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Full text of "Annual Report of the Illinois Courts: Administrative Summary-2010"

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THE JUSTICES OF THE 
SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS 




Left to Right: Justice Anne M. Burke, Justice Rita B. Garman, Justice Charles E. Freeman, Chief Justice 
Thomas L. Kilbride, Justice Robert R. Thomas, Justice Lloyd A. Karmeier, Justice Mary Jane Theis. 



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TABLE of CONTENTS 



HOIS STfiTE LIBRARY 
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3 LLET DL4AD345 L 



Letter of Transmittal 1 

A Message from the Chief Justice 2-4 

Annual Report of the Chief Justice 

to the Ninety-Seventh General Assembly 6-11 

Court Funding ILLWOB-SfiffiE-tBRAF 12 " 13 

Court Operations 14-15 

The Justices of the Supreme Court 16-17 

Supreme Court Support Staff 18 

Supreme Court Committees 19 

Judicial Conference Committee Activities 20-21 

Appellate Court 22-27 

Circuit Courts 28-47 

Administrative Office 48-54 



Cover Design: Inside the Illinois Supreme Court, Springfield, Illinois. The murals within the courtroom were completed in 
1911 by Albert H. Krehbiel and depict the "Origin, Function, and Continuity of Law" using allegorical and mythological 
figures. Mr. W. Carby Zimmerman, architect of the Supreme Court Building, considered the work to be an "example of the best 
mural painting ever executed in the West." (information source: www.krehbielart.com) Cover photos provided by 
Daniels-Ackerman Photography. 



Printed by Authority of the State of Illinois 
11-11/300/PR11-2714 



2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



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LETTER of TRANSMITTAL 




Cynthia Y. Cobbs 
Director 



Jt is with pleasure that I transmit the 2010 Annual Report of 
the Illinois Courts. The Report highlights the 2010 projects and 
accomplishments of the Illinois Judicial Branch. The Judicial 
Branch - at all levels - continued to do an extraordinary job of 
providing justice to Illinois' citizens and this Report presents a 
summary of our work, our successes, and our challenges. 

The 2010 Report summarizes the Annual Meeting of the Illinois 
Judicial Conference; the tasks and activities of the Supreme Court's 
various Judicial Conference committees; and the initiatives engaged 
in by the Administrative Office of the Illinois Courts. As is customary, 
the Report provides the reader with an overview of the shared state 
and local funding responsibilities for the Illinois Judicial Branch and 
the cost of maintaining the "Third Branch" of state government. Also 
included are important statistical data regarding court case loads 
at the Circuit, Appellate, and Supreme Court levels. The Report 
concludes with a brief description and overview of the six divisions 
that comprise the Administrative Office of the Illinois Courts, their 
current projects, and forecasts for the upcoming year. 



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*** 



The Administrative Office gratefully acknowledges the Clerks of the Supreme, Appellate, and Circuit 
Courts for their continued support and cooperation in providing the case statistical data published 
herein. Collectively, we strive to ensure that the Illinois Judicial Branch builds on its past successes 
to meet the current and evolving challenges of delivering quality justice in a new era of government. 
Providing information to Illinois citizens regarding the work of every level of our court system with 
transparency is a continued component of our accountability. I also wish to express my gratitude 
for the talents and efforts of a great many individuals in the Illinois judiciary, as well as non-judicial 
and court personnel who help to ensure that a thoroughly independent and competent court system 
provides fair and accessible justice for the citizens of Illinois. This is a goal to which all of the 
Illinois Courts strive constantly to attain. 

Lastly, I encourage you to visit our website at www.state.il.us/court for up-to-date information 
concerning Illinois' courts,andto learn more about the Illinois Judicial Branch, and the Administrative 
Office of the Illinois Courts. This website is an essential source of information and education for the 
citizens whom we serve. 



Sincerely, 




Cynthia Y. Cobbs, Director 
Administrative Office of the 



linois Courts 



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2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 








A MESSAGE EROM 
CHIEF JUSTICE 



THOMAS L. 



KILBRIDE 



The 2010 Annual Report tells 
the story of the Illinois Courts' 
achievements and our enduring 
commitment to the law, to justice, 
andtoserving Illinois' 1 2. 9million residents. 
I am honored to report on the initiatives of 
the Illinois judicial branch on behalf of my 
fellow Justices, our Administrative Director, 
Cynthia Y Cobbs, and the more than 950 
Illinois judges who strive daily to ensure 
justice is served. I am exceedingly proud of 
our court system, and I invite you to review 
our many accomplishments and activities. 

The work and projects described here 
embody the core values of the Illinois 
judicial branch of government - preserving 
the rule of law, protecting the rights and 
liberties guaranteed by the United States 
and the Illinois constitutions, ensuring 
prompt and efficient access to justice, and 
treating all who are served by the courts 
with dignity. As the new Chief Justice, I 
recognize that I stand on the shoulders of 
the many who ably preceded me as the 
chief steward of the "third branch." I wish 
to thank my predecessor, Chief Justice 
Thomas Fitzgerald, who retired from 
the Court in October 2010, for the many 
lessons I learned through his integrity 
and leadership. I regret that he was not 
able to complete his term as Chief, and I 
thank him for his guidance and friendship. 



When Justice Fitzgerald retired, the Court 
welcomed its newest Justice from the First 
Judicial District, Mary Jane Theis. Justice 
Theis joins Justices Rita B. Garman and 
Anne M. Burke to markthefirsttime in history 
that three women serve simultaneously on 
the Illinois Supreme Court. 

In 2010, economic recovery remained 
elusive, requiring comprehensive cost 
saving strategies. Prudent stewardship 
of our limited fiscal resources, in both the 
reviewing and trial courts, ensured that 
justice was neither delayed nor disrupted. 
The Illinois courts continued to administer 
fair and impartial justice in a fiscally 
responsible manner. 

Probation 

The level of appropriations provided 
to the Supreme Court in 2010 for the 
administration of Illinois' probation system 
continued to be a concern. Under the 
direction of the Supreme Court and the 
leadership of the Administrative Office, 
Illinois probation maintains its systemic 
commitment to Evidence-Based Practices 
(EBP), promoting community safety 
through managing and reducing offender 
risk, requiring offender accountability, and 
equipping probationers with competencies 



2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



encouraging pro-social conduct. As in 
fiscal year 2009, the Supreme Court's 
2010 appropriation for probation 
services was substantially less than the 
amount included in the Court's budget 
request. With a limited level of funding 
and probation's diminished capacity to 
be a viable alternative to incarceration, 
Governor Quinn again responded to the 
Court's plea by granting an additional $20 
million to the Court's revenues. The Court 
is grateful to the Governor for his favorable 
response. 

Judicial Accountability 

Accompanying the Administrative 
Summary of the 201 Annual Report is the 
Statistical Report providing information 
about the number and types of cases 
filed and disposed of in 2010. Case 
numbers, though, do not tell the entire 
story because each case affects real 
people by addressing the resolution of 
rights, the determination of custody, the 
disposition of property, or in some cases, 
the restraint or loss of liberty. Therefore, 
this Report seeks to summarize a sampling 
of the Illinois judiciary's many initiatives, 
demonstrating accountability for our 
work and transparency in our processes. 

A few years back, our Supreme Court 
adopted a Statement of Expectations for 
Illinois Judges. The words in the statement 
continue to express the strong values of 
our judiciary. "Critical to an independent 
judiciary is the public 's trust and confidence 
in the men and women who don the robes, 
interpret our laws and who seek to fairly 
administer justice." Consistent with this 
principle, the Supreme Court expanded 
its judge mentor program designed to 
aid judges in the performance of their 
judicial duties. The Peer Judge Mentor 
Program, modeled after the successful 



New Judge Mentor Program that the Court 
and Administrative Office have conducted 
since 1998, trains and assigns judicial 
mentors to Illinois judges who seek to 
enhance their skills or performance. In 
2010, 47 current or retired Illinois judges 
completed the inaugural Peer Judge 
Mentor Training-for-Trainers. This group 
provides a confidential relationship 
between paired judges for a period of at 
least six months, allowing new skills to 
be developed, modeled, and practiced to 
make a good judge even better. 

Judicial Education 

In 2010, the Supreme Court hosted 
the biennial Education Conference in 
Chicago. The Education Conference 
is the centerpiece of the Court's 
Comprehensive Education Plan for Illinois 
Judges, offering a comprehensive array 
of workshops to all Illinois judges. The 
2010 Conference programs addressed 
substantive law as well as the practical 
aspects of judging and permitted Illinois 
judges to fulfill their mandated 30 
hours of continuing judicial education. 

Consistent with its rulemaking authority, 
the Supreme Court frequently reviews and 
amends its rules of practice to ensure that 
the ends of justice are fairly and efficiently 
met. One of the more significant rule 
amendments in 201 was the modification 
of Supreme Court Rule 304 (Appeals from 
Final Judgements That Do Not Dispose of 
an Entire Proceeding). The amendments 
were intended to provide a swifter means 
for achieving permanency and stability 
in child custody issues in divorce and 
parentage cases. As then-Chief Justice 
Fitzgerald offered, "A child's life doesn't 
stop and wait for us," noting that "these 



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issues are some of the most important that 
come before our judicial system." 

Mental Health Courts 

To optimize the use of court and 
community resources in cases involving 
mental health issues, the Court created 
the Special Supreme Court Advisory 
Committee on Justice and Mental Health. 
The establishment of the 22-member 
panel mirrors numerous state and 
national initiatives designed to enhance 
the identification and treatment of mental 
health issues that result in criminal conduct. 

In Illinois, our dozen mental health courts 
directly address the purpose and mission 
of the Special Committee. Similar to 
drug courts, mental health courts employ 
a problem-solving approach, using the 
power of the court with other justice system 
partners (prosecutors, defense counsel, 
treatment providers, probation officers, 
law enforcement, mental health experts, 
community leaders, and others) to plan 
and closely monitor defendants' progress 
toward stability and recovery. 

Code of Evidence 

After nearly two years of work led by 
Chief Justice Fitzgerald, the Illinois' rules 
of evidence were codified. Following 
a comprehensive review of state and 
federal rules of evidence, the drafting 
of proposed rules for codification, and a 
series of public hearings, all conducted by 
the Special Supreme Court Committee on 
Illinois Evidence, the Court adopted the 
first Illinois Code of Evidence, effective on 
January 1 , 201 1 . The Special Committee 
then conducted a series of regional training 
sessions throughout the state to introduce 
Illinois judges to the new Code. 



Commission on 
Professionalism 

Finally, akey program of the IllinoisSupreme 
Court is the continued sponsorship of 
annual professional meetings organized 
by the Commission on Professionalism 
for incoming students at Illinois law 
schools. Programs were conducted in 
six Illinois law schools to help first-year 
law students gain exposure during their 
law school orientation to professionalism 
issues frequently faced by attorneys. 
This program includes presentations by 
judges and roundtable discussion groups 
addressing a range of ethical issues within 
specific scenarios, facilitated by attending 
attorneys and local judges. The students 
also take a "pledge of professionalism" as 
part of this popular program emphasizing 
professionalism at the earliest stages of 
their legal careers. In 2010, 3,097 new 
attorneys were admitted to practice. 

Conclusion 

In sum, this report provides only a brief 
synopsis of some activities of our highly 
conscientious and dedicated judiciary. I 
invite your further review of the work and 
accomplishments of the Illinois judicial 
branch as presented in the 2010 Annual 
Report. In closing, I extend my sincere 
appreciation to all those who have 
assisted with our courts' many projects 
and initiatives. It is my sincere privilege to 
serve as your Chief Justice. 

Thomas L. Kilbride 

Chief Justice 

Illinois Supreme Court 



2070 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



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2010 ANNUAL REPORT 

TO THE 

NINETY-SEVENTH ILLINOIS 
GENERAL ASSEMBLY 



January 28, 2011 

Honorable Michael J. Madigan 
Speaker of the House 
House of Representatives 
Springfield, IL 62706 

Honorable Tom Cross 
Republican Leader 
House of Representatives 
Springfield, IL 62706 



Honorable John J. Cullerton 
President of the Senate 
State Senate 
Springfield, IL 62706 

Honorable Christine Radogno 
Republican Leader 
State Senate 
Springfield, IL 62706 



Dear Messrs. Madigan, Cullerton, Cross, and Ms. Radogno: 

Attached is the 2010 Annual Report on behalf of the Illinois Supreme Court. I submit this Report to 
the General Assembly pursuant to Article VI, Section 17 of the Illinois Constitution of 1970, requiring 
the Supreme Court to report annually in writing to the General Assembly regarding the annual Judicial 
Conference. The Judicial Conference considers the work of the courts and suggests improvements in the 
administration of justice. In compliance with the constitutional mandate, this report includes a summary of 
the work performed by the six committees constituting the Judicial Conference. 

The Committees of the Judicial Conference include: (1) Alternative Dispute Resolution; (2) Criminal Law 
and Probation Administration; (3) Discovery Procedures; (4) Judicial Education; (5) Study Committee on 
Complex Litigation; and (6) Study Committee on Juvenile Justice. The annual meeting of the Judicial 
Conference was convened on October 21, 2010, to consider committee reports and recommendations. 
Those reports detailed initiatives undertaken during 2010. The annual report summarizes those initiatives 
and foretells of the projects and goals anticipated by the Conference committees in 201 1 . 

With the submission of this report to the General Assembly, the Supreme Court renews its commitment 
to the effective administration of justice and the management of the courts, to the careful stewardship 
of those resources provided for the operation of the courts, and to the development of plans and goals 
designed to assure that the Illinois judicial branch provides justice to our citizens and upholds the rule of 
law. 



On behalf of the Court, 
Assembly. 

Respectfully, 



respectfully submit the Supreme Court's 2010 Annual Report to the General 



zt./^ 



Thomas L. Kilbride 
Chief Justice 



2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



2010 Illinois Judicial Conference 

The annual meeting of the Illinois Judicial Conference 
was held on October 21 , 2010, in Chicago, Illinois. The 
Conference, which is authorized by Article VI, Section 17 
of the Illinois Constitution of 1 970, is mandated to consider 
the work of the courts and to suggest improvements in 
the administration of justice. The constitutional directive 
is implemented through Supreme Court Rule 41, which 
defines the duties and membership of the Conference. 
As provided by the Rule, the Conference is composed of 
judges from all levels of the judiciary, representing Illinois' 
five judicial districts. The Justices of the Supreme Court 
of Illinois, including the Chief Justice who presides over 
the Conference, also serve as members. Also, pursuant 
to Supreme Court Rule, the Administrative Director 
serves as an ex-officio member of the Conference. 

The work of the Judicial Conference is on-going 
throughout the year, largely through the efforts of seven 
appointed committees: Alternative Dispute Resolution 
Coordinating Committee; Automation and Technology 
Committee; Study Committee on Complex Litigation; 
Committee on Education; Committee on Criminal Law 
and Probation Administration; Committee on Discovery 
Procedures; and the Study Committee on Juvenile 
Justice. The membership rosters of the committees 
include appellate, circuit and associate judges who serve 
as full members of the Judicial Conference. Their work is 
aided by law professors, attorneys and some additional 
judges, all appointed by the Supreme Court to serve as 
either associate members or advisors to the committees. 
Senior level staff of the Administrative Office of the Illinois 
Courts serve as liaisons to support the committees' work. 

The Executive Committee, authorized through Supreme 
Court Rule 41 , acts on behalf of the Conference when the 
Conference is not in session. The Executive Committee 
consists of fourteen judges, six of whom are from the 
First Judicial District (Cook County) and two members 
each from judicial districts two, three, four and five. The 
Executive Committee previews the written reports of the 
conference committees and submits, for the Supreme 
Court's approval, an agenda for the annual meeting. 



As in prior years, the 2010 Annual Meeting of the 
Judicial Conference was conducted in a one-day format 
to decrease judicial time away from the bench, and to 
effectively manage costs, while still providing a forum 
for a thorough review of each committee's work. The 
meeting was convened by then Chief Justice Thomas 
R. Fitzgerald, who welcomed Conference members and 
thanked them for their diligent service throughout the 
conference year. He then acknowledged each of the 
current members of the Supreme Court: Justice Charles 
E. Freeman; Justice Anne M. Burke; Justice Robert 
R. Thomas; Justice Rita B. Garman; Justice Lloyd A. 
Karmeier; incoming Chief Justice Thomas L. Kilbride; 
as well as retired Supreme Court Justice Philip Rarick. 

In his remarks, Chief Justice Fitzgerald reflected on 
his nearly thirty years of judicial service in the Illinois 
Courts. On September 14, 2010, Chief Justice Fitzgerald 
had announced his retirement, effective October 25, 
2010. The Chief Justice commented that his career 
was marked by duty and an abiding care and respect 
for the fair administration of justice. He reflected on 
the 1980's Greylord Investigation and scandal that had 
shaken the community and damaged the public's trust 
in the judiciary. In relating the events which followed, 
Justice Fitzgerald admonished that Greylord should 
remain a life-lesson for all lawyers and judges to 
always sustain the commitment to do the right thing. 

In closing, Chief Justice Fitzgerald challenged all 
judges to continue to commit themselves to the 
highest standards of professional practice, "to do it 
the way it has to be done, to be noble and good." 

The Annual Meeting continued with Conference 
committee meetings devoted to finalizing committee 
reports and initiating planning for Conference Year 201 1 . 
The afternoon plenary session included a presentation 
from each of the committees summarizing their activities 
in Conference Year 2010 and offering initial suggestions 
for tasks in Conference Year 2011. The Committee on 
Automation and Technology had not been charged by 
the Court to meet this conference year, and therefore 
did not present a report. However, the Committee will 



2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



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be re-constituted in 2011. The following summarizes 
the written and oral substance of the committee reports 
presented: 

Alternative Dispute Resolution 
Coordinating Committee 

The Alternative Dispute Resolution Coordinating 
Committee monitors and assesses both the court- 
annexed mandatory arbitration and mediation 
programs approved by the Supreme Court. During 
the course of this Conference year, in coordination 
with the Administrative Office of the Illinois Courts, the 
Committee continued to track mandatory arbitration 
statistics and trends to determine program efficacy. 

The Committee also undertook many initiatives prescribed 
by the Court during Conference Year 201 0. Some of those 
projects included (1) finalization of a training curriculum 
for new arbitrators, (2) planning for production of an 
arbitrator training video, (3) development of a participant 
satisfaction survey for arbitration attorneys and litigants, 
(4) drafting a recommendation concerning a settlement 
data initiative, (5) reviewing the collection method of 
statistics relating to arbitration programs, (6) developing 
a survey to investigate the reasons for rejection of awards 
in arbitration hearings, (7) exploring the development of 
a mentor training program for arbitrator chairpersons, 
and (8) examining the issue of residency requirements 
for arbitrators. The Committee also met with arbitration 
administrators and supervising judges of circuits with 
mandatory arbitration programs to discuss program 
operations and identify areas for improvement. As a final 
matter, the Committee monitored existing court-annexed 
mediation programs in Illinois. 

Study Committee on 
Complex Litigation 

The Study Committee on Complex Litigation primarily 
focused its work on writing, editing and approving the new 
Fourth Edition of the Manual on Complex Civil Litigation. 
The Committee projected completion of its work on the 
Manual by the end of Conference Year 201 0. New subject 
matter to be covered in the fourth edition will include case 
law on declaratory judgment and construction cases. 
The Committee also reviewed the Criminal Law and 
Procedure Benchbook developed by the Judicial 
2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT 



Conference Committee on Education. After review, the 
Committee determined that revisions to the Manual on 
Complex Criminal Litigation should be the focus of their 
Conference Year 201 1 activities. 

Committee on Criminal Law and 
Probation Administration 

The Committee on Criminal Law and Probation 
Administration analyzed various statutes 
and recommendations concerning the use of 
video conferencing in criminal proceedings. The 
Committee concluded that a Supreme Court rule 
would provide uniformity for the utilization of video 
conferencing technology in such proceedings. 

The Committee continued its study of the utility of a 
criminal dispute resolution program in Illinois. In its 
consideration, the Committee examined programs from 
other states, reviewed treatises and articles on the 
issue, and heard presentations from persons involved 
in existing Illinois dispute resolution programs. The 
Committee concluded that a Supreme Court 
rule providing minimum guidelines is necessary. 

With respect to use of video conferencing and the 
application of criminal dispute resolution programs, 
the Committee has forwarded draft rules to the 
Administrative Director for management with the Court. 

Additionally, the Committee commenced discussion 
on the update to the 2007 Specialty Court Survey. 
In that regard, the Committee acknowledged 
receipt of information concerning new Drug, 
Mental Health, and Veterans Courts that have been 
established in Illinois since the presentation of 
the 2007 survey. The Committee is collaborating 
with the Administrative Office of the Illinois Courts 
to develop the planned updated survey instrument. 

Committee on Discovery Procedures 

In Conference Year 2010, the Committee on Discovery 
Procedures considered and disposed of several proposals 
forwarded from the Supreme Court Rules Committee. 
Specifically, the Discovery Committee recommended 
adoption of a proposal to amend Supreme Court Rule 
OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



204 to allow attorneys to issue subpoenas for deposition. 
The Committee, however, voted against a proposed 
amendment to the Rule which would limit fees that a 
physician could charge for giving deposition testimony. 

The Committee also considered and recommended 
adoption of proposed amendments to Supreme Court 
Rule 216 to, among other things, limit the number of 
reguests for admission to thirty (30); reguire that a 
party prepare reguests as a separate document; to 
serve them separately; and, to include a warning of the 
conseguences absent a timely response to a reguest. 

In addition, the Committee considered and rejected two 
(2) other proposals concerning discovery procedures. 
First, the Committee rejected a proposal which would 
permit the formulation of guestions addressed to 
nonparty physicians prior to deciding whether to take 
their depositions. The Committee determined that the 
formulation of such guestions would not be feasible 
because (1) compensation for answering any guestions 
could become an issue; (2) a doctor could use the 
proposed guestions as an escape mechanism to avoid a 
deposition; (3) the guestions could be used as a means 
to get around the Petrillo limitations; or (4) privacy 
concerns could become an issue. The second proposal 
concerned mandating disclosure of a list of cases in which 
a witness had previously testified as an expert within the 
prior four years and disclosure of all correspondence 
or communications between counsel and the expert. 

Pending with the Committee is the development of 
proposed rules to govern e-Discovery. Specifically, the 
Committee is charged with the task of drafting proposed 
amendments to select Supreme Court Rules, as well 
as guidelines to assist trial court judges in addressing 
e-Discovery issues. Preliminarily, during Conference 
Year 2010, the Committee monitored treatment of 
proposed amendments to e-Discovery rules currently 
under review by the federal court in the Northern District, 
Illinois; examined e-Discovery rules in other states, as 
well as guidelines established by the Conference of 
Chief Justices. 



Committee on Education 

The Committee on Education is charged with identifying 
ongoing educational needs for the Illinois judiciary and 
developing short-term and long-term plans to address 
those needs. For Conference Year 2010, the Committee 
received a continuing charge to identify emerging legal, 
sociological, cultural, and technical issues that may 
impact decision-making and court administration and, 
based on these emerging issues, to recommend and 
develop programs for both new and experienced judges. 
Additionally, the Committee is charged with examining 
and commending judicial education programs offered by 
organizations and entities, other than the Supreme Court, 
as potential sources for continuing judicial education. 

Under this broad umbrella of judicial education and 
training, the Committee continued to research and 
recommend topics and faculty for the biennial Education 
Conference, the annual New Judge Seminar, the 
multiple training events which comprise the annual 
Seminar Series, and the Advanced Judicial Academy. 

Education Conference serves as the centerpiece of the 
Supreme Court's Comprehensive Judicial Education Plan 
for Illinois Judges. The 201 Education Conference, which 
had as its theme Judging in a Diverse America, was held 
in February and April, 201 0. The Conference is a 30-hour 
training event which, in 2010, provided over 50 sessions 
for nearly all of the 958 trial and appellate court judges. 
Sessions were grouped into four tracks: civil, criminal, 
family, and judicial conduct, ethics and professionalism. 

The annual New Judge Seminar, conducted in 
December, 2009, provided an intensive week-long 
introduction to the thirty-eight (38) newest members to 
the Illinois bench. Judicial ethics and conduct, including 
discussions concerning attendance, timeliness and, 
other issues related to professional conduct, were topics 
presented by experienced faculty. The curriculum is 
designed to aid a new judge's transition to the bench, 
help develop skills necessary to become an effective 
jurist and, promote an increased knowledge of various 



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substantive and procedural topics. Planning is currently 
underway for the next New Judge Seminar to be held in 
January, 2011. 

The Committee also focused its attention on preparing 
for the Annual Seminar Series and the Advanced Judicial 
Academy. Specifically, the Committee designed and 
initiated planning of the 2010-2011 Seminar Series 
approved by the Court. Further, the Committee initiated 
planning and development of curriculum for the June 
201 1 Advanced Judicial Academy, the theme of which 
is To Have or Have Not: The Impact of Poverty and 
Wealth on Justice. Finally, the Committee continued 
its considerable work in drafting and updating the 
Illinois Judicial Benchbooks. Currently, over 3,700 
paper and CD-ROM copies have been distributed. 
The Committee also focused on faculty development, 
reviewed proposed non-judicial conference judicial 
education programs and providers, and proposed 
modifications to the Comprehensive Judicial Education 
Plan, matters which are pending with the Court. 

Study Committee on Juvenile Justice 

During Conference Year 2010, the Committee on 
Juvenile Justice focused primarily on updating Volume 
II of the Illinois Juvenile Law Benchbook, which 
addresses proceedings brought in juvenile court 
involving allegations of abuse, neglect, dependency 
and termination of parental rights. The Committee 
reasonably anticipates that an update to Volume II will be 
available for the New Judge Seminar in January, 2011. 

Further, the Committee continued its study of juvenile 
drug courts in Illinois by examining other states' juvenile 
drug courts, finding that such programs are often 
evaluated through the use of standards for measuring 
recidivism, retention and sobriety. The Committee also 
found that national organizations have created standards 
for specialty courts that could be utilized similarly in 
Illinois to measure the effectiveness of juvenile drug 
courts. The Committee determined that the effectiveness 
of juvenile drug courts depends on adeguate funding for 
programs in the community, which offer an alternative 
to drug use, and depends on addressing the often 
underlying mental health issues of juvenile drug 
users. The Committee concluded that the efficacy of 
2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT 



juvenile drug courts is highly dependent on addressing 
other issues, including funding and mental health. 
The Committee also continued its study of accessing 
mental health services for juveniles in Illinois. The 
Committee found that there are resources and data 
available through federal and national organizations 
concerning the provision of mental health services 
for juveniles. The Committee concluded that lack 
of adequate funding remains a major barrier to the 
provision of mental health services for juveniles. 

Additionally, the Committee discussed the applicability 
of the best interests of the minor standard versus the 
superior rights standard in adjudicating guardianship 
cases. In that regard, the Committee monitored the 
status of Senate Bill 1430, which would answer the 
question regarding the standard to be applied in such 
cases. If passed, the Bill would amend the Probate Act 
to provide that a guardianship shall not be terminated 
by a court unless the court finds, based upon clear and 
convincing evidence, that there has been a material 
change in circumstances since the guardianship was 
created and that termination is in the minor's best interest. 

Conclusion 



As in prior years, the work undertaken by the Judicial 
Conference in 2010 covered a broad scope of issues 
and topics, ranging from the use of video conferencing 
in criminal proceedings, updating manuals and 
benchbooks, to the education and training of new and 
experienced judges. Although many projects and 
initiatives were completed in Conference Year 2010, 
more are anticipated to continue into Conference Year 
201 1 , and additional projects will be assigned. Thus, the 
work of the Judicial Conference is ongoing. The work of 
the 2010 Judicial Conference has met the constitutional 
mandate to make suggestions to the Supreme Court to 
improve the administration of justice in Illinois. 



OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



Supreme Court Decisions 
Which the General Assembly May Wish to Consider 



Medical Malpractice - 

Noneconomic Damages Caps 

In Lebron et al. v. Gottlieb Memorial Hospital, et al., S. 
Ct. Docket Nos. 105741, 105745 cons. (February 4, 
2010) plaintiffs challenged the caps on noneconomic 
damages set forth in section 2-1706.5 of the Code of 
Civil Procedure (735 ILCS 5/2-1706.5 (West 2008)), 
which was adopted as part of Public Act 94-677. The 
Supreme Court determined that section 2-1706.5 of the 
Code of Civil Procedure is unconstitutional because 
placing a limitation on noneconomic damages in 
medical malpractice actions violates the separation of 
powers clause of the Illinois Constitution by encroaching 
upon the inherent power of the judiciary. In so holding, 
the court relied on its decision in Best v. Taylor Machine 
Works, 179 III. 2d 367 (1997), which held that a cap on 
noneconomic damages violates the separation of powers 
clause because it functions as a legislative remittitur 
and thereby encroaches on the power of the judiciary 
to reduce excessive verdicts. The court reasoned 
that section 2-1706.5, like the statutory damage caps 
held unconstitutional in Best, unduly infringes upon 
the fundamentally judicial prerogative of determining 
whether a jury's assessment of damages is excessive 
within the meaning of the law such that a remittitur is 
appropriate. The court furthermore concluded that, 
because Public Act 94-677 contains an inseverability 
clause, it is invalid and void in its entirety. 



Nursing Home Care Act - 
Federal Preemption 

In Carter v. SSC Odin Operating Company, S. Ct. Docket 
No. 106511 (April 15, 2010), plaintiff entered into a 
written "Health Care Arbitration Agreement," agreeing to 
submit to binding arbitration. Plaintiff subsequently filed 
a complaint alleging violations of the Nursing Home Care 
Act and the Wrongful Death Act for defendant's failure 
to provide adequate and properly supervised care. 
Defendant responded that both counts of the lawsuit 
were precluded by the arbitration agreement and filed 
a motion to compel arbitration based on section 2 of the 
Federal Arbitration Act (FAA). The supreme court held 
that the public policy behind the antiwaiver provisions 
of sections 3-606 and 3-607 of the Nursing Home Care 
Act are not grounds as exist at law or in equity for the 
revocation of any contract within the meaning of section 
2 of the FAA (9 U.S.C. § 2 (2000)). The court explained 
that section 2 of the FAA permits voiding of an arbitration 
agreement only on such grounds as exist at law or in 
equity for the revocation of any contract. In so holding, 
the court explained that the United States Supreme 
Court's decisions in Southland Corp. v. Keating, 465 
U.S. 1 (1984) and Preston v. Ferrer, 552 U.S. 346 (2008) 
make clear that state statutes are preempted by the FAA 
if the statutes, as applied, preclude the enforcement 
of federally protected arbitration rights, regardless of 
whether the state statutes specifically target arbitration 
agreements. Here, the antiwaiver provisions of the 
Nursing Home Care Act purport to invalidate arbitration 
agreements in a specific type of contract, those involving 
nursing care, and for that reason they are not a defense 
generally applicable to "any contract." 



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2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



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STATE AND LOCAL 
FUNDING FOR 
THE COURTS 

Financing the state court system is a shared responsibility 
of the state and the 102 counties of the state. Revenue to 
provide court services to the people of the state comes from a 
variety of sources: the state income tax, county property taxes, case 
filing fees, court-imposed fines and assessments, and other fees. 



State government pays for the salaries, benefits, 
and office expenses of supreme and appellate court 
judges, and salaries and benefits of circuit court 
judges. Effective July 1, 2010, judicial salaries, as 
determined by the legislature, were: Supreme Court 
justices, $207,066; appellate court judges, $194,888; 
circuit court judges, $178,835; and associate judges, 
$169,893. The state also pays for support staff of 
supreme and appellate court judges, staff in other units 
of the supreme and appellate courts, a small number 
of other personnel in the circuit courts, and mandatory 
arbitration staff in several counties. Part of the cost 
of operating the mandatory arbitration program is 
offset by fees paid by participants in the program. 
During Calendar Year 2010, the arbitration filing and 
rejection fees collected amounted to $6,770,919. 



State funding for probation departments currently 
covers approximately 2,900 probation personnel, 
for which the counties receive partial salary 
reimbursement on a monthly basis. At the present 
time, state funding provides for about 24% of 
the total cost of probation services in the state. 

County governments pay part of the cost of financing 
circuit court operations. Counties provide office and 
courtroom space, maintenance, and support staff to 
assist the circuit court judges. Circuit clerks collect 
money to help pay for their operations and some court 
operations. They also collect and disburse revenues 
to help fund local and state government programs, as 
summarized on the next page. 



State Funding 












80 








Appropriations for State Agencies 
Fiscal Year 2011 


70 


Governor's 
Agencies 
— 66.7% 


TAT" 


The graph to the right, shows the Supreme 


60 






5oc 






Court's share of the total appropriations 


50 








for Fiscal Year 2011 (July 1, 2010 to June 








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30, 2011). The total appropriation was 


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$60,213,505,000. The appropriation for the 








Education 




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courts was $326,229,000. 


30 










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Source: Table I-A: Operating Appropriations 


20 












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by Agency, Chapter 2 










Elected 




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Governor's Budget Message to the 


10 








Officials 




Other Legislative 


General Assembly for Fiscal Year 2012 










4.8% 


Courts 


Agencies Agencies 















0.5% 


0.3% 0.2% 









2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



Local Funding 



Uncollected Claims 



The circuit clerk's office in each county provides a 
variety of court recordkeeping and financial accounting 
services. Circuit clerks are elected for four-year terms 
by the voters in each county. Circuit clerks, with help 
from deputy clerks, attend sessions of the court, 
preserve court files and papers, and maintain complete 
records of all cases. Employees of the clerks' offices are 
appointed by and are accountable to the circuit clerk, 
with the county board having budgetary authority. 
During 2010, the total number of full-time employees 
in all 102 circuit clerk offices was 3,584, assisted by a 
total of 142 part-time employees. The cost of operating 
all circuit clerks' offices totaled $214,067,739 in 2010. 

Revenue to pay for these court-related services comes 
primarily from property taxes, filing fees, and court- 
ordered fines and costs. Fines, fees and other costs 
collected by circuit clerks are governed primarily by 
statute and Supreme Court rule. 

Revenue to Finance 
Local Improvements 

Fees and court-ordered fines were collected in 2010 by 
circuit clerks and earmarked for improvements in the 
clerks' offices and to help defray the cost to the county 
of operating the courts at the local level. 

Court Document Storage Fund 

is used for any costs relative to the storage of 
court records. 

$26,854,401 

Court Automation Fund 

is used to establish and maintain automated 
systems for keeping court records. 
$27,838,261 

County Law Library Fund 

helps defray the costs of maintaining a law 
library in the county for judges, attorneys, and 
the public. 

$10,542,752 

County Fund To Finance the Court System 

is available from fees collected by circuit clerks 

to help finance the court system in the county. 

$7,002,381 

Circuit Court Clerk Operations 
and Administrative Fund 

is used to offset costs incurred for collection 

and disbursement of State and local funds. 

$2,715,280 



The Administrative Office, the Supreme Court Clerk, 
the Supreme Court Library, and the Clerks of the 
five Appellate Districts are responsible for collecting 
certain fees. Outstanding accounts receivable are 
normally collected by the unit to which the account 
is owed. Additionally, a small number of accounts 
receivable are turned over to private collection 
agencies and the State Comptroller's offset system. 
At the end of FY10, there were 100 claims due and 
payable, totaling $607,993.16. 

Revenue to Finance 
Other Programs 

In addition to collecting fees for local improvements, 
circuit clerks receive, account for, and distribute 
millions of dollars to county governments, various local 
governmental entities, and various state funds. Some of 
the programs and dollars collected in 2010 by circuit 
clerks are listed below: 

Child Support and Maintenance: Court ordered 
payments collected and distributed by Circuit 
Clerks and the State Disbursement Unit. 
$1,042,489,383 

Drug Treatment Fund: Court ordered drug 
assessments are used to pay for treatment 
programs for people addicted to alcohol, 
cannabis, or controlled substances. 
$3,735,564 

Violent Crime Victims Assistance: Court 
ordered penalties in criminal and certain traffic 
cases are used to support victim and witness 
assistance centers throughout the state. 
$5,894,656 

Trauma Center Fund: Fees collected in certain 
traffic, DUI, and criminal cases are used to 
support Illinois hospitals that are designated 
as trauma centers. 

$4,301,797 

Traffic and Criminal Conviction Surcharge: 

An additional penalty imposed in traffic and 
criminal cases is used for training of law 
enforcement and correctional officers. 
$4,120,264 

Drivers Education Fund: Penalties and 
forfeitures in offenses reportable to the 
Secretary of State are used for driver education 
programs in high schools. 

$3,636,165 




9 

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2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



CASEFLOW 



i 



llinois has had a unified court system since 1964. In that year, voters 
approved an amendment to the 1870 constitution which made major 
changes in the system. 



Prior to 1964, the court system was 
fragmented. The courts of original jurisdiction had 
some concurrent and overlapping jurisdiction, and 
each court operated independently of the others. 
The old system had a circuit court with statewide 
original jurisdiction in all cases and some appellate 
jurisdiction; a Superior Court of Cook County 
having concurrent jurisdiction with the Circuit 
Court of Cook County; the Criminal Court of Cook 
County also having concurrent jurisdiction with the 
Circuit Court of Cook County but limited to criminal 
cases; a county court in each county with special 
jurisdiction that partially overlapped that of the 
circuit court; a probate court in certain counties with 
special jurisdiction; statutory municipal, city, town 
and village courts, with jurisdiction overlapping 
that of the circuit court; and justice of the peace 
and police magistrate courts with limited 
jurisdiction. 

By 1962, Cook County alone had 
208 courts: circuit court, superior court, 
family court, criminal court, probate 
court, county court, twenty-four city 
village, town and municipal courts, 

The path a case may follow 
in the process from start to 
finish can be complicated. 
The diagram, to the 
right, demonstrates, 
in general terms, 
how cases proceed 
through the state 
court system. 



seventy-five justice of the peace courts, and 103 
police magistrate courts. In addition, there were 
seven Supreme Court districts numbered from 
south to north and four appellate court districts 
numbered from north to south. For example, the 
first Supreme Court district was in a part of the 
fourth appellate court district and the seventh 
Supreme Court district was in a part of the first 
appellate court district. In today's system, as 
shown below, there are three levels of courts: 
circuit, appellate, and supreme, all operating within 
clearly defined geographical boundaries. The 
circuit court is a court of original jurisdiction which 
is divided into twenty-three circuits. Each circuit 
is located in one of five appellate court districts. 
Cases enter the circuit court via the circuit clerk's 
office in a county of the circuit. Cases may be 
appealed to the appellate court in the district 
containing the circuit court, or, in certain 
circumstances, directly to the Supreme 
Court. After an appellate court decision, 
parties to the case may seek discretionary 
review by the Supreme Court. Supreme 
and appellate district and circuit maps 
are found in their respective sections 
of this publication. 




2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



JUDICIAL BRANCH 
ADMINISTRATION 



Supreme Court 



The Supreme Court of Illinois, in addition to being the state's highest 
court, is responsible for the state's unified trial court, one appellate court 
with five districts, and several supporting units. General administrative 
and supervisory authority over the court system is vested in the Supreme 
Court. Several advisory bodies assist with this mission by making 
recommendations to the court. These include the Judicial Conference of 
Illinois and the various committees of the court. More information about 
committees can be found in the following sections. The Supreme Court 
also makes appointments to other committees, commissions, and boards as 
listed at the right. The chief justice is responsible for exercising the court's 
general administrative and supervisory authority in accordance with the 
court's rules. The Supreme Court appoints an administrative director to 
assist the chief justice in his duties. The staff of the Administrative Office 
of the Illinois Courts supports this function. Key support personnel exist at 
each level of the court to assist judges with the administration of justice. 
At the Supreme Court level, this includes the clerk of the Supreme Court, 
research director, marshal, and Supreme Court librarian and their staffs. 
Each support unit is described on page eighteen. 



Appellate Court 



At the appel late court level, the presiding judge and judges of each appel late 
district are assisted by a clerk of the appellate court and research director 
and their staffs appointed by the appellate judges. Appeals enter the clerk's 
office, where deputy clerks assign them filing schedules and actively monitor 
and review cases as they progress through record preparation, motions, 
briefing, and oral arguments. Problems such as late filings, jurisdictional 
defects, inadequate records or noncompliant briefs are_ referred to the 
court. After the court has heard an appeal, the clerk's office issues the 
court's decision and tracks all post-decision activity. The clerk's office also 
manages the court's computerized and manual recordkeeping systems 
and oversees the maintenance of physical facilities. The clerk responds to 
requests and questions concerning the court's cases and procedures. The 
research director oversees a staff of attorneys and secretaries providing 
centralized legal research services to judges. 

Circuit Court 

Each circuit is administered by a chief judge who is selected by the circuit 
court judges of the circuit. The chief judge is assisted by an administrative 
assistant and/or trial court administrator and other support staff. The 
number of counties in each circuit currently ranges from one to twelve. In 
each county, voters elect a circuit clerk for a four-year term. Circuit clerks, 
with help from deputy clerks hired by the circuit clerk, attend sessions of 
the court, preserve court files and papers, maintain complete records of all 
cases, and maintain records of money received and disbursed. 



Judicial Inquiry Board 

The Supreme Court appoints two circuit 
judges to the board, the governor also appoints 
four non-lawyers and three lawyers, which 
receives and investigates complaints against 
judges and prosecutes the validated complaint 
before the Illinois Courts Commission. 

Illinois Courts Commission 

The commission consists of a Supreme Court 
justice, two circuit judges selected by the 
Supreme Court, two appellate court judges 
selected by the appellate court, and two 
citizen members selected by the governor. The 
commission hears complaints brought by the 
Judicial Inquiry Board and can discipline a 
judge or remove a judge from office. 

Board of Admissions to the Bar 

The Supreme Court establishes rules and 
standards for the education, testing, and 
admission of law school graduates to the 
practice of law in the state and appoints 
seven attorneys to sit on the board. The board 
oversees the process of admitting law school 
graduates to the practice of law. 

Committee on Character and 
Fitness 

The Supreme Court appoints attorneys to a 
committee in each of the five judicial districts 
to evaluate the moral character and general 
fitness of applicants to practice law. 

Attorney Registration and 
Disciplinary Commission 

The Supreme Court establishes rules for 
the registration and discipline of attorneys 
and appoints four lawyers and three non- 
lawyers to the commission which oversees the 
registration and disciplinary process. 

State Appellate Defender 

The Supreme Court appoints the State 
Appellate Defender and two members to the 
State Appellate Defender Commission. Each 
appellate court district appoints one member 
to the Commission and the governor appoints 
two members. 

Board of Trustees of the Judges 
Retirement System 

The Supreme Court appoints three judges 
to the Board of Trustees of the Judges 
Retirement System and the chief justice is an 
ex-officio member, as is the state treasurer. 



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2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



THE JUSTICES OF 
THE SUPREME COURT 

The Supreme Court is the state's highest court; it also supervises 
and administers the state's judicial system. The state is divided 
into five judicial districts, with three justices elected from the 
first district (Cook County) and one justice elected from each of the 
other four districts. Justices are elected in partisan elections for ten 
years and may be retained in office for additional terms of ten years. A 
chief justice is elected by the other justices for a term of three years. 



Justice Freeman received a Juris Doctor degree from The John Marshall Law 
School, Chicago. Early in his career he served as an Assistant Attorney General, Assistant 
State's Attorney, and an attorney for the Board of Election Commissioners. He served 
as a commissioner on the Illinois Commerce Commission from 1973 to 1976. He was in 
the private practice of law from 1962 to 1976. In 1976, he was elected a Circuit Judge 
in Cook County where he served for ten years. He was elected to the Appellate Court 
in 1986 and to the Illinois Supreme Court on November 6, 1990, as the first African- 
American to serve on the Court. On May 12, 1997, he was selected as Chief Justice and 
served in that capacity until January 1, 2000. 

Justice Thomas was born on August 7,1952, in Rochester, NY. He received his 
B.A. degree in Government from the University of Notre Dame in 1974, and was named 
an Academic Ail-American in that same year. He received his J.D. degree from Loyola 
University School of Law in 1981. He was elected Circuit Court Judge in DuPage County 
in 1988. There, he presided over civil jury trials and was the Acting Chief Judge from 
1989 to 1994. In 1994, Justice Thomas was elected to the Appellate Court Second 
District. On December 4, 2000, Justice Thomas was sworn in as the Illinois Supreme 
Court Justice for the Second District. In April 1996, Justice Thomas was inducted 
into the Academic All-American Hall of Fame, and in January 1999, he received the 
prestigious NCAA Silver Anniversary Award. Justice Thomas is a member of the DuPage 
County Bar Association. He was selected as Chief Justice during the 2005 September 
Term of the Supreme Court and served in that capacity until September 5, 2008. 

Justice Garman received a Juris Doctor degree from the University of Iowa 
College of Law in 1968. She was an Assistant State's Attorney in Vermilion County from 
1969 to 1973. She then engaged in private practice with Sebat, Swanson, Banks, Lessen 
& Garman and was an Associate Judge for 12 years. Justice Garman was a Circuit Judge 
in the Fifth Judicial Circuit (1986-95) and Presiding Circuit Judge (1987-95). She was 
assigned to the Appellate Court, Fourth District, in July 1995, and was elected to the 
position in November 1996. Justice Garman was appointed to the Supreme Court on 
February 1, 2001 and subsequently elected to the Supreme Court on December 2, 2002. 



Rita B. Garman 

2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 




Robert R.Thomas 





Chief Justice Thomas L. Kilbride received his law degree from 
Antioch School of Law in Washington, D.C., in 1981. He practiced law for 20 
years in Rock Island, engaging in the general practice of law, including appeals, 
environmental law, labor law, employment matters, and other general civil and 
criminal matters. He was admitted to practice in the United States District Court 
of Central Illinois and the United States Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals. Chief 
Justice Kilbride was elected to the Supreme Court of Illinois for the Third District 
in 2000 and selected Chief Justice of the Supreme Court in October 2010. 



Thomas L. Kilbride 
Chief Justice 



Justice Karmeier received his law degree from the University of Illinois. From 
1964 through 1986, he engaged in private law practice, clerked for Illinois Supreme 
Court Justice Byron 0. House and United States District Court Judge James L. Foreman, 
and served as Washington County State's Attorney. Justice Karmeier has served on the 
Illinois Supreme Court Committee on Pattern Jury Instructions in Criminal Cases, 
presiding as Chair of the Committee from 2003 to 2004. He served as Resident Circuit 
Judge of Washington County from 1986 through 2004 when he was elected to the 
Supreme Court. 



Justice Burke was born on Feb. 3, 1944, in Chicago. She received her B.A. degree 
in education from DePaul University in 1976 and her J.D. degree from IIT/Chicago- 
Kent College of Law in 1983. She was admitted to the Federal Court, Northern District 
of Illinois, in 1983, the United States Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit in 1985, 
and certified for the Trial Bar, Federal District Court in 1987. In August 1995, she 
was appointed to the Appellate Court, First District. In 1996, she was elected to the 
Appellate Court, First District, for a full term. Justice Burke, the third woman to sit on 
the state's highest tribunal, was appointed to the Illinois Supreme Court for the First 
District on July 6,2006. 

Justice Theis, born February 27, 1949, in Chicago, graduated from Loyola University 

Chicago in 1971 and the University of San Francisco School of Law in 1974. During 

her career she served as an Assistant Public Defender, Associate Judge and Circuit Judge 

in Cook County until her appointment to the Appellate Court in 1993. Justice Theis 

has chaired both the Committee on Education and the Committee on Judicial Conduct 

of the Illinois Judicial Conference; served as a member of the Supreme Court Rules 

Committee; served as President of the Appellate Lawyers Association and the Illinois 

Judges Association; and has served as a member of various Bar Associations. She is the 

recipient of multiple awards including the Lifetime Achievement Award, Catholic Lawyer 

of the Year, Celtic Lawyer of the Year, the Mary Heftel Hooten Award and the Access 

to Justice Award. After her 17 years of service on the First District Appellate Court, 

Justice Theis was appointed to the Supreme Court of Illinois on October 26, 2010. 

MK K ' Mary Jane Theis 

2070 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 




Anne M. Burke 




18 



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SUPREME COURT 
SUPPORT STAFF 



T 




here are several support units which assist the Supreme Court 
with its work as the state's highest court. These units are located 
in Springfield, Bloomington, and Chicago. 



Clerk of the Supreme Court - Juleann Hornyak. The 

Clerk of the Supreme Court is appointed by the Court, reports 
to the Court and serves at the Court's pleasure. The Clerk is 
the Court's principal case processing and records manager 
who operates the office through a staff of specialized deputies, 
and by planning, developing, and implementing policies and 
procedures necessary to execute the responsibilities of the 
office. The office has existed since circa 1818 and supports 
the Court in the exercise of its statewide jurisdiction, authority 
to regulate the practice of law in Illinois, and supervisory 
authority over the courts in the state. 

In its case management capacity, the Clerk's Office 
maintains four distinct automated dockets, executing all 
associated processes, to ensure compliance with Supreme 
Court Rules and to ensure that cases are effectively 
monitored and scheduled, from initiation to issuance of 
mandates and final orders as appropriate. The general docket 
unit of the office supports the Court's primary docket. The 
miscellaneous record consists primarily of attorney matters. 
The miscellaneous docket consists of conviction-related cases 
filed by pro se incarcerated litigants and provides a forum 
without compromising standard filing requirements. The 
proposed rule docket was developed and functions consistent 
with the mandate of Supreme Court Rule 3. 

In its record management capacity, the Clerk's Office 
maintains the Court's active and closed files and permanent 
records, dating to 1818, including historically significant 
documents which are housed and preserved in the State 
Archives by agreement, and operates a micrographics unit 
which commits paper documents to a more stable medium. 

The Clerk's Office maintains the roll of attorneys, which 
includes the licensing process, and the currency of the capital 
litigation trial bar rosters; registers and renews professional 
service corporations and associations, and limited liability 
companies and partnerships engaged in the practice of law; 
files judicial financial disclosure statements required of state 
court judges. The office compiles, analyzes, and reports 
statistics on the Supreme Court's caseload and other activity, 
as reflected in the accompanying statistical summary and 
narrative for 2010. 

The Clerk's Office provides information to the public at 
large and the practicing bar and has working relationships 
with other courts and judicial branch offices, Supreme Court 
agencies, and state and county departments. 



Marshal of the Supreme Court - Bob Shay. The marshal 
attends all sessions of the court held in September, November, 
January, March, and May. In addition, the marshal directs 
a staff which maintains the Supreme Court Building and 
grounds, provides security for justices and employees, and 
conducts tours of the building. 

Reporter of Decisions - Brian Ervin. The reporter 
of decisions directs a staff which publishes opinions of 
the supreme and appellate courts in the Official Reports. 
Employees also verify case citations, compose head notes, 
attorney lines, tables of cases, topical summaries, and other 
materials appearing in the Official Reports; and edit opinions 
for style and grammar. 

Supreme Court Librarian - Brenda Larison. The 

Supreme Court librarian directs a staff who provide legal 
reference services to the courts, state agencies, and citizens 
of the state. The Supreme Court libraries include a 100,000 
volume public law library in Springfield, a 40,000 volume 
private branch library in Chicago, and four private judicial 
libraries across the state. The librarian oversees all aspects 
of library administration including budget and program 
planning, materials and equipment acquisition, cataloging and 
collection development, and library reference and research 
services. 

Supreme Court Research Director - Doug Smith. 

The Supreme Court research director supervises a staff of 
attorneys who provide legal research and writing assistance 

to the court. 

Supreme Court Chief Internal Auditor - John Bracco. 

The Supreme Court chief internal auditor and staff perform 
audits of the state-funded activities of the judicial branch. In 
addition, the internal auditor annually assesses the adequacy 
of internal controls for state-funded activities. 



Supreme Court 
Caseload 


Filed 


Disposed 


2010 


3,014 


2,922 


2009 


2,729 


■■2,897 


2008 


2,955 


2,825 


2007 


2,836 


2,962 


2006 


2,992 


3,048 





SUPREME COURT DIRECTORY 




Springfield (62701) 

Supreme Court Building 

TDD (217) 524-8132 

Clerk (217) 782-2035 

Librarian (217) 782-2424 


Chicago (60601) 

Michael A. Bilandic Building 

160 North LaSalle Street 

TDD (312) 793-6185 

Clerk (312) 793-1332 


Bloomington (61702) 

P.O. Box 3456 
Reporter of Decisions 

(309) 827-8513 
FAX (309) 828-4651 


Marshal (217) 782-7821 







2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



SUPREME COURT 
COMMITTEES 

Standing committees of the Court and chairpersons during 2010 



• Appellate Court Administrative Committee 

Justice Rita B. Garman, liaison officer. 

• Attorney Registration &. Disciplinary 
Commission 

Benedict Schwarz, II, Esq., Chair; Justice Lloyd A. 
Karmeier, liaison officer 

Review Board - David F. Rolewick, Esq., Chair; R. 
Michael Henderson, Esq., Vice-Chair 

• Board of Admissions to the Bar 

Neil K. Quinn, Esq., President; Justice Anne M. 
Burke, liaison officer. 

• Committee on Character and Fitness 

Jean M. Prendergast, Esq., Chair; Philip L. 
Bronstein, Esq., Vice-Chair ( First Judicial 
District); Patrick A. Salvi, Esq., Chair; Irene F. 
Bahr, Esq., Vice-Chair (Second Judicial District); 
William F. Smith, Esq., Chair; David L. Wentworth, 
II, Esq., Vice-Chair (Third Judicial District); 
Edward H. Rawles, Esq., Chair (Fourth Judicial 
District); John T. Papa, Esq., Chair; Frederick W. 
Johnson, Esq., Vice-Chair (Fifth Judicial District); 
Justice Robert R.Thomas, liaison officer. 

• Committee on Jury Instructions in Civil 
Cases 

Robert J. Napleton, Esq., Chair; Professor Nancy 
S. Marder, Reporter; Chief Justice Thomas L. 
Kilbride, liaison officer. 

• Committee on Jury Instructions in 
Criminal Cases 

Judge Bertina E. Lampkin, Chair; Patrick J. 
Cotter, Esq., Reporter; Professor John F Erbes, 
Professor-Reporter; Justice Lloyd A. Karmeier, 
liaison officer. 

• Committee on Professional Responsibility 

Steven F Pflaum, Esq., Chair; Professor Vivien C. 
Gross, Professor-Reporter; Justice Anne M. Burke, 
liaison officer. 

• Judicial Mentor Committee 

Judge S. Gene Schwarm, Status Member 
(Chairperson of Chief Judges' Conference); 
Judge Elizabeth A. Robb, Status Member (Vice- 
Chairperson of Chief Judges' Conference). 

• Legislative Committee of the Illinois 
Supreme Court 

Appellate Judge Mary K. O'Brien, Chair. 



• Minimum Continuing Legal Education 
Board 

Jack L. Brooks, Esq., Chair; Justice Lloyd A. 
Karmeier, liaison officer. 

• Special Supreme Court Advisory 
Committee for Justice and Mental Health 
Planning 

Appellate Judge Kathryn E. Zenoff, Chair. 

• Special Supreme Court Committee on 
Capital Cases 

Judge Christopher C. Starck, Chair; Vacant - Vice- 
Chair; Justice Mary JaneTheis, liaison officer; 
Vacant- Professor-Reporter. 

• Special Supreme Court Committee on 
Child Custody Issues 

Judge Robert J. Anderson and Judge Moshe 
Jacobius, Co-Chairs; Justice Rita B. Garman, 
liaison officer. 

• Special Supreme Court Committee on 
Illinois Evidence 

Judge Donald C. Hudson, Chair; Judge Warren D. 
Wolfson, Vice-Chair; Professor Ralph Ruebner, 
Professor-Reporter; Justice Mary Jane Theis, 
liaison officer. 

• Special Supreme Court Committee to 
Study Courtroom and Judicial Security 

Judge Michael P. Ki ley, Chair. 

• Supreme Court Commission on 
Professionalism 

Gordon B. Nash, Jr., Chair. 

• Supreme Court Committee on Judicial 
Conduct 

Justice Mary Jane Theis, Chair. 

• Supreme Court Judicial Performance 
Evaluation Committee 

Appellate Judge Joy V. Cunningham, Chair; Justice 
Rita B. Garman, liaison officer. 

• Supreme Court Rules Committee 

John B. Simon, Esq., Chair; Brett K. Gorman, 
Esq., Vice-Chair; Professor Keith H. Beyler, 
Esq., Reporter; Professor Jo Desha Lucas, Esq., 
Emeritus; Chief Justice Thomas L. Kilbride, liaison 
officer. 




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2010 Annual Report - SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



JUDICIAL CONFERENCE 
COMMITTEE ACTIVITIES 



The Judicial Conference of Illinois, consisting of eighty-two judges, is responsible for suggesting 
improvements in the administration of justice in Illinois. The Executive Committee, composed 
of the chief justice and fourteen members of the Judicial Conference, reviews recommendations 
of the various committees and makes recommendations to the Supreme Court, resolves questions 
of committee jurisdiction, acts on behalf of the Judicial Conference between annual meetings, and 
performs other duties delegated by the Supreme Court. The Administrative Office of the Illinois 
Courts serves as Secretary of the Conference. 



Alternative Dispute Resolution Coordinating Committee 

Judge Patricia Banks, Chair 
Circuit Court of Cook County 

The Alternative Dispute Resolution Coordinating Committee 
(Committee) monitors and assesses both court-annexed 
mandatory arbitration programs and mediation programs 
approved by the Supreme Court. During Conference Year 
201 0, the Committee continued to track mandatory arbitration 
statistics to determine program efficacy. The Committee 
undertook many initiatives prescribed by the Court during 
the conference year. Some of those projects included 
finalization of training curriculum for new arbitrators; planning 
for production of an arbitrator training video; development of 
a participant satisfaction survey for arbitration attorneys and 
litigants; drafting a recommendation on a settlement data 
initiative; reviewing the collection method of statistics relating 
to arbitration programs; developing a survey to investigate 
the reasons for rejection of awards in arbitration hearings; 
exploring development of a mentor training program for 
arbitrator chairpersons; and examining the issue of residency 
requirements for arbitrators. The Committee also met with 
arbitration administrators and supervising judges of circuits 
with mandatory arbitration programs to discuss program 
operations and identify areas for improvement. 



Study Committee on Juvenile Justice 

judge John R. McClean, Jr., Chair 
14th Judicial Circuit 

During the 2010 Conference Year, the Committee updated 
Volume II of the Illinois Juvenile Law Benchbook, which 
addresses juvenile court proceedings involving allegations 
of abuse, neglect, dependency and termination of parental 
rights. The Committee also considered a proposal to amend 
Supreme Court Rules 41 1 , 605, 303 and 313, which had been 
forwarded by the Supreme Court Rules Committee. Next, 
the Committee continued its study of juvenile drug courts 
by examining other states' juvenile drug courts, finding 
that such programs are often evaluated through the use of 
standards for measuring recidivism, retention and sobriety. 
The Committee also found that national organizations have 
created standards for specialty courts that can be utilized 
to measure the effectiveness of Illinois' juvenile drug courts. 
The Committee, however, determined that the effectiveness 
of juvenile drug courts depends on adequate funding for 
programs in the community, which offer an alternative to 
drug use, and depends on addressing the often underlying 
mental health issues of juvenile drug users. The Committee 
therefore concluded that the efficacy of juvenile drug courts 



is dependent on addressing other issues, including funding 
and mental health. The Committee also continued its 
study of providing mental health services for juveniles. The 
Committee found that there are resources/data through 
federal and national organizations regarding providing 
mental health services for juveniles. The Committee 
concluded that lack of adequate funding remains a major 
problem in providing mental health services for juveniles. 
As a final matter, the Committee continued to monitor the 
status of Senate Bill 1430, which may resolve the issue of 
determining the standard, either best interests of the minor 
or superior rights, appropriate in guardianship cases. 



Study Committee on Complex Litigation 

Judge Eugene P. Daugherity, Chair 
I3' k Judicial Circuit 

During the 2010 Judicial Conference Year, the Study 
Committee on Complex Litigation's primary focus was 
drafting the new Fourth Edition of the Civil Manual. The 
Committee had agreed during the prior conference year 
that the new Civil Manual should be a return to its original 
intended purpose as a "how-to" guide for judges who may 
regularly encounter complex litigation or may find themselves 
with a case that has become complex and protracted. To 
best achieve this goal, the Committee agreed to create a 
practical guide to litigation, offering an overview of issues 
in the first general chapters such as discovery, settlement 
and trial, then narrowing the focus later in the manual to 
more specialized issues such as class actions, mass torts, 
and complex insurance coverage disputes. The Committee 
members also agreed to include in the Fourth Edition new 
features to better assist judges utilizing this type of practical 
guide to navigate a complex case. For example, chapters 
in the new edition will include form orders, many of which 
may be downloaded for use by judges, and each chapter 
also concludes with a checklist for the judge's reference on a 
particular topic. During Conference Year 201 0, the Professor/ 
Reporter drafted several chapters which were approved 
by the full Committee for the Fourth Edition: Chapter 2 
Discovery, Chapter 3 Sanctions and Other Enforcement 
Techniques, Chapter 4 Settlement, Chapter 5 Alternative 
Dispute Resolution, Chapter 6 Final Pretrial Conferences, 
Chapter 7 Trial Techniques, Chapter 8 Cases with Parallel 
Proceedings, and Chapter 9 Specialized Problems and 
Miscellaneous Subjects, including Class Actions, Mass 
Torts, Insurance Coverage Disputes, Mechanics Liens, 
Environmental Litigation, Employment Disputes, and 
Antitrust. The Committee hopes to finalize and disseminate 
the Fourth Edition in Conference Year 201 1 . The Committee 
also reviewed the Criminal Law and Procedure Benchbook 



2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



created by the IJC Committee on Education and considered 
appropriate revisions to the Criminal Manual to avoid 
duplication and maintain a unique document. The Committee 
concluded that the Criminal Manual will need some revisions 
to remain a unique resource; however, the substantive work 
in this regard was put over to Conference Year 201 1 so that 
the Committee could focus on completing the Civil Manual. 



Committee on Criminal Law and 
Probation Administration 

judge Mary S. Schostok, Chair 
Second District Appellate Court 

During the 201 Conference year, the Committee on Criminal 
Law and Probation Administration examined the feasibility of 
the use of videoconferencing in criminal cases, resulting in 
recommendations being made to the Judicial Conference. 
The Committee continued to study and examine the use 
of diversion programs for certain Class 3 and Class 4 
felony offenses, which also resulted in recommendations 
being made to the Judicial Conference. Additional 
recommendations were made to the Judicial Conference 
as a result of the Committee's continued discussion of the 
utility of a criminal alternative dispute resolution program for 
Illinois. Finally, the Committee began discussion on updating 
the 2007 Specialty Court Survey, which will continue into the 
upcoming conference year. 



Committee on Discovery Procedures 

Judge Mary Anne Mason, Chair 
Circuit Court of Cook County 

During the 2010 Conference Year, the Committee 
considered several proposals that were forwarded to it 
from the Supreme Court Rules Committee. Specifically, 
the Committee recommended adoption of a proposal 
to amend Supreme Court Rule 204 to allow attorneys to 
issue subpoenas for deposition. The Committee, however, 
voted not to recommend adoption of a proposal to amend 
Supreme Court Rule 204 to put a limit on the fees that a 
physician can charge for the giving of deposition testimony. 
The Committee also voted not to recommend a proposal 
to amend Supreme Court Rule 236 to simplify the proof of 
reasonableness of medical bills. In addition, the Committee 
voted in favor of the Rules Committee's proposal to amend 
Supreme Court Rule 216 to limit the number of requests for 
admission to 30; to require that a party prepare requests 
as a separate document; to serve them separately; and to 
include a boldface warning on the first page stating that a 
failure to respond within 28 days will mean that the facts will 
be deemed true and the documents will be deemed genuine. 
The Committee submitted its own Comments to provide that 



the rule does not prevent a judge from controlling the timing 
of the requests to admit or entering appropriate protective 
orders. The Committee also undertook several projects. 
First, the Committee considered the formulation of questions 
addressed to nonparty physicians prior to deciding whether 
to take their depositions. The Committee determined that 
the formulation of such questions would not be feasible 
because of concern that (1) compensation for answering 
any questions will become an issue; (2) a doctor may use 
the proposed questions as an escape mechanism to avoid 
a deposition; (3) the questions could be used as a means 
to get around the Petrillo limitations; or (4) privacy concerns 
may become an issue. The Committee also considered 
and rejected mandating disclosure of a list of any other 
case in which the witness has testified as an expert within 
the prior four years and disclosure of all correspondence or 
communications between counsel and the expert. As a final 
matter, the Committee formed a subcommittee to consider 
its assigned task of drafting proposed amendments to select 
Supreme Court Rules as well as guidelines to assist trial court 
judges in addressing e-Discovery issues. The subcommittee 
reported that it has examined e-Discovery rules in other 
states and guidelines established by the Conference of Chief 
Justices. It also reported that it is monitoring the review 
of the e-Discovery amendments currently underway in the 
Northern District. 



Committee on Education 

Judge M. Carol Pope, Chair 
Fourth District Appellate Court 

The Supreme Court has given the Committee on Education 
a charge to develop and recommend a core judicial 
education curriculum for Illinois judges which identifies 
key judicial education topics and issues to be addressed 
through judicial education activities each conference year. 
This charge includes the identification of emerging legal, 
sociological, cultural and technical issues that may impact 
judicial decision making and court administration. Based 
upon this core curriculum, the Committee develops, in 
coordination with the Administrative Office Judicial Education 
Division, seminars, conferences and workshops, for new and 
experienced judges, that include, the annual Seminar Series, 
New Judge Seminar, Advanced Judicial Academy, Education 
Conference, and Faculty Development, a workshop for new 
and experienced judicial faculty. The Committee reviews 
and recommends to the Court, non-judicial conference 
judicial education programs for the award of judicial 
education credit. In addition, the Committee works with the 
Administrative Office to produce the following six Illinois 
Judicial Benchbooks and annual Updates: Criminal Law 
and Procedure, Civil Law and Procedure, DUI/Traffic, Family 
Law and Procedure, Evidence and Domestic Violence. The 
benchbooks are available to Illinois judges in hard copy, CD 
format, and through access to the judicial portal. 



Members of the Executive Committee of the Illinois Judicial Conference During 2010 
Chief Justice Thomas L. Kilbride, Chair Cynthia Y. Cobbs, Secretary 



Adrienne W. Albrecht, Circuit Judge, 21st Circuit 

Robert L. Carter, Appellate Judge, 3rd District 

Stephen J. Culliton, Chief Circuit Judge, 18th Circuit 

Timothy C. Evans, Chief Circuit Judge, Circuit Court of Cook County 

Susan Fox Gil lis, Associate Judge, Circuit Court of Cook County 

Shelvin Louise Hall, Appellate Judge, 1st District 

John C. Knight, Circuit Judge, 3rd Circuit 



Rita M. Novak, Associate Judge, Circuit Court Cook County 

M. Carol Pope, Appellate Judge, 4th District 

Elizabeth A. Robb, Chief Circuit Judge, 11th Circuit 

Robert B. Spence, Circuit Judge, 16th Circuit 

John 0. Steele, Appellate Judge, 1st District 

Joseph J. Urso, Circuit Judge, Circuit Court of Cook County 

Milton S. Wharton, Circuit Judge, 20th Circuit 



2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



APPELLATE COURT 



E 



xcept for those cases appealed directly to the Supreme 
Court, a person has the right to request a review of a 
circuit court judge's decision by the appellate court. 



M l 



The appellate court is organized into five districts. The 
first meets in Chicago, the second in Elgin, the third in 
Ottawa,thefourth in Springfield,andthefifth in Mt.Vemon. 

Each district can have one or more divisions. There are 
six divisions in the first district and one in each of the 
other four. The Supreme Court assigns judges to the 
various divisions. The presiding judge of each division 
assigns judges to panels of three to hear appeals. 

The number of appellate court judgeships, currently 
fifty-four, is determined by the legislature. The 
Supreme Court can assign additional circuit, 
appellate or retired judges temporarily to any district. 



Judges are elected by voters in each district 
for ten-year terms, and may be retained for 
additional ten-year terms. Each judge has a 
support staff of two law clerks and a secretary. 

Each district manages its own operations, subject to 
the overall authority of the Supreme Court. In the 
first district (Cook County), an executive committee 
exercises general administrative authority. This 
committee elects a chairperson and vice-chairperson 
for one year. In the other districts, judges select one of 
their members to serve as presiding judge for one year. 



Criminal 
Filed 



\t*\ rH BB 


Filed 


Disposed 


seload* 

2010 
2009 
2008 
2007 
2006 


7,836 


7,962 


7,730 
7,630 
7,631 


W8BBBBM 

7,925 

HiHIII 


7,838 


8,251 



'Totals do not include Industrial Commission Division Cases 



'Totals include Industrial Commission Division Cases 



Appellate Court Administrative Matters 

Annual Meeting: The Appellate Court held its annual meeting on September 27, 2010 with Justice 
Thomas R. Appleton presiding as honorary chair. Forty-two appellate justices attended the meeting. 
Pursuant to Article VI, Section 15(e) of the Illinois Constitution, the Illinois Appellate Court selects two 
appellate justices to serve as regular members and three appellate justices to serve as alternative 
members of the Illinois Courts Commission. Justice Margaret Stanton McBride (First District) and 
Justice Mary W. McDade (Third District) served as regular members, with Justice McBride commencing 
a second, three-year term, expiring December 2012. A vacancy was created by the December 2010 
term expiration of Justice Mary W. McDade and Justice Thomas R. Appleton (Fourth District) was 
nominated to serve as a regular member. Justices Mary S. Schostok, Daniel L. Schmidt and Richard 
R Goldenhersch were elected as alternate members. Justice Patrick J. Quinn was selected to serve 
as the next honorary chair of the Illinois Appellate Court Annual Meeting to be held in the fall of 201 1 . 

Administrative Committee: The Appellate Court Administrative Committee studies and 
recommends improvements to the Illinois Appellate Court. Additionally, the Committee plans and 
sponsors the annual Appellate Court Conference. The 2010 Conference hosted forty-two appellate 
justices, five appellate clerks and three research directors on September 27-28, 2010 in Springfield, 
Illinois. Sessions addressed during the Conference included a presentation and panel discussion 
entitled U.S. and Illinois Supreme Court Review of Criminal and Civil matters, as well as a discussion of 
Standards of Review. The Hon. Themis N. Karnezis served as Chair of the Committee. The Hon. Rita 
B. Garman served as the liaison from the Illinois Supreme Court. 



2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 




FIRST 
DISTRICT 



APPELLATE JUDGES 



DIVISION I 

Shelvin Louise Marie Hall, 

Presiding Judge 

Thomas E. Hoffman+ 

Bertina E. Lampkin* 

Mary K. Rochford 

DIVISION II 

Joy V. Cunningham, 

Presiding Judge 

Maureen E. Connors* 
Sheldon A. Harris* 
Themis N. Karnezis* 

DIVISION III 
Patrick J. Quinn, 
Presiding Judge 

Michael J. Murphy 

P. Scott Neville, Jr.* 

John 0. Steele 



DIVISION IV 

Michael J. Gallagher, 

Presiding Judge 

Terrence J. Lavin 
Sheila M. O'Brien 
Aurelia Pucinski 

DIVISION V 

James Fitzgerald Smith, 

Presiding Judge 

Joseph Gordon 

Nathaniel R. Howse, Jr.* 

James R. Epstein 

DIVISION VI 

Rodolfo Garcia, 

Presiding Judge* 

Robert Cahill++ 

Robert E. Gordon* 

Margaret S. McBride 



Chair ++ Vice-Chair: Executive Committee; 
* circuit judge assigned to appellate court 



Civil & Criminal 
Caseloads 


Civil** 
Filed 


Civil** 
Disposed 


Criminal 
Filed 


Criminal 
Disposed 


2010 


2,118 


2,095 


1,664 


1,727 


2009 


■WVM 


KYiEm 


1,606 


1,663 


2008 


2,020 


1,987 


1,582 


1,697 


2007 


■HHHHH HHHI 1.808 


2006 


1,965 


1,989 


1,768 


1,956 



Totals do not include Industrial Commission Division Cases 




I 



\ 



First District - Chicago 
Michael A. Bilandic Building 

(Formerly State of Illinois Building) 

Completed in 1924; Remodeled in 1992; 

Renamed in 2003 

(Holabird & Root/CDB photo) 

160 North LaSalle Street 

Chicago, IL 60601 

(312) 793-5600 

Steven M. Ravid, Clerk 
Marilyn T. Kujawa, Research Director 

Circuit: 

Circuit Court of Cook County 

District Population: 

5,194,675 (2010 census) 



Total Pending Caseload* 
All Case Categories 


Pending 


2010 


6,157 


2009 


5,835 


2008 


5,738 


2007 


5,589 


2006 


5,551 



Totals include Industrial Commission Division Case 



2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



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SECOND 
DISTRICT 




Second District Courthouse - Elgin 

Completed in 1966 (Second District Photo) 

55 Symphony Way 

Elgin, IL 60120 

(847)695-3750 

Robert J. Mangan, Clerk 
Jeffrey H. Kaplan, Research Director 

Circuits (Counties): 

15th (Carroll, Jo Daviess, Lee, Ogle & Stephenson) 

16th (DeKalb, Kane & Kendall) 

17th (Boone & Winnebago) 

18th (DuPage) 

19th (Lake) 
22nd (McHenry) 

District Population: 3,189,046 (2010 census) 



APPELLATE JUDGES 



Ann Brackley Jorgensen, Presiding Judge 

Joseph E. Birkett 

John J. Bowman 

Michael J. Burke* 

Donald C. Hudson* 

Susan F. Hutchinson 

Robert D. McLaren 

Mary S. Schostok 
Kathryn E. Zenoff* 

*circuit judge assigned to appellate court 



Civil &Crimi 
Caseloads 



Civil** Civil** Criminal Criminal 
Filed Disposed Filed Disposed 

699 741 607 717 




633 612 591 620 

629 606 659 601 

WSm 649 629 647 625 

Totals do not include Industrial Commission Division Cases 



Total Pending Caseload* 
All Case Categories 


2010 


1,651 


2009 




2008 


1,698 


2007 




2006 


1,550 


*Totals include Industrial Commission 


Division Cases 



2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 




THIRD 
DISTRICT 



APPELLATE JUDGES 



William E. Holdridge, Presiding Judge 

Robert L. Carter 

Tom M. Lytton 
MaryW. McDade 
Mary K. O'Brien 

Daniel Schmidt 
Vicki Wright 




Third District Courthouse - Ottawa 

Completed in 1860 (Gist Fleshman Photo) 

1004 Columbus Street 

Ottawa, IL 61350 

(815)434-5050 

Gist Fleshman, Clerk 
Gerald Ursini, Research Director 

Circuits (Counties): 

9th (Fulton, Hancock, Henderson, 

Knox, McDonough & Warren) 

10th (Marshall, Peoria, Putnam, Stark & Tazewell) 

12th (Will) 

13th (Bureau, Grundy & LaSalle) 

14th (Henry, Mercer, Rock Island & Whiteside) 

21st (Iroquois & Kankakee) 

District Population: 1,805,926 (2010 census) 



Civil & Crii 
Caseloa 


Civil** 
Filed 


Civil** 
Disposed 


Criminal 
Filed 


Criminal 
Disposed 


2010 


460 


506 


491 


509 


■muss] 


■ 535 


B^UBH 


509 


BBBBsam 


■mn73 


444 


456 


578 


480 


477 


533 


454 


513 



Total Pending Caseload* 
All Case Categories 


2010 


945 


2009 


wmo^m 


2008 


988 


2007 


■**■ 


2006 


849 



**Totals do not include Industrial Commission Division Cases 



Totals include Industrial Commission Division Cases 



2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



FOURTH 
DISTRICT 




Fourth District Courthouse - Springfield 
Waterways Building 

Renovated in 2001 

(Photo by Terry Farmer Photography, Inc.) 

201 West Monroe Street 

Springfield, IL 62794 

(217) 782-2586 

Carla Bender, Clerk 
Shirley Wilgenbusch, Research Director 

Circuits (Counties): 

5th (Clark, Coles, Cumberland, Edgar & Vermilion) 

6th (Champaign, DeWitt, Douglas, Macon, Moultrie & 

Piatt) 
7th (Greene, Jersey, Macoupin, Morgan, Sangamon & 

Scott) 
8th (Adams, Brown, Calhoun, Cass, Mason, Menard, 

Pike & Schuyler) 
11th (Ford, Livingston, Logan, McLean & Woodford) 

District Population: 1,320,113 (2010 census) 



APPELLATE JUDGES 



James A. Knecht, Presiding Judge 

Thomas R. Appleton 
JohnT. McCullough 
Sue E. Myerscough 

M.Carol Pope* 
Robert J. Steigmann 

John W. Turner 

*circuit judge assigned to appellate court 



Civil & Criminal 
Caseloads 


Civil** 
Filed 


Civil** 
Disposed 


Criminal Criminal 
Filed Disposed 


2010 


473 


442 


552 


459 


iWMWSffi 


453 


HHHHHI 


510 


hhhhn 


pkifajaf:^ 


443 


554 


511 


707 


■wnTSM 


535 


510 


540 


652 



Total Pending Caseload* 
All Case Categories 


2010 


861 


2009 




2008 


661 


2007 




2006 


1,028 



lot.ils (In nut mi ludi' lnilir.t rial Cnmmiv. Division Cases 



Totals include Industrial Commission Division Cases 



2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



FIFTH 
DISTRICT 




APPELLATE JUDGES 

Melissa A. Chapman, Presiding Judge 

James K. Donovan 

Richard P. Goldenhersh 

Stephen L. Spomer* 

Bruce D. Stewart 

Thomas M.Welch 

James M. Wexstten 

^circuit judge assigned to appellate court 



Fifth District Courthouse - Mt. Vernon 

Completed in 1857 (J. Huddleston Photo) 

14 th & Main Street 

Mt. Vernon, IL 62864 

(618) 242-3120 

John J. Flood, Clerk 
Vito A. Mastrangelo, Research Director 

Circuits (Counties): 

1st (Alexander, Jackson, Johnson, Massac, Pope, 

Pulaski, Saline, Union & Williamson) 

2nd (Crawford, Edwards, Franklin, Gallatin, Hamilton, 

Hardin, Jefferson, Lawrence, Richland, Wabash, Wayne 

& White) 

3rd (Bond & Madison) 

4th (Christian, Clay, Clinton, Effingham, Fayette, 

Jasper, Marion, Montgomery & Shelby) 

20th (Monroe, Perry, Randolph, St. Clair & 

Washington) 

District Population: 1,320,872 (2010 census) 





Civil** 
Filed 


Civil** 
Disposed 


Criminal 
Filed 


Criminal 
Disposed 


uvu & criminal 
Caseloads 


2010 


361 


383 


228 


216 


2009 


[402 


■192 


273 


261 


2008 


364 


395 


265 


251 


2007 


410 


409 


267 


260 


2006 


418 


460 


243 


234 



All Case Categories 

2010 
2009 
2008 



Pending 



'Totals do not include Industrial Commission Division Cases 



748 
757 
735 
752 

721 

* Totals include Industrial Commission Division Cases 




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2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



CIRCUIT COURTS 



The court of "original jurisdiction" is the circuit court. There are 
twenty-three circuits in the state, five of which are single county 
circuits (Cook, Will, DuPage, Lake, and McHenry). The remaining 
eighteen circuits contain two to twelve counties per circuit. 



In Illinois, the circuit court is the court of original 
jurisdiction. There are twenty-three circuits in the state. 
Five are single county circuits (Cook, Will, DuPage, 
Lake, and McHenry) and the remaining eighteen circuits 
comprise as few as two and as many as twelve counties 
each. Except for redistricting of the general assembly 
and ruling on the ability of the governor to serve or 
resume office, the circuit court has jurisdiction for all 
matters properly brought before it. The circuit court 
shares jurisdiction with the Supreme Court to hear cases 
relating to revenue, mandamus, prohibition, and habeas 
corpus. If the Supreme Court chooses to exercise its 
authority in a case of these types, the circuit 
court loses jurisdiction. The circuit court 
is also the reviewing court for certain state 
agency administrative orders. There are two 
types of judges in the circuit court: circuit 
judges and associate judges. Circuit 
judges are elected for a six year term and 
may be retained by voters for additional 
six year terms. They can hear any 
circuit court case. Circuit judges are 
initially elected either circuit-wide, from 
the county where they reside or from 
a sub-circuit within a county, depending 
on the type of vacancy they are filling 
Associate judges are appointed by circuit 
judges, pursuant to Supreme Court rules, for 
four-year terms. An associate judge can hear 
any case, except criminal cases punishable 
by a prison term of one year or more (felonies) 
An associate judge can be specially authorized by 
the Supreme Court to hear all criminal cases. Circuit 
judges in a circuit elect one of their members to 
serve as chief circuit court judge. The chief judge has 
general administrative authority in the circuit, subject 
to the overall administrative authority of the Supreme 
Court. The chief judge can assign cases to general or 
specialized divisions within the circuit. 



Circuit Court Administrative Matters 



Conference of Chief Circuit Judges: The 

Conference of Chief Circuit Judges is comprised of 
the chief circuit judges from the twenty-three Illinois 
judicial circuits. Judge S. Gene Schwarm, Chief Judge 
of the Fourth Judicial Circuit, serves as chairperson 
of the Conference and Judge Elizabeth A. Robb, 
Chief Judge of the Eleventh Judicial Circuit, serves as 
vice-chairperson. The conference meets regularly to 
discuss issues related to the administration of justice 
in the circuit courts and other matters referred to the 
conference by the Supreme Court. The Administrative 
Office serves as secretary to the Conference. 

Conference Committees and Activities: The 

Conference has established several committees to 
address particular issues, and to provide information 

2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS 




and recommendations. Committees active during 2010 
include the Article V Committee; Committee on Forms; 
Committee to Revise the Chief Circuit Judges' Manual: 
Domestic Relations Committee; Jury Committee 
Juvenile Committee; Long-Range Planning Committee 
Orientation Committee; Prison Committee; Probation 
Committee; Specialty Courts Committee; and several ad 
hoc committees convened to study specific, short-term 
topics. 

During 2010, the committees of the Conference 

considered subject matter in several areas. The Forms 

Committee developed forms for the Civil No Contact 

Order, Stalking No Contact Order, and Order 

I i? I 22" Tin °f Protection. The Domestic Relations 

1 Committee considered several proposed 

amendments to Supreme Court Rules 905 

and 924. The Juvenile Committee made 

recommendations to address issues related 

to the enactment of Public Act 95-1031. 

The Jury Committee recommended an 

amendment to Supreme Court Rule 285 with 

respect to small claim jury demand fees. The 

Article V Committee recommended, and the 

Conference approved, a proposal to allow 

the Second District of the Illinois State Police 

to operate an e-Citation pilot program. The 

Article V Committee, Domestic Relations 

Committee, Committee on Forms, Juvenile 

Committee, Prison Committee, Specialty 

Courts Committee, and Probation Committee 

continued to monitor and analyze new legislation 

and Supreme Court Rules relevant to each 

committee's focus. As necessary, related forms, 

policy, orders, etc., were modified in accordance 

with the new provisions. In addition, the Long-Range 

Planning Committee began to consider presentations 

for future educational sessions, which include a strategic 

planning session, education session on budget issues, 

and session on judicial calendaring/scheduling. Finally, 

the Conference, as a whole, considered a proposed 

parenting coordinator rule for inclusion in the 900 

series of Supreme Court rules, the impact of a repeal to 

Supreme Court Rule 296, and created an amendment 

to address issues related to Public Act 96-1217. Chief 

judges also offered the nomination of judges to serve 

as peer mentors, and considered issues related to the 

financial crisis of the state and counties. 

In the interest of furthering the knowledge and skills 
of its members, the Conference hosted a variety of 
presentations relating to trial court issues. For example, 
the Illinois Coalition for Equal Justice and Illinois Legal 
Aid online made a presentation on legal self-help 
centers which are located in 53 counties in Illinois. The 
presentation included information on future plans for legal 
self-help centers, which include a needs assessment to 
determine the efficacy of services provided and training 
for legal self-help center navigators. 
Administrative Summary 



CASE CATEGORIES 

CIVIL: Law and Law Magistrate for monetary damages over $10,000; Arbitration; Small Claims 

(amounts up to $10,000)*; Chancery (e.g., title to real property and injunctions); Miscellaneous 
Remedy (e.g., review of decisions of administrative bodies, habeas corpus matters, and demolition); 
Probate (e.g., estates of deceased persons and guardianships); Order of Protection (petition for 
order of protection, civil no contact order, and stalking no contact order filed separately from an 
existing case); Dissolution (e.g., divorce, separate maintenance, and annulment); Mental Health 
(e.g., commitment and discharge from mental facilities); Eminent Domain (e.g., compensation 
when property is taken for public use); Municipal Corporation and Tax (e.g., matters pertaining to 
the organization of municipalities and collection of taxes at the local level); Adoption; Family (e.g., 
proceedings to establish parent-child relationship and actions relating to child support). 

CRIMINAL: Felony (e.g., a criminal case in which the offense carries a penalty of at least one 
year in prison) and Misdemeanor. OTHER: Ordinance, Conservation, Traffic (excluding parking 

tickets), and DUI (Driving Under the Influence). 

JUVENILE: Abuse and Neglect, Delinquency, and Other (e.g., a minor who requires 
authoritative intervention). 

*Small Claim amount increased to $10,000 effective January 1, 2006. (Amended Supreme Court Rule 281). 



Caseload 
Statistics 

2010 
2009 
2008 



Civil Civil juvenile Juvenile Felony Felony 

Filed Disposed Filed Disposed Filed Disposed 



791,412 
'79,692 
753,569 
773,204 
706,836 



777,620 
776,953 
750,484 
732,016 
700,608 



30,602 
29,935 
28,834 
27,131 
26,454 



24,581 
24,655 
25,143 
27,148 
28,921 



81,488 
86,057 
90,466 
93,183 
95,747 



82,178 
90,131 
91,307 
94,917 
95,676 



Category 


2010 Total Cases 
Filed 


Traffic (excl. DUI) 


2,387,413 


Civil (excl. OP) 
Misdemeanor 


285,915 


Conservation/Ordinance 


128,873 


Felony 


81,488 


DUI 


■K 51,409 ;■■ 


Order of Protection 


53,322 


Juvenile 


30,602 



Total 
Caseload 


Filed Disposed 


2010 


3,757,112 3,817,690 


2009 


4,035,137 4,071,235 


2008 


4,220,121 4,239,358 


2007 


4,455,546 4,361,424 


| 4,305,551 4,248,347 



2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 




CIRCUIT COURT 
of COOK COUNTY 

(First Appellate District) 



30 



mm9 



L : hit 






•i*Kf 



Richard J, Daley Center 

(Photo courtesy of the 
Chicago Architecture Foundation) 

Timothy C. Evans, 
Chief Judge 

50 W. Washington St., Suite 2600 
Chicago, IL 60602 

Circuit Population: 

5,194,675 

(2010 census) 



C/5 

s 

o 

o 



s 



Pending Caseload 




21,739 


20,379 
18,446 


2010 
2009 
2008 
2007 
2006 


507,904 


487,165 


20,594 


477,666 


21,453 


14,392 


462,673 


22,080 


12,828 


412,285 


22,815 


15,022 



Total Caseload 


2010 


1,535,853 


1,525,499 


^B*I$R 






B^EB 


1,761,364 


1,768,850 


KSS^I 


1,955,480 


1,847,369 


IQS^fl 


1,873,192 


1,821,063 



Circuit Judges: 

Martin S. Agran 

Thomas R. Allen 

Mauricio Araujo 

Edward A. Arce 

Nancy J. Arnold 

Robert Balanoff 

Patricia Banks 

Ronald F. Bartkowicz 

Carole K. Bellows 

Michael Ian Bender 

Andrew Berman 

Jeanne Cleveland Bernstein 

Steven James Bernstein 

Robert W. Bertucci 

Paul P. Biebel, Jr. 

Richard J. Billik, Jr. 

Daniel P. Brennan 

Margaret Ann Brennan 

Eileen Mary Brewer 

Tommy Brewer 

Cynthia Y. Brim 

Rodney Hughes Brooks 

Janet Adams Brosnahan 

Mary M. Brosnahan 

James R. Brown 

Dennis J. Burke 

Kathleen Marie Burke 

Charles Burns 

Anthony L. Burrell 

Thomas J. Byrne 

John P. Callahan, Jr. 

Diane Gordon Cannon 

Robert Lopez Cepero 

Gloria Chevere 

Evelyn B.Clay 

Martin D. Coghlan 

Mary Ellen Coghlan 

Matthew E. Coghlan 

Bonita Coleman-John 

Ann Collins-Dole 

Ann F. Collins 

Donna L. Cooper 

Clayton J. Crane 

Paula M. Daleo 

Thomas M. Davy 

Maureen F. Delehanty 

David Delgado 

Anna Helen Demacopoulos 

Grace G. Dickler 

Christopher J. Donnelly 

John T. Doody, Jr. 

Deborah M. Dooling 

Jennifer Duncan-Brice 

Laurence J. Dunford 

Loretta Eadie-Daniels 

James D. Egan 

Lynn Marie Egan 

Richard J. Elrod 

Candace J. Fabri 

Thomas P. Fecarotta, Jr. 

Roger G. Fein 

Peter A. Felice 

Denise K. Filan 



Kathy M. Flanagan 

Thomas E. Flanagan 

James P. Flannery, Jr. 

Ellen L. Flannigan 

John J. Fleming 

Kenneth L. Fletcher 

Peter Flynn 

Nicholas R. Ford 

Raymond Funderburk 

Daniel J. Gallagher 

Celia G. Gamrath 

Vincent M. Gaughan 

James J. Gavin 

Nicholas Geanopoulos 

Allen S. Goldberg 

John C. Griffin 

Susan Ruscitti Grussel 

Deborah J. Gubin 

Catherine M. Haberkorn 

William J. Haddad 

Sophia H. Hall 

Orville E. Hambright, Jr. 

Kay M. Han I on 

La Quietta J. Hardy-Campbell 

Edward Harmening 

Russell W. Hartigan 

Shell! Williams Hayes 

Curtis Heaston 

Pamela E. Hill Veal 

Stanley L. Hill 

Margarita Kulys Hoffman 

Thomas L. Hogan 

William H. Hooks 

Vanessa A. Hopkins 

Kevin Horan 

Carol M. Howard 

Garritt E. Howard 

Michael J. Howlett, Jr. 

Arnette R. Hubbard 

Michael B. Hyman 

Cheyrl D. Ingram 

Anthony A. Iosco 

Moshe Jacobius 

Raymond L. Jagielski 

Marilyn F. Johnson 

Sharon 0. Johnson 

Dorothy F. Jones 

Linzey D.Jones 

Rickey Jones 

Sidney A.Jones III 

Edward R.Jordan 

Michelle D.Jordan 

James L. Kaplan 

Paul A. Karkula 

Joseph G. Kazmierski, Jr. 

Thomas J. Kelley 

Carol A. Kelly 

Kathleen G. Kennedy 

Kerry M. Kennedy 

Diana L. Kenworthy 

John P. Kirby 

Geary W. Kull 

William J. Kunkle 

Anthony C. Kyriakopoulos 



2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



William G. Lacy 

Diane Joan Larsen 

Jeffrey Lawrence 

Marjorie C. Laws 

Pamela Leeming 

Casandra Lewis 

Thomas J. Lipscomb 

Laura C. Liu 

Noreen V. Love 

Michele F. Lowrance 

Pamela E. Loza 

Stuart F. Lubin 

Marvin P. Luckman 

Daniel Joseph Lynch 

Thomas V. Lyons II 

Terence MacCarthy 

William D. Maddux 

William 0. Maki 

Daniel B. Malone 

Marcia Maras 
Jill Cerone Marisie 
LeRoy K. Martin, Jr. 

Patricia Martin 

Mary Anne Mason 

Veronica B. Mathein 

James P. McCarthy 

Barbara A. McDonald 

Susan J. McDunn 

James M. McGing 

Sheila McGinnis 

Dennis M. McGuire 

Kathleen M. McGury 

Michael B. McHale 

Clare E. McWilliams 

Barbara M. Meyer 

Mary Lane Mikva 

Martha A. Mills 

Raymond W. Mitchell 

Colleen McSweeney Moore 

Caroline K. Moreland 

Mary A. Mulhern 

Allen F. Murphy 

James P. Murphy 

Lisa Ruble Murphy 

Patrick T. Murphy 

Thomas W. Murphy 

Timothy P. Murphy 

Joyce Marie Murphy Gorman 

James C. Murray, Jr. 

Marya Nega 

Lewis Nixon 

Joan Margaret O'Brien 

Patrick W. O'Brien 

William Timothy O'Brien 

Ann O'Donnell 

James N. O'Hara 

Eileen O'Neill Burke 

William D. O'Neal 

Ramon Ocasio III 

Stuart E. Palmer 

Kathleen M. Pantle 

Sebastian T. Patti 

Sheryl A. Pethers 

Donna Phelps Felton 

Daniel J. Pierce 

Edward N. Pietrucha 

Edmund Ponce de Leon 

Jackie M. Portman 

Joan E. Powell 

Lee Preston 
Lorna E. Propes 
Robert J. Quinn 
Sandra G. Ramos 
Erica L. Reddick 



Jesse G. Reyes 

James L. Rhodes 

James G. Riley 

Anita Rivkin-Carothers 

Mary Colleen Roberts 

Patrick T. Rogers 

J. Prendergast Rooney 

Dominique C. Ross 

Thomas D. Roti 

Kristyna C. Ryan 

James Ryan 

Leida Gonzalez Santiago 

Drella Savage 

Andrea M. Schleifer 

George Scully, Jr. 

James A. Shapiro 

Colleen F. Sheehan 

Kevin M. Sheehan 

Diane M. Shelley 

Patrick J. Sherlock 

Henry R. Simmons, Jr. 

Henry M. Singer 

Maura Slattery Boyle 

Irwin J. Solganick 

Ketki S.Steffen 

David P. Sterba 

Paul Stralka 

Jane Louise Stuart 

Daniel J. Sullivan 

Laura M. Sullivan 

Sharon M. Sullivan 

Susan Kennedy Sullivan 

Donald J. Suriano 

Shelley Sutker-Dermer 

Alfred M. Swanson, Jr. 

Rhoda Sweeney 

Bill Taylor 

Michael P. Toomin 

Mary S.Trew 
Sandra Tristano 
John D.Turner, Jr. 
Valarie Turner 
Joseph J. Urso 
James M. Varga 

Raul Vega 

Kenneth J. Wadas 

Carl Anthony Walker 

Debra B.Walker 

Ursula Walowski 

Richard F.Walsh 

Maureen Ward Kirby 

Edward Washington II 

Arthur P. Wheatley 

Alexander P.White 

Walter Williams 

Camille E.Willis 

Thaddeus L. Wilson 

Charles R.Winkler 

William H.Wise 

Gregory J. Wojkowski 

Lauretta Higgins Wolfson 

E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. 

Frank G. Zelezinski 

Susan F. Zwick 



Associate Judges: 

Carmen K. Aguilar 

Jorge L. Alonso 

David B.Atkins 

Larry Axelrood 

Callie L. Baird 

Patrice Ball-Reed 

Mark J. Ballard 

Helaine L. Berger 

Laura Bertucci Smith 

Samuel J. Betar III 

Adam D. Bourgeois, Jr. 

Yolande M. Bourgeois 

Darron E. Bowden 
William Stewart Boyd 

Michael Brown 

Elizabeth M. Budzinski 

Clarence Lewis Burch 

Anthony J. Calabrese 

John Thomas Carr 

Frank B. Castiglione 

Cheryl D. Cesario 
Timothy J. Chambers 
Peggy Chiampas 
Joseph M. Claps 
LaGuina Clay-Clark 
Robert J. Clifford 

Neil H.Cohen 

Susan M. Coleman 

Thomas J. Condon 

Stephen J. Connolly 

Lisa R. Curcio 

Noreen M. Daly 

Ronald S. Davis 

Mathias W. Delort 

Israel A. Desierto 

Sheila King Devane 

Thomas M. Donnelly 

Lauren Gottainer Edidin 

James P. Etchingham 

Maureen P. Feerick 

Fe' Fernandez 

Howard L. Fink 

Brian K. Flaherty 

Lawrence E. Flood 

Thomas V. Gainer, Jr. 

Sheldon C. Garber 

Daniel T. Gillespie 

Pamela Hughes Gillespie 

Susan Fox Gillis 

Gregory R. Ginex 

Steven J. Goebel 

Renee G. Goldfarb 

William E. Gomolinski 

Joel L. Greenblatt 

Maxwell Griffin, Jr. 

J. B. Grogan 

Gilbert J. Grossi 

R. Morgan Hamilton 

David E. Haracz 

Donald R. Havis 

Thomas J. Hennelly 

Rosemary Higgins 

Arthur F. Hill, Jr. 

Earl B. Hoffenberg 

John L. Huff 
Bridget J. Hughes 
Colleen A. Hyland 

John J. Hynes 

Marianne Jackson 

William R. Jackson, Jr. 

Moira Susan Johnson 

Timothy J.Joyce 

Jordan Kaplan 



James N. Karahalios 

Nancy J. Katz 

Stuart P. Katz 

Lynne Kawamoto 

Carol A. Kipperman 

Randye A. Kogan 

Demetrios G. Kottaras 

Joan M. Kubalanza 

Maria Kuriakos Ciesil 

Alfred L. Levinson 

Neil J. Linehan 

James B. Linn 

Patricia M. Logue 

Mark J. Lopez 

Patrick F. Lustig 

Thaddeus S. Machnik 

Ellen Beth Mandeltort 

Martin E. McDonough 

Brigid Mary McGrath 

Patricia Mendoza 

Mary R. Minella 

Daniel R. Miranda 

Martin P. Moltz 

Thomas R. Mulroy 

Leonard Murray 

Raymond Myles 

Rita M. Novak 

Gregory M. O'Brien 

Thomas J. O'Hara 

James M. Obbish 

Marcia B. Orr 

Donalcl D. Panarese, Jr. 

Joseph D. Panarese 

Luciano Panici 

Kathleen Ann Panozzo 

Michael R. Panter 

Alfred J. Paul 

Arthur C. Perivolidis 

Angela M. Petrone 

William G. Pileggi 

Dennis J. Porter 

Carolyn Quinn 

Marguerite Quinn 

Jeanne M. Reynolds 

Hyman Riebman 

Elizabeth Loredo Rivera 

Stanley J. Sacks 

Marcus R. Salone 

Bernard J. Sarley 

Naomi H. Schuster 

Joseph M. Sconza 

John J. Scotillo 

Robert E. Senechalle, Jr. 

Terrence V. Sharkey 

Darryl B. Simko 

Michele M. Simmons 

Douglas J. Simpson 

David A. Skryd 

Terence B. Smith 

James E. Snyder 

Domenica A. Stephenson 

Richard A. Stevens 

SanjayT. Tailor 

Sybil C.Thomas 

Elmer J.Tolmaire III 

John D.Tourtelot 

Thomas M.Tucker 

Franklin U. Valcierrama 

Rena M. Van Tine 

Gregory P.Vazquez 

Neera Walsh 

Jeffrey L.Warnick 

Lori M. Wolfson 

Leon Wool 

James A. Zafiratos 




s 

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2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



FIRST CIRCUIT 

(Fifth Appellate District) 




Mark H. Clarke, Chief Judge 

Williamson County Courthouse 

200 W. Jefferson Street 

Marion, IL 62959 

Circuit Population: 216,176 (2010 census) 
Counties (seats): 
Alexander (Cairo) Pulaski (Mound City) 

Jackson (Murphysboro) Saline (Harrisburg) 
Johnson (Vienna) Union (Jonesboro) 

Massac (Metropolis) Williamson (Marion) 
Pope (Golconda) 



Saline County Courthouse, Harrisburg 



iHM 



32 



SECOND CIRCUIT 

(Fifth Appellate District) 




Crawford County Courthouse, Robinson 



E. Kyle Vantrease, Chief Judge 

Jefferson County Justice Center 

911 Casey Avenue, Suite HI-05 

Mt. Vernon, IL 62864 

Circuit Population: 199,730 (2010 census) 
Counties (seats): 



Crawford (Robinson) 
Edwards (Albion) 
Franklin (Benton) 
Gallatin (Shawneetown) 



Jefferson (Mount Vernon) 
Lawrence (Lawrenceville) 
Richland (Olney) 
Wabash (Mount Carmel) 



Hamilton (McLeansboro) Wayne (Fairfield) 
Hardin (Elizabethtown) White (Carmi) 



C/5 

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THIRD CIRCUIT 

(Fifth Appellate District) 




Ann E. Callis, Chief Judge 

Madison County Courthouse 
155 North Main, #405 
Edwardsville, IL 62025 

Circuit Population: 287,050 (2010 census) 

Counties (seats): 

Bond (Greenville) 
Madison (Edwardsville) 



Madison County Courthouse, Edwardsville 

2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



Circuit Judges: Brad K. Bleyer, Mark M. Boie, W.Charles Grace, Joseph Jay Jackson, Joseph M. Leberman, 
James R. Moore, Walden E. Morris, Phillip G. Palmer, Sr., William G. Schwartz, Carolyn Bailey Smoot, 
William J.Thurston, James R. Williamson 

Associate Judges: Charles Clayton Cavaness, Kimberly L. Dahlen, Everett D. Kimmel, Todd D. Lambert, 
Brian D. Lewis, Christy W. Solverson, John A. Speroni 



Pending Caseload 


Civil 


Felony 


Juvenile 


2010 


13,552 


2,161 


1,606 


2009 


13,175 


2,002 


1,532 


2008 


13,313 


2,185 


1,554 


2007 


12,792 


2,025 


1,379 




11,943 


1,855 


1,168 



Total Caseload 


Filed Disposed 


2010 


92,871 88,242 


2009 


98,132 90,406 


2008 


100,582 94,079 


2007 


110,857 99,134 


2006 ' 


93,184 91,672 



Circuit Judges: Melissa A. Drew, Larry D. Dunn, Thomas J. Foster, David K. Frankland, Terry H. Gamber, 
Bennie Joe Harrison, Robert M. Hopkins, Paul W. Lamar, David K. Overstreet, Stephen G. Sawyer, Thomas 
H. Sutton, Thomas Joseph Tedeschi, Barry L. Vaughan, Christopher L.Weber 



]]] 



Associate Judges: Thomas J. Dinn III, Kimbara Graham Han-ell, Robert W. Lewis, Timothy R. Neubauer 
Mark Lane Shaner, Mark R. Stanley 



Pending Caseload 


Civil 


Felony 


Juvenile 


2010 


15,574 


2,340 


1,710 


2009 


14,069 


2,423 


1,548 


2008 


13,395 


2,606 


1,414 


2007 


12,508 


2,526 


1,394 


2006 


11,318 


2,717 


1,303 



Total Caseload 


Filed Disposed 


2010 


56,150 55,855 


2009 


62,259 59,353 


2008 


57,971 55,689 


2007 


57,603 56,373 


2006 


55,403 51,958 



Circuit Judges: Barbara L. Crowder, David A. Hy I la, John Knight, A. Andreas Matoesian, William A. 
Mudge, Charles V. Romani, Jr., Dennis R. Ruth, Richard L.Tognarelli 

Associate Judges: Duane L. Bailey, Thomas William Chapman, Ellar Duff, David Keith Grounds, James 
Hackett, Clarence W. Harrison II, Janet Rae Heflin, Keith Jensen, Elizabeth Levy, Nelson F. Metz, Kyle 
Napp, Stephen A. Stobbs, Dean E. Sweet 



Pending Caseload 


Felony 


Juvenile 


2010 


19,215 


2,191 


804 


2009 


18,016 


2,444 


622 


2008 


16,613 


2,384 


494 


2007 


PMfirea 


2,387 430 


2006 


18,408 


2,347 


479 



Total Caseload 




Msposed 

108,037 
107,302 
113,282 
118,488 
107,999 



2 

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3 



2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



FOURTH CIRCUIT 

(Fifth Appellate District) 



19 aoH! 




S. Gene Schwarm, Chief Judge 

Fayette County Courthouse 

221 S. 7th St. 

Vandalia, IL 62471 

Circuit Population: 244,361 (2010 census) 
Counties (seats): 
Christian (Taylorville) J as P er (Newton) 



Clay County Courthouse, Louisville 



Clay (Louisville) 
Clinton (Carlyle) 
Effingham (Effingham) 
Fayette (Vandalia) 



Marion (Salem) 
Montgomery (Hillsboro) 
Shelby (Shelbyville) 



- 



34 



_5_ 



FIFTH CIRCUIT 




Tracy W. Resch, Chief Judge 

Clark County Courthouse 
501 Archer Avenue 
Marshall, IL 62441 

Circuit Population: 181,457 (2010 census) 

Counties (seats): 

Clark (Marshall) 

Coles (Charleston) 

Cumberland ( Toledo) 

Edgar (Paris) 
Vermilion (Danville) 



Coles County Courthouse, Charleston 



</5 

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SIXTH CIRCUIT 

(Fourth Appellate District) 




John P. Shonkwiler, Chief Judge 

Piatt County Courthouse 

101 W. Washington Room 306 

Monticello, IL 61856 

Circuit Population: 379,965 (2010 census) 

Counties (seats): 

Champaign (Urbana) 
DeWitt (Clinton) 
Douglas (Tuscola) 
Macon (Decatur) 
Moultrie (Sullivan) 
Piatt (Monticello) 



DeWitt County Courthouse, Clinton 

2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



Circuit Judges: Daniel E. Hartigan, Douglas L. Jarman, Michael P. Kiley, Kimberly G. Koester, Kelly D. 
Long, Michael D. McHaney, Dennis Micldendorff, Ronald D. Spears, Mark W. Stedelin, Wm. Robin Todd, 
Sherri L.E.Tungate 

Associate Judges: William J. Becker, James J. Eder, James R. Harvey, Allan F. Lolie, Jr., Bradley T. 
Paisley, James L. Roberts, Ericka Sanders 



Pending Caseload 



t\\ Felony Juvenile 



2010 


8,745 


1,069 


881 


2009 


8,356 


1,043 


746 


2008 


8,583 


936 


624 


2007 


8,410 


874 


487 


. 2006 


9,037 


858 


448 



Total Caseload 


Filed 


Disposed 


2010 


63,634 


63,153 


H^Efl 


65,366 


63,551 


mffltfliijgii] 


66,056 


64,372 


HiSs^H 


69,371 


67,826 


BBiiBBI 


66,327 


65,739 



Circuit Judges: Claudia J. Anderson, Michael D. Clary, Craig H. DeArmond, Millard Scott Everhart, 
Nancy S. Fahey, Steven L. Garst, James R. Glenn, Gary W. Jacobs, Teresa K. Righter, Mitchell K. Shick, 
Matthew L. Sullivan 

Associate Judges: Derek Girton, Mark S. Goodwin, David W. Lewis, Brien J. 0' Brien, Karen E. Wall 



Pending Caseload 


ivil 


Felony 


Juvenile 


2010 


861 


2,109 


1,051 


2009 


093 


1,929 


1,313 


2008 


724 


1,911 


1,127 


2007 


443 


2,131 


1,029 


2006 


222 


1,972 


1,260 



Total Caseload 

2010 


Filed 


Disposed 


43,314 


42,521 


2009 


48,096 


46,491 


BEEtflSI 


47,078 


44,617 


gg^ggj^ 


48,325 


44,557 


BlfcMiSJl 


46,823 


45,305 



35 



Circuit Judges: Arnold F. Blockman, Garry W. Bryan, Michael G. Carroll, Harry E. Clem, Thomas J. 
Difanis, Dan L. Flannell, Jeffrey B. Ford, Michael Q.Jones, Heidi Ladd, Katherine M. McCarthy, Albert 
G.Webber, Lisa Holder White 



Associate Judges: Robert C. Bollinger, Holly F. demons, James Coryell, Scott B. Diamond, Chris E. Freese, 
John R. Kennedy, Richard P. Klaus, Charles McRae Leonhard, Thomas E. Little, Brian L. McPheters, 
Timothy J. Steadman 



Pending Caseload 


Civil 


Felony 


Juvenile 


2010 


28,755 


3,452 


2,175 


H^^H 


29,148 


3,402 


2,255 




27,964 


3,482 


2,375 


M^^S 


26,718 


3,230 


1,892 


^E223i 


23,741 


3,103 


1,191 



Total Caseload 


Filed 


Disposed 


2010 


85,122 


84,056 


2009 


98,825 


98,567 


2008 


99,198 


92,739 


2007 


103,939 


102,787 


2006 


98,064 


101,650 



s 

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2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



SEVENTH CIRCUIT 

(Fourth Appellate District) 




Sangamon County Courthouse, Springfield 



Richard T. Mitchell, Chief Judge 

Sangamon County Complex 

200 S. 9th Street, Room 522 

Springfield, IL 62701 

Circuit Population: 323,003 (2010 census) 

Counties (seats): 

Greene (Carrollton) 

Jersey (Jerseyville) 
Macoupin (Carlinville) 
Morgan (Jacksonville) 
Sangamon (Springfield) 

Scott (Winchester) 



36 



EIGHTH CIRCUIT 

(Fourth Appellate District) 




Richard D. Greenlief, Chief Judge 

Adams County Courthouse 

521 Vermont Street 

Quincy, IL 62301 

Circuit Population: 144,116 (2010 census) 

Counties (seats): 

Adams (Quincy) Mason (Havana) 

Brown (Mount Sterling) Menard (Petersburg) 

Calhoun (Hardin) Pike (Pittsfield) 

Cass (Virginia) Schuyler (Rushville) 



Brown County Courthouse, Mt. Sterling 



o 
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s 



NINTH CIRCUIT 

(Third Appellate District) 




Gregory K. McClintock, Chief Judge 

130 S. Lafayette Street, Suite 30 
Macomb, IL 61455 

Circuit Population: 166,742 (2010 census) 

Counties (seats): 

Fulton (Lewistown) 

Hancock (Carthage) 
Henderson (Oquawka) 

Knox (Galesburg) 
McDonough (Macomb) 

Warren (Monmouth) 



Warren County Courthouse, Monmouth 

2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



Circuit Judges: Lois A. Bell, John W. Belz, Peter C. Cavanagh, James W. Day, Kenneth R. Delhi, Leslie J. 
Graves, Patrick W. Kelley, Patrick J. Londrigan, Eric S. Pistorius, John Schmidt, Leo J. Zappa, Jr. 

Associate Judges: Rudolph M. Braud, Jr., John E. Childress, John M. Madonia, Joshua A. Meyer, Steven 
H. Nardulli, Tim P. Olson, Brian T Otwell, C. Perrin, Esteban F. Sanchez, April G.Troemper 



Pending Caseload 


: elony 


MMMM| 

Juvenile 


2010 


37,522 


1,998 


3,486 


2009 


35,806 


2,093 


3,325 


2008 


34,309 


1,988 


3,169 


2007 


31,291 


1,807 


3,205 


2006 


35,069 


1,682 


2,907 



Total Caseload 


Filed Disposed 


2010 


95,445 101,957 


2009 


104,153 107,258 


2008 


108,320 110,121 


2007 


106,032 114,830 


2006 ' 


95,082 103,861 



Circuit Judges: Robert K.Adrian, Mark A. Drummond, Bobby G. Hardwick, Diane M. Lagoski, William 
0. Mays, Jr., Alesia A. McMillen, Michael R. Roseberry, Alan D.Tucker, Scott H.Walden 

Associate Judges: Thomas Brannan, Scott J. Butler, Thomas J. Ortbal, Chet W. Vahle, John C. Wooleyhan 



Pending Caseload 


elony 


Juvenile 


2010 


5,790 : 


L,038 


584 


2009 


5,177 


1,029 


471 


2008 


4,783 


936 


461 


2007 
2006 


4,836 


942 


452 


5,634 


905 


279 



Total Caseload 

2010 


Filed 


Disposed 


37,764 


36,853 


2009 


38,855 


38,308 


2008 


42,475 


42,016 


2007 


45,332 


44,906 


2006 


45,413 


45,625 



37 



Circuit Judges: Steven R. Bordner, Edward R. Danner, William C. Davis, Paul L. Mangieri, William E. 
Poncin, Scott Shipplett, James B. Stewart, David F. Stoverink, David L. Vancil, Jr. 

Associate Judges: Raymond A. Cavanaugh, Richard H. Gambrell, Dwayne I. Morrison, Patricia A.Walton 



Pending Caseload 


Civil Felony Juvenile 


2010 


10,261 1,438 395 


^^^^^B 






8,701 1,364 256 




9,115 1,299 251 




9,392 1,201 240 



Total Caseload 




Disposed 


2010 


38,879 


37,953 


2009 


44,618 


42,821 


2008 


40,720 


39,517 


2007 

i 


41,749 


41,581 


2006 


39,013 


39,140 



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2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



TENTH CIRCUIT 

(Third Appellate District) 




Peoria County Courthouse/ Peoria 



Stuart P. Borden, Chief Judge 

Peoria County Courthouse 

324 Main Street, #215 

Peoria, IL 61602 

Circuit Population: 346,528 (2010 census) 

Counties (seats): 

Marshall (Lacon) 

Peoria (Peoria) 

Putnam (Hennepin) 

Stark (Toulon) 

Tazewell (Pekin) 



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38 



ELEVENTH CIRCUIT 

(Fourth Appellate District) 




Ford County Courthouse, Paxton 



Elizabeth A. Robb, Chief Judge 

McLean County Law & Justice Center 

104 W. Front Street, Room 511 

Bloomington, IL 61701 

Circuit Population: 291,572 (2010 census) 

Counties (seats): 

Ford (Paxton) 

Livingston (Pontiac) 

Logan (Lincoln) 

McLean (Bloomington) 

Woodford (Eureka) 



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TWELFTH CIRCUIT 

(Third Appellate District) 



00& 5gj 

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Gerald R. Kinney, Chief Judge 

Will County Courthouse 

14 W. Jefferson, #439 

Joliet, IL 60432 

Circuit Population: 677,560 (2010 census) 

County (seat): 
Will (Joliet) 



Will County Courthouse, Joliet 

2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



Circuit Judges: Michael E. Brandt, Glenn H. Collier, Kevin R. Galley, Paul P. Gilfillan, Stephen A. Kouri, 
Michael D. Risinger, James E. Shadid, Scott A. Shore, John P. Vespa 

Associate Judges: David J. Dubicki, Chris L. Fredericksen, Mark E.Gilles, Katherine Gorman Hubler, Kim 
L. Kelley, Timothy M. Lucas, Jerelyn D. Maher, Richard D. McCoy, Albert L. Purham, Jr., Lisa Y.Wilson 



Pending Caseload 


: elony 


Juvenile 


2010 


14,150 


1,329 


1,870 


2009 


16,141 


1,433 


1,786 


2008 


21,231 


1,496 


2,157 


2007 


20,424 


1,440 


2,614 


2006 


20,906 


1,561 


2,611 



Total Caseload 


Filed 


Disposed 


2010 


98,269 


100,018 


2009 


105,240 


111,777 


2008 


113,511 


111,507 


2007 


117,238 


118,471 


2006 


109,580 


109,244 



Circuit Judges: Jennifer H. Bauknecht, Scott D. Drazewski, Kevin P. Fitzgerald, Robert L. Freitag, 
Thomas M. Harris, Jr., John B. Huschen, Paul G. Lawrence, Stephen R. Pacey, Charles G. Reynard, James 
E. Souk 

Associate Judges: David W. Butler, John Casey Costigan, Charles M. Feeney III, Mark A. Fellheimer, 
Thomas W. Funk, Rebecca Simmons Foley, Lee Ann S. Hill, Michael L. Stroh, Robert M.Travers 



Pending Caseload 


Civil 


Felony 


Juvenile 


2010 


10,590 


1,295 


1,990 


2009 


10,141 


1,264 


1,847 


2008 


9,780 


1,396 


1,674 


2007 


9,364 


1,370 


1,423 


2006 


8,963 


1,281 


1,158 



Total Caseload 

• 

2010 


Filed 


Disposed 


81,874 


93,866 


2009 
2008 


91,197 


101,205 


89,700 


98,019 


2007 


93,061 


100,527 


2006 


93,957 


93,019 



39 



Circuit Judges: James Jeffrey Allen, John C. Anderson, Amy M. Bertani-Tomczak, Paula A. Gomora, 
Carmen Julia Goodman, Sarah-Marie F.Jones, Robert P. Livas, Susan T. O'Leary, Barbara l\l. Petrungaro, 
Carla J. Alessio Policandriotes, Michael J. Powers, Raymond E. Rossi, Daniel J. Rozak, Richard C. 
Schoenstedt, Richard J. Siegel 



Associate Judges: Dinah J. Archambeault, Robert J. Baron, Matthew G. Bertani, Bennett J. Braun, 
Robert P. Brumund, Edward A. Burmila, Jr., M.Thomas Carney, James E. Egan, Lawrence C. Gray, Rick 
A. Mason, Raymond A. Nash, Domenica A. Osterberger, Joseph C. Polito, Marzell L. Richardson, Jr., 
Roger D. Rickmon, Marilee Viola 



Pending Caseload 




Total Caseload 


Filed 


Disposed 


2010 


175,448 


189,745 


2009 


187,001 


195,606 


2008 


205,396 


212,240 


2007 


206,645 


211,433 


2006 


195,536 


196,337 



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2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



THIRTEENTH CIRCUIT 

(Third Appellate District) 




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Howard C. Ryan, Jr., Chie/ Judge 

LaSalle County Courthouse 

119 W. Madison, #202 

Ottawa, IL 61350 

Circuit Population: 198,965 (2010 census) 

Counties (seats): 

Bureau (Princeton) 
Grundy (Morris) 
LaSalle (Ottawa) 



LaSalle County Courthouse, Ottawa 



FOURTEENTH CIRCUIT 

(Third Appellate District) 




Jeffrey W. O'Connor, Chief Judge 

Rock Island County Courthouse 

210 15 th Street, #408 
Rock Island, IL 61201 

Circuit Population: 272,964 (2010 census) 

Counties (seats): 

Henry (Cambridge) 

Mercer (Aledo) 

Rock Island (Rock Island) 

Whiteside (Morrison) 



Henry County Courthouse, Cambridge 



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FIFTEENTH CIRCUIT 

(Second Appellate District) 




Michael Mallon, Chief Judge 

Ogle County Courthouse 

106 S. Fifth Street, #306A 

Oregon, IL 61061 

Circuit Population: 175,304 (2010 census) 

Counties (seats): 

Carroll (Mount Carroll) 

Jo Daviess (Galena) 

Lee (Dixon) 

Ogle (Oregon) 

Stephenson (Freeport) 



Stephenson County Courthouse, Freeport 

2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



Circuit Judges: Marc Bernabei, Eugene P. Daugherity, Joseph P. Hettel, Robert C. Marsaglia, Lance R. 
Peterson, Cynthia M. Raccuglia 

Associate Judges: William P. Balestri, Daniel J. Bute, Cornelius J. Hollerich, Michael C. Jansz 



Pending Caseload 


Civil 


Felony 


Juvenile 


2010 


6,249 


604 


478 


2009 


5,994 


635 


417 


2008 


5,510 


578 


366 


2007 


5,336 


571 


344 


2006 


5,201 


490 


306 



Total Caseload 


Filed 


Disposed 


2010 


49,325 


50,662 


2009 


53,448 


53,513 


2008 


53,705 


53,775 


2007 


57,713 


58,525 


2006 • 


58,133 


57,913 



Circuit Judges: Walter D. Braud, James G. Conway, Jr., Clarence M. D arrow, Frank R. Fuhi; Ted 
Harrier, John L. Hauptman, Lori R. Lefstein, F. Michael Meersman, Stanley B. Steines, Charles H. Stengel, 
Mark A.VandeWiele 



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Associate Judges: Michael R. Albert, John L. Bell, Thomas C. Berglund, Alan G. Blackwood, Gregory 
George Chickris, Raymond J. Conklin, William S. McNeal, Dana R. McReynolds, Carol M. Pentuic, 
Richard A. Zimmer 



Pending Caseload 


Civil 


Felony 


Juvenile 


2010 


| 15,772 


1,605 


1,999 
1,793 

1,559 
1,382 


2009 


| 15,161 


1,677 
1,728 


2008 


| 14,568 


^ES^H 


| 13,780 


1,626 


BEmM 


| 15,091 


1,548 


1,125 



■ 
Total Caseload 


Filed 


Disposed 


2010 


69,676 


69,674 


2009 


76,527 


75,191 


2008 


79,682 


77,174 


2007 


82,379 


80,076 


2006 


82,504 


78,470 



Circuit Judges: Michael Paul Bald, Daniel A. Fish, Val Gunnarsson, Ronald M. Jacobson, William A. 
Kelly, Stephen C. Pemberton, Theresa L. Ursin 

Associate Judges: Jacquelyn D. Ackert, Charles T. Beckman, Robert T. Hanson, James M. Hausei; David 
L. Jeffrey, John F. Joyce, Kathleen 0. Kauffmann, Kevin J. Ward 



Pending Caseload 


Civil 


Felony 


Juvenile 


2010 


4,877 


858 


827 


KohUB 




812 


755 




4,644 


808 


825 


1 4,519 896 739 


^w^H 


4,519 


786 


503 



Total Caseload 


Filed 


Disposed 


2010 


44,942 


45,412 


2009 


50,183 


49,927 


2008 


50,647 


48,937 


2007 


49,817 


49,240 


2006 


48,224 


46,453 



2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



41 



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SIXTEENTH 
CIRCUIT 

(Second Appellate District) 




Kendall County Courthouse, Yorkville 



F. Keith Brown, Chief Judge 

Kane County Judicial Center 

37W777 Rte. 38, #400A 

St. Charles, IL 60175 

Circuit Population: 735,165 (2010 census) 

Counties (seats): 

DeKalb (Sycamore) 

Kane (Geneva) 
Kendall (Yorkville) 



SEVENTEENTH 
CIRCUIT 

(Second Appellate District) 




Janet R. Holmgren, Chief Judge 

Winnebago County Courthouse 

400 West State Street, #215 

Rockford, IL61101 

Circuit Population: 349,431 (2010 census) 

Counties (seats): 

Boone (Belvidere) 
Winnebago (Rockford) 



Boone County Courthouse, Belvidere 

2010 Annual Report ■ SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



Circuit Judges: David R. Akeman, John A. Barsanti, Susan Clancy Boles, Judith M. Brawka, Kevin T. 
Busch, Thomas L. Doherty, Joseph IVI. Grady, Kurt Klein, Bruce William Lester, Timothy J. McCann, 
Thomas E. Mueller, James R. Murphy, John A. Novermi, Robert P. Pilmer, Timothy Q. Sheldon, Mary 
Karen Simpson, Robert B. Spence, Robbin J. Stuckert 

Associate Judges: Allen IVI. Anderson, Melissa S. Barnhart, Linda Abraharnson Baurle, William P. Brady, 
Alan W. Cargerman, Thomas J. Gallagher, Patricia Piper Golden, James C. Hallock, Thomas C. Hull III, 
Robert L.Janes, David P. Kliment, Marmarie J. Kostelny, R. Matekaitis, Mary Katherine Mo ran, Robert 
J. Morrow, Mark A. Pheanis, Edward C. Schreiber, Thomas J. Stanfa, Leonard J.Wojtecki 



Pending Caseload 




Felony 


Juvenile 


2010 


32,531 


4,626 


1,663 


2009 


29,111 


4,599 


1,567 


2008 


25,245 


4,650 


1,901 


2007 


22,111 


4,601 


2,064 


2006 


19,315 


4,219 


1,938 



Total Caseload 




Disposed 


2010 


186,400 


190,092 


2009 


207,981 


212,868 


2008 


209,009 


209,569 


2007 


| 206,236 


203,522 


2006 


| 214,977 


200,967 



1 



Circuit Judges: Rosemary Collins, Eugene G. Doherty, Lisa R. Fabiano, Gwyn Gulley, Brendan A. Maher, 
Joseph G. McGraw, J. Edward Prochaska, Curtis R.Tobin III, Ronald J.White 

Associate Judges: Joseph J. Bruce, Fernando L. Engelsma, Mary Linn Green, Patrick L. Heaslip, John S. 
Lowry, Steven L. Nordquist, Gary Pumilia, R. Craig Sahlstrom, Brian Dean Shore, John R.Truitt, Steven 
G.Vecchio, K. Patrick Yarbrough, John H.Young 



43 



Pending Caseload 


Civil 


Felony 


Juvenile 


2010 


26,414 


5,094 


3,731 


2009 


24,370 


4,618 


3,536 


2008 


22,641 


4,879 


3,331 


2007 


22,051 


4,997 


3,009 


2006 


19,958 


5,067 


3,323 



Total Caselo 



Filed Disposed 



2010 


| 109,309 


112,976 


2009 


J 122,034 


121,356 


2008 


124,614 


123,457 


H^^EH 


126,366 


125,067 


H^^^Hf 


121,751 


118,143 



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2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



s 



EIGHTEENTH 
CIRCUIT 

(Second Appellate District) 




Stephen J. Culliton, Chief Judge 

DuPage County Courthouse 

505 N. County Farm Rd., #2015 

Wheaton, IL 60187 

Circuit Population: 916,924 (2010 census) 



County (seat): 
DuPage (Wheaton) 



44 



DuPage County Courthouse, Wheaton 



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NINETEENTH 
CIRCUIT 

(Second Appellate District) 




Victoria A. Rossetti, Chief Judge 

Lake County Courthouse 
18 N. County Street 
Waukegan, IL 60085 

Circuit Population: 703,462 (2010 census) 

County (seat): 
Lake (Waukegan) 

* Effective December 4, 2006, Public Act 93-0541 
created a new 22nd Judicial Circuit separating the 
counties of McHenry and Lake into single county 
circuits. For trend reporting purposes, the five year 
trend reports provided for the 19th and 22nd Judicial 
Circuit charts reflect individual county totals for Lake 
County (19th Judicial Circuit) and McHenry County 
(22nd Judicial Circuit). 



Lake County Courthouse, Waukegan 

2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



Circuit Judges: Robert J. Anderson, George J. Bakalis, Kathryn E. Creswell, John T. Eisner, Rodney W. 
Equi, Blanche Hill Fawell, Dorothy F. French, Robert G. Gibson, Daniel P. Guerin, John Kinsella, Kenneth 
Popejoy, Ronald D. Sutter, H ol lis L.Webster, Bonnie IVI. Wheaton 

Associate Judges: C. Stanley Austin, Liam C. Brennan, Neal W. Cerne, Linda E. Davenport, John W. 
Demling, Brian J. Diamond, Thomas C. Dudgeon, William I. Ferguson, Paul M. Fullerton, Bruce R. Kelsey, 
Robert G. Kleeman, James J. Konetski, Patrick J. Leston, Paul A. Marchese, Timothy J. McJoynt, Brian 
R. McKillip, Robert A. Miller, Jane Hird Mitton, Paul Nolancl, Mary E. O'Connor, James D. Orel, Peter 
W. Ostling, Cary B. Pierce, Richard D. Russo, Elizabeth W. Sexton, Terence IVI. Sheen, George J. Sotos, 
Karen M.Wilson, Michael A.Wolfe 



Pending Caseload 


Civil 


Felony 


Juvenile 


2010 


| 20,448 


1,824 


1,280 


2009 


I! W III HI 1 II MIMBTHI 11 


2008 


| 16,367 


2,030 


1,286 


2007 
2006 


; 15,612 


2,135 


994 


| 14,041 


2,314 


801 



Total Caseload 


Filed 


Disposed 


2010 


309,329 


329,844 


2009 


312,572 


329,257 


2008 


328,207 


346,736 


2007 


318,126 


347,035 


2006 


320,626 


340,619 



45 



Circuit Judges: James K. Borras, Valerie Boettle Ceckowski, Fred Foreman, David M. Hall, Mark L. 
Levitt, Margaret J. Mullen, Jorge L. Ortiz, John T. Phillips, Daniel B. Shanes, Christopher C. Starck, Jay 
W. Ukena, Diane E. Winter 

Associate Judges: Luis A. Berrones, Michael B. Betar, George Bridges, David P. Brodsky, Raymond D. 
Collins, Wallace B. Dunn, Michael J. Fusz, Mitchell L. Hoffman, Brian P. Hughes, Charles D.Johnson, 
Sarah P. Lessman, Margaret A. Marcouiller, Christopher B. Morozin, Veronica M. O'Malley, Theodore S. 
Potkonjak, Helen Rozenberg, Thomas M. Schippers, John J. Scully, James Simonian, George D. Strickland, 
Christopher Stride, Donna-Jo Vorderstrasse, Nancy S. Waites, Joseph R.Waldeck 



Pending Caseload 


Civil 


Felony 


Juvenile 


2010 


20,227 


2,059 


406 


2009 


18,120 


2,305 


401 


2008 


14,936 


2,483 


507 


2007 


EFER^^EKVP^H B!f7^| 


2006 


11,362 


2,176 


487 



Total Caseload 


Filed 


Disposed 


2010 


223,823 


235,088 


2009 


232,663 


241,671 


BE^SH 


241,189 


250,134 


E33MJ 


245,681 


256,329 


^^^B 


253,319 


265,786 



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2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



TWENTIETH CIRCUIT 

(Fifth Appellate District) 





C. John Baricevic, Chief Judge 

St. Clair County Building 

10 Public Square 

Belleville, 1L 62220 

Circuit Population: 373,555 (2010 census) 

Counties (seats): 

Monroe (Waterloo) 
Perry (Pinckneyville) 
Randolph (Chester) 
St. Clair (Belleville) 
Washington (Nashville) 



Washington County Courthouse, Nashville 



TWENTY-FIRST 
CIRCUIT 

(Third Appellate District) 




Kathy Bradshaw Elliott, Chief Judge 

Kankakee County Courthouse 

450 East Court Street 

Kankakee, IL 60901 

Circuit Population: 143,167 (2010 census) 

Counties (seats): 

Iroquois (Watseka) 
Kankakee (Kankakee) 



Kankakee County Courthouse, Kankakee 



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TWENTY-SECOND 
CIRCUIT 

(Second Appellate District) 




McHenry County Government Center, Woodstock 

201 Annual Report 



Michael J. Sullivan, Chief Judge 

McHenry County Government Center 

2200 N. Seminary Ave. 
Woodstock, IL 60098 

Circuit Population: 308,760 (2010 census) 

County (seat): 

McHenry (Woodstock) 

* Effective December 4, 2006, Public Act 93-0541 
created a new 22nd Judicial Circuit separating the 
counties of McHenry and Lake into single county 
circuits. For trend reporting purposes, the five year 
trend reports provided for the 19th and 22nd Judicial 
Circuit charts reflect individual county totals for Lake 
County (19th Judicial Circuit) and McHenry County 
(22nd Judicial Circuit). 
SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



Circuit Judges: Richard A. Brown, James W. Campanella, Michael N. Cook, Lloyd A. Cueto, Dennis B. 
Doyle, Jan V. Fiss, Robert B. Haida, Dennis Hatch, Robert P. LeChien, Stephen P. McGlynn, Milton S. 
Wharton 



Associate Judges: Richard A. Aguirre, Brian A. Babka, Walter C. Brandon, Jr., Laninya Cason, Zina 
Renea Cruse, Ellen A. Dauber, Andrew J. Gleeson, Eugene E. Gross, Julie K. Katz, Randall W. Kelley, 
Vincent J. Lopinot, Stephen R. Rice, Heinz M. Rudolf 



Pending Caseload 




Felony 


Juvenile 


2010 


17,971 


1,369 


450 


2009 


17,253 


1,487 


461 


2008 


16,181 


1,407 


278 


2007 


17,949 


1,435 


319 


2006 


16,997 


1,642 


300 



Total Caselo 




Filed Disposed 

119,759 124,967 

133,314 139,230 

141,279 130,206 

141,300 116,986 

138,303 122,729 



Circuit Judges: Adrienne W. Aibrecht, Clark E. 
Sumner Tungate, Kendall O.Wenzelman 



Erickson, Michael J. Kick, Gordon Lee Lustfeldt, Susan 



Associate Judges: Ronald J. Gerts, James B. Kinzer, Michael D. Kramer, Kenneth A. Leshen 



Pending Caseload 




,720 
17,159 
16,710 
16,520 
15,795 



854 

989 

1,012 

869 

842 



mile 

703 
700 
754 
851 
811 



Total Caseload 



Filed Disposed 

40,781 37,849 

39,937 39,647 

44,942 44,798 

49,975 48,221 

48,072 45,708 




Circuit Judges: Michael T. Caldwell, Michael J. Chniiel, Joseph P. Condon, Gordon E. Graham, Maureen 
P. Mclntyre, Sharon Prather, Charles P. Weech 

Associate Judges: Robert Beaderstadt, John D. Bolger, James S. Cowlin, Michael W. Feetterer, Suzanne 
C. Mangiamele, Thomas A. Meyer, Robert A. Wilbrandt, Jr., Gerald M. Zopp, Jr. 




2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



ADMINISTRATIVE 
OFFICE 






mmm 



48 



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The Executive Office 

is comprised of the 
Administrative Director, 

the Executive Assistant to the Director, 
the Senior Attorney, attorneys, 
and administrative staff. Through 
the Administrative Director, the 
Executive Office is responsible 
for coordinating and guiding the 
operations of each of the divisions 

of the Administrative Office and serves as a central resource for myriad 
operational issues which impact the administration of the judicial branch. 




The Executive Office, on behalf of the Sup- 
reme Court, manages and coordinates liaison 
activities with Executive and Legislative 
Branch officials and agencies. One of the major 
duties performed for the Supreme Court is the 
consideration of non-routine administrative 
matters, which are presented during each of 
the Court's terms. The Administrative Director 
prepares and presents agenda issues to the Court 
for discussion and deliberation to assure that 
the business of the judicial branch is timely and 
thoroughly managed. Agenda items approved by 
the Court for action are then implemented by the 
Director through the Executive Office. 

The Executive Office plans and directs 
Administrative Office staff support for Supreme 
Court Committees and the Committees of 
the Illinois Judicial Conference. The study 
and recommendations which flow from each 
Judicial Conference Committee to the Supreme 
Court impact matters related to improving the 
administration of justice in Illinois. Consistent with 
the Court's reliance on the work of the Judicial 
Conference committees to examine and make 
recommendations on matters of judicial branch 
policy, the Court again assigned specific tasks 
and projects to Judicial Conference committees 
in 2010. The Administrative Director assigns 
senior level staff, with subject matter expertise, to 



serve as liaisons to assist each committee in their 
assignments. 

In its administration of Supreme Court Rule 39 
(Appointment of Associate Judges), the Executive 
Office conducted forty (40) associate judge 
elections in seventeen (17) of Illinois'twenty-three 
judicial circuits during 2010. Also, as provided by 
Rule 39, preparations were initiated to manage 
the 2011 quadrennial reappointment process 
for Illinois' more than 380 associate judges. The 
Executive Office also processes applications filed 
under Supreme Court Rule 295, which authorizes 
the assignment of associate judges to hear felony 
matters. Additionally, applications for licenses 
issued to those law students seeking to provide 
limited legal representation under Supreme Court 
Rule 711 are processed through the Executive 
Office. 

The Executive Office's activities and 
responsibilities include securing and tracking 
legal representation through the Office of the 
Attorney General for members of the judicial 
branch named in a case or controversy arising 
out of the performance of their official duties. 
Executive Office staff negotiates, prepares, 
and manages office leases and contracts for 
the Supreme and Appellate Courts, mandatory 
arbitration programs, and the Administrative 
Office. All vendor contracts generated by the 



2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE DIRECTORY 



EXECUTIVE OFFICE 

Cynthia Y. Cobbs, Director 

Michael Tardy, Executive Assistant 

Marcia Meis, Senior Attorney 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE DIVISIONS 

Administrative Services Division - Kathleen L. O'Hara, Assistant Director 

Court Services Division - Dawn Marie Rubio, Assistant Director 

Judicial Education Division - Cyrana Mott, Assistant Director 

Judicial Management Information Services (JMIS) - Skip Robertson, Assistant Director 

Probation Services Division - Margie Groot, Assistant Director 






Administrative Office - Chicago 

111 North LaSalle Street, 13th Floor 

Chicago, 1L 60601 

(312) 793-3250 

FAX: (312) 7934335 



Administrative Office - Springfield 
3101 Old Jacksonville Road 
Springfield, IL 62704 
(217) 5584490 
FAX: (217) 785-3905 



49 



Administrative Office for use in securing goods 
and services are reviewed and approved by the 
Executive Office. Written summaries of recent 
Supreme Court opinions are prepared by legal 
staff within the Executive Office for distribution 
to all Illinois Judges. Additionally, the Executive 
Office serves as secretary to the Illinois Courts 
Commission, managing the filing and preservation 
of Commission records, distributing the Official 
Illinois Courts Commission Reports, and 
performing all other duties typically executed by a 
clerk of a court of record. Executive Office Staff 
also prepares and executes grants which provide 
for programming funded through the Lawyer's 
Assistance Program Act. 

The Administrative Services Division 

provides technical and support services to the 
judicial branch through its five operational units; 
the Payroll/Benefits Unit, the Accounting Unit, 
the Budget Unit, the Human Resources Unit, and 
Mail/Reprographics Unit. 

The Payroll/Benefits Unit maintains all payroll 
records for current state-paid judicial branch 



employees, as well as records for all previous 
employees. Staff of this unit work with the Office 
of the Comptroller to produce both monthly and 
semi-monthly payrolls for over 1,500 current 
judicial branch employees. Staff also coordinate 
the state's varied employee benefit programs, 
including health, dental, and life insurance. 

The Accounting Unit consistently and 
accurately processes all payment vouchers for 
the Supreme Court, the Appellate Court, the 
state-paid functions of the circuit courts, and the 
Administrative Office. The Accounting Unit also 
maintains all financial records for the expenditure 
of resources appropriated by the General 
Assembly. Staff of this unit work closely with staff 
of the Comptroller's Office to reconcile payment 
information and provide that office any additional 
information needed to facilitate the payment of 
judicial branch bills. 

In addition to overseeing procurement and 
inventory controls, the Budget Unit produces 
highly technical and analytical financial reports 
used by judicial branch managers and the 
Administrative Director. These reports track daily 



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2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



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Inside the Administrative Office of the Illinois Courts - Springfield 

spending, contractual obligations, and projected 
needs. This unit also prepares the comprehensive 
documentation utilized in the development and 
implementation of the annual judicial branch 
budget. The Budget Unit monitors the number 
of authorized judicial and non-judicial positions 
within the judicial branch and coordinates the flow 
of information among the Secretary of State's 
Office and the State Board of Elections regarding 
judicial election. 

The Human Resource Unit provides 
personnel services to judicial branch employees 
and managers. Staff within this unit maintain 
comprehensive attendance records for all judicial 
branch personnel covered by the Supreme Court's 
Leave of Absence Policies and assist individuals 
with questions regarding the associated paid 
and unpaid leaves of absences. Staff interact 
with CMS personnel to coordinate the state's 
workers' compensation program. The Human 
Resource Unit also works with judicial branch 
employees and managers in administering the 
judicial branch's classification and compensation 
plan. When requested, staff of this unit also assist 
judicial branch managers in their recruitment 
and selection process, including the placement of 
advertisements, the dissemination, collection, and 
review of applications, administering proficiency 
testing, and securing reference checks. 

The Mail/Reprographics Unit oversees the 
distribution of mail and parcel services for the 
Administrative Office. Acting as its own print 
shop, staff of this unit review materials presented 
for copying and determine the best method to 
replicate the originals. In many instances, the 
Unit produces print quality manuals, brochures, 
and publications. 



The Court Services 

Division is organized into four 

working groups (the Courts, 

Children and Families Unit; the 

Program Unit; the Recordkeeping 

and Technology Unit; and the 

Labor Unit) and is involved in 

a diverse and wide range of 

activities and projects affecting 

judges, circuit clerks, and other 

components of the judicial branch 

of government. The Division is 

responsible for staffing a variety 

of Supreme Court committees, 

Judicial Conference committees, 

and the Conference of Chief 

Circuit Judges. It produces the 

Court-Annexed Mandatory Arbitration Report 

and this annual report. The Division also serves 

as the primary liaison for addressing concerns 

and initiatives relating to the trial courts and 

circuit court clerks. It assists with local labor 

negotiations that impact the judicial branch. In 

addition, a number of specific-topic programs, 

such as the court-annexed mandatory arbitration 

programs, the Capital Litigation Trial Bar (CLTB) 

and the Emergency Preparedness Program, 

are managed by the Division. Child protection 

projects, including management of related federal 

grants, are also one of its responsibilities. Also, 

Court Services oversees the operations of five 

Child Protection Data Court sites. Finally, the 

Division provides legislative support services 

to the Supreme Court, and prepares legislative 

summaries for circuit clerks. 

Pursuant to the official policy of the 
Supreme Court, as established in the Emergency 
Preparedness Standards for the Illinois Circuit 
Courts, the Division was responsible for the 
management and oversight of the Emergency 
Preparedness Program. Division staff, in 
collaboration with expert consultants, provided 
technical assistance, regional training workshops, 
and enhanced technology to assist the circuit 
courts with development and submission of an 
Emergency Preparedness-Continuity of Operations 
(EP-COOP) Plan for each county and/or circuit 
within the state. During 2010, the National 
Center for State Courts [NCSC] was selected 
to administer mandatory judicial performance 
evaluations for associate and circuit court judges. 
In collaboration with the NCSC, the Court Services 
Division and the Judicial Performance Evaluation 



2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



Committee developed an enhanced, state-of-the- 
art evaluation program for Illinois judges. The 
survey instrument was constructed and pilot-tested 
in 2010, and judicial performance evaluations are 
set to commence in 2011. In 2010, Court Services 
staff processed 69 applications for membership 
in the Capital Litigation Trial Bar. Also, staff 
processed 13 applications for certification as an 
approved provider of Capital Litigation Trial Bar 
continuing legal education training courses. The 
Division processed the removal of 33 members 
from the active roster of the Capital Litigation 
Trial Bar for failure to comply with continuing 
education requirements as mandated by Supreme 
Court Rule 714(g). Pursuant to Supreme Court 
Rule 714(i), the Division also assisted in the 
reinstatement of 58 members to the active 
roster of the Capital Litigation Trial Bar. As of 
December 31, 2010 there were 831 members of 
the Illinois Capital Litigation Trial Bar. In 2010, 
the staff administered 12 impartial medical 
examination orders pursuant to Illinois Supreme 
Court Rule 215(d). In negotiating approximately 
35 collective bargaining agreements on behalf 
of Chief Judges and Circuit Clerks, the Labor 
Unit navigated through a difficult year; county 
budgets which by and large allocated less money 
than in the past for personnel costs, and unions 
that challenged the appropriateness of those 
reductions. 

The Division manages the programmatic 
and fiscal components of three (Basic, Data and 
Training) grant awards included in the federally- 
funded statewide Court Improvement Program 
(CIP). The purpose of the CIP is to enhance 
improvement efforts in juvenile abuse and neglect 
court systems in Illinois. The Division continued 
the CIP Legal Representation Initiative in 2010 
giving preference to programming and funding of 
projects that focus on improving 
outcomesforchildrenandfamilies, 
by enhancing the effectiveness 
of legal representation of 
children, parents, the state 
and the child welfare agency 
in child protection cases. As 
a result, sizable projects were 
funded including a specialized 
prosecutor for Lake County, a 
law clinic at the University of 
Illinois at Champaign focused 
on parent representation, and 
three court liaisons for the 
Department of Children and Inside the Ad mh 



Family Services. Additionally, several trainings 
were funded throughout the state for professionals 
working with families involved in the child abuse 
and neglect system including the final installment 
of the training Joining Forces: Tackling the 
Challenges Attorneys Face in Juvenile Abuse and 
Neglect Cases training. CIP funding enabled six 
judges from across Illinois to attend the National 
Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges' 
Child Abuse and Neglect Institute. Furthermore, 
the Child Protection Data Courts (CPDC) Project 
entered the second year of implementation. Four 
pilot sites began collecting data on 14 of the 
30 national child protection court performance 
measures, as well as demographic and key case 
information, in order to enable the courts to 
improve efficiency and effectiveness in ensuring 
safety, permanency, due process, and timeliness 
in child protection cases. A fifth pilot site will 
enhance its case management system to capture 
all 30 of the child protection court performance 
measures. Division staff participated in the 
development and implementation strategy of the 
Department of Children and Family Services 
Program Improvement Plan designed to address 
issues of safety and permanency. 

The Division also provides a wide range of 
guidance and technical support services to circuit 
clerks and their staff. Division staff continues 
to work with the Oversight Board for Continuing 
Education of the Illinois Association of Court 
Clerks to develop educational programs for circuit 
clerks and their staff, and coordination of the 
New Clerk Mentor Program, which assisted six 
new circuit clerks. An update of the Manual on 
Fines and Fees was released May 28, 2010, and 
distributed electronically to Chief Circuit Judges 
and Circuit Clerks. The Division monitored the 
filing of the circuit clerks' annual audits, updated 





listrative Office ofth 



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2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 




the Applicable Legal Requirements, and distributed 
the Requirements upon request. The Division 
coordinated activities relating to implementation 
of the Supreme Court approved Electronic 
Business Initiative, providing a framework for 
specific statewide e-Business services in the trial 
courts. In 2010 Fayette, Franklin, Morgan, 
and White Counties were approved to accept 
electronic pleas of guilty in accordance with the 
Standards for Accepting P/eas of Guiity in Minor 
Traffic and Conservation Offenses Pursuant to 
Supreme Court Puie 529. In total, ten counties 
have been approved for the e-Guilty program. 
Five counties are participating in e-Filing pilots 
- Cook, DuPage, St. Clair, Will and Madison. 
These pilots are authorized to accept electronic 
filings for various authorized case categories as 
approved by the Supreme Court. In addition, three 
counties submitted e-Filing applications, which 
are in the review process. The AOIC provided 
merged jury lists to 100 counties in 2010. Petit 
juror and grand jury handbooks were supplied 
to counties as needed. The Division continues to 
manage the Offense Code Table (OFT) to identify 
offenses reported to four state entities through 
the Automated Disposition Reporting (ADR) 
Program. A complete, updated version of the OFT 
was issued in March 2010, and is currently used 
for ADR reporting in 87 Illinois counties. 

The Judicial Education Division is 

responsible for the coordination and development 
of judicial education resources to ensure Illinois 
judges acquire the knowledge and skills needed to 
be effective jurists. In that regard, the Division 
partners with and provides administrative support 
to the Illinois Judicial Conference Committee on 
Education, the Special Supreme Court Committee 
on Capital Cases, the Special Supreme Court 
Advisory Committee on Justice and Mental Health 
Planning, the Special Supreme Court Committee 
on Evidence, the Judicial Mentor Committee, the 
Appellate Court Administrative Committee, and 
other committees, commissions or organizations 
as determined by the training and educational 
needs of the judiciary on behalf of the Court, 
including training event, authorized by the Court, 
for Appellate and Supreme Court law clerks, 
research attorneys and directors. 

Since the Supreme Court's adoption of a 30 
hour continuing judicial education requirement for 
all Appellate, Circuit and Associate Judges, the 
Division has coordinated, along with the Illinois 



Judicial Conference Committee on Education, 
the presentation of Education Conference 2008 
and 2010. Over 950 judges attended the two 
sessions of Education Conference 2008 and 
2010. Planning for Education Conference 2012 
is well underway and the attendance expectation 
remains the same. Education Conference 2012, 
like the 2010 Conference, will offer judicial 
education training in four core tracks: Judicial 
Conduct, Professionalism and Ethics; Civil Law 
and Procedure; Criminal Law and Procedure; and 
Family Law and Procedure. In addition to these 
tracks, the Court has approved the incorporation 
of Capital Cases training into Education 
Conference 2012, providing an opportunity for 
judges who preside over capital cases to receive 
Rule 43 certification while in attendance at the 
Conference. 

The Division has been actively engaged from 
year-to-year with the Project Benchbook Editorial 
Board of the Committee on Education in the 
production of judicial benchbooks, and in 2010 
the Division partnered with the Special Supreme 
Court Committee on Capital Cases to also publish 
the first edition of a benchbook on Capital Cases to 
be released in the Spring of 2011. The following 
Benchbooks are also available to members of the 
judiciary: Civil Law and Procedure, Criminal Law 
and Procedure, D LSI/Traffic, Domestic Violence, 
Evidence and Family Law and Procedure. All 
Benchbooks are available in hardcopy and CD 
format, or via the judicial portal. 

The 2010-2011 Judicial Education Division 
•Master Calendar began with the presentation 
of a fall Capital Litigation Seminar, followed 
by these judicial education events: Appellate 
Court Conference, Legal Research and Writing 
Workshop, presented twice in both Springfield and 
Chicago, Predicting Violent Behavior in Custody 
and Visitation, Peer Judge Mentor Training, 
Illinois Rules of Evidence Seminars, presented 
on three occasions in Springfield, Edwardsville 
and Chicago, New Judge Seminar, Search and 
Seizure: At Home and on the Road, DUIiTraffic 
Issues, The Mental Health Workshop: Effective 
Identification & Management of Mentally III 
Offenders in the Criminal Justice System and 
the Advanced Judicial Academy. The Division 
will also work in cooperation with the Committee 
on Education on the presentation of a faculty 
development workshop to be held September 15, 
2011 in the Chicago area. 

The Division also administers the New Judge 



2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



Mentor and Peer Judge Mentor programs in 
support of the Judicial Mentor Committee. 

The Judicial Management Information 
Services (JMIS) Division is one of five divisions 
within the Administrative Office of the Illinois 
Courts (AOIC). The JMIS division is charged with 
providing technology to the offices and staff of the 
Illinois Supreme and Appellate Courts, Supreme 
Court supporting units and all divisions within 
the AOIC. The JMIS division is staffed by 24 
professionals consisting of four groups organized 
to respond to the technology initiatives assigned 
by the Administrative Director. 

The Hardware / Software group manages the 
Courts' local and wide area networks, servers, 
personal computers, peripherals, and productivity 
software. The Hardware / Software group is also 
responsible for the installation and support of the 
state-provided digital recording systems in the 
supreme, appellate and trial courts. The Internet 
Services group is responsible for the design 
and maintenance of the Court's website (www. 
state.il. us/court) as well as the use of Internet 
technologies in the judiciary. The User Services 
group staffs JMIS' Help Desk, is responsible 
for database administration, telecommunication 
services, and manages the inventory and asset 
tracking of the Court's technology equipment. The 
Application Group is responsible for the design 
and development of more than twenty enterprise 
database applications written using an Oracle or 
Progress database system. 

In 2010, technology continued to provide 
enhanced access and efficiencies within the Illinois 
judiciary, offering online conference registration to 
judicial education and access to court documents 
and information through the judicial portal. 
Digital audio recording expanded in the trial courts 
by equipping more than 305 courtrooms with 
audio recording capabilities. Audio recordings of 
Supreme Court, Appellate Court, and Workers' 
Compensation oral arguments are available on the 
Court's website, where 43,000 visitors access the 
website each month. 

The Probation Services Division provides 
services to Chief Judges and their probation staff 
in all circuits. The Probation and Probation 
Officer's Act, at 730 ILCS 110/15 (1) states: "The 
Supreme Court of Illinois may establish a Division 
of Probation Services whose purpose shall be the 
development, establishment, promulgation, and 



enforcement of uniform standards for probation 
services in the State, and otherwise carry out the 
intent of this Act." Consistent with its statutory 
responsibility, the mission of the Probation 
Division is to improve the quality, effectiveness, 
and professionalism of probation and juvenile 
detention services in Illinois. In carrying out 
this mission, the Division's training, monitoring, 
standards-setting, and technical assistance 
activities extend to all aspects of the administration 
and operation of Illinois probation and court 
services departments. These activities include the 
administration of state reimbursement to counties 
for probation and detention services, review and 
approval of annual probation plans submitted 
by each department, collection and analysis 
of statewide probation data, administration 
of probation employment and compensation 
standards, implementation of evidence-based 
practices (EBP) in the supervision of offenders on 
probation, monitoring and evaluating probation 
programs and operations, administration of the 
interstate compact for probationers transferring 
into and out of the state, design and delivery of 
basic and advanced training for probation and 
detention personnel, and provision of technical 
assistance and staff support to circuit courts to 
improve the administration and operation of 
probation services in Illinois. 

In 2010, a major focus of the Division continued 
to be the application of the Supreme Court's data- 
driven model of probation reimbursement, in 
accordance with EBP, that targets the Supreme 
Court's limited resources to provide services for 
higher risk populations. By targeting higher risk 
offenders, the ultimate goal of EBP probation in 
Illinois is to achieve a reduction in the number 
of future crimes and victims. It is the Division's 
responsibility to ensure that core probation 
services are sustained, and as in 2009, many 
probation departments struggle to preserve 
core services as a result of budget cuts and staff 
reductions. 

Notwithstanding the continued critical 
shortfall in state probation funding in 2010, 
there emerged an even more urgent commitment 
to fully implement and measure EBP throughout 
Illinois probation. Division staff worked with 
departments to prioritize activities that were 
most likely to positively impact public safety, 
and provided technical assistance and training 
boosters including motivational interviewing, 
the Effective CaseWork Model, application of 



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2010 Annual Report • SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS • Administrative Summary 



54 



EBP, and the Thinking for a Change cognitive- 
behavioral curriculum. Division staff also initiated 
on-going quality assurance reviews of caseload risk 
distribution data, risk assessment administration 
and scoring, and case and supervision planning. 

The Division sponsored fifty-two (52) training 
events in 2010 that served over 1,000 probation 
and detention participants. In addition to Basic 
Training for probation and juvenile detention 
staff, training topics in 2010 included Thinking 
for a Change facilitator training, Officer Safety, 
Legal Issues, and Program Evaluation and 
Outcome Measurement. At the direction of 
the Administrative Director, the Division also 
contracted with the University of Cincinnati to 
conduct a reliability study and re-validate the 
Level of Service Inventory-Revised (LSI-R) and 
the adult pre-screeen instrument for Illinois' adult 
probation population. The re-validation study will 
be completed in 2011, and will again examine if 
there are any age or gender bias in the instrument. 
In Fall 2010, the new secure web-based 
application of the Youth Assessment and Screening 
Instrument (YASI), known as Caseworks, was 
implemented statewide along with an enhanced 
case management component. This application 
will improve consistency in juvenile probation 
supervision practices and allow for greater 
quality assurance at both the local and state level. 



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