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Full text of "Annual report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service"

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„ /, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



IMMIGRATION AND 

NATURALIZATION 
SERVICE 

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ANNUAL REPORT 
of the 
^IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE 
^ U. S. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

WASHINGTON , D. C. 

For the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1949 




WATSON B. MILLER 
COMMISSIONER 



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I 

OUTLINE OF REPORT 



Page 

Out I i ne ,,,,.„.,....... I - III 

Immigration and Nationality Legislation . . . .^. . . I 

Legislative activity. ..--,.... I 

Summary of Service Activities and Problems . .......... 3 

Office of Deputy Commissioner . 7 

Enforcement Division . 8 

I . Inspection and Examination 8 

I mm i g rants 10 

Quota immigrants................................ II 

Displaced persons ....... 12 

Nonquota immigrants^,........., 14 

Wa r brides......... 14 

Non i mmi g rants. ................................. 15 

Agricultural laborers admitted through 

exercise of Ninth Proviso.................... 16 

Suspension of deportation..,,..,, 17 

Displaced persons in the United States......... 18 

Emigrants and nonemigrants IB 

Alien c rewmen , 18 

Examinations in naturalization proceedings..... 19 

Dec I a rat i on s and pet i t i ons f i I ed. ...... 19 

2. I nvest i gat i ons. . . 19 

Anti-subversive operat i ons. ................... . 20 

Deportation of aliens under the Act of 

October 16, 19 18; as amended................. 20 

Exclusion of aliens under 8 C.F.R.175.57.. 2! 

Denial of naturalization under Section 305 

of the Nationality Act....................... 21 

Revocation of naturalization under Section 338 

of the Nationality Act....................... 21 

Law enforcement operations..................... 21 

3. Detentions and Deportations . ................... 22 

Alien enemies.... .................. ............ 22 

Detent i ons. .................................... 23 

Travel documents or passports for deportees.... 26 

Transportation of aliens....................... 27 

Alien parole....... ...................... 28 

Deportations and voluntary departures.......... 28 

Destitute aliens removed....................... 29 

4 . Border Patrol 30 

Accomp I i shments. .............................. 50 

How the work -has been accomplished........ 35 

Problems facing the Border Patrol.............. 36 



Adjudications Division . 

1 . Trave I Cont ro I 

Petitions for immig rat ion v i sas ............ 

Preexam i nat i on , , , ........ ....,.,........■...- • 

Reent ry permi ts. ...,,.. o c ,,...-.„.......... 

2. Hearing Review . . . , . . 

Exc I us ions. , . . , .... ,„.. = „,,,,........«........-.. = . 

Exercise of Nintl^ Proviso........................ 

y- Expulsions. .................... .............. 

Suspension of deportation...:... .............. . 

Displaced persons residing in the United States. 

Exercise of Seventh Proviso............. 

Administrative fine proceedings................. 

Perm! ss ions to reapp \ y . , , , 

3. Nationality and Status , . ,.,.....=, 

General 

Certificates of arrival and preliminary 

applications for naturalization............... 

Registry of aliens under Section 328(b) of 

the Nationality Act of 1940 ................. : 

Persons natural i zed , , . . . 

Special certificates of naturalization to 

obtain recognition as a United States 

citizen by a fore;gn state..................... 

Citizenship acquired by resumption or 

re pat r i at i on. . . - 

Absences f rom the Un i ted States . . 

Pet i t i ons for natural I zat ion .......... 

Pet i t i ons den i ed ....... ........ 

Naturalizations revoked. ...... ,..,.. 

Certificates in changed name.,,.....,.,....,...,, 

Loss of nationality............................... 



Page 
38 
38 
38 
39 
39 
40 
40 
41 
4! 
42 
42 
43 
43 
43 
44 
44 

45 

45 
45 



47 

47 
48 
48 
48 
48 
48 
48 



Office of General Counsel . .,■„.. .o .... . ....... 49 

Funct i ons i n general . , ,\W'.'J. ... ...... 49 

Leg i s I at i ve act i v i ty . ............................. 50 

Court decisions affecting Service functions...... 50 

Supreme Court cases 51 

United States Courts of Appeal decisions......... 52 

District Court cases and special prob I ems. ...... . 53 

United States Court of Claims cases... .......... 55 



Administrative Division . .......... ... 

I . Budget and Fiscal Control . . 

General 

Recei pts and refunds. ... ......... 

Extra Compensation Act of March 2, 
Financial statement...... 

Income and sources thereof. . 



193 



56 
56 
56 
57 
59 
61 
62 



1 1 I 

Page 

2. Personne I . . 63 

General 63 

Placement and training.................. 63 

Classification and employee services............. 64 

3 . Information. Mail, and Files 65 

4 . Space. Service, and Supplies . 66 

Division of Research and Education . .................... 67 

I . Citizenship Education . 68 

Names of newly-arrived immigrants... 69 

Home study prog ram. 69 

Public-School certificates of proficiency 70 

Fourth National Conference on Citizenship... 70 

2. General Research . 71 

3. Immigration and Nationality Digeset and Manuals.. 71 

4 . Stat i St ics . 72 

CHARTS 

Chart — "Immigration to the United States, years ended 

June 30, 1820- 1949"............. 9 

Chart — "Immigrant aliens admitted, years ended 

June 30, 1940- 1949"............. 10 

Chart — "Quota immigrants admitted, years ended 

June 30, 1925- 1949"..... 12 

Chart — "Deportations and voluntary departures, years 

ended June 30, 1940 - 1949".. 29 

Chart — "Miles patrolled by border patrol officers, 

years ended June 30, 1925 - 1949"............... 30 

Chart — "Deportable aliens apprehended by border patrol 

officers, years ended June 30, 1925 - 1949"..... 31 
Chart — "Smugglers of aliens apprehended by border 

patrol officers, years ended June 30, 1925 - 

1949"...... 33 

Chart — "Persons apprehended by border patrol officers 

for other than immigration law violations, years 

ended June 30, 1925 - 1949"....... 35 

Chart — "Persons apprehended and authorized border 

patrol force, years ended June 30, 1940 - 1949". 37 
Chart — "Reentry permits, years ended June 30, 1940 - 

1949". 39 

Chart — "Naturalization, years ended Sept. 27, 1906 - 

June 30, 1949"..... 46 

Chart — "Income and sources thereof, years ended June 

30, 1935- 1949". ... 63 

Chart — "Citizenship text books for naturalization 

applicants distributed to public schools, years 

ended June 30, 1943 - 1949". 68 



IV 



APPEND ICES ' 

Table ' "Immigration to the United States- !820 ■■ 1949" 
Tab.e 2 "Aliens and citizens admitted and departed, aliens 

exciuded, by months: years ended June 30^ 1948 and 1949" 
Table 3. "A; lens admitted, by classes under the immigration 

laws: years ended June 30, 1946 to 1949" 
Table 4 "Immigration by country, for decadesr '820 to 1949" 
Table 5. "Immigrant aliens admitted, by classes under the 

immigration laws, and by port or district: year ended 

June 30, 1949" 
Table 6- "Immigrant aliens admitted, by classes under the 

immigration laws and country or region of birth; year ended 

June 30 i949" 
Table 6A "Immigrant aliens admitted, by classes under the 

immigration laws, and country of iast permanent residence: 

year ended June 30, 1949" 
Table 68. "Displaced persons admitted to the United States 

under the Displaced Persons Act of !948, by classes and 

country or region of birth: year ended June 30, !949" 
Table 1 . "Annuai quotas and quota immigrants admitted: 

years ended June 30, 1943 to 1949" 
Table 8- " I mmi g rant a I i ens admitted by major occupation 

group and race or people: year ended June 30, 1949" 
Table 9. "Alien spouses and alien minor children of citizen 

members of the United States armed forces admitted under the 

Act of December 28, !945, by country or region of birth; 

year ended June 30, '949" 
Table 9A. "Alien fiancees or fiances of members of the armed 

forces of the United States admitted under the Act of June 

29, '946; by country or region of birth: years ended June 

30, 194?' to 1949" 

Tab'e lO. "Immigrant aliens admitted, by race or people, sex, 

age, and marital status: year ended june 30, 1949" 
Table lOA. "Immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens 

departed, by sex, age, illiteracy, and major occupation group; 

years ended June 30, !94! to 1949" 
Table \ '. "Aliens and citizens admitted and departed, aliens 

excluded: years ended June 30, 908 to 1949" 
Table i2. "immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens 

departed, by State of intended future or iast permanent 

residence: years ended June 30, !945 to 1949" 
Table !2A„ "Immigrant aliens admitted to the United States, 

by specified classes and by rural and urban area and city: 

year ended June 30, 1949" 
Table 13 "Immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens 

departed, by country of last or intended future permanent 

residence: years ended June 30, 1945 to !949" 



Table :4 "Emigrant aliens departed by race or people,, sex, 
age and marital status: year ended June 30, 1949" 

Tabie j 4A "Emigrant aliens departed^ by major occupation 
group and race or people: year ended June 30.„ 1949" 

Tabie \5 "Nonimmigrant aliens admitted, by c asses under 

the immigratron laws, and by port or district year ended 

June 50, 1949" 
Tabie '6 "Nonimmigrant aiiens admitted, by c'asses under 

the immigration laws, and country of birth; year ended 

June 30. ;949" 
Table '.7, ''Nonimmigrant aliens adm?tted, by classes under 

the immigration iaws, and country of :ast permanent 

residence: year ended June 30, 1949" 
table '8. "'Nonimmigrant aliens admitted and nonemigrant 

aliens depa ted. by country of last or intended future 

permanent residence: years ended June 30, 1945 to 1949" 
Table '9. "Non •mmi g rant aliens admitted as temporary visitors 

or transits from July \ ._ ! 945 to June 30, 1949, who were in 

the United States June 30, 1949" 
Tabie 20. "Aiiens excluded from the Un ted States, by cause: 

years ended June 30, 1940 to !949" 
Table 20A, '-Aliens excluded from the United States, by cause: 

years ended June 30, 1892 - 1949" 
Tabie 2' "Aliens excluded from the United States, by race or 

people and sex: years ended June 30, '940 to '949" 
Table 22 "Alien seamen deserted from vesse,s arrived at 

American seaports, by nationality and flag of vessel: year 

ended June 30, 1949" 
Tabie 23. "Vessels and airplanes Inspected, seamen examined, 

and stowaways found on arriving vessels, by district: years 

ended June 30, 1948 and 1949" 
Table 24 "Aliens deported, by cause and country to which 

deported: year ended June 30, 1949'" 
Table 25. "Inward movement of aliens and citizens over Inter- 
nationa; land boundaries, by State and po't: year ended 

June 30, :949"' 
Tabie 25A. "inward movement by air of aiiens and citizens over 

international iand boundaries, by State and port: year ended 

June 30, 1949" 
Tabie 26. 'Purpose for which alien and citizen commuters cross 
. the international iand boundaries,, by ports: year ended 

June 30, S949" 
Table 26A. "Aliens and citizens possessing border crossing 

cards who crossed the Internationa; iand boundaries, by 

Classes and ports: year ended June 30, 1949" 
Table 27 "Miscellaneous transactions at land border ports, 

by districts: year ended June 30, 1949" 
Tabie 28. "Inward movement of aliens and citizens over inter- 
national iand boundaries: years ended June 30, 1945 to 1949" 



\ 



VI 



Table 29- "Principal activities and accomp i i shments of 

Immigration Border Patrol, by districts: year ended June 30, 

1949" 
Table 30 "Passenger travel between the United States and 

foreign countries, by port of arrival or departure, year 

ended June 30, 1949" 
Table 30A "Passenger travel by air and by sea between Puerto 

Rico and continental United States (mainiand) and the Virgin 

Islands and between Hawaii and continental United States 

(maintand) and insular possessions, years ended June 30, 

194! to !949" 
Table 30B^ "Passengers arrived in or departed from the United 

States from foreign countries, by sea and air by registry 

of carrier and ports or arrival: year ended June 30, !949" 
Table 31. "Passenger travel to the united Sta-:es from 

foreign countries, by country of embarkation: year ended 

June 30, :949" 
Table 32 "Passenger travel from the United States to foreign 

countries, by county of debarkation: year ended June 30, 1949" 
Table 33, "Alien passengers arrived in the United States 

from foreign countries, by port of arrival and country of 

embarkation: year ended June 30, 1949" 
Table 34- "Alien passengers departed from the United States 

to foreign countries, by port of departure and country of 

debarkation: year ended June 30, 1949" 
Table 35 "Citizen passengers arrived in the United States 

from foreign countries, by port of arrival and country of 

embarkation: year ended June 30, i949" 
Table 36» "Citizen passengers departed from the United States 

to foreign countries, by port of departure and country of 

debarkation: year ended June 30, 1949" 
Table 37 "Declarations of intention filed^ petitions for 

naturalization filed, and persons naturalized: years ended 

June 30, 1907 to '949" 
Tabie 38. "Persons naturalized by classes under the nationality 

laws and country of former allegiance: year ended June 30, 1949" 
Table 39. "Persons naturalized, by country of former 

allegiance: years ended June 30, 1940 to '949" 
Table 40- "Persons naturalized, by country of former allegiance 

and major occupation group: year ended June 30, !949" 
Table 4'.. "Petitions for naturalization denied,, by reasons for 

denial: years ended June 30, 1945 to 1949'' 
Table 42.. "Persons naturalized, by sex and marital status, 

with comparative percent of total: years ended June 30, 

!94: to 1949" 
Table 43 "Persons naturalized, by sex and age; years ended 

June 30. 194' to 1949" 
Table 44 "Persons naturalized,, by States and territories of 

residence: years ended June 30, 1945 to 1949" 



Table 45 "Persons naturalized, by specified countries of 
former allegiance and by rural and urban area and city.: 
year ended June 30, 1949" 

Table 46. "Persons naturalized, by country or region of 
birth and year of entry: year ended June 30, 1949" 

Table 46A. "Persons naturalized, by country or region of 
birth and country or region of former allegiance: year 
ended June 30, 1949" 

Table 47. "Persons naturalized, by statutory provisions 
for naturalization: years ended June 30, 1945 to !949" 

Table 48. "Writs of habeas corpus in exclusion and depor- 
tation cases: years ended June 30, 1940 to 1949" 

Table 49. "prosecutions for violating immigration and 
nationality laws: years ended June 30, 1940 to 1949" 



ANNUAL. REPORT 
Of the 
MMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE 
for the year ended June 30, 1949 

WATSON B. MILLER, COMMISSIONER 



The Immigration and Naturalization Service is responsi- 
ble for the administration of the immigration and nationality 
laws. Among its more important functions are the inspection 
of aliens to determine their admissibility under the immigra- 
tion laws, the investigation, apprehension, and deportation 
of aliens in the United States illegally, the prevention of 
surreptitious entries into the United States, and the exami- 
nation of applicants to become citizens through naturalization. 

IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY LEGISLATION 

Leg i s I at i ve act i v i ty . — The only act of major importance 
to the Service which was passed by the 80th Congress during 
the fiscal year was Pub I ic Law 865 of July I, 1948, This Act 
amended Section 19(c) of the Immigration Act of 1917 in sev- 
eral major respects Under the new law, suspension of depor- 
tation by the Attorney General is authorized even though an 
alien is rac iaily ineligibleto citizenship. The I aw also 
permits such suspension in the cases of al iens who have 
resided continuously in the United States for seven years or 
more and who were residing here on July I, 1948. The other 
important change in Section i9(c) revised the procedure to 
be followed by the Congress in approving suspension of de- 
portation cases,. Affirmative, rather than negative, action 
is now required before such cases may finally become effective. 
There is a provision for protecting small quotas by providing 
that in the future no quota shall be reduced by more than 
50 percent in any one year, 

Publ ic Law 882 of July 2, 1948, amended the Philippine 
Rehabilitation Act of i946, which deals with the training of 
certain alien Filipinos in the United States. The Act did 
not materially affect the Service, Pub I ic Law 895 of July 5, 
1948, authorized the Federal Security Administrator to recruit 
foreign workers within the Western Hemisphere and Puerto Rico 
for temporary agricultural employment in the continental 
United States, The bill contained no provision waiving the 
application of the immigration laws to such recruited workers. 

During the first session of the 81st Congress three bills 
affecting Service activities were passed prior to the close of 
the fiscal year The f i rst was Publ ic Law 5 I of Apri I 21 , 1949 
This Act authorized American foreign service officials to com- 
plete the processing of cases pending in their offices on 
December 51, 1948, involving alien fiances and fiancees of 
certain American citizens who had applied to come to the United 
States under the special terms of P ub I i c Law 47 I of the 79th 



-. 2 - 

Congress, as amended and extended The new Act required that 
the citizen and his or he:" prospective alien spouse must have 
personally met, and that the alien must arrive at a port of 
entry with a valid visa within five months after April 21, 
1949 Provision was made in the Act to permit such al lens 
to become permanent resrdents after marriage. 

Public Law '0 ot June 20, 1949 provided for adminis- 
tration of a Central Intelligence Agency established pur- 
suant to the National Security Act of 1947. Section 8 of 
the Act authorizes the entry into the United States du ring each 
fiscal year of not to exceed 100 aliens for permanent resi- 
dence without comp ! . ance with the immigration laws These 
persons are to be chosen upon a finding by the Director of 
the Central Intelligence Agency, the Attorney General, and 
the Commissioner of Immigration and Naturalization that the 
entry of such aliens is in the interest of the national 
security or essential to the furtheirance of the national 
intelligence mission. 

P ub.i i c Law ; 4 of June 29, 1949^ me re I y co rrected a 
typographical error in Section 324A of the Nationality Act 
of 1940 (Public Law 567, 80th Congress, 2nd Session). Sub- 
paragraph (7) of paragraph ( b ; of that Section, as originally 
enacted, made reference to ''Section 334 (e)" of the Nation- 
al ity Act, whereas the p-oper reference should have been to 
"Section 334ic)". 

Twenty-three private bit is extending benefits to persons 
under the immigration or nationality laws were enacted during 
the fiscal year, as compared with 121 in the year ended 
June 30, 1948- 

Pursuant to authority granted by the United States 
Senate in July, !947 (S Res= !37 - 80th Cong, — 1st Sess,,, 
as amended.^ the Senate Judiciary Committee, through approp- 
riate subcommittee and staff members, has been engaged in 
making a full and compiete investigation of the entire immi- 
gration system of the United States Legislation as a result 
of that investigation is expected to be submitted to the 81st 
Congress during 1950 This has resulted In delay in consider- 
ation of several measures which the Service has recommended= 

There have also been introduced in the first session of 
the 8!st Congress some 955 private bliis in the field of 
immigration and nationality.. Considerable legislative activ- 
ity may reasonably be expected ;n ,950 as a result of that 
;; i tuat : on , 



- 3 - 

SUMMARY OF SERVICE ACTIVITIES AND PROBLEMS 

The Immigration and Naturalization Service has respon- 
sibility to and for the alien migrant. Its program inevitably 
must reflect the international forces at work. 

In a world socially and economically disturtjed, the 
United States continued to be the lodestar for the peoples 
of other lands. Each year since the close of the war finds 
the flow of immigration larger. During the past year 188,317 
immigrants were received for permanent residence while only 
24,586 emigrants departed for permanent residence abroad. Of 
the immigrants I 13,046 or 60 percent were quota immigrants. 
Slightly more than a third of the quota immigrants were 
refugees from tyranny and oppression admitted under the 
Displaced Persons Act of 1948. The authorized quota of 
Northern and Western Europe was only 47.3 percent filled, 
while that of Southern and Eastern Europe was oversubscribed 
by 110.4 percent This happened because future quotas are 
mortgaged where necessary to permit admission of displaced 
persons who are nationals of such countries. Great Britain 
with 23,543 quota Immigrants, Poland with 21,462, and Germary 
with 12,819 outranked other quota countries. 

The 75,271 nonquota immigrants were principally natives 
of Canada and Mexico, and war brides From December 28, 1945, 
when the "War Brides" Act became effective through June 30, 194^ 
there were I 13, 135 wives, 327 husbands, and 4,537 al ien 
children of citizen members of the armed forces admitted to 
the United States, Nearly one-half were from the Engl ish- 
speaking countries of the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia 
and New Zealand, 12 percent were from Germany, 8 percent from 
Italy, and 7 percent from France. 

The number of nonimmigrants admitted for temporary periods 
was 447,272. There was a marked rise in the number of alien 
visitors, the number of t rans I ts, however, declined considerably. 
Four hundred five thousand five hundred three nonemigrants 
departed. In total there were 88,411,790 entries of aliens and 
citizens at land and sea ports of entry, almost 97 percent were 
commuters and other persons who made frequent crossings at the 
border or who were making visits of short duration. 

The importation of farm laborers, begUn during the war, 
was continued, but the program was decreasing as more citizens 
became available for farm work. On June 30, 1949, there were 
26,818 farm laborers, chiefly from West Indies and Mexico, in 
the United States. 



The complexity of immigration law, in its applies 
and of human relations sometimes creates hardships fo -! r 
for whom discretionary relief is provided by law i,.-^. 
applications of 1,754 aliens for preexami nat i on werf i.rr;i 
4,302 names were submitted to Congress for approva; • ,- 

pension of deportation; in 334 cases the discret... 
Attorney General was exercised under the 7thvP,rO' ' i 
Section 3 of the immigration Act of 1917 Another ' 
measure Section 4 of the Displaced Persons Act whif ■< 
i zed the adjustment of status to that of immigrant , 
admitted as nonimmigrants,, who are in fact dispiaceu 
by reason of danger of political persecution^ was * 
for much investigative and adjudicative work on 
applications received. Finai decision on many or ;: ; 
will be made in the next fjsca! year. 

Internationa! tensions aggravated the necessity tor >rt!e- 

guarding the nation from those who wou Id subvert this der ■ ■. , , 

The investigation of aliens beHeved to constitute a t' •:. 

national safety was a function of primary importance duf isuj ,iae 
year Included in the 320 thousand investigations • ■• ' -d 
during the year, were many heading to the deportal ;'- 

versive aliens; or to the excfusion of aliens whos* 
deemed to be prejudiciai to the interests of the Unii^v, 
or to the denial or revocation of naturalization of the 
sons who may have advocated the overthrow of the Gove.r' • 
f o re e . 

The Border Patrol rounded out its twenty—f i f th , . ' ■ ' 
organization with a year of great accomp i i shment •. 

eleven million miles were patrolled over the varie 
and through the kinds of weather that can prevail. ;4!P 
3,000 mile ''beat" of the borders covered. Border, pel- ro d ; ,-. 
questioned more than six and a half mi I i ion per-vons; ^.n:- 
apprehended 289.400 aisens. 

There were 49,261 aliens detained in the seven • i 

facilities operated by the Service, and 53,262 detain / i 

institutions with which this Serv i ce has cont racts , 
days of denention per person has been reduced both !■ . . 

facilities, and in other institutions, by the policy ©f .. 

ing paroie and by improved efficiency in processing aci i : -T-^ t.'-' 
the conclusion of deportation or exclusion^ At the en.i of 1 I','';- 
year there were 9,229 aiiens under parole superv i s ■ ci. . 

Increased investigative wo rk p I us g rea > • ' 

apprehensions added to the fact that transpori ■ • •■ 

readily available for deportation, i' ed to the (iev'Jt<. u;. .i '• : 
20,040 aliens, and the voluntary departure of 276 20'> '> cr-l- 
able aliens, — -the latter figure a 40 percen. 
compared with last year,.* The key to the spectacular : >, . ri :.: • 



- 5 - 

in numbers of vol unt a ry departures lies in the continued iMegal 
entry of Mexican nationa s; 96 percent of the vo untary 
departures took place at the southern border ports of Texas and 
Cal i forn i a 

Concomitant with the admission of aiiens into our country 
is the naturalization of aliens who choose to make this 
country their own and who demonstrate their fitnessto become 
citizens. The number of persons naturalized^ 66,594 was the 
lowest number in 37 years, but the puzzling questions of law 
raised by those naturalizations were many Typical problems 
are those of former alien enemies now removed from that class 
by the treaties of peace signed September 15, !947, who became 
eligible for naturalization; war brides who wish to be natural- 
ized while accompanying their citizen husbands on assignment 
outside the United States, former United States citizens who 
became expatriated dur i ng the war and now seek to regain citizen- 
ship. The courts approved the recommendations of the Service 
in 99„7 percent of the cases for naturalization presented for 
final hearing Petitions were denied in 2,271 cases,. 

The increase in declarations and petitions bears out 
the belief that there will be a reversal of thedownward 
trend in naturalizations within the next few years. The 

war brides, displaced persons, and other immigrants admitted 
since the war will comprise the future natu ra ; i zat i on potent i a i , 

It is imperative for good government that those who come 
to this country to stay be equipped with the basic toolsof 
political existence in a democracy. Education in citizenship 
has been encouraged by the Division of Research and Education 
by transmitting '48^204 names of new arrivals to the public 
schools and state universities,, and by the distribution of 
'45,528 textbooks on citizenship An important advance has 
been the acceptance by the Service and certain courts of the 
public school certificates showing satisfactory completion 
of study on the basic principats of the Constitution and 
Government, Where schools are we M conducted, such a certifi- 
cate is a more adequate proof of_ requisite knowledge than the 
brief oral examination by. the naturalization examiners. 

There were many and important decisions rendered in the 
courts in the past year affecting the operation of the Immi- 
gration and Naturalization Service Among the issues were 
those arising under the Administrative Procedures Act, as to 
whether the certain Sections of that Act are applicable to 
deportation and exciusion proceedings under immigration i aw , 
Other cases of partscuiar' interest were those m which aliens 



- 6 " 

deport at Ion and natural i zat i on proceed i ngs were pen di ng s imu Itan- 
eously,. Decisions so far rendered have left the status of 
this problem st i I i unsettled, and it may be that the ultimate 
solution Will depend on amendatory legisSation. 

Many of the problems listed in last year's report have 
not been met^ and are repeated below The Service recognizes 
that legal remedies may be forthcoming when the Senate Sub- 
Committee on Immigration presents its report and recommenda- 
t I ons„ 

T he position of immigra nt Ins pector re mai ns unclas- 
sified hence immigrant Inspectors suffer from inequality in 
wages^, and consequent lowering of moraie and of the quality 
of personne i „ 

2 Smuggling and lliegai entries — -The Mexican nationals' 
crossing the borders iiiegaliy is the outstanding probiem in 
the Southern border districts. Cuba with its thousands of 
Europeans and proximity to the mainland offers a potential 
menace„ wh i i e increased European immigration to Canada is 
being reflected in the increase in the nu'mber of attempts to 
cross the Canadian border Smuggling by air is one of the 
gravest of smuggling problems 

3 Stowaways - Stowaways are st M I a problem, Legis- 
iation to authorize stowaways being detained on board and 
deported without board of special inquiry hearings would make 
for bette:' i aw enforcement and conservation of manpower 

4- ■ Sej;me_rv, --Woth the present inspection force^ it is 
impossibie to have a satisfactory system for verifying the 
departure of transient seamen This appears to be one of 
the gravest problems of cont'o, 

5 D.spiaced Per sons -The cases of displaced persons 
who wish to change status from that of temporary admissions 
to that of immigrants under Section 4 of the Displaced Per- 
sons Act are adjudicated by this Service. No additional 
personnel has been provided for this purpose and the pro- 
gress of investigation is slowed up accordingly 

6 D: f f i cu J t.y in obtaining travel docu ments for deportee s. 

— In order to deport aiiens it is necessary to procure a pass- 
port or other travel document permitting the alien to enter the 
country to which ordered deported On June 30, !949, there were 
2,066 warrants of deportation pending because passports had been 
refused 



- 7 - 

7. L ack of housing and equipment . — One of the most urgent 
needs, particularly in districts with many small ports 
at isolated places, is a building program to provide suitable 
office and living quarters for members of the Service. Hovels 
and shacks are the terms used by district directors in describ- 
ing some of the bgildings now in use as inspection stations. 

8. Border Patrol. — A recent survey along the entire Mexi- 
can border and the gulf coast of Florida has led to the con- 
clusion that approximately 700 additional personnel and 300 
additional units of transportation equipment including boats, 
aircraft, and automobiles would enable the Service to have ef- 
fective control of the situation. 

OFFICE OF DEPUTY COMMISSIONER 

Attached to the office of Deputy Commissioner are the 
Operations Advisors, who act 1 n a liaison capacity, repre- 
senting the Central Office in the Field and the Field Offices 
to the Central Office Staff. 

In addition to the usual routine inspection trips to the 
various field districts of the Service which resulted In many 
minor Improvements In procedures, the Operations Advisors 
have participated In Interdepartmental and international 
conferences looking toward an agreement with the Government 
of Mexico regarding agricultural laborers from that country. 

Another of the Operations Advisors was designated by 
the Secretary of State as a member of the United States 
delegation to the Third Inter-American Travel Congress held 
in San Ca'rios'lle Bariloche, Argentina, February 15-24, 194.9. 
This Congress was composed of delegates from the 21 American 
Republics and the Dominion of Canada. At this Congress many 
proposals were acted upon having in view the facilitation 
of travel between countries in the Western Hemisphere. 

The Operations Advisors have represented the Service at 
many conferences with the Department of State, the Inter- 
departmental Travel Committee and the Facilitation Subcommittee 
of the AI r Coordinating Committee having in view the simpi i- 
fication of Immigration procedures In so far as possible within 
the framework of statutory requirements and having due consid- 
eration for the question of national security. 

The Operations Advisors have also participated in the 
Annual Work Conference of the National Office of Vital 
Statistics, Federal Security Agency, composed of representa- 
tives from all the States, with a view to securing the 
cooperation of the responsible State agencies in the enact- 
ment of laws requiring more adequate proof in connection 
with applications for so-called "delayed birth certificates." 
The experience of the Service has shown an increase in the 
practice of fraud in connection with these delayed birth 
certificates. 



During the past year there have been put into comolete 
operation procedures developed by the Operations Advisors 
whereby the paper work required from transportation companies, 
the American Consuls and this Service has been greatly simpii- 
fiedo This has resulted in savings of many thousands of dollars 
to ail concerned. At the same time the controls over aliens 
entering the United States for temporary stays have beer, 
strengthened , 

The Special Assistant to the Commissioner for Public 
Information in addition to representing the Service to the 
public, is the editor of the "Monthly Review". 

The "Monthly Review" Is the bulletin of the Service 
authorized by the Nationality Act of 1940= Its pages are a 
medium for expressing the poMc;es, viewSj, and experience of 
the Service in administering the immigration and nationality 
laws. Through its pages members of the Service, social agen- 
cies, research students and other members of the interested 
public are kept informed of the various phases of the work of 
the Service. In addition to members of the Service, 4,532 
copies are distributed to regular subscribers, 

ENFORCEMENT PI VISION 

Funct ions „— The Enforcement Division is respons i b I e for the 
enforcement of the immigration and nationaiity laws including 
immigration inspections; naturalization exami nat : ong; investiga- 
tions; patrol of borders, arrest, custody, and deportation of 
aliens, 

! i nspection and Examination 

The essent.ai roe of the immigrant inspectors at more than 
450 designated ports of entry cannot be overemphasized. It is 
these officers who make the first and in the majority of cases 
the only decision as to whether each alien applicant for admis- 
sion measures up to the standards fixed by immigration law, or 
that each c it i zen ■ s c ; a'm to c i t Fzenshi p is properly substantiated. 

For many years customs and immigration officers have shar- 
ed duties and responsibilities at small ports of entry where 
one official at a time was sufficient to handle border traffic 
During the past year, however, at a number of iarger ports, the 
preliminary screening by one officer for both Services has been 
undertaken. While the practice needs perfecting,, it is be- 
lieved that ;t will prove to be efficient and economical for 
this Service and the Customs Service. 

There were more than 88 million aliens and citizens who 
arrived and were examined at ports of entry. Almost 97 percent 
were land border crossers,, who were counted upon each entry. 
The increase (more than seven mi I I :on) as compared with last 
year, is due more to augmented travel by United States citizens 
across the land borders particularly into Canada, than to 



- 9 - 

aliens coming into the United States. 

The number of alien crew members examined exceeded that 
of last year by approximately four percent, while there were 
seven percent less citizen crew members on vessels and planes. 
Passenger arr i va I s by sea and air were only eight percent great- 
er than last year and reflected, as did the land border figures, 
a larger number of citizen travellers than there were last fis- 
cal year. For purposes of comparison, the figures for the past 
two years are shown below: 

Aliens and citizens arrived and examined at U. S. ports of 
entry during years ended June 30, 1948 and 1949 

Year ended June 30. 1949 
Tot a I A I i ens C i t i zens 

Total 88.41 I ,790 41,535,323 46,876,467 

Arrived at land borders 85,400,278 40,077,743 45,322,535 

Canadian 39,736,497 16,054,649 23,681,848 

Mexican 45.663,781 24,023,094 21,640,687 

Crewmen 1,907,039 960,099 946,940 

Arrived at, seaports. .. . 1,104,473 497,481 606,992 

Year ended June 30. 1948 
Total A I iens C i t i zens 

Total 81,323,823 40,305, 105 41,018,718 

Arrived at land borders 78,362,207 38,892,545 39,469,662 

Canadian 34,888,274 15,535,509 19,352,765 

Mexican 43,473.933 23,357,036 20,116,897 

Crewmen 1,937,874 922,349 1,0 15,525 

Arrived at seaports.... 1,023,742 490,211 533.531 



IMMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1820 - 1949 
THOUSANDS 




- 10 - 

'■ I mm i g rants . — An i mml g rant alien is a nonresident alien 

admitted to the United States for permanent residence. Immi- 
grants have been further classified as: q uota immigrants , 
or those admitted under established quotas from European 
countries, Asia, Africa, and the Pacific, and colonies, 
dependencies, and protectorates of European countries; and 
nonquota immigrants i.e., natives from the independent 
countries of the Western Hemisphere, their wives and unmarried 
children under J8 years of age; wives, husbands, and unmarried 
children of citizens of the United States; ministers and pro- 
fessors who enter to carry on their professions and their 
wives and children; and other classes. 

In this disturbed post-war era there were many who 
sought a home in the United States. One hundred eighty- 
eight thousand, three hundred seventeen immigrants became 
permanent residents of the United States in the year ended 
June 30, 1949. Thus for the fourth consecut i ve year, immi- 
gration continued to rise toward levels that have not been 
reached since 1950. There were N3,046 persons charged to 
quotas and 75,271 who were admitted as nonquota immigrants. 



IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1940 - 1949 



IMMIGRANTS (In Thousonds) 
120 

100 







- i I ■= 

The authorzed quota during the year 
!949; was 153,929. Under the DispSaced Persons 
Act of 1948; however,, quotas for the countries of origin of 



Quota immlg an i s .- • 
ended June 30 



1948, 

displaced persons could be mortgaged for succeeding years up 
to 50 percent so that quotas for such countries could be 
exceeded in any g,ven year Of the 113,046 quota immigrants 
admitted there were 39,734 who were admitted under the Dis- 
placed Persons Act and 73,3:2 admitted under the Immigration 
Act of 1924, as amended 

Priority within quotas is given by the Immigration Act 
of May 26, 1924 to certain groups of aiiens. This preference 
has affected the admission of but few of the immigrants in the 
recent past ifour percent in '945 and seven percent in 1946). 
However in 1948. '9 percent of quota immigrants received 
favorable pos t;ons w.thin the quota, in 1949, the number and 
percent of preference quota immigrants declined Two factors 
affected the numbers of persons hav-ng preference.. One was the 
decrease in first preference quota due to legislation (Public 
Law 538,, 80th Congress, of May 59, 1948; that provided that hus- 
bands of United States c ] t izens who had married prior to Jan- 
uary I, 1948, could be accorded nonquota status This change 
in law is reflected in the figures Another reason for the 
decrease is that displaced persons admitted last yearwere ad- 
mitted under the Immigration Act of '924, whereas in the fiscal 
year 949 they were admitted under the Displaced Persons Act 
of 1948, 



Quota immigrant adm:tted 
Years ended June 50. i948 and 



1949 



1949 



1948 



Total number 



13.046 92.526 



First preferenc e quota 
Relatives qf citizens 
Skilled agriculturists 



8,548 12, 103 
2,093 2,0 10 



Second preference q_uota 
W.ves and cht.dren of 
res i dent al i ens 

Nonpref erence quota 



3,738 3,215 

58,933 75, 198 



Displaced persons admitted under 
the Displaced Persons Act 
of 1948 



59,734 



- 12 - 



QUOTA IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1925 - 1949 



T HOUS ANDS 
180 




Displaced persons. — The Displaced Persons Act of 1948 
permitted the admission of 205,000 persons within the two 
years ended June 30, 1950. All except 3,000 orphans of the 
205,000 were to be charged to quotas either through filling 
current quotas or mortgaging future quotas. 

The difficulties encountered in administering the 
Displaced Persons Act made for a slow start; but each month 
has seen an acceleration of the program. It is anticipated 
that the full 205,000 visas will be issued by the close of the 
year ended June 30, 1950, even though only 20 percent of that 
number had been admitted by June 30, 1949. The Displaced 
Persons Act also established preferences and priorities. 
Preference status for those admitted Is shown below. 



13 



Immigrants admitted under 
Displaced Persons Act 



Number of 
persons 



Tota I number, , . , 

First preference quota 

Displaced persons engaged in agricultura! 

pursu i ts and the i r w; ves and ch i . d ren 

Second preference quota 

Displaced persons having special skills and 
t rai n i ng, and the! r wi ves and ch i idren. „ , 
Thi rd preference quota 

Displaced persons who are blood relatives 

of U. S. ci'tizens or res ! dent al i ens 

Nonpref erence quota . ,..,.... , . , 

Nonquota 

D ; sp I aced orphans ... 



40 ■ 048 



10,088 



23,542 



4,016 
2,088 

314 



Since quotas may be mortgaged into the future by displaced 
persons, several small quota countries exceed their fiscal year 
quotas by more than 1,000 percent, as may be seen below. 



Annual qu 


Dtas and 


quota immigrants admitt 


sd, by 






quota 


nat ion a 1 


ty„ Year ended 


June 30 


. 1949 








Annual 


Quota immiqrant 


s admitt 


ed Percent quota filled 


Quota 


Total 


1 mm 


D-, P. 


Total 


Imm. i 


D. P., 


nat Jonal ity 


quota 


number 


Act of 

1924 


Act 




Act of' 
1924 


Act 


Al 1 count r : es. . . , . 


'53.929 


M 3 . 046 


73.312 


39.734 


73.4 


47 ..6 


25.8 


Europe „ , , . _ ... 

Northern and 


150.501 


i ! L443 


7 I..730 


39 ,713 


74, ! 


47.7 


26.4 
















Western Europe „ , . 
France. ........... 


! 25,, 853 


59 , 578 


54., 92; 


4.657 


47.3 


43.6 


?.7 


3.086 


2,997 


2,980 


17 


97.2 


96 6 


,6 


Germany.. , - . 


25.957 


;2,8!9 


8, ^99 


4,620 


49. 4 


31.6 


17.8 


Great Britain & 
















N- 1 re ; and, „ ... , 


65,721 


23,543 


23,534 


9 


35.8 


35.8 


1' 


1 rel and 


17,853 


8,505 


8,505 


... 


47,6 


47.6 


- 


Other N J( W Europe 


13,236 


1 1,714 


! 1,703 


1 ! 


88.5 


88.4 


, 1 


Southern and 
















Eastern Europe . 


2,4,648 


5L865 


16 809 


3 5., 056 


2'0,4 


68 2 


142,2 


Czechos ! ovak i a. 


2,874 


3.255 


1 . 924 


L331 


! ! 3 , 2 


66.9 


46,5 


Estonia, ,, 


I 16 


■,T':6 


60 


•,656 


■,479. 3 


51.7 


1 , 427 . 6 


Hungary ,. „ 


869 


' .. 445 


670 


775 


166.3 


77. 1 


89.2 


Italy ,.,..,..„. . 


5,802 


5,207 


5,200 


7 


89,7 


89.6 


.1 


Latv ) a,. „.,..,.. . 


236 


3,534 


!04 


3,430 


1 , 497 . 5 


44. 1 


1,453.4 


Lithu an ia. ...... 


386 


6,452 


177 


6,275 


1 , 67 1 . 5 


45.9 


!,625.6 


Poland. . , .^ . . , „ . 


6,524 


2^,462 


3,704 


17,758 


329.0 


56.8 


272.2 


US, S.R ..,„.„,, . 


2,7:2 


3 7:0 


1,462 


2,248 


136,8 


53.9 


82.9 


Other S & E 
















Europe . 


5,. :29 


5.084 


3,508 


1 , 576 


99,.! 


68.4 


j 30.7 

5 '2 


Asia... 


! ., 528 


1 ,003 


984 


19 


65<6 


64.4 


Af ri ca. ,„„.„„., o ... . 


1 200 


328 


326 


2 


27.5 


27. 1 


Pac i f I c , ..„ . ,...,._._.» v.. ._s_f_f. 


700 


1 272JI 272 


- 


38.9 


38.9 


i« 



\l Less than 



percent 



Nonquota imm i g rants.-- -Fo r the second year since World 
War II,. quota Immigration exceeded nonquota immigration, Al- 
most haif of the 75,27: nonquota immigrants admitted were 
natives of nonquota countries, chiefiy Canada and Mexico. 
Husbands, wives, and children of United States citizens made 
up most of the remainder. As stated above included in the 
nonquota count are 5 A- orphans admitted under the Displaced 
Persons Act of !948 

Nonquota immigrants adm tted in years 

ended June 50, :948 and 1949 

1949 1948 

Total nonquota immigrants admitted 75, 27 I 78, 044 

Husbands of citizens. 3,239 647 

Wives of citizens 27,967 30,086 

Unmarried children of citizens . ., 4,648 6,097 

Natives of nonquota countries , 35,969 37,506 
Wives and children of natives of 

nonquota count ri es , . . o . . ' . . . 425 462 

M.nisters, the: r wives and children i , 233 1,592 

Professors, their wives and children - 869 997 

Women who had been citizens, MO 136 

Other nonquota classes 8!' 521 

!t w; I i be noted that the number of "husbands of citizens" 
was higher, a reverse of decrease in number of preference 
quota relatives of citizens shown under "quota immigrants." 

wa; P. i,j.jj_^lk, The Act oi December 28;, '945., faci I itated 

the entry into the United States of alien wives, husbands, 
and children of c i t ; zen members of the armed forces, From 
April 1946, when the first ships arrived bringing wives and 
children of soidiers to the United States, to June 30, 1949, 
the following numbers have been admitted 



Tot a: Husbands 



Year endec 


June 50 


Total 


1 949 


!948 


1947, 


:946, 



'7.999 .J27 





Alien 


Wi ves 


Chi Idren 


! 13. 1?5 


4,537 


20,670 


1,473 


21,954 


968 


25,736 


1,375 


44,775 


72 1 



22.2!4 7; 

23,016 94 

27 , 2 1 2 ! I 

45,557 6' 

The "War 8r;des'' Act expired on December 28, 1948, three years 
after enactment; The race to meet the dead line date was accel- 
erated each month between Ju ly and December, 1948, A few, 88 wives 
and 26 children who started from their homes but f ai I ed to reach 
the United States by midnight of December 28, 1948, were 
admitted under the Act since it was determined that the law 
couid be interpreted to include these iate comers. 



Summing up the war brides program points to some inter- 
esting factors The circumstances of war as well as more 
facile means of communications must both have contributed to 
the fact that nearly one-half of the alien spouses and 
children were from English speaking countries. dhief among 
the countries from which war brides came^, were the following: 



Number of 


war 1 


Dr ides 


! i^, 


, 135 


34, 


,894 


13, 


,315 


8, 


,873 


8, 


,531 


7. 


.236 


6, 


,649 


5, 


099 




752 




,786 



A I i count r; es , , , 

Engiand,, Scotland, and Wale^ 

Germany 

Italy,,,, 

France 

Canada 

Austral : a 

Ch!na,- - , , 

Japan 

AM other count r : es , 

Non immigrants.— *A nonimmigrant alien is an alien resi- 
dent of the United States returning from a temporary visit 
abroad or a nonresident alien entering the United States for 
a temporary period Included in this group are visitors^ 

transits^, treaty merchants,, st udents , f o re i gn government 
officials^ officials to international organizations, and the 
wives and unmarried children of members of these groups. 
Travelers between the United States and the insuiar possessions 
are not included in the count of nonimmigrants,, nor are 
commuters and others who frequently cross the international 
land boundaries, nor are crew members,, In general, aliens ad- 
mitted to the United States at land boundaries for 30 days 
or more are included in the statistics. 

There were 447,272 non i mm . g rants admitted to the United 
States during the year ended June 30, 949 The ye. 
nessed a marked rise in alien visitors coming to the united 
States for vacations but travel through the United States in 
transit deciified considerably. 

Nonimmigrants admitted 
in years ended June 30- 194 8 an d 1949 



Total nonimmigrants admitted , 

Government of f i c i ais. , „ , . „ » . . ,. , . , 
Members of i nternat ionai organizations. 
Temporary visitors for business. 
Temporary visitors for pleasure. 

I n t rans i t : „■. .,■ . ,. „ i . „ . \ '.. ■. - 

Returning residents, 
St udents „ . ,,„.„.„ , 
Treaty traders. 
Other nonimmigrants , 



;949 


1248 


447 272 


476,006 


13 722 


16,822 


4.723 


4,059 


73. 338 


78,876 


225 745 


206, 107 


8i 6)5 


124,780 


36,984 


32,464 


! 0,481 


i 1,914 


632 


71 1 


32 


273 



- 16 - 

Thirty-nine of those admitted as visitors were persons 
admitted under the Information and Education Exchange Act 
of 1948. Seventy-five treaty merchants and their wives and 
children took advantage of the Act passed last year which 
provided for special return permits for treaty merchants 
lawfully admitted to the United States during the period 
July I, 1924 and July 5, 1932. 

Under the extension of the "Fiancees Act" approved in 
April, 1949, 168 fiancees or fiances of members of the armed 
forces were admitted as visitors. 

Agricultural laborers admitted through exercise of 
N i nth Prov i so . — The authority of the Attorney General under 
the 9th Proviso to Section 3 of the Immigration Act of 1917, 
as amended, to admit for temporary periods, in his discre- 
tion, persons otherwise inadmissible to the United States, 
has been exercised in connection with the importation and/or 
transfer to other than the original employers of unskilled 
agricultural and industrial laborers, who would be subject 
to exclusion from the United States under the provisions of 
the immigration laws relating to contract laborers. During 
the year such laborers were imported from Mexico, British 
West Indies, Canada and a few other countries in the Western 
Hemisphere because of the shortage of domestic labor. Before 
importation is authorized, a showing is required that there 
is a need for the labor, that prevailing wage rates in the 
area of employment will be paid, and that American labor 
will not be displaced by the aliens imported. 

On February 2\ , 1948, a formal agreement was entered into 
between the United States and Mexico which contemplated the im- 
portation or recont ract i ng of approximately 50,000 agricultural 
laborers. This agreement was effective until it was declared 
no longer operative by the Mexican Government in October 1948. 
At that time approximately 35,000 laborers had been imported 
under the accord Thereafter, pending negotiations for a new 
ag eement, the contracts of several thousand Max ican f arm I abor- 
e rs were extended and they continued their agricultural employ- 
ment in the United States. In addition, informal arrangements 
were agreed to by both governments providing for the contracting 
of up to 4,000 Mexican nationals in this country who had not 
entered pursuant to the terms of the 1948 agreement. The use 
of such laborers was limited to California and Arizona. 

Formal discussions for the purpose of reaching new agree- 
ments between representat 1 ves of th is Government and the Mexican 
Government were begun in Mexico City on January 17, 1949, and 
were carried on through February 15, 1949. At that time sub- 
stantial agreement had been reached on most points under con- 
sideration. After February 15, negotiotions were continued 
through the exchange of notes to clarify the position of each 
government on the points of difference with a view to reaching 
a final accord on all issues. A new agreement was approved and 
became effective August !, 1949. 

The 1949 agreement sets forth the conditions under which 



- 17 - 

Mexican agricuiturai workers sha.i be empioyed,, includingre- 
quirements that they be paid prevailing wage rates, and that 
they be furnished adequate housing facilities. It recognizes 
the disturbing el etnent of illegalentriesofMexican laborers 
In that both governments have agreed "to take ai i necessary 
measures to suppress radically the illegal traffic in Mexican 
workers," Workers shall not be empioyed in the United States 
under the agreement uniess the need for their services is cer- 
tified to by the Un-ted States Employment Service, 

At the end of June the following numbers of agricultural 
laborers from all countries were empioyed in the United States. 

Agricultural laborers in the United States who were 
admitted under the gth Proviso to Section 5, 
Immigration Act of February 5, 1917 
As of June 30. 1949 



Country of last permanent re s idenc e 

District Total Can- Mex- Ba- Bar- Hon- J a- Leeward 
Number ada ico hamas bados duras maica Islands 



A, . districts. 26.818 222 8,0!8 5.4 5 248 222 !2.597 96 

St. Aibans, Vt„, 2i0 2i0 _ _ - _ _ - 

New York, N ,, Y_ 623 12 - 325 - - 286 

Ph Made i ph la,, Pa„ 16 - - (6 - - - - 

Miami, Fia./., 17,472 -- -4,900 248 222 12,006 96 

Buffa'io, N_ Y„.„ 329 ■■ -- !74 -• - i55 

Detroit, Mich_„ 226 - 76 ■ - - 1 50 - 

San Antonio, Tex. 2,0 '5 --2,0:5 

El Paso, Tex_ 758 758 

Los Angeles Ca,„ 5J69 - 5, !69 



The program permitt.ng the importation of ski.ied Canadian 
woodsmen under bond to guarantee maintenance of status and 
departure continued in effect during the year, and the need for 
the program st i i i exists,. At the end of the fisca! year, there 
were 59 individual permits in effect authorizing the importation 
of 8,285 woodsmen as compared with 10! permits covering 7,895 
woodsmen the previous year. However, less than half of the 
number of woodsmen authorized were actually imported and working 
in the woods at any one time,. 

Violations of the terms of the perm.ts decreased during the 
year, probably due to the ciose policing of the woods camps by 
the Border Pat ro . and a better understanding of their responsi- 
bilities on the part of the operators Breaches of bond were 
ordered in eight cases and coiiec+ion made in five. 

S uspension of de port at i o n , -- I n addition to immigrants 
admitted from abroad there were L, 393 aliens who became legal 
permanent residents through suspension of deportation, and 
for whom the State Department charged the quotas of the 
various countries Charges to the vaious quotas made by 



the State Department for the year ended June 30, 1949 included 



1 tal i an 


294 


Span i sh 


40 


Greek 


153 


Turk 1 sh 


40 


Pol ish 


69 


Portuguese 


25 


Ch i nese rac i al 


52 


Austral i an 


25 


Ruman i an 


45 


Yugos 1 av 


22 



As is pointed out elsewhere in this report^ the amend- 
ment to Section 19(c) of the Immigration Act of 1917 approved 
on July I, 1948, provides that suspension of deportation 
orders shall be approved concurrently by both Houses of 
Congress. It was not unt i I July 6, !949, that the seven 
resolutions involving about 900 suspension orders were passed 
by the House (the Senate having approved the resolutions at 
an earlier date). In each case approved the Service collects 
the required fee of $18.00 and cance I s deportat i on orders. 

Suspension orders involving two Mexican couples and one 
Cuban couple were not approved by Congress These cases wi I I 
serve as a guide in future recommendations 

Displaced persons in the United States . — Under Section 4 
of the Disp.aced Persons Act of 1948, any alien who entered the 
United States on a temporary basis^, prior to April !, 1948, and 
who is a displaced person as defined in the Section,, and who is 
admissible under the immigration laws,, may make application 
to the Attorney General to have hiS status adjusted to that of 
an immigrant al i en As of the end of the fiscal year 1949, 
no cases had been approved by the Adjudications Division acting 
under delegation of authority by the Attorney General. 

Emigrants and nonemi q rants . — During the fiscal year 1949, 
there were 430,089 aliens (exclusive of border crossers, 
Mexican agricultural laborers, and crewmen) who departed from 
the United States, Only 24,586 were emigrants, i e., aliens 
who left a permanent residence in the United States for a 
permanent residence abroad; 22,354 of the nonemigrants were 
resident aliens who planned to return to the United States 
after a temporary stay abroad; six of the nonemigrants were 
treaty traders who also planned to return to the United States, 
and 383, 143 were al iens who had been admitted as visitors, 
persons in transit, and others temporarily admitted. 

A I i ert crewmen ., — There were 62,022 vessels and 93,723 planes 
inspected on arrival at United States ports. 

While the number of crewmen examined on arrival 1,907,039 
was a decrease of two percent for the total from last year, the 
ratio for alien crewmen was reversed, since there were 960 099 
admitted in the year ended June 30, 1949, as compared with 
922,349 in 1948.. Conversely, citizen crew members totalled 
946,940 and 1,015,525 in 1949, and 1948 respectively. 



- 19 - 

There were 3,598 alien crewmen who deserted during the 
year. Principal nationalities of deserting crewmen were 
Italian ( 884 ) , Br i t i sh ( 557 ) , Norweg i an ( 308 ) , and Chinese (207). 

The alien seamen situation has become worse since the end 
of the war. Seamen who have seen service d"n American ships are 
reluctant to go back to sea on foreign vessels because of the 
lower wages, and poor living and working conditions. Almost 
without exception the district directors of field districts 
bordering on water express a need for further legislation which 
would provide for greater control of alien crewmen. 

Examinations in naturalization proceedings . — There were 
98,383 status, preliminary examinations and 70,298 final nat- 
uralization hearings completed during the year. 

Declarations and petitions filed . — Indicative of the prob- 
able increase in naturalization activity is the fact that the 
number of declarations filed, 64,866 was an increase of eight 
percent over the previous year. Petitions filed equaled 7 1,044 
an increase of four percent as compared with 68,265 last year. 

2. I nvest i gat i ons 



With the closing of the fiscal year 1949, the Investigation 
Section marks the completion of its first year. During thif 
period it has matured from the blue-print stage into a highly-' 
organized and we I I - i nteg rat ed group of specialists, whose 
activities reach into and assist in all phases of the enforce- 
ment work of the Service. 

The march of events both at home and abroad during the 
past few years has had a marked effect on the responsibilities 
of the Service in enforcing the laws delegated to it. Unsettled 
conditions abroad have aroused in numerous aliens the desire to 
enter the United States by whatever means are possible, lawful 
or unlawful, Many aliens admitted here for temporary visits 
have been reluctant to return to their own countries, and have 
attempted to remain here longer than permitted. Strained inter- 
national relations have brought into closer focus the problem 
of preventing the entry of aliens whose presence may constitute 
a threat to our national security. At the same time, develop- 
ments within this country have required that resident aliens 
suspected of subversive activities be subjected to closer 
scrutiny and appropriately dealt with, The new tide of immi- 
gration represented by displaced persons has brought with it 
its own peculiar problems. All the foregoing factors have been 
increasingly operative during the past year, and have demon- 
strated the necessity for centralizing the direction of the 
investigative responsibilities of the Service in the newly 
organized Investigation Section. 



- 20 - 

At the opening of the fiscal year, there were 145,258 
Investigations pending in the field. At the close of the year 
the backlog of cases pending in the field had been reduced to 
40,043 despite the fact that 230,! 13 new cases were received 
during the year. 

Of primary importance in the work of this Section has been 
the investigation of the activities of aliens believed to con- 
st itute a th reat to the national safety. Close liaison has been 
maintained with other investigative and intelligence agencies 
both in this country and abroad, and a mass of information per- 
taining to suspected aliens and naturalized citizens has been 
disseminated tothefield. Selected field officers were brought 
to the Central Office in April, 1949, where they were given a 
course of special training in the investigation and prosecution 
of cases involving subversive aliens,. 

A nt i -subve rs i ve operations - — The work of the Section in 
the f i e Id of ant i-subvers i ve activity has fallen generally into 
four categories: 

( I ) Deportation of aliens unde r th e Act of October 16. 
1 9 18. as amended , — During the year just ended, 2,554 aliens 
were investigated to determine if they were deportable under 
this Act. On the evidence produced by the investigations, 
warrants of arrest in deportation proceedings were issued in 
92 cases Although hearings were at first hindered by an 
adverse judicial decision under the Administrative Procedure 
Act and by dilatory litigation instituted by various of the 
arrested aliens, the trend of the more recent decisions has 
been decidedly in favor of the Government,, so that deporta- 
tion hearings may be proceeded with once more Deportation 
hearings have been completed in the cases of 60 aliens, and 
many more are scheduled for the near future. 

During the past year, 36 records of hearings in such 
cases have been received in the Central Office. The Commis- 
sioner has issued warrants of deportation in 23 cases. On 
appeal to the Board of Immigration Appeals, 10 orders of 
deportation have been affirmed, and five cases are nowpending 
and undetermined before the Board, One of the first aliens 
taken into custody for deportation under a warrant of depor- 
tation issued under the present program has instituted pro- 
ceedings for judicial review and it is anticipated that the 
decision in his case will be definitive with respect to the 
various attacks as to the constitutionality of the Act of 
October 16, 1918, as amended Four other aliens have been 
deported or have departed voluntari iy under orders of de- 
portation, including such well-known Communists as J, Peters 
and John Santo. Gerhard Eisler, Comintern agent, fled the 
country while deportation proceedings were still pending 
aga i nst him. 



- 21 - 

It is anticipated that during the current fiscal year, 
there will be a substantial increase in the number of cases 
investigated for possible deportation under the Act of 
October 16, 9 B as amended, with an attendant increase 
in the number of warrants issued, hearings held and aliens 
ordered deported. 

(2) Exclusion of aliens under 8 CFR 175.57. — During the 
past year„ largeiy as the result of information disseminated 
by the Investigation Section, 255 ai:ens seeking to enter 
the United States were temporarily excluded at ports of entry 
on the ground that their entry might be prejudicial to the 
interests of the United States Twenty-three exclusions 
under 8 CFR !75 57 were made permanent without according a 
hearing before a Board of Special Inquiry, since the exclu- 
sions were based on confidential information, the disclosure 
of which would be prejudicial to the public .nterest. 

' 5 ( Denial of natu ralization under Section 505 of the 
Nat i on a. i ty Act — In addition to supervising the investiga- 
tion of numerous petitioners for naturalization suspected of 
subversive activities, the Investigation Section has embarked 
on a program of investigating various organizations to which 
such petitioners belong, ,n order that a determination may 
be made whether such organizations are within the scope of 
Section 305 of the Nationality Act., During the past year, the 
investigation of 102 organizations was initiated by this 
Sect i on,. 



( 4 ) Revo cation o f naturaliza t ion under Section 358 of 
t_he Nationality Act . - I n the cases of naturalized citizens 
suspected of engaging in subversive or proscribed activity, 
investigation "S conducted to determine whether the natural- 
ization was obtained iilegaiiy or by fraud and is thereby 
subject to revocation. During the past year investigation 
was initiated in 61 1 cases of this type, in view of the 
heavy burden of proof imposed on the Government,, as defined 
by the Supreme Court in the case of Schne i derman v Jinj-tejd. 
States, 320 U S iS, the evidence necessary to support 

revocation proceedings can be obtained only by the most 
painstaking ,nqu i''y 

Law enforcement op e_r a t_[ o n_s_.. -■ in addition to their 
operations specifically directed at subversive elements, 
investigators of the Service during the past year have been 
increasingiy active in the investigation of violations of the 
laws generally administered by the Service. Increasing 
attempts at iiiegai entry prope:-iy must be anticipated. This 
uniawfu, activity flows through devious channels, encompassing 
smugg ers, stowaways, forgery and f a , s : f i cat i on of documents, 
corruption of public officers and the like 



- 22 - 

In addition to cases involving smugglers and stowaways, 
cases of tlie following types have been dealt with during the 
past year: the forging of French passports; the obtaining of 
United States passports by presenting fraudulent evidence of 
United States citizenship; traffic in foreign visas; the 
arranging of fraudulent marriages to American citizens as a 
means of obtaining nonquota visas; fraudulent evidence pre- 
sented by persons seeking admission as displaced persons: 
frauds perpetrated by immigrants in obtaining visas; and the 
like. Among the highlights of the year was the conviction 
and sentencing of a group of public officials who had conspired 
to issue United States passports to aliens. 

The system of issuing "lookout" notices to all ports of 
entry concerning persons whose entry to the United States 
might be prejudicial to the public safety or otherwise subject 
to question has been revised and improved. During the past 
year 2,095 such notices were disseminated to the field. 

5. Detentions and Deportations 

A I ien enemi es . — -At the beginning of the fiscal year 1949 
there were 174 continental Germans and 27 continental Japanese 
still under orders of removal issued by the Attorney General, 
pursuant to the Presidential Proclamation of July 14, 1945 
Of the Germans, 75 departed or were removed from the United 
States during the fiscal year as the result of the Supreme 
Court decision in the case of Kurt G. W. Ludecke v. W. Fran k 
W atk i ns handed down on June 21, (948, upholding the right of 
the Government to remove or deport under the Al ien Enemy Act 
of 1798 interned alien enemies deemed by the Attorney General 
to be dangerous because they had adhered to an enemy govern- 
ment or to the principles thereof; 58 were released outright; 
three were released by court order; and six were paroled 
pending further administrative determination of their cases. 
In view of the decision handed down on January 17, 1949, by 
the Supreme Court in the case of K I apprott v, Un i ted State s 
336 U.S. 942 ( !949) execution of removal orders was deferred 
in the 29 denaturalization cases remaining for further admin- 
istrative consideration. Only three continental Germans 
were s.t i I I detained at Ellis Island at the close of the 
fiscal year. 

With respect to the 27 continental Japanese still under 
removal orders issued by the Attorney General, 25 were re- 
leased from alien enemy proceedings by the Attorney General / 
Because of court proceedings, the Service has been precluded 
from executing the removal orders for the remaining two 
Japanese. 

There has been no change in the status of the Japanese 
who renounced their United States citizenship pursuant to 



- 23 - 

Section 40 I ( i ) of the Nationality Act of 1940, as amended, 
since their release by order of the United States District 
Court for the Northern District of California on September 8, 
1947 

At the beginning of the fiscal year there were under 
removal orders issued by the Secretary of State 23 German 
aliens who had been brought to the United States from Latin- 
American countries for internment Of this number, two 
were released unconditionally; 15 departed from the United 
States to Latin-American countries; and one was removed to 
Germany. The remaining five are on parole awaiting final 
disposition of their cases,, 

Warrants of deportation directing deportation to Peru 
have been issued for each of the 290 Peruvian Japanese who 
were released from alien enemy restraint by the Department 
of State.. The Department of State has been attempting to 
obtain a decision from the Peruvian Government for the past 
three years as to whether these Japanese will be permitted 
to return to Peru, if the Peruvian Government refuses to 
permit their return, it will be necessary to re-submit their 
cases to the Board of Immigration Appeals in order that the 
warrants of deportation may be amended to permit their de- 
portation to Japan In this event court proceedings are 
likely which undoubtedly will be taken to the Su p reme Court , 
thereby carrying these cases into the next fiscal year, 'it 
shou'd be borne in mind that many of these Peruvian Japanese 
were brought to the United States by the Department of State 
for internment in the early part of 1942, and applications 
have already been received In a number of cases requesting 
suspension of deportation and administrative relief pursuant 
to Section 19 (c) of the Immigration Act of 1917, as amended.. 

With the exception of the renunciants and the Peruvian 
Japanese, it is anticipated that the alien enemy program will 
be concluded within the next fiscal year. 

Detent ions ..- — The Service operates seven detention facili- 
ties located at Ellis Island, New York Harbor; East Boston, 
Massachusetts; Seattle,, Washington; and San Francisco, San 
Pedro, Camp Elliott, and El Centre, California, In addition, 
at most of the border points there are facilities for tempo- 
rary detentions of a few hours' duration. The Service also 
has contracts with 211 institutions and county jails through- 
out the United States for the detention of aliens 

The following figures indicate the number of aliens de- 
tained during the year in Service and non-Service operated 
facilities and the average length of detention per person per 
day: 



- 24- - 

Service Non--Serv i ce 

Total number of aliens detained 49,26' 53262 

Average days detention per 

person iO.O 5.2 

The reduction in length of detention in Service-operated 
facilities from 10.9 in 1948 to 10,0 in 1949 has been due to 
a policy of directing parole or release when prolonged deten- 
tion appears inevitable; of expediting Central Office and 
field actions in connection with the procurement of travel 
documents, decisions, and orders, and coordinating the transfer 
of aliens for deportation. The decrease from 5.6 days in the 
fiscal year 1948 to 5 2 days in the fiscal year 1949 in the 
average length of detention in contract facilities was occa- 
sioned by the same measures. 

As local Fede ra I ly app roved jails remain overcrowded, 
the Service is continuing the established policy of de- 
taining at El Centro, Camp Elliott, and Terminal Island 
facilities prisoners who are awaiting trial for violation 
of the immigration and naturalization laws. These detentions, 
of course, are upon a reimbursable basis. 

At the time of the last report, negotiations were under 
way whereby the Bureau of Prisons was to execute joint con- 
tracts for the detention of Federal prisoners and Service 
detainees in contractual jail facilities. These arrangements 
have now been completed. Effective July I, 1949, practically 
ail of the 200 or more facilities required for the detention 
of aliens were placed under joint contract. This new procedure 
clears up the anomalous situation of two branches of the De- 
partment of Justice entering into separate contracts under 
which they frequently paid different rates for practically 
identical detention services. Savings are anticipated in 
the adjustment in jail rates, in the elimination of adminis- 
trative and clerical services in connection with annual 
negotiation and processing of contracts, and in the reduced 
amount of inspection of jails that will be required. 

All Service-operated facilities are periodically inspected 
and closely supervised. Through efficient management, maximum 
use of available physical equipment, and a more comprehensive 
understanding of Service policies with respect to the care. 
and treatment of aliens, the Service is gradually accomplishing 
changes and i mprovements which were of necessity foregone during 
the war years, A program of planned improvements has been 
initiated whereby more consideration will be given to future 
needs so as to insure economy and priority. 

Food costs at Service-operated detention f ac i I i t i es . rose 
steadily during the first half of the fiscal year 1949 In 

an endeavor to offset even higher costs, an extensive survey 



63 


$.67 


76 


.11 


81 


.94 


47 


„47 


46 


„44 



- 25 - 

of procurement methods, contracts, and purchase orders was 
made, and close scrutiny was maintained over culinary reportSo 
An instruction directing strict adherence to the standard 
dally ration scale resulted in a sharp drop in food costs. 

In March, when food prices began to fail, the Field was 
advised to make only short term contracts, unless long term 
prices were lower than those quoted by commei-cial houses. 
With respect to culinary departments operated by this Service, 
these efforts were, as indicated in the following figures, an 
effective brake, inasmuch as the average cost of food at al I 
f ac i I i t i es . d ec I i ned from 64.8 cents per person per day in 

1948 to 62.6 cents per person per day at the close of the 
year 1949: 

Service-Operated Culinary Departments 

1949 1948 

Ellis Is! and 3 

San Francisco 
Termi nal I s I and 
El Centre 
Camp E I i i ott 

Service Contractual Culinary Departments 

1949 1948 

Honolulu $2.25 $ 

Seattle 1.89 1.53 

Boston I .35 I . 13 

Al I Service-operated cul inary departments are now 
effecting economies by utilizing the facilities of the Federal 
Bureau of Supply, Coffee, for instance, is obtained on a 
quarterly basis at considerable saving Surplus food lists 
from this Governmental agency are used when possible. 
Arrangements are also under way to procure canned goods on 
a quarterly basis at a minimum price from the Federal Prisons 
Industries canning factory at McNeil Island, Washington. It 
is expected that further economies will result from procedures 
which have been formulated for the purpose of correlating 
information received in the Central Office from the Field as 
well as from other Governmental agencies, covering surplus 
equipment, foodstuffs, and miscellaneous materials^ A manual 
of culinary instructions for Service-operated detention 
facilities will be issued within the next fiscal year. 

During the year, aliens held in custody under the immi- 
gration laws performed 117,094 hours of work in Service- 
operated facilities as laborers in the various culinary de- 
partments and on painting andrepai r projects, etc. 

Due to the high cost of contractual feeding of aliens 



- 26 - 

at Seattle, Washington, as compared with the cost of feeding 
at facilities where the Service operates its own culinary 
departments, the situation at Seattle will be examined to 
determine whether it is advisable to install a Service- 
operated station there. 

Travel documents or passports for deportees , ---When 
travel documents or passports for al iens ordered deported 
cannot be obtained local ly, field offices submit reports to 
the Central Office for examination. 

If a foreign country does not have a consu I a r serv ice 
in the United States or when a consul may not accept an 
application from this Service for a travel document, the 
Department of State upon request endeavors to obtain the 
necessary travel document If a foreign country has no 

diplomatic rep rese ntat i ve i n the United States, the Depart- 
ment of State wi I I not request a travel document or passport 
for an alien ordered deported,. 

Territorial changes which have occurred since the close 
of hostilities have made the task of establishing nationality 
more difficult. It is frequently necessary to consult the 
laws of the various nations in order to decide whether a case 
should be submitted to the Department of State for presenta- 
tion to the appropriate authorities 

Of the 354 applications for travel documents or passports 
pending at the close of 1948,, action on 186 was obtained 
during 1949 as follows; 

After loca: consuls had refused to issue 
travel documents, authorizations were 
secured in.,.......,,,,..., , .,„.i. 65 cases 

Reports from the Department of State and 
other agencies that travel documents 
would not be issued were received in M7 cases 

Passports were no longer required, as 

act i on was d ; scont 1 nued i n. ,,,<„,.,.. . 4 cases 

To !68 cases still under consideration from the previous 
year should be added 150 new cases, presented to the Depart- 
ment of State and other agencies, or a total number of 318 
cases pending at the close of the fiscal year 1949. 

It is a matter of considerable significance that deport- 
able aliens, upon their own application, have been .successf u I 
in obtaining travel documents after the local consuls and 
embassies had refused to issue travel documents upon applica- 
tion by this Service, such refusal being based upon their 
ruling that the alien had expatriated himself or Was no 
longer considered a national of that country because of long 
absence. 



2 7 

Cooperat on extended this Service by other agencies has 
been of .nvaiuab'e ass. stance; The V.sa Division of the 
Department of State uses cabie fac'ilties ;n obtaining prompt 
decisions :n connect. on w.th the admissibility of aliens into 
foreign countries^ mi.itary authorities arrange for the 
acceptance of aliens into countries under United States 
miiitary contro . Embassies and . egat ons have furnished 
information concerning procedures and practices of the 
various countries w th respect to the issuance of passports.. 
Th;s information^ wh:Ch has been passed aiong to the F i e i d, 
has brought about more un,de rstand i ng and efficiency indeai-- 
ing w.th deportation p rob i ems 

At the end of the fiScai year there we e 6,990 unexecuted 
warrants of deportation pend : ng These warrants have not been 
executed for the foi lowing reasons: 

; .. Serving sentence ! , 572 

2. Deferred for reconsideration or stay .347 

3. Awaiting travel documents 743 

4 Await 1 ng trans port at ; on. , . 399 

5. Unable to trave, due to physical or 

menta; disabi . ity„. , 82 

6o !n armed forces„ .„,.,. ., iO 

7. Passports ref used., , „ o = » „ 2,066 

8. Whereabouts unknown,, 77 1 

The foregoing figures include 25 warrants of deportation 
which were issued under the Act of October ,6, !9i8;. as amended, 
reiating to anarchists and other subversive classes, 

A!i of these cases are reviewed constantly to determine 
any change of status Where necessary, further reports and 
i nvest : gat ons are requested New information is used to locate 
the aiien. or assist in procuring documents so that outstanding 
warrants of deportation may be executed 

T.-'ansp orta t i on of aiJenSo—An important item of expense 
ncident to the deportation of alliens is the cost of transfer 
to the seaport or iand border point from which actual departure 
from the United States w i ; 1 be effected.. During the fiscai 
year, aii t ranscont ; nenta i deportation parties were handled by 
air,. This mode of trave' permitted the joining of deportees at 
various points in the United States thus effecting substantial 
savings in detention costs by moving them rapldiy in smaii 
numbers instead of hoiding them in custody wh : e awaiting the 
assembling of (arge groups, Additional savings result from 
the fact that under Service air contracts there :s usuaily no 
transportation cost for security officers and the speed of 
travel has considerably reduced per diem payments for these 
officers, a.so„ meais are ser.ed to aliens free of charge 
enroute to thei: destination. 

By coord. nat;ng east bound and westbound partes, it has 



- 28 - 

been possible to ut i I i ze the services of the same security 
officer both ways. The same arrangements are in effect with 
respect to New York - Miami deportation parties Railroad 
transportation is used only for the transfer of sma . ' groups 
to points where they are joined to airborne deportation parties, 
or where transportation by rail was more advantageous. The 
Service continues to find the movement of deportees by air 
to be practical and economical. 

To effect further economies, the acquisition of airplanes 
by the Service for the purpose of transferring and deporting 
aliens has been under consideration. The possibility of 
obtaining by transfer three Douglas DC- 3 airplanes, each 
carrying twenty-one passengers, from the War Assets Adminis- 
tration has been considered,. It :s hoped that such a transfer 
can be arranged. 

Increased travel augmented the difficulty of procuring 
water transportation overseas. Passenger accommodations 
were practically impossible to obtain for Scandinavian 
countries. Consequently, air transportation was used for 
detainees where it was found that the cost of detention, 
added to the cost of transportation by water,, exceeded the 
cost of transportation by air. 

The Army has provided ocean transportation at subsistence 
rates to t rans--Pac i f i c dest i nat ' ons , and the Department of 
State has arranged for the trans-shipment enroute of persons 
destined to points not on the regu'ar steamship routes. The 
Department of State has also assisted the Service in having 
Chinese accepted at Hong Kong, for transfer to Canton, 

China. Without such assistance deportation, in many instances, 
would have been virtually impossible. 

A lien paro ! e .— -The practice of paroi^ng aliens in deten- 
tion cases where final disposition is pending has been contin-- 
ued. Little difficulty has been encountered in keeping the 
subjects available. At the end of the fiscal year,, there were 
9,229 aliens under parole supervision. 



D eportations and voluntary depart ures , --Du r i nq the past 
fiscal year 20,040 aliens were deported and 276,297 aliens 
who had been adjudged deportable were permitted to depart at 
their own expense. In this iatter group were those found to 
be deportable on other than criminal^ moral, or subversive 
grounds,, or because of mental or physical defects. Such a 
procedure is advantageous to the al ien since he is not pre- 
vented from applying immediately for readmission if the 
basis for his deportable status includes no element which 
might disqualify him for readmission. It is also advan- 
tageous to the Service as it results in a saving of depor- 
tation expense. 



- 29 - 



DEPORTATIONS AND VOLUNTARY DEPARTURES 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1940 - 1949 




A comparison with the deportation activities of last year 
as depicted In the graph above Indicates a slight decrease in 
deportations, but a 40 percent Increase In voluntary departures. 
The mounting figures on voluntary departures are due largely to 
the continued illegal entry of Mexican nat lonals at the boundary; 
96 percent of the voluntary departures took place at ports on 
the southern borders of Texas and California. 

Destitute a|iens removed . — Section 23 of the Immigration 
Act of 1917, as amended by the Act of May U, 1959, provides 
for the voluntary removal of destitute aliens who apply for 
return to their native lands at Government expense. Persons 
thus removed become ineligible for readmisslon except upon ap- 
proval of the Secretary of State and the Attorney General. 
During the past year, 128 aliens were returned to their native 
lands under the provisions of this Act, as compared with 2,637 
In 1932, 40 In 1937, 88 In 1947, and 55 In 1948. 



- 30 - 



Border Patrol 



The Immigration Border Patrol has often been called "our 
first line of defense" against aliens who attempt illegally 
to enter the United States. Authorized by Congress on May 28, 
1924, its primary function is to detect and prevent the 
smuggling and unlawful entry of aliens and the apprehension of 
such a I i ens . 

June 30, 1949, marks the close not only of a year of 
great accomplishment but of 25 years of the Border Patrol, 
organized as it is at present. There are reported here a few 
of the high-spot activities of the past 25 years, as we I I as 
the year just closed. Here, further, can be found some of the 
problems facing the Immigration and Naturalization Service 
through its Border Patrol in protecting our long boundaries. 

Accomp I i shments . — The record is prodigious. The Border 
Patrol has as its "beat" more than 3,000 miles of Canadian 
and Mexican land boundaries and the Florida and Gulf seacoasts. 
It includes blistering deserts, blizzard-swept prairies, 
dangerous swamps, and snow-bound forests. In the last year 
10,901,478 miles were patrolled by auto, plane, boat, horse- 
back, and afoot. A report from the Miami district tells of a 
five-day trip into the Everglades made by two patrolmen who 
were supplied with food by plane. In 25 years a staggering 
194 mi I I ion mi les have been patrol led — more than eight and 
one-half million miles afoot in places where the going was too 
rough for other means of travel. Step for step the patrolmen 
could have made 1,666 round trips from San Francisco to New York 
and back over the years. 



MILES PATROLLED BY BORDER PATROL OFFICERS 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1325 - 1949 



MILES ( In Millions 
14 







- 31 - 

Last year 6,618,056 persons were questioned, and 2,102,332 
convi'ynnces were examined. In 25 years, ninety and a half 
millicin persons were questioned and more than thirty-five 
million conveyances were stopped and examined. 

Patrolling, questioning, checking, and examining produced 
last ye:\r such tangible results as 289,400 apprehensions, and 
the seizure of 250 conveyances and contraband of all kinds 
valued at $222,022. 



DEPORTABLE ALIENS APPREHENDED BY BORDER PATROL OFFICERS 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1925 - 1949 



APPREHENSIONS 
I In Thousonds 

300 



200 



100 




During 25 years 1,189,363 aliens were delivered to other 
branches of the Immigration and Naturalization Service for de- 
portation, 11,618 persons to the Bureau of Customs for viola- 
tions of which that Service takes cognizance, and 24,613 per- 
sons to other Federal, State, and municipal enforcement 
agencies. During the same period it seized 9,661 conveyances 
and contraband of a! 1 kinds having a total value of $7, I 10, 102. 



The history of some of the accomplishments of the past is 
pictured in the charts that follow. In no two of the 25 years 
have the problems remained static. The depression, World 
War II, and the acceleration of transportation have contributed 



- 32 - 

to the changing pattern Pictured below is the pattern of 
arrests of deportable aliens, chiefly illegal entrants at the 
Mexican border The reasons for the immense increase in 
apprehensions shown in each year since i944 are illustrated 
by the following quotations from reports of the district 
directors in the Southwest, 

"The first large increase in Border Patrol appre- 
hensions occurred during the fiscal year i944 when 
the number was slightly more than double that of 
the preceding fiscal year. The reason for this 
sudden increase was the general manpower shortage 
due to war activities, funnelling farm laborers into 
military and contributory channels Notwithstanding 
the fact that a state of war ceased to exist some 
time ago and that in the very nature of things there 
has been a continuous increase in the number of farm 
laborers in this country. each year the number of 
Mexican farm laborers iMegaiiy entering the United 
States isaiarmingly larger than that of the preceding 
year The reasons, of course, are that the Mexican 
farm laborers are more docile and are willing to 
work for lower wages than are the domestic farm 
laborers. Aside from the numerous abuses resulting 
from the employment of this type of labor, its 
continuance has resulted in a very grave injustice 
to ocal farm laborers who have been driven from 
the border to other parts of the United States 
where they can earn a ; "ving for themselves and 
families. Some of the farmers and ranchers 
frankly state that they prefer the iliegai entrant 
to the American citizen laborer They can pay him 
practically any wage they may desire, have to 
furnish the very least of living facilities, and 
can in the majority of cases, control the move- 
ments of such aliens by threatening them with action 
by the Immigration Service" 

"One thing is certain, and that is that as long 
as there is such a vast difference between the 
economic conditions of Mexico and the United 
States, there wi M be thousands of Mexican 
nationals striving to come to this country in 
search of employment there are thousands of 
native Americans who are willing and able to do 
farm work, if paid a wage commensurate with the 
present high cost of living " 

The smuggling of aliens was not so serious a problem dur- 
ing the war when ships and p , anes were not available for such 
pract i ces 



- 33 - 

The Chinese exclusion laws made smuggling of aliens a 
profitable business, before the turn of the century, and the 
first mounted guards, forerunners of the Border Patrol, were 
riding the Southern border b> 1904. With the passage of the 
Quota Immigration Act the smuggling of Europeans who would 
not wait for quota numbers or who otherwise were inadmissible, 
enlarged the group of persons seeking help for illegal 
entrance. The Annual Report of 1948 stated, "the problem of 
smuggling of aliens has ceased to become a potential danger 
and has become a real one." This statement is borne out by 
the arrest of 635 smugglers as compared with 412 the previous 
year. 



SMUGGLERS OF ALIENS APPREHENDED BY BORDER PATROL OFFICERS 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1925 - 1949 




A few quotations from the men close to the problem follow: 



"More than 150,000 European immigrants have settled 
jn provinces adjacent to the New England and New 
York borders. Recent apprehensions for Illegal 
entry have included Europeans and 'd i sp I aced persons' ." 

"In the Miami sector the principal problem lies in 
the possible illegal entry of aliens from Cuba, 
Central, and South America. There are over 300,000 



- 34 - 

aliens in Cuba . ,. . The apprehension of a pilot 
after he had flown many trips into the United States 
with aliens and others is an example of the poten- 
tialities of smuggling from Cuba." 

One storyof the apprehension ofa smuggler although related 
some years ago bears repeating, 

"One heroic incident stands out above the many ot hers 
because of the novelty of the situation. Airplanes 
are one of the means of transportation well adapted 
to the uses of modern smugglers. Officers of the 
Patrol in a certain sector on the Canadian Line 
had been on the watch for an airplane suspected of 
running aliens across the border. They came upon 
the plane too late to prevent its take-aff but 
in time to apprehend two aliens who had alighted 
f rom i t , 

"on the chance that the plane would return. Patrol 
officers waited in the vicinity of the field intheir 
car. Within a comparatively short time they heard 
the drone pf the plane's motor, watched it circle 
the field and land. Their problem then was a 
difficult one.. On the open landing field there 
was no sort of cover which would permit them to 
approach the plane unobserved Yet the moment they 
disclosed their presence, the pilot was in a posi- 
tion to get his plane Into the air almost immedi- 
ately There was nothing for them to do but to 
drive for the plane at top speed, 

"Quick to see his danger, the pilot instantly open- 
ed his motor f u M -thrott I e, headed his plane into 
the wind and started his run for the take-off,. It 
looked like another clean get-away, The inspector 
at the wheel of the Patrol car saw one desperate -- 
chance and took it. He swung the automobile di- 
rect y into the path of the on-coming plane,. There 
was a crash wh;ch would have done credit to a movie 
thriller. Fortunately no one was seriously hurt. 
And the inspectors got their men — the pilot and a 
third alien who was in the plane at the time of its 
second landing, 

"For courage, bravery, and resourcefulness, that 
story can be matched by dozens of others. The point 
which they prove is that in e spr i t de corps , disci- 
pline, and effectiveness the Immigration Border Pa- 
trol does not suffer by comparison with the famed 
Royal Northwest Mounted Police or the best of our 
State constabularies," 



- 55 - 

Statistics of persons arrested and turned over to other 
governing agencies are dry f i gures that shou Id be I I I umi ned by the 
stories of the arrest of murderers, cattle rustlers, and other 
dangerous criminals. Prohibition days and alien enemies 
during the war account in some measure for the hi I Is and 
valleys in the graph below. 



PERSONS APPREHENDED BY BORDER PATROL OFFICERS 

FOR OTHER THAN IMMIGRATION LAW VIOLATIONS 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1925 - 1949 

S (In Tl 

7 



b 1 


n 


Ihc 


use 


nd 


II 




















1 






— -| 


1 — 1 


1 




1 








i 








































1 


































— 




























































T 


































1 
















k 




























i 




n 


I 














> 




N 


^ 




















i 


\ 






\ 


< 








191. 







- 


J9. 


g_ 






<* 


JiL 


3 




-- 

^ 


■s 


J9 


/ 

2I 




: 


— 


/9 


« 






94i 




^Vv•'i^^!S?■■S^!i^?^l3S5^^Sl 



Other facets of the work of the border patrolmen not 
reported In statistics but in the hearts of many people are 
the courageous and effective hurrane acts of the patrolmen. 
They include lives saved from fire, accidents, thirst In the 
desert, loss of way In northern blizzards, and the security 
provided our citizens who reside in Isolated places where 
there were no law enforcement officers before the establish- 
ment of the Patrol. 



How the work has been accomplished . — The size of the 
authorized force of the Border Patrol Is shown In the graph 
"Persons Apprehended and Authorized Border Patrol Force". Stan- 
dards nave been high and the weeding out of persons who were not 
fit either physica 1 ly or I acki ng In the moral stamina, or intel- 
I Igence to maintain such standards has gone on continuously. 
The motto "Honor First" adopted by an early body of patrolmen 
has a very real significance to members of the Border Patrol. 



- 36 - 

The general pattern adopted by the Border Patrol in- 
cludes; (I) assembling advance information of system at ic or 
organized crossing; (2) "sign cutting," i.e. the searching 
tor traces of i I legal crossers ot the boundary and tracking 
them down; (3) aerial and ground patrolling by night and day 
at border points of crossing; (4) adequate fencing of "hot 
spots" with watch towers and suitable lighting, (5) employing 
of a small but efficient and highly trained mobile intelligence 
group;(6) inspecting highways and railroads, and traffic at 
points of ingress from the border; (7) cultivating and 

appreciating the contribution that Is and can be given by 
officers of other Government agencies and by citizens on the 
many highways, Dyways, farms and ranches. 

The last point deserves emphasis because without such as- 
sistance the overwhelming volume of activities shown in this 
report could not have occurred. There follow a few excerpts 

from reports of the field officers. Speaking of ways of meeting 
reductions in force one District Director says, "Renewed efforts 
will bemade to strengthen our liaison with enforcement agencies 
and sources of information on both sides of the international 
boundary in order that routine patrolling may be cu rta i I ed; " or 
this from a chief Patrol Inspector^ "Our i i ai son work wi th other 
enforcement agencies has paid excellent dividends in apprehen- 
sions. Police departments, sheriff's departments, State police, 
and others are constantly on the aiert for al lens. We spend a 
great deal of t i me each month on trips to take custody of aliens 
they have picked up for us. It is evident that their interest 
is growing and with it apprehensions for immigration violations 
are g rowi rrg . " 

Problems facing the Border Patrol . — Despite ail the accom- 
plishments of the Border Patrol much remains to be done. Ad- 
mittedly the tasks and problems facing the organization are 
t remendous , 

The number of Europeans in nearby Cuba, Canada, and other 
Western Hemisphere countries who wish to come to the United 
States, but for whom there are no quota numbers make smuggling 
of aliens a profitable if nefarious business The airplane is 
a splendid tool for smugglers and a difficult one to police. 

In terms of volume the i I legal entrant at the Mexican 
Border presents the most serious problem confronting the Border 
Patrol. Contract laborers and Mexican laborers who entered the 
United States i I I ega My were emp i oyed during and since World War 
II and such laborers are well acquainted with the economic ad- 
vantages to be had in this country; the gradual worsening of 
economic conditions in Mexico a I so has cont ri buted to the immen- 
sity of the drawing power of this country for Mexican nationals, 



- 37 - 

Added to the problem created by aliens entering illegally 
^re certain administrative difficulties. Among them are the 
I Q45 Overtime Pay Act; the adoption of the five-day week;new 
and untrained patrolmen; deterioration of equipment; and the 
excessive number of man-days lost from patrol work in order to 
p rocess and accompany apprehended aliens to immigration stations 
and law enforcement agencies. 

These circumstances have brought about a situation so 
serious that a number of intelligent and conscientious persons 
in the executive and legislative branches of the Government 
have expressed the view that the immigration laws cannot satis- 
factorily be enforced at the Mexican border, regardless of the 
personnel and essential equipment that may, within reason, be 
prov ided. 

With this conviction the responsible supervisory officers 
of this Service, most of whom have been with the Border Patrol 
since i ts beg i nn i ngs, would emphatically disagree. A comparison 
of the size of the authorized force over the past 10 years and 
the number of persons apprehended gives some idea of the acute 
emergency that exists. 



PERSONS APPREHENDED AND AUTHORIZED BORDER PATROL FORCE 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1940 - 1949 
AUTHORIZED FORCE PERSONS APPREHENDED 



3,000 



2,000 



1,000 




300.000 



200.000 



100.000 



\94V 



1943 



1946 



1949 



- 38 - 

A recent survey along the entire Mexican border and the 
gulf coast of Florida has led to the conclusion that approxi- 
mately '700 additional personnel and 300 additional units of 
transportation equipment including boats, aircraft, and automo- 
biles would enable the Service to have effective control of the 
s i tuat i on. 

"E'fTective control" does not presume the accomplishment of 
the well-nigh impossible task of preventing all illegal cross- 
ings of the border — at the international line. Nothing short 
of an impassable barrier could do that. 

However the number of aliens who would succeed in getting 
through the border patrol theatre of operations with this well- 
equipped staff would be negligible. A high percentage of such 
illegal entrants, realizing the effectiveness of our coverage 
of routes of escape, will upon term! nat i on of employment head 
bacl< to Mexico, rather than chance apprehension and prosecu - 
tion by attempting to establish residence in the interior. 

The problem as it affects the people of the United States 
is serious. If contract labor can be provided under agreement 
the Mexican "illegal entrant" can be pushed bacl< to his 

own border and kept there, and the smugglers of aliens will find 
their business unprofitable. 

ADJUDICATIONS DIVISION 

Funct ions . — The Adjudications Division is responsible for 
the adjudicative work of the Service both in the Field and Cen- 
tral Office. This Division reviews case records, prepares 
findings of fact and conclusions of law and makes determinations 
in cases involving alien and citizenship status, verification 
of arrival of aliens, exclusion and expulsions, and travel con- 
trol, 

I . Travel Control 



No major changes in the regulations pertaining to documen- 
tary requi rements for al i ens entering the United States occurred 
during the year. As to departure control regulations, however, 
in October 1948, the Secretary of State, with the concurrence 
of the Attorney General, authorized ageneral waiver of the exit 
permit requirements for all aliens regardless of destination. 

Petitions for immigration visas . — The Immigration Act of 
1924 provides that nonquota or preference-quota status may be 
granted to certain near relatives of citizens of the United 
States, In order to obtain such status, the United States 
citizen must file with this Service a petitFon for trie issuance 
of an immigration visa (Form 1-133) accompanied by proof of his 
citizenship, his relationship to the beneficiary, and other 



- 39 - 

facts. If, after examination, the petition is approved, it is 
forwarded to the Department of State for transmittal to the 
appropriate American consul. During the year just ended, 
21,060 new visa petitions were received; of that number 20,649 
visa petitions were approved, 311 were rejected, and 69 ap- 
provals were revoked. 

Preexami nat i on . — Preexami nat i on is a privilege accorded 
certain aliens who are in the United States in a status other 
than that for permanent residence and who desire to adjust their 
immigration status by proceeding to Canada to app ly to an Ameri- 
can consul in that country for an immigration visa with which 
to apply to the United States for permanent residence. During 
the year, 2,078 new applications for p reexami nat i on were sub- 
mitted by aliens who were not under deportation proceedings. 
One thousand seven hundred fifty four applications for preexam- 
ination were approved. Preexami nat ion was denied to 324 appli- 
cants. The authority for preexami nat i on was revoked in the case 
of 101 individuals during the year. In the preceding fiscal 
year 1,473 new applications for preexami nat ion were received. 

Reentry permits . — Section 10 of the Immigration Act of 
1924 provides that resident aliens who have been lawfully ad- 
mitted for permanent residence who depart for a temporary visit 



REENTRY PERMITS 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1940 - 1949 



'JUMBEF. ISSUED 



NUMBER ISSUED 



40,000 




20,000 



- 40 - 

abroad may obtain reentry permits to facilitate their readmis- 
sion to the United States. The years since the end of the war 
have shown a steady increase in the number to apply for docu- 
ments wi th wh i ch to t rave I outside the United States. The travel 
to European countries. in particular has shown a large increase 
and this may be expected to cont i nue as more space becomes avail- 
able in passenger carrying ships and planes. 

During the fiscal year of 1949 a total of 52,036 applica- 
tions for these travel documents were received and of this num- 
ber 51,481 were approved and issued, and at the end of the year 
480 applications were pending. During the previous year 45,700 
permits were issued. 

Extensions of reentry permits were granted in 9,494 cases 
(\n 1949 as compared with 9,030 during the previous fiscal year. 
FWe hundred fifty-five applications for extensions were denied 
and there were pendingat the close of the year 424 applications 
for extensions. 

2 . Hearing Review 

Exc I usi ons — Duri ngthefiscal year there were 5, 541 all ens 
excluded including 1,707 who were seeking to enter at the land 
borders for less than 30 days. Of the renraining 3,834 persons 
excluded, 25 persons were excluded as subversive or anarchistic, 
2,970 without proper documents, 97 likely to become public 
charges, 112 mental or physical defectives, 2 16 stowaways, and 
66 alienswhohad previously departed toavoid military training. 

Aliens held by a Primary Inspector at a port of entry for 
examination are given a summary hearing before a Board of Special 
Inquiry, whose members usually compr i se two Immi grant Inspectors 
and a secretary. From an order of exclusion an appeal lies to 
the Commissioner, except where a medical officer certifies the 
alien to be inadmissible because found to be afflicted with a 
loathsome or dangerous contagious disease, or tuberculosis in 
any form, or suffering from mental defect. 

Although the number of exclusions was lower than that of 
last year a number of factors made the work load for Boards of 
Special Inquiry unusually heavy A I ien stowaways. United States 
nationals whose expat ri at i on may have been effected by departure 
from or remaining outside the United States after September 27, 
1944^ to evade military service, wives and fiancees of members 
of the armed forces who sought entry at or close to the expira- 
tion dates of the Acts were among the cases requiring considera- 
tion 

A new factor arose in the reception of large numbers of 
aliens arriving as displaced persons under the Di sp I aced Persons 
Act of June 25, 1948 (P L, 774), authorizing the issuance of 
205,000 visas during the following two fiscal years. These 
aliens are not relieved from any of the excluding provisions of 



- 41 - 

the immigration laws. 

During the year there was an increase in the exclusion of 
aliens whose entry was deemed prejudicial to the interests of 
the United States. A total of 222 cases were considered. 

During thefiscal year 3,428 appeals were determined in the 
Central Office, involving an adjudication of quest|ons of law 
presented, and the exercise of administrative discretion in 
matters of relief or parole. A total of 3,479 appeals were 
received; 51 cases were pending at the close of the fiscal year. 

Exercise of Ninth Proviso . — Under the terms of the 9th 
Proviso to Section 3 of the Immigration Act of 1917, the Attor- 
ney General is permitted in his discretion to admit, for tem- 
porary periods, certain persons who otherwise are Inadmissable 
to the United States. During the past fiscal year, there were 
933 applications for consideration under the 9th Proviso, in- 
volving 21,146 aliens, finally disposed of. One-hundred seven- 
teen of the applications were for permission to import 20,323 
unskilled contract I aborers for emp I oyment in the United States, 

Most of the 9th-Proviso cases involved aliens excludable 
as mental orphysical defectives, criminals, orcontract laboreiS 
who applied for advance exercise of the 9th Proviso in order to 
enter the United States temporarily for medical treatment, as 
border crossers, to visit relatives, to work, or aliens already 

in the United States who sought an extension of temporary stay. 
Of the 933 app I i cat i ons f or cons i derat ion under the 9th Proviso, 
784 or 84 percent, were found to be meritorious and admission 

into the United States was authorized. One hundred forty-nine 
app i icat i ons, or 16 percent of the total, were denied. 

During the year with particular reference to aliens apply- 
ing from European and Asiatic countries for the exercise of the 
9th Proviso, close cooperation was achieved with the Department 
of State, and detailed instructions setting forth the require- 
ments of administrative policy in these cases were circularized 
to American consular offices. 

Expu I si ons . — Records in warrant hearings for determination 
by the Commissioner were submitted during the fiscal year in 
13,062 cases. This was an increase of 730 cases over the pre- 
vious year. Of the cases requiring determination as to deporta- 
tion or voluntary departure, 152 remained for attention at the 
end of the fiscal year. 

Related to expulsion procedures, there were in addition 
received and acted upon 706 motions to reopen, 308 applications 
for stays of deportation, 605 requests for extensions of time 
within which to depart voluntarily, a total of 1,619. Other 
actions of miscellaneous nature in warrant cases numbered 1,717 
making a total of 3,336 related actions. 



- 42 - 

An important activity during the year was the development 
of procedures and ev i dent i ary material tosustain warrant charges 
against alien members of proscribed organizations. 

S uspension of deportation . — Section :9 of the Immigration 
Act of 1917, as amended by the Act of June 28, 1940^ provides 
that the Attorney General may suspend the deportation of an 
alien who is deportable on grounds othe r than that he iscriminal, 
immoral, or subversive, or physically or mentally defective, 
and who has proved to be of good moral character, and is not 
racially inadmissible or ineligible to naturalization, if the 
Attorney General finds that such deportation would result in 
serious economic detriment to a citizen or legally resident 
al ien who is the spouse, parent, or minor chi Id of the deportable 
alien. The amendment to Section 19(c) described in this report 
under "New Legislation" removes the racial bar to suspension of 
deportation, and extends such relief to a'iens of good moral 
character, who had lived in the United States for seven years 
or longer and who were in the United States on July I, 1948. 

Most of the 3,680 applications for suspension of deporta- 
tion considered were under the original provisions of the Act 
of June 28, 1940, amending Section 19(c) of the Immigration Act 
of 1917 (8 US.C. 155), in behalf of aliens whose deportation 
would constitute serious economic detriment to a citizen or 
legally-resident spouse^, parent o>- minor chiido At the close 
of the year I, ,705 cases were pending 

The effect of the amendment by the Act of Juiy !, 1948, 
(P., L, 863), extending this relief to aliens of good character 
who have resided in the United States for seven years or more, 
if residing in the United States on July 1, ;948, was not fully 
reflected in the i ast fiscal year's applications. 

Under the revised procedure of the above Act favorable 
action is required by both the Senate and the House of Repre- 
sentatives before suspension may be granted to those aliens 
whose cases have been submitted to the Congress by the Commis- 
s i one r = 

Du ri ng the year ended June 30, '949, 4,302 suspension cases 
were submitted to the Congress, as compared with 3,160 applica- 
tions in 1948, and5,806 in 1947, S.nce the passage of the Act, 
27,906 applications have been submitted to the Congress, or an 
average of 3, 100 cases a year 

Displaced persons residing in the Un:ted States .. — Section 
4 of the Displaced Persons Act of ! 948 (P. L, 774) authorizes 
aliens who entered the United States legaMy prior to April I, 
1948, in nonimmigrant or nonquota student status to apply for 
adjustment of immigration status if displaced from country of 
birth, nationality, or last residence by events subsequent to 
the outbreak of World War il (September i, i939), if he cannot 
return "to any such countries because of persecution or fear of 



- 43 - 

persecution on account of race, religion, or political opinion," 
and if otherwise admissible under the immigration laws. 

During the fiscal year 5, 904 appi ications underthis sect ion 
were received. Field office investigations and hearings have 
been completed in 396 cases. 

Exercise of Seventh Proviso . — Aliens returning from a tem- 
porary absence abroad to an un re I i nqu i shed United States domicile 
of seven consecutive years or more, may, notwithstanding the 
existence of a ground of exclusion under the immigration laws 
other than one under the Immigration Act of 1924, be readmitted 
to the United States in the discretion of the Attorney General 
(7th Proviso to Section 3 of the Immigration Act of February 5, 
1917). While 5,541 applicants were excluded from admission to 
the United States, only 306 aliens were granted the benefit of 
that proviso during the past fiscal year. Practically all of the 
306 cases in which favorable act i on was taken represented persons 
who, besides having the statutory requisite of seven years of 
prior domicile in the United States, had established family ties 
in this country and otherwise unblemished records for years past. 
Twenty-eight of the applications were denied. 

Administrative fine proceedings . — Provision is made in the 
Immigration Acts of 1917 and l924forthe institution of adminis- 
trative fine proceedings against steamship and transportation 
companies for failure to supply proper manifests, both incoming 
and outgoing (in the case of crew lists), for failure to detain 
alien seamen on board for inspection or when so ordered, for 
bringing to the United States aliens subject to disability or 
afflicted with disease, or improperly docume-nted, and for other 
violations of the immigration laws. After service of Notice to 
Fine a vessel is refused clearance until a bond is posted with 
the Collector of Customs guaranteeing payment of the fine. 

During the fiscal year 2,180 cases were received involving 
the assessment of administrative fines, or the reference of the 
claim to the Criminal Division of the Department for proceedings 
i n personam or i n rem under Section 10 of the Immigration Act of 
1917 (8 U.S.C, 146) for the unauthorized landing of aliens in 
the United States. 

During the year new fines in the number of 760 were assessed, 
amounting to $463,417.29. The total collection of fines during 
the year amounted to $163,858. 87. 

Permissions to reapp ly. — Aliens deported from the United 
States may not apply f or* readmi ss i on until the expiration of one 
year from the date of deportation, and then only after permis- 
sion has been granted. During the fiscal year 4,837 such appli- 
cations were received. 



- 44 - 

5 Nationality and Status 

Genera! .--Duri ng thewarthe naturalization of enemy aliens 
was forbidden unless they had procured a Presidential Exception 
from the c iass i f icat i on pf alien enemy after having established 
their loyalty to the United States, Following the treaties of 
peace on September 15, 1947, with certain enemy countries, 
nationals thereof became e I i g 1 b le for natural i zat i on on an equal 
standing with other aliens. In v:ew of the questions of law 
presented, the Central Office staff reviewed suchcases prior to 
presentation to naturalization courts 

The attitude of thecourts with respect to conduct previous 
iy considered evidence of disloyalty became considerably more 
lenient. If a treaty of peace with Germany is concluded many 
more cases may be expected since aliens of German nationality 
will become eligible for naturalization. During the year, 61 
petitions were denied by the courts for failure to establish 
attachment to the pr i nc : p I es of the Constitution and proper dis- 
position to the good order and happiness of the United States,, 

Improvement in travel facilities has made possible the re- 
turn to the United States of former citizens who had become ex 
patriated Petitions in increasing numbers were received from 
such persons. Such cases often presented difficult questions 
requiring a determination of citizenship status and of legal 
ei-gibiiity for citizenship. 

App I icat i ons are beg i nn i ng to be received for naturalization 
under special provisions of the law, such as Section 3i.7(c) of 
the NationaMty Act of 1940 That Section provides for the ex-- 
peditious natural i zat Ion of former c i t i zens of the United States 
who lost c it i zensh i p by serv ing in a foreign army, These appli- 
cations involve quest ions of attachment and i oyal ty to the United 
States since the loss of citizenship i n. many cases is based upon 
service in the armed forces of a former enemy country Novel 
questions of law, particularly as to the necessity of a lawful 
entry, have arisen in such cases and may be adjudicated by the 
courts for the first time during the coming year. This Service- 
has adopted the view that apetitioner under Section 317(c) must 
establish iawfu; entry into the United States for permanent 
residence . 

Section 324Aofthe Nationality Act providesfor the expedi- 
tious natural i zat i on of a I I ens who served in World Wars I and II. 
This Serv i ce has rev : ewed and presented to the courts petitions 
filed under that Section The number of veterans of the First 
World War who are applying for benefits of the Section is sur- 
prising. Persons who were naturalized during theF.r^;tWc:ria 
War on the basis of thei r mi I itary service, thereafter became 
expatriated. They subsequently returned to the United States, 
and again are applying for citizenship based upon the same 
military service. The courts have approved the view of the 



- 45 - 

Service that naturalization under Section 324A, under these 
circumstances is legally permissible. 

Recently there has been an upsurge in the number of persons 
seeking naturalization under Section 312 of the Act. This 
Section provides that spouses of citizens stationed abroad in 
certain capacities may be naturalized expeditiously. Many of 
these applicants are wives of members of the armed forces who 
are about to be stationed abroad. In view of several recent 
court decisions the Service has accepted the view that wives of 
members of the armed forces of the United States regularly sta- 
tioned ariroad are eligible for naturalization under Section 312 
of the Act. The position of the United States in international 
affairshasresulted inanincrease of petitions filed by spouses 
of American citizens statoned abroad in practically all of the 
capacities mentioned in the Section, in addition to spouses of 
citizens serving in the armed forces. 

Certificates of arrival and preliminary applications for 
n atural i zat i on . — App I i cat ions for certificates of arrival and 
preliminary forms for declarations of intention were received 
during 1949 from 86,416 aliens, an increase of nine percent as 
compared with last year. App 1 i cat i ons for cert i fi cates of arri- 
val and preliminary forms for petitions for naturalization were 
received from 96,646 aliens, an increase of eight percent as 
compared with last year. 

Registry of aliens under Section 328(b) of the Nationality 
Act of 1940 .. — An alien may make application to the Commissioner 
of Immigration and Naturalization for the creation of a record 
of lawful entry where no record exists of his admission for 
permanent residence. To be eligible to have a record of regis- 
try created, the alien must prove that he is eligible for citi- 
zenship, that he entered the United States prior to July I,I924> 
and has resided here continuously s:nce,that he is a person of 
good moral character, and that he is not subject to deportation. 
Such registration establishes the alien's lawful admission for 
permanent residence as of the date of his entry. During the 
past year 6, II I appi icatlons for registry were received, and 
4,294 records of registry completed. 

Persons naturalized . — The great number of persons naturali- 
zed during the war years, and the low immigration during that 
period have reduced materially the naturalization potential in 
the United States. This continues to be reflected in the de- 
creasing number of persons naturalized. The number of nonciti- 
zens who were naturalized was 66,594, the lowest number since 
1911. 

From the time the United States entered World War II, 
through June 30, 1949, the number of persons who acquired citi- 
zenship through natural i zat i on was as follows: 



- 46 - 



TOTAL 



Total 1.506.034 



J an. 
Year 



l-June 30, 
ended June 

1943 

1944 

1945 

1946 

1947 

1948 

1949 



942 
50, 



133,010 



318 

441 

251 

150 

93 

70 

66 



,935 
,979 
,402 
,062 
,904 
, 150 
,594 



MILITARY 
In the Out of . 
U.S. the U.S . 



124.868 
1,296 



36,049 
42,7 17 
1 7 , 029 
13, 159 
I 1,092 
I ,070 
2,456 



21.011 



1,425 
6,496 
5,666 
2,054 
5,370 



CI VI LI AN 



1.360. 155 
151,714 

28 1 . 459 

592,766 

208,707 

134,849 

77,442 

69,080 

64, 138 



As stated last year, there area number of factors that will 
tend to increase petitions for naturalization. The principal 
groups who make up the potential candidates for naturalization 
are the new immigrants, including the displaced persons and war 
brides, together with those persons who have recently become 
racially eligible for naturalization. 





DECLARATIONS OF INTENTION 
PETITIONS FOR NATURALIZATION 
NONCITIZENS NATURALIZED 



- 47- 

During the past year 19,557 persons filed applications for 
certificates of derivative citizenship. These persons derived 
citizenship at some previous time, through the naturalization 
of a parent or a husband. Over the same period 16,652 certifi- 
cates were completed. Certificates of citizenship were issued 
to 3,899 persons by reason of their birth abroad to citizen 
parents . 

Special certificates of naturalization to obtain recogni- 
tion as a United States citizen by a foreign state . — With the 
resumption of trade and commerce, the Service has received an 
increased number of app I i cat i ons for cert i f i cates, used by United 
States citizens to establish their citizenship for the country 
of their former allegiance. During the past year, about 950 
such certificates were issued by the Service, representing an 
increase over the previous year. 

Citizenship acquired by resumpt i on or repat r i at ion .— -Statu- 
tory authority exists for the re-acquisition of citizenship by 
persons who lost United States citizenship by serving in a for- 
eign al I ied army during World War I or World War II, vot i ng in 
a foreign political election, and women who lost citizenship 
through marriage to aliens. 

The number of former citizens who received certificates of 
citizenship under such conditions is shown below: 

Years ended 

June 30 
1949 1943 

Total number, ... ........ o ... = ... = ...•.... . 2. . 1 ,16 2. 9,.! 2 

Persons who lost citizenship by serving in the 
armed forces of allies of the United States 
or by voting in a foreign political election 
after Jan, 12, 1941 in a non-enemy country 
and who were repatriated under Sec. 323, 
Nationality Act of 1940....................... 899 1,671 

Native-born women who lost citizenship through 
marriage to aliens and who were repatriated 
under the Act of June 25, 1936, as amended.... 1,040 1,051 

Native-born women who lost citizenship through 
marriage to aliens and whose marriages ter- 
minated and who were repatriated under 
Section 317(b) of the Nationality Act of 1940. 177 190 



- 48 - 

Absences from the United States -Under Section 307(b) and 
Section 508 of the Nationality Act, the Service by delegation 
from the Attorney General may approve absences from the United 
States by persons who desire to maintain the continuity of 
their residence in this country for naturalization purposes. 
During the year about 475 such cases were acted upon„ 

P etitions for natural! zat ion .--- 1 n the Cent ra I Office review 
is conducted in the naturalization cases which present factors 
unfavorable to a recommendation of the granting of naturaliza- 
tion Changes in regulations have reduced the type of cases 
requiring Central Office review to those which present unusual 
and difficult problems. 

In 99.7 percent of the cases presented for final hearing, 
the courts approved the recommendation of the officers of this 
Service, Recent appeMate court decisions with regard to an 
illicit reiationshsp upon proof of good moral character by a 
pet itionerfornaturalizationanda milder attitude of the courts 
in that regard has caused a change in Service policy. Several 
appellate courts rendered important dec i s ions concerning natura- 
lization procedure during the past year which have led to the 
preparation of new regulations and instructions to put into 
effect the practice demanded by the court ruiing. 

Petitions d e nied ., — The cases in which the Service recom- 
mendation for denial was not approved totaled 216 during the 
year. In such cases, where it appeared that the question of 
law was sufficiently important, a recommendation was made to 
the Department that appeal be taken. Several appellate courts 
rendered significant decisions concerning naturalization pro- 
cedure and practice during the past year. Throughout the year, 
2,27! petitions for naturalization were denied, as compared 
with 2,887 denied during the previous year. Almost two-thirds 
of the 2,27! petitions were denied for want of prosecution. 

Natural i zat i ons revoked _ - -There were 184 judgments of natu- 
ralization revoked and certificates of naturalization canceled 
during the year an increase of 2 ! as compared with the preced- 
ing year In 179 cases the Foreign Service of the Department 
of State initiated the action because naturalized citizens of 
this country became permanent residents of foreign countries 
within five years of naturalization. ;n five cases the Immi- 
gration and Naturalization Serv:ce initiated action because 
natura ! i zat i on was otherw; se fraudulently or illegal iy procured. 

Certificates in chang ed name— With the importance of proof 
of citizenship becoming more evident., a total of 900 certifi- 
cates of naturalization in a changed name were applied for dur- 
ing the year, representing an increase of over 25 percent above 
the previous year,, 

Loss of nat i ona ! J ty - -Du f i nq the last year 8,575 persons 
lost United 'States nationality, as compared with 6,779 in the 
preceding year 



- 49 - 

The numberof former citizens who lost United States nation- 
al ity during the year and the reasons for such loss are shown 
below; 

Number of 
persons 

Tota k ..................................... . 8,575 

Voting in a foreign political election or 

plebiscite. ............ ^ .=..-................• . 4,515 

Entering or serving in the armed forces of a 

foreign state 1,459 

Naturalization in a foreign state................ 754 

Residence of a naturalized national in a foreign 

state (Sec 404, Nationality Act of 1940)...... 694 

Taking an oath of allegiance in a foreign state.. 430 

Renunciation of nationality...................... 356 

Departing from or remaining away from the United 

States to avoid training and service in the 

land or naval forces. .......................... • 259 

Accepting or performing duties under a foreign 

state,., .,.....,,.. 99 

Desertion from the armed forces.................. 4- 

Other reasons. .............. ..-..........•...■•■■ • 5 

The number of cases requiring determination of citizenship 
status increased substantially during the year. Three hundred 
twenty-four of such cases were adjudicated, representing about 
30 percent more than the previous year. 

OFFICE OF GENERAL COUNSEL 

F unct ions i n general : — The Office of General Counsel is 
the iaw office of the Service. The Office serves as legal ad- 
visor to the Commissioner and to rank i ng officers of the Central 
Office and the Field Service, and advises and consults on legal 
matters with other Divisions of the Department of Justice and 
other Governmental agencies. The table which follows shows the 
number of transactions during the past year according to the 
principal categories within which the work of the Office falls. 

Advisory functions 

Opinions on outstanding or complex problems of law 93 

Interpretative legal correspondence 172 

Advice to Pardon-Attorney 218 
Drafting and legal review of proposed regulations, 

instructions, and forms 199 

Preparation and review of contracts 87 
Oral consultations on legal matters incidental to 

performance of functions of the office (by hours) 2,015 



- 50 - 

L it i gat I on 

Criminal prosecutions 35 

Proceedings for revocation of natural , zat I on 17 1 

Appeals in naturalization petition cases 220 

Suits for judicial determination of citizenship 90 

Habeas corpus proceedings 260 

Claims for or against the Government 159 

Fines or penalties against transportation lines 39 

Administrative Procedure Act cases 36 

Miscellaneous matters relating to litigation 1,588 

Leg i s I at i on 

Reports drafted or approved 430 

Legislative bills examined 1,076 

Proposals for legislation exam.ned or drafted 59 

Miscellaneous matters relating to legis.ation 113 

Mi see I I aneous 

Admission to practice of, and d-scipiinary 

actions against^ attorneys and representatives 105 

Preparation, examination, and enforcement of bonds 1,635 

Miscellaneous cases, reports,, and correspondence 2,012 

Leg i s i at i ve act ; v i t,y ,-— Th i s office prepares reports to 
the Assistant to the Attorney General on public biils intro- 
duced in Congress Such reports include those on the public 
laws passed during the year ended June 30, 1949,, and at the 
beginning of this report. 

Court decisions affecting Service f unct i ons . - -The past 
fiscal year has been one of intense activity :n the courts in 
immigration and naturalization matters and important decisions 
affecting operation of the Immigration and Naturalization Ser- 
vice were rendered by the United States Supreme Court, United 
States Circuit Courts of Appeals, and by numerous United States 
District Courts with a large number of cases still pending 
upon their dockets. Many of these decisions were of such im- 
portance as to deserve some comment if space would permit, but 
for the purposes of the Annua, Report it is necessary to limit 
the discussion largeiy to statistical results, or to problems 
: nvo i ved . 

The , argest area of judicial activity during the year in 
re i at ; on to :mm; grat Ion and nationality matters was, of course, 
in the Federal District Courts Of the scores of cases arising 
in such courts some decisions conformed to previously estab- 
lished principles of : aw and were therefore only cumulative, 
but many new issues arose The range of new issues was broad 
because of several factors, among them the fact that deporta- 
tion of aliens during the war years was deferred in the major- 
ity of cases because of inability to deport to countries abroad 



- 5i - 

either engaged in war or in the war areas, and for other war- 
time conditions This resulted, following the end of hostili- 
ties, in increased deportations, including execution of many 
deportation orders entered years previously. Thespan of years 
meantime had been a period of enactment of many new laws touch- 
i ng upon immigration and natiyonality matters, pertaining to 
many classes of persons such as members of the armed forces, 
veterans,, their spouses or fiancees,, displaced persons, and 
others. The basic immigration and nationality laws were also 
amended in other respects during the period. Congress also 
enacted the Administrative Procedure Act in 1946, which to- 
gether with the Declaratory Judgment Act of 1934, and the pro- 
visions of Section 503 of the Nationality Act of 1940, came to 
be utilized more extensively by counsel for aliens as means of 
seeking judicial review or relief from exclusion and deporta- 
tion orders, as well as the writ of hareas corpus t rad i t ional (y 
used as a basis for coMatera! judicial review in such cases. 

As deportation and exclusion orders increased, or their 
execution was accelerated, following the war years, the number 
of court actions likewise increased, although, to a large ex- 
tent the increased litigation was due to efforts of attorneys 
for the aliens to obtain judicial review other than by habeas 
corpus which cannot be invoked until after the aliens are taken 
into custody. Hence, in cases which had not yet reached the 
stage of executing the order of deportation, the order itself 
was challenged in litigation, or the procedure for conducting 
deportation proceedings was challenged in the early stages, 
giving rise to issues in litigation at various stages of the 
administrative process relating to exclusion and expulsion. 

Supreme Court case s , - -Th ree cases were decided by the 
Supreme Court during the fiscal year and one at the close of 
the previous fiscal year but too late to be included in the 
last Annual Report J./; certiorari wasgranted in four cases 2/; 

±/ W! xma n v. United States . 69 S= Ct , 233, decided December 6, 
1948; Kl apprott v. United States . 335 U. S. 60 1, decided 
January 17, 1949, judgment modified 336 u. S. 942; Un i ted 
States ex re I Johnson v„ Shauahnessy. 336 U S. 806, de- 
cided May 9, 1949, 

2/ Knauff. United States ex re I v. Shauqhnessy . certiorari to 
the Second Circuit Court of Appeals to review an order of 
March il, 1949. !73 F, 2d, 599; Wi I iumeit. United States 
ex re I v. Watk ins . certiorari to the Second Circuit Court 
of Appeals to review an order of January 21, 1949, 17 1 F. 
2d. 773; Savorqnan v. United States, et a I ., certiorari to 
the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals to review an order of 
December 14, 1948, !7! F, 2d 155; Eichen I auq . Un i ted States 
ex_r,e_i___v___Wa_tj<j^ns, certiorari 'fo the Second Circuit Court 
of Appea I s to rev i ew an order of May 3, 1948, 167 F. 2d. 659. 



- 52 - 

and was denied in four cases .^/ . Pending on the 1949- 50 docket 
of the Supreme Court at the close of the fisc&l year were 
three petitions seel<ing certiorari, one of which arose from 
the State Department but in a case having important bearing 
upon operations of this Service. 4/ 

United States Courts of Appeal decisions . — In addition 
to the United States Courts of Appeal decisions in the cases 
acted upon or docketed in the Supreme Court, there were 21 
others of Importance decided by those courts during the 
fiscal year, which are numerically listed as follows, by 
Circuits: First Circuit, I; Second Circuit, 13; Third Cir- 
cuit, I; Seventh Circuit, I; Ninth Circuit, 3; District of 
Columbia, 2. 5/ 

i/ Sch i rremei ster. United States ex re I v. Wat kins , 69 S. Ct. 
1520 (certiorari denied because petition was not timely 
filed) arising from the Second Circuit Court of Appeals 
decision of January 12, 1949, 171 F. 2d. 858; Lee Fonq Fook 
V. Wi xon. 336 U. S. 9 14, arising from decision of the Ninth 
Circuit Court of Appeals on October 25, 1948 (as amended 
.. on November 8, 1948) 170 F.. 2d. 245; U nited States v. 

Dadonn a, 336 U. S. 961, arising from the Second Circuit 
Court of Appeals decision of November 29, 1948, F. 2d. 965; 
Emi I W. K. Beckman v. Robert J. Barrett , 336 U. S. 970 aris- 
ing from a per curiam decision of the Court of Appeals for 
the District of Columbia on April 18, 1949. 

4/ Battaq I i no v. Marshal I .Sec retary of State, seeking certior- 
ari to review an order of the Second Circuit Court of 
Appeals on March 3, 1949, 172 F. 2d. 979; Wong Yang Sung v.. 
Clark, et a I . ., seeking certiorari to review a decision of 
the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Col- 
umbia, entered on April 4, 1949, \1A F. 2d 158, affirming 80 
F, Supp. 235; U. S. ex re I Lee Wo Shinq v. Watk i ns .pet i 1 1 on 
filed July 27, 1949, seeking certiorari to review a decision 
of the Second Circuit Court of Appeals on June 7, 1949, in 
case No. 21359. 

^/ Limitations of space in Annual Report preclude listing of all 
the Courts of Appeal cases referred to. 



- 53 - 

D istrict Court cases and special problems . — Some of the 
issues which arose in these cases are presented below. 

( I ) Adm i n i St rat i ve Procedur e Act issues : — Major issues 
before the District Courts during the year arose from the 
Administrative Procedure Act alone, some of which reached the 
higher courts Upon the first major issue arising under that 
Act, as to whether the procedural and examiner requirements. 
Sections 5, 7, 8, and II of the Administrative Procedure Act 
are applicable to deportation or exclusion proceedings under 
the immigration laws, twelve district court decisions favored 
the Government's contention that such provisions are inappli- 
cable These were in addition to three other decisions 
arising from District Court decisions upon which the Second 
Circuit Court of Appeals decided in favor of the Government's 
contention, and one such decision in which the Court of Appeals 
for the District of Columbia held to the same effect. One 
District Court' decision adverse to the Government's contention 
had been appealed and was pending in the Court of Appeals for 
the District of Columbia at the end of the fiscal year. 

Upon the second major issue arising under the same Act, 
as to whether, or to what extent. Section 10 of the Adminis- 
trative Procedure Act is applicable as a basis for judicial 
review of deportation or exclusion cases, seven District 
Court decisions had been rendered by the close of the year 
favoring the Government's contention that judicial review 
of such cases is limited to collateral review by habeas 
corpus only, and that the opening language of Section 10 of 
that Act either precludes judicial review under that section 
entirely, or at least limits it to the heretofore applicable 
remedy of habeas corpus review. Two District Court decisions, 
in the same district, adverse to the Government's contentions 
upon this issue were handed down during the year. 

A collateral issue under the same Act, as to whether an 
alien who was facing deportation proceedings was entitled to 
invoke judicial power to restrain anticipated errors and to 
require compliance with the Administrative remedies, was also 
decided in favor of the Government's contentions that the 
administrative remedies must first be exhausted,, 

( 21 D ec i aratorv Judgment Act issues . — In many of the cases 
involving the Administrative Procedure Act issues, plaintiffs 
had also sought relief under the Declaratory Judgment Act of 
1934 (now 28 U.S C- 220 1-2202) and in dismissing or deciding 
their cases the courts also, in some instances, decided favor- 
ably to the Government's contention that the .statute does not 
provide a basis for judicial review, or relief from deporta-- 
tion and exclusion orders The issue was directly passed upon 
in the Government's favor in one District Court case inthe 
District of Columbia and later in one case arising in the 
Southern District of New York,, Both decisions arose from 
deportation cases. 



- 54 - 

' 3 ) I ssues u nder Section 503 of the Nationality Act of !940 , — 
Litigation under this section arose where plaintiffs sought 
judgments declaring them to be citizens of the United States, 
and presented numerous issues, some of which were controlled 
by decisions in previous years. However, new issues continued 
to arise during the past year and among the more important 
decisions were those of two different District Courts whichheld 
to the effect that prior determination of the issue of citizen-- 
ship adverse to plaintiff in habeas corpus proceedings, is not 
res judicata so as to preclude jurisdiction of the courts sub- 
sequently to hear the issue under Section 503. The cas.es viewed 
the statute as provid i ng for a hearing of the citizenship issue, 
and not merely a review of the administrative proceeding. A 
contrary view was indicated in one decision in the Court of 
Appeals for the District of Columbia. 

\ 
"^ ( 4 i Confllct where alien's deportation and naturalization 

p roceed i nq s a re pending s i mu I taneous I y . - -The deportat i on and 

naturalization statutes being separate, cases continued to 
arise in which aliens subject to deportation proceedings 
were also proceeding toward naturalization. Administrative 
policy applied to procedures in such cases resulted in some 
litigation during the year On July !, 1949, the District 
Court, Southern District of New York, held in one case that 
where the court is to consider admission of the al ien to 
citizenship in spite of an existing order for deportation, 
orderly procedure dictates that the order of deportation be 
first vacated by the Immigration Service before the applica- 
tion for naturalization is considered. Other cases followed 
which recognized possible exceptions to the foregoing view 
by reason of special circumstances, such as an inactive 
deportation matter, or an order of deportation which by reason 
of certain circumstances cannot be enforced. On May 13, 1949^ 
the United States District Court, District of Minnesota, 
Fourth Division, approved an order granting a motion for 
continuance of the petition for naturalization until a 
pending and active deportation matter was determined. A 
different result was reached on a similar issue decided on 
June 20, 1949, by the Second Circuit Court of Appeals which 
arose from a District Court dismissal of a writ of habeas 
corpus. The Circuit Court vacated the order dismissing the 
writ, directed that the habeas corpus petition is to remain 
undecided in the District Court until the Relator's natural- 
ization proceeding is concluded, and that the deportation 
order and warrant be stayed meanwhile. There were at least 
two other District Court decisions involving the same problem, 
one of which held where the alien was physically present 

in the United States for the required period, that a warrant 
for his deportation outstanding against him when he 

petitioned for and received his naturalization certificate, 
based on findings that he was likely to become a public charge 
and was a person of constitutional psychopathic inferiority 
at the time of entry, did not render his residence void so 
as to justify revocation of the order admitting him to 



- 55 - 

citizenship The other held the issuance of a deportation 
warrant did not terminate the petitioner's legal residence 
in the United States and that the petitioner had met with 
the requirements of continuous residence and his petition for 
naturalization should be allowed. 

While such cases involved applied policy in relation to 
procedures, the paramount legal issue was whether an alien 
subject to deportation or one likely to be held deportable, 
could meet or had met the lawful residence requirements for 
naturalization. Another basis of conflict in some such cases 
is indicated by the fact that the deportation order may be 
based upon admitted Communist membership more than ten years 
previously, while the naturalization court is not permitted 
to go baci< more than ten years preceding the filing of the 
petitioner's application to determine whether he is a member 
of, or affiliated with a prescribed organization. Hence an 
alien may be eligible for naturalization while under order 
of deportation for Communist membership, and if his naturali- 
zation were to occur before deportation it would collaterally 
nullify the deportation order. 

The status of this problem and legal issues was still 
somewhat unsettled at the end of the fiscal year, but there 
were growing indications that ultimate solution may depend 
upon amendatory legislation. 

United States Court of Claims cases . — There was continued 
activity in the United States Court of Claims, chiefly in 
relation to claims of Immigrant inspectors for benefits 

under their overtime statute, Act of March 2, 1931 (8 U.S.C. 
I09(a)(b)), following the" earl ier case of Renner-Krupp vs. 
U nited States 106 Ct , Cis. 676, reported in a previous Annual 
Report. Petitions of Patrol Inspectors of the service for 
similar benefits as were obtained by Immigrant Inspectors 
under the Renner-Krupp d ec i s i on, were st i I I pending and unde- 
cided, Other litigation had arisen from a proviso in the 
Appropriation Act for this Service for the fiscal year 1948, 
which, as construed by the Comptroller General, had the effect 
of limiting holiday, Sunday and overtime payments under the 
1931 Act to the rates of the Federal Employees Pay Acts. This 
resulted in much lower income from extra compensation during 
the 1948 fiscal year for employees performing services under 
the 1931 Act, and suits were instituted seeking to recover the 
difference between the extra compensation amounts authorized 
to be paid from the Service Appropriation Act and the amounts 
required to be paid as extra compensation for the 1931 Act. 
The issues involved construction of the proviso and of the 
!93l Act, On June 6, 1949, the Court of Claims entered its 
first decisions upon such issues in three cases of Thomas C. 
G i bney v. The United States . No. 48572; Joseph M. Ahearn v. 
T he United States, Ct ., CIs. No. 48610; and Donald M,. Tay I o r 
v" United States . Ct. CIs. No. 4861^; all of which were in 

favor of plaintiffs upon the controlling issues. 



- 56 - 

Meanwhile, an Interdepartmental Committee on wiiich the 
General Counsel of this Service is a representat i ve^ and which 
was referred to in the last Annual Report, continued actively 
to seek a basis for a bill which would provide uniform appli- 
cation as to coverage and rates for overtime services in the 
inspectional work of the Federal Government. After frequent 
sessions the committee prepared a final draft of a bi I I by 
June A- , !949j and shortly after the end of the fiscal year 
submitted the bi I i and an extensive report thereon to the 
Secretary of Commerce, the committee having been initiated 
by the Air Coordinating Committee of that Department for the 
purpose of mak:ng a study of inspectional overtime pay problems 
and preparing remedial legislation, 

ADMINISTRATIVE DIVISION 

Funct ions . - The Administrative Division has responsi- 
bility for administrative and organizational matters within 
the Service,. This consists of; (I) all budget, accounting, 
auditing,, and fiscai control; (2) recruitment, classifica- 
tion,, placement, training of personnel, processing and 
records maintenance, employee relations and health service 
for ail personnel of the Service; (3) information, distribu- 
tion of mail and maintenance of Service files; (4.1 procure- 
ment ot supplies, processing requisitions and control of 
property; and (5) planning and executing the engineering 
services and allocation of space. 

I. Budget and Fiscal Control 

G.e.ne_ra_[ „ --A total appropriation of $30, 450,000 was 
made to this Service for the fiscal year 1949, an increase 
of $3,,450,000 over the amount available for the preceding 
fiscal yea.--. The increase in the appropriation for 1949 
was applied as follows; (!) $2,300,000 for higher salary 
rates specified by the Postal Rate Revision and Federal 
Employees Saiary Act of 1948 (Public Law 900, 80th Congress, 
approved Juiy 3, '948); (2; $595,000 for resumption of pay- 
ments for Sunday and holiday duty at the rates specified by 
the Act of March 2, 1931, pursuant to noncont i nuance of a 
restrictive proviso included in the 1948 Appropriation Act, 
limiting such payments to rates provided by the Federal 
Employees Pay Actsof !945 and 1946; (3) $150,000 for appre- 
hension and return of alien agricultural workers,, particu- 
larly those who skipped their employment and moved to 
various parts of the country; and (4) $405,000 for an accel- 
erated investigative program. 

During the last half of the fiscal year there was a 
possibility that it would be necessary to separate approxi- 
mately 160 Patrol Inspectors serving under war service 
appointments The average salary equivalent for accrued 
annual leave of this group was oveir $1,000 each. This un- 
certainty made it necessary to hold $160,000 in administra- 
tive reserve unt i I late in the fiscal year when the exact 



- 57 - 
number to be separated could be determined. 

Effective with the bi-weekly pay period of December 12 
to 25, !948;, the Department directed that the Central Office 
take over the preparation of its payrolls in accordance with 
General Regulations 102, the earnings record cards, income 
tax reports, and the retirement records, Shortly thereafter, 
the bond accounts of Central Office employees were turned 
over to the Budget and Fiscal Control Section, This proce- 
dural shortcut has proven highly beneficial, New employees 
receive their checks on time Leave without pay is deducted 
from current salary checks A separate payroll is maintained 
for the employees engaged upon the Immigration and Naturali- 
zation Service phase of the Displaced Persons Program. 

For many years the Field Offices and the Central Office 
have recommended decentralization of voucher procedure to 
the end that payments could be effected through regional 
disbursing officers. The first step in that direction was 
taken on Ju!y I, 1944, w i t h the decent ra M zat i on of field 
payrolls. In the intervening years other minor steps have 
been taken in that direction, such as payment of witness 
fees by United States Marshals, payment of allowances to 
aliens, etc. On June 24, 1949, i nst ruct i ons we re i ssued to 
provide for the payment locally of all vouchers chargeable 
to the fiscal year 1950 and subsequent fiscal years except 
those which must necessarily be paid in Washington or which 
can be settled more advantageously in Washington, This 
should go far toward expediting payment of vendors' bills 
and reimbursement of travel expenses of field employees. 

A study was completed of fiscal procedures in Field 
Offices pertaining to issuance of bills, collections, de- 
posits, and accounting for moneys received for head tax 
immigration fines, extra compensation, maintenance and 
detention, and numerous other sources of revenue. There 
was designed and approved by the Comptroller General a 
uniform bill for use in billing and accounting for all 
indebtedness arising through operation of immigration and 
naturalization laws and regulations Proposed procedures 
to provide uniformity, compliance with various regulations 
and laws applicable to moneys received by administrative 
offices was pending approval by the Gene ra I Account 1 ng 
Office at the close of the year Approval of the procedure 
wherein they apply to the Bureau of Customs with respect to 
immigration fines and head tax has been secured. Revised 
procedures will be released in the fiscal year 1950. 

Receipts and refunds . — The work load of the Receipts 
Accounting Unit, with respect to the issuance of receipts, 
steadily continued to expand during the fiscal year 1949, as 
a result of the increase of foreign travel generally and the 
emigration of war brides to their homes in various countries 



- 58 - 

with the intent to return to the United States. This required 
the issuance of a greater number of reentry permits and ex- 
tensions, and created an increase in associated duties, 
such as correspondence, the handl ing of incoming mai I, and 
the preparation of Schedules of Collections. The demand for 
advance bookings with air and steamship agencies is indicative 
that the peak of foreign travel has not as yet been reached. 

The great decrease in the volume of fine cases processed 
is due, primarily, to the effect of a certain few decisions 
of the Board of Immigration Appeals, and to a change in the 
first six months of the fiscal year in the use of the mani- 
fest form, which action reduced normal assessments under 
Sections 14 and 36 of the Act of February 5, 1917. Until 
such time as the transportation lines were familiar with 
the new regulations, fines were not levied as usual, al I ow- 
ances being made for violations during this period of adjust- 
ments 

A procedural change of decentralization to Field 
Offices of the deposit of breached United St at es Treasu ry 
Bonds or Notes brought about a decline of bond work in the 
Central Office. The volume of breached bonds was also 

affected by the decision to hold pending those/cases in- 
volving fiancee bonds, wherein the subject aliens were 
eligible for suspension of deportation, the breach orders 
to be withheld until final action has been taken on the 
suspension proceedings. 

The following figures are illustrative: 





Fiscal 


F iscal 


Percentage 




Year 


Year 


increase or 




1948 , 


1949 


dec rease 


Permits and Extension Fees 






Number received 


53,903 


6 1,530 


14. 1 


Amount 


$160,483.00 


$184,285.00 


14.8 


Copying Fees 








Number received 


2,222 


2,20 1 


- 0.9 


Amount 


$1,382.00 


$ 1,509.00 


9.2 


Fines 








Number received 


2,740 


760 


-72.3 


Amount assessed 


$558,485.00 


$463,4 17.00 


-17.0 



Collection Schedules 

Prepared 879 1,264 43.8 

Bonds 

Number processed 171 130 -24.0 

Amount $119,050.00 $66,411.00 -44.2 



Fisca 1 


Fiscal 


Year 


Year 


1948 


1949 



- 59 - 

Percentage 
increase or 
dec rease 

Clerks of Court Fees 

Number received 132,194 134,150 1.5 

Amount $639, 657 .00 $647 , 067. 00 1.2 

A total of $6,997.00 was refunded from open appropriations 
and the sum of $32,790.00 from Trust Accounts during the fiscal 
year 1949, which work, while involving a much lesser amount of 
money, required the preparation of an equal number of refund 
vouchers as during the preceding fiscal year. 

Extra Compensation Act of March 2., 1951 . — As a result of 
the May 6, 1946, decision of the United States Court of Claims 
in the cases of Wa I te r A . Renne r v . the United States . 
No. 46338 and P eter H. Krupp v. the United States . No. 46355, 
48 certified accountings were furnished the United States 
Court of Claims and 267 certified accountings were furnished 
the General Accounting Office. The comparison of accomplish- 
ments for the fiscal years 1947, 1948, and 1949 andthe total 
for three years are c-.s follows: 

Accountings Certified under Renner Precedent 

Year ended June 30 



T otal 1947 1948 1949 



U. S. Ct., of C iaims 

Individuals 506 197 261 48 

Amount $967,702 $502,393 $363,359 $101,950 

Gen. Acct , Off i ce 

Individuals 1,580 - 1,3 13 267 

Amount $1,920,194 - $1,669,764 $250,430 

Total 

Individuals 2,086 197 1,574 315 

Amount $2,887,896 $502, 393 $2, 033, 123 $352,380 

On June 30, 1949, there were on hand 34 letters of claim 
referred here by the General Accounting Office for administra- 
tive reports. No petitions filed in the United States Court 
of Claims and referred here by the Assistant Attorney General 
were on hand In addition to these two classes falling squarely 
within the R enner case as precedent ( 106 Ct . CIs. 676), there 
were on hand 138 protests filed here by employees, 89 letters 
referred here by the General Accounting Office, and 3 peti- 
tions in the U, S, Court of Claims, all protesting payment 
pursuant to the restrictive proviso of "The Departments of 
State, Justice and Commerce and the Judiciary Appropriation 



- 60 '- 

Act, 1948, Public Law 166, 80th Congress, approved July 9, 
1947" prohibiting payment at rates other than those provided 
by the Federal Employees Pay Acts of 1945 and 1946. There 
were 17 letters referred here by the General Accounting 
Office and 101 petitions in the U. S. Court of Claims re- 
quiring further action onquestions presented to the court 
as to Border Patrol activities and the Act of March 2, 1931 

During the fiscal year 1949 funds for the payment of 
claims filed pursuant to the Act of March 2, 1931, were appro- 
priated as fo I lows: 



U.S. Court 
of C I aims 



Genera I 
Account 1 ng 
Office 



Fl rst Def ic lency 
Approprlat ion Act; ' 
!949 (Publ ir Law 71 
approved May 24, 1949): 



Senate Document 15,, 

8 1st Congress $243,598,0: 



$622,982.92 $866,580.93 



'Second Deficiency 
Appropriation Act, 
1949 ( Publ ic Law i !9, 
approved June 23, 
1949): 



Senate Document 52 
81st Congress 

House Document 145 
8 1st Congress 



Total 



15,225.24 
2 t„, 299. 98. 
$280, i 13.23 



14,076.52 

2$,g99,^ 

$663,958.74 



29,301.76 

$944,07 1 .97 



61 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE IMMIGRATION 

AND ■NATURALIZATION SERVICE 

FISCAL YEAR - IQ4Q 



Appropriation for the conduct of the Immigration and 

Naturalization Service and the administration of the 

Immigration and Naturalization Laws 



Salaries and Expenses: 

Departmental Service..................... $ 2,948,300.00 

Field Service............................ 27. 50 1 . 700. 00 

$ 30,450,000.00 

Net amount expended for all purposes after 

deduction refunds to the appropriation not 

properly chargeable to the Government.... 50. 404, 52 I .00 

Net ba I ance. ..„„..,....,........ . 45,479.00 

Balanced against the expenditures mentioned 

there was collected as hereinafter shown 

the sum of ........... . 3,292,860.99 

Making the net cost of operation.............. 27,111,660.01 

Income and Sources Thereof (Collections) 

Copying fees................................... 8,219.23 

Naturalization fees............................ 249,837.79 

Clerks of Court fees........................... 647,191.50 

Certificates of registry...................... 66,780.50 

Suspended deportation fees.................... 4,896.00 

Reentry permits and exten si ons. .............. . 184,505.65 

Head tax _ .................................. 1,841,210,75 

Sale of Government property-products.......... 33,705.36 

Miscellaneous collections...,,..,,.,...,,,.,.. 12,279.97 
Forfeitures and bonds forfeited and 

paid without suit, including 

interest coupons ..................... 95,714.24 

Administrative fines.......................... 148. 520.00 

TOTAL. , . $ 3,292,860.99 



I 



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- 63 - 



INCOME AND SOURCES THEREOF 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1935 - 1949 



1 HOUSANDS $ $ $ 

5,000 1 1- 



4,000 



3,000 



2,000 - 



1,000 - 



THOUSANDS $$$ 

5,000 



- 4,000 




- 3,000 



9 2,000 



1,000 



935 36 37 38 39 1940 "l "2 43 14 1945 4e 4' 48 )949 



2. Personnel 

General . — The primary functions of the Personnel Section 
are the defining of positions in terms of Civil Service classi- 
fications and grades, the adequate placement and training of 
employees in these positions, and the welfare of the personnel 
on duty. The Section is divided into two units. Placement and 
Training, and Classification and Employee Services. 

On June 30, 1949, the Immigration and Naturalization Ser- 
vice consisted of 6,702 employees. There were 958 in the Cen- 
tral Office and 5,744 in the field. The latter group includes 
96 employees stationed in Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico and the 
Virgin Islands of the United States, and 71 located in Canada 
and Cuba. 

Placement and training . — The number of employees with com- 
petitive Civil Service status increased markedly during the 
fiscal year, with a corresponding decrease in number of employees 
without such status. This was primarily due to the fact that a 
large number of temporary employees recruited by the Central 
Office toward the last of the preceding fiscal year, upon our 
removal from Phi lade I ph i a, have since obtained competitive status. 

The Board of Civil Service Examiners for the Immigration 
and Naturalization Service received and processed applications 



- 64- 

and examinations for Patrol Inspector (Trainee) and Immigrant 
Inspector positions as follows; 

Patrol Inspector: 

App I i cat i ons race i ved . , , .........,....,..'. 2, 464 

Applications on hand, having been received 

at end of preceding fiscal year, ............ „ 26,326 

Applications rated. ........................... . 16,689 

P i acements ...................................... 403 

Immigrant Inspector: 

App I i cat i ons recei ved .... . .,....,...., 19,017 

App I i cat i ons rated ... ..o ....................... . 21 

P I acements 4 

In the Central Office approximately 7,700 interviews 
were conducted and 5,000 letters and memoranda were prepared 
in connection with recruitment and placement activities. 
Eleven thousand seven hundred five personnel actions were 
processed; 8,043 concerned the Field Service and 3,662 the 
Central Office, 

The training work of this unit during the fiscal year 
consisted primarily of conducting a correspondence training 
program on a Service-wide basis. Thirty-one lessons were 
in circulation^ 29 of which were on subjects relating to 
immigration and nationality laws, regulations, and procedures, 
and two to personnel matters. Enrol lees in the program 

carried on the work on their own time, and spent an esti- 
mated 16,000 hours in such study. 

In order to increase the efficiency of typists and 
stenographers employed in the Central Office, a refresher 
course of six weeks' duration was conducted for 75 typists and 
75 stenographers. 

Four hundred eighty-five applicants for typists and 151 
applicants for stenographic positions were given demon- 
stration tests as placement aids. 

C lassification and employee services . — During the fiscal 
year there was continued review of positions in the Central 
Office and the Field Offices for the purpose of maintaining 
conformity with Civil Service standards Approximately 2,000 
positions were so reviewed. These surveys were of two general 
types: (I) by occupational group, and (2) by organizational 
unit.. 

One of the principal surveys of the first type resulted 
from the transfer of numerous positions from the Adjudications 
Divisions of the Field and Central Office to Enforcement 
Divisions with the accompanying segregation of enforcement work 
from adjudications functions. 



-- 65 - 

The principal survey of the second type resulted from 
the combination of the Spokane and Seattle Districts^ and 
the establishment of a new Honolulu District. Individual 
officer and clerical positions resulting from these actions 
had to be surveyed and adjusted. 

During the year, 4,555 regular, probational, and special 
efficiency ratings were processed and reviewed for accuracy, 
completeness, and conformity to standards. Thirteen efficiency 
rating appeals and complaints were reviewed. 

Nineteen hundred sixty-eight cases involving disciplinary 
action, retirement, injury, reinstatement, involuntary separa- 
tion, and non-disciplinary demotion were reviewed. 

In the dispensary maintained in the Central Office, the 
services rendered included 14,498 treatments during the year, 
counseling on problems of health and hygiene, and referrals 
to the Public Health Service, to clinics, or to private 
physicians In addition, 4,407 sick leave applications were 
rev i ewed . 

All collection and accounting activities for group 
hospitalization and the Federal Credit Union were also 
handled in this unit. One thousand two hundred eighty 

employees were interviewed in connection with inquiries 
regarding hospitalization, credit union activities, and 
other matters. 

5 ■ I nfo rmat i on . Mai I. and F i I es 

The Information, Mail and Files Section receives, 
creates and maintains files of mail and documents processed 
in the Central Office; cancels and consolidates files; trans- 
lates foreign documents; conducts the Service records retire- 
ment program; replies to requests for information of a routine 
and non-technical nature and produces mic rophotograph i c, photo- 
graphic or photostatic copies of documents as required. 

Pursuant to requirements of the Act of July 7, 1943, 
(57 Stat. 380), 5,277 cubic feet of file material were 

disposed of, 4,983 cubic feet being record material and 294 
cubic feet being non-record material. 

The Section consolidated 427,827 Central Office records 
into 248,476 consolidated files. Alien cases were set up 
under al ien registration f i le numbers and, when the al ien 
became naturalized, the record was converted to a consoli- 
dated certificate of naturalization file, whenever the 
authorized force of personnel permitted this function. 

The project of microfilming arrival records in the 
Central Office was suspended the past fiscal year. During 
the year, however, the balance of the Miami District arrival 
records were microf i I med . After microf i Iming, the original 



~ 66 - 

manifest Is destroyed, resulting in a saving of more than 90 
per cent in space The microti Iming program has now been 
extended as a function to field offices The arrival records 
at the port of San Francisco, California are now being filmed 
by employees of that District. 

During the year, there were received from displaced 
persons residing temporarily in the United States 5,904 
applications for the adjustment of the'r immigration status 
to permanent residents under the provisions of Section 4 of 
the Displaced Persons Act of 1948 (Public Law 774, 80th 
Congress). This Section indexed each application, verified 
the claimed arrivals and referred each application to the 
District Director having jurisdiction over the place of 
residence of the alien- 

During the fiscal year, more than 188,000 visas, 
including 39,000 visas covering arrival of displaced 
persons under the provisions of Public Law 774 of the 
80th Congress^ were indexed, fi led, and appropriate 
al ien registration receipt cards issued. The Section 
also received and filed approximately one million entry 
and departure records covering visitors and transits, an 
increase of 67 percent over the prior fiscal year. There 
were further increases in applications for reentry permits 
and petitions for immigration visas 

4. Space, Service,, and Supplies 

During the fiscal year a complete survey was made of 
the need for new bui idings and recommendations were submitted 
to the Department for inclusion in Public Buildings Adminis- 
tration schedules of new construction 

The Border Patrol Sector Headquarters office, located 
for many years at Lynden, Washington, was moved to Bialne, 
Washington, in September 1948. The Border Patrol Sector 
Headquarters office, located for many years at Alpine, Texas, 
was moved to Marfa, Texas, in Apri \, 1948. The office is 
now located in the former Officers' Club attached to Fort 
Do A. Russell. This building, together with 12 non-commissioned 
officers' residences and some eight acres of iand, was occupied 
under a Use Permit issued by War Assets Administration to the 
Public Buildings Administration, Congressional authority 
for the transfer of the property from War Assets Administra- 
tion to the Public Buildings Administration for the use of 
this Service was included in Section 205, Public Law 105, 
8 1st Congress, approved June !6, !949 A plot of land was 
purchased at San Ysidro, California, where it is proposed 
to set up several surplus portable frame bui Idings and 
transfer the Border Patrol Sector Headquarters now located 
at Chu I a Vi sta. 

Radio communication stations were established at Seattle, 
Washington; West Palm Beach, Fiorda, and Van Buren, Maine, 



- 67 - 

during the fiscal year, making a total of 52 fixed stations 
in operation at the end of the year. A program of conversion 
to FM radio equipment is underway. Late in the fiscal year 
new FM equipment, principally for use along the Mexican Border, 
was purchased. ■ 

During the past year it has been difficult to recruit 
competent stenographers. Two hundred eight electronic 

dictating machines and 125 transcribing machines were pur- 
chased during the fiscal year for use on adjudications and 
hearings work. The electronic equipment saves the time of 
stenographers and permits utilization of typists without 
stenographic training. 

Two large diesel-type busses were purchased for use in 
the Los Angeles and San Francisco Districts for transporting 
aliens in exclusion and deportation cases. This equipment 
eased the tremendous problem of alien movements in the South- 
western area. Other automotive purchases included replace- 
ments for 106 sedans, 16 carryalls and 23 trucks. A 26-foot 
cabin type cruiser was purchased for patrol work in the Buffalo 
District. 

One airplane, an ex-Army L-5, was permanently grounded 
during the year because of unreliable performance. Four 
airplanes were in operation and three observation-type 
planes were on order at the close of the fiscal year. The 
transfer of a surplus observation-type plane from the Civil 
Aeronautics Board was in process. 

Effective October, 1948, the purchasing procedure 
was decentralized to the extent that District Offices were 
authorized to' make directpurchases for items stocked in 
the field supply centers of^the Bureau of Federal Supply 
This has resulted in the more prompt delivery of supplies 
and has relieved the Procurement Section of the Department 
of considerable work w i t hout i nc reas i ng the work of the 
District Offices to any great extent. 

DIVISION OF RESEARCH AND EDUCATION 

F unct i ons , — The functions of the Division of Research 
and Education are: ( I ) to foster better citizenship by 

cooperating with the public schools in supplying the names 
of candidates for naturalization who need instruction in the 
nature and scope of the national and local governments in 
the United States, in preparing themselves for their citizen- 
ship duties and responsibilities, and in furnishing citizen- 
ship textbooks to such schools; (2) to assemble and analyze 
the statistics of the Service and conduct necessary research 
in immigration and nationality; (3) to prepare for publi- 
cation the immigration and nationality laws and regulations, 
and manuals of interpretation of such laws and regulations. 



- (50 
I. Citizenship Educat j q n 

The f undafnentfll purpose of the citizenship eHuc^Moh 
program of the Service Is to offer oppo 't iiri 1 1 I fl<^ fi*- ^h^ 
better preparation for thp duties and respons I b I I I M »* of 
citizenship to candldet-s for nat u ra m zat | on, with a /i?>v 
to their more affective a'?sImilation Into the hody -3' cit- 
izens. The more adequate this prngrtim hiromna •'hfl q »• 1 a •■, «i r 
its value In unifying our various groups of peopi"" f."M/«i 
and foreign-born- Into a h»irmoniou«< r.aM'Kii^l flfup. 

• 

It has therefore be»n most ^nc'oiir ap 1 rfl *o nh^ir'/f •;^'» 
splendid manner In //hich +he cltlz«n*^lo ^dicaMo'i Wf'V" hi** 
progressed during tha fiscal ytnir ^r,tie6 Uinn 50, I ^''^ 
Following is a summary of the detaila of th« prinripai p^9<^<»'^ 
of this program; 



CITjIZENSHlP "EXT 800KS FOR NATURALIZATION APPLfCAflT^ 

DISTRIBUTED TO PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

YEARS CNOED JUWE 30, 1343 - l949 



■X'lAM') 



NUMBER 




'•.'^ A-i-^ 



of newly-arrived iflwiQ rants 
'ansmitte^ to the 'ietd Offices oy t^e 

Sent ra I Of'' '» ce, ,,. ^,.,., ...,.„. 

ruasmittea to the fJobHc sehooid »y f>»< 

Fle'-i Off'oe^ 






-■eH ^■ff'C'i'5 CO 






- 69 - 

Home study 

Names of noncitizens supplied by the Field 
Offices to State universities and State 

departments of educat i on , _ . „ . . . . • 22, 049 

Noncitizens informed by the Field Offices of 

facilities for correspondence courses............. 44,359 

Textbook distribution 

To the public schools for candidates for 

naturalization by the Central Office.............. 145,528 

P ublic-school classes and enrollments 

Public-school (and home study course) classes 

o rg an i zed ,......„.........-...-" . ................. 2., 123 

Candidates for naturalization enrolled in 

such c I asses ..,,„„„..,...,..........-............. 35^ 832 

H ames of newly-arrived i mm i q rants . --Du ri ng the fiscal 
year, a total of 148.204 visa-name slips were transmitted 
to the Field Service by the Central Office for ultimate 
distribution to public schools holding citizenship education 
classes for naturalization candidates. The form of these 
slips was changed somewhat during April 1949, when they were 
simplified to include only the name, address, date of birth, 
and nationality of the immigrant alien This action resulted 
in a saving of both time and personnel in the Central Office. 

Enthusiastic reports continue to be received from the 
Field Service on the value of this information in recruiting 
naturalization candidates in public-school citizenship classes. 
Many school officials have emphasized the importance of the 
name slips. Some State Education officers and cooperating 
State colleges and un i ve rs i t i es send letters of welcome to 
persons whose names appear on the slips, outlining the home 
study course offered by such institutions for naturalization 
cand i dates. 

H ome study program . — The keenness with which this program 
has been pursued is evidenced in the following excerpt from a 
report of the Di rector of Correspondence Study of the University 
Division, University of Nebraska: 

"I enjoy this ci-tizenship work so much, and my students 
are such grand people. One elderly lady braved the 
blizzard and traveled some thirty miles to appear be- 
fore the Examiner at the time she had been told to 
appear. Out at Bassett, Nebraska, two of my war bride 
students, an English and an Irish girl, heard of a new 
war bride who had come to the community They went to 
call on her and found a German girl who spoke almost 



*« 



*» 



This figure is included in total of 148,204 for the fiscal 
year, 

This information is taken from reports made at time 
textbooks are requisitioned and may be regarded as 
a reasonably accurate reflection of work accomplished. 



- 70 - 

no English. They took her in tow, and are teaching 
Her the English language, and the three are working 
together on citizenship study — a regular little United 
Nations out in the edge of the Nebraska sand hills." 

The District Director of the Service at Miami recently 
referred to the increasing number of applicants taking ad- 
vantage of the Home Study Course conducted by the University 
of Florida: "Needless to say, the results of the educational 
examination given to applicants who have been taking the Home 
Study Courses are gratifying. Our Examiners feel more secure 
in recommending those applicants to the Court, and it is evi- 
dent that they are better qualified to assume the responsi- 
bilities of citizenship, and that the educational standard of 
our new citizenry is being raised " 

Of the total reported enrollment of 35,832 candidates 
for naturalization in public-school classes or courses, 6,629 
such persons were reported enrolled in Home Study Courses, 

P ublic-school ce rt i f.i cates of proficiency --One of the 
outstanding advances has been the acceptance by the Service and 
the Courts of public-school certificates showing the satisfac- 
tory completion of courses of study upon the basic principles 
of the Constitution and Government, and the History of the 
United States, by cand i dates for naturalization. The naturaliza- 
tion courts in the following cities have accepted such certifi- 
cates as evidence of the petitioner's educational qual if ications; 
Philadelphia, Pa., Baltimore, Md . , Washington, D. C, Niagara 
Falls, N. Y., Chicago, III,, Sacramento, San Francisco, Redwood 
City and San Mateo, California; also the Superior Courts for 

the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the United States Dist rlct 
Courts of Connecticut and Rhode Island. 

Where the public schools maintain an effective program of 
instruction for naturalization candidates, acceptance of such 
certificates by this Service and the naturalization courts will 
be encouraged, Such action gives greater assurance that the 
petitioner for naturalization has a satisfactory knowledge and 
,u nde rstand i ng of the basic principles of the Constitution, 
Government, and History of the United States (see Sec, 356.3; 8 
C.F.R. ) than can be determined by informal questioning. It 
also lessens the time that the examiner must devote to each 
petitioner for naturalization, thus freeing the officer to that 
extent for other vital assignments,. 

Fourth National Conference on Citizenship . — As in previous 
years the Service participated actively in the Fourth National 
Conference on Citizenship held at New York City, May 14 - 18, 
1949. For the first time, an entire day of the period, the 
initial one, was devoted to a program presented under the di- 
rection of the Service, The proceedings were led by the Com- 
missioner of this Service who outlined the important phases 
of the year's accomplishments and plans for future programs. 



- 7 I - 

The morning session concerned immigration and nationality 
problems, displaced persons, and the need for revision of 
present laws, discussed by members of the Central Office 
Staff and the Chairman of the Displaced Persons Commission. 
The afternoon session was devoted to the social aspects of 
naturalization, including discussions, by a member of the 
Central Office staff and other public officials, of citizen- 
ship education requirements and educational facilities, as- 
similation of the foreign born, and meaningful naturalization 
court induction ceremonies. 

As has been done in the past, the Service had an ex- 
hibit on citizenship education work, displaying the various 
parts of the Federal Textbook on Citizenship "Our Constitution 
and Government," and giving in graphic form statistical and 
.other information on the citizenship education work that is 
carried on in cooperation with the public schools throughout 
the United States, Hawaii, and Alaska, 

2. General Research 

stud i es. 




To assist in interpreting the intent of Congress the 
Congressional Committee Reports on important immigration and 
nationality laws are being brought together for the use of 
officials of the Service. The Immigration Act of 1917 re- 
quires that immigrants shall be tested for literacy and re- 
vised literacy test cards have been prepared for this purpose. 
The revised cards have been translated into 41 languages and 
at the end of the fiscal year 1949, were being processed for 
distribution to the appropriate officials of the Service. 

5. Immigration and Nationality Digest and Manuals 

The Digest and Manual Section is responsible for keeping 
current the Immigration and Nationality Manuals and the matep- 
ial upon which they are based. These are comprehensive 

official work-'books containing a total of 2,000 printed loose- 
leaf pages of concise statements of the substantive and pro- 
cedural law upon these subjects as enacted by Congress, 



- 72 - 

implemented by regulations and interpreted and applied judi- 
cially and administratively. This work involved the final 
technical drafting of 2,275 pages of manuscript to replace 
manual texts affected by changes in the lawsand regulations 
or by new interpretations. 

Included in the material examined in revising and adding 
to the two manuals were 20,197 administrative and judicial 
opinions or rulings. The Section digested and indexed 2,169 
administrative and judicial precedents for inclusion in the 
card index-digest. This index contains an exhaustive collec- 
tion of precedents for use of the Service in maintaining uni- 
form and consistent action in disposing of its work. 

Although emergencies made it necessary to detail profes- 
sional personnel of this Section to other Divisions for ex- 
tended periods, the Section was able to dispose of 61 special 
assignments. Among them was the preliminary drafting of a 
manual to inform law enforcement officers and other groups 
outside the Service enough about the nationality and immi- 
gration laws and smuggling operations to increase the effec- 
tiveness of their cooperation. A continuing special function 
performed during the year was the examination and pertinent 
digesting for the Central Office of the daily issue of the 
Congressional Record, 

4, Statistics 



The numerical facts derived through administration of 
immigration and Nationality laws are collected and compiled 
for the most part, from visas, reentry permits, deportation 
orders, naturalization certificates, and other operating 
documents of the Service. Statistical tables make known the 
effectiveness of the laws in terms of volume. Legal classes 
of admission of aliens, causes for exclusion, deportation 
charges, and the sect i on of the Nationality Act under which per- 
sons are natural ized are related to such other pertinent 
factors as countries of birth and race. For the study of 
economic and social factors, statistics are presented on age 
sex, marital status and occupation. Tables on displaced 
persons admitted under the Displaced Persons Act of 1948 
are prepared in the classes shown above on a monthly and 
semi-annual basis, for the Displaced Persons Commission. 
Operations reports from'the field are used to study work- 
loads and personnel in order to more effectively carry out 
the program of the Service. 

Passenger travel reports of citizens and aliens furnish 
various government agencies, transportation companies, and this 
Service with data as to the movement of aliens and citizens by 
sea and air. Graphs and exhibit materials have been presented 
in the Month'l y Rev i ew . at conferences and other gatherings 
interested in immigration and naturalization. 



- 73 - 

Studies are based upon the statistics of the Service. In 
the past year, the interest of legislative committees and others 
in proposed legislation has dictated to some extent the types 
of studies undertaken. Class of admission of deportees; esti- 
mate of quota immigrants who departed as emigrants, the dis- 
criminating factors in immigration law as they affect women, 
Asiatic immigration, war brides admitted, revocation of natura- 
I ization, and loss of national ity, are some of the subjects 
covered. 

Monthly analyses of the status of visitors, transits, 
students, treaty traders, and agricultural laborers are sup- 
plied to the Central Office staff and District Directors. 

The view of the Service has been represented at conferences 
of State Registrars of Vital Statistics and at the Interdepart- 
mental Committee on Migration Statistics 



Theappendix to this report summarizes in statistical 
the principal activities of the Service, 



form 



TABU 1. IMMIGHATION TO THl UNITED STAITIS 
18£0 - 19U9 

/Trom 1820 to 186? figures represent alien pasaexigerB arrived; 186g to 1891 
inclusive and 1895 to 1897 inclusive immigrant aliene arrived; 1892 to I89U 
inclusive and from 1898 to the present time immigrant aliens admittedi/ 



Year 



No. of 
Persons 



Year 



Ho. of 

Persons 



rear 



No. of 
Persons 



Year 



No. of 
Persons 



I820-I9U9 

1820. . . 

1821-1830 
1821... 
1822... 
1823... 
182U. . . 
I825. . . 
1826. . . 
I827... 
1828... 
I829... 
I83O. . . 

1831-1840 
IS31... 
1832. . . 
1833... 
183U. . . 

1S35-.- 
1836. . . 
1837... 
1838... 

1839... 
I8U0... 

181+1-1850 
1841... 
1842... 
1843... 
1841+. . . 
1845... 
1846... 
1847... 
1848.... 
1849. . . 
I850... 



39.076.295 



8,3S5 



9.127 
6.911 
6,354 

7.912 
10.199 
10,837 
18.875 
27.3S2 
22,520 

23.322 
22,633 

60,482 
58,640 

65,365 
45,374 

76,242 
79.3^!0 
38,914 
68,069 
8U,066 

80,289 

104,565 
52,496 

78,615 

11^,371 

15^,416 
234,968 

226,527 
297,024 
369.980 



I851-1860 

1851... 
I852. . . 

1853... 
1854... 

1855... 
1856... 
1857... 
1858... 

1859. c. 

i860. . . 

I861-I870 
is6i... 
1862... 
1863... 
1864. . . 
1865... 
1866.. . 
I867... 
1868... 
I869... 
1870... 

I871-188O 
I871... 
I872... 
I873... 
187 4... 

1875. •• 
1876... 

1877... 
1878... 

1879... 
1880. . . 

1881-1890 
1881... 
1882... 



2jl528*214 
379.1+66 
371.603 
368,645 

^27,833 
200,877 

200,436 
251,306 
123.126 

121,282 

153,640 

2.31^.824 

91.91s 

91.985 

176.282 

193.^18 

248,120 
318. 568 
315.722 
138.840 
352. 7S8 
387.203 

2,812.191 
321.350 
404,806 
459. S03 
313.339 
227.1+98 
169,986 

1 1+1. 857 
138,469 
177.826 
457.257 



H 



69>3l 
788,992 



IS83... 
1884... 
1885... 

1886... 
1887... 
1888... 
1889... 
1890. . . 

I891-1900 
1891... 
^892. . . 
I893... 
1894. . . 
1S95... 
1896... 
1897... 
1898... 
1899... 
1900. - . 

1901-1910 
1901... 
1902... 

1903... 
1904. . . 
1905... 
1906. . . 
1907... 
19O8... 

1909... 
1910. . . 

1911-1920 
1911... 
1912... 
1913... 
1914... 

1915.-. 



603,322 
518.592 
395,346 
33^.203 
490,109 
546v8S9 
44U,427 
455.302 

1^687,564 

56O.319 
579.663 

439,730 
285,631 
258,536 
3^3.267 
230,832 
229.299 
311.715 
448.572 



8 



Jg^.386 
487.918 
648.743 
857.046 
812,870 
1.026,499 
1,100,735 

1.285,3^ 
782,870 

751.786 

1,041,570 

5, 735.811 

878,587 

838,172 

1.197,892 

1,218,480 

326,700 



1916... 

1917... 
1918... 

1919... 
1920. . . 

1921-1930 
1921... 
1922... 

1923... 
192U. .. 

1925... 
1926.., 

1927... 
1928... 

1929... 
1930... 

193I--I940 

1931... 
1932. . . 

1933... 
1934... 

1935... 
1936... 

1937... 
1938... 

1939... 
19W... 

1941-1949 
1941... 

19^4-3... 
1944... 

1945. . . 
1946... 
1947... 
1948... 
1949. 



298,826 

295,^3 
110,618 
1 41,132 
430,001 

S05,2i'S 
309.556 

522.919 
706,896 

294,31^^ 
304, 4«g 

335.175 
307.255 
279,678 
241,700 

97.139 
35.576 

23.06s 
29,470 
34,956 

36,355 
50,244 

67.895 
82tS^8 

70,756 

51.770 

28,781 
23,72'^ 
28,551 
39.113 

14?, 292 
170.570 



1/ Data are for fiscal years ended June 30, except 1820 to I83I inclusive and 
1844 to 1849 inclusive fiscal years ended Sept. 3O; 1833 to 1842 inclusive and 
I851 to I867 inclusive years ended Dec. 3I; 1832 covers 15 months ended Dec. 3I; 
1843 nine months ended Sept. 3O; I85O fifteen months ended Dec, 31, and 186S six 
months ended June 30» 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 2. ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AND DEPARTED, 
ALIENS EXCLUDED. BY MONTHS s 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 19^ and 191+9 

(Data excludes travelers bet%reeii continental United States and insular posses- 
sionst 'border crossers and agricultural and railway track laborers) 



T 



Period 



Fiscal year igUg 

July-Dec, 19H7 

July 

August 

Sept ember o • . e 
October. ..<... 

November 

December. .... 

Jan.-June, ISMS 
Januaiy. . . . .. 

February 

March 

Ap ril.. 

May 

Jane 



ALIENS ADMITTED 



Immi- 
grant 



170.570 



88.307 



15o6^ 
13.^^33 
13.853 

lU.SSO 

15,618 
1^.879 



Nonimmi- 
^rant 



U76,006 



2148,276 



Fiscal year 19U9 

July-Dec, 19^ 
July, 

August 

September. . . . 

October 

November 

December. .... 

Jan. -June, 19U9 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June. ........ 



lU,126 
lU,272 

IH.567 
1^,211 
12,7^2 
12.3^ 



188,317 



88.157 



12,370 
11,500 

12,325 
15.700 

15.321 
20,9Ul 

100,160 
12,612 

10,965 
16,662 
17,07U 
^2,038 
20,809 



^^7.315 
UU.176 
50,oUU 
39.38H 
33,023 
3^o33'+ 

22 7 J 30 



1+2, 616 
29,161 
35.586 
37,249 
38.509 
UU,609 



Total 



6U6,576 



ALIENS DEPARTED 



Smi- 
grant 



20„875 



liL^ 



62.959 
57.609 
63,897 
5U, 264 
U8,6Ui 
>+9.2i3 

309,993 



UU7,272 



2H3.157 



1*7,305 
U5.78O 

37,39H 
29,470 
35.715 

20U.115 
34,462 
26,382 
31.618 

34,673 
37.406 
39.574 



56,742 
43.433 
50,153 
51.460 

51,251 
56.954 



635,589 



3?i°3i^ 



ii^mh 



Nonemi'^ 
grant 



427.343 



228,161 



2, 

1< 
2, 
2, 
1< 

1, 



233 

997 
429 
047 
702 
566 



Total 



448,218 



240,135 



2XCBSS 



198.358 



8.901 



1.300 

1.193 
1.556 
1.750 
1.395 
1.707 

24,586 



59.675 
57.280 
59.818 

53.094 

44.791 
56.656 

304,21 

47T0P 
37,347 

48.280 

51.747 
59,444 

60.383 



iiim. 



3.020 
2.238 
2.061 

1,938 
1,318 
2.300 

lijTi 

T75S9 
1.461 
1.883 
2.152 

2.07s 
2.568 



35.552 
42.994 
41.056 
39,963 
35.258 
33.338 

199.182 



27.213 
27.196 
35.696 
37,165 
36.105 
35,807 

405.503 



96.448 



37,785 
44.991 
43,485 
42,010 
36,960 
34.904 

208.083 



a S. C 



ITIZENS 



Ar- 
rived 



542,932 



De- 
parted 



478,988 



217.560 



28,513 
28.389 

37.252 

38.915 
37,500 

37.514 
430. 089 



25,174 
12,618 
20,412 
12,254 
11,681 
14,309 

101,910 



285,303} 213.718 



40,536 
46,318 

39.717 
34,366 

25,291 

31,332 

131,941 



237691 
24,442 

33,859 
38,353 
31.719 
35,879 



212^411 



43.556 
48,556 
41,778 
36.304 
26.609 
33,632 

199.654 



25,260 

25,903 
35,742 

40,505 
33.797 
38.447 



28.229 
15.044 
12.901 
12,545 
13.751 
19,440 

205,500 



48,147 

56,855 
60,324 

46,492 
36,0714 
37.411 

257,629 



48.724 
40,059 
34,671 
32.748 

25.507 
32,009 

265.270 



38,3801 
46,695 

47,587 
41,823 
37,517 
45,627 

620,371 



100.879 



16.119 
8.724 
18,040 
16.790 
18.182 
23,024 

104,621 



"21.814 
11.444 
12.538 
11.242 
25,647 
21,936 



328,37^ 



52,964 
68,081 
64.865 
53.854 
44,540 
44,070 

291.997 



36.581 
42,690 
44,722 
40.574 
41,271 
59,432 

* a • * • o 

552,361 



229,911 



i 



39.3 
47.540 

55,907 
50,397 
47.743 
51,062 



58.525 
42,926 

32,503 
34,029 
25.648 
36,280 

322.450 



4070L 
48, 161 
54,681 

53.899 
53.966 

71,695 



^ Excess of admissions over departures. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalisation Service 



TABLE 3, ALIENS ADMITTED, BY CUSSES UNDER THE IMMIGRATION UWS, 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1946 to 1949 

Jpa-ta. excludes travelers between continental United States and in- 
sular possessions;, border erossers, and agricultural and railway 
track laborers admitted from Mexico „/ 



CLASS 




1948 



1949 



ALIENS ADMITTED o 

IMMICaiANTS l/o..o,.„. 

Quota Immigrants o „ » 



« o o o 



Nonquota Immigrants „ o o o . ^ . « » « , . . » <, » . . . . 

Husbands of ll<, S„ citizens, o ........ . 

Wives of Uo So citizens ....,.....,..,. 

Unmarried children of U„ S„ citizens o 

Natives of nonquota countries . , o . . » » . 
Their wiVes <> „ ,o„ o . <>,... o ...... o oo. , 

Their unmarried children „ „ . » o <. <, o . . o 

Ministers of religious denominations. 

Their unmarried children,, o , o » . „ o . . c 
Professors of colleges , universities. 

Their wives ................ — . . . . . 

Their unmarried children o ,........< 

Women who had been Uo So citizens „o.< 
Other nonquota immigrants »» ..,..» ... < 



NONIMMIGRANTS o 



Government officials j, their families, 

attendants, servants, and employees », 
Temporary visitors for business ....... . 

Temporary visitors for pleasure ........ 

In continuous transit thru the U„ S.... 

To carry on trade under treaty » ....... < 

Members of international organizations. 
Returning .residents „ oo ... ,,„,,..,.,,.. . 
Students o ,. ...... .......... o ........... < 

Other nonimmigrants ,.. .... ............ . 



17,031 

74,913 

59,913 

31,124 

378 

658 

13,306 

5,855 

291 



646,576 



170.570 



92,526 
78,044 



203,469 366.305 



16,517 

79,634 

134,924 

96^825 

651 

3,803 

22,818 

11,003 

130 



647 

30,086 

6,097 

37,506 

316 

146 

782 

367 

443 

505 

238 

254 

136 

521 

476.006 



16,822 

78,876 

206,107 

124y780 

711 

4,059 

32,464 

11,914 

273 



635.589 



188,317 



113,046 
75.271 



3,239 

27,967 

4,648 

35,969 

282 

143 

623 

244 

366 

424 
212 

233 
110 
811 

447,272 



13,722 

73,338 

225,745 

81,615 

632 

4,723 

36,984 

10,481 

32 



1/ An immigrant~is defined in statistics of the Service as an alien admitted for 
permanent residence, or as an addition to the populationo Therefore, students 
who are admitted for temporary periods and retxirning resident aliens who have 
once been counted as immigrants are included with nonimmigrants, although 
Section 4 defines such classes as immigrants. 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE ho IMMIGRATION BY COUNTEI, 
JOR DBCADESg 1820 to 191+9 }J 

/from 1820 to 1867 figures represent alien passengers arrived; 1858 to I89I incla- 
sive and I895 to 1897 inclusive immigrant aliens arrived". 1892 to 1894 inclusive 
and from I898 to the present time immigrant aliens admitted. Data for years prior 
to 1906 relate to country whence alien camej thereafter to country of last penna- 
nent residence. Because of changes in boundaries and changes in lists of coun-= 
tries, data for certain countries are not comparable throughout^ 



Countries 



111 countries. ......... 

(uPope. .... = .. 

Austria-Hungary 2/.. 
Belgium. ............ 

Denmark o • 

J ranee. ..o. ......•*. 

Sermany 2/ 

(England. . . . 

Sreat (Scotland, . . . o = . . , . 

Britain( Wales.... ......... 

(Not specified i/.. 
Greece. .. .... ..0 ...•»• ^ •« <• 

Ireland. ................... 

Italy.............. ........ 

HetherlandSo ............... 

Norway) uf 

Sweden) "^ 

Poland ^, ............... .0 

Portugal.. . ................ o 

Spain. ..................... 

Switzerland. ............... 

Turkey in Europe, .......... 

Union of Soviet 

Socialist Republics 6/0.., 
Other Europe, .............. 

&6ia, ....«............•'■'■..<>'' 

China. .. o ........... ...... « 

India. .....,........••••.<•« 

Japan j/. .................. 

Turkey in Asia 8/. ........ . 

Other Asia. ............."• 

Anerlca, ..................«.< 

Canada and Hewfoundland 2/. 
Mexi CO lOj ................. 

West Indies, ............... 

Central America. ........... 

South America, ............ 

Africa. ..................... 

Australia & New Zealand. .... 

Not specified. 



See footnotes at end of table. 



1820 



7.691 



1 

20 

968 

1.782 

268 

360 

3.61U 
30 
^9 



5 

35 

139 

31 

1 

lU 



1 
1 



, 387 



209 
1 

16U 

2 

11 



301 



1821- 
I83O 



lt+3.U39 



98.817 



27 
169 

6,761 
1U0O55 

2o9l2 

170 

7»9U2 

20 

50„72U 

U09 

1»078 

91 

16 
l»+5 

3o226 
20 

75 
3 

10 



ll»56U 



.277 

,817 

,83U 

105 

531 

"16 



33.032 



1831-181« 



599.12^ 



U95»688 



22 

I0O63 

^5 .575 

152 0^5^ 

7 0611 

2,667 

185 

65.3^7 

207.381 
2„253 
1„U12 

1,201 

369 

829 

2,125 

U„821 

7 
27] 



ki 



35 




i2^ 



181+1-1850 



1.713,251 



2x5211-501 



5.O7I+ 

539 

77.262 

U3U,626 

32,092 

3»712 

1,261 

229 979 
16 

780„719 
1,870 

8,251 

13 903 

105 

550 

2,209 

U,6W 

5' 

553 
7S 

8c 



3! 

3^ 



1 

62;U6* 



'72J 

.27 



Ul 
3 

I3r52i 

361 
3.57t 

5b 



I851-I860 



2,598,2 lU 



2,452,660 



^+0 738 

3.7^ 

76.358 

951.667 

2i+7a25 

38,331 

6,319 

132.199 

31 

91^.119 

9.231 

10,78 



20,933 
I.16I 
ip055 
9.29i 

25,011 
8j 

Jl^L 



T«r39 

1 



59.30J 

3.075 

10„66) 

l,22Lt 
21 D 



^}„lM \ 29.1<: 9 lli,2i 



1861-1870 



2.3l^t82U, 



2s^_..2.I0_ 
7,800 

6,73^ 

17,09^ 

35.986 

787.468 

222.277 

38.769 

4.313 

3^1.537 

72 

435.778 

11.725 

9,102 

(71 0631 

(37.667 

2.027 

2.658 

6.697 

23.286 

129 



2,51^: 



L2 
S 



64.630 

6^301 

69 

186 



T53,878 

2.191 
9,046 

95 

1.357 

312 
36 



United States Department of Justica 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE U. iMMiaRATlON BY COUNTST„ 
FOR DECADE Ss 1820 to I9U9 l/ (Continued) 



Countries 



1871-1880 



1881-1890 



I89I-I9OO 



1901-1910 



1911-1920 



All countrieSo .<,.<,...... 



• ft o o o 



2/. 



ed U 



Europe o . . . 
Austria) 
Hungary) 
Belgium. ........ . 

Bulgaria U/. . . . . . 

Czecho Slovakia. 12/ 
Denmark. ...,,..... 

linland 12/.... .. . 

France. 

Oermany 2/. 

(England. . 
Great (Scotland. 

Britain(Wale8. . ., 

(Not specifi 
Greece. ............. 

Ireland. 

Italy. 

Netherlands. ........ 

Norway U/. ......... , 

Sweden 4/. ......... . 

Poland ^„ ......... . 

Portugal. ........... 

Rumania 1^. ........ 

Spain. .............. 

Switzerland. ........ 

Turkey in Europe. . . , 
Union of Soviet 

Socialist Republics 
Yugoslavia 11 / . . . . . . 

Other Europe. ....... 

China. .............. 

India, o .. o ......... . 

Japan 2/0 ° -•«■■••'>,•» • 
Turkey in Asia 8/. . . 
Other Asia. ......... 



America. ....................... 

Canada and Newfoundland ^.o. 
Mexi CO 10/ ................... 

West Indies, ................. 

Central -^erica. ............. 

South America. ............... 

•■inCcto ooooOOoooeaOaOaaODOOouOO 

Australia and New Zealand...... 

Pacific Islands................ 

Hot specified 1_U/. ............. 



6/. 



2.812,191 



2.272.262 



72.969 

7o221 

31,771 

72.206 

718,182 

U37.706 

87.564 

6.631 

16.1U2 

210 

436,871 

55.759 

16.541 

95.323 

115.922 

12.970 

1 4.082 
11 

5.266 

28.293 

337 

39.284 

1.001 

123^823 



123,201 

163 

l49 

67 
243 

404.044 

383. 6U0 

5.162 

13.957 

157 

1,128 

° 358 

9.886 

1,028 

790 



5.246.613 



3.687.564 



8.795.386 



5.735.811 



4.737.046 



3.558.978 



8,136.016 



4^76^64 



353.719 
20.177 

88,132 

50,464 

1,452,970 

644,680 

149,869 

12,640 

168 

2,308 

655.482 

307.309 

53.701 

176.586 

391.776 

51.806 

16,978 

6.348 

4.419 

81.988 

1.562 

213,282 

682 

68,380 



61 



711 

269 

2.270 

2,220 

1 910 



426.9 61 



393.301 
1.913 

29.042 

404 

2.304 

857 
7.017 
5.557 

789 



592.707 

18. 167 
160 

5O0231 

30.770 
505.152 
216,726 

44,188 

10.557 
67 

15.979 
388,416 

651. 893 
26,758 
95.015 

226,266 
96,720 
27.508 

12,750 
8,731 

31.179 
3.626 

505.290 

122 
'71.236 



14. 799 

68 

25.942 

26.799 
3.628 



971 
33.066 

549 
1.075 

350 
2.740 

1.225 
14.063 



2,145,266 

41.635 
39.280 

65.285 

73.379 
341,498 
388,017 
120,)469 

17.464 

167.519 

339,065 

2,045.877 

48,262 

190,505 
249.534 

69.149 

53.008 

27.935 
34.922 

79.976 
1.597.306 
665 
243,567 



t^ 



20.605 
4.713 
129.797 

77.393 

11.059 

361,888 



179.226 
49.642 

107,548 

8.192 

17.280 

7.368 

11.975 

1.049 

33.523 



T453T^ir 
(442.693 
33.746 

22.533 

3.426 

4i,983 

756 

61,897 

143.945 

249,944 

78.357 
13,107 

184,201 

146,181 

.,109.524 

43. 718 

66,395 

95.074 

4,813 

89.732 

13.311 
68,611 

23,091 
54.677 

921,201 
1,888 
8,111 

192,559 



21,278 

2.082 

83.837 

79,389 

5.973 

eaSvOsoVO 

.143,671 

742,185 
219,004 
123, U24 

17.159 
41,899 

8,443° 
12,348 

1.079 

1.147 



See footnotes at end of table. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE k, IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, 
fOR DECADES s 1820 to 19^9 l/ (Oontinaed) 



Countries 



1921-1930 



I93I-I9UO 



I9U1-I9I+9 



Total 130 yrs. 
1820--19i^9 



All countries. 



9o O o o o 



12/. 



Europe 

Albania 12 
Austria 2. 
Hungary 2/ , . . , 
Belgium, o , . . . . 

Bulgaria ll/.. 
Czechoslovakia 
Denmark. » . . = . 
Estonia 12/. ... ... . 

Finland 12/..... ... , 

France. ............. 

G-ermany 2/. ......... 

(England. . . . 

Great (Scotland... 

Britain(Wale8. , .. . . 

(Not specifi 
Greece. ............. 

Ireland. ............ 

Italy. .............. 

Latvia 12/..... . .... 

Lithuania 12/. ...... 

Luxemburg 12/. ...... 

Netherlands. ........ 

Norway 4/. ......... . 

Poland _5/» .......... 

Portugal. ........... 

Rumania 1^ ......... 

Spain. .............. 

Sweden U/. ......... . 

Switzerland. ........ 

Turkey in Europe. . . . 

Union of Soviet 

Socialist Republics 
Yugoslavia ll/. ..... 

Other Europe.. ....... 

Asia. ................. 

China. .............. 

India. .............. 

Japan j/. .......... . 

Turkey in Asia 8/... 
Other Asia.. ........ 



edi/. 



o o • e • 



6/. 



U.107»209 



2.U77.853 



See footnotes at end of table. 



l„663 
32,868 
30 680 

15,8^ 

2,9^5 
102,19'+ 

32, ^30 
lo576 

16,691 

1+9,610 
Ul2,202 
157.^20 
159,781 

13,012 

51,08U 
220, 591 
1+55,315 



3. 

6, 



.399 
,015 

727 

26,9*^8 

68,531 

227. 73 U 

29,991+ 
67,646 
28,958 
97.249 
29,676 
14,659 

61,7^2 

1+9,061+ 
9 0603 

°97]4oo 



29,907 

1,886 

33.^2 

i9oi65 

12,980 



528,431 



785,852 



39.076,295 



348,289 



2,040 

3.563 
7,861 

4,817 

938 

i'+,393 

2.559 

506 

2,l46 

12,623 

114,058 

21,756 

6.887 

735 

9,119 
13.167 

68,028 
1.192 
2,201 

565 
7.150 
4,740 
17,026 
3.329 
3.871 
3.258 
3.960 
5,512 

737 

io356 
5.835 
2,361 



422,589 



928 
496 

1,948 
328 

7.644 



71 

8.393 

3,279 

10,760 

362 

7.^1 

4,299 

208 

1.997 

3i+,379 

97.986 

102,061 

13.832 

2,944 

7.79^ 

19,535 
45.207 

356 
678 
756 

11,780 

7.838 
.875 

.317 
921 

2.515 

8,482 

80693 
471 

5I+2 

1.387 

4,470 

28,001 

15.429 
1,640 

1,455 

205 

9.272 



6, 

6. 



33.QU7,224 
3777F 

4,155.^^7 

168,965 

66,218 

127,414 

339.324 

2,290 

21.590 

629,377 

6.119.937 

2,7^3.252 

747,606 

89.338 

793.7^1 

43s. 402 

4.611,643 

4.764,430 

4,947 

8,894 

2,048 

265.539 

812,693 

421,630 

262,361 

157,866 

172,638 

1,225,930 

304,373 

156.3W 

3.31+3,889 
53.17^ 
27.150 



3977^ 

11,513 

279.046 

205,568 

52,811 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE U, IMMIGRATION BY COUNTHY, FOE DECADES 8 
1820 to I9U9 1/ (Continued) 



Countries 


1921-1930 


1931-19^ 


19U1-19U9 


Total 130 yrs. 
1820 - 19 1+9 


Ame ri ca. .................... 


1.516.716 


160,037 


310.613 


'+. 712.079 


Canada and Newfoundland ^ 
Mexico JjO/. ............... 

West Indies. .............. 

Central America. .......... 

South Ameri ca. ............ 

Other America 15/° ........ 

Af ri ca. ..................... 

Australia and New Zealand... 
Pacific islands. ............ 

Not specified lU/... ........ 


92i+,5l5 
1+59.287 

7^.899 
15.769 
U2.215 

31 

6„286 

8.299 
1+27 
228 


108^527 

22,319 

15.502 

5.861 

7.8O3 

25 

2.231 
780 


11+9 .833 
53.81+5 

'+3.519 
19.^96 

I8.5U7 

25.373 

°°° "6.518' 
13.3^5 
^.651 
135 


3.155.561 

832,100 

1+90. I49O 

68,650 

139.81+9 
25,U29 

'32;578° 
67.877 
15.796 

25^,201 





1/ 



2/ 






6/ 

10/ 
11/ 



12/ 



j^ 



Data are for fiscal years ended June 30. except 1820 to I83I inclusive and 
181+1+ to 181+9 inclusive fiscal years ended Sept. 3O5 I833 to 181+2 inclusive 
and I85I to 1867 inclusive years ended Dec. 3I; 1832 covers I5 months ended 
Dec. 31; 181+3 nine months ended Sept. 3O5 I85O fifteen months ended Dec. 3I 
and 1868 six months ended June 30° 

Data for Austria-Hungary were not reported until I86I. Austria and Hungary 
have been recorded separately since 1905° In the years 1938 to 19^ inclu- 
sive Austria was included with Germany. 
United Kingdom not specified. 

from 1820 to I868 the figures for Norway and Sweden were combined. 
Poland was recorded as a separate country from 1820 to 1898 and since 192O. 
Between 1899 and 1919 Poland was included with Austria-Hungary, Germany, and 
Hussia. 

Since 1931 the Russian Empire has been broken down into European Russia and 
Siberia or Asiatic Russia. 

No record of im/nigration from Japan until lS6l. 
Kg record of immigration from ^^urkey in -^sia until 1869° 

Prior to 1920 Canada and Newfoundland were recorded as British North America. 
From 1820 to 1898 the figures include all British North American possessions. 
No record of immigration from Mexico from 1886 to 1893» 

Bulgaria, Serbia, and Montenegro were first reported in 1899° Bulgaria has 
been reported separately since 1920 and in 1920 also a separate enumeration 
was made for the Kingdom of Serbsj Croats, and Slovenes. Since 1922 the 
Serb, Croat, and Slovene Kingdom has been recorded as Yugoslavia. 
Countries added to the list since the beginning of World War I are thereto- 
fore included with the countries to which they belonged, ^igm-es are avail- 
able since 1920 for Czechoslovakia and Finland; since 192I+ for Albania, Es- 
tonia, Latvia, and Lithuania; and since 1925 for Luxemburg. 
No record of immigration from Rumania until 1880. 

The figure 33,523 in column headed I90I-I91O, includes 32,897 persons re- 
turning in 1906 to their homes in the United States. 
Included with countries not specified prior to 1925° 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 5, 



IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED, BY CLASSES UNDER THE IMMIGRATION LAWS 
AND BY PORT OR DISTRICT; YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 19^9 



Port or 

district 



Number 

ad- 
mitted 



All -Dorta or districts. 



tlaatico ... o .. o .... o . 

New York, No Y. . . . . . 

Boston, Maeflo ....... 

Philadelphia, Pa. . . . 

Baltimore, Md. ...... 

Portland, Me. ...... 

Newport News, Vao . . 
Norfolk, Va. ....... 

Charleston, S. C. . . 
Savannah, Gao ...... 

Jacksonvin e, Fla. . 
Key Wert, Fla. . . . . . 

Miami, fla. ........ 

West Palm Beach, Fl 
Port Everglades, fl 
Puerto RicOc . . . c . . . 
Virgin Islands. . . . . 

Other Atlantic. . . . . 

rulf of Mexico. ...... 

Tampa, Fla. ........ 

Pensacolao ^la. . . . • 

Mobile, '^la. ....... 

New Orleans, La. . . . 

Galveston, '^ex, . . . . 

Other Gulf. . . . . . . . . 



138,317 



c 

(0 

i- 

(0 en 

+-■ ■;= 

o S 

3 E 

o — 



113, 0U6 



136,636 99.631 



a. . . 



113»050 

iU,3lg 

263 

559 
16 

103 

187 

29 

20 

109 

5.711 

13 

1 

503 

1,69] 



(/5 W 

■O C 

C Q) 

(0 N 

jD - 

10 +-■ 

D — 

X O 



3.239 



(1) 

m N 
<p .- 

> ■*-> 



21,3^1 



2,531 



Pacific. ,..,.........•. 

San Francisco, Calif „ 
Portland, Ore.. ...... 

Seattle, Wash........ 

Los Angeles, Calif... 
Honolulus, To Ho , . . . • . 

Alaska. ................ 

Canadian Border. ....... 

Mexican Border. ........ 



381 
8 

303 
3.80 

19c 

1^ 



83,388 

13,111 

200 

27 U 
lU 

75 

118 

13 
10 

17 
2 

1.975 



108 

30 
292 

3.I6U 



,261 

109 

12 

18 

1+ 
7 



1 

108 



21 „ 517 



19.269 
U27 

32 

108 



UO 



"D — 
01 O 



C 0) 



U,6l43 



3.966 



,167 
21 

552 
2U9 

1.5'+2 

1^ 
30,238 

10,171 



67 
3 

82 

,88l4 

121 



2,019 



U5U 
18 

103 

1U5 

299 

3 

7,US6 

7U3 



28 



3 

18 

5 
1 

_28 

12 



31c 



2| 



1.27s 
^ 



5 
1 

10 



500 
52 



12: 

7^ 
2( 



3.66: 



3,6Uo 
160 

5 
11 

2 
1 



1 

2 

^3 



o 
cr 



(U o 

I- C' 

•- m 
u > 



IS) (0 

O) c 

> 



35.969 



6,669 



— c 



1- u 

0) 

■(-' 

10 (/) 

._ 0) 

c > 

2 i 



<u c 
o o 
0-5 



)|25 



1^-5 



2 

99 



2,397 

U2U 

11 

139 

1 

12 

19 

11 

U 

6 

101 

3.182 

9 

1 

320 

1 

31 



114 

9 



1,208 



1.233 



891 



800 

2 



S6j 



(0 c 

-C 0) 
0-- 

o 

is 



110 



571 



20 



19 
10 



U50 



2.l7t 

321 

31 
1.12c 



2,0Uc 

U98 



373 
1 

7 
12 

57 

1 

1^0 

U7 



288 

5 

68 

30U 

32 

11 

2ll| 



57 

100 

U9 

s 

8 

19.107 

8.763 



57 



13 
2 



526 
11 



S 



811 



70 665 



67 
2 



10 

10 

1 

16 



588 

51 

1 



258 

9 



}^ 



V 



26 
1 

lU 



27b 

15 



10 
3 



90 



-^ 



19 
1 



62 



25 



171 
21 



1 
5 



27 



1 
1 

b 

lli 
22 



United States Department of Justice 
ImiTiigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE -6o IffllGRAWr ALIENS ADMITTED, BY CLASSES WIDER THE IMMIGRATION LAWS 
AND COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH; YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1949 













c 




4- <0 




., 1 














£ 




O-M 


k. 


















TS 


1 <0 


o 


- c 


<u c 


















C 0) 


C 3 


4) (U 


£ "» 


















o - 


a> cr 


.C '-' 


+^ I. 


■D <0 


(0 












■5 « 


° i 


•^g 


■fj -0 


x> 


2 g 


(0 


Covintry -or 
region of 


Number 
ad- 


CO 

c 
"J 


o 
m io 


° S 


c 
-a 0) 
«> N 


Natives of 
quota coun 


■— c 
— <n 


(0 jC 




(0 
<0 


t! 


10 




birth 


mitted 


4S ? 

O E 

3 e 
o — 




to N 

» o 


« o 


Wives 
nativ 
count 


(0 « 

i 1 

X 5 


a> <o 
> 

IL. — 
0- » 


ll 


:& 




All countries c . . ^ » 

Europe .o ....... o „ oo o o , . 

Austria » .«....•..»., » 


188,317 


113.046 


3.239 


27,967 


4,648 


35,96? 


425 


l-,233 


869 LIO 


811 


138.301 


107.722 


2,928 


21,386 


:3,835 




?74 


988 


653 


7 


408 


2,363 


1,325 


18 


883 


87 


- 


1 


11 


29 


- 


9 


Belgium „ „„„.„., o co. =, 


1,592 


1.258 


11 


281 


10 


_ 


3 


24 


5 


— 


- 


Bulgaria o , » , . , . » . . . » » 


84 


■ 65 


3 


14 


« 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


— 


Czechoslovakiao o . <. . . » 


4,393 


3,286 


109 


687 


191 


- 


5 


79 


31 


- 


5 


Denmark . „ » . » o o <. « . » » . o 


1,305 


1,105 


27 


121 


7 


- 


6 


3 


36 


— 


- 


Estonia oo»<.oooo<.o<. = oo 


1,840 


1,716 


8 


81 


2 


- 


=» 


16 


11 


- 


6 


Finland o <>. o o <>«•>». . = o o 


704 


495 


36 


87 


61 


- 


2 


10 


11 


- 


2 


France „.„,...,. o ..<> o o 


3,972 


2,798 


29 


962 


82 


- 


14 


27 


57 


- 


3 


Germany o o » , , o , . o » . . . o 


23,844 


12,632 


199 


10,130 


771 


«, 


11 


30 


51 


- 


20 


(England o » » 


13,589 


12,560 


44 


734 


43 


- 


125 


49 


30 


1 


3 


Great (Scotland. „,. 


4,805 


4,656 


8 


88 


4 


- 


35 


9 


5 


— 


— 


Britain CWales„..„.o 


656 


600 


2 


44 


3 


- 


3 


3 


1 


- 


- 


Greece „ , » . » o « . . . . . o » 


1,759 


426 


277 


826 


202 


- 


- 


20 


8 


- 


- 


Hungary „ , , » . . o o . o o » » » 


1,998 


1,464 


47 


258 


41 


- 


5 


111 


71 


- 


1 




8,585 


8,490 


11 


56 


7 


- 


6 


10 


2 


— 


3 


X UaXy oooooooooooooooo 


11,157 


5,182 


1,336 


3,081 


1,303 


- 


71 


75 


34 


4 


71 


Latvia „ o <..,.....» »oo o 


3,853 


^3,534 


6 


133 


13 


- 


1 


18 


12 


- 


136 


Lithuania o o . . . . . . » .o 


6,691 


6,451 


27 


92 


35 


- 


- 


22 


38 


- 


26 


Netherlands. » . . . , . » o » 


3,200 


2,897 


67 


166 


26 


- 


7 


21 


12 


1 


3 


Northern Ireland « , o . c 


2,425 


^,362 


4 


48 


3 


- 


4 


3 


1 


— 


— 


Norway » « .. . . . „ , « » » . o 


2,563 


2,283 


71 


124 


23 


- 


5 


22 


35 


— 


— 


Poland „ o „ « o o o o o p o 


23,744 


21,487 


153 


1,294 


451 


- 


16 


229 


70 


— 


44 


Portugal O O <, O O O O O O O O „ 


1.235 


449 


209 


229 


330 


- 


9 


6 


1 


_ 


2 


Rumania o » » = « » » o o » . . . „ 


1,043 


7U 


50 


140 


12 


- 


3 


93 


27 


— 


4 


Spain O O O , O O . O O . O O o 


503 


186 


62 


131 


60 


- 


9 


31 


24 


- 


=- 


Sweden o » » . » o . » o .^o . » . „ 


2,433 


2,363 


13 


28 


1 


- 


4 


4 


18 


— 


2 


Switzerland » « » . « o o. 


1,585 


1,501 


8 


62 


3 


- 


4 


1 


4 


— 


2 


UoO^OoRooaoffOodroooooo 


3,907 


3,539 


27 


278 


2 


- 


17 


21 


16 


<m 


7 


Yugoslavia , o o » o , = « » » o 


1,384 


1,036 


32 


161 


48 


- 


5 


36 


7 


1 


58 


Other Exirope » o o , , o . o » 


1,089 


862 


34 


167 


U 


*■ 


3 


4 


4 


^ 


1 


<>S3-A nnnsnnafiaODaaaitaeAn 


5o287 


1 = 563 


109 


3,017 


336 


_ 


18 


9^ 


145 


2 


3 


vllina oooooooooooooooo 


2,823 


317 


7 


2,143 


240 


- 


2 


13 


98 


2 


1 


XnClXa oooooooooooooooo 


166 


103 


8 


38 


3 


- 


4 


- 


10 


— 


— 


Japan . . . <, . « « o « . . = <> o » 


508 


45 


1 


445 


4 


- 


- 


3 


8 


— 


2 


Palestine o o o . , . „ o » . o o 


234 


117 


7 


34 


38 


- 


3 


27 


8 


— 


— 


Other Asia „ » » o o » « » . » , 


1,556 


981 


86 


357 


51 


— 


9 


51 


21 


^ 


^ 


Canada » , o . » « . „ . « o , . . » . » 


20,798 


1 


8 


1,203 


64 


19,314 


- 


81 


16 


2 


109 


Newfoundland » » o » » » » » o » „ 


717 


_ 


1 


117 


11 


587 


- 


- 


1 


- 


— 


Mexico oo o , o . . . » , „ 


7,977 


1 


3 


396 


41 


7,507 


- 


4 


6 


1 


18 


West Indies „ o » , o o <> o » <> » „ 


6,518 


2^441 


99 


273 


72 


3,576 


16 


32 


3 


- 


6 


Central America » » o » o » o o 


2,493 


58 


5 


107 


26 


2,289 


1 


- 


4 


- 


3 


South America, , , » . o , . » . 


2,639 


170 


9 


110 


10 


2,327 


- 


7 


3 


1 


2 


Africao.oo....„=o.=o.,. 


737 


534 


23 


136 


15 


- 


8 


8 


12 


— 


1 


Australia & New Zealand 


602 


214 


21 


286 


42 


_ 


4 


12 


22 


- 


1 


Philippines o . » o , o o o . o o o 


1,068 


53 


15 


807 


187 


. 


1 


- 


- 


- 


5 


Other ®ountries o „ « , » « o . 


1,180 


289 


18 


129 


9 


' 369 


3 


71 4 


97 


255 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 6A. immigrant ALIENS ADMITTED, BY CLASSES UNDER THE IMMIGRATION LAWS 
AND COUNTRy OF LAST PERMANENT RESIDENCE; 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 19^9 



Country of 
last residence 



Jumber 
ad- 
nitted 



All countries... 



irope. ..•.».-..• 

Austria. 

Belgium, ...... 

Bulgaria. ..... 

Czechoslovakia 
Deninarlc. ...... 

Sstonia. ...... 

Finland. ...... 

France. ....... 

Oermany 



Creat 



(England. 
(Scotland 



Britain (wales 
Greece. .......... 

Hungary. ......... 

Ireland. ......... 

Italy. ........... 

Latvia. .......... 

Lithuania. ....... 

Netherlands. ..... 

Northern Ireland. 
Norway, ............... 

Poland, ............... 

Portugal. ............. 

Rumania. .............. 

Spain. ................ 

Sweden, ............... 

Switzerland. .......... 

UoS.^oA.«...o.......OO 

Yugoslavia. ........... 

Other Europe. ......... 

Sla. eoo...oo.....oa..oo 

China. ................ 

India, ,..,,......,.... 

Japan. ................ 

Palestine. ............ 

Other Asia, ........... 

laaada. ................. 

'ewfoundland. ........... 

Sexlco.. ................ 

'est Indies. ............ 

Jentral America. ........ 

South Arae ri ca. .......... 

Africa......... ......... 

^atralia & New Zealand. 
Philippines. ............ 

Hher countries. ........ 



128.317 



12' 



k 



(0 en 

+j ._ 

O E 

3 E 
O — 



113.0^6 



hl^ 



2o 
1. 



•7 
057 

22 
018 

239 

Ik 
567 

U„8l6 
55.28U 

16,631+ 

U0O75 

kko 

l»73^ 
7US 

6.552 

11 0695 

22 

67 
330 
126 

476 

673 

282 

155 
U09 
847 

967 
21+ 

198 

67H 



3» 

2„ 

2, 

lo 

1. 



2. 

1. 



415 

175 

529 

323 

1.996 

2U„5l6 
8„083 

733 



6, 
2, 

3. 



U31 
107 
995 
661 

1.157 
3o96U 



oo.iiu 



3.213 

1.748 
18 

1.325 
1.072 

7 
38U 

3.661 

Ul.590 

15.777 

U„oo6 

1+15 

kS3 

U4i 

6„496 

5.478 

6 

20 

3.123 

2.078 

2.258 

56s 

452 

94 

171 

2.704 

1.866 

17 

113 

524 

2.732 



2.366 



r52F 

138 

49 
206 

815 

3.212 

10 

305 

2.637 
162 

967 
778 
332 
120 
1.677 



T3 C 



(0 N 

JD — 



21 

10 

1 

81 

16 
31 

46 

237 

4g 
2 

1 

213 

24 

6 

IL.270 

8 

38 
1 

29 
26 

196 

9 
24 
11 

6 

6 

5 

_I1 



17 
2 

5 

59 

116 

22 

107 
12 

27 

14 

10 

14 

468 



(U 
N 



27^^67 



20J87 



978 
249 

3 

324 

93 
4 

75 

813 

12.165 

509 

36 

21 

801 

130 

28 

3.042 

9 
14 

107 

36 

105 

625 

235 
19 
91 
U3 
57 
5 
59 

111 

_2,ig.8. 



1.517 

18 

463 

45 

955 

1.521 

116 

423 
320 
l46 
102 
l40 
254 

830 

330 



I 

■O if) 

— c 

.- (D 

jr N 

U ■- 

+-> 

XJ — 

Q> O 

l5 ° 

B c 



4„648 



35,363 



3»805 



100 

11 

155 
9 
1 

53 

80 

898 

40 

5 

202 
40 

9 

,298 

1 

12 

24 

2 

22 

410 

327 

7 
58 

7 
4 
1 

17 
12 

329 



219 
2 

7 
24 

77 
76 
11 
40 
72 
29 
10 

16 
29 

184 
47 



o.- 



<4- C 

° 8 

V) o 

> <a 

— -H 

+^ o 

(0 =J 

z o- 



JS^ 



3 

7 

2 

9 
4 

21 

20 

76 

12 

1 

2 

1 

2 

114 

2 
8 

5 
8 

16 

15 
4 

9 

3 
11 

_2i. 



ecu) 
0) o 0) 

l_ c — 
-o 1- 

— M-' 

— to C 
x: <D 3 

u > o 
•- o 

in (0 <o 

CD C+J 

> o 
S o o- 



425 



117 



!9 



7 
3 

2 

5 
6 

042 

501 

7.253 

3.505 

2„o64 

1.9^ 
i4 

5 

1 

lp258 



3 

1 
5 
3 
15 
3 



63 

5 
2 

9 

5 
1 
1 



— c 
0) 0) 



JZ 

o 



._ 0) 
c > 



i»2 33 



J2i 



2 

4 

237 

1 

5 
17 

8 
16 



17 



21 
27 

97 
1 
2 

7 
84 

67 
81 

7 

19 
79 

5 
124 

4 

6 
l4 

4 
21 

35 
4 

21 
14 
40 

9 
1 

2 
122 



— c 

(1> 0) 



W) — 

1- JZ 

o o 

10 

in .. 

0) in 

Q- 5 



86i 



^51 



2 

27 

59 

134 

3 

44 

2 

22 

13 
16 

3 

_I1 



30 

5 

29 
35 



101 

59 

7U 

4 

2 

7 
30 

3 
38 

2 

5 
8 

31 

9 

2 

5 

21 
31 

6 



9 

Hi. 



o 

c 

e 



in 

c 

0) 

N 



in 
<u 
in 
in 
Id 



0) 

s 



ISO 



811 



91 
10 

5 

9 

19 
49 

1 
14 

8 

3 

11 
18 

13 
2 

66 



M. 



611 



1 

1 

10 

12 



1 
1 

30 



1 

2 
2 



5 
2 

1 

23 

1 
1 
1 
2 
1 



80 

2 
1 

7 

4 
235 

2 



2 
2 
238 



39 

9 
4 

7 



1 

106 

17 
22 
4 
2 
1 
1 
3 
Ji 



United States Department of Justice 



TABLE 6B. DISPLACED PERSONS AOMITTED TO THE UNITED STATES 
UNDER THE DISPLACED PERSONS ACT OF 1948, BY CLASSES 
AND COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTHs 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1949 



Country or 
region of 
birth 



All countries 



o B c o o o I 



I o -o o o a o o 



L o o o o I 



Eurojie <, « . . o « . » . . 
Austria , . , . . . . . 

Bulgaria o ,.,.■> . 
C z ^ c ho s lo vakia » 
Darlzig o ....... , 

Derimark ,00.0.., 
Estonia o . . 

France « o,,.. ... ....... . 

Crermany ..,<,.......,o.. 

Grdat (.England „ . . . , 
Britain (Scotland 
Greece 
Hungary 
Italy 
Latvia 
Lithuania,....^ .«,. 

Luxemburg o. .« . .^♦.. 
Netherlands ».,.... 

Northern Ir eland c. 
Norway ,..,..... ,0 « 

Poland 

Poi*tugal 

Ruittania 

Sjufl Marino. . . » 

Tui'key (European) 

U.S.SoR. (European) o . . 

Yugoslavia „ .o., ...... . 



' Q o o «■ < 



O • o o » < 



ko o Q a-ao-ooo-o a a -a o • « j 






LoQoocov^-oooa' 



.oooo*oo« 






o o e o 






Asia, 
China ..<,.,<,,........, 

Palestine o .<.., ...... . 

Syria o .. o o o . o ....... o 

Turkey (Asiatic) „„.. . 
U,3,S,R. (Asiatic)... 

Africa , ............... . 

Other countries „ 



Number 

ad- 
mitted 



40.048 



^9,964 



554 

5 

1,334 

15 

4 

1,662 

7 

17 

4,626 

6 

1 

20 

776 

7 

3,566 

6,300 

3 

3 

2 

1 

17,794 

1 

442 

1 

10 

2,235 
572 

58 



1/ Includes wives and childr 



10 
7 

1 
1 

19 
20 



2k. 



Quota displaced persons 



Total 



39,734 



39.650 



545 

5 

1>331 

15 

4 

1,656 

7 

17 

4,606 

6 

1 

20 

775 

7 

3,430 

6,274 



2 

1 

17,750 

1 

438 

1 

10 

2,228 

514 



I 

-p © 



-^ 



u 



?-3 

CO<W .H CO 

^ © J< ^ 



10.088 



10,069 



^ 



10 
7 

1 

1 

19 

20 



24 



158 

2 

100 

1 

524 
1 
2 
1,092 
2 
1 
1 
70 

1,650 

1,586 

2 

1 



4,266 
37 

5 
454 
114 

13 



tj ti CJ r/i 

3 ffivH,-) 
O 'H rJi-I 
O ©©.HI 

© f-(iO*U 

CO P-4am 



.23...542 



23,493 



1 
1 



7 
4 



231 

3 

838 

9 

2 

1,084 

6 

13 

2,795 

2 

18 

551 

7 

1,550 
3,757 

1 
2 

10,523 

1 

309 



1,400 
337 



3L. 



i-Tl 
© ' 

O CQ 
A © 

© !> 

J., cr^, 

1-; © cv-i 



4,016 



4.009 



5 
6 

1 

12 
10 

1 



114 

246 

5 

1 
27 

2 

470 

1 



104 

142 

677 

1 



1,924 

73 

1 

191 
29 



± 



2 

1 



o 

o 

a 

2 

© 

© 

&. 

o 

!21 



2.088 



2,079 



42 
97 

1 
21 



249 

1 

1 
50 

88 
254 



1,037 
19 

1 

183 

34 



8 



1 
4 



$ 



© 

Ceo 
O aid 

d rapu 
StJO 



314 



314 



9 

3 



20 



136 
26 



44 
4 



7 
58 



en. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 7. ABfNUAL (QUOTAS AND qUOTA IMMIGBANTS ADMITTED? 
YEAIIS ENDED JUNE 30, I9U3 to 19^9 
^Persona born in celoaies, dependencies, or pretectsrates, or portions thereof within the 
barred aone, &f Burepean couatries, who are admiseible under the immigration lawB of the 
United States as quota immigrants are charged to the quota of the country to which such 
colony or dependency helongs or hy which it ig administered as a protectorate. Aliens who 
obtain visas during the latter part of a fiscal year may be admitted in the following year 
since visas are valid for a period of four monthsa Nationality for quota purposes does not 
always coincide with actual nationality (Section 12 of the Immit^ ration Act of 192U)7 



Quota nationality 



Jooooecoo' 



o o o u 



9 e 

«ooooo«O0 CO 
o 9 O 
oooooooooo 
oeooooQooo 



o o a o 



• 00 



All countries. 

AUa OT?^ ooflftoo 0oeoe«oooooooocoo 

Northern and Western Biirope 

Belgium 

Denmark:. .<><>. 

Fraace. ...... 

Germany 2/. .......... 

Great Britain and 
Northern Ireland. . , 

Iceland. ...... 

Ireland. ..... 

Luxemburg. ..... 

Netherlands. . . . 

Norway. .... 

Sweden. .... 

Switzerland 
Southern and Eastern Europe 

Austria 2/.. .. 

Bulgaria. ..... 

CzechosloT&kia 

Estonia, o . . . . . 

Finland. ...... 

Greece. ....... 

Hungary. ...... 

Italy. ........ 

^<aX' VXS.0 o e o o o o o 

Lithuania. .... 

Poland. ....... 

Portugal. .,,.., 
fiumania. ...... 

Spain. ........ 

Turkey. ....... 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia. ......... 

Other Southern and 
Eastern Europe.... 



o e e o o o o 

o o o o o o o 

o e o o e o o 

9 

o o o o o c o 



ooooooooeooi 




125,8 

1,30 

1,181 

3o086 

25.957 

65,721 
100 

17,853 

100 

3ol53 
2.377 
3,31^ 
l»707 

2k, ens 
TTSJ 

100 

2,874 
116 
569 
307 

869 

5,802 
236 

386 

6,52U 

kko 

377 
252 
226 

2.712 
sh^ 

600 



10 
196 

23 
222 

102 
3k 

121 

U„io6 




8 

362 

18 

99 
301 

163 
67 
62 

117 

.533 
263 

220 

255 

107 

U26 

90 

15 



,303 

26 

123 

2 

259 

176 
80 

46 

4o 190 



323 
27 

63 

287 
212 

160 
62 

93 
,338 

380 

230 
2U1 
178 
389 
167 

20 

2l4 

kl 

150 



(^ueta immi 




5,106 

43 

232 

11 

152 

100 

57 
52 



9 

276 

16 

53 
218 

117 
268 

k3 
78 

ia22 
1+21 
215 

182 
156 
372 
177 

Ik 

388 

71 
122 



grants admitted 



69,128 



8,701 

69 
5U6 

Ik 
I+3U 
300 
288 



833 

28 

964 

113 
172 
291 
488 
,262 
180 

215 

.144 
420 

349 
238 

18S 

938 
547 

53 

710 
269 
HI 



1947 



.70,701 



1,315 
1,097 

3,l4o 
13.662 

19,218 

95 
2,011 

71 



,451 
,928 

,187 
872 
22 „ 081 



2, 
1, 
1, 



T7455 
88 

2,663 
101 
545 
133 
949 

5,042 
261 
427 

6.516 

327 

377 

63 

120 

1.982 
810 

222 

999 
263 



19^" 



90^632 



1,308 

1.172 

3,059 
17,229 

27.774 

56 

7.444 
82 

3.515 
2,46o 

1,965 
1.331 



i7^ 

81 

2,831 

127 

516 
213 
882 

5,631 
300 
458 

6.143 
445 
4oo 
189 
188 

2,061 
794 

286 

1,248 
328 
318 



1949 



111 . 443 



.^2x5Ii 



1,270 

1,109 

2.997 

12,819 

23.543 
68 

8.505 
94 
2,991 
2,303 
2,376 
1.503 
51,865 



1,327 

65 

3,255 

1.716 

497 

426 

1.445 

5.207 

3.534 

6.452 

21,462 

462 

699 

194 

177 

3.710 

976 

261 

1,003 
32S 

J12 



was 1537774. The Act of Dec. 17, 191^ repealing Chinese 



Exclusion Laws authorized a quota for Chinese. This quota of IO5 was established 
Eeb. 8, 1944, bringing the quota maximum to 153.879. On July 4« 1946 the quota for 
the Philippine Islands was increased from 50 to 100, thereby raising the quota to 
153.929. 
2/ In the fiscal years 1943 to 1945 the Austrian quota is included with the quota for 
Germany. 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



1 



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sOOOrHOrHrHOr^ 
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a\ 

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KN 



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K\ OJ 



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c^ 



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CM KN rH 
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C^N 



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X'eUOTSSQJOJj 



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rrN 
rH 



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TABLE 9» ALIEN SPOUSES AND ALIEN KIND?t CIIILDh^EN OF CITIZEN 
MEMBERS OF THE UNITEl STATES ARMS) FTiRCES ADMITTED UNDER THE 
ACT OF DECEMBER 28, 1945, 1/ BY COUKIRI OR REGIDN OF BIRTH: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30^ 1%<) 



County or region 
of birth 
All count ries oo. eo oo o ooo 

ljUrOP6 oooooooooooooooooooooooo 
AUStrXSl oooooooooaoooooooooo 

oG-LglUnio oo»oooooooooo*ooooo 
OUXgSLnSl ooooooooonooooooeoo 

Czechoslovakia, o oaaoa*<>oooao 

U @mUa riC oooeeeoooooo«ooo»eoe 
I!iS XfO nicL oeooooooooooeooooooo 

Finland 
France 
Germany o 

(England 
Great (Scotland 

Britain (Wales 
Greece 
Hungary, 
Ireland. 

Italy o 

I^tvia. 

Lithuania, 

Netherlands 

Northern Ireland » 

Norway. 

Poland 

Portugal 

iXwu TW nielo oeeoooooo9««oo*oooo 
O^^O' m oooooooeooooooeoooooo* 
O vV @Q@n oi>oooooeoooeooa««eeeo 
O VV 1 u Zi 6 I^XcL nCl coo«eoooeooDOooo 
U«0»OoLteoooooo ooeeocooooooo 
i" &0 S-l-O. /XcL aoooooooooo*o*eoo 

Other Europeoo ooo*(» • wo* oooo 



looe«oooooao ooooooooo 
ooooooooo •oeooooooooo 
ooooooeoooooeoooooe 
ooooooeotto 
ooooooooo 
oooooooooe«o 
0OOOO <i9eoooooo«ooa«oo 
0000000900000000000 
ooeoooooooooooooeoo 
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 
oooooooooeoooo 
ooeoooooooooooooO 
oooeoooooooeoooo 
ooooeooooo 

OOOGOOOOOOOOOOOO0OOO 
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

>o oooooooooooooooeoo 



I o o o o o < 



Total 



22.21A 



I6t^79 



Asia. 



ooooooooooooooooooooooooo 
V^Il^Jlci oooooooooooooooeoooooo 

JJlUXO' ooooooooooooeooooeoooo 
va^xin ooooooeoeooooooooooeoo 

Palestine,, 
Other Asia 



looooooooooeooooeo 
ooooeoeoooeoooooo 



861 

239 
10 

422 

77 

76 

31 

843 
9,901 

667 

65 

39 

274 

171 

34 

1,137 
132 

57 

98 

40 

34 

623 

58 

94 

28 

13 

43 

213 

104 

95 

2.254 

1,561 

29 
447 

15 
202 



Husbands 



vAnaQa ttottoo.eeooooo.o.oooeoooA -^,^'+f 

Newfoundland. ............c.... 128 

■lOJtlCO oooooooi»o.eo.oe«o..oeooo ■) * O i 

ncSu Indies . «oo.s.«.o«a*so«o«. 240 ^ 

Central America,.,.. .• ......<.« 129 

South America., oo.o,,... „..„,« 108 1 

"•^■^iCa oooooooooooooooooooooooo oX X 

Australia & New Zealand. ...... 242 1 

"nU-lp pines oeoe,,,a.o.oeo...so 775 

other countries.,., o. a........ 103 

1/ The Act of December 28, 1945, expired on Deceraber 28, 1948 



Public Law 51 of 

April 21, 1949, authorized the admission of certain alien fiances and fiancees 
and adjustment of their records to show admission for permanent residence, 
2/ In addition, 4729 United St.ates citizen children of members of the United States 
armed forces were admitted. 

United States Department of Justice 
jjansigration and Naturalization Service 






4 

1 

1 

3 
3 
3 



9 
3 
3 

6 
1 



5 

1 
1 

1 

1 



1 

1 

1 
4 



Wives 



"20,670 



15 « 513 



789 

234 
10 

395 
75 
73 
26 

795 
9,316 

645 

63 

39 

261 

165 
30 

1,053 

120 

55 

90 

39 

32 

589 

54 

88 

28 

12 

41 

211 

95 
90 

2.009 



.,340 

26 

443 



86 



18 



1,186 
117 
391 
218 
103 
100 
78 
208 
650 

2L 



Children 2/ 



1|W 



.ffi. 



67 
5 

23 

1 

2 

5 

45 
582 

19 
2 

4 
3 

1 

78 

U 

2 

6 
1 
2 
29 
3 
5 



1 
2 
9 
3 

238 



220 
2 
4 

12 

58 

36 
20 
26 

7 
2 

33 

125 
6 



TABLZ 9A. ALIEN FIANCKES OR FIANC£S OF MSHSEHS OF THli AfiMXD 
FORCES OF THE UNITED STATES ADMITTED UNDER THE ACT OF JUNE 29, I9U6, 
BY COUNTRY OH REGION OF BIRTHS YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 19^7 to 19^9 



Country or region 
of birth 



19^9 



191+7 



ISHS 



I9U9 



All countries, . . , . , . . . . . . . . . . . 

Europe. 

AU8 wrXfi* .....a. .9.. ... ...... ...» 

Belgium. 

Bulgaria^ ....................... 

Czecho Slovakia. ................. 

DeniDarka 

Afltonia* ........................ 

Finland. 

France 

Germany. 

(Bngland. 

^'fea* (Scotland 

Britain (Wales.... 

Greece. ......................... 

C UUgS'I'y s 000ou0»0ee9»«0a»»« *(i6O0o 

Ireland. ........................ 

Latvia. ......................... 

Li thuania. 

Netherlands. .................... 

Northern Ireland. ............... 

Norway. ......................... 

Poland. ......................... 

Portugal. . o .................... . 

Rumania. ....................... 

Sweden. ......................... 

Switzerland. .................... 

Yugo slavia. ..................... 

Other Europe. ................... 

China. .......................... 

India. .......................... 

Japan. .......................... 

jr ajL es V j^ne. ...........o.......... 

Other Asia. ..................... 

Canada. ........................... 

Newfoundland. ..................... 

West Indies. 

Central Ameri ca. .................. 

South America. .................... 

Af ri ca. .......................... . 

Australia & New Zealand. .......... 

Philippines. ...................... 

Other countries. .................. 



itliL 



7>260 



729 

73 

9 

252 
26 

37 

16 

,090 

,862 

90 

7 

8 
824 
190 

9 
,326 

27 
21 

96 

6 

12 

259 

33 
U5 
19 
2 
12 
57 
^1 
76 

J5i. 



91 
51 

2 

5 
110 

12 
2 
2 

Ik 
1 

12 

82 

571 

_51. 



3»3U9 



2>693 
559 

27 
U 

112 

12 

8 

ISk 

U8 

13 
2 

318 

97 

6 

U95 

8 

46 

1 

115 

15 

15 

Ik 

k 

22 
22 
28 

110 



22 

33 
1 

2 
52 

2 
2 
1 
2 

5 

53 

461 

lU 

6 



2>o67 



l»896 



159 
9 

4 

85 
10 

17 

2 
198 

335 

6 

1 

306 

63 

1 

458 

15 

8 

29 

1 

3k 
k 

19 
3 
1 
1 

21 
21 

25 

61 



25 
10 



26 



3 

7 

39 

13 

40 



2>g?6 



2.67^ 



101 

37 
1 

55 

12 

8 

6 

108 

l.J+79 

71 

5 

7 

200 

30 

2 

373 

8 

5 

21 

6 
10 
50 
14 
11 
2 
1 

7 
14 

4 
23 

88 

— IPT 

8 

1 

3 

32 



1 

7 
1 

4 
22 
71 
17 

7 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



O 
LU 
Q. 

cr 

o 

Li) 
O 
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(X 

>- 

CD 



O 

LU 



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in 

LU 



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UBiABUipireos 



UBissny 



9S9n6n^od 



qs ! 1 od 



qjSsn 



U3 









Lreouaiw 



UB! ii3:H 



qsu 



MS3JD 



UBUiJ89 



L|DuaJd 



ouidi I !d 



qq(2— ■^OK^CDLTi — ^nOcq^iii^c^io^iN- 
CN CN CN — — ' •^'' ^'" ro t<^ r'S' CN — 



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tc\ — kiit5t<Sr~-Ln'^^cs; 



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l^S^o>^je^g^SUjc^^^-^ I- 



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CT, CN^rrC^l§girocs^Kf<^^f§S9 



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?^ 8 CO ?i 

K\ o-< — 



,, ,-t,rM K^(T-rr\CN'^CNooinmoc7>criCO^C: 

^ ^ § ?^ 88 § § ^ S I © & ^^ ^. 5. 5i = 8 § °^ 

^" cyT r-' — ■*" oo" cn ^ co vg cn oT r- ^ k> cn cn — 



0\ ro 



S-^ 



00 



Q in a^ CN 



o> 



m 

3 

(0 -H 

0) 

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(0 (0 

■H 

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— ^ .......iiiiiii:>v 



3 
1)5 



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Ixll a; 1^2 ^2RS«^^i^9§SiSS©Rt^S5-c-j^$5Q5 



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§ 



TABLE 10A„ ILQjIIGRAMT ALIM\3 ADMITTED AND ailGRAKT ALimS DEFiUlTED, BY SeX, AGK, 
ILLITERACY. AfJD MAJOR OCCUPATION GRO UP; YiLARS H;OED JUl.h . 30. 1941 TO 1949 



Sex, age, illiterates, cind occupation 



jnmigrant aliens admitted, 



Sex: 

Male o o , o , 

Female , 

Males per 1,000 females, 

Age: 

Under 16 years <> o 

l6 to 44 years 1/ 

45 years and over 2/..., 



Illiterates: 
Number 2/' 
Percent . . , 



Major Occupation Group: 

Professional & semiprofeasional workers 

Farmers and farm mana/^ers 

Proprietors, managers, officials, except farm. 

Clerical, sales, and kindred workers 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers) 

Operatives and kindred workers ) 

Domestic service workers 

Protective service workers 

Service workers, except domestic & protective. 

Farm laborers and foremen 

Laborers, except farm. 

No occupation 



Mgrant aliens departed. 



Sex: 

Maleo , 

Female „« ..„.,.. , 

Males per 1^000 females, 
Age: 

Under l6 years . ........ , 

16 to 44 years 1/ 

45 years and over 2/ o . . . 



Major Occupation Group: 

Professional and semiprofessional workers 

Farmers and farm managers 

Proprietors, managers, officials, except farm. 

Clerical, sales, and kindred workers 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers) 

Operatives and kindred workers ) 

Domestic service workers , , 

Protective service workers 

Service workers, except domestic & protective. 
Farm laborers and foremen 



Laborers, except farm,, 
No occupation. 



1941- 
124^ 



170.952 



70,151 

100,501 

696 

24,608 

107>551 

38,793 

1,403 
.8 

17,913 

1,691 

11,284 

12,398 

16,205 

5,765 

62 

4,072 

813 

3,822 

96,927 

42,696 



25,006 
17,690 

1,414 

4,628 
26,715 
11,353 

3,723 

627 

2,394 

2,033 

3,089 

1,104 

104 

987 

1,103 

7,377 

20.155 



1946 



108.721 



27,275 

81,446 

335 

11,092 
85,797 
11,832 

379 
.3 

6,198 

947 

3,616 

8,378 

4,157 

4,669 

2,464 

119 

2,034 

189 

1,473 

74,477 

18,143 



1947 



1 47.292 



10,246 
7,897 
1,297 

2,198 
8,550 
7,395 

1,891 
217 

1,803 
971 
447 
990 
367 
249 
392 

1,237 
958 

8.621 



53,769 

93,523 

575 

18,831 

101,459 

27,002 



1,309 
.9 



10,891 
3,462 
5,886 

13,961 
8,726 

10,580 

4,922 

292 

3,590 

442 

2,831 

81,709 

22,501 



1948 



170.570 



U,392 
8,109 
1,775 

1,563 
10,653 
10,285 

2,707 
427 

1,826 
866 

824 

1,448 

424 

193 

714 

1,602 

2,729 

8, 741 



67,322 

103,248 

652 

24,095 

112,453 

34,022 



2,766 
1.6 



12,619 

4,884 

6,207 

15,298 

11,019 

12,797 

6,389 

318 

4,032 

946 

4,826 

91,235 

20,875 



11,505 
9,370 
1,228 

1,530 

10,426 
8,919 

2,25c 
416 

1,735 
898 
550 

1,294 
450 
152 
588 
108 

1,841 
10,593 



1/ 19a='1944, 16 to 45 years 

2/ I94I-I944, 46 years and over — includes age unknown. 

2/ Immigrants I6 years of age or over who are unable to read or write any language 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Seirvice 



TABLE 11. ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AND DEPAHTED„ ALIENS EXCLUDED 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. I9O8 to 19^+9 



ALIENS ADMITTED 



All MS DEPARTED 



Period 



Immi- 
grant 



Noalmmlo 
grant 



Em*" 



Noneffli- 



ALIENS 

EX- 
CLUDED 



Uo So CITIZENS 



Ar- 
rived 



De- 
•parted 



il, 1908 to 19U9 i3o733o529 7.250^Us6K6o3o920 



I9O8-I9IO 1/. o 

1911-1920..... 

X ^XX 00000 

1912.,,.. 
l9i3»»-«. 

I9IU. o . . . 

19150 . . « . 

1916..... 
1917.- »•« 

1918.„.., 

1919.."- 
1920. .... 

1921-1930. .... 

1921.... o 

1922..... 
1923. .... 
192U, .... 
1925,,... 
1926. .... 

1927. 0..0 

1928...,. 
1929. .... 
1930. .... 

1931-19^. . » . . 

X y^X D O O o O 

1932. .... 
1933..... 
193'+. . . • . 
1935." •«" 
1936. .... 

1937.."". 
1938. »".» 
1939.. ".» 
19U0. .... 

19^*1-19^9. . " " . 

X y Ha 00000 

19U2. . . . . 
19H3..... 
191^1^. .... 
19H5. .... 
19U60.... 
1947..... 
1948 



o o o o 



2o576„226 



5.735,811 



878„5S7 
838 172 

.197,892 

,2l8„l»gO 

326,700 

2980826 

295^^3 
11O0618 
1U10132 
1*30.001 



uao7o209 



U90.7U1 

l»376„27l 



805,228 

309o556 

522,919 
706,896 
29U,3lU 
30U,U«8 
335.175 
307o255 
279,678 
2ltt,700 



151^713 

178.983 

229,335 

I8i+.601 

107.5^'* 
67.922 

101,235 

95o889 

191.575 



liLiii 



7«576,907 



507.908 



12,01*7,130 



ll,962,8lK) 



I^MIm. 



295o'566" 
333.262 
3O8 190 
303.338 

20U,07U 

129.765 
66,277 

9^0 585 
123 522 

288.315 



672,327 
1,8^1,163 



'*5.583 



1,77^0881 i,0U5 076 

172,935 25? 718 

122,949 198,712 

150, U87 81 ,,450 

172,1*06 76.789 

16U,121 92.728 

191,61s 76.392 

202,826 73.^566 

193.376 77:U57 

199. 6U9 69 203 

20i+,5li* 5f^'.66l 



528, U31 1,57^,071 



970I39 
35.576 
23.068 
29,1*70 
31*0956 

36,329 

50.2UI+ 

67.895 
82,998 
70,756 

I 785.852 



51,776 
28,781 

23,725 

28.551 

38.119 

108.721 

1U7.292 
170,570 

188,317 



183,51*0 

139,295 

127,660 

1 31+, 1+3'+ 
1UU.765 
15^,570 

181, 6i«) 
18U,802 

185,333 
138,032 

2.031*, 522 



^59.738 



bl.S82 

103.295 

80.081 

39,771 
38„83U 

35 S17 
26, 736 
25.210 

26,. 651 

21.461 

II • ■ e '} o o I 

128,801 



222,51*9" 
282,030 

303.73^ 
330. 467 

180,100 

111,042 

80 „ 102 

98.683 

92.709 

139.7^7 

1,649.702 



178.109 



660,811 342,600 



178,313 

146,672 
119.136 
139.956 
132.762 
150.763 

180,142 
196.899 

183.295 
221,764 



22.349 

16.057 
19.938 
33.041 
24,111 
18,867 
16,028 

7.297 
8,626 

11.795 



1.938,508 



269,128 
280,801 
286, 6o4 
286,586 

239.579 

121,930 

127,420 

72,867 

96,420 

157.173 



189.307 S 3, 522,713 



13.779 
13.731 

20,619 
30,284 

25.390 
20,550 
19.755 

18.839 
18,127 

8.233 



1,736,912 68,217 



100,008 
82.457 
81.117 

113,641 
164,247 
203,469 
366,305 
476,006 
447.272 



17,115 

7,363 

5.107 

5.669 

7 » 442 

18. 143 

22,501 

20,875 

24„586 



229,034 
184,362 
163.721 
137.401 
150,216 
157.467 
197.846 
197.404 
174,758 
144,703 

,676,803 



9o744 
7.064 

5.527 
5.384 



222,712 

243,563 
308,471 
301.281 

339.239 
370.757 
378,520 

430.955 
449.955 
477.260 



2.517.889 



71,362 

67.189 

53.615 

78,740 

85.920 

186,210 

300,921 

427.343 

405.503 



5.55s 
7.000 

8,076 
8,066 
498 
300 



6c 
5= 



439.897 
339.262 
305.001 
273.257 
282.515 
318,273 
386.872 

406,999 
354,438 

25s. 918 



349:472 
353,890 
3^7.702 
368,797 
172,371 

110.733 
126,011 

275.837 

218,929 

19^.1^7 

3.519.519 
271,560 

309.»*77 
270,601 

277.850 
324,323 
372,480 
369.788 
429.575 
431,842 
462.023 

3.357,936 



26,692 I 2.559.666 i 



2. 
1, 

Ic 

It 

2r 

2. 

4. 
4, 



929 
833 
495 
642 

3^1 
942 

771 
905 



ijll 



175,935 
118,454 

105.729 
108,444 
175.568 
274,543 
437.690 
5U2.932 
620,371 



446,386 
380,837 
338,5^5 
262.091 
272.400 
311.480 
390,196 
397.875 
333.399 
224, 727 

■ 00 •rconoO 

2.224.896 

168,961 
113,216 
62,403 
63.525 
103,019 
230.578 

451.845 
478,988 
552,361 



1/ Departure of aliens first recorded 
recorded in 19IO0 



in 19O80 Departure of U. ^. citizens first 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 12 IMMIGRANT ALTT??TS iJ)MITTlSD AOT EMIGaAFT ALIBKS DEr'-AP.TE-0 BT STATU OP 
INTENDED FUTUHS OR LAST PERMANENT BE SIDEHCBs YEARS ENDED JUKE 30. 19^5 t» ICj^iS 

G R A N T__ 



future •r las* 
residence 



All States. • - • 

Alabsuna. o = ....... = 

Arizona. .0. o ..... o 

Arkansas. ......... 

California. ....... 

Ctlsrado .......... 

Connecticaito ...... 

Delaware. ........ . 

Di3to of Columbia. 
Florida. .......... 

Georgia. .......... 

I deiho ............. 

Illinois. ......... 

Indiana. .......... 

Iowa. .......•.•■.. 

Kansas. ........... 

Kentudcy. ......... 

Louisiana. ........ 

Mai n© ... .000.0.... 

Maryland. ..... o.. . 

Massachusetts. • . • . 
Mi chi gan. ..o ..... . 

Minnesota. .. ..... . 

Missis8ipT)i. ...... 

Missouri. ......... 

Montana. .0. o ..... . 

Nebraska. ......... 

Nevada. ... o ...... . 

Sew Hampshire. . . . . 

New Jersey. ...... . 

New Mexico. ....... 

Hew York. ..... ... . 

North Carolina. . . . 

North Dakota. . . . . . 

Ohio. O . . . O . , . . , O < 

Oklahoma. . . . o . . . . < 

Oregon. ... o ...... . 

Pennsylvania. . . . • . 

Rhode Island. . . . . , 

South Carolina. . . ■ 
South Dakota. . . . . , 

Tennessee. ... ... . 

Texas. o ... ..... o . 

Utah. o . . . o . . o . . o , 
Vermont. .„. ..... . 

Virginia. ........ 

Washington. ..... , 

West Virginia. . . . 

Wisconsin. ....... 

Wyoming, ... ..... . 

All other. ...... . 



19^5 



380II9 



IMMIGRAH 



19 U6 



108.721 



119 

5U1 

51 

7o308 

117 

558 

Ul 

U12 

1»170 

160 

65 
1.272 

299 

133 
12U 

92 

U77 

U76 

263 

1.557 

2o335 

325 

70 

268 

lUo 

75 

50 

181 

1.059 

133 

10.124 

150 

77 
70H 
12U 
26s 

1.005 

211 

70 

43 

s6 

3.1^2 
go 

220 
20k 
9^0 

77 

235 

3U 



1. 
2. 



5. 
1. 



1, 
1, 



5« 
1, 



JLi^i 



1U7.292 



vM 



626 
787 
I409 
12,166 
571 
1.795 
172 

1^1 
1U7 
723 

308 

295 

630 
978 
693 

775 
oUs 
,2U0 
1.22U 
U.956 
818 

koh 

U27 

ipUii 

431 
466 
loU 
576 

U.2S7 

282 

27.009 

766 

386 

3 0897 
683 
0U7 
0h9 
72s 
372 
223 
721+ 

5.582 

293 

719 

1.121 

2.309 
672 

1.450 

144 
651 



1, 
6, 



lli^jO 



474 
889 
238 

18.089 

569 

3,165 

210 

1.539 
2.802 

616 

240 

7.340 

1.3^1 
757 
523 
503 

1,004 
1.347 
1.^51 
7.112 
7.575 
1.300 

331 
1.316 
43^, 
396 
169 
749 
6.902 
256 

47.353 
690 

255 
4„458 

505 

ia24 

6,925 
950 
349 

ISO 

545 

5»^7 
561 
9o4 

1,081 

3.058 
523 

1,502 
163 

1.043 



_i2lil 



j3^ 



18 8. 31 7 



458 

1.117 

238 

22^666 

594 

3.504 
271 

1.473 

3»Ob4 
564 
376 

9.102 

1.571 

550 

545 

450 

982 
1,362 

1.493 
8.319 
9.278 
1.639 
296 

1.393 
489 
406 
241 
679 
8,457 
286 
54,056 
684 

357 
4,809 

443 
1,271 

8.153 

1.091 

292 

253 

480 

5.595 
1,077 

8 03 
1,103 
3.521 

564 
1,870 

222 
1.323 



53s 
1.252 

417 

21.014 



7.442 



753 



_ E M 
19^ 



18.143 



J3}a. 



22. 301 



19 48 1 1949 



20.875 24, 



M. 



5.036 

279 

1,564 

2.736 

661 

367 

11.469 

2.172 

i.>+25 

605 

734 

,151 

,089 

747 

,259 



2, 
1, 
2, 

9, 



10,267 
2 
1 
1 



288 
058 
613 
646 
578 
180 
644 

9.832 

264 

53.926 

1.203 
718 

6,158 
596 

1.382 

10,162 
1.156 

436 
350 
694 
,071 
,293 

757 
,'483 
,492 

730 
,451 

169 
.476 



6, 
1. 

1 
3 



10 

117 

3 

,262 

32 

173 

15 

512 

55 

14 

4 

168 

22 

10 

19 
15 

60 

38 

110 

283 

185 

39 
8 

29 

7 

4 

1 

34 

235 

42 

!,3l^ 

21 

5 
l4b 

10 
IS 

198 

44 

5 
1 

7 
294 

7 

23 
45 
72 

5 
21 

2 
692 



19 

102 

7 

i.9'+7 

46 

30T 

17 

1.487 

98 

20 

13 

426 
41 
27 
33 
19 

136 
57 

190 

526 

375 
60 

13 
64 

14 

17 

24 

28 

574 

3^ 
7.452 

31 

6 
181 

15 
78 

443 

77 

l4 

6 

20 

209 

9 

54 

102 

172 

23 

51 

6 

2,473 



IS 
100 

9 
3.264 

hh 

389 
24 

1,112 

438 

30 

24 

U92 

69 

39 

16 

21 

217 

52 

158 

66s 

448 

110 

37 

57 

20 

14 

lb 

35 

669 
3'U 
.525 



!^6, 
101 

12 
2,8571 

85! 
25s! 

I7I 
987 
422 

43 
26 
021 
38 
61 

37 
24 

160 

79 

167 

713 
556 
l4i 

35 
94 

35 
21 

28 

34 

5931 

20 

7.2l4| 9 



53 

132 

16 

,038 

74 

559 
IS 

,295 

,449 

72 

27 

730 
132 

85 

62 

56 

285 

7U 

221 

736 

633 

176 

37 

115 

25 

2^3 

17 

44 

785 

30 

,267 



43 


6^. 


So 


8 


24 


Ji 


216 


309 


394 


27 


22 


64 


77 


115 


101 


462 


674 


631 


105 


84 


92 


10 


16 


34 


6 


10 


15 


26 


28 


S3 


232 


193 


452 


13 


26 


34 


39 


42 


42 


80 


115 


187 


212 


232 


28^ 


2b 


39 


50 


72 


135 


156 


9 


17 


13 


4.689 


3.174 


2,564 



United States Departmen 
Immigration and Natural i 



t of Justice 
zation Service 



TABLE 12A„ IMKIGHAHT ALIENS ADMITTED TO THE UNITED STATES, BY SPS-CIFIBD CLASSES 
AND BY RURAL AND URBAN AREA AND CITY; l/ YEAH ENDED JUNE 30. 'i-3^3 



Class of nlace and city 



Totaloooc..».o,....«... o. 
Baral „,.... o = .o = . ,,o. = ... . 

UrtaHo O . . . a . . . . , C . » O = o . , . 

City totalo o . . , o . . , . . o . » . 
Los Angeles, Calif «... 
Oakland, Calif o o .,... <• 
San Diego, Califo. . .. = 

San Francisco, Calif. = 
Bridget)ort, Conno » . • - , 
Hartford, Connoo.,,.,. 
Washington, D„ C„ . o , . . 
Miami, Fla, .. o, ...... . 

Taiirpa.(, Fla. , <, • , . = . , = . , 
Chicago, 111. .,... = <..<. 
New Orleans, La„ „,.,.. 
Baltimore, Mdc = » ..... , 

Boston, MasSo o . . o . . . <, . 
Cambridge, Mass....... 

Detroit, Mich.... = .. .. 

Minnea-nolis, Minn,, . = • . 
St. Louis, MOo ....... . 

Jersey City, No Jo.... 

Nevrark, No Jo ... ..... . 

Paterson, No Jo....... 

Buffalo, No Y0...0.... 

New Yorko K„ Y,,...... 

Rochester^ No Yoo..... 

Cincinnati, OhiOo . . . . . 

Cleveland, Ohioo.o.... 

Portland, Ore. .. ..... . 

Philadelphia, Pa„ . . . . , 

Pittsburgh, Pa. ...... . 

Providence, R. lo..... 

Houfitont, Texo ......... 

San Antonio, TeXo . . . . . 

Salt LsJce City, Utah.. 
Seattle, Wash. ........ 

Milwaukee, Wis. 00..... 

Other cities, ......... 

Outlying territories and 
■possessionGo ............ 

Unknown or not reported. . 



Total 
immigrants 



188,317 



32,715 
52.30U 



101 „ 510 



ogU 
75s 
^+,118 
H69 
87s 

lcl20 

267 

8.37b 

759 
i»30l 
i.7b3 

Usi 

5.S97 
5eh 

670 
1,111 

U52 

1»172 

38,19'+ 
815 

375 

2„0ti2 
59U 
3,U08 
l.OlU 
502 
5U0 
665 

789 

1.1+65 

7U1 

11,726 



1.185 
603 



War brides, 
vrar husbands, 
their children 2/ 



Displaced 
persons ^ 



22„2lU 



U,6S7 
S.957 



575 
115 
117 
562 

37 

1+3 

197 

56 

27 

551 

55 

137 

115 

25 

36U 

66 

95 

52 

78 

26 

118 

lp690 

Sk 

55 

150 

81 

293 

99 
1+3 
67 

97 

28 

163 

83 

1.595 



58 6 
1U5 



Uo.oUs 



8,869 

8,855 
22,292 



377 

25 

20 

120 

90 

251 

IbU 

67 

k 

16s 
U9U 

209 

50 

92U 

122 

90 

158 
380 

1U5 
150 

10.555 

256 

101 

7S7 

28 

1.191+- 

272 

90 

60 

12 

11 

56 

163 

2.359 



8 

2U 



Other 

immigrants 



126,055 



19,159 

3i4,U92 

71.379 

"TTsTb 

5!;!^ 

621 

3.1+36 
3U2 
52U 

1.203 
997 
236 

5.1+25 
536 

670 

1.^439 

U06 

1+,60Q 

376 
363 

U60 

653 

2S1 
90U 

25.31+9 

U75 

219 

1.125 

1.921 

bU3 
369 
1^13 
556 
750 

I.2U6 
U95 

7.772 



591 

U3U 



1/ 



Urban - Population of 2.500 to 99.999. 



Rural =. Population of less than 2,500. 

Cities - inOj,000 or over, 
2/ Alien spouses anri nlipn minor children of citizen inembers of the United States 
"* armed forces ad'rjltted under the Act of December 28, 19l+5« 
1/ Displaced persons admitted under the Displaced Persons Act of 19l■^8. 

Uaited States Department of Juftice 
Imaigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 13. IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED AND EMIGRANT ALIENS DEPARTED, 

BY COOTTEY OF LAST OR INTENDED FUTURE PERMANENT RESIDENCES 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30» 19^ TO I9U9 



Country of last 
Df future residence 



IMMIGRANT 



1945 



All countries. 



{t a Q o 



Austria. ...... o»..» o « 

Belgium. ......... ... . 

Bulgaria. ............ 

Czechoslovakia. ...... 

Denmarkc o ........... . 

Sstoniaa ............. 

Finland 

France. .............. 

Qermanyo •.......•...• 

(England 

*"** (Scotland.... 

B»i**i'^(Wale8....... 

Sreece. ,........>.,.. 

Hungary. ............. 

Ireland. 

Italy................ 

Latvia. .............. 

Lithuania. 

Netherlands. ......... 

Northern Ireland. .... 

Norway. .„.,.,........ 

Poland. .............. 

Portugal. ............ 

Rumania. ............. 

Spain. .. ........ ...... 

Sweden. .............. 

Switzerland. ......... 

U.S. S. £.,..„,..,..... 

lugo slavia. .......... 

Other Europe. ........ 

iia. ......... .......00 

China. ............... 

India. ............... 

Japan. ............... 

Palestine. ........... 

Other Agia. . . . . , . . , . . 

mada. ................ 

;wfoundland. .......... 

:xi CO ................ . 

ist Indies. ........... 

intral Ameri ca. ....... 

)Uth America. ......... 

frlca. ................ 

istralia & New Zealand 
illippines. ........... 

kiier countries. . 



32ai9 



19^6 19U7 19143 



108.721 l»+7. 292 1170. 570 



191+9 



19U5 I191+6 



188,317 



EMI GRANT 



19U7 



7,^2 



18,1^3 



22,501 



19^ 19^9 



20.875 



2U,586 



/ Included with Germany 




United States -i^epartment of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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TABLE 15, NONIliMIGiiMT ALIENS ADMITTED, BY GLASS,; J mHim THE IMilGRATION L«V/a 
AND BY PORT OR DISTRICTS YUR ENDED JUN3 JO, 19^^9 



Port or district 



Nuniber 

ad- 
mitted 



aovern 
merit 
offi^^ 
cials 



All ports or districts 



New York^ N, Y, » o .<.»«<, . 
Boston^, Mass o ,,.,„„ oo o o 
Philadelphia^ Pa^ 
Baltimore „ Md 



Portlands Me.. 
Newport News, Va 

Charleston, S, C 



O O « « u 

OOOOnoOOOO 
• a o o o o 
O e • o e 



o • e o 



• OOCOSOOQUOO 



Savannah, Ga 
Jacksonville, Fla«»,o<,. 
Key West^ Fla. o ^ » » <, o » » o 

Ir ll ami p r Xa •oeoouooooaoc 

West Palm Beachj Fla.„. 
Port Everglades, Fla,.. 
Puerto Ricoooo 
Virgin Islands 
Other Atlantic 



oooooooo 



'OOOOOOOi 



3ulf of Me^dco 
Tampa^ Fla.„„<,„ 
Pensacola^ Fla, 
Mobile J Alao » <. o 
New Orleans., La 
Galveston^, Tex. 
Other Gulf., 



OOOfOOOC* 



o o o o o 



00000090 



O O O O O O O I 



San Francisco^ Calif 



o o o 

OOOOOOOODO 



Portland^ Ore 
Seattle^ V/ash 
Los Angeles c, Calif o 
Honolulu, To H.oooo 



U.doK.3o OOOOOOOOOOOOCOOOOO 

■anadian Border, 
lexican Boraer. 



I O O Q O O O O 



iM,^. 



8,830 



8^897 
4,623 
1,153 
2,743 

46 

124 

,305 

82 

^«4 

63 

.5,175 

87,332 

2.. 530 

7 

4,135 

1,157 

394 



T 



13 722 



SUP^. 



6,159 

10 

561 

9,1185 

427 

3? 

8^98 

23 

639 

I5I6I 
8,046 

37 
93.611 
39.&kS 



6,300 

89 

59 

312 

1 

1 

20 

4 
2 

10 

59 

1,789 

5 

254 

6 

133 
765 



Teiuporary 
visitors for 



busi- 
ness 



.72i^8 



485,222 



Pleas- 
ure 



225,745 



it' 
trans- 
it 



81,61' 



247 

68 

440 

10 



Jt2i 

138 



31,529 
651 
138 

435 

7 

16 
62 

14 

7 

4 

332 

11,821 

2, 305 

T 

972 
30 

98 



Mh^ 



1,335 

1 

109 

1,592 

33 

5 



56,302. 

1,93 
286 

1,018 
24 
37 
88 

35 

20 

22 

4,229 

57,074 

189 

1,149 
1,043 

74 

8.592 



h^jjn 



8 

16 

267 



1,684 
I08OO 



1.099 

4 

17 

94 
1,584 



7 
10 .,911 



3,284 

5 

240 

4,893 

163 
7 



he, 3^6 
896 

551 
586 

4 

51 
73 
13 

11 

208 

8,19? 

13 

4 

1,255 

54 

21 



1,883 



[!o I (let 



urn- 



carry xng 

on j resi" 
trade dents 



I 



Jt2i 



612. ?6,984 lOsijBl 



419 
5 

11 



io,i57_ 



4 
43 



7 



1,662 3,538 

7 8 

29s 133 

564 373 

1,564 2,743 

17 4 

67,419 9,708 

3.325 1 22,10l| 4^908_ 



601 

3 

79 

1,021 

159 
20 



6 



21,605 

336 

53 

231 

5 

13 

27 

12 

? 

315 

6,491 

16 

2 

450 

22 

60 



Stu- 
dents 



12 l^iO^. . .628 



il 



1 

36 

665 

43 

3 

2,171 



^,567 
149 
58 

104 

5 

5 

29 

3 

16 

2 

27 

1,520 



19 
2 
8 



Inter- 
nat'l 
offi- 
cials 



iJ2i 



3>009 

66 

8 

46 



4 
31 



! 



62 

Jl. 



651 

'1 

J. 

92 
43 
1,379 

1 
1,544 



27 

542 

16 



ii21Z 



1,499 

3 

86 

61 
308 



1 



3 

,672J 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Sei*vice 



Other 
classes 



397 
2 

29 






39 






—JiimMia 



1 

170 

5 
579 1 32 



TABL£ 16, 



NONIMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED, BY GLASSES DIDDER TEE IMMIGRATION LAWS 
AMD COUNTRY 0? BIRTHS YgAR ENDED JUNE 30» 19^9 



Country 

of 
birth 



All countries o . 

tarope. 0.0........ 

Austria. ,..,.,.. 

Belgium o . 

Bulgaria. ....... 

Czacho Slovakia. . 
Denmark. ........ 

Estonia. ... c- ... . 

Finland. 

France 

Germany. ........ 

(England. . 

'*^«** (Scotland. 

Britain(waie8.... 

Greece. ... ....... . 

Hungary. .......... 

Ireland. .......... 

Italy. ... o ....... . 

Latvia. ....<....... 

Li thuania. .. ..... . 

Netherlands. ...... 

Northern Ireland.. 
No rway ............ 

Poland. ........... 

Po rtugal .......... 

Hvuaania. .......... 

Spain. ............ 

Sw>3:ddn. ........... 

Switzerland. ...... 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe. . . . . . 



Nufflher 

ad- 
mitted 



hkh2l2 



lg3o078 



iBxa. .......ooo.*.... 

China. < 

India. ............. 

Japan. .........•..' 

Palestine. ......... 

Other Asia. ..... o . , 

Canada. .............. 

Bewfoundland. ........ 

Heiico. .............. 

West Indies. ......... 

Central America. ..... 

South America. ...... 

Africa. .............. .' 

Aastralia & New JZsaiand 
Philippines. ......... 

Other countries...... 



3.9^46 
161 

2,407 

U„g6U 
270 

1.670 
1U.397 

9.285 

50 0683 

n,i6U 
,756 
,721 
,869 
,668 

li.35»* 
311 
737 
,050 
73»* 
732 
80 061 
2,362 

1^855 
io„6gg 



1, 
2, 

1. 

3. 



9. 

1. 
6„ 



Govern 
ment 
offi- 
ntflls 



13.722 



35h 
289 
lOg 
576 
2,766 



ji,y}9 



9 c 213 

3.200 
739 
675 

5.603 

69.391 

1.707 

29,g'+6 

go, 538 
10,261 
31.030 

3.523 

5.ogg 

2,glU 

10„566 



IslSl 



'49 
127 
2k 

93 
87 

53 
528 

k2 

,521 

129 

h3 

kok 

52 

57 

223 

1 

3 

275 

20 
20U 
1U2 
100 

12 
130 
207 
136 
21 U 

91 
226 



i.oou 



•fi 



LASSES 



• Temporary 
visitors for 
TTeas- 



Busi 
ness 



ure 



la 

trans- 
it 



73.338' 225.7^5,81.615 



lk62i 



173 
367 

g 

17 
439 

6Ug 

12 

1,186 

763 

659 

3.09H 

313 

2U5 

173 

U26 



552 

7g6 

32 

3SU 

950 

28 

288 
kks 
579 

022 
1,100 
228 
509 
3J4O 
3O8 

1.813 
90 

175 
2,121 

151 

?6h 

1,808 
lg7 
U35 

i,6oi* 
1.512 

l„12g 

7^ 

g5 

525 



■^.1^0 



goi 

789 
iig 
205 

1,217 

7,853 
218 

6,725 
10,656 



398 
976 
781 
,270 
802 

Hi 



7O.6U8 



1 



215 

i„26l 

5U 
716 

c'o025 

58 

U61 
.8U9 

4oU71 
2f .110 

-3.656 

787 

989 

573 

.'470 

.957 
121 

kk2 
:;.056 

926 
-•^,912 
3.559 

323 

927 
;>,ooU 

':.l+72 

^.387 

a, 861 

190 

816 

3 .832 



U60OI5 



l^tornF- 

lag 
resl- 
timdel dents 



■ST 
carry 
on 



632 



36,9gH 



.3^9 

559 

70 

260 

1.594 

46. 327 
944 

1^.775 

55.375 

5.302 

14,613 

1 

1 



.173 
,505 
729 
„:...522 



476 

1.217 
18 

705 

1.248 

162 

611 

3.295 

g4o 

12.902 

2»67g 

4o6 

507 

599 

777 

4,113 

59 

83 

2.5g9 

373 

1.849 

1,623 

1,001 

283 
4,280 
821 
801 
712 
104 
883 



Jni 



4,630 

678 
156 
101 

1,002 



11 



4 
25 

1 

44 

34 

7 

6 

176 

25 

6 

14 



3 

5 

33 

5 

1 

17 
1 

47 
8 

7 
M. 



22^364 



759 

75 
643 
048 
002 

079 
480 

lr351 

182 

lo4l4 



71 
6 



10 
12 



10 
2 

27 
5 

10 



253 

347 

15 

311 

374 

9 
l42 

2.393 
1.179 
6.295 
1.508 

263 
l4g 

195 
1,020 

2,082 
35 

25 

799 
235 
652 
680 

705 
105 
533 
815 
661 

351 

67 

169 

1.^37. 



Stu- 
dents 



Inter- 
nat'l 
offi" 
clals 



10.481 



2.264 



702 
96 

313 

46 

2gO 

1,240 

'440 

1,005 

6,429 
1,083 

1.407 
277 
485 
620 

197 



4.723 



68 
62 
10 

137 
51 
11 
71 

234 

'II 

20 

3 

125 

105 

12 
116 

3 

7 

119 

12 

212 
177 

33 
g3 

gg 

73 
64 

25 

7 

107 

2.893 



2.422 



other 
Classes 



32 



1,240 

584 
72 

44 

953 

1.251 
16 

337 
1,097 

729 
1.179 

354 
77 

221 



23 
121 

8 

60 

85 

2 

10 

642 
33 

50 
48 
l4 

25 

5 

21 

50 

1 

4 

Si 

12 

106 

67 

13 

9 

32 
53 
65 
197 
32 
3? 

480 



247 

121 

2 

2 

108 

269 
2 

175 
160 

86 

655 
l4o 
l45 

87 
102 



32 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



"tabls 17<. nonimmigrmt aliens 


ADMITTED, BY CLASSES V^fVW. TES rMMXG«ATIOH 


LAWS 




*■ AHD COmiTRY OF LAST PERHAU35NT liffiSIPEl^CEs 


YiAE 


jaDAJ JUNIi 30 5 


„i3'^9 






. ... --| 


OovericU 


Temporary | 




7:o aeturn-^ 




Inter- 




Country 
of 


Number 
ad~ 


TD^n^ 


visito 


re foi 


In 


caii'y 


iftff 


Stw.- 


nat'i. 


Other 


offi- 


Bu8i=> 


Pleas- 


^rane- 


on 


resi- 


deate 


offi- 


classes 


last residence 


mitted 


cials 


ness 


ure 


it 


^,r»de 


dent 8 




cial 8 




All countrieSo o o . o . 

JUrOpSo o o . o . , o . = . . . » 

Austriao o o . . o , o . „ o o » » 


UU7»272 


13.722 


73.338 


225.7^5 


81 » 615 632 


16^84 


10,1481 


^^723 


52 


111,590 


K9^ 


25W92 


k}Mi 30 792 


4p0 


1.621 


1^971 


2,452 


^ 


85^ 


3S 


188 


l-V^O 


65 


^ 


19 


39 


iU 


- 


Belgiufflco „..... = o , c = 


3o037 


iiH 


778 


1.037 


8 56 


29 


7H 


64 


85 


«(« 


Bulgariao . . • . « » , » . ,. „ o 


U7 


22 


1^ 


8 


7 


- 


'■ 


3 
68 


3 


— 


Czechoslovakia. <. . <, , , » 


68U 


Ik 


33 


95 


357 


" 


20 


37 


— 


Denmarko <, . . . o . = « • . . . « 


3.680 


79 


gi+3 


1.736 


827 


45 


22 


52 


?b 




l8tonia„ „. ....... o . o o 


^+7 


_ 


12 


17 


18 


- 


- 


- 


- 

r 




Finland^ o. ......,..» o o 


877 


5^^ 


252 


271 


172 


33 


18 


71 


6 


- 


JrancBo . o o , ». = ...... « 


11,8U2 


534 


3.^55 


3.327 


2.993 


7 


231 


35^ 


9U1 


- 


Sernany. «, o .... ^ . .... » 


^039^+ 


18 


l.''*50 


2.607 


190 


- 


61 


58 


30 


_ 


(England. » . <> 


37o97i 


1.707 


9.39^ 


i5oI3l 


9.853 


195 


332 


201 


5i>8 


- 


(^reat (Scotland... 


5.769 


25 


566 


3.i^^7 


1.652 


17 


27 


18 


17 


M. 


Britain (Wales...... 


8U8 


9 


125 


kSb 


208 


3 


1 


1 


5 


- 


Sreece. .............. 


1.9^ 


1403 


313 


657 


379 


rl3 


3k 


130 


19 


" 


Hungaryo ............. 


657 


hi 


73 


113 


370 




12 


46 


2 


- 


Ireland. ............. 


io530 


31 


167 


779 


•+77 


3 '^7 


8 


18 


- 


Italy.............. .o 


7 0830 


218 


1.593 


2,08iv 


3,589 


204 


ilO 


32 


- 


Latviao .............o 


2k 


= 


3 


7 


S 


„ 


- 


— 


- 


f 


Lithuania. ........... 


25 


1 


k 


7 


12 


- 


■" 


" 


1 


«. 


Netherlands. .......... 


6„712 


258 


I-.965 


2.32^ 


1.S32 


wn 


96 


-115 


72 
7 


~ 


Northern Ireland..... 


1.011 


5 


123 


602 


231 


3 


2? 


7 


.. 


Norway. .............. 


5o305 


207 


652 


2 ,,551 


1.470 


3^ 


85 


214 


52 


- 


Poland. .,......,...,„ 


699 


78 


61 


72 


429 






16 


27 


w 


Portugal. ............ 


lo577 


90 


i6n 


263 


975 


1 


52 


27 





- 


Bnnianiao ............. 


93 


Q 


13 


28 


31 


„ 


J 


5 


2 


- 


Spain. ............... 


3.067 


96 


U52 


73k 


1.658 


14 


6s 


33 


^ 


- 


Sweden. .............. 


5.053 


209 


1.661 


2.2U3 


633 


..=. 


111 


144 


52 


I 


Switzerland. ......... 


3o5l9 


146 


1,080 


i.251 


667 


49 


81 


73 


172 


; 


U.S<,S„Ho....... ...... 


527 


183 


15 


33 


li46 


- 


13 


«e> 


131 


- 


Tugo slaviao .......... 


158 


87 


k 


7 


26 


- 


1 


- 


33 


1 


Other Europeo ....... . 


1.805 


216 


353 


465 


bll 


2 


25 


108 


25 


•" 


lifil&o ocoooooooooo oooooo 

China. ............... 


l5olH7 


928 


2.88U 


2.591 


5.168 


IK 


, 513 


2.83^ 


__JSi 


' 


6.23^ 


Iks. 


624^ 


991 


2.707 


5h 


301 


1-/193 


22?. 


- 


India. ............... 


2,Ul2 


282 


699 


373 


388 


3 


9 


5(0 


83 


- 


Japan. ..............o 


U88 


7 


107 


3S 


iOS 


1 


144 


32 


1 


- 


Palestine. ............ 


8O9 


19 


366 


249 


125 


1 


10 


37 


'1 


«• 


Other Asia. .......... 


5M^ 


^+76 


1.088 


940 


1,840 


15 


49 


952 


112 


— 


Canada. , ... ........... . 


100^773 


1.072 


9.921 


67.804 


19.972 


23 


92 


l,4i6 


441 


32 


Hewfoundlando ......... o 


I.2U7 


13 


27U 


842 


92 


2 


e 


l4 


2 


- 


Mexi CO . o . o .... o ....... 


3^M5 


1.272 


7»766 


20,644 


3. 985 


= 


147 


372 


2.19 


- 


Veet Indies. ............ 


87o5l7 


8U5 


13.102 


61.993 


9.SSb 


21 


373 


1,1^3 


154 


- 


Central America. ....... 


10 „ 701 


657 


10690 


5.995 


1.4o4 


1 


126 


749 


79 


- 


South America. ......... 


39.291 


3.083 


8/UU2 


18.346 


7,321 


41 


170 


1^296 


592 


- 


Africa................. 


3.912 


285 


i.oiw 


l.^lj 


-666 


5 


44 


355 


104 


~ 


'bstralia & New Zealand 


5,062 


199 


io39l 


1.5^ 


1.673 


7 


84 


73 


95 


- 


Philippines. .......... . 


2.1^97 


178 


867 


765 


231 


- 


161 


213 


82 


- 


Other countries. ....... 


3^.s6o 


232 


163 


324 


425 


8 


33.585 


45 


78 


- 






u 


nited Sti 


ate 8 Dej 


jartment of Ju 


stice 












In 


imigratioi 


!i and N{ 


itural 


ization 


Service 







TABLE !8. NONIMMIGRANT ALIENS ADM TTED AND NONEMiGRANT ALiENS DEPARTED, 
BY COUNTRY OF LAST OR INTENDED FUTURE PERMANENT RESIDENCE. 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, :945 TO '949 



NON 



U 



Countries 



!945 



1946 



IMMIGRANT 

T 

;947 



_ NONEMIGRANT 

947 



Al ! countr;eG. 

[urDpe. . . - 

Austria. „,.„.. 

Belgium. ..,.,. .... 
8ulgaria_, 
Czechos I ovak i a, . 

Denmark, . , 

Eston i a. , . . 
Finland. . o. .,.,., . 
France. ...,...,,.. 
Germany. 



Great 
Britain 



( Eng i and 
(Scot land 
(Waies. . , . 



Greece,, ........ .,...-. 

Hungary .„„.,..„ 

I re I and . ....■,.,. 
Italy.,,,, ..,..,., 
Latvia, .,....,.., 
Lithuania. .„....„ 

Netherlands 

Northern Ireland 
Norway. ........... 

Po I and .„,..„„ o ... . 

Portugal .„..„.„.. 
Rumania. . , .»,„„. 

Spain, , , , , , . 

Sweden , ,„.,..„, . , 
Switzerland. . , , . 
U.S.S.R,, ........ 

Yugoslavia. ,..,... 
Other Europe, „. . . 

teia, .,.,....„„,. 

China, ,,. „ .„ ., „ „„ ., 
India, ..... . 

Japan, ,..,...,.,. 
Palestine.., ...... 

Other Asia. , . . . „ , 



Canada ............. , 

Newfound i and .......„, . „ 

vtexico,, . , .„.,„„.. 

test Indies. .,.....„,. 

Central America, 

South America, . _ . , . 
Africa .,„,.,„.., , . ., , 
Aust ra I i a & New Zea I and 

Phi I ippines. . . . - „ 

Other countries. . , , , , 



'64.247 r 205.469 



286 

9 

i33 

96 

13 

4 

3:9 

89 
502 
267 
290 

3, 

236 

344 

!50 

2.028 

68 
38? 

7 545 



v..42,.465 
33. 


1, 109 


12 


23: 


'.24' 


28 


87; 


7, 774 





'3.656 


840 


!48 


353 


528 


.066 


5 


2,765 


2:7| 


3.623' 



3.357 

3.467 

3 

52 
666 



357, 

578: 

69 

:;459 

2, 002 I 

\, !42 

'.... :80 

772 

_6_206 

2,949 

1,800 

252 

396 

909 



36,645 


50,966 


I„i33 


870 


3,, 836 


6,6!0 


60,208 


48,798 


5.633 


6,7:5 


12,075 


20.685 


!,496 


2 702 


2.797 


!,980 


1.688 


.49- 


8,469 


13,881; 




J./ Included with Germany 



1948 



A2L^A 



3 041 

22: 

3.620 
58 
229 



1949 



.405. 50A. 



.012i7_ 

39! 

5,075 

52 

555 



5 4 9 


3,680 


'8 


■■5 


604 


74' 


,2 404 


' :/97 


5:5 


',592 


52 554 


40,405 


8,509 


6,395 


',,000 


993 


; .227 


[,385 


506 


357 


2,277 


1,678 


4 508 


6 654 


6 


20 


!4 


14 


5 667 


6,662 


:,027 


L035 


5,977 


4,875 


775 


676 


:.2i! 


;,582 


58 


71 


3,936 


2,665 


4,585 


5, 108 


5,066 


5,455 


561 


362 


.37 


i07 


1,000 


:,466 


!5,786 


'0,574 


9,822 


5,885 


\796 


! 702 


330 


522 


1,778 


901 


2,060 


5,764 


95,899 


92, 14: 


1, 17! 


!,046 


22,892 


24, 151 


73,763 


89.265 


8, :67 


9,657 


53,576 


57,651 


5,642 


5,574 


5, 59 


4,750 


,466 


:,795 


47,775 


' 25 ,.724 



United States Department of Justice 
inmigration and Naturalization Ser-v;ce 






g 



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rf\ H Cvi c~- ' 

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CVi K> t~l K>vO i~« (M rH 



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l_t^ iH o LP.'vB H rH \o 0-. ^- Lfs i-- i~i f£\ 
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9 PQ Q O CO CO 




TABLE 20. ALIENS 


EXCLUDED FROM THE 


UNITE! 


STATES, BY 


CAUSE J 








YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, I9UO to 


19 U9 












(Figures represent all exclusions at seapo 


rts and excl 


usiona 








of aliens seeding 


entry 


for 30 days 


or longer at 


land 


ports. 


) 






r 

Cause 


I9I4O 


I9UI 


1942 


191^3 


19^^+ 


191+5 


19^6 


19^7 


I9U8 


19^+9 


Number excluded. ...„ = ..„..... . 

Idiots and imbeciles. ......... ..0 . 


5.300 


2.929 


I.S33 


iM5 


I.6U2 


2,3^1 


2,9^2 


H,77l 


H.905 


^33U 


2 


1 




2 


1 




2 






3 


Feeble minded. .................... 


8 


7 


6 


8 


5 


2 


U 


1 


u 


3 


Insane or had been insane. ........ 


26 


15 


12 


17 


22 


15 


\k 


23 


22 


20 


Iplleptics. ....................... 


6 


3 


1 


3 


k 


10 


3 


10 


9 


19 


Oonetitutional psyciiopathic 






















inferiority,, .................... 


12 


U 


7 


1+ 


15 


19 


9 


17 


11 


11 


Jurgeon's certificate of mental 






















defect other than above. ........ 


5 


5 


3 


2 


3 


15 


11 


20 


lU 


12 


iluberculosis (noncontagious) 


3 


1 


■= 


1 


1) 


11 


8 


10 


16 


17 


(Tuberculosis (contagious) 


9 


k 


U 


5 


10) 












trachoma and favus. ............... 


1 


_ 


1 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


)ther loathsome or dangerous 






















contagious disease. ............. 


26 


10 


9 


16 


15 


22 


9 


28 


97 


20 


lurgeon' s certificate of physical 






















defect other than contagious 






















disease. ........................ 


28 


22 


6 


h 


15 


13 


U 


12 


26 


3 


Jhronic alcoholism., ............... 


2 


1 


2 


1 


1 


u 


1 


3 


5 


3 


,ilcely to become public charges... 


i„296 


322 


160 


95 


106 


53 


33 


70 


67 


97 


'aupers, professional beggarso 






















and vagrants. ................... 


38 


6 


1 


1 


1 


3 


. 




~ 


2 


iDntract laborers. ................ 


111 


UO 


26 


26 


28 


18 


13 


19 


11 


26 


assisted aliens. .................. 


8 


3 


k 


4 


_ 


U 


3 


1 


1 


2 


itowaways. ........................ 


272 


227 


252 


77 


155 


161 


361 


902 


709 


216 


iccorapanying adiens (Sec. 18)..... 


5 


6 


1 


3 


3 


1+ 


3 


1 


2 


4 


'nder I6 years of age^ unaccom- 






















panied by parents. .............. 


11 


11 


6 


3 


7 


16 


7 


11 


5 


12 


irimlnals. 


Ikk 


92 


70 


68 


63 


87 


87 


139 


l42 


127 


olygamists, axiarchistB. ......... . 


- 


2 


- 


1 


- 


- 


2 


«■ 


1 


27 


rostitutes or aliens coming for 






















any immoral purpose. ............ 


2k 


9 


10 


6 


7 


3 


3 


3 


3 


10 


upported by or received proceeds 






















of prostitution. ................ 


- 


1 


„ 


- 


- 


- 


-• 


- 


_ 


1 


Tocurers or attempting to bring 






















in persons for any immoral 






















purposes. ..................... .3 


9 


3 


• 


- 


1 


1 


_ 


- 


2 


1 


ad been deported or excluded..... 


115 


1+1 


33 


31 


i+5 


^5 


Uif 


U5 


30 


66 


'nable to read 






















(over 16 years of age).......... 


8 


8 


9 


8 


21 


23 


1+ 


11 


2 


9 


irought by nonsignatory lines..... 


k 


9 


3 


3 


4 


1 


2 


2 


2 


11 


'ithout proper documents. ......... 


3a27 


2.076 


1.207 


ii,io6 


I0IO9 


I.8O5 


2,29^+ 


3.316 


3.690 


2,970 


'reviously departed to avoid 






















military service. ............... 


= 


- 


~ 


_ 


- 


6 


21 


111 


30 


66 


'ther.. .......,..,....._......,.. 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


16 


3 


1*^; 






United 


States 


J^epar 


tment 


of Jus 


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TABLE 21o ALIENS EXCLUDED FROM THE UMTBD STATES, BY HACK OR PEOPLE AJJD SEX: 

TEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 19^ to 19^f^ 

(Figures represent all exclusions at seaports and exclusione 
of aliens seeking entry for 30 days or longer at land ports; 



Race or people 



Hum'ber excluded. 



19UO 



5o300 



AroeniaQo ,..........-.•• 

Bohemian and 

Moravian (Czech),...., 
Bulgarian^ Serbian, and 

Montenegrin, .......... 

Chinese, . . . . 

Croatian and Slovenian. . 
Cuban. „..,.......»•»•••• 

Dalmatian!, Bosnian, and 

Hercegovinian. 

Dutch and Flemish. ...... 

East Indian, ............ 

English. 



Filipino........ ■.. •• 

Finnish, ................. 

French, 

Oe nnan, 

Greek, ................... 

Irish, ... o .............. • 

Italian. ................. 

Japanese, .. ............. • 

Korean, . 

Latin American. .......... 

LitlS-uanian. ............. 

Magyar, ................. 

Negro ................... 

Pacific Islander. ......... 

Polish, ...,., 

Portuguese, .............. o 

Rumanian, .................. 

Russian, .................. 

Ruthenian ( Hussnisdc ),.... o 

Scandinavian, ............ « 

Scotch, ................... 

Slovak. . o .......,.....••• . 

Spani sh. .................. 

Syrian, ................... 

Turkish.. ................. 

Welsh. ........ ............ 

West Indian (except Cuban) 

All other, ................ 



Sex. 



(Male, . . 
(Female, 



19^1 



2o929 



7 
160 

7 
77 

2 
65 

3 

906 

12 

20 
923 
222 

82 

UUl 

99 

6 

1 

38 

9 

30 

1U3 

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37 

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39 

105 

^21 

33 
133 

39 
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21 

973 

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19U2 



127 

8 
52 



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513 

31 
52U 

126 

32 

21 U 

59 
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3 

17 
98 

Ul 

10 

1^ 
13 
95 
207 
13 
59 
15 

17 

9 

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1.833 



19U3 



1,^95 



1 
11 

5 
1+9 



30 

282 

18 
8 

335 

57 

8 

151 

26 

2 

26 

1 
12 
82 

1 
32 
39 

5 
19 

5 

55 
1U6 

2 

28 
6 
1 

3 

10 
322 

1,173 

660 



igllUl 19U5 



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2 

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1 

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1 

18 

3 

231 

1 

5 
2^1+ 
2U5 

8 

101 

2U 

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1 

6 
77 

15 
9 

5 

21 

9 
U2 

103 

16 

6 

10 

2 
2U9 



2.3^1 



5 

11 

3 

16 



26 

2 
236 

5 

3 

365 

56 

U 

131 

19 

8 

l40 

5 

9 

101 

7 
21 
U2 

6 
20 
11 

55 
112 

9 
13 



292 



1.0U3 1,037 
U52 605 



19*^ 



2,91+2 



1 

13 

6 

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30 

7 
359 

7 

U51 

57 

10 

185 
30 

18 

3 

35 
1 
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171 
13 
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28 
11 
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7 
58 

181 
12 

29 
8 

10 

9 
1+79 



1.523 
818 



19^7 



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15 

6 

18 



•=1 

5^6 
6 

11 
566 

87 
21 

239 

89 
6 

U9 
2 

16 
1^0+ 

13 

57 

21 

Q 
68 

9 
b7 

b 
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17 

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2,158 
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7 

9 
16 

B 

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81 
8 

655 

k 

2S 

677 
175 
llU 

291 

193 
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60 
12 

3^ 
170 

139 

51 

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lOS 

33 
lou 

310 

22 
Zjk 
11 
5 
13 
15 

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3,679 
1.092 



19U9 



3.83^ 



12 

19 
6 

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76 

8 

75U 

3 
16 

623 

165 

300 

21s 

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77 
6 

21 
1^5 

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159 

37 

1+6 

93 
23 
93 

335 
26 

223 
18 

13 
21 

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3.676 
1.229 



7 

5 

19 
2 

108 

1 
52 

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553 
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3 
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80 

31 

220 

73 

3 

1 

50 

60 

69 
■7, 

60 
16 

76 

222 

18 

106 

9 

2 

20 

6 
l,'+22 



2,731 

lrl03 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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TABUS 26a. ALIMS AND CITIZENS POSSBSSIITO BOBDEfi CROSSING OAHDS WHC CfirSSED ^, 

THySTml T'lnNArLAND BODKP^RIICS. BY CLASSEo ^D TQm5j__^m ^.mM.ol!l^AJ0^:^l}L 



POST 



All ports. 



ALIENS 



Residents of 
Canada or MexloD 



Inter- 
mit- 
tent 



Canadian Border 2/... 

Calais, Me 

Eaetport, Me 

Fort Kent, Me 

Jaclcman, Me. 

Madawaslca, Me 

Van Baren, Me 

Vancetoro, Me 

Derby Line, Vt 

Highgate Springs, Vt 

Buffalo, N. Y 

Lewiston, N. Y 

Niagara Falls, K. Y. 
Rooseveltown, N.Y.. 
Rouses Point, N. Y. 

Detroit, Mich 

Port Huron, Mich... 
Intern' 1 Falls, Minn 

BlJ^i ne , Wash • • 

Other ports. ....... 



3^ . 300 



129.026 
S,266 

1,330 
13 

122 

95 

8 

17 
26.UUU 

U2,U3g 
65 

22,0 71 

11,311 

3/300 

t^i 



Ac- 
tive 



lll.S5'^ 



Mexicari Border. 2/ • • • • 

Browisville, Tex... 

Del Rio, Tex 

Eagle Pass, Tex. . .. 

El Pa 30, Tex 

Fabens, Tex 

Hidalgo, Tex 

L.redo, Tex 

a.;ma, Tex 

Ysleta, Tex .•• 

Siapata, Tex 

Douglas, Arizona... 

Saco, Arizona 

Nogales, Arizona... 

Sasabe, Arizona.... 

San Luis, Arizona.. 

Sonoyta, Arizona... 

Calexico, Calif.... 

San Ysidro, Cqlif . . 

Other ports 

1/ Intermittent covers 

active covers dail,y 

2/ Residents of Canada 



219.^7^ 



7,01.5 

4,011 

12,U80 

27. Obi 

U76 

28,158 

75,050 

750 

1 , 20f) 



TjO 



o7 

502 

5,).iS3 

1475 

U75 

1.501 

37.823 

11.188 

4.989 



27.146 



Resident 9 of 
United States 



Inter- 
mit- 
tent 



117.815 



Ac- 
tive 



CITI ZE^IS 



Residents of 
Canada orltexLap 



Inter- 
mit- 
tent 



31.681 



Ac- 
tive 



Residents of 
Uaited States 
Inter- 



mit- 
tent 



9.858 

552 

16 

U 

lUl 

123 

3 

25 

13 

2.U98 

135 

4.710 

12 

9 

5.285 

44o 

226 

2 

3,088 



34,937 



438 

26 

300 

8 

226 

85 
16 
92 

108 

)..)13 

128 

^,520 
lil 

7,0 te2 
2,804 

6' 
J), j'o'i 
■■^336 



4f076 



»^,4.708 a2.i:;78 27,605 



1,211 

5 

7 

12 

217 

92 

2 

9 

545 

37 
723 

77 
4 

188 

131 
18 
12 

786 



.iiiSl 



3.375 
161 

^,145 

1^2,564 

328 

2.^23 

1,350 
122 

283 

20 
1,442 

520 
10,530 

115 
1,048 

20 4 
'3.009 
'1.823 
1.546 



3. 
2, 

4. 
V), 

25. 
1, 



1. 



7. 
4. 



occasional crossing 
crossing or at least 
crossing Canadian bo 



090 

917 
044 

102 
326 

702 

000 

65 

100 

bOO 

98 

93 

055 

110 

13 

950 

263 

496 

854 



21. 



1, 



1. 



610 
64 

257 

220 
211 

4«6 
5f)0 

25 
260 

2d0 

72 

395 

13 
66 

125 
211 

689 
l4i 



4.308 



228 

H3 



10 
10 

1.915 
91 

i,i44 
9 

39 

l4 

6 
142 

8.158 



923 
35 



^1 



;2g.a 78 J4..1i5 



280.105 



Ac- 
tive 



TOTAL 



7,928 
216 



21 



24,530 



995.738 



1.0:^6 

45 

584 

1 

1.392 
12 

2 

171 

6,278 



925 

20 

1,080 

486 
26 

192 

2,000 

10 

l45 
25 
30 

13 

l49 

21 

4 

10 

1.97^ 

613 



130 

43 

537 

1.417 

19 
22 

900 
4 

175 

250 
21 

922 
12 

3 

10 

723 

969 

121 



173,818 

9,436 

85,704 

2 

322 

18 

5 
2,635 

'^.773 



3, 

7. 

10, 

2. 

:.2, 



2. 
1, 
1. 



000 
101 
347 

200 
105 

565 

:joo 

2S0 

625 
750 

25 

41 

837 

105 

5 

100 

733 

036 

918 



t,6S9 
40 



33 



23 

l4,oo4 

191 

1.992 

3 
1.152 

24 



379 

10.085 



^07.7 79 



m 

54i 



35.51^1 

2,247 

336 

817 

395 

21 

167 

138 

233.333 

iU,?67 

139, SI 5 

277 

110 

38,911 
14,760 

3.825 

8.991 

23.304 

^7.959 



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220 

309 
4,288 

32 

232 

450 
30 

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10 
25 
19 

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30 

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200 

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or less than 4 times a week on an average; 

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rder; of Mexico crossing Mexican border. 



21,255 

10.537 
28.199 

122,33s 
1.523 

50,280 

117,250 

1.286 

3.938 

2.155 
2,217 

1,281 

27.302 

881 

1.647 

3.100 

57.^3^ 

24,89^ 

10,402 



United States Department of Justice 
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TABLE 28 o INWARD MOVEMENT OF ALIENS AND CITIZENS CYi'R INTERNATIONAL LAND BOUNDARIES 


YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1945 to 1949 1/ 






Port 


1945 


1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 


Aliens and citizens o o .. oo » 


55,801,140 


7<+,240,190 


77,350,266 


78,362,207 


85,400,278 


Aliens , total „ » , =. o . . . o » 


27.395,495 


37,085,718 


38,921,170 


38,892,545 


40,077,743 


Canadian Border c . « . . ^ . 


10,482,226 


13,443,528 


15,773.964 


15,535,509 


16,054.649 


Blaine , Wash . . » « . <. » <, 


172,481 


390,792 


585,427 


536,996 


606,885 


Buffalo, N.<.Y,« ,......«, 


431,105 


589,273 


769,120 


862,015 


1,117,877 


Calais, Meoo . oo c . .« o 


662,765 


778,467 


948,548 


905,567 


938,492 


Detroit, Mich^o .<>,o»« 


3^52,712 


?, 524, 665 


4,440,629 


4,220,826 


3,974,134 


Madawaska,, Me,.o<.oo. 


334,854 


476,448 


568,535 


506,076 


576,057 


Niagara Falls, N, I, 


1^068,474 


1,970,525 


1,959,880 


1,837,085 


1,994,263 


Port HuTian, Micho o . » 


373,805 


510,347 


566,405 


549,696 


539,438 


Other ports « o » « . « , . o 


3,986,030 


!i,203,011 


5,935,420 


6,117,248 


6,307,503 


Mexican Border „ « <. o . . * « 


16 [913 0269' 


2 -.642, 190° 


23,147.206 


°23!357!636 


24.023,094 


Brownsville, lexo » . » 


1,412,028 


:i, 157, 788 


1,845,409 


1,729,815 


1,972,760 


Calexico, -Calif „ » . » o 


2,726,568 


::,763,760 


3,322,186 


2,951,260 


3,118,609 


Douglas , Ariz o , . « o <> o 


429,274 


789,6^8 


835,333 


692,999 


787,374 


Eagle Pass, T8x„o»«o 


713,076 


897,498 ' 


969,528 


1,055,580 


1,039,732 


El Paso, Texo.o.,.., 


5,089,981 


6,226,997 


6,645,104 


6,612,748 


6,534,907 


Laredo, Tex„o » . . o , . . 


1,992,103 


^,358,202 


3,212,975 


3,288,920 


2,845,801 


Nogales , 4iriz o o , . . o , 


1,291,995 


.376,056 


2,006,334 


2,162,843 


2,418,469 


San Ysidro, Calif ooo 


1,268,320 


-,709,054 


1,714,827 


2,260,425 


2,284,354 


Other ports o ^ ,<,,.,<, o 


1,989,924 


2,363,187 


2,595,510 


2,602,446 


3,021,088 


Citizen.3i, totals » » o o , » , » . 


28,405,645 


3,- "154 [472° 


'38 '429*096 


°39,°469,*662 


°45;322,535 


Canadian Border » « » <, o .. o 


13,033,370 


16,719,610 


19,065,230 


19,352,765 


23,681,848 


Blaine,, Wash, .. o.. , . , , 


264,298 


459,822 


506,366 


5U,193 


481,243 


Buffalo, No Y„___ 


2,347,563 


.152,121 


3,999,526 


4,569,110 


5,242,191 


Calais, Me„ ., <• . , o , ., ., . 


598,863 


653,719 


812,922 


843,117 


736,566 


Detroit, Micho „ , « . . 


4,773,347 


5,287,000 


4,737,132 


3,027,925 


6,313,229 


Madawasica , Me o <. . » . » o 


386,232 


485,311 


552,288 


520,715 


576,357 


Niagara Falls, No Y„ 


1.024,761 


^,941,513 


2,027,450 


2,767.732 


2,932,568 


Port Huron, Mich„ooo 


434,872 


653,229 


807,021 


849,579 


957,996 


Other ports .00.0,0 = 


3,203,434 


.,086,895 


5,622,525 


6,260,394 


6,441,698 


Mexican Border . » » . . » 


15 ; 372 ,'275* 


'2r ,434^862' 


'i9;363;866° 


20,116,897 


'iij^doMi 


Brownsville, Texo„oo 


535,048 


- .654,568 


929,822 


869,062 


' 998,788 


Calexico , Calif „ » » 


1,478,048 


: ,603,267 


1,690,530 


1,345,240 


1,580,780 


Douglas, Ariz 00 , .0 , 


866,330 


789,648 


835,333 


622,890 


747,604 


Eagle Pass, Tex o« 0.0 


583,425 


598,333 


665,775 


703,463 


692,572 


El Paso, Texo c c 00000 


3,330,606 


3,778,352 


4,413,672 


4,392,969 


5,357,814 


Laredo, Tex„oooo„.oo 


2,997,233 


:3,484,U2 


3,212,975 


3,287,189 


2,845,802 


Nogales, AriZooooooo 


512,692 


2,154,324 


1,376,848 


1,392,128 


1,580,273 


San Ysidro, CaHfooo 


2,982,607 


:..963,946 


3,946,075 


5,207,768 


5,234,700 


Other ports 0000,-0. 


2,086,286 


^,408,282 


2,292,836 


2,296,188 


2,602,354 



1/ Each and every arrival of the same person counted separately- 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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TABLE 3O0 PASSENGER TEAVEL BETVhT 
BY PORT OF ARRIVAL OR D: '"^ 
sea and Joj ai ■ 



p(:;,»t or District 



ARRIVED 

Bew Yorki, No Yo » o . 
Il'^ston, MasSo . o » o <> 
5hiladelphiao Pa.. » 
3,'5l timoreo 2^do « » o <> 
S'ewport Kewsj Va. » 
Iff- rf oik, Va» » « » « o 
Se^'^mnah, frao <> <■<,<. . 
2...t/-rle8ton„ So Co 
Ml&inio Flao o o o o o o o 
•<„ Palm Beach, Pla, 
Key Wesfes ^1a» » » = • 
Sc/i Juaiis Po Ro 6 o o 
Viygin IslandgoDoo 

Mobile, Ala, , o a » » 
ITniv, Orleans s Lao <, , 
tix. Pranci sco Cal o 
Portland, Oreo . . . 
Ssattle, Washo 2/. 
Lo s Angel e g „ Cal » » 
£o?iolulU(, To Ho o o 
Other ports 



) o o o o o 



DEPARTED 

N»w York, N. Yo.o. 
Boston, MasSo 000.0 
i^hiladelphiaj Pao 
3al timo ret, Mdo ,000 
Uewport Newsc Vao o 

nCTiOllCB Vaooooooo 

Savannahs Gao 00000 
Charlestons So Coo 
Miami , Elao o o •. c o o 
W. Palm Beach, Plao 
Key Wests Ela. 0.00 
Sah Juan, Po Ro » . o 
Virgin Islands 00 00 
Tampao Flao 0000000 
Mobile, Alaco 0.0.0 
New Orleans, La. . « 
San Francisco, Cal o 
Portland, Oreo . . . 
Seattle, Washo 2/o 
Loa Angeles, Cal.o 
Honolulu, To Hooo. 
Other portsc 



Aliens 



^liM 



310.793 

23 » 597 



1, 
3. 



,UU3 

,950 

272 

939 

93 

108 

93 » 062 

U„Ui3 

.371+ 
,550 
230 
6„854 

791 
13d^28 
17,212 

85 

,57U 

,162 

,Sl42 
709 



5o 
5. 



li 
1, 
li 
K 



2]^-S2i 



172o 

2, 



90, 

K 
6, 

5. 

9o 
8. 



i/ Exclusive of travel 
2/ Includes air travel 



582 
376 
263 

566 

69 

136 

16 

81 

097 
880 

293 
587 
173 

599 
183 

275 

257 

^3 

U31 

806 

70s 

178 



Citi. 
zens 



Mi2S2 



302 Ml 

2l*„l53 

7o8^ 
103 

l»S7H 
50 

;32 

lU0,8gU 

97S 

l6o350 

Hon 
6,576 
7»662 

27 084 

23.199! 

11,3^^''' 5 

1.576 I 
5.210 
12.876 



278.768 

6,225 
^3 

5»S92 



136 



11 

93 

6?7 

975 

15.^1+3 

15,013 

305 

6,116 

1.102 
26,1487 

15.723 

72 

12.090 



656 
700 



19.160 



Tct. 



1.10U, i-73 



613. ■154 

^7.-90 

2,098 

11 „ 790 

:'75 

2,oi3 

1U3 

rlUO 

233»S'<6 
5 389 

20,970 

21, 3 '''O 
b ) 'i 

13.^/^ 

8,4:)3 
Uo,5'-2 

U0,411 



12 

t: 

7. 

17,: 



,V3S 



.865x1 



THE UNITED STATES AND FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
REg YEAR ENDED JUN E 30. 19^9 l/ 



Aliens 



2Ul,850 



189,181 

16.U28 

1.335 
1,019 

272 

801 

93 
107 

7.9U3 
111 
181 

393 
130 

321 

600 

5,057 

13.585 

65 

887 

l,lU8 

569 

I.62U 

1^3,085 



lli+,^37 




By sea 



Citi. 
zens 



26OJUI 



l66„95^ 
13.686 

539 
5»*9 
103 

1.859 

- 50 

132 

23.604 

309 
205 

590 
ikz 

181 

2.2U1 

12 „ 264 
21.423 

27 

,878 

,553 
,950 
,50U 



9e 

1< 

1< 

2. 



26H.996 



183,725 

1.980 

145 

264 

60 

1.300 

11 

93 

23.505 

35U 

490 
107 

319 
13 706 

14.922 
68 

11.702 
1.656 
1.2U1 



Total 



J02,.521 



It 

li 



Aliens 



255ii5l 



356,135 

30.11^ 
,871+ 
,568 

375 

2.660 

l»*5 

239 

31.547 

420 
386 

983 

272 

502 

2.841 

17,321 

35.008 

92 

10.765 

701 

,519 

,128 



2. 

2, 



408.081 



298 

3 



31 



16 
21 

12 

2 

3 

14 



over internati 
via Anchorage 



,162 
,197 
353 
657 
129 
,436 

27 

174 

,067 

451 

175 
690 
180 

355 
466 

,011 
,863 
111 
,029 
.447 
527 



121,612 

7.169 

108 
2,931 

138 

1 

85,119 
4.302 



5.193 

5,157 

100 

6.533 
191 

8.371 

3,627 

20 

687 
14 

1.273 
3,085 



172.514 



58,145 

1,159 

55 

1,173 



82.535 
783 



,118 

,387 
100 
,418 
36 
,970 
,316 

104 

15 

,422 

JI8. 



By air 



Citi- 
zens 



346,249 



135,487 

10,467 

116 

7.291 

15 



117,280 

667 

15,391 

15.760 

258 

6,395 

5,421 

14.820 

1,776 

8 
1,442 

23 

3,260 

10,372 

282x1^ 



95,043 

4,245 

338 

5,628 



onal land boundaries 
Alaska 
United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



113,172 

621 

15,443 

14.523 

198 

5.942 

783 

12,781 

201 

4 

388 

3,459 
9.986 



Total 



601 „ 880 



257,099 

17.636 

224 

10.222 

153 



202.399 

4.969 

20,584 

20.917 

358 
12,928 

5,612 

23,191 

5,403 
28 

2,129 
37 

4,533 
13,457 

455.870 



153,188 
5.4o4 

393 
6„801 



195.707 
1,404 

19.561 

20.910 

298 

11.360 

819 

19,751 

2.117 

4 
492 

15 

6.881 
10,764 



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^-/^BLE ?1. PASSENGER TRAVEL TO HiE ITNITED STATES FROM FOliEIGi: COIWTRIES, 
BY COiniTRY OF EMBARKATIONS YEAR EMDED JME 30, 1914-9 l/ 



Country of 
eribarkation 



By sea and by air 



Aliens 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



By sea 



Aliens 



Citi= 
zens 



Total 



By air 



Aliens 



Citi= 
zens 



Total 



m COtL^tri&Se • ■> » o 9 o f> s • 

'JJ*OPe •«eoooaoe«ci«o«ooo« 

jBQir*^ '-'^ ©00060»000«00» 

Czacsli :,lovalciao « » « , » » e 

DdHn^w*'^ oeoeoooo9o*o»ee 
Finiaj Jl ««eoooaooo«oo«o 
r I*&nC 0*«ooaooooooooooo 

ijsnnanye o*0oooottoeoae« 

«. ^reat i>r'Xt:;.Xno eft«o*oee 
llTQQOQo ««oeoooe«aooo«« 
ICdxail'J.* ••oo«>CDO«eoo«o 
ireXailU.* •oooooo«oeeo«<» 

ItaXy* •••ooooooooeoaoe 

rfetb.erlaijds<,eo<i».o .». <> 

* 1 Olntiy* •ocoooooeoooovo 
irOXS'IlCl. oftoec) uoooooo oo«a 

Portu[':ui mlcI Azoi'esaoo 

LkUIlfilli'''^ oogooe»eooooooo 
.jp» iilo»oeociti uoooooooon 
bW3Cl9Ilo cofloooooooooooo 
oWl vZQr'X&DU. o9«e«oooee* 

Turkey in Buropeo«oo«« 

L tO kJ o I've • « e « o o 

Yugosiaviaae 
Other Europe 



oooooooe 
•«ouooo«oo 
oeoeaeoo oo 



oooooooAoooeo* 



<1A« •oAOoeooocooooooooo 
Un lXlQ> fio«ocooo«oooo»ese 

ilndia... 

Iraq 

Japan and Korea, o, <..»<, 

A »ii©S'Uine •eoeoooooo*** 

Syria and the Lebanon. 
Other As las o.*«.<,...o. 

" XX X(^e •o«oo«ooooo« 

AiAstralia.eoooo o 
liew Zealand oo.oo»o»«oe 
Philippines. ». 
Other Pacific. 



o o • a 

o o o « • o 



ooao*ooe 
uoeo»«*o 



Il97^M1 



606,992 



1,101^ A73 



21+1,850 



260, 7U3 



502,593 



255,631 



346,2149 



601,880 



262,232 



5,286 

330 

l+,800 

259 

30,8142 

59,1412 

82,940 

2^618 

14+0 

10,856 

20,391 

13,317 

6,573 

1,633 

5,059 

3,209 

11,289 

1,327 

1,067 

83 

I4I 

1+80 

16,169 



11,639 

1, 122 

31 

1,629 
765 
761 



5,988 



1»575 
668 

3,511 
2314- 



217,536 
~E 

3,694 
813 

4, 61+5 
166 

41,517 
31,701 
54,279 

2*487 

1,357 
12,990 
26,496 
10,900 

5,701 
958 

4,699 
9 

l,3i44 
10,649 

1,853 
279 

18 
995 

,934 



479,768 



192,805 



137,977 



330,782 



^,427 



79,559 



32 



9,215 
689 
121+ 
19,774 
777 
890 

ii)465 

10,378 



845 

396 

6,753 

2,384 



8,980 

1,143 

9,1443 

425 

72,359 

91,113 

137,219 

5,105 

1,777 

23,846 

46,889 

24,217 

12,274 

2,591 

9,738 

9 

4,553 

21,938 

. 3,180 

1,346 

83 

59 

1,475 

49,103 



20,854 
1,811 

155 

21,405 
1,542 
1,651 
1,687 

16,366 



2,ii20 

1,064 

10,264 

2,618 



3,041 

2,338 

119 

21,357 

49,631 

62,2144 

1,983 

102 

6,814 

18,158 

8,616 

4,957 

1,633 

904 

508 
8,968 

828 
83 
41 

480 

15.1*73 



1,417 

2,274 

19 

29,776 

16, 182 

35,312 

1,611 

12 

6,572 

21,999 

6,800 

4,016 

958 

1,057 

9 

252 

8,612 

86 

18 

995 

27,833 



io,4it3 

1+68 

1 

1,580 

512 

505 
l6i+ 

5,140 



TTeoir 
562 

18,601 

454 
454 
178 

6,911 



4,458 

4,612 

138 

51,135 
65,815 
97,556 

5,594 

111+ 

15,586 

40,157 

15,416 

8,975 

2,591 

1,961 

9 

760 

17,580 

914 

85 

59 

1,475 

41,506 



9. 

9: 



18,247 

830 

1 

19,981 
966 
959 
342 

10,051 



,245 
330 

,462 
140 

,485 

,781 

20,696 

635 

558 

4,042 

2,255 

4,701 

1,616 

4,155 

2,701 

2,521 

1,527 

239 



2,696 



^19^ 
654 

30 
249 
253 
256 

58 

81+8 



"5" 
2,277 
815 

2,3^ 

147 

11,741 

15,519 

18,967 

876 

1,325 
6,418 

4,499 
4,100 

1,685 
5,6l42 

1,092 

2,057 

1,855 

195 



5,101 



148,986 



572 
220 

2,253 
95 



348 

124 

4,598 

1,841 



1,111 
327 
124 

1,175 
323 
456 

1,28? 
3,467 



3 

4,522 

1,143 

4,831 

287 

21,226 

25,500 

39,6yS5 

1,511 

1,663 

io,:+6o 

6,732 

6,801 
3,301 

7,777 

3,795 

4,358 

5,180 

452 



797 



920 

544 
6,851 
1,956 



1,005 
448 

1,258 
159 



497 
272 

2,155 
543 



2,607 
981 

154 

1,422 
576 
712 

1,345 

6,515 

1,500 

720 

3,415 

662 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



riiHLE 31 • 


PASSElJGf 


]R TRAVEL 


TO THE TOIIT3D S: 


[ATES FRO 


w; foreig: 


f COUNTRIES, 






BY COUi^TTRY OF EMMRKATIOIh 


Yj:/ir El 


JDED JDIIE 


50, 1949 1/ 








(GOiJTMTKD) 




^t* 




, Coixrtry of 


By sea and by air 


By sea 


By air 




Citi- 






Citi- 






Citi- 




embarjsstioii 


Aliens 


zens 


Total 


Aliens 


zens 


Total 


Al iens 


zens 


Total 


rtiieni -*vfr'^ cae « « » o 


1,798 


1,777 


3,575 


712 


511 


1,225 


1,086 


1,266 


2.3;^ii 


LQT ^^ I " > - * .. O « C 


I5626 


1.597 


3.223 


1,025 


868 


1.391 


605 


729 


1.332 




163.255 


274.495 


437.750 


18.154 


55,572 


75.706 


145,121 


218,925 


;6i4,^---i- 


45,070 


51.780 


96,850 


2.979 


15.071 


16,050 


42,091 


58,709 


•To~T.">^ 


rQOHXi'- tj-^oooeoQcooo 


li+ 


91 


105 


9 


4 


15 


5 


87 


92 


6J1C0* ow»i^ U0«;0000 


1,388 


2.392 


3.780 


562 


507 


1,069 


826 


1.885 


2.711 


©rinXJU^'. oe«oooO'.<o«oo 


7.114 


41.147 


148,261 


1,575 


9,857 


11,452 


5,539 


51.290 


56.829 


ritish "est Indies 


18 p 066 


36.252 


54,298 


1,809 


5,ii47 


7,256 


16,257 


30.735 


47,0i42 


UO£L« «oo*oooo»ooooo 


82,540 


129.770 


212,510 


10, Go? 


25.228 


35,295 


72,473 


104.542 


177.015 


Birlnicaii RepuoliCo 


4.177 


7.147 


11,524 


I4S8 


687 


1.175 


5.689 


6,460 


10,1149 


itch Vilest Indies «o 


2,750 


2.546 


5.296 


514 


650 


1,144 


2,256 


1,916 


4.1^2 


ranch West Iriiies« 


359 


92 


451 


48 


24 


72 


311 


66 


379 


lll/Xo ooo*o9ooo«o«e 


1^777 


3.298 


5.075 


85 


117 


200 


1,^4 


3,181 


4.^75 


:trai Ameri 58.0.0 09 
eitish Hondurasoso 


11.430 


35.999 


47.I429 


2.805 


20,214 


23.019 


8,625 


15.785 


24.410 


63 


26 


89 


52 


16 


68 


11 


10 


21 


inal Zone & Panama 


4.010 


25.410 


27.I420 


1,241 


12,61tB 


13,889 


2.7^ 


10,762 


15.531 


)5 v& iCXCfl.© OOOOOOOO 


292 


195 


487 


119 


110 


229 


175 


85 


258 


aateirala ooooooo«oo 


3.377 


8.476 


11.853 


616 


5.021 


5.657 


2,761 


3.455 


6,216 


ttldliir'^ili OOOOOOOOOOO 


849 


2.1449 


3.298 


755 


2.588 


3.143 


94 


61 


155 


LC£L3I°8.gU£^o oc-Gcooooo 


856 


468 


1.324 


17 


25 


k2 


859 


4U3 


1,282 


I i. ?S,0 OT^ OOOOOOOOOOO 


1.983 


975 


2.958 


5 


6 


11 


1.978 


960 


2,947 


-iGh Amsv i^J^o o o o o o 
. ?CI1'C XT1;9- cooo«oooeo 


34.983 


32.276 


67,259 


9.758 


10.857 


20,615 


25.2^5 


21.419 


a •1.3644 


"1^.776 


4.701 


9.477 


1.865 


3.401 


5,266 


2,911 


1.300 


"57211 


/XXV19>0 OOOOOOOOOOO 


3 


7 


10 


« 


_ 


«. 


5 


7 


10 


r&^X.^o oooi- ^oee*«*» 


6.854 


7^045 


13,899 


2,304 


3.102 


5,406 


4,550 


3,943 


8.. 93 


ritish uvi.aaaoooo© 


652 


505 


1.157 


82 


144 


226 


570 


561 


' 31 


^ch ^u litrja© o o « o « o 
t 


163 


55 


218 


19 


1 


20 


144 


54 


:.98 


ench Guianaooooeo 


89 


32 


121 


- 


» 


_ 


89 


32 


1.21 


'Ixeeooouoouoooooo 


1.656 


959 


2.595 


676 


553 


1.229 


960 


406 


1,566 


^..'■OIQDX^O OOOU060000 


5.925 


5.542 


9.467 


951 


585 


1.536 


4,974 


2.957 


7.931 


'^Wl OiToOfiOOOOOOOOO 


709 


289 


998 


217 


50 


267 


492 


239 


751 


^T*ft OOOOOOOOOOOOOO 


2.419 


2.61'5 


5,034 


622 


1.048 


1.670 


1.797 


1.567 


-..Oi 


I U^Uay o ooeooooooee 


577 


301 


878 


197 


92 


289 


580 


209 


";89 


wiszuelao oooooo<«oo 


11,180 


12,225 


23.405 


2.825 


1„881 


4,706 


8.555 


10.5144 


>.f^.699 


ag of cxirriers 




















Jnited States. „,.„ 


283.387 


413.652 


^7.059 


a4.732 


145.117 


259,849 


168,655 


268,555 


437a '^90 


Weign.oooooooo.. 


214.094 


195. 3V0 


407.434 


127,118 


n5,626 


2i42,7l44 


86,976 


77.714 


164, 090 


Exciusi-re of travel 


over land 


bci'derso 
















United 


States De 


apartment of Just 


ice 










Inimigrat 


ion and 1 


Natural iz 


ation Se 


rvice 





'"•ABLE 31. PASSENGER TRAVEL TO THE UiJITED STATES FROM FOREIGIT COUMTRIES, 
BY COUilTRY OF EMBARKATIONS YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 19i4.9 l/ 



Country of 
embarkation 



By sea and by air 



Aliens 



Citi- 
zens 



By sea 



Total 



Aliens 



Citi- 
zens 



By air 



Total 



Aliens 



Citi= 
zens 



Total 



LI COU..tri "'Se • • e o « o o o • 
C'OPe ««oooouooaoeo«ooee 

30 1[^ I -Ii« ®oo«»oeooo«oo» 

IJzec. , -io'vakiao . o c • o o o 

J9Illrj3 ..*.oeoooeoooo«o«oe 
^ inX^^i->-^ ••eoooooooooooo 
*T6iXXGOm •00000000000000 
jSnn^ny* oveoooosoeoseo 
'Feat i^rit:;.ina e o a o • s» e 
-lX*6eCea aeoeooocttsoooea 
LQSXSiYL'i n ••»ef>OQO«aooao 
i]?9i.ailU.a aooooooaaeaoaa 
iuaXya aaaoooeooooeoaofl 

lather la; jdso » o « » . o . a . o 

OZ~W£t Yooo : nooooeoooovo 
. OX&XlCl 094QC) uoooooo ooe» 

^orttig;al mid Azor^Sooo 

.kUli^illi''- eoooeo0»ooooooo 
jUa ill o«oeoouuooooooooo 
) WC u QXi o voaoooooooooooe 
^w!lT*291r'X&llLi 090000 oo«oe 

rurkey in Eiiropeoaooaa 

J*Oo»Jo''-«««e«ooo ooo Qo o« 
'fUgOslaviaa a . a o o « « o . » a 

3ther Europeo a o a a a o » o a 

19* • «oooe«QOOOoooo(JOOOO 

illO. -LA«a9eflot>oueooooe90 
UraC^tt eooo»ea«ooooooo0e 

Japan and Korea, oeoaoe 

^^XeSXmGa aoaoeooooeaa 

Syria and the Lebanona 

3tiier As iae oaaaa.a.ao. 

[iUo uxn i, X€L •eooooooooAao 
^■OW ^0£lX€lXlU. iie«eooo«eoe 
1*1 1 X Xp' y J-iiG Sttott oooo*ooe 
Other Pacif iCaooaaaaao 



i|.97A81 



606,992 



1,104A73 



2i+l,850 



260,7^3 



302,593 



255,651 



31+6, 2i49 



601,380 



262,232 



217,536 



5.286 

350 

14., 800 

259 

30,81+2 

59»i4l2 

82«9l+0 

2,618 

Uko 

10,856 

20,391 

13p317 

6,573 

1,633 

5,039 

3,209 

11,289 

1,327 

1,067 

8.3 

kl 

1+80 

16,169 



6 

5,69i+ 

813 

l+,6l4.3 

166 

1+1,517 

31,701 

51+, 279 

2,a87 

1.357 

12,990 

26A98 

10,900 

5,701 

958 

i+,699 

9 

l,3i+i+ 

10,6149 

1,853 

279 

18 

995 

32,93i4 



1+79,768 

~S 

8,980 

l,li+3 

9,l4i+3 

1+25 

72,359 

91,113 

137,219 

5,105 

1,777 

23,8U6 

1+6,889 

2l+,217 

12,271+ 

2,591 

9,738 

9 

l+,553 

21,938 

. 3,180 

1,31+6 

83 

59 

1,1+75 

1+9,103 



192,805 



137,977 



330,782 



69,1427 



79,559 



li+8,986 



3,Ol4l 

2,338 

119 

21,357 

i+9,631 

62,2141+ 

1,983 

102 

6,8114. 

18,158 

8,616 

l+,957 

1,633 

901+ 

508 
8,968 

028 
83 

hBO 

13,1+73 



l,i+17 

2,271+ 

19 

29,776 

16,182 

35,312 

1,611 

12 

6,572 

21,999 

6,800 

1+,016 

958 

1.057 

9 

252 

8,612 

86 

18 
995 

27,833 



11,639 
1,122 

51 

1,629 

765 

761 

222 

5,938 



9,215 
689 
124 
19,771+ 
777 
890 

1,1+65 
10,578 



20,851+ 

1,811 

155 

21,1+03 

l,5i<2 

1,651 

1,687 

16,366 



10,1+43 

U68 

1 

1,380 

512 

505 

16L4. 

3,11+0 



362 

18,601 
1+51+ 

178 

6,911 



l+,l+58 

i+,612 

138 

51,153 

65,813 

97,556 

3,591+ 

111+ 

13,386 

1+0,157 

15,1+16 

8,973 

2,591 

1,961 

9 

760 

17,580 

911+ 

83 

59 

1,1+75 

1+1,306 



9. 

9r 



18,21+7 

830 

1 

19,981 
966 
939 
31+2 

10,051 



,21+5 
330 

,1+62 
ll+O 

,1+85 

,781 

20,696 

635 

558 

l+,0l42 

2,235 

1+,701 

1,616 

i+,155 

2,701 

2,521 

1,527 

259 



2,696 



2,277 
81 3 

2,5^ 

11+7 

11,71+1 

15,519 

18,967 

876 

1,525 
6,1+18 
i+,1+99 
1+,100 

1,685 
5,6l42 

1,092 

2,037 

1,855 

195 



5,101 



A96 

651+ 
50 
21+9 
255 
256 

58 
,81+8 



-,Tlir 

527 
121+ 

1,175 
323 
1+56 

1,287 
5,1+67 



1,575 
668 

3,511 
231+ 



81+5 
396 

6,753 
2,38i+ 



2,1420 

1,061+ 

10,261+ 

2,618 



572 
220 

2,253 
95 



31+8 

121+ 

l+,598 

l,8l4l 



920 

5I4I+ 
6,851 

1,956 



1,003 

1,258 
139 



1+97 
272 

2,155 
51+3 



T 

l+,522 

1,11+3 

1+,831 

287 

21,226 

25,500 

59,663 
1,511 
1,663 

lo,:+6i3 
6,752 

6,801 
3,301 

7,777 

5,795 

l+,558 

3,180 

1+52 



, /97 



2,i.J07 
981 
151+ 

1,422 
576 
712 

1,31+5 

6,315 



1,500 
720 

5,1+15 

662 



United States Department of Jiistioe 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



Ijy COIJ;rfiC/' ok KMllAitKATIOW. ..uiCU JI/Mifi ^0, iv/<(^ i/ 

1:' 'JiL 






•• • " * • * • 



'llart/J 



./"I •■«3«t. Itiiliea 

'I • w • r/ 'f •*•</«»• • 
iOli. I li'; 1) jIIo. 

Itlah Horj/l ;rac**o 
nal Zari/) '^ Pamnne. 
' t« Rlr*.*^ ., -,.,«> .,o« 

J 4 « • W # « « '/ V 9 
LTt?.'' Or'»; *j », O '> V « '/ '' O «» 

- '5 '> o », ', * 

. .--I, •, '^ « « e '> 

I Guiana.,,..,., 

'' 4» 4 • If « « « « •/ ^ «<> '> '> 
-..'.tijLH-u «> •> '/ w V « « */ V «> 

tf/1 O JT ©•/.', ', V '/ V « V '^ "t 

' .'/ '-'' '^ o •■.'*•' «;f • V • ♦ 
'^r, of 'Ji.TT\^Tt 

' fiJ* . «f ♦, '/ ', V *< * ■■ « * 



I>y eott and by air 



Ail«lX/i 



i.yyy 



U.oio 

'356 
1«985 



CTTT 



(Jj'd 

709 
11,160 






ii<»r/« 



I. Ill 

'^.,'jyd 

ia.i^y 

129, yyo 
y.ii^y 

•yn 



Jk 



2^ 

25»iao 

195 

ojiy6 

2.i«ii9 

J4O3 
9y5 

j^^yc 

4//01 

7 

7/-45 

505 



'0> 



55 



959 
5l|2 

2'';9 



&.-15 
^01 

12,225 



iaii»052 



/ . ,. ^j-n 'j V9 of* travel over la.-.d 



/ y y 



Tol^ii 



5.575 



J 05 

^.y'io 

5U,29'J 

212.510 

ll,52ii 

5,2'>6 

5.oy5 
?>9 

4'iy 

ll*'i55 
5*^/i 
l»52iv 
2,95^i 

9A77 

15.'>7> 
1»15V 

21/; 

121 
2,595 
9J/.7 

'//'■> 
5*054 

'jI'j 

25.ii05 



Ailoru; 



i;y woft 



^/>7,059 



712 

1,0'-^ 

'J 
562 

l/Z/'y 

J ,;;(/> 

514 

4'> 

2,''>05 



52 

,2ia 

J. J 9 

755 

17 

5 



2.y.4 

'';2 
J9 

676 

951 
217 
C22 
197 
2,;j25 



114,752 
]^,llo 



Totfti 




''7 

l,'i'i5 

5l,2>o 

50.7''i5 
i^A*542 

1.916 

5,i/'Ji 



^%^^7 



5.1fJ2 

1 



555 

5''i5 
50 

l,OVi 
92 

l.'^'il 



U(5.117 
115,626 



2r^6i5 
~5^ 

5,/|06 
226 

20 

1.22> 

1.556 

267 

1,670 

2^i9 

4,706 



^42. 74^ 



.iy <».1 r 



AJ J«Alit 



1,0^}6 
''/>5 



^4^^121 

5 

5.559 

16.257 

72./i75 

5.6''/^ 

2,256 

511 
l.^/A 



11 
2,76> 

175 
2.761 

94 

'^59 

1.97'^ 

^ 5>^>-> 



"Ttt; 



5 
i^.550 

570 

144 

'/> 

9''X^ 
U.97i+ 

492 
1.797 

'^.555 



7.4/ji;) 



1.2/y. 

72^,/ 



15 

10,762 

'i5 

5.U55 

61 

9^ 

21.419 



i 



■005: 

7 

5.91*5 

561 

5ii 

52 

406 

2.957 

259 

1.567 

209 

10.5^ 



166.655 2ai.555 

06,9761 7^71^^. 



2,5/<i 



2,7. i 

/iy.'^v- 






2r 

15.551 

256 

6.2-1/. 

1.2';2 
2.947 

6^^ 






'.951 
751 

,'/4 



457, *90 



' <3 r« V 



United 3tat«« Depftrtant of Justie* 
Irnmij're.tior. anl Saturalize-tlon Service 



TABLE 32 „ PASSENGIK TRAVEL FROM THE UNITED STATES TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
BY COUNTRY OF DEBARKATION: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1949 1/ 



Country of 
debarkation 



All countries, 



Europe 

Austria „ ,„.«...,.„„ 

Belgium o o 

Czeciios Lovakia„ . , o . 

Dennifirk , » . , . 

Finland » .- . » 

Germany ,,o. ^ ...... o 

Great Britain <> o » . . . 

Gre'ice „ <, 

Iceland.. » » . « o » . . o <, . 
Ireland . o . . « . , » . . . . 
Italy. . o .. o o . o , . o o . 
NetherJ.andSo . = c . • . » 
Ko7'-»ay o o . o o , o o » . . . 
Pc i . ui.-t c »:..«-■. = .. O , 
f vi-i aga] <,,........, 

.eden 0.00.... = .... 

Switzerland o ...... . 

Turkey in Europe . . . 

Yugoslavia o . . = . . . . . 
Other Europe „,=.... 

Asia cie*o..o.ccos*;ec 

China .. ...... ..... = 

India. .....,.....=, 

Iraq » ............ . 

Japan and Koreix .... 

Palestine. .......... 

■Jyria and the Lianon 
Other Asia ..,.,. c . . 

Pacific , . 

Australia. ......... 

New Zealand. ....... 

Philippines . . . « . . . , 
Other Pacific ...... 



By sea and by air 



Aiien^ 



31 ^,^99 



141.044 



2,604 

73 

3,374 

101 

24,360 

2,364 

66,352 

1,566 

298 

3,122 

7,794 

y,041 

4,759 

608 

2,708 

1,880 

7,796 

1,121 

423 

376 

112 

212 

1^.74^ 
5,37?' 

53^ 

12 

,561 

,')26 

561 

172 



Citi- 
zens 



r 



548,352 



222.634 



1 = 
1, 



36 

3,411 

260 

4,002 

92 

47,016 

22,009 

63,336 

2,879 

1,528 

11,557 

28,989 

11,163 

5,094 

652 

5,052 

1,678 

10,549 

2,235 

659 

1 

75 

361 

29.767 



4,579 
1,101 

447 

19,721 

1,680 

871 
1,368 




Total 



863.951 



363,678 



36 

6,015 

333 

7,376 

193 

71,376 

24.373 

129,688 

4,445 

1,826 

14,679 

36,783 

20,204 

9,853 

1,260 

7,760 

3,558 

18,345 

3,356 

1,082 

377 

187 

573 

39t5l^ 



9,957 
1,63£ 
459 
21,282 
3,206 
1,432 
1,54'^ 



By sea 



Aliens 



143.085 



264.996 



102,600 



1,493 

1,967 

69 

17,073 

1,342 

52,136 

954 

71 

2,069 

0,673 

5,736 

3,818 

608 

1,041 

605 

5,945 

301 
376 
112 
211 

P. 126 



■,832 

237 

1 

1,135 

1,339 

461 

121 



514 

108 

:,962 

161 



¥ 



iti- 
zens 



154.312 



1,846 

2,133 

14 

36,121 

14,594 

43,362 

1,768 

21 

7,135 

24,348 

7,670 

3,600 

651 

1,307 

508 

8,610 

194 

74 
356 

24.926 



Total 



408,081 



256,9 12 



3,731 

545 

11 

18,494 

1,378 

5^-4 

183 

6,636 



345 

61 

3,831 

.2,399 



3,339 

4,100 

83 

53,194 

15,936 

95,498 

2,722 

92 

9,204 

31,021 

13,406 

7,418 

1,259 

2,348 

1,113 

14,555 

495 
376 
186 
567 



.tLX 



052 



8,563 

782 

12 

19,629 

2,717 

],0A5 

304 

10.3' i 

c> r , , 
](■ ' 

6,793 
2.560 



By air 



Aliens 



172 ,514 



38,444 



1,111 

73 

1,407 

32 

7,287 

1,022 

14,216 

612 

227 

1,053 

1,121 

3,305 
941 

1,667 
1,275 
1,851 
1 , 121 
122 



1,6^0 



546 
298 

11 
426 
187 
100 

51 

3.807 



2,090 
938 
641 
138 



¥ 



itlT 
zens 



283.356 



68,322 



36 

1,565 

260 

1,869 

78 

10,895 

7,415 

19,974 

1,111 

1,507 

4,422 

4,641 

3,493 

1,494 

1 

3,745 

1,170 

1,939 

2,235 

465 

1 

1 

5 

_J*j841 



Total 



455.870 



106.766 



848 
556 
436 

1,227 
302 
287 

1,185 

2.997 



839 

338 

1,130 

690 



36 
2,676 

333 
3,276 

110 

18,182 

8,437 

34,190 

1,723 

1,734 

5,475 

5,762 

6,798 

2,435 

1 

S412 

2,445 

3,790 

3,356 

587 

1 

1 

6 

6.460 



-,394 
854 
447 

1,653 
489 
387 

1,236 

6.804 



2,929 

1,276 

1,771 

828 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 32 o PASSENGER TRkVEL FROM ^J-ffi TJNITED STATES TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
BY COUNTRY OF DEBARKATION: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1949 (CONTINUED) 1/ 



1 

Country of 


By sea and by air ' 


By sea 




By air 


' Citi. 1 






Citi- 






Citi- 




debarkation 


Aliens 


zens 


Total 


Aliens 


zens 


Total 


Aliens 


zens 


Total 


rthern Africa » ........ . 


692 


1,628 


2,320 


395 


508 


903 


297 


1,120 


1,417 


iier Africao , » « , . o . , . . . . 


1,843 2,279 


4,122 


1,237 1,339 


2,576 


606 


940 


1,546 


rth America , ,, « <, . « 

Canada & Newfoxmdland, o 


109,448 217=385 


326,833 


13,040 45,543 


58,583 


96,408 


171,842 


268,250 


2,527 4,618 7,145 


965 1,378 


2,343 


1,562 


3,240 


4,802 


jreenianci ooooooooccoooo 


7 131 ! 138 


- 


=. 


7 


131 


138 


ileodcoc , . . . o . , . c , . c o 


924 2,793 3,717 


89 573 


662 


835 


2,220 


3,055 


Bermuda » , <, . . « , , . o . « o o » <, 


6,087 40,761 46,848 


1,470 12,554 


U,024' 


4,617 


28,207 32,824 


British West IndieSo = oo 


15,300 31,881 


47,181 


966 3,934 


4,900 


14,334 


27,947 42,281 


^UD& oo«0000«o»ooa»ooooo 


76,443 124,611 


201,054 


8,369; 25,541 


33,910 


68,074 


99,070 


167, U4 


)ominican Republic „ o . « o 


3,619 7,169 


10,788 


602 663 


1,265 


3,017 


6,506 


9,523 


)utch West Indies, . . , . , 


2,565 2,452 


5,017 


465, 789 


1,254 


2,100 


1,663 


3,763 


•Vench West IndieSooooo 


281 100 


381 


39 30 


69 


?k? 


70 


312 


lokl. wX ooooooooooo ooo«ooo 


1,695^ 2,869 


4,564 


75 81 


156 


1,620 


2,788 


4,408 


itral America o o , o . , « o . « 


10,179 31,510 


41,689 


2,384 18=214 


20,598 


7,795 


13.296 


21,091 


British Honduras o o . « . . « 


18 13 


31 


-1 1 


1 


18 


12 30 


i)anal Zone and Panama, » 


3,436; 18,822 


22,258 


1,018 j 10,405 


11,423 


2,418 


8,417 10,835 


]osta Rica, „ » . . , • » , . , , , 


248 1 264 


512 


108 U5 


253 


140 


119, 259 


}uatemala „ . , , , , „ 


3,137' 8,396 


11,533 


454' 5,034 


5,488 


2,683 


3,362 


6,045 


tenduras „ , <, , o . , , <. , . , . . , 


890' 2,706 


3,596 


784 2,610 


3,394 


106 


96 


202 


(icaragua » o, c,«. c ..... , 


820 471 


1,291 


7 12 


19 


813 


459 1,272 


JcLXVcLUOa OOOOOOOOO^OOOOO 


1,630 838 


2,468 


13 7 


20 


1,617 


831 2,448 


uth America , . . , o , 


??»096 
4,299 


33,516 i 68,612 


11.558 13,518 


25,076 


23,538 


19,998 43,536 


Argentina ,„..,..<. 


2,917 i 7,216 


1,904 1,823 


3,727 


2,395 


1,094 3,489 


Bolivia , , • <, , . . o = o o o c 


2 2i 4 


2 


2 


2 


2 


Brazil,..,... ...... 


6,254 7,198 1 13,452 


2,397 3,391 


5,788 


3,857 


3,807 7,664 


British Guiana, » , . o . . . , 


480 516 \ 996 


62 254 


316 


418 


262 680 


Dutch Guiana ,,,... .... , 


160 83 


243 


2 3 


! 5 


158 


80 238 


French Guiana, , , , o . . . . , 


119 33 


152 


6 


6 


119 


27 146 


Chile, o....o.....,,o... 


1,641 1,086 


2,727 


749 590 


' 1,339 


892 


496 


, 1,388 


Colombia ,,..,.., o...,, . 


5,498 


3,106 


8,604 


1,074 609 


1,683 


4,424 


2,497 


6,921 


Ecuador ,„,,,,,,. 


863 


315 


1,178 


214 75 


289 


649 


! 240 


889 


Peru, 


3,098 


2,873 


5,971 


758' 1,297 


2,055 


2,340 


1,576 


3,916 


Uruguay 0,..,.. ......,., 


532 


354 


886 


263 


158 


421 


269 


196 


465 


Venezuela ,,,..,. o,.,., , 


12,150 


15,033 


27,183 


4,135 


5,310 


9,445 


8,015 


9,723 


17,738 


ag of carrier: 
















1 




United States ,,...,,,, , 


170,310 


357,382 


527,692 


45,099 


128,588 


173,687 


125,211 


'228,794 354,005 


Foreign, ,, ,.,..,....., . 


145,289 


190,970 


336,259 


97,986 


136,408 


234,394 


47,303 


1 54,562 101,865 

1 



' Exclusive of travel over land borders o 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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TABLE 37. DECURATIDNS OF m.SOTIDN FZ^m, PETITIONS FOR NATURALIZATION FILED, 
AND PERSONS NATURALIZtlDg YEARS ENDED JWIE 30, 1?07 to 1949 ^ , 




Period 



1907-1949 
1907-1910 

1911-1920 

1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 

1921-=1930 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1^29 
1930 

1931-1940 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 

1937 
1938 

1939 
1940 



19a-1949 

19a 

1942 
1943 
1944 
1945 
1946 
1947 
19^.8 
1949 
JTMorAiers of 

in 1944 i 5 



Declara= 
tions 
filed 



2^686^ 

189,249 
171 A33 
182j095 
214,104 
247^958 
209,204 
440,651 
342,283 
391A56 
299,076 



2,709,014 



Petitions 
filed 



74,740 
95,661 
95,380 
124,475 
106,399 
108,767 
130,865 
169,507 
256,858 

218,732 



OOOOOOttOOOC OOOOOOOOOOOO 



303,90r 
273,511 
296,636 
424,540 
277,218 
277,539 
258,295 
254,588 
280,645 
62,138 

GOOOOOOOOO< 

1.369.479 



106,272 
101,345 
83,046 
IO85O79 
136,524 
148,118 
176,195 
150, t 73 
155,691 
203,536 

OOOOOOOOOOt 

826«757 



224,123 
221,796 
115,664 
42,368 
31,195 
28,787 
37,771 
60,187 



1,884,277 



Persons naturalized 



Civilian 



56,683 
70,310 
83,561 

104,145 
91,848 
87,831 
88,104 
87,456 
89,023 

125,711 

o§o ooooooooooc 

1,716,979 



Military 



"195, 53i. 
162,638 
165,168 
177,117 
162,258 
172,232 
240,339 
240,321 
^55,519 
1X3,151 

ooooooooooaoo 

1.637.U3 



145,474 
131,062 
112,629 
117,125 
131,378 

167,127 
165,464 
175,413 
213,413 
278,028 



- l,872^ v m 



the armed fo 
,666 in 19455 



277,807 
343,487 
377pl3t' 
325,71/ 
195,917 
123,864 
88,802 
68,265 

_JZl.oz^ 



160,979 
137,975 
140,340 
152,457 
146,239 
195,493 
228,006 
224,197 
167,637 

OOOOOOOOOOO 



Total 



63,993 

128,335 

51,972 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOO 



56,206 



1 ,128^972 

56,683 

70,310 

83,561 

104,145 

91,848 

87,831 

88,104 

151,449 

217^358 

177,683 



ooooeooe«ooaee*oo 



17,6^6 
9,468 
7,109 

10,170 

92 

4,311 

5,149 

531 

1,740 

00900090090000 

19.891 



1.773 ,185 



140,271 
136,598 
112,368 
110,867 
118,945 
140,784 

162,923 
158,142 

185,175 
232,500 



ooooooooooooooooo«oooooouoooooooooooooo 



1,772.950 



rces include 1 
2,054 in 1946 



275,747 
268,762 

281,459 
392,766 
208,707 
134,849 
77,442 
69,080 



3,224 
2 

995 
2,802 

481 

2,053 
3,936 
3,638 
2,760 



m^vi. 



1,547 
1,602 

37,474 1/ 
49,213 1/ 
22,695 1/ 
15,213 1/ 

16,462 y 
1,070 

2A^6 



181,292 
170,447 
U5,084 
150,510 

152,457 
146,331 
199,804 
233,155 
224,728 
169,377 

00000000000000000 



143,495 
136,600 

113,363 
113,669 

118,945 
ia,265 
164,976 
162,078 
188,813 
235^260 

0000000000000*0 

1,920.682 



277,294 
270,364 
318,933 
441 9979 
231,402 
150,062 

93,904 
70,150 

_66^ 



fTJ] 



in 19435 6,496 



,425 naturalized overseas 
; and 5,370 in 1947 

United States Depaxtment of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 38. PERSOHS 



lountry or region 

former 
llegiance 



NATURALIZED^ BY CLASSES UNDER THE NATIONALITY LAWS ^ AND COUNTEY 
OF K)RMS1R A LLEGIANCES YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 19^9 




All CO ant rl 68 

^arope. ........ 

AuBtria. 
Belgium. 
Brltiah Empire. 
Bulgaria. ...... 

Czechoslovakia. 
Denmark. ...... o 

letonia. ....... 

linland. ....... 

France. ........ 

Oermany. 
Greece. . 
Hungary, 
Ireland. 
Italy. ...... 

Latvia. ..... 

Lithuania. . . 
Netherlands. 
No rway . . . 
Poland. . , 
Portugal. 
Rumania. . 
Spain. . 
Sweden. ..... 

Switzerland. 
U.S.S.R. .... 

Yugoslavia. . 
Other Europe. 

China. . 
Japan. 
Palestine. 
Syria. ......... 

Other Asia. .... 

'anada. .......... 

■^exi CO . o ........ . 

rfest Indies. ..... 

Central A^ierica. . 

outh America. . . . 

*-f ri ca. .......... 

Philippines. ..... 

Stateless and misc. 



i/^ee also table U?' for detedl^ figures on naturalization hy statutory provisions. 



United States Department of Justice 
Tmtn-iiJTot.inn «nd Naturalization Service 






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TABLE U2. PERSONS NATUHALIZED, BY SEX AMD MARITAI, STATUS WITH. COMPARATIVE 
PERCENT OF TOTALj YEARS ENDED JUIIE 3O, 19UI to 19^9 



Sex and 

narl tal 
status 


I9U1 


19^+2 


19^3^/ 


19Ul4i/ 


1945^ 


1946^ 


1947 


1948 


191+9 


Both sexes 
Single, ....... 

Married. ...... 

Widowed. 

Divorced 

Hale. .....•••. 

Siagle..,. 

Married. ...... 

Widowed. 

Divorced. ..... 


277.29^ 


270, 36U 


317.50s 


lihsiher 
U35.i+S3 1 225.736 


148,008 


93.904 


70,150 


66.^91+ 


30,395 
228,750 

1^.33^ 
3,815 


2l|,756 

228,263 

13,635 

3.710 


55.17U 

239. 5S5 

17. 508 

5,2Ul 


71.278 

327.459 

29.067 

7,679 


1-«3,014 

163.200 

17.335 

5.187 


30.236 

101.828 

12,207 

3,737 


19.697 

64.704 

6,988 

2,515 


12.206 

50.513 

5,429 

1.997 


9,b23 

50, 723 

4, 6c4 
1.61^-4 


136.3i«! 


112,0140 


156„2U5 


196.227 


111.059 


74.250 


52,99s 


33.147 


27.365 


19. 1*52 
110,668 

1,S11 


15,567 

91.323 

3,»+36 


1+1,^51 
107,691+ 

2,6U2 


H5.725 

139.950 

7.007 

3.5»+5 


23,301 

80.571 

4,635 

2.552 


18,4x6 

50,668 

3,235 

1.931 


13.567 

35.942 

2.032 

1,1+57 


7.449 

23,200 

1.466 

1.032 


t,i4 

19.833 

1,089 
801 


Female. 


ll40,9U6 


158. 32U 


161.263 


239.256 


114,677 


73.758 


4o,9o6 


• vk-at*** 

37,003 


38,729 


Single 

Married 

Widowed. 

Divorced. ..... 


10. 9^+3 

118,082 

9.917 
2,00U 


9.189 
136,91+0 

10,199 
1.996 


13.723 

131.891 

13.050 

2,599 


25.553 

187. 509 

22,060 

4,134 


16,713 
82,629 

12,700 

2.635 


11,820 

51,160 

8,972 

1,806 


6.130 

28,762 

4.956 

1,058 


1+.757 

27,318 

3.963 

965 


3.i«il 
3o,sqo 

3.515 

843 




100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


Percent of total 


100.0 


100.0 




Both sexes 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


Single........ 

Married. ...... 

Widowed. ...... 

Divorced. ..... 

Male.......... 


11.0 

82,5 

5o2 

lo3 

49.2 


9.2 

8U.U 
5o0 
i.U 


17=^ 

75.5 
5.5 

1.6 

'°U9[2 


16.4 

75=2 

6.7 
1.7 


17.7 

72.3 

7.7 

2.3 

49^2 


20.4 

68,9 

8.2 

2c5 

50.2 


21.0 
68.9 

2.7 


17.4 
72.1 

7^7 
2.8 


i4.4 

76.;^' 

6.9 

2v5 

41 1« 


Single....... , 

Married, ...... 

Widowed. ...... 

Divorced. ..... 


7ol 

39.9 

1.6 

.6 


5=8 

33o8 

1.2 

.6 


i3oi 

33 = 9 
1.4 

.8 


10.5 
32,1 

1.7 
.8 


10.3 

35.7 

2,1 
1.1 


12.4 

3»+.3 
2.2 

1.3 


i4,4 

38.3 
2.1 

1.6 


10.6 

33.1 
2.1 

1.5 


9.2 
29. S 

1,6 
1.2 


Female. ....... 


50.8 


58.6 


50.8 


5l+»9 


50,8 


49.8 


43.6 


52.7 


58.2 


Single. ....... 

Married. ...... 

Widowed. ...... 

Divorced. ..... 


3.9 

U2.6 

3.6 

.7 


3oU 

50.6 

3 = 8 

.8 


4.3 

U1.6 

U.i 

,8 


5.9 
43.1 

5.0 
.9 


7.4 

36.6 

5.6 

1.2 


8.0 
34.6 

6.0 
1.2 


6.6 
30.6 

5.3 
1.1 


6.8 

39-0 
5.6 
1.3 


46,4 
5.3 
1.3 



y 



Does not include 1,425 members of the armed forces naturalized overseas in 1943; 
6,496 in 1944; 5.666 in 19455 and 2.054 in 1946. 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE U3. PERSONS NATURALIZJSD. BY SSX MD AOSs 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 3O0 IS'+l to 19^9 



Sex and age 


19 Ul 


I9U2 


191+3^ 


19 UU^ 


19^5^ 


191+6^ 


19^7 


I9I+8 


i9»+9 


Both eexes.o 
Under 21 years 


277.29'+ 


270,361+ 


317. 508 


1+35 vU83 


225.736 


11+8,008 


93,901+ 


70.150 


66,59U 




3U 


2,1+76 


5.609 


1,669 


1.21+1+ 


5I+I+ 


1+76 


987 


21 to 25 " 


6.1401 


6,222 


15.829 


19.1+1+1 


8,21+6 


7.269 


5.1+95 


2.970 


6,297 


26 to 30 " 


21,592 


18,682 


22,ll+8 


22,979 


11,51+0 


7.818 


6,627 


3.783 


6.07U 


31 to 35 " 


37.339 


35.001+ 


37.021 


1+3.893 


ll+,902 


10,223 


7,221 


^,131 


U,gg6 


36 to »«) " 


Us, 120 


1+6.156 


U9.I7U 


61.139 


2I+.399 


16,229 


11.205 


7,867 


7.107 


In to U5 " 


kk, 250 


1+1+.391 


1+7.706 


65.517 


29.976 


19.31+1 


ii+,09i 


11,113 


S.16U 


1*6 to 50 " 


Uo,596 


1+1. 5U7 


1+6,510 


65.280 


32.131 


20,1*12 


13.137 


11.170 


9,13s 


51 to 55 " 


32.560 


33.033 


38.392 


57.915 


32,856 


20,783 


11,531 


9,1+si 


7,822 


56 to 60 " 


21,597 


22,153 


28,1+18 


UI+.273 


29. 1*09 


18,599 


9,601 


8,018 


6,1+Ul 


61 to 65 " 


13.098 


12.809 


16,61+9 


27.173 


20,86U 


13.185 


7.3U7 


5.637 


U.U73 


66 to 70 " 


6,832 


6,1+83 


8.1+61+ 


ll+.UlS 


11,952 


7.636 


l+,260 


3.30U 


2.551 


71 to 75 " 


3.013 


2.662 


3.257 


5.53U 


5.226 


3.298 


1.953 


1.1+1+5 


1,08U 


Dver 75 " 
Hale.o ...... 

Jnder 21 years 


..1,296. 
136.3U8 


...1JS2. 
112„0l*0 


...i,U6i+. 
156,21+5 


...2,312. 
196,227 


...2,566. 
111,059 


..l.5?l. 
71+, 250 


892. 


....755. 


.... 510. 


52,99s 


33.l»+7 


27,86$ 


- 


19 


2.359 


5.378 


1.579 


1.115 


H06 


257 


^33 


21 to 25 " 


3.5U1 


3.1+01+ 


12.00I+ 


n.915 


U.I15 


3.297 


3.032 


711 


1.239 


?6 to 30 « 


10,700 


8,072 


12.710 


n,39U 


5.191 


3.719 


i+.ii+l 


1,091+ 


1.705 


31 to 35 " 


17.670 


13,706 


18,788 


19,636 


6,668 


5.116 


U,073 


1,569 


1,925 


56 to I40 " 


21.925 


17.6U1 


22.575 


2U. 960 


10,772 


7.902 


6,1*25 


3.672 


3.257 


^\ to U5 " 


19.555 


16.219 


20,1+28 


25.U16 


13.777 


9.151 


8. 185 


5,625 


i+,25i+ 


it6 to 50 " 


19,016 


15.707 


18.801 


2^,659 


li+,770 


9.U81 


7,505 


5.679 


U,27l 


51 to 55 " 


17.U01 


1I+.356 


17.599 


25. 108 


15.788 


10.095 


6,122 


1+.535 


3M-6 


36 to 60 " 


12,U06 


10,836 


li+,6l+6 


21.986 


15.658 


9.926 


5.051 


U,098 


2,971 


3l to 65 " 


7.651 


6.5U7 


9.063 


ii+»303 


11.955 


7.535 


1+.195 


2,981 


2,1S6 


36 to 70 • 


U,oo6 


3.389 


1+.559 


7.371 


6.537 


1+.236 


2.310 


1,737 


1.297 


n to 75 " 


1.713 


1.1+61 


1,861+ 


2.90I+ 


2,81+6 


1,819 


1.075 


766 


570 


)ver 75 " 


764 


.....683. 


. ....?^?. 


...l?!?!, 


...^5^3. 


....?58^ 


_ 1+78 


_ _ 1+23 _ 


__ 263 


Female^ ..... 
Mer 21 years 


ii40o9U6 


158.321+ 


161.263 


239.256 


lli+.677 


73,758° 


Uo,906 


'37^003' 


36.729 


~ 


15 


117 


231 


90 


129 


138^ 


219 


55^5 


21 to 25 " 


2,260 


2.818 


3.825 


7,526 


U„1.31 


3.972 


2,U63 


2.259 


5.058 


26 to 30 " 


10,892 


10,610 


9.1+38 


11.585 


6,3^9 


1+.099 


2,1+36 


2,6S9 


U,36^9 


51 to 35 " 


19.669 


21.29s 


18.233 


21+.257 


8.231+ 


5.707 


3.1US 


2,562 


2.961 


36 to Ho " 


26.195 


28^515 


26.599 


36,179 


13,627 


8.387 


l+,780 


U,195 


3,850 


^1 to 45 " 


25.295 


28.172 


27.278 


iw.ioi 


16.199 


10.190 


5,906 


5,US8 


i+,9io 


1*6 to 50 * 


21.580 


25.8I+O 


27.709 


1+0. 621 


17,361 


10.661 


5.632 


5.U91 


1+.927 


51 to 55 " 


15.159 


18. 677 


20.793 


32,807 


17.068 


10,688 


5.1+09 


i+,9i+6 


•+,33^ 


56 to 60 " 


9.191 


11.317 


13.772 


22.287 


13.751 


8,673 


4, 550 


3.920 


3,^70 


Si to 65 " 


5Ml 


6.262 


7.586 


12.870 


8,909 


5.650 


3,152 


2.656 


2,287 


S6 to 70 ' 


2,826 


3. 091+ 


3.905 


7.01+7 


5.U15 


3,1*00 


1,950 


1.567 


1,25U 


71 to 75 ' 


1.300 


1.207 


1.393 


2,630 


2,380 


1.U79 


878 


679 


51 U 


Over 75 " 


532 


U99 


615 


1.115 


1.163 


723 


Uli+ 


332 


21+1 


1/ Does not in( 


:lude l.U; 


25 members of the 


armed for 


ces nature 


■ilized overseaa in 19^3; 


6,1+96 


In 19U4j 5,( 


>66 in 19 


1+5; and 2.O5I+ in 1 


9U6„ 














Uai 


ted Statei 


5 Department of Justice 












Immi 


gration ai 


id Natura 


lizatiou 


Service 





TABLE UU. PERSOKS MTUHALIZED, BY STATES ASfD TERRITORIES OF RESIDBHOE: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 19^5 to 19^9 " 



State of residence 



Total 

Alal)a]na 

Arizona ^ 

Arkansas 

California 

Colo rado 

Oonnectlcat 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idab$ 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Loui si ana. . 

Maine.. 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan. 

Hinneso ta 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada. 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey. 

New Mexi CO , . 

Hew York 

North Carolina 

North Dako ta 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 



19^5 



231.^2 



289 
588 
138 

IS.OOU 

755 

7,712 
392 
922 

2,081 
U58 

203 

13.551 

2,123 

9U7 

613 

260 

855 

1.S73 

1.520 

18. 172 

12,952 

2,010 

192 

2.678 

U23 

720 

155 

1.069 

15.958 

2^8 

81,123 
209 
5U6 

10,711 
332 



19^ 



150.062 



190 


101 


U57 


375 


66 


30 


1^0 595 


10,120 


587 


355 


K12S 


2,952 


285 


120 


1,035 


686 


1.159 


880 


206 


139 


210 


128 


9.301 


5.230 


l„o6g 


667 


5^9 


3^+2 


Uio 


l64 


180 


100 


U76 


350 


1.193 


isk 


1.5^7 


588 


11„809 


6,806 


s„6is 


5.128 


1.55s 


709 


83 


51 


1,668 


683 


269 


18U 


UsU 


205 


107 


66 


721 


629 


8,5'+3 


^.919 


190 


1U2 


50.S62 


29 , 008 


22U 


88 


173 


218 


5.289 


2.625 


199 


103 



19J+7 



19U8 



Ji^2oi. 



70,150 



102 

305 

30 

9.194 

2^5 

1.987 

77 

350 

823 

62 

125 

3,259 
505 
2^5 

159 

68 

517 

539 

U. 618 

3.665 

560 

U7 

U13 

172 

116 

322 

U.liU 

58 

25. 238 
103 
1^48 

l.SUg 
110 



19U9 



ii^^l 



109 

329 

60 

9.370 
32U 

1,861 

85 

ii30 

1,069 
157 

76 

3.297 

UlS 

159 

55 
273 
557 
509 

5.021 

3.301 

660 

60 

193 

135 

71 
371 

3,^^M5 



21 



174 
126 
ll^l 

2,285 
120 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE UU. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY STATES AND TERRITOHIES 01 RESID.f}3CE: 
TEARS ENDED JUNE 30, I9U5 to 19U9 (Cont'd.) 



State of residence 



Oregon 

Pennsylvania. . , 
fihode Island. . . 
South Carolina. 
South Dakota. . • 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Termont 

Virginia 

Vaehington 

West Virginia.. 

WisconBin 

Wyoming 

'erritories, etc. 

Alaska 

Hawaii 

Puerto Rico. . . . 
Virgin Islands. 
All other 



19 U5 



920 

13.201 

2.936 

138 

287 

308 
3.1U8 

729 
1*83 

3.096 

88U 

3.097 

151 



150 

257 
121 

^7 
326 



19U6 



755 

9,235 

1,^50 

92 

189 

116 

2,381* 
312 
5U2 

395 

l.sUc 
582 

1.827 
122 



97 
51 U 

115 
312 



19U7 



730 

U,U28 

1,016 

55 

155 

III+ 
1.532 
1^7 
355 
261 

1.696 

230 

1.031 

69 



121 

593 
83 

U8 

5.565 1/ 



19U8 



Ug2 

2,698 

598 

55 

65 

58 
78U 
124 
283 
208 

168 

51 



105 

1,UU2 
95 
19 
77 



19149 



301 

2,685 

650 

63 

U6 

92 

1.122 

105 

277 
332 

1.3^5 

166 

726 

U6 



87 
1,362 

73 

37 

5 



/ Includes 5,092 residents of the Philippine Islands. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



^iLa h% PiaSOHS HATUEALIZID, BY SPlCIFI&D CttUMBlS^ Ojf ^ipWBi JXLMI 
AID BY HUEAL A»D UBBAK JLBXi AJTO CITT l/j TliOl MDS» MA 3». ^3**^ 



Gi«{sfl of plac* 
and city 



Total ; Germany 



Country of. forawr 5^11*gi&ttc« 



Itjily 



Tstal. 



firal . ■ 



rCftSo 



Polaad 



a e • e s B 



• * e 



O o 




lt7 totml.o , 
Lot An^fsleso Calif. 
0«k:)l«Ad, Oallf 
8w BitfOo Calif 
San Vraneltooc Calif. 
BriAgvporto Conn 
Sar^fordr Conn. 
1«v Haveac Conn. ....... 

VaMiiagton, Dp C 
Mlttffli, 71a.. 
Obi ease » 111 
8«w Orldant; I« 
Baltiaoreg Md. 
destoiiD Mass 
(})us\>ridse, Mag« 
?&11 M'rero^AsSo <■ 

V. B<»dfoM(, Ha«« 

^'ring-fi«ldt, Ma»t 

Voisi'oastdr, Maetto o . 

'■ vifoitii, Mich. CO . . 

.iinaapoliSo Minn. 

S«. Louis,. Mo. - . . . 

• a«y City„ H„ J„ 

S-frtertkoUc f . J. . . . 

-■falOt K. Yo . . . . 
- -_ Tofkc Jf* Y. . o o 
S)>«ii*«i«r(, H. Y, . . 
(iiueinnati, Ohio.. 
Slwal&ndo Ohio... 
^'ftHlaadi, Ora. c . . . 
Itdffiiphifti, Pa. . 
: i t^isbargho P»o o o o 
SsffARtoao Pa. o o „ o . 
yid«nc«o B. I. . 
^toniCi, Tex.. 
tttUft„ Wash.... - 
:«*'„ Wis 
Ues 
rritories and 



,^- - Population of less than 2,500 
Cltiea, - 100.000 or over. 



Population of 2,500 to S9,999<, 



United States D«!partae&t ef Justice 
Xuiijtration and Bataralisfttlon Servlcs 



TABLE 46. 



FER30KS I;ATURALIZj£D, 3Y COUIITRY CR REGION OF BIRTH AND YEAR OF EI^TRY; 
YEAR ENDED JWIE 30, 1949 



Country or 
region of 
birth 



All countries-. 



rope . . o 

Austria , 

delgiura, 

Bulgaria .„«,,. 
:;zechoslovakia , 

Denmark 

Eston: a , o . . . . . . 

Finland , 

France. 

ermany , 



}reat 



(England. , 
(Scotland. 
Britain (Wales ... , 

ireece 

fiungary . . . , . ....... 

Ireland , . . 

Italy. 

Latvia ..,..,.....,-• 

Lithuania 

ietherlands ... . . 
iorthern Ireland.. . 

tJorway ..«.,..- 

Poland 

Portugal , 

Rumania , 

Spain , 

Sweden ............. 

Switzerland.. 

U.S.S.R.,., 

Yugoslavia.. ........ 

ether Europe ...... 



la. . , o 
China. 
India .<,... 
Japan ..... 
Palestine , 
ether Asia 



o .» ^ o • 



Number 
natu- 
ral- 
ized 



66,594 



nada 

iwfoundland . ^ 

acico. 

ist Indies = o , « 

intral America ^ ........ 

)uth America . 

E'rica. 

istralia and Kew Zealand 

lilippines 

^her countries 



Year of entry 



1940- 
1949 



20,718 



1,221 

613 

69 

1,289 

521 

106 

502 

1,448 

6,047 

4,883 

1,567 

176 

1,545 

1,071 

1.899 

8,183 

176 

613 

7^3 

4.39 

907 

4,521 

958 

691 

659 

1,033 

425 

2,892 

822 

506 

2..Q6.9., 



Lk^Zll 



994 

135 

21 

62 

857 

8,090 
128 

^,214 

1,821 
409 
470 
330 
579 

3,486 
47 3 



1930- 
1939 



7.020 



i±j. 



8^ 



544 

488 

25 

461 

170 

64 

120 

1,107 

1,546 

2,857 

377 

91 

394 

285 

263 

i,3e6 

82 
97 

J.49 

;r/5 

1,506 
142 
231 
154 
117 
127 
489 
184 
159 

627 
2S6 

80 
9 

22 
220 

3,106 
63 
296 
695 
266 
221 
269 
500 
212 
188 



1920- 
1929 



19,640 



12,482 



137 
28 
12 

159 

43 

9 

59 

73 

1,048 

316 

160 
11 

208 
98 

229 
1,146 
10 
31 
71 
51 
86 

275 
68 
51 
76 
46 
44 

10-: 

108 
85 

274 



1>4 

13 

3 

16 
88 

768 
11 

141 

173 
36 
51 
13 
29 

656 



1910- 
1919 



10,720 



8.042 



177 

42 

9 

245 

154 

21 

112 

139 

2,900 

1,011 

845 

44 

305 

150 

880 

2,153 

33 

48 

129 
143 
277 
614 
267 
U6 
229 
454 
154 
507 
160 
134 

_.i57. 



327 

31 

9 

18 

212 

2,593 
32 

962 

544 

79 

140 

27 

29 

2,081 



1900- 
1909 



. 6,4 93 



i^.,670 



180 

27 

13 

208 

68 

5 

126 

58 

246 

380 

100 

16 

446 

257 

210 

1,857 

25 

229 

95 

43 

108 

1,243 

304 

135 

160 

192 

55 

955 

214 

87 



1890- 
1899 



148 

8 

6 
217 

850 

13 

702 

311 

12 

36 

16 

12 
310 
JZL 



153 

14 

9 

186 

53 

2 

75 

48 

168 

202 

63 

8 

x78 

257 

218 

1,423 

18 
189 

37 

37 
128 
793 
159 
122 

31 
157 

29 
729 
148 

36 



151 



43 
3 



105 

440 
6 

88 

74 
4 

15 
5 
5 

29 
6 



.2^. 



701 



17 
6 

18 
9 

7 

9 
52 
42 
13 

1 

3 

18 

72 

170 

5 
14 

7 
12 

8 
61 
10 

5 

3 
46 

8 
81 

1 

3 

-^1 



1880- 
1889 



368 



11 



12 

182 
2 

14 
6 



1 
10 



253 



7 
3 

4 
5 



5 

68 

38 

5 

5 

4 
18 
21 

2 

10 

3 

15 
12 



9 

5 

14 



1870^ 
1879 



J^ 



25 



1860- 
1869 



1 

4 

10 



2 
2 



1 
2 

1 
2 



91 

1 

7 
2 



1 
9 



16 



1 
1 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE U6A0 PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY COUril'ftY OH R1SGJ0« J^^^i^^'H AITD GOU^Ivffif OR HBG-\J» 
or FORMER ALLEGIAKCiSs YMB ENDE D .j:q3|i'30t._i.fe 



CouAtry or 
regiou of 
birth 



All countries. 

lurope. ... = ..<... 

Auetria° o . . . . . 

Belgiunic ...... 

Bulgaria^ . . . . . 

Czechoslovakia 

Sennark, 

Istoniao 

Finlando , . 

Trance. ....... 

Qermaxiy 



Great 
Britain 



(Engl and o . 
(Scotland. 
(Wales. . . . 



Greece. ......... 

Hungary. ........ 

Ireland. ........ 

Italy.... ....... 

latvia. ......... 

Lithuania. ...... 

Netherlands. .... 

Northern Ireland 
Norway. ..,,...„. 
Poland. ..... 

Portugal. . .. 

Bumaniao .... 

Spain. ...... 

Sveden. ..... 

Switzerland. 
UoS. So R. . . . . 

Yugoslavia. . 
Other EuroTje 



Asia, :....... 

China. ..... 

India. ..... 

Japan. ..... 

Palestine. . 
Other Asia. 

Canada. ..... 

Newfoundland. 

Meil CO 

We«t Indies. . 

Central Americao ....... 

South America. . . . . . 

Af ri ca. ,,....„..... = ... 

Australia & New Zealand 
Philippines. ........... 

Other count ri ego ....... 



•...00 






CO 
(D 

U 
■P. 



o 
o 

r-i 



(D 

o 



66,52i£ 



^6.525 



221' 

613 
69 
289 
521 
106 
502 

0U7 

883 

176' 

5U5 
071 

899 
8.183 

176 
613 
7U3 
U39 
907 

U,521 
958 

691 

659 
10O33 

U25 

2,892 

822 

506 

2„06 



I 



99 
135 

21^ 

62 

S5t 
80 090 

128. 
2o2ll+ 
lo821 
U09 
U70 
330 
579 

^73 



■32.213 



U5.819 



1.185 

601^ 

68 

1,268 

516 
105 
h98 

H37 

881 

855 

556 
175 

io5'+l 
1,056 

1.895 
8,i6l+ 

171 
599 
736 
U39 
898 

1+0 392 
957 
65^ 
652 

I0O27 
U2J+ 

2.772 
807 
U87 

599 



Country or reg i on of former allegiance 



u 

-p 

M 



1.19^ 



1.191 



1.079 



19 



21 



73 

79 

6 

6 

1+35 

a83 

126 
„2l40 

39 

lOU 

222 

578 

10 

286 



12 
1 



he 



•ri 






•H 
U 



6l2|l3.28U 



610 



1 
572 



7,831 



7 
3 
1 



10 



1 

5 



_; 



■J4 



m 

o 
xi 
o 
© 

o 



1.28U 



1.281 



11 
2 

u 

h 
5f 

3 
8 

15 

39 

U.827 

i.5'*7 

17^ 

10 

13 
531 
13 

2 
2 

3 

U27 

2 

36 

h 
11 

2 
11 

1 

Ul 
10 

76 

152 



30 
1 






1,217 

1 



18 

71 
2' 

6 
55 

3.161 

125 

2 

1.198 

30 
65 

J9 

575 

k 

102 



u 

(D 



5ii 



d 

r-i 

•rl 



iiii 



521WlJi8ji 



1 

509 






O 
t 



1,658 



■51 



U75 



1.369 
16 

8 



^ 



5 



o 
o 



bO 



W 



^,111 1^630^036 

5.7U7|U576.3:,P30 



1 

6 

5,636 
3 



- < 



J I 
1 



J. 



1: 



18 

1 
k 
1 

6 
30 

3 

16 



It 

12 

5 

1 
12 

2 

3 
123 
11 



1 
2 
2 
6 

J. 

2 

1 

1 

36 

3 

2 

3 
9 
3 
5 

3 



iii 16 



1 

2 

5 



1,51^ 

i 

2 

5 



1| 
1- 

1, 

1; 



1* 
2 
2 
37 

Ho 



)40 



19 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE /^6A, PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY CCUiMl'RY Oil REGION OF BIRTH ANU COUl\.rRY OR REGION 
OF FORMER ALLEGIAN CE; YEAR RTED JUI;E 30, 1149_.(ConU.nued) 



Country or 
region of 
birth 









Country or region of former allegiance 



•d 









o 



<D 



o5 
O 



H 

Si 

o 

Oh 



Qi 
•H 



CO 



© 



1 

1-4 

K 
-P 



All countries , 



O O O • D I 



I ■} o o • o 



UTope o . . o . o . . . o 

Austria <, 

Belgium o ...... 

Bulgaria „ 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark ....... 

Estonia « . . . . . . 

Finland , . o . . . . 

France ,...,„.. 

Germany , . o , . . . 

„ . (England , 

^^f^ . (Scotland 
Britain (^^,^^^3^ 

Greece. ,0 

Hungary . c . . . o „ . 
Ireland „ . « , . « . . , 
Italy . o o . a . . . o . . 
Latvia ^ ,,,.... o » 
Lithxiania o . . o . . . 
Netherlands 0.000 
florthern Ireland 
Norway » , o . , • » . . 
Poland o o .; . . . o o . 
Portugal , o • o . . o o 
Rumania ,. . » , , » , » o 
Spain c 

Sweden 00000.. 
Switzerland o » 
UoSoS„R,,o,_ 

Yugoslavia c . 
Other Europe o 



siao. . . 
China, 
India o 
Japan < 

Palestine , „ . . 
Other Asia. <, „ . 

anada .... o, ... . 
ewf oundland , , „ , 
exico coo,..,.., 
est Indies , o . . , 
entral America, 
■outh America » o , 
Africa „ „ o o . . ,, o . , 
ustralia & New Zealand 
hilippines o o o . « . . « . . . . 
^her countries o o o o . . o « 



1 ,370 



e,3oi 



601 



836 ; 912 I 4.371 



971 



632 



676 



1^04/4 



.hhh 12/^2 



lx26i 



8JJZ1 



600 



763 I 905 j 4.361 



10 



.251 



628 



ill 



1.034 



14 
8 



1,352 



11 



14 
4 
1 

1 

3 
1 
2 

8,111 
2 

1 

1 



21 

1 



588 



3 
1 

1 

2 

18 

22 



75 



715 

1 
6 
1 
1 

1 

2 

1 

4 



1 ' 

2 ' 
21 

1 j 

2 I 
1 i 



2 

9 
60 

1 



2 
1 



1 
13 



886 

2 



7 
3 
3 
5 

2 
4,192 



455 12.662 
2 7 

2 

3 
1 

1 
8 
27 
1 
2 



2 
2 



949 

1 



1 
2 



2 

37 

1 

5 



1 
599 

9 

1 
1 



1 

64^4 

1 

2 

1 

2 



2i 
3 



1,011 
2 
2 



2 j 21 

- , 1 
1 ' 4 

_ ! _ 

398 3 

- 12,606 

- I 1 

3 1 



1 

2 



20 

8 
2 

1 
J8 



1 
1 



1 
2 

3 
2 
5 

2 

6 



1 



1 
1 



2 I 



1 



United States Department of Justice 



TABLE U6k„ 



PH130NS NATURALIZED, BY COUNTRY OR RBGIC41 OF BIRTH AND COUNTRY OR REGION 

OF FORMER ALLEG IANCE: YSAR MD ED JUIvE;lQ , 1949 (Continued) 

»/' ■allegiince_ 



Country or 
region of 
birth 



i^ 

All covmtries , . . o o > o 
Europe o , « o 

AuS W4 XA ««*«0'**oooao«o 
O^X^XUfll o««9«oooodooao 

Bulgaria <> o o 

Csechoslovakiao . . <> , . <. 

UOriniAi/K ooooo««eftoc>»o* 
Jj8X»0&1XA ooo«090«eooooo 

r xnxAnci ooao«oooo*«*oo 

"a &IiC0 ooooooaooecaeoo 
vrOjrS&Zijr oooooo»«eoo0O« 

( England „ . « » 

^J^^ (Scotland, 

Britain (Wales.. „,=o 

Xl^Oj-^TlCL oobooooooooooo 
X uCl.±J^ oooo teo9«*ooooo0 
Xift wVXa ooOoooaaoooo«»o 

LithuaniA <^o*»»*»oo>oo 
NethorlAnds oo^ooaoooo 
Northern Ireland o « o » o 

r» or way ooeoooa4.o*o«aoC' 
r OJLanU oooood«oOo«soo« 

* or wU^aX 000009000»«00 

RujTUUila oo*o««« 00 

wOaXXl ooooeaff**««*»a«o 
'wWOGian OQOOOOOOOtOOOOS 

Switcerland <> 

Xu^osxavxa ooooeooo«oo 
Other Europe c • . • . » o o <> 

ABXa oooo««ooooooeooeooo 
wIULIjA coo«oooo»o*»oooo 
AllQXa ooooeooacoooeooo 

Japan oo«.o oo 

V/wlier *&gXa ooee«»ooaoo 

Canada ..^. . . . 

Newfoundland ........ o. . 

Mexico 0..... o o 

neStf xIlCu.e0 o»«....eoooo 

Central America, . , . . . , o 
South Americao ......... 

Africa , . o 

Australia & New Zealand 
Philippines OO0........O 

Other countries ........ 



Country or r»f^jL9n of fo' 




l^ted St&t«i3 DepartKent cf Justice 



TABLB k], PERSONS NATUHALIZED, BY STAIUTOHY 
PHOVISIONS K)R NATURALIZATION: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30 „ I9I+5 to 19U9 



Statutory provisions 



19^5 



I9U6 



191^7 



19U8 



Total naturalized. 



231, U02 



150,062 



93.90if 



70,150 



ttloaality Act of 19>40 



General provisions. 

Sees. 310(a)(l3), 31I, and 312 - Persons married 

to Uo S, citizenso 

Sees. 315, 316 - Children, including adopted 

children, of Uo S„ citizen parents. 

Sec. 317(a) - Women who lost U. S, citizenship 

through marriage. , . 

Sec. 317 (c) - Dual U. S. nationals expatriated by 

entering or serving in amed forces of a foreign 

Sec. 31s (a) - Former U. S. citizens expatriated 
through expatriation of parents. 

Sec. 319(a) - Persons who lost citizenship 
through caucellation of parents' natural izatioa 

Sec. 320 - Persons misinformed prior to July 1, 
1920, regarding citizenship status. ...... o.... , 

Seco 32IA - Filipino persons whose continuous 
residence in the U. S„ commenced prior to 
May 1 , 193I1 !/.......,....._„......,....,_.. 

Sec. 322 - Noncitizen natives of Puerto Rico - 
declaration of allegiance. ..................... 

Sec. 32k - Persons who served in U. S. armed 
forces for three years. ........................ 

Sec. 32UA - Persons who served in U. S, armed 
forces in World War I or World War II or were 
honorably di scharged 2/. 

Sec. 325 - Persons who served on certain U. S. 

■ CoBv^OOoo • as* • •• a oeo Ds o » • o o • o« s • ve so* *•• ooae« 

Sec. 701 - Persons naturalized while serving in 
the U. S, armed forces in World War II......... 

Sec. 701 - Persons honorably discharged from 
U. S. armed forces following service in World 

"»*r ^Xo«oi>o«oo»«saaoooeoaoeooa a»*s o a*»ooaoaooOO 

Sec. 702 - Persons serving in U. S<, armed forces 
outside of the U. S„ in World War II........... 

t of July 2. iqUo 



137,729 

69,526 

182 

506 

6 

k 

k 

86 



Persons who entered the United States while 
under 16 years of age. .................... 



Ik 
25 

I9U 

ii+,3i^ 

2,715 
5,666 

U18 
13 



93.3^+6 

Uo,i90 

118 

klk 

8 

13 

63 



11 

39 

2U6 
7,391 

5.768 
2.05U 

I401 



^6.339 

27,066 

2U5 

316 

22 
6 
2 

31 

2,655 
83 

24l 

1.105 

9,9S7 
5,370 

U36 



3^.3^7 

28,898 

419 

296 

29 

12 

1 

26 

U,200 

15 
98 

U18 
90 

980 



316 
5 



Act of July 2, I9U6 
Act of June 1, 19U8 
' Sections 701 and 702 are no longer operative. Petitions filed under Sec. 701, which ware 
Btill pending on June 1, 19U8, were determined in accordance with Sec 32UA of the 

nationality Act of I9U0 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE i|8. WRITS OF HABEAS CORPUS IN EXCLUSION AM) DEPORTATION CASES: 

YEARS ENDED JUlffi 30, I9I4O to 19i49 



Action taken 


191+0- 
191+9 


191+0 


191+1 


19I42 


191+3 


19I4I+ 


191+5 


191+6 


191+7 


19I4S 


191+9 


otal Writs of 
Habeas Corptis 


2,808 


21+6 


5I42 


222 


97 


81+ 


9? 


26? 


W+ 


306 




Disposed of 

Sustained* ...o.....* 

Dismiss ed. 

Withdra-wn* ...•<>..... 


511 


114 

1,967 

727 


11 

180 

55 


12 

1+83 

1+7 


23 
158 


1 
62 
31+ 


2 
1+6 
36 


3 

55 
35 


9 
133 
121 


15 
278 

151 


29 
175 
102 


9 
397 
105 


Pending end of year... 


1M+ 


79 


113 


25 


27 


20 


16 


206 


156 


160 


U4+ 


Involving Exclusion 
























Disposed of 

Sustained......... 

Dismissed. ........ 


515 


130 


138 


50 


10 


6 


6 


1+ 


61+ 


1+8 


59 


39 
317 
159 

16 


1+ 
92 
31+ 

Ul 


7 
96 
35 

29 


9 
30 
11 


1 
6 
3 

2 


1 

3 

2 


2 

3 
1 


h 


6 
19 
39 

15 


3 
26 

19 

12 


6 
38 
15 

16 


Wi'tiidratvn. ........ 


Pending end of year. 


2 


2 


1 


1 


Involving Deportations 
























Disposed of .....o... 

Sustained* .... ... . 

Disndssed* ..,..•.* 
Withdrawn. 


2,293 


116 


1+01+ 


172 


87 


78 


87 


259 


380 


258 


1+52 


75 

1,650 

568 


7 
88 
21 


5 

387 

12 


14 

128 

30 


56 
31 


1 
1+3 
31+ 


1 
52 
31+ 


9 
129 
121 


9 
259 
112 


■■" 2^ 

11+9 

83 


3 

359 

90 


Pending end of year* 


128 


38 


81+ 


23 


25 


18 


15 


205 


litl 


11+8 


128 



United States Departnent of Jiostice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 49, PROSECUTIONS FOR VIOLATING IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY LAWS: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1940 TO 1949 



Action taken 


1940- 
1949 


1940 


1941 


1942 


1943 


1944 


1945 


1946 


1947 


1948 


19149 


TOTAL PROSECUTIONS: 
Disposed of 


59,251 


3,747 


2,439 


3,315 


3,807 


5,083 


7.746 


5,763 


7.889 


818IO 


10.652 


Conv ctions . ..0. .o. .. ..o.o.. 

Acquittals, , = ,.c «= , »»= » r. = .c . 
Dismissals J^a .o „. ,.» .r oo.oc. 

Pend i ng end of year„ . » , o . „ . . ^ . 

Prosecutions for violating 
inmiqration laws 


55; 108 

196 
3,947 

554 
57. 545 


3,569 

23 
155 

388 
3,689 


2,246 

8 
185 

356 
2.402 


2,993 

16 
306 

472 
3>234 


3,344 

25 
438 

564 
3.659 


4,759 

29 

295 

871 

4,959 


6,490 

13 

1,243 

465 
7.438 


5,388 

18 

357 

617 
5,569 


7,486 

18 

385 

547 
7.731 


8,518 

21 

271 

610 
8.553 


10,315 

25 

312 

554 


Disposed of . ooo„o« = o..... w. 


10.311 


Conv ictionso .= co = oooooo.,;.,,. 
Acquittals, n , = o.= J. .o ... = = . 
Dismissals i/.cooo».oo. co.< . 

Prosecution for violating 
national ity laws 
Disposed of , ,.oo l =. = a .doo. . 


53,734 

156 

3,655 

HS6 

1,706 


3,528 

19 

142 

346 
58 


2,216 

7 

179 

328 
37 


2,917 

15 

302 

445 
81 


3,215 

19 

425 

523 
148 


4,654 

16 

' 289 

830 
124 


6,252 

9 

1,177 

421 
308 


5,251 

17 

301 

579 
194 


7,359 

14 

358 

505 
158 


8,306 

IB 

232 

555 
257 


10,036 

25 

250 

486 
341 


Con VIC ti ens c ., no u..,o., 

Acquittals .,== ..».».. r„ , . 
Dismissals j/. ,..,», „ „ , ,, 

Pending end of yeaf„c.. = o., . , 

AGGREGATE FINES AND 
IMPRISONMENT" 

Fines .oooo,. aooo ,.»».i., . . , 


1,37-4 

40 

292 

68 
$402,709 


, 41 
4 
13 

42 

$21,758 


30 
1 
6 

28 
$25 223 


76 
1 
4 

27 

$27,747 


129 
6 
13 

41 

$76 542 


105 

13 

6 

41 

$29,765 


238 

4 

66 

44 

$21,229 


137 

1 
56 

38 

$51,329 


127 

4 

27 

42 

$76,058 


212 

6 

39 

55 

$75,510 


27' J 
62 
68 

$47,548 


Immigration laws, ,oo=.uooo. 
Nationality laws o,.o,,, = ... 

Imprisonment (years).o „. a. no .= 


358,460 
44,249 

17.079 


18,243 
3,515 

1 881 


21^572 
3.651 

1.069 


24,445 
3,302 

l<232 


U,937 
6,545 

1 327 


24,730 
5,035 

1.824 


14,529 
6,700 

2.094 


45,754 
5,575 

1,698 


72,458 
3,600 

1.971 


71,610 
3,900 

1.928 


45,122 
2,426 

2.055 


Immigration laws. .o. . .. o = ». o 
Nat lonal ity lawso = . • . . . , o . . . 


16,397 1,844 
682 37 


1,048 
21 


1, 164 
68 


M92 
135 


1,740 
84 


1,996 
98 


1,657 
41 


1,937 
34 


1,846 
82 


1,973 
82 



[J Dismissed, discontinued, or dropped 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06351 97 



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