlings and adults. 



32 DEPARTMENT OP GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1943) 



APPENDIX 

GAME AND FISHERIES 
Statistics of the Fishing Indusitry in tlie Public Waters of 

EQUIP 



District 



No. 

of 

Men 



TUK8 



No. 



Tons 



Value 



Gasoline 
Launches 



No. 



Value 



Sail and 
Row Boats 



No. 



Value 



Gill Nets 



Yards 



Value 



Northern Inland Waters 

Lake Superior 

North Channel 

Georgian Bey 

Lake Huron 

Lake St. Clair 

Lake Erie , 

Lake Ontario 

Southern Inland Waters 

Totals 



734 
396 
126 
436 
284 
130 
784 

541 

177 



34 
360 
149 

4821 
384 



42 



827 



$ 11.450] 

64,500 

36.800 

120.556 

101,300 



287,300 



159 

104 

37 

120 

90 

40 

149 

204 

7 



70,9751 

44.6801 

18,750 I 

100,7371 

58,9041 

14,2001 

194.4151 

111.8601 

7701 



I 

303| 

70| 

431 

1201 

26| 

751 

1201 

101| 

73| 

I 



$14,4501 
4.5501 
2.2401 
5.661! 
2.5901 
4,0601, 
6,095| 
3,7441 
2,7381 . 
I 



469.1231 

830.2371 

539.4201 

1,419.3031 

1.350.6201 



$ 61,940 

111,205 

55,635 

153,716 

154,077 



2,225,5201 367,054 
1,292.2301 137,285 
I 



I ' I II I 

3.6081 107| 2,236| $621.906| 910 | $615,2911 

< II II I 



I I 1$ 

931| $46,1281 8,126,45311,040,912 

I I I 



APPENDIX 

QUANTITIES OF 



District 



Herring: 



lbs. 



Whitefish 



lbs. 



Trout 



lbs. 



Pike 



lbs. 



Pickerel 
(Blue) 



lbs. 



Pickerel 
(Dore) 



Ibf 



Northern Inland Waters 

Lake Superior 

North Channel , 

Georgian Bay , 

Lake Huron 

Lake St. Clair 

Lake Erie , 

Lake Ontario 

Southern Inland Waters 



7, 
63, 

188 



143| 
139| 
983| 
7191 
,5941 



115, 
1.921, 



559] 

835 



1.328, 
314. 

85. 
747. 



3,358 
441, 



1341 

8871 
128| 
9831 
058 
518 
647 
577 



I 

164,8081 

1,298.4851 

211.5971 

1.501.6311 

1,109,7861 




69,021 


8601 


1,494,108 


9,398 


18.152] 


115.296 


66.947 


1 


12.839 


24.873 


... ] 


57 157 


1.241 


1501 


1941805 


34.019 


200] 


83,237 


46,522 


1.543,808 


347.324 


47,099 


57,779 


6.647 


2.016 







Totals 



3.736.9721 6,369.9321 4,412,137| 1,101,136| 



1,620.9491 2.311,413 

I 





1 1 
.061 .11: .11 

1 1 


.06 

] 


.05! .11 




Values 


1 

$186,848.60] $700,692.52 

1 


$485,335.07] 


$66,068.16 
1 


1 

$81,047,451 $254,255.43 

1 





ANNUAL REPORT, 1941-42 



33 



No. 3 

DEPARTMENT, ONTARIO 

the Province of Ontario, for the year ending December 31st, 1941. 

MENT 



Seine Nets 



No. Yards 



Value 



Pound Nets 



No. 



Value 



Hoop Nets 



No. 



Value 



Dip and 
Roll Nets 



No. 



Value 



Night Lines 



No. 
Hooks 



Value 



Spears 



No. 



Value 



Freezers & 
Ice Houses 



No, 



Value 



Piers and 
Wharves 



No. 



Value 



Total 
Value 



6i 1,0001 $ 8501 



27! 
321 

61 



7, 1001 

9,0801 

5901 

2,860| 



3.9051 

6,3751 

5051 

2,3001 

I 



I ! 

20,630!$13,935 
I I 



45 


1 
$15,470 


57 


22,600 


40 


16,950 


79 


76,480 


103 


63,500 


112 


13,650 



55 



52 



5531 276.9501 



3 

10 

345 



$ 991 



725 



475 

1,500 

9,135 

3,798 

I 



$ II 



1,580 
4 



201 

737 

461 



21,300 

7,216 

3.300 

900 

2,100 

600 



$3131 

5 



2,994| 

8151 

181 

26 



151 



124 


$30 


65 


22 


32 


12. 


56 


16 


57 


26 


24 


9 


109 


176 


32 


7 


16 


1 



I I 



I I 

101 

48 
27 
2501 53 
1761 24 
1501 17 
2901 87 
9201 26 
,3951 1 



I I 

9S9|$485,600! 



634116,6241 
I I 



391 $808( 37,000|$4.432| 1 '515 

ill! I I 



$302 



$12, 
12, 



486 384 $112, 

I I 



$218,040 

282,695 

151,750 

508,254 

413,628 

49,413 

1,348,625 

276,674 

11.362 



319 $3,260,441 

I 



No. 4 



FISH TAKEN 



Sturgeon 



Eels 



lbs. 



tbs. 



Perch 



lbs. 



TuUibee 



lbs. 



Catfish 



tbs. 



Carp 



lbs. 



Mixed 
Coarse 



tbs. 



Caviare 



tbs. 



Total 



lbs. 



Value 



! 57,563 




18.884 


116.999 

81,081 

6,147 

202.660 

233,266 


42,639 


1 
10,241 


I 

392.9331 

163.3141 

134,644 

77.588 

85.450 

363.867) 

1.079,278 

172.570 

275.002 . 

1 


1 
1,4151 


4.503.748 
• 3.435,702 

541.655 
2.733.587 
2.147.953 

992.370 
8.950.762 
3,126.414 

517.440 


$429,182.41 
273.826.19 


1.950 





3.233 
1.027 





12.274 

4.336 

208.705 

65.998 

2.050.050 

92.569 

7,365 


94 
5,486 
20,899 
99.876 
108.481 
87.646 
82,397 


672 

47,103 

6,386 

333.628 

286.835 

150.232 

148,498 

1 


971 

24 

445 

3401 

643 

12 


44.921.17 
276.356.01 


i 5,168 
1 10,587 


100 


194.751.18 
54,733.38 


i 13.575 




657.394.95 


I 6.245 


16.413 
2,162 




192.935.92 


1 




22,907.27 






1 




1 

1 99.348 

1 


18,675 


2.460,181 


640.153 


447,518 


1 
983.5951 


1 
2.744.6461 

1 


2.976 


26,949.631 






1 

1 .40 


.07 


.05 


.06 


.08 


.051 
1 


1 

.031 

1 


1 

i.ool. 

1 






' 






1 $39,739.20 


$1,807.25 


$123,009.05 


S38.409.18 


$35,801.44 


$49,179.75 


$82,889.38 


$2,976.00 . 




$2,147,008.48 



34 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1943) 

APPENDIX No. 5 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE YIELD OF THE FISHERIES OF ONTARIO 



Kind 



Herring 

Whitefish 

Trout 

Pike 

Pickerel (Blue) 
Pickerel (Dore) 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed Coarse . . 
Caviare 



TOTALS 27,966.956 26,949,631 



1940 
Pounds 



3,597,785 

6,368,617 

4,364,071 

1,216,234 

2,118,383 

2,515,381 

147,143 

34,678 

2,471,482 

806,897 

401,934 

1,119,538 

2,799,865 

4,948 



1941 
Pounds 



3,736,972 

6,369,932 

4,412,137 

1,101,136 

1,620,949 

2,311,413 

99,348 

18,675 

2,460,181 

640,153 

447,518 

983,595 

2,744,646 

2 976 



Increase 
Pounds 



139,187 
1,315 

48,066 



45,584 



Decrease 
Pounds 



115,098 

497,434 

203,968 

47,795 

16,003 

11,301 

166,744 

135,553 

55,219 

1,972 



■1,017,325 



* Net Decrease 

APPENDIX No. 6 
STATEMENT OF THE YIELD OF THE FISHERIES OF ONTARIO— 1941 



Kind 



Herring 

Whitefish 

Trout 

Pike 

Pickerel (Blue) 
Pickerel (Dore) 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Carp 

Mixed Coarse . 
Caviare 

TOTALS 



Quantity 
Pounds 



3,736,972 

6,369,932 

4,412,137 

1,101,136 

1,620,949 

2,311,413 

99,348 

18,675 

2,460,181 

640,153 

447,518 

983,595 

2,744,646 

2,976 



26,949,631 



Price per 
Pound 



.05 
.11 
.11 
.06 
.05 
.11 
.40 
.07 
.05 
.06 
.08 
.05 
.03 
1.00 



Estimated 
Value 



$186,848.60 

700,692.52 

485,335.07 

66,068.16 

81,047.45 

254,255.43 

39,739.20 

1,307.25 

123,009.05 

38,409.18 

35,801.44 

49,179.75 

82,339.38 

2,976.00 



$2,147,008.48 



APPENDIX No. 7 

ESTIMATED VALUE OF FISH TAKEN FROM THE WATERS 

OF THE PROVINCE 

1922—1941 INCLUSIVE 



1922 $2,807,525.21 

1923 2,886,398.76 

1924 3,139,279.03 

1925 2,858,854.79 

1926 2,643,686.28 

1927 3,229,143.57 

1928 3,033,944.42 

1929 3,054,282.02 

1930 2,539.904.91 

1931 2,442,703.55 



1932 $2,286,573.50 

1933 2.186,083.74 

1934 2,316,965.50 

1935 2,633,512.90 

1936 2.614.748.49 

1937 2.644.163.49 

1938 2.573 640.97 

1939 2,564,516.37 

1940 2.226,418.18 

1941 2,147,008.48 



Thirty-Sixth AniJiyol Report 



OF THE 



Game and Fisheries 

Department 



PRINI'IID BY ORDER OF 

1TIE I,EGISIATIVE ASSEMBLY OF OISITARIO 
SE,SSIONAL PAPER No. 9, -1944 




ONTARIO 



TORONTO 
Printed and Publis^hed by T. E. Bowman, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 4 4 



TO THE HONOURABLE ALBERT MATTHEWS, 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontaiio. 

MAY IT PLEASE YOUR HONOUR: 

The uaderHigaed haa the hoaour to pre.seat tlie Thirty-sixth Aanual Report of the 
Department of Game aad Fisheries for the Province of Ofcitario, for tlie year ending 3 1st 
March, 1943. 

Respectfully submitted, 



G. H. DUNBAR, 

Minister in Charge, 
Deportment of Game ond Finhci-ies. 



1 



THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Department of Game and Fisheries of Ontario 



TO :THE HONOURABLE G. H. DUNBAR, 

Minister in Charge, 

Department of Game and Fisheries: 

SIR— 

I have the honour to submit to you herewith the Thirty-sixth Annual Report of the 
Department of Game and Fisheries* outlining a summary of the activities of the various 
Departmental services, and including condensed statistics for the fiscal year ended March 
31st, 1943, as well as certain comparative tables. 



INTRODUCTORY 

The natural resources of a nation form the foundation of a stable economic superstruc- 
ture and its resultant wealth. 

Wild-life is an integral part of the natural resources of the Province of Ontario, and 
an evaluation of its worth will show that it is an important part of the total economy of the 
entire Dominion. Briefly, it provides a measure of food and clothing, (fish, flesh and fur), 
through the usual channels of industry and through the sporting activities of countless 
thousands of our residents to whom its pursuit affords pleasure and healthful exercise; it 
creates employment for thousands of our citizens in the important fur industry and its 
related activities, in the commercial fishing industry, in the manufacture and supply of 
necessary equipment, as well as for an army of guides, whose business it is to know where and 
how it may be obtained; it is the greatest asset of our tourist trade, in normal times one of 
the principal industries of the Province, and which plays an important part in fostering 
those friendly relations which have prevailed and which now prevail between us and our 
neighbours to the south. 

"While the economic value of the wild-life of this Province can thus be computed in 
monetaiy terms, it has a moral and recreational value which is of even greater importance 
particularly to our own residents, for it is the incentive which attracts countless thousands of 
people into the great outdoors, where the environment of field and stream is conducive to 
health, happiness and good citizenship. 

Wild-life is a public trust- in which eveiy citizen of the Province has an equity, and 
the administrative policies of the Department have been formulated and developed on that 
premise. It is essential that this division of our natural resources shall not be impaired and 
that its perpetuation shall be assured. Having this in mind the work of the Department 
has been directed towards the protection and rehabilitation of these resources and the 
progressive development of conservation policies intended to promote wise use without 
reduction of existing stock. Details of how these plans have been advanced during the period 
under review, as well as information on the present status of such resources, will be found 
elsewhere in this report. 

The broad policy of conservation which has characterized administrative control for 
more than three decades has assumed a new importance during the present emergency. The 
public liae become deeply conscious of the value of conservation as an aid to economic security 

CD 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 (1944) 



ihrough the necessity for regulating supply and demand as determined by our war effort. 
This in turn has emphasized the contribution which wild-life makes to the food supply of the 
nation, and the necessity for public co-operation in its protection and sane use. The success 
of Departmental plans for maintaining an adequate reserve of fish and game to meet ever 
increasing demands depends in large measure upon public support, and it is pleasing to note 
that this phase of the conservation programme continues to receive encouragement and 
i^timulation through the efforts of organized sportsmen. 

Despite the national emergency and the curtailment of many activities occa-sioned 
thereby, provision has been made whereby it has been possible to carry on the essential work 
of the Department for the achievement of the foregoing objectives. 

FINANCIAL 

The following table shows the totaJ revenue collected by this Department during this 
particular fiscal year. It outlines the various sources from which this revenue is derived 
and in detail gives the respective amount collected from each of these sources: — 

REVENUE FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING MARCH 3lst, 1943 



ORDINARY- 
MAIN OFFICE 
GAME— 

Licenses — 

Trapping 

Non-resident huntn 

Deer 

Moose 

Gun 

Dog 

Fur Dealers 

Fur Farmers 

Tanners 

Cold Storage 



Royalty 



FISHERIES— 

Licenses — 

Fishing 
Angling 



(Commercial) 



Royalty 

GENERAL— 

Licenses — 

Tourist Camps 
Guides 



Fines .. .; 

Costs Collected ( Erif orcemeiit of Game Act) 
Sales— Confiscated Articles, etc 



$ 39,602.45 

93,245.00 

118,083.55 

4.372.50 

102,244.90 

6.450.55 

26,288.00 

6.250.00 

130.00 

209.00 



396,876.01 
122,032.15 



74.355.00 
306,263.85 

380618,85 
10,152.32 



6.565.00 
6340.00 

13.405.00 

17.718.20 

546.01] 

14,779.25 



$518,908.16 



$390,771.17. 



ANNUAL TIEPORT, 1942-43 



Rent, 


3,149.00 
L758.55 
1,315.56 




Commission — Retained by Piiovjl.'. ... -ale of Licenses 

Miscellaneous - . . . . 






52.671.56 






Net Ordinary Revenue 




$962,350.89 



I 



The total collections represent a decline of more than $220,000.00 a.s compared with the 
jevenu(? produced in the previous fiscal year. The principal reason for this decrease is the 
reduced amount of fees received from the sale of non-resident licenses, both angling and 
Ir.mting. In 1941-42 the revenue from the sale of these licenses reached the impressive total 
of $600,884.95. The amount received this year from this source was S399.508.85. a decrease 
of more than $201 '000.00. This decrease had been anticipated and was unquestionably due 

) a condition to which reference was made in our previous Annual Report, viz: — the United 
-tates now being involved in war would necessarily result in restrictions on travel and trans- 

ortation facilities, which with the added necessity of stern application to the producton of 

]tal war material, would undoubtedly result in a very noticeable decrease in the number of 
\merican citizens visiting this country for vacation purposes. Other important reductions 

1 the collection of revenue when compared with that of the previous fiscal year will be 
Ml)served in the amounts received from the sale of commercial fishing license.s^ which 
decreased $13,500.00. from penalties imposed on those convicted of violations of provisions 
of the Game and Fisheries Act, and from the sale of articles confiscated following .such con- 

ictioris, which decreased $16,000.00' and from fur royalties, which decreased $8,500.00. It 
tnay, however, be of interest to make reference to the fact that the amount of $231,151.56 
received from the sale of various types of hunting licenses to residents of Ontario was 
?29,000 00 in excess of the amount derived from the same source in the preceding year. 

The following tables include details with reference to the sale of hunting and angling 
licenses: 



ANGLING LICENSES ISSUED 

Non-resident : — 

Individual (Seasonal) 27-330 

Individual (Three-day) 31,597 

Family 14.388 

Manitoba Resident r. 697 

Boys' Camp 20 

HUNTING LICENSES ISSUED 

. . Resident: — 

Deer 31.530 

Deer (Camp) 373 

Deer (Farmers') 7.288 

Moose 780 

Gun 118,268 

Non-resident : — 

Small Game L473 

Deer 1^518 

General '9^ 

Bear (Spring Season) 232 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1944) 



statem^^:- '' '^'''-^'-^' ^oth ordmary aad capital, are set forth m the followiog 
EXPENDITURE FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st 



1943. 



ORDINARY— 



Main Office 
General 



$ 52,385.16 

39,950.68 

Enforcement .„ 209.647.93 

Game Animals and Birds 17.949.05 

MacdJannid 3 573 20 

Biological and Fish Culture Branch 205,599.97 

Grants 5,400.00 

Wolf Bounty 33,606.62 

Special Warrant— Bear Bounty 3,640.00 



Total Ordinary $571,852.61 

Capital 2,879.88 



Total Expenditure *574.:32.49 



The principal items of expenditure were made for the payment of salaries and expenses 
of members of the Enforcement Service and for the maintenance of services provided by the 
Biological and Fish Culture Branch in connection with the raising, distribution and the 
planting of fish in suitable waters throughout the Province. More details of the work 
performed by these two important branches of the Department will be found further on in 
this report. 

There is an additional item of expenditure included in this statement, i.e., for the 
payment of bounty on bears killed in certain sections of the Province, as provided by the 
Order-in-Council dated August 19th, 1942, more details of which regulation and expenditure 
nre also incorporated later on in this report. 

The sum of $5-400.00 which was provided for the payment of grants was allotted aa 
follows:— $2,500.00 to the Ontario Fur Breeders Association to augment the funds of this 
organization and to permit them to continue their services on behalf of fur farmers who are 
established and operating in Ontario; $500.00 to the Ontario Federation of Anglers and 
Hunters for their educational campaign, one of the principal objectives of which is to 
emphasize the importance of proper observance of provisions of the Game and Fisheries Act; 
$500.00 to Professor W. J. K. Harkness for his services in connection with fish culture research 
and which services are supplementary to those provided by Departmental Biologists; and the 
remainmg $1,900.00 to Mr. Jack Miner, Mr. Thomas N. Jones and Miss Edith L. Marsh, who 
provide sanctuaries for birds, both migratory and native species, on their properties located 
respectively in the counties of Essex, Elgin and Grey. 

From the year's operations it will be noted that there was a surplus of $387,618.40' 
which may be considered a satisfactory condition. 

The following table details* Departmental revenue and expenditure for the various fiscal 
years from and including the period ended March 31st, 1936:— 






ANNUAL REPORT 1942-43 



Revenue Expenditure Surplus 
(Ordinary & Capital) 

1935-36 $ 683,938.72 $451,041.91 $232,896.81 

1936-37 782,217.63 474,128.95 318,088.68 

1937-3S 866,558.19 563,938.33 302,619.86 

1938-39 914,475.24 575,437.79 339,037.45 

1939-40 1,015,350.82 568,198.55 447,152.27 

1940-41 .'. 984.800.69 512,834.70 471,965.99 

1941-42 1,183,269.29 576,762.26 606,507.03 

1942-43 962,350.89 574,732.49 387,618.40 



GAME 

Herewith is a summaiy of conditions as they apply to the various species of game 
anJrnaJs and birds found in Ontario, which information has been compiled from reports secured 
from officers of the enforcement service throughout the Province: — 

DEER: — Generally speaking in those portions of the Province in which the regular open 
f-eason for the hunting of deer has been in effect conditions with reference to the prevalence 
of these animals have continued to be quite satisfactory. The period during which they 
may be lawfully taken as at present provided is not excessively lengthy, and those sportsmen 
who avail themselves of this opportunity for recreation have displayed an earnest desire to 
co-operate with the Department in complying with various regulations which govern and 
which have been provided by the Legislature and which are established on the premise that 
they are necessary for the future welfare of the existing deer herds. There is good reason 
to believe that the fine quality of hunting which is at present available in the various deer 
sections of this Province will prevail for the enjoyment of generations to come, provided 
there is no relaxation in the present regulations which apply and that the existing co-operation 
of hunters continues, and also that there arises no contingency detrimental to the existence of 
this species which is at present unforeseen. In many areas in the extreme southwestern 
portion of the Province in which this species has been provided the protection of an entire 
closed period for the past several years there has been a noticeable increase in the number of 
tliese animals and which improvement has resulted on some occasions in complaint to the 
Department regarding damage to field crops. The popularity of this branch of hunting is 
levealed in the fact that the number of Ontario residents who purchased licenses to hunt deer 
during the open season of 1942, exclusive of those who purchased farmer's licenjses, showed 
an increase of twenty-five per cent over the number who purchasd such licenses during the 
previous year, or an increase of 6,305 in actual numbers. 

The general open season for deer in Division (d), i.e., Southern Ontario, exclusive of 
the southwestern counties and certain eastern counties, was provided by order-in-council 
to extend from November 2nd to November I7th. The same period of open season was also 
piovidod for that portion of the County of Carleton lying west of the Rideau River, (excepting 
the Township of Marlborough) and for the Township of Roxborough in the County of 
Slormont. In the Counties of Simcoe, Dufferin, Grey and Bruce and the northern portion 
of the County of Huron the hunting of deer was permitted during the period from November 
16th to 21st, with the provision that no dogs were to be used during this open season. 

The Counties of Northumberland, Durham and Prince Edward and that portion of the 
County of Ontario lying south of the north boundaries of Brock and Scott Townships as well 
as the Township of Cambridge in the County of Russell, were included among the areas in 
which the hunting of deer was prohibited at all times. 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1944) 



MOOSE :^-Conditions applicable to moose showed no important changes during the year. 
Some slight increase was reported in scattered areas in the northern uortion of the Province 
which are favourable to their existence, but as a general rule they are not found in sufficient 
numberfc- to justify any extensive hunting. The protection at present provided would appear 
to be essential for the continued existence of this species. The usual period of open season 
provided by the Game and Fisheries Act was in effect m Northern Ontario, while a restricted 
period of open season, extending from October 15th to 30th. 1942, was established by Regula- 
tion effective in those portions of the Districts of Nipissing, Sudbury and Temiskaming defined 
in clau.se (i) of subsection (b) of Section 7, and in the District of Rainy River and those 
portions of the Districts of Kenora and Thunder Bay defined in clause (ii) of subsection (b) 
of Section 7 of the Game and Fisheries Act. 

CARIBOU: This species exists only in very limited numbers and in but few isolated 

fAreas. The hunting of caribou is prohibited at all times, and this complete protection would 
appear to be quite necessary for the majntenance of this species even in its present limited 
proportion^. 

ELK: — Little improvement has been reported from the various sections in which these 
animals are to be found. The original stock was brought into the Province several years ago 
from Western Canada, and limited numbers were liberated on subsequent occasions in suitable 
portions of the Counties of Bruce and Peterborough, and in the Districts of Nipissing, Sud- 
bury, Algoma and Thunder Bay. Some specimens are also located on Beausoleil Island in 
Georgian Bay off the county of Simcoe. • The original importations were placed on the 
Petawawa Crown Game Preserve- in the County of Pembroke, where numerous specimens 
still exist. 

BUFFALO: — These animals are to be found only on lands in (he Burwash Crown Game 
Preserve in the District of Sudbury, where they were placed after being brought from Alberta 
in 1939. Little increase has been reported. 

BEAR: — Bear continue to be quite plentiful throughout (lie nortliern portion of the Provmce 
and increased numbers were reported from man5'^ areas. The hunting of this species provides 
some measure of sport and recreation and as has been stated previously in this report, the 
Department disposed of two hundred and thirty-two non-resident liceiLses for the taking of 
bear during the 1942 spring season, i.e., from April 1st to June 15th. 

During the year a regulation was provided to authorize the payment of a bountv of 
?10.00 on each bear killed in defence or preservation of live-stock or property. Tiiis regu- 
lation applied only to bears over the age of twelve months which had been killed in^ any 
township in which not less than twenty-five per cent of the total area is devoted to agriculture 
and which are located in Northern Ontario, the Districts of Parry Sound, Muskoka and 
Haliburton and in the Counties of Bruce, Frontenac, Hastings- Lennox and Addington, 
Peterborough, Renfrew and Victoria, and was payable only in respect to bear killed by a 
resident of the Township in which such bear was actually killed. 

RABBITS: — Reports received in the Department would indicate that the various species 
of rabbit y^hich inhabit the different sections of the Province were quite plentiful, and 
boeaking generally, there would appear to have been some increase in their numbers in many 
districts. Cotton-tail rabbits prevail throughout the western and central portions of southern 
Ontario, the European hare, or jack rabbit, throughout the southwestern counties generally, 
while hnow-shoe rabbiia, or varying hare, are to be found m tne northeru and eastern portiom 
of Southern Ontario and tmoughout that portion of the Provmce lying north and west of the 
Mattawa and French Rivers and Lake Nipissing. In some portions of the south-central and 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1942-43 



eastern counties some decrease was reported d\ie to the prevalence of fox. The hunting of 
rabbits continued to provide excellent sport during the late fall and early winter months for 
a multitude of interested sportsmen. 

PARTRIDGE: — During the period under review there was some decline throughout the 
Province in the numbers of partridge, though the various species of this fine game bird 
continued to be sufficiently plentiful to warrant the provision of a short open season, with a 
restricted take. The general open season, which was effective, covered two periods- viz: 
October 3rd to 17th and November 2nd to 14th, with a limit of five birds per day and not 
ntore than twenty-five in all over the two periods. In the Townships established as Regulated 
Game Preserve Areas the dates on which partridge could be taken coincided with those 
provided for the taking of pheasants therein, with a limit of five birds per day. The shooting 
of partridge was also permitted in the County of Lambton on O^ctober 31st, and in the 
counties of Essex and Kent, on October 29th, 30th and 31st,, with a bag limit in each case of 
five birds per day. 

HUNGARIAN PARTRIDGE:— There are but few sections of Ontario which these birds are 
reported to inhabit, and those areas are restricted in extent, being chiefly in the extreme 
southwestern counties and in two or three of the eastern counties. Such as are to be found 
here have resulted from ne-stocking undertaken by the Department in previous years. 
8hootmg of this species was restricted to the Counties of Essex and Kent, on October 29th, 
30th and 31st, with a bag limit of two birds per day. 

PHEASANTS: — In 1942 the Department was responsible for the distribution of 22,399 
plieasa.nts, comprised of 20.986 poults, 1171 adult hens and 242 adult cock birds. The actual 
purchase price was $17,400.60. These birds were liberated under the supervision of Depart- 
mental field officers' principally" in the various ToMmships established as Regulated Game 
Preserve Areas, and which distribution totalled 20.070 birds. Of the remainder 2,200 were 
liberated in suitable areas in a few additional Southern Ontario counties, while various 
branches of the Ontario Bird Dog Association were allocated 129 birds for use in connection 
with their spring and fall bird dog trials. Details of this distribution are set forth herewith, 
and in all cases except as indicated the birds so liberated were poults: — 

Rerulated Game Preserve Areas: — County of Brant, (three townships— Burford, 
South Dumfries and Onondaga), 710 birds; County of Elgin, (five townships. Aldborough, 
Bayham, Dorchester South, Dunwich and Malahide), 1,000 birds; County of Haldimand, 
(ten townships— Canboro, Dunn, Moulton, Cayuga North,Cayuga South, Oneida, Rainham, 
Seneca, Sherbrooke and Walpole), 1830 birds of which 10 were adults; County of Halton, 
(four townships, — Esquesing, Nassagaweya, Nelson and Trafalgar), 1554 birds of which 204 
were adults; County of Lambton, (one township — Plympton), 195 birds; County of Lincoln, 
height townships— Caistor, Clinton, Gainsboro, Grimsby North, Grimsby South, Grantham, 
liouth and Niagara), 1665 birds; County of Middlesex, (two townships — Westminster (part) 
and Metcalfe), 500 birds; County of Norfolk, (four townships — Middleton, Townsend. Wind- 
ham and Walsingham), 1020 birds; County of Ontario, (three townships — Pickering, Whitby 
East and Whitby West), 1315 birds of which 205 were adults; County of Oxford, (two 
townships — Dereham and Oxford East), 546 birds; County of Peel, (five townships — Albion, 
('aledon. Chinguacousy. Toronto (part) and Toronto (Gore), 1714 birds, of which 229 were 
adults; County of Prince Edward, (one township — Maiysburgh South), 120 birds; County 
of Welland, (eight townships — Bertie, Crowland, Humberstone, Pelham, Stamford, Thorold, 
Wainfleet and Willoughby), 1935 birds; County of Wellington (one township — Puslinch) 
3(X) birds; County of Wentworth (eight townships — Ancaster, Barton, Beverley, Binbrook, 
Glanford, Flamboro East, Flamboro West and Saltfleet), 2100 birds of which 300 were adults; 
and the County of York, (seven townships — Gwillimburj' East, Gwillimbuiy North, King, 
Markham, Scarborgugh Vaughan and Whitchurch) 3361 birds of which 441 were adults. 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1944) 



General: — County of Essex. 1000 birds; County of Kent, 700 birds, County of Lambton 
(excluding Plympton Township), 405 birds; County of Leeds, 30 birds; County of Peter- 
borough, 45 birds; and the County of Wellington, 20 birds. 

Miscellaneous: — Ontario Bird Dog Association — 129 birds, 24 of which were adults, 
for Niagara, St Catharines, Toronto and London trials. 

The favourable conditions which resulted from a satisfactory natural hatch and the 
intensive re-stocking previously outlined encouraged the provision of special regulations for 
the shooting of pheasants in certain areas, as detailed herewith : 

U) On Pelee Island the dates provided were October 28th, 29th, and 30th, 1942, with 
a limit of four birds per day, one of which was to be a hen. Hunters participating, in 
addition to having the regular hunting license as provided by the Game and Fisheries Act, 
were also required to be in possession of the special hunting license which the municipality of 
Pelee Island was authorized to issue for such hunting. 

(b) In the Township Regulated Game Preserve Areas, other than the Townships of 
East Oxford and Plympton, pheasant shooting was permitted on October 23rd and 24th, with 
an additional day, October 28th, being made available for such shooting provided this last 
mentioned date was approved by the Controlling Organization in each respective Township 
area. The date provided in the Township of East Oxford was October 24th, and in the 
Township of Plympton, October 31st. Special hunting licenses were also required of 
sportsmen participating in this shoot in these Township Regulated Game Preserve Areas. 
Bag limits were three cock birds per day. 

(c) In the Counties of Essex and Kent such shooting was permitted on October 29th, 
30th and 31st, and in the County of Lambton on October 31st. In these counties the bag limit 
was three cock birds per day. 

QUAIL: — These birds are not at all plentiful, and in a great proportion of the Province are 
practically non-existent. Their prevalence is restricted to the more southerly counties, and 
the conditions pertaining thereto have been such that it has been impossible to permit 
hunting of this species in any areas except the counties of Essex and Kent. The Regulation 
which was provided in 1942 permitted such shooting only in the aforementioned counties for 
three days, October 29th, 30th and 31st, with a bag limit of four birds per day. 

DUCKS: — Conditions applicable to ducks continued to be quite satisfactory. In most areas 
they are reported to be fairly plentiful with some improvement noticed in various sections. 
The several varieties which cross Ontario in their southerly fall migration provided excellent 
opportunities for recreation for the goodly number of hunters to whom this branch of the 
sport of hunting has an especial appeal. The regi:'iati©ns which are in effect for their pro- 
tection are provided under the Migratory Birds Convention Act by the Federal Government 
with the co-operation of the various Provinces of the Dominion, and conditions were suffi- 
ciently satisfactory to warrant an extension of fifteen days in the period during which they 
could be legally taken in the year 1942. 

GEESE: — The areas in which favourable wild goose shooting is available in this Provmce 
are extremely few and scattered The best, sections possibly are those along the western shore 
of James Bay and in the extreme southwestern counties. Hunting of this species is regulate) 
by provisions of the Migratory Birds Convention Act, and as in the case of wild ducks the 
period of open season was extended in 1942 for fifteen days, except in the Counties of Essex, 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1942-43 



Kent and Elgin, where the extension was limited to two days, thereby permitting such 
shooting over New Year's Day (1943). 

WOODCOCK; — These birds as a general rule are quite scarce throughout There are but 
few sections in which they can be hunted with any degree of success, which areas may be 
stated as located in some of the counties along the shore of Lake Erie and one or two 
adjoining counties to the north thereof, as well as in a few of the eastern counties. The 
period of open season established by the Migratory Birds Convention Act which governs, 
viz : — October 1st to 31st, applied throughout the Province. 

SNIPE: — It may be stated that this species as a general rule is not too plentiful, though there 
are some scattered localities in which successful hunting prevails, principally in the more 
southerly counties of the Province. The reguJations for their protection and shooting thereof 
Lre provided by the Migratory Birds Convention Act, and in 1942 the bag limits were reduced 
fiom twenty-five per day to twenty per day and not more than two hundred for the season, 
which extended over a period of two months, from September 15th to November 15th in 
the northern division and from October 1st to November 30th in the southern division. 

PLOVER: — Reports would indicate that plover are not at all plentiful in any section of 
the Province, and while some improvement was observed in a few sections, conditions 
generally were such that the protection of an entire closed season again prevailed throughout 
1942 with respect to this ^species. As in the case of wild ducks, wild geese, woodcock and 
snipe the regulations which apply are provided under the Migratory Birds Convention Act. 



FUR-BEARING ANIMALS 

The following . information with reference to the various species of fur-bearing animals 
which inhabit Ontario has been assembled from reports submitted by members of the 
Departmental Field Service Force: — 

BEAVER: — In the southwestern and southeastern counties these animals are not at all 
plentiful due to the lack of favourable habitation. In the remaining sections, and more 
particularly to the north, there is every indication that beaver are fairly plentiful, with some 
improvement in their numbers being reported from numerous areas. This condition may be 
attributed in some measure to the protection they have received in past years when a 
cflmaplete closed season' prevailed and in more recent years when only a limited period of open 
season has been provided in suitable areas during the first part of December. A regulation 
was adopted which provided an open season from December 1st to 21st, 1942, for the taking 
of beaver in that portion of Ontario lying north and west of the French and Mattawa Rivers 
and Lake Nipissing (excepting therefrom the District of Rainy River and portions of the 
Districts of Kenora and Thunder Bay lying south of the main transcontinental line of the 
C.N.R. and west of the line of the C.N.R. running south-easterly from Superior Junction to 
Fort William), in the Districts of Manitoulin, Parry Soiind, Muskoka and that portion of tht 
District of Nipissing lying south of the Mattawa River, and in the Counties of Victoria, 
Haliburton, Peterborough, Hastings, Lennox and Addington, Froatenac and Renfrew. All 
persons who trapped beaver during this open season were required to have proper trapping 
licenses and each trapper was authorized to take not more than ten beaver. In addition, 
and in view of complaints regarding damage to property by beaver, an open season extending 
from November 1st to 30th, 1942, was provided in the county of Grey. Only residents of 
this county were permitted to trap during this open season, and each trapper was permitted 
to take not more than ten beaver. In this case the pelts were disposed of by the Department 
and the pioceeds were remitted to the trappers concerned. Departmental returns show that 



10 DEPARTMBNT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1944) 



24,194 pelts were taken during these periods of open season, and it has been estimated that 
their value to the trappers was practically $779,000.00 The average value of these pelts was 
almost fifty per cent in excess of that received for such pelts during the season of 1941. 

FISHER: — ^These animals are practically non-existent in Southern Ontario, and they are 
extremely scarce in the northern portion of the Province. But few specimens are taken 
during the regular trapping season and there has been a steady annual decline in the catch. 

FOX: — This species continued to be very plentiful throughout almost the entire area of the 
Province. This prevalence was responsible for a condition which was detrimental to the 
welfare of domestic poultry stocks as well as that of native game birds, with the result that 
enforcement officers were authorized by the Department to permit the hunting and trappmg 
of foxes in southern Ontario for an additional fifteen days, or until March 15th, 1943, as a 
means of further reducing the numbers of these predators. Organized fox drives were carried 
on thoughout the open season in many of the southern counties, while some Municipal 
Councils continued to pay bounty on foxes which were killed within the limits of such 
municipalities. There was a slight reduction in the number of red fox pelts which were 
taken during the year but increases were reported with respect to the number of cross fox 
silver fox and white fox pelts which were taken in the prevailing open season, though the three 
last mentioned varieties of this species are not at all plentiful anywhere in this Province. 

LYNX: — This is another one of the species which are very scarce. As in the case of Fisher 
tiiey are practically non-existent in Southern Ontario, and trappers are successful in taking 
but few specimens in the north. There is little variation in the numbers which are trapped 
from year to year. 

MARTEN: — Continues to be extremely scarce. This is another species which has practically 
ceased to exist in the south portion of the Province. There has been a steady decline in the 
annual catch, no indications of any general improvement have bfeen reported, nor does it 
appear that such improvement can be anticipated. 

MINK: — Favourable conditions continued to exist quite generally throughout the entire 
Province, and trappers again were rewarded with a measure of satisfactory results from their 
operations for the taking of mhik. This is one of the species contributing in an important 
v/ay to the revenue derived by licensed trappers from the sale of pelts of fur-bearing animals 
taken by them, and the return from the sale of mink pelts taken during the 1942-43 season 
was exceeded only by such returns from the sale of muskrat and beaver. While it would 
appear from reports that the number of mink was about normal in the south, some increase 
in their number is reported from most sections of the north. 

MUSKRAT: — While there was a decrease in the catch of muskrat taken during the period 
of the open season which preyailed in 1942-43 as compared with that of the previous season, 
it may be stated that insofar as this species is concerned fairly satisfactory conditions again 
prevailed. Due to varying conditions which exist in different sections of the Province, the 
limited period of open season which was provided by Regulation was established in these 
different sections to coincide with prevailing weather conditions which would be favourable 
to trapping operations. Muskrat pelts were again the principal source of revenue derived 
by licensed trappers. 

It has been estimated that in 1942-43 more than $1,446,000.00 was received by trappers 
from the sale of their muskrat pelts. This amount is slightly in excess of that derived 
from the same source in the previous year, notwithstanding the fact that the total number 
of pelts taken was 80,000 less. The sum referred to represents forty per cent of the total 
proceeds derived by trappers from the sale of all pelts taken in their trapping operations. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1942-43 11 



OTTER: — This species is not at all plentiful anywhere in Ontario, and there would appear 
to be little, if any, c|iange. There was a decrease in the number which were taken by licensed 
trappers during the open season which prevailed, 

RACCOON -.—These animals are to be found only in Southern Ontario. They are not at all 
}>lentiful. and there are but few sections in which even slight improvement has been in 
evidence. The number which is reported to have been taken during the open season which 
l)revailed in the period under review would represent the average catch of more 
recent seEisons. 

SKUNK:— While these animals continue to be quite plentiful throughout the entire Province, 
there was a considerable decrease in the number taken and disposed of by trappers. The 
number reported taken is only slightly more than fifty per cent of the catch reported in the 
previous year. It is altogether probable that trappers generally are not greatly interested 
in this particular species. 

WEASEL:- This species is reported to be fairly plentiful throughout Ontario. The number 
taken duiing the season shows a considerable decrease when compared with the previous 
season's total, and it is possible that the demand for weasel was not sufficient to encourage 
intensive trapping operations. 

The following comparative table shows the numbers of pelts of the several varieties of 
iur-bearing animals taken by licensed trappers, and which were either exported or dressed, in 
each fiscal year since 1939-40: — 

1939-40 1940-41 1941-42 1942-43 

Bear 295 

Beaver „ 33,530 

Fisher . '. 1,382 

Fox ( Cross) 981 

Fox (Red) ' 19,925 

,Fox (Silver or Black) 101 

Fox (White) 36 

Lynx 514 

Marten 1,790 

Mink 36,518 

Muskrat 689,706 

Otter 4,101 

Raccoon 14,493 

Skunk 74176 

Weasel 95,832 

Wolverine : 2 

From information supplied to the Department by licensed fur-dealei-s it has been 
estimated that the value to the trappers of the pelts taken during 1942-43 was $3,545,937.52. 
The principal species contributing to this total in the order of their importance were muskrat, 
beaver, mink and the several varieties of fox, the returns from these pelts being ninety per 
cent of the entire total value. 

I'elts taken from animals raised on licensed fur farms, viz: — silver or black fox, cross 
fox, blue fox and mink, and disposed of during the year by the operators of such fur farms, 
were estimated to have realized the sum of $1,489,501.45, an increase of more than $450,000.00 
a» compared with the results of operations in the preceding year, and thus making the value 
of tlie total fur production of the province for tlie year 1942-43 the sum of $5,035,438.97, as 
fompared to a total of $4,207,144.53 for the year 1941-42. 



274 


384 


288 


21,605 


25,1)97 


24,194 


858 


884 


691 


722 


1,780 


2,649 


15,059 


32,215 


31,297 


67 


206 


265 


91 


114 


185 


383 


537 


552 


1,439 


1,652 


1,417 


38,976 


63,996 


60,331 


739,224 


722,387 


042,810 


3,931 


3,880 


3,557 


11,973 


13,499 


13,420 


72,005 


94,656 


48.337 


53,719 


80,776 


62.553 


2 


3 


6 



12 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1944) 



FUR-FARMING 

A declining market for raw furs during the pelting season in the fall of 1941, an increas- 
ing cost of feed a;nd a scarcity of nece.ssary help caused some further recession in the fur 
farming industry in the year under review. Dujing this period there were some 1,475 fur 
farmer's licenses issued, a net decrease of nine per cent. In spite of the unfavourable pros- 
pects mentioned 154 of these licenses were for newly established fur farms. 

As is indicated in the following table, mink and foxes are ajid have continued to be the 
principal species propagated. Experiments in connection with the raising of fisher, marten, 
muskrats and beaver were negligible and devoid of definite results. Mink were raised on 
981 farms, and while silver foxes are still the principal other species, there is considerable 
interest being displayed in the new type foxes, i.e. white marked foxes which were raised on 
122 fur farms, and platinum foxes which were raised on 62 fur farms. 

BREEDING STOCK ON LICENSED FUR FARMS 
as at Januarj'' 1st. 

1940 

Beaver 4 

Fisher 27 

Cross Fox 168 

Red Fox 96 

Silver Black Fox 18,327 

Blue Fox 209 

♦Platinum Fox 

♦White Marked Fox 

Lynx ' .2 

Marten ^19 

Mink 31,989 

Muskiat 235 

Otter 2 

R accoon 243 

Skunk ^ : 10 

*New type foxes previously included with silver bla^ck foxes. 

Transactions undertaken by fur farmers during the year 1942-43 as recorded with the 
Department, show disposition of pelts from stock raised on such licensed premises, as follows: 

85,493 Mink, 79,244 of which were exported, and the remaining 6,249 dressed witliin the 
Province. 

27,563 Silver Black Foxes, 18,254 of which were exported and the remaining 9,309 dressed 
within the Province. 

' 1,333 Blue Foxes, 1,296 of which were exported, and the remaining 37 dressed within th? 
Province. 

166 Cross Foxes, 122 of which were exported, and the remaining 44 dressed within the 



CROWN GAME PRESERVES 

During the period under review the only addition which was made to the system of 
Crown Game Pre,serves prevailing throughout the Province was the establishment of an area 
in the District of Patricia as a beaver sanctuary. This area is designated as the Albany River 



1941 


1942 


1943 


13 


18 


21 


26 


16 


15 


134 


112 


68 


65 


73 


96 


16,034 


15,630 


12,901 


397 


644 


595 

125 

1379 


2 


2 


2 


16 


19 


15 


34,277 


38,650 


29.345 


179 


119 


52 


2 








139 


124 


121 


7 


5 


2 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1942-43 13 









Bounty and 


Brush 


Pups 


Total 


Expenses 


614 


22 


, 1,743 


$25,058.12 


400 


8 


1,146 


16,477.43 


577 


37 


1,813 


40,593.77 


497 


32 


1,464 


33.606.62 



Beaver and Fur Preserve. The boundaries may be generally described a^s follows:— on the 
north the Albany River ,on the west the Chipie River, on the south the Kwataboahegan 
River, and on the east the westerly shore of James Bay The regulation which governs was 
provided at the request of the Department of Mines and Resources for the Dominion of 
Canada to permit of the restocking of the area with beaver, and to control the annual take of 
l»eaver therein, if and when such trapping is authorized, and to provide a restricted and con- 
trolled trapping ground for the benefit of resident Indians. This is the third such sanctuary 
so established. 

The system of Regulated Game Preserve Areas which has been in effect during recent 
joars was extended to include the Township of East Oxford in the County of Oxford. 



WOLF BOUNTIES. 

■ The following is a comparative statement showing annual wolf bounty statistics and 
payments for a period of four years ending with the 1942-43 fiscal period:— 

Period Timber 

For the year ending March 31, 1940 1,107 

Yor the year ending March 31, 1941 738 

For the year ending March 31, 1942 1,199 

For the year ending March 31 1943 935 

Various factors have influenced the prevalence of wolves and the number taken, 
including the basic rate of bounty, enHstments in the armed forces and employment in war 
industries, and the abundance of game, but weather conditions would appear to be the most 
important. The winter of 1942-'^ 3 was exceptionally severe and during this period only 714 
wolves were taken. Generally speaking fifty per cent of the wolves are snaJred and the special 
wire i*eq\iired for this purpose is not available at present, 

SUMMARY OF WOLF BOUNTY CLAIMS 

County Tim'ber Brush Pups Total 

Brant 112 

Bruce 8 18 26 

Frontenac 8 9 5 22 

Haldimand 10 1 

Halton 2 2 

Hastings 9 1 10 

Lambton 10 1 

Lanark 1 Q 1 

Leeds ^ Q 1 1 

Lennox & Addington 10 13 23 

Lincoln 10 1 

Norfolk 9 9 

Northumberland 10 1 

Ontario 13 4 

Peru. 10 1 

Peterboro 11 11 

Prince Edward 1 1 

Renfrew 26 6 31 



H 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 (1944) 



Simcoe 3 8 5 16 

Victoria 18 9 

Welland 0.2 2 

York ..„ 2 2 

Total in Counties 78 88 11 177 



District 

Algoma 

Cochrane 

Haliburton 

Kenorgy 

Manitoulin 

Muakoka 

Nipisaing 

Parry Sound 

Patricia 

Rainy River 

Sudbury 

Temiskaming 

Thunder Bay 

Total in Districts 

Grand Total 



iber 


Brush 


Pups 


Total 


68 


72 


6 


146 


19 


1 





20 


20 








20 


271 


70 


2 


343 


20 


45 


8 


73 


26 


4 





30 


65 


13 





78 


58 


5 





63 


67 


7 





74 


82 


59 





141 


76 


92 





168 


4 


1 





5 


85 


47 


5 


137 


861 


416 


21 


1,298 


939 


504 


32 


1,475 



There were 1,120 claims submitted in respect to 1,475 wolves. These, together with four 
•claims in respect to 4 wolves outstanding as at April 1st, 1942, were considered. Fourteen claims 
•with respect to 15 wolves were rejected for the following reasons: — 8 of the pelts were domestic 
dogs, 1 was a red fox, on 4 pelts insufficient evidence was produced, and 2 of the wolves fitom 
which pelts were submitted were not killed by the applicants making the claims. 

Information assembled from the applications for bounty which were forwarded to the 
Department shows that 449 of these wolves were destroyed bj'- farmers, 715 by Indians and 
trappers, 203 by huriters, rangers^ guides and tourist outfitters, and the remainder by miscel- 
laneous persons. 

Previous to November 1st, 1942, these wolf pelts were returned to the respective persons 
who had taken the same, but the regulation which provided for such disposition was repealed 
on the date mentioned, since when such pelts have been delivered or made available to the 
Seamen's Fur Vests War Project for manufacture into garments for saiilors, both in the Naval 
Service and Mercantile Marine. The number of wolf pelts of which such disposition was 
made during the period between November 1st, 1942, and March 31st, 1943, was 1,005. 

Reporting in connection with this endeavor by the Seamen's Fur Vests War Project, 
Mr. Alexander D. Schatz, Chairman of the Ontario Division, stated in a letter to this 
Department : — 

"We take pride in pointing out that this voluntary War Effort on the part of 
ttie Fur Industry of Ontario had the fullest support and co-operation of employers and 
workers, as well as the generous assistance of lastitutions, Organizations and numerous 
individuals." 



A^^NUAL REPORT, 1942-43 15 



Of interest in this connection is the following letter addressed to the Seamen's Eur 
Vests War Project by the Commanding Officer of one of the vessels in the Canadian Naval 
Service: — 

"Not so long ago 25 Fur-lined Jackets came aboard this ship. Their arrival was 
watched with interest by members of the crew, most of whom had been out on the North 
Atlantic before, and knew just how cold it can get out there, and what protection your 
jackets afford. In due course they were distributed, and once again the eager eyes were 
evident. 

If you could come aboard some night when we are at sea and watch how your 
Jackets are passed about by members of the crew going on and coming off watch, this 
letter of thanks would not be necessary. Each member of the crew stands 8 hours on 
watch duty per day, but your Jackets are on 24 hours duty. 

On behalf of the ship's company, I wish to take this opportunity to thank your 
. . ..organization for this splendid and much appreciated gift." 



GENERAL 

TOURIST OUTFITTERS:— 

Further rationing of gasoline and additional travel restrictions or other difficulties 
attributable to present war-time conditions again had an adverse effect on the tourist traffic 
to and within the Province. Many of the tourist outfitters' camps 'were affected by these 
conditions, particularly those catering to the transient tourist and those which are accessible 
only to road traffic. It may be stated that such unfavourable conditions were responsible for 
the reduction in the mim^per of tourist outfitters' camp licenses which were issued to cover 
operations during the year under review, viz : — 615, which number was 50 less than the number 
of such licenses issued for the previous year. Of these licenses 565 were issued in favour of 
resident operators and the remaining 50 in favour of non-resident operators. 

These camps are located in districts set forth in the following tabulation: — 

Algoma 87 

Cochrane 7 

Kenora 144 

Manitoulin ■■ 50 

Nipissing - 86 

Pariy Sound 100 

Patricia • 2 

Rainy River 42 

Renfrew 14 

Sudbuiy 54 

Temiskaming 7 

Thunder Bay 22 

Total 615 



BEAR BOUNTY:— 

The C>rder-in-Council which gov^erned the payment of bounty on bears was dated the 
I9th of August, 1942, and was applicable to bears killed during the period between August 1st 
and November 30th, 1942. This bounty was paid on a total of 364 bears which were destroyed 



Ift DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FLSHERIE.S No. 9 (1944) 



in accordance with the provisions of this Order-in-Council. Applicatioa'i for the payment of 
bounty on an additional 22 bears were refused for various reasoas, the principal reason being 
that the bears had been destroyed in Townships which were not in the proper classificatioji 
regarding agricultural development, and this condition applied in respect to 14 bears. Rejection 
of claimg was also made for the following reasoas: — 

2 killed before August 1st, 1942. 

4 killed by persons not residents of the Township in which the bears were killed. 

1 killed in a Crown Game Preserve. 

1 killed by a person other than the applicant. 

Grateful acknowledgement is made of the valuable co-operation of Agricuitural Repre- 
sentatives and other officials of the Department of Agriculture who provided the neces.sary 
information to enable our Department to determine which Towaships were within the classi- 
tication stated in the Regulation, i.e., those in which not less than twenty-five per cent of the 
total area was devoted to agriculture. 

The following statistical table indicates the total number of bears killed in each of the 
Districts and Counties, and in respect of which applications for the payment of bounty were 
submitted: — 

County or District . Total 

Algoma 10 

Cochrane 20 

Kenora 6 

Maaitouhn 7 

Muskoka 12 

Nipissmg ' 37 

Parry Sound 32 

Rahiy River 10 

Sudbury 43 

Thunder Bay 79 

Temiskaming 24 

Haliburton 12 

Bruce ....^^., 7 

Frontenac ..'::.: ^....,... 8 

Hastings 23 

Lennox & Addington 6 

Peterborough 3 

Renfrew - 44 

Victoria 3 

386 



GAME AND FISHERIES ACT: — 

Amendments to the Game and Fisheries Act which were adopted by the Legislative 
Assemblj^ provided: — 

(a) For the exportation by non-resident anglers of the lawful catch of one day's fishing 
or the lawful catch of two days' fishing in the case of commercial fish taken from 
Great Lakes. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1942-43 17 



(b) That the prov^isioa of Section 65 (Trespass) would not apply in the case of person^ 
travelling oa water with fishing tackle so encased or dismantled as to prevent its 
use whil^ in transit. 

Regulatioas additional to those already referred to in other portions of this report were 
adopted, and provided : — 

(a) An open season for black and grey squirrels in Southern Ontario, on November 
5th, 6th, and 7th, 1942^ with a bag limit of five per day. 

(b) That it would be unlawful for any person to take minnows in excess of a total 
weight of forty pounds from the waters of Lake Simcoe and Lake Couchiching, 
during the period from October 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943. 

(c) That it would be unlawful to hunt deer or moose in the open season in the territory- 
lying within one and ;one-half miles on either side of Highway No. 70, between 
Kenora and Fort Frances. 

(d) That certain Townships in the District of Algoma, as enumerated, be transferred 
from Division "C" to Division "B" for the purpose of the open season for deer 
and moose. 



ENFORCEMENT 

Enforcement of provisions of the Game and Fisheries Act and other legislation which 
has been provided for the protection of game and fish in Ontario, such as the Migratory Birds 
Convention Act and the Dominion Special Fishery Regulations, is assigned to the regular 
8taff of Game and Fisheries Overseers, and the services performed by the members of this 
branch of Departmental services play an important part in maintaining and improving our 
efforts towards the conservation and preservation of the game and fish resources of this 
Province. These services are augmented by the co-operation provided thoughout the year 
by members of the Ontario Provincial Police Force, and by the services of seasonal overseers 
who are engaged periodically, but more particularly for the purpose of providing additional 
patrol services through the critical fish spawning periods in the spring of the year. Considerable 
assistance is also received from the many hundreds of interested persoas who voluntarily act 
as Deputy Game and Fishery Wardens, without remuneration, under the authority of their 
annual appointments. Quite a proportion of the.se Deputy Game Wardeas are appointed on 
the recommendation of the Municipal Councils of the Townships which have been established 
as Regulated Game Preserve Areas and for the most part these appointees are active only in 
the Townships in which they reside. 

The duties of the officers to whom is entrusted this work of enforcement are greatly 
assisted by reason of the active co-opferation received by them from the majority of sportsmen 
who in more recent years have become convinced of the necessity for proper observance of 
the various provisions bf the Game and Fisheries Act which are essential for the adequate 
protection and conservation of thia division of our natural resources. Such a satisfactory 
condition is to a very great extent attributable to the educational programmes undertaken by 
the Fish and Game Protective Aasociations, and other organizations having similar objectives, 
and which associatioas and organizatioas now exist in practically every section of Ontario. 

Nevertheless it is still true that there are occasioas on which it is necessary for our 
enforcement officers to make seizures and undertake subsequent prosecutions for offences 
iuvolviuK violations of provisions of this protective legislation. 

During the period covered by this report the seizure of articles from offenders was 
reported in a total of 1448 cases. Such seizures were made by Game and Fisheries Overseers 



18 DEPARTMENT QF GAME AND FISHERIES No! 9 (1944) 



in 1272 cases, by Deputy Game and Fishery Wardens in 45 cases, by Provincial Police 
Constables in 25 cases and by members of various Municipal police forces in 20 cases. Co- 
operative action by Overseers, Deputy Game Wardens and Provincial Police resoilted in seizures 
in 63 case?, and in tha remaining 23 cases by co-operative action on the part of Overseers and 
members of Municipal Police Forces 



The following is a summary of the articles which were confiscated in these seizure cases: 

Live animals and birds in 3 cases 

Birds, game animals and meat - in 225 cases 

Fire-arms and ammunition .-„„„ in 668 cases 

Fish in 174 cases 

Nets and fishing equipment in 137 cases 

Angling equipment in 113 cases 

Pelts and hides in 261 cases 

Traps and trapping equipment .., in 86 cases 

Motor boats, rowboats, canoes in 19 cases 

Outboard motors in 5 cases 

Motor vehicles in 7 cases 

.^Flashlights and lanterns in 22 cases 

• Spears ; '. in 43 cases 

Miscellaneous articles in 57 cases 



The apparent discrepancy as between the actual number of cases in which seizures were 
reported and the total of the above summary would be accounted for by reason of the fact that 
iu mani^ of the instances a combination of articles was seized, such as fire-arms and game, nets 
and boats, fishing tackle and fish, pelts and traps, spears and artificial lights, and so forth. 

^ Details of the fire-arms which were confiscated are as follows:^ — single-barrel shotguns 

87, double-barrel shotguns 82, automatic shotguns 4, repeating shotguns 44, 410 gauge shotguns 
12, combination shotgun and rifle 3, 22 calibre rifles (various types) 337 heavy calibre rifles 
85, .25- .20 calibre rifles 13, revolvers 6, and air guns 25. 

Confiscated pelts of fur-beaiing animals were as follows: — 291 beaver, 3 fisher, 34 fox, 
(Silver Black, cross and red), 1 lynx, 160 mink, 800 muskrat, 13 otter, 35 raccoon, 15 skunk, 
79 squirrel, 90 weasel as w«ll as 66 deer and moose hides. 

The miscellaneous articles which were seized included two axes, two bicycles, 316 duck 
decoys, eight ferrets, seven grappling poles, two hounds, fifteen packsacks and haversacks and 
two trunks or suitcases. 

With reference to prosecutions, charges were laid in 1210 eases This action resulted in 
convictions and the imposition of penalties in 1,146 of these cases. The charges laid were 
dismissed by the presiding magistrates in 54 of the remaining cases, while in the balance of 10 
cases the charges were withdrawn. In the cases in which convictions were registered, the 
informations were laid by Game and Fisheries Overseers in 1,085 instances, by Provincial Police 
in 22 instances, by joint action by Overseers and Provincial Police in 8 instances, by Municipal 
Police in 24 instances, and by private land-owners (trespass) in 7 instances. In actions which 
were dismissed the informations were laid by Game and Fisheries Overseers in 46 instances, by 
Provincial Police in 1 instance, and joint action in 7 instances. Charges were withdrawn 
in 9 instances by Game and Fisheries Officers and in 1 instance by the Provincial Police. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1942-43 19 



REPORT OF THE FISH CULTURE BRAl^CH 

I^'ish cultural operatioiLS were carried on during the year in tWenty-seven provincial 
government hatcheries and rearing stations. Due to #krtime conditions there was no 

expansion of the hatchery system to include new plants, and only proper maintenance and 
essential repair work were undertaken. 



THE CULTURE AND DISTRIBUTION OF FISH 

A detailed account of distribution of hatchery reared fish by county or district, species, 
age-class, and number planted is given in appendices 1 and II. In the following paragraphs, 
comparison of the year's distribution with that of the previous year and other pertinent data 
are given. The total output of all species for the year was approximately 14% higher than 
in 1941-42. 

Speckled Trout: 

The distribution objective was 3,000,000 speckled trout yearlings, but the year's total 
was somewhat lower, namely 2,918,500. Due to congestion at the Dorion Trout Rearing Station 
it was necessary to plant a fairly large number of fingerlings, namely 380,000. For the same 
reason smaller numbers wei;p planted from -Hill Lake, Sault Ste. Marie, Chatsworth and Cod- 
rington. The private hatchery at Caledon had approximately 170,000 fingerlings which could 
not be accommodated; these were distributed as effectively as pos,sible in suitable and publicly 
fished waters. On the whole, approximately 60% more fingerlings were planted as compared 
with the preceding year. 

Brown Trout: 

The production of brown trout yearlings, was 3.8 per cent, greater than that of the 
preceding year. 

Rainbow Trout: 

Distribution of rainbow trou.t yearlings was 9.8 per cent, greater than in 1941-42. 

Kamloops Trout: 

This species was introduced to a number of carefully selected lakes in Ontario, and it 
promises to provide excellent game-fish possibilities, at least in some of the lakes chosen. 

During the year 24,800 yearlings were planted as compared with 25,000 in 1941-42. 

Lake Trout: 

Due to inclement weather which occurred during the lake trout spawning season in the 
fall of 1942, the egg collection was somewhat reduced. As a result the distribution 
of fry aod fingerlings for the year under discussion was correspondingly reduced. The total 
production of eyed eggs, fry and fingerlings was 18 per cent, less than that of the preceding 
year. However, over 10,680 yearling lake trout were planted, which should have a compen- 
satory and equalizing effect. 

Whitejish : 

The number of whitefish planted was approximately 5 per cent, greater than that of 
the preceding year. 



20 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1944) 



Herring : 

The collection of herring eggs at Glenora and Kingsville hatcheries was more than twice 
that of the preceding year, an increase of 114 per cent. 



yellow Pickerel (Pike-perch) : 

A favourable increase of 32 per cent, over last year's distribution of eyed eggs and fry 
of yellow pickerel was realized. 



S?nall-rnouthed Black Bass: 

One of the main annual objectives as regards bass cuJture is to increase the output of 
bass fingerlings by using all the facilities available as effectively as possible. In this we were 
successful to the extent of increasing by 4 per cent the previous year's output. 



Large-mouthed Black Bass : 

The culture of large-mouthed bass in two ponds at the Mount Pleasant hatchery was a 
JHiccess. Compared with the preceding year's production, the pei'centage increase of fry and 
fingerlings was 68 per cent, and 8 per cent, respectively. 



Yellow Perch : 

Annual collections of perch spawn from Lake Erie in the vicinity of the Kingsville 
hatchery vary greatly in abundance from year to year. Although 24,000,000 fry were planted 
this year this number was 24 per cent less than that of the preceding year. 



Maskinonge: 

Compared with the preceding year there was a decrease of approximately 25 per cent, 
m the distribution of fry, and 53 per cent, in the distribution of fingerlings. 

Weather conditions have a pronounced effect on sTJCcessfuJ spawning and hatching of 
maskinonge. The spawning, hatching and feeding seasons in 1939 and 1940 were good, because 
the seasons were late, followed by mild and favourable weather. Changeable weather follow- 
ing an early opening is decidedly unfavourable. 

The effect of weather conditions is most striking on the spawning grounds in the Pigeon 
River. The Pigeon River receives considerable warm surface water from the sinrounding laud, 
opens early and provides a maskinonge spawning s'eason of comparatively short duration. A 
short spawning season, generally speaking, reduces the percentage hatch. On the Lakfield 
spawning grounds, conditions are quite different. Owing to the large body of ice which forms 
in Stony Lake each winter the spawning season for maskinonge is later, and the hatchability 
and general conditioh of the eggs are much better. 

Reduction in the number of maskinonge fingerlings may also be attributed to weatner 
conditions. Unsatisfactory weather conditions interfere with the spawning of suitable minnows, 
resulting in a poor yield and retarded growth of the minnows. When live minnow food, 
which is the most, important item in the diet of m*iskinonge fingerlings is interfered with the 
normal growth and production of maskinonge suifec. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1942-i3 21 



CLOSED WATERS 

Establishing closed water areas is one of the practical methods employed in maintaining 
and improving the fishing in our lakes and streams. The closed area acts as a source of 
supply for replenishing the immediately adjacent open area with the natural increase provided 
year after year. If closure is continuous the area becomes a sanctuary of very great practical 
value. 

The waters in the following list were closed during the year April 1, 1942, to March 31, 
1943, to supplement those already closed : 

ADAM LAKE 

Unorganized territory north of Clay Lake between Fluke Lake and Segise Lake, District 
of Kenora. Closed for maskinonge propagation. Adam Lake is a feeder of Clay and Segise 
Lakes. 

GEORGIAN BAY (Portion located as follows:) 

■ (a) An area approximately 1 mile square lying west of Electric Island; 

(b) An area approximately 1 mile square lying west of Lot 51, Concession VIII. 
Township of Harrison, District of Parry Sound; 

(c) An area lying east of and extending approximately 2 miles along the shore line 
opposite Concessions XIII and XIV, Township of Harrison, District of Pariy 
Sound. 

HARVEY CREEK (Nogie's Creek) 

Townships of Galway and Harvey, County of Peterborough. Sanctuary for maskinonge, 

LUKINTO LAKE 

Unsurveyed temtory, 12 miles east of Longlac, and 6 miles north of Seagram, District 
of Thunder Bay. Closed to provide additional protection for speckled trout. 

MASKINONGE CREEK 

Part of Maskinonge Lake, and part of Little Vermilion Lake, Townships of Pickerel and 
Vermilion, District of Kenora. Closed to provide additional protection for maskinonge 
with a view to maintaining and if possible increasing the supply of maskinonge by 
natural means. 

TASSO, CAMP, BLUE AND CLEAR LAKES 

Township of Finlayson, District of Nipissing. Closed to protect trout during winter 

months. 

< 

TWELVE MILE CREEK 

Townships of Nelson and Trafalgar on certain specified lots and concessions. County 
of Halton. Closed to provide protection for small-mou.thed black bass so that the closed 
area will help to replenish adjacent areas of the river from year to year. 

WHITEFISH, CLEAR, PORTAGE AND BIG JOSEPH LAKES 

Township of Humphrey, District of Parry Sound. Closed to winter fishing to protect 
lake trout. 



22 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1944) 



REMOVAL OF COARSE FISH 

Hoop nets were operated at the outlet of Charleston Lake for the purpose of removing 
ling. Owing to changeable weather conditions the spawning run was small ,although the 
spawning period was more prolonged. The total catch of ling was 1,100. 

Similar work was undertaken on Otty Lake, Township of North Elmsley, County of 
Lanark. The total catch was 368 ling, weighing about 3 lbs. each, or a total weight of 1,104 lbs. 

The purpose of operations on Loughborough L^ke and West Rideau Lake was to remove 
quantities of whitefish and herring, and coarse fish. A trap net was set in Loughborough 
Lake but only catfish were taken. After sounding and determining the type of bottom, 
pound nets were set on what was considered the best whitefish grounds in West Rideau Lake. 
Trap nets were also set on suitable whitefish grounds and the fish taken were game fish and 
ling, the former being liberated and the latter turned over to fox farmers in the district. 
P'rom November 15 to November 26, 1942, the following fish were taken from West Rideau 
Lake: 308 lbs. of whitefish, 514 pounds of catfish, and 12,228 lbs. or approximately 6 tons of 
Hng. 

All the operations were under the direct supervision of local overseers or the hatchery 
supervisor. Nets and other equipment were supplied by the Department and considerable 
assistaDce was given by local residents. The whitefish and catfish were sold at a very nominal 
price, and the ling were disposed of to local residents and fox farmers. 



BIOLOGICAL SURVEYS 

At frequent intervals from April 27 until June 26, a study of the spawning of srnall- 
mouthed black bass. Long Point Bay, Lake Erie, was undertakeq. It was not until June 23 
that the first small-mouthed fry were taken off the nests. The study indicated the danger 
of opening the season too early without substantial evidence of spawning conditions. 

A study of two quarry ponds at Hagersville and a small pond at Guelph was made. 

For the most part, technical studies were confined to the hatcheries and rearing stations 
in connection with the care and feeding of the fish reared therein. 

The Ontario Fisheries Research Laboratoiy of the Department of Zoology, University 
of Toronto, continued field and laboratory studies in Algonquin Park, limiting the work to 
the more urgent and important needs of fish culture. 

In co-operation with the Park Staff, 60,000 speckled trout yearlings, provided by the 
Ontario Department of Game and Fisheries, were distributed as recorded in appendix I under 
the District of Nipissing. 

Another measure for the maintenance of good fishing is the alternate closure of lakes to 
fishing, which was initiated in 1938 and has been continued as shown by the following table: 





Number of 


Year 


lakes closed 


1938 


4 


1939 


5 


1940 


24 (the 


1941 


17 


1942 


20 



(the 21 reported for 1940 and 1941 shovild read 24) 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1942-43 23 



The creel census is proving to be the most succes.sful means of determining the trends 
in the abundance of game fish and although it does not give a complete record of the number 
of fish taken it is a measure of both the total number taken and their availability or the 
number taken per hour by anglers. Where the creel census is carried on continuously for the 
same lakes and streams over a number of years it indicates the results of uncontrolled or 
unlimited angling, angUng under controlled conditions as by alternate closure of lakes and 
other remedial measures, such as stocking and introduction of forage fish which are being 
applied as major experiments in fish culture. It is especially desirable to carry out the creel 
census as a war time activity, as it gives a measure of the influence of the war on the number 
of anglers, as well as information on the stocks of game fish which is a guide to post-war fish 
culture needs. 

The following table gives a summary of the creel census records for lake trout and bass 
from those lakes in Algonquin Park for which information is available. 

LAKE TROUT 

Year 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 

Number of lake trout recorded 1414 3855 3083 4681 1827 2452 1832 

Number of lakes for which 

anglers have reported 23 51 41 59 24 47 44 

SMALL-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

Number of bass recorded 1202 1891 1694 1582 1640 1520 

Number of lakes for which 

anglers have reported 4 8 11 15 14 18 

Number of bass recorded 

from Lake Opeongo 688 '731 270 404 494 217 

During 1942 the creel census recorded the valuable information that numbers of white- 
fish were taken by anglers from Lake Opeongo and brown trout from Brewer Lake. The value 
of the creel census is in direct proportion to the co-operation received from anglers to whom 
iUuch credit is due for their active participation without which this important measurement 
01 fish culture work could not be carried out. 

It has been found that the whitefish, perch and suckers constitute the most important 
lake trout food, particularly in Lake Opeongo. The small perch and perch fry are most 
important from midsummer into the fall, and studies of the feeding and food supply of this 
important forage fish have been continued. 

The speckled trout living in the streams feed upon the aquatic i;isects which are present 
in great numbers and which irjclude such well known forms as blackflies, midges, mayflies, 
caddis flies and stpneflies. There is a marked variation in the numbers from year to year 
which is shown by the following table giving the total insect emergence from one square yard 
of the same stream each year over a period of years. 

Total number of insects emerging 
Year from one square yard of stream 

1937 13,385 

1938 15,077 

1939 10,836 

1940 13,504 

1941 11,343 

1942 16,553 



24 DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES No. 9 (1944) 



L'nder natural conditions beavers frequently build dams in trout streams and in stream 
improvement, dams and deflecting weirs are constructed to form deep pools of quiet water. 
Such dams or deflecting weirs create changes in streams which have a marked influence upon 
the insect fauna. The nature of this change is important insofar as it results in the production 
01 different species and numbers of aquatic insects as compared to those present before such 
•iaras are built. It has been learned that the aquatic vegetation which often appears as the 
result of such dams definitely increases the number of insects, and further work is being 
carried out to determine whether the aquatic insects produced in this way are available to and 
constitute the food selected by the trout and to what extent the other conditions resulting 
from the dams are favourable or unfavourable to trout production. 

Examination of the fish of the Park waters shows that some of them cany fish parasites 
and although none of' these parasites are injurious to man they may be quite harmful to 
the fish. Much of the information from these studies is of value in the local fish culture 
work, as it has been learned that: the same species of fish in different lakes carry parasites of 
different kinds and degree of harmfulness which is a warning against indiscriminate transfer 
of fish from one lake to another. There is a relation between the fish parasites and the food, 
so that in a large lake fish in one area may be parasitized, while those in another area may be 
free of that particular parasite, which suggests a possible approach to parasite control. Lakes 
containing small-mouthed black bass had several species of fish infested with larval cysts of 
the cestode, Protcocephahis ambloplitis, while fish from lakes that do not contain small- 
ruouthed black bass do not carry this cestode." 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

In closing this report I desire to express my appreciation of the excellent spirit of 
co-operation which has been displayed throughout the year by^the Ontario Federation of 
Anglers and Hunters and its various constituent Game and Fish Protective Associations, 
und by the officials and members of the Northern Ontario Tourist Trade Association, as well 
as others who are interested in the services rendered by this department on behalf of hunters, 
anglers and trappers. Such contacts cannot but be of inestimable value and assistance to us 
in the performance of duties required in connection with the proper administration and conduct 
of the Department. 

Regarding the work of the staff. May I state lliat nienibeis of the Departmental 
Service generally have been very conscientious in carrying out their duties and courteous in 
their contacts with the public in their efforts to produce the best results. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I am. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

D. J. TAYLOR, 

Deputy Minister of Game and Fisheries. 



I 



ANNUAL REPORT. 1942-43 



25 



APPENDIX No. 1 

SPECIES AND QUANTITEES OF FISH PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS 
APRIL 1, 1942, TO MARCH 31, 1943. 



LARGE-MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

FRY 

Bruce 70,000 

Huron 401000 

Lambtoa 20,000 

Victoria : ; 55,000 

Total 185,000 

FINGERLINGS 

Haliburton 1,000 

Lincoln 1,500 

Muskoka 4,000 

Nipissing 1,100 

Simcoe 2,000 

Victoria 6,000 

Wentworth 1,500 

York 2,000 



Total 19,100 

YEARLINGS AND ADULTS 

Brant : 15 

York : 175 

Miscellaneous 100 

Total „..., 290 

SMALL -MOUTHED BLACK BASS 

FRY 

Bruce „ 60,000 

Dundas 5,000 

Elgin 60,000 

Frontenac „ 55,000 

Grenville 8,000 

Grey 40,000 

Hastings 27,500 

Hii ron ,. 20,000 

Lanark 20,000 

Leeds 30,000 

Lennox-Addington 30,000 

Manitoulin 105,000 

Middlesex 60,000 

Muskoka 120,000 

Nipissing : 100,000 

Parry Sound 500,000 

Peterborough 100,000 

Prince Edward 15,000 

Sudbury 25,000 

Timiskaming 15,000 

Waterloo 105,000 

Wellington 40,000 

Total , 1,535,500 

FINGERLINGS 

>^lq:oma 66,600 

Brant 359 

Cochrane ^ 2,000 

Durham • '500 



Fi-ontenac 30,250 

Haldimand 2,000 

Haliburton 6,000 

Halton , . 1,000 

Hastings 9,000 

Huron . 1.000 

Lanark 15,500 

Leeds .. . 13,000 

Lennox-Addington 3,000 

Manitoulin 233,500 

Muskoka 21,000 

Nipissing 18,800 

Northumberland 2,000 

Ontario 1,000 

Oxford 1,000 

Parry Sound 26,000 

Peterborough 19,000 

Renfrew 6.500 

Russell .. 1,500 

Simcoe . ... _ 16,700 

Sudbury 192,200 

Thunder Bay 11,350 

Timiskaming 2,000 

Victoria 13,000 

Waterloo 1 ,000 

Welland 1,500 

Total 718,259 

YEARLINGS AND ADULTS 

Brant 122 

Hastings 822 

Manitoulin 387 

Parry Sound 358 

Peterborough 558 

Miscellaneous 108 

Total 2,355 



MASKINONGE 



Haldimand 

Hastings 

Leeds 

Lennox-Addington 

Manitouhn 

Mu.skoka 

Nipissing 

Northumberland 

Ontario 

Parry Sound 

Peterborough 

Prince Edward 

Renfrew 

Simcoe 

Stormont 

Sudbury 

Victoria 

Waterloo 



FRY 



10,000 

125,000 
15,000 
20,000 
10,000 
65.000 
40.000 

180,000 
25.000 
30,000 

705.000 
40,000 
40.000 
20,000 
15,000 
25,000 

200,000 
10,000 



Total 1 ,575,000 



26 



DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND FISHERIES 



No. 9 (1944) 



SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF FISH. PLANTED IN PROVINCIAL WATERS, 
April Ib't, 1942, to March 31st, 1943— Continued i 



MASKIN ON GE— Continued 

FINGERLINGS 



Northumberland 

Peterborough 

Victoria 



Total 



MINNOWS 



165 
440 
100 



Haldirnand 
Total . 



705 



600 



500 



PEKCH 

Lake Erie -^ 23,175,000 

Lake St. Clair (Mitchell's Bay) 1,000,000 

Total 24,175,000 

PICKEREL 

EYED EGGS 

Exchange ...., 1,000,000 

Sale ... 200,000 

Algoma 500,000 

Bruce 1 -275,000 

Grey 200,000 

Muskoka :. 1 .500,000 

Nipissing 3,000,000 

Ontario 400,000 

Rainy River 4,000,000 

Simcoe 1 ,875,000 

Sudbury 4,250,000 

Wellington 250,000 

Total - 18,450,000 



FRY 

Algoma 14,310,000 

Bruce :• * -760^000 

Carleton : 2.500.000 

Cochrane 2,700,000 

Frontenac 8.(K)0,000 

Grenville 250,000 

Haldirnand 250,000 

Haliburton 2.050,000 

Hastings 4 ,750,000 

Kenora 63 .650,000 

Kent : 500,000 

Lanark 6.400.000 

Leeds 2,950.000 

Lennox-Addington 4 .700,000 

Manitoulin 4.700,000 

Middlesex 750.000 

Muskoka 7,500,000 

Nipissing. „ 9.900.000 

Northumberland 7,500,000 



Parry Sound 18,300,000 

Peterborough 11,850,000 

Prince Edward 8,250,000 

Rainy River 24,500,000 

Renfrew 10,600,000 

Russell 500,000 

Stormont 250,000 

Sudbury 9.050,000 

Thunder Bay - 1,000,000 

Timiskaming 4.450,000 

Victoria 3,450,000 

Great Lakes 46,400,000 



Total 283,310,000 

BROWN TROUT 

FINGERLINGS 



Brant 

Norfolk 

Oxford 

Miscellaneous 

Total 



YEARLINGS 



Brant 

Bruce 

Durham .... 

Elgin :...., 

Gj-ey 

Plaldimand 

Halton 

Hastings .... 

Huron 

Lambton ... 

Lincoln 

Middlesex 
Norfolk 



N orthumberland 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough .... 

Simcoe 

Waterloo 

Welland 

Wellington 

Wentworth 

York 



12,000 
1,000 
8.000 
2.000 

23,000 



24,600 
4.400 
15,250 
25.800 
29,400 

2.400 
24,600 
19.200 

8.100 

1,000 

2,800 

5.300 
46.000 
12.800 

3.800 
15,300 

3.400 
10,800 

3,600 
17,801 
31.500 
15.724 

6.600 
12.000 

3,600 
13.500 



Total 359.275 



LAKE TROUT 

EYED EGGS 



Exchange 
Total 



400,00