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Full text of "Annual report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service"

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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



IMMIGRPTION and NP T URAL IZPTION SERVICE 

Washington , D. C. 



FOR THE Fiscal year Ended June 30, 




The attached material is being sent to you by the office of~ 

Mro Raymond Fo Farrell 

Assistant Commissioner, 

Research, Education, and Information Division 

Immigration and Naturalization Service 

Temporary Building "X", 19th and East Capitol Sts., N,E. 

Washington 25, Do Co 

Should you desire further information, you may wish to communicate with 
this office o 



A. R: MACKEY 

ACTING COMMISSIONER 



ANNUAL REPORT 

IMMIGRATION and NATURALIZATION SERVICE 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

WASHINGTON , D. C. 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1950 




A. R: MACKEY 
ACTING COMMISSIONER 



■^\Jh 










OFFICERS OF THE IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE 

A. R. Mac key, Acting Commissioner 

Assistant Commissioners 

Edward A Loughran, Administrative Division 
Allan C Devaney, Adjudications Division 
W. F. Kelly, Enforcement Division 
Raymond F. Farreli, Research, Education and 

Information Division 



General Counsel 



L. Paul Winings 



Di st r i ct 
No. 



DISTRICT DIRECTORS 



2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

1. 

8. 

9- 
II. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 



E, E. Sal isbu ry 
Henry Nicol Is 
Edward J. Siiaughnessy 
Karl I. Zimmerman 
John L. Murff 
Joseph Savoretti 
Arthur J. Karnuth 
James W. Butterfield 
Andrew Jordan 
A, H. Bode 
John P. Boyd 
Bruce G. Barber 
Wi I I iam A. Whalen 
Grover C. Wi I moth 
H- R. Landon 
D. W. Brewster 



St„ Albans, Vt. 
Boston, Mass. 
New York, N. Y. 
Phi lade I phi a. Pa. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Miami, Fla. 
Buffalo, N, Y. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Chicago, ill,, 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Seattle, Wash. 
San Francisco, Calif. 
San Antonio, Tex. 
El Paso, Tex. 
Los Angeles, Cal if. 
Honolulu, T. H. 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

Immigration and Naturalization Service 

Washington 25, D„ Co 



Report of the Commissioner 
of Immigration and Naturalization 

The Attorney General 

United States Department of Justice 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the Annual Report of the 
Immigration and Naturalization Service for the year ending 
June 30,_1950„. The report consists of a narrative report 
and statistical tables covering the accomplishments of 
the Service,,, 

Mr„ Watson B„ Miller was Commissioner during most of 
the year reported, but resigned at the close of the year. 
The report has been prepared during my tenii as Acting 
Commissionero It has been assembled under the editorial 

R^?^r^^J'°^/^ ^^'° ^^^^"^ ^" Eckerson, in the Division of 
Research, Education, and Information, 




Ro Mackey '=*=^^C/ 



Acting Commissioner 



Immigration and Naturalization Service 
December 1, 1950 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Chapter | Introduction 

Page 

Immigration, 1950. ...<,...,........,.,.,,,........._.,...,......,... 2 

Mexican illegal entries. .......................................... . 2 

Subversives. ..--..............,„....„...,.„„........,„.,..„..,.,..,. 3 

Stowaways and deserti ng seamen ■ , ............................ 5 

Wong, Yang Sung decision, .......................................... . 5 

Decent ra I i zat i on „.,,„.„,.,,.....,..,...,...,.,.„.„.,„.., ^ „„,,,, ^ _..„ , g 

Chapter 2 Legislation and Litigation 

Leg i s I at i on enacted .... ~ ...... ..o ................................. . | j 

Litigation.....,,,. ..,.......„,...,..,._.„„_„_.,...„._._____ ,3 

Court decisions affecting Service funct ions. ... ................. . 14 

Sup reme Cou rt Cases ............................................... 14 

United States Courts of Appeal Cases..,,......,,...,....,......... 14 

united States Court of ClaimsCases. .....,...,.,.,......,...,..., . 14 

General i ssues. ..,.,.„.....„,...,,,.,. 15 

Prosecutions for violations of inmlgration and nationality laws.. |6 

Writs of Habeas Corpus.............,,................,...,,,,.,.,.. 17 



20 



Chapter 3 immigration and Emigration 

C rewmen ... = ....................,.,.,...,....,,...,,,,.,...„,„.,., 

Immigrants. ........ ,.0 ...,..,,....,,.....,.,.,,,,..,„„.,.,.,....„,. . 2 1 

Di sp I aced persons. .......,,..,..,...,.<,.,.....,..„.....,,.,,._.,, 23 

Other quota immigrants. ....„,.... . ...,.,.,,....,...,...,,.,.., 23 

Nonquota i rrm i g rants. .....,...,,..,.......,.,..„........,.,,,.,... 25 

Nonimmigrants, -..,.......„........,......,,,..,....,.,.„,.,.,.,..., 29 

Exercise of Ninth Proviso....,.,,,,......,..,,........,..,,,,,,,,.. 31 

Agricultural laborers admitted.,..,,.,..,.,,,,,,,,...,..,,......... 32 

Canad i an woodsmen ...,.,,..,.„.,.„.„„....„..,..„...,...„.,.,,„„.. ^ ,., . 33 

Petitions for immigration visas and reentry permits..., ,.,,.,.. 33 

Emigrants and nonemigrants. ...,..,................,,,,.,,,,,,,,... , 35 

Chapter 4 Adjustment of Status 

Suspension of deportation. ......„...,..,,.,,„.....„„......,,,,..,, . 3-7 

Displaced persons residing in U. S. ...,.....,...,.......,,.,,.,,.. . 33 

Preexaminat ion. - .....■..,.......,...,............,,„...,..,,,.,.,, , 

Exercise of the Seventh Proviso..,,....,.,,,..,,.,..,,.,.,.,.,,.... 

Reg i St ry .....„.....,,,....,,.....,,.,,,,.,.. . '.'^ 

private bi I is, .„,..,,,.....,.,,..,,,,,....,„,,,.,,,,,,.. ^ _^^ ._ ^ _ .^ _^ _^ _ ^ ^ 

Chapter 5 Enforcement 

Border Pat ro I „.......,,,..„.„.........,........,,..,...,,.,.,,,,. ^ ^ I 

investiqat ions. ..,,..,....,,....,.,. , „ /,a 

False documents. ,....,„.,.......,, . a. 

Frauds by d i sp I aced persons. ......,..,,,.,.,..,..,„,..,....,,...„ 45 

Lookouts , , •"••••'•"".••.■..........,.,...,,.,,..,...,..... 45 

Cooperation with other agencies. .....,,.,. . ac 

Detent ions, , ,, , .........-..........,....,.,,.,,,..,.,.,......_ 45 

,.......,,,,,,,..,,...,,......„..,,....., 47 



39 
39 



A I iens detained. „ . . . 
Economies effected.. 



Chapter 5 (Continued) 

^ Page 

Non-Service operated faci I it ies. • 49 

Al ien Parole. , 49 

Deportations and voluntary departures.. 50 

Deportations. 51 

Trave I documents for deportees. 52 

Transportation for deportees. . ............................... 53 

unexecuted warrants of deportation. 54 

Dest i tute a I i ens removed ...................................... 55 

Voluntary departures. ................................... — ........ 55 

Alien enem i es ..................................................... . 56 

Exc I us i ons 56 

Chapter 6 Naturalization 

Declarations of I ntention. ......................................... 59 

Pet i t i ons f i I ed ............................................... .... • 59 

Pet i t i ons g ranted .................................................. 60 

Pet i t i ons den i ed .................................................. - 63 

Natural izations revoked. ............................ ........... 64 

Loss of nat i ona I i ty ............................................... - 64 

Special certificates of naturalization.................. 65 

Citizenship acquired by resumption or repatriation................. 65 

Derivative certificates. ................... — ..................... 66 

Citizenship education. ............................................. 66 

Names of newly arrived irrmigrants. .............................. , 68 

Home study p rog ram. .............................................. 68 

Pub! ic-school certificates. ...................................... 69 

Fifth National Conference on Citizenship. ....................... . 69 

Naturalization court ceremonies.............. 70 

Chapter 7 Research and Information 

Research. .......................................................... 7 I 

Statistics. ........................................................ 72 

Information. ....................................................... 73 

Chapter 8 Administration 

Pe rsonne I ......................................................... . 76 

P I acement and t rai n i ng .......................................... . 76 

Classification and employee services........ .................. 76 

Budget and f i sea I cont ro I ......................................... , 77 

Rece i pts and refunds. ............................................. 77 

Extra compensation under Act of March 2, 1931..................... 78 

Management i mp rovement .................................... ..... 79 

Space services and supplies.......... 80 

Ma i I and files..................................................... 81 

Append i x I 

United States Supreme Court cases.................................. 83 

united States Courts of Appeals Cases...................... 83 



APPENDIX 1 I 

Table I. "immigration to the united States: 1820 to 1950" 

Table 2. "Aliens and citizens admitted and departed, aliens excluded, by 

months: years ended June 30, 1949 and 1950" 
Table 3. "Aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration laws: years 

ended June 30, 1947 to 1950" 
Table 4. "immigration by country, for decades: 1820 to 1950" 
Table 5. "immigrant aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration 

laws and port or district: year ended June 30, 1950" 
Table 6. "jnmigrant aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration 

laws and country or region of birth: year ended June 30, 1950" 
Table 6A. "immigrant aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration 

laws and country of last permanent residence: year ended June 30, 1950" 
Table 6B. "Total displaced persons admitted to the united States under 

the Displaced Persons Act of June 25, 1948, as amended, by classes and 

country or region of birth through June 30, 1950" 
Table 6C. "Displaced persons and other Immigrant aliens admitted to the 

United States, by country or region of birth: year ended June 30, 1950" 
Table 7. "Annual quotas and quota immigrants admitted: years ended June 

30, 1946 to 1950" 
Table 8. "immigrant aliens admitted, by major occupation group and 

country or region of birth: year ended June 30, 1950" 
Table 9. "Alien spouses and alien minor chi Idren of citizen members of 

the united States armed forces admitted under theAct of December 28, 1945, 

by country or region of birth: year ended June 30, 1950" 
Table 9A. "Alien spouses and alien minor children of citizen members of 

the united Statesarmed forces admitted under the Act of December 28, 1945, 

by country or region of birth: years ended June 30, 1946 to 1950" 
Table 98. "Alien fiancees or fiances of citi zen members of the armed forces 

of the united States admitted under the Act of June 29, 1946, by country 

or region of birth: years ended June 30, 1947 to 1950" 
Table I0. "Immigrant aliens admitted, by race or people, sex, age, and 

marital status: year ended June 30, 1950" 
Table jOA. "immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant al i ensdeparted, by sex, 

age, illiteracy, and major occupation group: years ended June 30, 1946 

to 1950" 
Table jOB. "immigrant aliens admitted, by country or region of birth, sex, 

age, and marital status: year ended June 30, 1950" 
Table I I. "Aliens and citizens admitted and departed, aliens excluded: 

years ended June 30, 1908 to 1950" 
Table 12. "immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens departed, by 

State of intended future or last permanent residence: years ended June 

30, 1946 to 1950" 
Table I2A. "Displaced persons and other immigrant aliens admitted to the 

united States, by rural andurban area and city: year ended June 30, 1950" 
Table I2B. "immigrant aliens admitted to the united States, by rural and 

urban area and city: years ended June 30, 1946 to 1950" 
Table 13. "immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens departed, by 

country of last or intended future permanent residence: years ended June 

30, 1946 to 1950" 
Table I3A. "immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens departed, by race 
or people: years ended June 30, 1946 to I95O" 



Table |4. "Bmigrant aliens departed, by race or people, sex, age, and 

marital status: year ended June 30, 1950" 
Table |4A. "Emigrant aliens departed, by major occupation group and country 

or region of birth: year ended June 30, 1950" 
Table |4B. "Emigrant aliens departed, by country or region of birth, sex, 

age, and marital status: year ended June 30, 1950" 
Table 15, "Nonimmigrant aliens admitted, by classes under the Immigration 

laws and port or district: year ended June 30, 1950" 
Table |6. "Noninmi grant aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration 

laws and country or region of birth: year ended June 30, 1950" 
Table 17. "Nonirrmi grant aliens admitted, by classes under the inmigration 

laws and country of last permanent residence: year ended June 30, 

1950" 
Table I8. "Nonimmigrant aliens admitted and nonemigrant aliens departed, 

by country of last or intended future permanent residence: years ended 

June 30, 1946 to 1950" 
Table 19. "Nonimmigrant aliens admitted as temporary visitors or transits 
frrtm July |, l946to June 30, 1950, who were in the United States June 30, 

1950" 
Table 20. "Aliens excluded from the United States, by cause: years ended 

June 30, 1941 to 1950" 

Table 20A. "Aliens excluded from the united States, by cause; years ended 
June 30, 1892 to 1950" 

Table 21. "Aliens excluded from the United States, by cause and country 
or region of birth: year ended June 30, 1950" 

Table 2IA. "Aliens excluded from the united States, by race or people: 
years ended June 30, 1941 to 195O" 

Table 22. "Alien seamen deserted from vessels arrived at American sea- 
ports, by nationality and flag of vessel: year ended June 30, 1950" 

Table 23. "Vessels and airplanes inspected, seamen examined, and stow aw^ 
found on arriving vessels, by districts: years ended June 30, 1949 and 
1950" 

Table 24. "Aliens deported, by cause and country to which deported: year 
ended June 30, 1950" 

Table 24A. "Aliens departed and aliens departing voluntarily under pro- 
ceedings: years ended June 30, 1892 to 1950" 

Table 25- "inward movement of aliens and citizens over international land 
boundaries, by State and port: year ended June 30, 1950" 

Table 25A. "inward movement by ai r of aJ iens and citizens over international 
land boundaries, by State and port: year ended June 30, 1950" 

Table 26. "purpose for which alien and citizen commuters cross the inter- 
national land boundaries, by ports: year ended June 30, 1950" 

Table 25A. "Al iens andcitizens possessing bonder crossing cards who crossed 
the international land boundaries, by classes and ports: year ended June 
30, 1950" 

Teible 27. "Miscellaneous t rans£Ct i ons at land border ports, by districts: 
year ended June 30, 1950" 

Table 28. . "inward movement of aliens and citizens over international land 
boundaries: years ended June 30, 1946 to 1950" 

Table 29. "Principal activities and accomplishments of immigration Border 
Patrol, by districts; year ended June 30, 1950" 

Table 30. "Passenger travel between the united States and foreign coun- 
tries, by port of arrival or departure; year ended June 30, 1950" 



Table 30A. "passenger travel by air and by sea between Puerto Rico and 

continental united States (mainland) and the Virgin islands and between 

Hawaii and continental united States (mainland) and insular possessions 

or outlying possessions: years ended June 30, 1942 to 195O" 
Table 308. "Passengers arrived in or departed from the united States from 

foreign countries, by class of travel, nationality of carrier, and ports: 

year ended June 30, 1950" 
Table 31. "Passenger travel to the united States from foreign countries, 

by country of embarkation: year ended June 30, 1950" 
Table 32. "Passenger travel from the United States to foreign countries, 

by country of debarkation: year ended June 30, 1950" 
Table 33. "Alien passengers arrived in the united States from foreign 

countries, by port of arrival and country of embarkation: year ended 

June 30, 1950" 
Table 34. "Alien passengers departed from the United States to foreign 

countries, by port of departure and country of debarkation: year ended 

June 30, 1950" 
Table 35. "Citizen paissengers arrived in the united States from foreign 

countries, by port of arrival and country of embarkation; year ended 

June 30, 1950" 
Table 36. "Citizen passengers departed from the united States to foreign 

countries, by port of departure and country of debarkation: year ended 

June 30, 1950" 
Table 37. "Declarations of intention filed, petitions for naturalization 

filed, and persons naturalized: years ended June 30, 1907 to 1950" 
Table 38. "Persons naturalized, by classes under the nationality laws and 

country of former allegiance: year ended June 30, 1950" 
Table 39, "Persons naturalized, by country of former allegiance: years 

ended June 30, 1941 to 1950" 
Table 40. "Persons naturalized, by country of former allegiance and major 

occupation group; year ended June 30, 1950" 
Table 41. "petitions for naturalization denied, by reasons for denial: 

years ended June 30, 1946 to 1950" 
Table 42. "persons naturalized, by sex and marital status, with compara- 
tive percent of total; years ended June 30, 1942 to 1950" 
Table 43. "Persons naturalized, bysex and age; years ended June 30, 1942 

to 1950" 
Table 44. "persons naturalized, by States and territories of residence; 

years ended June 30, 1946 to 1950" 
Table 45. "persons naturalized, byspecified countries of former allegiance 

and by rural and urban area and city: year ended June 30, 1950" 
Table 46. "Persons naturalized, by country or region of birth and year of 

entry; year ended June 30, 1950" 
Table 46A. "Persons naturalized, by country or region of birth 2md country 

of former allegiance; year ended June 30, 1950" 
Teibie 47. "Persons naturalized, by statutory provisions for natural izartion: 

years ended June 30, 1946 to 195O" 
Table 48. "Writs of habeas corpus In exclusion and deportation cases; 

years ended June 30, 1941 to 1950" 
Table 49. "Prosecutions for violating itmiigration and nationality laws; 

years ended June 30, 1941 to 1950" 



CHAPTER 1 




Introduction 



This Annual Report for the year ended June 30, 1950, is the record of 
the activities and accomplishments of the Government agency whose chief 
concern is with aliens in their relation to immigration and nationality 
laiws. It is the chronicle of a year of grave responsibility for internal 
security from aliens with subversive tendencies, and of great accomplish- 
ment in terms of sheer volune. 

The Service program has many facets. |t is an adjudicative agency, for 
its officers must meike many decisions affecting the I ives of al iens seeking 
attoiission, or naturalization, or provide some discretionary relief from the 
harshness of laws in meritorious cases. |t is an enforcement agency that 
must apprehend and ccrt^el departure of those aliens who break the laws 
either at the time of entry or after entry. |t is, as the name implies, a 
service to aliens and citizens alike, for furthering the principles of 
democracy, through its fair treatment of aliens, its program for fostering 
citizenship education, and the day-to-day contacts with the public. 

The impact of world conditions on the inmigration and Naturalization 
Service is forceful and immediate. Two dominant influences, crossing and 
intertwining, thread their way through the whole pattern of the year. The 
first of these — recovery from the effects of World War || — is seen in 
increased inmigration, largely of displaced persons, and in the magnitude 
of illegal entries that is the outgrowth of the agricultural importation 
program in the Southwestern States. The second — guarding against commu- 
nistic infiltration — is reflected In the whole field of investigations, 
deportations, and other enforcement activities. 

Some of the elements that mark the year have been taken out of context 
and shown in the Introduction, since they have influenced so many phases of 
the work. 

jfmilaratlon, 1950 .— Following world war n, inmigration Increased from 
38 thousand In 1945 to |Q8 thousand by 1949. The 24.9, 187 Immigrants 



- 2 - 

who found a haven in theUnited States in 1950 constitute the largest number 
admitted -n any sing e year since i930. Haif of them, more than i24 thou- 
sand, were a small remnant of the innumerable hordes that were moved across 
the face of Europe, finally to be admitted to this country under the Dis- 
placed Persons Act of 1948- Other quota immigrants numbered 75,340, while 
51,727, chiefly wives of United States citizens and natives of Western Hem- 
isphere countries, entered as nonquota inmigrants. 

For 26 years the quota 1 imitation for practical ;y al I countries except 
Western Hemisphere countries has served as a numeric brake on immigration, 
under the Displaced Persons Act of 1948, however, this limitation has been 
removed temporarily by providing for mortgaging 50 percent of future quotas 
for those countries where tlie necessity exists, This accounts for the 
acceleration of the upward trend in immigration from Southern and Eastern 
Europe, and means that countries with small quotas such as Latvia. Estonia, 
and Lithuania have mortgaged 50 percent of their quotas for 90 to 175 years 
from now 

The 73,340 quota irmigrants who were not displaced persons, added to 
the quota displaced persons, bring the total quota Immigration to 197,460, 
thereby exceeding the annual authorized quota of 154,206 by 28 percent., 

jiiega: entries from Mexico ,— The shortage of agncuiturai laborers 
during World War || brought about a tremendous Influx of iaborersfrom 
countries of the Western Hemisphere, particularly Mexico, Many of them 
were admitted 'egal ly, under special legislation or under the Ninth proviso 
to Section 3 of the immigration Act of 1917, as amended However, ease of 
access to this country by way of the Rio Grande (which has earned the name 
''wetbacks" for illegal entrantsfrom Mexico; and the willingness of farmers 
in the area adjacent to the Mexican border to employ "wet" labor, have 
created a probie'n that has grown from year to year 

From Texas, California, and the cotton areas of Arkansas, Mississippi, 
and Tennessee, west and north as far .as Alaska, come reports of Mexican 
nationals in agricultural work who are here ii legally. So great was the 
influx that almost 500,000 deportable al lens were apprehended by the Border 
Patrol in 1950 and were granted voluntary departure in lieu of deportation 
— since immigration officer personnel was total ly inadequate to ho id lepor- 
tation proceedings in any but the most aggravated cases,. 

Comments from two District Directors state the problem and suggest 
some solutions. 

From San Antonio, Texas : "The chief problem in 
this district is still the ^wetback:, just what can 
and wi I I be done towards effecting some practicable means 
of controi cannot be foreseen, but it is hoped that 
some solution can be found,, whetheradditicnai legis- 
lation would be of any help is doubtful We already 
have laws providing for the deportation of illegal 
entrants. About the only additional legislation that 
would appear to be of any help would be to make it an 



offense to employ any alien umawfuiiy in the country 
Something should bedone soon because the wetback prob ■ 
iem is creating a we i i -defined split among the peop.e 
in the lower half of this State — a split which has 
given rise to bitterness on the part of some groups," 

From L os Angeies, California ; "'no significant 
decrease inthepresent large number of laborers swam 
ing out of the interior of Mexico with the intent to 
enter the United States i. legally is ant icipatedo . . . 
The 'ncreasing number of our apprehensions demonstrates 
the growth of the army of Mex,cans who throng the towns 
ontheMexican side of the border — penni less^ hungry, 
and desperately anxious to obtain employment on this 
Side of the i me and earn some money to send to thei r 
families ;n Mex i co ,,„ These considerations have caused 
us to propose that we operate a ship from San Diego to 
Central Mexico,. . ,The operation of this pian for even 
a few months would largely eliminate ■ repeats rs' who 
are expel led across the border one day, oniy to try 
Illegal entry again the next day," 

Subvers.ves — |n the conflict of current history the immigration and 
Naturalization Service fulfi I led an important function in 1950 Theguer, i.a 
warfare of ideas is fought principal ly by infi itration into the body poiitic 
of those peopie whose poi iticai convictions and dogmas conflict with those 
of this democracy, The uniform of communist ideology is not easy to iden- 
tify - it may be a guise to m by a citizen or an alien- When worn by an 
alien or a natura-i^ed citizen, it becomes the proper function of the 
Service, by every adjudicatory and enforcement means ava, ,able, to subvert 
these ideoiog^ca warriors 

The passage of the internal Security Act on September 23, 1950, accei- 
e at es and makes more specific the ant i -subversive enforcement of i rrm i g rati on 
and nationality laws, but even before the passage of that Act, the Service 
in its investigative andother enforcement activities was giving emphasisto 
m+emai security. 

The ant i -subversive operations of the Service are in four major inter- 
re.ated categories. ( -) the prevention of entry of aliens whose presence 
may be detrimenta, to internal security, (2) the deportation of such aliens, 
i3, the den.ai of naturalization to those whose previous conduct makes them 
suspect of subversive activity, and (4) the revocation of naturalization 
for those who obtained their United States citizenship through fraud or 
chicanery 

I,, Excusion of Aliens,— The protect ion of pub I ic safety requirfs thp 
exclusion from the United States of aliens who bring with thern vdepiogies 
which are subversive to national security.. Under immigration laWS, fuppie 
mented by Federal Regulation (8 CFR I7§.57;26S 9i iens seeking t© 'enter 4§ 
mm, grants or visitors were temporarily excluded from admissiOf) ts the 
United States when there was reason to beneve that their admlssipR Wihii 



be prejudicial to the pub> ic interest 

One hundred and fifty-four temporary exclusions were made permanent 
by order of the Attorney General Without according a hearing before a Board 
of Special inquiry. The exciuding decisions were based on confidential 
information (the disclosure of which would be detrimental to public inter- 
est) During the preceding f:sca: year^ 255 aliens had been temporarily 
excluded and 23 exclusions had been made permanent without Board of Special 
inquiry hearing The tremendous increase in the number of pesTnanent exclu- 
sions stems from several factors Expeditious investigations madethecases 
ready for adjudication much more quickiy than in the preceding year Again, 
the promulgation of President's Proclamation No 2850 of August '7, 1949. 
greatly facilitated final action in such cases by vesting the decisive 
authority to exclude in the Attorney General Theretofore, the Attorney 
General was required to consu't wth the Secretary of State before an 
excluding order could be entered 

Of the 54 aliens whose temporary exclusions were made permanent^ 147 
were applicants for admission at ports of entry on the Canad.an border 
This high incidence of Canadian exclusions flows :og;cai,y from the fact 
that many residents of Canada may enter the United States for temporary 
vis.ts without securing travel documents or visas from an American Consul, 
They are thus free from the weeding-out process which foi lows from consular 
sc reen i ng 

|n addition to the aliens excluded who had sought entry as irrmigrants 
or temporary visitors, 229 a len seamen were ordered deta.ned onboa-d their 
vessels on arrival because of membership 'n subversive organizations These 
seamen had arrived on 128 vessels at 5 ports of entry Their rapid detec- 
tion and deportation was made possible largely as a result of "look-out" 
notices distributed to the various ports of entry 

iDunng the past year, the Attorney Generals authority to exclude 
under 8 CFR 175,57 without according a hearing before a Board of Special 
Inquiry was sustained by the united States Supreme Court in the case of 

US ex re 1 Kna uf f v S hauqhnes sy. 338 U S 537 Ths definitive decision 

is especially important at a t:me like the present, since the proper per- 
formance of Service responsibi ■, ities unde' 8 CFR :75.57 can be of signal 
sign ficance in safeguarding our nationa. secur'ty ; 

(2/ Deportation of subversive a .ens - The Act of October i6 ^98 as 
amended provides for the deportation of aliens who hold subversive 
be I ;efs as wei i as for ai lens who have been members of or aff iated with 
subversive organizations past experience has ind cated that ai ens :n the 
latter category wi I i seidom admit their association with proscribed organ- 
izations in such cases, recourse must be had to extrinsic evidence to 
estabi sh i , whether the a .en has been a member of or affi 1 iated with the 
organization in question, and (2) whether the o.-ganizat on fal ,s within the 
statutory ban Moreover, since the aiien aganst whom deportation pro- 
ceedings have been instituted is entitled to a hearing on the charges., the 
evidence must be of such quai'ty as to be admissible in a quasi -j ud ic i al 
proceeding and as to meet the tests of fair admin st rat' ve practice 



- 5 - 

During the year just ended, 2,323 aliens were investigated to deter 
mine whether they were deportable under this Act On the evidence produced 
by the investigations, warrants of arrest in deportation proceed. ngs were 
issued in 104 cases. Hearings under such warrants were heid ;n 78 cases 
between July I, 1949 and February 20, 1950, on which date the United States 
Supreme Court announced its decision in the case of Wong Yang S ung / 
McGrath, 339 U.S. 33. 

(3) Denial of naturalization under Section 305 of the Nat.ona.ty 
Act. — Section 305 of the National ity Act of 1940 prohibits the natural iza:- 
tion of any person who advises the overthrow of the Government by force or 
violence, who is a member of or affiliated w,th an organ zat on wh ch has 
those aims, or who contributes to the support of such organizat ons The 
prohibition extends for a period ten years prior to the date the petition 
for naturalization is fi led. During the past year investigations were com- 
pleted of 17 organizations. As a result of our investigation of the Inter- 
national Worker Order, that organization has been found to be wrthin the 
proscription of Section 305, and recommendations for den;aiare beiT^g made 
in the cases of petitioners who were membe-'s of this organization durng 
the statutory period. 

(4) Revocation of naturalization under Section 338 of the National, ty 
Act, — |n many instances, evidence of subversive or proscribed activity on 
the part of naturalized citizens gives risetothe possibility that they may 
have obtained their naturalization by fraud or i I legai rty in such cases, 
investigation is conducted to see whether the natural i zat on !S subject to 
revocation under Section 333 of the National ,ty Act During the past year, 
investigation was initiated in 1,244 cases of this type Revocaton pro- 
ceedings were authorized against 10 naturalized citizens because of their 
subversive activities prior to naturalization. 

An outstanding case was the successful prosecution in the united States 
District Court in San Francisco of Harry Reuton Bridges who was convicted 
of perjury in a naturalization proceeding, Revocat on of natura. : zation was 
ordered by the court under Section 338(e) of the Nationa,ity Act of 940, 
after his conviction on other charges 

Smuggling, Stowaways, and Deserting Seamen , ■-Notw,thstandinQ the fact 
that 520 alien stowaways were detected and excluded on arriva, at various 
seaports in the united States last year, it is ,ncreasingiy apparent that 
many stowaways are able to effect a landing undetected This is affirmed 
by the fact that 155 of the illegally resident aiiens apprehended in this 
country in the past year admit having arrived by the stowaway route While 
criminal prosecution and deportation may act as deterrents of a sort, rt is 
obvious that this is oniy a partial solution, and that the omy reai solu- 
tion lies in preventive action. 

It is virtually impossible for a person to rema n undetected aboa,-d 
ship over a number of days and be supp. ied w,th the m n:mum necessities of 
life unless he has outside assistance in many instances, crew members, 
individually have assisted stowaways, often for a pecuniary consideration.. 
Recently, however, the incidence of stowaways points to the existence of 



- 6 - 

smuggling rings, highly organized and operating on a large scale over both 
our land and sea borders. 

Smugglers are resorting to new techniques in plying their trade. The 
airplane has now joined the ship and the automobile as a vehicle for this 
illicit traffic. Among the smuggling rings broken up during the last year 
was one which used light airplanes in bringing European aliens from Cuba 
to Miami under cover of night. This gang succeeded in landing 26 a;iens 
before it was stopped by the joint efforts of the Investigation and Border 
Patrol Sections of the Service. (Twenty of these aliens have since been 
apprehended and appropriately dealt with. ) The pilots of the aircraft and 
their accomplices were convicted and sentenced to imprisonment for terms 
ranging up to eight years. interestingly enough, after conviction and 
while at large awaiting sentence, the pilots attempted to smuggle in two 
Chinese aliens from Cuba, and were apprehended in the act by Border 
Patrol Officers when their airplane landed near Miami. 

There is evidence that there may be organized smuggling of Italian 
subjects into the united States. in one district, 52 Italian nationals, 
most of whom are from the vicinity of Palermo, Sicily, were apprehended -n 
the last six months. The majority of these entered at Southern and Eastern 
seaports as stowaways, but 12 of them entered from Canada, either with the 
assistance of smugglers or by evading inspection. Recently, over 100 East 
Indians, who arrived at various ports in the united States as seamen, have 
been apprehended in the San Francisco District, They had gravitated to 
certain ag-" cjltural regions within the District. 

Among tri-, aliens apprehended during the past year who had effected 
entry through the medium of smuggling gangs were criminals wanted by the 
police in their native lands; aliens previously deported on grounds which 
preclude readmission; as well as aliens from the low- quota countries who 
were unwilling to wait until they could enter by lawful means., Apprehension 
of these aliens has led in some instances to the detection of the smugglers, 
and some inroads have been made. The detection and breal<ing up of smug- 
gling operations remains, however, one of the most serious problems con- 
fronting the Service during the current fiscal year. 

Wong Yang Sung Decision , — On February 20, 1950, theSupreme Court, inthe 
case of Wong yang Sung v. McGrath, held that administrative hearings in 
deportation cases must conform to pnoceduai requirements of the Administra- 
tive Procedure Act (5 U.S C, 1001 et seq. ), if resulting orders are to have 
val idity. 

Wong Yang Sung was a Chinese seaman who overstayed his shore leave. 
The Immigrant | nspector who hel d the hearing after arrest recommended de- 
portation. The action was approved by the Acting Commissioner, and the Board 
of immigration Appeals confirmed the order. 

Mr, Sung sought release from custody by habeas corpus proceedings, on 
the grounds that the administrative hearing was not conducted in conformity 
with the Administrative Procedure Act. 



- 7 - 

The law as appi led by the Supreme Court in the Wong Yang Sung case is 
revolutionary in the basic concept of inmigration policy It treats the 
subject as if it were of a judicial character. During ail previous history 
it has been dealt with under the highest judicial sanctions as a political 
question in which the sovereign had rather complete and flexible power to 
deal with an everchanging and often paramount problem vita; to the social 
and economic welfare of the nation The immediate effect of the Supreme 
Court decision was to bring into question the validity of certain other 
hearings in deportation proceedings in which the subject aiien had not been 
deported,. The immigration and Naturalization Service had to adjust its pro- 
cedures and regulations to comply with the decision. The effect of the 
decision was most dramatically indicated when the number of deportat:ons 
dropped from 568 in February !950 to 99 in March^ and 96 in Apr . 

The regulations relating to the conduct of the hearings had to be 
entirely revised. Hearing Examiners needed to be appointed Prosecutive 
and adjudicative functions had to be completely separated so that one of- 
ficer no longer acts as "investigator, prosecutor, and judge". Thousands of 
cases in various steps of completion had to be reheard de novo,, adding con- 
siderably to an already heavy workload. As a result of the deciSion, it 
was necessary to Immediately thereafter effect about 100 temporary appoint- 
ments of Hearing Examiners. All positions involving the holding of formai 
hearings Tn deportation proceedings formerly held by immigrant inspectors 
were abolished. The functions were assigned to a new position of Hearing 
Examiner, 

While the Supreme Court decision stressed the point that Congress had 
determined that the "price for greater fairness is not too huge", the 
effect of the statute as applied to immigration processes was not omy to 
increase cost, but also to create many opportunities for deiay it 
resulted in the detention of aliens for weeks instead of two o- three days. 
Typical difficulties are reported by one District Director: 

"Hearings, before designated Hearing Examiners, 
only serve to confuse the ordinary Mexican aiien, it 
is not difficult to understand why an untutored Mexican 
alien fmaiiy wailed despairingly. Mister, | donrt kna^/ 
what you are talking about; all | want is to get out of 
here and go back to Mexico'. 

"Most of the Mexican aliens held in deportation 
proceedings are unable to employ counsel and are not, 
in fact, represented by an attorney, in the yery nature 
of things our proceedings are very compi icated and are 
most confusing to such unrepresented aliens, they ser\'e 
to increase the period of their detention, and have not 
resulted, and wi ii not result, in any advantages to the 
aliens that might have been in contemp i at ion by the 
Supreme Court in rendering its decision in the Sung 
case. " 



As this report is being written the Service is making another about- 
face, since the Third Deficiency Appropriation Act, approved September 27, 
1950, contained the following provision; 

"Proceedings under law relating to the exclusion 
or expulsion of aliens shall hereafter be without re- 
gard to the provisions of Sections 5, 7, and 8 of the 
Administrative Procedure Act (5 U.S.C. 1004, 1006, 
1007)." 

Decentralization. — |n the field of administration, effective changes 
were made that have resulted in better public service and greater adminis- 
trative efficiency.. Certain functions heretofore exercised by the office 
of the Commissioner were delegated to the I6 District Directors. 

Among the decisive functions delegated to District Directors are those 
rei at ing to: 

I. issuance of ail warrants of arrest and deportation. 

2. Petitions for the issuance of immigration visas m nonquota or 
preference quota status, unless the citizen relatives filing the 
petition are residing abroad, 

3. Applications for reentry permits, and extensions thereof. 

4. Applications for registry of aliens under the Nationality Act of 
1940. 

^ Applications for certificates of derivative citizenship. 

6. Applications for replacement of lost, mutilated, or destroyed dec- 
larations of intention ("First papers"). 

7, AppI icat ions for removal of distressed aliens from the united States 
8 Applications for duplicate Aiien Registration receipt cards. 

9, Applications for voluntary departure and p reexamination in Canada 

Foi lowing the decentralization of functions to Field Offices, a new 
concept of file handling was developed. This concept calls for a single 
file containing al i records dealing with admission, exclusion, deportation, 
and naturalization of aliens, the file to be retained in the District hav- 
ing jurisdiction over the alien'S residence,. To carry out this plan re- 
qui res the decent ra I ization of three and one-half to four mi i > ion f i les now 
held m the Central office, in addition to f i les which wi i 1 be estabi ished 
in the future for newiy arriving immigrants. All files relating to newly 
arriving immigrants are decentralized, as well as files relating to aiiens 
who submit a change of address card and files specifically requested by 
field officers in connection with pending action. At the end of the fiscal 
year 1950, 168,000 files had been decentralized. Qne District Director 
summed up the effects of the decentralization program at the end of four 
months of operations, as follows; 

"The pian wasboldly conceived and naturally caused 
some confusion in the early days of operation. Order 
is being restored, and the benefits of the plan are al- 
ready noticeable. |t definitely permits of greater 
service to the public, and, paradoxical as it may seem. 



- 9 - 

also results in better enforcement, ., .better enforce- 
ment results from the fact that the applicant and all 
records are before the official who is required to make 
the decision. " 

Tabulating equipment is used to decentralize the files. With this 
equipment, preparation of the Alien Registration card, thefieid index card, 
and the Central Office docket control card for each f J le is accomplished 
from a single punched card. Before the end of the next fiscat year, the 
certificate of arrival and a nationality docket card will also be included 
among the documents prepared in this operation. The use of tabulating 
equipment is estimated to have saved thousands of hours of personnel time 
that would be required to perform manually the various processes necessary 
in connection with each file that is decentralized 

The consolidation of records in the District of the aiien^s residence 
will greatly expedite the handling of records, however, only if the aiien 
reports his change of address as required by the Alien Registration Act of 
1940, (and more recently by the internal Security Act of 1950) Fa^ lure to 
make such a report will inevitably result in delays at the time when an 
alien requests service of the District Offices. 




CHAPTE 



R 2 



Legislation 

AND 

Litigation 



m thecourse of the fiscal year the General Counsel — the law officer 
of the Service — drafted or approved 1,965 reports expressing the view of 
the Service on both public and private bills. Thirty-eight pieces of pro- 
posed legislation were drafted, and there were 1,673 other undertakings 
requiring consideration of legislative matter. 

Legislation enacted.— On April 20, 1950, S. 3455— an omnibus bill 
having as its objective the complete revision o/ immigration and nation- 
ality laws was introduced in the Senate. Possibly because of this measure, 
which would include changes embodied in other independent bills, there were 
few public laws relating to immigration and nationality enacted in the past 
fiscal year. 

One of the more important legislative enactments of the year affecting 
the work of this Service was Pub I ic Law no. 555 . approved June 16, 1950, 
which amended the Displaced Persons Act of June 25, 1948- Under the amend- 
ing Act the ninber of refugees and displaced persons who may be admitted to 
the united States is enlarged to a grand total of 415,744. Provisions of 
the 1948 Act which were challenged as discriminating against racial and 
religious groups areel iminated. Additional safeguards are provided against 
the entry of those whose admission to the united States would be against 
the national interest. Primary responsibility for administering the statute 
remains in the Displaced Persons Commission. However, the Department of 
State is given authority to determine eligibility for certain groups out- 
side Germany and Austria. Whi e the Displaced Persons Commission, gener- 
ally, isempowered to determine eligibility for benefits, its determinations 
are subject to veto power entrusted to the Foreign Service of the Department 
of State and this Service. The amended Displaced Persons Act continues the 
responsibility of the immigration and Naturalization Service, relating to 
adjustment of status of displaced persons residing in the united States. 
The date for issuance of visas under the Displaced Persons Act generally is 
extended to June 30, 1951, although in some instances (such as applicants 
who are orphans or German expellees), visas may be issued until June 50, 
1952. 



- 12 - 

The amendment of the Act adds provisions which have increased the 
responsibilities of the Service, No visa may be issued to any alien whose 
admission must be based upon the submission of an assurance of suitable 
employment unless and until he executes a signed statement accepting and 
agreeing in good faith to abide by the terms of employment provided in the 
assurance Upon a finding that the statement was falsely made, the aiien 
is to be deported. 

Every displaced person admitted on the basis of an assurance of employ- 
ment must report twice each year, until four reports have been made, 
respecting the nature and place of his employment and the place of residence 
of himself and members of his family. Willful violation of this require- 
ment, enforcement of which i les with this Service, renders the ai len sul>- 
ject to a fine of up to $500 or imprisonment up to six months 

No visa may be issued to any displaced person whose admission would be 
against the national interest. Upon arrival at a port of entry the dis 
placed person must take and subscribe an oath or affirmation that he is not 
and has never been a member of any organizations or movements contrary to 
the united States and its form of government. |f the oath is wihful.y 
faise, the aiien may be prosecuted for perjury, jf anyone not entitled to 
a visa under these provisions nevertheless is admitted, he is to be taken 
into custody and deported. 

Pub I ic Law 587, approved June 30, ^950, is another law mak,ng quota 
provisions for a special group of immigrants. It provides relief for the 
sheep-raismg industry by making 250 special quota imnigration visas avail- 
able to certain alien sheepherders for a period of one year 

Other enactments during the year relating to immigration included: 

The Act of September 7, 1949, Pub i i c Law 295, amended subsection (e) 
of Section 3ll of the Philippine Rehabilitation Act of 1946 by extending 
until June 30, 1951, provisions and appropriations for the training of 
Filipinos whose admission to the united States as students for training and 
instruction was authorized by the Act 

The Foreign Economic Assistance Act of !950, Act of June 5, '950, 
Pub I ic Law, 535 , in Section 202 makes funds available to the Secretaryof 
State for the necessary expenses of selected citizens of China, for study, 
teaching, or for research and related academic and technical activities 
in the united States, jt also authorizes the Attorney General to promu • 
gate regulations that such citizens of China shall be granted permission to 
accept employment upon application filed with the Commissioner of immigrar- 
tion and Naturalization,. 

in the field of nationality legislation. Pub I ic Law 597 , approved 
June 30, 1950, provides for the enlistment of aliens in the armed forces, 
and in Section 4 provides that the provisions of Section 324A of the 
Nationality Act of 1940, as amended by the Act of June I ,, 1948 i Pub i ic 
Law 567, 80th Congress), are applicable to aliens enlisted or reen listed 



- 13 - 

pursuant to its provisions. The Act also provides that any such alien who 
subsequently enters the united States pursuant to military orders, shall, 
after completion of five or more years of military service, if honorably 
discharged therefrom, be deemed to have been admitted to the united States 
for pei-manent residence within the meaning of Section 324A. 

|n recent years the number of aliens who seek an adjustment of status 
by Act of Congress has increased tremendously. 



NUMBER OF PRIVATE BILLS INTRODUCED 
INTO CONGRESS AND ENACTED 
75 th - 81st CONGRESSES 



NUMBER 



3,000 — 



2,0 — 



1,000 




75 th 76 th 77 th 78 th 79 th 

CONGRESS 



80 th 81 St 



There were 202 private bills approved last year, in comparison with 
23inthe fiscal year 1949, and 1 17 in 1948. VhWe comparatively few, (less 
than ten percent) of the private bills are enacted into laws, the increase 
in the number of such bi Ms introduced is becoming an exacting tax on the 
investigative force of the Service. When private bills are introduced, a 
request is made of this Service for a report on the beneficiaries of the 
bill. These cases are given top priority in field investigations. 

Litigation .— A function of the General Counsel i s, general ly, to direct 
the field service in litigation throughout the united States arising from 
operations of the Service, and also, upon request, to prepare legal memo- 
randa and briefs or otherwise assist united States Attorneys and the 
Department of Justice in connection with such litigation. 



- 14 - 

Lit I gat. on cases handled included: 

Criminal cases. ...-......--•....."..-.- ^ 53 

Revocation of naturalization cases.. 289 

Admission to citizenship appeals. ....... o. ., , 152 

Habeas corpus cases. .,,,,,..,,,,..„„......•,. 268 

Section 503, Declaratory Judgment Act cases. 98 

Administrative procedure Act cases,, .,,..»,.„ . 37 

Claims, fines, penalties..... ....,,... 209 

Miscellaneous litigation and correspondence . 2,278 

Court Decisions affecting Service functions : — The past fiscal year was 
one in which court cases relating to immigration and naturalization matters 
increased both in volume and in importance in terms of the;r effect on the 
administration of immigration and nationality laws. 

During the past fiscal year eight cases involving matters before this 
Service, were decided by the United States Supreme Court as compared with 
three cases mentioned in the Annual Report for the fiscal year 1949 The 
highest court denied certiorari in nine other cases during the past year, 
as compared with four the previous year. At the end of the past f iscai 
year there had been filed with the Supreme Court five additional cases, m 
one of which certiorari had been granted. U Qf the cases decided the most 
important was that of Wong Yang Sung, discussed in the introduction to this 
report 

Other decided cases also involved issues of importance Of those 
pending before the Court the most important is that of McGrath v, Kristensen 
in which the Court has granted certiorari,. That case, like the Wong yang 
Sung case, involves provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act, test- 
ing whether deportation proceedings are juri sdict ional ly subject to the 
judicial review prescriptions of Section 10 of that Act, (5 U S C 1009) 
The case also involves an important substantive issue. 

The increase in litigation involving Service responsibilities was 
even more pronounced in the united States Courts of Appeal 2^ where 45 cases 
were decided during the past year (exclusive of those which went to the 
Supreme Court), as compared with approximately 2! cases decided by the 
C rcuit Courts of Appeal during the preceding year. New issues arising to 
be tested in Federal District Courts included many resulting from the appli- 
cation of procedural requirements of the Administrative Procedure Act, A 
backlog of cases in some District Courts involved other issues, including 
cases arising under Section 503 of the Nationality Act of 1940 (8 U S.C 903) 
upon questions of citizenship. 

united States Court of Claims . — The last important cases decided by the 
United States Court of Claims in relation to Service matters were those of 

\J For list of cases see Appendix 1, united states supreme court cases, 

2/ For list of cases, see Appendix 1, united states courts of Appea' cases. 



- 15 - 

Gibney v. The united States, No. 4-8572; Joseph M Ahearn v T he United 
States, NO. 48610, and Donald M. Ta.y lor v , The United St ates, No_ 4861', 
decided on June 6, 1949, and reported in the last Annual Report However^ 
those decisions in favor of plaintiffs served as precedents for other suits 
in which approximately 750 other iirmigrant inspectors during the past year 
claimed back-pay similarly earned during the fiscal year 1948 under the 
provisions of the Immigration Employees Overtime Act of March 2. '93 
(8 U.S.C. 109 (a) (b)). These suits, insofar as they are contro, :ed by the 
G i bney-Ahearn-Tay I or dec i sions, require on,y auditing and payment processing 
upon any judgments entered by the Court 

Not to be overlooked in importance, however, are the su,ts now pending 
before the Court of Claims by Harry B. Greene and G enn i Toney, cases No 
47418 and 47511 respectively, in which plaintiffs seek payment of extra 
compensation for services performed by them on Sundays and ho: ;days as 
inspectors of the Border Patrol, During the past year hearings we'e heid 
by the Commissioner for the Court, and briefs are being submtted, in the 
view that these suits will be decided during the Fall term of the Cour- 
These cases, if decided in favor of plaintiffs, couid resu t in hundreds o^' 
suits orciaims for back pay by other Border patrol Inspectors of the Se-\ ce 

General issues and problems reflected by litigat.o n —During the past 
year, the courts indicated an increasing disposition to ook carefu ly into 
the exercise of discretion by administrative authorities to determine 
whether there was an abuse of discretion in denial of relief from deporta- 
tion processes^ The Wong Yang Sung decision by the Supreme Court, previ- 
ously cited, settled the issue of applicability of the p-ocedurai require- 
ments of the Administrative Procedure Act to deportation hearings, with the 
result that many lower court cases pending upon that issue were prompt^/ 
disposed of. But in the wakeofthe decision new litigation arose, as wei 1 
as many new administrative problems of the Service in adjust ng its reguia 
tions and processes to the requirements of that decision There st ; . 1 
remained in the courts, pending decision by the Supreme Court in the 
Kristensen case, previously cited, the very important issue as to whethe'^ 
Section 10 of the Administrative Procedure Act appl es to g ^ ve the courts 
jurisdiction to review deportation orders Decis'ons n the lower courts 
throughout the country, and pending court cases invoiving that issue, a 'e 
numerous, and wi II possibly be disposed of if the Supreme Court passes 
squarely upon that issue in the Kristensen case 

Litigation arising during the year under Section 503 of the Nator.a, ity 
Act of 1940, in which plaintiffs sought judgments declaring them to be 
citizens brought forth a variety of procedural and substantive issues; J e , 
Iheright of jury trial in such litigation; the proper use of Serv'ce records 
as evidence; andwhether a previous decision, in a habeas corpus pi-oceed ;ng, 
that a petitioner was not a citizen, was res adjudicata so as to bar him 
from relief under Section 503. Substantial cla ms of citizenship arose 
most frequently inthecasesof persons abroad, who had been administratively 
heid to be expatriated because they had taken some affi'-mative political 
action in a foreign state as set forth in Section 40 1 of the Nationality 
Act of 1940- The petitioners claimed their act ions we re under ci rrumstances 



- 16 - 

amounting to duress. 

Some of the issues arising upon which interest centers are: the power 
of the Attorney General to exclude aliens solely upon his finding that 
their admission would be prejudicial to the interests of the united States 
(see the Knauff case decided by Supreme Court, Appendix |j; whether refusal 
to serve in the armed forces of the United States disqualifies an alien for 
United States citizenship (see Cohnstaedt case, decided by Supreme Court, 
Appendix I), whether grant ing of exemption from military service to a 
neutral alien disqualifies such aiien for naturalization and discretionary 
relief from deportation; whether minor sons of al lens who entered the United 
States as treaty merchants have permanent lawful residence for naturaliza- 
tion purposes, whether aliens employed on vessels registered in foreign 
countries but operated by a subsidiary of the united States Government may 
qualify for citizenship under Section 325 of the Nationality Act of 1940, 
and similar questions involving vessels operating from "home" ports in the 
United States or abroad under various circumstances of registry or control; 
and whether court judgments based upon consent and waivers of defense, by 
which United States citizenship of various persons was revoked during the 
war years, may now be set aside or the ai iens entitled to have their cass 
restored on petitions for hearing before the court, 

in general, the Service was on the defensive during the year in a wide 
variety of litigation which tended to result in decisions favorable to the 
aliens, with the result that more ai iens may be encouraged to seek recourse 
to test issues and seek judicial relief in the future. Also, there was a 
rising trend for aliens to seek relief through private legislation in 
some instances, indeed, court actions and the enactment of private bilis 
were sought concurrent ly, 

Prosecution for violating the immigration and nationality laws . — The 
number of convictions for violations of immigration and Nationality laws 
continued to be high In addition to the provisions in the immigration 
laws whereby vioiators of immigration ; aws may be deported or allowed to 
depart voluntarily under administrative proceedings, there are also con- 
tamed in the immigration laws, as we'l as in Titie !8, United States Code 
on Crimes and Criminal Procedure, provisions for the prosecution in the 
courts of certain violators of immigration and nationality laws Prosecu- 
tions are generally instituted by comp.a nt f i led with the United States 
Cormiissioner, by indictment, or presentment of a grand jury, or by informal 
tion filed by the United States Attorney 

During the fiscal year ended June 30, 1950, prosecutions were insti- 
tuted in 11,445 cases involving v loi at ions of immigration laws and 370 cases 
involving violations of nationality laws Such prosecutions resulted in a 
total of 10,622 court convictions during the year, with an aggregate impris- 
onment of 1,96! years and fines aggregating $88, '58 

Ninety-two percent of the convictions last year were made under Sec- 
tions I and 2 of the Act of March 4, 1929, for illegal entry. Convictions 
were made in 298 cases for violation of nationality iaws, chiefly under 



- 17 - 
Section 911 of Title 18. United States Code, for false representation as a 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

KEASE ADDRESS SEPLY TO 

IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE 
Washington 25. D. C. 

FFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER AM) MfER TO this file NO. 

April 30, 1951 



We are pleased to sen<i you a copy of the Annual Report 
of tt^e Ininjigration and Naturalization Service for tl^e year 
ended June 30. 1950, as subniitted to tl^e Attorney general. 

It contains a sunin^ary of Service activities and statisti- 
cal tables covering in^njigration, enjigration> naturalization, 
deportation, detention, and border patrol activities. 

Sincerely yours ^ 



/O/^^on^niissioner ^^-""^^ 



Enclosure 



were dismissed in 169 cases and in 153 cases tne applications tor wnxs or 
habeas corpus were withdrawn. 



- !6 
amounting to duress. 



tuted in !!,445 cases mvoiving v to at ions oT immtgrat ion laws and 370 cases 
involving violations of nationality laws Such prosecutions resulted in a 
total of 10,622 court convict, ons during the year, with an aggregate impris- 
onment of 1,961 years and fines aggregating $88, '58 

Ninety-two percent of the convictions last year were made under Sec- 
tions I and 2 of the Act of March 4, 1929, for illegal entry_ Convictions 
were made in 298 cases for violation of nationality laws, chiefly under 



- 17 - 

Section 911 of Title 18, United States Code, for false representation as a 
citizen of the United States. 



The chart which fol lows shows a sharp rise in the number of convic- 
t ions fol lowing World War | | . 

CONVICTIONS IN COURTS FOR VIOLATING 
IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY LAWS 

_...„^^ YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1935 - 1950 

NUMBER 



15,000 



10.000 



5,000 




1945 



1950 



Writs of Habeas Corpus . — The institution of habeas corpus actions as 
a means of delaying deportation presents a continuing problemtothe Service. 
Writs of habeas corpus may be granted in the Federal Courts to determine 
the legality of the detention of aliens in the custody of immigration 
officers. In the fiscal year 1950, 101 writs of habeas corpus involving 
exclusion and 220 writs involving deportation were served by the united 
States Marshals upon immigration officers for release of aliens in their 
custody. During the year, a total of 547 cases had been acted upon by the 
Federal courts, 96 cases involving exclusion and 251 involving deportation. 
In 25 of the cases, the courts sustained the writ and ordered discharge of 
the persons from the custody of the Service. The writs of habeas corpus 
were dismissed in I69 cases and in I53 cases the applications for writs of 
habeas corpus were withdrawn. 



CHAPTER 



Immigration 

AND 

Emigration 




The accumulating tensions in international relations made the tradi- 
tional function of the Service — that of determining the citizenship and 
adnissibi I ity of each alien applicant — vastly important and ever more com- 
plex, indicative of the magnitude of the task is the astronomical niinber of 
more than 90 million alien and citizen entries into the united States at 
468 land, air, and seaports during the past fiscal year. 

Ninety-seven percent of these entries were of alien and citizen border 
crossers, Aho may have made numerous entries across the Canadian and 
Mexican borders. There were 129,309 border-crossing cards issued and 
273,307 cards reissued to aliens and citizens who frequently crossed the 
borders — to engage in occupations, or as students, or in the ordinary busi- 
ness intercourse. 

Aliens and citizens arrived and examined at U- S. ports of "entry during 

years ended June, 30. 1949 and 1950 

Year ended June 30. |950 

Total Al iens Citizens 

Total 90.322.406 42.689.810 47.632.596 

Arrived at land borders 87,510,056 41,297,774 46,212,282 

Canadian 38,771,076 16,626,902 22,144,174 

Mexican 48,738,980 24,670,872 24,068,108 

Crewnen 1,630,198 861,827 768,371 

Arrived at seaports 1,182,152 530,209 651,943 

Year ended June 30. 1949 

Total Al iens Citizens 

Total 88.411.790 41.535.323 ^.875.4^ 

Arrivpd at land borders 85,400,278 40,077.743 45,322,535 

Canadian 39,736,497 16,054,649 23,681,848 

Mexican 45,663,781 24,023,094 21,640,687 

Crevsmen 1,907,039 960,099 946,940 

Arrived at seaports 1.104.473 497.481 606.992 



- 20 - 



ENTRIES OVER CANADIAN AND MEXICAN LAND BORDERS 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1941 - 1950 
MILLIONS 
100 



75 



50 



T 



T 



T 



T 




TOTAL 
Alien and Citizen 
Border Crossers 



25 



M\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\^^^^^^^ 










1941 



1945 



1950 



Crewnen . — Of the 1,630, 198 crew members admitted to the United States 
in 1950, slightly more than half were aliens. Because many aliens who wish 
to remain here illegally use the seaman route for attempted entry, and 
because the Service does not have sufficient personnel to inspect all 
depeu^ing vessels and planes, the crew inspections on arrival must be care- 
fully conducted. Last year 30,775 alien crewmen were ordered held on board 
the vessels on which they arrived, because they were inadmissible to the 
united States. Records indicate that 2,410 alien crevwnen deserted during 
the year. This is a reduction of 55 percent compared with the previous 
fiscal year. 



-21 - 



IMMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1820 - 1950 
THOUSANDS 



1,400 
1,200 
1,000 
800 
600 
400 
200 



TOTAL(NUMBER OF IMMIGRANTS) 
EUROPE (SOUTHERN a EASTERN) 
EUROPE (NORTHERN a WESTERN) 




1900 



'40 1950 



Immigrants 

innigrants are potential citizens, so that when aliens are admitted 
for permanent residence, they are in actuality talcing the first step toward 
citizenship. The 249,187 irmiigrants admitted represent the largest nunter 
in any year since I929. Thus this past year continued the upsurge in iimii- 
gration that followed World Wbr If. 

The chart below points to the close relationship between the march of 
events In contemporary international history and inmigration. tmnigration 
all but ceased during the depression years, climbed a little In the late 
30's largely as a result of Nazi political and religious persecution, 
drDpped again during the war years. 



The first waves of iimlgratlon that fol lowtd the war wtr* swat lad by 
war brides, followed later by the political ealgrees and other displaced 
persons who were part of the Innonarable migration that swept across Eastern 
and Central Binope during and since the war. 



-22- 



THOUSANDS 
400 



IMMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1925 - 1950 



I I I I I rr 



300 



1 — \ — I — r 



T^ 



Total 

Immigrants 

Admitted 



200 



THOUSANDS 
2001 



Ditplaced Persons 

S. a E. EUROPE 



100 




1945 



Four out of e\/ery five irmigrants or 197,460 admitted in the fiscal 
year 1950 were quota immigrants. Of the quota immigrants, flve-^lgttts 
were displaced persons. 

QUOTA IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 90, 1929 - 1950 
THOUSANDS 



200 




ItSt 



I94S 



I9»0 



- 23 - 

Displaced Persons — The thousands upon thousands of persons uprooted 
from their homes during the war created one of the most perplexing after- 
maths of the war,. Under the President's Directive of December 22, 1945, 
and subsequently under the Displaced Persons Act of 1948, some 200,000 dis- 
placed persons have found a permanent abode in this country. There were 
124,355 admitted in the fiscal year '950 

The Displaced Persons Act of '948, prior to the amendment cited on 
page II of this report, provided for three preferential groups within the 
quotas. The preferences and the number of persons admitted thereunder are 
shown below: 



Displaced persons admitted under the 

Displaced Persons Act of !948 
Years ended June 30. 1949 and !950 



...... o n . o .... . 


164,40! 


40,048 


124.355 


,,...„....„...„ 


163.854 


59,734 


124, 120 


pursuits. 










47,983 


10,088 


37,895 


their w 1 ves 









Class Total 1949 1950 

Total number ,.......„.,,„.. „ 

Quota . ........,,,.,....,..„„,„..„. 

First preference quota : 

Persons engaged in agricultural 

their wives and chi Idren. „ . „ „ ., 
Second preference quota : 

Persons having special skills, 

and chi Idren, ,...._„.....,,...„„_.._., 105,454 23,542 79,912 

Thi rd preference quota : 

Persons who are blood relatives of U-S. 

citizens or resident aliens, 
Nonp reference quota ...„_„... 

Nonquota . .,,...,.,....„..,„..,.. 
Displaced orphans. .„,.. „o.„, . 
Other nonquota. ....„„..„„-„.,. 



For 26 years the quota I imitation for ai i but Western Hemisphere coun- 
tries has served as a numeric brake on immigration. Under the Displaced 
Persons Act, however, the brake has been temporarily removed by providing 
for mortgaging 50 percent of future quotas for those countries where the 
necessity exists. 

The results, as of June 50, 1950, are somewhat startling for a few of 
the countries with small quotas. For example, 50 percent of Latvia's 
quota of 256 wi I I be mortgaged through the year 2, 124. Estonia's quota of 
116 wi I I be only 58 for : 18 years, and one-half of Lithuania's quota of 386 
has been mortgaged for 90 years. 

The Act provided for the admission of eligible displaced orphans m 
nonquota status. Five hundred and three had been admitted by June 50. '950. 

Other Quota Immigrants — There were 75.540 quota immigrants in the 



6,252 


4,016 


2,236 


6, i65 


2,088 


4,077 


547 


514 


255 


505 


314 


189 


44 


- 


44 



- 24 - 

past year who were not displaced persons,, The principal quota national- 
ities were: 

Quota nat ional it.y Number 

Great Britain and Norther I re I and. .......... 17, 161 

Germany. .................................... 15,936 

I re I and. ................................... . 6, 442 

Italy.................. .................. ... 5,382 

Aust r i a ................................... ■■ 4, 170 

France. .......... .......................... . 3, 117 

in the Displaced Persons Act there was a provision that Germans of 
German ethnic origin should be charged to the German and Austrian quotas. 
These were Germans who settled in Eastern Europe and who were pushed out by 
the fortunes of wars. In the table below is shown the country of birth of 
German ethnic immigrants so charged; 

Country of birth Number 

Total.................. ........... 8.457 

Yougos I av i a. ............................... .. 3, 587 

Ruman i a. .................................... . 1 , 397 

Poland., ..................................... I, 170 

Czechos I ovak i a. ............................ . 933 

Hungary .,,..„„.,,„,„..... 768 

Other countries (includes dependent spouses 

and children of German ethnics)........... 602 

Preferences within quotas, as established by the Immigration Act of 
1924, as amended, were granted in the following numbers: 

Quota immigrants admitted 
Years ended June 30. 1949 and 1950 

950 1949 

Total number........... 

First preference quota 

Re I at i ves of c i t i zens . . . . , 
Skilled agriculturists,... 

Second preference quota 

Wives and chi Idren of resident 

aliens.... ,...„...„ ............ 4^520 3,738 

Nonpreference quota 61,181 58,933 

Displaced persons admitted under the 

Displaced Persons Act of 1948.... 124,120 39,734 



197.460 


1 13.046 


6,888 


8,548 


751 


2,093 



-25- 



|t is interesting to note that 31 percent of the displaced persons 
admitted under the quota were granted preference as agriculturists, while 
only one percent of those admitted under regular i rnn i g rat i on laws received 
such preference. 

IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30,1940-1950 

IMMIGRANTS (In Thousands) 

200 



150 



100 




Nonquota immigrants . — When Congress limited irtmigration by means of 
quotas, it included in the same law provision for certain classes who could 
be admitted without numerical restriction. 

Shown below are the principal class of nonquota inmigrants admitted: 

Nonquota inmigrants admitted in years 
ended June 50. 1949 and 1950 

1950 1949 

Total nonquota inmigrants admitted 51.727 75.27 I 

Husbands of citizens 1,459 3,239 

Wives of citizens 12,291 27,967 

unmarried chi Idren of citizens 2,525 4,648 

Natives of nonquota countries 32,790 35,969 

Wives and children of natives of nonquota coun- 
tries 448 425 

Ministers, thai r wives and chi Idren 833 1,233 

Professors, the i r wives and chi Idren 603 869 

Women who had been cit izens 86 I 10 

Other nonojcta c I asses 692 8 1 I 



- 26 - 



The largest single class of nonquota irtmigrants last year, and in most 
of the years since 1930, is natives of nonquota countries , irtmigrants of 
this class come from the independent countries of the Western Hemisphere, 
principally the neighboring countries of Canada and Me-xico. The chart 
below shows the admission of such immigrants for the past 26 years: 

NATIVES OF NONQUOTA COUNTRIES, 
THEIR WIVES, AND MINOR CHILDREN 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1930 - 1950 
THOUSANDS 



70 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 




ALL COUNTRIES 
CANADA 



MEXICO 




>.<5S^^S5S 



!5I!!555555S 



<sssv"<^^cs;^^\ 






r 

1930 



1935 



I ' 
1940 



1945 



1950 



The next group in numerical importance consists of the husbands, wives, 
and children of citizens of the United States. |n addition to the provisions 
of the immigration Act of 1924, as amended, that gave nonquota status to 
the iirmediate relatives of citizens, there have been a number of instances 
of special legislation. 

Following the end of World War II two laws were passed that were de- 
signed to ease the problems of members of the armed forces who married or 
became engaged to nationals of foreign countries. Pub! ic Law 27 I , passed 
December 28, 1945, facilitated the entry into the United States of alien 
wives, husbands, and children of members of the armed forces of this coun- 
try, by waiving visa requirements as well as excluding provisions concerning 
physical and mental defectives. This law was later amended by Pub I ic 
Law 213. of July 22, 1947, which extended the benefits to spouses of ra- 
cial ly ineligible races if they were married to United States citizens 
before or within 30 days of the passage of the Act. 

There are contrasts in the countries of origin that are indicative of 
the geographic distribution of American soldiers in this global turmoil, as 



- 27 - 
well as the effects of special legislation. For example: 

Numbers of wives of citizens 

rountrv of birth 1246 IS47 MS 1249 ^SO 

Great Britain & North Ireland 27,094 7,160 1,843 914 241 

Germany 303 701 3,638 10,130 3,798 

Italy 2.419 5,711 6,385 3,081 2,168 

China. 1^ 902 5.192 2,143 1,062 

Japan 4 14 298 445 9 

Australia and New Zealand 5.375 2,225 852 286 184 



WIVES, HUSBANDS, AND MINOR CHILDREN 
OF UNITED STATES CITIZENS 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1925 - 1950 

THOUSANDS 

I I I I I 



60 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I ' I 




1925 



1930 



1940 



1945 



1950 



The other principal claisses of nonquota inmigrants arethe professional 
groups— ministers and professors, and their wives and children. 



- 28 - 
The recent history of such adm iss ions is shown in the two charts below: 

MINISTERS, THEIR WIVES AND CHILDREN 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1925 - 1950 
NUMBER 
2,000 I I I I I [ I I I I 



1.500 



1,000 



500 




1925 



950 



PROFESSORS, THEIR WIVES AND CHILDREN 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1925 - 1950 
NUMBER 
2,000] — t il l 



1,500 



1,000 



500 




950 



- 29 - 

Nonimmigrants 

Nonimmigrants are aliens who enter the United States for temporary 
periods, or resident aliens returning from a temporary stay abroad. The 
figures below do not include such special groups as agricultural laborers, 
border crossers, and crewmen.. 



Nonimmigrants admitted 
in years ended June 50. 1949 and 1950 



1950 1949 



426,837 


447,272 


13,975 


13,722 


5,0:0 


4,723 


67,984 


73,338 


219,810 


225,745 


68,640 


81,615 


40,903 


36,984 


9,744 


10,481 


766 


632 


5 


32 



Total nonimmigrants admitted. ,>„„.,. o.... . 

Gove rnment officials.... ......„o,. ...... 

Members of international organizations,. 
Temporary visitors for business. ....... , 

Temporary visitors for pleasure......... 

I n t rans i t ............................. „ 

Returning residents. .................... 

Students. ............................... 

T reaty t rade rs ......................... . 

Other nonimmigrants. .................... 



Because quotas are filled and immigrant visas are difficult to obtain 
and because this country is engaged in an ideological struggle to maintain 
the democratic ideals for which this nation stands, the admission of non- 
immigrants takes on greater significance. it must be clearly determined 
( I) that each alien seeking temporary admission is in fact and in intent 
coming for a temporary period and (2) that he does not bring with him 
ideologies subversive to our form of Government. 

For the past four years nonimmigrant arrivals have exceeded, in each 
year, such arrivals in any single year since the first records of 1908. 
The second line in the chart following, that for visitors, shows where most 
of the gain has been, but the number of students, government officials, and 
transits has increased over the prewar years. 



- 30 - 

NONIMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED TO THE UNITED STATES 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1931 - 1950 
THOUSANDS 
500 



40O 



300 



200 



100 




1950 



The principal countries or regions of birth for nonimmigrants in the 
past year were: 



West indies 76,775 

Canada 69, 042 

England, Scotland, and 

Wales 58,765 

South America 30,877 

Mexico 26, 107 



France 13,922 

Italy : 10,798 

Central Mierica 10,752 

Spain 10,368 

Germany 10,242 



There were approximately 28,000 students studying in the United States 
last year; 9,744 were admitted during the year. These students are all 
enrolled in approved institutions of learning. As of June 50, 1950, the 
distribution of students by Districts was as follov>/s: 



- 31 - 

Students in the united States 
On June 30, 1950 

District Number 



Total 



24.939 


142 


2, 154 


4,290 


1,383 


1,283 


1,584 


1,020 


2,773 


2,482 


2,335 


1, 140 


2, 184 


349 


576 


1, 187 


57 



St. Albans, Vt. ............................. 

Boston, Mass ,.,..... ..o ........... . 

New York, N. Y- 

ph i I ade I ph i a. Pa. ....„...,..,.,.. .............. 

Ba 1 1 i more, Md ............... . .............. 

Miami, Fla ... 

Buffalo, N. Y. 

Detroit, Mich. 

Ch i cago. III 

Kansas City, Mo. .......... .» 

Seatt I e. Wash. ............................... 

San Franc i see, Ca I i f ......................... , 

San Anton i o, Tex. 

E I Paso, Tex. ... ............................ 

Los Angeles, Calif........................... 

Honolulu, T. H. ............................ .. 

District Offices report on the number of visitors, transits, and treaty 
traders in the United States at the end of each month. At the end of June 
'950 the following numbers were reported to be in the United States. 



Visitors. .................................... 79^474 

Transits. ..... ........................... 6,787 

Treaty traders (admitted since December 7, 

1948)...................................... 813 

Exercise of the Ninth Proviso . — Under the terms of the Ninth Proviso 
to Section 3 of the immigration Act of 1917, the Attorney General is per- 
mitted in his discretion to admit, for temporary periods, certain persons 
who otherwise are inadmissible to the United States. The table below shows 
the number of applications for consideration under the Ninth Proviso, ex- 
clusive of Mexican agricultural laborers, finally disposed of during the 
past four years and the manner of disposition of such appi i cat ions. 



- 32- 

App Meat ions for exercise of Ninth proviso U 

Years ended June 50. 1947 - 1950 

Number Disposition Number of 

Years ended of Admission Admission persons 

June 50, appi i cat ions authorized denied involved 

Total......... 5.246 2.712 554 4 5. 159 

1947 . 617 491 126 6,088 

IQ48.-.....- .••• 628 551 77 6,009 

1949. -..-•-...=. 933 784 149 21,146 

1950. ■■ .- 1.068 886 182 11.916 

■^ Exclusive of Mexican agricultural laborers. 

Most of the Ninth Proviso applications were filed in behalf of aliens 
excludable as mental or physical defectives, criminals, contract laborers, 
or illiterates. The applicants usually sought advance exercise of the 
Ninth Proviso in order to enter the united States as temporary visitors or 
border crossers, or sought border crossing privi leges, for the purpose of 
receiving medical treatment, to visit relatives, to work, or make purchases. 
Of the 1,068 applications for exercise of the Ninth Proviso last year, 119 
were for permission to import 10,956 unskilled contract laborers for employ- 
ment in the united States^ 

Agricultural laborers admitted through exercise of Ninth proviso . — Th e 
Attorney General is authorized, in his discretion, under the terms of the 
Ninth proviso to Section 3 of the Immigration Act of 1917, to import un- 
skilled agricultural and industrial laborers who would be subject to exclu- 
sion from the united States as contract laborers Before importation is 
authorized, a showing is required that there is a need for the labor, that 
prevailing wage rates in the area of employment will be paid, and that 
American labor will not be displaced by the aliens imported. 

At the beginning of the fiscal year 1950 there were 26,818 agricul- 
tural laborers in the united States During the year 26,219 agricultural 
laborers were admitted to the United States, chiefly from Mexico and the 
British West indies, and 98,381 agricultural laborers departed,. An interim 
agreement was entered into with Mexico in the early spring of 1949 which 
resulted in a formal agreement which was approved and became effective on 
August I, 1949, for the contracting of Mexican agricultural laborers ille- 
gally in the United States,, The program of contracting illegal entrants 
reached full swing during last September, when 55,765 Mexican illegal en- 
trants were contracted, Such contracting has tapered off considerably 
since September, and in June 1950, only 572 agricultural laborers illegally 
here were recontracted. During the fiscal year 1950, a total of 96,239 
Mexican agricultural laborers illegally in the United States were contracted 
in pursuance to the agreement with Mexico. 

The importation of Mexican agricultural laborers ceased at the end of 



- 33 - 

last November |n December and January only Bahaman agri cultural laborers 
were imported to this country, no laborers were imported during the months 
of February, Iviarch and April,, During the months of May and June, a total 
of 1,076 Bahaman, 680 Jamaican, 27 Canadian, and 10 Mexican .aborers were 
admitted to the united States 

At the end of June the following numbers of agricuitura; laborers from 
all countries were employed in the United States. 

Agriculturai laborers admitted under the gth Proviso, 
by Districts 
As of June 50. 1950 



Country of ,ast penranent residence 



Lee 
District Total Can Mex- Ba- Bar- Hon- ja ward 
ada ico hamas bados duras maica |sis, 



All Districts. ,.„. 59,765 36 53,765 ',7'8 945 100 3,056 145 

St. Albans, vt.,...., „ 28 28 - - - -- _ _ 

New York, n Y. . . . . . . 317 8 - 168 .- - 14^ 

Philadelphia, Pa„.,.. 13 ~ - '3 - 

Miami, Fla ,,-..,.„. 5,555 _ _ 1,537 945 .qq 2,828 '45 

Buffalo, N Y......=„ i9 - - - - - .9 

Detroit, Mich. ,. , , ;52 - 54 - - ~ 53 

San Antonio, Tex, . 6, /'I - 16, !47 - _ _ -. .. 

Ei Paso, Tex. .._.„_ 10,939 - 10,939 - _ _ „ ._ 

Los Angeles, CaL.... 6.615 - 6.6.5 - 

Canad i an Woodsmen . —The program perm.ttmg the importation of ski;,ed 
Canadian woodsmen under bond to guarantee maintenance of status and departure 
continued in effect during the year, and the need for the program stn. 
exists. However, during this summer domestic labor has become more andmore 
avai I ab I e, and the need for importation decreased accordingly. Also, reduced 
demand for woods products and accumulated stockpi les curtailed woods opera 
tions At the end of the fisca, year, there were 47 individual permits in 
effect authorizing the importation of 5,965 woodsmen, as compared with 59 
permits covering 8,285 woodsmen the previous year However less than ha^f 
of the number of woodsmen authorized were actuai ,y .mported and working in 
the woods at any one time 

Violations of the terms of the permits decreased dur.ng the year 
probably due to the ciose pol icing of the woods camps by the Border Patroi 
and a better understanding of their respons . bi I it ies on the part of the 
operators. 

Petit. ons for immigration visas and Reentry permits , wh : . e :n most 
instances the appi i cat ions for admission to the united States are hand,ed by 
the State Department, in two instances at east the initia, application ;s 
initiated through our Service, 



- 34 - 

Petitions for irrmigration visas . -^ The inrnigration Act of 1924 provides 
that nonquota or preference-quota status may be granted to certain near 
relatives of citizens of the united States. |n order to obtain such status, 
the united States citizen must file with this Service a petition for the 
issuance of an immigration visa (Form 1-135) accompanied by proof of his 
citizenship, his relationship to the beneficiary, and other facts. | f , 
after examination, the petition is approved, it is forwarded to the Depart- 
ment of State for transmittal to the appropriate American Consul. During 
the year just ended, 27,413 new visa petitions were received; of that 
number 21,556 visa petitions were approved, 285 were rejected, and 64 
approvals were revoked. 

Reentry permits. — Section 10 of the immigration Act of 1924 provides 
that resident aliens who have been lawful ly admitted for permanent residence 
who depart for atemporary visit abroad may obtain reentry permits to facil- 
itate their readmission to the united States. The years since the end of 
the war have shown a steady increase in the number to apply for documents 
with which to travel outside the united States. The travel to European 
countries in particular has shown a large increase. 



REENTRY PERMITS ISSUED 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1925 - 1950 



NUMBER OF 
PERMITS ISSUED 




During the fiscal year of 1950 a total of 63,893 applications for 
these travel documents were receivedand of this number 63,724 were approved 
and issued, and at the end of the year 1,302 applications were pending. 
During the previous year 51,48 1 permits were issued. 



- 35 - 

Extensions of reentry permits were granted in !i,643 cases in '950 as 
compared with 9,494 during the previous f;scai year One hundred two appli- 
cations for extensions were denied and there were pending at the ciose of 
the year 277 appi i cat ions for extensions. 

Emigrants and Nonemi grants 

During the fiscai year there were 456,689 a, iens ;exciusive of border 
crossers, Mexican agricultural laborers, and crewmen) who departed from the 
United States Only 27,598 were emigrants, i.e,, ai 'ens who eft a perma- 
nent residence in the United States for a permanent residence abroad, 
48,054 of the nonemigrants were resident ai-ens who planned to return to 
the united States after a temporary stay abroad, and 38 1,037 were a, ens 
who had been admitted as visitors, persons in transit, and others temporar 
i iy admitted. 



CHAPTER 4 




Adjustment 
OF0t Status 



'.■v.v/.*:': 


' ^ 




S^^^^^^^:^ ^^ 


'•V/V.-;I' 


N 


•.'•• iBRfir 


• •••*•••"• 




■Al^-v-. _•.._•••...; M^HRil 


'•I' •'•**t^' 


n 


t*.,^ **~~<iiiV."^IS// 


%•••■••.••;'' 


1 1 


t^^'^^~~"s-wr^""^~^^^^^3p 


*•'-•'.' * •*,' 


u 


^r,*.'*\ "'•^V'^^*^ ^"^^^fc^ 




I 





The history of immigration laws hasbeen one of increasing restriction. 
It is difficult, if not impossible, to enact general laws that in their 
application do not impose undue hardship on aliens and citizens. |n order 
to ameliorate these situations, there are certain provisions in law and 
regulation. 

Suspension of deportation . — Section 19(c) of the irmiigration Act of 
1917, as amended, provides that the Attorney General may suspend the depor- 
tation of an alien who is deportable under law (otherwise than on charges 
relating to subversives, criminals, narcotics, immoral persons, and the 
mentally and physically deficient), if the Attorney General finds ( |) that 
such deportation would result in a serious economic detriment to a citizen 
or legally resident alien who is the spouse, parent or minor child of the 
deportable alien, or (2) that such alien was residing continuously in the 
United States for seven years or more and was residing in this country on 
July I, 1948. 

in addition to the 249, 187 immigrants admitted from abroad during the 
pest fiscal year there were 833 aliens who became legal permanent residents 
through suspension of deportation under the provisions of Section 19(c) of 
the limiigration Act of I9I7, as amended. Charges to the quotas of the fol- 
lowing countries were made for these al iens by the Department of State for 
the year ended June 30, 1950: 



Total 


Number 


833 


Great Britain,. 


, .. . 173 


U=S„S,.R, , _ 


Italy. ,..„....,, 


'69 


Finland. . 


Greece, . . • , = .o «. . 


65 


Spain. , , . 


Netherlands- , , „ . 


. „ . 42 


France, ,, 


Chinese racial..... 


37 


Germany , 


No rway , ,,,,.. ..^ ,. 


= .- 36 


Austral ia. 


ph i 1 1 pp 1 nes. 


36 


Other„.... 



- 38 



35 
31 
28 
25 
23 
22 
III 

Section 19(c) of the i mm i g rat i on Act of I9I7 requires that the perti- 
nent facts In all cases in which the deportation of an alien is suspended 
shall be reported to Congress with the reasons for such action, |f during 
the session at which a case is reported or in the next foiiowmg session 
Congress approves by concurrent resoiution the granting of suspension to 
the a.ien, deportation proceedings are thereafter cancel led and the alien 
is accorded the status of a i awf u permanent resident of the united States 
If the Congress does not pass such a resolution, the Attorney Genera, is 
directed to deport the alien in the manner provided by law 

During the f ;sca: year 1950^ 4,452 suspension cases were submitted to 
Congress, as compared with 4,302 m :949 and 3, 160 in !948. Since the 
passage of the Act of June 28, '940., authorizing suspension of deportation^ 
32,358 names have been submitted to Congress for approval, or an average of 
3,236 a year. 

Displaced persons residing in the united States Section 4 of the 
Displaced Persons Act of 1948, as amended, provides that eligible Displaced 
Persons (as defined in that Act, temporarily residing n the united States 
may apply tothe Attorney General for adjustment of their irrmigration status 
to that of permanent residents, provided that they are otherwise admissible 
to the united States and were .awfu, ,y adm.tted to the united States as 
nonimmigrants under Section 3> or as students under Section 4(e), of the 
Immigration Act of 1924 

Displaced persons filing application for adjustment of their immigra 
tion status are required to estabi ish by credible evidence that they have 
been displaced as a resu't of events occurring subsequent to the outbreak 
on September i, '939, of \Nor\d War || They are further required to estab 
iish that they cannot return to their native countries, nor to the countries 
of last residence or nationality, because of persecution or fear of perse 
cution on account of race, religion or political opinions 

The applications in 491 cases (constituting 48% of the ',09 cases in 
which final decision had been entered by the Commissioner by June 30, '950) 
were denied because the applicants fai ied to establish eligibility for 
adjustment of status in accordance with the requirements of Section 4 of 
the Act, principal grounds for denial were that the applicants did not 
prove "displacement" from the country of birth, last residence, or nation 
aiity, that they did not enter lawful. y under Section 3 or Section 4(ej of 
the immigration Act of !924, or that they entered the united States subse 
quent to April |, 1948, whereas under the Displaced Persons Law, prior to 



39 

the amendment of June 16, 950 iPubilc taw 555, . e gibe app :cants were 
required to enter prior to Apn i , '943 However, the amendment of 
June ;6, 1950 advanced the date under refe -ence from Aprs : ' 948 to 
Aprii 30, 949 Therefore,, some of the denas upon reapp-xat on by the 
Dispiaced Persons, may present.y '-ece've favorab e cons, de -at on 

Pree xa m^ natio n. — Preexam; nat on is a pr'v .ege accorded to certain 
ai iens who a.-e in the United States n a status other thar, that fo^r per- 
manent res dence and who des re to adjust their 'mm.graton status by 
proceed, rg to Canada to app y to an Amerxan consu, in that country -f^o - an 
mmigrat:on vrsa with wh ch to app y to the Un ted States fo,- pe-manent 
'es I dence 

if the appiicat.on for preexamiiation 'S app,>-o.-ed, the ai 'en is given 
a hear,ng to determ.ne his adm:ss;b .' .ty to the Un.ted States The ai en 
must be adm'ssib.e to Canada, of good mora: cha^-acter and have assurance 
from the American consul, in Canada that an imm grat.o^ - sa can be issued 
prompt y ,t the a, len ;s found to be e :g b e for a" mn'grat.on v:sa. he 
is issued a preexam: nat ion bo; der- c'-ossirg cad to fac tate entry into 
Canada Durmg the year, 3 805 new app.xat ons ror preexam nat; cn were 
submitted by a 'ens who were rot subject to deportat.on proceedings, 2 356 
app,;cat,ons for preexam mat ion were approved, and 3 4 were den ed During 
the year, the authority for peexam; nation was .►-evoked r the cases of 33 
indivi'dua.s, in the preceding year 2,078 new app i cat ons for preexam. na 
tlon were received 

.Exerci se of the Seven th Pre r. A ens returning after a temporary 
absence to an unreunquished domic:, e r the un.ted States cf se.en consec- 
utive yea-s may be adm.tted by the Attorney Gene-a: ,nde:- the a^thorty 
contained r, the 7th prov.so to Section 3 of the inmi g'-at ,on Act of '917" 
notwithstanding a ground or grounds of inadmissib: ■ ity under the rfin g at.cn 
laws 1 However, ,t is to be noted that the mtemai Secuity Act of '950 
contains a proh.bit^on that the 7th Ptov so shau ha\e no app; cation to 
cases fa, , ng w-thin the pu!-v;ew of Sect, on ; of the Act of October '6 
9 8, as amended ; 

The tab e which foi lows shows thenumbe- of app, icat, ons fo- cons:de,-a 
tion under the Seventh p-oviso f ma, .y d , sposed of d'. ' ->e past fou;'- 
years and the manner •:jf d sposition of such app' cat ons 

App cat :ns fo' exe.-cse of Seventh pro. : so 
rea & ended „up.e 30. 





Nunbe.'- 

of 

appI i cat ions 


D spos ■ t j on 


of_ag£|i 


cat 


ons 


^' 


Years ended 
June 30 


Adm 
auth 


ss on 

10 r, zed 






Adm! 
den 


ssion 
ied 


Tot a; 


'022 
■72 
334 

248 
268 




90, 








-\^ 


^950 ,- 
-949 
'948 
'947 


38 
306 

240 








34 
28 
25 
28 



- 40 - 

Most of the applications for Seventh Proviso relief during the past 
fiscal year arose in deportation or p reexamination proceedings of resident 
aliens who would havebeen excludable criminals or mental or physical defec- 
tives, or illiterates. Practically all of the !38 cases in which favorable 
action was taken represented persons who, in addition to having the statu- 
tory requisite of seven years prior domicile in the united States, had 
established family ties in this country and had otherwise unblemished rec- 
ords for years past,. 

Registry of aliens under Sect ion 528( b) of the Nationality Act of 1940 . 
— To obtain a reentry permit, to be naturalized, and for various other rea- 
sons, aliens need to have proof of lawful permanent entry into the United 
States. After the alienis record of entry is verified, a certificate of 
arrival or other appropriate document is issued by this Service. 

An alien may make application to the Commissioner of Immigration and 
Naturalization for the creation of a record of lawful entry where no record 
exists of his admission for permanent residence. To be eligible to have a 
record of registry created, the alien must prove that he is eligible for 
citizenship, that he entered the united States prior to July ', 1924, and 
has resided here continuously since, that he is a person of good moral char- 
acter, and that he is not subject to deportation. When registry is approved 
a record is created establishing the alien's admission for permanent resi- 
dence as of the date of his entry. During the past year 5,544 applications 
for registry were received, and 3,854 records of registry completed. 

Private Bills . — Another means of adjusting status is by private con- 
gressional action. Private bills are placed before Congress to relieve 
hardship and are necessary in individual cases, such as those for Japanese 
war brides or fiancees of United States citizen servicemen, whose admission 
into this country was not possible after the expiration of the War Brides 
and Fiancees Acts. Of the 460 approved by the 8 1st Congress to date, !3I 
were for Japanese war brides, and chi Idren of G, I 's, — persons whose cases 
would now be covered by Pub I ic Law 7 17 approved August 19, 1950 In another 
instance, a private law was passed on August 17, 1949, authorizing the 
repatriation of a native-born former citizen of the United States who 'ost 
citizenship by voting in British elections. The provision in Section 323 
of the Nationality Act of 1940, which had authorized the repatriation of 
such a person, expired on August 6, 1947. 



CHAPTER 




FORCEMENT 



While the enforcement of imnigration and nationality laws is always 
important, enforcement takes on added meaning amidst the pressures and 
tensions. of our contemporary world, and guarding the borders, following 
through on investigations, and detention and deportation activities become 
paramount in many phases of Service work. 

Border Patrol 



Twenty-six years ago when the "Border Patrol" began, its name fitted 
an organization conceived for the primary purpose of patrolling the land 
borders. This is sti I I an important work as is showi by the graph below: 

MILES PATROLLED BY BORDER PATROL OFFICERS 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1925 - 1950 



MILES (In 


Millions ) 
































1 — 1 




—, 


1 


■ — 1 


n 


14 


— 1 


r-r 1 1 


- 1 1 1 1 " 


—rill 




K^ — 






12 








1 




^ 


i — 


— i 


r" 


f 


^ 


10 




BT TNtiN - 


MOR» - BOAT 


ft 


MRCRAFT 


J 






t 


J 








J 


K 






f/ 


5 


'1- 


8 




y 


f 


% 


[^ 


=f1 


^ 


r 


P= 


A 


•oc 


T 




/ 












6 
4 


i 












i 


^ 


f 














_ 


JY 


MO 


row 
























Z 


^ 


f 
















































0, 


B 


— 






« 


Q 




_ 





































A 


















Jh 


fO_ 


— 




— 


/x 


'5 







II 


so 




- 42 - 

However, asmeans of rapid transportation increased this plan of opera- 
tion decreased in effectiveness. For example, only a decade ago the 
problem of unlawful entry of Mexican laborers was one confined almost 
entirely to States bordering on Mexico. Mexican aliens now, however, have 
been apprehended by the thousands in the North. Small details of our 
officers in Chicago have apprehended on the streets of that city more than 
a hundred aliens a week who were unlawfully in the united States. A colony 
outside Port Huron, Michigan, contains over 800 former residents of Mexico 
and south Texas. Wherever masses of illegal labor have gained a foothold, 
there has been a decided migration of local workers. They cannot meet the 
competition and live by American standards — the Mierican way of life. 

It is largely these same Mexican laborers that brought about a year of 
stupendous accomplishment of 469,581 apprehensions during the year by Border 
Patrol Officers, although other groups apprehended in much smaller numbers 
may be much more important in terms of national security. The chart below 
shows the sharp increase in apprehensions over the past two years. 



DEPORTABLE ALIENS APPREHENDED BY BORDER PATROL OFFICERS 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1941 - 1950 
APPREHENSION do Thousands) 
500 



400 




300 



200 



100 



It has been necessary for the Border Patrol to give increasing atten- 
tion to avenues of unlawful entry which, though previously existing, had 
not been used extensively for many years. As cited elsewhere in this 
report, hundreds of south and middle Europeans have been found unlawfully 
in east and midwest united States. Many of t hem entened on arriving vessels 
at ports of the eastern seaboard. To close this avenue of i I legal entry 
into the heart of America used by those who not only are law violators, but 
are also possible menaces to our national security, the border patrol oper- 
ations have had to be extended to sea as we 1 1 as land borders. 



- 43 - 

The 713 smugglers apprehended during the year included every type, 
from the smal I operator who brought one alien at a time to the we\ l-knit 
organizations that have smuggled dozens or even hundreds of aliens by air- 
plane into the united States. The importance of this work, even to the 
smallest case, is readily apparent when it is realized that a saboteur or 
atomic spy will more than likely seek this illicit entry by the most ob- 
scure and least conspicuous route. 

Along with the higher costs of production and inflationary trend in 
our economy, there has come a tremendous increase in the fees and the 
incentive for smuggling. Formerly it was a rare and prominent case if the 
smuggler's price was over a hundred dol lars. We have now made apprehensiorts 
in a number of cases where the price was a thousand dol lars or more. 



SMUGGLERS OF ALIENS APPREHENDED BY BORDER PATROL OFFICERS 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1925 - 1950 




Never before in the history of the Border Patrol have there been such 
stupendous accomplishments. Never before has the Border Patrol been called 
upon to assume greater responsibilities than those brought about by a world 
political situation which, by the end of the fiscal year, had seen a cold 
war of world politics change to a shooting war in the Far East. 

With new equipment and improved techniques, the Border Patrol will put 
all its effort behind the task of apprehending this more dangerous type of 
smuggler, with better radio comnuni cat ions, more airplanes, more personnel 
and better planning, it is believed the Border patrol is well able to meet 
the new challenge of illegal migration. 



- 44 - 
I nvesti gat ions 

There is hardly a phase of the enforcement and adjudicative operations 
of the Service that does not require that an investigation be conducted at 
some stage in the proceedings. Our growing security consciousness has 
resulted in progressive increase in the number of investigations required 
in all avenues of Service activity. 

until recent years, the investigative responsibilities of the Service 
were perfontied by immigrant inspectors, Naturalization Examiners and other 
officers as incidental to their normal duties. The impact of World War || 
made it apparent that specialization was required, and investigations were 
gradually channelled to a group of carefully selected and specially trained 
officers devoting their full time to investigative pursuits. 

Special emphasis was given during the past year to the problems pecul- 
iar to the times, such as subversive aliens, smugglers and related activ- 
ities, outlined in the introduction to this report. 1'' |n addition, of 
course, due attention was given to investigations required, both in normal 
times and times of stress, in the execution of the laws generally corrmitted 
to this Service for administration and enforcement. 

Even in the field of usual operations the stress of external events 
created its own peculiar problems. For example, during the past few years, 
numerous aliens were brought to the united States to testify in the various 
treason trials arising out of the recent war. Careful follow-up had to be 
maintained to see that these witnesses departed once the trials were con- 
cluded. Private bills required a careful investigation by the Service, 
various aliens enjoying special status in this country by reason of of- 
ficial employment by a foreign government or by the united Nations termi- 
nated their employment, thereby necessitating inquiry to see that they de- 
parted. Following are some of the attendant problems: 

( I ) Fal se documents — The past year has yielded evidence of the at- 
tempted use of false passports and other documents in trying to gain entry 
into the united States. |n some instances, the documents have been forged 
or altered, in others, foreign passports have been stolen in blank and 
trafficked commercially. Some aliens have also attempted entry in the 
guise of American citizens by presenting false or illegally created birth 
certificates. 

One of the criminal cases was that of John Runningwater Eagle, who was 
successfully prosecuted under 18 U.S.C. 911 and 371, for assisting, induc- 
ing, and procuring aliens to falsely claim united States citizenship. He 
received total sentences of fourteen years imprisonment. This defendent, 
who was a citizen and a notary public, followed the practice of advertising 
that he would assist Mexican aliens, here illegally, to adjust their immi- 
gration status so that they might remain here permanently. From such aliens 
who would engage his services, he would collect a fee ranging between $50.00 
and $125-00, and would then create a delayed birth record showing the birth 
of the alien in the United States. This would be accomplished by means of 
fraudulent affidavits showing birth in Texas, the alien's true name, true 
1/ see pages 3 t o 6 . 



- 45 - 

date of birth and true names of parents, the oniy fa,se item being the 
alien.s place of birth Our investigation indicated that th:s sing,e notary 
public had created such fraudulent b.rth records in more than iqo cases 
This practice is unfortunately too common 

Again, there are .ndications of organized criminal rings traff:cking 
in false documents The use of such birth cert.ficates by a, len Chinese m 
securing documentation as American citizens has also been disciosed by 
investigation. The evidence has been presented to the Federal Grand jury 
at San Francisco, and a conspiracy ind:ctment was recently returned against 
some of the participants, incuding a prominent attorney 

(2) Frauds by dispiaced person s, -invest i oat ons conducted both n the 
united States and abroad during the , ast year indicate that a number of 
aliens admitted or applying for admission under the D'spaced Persons 
Act of 1948 have procured their status as e^igib.e displaced persons bv 
fraud or deceit whiie the statistics for the past fiscai year are incom" 
piete, during that per od at .east 653 .nvestigat ons of possib.e frauds on 
the part of displaced persons were initiated 

Another facet of the problems re at ng to displaced persons ,s that 
arising from the fact that, once admitted to th s country many displaced 
persons have promptly left the emp.oyment assured them as a prerequisite to 
the issuance of their visas. Section 6 of the Disp:aced Persons Act of 
'948, as amended on June le, 1950, now requres appi cants of this sort to 
execute a signed statement accepting and agreeing n good faith to abide by 
the terms of the emp.oyment. Misrepresentation in th.s -egard is made a 
basis for deportation, under the amended act Vio.ations of this section 
of the act win no doubt add to the numbers of investigations during the 
fisca. year 195 

j5; Lookouts, —The investigation Section ,n the Centra. off:ce is the 
clearing house for infonnation of al , sorts drect.y affecting the enforce 
ment operations of the Serv.ce, Through this focai po^nt passes ai , manne- 
of inteiiigence, which must be analyzed, classified and disseminated to the 
Field m such form as to be read< ;y avai,ab,e at a., times for qu^ck 
reference The buik of this information s sent out in the form of lOokout 
cards which can be uniformly maintained in ai ; Fle^d Offices 

in September 1949 a revised system of 'ssuing lookouts, to cope wth 
the rapidly increasing vcume of information requ.rmg dissem.nat ion was 
inaugurated Th.s new system has proved highly successfu. n operation and 
has contributed greatly in preventing the entry or continued residence of 
undes.rabie aliens. During the past year, 2,6^6 lookouts were distr buted 
to the Fieid, as compared with 2,095 during the preceding year 

The tabe be.ow shows the principal types of 1 nvest 1 gat ons that fig- 
ured prom.nent.y in the work of the fiscai year 



46 - 

I nvest I gat ions 
Year ended June 50. 1950 



Number of 
Type of case investigations 

Total „ „ . , , .......,.„..„„...... = .. = ..... ~ .... o ..„......- . 258. 064 

Violation of general immigration iaws. ...,.....,,...-..-....•. .^ 107,500 

Violation of status of visitors, students, transits and 

treaty merchants: 

Remained longer than authorized. ..„<,, ..o ... = .. ^ ............. . 23,685 

Other V i o I at i on of status,, „...,.,....... o.. ..o ........ ..o„ ... . 12, 479 

Suspension of deportation (under Sec. 19(c), immigration Act 

of February 5, 19:7, as amended). ......................... . 15,004 

Violation of Alien Registration Act. ....................... . 9,823 

Eligibility of displaced persons applying for adjustment of 

status under Sec. 4. Displaced Persons Act of !948, as 

amended .........,.„.,.,.........:...-.. 4, 239 

V i o I at 1 on of paro I e, .................... . ..................... 2, 935 

Subversive aliens (under Act of October 16, '918, as 

amended ).........,.,...................■.-......•...•. = •.••■■■•.• 2, 323 

Naturalization cases. 

Revocation of natural ization. ..... c ,,.. „..o ........ . . ',279 

Petitioners for natural izat ion. .................... , 7,539 

Other natural izat ion cases. . . .. < „„„;,.,............. 8.701 

Mi see i I aneous cases . ..„...„.„..„., ......................... . 42. 557 

(4) Cooperation with other agencies — Close liaison is maintained with 
other agencies possessing information which may be relevant to Service 
responsibilities. These relationships have proven to be mutually advanta- 
geous, and the interchange of information has not only made more effective 
the enforcement work of the Service, but has also contributed substantially 
to the over-all effectiveness of the Government as a whoie Extensive 
security measures were inaugurated during the past year to maintain invio- 
late such data as were furnished under the seal of confidence. 

Detentions 

The detention policy of the jnmigration and Naturalization Service has 
two major objectives: First, to discharge its functions in such manner 
as to create in the alien proper respect for our Government, its officials 
and property; and, second, to enforce a minimum of restraint, consistent 
with security and discipline, in order that upon release from custody he 
may harbor no feelings of hostility or have experienced any adverse effects 
from his detention.. 

From the time a temporarily inadmissible alien, an excluded a. len. or 
an alien under warrant of deportation is placed in the custody of the 
Service until his departure he is provided with ciean, sanitary living 
quarters, an adequate, nutritious and wei i-baianced diet, medical care by 
the Public Health Service, and facilities for religious services, recrea- 
tion, and education. Although aliens are not required to perform any labor 
during detention, good morale is indicated by the fact that there is a. ways 



- 47 - 

more voluntary help for the limited type of maintenance work available than 
we can uti I ize. 

(I) Al iens detained . — During the fiscal year 1950, 97,710 aliens were 
detained in Service-operated facilities at Ellis island, Boston, Seattle, 
San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Diego, El Centre, and Honolulu, and in more 
than 300 contractual jails throughout the united States. There was a 
decrease of about five percent in the number of aliens detained in compari- 
son with the number in 1949. 



Tota I a 1 i ens detained 



years ended June 50 
1950 1949 



Total 97,710 



102, 523 



I n Service-operated faci I it ies 38,515 49,261 

|n Non-Serv ice-ope rated facilities 59,195 53,262 



As a result of continued efforts in expediting the processing of cases, 
the issuance of travel documents, arranging prompt deportations by steam- 
ship and airplane — whichever is available and most economical to the 
Government — and the release of al i ens onbond or parol pending final deter- 
mination of cases, the Service was able to reduce the total number of days 
detention provided, as indicated by the chart which follcws, until the last 
quarter of 1950. At that t ime, the effect of the new Administrative 
procedure Act upon this record is reflected in the sudden up-surge in d^s 
detention provided, almost reaching the high point of July 1949- 

DAYS DETENTION IN SERVICE AND NON-SERVICE OPERATED FACILITIES 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1950 
NUMBER OF DAYS DETENTION 
8 0,000, 1 1 1 1 1 1 \ 1 T 



60,000 



40,000 



20,000 




- 48 - 

Likewise, there was also a decrease in the average number of days 
detention per person for the first nine months of the past year. |t wi I I 
be noted however that the size of the decrease was reduced by the applica- 
tion of the Administrative procedure Act, which delayed the release of many 
aliens from detention from April through June. 



Average days detention 



Years ended June 50 
1950 1949 



All facilities 7.50 6.87 

In-Service -operated faci I ities 9.98 10.64 

I n Non-Serv ice-ope rated facilities 5.20 4.43 

(2) Economies effected . — Following a special survey of all Service- 
operated detention facilities in the interest of efficiency and economy, 
the El Centro facility in Southern California, which is located I 10 miles 
east of San Diego, was placed upon a curtailed basis as of Januat7 15, 1950. 
This was made possible as a result of using the voluntary departure proce- 
dure rather than holding Mexican aliens for deportation. The Camp Elliott 
facility, because of its favorable location II miles west of San Diego and 
its large capacity, as well as its proximity to the united States District 
Court in San Diego, has been expanded to include the detention of aliens 
apprehended in the El Centro area. The Seattle detention quarters were 

UNIT FOOD COSTS PER PERSON - PER DAY 
CENTS 
70 




JUNE 
1949 



JANUARY 
1950 



JUNE 
1950 



49 - 

also placed upon a cu^tai ed basis as of February !, 950; due to the smal i 
number of arriving passengers from the Orient Arrangements were made to 
transfer temporarily inadmissible aliens to our San Francisco f ac i ' ty and 
to detain ai lens apprehended under warrants of arrest in the Seattle area 
in local jails By curtail, ng these two faci':ties annuai savings of more 
than $100,000 wi i i be realized unt i , conditions warrant a return to maximum 
use. 

Substantial savings during the past year have been effected with re 
spect to food Comparison of food costs -.s shown ^n the accompany ngchai: 

As the Bureau of Labor Stat.st cs index shows ncreas:pg food costs 
during the last haif of the year, t is apparent the coordination of a. 
phases of the detent , on operation under one supervsory officer in the 
Central Office, and the inspect, on of detention faci.ities for the purpose 
of supplementing Central Off ce regulations with on-the spot instructions 
to Field operating personnel, have been extremely effective 

More than a mi i l ion and one-half meais were served at E . s isiand, 
San Francisco, Los Angeles, El Centro^ and Camp Ei . iott detention facilities 
during the i ast year, at an average cost of approximate. y "] cents each. 
Mea,s are carefuMy pianned on a basis of nutritive va.ue, and 't s a 
matter of sat i sf act ■ on to know that our uniform da: .y -at on food scaie 
meets the required standard d etary a owances of the Food and Nutrition 
Board of the Nationa; Research Counci i 

(5) Non-Serv I ce operated facilities .- New procedures estabi ished as of 
Juiy !, 1949, in connection with the joint contracts executed by the Bureau 
of Prisons and the Immigration and Naturalization Service for the care and 
maintenance of aiens and prisoners with city, county, and State jaiiS, 
have worked satisfactorily durmg the first year of operation Numerous 
overlapping .nspection, contractual, and ctericai functions have been e, .m- 
I nated inspect. on reports on file in the Washington office of the Bureau 
of Prisons reiat \e to these contractual ja. ,s ptov de immedate factual 
data whenever requi red 

Ai ien Paroie 

There has been a steady increase n the number of transactions involv- 
ing persons under deportation proceedings who are released under authonza 
tion of 8 CFR '50 6, pending fina^ d^sposit.on of cases These incude 
( I j a substant a' number whose deportation cannot be effected due to na 
bility of the Service to procure travei documents, i2) persons released 
pending hearing or decision or result of appea;, (3) those for whom trans- 
portation arrangements couid not be immediately completed, (4, those with 
private biiis pending. Aiso included are persons who stand excluded from 
the united States and who are paroied to permit the adjustment of imm.gra 
tion status, to defend cnminai prosecution, to testify m crim'nai cases 
for the Government, to app.y for registry, and simi ar circumstances where 
the case is exceptiona ly mentor ous and mmediate deportation couid be 
inhumane m exc.usion cases, therefore t i s an adm.n strat ve remedy 
usually for the benefit of the aiien in deportation cases, the benefit is 



- 50 



to the Government, in that the expense of detention is eliminated and the 
expense of parole supervision is nominal. 

The average number of persons under parole supervision per month was 
11,689, with a'low of 9, 145 during August 1949, and a peak of 12,395 during 
March 1950. Ttiere was an average of 947 placed on parole per month, whi le 
801 per month were removed from parole either by return to detention for 
violation of parole or by deportation or other closing action. During 
April a peak of 2,491- vvere removed from parole. The effect of the Sung 
decision is reflected in the increase in the number on parole in March 1950 
and the radical increase in the number removed from parole during April 
1950, a large nunber of the latter being persons who were granted voluntary 
departure under the privilege of 8 CFR 150.3. 

Due to the increasing number of countries to which deportation cannot 
be effected due to inability to secure travel documents, the number of 
persons placed on parole will continue to increase, because, except in the 
cases of those" waiting hearing or decision, removal from parole can only be 
effected by death, private bills, or adjustment of status under the provi- 
sions of Section 19(c) of the Act of I9I7, as amended June 30, 1948, or 
other remedial legislation. 

Deportations and Voluntary Departures 

The total deportations and voluntary departures reached the astounding 

DEPORTATIONS AND VOLUNTARY DEPARTURES 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1944 - 1950 



/9S0 



1949 



J 948 



1947 



1946 



1945 



1944 




69,490 



32,270 



214, S43 



ALIENS DEPARTINO 
VOLUNTAHILY UNDER 
PROceCDINOS 



116,320 



80,760 



3»,4'19 



400 

Thousands 



600 



800 



- 51 - 

figure of 579, '05. Each year for the past four or five, we have hoped the 
peak has been reached, but this year's figure practically doubled that of 
last year, and was aimost i5 times as great as the number deported and per- 
mitted to depart voluntarily m 1944 

( I ) Deportations . — Only 6,628 of these persons were deported This is 
just about one third of the number deported in the fiscai years 948 and 
1949 There are a number of reasons for the drasticai ly reduced figure, 

(a) The illegal entry of Mexican laborers was so tremendous in 1949 
that the Service was forced to devote more of its resources to the speedy 
removal of these al lens under vol untary departure processes with less atten 
tion being given to more lengthy formal deportation proceedings, in order 
that a uniform policy might be followed in the three Mexican Border 
Districts, instructions were issued in May 1949 to the effect that except 
for Mexican aliens of the criminal and immorai ciasses for-ma! deportation 
proceedings should be limited to those who had previous, y been granted four 
voluntary departures., The resu.ts have been a sharp dec ine in the number 
of forma, deportations, and a concurrent increase in the number of deport- 
able aliens required to depart under voluntary departure processes (b,. |n 
addition to the 1 and border practice of encouraging departures, another 
factor in the decrease in deportations is the liberalized provision, effec- 
tive July •, 1949, of Sect on ^9(0) of the Act of !9'7, author, zmg the 
suspension of deportation on the basis of economic detriment to dependents 
or of meeting specified character and residence requirements (c) There 
was aiso an increase in stays of deportation, usual ly granted for such 
reasons as pending applications for pardons, but during this fisca. year 
augmented by the .ncreased number of private bills introduced into the 
Congress to iegaiize the presence in the united States of persons who have 
been found deportable, (d) And final, y, the effect of the Sung decision 
was to immediately cut off numerous deportations until reheanngs could be 
held and the deportation procedure repeated. 

In the table which fol iows,the countries to v^ich ai lens were deported 
are shown for 1949 and 1950 

Al lens deported from the United States by country 
or reg.on to which deported 
Years ended June 50. '949 and !950 



Country or region to which deported 950 1949 



Al i countries- 
Europe. , 

As i a. ..„,... c .... o . 
Canada, ,..,..„.„,,.,. 
Mex i CO , 
West I nd I es , 
Central America, 
South Anenca. . 
Africa- 
Other countries 



... - . 


6.628 


20.040 




947 


985 




244 


225 


„ , . „ . . 


757 


869 




3.519 


:6,903 




722 


346 




■44 


152 




60 


•49 




47 


39 




308 


374 



- 52 - 

It will be noted that the proportionate number of Mexican nationals 
deported is considerably lower than last year, due no doubt to the proce- 
dure referred to in item ( I) above. 

Causes for deportation again reflect the policy of using voluntary 
departure procedure as an expedient way to rid the country of those who 
entered without Inspection. 

Aliens deported from the united States by cause 
Years ended June 50. 1949 and 1950 

Cause 1950 1949 

Al I countries. ............................. 

Criminals. ..................................... - 

Immoral classes. ................................. 

Violators of narcotic laws. .................. o. . 

Mental or physical defectives..................... 

Previously excluded or deported........ 

Remained longer than authorized................. 

Entered without proper documents................ 

Abandoned status of admission. ................. . 

Entered without inspection or by false statements 
Likely to become public charges................. 

UnabI e to read ( over 16 years of age) . ..... ..... 

Subversive or anarchistic. ..................... . 

Mi see I I aneous. ..................................... 

(2) Travel documents for deportees .— Qne of the discouraging factors 
in the deportation program is the difficulty encountered in obtaining travel 
documents for deportees. Before a warrant of deportation can be executed, 
a travel document must be obtainable from the country to which the alien is 
ordered deporled. The closing of consular offices, stricter interpretation 
of regulations by some consular officers, and changes in territorial juris- 
diction so that consuls in one or more countries refuse to accept the alien 
as a deportee are some of the reasons why it is difficult to obtain travel 
documents. When travel documents cannot be obtained from embassies or 
consulates by this Service the cases are treferred to the Department of 
State, That Department, however, does not request travel documents for 
countries with which the United States does not have diplomatic relations. 

The table which follows shows the number of cases in which the Field 
Officers were unable to obtain travel documents local iy, and applications 
were made to embassies and through the Department of State 



6.628 


2D. 040 


790 


1,024 


53 


76 


55 


70 


53 


82 


553 


3,815 


1,661 


1,379 


1,352 


998 


224 


329 


1,734 


12,094 


38 


20 


6 


4 


108 


148 







3!8 


- " " 


o . „ u 


240 
558 


52 


cases 





- 53 - 

Cases pending July I, 1949.""..- - ■ 

Cases rece i ved .. ..,..- .,„ , . , ..„„.,.,„.„.,....,..... 

After local consuis had refused to issue travel docu- 
ments, authorizations were secured in. ...„.„..,.„.... . 

Reports from the Department of State and other agencies 
that travel documents would not be issued were re- 
ce i ved in „ . , „ .... 1 29 cases 

Passports no longer required, as action was discon- 
t i nued in, „ , ., . „ . .- , „,......,... 53 cases 

Cases pending June 30, 1950- «.-.. = ... o.... ,..,,..... . ....... o. ....... « 324 

in addition to the negotiations conducted with the State Department 
and the embassies, the Service negotiaced with the Allied High Commission 
for entry into Germany of persons under exclusion, expulsion and removal 
orders. During the fiscal year autho ri zat ions were received from the Allied 
High Commission for entry into Germany of 26 displaced persons under exclu- 
sion order — one displaced person under expulsion order, and 121 others 
under expulsion order. There were i I authorizations for transit of depor- 
tees through Germany enroute to Austria and Czechoslovakia. Authorization 
for entry into Germany was denied in | | cases, of non-Germans who did not 
meet the qualifications of the Commission for acceptance into Germany as 
deportees. Entry into Germany as deportees was also refused i n the cases 
of 66 insane persons because no suitable facilities for institutionaliza- 
tion have been restored. 

Close co-operation has been accorded by the Ai i led High Commission, as 
indicated by the fact that the Commission has reversed previous refusals in 
e\/ery instance in which the Service felt that there was sufficient basis on 
which to re-present the case. Negotiations were completed for acceptance 
into the Western zones of Germany of persons of German descent who origi- 
nated in the former Free City of Danzig or that part of Germany which is 
now under Polish administration 

The close liason which has been maintained with embassies and legations 
of other countries has resurted, in some instances, in improved procedures 
which expedite the issuance of travel documents. The British Embassy sev- 
eral years ago authorized the Consulate at New York to accept applications 
for travel documents for deportees of British nationality where no docu- 
mentary evidence was available. |n recent months that authorization has 
been broadened to include the principal consulates. 

(5) Transportation arrangements for deportation of aliens . — Transporta- 
tion of aliens often has two aspects. ( I ) to get the alien to the port 
from which he starts for the country to which he is to be deported, and (2) 
transportation to the country of deportation from the port. 

Within continental united States there were 152 deportation parties 
authorized, carrying ', '48 aliens by air As heretofore, the flights were 



- 54- 

coordi natedto avoid excessive travel of Security Officers and to avoid 
excessive detentions,, The use of planes of non-scheduled carriers, which 
has effected yery considerable savings by decreased man-days of detention 
and in cost of transportation and meals per alien and in per diem expense 
and man-hours of escort officers, continued during fiscal year 1950. 

There was increasing difficulty in the procurement of water transpor- 
tation and of documents and escort for transit through countries outside 
continental united States. 

procurement of transportation on steamships for deportees is becoming 
particularly difficult, apparently because of insufficient passenger-carry- 
ing shipping to meet present commercial demands. The usual tourist season 
scarcity of space to the Scandinavian countries now appears general as to 
all countries. Most of the deportations to Australia during the fiscal 
year involved the securing of reservations two to three months in advance 
and involved prolonged detentions in several cases. Apparently the situa- 
tion is becoming worse rather than better. 

The cost of air transportation has precluded overseas deportations by 
the regular airlines, except under unusual circumstances. The use of 
non-scheduled carriers under contract is practicable only for group move- 
ments. During the year, two such flights totaling 78 aliens were operated 
to Pakistan and Indonesia. There was but one mass movement by steamship, a 
party of 58 deportees to Pakistan. Deportations to China proper have prac- 
tically ceased, the last group having been deported through Hong Kong to 
the Cantonese area at the close of the fiscal year 1949. The British Crown 
Colony of Hong Kong, early in 1950, decreed that they vrould accept as depor- 
tees only bonafide residents of Hong Kong. The same situation exists as to 
Formosa. 

Deportations which require transit through other countries often ne- 
cessitate the service of an escort, particularly in the cases of physical 
or mental incompetents. This usually is arranged through a steamship com- 
pany and included in their billing. However, through the permit Office of 
the Allied High Commission, arrangements have been made for the German 
authorities to provide escort through Germany to several bordering coun- 
tries, and it is anticipated that there will be an increase during fiscal 
year 1951 of deportations to those countries, particularly of incompetents. 
It is anticipated that negotiations will be completed early in the fiscal 
year for simi lar deportations via Trieste. 

It is appropriate at this time to mention the hearty cooperation of 
the Visa Division of the Department of State, and the permit Office for 
Germany of the Allied High Commission in arranging for trans-shipment and 
transit through other countries in instances where direct transportation is 
not available. The Office of Chief of Transportation of Troop Movement 
Division of the military establishment, and the international Refugee 
Organization have cooperated in arranging for accommodat ionson vessels 
operated by or for those agencies. 

(4) unexecuted warrants of deportation . — in contrast to the 6,990 



-35- 

unexecuted warrants of deportation pending at the beginning of the fiscal 
year, there were 5,379 pending on June 30, 1950, unexecuted, except as to 
the first group, for reasons beyond the control of the Service: 

Def e r red f o r recons i de rat i on or stay ..................... . 877 

Deferred account private bi I Is. .,.„......,.„....„.„..„,.. „ 173 

Awaiting travel documents. .........„...,„„,,.,„...,.„.,.. „ 375 

Awaiting transportation. .„...........„...,..„.„,„,...,,.. . 2 '8 

Serving sentence. 

Trave 1 document obtai nab I e. ,..„.„....,„....,... , . . . 53 j 

Travel document unavai 1 abl e. . ...,,...,..„... ...... 340 

I n armed forces. .......................................... 3 

In hospital or asylum; 

Waiting travel document or transportation. ............. . |00 

Travel document obtainable, not able to travel.......... 115 

Travel document not obtainable.......................... 256 

Travel document not available: 

At i arge. ............................................... i^ 342 

Whereabouts unknown, .,„,....,.„.„.....,,.,..„........... 507 

Travel document obtainable, whereabouts unknown........... 290 

The substantial decrease in the number of unexecuted warrants of de- 
portation is due largely to the effect of the Sung decision of February 20, 
1950, which necessitated the invalidation of many warrants of deportation. 
The majority of these wi i I result in the reissuance of warrants of deporta- 
tion after new hearings, 

(5) Pest itute al iens removed . —Ei qhty -five aliens were removed from 
the united States under Section 23 of the immigration Act of 19 17, as 
amended by the Act of May !4, !939, which provides for the voluntary removal 
of destitute ai iens who applied for return to their native lands at Govern- 
ment expense. Aliens removed under the provisions of this Act became 

ineligible for readmission except upon approval of the Secretary of State 
and the Attorney General. 

(6) Voluntary departures . -During the past fiscal year 572,477 aiiens 
who had been adjudged deportable were permitted to depart at their own ex- 
pense, in this latter group were those found to be deportable on other 
than criminal, moral, or subversive grounds, or because of mentai or physi- 
cal defects. Such a procedure is advantageous to the alien since he is 
not prevented from applying immediately for readmission if the basis for 
his deportable status includes no element which might disqualify him for 
readmission. |t is also advantageous to the Service as it results m a 
saving of deportation expense, 

included among those who were permitted to depart voluntarily were 
12,628 who departed after the issuance of warrants of arrest. There were 
11,939 in this category in the fiscal year '949. 

The comparatively slight increase in the number who departed at their 
own expense after the issuance of a warrant of deportation appears to be 
solely an increased desire on the part of the aliens to avoid return to the 



- 56 - 

countries to which ordered deported or, to a lesser degree, to avoid the 
stigma of arriving abroad as a deportee, under the regulations, the de- 
parture executes the warrant of deportation 

Of the total voluntary departures 560, 198, or 98 percent, were from 
the three Southwestern Districts with headquarters at San Antonio and El 
Paso, Texas, and Los Angeles, California. They were principally departures 
of Mexiccin nationals. 

The number of cases which have been disposed of by permitting reship- 
ment foreign as seamen will probably decrease, due to new regulations pro-- 
hi biting the shipping on American subsidy vessels of non-dec i arant alien 
seamen and the difficulty — often six months or more — in arrangingfor depar- 
tures on other vessels. 

Al ien enemies .. — The alien enemy program, insofar as it relates to 
World War ||, may be said to be completed. The remaining cases are. 

There are 25 Germans and one Japanese awaiting outcome of court ac- 
tions, eight Germans awaiting further administrative action, two Germans 
from Latin-America for whom departure is being arranged, and 290 Peruvian 
Japanese, Recent developments indicate a change of attitude on the part of 
the Peruvian Government, which may lead to the return of a considerable 
number of Peruvian Japanese. 

The Japanese who renounced their united States citizenship under Sec-- 
tion 40 i ( i ) of the Nationality Act of 1940, as amended, are still at large, 
having been released by order of the united States District Court for the 
Northern District of California, on Septembers, '947 

Exclusions . — There were 5,256 aliens excluded from the united States 
during the year. Aliens who arrive at ports of entry seeking admission to 
the united States may be excluded if they fail to qualify under the immi- 
gration laws of the united States. |n most instances aliens held for ex- 
clusion are given a hearing before a three-member Board of Special inquiry. 
From an order of exclusion by the Board, an appeal lies to the Commissioner 
except in certain instances when the Public Health Officer certifies an 
alien to be Inadmissible. Another type of exclusion where there is no 
appeal is discussed in the introductory pages, in the section on subver- 
sives.. 

To avoid prolonged detentions at ports of entry into the united States 
pending determination of admissabi I ity, a force of primary inspectors has 
been stationed in Europe to make immigration inspections of displaced per- 
sons to be admitted. This p reexamination procedure has involved large nunv- 
bers of appeal cases out of the more than 150 thousand cases examined. 
There were 92 excluded before embarking at European ports. 

Of the 5,256 aliens excluded, 1,685 were seeking admission at the land 
borders for less than 30 days, while 3,57l were excluded at seaports or 
land border ports when seeking entry for more than 30 days. 



57 

a; 'ens excluded from the united States, by cause 
Years ended June 50, ^950 



Number exciuded 



Cause Border- Other 
Tot a. crossers -■-• a! -ens 

Ai ; causes, 5.256 ^681 5. 57i 

Without proper documents 3.926 '.058 2,868 

Criminals , „ 428 229 199 

Mental or physicai defect. ves 2 9 94 125 

Subversive or anarchist c 

Had been previously excuded or- deported 

Stowaways . 

Likely to become public charges.., 

previously deported to avo d m: . itary service 

Inmorai c asses 

Unabie to read (ove.' 6 years of age, 

Cont ract i abo r'e rs 

Other Classes , . , 



57 


126 


3: 


35 


85 


50 


22 


- 


'22 


03 


50 


53 


56 


3 


43 


32 


'6 


'6 


4 




3 


2 




12 


52 


■3 


39 



-i' Aliens seeking admssion at land borders for less than 30 days 



CHAPTER 6 



Naturalization 




in all its varied activities of enforcement, the Service has kept In 
proper perspective the important part played by it in the naturalization 
process. While the exclusive jurisdiction to naturalize aliens is conferred 
on the courts, the whole process, including the final hearing and recotmien- 
dation, is the responsibility of this Service, in such times as the pres.=- 
ent, the protection of society requires that each alien presented for natu- 
ralization be a person in whose case there is no shadow of a doubt as to 
his belief in our form of Government through democratic means. For citi- 
zenship once granted is difficult to revoke. 

Declarattions of intention . — Generally, the first step in the naturali- 
zation process is the filing of a declaration of intention. Past records 
indicate that wars throughout the world stimulate an appreciation of and a 
desire for united States citizenship in those who are resident aliens. 
There was evidence of the "cl imate of war" in the increase in declarations 
in the past year. Applications for certificates of arrival and preliminary 
forms for declarations of intention were received in 1950 from 1 17,4-35 
aliens, an increase of 36 percent over the number received In 1949. There 
were 93,527 declarations of intention filed; this, too. Is an Increase of 
44 percent over last year. Possibly the principal group to file declara- 
tions are the displaced persons who make up such a large part of the pres- 
ent immigration. War brides — the other large group of recent Immigrants^ 
are not required to file declarations of intention. 

petitions filed .— There were 66,038 petitions filed during the year. 
Included in this number were many who sought expeditious naturalization 
under Section 312 of the Nationality Act of 1940- This section relates to 
al len' spouses of united States citizens who are employed abroad In the serv- 
ice of the united States Government or wdo are employed by Anwrlcan insti- 
tutions of research or by /werlcan firms engaged In foreign trade and com- 
merce. 



- 60 -- 



THOUSANDS 



200 



DECLARATIONS OF INTENTION FILED 
AND PERSONS NATURALIZED 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1946 - 1950 



150 



100 



50 



1 1 1 


\. PERSONS NATURALIZED 




V 




X 




^^ 


<** 




^ 


"^V DE 
\ IN 


^LARATIONS 
rENTION Fl 


OF 
LED 









1946 



1947 



1948 



1949 



1950 



Inasmuch as the Department of the Arn\y permitted the wives and families 
of many o"f the men stationed abroad in areas of occupation to accompany 
their husbands, a large number of petitions for naturalization had been 
filed wherein the petitioners claimed the benefits of this Section. 

The Service has adopted the view that a member of the United States 
Armed Forces regularly stationed abroad Is In the employ of the united 
States Government as contemplated by Section 312. 

petitions granted . — There were 66,346 petitions granted during the 
past fiscal year. Thus, the number of persons natural ized continued to re- 
main at 9 level that has been maintained for the past several years fol low- 
ing the peak years of the world mr \\ when In the five years from July |, 
1940/ through June 30, 1945, there were a million and a half natural izat- 
tions, or an average per year of 300.0nr). 



- 61 - 



Reasons for the reduction in numbers of persons naturalized are sev- 
eral: ( I) ifTifligration was very low during the depression years of the 30' s 
and during vorld war ||; (2) the great nunbers of persons naturalized dur- 
ing the war reduced the alien population so that there were not many per- 
sons left to be naturalized; and (3) of those aliens eligible to be natu- 
ralized, many who entered in the peak periods of immigration — 1900-1925 — 
were now in the older age groups and could not readily meet the educational 
requirements for naturalization. Qf interest in the trend of the past few 
years is the increase in the number of "wives of citizens" naturalized, and 
the decrease in the ni/nber of members of the anried forces naturalized. The 
chart and table which follow show the principal groups for the past four 
years. 



ALIENS NATURALIZED IN THE UNITED STATES 
BY STATUTORY PROVISIONS 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1947 - 1950 
STATUTORY PROVISIONS 

( Percent ) 
100] 



80 



^ 



60 



GENERAL 

PROVISIONS 40- 

WIVES OF 
CITIZENS 



••.• ' •:•/•••.•.'; j MEMBERS OF 20- 



'*--■-- 



ARMED FORCES 
OTHER 




950 



- 62 - 



Persons naturalized, by statutory provisions for naturalization 
Years ended June 50. 1947 to 1950 



Statutory provisions 1950 1949 1948 1947 



Total naturalized................... 66. 546 66.594 70. 150 95,904 

National ity Act of 1940 

General provisions................ .... 19,405 24,566 54,547 46,539 

Sees. 5IO(a)(b), 511, 512-Persons 
married to U- S. citizens.............. 40,684 55,151 28,898 27,066 

Sees. 315, 516-Children and 

adopted children of U.S. citizen 
parents. ......................... • • 

Sec. 3l7(a)-\Atomen who lost U.S. citizen- 
ship through marriage.................. 

Sec. 32IA-Fi I ipino persons whose con- 
tinuous residence in U.S. commenced 
prior to May I , 1954. .................. 

Sec. 524-Persons who served in U.S. armed 
forces for three years. ................ 

Sees. 524A, 70!, 702-Persons who served 
in U.S. armed forces in World Wars I or 
I I or were honorable discharged. ....... 

Sec. 525-Persons who served on certain 
U.S. vessel s. ......................... . 

Act of July 2. 1940 

Persons who entered the U.S. whi le under 

16 years of age, ........................ 256 5 !5 516 436 

Other provisions.... ...................... . 187 158 88 61^ 

The impulses that make immigrants choose to become naturalized citi- 
zens are many and varied; the economic advantage of citizenship as in time 
of war is a strong factor. People from countries with similar political 
traditions and the same language can be more readily assimilated than those 
with a different political ideology. On the other hand, those who are 
political and religious refugees wish to become citizens as quickly as pos- 
sible. This has been demonstrated by the speed with which the displaced 
persons are filing declarations of intention. 

The table which follows shows the principal countries of former alle- 
giance of persons naturalized. 



499 


448 


419 


245 


245 


245 


296 


516 


1,843 


2,675 


4,200 


2,655 


545 


450 


98 


83 


1,724 


2,006 


1,070 


16,462 


1, 164 


622 


418 


241 



63 - 



Years ended June 50. 



Former na ti onality 

Total 

British 
Can ad an 
German 
Itai lan 
Poi ish 
USSR 
F I 1 . p ; no 
Other „ = „ 



J9S0 


949 


!948 


!947 


66,346 


66 594 


70, 150 


93.904 


'.2,697 


!3,284 


;2,36; 


20,328 


5,882 


5,347 


3,860 


1/ 


6 065 


5,777 


7,486 


i0.703 


8,743 


8 30! 


9.452 


'',56 


3,793 


4,37: 


5. '36 


6,495 


2, 22 


2,752 


3, 43 


3 562 


3,257 


3,478 


5,768 


0,764 


23,787 


23, 284 


22,944 


30,536 



j_/ jnciuded w:th British 

Effective February 7, 1950,, new reguiat'ons. 8 CFR 373, were pnamui ■ 
gated as the result of severa, natural i zat on decisions the purpose of 
which was to define cieariy the rights of the petitioners for naturaiiza 
tion when appearing before officers of the Service for pre) imlnary hearings 
upon their petitions, and to improve the naturalization '-ecoi'ds. One of 
the outstanding features of the new re9u:ations permits an appi icant to be 
represented at the hearing by an attorney or a person representing a repu- 
table rei'ig:ous, char i tab ie^ or socia. service org an i zat ion Verbatim rec- 
ords of the hearing are to be made where the comp,exity of the issues and 
evidence just fy such cou -se The appi icant may submit bnefs on the is- 
sues : nvo I ved 



if the recommendation of the Service is for den ai of the petition for 
natural ization, or :f it is a i'grant" case In which the facts a-e to be pre 
sented to the court, the Hearing Officer is required to subm t to the Cou 't 
at the fina, hearing a memorandum containing a summary of the evidence, 
find:ngs of fact, cone, us ions of iaw and a '■ecommendat i on as to the fma 
disposition of the petit on A copy of thiS memorandum is required to be 
served on the appi icant 

Natu ra i i zat i on pe t J t : ons den ea "ne e were 2,276 petitions for natu- 
raiization denied by the courts, inciuded m th s number were 1,537 cases 
denied fc want of p '•osecut i on , in most of these cases, however, the peti- 
tioner fornaturai i zat lon failed to prosecute the petition after notice that 
the petition would be recommended for denia, on the merits of the case The 
petitioner faiied to establish good mora, character in 139 cases in 151 
cases he fa: led to estab. ish sufficient knowledge and understanding of the 
principles of the Constitution 

The record discloses that on y 40 petit ons for naturalization were 
denied on the ground that the petitioner had fai.ed to estab. ish attachment 
to the principles of the Constitution of the united States and favo>-ab,e 
disposition to the good ordei- and happiness of the united States The fact 
that this f gure is much lower than the corresponding figure for the previ 
ous years s .ndicative of the changing attitude of courts m the case of 
alien enemies, as to whom most of the adverse information referred to ac 
tivities prior to 1942, the courts have heid that even when such activities 



- 64 - 

were within the statutory period, the petitioners had shown a change in 
their feelings toward the united States and thereby estabi ished their at- 
tachment and favorable disposition toward the united States, one reason 
for this lenient attitude is that the available witnesses who previously 
testified against the petitioners and who refused to recommend them for 
citizenship have now changed thei r recommendation or have fal led to remember 
any specific actions of the petitioners which indicated a lack of attachment 
to the united States. That the Service has been slower to change its atti- 
tude toward the actions of the petitioners during the statutory period is 
evidenced by the fact that during the year 129 petitioners for naturaliza- 
tion were admitted to citizenship over the objection of this Service., A 
large percentage of that number involved cases in which there was a question 
as to the petitioner's loyalty to the united States. 

Naturalizations revoked,— of the 415 judgments of naturalization re- 
voked in the fiscal year 1950, 392 were cases in which the Foreign Service 
of the Department of State initiated action because naturalized citizens 
became residents of foreign states within five years of natural ization. 
Other causes for revocation are shown below. 

Certificates of naturalization revoked, by 
grounds for revocation 
Years ended June 50. 1950 

Grounds Number 

Total ................................................... 0. ,j. 415 

Established permanent residence abroad within five years after 

natural i zation. ..„.....,.„...,,.,.....„„,...,.,,.„.,.„......„. o... . 392 

Failed to meet residence requirements (false a! legations). „..,.„..„ . 5 

Bad moral characted ( fraud i nvo i ved )..........,..„.,.....,........ o. . 5 

Misrepresentations and concealments relating to marital and family 

status. 3 

Bad moral character (no fraud involved)...,....,.................... 2 

Dishonorable discharge following naturalization based on military 

sen/ice during World War || ......,.......,.....,..„„,,..„...,.... . 6 

Other gounds. ...........,,„,..,,......„..,........,.,....„.„...„..., 2 

Loss of national ity . — |n addition to those persons whose united states 
citizenship was revoked, there were 5, 792 persons who expatriated themselves 
by affirmative action. Most of the certificates of loss of nationality 
were received from American consuls of the Department of State. The var- 
ious ways of losing nationality, which are stipulated in Chapter jV of the 
Nationality Act of 194O and in previous acts, and the numbers of persons 
are shown in the following table. 



- 65 - 

Persons expatriated, by grounds for expatriation 
Year ended June 50. 1950 



Grounds for expatriation 



Number of 
persons 



Total . , . , . ...„„...,..,,... „„,,„,„.,.,,....,.„„,, 5.792 

Voting in a foreign political election or plebiscite,..,.,..,.,,,...,,,, 1,693 
Residence of a naturalized national in a foreign state(Sec. 404, 

Nationality Act of 1940) „,....„„„,...„,.,. !,424 

Natural izat ion in a foreign state, ..„,.„,„„„.,„,,.„ „.,,,-, 1,096 

Entering or sen/ing in the armed forces of a foreign state... 721 

Taking an oath of ai legiance in a foreign state,, .,.......-..,,„.,.„ 359 

Accepting or performing duties under a foreign state, .... ,,.0 .,...» ,, |63 

Renunci ation of nat ionai ity abroad. .,.„.,„..,......,.„„.....,...„„„„. 149 

Departing from or remaining away from the united States to avoid 

training and service in the land or naval forces................. !09 

Desert i on from the armed forces. ............ ...,.....,,.....„.,..„ 4 

Other g rounds. ....„,,..„.,......„..„ „ 64 

Special certificates of naturalization . — Over 1,300 special certifi- 
cates of naturalization were issued during the year. The main reason for 
this large number seems to lie in the fact thatmany united States citizens, 
now, are prosecuting claims for property damages incurred during Worid 
War II to property owned abroad.. The special certificates are needed 
to obtai n recognition of united States citizenship by the foreign governminLs 
concerned. Another indication of worid conditions is noted in the fact 
that 296 applications for the benefits of Section 307(b) or Section 308 of 
the Nationality Act of 1940 were considered. These are applications sub- 
mitted by aliens who, because of employment by American organizations, are 
required to reside abroad for a period of one year or more and who wish to 
maintain the continuity of their residence in the united States for natu- 
ralization purposes. 



Citizenship acquired by resumption or repatriation .— Statutory author- 
ity exists for the re-acquisition of citizenship by persons who lost United 
States citizenship by serving in a foreign allied army during Worid War ! 
or World War ||, and by women who lost citizenship through marriage to 
al iens. 

The number of former citizens who received certificates of citizenship 
under such conditions is shown in the table which foi lows-. 



- 66- 

Years ended 

June 50 
1950 1949 

Total number. ............ ....................... 1,219 2, I 16 

Persons who lost citizenship by serving in the 
armed forces of al lies of the United States, 
and who were repatriated under Sec. 523, 
National ity Act of 1940............................. 276 899 

Native-born women who lost citizenship through 
marriage to a I iens and who were repatriated 
under the Act of June 25, 1936, as amended. ..,„.. . '775 1,040 

Native-born women who lost citizenship through 
marriage to aliens and whose marriages terminated, 
and who were repatriated under Sec. 317(b) of the 
National I ty Act of 1940............-..........."... 170 177 

Section 325 of the Nationality Act of 1940 specifically authorizes re- 
patriation after service in a foreign, a 1 1 i ed a rmy . In addition, Section 
317(c) of the Nationality Act provides an expeditious means for the natu- 
ralization of former citizens of the united States who were expatriated 
pursuant to Section 401(c) of the Nationality Act of 1940 by reason of 
service in a foreign army.. Since Section 401(c) does not distinguish be- 
tween service in an allied army and in the army of an enemy country, it 
permits persons who served in an enemy army during the recent war to claim 
the benefits of Section 517(c). In such cases, many questions arise con- 
cerning attachment to the Constitution of the United States and favorable 
disposition to the good order and happiness of the United States. Therefore, 
most of such cases are reviewed by the Central Office before they are pre- 
sented to the courts for final hearing. Citizenship was not conferred upon 
any applicant under this Section during the year. 

Derivative certificates . — During the past year, 19,078 persons filed 
applications for cert if icates of derivative citizenship, claiming to have 
derived citizenship at some prior time through the naturalization of a par- 
ent or husband. Over this period, 16,502 certificates of derivative citi- 
zenship were completed. 

|n addition, certificates of citizenship were issued to 4,520 persons 
by reason of their birth abroad to citizen parents. 

Citizenship education . — The citizenship education program of the 
Service has been in continuous operation since 1917, having first been au- 
thorized by the immigration Act of that year and further strengthened by 
the Nationality Act of 1940. The program seeks to aid naturalization can- 
didates in preparing to assume their duties and responsibilities as citi- 
zens of the United States, by furnishing — through the public school sys- 
tems — copies of the Federal Textbook on Citizenship to be used in class-room 
study. A clear understanding of these responsibilities cannot be too 
strongly emphasized inviewof present-day political trends. National unity 
of purpose can be more readily achieved when our various groups of peoples 



- 67 - 

fully appreciate the ideals upon which our Government was founded and are 
willing to assume the duties which they will incur, as citizens, in perpet- 
uating our way of life. 

It is wel I to examine the progress which has been made over the fiscal 
year ended June 30, '950. Detal Is of the principal phases of the work 
f o I I ow: 

Citizenship textbooks for naturalization applicants 
distributed to the public schools 
Years ended June 50. 1944 - 1950 

1944 — 294,939 1948 — 149,600 

1945 — 259,039 1949 — 145,528 

1946 — 179,694 1950 — 190,038 

1947 — 190,354 

Names of newly-arrived immigrants 

Transmitted to the Field Offices by the Central Off ice. . . . . . . » » „ 181,311 

*Transmitted to the public schools by the Field offices .,... 149,461 

Noncitizens referred by the Field offices to public-school 

c I asses. .....,.,.„......,„ 109, 9 '9 

Home study 

Names of noncitizens supplied by the Field Offices to State 

universities and State correspondence centers. ............ o,. . 31,22! 

Noncitizens informed by the Field Offices of facilities for 

correspondence courses. ........................................ 44,801 

Textbook distribution 

To the public schoois for candidates for naturalization by the 

Cent ra I Of f i ce. ...... , 190, 038 

Public-school classes and enrollments 

**Publ ic-school (and Home Study Course) classes organized during 

f i seal year 1950. i , 847 

**Candidates for naturalization enrolled in all classes during 

the last fiscal year............................... ....... 69,765 



This figure is included in the total of 181,311 for the fiscal year. 
This information is taken from reports made bypublic schools at the time 
text-books are requisitioned, andmay be regarded as reasonably complete. 



- 68 - 



CITIZENSHIP TEXT BOOKS FOR NATURALIZATION APPLICANTS 
DISTRIBUTED TO PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1944 - 1950 



THOUSANDS 
400 



300 



200 



100 



THOUSANDS 
400 



300 




200 



100 



Names of newly-arrived iimiigrants . — During the fiscal year, a total of 
181,311 visa-name slips were transmitted to the Field Service by the Central 
Office for ultimate distribution to the public schools holding citizenship 
education classes for naturalization candidates. On March I, 1950, the 
decentralization of a part of the work made it necessary to prepare these 
slips in the Field Offices as a part of the process of mailing Alien Regis- 
tration Receipt Cards. This action resulted in a saving of time and per- 
sonnel in the Central Office. 

The value of this information in recruiting candidates for naturaliza- 
tion in public-school classes has been forcefully called to the attention 
of the Service on many occasions. The practice inaugurated in many school- 
systems and State educational institutions of sending welcoming tetters to 
naturalization candidates has been adopted in an increasing number of lo- 
calities over the past fiscal year, and has resulted in increased enroll- 
ments. 



Home study program . — Ttie work of processing the home study program is 
carried on by state colleges and universities in co-operation with this 
Service. During the past fiscal year even greater efforts to serve aliens 
in rural areas have been made through these facilities, especially in 
Southern and Western States »*ier8 scattered populations make organized 
•classroom study difficult. As many as 42 nationalities have been repre- 
sented In one such program, with age ranges of from 17 to 80 years. Educa- 
tional backgrounds range from no fonnal education to over four years of 
college. Many enrol lees could neither speak, read, nor write English, yet 



- 69 - 

in most cases they were measurably aided toward their goal of citizenship 
through home study. 

Of the total reported enrol Iment of 69,765 candidates for naturaliza- 
tion in public-school classes or courses, 10,327 such persons were reported 
enrol led in the home study courses. 

Public-school certificates of proficiency . — The past fiscal year has 
witnessed an increased acceptance by the Service and the courts of public- 
school certificates showing the satisfactory completion by candidates for 
naturalization of courses of study upon the basic principles of the Consti- 
tution and Government and the History of the united States The following 
naturalization courts have accepted such certificates as evidence of the 
petitioner's educational qualifications. AM Federal and State Courts m 
Connecticut, Massachusetts, andRhode island. District Courts at phi lade i ph.a, 
Pennsylvania, Camden, New jersey, and Trenton, New jersey, the District 
Court at Baltimore, Maryland; Supreme Court of New York State at Niagara 
Falls, New York; District Courts at Detroit and Grand Rapids, Michig.an, 
Toledo, Ohio, and Wayne, Indiana, 37 State Courts in the State of Michigan; 
four State Courts in Ohio; and one State Court in Indiana; District Courts 
at Chicago, Illinois, and Milwaukee, Wisconsin; the District and Superior 
Courts at Sacramento, California; and the District Court at Albuquerque, 
New Mexico. 

Fifth National Conference on Citizenship ,, — The immigration and Natu- 
ralization Service participated actively in the Fifth National Conference 
on Citizenship sponsored by the Service, the Department of justice, and the 
National Education Association. Thisyear's meeting was held at Washington, 
D. C , May 20-24, 1950. Once again an entire day of the program was devoted 
to a discussion of the work of this Service on Saturday, May 20, !950. 
Ninety organizations representing patriotic, civic, governmental^ education, 
and social service groups sent more than 200 delegates to participate in 
the May 20 discussions. 

The proceedings were led by the Commissioner of immigration and Natu- 
ral ization, who outlined conference objectives and called upon members of 
his staff and guest speakers to discuss problems confronting the Service. 

These discussions, during the morning session, concerned an outline of 
current immigration and naturalization trends and administering the irrmi- 
gration laws, discussed by Service staff officials, as well as the dis- 
placed person and nationality problems of other Government officials. The 
afternoon session was devoted to the social aspects of naturalization, in- 
cluding discussions of the citizenship education program and public-school 
educational facilities, assimilation of the foreign-born, and meaningful 
naturalization court induction ceremonies. 

As on previous occasions, the Service provided an exhibit displaying 

various parts of the Federal Textbook on Citizenship, nQur Constitution and 

Government." As an additional part of the exhibit, statistical information 

,-on the citizenship education work, as carried on in cooperation withthe 

public schools throughout the united States, Hawaii, and Alaska, was set 



-70- 



forth in graphic form. 



Naturalization court ceremonies . — The judges of naturalization courts 
have arranged more meaningful ceremonies for the induction of new citizens. 
These programs, during the past year, have become even more inspirational, 
and usually include a statement by the judge at the time of administering 
the oath of Allegiance; an address of welcome by a civic leader; a "re- 
sponse" by one of the naturalized persons; and presentation of certifcates 
of naturalization, various civic and patrtotic organizations furnish music 
and pageantry which add color to the programs. 

Many reports carrying the text of "responses" by newly naturalized 
citizens indicate thedepth of feeling for this country entertained by these 
people. Such ceremonies give these new citizens an opportunity to publicly 
acknowledge their newly-acquired responsibilities and duties. On the 
occasion of his naturalization recently, a great actor remarked that the 
Oath of Allegiance was, bethought, one of the most beautiful and impressive 
pieces of prose he had ever heard. He further stated that it would be in- 
cluded in his repertoire. 



NATURALIZATION - YEARS ENDED SEPT. 27, 1906 - JUNE 30, 1950 

THOUSANDS 
500 



400 



300 



200 



100 



, DECLtRtTIOItS OF INTEMTION 
PETITIONS FOR NiTUUllZtTIOII 
DOIICITIIEIIS NtTUI«ll2E0 




1907 1910 



1920 



1930 



1940 



1950 




CHAPTER 



7 



Research 

AND 

Information 



As in every other phase of Service wDri<, the functions relating to 
appraisal of the work through research and statistical analyses and the 
dissemination of knowledge concerning the activities of the Service took on 
importance in the light of present-day events. 

Research. — Research of two general types is carried on in the Service. 
One group constantly reviews and digests the administrative and quasi- 
judicial decisions made by the adjudicative officers of the Service and the 
Board of immigration Appeals, in order that the manuals of the Service may 
reflect the current thinking and judgments, and the Field decisions thereby 
may be kept uniform throughout the united States. The umiiqration and 
Nationality Manuals are comprehensive official work-books, containing a 
total of 2,000 printed loose-leaf peiges of concise statements of the sub- 
stantive and procedual law upon these subjects enacted by Congress, imple- 
mented by regulations, and interpreted and applied judicial ly and adminis- 
tratively. (This work involved the final technical drafting of 1,511 pages 
of manuscript to replace manual texts affected by changes in the law and 
regulations or by new interpretations.) 

The second kind of research covers a variety of topics connected with 
imnigration and naturalization. There follow© a brief statement concerning 
some of the research reports prepared. "The Deported Criminal Allen" gives 
a comprehensive picture taken from Service files of the social characteris- 
tics of this group of aliens. "The Foreign-Bom Population and Old-Age 
Assistance" brings together available information from a variety of sources 
to give a full statistical review of a problem concerning which statements 
have frequently been made without benefit of detailed knowledge. "The 
Social char£>cteri sties of Aliens Registering for Selective Service during 
World War || from Three Southwestern States" deals primarily with aliens 
from Mexico. It gives a detailed picture of their age, marital status, and 
length of residence in this country and compares this group with al I persons 
registering for selective service. A study, "Aliens Deported as Public 
Charges", analyzes the reasonsfor these persons becoming public charges; 



-12- 

it gives the length of residence in the United States, age, marital status, 
country/ of birth and length of t'me spent in institutions in this country. 

A program of research has been undertaken summarizing the social char- 
acteristics of persons recently naturalized. These studies are providing 
cis comprehensive a picture of these persons as can be obtained from the 
files of the Service. They measure the relationship between the age of the 
alien at the time of entering this country and the time required to become 
naturalized; they also measure the influence of marriage to a native-born 
or naturalized citizen upon the time required to become naturalized. 
Changes in occupation and residence from the time of alien registration to 
the time of naturalization are analyzed. Age, marital status, number of 
children, and place and length of residence of these persons are described. 
The study of former nationals of Mexico has been completed, and at the end 
of the fiscal year, a study of former nationals of Italy was under way. 

Statistics . — As in years past, immigration and nationality statistics 
have been col lected, presented, analyzed, and Interpreted during the fiscal 
year covering data on migration, naturalization, derivative citizenship, 
expatriation, repatriation, exclusion of Inadmissible aliens, the apprehen- 
sion and deportation of aliens illegally in the united States, and data on 
the adjudicative funct'ons delegated to the Service by law and regulations™ 
Detailed tables on displaced persons admitted under the Displaced Persons 
Act of I94S have been prepared on a monthly basis for the Displaced Persons 
Commission, and special tab'es have been prepared semi-annually on the dis- 
placed persons al .-eady ^n this country. Current statistics have been pub- 
I ished periodical I y in the Monthly Review . 

Operations reports from the Field and statistical analyses have proven 
of increasing value in the study and determination of administrative proce- 
dures and policies of the Service. increasing requests have been made by 
various Government agencies and transportation companies for passenger re- 
ports of aliens and citizens travelling by sea and air, which are compiled 
and distributed monthly to interested agencies. These repoiiis are used as 
the official data both by the Civil Aeronautics Board and by air transpor- 
tation companies at headings before the Civil Aeronautics Boa^'d. 

Public and Congressional Interest in the heavy number of public and 
private bills dealing with Immigration and naturalization which were Intro- 
duced in Congress in the past fiscal year has resulted in many requests for 
additional detailed statistics and analyses. in order to adequately meet 
the demands of the Senate sub-committee investigating immigration and the 
Judiciary Comm'ttee, which has been considering the omnibus immigration 
bill, certain statisfca! studies have been prepared. Chiefly, they have 
dealt with (I; immigration restri ction, 1 2, the effect of the Displaced 
persons Act of i948 upon future immigration to this country, (3) the effect 
of liberalizing legislation of the present raciai bars upon naturalization, 
and ;4) the adjustment of immigration status of displaced persons residing 
In the united States. Summat'es of several of these studies were published 
i n the Monthly Review . 

The turn of po'ic'cai e.-ents in the past year has thrown greater 



- 73 - 

emphasis on internal security and the important roie of the United Nations. 
The Service has been represented in interdepartmental committees dea mg 
with the problems of international migration statistics, and studies have 
been made and recommendations drafted concerning the improvement of inter- 
national migration statistics. The Section has cooperated with investiga- 
tive and intelligence agencies and interdepartmental committees in the col- 
lective aim at internal security,,. 

Periodic and special reports and analyses have been prepared deai ing 
with illegal entries, the legality of status of visitors,, transits, stu- 
dents, treaty traders, and agricultural workers in the united States, and 
the steps undertal<en to prevent and punish iiiegal entrants A repo^ :S 
in process on the prosecutions in the courts for violating inm gration and 
nat ional ity laws. 

Other statistical work in the past year included articles for !0 stand 
■ard reference yearbooks, material for taiks by the Commissioner, ana.yses 
of procedural changes, analyses of the statistical needs of the Dispiaced 
Persons Commission, and the preparation of the Annual Report and tables 
which are appended hereto. 

Information .. — The Monthly Review of the Service contains articles ar-d 
research reports relating to the activities of the Service Du-mg the 
past year many of the research and statistics reports have been summarized 
in the Monthly Review . Articles on the operation of the Service at various 
ports of arrival, on the effects of changes 'n : aw,, and on the ways of 
administering the laws have been included in the I2 issues. 

information from the records is furnished 'n those individual cases :n 
which certification of naturai i zat ion or other information is required from 
the official records. 

in the wider field of public relations, great interest has been shown 
in the Service, and the mass media of news releases, radio, te e, s on 
motion pictures, and magazine articles were used throughout the year to 
keep the public informed on the Service work and the reasons for the admin- 
istrative actions taken. 




CHAPTER 8 



OMINISTRATION 



The changing problems and responsibilities of the Service were re- 
flected in almost every phase of acini nist rat ive responsibility. Decentrali- 
zation, with its procedural and organizational changes, the realignment of 
personnel following the Wong Yang Sung decision, and changes in budget 
and financial procedures are a few of the outstanding factors that affected 
the administrative work of the Service. 



IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE 

CENTRAL OFFICE ORGANIZATION 



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- 76 - 

Personnel 

On June 30, 950, the Immigration and Naturai izat ion Service consisted 
of 6,630 employees. There were 792 m the Central Office and 5,838 in the 
Field, The tatter group included 92 employees stationed in Aiaska, Hawaii, 
Puerto Rico and the Virgin islands, of the United States, 83 located in 
Canada and Cuba, and 'J assigned to Gennany to assist the Displaced Persons 
Comm i ss i on 

placement and training, — The task of filling ai . pos;t:ons with pei-sons 
who have qualified through C'vil sef-vice exam, nations was a most comp:eted 
last year There were oniy 346 employees occupy' ng positions ^n the com 
petit've service who did not have permanent or p-obationa, appontments at 
the end of the fiscai year Almost haif of this number was located :n the 
Washington, D> C ,, area, due largely to the shortage of persons eiigibie 
for probationai appointment to such positions as stenographer and typist 

The Board of Civil Service Exam ners for the immigrat on and Naturali- 
zation Service rece.ved and rated 2i,233 applications for examinatons for 
the positions of Patroi inspector (Trainee) and immgrant inspector. The e 
were 346 appointments made from the i ists 

m the Cent --a Office approximately 7,500 inte: views were conducted 
and 4,500 letters and memoranda were prepared 'n connect'on with placement 
activities Approximately 10,000 personnel act ons we^e processed,- 8,000 
concerned the Fie^d Service and 2,000 the Central Office 

For a number of years correspondence courses have been o'''fe'ed to 
Service employees on the regulat ons and procedures En-oi ees ,n the pro- 
gram comp eted 2,2^ : essons during the year on various phases of immig-'a- 
t on and nationa. ity work 

Forty-three typists and 40 stenographers empioyed 'n the Central Of- 
fice were enrolled during the year :n a -efresher training program N nety 
applicants for' typist pos'tions and !25 appi icants for stenographic pos: - 
tions were given demonstration tests as p acement ads Sxteen tests in 
Spanish and .aw we.e drawn up during the year foi' testing p'^obationary Pa- 
troi Inspectors The comp-eted tests a:e reviewed and a prog.'ess file is 
maintained on each trainee 

Class i fication and employee services , — From the c i ass i f i cat . on v i ew- 
point, the fiscal year '950 was an eventful one. The Classification Act of 
'949, wh'ch superseded the 923 Act brought the |mnn;grant inspector posi- 
tion into classified serv.ce Approximately !,i00 incumbents were thus 
brought within the Classified service. Temporary ahocat.ons we^e made by 
the Civil Service Commission to grades GS-6, GS-7., and GS-8, The Cormiis- 
sion has stated that a complete study of the position wi ; i be made before 
the above grades become permanently fixed. Basic rates of pay were, of 
course, in conformance with the new classification scheme -athe' than the 
Reed-Jenkins Act, under which they were former. y estab ished 

Foi lowing the Supreme Court decision of Februa'"y 20, 950; in theWDng 
Yang Sung case, ail positions invoiving the ho.dng of forma, hearings in 



- 77 - 

deportation proceedings, formerly held by Immigrant inspectors were 
abolished and the functions placed into a new position as Hearing Examiner, 
To present the Government ' s case, a new position as Examining Office^ has 
been recommended for positions comparable to those of Hearing Examiner, 

Twelve surveys were conducted during the year and 2,000 positions were 
reviewed for classification or reclassification. Classification activities 
in all phases made necessary 12,000 record entries,. 

Treatments for illness, counseling on problems of health and hygiene 
and referrals to the Public Health Service or private clinics showed a 
marked increase over 1949, Sixteen thousand eight hundred ninety-nine 
cases, as compared with '4,498 in 1949, were bandied by the Central office 
dispensary. In addition 4,589 sick leave applications were approved by the 
nurses of the dispensary. 

One thousand seven hundred ninety-four cases involving disciplinary 
actions, loyalty and character investigations, retirement, injury, appeals 
and complaints, were reviewed and appropriate action begun. 

All collecting and accounting for group hospitalization and Federal 
Credit Union are part of the welfare program for employees. During the 
fiscal year, the Credit Union disbursed $69,000.00 in loans,. Collections 
amounted to $83,972.50 Group hospitalization collections amounted to 
$11,198.80. Interviews in connection with these activities numbered 1, 38',, 



Budget and fiscal control 

General . — A total appropriation of $31,229,000 was made to this Serv- 
ice for the fiscal year 1950, an increase of $779,000 over the amount 
available for the preceding year The increase in appropriation for the 
fiscal year 1950 was required to meet ( i) increased salary costs resulting 
from the Classification Act of 1949 (Public Law 429, 8lst Congress, approved 
October 28, 1949),, which became effective October 30, '949, and (2) higher 
rates per diem and mi ieage allowances provided by the Travel Expense Act of 
1949 (Public Law 92, 8 1st Congress, approved June 9, i949), which became 
effective July |, 1949. 

Receipts and refunds , — Changes in procedure were made dui-ing the year" 
While the total amount of receipts and refunds did not change materially 
from last year, there were a number of notable changes. There was an ex- 
pansion in fine cases arising from increased attempts at illegal entry 
There was an increase in the clerks of courts accounts due to the 'nterest 
of the displaced persons, war brides, and others seeking naturalization,. 
The following figures are illustrative of those items which can be compared 
with similar work performed during the previous fiscal year. 



78 



Comparison of receipts 

Permit and extension fees 
Number rece i ved ......... 

Amount. . . .............. 



Year ended June 50 



1949 



1950 



61,530 50,050 
$184,285 $148,583 



Percentage 
change 



18,7 
19.4 



Copying fees 

Number received. 
/Vnount „.„„..,... 



2,201 

1,509 



2, I 16 
1,746 



- 3 9 
15 7 



Pipes 

Number received.... 
Amount assessed 

Co I i ect i on schedu I es 
Prepared. .......... 

Clerks of Court fees 
Number received..... 
Amount ............. 



760 
463,417 



1,264 



134, 150 
$647,067 



1,081 
545,582 



708 



159-283 

$699,753 



42.2 
17.7 



44„0 



18.7 



During the year a total of $4,794 was refunded from the appropriation, and 
from trust accounts a sum of $55,363. 

Extra compensation under the Act of March 2. 1931 . — Sixteen certified 
accountings were prepared for the U. S. Court of Claims pursuant to its 
decision of May 6, 1946 ( 106 C.Cls, 676) for a total of $33,008, 188 were 
certified to the Claims Division of the General Accounting office for a 
total of $65,447, andtwo claims totaling approximately $1,400 were reported 
to the General Accounting Office without certification because of important 
distinctions in the latter accounting, setting them apart from the test 
cases decided on May 6, 1946- One of these was decided favorably to the 
claimant and it is estimated that 100 simi lar c laims wi I I be filed using 
this as a precedent. The other uncertified case was not the subject of a 
decision during the year. 

The Court of Claims ruling of June 6, 1949, in the cases of Thomas C . 
Gibney (No. 48572), Joseph M. Ahern (No. 48610), and Donald M. Taylo_r 
(No. 4861!) became final ( 114 C. Cls. 38). These, with two companion cases 
filed by another legal firm, resulted in certifications totaling $3,381. 

A few claims were received from |nmi grant inspectors and others under 
the May Q_ 1946, precedent, some for differences al leged due for the fiscal 
year 1948, and from employees of the Border Patrol alleging additional com- 
pensation due them. Shortly before the close of the year (from June 2 to 
June 28,, 1950) 500 individuals filed suits in the U. S. Court of Claims for 
extra compensation under the Gibney case (fiscal year 1948 amounts). 

The table below gives a comparison of accountings certified under the 
May 6, 1946, precedent, both to the Court of Claims and the General Ac- 
counting Office. 



- 79 - 

Accountings Certified under Precedent of May 6, 946 

Year ended June 3 

Total !947 1948 1949 j950 



261 48 6 

$ 363,359 $ 01,950 $33,008 



US Ct. of Claims 






individuals. ... 


522 


'97 


Miount ..,„...., . 


$1,000,710 


$502, 393 


Gen ,, Acct , Off i ce 






Individuals. .... , 


1,768 


- 


Amount , 


$1,985,64' 


~ 


Total 






individuals. „ , .,. 


2,290 


197 


Amount .....,...,,. , , . 


$2,986,35! 


$502,393 



,3 '3 267 '88 

t , 669 , 764 $250 , 430 $65 , 44-7 



1,574 3 '5 204 

$2,033, '23 $352 380 $98,455 

During the fiscal year 1950, deficiency and supp ementai funds for the 
payment of claims filed pursuant to the Act of March 2 93' we e appro- 
priated as foi lows; 

Genera. 
US Court Account ng 
Measure Enacted of Claims Office Total 

Th i rd Def i c i ency App rop r i at 1 on Act , 

1949 (Public Law 343 approved 

October !0, '949). $24,361.92 $700,36' 07--^ $724,722 99 

Supplemental Appropriation Act, 

1950 (Public Law 358, approved 

October 14, 1949): 67' 87 ~ 6/\ 87 

Second Supplemental Appropriation 
Act, '950 (Public Law 430, 
approved October 28, !949). 2,074 8 '2/ - 2,074 8. 

Deficiency Appropriation Act, 1950 
( Pub I i c Law 583, app roved 
June 29, 1950): i5.786.76 M6. 139.58 13 1.926. 34 

Total $42,895 36 $816,500 65 $859,396,0 

_]_/ The Third Deficiency Appropriation Act, 1949, includes $35,127.72 for 
other obligations which is not included :n the $700r361_07 figure. 

2/ under decision of the court of clams of the u. S of june 6 1949 
(114CCIS.38)' 

Management improvement — The principal organizational changes resu'ted 
from ( I) the realignment of personnel, to conform to the Administrative 
Procedure Act, following the Wong Yang Sung decision, and (2) "the decen- 
tralization of functions to the Field Another organ:zat ona, change was 



- 80 - 

the transfer of information functions to tine Division of Research, Educa- 
tion, and Information, 

in connection with the decentralization program, an analysis of the 
utilization of tabulating equipment in the Central Office was made. Such 
equipment, formerly divided between the Statistics Section and the Budget 
and Fiscal Control Section, was centralized in one section Such centrali- 
zation permits this section to perform the decentralization of file proc- 
esses as well as the fiscal work and the machine tabulating for statistics, 
with better utHization of equipment and personnel, and using uniform pro- 
cedures which contribute to increased efficiency and a greater economy of 
ope rat ion. 

Another piece of decentralization became effective October !, 1949, 
when a single form was instituted to replace approximately special bill 
forms. The new form provides a receipt to be exchanged for every remit- 
tance received by the Service Furthermore, checks and other remittances 
including cash, formerly transmitted by mail to Washington for deposit, 
were, after October first, deposited to the credit of the Government in 
ocal bankS: The standardized billing procedure has brought about a more 
effective control of collect ions, made possible a systematic analysis of 
accounts receivable, and resulted in more prompt payments of bills, as well 
as simplification in the clerical work to preparing, mailing, and filing 
bi lis. 

The Service has its own suggestion system, and is participating in a 
Department-wide incentive awards system Both programs are designed to 
give recognition to outstanding units, supervisors and employees, and to 
make appropriate monetary awards to personne; making superior contributions 
to efficiency and economy, 

in addition to the areas of management improvement discussed above, 
other projects included an intensive study and analysis of the Service's 
work measurement system. Revisions in the system are planned to meet the 
requirements of new or revised legislation, regulations and procedures, and 
to put into effect such changes as three and a half years of experience 
have shown to be desirable to make the system more comprehensive, more 
accurate, easier to understand and more useful to all officials. 

During the year the Administrative Manual was frequently amended and 
enlarged to include many new and revised procedures concerning various 
phases of administrative operations. A more attractive format was devel- 
oped that made it easier to read and comprehend,. 

Space, services, and supplies . — The problem of sufficient space for 
adequately serving the public, particularly at sea and air ports, and hous- 
ing the documents necessary in the conduct of the Service is a continuing 
one, but some steps have been taken to meet it. 

All Philadelphia offices of the Service were brought under one roof 
for the first time in 39years„ New office quarters were provided at Miami, 
Florida, for the District Office and for the port office in the new Federal 



- 8' - 

Building. The new offices provide the Miami District with modem facili- 
ties that have been needed for a long time Additional space was provided 
the Los Angeles District Office for setting up offices for Hearing Examin- 
ers plans are made to alter the space use on certain f ioors in the New 
York Office, to provide offices for hearing purposes At Brownsville, 
Texas, also^ the Public Buildings Service will make improvements in the 
Officers Club building that is used in the processing of farm laborers and 
to correct the very unsanitary conditions which prevailed there_ An auto- 
mobile repair shop with attached automobile storage sheds was erected at 
the Border Patrol headquarters at Marfa, Texas,. |n the Central Office an 
additional 6,000 square feet of space was secured for setting up the files 
decentralization work area and the tabulating machine unit This additional 
space, together with the reduction in Central Office personnel, will aid m 
relieving space problems in the duplicating unit, stock room, and indices 
as well as pe rm i t remova I of most of the naturalization certificate f i ies 
from the corridors,, 

Radio conmunicat ion stations were established at New York. N Y. Fo,-t 
Fairfield, Me,, and Norton, Vt.,, during the fiscal year, making a totai of 
55 fixed stations in operation at the end of the year. The program of re 
piacing the present ampi itude-modulated radio system with frequency modu- 
lated equipment was continued, A portion of the FM equipment purchased 
late in the fiscal year 1949 has been put in operation but the instaMation 
of repeater stations on mountain tops has been siow. Permits have been 
secured for repeater stations on Santiago Peak and Mount Laguna in Califor 
nia, on Mount Lemmon in Arizona and Mount Frank! in in Texas, and arrange- 
ments are being made to set up small buildings on the sites obtained for 
housing the equipment. To improve radio operations in the Biaine, washing- 
ton, sector, a remote radio receiver was installed on Sehome Hiil in 
Beliingham,, Washington, with a radio iink between this point and Blaine, 
This installation has been in operation for aimost a year and has given 
yery good service. 

At the close of the fiscal year, the aircraft fleet consisted of one 
amphibian-type airplane and seven observation planes, with four airplanes 
on order. |n addition, during the year,, purchase orders were issued for 
132 passenger automobiles, 28 carryalls, \l busses and 7 1 trucks. 

During the year 800 copies of a Court Directory were dup.',cated_ it 
contains ;75 pages and shows each court in the United States having juris- 
diction in naturalization proceedings, the clerk^s address and the counties 
over which jurisdiction is exercised. 

Mai I and f i ies .— The decentralization program increased rather than 
decreased the files work in the Central Office in its first few months, 
because as each file is requested for some current action in the Fieid, the 
file is consolidated, i.e., the Alien Registration file, letter fiies, 
declaration of intention, and ail other data pertaining to the individual 
alien are assembled into one file. Although a files consolidation program 
has been in operation since 1943, 't st i I ! has been necessary to consoli- 
date almost half the files requested by the Fieid before they can be re- 
leased. An additional work load was caused by the volume of incoming mail 
which was the highest on record. 



- 82 - 

When a major portion of the files has been decentralized and the Inter- 
ested aliens have learned to write to the Field headquarte/s for answers to 
their questions, the files work of the Central Office wi I I decrease consid- 
e rab I y . 

During the past fiscal year, 2,722 cubic feet of record material and 
348 cubic feet of non-record material were disposed of under the records 
retirement program. 



- 85 - 

APPENDIX I 

United States Supreme Court Cases 

I. Cases dec I ded — Vtonq yang Sung v„ McG rath, Att orney General, et al 
339 US. 33; 70 S^ Ct, 445, modified 339 U S 9Ce, 70 S Ct 564 U S ex 
rel Lee Wd Shinq, 339 US 906, 70 S Ct 565. Cohnstaedt v. | rnn i g rat i on 
and Natural i zation Service , 339 US 90' Unit ed Stat es ex rei Knauff v, 
Shaughnessy, 358 U S- 537, 70 S Ct. 309. affirming 173 Fo 2d 599 United 
States ex rel Eiciieniaub v Shauqhnessy, 338 U S. 521, and United States ex 
re i Wi i i umeit v Shaughnessy, same, US ex rei Pi rinsky v Shaughnessy , 
70 S- Ct 232- Save rg nan v, united States, et ai 338 US, 491, rehearing 
denied, 389 US 9 '6 

2 Cases denied certiorari - pota sh v C^ark, Atto rney Gen era ^id_ 

338 U S 87$, 70 S, Ct. '60. Schoeps ■/ 



Carmichaei , 339 U-S 9:4 B e.jeuhr v, Shaughnessy , 338- U S 948 Batiagj_^^^no 
V . Marshal 1 , , 33a U ■ S 829 U S ex rei E^cheniaub v Shaughnessy. 70 S Ct 
!028. united States v Hans Ge^sler , 338 U-S- 86! Greqoi re v, Bi ddie, 
339 US 949 Kaminer v.. Clark, 338 US 873- U S ex rei Lap id es v 
McGrath, 338 US 860 

3 Additional cases fiied during fiscai yean - united States ex rei 
Knauff V McGrath , decision beiow ;8- F 2d. 839-. McGrath v. Knstensen, 
certiorari granted, 70 S Ct 979 decision beiow 179 F 2d 796- Hans and 
Frieda Ackerman v US ,., decision beiow 179 F. 2d 983, !79 F 2d 236- 
Vlsic V. Deve r, decision below 180 F 2d 924 W" i 1 ume i t v. Shaughn essy, 
NO. 191, ;8 L-W, 303'., 

united States Courts of Appeals Cases 

L First Circuit: DiQrio v N i cho i s, dec:ded June 9. 1950, !82 F 2d 
836. 

2 , Second C i rcu 1 1 . US ex rei Waither v . District Di recto r, ' 75 F 
2d: 693- U. S. ex re-. Pi rinsky v Shaughnessy, i77 F. 2d 708, U S ex 
rel Lu;gi RizzJ v District Director, !8I F,2d. 304, U S ex rei yajta v. 
Watkins, '.79 F 2d !37- U. S ex rei Bartsch v, Watkins, 175 F. 2d, 245 
U. S. ex rei Bauer v Shaughnessy '78 F. 2d, 756 Connor v„ MJ i ier and 
Shaughnessy, '78 F. 2d. 755 Knauff v. Shaughnessy, 179 F 2d. 628 Chu 
Leung v Shaughnessy, 176 F. 2d 249 U. S. ex re i Ka.lo udis v Shaughnessy, 
180 F. 2d. 489. Mastrapasqua v. Shaughnessy, 180 F. 2d 999 P i c ■ cc ; v. 
District Di rector, 181 F 2d 304 Sac iar ides v. Sh aughnes sy, 180 F. 2d 
687. Schmidt V U. S - , .77 F 2d. 450 U S. ex rei K nauff v McGrath , 
18 1 Fc 2d.. 839 Scho Iz v Shaughnessy , |80 F.. 2d, 450 Sleddens v. 
Shaughnessy, |77 F. 2d. 363 U_^ v Moser , decided June 14, 1950, !82 F.^ 

2d 734. U- S . V, Schuete, dec : ded December 29, 1949= F. 2d. ■ 

Un S. ex rel Adei v,. Shaughnessy, decided July 26, 1950, 183 F 2d 37! 

3. Third Circuit.-. Pet : t i on of Bartenbach, !78 F.. 2d 403, affirming 
82 F, Supp. 649 Podovi nn ikoff v. Mi I Ier, !79 F,. 2d. 937 US ex rei 
Somerkamp v, Z 1 mme rman , ;76 F, 2d. 645 U. S ex rei Chin Fat Neu v. 



- 84 - 

Zimmerman, decided March 15, !950, '80 F, 2d, 582. 

4 Fourth Circuit: Bogiatzis, at al (6 cases ) v„ Hai I , reversing 83 
F. Supp 469, F, 2d.. Regan v„ Papagianakis, 180 F 2d, 889 

5, Fifth Circuit: u, S ex rel Frisch et al v. Mi I ler , 18' F. 2d, 
360. Mi I ler (Carmichae: ; v. Hunt, decided April 7, 1950, 181 F, 2d. 363. 
In re Molsen, decided May 26, 1950, 182 F. 2d, 480, Steffner v. Carmichaej 
decided June 21, '950, I83 F, 2d !9 

6- Seventh Circuit. Kavadias v. Cross, 177 F.. 2d. 497, ij, S. ex re i 
Katai iakos v. Jordan, !79 F, 2d, 422. Murra v. United States, I78 F. 2d, 670 

7. Ninth Ci rcuit. Yan i sh v. Barber, 13 I F- 2d. 492. Bechtei v United 
States, 176 F,, 2d. 741., Peui Fix v„ United States, i76 F. 2d. 746. Chin v 
Phelan, 181 F,. 2d 589. M:randa v, dark. !B0 F. 2d 257, U, S , v Payne 
(Harrison), 180 F,. 2d 98- U. S . v. Yung Po.y, '77 f, 2cl, '44 Simran.y v. 
Jager, I8O F, 2d, 650 

8. District of Coiumb a: Bertoldi v, McGrath, i78 F. 2d. 977 Zander 
v, Clark, 177 F, 2d. 649- F^nucane, McGrath and Mi i ier v. Bindcz.yck, decid- 
ed June '9, 1950, 184 F 2d 225. 



TABLE 1. IMMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES 
1820 - 1950 



/From 1820 to 1867 figures represent alien passengers arrived; 1868 to 1891 
inclusive and 1895 to 1897 inclusive immigrant aliens arrived; 1892 to_1894 
inclusive and from 1898 to the present time immigrant aliens aximitted_j/ 





No. of 




No. of 


No. of 


No, of 


Year 


Persons 


Year 


Persons Year 


Persons Year 


Persons 


y 

1820-1950 


?9.?2?,482 


1851-1860 


1 

2,598,214 1883... 


603,322 1916,., 


298,826 






1851... 


379,4661 1884... 


\ 518,592 1917,. 


295,403 


1820... 


8,385 


1852... 


371,603, 1885oo, 


395,346 1918,,, 


110,618 






1853... 


368,645 


I886000 


334,203 1919.00 


141,132 


1821-1830 


143.439 


1854... 


427,833 


1887 0.0 


490,109 1920,., 


430,001 


1821... 


9,127 


1855... 


200,877 


Xooo 000 


546,889 




1822... 


6,911 


1856... 


200,436 


1889ooo 


444,427 1921-1930 


4,107,209 


1823... 


6,354 


1857... 


251,306 


1890o«o 


455,302 1921,, 


805,228 


1824... 


7,912 


1858... 


123,126 




19220,0 


309,556 


1825... 


10,199 
10,837 


1859... 
1860... 


121,282 
153,640 


1891-1900 
I89I000 


3,687,564 1923. », 


522,919 


1826... 


560,319 1924ooo 


706,896 


1827... 


18,875 






1892.0, 


579,663 1925 oo. 


294,314 


1828... 


27,382 
22,520 


1861-1870 
1861... 


2,314,824 


1893.0. 
1894ooo 


439,730 1926,., 
285,631 1927,0 


304,488 


1829. . . 


91,918 


335,175 


1830... 


23,322 


1862... 


91,985 


1895. 0, 


258,536. 1928,.. 


307,255 






1863... 


176,282 


I896000 


343,267 1929,,, 


279,678 


1831-1840 


599.125 


1864... 
1865.0. 


193,418 
248,120 


1897ooo 
1898 o.o 


230,832, 1930,0, 
229,299 


241,700 


1831... 


22,633 




1832... 


60,482 


1866... 


318,568 


1899ooo 


311,715 1931-1940 


528,431 


1833... 


58,640 


1867... 


315,722 


1900,0. 


448,572 1931.. 


97,139 


1834... 


65,365 


1868... 


138,840 




1932,,, 


35,576 


1835... 


45,374 
76,?/,? 


1869. . . 
1870... 


352,768 
387,203 


1901-1910 
1901.00 


8,795,386 1933.., 


23 ,068 


1836. . . 


487,918 1934,,, 


29,470 


1837... 


79,340 






1902.00 


648,743 1935,,, 


34,956 


1838... 


38, 9U 
68,069 


1871-1880 
1871... 


2,812,191 


1903. 00 
1904o.o 


857,046 1936,,, 
812,870 1937,0, 


36,329 


1839... 


321,350 


50.244 


1840... 


84,066 


1872... 


404,806 


1905.0, 


1,026,499 1938,,, 


67,895 






1873... 


459,803 


1906,0, 


1,100,735! 1939,,, 


82,998 


18U-1850 


1.713,251 


1874... 
1875... 


313,339 
227,498 


1907, 0, 
-I9O800, 


1,285,349' 1940,,. 
782,8'70 


70,756 


1841... 


80,289 




1842... 


104,565 


1876... 


169,986 


1909oo. 


751.786 1941-1950 


1,035,03? 


1843... 


52,496 


1877 oo. 


141,857 


1910,0, 


1,041,570 19a. 00 


51,776 


1844... 


78,615 


1878... 


138,469 




1942... 


28,781 


1845... 


1U,371 
154,416 


1879. . . 
1880... 


177,826 
457,257 


1911-1920 
1911.. 


5,735.811 1943.0. 


23,725 


1846... 


878,587 1944.0, 


28,551 


1847... 


234,968 






1912... 


838,172 1945.0, 


38,119 


1848... 


226,527 
297,024 


1881-1890 
1881... 


5,246,613 


1913, 00 
1914.00 


1,197,892., 1946,., 
1,218,480 1947,,, 


108,721 


1849... 


669,431 


147.292 


1850... 


369,980 


1882... 


788,992 


1915 0,0 


326,700 1948.0, 
1949, . 
i950ooo 


170,570 
188 J17 
249,187 



1/ Data are for fiscal years ended June 30, except 1820 to 1831 inclusive and 
1844 to 1849 inclusive fiscal years ended Sept, 30; 1833 to 1842 inclusive and 
1851 to I867 inclusive years ended Dec, 31; 1832 covers 15 months ended Dec, 3I5 
1843 nine months ended Sept. 30; 1850 fifteen months ended Decc 31, and 1868 six 
months ended June 30. 

Iftiited States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 2. M1M6 !Mi 'CITIZilllJ /J3I'.ITT.J3 ■uJD DEPARTED, 
;j.IEl\IG jV.ULUDliD, hY KOi>j'THS: 
YEARS EI^IDEL JME 30^ 1949 'dK 1950 

(Data esxcliide travelers betv;een continental United Jtates and insular posses- 
sions, border crossers and agricultural laborers) 



All H:] ADMTTZD 



Period 



o o o o 



'00990009 



O O O O 



e o o o o e 



Fiscal year 1949 

July-Dec, 1948. 
July. 
August , 
September, 
October, . 
November. . , , . . 
December. ..<,.. 

Ian, -June, 1949. 
January. ..... . 

February, , 
March, , 
April, o . 
May,. 
June. 



grar.t 



T 



188, 317 



Jonirmu.- 
;::rant 



Vf7»272 



§21^222. 



88.157 243,157 



12,370 
11,500 
12,325 
15,700 
15,321 
20,941 



47,305 
45,780 

47.493 
37,394 
29,470 
35,715 



100,160 204.115 



I O O o o 



O o o « o < 



lOOOOOOOOOO 



?ooeooo«ooo 



12, 612 
10,965 
16, 662 
17,074 
22,038 
20,809 



iscal year 1950 249,187 



34,462 
26,382 
3I56I8 

34,673 
37,406 

39, 574 

4,26,837 



59,675 
57,280 
59,818 
53,094 
44,791 
56,656 

|304.275 



> O O o o e o o 



'oeoooooo 



uly-Dec, 1949. 
July, , 

iiUgllstc 

September. . , . , 
Octfjber. „ , . . . „ 
November, 

December. 



o e « o O 



o o o o o 



jii.-Jxane, 1950, 
January. 
February. , 
March, . ■ 
April., 
May. , 
June. 



148,827 226.826 



'0000000 



00000 



< o o e o o o 



oooooaoo 



00009 



24, 134 
25,554 
26, 006 

27.243 
21,91s 
23,972 

100.360 
14, 201 
15,365 
16,142 
16,463 
19,974 
18,215 



43.294 
40,333 
47,477 
36,087 
29,901 
29, 734 



200. Oil 
31,489 
25, 962 
30, 587 
34,329 
36,565 
a, 079 



:ot:.l 



^31.314 



47,074 
37,347 
48, 280 
51,747 
59,444 
60,383 

S76.024 



M iiub dep/jit: 



.c^rant 



24. 586 



12,875 



3,020 
2,238 
2,061 
1,938 
1,318 
2,300 

11.711 



T7569 
1,461 
1,883 
2,152 
2,078 



ijonemi- 
grant 



40^^03 



217,560 



40, 536 
46,318 
39,717 
34,366 
25, 291 
31,332 

187,943 



23, 691 
24,442 
33,859 
38^353 
31,719 
35,879 



67.428 
65,887 
73,483 
63,330 
51,819 
53,706 

300.371 



45,690 
41,327 
46,729 
50,792 
56,539 
59,294 



Total 



430.089 



230, A^;. 



43,556 
48,556 
a, 778 
36,304 
26, 609 
33,632 

122,651 



25, 260 
25, 903 
35, 742 
40, 505 
33,797 
38,447 

456.689 



14.866 1217,329 



2,798 
2,794 
2,713 
2,371 



,795 
,395 



39.873 
44,918 

40,413 
33,336 
27, 823 
30,966 



232.195 



U4 



U.732 211.762 
22,884 

25, OU 
37,286 
42.404 
38, 082 
46,092 



^,034 
1,524 
2,122 
1,985 
2.083 
3,384 



42, 671 
47,712 
43,126 
35,707 
29,618 
33,361 

224.494 






205.500 



100.879 



16,119 
8,724 
18,040 
16,790 
18,182 
23,024 

104.621 



21g8U 

11,444 
12, 538 
11,242 
25,647 
21.936 

219,335 



I. 5. CITIZ3;3 



Ar- 
rived 



620.371 



328.374 



52,964 
68, 081 
64,865 
53,854 
44,540 
V4,070 

291.997 



1 43. 4 ^g 



24, 518 
26, 538 
39,408 
44,389 
40,165 
49,476 



24,757 
18,175 
30,357 
27,623 
22, 201 
20,345 

'5.577 






^x,172 
14,789 
7,321 
6,403 
16,374 
9,818 



1/ Excess of admissions over departures, 



39,348 
47, 540 
55,907 
50,397 
47, 743 
51, 062 

663.567 



De- 
parted 



532.361 



229.911 



58,525 
42,926 
32, 503 
34, 029 
25,648 
36, 280 

^22.4^0 



351.282 



64, 588 
79,459 
73,172 
54,039 
39,301 
40,723 

112,281 



40,553 
51,656 
59,457 
53,434 
50, 283 
56,902 



Z.0,048 
48,161 
?4,681 
53,899 
53,966 
71,695 

655,518 



280. 584 



77,820 
53,498 
42,372 
37,532 
31,925 
37,437 



221^21 



i 



^,63 
55,067 

65,3J6 
62,677 
60, a 3 
88,305 



United States Lepartraent of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 3. ALIENS ADMITTED, BY CUSSES UNDER THE D-iHIGRATICN LAWS, 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1%7 to 1950 

/Data excludes travelers between continental United States and in- 
sular possessions, border crossers, and agricultural and railway 
track laborers admitted from Mexico_^ 



ALIETJS ADMITTED. 



II^IMIGRAIMTS 1/, 



Quota Immigrants. 



1%7 



313.597 



1948 



646.576 



1949 



1950 



635.589 ' 676 .02Z. 



147.292 I 170.570 188.317 ' 249.187 



70,701 92,526 j 113,046 ' 197,460 



Nonquota Immigrants 

Husbands of U . S . citizens 

A'ives of U . S . citizens , 

Unmarried children of U. S. citizens.. ! 
Natives of nonquota countries. | 

Their wives 

Their unnarried children 

Ministers of religious denominations. 

Their wives 

Their unmarried children, , 

Professors of colleges, universities.. 

Their wives , , 

Their unroarr-ied children 

Women who had been U. S. citizens..,.. 
Other nonquota immigraiits 



76.591 



579 

31,698 

6,462 

35,309 

252 

79 
692 
294 
350 
297 
112 
125 

91 
251 



I 78.044 { 



UONE^raCRAI^ITS 366.305 



Government officials, their families, 

attendants, servants, :^nd employees,. , 
Temporary visitors for business ......... 

Temporary visitors for pleasure 

In continuous transit thru the U. S,,,.» 

To carry on trade under treaty.. 

Members of international organizations.. 

Returning residents 

Students , 

Other nonimmigrants 



16,517 

79,634 

134,924 

96,825 

651 

3,803 

22,818 

11,003 

130 



647 

30,086 

6,097 

37,506 

316 

146 

782 

367 

443 

505 

238 

254 

136 

521 



75.271 I 51.727 



3,239 

27,967 

4,648 

35,969 

282 

143 

623 

244 

366 

424 

212 

233 

110 

811 



1,459 

12,291 

2,525 

32,790 

278 

170 

454 

147 

232 

291 

124 

188 

86 

692 



476.006 447.272 426.837 



16,822 

78,876 

206,107 

124,780 

711 

4,059 

32,464 

U,914 

273 



13,722 

73,338 

225,745 

81,615 

632 

4,723 

36,984 

10,481 

32 



13,975 

67,984 

219>810 

68,640 

766 

5,010 

40,903 

9,744 

5 



1/ An immigrant is defined in statistics of the Service as an alien admitted for 
permanent residence, or as an addition to the population. Therefore, students 
who are admitted for temporary periods and returning resident aliens who have 
once been counted as immigrants are included with nonimmigrants, although 
Section 4 defines such classes as immigrants. 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 4. E#1IGRATI0N BY COUl^TRY, 
FOR DECADES: 1820 to 1950 i/ 

/From 1820 to 186? figures represent alien passengers arrived; 1868 to 1891 inclu- 
sive and 1895 to 1897 inclusive immigrant aliens arrived; 1892 to 1894 inclusive 
and from 1898 to the present time immigrant aliens admitted. Data for years prior 
to 1906 relate to country whence alien came; thereafter to country of last perma- 
nent residence. Because of changes in boundaries and changes in_lists of coun- 
tries, data for certain countries are not comparable throughout_^ 



Countries 



1820 



1821-1830 1831-1840 



1841-1850 



1851-1860 



1861-1870 



All countries. 



Europe , 

Austria-Hungary 2/ . , , 

Belgium ,<,.., 

Denmark ^ « 

France 

Germany tJ ........^......^p 

(England 

Great (Scotland , . 

Britain (Wales , . . . . 

(Not specified 3/,, 

Greece 

Ireland. .... 






*«'«**»' 



Netherlands , 
Norway) ^, ^ 
Sweden) -' ' ' 
Poland 1/ ... 
Portugal. . . . 

Spain 

Switzerland. 

Turkey in Europe , 

Union of Soviet 

Socialist Republics k/ , , . . 
Other Europe .......... 



o*«a** e*o 



» a • a 5 



auo«i»or«'ik? 



» 9 o «■ a 



Asia 

Turkey in Asia 8/, ^ ...,.,, , 
Other Asia .........= 

America. 

Canada and Newfoundland 2/ , 

Mexico 10/ .....,, 

West Indies 

Central America , . . . . 

South America 

Africa « . 

Australia & New Zealand ...... 

Not specified ............... -^ 

See footnotes at end of table 



8,385 



7.691 



1 

20 

371 

968 

1,782 

268 

360 

3,614 
30 
49 



5 

35 

139 

31 

1 

14 



387 



209 
1 

164 

2 

11 



143,439 



599,125 



1.713.251 



2.598.2U 



2.3U.824 



98.817 



495.688 



1,597.501 



2,452,660 



2.065.27 



27 

169 

8,497 

6,761 

14,055 

2,912 

170 

7,942 

20 

50,724 

409 

1,078 

91 

16 

145 

2,477 

3,226 

20 

75 
3 

10 



22 

1,063 

45,575 

152,454 

7,611 

2,667 

185 

65,347 

49 

207,381 

2,253 

1,412 

1,201 

369 

829 

2,125 

4,821 

7 

277 
40 

48 



5,074 

539 

77,262 

434,626 

32,092 

3,712 

1,261 

229,979 

16 

780,719 

1,870 

8,251 

13,903 

105 

550 

2,209 

4,644 

59 

551 
79 

82 



4,738 

3,749 

76,358 

951,667 

247,125 

38,331 

6,319 

132,199 

31 

914,119 

9,231 

10,789 

20,931 

1,164 

1,055 

9,298 

25,011 

83 

457 
5 



41.455 



8 
39 



35 
36 



11 



41,397 
43 



15 



11.564 



33 .424 



2,277 

4,817 

3,834 

105 

531 



13,624 

6,599 

12,301 

44 

856 



62.469 



41,723 
3,271 

13,528 

368 

3,579 



74.720 



59,309 
3,078 

10,660 

449 

1,224 



OttS««****0 



o • • » « 



301 



16 



33 .032 



54 
69.911 



55 

53.144 



210 
29.169 



7,800 

6,734 

17,094 

35,986 

787,468 

222,277 

38,769 

4,313 

341,537 

72 

435,778 

11,725 

9,102 

(71,631 

(37,667 

2,027 

2,658 

6,697 

23,286 

129 

2,512 
8 



64.630 



647301 

69 

186 

2 

72 



166.607 



153,878 

2,191 

9,046 

95 

1,397 



312 

36 

17.969 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 4. B3-iIGRATI0N BY COWJIRY 
FOR DECADES; 1820 to 1950 1/ (Continued) 



Countries 



1871-1880 



1881-1890 



1891-1900 



1901-1910 



1911-1920 



All countries ....,......,....,,. 

Europe ,.,.... 

Austria) - 

Hungary) ^ ,.,.... .,o , 

Belgium ,»,,,.,.,.. 

Czechoslovakia 12/ , . . . , ^ , , o . . o 

r jTcUiCc «»9*«a««t««e9i>eooo*oao«e 

Germany ^ • ^ ^ • » <> ^ o ooo«ooe 

Great (Scotland. .o.e.»c.co.» 

Britain (Wales .... .,.,»,, o .. o . 

(Not specified 3/,..,, 

vjrl^eeCe •••••••••o*o*eoo«e»ooooo 

Xx eXaTlCl ••r«*»»»9e«09»»9cceo0'>o 
XT' cLLy e9««oo*«*9ocoee909909eo«9 

^e Un6X^X.dXlQS «»«9*9«ft99900000'}00 
I^l O Iriaiy _L/ e0099999e9*9900090ee0 
OWeQen ££/ 9O«O«9ft«ee«99OC09C9C0 
X'^OXaXlCL i*-^/ «099«e0«0«»9009090000 
r^OXuU^cLX •a909900<9ff0990»000ee00 

pJ^TnH.ri I ^. *^^/ o»«9a90090090aao09O 

OUaXTl 9t«« lf9«0«Q»0»9999a09l>000» 

iDWXwZeA XaTlCl •9099990«oa99oo«oao 

Turkey in Europe .,,, ...... ... o 

Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics £/o ,<,,,. « 

XVL^OSXd.vla. XX/ 6000000<»0©#0«90» 
UTllieX* lll\l]?Op)€ 9<>9«99e0909000r>909 

^\5X& 9«9999»999099a999*90090990d0 
\i/riXriCL9 •9999e9C99e0000000900000 
XXIUXQ 0»9* •9909999e9«e990000001> 

V cLUSjl ( / ft9««9oce**«*a*««ooooo«i 

Turkey in Asia 8/ « » * o <> » o . « . » « <. 

UOlier ASXcL 9000990099»900e00990 
fUHeX^XCOla •«990««99<100999«999900l>» 

Canada and Newfoundland 5/ . o . o 
Mexico 10/ ,..,.,«<,o9..«o«»oooo 
West incixes ......ooo... •»..»«<» 

Central America. » <, . . . . . » . 

South America, ,o«»....o.o.o.»« 

Ainca. •.....•...••.•.•Beo9.«««o 
Australia and New Zealand, .»... <. 

Pacific Islands ,..,....<. 

Not specified 1^/. ■....♦..<......« 

See footnotes at end of table. 



2 .812 .191 



3o246.6l3 



3.687.564 



8.795.386 



5.735.811 



2.272.262 



4.737.046 



3^558,978 



8.136.01 6 



72,969 
7,221 

31,771 

72,206 

718,182 

437,706 

87,564 

6,631 

16,142 

210 

436,871 

55,759 

16,541 

95,323 

115,922 

12,970 

14.082 

11 

5,266 

28,293 

337 

39,284 

1,001 

90999990991 

123 .823 



123,201 
163 
149 
67 
243 



9 O 9 9 9 



404.044 



383,640 

5,162 

13,957 

157 

1,128 

.....^.^ 

9,886 

1,028 

790 



353,719 
20,177 

88,132 

50,464 

1,452,970 

644,680 

149,869 

12,640 

168 

2,308 

655,482 

307,309 

53,701 

176,586 

391,776 

51,806 

16,978 

6,348 

4,419 

81,988 

1,562 

213,282 

682 

68 .380 



61,711 

269 

2,270 

2,220 

1,910 

'426 '.967 



393,304 

1,913 

29,042 

404 

2,304 

»9»»O9OO0 

857 
7,017 
5,557 

789 



592,707 

18,167 
160 

50,231 

30,770 
505,152 
216,726 

44,188 

10,557 
67 

15,979 
388,416 

651,893 
26,758 
95,015 

226,266 
96,720 
27,508 
12,750 
8,731 
31,179 
3,626 

505,290 

122 

0«000909< 

71.236 



2,145,266 

41,635 
39,280 

65,285 

73 ,379 
341,498 
388 ,017 
120,469 

17,464 

167,519 
339,065 
2,045,877 
48,262 
190,505 
249,534 

69,149 
53,008 

27,935 
34,922 
79,976 

1,597,306 

665 



14,799 

68 

25,942 

26,799 

3,628 

• 9 9 o o o 9 < 

38.972 



JOOOOOOOOOOI 

243.567 



10999990000 



3,311 

971 

33 ,066 

549 

1,075 



350 

2,740 

1,225 

14.063 



^, 376,56i» 

(453,649 

(442,693 

33,746 

22,533 

3,426 

41,983 

756 

61,897 

143,945 

249,944 

78,357 

13,107 

184,201 

146,181 

1,109,524 

43 .718 

66,395 

95,074 

4,813 

89,732 

13,311 

68,611 

23,091 

54,677 

921,201 
1,888 
8,111 



20,605' 

4,713 

129,797 

77,393 

11,059 

9000900990< 

361.888 



9900900000 

192.559 



179,226 
49,642 

107,548 

8,192 

17,280 

ft09O9O09O 

7,368 
11,975 

1,049 
33.523 



21,278 

2,082 

83 ,837 

79,389 

5,973 

O90OOOO00O 

1.143.671 



742,185 

219,004 

123,424 

17,159 

41,899 

0OOO«O99O 

8,443 
12 .348 

1,079 
1.147 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 4. E'lMIGRATION BY COUI^TRY 
JpR DECADES: 1820 to 1950 V (Continued.) 



Countries 



All countrieE 



«»«••• 



Europe....... 

Albania ±^-1 ...... 

Hungary 2/ ,.,,..,,,, ^ ,., . 

Bel.^-iim 

Bulgaria li/ 

Czechoslovakia 12/ .,...., 

Denmark 

Estonia 12/ „...,.. 

Finland 12/ ..,,.,,. 

FrPTce , 

Germany 2/ , , 

(England 

Great (Scotland 

Britain (Wr?les 

(Not specified 2/ 

Greece , 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 12/ ...... ........ . 

Lithuania 12/ , , . 

Luxemburg 12/ ....,..,...„ 

Netherlands 

Norway hJ 

Poland 2j ,..... = .. 

Portugal 

Rumania 13/ ,.,.,,.... 

Spain 

Sweden it/ 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe ........... 

Union of Soviet 

Socialist Republics H/..., 
Yugoslavia 11/ ......<...... 

Other Europe ..... ......... . 



» a 3 » 



9goee«e# 



Asia.. 

China 

India 

Japan 2/ . . 

Turkey in Asia %J , 
Other Asia. 



• «©»•■ 



1921-1930 



4,107.209 



2.477,853 



1,663 

32,868 

30,680 

15,346 

2,945 

102,194 

32,430 

1,576 

16,691 

49,610 

412,202 

157,420 

159,781 

13 ,012 

51,084 

220,591 

i.55,315 

3,399 

6,015 

727 

26,948 

68,531 

227,734 

29,994 

67,646 

28,958 

97,249 

29,676 

14,659 

61,742 

49,064 

9,603 



1931-1940 



97 .xm 
29,<567 
1,886 
33 ,462 
19,165 
12,980 



528 .431 



348,289 



2,040 

3,563 

7,861 

4.817 

938 

14,393 

2,559 

506 

2,146 

12,623 

114,058 

21,756 

6,887 

735 

9,119 

13,167 

68,028 

1,192 

2,201 

565 

7,150 

4,740 

17,026 

3,329 

3,871 

3,258 

3,960 

5,512 

737 

1,356 
5,835 
2,361 



1941-1950 



1.0?^» CP.9. 



15,344 



4,928 
496 

1,948 
328 

7,644 



621,704 



85 

24,860 

3,469 

12,189 

375 

8,347 

5,393 

212 

2,503 

38,809 

226,578 

112,25? 

16,131 

3,209 

8,973 

25,377 

57.661 

361 

683 

820 

14,860 

10,100 

7,571 

7,^.^3 

1,076 

2,898 

10,665 

10,547 

580 

548 
1,576 
5,573 

"31.780° 



Total 131 yrs. 
1820-1950 

39.325.482 



16,709 

1,761 

1,555 

218 

11,537 



33.246.339 



3,788 
4,172,104 

170,394 

66,231 

1-28 ,360 

3W,418 

2,294 

22,096 

633,807 

6,248,529 

2,753,443 

749,905 

89,603 

793,741 

439,581 

4,617,435 

4,776,884 

4,952 

8,899 

2,112 

268,619 

814,955 

422.326 

263,4'b7 
158,021 
173,021 
1,228,113 
306,227 
156,453 

3,343,895 
58,363 
28,253 

°' °956'.3i9° 



398,882 

U.634 

279,146 

205,581 

55,076 



See footnotes at end of table. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 4. II4MIGRATI0N DY COWITRY, FOR DECADES 
1820 to 19$C 1/ (Continued) 



Countries 



1921-1930 



America , . 

Canada and Newfoundland 2/ . 

Mexico 10/ 

West Indies , 

Central America .- 

South America ,..,..,,,..,.., 
Other America 15/ , , 



1.^6,716 



t «' T <' P > • 3 



« Q V 



Australia and New Zealand. 
Pacific Islands, ..,....,..<,..., 
Not specified 14/ , . 



924,515 

459,287 

74,899 

15,769 

42,215 

31 

6,286 

8,299 

427 

228 



1931-1940 



160 .037 



108,527 

22,319 

15,502 

5,861 

7,803 

25 

1,750 

2,231 

780 



1941-1950 



354.804 



171,718 
60,589 
49,725 
21,665 
21,831 
29,276 

**"7°36f 
13,805 
5,437 
JAL 



Total 131 yrs. 
1820 - 1950 



4,756.270 



3,177,446 
838,844 
496,696 

70,819 
143,133 

29,332 



D « « • O O ' 



33 ,427 

68,337 

16,582 

254.208 



y 



2/ 



1/ 

y 



V 
2/ 

10/ 

11/ 



12/ 



12/ 

ly 



Data are for fiscal years ended June 30, except 1820 to 1831 inclusive and 
1844 to 1849 inclusive fiscal years ended Sept. 30 i 1833 to 1842 inclusive 
and 1851 to 1867 inclusive years ended Dec, 31; 1832 covers 15 months ended 
Dec. 31; 1843 nine months ended Sept. 30; 1850 fifteen months ended Dec» 31 
and 1868 six months ended June 30, 

Data for Austria-Hungary were not reported until 1861, Austria and Hungary 
have been recorded separately since 1905. In the years 1938 to 1945 inclusive 
Austria was included with Germany. 
United Kin.f^dom not specified. 

From 1820 to 1868 the figures for Non-;ay and Sweden were combined, 
Poland was recorded as a separate country from 1820 to 1398 and since 1920. 
Between 18S9 ^"d 1919 Poland was included with Austria- Hungary, Germany, and 
Russia > 

Since 1931 the Russian Empire has been brok'^n down into European Russia and 
Siberia or Asiatic Russia. 

No record of immigration from Japan until xooi. 
No record of immigration from Turkey in Asia until 1869- 

Prior to 1920 Canada and Newfoundland were recorded as British North America. 
From 1820 to 1898 the figures unclude all British North American possessions. 
No record of im:ii.pration from Mexico from 1886 to 1893 » 

Bulgaria, Serbia, and Montenegro were first reported in 1899. Bulgaria has been 
reported separately since 1920 and in 1920 also a separate entuneration was made 
for the ICingdom of Serbs, Croats ^ and Slovenes. Since 1922 the Serb, Croat, and 
Slovene Kingdom has been recorded as Yugoslavia, 

Countries added to the list since the begirning of Worls War I are theretofore 
included vrith the countries to which they ;.elonged. Figures are available since 
1920 for Czechoslovakia and Finland; since 1924 for Albania, Estonia, Latvia, 
and Lithuania; and since 1925 for Luxemburg, 
No record of immigration from Rumania until 1880, 

The figure 33,523 in column headed 1901-1910, includes 32,897 persons returning 
in 1906 to their homes in the United States. 
Included with countries not specified prior to 1925. 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 5. IMMIGRANT ALIBWS ADMITTBD, BT CLASSES UNDER THE IMMIGRATION LAWS 
AND PQitt OR DISTRICT: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1950 



Port or 
district 



Number 

ad- 
mitted 



Vi 

o 

n n 

3C O 



Vl to 

°§ 

**. -^ 

•H ^ 



T3 to 

•r^ 4> 

O -H 

•O -iH 
0) U 

•H 

ti O 

i C 



c 
o 

c 

o 



n 

V 
•H 



10 
•H -P 



-P 



O 



I 

c c 

0) o 

2 . 

•H m 

•N-P 

ID CO <t3 
0) C-P 

> 2 

o a 



0) a> 

-p -o 
H 






in 
U 
<u 
-P •> 
CO (0 



-P tn 
XI 

oT-rl 

o o 

to 

to •« 

0) to 



•a to 

^ s 

c^ 
O -H 



All ports or districts. 

Atlantic 

New York, N. Y 

Boston, Mass 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Baltimore, Md 

Portland , Me 

Ne/port News, Va 

Norfolk, Va 

Charleston, S. C 

Savannah, Ga 

Jacksonville , Fla 

Key West, Fla 

Miami, Fla 

West Palm Beach, Fla... 
Port Everglades, Fla... 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands ......... 

Other Atlantic 

Gulf of Mexico 

Tampa, Fla 

Pensacola, Fla 

Mobile, Ala 

New Orleans , La 

Galveston , Tex 

Other Gulf 

Pacific 

San Francisco, Calif... 

Portland, Ore 

Seattle , Wash 

Los Angeles , Calif 

Honolulu, T. H 

Alaska 

Canadian Boixler 

Mexi can Border 



^9 .18 7 



197.460 



l*k5i 



12.291 



2»^ 



32.790 



Mi 



833 



603 



86 



199.630 



166,849 

;24,222 

' 370 

260 

23 

22 

183 

16 

20 

9 

110 

5,451 

6 

8 

1,245 

34 

802 

12.193 



178.161 



1.108 



9.901 



2.343 



446 

2 

224 

11,320 

193 

8 

3.1^8 



151,182 

23,449 

318 

189 

22 

16 

91 

12 

13 

5 

3 

2,127 

5 

4 

244 

29 

452 

10.913 



2,174 

10 

77 

280 

617 

9 

25,564 

8,6?3 



133 

106 

10,521 

153 



1.260 



870 

9 

31 

184 

166 

1 

6,413 

712 



949 

83 

5 



47 

1 

10 

1 
2 

22 



20 



16 

2 

1 
1 

1 

288 

20 



9,074 

228 

22 

27 

3 
16 



2 

231 

2 

12 

3 

279 

67 



2,118 

156 

12 

2 



6.447 



200 



37 

2 

7 



2,025 

255 

8 

33 

1 

2 

71 
3 

4 

105 

2,9a 



ISt" 

8 



19 



17 

19 
21 
10 



1. 3^1 



959 

9 

19 

364 



852 
120 



939 

1 

59 

1.169 



2 

2 

1 

117 



95 



3 
19 



51 



291 
2 

92 

757 

21 

6 

211 



94 
1 
34 
72 
10 

7 

17,275 

7.681 



508 



468 
6 
2 
4 



367 



318 
4 
2 



KL 



45 
2 



15 



11 



72 



53 



19 



233 
8 



224 
_21 



27 



11 



3 

1 
60 



43 



17 



1 
7 



139 1 27 
33 I 1 



United States Depcurtment of Justice 
Immigration and Nattirallzation Service 



TABLE 6, r*IIGRANT ALIENS 


ADMITTEI 


), BY CLASHES 


UNDtlH 


THE IMMIGRAT 


ION UWS 






AND COUNTRY CR REGION OF 


BIRTH! 


YEAR ENDED 


JUNE 30 , 1950 




Country or 


Numbeir 








> 


1 v> 






c 
■0 


CO C 




region of 
birth 


ad-- 

mitted 


-f- 




f- (0 

c 


(A 

-. f 

a ^ 


c 


-c 5 

— c 

— V, 

J- - a 
<j 0. - 




« — 

t/5 


-5 t 


to 

(J 






k- 


C <i> 


0) 


C -t- 




. c. >- 


-^' 


«• 


"* 








4S .E 


<SJ N 


</ h. 


L. — 


; 


<.. >* 


(T- W. 


0, V 


c 


k. 






X* 


c — 


to 




a - c 


" C 


■y- C 


a. c 


(U 






s 


V) -K' 


> -t- 


e 




>-t- i 


c > 


C > 


i| 


-C 






S-.E 


3 ._. 




?, 'S 




- n. '. 

r c 




1. - 
CI- ? 


t 


All countries 


249/18? 


19'' ,,460 


1,459 


12 =291 


2,525 


32,?9C' 


UtS 


T?"' 


jm_ 


86 


692 


Etsrop* . , o o , o o „.„.,<,,.,, , 


206, '54 7 


1<=1...114 


1 J02 


10.093 


2.26S 




38^ 


V.:". - 


^:y 


9 


P?8 


Austria c « <> o . » o o o . » .> . s 


3 ,182 


2,743 


14 


364 


16 






". '^ 


iO 




17 


B'SXgXtlino OOOOSOOOOdOO- 


l..,i08 


969 


5 


106 


10 




3 


13 


1 


=i 


1 


Bulgaria o o « „ .<. , o ^ » . 6 -. 


190 


177 


1 


10 


^ 




1 




j» 


^ 


» 


Czechoslovakia ,00,0,, 


5.528 


4,988 


51 


338 


89 




5 


^7 


13 


^ 


7 


JJcrMEiBLji'lC O0O«eOO9OS'*'>l 


I5234 


1,097 


12 


99 


2 


2 


1 


21 


= 




liSX-OnXSe ooaooaeeoooft*:-' 


5,422 


5,386 


1 


26 


1 


! 


4k 


■=- 


^ 


7 


^i Xr^JkSrilCl oesoosesooa?-?- 


6h5 


517 


14 


56 


31 




3 


13 


11 


<^ 


=. 


r 3/3211 >'»$OC009t3 '?«G£QaA " 


3>,519 


2,973 


14 


443 


30 




10 


9 


33 


= 


7 


Germany, .- ^ e >»-«.« ^ .=.., . 


31. .,22 5 


26.99c 


■3,9 


3,798 


20'5 


=- 


21 


24, 


31 


4 


49 


Great (England.. <,. 


8,812 


8 ,,428 


28 


190 


2f 


.- 


96 


28 


15 


=. 


12 


Britain. (Scotland. . 


2. ,983 


2,893 


10 


25 


,1 




53 10 


e 


- 


= 


(Wales ,«,, = ,.. 


393 


379 


- 


7 


- 




4 3 


= 


= 


= 


Greeeft - s « ^ -> c » s r. a a e = 


l,-,.242 


285 


83 


705 


143 




•i_ 


16 


8 


= 


1 


H'angarjo » a « c ^ .» » s <. ^ - 


5 .098 


4,820 


30 


121 


18 






^ " 


.:>6 


= 


6 


tXilrSXaaliCl c>f)<e9<iCfia'S<3 00^{: 


6.5C1 


6^441 


8 


ZJ 


9 


^ 





ju. ^..- 


2 


=■ 


2 


i'l&ajLyo aoo««90«eeoeooo 


9,839 


5.829 


522 


2;i68 


1,C43 


.. 


120 


60 


2i: 


2 


71 


lAt^XSLa 04.»r. oa9«9oQ«>^ -- 


17,494 


17,433 


T 


37 


- 


"- 


7 1 




= 


17 


lithlliania «ooeoioe.c<as 


11,870 


11,751 


3 


41 


13 


=-- 




t^ 


J, 


= 


28 


Netherlands, s « = »,.».■ s 


3.148 


2,95:1 


33 


105 


■■y 


-=- 


7 


i-'. 


21 


= 


3 


Northermi Ireland, . » - » 


1.249 


1,212, 


2 


19 


-I 




t 




_3 


=. 


1 


■NO^rWay® ooeass^ifflsaefi* 


2,379 


2,168 


2.7 


.101 


13 




A- 


; ■ J 


_^ A"! 


= 


= 


?C' aland » ,, t . > e = . . „ » » <- » 


52,851 


51,820 


76 


529 


190 




16 


\ I * 


49 


= 


56 


Pc;rtt.ittgalo ^ ,*,,,»,,. , 


1,075 


426 


245 


183 


<^95 




.0 


JL 


s. 


i 


9 


RMiania.o»oo*. . » .. » . : f 


3.599 


3.415 


13 


71 






■5 


65 


16 


^ 


6 


SpailJLio a a e s s e o e ,' .-■ " ■■ -' 


463 


19^ 


38 


ill 


56 




.i 


-.-5 


30 


- 


1 


SWeCZ©all o»c*«e«i«3.. 


1.892 


1«36C 


7 


11 


4 








^, 


= 


1 


SwitK-eirlaiid. o, a,, . , . . 


lc728 


i:66s 


6 


44 


i. 


-■ 


H 


.. 


^ 


I 


1 


y S5'.Ro»jj,ocpf,. ^,.. 


10.971 


10,789 




109 


1 




yn 


!'. i. 


^.i. 


= 


12. 


Yui?©sla¥ia.,. , ,, , 


9.154 


8,939 


15 


vi'^ 


^^5 












-■ Q-V 


Other E\irop# - , , , . . , .. 


. 1,753 


1.571 


15 


144., 


1.0 












1 


ASX^ oooeocaaooias^ee?: * 


4,C20 


2,23x 


47 


1 ,,364 


' 9 


._ 


^0 


-^ 


^tl 


__ 1 


4 


waaXm&e © « i/^ • t- <> » e ■:? o ^ ? 


l-.,494 


260 


3 


1 .062 


io 


■^ 


3 




^"'HT 




JJ!110.X3fo eeogoaoca^faftrto; 


153 


107 


1 


24 


3 


-- 


'-,, 




'4 


- 


= 


J apSJl oosos'i9'i*o»et»oo 


76 


34 


1 


9 


- 


- 










'- 


i^'aX'^iiiX'Xri'ft » ■- " B a -a .5 9 ?. e 


212 


136 


13 


24 


19 


•= 


.Ui 


.^. 




- 


= 


Ot^her Asiao « « e « ^ ^- « « • o 


2,085 


1,695 


27 


245 


4l 




1*; 


3^ 


- ■> 


- 


1 


V'&ntStuS. ooprtoo&ocof etiosaa 


18 .043 


1 


1 


39 





17:88V 


— 




-■ 


1 


67 


jYISJCX C'U' 000£>0 300e000 50fi«'' 


6.841 


=. 


1 


6 


-= 


6, .798 




"^ 




■= 


23 


W©® V JLj1Q.X©S oooooeoofloci; 


6 ,.093 


2. ,675 


53 


86 


4-^^ 


3.204 


1^, 




,.* 


- 


7 


Central America ^ , = * , « * 


2,151 


103 


^ 


12 


1 


2,031 


'- 


i 


— 


= 


2 


Sowth America, 0,000,000 


2,777 


201 


2 


21 


.3 


2,533 


2 


5 


4 


= 


6 


AX A 1<CS oooooooooeooosioo© 


689 


530 


13 


103 


14 


= 


3 


15 


10 


<= 


1 


Australia & New Zealand 


443 


219 


14 


184 


2 


- 


4 


18 


2 


= 


= 


Philippines » c,„ . . 


595 


66 


16 


352 


105 


= 


- 


^ 


5 


1 


49 


Other countries , » *. » <> 


988 


?^9 


10 


31 


. i 


. .J^ 


9 


3 


? 


7^ 


19? 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 6A. Dli'ilGR^YT /iLIENS ADMITTED, BY CLAcJSK' UNDER THE IMI«IIGRATION LAWS 
AND COUNTRY OF LAST PERJ-IANENT RILSIDH^CE: 
YEAR PJNDED JUNE 30. 1950 



Country of 
last residence 



All Countries 



<■ C • < r 



t G » c o 



urope. c o c 
Austria,, ,,..... 
BelgiuiTi, :„.,,.= 
Bulgaria „ , , , - o . 
Czechoslovakia.. 
Denmark o ...„,,„ 

Jstonia. 

Finland, .. ^ . . . , , 
Fnmce, .....,., 

iJeniiany, o .... o ... , 

(England. . 

Great ( Scotland c 

Britain(Wales 

Greece, „ o . . . . 

Hungary. c . - , . 
Ireland „.,.,.. 
Italy- . . c . . . . 

Latvia .,.,.,. 
Lithuania. « , . 
Netherlands, . 
Northern Ireland.. 
Norway,,. ..... 

Poland . o . , . . . 
Portugal, , , . . 
Huniania ^ . . . . . 

Spain, ■,.«,,« 
Owed en „ s » . = - >■. 
Switzerland . 

Yugo slavia , , „ 
Other Europe, 



• o o c 



• ••CO 



o o o • « 



• • A A 4 ? O 

• •«••• a 

C • o • « 4 U 



O « » O -3 • 9 

K • o • • u c 

• • 4 1 • 4 



« « 9 



3ia, 

China ....... 

India,, ....,, 

Japan ,....., 

Palestine. . . 

ether Asia. . 
inada ...,.,.. 
exico, ..,,,. o 
est Indies, , . 
entral /jaerica 
Duth America 
frica,, . . c . . . 
ustralia & New Zealand., 
hilippines ,,.-..,...,00 
thyr countries ,,.,,.,., 



3 V • -; '} 



• r»o**e9 



NuTiber 

ad- 
mitted 



249. 1S7 



: 99, 115 



x. ., 467 

1,429 

13 

946 

1,094 

4 

506 

4,430 

128, ^92 

lOj 191 

2,299 

265 

1,179 

190 

4,837 

12,454 

5 

5 

3,0b'0 

1, 005 

2,262 

696 

1, 106 

155 

583 

2, 183 

1,854 

/ 

D 

189 
1,290 



1,280 
121 
100 
168 

2,110 

21,885 

6,744 

6,206 

2,169 

3,284 

849 

460 

729 

3,967 



w 
-p 
c 

u 

<t3 to 
-P -H 

§ ^: 



197 .. 460 



134^560 



o 

CO w 

-a c 

c a> 

X3 -H 

to .p 

3 -H 

S 'J 



i459 



987 



15,909 

1,287 

10 

638 

995 

406 ! 

3,718 
123, 632 

9,824 

2,242 
257 
279 
110 

4,795 

8,309 
2 
2 

2,946 
992 

2,091 
253 
428 
120 
160 

2, 13? 

1, 770 

5 

103 

1,141 

2,073 



573 
97 
49 

110 
1,244 
3,654 

174 
2, 774 

199 
1,002 

713 

278 

203 

. 1.830 



15 

5 

35 

4 

9 

20 

114 

22 

1 

58 

7 

3 

467 



20 

18 

13 

137 

3 

20 

5 

3 

2 
6 

44 



^H to 

o c 

to N 

■r-i -H 

L?i o 



•rl 
U 

C 



12,291 



9.421 



4 
2 
2 



42 

8 

57 

3 

25 

13 

12 

12 

2^ 



419 

91 

3 

172 
69 

^38 

442 

4,285 

151 

15 

4 

674 

35 

12 

2,095 
1 
1 

74 
5 

78 

254 

171 

13 

86 

17 

50 

1 

52 

113 

1,314 



O 

c 
1) 
u 
■a 



■H +J 

o o 



> r. ^c 
-> - - - 



2,247 



O 



to 

cfl (U 
to ^ -H 
<U O Jh 

> :3 +3 

H o- q 



o o 



32,790 



600 

8 

9 

16 

681 

309 

27 

112 

26 

45 

84 

148 

352 

453 



22 
11 

81 
2 

29 
32 

248 

19 

4 

144 
8 
8 

1,035 
2 

3 

1 

18 

173 

296 

4 

56 



J$b_ 



32 
9 

70 



8 
1 
2 

16 
43 



44 
1 
5 

14 

2 

100 

33 



24 
59 
62 

11 
2 
4 

3 
133 



4 
:> 
7 

16 
1 

IS 
1 
6 



1 
: c 

> o 

■> c 

3 .V 

H n 

H 0) 

: > 

> -H 
-.-P 

to n5 
a, c 
> 

H Cm 
O 



448 



146 



5-" c 

•H <!> 

+-> rS 
-•rl 

to JZ 

u o 

-P .V 

to to 

■H C? 

c; > 



833 



465. 



.>to 

(0 0) 
O-H C 

to3 a 
to J- 

0<U-'- 



603 



-24 



3 
3 

2 

20 

17,414 
6,481 
3,156 
1,925 
2,157 

6 

5 
' 1,221 



111 



10 

1 
2 



11 



3 
9 

234 

<; 

22 

3 

16 
3 



4 



31 



10 



108 
23 
35 
18 
2 
14 
21 
12 
72 

1 
4 
1 
19 
3 

14 

17 

3 

6 



m. 



rJ to 

td q 

tsl 
o -H 



:?: -Q 



86 



13 

2 



42 



o _ 



118 



35 
1 

25 
11 
46 

102 

13 
11 

6 
22 

8 
14 

2 
72 



11 
77 
16 
42 



5 
3 

21 



20 

O 

31 

3 

17 
11 

7 



2 



1 
21 



Jl 



49 
6 
4 
2 

32 

34 

10 

20 

4 

9 

5 

5 
90 



4 

27 
1 
1 



1 
2 



United States Department 
Iininigration and Natviraliz 



of Justice 
ation Service 



to 

to 
to 






692 



530 



48 

1 



2 
6 
194 
9 



1 

1 

3 
19c 



9 
1 



43 

6 

5 

8 



2 



TABij; 6b» total displaced persons admitted to the united states 

UNDER the displaced PERSONS ACT OF JUNE 25, 1948, AS AMENDED, BY CLASSES 
AND COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH, THROUGH JUNE 30, 1950 





Number 


Quota displaced persons 


iNonquota displaced 


persons 


Country or 


Total 


J3 
« 1 -P 

a> d 3 




0) 

>; 


Q) 


Total 






region of 
birth 


ad- 


quota 


1 


•H 
-P 




c 


nonquota 




B 


mitted 


displaced 
persons 


prel 
gric 
purs 


0) 

c hH 


OrH 

0) u 


0) 


displaced 
persons 


XI 

(0 0) 

+3 to 


a* 

COOT 








tfl 


■a ft a m 


u 


0) 




CO C 


CO C 








CO ® rt 


C a> -H rH 


T} (D-a 


u 




3 r-j Cd 


^^ r-l 








«M rH 
0) (U -H 
Q> U AX 


Thir 

pref 

bloc 

1/ 


a. 




cr cux 


Q) P< OT 








u u 


c 




c CO 0. 


X; OT ^H 















-H t< 


+J -H Q) 








CO d. w m 


s 




a -0 


T3 Cu 


All countries. 


164 ,401 


163 ,854 


47,983 


103,454 


6.252 


6,165 


547 


503 


H 


EVU*0P6 ' Ooooooooooooo 


163,593 


163 ,058 


47,795 


102,876 


6,237 


6,150 


535 


502 


33 


Albaniaoo«o oo.o o<,o 


24 


24 


4 


20 








— 




AUSvX IcLo 0009C0O000 


2,554 


2,528 


889 


1,454 


125 


60 


26 


22 


4 


D^JL^XXinio oooeoodooo 


13 


13 


4 


7 


=. 


2 


- 


„ 


- 


Bulgaria oooooooooo 


117 


117 


51 


63 


1 


2 


= 


- 


- 


Czechoslovakia o o o 


4,096 


4,086 


476 


3,025 


354 


231 


10 


8 


2 


UanZXg ooooeooooooo 


81 


81 


2 


68 


6 


5 


- 


= 


= 




11 


11 


3 


6 


1 


1 


_ 


- 


„ 


JjSuOnj.ao oooooooooo 


6,998 


6,985 


2,032 


4,784 


44 


125 


13 


8 


5 


r xTULanci ooooooooooo 


48 


48 


7 


40 


- 


1 


- 


„ 


„ 


r i^arice oooooooooooe 


8? 


87 


17 


62 


5 


3 


= 


_ 


- 


\j€mciany o oooo«ooooo 


20,243 


20,177 


5,925 


12,431 


890 


931 


66 


63 


3 


Great (England „ <> 


' 30 


30 


7 


19 


2 


2 


- 


„ 


- 


Britain (Scotland „ 


4 


4 


1 


3 


_ 


„ 


= 


= 


~ 


LrlT'^eCe «0000096080» 


117 


117 


16 


95 


4 


2 


» 


-> 


„ 


nJungary© ooooo<soo«o 


4,414 


4,407 


829 


3,171 


171 


236 


7 


7 


- 


X O aXy ooo®ooooooooo 


487 


485 


60 


421 


4 


=, 


2 


2 


- 


XiaXrvXao ooooooooooo 


20,884 


20,731 


9,195 


10,864 


266 


406 


153 


153 


= 


Lithuania, , o , » « » o =, 


17,904 


17,850 


4,357 


11,886 


1,035 


572 


54 


46 


8 


Luxemburg,,ooooooo 


6 


6 


3 


2 


1 


_ 


■= 


- 


- 


Netherlands „ , „ » » , » 


11 


11 


4 


5 


- 


2 


- 


— 


- 


Northern Ireland. o 


6 


6 


1 


4 


- 


1 


"= 


- 


~ 


IM rWa jT seoooooooooo 


9 


9 


= 


8 


1 


- 


= 


- 


- 


r^OXanCl ooooooeooooo 


65,665 


65,565 


18,478 


41,269 


2,881 


2,937 


100 


94 


6 


i orxu-gaXo ooooooooo 


2 


2 


_ 


2 


" 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Rimaniao.oo 000,000 


2,234 


2,224 


310 


1,699 


116 


99 


10 


10 


- 


Turkey (European) » 


71 


71 


18 


52 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


UoSoSoRo (European) 


12,007 


11,988 


3,617 


7,661 


262 


448 


19 


14 


5 


Yugoslavia „,,„„, CO 


5,438 


5,363 


1,483 


3,730 


67 


83 


75 


75 


- 


Other Europe 00000. 


32 


32 


6 


25 


1 


<=> 


•= 


°° 


"■ 


AoXAo ooeooooooooQooo 


683 


683 


165 


501 


6 


11 


_ 


— 


— 


H UriXTia OOOOOOOOOOOOO 

Xirari 00000000000000 


35 


35 


2 


28 


2 


3 


_ 


- 


- 


107 


107 


24 


83 


— 


- 


- 


- 


— 


Turkey (Asiatic) 00 


507 


507 


132 


372 


2 


1 


- 


- 


- 


UoSoSoRo (Asiatic) 


27 


27 


7 


12 


2 


6 


- 


- 


— 


Other Asia 8 =, » « 


7 


7 


=■ 


6 


~ 


1 


— 


■• 


^ 


AX riCaa OOOOOOOOOOOOO 


4 


4 


= 


3 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Other countriesooo 


121 


109 


23 


74 


8 


k 


12 


1 


11 



1/ Includes wives and children « 



^ 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 6C . DISPUCED PERSONS 1/ AND OTHER IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED TO THE UNITED STATES 

BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH; YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 19 50 *__ 

Imniif^rants I Displaced persons t Other imaigrants" 



Coiintry or 

region of 

birth 



All countries, , , 



k> 9 • « « e « < 



Europe « . « 
Austria 
Belgimn. . , 
Bulgaria . , 
Czechoslovakia. 
Denmark » .,,,,, , 
Estonia 
Finland 
France 
Germany 



• • « • • o < 



e»«o9oeoe(>o 



O c o e o o 



9 « e « o e o 



' o o c o * o < 



o • o o o e I 



Great 
Britain 



(England = . 
(Scotland. 
(Wales, , . 



o e o o o o < 



Greece. . . 

Hungary,. 
Ireland , . 
Italy, . . . 
Latvia, . . 
Lithuania 
Netherlands, , . . , 
Northern Ireland 
Norway, . , , o . , . , , 
Poland „.,,„.,, o , 
Portugal 
Rumania 
Spain , , . 
Sweden 
Switzerland, 

U o O e l^oXl • • • » • 

Yugoslavia, . 
Other Europe 



9 



o o e o o 



o o o e e 



. o o o o O I 



i>eoooooeooe o«oo 



oooooftoeoi 



LOOOOOOOOO' 



oo«ceeo90 



V SX dL»*0*0ce0e«00DO0O90C'090 

wXlXIld •oooeoeooeeeoonoooe i 

India. . 
Japan. 
Palestine 
Other Asia, 



eo««oooooooo«eooo 



oo»ooooooeoo«oo oo 



'Booooeoooi 



ooooooooo«eo< 



• o • o e o < 



> e e o • ' 



lanada, . 
lexico. , 
/est Indies 
lentral America,, 
iouth America, 
kfrica, ,,,,,,,,,,„„.„„, 
lUstralia & New Zealand 
Philippines. ,,,,, <,,.,. . 
)ther countries. ,,,,.,, 



9 




J Displaced persons admitted under the Displaced Persons Act of June 25, 1948, as amended 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 7. MliUAL QUOTAS AWD QUOTA BQ4IGRANTS ADMITTED: 
YEARS ENDED JUl\iE 30, I946 to 1950 
/Persons bom in colonies, dependencies, or protectorates of European countries are charged 
to the quotas of the countries to which they belong. Nationality for quota purposes does 
not always coincide with actual nationality (Section 12 of the Immigration Act of 1924)/ 

Quota nationality Annual Quota immigrants admitted 

quota y 1946 1947 1948 



1949 



All countries 

Europe 

Northern and Western Europe. 

Belgium 

Denmark 

France 

Germany 

Great Britain , N , Ireland . . 

Iceland 

Ireland 

Luxemburg 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Southern and Eastern Europe. 

Austria 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Estonia 

Finland 

Greece 

Hungary 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania <> 

Poland 

Portugal , 

JEtumania 

Spain. . . .' 

Turkey 

U.S.S.R.. 



1950 



154.206 29.095 , 70.701 92,526 113,046 , 197,460 



150.501 27.839 69.128 j 90.632 111.443 



125.853 



Yugoslavia 

Other S. and E. Europe. 



Asia, 



China. 

Chinese race 

_ . (East Indian race. 

^^i^ (All other 

Other Asia 



Africa. 



1,304 

1,181 

3,086 

25,957 

65,721 

100 

17,853 

100 

3,153 

2,377 

3,314 

1,707 



1,413 
100 

2,874 
116 
569 
310 
869 

5,799 
236 
386 

6,524 
440 
291 
252 
226 

2,798 
845 
600 

1.805 



100 
105 

[100 

1,500 

1,200 
700 



J.6j4l6 



380 

259 

1,554 

3,634 

8,701 

69 

546 

14 

434 

300 

288 

237 



47.047 67J95 59.578 



24.648 11.423 



833 
28 

964 
113 
172 
291 
488 

1,262 
180 
215 

4,144 
420 
349 
238 
188 
938 
547 
53 

710 



1,315 

1,097 

3,140 

13,662 

19,218 

95 
2,011 

71 

2,451 

1,928 

1,187 

872 



22_^081 



77 
89 

[120 

424 

269 
277 



1,455 
88 

2,663 
101 
545 
133 
949 

5,042 
261 
427 

6,516 

327 

377 

63 

120 

1,982 
810 
222 

999 



200 

65 

( 18 

( 96 

620 

263 
311 



1,308 

1,172 

3,059 

17,229 

27,774 

56 

7,444 

82 

3,515 

2,460 

1,965 

1,331 

23,237 



^,^92 
81 

2,831 
127 
516 
213 
882 

5,631 
300 
458 

6,143 
445 
400 
189 
188 

2,061 

794 
286 

1.248 



377 

80 

( 20 

(110 

661 

328 
318 



1,270 

1,109 

2,997 

12,819 

23,543 

68 

8,505 

94 

2,991 

2,303 

2„376 

1,503 

^1 .86p 



195,671 
69,366 



-,327 
65 
3,255 

1,716 

497 

426 

1,445 

5,207 

3,534 

6,452 

21,462 

462 

699 

194 

17? 

3,710 

976 

261 



iP03 



281 
36 
( 36 

( 74 
576 

328 
272 



979 

1,101 

3,187 

31,511 

17,194 

88 

6,444 

74 

3,067 

2,179 

1,876 

1,666 

126,30^ 

57153 

177 

4,058 

5,387 

518 

285 

4,054 

5,861 

17;439 

11,774 

50,692 

426 

2,019 

197 

697 

10,854 

5,359 

355 

la?!^ 



203 

59 

( 55 

( 68 

783 

328 
288 



Pacific Lx:; -■ ■ ■ .- — ■ c^^=^ »- ■■ — -■ 2- 

1/The annual quota was 153,879 in the fiscal year 1946 and 153,929 in the fiscal years 1946 
to 1949, inclusive. The quota was increased to 154,206 on July 27, 1949, by the establish- 
ment of separate quotas of 100 each for Israel, Syria, and Lebanon, and the abolishment of 
the combined quota of 123 established for Syria and the Lebanon » 

United States Department of Justic® 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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T >BLL 9„ \ I'J .3FCUoiLo >-liD AIIEif MINOrt CHILUrOkJ CF CITIZEN 
.Ixji-jitliL; OF Tiii UIoiTEb oi'.iTEo ^^litl^U FO^iCib ,iD::iTTEiJ 'JNU"R i'H^ 
ACT OF biC'i'iiiEK 28, ].%5, 1/ ^Y C.Jiri'HY .^k 'JiClL;; .F 5IRTI-.: 
Y.:>iR ?rilJhU JUT^E 30. 1950 



f^ountry or region 






1 




of birth 


Total 


}• us bands 


.iives 


"hildren 2/ 


All countries „„„, o„o «..„,„ . 


1,694 


6 


1.556 


1^2 


IjUx Op6 «««e6*4oo*oooooe«oooooooooo 


1,545 


5 


1.418 


122 


nU.oX*X^Xcl« ooooaooooo«oo6ooueo*oo 


66 


1 


60 


5 


^^Cxgmnio eoeooooooooooooooooooo 


16 


— 


16 




DVUL^SfX XcLo OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 


2 


_ 


2 


^ 


Czechoslovakia c <.,.., o «« o ,, <,o . 


42 


2 


38 


2 


i^ 6riIIla J^iV ooooooooosoooooeooooooo 


7 




7 




XJO U wIlXo. >> eoooooooooooAOooeooooo 


3 


_ 


2 


1 


r XXlxoJxCl •08ooo«ooooooooooooooeo 


4 


~ 


4 




r i cUlCG ©ooeoo©ooooooooooooo»ooo 


52 




50 


2 


W P rillajiy 0»00O00000«00«0«800O008 


948 


1 


860 


*?? 


( ■f^Aaf ViiingXSnQ ooooooooooeoo 


47 


- 


43 


4 


Britain (-'cotlanclo „ , , » . . o , „ , , 

V '>^'2X6S OOOOOOOOOflOOOOO 


5 


- 


5 


- 


2 


— 


2 


— 


V.Tr^6C€ eo«Qooeoooo90ooooeoiioooo 


41 


- 


41 


— 


r UTl^rSJj' f. 00©00©000«000900000000 


10 


1 


8 


1 


XT^CXaJiQ •0C00O00«00O000O000«090 


— 


— 


— 


_ 


XX G A. J 0900000000000&00000000000 


177 


- 


173 


k 


X&X» V13 0009000000000000t»0600000 


5 


- 


5 


. 


XXX«nu.3ilX3 oeo«ooooooooo«ooo*ooo 


6 


— 


4 


2 


Vi SuriGr^XcinClS ©©OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO© 


11 


— 


9 


2 


:>Iorthem Ireland o <> « « o o © « © o « o o o 


2 


— 




_ 


LyOrWo^y oooo«ooooooooooooo»oo»o 


9 


- 


9 


— 


1 O X dJlQ. oae«ooGoooooooo9©ooo«oao 


49 


- 


39 


10 


r OXibLl^cLX oooooooooooooooooooooo 


7 


- 


7 


- 


iiuJllcUlXo. OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 


2 


- 


2 


— 


OpaXri ©«090000000000000000000»0 


1 


- 


1 


— 


OWSQ ?H oo»ooooooooooooooooooao© 


2 


— 


2 


— 


Switzerland ooooooooooo©oooo«o 


2 


— 


2 


_ 


U oO oO a i ooooe oooooooooooo oooooo 


12 


- 


11 


1 


X Vigo S JL 3- V X 3.oeoooo«ooooooooooooo 


1 




1 


- 


V^ t'llvSX^ ^'hXxGkj^ ooooooooooooeo<^9oo 


u 


- 


13 


1 


-■^k^Xdc eooo OOOOO OOOOOOOOOOOOOO oo ooo 


65 


„ 


58 


7 


\^nXna,o oooooooooooooooooooooooo 


39 


- 


33 


6 


XnQj.^o OOoO^OOCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 


7 


„ 


7 


- 


U &p(ul oeooooooooD«ooooooooooooo 


6 


- 


6 


- 


^OiXool^Xri^ ooeoooooooooooooooooo 


1 


- 


1 


- 


ox nSi nSXcL •ooooooooooooooooooo 


12 


- 


11 


1 


V^oncLQao oooeoooooooooooooaoooooooo 


18 


- 


18 


— 


> L6JCXC0 0»0»00000«090 OOOOOOOOOOOOOO 


- 


- 


- 


- 


J^SU XnQX6S OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 


11 


1 


10 


— 


'.^■fOriu rs-X Arnerxcs-o ooooooooooooooooo 


1 


- 


1 


- 


ooutii Ainericao eooooooooooooooooo© 


5 


- 


5 


- 


rtl rXCdo 90000000000000000009000000 


12 


- 


12 


- 


Australia &. New Zealand, , . « .. , . » . « 


28 


- 


26 


2 


r nXXXppm©© 0900000«90000090000000 


8 


- 


7 


1 


Other cuuntries o .,..<.. o,.,.» o ,<,<. » 


1 


- 


1 


- 



1/ The ^ct of Jecember 28, 1945, expired on December 28, 1948, P. L. 51 of April 21, 
1949, authorized the admission of cert.ain alien fiances and fiancees and adjustment 
of their status to that of permanent residence, 
2/ In addition, 85 United States citizen children of members of the United States 
armed forces were admitted o 

United Jtates Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 

OF TK 



Country or 
region of 
birth 



All countries., 
irope ■ n o 

nUSwl^-Lao ooeao»*ooo 

Belgium. <,...,,..., 
Czechoslovakia, . , . 
Denmark, , 

r inXanci ,*oo,ooe«,o 

France.. , 

Germany, .»,,,..... 
Great Britain 

Hungary,,. ,.....,, 

'Ireland , 

iwu.xy. ......... ._. . 

Latvia, ,.......■.., 

Lithuania ,.. ..... , 

JJetherlands., , , . . , 
)Iorthern Ireland., 
■iorway, ,......,.., 

OXanQ o»a.e».e...o 
■ vl'UU^aX 000.....00 

luiiiania, ...,,.,.., 

Jugoslavia ,„,.,,,, 
)ther Europe, , , . . . 

La ooo»oooooooe«9eo 
jliAJ.iao OOOOOOSftaoOO 

' d JJaJl O09oo«*«o*«e« 

Jther Asia...... ,, 



V^:'^^.J:l^^^''^ ^^ ^I2N MINOR CHUDREtJ OF CITIZ^J Ki^itsa'i 
.: VhllzD bTATES AKlJiD F0KC£5 ALwITT':D U:;L.Ji TH ■■ i*AR BRIDEi ACT 
OF DECaiBLR 28, 1945, 1/ BY COUNTRY 0. REGION OF BIRTH 
YEms EMDED JUNE 30. 1%6 TO 1?^0 

"^^-•^"^^ ' wiTls I ghiidrenIZ 



Number 
admit- 
ted 



119.693 



87,624 



I O O • O • O I 



« • » « O 9 



lada, 

J-co, , , 

it Indies, ,,,„..,, 
itral \merica..o»<, 
ith ^^erica, . .. ,,, 

'traxia, , ....•.«.. 
' Zealand,,.,. „. .. 
Llif pines ,, „ . . .. , , 
lor countries., ,,„ 



2,302 

2,721 

1,346 
231 
219 
112 

8,744 
14,931 
35,469 

1,469 
567 

1,245 

9,728 
294 
185 
702 

1,469 
2£5 

2,674 
237 
312 
808 
500 

1,072 

7. 717 



5,726 
467 
763 
761 

7,541 

2,300 

1,327 

518 

492 

931 

6,853 

1,038 

2,485 

867 



Tot23. 
hus- 
bands 



333 



u 

Q) 
Xi 
C CO 

^ iXl O 
Q> <£ 

-P U 



M 



212 



234 



8 
1 
11 
4 
2 

23 
6 

53 

15 

7 

3 

21 
1 

30 
3 
3 

23 
1 
4 
3 
3 
9 

16 



44 
6 
7 
1 
2 
6 
7 
2 
1 
7 



U9 



1 
5 
3 

1 

15 
4 

42 
5 
4 
3 
8 
1 

24 
2 
1 

12 
1 
1 
1 
3 
6 



36 
6 

1 

1 
3 
3 

2 
1 

i. 



0) 

+3 W 

-^ 0) 



Total 
wives 



121 



11 
2 



6 

1 
1 

8 

2 

11 

10 

3 

13 



6 

1 

2 

11 

3 
2 



114. 691 



84. 517 



4 
1 



8 

6 

1 
1 
3 
4 



2,180 

2,687 

1,236 
225 
214 
102 

8,581 
14,175 
34, 944 

1,301 
544 

1,224 

9,0/+6 
279 
179 
655 

1,446 
246 

2,514 
211 
303 
795 
395 

1,035 

7tO^? 



u 

-a 

(D < 



102, 662 



76.226 



5,132 
458 
758 
701 

7,254 
2,080 
1,230 
464 
471 
907 
671 
007 
215 
826 



6 

1, 
2, 



1,421 
2,582 

954 

166 

181 

69 

7,309 

12,185 

34,528 

600 

385 

1,199 

7,659 
244 
153 
520 

1,426 
187 

2,164 
169 
252 
714 
331 
828 

6.527 



4,875 
371 
745 
536 

6,506 

1,949 
931 
405 
404 
782 

5,407 
744 

2, 048 

J21 



■a r^ 

-p to 
to P 

.- 0) 



12.029 



8.291 



759 

105 

282 

59 

33 

33 

1,272 

1,990 

416 

701 

159 

25 

1,387 

35 

26 

135 

20 

59 

350 

42 

51 

81 

64 

207 

522 



257 
87 
13 

165 

748 

131 

299 

59 

67 

125 

1,264 

263 

167 



Total 
child- 
ren 



JIM. 



2,87;? 



114 

33 

101 

2 

3 

10 
140 
750 
472 

153 
16 
18 

661 
14 
6 
17 
20 
36 

137 

25 

5 

10 

102 
28 



u 
<u 
-a 
c w 

_ "^ 
-a -H 

<D U 

ft Ol -P 
0) o 

+3 U ■< 



HM 



2.485 



589 

5 

5 

53 

243 

214 

90 

53 

19 

18 

175 

29 

269 

J4 



63 

32 

91 

2 

3 
9 

107 

565 

462 

153 

9 

18 

614 

11 

6 

11 

20 

36 

119 

21 

3 
6 

99 
25 

63 



57 
3 
4 
51 

224 

204 
80 
52 
15 
12 

154 
23 

243 
30 



on December 28, 1948, Public Law 51 of Aprl 
alien fiances and fiancees and adjustment of 



21, 1949, 
their status 



The Act of lecember 28, 1945, expired 

authorized the admission of certain 

to that of permanent residence. 
In addition, 25,877 United States citizen children of members of the United States armed forces 

were admitted. 

Adjusted status while in the United States from nonimmigrants to immigrants under the V/ar Brides 

Act of December 28, 1945 o 

United States Department of Justice 

Immigration and Naturalization Service 



T\3LE 9Bo .JLIiiN FIAImCELS OR FlANCi;3 OF MEI-IBEito OF THji Afu-oED 
FORCi.S CF THE 'JUITED STATES ADMITTED UNDillR THE ACT CF JUNE 29, 1946^ 
BY OOUNTKY OR REGION OF BIRTH s YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1947 to 1950 1/ 



Country or region 
of birth 



All countries 



soo oooooeooooooooo 



iJllI^P© OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

Austria 
Belgium 

DUjL^aJna 0000000000000000000000900 

wZcQiiOoJ '< V clKlcl o oooooooooooooooooo 

benmark 

Estonia 
Finland 
France, 
Germany 

Great (™gland„„ 
Britain iScotlando 
(iflfales 
Greece o <> 

tlUH^&ry ooooooooooooooeoaooooooooo 

Ireland 
Italy o 
Latvia 

X-XXiniXcUlXO o OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOO 
iv 6 V'liC^X^J. 3JIQ.9 oooooooooooooooooooooo 

Northern Ireland » 
Norway^ o 

Poland 
Portugal 

itUirioJlX^ oattoooooooooooodoooooooooo 
tM*PaXil OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 
OvTGClGH ooooaooooooooooooeooooeoooo 
OWX u At 6 A X oXICl oooooooooooooooooooooo 
L'ok^oOo*'Xooo o ooo o oooooooooooooooooo 

Yugoslav^ a oo 
Other ."urope 



oeoooooooooooooooooooooooo 
oooooooooooooooooooooooooo 



fc O O I 

oooooooooooooooooooooooooo 

oooooooooooooooooooooooooo 

oooooooooooooooooooooooooo 

oooooooooooooooooooooooooo 

ooooooooooooooooooooooooo 

oooooooooooooo 

lOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

^oooooooooooooooooo 

'OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

'ooooooooo< 
Loooooooooooooooooooooooooo 



lOOOOOOOOOOOOi 



OOOOOOOOOOOO 



koooeooooooooooooooooooooooo 



(OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 



looooooooeoooooooooooooi 



oooooooooooooooooooooooooo 



. o o O O O O ' 



oooooooooooooooooo 



oooooooooooooooooooo 
oeoooooooooooooooooo 



i^oXcLo OOOOOOOOGCOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 
wOXXl^ OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 
XXiClXcl OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

V cL WoO ooooooooeooaooooooooGOOOoooo 
Jr&XGSvXHS eooooooooeoooooooooooooo 

V LrilGX* ilSXcl ooooooooooooooooooooooo 

I'' 3j!iolC&a>o OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

' -GXXCO OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 
•\6S V XnClX^S OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

(^entral Americao ooooooooooooooooooo 

OOUfch AmBFiCflL oooooooooooooooooooooo 
MX I^XCSlo oooooooooooooooooo«*oooooooo 

Australia and I'ew Zealand « oo o o ooo oo 

Philippines 

Ot.her coimtries 



oooooooooooooooooo«ooooO 
oooooooooooooooooo 



1947- 
1950 



8-538 



7A66 



741 
73 
9 

260 

27 

37 

16 

1,091 

2,010 

90 

7 

9 

829 

192 

9 

1,344 

27 

21 

97 

6 

13 
262 
33 
45 
20 
3 

12 
58 
47 
78 

271 



100 

51 

4 

5 

111 

15 
2 

14 

1 

13 

83 

574 
46 



1947 



J,}k? 



2.691 



469 

27 

4 

112 

4 
12 

8 

784 

48 

13 
2 

318 

97 

6 

495 

4 

8 

46 

1 

115 

15 

15 

14 

4 

22 
22 
28 

110 



1948 



22 

33 

1 

2 

52 

4 

1 
2 

5 

53 

461 

14 

6 



2.067 



1.896 



159 

9 

4 

85 

10 

17 

2 

198 

335 
6 

1 
306 

63 

1 

458 

15 
8 

29 

1 

94 

4 

19 

3 

1 

1 

21 

21 

25 

61 



1949 



■2,82,6 



2.671 



25 
10 



26 
3 

5 

3 

7 

J9 
13 

40 



101 

37 

1 

55 

12 

8 

6 

108 

1,479 

71 

5 

7 

2X 

30 

2 

373 

8 

5 

21 

6 

10 

50 

14 

11 

2 

1 

7 

14 

4 

23 

88 



1/ The Act of June 29^ 1946, (PcLo 47l) expired on December 28, 1948 



44 

8 

1 

3 
32 

7 

1 

7 

1 

4 
22 
71 
17 
JL 



Joint Resolution 
of April 21^ 1949/(plLo'5i) authorized the completion of the processing of the cases 
pending under P,L„ 471 and adjustment of the records to shov admisstcm for permanent 
residence c United States Department oi Justice 

Immigration and ..aturalization Service 



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TAi::L-. lOA, L--iIuHAj,T ALIli.vS ;,DiaTT:D AllD IKiaRANT Alli^.'S DZP/JiT'l, BY 3nX, APiL, 
IILIT:£kACY, AIJD MAJOR OCCUPATION ORCUP; YEj'Rj :ZX'ED JU.'.'Z 30. 1946 TO 1930 



Sex, age, illiterates, and occupation 



[3.ii,'5;rant aliens adraitted. 



Sex: 

r ej["/iaj.e oooooo«oo»»»»o«««»«o«»«»*«' 
Males per 1,000 feii:ales„ . „ 

Age; 
Under 16 yecrs, . « . 
16 to 44 years o. . . 
45 years and over. „ . . . . = . . 



Illiterates: 
rJvunber l/« 
Percent c o » 



1946 



» • » o 



e o o • 



o o o o 



O o o 



9 e 



• o o o 






108.721 



27,275 

81,446 

335 

11,092 
85,797 
11,832 



279 



Major Occupation Group: 

Professional & semiprof essional workers „ <, , . , » . 
Farmers and f ana managers ,, ... o ........ o .. o.. = 

Proprietors, managers, officials, except farm. 
Clerical, sales, and kindred workers. ,., o.... . 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers. ..... . 

Operatives and kindred workers .,,..<,......,... 

Domestic service workers. ..,...,.......<....... 

Protective service workers. ......... .... ..... . 

Service workers, except domestic &■. protective. 
Farm laborers and foremen. ....,,........<...<..<'« 

Laborers, except farm. .......... 

No occupation. .................. 

Emigrant aliens departed, 

Sex: 

iiaie CO. ooo....... »<><'''*•'»''•'***'*''* 

Female. ,.,•..,..........••.•■'>»•<' 

i-lales per 1, COO females ......... 

Age: 

Under 16 years, 

16 to 44 years c 

45 ?/ears and over ,,„.......,.« 

Major Occupation Group: 

Froi'essional end semiprof essional workers,,... 

Farmers aind farm managers ,....,.,......• 

Proprietors, ir.anagers, officials, except fariu. 
Clerical, sales, and kindred workers.......... 

Craftsmen, forem.en, and kindred workers, ..... . 

Operatives and kindred workers ,...........«••' 

Domestic service workers 

Protective service workers, .,,..,,....< 

Service workers, except domestic & protective, 

Farm laborers and f oreiiien .,...,.... 

Laborers, except farm. ,.,..... ,.,.-..,... 

Ko occupation, 



1947 



147.292 



1948 



170.570 



6,198 

947 

3,616 

8,378 

4,157 

4,669 

2,464 

119 

2,034 

189 

1,473 

74,477 

15.143 



53,769 

93,523 

575 

18,831 
101,459 

27, 002 



1,309 
o9 



10,891 
3,462 

5o386 
13,961 

8,726 
10, 580 

4,922 
292 

3,590 
442 

2,831 
81, 709 

22o501 



1/ Imaigrants l6 years of age or over who are un; 



ible 



10, 246 
7,897 
1,297 

2,198 
8,550 
7,395 



1,891 
217 

1,803 
971 
447 
990 
367 
2^9 
392 

1,237 
958 

8.621 



14,392 
8,109 
1,775 

1,563 

10, 653 
10, 285 



2,707 

427 

1^826 

866 

324 

1,448 

424 

193 

714 

1,602 

2,729 

8,741 



67,322 

103,246 

652 

24,095 

112,453 

34,022 



2,766 
lc6 



12, 619 

4,884 

6,207 

15,298 

11,019 

12,797 

6,389 

318 

4,032 

946 

4,826 

91,235 

20.875 



1949 



188,317 



1950 



249.187 



11 



,505 
9,370 
1,228 



bO, 340 

107,977 

744 

32, 728 

123,340 

32, 249 



1,983 
1.1 



13,884 

8,937 

6,014 

14, 797 

13,693 

14, 271 

6,990 

294 

3,643 

933 

6,192 

98, 669 

24.586 



119,130 

130, 057 

916 

50,468 

152,358 

46,361 



1,677 
.7 



20, 502 

17,642 

6,396 

16,796 

21, 832 

19,618 

8,900 

885 

4,085 

3,976 

5,693 

122,862 



1,530 

10,426 

8,919 



2,250 
416 

1,735 
898 
550 

1,294 
450 
152 
588 
108 

1,841 
10.593 



12,950 

11,636 

1,113 



27. 598 



14,331 

13,267 

1,080 



2,032 


2,333 


13,895 


15,576 


8,659 


9,689 


2,150 


2,631 


306 


335 


1,619 


1,983 


1,280 


1,540 


879 


929 


1,265 


1,222 


643 


663 


285 


277 


405 


453 


976 


642 


1,702 


993 


12,676 


15.930 



to reed 
United 
Liimigrat 



or vn-ite any language 
States Ler.art:.Lent of Justice 
ion and Naturalization Service 



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TABLE U. ALims AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AND DEPARTED, ALIOJS EXCLUDH) 

YEARS :TJmm .TIIMI? in inr^ i- i«,.« y^vvi:^ 



Period 



Total, 1908 to 1950 

1908-1910 1/.. 

1911-1920. .... 

1911.. o.. 

J*7«Lfc • O O O 9 

1913 

19U. .... 
1915..... 
1916 

•^7 J* ( • • o « 

1918 

i 7 J" 7 • o • « o 
A./^\Jo o o o • 

1921-1930..... 

1921 

1922 

i 7^^ « • • o o 

192/m .... 

1925 

1926 

JL 7^ (••«•• 

1928 

JL 7^7 tt • « o e 

1930 

1931-1940. .... 

JL-7^Mm • o o 

1932 

1933 

X/^if o O • O o 

1935..... 
1936 

i 7^ r o o o o • 

1 939 • • o e • 

1939..... 
1940 

1941-1950..... 
1941 

XyZf A« • o o e 
JL/if ^ « o e • 

1944. .... 
1945 

1946.,... 
1947..... 
1948..... 
1949..... 
1930 



YEARS ZNDED JUNE 30. 1906 to 19S0 



ALIENS ADMITTED 
Innni- ' 



/^rant 



13.982.716 



2.576.226 



5.735.811 



878,587 
838,172 
1,197,892 
1,218,A80 
326,700 
298,826 
295,403 
110,618 
141,132 
430,001 

805, 228 
309,556 
522, 919 
706,896 
294,314 
304,488 
335,175 
307,255 
279,678 
241,700 

oooooooooo 

?28,431 
97,139 
35,576 
23, 068 
29,470 
34,956 
36,329 
50,244 
67,895 
82,998 
70,756 

oovoooooooi 

i.03^>,03? 

51,776 

28,781 

23,725 

28,551 

38,119 

108,721 

147,292 

170,570 

188,317 

249.187 



Nonimmi- 
grant 



7» 677. 323 



4?9»7^A. 



1° 376. 271 



151,713 

178,983 

229,335 

184,601 

107,544 

67,922 

67,474 

101,235 

95,889 

191,575 



ALIENS DEPARTED 



Eini- 
grant 



4.631o518 




Nonemi- 
grant 



8.005.998 



O O O O O o 4 



oooooooooocjooe< 

1.774.881 
172,935 
122,949 
150,48? 
172,406 
164,121 
191,618 
202,826 
193,376 
199,649 
204,514 

O O O O O O O I 

1.374.071 
183,540 
139,295 
127,660 
134,434 
144,765 
154,570 
181,640 
184,802 
185^333 
138,032 

oooooooooc 

2.461.3; 



295, 
333,262 
308,190 
303,338 
204,074 
129,765 
66,277 
94,585 
123.522 
288,315 

> O O O O O 9 

1,045.076 
247,718 
198,712 
81,450 
76,789 
92,728 
76,992 
73,366 
77,457 
69,203 
50,661 



672.327 



1.841.163 



222,549 

282,030 

303,734 

330,467 

180,100 

111,042 

80,102 

98,683 

92,709 

139,747 

i» 649 '702 



ALIHJS 
EX- 
CLUDED 



mjtii. 



43.383 



178.109 



Ji^l^J^ 



100,008 
82,457 
81,117 
113,6a 
164,247 
203,469 
366,305 
476,006 
447,272 
426.837 



I -fr-- . -TTi I —r/i — ■ I -T— -i-rf i I 1 

1/ Departure of aliens first recorded in 1908, 



61,882 
103,295 
80,081 
39,771 
38,834 
35,817 
26,736 
25,210 
26,651 
21,461 

I o o o o o o o < 

156. 

17,115 

7,363 

5,107 

5,669 

7,442 

18, U3 

22,501 

20.875 

24.586 



178,313 
146,672 
119,136 
139,956 
132,762 
150,763 
180,142 
196,899 
183,295 
221,764 



22,349 
16,057 
19,938 

33, oa 
24,111 
18,867 
16,028 
7,297 
8,626 
11,795 



u. s. cmzEus 



Ar- 
rived 



12.710.697 



De- 
P*rted 



660.811 



1.938.508 



269,128 
280, 801 
286,604 
286, 586 
239,579 
121,930 
127,420 
72,867 
96,420 
157,173 



189. ?0 7 . 



229,034 
184,362 
163,721 
137,401 
150,216 
157,467 
197,846 
197,404 
174,758 
144,703 

Doooooffot 

■103.894 



71,362 

67,189 

53,615 

78,740 

85,920 

186, 210 

300,921 

427,343 

405,303 

429.091 



13,779 
13,731 
20,619 
30, 284 
25,390 
20,550 
19,755 
18,839 
18,127 
8,233 



3.522.713 



222,712 
243,563 
308,471 
301,281 
339,239 
370,757 
378,520 
430,955 
449,955 
477,260 



12.618.358 



342.600 



2.517.889 



349,472 

353,890 
347,702 
368,797 
172,371 
110,733 
126,011 

275,837 
218,929 
194,147 



3.519.519 



68.217 



9,744 
7,064 
5,527 
5,384 
5,558 
7,000 
8,076 
8,066 
6,498 
5,300 



30.263 



2,929 
1,833 
1,495 
1,642 
2,341 
2,942 
4,771 
4,905 
3,834 
3.371 



3.365.432 



439,897 
339,262 
305,001 
273,257 
282,515 
318,273 
386,872 
406,999 
354,438 
258,918 



271,560 
309,477 
270,601 
277,850 
324,323 
372,480 
369,788 
429,575 
431,842 
462,023 



3.223.233 



175,935 
118,454 
105,729 
108,444 
175,568 
274, 543 
437,690 
542,932 
620,371 
663.567 



446^86 
380,«37 
338,545 
262,091 
272,400 
311,480 
390,196 
397,875 
333,399 
224,727 



2.880.414 



168, 961 
113,216 
62,403 
63,525 
103,019 
230,578 
451,845 
478,988 
552,361 
6??.?18 



Departure of U, S. citizens 'first recorded in 1910. 



United States 
Imraipration and 



Department of Justice 
Katuralizatior; Service 



TABLJ; 12. DC'IIGil'J.'T ALIEhB AEMITTBT /JJD aUGRATT ALI3JS DEPARTED BY STATE OF 
INTSNCa) FUTURE OR LAST PEBKAli'HJT REuIPaJCE; YEARS EHDiiD JUNE 30. 1946 TO 1950 



Future or last 
residence 



m5" Vfki I i9Ui I 1949 I 1950 



IMMIGRANT 



E M I G R ANT 



1946 



1947 



1948 



1949 



1955" 



All States 

Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Dist. of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho, 

Illinois. 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

KentuclQr 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts. . . . 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire. . . , 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York. 

North Carolina , . . 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon. 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina . . . 

South Dakota 

Tenn*ss«e 

Texai. 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia... 

Washington 

West Virginia. . . . 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

All other 



ina.72;i 



M7.??? 



170. ^70, 



188.317 



249.187 



18. U3 



626 

787 

409 

12, 166 

571 

1,795 

172 

1,147 

2,147 

723 

308 

5,295 

1,630 

978 

693 

775 

1,048 

1,240 

1,224 

4,956 

5,818 

1,404 

427 

1,411 

431 

466 

104 

576 

4,287 

282 

27,009 

766 

386 

3,897 

683 

1,047 

6,049 

728 

372 

223 

724 

5,582 

293 

719 

1,121 

2,309 

672 

1,450 

lU 

65i 



474 

889 

238 

18,089 

569 

3,165 

210 

1,539 

2,802 

616 

240 

7,340 

1,341 

757 

523 

503 

1,004 

1,347 

1,451 

7,112 

7,575 

1,300 

331 

1,316 

433 

396 

169 

749 

6,902 

256 

47,353 

690 

255 

4,458 

505 

1,124 

6,925 

950 

349 

180 

545 

5,487 

561 

904 

1,081 

3,058 

523 
1,502 

163 

i-Q^I 



458 

1,117 

236 

22, 666 

594 

3,904 

271 

1,473 

3,064 

564 

376 

9,102 

1,571 

890 

545 

450 

982 

1,362 

1,493 

8,319 

9,278 

1,639 

296 

1,393 

489 

406 

241 

679 

8,457 

286 

54,056 

684 

357 

4,809 

443 

1,271 

8,153 

1,091 

292 

253 

480 

5,595 

1,077 

803 

1,103 

3,521 

564 

1,870 

222 

1-323 



538 

1,252 

hl7 

21,014 

729 

5,036 

279 

1,564 

2,736 

661 

367 

11,469 

2,172 

1,425 

605 

734 

2,151 

1,089 

2,747 

9,259 

10,267 

2,288 

1,058 

1,613 

646 

578 

180 

644 

9,832 

264 

53,926 

1,203 

718 

6,158 

596 

1,382 

10,162 

1,156 

436 

350 

694 

6,071 

1,293 

757 

1,483 

3,492 

730 

2,451 

169 

1-^76 



469 

950 

725 

20,428 

1,401 

6,282 

396 
1,670 
2,980 

801 

424 

18,673 

3,642 

2,139 

958 

918 
2,125 
1,100 
4,330 
10,443 
14,681 
5,287 
1,584 
2,497 

802 
1,603 

164 

637 
13,349 

296 

68,944 

1,981 

1,279 

9,829 

755 

1,364 

15,268 

1,288 

509 
1,601 

953 
6,385 
1,325 

794 
3,570 
3,825 

690 

5,776 

275 

^.022 



22.501 



19 

102 

7 

1,947 

46 

307 

17 

1,487 

98 

20 

13 

426 

a 

27 
33 
19 

136 
57 

190 

526 

375 
60 
13 
64 
14 
17 
24 
28 

574 

34 

7,452 

31 

6 

181 
15 
78 

443 

77 

14 

6 

20 

209 

9 

54 

102 

172 

23 

51 

6 

2.W 



20.875 



24.586 



27.??8 



18 

100 

9 

3,264 

44 

389 

24 

1,112 

438 

30 

24 

492 

69 

39 

16 

21 

217 

52 

158 

666 

448 

no 

37 
57 
20 
14 
16 

35 

6o9 

34 

7,525 

43 

8 

216 

27 

77 

462 

105 

10 

6 

26 

232 

13 

39 

80 

212 

26 

72 

9 

^. 68 ? 



46 
101 
12 
2,837 
85 
258 
17 
987 
422 
43 
26 
621 
88 
61 
37 
24 
160 
79 
167 
713 
556 
141 
35 
94 
35 
21 
28 
34 
593 
20 
7,214 
65 
24 
309 
22 
115 
674 
84 
16 
10 
28 
193 
26 
42 
115 
232 
39 
135 
17 



53 
132 
16 
2,038 
74 
559 
18 
1,295 
1,449 
72 
27 
730 
132 
85 
62 
56 
285 
74 
221 
736 
633 
176 
37 
115 
25 
29 
17 
44 
785 
30 
9,267 
86 
33 
394 
64 
101 
631 
92 
34 
15 
83 
452 
34 
42 
187 
283 
50 
156 
13 
2.564 



67 
145 
12 
2,616 
105 
504 
33 
1,743 
1,317 
92 
30 
1,000 
226 
140 
84 
87 
362 
104 
338 
894 
880 
364 
56 
180 
48 
38 
27 
59 
1,027 
71 
9,519 
114 
38 
508 
89 
91 
777 
98 
42 
24 
84 
622 
83 
86 
184 
377 

53 

252 

18 

1.890 



United States Department of Justice 
Lnmigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 12A. DISPLACID PERSONS 1/ AND OTHER IMMlGRAIfr ALIENS ADMITTED TO Th£ UNITEL STATRi 
BY RURAL AiJ) URbA!^ AJtEA ANL CITY 2/: YEAR E!^ED JUNE 30. 1950 ' 



Class of place 
and city- 



Total. 
Rural. 
Urban. 



City total 

Los Angeles, Calif... 

Oakland, Calif 

San Diego, Calif 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Bridgeport, Conn 

Hartford, Conn 

Washington, D. C 

Miami, Fla 

Tampxa, Fla 

Chicago, 111 

New Orleans, La 

Baltimore, Md 

Boston, Mass 

Cambridge, Mass 

Detroit, Mich 

Minneapolis, Minn.... 

St . Louis, Mo 

Jersey City, N. J.... 

Newark, N. J 

Paterson, N . J 

Buffalo, N. Y 

New York, N. Y 

Rochester, N. Y 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Portland, Ore 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Pittsburgh, Pa 

Providence, R. I 

Houston, Tex 

San Antonio, Tex 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Seattle, Wash 

Milwaukee, Wis 

Other cities 

Outlying territories 

and possessions 

Unknow n or not reported 



Total 



249.187 



47,066 
66,157 



57263 

662 

628 
3,594 

454 
1,124 
1,670 
1,279 

273 
13,152 

668 
2,151 
2,164 

519 
7,128 
1,449 
1,127 

752 
1,647 

560 

1,481 

50,779 

1,143 

682 

3,331 

676 

5,242 

1,369 

595 

667 

630 

824 

1,565 

1,558 

17,698 



848 

612 



Imm igrants 



Quota 



197.460 



40,290 

49,050 

107. ?81 



2,^63 
414 
283 

2,346 
355 
993 

1,081 

534 

123 

11,515 

380 

1,852 

1,646 
335 

4,927 

1,206 
948 
574 

1,439 
489 

1,061 

43,087 

917 

603 

2,925 
422 

4,686 

1,U0 
U7 
399 
204 
748 
843 

1,366 
14,430 



190 
349 



Non- 
quota 



?ii727 



6,776 
17,107 
26.923 



2,400 
248 

345 

1,248 
99 
131 
589 
745 
150 

1,637 
288 
299 
518 
184 

2,201 
243 
179 
178 
208 
71 
420 

7,692 
226 
79 
406 
254 
556 
229 
148 
268 
426 
76 
722 
192 

3,268 



658 
263 



Displaced peraons 



Total 



124.353 



30,261 
29,872 
64.164 



1,U9 
131 
100 
881 
170 
740 
434 
252 

33 

7,608 
240 

1,561 
783 
168 

2,716 
955 
516 
312 

1,057 
277 
681 

24,893 
598 
296 

1,846 
217 

3,241 
746 
262 
213 
109 
47 
363 
629 

9,940 



19 



Quota 



124.120 



30,245 
29,847 
63.972 



1,148 
131 
100 
881 
170 
740 

433 
252 

33 

7,607 
240 

1,560 
783 
168 

2,714 
955 
516 
312 

1,057 
277 
680 
24,711 
598 
296 

1,846 
217 

3,240 
746 
262 
213 
109 
47 
363 
629 

9,938 



19 



Non- 
quota 



J2L 



16 

25 

192 



1 
1 



1 
162 



Other lannigrants 



Total 



1^4.834 



16,805 
36,285 
70.340 



4,114 
531 
528 

2,713 
284 
384 

1,236 

1,027 
240 

5,544 
428 
590 

1,381 
351 

4,a2 
494 
611 
UO 
590 
283 
800 
25,886 
545 
386 

1,485 
459 

2,001 
623 
333 
454 
521 
777 

1,202 
929 

7,758 



829 



Quota 



73,340 



10,0i»5 
19, 203 
43.6C9 



1,715 
283 
183 

1,465 
185 
253 
648 
282 
90 

3,908 
140 
292 
863 
167 

2,213 
251 
432 
262 
382 
212 
381 
18,376 
319 
307 

1,079 
205 

1,U6 
394 
185 
186 
95 
701 
480 
737 

4,492 



171 
312 



1/ Displaced persons admitted under the Displaced Persona Act of June 25, 1948, as amended. 
2/ Rural - Population of less than 2,500. Urban - Population of 2,500 to 99,999. 
Cities - 100,000 or over. 

Unit«d St«tM Department of Justice 
Ladgratioa and Naturalization Service 



Non- 
quota 



51.494 



6,760 
17,082 
26.7^1 



2,399 
248 
345 

1,248 

99 

131 

588 

745 
150 

1,636 
288 
298 
518 
184 

2,199 
243 
179 
178 
208 
71 

a9 

7,510 
226 
79 
406 
254 
555 
229 
148 
268 
426 
76 
722 
192 

3,266 



658 

263 



TABLE 12B. IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED TO THE UNITED STATES, BY RURAL 
AND URBAN AREA AND CITY l/; YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1946 TO 1950 



Class of place and city 



1946 



1947 



1948 



1949 



1950 



Total. 



Rural. 



Urban. 



City total , 

Los Angeles, Calif..., 

Oakland, Calif , 

San Diego, Calif , 

San Francisco, Calif. , 

Bridgeport, Conn 

Hartford, Conn 

Washington, D. C , 

Miami, Fla 

Tampa, Fla 

Chicago, 111 

New Orleans, La 

Baltimore, Md 

Boston, Mass 

Cambridge, Mass 

Detroit, Mich 

Minneapolis, Minn.... 

St. Louis, Mo 

Jersey City, N, J.... 

Newark, N. J 

Paterson, N. J 

Buffalo, N. Y 

New York, N. Y 

Rochester, N. Y 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Portland, Ore 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Pittsburgh, Pa 

Providence, R. I 

Houston, Tex 

San Antonio, Tex 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Seattle, Wash 

Milwaukee, Wis 

Other cities 



106.721 



1^7.292 



170. 570 



188.317 



20,554 
33,775 



3,958 
420 
452 

1,845 
213 
242 

1,U7 
767 
324 

3,263 
512 
695 
776 
221 

3,101 
357 
465 
298 
548 
163 
767 
18,618 
426 
273 
777 
493 

1,486 

675 
259 
444 
627 
121 
915 
407 
7,655 



Outlying territories and 
possessions 

Unknown or not reported.. 

l7 Rural - Population of less than 2,500, 
99,999. Cities - 100,000 or over. 



545 
221 



24, lU 
39,408 
82.625 



5,434 
609 
569 

3,683 
427 
481 

1,539 

1,032 
385 

5,157 
605 
934 

1,365 
356 

4,473 

a4 

555 

10.2 

793 
319 
943 
33,847 
587 
397 

1,226 
569 

2,294 
684 
371 
398 
699 
311 

1,359 
542 

8,856 



27,377 
46,469 



7962 



695 

423 



5,962 

734 
656 

4,903 
476 
653 

1,473 

1,261 
293 

6,565 
639 
976 

1,682 
374 

5,479 
486 
583 
542 
947 
385 

1,008 

38,418 

712 

360 

1,308 
603 

2,757 
891 
402 
398 
538 
650 

1,540 
551 

9,991 



1,033 
495 



32,715 
52,304 

101. 510 

5,668 
684 
758 

4,118 
469 
878 

1,564 

1,120 
267 

8,376 
759 

1,301 

1,763 
481 

5,897 
564 
548 
670 

1,111 
452 

1,172 

38,194 

815 

375 

2,062 
594 

3,408 

1,014 
502 
540 
665 
789 

1,465 

741 

11,726 



1,185 
603 



249.187 



47,066 
66,157 

5,263 

662 

628 
3,594 

454 
1,124 
1,670 
1,279 

273 
13,152 

668 
2,151 
2,164 

519 
7,128 
1,U9 
1,127 

752 
1,647 

560 

1,481 

50,779 

1,143 

682 

3,331 

676 

5,242 

1,369 

595 

667 

630 

824 

1,565 

1,558 

17,698 



848 
612 



Urban - Population of 2,500 to 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 13. IMMIGRANT ALIi^S nUHlTTED AND E-IIGHANT ALIENS UEl^HKTJiU, 
BY COUNTRY OF LAST OR INTENDED FITTURE PERMANENT RESIDENCE: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1%6 TO 1950 



Country of last 
or future residence 



IMMIGRANT 



1%6 1947 1948 1949 



1950 



EMIGRANT 



1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 



All countries.. 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia. . . 

Denmark 

Estonia <..... 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Great (England. 

Britain (^^o*^!*"'* 
(Wales . . . 

Greece 

Hiongary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Northern Ireland. 

Norway 

Poland 

Poi-tugal 

Riunania. 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Japan 

Palestine 

Other Asia 

Canada, incl. Nfld. 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Central America.... 

South America 

Africa. 

Asutralia & N. Z... 

Philippines 

Other countries .... 



108.721 



147.292 



170.570 



188.317 



249.187 



18.143 



22.501 



20.87 5 



24. ^86 



27. ?98 



?2 .8?2 



130 

1,718 

8 

267 

194 

9 

29 

5,708 

2,598 

30,922 

1,586 

1,044 

367 

49 

526 

2,636 

29 

lA 

355 

1,29Q 

248 

335 

578 

19 

227 

643 

766 

72 

65 

420 

1.633 



83.535 



252 
425 
14 
483 
459 

21,344 
7,146 
5,878 
2,338 
2,633 
1,516 
6,009 
475 
6 .Q97 



1,545 

2,465 

51 

2,053 

999 

25 

514 

7,285 

13,900 

20,147 

2,962 

679 

2,370 

803 

1,445 

13,866 

28 

24 

2,936 

1,129 

1,967 

745 

633 

93 

260 

1,848 

1,779 

170 

221 

593 

5.823 



103.544 



3,191 
432 
131 

1,272 
797 

24,342 
7,558 
6,728 
3,386 
3,094 
1,284 
2,821 
910 
7.811 



2,271 
2,041 

119 

2,310 

1,335 

49 

492 

5,550 

19,368 

21,257 

4,504 

642 
2,250 

947 

5,823 

16,075 

92 

180 
3,999 
1,711 
2,447 
2,447 

890 

273 

404 

2,260 

2,026 

84 

478 
1,220 

10.739 



129.592 



7,203 

263 

423 

1,150 

1,700 

25,485 
8,384 
6,932 
2,671 
3,046 
1,027 
1,218 
1,168 
6.3?6 



4,447 

2,057 

22 

2,018 

1,239 

14 

567 

4,816 

55,284 

16,634 

4,075 

440 

1,734 

748 

6,552 

11,695 

22 

67 

3,330 

2,126 

2,476 

1,673 

1,282 

155 

409 

2,847 

1,967 

24 

198 

674 

6.438 



199.115 



3,415 
175 
529 
323 

1,996 

25,156 
8,083 
6,733 
2,431 
3,107 
995 
661 
1,157 
3.?^ 



16,467 

1,429 

13 

946 

1,094 

4 

506 

4,430 

128,592 

10,191 

2,299 

265 

1,179 

190 

4,837 

12,454 

5 

5 

3,080 

1,005 

2,262 

696 

1,106 

155 

383 

2,183 

1,854 

6 

189 

1,290 

3 .77? 



10.500 



1,280 
121 
100 
168 

2,110 

21,885 

6,7U 

6,206 

2,169 

3,284 

849 

460 

729 

3,?67 



8 

411 

5 

97 

200 

1 

27 

1,192 

57 

3,259 

437 

37 

111 

6 

308 

354 

1 
459 

65 
983 

24 
401 
1 
240 
526 
364 
575 

93 
258 

1 .352 



11.153 



26 

259 

12 

254 

216 

2 

54 

1,148 

301 

1,793 

260 

30 

470 

32 

427 

1,851 



408 

51 

509 

55 

765 

8 

286 

409 

311 

873 

88 

255 

2,861 



10.258 



11.893 



785 
103 
59 
283 
122 

867 
1,069 
1,384 
327 
915 
3U 
305 
264 
846 



2,249 

113 

57 

113 

329 

898 
884 

2,426 
398 

1,216 
261 
270 

1,685 



53 
244 

18 
145 
285 
2 
119 
953 
134 
2,262 
320 

51 
349 

32 

285 

1,498 

2 

2 

354 

87 
577 
127 
394 

10 
323 
510 
318 
345 
192 
267 

3.220 



79 

225 

18 

113 

324 

1 

123 

1,274 

622 

2,988 

443 

103 

389 

29 

302 

1,494 

4 
368 

97 
596 
133 
230 

11 
262 
425 
300 
627 

82 
231 

1.642 



12.642 



2,287 
295 
143 
182 
313 

1,165 
849 

1,024 
389 

1,862 
363 
586 
615 
?44 



365 
243 
230 
177 
627 

1,233 

1,096 

3,603 

775 

2,538 

345 

244 

926 

291 



United St«t«8 Department of Justice 
InmigFation and Naturalization Seinrice 



TABLE 13A. IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADtilTTED AND EMIGRANT ALIMS DEPARTED, 

BY RACE OR PEOPLE; 
YEARS MDED JUfflS 30. 1%6 TO 1950 



^ace or people 



12^ i?4Z,_J:M 



1 o o ■> a 9 



All races or people»„ 1 



eirdan and Moravian 
Czechoslovakia) » ^ « c o o 
garianj Serbian and 
jntenegrin, 

atian and Slovenian, , 

natian^ Bosnian, and 
ercegoviniano o<,«ooooo 
ch and Flemish o « o o . » o 

h ^HClXctO ooooooDoooaoo 
J.X3Ilo ooooooo^eooocsoo 
CnXcLli joooo09oe9aooooc 

ipino o » » o o 
rdsho » 
acho . o 



ooooooooooooo 



• 90 

oooooeo»o9(»oooo 

Ulclll oooooooooocooooooe 

ooot'Ooooo ocooeooooci 

SiIq 0000000«OOOOi>0<»000 
^3X1 ooooooooeooooowo 0© 

in American ooooooo»<>o 

huanian » 

ya.r„o .» ^ 

ivoooooooooo&oooo oooo 

ific Islander o o , o o , , o 

-tOfl ooooooeoooccQOuooo 

Ufv, lie S©ooocooi3ocoo ao'1 

l3ulJ.cirio 000eD0«>000ft9O00 

5 -^.d J), r>j-. ©CO"?©© 

heniaii (Russniak) 

,adinavian„ „ , , « 

itcbo 

ivak 

inish, 

ian 

•kish 

.3h- 



9 

o o e O 

o o o • o o 

ooooeoooooooooo«o 

eeo90oooo9ooo»oooo 

oooooooaooooonoo 

COOOOOdOOOOOOOCdOO 

Oo-oooooooooeoooo 



ooosoooo 



. o o 



it Indian (except Cuban] 



other. 



! o o o o o o 



IMMIGRANT 



147.292 170.570 



329 



>,635b 



271 



1,128 
617 
2,4821 



J2hl 



I88,;3r7 



EMIGRANT 



1950 1946 



249.187 18.143 



1^896 
5 

9^176 
95s 
5"71 i 

2s9Ul 
108 i 

5s 519 
7A56 
816 
9891 

339 i 
132 
1,016 1 
I5O78 
12,025 



390 
3,138 

347 
3,574 

573 
2,827 



29 

5,515 

42 

265,200 

241 

1,055 

747 

9,702 

25,038 

3, 060 

13,511 

16.677! 

316 1 

3 

4, 169 1 



387 1, 592 



•4^+' 



.8 
826 i 
Xj205 



3,507 

165 
2,490 

78/f 
1,956 

35 

5,041 

55 

20, 620 

1,939 

1,000 

726 

■7,888 

24,030 

2,537 

15,181 

12, 267 



2 

8 

9,000 

1^230 
75s ^ 

3AS4 
57 

69886 

9,040 
938 
998 
314 
126 
939 

1,448 
13,747 



39 1 
4.122i 
4, 058 1 
?,594i 
2,0021 

1,954 

26,787 

1,509 

1,057 

5,023 

26 

7,098 

7,977 

800 

1,501 

482 

146 

738 

1,679 

123 625 




3,677 

656 
1,289 
4,940 
1,915 

79 
4,508 
70 
15,295 
5,963 
531 
303 
6,425 
28,926 
1,497 
10,955 
10,215 
45 
6 
4,035 
18,752 
13,755 
5,250 
1,468 
3 
55,146 
1,156 
2,100 
17,125 
901 
6a28 
5,707 
600 
787 
537 
147 
519 
2,003 
14,161 



1947 1948, 1949 



22.501,20.875,24,586 



98 

7 

770 

7 

30 

20 

805 

48 

3,492 



226 
18 
1,332 1 

376 
94 

482 

333 
12 

37 

809 

10 

8 

15 

68 

1 

86 
483' 
Hi 
6561 
2! 
1^640 
709 
48 
308 

13 

112 

59 

38 

4,874 



121 

41 

2,168 

19 

193 

16 

594 i 

52 

2,464 

1 

1,608 

59! 

1,175! 

501 

410 

554 

1,790 

17 

33 

928 

2 

3 

36 

1,250 

1 

133 

775 

12 

918 

2 

1,164 

405 

198 

376 

49 

88 

45 

77 

4,218 



33 

64 

51 

2,238 

93 

280 



22^ 



2Li28 






34 

501 

134 

3,118 

545 

93 

1,061 

429 

354 

513 

1,485 

101 

9 

1,275 
3 

10 

46 

120 

2 

206 

437 

22 

368 

1 

1.3U 

477 

149 

403 

70 

118 

68 

206 

4,394 



172 

105 

33 

547 

63 

1,188 

9 

616 

317 

3,997 

2 

903 
110 

lo209 
ly082' 

444 

573 
1,522 

225 

18 

2,651 

5 

U 

67 

1,324 

9 

268 

335 

40 

604 

6 

1.475 
664 
50 
6361 
112 
148 

^M 
327 

2,622 7 



ku 
64 

32 
674 

52 
750 

1^ 
514" 
517 
3p583 

c 

1,17c 
llf 

lcl32 

1,234 

511 

75 i 

1,136 

30s 

31 
2,05C 



6 

50 

981 

8 

2;^ 

229 

25 

197 

c 
CO' 

72 <: 
48 

517 
99 

123 
93 

257 

781 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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10 - 14 " 
15 " 
16 - 17 " 
18 - 19 " 
20-24 " 
25-29 " 
30-54 " 
35 - 39 " 
40-44 " 
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65-69 " 
70 - 74 " 
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370 

565 

3,093 

4,210 

2,998 

2,^6 

1,944 

1,498 

1,269 

1, 141 

1,206 

1,302 

1,097 

661 

322 

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2, 145 
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2,156 


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5-9 " 

10 - 14 " 
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30-34 " 
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8-1 • 


a o ^ *i i> « ^ >>-H ;) • c d CO m (> 
o q e « 1< tpH M > js JS 3 e • o i 
■p3K4)o?c4-p-p-phe coulf 

W b. (5 ci £mm J ►J 2 a. « =>►* c 


• 
• 


.-3 rt C fc 


. • • q r-l o: • M. o 
rt O M (C d Q. 
•o o )h x: o -H V, 








(fl J3 c nj 4- 
•H O M ►^ C 
(A 


> cS -H +J +3 +i -H pH 1> 

aSuQjotHx:-^ 






iS 




























< 










c 


> X 


3 


c 


tr 


■=; 


' CL 


^i 



sau:).Linoo 




cn in 


SSS^^^«&^^^^ffiRS®^Si^^ 


^ 




S 


2: 




B3IJ8UV 


eg 
in 
cm" 


Si 


®^^§®^^g^^^g^p^^^o^-^ 


r- — ■>* in — 

?^^ Si '^ - = 


Bouaw 


..CO 


^1 


^RF5tSg^^gKp:;g^g^CN^lnr~CN-;Jt 


in fo 00 o CD 
hn — , — — g^ 
in CM 


saipul 

ism 


CO 


in Eo 

\D — 


SRlS[B^P^P§g|^^^S^S^^§2)°^^£ 


1,265 

965 

72 

56 

480 


0DIX9^ 






^gS?^ffi5^^8SSSi8^^^B5^^^^ 


O CO r~ in On 
cj ffi ■^ — K^ 


BpeuBO 




CO o 


lgK«-^SR^^g^^E5S^SS^55;^«[c 


00 E Cm CN 5 


eisv 


IN 


f8^ 


CN ^ hO Cn — — 


K in CN R CN 

(T' a^ — CM 


adcung 


in 


in CI) 
IBS 


— — — inooing^tJSrAhO'^cNCN — — — 


00 f<D CTi K~i — 

s ^_ p^ ^ ^ 

cm" cm" 


B!AB|so6nA 


& 


^ CN 


— |CN|| 1 |hO00CNCN^l£lr~-^00K}O^fOC^I — 


N S2 1 ^ 


■y 'S 'S 'n 


^ 


^K 


(^00- 1 l-0^^^^g)f^^^Q«^^o-cc 


s ^^ ^« 


pUB|Ctl 




C: ^ 


^VD-^-^^^^n^^^^^-CN^VDO^^ 


& « K ^^ 


B!UBnq:Kl 


■± 


■* Q 


— 1 1 — 1 1— fO— ICN 1 — 1 1 — 1- 


K^ CD cm 1 — 


B 1 a:^b1 


UD 


CM -^ 


lllllil 1 — lllll 1 


1 -St 1 


/ClBll 


in 


SS 


C.^^K.^CNLg^Oggg.gg^^^^^g^ 


rsS Ch N 


puB 1 aj 1 


9 


sg 


^ ^ ^ CM ^ ^0 IQ ^ ^ ^ § - ^ C. CN ^ ^ C^ CN ^ ^§£^1^ 


XjBBunH 


® 


?^ ^ 


1 CM — — 1 — inK^-^c^r--^i£)K^r~r~-CNCM— vi 


R « 0^ ^ -* 


PUB|BJ| -N 
pUB 

u!B:).!jg q.BaJ9 




~ CN 




/■ueouas 


1 




^i£^^-^e(B[f^SR^9«K^R^^^So 


] ^ S o ^ S 

CM v£) in 


B ! uortsB 


OD 


in K^ 


1 1 1 1 1 1 — 1 i i-i 1 1 


N^ ^ 1 1 — 


B!>(6A0|S0L|382D 


1^ 


ss 


inro-* 1 — ^r-criK~> — CJiCTir-- in— ^vo— K~i cDUDocNin 


Number 

de- 
parted 


Fi 




753 

808 

644 

151 

370 

565 

3,093 

4,210 

2,998 

2,396 

1,944 

1,496 

1,^9 

1, 141 

1,206 

1,302 

1,097 

661 

322 

1, 193 

II, 173 
1 1,771 

2, 145 
353 

2, 156 


(/I 

T5 =1 

-H 
K If) 
0) 
CD — 

+-> 

5^ g 


t 

(0 

g- 

z: 


: 0) 

1% 


1 

(0= = = = r = = = = = = = = = = = =-c 

"^ S 

a.<^5int^^^^^^^2*;g^S©^R^^ 

0) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 > 

^. ?ino ^og^ir)^ir.^^pipg^oin5 


] E 


in 

a 

lO C 

+-> c 


L. 


; 5 


t 

c 
> 


> s 





"O 




C) 


(1) 




o 


£ 


t^ <9, 


3 




— :> 


h 


't- 




O 


« 


■H 


N 




•— 


^ 


!« 


L 


-1 


(f. 


+-> 


n 


rti 


« 


z 




T) 


^ 


1^ 


1fl 


C 


■H 


n 


(O 






■H 


^ 


-(0 


-H 


en 



TABLE 15. NONIMMIGRj'J^T /d.IJJS AH^in'TED, lY aA3SE3 UNDER THE E-fO IIGRATION l.AV;3 
AMD PORT OR DISTRICT; YEAR Q^DIH JUHIi: 30. 1950 



Port or district 



All ports or districts.... 

Atlantic , 

New York, N. Y 

Bostont Mass., 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Laltimore, Md 

Portland^ Me 

Newport News, Va , 

Norfolk, Va..... 

Charleston, S . C 

Savannah, Ga, 

Jacksonville, Fla 

Key West, Fla , 

hiami, Fla. 

ii'est Palm Beach, Fla..,. 
Port Everglades, Fla.... 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands 

Other Atlantic 

^ulf of Hexico 

Tampa, Fla 

Pensacola, Fla 

Mob.ile, /da 

New Orleans, La 

Galveston, Tex 

Other Gulf 

Pacific. 

San Francisco, Calif.... 

Portland, Ore 

Seattle, Wash 

Los Angeles, Calif 

Honoliilu, T. H 

Alaska , 

Canadian Border 

Mexican Border 



NuBber 

ad- 
mitted 



Govern- Temporary 



426.837 



26?.??0 



163,423 

3,832 

924 

1,044 

66 

43 

159 

90 

93 

42 

4,652 

83,209 

604 

13 

7,695 

3,047 

614 

18.885 



M89 

198 

498 

9,337 

1,839 

24 



7,305 

60 

986 

1,230 

8,900 

61 
86,174 
33,686 



itient 
offi- 
cials 



13.975 



?.700 



6,944 

114 

68 

118 

1 
2 

10 
2 

14 

26 

1,748 

32 

388 

4 

229 

850 



308 

3 

47 

373 

118 

1 

Jt26 



139 

15 

17 

305 



1,556 
1,393 



rlsiton for 



Busi- 
ness 



67.984 



4?. 74^ 



32,032 

555 

109 

217 

9 

8 

23 

23 

4 

5 

373 

10,838 

100 

1 

1,224 

130 

92 

3.301 



1,207 
3 

51 

1,605 

433 

2 

3.030 



1,002 

3 

228 

76 

1,721 



9,573 
6,337 



Pleas- 
ure 



219.810 



121.464 



53,303 

1,655 

279 

406 

27 

12 

66 

hU 

43 

20 

3,636 

54,900 

405 

8 

3,799 

2,808 

53 

10. 076 



4,181 

1 

252 

5,022 

612 

8 

4.020 



1,580 

9 

362 

597 

1,472 

12 
64, 575 
19,663 



In 
trans- 
it 



68.640 



48.833 



38,987 

611 

344 

162 

18 

10 

19 

7 

19 

11 

217 

6,804 

52 

1,429 
52 
91 

1.982 



489 
190 
80 
884 
332 
7 

6.405 



2,882 

28 

256 

444 

2,795 

4 
7,004 
4,412 



To 
carry 

on 
trade 



766 



605 



484 
4 
4 
3 



1 

74 

2 

31 

1 
1 

16 



J2 



42 
8 
9 



79 
7 



Return- 
ing 
resi- 
dents 



40,?03 



33.?0( 



24,71< 

727 

67 

82 

5 

7 

24 

9 

3 

5 

366 

7,029 

12 

4 

680 

42 

129 

1.6?8 



594 

1 

50 

824 

223 

6 

2.877 



775 

4 

77 

55 

1,966 

1 
1,254 
1,166 



Stu- 
dents 



9.7Vf 



^.438 



3,723 

a 

52 
6 
4 

17 
5 

10 
1 

28 

1,300 

1 

90 

17 

766 



120 

18 

546 

82 



1.439 



849 
16 
38 

a 

495 

44 

1,543 

514 



Inter 
nat'l 
offi- 
cials 



i^oio 



3.860 



3,234 
23 
12 
4 



5 

516 



54 

10 

2 

196 



81 



80 
35 



36 



2 
137 



585 
194 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 16. NONIMf- IGR/J^IT i 


-LTKNc; AI KITTED, 


BY cla:: 


3I'.i UNE.m THl' 


L'lrllGR 


ATION 


LAWS 




AND X( 


JNTRY OR 


Rir.ICN OF BIRTH 


; Y7JiJt 


:CNDZD JUNE 30. 1950 . 










Number 


Govern- 


Temporary- 




To 


Return- 




Inter 




Country 


ad- 
mitted 


ment 
offi- 


visitors for 


In 
trans- 


carry 
Dn 


ing 
resi- 


Stu- 
dents 


nat'l 
offi- 


ether 


jr region 


Lusi- 


Pleas- 


Classes 


3f birth 




cials 


ness 


ure 


it 


trade 


dents 




cials 




LL countries „..<,. o..,,, „ 


426,837 


13,975 


67,984 


219,810 


68,640 


766 


40,903 


9,7Vf 


5,010 


5 


DpC eo«oooeo«<iooo««oo9oo 


172, 562 


5,526 


34,475 


66,166 


36, 201 


559 


24,896 


2,262 


2,477 


^ 


ISTfTla. 6©»eooooo«o»<soooo 


2,796 


69 


1,143 


410 


5 


32i 


^2 


26 


- 


JX^lUnio oo«ooooooooooooo 


3,526 


139 


737 


1,091 


694 


36 


633 


51 


145 


- 


iX^cLl^^L^ OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 


136 


= 


40 


46 


23 


- 


19 


5 


3 


- 


zechoslovakia. .<,..<,..„ « 


1,778 


87 


395 


544 


328 


2 


282 


84 


56 


- 


3311113 J/'Ko 00000000090000©o 


4,708 


113 


870 


1,926 


1,233 


42 


387 


58 


79 


^ 


SX'OnXcL oo»oooooeooooooo^ 


291 


3 


31 


41 


186 


1 


16 


9 


4 


_ 


Lm.cLriQ OOOOOOOO0OOOOOOOO 


1,611 


61 


291 


420 


588 


u 


183 


45 


9 




, cLi 1 ^"ooeoooeoooooooo9o« 


13,922 


562 


3,389 


3,678 


2,765 


2 


2,709 


237 


580 


- 


jnnany oooooaoooooooeooo 


IO5242 


109 


3,340 


3,274 


1,115 


5 


2,112 


246 


38 


_ 


(jhglando « « * c o oo 


47,195 


1,566 


9,254 


19,235 


9,439 


166 


6,917 


95 


523 


— 


9,883 


128 


1,151 


5,199 


1,831 


26 


1,492 


11 


45 


— 


Jritain/^ 1 


1,687 


55 


214 


790 


261 


9 


334 


7 


17 


— 


"'O6C60 eo©«oooo»oeoooooo 


2,419 


140 


506 


679 


630 


25 


271 


138 


30 


- 


ingary„„,.».oo„ .. „o 


1,300 


42 


280 


523 


222 


5 


150 


66 


12 


- 


^6XBiiQ oooooooooooeooioo 


3,036 


89 


294 


1,259 


450 


» 


914 


3 


27 


— 


vO.Xj' oooo«©o»oooeoooo«o 


10,798 


278 


1,778 


2,659 


3,689 


29 


2,203 


119 


43 


= 


LOVXao OOOO00OOOOO0«OOOO 


334 


1 


78 


150 


62 


2 


34 


6 


1 


- 


.thuaniao <, . „ . » . c « , « 


766 


7 


199 


a4 


94 


„ 


38 


8 


6 


« 


'IfXl6X^^CXriQ 0*90000000000 


8,200 


609 


1,873 


2,488 


2, 202 


- 


em 


98 


129 


_ 


Tthem Ireland, „ „ , » <, 


1,969 


29 


201 


1,008 


309 


4 


392 


9 


17 


— 


'iivsy 000000000000000000 


5,914 


169 


735 


2,361 


1,699 


47 


610 


207 


86 


_ 


XanO. oeooooeaoe«»o«e<>o9 


7,942 


130 


1,850 


3,810 


1,060 


3 


844 


178 


67 


- 


rX» il^S.X oooooooeo«oooooo 


1,656 


60 


129 


298 


635 


1 


491 


31 


11 


- 


nania» « »<> <, « , » <. « , 


1,887 


22 


477 


944 


255 


1 


119 


62 


7 


„ 


a-XTio oeoooooooooooooooo 


10,368 


115 


1,698 


4,757 


3,079 


49 


513 


97 


60 


- 


6Q.SI1 ooooooooooooooooo* 


5, 628 


174 


1,398 


2,304 


816 


1 


814 


65 


56 


- 


itzerlando <> * o o « o « o © « o o 


4,260 


96 


1,174 


1.416 


724 


64 


678 


a 


67 


- 


DoOo-tloootiooooooonaoooo 


4,914 


210 


753 


2,702 


708 


1 


307 


30 


203 


- 


gOSX^Vla 00000000O0B600 


728 


161 


117 


184 


108 


1 


46 


25 


86 


~ 


nBi" j:!jUropSo ooooo«»»ooo 


2,668 


302 


493 


823 


583 


18 


266 


139 


44 


- 


eooaoooooooooooooooooo 
1X13. ooooooooooeoooooooo 


17,792 


1,083 


3,372 


_ls.8M= 


4,115 

2,no 


88 


^^,)^ 


2,430 


?o? 


=. 


4,8i+9 


103 


511 


845 


71 


292 


753 


164 


- 


uXC ooooooooocooooooooo 


2,724 


258 


583 


494 


682 


8 


112 


418 


169 


„ 


Pa-H. ooooooooot-oooooeooo 


3,026 


21 


683 


U9 


388 


_ 


1,567 


246 


2 


- 


X6SLfXn6o 00000000000000 


748 


17 


172 


289 


116 


1 


67 


81 


5 


- 


II"X XlO JLOt ooooo«oooooooo 


6,445 


684 


1,423 


2,097 


819 


8 


319 


932 


163 


— 


UcL ODOoeo^odoaotoaaaooo 


d9, 042 


689 


7,117 


46,717 


11,621 


8 


1,316 


1,254 


315 


5 


OOo 0009000000000000000 


^0,107 


1,088 


5,365 


165 006 


2,3a 


3 


724 


382 


198 


» 


Indies « « • . . * • « « * o o « * o 


76,77> 


956 


7,511 


;j5,533 


4,761 


11 


6,742 


1,037 


224 


„ 


ral Arnericao « , . « o « . « « o 


10,752 


524 


1,327 


5,833 


1,094 


1 


1,225 


653 


95 


- 


h /'jnericaooo ooo .. « ooooo 


30,877 


2,634 


5,175 


15,211 


4,660 


63 


1,369 


1,066 


699 


« 


*.^Oo ooooooooooooaoooooo 


3,106 


366 


693 


950 


420 


14 


288 


271 


104 


- 


ralia & New Zealand,, „o 


5,691 


205 


1,335 


1,613 


1,808 


7 


536 


60 


127 


.^ 


ippines , , , » , „ . . » . , , » 


2,779 


271 


754 


725 


19C 


-= 


516 


261 


62 


- 


r countries „„..„,.,,„. 


11.354 


633 


860 


7„212 


1,429 


12 


934 


68 


2C6 


„ 












I 


Inited States 


Deparl 


tinent < 


Df Justice 












Immj 


.gratic 


)n and ^ 


latiira; 


Lizati< 


3n oervice" 



TABIE 17. NOKE-n-HGRANT .^IMS ADMITTED, BY aA3SES UNDER THE H^IIGRATICN LAi>/S 
A^jD country or RIJGICIJ OF LAST PEHIlAMUIT RESIDEIICE; YE;IR EJ-^DED JUNE 30. 1950 



)u.itry or region of 
ist residence 



Number Govern 

id- iiient 
raitted offi- 
cials 



Temporary 
visitors for 



busi- 
ness 



Pleas- 
ure 



In 
trans- 
it 



To 
carry 
on 
trade 



Return- 
ing 
resi- 
dents 



Stu- 
dents 



Inter- 
nat'l 
offi- 
cials 



ill countries 

•ope 

.ustria 

ielgium, 

ulgaria 

Izechoslovakia 

enniark 

Istonia, , 

inland 

ranee . . . , 

•ermany , , 

(England. . r ^ .. 

reat (Scotland , 

Britain (Wales , 

reece 

ungary . , 

reland 

taly ..., 

atvia 

ithuania 

etherlands , , ,. 

orthern Ireland. 

orway , 

oland 

ortugal 

umania 

pain 

weden , , , 

witzerland 

.S.S.R 

ugoslavia , 

ther Europe 

a ^ . 

hina , 

ndia 

apan , 

alestine « 

ther Asia 

ada 

ico 

t Indies 

tral America 

th America , . 

ica 

tralia & New Zealand. . 

lippines , . 

er countries .......... 



426.837 



13,973 



67.984 



219.810 



68,640 



766 



40. 903 



9,744 



SOIQ 



97,186 



928 

2,45C 

15 

227 

3,532 

18 

833 

10,433 

4,091 

33,695 

4,648 

718 

1,541 

66 

1,229 

7,050 

6 

8 

5,405 

858 

4,576 

411 

1,091 

35 

2,610 

4,598 

3,673 
472 
290 

1,679 

15.323 



1,959 
1,890 
1,498 
436 
9,540 

97,063 

30, 735 

85,035 

11, 207 

40,094 

3,320 

5,737 

2,517 

38.620 



5>384 



59 
141 

79 
122 

47 
555 

53 
1,865 

22 

6 

145 

27 

52 
2S6 

1 

606 

4 

168 

78 

61 

10 

99 

184 

117 

200 

153 

244 

1.103 



26,464 



36,654 



22,020 



551 



337 

705 

4 

5 

775 

2 

270 

3,414 

2,259 

9,786 

599 

118 

349 

10 

196 

1,593 

1 

2 

1,669 

129 

649 

24 

106 

5 

488 

1,476 

1,194 

3 

2 

314 



^9 
150 

22 

8 

854 

1,138 
1,213 

1,067 
565 

2,664 

345 

163 

262 

71 



3. SOI 



259 
485 
738 
136 
2,183 

8,592 

6,327 

10, 260 

1,647 

7,563 

878 

1,452 

844 

136 



295 

858 

2 

28 

1,659 

8 

263 

2,911 

1,113 

14,297 

3,008 

439 

337 

16 

658 

1,628 

1 

3 

1,748 

573 

2,013 

22 

213 

7 

778 

2,046 

1,269 

4 

8 

449 

3,234 



125 

454 

4 

64 

783 

5 

181 

2,213 

367 

6,437 

948 

134 

474 

5 

257 

3,183 

4 

2 

1,108 

112 

1,336 

222 

609 

8 

1,124 

685 

577 

99 

37 

463 

3.853 



1,700 



1,934 



39 

1 
41 

1 
14 

3 

200 

15 

1 

21 



28 



4 
49 

30 

19 

70 

15 
67 



22 
69 

1 

10 

27 

2 

11 

311 

103 

393 

33 

6 

42 

4 

43 

188 



73 

23 

64 

17 

39 

4 

45 

71 

65 

5 

1 

28 

373 



320 

253 

102 

162 

2,397 

66, 786 

18,970 

63,726 

6,596 

19, 742 

1,219 

1,681 

758 

444 



673 

435 

200 

68 

2,477 

18,464 

3,499 

8,232 

1,474 

7,910 

457 

2,183 

272 

276 



77 
52 

8 

56 

41 

397 

171 

165 

11 

4 

139 

4 

9 

102 



96 

8 

213 

9 

25 
1 
49 
85 
76 



136 

2.440 



2,459 



13 
132 

4 
32 

69 

6 
629 
25 
552 
12 
10 
34 

14 
42 



105 

5 

84 

39 

8 



51 
305 
161 

89 

30 

452 



15 
1 

3 
48 

31 

4 

21 

1 

83 
2 

3 
_1 



113 
15 

158 
20 
67 

110 
102 
396 
144 
226 

61 
109 

68 
37.614 



416 
420 

273 
38 

1,293 

1,381 
400 

1,080 
669 

1,201 

253 
62 

264 
60 



94 

131 

2 

4 

221 

556 
220 

253 

111 

705 

105 

84 

49 

16 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 18. NONIMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED AND NONEMIGRANT ALIENS DEPARTED, 
BY COUNTRY OF LAST OR INTENDED FUTURE PERMANENT RESIDENCE: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1946 TO 1950 



Country of last 

or future residence 



Al I countries 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgium. 

Bulgaria 

Czechos I ovak i a 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Gr^at 'England 
Britain 'Scotland.. 

(Wales 

Greece 

Hungary 

I re I and 

Italy 

Latv i a 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Northern Ireland 

NorwE^y 

Poland 

Portugal 

Ruman i a 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

U.S.S.R 

Yugos I av i a 

Other Europe 

Asia 

Ch i na 

I nd i a 

Japan 

Palestine 

Other Asia 

Canada, incl. Nfid 

Mexico 

West indies 

Central /Wnerica 

South America 

Africa 

Austral la &New Zealand 

Phi I ippines 

Other countries 



1946 



203.469 



42.466 



33 

I, 109 

12 

231 

1,241 

28 

187 

7,774 

101 

13,656 

840 

148 

1,355 

71 

328 

1,066 

5 

7 

2,765 

217 

3,623 

357 

578 

69 

1,459 

2,002 

I, 142 

I, 180 

III 

772 

6.306 



2,949 

1,800 

252 

396 

909 

51,836 
6,610 

48,798 
6,715 

20,685 

2,702 

1,980 

1,491 

13,881 



NONIMMIGRANT 



1947 



366.305 



12.554 



817 

2,857 

24 

I, 182 

3,406 

23 

602 

14,961 

1,384 

37,530 

4,912 

667 
3,461 

504 

1,023 

6,823 

16 

10 

8,690 

769 
5,887 

718 
1,446 

197 
4,756 
4,417 
2,718 
1,384 

163 
1,207 



1948 



476.006 



14-622 



7,099 
3,096 
257 
1,783 
2,387 

79,274 

17,707 

65,410 

9,354 

31,752 

5,447 

5,517 

2,514 

24, 374 



l?5.359 



642 

5,954 

47 

1,674 

4,255 

42 

1,404 

15,557 

1,276 

49, I 15 

8,465 

I, 129 

2,582 

847 

^1,772 

8,825 

15 

12 

7,018 

1,482 

5,825 

828 

1,791 

175 

5,276 

5,286 

5,748 

504 

176 

1,645 

17.287 



1949 



447.272 



1 .590 



6,890 
2,774 
219 
2,819 
4,585 

106, 107 

57,023 

82,522 

9,975 

41,200 

4,558 

5, 138 

2,525 

54,512 



854 

5,057 

47 

684 

5,680 

47 

877 

11,842 

4,594 

57,971 

5,769 

848 

1,948 

657 

1,550 

7,850 

24 

25 

6,712 

1,01 1 

5,505 

699 

1,577 

95 

5,067 

5,055 

5,519 

527 

158 

1,805 

15.417 



1950 



426.857 



97. 186 



6,254 

2,412 

488 

809 

5.474 

102.020 

34.405 

87,517 

10.701 

39,291 

3.912 

5,062 

2,497 

54,860 



928 

2,450 

15 

227 

5,552 

18 

855 

10,455 

4,091 

55,695 

4,648 

718 

1,541 

66 

1,229 

7,050 

6 

8 

5,405 

858 

4,576 

41 I 

1,091 

55 

2,610 

4,598 

5,673 

472 

290 

1,679 

15.323 



1946 



186.210 



25.517 



1,959 
1,890 
1,498 
456 
9,540 

97,065 

30,755 

85,055 

11,207 

40,094 

3,320 

5.737 

2,517 

38,620 



II 
741 

147 
647 

57 

5,216 

25 

9,285 

591 

85 

114 

7 

255 

278 

2 

1, 155 

69 

2,257 

61 

256 

9 

1,750 

945 

775 

569 

58 

198 

2.587 



NONEMIGRANT 



1947 



500.921 



57.991 



940 
770 
481 
208 
188 

47,295 

4,758 

16,258 

802 

3.533 

1.003 

2.094 

426 

83,937 



65 

1,701 

9 

814 

1,941 

2 

261 

7,962 

223 

24, 126 

2,049 

248 

647 

119 

804 

1,557 

1 

5 

3,445 

531 

2,376 

428 

619 

58 

2, 151 

2,905 

1,866 

741 

165 

658 

9 . 9P4 



1948 



427. ?4^ 



I 18-047 



1949 



405.503 



107.217 



6,272 

1, 110 
159 
562 
821 

80,125 
16, 185 
21.596 

2. 125 
11,388 

2,106 

4, 123 

I, 112 

95,272 



221 
3,620 

38 

1,229 

3.419 

18 

604 
12,404 

315 

52. 554 

8.509 

1.000 

1.227 

506 
2,277 
4,508 
6 
14 
5,667 
1,027 
5,977 

775 
1.21 I 
58 
5.956 
4.585 
5,066 

561 

157 
1,000 

15.78^ 



9,822 
1,796 
330 
1,778 
2,060 

97,070 

22,892 

73,765 

8, 167 

53,576 

3,642 

5,159 

1,466 

47.775 



391 

5.075 

52 

553 

3,680 

15 

741 

II, 197 

1,592 

40,405 

6,595 

995 

1,383 

557 

1.678 

6,654 

20 

14 

6.662 

1,035 

4,875 

676 

1,582 

71 

2,665 

5, 108 

5,455 

562 

107 

1,466 

10.574 



1950 



429.091 



96.477 



3.885 

1,702 

322 

901 
3,764 

93, 187 

24,151 

89,265 

9,657 

57,651 

5,574 

4,750 

1,795 

25,724 



782 

2,448 

25 

219 

3,514 

24 

823 

9,800 

2,903 

36,775 

5,464 

794 

1,578 

70 

1,599 

6,404 

4 

15 

5.115 

967 

5,306 

416 

717 

50 

2,465 

4,995 

5,415 

525 

205 

1,472 

8.850 



I, 115 

1,581 

957 

520 

4,857 

96, 117 

25, 174 

88,818 

10,849 

40,279 

5,055 

5,868 

1,926 

49.720 



united States Department of Justice 
I rtm i g rat i on and Naturalization Service 



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TABLE 20 ALIMNS EXCLUDED FftOM THE ' 


UNITED 


STATES, BY ( 


:?Au,w.2 




■ I ■■ 




YEARS ENDED JIJNE 30 p 1941 to 1950 








(Figures rtpresenit^ all exclusions at seaports and exclusions 








of «li«« ®««king miTj for 30 days or longer at land ports « 


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G.&US® 


1941 1942 


1943 1944 1945 1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


Number txcluded, o » „ o o c o » » o o <, o o 


2,929 1,8^ 


2 


1,642 


2.^^,2.^^ 


^-,771 


^^9^1 


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15 


12 


17 


22 


15 


14 


23 


20 


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3 


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10 


3 


10 


9 


19 


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11 


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5 


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11 


8 


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16 


17 


21 


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contagious disease 000000000 = 0000 


10 


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22 


9 


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Ghroniig alcoholismo 000000000000000 


1 


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1 


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1 


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5 


3 


2 


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322 


160 


95 


106 


53 


33 


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67 


97 


53 


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18 


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227 


252 


77 


155 


161 


361 


902 


709 


21 fe- 


122 


kiecsepariiying aliens (SeCo 18) 00 000 


6 


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70 


68 


63 


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139 


145 


187 


199 


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13 


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41 


33 


31 


45 


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8 


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9 


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2 


11 


3 


ftthOTflt proper documentSoooooooooo 


2^076 


1,20? 


1,106 


1,109 1,805! 


2,294 


3,316 


3,690 


-,970 


2»868 


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1,173 


1,043 


1,037 1,523 


2,158 


3,679 


3,676 


2,731 


2,3a 


1,233 660 


452 


605 


818 




784 


1,092 


1^229 


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TABLE 21j\. /IIHJG -ilXCLUBlD Fl;Oi: THC UNITII STAIES, BY RACE OR FLOFLE: 

yi1'Ir:3 ;;i:D2D jui.t 30, 1941 to 1950 

(Fisures represent all exclusions at seaports snd exclusions 
of aliens seeking entry for 30 days or longer at land ports) 



Race or people 



19A1 



1942 



19A3 



19AA 



1945 



1946 



1947 



1948 



1949 



Nvunber excluded. 



2.929 



iiS^l 



1 .4?^ 



Armenian 

Bohemian and 

Moravian (Czech) 

Bulgarian, Serbian and 

Montenegrin 

Chinese 

Croatian and Slovenian.... 

Cuban 

Dalmatian, Bosnian, and 

Hercegovinian 

Dutch a:id Flemish 

East Indian 

En,-];lish 

Filipino 

Finnish 

French 

German 

Greek 

Irish 

Italian 

Japanese 

Korean 

Latin American 

Lithuanian , 

Magj^ar , 

Negro , 

Pacific Islai:ider , 

Polish , 

Portu^;uese , 

Ruii^nian , 

Russian , 

Ruthenian (Russniak) , 

Scandinavian , 

Scotch , 

Slovak 

Spanish , 

Syrian 

Turkish 

Welsh 

'./est Indian (except Cuban). 
All other 



127 

8 

52 



38 

1 

513 

46 

31 
524 
126 

32 
214 

59 
4 

47 
3 

17 
98 

41 
34 
10 
15 
13 
95 
207 
13 
59 
15 

17 

9 

449 



1.642 



2,m. 



2.?42 



4t77i 



4.9C5 



3.834 



1 
11 

5 
49 



30 

282 

18 

8 

335 

57 

8 

151 

26 

2 

26 
1 

12 

62 
1 

32 

89 
5 

19 
5 

55 

146 

2 

28 
6 
1 
3 

10 
322 



2 
2 

1 
6 

1 
18 

3 
231 

1 

5 
244 
245 

8 

101 

24 

1 

24 

1 

6 

77 

15 
9 
5 

21 

9 

42 

103 

4 
16 

6 

10 
2 

249 



5 
11 

3 
16 



26 

2 
236 

5 

3 

365 

56 

4 

131 

19 

8 

40 
5 

9 
101 

7 
21 
42 

6 

20 

11 

55 

112 

9 
13 

4 

4 
292 



1 
13 

6 
24 



30 

7 

359 

7 
451 
57 
10 
185 
30 
18 

3 
35 

1 

4 
171 
13 
42 
28 
11 
40 

7 

58 

181 

12 

29 



10 
9 

479 



15 

6 

18 



51 

3 

568 

6 

11 

566 

87 

21 

239 

89 

6 

49 

2 
16 
144 
13 
57 
21 

9 
68 

9 

67 

254 

6 

64 
14 

17 

14 

421 



6 

7 

9 

16 

8 

49 



81 

8 

655 

4 

28 

677 

175 

114 

291 

193 

4 

60 
12 

34 
170 

139 
51 
44 

108 
33 

104 

310 
22 

274 

11 

5 

13 

15 

1,0a 



12 

12 

19 

6 

43 



76 

8 

754 

3 

16 

623 

165 

40 

300 

218 

4 

5 

77 

6 

21 

145 

159 
37 
46 
93 
23 
93 

335 
26 

223 
18 

13 

21 

1,262 



5 

19 

2 

108 

1 

52 

4 

553 

1 

3 

461 

80 

31 

220 

73 
3 

1 
50 

4 
32 

60 

69 

3 

31 

60 

16 

76 

222 

Ic 

106 

9 

2 

20 

6 

1,422 



United Str.tes Be. artrent of Justice 
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TABLE 2AA. 


ALIENS DEPCRTED AND ALIENS DEPARTING VOLUNTARILY 


UNDER PROCKKUINGS: YEARS. 


ENDED JUNE 3C 


). 1892 TO 1950 








Aliens departing 


Period 


Total 


Aliens 


voluntarily 1/ 






deported 


under proceedin/;s 


1892 - 195 ( 


5 ii???ti77 


362.689 


1.636.488 


1892 - 190( 


) 3,127 


3,127 


- 


1901 - 191C 


) 11,558 


11,558 


- 


1911 - 192( 


) 27,912 


27,912 


- 


1921 - 193C 


) 164.390 


92.157 


72.233 


1921.... 


4,517 


4,517 




1922.... 


4,345 


4,345 


- 


1923.... 


3,661 


3,661 


- 


1924.... 


6,409 


6,409 


- 


1925.... 


9,495 


9,495 


- 


1926.... 


10,904 


10,904 




1927.... 


26,674 


11,662 


15,012 


1928. . . . 


31,571 


11,625 


19,946 


1929.... 


38,796 


12,908 


25,888 


1930. . . , 


28,018 


16,631 


11,387 


1931 - 194( 


) 210.416 


117.086 


93.330 


1931.... 


29,861 


18,14? 


11,719 


1932... 


30,201 


19,426 


10,775 


1933... 


30,212 


19,865 


10,347 


1934.... 


16,889 


8,879 


8,010 


1935.... 


16,297 


8,319 


7,978 


1936.... 


17,446 


9,195 


8,251 


1937.... 


17,617 


8,829 


8,788 


1938... 


18,553 


9,275 


9,278 


1939.... 


17,792 


8,202 


9,590 


1940. . . 


15,548 


6,954 


8,594 


1941 - 195( 


) 1.581.774 


110.849 


1.470.925 


1941... 


10,938 


4,407 


6,531 


1942.... 


10,613 


3,709 


6,904 


1943... 


16,154 


4,207 


11,947 


1944. . . 


39,449 


7,179 


32,270 


1945... 


80,760 


11,270 


69,490 


1946.... 


116,320 


14,375 


101,945 


1947... 


214,543 


18,663 


195,880 


1948... 


217,555 


20,371 


197,184 


1949... 


296,337 


20,040 


276,297 


1950. . . 


579,105 


6,628 


572,477 



y Voluntary departures of aliens under proceedings first 
recorded in 1927. 



United States Department of Justice 
Innnigration and Nat\iralization Service 













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1 TABTJ? 26a. JiJIENS hND CITIZENS POSSESSING BuliDI-R CROSSING CARDS *H0 C 


xiO^SED 


THE INTER^JATIONA 


L LiUW BCUJ^DAfOES. 


BY CL^ 
K S 


^E3 /U.D FCHTSs 


YjiAR L 

C I T 


MDiiD JIJN 

T Z E N 

■.esider 


£ 30. 1950 y 




ALII 
Residents of 


j 


— *i— a — 

S 

its of 






Residents of Jxiesidents of 




PORT 


Cajiada or Mexico 


Ihilted States 


Canada or Mexlix 


iinited 


States 


TOTAL 




Inter- 




Inter- 




Inter- 




inter- 








mit- 


Ac-^ 


init= 


Ac- 


mit- 


Ac- 


mit- . 


Ac- 






tent 


tive 


tent 


tive 


tent 


tive 


tent 


tive 




All ports c o c oo 


268,295 
70,890 


115.565 


104,102 34.510 


13.169 


ili?00 


265,950 


36,329 


851.420 


1 

Canadian Border S/,„o 


27,7?7 


28 „ 999 ^990 


5,398 


6.948 


211.624 


23,812 


331,458 


Calais , Me ■ c e o o o » o o 


8,126 


9,931 


397 1,319 251 


988 


7,816 


6,741 


35,569 


1 Eastport , Me o o e o o .-. » 


1,280 


545 


25 5 


43 


32 


210 


47 


2,187 


1 Fort Fairfield J, Me, 


210 


14?. 


139 91 


27 


32 


283 


148 


1,072 


1 Madawaska _, Me .-.<>, o .- - 


132 


129 


221 228 


«. 


• 


„= 


4 


714 


f Van Buren^ Meo,o^,o 


92 


121 


90 96 


«. 


= 


= 


=, 


399 


Buffalo, No Y.o,»„. 


21,169 


2,333 


4,954 


605 


3,030 


953 


181,910 


11,949 


226,903 


Lewiston^ No Yco,^ 


3,773 


395 


173 


268 


145 ! 283 


8,529 


565 


U,131 


Niagara Falls ^ NoY-, 


6,144 


2,694 


1,976 


847 


363 


1,049 


8,217 


2,254 


:i3,544 


Ogdensburgj, No Yoo., 


850 


15 


250 


«. 


4 


6 


5 


3 


1,133 


Rouses Point J, N^ Y, 


80 


„ 


344 


4 


33 


11 


1 


7 


480 


V/addington ^ N . Y . : -, 


482 


542: 


213 


15 


13 


2 


386 


140 


1,793 


Youngstowij, N. Yooo 


344 


108 


16 


44 


= 


«. 


127 


31 


670 


Detroit^ Mich- =,,„ 


15,896 


9,074 


7,271 


1,670 


1,176 


3,345 


3,013 


1,636 


43,081 


Port Huron J Mich,,o 


3,452 


377 


913 


45 


102 


75 


118 


63 


5,U5 


Baudet t© ^ i^dnn , o o » o 


607 


1 


42.: 


=„ 


= 


= 


650 


Intern »1 Falls.Miim 


3,805 


324 


90 i 15 35 


25 


as3 


=- 


4,294 


Pigeon PiiTer^ Minno 


265 


146 


49 " - 


« 


= 


=. 


460 


Blaine , V/ash c o > . <> o » 


137 


3 


9,011 


14 12| 3 


47 


- 


9,227 


Other ports ■_ ^ , t, , <> » -> 


4,046 


917 


2,825 


724 


164 


144 


962 


224 


10,006 


KexLcan Border S/ , „ , „ 


19?„405 


87,768 


75a03 


28,520 


7,771 


6,552 


54,326 


12^17 


469,962 


Brownsville J, Tex^o« 


7,767 


3,935 


3,400 


671 


1,017 


15^ 


5,500 


1,050 


23,490 


Del Rio^ Tex, 0.-, CO OS 


3,121 


270 


1,610 


110 


65 


50 


4,529 


325 


10,080 


Eagle Pass^ Tex^ooc 


10,525 


1.327 


3,654 


236 896 


484 


6,420 


286 


23,828 


El Paso^ TeXoocaooo 


32,098 


48,516 


18.010 


21,982 


513 


1,381 


11,750 


4,850 


139,100 


It aLD^SilS a 1 €X oeoooooo 


274 


381 


270 184 


49 


23 


173 


53 


1,4*^7 


Hidalgo 5 Texooooooo 


32,706 


3,003 


12,349 543 


197 


26 


2,810 


236 


51,67V 


TAredo j, TeXo o o o <, o o o 


60,062 


1,570 


22,500 


503 


1,800 


587 


12,800 


620 


100,442 


nOniS^ ieXo ^ooo(^oooo 


686 


157 


68 


27 


8 


30 


300 


41 


1.317 


isxeiwfiij) 1 ex 3 o n 


1,250 


286 


1,150 


280 


150 


180 


650 


155 


4.101 


'^apata^ rex© o <? © o © © o 


620 


23 


428 


18 


^ 


620 


10 


1,719 


Douglas^ Arizona. >. 


243 


1,282 


62 


360 


35 


214 


977 


1,315 


4,488 


Lukevillej, Arizona o 


2,003 


252 


1,000 


150 


10 


10 


100 


200 


3,725 


Naco J, Arizona , o o c o o 


649 


577 


86 188 


15 


5 


17 


8 


1,545 


Nogales ^ Arizona ^ „ , 


5,250 


15,737 


1,191 


1,583 


193 


807 


1,974 


1,11,2 


27,877 


San Luis, Arizona cc 


1,575 


993 


65 


46 


44 


40 


1,002 


823 


4,588 


/tndrade ,, Calif - , , „ « 


287 


1,693 


126 


28 


= 


588 


28 


162 


2,912 


Calexico, CJalif o = , « 


24^685 


3,575 


4,897 


9a 


1,743 


891 


1,948 


567 


39,247 


San Ysidroj Calif »,j 


10 3 882 


3,218 


3,758 


576 


637 


990 


1,527 


462 


22,050 


Other ports. - o=, . . . ' 


2,722 


973 


479 


112 


381 


96 _ 


1,201 


212 


6,176 


1/ Intennittsnt covers 


occasion 


al crossi 


Jig of less than 4 times a weeh 


: on an £ 


iverage j 


active covers daily 


crossing 


or at le 


ast 4 times a week on an avera 


tge: 




2/ Residents of Canada 


crossing 


Canadian 


borderj 


of Ma> 


dco crc 


>ssing Me 


ixican be 


)rdero 





United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization SeiTd.ce 



TABLE 28 o IN.VARD MOVEMENT OF ALIENS AND CITIZENS OVER B1TERNATI0^AL LAND BOUNDARIES 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1946 to 1950 1/ 



Port 



Aliens and citizens 



oeoooooo 



Aliens, total 



oo^osooooooo 



Canadian Bordero o o o o o o o 
oxaxns n vvasn ooooooooe 
Buffalo g No Yoooooooo 

vftX a XS J) Jrl6 ooooooooooo 

Detroit ^ Mich oooooooo 
Madawaska ^ Me o o o <> o o o o 
Niagara Falls ^ N„ Yoo 



Port Huron 5, Mich 
Other ports 



e o o 



oooooooooo 



Mexican Bordero 



oooooooo 



Brownsville g Tex. o o o o 



Calexico^ Calif « 
Douglas j, Ariz. 
Eagle Pass J TeXc 

El Paso^ TeXo 
Hidalgo J TeXo 
Laredo J, 1 

l'JO^ClX6t3 a ^X^X'^ oooooooo 

San Ysidro^ Califoo oo 
Ot^her port. So . 







POOOOOOOO 



^o o o o o o 



>-0 OOOOOOOO 



lOOOOOOOO 



OOOOOOOOOO 



Citizens s total 



■OOOOOOOOO 



OOOOOOOOOO 



Canadian Bordero 
Blaine J Washoo 
Buffalo J iMo To 
Calais s Mec 



O O o o o o o 
o o o o o o o 
e o o o o o o 



loooooooo 



'OOOOOOOO 



» ^ ri.^ OOOOOOOOOOO 

Detroit J, i^lich,! 
Madawaska J 

Niagara Falls ^ No Y. 
Port Huron^ Michoooo 
Other ports c 



foooooooooo 



Mexican Borderooooooo 
Brownsville J TeXooo 
Calexicoj, Califoooo 
Douglas J Ariz o , o o o o 
Eagle Pass j, TeXo o » « 
El Paso J TeXooooo oo 
Hidalgo g TeXo o o » » o o 

XfaiT'SCiO • X 6jC oooooooo 

Nogales ^ Ariz o o o o o o 

San Ysidro^ Calif oo 

Other ports oooooooo 

1/ Each and every arrival 



o o 

o o 

o o 

o e 

o 

o o 

o o 

o o 

o o 

G O 

o 



1946 



lLuQg^.^li 



1947 



74.240,190 77,350„266 



M^^IJJO 



J28 
390,792 

589,273 

778,467 

3^524,665 

476,448 
1,970,525 

510,347 
5,203,011 



o o O O O I 



23.642ol90 



,157,788 



763,760 
789,648 
897,498 
226,997 
141,546 
358,202 
3,376,056 
1,709,054 
1^221,641 

OOOOOOOOOl 



585,427 
769,120 
948,548 

4,440,629 
568,535 

1,959,880 
566,405 

5,935,420 

00000000000( 

23.147.206 
1,845,409 
3,322,186 

835,333 

969,528 

6,645,104 

1,098,202 

3,212,975 
2,006,334 

1,714,827 
1,497,308 



Q0009000000< 




1948 



78.362.207 



■ ?8,892,^it^ 



536, 99< 

862,015 

905,567 

^220,826 
506,076 

,837,085 
549,696 

,117,248 



OOOOOOOOOO' 



1,729,815 
2,951,260 
692,999 
1,055,580 
6,612,748 
1,244,134 
3,288,920 
2,162,843 
2,260,425 
1,358,312 



OOOOOOOOOOOO 



459,822 
,152,121 

653,719 
,287,000 

485,311 



653,229 

4,086,895 




506,3' 
,999,526 

812,922 
,737,132 

552s288 
,027,450 

807,021 
5622,525 



514,193 
4,569,110 

843,117 
3,027,925 

520,715 
2,767,732 

849,579 
6,260,394 



O o o o o • 



oooooc 000000000000 



,603,267 

789,648 

598,333 

3,778,352 

761,946 

3,484,142 

2,154,324 

3,963,946 

1,646„336 



19.?63,866 



929,822 
1,690,530 
835,333 

665,775 
4,413,672 

736,727 
3,212,975 
1,376,848 
3,946,075 
l,556aO' 



20ai6.897 

869,062 

1,345,240 

622 ,890 

703,463 

4,392,969 

881^692 

3,287,189 

1,392,128 

5,207,768 

1,414.496 



1949 



85.400.278 



40,077,74^ 



16„0 54»649 

.06,885 
1,117,877 

938,492 
3,974,134 

576,057 
1,994,263 

539,438 
6,307,503 

OOOOOOOOOOOO 

24,023o094 



1950 



87,510,056 



U. 297. 774 



1,972,760 
3,118,609 
787,374 
1,039,732 
6,534,907 
1,327,709 
2,845,801 
2,416,469 
2,284,354 
1,693,379 

OOOOOOOOOOOO 

i 322. 535 



16.626.902 

667,104 

1,104,536 

1,047,401 

4,129,552 

579,037 

1,960,251 

537,028 

6,601,993 

OOOOOOOOOOO 

24.670»872 



23.681o848 



481^243 
5,242,191 

736,566 
6,313,229 

576,357 
2,932,568 

957,996 
6,441,698 

OOOOOOOOOOOO 



998,788 
1,580,780 

747,604 

692,572 
5,357,814 

904,921 
2,845,802 
1,580,273 
5,234,700 



j^: 



7 1, C!'> 



2,229,093 
3,264,013 
816,354 
929,537 
6,903,953 
1,452,300 
2,867,461 
2,455,807 
2,136,799 

1,615,555 

I900000 too 

46.212. 282 



22.144.174 

497,582 
4,796,507 

765,489 
5,392,192 

561,608 
2,625,779 

918,422 
6,586,595 

OOOOOOOOOOO 

.068.108 

1,126,110 

1,760,451 

816,668 

769,809 

7,450,707 

966,448 

2,867,898 

1,637,350 

4,918,562 

1»754.105 



of the same person counted separatelyo 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 







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TABLE 30. PASSH^GER TRi-VVEL BETWEEN THE UI^ITEU STATED AI^'D FOREIGN COUNTRIES 
3Y PORT OF ARRIVAL O R DEPARTURE: YEAR ENDEU JUIJE 30. 1950 1/ 



Port 



ARRIVED 

New York, N. Y 

Boston, Mass , 

Philadelphia, Pa.,, 

Baltimore , Md 

Newport News, Va.., 

Norfolk, Va 

Savannah, Ga 

Charleston, S. C... 

Miami, Fla, 

W. Palm Beach, Fla. 

Key West, Fla 

San Juan , P . R . . . , , 

Virgin Islands 

Tampa, Fla. 

Mobile, Ala 

New Orleans, La..,. 
San Francisco, Gal. 

Portland , Ore 

Seattle, Wash. 2/,, 
Los Angeles, Gal... 

Honoliilu, T. H 

Other ports.. ..,,,, 

DEPARTED 

New York, N, Y,..., 

Boston, Mass „ 

Philadelphia, Pa. . , 

Baltimore , Md 

Newport News, Va... 

Norfolk, Va, 

Savannah, Ga 

Charleston, S. C, . . 
Miami, Fla 



By sea and by air 



Aliens 



W. Palm Beach, Fla. 

Key West, Fla 

San Juan, P, R. .. . , 
Virgin Islands . , . , . 

Tampa , Fla , , 

Mobila, Ala. ....... 

New Orleans, La,.,, 
San Francisco, Gal. 
Portland, Ore. . , , , , 
Seattle, Wash.2/. .. 
Los Angeles, Gal,., 
Honolulu, T, H. . . ,, 
.Other ports 



530,209 



327,887 
30,736 
1,591 
1,865 
81 
511 
110 
102 
91,492 
5,286 
5,144 
9,061 
157 
8,104 
713 
21,095 
13,899 
151 
1,073 
! 1,037 
i 4,725 
i 5,389 

I 329.529 



179,218 

2,678 

205 

576 

77 

88 

25 
12 

93,544 

2,178 

4,073 

7,993 

208 

6,523 

170 

9,564 

7,706 

73 

490 

910 

6,149 

7.069 



Citi- 
zens 



651.943 



Total 



1.182.152 



311,856 

26,1751 
8Z^1 

5,2311 
60 1 
3,037! 
40 
124 
158,281 
3,258 
19,104 
18,485' 
3871 
7,5191 
8,371 1 
27,180 I 
25,970 
130 
9,525 
1,788 
6,398 
18,182 

651.595 



639,743 

56,911 

2,433 

7,096 

141 

3,548 

150 

226 

249,773 

8,544 

24,248 

27,546 

544 

15,623 

9,084 

48,275 

39,869 

281 

10,598 

2,825 

11,123 

23,571 

981.124 



Aliens 



305.210 



341,236 

11,945 

570 

3,735 

65 

853 

39 

38 

154,603 

3,529 

19,097 

17,071 

352 

6,909 

355 

25,873 

16,354 

78 

15,130 

1,948 

7,614 

24.201 



520,454 

14,623 

775 

4,311 

142 

941 

64 

50 

248, U7 

5,707 

23,170 

25,064 

560 

13 ,432 

525 

35,437 

24,060 

151 

15,620 

2,858 

13,763 

31,270 



243 ,486 

24,272 

1,027 

656 

81 

427 

110 

71 

6,531 

118 

2 

1,079 

67 

305 

559 

12,208 

8,621 

133 

736 

1,021 

1,744 

1,956 

146 .347 



&5L 



sea 



Citi- 
zens 



296.333 



198,325 

L4,536 

615 

547 

60 

3,034 

40 

124 

23,803 

311 

193 

1,485 

234 

280 

2,417 

10,809 

22,422 

no 

9,124 
1,732 
1,836 
4,296 



Total 



601.543 



320.758 467.105 



120,273 

1,537 

143 

162 

77 

49 

25 

11 

6,478 

81 

1,011 

157 

149 

138 

1,999 

4,859 

65 

290 

905 

3,511 

4.427 



441,811 

38,808 

1,642 

1,203 

141 

3,461 

150 

195 

30,334 

429 

195 

2,564 

301 

585 

2,976 

23,017 

31,043 

243 

9,860 

2,753 

3,580 

6,252 



By air 



Aliens 



Citi- 
zens 



224.999 



231,012 

7,331 

188 

229 

65 

853 

39 

33 

24,931 

331 

186 

1,146 

221 

188 

325 

12,687 

14,279 

69 

14,606 

1,947 

2,483 

7.604 



84,401 

6,464 

564 

1,209 

84 

31 

84,961 

5,168 

5,142 

7,982 

90 

7,799 

154 

8,887 

5,278 

18 

337 

16 

2,981 

3,433 

183 .182 



355.610 



351,285 

8,868 

331 

391 

142 

902 

64 

49 

31,409 

412 

186 

2,157 

378 

337 

463 

14,686 

19,138 

134 

14,896 

2,852 

5,994 

12.031 



113,531 

11,639 

227 

4,684 



134,478 

2,947 

18,911 

17,000 

153 

7,239 

5,954 

16,371 

3,548 

20 

401 

56 

4,562 

13 ,886 

330.837 



Total 



580.609 



58,945 

1,141 

62 

414 

39 

1 

87,066 

2,097 

4,073 

6,982 

51 

6,374 

32 

7,565 

2,847 

8 

200 

5 

2,638 

2.642 



197,932 

18,103 

791 

5,893 

87 

31 

219,439 

8,115 

24,053 

24,982 

243 

15,038 

6,108 

25,258 

8,826 

38 

738 

72 

7,543 

17,319 

514 .019 



110,224 

4,6U 

382 

3,506 



129,672 

3,198 

18,911 

15,925 

131 

6,721 

30 

13,186 

2,075 

9 

524 

1 

5,131 

16.597 



169,169 
5,755 
444 
3,920 

39 

1 

216,738 

5,295 

22,984 

22,907 

182 

13,095 

62 

20,751 

4,922 

17 

724 

6 

7,769 

19.239 



1/ Exclusive of travel over international land 
2/ Includes air travel via Anchorage, Alaska 



boundaries 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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TABLE 31. PASSEi-lGFJt TRAVEL TO THE UNIT3J STAT1:S FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
BY C OUNTRY OF Jl IBARKA'i' ION ; YiLAR BiDED JUNZ 30, 1950 1/ 



Country of 
embarkation 



E'.y sea and by air 



Aliens 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



Aliens 



By sea 



Citi- 
zens 



By air 



Total 



Aliens 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



11 countries 

rope, ................. 

Austria , 

Belgium, ..,.«..,, 

Czechoslovakia . . . „ . . . . 

Denmark 

Finland ».,..., 

r roll C " o oo«oeeo«o»«oo»» 

Jermany ,,.... 

}reat Britain .,..,...„ 

;J^66C6o a *••«•• • » « e« s 

Netherlands . ^ ........ . 

orway. 

'oland, 

Portugal .............. 

iweden. ............... 

Switzerland. .......... 

'urkey in Europe ...... 

'ugoslavia.. .......... 

)ther Europe. ......... 



b o o o 



O O O C Q 



• o • • « « 



a. 

!hina. 

ndia , 

apan and Korea. ...... 

alestine, ............ 

yria and the Lebanon, 
ther Asia, 



• o • • 



ifiCo ..... 

ustralia. ...... 

ew Z ealand ..... 

hilippines .,......., 

ther Pacific. ..,.,,. 



« » ■ o a a 



» > • « 



530.209 



651.943 



1.132.152 



305,210 



296.333 



601,543 224.999 



329.644 



258.560 



59 

3,372 

115 

4,449 

277 

36,956 

136,137 

71,993 

2,325 

454 

7,994 

22, 864 

14,526 

6,193 

1,284 

3,494 

4,095 

9,543 

1,632 

591 

117 

1,174 

14.573 



71 

3,684 

267 

4,199 

266 

62, 099 

31,361 

70, 210 

2,956 

1,440 

13,864 

29, 792 

12, 059 

5,282 

1,185 

4,513 

1, 684 

9,806 

2,224 

315 

29 



588,204 



262,205 



164, 908 



1,054 



1,059 

809 

20 

3,733 

2,184 
802 

5,966 

7^629 



i5,iP4. 



970 

540 

197 

24, 015 

1,972 
904 

6, 906 

11,011 



2,502 
909 

3,831 
387 



,086 

'451 

5,358 

4.116 



130 

7,256 

382 

8,648 

543 

99,055 

167,498 

142, 203 

5,281 

1,894 

21,858 

52,656 

26,585 

11,475 

2,469 

8,007 

5,779 

19,349 

3,856 

906 

146 

2,228 

50.077 



2,029 

1,349 

217 

27, 748 
4,156 
1,706 

12,872 

18,640 



1,118 

2,380 

94 

28,833 

124, 585 

50,626 

1,906 

107 

5,450 

20,885 

9,674 

4,927 

1,154 

639 

944 

7,348 

245 

117 
1,165 

9.883 



3,588 
1,360 
9,189 
4.503 



897 

297 

1 

2,810 

1,668 

245 

3,965 

3.238 



731 

2,104 

35 

46,975 

16,735 

43, 662 

2,150 

18 

6,499 

23,816 

7,587 

3,948 

834 

826 

428 

7,453 

87 
29 

985 

28,95 



427,113 



jPi 



362 

230 

2,544 

102 



806 

283 

5 

081 

,659 

448 

3,675 



14 
1,849 

4,484 

129 

75,808 

141,32c 

94, 288 

4,056 

125 

11,949 

44, 701 

17, 261 

8,875 

1,988 

1,465 

1,372 

14,801 

332 

146 

2,150 

38.840 



67.439 



355.610 



580, 609 



22, 
1, 



6,632 

160 

72 

3,916 

2,484 



1, 703 

580 

6 

24,891 

3,327 

693 

7,640 

9.870 



51 
2,254 

115 
2,069 

183 

8,123 

11,552 

21,367 

419 

347 
2, 5''f4 
1,979 
4,352 
1, 266 

130 
2,855 

3,151 

2,195 

1,632 

346 

9 

4., 690 



93,652 



522 

302 
6,460 
2.586 



162 

512 

19 

923 

516 

557 

2,001 

4.391 



2,140 
679 

1,287 
285 



65 
3,153 

267 
2,095 

231 
15,124 
14, 626 
26,54s 

806 
1,422 
7o365 
5.976 
4,472 
1,334 

351 
3,687 
1,256 
2,353 
2,224 

228 

69 

6.547 



164 
257 
192 

1,934 
313 
456 

3,231 



Jixl29 



92b 

379 

1,442 

1,6:32 



161.091 

^ 

5,407 

382 

4.164 

414 

23,247 

26, 178 

47,915 

1,225 

1,769 

9,909 

7,955 

9,324 

2,600 

481 

6,542 

4,407 

4,548 

3,856 

574 

78 

11»23.7 

326 

769 

211 

2,857 

829 

1,013 

5,232 

8,770 
3,066 
1,058 
2,729 
1 ^917 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 31. PASSEIvGSR TRAV3. TO Tl-iE UNIT,^ STATiS ?«»! FOREIGN COUWTRIKi, 
BY COUNTRY OF H'-iBARllATlON: YEAR .3:DZD JUI.'E 30, 1950 1/ 

(CONTINUED) 



Country of 
ernbarfetion 



Horthern Africa. 
Other jif rica , . . . 



Horth America 

Canada 

Greenland 

kexicc, . . , . , 

Ber.'uuda . 

British 'ivest Indies. 

Cuba ,0 

Dominican Kepublic. 
Dutch ,;est Indies... 
French West Indies.. 
Haiti. 



Central America 

British Honduras . . . , 
Canal Zone t Panama, 

Costa Rica . . . , 

Guatemala 

Honduras , 

Nicaragua. 

Salvador. 



3outh /iriierica= . . . 
Argentina,, , . . . , 

Bolivia , 

Br5 zil . 

British Guiana. 
Dutch Guiana, . . 



Falkland Islands, 
French Guiana , . , , 

Chile,,, 

Colombia .,..,.,,, 
Ecuador ........... 

Paraguay ......... 

Peru, , 

Uruguay. 

Venezuela. ...*... 



By sea pvd by air 



Aliens 



?lag of carrier: 
United States, 
Foreign, ...... 



1,079 
1,066 

12b-. 245 



Citi- 
zens 



11, 092 

8 

2,077 

6,713 

21, 289 

76, 722 

4,849 

2,737 

533 

2,225 

12.387 



144 
4,519 

327 
3,909 

86b 

870 
1,750 

35,586 



3,607 

71 

5,834 

696 

124 

2 

45 
1,666 
7,038 
1,126 

83 

2,346 

562 

12,386 



323,829 
206,380 



1,426 
1,621 

273.602 



23,493 

100 

2,248 

42, 037 

55,742 

134,326 

8,085 

2,638 

176 

4,757 

38,379 



162 
26,351 

315 
8,000 
2,280 

434 

837 

31.840 



3,710 

136 

7,108 

390 

86 

6 

12 

1, 285 

3,005 

373 

158 

2,195 

267 

13,104 



425,925 
226, 018 



Total 



2,505 
2,687 

401,847 



34, 585 

108 

4,325 

48,750 

77, 031 

211, 048 

12, 934 

5,375 

709 

6,982 

50,766 



306 

30,870 

642 

11, 909 

3,148 

1, 304 

2,587 

67.426 



7,317 

207 

12, 942 

1,086 

210 

8 

57 

2,951 

10,043 

1,504 

241 

4,541 

829 

25,490 



749,754 
432,398 



y ijxclusive of travel over land borders. 



By sea 



Aliens 



612 
640 

16.626 



3,327 
6 

598 
2,395 
1,373 
7,756 

395 

492 
41 

243 

2.864 



20 

1,513 

177 

403 

728 

15 
8 

9.142 



1,266 

70 

2, 268 

93 

3 

2 

635 
1,107 

231 
83 

387 

130 
2,867 



176, 007 
129, 203 



.^ 



Citi- 
zens 



428 
914 

62.159 



13,786 

4 

390 

14, 266 

5,742 

25,982 

903 

891 

14 

181 

21, 534 



94 

14, 928 

242 

4,061 

2,169 

36 

4 

10.801 



2,519 

117 

3,846 

184 

7 

6 

660 
633 
94 
158 
439 
106 
2,032 



149, 772 
146,561 



Total 



1,040 
1,554 

78,785 



17,113 

10 

988 

16, 661 

7,115 

33, 738 

1,298 

1,383 

55 

424 

24.398 



114 

16,441 

419 

4,464 

2,897 

51 

12 

19,943 



3,785 

187 

6,114 

277 

10 

8 

1,295 

1,740 

325 
241 
826 
236 
4,899 



325,779 
275,764 



by air 



Aliens 



467 
426 

111.619 



■777^ 
2 

1,479 

4,318 

19,916 

68, 966 

4,454 

2,245 

492 

1,982 

9,523 



Citi- 
zens 



998 
707 

211.443 



124 
3,0C6 

150 
3,506 

140 

855 
1,742 

26,444 



2,341 
1 

3,566 
603 
121 

45 

1,031 

5,931 

895 

1,959 

432 

9,519 



147,822 
77,177 



9,707 

96 

1,858 

27, 771 

50, 000 

108,344 

7,182 

1, 747 

162 

4,576 

16.845 



cb 
11,423 

73 

3,939 
111 
398 
833 

21.039 



1,191 
19 

3,262 

206 

79 

12 

625 

2,372 

284 

1,756 

161 

11, 072 



276,153 
79,457 



Totf.l 



1,465^ 
1,133 

323.062 



17,472 

98 

3,337 

32, 089 

69,916 

177,310 

11,636 

3,992 

654 

6,558 

26,368 



192 

14,429 

223 

7,445 

251 

1,253 

2,575 

47.483 



3,532 
20- 

6,828 
809 
200 

57 

1,656 
8,303 
1, 179 ; 

3,715 1 

593; 

20, 591 ' 



423,975- 
156, 634 : 



United States Departi.ient of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Ser-vice 



TABLE 32, PA.iS3NGER TRAVLL, FROM THE UNITLD STATES TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
BY COUrJTHY CF EEB/J.'KATICr:: YEAR xi-\'DMJ JUIJE 30. 1950 1/ 



Coiintry of 
debarkation 



By sea and by air 



Aliens 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



Aliens 



By sea 



Citi- 
zens 



[■otal 



/J-iens 



% air 



Citi- 
zens 



Totcil 



111 coiintries 

iurope ,...,. 

Austria » , , 

Belgium. 

Czechoslovakia. 

Denmark, , , 

Finland , . . . . 

France. 

Germany. , 

Great Britain. ........ 

Greece 

Iceland. 

Ireland o ...=...., 

Italy. 

Netherlands , 

Norway. 

Poland , . 

Portugal 

Spain , 

Sweden 

Switzerland, 

Turkey in Europe. . . . . . 

Yugoslavia , 

Other Europe , 

sia. . , . , 

China , . . „ , . 

India. ,,...... 

Japan and Korea ..,..,, 

Syria and the Lebanon. 
Other Asia 

acific, 

Australia. ............ . 

New Zealand 

Philippines . , 

Other Pacific 



329,529 651.595 



981,124 



146.347 



320,753 



150.617 



29 

2,456 

18 

3,224 

140 

26,362 

4,602 

67, 739 

2,371 

375 

3,270 

8,688 

9,615 

5,875 

621 

2,232 

3,045 

7,501 

1,457 

479 

101 

417 

9.782 



226 

322 

18 

4,503 

2,059 

511 

2,143 

7.557 



2, 571 
869 

3,409 
708 



467.105 



183.132 



330.837 



514.019 



282.183 



3C9 

3,743 

128 

4,331 

2I0 

61, 781 

31,501 

79,8dl 

5,319 

1, 141 

13,793 

37,503 

12,758 

6,652 

717 

4,599 

1,971 

9,644 

2,599 

864 

89 

2,642 

36,420 



432, cOO 



579 

744 

170 

26,459 

3,328 

1, 282 

3,858 

11.905 



333 

6,199 

146 

7,555 

358 

88, 143 

36,103 

147, 620 

7,690 

1, 516 

17, 063 

46,191 

22,373 

12,527 

1,338 

6,c31 

5,016 

17, 145 

4,056 

1,343 

190 

3,059 

46.202 



106,378 



190.618 



296,996 



44.239 



805 
1,066 

188 

30,962 

5,387 

1,793 

6,001 

19.462 



1,325 

1, 846 

47 

19,572 

2,685 

49,586 

1, 906 

97 

2,152 

7,195 

6,341 

4,894 

525 

767 

1,044 

5,790 

3 

217 

101 

285 

7.729 



1,658 

2,374 

16 

48, 517 

17,609 

53, 538 

3,927 

39 

8,886 

29,220 

7,591 

5,201 
484 
955 
740 

7,842 

25 

256 

87 

1,453 

29.110 



3,133 

4,220 

63 

68,089 

20,294 

103, 124 

5,833 

136 

11, 038 

36,415 

13,932 

10, 095 

1,009 

1,722 

1,784 

13, 632 

28 

473 

188 

1,738 

36.839 



29 
1,131 

18 
1,378 

93 
6,790 

1,917 
18,153 

465 

278 
1,118 
1,493 
3,274 

981 
96 
1,465 
2,001 
1,711 
1,454 

262 

132 
2.05: 



91 .^65 



135.804 



1,455 

401 

5,560 

4,489 



4,026 
1,270 
8,969 
5,197 



220 

150 

4 

3,502 

1,705 

371 

1,777 

;3>194 



530 

519 

8 

23,275 
2,768 

814 
1,196 

6.684 



750 

669 

12 

26, 777 

4,473 

1,185 

2,973 

9.878 



289 

12 

2,416 

477 



258 

15 

4,079 

2,332 



547 
27 

6,495 
2,809 



6 
172 
14 
1,001 
354 
140 
366 



309 

1,885 

128 

1,957 

202 

13,264 

13,892 

26,343 
1,392 
1,102 
4,907 
8,283 
5,167 
1,451 

233 
3,644 
1,231 
1,602 
2,574 

608 

2 

1,189 

7.310 



49 
225 
162 

3,184 
560 
468 

2,662 

5,221 



2, 262 
857 
993 
231 



1,197 

386 

1,481 

2,157 



338 
3,016 

146 . 
3,335 

295 

20, 054 

15,809 

44,496 

1,857 

1,380 

6,025 

9,776 

8,441 

2,432 

329. 
5,109 
3,232 
3,513 
4,028 , 

870 

2 

1,321 

9 ,363 . 



55 
397 
176 

4,185 
914 
608 

3,028 

9.5841 



3,479; 
1,243= 
2, 474 1 

2,388-' 



United States Departc'.ent of Justice 
Immigration and Natur.;.lization Service 



TAEia 32. PASSENGER TriAVSL FROM THE UNITID STATES TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
BY COUNTRY OF DEBARKATIOK: YEAR EiJDED JUKE 30, 1950 (CONTINUED) 1/ 



Covintry of 
debarkation 



By sea and by air 



Aliens 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



Aliens 



By sea 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



Aliens 



By air 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



Northern Africa. 
Other Africa. . . . 



North America 

Canada 

Greenland 

Mexico 

Bermuda 

British West Indies.. 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic . . . 
Dutch West Indies.... 
French West Indies . . . 
Haiti 



Jentral America 

British Honduras. . . . 
Canal Zone & Panama. 

Costa Rica 

Guat emala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua, 

Salvador 



outh Ajnerica. 

Argentina, , , 

Bolivia 

Brazil, 

British Guiana. ...,,, 

Dutch Guiana , 

Falkland Islands. ... 

French Guiana. 

Chile, 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Paraguay 

Peru, 

Uruguay 

Venezuela. 



lag of carrier: 
United States. 
Foreign 



750 



1,088 
112.648 



1.921 



1,988 

23 

1,776 

6,475 
20, 096 

73, 913 
4,055 
2,002 

351 

1,969 
10, 623 



2,252 

257.060 



2.671 



447 



10,819 

153 

2,754 

46,597 

50,880 

129,683 

8,991 

2,373 

166 

4,/^4 
27.843 



3,340 
369.708 



37 
3,207 
633 
4,047 
945 
794 
960 

36,464 



3,647 
35 
5,990 

511 
179 

36 
1,608 
7,270 
1,041 
32 
2,445 
496 

13,174 



172,591 
156,938 



28 

15,296 

322 

7,617 

3,613 

469 

498 

32, 011 



12,807 

176 

4, 530 

53, 072 

70,976 

203,796 

13, 046 

4,375 

517 

6,413 

38.466 



760 
12.788 



823 



1,307 
61.928 



1.270 



2,067 
74.716 



303 



1.098 



1.401 



328 
99.860 



7^ 

74 

7,243 

400 

70 

4 

13 

1,317 

3,180 

546 

37 

2,367 

355 

13, 712 



404,767 
246,828 



65 

18, 503 

955 

11, 664 

4,558 

1,263 

1,458 

68.475 



o, ^40 

109 

13,233 

911 

249 

4 

49 

2,925 

10,450 

1,587 

69 

4,812 

851 
26,886 



577,358 
403, 766 



/ Exclusive of travel over land borders „ 



939 

207 

2,418 

1,069 

7,144 

458 

468 

10 

75 

2.257 



1,020 

86 

329 

738 

10 

74 

12,794 



1,469 
31 

3,024 

116 

10 



713 
1,385 

217 
32 

562 

169 
5,066 



42,634 
103,713 



7,691 

508 

21,401 

4,610 

25,554 

1,092 

913 

17 

142 

16.439 



8,901 

92 

3,926 

3,460 

15 

45 

13>S49 



1753^ 

66 

4,370 

167 

1 



689 
606 
197 
37 
735 
212 

5,233 



140,894 
179,864 



8,630 

715 

23,819 

5,679 

32, 698 

1,550 

1,381 

27 

217 

18,696 



1,049 

23 

1,569 

4,057 

19,027 

66,769 

3,597 

1,534 

3a 

1,894 

8.366 



945 

195, 1?2 



9y921 
178 

4,255 
4,198 

25 
119 

26,643 



3,005 
97 

7,394 

283 

11 



1,402 
1,991 

414 

69 

1,297 

381 

10,299 



183, 528 
283, 577 



37 
2,187 
547 
3,718 
207 
784 
886 

23.670 



2,178 
4 

2,966 
395 
169 

36 
895 

5,885 
824 

1,883 

327 

8,108 



129,957 
53,225 



3,128 

153 

2,246 

25,196 

46,270 

104,329 

7,899 

1,460 

149 

4,302 

11,404 



1,273 

294.992 



28 

6,395 
230 

3,691 
153 
454 
453 

18.162 



1,157 

8 

2,873 

233 

69 

4 

13 

628 

2,574 
349 

1,632 

143 

8,479 



263,873 
66, 964 



4,177 

176 

3,815 

29,253 

65,297 

171,098 

11,496 

2,994 

490 

6,196 

19.770 



65 
8,582 

777 
7,409 

360 
1,238 
1,339 

41.832 



3,335 
12 

5,839 

628 

238 

4 

49 

1,523 

8,459! 

l>173i 

3, 515 ; 
470 ■• 

16,587? 



393,830; 
120,189; 



United States Department of Justice 
Inmiigration and Naturalization Seirvice 



























































































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5 






.? 







TABLE 37. DECLARATIONS OF 


INTMTION FILiX, KiTITIOI^J. 


3 FOR NATURALIZATION FILED, 


AND PERSONS NATURjlLIZH): YEARS EIJDED JUNH 


30. 1907 TO 1950 




Declara- 


Petitions 








Period 


tions 
filed 


filed 


Persons naturaliz 


ed 




Civilian 


Kilitary 


Total 


1907 - 1950 


8,212,008 


7,004.876 


6.049.191 


470.196 


6,519,38? 


1907 - 1910 


526.322 


164.036 


111.738 


_ 


111.738 


1911 - 1920 


2,686.909 


1.381.384 


884.672 


244.300 


1.128,972 


1911 


189,249 


74,740 


56,683 


- 


56,683 


1912 


171,133 


95,661 


70,310 


- 


70,310 


1913 


182,095 


95,380 


83,561 


- 


83,561 


19U 


214,104 


124,475 


104,145 


- 


104,145 


1915 


247,958 


106,399 


91,848 


- 


91,848 


1916 


209,204 


108, 767 


87,831 


- 


87,831 


1917 


440,651 


130,865 


88,104 


- 


88,104 


1918 


342,283 


169,507 


87,456 


63,993 


151, U9 


1919 


391,156 


256,858 


89,023 


128,335 


217,358 


1920 


299,076 


218, 732 


125,711 


51,972 


177,683 


1921 - 1930 


2! 769! 614" 


*i! 884! 277" 


"i! 716! 979** 


56.206 


i! 773! 185"* 


1921 


303,904 


195,534 


163,656 


17,636 


181, 292 


1922 


273,511 


162,638 


160,979 


9,468 


170,447 


1923 


296, 636 


165,168 


137,975 


7,109 


145,084 


1924 


424,540 


177,117 


140,340 


10,170 


150,510 


1925 


277,218 


162, 258 


152,457 


- 


152,457 


1926 


277,539 


172,232 


146,239 


92 


146,331 


1927 


258,295 


240,339 


195,493 


4,311 


199,804 


1928 


254,588 


240,321 


228, 006 


5,149 


233,155 


1929 


280,645 


255,519 


224,197 


531 


224, 728 


1930 


62,138 


113,151 


167,637 


1,740 


169,377 


1931 - 1940 


i! 369.* 479'" 


'i.' 637.* 113** 


'*i.* 498,* 573*' 


19.891 


i.' 518! 464*** 


1931 


106,272 


145,474 


140,271 


3,224 


U3,495 


1932 


101,345 


131,062 


136,598 


2 


136,600 


1933 


83,046 


112,629 


112,368 


995 


113,363 


1934 


108,079 


117,125 


110,867 


2,802 


113,669 


1935 


136, 524 


131,378 


118,945 


- 


118,945 


1936 


148,118 


167,127 


140,784 


481 


141,265 


1937 


176,195 


165,464 


162, 923 


2,053 


164,976 


1938 


150,673 


175,413 


158,142 


3,936 


162, 078 


1939 


155,691 


213,413 


185,175 


3,638 


188,813 


1940 


203,536 


278,028 


232, 500 


2,760 


235, 260 


1941 - 1950 


920.284 


*i.* 938.* 066*' 


"*i.' 837." 229 


""149." 799"* 


1.987.028 


1941 


224,123 


277,807 


275,747 


1,547 


277,294 


1942 


221,796 


343,487 


268,762 


1,602 


270,364 


1943 


115,664 


377,125 


281,459 


37,474 1/ 


318,933 


1944 


42,368 


325,717 


392,766 


49,213 y 


Ul,979 


1945 


31,195 


195,917 


208,707 


22,695 1/ 


231,402 


1946 


28,787 


123,864 


134,849 


15,213 1/ 


150, 062 


1947 


37,771 


88,802 


77,442 


16,462 y 


93,904 


1948 


60,187 


68,265 


69,080 


1,070 


70,150 


1949 


64,366 


71,044 


64,138 


2,456 


66, 594 


1950 


93.527 


66.038 


64.279 


2.067 


66.346 


1/ Members of 


'the armed fo 


rces include 


1,425 natural 


ized overseas . 


m 1943; 6,496 



in 1944; 5,666 in 1945 j 2,054 in 1946; and 5,370 in 1947 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TAE13 38. PERSONS NATURALIZID, BY CLAoSIS UNDER THE xMATIONALITY LAWS 1/ AND COUNTRY 
OR RLniON OF FOhl-'FJt /VLL:i_!i:}IAiJCB; YK\R El.DED JUNE 30. 1950 



Countrj' or region 
of former 

allegiance 



Total 
number 



Persons naturalized 



Under 
general 
natural- 
ization 
provi- 
sions 



to 

U. S. 
citizens 



Harried Children 



of U. S. 
citizens 



Military 



Other 



All countries. 



iiurope. 



Austria 

Belgium 

British Empire. 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia , 

Deniaark 

Estonia 

Finla,nd. 

France 

Gerniany 

Greece 

Hxongary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands. . . . 

Norway, 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland. . . . 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe, . . 



Asia 

China. 

Japan 

Palestine. . 

Syria 

Other Asia. 



Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Central Ajnerica. 
South America... 
Africa 

Philippines 

Stateless and miscellaneous. 



66.346 



50.838 



1,192 

654 

12,829 

59 

1,276 

515 

139 

437 

1,867 

6,065 

1,667 

850 

1,451 

8,743 

186 

482 

872 

879 

3,793 

1,066 

523 
614 
879 
373 
2,122 
770 
535 



903 
24 
101 
192 
325 

5,882 

2,323 

838 

502 

470 

86 

3,257 

605 



19.403 



15,332 



390 
101 

3,095 
29 
416 
144 
25 
203 
269 

2,024 
521 
311 
450 

2,256 

57 

219 

222 

282 

1,492 
496 
209 
252 
357 
146 
839 
330 
197 

589 



375 

33 

71 

110 

1,584 
831 
312 
149 
117 
12 
262 
215 



40. 684 



499 



33.244 



769 

516 

9,244 

28 

804 

293 

72 

203 

1,539 

3,886 

1,035 
526 

969 
6,026 
105 
249 
592 
532 
2,176 
452 
308 
288 
457 
219 
1,247 
388 
321 

606 



JiL 



235 

3 

62 

110 

196 
3,932 

1,218 
434 
250 
270 

53 

320 



7 
4 

78 

11 
4 



10 

31 

12 

2 

6 

113 

3 
5 
6 

3 
14 
23 
1 
6 
1 

1 

10 

2 

41 



35 
5 

1 

80 
2 

10 
2 
1 

7 
2 



2.067 



723 



12 

12 

196 

1 
23 

9 

2 

20 

69 

37 

5 

15 

143 

4 

7 

13 
15 
58 

13 

1 

7 
11 

2 

19 
18 
11 

111 



86 
4 
1 
7 

13 

211 

256 

56 

34 

25 

3 

626 

22 



3.693 2/ 



1x181 



14 

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216 

1 

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65 
42 
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62 

6 

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205 

17 

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47 
53 
82 

4 
61 

53 
6 

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24 

4 

198 



172 
17 

4 
5 

75 

16 

26 

67 

57 

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1/ See also table 47 for detailed fig\ires on nat\iralization by statutory provisions. 
2/ Figure includes 1,843 Filipinos with U. 3. residence prior to May 1, 1934. 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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Sex and 
marital 

status 



TABLE 42. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY SE:: AI.'D i:.\RIT;1 STATUS V^TH OOMP/iRATIVE 
PERCENT OF TOTAL; YEARS ENDH) JUNE 30. 1942 TO 1950 



Both sexes 

Single 

Married. . . . 
Widowed. . . . 
Divorced. . . 

Male 

Single 

Married.. . . 
Widowed .... 
Divorced. .. 

Female 

Single 

Married. .. . 
Widowed .... 
Divorced... 



Both sexes 

Single 

Married .... 
Widowed .... 
Divorced. . . 

Male 

Single 

Married. . . . 
Widowed.. . . 
Divorced. . . 



Female 

Single. . . . , 
Married.. . , 
Widowed.. . , 
Divorced. . , 



1942 



194 



31/ 



19. 



44i/ 



1945^/ 



1946i/ 



1947 



1948 



1949 



Number 



220, 



2§L 
756 



24,75< 
228, 263 

13,635 
3,710 



112. 040 



4C 
Pi 



15,567 

91,323 

3,436 

1,714 



158.324 



9,189 

136,940 

10,199 

1,996 



317.505 



55,174 

239,585 

17,508 

5,241 



136.245 



41,451 

107,694 

4,458 

2,642 



161.263 



13,723 

131,891 

13,050 

2,599 



435t483 



71,278 

327,459 

29,067 

7,679 



196.227 



45,725 

139,950 

7,007 

3,545 



239.256 



25,553 

187,509 

22,060 

4,134 



225.736 



40,014 

163, 200 

17,335 

5,187 



111.059 



23,301 

80,571 

4,635 

2,552 



114.677 



^ 



16,713 

82, 629 

12,700 

2,635 



148.008 



30,236 

101,828 

12,207 

3,737 



7^.250 



18,416 

50,668 

3,235 

1,931 



73.758 



11,820 

51,160 

8,972 

1,806 



93.904 



19,697 

64,704 
6,988 
2,515 



52.998 



13,567 

35,942 

2,032 

1,457 



40.906 



6,130 

28, 762 

4,956 

1,058 



70.1^9 



12, 206 

50,518 

5,429 

1,997 



33,iA7 



7,449 

23,200 

1,466 

1,032 



37.00? 



4,757 

27,318 

3,963 

965 



66. m 



9,6^ 

50,723 

4,604 

1,644 



2 7. 86 5 



>,142 

19,833 

1,089 

801 



38.729 



3,481 

30,890 

3,515 

843 



Percent of total 



100.0 



9.2 

84.4 
5.0 
1.4 



MJl 



5.8 

33.8 

1.2 

.6 



58.6 



3.4 

50.6 

3.8 

.8 



100.0 



17.4 

75.5 

5.5 

1.6 



49.2 



13.1 

33.9 

1.4 

.8 



50.8 



4.3 

a. 6 

4.1 
.8 



100.0 

16.4 

75.2 

6.7 

1.7 



MA. 



10.5 

32.1 

1.7 

.8 



Jit^ 



5.9 

43.1 

5.0 

.9 



100.0 



17.7 

72.3 

7.7 

2.3 



Jdil 



10.3 

35.7 

2.1 

1.1 



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7.4 

36.6 

5.6 

1.2 



100.0 



20.4 

68.9 

8.2 

2.5 



50.2 



12.4 

34.3 

2.2 

1.3 



49.8 



8.0 

34.6 

6.0 

1.2 



100.0 



21.0 

68.9 

7.4 

2.7 



56.4 



14.4 

38.3 

2.1 

1.6 



43.6 

30.6 
5.3 
1.1 



100.0 



17.4 

72.1 

7.7 

2.8 



JtL 



10.6 

33.1 
2.1 

1.5 



J2^ 
6T8 

39.0 
5.6 
1.3 



100.0 



14.4 
76.2 

6.9 
2.5 



41.8 



9.2 

29.8 

1.6 

1.2 



58.2 



5.2 

46.4 
5.3 
1.3 



1950 



66. 346 



W 



87439 

52,025 

4,218 

1,6U 



25.7^5 



5,710 

18,345 
921 
769 



40.601 



2,779 

33,680 

3,297 

845 



100.0 



12.8 

78.4 

6.4 

2.4 



38.8 
875 

27.7 
1.4 
1.1 



61.2 



4.2 

50.7 

5.0 

1.3 



1/ Does not include 1,425 members of the armed forces naturalized overseas in 1943; 
6,496 in 1944 J 5,666 in 1945; and 2,054 in 1946. 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration aind Naturalization Sexnrice 



I 

1 



TABLE 43. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY SEX AND AGE: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1942 TO 1950 



Sex and age 



1942 



1943i/ 



1944^/ 



1945^/ 



L946i/ 



1947 



1948 



1949 



1950 



Both sexes . . . 



Under 21 years 



21 to 
26 to 
31 to 35 
36 to 40 
41 to 
46 to 
51 to 
56 to 60 
61 to 65 
66 to 70 
71 to 75 
Over 75 



25 
30 



45 
50 
55 



Male 

Under 21 years 

21 to 25 " 

26 to 30 " 

31 to 35 " 

36 to 40 " 

41 to 45 " 

46 to 50 " 

51 to 55 " 

56 to 60 " 

61 to 65 " 

66 to 70 " 

71 to 75 " 

Over 75 " 



Female . 
Under 21 
21 to 25 
26 to 30 
31 to 35 
36 to 40 
41 to 45 
46 to 
51 to 



50 

55 
56 to 60 



61 to 
66 to 
71 to 



65 
70 
75 



Over 75 



years 
n 

I) 

ti 
n 
n 
It 
II 
II 
11 
II 
n 
II 



270.364 



iiZiiOS. 



ifc^^a^ 



22?.7 :?6 



148.008 



93.904 



70.i?o 



66,i2it 



66.346 



34 

6,222 

18,682 

35,004 

46,156 

44,391 

41,547 

33,033 

22,153 

12,809 

6,483 

2,668 

1,182 



2,476 

15,829 

22,148 

37,021 

49,174 

47,706 

46,510 

38,392 

28,418 

16,649 

8,464 

3,257 

1,464 



5,609 
19, 4U. 
22,979 
43,893 
61,139 
65,517 
65,280 
57,915 
44,273 
27,173 
14, a8 
5,534 
2,312 



112.040 



19 

3,404 

8,072 

13,706 

17,641 

16,219 

15,707 

U,356 

10,836 

6,547 

3,389 

1,461 

683 



156.245 



2,359 
12,004 
12,710 
18,788 

22,575 

20,428 

18,801 

17,599 

14,646 

9,063 

4,559 

1,864 

849 



196.227 



i^&xm. 



15 

2,818 

10,610 

21,298 

28,515 

28,172 

25,840 

18,677 

11,317 

6,262 

3,094 

1,207 

499 



161.26? 



117 

3,825 

9,438 

18,233 

26,599 

27, 278 

27,709 

20,793 

13,772 

7,586 

3,905 

1,393 

615 



5,378 

11,915 

11,394 

19,636 

24,960 

25,416 

24,659 

25,108 

21,986 

14,303 

7,371 

2,904 

1,197 



239.256 



231 

7,526 

11,585 

24,257 

36,179 

40,101 

40,621 

32,807 

22,287 

12,870 

7,047 

2,630 

1,115 



1,669 

8,246 

11,540 

14,902 

24,399 

29,976 

32,131 

32,856 

29,409 

20,864 

11,952 

5,226 

2,566 



111.059 



1,579 

4,115 

5,191 

6,668 

10,772 

13,777 

14,770 

15,788 

15,658 

11,955 

6,537 

2,846 

1,403 



114.677 



1,244 

7,269 

7,818 

10,823 

16, 289 

19,341 

20,142 

20, 783 

18,599 

13,185 

7,636 

3,298 

1,581 



74.250 



1,115 
3,297 
3,719 
5,116 
7,902 
9,151 
9,481 
10,095 
9,926 

7,535 

4,236 

1,819 

858 



544 

5,495 

6,627 

7,221 

11,205 

14,091 

13,137 

11,531 

9,601 

7,347 

4,260 

1,953 
892 



52.998 



4, 

6, 

8, 

13, 

16, 

17, 
17, 
13, 
8, 
5, 
2, 
1, 



90 
131 
349 
234 
627 
199 
361 
068 
751 
909 
415 
380 
163 



73.758 



129 

3,972 

4,099 

5,707 

8,387 

10,190 

10,661 

10,688 

8,673 
5,650 
3,400 
1,479 
723 



406 
3,032 
4,1U 
4,073 
6,425 
8,185 
7,505 
6,122 
5,051 
4,195 
2,310 
1,075 

478 



476 

2,970 

3,783 

4,131 

7,867 

11,113 

11,170 

9,481 

8,018 

5,637 

3,304 

1,445 

755 



^3.147 



987 
6,297 
6,074 
4,886 
7,107 
9,164 
9,198 
7,822 
6,441 
4,473 
2,551 
1,084 

510 



40.906 



138 
2,463 
2,486 
3,148 
4,780 
5,906 
5,632 
5,409 
4,550 
3,152 
1,950 
878 
414 



257 

711 

1,094 

1,569 

3,672 

5,625 

5,679 

4,535 

4,098 

2,981 

1,737 

766 

423 



27.865 



1,003 
7,742 
8,570 
5,355 
6,535 
8,U4 
8,239 
6,937 
5,773 
4,298 
2,289 
926 
535 



433 
1,239 
1,705 
1,925 
3,257 
4,254 
4,271 
3,488 
2,971 
2,186 
1,297 
570 
269 



23.745 



37.003 



219 
2,259 
2,689 
2,562 
4,195 
5,488 
5,491 
4,946 
3,920 
2,656 
1,567 
679 
332 



38.729 



554 
5,058 
4,369 
2,961 
3,850 
4,910 
4,927 
4,334 
3,470 
2,287 
1,254 
514 
2a 



371 
1,732 
2,375 
2,026 
2,825 
3,574 
3,615 
2,870 
2,471 
2,052 
1,088 
467 
279 



40. 601 



1 



632 
6,010 
6,195 
3,329 
3,710 
4,570 
4,624 
4,067 
3,302 
2,246 
1,201 
459 
256 



1/ Does not include 1,425 members of the armed forces naturalized overseas in 1943; 6,496 
In 1944; 5,666 in 1945; and 2,054 in 1946. 

United States Department of J\istice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 44. PERSONS NATURALIZID, BY STATES AND TERRITORIES OF RiSIDHvCE: 
YEAHS ENDED JUNE 30. 1946 TO 1950 



State of residence 



1946 



1947 



1948 



1949 



1950 



Total 

Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia, 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Main* 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York, 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 



150. 062 



.21x22L 



70,1^0 



66.594 



190 

457 
66 

14,595 
587 

4,728 

285 

1,035 

1,159 

206 

210 
9,301 
1,068 

549 
43-0 

180 

476 

1,193 

1,547 

11,809 

8,618 

1,558 

83 

1,668 

269 

484 
107 
721 
8,543 
190 

50,862 

224 

173 

5,289 

199 



101 

375 

30 

10,120 

355 

2,952 

120 
686 
880 
139 

128 
5,230 
667 
342 
164 

100 
350 
784 
588 
6,806 

5,128 

709 

51 

683 

184 

205 

66 

629 

4,919 

142 

29,008 

68 

218 

2,625 

103 



102 

305 

30 

9,194 

243 

1,987 

77 

350 

823 

62 

125 
3,259 
50:5 
245 
159 

68 

342 

517 

539 

4,618 

3,665 

560 

47 

413 
172 

li^8 

116 

322 

4,114 

98 

25,238 

103 

148 

1,848 

no 



109 

329 

60 

9,370 

324 

1,S61 
35 

430 
1,C69 

157 

76 

3,297 

U8 

224 

159 

55 

273 

557 

509 

5,021 

3,301 

660 

60 

483 

193 

135 

71 

371 

3,448 

117 

21,174 
126 

la 

2,2S5 
120 



66. 346 



140 

341 

44 

9,468 

358 

1,753 

90 

466 

957 

200 

85 

3,367 

577 

329 

198 

198 
245 
475 
489 
4,861 

3,475 

567 

60 

502 

166 

156 
68 

318 

3,742 

125 

20,499 

188 

93 

2,254 

160 



Unitad States Department of Justice 
Imnigmtlon and Naturalization Service 



TABLE kk. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY STATES AIJD TERRITORIES OF RiiSIDEIjCE: 
YEARS ajDED JLTS 30. 1%6 TO 1950 (Cont'd.) 



State of residence 



1946 



1947 



1948 



1949 



1950 



OreriOn 

Pennsylvania . , . 
Rhode Island. . . 
South Carolina. 
South Dakota. , , 



Tennessee. 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont . . . 
Virginia. . 



Washington . . . . 
West Virginia. 

Wisconsin 

iVyoming 



Territories, etc. 

Alaska . 

Hawaii 

Puerto Rico. . . . 
Virgin Islands, 
All other 



755 

9,235 

1,450 

92 

189 

116 

2,384 
312 
542 
395 

1,840 
582 

1,827 
122 



97 
514 
115 
144 
312 



730 

4,428 

1,016 

55 

155 

114 
1,532 
147 
355 
261 

1,696 

230 

1,031 

69 



121 
593 

83 

48' 
5,565 1/ 



482 
2,698 

598 
55 
65 

58 
784 
124 
283 
208 

1,445 
168 

7a 

51 



105 

1,442 

95 

19 

77 



301 
2,685 

650 
69 
46 

92 

1,122 

105 

277 

332 

1,345 

166 

726 

46 



87 
1,362 

73 

37 

5 



451 

2,443 

521 

93 

89 

106 
1,353 
125 
232 
413 

1,176 

175 

623 

69 



95 

L,087 

55 

62 

144 



1/ Includes 5,092 residents of ohe Philippine Islands, 



United States Department of Jiistice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 45. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY SPECIFIED COUNTRIES OF FORMER AUBGIANCE 
AND BY RURAL AND URBAN AREA AND CITY 1/: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1950 



Class of place 
and city 



Total 



Germany 



British 
Qpplre 



Country of f onner 



Italy 



allegiance 



Poland 



U.S.S.R, 



Philip- 
plnea 



Other 



Total. 
Rural... 



Urban. 



City total 

Los Angeles, Calif. . . 

Oakland, Calif 

San Diego, Calif 

San J'rancisco, Calif. 

Bridgeport, Conn 

Hartford, Conn 

New Haven, Conn 

Washington, D. C 

Miami, Fla 

Chicago, 111 

New Orleans, La 

Baltimore, Md 

Boston, Mass 

Cambridge, Mass 

Fall River, Mass 

New Bedford, Mass .... 
Springfield, Mass .... 

Worcester, Mass 

Detroit, Mich 

Minneapolis, Minn.... 

St . Louis, Mo 

Jersey City, N. J.... 

Newark, N. J 

Paterson, N. J 

Buffalo, N. Y 

New York, N. Y 

Rochester, N. Y 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Portland, Ore 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Pittsburgh, Pa 

Scranton, Pa 

Providence, R. I 

San Antonio, Tex 

Seattle, Wash 

Milwaukee, Wis 

Other cities 

Outlying territories 

and possessions 

All others. 



66.346 



8,441 
18,939 



2,324 
274 
375 

1,864 
206 
229 
188 
466 
376 

2,465 
155 
280 
640 
200 
179 
185 
127 
176 

2,004 
130 
246 
121 
473 
159 
348 
15,875 
266 
132 
743 
231 
831 
289 
31 
188 
289 
550 
226 

3,654 



1,383 
88 



6.065 



12.829 



8.743 



?.??? 



2.12:^ 



?.2?7 



973 
1,425 
3.658 



97 

6 

10 

60 

16 

7 

8 

32 

7 

382 

4 
48 
16 

8 

3 
2 
3 

79 

10 

37 

7 

51 

7 

33 

2,094 

27 

36 

62 

n 

80 
24 

6 

15 

16 

49 

305 



2,196 
4,514 
6.010 



842 
2,669 

5.218 



399 
84 
87 

277 
29 
55 
18 
78 

121 

261 
32 
54 
98 
49 
52 
41 
54 
32 

324 
20 
30 
14 
60 
27 
50 
2,154 
40 
22 
89 
56 

181 

73 
6 
61 
52 
72 
26 
832 



98 
11 



U9 
19 
37 

143 
53 
56 
91 
24 
16 

266 
20 
23 

161 

27 

5 

2 

24 

27 

219 

3 

42 

36 

132 
60 
53 
2,626 
78 
14 

107 
14 

lU 
47 
4 
39 
9 
17 
21 

443 



10 
A 



303 
819 
2.670 



75 

3 

1 

21 

14 

19 

12 

18 

10 

246 

19 

25 

6 

15 

11 

13 

13 

196 

3 

10 

15 

45 

13 

43 

1,393 

18 

5 
97 

4 
63 
17 

9 
11 

3 

3 

21 
180 



213 
452 

it4?4 



132 

7 
5 

57 
7 
15 
8 
20 
13 
91 

18 

34 
2 
2 
3 
5 
7 

54 
3 

18 
3 

18 

3 

9 

692 

10 

1 
28 

5 
56 

9 

9 

1 

8 

18 

83 



1 
2 



223 

505 
l.Vf6 



84 

33 

98 

606 



21 
6 
29 
18 
5 
6 
3 



U 
2 
2 

4 

1 

214 
1 
1 
2 
8 
38 
1 

4 

3 

134 

107 



1,080 
J. 



1/ Rural - Population of less than 2,500. Urban - Population of 2,500 to 99,999. 



Cities - 100,000 or over. 



2?. 5^7 



3,691 

8,555 

17.0^? 



1,U8 

122 

137 

700 

87 

76 

51 

273 

2Q3 

1,190 

81 

113 
300 
105 
105 
125 

29 

94 
1,118 

89 
107 

46 
163 

48 

160 

6,702 

92 

53 
358 

133 

272 

118 

12 

58 

206 

300 

91 

1,704 



188 

-6L 



United States Department of Justice 
Inmigratlon and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 46. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BT OOOITSI OB RBCION OF BIRTH AND YEAR OF MTRT: 

YEAR mm JUHB JO. 1950 



Country or region 
of birth 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgium , 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia , 

Denisark 

Estonia 

Fiiiland 

France , 

Germany 

(Ehgland... 

l^. . (Scotland.. 
Britain (j^^„ 

Greece , 

Hungary. 

Ireland 

Italy 

LatTia 

Lithuania , 

Netherlands 

Northern Ireland 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia , 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Japan 

Palestine 

Other Asia 

Canada 

Mexico < 

West Indies , 

Central America 

South Amariea 

Africa , 

Australia and New Zeal. 

Philippines 

Other countries , 



NuBber 
natu- 
ral- 
ised. 



66.1it6 



1,261 

659 

59 

1,274 

506 

141 

449 

1,618 

6,508 

4,862 

1,492 

214 

1,516 

908 

1.655 

8,552 

201 

484 

743 

483 

875 

3,986 

1,036 

605 

611 

876 

373 

2,182 

762 

527 

2.?37 



1,012 

176 

24 

88 

1,037 

7,957 

2,292 

2,238 

544 

592 

405 

686 

3,258 

619 



T«ar of entxy 



1950 



ii 



M. 



1940- 
1?4? 



27.587 



18.956 



727 
547 
26 
572 
249 
109 
151 
1,301 
2,637 
3,279 
436 
124J 
556 
329 
319 
2,612 
111 
104 
456 
242 
366 
1,670 
295 
247 
209 
173 
149 
495 
250 
215 

921 



429 

106 

15 

a 

330 

3,561 
379 

1,136 
406 
337 
338 
623 
582 



1930- 
1221. 



6.186 



4.360 



140 
18 
6 

147 
37 
12 
49 
82 

927 

249 

184 
13 

204 
68 

200 

1,088 

13 

a 

51 
38 
55 
238 
62 
54 
74 
39 
34 
85 
83 
69 

184 



74 

8 

2 

21 

79 

710 

132 

174 

29 

33 

18 

14 

497 

-2i 



1920- 
1929 



1910-^ 



16.634 



10.^92 



137 

48 

10 

183 

116 

10 

83 

129 

2,476 

039 

710 

48 

276 

112 

760 

1,922 

28 

35 

131 

135 

227 

491 

211 

135 

179 

329 

114 

343 

132 

143 



280 

29 

5 

17 

213 

2,?36 
940 

556 

67 

120 

25 

15 

1,553 

86 



Lm 



6.40: 



16 



12i 
22 

12 
191 

58 

5 

103 

50 
206 
258 
103 

15 

343 

207 

164 

1,684 

18 
174 

61 

32 
108 
880 
289 

78 
114 
162 

39 
649 
179 

73 



US 

164 

25 

1 

5 

253 

676 

678 

282 

24 

60 

11 

15 

210 

28 



1900- 
1909 



1^168 



iui2i 



102 

16 

5 

U5 

35 

4 

59 

39 

148 

147 

42 

11 

126 

179 

145 

1,114 

28 

123 

27 

21 

92 

640 

152 

84 

29 

130 

23 

539 

99 

25 

179 



32 
3 

1 

3 
UO 

408 

109 

55 

4 

21 

7 

4 

36 

16 



1890- 
1899 



780 



521 



15 
5 

21 
5 

4 
5 

46 

44 

7 

6 

11 

43 

111 

2 

5 

5 

11 

11 

48 

18 

5 

1 

30 
5 

56 
1 



JL 



10 

1 



13 

175 

U 

7 

2 

2 

1 

2 

19 

13 



1880- 
1889 



420 



ML 



7 
3 

1 

2 

54 

33 

9 

3 

4 

1 

22 

17 

1 

2 

8 

4 

11 

18 

6 

2 

10 
8 

11 
3 



1870- 
1822_ 



J2. 



ZL 



1 
3 



2 
8 
4 



103 

15 

8 

1 
1 
1 
1 
32 
9 



3 

1 



1 
1 



1860- 
1,861 



18 
4 

1 

1 
1 



19 



11 



1 

3 
2 

1 



1 
4 



United States Department of Justice 
lamlKratlon and Naturalisation Service 



Il 



TABLE 464. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH AND COUNTRY 
OF FORMER ALLEGIANCE ; YEAR MDED JUNE 30. 1950 



Covmtry or region 
of birth 



All countries. 



Europe 

Austria 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

(England.. 

Great (Scotland. 

Britain (Wales.... 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Northern Ireland. . . . 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden. 

Switzerland 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia , 

Other Europe 



g 



o 
o 



Asia 

China 

India. . . . . . 

Japan 

Palestine.. 
Other Asia. 



Canada , 

Kexico , 

West Indies , 

Central America , 

South America , 

Africa , 

Australia & New Zealand 

Philippines 

Other countries , 



66.346 



45.a8 



1,261 

659 

59 

1,274 

506 

141 

449 

1,618 

6,508 

4,862 

1,492 

214 

1,516 

908 

1,655 

8,552 

201 

484 

743 

483 

875 

3,986 

1,036 

605 

611 

876 

373 

2,182 

762 

527 

2.337 



?0,8?8 



^.158 



1,012 
176 

24 

88 

1,037 

7,957 
2,292 
2,238 

544 
592 
405 
686 
3,258 
__612 



1,203 

650 

54 

1,231 

498 

135 

435 

1,601 

6,187 

4,798 

1,478 

210 

1,510 

868 

1,652 

8,521 

189 

464 

733 

478 

869 

3,744 

1,034 

557 

593 

867 

366 

1,985 

743 

505 

8?4 



Country of former allegiance 



•H 

-p 

0) 

A. 



1.192 



1.1?2 



130 

121 

U 

15 

574 

2,716 

9 

1,484 

50 

146 

318 

684 

18 

401 



1,044 

1 

24 



28 

1 



H 
0) 



6^ 



650 



4 
602 



jC a> 
•H i* 



12.829 



7.422 



26 
2 
2 



35 

1 

20 



17 
3 
2 

1 



8 
10 

1 
7 
5 
1 
3 
9 

34 

4,766 

1,464 

209 

n 

8 

253 
10 

1 

3 
433 

1 
46 

8 
4 
9 

8 
43 

5 
62 

266 



I 
o 

m 
o Rt 

■g:d 

0) cd 
o 



1.276 



1,268 



32 
119 
10 
14 
91 

2,685 

1 

1,426 

38 

72 

75 

683 

7 

1^ 



33 



1,161 

1 



1 
17 

1 



18 



ill 



i02. 



1 
1 

1 

483 

1 
1 
6 
2 



,&- 



Ji21 



1.867 



428 



IaMl 



1 
423 



Q) 
O 






1 

1,506 
26 
5 



2 

1 

1 

16 

1 
1 
1 

15 

9 
2 

10 
13 

6 

22 



8 



14 

3 

1 

30 

2 

172 



21 



6.065 



6.031 



19 
5 

14 

1 

1 

14 

5,871 

2 

3 



3 
1 
7 
2 
3 
3 
1 
1 
38 
1 
4 

2 
11 
10 

1 
13 



10 

7 



1 
11 



« 

o 



1.667 



1.579 



1 
2 



1 
5 
4 

1 

1,477 
7 



1 
1 
5 

1 



4 

4 

65 

61 



61 

3 
3 

1 

1 

1 

17 

1 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 46a. persons NATURALIZED, BT COUNTRY OR RROION OF BIRTH AND COUNTRY 
OF FORMER ALLEGIANCE: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1950 (ContM) 












Country of former 


alleslanc* 






Country or region 
of birth 




1 


.3 


—n — 

1 

0) 





s 

CI 


t 


(3l, 


1 

a 
i 


t 


8 

1 


t 


• 

PS 

• 

• 

to 

• 



All countries 


1.451 


8.743 


1^2 


872 


87? 


?i7?? 


1.066 


?23 


614 


87? 


m 


2.122 


Europe 


1.446 


8.552 


47? 


77? 


873 


?i77? 


1.031 


?22 


?8? 


867 


?62 


1.849 


Austria 


1 
1 
2 
3 

1,394 

43 

1 

1 
1 


11 
2 

1 
2 

1 
23 
13 

1 

7 
2 

8,455 

1 
2 

3 
2 
2 
2 

2 
4 
8 
8 


4 

1 
1 

3 
452 

1 

4 

13 

1 


3 
4 

1 

30 
6 

1 

1 

713 

3 
8 

2 

1 

8 


1 

2 
2 

1 

860 
4 

2 

I 
4 


31 
13 

6 

1 

12 

87 

2 

1 
1 
1 
4 
5 
3 
2 

3,544 

1 

1 
52 

6 
5 


1 
1 

1,026 

2 

1 
10 


7 

1 

1 

3 

10 

1 

3 
484 

1 
9 
2 

1 


1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

581 

1 

1 
1 


1 
1 

3 

4 

1 

3 

1 
1 
1 
ft/,ft 
2 

1 
2 


3 

7 
23 

1 
1 

3 

2 

319 
2 

1 

3 


2 


Belgium 

Bulgaria 


1 
2 


Czechoslovakia 

nenmark 




Estonia 

Finland 


- 


France 


3 


Germany 

(England... 
Great (Scotland.. 

Britain (v^g^es 

Greece 


6 

1 
1 


Hungary 

Ireland 


- 


Italy 

Latvia 


4 
2 


Netherlands 


1 


Nomay '. 


16 


Portugal 

Ruaani A 


1 
2 


Spain 

Sweden 


1 
2 


Switzerland 

Yiigoslavia 


1,801 

3 
267 


China 


1 
4 


5 
1 
1 
2 
30 
29 

2 

121 


1 

1 
1 


2 

6 

1 

23 
22 

2 
43 


2 

2 
2 


5 

2 

1 
1 

2 

? 


7 

1 

1 
1 

1 

7 

1 

1 
1? 


1 


1 
1 

1 
4 
2 
7 

5 


2 

1 

9 


2 

1 
1 

6 

1 


50 






Japan 

Other Asia 


2 
215 


Canada. ....••••. 




Mexico .•••...... 


_ 


West Indies 


^ 


Central America 

South America. ......... 


1 






A\istralia & New Zealand 
Other countries 


V 

? 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 46A. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BT OOUN" 
OF FORMER ALLEGIANCE: lEAR £» 


rRI OR REGION OF BIRTH AND COUNTRY 
m> JUNE 30. 1950 (Cont'd) 








Coont 


rr of fomar allesiance 


Country or region 
of birth 


1 

(0 

1 


« p 

•c a 


« 

< 


1 


ft 


1 


1 


5 

1 


•as 

55 





8 

•H 


n 
« 

1 


a 

CQ 

a> 

■P 


S8 


r 

All countries 


770 


?1? 


i-t?45 


90? 


642 


5,882 


2,32? 


838 


502 


470 


86 


2t257 


586 


1? 


Europe 


760 


737 


77 


9 


68 


496 


27 


81 


i;i 


20 


2 


? 


?42 




Austria 


23 

1 
3 

1 

1 
1 
6 

4 

1 
1 

1 

4 

712 

1 

7 


1 

1 

50 

2 
126 

1 

3 

17 

1 

9 

1 

3 
174 

3 

1 
14 

330 
178 


1 
1 

3 

19 
3 

1 

3 
1 
2 

1 

15 

4 

1 

1 
11 

4 

1.407 


1 

3 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 
866 


1 

19 
2 

1 

2 
1 
2 

14 

4 

1 

1 
10 

4 
541 


I 

23 

4 

13 
1 

10 

57 

14 
4 
3 

20 
3 

19 
6 

10 

9 

4 

6 

128 

24 

8 
6 

93 

13 

3 

17 


1 
2 

1 

2 
3 

6 

1 
5 

3 

3 

1 


1 
3 

3 
2 

1 

2 

2 

34 

3 
10 

1 

12 

7 
9 


1 
2 

1 

2 

3 

1 

1 

3 


2 
6 

3 

4 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 

6 


2 

1 

3 


1 

1 
1 

7 


42 

1 

3 
16 

t 

1 

5 

281 

1 

1 
19 

2 
5 
3 

1 

51 

1 
15 

1 

75 
5 
3 


. 


Bel giun 


. 


Bulgaria 


_ 


Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 


- 


Estonia 


_ 


Finland 


_ 


France. , 


. 


Germany. ....... t . 1 1 . ■ 


. 


(aigland.. .. 
Great (Scotland. . . 

Britain (Wales 

Greece 


- 


HiirnrarTT 


„ 


Ireland 


- 


Latvia 


„ 




«. 


Netherlands 

Northern Ireland 

Norway 

Poland 


- 


Portugal 

Rumania 


- 


Soain 


_ 


Sweden 

Switzerland 


- 


Yugoslavia 


- 


Other Europe 


_ 




, 


China 


2 

5 

1 
1 

1 


3 

175 

1 

1 
1 

1 


657 

54 

7 

66 

423 

6 
1 
2 
4 
3 
4 
2 
3 
36 


854 

2 

10 
6 

1 

1 

2 

18 


3 

54 

5 

66 

413 

1 
1 
4 
3 
4 
1 
1 
18 


2 

1 
1 

13 

5,222 

1 
5 
1 
1 
2 


1 

7 

2,277 

7 


1 

8 

5 

3 

734 

1 

1 


2 

1 

3 
482 

3 


2 
4 

3 
437 

4 


1 
2 

1 

4 

74 

1 


1 
1 
5 

1 
5 

3,236 


21 

1 
1 
7 

1 

1 
3 

1 
8 


- 


Japan 


- 


Palestine. ........... 


. 


Other Asia 


_ 


Canada 


_ 


Mexico 


- 


West Indies ............ 


_ 


South America 


- 




- 


Australia & New Zealand 


- 


Other countries 


127 


4 


4 


- 


1? 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 47. PERSONS NATURALISED, BY STATUTORY 

Fr.C 713 IONS FOR NATURAIIZATION: 
Yi:-".ico EimDED JUNE 30. 1946 TO 1950 



Statutory provisions 



1946 



1947 



1948 



1949 



1950 



Total naturalized 

Nationality Act of 1940 

General provisions 

Sees. 310(a) (b), jH, and 312 - persons married 
to U , S . citizens 

Sees. 315, 316 - Children, including adopted 

children, of U. S. citizen parents 

Sec. 317(a) - Women who lost U, 3, citizenship 

through marriage 

SeCo 317(c) - Dual U. S. nationals expatriated 

by entering or serving in armed forces of a 

foreign state 

Sec. 3I8 (a) - Former U. S. citizens expatriated 

through expatriation of parents 

Sec. 319(a) - Persons who lost citizenship 

through cancellation of parents' 

naturalization 

Sec. 320 - Persons misinformed prior to Ji£Ly 1, 

1920, regarding citizenship status 

Sec. 32IA - Filipino persons whose continuous 

residence in the U. S. commenced prior to 

May 1, 1934 1/ 

Sec 322 - Noncitizen natives of Puerto Rico - 

declaration of allegiance , , 

Sec. 324 - Persons v;ho served in U . S. armed 

forces for three years 

Sec. 324A - Persons who served in U. S. armed 

forces in World War I or World War II or were 

honorably discharged 2/ 

Sec. 325 - Persons who served on certain U. S. 

vessels 

Sec. 701 - Persons naturalized while serving in 

the U. S. armed forces in World War II 

Sec. 701 - Persons honorably discharged from 

U. S. armed forces following service in World 

War II. 

Sec. 702 - Persons serving in U. S. armed forces 

outside of the U. S. in World War II 

let of July 2, 1940 

Persons who entered the United States while 
under I6 years of age 

)ther, 

[7 Act of July 2, 1946 
2/ Act of June 1, 194B 
3/ Sections 701 and 702 are no longer operative. 

still pending on June 1, 1948, were determined 

Nationality Act of 1940 



150.062 



93,346 
40,190 

118 
414 

8 
13 

63 



11 
39 

246 
7,391 

5,768 
2,054 

401 



93.904 



70.150 



66. 594 



66.346 



46,339 
27, 066 

245 
316 

22 
6 

2 
31 



83 



241 
1,105 

9,987 
5,370 

436 



34,347 

28,898 

419 

296 



29 

12 

1 

26 



2,655 4,200 



15 
98 



418 
90 

980 



316 
5 



24,566 

35,131 

448 

243 

91 

10 

4 
21 

2,675 

11 

450 

2,006 
622 

2/ 

1/ 
2/ 



315 
1 



19,403 



40, 684 



499 
243 

136 
8 

3 
33 

1,843 

5 

343 

1,724 
1,164 
2/ 

2/ 
2/ 

256 
2 



Petitions filed under Sec. 701, which vrere 
in accordance with Sec. 324A of the 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



I 



TABIZ kS. WRITS OF HAEBAS CORPUS ZH PCUBOTI AND DBPOBIAIIGM CA2ES: 

IBABS BIDED JOB 30, 1%1 to 1950 



Action taken 



1%1- 
1950 



i9ia 



19U2 



1943 



1%1* 



1945 



1946 



1947 



1948 



1949 



1950 



Total Writs of 
Habeag Corpvte 

Disposed of<>o«.oooo*o<> 
Sustained ooaooooooco 

Dismissed 

Withdrawn ........... 



2,?0? 



Pending end of year... 



Ihyolving Exclusion 

Disposed of......... 

Sustained. ........ 

Dismissed ......... 

ivx vMurawn ... ...... 



128 
1,956 
825 



118 



J^ 



Pending end of year. 



Involving Deportation 



Disposed of 

Sustained. ........ 

Dismissed. ........ 

KLthdrawn ..••...«• 



■ 0..000000 



43 
273 
165 

21 



2.428 



Pending end of year. 



85 
1,683 
660 



97 



542 



222 



12 
483 
47 

113 



138 



7 
96 
35 

29 



ML 



23 

158 

41 

25 



JO 



Jl 



1 
62 
34 

27 



10 



M. 



2 

46 
36 

20 



-21 



3 
55 
35 

16 



_M_ 




206 



156 



9 
30 
11 



160 



M. 



172 



5 
387 
12 

84 



14 

128 

30 

23 



-81 



78 



56 
31 

25 



1 
43 
34 

18 



_8I 



1 
52 
34 

15 



4 

1 

_25i 



19 
39 

15 



380 



3 
26 

19 

12 



258 



9 
129 
121 

205 



9 
259 
112 

lU 



U9 
83 

148 



144 



118 



^?i 96 



T 

38 

15 

16 



Jt^ 



3 
359 
90 

128 



8 

48 
40 

21 



251 



17 
121 

113 

97 



Uhited States Department of Justice 
iBBigratlan and Naturalization Service 



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