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Full text of "Annual report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service"

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UNITED STATES 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Immigration and Naturalization Service 
Washington , D. C. 




FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 

1951 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

IMMIGRATION and NATURALIZATION SERVICE 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

WASHINGTON , D. C. 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 195 1 




A. R: MACKEY 
COMMISSIONER 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

Immigration and Naturalization Service 

Washington 25; D. C. 



Report of the Commissioner 
of Immigration and Naturalization 



The Attorney General 

United States Department of Justice 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the Annual Report of the 
Immigration and Naturalization Service for the year ending 
June 30i 1951. The outstanding accomplishments of the 
Service during the year have been set forth in text and 
tables as well as some of the more pressing problems. 

The report was prepared by Mrs . Helen Eckerson^ Chief of 
the Statistics Unit of our Division of Research^ Education 
and Information. 



Respectfully submitted, 




Commissioner 



Immigration and Natviralizat ion Service 
December 1, 1951 



Page 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Chapter I Introduction 

Chapter 2 Legislation and Litigation 

Public laws 5 

Private bills introduced and enacted 6 

P rosecut i ons and I i t i gat i ons , 7 

Writs of Habeas Corpus , 10 



Chapter 3 Immigration and Emigrat 



ion 



Land border entries , 14 

Crewmen 15 

I mm i g rants , 16 

Nonimmigrants. . . 23 

Exercise of Ninth Proviso 26 

Agricultural laborers admitted 27 

Canad i an vwoodsmen . . , . ,......, 28 

Petitions for immigration visas and reentry permits.......... 28 

Ern i g rant s and nonemig rant s 30 

Chapter 4 Adjustment of Status 

Suspension of deportation. . , 33 

Displaced persons residing in United States 34 

P reexam i nat i on 36 

Exerc i se of the Seventh Prov i so. 36 

Reg I St ry 37 

Chapter 5 Enforcement 

Border Patrol 40 

I nvesti gat ions. ,. 43 

Alien parole.... 48 

Detent ions. . ., 50 

Deportations and voluntary departures.. 57 

Exclusions. 64 

Chapter 6 Natural ization 

Declarations of intention.... 69 

Pet i t i ons f i I ed 69 

Pet i t i ons g ranted 69 

Petitions denied 72 

Natural i zat ions revoked 72 

Loss of nat ional ity 73 

Special certificates of natural ization 74 

Citizenship acquired by resumption or repatfiation 74 

Derivative cit i zenshi p 75 

Citi zenshi p education. , 75 



Page 



Chapter 7 Research, Statistics and Infoi-mation 



Digest and manuals 81 

Regulations and instructions 82 

General research 82 

Information. 82 

Statistics 83 

Chapters Administration 

Pe rsonne I 85 

F i nance 88 

Buctget. •■ 92 

Management i mp rovement ... 93 

Space, se rv i ces and supp i i es. 96 

Mail and f i les ..... 97 



APPENDIX 

Table I, Immigration to the United States; 1820 - 1951 

Table 2 Aliens and citizens admitted and departed, by months: 

Years ended June 30, 1950 and 1951 
Table 5, Aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration laws; 

Years ended June 30, 1947 - 1951 
Table 4„ Immigration by country, for decades: 1820 to 1951 

Table 5. Immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens departed 

by port or district. Years ended June 30, 1947 to 1951 
Table 6 Immigrant aliens admitted, by classes under the immi- 

gration laws and country or region of birth: Year ended June 30, 

1951 
Table 6A Immigrant aliens admitted, by classes under immigration 

laws and country of last permanent residence; Year ended June 30, 

1951 
Table 68,, Immigrant aliens admitted to the United States under the 

Displaced Persons Act of 1948, as amended, by classes and country 

or region of birth: June 25, 1948 to June 30, 1951 
Table 6C, Displaced persons and other immigrant aliens admitted to 

the United States, by count y or region of birth. Year ended June 30, 

1951 
Table 7. Annual quotas and quota immigrants admitted: Years ended 

June 30, 1947 to i95i 
Table 8 Immigrant aliens admitted, by major occupation group and 

country or region of birth: Year ended June 30, 1951 
Table 9,. Immigrant aliens admitted by country or region of birth, 

sex and age: Year ended June 30, 1951 
Table 10. Immigrant aliens admitted by race, sex and age: Year 

ended June 30, 1951 
Table lOA Immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens departed, 

by sex, age, i I 1 iteracy, and major occupation group: Years ended 

June 30, 1947 to 1951 
Table lOB Immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens departed, 

by country or region of birth, sex and marital status: Year ended 

June 30, 1951 
Table II. Aliens and citizens admitted and departed, aliens excluded: 

Years ended June 30, 1908 to 195 i 
Table 12. Immigrant al .ens admitted and emigrant a'iens departed, by 

State of intended future or last permanent residence: Years ended 

June 30, 1947 to 1951 
Table I2A. Displaced persons and other immigrant aliens admitted to 

the United States by rural and urban area and city: Year ended 

June 30, 1951 
Table 128. Immigrant aliens admitted to the United States, by rural 

and urban area and city: Years ended June 30, 1947 to 1951 
Table(_J>f'^ Immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens departed, 

by country of last or intended future permanent residence: Years 

ended June 30, 1947 to 195 1 
Table I3A Irmiigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens departed 

by race or people: Years ended June 30, 1947 to 1951 
Table 14. Emigrant aliens departed by race, sex and age: Year ended 

June 30, 1951 



APPENDIX (Cont'd) 

Table I4A Emigrant aliens departed^ by major occupation group and 
country or region of birth: Year ended June 30, 1951 

Table 15, Emigrant aliens departed, by country or region or birth, 
sex, and age: Year ended June 30, 1951 

Table 16. Nonimmigrant aliens admitted, by classes under the immi- 
gration laws and country or region of birth: Year ended June 30, 
1951 

Table 17. Nonimmigrant aliens admitted, by classes under the immi- 
gration laws and country or region of last permanent residence: 
Year ended June 30, 195 i 

Table 18. Nonimmigrant aliens admitted and nonemigrant aliens de- 
parted, by country of last or intenc^ed future permanent residence: 
Years ended June 30, 1947 to 1951 

Table 19. Nonimmigrant aliens admitted as temporary visitors, 
transits, students, or t realty traders in the United States, by 
district: On June 30, 1950 and 1951 

Table 20. Al i ens. .excluded from the..United States, by cause: Years 
ended June 30, 1942 to 1951 

Table 2L A liens excluded from the United States, by cause and 
country of birth: Year ended June 30, 1951 

Table 21A. Aliens excluded from the United States, by race or people: 
Years ended June 30, 1942 to 1951 

Table 22. Alien crewnen deserted from vessels arrived at American 
seaports, by nationality and flag of vessel: Year ended June 30, 
1951 

Table 23. Vessels and airplanes inspected, crewmen examined and 
stowaways found on arriving vessels, by districts: Years ended 
June 30, 1950 and 1951 

Table 24, Al iens deported, by cause and country to which deported: 
Year ended June 30, 1951 

Table 24A. Aliens deported and aliens departing voluntarily under 
proceedings: Years ended June 30, 1892 to 1951 

Table 25. Inward movement of aliens and citizens over international 
land boundaries by State and port: Year ended June 30, 1951 

Table 25A. Inward movement by air of aliens and citizens over interna- 
tional land boundaries by State and port; Year ended June 30, 1951 

Table 26. Purpose for which alien and citizen commuters cross the 
international land boundaries, by port: Year ended June 30, 1951 

Table 26A. Aliens and citizens possessing border crossing cards who 
crossed the international land boundaries, by classes and ports: 
Year ended June 30, 1951 

Table 27. Miscellaneous transactions at land border ports, by 
districts. Year ended June 30, 1951 

Table 28, Inward movement of aliens and citizens over international 
land boundaries: Years ended June 30, 1947 to 1951 

Table 29. Principal activities and accomplishments of Immigration 
Border Patrol , by districts: Year ended June 50, 1951 

Table 30. Passenger travel between the United States and foreign 
countries by port of arrival or departure: Year ended June 30, 1951 



APPENDIX (Cont'd) 

Table 30A Passenger travel by air and by sea between Puerto Rico 
and continental United States (Mainland) and Virgin Islands: Years 
ended June 30, 1943 to 1951 

Passenger travel by air and by sea between Hawaii and continental 
United States (Mainland) and i nsul ar or out ly ing possessions: Years 
ended June 30, 194-3 to 1951 

Table 30B, Passenger travel between the United States and foreign 
countries by class of travel, nationality of carrier, and ports: 
Year ended June 30, 1951 

Table 3 1. Passenge r travel to the United States from foreign 
countries, by country of embarkation: Year ended June 30, 1951 

Table 32, Passenger travel from the United States to foreign 
countries, by country of debarkation: Year ended June 30, 195 1 

Table 33, Alien passengers arrived in the United States from 
foreign countries, by port of arrival and country of embarkation: 
Year ended June 30, 1951 

Table 34. Alien passengers departed from the United States to 
foreign countries, by port of departure and country of debarka- 
tion: Year ended June 30, 1951 

Table 35. Citizen passengers arrived in the United States from 
foreign countries, by port of arrival and country of embarkation: 
Year ended June 30, 1951 

Table 36. Citizen passengers departed from the United States to 
foreign countries, by port of departure and country of debarka- 
tion: Year ended June 30, 1951 

Table 37. Declarations of intention filed, petitions for naturali- 
zation filed and persons naturalized: Years ended June 30, 1907 to 
1951 

Table 38. Persons naturalized, by classes under the nationality laws 
and country or region of former allegiance: Year ended June 30, 1951 

Table 39. Persons naturalized by country or region of former allegi- 
ance: Years ended June 30, 1942 to 1951 

Table 40. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former alle- 
giance and major occupation group: Year ended June 30, 1951 

Table 41. Petitions for naturalization denied, by reasons for denial: 
Year ended June 30, 1947 to 1951 

Table 42. Persons naturalized, by sex and marital status with com- 
parative percent of total. Years ended June 30, 1943 to 1951 

Table 43. Persons naturalized, by sex and age. Years ended June 30, 
1943 to 1951 

Table 44, Persons naturalized, by States and terntor i es of resi- 
dence: Years ended June 30, 1947 to (951 

Table 4^, Persons naturalized, by specified countries of former 
allegiance and by rural and urban area and city: Year ended June 30, 
1951 

Table 46 Persons naturalized, by country or region of birth and 

year of entry: Year ended June 30, 1951 

Table 46A. Persons naturalized, by country or region of birth and 
country or region of former allegiance: Year ended June 30, 1951 



APPENDIX (Cont'd) 

Table 47. Persons naturalized, by statutory provisions for naturali- 
zation: Years ended June 30, 1947 to 1951 

Table 48. Writs of Habeas Corpus in exclusion and deportation cases: 
Years ended June 30, 1942 to 1951 

Table 49. Prosecutions for immigration and nationality violations: 
Years ended June 30, 1942 to 1951 



CHAPTER 



1 




Introduction 



This report presents some of the accomplishments and problems 
of the Immigration and Naturalization Service for the fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1951. Among the more important functions of the 
Service are the examination of aliens to determine their admissibil- 
ity under immigration laws, the investigation, apprehension, detention, 
and deportation of aliens in the United States illegally, the prevention 
of illegal entry, the registration of aliens, and the examination of 
applicants who seek to become citizens through naturalization. 

This agency, whose responsibilities relate so completely to human 
beings who are also aliens, is of course sensitive to the internation- 
al tensions that exist. Possibly the major emphasis that marked the 
year was national security. This emphasis was crystallized by the 
Internal Security Act of September 23, 1950, which, by amendmentto 
existing immigration and nationality laws, pervaded almost every 
activity of the Service. 

The Act made membership per se in communist or totalitarian 
organizations, and participation in their programs, cause for exclu- 
sion, deportation, or denial of naturalization. The definition of 
membership was later modified when the law appeared to necessitate 
undue harshness in the case of aliens whose membership was of a 
purely involuntary nature. It stiffened parole controls and re- 
quired a yearly address report from resident aliens. In the field 
of naturalization, it made reading and writing, as well as the ability 
to speak English, and a knowledge of the history of this country as 
well as of its Government and Constitution, prerequisite to naturali- 
zation. 

The Internal Security Act for the first time recognized the 
inconsistency existing between the provisions of the imnigration laws 
directing the deportation of aliens amenable thereto and theprovi- 
sions in the naturalization laws which permitted the naturalization 



of such aliens The law now prohibits the naturalization of depor- 
table aliens and additionally precludes an alien against whom 
deportation proceedings are pending from having a hearing upon the 
petition until the deportation proceedings have been completed. 

Almost simultaneously with the passage of the Internal Security 
Act came other legislation which, while not nearly so far reaching 
in importance, was nevertheless a factor which created administrative, 
adjudicative, and enforcement problems. It will be recalled that on 
February 20, 1950,, the Supreme Court held that administrative hearings 
in deportation cases must conform to the requirements of the Adminis- 
trative Procedure Act, If resulting orders are to have validity,. On 
September 27, 1950, Congress, by law, removed exclusion and expulsion 
proceedings from the pertinent provisions of the Administrative Pro- 
cedure Act. This necessitated an about face in terms of conduct of 
hearings, appointment of hearing officers, and necessity for rehear- 
ings. These readjustments, however, have in the main been concluded, 
and procedures were functioning smoothly at the end of the report year. 

Not new, but \/ery prevalent, were other important factors that 
dominated the year's work- 

Aliens who attempt surrept 't ious entry into the United States 
either as stowaways or as smuggled aliens are a vexing and constantly 
growing problem-. New impetus was given to this unwelcome traffic by 
adverse conditions abroad, by the presence of many European and 
Oriental nationals in nearby countries, and by the higher prices paid 
to smugglers Last year 497 stowaways were detected and excluded at 
ports of entry and 479 aliens were apprehended in the United States 
who had entered as stowaways or as smuggled al i ens In these cases 
as in all other cases of illegal entry, the chief deterrent is swift 
and vigorous legal action, 

The expulsion of aliens reached phenomenal numbers last year 
Of the 686,7 13 aliens required to depart from the United States last 
year, 13,544 were deported, and 14, 176 were permitted to depart at 
their own expense after warrants of arrest were issued. During the 
past year 2,363 aiiens were investigated to determine whether they 
were deportable as subversive aliens. 

The problem of Mexican illegal aliens who come into the United 
States IS still with us. The President's Commission on Migratory 
Labor found that wherever there were numbers of illegal aliens em- 
ployed, wages were depressed and housing conditions were substandard. 
Last year there were 112,000 Mexican farm laborers legally employed. 
During the same period 510,000 aliens illegally in the United States 
were arrested by the Border Patrol When the ratio of legal workers 
to arrested aliens is I to 5, it is evident that the whole spirit of 
immigration , aw is being defeated. These illegal entrants are not 
inspected as to political ideologies, health, literacy, or past 
criminal record. They are making a mockery of the contract labor 



provision of the : mm i g rat i on laws which a-e designed to protect the 
American workers After the end of the fiscal year, Pub I ic Law 78 , 
approved Juiy 12, i95l, reluctantly was signed by the President, 
Subsequently agreements were reached by the governments of K4exico 
and the United States Whie this law establishes standards as to 
wages and working conditions for legally contracted aliens, it fails 
to get at the root of the prob:em, which is the i i legal or wetback 
worker, and on this account it leaves much to be desired 

The Mexican ; ; ,egai entrants by their very voiume create easy 
access for non-Mexicans During the f;scai year 20' non-Mexican 
aliens were apprehended after illegally crossing the Mexican border 
It is not known, of course how many have escaped apprehension The 
danger in such conditions is beyond estimate during these times when 
alien forces of political and social evil are in violent struggle 
with the principies upon which ou-' Government is established 

A few years ago wetback aborers were found only on farms within 
a few hundred m es of the Mexican border Now, however, they are 
apprehended n our ^a-ge industrial centers of the North^ n factories 
as well as in the surround ng rural a:'eas The prob'em is not one of 
more laws for exc:us;ons of ai :ens, but rather of need for more en- 
forcement. Some beg.nnings have been made in meeting the problem 
Last year the Immigration and Natura: i zat ion Service, for a brief 
period, was abie to transport i i legal Mexcan a.iens by air to p.aces 
near their homes in centra^ Mexico Th i s had a salutary effect in 
slowing down the number of apprehended ai lens, since it made returns 
to the United States border more d ff:cult for the alien. This could 
be continued for only a short t me because of ;ack of funds.. 

Effective i aw enfccement '-equ'^-es that auens who succeed 
in entering the United States illegal. y be apprehended prompty,that 
they be expelled qu ck-y, and that smugglers and other flagrant vio- 
lators be prosecuted vigo?'ously as a deterrent to such criminal 
activity Such an enforcement program requires additional investi- 
gators, examiners,, and other" personnel 

In addition, the enactment of egisiation relating to the smug- 
gling, harboring, concealing, and shielding f.'om detention of aliens 
i i legal iy in the United States w: I i be a long step forwa-d ;n the 
e nf o rcement of our i mm i g rat i on , aws 

While the officers of the Service, border patroimen, .mmigrant 
inspectors, natural 1 zat ion examiners invest : gators, security officers, 
and all of us laid much stress upon the hard facts of enforcement, we 
have by no means been unmindful that ours is a service to render to 
law-abiding and deserving peopie wth fairness and cons .derat ion 
There were 96 mi i : ion entries last yean at our land and sea ports 

Two hundred five thousand seven hundred seventeen immigrants 
met our complicated requ.rements and found a home in the United States 



_ 4 - 

Ninety-six thousand, five hundred fifteen were displaced person.?, 
whose years of hardship and wandering came to a close when they found 
a haven in the United States, Many cases of possible adjustment of 
status were considered and decided in favor of deserving aliens by 
suspension of deportat.on or other discretionary measures. 

Largely because of the new requirements for naturalization, there 
was a substantial decrease m the number of persons naturalized; but 
54,7 16 war brides and others were guided to their goal of naturali- 
zation, and 125.262 made applications to file declarations of intention, 
through the good offices of this Service The basic purpose of the 
Citizenship Education Program is to build for good citizenship among 
our naturalized citizens To this end the public schools were 
regularly informed of aliens who were possible students for adult edu- 
cation; and citizenship textbool<s were furnished the classes 

The pages that fol iow record the year s work, our accorr.pi ishments, 
our adjustments to new leg I si at ion; and our improved efficiency through 
better administrative pract'ces 




CHAPTER 



Legislation 

AND 

Litigation 



The major legislative project of the fiscal year was continu- 
ance of work begun early in 1950 on omni bus bills having for thei r 
purpose the recodification, and in many particulars the revision of 
existing laws relating to irmiigration, naturalization and national ity. 
The first such bill S. 5455 was introduced in the 8 1st Congress on 
April 20, 1950. The second and third bills S. 7 16 and S. 2055 were 
introduced in the 82nd Congress on January 29, 1951 and August 27, 
1951 respectively. The Service, through the Office of General Counsel, 
and the Department, continued active cooperation with those engaged 
in Congressional Committee work on this omnibus legislation. An 
attorney from the General Counsel's office worked virtually full time 
with Congressional Committee staff members. He assists in drafting 
revisions, preparing reports, and performing other tasks in which the 
experience of the Service is of value. 

There were flurries of legislative activity upon various other 
pub I i c me as u res not enacted by the end of the fiscal year. Some 
general legislation dealing with various phases of immigration and 
naturalization possibly was deferred because the general omni'bus 
bill is looked upon as likely to make some separate public enact- 
ments unnecessary, or to provide a general legislative measure that 
can be amended to attain legislative aims, without the necessity of 
independent legislation. 

During the fiscal year 2, 108 legislative reports expressing the 
view of the Service on both publ ic and private bills were drafted or 
approved. This may be compared with 1,963 such reports prepared dur- 
ing the previous fiscal year. In addition 56 items of proposed legis- 
lation were drafted as compared with 38 the previous year. 

Pub 1 ic laws . — Of the publ i c I aws enacted during the year 
relating to Service functions, perhaps the most important was the 
Internal Security Act of 1950 ( Pub I ic Law 85 1 . 8 1st Congress, 



- 6 - 

-•I 
effective September 23, 1950). No legislation in recent years has 
had greater impact on Service functions. Some provision of the 
statute affects almost e'^ery Service activity. The purpose of the 
Act is to protect the United States from certain un-American and 
subversive activities. The law requires, in part, that communist 
organizations be registered, it amends immigration and nationality 
laws by refining, clarifying, and augmenting the classes of persons 
to be considered as risks to internal security; it strengthens the 
administration and enforcement work of the Service in these fields; 
and requires of each resident alien an annual recurring report of his 
address. 

Another noteworthy legislative development was Pubi ic Law 845. 
(8 1st Congress, enacted September 27, 1950), which exempted the 
conduct of deportation proceedings from the Sections 5, 7, and 8 
of the Administrative Procedure Act. From February 20, 1950, the 
date of the Supreme Court decision in the case of Wong Yang Sung v. 
McGrath . until September 27, 1950, the Service conducted hearings 
with the full formalities required by the Administrative Procedure 
Act. New regulations and policies, drafted on the basis of Pub I i c 
Law 845 , aim at a concise hearing that gets to the root of the 
problem in determining alienage, deportabi I ity, and eligibility for 
discretionary relief. At the same time, all the rights of the alien 
to a fair hearing are safeguarded. 

Other publ ic I aws relating to work of the Service enacted dur- 
ing the year included the Act of August 19, 1950, ( Publ i c Law 7 17 , 
81st Congress, 2nd Session) to permit the admission of racially in- 
admissable alien spouses and minor children of citizen members of 
the United States armed forces; Act of March 28, 1951, ( Pub I ic Law 
14. 82nd Congress, 1st Session) to clarify the immigration status of 
certain aliens in relation to membership in or affiliation with cer- 
tain organizations of the subversive classes; Act of March 19, 1951 
( Publ ic Law 6. 82nd Congress, 1st Session) to extend the period for 
the admission of alien spouses and minor children of citizen members 
of the United States armed forces; and the Act of June 28, 1951 
( Publ IC Law 60 . 82nd Congress, 1st Session) to amend the Displaced 
Persons Act of 1948, as amended. The Act of August I, 1950 ( Publ ic 
Law 630 . 8 1st Congress, 2nd Session) provided a civil government 
for Guam, and for other purposes,. It includes provisions relating 
to nationality of inhabitants of the Island of Guam, and authorizes 
the Commissioner of Immigration and Naturalization, with the approval 
of the Attorney General, to make and prescribe such rules and regu- 
lations not m conflict with the Act as he deem necessary and proper 

Private bills introduced and enacted . — The number of pri vate 
laws deal i ng with immigration and naturalization matters enacted 
during the fiscai year was 354, compared with 202 enacted during 
the previous fiscal year of 1950, , 25 during the fiscai year 1949, 
and 1 17 during the fiscal year 1948. The total number of p r i v at e 
bills introduced during the past fiscal year was 2, I 10, of which 



- 7 - 

1,424 were introduced in the House and 686 in the Senate. As 
pointed out in the last annual report, comparatively few private 
bills are enacted into laws, the percentage as to prior years 
being less than ten percent The number enacted during the past 
year, however — 354 — was almost 17 percent in relation to the 
2, I 10 bills introduced during the same period. 

Whether or not biiis are enacted into law, their introduction 
results in many requests of the Service for reports to Congressional 
committees concerned. District Directors report that it is evident 
that a growing number of aliens arrested for illegal entry apply for 
private bi lis as soon as they are released under bond. The majority 
of these cases are groundless, and succeed only in delaying action, 
cumulating detention expenses, etc. High priority is given such 
cases in field investigations necessary as a basis for reports 
Thus the increasing number of bills introduced in each fiscal year 
is becoming an exacting tax on the investigative force of the 
Service, and adds correspondingly to the work of the General Counsel's 
office in preparing reports, and in appearances by representatives 
of his office in hearings or proceedings upon many such bi ' is be- 
fore Congressional committees 

Prosecutions and j i t igat ions . ■■— Duri nq the past year, the 
General Counsel in the Central Office and the counterpart in field 
offices have participated in preparation of legal memoranda and 
briefs, or otherwise have assisted the United States Attorneys 
and the Department of Justice in connection with litigation arising 
from the operations of the Service, 

As In previous years the great bulk of litigation was in the 
Federal District Courts, with many decisions there being appealed 
to the various United States Courts of Appeals, and a continuing 
trend by parties adversely affected by such appeals i n numerou s 
instances to seek review by the United States Supreme Court, 

During the fiscal year the Supreme Court decided the cases of 
McGrath v. Kri stensen. 340 U.S. 162; Ackermann v United States 
340 U.S. !93; United States ex re I Knauff v McGrath. 340 U S. 940, 
which followed in the wake of the important decision of United States 
ex re I Knauff v Shauqhnessy. 338 U S. 537, decided the previous year, 
Jordan, District Di rector of Irrmiqration and Naturalization v. DeGeorqe. 
34 1 U.S 223; Moser v. United States . 341 U.S, 41; and the case of 
Mo I sen v. Younq. , 340 U.S. 88Q which vacated the judgment of the lower 
courts upon agreement, with remand to the District Court 

Other actions by the Supreme Court during the fiscal year in- 
cluded denial of certiorari in the cases of Potter. US Attorney . 
et al v Estes. 340 U-S. 920, Klapprott v. United States. 340 U.S. 
896; Mastrapasqua v Shauqhnessy. 541 U.S. 930, Obermei er v Un ited 
States and United States v Gbermeier. 540 U.S. 951, Papaqianak-s 
et al V The Somos. et al . 341 U.S. 941; Papal ioi ios et ai v Durninq. 



- 8 - 

34! U.S 940; US ex rei Russ o v. Thom pson. Ward en , et a, , 34! U. S. 
954, S I av I k v M . i i e r .. 340 U. S 955,- .SmLiex v U„ S. and U S. v. 
Sm i i e y ., 340 US. 8 7, rehearing denied. 340 US. 885,. supplemental 
petition for rehearing denied, 186 F 2d 903, Steffner v . Savo rett I , , 
340 u/s. 829, Visic v Savo rett i . 340 U S 83 1, Wi I .umeit v United 
States. 340 U S 834, rehear.ng den . ed 340 US. 885 

The Supreme Court granted certiorari in the case of B/ndcz.yck 
V Fi nucane , 341 US, 9 !9„ and continued the case to the i95i-52 
calendar. Other cases f : i ed with the court for consideration and 
continued to the 195 i -52 term i no. ude Green v Un_i_t ed States . 
petition for cert.orari f i i ed May \, 1951 to the United States 
Court of Claims, 94 F. Supp„ 666, Harisiades v .Si]aughn.essx. peti- 
tion for certiorar filed May 3, 1951, to the Un.ted States Court 
of Appeals Second Circuit, to revise i86 F 2d :37, Carison. aka 
Solomon Sko.mck et ai v Land on. petition for certiorari fi^ed 
April 28, i95l, to the United States Court of Appeals N nth C;rcu:t, 
to review i87 F, 2d 99 1, and the Supreme Court, on Aprl i 30 directed 
to the release of pet-.tioners on ba pend ng disposition of petition, 
34 1 US, 9 18, Z^dok. V, Butte rfi e d petition tor cert lorari filed 
June 22,, 195 , to rev ew United States Court of Appeals. Sixth Circuit , 
in 187 F 2d 802 

The Solicitor General authoi'ized the fi-ing of a petition 
for certiorari to review the decison of the United States Court 
of Appeals, Eighth Circuit, in U_S ex re i Kurt Einar Heikkenen v„ 
Gordon. ;90 F. 2d 16. 

The limitat ons of this annua: report preclude any extensive 
discussion of the many issues invoived in the cases disposed of 
during the fiscal year by the Supreme Court or pending before it 
at the end of the f iscai year. However one of the more active 
and most important of issues i^keiy to reach the Supreme Court at 
its i95!-52 term, invoives the author.ty of the Attorney Genera! 
to revoke previously granted bai , or to deny origina: bail to 
aliens arrested n deportation proceedings,. Since the amendment 
to Section 20 of the Immigration Act of !9 :7 t8 U S C :56; by 
Section 23 (a) of the Internal Security Act of September 27_ 1951 
there have arisen approximately 50 cases ;n various district courts 
These cases chal.enge the Attorney General s autnorrty to revoke 
previousiy gi'anted ba. i or to deny original ba i to anens arrested 
in deportation proceedings,. 

The issues involved are i i lust rated . n the cases of the so- 
called "Terminal Island Four," Th s refers to four ai iens, Carlson, 
Stevenson,, Hyun, and Carlisle, who after amendment of 8 USC 156 by 
the Interna; Security Act of 1950, we^e taken into custody under 
warrants of arrest containing charges based on membership in the 
Communist Party They were continued n custody without bond under 
the new statutory provision giving the Attomey Genera! authority in 
his discretion to detain an alien without bond pending fina; deter- 



- 9 - 

mination of his deportability The a I iens app li ed to the Uni ted 
States District Court at Los Angeies for writs of habeas corpus to 
test the iegaiity of their detention. The District Court, in 94 
Fed„ Supp 18, on November 10. i950, denied the petitions for writs 
of habeas corpus The aliens appealed this action to the Circuit 
Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, which in i86 F 2d 183, on 
December 16, 1950, reversed the lower court and remanded the cases 
witn directions for further action upon the petitions for writs of 
habeas corpus. Thereafter the District Court granted writs, conducted 
hearings thereon in accordance with the mandate of the Circuit Court, 
and on January ll, i95l, discharged the writs and remanded the aliens 
to the custody of this Service The four aliens again appealed to 
the Circuit Court of Appeals, which in 187 F 2d 99', on March 13, 
1951, affirmed the judgment of the lower court Thereafter the aliens 
filed a petition with the Supreme Court for the issuance of a wr;t of 
certiorari. The Supreme Court on April 30, 1951, made an order di- 
recting that the four aliens be released on bai : pending disposition 
of their petitions for writs of certiorari and the litigation remalrs 
m this posture at the present time, the Supreme Court having recessed 
for the summer without making any further decision in the cases 

One of the effective deterrents to smugg i , ng and kindred 
offenses is successful criminal prosecution In addition to the 
provisions in the immigration i aws whereby violators of immigra- 
tion i aws may be deported or alowed to depart voluntarily under 
administrative proceedings, there are also contained in the immi- 
gration laws, as weii as in Titie 18, United States Code on Crimes 
and Criminal Procedure, provisions for the prosecution in the courts 
of certain violators of laws involving immigration and naturali- 
zation matters Prosecutions are generally instituted by compiaint 
filed with the United States Commissioner, by indictment or pre- 
sentment of a grand jury, or by information f i led by the United 
States Attorney 

With the cooperation of the various United States Attorneys, 
this Service is presenting for prosecution the cases of a! I smugglers 
and other persons cnminaily involved in these illicit transactions 
The courts are becoming increasingly aware of the gravity of the 
smuggling menace, and are imposing heavier sentences on convicted 
offenders. For exampie, one of the smuggling rings broken up i ast 
year consisted of Mierican citizens who, in cooperation with a con- 
tact in Cuba, smuggled aliens into the United States by light planes 
from Cuba The apprehended smugglers, John Morgan and Marion 

Robinson, received prison sentences of 2 years and 18 months, respec^ 
tively, and each was fined $500 In another case, Pericie Manner. ni 
who had engaged in smuggling aliens into the United States over the 
Canadian border, was convicted and sentenced to imprisonment for 
three years. 

The number of convictions for immigration and nationality 
violations increased 49 percent in the past fiscal year During 



- 10 - 

the fiscal year ended June 30, 1951, prosecutions were instituted in 
15,230 cases involving immigration matters and 393 cases involving 
nationality matters. Such prosecutions resulted in a total of 
15,834 court convictions during the year, with an aggregate im- 
prisonment of 3,7 16 years and fines aggregating $9 1,469. 

Ninety-four percent of the total convictions last year were 
made under Sections I and 2 of the Act of March 4,* 1929, for 
illegal entry. Convictions were made in 358 cases for violation 
of nationality matters, chiefly under Section 911 of Title 18, 
United States Code, for false representation as a citizen of the 
United States. 

The chart which follows shows a sharp rise in the number of 
convictions in the past fiscal year. 



NUMBER 
20,000- 



15.000 



10,000 



5,000 



CONVICTIONS IN COURTS FOR VIOLATING 

IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY LAWS 

Years ended June 30, 1935 - 195 1 

T 




Writs of Habeas Corpus . — The institution of habeas corpus 
actions as a means of delaying deportation presents a continuing 
problem to the Service. Writs of habeas corpus may be granted 
in the Federal Courts to determine the legality of the detention 
of aliens in the custody of immigration officers. In the fiscal 



year 1951, 49 writs of habeas corpus involving exclusion and 274 
writs involving deportation were served by the United States 
Marshals upon immigration officers for release of aliens in their 
custody During the year, a total of 394 cases had been acted 
upon by the Federal Courts, 57 cases involving exclusion and 337 
involving deportation In 56 of the cases, the courts sustained 
the writ and ordered discharge of the persons from the custody of 
the Service The writs of habeas corpus were dismissed in 260 
cases and in 78 cases the applications for writs of habeas corpus 
were wi thdrawn 



CHAPTER 




Immigration 

AND 

Emigration 



w: 



i^^ 
'j^ 






Under immigration laws, aliens admitted to the United States 
must as individuals measure up to certain qualitative standards 
physically, mentally, morally, and economically. 

The Internal Security Act, by providing that all members of 
communist and totalitarian groups be excluded from entry into the 
United States, let the Service in for a few pretty hectic days - 
particularly at the Port of New York. Aliens arriving who had re- 
ceived passports before September 25, 1950, and who arrived after 
that date had to be screened for membership in the proscribed 
organizations. Those who had been members - even if nominal - had 
to be detained. 

When Publ ic Law 14 was approved March 28, 1951, the situation 
was improved. However, many border-line cases caused a sharp in- 
crease in the number of Board of Special Inquiry hearings, to de- 
termine whether the membership or affiliation actually was involuntary. 

The Displaced Persons Act of 1948 was further amended to provide 
that the time within which visas might be issued to aliens for ad- 
mission to the United States be extended from June 50, 1951 to 
December 51, 1951. The inspectional force which has been in Europe 
during the past two years continues to examine immigrant displaced 
persons before embarkation. There has been a sharp increase in the 
number of Board of Special Inquiry hearings because the so-called 
hard core cases have now been reached. This means that many aliens 
with physical defects have been processed. In these cases it is 
necessary to require the posting of a bond to guarantee that such 
aliens will not become a public charge in the United States. 

Sheer volume, which increased by five million over the previous 
fiscal year, added to the normal problem of inspection of all per- 
sons arriving at the ports of the United States. As may be seen in 



the table that fol lows, the greatest increase was in land border traffic. 



Aliens and citizens arrived and examined at 

U. S. ports of entry during years ended 
June 30. 1950 and 1951 



Year ended June 50. 1951 



Total 



A I lens 



Citizens 



Total , 



Arrived at land borders. 

Canadian 

Mexican 

C rewnen 

Arrived at seaports 



95.596.519 46,102,008 49.294.511 

92,400,556 44,620,010 47,780,546 

41,541,410 18,680,987 22,660,425 

51,058,946 25,939,023 25,119,923 

1,7 15,998 949,555 764,465 

1,282,165 552,463 749,702 



Total 

Arrived at land borders. 

Canadian 

Mexican 

C rewnen 

Arri ved at seaports 



- Year ended June 50 


. 1950 


Total Aliens 


Citi zens 


90,522,406 42,689,810 


47,652,596 



87,510,056 41,297,774 46,212,282 

58,771,076 16,626,902 22,144,174 

48,758,980 24,670,872 24,068, 108 

1,650,198 • 861,827 768,57 1 

I. 02. 152 550.209 651.945 



ENTRIES OVER CANDIAN AND MEXICAN LAND BORDERS 
Years ended June 50, 1941 - 1951 



mil lions 
100 



75 



50 



25- 



TOTAL 
Alien and Citizen 

Border Crossers 




0. 



1941 



^^^^^v^'v.'--V->' ::/.•;'•'•:':' aliens •■.'■'•■■ 

:•.■■.•::•{•: ■^•.•••■^•l^■:^•^^•■i.•■^^^.^^^^:^^:■ ^^^•:•:•^■ 



^'^^'• '-'-••'•' • •'•'-'■ ••'■ 



1945 



1951 



- 15 - 

CrevMTien . — We have found that aliens permitted shore leave as 
seamen have used this method to attempt permanent entry. Thorough 
inspection of crevvmen and carriers is made necessary, also, because 
of the fact stowaways must usually be assisted in effecting entry by 
crewmembers. In the fiscal year 1951, 57,275 vessels and 9 1,901 
planes were inspected on arrival. The 1,7 13,998 inspections of crew^ 
men on arrival last year included 949,535 aliens and 764,463 citizens. 

The excluding provisions of the Internal Security Act, of course, 
applied to crew members as we I I as to other arriving aliens, so that 
the work of inspecting crewmembers was accordingly increased. There 
were 37,588 alien crewmen ordered held on board the vessel on which 
they arrived because they were found to be inadmissible to the United 
States. 

Included in this group were 212 alien seamen who were ordered 
detained on board their vessels on arrival because of membership in 
proscribed organizations. In the cases of 12,778 other alien sea- 
men whose membership was found, after investigation, to have been 
involuntary, temporary admission was authorized under the 9th Proviso. 
Records indicate that 3,591 alien crewmen deserted from vessels at 
American seaports. Seven hundred and five were Italian, 521 British, 
361 Norwegian, 274 Spanish, 197 Chinese, 186 Greek, 166 Portuguese, 
166 Swedish, and 104 Danish. 



MMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES 
Years ended June 30, 1820- 1951 



THOUSANDS 
1,400 



1,200 - 



1,000 - 



800 - 



400 - 



200 - 




- 16 - 
Immigrants 

From the beginning of our history until 1930, immigration was 
an important source of population growth. Since then legal numeric 
restrictions, economic depression, and war have reduced immigration 
to an insignificant factor. Since the war there has been a rising 
trend in immigration, due in large measure to the migration of war 
brides, political emigrees, and other displaced persons to our 
country. This acceleration was sufficient to raise the number to 
24-9,187 in the fiscal year 1950. In I95i there were 205,717 immi- 
grant admissions. The decrease was due to a 22 percent reduction 
in the number of displaced persons admitted and to a less marked 
decline in the number of immigrants in other classes. 



IMMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES - BY COUNTRY OF BIRTH 
Years ended June 30, 1925- 1951 



THOUSANDS 
400| 1 



"1 TT 



1 \ \~T 



T~\ rn" 



300 



200 



100 



TOTAL , 

IMMIGRANTS 

ADMITTED 




IMMIGRATION TO THE 

UNITED STATES FOR YEAR 

. ENDED June 30, 1951 
Thousands ' 

200 



M Disploced Persons 


- 






other 






■ 




Other 


wmmwmww 



N. a w. s. a E. 

EUROPE EUROPE 




1935 



1940 



1945 



1950 



- 17 - 

Superimposed upon the qualitative restrictions to immigration 
are certain other restrictions applicable to immigr-ants. Quotas 
limit immigration frxtm countries other than those of the Western 
Hemisphere. Nonquota immigrants, other than those from the Western 
Hemisphere, are exempt from quota restrictions either by reason of 
professional occupation of minister or teacher, or by reason of close 
relationship to a United States citizen. Notwithstanding a decrease 
of approximately 28,000 displaced persons in 1951, the quota of 154,277 
was slightly oversubscribed. 



QUOTA IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED 
Years ended June 30, 1925-1951 



THOUSANDS 
200 




1930 



1935 



1940 



1945 



1950 



- 18 - 

Displaced persons ,. — The Displaced Persons Act became effective 
June 25, 1948, was amended on June 16, 1950, and again on June 28, 
1951. The Act and its amendments authorized the issuance of visas 
in the following numbers: 



Maximum visas authorized and immigrant aliens admitted 
to the United States, by classes under Displaced 
Persons Act of 1948, as amended: 
June 25, 1948 - June 50, 1951 



Class of admission 
under Pub I ic Law 555 



Maximum 

number Total number 

of visas admitted thru 

authorized June 50. 1951 



Total all classes. .„..,,.„„.,.,,. . 

Sect ion 2 d i sp I aced persons^ ...,..„.. » 
Displaced persons. . . .., o ........... . 

Czech refugees, ....,..,....,....,■... 

Recent political refugees, ..„..,,... . 

Displaced orphans.. ..„.,,.„,,.....,.... 

Adopted orphans, ....,.,,......,,0.0. 

Venezia Gui iia displaced persons,. . . „„ 

Section 5 displaced persons....,,...,... 
Displaced persorsfrom China, ..,=„... , 
Polish veterans in Great Britain.,... 

Greek displaced persons -.,,,„ 

Greeks entitled to preference quota 

status. ,..,...„.... . . . . : 

Displaced persons outside of 

Germany, Austria, or Italy. „..„.. , 



271.578 



249,7 i2 


54 i ., 000 


247.927 


2.000 1/ 


558 


500 ;/ 


- 


5, 000 \J 


849 


5,000 


225 


2,000 1/ 


175 




1 1.-194 



4,000 \J 

.8,000 \J 

7,500 \l 

2,500 1/ 



2,654 
5,808 
2,848 

662 

1,222 



Section 12 persons,., 

Ethnic Germans , 

Adopted chi Idren. . 



10,672 



54,744 



10,672 
10 



\_l This number of v isas is authorized within the total numerical 
limitation of 341,000 Visas not issued to this special group 
may be issued to the general group of displaced persons. 

During the past fiscal year. 96,5!5 displaced persons, including 
57 1 adopted and other orphans, were admitted to this country, bring- 
ing the total number of admissions under the Act to 260,916 As of 
June 50, 1951, a total of 10,662 ethnic Germans have been admitted to 
the United States (2,040 in 1951; and the cases of 1,657 displaced 
persons in the United States had been submitted to Congress for ad- 
justment of their immigration status under the provisions of Section 
4 of the Displaced Persons Act, 



The principal countries of origin of displaced persons admitted 
in the past year were Poland, Germany, the U S. S R., and Latvia. 



- 19 - 

Preferences witnin the quotas, w -re changed under the 

June 16, 195.0, amendments are shown be !> 

TotaL-... 96 '_> : :: 



Quota. 95,920 

First preference quota .84, 136 

.['Persons whc are, f arm^ nuoociiuu, uu(i;>1(uul lun. 
■clothing •- ' garment workers, and others with 
speci' ng and professional qualifications, 

and ' wives and children) 

Second preference quota ,.„..„ 340 

(Blood relatives of citizens or resident aliens of 
the United States, and their wives and children) 

Non-preference quota 
Section 2 
Section 3 ' ' . !94 

Nonquota 595 

Displaced orphans 57 i 

Other nonquot?. . , 2^ 

Quota immigration rn the fiscal year 1951 exceeded the annual 
quotas by 2,270 As a result of the provision in the Displaced Per- 
sons Act author i zi ng the mortgaging of 25 percent of the respective 
quotas for the fiscal years 1951 to 1954 and 50 percent of the quotas 
for the years thereafter, more than four times as many quota immigrants 
came from Southern and Eastern Europe as were authorized under the quota 
of 24,7 19 for that region. Several countries, such as Estonia Latvia, 
and Lithuania, with Small" quot-as, have mortgaged, hal f of the i h " efuot as 
for many years into the future, " ' - 

The 2;04O p'fersbns of fethhic German ongm admitted last year were 
born chiefly i n Yugoslav i a ( 1 , 132), Rumania (352), Poi and ( 167 ), 
Hungary (107), and Czechoslovakia (86). 

Other quota immigrants — While the princip'al factor in the de- 
crease in immigration was a reduction in the number of displaced 
persons admitted, there was also a decrease in the number of other 
quota immigrants. The difference may be observed in the table that 
foil ows 



- 20 - 

Quota immigrants admitted 
Years ended June 50. 1950 and 1951 



1951 1950 

Total ...........-,,.,....,. 156.547 197.460 

First preference quota 

Relatives of citizens .... 5,002 6,888 

Ski I led agriculturists. , ..... 445 751 

Second pr eference quota 

Wives and chi idren of resident 

aliens ,„. „ . ,.,,,,,. 4,029 4,520 

Nonp reference quota . ................ 51,151 61,181 

Displaced persons admitted under 
the Displaced Persons Act of 
I94S, as amended.. -.-,., , 95,920 124,120 



Some countries were not affected by the Displaced Persons Act, 
and therefore, the quota fulfillment or lack of it may be an indica- 
tion of the desire of persons from those countries to emigrate to the 
United States.. Immigrants from Denmark, France, Netherlands, Norway, 
Portugal, and Spain practically filled the quotas of their respective 
countries On the other hand,, the quotas of Great Britain and Ireland, 
aggregating more than half of the authorized quotas of 154,277, were 
less than a quarter filled- As a result only three-eights of the 
quota numbers of northern and western Europe were f i I led. 

The quota for Spain was oversubscribed last year, because an 
Act approved June 30, 1950, provided for the relief of the sheep- 
raising industry by making 250 special quota visas available to 
certain sheep herders for one year. Under this special legislation 
125 sheep herdei-s were admitted last year. 

Nonquota immigrants — When Congress limited immigration by means 
of quotas it also provided for certain classes of aliens who couid 
be admitted without regard to quotas. The nonquota immigrants may 
be roughly divided into three groups — (1) geographic — natives of 
the independent countries of Western Hemisphere; (2) profess ion a I ;■" — 
ministers and teachers, and (3) wives,, children, and, in some 
instances, husbands of United States citizens.. 



21 - 



IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED 
Years ended June 30, 1940-1951 



IMMIGRANTS (In Thousands) 
200 

43 




The change in "natives of nonquota counties", is largely due 
to an increase of immigration from Canada. 

The special legislation which facilitated the entry of war 
brides into the country expired on December 28, 1948, so that wives 
of soldiers thereafter were admitted under the provisions of the 
Immigration Act of 1924, as amended. However, legislation during 
the past year was passed to permit the admission of war brides 
racially ineligible for admission. The effect of this Act may be 
observed in the increase in numbers of Japanese wives of citizens 
admitted in 1951. 



- 22 - 
NONQUOTA IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED -BY CLASSES 



NATIVES OF NONQUOTA COUNTRIES, 
THEIR WIVES, AND MINOR CHILDREN 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1930 - 1951 
THOUSANDS 

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 




WIVES, HUSBANDS , AND MINOR CHILDREN 
OF UNITED STATES CITIZENS 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1925 - 1951 
THOUSANDS 



GO 




MINISTERS, THEIR WIVES AND CHILDREN 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1925 - 195! 
NUMBER 
2.000 I I I f I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 




PROFESSORS THEIR WIVES AND CHILDREN 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1925 - 1951 
NUMBER 
2.000 I I I I 1 — I — i—i — I — I — I I I I — |- 



I.SOO 




1935 1940 194. ._0 1925 1930 1935 1940 1945 1950 

A comparison of the classes of nonquota immigrant admissions 
for the past two years is shown below: 

Nonquota immigrants admitted in 
years ended June 50, 1950 and 1951 



1951 
Total nonquota immigrants 49 ^ 170 

Natives of nonquota countries and their wives 



51.727 



and chi Idren. 

Husbands, wives, children of citizens. 
Ministers, their wives and children... 
Professors, their wives and children.. 
Other nonquota irmiigrants 



35,274 


33,238 


11,462 


16,275 


733 


833 


457 


603 


1,244 


778 



Courrtry of bi rth 

Great Britain and 
No rt h. I re I and . . . 

Germany. ...... 

Italy......... 

China. ........ 

Japan. ....... 

Austral i a and 
New Zeal and , 



... 23 - 
Number of wives of citizens 
1951. I95P (949 1948 1947 1946 



148 

2,042 

1,534 

826 

125 

159 



24! 

3,798 

2, 168 

1,062 

9 

184 



914 

10, 130 

3,081 

2, 143 

445 

286 



1,843 
3,638 
6,385 
3, 192 
298 



7, 160 
701 

5,71 1 

902 

14 



852 2., 225 



27,094 

303 

2,419 

159 

4 

5,375 



Nonirmi grants 

Nonimmigrants are aliens who enter the United States for tempo- 
rary periods or resident aliens returning from a temporary stay 
abroad. The figures below do not include such special groups as 
agricultural laborers, border crossers, and crewmen 

Noninmi grants admitted 
Years ended June 30. 1949-1951 



195 



19a 



1949 



Total nonimmigrants admitted .,,,... 

Government officia's 

Members of Internationa; organizations 

Temporary visitors for business 

Temporary visitors for pleasure. 

In transit . 

Returning residents, . ., , 

Students, . , „ ..,.,,,, , ...,......,., 

Treaty traders 



465. 106 


426.837 


447.272 


20,881 


13,975 


13,722 


5.526 


5,010 


4.723 


83 995 


67,984 


73, 338 


230,210 


219,810 


225,745 


72,027 


68,640 


81,615 


44,212 


40 903 


36,. 984 


7,355 


9,744 


10,481 


850 


766 


632 


50 


5 


32 



Other noninmig 


rants 


„ . , 










50 


5 




32 


For the 
i n each year, 
cords of 1908 


past 
such 


five years 
arrivals 


non immi g rant 
n any s i ng i e 


arrivals h 
year since 


ave 
the 


exceeded, 
f i rst re- 



- 24 - 

The principal countries from which nonimmigrants came are 
shown below: 



Number of nonimmigrants 



Country or region of birth 

All countries 

\Afest I nd i es 

Canada 

England, Scotland, and Wales. 

South />mer i ca 

Mexico 

France 

Germany 

Central Anerica 

Nether! ands 

Italy 

Spain 

Other count ri es 



19^1 


1950 


465. 106 


426.837 


79,613 


76,775 


78,581 


69,042 


K", 119 


58,765 


39,317 


30,877 


28,060 


26, 107 


16,419 


13,922 


12,670 


10,242 


1 1,462 


10,752 


10,307 


8,200 


9,764 


10,798 


9,602 


10,368 


1 10, 192 


100,989 



NONIMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED TO THE UNITED STATES 
Years ended June 30, 1931 - 1951 
Thousands 



500 



400 



300 



200 



100 




1950 



- 25 - 

Gove r nment of f i c i ais - The number of government officials from 
Europe doubled last year because there were many more representatives 
of the countries within the sphere of the foreign aid programs from 
such countries as Gteece^ Germany, and Itaiy, This largely accounts 
for the high number of government officials 

Visitors - The most important factor m the larger number of 
nonimmigrants was the larger number of visitors for business or 
pleasure Business travellers from Europe increased by about 6,000 
However,, there were approximate iy 4,000 fewer vacationers from 
Europe^, poss.bly because of money restrictions Pleasure travel 
from Canada. Soutn America, and the West indies, however, continued 
to show gains over previous years As of June 30, ,951; there were 
88, 176 Visitors in the United States 

S tudents .— -Wh I le the number of students admitted d:d not equal 
that of last year, the number m the Un.ted States on June 30,, 1951, 
was about the same as it was at the end of last fiScai year Chinese 
students who were admitted !949-1950 and cannot go home now, have 
been something of a problem since they are often without funds and 
therefore have to be permtted to worK^ even though ,n a student 
status 

Students .n the United Spates by District 
on June 30. ;950 and ,95. 

Di strict 

Total 

St Albans Vt 
Boston., Mass. 
New York, N Y 
Ph. lade ph^a, Pa. 
Bait, mo re Md 
Miami „ Fia. , 
Buffalo,, N Y 
Detrot, M:ch 
Chicago_ I ■ : 
Kansas Cty Mo 
Seattle, Wash 
San Franc i sco,, Cai i f 
San Antonio, Tex 
Ei PasOj Tex 
Los Angeies, Cal if 
Hono i u 1 u , T H 



.1,95 i, 


j92) 


24,, 859 


24, 939 


123 


(42 


2,059 


2.. 154 


4.235 


4,290 


,292 


,383 


.563 


283 


1 668 


584 


990 


: 020 


2,501 


2.773 


2,405 


2 482 


2,219 


2 335 


i.093 


i 140 


2,275 


2. 84 


356 


349 


626 


576 


1,390 


1, 187 


64 


57 



- 26 - 

Exercise of the Ninth Proviso 

Aliens, except agricultural laborers , — Under the terms of the 
Ninth Proviso to Section 3 of the immigration Act of 1917, the 
Attorney General is permitted in his discretion to admit, for 
temporary periods, certain persons who otherwise are inadmissible 
to the United States. 

Applications for exercise of Ninth Proviso \J 
Years ended June 50, 1947 - 1951 





Number 
of 


Dispos 


i t i on 


Number of 


Years ended 


Adm i 53 . on 


Admission 


persons 


June 30. 


appi i cations 


authorized 


denied 


i nvo 1 ved 


Total ...... 


19. 150 


18,445 


705 


93.030 


1951....... 


15 904 


15.733 


17 1 


47,871 


1950,..,... 


1,068 


886 


182 


11.916 


1949 .... 


933 


784 


149 


21, 146 


_ 1948...... 


628 


551 


77 


6,009 


1947. .... 


6!7 


491 


126 


6.088 



\J Exclusive of Mexican aflricuUural laborers 

For the six months between the passage of the Internal Security 
Act, making membership in communist or total itan an organizations a 
cause for exclusion, and PubMc Law 14 ciarifyinq the mean'ng of 
membership, the Service was forced to exclude many aliens whose 
membership was purely nominal — held for such purposes as obtaining 
work, attending schools and the I ike In order to take care of this 
situation, aliens in this class were admitted through the exercise 
of the Ninth Proviso. It was for this reason that the number of appli- 
cations was 15 times that of the previous year This number included 
12,778 seamen admitted. 

The grounds waived in the exercise of the Ninth Proviso are shown 
in the following table, 

Applications for exercise of Ninth Proviso, 
by grounds waived and decision 





Year ended June 30, 1951 






Number 

of 

appi i cat ions 


Disposition 


Grounds waived 


Adm i ss i on Adm i ss i on 
authorized denied 



Total ,.,,... 15.904 15 733 [7] 

Mental or physical defectives 

Ci'iminals ,.,..,.. . ... 

Contract laborers ........... 

Unab I e to read . o , . . 

Immoral c I asses. ................. 

Subversive or anarchistic classes. 
Mi seel I aneous, ,..,,,..,. . . - „ . , . 



347 


290 


57 


346 


3i4 


32 


136 


i34 


2 


65 


^ 


8 


26 


24 


2 


14,933 


14,. 882 


5! 


5! 


32 


19 



- 27 - 

The applicants sought the exercise of the N^nth Proviso an 
2,454 cases as temporary visitors to receive medical treatment, to 
visit relatives in the United States^ to attend schools, to attend 
conventions and conferences, to attend to business, to play in 
orchestras or as contract laborers In 112 cases the applications 
were for border crossing privileges, in 54 cases for transits, in 
77 cases for shore leave for crewmen, in three cases for students, 
and in 426 cases for extension of temporary stay to continue medical 
treatment, border crossing privileges, etc 

Agricuiturai laborers admitted through the exercise of the 
N inth Proviso - — Included among those admitted through the exercise 
of the Ninth Proviso were unskilied agricultural and industrial 
laborers who would be subject to exclusion frcm the United States 
as contract laoorers Before importation is authorized, a show- 
ing is required that there is a need for the labor, that prevail- 
ing wage rates in the area of employment win be paid, and that 
American labor vvi i i not be displaced by the ai iens imported. 

The problem of migratory labor in agriculture was the subject 
of a study by the President sCommi ssion on Migratory Labor This 
Commission was created June 30, 1950 The Comm.ssion, in submit- 
ting its report to the President, recommended that. "Foreign-labor 
importation should be undertaken only pursuant to intergovernmental 
agreements. The conditions and standards of work shou:d be substan- 
tially the same for all countries " The Cormission further recormended 
that the administration of a foreign labor recruiting program be the 
direct responsibility of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 

It was not until Juiy 12, 1951, however,, that Pub i ic Law 78 was 
passed Subsequently, agreements were reached with Mexico setting 
forth the responsibility of the respective countries, so that for 
the fiscal year i95i laborers were imported through the exercise of 
the Ninth Prov.so 

On J^ne 30, 1950, there were 39,765 agricultural laborers m 
the United States, During the year 127 ,,002 laborers were admitted 
for agricultural work, 3,628 aiiens illegally in the United States 
were contracted in pursuance to an agf-eement with Mexico, 68 047 
such a:iens departed from the United States, 5,967 other cases were 
closed after investigation, leaving 96,38; reported to be in the 
United States on June 30, 195! The countries from whence they 

came were as foi iows: 

Country of last Number m the 

permanent residence U.S. on June 30. 1951 

Total 96- 58 1. 

Canada . , 280 

Mexico 83,447 

Bahamas. . , . 4,6^0 

Jamaica ....... 4,992 

Barbados ,,.„.. ■ , 984 

Leeward Islands ■ ^058 



- 28 - 

Canadian woo dsmen — The program permitting the importation of 
skilled Canadian woodsmen under bond to guarantee maintenance of 
status and departure continued in effect during the year, and the 
need for the program still exists. At the end of the fiscal year, 
there were (28 individual permits in effect authorizing the impor- 
tation of 9,889 woodsmen as compared with 47 permits covering 
5,965 woodsmen the previous year. The increase is attributable to 
several factors, principal of which are the great iy increased de- 
mand for paper,, iumbei' and other products of the woods industry,, 
and the absorption of domestic workers into other industry where 
working and living conditions are more attractive. During the year 
eight permits were issued to applicants for the importation of skill- 
ed Canadian woodsmen into the State of New York for 645 men as 
compared to none the previous year However, a great dea, of timber 
was biown down during the past winter and a large number of laborers 
was required to remove it 

A time saving of at least two weeks was made between receipt 
of the applications to import ski i led Canadian woodsmen and the 
issuance of the permits because of delegation of authority to issue 
the permits to the District Director As a resu i t. appi, cants are 
permitted to submit their applications two weeks later than previ- 
ously 

Four violations of the terms of permits to import foreign 
labor were discovered during the year. One was found to be of such 
a minor nature that no action was taken. Investigations ;n two 
cases were not completed at the end of the year In the other case^ 
bond in the amount of $4,000 was declared breached by the Central 
Office and the pena.ty forfeited. 

Petitions for i mti i g rat i on Visas and Reentry Pe rmits 

While in most instances the applications for admission to the 
United States are bandied by the State Department, in two instances 
at least the initial application is initiated through our Service 
For the past 18 months the authority to pass on these appi ications 
has been delegated to the District Director in the various districts 

Petition s f or immigration visas . — The Immigration Act of 1924 
provides that nonquota or preference-quota status may be granted to 
certain near relatives of citizens of the United States. In order to 
obtain such status, the United States citizen must file w th this 
Service a petition for the issuance of an immigration visa (Form 1-133/ 
accompanied by proof of his citizenship, his relationship to the bene- 
ficiary, and other facts If, after examination, the pet t:on is 
approved, it iS foi'warded to the Department of State for transmittal 
to the appropriate American Consu. , The members of our armed forces 
stationed abroad contributed to the large number of visa petitions 
filed during the fiscai year After they were married n foreign 
countries they applied for nonquota visas for their alien Wives 



- 29 - 

During the year just ended, 25,227 new visa petitions were received; 
of that number 23,227 visa petitions were approved, 495 were rejected, 
and 19 approvals were revoked. 

Reentry permits . — Section 10 of the Immigration Act of 1924 
provides that resident aliens who have been lawfully admitted for per- 
manent residence who depart for a temporary visit abroad may obtain 
reentry permits to facilitate their readmission to the United 
States. The years since the end of the war have shown a steady in- 
crease in the number to apply for documents with which to travel out- 
side the United States. The travel to European countries in parti- 
cular has shown a large increase. 



REENTRY PERMITS ISSUED 
Years ended June 30, 1925- 1951 



NUMBER OF 
PERMITS ISSUED 




During the fiscal year of 1951 a total of 58, 987 app I i cat ions 
for these travel documents were received and of this number 56,646 
were approved and issued, and at the end of the year 1,371 applica- 
tions were pending. Almost half the reentry permits were issued in 
New York. 

Extensions of reentry permits were granted in 13,246 cases in 
1951 as compared with 11,643 during the previous fiscal year. Nine 
applications for extensions were denied. There were pending at the 



30 



close of the year 53 1 applications for extensions of reentry per- 
mits. 

Emigrants and Nonemigrants 

Emigrants — Emigrants are, by definition, aliens who depart 
from the United States after residence of a year or more in the 
United States, with the intention of remaining abroad It will be 
seen from this definition that emigrant, therefore, is not the oppo- 
site of immigrant in ai ; cases, since some aliens admitted as non- 
immigrants on arnvai may depart after a year or more and be classed 
as emigrants 



The number of emigrants who departed and the principal countries 
to which they went are shown below 

Number of emigrants departed by country of 

intended future residence 

Year ended June 50, 1951 



Country of 
future residence 



Number of 
emigrants 



Country of 
future residence 



Number' of 
emigrants 



Total , 

Europe . . , „ 
Denmark. , 
France. ,.'::':. .. 
Ge sTTiany , , . > „ . 
Great Britain, 
Greece . , . 
I re I and 
Italy 

Netherlands 
Norway , „ 

Sweden 
Switzerland 
Other Europe 



26. 174 

11,477 

336 

1,019 

I, lOi 

3,425 

374 

559 

1„440 

304 

576 

45! 

311 

1,601 



Asia. , , , , 

Chfna. ... , . 
India. . , , . 
Other Asia. , , 

Canada, ,..,.. . 
Mexico, , , . 
West I nd i es , . . , ,. 
Central America. 
South America. , . 
Africa . . „ . . 
Aust ra i i a and 
New Zeal and,. 

Phi I ippines 

Other countries. 



1,902 


376 


3!4 


l,2!2 


3,202 


1 149 


2,897 


816 


2 817 


395 


497 


627 


597 



Nonem ig rants . —Nonemigrants are temporary visitors leaving the 
country after a stay of less than a year^ or resident aliens who are 
leaving for a temporary visit abroad 



During the year ended June 50, 1951, 446,727 nonemigrants depart- 
ed from the United States There were 45^444 alien residents who 
were returning to the United States after temporary residence abroad. 
Three treaty traders had return permits The remainder. 40 L 280, had 
entered as tourists, transits, government officials, and others who 
were leaving the United States after stays of a few days to a yearns 
durat ion. 



- 31 - 

United States Citizens Permanently Departed 

United States citizens who leave a domicile in the United 
States for periods of a year or longer abroad totalled 57,923 last 
year; 46,325 of these persons were native-born citizens and I i 598 
were naturalized citizens. 



CHAPTER 




Adjustment 
OF ^Status 



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^^??^^^^A^^^>i!II 


'•'• ,"'•*, ••' 


O 


' m * •' I *'»*• *•' I *' '••" 




1 1 


.* ; ',•;.•;.••,*;'• '•'• * • I 






• ,••«• • •«••••• 


•*•: •'.'.'•' 


I 





Immigration laws have become increasingly restrictive. Inevi- 
tably, such laws on occasion impose undue hardship on aliens. Parents 
of citizens, and other aliens with close ties in this country are 
often the sufferers of such restrictions. To ameliorate these situa- 
tions, there are certain provisions in the law and regulations. 

Suspension of deportation . — Section I9lc) of the Irrmigration Act 
of 1917, as amended, provides that the Attorney General may suspend 
the deportation of an alien who is deportable under law other than 
one who is deportable on charges relating to subversives, criminals, 
narcotics, immoral persons, and the mentally and physically deficient, 
if the Attorney General finds ( I) that such deportation would result 
in a serious economic detriment to a citizen or legally resident alien 
who is the spouse, parent, or minor child of the deportable alien, or 
(2) that such alien was residing continuously in the United States 
for seven years or more and was residing in this country on July I, 
1948. In addition to the 156,547 quota immigrants admitted from abroad 
during the past fiscal year there were 1,506 aliens who became legal 
permanent residents through suspension of deportation under the provi- 
sions of Section 19(c) of the Immigration Act of 1917, as amended, 
and for whom a quota charge was made in the fiscal year 1951. Charges 
to the quotas of the fol lowing countries were made for these al iens by 
the Department of State for the year ended June 30, 1951: 



34 



Quota Visas Cf~.arged to 1951 Quotas in 
Suspension of Deportation Cases \J 





Number 


- chargeable 


Count ry 


to fi 


iscal year 
!95i 


Total _ 


_^ 


l,'^6 


Austiaita. 




43 


Austria, „..,.,..„ 




58 


Chinese racial , . , 




52 


France,. . . . „ . 




38 


Ge rmany ...,.,,....: 




176 


Great Britain. 


. . 6 


209 


Greece , 




i08 


Italy . 




237 


Norway. 




39 


Phi ! ippines. . . _ , 




45 


Po i and , 




65 


Portugal - . 


. 


46 


Spain. . . 




37 


Other.. . . 




353 



j./ Source; Visa Oivisio.n, Department of State. 

Section 19(c) of the Immigration Act of 1917 requires that the 
pertinent facts In ai i cases in which the suspension of deporta- 
tion is proposed shall be reported to Congress with the reasonsfor such 
act;on If during the session at which a case is reported or in 
the next foi Sowing session Congress approves by concurrent resolu- 
tion the granting of suspension to the alien, deportation proceedings 
are thereafter cancelled and the alien is accorded the status of a 
lawful permanent resident of the United States If the Congress 
does not pass such a resolution, the Attorney General is directed to 
deport the aiien ;n the manner provided by ; aw 

During the fiscai year 1951, 5,563 suspension cases were submitted 
to Congress, as compared with 4,452 in 1950 and 4,302 in 1949 Since 
the passage of the Act of June 28 :940^ authorizing suspension of 
deportation^ 37,921 names have been submitted to Congress for approval, 
or an average of 3,447 a year. The 82nd Congress had approved 3,319 
through July 3 L, 1951 

Displaced Persons Residing In The United States 

Section 4 of the displaced persons Act of 1948., as amended, pro- 
vides that 15,000 eligible Displaced Persons (as defined in that Act) 
temporarily residing in the United States may apply to the Attorney 
General for adjustment of their immigration status to that of pennanent 



- 35 - 

residents, prov.ded that they are otherwise admissible to the 
United States and were lawfuiiy admitted to the United States as 
nonimmigrants under Section 3, or as students under Section 4(e), 
of the immigration Act of 1924 Final approval rests with Congress 
under a procedure similar to that for suspension cases. 

Those who f i :e applications for adjustment of their immigration 
status are required to establish by credible evidence that they have 
been displaced as a result of events occurring subsequent to the out- 
break on September I, 1939, of World War. II They must prove that 
they cannot return to their native countries, nor to the countries 
of last residence or nationality, because of persecution or fear of 
persecution on account of race, religion or political opinions 

By June 30, ;95i, 8,932 applications had been received for ad 
j ustment of status under Section 4 of the Displaced Persons Act of 
1948, as amended There were 1,657 cases approved by the Commissioner 
and submitted to Congress. 

The grounds for den.ai of adjustment of immigration status under 
Section 4 fail into the fo: i owing categories. 

Total number . 782 



Not unable to return to country of 
birth, residence, or nationality; 
no apparent persecution due to race, 
religion, or poiiticai opinion..,.,..,, 46i 

Cause f o r d : sp I acement d i d not ar : se 
from events occasioned by and sub- 
sequent to outbreak of Worid War I i 21 

Not a lawful entry under Section 3 or 
Section 4ie; of the Imnigration Act 
of 1924. , . . . 176 

Inadmissible to United States 22 

Entered subsequent to April I, 1948 1/ 99 

Not in United States when decision was 

rendered , =..,.,.- . , „ , „ ,_ o „.,,,.,..,- . 3 

\J Pub I c Law 555 of June 16, 1950 . excended the «fitry date to 
April 30, 1949 However-p no applications were denied on 
th;s g'ound since i he Amendment was enacted. 



- 36 ~ 

Preexaminat ion - -Preexami nat ion is a privilege accorded to 
certain aliens who are in the United States in a status other than 
that for permanent residence They wish to adjust their immigra- 
tion status by going to Canada to apply to an Amer'ican consul in 
that country for an immigration visa with which to apply to the 
United States for permanent residence. 

If the application for preexaminat i on is approved, the al iem 
is given a hearing to determine his admissibility to the Un.ted 
States, The alien must be admissible to Canada, of good moral 
character, and have assurance from the American consul in Canada 
that an immigration v ; sa can be issued promptly. If the alien is 
found to be eiigibie for an immigration visa, he is issued a p re- 
examination border-crossing card to facilitate entry into Canada,, 
During the year, 1,945 new applications for preexaminat ion were sub- 
mitted by ai.ens who were not subject to deportation proceedings; 
1,201 applications for preexaminat ion were approved; 156 were denied, 
and the authority for preexaminat ion was revoked in the cases of 30 
individuals In the preceding year 3,805 new applications for pre- 
examinat ion were received 

Exercise of the Seventh Provl so , -^-Ai i ens returning after a 
temporary absence to an unrelinquished domicile in the United States 
of seven consecutive years may be admitted by the Attorney General 
under the authority contained in the 7th Proviso to Section 3 of 
the Immigration Act of 19 17,, notwithstanding a ground or grounds of 
i nadmi ssi bi i ity under the Immigration laws (However, it is to be 
noted that the Internal Security Act of 1950 contains a prohibition 
that the 7th Proviso shai I have no application to cases fa! mg within 
the purview of Section I of the Act of October 16, 19i8, as amended) 

The table which foMows shows the number of applications for 
consideration under the Seventh Proviso finally disposed of during 
the past five years and the manner of disposition of such applications,. 

Applications for exercise of Seventh Proviso 

Years ended June 30, 1947 - 1951 

Years ended Number D isposition of applications 
J une 30 of Adm i ss I on Adm i ss i on 
applications authorized deni ed 

Total, , i. 162 1.028 134 

1951. 140 121 19 

1950. , 172 138 34 

1949 334 306 28 

1948,.. 248 . 223 25 

1947. 268 240 28 



Most of the app.ications for Seventh Proviso relief dur.ng the 



... 37 - 

past fiscal year arose m deportation or preexaminat ion proceedings 
of resident aliens who would have been excludable criminals or menta; 
or physical defectives or illiterates Practicaliy ail of the \2\ 
cases in which favorable action was taken represented persons who. 
in addition to having the statutory requisite of seven years prior 
dom<cMe in the United States,, had established family ties m th;s 
country and had otherw.se unblemished records for years past 
Grounds wa,:ved in order to authorize readmission were; 22 physical 
or mental defects, 86 criminals, nine unable to read^ and four other 
excludable ci asses 

Reg. str y of alie ns under Section 528!b; of the Nat ionai Ity Act 
of 1940 ---To obtain a reentry permit, to be natura.ized and for var- 
ious other reasons, a, ens need to have proof of I awf u : permanent 
entry into the United States, After the alien's record of entry is 
verified, a certificate of arrival or other appropriate document is 
issued by this Service. 

An alien may make appiicat.on to the CommisS'One'- of Imnigratlon 
and Natural ization for the creation of a record of lawful entry where 
no record ex-sts of his admission fo;" pe.nnanent residence To be 
eligibie to have a record of regist y created, the alien must prove 
that he is eligibie for citizenship- that he entered the United States 
prior to July 1, 1924, and has resided here continuously since, that 
he is a person of good mora: character, and that he ;s not subject to 
deportation When registry is approved a record is created establish- 
ing the ai len's admission for permanent residence as of the date of 
his entry. During the past year 4,547 applications for registry were 
received, and 3 242 records of registry completed 



CHAPTER 




FORCEMENT 



"Enforcement" of the laws entrusted to this Service may we I I ■ 
be termed the keynote of the year's work. The increasing stress 
on enforcement has been gradual but constant in each of the past 
several years, for two principal reasons: The crescendo of com- 
munism with its devious schemes of infiltration, has made enforce- 
ment for internal security of primary importance. This past year 
the Internal Security Act gave specific directives for the conduct 
of the Service toward communist aliens and members of other totali- 
tarian groups who are in the United States or who seek to enter. 

The second major enforcement problem is the perennial one of 
the Mexican migrant laborers who enter illegally. They have come 
in wave upon wave like the tides of the ocean, fluctuating with each 
season's agricultural work, receding as apprehensions and voluntary 
departures take place and rolling in again with each new cycle of 
agricultural work. 

Joined to these two major problems are many other related ones. 
Smuggling is commanding considerably higher prices in recent years. 
This makes the practice more attractive to smugglers. Probably the 
reason prices are higher is that there are many Europeans in nearby 
countries who wish to come to the United States, and for whom there 
are no quota numbers. Since a stowaway can scarcely get into the 
country without the help of crewmen and others who protect him, he 
too, represents a smuggled alien. 



Section 25 of the Internal Security Act amended Section 20 of 
the Immigration Act of February 5, 1917, and thereby brought about 
some drastic changes in the duties and responsibilities connected 



- 40 - 

with enforcement work. These will be related in the various types 
of work of enforcement reported here. 

Border Patrol 

The Border Patrol is the nation's police organization responsible 
for protecting our long frontiers against the illegal entry of aliens. 
It is the only such protection that the country has. 

Never before has our country been more greatly endangered by 
the clandestine entry of so many aliens. The path worn by illegal 
entrants has readied a smooth road for dangerous aliens to travel. 
Many of them have been found to be professional criminals. Others 
are subversive. Many are susceptible to'communist influence because 
of their exploited and depressed economic situation in their own 
countries, and in many instances, in the United States after their 
arrival. From any point of view, those who seek admission in this 
manner are highly undesirable. 



DEPORTABLE ALIENS APPREHENDED BY BORDER PATROL OFFICERS 
Years ended June 30, 1941 - 1951 



APPREHENSION (In Thousands 
500 



400 



300 



200 



100 




- 41 - 

( I) Smugglers apprehended . — Smuggling has not escaped inflation. 
Mexican workers who formerly paid a few pesos for the services of a 
smuggler now pay as much as $100. The price for smuggling Europeans 
and Chinese has been known to be as high as $1,000 or $1,500 per 
person. The increased prices for smuggling made it more attractive 
and hence more important to stop. During the past fiscal year 811 
smugglers of aliens were apprehended. 

Smugglers who flew Chinese from Cuba have been arrested in 
California, and Italians who landed at Mobile have been located in 
Detroit. The Canadian border and the West Indies are providing the 
gateway for growing numbers of illegal entries into the United 
States. Surveys have shown that there are in Canada substantial 
numbers of Italians, Greek, and Macedonians seeking entry. 

Entry of stowaways smuggled in by crew members is on the in- 
crease, too. To meet this situation. Patrol units in the Baltimore 
and Philadelphia Districts were added, during the past year, to the 
station already established in>lew York City. The chief task of 
these units is to search vessels for stowaways, and to patrol water- 
front areas in order to prevent illegal entry. 

SMUGGLERS OF ALIENS APPREHENDED BY BORDER PATROL OFFICERS 
Years ended June 30, 1925- 1951 



PERSONS 
800 




- 42 - 

(2) Others apprehended — The Border Patrol's primary activity, 
that of apprehending aliens unlawfully entering, or unlawful iy in 
the United States, reached a new high and culminated in 510,355 
apprehensions. The illegal entry of Mexican nationals is our largest 
and most vexing problem in terms of volume. Ninety-eight percent 
of the apprehensions are of Mexicans entering illegally in the 
Mexican border districts These illegal entrants no longer stay in 
the localities close to the border, but have spread over much of the 
Nation. Details of officers, in places as remote from the Mexican 
border as Chicago, and Yakima, Washington, have apprehended hundreds 
of illegal Mexican aliens. However, it was also necessary during 
several months of the year to make major shifts of officers to meet 
great influxes of aliens along the Mexican border. 

Many Mexican nationals who are apprehended and returned immedi- 
ately to Mexico, have no place to go and no means of livelihood, so 
they again enter the United States illegally. To discourage this 
practice, the airlift program described elsewhere in this report, 
was devised to fly aliens to points in Central Mexico near their 
homes. The immediate effect of the airlift was to diminish the 
number of apprehensions because the source - the pool - from which 
they came had been diminished. This fact is now enabling the Border 
Patrol to process, fingerprint, detain, and dispose more effectively 
of aliens apprehended,. 

(3) Cooperation with and from other officers . — During the past 
fiscal year, the Border Patrol apprehended 385 violators of other 
than immigration i aws relating to border violations; 137 of them 
were for violations of the customs laws. Seized contraband and 
vehicles were valued at $261,160. The Border Patrol contributed to 
the drive against narcotics use by the seizure of quantities of 
narcotics valued at $42,411,75. In the Laredo, Texas area alone 673 
pounds, Mi ounces of marijuana were seized from June 1950 to mid- 
April 1951. This gives an indication of the source of vast quantities 
of this narcotic which have been discovered by the Bureau of Narcotics 
and police officers all over the nation. 

(4) Airplanes and radio . — The Border Patrol has a fleet of 
twelve planes used for patrolling, sign-cutting, and general scout- 
ing duties. During the past year hundreds of aliens were apprehended 
by airplane-jeep patrolling wherein the plane radios to a ground team 
the location of aliens seen from the air. 

During the year provision was made for establishment of FM radio 
the entire way across the Mexican border. Most of the equipment has 
now been installed In the areas where the change has been made 
from the standard AM, the Border Patrol has almost perfect static 
free reception. With increased use of planes and coordination of 
automobile and jeep patrols along the border, efficient use of radio 
is absolutely necessary. 



- 43 - 

(5) Border Patrol Training School — The Border Patrol Training 
School was transferred from El Paso to New Mexico A & M College near 
Las Cruces, New Mexico, temporarily, pending construction of suitable 
quarters for the school at El Paso. New Mexico A i M offered the 
only facilities in the area for classes of Border Patrol recruits up 
to 150 to 200 men each Recruiting problems and the dire need for 
an increase in force made this necessary. The Border Patrol suffered 
severe depletion of force during the year through numbers of trained 
men being assigned to other branches of the Service 

(6) D eaths In line of duty . — During the year two officers were 
killed iTiine of duty, one being Pilot Michael T Box_. the other 
being Patrol Inspector Richard D Clarke Inspector Clarke was 
stabbed to death by an alien at El Paso, Texas In the operation of 
the air patrol, Pilot Michael T. Box lost his I i f e in a crash near 
El Paso, Texas, Pilot Box had furnished ground patroi teams the 
location of 15 aliens who were apprehended a few minutes before 
motor failure caused him to crash to the ground from the altitude 
of about 150 feet This brings the total of officers who have met 
death in line of duty to 44, eight of them since World War II. 

I nvesti gat ions 

During the fiscal year just closed, the investigative activities 
and responsibi ities of the Service reached a new peak Increased 
international tension, coupled with the armed conflict in Korea, de- 
manded increased vigiiance against aliens who threaten internal 
security The Internal Security Act of 1950, by expanding the giounds 
for exclusion, expulsion, denial of naturalization and denaturali- 
zation, created the need for many new investigations 

In addition, the wealth of information from other agencies and 
from our own sources made necessary new specialized projects to 
search into, classify, assemble and disseminate relevant facts The 
investigation Section in the Central Office is the clearing house 
for information of an sorts directly affecting the enforcement 
operations of the Service, Through this focal point all manner of 
intelligence is disseminated to the Field, usually m the form of 
lookout cards which can be uniformiy maintained in ai i Field Offices., 
During the past year, 6,511 lookouts were posted, as compared with 
2,616 during the preceding year The sum of the factors outlined 
above resulted in a sharp rise in investigative work, as shown by a 
comparison of the statistics for the fiscal years 1950 and 1951 

1951 1950 

Cases on hand at opening of fiscai year 38,462 40,043 

New cases received during fiscal year . . 266 153 236 483 

Investigations completed during fiscal year= 256,990 238 064 

Backlog at close of fiscal year ,..,...,.,,,,... 47,625 ■• 38,462 



- 44 - 

To meet this increased investigative work-ioad_, add;ttonal 

persons were transferred to investigative pursuits intensive 

training courses v»ere conducted at the Central Office in order to 
train these new investigators rapidly 

The variety and scope of investigative work make it difficult 
to classify into neat compartments In general, however, the 

investigative activities may be summarized under three headings; 
( I) Ant i -subversive operations; 12) Ant i-smugg i i ng and inte.i i- 
gence operations^ (3) GeneraS operations. 

(I) Ant i -F , jbvers i ve ope r at i ons , — (a) Exclusion cases— Largely 
as a result of the provisions of the Internal Security Act. 2,400 
aliens seeking admission were temporarily excluded, and 13,000 a,, en 
crewmen were ordered held on board their vessels pending nvesti- 
gations of thei- secur,ty status In 156 cases the temporary 

exclusions were made permanent wthout according the aiiens a hear- 
ing before a Board of Specia< Inquiry, This was because the 
excluding decisions were based on confidential information, the 
disclosure of which wouid be detrimental to the public interest 
The cases of 73 temporari iy exciuded a.iens were referred to Boards 
of Special Inqui^'y fo" hearng and determination of admiss: bi ! ity . 

(b) Deportation cases - The Act of October i6. 9i8; as 
amended, provides for the deportation of aiiens who hold subversive 
beliefs or who have been members of or affiliated with subversive 
organizations During the past year the .918 Act was amended by 
the Internal Security Act of :950„ with the result that the pro- 
scribed classes were greatly amp; -fled. At the same time, member- 
ship in certain organizations (notably the Communist Party; became 
per se a cause for deportation This re.;eved the Service of 
proving the subversive character of the organization. 

During the yeas just ended, 2, 363 aiiens were invest. gated to 
determine whether they were deportable under the i918 Act Warrants 
of arrest in deportation proceedings were issued in 74 cases on 
evidence produced by such investigations Completed hearings m 157 
cases were referred to the Centra* Office for adjudication during 
the same period 

One case of interest was that of Andrew Dmytryshyn, Extended 
hearings were heid and concluded during the past year, and on June 4_. 
1951, an order of deportation was entered This is the first case 
in which deportation has been ordered under the 1918 Act based on 
membership in the Inte-^nat onai Workers Order 

(c) Denial of naturalization cases ■ Sect.on 305 of the Nation- 
ality Act of 1940 prohibits the naturalization of any alien who has 
held certain subvers:ve beliefs or who has been a member of or 
affiliated with a subversive organization at any time within iO years 



- 45 - 

prior to filing his petition for naturalization The Internal 
Security Act of 1950 amended Section 305 by great. y emarging the 
types of organizations which fai i within the statutory ban, During 
the year just ciosed, 359 investigations were completed in cases 
involving possible den.ai of naturalization under Section 305 

(d) Revocation of naturalization cases, — In a number of cases^ 
evidence has been obtained that naturalized citizens are engaged 
i n subversi ve activities, thereby giving rise to the possibility 
that they may have obtained naturalization by fraud or illegality 
In such cases, investigation :s conducted to determine whether 
the naturalization is subject to revocation under Section 338 of 
the Nationality Act of 1940 In addition Section 305 of that Act, 
as amended by the Internal Security Act of i950. sets up new 
grounds for denaturalization based upon subversive activity within 
5 years after naturalization During the past year, !,838 investi- 
gations were intiated for possibe revocat . on of natural , zat ion 
based on proscribed conduct 

(2) Ant : smugg I . nq and i ntelligenc e o peratio ns. — -; a; Smuggling,, 
stowaways, and deserting crewmen —Adverse conditions abroad, the 
presence of many European and Oriental nationals in nearby countries, 
ease of smuggling by piane, and the h.gh prices paid to smugglers 
have made organized smuggling a b.g business m recent years To 
cope With this situation, a Central Office unit collects and clas- 
sifies a. 1 data aval I able concern I ng .Micit entries, disseminates 
relevant information to the Fieid and coordinates ant; smuggling 
I nvest i gat .ons. In the Fie.d, additional investigative personnel 
have been concentrated at seaports and other focal points through- 
out the country where stowaway and other smuggling activities are 
I ike I y to take p lace 

During the past year, 497 stowaways vBre detected and excluded 
on arrival at various seaports in the United States There is aiso 
evidence of concerted action in bringing aliens to the United States 
in the guise of crewmen who,, once granted shore leave, promptly 
desert and attempt to remain here indefinitely. Thousands of these 
deserting crewmen were apprehended i ast year , 

A typica; exam.ple of smuggi.ng by ship occurred on September 26, 
1950, when the S S BRASIL arrived at New York with iO stowaways 
concealed on board These stowaways had been furnished with seamen=s 
clothes and documents by crew members who were part of the smuggling 
ring Prompt action resulted m the detection and apprehension of 
10 landed stowaways ind.ctments were returned against 28 persons, 
including the iO stowaways, the six crew members who assisted them, 
and 12 other persons who participated ashore in the smuggling con- 
spiracy On con/ict on. the ringleader was sentenced to prison 
for two years, and commensurate sentences were imposed on the others 



~ 46 - 

(b) False documents — Akin to the problem of the smuggled 
alien is that presented by the aliens who attempt entry on the basis 
of forged, altered or otherwise false documents. Here again, there 
is evidence of organized international traffic in illicit papers, in 

some instances, foreign passports and other documents prerequisite 
to the issuance of a visa have been forged In other cases, the 

foreign passports have been stolen in blank and trafficked commer- 
cially, to be filled in as required by the purchaser In some cases, 
aliens have procured the execution of delayed American birth certi- 
ficates on the basis of fraudulent evidence, and have then attempted 
reentry in the guise of American citizens 

One of the most flagrant fraudulent practices used to evade 

the immigration laws in seeking residence in the United States has 
occurred in connection with Chinese claiming the right to admission 
because of their relationship to United States citizens. This fraud 
might well be termed a Chinese school for a short cut to United 
States citizenship. It has been established by the admissions of 
Chinese applicants who sought to gain entry into the United States 
at the port ofSan Francisco during the past fiscal year, that the 
claimed relationship to United States citizens does not exist in fact, 
but that the fictitious story of relationship has been learned in 
a coaching school in Hong Kong Together with an alleged mother and 
brother he studies about a viiiage in China in which he was allegedly 
born. He learns the names of ail the villagers and other details 
of the small village This information wi i i coincide with informa- 
tion which a Chinese whose status as a citizen has been conceded, 
has given to the Immigration Service upon his return from visits to 
China over the years, The coaching school will furnish the alleged 
family with photographs of the alleged husband and father. He will 
learn all about the alleged father's relatives; about deaths occur- 
ring in the family history, about his various trips to China from 
the United States 

This system is definitely established by investigations con- 
ducted in Hong Kong during the past fiscal year and the admissions 
obtained from applicants and other Chinese, In one recent case one 
of the alleged Ch.nese sons informed the immigration authorities at 
the port of arrival, of the school and the fact that he had met his 
alleged mother, with whom he traveled, for the first time at this 
school and that the alleged brother who also accompanied him had 
joined the alleged mother and himself at the school. When the alleged 
father at the port of arrival made a sworn statement that the boy 
was in fact his blood son, the boy told the alleged father that he 
was not, in fact, his son and that his blood father resided in Hong 
Kong. The blood father had talked to our officers in Hong Kong and 
was well known to them 

During the past fiscal year a total of 1,688 Chinese persons 
arrived at San Francisco who claimed a right to enter the United 



- 47 - 

States by reason of alleged relationship to ac-tizen. From the 
foregoing, it will be apparent that these cases are such as to re- 
quire very exhaustive examination and thorough investigation because 
of the possibility that the claim of relationship may be fraudulent 
The entire absence of any records pertaining to btrlhs, marriages , 
or deaths in China makes it impossibie to verify any statements 
of such applicants on the issue of relationship from documentary 
sources, and the decisions in these cases must therefore rest 
almost entirely on the testimony of the principals The burden of 
sifting the claimsin such a large number of cases of this type 
is of course substantial and requires the expenditure of a great 
deal of manpower on the part of primary inspectors members of 
boards of special inquiry, interpreters, and investigators 

(3) Genera! operations , — Even in the fieid of general investi- 
gations required in the execution of the laws administered by this 
Service, the stress of external events during the past year created 
its own pecu i i ar impact For example, the Interna! Security Act 
of 1950, which added to the classes of excludable aliens, precipi- 
tated a rush of advance appiicat.ons for the benefits of the 9th 
Proviso to the Immigration Act of i9'7 Each application required 
individual security Clearance During the past year_ 2, 34 such 
applications were received 

Simiiariy, the Interna! Security Act amended the Alien 
Registration Act of 1940 by requiring an a.iens to fne annually 
a report of their current address The number of reports received 
in 1951 fell short of the number of anens required to report, and 
these noncompliance cases have added materially to the investi- 
gative burden of the Service The f u ■ I effect of this increase 
will not be manifested, however, until the fiscai year i952 
Similarly, among the aliens who did report their current address 
in 1951 were many who are here in an 1 ilegai status, and numer- 
ous cases for investigation are presented thereby, which wi i i be 
reflected in the report for the current fiscal year 

The table which follows showsthe principal types of investiga- 
tions that figured prominently in the work of the fiscal year 



48 



Type of case 

Total 

Violation of general irmigration iaws 

Violation of status of visitors, students, trans, ts 

and treaty merchants - - .. ^ , , 

Suspension of deportat-on (under Section 19(c) 

Immigration Act of February 5, 1917, as amended) 
V i o I at ! on of A ^ i en Reg >. st rat i on Act , , 
Investigation of displaced persons 

I nvest ' gat . on of paro i ees ., , 

Subversive a, lens (under Act of October 16. 1918. as 

amended) 2,363 

Natural ization investigations 

Revocat{on of naturalization, : - 26 ■ 

Petit. ons for naturai ization , . . 6 236 

Other naturai ization cases 7,358 

Smugg : ;ng . , , . , 1,7 '5 

Miscellaneous 55 615 



Number of 


investigations 


256.990 


■05,918 


27,723 


i 1,351 


29,365 


2,309 


5,776 



Ai ien Parole 

There cont nued to be an increase irrthe number of trans- 
actions mvotvipg pe-'sons under deportation proceedings who are re- 
leased under authorization of 8 CFR '50 6, pending finai disposition 
of cases. These ,nciude ( 1) those whose deportation cannot be 
effected because travel documents cannot be procured, (2) persons 
released pendng hearing or deciSion or result of appeai, ^3i those 
for whom transportation arrangements couid not be immediately com- 
pleted; and :4; those with private biiis pending. There has also 
been a substantias increase in the number of persons who stand ex- 
cluded from the United States These people are paroied to perrn:t 
the adjustment of immigration status, to defend criminai prosecution, 
to testify in criminai cases for the Government, to app;y for registry 
and similar circumstances where the case is exceptionally meritorious 
and immediate deportation cou.d be inhumane 

Prior to the passage of the internal Security Act, parole meant 
aliens at large on bond or personal recognizance Many aliens had 
been on such paroie for years (usually because deportation couid not 
be effected/. Section 23 of the internal Security Act of 1950, 
however, provides for the detention of arrested aliens or their re- 
lease on bond or conditional paroie pending final determination of 
deportabi 1 ; ty, and for six months thereafter, If deportation has 
not been effected within those six months, the aiien becomes subject 
to parole supervision to controi his conduct, associates,, and 
activities. The penalty for violating conditional paroie iS return 



49 



to detention. Wilful failure to comply with the restrictions of 
parole supervision is a felony. 

In June 1950 there were 11,237 persons on parole. During the 
fiscal year under review 13, 132 aliens, were placed on parole, while 
9,002 were removed from parole, thus leaving a net figure of 15,27 1. 

The chart below shows the number of aliens on parole each month, 
and points to the effect of the Internal Security Act on parole pro- 
cedures. 

AL I ENS ON PAROLE 



Thousands 



Years ended June 30, 1950 and 195 



20- 



10 



1 — i — I — I — \ — m — I — 1 r 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 1950 ^^"^ 1951 



UJift(iim\\\uu* 



\\\\v\^' 



^^^^^\\' 



UVVA\\\' 



A\\\\^ 






JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT- NOV, DEC. JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE 



The number placed on parole during the year rose in an almost 
constant upward curve from a low of 379 during July 1950 to 1,690 
during June 1951. During the fiscal year 1950 the largest number 
placed on parole was 1,521 in November 1949, with an average per 
month of 947. The change from very little parole supervision to the 
present law requiring supervision of much the same nature as that of 
the Probation Officers or Parole Officers of the various States has 
necessitated the creation of entirely new organizational units for 
enforcement of the parole provisions of the internal Security Act. 
Due to the wery magnitude of the task and the small force so 
assigned, there are still approximately 15,600 cases to be brought 
under the parole supervision required by the Act. Present indica- 
tions are that this backlog will be overcome during the present 



~ 50 - 

fiscal year, so that the Service should enter the fiscal year 1953 
with practically every alien under proceedings either detained at 
Serv;ce expense, or under parole supervision. 

New duties and responsibilities which increase the degree of 
control over the conduct and activities of aliens on parole are: 
conditions of parole, coordinating work with parole supervisors 
(persons outside the Service), receiving the personal and written 
reports of the paro ees and presenting cases for violation of 
parole conditions or for failure to depart,. 

Detentions 

The Internal Security Act, making membership in communist and 
other totalitarian groups a cause for exclusion, immediately made 
necessary the detention of large groups of aliens pending a deter- 
minatio^h of their status. Under this Act, also, more deportable 
aliens are required to be kept in detention until they can be de 
ported. Last year the Service, for a brief period, was able to 
t ransport i l legal Mexican al i ens by air to pi aces near thei r homes 
in central Mexico, To do this the apprehended Mexicans had to be 
held in detention quarters until they could be assembled and trans- 
ported by plane. 

To provide proper care for the increase in the number of al iens 
in detention,, which was expected following the passage of the 
Internal Security Act of 1950, a survey of Service facilities and 
personnel was made As a result, 65 additional Security Officers 
were appointed in the New York, Los Angeles, and Boston districts 
and authority was granted for the appointment of others at Seattle 
whenever required in that area 

Since November of 1950, officials responsible for the operation,, 
maintenance, and administration of each detention facility have been 
meeting once a month to discuss their problems. These meetings are 
proving effective in promoting economy, efficiency, and stabi I ity in 
a period of rapidly changing market conditions and emergency situa- 
t ions. 

The entire Security force of 375 men is now dressed in a smart 
green uniform which compares favorably with the uniforms worn by 
Immigrant Inspectors and Border Patrol. 

A manual to meet the needs of the detention facilities is in 
preparation This will include a revision of existing operating 
practices and procedures., detailed instructions for the culinary 
service, and uniform standards to be maintained throughout the 
Service with respect to the care and treatment of aliens 

The report on detentions this year covers ( I) aliens detained, 
(2) economies effected in detention facilities, and (3) a description 
of the detention faci I ities. 



- 51 - 

MANDAYS OF DETENTION IN SERVICE AND OTHER 

OPERATED FAC I L I Tl ES 

Year ended June 30, 1951 



MANDAYS 
100,000 

80,000 

60,000 

40,000 

20,000 




JULY AUG. SEPT OCT NOV, DEC. JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE 



( I ) Al lens detained . — Last year the number of al iens detained 
increased by about 27 percent over the previous year; however, the 
average number of man-days detention did not materially increase 
in spite of the mounting difficulties in procurement of travel 
documents, and in returning excludable and deportable aliens to 
foreign countries. 

Aliens detained and average days detention 
Years ended June 30, 1949-1951 



Years ended 
June 30 


Total 




In service- 
operated 
f ac i 1 i t i es 


In non-service- 
. operated 
f ac i 1 i t i es 


1951: 
Number of al iens detained 
Average days detention... 


124. 187 
6. 


55 


48,627 

9. 19 


75,560 

4.85 


1950: 
Number of aliens detained 
Average days detention... 


97,710 
6 


87 


38,515 
10.64 


99, 195 

4.43 


1949: 

Number of aliens detained 
Average days detention... 


102,523 
7 


50 


49,261 

9.98 


53,262 

5.20 



w^ 



- 52 - 

liil MAN DAYS OF DETENTION (BY MONTHS) 

Year ended June 30, 1951 

MANDAYS ^ MANDAYS 
40,000| 1 1 1 1 1 1 \ 1 1 1 1 40,000 



30,000 — 



20,000 



10,000 




30,000 



20,000 



10,000 



IMANDAYS 

: 40,0001 1 1 1 1 r 



30,000 



ig 20,000 



10,000 



JULY ASONDJFMAM JUNE 
( mnnt hs ) 

MANDAYS 

40,000| 1 1 1 1 



~r~r 



LOS ANGELES 




30,000 — 



20,000 



10,000 



1 I I I r 



SAN ANTONIO 



JULY A 



N D J F 
(months ) 



M JUNE 




JULY A 



N D J F 
( months ) 



M JUNE 



Following the passage of the Internal Security Act, the popu- 
lation at Ellis Island increased from approximately 400 to 1,200 
within 90 days. Indications are that the population may reach 1,500 
as a result of the necessity for detaining aliens under deportation 
proceedings, as authorized by the Act. 

In the Los Angeles and San Antonio Districts, the sharp in- 
crease in man-days detention shown in the charts above in June, are 
due to the detention of aliens at El Centre, California, and Brownsvi I le, 
Texas. 



(2) Economies effected . — Although the Cost of Living Index of 
the Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates a rise in food costs during 
the last calendar year of 10 percent, per capita food costs in 
Service detention facilities were heldto8.3 percent above the 
figure for the previous year. At the close of June 1950, per capita 
food costs were 54 cents a day; as of the close of the fiscal year 
just ended they had risen to 58.5 cents. 

An adjustment in daily rates has been agreed upon effective 
July I, 1951, between the Bureau of Prisons and the Immigration and 
Naturalization Service, whereby each agency will pay the other 
actual unit cost of holding aliens in penitentiaries or United States 



- 53 - 

prisoners in detention facilities. For many years, under a reciprocal 
agreement, this Service paid a flat rate of 75 cents to the Bureau 
of Prisons, whi le the latter paid us $1.00 per person for these services. 
Under the new arraingment the average unit cost to each agency wi II 
amount to approximately $3.00 per day. 



For the fiscal year ended June 30, 1951, 1,237,460 meals were 
served at the following detention Service facilities: 



Detention 
faci I ity 



Number of 

meals 
furnished 



Detention 
f ac i I i ty 



Nunber of 

meals 
furn i shed 



Ellis Island 

San Francisco 

San Pedro 

Camp El I iott ±/ . . . 
Camp Gi I lespie 2/. 



586,484 
203,889 
174, 162 
122,367 
45,318 



El Centre 3/. 

*Honolulu 

*Boston 

'Seattle 



38,640 
20,376 
30,972 
15,252 



_!_/ Closed as of January 15. 1951. 
2/ Opened as of March 8, 1951. 
^/ Reopened June 1, 1951. 

* No Service-operated culinary staff in facility, 
by local restaurants under contract. • 



Meals are furnished 



In addition to meals served in Service detention facilities, 
more than 25,000 meals and box lunches were furnished to aliens in 
transit to deportation points. 



(3) Detention facilities . — Detention facilities vary in terms 
of the purpose they serve, aind also in the adequacy of the facilities 
to meet the purposes. There are eight service facilities. Most of 
them, as may be seen in the map below, are at the seaports of entry. 

IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE 

DETENTION FACILITIES 



(T) SAN FRANCISCO 




EAST BOSTON 



ELLIS ISLAND 



HAWAII 



Detention Facility Only. 

U.S. Border Patrol and Detention 

Faci I ity. 



. 54 - 

(a) Eilis Island -—Best known to the pub.ic and largest of the 
faci I ities is Ei i is island. As we have seen ear I ier , in this report, 
the detainee population at Eiiis Island expanded rapidly because of 
the Internal Security Act This immediately posed a problem of space 
Some of the space at Eiiis Island had been relinquished for files 
storage space When it was reclaimed for detention quarters^ waiis 
and floors were in bad shape, but they had to be used because of the 
emergency. 

Lack of space also posed a feeding problem. The present dining 
room seats only 500 persons. Since aliens under warrant proceedings 
are served separately from passengers, this meant that meals were 
served practically the entire day. When 7,500 square feet of file 
space adjacent to the din;ng room has been repaired and equipped for 
dining space, this problem will be solved. 

The fact that the Public Health Service closed its hospital on 
the Island in February contributed to crowded conditions. The 20-bed 
infirmary and Public Health medical staff immediately installed in 
the detention quarters did not include facilities for X-ray examinet- 
tion. Consequently, hundreds of medicai hold cases had to be 
examined at one of five different Public Health hospitals in the 
New Yor^k area. This procedure was so slow that the group of manda- 
tor! ly excludable cases totalled 125 in June, the largest number of 
medicai cases ever in detention at Ellis Island Through conferences 
with the United States Public Health authorities at New York and in 
Washington, it is hoped that the situation may soon be cleared. 

The new school for children was formally opened at Ellis Island 
on May 22, 195:, with appropriate ceremonies. Its modern equipment 
and design received wide commendation from the press and public 
This is especial iy gratifying since the entire construction of the 
school was supervised by the engineering staff of the Service at 
E.MS Island at a mmimLm cost,. In May as many as 125 children were 
in detention; the daily average for the year was approximately 35 

Other changes and improvements have been made; rearrangement 
and better use of space,: new paint and linoleum; a new motion picture 
projector, a new aitar, pulpit, piano and organ for the 200 capacity 
chapel were furnished by the social service organizations, but the 
physical plant leaves much to be desired, • Uncomfortable, inadequate, 
and inappropriate furniture is found in the rooms where passengers, 
persons under warrant proceedings, and their visitors must meet, or 
while away the waiting periods. An integrated plan adequately to 
equip these rooms is being prepared, so that a start can be made to- 
ward overal I improvement. 

Forty newly appointed Security Officers (trainee) finished a 
six weeks course of training at Ei I is Island in June.. This training 
school, which has been held annually for the past six years, will be 
extended to other Districts in order that all Security Officers may 



- 55 - 

receive unifonn instruction and specialized training in tliei r duties. 
The scope of in-Ser/ice training for emplcyees at Ellis Island was 
enlarged when this Service participated in the BL;''eau of PrisoAS 
School of Cocking which was held in March and April at the National 
Training Schoo for Boys. Washington, D, C. Plans have been made 
to enroll culinary personnel in future classes as they a-e scheduled 
in various sections of the United States. 

A pocket pampnlst to be given to a: I detainees upon admission 
to Ellis Island ("las been prepared and will be issued shortly. Printed 
in eight languages, it wi i I carry a brief message from the Commissioner 
and answer routine questions relative to ''iv'ng cond tions, v siting 
privileges medical recreation and religious faci ities, general 
administrative pocedures and rules of conduct Similar pamphlets 
for issuance at other Service facilities a-e receiving consideration. 

More than 800 visitors representing educational., governmental, 
and religious groups, as weil as members of both foreign and United 
States diplomatic and consular services and press inspected the 
facility last yea<' Among the visitors or one day were 250 membe''S 
of the Little Cong 'ess who are employed as administrative or staff 
assistants to Members of Congress 

(b) Facilities on Mexican border, —The a: r lift of Mexican 
nationals, which began on June I, necessitated the reopening of our 
facility at El Centre, California This facility consists of severa. 
barracks surrounded by a 10 foot wire fence located at the rear of 
the Border Patrol station Accommodations are suitable for the tempo- 
rary or overnight detentions which are usuai in this agricultural 
area. The air lift was later extended to Brownsville. Texas., from 
which point aliens were deported to Durango and San Luis Potosi, 
Contractual jails in the area, which ai'e extremely inadequate and un- 
satisfactory under normal conditions, were taxed to the utmost A 
Service-operated detention facility, similar to those at Camp Gillespie 
and El Centre, continues to be the pressing need in the Brownsville- 
McAl len-Val ley area. 

On January 15 the United States Navy reactivated Camp Elliott^ 
located near San Diego, a portion of which had been operated as a 
facility for the detention of Mexican .lationals for the past five 
years Until March 8, when Camp Gillespie was opened a': El Cajon, 
15 miles north of San Diego, Mexican detainees from the Camp 
Elliott-San Diego area were cared for at the San Pedro and El Centre 
facilities and In adjacent contractual jaiis Camp Gi I iespie, which 
IS now accommodating approximately 200 aliens a day, has been fur- 
nshed with new equipment which will be transferred to a permanent 
detention facility in that area at a ;ater date In this connection, 
the Service now holds titie to five acres of land at Chula Vista, 
California, on the Mexican border, upon which it :s proposed to build 
a combined Border Patrol stat.on and detention facility 



- 56 

San Pedro detention facility, bui it in 1936,, has acapacty of 
280. it IS located on TerTtiinai I si and,, 20 mles south of Los Angeies, 
is well located^ has adequate outdoor recreation space and modern 
dormitory and cu I inary equipment The average number of aliens de- 
tained per day for the f.sca! year just ended was 176 The majority 
of the detainees are Mexican and the turnover is rapid because the 
facility fs only ^20 miles north of the Mexican border, It is re- 
garded as a stopover for al iens enroute fo- deportation from San Fran- 
cisco and farther north or from the general Los Angeles area 

•! c ) San F-.'anciSco ■■ ■Datent .ens at San Francisco increased by 
approximately !8 percent, largely because of the extensive investiga- 
tions necessary in cases of Chinese seekng adm'ssion A dai •> average 
of 195 aliens, the majority of wnoin were Chinese, were sn detention 
throughout the year just ended Ai ! sast year there was an average 
of 35 Chinese in detention who had been there for more than 90 days 
each The detention quarters are on the i2th and i3th floors of the 
Appraisers Building, in which the Immigration and Natural i zat ion 
Service offices are ocated in downtown San Franc i sco They are not 
generally wel i p anned or located for detention purposes, although 
well furnished Recreation fac irties are iimlted to separate porches, 
and day rooms, To offset the effects of long detention,, and the 
lacl< of proper outside recreationa; facilities, traditional Chinese 
dishes are included in the menus 

Id) East Boston — The East Boston detention facility occupies 
the first fioor of a t'wo story bnck building owned by the Govern- 
ment. The quarters consist of three i arge dormrtory sty^e rooms 
suitable for housing approximately 250 male persons. There are no 
small rooms, in which fam: . les may be kept together, Oi" for single 
women The present dining room is adequate for the population, 

which averaged 28 per day in the fiscal year 1951 Recreation i awn 
space enclosed by a 10 foot wire fence adjoins the facility, Neither 
the location nor accommodations of this facl.ity conform to Sen.' ice 
standards of detention An avei^age of 28 aliens were detamed per 
day durmg the fiscal year ending June 30, i95i,. 

lej Seattle — The detention quarters at Seatt.e have been oper- 
ated on a part time basis since February of i950 as a result of a 
steady decrease in the number of passengers seeking admittance to the 
United States from the Orient. Ample accommodations for passengers 
not immediately admissible, are available, warrant cases are detained 
in contractual jajis In the Seatt e area at an average cost of 
approximately $1,25 per day, whi le the detention quarters, which have 
a capacity of 180, remain on a standby basis ready for immediate 
occupancy. The fac-iity lacks outdoor recreation grounds, but other- 
wise IS adequate and well i ocated 

(f> Honolulu - Detentions at the Honoi ui u- detent ion facility 
were affected by the Internal Security Act, but not sufficiently to 
initiate emergency measures This facii.ty,, wh:ch has adeouate 



- 57 - 

accorr"iodat ions for a maximum capacity of 300, is weli located with 
considerable outdoor recreation space Meals are furnished by a 
local caterer who serves Oriental and European foods according to 
population requirements. An average of 19 aliens were in detention 
per day during the fiscal year ending June 30, 195!, the majority of 
whom were Chinese or Korean. 

The curtailment of Seattle and El Centre facilities during a 
period of relative inactivity resulted in direct operating savings 
of approximately $50,000 for the six month period January through 
June, J950 in connection with the necessity to purchase new equip- 
ment for emergency purposes at a cost of approximately $30,0 00 
during the fiscal year ended June 30, 195:, tor Seattle, El Centre, 
and Ellis Island facilities, as well as for Camp Gillespie, the 
savings of $50,000 effected in the previous year should be borne in 
mind in order to properly evaluate long range planning and operating 
efficiency. 

Deportations and Voluntary Departures 

Year by year since World War II, the volume of a! lens deported 
or required to depart has multiplied, largely because of the spread- 
ing encroachment of Mexican illegal entrants into rural and indus- 
trial areas in the United States It is these illegal entrants who 
swell the volume, particularly of voluntary departures. In the 
fiscal year 1951, the total reached 686,713, an increase of 19 per- 
cent over last year. Deportations more than doubled and voluntary 
departures were at an al I time high of 673, 169. 

( I ) Voluntary departures — Voluntary departures are of t\Ao kinds. 
In the first type, (there were 14, 176 last year), warrants of arrest 
have been issued.. In some instances, deportation hearings were ac- 
corded, but it was determined not to issue orders of deportation, but 
to require the aliens to depart In such transactions, the work in- 
volved is about equal to that of a true deportation :n the majority 
of cases, only warrants of arrest had been issued, the privilege of 
departure in lieu of deportation was granted early in the proceedings, 
eliminating a portion of the hearings procedure 

The second kind of voluntary departures comprises98 percent of 
those required to depart m lieu of deportation The procedure is 
to obtain a statement from the alien showing illegal presence in 
the United States, and requesting the privilege of departure. The 
granting of the privilege of departure in lieu of deportation en- 
abled the Service to enforce the departure of 658,993 a; lens who 
were illegally in the United States. This was many, many times the 
number that could have been deported under the ful I formal procedure. 

While voluntary departure has the advantage of being less expen- 
sive, and makes it possible to complete large numbers of cases, it 
has beer quite unsuccessful in damming the flood of illegal Mexican 



58 



a I I ens 



Many of those permitted to depart were "repeaters" - persons 
who returned time after time after having departed to towns in Mexico 
adjacent to the border Effective law enforcement requires deporta- 
tion with the whole process of investigations, hearings, and 
detention (often prolonged by appeals and further consideration) 
Deportation entails the further penalty of imprisonment for again 
returning after deportation 

Many of those permitted to depart voiuntari ly are not from the 
border area They are unable or unwilling either to return to their 
home loca-'ities or to find employment along the border Thus, they 
have no alternative but to face risk of arrest and deportation by 
reentering the United States In an attempt to solve at least a 
portion of the "repeater'' problem an experimental airlift operation 
was inaugurated on June 1, 1951, to remove to points in southern 
Mexico those aliens who lived in centra! and southern Mexico After 
a screening process to eliminate those whose homes were near the 
border, a totai of 9,648 were fiown - 5^699 from Ei Centre^- Califor- 
nia, and 3,949 from Brownsville, Texas, - to points 351 to i,3i4 
air-miles distant from the two points of departure,. 

While it is too soon to make fmai judgment,, the initial success 
seemed demonstrated when voluntary departures of 63, 160 in May de- 
creased to 49, ;4i during June. The June departures were the lowest 
during the fiscal year except during November through February, the 
winter season, when work in agriculture is siow In E! Centre, the 
airlift thinned out the multitude of potential invaders at the border 
to such an extent that apprehensions were reduced to a quarter of the 
volume before the airiifx 

'2i Deportations --la) Deportations effected — When a warrant 
of deportation has been executed, aliens who depart either through 
deportation at the expense of the Government, or who depart at their 
own expense are i nc i uded in depos'tatlon statistics. Foi.ow.ng the 
World War II deportations averaged about 20,000 until last year when 
the number dropped to 6.628 In the fiscal year i95l, however, the 
number more than doubled to reach i3_544. 

The very i ow number of deportations in the past two years ,s 
due to the following factors; 

(a) The volume of i i legai Mexican entries forced the Service to 
effect speedy removal of these aliens under voluntary departure pro- 
cesses Since May, 1949,. formai deportations of Mexican aliens have 
been limited to those of the criminal and immoral classes or to those 
who had previously been granted four voluntary departures 

(bj The liberalized provisions, effective Juiy 1, 1949, of 



- 59 - 

Section 19(c) of the Act of 1917, authorizing the suspension of de- 
portation on the basis of economic detriment to dependents or of 
meeting specified character and residence requirements delayed or 
eliminated deportations. At the same time, there were increases in 
stays of deportation, granted for reasons such as pending applications 
for pardons, and private bills introduced into the Congress to legal- 
ize the presence in the United States of persons who have been found 
deportable. 

(c) The effect of the Sung decision was to immediately cut off 
numerous deportations until rehearings could be held and the deporta- 
tion procedure repeated. The retarding effect of the Sung decision 
was removed when Pub! ic Law 845 on September 22, 1950, provided that 
deportation hearings be conducted without regard to the provisions of 
the Administrative Procedure Act. This again meant a reversal in pro- 
cedures and rehearings. 

(d) The inability of the Service to obtain travel documents to 
China and iron-curtain countries, or having obtained documents, the 
difficulty in arranging transportation reduced the number it was 
possible to deport. The Internal Security Act aggravated this diffi- 
culty by the provision that aliens could choose their country of 
deport at ion. 



COMPARISON OF DEPORTATIONS - BY MONTHS 
Years ended June 30, 1949 -1951 



Number 

3.000 



2.000 



1,000 



T 



T 



1949 



iiiiiiiiiii 1950 



T 



1951 




B,„„,^uu^^>^^^'""" "iiuu><^>">^"""""'"///„„„„„,^ 



4 \ j 1 — I — 4 1, T""""T" I 



><^^' 





JULY SEPT. NOV. JAN. MAR. MAY 

AUG. OCT. DEC. FEB. APR. JUNE 



- 60 - 

Comparison of deportations by months during the past three 
years shows vividly the decrease continuing from June, 1949, brought 
about by the policy of initiating deportation proceedings in only 
certain specified cases in the three Mexican border Districts, and 
the drastic decrease to less than one hundred in the two months 
following the Sung decision of February 1950. Carrying forward into 
the fiscal year 1951, the slow upward trend is interrupted in 
September, 1950, by the enactment of Pub I ic Law 845 and the Internal 
Security Act. 



DEPORTATIONS AND VOLUNTARY DEPARTURES 
Years ended June 30, 1945- 1951 



1951 



1950 



1949 



1948 



1947 



1946 



1945 



14,375 



11,270 



69,490 




ALIENS DEPARTING 
VOLUNTARILY UNDER 
PROCEEDINGS 



116,320 



80,760 



2 00 



400 
THOUSANDS 



600 



800 



- 61 - 

The table below forms a basis for comparison for the last three 
years. 

Aliens deported from the United States by country 
or region to which deported 
Years ended June 30, 1949, 1950, and 1951 

Country or region to which deported 1951 1950 1949 

All countries .. ...„ 13,544 6,628 20,040 

C,U r Up6 coaosoeBBi.rau»uaBt>DaBaau»tfu.ifiBOB 

Canada, „...„,.„. ^ „......, ^ » o ....... o .. . 

Mex i CO , . ,,,,,..,,.,...,.,.„.„.........,, 

West I nd i es, ,.,...„,, .,......,,....,, 

Cent ra i Ame r i ca. - ... ,,,,,.. 

South America. .............. ...... 

Africa ........... .i.. ......... . 

Other count ries.„ ......,„..„. ..,„.„.. . 



1,537 


947 


983 


238 


244 


225 


U 100 


737 


869 


8,928 


3,319 


16,903 


1,071 


722 


346 


163 


144 


152 


269 


160 


149 


46 


47 


39 


192 


308 


3-/4 



The causes for deportation are shown be.ow Note that 3 times 
as many subversives were deported - due to the provisions of the 
Interna; Security Act as were deported in 1950 



Miens deported from the United States by cause 

Years ended June 30, 1949, 1950, and i95l 

Cause 1951 1950 1949 



A.I causes. ..„.,....„,.. 13,544 6 ..628 20 ..040 

Criminals., ........... .,„....... „ 

I mmo ra i c I asses , , , 

Violators of narcotic laws. „.. . 

Mental or physical defectives,,...... 

Previously excluded or deported .... . 

Remained longer than authorized,.,... 

Entered without proper documents 

Abandoned status of admission........ 

Entered without inspection or by 
f al se statements, .,..„.,........,... , 

Likely to become public charges .... 

Subversive or anarchistic, ., . , . 

Mi see I i aneous. .„.......„,....„.- , 



1,036 


790 


1,024 


67 


53 


76 


62 


55 


70 


45 


53 


82 


940 


553 


3,815 


3,289 


1,661 


1,379 


5,322 


1,352 


998 


298 


224 


329 


2,293 


1,734 


12,094 


14 


38 


20 


18 


6 


4 


160 


109 


149 



- 62 - 

13) Acceptance of deportees b.y foreign countries — Deportation 
is frequently impeded because travel documents that will assure the 
alien's admission to the country to which deported cannot be obtained. 
Territorial changes, strict rulings on expatriation, and the entry 
of stowaways and other aliens without passports are some of the 
reasons why consular or diplomatic officers are unwilling to issue 
the necessary papers 

The Internal Security Act of 1950 added a number of options re- 
garding the place of deportation and also provided for prosecution 
in some cases when ai'iens ordered deported fai led or refused to de- 
part from the country 

Under this Act, the first option regarding the place of deporta- 
tion wi II be to the country specified by the ai ien "if it is wi II ing 
to accept him into its territory". When an alien specifies a country 
for deportation other than the one of which he is a native or national 
the country chosen has no obligation to accept the a. ien While 
there are sometimes valid reasons for an aiJen to specify a country 
other than his own, it often appears to be a choice made for the pur- 
pose of delaying deportation. 

Canada is specified by noncitizens of that country more often 
than any other one country, Canada has not granted permission for 
entry in any of the 325 cases in which that country was the first 
option of deportees 

The procedure described above often makes it necessary to seek 
travel documents from two or more countries before deportation can 
be accompi i shed 

Travel documents for China, and the Iron curtain countries of 
Europe are practical iy impossible to obtain. Even the possession 
of travel documents is not an assurance that an alien will be accepted 
as a deportee - even that he will be permitted to leave the United 
States, as the Polish consular authorities have had aiiens removed 
from the Polish-operated steamship "Batory" after they were placed 
on board by this Service for deportation to Poland. The opportunity 
for the Service to accomplish even such "near-deportations" ceased 
in the fiscal year i95! when the Polish Government withdrew the 
"Batory" from the Gdynia-New York run, and the sole commercial com- 
petitor a ISO withdrew its service. 

The Visa Division of the Department of State has continued its 
generous cooperation with this Service, in trying to get travel 
documents through diplomatic channels when they cannot be obtained 
through foreign consular offices Pending and new cases referred 
through the Department of State last year equalled 538 One hundred 
seven cases were disposed of as follows: 



- 63- 

Authorization for travel document granted 40 

Authorization for travel document refused 37 

Authorization for travel document no longer required 30 

Of the 431 cases still pending, over half relate to aliens from 
communist countries A smaller number of passport cases were dis- 
posed of in this year In January 1951 the issuance of travel docu- 
ments for deportees was made a function of the newly established 
German Consulate General at New York, and since April 1951 the German 
Consul at Chicago has also issued such documents^ both offices dealing 
directly w,th the Service Field Offices. 

Through the cooperation of the German Consul Genera^ in New York 
it is anticipated that there wi I 1 be a number of deportat:ons of insane 
to Germany during fiscal year 1952 The dossiers of 66 cases of physi- 
cal and mental incompetent aliens have now been referred to the German 
authorities with the view of arranging for their proper care. The 
occupation authorities could not accept these people into Germany due 
to lack of institut onai facilities. 

Yugoslavia issued the necessary trave; documents for the deporta- 
tion of its nationals, including the acceptance of three mental 
incompetents - in this type of case, their representatives he!'e must 
not only issue travel documents, but also arrange for the reception 
of the insane abroad, including accepting custody at an agreed-on 
border point These deportations were by vessels of the Military Sea 
Transport Service to Trieste, where United States m. : itary authorities 
accompi ished the del ivery at the border 

(4) Transportation for deportation — Within the United States, 
transportation to border points for deportation was by air coach when 
such a method proved cheaper than other means of transportation, in- 
cluding cost of detention and escort officer 

The outstanding achievement during the fiscal year in effecting 
the departure of al iens who were i I legal ly in the United States was 
the operation of the airlift removing "wetbacks" from points adjacent 
to the Mexican border. 

Other than to Mexico, the use of aircraft outs.de continental 
United States has been movements of individuals on regular commercial 
flights to points where the use of air was more advantageous than 
the use of steamship service Commercial planes have been used for 
deportation when it was economically advantageous, notably from the West 
Coast to Central America and from Miami to points in the Caribbean 

One contemplated flight to return a group of East Indians to 
Pakistan had to be abandoned because of the introduction of a succes- 
sion of Senate private bills in their behalf This so reduced the 
number that the cost became prohibitive and the project had to be 
abandoned 



- 64 - 

The transportation of deportees to overseas countries was often 
possible through the use of the Military Sea Transport Services. 
Deportees have gone from New York to England, Gerrrany, Greece, Italy, 
Trieste, and Panama, and from San Francisco to the Philippines, Japan, 
and Korea. During the tourist season when space on vessels is not 
available, deportation to the Scandinavian countries is accompMshed 
by utilizing MSTS to Germany thence air - through arrangements made 
by the cooperation of the German Consul General in New York in each 
individual case for surveillance between the port of debarkation and 
the airport, and for reimbursement of the Gemian civilian authorities 
for any incidental expenses involved. Similarly MSTS is used for 
deportation to Austria and Czechoslovakia via Germany and for depor- 
tations to Yugoslavia via Trieste. 

(5) Destitute aliens removed . — One hundred one aliens were re- 
moved from the United States under Section 23 of the Immigration Act 
of 1917, as amended by the Act of May 14, 1939, which provides for 
the voluntary removal of destitute aliens who applied for return to 
their native lands at Government expense. Aliens removed under the 
provisions of this Act became ineligible for readmission except upon 
approval of the Secretary of State and the Attorney General 

Included in those removed last year were a war bride who was 
accompanied by her citizen husband and family (whose passages were 
paid by interested persons). 

Excl us ions 

Aliens who arrive at ports of entry seeking admission to the 
United States may be excluded if they fail to qualify under the 
immigration laws of the United States, In most instances aliens 
held for exclusion are given a hearing before a three-member Board 
of Special Inquiry, From an order of exclusion by the Board, an 
appeal lies to the Commissioner except in certain instances when the 
Public Health Officer certifies an alien to be inadmissible 

Other cases in which there is no appeal are those cases in which 
the excluding decision is based on confidential information, the 
disclosure of which would be detrimental to the public interest 

Following the passage of the Internal Security Act, 2,400 persons 
were temporarily excluded because of membership in proscribed organi- 
zations. In nine-tenths of the 2,400 cases of temporary exclusion, 
membership was nominal; the admission status was changed to that 
accorded by the visa after the passage of Pub I ic Law 14 . To avoid pro- 
longed detentions at ports of entry into the United States pending 
determination of admissibility, a force of primary inspectors has been 
stationed in Europe to make immigration inspections of displaced 
persons to be admitted Most of the mental and physical defectives 
excluded were excluded before embarking from Europe, 



- 65 

During the fiscal year 195', 5,647 aliens were excluded from 
the United States, one-third of whom sought admission at the Canadian 
and Mexican land borders for less than 30 days. Seventy percent 
were excluded on documentary grounds An increase is noted in the 
exclusion of criminals and menta! or physical defectives During 
the past year, 136 alien border-crossers and 29 other aliens were 
excluded on subversive grounds Of the 29 subversive aliens excluded 
who were not border crossers, 14 were born in the European i ron - 
curtain countries, eight in Canada, and seven in other countries 



Aliens excluded from the United States, by cause 
Year ended June 30, 195 1 



Cause 



Number excluded 



Total 



Border 



crossers — 



1/ 



Other 
al iens 



Ail causeSo „ , . , , . . „....„.,....= 5,647 1,863 

Without proper documents. ,,.„.„ ..... , . 

Criminals.. ,..,,........ 

Mental or physica; defectives 
Subversive or anarchistic........... 

Stowaways , ,,....„.. „..,„„,.. o . . , 

Had been previously excluded or deported 

Likely to become public charges .....,,. 

I mmoral c I asses. , , ... ..o .,.....,.„......-. » 

Previously departed to avoid mi ■ tary 

service . 
Unable to read lOver '6 years of age) ,. 
Contract laborers ! 

Other classes .... 63 34 



3,784 



3,963 


i. 180 


2,783 


610 


273 


337 


434 


97 


337 


i65 


i36 


29 


I2i 


~ 


I2i 


1:9 


72 


47 


I ;6 


38 


78 


38 


23 


15 


.4 





4 


3 


- 


3 



29 



U Aliens seek.ng admission at land borders for less than 30 days 



CHAPTER 



Naturalization 



The enactment of the Internal Security Act brought with it 
important changes in the requirements for naturalization. 

Under this Act it became incumbent upon petitioners for natural- 
ization to establish that they had not been members of fascist, nazi, 
communist, or other totalitarian organizations d.uring the ten years 
immediately preceding the date for filing their petitions for natu- 
ralization. Included in this group of petitiogs were hundreds of 
"Gl brides". Many of these wives were compel led to join youth organi- 
zations while attending school, and their membership was within the 
statutcwy ten year period. 

Upon the enactment of Pub I ic Law 14- . on March 28, 1951, defining 
membership or affiliation in totalitarian organizations under immi- 
gration laws, the Service took the initative in applying such 
definitions to naturalization cases. Under this interpretation, only 
voluntary membership in such organizations precluded petitioners 
from being naturalized. Specifically designated as being involun- 
tary was membership in a totalitarian organization before the appli- 
cant was 16 years of age. Thus the Service was able to recommend 
to the naturalization courts that hundreds of petitions be granted, 
in whose cases it would have been necessary to make an adverse 
recommendat ion. 

Many other provisions of the Nationality Act of 1940 were 
amended by the Internal Security Act. For the first time in history, 
a petitioner for naturalization was required to be able to read and 
write words in ordinary usage in the English language. Heretofore 
he was required only to be able to speak the English language. How- 
ever, persons who had resided in the United States for 20 years 



- 68 - 

and were over 50 years of age were exempted from the i Jteracy pro- 
vision in the law although they were st : i i '-equired to demonstrate 
knowledge and understanding of the fundamentals of the history, 
principles and form of Government of the United States., In those 
cases in which the applicant was subject to the •; iteracy test, the 
Service directed that the examination be conducted by the use of 
one of four Federal Textbooks on citizenship issued by this Service 
This was to achieve uniformity as weM as to meet the mandate of the 
law that the test be conducted in simple language and that no extra- 
ordinary conditions be imposed 

The Act also for the first time brought into harmony the incon- 
sistency that has existed between the provisions of the immigration 
laws directing the deportat.on of aliens amenab.e the'-eto and the 
provisions in the naturalization laws which permitted the naturali- 
zation of such aliens The Act provided that no person can be 
naturalized against whom there is an outstanding order of deporta- 
bSlity, nor can a final hearing be he d on a petition for naturali- 
zation whiie deportat:on proceedings are pending agamstthe 
petitioner Careful inquiry )S therefore pursued ;n the case of 
each applicant to ascertain whether o:'' not there has been a viola- 
tion of the immigration aws and whether grounds fo' deportation 
exist Warrants of arrest are issued in appropriate cases and the 
petitions held in abeyance pending termination of the deportation 
proceedings The natura; I zat ion of undesirable aliens and circum- 
vention of the immigration laws is thereby prec uded , 

The Act also made impoi'tant changes in the powers of the 
designated examiner conduct ing preliminary examinations upon peti- 
tions for naturalization by piacing on an equal footing the 
recommendations made by that officer to the Court and the recom- 
mendation made by the Commissioner In ttiose cases in which the 
Commissioner disagrees with the recommendation of the designated 
examiner, both are presented to the naturalization court The 

Commissioner has accordingly required that certain categories of 
cases presenting important issues such as membership in proscribed 
organizations loyaity to the United States and good morai character 
be submitted to h,m for review after the designated examine:' has 
reached a decision Where the Comm ssioner disagrees with the 

examiner's recommendation,, he prepares a memorandum contan.ng the 
facts and issues in the case with findings and concius.ons thereon 
which are presented to the court at the finai hearing This pro- 
cedure has produced full and complete records in controversial or 
involved cases and has safeguarded the rights o-f the petitioner 
It is significant, however, that on iy 78 pet'tioners^ or ,ess than 
one percent of those presented to the courts were admittedto 
citizenship over the objections of this Service 

Cert ificates of ar rival --General ly, the first step toward 
citizenship through naturalization is to prove adm'ssicn for law- 
ful permanent residence Because many of the immigrants who have 



- 69- 

become residents of the United States in recent years desire to 
become citizens, 110.029 certificates of arrival were issued by the 
field offices last year^ 

Declarations of intention — Except in certain cases (notably 
wives of citizens), the next step in the process of attaining citizen- 
ship is the filing of an application for a declaration of intention 
to become a citizen. The "emovai of the literacy requirement for 
older aliens enabled many who had previously been unable to qualify 
in that respect to file applications for naturalization. Possibly 
the provisions in the Internal Security Act requiring aliens to 
notify the Commissioner within the ten days following January 1st 
of their current addresses also stimulated the filing of applications 
to make declarations of intention, since there was a marked increase 
in the number of such applications filed in the last six months of 
the fiscal year Applications for declarations numbered 125,262, 
seven percent more than the I 17 435 filed last year, Declarations 
filed equalled 9, 497, a figure slightly lower than that of last 
year. The decrease was due to the Field Offices inability to pro- 
cess applications for declarations because of t.me required for 
invest i gat ions 

Pet i t i ons f i i ed — There were 61,634 petitions filed last year. 
This was also a seven percent reduction from last year Applications 
for petitions, however, i,ke the applications for declarations, showed 
an appreciable increase in the last six months of the fiscal year. 
This year again many wives of men in our occupation forces all over 
the world were permitted to join their husbands. This permission 
entitled them to claim the benefits of Section 312 of the Nationality 
Act, and many petitioners took advantage of that fact. 

Petitions granted . — In spite of a definite Interest in naturali- 
zation, evidenced by larger citizenship classes and more applications 
for declarations and petitions, the actual number of persons natura^- 
I i zed (54 716) was low — lower than it has been m any year since 
1910 The presenting of naturalization petitioners was somewhat re- 
tarded by the additional requirements of the Internal Security Act, 
but the principal reason for the record low probably lies in the fact 
that there was a low point in the filing of declarations In 1945- 
1946-1947. This means that there is now (five years later) a small 
number of potential citizens who have fulfilled the time require- 
ment to meet the general provisions of the nationality laws. 



-70 - 



Thousands 
200 



DECLARATIONS OF INTENTION FILED 
AND PERSONS NATURALIZED 
Years ended June 30, 1946-1951 



150 



PERSONS NATURALIZED 




DECLARATIONS OF 
INTENTION FILED 



1946 



1947 



1948 



1949 



1950 



1951 



Of the 54,7 16 naturalized, only 14,864 were naturalized under 
the general provisions of the nationality law. Two-thirds of those 
who received certificates were persons married to citizens who were 
not required to file declarations, and 975 were military naturaliza- 
tions, also not requiring declarations. 

While the nationality laws do not distinguish between "war 
brides" and other spouses of citizens, it is evident that the war 
brides are in large measure responsible for the increased percentages 
of those persons naturalized who are "married to citizens." 



71 



m& 



Tu ENS NATURAL UN I TED STATES 

BY STATUTORY PROVISIONS 
Years ended June 30, 1947- 1951 

STATUTORY PROVISIONS 
( Percent ) 
100 



n 



^ 




1947 1948 1949 

GENERAL 
PROVISIONS 



1950 



1951 



MEMBERS OF 
•/^;vg ARMED FORCES 



PERSONS MARRIED 
TO CITIZENS 

OTHER 



! 



The impulses that make immigrants choose to become naturalized 
citizens are many and varied; the economic advantage of citizenship 
as in time of war is a strong factor. People from countries with 
similar political traditions and the same language can be more 
readi ly assimi I ated than those with a d i fferent pol it ical ideology. 
On the other hand, those who are political and religious refugees 
wish to become citizens as quickly as possible. This has been 
demonstrated by the speed with whidh the displaced persons are fil- 
ing declarations of intention. 



- 72 - 

The table which foiiows shows the principal countries of former 
allegiance of persons naturalized 



Years e nded June 50. 



Former nationality 

Total - 

Brit ish_ . o, . .. , . 
Canadian...... . . 

German . , 
Ital ian . . 

Pol ish _ .. ,. 

U,S,S.R„..,. 

Fi I ipino. ..„,.„.,.„„ 
Mexican, ..„.„•...»„. 
Other = . . ., .„ 



1951 


;950 


1949 


1948 


1947 


54,716 


66.346 


66.594 


70. 150 


93.904 


.0 867 


12,697 


13..284 


12 36. 


20.328 


5,872 


5, 882 


5., 347 


3,860 


1/ 


5.439 


6.065 


bin 


7,486 


10,703 


5.975 


8,743 


8.301 


9.452 


!l,5i6 


3 =00 


3,793 


4, 37 i 


5. 136 


6-495 


- i 830 


2, \22 


2.752 


3., 143 


3,562 


1 595 


3,257 


3,, 478 


5 768 


10,764 


1,969 


2,323 


2,227 


1 895 


3.336 


18,069 


2!, 464 


2 1 „ 057 


2 ! , 049 


27 200 



\_l Included with British 

Petitions denied — Seventy pei^'cent of the 2 395 naturai izat ion 
petitions denied were denied for want of prosecution In 7 72 of 
these cases the petitioner withdrew the petition, in the remaining 
908, the petitioner failed to prosecute his petition In 105 cases 
the petition was denied because of ,ack of good mora' cha'-acter 

Attention was cai led last year to the fact that in that year 
only 40 petitions were denied on the ground that the petitioner 
fai fed to establish attachment to the principles of the Constitution 
and well disposed to the good o-'der and happness of the United 
States In the fiscal year 'i95: on:y .9 were denied on these 

grounds However, there were 2!9 denia is for lack of knowledge and 
understanding of the fundamentals of the history and the principles 
and form of Government of the United States, This last figure is 
MBr-^ high in comparison to 15! in !950 and 78 in i949„ 

Seventeen petitions were denied because the petit 'oner was 
unable to write, read, and speaK Engiish, Last year, when the re- 
quirement was oniy the ability to speak English, there were just' 
four deni al s 

One petition was denied because there was an outstanding order 
of deportation, and 60 were denied because the petitioner was an 
alien enemy, not exempt under the Nationality Act 

Naturalizations rev oked - -Of the 403 judgments of natural izat ion 
revoked in the fiscal year 1951, 384 were cases m which the Foreign 
Service of the Department of State initiated action because natural- 
ized citizens became residerts of foreign states w thin fr-e years 
of naturalization Other causes for revocation are shown beiow 



- 73 - 

Ce rt 1 f i cates of natu ra 1 1 zat ; on revoked,,- bysjjJscjS 

grounds for revocation e I I isW blioW 

Year ended June 30, 1951 .■■^^ / ■■:^: M.s-iuJT.n to 



Grounds f b'j-^ i uos-; sib Nwber 

iisio't' -s 'to iBiOlTTO 

Total.. , ..J>AQ1Q=",19Lf=m,U!3_l401_ 

Vo ssviw Y/!6ro niBpe 

Established permanent residence abroad within five years after^c; -a-isw 

natural i zat i on -■, ..M-j'ii .t's ! ^ '^4 

Failed to meet reS'.dence requirements (false al legations J^i'^-PK Jo JoA 5 

Bad mora; character ifraud in^o'.ved;. „ .....„„,.„... ,0 I 

Misrepresentations and concealments relating to lnafita(i3aSElLj_Li.?. 

fami iy status „ i:'.T„.-^t^U?oyJ;,iAoriJu.s 3 

Bad moral character (no fraud i nvo 1 ved ; _ .. . . Je/S, ^b.^^tlri^^J/iQl oiiw 2 
Dishonorabie discharge foiiOwmg natura. ization faa^d'^ gni-.uh vf-.r-; 

mihtary service during World War ii , . .. . , .':svO;'riJ-^,f^!;1; 2 

Unw: i I ing to bear arms (oath taken with mental reservation) ..^ I 

Naturalization fraudu entiy or iiiegaiiy procured.-'., . .v-u'-i'J-J^-o.r.V. 2 

Other grounds , , :'PiJ2,;'fPCyo9JC<?o^?^ ''^'''^ 3 



Loss of n ationality —In addition to those persons whose United 
States citizenship was revoked, there were 4,443 persons who expatri- 
ated themselves by affirmative action. Most of the cert if <cates of 
loss of national >ty were received from American consuls of the 
Department of State The various ways of lossng nationality, which 
are stipulated in Chapter IV of the Nationaiity Act of 1940 and in 
previous acts, and the numbers of persons are shown in the foi;owing 
table. ;i to tcA y,?: iBnoiTBH 

Persons expatriated, by grounds for expatriation :i-9vitsM 

Years ended June 30^^1950 and '95! ___^ 



Nimber of persons 
Ground s for e x patriation 1 951 1950 

r ;'<;'3v,' o't.v f:ru5 .b;-' 
Voting in a foreign pol;tica: eiectfon or pleblscltej.-..:.ii4©',i jp.,-* 1,693 
Residence of a naturalized national in a foreign 

state (Sec 404, Nationa.ity Act of 1940). ., P^Ji*.^??- 1,, 084' -"c.eri ^^424 

Naturalization in a foreign state ,,,_„, 836 - ~ l~s096 

Entering or serving In the armed forces of a foreign 

state ^iA'LV-^ ^'S^'^- 721 

Taking an oath of ai!egiance ~n a foreign stat«.''^= .C9J ^''''"" ' 1^^^"^ ^-"'■'•'369 
Accepting or performing duties under a foreign state. '' 73''^' ■'^^ ^63 
Renunciation of nationaiity abroad . - . ..l.-riL"'"' ^^S'"" £uoi:J49 

Departing from or remaining away from the Unitecf' ^~'^'"'-' ortw aoJ-6l,> 

States to avoid training and service in the land "* >CJi Isno 1 J-sH 

or naval forces- ,.,„.„.,.,....., „... ,-'^. ;.-;.Vo-^ noj^sS 9:>ni.-^o9 

Dese rt i on f rom the armed f rceSo ,...,._. = _.... A° ^T.^. »^ ^ " !2 '^^ t^ « 4 
Other g rounds. .. „„...,.„ ,. . . .,...,...„.„,.„ ,.0 . „ . . . , o » 38 64 



- 74 ~ 

Special certificates of naturalization. — As a direct result of 
World War II a total of 1,708 applications for special certificates 
of naturalization, an increase of 400 over the previous year, were 
received this fiscal year. Most of these were submitted by persons 
who are required to estabi ish t hei r United States citizenship to an 
official of a foreign government in connection with the prosecution 
of claims for property damage incurred during the war. This year 
again many wives of men in our occupation forces all over the world 
were permitted to join their husbands abroad. This permission en- 
titled them to claim the benefits of Section 312 of the Nationality 
Act of 1940, and many pet itionerstook advantage of that fact 

Citizenship acquired by resumption or repatriation . — Statutory 
authority exists for the re-acquisition of citizenship by persons 
who lost United States citizenship by serving in a foreign allied 
army during World War I or World War II, and by women who lost 
citizenship through marriage to aliens. 

The number of former citizens who received certificates of 
citizenship under such conditions is shown in the table which follows. 

Years ended June 50 , 

1951 1950 1949 

Total number... ......... ,„..._,.„.„.,. _.„.„, L242 1.219 2. I 16 

Persons who lost citizenship by serving in the 
armed forces of al I ies of the United States, 
and who were repatriated under Sec. 323, 
Nat i onai ity Act of 1940, ..,.........„.,......,,. 256 275 899 

Native-born women who lost citizenship through 
marriage to aliens and who were repatriated 
under the Act of June 25, 1936, as amended.. 839 773 U040 

Native-bom women who lost citizenship through 
marriage to a I iens and whose marriages termin- 
ated, and who were repatriated under Sec. 317(b) 
of the Nationality Act of 1940..........,,......,, ■ 145 170 177 

Persons repatriated under private laws. ......... 2 I 



Section 323 of the Nationality Act of 1940 specifically author- 
izes repatriation after service in a foreign, a M i ed army. In 
addition. Section 317(c) of the Nationality Act provides an expedi- 
tious means for the naturalization of former citizens of the United 
States who were expatriated pursuant to Section 40 1 ( c ) of the 
Nationality Act of 1940 by reason of service in a foreign army. 
Since Section 401(c) does not distinguish between service in an allied 
army and in the army of an enemy country, it permits persons who served 



-lb - 

in an enemy army during the recent war to claim the benefits of Sec- 
tion 3i7(c). In such cases, many questions arise concerning attach- 
ment to the Constitution of the United States and favorable disposition 
to the good order and happiness of the United States. Therefore, 
most of such cases are reviewed by the Central Office before they are 
presented to the courts for final hearing. Citizenship was not con- 
ferred upon any applicant under this Section during the year 

Derivative c i tizenship — The requirements of the Internal 
Security Act stimulated the interest in proof of derivative citizen- 
ship. During the fiscal year 1951 there were 20,695 applications 
by persons who claimed that they derived citizenship at some prior 
time through the naturalization of parents. There were 15,785 deriv- 
ative certificates completed. 

In addition, certificates of citizenship were issued to 4,2i6 
persons by reason of their birth abroad to citizen parents 

Citizenship educat ion.- — The citizenship education program of 
the Service has been in continuous operation since 19 18. The pro- 
gram was authorized by the Immigration Act of that year and further 
strengthened by the Nationality Act of 1940. 

The Internal Security Act of 1950 with certain exceptions 
strengthened the requirements for naturalization bymakingthe 
ability to read, write and speak English a prerequisite to naturali- 
zation In addit on, the candidate for naturalization must not 
only know and understand the principles and form of Government of 
the United States. but must also have knowledge of its history. 
The citizenship education program consists of: cooperating with 
public schools through editing and distributing citizenship text 
books for use in public school classes or home study courses, 
through informing the public schools of potential candidates for 
citizenship; and by promoting meaningful naturalization ceremonies.. 



1949. 




145,528 


1950. 




190,038 


1951 


±/.... 


166,833 



- 76 - 

The statistics on the citizenship program are shown below: 

Citizenship textbooks for naturalization applicants 

distributed to the public schools 
Years ended June 30, 1945- 1951 

1945. .. 259,039 

1946..... 179,694 

1947...... 190,354 

I94S...... 149,600 

Names of newly-arrived immigrants 

Transmitted to the public schools by the 

Field Offices. 151 ,458 

Noncitizens referred by the Field Offices to 

public-school classes......................... 124,784 

Home Study 

Names of noncitizens supplied by the Field 
Offices to State universities and State corre- 
spondence centers. ........................... 3 1 ,684 

Noncitizens informed by the Field Offices of 

facilities for correspondence courses......... 34,423 

Public-school classes and enrollments 

Public-school (and Home Study Course) classes 

organized during fiscal year 1951 2/........., 1,860 

Candidates for naturalization enrolled in all 

c lasses during the last fiscal year 2/. ...... . 76,757 

_!_/ In addition 75,689 books were ordered, but were not distributed 
because they were out of stock. 

2/ This information is taken from reports made by public schools at 
the time textbooks are requisitioned, and may be regarded as 
reasonably complete. 

Names of newly-arrived immigrants . — During the past fiscal year 
all work pertaining to the preparation and dissemination of visa- 
name slips has been accomplished by the Field Offices of the Service, 
having been assigned to them on March I, 1950. From July !, 1950 
through June 30, 1951, a total of 151,458 such slips were sent to 
public-school officials. They were used to notify alien naturali- 
zation candidates of citizenship education classes. The value of 
this program is constantly brought to the attention of the Service. 

Home study program . — State colleges and universities, cooperat- 
ing with this Service, conduct the Home Study Courses Textbooks 
used in the course are distributed by the Service under provision 
of the law. This program brings to outlying districts of the United 
States the benefits of organized instruction in this important phase 



_ 77 - 

of adult education One such program reports enrol lees from 56 

foreign countries, the largest numbers from Germany, Italy, England, 
Poland, Canada, and Hungary Some have been in the United States 
only two or three months whi le others have been here over fifty 
years. Their ages range from 17 to 80 years. Educational back- 
grounds range from no formal education to over six years of college 
work; many could not read, write, or speak English when starting 
the course, yet all have been aided toward their goal of citizen- 
ship,. 

Pub i ic-schoo i certificates of proficie ncy — The Service and 
courts continued to accept pub i ic-schooi certificates showing the 
satisfactory completion by candidates for naturalization of courses 
of study upon the basic principles of the Constitution and Govern- 
ment and the History of the United States The following naturali- 
zation courts have accepted such certificates as evidence of the 
petitioner's educational qualifications: All Federal and State 
Courts in Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island; District 
Courts at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Camden_. New Jersey, and Trenton, 
New Jersey; the District Court at Baltimore, Maryland; Supreme Court 
of New York State at Niagara Palis, New York; District Courts at 
Detroit and Grand Rapids, Michigan, Duiuth, Minneapolis, and St. Paul, 
Minnesota, Toledo, Ohio, and Wayne, Indiana; 37 State Courts in the 
State of Michigan; four State Courts in Ohio; and one State Court in 
Indiana; District Courts at Chicago, Illinois, and Milwaukee, Wisconsin; 
the District and Superior Courts at Sacramento, California; and the 
District Court at Albuquerque, New Mexico 

Sixth National Conference on Citizenship . — The Immigration and 
Naturalization Service participated actively in the Sixth National 
Conference on Citizenship sponsored by the Service, the Department 
of Justice, and the National Education Association Meetings were 
held in Washington, D C on May 16 - 20, 1951, One entire day. 
May 16th, was devoted to conferences on citizenship education for 
the foreign-born and related matters Discussion groups met in the 
Great Hall of the Department of Justice. One hundred and thirty 
organizations representing patriotic, civic, governmental, education, 
and social service groups sent more than 300 delegates to participate 
in the discussions. The three main topics covered in the morning 
keynote addresses and the afternoon discussion groups were: 
Naturalization Proceedings and Court Ceremonies, Education of the 
Foreign -born for Citizenship; and Some Present-day Naturalization 
Problems 

The Service again provided an exhibit which not only displayed 
the various parts of the Federal Textbook and graphically outlined 
the work accomplished during the previous y^ar, but centered around 
amoving picture entitled "I Am An American", shown on a continuous 
projecting machine installed as a part of the display itself This 
movie depicts the life of an immigrant family and their descendants 



- 78 - 

and the part they play in helping to make the United States a lead- 
ing world power. Copies of the film are available upon request for 
loan to civic, patriotic, and other groups interested m furthering 
the cause of democracy. 

Naturalization court ceremonies . — Judges of naturalization 
courts have continued to arrange more meaningful naturalization cere- 
monies for the induction of new citizens However, major problems 
in this field are recognized to exist, and were discussed at length 
during the Sixth National Conference on Citizenship A committee 
to study the matter has been organized by the American Bar Associa- 
tion to look into the matter and make appropriate recommendations. 
Reports received by the Service, however, indicate keen interest in 
this phase of the work by not only members of the bench and bar, but 
by patriotic, civic, and other organizations who aid in making the 
proceedings more meaningful. 

In carrying out the duty outlined in Sec. 327(cJ of the 
Nationality Act of 1940 of promoting "instruction and training in 
citizenship responsibilities of applicants for naturalization," the 
Service has during the year issued revised editions of the two pamph- 
lets published in 1950 "The Road to United States Citizenship" and 
"Welcome to United States Citizenship." 

The revisions were necessitated by the 1950 Internal Security 
Act which requires, among other things, inciusion in the Oath of 
A I legiance of a statement covering wi I 1 ingness to bear arms or per- 
form noncombatant service in the Armed Forces,. 

The "Road" pamphiet is meeting a need of our District and other 
Field Offices for matera, to distribute "over-the-counter" to per- 
sons seeking information on the steps to take to become a citizen. 



-19 - 

The "Welcome" pamphlet is used -as a memento and is usually 
distributed by the presiding judge to new citizens at the time of 
their naturalization. It has been most favorably received by 
Bench, Bar, the Press, and the new citizen. Because of its material 
contribution to the furthering of good citizenship, the Department 
of Justice, this Service, and former Commissioner Watson B. Miller, 
during whose term of office the pamphlet was first issued, were 
awarded Honor Medals by the Freedom Foundation. These medals are 
awarded annually to organizations and individuals who have made 
outstanding contributions to the fostering of good citizenship. 



Thousands 

500 



400 



NATURAL! ZATION 
Years ended Sept. 27, 1906 - June 30, 1951 



300 




200 - 



1907 1910 



1920 



1930 



1940 



1950 




CHAPTER 



7 



Research , 
Statistics 

AND 

Information 



As in every other phase of Service work, the functions relating 
to appraisal of the work through research and statistical analyses 
and the dissemination of knowledge concerning the activities of the 
Service took on importance in the light of present-day events. 

Digests and manuals . — Officers of this Service need to have an 
authoritative guide to the interpretations of law that affect their 
work. For this purpose 1,755 manuscript pages of new and revised 
text were prepared for publication. These mainly were for the 
Nationality and Immigration Manuals, the analytical work-books of 
some 2,200 printed loose-leaf pages that concisely state the sub- 
stantive and procedural law from all sources on those subjects. 
They also were for such public information mediums of the Service 
as the pamphlets, "Naturalization Requirements and Procedure" and 
"General Information Concerning United States Immigration Laws". 
Additionally, in the interest of accurate public information, private 
publishers were assisted in bringing to date many year-book articles 
on nationality and immigration. 

To complete the manuals 25,524 administrative and judicial 
decisions or opinions were examined. From these 1,327 digests were 
prepared, indexed, and entered into the Index Digest, an exhaustive 
collection of precedents that envisages the assembly behind specific 
fundamental titles of the substantive and procedural law from all 
sou rces. 

In addition, the Congressional Record is reviewed each day. 
A brief resume of legislative action of interest to the Service is 
circulated to staff officers. 



Regulations and instructions — New legislation and changes in 
Service policies and procedures result in the need for amendments 
to the Code of Federal Regulations and the Operation Instructions. 
In the past f isca; year the Internal Security Act^ which amended 
numerous sections of prevously enacted immigration and nationality 
laws, and the legislation that removed the conduct of deportation 
proceedings from the operation of the Administrative Procedure Act, 
created a need for numerous amendments to Title 8 of the Federal Code 
of Regulations 

Gene ra, research — During the past year comprehensive studies 
V'lere prepared of the social characteristics of recently naturalized 
aliens. These studies made detailed analyses of age, maritai status, 
place of residence, occupat.on and the relationship of these factors 
to the rate of natura; i zat ion At the end of the year studies were 
completed of nationais of Mex.co and Ita.y and a study of nationals 
of Nor"way was under way These provide vaiuabie information for the 
citizenship education work of the Service 

In response to a request from the Pi'esident s Commission on 
Migratory Labor a detailed study was prepared of Mexican illegal 
migrants in the United States 

During the year extended Congressional hearings were he'd on 
omnibus immigration and naturalization bills A detal led digest 
of these hearings was prepared and distributed to officials of the 
Se rv ! ce 

Information — The Month, y Review contains articles of current 
and lasting Interest concerning the Service prog ram Art lei as 

interpreting new legislation and its effect on Service program, 
research into the meaning of the statistics of the Service, the 
operation of inspection as carried on at various ports, and other 
articles of wide variety, most of them written by members of the 
Service staff, are published m the Monthl y Review At the end of 
the fiscal year an information bulletin for the Service was in pre- 
paration. Published weekly, this news letter keeps the personnel 
of the Service informed of events and substantive materia! that is 
pert i nent 

Inquiries keep phones ringmg and typewriters clattering as 
aliens and citizens, alike, seek to know, how to become a citizen, 
how to file an immigration visa to bring an alien parent into the 
United States, all about Italian immigration for the past iOO years; 
the date of natural .zation-".of a parent, and various other items of 
interest 

In the wider field of public relations,, great interest has been 
shown in the Service, and the mass media of news releases, radio, 
television, motion pictures, and magazine articles were used through- 
out the year to keep the public informed on the Service work and the 



- 83 - 

reasons for the administrative actions taken 

Stat 1st ics . — The activities of the Service are so numerous, 
diversified, and complex, that it is almost impossible within the 
limits of this report to describe them- The magnitude of many of 
these activities is reflected m the tabulations which are appended 
to this report. The statistics, to be meaningful., must be col lected 
in such manner as to reflect changes in law Continuous review 

of new legislation and regulations resulted in twe . ve transmittals 
revising the entire punched card and coding procedures 

As in years past, immigration and nationality statistics have 
been coliected, presented analyzed, and interpreted during the 
fiscal year covering data on migration, including agricultural 
laborers, naturalization, derivative citizenship, expatriation, 
repatriation., exclusion of inadmissible aliens, the apprehension 
and deportation of aliens illegally in the United States, and data 
on the adjudicative funct;.©ns delegated to the Service by law and 
regulations Detailed tables on displaced persons admitted under 
the Displaced Persons Act of 1948 have been prepared on a monthly 
basis for the Displaced Persons Commission and special tables have 
been prepared semi-annually on the displaced persons already in this 
country. Current statistics have been published periodically in the 
Month! y Rev i ew 

Operations reports from the Field and statistical analyses 
have proven of increasing value in the study and determination of 
administrative procedures and poiicies of the Service 

More than 100 Government agenc:es and transportation companies 
receive the monthly reports on ai len and citizen passengers travel- 
ling by sea and air that are compiled and distributed to interested 
agencies. These reports are used as the official data both by the 
Civii Aeronautics Board and by air transportation companies at hear- 
ings before the Civil Aeronautics Board 

Public and Congressionai interest in the heavy number of public 
and private bills dealing with immigration and naturalization which 
were introduced in Congress in the past fiscal year has resulted in 
many requests for additional detailed statistics and analyses 

Among the statistical studies made in response to those requests 
were ( I) the effect of the literacy requirements on immigrant admis- 
sions, (2) the volume of passengers carried on foreign and domestic 
carriers, and (3) analyses of United Nations proposals for collection 
of international migration statistics 

Other statistical work in the past year included articles for 
10 standard reference yearbooks, materia! for talks by the Commis- 
sioner, analyses of procedural changes, analyses of the statistical 
needs of the Displaced Persons Commiss.on, and the preparation of 
the Annual Report and tables which are appended hereto.. 



CHAPTER 




Administration 



The increased responsibilities placed upon the Service - particu- 
larly those resulting from the Internal Security Act - affected all 
of the Administrative service functions of the Service. The address 
report required of each resident alien under the Internal Security 
Act; the rea"lignment of personnel after the exemption from certain 
sections of the Administrative Procedure Act; the need for more 
Border Patrolmen, and for better equipment, made necessary greater 
efficiency in operation to most efficient use of employees and 
equipment. The ways in which these responsibilities were met are 
reflected in the reports that follow. 

IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE 
CENTRAL OFFICE ORGANIZATION 



OrriCE OF THE COMMISSIONER 



ASSISTANT COrtMISSlOvER 

ADMINISTRATIVE 

DIVISION 



fllEI 
tECTiOM 



ASSISTANT COHHISSIOHER 

ADJUDICATIONS 
DIVISION 



FIIAICt 

lECTlOH 



SEKICES li 



OPEBATIOHS A0V1SI0RS 



ASSISTANT COHHISSIONEft 
EHronCEHEHT 
DIVISION 



■OIBEI 

PATtOL 
lECTIOI 



GENERAL COUHStL 



ASSISTANT COHHISSIONEIt 
USEAICH. EDUCATION. % 
IHFOIMATION DIVISION 



INSPECTIOIII 

[UMIUKOI 



OIQfSI ( 

HIINAL 

SECTIOI 



imiUTIM 
APftALl 

SECtKN 



DEfElTiC* 



ITAtlSTIU 
3ECII0I 



QERCIItL 
lEJEtrtCI 

lECTiei 



■FOUMTiOHk 
CEITIMCITIM 

StCTiDI 



lIlIllfCIlM 
lECIION 



December I, 



- 86 - 
Personnel 



General —On June 30„ 1951, the Immigration and Naturalization 
Service consisted of 7,539 employees There were I, 172 in the 

Central Office and 6,367 in the field. The latter group includes 
109 employees stationed in A.aska,, Hawaii^, Puerto Rico and the 
Virgin Islands of the United States^ 107 located in Canada and Cuba 
and 37 assigned to Germany to assist the Displaced Persons Commission 

P i ace ment and t: aj n.,; ng,, — As a direct result of the increased 
responsi b 1 s / t i es p.aced upon the Service, 2,533 appointments were 
made durmg the fiscai year 195! as compared with 875 during the 
preceding year As a consequence of Executive Order No, 10180, 

the majority of these appointments were of an indefinite or tempo- 
rary nature, which did not confer civil service status. 

In the Central Office approximately 7,800 i nterv i ews were 
conducted and 5 500 letters and memoranda were prepared in connec- 
tion w?th placement activ'stites Approximately 13,600 personnel 
actions were processed; 9,600 concerned the Fieid Service and 4,000 
the Central Office- 

By a provision 'n the Supp.ementai Appropriation Act_ 1951, 
Congress exempted this Service from the requirement prescribed by 
the Supreme Court decision of February 20_, 1950, in the Sung case 
that Hearing Officers in deportation hearings be appointed in 
accordance with Section ;i of the Adm : n i st rat ve Procedure Act., 
An examinat'on of Service employees was conducted and a nation- 
wide list of eiigibies was estab' shed from which promotions and 
reass i gnments were made to fiii appi'oximate .y iOO new positions 
as Deportation Exams ner 'Hearing Officer; which were established 
to conduct deportation hearings under the revised regulations and 
procedures 

The Board of U S Civii Service Exam.ners for the Immigra- 
tion and Natural ; zat ion Service received and processed applicants 
for examinations for the positions of Pat-'ol Inspector (Trainee) 
and Immigrant Inspector as follows, 

Appi i cat ions ... I 1 . 29 ! 
Applications on hand at end 

of preceding fiscal year 413 

Applications rated , .- 10,567 

Placements 546 

The training work during the fiscai year consisted of a variety 
of training and testing services Two correspondence training pro- 
grams are conducted The first, a general program ;n immigration 
and nationality law, !s conducted on a Service-wide basis. Twenty 



- 87 - 

lessons were in circulation at the end of the fiscal year (45 lessons 
are listed in the catalog) The completion of the lessons was pre- 
vented by the many procedural changes caused by the action of 
Congress with regard to the Administrative Procedure Act, and the 
wide changes in the laws and regulat.ons caused by the Internal 
Security Act of 1950 Enrol lees in th^s progra/n completed 647 

lessons during the fiscal year 

The second series :s a course of study for Patrol Inspectors 
(Trainee) in preparation for final examination The complete 

series of !l law , essons and 15 Spanish lessons together with diag- 
nostic tests in each subject are ail in circulation as weM as two 
booklets of study materiais Enroiiees ;n this course completed 
2j422 lessons last year 

Eight hundred and seven typing tests and 75 stenography tests 
were given as aids to the placement office 

The testing program in law and Spanish for probationary Patrol 
Inspectors was continued. Ten new tests were devised and old tests 
were discarded or revised Four hundred and nine tests were fur- 
nished to the Field Offices The index file of trainee progress 
was maintained and periodic reports of th^s progress were furnished 
to the Fieid Offices A test in law. and Spanish was devised and 
administered to establish a register -for position of Patrol Inspector, 
GS-8 Five hundred and sixty seven tests were furnished the Field 
Offices Resident schools were conducted for 275 officers to instruct 
them in the latest 'aws. procedures, and methods 

In addition., varied individual and spec^a? training programs 
were conducted for representatives of foreign gove "nments, other 
Government agencies,, and this Service 

Classific ation and Employee Se rvjce_ Unit ■ — Du''ing the fiscal 
year 1951, the Budget and Fiscal Contro! Section of the Administra- 
tive Division of the Central Office was compietejy reorganized and 
in lieu thereof the Finance Branch and Budget Branch were established. 
Twenty-five new positions were approved in grades commensurate with 
the technical character of the work. This was a great improvement 
over the old fiscal set-up in wh!ch, w;th few exceptions, grade 
allocations were based largely on supervisory responsibilities 

During the same period a Tabulating Un:t was approved for the 
Administrative Division, which included fourteen new positions in 
grades ranging from GS-2 through GS~II 

In the field service, due to new legislation removing the con- 
duct of hearings in deportation proceedings from certain provisions 
of the Administrative Procedure Act, Hearing Examiner positions in 
GS-II., GS-12 and GS~i3 were revised and allocations were approved 
as Deportation Examiner, GS-942--II, i2 and 13 



Treatment for illness- counseling on problems of health and 
hygiene and referrals to the Public Health Service increased I , i% 
over 1950, with a total of 17, 107 Health Unit treatments in 1951 as 
compared with 16,899 in 1950. Five thousand two hundred ninety-one 
sick leave applications were processed by the nurses of the Dispen- 
sary as compared with 4,589 in 1950. Six hundred fifty -four 
loyalty and character investigations were processed; nineteen dis- 
ciplinary actions were adjudicated and appropriate action taken; 
fifty-six employees were ^'et i red under the provisions of Public 
Law 879 . 

All coliecting and accounting for Group Hospitalization and 
Federal Credit Union activities, each a part of the welfare pro- 
gram for employees, are functions of the Employee Services Unit 
During the fiscal year the Credit Union disbursed $107,640.48 as 
compared with $83,972.50 in 1950; loans to employees totaled 
$87,547 89; Group Hospitalization collections amounted to $14,668.50. 

The Performance Rating Act of 1950 abolished the efficiency 
rating system and required each agency to submit a plan for the 
rating of employees based upon performance, A p I an was submitted 
to the Civil Service Commission and was approved January 29, 1951 
An interim plan was used during the rating period ending March 31, 
1951. A more comprehensive plan will be installed for the rating 
period ending March 3U 1952. Under this plan ratings of Outstand-- 
ing. Satisfactory and Unsatisfactory will take the place of the 
Excellent, Very Good, Good, Fair, and Unsatisfactory ratings made 
under the old efficiency rating system,. 

Finance 

General , — During the first half of the f ■sea; year the Budget 
and Fiscal Control Section of the Administrative Division was re- 
organized, the finance functions placed sn the Finance Branch and 
the budget functions placed in the Budget Branch The new Finance 
Branch,, composed of the Accounting, Settlement and Receipts Sections, 
began to function in February, 1951. 

The Budget and Accounting Procedures Act of 1950 places upon 
the head of each agency the responsibility for the establishment 
and maintenance of an adequate and complete accounting system The 
Finance Branch is now actively engaged in developing an accounting 
system pursuant to the provisions of the Act. to mciude accounting 
support for the budget; to produce more info"r^?t \e f inane 'a; reports, 
at less accounting costs, to improve, simplify, and strengthen the 
system of control in line with increased effectiveness of the account- 
ing system, and to coordinate and integrate budget, accounting, and 
reporting processes. 

Extra Compensation under the Act of March 2. 1951 — There were 



- 89 - 

121 accountings totaling $21,767.52 certified to the Ciaims Division, 
General Accounting Office for claims received pursuant to the decision 
of the U S. Court of Ciaims rendered May 6. .946, in the Renner - 
Krupp cases. These cases heid that employees of this Service are en- 
titled to extra compensation as provided in the Act of March 2, 1931, 
for overtime services performed on Sundays and holidays in connection 
with the examinatton and landing of passengers and crews arriving in 
the United States from a foreign port 

Specific reports for three claims for extra compensation under 
the provisions of the Act of March 2, 1931, for overtime services 
performed as immigrant inspectors on week-days, were prepared and 
submitted to the Genefai Account img Office in accordance with their 
request These claims are to be used as a basis for a decision by 
the Comptroller General prescribing procedure to be accorded admini- 
strative reports which may be forwarded to the General Accounting 
Office These reports Wi I i attest to extra duties performed on week- 
days for which compensation under the Act of March 2, 1931, has not 
already been paid These claims have not as yet been made the sub- 
ject of a decision by the Comptroller General Accountings totaling 
$1,210.30 were prepared and transmitted to the Genera! Accounting 
Office for 14 simi lar claims for extra compensation 

As a result of the U S Court of Claims decision rendered 
June 6, 1949, m the cases of Thomas C Gibney. No, 48572, Joseph M . 
Ahearn , No 48610 and Dona I d M Tay i or . No 486il, approximately 
823 individuals filed suits in the U, S, Court of Claims seeking to 
collect extra compensation under the provisions of the Act of March 2, 
1931, for overtime services performed during fiscal year 1948 The 
resulting certifications for these suits total $507,540 63, with 
Court of Claims' judgments in the amount of $375,339,46 having been 
rendered in favor of 582 of the approximately 828 individuals who 
f i led suits 

The U. S Court of Claims in a decision rendered January6, 
1951, in the cases of Harry B, Greene v , The United States. No, 47418 
and Gl en I Toney v The Unite d States... No 47511, held that the 
plaintiffs, Greene and Toney are not entitled to recover under the 
provisions of the Act of March 2 1931. (46 Stat. 1467 - 1468) for 
duties performed by them whi le acting as members of the Border Patrol, 
Immigration and Naturalization Service As a result of this decision 
approximately 650 claims which had been held pending a decision in the 
court cases crted above, were returned to the General Accounting 
Office, 

A total of approximately 2.200 individual claims were processed 
during fiscai year !95l. Certifications in the total amount of 
$529', 308 15 were prepared for 944 of these claims A few were made 
the i^ubject of test cases by the Comptroller General and the remain- 
ing claims were returned to the General Accounting Office without 
certifications either as a result of a Court of Ciaims decision or 



- 90 - 

because Service records did not reflect overtime services performed 
for which extra compensation was due under the Act of March 2, 1931. 

The table below gives a comparison of accounting certified 
under the May 6, 1946, precedent, both to the Court of Claims and 
the General Accounting Office. 



ACCOUNTINGS CERTIFIED UNDER PRECEDENT OF MAY 6, 1946 
Year ended June 30, 1947 ~ 1.95 1 

Total 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 

U. S. Court of ClaiJiis 

Individuals 522 197 261 48 16 - 

Amount $1,000,710 $502,393 $ 363,359 $101,950 $33,008 

Gen. Accounting Office 

IndiTidual 1,889 - 1,313 267 188 121 

Amount $2,007,409 - • $1,669,764 $250,430 $65,447 $21,768 

Total 

IndiTidual 2,411 197 1,574 315 204 121 

Amount $3,008,119 $502,393 $2,033,123 $352,380 $98,455 $21,768 



- 91 - 

Financial Statement 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 
Fiscal Year 1951 

Appropriation for the conduct of the Irmigration and 

Naturalization Service and the administration of the 

Immigration and Naturalization Laws 



Appropriation: 

Salaries and Expenses. „.... , $34,400,000.00 

Reimbursements. .............. 1.569.696.00 

Total $35,769,696.00 

Less: 
Transfers to other agencies. ...... . $ 51,800.00 

Reserve. ........................... 60,000.00 

Unob I i gated bal ance ................ 5.285.64 I 17.085.64 

Total........... $35,652,610.36 

Balanced against obligations 
are col lections as fol lows: 

Income and Source 
( Col lections) 

Copy i ng Fees. ... ~ .... . $ 22, 747 . 56 

Clerks of Court Fees, .............. . 633,987. 10 

Fees and Permits ............. 418,033.40 

Head Tax,, ...„.,.,.... .......... 1 , 546, 79 1 . 52 

Sale of Government Property.......... 4,539.39 

Miscellaneous Collections............ 37,995.35 

Forfeitures and Bonds Forfeited. . 162,253.52 

Administrative Fines. 118,704.19 2,945,052.03 

Total...... $32,707,558.33 

Transfers from other agencies 

Obligations against funds transferred from: 

Emergencies (National Defense) . $ 480,000.00 

Displaced Persons Commission......,, 630.000.00 

Total........... $1,11 1,000.00 

Less: 
Unob I i gated balances........ 21,645.24 1,089,354.76 

Net cost of operations ........ . $33,796,913.09 



- 92 - 

Budget 

A total appropriation .of $34,400,000 was made to the Service 
for the fiscal year 1951, an increase of $3, 17 1,000 over the amount 
available for the preceding year The 1951 annual appropriation in 
the amount of $31,400,000 was included in the "General Appropri- 
ation Act, 1951", Pub I ic Law 759. 81st Congress, approved September 6, 
1950 Pursuant to Section 1214 of that Act the Bureau of the Budget 
set up a reserve of $60,000 as enforced savings, representing the 
Service's share of the overal I reduction ordered by Congress, 

The fiscal year 1951 was characterized by the necessity for 
almost continual change in the budgetary program. At the beginning 
of the year the Service was commencing operation under deportation 
procedures newly reorganized and expanded to meet the requirements 
of the Administrative Procedure Act. A supplemental estimate in 
the amount of $3,980,000 was pending in Congress to provide for the 
additional costs stemming from the lengthened and more complex pro- 
cedures. Instead of appropriating funds to meet operations under 
the Administrative Procedure Act the Congress exempted from that 
Act proceedings relating to the exclusion or expulsion of aliens 
(Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1951, Pub I ic Law 843, 81st Congress, 
approved September 27, 1950). This required immediate revision of 
program and budget schedules 

Almost concurrently with settlement of the issue regarding the 
Administrative Procedure Act, the Service was faced with a new and 
more far-reaching budgetary problem with the enactment by Congress 
on September 23, 1950, of the Internal Security Act of 1950 ( Pub I ic 
Law 83 1, 81st Congress). This new legnslation presented operational 
problems of an extent which could not be immediately determined A 
supplemental estimate of $6,203,000 to meet these problems was sub- 
mitted to the Bureau of the Budget. The Bureau of the Budget was 
sympathetic as to the additional burdens placed upon the Service but 
felt that fiscal expansions should be held to a minimum until the 
overall program had crystallized To enable immediate operation 
under the more urgent provisions of the new law the Bureau of the 
Budget on November 25, 1950, made available an allocation of $480,000 
from the appropriation entitled "Emergencies (National Defensejj 
Executive Office of the President, 1951" The Budget also approved 
submission to Congress of a supplemental estimate m the amount of 
$3,250,000 for Internal Security Act requirements during the last 
half of the fiscal year The Congress appropriated $3,000,000 for 
this purpose (Second Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1951, Publ ic 
Law 9 1 If 8 1st Congress, approved January 6, 1951) 

At the close of the fiscal year further revisions and adjust- 
ments in the budgetary program were imminent On June 28, 1951, 
Pub I ic Law 60 . 82nd Congress, extended for six months certain pro- 
visions of the Displaced Persons Act of 1948, as amended; there was 
also pending legislation which would require the Service to expand 



- 93 - 

its inspection program in connection with importation of agricul- 
tural workers from Mexico, 



Management Improvement 

Forms cont rol — During the year a forms control program was 
initiated and is now functioning effectively. The Forms Control 
Officer suggests improvements in design, attempts to consolidate 
or eliminate overlapping forms, seeks standardization of format and 
wording, and clears with the Bureau of the Budget where required. 
Changes such as snap-out or continuous forms are introduced where 
savings in personnel time will result Economies are effected 

through minimizing the number of copies prepared in any one opera- 
tion, as well as through avoiding the duplication of excessive 
quant it i es 

During the fiscal year !95l, 694 forms were processed Of 
these,, 4 1 were new forms, 128 were revised, and 344 approved for 
reprint without change, and 14 Service-wide forms and 167 Central 
Office forms were eliminated Seventy-one forms were also cleared 
with the Bureau of the Budget 

It is planned to extend the same type of control to district 
forms, which are not now subject to Central Office review. It is 
expected that this extension of control will make it possible to 
eliminate many district forms and to substitute Service-wide forms. 

Services and supplies surveys — During the past year the 
Central Office stock-room and duplicating unit were surveyed and 
major reorganizations effected As a result of the survey of the 
duplicating unit, procedures and forms were instituted which gave 
the Service an accurate and detailed picture of the costs of each 
duplicating job and enable the supervisor to decrease idle time of 
machines and personnel by scheduling work on a constant flow basis. 
Rearrangement of lay-out has brought better f iow of work, and costs 
have been reduced by directing a greater quantity of work to the 
lower-cost machines and by using less expensive paper whenever 
f easi bl e 

After the new Central Office stock-room and dup I i eating unit 
systems have been thoroughly tested and any necessary refinements 
completed, it is planned to make similar installations in Field Off ices 

Administrative Manual and other admi nistrat ive releases — During 
the year there were released fifteen Administrative Manual Transmit- 
tal Memos, encompassing 193 new and revised pages of instructions 
and 20 exhibits. Among the re I eases were a new procedure, that pro- 
vided better control over construction, improvement or repair of 
building, and major equipment purchases in the field; a revised and 



- 94 - 

improved procedure for handling files in exclusion and expulsion 
cases; a current index; a directory of key officials; new instruc- 
tions concerning the payment of rewards and the employment of 
consultants; and revised procedures relating to the decentraliza- 
tion of files, with illustrations of the relating forms. In the 
Telegraphic Code a complete new series of code words covering sub- 
versive charges under the Internal Security Act of 1950 was devised 
and released. Work was begun to revise and bring up to date the 
numbered releases known as the Central Office Memo series, which dates 
back some 10 years and contains much obsolete material. 

Work m!easurement . — A comprehensive analysis of the Service's 
work-measurement system was completed during the year and a draft 
of a proposed revision submitted to various Districts far comment. 
The proposed revision represents a considerable simplification, 
some ten forms and forty pages of instructions having been elimi- 
nated without the loss of any essential data, I terns of work new to 
the field have been added to the report, work processes have been 
regrouped and operations and activities redefined for greater 
accuracy of reporting, and provision has been made for securing 
data on "loss time" or "idle time" Final revisions to gear the 
system with performance budgeting requirements are expected to be 
completed during the coming year 

Work-simpi if icat ion — During the year work analysis charts 
covering almost all of the Service s field operations were prepared 
in selected District Offices Simi i iar work-analysi s charts were 
prepared in the Central Office for al I Central Office operations. The 
charts were reviewed by Central Office staff and operating officials 
and a preliminary draft of standard process charts for all Districts 
was completed. 

Microfilm prog ram . ---The rapidly increasing volume of Service 
files has made the housing and maintenance of Service records an 
increasingly acute problem in recent years. In addition, the present 
international situation makes it imperative from the standpoint of 
national security that duplicate Immigration and Naturalization 
records be available in the event of some catastrophe at the seat 
of government 

A microf i Im program was decided to be the solution to both 
problems, and as the first step in that program it was decided to 
microf i Im most of the Service' s natural 1 zat ion cert if icat e f i I es. 
Detailed procedures were developed, relating forms designed, cost 
estimates prepared, and clearances made with the Bureau of the 
Budget and the National Archives Thereafter a contract was awarded 
under which over six million natural i zat ion certificate files will 
be microf i Imed by next spring. The naturalization certificate files 
now occupy some 12,000 square feet of floor space; the microfilm 
records of the same flies are expected to require only 200 square 
feet of floor space. A negative copy of al i microf 1 Im rol Is wi II 



- 95 - 

be deposited with National Archives for safekeeping The program 
was designed to integrate the microfilm operation into the regular 
files operations of the Service 

At present there is being developed an overall microfilm pro- 
gram which will deal with all types of records in the Central Office 
and in all Field Offices, and which will have as its objectives the 
preservation of records, the conservation of space and equipment, 
and the assurance of copies for security purposes 

■Aijen add ress repo rt program — Under the Internai Security Act 
of 1950 each a. ien resident in the United States on January I of 
each year is required to report his address within ten days of that 
date to the Commissioner of this Service In order to create usable 
records and match those records against existing flies for resident 
aliens^ a system was devised for reporting and processing which pro- 
vides for maximum utilization of tabulating equipment This neces- 
sitated the design of punched card and other forms and form letters, 
and the preparation of comprehensive written procedures which were 
used for training new employees as vi/el i as for reference Budget 
est ;mates were prepared, processing schedules established, progress 
reports deve.oped, and both quantitative and qualitative controls 
1 nst ituted 

By June 30, 1951, over 2,294,000 address reports had been re- 
ceived from ahens and a "security deck'' of punched cards was 
available from which lists containing names and addresses of aliens 
of any specified nationa.ity or at a designated geographic location 
couid be prepared at short notice for government inteliigence 
agencies Lists containing the names of 120 000 non-comp.y .ng ai lens 
had been prepared from punched cards and referred ■''or investigation 
Several hundred thousand additional non -comp 1 ance cases are expected 
to be referred in the com ng months In addition, 56 000 cases of 
reporting aliens for whom no relating file couid be found were 
referred for investigation of possible iiiegai immigration status 

Lnvent ory of non-exp en dabie pro perty • - Wo r k was b eg u n during 
the year on a system for maintaining a'- perpetual inventory of ai I 
non-expendabie property, such as desks, chairs, file cabinets, auto- 
mobiles, etc When completed, rt is expected that the system wl i I 
make instantly available data as to the location, original cost and 
subsequent expenditures in connection with every item of non-expendable 
equipment in every office of the Service 

Dec ent ra l :■ zat i on —-Procedures for decentralization of files 
were rev.ewed and refinements introduced to meet problems that had 
arisen during the year The basic form for field request of files, 
a punched card form, was revised to make it easier to prepare and 
quicker to process, and the Instructions were revised to expedite 
the furnishing of files in emergent cases and to meet other field 
operating needs Two additional forms, the Certificate of Arrival 



- 96 " 

and the Nationality Docket Control Card, are now being prepared in 
the Central Office on tabulating equipment and included with de- 
centralized files relating to newly arrived immigrants,. 



Space, Services and Supplies 

Space — The lack of suitable housing for our offices continues 
to be one of our most urgent needs In Districts with many small 
ports, adequate offices for border inspections and suitable living 
quarters for inspectors at isolated locations are urgently needed 
Over 100 building projects to relieve space problems have been 
recommended to the General Services Administration, but such con- 
struction is dependent upon authorization by Congress The General 
Services Administration under Reorganization Plan 18 has taken over 
several buildings previously maintained by this Service as well as 
most leases covering space occupied by this Service 

New offices were established at the following locations: 

Memphis, Tenn, (Sub-office) 

Little Rock^ Ark (Border Patrol only) 

Blytheviile, Ark. ( Border Patrol only) 

Lake Charles, La. (Sub-office) 

Hampton Roads, Va (Border Patrol only) 

In the New York District, the Public Health Service closed the 
Marine Hospital on Ellis island on March 1, 1951, and surrendered 
all space occupied by that Agency on June 30 The space released 
by PHS on Island HQ. has been made available to the U S. Coast Guard. 
The space released on Island #3 is being used for the storage of files. 
The Immigrant Building on Ellis Island is being repaired and renovated 
to house the Expulsion Section which is being moved from the New York 
office at 70 Columbus Avenue 

At New Orleans, the sub-office was moved to a new location which 
is more centrally located and better suited to the needs of the Service. 

In the Los Angeles District, arrangements were completed to 
occupy additional space in the Rowan Building beginning July I, which 
permits the consol idat ion of all District Office units in one bui Id- 
ing. Because of the Navy's reactivation at Camp Elliott at San Diego, 
California, the Service was required to vacate the space used there 
for detention purposes A new and somewhat smaller detention facility 
was established at Camp Gillespie near El Cajon, California, to re- 
place the facility at Camp Elliott 

Approximately 23,000 square feet of space was made available 
to the Central Office in Temporary X Bunding when the Department 
of Agriculture, Agricultural Exhibits Sen/ice, moved to other quarters. 



- 97 - 

Services .. — In the Central Office improved layout and flow of 
work were effected for the Duplicating Unit. Included among the 
items of new equipment purchased was a stenafax stencil cutter, a 
power cutting machine and a power stapling machine. During the 
year 13,843,746 sheets were duplicated. 

Instaiiation of FM radio equipment was continued. Repeater 
stations have been p.aced In operation on Santiago Peak south of 
Los Angeles and on Mount Franklin In the El Paso area.. Other re- 
peater mstal iat ions are in progress on Mount Laguna in California, 
Mount Lemmon m Arizona and on Bellevue Hill near St. Albans, Vt 

The Service s communication facilities have been improved and 
expanded by the instaiiation of TWX (teletype) equipment in the 
Central Office and all District Offices except Honolulu.. 

The manual, y operated telephone switchboards in the New York 
Di strict Of f ice and on Ellis Island were replaced with automatic 
dial type boards which greatly improved the telephone service in 
these offices 

Equipment and supplies — During the year purchase orders were 
issued for 161 passenger automobiles, 45 jeeps, 5 buses, 2 station 
wagons, I carry-all^ 9 trucks and 4 airplanes With the exception 
of the jeeps these were all replacements Eight microfilm cameras 
were also purchased 



Mai I and Fi les 

The address report program imposed a heavy workload on the 
Central Office Mail and Files Section During the last half of the 
year, working around the clock on three shifts for part of the time, 
the Section coded approximately 2.300,000 report cards, made 640,000 
index searches,, sent out over 265,000 form letters requesting addi- 
tional information and filed 1,650,000 report cards. An additional 
340,000 cards were filed in Field Offices The major part of this 
work in the Central Office was done by temporary employees working 
under the supervision of regular members of the staff, and was 
accomplished without appreciable interference with the regular work 
of the Section. 

The work decentralization program of the Service began to show 
a saving in the work of the Centra! Office Mail and Files Section 
during the year, but this saving was more than offset by increased 
activity resulting from the internal security program, involving a 
heavy movement of mai i and files 

Under the files decentralization program, 549,522 files were 
sent to the Districts during the year, making a total of 717,725 



files decentralized since the initiation of the program on March I, 
1950. 

Considerable progress was made on the records retirement 
program during the year Nearly one mi I I ion f i les of natural i zed 
persons were withdrawn from the active alien files and either 
destroyed or placed with the closed files During the year 1,704 
cubic feet of record material and 1,726 cubic feet of non-record 
material were disposed of Nearly 15,000 cubic feet of records 

were placed in intermediate storage in Federal Records Centers. 
Work was started on microfilming of Central Office Files. A com- 
plete inventory of files and indexes in the field was completed 
during the fiscal year 1951, and should result in the retirement 
of substantial quantities of fieid records during 1952 





TABLE 1. IMMIGRATION TO 


THE UNITED 


STATES 








1820 - 1951 






/ifrcm 1820 to 1867 figxires represent alien p&ssengers arrived > 1868 to 1891 


inclusive and 1895 to 1897 inclusive iiamigrart all 


ens arrived:- 1892 to It 


'94 


" jjiclusive and from 1896 to the present time icrripr 


ant aliens almittcd./ 






Number 


Number 




?<ucjber 




r.-.jiiber 


i Year 


of 


Year of 


Year 


of 


Year 


of 


H 


persons 


persons 




nersons 




ueroons 


1820-1951 1/ 


:v9. ^31.199 


1651-1860 2.598.214 


1384. . 


51ti,592 


1918.. 


lie, 618 






1851.. 379,466 


1885.. 


395,346 


1919.. 


];4l,,132 


- 1820 


8,385 


1852.. 371,603 
1853.. 368,645 


1886.. 
1887.. 


334,203 
490,109 


1920.. 


43>-', 001 


1821-1830 


143.439 


1854.. 427,833 


1888.. 


546,889 


1921-1930 


4,107,209 


1821.. 


9,127 


1855.. 200,877 


1889.. 


444,427 


1921.. 


805,226 


1822.. 


6,911 


I856.. 200,436 


1890. . 


455,302 


1922. . 


309,556 


1823.. 


6,354 


1857.. 251,306 






1923.. 


522,919 


1824. . 


7,912 


1858.. 123,126 


1891-1900 


3,687,564 


1924.. 


706,896 


1825.. 


10,199 


1859.. 121,282 


1891. . 


560,319 


1925.. 


294,314 


1826.. 


10,837 


I860.. 153,640 


1692.. 


579,663 


1926.. 


304,488 


1827.. 


18,875 




1893.. 


439,730 


1927. . 


335,175 


1828.. 


27,382 


1861-1870 2.314,824 


1894.. 


285,631 


1928.. 


307,255 


1829.. 


22, 520 


1861.. 91,918 


1895.. 


258,536 


1929. . 


279,678 


1830.. 


23,322 


I862.. 91,985 
1863.. 176,282 


1896.. 
1897.. 


343,267 
230,832 


1930. . 


241, 700 


1831-1840 


599,125 


1864.. 193,418 


1898.. 


229, 299 


1931-1940 


?28,431 


1831.. 


22,633 


1865.. 248,120 


1899.. 


311,715 


1931.. 


97,139 


1832.. 


60,482 


1866.. 318,568 


1900. . 


448,572 


1932.. 


35,576 


1833.. 


58,640 


1867.. 315,722 






1933.. 


23, 068 


1834.. 


65,365 


1868.. 138,840 


1901-1910 


8,795.386 


1934.. 


29,470 


1835.. 


45,374 


1869.. 352,768 


1901. . 


487,918 


1935.. 


34,956 


1836.. 


76,242 


1870.. 387,203 


1902.. 


648,743 


1936. . 


36,329 


1837.. 


79,340 




1903.. 


857,046 


1937. . 


50,244 


1838.. 


38,914 


1871-1880 2,812.191 


1904.. 


812,870 


1938.. 


67,895 


1839.. 


68, 069 


1871.. 321,350 


1905.. 


1,026,499 


1939.. 


82, 998 


1840. . 


84, 066 


1872.. 404,806 
1873.. 459,803 


1906.. 
1907.. 


1,100,735 
1,285,349 


1940.. 


70,756 


1841-1850 


1,713.251 


1874.. 313,339 


1908.. 


782,870 


19a-1950 


1,035,039 


1841.. 


80, 289 


1875.. 227,498 


1909.. 


751,786 


1941. . 


51,776 


1842. . 


104,565 


1876.. 169,986 


1910. . 


1,041,570 


1942.. 


28,781 


1843.. 


52,496 


1877.. 141,857 






1943.. 


23,725 


1844.. 


78,615 


1878.. 138,469 


1911-1920 


5.735,811 


1944.. 


26,551 


1845.. 


114,371 


1879.. 177,826 


1911.. 


878,587 


1945.. 


38,119 


1846.. 


154,416 


1880.. 457,257 


1912.. 


838,172 


1946.. 


108,721 


1847.. 


234, 968 




1913.. 


1,197,892 


1947. . 


U7, 292 


1848.. 


226, 527 


1881-1890 5,246,613 


1914.. 


1,218,480 


194B.. 


170, 570 


1849.. 


297, 024 


1881.. 669,431 


1915.. 


326, 700 


1949.. 


188,317 


1850.. 


369,980 


1882.. 788,992 


1916.. 


298,826 


1950.. 


249,187 






1883.. 603,322 


1917.. 


295,403 


-91) 

1951 


205,717 


1/ Data are 


for fiscal years ended June 30, except 1820 


to I83I inclusive and 1844 to 


1849 inclusive fiscal years ended Sept. 30; 1833 to 1842 inclusive and 1851 to 1867 


inclusive years ended Dec. 31; 1832 covers 15 months 


ended Dec. 31} 1843 nine months 


ended Sept. 30; 1850 fifteen months ended Dec. 31, and 1868 six months ended 


1 June 30. 




United States Department of Justice 








Immigration and Natuj 


ralization Service 



• •. TABLE 2, ALIENS AI\ID CITIZENS ADMITTED AlCD DEPARTED, 

BY MONTHS: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1950 AND 1951 

(Data exclude travelers between continental United States and insular posses- 
sions, border crossers and agricultural laborers) 




ADMITTED 



.seal year 1950 



ily.-Dec, 1949 o 
July. 

August . o <. . 
September, 
October. o o 
November o , 
Dec ember. 



<)>>ocoao04 



I O O o o 



o o D e 



n.-June, 1950. 
January. . . . o . <> 
February. ..,»»<> 
iyt3.!rci^ 00O0O0903 

ApT^lX Q ooouoooe 

J'jne. ^ , 



oooooooa 



seal year 1951 
ly^^Dec, 1950. 



~y > y o o I 



O O O O 9 



September. 
Dctober 
So V ember 
December 



_^^7 
24,13 
25,554 
26,006 

27.243 
21,918 
23,972 



14, 201 
15,365 
16„142 
16,463 
19.. 974 
18,215 



O U U O I 



O O O o 



Qp-Jione, 1951 

■January. 

Februaryo 

^:^ch. 

dpril. 

icLy o oouodooo«o 



17., 478 
18 0690 
15. 98'^ 
14^044 
16„379 
20,469 



Nonimmi- 

rant 



426,837 



226,826 



f3,294 
40,333 
47,477 
36,087 
29,901 
29,734 

200.011 



Total 



676,024 



31.489 
25,962 
30,587 
34.329 
36,565 
41,079 



20iJ3JL 465,106 



i£kO^ 



252.196 




48,522 
47 „ 226 

52,485 
39,981 
29. 702 
34,280 

212, 910 



37.. 305 
28,946 
33,145 
33,694 
37<.493 
42,327 



67,428 
65,887 
73,483 
63,330 
51,819 
53,706 

300.371 



ALIEI^iS DEPARTUD 



Emi- 
grant 



27.598 



14.866 



45,690 
41,327 
46, 729 
50,792 
56,539 
59,294 

670.823 



?55,243 



66, 000 
65,916 
68,472 
54,025 
46, 081 
54,749 



55,874 
41, 600 
48, 505 
48,231 
55,438 
65,932 



2,798 
2,794 
2,713 
2,371 
1,795 
2,395 

12,732 
1,634 
1,524 
2,122 
1,985 
2,083 
3,384 

26.174 



Nonemi- 
grant 



Total 



429.091 



217.329 



15.149 



3,803 
2,921 
2,468 
2,075 
1,599 
2,283 

11,025 



2,023 
1,635 
1,661 
1,686 
1,809 
2,211 



39,873 
44,918 
40,413 
33,336 
27,823 
30,966 

211. 762 




22,884 
25,014 
37,286 
42,404 
38, 082 
46, 092 

446, 727 



236.003 



47,671 
49,855 
42, 969 
34, 988 
28, 632 
31,888 

210, 724 



26, 538 
25,595 
40,983 
38, 970 
37,659 
40,979 



42, 

47 .,712 
43,126 
35,707 
29, 618 
33,361 



24,518 
26, 538 
39,408 
44,389 
40,165 
49,476 



t^ 

"247757 
18,175 
30,357 
27, 623 
22, 201 
20,345 




21,172 
14.789 

7,321 
6,403 

16,374 
9,818 



472.901 197,922 



251.. 152 
51,474 
52, 776 

45.437 
37,063 
30,231 
34,171 

221i^ 

27.230 

42,644 
40, 656 
39,468 
43 o 190 



104,091 



14, 526 
13,140 
23,035 
16,962 
15,850 
20, 578 

93.831 



79.45^ 
73^-^2 
54,039 
39,301 
40, 723 



40, 5.^3 
51,656 
59,457 
53,434 
50, 283 
56,902 

760,486 



413.981 



27,313 
14.370 
5., 861 
7.575 
15, 970 
22^,742 



78., 030 
96,425 
88,706 

59,763 
46,242 

44", 810 
^46., 505 



^2,209 
59,093 
63.969 
60,854 

51,413 
58,967 




Excess of admissions over departures, 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 3o ALIENS ADMITTE)^, BY CLOSES UNDEil THE IMtCEGMTION LAWS, 
riiARS EI^DED JUNE 3C, 1947 to 19?1 

j/5ata exclude travelers between continental United St-d.-.-.^ .i^.'u jji- 
s-olar possessions, bcrder crosssrsj and agriciiltiirai and railwav 
track laborers admitted from Mexicc ./ 



Class 



ALia.'S ADMITTED 



o o o o o e o < 



«e«««*«*a 



iMIGRANTS l/'o ..,.., , 

I Quota Immigrants o.o.<>o«...<>. ...,....,,.<> 

Nonquota Imnigrants ..«, 

Husbands of U . S ^ citizens „ , 

Wives of U. S. citizens o . , . . . 

Unmarried children of U. S. citizens. 
Natives of nonquota countries, o 

Their unmarried children. ,...,...., 
Ministers of religious denominations. 

Their unmarried children o 

Professors of colleges, loniversities. 

Their unmarried children. ...,.,.... 
Women who had been U. S. citizens. «, , 
Other nonquota immigrants 



lONIMMIGRAI^TS. 



<o«9e»*QO*«*oc«c< 



Government officials, their families, 
attendants, senrants, and employees 
Temporary visitors for business... 

Temporary visitors for pleasure 

In continuous transit thru the U. S 

To carry on trade under treaty. 

Members of international organization 
Returning residents . o o . 

Other nonijnmigrants . , , . 



• e • 9 9 I 




20,881 

83,995 
230,210 

72,027 
850 

5,526 

U,212 

7,355 

50 



An imadgraTit is defined in stat^icitics of the .Service as an alien admitted for 
permanent residence, or as an addition to the population. Therefore, students 
who are admitted for temporary periods and returning resident aliens who have 
once been counted as immigrants are included with nonimmigrants, althoxxgh 
Section 4 defines such classes as immigrants. 

United States Departio^nt of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE if. IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES s 
1820 to 1951 1/ 

/from 1820 to 186? figures represent alien passengers arrived^ 1868 to 1891 inclusive and 
1895 to 1897 inclusive immigrant aliens arrivedj 1892 to 1894 inclusive and from 1898 to 
present time immigrant aliens admitted. Data for years prior to 1906 relate to country 
whence alien camej thereafter to country of last permanent residence. Because of changes 
I in boundaries and changes in lists of countriesj, data for certain countries are not com- 
parable throughout./ 



LI coiontries . . 



a o e « o 



'OOOOBoeoeOA* 






eosuvooooe, 



O O O O CI 



osauoooeooooo 



o o e o u o < 



ooooo»»o 




OOOOOO04i«OOOOOOO 



Europe . , , „ 

Austrian-Hungary 2/. 

DeXgXUm. oo.eeuooo.e 

uenmariCo e.ooo.o.o.eoooo.o 

r ranee. ooo...o..ooo«9»oo. 

Germany 2/ „„„„,„, „„<,„oo.o 

(England. ..... 

^r®^*' (Scotland 
Britain /M^ 

(Not specified J/ 

Greece. . 

Ireland. 

Italy 

Netherlands .,,,o........ 

Norway) , 
Sweden) V°"°^°' 
Poland 2j 
Portugal, 

Turkey in Europe, „.„..,.. 
Union of Soviet 

Socialist Republics ^ ., 
Other Europe. 

winnsLB s • o • o * 

y cipcin. ij e««eooea«e««99o»o 

Turkey in Asia 8/, ....... 

Other Asia. . 

America. . ,, . 

Canada and Newfoundland ^ 
Mexico 10/.. . . 
West Indies.. , . 
Central America 
South America. , 

Australia & New Zealand 
Not specified, ... . ... .o. ,. ,. » 

ee footnotes at end of table 



United States Department of J\;^tice 
Immigration and Nat\iralization Service 



TABLE 4. IMMIGRATION BY COUNTHYj FOR DECADES s 
1820 to 1951 1/ (Continued) 



Countries 



1871-1880 1881-1890 



1891-1900 



1901-1910 



1911-1920 



All countries 

Austria) . 

Hungary) ■— ' •••'>»<»»o<>-»»<'*»*»»<'»« 

Czechoslovakia 12/ « 

irZLTL^aXlO. X<^/ »oe*o«e»«oo*s*o»9**«* 
P X^aXi C60»9O9«*««ooeoo««9a«o«oe»«o 

lt g rinan jr ^/ o«»»ob«»o(»««»»«o*»o»o» 

X^ngland •«••« 

Great (Scotland 

Britain(Wales.«....o 

(Not specified ^o •<>•,,• 

LrreeCeo •(ioo«se«eQ*eoooso90««»«»« 
XreXanQ «*9«««9o»«Q9o«oaao«»o«o«a 
XX'a.Ljr ao*0oeoooe9«o«9e«*eaa«e»*«* 

iM e^ner j-axiQs ••«o««»o»eo««ooo««»o« 

Norway i^/ ••a««ooo«o»oo*o(> 

Sweden Z^/ 

Portugal. 

Rumania 13/ 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe. 

Union of Soviet 

Socialist Republics 6/.. 

xugosxavxa xx/ ••oo«e*o9Bo««»«*«ft 
u L>ner jzjiirope ••o9*o««»oc»oo9«***« 

AO Xa e0«oaeO9«9ft00999999««9«00«»O99 
Oil jXia 0*O999990BeOa0*009ftS»a 00099 

XnCXia •O99aoo9900*o99«e9oeo99»a»o 

a pan // «9**«009«099909ea«099900 

Turkey in Asia 8/, 

Other Asia 

America 

Canada and Newfoiondland 2/ 

Mexico 10/ 

West Indies 

Central America. , . . , 

South America. 

iix nca ........ 00... ...«o.«..o.*»a. 

Australia and New Zealand. ........ 

r^acxixc xsxanG.So o«*o99ao99««o*9«99 
Not specified 14/ ............. . . . . 

See footnotes at end of table. 



2.812.191 



5.246.613 3.687.564 8.795.386 



S7?^,811 



2.272.262 4.737.046 3.558.978 8.136.016 



72, 969 
7,221 

31,771 

72, 206 

718^182 

437,706 

87,564 

6,631 

16,142 

210 

436,871 

55,759 

16,541 

95,323 

115, 922 

12,970 

14,082 

11 

5,266 

28,293 

337 

39,284 

1.001 




404.044 



383,640 

5,162 

13,957 

157 

1,128 



358 
9,886 

1,028 



353,719 
20,177 

88,132 

50,464 

1,452,970 

644, 680 

149,869 

12,640 

168 

2,308 

655,482 

307,309 

53, 701 

176,586 

391,776 

51,806 

16,978 

6,348 

4,419 

81j 988 

1,562 

213,282 

682 

68,^80 

Si, 711 

269 
2,270 
2,220 
1,910 

io«09*eo»o 

^26^ 

393,304 

1,913 

29,042 

404 

2,304 

857 
7,017 
5,557 

789 



4.376.564 



592,707 

18,16? 
160 

50,231 

30,770 I 

505,152 

216,726 

44,188 

10,557 

67 

15,979 

388.416 

651,893 

26.758 

95,015 

226, 266 

96, 720 

27,508 

12,750 

8,731 

31.179 

3,626 

505,290 

122 



2,145,266 

41,635 
39,280 

65,285 

73,379 
341,498 
388, 017 
120,469 

17,464 

167,519 
339,065 
2,045,877 
48,262 
190, 505 
249,534 

69,149 
53,008 

27,935 
34,922 
79,976 

1,597,306 

665 



• o o o o B «j| « «eii«aoe999 

71.236 1 243.567 



14, 799 

68 

25,942 

26,799 

3,628 



o«aeo«»09a9 



38^iZ2 

3,311 

971 

33,066 

549 
1,075 



20, 605 

4,713 

129,797 

77,393 

11, 059 



> o • « 9 < 



350 

2,740 
1,225 
14^063 



179, 226 
49,642 

107, 548 

8,192 

17.280 



aooeoeo* 



7,368 
11,975 

1,049 
33.523 



(453,649 

(442,693 

33,746 

22,533 

3,426 

41,983 

756 

61,897 

143,945 

249,944 

78,357 

13,107 

184,201 

146,181 

1,109,524 

43, 718 

66,395 

95,074 

4,813 

89, 732 

13,311 

68,611 

23,091 
54,677 

921, 201 
1,888 
8,111 

i9aooaaoaoe 

192. 
21, 278 

2,082 
83,837 
79,389 

5,973 

V9a99a»9 

,143.671 

742,185 

219, 004 

123,424 

17,159 

41,899 

I99e99999* 

8,443 

12,348 
1,079 
1,147 



United §tates Department of Jus 
Immigration and Natioralization ^ 



tic? 
ervice 



TABLE 4. E^aGRATION BY COUNTRY^ FOR DECADES: 
1820 to 1951 1/ (Continued) 




OOOttOOOOOOOOA 



« 8 • O • I 



OOOOOOOO' 



>09eC9«tt00l 



Europe 

Albania Ig 
Austria 2 
Hungary 2/, 
Belgium,, , 
Bulgaria ll/. . . . 
Czechoslovakia 12/ 
Denmark 
Estonia 12/ o, . 
Finland 12/ 
France 
Germany 2/ 

(England. „ . . , » . » , o 
^-^®at (Seotlando........ 

Britain (Wales, ..„.....,. . 

(Not specified 2/« 
Greece. 



I a o • s o o o I 



• OSO»9«0» 



o«oooaooe«' 



ooooo<»ooo< 



0*O«OO0OO«90l 



» • • • 

» tt e o 



L o o e 4 e 



eoe(iooon»o09ooo< 



eooooosoo 



I e » o o 9 o o 



O A O d O I 



Ireland 
Italy. , . 
Latvia 12/. „ 
Lithuania 12/ « 
Luxembourg 12/ 
Netherlands 
Norway ^.. 
Poland ^/ 
Portugal, . . , 
Rumania 1^/ . , 
Spain 

Sweden i^/ ■> • 
Sw.,.iZ8vland 
Tuikey in Exirope 
Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics 
Yugoslavia 11/ , . . , , 
Other Europe. ....... 



oooeoodooeoei 



• O I* A O 



oooooo«e*e9000oe*e«o 



oofloo«eooe*oeoo«< 



eeooo«ooo9»«oooft 



o e 6 o 
o o o o 



e o o o o 



« • o 9 o 



9 • 6 
« o • 



goeosooo9ee«oooi 



< o o a w e o « 



OOO9O999O0OO6«eoS«i 



L(t»90««*>eQoooei 



O O A < 



ie90U090099«9' 



• 0099 



9 « • O « O < 



99099«0e«S< 



6/., 



' « e O 9 9 9 9 < 



O O 9 O I 



t>0O9«999OOd»e9 



Asia 
China 
India. 
Japan 7/ 
T'-orkey in Asia 8/ 
Other Asia 



o e e 9 I 



I0e99909e9990e999*i 



i09999e99«O999l 



9 9 9 9 9 9 9 



9 9 O U 9 O 



O 9 9 • I 




k0099999999 



32,868 

30,680 

15,846 

2,945 

102,194 

32,430 

lp576 

16,691 

49,610 

412,202 

157,420 

159,781 

13, 012 

51,084 

220,591 

455,315 

3,399 

6,015 

727 

26,948 

68,531 

227,734 

29,994 

67,646 

28,958 

97,249 

29,676 

14,659 

61,742 

49,064 

9,603 



040 

3,563 

7,861 

4,817 

938 

14,393 

2,559 

506 

2,146 

12, 623 

114,058 

21,756 

6,887 

735 

9,119 

13,167 

68, 028 

1,192 

2,201 

565 

7,150 

4, 740 

17,026 

3,329 



B5 

24,860 

3,469 

12,189 

375 

8,347 

5,393 

212 

2,503 

38,809 

226, 578 

112,252 

16,131 

3,209 



O99999On09 



97,400 



29, 907 
1,886 
33,462 
19,165 
12, 980 



See footnotes at end of table. 




172,196 
66,232 
128,448 
341,494 
2,294 
22,628 
638,380 
6,336,284 
765,836 
752,214 
89,799 

793,741 

444,040 

622, 219 

4,785,842 

4,957 

8,907 

2,163 

271, 681 

817,244 

422,424 

264, 545 

158,125 

173,463 

230,135 

307,712 

156,571 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Natxiralization Service 



TABLE 4o IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES s 
1S20 to 1951 1/ (Continued) 



Countries 



1921-1930 i 1931-1940 1941-1950 



America o » 

Canada and Newfo'andl.and _£/' 
Mexico lO/' 
West Indies o 
Central America 
South America 



ooooiooooovooocooooooooe 

o o e • o 

O0000ooo«90oeo eo*09oo 

oooooooaooooo0«oo*o 

Oooonooooeooocoo 

OOOuoooouoaoo9t>oo* 

Other Affisrica 15/ 



O O O O O O 1 



ooooeooooeoooeoooi 



Australia and New Zealand.. 
Pacific Islands 
Not specified Uj/ 



o e o o • o 



00000000(tOOOOOO*00 

o o • o o 00000 o o » o o o 



1.516,716 

924,515 

459,287 

74,899 

15,769 

42,215 

31 

• nooeeeooojo 



J^c^o;^ 



uL 



108, 527 

22,319 

15,502 
5,861 
7,803 

25 




Total. 132 Irs. 
1820-1951 




171,718 
60,589 
49,725 
21, 665 
21,831 
29,276 

lt«000*004 

,367 
13,805 




25,880 
6,153 
5,902 
2,011 
3,596 
4,089 



8Vf,997 

502,598 

72,830 

146,729 

33,421 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOi 

34,272 

68,827 

19,847 

228 



y 



y 

ij 



^' 






Data are for fiscal years ended June 30, except 1820 to I83I inclusive and 1844 to 1849 
inclusive fiscal years ended Sept, 30j 1833 to 1842 inclusive and I85I to 1867 inclusxve 



years ended Dec, 31,* 1832 covers 15 months ended Dec. 






1843 nine months ended Sept, 



3O5 I85O fifteen monthfj ended Dec. 31 and 1868 six months ended June 30, 
Data for A\istria"H''angai^'- were not reported until 1861, Austria and Hungary have been 

recoided separately since 1905, In the years 1938 to 1945 inclusive Austria was in- 
cluded with Germany, 
United Kingdom not specified. 

From 1820 to 1868 the figures for Norway and Sweden were combined. 
PoiaTid WAS recorded as a separate coimtry from 1820 to 1898 and since 1920, Between 

1899 and 1919 Poland was included with Austria-Hungary, Germany, and Russia, 
Since 1931 the Russian Empire has been broken down into Europeari Russia and Siberia or 

Asiatic Russia. 
No record of iJi)mi.gration from Japan until I86I, 
No record of immigration from Turkey in Asia until. 1869, 
Prior to 1920 Canada and Newfo^indland were recorded as Brititih North America, From 

1820 to 1898 ths figures include all British North American possessions. 
No record of immigration from Mexico from 1886 to 1893. 
Bulgaria, Serbia, and Montenegro were first reported jji 1899, Bulgaria has been 

reported separately since 1920 and in 1920 also a separate enumeration was made for 

the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes, Since 1922 the Serb, Croat, and Slovene 

Kingdom has been recorded as Yugoslavia, 
Cour^tries added to the list since the beginning of World War I are theretofore 

included with the countries to which they belonged. Figures are available aince 1920 

for Czechoslovakia and Finland| since 1924 for Albania, Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania^ 

and since 1925 for Luxembourgo 
No record of immigration from Rumania until 1880. 
The figure 33,523 in column headed 1901-1910, includes 32,89? persons retvj-ning in I9O6 

to their homes in the United States. 
Included with countries not specified prior to 1925* 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Sejrvice 



TABLE 5. IM1>4IGRMT ALIENS ADMITTED AND EMIGRANT ALIENS DEPARTED, 
BY PO RT OR DISTRICT; YEARS ENDED JUME 30. 1%7 TO 1951 



Port or 
district 



All ports or districts 

tlantic 

New York, N. Y 

Boston, Mass 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Baltimore, Md. 

Portland, Me 

Newport News, Va 

Norfolk, Va 

Charleston, S . C 

Savannah, Ga 

Jacksonville, Fla 

Key west, Fla 

Miami, Fla 

West Palm Beach, Fla-. 
Port Everglades, Fla,. 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands , 

Other Atlantic 

tulf of Mexico 

Tampa, Fla • 

Pensacola, Fla , 

Mobile, Ala 

New Orleans, La , 

San Antonio, Tex...., 
Other GxJ_f 

'acif ic 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Portland, Ore , 

Seattle, Wash 

Los Angeles, Calif.., 
Honolulu, T. H 

daska 

Canadian Border 

lexican Border 



IMMIGRANT 



1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 



147.292 



95.245 



83,884 

849 

658 

1,110 

12 

116 

466 

114 

58 

45 

34 

7,186 

58 

8 

527 

36 

84 

2 i 51 7 



170t^7Q 



116.008 



285 
32 

226 
1,436 

500 
38 

7.396 



6,343 

27 

357 

393 

276 

25 
31, 709 
10, 400 



104, 665 

1,772 

467 

1,227 

27 

124 

318 

54 

39 

44 

156 

6,476 

2 

5 

355 

43 

234 

2.262 



188.317 



136.656 



374 

28 

219 

1,366 

245 
30 

11.097 



9,71A 
7 

288 
352 
736 

31 
30,380 
10, 792 



113,050 

14,318 

263 

559 

16 

103 

187 

29 

20 

34 

109 

5,711 

13 

1 

503 

43 

1,697 

4t706 



381 

8 

303 

3,805 

190 

19 

6.531 



4,167 

21 

552 

249 
1,542 

15 
30, 238 
10,171 



249.187 



199.630 



166, 849 

24,222 

370 

260 

23 

22 

183 

16 

20 

9 

no 
5,451 

6 
8 

1,245 

34 

802 

12.193 



446 

2 

224 

11,320 

193 
8 

3.1^8 



2,174 

10 

77 

280 

617 

9 

25,564 

8,633 



205.717 



154. 581 



142, 903 

3,787 

134 

148 

34 

19 

42 

47 

15 

7 

106 

5,199 

34 

3 

1,563 

42 

498 

10.035 



351 

2 

101 

9,177 

366 

38 

^|274 



3,841 

15 

382 

294 

742 

54 

28,039 

7,734 



EMIGRANT 



1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 



22. 501 



liiM 



13,428 
200 
488 
105 

43 

34 

992 



329 
46 

5 

3 

171 



689 



15 

42 
620 

12 



4.264 



2,412 

3 

293 

106 

1,450 



729 
973 



20.875 



1 ^,101 



14,211 

111 

64 

206 

10 

11 

7 

12 

358 
3 

11 
10 
87 

528 



18 

507 
1 



3.^62 



3,270 

16 

209 

67 



760 
924 



24.586 



IB^m. 



14,367 

193 

40 

118 

8 

14 
5 
1 
1 

41 
3,590 

31 

514 
2 
9 

664 



64 

21 

531 

46 

2 

1.791 



625 

1 

41 

71 

1,053 

2 
1,734 
1,461 



27.?98 



19,72? 



15, 522 

223 

49 

53 

17 
7 
5 

1 
1 

69 
3,076 

80 

583 
14 
25 

97 3 



146 
2 

23 

622 

176 

4 

2 ,4? 2 



1,021 

1 

51 

136 

1,283 



2,778 
1,630 



26.174 



18,001 



14,295 

218 

22 

39 

2 

14 

10 

10 

5 

4 

50 

2,666 

33 

571 
38 
24 

.228 



180 

2 

17 

636 

155 
8 

1.770 



907 

5 

89 

139 

630 



3,893 
1,512 



United States Department of Justice 
Imraigration and Naturalization Service 



TASLE to IMMIGRANT ALIEl'JS ADMITTED, BY CLA33E3 hmER THE IMMIGRATION LAWS 
AND COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH;: YEAR Ei^iDED JUNE 



Great 
Britain 




irop 

Au.5':r la 

Bulgarxa 

Czechoslovakia, , 
Denmark, 

1J& V^OnXoto oeooo»ooooo090 
r <i.n,uuHXlU. • •••oeoooo 

France, , , , 
Germany. . . 

(England. 

(Scotland 

(Wales 

Hungary, , . . , 

Ireland, . , 

Italy,, 

Latvia,, , 

Lithuan.ia 

Netherlands ,,,.,.,,,., 

Northern Ireland, . . . o . 

Norway, , , , 

Poland,, , . 

Portugal, 

Rumania 

Spain, , , , , 

Sweden, „ . . , , . o » 

Switzerland 

UoS,S,R, 

Y-agoslavia 

Other Europe,. 

WnXria Oen<i«pe«o 

India, 
Japan , 

Palestine, . . 
Other Asia. . „ . 



nada 

St Indids 
ntral Am«rl^"-a 
uth America, 

stralia & New Zealand, 

ilippines , 

her countries . , , 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 6A. Il-iMIGRAIJT ALIENS ADx-ITTED, BY CLASSES ULiDER THE liyS'iIGHATION LAWS 

Ai^i'D COUNTRY OF LAST PEHKiAMEkT RESIDEt'iCE: 



Cotintry of 
last residence 



YEi^H EI'iDED JlU-iE 3C 



NiJinber 

ad- 
mitted 



All countries 

ope 

ustria 

elgium 

algaria 

2,echoslovakia, 

3rjnark 

Inland 

ranee. 

Brmany 

(England 

[^^Y . (Scotland 

Britain (^^^^^3 

'eece 

mgary 

'eland 

-aly, , 

ttvia 

.thuania 

itherlands 

irthern Ireland 

irway 

dand 

•rtugal 

imania 

lain 

eden. 

'itzerland 

igoslavia 

■her Eiirope 

ina 

dia . , 

rael 

pan 

lestine 

her Asia 

da,. 

» CO. . , 

: Indies 

■ ral America 

;h America. 

:ca. , 

iralia & New Zealand. 

i ippines 

'. r countries 



205,717 



05 



u 



O 



o 

m m 

CO -P 

^ 'H 



i^iiiitl 



U9.545 



9,761 

1,802 

1 

58 

1, 076 

532 

4, 573 

S7,755 

12,393 

2,30'; 

196 

4,459 

62 

2,592 

8,958 

5 
8 

3,062 
552 

2,289 
98 

1,078 
104 
442 

2,022 

1,485 

10 

454 

1,379 

^i921 



2IL^2. 



335 
109 
968 
271 
164 
2,074 

25,880 

6,153 
5,902 
2,011 
3,596 

845 

490 

3,228 

4.146 



9,314 

1,714 

1 

58 

971 

446 

4,076 

84,761 

12,151 

2,279 

191 

3,668 

47 

2, 581 

6,127 

4 

8 

2,916 

537 

2,170 

70 

400 

76 

261 

1,973 

1,402 

9 

193 

1,228 

_2iJS2„ 



822 



ill 



104 
89 

364 
79 

116 
1,130 

4,931 
144 

2,642 
215 

1,213 
737 
321 

2,553 



9 
1 

3 
2 

6 

15 

29 

6 

1 

45 
1 

238 



21 

2 
10 

111 

1 

19 
2 

1 
1 
2 
5 



26 



J2^ 



^ CO 

o j;:; 

Q) 

(1> -H 
> -P 
•H H 



3,68 



5.987 



4 

1 

3 

17 

27 
1 

35 
5 

14 

12 
8 

19 
1^ 



303 
42 

22 

67 

33 

270 

2,353 

87 

9 

1 

573 
8 

7 
1,447 



67 

9 
61 
22 
178 
14 
56 
26 
40 

164 
128 

1,162 






O 






Ix^ 



1,^20 



205 
9 

47 
135 

12 

754 

290 
22 

102 

23 

46 

58 

115 

389 



29 

10 

4 
6 

12 

25 

124 



122 
3 
3 

656 



9 

16 

5 

322 

10 

QG 

^ / 
2 
6 

94 
13 

109 



O «J 

(0 jj -iH 

0) O ?i 

> g,-P 

•H a* q 



o o 

c; o 



34,704 



iil 



20 
24 
62 
12 



1 

80 



7 

1 

3 

14 
19 



O 

CO 
Q) 
^> 
■H 



2 O ^ '.53 S: 



570 



214 



1 

5 

19 

2 



149 



1 

1 

10 

12 

13 
72 

8 

57 

2 

> 

17 

4 
208 
_21 



28 



2 

3 
17 

19.912 

5,946 

2,972 

1,756 

2,278 

3 
■3 

10 



4 
1 

19 

10 

1 



.3 



CO 

x; 'cj 

CI Xi 

M O 

CO CJ 



•nl 



0) f-t 

o a> 

II, -p 



222 



M 



1 



1 
2 

273 

38 

4 
11 

2 
10 

^ 
10 



it) 
30 



2 

1 

90 

28 

36 

L 

4 
9 

3 

55 



16 

1 
10 

3 
3 

19 
6 

5 

1 
2 

113 



.» (O 
CO 0) 



-I a 

u 



AZ 



.;^^ 



4 



1 
20 
30 
68 
20 

13 
1 



7 

3 

31 

20 

14 
43 

125 

7 

26 

2 
12 

5 
15 



17 

1 

19 

13 

4 

11 

5 

15 



:za 



f-1 



1: 0) 

O -H 

? -rH 

C5 (U 

3 x> 



21 



11 



[6 

2 

11 



20 

3 
6 

9 
4 

11 
4 

86 



1 

1 



12 
2 

1 



1,20^ 



United States Department of Justice 









TAELE 6B. Iia^IIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED TO THE UNITED STATES UNDEE THE DISPLACED PSiSONS ACT 
OF 1948, AS AMENDED, BY CLASSES AND COUNTKI OE REGION OF BIRTH 
JUNE 25. 1948 - JUNE 30. 19^1 



Country or 
region of 
birth 



All countries . . . . 

Europe 

Albania 

Austria 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Danzig 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

(England. . . 
Great (Scotland. . 

Britain (Wales 

Greece 

Hungary. 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Luxembourg 

Netherlands 

Northern Ireland. . . . 

Norway. .• 

Poland 

Portugal, 

Rumania 

Turkey (European) . . . 
U.S.S.R. (European). 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

Iran 

Turkey (Asiatic) . . . . 
U.S.S.R. (Asiatic).. 
Other Asia 



Africa. 



Other countries. 



Number 
admitted 



271.578 



269. 603 



94 
4,394 
60 

293 

7,300 

137 

26 

8,987 

68 

188 

34,528 

466 

63 

19 

3,608 

9,455 

1,037 

31,327 

21,673 

7 

24 

18 

19 

100,794 

4 

5,631 

107 

22, 730 

16,424 

122 

1.728 



748 
134 
664 

107 
55 

29 

218 



Total 

displaced 

persons 



1/ Includes wives and children. 



260.916 



2^8,?^? 



94 
4,046 
60 

293 
6,246 
127 
26 
8,987 
68 
188 
34,140 
466 
63 
19 
3,606 
8,561 
1,036 
31,327 
21,671 
7 
22 
17 
17 
99,422 
2 
3,867 
107 
22,709 
U,6U 
115 

l.,727 



748 
133 
684 
107 
55 

28 
208 



Displaced persons 



Quota 

displaced 

persons 



2??i774 



2^7.833 



94 

3,986 

60 

292 

6,225 

127 

24 

8,967 

67 

la? 

33,818 

465 

63 

19 

3,587 

8,536 

994 

31,150 

21,603 

7 

22 

17 

17 

99,238 

2 

3,851 

107 

22,675 

11,519 

lU 

' 1.727 



748 
133 
684 
107 
55 

28 
186 



Nonquota 

displaced 

orphans 



1.07^ 



1.069 



55 

1 
19 

2 

15 

1 

1 

312 



19 
25 
42 
177 
57 



174 

16 

28 
124 

1 



Other 
nonquota 
displaced 
persons 



Ethnic 

Germans 1/ 



68 



Jl. 



10 

1 



11 



10 



6 

1 



2L 



10.662 



10«650 



3kB 



1,054 
10 



388 



2 
894 

1 



2 
1 
2 

1,372 
2 

1,764 

21 

4,780 

7 



1 
29^ 



United States Department of Justice 
Imiaigration and Naturalization Service 



;ABLE ^Co DISPLACED PERSONS 1/ AND OTHER Bi-UGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED TO THE UNITED STATES, 



Cotaitiy or 
region of 
birth 



BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIHTH; YEAR EI^D ED JUI^ 30, 19^1 





ooooeoOAOi 



o o o e o I 



9 O C « O I 



it 



:a.'m 



All ccuiitries „ „ , 

9o CO0U9i>WOOU0Ci-C 

^"LXUHo o»oooo«oooo 
ga i X.o^ oewoooovo«« 

cho Slovakia, ^ o . . 

HorJ llt>oieooooooo»o 

Land 

ice, 

4»any 

(England. , 
(Scotland, 
(Wales, , . , 

tJary„„ 
Land^ , 

«jP^O O O O o o 

' r^O. A o 9 • e 

iTjanxa^ » 
lerlands 
:heni Ireland. 
iray„ 

md „ „ „ , . 
:ugal,o . 

aU. X^ o o o o 
^^ o o o o o o 

len , o c 
Lzerland 

>slavia„ o 
;r E^iirope 



I Total 
. 1205.7171 156,. 547 



c n • c o < 



' « b o o o ' 



c • u • o o 



I ft A u O A e O I 



O • D O 



O 4 O O A O < 



O O O O O ' 



« o « • c 



o*oo*o*«*< 



I O O O O ' 



« O • o 



OOOOO0OOO 



' 9 O • « • » 



o o o » 



' U O O O O I 



i1 o o o o o • 



' O A 1? O 8 I 



< o '3 • o O a < 



loo 

'OOSOOPOOl^OOO 

Indies , « „ „ o , . 
.1 America, , . 
America., „ . , 



O O O • f O I 



• • • • o 



c e o « o ' 



161J, 

2,777 

1,238 
231 
3,863 
1,217 
2,073 
6A6 

-3 -2-3 ■•7 

26,369 

8,333 
2,950 

368 
4,447 
4, 922 
3,739 
7,348 
10, 588 
4,028 
3,170 

840 

2. 378 

37,484 

1,048 

2,351 

510 
1.427 
1,408 
11,953 
8,254 
1,880 

1,821 
134 
198 
210 

2,043 

20,809 
6.372 

5,553 

1,970s 

2, -^24 

700 
390 1 
■760? 



?o. 267 

2,41 
1,138 
219 
3,629 
1,09^ 

2.049 

555 

2. 929 

23,871 

8,009 

2,87/. 

350 

3.650 

4-, "37 
3,702 
4,592 

10,532 

3,968 

2,966 

798 

2. 231 

36,951 

390 

2,22b 

286 

1.393 

1,349 

11,823 
7,843 
1, 696 



/^■r\ 



Jt?.iiZO 



Displaced persons 



_l£i-Ji_L,^Acta. 



Non ■■ 
quota 



Other jjiiiii^rantg ^ 
Total 1 Quota Ljjuot-- 



96,515 95,920 ___.^9^^^ 



^5.360 



?4,77.'^ 



202 



8 
33,673 



10, 702 10, 687 

6,206' 6,156 

169 f 189 



IxOMl 



1.044 



34 




^S8i? 



2 ( 



1,285 
1.191 



958 



J^i2i 



3,159 I 2.955 



767 
2,223 



fCtk jC:J nL. 



^i^M 



i,745 



1,310 



2,208 



20,802 
6,370 
3,345 
1,893 
2,611 



l'OOooooAoo«eo9e«*«e 

l-lia & New Zealand. 

iipines, ,,,. ,, 

! count rles o ....... . 

..splaced persons admitted under the Displaced Persons Act of June 2';:, 1948, as amended, 

'eludes 2,040 ethnic Germans admitted under Section 12 of the Displaced Persons Act, 

I 

i United States Department of Justice 

Imffdgration and Naturalization Service 



mI-' 



TABLE 7. ANNUAL QUOTAS AND QUOTA IMMIGRANTS AIMITTED: 
YEARS EMDED JUNE 30, 1947 to 1951 

/Persons bom in colonies, dependencies, or protectorates of European countries are charged 
to the quotas of the countries to which they belong. Nationality for quota purposes does 
not always coincide with actual nationality (Section 12 of the Immigration Act of 1924T7 



Quota nationality 



Annual 



quota 



1/ 



Quota immigrants admitted 



i?47 



1948 I 1949" 



1950 



1?^1 



All countries. 



Europe , 

Northern and Western Europe., 

Belgium 

Denmark 

France 

Germany 

Great Britain, N. Ireland., 

Iceland 

Ire2.and 

Luxamboiirg 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Southern and Eastern Europe. . 

Austria 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia. 

Estonia 

Finland 

Greece 

Hungary 

Italy 

Latvia. 

Lithuania 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Turkey 

U.S.S.R 



Yugoslavia 

Other S. and E. Europe. 



Asia 

China 

Chinese race 

_ ,. (East Indian race. 

^^^ (All other 

Other Asia 



Africa. 



Pacific. 



i?4.277 



150-572 
125.653 



1,304 

1,181 

3,086 

25,957 

65,721 

100 

17,853 
100 

3,153 
2,377 
3,314 
1,707 

24.71? 



i,a3 

100 

2,874 
116 
569 
310 
869 

5,677 
236 
386 

6,524 
440 
291 
252 
226 

2,798 
938 
700 

1.805 



100 
105 

[100 

1,500 

1,200 

700 



70.701 



92.526 



113.046 



197.460 



69.128 

47.047 
1 ■5T; 



?0.^?2 



^,315 

1,097 

3,140 

13,662 

19,218 

95 

2,011 

71 

2,451 

1,928 

1,187 

872 

22.081 



S2ii21 



111.443 



1,455 
88 

2,663 
101 
545 
133 
949 

5,042 
261 
427 

6,516 

327 

377 

63 

120 

1,982 
810 
222 

.22L 



1,308 

1,172 

3,059 

17,229 

27,774 

56 

7,4U 

82 

3,515 

2,460 

1,965 

1,331 

23.237 



59.578 



1?^6 



200 

65 

( 18 

( 96 

620 

263 

311 



1,692 
81 

2,831 
127 
516 
213 
882 

5,631 
300 
458 

6,143 
445 
400 
189 
188 

2,061 
794 
286 

1.248 



1,270 

1,109 

2,997 

12,819 

23,543 

68 

8,505 

94 

2,991 

2,303 

2,376 

1,503 

51.865 



22*1 



377 

80 

( 20 

(no 

661 
328 
318 



1,327 

65 

3,255 

1,716 

497 

426 

.1,445 

5,207 

3,534 

6,452 

21,462 

462 

699 

194 

177 

3,710 

976 

261 

^.00? 



979 

1,101 

3,187 

31,511 

17,194 

88 

6,444 

74 

3,067 

2,179 

1,876 

1,666 

126.305 



281 

36 

( 36 

( 74 

576 

328 
272 



67153 

177 

4,058 

5,387 

518 

285 

4,054 

5,861 

17,439 

11,774 

50,692 

426 

2,019 

197 

697 

10,854 

5,359 

355 

1.173 



208 

59 

( 55 

( 68 

783 

328 
288 



1^6.547 



j^kxm 



^7!02g 

991 

1,082 

2,900 

14,637 

15,369 

96 

3,810 

59 

3,102 

2,24s 

1,360 

1,372 

107.733 



17361 

231 

3,870 

2,230 

556 

3,638 

5,079 

4,325 

11,220 

4,568 

45,766 

384 

2,042 

286 

401 

14,019 

7,411 

346 

l.?41 



518 

56 

( 50 

( 19 

698 

272 
175 



1/ The annual quota waa 153,929 In the fiscal years 1947 to 1949. IncluBive. and 154. 20i in 



the fiscal year 1950. 



The quota was increased to 154,277 on October 31, 1950. 

United States Department of Justice 
Imnigration and Naturalization Service 





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TABLE 10, IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED BI RACE, SEX AND AGEs 
YEAR EtffiH) JUNE gO, l^^l 



Pacdfi- 



Sex and age 




limber admitted o .00. 


lale 




Under 5 


years. o. . » 


5 - 9 


It 


10-14 


II 


15 


11 


16-17 


11 


18-19 


It 


20-24 


n 


25-29 


II 


3034 


It 


35-39 


tt 


40=-44 


It 


45-49 


II 


50-54 


II 


55-59 


II 


60-64 


It 


65-69 


II 


70-74 


It 


75-79 


It 


80 yrs. 


and over, , 


Unknovm, 


«oo«ooeeoo 



years , , . . 
II 



emale 
Under 5 

5 - 9 

10-14 " 

15 " 

16-17 " 

18-19 " 

20-24 " 

25-29 " 

30-34 " 

35-39 " 

40=44 " 

45-49 " 

50-54 " 

55-59 " 

60-64 " 

65-69 " 

70-74 " 

75-79 " 

80 yrsc and overo. 
Unknown ,. 00 «,.«,.<, o 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE lOAo Il^ffi-lIGRAWT ALIEWS ADMITTED AND EtJGRAI^T ALIilJS DEPARTED, BY SEX, AGE, 



ILLITERACY. AI^D MAJOR OCCUPATION GKOUP; 



Sex, age, illiterates., and occupation 



imigrant aliens admitted 



O O O O • ' 



e « • ft o I 



o o • r ^ o < 



Sex: 

jyiclXC ooooooooooooooeo 

P CJTIq^G oooo0oeoooo»oooooo»o v 

Males per 1,000 females ...o 
Age; 

Under 16 years « o o o ^ o » . . o . . . 
l6 to 44 years o . o o . . o . 
45 years and overoooo. 



Illiterates 
Niimber 1/ 
Percent c , 



a • • • 



«C*OOOO0O* 



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tf»«gooo««« 



O « O 




O t) 



> e • o a • 



Major Occupation Group; 

Prof es-l',-ial and semiprofessional vj-orkers, 

Farmers and farm managers 

Proprietors, managers, officials, except farm. 

Clerical, salesj and kindred workers 

Craftsmen;, foremeny and kindred wcrkors 

Operatives and kindred workers , 

Domestic service workers „ 

Protective service workers 

Service workers,, except domestic & protective. 

Farm laborers and foremen 

Laborers, except farm. 
No occupation, 



o • • • « • < 



^ O O O 



< e o • • 



• oavovoo' 



igrant aliens departed, „, 



Sex? 



ooooooooooooooooooeoo«e*ttvs*9«o«o*oo»»o« 

OOOUOCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO«0««O*««OOO»««O»O«* 



Male, 
Female 
Males per 1^ 000 females ,.,„<,„ ....,<>... 

Age I 

Under 16 years . » o 

l6 to 44 years 

45 years and overooooco^ 



oooooooe< 



• ■••••O«0«0«09C9OdO 

OO<^O9OOOeoC*O9999*9*99090«9«oee« 

O999999«««0W9e090 



O O 



Major Occupation Groups 

Professional and semiprofessional workers ...oo 
Farmers and farm managers ..,,.,,....,,., o»..,. . 

Proprietors, managers^ officials, except farm. 
Clerical, sales^ and kindred ^■or\>:r::> ..,...,.., 
Craftsmen, foremen^, and kindred workers. 
Operatives and kindred workers . , 
Domestic service workers........ 

Protective service workers ...... 

Service workers, except domestic & proteetivec 

Farm laborers and foremen. o . . 

Laborers, except farm. <, „ „ . . » , . . . . . . . . 

No occupationo 



9 O 6 O < 



O O O « O 9 



YEARS EImDED JUI^JE 30., 1947 TO 1951 



1947 



1948 



53,769 

93, 523 

575 

16,831 

101,459 
27, 002 



1,309 



10,891 
3,462 
5,886 

13, 961 
8,726 

10, 580 

4,922 

292 

3n590 

442 

2,831 

81,709 



14,392 
8,109 



1,775 



1, 563 
10, 653 
10, 285 



1949 



67,322 

103, 248 

652 

24,095 

112,453 

34, 022 



2.766 
1.6 



12, 619 

4,884 

6, 207 

15,, 298' 

11^019 

12,7971 
6,389 

318 
4,032 

946' 
4. 826 
91,235 

20875 



Llj 505 
9o370 
1,228 



80,340 

107, 977 

744 

32,728 

123,340 

32,249 



In 983 

lol 



13,884 
8,937 
60 014 
14,797 
13,693 
14,271 



1950 



T 




119,130 
130,057 

so, 463 

152,558 

46,361 



1,677 



20,502 
17,642 

6,396 

165 796 
21,832 
19,618 
8,900 
885 

4,08^; 

3,976 
5,6^3 



122,862 



12,950 
11,636 
1,113 



14,331 

13, 267 

1,080 



I Immigrants lb years of age or over who are \;inable 




19'^! 



i05^ 



9S327 

106,390 

934 

44.^023 

121,823 

39,871 



I5869 
o9 



15^269 
10,214- 

5^4=?3 
14, 0'38 
16,183 
r\a58 

7,243 

3,9-e 

4,9-2 

5o481 

103,614 



^8l_26,174 



12,843 

13,331 

%3 



any lang^oagec 



United States Department of Jxistice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



saui-unoo 



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TABLE 11. 



o • o e o • « 



Period 



., 1908 to 1951 

d-1910 1/.,.,. 
1-1920 ' 
1911= o 
l912o„, 

X/ J-^ ono*«t««<i 
1916, . o . , ,. 

1917...... 

1918 

1919 c.. 
1920 



ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED A1>JD DEPARTED, AIIE^'S EXCLUDED 
JEARS ENDED JUM^10,^J,2C«_toJ^l_' 



A LIEI^S ADMTTED""T"' 
Immi' JNonirmai" !" 



_M.m;IS.^ DEPART^ 
Emi' ~] Icnerrd 



^rant, _i, _^ ^^^B'^ 





So CITIZENS 



617^692. J^:^2,J725. 



o • « • o 



c u » • o 



P » 3 • « » ' 



/so 9 9 » • ' 



o e e o o I 



U1930 

1921 „,„ 

192?.., 
1924 
192';! „„„ 
i.926..„ 
l927. . o 
L928«,„ 
L929. 
L930 



009*0009 



9 o • • c o e 



878,587 
838, 1?2 
1,197,892 
1,218,480 " 
326, 700 I 
298,826 
295,403 
110,618 I 
141,132 
430., 001 




295. 



67, 9i 

67,474 

101,235 
95^880 

191o575 



333,262 
?0 
303,338 
204, 074 
129, 765 
66, 277 
94,585 
^22 
288,315 



:• ! 



I e o • e o 



o ? O O • ' 



009««90*9« 



805,22? 
309.^:56 
522,91s 
706,896 

294, 3iV 
304, 488 
335. 1~5 
307,255 
279s 6''8 
2U,700i 




222, 549 
282, 030 

303, 734 

330,467 

180,100 

111. 042 

80,102 

98, 683 

92, 709 

139,747 



oooooeooo 

172,-, 93 5 
122, 949 
150,487 
172.406 
164,121 
191,618 
202,826 
193,376 
199', 649 
204, 514 



'jooooo9oo9H«eoooeooo 



24'', 718 
198, :'12 
81,450 
76, 789 
92, 728 
76, 992 
73,366 
77545? 
69,203 

50, 661 




ili^iiikSL 



2,517,889 

349.472 

353,890 
347, 702 
368,79? 
172,371 
110,733 
126.011 
275.837 
218, 929 
194,14'? 



,b4 9, 702 . 1^ 



178,313 
U6, 672 I 
119,136 
139,956 ■ 
132, "'62 
150, 763 
180,142 
196,899 

183,295 
221, -764 



13,7 
13,731 
20, 619 
30,28 
25, 390 
20,550 
19,755 
18, 639 
18,127 
8,233 



9 O 9 • 



O 9000 &ofloo90oeooo< 



' O • 9 O 9 



9 9 • 9 • • 4 



» 9 » 9 



O 9 C ' 



L"*X7H-U» 9 a « » « 

*- /,? ..-••• -«0999 

'9'^2 

^/^^e C"999999 

L933c 
L934o 
L935,co 
1936., 
^937,, 
L938,, 
-939, . 
194O0 , 



L-1950 

194^-0 o 

L942, . 

L943 

^944 

L945 

1946 

l947 

L948 

L949 

1950 



loooo^aoooo oEo o n e 9 • o 9 ovo 



528,431 1. 



• o a o 



9 



o o o < 



o • • c • 



> o 9 • 



O O 9 J e 9 

o^-o?oooa* 
OOCOl ococ* 



O0e9t90o«n 
00800**979 

C00eo9*««9 



97,139 

35'" 576 

23, 068 

29.4701 

34,956 

36,329 

50,244 

67'. 895 

82.9^5. 
70;755 



183, 540 
139,295 
12^, 660 

134,434 
14^^,765 ' 
154, 570 
181, 640 
184,802 

185,333 
138, 032 



61, 882 
103.295 
80,081 
39, 771 
38,834 
35,81? 
26, •:'36 
25,210 
26, 651 
21,461 



uZ2§i2l2 

229,034 
184,362 

163:^21 

137,401 
x:;0<. 216 
15^46? 
1^'",8,46 
197,404 



MjJII^ 



222, 712 
243,563 
308,471 
301,281 
339,239 
370, 757 
378,520 
430,955 
449,955 
477,260 

'C>900«»«00 oE< 






271. 56b 
309,477 

270, 601 
277,850 
324,323 

372,480 
369,788 
429,575 
431.842 
462,023 



• 9 9 c o o • 



.^elA. 



9,^44 
7,06:, 
5,52? 

5,558 
7, 000 
8, 076 
8, 066 
6, 498 
5,300 



439,897 
339,262 
305, 001 

273,257 
282, 515 
318,273 
386,872 
406, 999 
354,43s 
258, 918 






51, f '6 

28,, 781 

23 o 725 

28,551 

38,119 

108, 721 

14'"^,292 

170, 5^0 

188,31? 

249,187 

205, 



039J_2^46.L,15Q 



• 9 e 4 I 



100., 008 
82, 457 
81, 11^ 

113,641 

164, 2yv:^ 

203,469 j 
366,305 
4''6, 006 
447,272 

426,837 
465, 106 



5parvare of aliens first recorded in 1908 




446,386' 

380,837 

338,545 

262, 091 

272,400 

311,480 

390,196 

397,875 

3.33,399 

224,727 



2»880jjjl4^ 
168, 961 
113,216 
62^403 
63,525 
103, 019 
230,578 
451,845 
478,988 
552,361 
655,518 

o 9 O O O • 

________ ______^^ 667,126 

Departure of U„ S, Citizens first recorded 111^910. 

United States Department of J-ustice 
Im m igration and Nat-jralization Service 



TABUB 12. IMMIGRANT ALIIE^S AD- 
MTEiMDED FUTURE OR lAaT PEffi^JJJE'iX dJU^iur^ 



.1 s:'ATE OF 



Future or last 
residence 



All States 

Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Dist. of Columbia. 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Kaine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Han5)3hire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York. 

North Carolina.... 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

I Rhode Island 

South Carolina.... 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

All other 



1947 



147.2?2 



474 

889 

238 

18,089 

569 

3,165 

210 

1,539 

2,802 

616 

240 

7,340 

1,3a 

757 

523 

503 

1,004 

1,347 

1,451 

7,112 

7,575 

1,300 

331 
1,316 
433 
396 
169 
749 
6,902 
256 

47,353 
690 
255 

4,458 
505 

1,124 

6,925 
950 
349 
180 
545 

5,487 
561 
904 

1,081 

3,058 
523 

1,502 
163 

1,043 



1 MMIG RANT 



1948 



170.570 



458 

1,117 

238 

22, 666 

594 

3,904 

271 

1,473 

■3, 064 

56/^ 

376 

9,102 

1,571 

890 

545 

450 

982 

1,362 

1,493 

8,319 

9,278 

1,639 

296 

1,393 

489 

406 

241 

679 

8,457 

286 

54,056 

684 

357 

4>809 

443 

1,271 

8,153 

1,091 

292 

253 

480 

5,595 
1,077 

803 
1,103 
3,521 

564 
1,870 

222 
1.323 



1949 



188.317 



538 

1,252 
U7 

729 

5,036 

279 

1,564 

2,736 

661 

367 

11,469 

2,172 

1,425 

605 

734 

2,151 

1,089 

2,747 

9,259 

10,267 

2,288 

1,058 

1,613 

646 

578 

180 

644 

9,832 

264 

53,926 

1,203 

718 

6,158 

596 

1,382 

10,268 

1,156 

436 

350 

694 

6.071 

1,293 

757 

1,483 

3,492 

730 

2,451 

169 

1,4761 



195. 



249.187 



950 
725 

20,428 
1,401 
6,282 

396 
1,670 
2,980 

801 

424 

18,673 

3,642 

2,139 

958 

918 
2,125 
1,100 
4,330 
10,443 
14,681 
5,287. 
1,584 
2,497 

802 
1,603 

164 

637 
1^,349 

296 

68,944 

1,981 

1,279 

9,829 

755 

1,364 

10,666 

1,288 

509 
1,601 

953 
6,385 
1,325 

794 
3,570 
3,825 

690 
5>776 

275 
1,022 



20^x112 



386 

958 

384 

19, 588 

1,035 

4,841 

328 
1,460 
2,923 
■ 608 

423 

20, 562 

2,777 

1,639 

785 

637 
1,115 

809 

2,275 

8,124. 

13,452 

2,710 

500 
1,721 

663 
1,273 

165 

500 
10,701 

315 

60,113 

1,069 

595 
7,926 

720 

1,274 
462 
938 
371 
487 
656 

5,533 

1,192 
511 

1,740 

3,415 
457 

3,162 
222 

1^003 



^r J< ,\ N T 



1947 



22.501 



18 

100 

9 

3,264 

44 

389 

24 

1,112 

438 

30 

24 

492 

69 

39 

16 

21 

217 

52 

158 

668 

448 

no 

37 
57 
20 

16 

35 

669 

34 

7,525 

43 

8 

216 

27 

77 

672 

105 

10 

6 

26 

232 

13 

39 

80 

212 

26 

72 

9 

4,689 



.949 



^0.67? 



^^566 



/^6 
101 

"i 
2,837 

85 
25s 

17 
987 

422 

43 

26 

621 

88 

61 

37 

24 

160 

79 

167 

713 

556 

141 

35 

94 

35 

21 

28 

34 

593 

20 

7,214 

65 

24 

309 

22 

115 

674 

84 

16 

10 

28 

193 
26 

42 
115 
232 

39 
135 

17 
3,174 



53 

132 

16 

2,038 

74 

559 

18 

1,295 

1,449 

72 

27 

730 

132 

85 

62 

56 

285 

74 

221 

736 

633 

176 

37 

115 

25 

29 

17 

44 

785 

30 

9,267 

86 

33 

394 

64 

101 

631 
92 

34 
15 
83 

452 
34 
42 

187 

283 
50 

156 

13 

2,564 



1950 



27a^?^ 



1951 



67 

145 

12 

2,616 

105 

504 

33 

1,743 

1,317 

92 

30 

1,000 

226 
140 

84 

87 

362 

104 

338 

894 

880 

364 

56 

180 

48 

38 

27 

59 

1,027 

71 

9,519 

rUf 

38 

508 

89 

91 

777 

98 

42 

24 

84 

622 

S3 

86 

184 

377 

53 

252 

18 

1,890 



26.174 



63 

121 

27 

2,531 

104 

341 

28 

2,051 

1,106 

115 

42 

957 

228 

103 

74 

65 

279 

156 

280 

956 

863 

200 

60 

126 

67 

32 

16 

82 

• 991 

61 

9,380 

90 

31 

464 

78 

116 

742 

111 

33 

12 

115 

557 

60 

90 
188 
357 

50 
:-,60 

14 
i,201 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



T;^LE 12A. DISPLACED PERjONS 1/ Ai\iD OTHER IMMIGRAIIT ALIEI'JS ADi-iITTED TO THL UNITED STATiS 
BY RURAL /g'JD URBAN AREA AiJD CITY 2/; YEAR EIjDED JUNE 30. 1951 



Class of place 
and city 



Total 



Immigrants 



Wuota 



Non- 
quota 



Disclaced persons 



Total 



^uota 



Non- 
quota 



Other JMiiigrants 



Total 



^uota 



Non- 
quota 



Total. 
Rural. 
Urban. 



City total 

Los Angeles, Calif... 

Oakland, Calif 

San Diego, Calif 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Bridgeport, Conn 

Hartford, Conn 

ViashLi^ton, D. C 

Miami, Fla 

Tampa, Fla 

Chicago, 111 

New Orleans, La 

Baltimore, V.d 

Boston, Mass 

Cambridge, Mass 

Detroit, Mich 

Minneapolis, Minn.... 

St . Loiiis, Mo 

Jersey City, U. J.... 

Newark, N. J 

Peterson, N. J 

Buffalo, N. Y 

New York, N. Y 

Rochester, 'N. Y 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Portland, Ore 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Pittsburgh, Pa 

Providence, R. I 

Houston, Tex 

San Antonio, Tex 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Seattle, V/ash 

Milwaukee, Wis 

Other cities 

Outlying territories 

and possessions 

Unknown or not reported 



205, 717 



156, 547 



49,170 



96, 515 



95,920 



595 



lu9, 2^2 



60,627 



48,575 



27.674 



21,28^ 



6 ,^?1 



12.863 



12.811 



^ 



14.609 



8 .47 2 



6 , ^ ^7 



^^,8^8 



40.158 



15.690 



24,215 



24.120 



_2i 



^1.6^ ^ 



16,0:38 



13.595 



120. 740 



4,746 

623 

553 
4,289 

345 
1,071 
1,460 
1,237 

221 
14,461 

586 
1,107 
1,927 

403 
7,709 

891 

686 

716 
1,339 

316 

1, 669 

45,650 

1,022 

507 
3,048 

609 
4,062 
1,044 

420 

545 
569 
816 
1,676 
983 
13,434 



899 
.1^ 



?4,7Q7 



2,337 
356 
215 

3,071 
293 
972 

1,030 

433 
68 

13,115 
280 

899 

1,360 
256 

5,026 
682 
543 
596 

1,163 
261 

1,089 

38,259 

831 

457 

2,722 
314 

3,701 
887 
329 
287 
170 
750 
835 
850 
10,270 



188 

211 



^6.0 ^3 



2,409 
267 
338 

1,216 

52 

99 

•430 

804 

153 

1,346 
306 
208 
567 
147 

2,683 
209 
143 
120 
176 
55 
580 

7,391 
191 

50 
326 
295 
361 
157 

91 
258 
399 

66 

841 

133 

3,164 



711 



^?.W 



718 

127 

75 

1,766 

154 
761 
469 
165 
17 
10, 234 
1U3 
581 
734 
103 

2,980 
510 
296 
390 
854 
124 
723 
23,336 
554 
259 

2,095 
155 

2,764 
584 
163 
111 
86 
23 
370 
430 

6,543 



^S,?71 



446 



718 

127 

75 

1,766 

154 
761 
467 
165 
16 
10, 221 
142 
581 
733 
103 

2,978 
510 
295 
390 
852 
124 
720 
22,971 
554 
259 

2,092 
151 

2,759 
580 
162 
111 
83 
23 
368 
429 

6,511 



61.323 



1 

13 

1 

1 

2 

1 
2 

3 

365 



2 

1 

32 



4,028 
496 
478 

2,503 
191 
310 
991 

1,072 
204 

4,227 
443 
526 

1,193 
300 

4,729 
361 
390 
326 
485 
192 
. 946 
22,314 
468 
248 
953 
454 

1,298 
460 
257 
434 
483 
793 

1,306 

553 
6,891 



890 
547 



35.736 



1,619 
229 
140 

1,285 
139 
211 
563 
268 
52 

2,894 
138 
318 
627 
153 

2,048 
172 
248 
206 
311 
137 
369 
15, 288 
277 
198 
630 
163 
942 
307 
167 
176 
87 
727 
467 
421 

3,759 



179 
202 



25.587 



2,409 
267 
338 

1,218 

52 

99 

428 

804 

152 

1,333 
305 
208 
566 

147 
2,681 
209 
142 
120 
174 

55 

577 

7,026 

191 

50 
323 
291 
356 
153 

90 
258 
396 

66 

839 

132 

3,132 



711 



1/ Displaced persons admitted under the Displaced Persons Act of June 25, 1948, as amended. 
2/ Rural - Population of less than 2,500. Urban - Population of 2,500 to 99,999. 
Cities - 100,000 or over. 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Nattiralization Seirvice 



TABLE 12B. liiaGRiUJT ALIENS ADWiTED Tu i'HS UI^ITLL iTivTES, BY RUfi^J. 
AND URBAN AREA Al^D CITY V; JglA:h5 IJffi^ ^:?jf 7 _-^0 . lg ,51. 



Class of place c^'^d city 



XOvcLJL» oc(ooeoe«« 

Rural 



Urban 



9eooeoQo06ooe«cve»oo*o 



9 o o o o « 



City total. 

Los ilngeles, Calii" 
Oakland, Calif , . 
San Diego, Calif <,ooo 
San Francisco, Cal.if 
Bridgeport J Corji. . . o , , , o . 
Kartf ord. Conn . c . » . c » <- « , c 
Washington, D„ C 
li'xiaiTii, Fla 
Tampa, Flao 
Chicago, 111 
New Orleans, La 
Baltimore^ Mdo 
Boston, I^ss 
CuJibridge, Mass 




Detroit, Mich 
Minneapolis, Minn 
Sto Louis- Mc 
Jersey City, No Jo . 
Newark, 

Paters on. No J 
Buffalo/ No Yo. 
New York, N. Y 
Rochester 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Portland, Ore 
Philadelphia, Pa 
Pittsburgh, Pa^ o 
Providence, R 
Houston, Tex 
San Antonio, Tex. . » . . o o o 
Salt Lake City, Utah. , 
Seattle, VJash 
I'lilwaukee, Wis 
Other cities 

Outlying territories and 

possessions. , . 
Unknown or not r eported 



899 



1/' Rural - Population of less than 2,500. Urban - Population of 2,500 to 
99,999. Cities - 100,000 or overo 

United State? Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 13 o EMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED A1\1D E14IGRANT ALIENS DEPARTED^, 
BY COUNTRY OF LAST OR nJTENDED FUTURE PEHI^IANEInIT KESIDEi^JCE; 
YEARS EI^DED JUNE jO^ 1^47 TO 1951 



t 
taip." 



k^C OOOOOOOOOOO 

iAjTo ooooooooo 

^Hd OOOOOOOOOO 

Y O ooooooooooo 
l.a ooooooooooo 

I jQ.rlXO QOOOOOOO 

, 3X*X3X1CIS o o o o u 

:iern Ireland „ 

I *J oouoooooooo 
iSJl OOOOOOJOOOO 

■l^cLJ- Ooooooooo 
i JrvCL uOOOOOOOOO 
ilo^lOOOOO'JiJOOO 

I an 

, -i-lA oooocoooooo 

iserlando o o « o o 

i^oXto OO C O O O OOO 

[slaviao o o o o o o 
I* Europe o ^^000 

JOOOOOOOOOOOO 

*0 oocoouooooo 
*o ooooooooooo 

»1 1/ 

(ioooo^ooo 

.3tine,l/„ 

L > •ti,^ la. 0000000 

I inclo Nfldo 

lOOOOOOOOOOOO 

iuxes 00000000 
'L Americacoo o 
i^ericao ■ 



1,545 

2o465 

51 

2. 053 

999 

25 
514 

7.285 

13-. 900 

20 14-7 

2,962 

679 

2,370 

803 

1,445 



1-, 



0000 



0000 



100000 



000000 



131 

1,272 

797 



■Lia & No Zooo 

•, -'-fcJLl^So o o u o o o o 

^?ountriesoooo 



24.; 342 
7.558 
6,^28 
3,, 386 

3.094; 

1,284 

2n821 

■ 910 
7,811 



2, 041 

119 

2,310 

1 335 

49 

492 

5.550 

19.368 

21,257 

4.504 

642 

2,250 

94^? 

5,823 

16,075 

92 

180 

3.999 

1,- 711 

2,, 447 

2.447 

890 

2^3 

404 

2.260 

2 026 

84 

478 

1,220 




itry of last 
,ure residence 



11 countries . 

'ooooo 00000000 

I^ J.O OOOOOOOOOO 

m iU o ooooooooo 
cLXlOto o o o o o c 

ho Slovakia 

OOOOOOOOOO 
UXd OOOOOOOOOO 

ancio o o 

C6000000COOOO 

any,., o . 

(England : 
(Scotland 
(Wales „ p 




7|205.71? 22, 501 



97751 




532 

4.573 

8^,755 

12.393 

2,309 

196 




250.485 
8.384 
6.932 
2„671 
3.046 
1,027 
1.218 

ia68 

6,3ii 



995 

661 

lol5-^ 



25.880 

6.153 

5,902 

2,011 

3. 596 

845 

490 

,228 



E M I G R A 



N T 



1948 



2,861 



2.249 
113 



20.^875 



10.258 11.8?3 



5"^? 



-Ii220_ 
2„ 287 
295 



1.165 




642 



230 
37a 
426 

1.233 
1 096 

3,603 
775 

2„53e 
345 

244 
926 
291 



1950 




L95: 



598 26.174 



12o 642 i Ho 4^^^ 



J-OIO 



2<,267 
1,25'7 

3,190 
S51 

2„873 

433 

459 

1,5 181 

'31^ 



374 

30 

539 

lo440 



1,902 



■ rael is included in Palestine prior to 1950o 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 13A. IMMIGRANT ALIMS ADMITTED AND EMIGRANT ALIENS DEPARTED, 

BY RACE OR PEOPLE 
YEARS EItt)ED JUNE 30. 1947 TO 1951 



Race or people 



IMMIGRANT 



1947 1948 



1949 



1950 1951 



EMIGRANT 



1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 



All races or people.. 



147. 2?2 



170,^70 



I8e , ^i 7 



249.187 



205.717 



22. 501 



20.87 ^ 



24.?86 



27. 598 



26.174 



Armenian 

Bohemian and Moravian 

(Czech) 

Bulgarian, Serbian and 

Montenegrin 

Chinese 

Croatian and Sloveniein.. 

Cuban 

Dalmatian," Bosnian, and 

Hercegovinian 

Dutch and Flemish 

East Indian 

English 

Estonian 

Filipino 

Finnish ' 

French 

German 

Greek 

Irish. ', 

Italian 

Japanese 

Korean 

Latin American 

Latvian 

Lithuanian 

Magyar 

Negro 

Pacific Islander 

Polish 

Portuguese 

Rumanian 

Russian 

Ruthenian (Russniak) .... 

Scandinavian 

Scotch 

Slovak .' 

Spanish 

Syrian. 

Turkish 

Welsh 

West Indian (except Cuban] 
All other 



271 
2,928 

294 
1,128 

617 
2,482 

52 

4,748 

36 

28,502 

188 

622 

797 

10, 786 

17, 180 

2,882 

7,244 

15, 061 

9 

1 

4,772 

368 

640 

956 

1,896 

5 

9,176 

958 

571 

2,944 

108 

5,519 

7,156 

816 

989 

339 

132 

1,016 

1,078 

12, 025 



390 
3,138 

347 
3,574 

573 
2,827 

29 

5,515 

42 

26,200 

2a 

1,055 

747 

9,702 

25, 038 

3,060 

13,511 

16,677 

316 

36 

4,169 

448 

826 

1,205 

2,231 

8 

9,000 

1,230 

758 

3,184 

57 

6,886 

9,040 

938 

998 

31A 

126 

939 

1,448 

13,747 



387 
3,507 

165 
2,490 

784 
1,956 

35 

5,041 

55 

20, 620 

1,939 

1,000 

726 

7,888 

24,030 

2,537 

15,181 

12, 267 

492 

39 

4,122 

4,058 

7,594 

2,002 

1,954 

26, 787 

1,509 

1,057 

5,023 

26 

7,098 

7,977 

800 

1,501 

482 

146 

738 

1,679 

12,625 



1,592 
3,677 

656 
1,289 
4,940 
1,915 

79 

4,508 

70 

15,295 

5,963 

531 

303 

6,425 

28,926 

1,497 

10, 955 

10,215 

45 

6 

4,035 

18, 752 

13,755 

5,250 

1,468 

3 

55,146 

1,156 

2,100 

17,125 

901 

6,128 

5,707 

600 

787 

537 

147 

519 

2,003 

14,181 



663 

2,839 

1,340 
1,083 
5,996 
1,617 

156 

4,702 

74 

14,952 

2,258 

677 

177 

6,749 

20, 677 

5,051 

8,160 

8,144 

206 

24 

4,042 

11,598 

4,880 

6,684 

1,145 

3 

37,380 

•1, 200 

1,507 

22,083 

1,454 

5,661 

6,132 

376 

936 

699 

125 

469 

1,936 

11,862 



121 

a 

2,168 

19 

193 

16 

594 

52 

2,464 

1 

1,608 

59 

1,175 

501 

410 

554 

1,790 

17 

33 

928 

2 

3 

36 

1,250 

• 1 

133 

775 

12 

918 

2 

1,164 

405 

198 

376 

49 

88 

45 

77 

4,218 



33 

64 

51 
2,238 

93 
280 

34 

501 

184 

3,118 

545 

93 

1,061 

429 

354 

513 

1,485 

101 

9 

1,275 

3 

10 

46 

120 

2 

206 

437 

22 

368 

1 

1,314 

477 

149 

403 

70 

.118 

• 68 

206 

4,394 



172 

105 

33 

547 

63 

1,188 

9 

616 

317 

3,997 

2 
903 

no 
1,209 

1,082 

444 

573 

1,522 

225 

18 

2,651 

5 

11 

67 

1,324 

9 

268 

335 

40 

604 

6 

1,475 

664 

50 

636 

112 

148 

97 

327 

2,622 



44 

64 

32 
674 

52 
759 

19 

514 

517 

3,583 

5 

1,170 

115 

1,132 

1,234 

511 

751 

1,136 

305 

31 

2,052 

2 

6 

50 

981 

8 

237 

229 

25 

197 

2 

1,521 

722 

48 

517 

99 

123 

93 

257 

7,781 



30 
61 

22 
560 

62 
752 

10 

435 

383 

3,579 

11 

562 

93 

i;223 

1,293 

358 

909 

1,279 

259 

24 

1,869 

28 

20 

70 

529 

14 

268 

199 

26 

236 

5 

1,327 

793 

14 

463 

100 

111 

114 

225 

7,838 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 





TABLE 14 


H-iIGr.."J\:T /ilENS DEPARTED BY RACE, SEX Ai\iD AGE 


3 








Y 


EAR EMjED JUNE 30 

\ 8 


i ^^^"^ 












Number 






j 


j 




Pc.cif;- 


Sex and age 


de= 


'.<hite 


j Chinese 


East 


Fili- 


Japa- 


Kor- 


Ne^ro 


Ip- 




_EartedL 


;i 


1 


Indian 


pino 


nese 


ei.n 




lance ■•- 


\iumber departed, c , . , 

fele 
Under 5 years » . . . . 


26,174 


123,843 


j 560 


„^B3 


562 


! 180 


. 24 

22 


529 

328 




377 


11»215 


378 


316 


8 


359 


5 


3 


7 


1 


= 


2 


_ 


5-9 " 


461 


435 


8 


9 


5 


= 


= 


4 


^ 


10=14 " 


349 


334 


3 


2 


7 


- 


^ 


3 


=. 


15 " 


73 


70 


1 


1 


1 


„ 


" 




<_ 


16=17 " 


172 


165 


1 


1 


1 


= 


~ 


4 


^ 


18-19 " 


354 


330 


5 


7 


5 


= 


- 


7 


= 


20-=24 " 


1,732 


1,586 


26 


39 


32 


4 


2 


39 


4 


25-29 " 


2,096 


1,767 


77 


108 


58 


9 


2 


74 


1 


30-34 " 


1,485 


1,200 


89 


59 


55 


10 


4 


67 


1 


35-39 " 


1,139 


934 


59 


31 


59 


13 


3 


40 


^ 


40-44 " 


915 


771 


33 


24 


56 


2 


4 


25 


_ 


45-49 " 


664 


584 


19 


1 ^ 


36 


5 


3 


9 


= 


50-54 " 


549 


471 


11 


8 


28 


14 


2 


15 


^ 


55-59 " 


438 


403 


5 


1 


11 


13 


= 


5 


= 


60=64 " 


398 


353 


3 


1 


12 


21 


» 


8 


_ 


65-69 " 


495 


438 


6 


=. 


n 


31 


1 


8 


= 


70=74 " 


345 


299 


4 


1 


2 


33 


1 


1 5 


= 


75-79 " 


215 


195 


2 




= 


17 


= 


1 


=^ 


80 yrSo and overo,. 


109 


102 


_ 


1 


=. 


6 


= 




= 


Unknowrio .,«,.« o o o » 


477 


419 


21 


12 


10 


1 


- 


12 


2 


emale 


13.3J1_ 


12. 628 


182 


67 


166 


79 


2 


201 


6 


Under 5 years „ , „ „ „ 


318 


308 


^ 3 


4 


2 


= 


=. 


1 


= 


5-9 " 


440 


420 


7 


3 


6 


^ 


=. 


4 


= 


10-14 " 


323 


306 


4 


2 


6 


= 


_ 


5 


^ 


15 " 


76 


70 


= 


^ 


1 


» 


= 


5 


=i 


16-17 " 


190 


182 


= 


=, 


5 


^ 


1 


2 


ca 


18-19 " 


28? 


273 


2 


1 


5 


1 


=B 


4 


1 


20=24 " 


1, 510 


1,442 


25 


8 


18 


3 


=, 


14 


=. 


25-29 " 


2,212 


2,086 


38 


16 


30 


3 


= 


37 


2 


30-34 " 


1,462 


1,345 


42 


17 


32 


4 


=, 


21 


1 


35-39 " 


1,007 


933 


22 


6 


18 


4 


_ 


24 


= 


40-44 " 


861 


802 


17 


3 


14 


6 


= 


19 


= 


45-49 " 


753 


710 


8 


2 


6 


9 


„ 


18 


=. 


50-54 " 


643 


610 


2 


= 


6 


10 


.= 


15 


= 


55-59 " 


630 


605 


2 


1 


3 


3 


1 


15 


= 


60-64 " 


587 


576 


1 


„ 




8 


„ 


2 


« 


65-69 " 


609 


585 


1 


— 


1 


17 


= 


5 


_ 


70-74 " 


509 


500 


= 


e. 


1 


4 


— 


4 


= 


75-79 " 


313 


307 


^ 


= 


1 


4 


_ 


1 


=. 


80 yrs. and overo = 


151 


146 


— 


1 


» 


1 


_ 


3 


^ 


Unknowno...o «,,,,, 


450 


422 


8 


3 


11 


2 


^=_„ 


2 


2 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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u^ 


CO 


— CM — CM CN 

II III! 


r- 


CM — CM 

III 1 II 


J!>pAO|SoqD9Z3 


8 


in 


CMCNCMCJ^lOlOVD — — 


in 


csicNrovooo«ininvo cm 


Number 

de- 
parted 




9 

00 
CM 


PS § 5 S S In 8 g S 5 5 
(o csT — 




' 318 

440 

876 

3,722 

2,469 

1,614 

1,273 

1, 196 

822 

151 

450 

1 


« 

X 


L. 
4) 

z 


4i 


Under 5 years 

5-9 " 
10 - 19 " 
20-29 " 
30-39 " 
40-49 " 
50-59 " 
60-69 " 
70 - 79 " 

80 yrs. and over 

1 Inknown 


4 
Ll. 


Under 5 years 

5-9 " • 
10 - 19 " 
20-29 " 
30-39 " 
40-49 " 
50-59 " 
60-69 " 
70 - 79 " 

80 yrs. and over 

Unknown 





4> 

O 

(1) ._ 



t ^ 

a. 10 

■a 

4> ra 

1o c 

iS ° 
•H 

c E 



TABLE 16. 



ntry or region 
of birth 



NONII'IMIGRAI^JT ALIfflS ADMITTED, BY CLASSES ULDSR THE li-fraORATION LA.W3 

km) COmJTRY QRJKSGI OIn; of BIii-TH; YEAR ElNlDSD JUI'E 30, ,1 951 . ^ ^^^^^ 

jln.t er 4 
•1 



11 countries. 



g • o 






ooooeoooco»oocoo9o 
XliUHo •0000»0»C»00OO 

noslovakia, » , 

ark. „,„„...,..«..» 
nia o o o . o o o . . o ^ • = • o 

3X1 Cl O«O03000*O0«O»0 

;e 
iny 

(England , » . , c 

' . (Scotlando o ^ . 
bain Xt n 

(Wales o ..... . 

iryo o o • o o o o 3 ft » - o o o 

13X1 XcL ooeooo««oo'>oo 

srlands « <» c o o « » « <> • • 
lem Ireland o • o • <, . 

- Id ooo<jO«J090»eoc»o 
J, Igalo « o o . o :> o o « o ^ • • 
1 IXa ouooowoeoovojae 
lloooopowooo oo'TOoe© 

J ; P 

I* Europe^ ^ - « . c • « » <> 

I 

J'tooouooooooooo AOOC 
LXoQOO'>4uCi>On uooo*o 
lioooooooooooo«»ooo» 

MStrXneo owoooo»»ciJ«e 

I: Asiao ^ « . . o 



• A o o o 



0O0O0O9oeort00 



|> O O 

I 
%. 

IGLXeS ovooooooouooo 

f{L America o » o o o » • « 
1 Uaericao ^ o o © « © <. o o « 



o o o '• 



Mia & New Zealand. 
I Dines o o o > o o . o . . o . o 
r countries,, « .,,...<> 



Number 

ad- 
mitted 



MiJ=06. 



Govern 
menb 
offi- 
cials 



1^4. 



emporarj/ 
itors for 



20^881. 



182,4 0? 
2,921 
4,280 

103 
1,590 
5,084 

247 
1,802 

16,419 
12, 670 
47, 549 
10, 005 

1, 565 
4, 615 
1,302 
3,303 
9,764 

404 

739 

10,307 

1,761 

6, 253 

7, 743 

1,374 

1,845 

9,602 

5,/x73 

4. "^20 

5,016 

807 

3,144 

19,928 

4,344^ 
2,352 

5,585 

646 

?., 001 

78,581 
28,060 

79,613 
11,462 
39,317 

3,127 
7.344 

2, 917 



55 

363 

35 

350 

52 

1,840 
261 

1,963 
161 

70 

1,333 

52 

62 

1,382 

1 

7 

627 

34 
446 
156 
192 

27 
222 

153 
114 
191 
188 
212 



72 
216 

93 
6 

985 

874 

1.103 

968 

643 
3,365 
377 
344 
338 
948 



Busi- 
ness 



31^S±. 



917 
863 

38 

410 

1,159 

19 

439 
4,636 
4,249 

10, 270 

1,361 
248 
726 
309 
381 

1,485 
111 
194 

2, 512 
189 
995 

1,994 
242 
461 

1,740 

1,685 

1,374 
763 

114 
540 



388 
659 

2,131 
192 

1,639 

8,604 
5,869 
9,665 
1,462 

7,993 
860 

2,07i 
956 

_li077 



Pleas- 
ure 



_23_0,210 



12^418- 



1,188 

1,079 

42 

532 

1,558 

53 

408 

3,63s 

4,046 

17, 636 

4,880 

596 

978 

511 

1,214 

2,132 

151 

429 

2,509 

853 

1,719 

3,734 

260 

1,011 

4,081 

1^847 

1,409 

2, 9V+ 

249 

751 

__2uL58. 



439 
460 
338 
238 
2, 083 

54, 781 

15,877 

55,656 

6,618 

19,920 

910 

1,907 

629 

- 7,916 



In 
trans- 
it 



12*027 



Ht-Ol^ 



327 
1,087 

8 

230 
1,458 
147 
629 
2,867 
1,152 
9,774 
2,002 

311 
992 
212 
4?7 

1,798 
79 
57 

3,483 
284 

2,093 
667 

269 

187 

2,935 
783 
871 
501 
113 

1,243 

4,848 



To 
carry 

on 
trade 



.850_ .4^212 



66i 



2,825 

494 

518 

72 

939 

11,478 
4,101 
4,910 

995 
4,562 

314 
2,272 

168 



15 
26 

1 

5 
48 

1 
15 

4 
12 

204 

36 

16 

25 

3 

8 

24 
2 

2 

5 

37 

8 

1 

5 

74 

60 
8 

19 

47 



31 
4 
1 
1 

10 

44 

16 
1 

46 
8 
6 
1 

17 



Return- 
ing 
resi- 
dents 



26^1.881 



3bl 

648 

12 

258 

40? 

19 

219 

2,69? 

2,559 

7,042 

1,498 

,306 

337 

159 

1. 135 

2', 801 

46 

43 

939 

37c 

762 

973 

384 

109 

434 

384 

800 

340 

80 

256 



Stu- nat 



dent 



^ 



Ll^^ 



152 

103 

2,205 

71 

372 

1,398 

480 

7,514 

1,298 

1,640 

328 

511 

471 

786 



41 
26 

71. 

27 

8 

33 

llA 

347 

66 

7 

2 

180 

50 

65 

10 

4 
78 
10 
107 
148 
17 
39 
71 
31 
18 

23 

in 
32 

1.646 
299 
238 
294 
55 
760 

981 
398 
682 
339 
1,043 
199 
68 

277 
„.J1 



offi- 
cials 



M. 



75? 



<^t '/C 



17 

188 

2 

49 

77 



623 
44 

594 
60 
16 

44 
6 

26 
77 

4 

157 

16 

94 

63 

9 

6 

45 
90 
7/^ 
241 
53 
41 



138 

J. .'O 

5 

11 

213 

371 
232 
202 
106 
748 
131 
165 
77 
226 



Other 
class 6 



,^0. 



United States Department of Justice 
Lnmigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 17 „ NONIMMIGRANT 
AND COUNTRY OR REGION 



y or region of 
t residence 



U countries. 



Xot oo«oo(>*o«oe«ei 

.UjXLo o*oo*oeoo900< 

SLlTXct oa*oooeo9««o< 

noslovakiao • « o * <> « 

(England oo o c 
•' (3 Gotland o o < 
•.ain (Walescoooo. 

Ul M. 00000000090001 

/ o oaftoooooooooool 
l.a •eoooooeooooflOi 

jaXl-Xa OOOOOOAftOOO' 

: srlands ,,...,,. o 
tiern Ireland. . . » , 



f ly ooooooooeooooooo 

I l.Q« VQOOOOCSOOOIOOO 

t •I^a J-ooooooooeooooe 
I !l Xa voooooooooooeca 

SriooOOO OOUV O 99 :>00 00 
' on «00*O0«0«9eOA0*« 

] 26X*J.anQ« oooe^ftveo* 
MDaXLooo o « ooooo o oo 9 

E 5 J.a V xa 0O««0OO90OOe 

hr Europe, ... ,0.0. <. 

OQ *o«»*«*»*«e«e*««* 
•i^»eo«**««ooooooo»» 
bl^«o«o»eo«o««««ooo9 

t^el o.. 

»:i... •• 

llistine. 

far Asia 

Uoo«o««oo9«»«0 9999ft 
^te0000090«099e9909 

, ridies 

It I America 

h America. 

c , . 

■rLia & New Zealand. 

"l-Pin©S oeooocooeooo* 

T sount ries 



Nxomber 

ad- 
mitted 



ALIENS ADMITTED, BY CL;^SES UNDER THE Ily]14IGKATI0N LAWS 
OF L /iST PERMANEIMT RESIDENCE; YEAR E l^LED JUNE 30, 1951 

Return - 



104 ,96-.^ : 10.383 



3. 9vA 

i? 

975 

13,197 

6,022 

33,382 

4,'5'-^o 

606 

3,643 

79 

1,072 

5,389 

24 

5 

7,641 

732 

4,717 

217 

915 

50 

2,190 

4,289 

3,926 

427 

285 

2,353 



1 6,801 

1,506 
2,945 
3,580 
362 
7,645 

108,887 

32,851 

86,398 

11,832 

48, 004 

3,125 

7,585 

2,728 

™Mx5i2. 



1,472 



Temporary 
visitors for 



Busi- 
ness 



83. 995 230, 210 7 2. 027 850 A4,. 212 



459 
881 

4 
1,038 

3 

396 

4,693 

3,039 

10, 530 

720 



Pleas- 
ure 



^1^? 



1,362 
1,210 

1,179 
660 

3,575 
321 
303 
340 

Zi 



80 

523 

1,058 

2,250 

114 

1,134 

10,567 
6,839 

12, 516 
1,836 

10, 902 

1,035 
2,343 
1,062 

187 



31,2 10 25,018 



.2,^20 



To 
carry! ing 

on I resi- 
trade! dents 



1,011 3,446 



78, 029 

18,289 

63,348 

7,525 

24,553 

1,131 

2,007 

664 

464 



16,987 
5.867 
8,054 
1,246 
6,871 

292 
2,662 

202 



2,077 1,372 2,730 



18 



39 



89 



^tL-.,.Al40^l 



other 
classes 



29 



171 




80 



Ml-AtiZO™ 



48 140 

9 219 

23 1 288 




United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



50 



TABLE 18. NONBll-IlGRANT /iLIENS ADI4ITTED AND NONSaGRiiNT ALIEl^S DEPARTED, 



BY COUNTRY OF LAST OR INTENDED FUTURE PLK 
YKAR5 fflPED JUNE 30. 1947 T O 



Coiontry of last 
or future residence 



NONIMMIGRANT 



1947 



1948 



1949 



1950 



1951 



I G R ii 



1947 



rji^6 



1949 



195 C 



1951 



All countries 

^ope 

mstria » 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

)zechoslovakia 

)enriiark 

Estonia 

'inland 

'ranee 

;en;any 

(England 

Z"^]; . (Scotland 

Britain ^^.^^^^^ ^ 

reece 

:ungary 

reland 

taly 

atvia 

Ithuania 

ether lands 

orthem Ireland 

orway 

oland 

ortugal 

umania 

pain 

wed en 

witzerland 

.S.S.R 

ugoslavia 

ther Europe 

a 

hina 

ndia 

srael 1/ 

apan 

alestine 1/ 

ther Asia 

ada, incl. Nfld 

ico 

b Indies 

tra] America 

bh America 

ica 

bralia & New Zealand... 

lippines 

,er countries 

Israel is included in 



366.305 



476. 006 



447. 272 



hi^^mi 



465. 1C6 



100,^21 



427.^43 



405.503 



429.091 



/^6.727 



112,554 

817 

2,857 

24 

1,182 

3,406 

23 

602 

14,961 

1,384 

37,530 

4,912 

667 

3,461 

504 

1,023 

6,823 

16 

10 

8,690 

769 

5,887 

718 

1,446 

197 

4,756 

4,417 

2,718 

1,384 

163 

1,207 

14.622 



1 ^^ 25 9 



7,099 
3,096 

257 
1,783 
2,387 

79, 274 
17, 707 

65, ao 

9,334 
31,752 
3,447 
5,317 
2,514 
24.374 



642 

3, 95^ 

47 

1,674 

4,255 

42 

1,404 

15,557 

1,276 

49,113 

8,465 

1,129 

2, 582 

847 
1,772 
8,823 
13 
12 
7,018 
1,482 
5,825 

828 
1,791 

173 
5,276 
5,286 
3,748 

504 

176 
1,645 

17. 28 7 



111.590 



3,890 
2,774 

219 
2,819 
4,585 

106,107 

37,023 

82, 522 

9,975 

41,200 

4,358 

5,138 

2,525 

24.^12 



854 

3,037 

47 

684 

3,680 

47 

877 

n,842 

4,394 

37,971 

5,769 

848 

1,948 

657 

1,530 

7,830 

24 

25 

6,712 

1,011 

5,305 

699 

1,577 

93 

3,067 

5,053 

3,519 

527 

158 

1,805 

1 ^.417 



?7 »ie6 



6,234 
2,a2 

488 
1,256 
5,027 

102, 020 
34,405 
87,517 

10, 701 

39,291 
3,912 
5,062 
2,497 

34.860 



928 
2,450 
15 

227 

3,532 

,18 

833 

10,433 

4,091 

33,695 

4,648 

718 

1,541 

66 

1,229 

7,050 

6 

8 

5,405 

858 

4,576 

ai 

1,091 

35 

2,610 

4,598 

3,673 

472 

290 

1,679 

15.323 



1,959 
1,890 

3,008 

1,498 

436 

6,532 

97,063 

30, 735 

85,035 

11,207 

40, 094 

3,320 

5,737 

2,517 

^8,620 



104.963 



926 
3,254 

9 

97 

3,974 

17 

975 

13,197 

6,022 

33,382 

4,550 

606 

3,643 

79 

1,072 

5,389 

24 

5 

7,641 

732 

4, 717 

217 

915 

50 

2,190 

4,289 

3,926 

427 

285 

2,353 

16,801 



7^3 
1,506 

2,945 

3,580 

362 

7,645 

108,887 

32,851 

86,398 

11,832 

48,004 

3,125 

7,585 

2,728 

41,??2 



^7.?91 

65 

1,701 

9 

61h 

1,941 

2 

261 

7,962 

223 

24,126 

2,049 

248 

647 

119 

804 

1,337 

1 

5 

3,443 

331 

2,376 

428 

619 

38 

2,131 

2,903 

1,866 

741 

163 

638 

8.904 



118 ..047 



■57272 
1,110 

139 
562 
821 

80,123 

16,183 

21,596 

2,123 

11,388 

2,106 

4,123 

1,112 

95.272 



221 

3,620 

38 

i,229 

3,419 

18 

604 

12,404 

313 

52,334 

8,309 

1,000 

1,227 

506 

2,277 

4,508 

6 

14 

5,667 

1,027 

3,977 

775 

1,211 

58 

3,936 

4,585 

3,066 

561 

137 

1,000 

15.786 



107. 217 



9,822 
1,796 

330 
1,778 
2,060 

97,070 

22,892 

73, 763 

8,167 

33,576 

3,642 

5,159 

1,466 

47 .7 7 5 



391 
3,075 

32 

533 

3,680 

15 

741 

11,197 

1,592 

40,403 

6,395 

993 

1,383 

357 

1,678 

6,654 

20 

14 

6,662 

1,035 

4,875 

676 

1,582 

71 

2,665 

5,108 

3,455 

362 

107 

1,466 

10 .574 



?8,477 



3,885 
1,702 

322 
1,337 
3,328 

93,187 

24,131 

89,263 
9,657 

37,651 
3,574 
4,730 
1,795 

23.724 



782 

2,448 

23 

219 

3,514 

24 

823 

9,800 

2,903 

36,773 

5,464 

794 

1,578 

70 

1,399 

6,404 

4 

13 

5,115 

987 

5,306 

416 

717 

30 

2,465 

4,995 

3,a3 

323 

203 

1,472 

8,8^0 



^2x 



462. 
687 



387 

2,935 

8 

103 

3,796 

11 

938 

10, 785 

5,152 

35,025 

4,744 

633 

1,868 

65 

1,267 

4,796 

9 

15 

7,031 

779 

4,715 

221 

738 

48 

2,470 

4,278 

3,598 

366 

240 

2,148 

ia6i8 



1,115 
1,581 
1,760 
957 
320 
3,097 

96,117 
25,174 

88,818 

10,849 

40,279 

3,033 

5,868 

1,926 

49.720 



483 
1,133 
2,809 
2,532 

161 
3,500 

105,710 

26,471 

89, 201 

11,364 

44,780 

2,702 

7,443 

1,925 

47.044 



Palestine prior to 1950. 



United States Department of Justice 
IiiUiiigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 19 o NONBlIIGR/dyiT ALIElJS ADMITTED AS TSiPORARY VISITORS., TiiAMSITSj 
STUDEi\ITS, OK TKSfTY 'iTJiil^L. 1/ IIj TrS UKITED STATES, BY DISTRICT 
ON JUNE 30^ 1950 MQ 1951 • 



District 


Visitors 


Ti'ansits 


1 

student.^ Treaty 










traders 1/ 


Jvine 30.9 1950? 










Ail districtsooo. . 


.-.Z9^424_ 


.AJ§1^ 


24,939 
142 


813 


wJ o Axb3JlS s V X O C J .. C O 


6.3^5 


387 


.u4 


Boston, Mass ^ o . , .. . ^ » o ■> c « « 


908 


69 


2.154 


8 


New York;, N. Y 


303 579 


2,774 


4.290 


460 


Philadelphia, Pa o . » . o << o o o 


252 


44 


1,383 


4 


jjii-LT' jJHOrGo riClo ooco-joooooo 


467 


25 


1,283 


s 




lA, "518 


870 


1,584 


96 


Buffalo, N. Y,. ,ooo..oooo« 


1.776 


137 


1-020 


11 


iJ?T(J*ClUo r'iafc.CiXo ooooooooooo 


5;; 75? 


199 


2,^73 


6 


UniC^gO^ i.J-Xo ooooooouoooo 


1,.677 


50 


2 c 482 


_ 


Kansas City^ i-IOo oo ^ o oo o ., c 


-= 


"° 


2,335 


_ 


^S&X'X'XSo sJ^aSHo ooooooooooo 


3,846 


537 


1„140 


30 


Sar; Francisco^ Calif ccooo 


3., 825 


699 


2,184 


139 


San Antonio : Texo ^ « o o o o » o 


5,4'' 1 


7^7 


349 


= 


i-iX X"^a.t»Ot( X C.A.O oocjoooooooo 


1,753 


5'7 


576 


1 


Los Angeles .,, Calif,, <, . ,., ., „ o 


lo 698 


03 


1.167 


6 


Honolulu, Tc, Ho CO 


582 


89 


57 


■= 


June 30s 1951 o 










All districts OOaOOOOOOO.aOO 


68^176 


7.814 


24i8i9_ 


857 


St o Albans , Vt ooooooooooo 


7,4^3 


284 


123 


a 


Boston^, Lass ooooooooooooo 


7'50 


7S 


2. 059 


17 


New Yorko No Yooooo.ooooo 


35o2'55 


3,702 


4,235 


537 


Philadelphia, Pao o o o = > o o o 


212 


46 


1,292 


3 


Baltiiacre^ Mdc ooooooo-jo<,o 


374 


25 


1,563 


9 


rliaHHq r J.<io OO -COOOOi^OOCO 


'^ir, 200 


496 


1.668 


100 


Bui X aio v- No Xoooo^voooooo 


1.952 


136 


990 


20 


iJ ex* 370 XT' ^1 i'^X' ^o OC'OOODOOOOO 


5.894 


266 


2, 501 


<= 


Chicago J 111 O O O O O O C C 


1,68? 


B' 


2v405 


-- 


Kansas City^ Mo o o o » . , . « » o 


---- 




Z, 21^ 


= 


Seattle, V/asho « o » <. „ o » « o o o 


4,364 


^99 


1,093 


10 


San Francisco, Califoocoo 


4.3^2 


489 


2c 27.5 


-in 


San Mtonio. Texooooooooo 


5,946 


1,33? 


356 


^ 


IjX Jk cloO V-, 1 Ci^o oooijoocooooo 


lc50l 


-6 


626 


2 


Los iUigel 3S o Calif o ■> « » o o o 


2r 087 


127 


1,390 


7 


Honolialu^ T ^ H , o o ., » o » o » <, c 


959 


69 


A4 


= 



1/ Admitted sirice December 7^ 1948c 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 20. ALIEV'3 EXCLUDED FROM THE UNITED STATES, BY CAUSE s 
.rEAR3 Ei^IDED JUM2 30, 1942 TO 19.51 

'Figares represen^^ all exc J-V.s ions at seaports and exclusions 
of aliens seekir-g entry for 30 days or longer at land ports. ) 



Cause 



NuJEber excluded. 



1942 f 1943 :.9a^" 194f; 



Hot s and xtcbaciles c 

leble minded, .o <. 

>sane or hai been axisaiie 

x.r>t it-;it icnai psychopathic 
i,f ericriby. 

rg£;>n"s certificate of nental 
efect other than above,,..,.. 

her loathsome or dangero-os 
or-tagious disease. , . . - , i 

rgeon's certificate of physical 
efeot other thar. contagious 

rcni; alcoholLim. , , 

kelj' to become public charges . . . 

uperr.,, professional beggars, 

id ■ agrants ,. o«, ... <.,.....».... . 

ntrac'. laborers. „.,.. 

sistsd aliens, . „ <. 

owaway s , .o«.». .-o. j .- ^ ........... • 

compan;'ing aliens (See, 18) » ..... 

der l6 years of age, ruiaccom- 
anied by parents .... 

iminals .... o ... » 

bversive or anarchistic - . , 

I lI10X*3.J. CX9.SS6S cfc»ooooa*nov«>i>9*d*9 

id been deported cr excluded 

;abls to "ead 

:>ver 16 years of age) 

: :ught by nonsignatory lines. c... 
» thcut proper documents . ....,.,.. 
.■sviously departed to avoid 

ilitary service. 

)ier 



Q 

12 
1 

7 

3 

4 

10 



160 



iii^iiiiitSiiiA^sa^. 2^.42 



2 

3 

4 

2 
6 

16 



26 

4 



0r}«O<J«C'9< 



<•««••••• 



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• ••««••••• 






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25^ 



70 

10 

33 

9 
3 

.,207 



o « « « » 

1,173 
660 



26 

4 

77 



3 

68 

1 

6 

31 

8 

3 



1946 j 19^" 



. 



22 

4 



3 
11 



15 

1 

106 



28 

155 
3 

7 

63 

8 

45 

21 

4 



15 
10 

19 

15 
11 

22 



13 

4 

53 

3 

18 

161 



>J'7 



Aililibio 



2 

4 

14 
3 

9 



1948 



23 
10 



17 



4 

22 

9 

il 



u 

1 

33 



20 14 

10 I 16 j 

i! 

28 ; 98 
J ! 



1949 



3 

3 

20 

19 



1950 



3 
3 

23 
10 



1951 



111 17 



12 j 

17 



.10 

21 



12 

•■^0 



! 



13 19 



26 

5 
67 



n 

X 



361 902 709 

3! 11 2 



8? 
2i 

4?' 



Ill 5 
139 f 142 
1[ 
5 



1,106 '1,109 



» tt O 9 O • 



1,043 



• 9 • • < 



1, 037 



452 605 



23 

1 

1,805 

6 



3 

45 



21 


13 






3 


23 


3 


2 


97 


53 


2 


2 


26 


12 


2 


6 


216 


J.22 


4 


4 


12 


12 


187 


199 


25 


31 



12 16! 
301 66 50 



4 11 
2 



' 



2, 294 
il 



e*00«< O99004 



.1,52312,158 
818 



-I 



3, 316 1 3, 690 



ill! 
16! 



30 

1 



9 

11 

2, 970 

66 

17 



99900f9eAO*^e9990 

\ * 

3,679 3,676; 2, 731 
78411,092 1,229 1,103 

I L™ 



13 

3 
2,868 

43 
12 



2,341 

1,230 



q 
.23 

7 



13 
11 

IQ 



^40 

1 

78 

1 

121 
8 

4 

337 

29 

15 

4^ 

3 

2,783 

4 
17 

e e • o ** 

2,361 
.1,4.23 



„1„...^.,. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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TABLE 21k r ALIENS EXCLUDED FROM THE 


UMITKL 


STATES 


, BY RACE OR PEOPLE; 








YEARS EI^DED JUNE 30<, 1942 TO 1951 










(Figures represen 


t all exclusions at seaports 


and exclusions 






of aliens 


seekin 
1942 


2 entry 
1943 


for 30 


days 


r longe 
1946 


r at land port 


s) 






Race or people 


1944 


1945 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


All races or people, oo 

tlXall ooooooooooooooooo oo 


1,833 1,49.5 


1, 642 


2,341 


2o942 


4^71 


4,905 


3,834 


J^ 


.I4J84 


2 


2 






5 


6 


3 


4 


2 


14 


mian and Moravian 






















uQOn J OOOOOOO :'0C>O000OQO0 


3 


1 


1 


2 


6 


7 


12 


7 


.U 


19 


arian., Serbian and 






















Qw-enegrino oooooooooooo© 


1 


2 


5 


1 


- 


9 


12 


5 


4 


39 


8S Caopooooo'^ i,''.-oooooooo 


11 


2 


11 


13 


15 


16 


19 


19 


15 


22 


tian and Slovenian » o o o. 


5 


1 


■ 3 


6 


6 


8 


6 


2 


3 


23 


lo OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 


^9 


6 


16 


24 


18 


49 


43 


108 


188 


123 


itian<> Bosnian, and 






















rcegovinianc o o c q o o o o o oo 


■= 


1 


= 




_ 


_ 


-7 


1 


8 


J 


1 and Flemish o o o o o o c © o « 


30 


18 


26 


30 


51 


81 


76 


52 


42 


52 


XnGXaHo ooooooooooooooo 


— 


3 


2 


7 


3 


8 


8 


4 


2 


■^ 


LSri oocoooooocoooooooooo 


282 


231 


236 


359 


568 


655 


754 


553 


424 


424 


DiXnO OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 


18 


1 


5 


_ 


6 


4 


3 


1 


4 


— 


LSri oooOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 
Ztio oooooooooooooooooogo 


8 
33.5 


5 

244 


3 
365 


7 
451 


11 
566 


28 
677 


16 
623 


3 
461 


6 
398 


7 
396 


m OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 


57 


245 


S6 


57 


87 


175 


165 


80 


84 


121 


Co OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 


8 


8 


4 


10 


21 


114 


40 


31 


10 


16 


Xo OOOOOOO OOOOOOOOOOOOOC 


151 


101 


131 


185 


239 


291 


300 


220 


IQO 


1-75 


Lano OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 


26 


24 


19 


30 


89 


193 


218 


73 


49 


43 


IllCSCo OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 


2 


1 


8 


18 


6 


4 


4 


3 


8 


4 


Ulo OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 


= 


= 


= 


3 


•= 


■= 


5 


1 


-=- 


=■ 


1 Amei'icaxio ooooooooooou 


26 


24 


40 


35 


49 


60 


77 


50 


47 


36 


lanian ooooooooooooooooo 


1 


1 


5 


1 


2 


12 


6 


4 


14 


76 


1 xT oor-oooooooooooooooooo 


12 


6 


9 


4 


16 


34 


21 


32 


28 


39 


))uO0O0OOOO0OOO0OO00O0OO 


82 


77 


101 


171 


144 


1?0 


14.5 


60 


■''4 


66 


s 'ic Islandero o o o o o o o o © o 


1 


„ 


7 


13 


13 


=- 


" 


■= 


— 


.=. 


fc^nOvTOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 


32 


15 


21 


42 


57 


139 


159 


69 


100 


278 


lgU.es 6oonoooooooooooooo 


89 


9 


42 


28 


21 


51 


37 


3 


4 


13 


U nan ooooooooooooooooooo 


5 


5 


6 


11 


9 


44 


46 


31 


22 


23 


r Lan oooooooooowooooooooo 


19 


21 


20 


40 


68 


108 


93 


60 


90 

■ 


214 


; snian (Russniak) » o o » » » o 


5 


9 


11 


7 


9 


33 


23 


16 


10 


19 


L imavxan ooooooooooooooo 


55 


42 


55 


58 


67 


104 


93 


76 


58 


57 


1 ^Ho oooooooooooooooooooo 


146 


103 


112 


181 


254 


310 


335 


222 


192 


186 


f iiV OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 


2 


4 


9 


12 


6 


22 


26 


18 


14 


9 


LLSno oonoooooonoooouoooo 


28 


16 


13 


29 


64 


274 


223 


106 


58 


52 


. . Ul OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 


6 


6 


4 


8 


14 


11 


18 


9 


10 


12 


r. LSno OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 


1 


_. 


= 


= 


« 


' 5 


'- 


2 


1 


3 


Lllooo OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 


3 


10 


4 


10 


17 


13 


13 


20 


6 


9 


J" Indian (except Cuban), 


10 


2 


•=■ 


9 


14 


15 


21 


6 


8 


16 


L ^tner ooooooooooooooooo© 


322 


249 


292 


479 


421 


1.0/^ 


1„262 


1.422 


_iJ87. 


1,186 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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TABLE a4A. ALIENS DEPORTED AND ALIEIC DEPARTING VOLUNTARILY 
UNDER PROC EEDINGS g YEARS ^E i^'D^_ JUNE JO. 1892 TO 1Q51 

[Aliens departing 
voluntarily 
•under prcceed- 
ings 1/ 



Period 



1892 =- 1951 

1892 - 1900 
1901 ™ 1910 
1911 - 1920 
1921 - 1930 

cXy^c^o o o 

X 7 ^^ o o o o 

i/^c^ o o o 

1924o . „ o 
19?^ 

J- 7^.-' W Li O 

1926„ooo 
1927.. 
19280000 
=»- 7^7 0000 

1931 - 1940 

oLy^^o o o CT 

1932,,. 00 
1933 ..0.0 

1934 O O O 

1935ou„o 

19360000 

«i-y^J O J O O 

1938o„oo 
1939oooo 

I94O0 a o 

1941 - 1950 

XVA^nLu 

t*. 7*+!^ u o o 
J-yi^^ 0000 

1944. OUO 
1945 0000 
194^0 000 

19 

194800 
1949. o 
I95O0C 



. 7 

^-f ' J o o o 




4 O 9 O O O 



Total 



3^127 

11,558 

27,912 

164-390 

4,51^ 

4,345 

3 c. 661 

6.409 

9,495 

10- 904 

26.674 

3I0 5^1 

380 796 

28, 018 

210o4l6 



29. 

30o201 

30,212 

16,889 

iC 29? 

17.446 

17,61^ 

18,553 
17. •'92 

15-^548 



JUi 



^17; 



10.938 

10.613 
16.154 
3^,449 
80. %0 
116.320 

2U^543 
217, S5 5 
296.337 
5^^9.105 



686, 713 



Aliens 
deported 



3.127 
11. 558 
27.912 

92al5 




10. 904 

11.662 
11.625 
12.908 
16-631 






18.142 
19.426 
1'5..865 
8.879 
8,319 
9,195 
0.829 

9.2'^5 
8. 202 



_110. 8-49 



'^2.233 



15.012 
19.946 
25.888 

.ll.,387 



.__^JL 



4.407 

3.709 

4o20-:' 

7.179 

;U.270 

lu. 375 

18. 663 

20.3''l 

20, C^O 

< 628 

13.0 544 



11., 719 

10.775 

10.347 

8.010 

7.978 

8.251 
85 788 
9,278 
9,590 
8,594 

1420^^521 



^,531 

6.904 

11.947 

32.270 

69.490 

101,945 

195.880 

197.184 

276,297 

572.477 

673,169 



Voliontary depaiir-iires of aliens under proceedings first 
recorded In 1927o 

United States Department of Ju.stice 
Inmlgration and Nat-uralization Service 



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t5 



TABLE 26a o ALIENS AND CITIZENS POSSESSING BORDER CROSSING CARDS WHO CROSSED 
THE INTERNATIONAL LAND BOUNDARIES, BY CLASSES AND PORTS 




Iftdian Border g/o » » 

I^XclXSq 116 oooouooo 
^LSuj^Oj/Vci 116 o O O O o 

3rt Fairfield^ Me. 
adawas ka ^ Me o » <> o o o 
in Buren^ Me^ 
iffalo, No I 
jwiston;, N„ Yo 
Lagara Falls ^ NoY„ 
;densburgp No Yo„. 
•uses Pointy NoY 
.ddingtorio No Y 
'Ungstcwn. No Yo 
itroitr, Micho o o » o » 
>rt HxiroHo Micho oo 
ludette, Mixuio 
itern'l Fall s^, Minn 
.geon River<, Minn„ 
aineo Was ho 
her ports 

.can Border 2/ 
iownsville,. Texo o o 
1 Rio,, Texo 
gle Pasg, Tex„ 

X a>^On 1- 6JLo o o o o o o 
OCXiS r^ 1 CjLo o o o o o o o 

ialgc Tex. 
IredO; Texo o 

Tex 
ii-eta^ Tex 
2pata^ Tex 

iiteville, Ariz. 
\i'w c) «\X^.^<ci o o o o o 
gales o AriZo o » 
Sn, Luis., AriZooo oo 

** -LT'clClff p O^XXX o o o o 

ClexicOo Calif o 
Si Y.sidroy Calif 
ler ports 



k-OOOOOOOOOO 



>OQOQOOOO 



itermittent covers occasional crossing of less than 
active covers daily crossing or at least 4 times a 



4 times 
week on 



a week on an average; 
an average o 



27,1.55 

3,510 

1. 760 

4^, 988 

36,104 



?-idents of Canada crossing Canad,ian border ^ of Mexico crossing Mexican border. 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



fl 



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TABLE 23, INWARD MOVEMENT OF ALIENS AND CITIZENS OirER I1\ITERNATI0NAL LA^T) BOUI^JDARIES 

YEASS ENDED JWIE .30, 194? to 1951 1/ 



Aliens aiid citizens. 







Alieas. total 

Canadian Border 

Blaine, V/ash 
Buffalo, N. Y, . .. - .c 

udXaXS « rle ••e«o9ttoeo» 

Detroit, Vilch o . 

Madawaska, He o 

Niagara Falls, N. Y., 

Por-t Huron, Mich 

Other ports 



535, ^2?1 536,996 



o a • o » < 



Mexican Border... 

Brownsville, Tex. . . . 
Calexico, Calif ..... 

Do"Jglas, Ariz , 

Eagle Pass, Tex. . . „ . , 
El Paso, Tex, , . . , , , . , 
Hidalgo, Tex, , 
Laredo, Tex, , 
Nogales, Ariz...,, 
Sail Ysidro, Calif., 
Other ports, . , 



e • 9 • « ' 



• o • o o 



eeaaeoco 



Citiians, total ....... 

Canadian Border , 

Blaine, Wash , 

B-offalo, N. Y...... 



769,120 

948.. 548 
4. 440„ 629 

568., 535 
1,959,880 

566,, 405 
5 c, 935.^ 420 

Oooooooooooo 

23.14^.206 
1^84 5 ,,409 
32 322", 186 
835 333 
969,-528 
6„ 645. 104 
1, 098 „ 202 

3, 212; 975 
2,, 006,334 
lo 714, 827 
l,,497o308 



862„ 015 

905,567 
4,220,826 

506,076 
1,837,085 

549,696 
6.117,2.48 



I6^iiyiii.ll6j.ii6,^2 
606,885] 667,104 
1,117,877 j 1.10,4,536 



18,680,987 

628,039 

1,335,785 



938,492 I 1,047,401 l,153,46i 

4,129,552 3,978,168 

579,037 I 725,047 



3,974,134 
5?6,057 

1,994,263 
.539,438 

6, 307, 503 



O O O'O O O I 



O A &|0 O O I 



0000000 



1,960,251 

537,028 

6,601,993 



23.35^.036 24,023,094 24,670,872 



1, '729,8.15 
2,951,260 
692,999 
1,055', 580 
6,612,748 

1„ 244, 134 
3,288,920 

2,162,843 
2,260,425 
1.358,312 




1, 972, -^-0 

3p Lie, 609 

787,374 

1,039,732 

6,534,90-' 
1, 327, ~09 
2,845,801 
2., 418, 469 
2,284,354 
1,6933 3 7'^ 



2, 229, 093 

3,264,013 

816,354 
92<),537 
6,903,953 
l,,-:.52,300 
2,867,461 
2,45 5,807 
2,136,799 
1,615,555 



2,U6,65i 
643,027 
8,070,806 



OKO O O O O 



(••COCOOO 



Calais, Me... 

Detroit, Mich ., 

Madawaska, Me .., 

Niagara Falls, N, Y,„ 
Por't Huron, Mich, 
Other ports, . , 



e « « o 



9 • o o 



MexiCcui Border , „ , 

Brownsville, Tex. ... , 
Calexico, Calif... „., 
Douglas, Ariz . 
Eagle Pass, Tex. 
El Paso, Tex. 
Hidalgo, Tex. , 

Laredo, Tex 

Nogales, Ariz , 

San Ysidro, Calif,. 
Other ports , . 



k o o 9 O O O I 



Jooaotttoo 



^04 * « 00 



o 9 • « « e o < 



'«•••• e o I 



19,06 

56 

3,999,526 

812c, 922 

4,73?;"132 

552,288 

2, 02'^ , 450 

" 807„ 021 

5, 622, 525 j 

o o o o oil 

i2ilil^66 

929,822 

1, 690", 530 

' 835' 333 
665,775 
4,413,672 
[ 736,727 
( 3- 212, 975 
i 1<, 376c, 848 
I 3,946,075 
! 1,556,109 



M^jm^jf^ 



514,193 
4,569,110 

843,117 
3,02"^925 

520,715 I 
2, 767,, 732 

849, 579 *■ 
6,260,394 



2^^^l4lkSlk282 



00000000000 

20,116,8?2 

062 

1,345,240 

622,890 

703,463 

4,392,969 

881,692 

3,287,189 

1,392', 128 

5,207, -768 

.1^14,4^6 



23,18.1^848 
481,243" 
5,242,191 

736, 566 
6, 313., 229 

576,357 
2, 932, 568 

957, 9Q6 
6,441,698 



22, 14-.i 

497,582 
4,796,507 

765,489 
5,392,192 

561, 608 
2,625,779 

918,^22 
6,586,595 



2^»J2i2^2i 

2,543,855 

3,235,635 

803,231 

1, 050, 566 

7, 389, 3U 
1, 715, 222 
2,601,056 
2,711,537 
2,165,326 
1,718,254 




00 ooooooaooo 

S- 6/^0^82 

'998,78:8 

1, 580', 780 

74?', 604 

692^5 72 

5,357,SU 

<^0L, 921 

2,-, 845, 802 

1, 580, 273 " 

5,234,700 

=k697^_ 

Each and every arrival of the same person co'-anted separately 




1,1267110 

1,760,451 

816, 668 

769,809 

7,450,707 

966,448 

2,667^898 

1,637,3.50 

4,918,562 



22, 660. 42: 

473,967 
5,177,676 

695,403 
5,193,290 

537,938 
2,695,264 

931, 917 
6, 954, 968 



1,277,650 
1, 741, 728 
803,913 
817,775 
7,973,475 
1,144,, 748 
2,601,435 
1,804,918 

5,069,453 



l^2^^2kLl,ml^2B 



United State.s Liepa.rtnient of Justice 
Immigration and Nat^arali^aticn Service 



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Porfc 



TABLE 3O0 PASSIiNGM TRAVEL EBrwliIIi2:J THE UIJITED STATES AM) FOREIGN CX3UNTR.IES 
EY PORT OF ARRI7A1 OL DLFAIiTUIiL;? YEAR EiiiJI^J JUiS 30. 1951, 1/ 

eaand,byaU J^ .By sea^ ~_^ jj By aj|?L 

Tcta:i. t Alien- 



ARRIVED 




00000000 



■00000 



York, N„ Y„, 

Albans J, Vtoooooo 
■;opeec, MasSogo - o o 
vono Mass » , „ , . „ . 
Ladelphiac Pao '. » .. 
iimore. Mo „ o o ^ . >, 

.OXxT.;) VslooOUOOOOO 

u Flaou ,, . .0. ,. 00. 
Jm Beach, Flao <. o 
West. Fla. „.,..,.„ 
Juan. Po R„ ., , . „ . 
.m IsiandSo 00000 

'Si . £ J-cL ou>'(.'Oooooo 
1 6 : jr\^.cL o''0oou^oo 

Orleans, Laooo<, o 
Anton iC;; Tex„ o o 
FT-anciscOs Caloo 

:A.3^Cl,i U.A 6 o n u c t. 

tie,,,' Wash o 2/,., 
Angeles,, Calcooo 
L-iiu,, T„ Ho.„o„, 

V pO A X^ Sooooooooo 

DEPARTED o,.o 'coo. 

forko No Yooo., 00 
Albans., Vt.>o oo^o 
/pee. Mass ,. o ., ., o o 
.n. UaSo >,) i> o ^. o o o o 
idelphiar Pa„„„o 
unorB;, Md. 
3lk- Vao, 

1-1-. r Xa. o o o J <• o '. ■■ c 

iJm Beach^ Fla^ 

• -'S Xi ; i/ JLa o c o o r) u 

liiat), Po Ro o .. o J 
L?5. Islands o c o o c 

i- i^J>a.ooooooooc 




-+■-■ 



Citi- 



^^^i-^asn.3^ 



52^A^2hk'?z.i9^hl^i],^.^i^^^23h§.^y.9Z7 b4?..866 mQ, 624 14640 67.5 g 734. 299 



324. 573 [370, 59s 1 

2,730! l,C26f, 



l<i 037 li 
11,2741 



8.599 
24, 926 



••C3 



1.142 



3,692 
340 



100,. 261 184,045! 



11,795 

4.278 

11 965 

864 

8,477 

483 

19. 5^7 

2. 062 1 

14., 157 

166 

2,834 

4.058 

8^ 763 

1,10 7 



looocooo 



I00000900 



l'7p,653 

1/703 

4'^7 

2,771 
150 

287 

40 

96,253 

1,780 
3^ 9'^2! 
7,83i. 

1.315 
7.290 



3,592j 

20., 714 J 

18.2-39] 

9''2! 

8., 864! 

5,568; 

23, 26S i 

27,12?: 

13,706! 

12, 452 1 

lif,296l 

2,4,57 



335,8011 663,773 999,.574 132o658r265„9'^l 3Q8-62Q 20 



\1 



otal 



695o 171 1223, ^55 jei2, 361 1436^ 3lS 

4. 556 \ 

9.636j 
30,200! 

l'39lS 

4, 834 J 

492 ( 

2B4o306; 

15.-387^ 

24. 992 \ 

30. 224 \ 

lo836j 
17,3a! 

6,0511 
42, 862 1 

5, 653 1 
41, 282 < 
2~8i 
16,540 
16, 510 t 
23,059' 

3' 564 



58, 237? 258. 855 

4., 55'^' 

9,636 

.IS. 297 

344 

3,891 

86 

252., 79 -^ 

14,96s 

24. 78^ 

714 
16 c 9/^9 

3.16 s 
26.. 54^ 

4^951 

!« '^7« 
. .„_^ 

12, '746 

U.,101 

l'^,..44'5 

2,335 



3,286 

20, 506 

16.. 110 

'462 

8.68« 

3.^046 
,16., 786 

3-. 263 1 
13^4221 

.ip,40l! 
169 f 10,, 932 j 
12,363 



«^ 1 .cl u \ 



'.onio.: Tex, „ 

" an CIS CO. Cal 

i. Ore„„ „., „ 

-.VJasho 2/00 

:eles, Cal„o 

icurj- T, Koo., 

a« Jpqrrso... , o o . 



348,502 
758 
8,126 
8,098; 
635: 
1.615 
78 f 
175,075 
3,781 
21,732 
18„487 
1,432 



528, 155 JIO9, 031 : 206, 145 



10, 323 
l'»671 
6^964 
30 
453 
3.109 
6., 275 



8.940 

275 

26,148 

3, 526 

9,902 

34 

2.345 

8,005 

9., 189 



2,4611 
8.603 
10, 869 i 
785 
1, 902 I 
118 j 
271,328! 
5, 561 
25,704 
26,321 » 
2/747! 



A 



8,537 
l.,152 
2,849 



15 o 981 

2,.. 961 
2„032 



16, 230 f 

4415 
36,471 
5.,, 197 
16,866 
64 
2, 798 \ 
11, lU 
~«~.... ,., — , 15,464| *., -w^, ^.,.-,^,., ^1, ,....• 

_ l^ji^Ii0g0[_jL0^iL .JLilOJ _ Ji^217l_7,147 

'I 'lusive of travel over international land boundaries, 
Lades air t ravel via Anchorage^ Alaska. 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Ser^'ice 



1. 797 
98 

130 
40 

7,714i 
111 

2i 
4fJ8l 

739 
59 

166 
1„ 786 

519 

4,115 

30 

20'' 

795 

1,981 



3.365!) 
' 198 |! 
236 
78 
26.324 
■361 
200 
824 1 
476 
47! 
275 1 
10., 167 

565 
7,870 

34 
1,687 

1,497 

1,405 



315,176 



5,1.62 1| 

296 

366 

118 

34. 038 

472 

202 

1,232 

1,215 

106 

441 

11,953 

1., 084 

11 985 

64 

1,894„ 

2,292! 

3' 386 




88, 539 f 148, 751 
3,420 



1„ 669 
3y 970 
^,426 
5-^6 
7. 231 



21,532 

1-7- 663 

956 

8,893 



237^ 290 

5,089 

25 502 

25 089 

1, 532 
16 , 12+ 

24. 518 
4,1L3 
4,881 




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TABLE 



, PASSIZrant TRil/EL TC TIE UNITED STATIiJ FRDII FOREIGN COUNTR-IES., 
BI C0U1\I-TRY OF EI^iE;i\HKATlON; YEAR EifflED JUItS 30^ 1951 1/ 




peo 

Igi'amo 
•UDarko 
iland o o 

BUl G^OOOUOO O O Ij o ooo 

. mcuiy oooooooooouoe 
^aX' iii'iX'CLc*jLi o o o o u o o 

rf^VCoOO '■' O O O OO oo o oo 

jiando 
;lam.do 

iXj" e o o o o o 

/herlands o » o c 

TiT 3.^ OOOOOOQOOiaOOO 

.and 

•tugal 

.in 

tserlar>doo 
key in Europe 
:o5,lavia 
ler Earcpe 

oooooooouoooooeoo 
^ao coitooooooooooo 
Xcl uoooooooooooooe 

an and Korea o 

SSX- jLxiS o o o o o o ^» 

-—^ OQOOOOOOOOOCOOO 

6X^ «v5 cLcL ooooououoo 



iC o o o o 

bralia 

Zealcun.do o 

Lippines 

er Pacific^ 



<.. oooooouoo 

000<'<7UU000 



O CI O O O ij 



'OOOOOOOOOUOKOUO 

an of So„ Africa, 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE .31 o PASSENGER THA^/EL TO THE UNITED STATES FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
BY COUl^TRY OF ElffiARKATION s YEjIR ENDED JUNE 30., 1951 1/ (Cont'd) 



■land 

.da» o 

sn West- Indies 

OOCUUOtfOOOOOO 

lean Republic. « 

West Indies , o » 
h West Indies o » 



America,, « o . 
3h Honduras o 
Zcne & Panama 
Rica 

Ua.i d. u o a ft o •# o o o o 

•a.- 




I^'-IS- oooodouonou 

liC'X X -"d. pioooooooo 

.1 X13, oooououoooo 

-O, AOOOOOOOOOOvO 

' O (I '> O O o 

h Guianaoo., . 

txT^*3CAX*.cl e ij o ti A fi o o 

-. '^lL?<3>TAd.o O t> O O » s> 
00060*003 noooo 
ci.3' e I'oononooooo 
A o o o p o o o o w u y '■ 

^fjr ooAooooooouo 

0O000COOUOUOO4J 
& O © « O O ' 

carriers 
States, 



3ol93 

688 
11, 569 



292,808 4'70,227 763,03o|l29,85-4l-18,017 
23^3^55 279,475 519a30J132, 982 167,010 



515,. 16,1 
21Q,138 



usive of travel over land borders. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABUS 32o PAS3El«IGER TRAVEL FPiOM THE UNITED STATES TC FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
BY COUNTRY OF DEBARK.iTION s YEAR EI®ED JUNE 30, 19$1 1/ 




Unit-ed States Department cf •J'u.stice 
.Inmigration and Naturalization Servi-s 



TABLE ?2c PASSENGER TRiV/EL FROM THE UI\I.ITED STATES TO FOREIGN COUNTRiaS., 
BY COUNTRY OF DSB.\RivATIOI\I i YEAH MDED JWE 30^ 1951 (Ccr.tM) 1/ 



Country of 
debarkation 

h America, , , 
jiada c o . 
eenl and, 

Itlsh West Indies I 

Dcfc o o o 

m-oilc iin. Republic , 
■-.ch West Ind.ie5, 
enoh West Ind.i 

i-t A-O O & O O <) O C 

"al Ameri-a 
r:5h Hond iraSoc p 
lal Zon.8 & Panama 

itcmalao o 
idi;rc-:.-= . „ 
ar agiac. ^ 
.vadcroo o 

Arr,eri'a 
,ert?^r;'.a„o 
Ivia 

*.^ 400 0'JOOQOOOOO 

.tish Guiana 
ch Q-uianao ,. 
r7.h Guiana 
1= 

-1- .■ "^ o o o o 

onibi?,, o o 

cl-lv O O O t, 

aguay-o « o 

ezueia, 

of carriers 

ted States „ , ,-, ^ ^ a 




163,^96 

172, 005 



40^5 421 5 68, 21'^ I 3 5 634 1 101. 494 
259,352 431,35? 9^,024 



elusive of travel over land borders. 




13?a 128 128, 1625 302. Q27 431. 089 
261^501 745 981 j 94,875 1695856 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigrat.ion and Naturalization Ser"''ice 



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I 




1 


' 


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' 


1 


' 


u 


















































rH 






































X 


^ 


J 


^ 


o 


O 


^ 


■O O 


CT* 


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l£^. 


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^ 


CO 


o 


zt- 






d- 


ITN 










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^ 


i~i 








CM 




IfN 


tTN 










o 

CD 
CJ 


CD 

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a: 
o 

K 

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3- 


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D 

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CM 

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c^ 

1£^ 


CO 






* 


NO 

CM 




CO 




nO 

C»( 






c^ 


■ 


1 


CTN 




1 




' 




NO 

o 


C3 
CM 


CM 


CM 

ITN 

tTN 


CO 




ON 

CM 




NO 


•O 


' 


■ 


ITV 


NO 
NO 


CM 

_ 


c^ 






o 


O rH 




m 


o 


M3 


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f»^ 


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^ 


o 


* 


o 


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^ 


CM 


__, 


J- 


(D 


fn 


iC\ 


CO 


o 


ON 


3" 


o 


fr\ 


tf> 




CO 


CO 


Zt 




(O 


o 


CM 


CM 












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o 


o 


CD ce 


(f\ 


o 


if\ 


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<T. 


NO 


ON 




O 


nO 


a- 


rH 


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en 


r- 


On 




CM 


CM 


^ 


CO 


rr\ 


o 


o 


r^ 


IfN 


o 




(D 

On 




o 






a. 


CO 


'O |*o 


lO 


iTN 


c^ 


o rf> 


30 


fn 


(7> 


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* 


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3- 


WTN 




3- 


ON 


n~\ 


to 


* 


en 


o 


•~t 


ON 


o 


CO 


O 


a- 




O 


O 


lf^ 


* 


o 


CM 


If 


ON 


>o 








s- 


r-i 


«r% 


c^ 




n-\ 


-" 


^ 


f-^ 


m 


-^'■ 


vO 


<^ 


d- 


a- 


r<-« 


NO 


rH 


rH 


a- 


CM 


CM 







CM 


ON 


rH 


rr~i 


CM 
rH 


- 


(^ 


CM 


CM 


CM 






C7K 


If 






_i. 










































CM 








'~* 












_ 


^ 






^ 




_ 








^ 


J 


>o 


.£> 


^ 


OK NO 


NO 


^r^ 


^ 


* 


<^ 


^ 


* 


o 


NO 


nO 


(D 


O 


C4 


rrs 


•o 


t»^ 


lO 


O 


CM 


nO 


On 


o 


lf\ 


r^ 


r^ 


7 


<o 


o 


CM 




o 


Ok 


rH 


o 




a 1/? 




(N ^ 




iCv 




^ tf\ 


CM 


iCS 


* 


o 


* 


o 




o^ 


•O 


ir> 


>o 




<n 


o 


>«> 


<o 


CM 




OJ 


CM 


3- 


IC\ 


CM 


CO 




* 


CM 


3- 


CD 


CM 


o 


tr\ 


CO 
^O 


(*^ 




UJ K 

O a. 




CN 








^o 


rr\ CM 




0^ 


rH 


^ 


o 




o 


<o 


(T-. 


* 


«D 


*n 


rH 


ffK 


CM 




CJN 




CO 


CM 


c^ 




>o 


c^ 


NO 




CM 


>o 








ICN 




o 


^0 






^ 


CM 


iT 




rH 


r-( 








-H 


^ 




•o 




rH 


^ 


rH 




:3- 


NO 


ci 


rH 


CTN 


(^ 


CD 




CD 










IfN 


rH 


CM 




^ 




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1 






• 










































































-— 



















— . (_ 




















































< 


1 o 


w 


»^ o^ 


'O 


lt> 


tf^ 


ir 




O 




.-H 




NO 




ir. 


tTN 


r^ 


n^ 


r^ 


(D 


O^ 


CJN 


O 


CM 


^ 




«r\ 






Ok 


^ 


o 


^ 




ON 


^ 


<D 


O- 




^ 


IfN 


X z u 




OJ f— 




OJ 








CM 




CM 




nO 




fT-* 


CO 


CM 


c/ 




f>~\ 




NO 


CM 


J- 












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o 


O) 














■« < VO 


M 










1 


1 












1 


>r\ 










IfN 


d- 




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CH 




1 




^ 












^ 


o oc — 


















































































u- o 


cr^ 












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rJ- 




(TN 






zt- 




CM 


—' 






































5 






























































~ 


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_ 














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CD 


T7 


tC 




TT 


^ 


9 


* 




CM 


NO 


J- 






00 


o-i 




ON 


zT 


.H 


NO 


00 


^ 


r-» 


^ 






a- 


CD 


o 




o 


ifN 


tfN 


NO 


* 






CM 


nO 


o 


ffl 




UJ UJ 

Z -( 

oc 


^ *? 1 








■43 


IT 






ir> 




















rr\ 


CM 






rH 






NO 


Csl 






* 






^ 




ON 




ON 


00 


"^ 


(D 


S 

V5 




y 












































CO 


' 


' 


ICN 
CM 


* 






o 


O 


ON 


NO 

ITS 


^- 


■o 


' 


J 






|T> 




o 




















































































& 




































_ 




















^ 
























^ 


^ 




























































































1^ 
o 


■^ 




















-H 




s 




















ON 






=1- 


to 


o 


r— 


o 


CM 


ITN 


r^ 


o 


CO 


kf 


n~l 


n-^ 


CO 


C^ 


Q 


a 


CO 






















' 


nO 




















<T> 








ir\ 


o 


ON 






NO 


o 


o 




C". 


o 












' 


1 


1 


1 


' 


1 1 


1 


1 


' 








1 


' 


' 


' 




' 


1 


1 


1 


ON 


t 


' 


:* 


C«J 


•o 


rH 


* 


NO 


^r^ 


NO 


r— 


n^ 


-o 


Cm 


rr\ 


<7N 


m 


i 


z 


tr\ 
















































CO 
ITN 






JCN 


o 


''■■ 


- 


f^ 


^0 


ȣ> 






c^ 






^ 




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Q. 














































'-' 








^ 




























a 


UJ 


















































































lO 


o 




w 






* 


CN 


CI 




Cm 






^0 


IC\ 




.H 


















1C\ 


r-4 


^ 


00 


r^ 


^ 


ON 


CO 


(N 


NO 




NO 


NO 




^ 


^ 


CD 






Z 




1 


1 


r-t 






' 




1 


t 




r-< 


1 


O^ 


' ' 


' 


1 


1 


' 


' 


1 


1 


zf 


^ 


OK 








rH 




n-> 




1 


rH 


" 






CK( 




' 




o 




















































— 
























—J 










CM 


.. 


ir. 


^ 


^0 


CM 


CD 


Cj 


* 


^ 


^ 


O 


^ 


ri~\ 


cv 




zt 


CO 


«r 


QO 


(T- 


a: 


,^ 


00 


CO 


CO 


C-J 


IC\ 


f^ 




03 


* 


tC-i 


o 


ON 








n^ 


-^ 


» 




O 


O 


cn; 




-£> 


-O 




-o 




ft) 




CM 


sO 


CM 






CM 










CM 


O 


rH 




n~\ 






<o 


CM 


(TN 


NO 






NO 


* 


o 


o 




o 


CD 




CD 




>■ 


IC\ 




to 




:»■ 


Ov 




<N 


,-H 


Csl 


o 


GO 


tr\ 


r^ 




zT 


1 




rr 




-H 








ir\ 




CO 




IfN 


CM 


c^ 


(T^ 


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M 


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CD 


OD 


Ok 


CD 


CO 


















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CO 


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rrs 






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~ 


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CO 


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so 


CTN 


ON 


<D 








CM 








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f^ r-* 1 


If 


O 


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CTK 


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LT 


ON 






SI 


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Ov 


o 


o 


o> 


f^ 


NO 




(T- 


o^ 


NO 


CO 




tfN 






CM 


* 


5 


CD 




-• ►- 




Csj 


o 


e^^ 


ro 




zT 


o* 


CM 




ON 


lf^ 


rr\ 


a> 


on" 


J 


rH 


o 


tc 


O 


•c 




(ry 


rH 




nO 




CO 


<£> 


t£\ 






ir- 


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CN* 


(O 


■^ 


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(•" 


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rZ 


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* 


tf\ 


fZ 


CO 




O 


<7v 


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„ 


ITN 


O 


lO 


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iO 


kO 


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CM 


cr^ 


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«r\ 


^ 


3- 






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• 


no' 




A. 


sO 


«CN 




W3 


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CM 


r^ 










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NO 


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1 


















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a 




























































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ea — UJ ■< 




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UJ 










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1 




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3 o a o 
o. Z « — 


a. 


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a: — 














s 










1— 




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o r 1 


S i 




UJ 

< z 








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^ •* ^ m 


< 






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fe 


t 


2 




3 


>e >- 


ao o 1 -i •<■ UJ K 1 




o i E 




« 


£ 


O -J UJ »^ 
rNj < o * 


z 




• UJ «rt 1 






§ 






a: w z 


UJ z ar >- 5 z g 




•< 


o 


</I 


_ _i 


a ^ 




— < Ol 3 


z 

8 






< o «t 


v-o-c>-iw-<-jMjj: E«c 


:e as < 


iZ E^ 3 


o: _ 


o 


3 


— z z cc *t 


_i UJ a 




— a >^ OC 




CL o 


^ Z X 


-■suj— i-jx^wsau* flz 


;f ^ u 


UJ X 


< 


a 


t- ■< - o w q: 

— B S 1- Z P 


•<: t- UJ X 




•Nrf o UJ UJ 






j; ■» cc 


— UJ UJ «c •■- a: cc UJ ac tf f - 




3C ^ 


z 


a: 


* •* = C 


d 


« -> Z Z 




—J 
—J 
< 




■jj a; vj 


oc q: a. ■— i«j o o ^ t - _p ■^c 


■^ >- IV 


o = x 




■< 


u> 


(r 3 O 3 t- z 
BO O O 63 O (x) 


•< = 1- Z) 


oc 


oc O Ul ^ 


g 


03 


O ^- o 


13 o — - ^:: K <» v) Q i/Jr '-* 


-3 o r" 


sl 


o o 


w 


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<j o o Q 


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mo > O 


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TABLE 37. DECLARATIONS OF IKTEKTIOK FILED, PETITIONS FOR NATURALIZATION FTT.KO, 


AND 


PERSONS NATURiJLIZED: YEARS EICDED JUNE 30. 1907 to 1951 


Period 


Beclara- 
tilons 


Petitions 


Persons natxiralized 




filed 


filed 


Civilian 


>Iilitary 


Total 


1907 - 1951 


8,3P2,?0? 


7.066.510 


6,102,932 


471,171 


6.574.103 


1907 - 1910 


526,322 


164.036 


111.738 




111.738 


1911 - 1920 


2.686.909 


1.381.384 


884,672 


2U.300 


1.128.972 


1911 


189,249 


74,740 


56,683 


- 


56,683 


1912 


171,133 


95,661 


70,310 


— 


70,310 . 


1913 


182, 095 


95,380 


83,561 


- 


83,561 


191A 


214,104 


124,475 


104,145 


- 


101,145 


1915 


247,958 


106,399 


91,848 


- 


91,848 


1916 


209, 204 


108,767 


87,831 


- 


87,831 


1917 


440,651 


130,865 


88,104 


- 


88,104 


1918 


342,283 


169,507 


87,456 


63,993 


151,449 


1919 


391,156 


256,858 


89, 023 


128,335 


217,358 


1920 


299,076 


218, 732 


125,711 


51,972 


177,683 


1921 - 1930 


2.' 709 .'oil" 


**i.'884.*277** 


* *i.* 716*979*" 


"**56.*2Q6"* 


'i'TO.'iss*** 


1921 


303,90^ 


195,534 


163,656 


17,6^6 


181,292 


1922 


273,511 


162,638 


160,979 


9,468 


170,447 


1923 


296,636 


165,168 


137,975 


7,109 


145,084 


1924 


424,540 


177,117 


140,340 


10,170 


150,510 


1925 


277,218 


162,258 


152,457 


— 


152,457 


1926 


277,539 


172,232 


U6,239 


92 


146,331 


1927 


•258,295 


240,339 


195,493 


4,311 


199,804 


1928 


254,588 


240,321 


228,006 


5,U9 


233,155 


1929 


280,645 


255,519 


224,197 


531 


224,728 


1930 


62,138 


113,151 


167,637 


1,740 


169,377 


1931 - 1940 


i.*369.*479** 


**i.*637.*n3*' 


**i!498.*573*" 


19.891 


'i.*518*464*** 


1931 


106,272 


145,474 


140,271 


3,224 


143,495 


1932 


101,345 


131,062 


136,598 


2 


136,600 


1933 


83,0^6 


112,629 


112,368 


995 


113,363 


1934 


108, 079 


117,125 


110,867 


2,802 


113,669 


1935 


136,524 


131,378 


US, 945 


— 


118,945 


1936 


148,118 


167,127 


140,784 


481 


141,265 


1937 


176,195 


165,464 


162,923 


2,053 


164,976 


1938 


150,673 


175,413 


158,142 


3,936 


162, 078 


1939 


155,691 


213, a3 


185,175 


3,638 


188,813 


1940 


203,536 


278, 028 


232, 500 


2,760 


235,260 


1941 - 1950 


920.284 


"i*938.*666** 


**i.*837.*229"' 


"*i49.*799"* 


'i.'987*628*** 


19a 


224,123. 


277,807 


275,747 


1,547 


277,294 


1942 


221, 796 


343,487 


268,762 


1,602 


270,364 


1943 


115,664 


377,125 


281,459 


37,474 1/ 


318,933 


1944 


42,368 


325,717 


392,766 


49,213 y 


441,979 


1945 


31,195 


195,917 


208,707 


22,695 y 


231,402 


1946 


28,787 


123,864 


134,849 


15,213 1/ 


150, 062 


1947 


37,771 


88,802 


77,442 


16,462 1/ 


93,904 


1948 


60,187 


68,265 


69,080 


1,070 


70,150 


1949 


64,866 


71,044 


64,138 


2,456 


66,594 


1950 


93,527 


66,038 


64,279 


2,067 


66,346 




91.497 


61.* 634** 


?5t*7ii*" 


m" 


* "54*716*" 



y Members of the armed forces include 1,425 naturalized overseas in 1943; 
6,496 in 1944; 5,666 in 1945; 2,054 in 1946; and 5,370 in 1947. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE ??, PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY CLASSES UNDER THE NATIGN/JLITY LAIVS 1/ AND COUl\lTHY 
OR REGION OF FORI^ISR ALLEGI/JJCE; TEAR El'iDED JUKE 30. 195.1 



Persons naturalized 



Country or region 
of former 
allegiance 



Milit ary 



All co\mtries 



OOOOOOOOOOOOtfOO 



o « o « 



o o o • e 



o o o o 



9 O O 9 O 



O O » o o 



. o o o o 



Europso o . , 
Austria 
Belgiomc 
British Empire o 
Bulgaria 
Czechoslcvakiaa » 
Denmark „ 
Estonia, 
Finland o 
France, „ 
Germany, 
Greece„ , „ , , 
H'JPxgary 
Ireland „ 
Italyo o o 
Latvia 
Lxthuania„ » 
Netherlands 
Norwayo . <. « <. 
Pel and , o . . 
Fortuga." 
RatDanii 
Spain 
Sweden 
Switzerland, „ 

UoSok7aR 

YTigoslav.ia 
Other E-orop 



L o o 4 n o 



bOOSOOO>> 



I. ooooneoo 



L o o o o • 



^ o o • o o o 



• o o 



oononooou 



Ai? <X.cl' o n o o " 

Ch,lj::a« „ 
Israel o . 
Japan ^ „ ^ ., 
Lebanon. „ . 
Palestine 
Syria, o , , , „ , 
Other A-sia, , 



O O 9 O O 



lOOOOOOOO 



I o « o 



> O » o o 



"anada,, , 

-XXCOo 

T5t Indies 
j.itral America o 
■'ith America 

Ai. r X*>-o. o o o o o e A 

P'l-iilippines, „ 

ateless & Miscellaneous 



3 

104 




Other 



.12^^ 



H- 



n 
6 

142 



6 


9 


5 


52 


2 


17 


7 


12 


8 


17 


25 


32 


10 


26 


5 


3 


6 


9 


66 


8? 


3 


6 


7 


3 


9 


14 


2 


29 


41 


26 


6 


32 


3 


2 


6 


32 


7 


27 


6 


7 


11 


21 


6 


10 


4 


6 



93 
26 
22 
92 
44 
8 
89? 2/ 
22 



S«e also table 47 for detailed figures on naturalization by statutory provisions, 
Fig^ir-e 3Jicluded 843 Filipinos with U. S. residence prior to l-iay l^, 1934o 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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TABLE 42 o PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY SEX AND MARITAL STATUS WITH COMPARATIVE 



PERCEI.'T OF TOTAL: 



YEARS Elg)ED JUNE 30, 1943 TO 1951 




)th sexes 

Single „ „ „ , , 
Married, o . . 
Widowed, , . , 
Divorced., , 

If 

Single, , D o < 
Married, „,< 
Widowed, „ , , 
Divorced, . , 

wale 



Number 



^35,483 



71,278 

327,459 

29, 067 

7,679 



225,736 \ 148 



40, 014 

163.200 

17,335 

5,187 



9 O ti 3 



•r o o o e o 



Mai'-ied,,. 
Widowedo., 
Divorced, , 



41,451 

107j 694 

4,458 

2,642 



19b, 227 



•• 



30,236 

101,828 

12^ 207 

3,737 



o • o o ajo 0000000 Oi« o o 



45, 725 

139,950 

7, 007 

3r.545 



oooaooaoUoo4 



161.263 ! 239,256 

13, 723 

I3I5 891 

13.050 

2,599 



111,0^? 74 



23,301 

80,571 

4,635 

2,552 

ooooeooooooo* 



25,553 

187,509 

22, 060 

4,134 



1 



ifria^ 



1141677 V,2^ 



713 

82, 629 

12, 700 
2,635 



ooooouoooo»e«oe«o*i 



o o o » « o I 




5O0668 



11,820 

51,160 

8,972 

lj,806 



lOOUOCOOOC 



oo«onDoaoo»ooeoo 



000000000001 



Percent of total 




i th_gj5X.es 

Single,, 

Married, 

iflfidowfid 

I Divorced 

lie 

Single 
Married 
rfidowed, 
Lvorced 

F^le . 

oingle. 
Married, 
rfidowed,. 
Divorced, 



1 Does not Include 1,425 members of the armed forces naturalized overseas in 1943; 
6j496 in 1944.; 5', 666 in 1945 j and 2,054 in 1946. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 





TABLE 43. 


PERSONS NATUHALIZED, BY SEX, At\lD AGE: 








YEARS EIJDED JUIffi 30, 1943 TO 1951 






Sex and age 


194_^/ 


19V+i/ 


1945^ 


1946i/ 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


Both sexes, 
inder 21 years 


317. 508 


.,.43.5^481. 


225,736 


148,008 


?3,?04 


70,150 


66,5?4 


66,346 


54,716 


2,476 5.609 


1,669 


1,244 


544 


476 


987 


1,003 


726 


1 to 25 " 


15,829 19,/|/|1 


8, 246 


7,269 


5,495 


2,970 


6,297 


7,742 


6,23s 


:6 to 30 " 


22, 148 22 J 979 


11, 540 


7;, 818 


6,627 


3,783 


6,074 


8,570 


8,295 


1 to 35 " 


37,021 43,893 


14,902 


10,823 


7,221 


4,131 


4,886 


5,355 


4,751 


6 to 40 " 


49,1% ( 61,139 


24,399 


16, 289 


11, 205 


7,86? 


7,107 


6,535 


5.479 


1 to 45 " 


47,706 65,517 


29,976 


19,341 


14,091 


11,113 


9,164 


8,144 


6,12? 


6 to 50 " 


46,510 65,280 


32,131 


20,142 


13,137 


.U,170 


9,198 


8,239 


6,699 


1 to 55 " 


38,392 


57,915 


32,856 


20, 783 


11,531 


9,481 


7,822 


6,937 


5,554 


6 to 60 " 


28,418 


44,273 


29,409 


18, 599 


9,601 


8,018 


6,441 


5, 773 


4,476 


1 to 65 " 


16,649 j 27,173 


20,864 


13,185 


7,347 


5,637 


4,473 


4,298 


3,269 


6 to 70 " 


8,464 14,418 


11, 952 


7, 636 4, 260 


3,304 


2,551 


2,289 


1,884 


1 to 75 " 


3,257 5,534 


5,226 


3,298 1,9.53 


1,445 


1,084 


926 


823 


7er 75 " 


1,464 2,312 


2,566 


1, 581 


892 


755 


510 


535 


395 


iicl^C O W O O D 

ader 21 years 


oooooouoeoooooooc 

156.245! 196,227 


oooao«6oo 

111,059 


oaoooe4>0( 

7^,2^^ 


«0090O0Q 

52,998 


33,147 


• 0O«00»« 

27,865 


900«0I>U* 

25,745 


'ie'm** 


2,359 5,378] 


1,579 


1,115 


406 


257 


433 


371 


282 


L to 25 " 


12^004 TT,915 


4,115 


3,297 


3,032 


711 


1.239 


1,732 


1,019 


6 to 30 " 


12,710 11,394 


5,191 


3,719 4,141 


1,094 


1,705 


2,375 


1,835 


L to 35 " 


18,7ssi 19,636 


6,668 


5,116 4,073 


1,569 


1,925 


2,026 


1,510 


S to 40 "' 


22,575 24,960 


10,772 


7,902 6,425 3,672 


3,257 


2,825 


2,003 


L to 45 " 


20,428 25,416 


13,77? 


9,151 8,185 


5,625 


4,254 


3,574 


2,387 


S to 50 " 


18,801 24,659 


14, 770 


9,481 7,505 


5, 679 


4,271 


3,615 


2,868 


L to 55 " 


r\5q9 25,108 


15,788 


10,095 6,122 


4,535 


3,488 


2,870 


2,192 


6 to 60 " 


14, 646 ,21, 986 


15,658 


9,926 


5,051 


4,098 


2,971 


2,471 


1,779 


L to 65 " 


9,063 14,303 


11.955 


7,535 


4,195 


2,981 


2,186 


2,052 


1,356 


1 to 70 " 


4,5595 7,3-71 


6, 537 


4,236 


2,310 


1,737 


1,297 


1,088 


882 


L to 75 " 


1,864 2,904 


2,846 


1,819 


1,075 


766 


570 


467 


417 


rer 75 " 


849 1,197 


1,403 


858 


478 


423 


269 


279 


181 




ooooooooeoooooooa 


o«o»oo»o« 


OWOOOOOOf 


oouooeoo 


coeooooa 


o**ooooo 


• o*6eoe* 




Feroar;. » o « . , 
ider 21 years 


161, 263^ _23^ji,25_6_ 


114^677 


73,758 


40, 906 


3?, 003 


^8, 72? 


40. 601 


'j§l^li 


11^-^ t 231 


90 


129 


138 ,219 


554 


632 


444 


L to 25 " 


3v825 j 7,526 


4,131 


3, 972 


2,463 2,259 


5,058 


6,010 


5,219 


3 to 30 " 


9,438 11,585 


6,349 


4,09Q 


2,486 


2,689 


4,369 


6,195 


6,460 


L to 35 " 1 


18,233 24,257 


8,234 


5,707 


3,148 


2,562 


2,961 


3,329 


3,241 


S to 40 " 


26, 599 


36,179 


13,62? 


8,38? 


4,780 


4,195 


.3^850 


3, 710 


3,476 


L to 45 " 


2?, 278 


40,101 


16,199 


10,190 


5,906 


5,488 


4,910 


4,570 


3, 740 


S to 50 " 


27, '^09 40. 621 


17,361 


10, 661 


5,632 


5,491 


4,927 


4,624 


3,831 


L to 55 " 


20,793 32,807 


17, 068 


10, 688 


5,409 


4,946 


4,334 


4,06? 


3,362 


S to 60 " 


13,772 22,287 


13, 751 


8,673 


4,550 


3,920 


3,470 


3,302 


2,697 


I to 65 " 


7,586 12,870 


8,909 


5,650 


3,152 


2,656 


2,28? 


2,246 


1,913 


3 to 70 " 


3,905 7,047 


5,415 


3,400 


1,950 


1,56? 


1,254 


1,201 


1,002 


L to 75 '• 


1,393 2,630 


2,380 


1,479 


878 


679 


514 


459 


406 


/er 75 " 


615 1,115 


1,163 


723 


414 


332 


241 


256 


214 


'' Does not in 


:lude 1,425 members of the a 


rmed forces naturalized overseas 


in 1943] 




63496 iB . 


L9443 5,666 in 1945; and 2,0 


54 in 1946. 

United States Department of J 


ustice 




1 








Immigr 


at ion an 


d Natura 


ligation 


Service 





TABLE 44. F£RS0N5 NATURALIZED, BY STATES AND TEKRITORIES OF KESIDEImCEs 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 194? TO 195: 



State of residence 



Total, o 

Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Cclambia 

Florida 

Georgia o c 

Idaho ^ o 
Illinois o 
Indiana „ . 
Iowa 
Kansas 

Kentucky 
Louisiana. . 
Maine c <. o 
Maryland 
Massachusetts, 




Ik O O Q O 



Michigan 
Minnesota 

ii'iO'^ -iiiP ^ rirjLJU.i, o 0(190000000 

Missouri 
Mcntar.,a„ 



oooocoooeooooQOftoO 

OHO-iOOO i 00009 -OOO 

ooe 0000 
ooooooaoouoocouooo 



Nebraska 

Nevada. 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey„ o, „ 

New Mexico „ „ ,, » 



OlOUOOOUUOOOUOOiJ 

U0090V0000990000 

OOOOOOOOOOOOO 

OOOOOOOOO'.tuOO 

OOOOOOOOOOOO 



205 i I48 

66 1| 116 

629 '■ 322 , 

4.91^ i 4,114' 

142 1 98 



New Yorko „ 
North Carolina 
North Dakota 
Ohio 
Oklahoma o 



OOOAOOOOObbOOOO 



0«0i>00«090u0 
OOOOOOOOOOOOAO 

ooooooooeoooooodoooooo 
ouuoooeoo9ooeoeo 



2^,008 25,238 21,1?4 20,499 17.990 

881! 103 126 188! 210 

L48 lal 93 1 138 

2,285 2^254 1.386 

120 ! 160 234 



218 

2.625 

103 




United States Depaitment of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 44. POiSONS NATURALIZED, BY STATES AND TERRITORIES OF RESIDEiJCE: 
YEARS EJWED JUNE 3 Q' ^947 TO 1951 (Cont'd) 



State of residence 



1947 



1948 



1949 



1950 



1951 



Oregon..,. 

Pennsylvania. ., 
Rhode Island. . . 
South Carolina. 
South Dakota.., 



Tennessee. 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont . . . 
Virginia. . 



Washington,,., 
West Virginia. 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



Territories and possessions: 

Alaska. 

Hawaii 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands 

All other 



730 
4,428 
1,016 

55 
155 

114 
1,532 
147 
355 
261 

1,696 

230 

1,031 

69 



121 
593 

83 

48 ^ 
5,565i/ 



482 
2,698 

598 
55 
65 

'^S 
784 
124 
283 
208 



1,445 
168 



741 

51 



1,442 



301 

2,685 

650 

69 

46 

92 

1,122 

105 

277 

332 

1,345 

166 

726 

46 



451 
2,443 

521 
93 
89 

106 
1,353 
125 
232 
413 

1,176 

175 

623 

69 



T/ Includes 5,092 residents of the Philippine Islands 




278 

2,312 

419 

74 

73 

105 

1,192 

81 

224 

456 

1,032 
112 

515 
58 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 45. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY SPECIFIED COUNTRIES OF FORMER ALLEGIANCE 
AND BY RURAL AND URBAN AREA AND CITY l/; YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 19$1 



Class of place 
and city- 



Total 



British 
Empire 



Canada 



Country of former allegiance 



Germany 



Italy 



Poland 



U.S.S.Ro 



Other 



Total. 



^4,716 



Rural. 



6 ,??8 



Urban » , 



e o o 9 o o o I 



U.932 



Los Angeles, Calif.,,.. 
Oakland, Calif. .,,,,... 
San Diego, Calif, , , » . , , 
San Francisco, Calif... 
Bridgeport, Conn...,,,. 

Hartford, Conn, . , 

New Haven, Conn. ....... 

Washington, D . C ...... . 

Miami, Fla .,..,. 

Chicago, 111, , , , , . o . . . . 
New Orleans, La. ....,,. 

Baltimore, Md.... 

Boston, Mass ,,,,.. 

Cambridge, Mass , ,..,,, . 
Fall River, Mass ....... 

New Bedford, Mass ...... 

Springfield, Mass 

Worcester, Mass... 

Detroit, Mich.,...,..,, 
Minneapolis, Minn..,,,. 

St o Louis , Mo , o 

Jersey City, N. J 

Newark, N . J 

Paterson, N. J.. 

Buffalo, 'n. Y... 

Ill 6W XOX^XVf 1<9 Xoeootesaa 

Rochester, N . Y. ...... . 

Cincinnati, Ohio....... 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Portland, Ore, .,.....,. 
Philadelphia, Pa, „,.... 
Pittsburgh, Pa 

Providence, R. I....... 

San Antonio, Tex. 

Seattle, Wash. 

Milwaukee, Wis 

Other cities .,,,.,..... 

)utlying territories and 

possessions 
■I Jl oth ers 



J2,015 



' O O o < 



I o o o o 



I a » • • ' 



1,932 

245 
315 
1,369 

93 
175 
109 
371 
488 
1,516 
200 
341 
804 
139 
101 
138 

77 
U7 
1,502 
173 
184 
184 
309 
122 
370 
14,707 
187 

86 
346 

89 
851 
158 

18 
158 
246 
408 
172 
3,185 



683 
88 



10.867 



3.872 



5i^3? 



5.975 



3.100 



1,830 



21.633 



ii68_ 



878 



802 



Jt^ 



217 



160 



2 , 51 4 



3,506 



2,115 



1 ,371 



1,536 



.611 



JIL 



3.^54 



i^ji: 



218 
71 
86 

217 

5 

30 

11 

74 

178 

171 
36 
85 
97 
17 
28 
43 
30 
18 

205 
26 
26 
23 
27 
16 

57 
2,254 
36 
14 
45 
19 

197 
48 
6 
48 
49 
67 
26 

713 



60 
16 



2.817 



Rural - Population of less than 
Cities - 100,000 or over. 



328 

1 

1 

2 

13 

25 

5 

30 

39 

142 

8 

3 

191 

36 



33 

629 

40 

8 

7 

18 

2 

115 

501 

40 

3 
28 

23 
16 

3 



1A3 

15 

368 



39 



3,242 3,965 



82 

12 

9 

66 

1 

9 

4 

34 

23 

198 

6 

37 

23 

8 

2 



49 
13 
20 

27 
27 

12 

41 

1,964 

28 

19 

32 

7 

74 

9 

10 
29 
20 
40 
304 



6 
18 



83 
22 
25 
92 
24 
34 
55 
28 

9 

135 

22 

45 

146 

12 

3 

1 

11 

29 

106 

5 

27 
40 

76 

46 
54 
,287 
35 
12 
36 

7 

102 

32 

3 
42 

5 

13 

9 
252 



9 



2.265 



89 

2 

4 

25 

10 

19 

8 

16 

11 

183 

6 
18 

49 

6 

6 

10 

4 

8 

107 

4 

11 

15 

31 

13 

24 



1 ,329 



3 

2 



112 

2 

6 

47 

3 
11 

5 
14 
12 

65 

2 

20 

46 

5 

2 

1 
1 

2 
34 

9 
22 

2 
17 

4 

8 



13 080 



2 
2 



292 


626 


12 


1 4 


=- 


1 


32 


1? 


2 


1 


68 


96 


11 


5 


6 




7 


5 


6 


2 


8 


17 


18 


n 


124 


92 



1,020 
135 

184 
920 

37 
47 
21 

175 
216 
622 
120 

133 

252 

55 
60 

83 
27 
5"' 

372 
76 
70 
70 

113 
29 
71 
5,783 
32 
37 

156 
30 

298 

50 

3 

46 

155 

140 

53 
1.332 



564 
21 



2,500. Urban - Population of 2,500 to 99,999. 



United States Department of Jvistice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 46. PERSONS NATUEALIZED, BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH A1>JD YEAR OF Ew'TRY: 

YEAR E:^;D£D JUI\1E 30, 1951 



Coiontry or region 
of birth 



Number 
natu- 
ral- 
ized 



1951 



1950 



1940- 
1949 



1930- 
12^ 



Year of entry 



1920- 
1929 



1910- 
1919 



1900- 

1202„ 



1890- 
1899 



1880- 
1889 



Be- 
fore 

1880 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgixim 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Demnark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Great (iJigland 

Britain (Scotland... 

(Hales 

Greece 

Hungary » . 

Ireland , . 

Italy 

Latvia. 

Lithuania 

Neth ei" lands 

Northern Ireland 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

U.3.S.11 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Japan 

Palestine 

Other Asia 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Central America 

South Arr.erica 

nfrica 

Australia and iJew Zeal. 

Philippines 

Other countries 



$4. 716 



72 



21< 



26. $0 4 



4, 064 



12.342 



k^m. 



hm 



■^^ 



238 



3 7. 60 4 



1,254 

573 

55 

995 

352 

95 

336 

1,391 

6,108 

4,472 

1,266 

181 

1,185 

788 

1,477 

5,869 

153 

356 

592 

419 

661 

3,387 
680 

553 

a6 

619 

279 

2,154 

543 

397 

1,868 



JlL 



128 



852 

129 

22 

56 

809 

6,683 

1,936 

2,430 

579 

445 

334 

616 

1,622 

399 



6 

1 
1 
7 
4 
7 



1 
1 



8 

3 
1 

2 

2 

1 

18 

15 

16 

2 

1 

7 

2 

2 

20 



2 

1 

1 
4 
1 
4 
1 
4 
2 
3 
5 

21 



1^.177 



n 
2 

2 

6 

18 
2 
4 

11 

2 

5 
2 

15 



787 

482 

27 

595 

205 

• 72 

110 

1,147 

3,304 

3,121 

404 

114 

454 

339 

352 

2,055 

93 

116 

371 

194 

296 

1,658 

192 

281 

126 

132 

122 

565 

261 

202 

901 



2 .70^ 



419 
86 
17 
36 

343 

3,543 
357 

1,452 
457 
274 
274 
558 
318 
193 



97 
12 

4 
63 
16 

Q 

27 

49 
612 
206 

143 

10 

111 

45 
166 
526 
11 
13 
40 
3S 
31 
154 
26 
29 
51 
34 
20 
78 
35 
49 



8.010 



112 

37 

6 

122 

69 

6 

44 

88 

1,873 
712 

589 

42 

209 

86 

661 

1,283 

17 

29 

89 

118 

186 

423 

150 

100 

125 

224 

81 

350 

89 

90 



itrin 



55 
8 
1 
5 

67 

588 
84 

146 
29 
37 
13 
22 

2S2 
22 



198 

15 

2 

10 

186 

1,761 

789 

481 

43 

87 

17 

15 

683 

41 



147 
23 
14 

119 
27 

95 

38 

135 

231 

78 

6 

291 

157 

131 

1,132 

14 

101 

61 

32 

66 

687 

174 

54 

84 

111 

29 

609 

88 

39 

249 



:^.U-9 



no 

12 

1 

2 

124 

495 

573 

265 

18 

24 

14 

7 

130 

_2i 



87 

11 

1 

81 

13 

1 

47 

26 

b2 

132 

29 

1 

105 

151 

114 

741 

15 

90 

20 

22 

64 

428 

104 

81 

20 

73 

19 

491 

59 

11 

JL2i 



J28. 



11 
3 



7 

6 

34 

21 

9 

3 

1 

6 

32 

89 

1 

6 

2 

6 

8 

23 

25 

4 

24 

49 



-I52. 



8 
36 
17 

6 

1 



15 
8 
1 

4 
4 
6 
7 
2 
1 
1 
12 
2 
4 
3 



42 
5 

1 
76 

276 

91 

53 

■3 

14 

8 

2 

15 

-11 



110 

14 

9 

1 

2 



3 
11 



57 

12 



JtO. 



^1 



5 
5 
3 
1 



1 

1 
1 



7 
2 
2 

1 



1 
1 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 46a. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BI OOUNTHT O B RE&I Qg OF BIETH AHD OOWnSI OB BEGICai 
OT TOBMSa ALLEGOiAMCE; IBAH SanED JUME 30. 1951 



Country or region 
of birth 



3 



: 

•H 
U 

g 



Coqntry pr region of former *nafH«nfta 






I 






<& 



II 






& 






All countries 

Surope 

Austria 

Belgivuu 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

"^"^^ . (s^oti^d!!! 

Britain ^^^^^^ 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Northern Ireland 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania.. . . « 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Isia 

China 

India 

Japan 

Palestine 

Other Asia 

Canada 

iexLco 

'est Indies 

central America 

>outh America 

ifrica 

lustralia & New Zealand 

Philippines , 

)ther countries 



^4.716 



40.921 



^^k 



563 



10.66? 



m= 



2^ 



22k. 



1|641 



5.439 



1»313 



37.604 



1,254 

573 

53 

995 

352 

95 

336 

1,391 

6,108 

4,472 

1,266 

181 

1,185 
788 

1,477 

5,869 
153 
356 
592 
419 
661 

3,387 
680 

553 
416 
619 
279 
2,154 
543 
397 

1.868 



2i^m. 



§52 

129 

22 

56 

809 

6,883 

1,936 

2,430 

579 

445 

334 

616 

1,622 

399 



17167 
560 
53 

945 

344 

95 

326 

1,378 

5,578 

4,401 

1,234 

177 

1,179 

726 

1,470 

5,837 

Ul 

326 

579 

413 

657 

3,024 

680 

476 

408 

609 

276 

1,882 

504 

382 



l^M. 



1,014 



26 



^l^ 



6.612 



1 
518 



148 

99 

13 

8 

317 

1,788 

7 

1,627 

54 

134 

261 

394 

29 

_2ii 



27 



13 

1 
6 



n 

7 
5 



40 
9 



9 
5 

7 
3 

1 

1 

II 

29 

4,373 

1,228 

175 

5 

6 

189 

12 

4 

1 

4 

383 

6 

33 
2 
6 
5 
5 
5 

33 
1 

70 

20? 



25^ 



2hL 



221 



1.^38 



877 



1 
13 

1 



1 



1 
335 



323 



7 
2 
1 
4 



1,309 
30 
6 
2 
1 
3 
6 
1 
14 
3 



1 

1 

13 

2 
2 

2 
19 



22 



5.^ 



20 

1 

1 

11 

1 



8 
5,296 

1 
1 



1 
27 

3 

1 

8 

14 

2 

8 



1.222 



1,161 

1 



48 

93 

8 

4 

56 

1,773 

3 

1,568 

48 

101 

74 

390 

9 

80 



± 



18 
Z 
3 
134 
2 
1 



1 



6 

1 
1 

3 
50 



65 

1 
1 



13 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 46a. persons NATURALIZED, BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH AND COUNTRY OR REGION 
OF FORMER ALLEGIANCE: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1951 (Cont'd) 



Coxintry or region 
of birth 



All countries. 



Great 
Britain 



Europe 

Austria 

Belgiiom 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

(England. ... 

(Scotland. . . 

(Wales , 

Greece , 

Hvmgary :...., 

Ireland , 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Northern Ireland 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

U.S.S.R.. 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 



T3 

s 

H 

« 



Cotnrtry or region of former allegiance 



1,^08 



j^m. 



M 



5.975 



3.871 



1,274 



28 



Asia 

China 

India 

Japan 

Palestine. . 
Other Asia. 



Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Central America 

South America 

Africa 

Australia and New Zealand. 

Philippines 

Other countri es 



15 

1 
2 



16 

10 

3 

1 
2 
1 
1 
5,787 
1 
1 
1 



•H 



.2^ 



n 



e 



320 



Jli 



4 
303 



680 



621 



1 

31 
2 



21 

25 

1 



565 



r 

o 



T3 

H 
O 

On 



660 3.100 



652 



J^ 



1 
13 



23 

1 
6 



Ml. 



644 

1 



1^ 

u 
o 



703 



3,083 _68j^Jti2 



24 

15 

1 

5 

1 



7 

79 

2 



1 

1 

11 

1 



2,858 
2 
6 



1 

2 

55 



Ji^ 



1 
676 



16 



lA 

1 
1 



10 






428 



401 



a 

"2 



627 



620 



X3 

a 

« 

■p 



299 



2 
418 

1 
9 
1 



1 
395 



285 



4 

19 

2 



597 

1 
2 



13 
J. 



1 
1 

1 

247 

1 
1 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



JJ 



CO 

CO 

J2- 



1|8 30 



1 .77 1 



10 

1 

2 



2 

1 



7 
7 



23 

4 



1 

1,709 

1 

3 



^ 



51 



TABLE 46a. persons NATUHAiJZED, BI COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH AI^1D COUNTRY OR REGION 
OF FORj - lER ALLEGIANCE; YEAR EMDED JUNE 30. 1951 (Cont'd) 



Country or region 
of birth 



Count 



3 

I 



4> O 

O !A 



4 
•H 

5 



ry or region of former allegiance 






o 



<6 



O 



O 

o 



in 

V 

•H 



-P 

<a 

V 



rH oj 

-P u 

§ i 

o -3 



n 
« 

a, 

a 

P4 



01 

t> 

•H 
Jh -P 

^i 

-P o 
O o 



All countries 

ilurope 

Austria 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France. 

Germany 

(England 

^^^^ . (Scotland.... 

Britain (^j^les 

Greece , 

H;mgary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Northern Ireland 

Norway ' 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

U.S.S.R. 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

sia 

China 

Japan 

Palestine 

Other Asia 

Canada 

exico 

est Indies 

entral America. 

outh America... 

frica 

ustralia & New Zealand. 

hilippines 

ther count cies 



ill 



iii 



Ik 



2 

485 



701 



1.291 



714 



577 



3.872 



1.969 



886 



i^ 



420 



71- 



i*12i 



916 



522 



111 



108 



1 
44 

93 

3 
10 



624 



28 



84 



21 



1 

118 

2 

1 

1 
2 



10 

1 

225 

161 



4 

1 

162 



13 
9 

12 
6 



J2 



38 
2 

1 



23 
2 

21 



1.134 



670 

30 

5 

43 

386 

3 
3 
2 



3 

1 

6 

28 



36 
2 
1 



689 



666 

1 



22 

3 
.1 
2 



1 

3 
12 



23 
2 

21 

• 7 



4 
29 

5 

43 

364 



3 
16 



8 

4 
21 
65 
31 

4 

5 
20 

6 
24 

3 
15 
10 

6 

4 
162 

45 

7 

1 

115 

27 

1 

_li 



2 

4 

10 

5,083 
2 
2 

1 
4 
2 
1 

1 ^4 



52 

3 

5 



6 

4 

1 

4 
1 
1 



5 

1,922 

5 



1 
3 

1 

1 

791 

1 



4 

1 

1 
523 



77 

1 
307 



63 



865 



v: 

2 

34 

1 



2 

4 
456 

1 



33 

5 
7 
3 
2 



101 
22 



2 

111 

10 

5 



^ 



30 
2 
5 
1 



A 



1,585 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Natioralization Service 



2 
_2_ 



Jg2 



220 



TABLE 47 o PEHSOKS NATURALIZED, BY STATUTORY 
PR0VL3I0KS FOR NATURALIZATIONS 
YEARS mUED JUNE 30. 1947 tc 1951 




ioof>ooooueuo9eooooro(»oooobooao 



eneral provisions 

ecso 310(a) (b)^ 311. and 312 - persons niarried 

uO U c O o dv^^6nS ooou'jDC'i}<>tior9.)e60oo I.- 00900000000 

ecSo 31,5* 316 ■= Children, including adopted 
children, of U o So citizen parents o . ■> o <, » <. ,> o o „ « c <. 

eCo 31?(a) - Women who lost U. S<, citizenship 
through marriage a . o (,„„<>, o o o .« oo„ o„o o»„<.o o o <, ^ o . o , 

sCo 317(c) - Dual Uo Sc nationals expatriated 
by entering or serving in armed forces of a 

XOa 6-jLHfi O wSX 6 J OUJJOOCiOljO'l^dOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOUOOOUO 

;c„ 31^(a) ~ Former Uo S„ citizens expatriated 
through expatriation of parents „ ■> » » „ <. » » . » » o « . o , 
iCo 319(a) - Persons who lost citizenship through 
cancellation of parents ' naturalizationo ^ o » . » o ., o 
:Co 320 - Persons misinformed prior to Jxily 1, 
1920_, regarding citizenship status » » , >, . ^ c » . » , o » o 
^Co 32IA -^ Filipino persons whose continuous 
residence in the U„ So commenced prior to May 1, 

aL/^*+ -.Lj o ') J (. o j t J ij :> o o u o o u o o o i» o o o o o o t> o o o o •! o 'J t 

Co 322 - Noncitizen natives of Puerto Rico - 
declaration of allegiance, 
Co 324 = Persons whc served in U„ S„ armed 
forces for three years . „ , o . « » o o o ^ o , , » » o » o „ , , <> o „ « 
Co 324A - Persons whc served in Uo So armed 
forces in World War I or World War II or were 
honorably discharged ^/ o » » » ^ o . o , o o o o » o .. o o c o „ » o ^ » 
Co 325 ~ Persons who served on certain U„ S„ 

V CD O 6 i,5 00... ooo'.^' 000 00000000000000000000 onooooyyo 

Co 701 -= Persons natiiralized while ser'ying in 
the Uo S , armed forces in V/orld War II„ » , o « , o o o o 
Co ''01 - Persons honorably discharged from Uo S„ 
armed forces following service m World War II„o 
Co ^02 '■ Persons serving in Uo So armed forces 
outside of the Uo S^ in World War II o 



o o « 



46,339 

27, 066 

245 

316 

22 

6 

2 

31 



2., 655 



34,34'7 j 24,566 19,403 14,864 

23,898 j 35,131 40,684 36,433 

419 448 I 499 I 487 

296 243 I ^43 i 220 

29 

12 

1 

26 



00000000000 



17 



83 



4.200 2, 6-75 1,843 
15 
98 



OO'ioooo 0000 



rsons who entered the United States while under 
L6 years of age,, 



ouoooooooooooeO' 



tf90f>00000 



241 
^1,105 
9, 987 
5,370 

436 



418 

90 

980 



2^006 ! 1,724 



ler 



ooooocooooooouooouodocoooeonoooocoooftooQooooO 



316 




Vet of July 2. 194c 
i.ct of June l",. 1948 „ 

'ections 701 and 702 are no longer operative c Petitions filed under SaCo 701.o which were 
still pending on June 1, 1948, were determined in accordance with Sec„ 324A of the 
Nationality Act of 1940'« 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Natiiralization Service 



TABLE ;.■?. VffilTo OF HABEAG CORPUS II^I EXCLlblON I\1{D DEPCRTATIOM CASIiis 

YEAE3 EIJDED. JWM jO, 19;42 to 19>1 



Action "taken 



' tal writs of 
Habe r. ^ Corpus 

Disposed of . . . 
Sustiiiisd. . , 

I' WithdraTM... 



• • o • 



Pending end of year « „ . 



1942- 

1931 



1942 



-Jii. 



761 



Disposed of., 
3'j.st>-.ined. . 
Di3m:.53sd. , 

V/ithdra\vr.. , 



Pending end of year. 
Invol ving D eportatioa 



Disposed of , 

Sustained 

Dismissed. ,.,„.... 
'w ithdrswn .,.,,... 



Pend:jag end of year. 



172 

Lj 733 
3? 6 



AQ2. 



'-;o 



204 
157 

13 
2t36l 



133 
1,529 
699 

34 



PP2 



15S 

a 



9 
30 
11 

2 



221 



14 
128 

30 

23 



1943 




United States Uepartraent of Justice 
lJCTi.grEticn and Katixralization Ssnri,ce 






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