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Full text of "Annual report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service"

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UNITED STATES 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Immigration and Naturalization Service 
Washington , D. C. 




FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 

1952 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

IMMIGRATION and NATURALIZATION SERVICE 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

WASHINGTON , D. C. 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1952 




A. R: MACKEY 
COMMISSIONER 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

Immigration and Naturalization Service 

Washington 25, D, C. 



Report of the Commissioner 
of Immigration and Naturalization 



The Attorney General 

United States Department of Justice 



Sir! I have the honor to submit the Annual Report of the Immigration 
and Naturalization Service for the year ending June 30 1952, The 
outstanding accomplishments of the Service during the year have been 
set forth in text and tables as well as some of the more pressing 
prob 1 ems , 

The report has been assembled under the editorial supervision of 
Mrs, Helen Eckersjon, Chief of the Statistics Branch of the Admin 
istrative Division. 



Respectfully submitted, 



^.^-^^>^ ^:^^e^^a 



Commi s sioner 




Immigration and Naturalization Service 
November 10, 1952 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Chapter I Introduction 

Chapter 2 Legislation and Litigation 

Public I aws , . , , , ,,.,... ^ ................ 5 

Private bills int reduced and enacted .... . 6 

L i t i g at i on .......,.......,-...-...,:. . ,7 

Writs of Habeas Corpus., ........... 50 

Chapter 3 immigratio.n and Emigration 

C rewmen .,.,,., 13 

I mm igrants...........................c.... ................... 14 

Non I mm i g rants. ...,...-.-., .................................. 21 

Exercise of Ninth Prov i sp. ................................. . 23 

Agr icu I turai i aborers. .................. ^ .................. . 24 

Canad i an woodsmen .......................... o .............. . 26 

Petition for immigration visas and reentry permits........... 26 

Emigrants and nonem i grants, .,...„..„.,...„. ^ ................ , 28 

Chapter 4 Adjustment of Status 

Suspension of deportation.................................... 29 

Displaced persons residing in United States................. 30 

Preexami nat i on ...........„..,,...,......,..,....,.,„....,,. . 3,i 

Exercise of Seventh Proviso ............................... . 32 

Reg i st ry ............................. o .......... . ....... 33 

Chapter 5 Deportation, Detention and Border Patroi 

Deportations and voluntary departures., .. ............. 34 

Border Pat ro I ...................................... . 39 

Detent i on. ................................................. . 44 

Alien paro i e, .............................................. . 49 

Exc i MS I ons. . . . 5 

Chapter 6 investigations 

Ant 1 -subvers i ve investigations.............................. 55 

Ant I -smugg M ng and stowaway investigations.................. 56 

Fraud in vest i gat 1 ons. ...................,..,........,...;.. , 57 

Generai i n vest i gat i ons. 57 



Page 



Chapter 7 Naturalization 



Dec I arat i ons f i I ed 60 

Pet it i ons f i I ed ............................................ . 60 

Petitions granted...,. 60 

Pet it i ons den i ed ........................................... . 62 

Naturalizations revoked...................................... 62 

Loss of nationality.. 63 

Citizenship acquired by resumption or repatriation.......... 64 

Derivative citizenship 64 

C i t i zensh i p educat i on 65 

Chapter 8 Statistics, Information and Instructions 

St at i St i c s 69 

Info rm at ion....................... .......................... 70 

Instructions.... 71 

Chapter 9 Administration 

Personne I 72 

Finance. .............................. ...I. ...... ............ 74 

Budget. ..................................................... 79 

Space, services and supplies....... 80 

Management improvement program.............................. 81 

Records administration...................................... 86 



APPENDIX I 
JUDICIAL OPINIONS IN LITIGATION AFFECTING THE SERVICE 

APPENDIX I I 

Table I. immigration to the United States: 1820 - 1952 

Table 2. Aliens and citiz-ens admitted and departed, b^* months. 

Years ended June 30, 1951 and 1952 
Table 3. Aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration laws: 

Years ended June 30, 1948 to i952 
Table 4. immigration by country, for decades: 1820 to 1952 

Table 5„ Immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens departed, 

by port or district: Years ended June 30, 1948 to 1952 
Table 6. immigrant al lens admitted, by classes under the immi- 

gration laws and country or region of birth: Year ended June 30, 

1952 
Table 6A. Immigrant aliens admitted, by c I asses under the immigration 

laws and country of last permanent residence: Year ended June 30, 

1952 
Table 68. immigrant aliens admitted to the United States under the 

Displaced Persons Act of 1948, as amended, by classes and country 

or region of birth: June 25, 1948 to June 30, 1952 
Table 6C. Displaced persons and other immigrant aliens admitted to 

the United States, by country or region of birth. Year ended 

June 30, 1952 
Table 7. Annual quotas and quota immigrants admitted. Years ended 

June 30, 1948 to 1952 
Table 8. Immigrant aliens admitted, by country or region of birth, 

and major occupation group: Year ended June 30, 1952 
Table 9. Immigrant aliens admitted, by country or region of birth, 

sex and age: Year ended June 30, 1952 
Table 10. Immigrant aliens admitted, by race, sex and age: Year 

ended June 30, 1952 
Table lOA. I mmi g rant a I i ens admitted and emigrant aliens departed, 

by sex, age, i I I iteracy, and major occupation group: Years ended 

June 30, 1948 to 1952 
Table lOB. immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens departed, 

by country or region of birth, sex, and marital status: Year 

ended June 30, 1952 
Table M. Aliensandcitizensadmittedanddeparted, aliens excluded: 

Years ended June 30, 1908 to 1952 
Table 12. Immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens departed, by 

State of intended future or last permanent residence: Years ended 

June 30, 1948 to 1952 
Table I2A. Displaced persons and other immigrant aliens admitted to 

the United States by rural and urban area and city: Year ended 

June 30, 1952 
Table 128. Immigrant aliens admitted to the United States, by rural 

and urban area and city: Years ended June 30, 1948 to 1952 
Table 13. Immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens departed, 

by country of last or intended future permanent residence: Years 

ended June 30, 1948 to 1952 
Table I3A. Immigrant aliens admitted, by country or region of birth: 

Years ended June 30, 1943 to 1952 



APPENDIX I I (Cont inued 



Table 14, Emigrant aliens departed, by race, sex and age: Year 

ended June 30, 1952 

Table 14A, Emigrant aliens departed, by country or region of birth, 
and major occupation group: Year ended June 30, 1952 

Table 15. Emigrant aliens departed, by country or region of birth, 
sex, and age: Year ended June 30, 1952 

Table 16. Nonimmigrant aliens admitted, by classes under the immi- 
gration laws and country or region of birth. Year ended June 30, 
1952 

Table 17, Nonimmigrant aliens admitted, by classes under the immi- 
gration laws and country or region of last permanent residence: 
Year ended June 30, 1952 

Table 18» Nonimmigrant al lens admitted and nonemigrant al iens de- 
parted, by country of last or intendecl futurq permanent residence: 
Years ended June 30, 1948 to 1952 

Table 19. Nonimmigrant aliens admitted as temporary visitors, 
transits, students, or treaty traders in the United States, by 
district: On June 30, 195 1 and 1952 

Table 20, Aliens excluded, from the United States, by cause: 
Years ended June 30, 1943 to 1952 

Table 21, Aliens excluded from the United States, by country or 

region of birth, and cause: Year ended June 30, 1952 

Table 22. Alien crewmen deserted from vessels arrived at American 
seaports, by nationality and flag of vessel: Year ended June 30, 
1952 

Table 23. Vessels and airplanes inspected, crewmen examined and 

stowaways found on arriving vessels, by districts: Years ended 

June 30, 1951 and 1952 
Table 24. Aliens deported, by cause and country to which deported. 

Year ended June 30, 1952 
Table 24 A „ Aliens deported and aliens departing voluntarily under 

proceedings: Years ended June 30, 1892 to 1952 
Table 25. Inward movement of aliens and citizens over Internationa 

land boundaries, by State and port. Year ended June 30, 1952 
Table 26. Aliens who reported under the Alien Address Program, by 

selected national i t i es, and by rural and urban area and city: 

Dur I ng 195 I 
Table 27. M iscei laneous transactions at land border ports, by 

distrncts: Year ended june 30, 1952 
Table 28. Inward movement of aliens and cit i zens over international 

land boundaries: Years ended June 30, 1928 to I952 
Table 29. Principal activities and accomplishments of Immigration 

Border Patrol, by districts: Year ended June 30, 1952 
Table 30. Passenger travel between the United States and foreign 

countries, by port of arrival or departure: Year ended June 30, 1952 
Table 30A. Passenger travel between the United States and foreign 

countries, by country of embarkation and debarkation, class of 

travel and national i ty of carrier: Year ended June 30, 1952 
Table 31. Passenger travel to the United States from foreign 

countries, by country of embarkation: Year ended June 30, 1952 
Table 32. Passenger travel from the United States to foreign 

countries, by country of debarkation: Year ended June 30, '952 



APPENDIX I I (Cont inued) 

Table 33. Alien passengers arrived inthe United States from foreign 
countries, by port of arrival dnd country of embarkation: Year 
ended June 30, 1952 

Table 34. Alien passengers departed from the United States to 
foreign countries, by port of departure and country of debarka- 
tion: Year ended June 30, 1952 

Table 35. Citizen passengers arrived in the United Statesfrom 

foreign countries, by port of arrival and country of embarkation: 
Year ended June 3>0 , 1952 

Table 36. Citizen passengers departed from the United States to 
foreign countries, by port of departure and country of debarka- 
tion: Year ended June 30, 1952 

Table 37. Declarations of intention filed, petitions for naturali- 
zation filed, and persons naturalized: Years ended June 30, 1907 
to 1952 

Table 38. Persons naturalized, by classes under the nationality laws 
and country or region of former allegiance: Year ended June 30, 
1952 

Table 39. Persons nat u ra I i zed, by. count ry or reg i on of fo rmer allegi- 
ance: Years ended June 30, 1943 to 1952 

Table 40. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former alle- 
giance and major occupation group: Yea" ended June 30, 1952 

Table 41. Petitionsfornaturalization denied, by reasons for denial; 
Years ended June 30, 1948 to 1952 

Table 42. Persons naturalized, by sex and marital status with com- 
parative percent of total: Years ended June 30, 1944 to 1952 

Table 43. Persons naturalized, by sex and age: Years ended June 30, 
1944 to 1952 

Table 44. Persons naturalized, by States and territories of resi- 

dence: Years ended June 30, 1948 to 1952 

Table 45. Persons naturalized, by specified countries of former 

a I I eg i ance and by rural and urban area and city: Year ended June 30, 
1952 

Table 46. Persons naturalized, by country or region of birthand 

year of entry: Year ended June 30, 1952 

Table 46A. Persons natural ized, by country or region of birth and 
country or region of former al legiance: Year ended June 30, 1952 

Table 47. Persons naturalized, by statutory provisions for naturali- 
zation: Years ended June 30, 1948 to 1952 

Table 48. Writs of Habeas Corpus inexclusion and deportation cases: 
Years ended June 30, 1943 to 1952 

Table 49. Prosecutions for immigration and nationality violations: 

Years ended June 30, 1943 to 1952 



CHAPTER 



1 




NTRODUCTION 



1>S^iS4®SSS?5SS' 



'^^^^m^mmmm 



The development of immigration and nationality policy of the 
United States has necessarily been closely associated with our 
economic, political, and social history. As these varied threads 
of history have become inextricably intertwined, so, too, have the 
responsibilities of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 
become varied, complex, and difficult. In short-term perspective 
the conspicuous and distinctive motivations for the year ended 
June 30, 1952, seemed to be: a quicl<ened sense of accountability 
for law enforcement to insure protection from subversive and other 
i llegal alien elements; an urgency to administer the immigration 
and nationality laws with the equity and consideration that befits 
a Government agency in a country that has so recently assumed world 
leadership, and a girding for the overhauling of the regulatory 
and administrative machinery of the Service for the implementation 
of the all-inclusive Immigration and Nationality Act of June 27, 1952. 

A reorganization, planned for greater efficiency, was put into 
effect during the year. The reorganization was undertaken because 
the experience gained in administering the Internal Security Act 
of 1950 indicated a need for change. Also, the decentralization 
of many adjudicative functions to districts and. the change in ap- 
peals procedures made some changes desirable. Anticipation of new 
procedures to implement the new immigration and Nationality Act 
that becomes effective on December 24, 1952, also pointed to some 
need for reorganization. 

The Operations Advisors group, under the Deputy Commissioner, 
was enlarged so that close liaison between the field offices and 
the Central Office could be more readily maintained. The Personnel 
Office was placed directly under the Deputy Commissioner, and certain 
personnel actions were delegated to the district directors. 



For better administration, the enforcement work was divided 
between an Assistant Commissioner for Investigations and an Assistant 



- ^. - 

Commissioner for Border Patrol, Detention,, and Deportations Much of 
the adjudicative work formerly done in the Centra! Office has been 
transferred to the field offices in tne past two years In addition, 

jurisdiction over cases formerly appealable to i ne Adjudications Divi- 
sion in the Central Office, with a further right of appeal to the 
Board of Immigration Appeals, was conferred exclusively on the Board 
of Immigration Appeals Therefore, the former Adj ud icat i ons Di v is . on 
became the inspections and Examinations Divisicn, with personnel 
responsible for enunciation of Service policy and dissemination of 
Board opinions, so that changing trends and policies may be rapidly 
relayed to the field offices. New emphasis was placed on citizenship 
education in the Citizenship Services and instructions Division; and 
the Statistics Branch, with certain added research functions, was 
p , aced p the Administrative Division 

Possibly the most emphasized function of the year was that of 
enforcement, because the mount i ng international tensions made national 
security of first importance investigators^ border patrolmen, immi- 
grant inspectors, and security officers used ev&ry means attheircom- 
mand to ferret out and apprehend and deport subversive aliens in the 
United States, or to exclude from the United States any such aliens 
seeking entry 

Each year since the end of World War I i has seen more and more 
alien immigrants, tourists, crewmen, border crossers, as well as 
United States citizens, arriv-ng at our land, sea, and air ports, 
seek'ing admission There they must be examined by our immigrant 
inspectors Last year there were more than 107 million entries 
More than half of those who were admitted were citizens, and of the 
52,852,677 alien admissions, 97 percent were repeated entries of 
border crossers at the Canadian arid Mexican borders 

There were 265,520 aliens admitted who were immigrants admitted 
for permanent residence Not since !929 have so many immigrants 
been admitted in a single-year The high number is due in part_ to 
the admission of ethnic Germans and displaced persons, and also to 
the increasing number of immigrants from Western Hemisphere nonquota 
countries, and the number of wives of citizens who are coming largely 
from the countr es where United States military forces and civilians 
are stat i oned 

The c ount ry c ont i nued to import woodsmen and potato diggers 
from Canada, asparagus pickers from the West indies, and cotton 
pickers and other agricultural laborers from Mexico in total about 
236 000 temporary workers were brought into the United States, either 
under special legislation or under the discretionary powers of the 
Attorney General 

in addition to the aliens who entered the United States legally, 
there were many others who wished to come in who could not legally 
enter for varous reasons The smuggi i ng and stowaway methods of 
entry of al lens continued to be a lucrative, nefarious business 



- 3 - 

To be sure, the attractiveness of the appeal to enter varies It may 
mean fieeing from persecution by a European who cannot obtain a quota 
number, or it may mean seeking an undocumented entry in order to carry 
on theschemesof a foreign agent; or it may be a way to earn a ' better 
living than can be obtained in Mexico; or it may mean trying to escape 
the conditions in the Orient which have increased the desire of 
thousands of Chinese persons tofind a haven in some other part of the 
world Whatever the motivation, the means used to try to enter were 
nume rous. 

Two men were discovered crossing from Canada to Buffalo in the 
trunk of a car F ve others carved for themselves a two-room suite 
out of a cork cargo from Portugal; another, assisted by a deck ste- 
ward, travelled first class in a deck chair; others are flown from 
Cuba or Mexico to t ttie-used airfields where they are picked up by 
organized groups of taxi drivers and driven north, and, of course, 
many others from Mex.co use the traditional "wetback" method of 
crossing the R;o Grande Subversives, criminals, narcotic i aw v i o- 
ators. smugg ed a, ens,, other li legal entrants, in that order of 
precedence, were sought out for expulsion from the country or pro- 
secut ; on , 

Some measure of the accomplishments in law enforcement is ;n the 
number of deportat ons and voluntary departures Following World 
War ,:, deportations averaged about !8,000 a year During '950 and 
'95:, the number was ;ower, because the Service,, in an effort to com- 
bat the enormous Mex'can Miegai entry problem adopted the po i i cy of 
g rant , ng voluntary departure in as many cases as possib.e in the 
fiScai year 952 the number of deportations again equalled 20, -8!, 
wh i 1 e the numbe • of those permitted to depart reached the astronomical 
figure of 703 778 

The 3' a ens deported and 148 aliens excluded as subversves 
tens on.y a smai. part of the story of i nvest ; gat ■ ons and hearings 
necessary to brng about the desired result of r dding the country of 
subversive anens Smuggling, which has become an an too lucrative 
and we 1 i ordered busness .n recent years,, continued to be a serious 
problem, and the vo i ume of Mexican iilega. entries continued to be a 
maj or prob > em 

Wh le. undoubtedly the internal security and enforcement pro- 
grams have taken precedence over ai! other programs in the past year, 
the Service has n a very different sense, had another program of 
security — that of natura i i zat ion . Part of the assimilative process 
of aliens into our democracy lies in their entering nto and accept- 
ing the duties and responsibilities of citizenship. 

In the f iscai year 952, it was evident that many of the new 
immigrants who have come to this country since the war, were be- 
coming naturalized as soon as the residence requirements were ful- 
filled The number of naturalization certif.cates granted was 88,655, 
an increase of 62 percent s ■ nee last year 



- 4 - 

Part of the citizenship education program has been the active 
participation of members of this Service in the "i Am An American 
Day" programs During the past year a new emphasis was placed on 
this celebration of citizenship when Congress, by Joint Resolution, 
approved February 29, 1952, designated September 17 of each year 
to be celebrated as "Citizenship Day", in commemoration of the sign- 
ing of the Constitution on September 17, 1787, The observance of 
this day will give all citizens, native-born and naturalized, an 
opportunity of dedicating themselves to the principles of democracy. 

This report would not be complete without mention of the repre- 
sentatives of the Central Office and the field offices who have 
worked with the Congressional Committees to give technical advice 
in the drafting of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952, and 
who now are using their knowledge and skill in the monumental task 
of readying the Service for the operation of the new Act when its 
provisions become effective on December 24-, 1952. 




CHAPTER 2 

Legislation 

AND 

Litigation 



The Service, through the office of the General Counsel, drafted 
or approved 3,989 legislative reports expressing the views of the 
Service on both public and private bills during the fiscal year, as 
compared with 2,108 such reports during the previous fiscal year. 
Other legislative work of that office included the drafting of 56 
items of proposed legislation, the same number as in the preceding 
year. 

Public Laws . — The major legislative project of the fiscal year 
continued to be the work begun early in 1950 on omnibus bills hav- 
ing for their purpose the recodification, and in many particulars 
the revision, of existing laws relating to immigration, naturaliza- 
tion and nationality. These bills culminated in H. R. 5678, 82nd 
Congress, which was enacted over the President's veto on June 27, 
1952, and became Pub I ic Law 4 14 . The Service and other representa- 
tives of the Department of Justice continued active cooperation 
with those engaged in Congressional Committee work by giving tech- 
nical advice on this omnibus legislation, in various conferences, 
draft revisions, reports and other tasks. Pub I ic Law 4 14 was 

undoubtedly the most important legislative product of the fiscal 
year just closed. Its real impact upon the Service functions will 
not be felt until well into the current year. Its enactment just 
three days before the close of the fiscal year would in any event 
have left it very little time to affect the operations of that year. 
Moreover, with one exception. Its provisions will not go Into effect 
until December 24, 1952. The work of drafting the necessary regula- 
tions and Instructions to implement the Act, of construing and 
interpreting its many new provisions, are necessarily the agenda of 
the current year. And of course the full weight of the Act will 
not be manifest until it has been in effect for some time. 

Anticipation of the enactment of the omnibus bill undoubtedly 
had an inhibiting effect insofar as concerned Congressional action 
on many other public measures relating to Service functions. 



Consideration of bills dea I i ng wi t h vari ous phases of immigration and 
naturalization was deferred because the general omnibus bill was 
looked upon as likely to render separate publ ic enactments un- 
necessary . 

Other public laws introduced in the 82nd Congress relating 
to or affecting the work of the Service and enacted during the 
year included the Act of July 12, 1951 ( Pub i i c Law 78 ) . amending 
the Agricultural Act of*l949; the Act of October 19, 1951 ( Pub I ic 
L aw 18 1 ), terminating the state of war between the United States 
and Germany, the Act of March 20, 1952 ( Pub I ic Law 285 ) , creating 
a penalty for harboring or concealing illegally entered aliens, 
and making it a criminal offense to transport certain illegally 
entered aliens with knowledge of such status; th,e Act of April 9, 
1952 ( Pub I ic Law 507 ) . making special quota immigration visas 
available to certain alien sheephe rde rs, the Act of June 18, 1952 
(P ub I i c Law 595 ) . facilitating the acquisition of detention facil- 
ities. 

Private bills introduced and enacted ■ — The number of private 
laws dealing with immigration and naturalization matters enacted 
during the fiscal year was 477, compared with 554 enacted during 
the previous fiscal year, 202 during the fiscal year 1950, 23 
during the fiscal year 1949, and 117 during the fiscal year 1948. 
The total number of private bi I Is introduced during the past 
fiscal year was 2,008, of which 1,569 were introduced in the House 
and 659 in the Senate. As pointed out in the last annual report, 
comparatively few private bi I Is are enacted into laws, the average 
as to prior years being less than ten percent In the fiscai year 

of 1951, the proportion rose to almost i7 percent. The upward 
trend continued during the past fiscal year and the number of 
private laws then enacted — 477 — was over 24 percent of the 2,008 
private bills introduced in the same period. 

Whether or not bills are enacted into law, their introduction 
results in many requests upon the Service for reports to the 
Congressional Committees concerned. High priority is given to 
such cases in the field investigations required as a basis for such 
reports Thus the growing number of bills introduced in each 
Congress becomes an increasing burden on the investigative force 
of the Service. This adds correspondingly to the work of the 

General Counsel's office in preparing reports and in appearances 
by representatives of his office at hearings or proceedings upon 
many of such bills before Congressional Committees. 

L i t i gat i on — The Internal Security Act of 1950, which amended 
the Act of October 16, 1918, made criminal prosecutions a more valu- 
able weapon of enforcement in subversive, alien registration, and 
other types of cases. Publ ic Law 285, making it an offense to trans- 
port i 1 legal iy entered al iens, also added to the types of cases to be 
prosecuted 



- 7 - 



NUMBER OF PRIVATE StttS JNTRODUCED INTO CON0RES3 ANO ENACTED 
MUMSER T6TH - 82 NO CONS«ESSES 

5,669 
728 




-«,000- 



293 
30 



.CZl 



601 

65 



430 



76lh 



2,811 



PRIVATE 8H,LS mTBODOCEO 



503 



PRIVATE LAWS ENACTED 



163 



I ,141 
181 



t,. LJ !._^... 



II 31 $t 82 (Wj 



As in previous years, the great bulk of the litigation was 
in the Federal District Courts. Many of the decisions there were 
appealed to the various United States Courts of Appeals and there 
was a continuing trend by the parties adversely affected by the 
appellate decisions to seek review by the United States Supreme 
Court. 

During the past fiscal year, the Supreme Court announced its 
decisions in the following cases, which either arose out of 
Service activities or involved statutes administered by this 
Service: Bi ndczyck v. F inucane . 342 U.S. 76; U.S. ex re I . Jaeqe ler 
V. C arus i . 342 U.S. 347; Carlson et al . v. Landon . 342 U.S. 524; 
H ari s i ades v. Shauqhnessv . 342 U.S. 580; Acheson v. Ok imura . 342 
U.S. 899; Acheson v. Murata . 342 U.S. 900; United States v. Spector . 
343 U.S. 169; and Kawakita v. United States . 343 U.S. 7 17. 



Other actions by the Supreme Court during the fiscal year 
included the denial of certiorari in the cases of G reene et a I . 
v. United States . 342 U.S. 813; Abo et al . v. McGrath. Aoki v. 
Barber . McGrath v. Abo , and Barber v. Aoki ^ 342 U.S. 832; Kun i.yuki v. 
Acheson. 342 U.S. 942; Mac h ado v. McGrath. 342 U.S. 948; Sine! ro v. 
United States . 343 U.S. 9Q4; and denial of bail in U.S. ex re I . 

Young v. Shauqhnessv . 343 U.S. 9 13. 

The Supreme Court granted certiorari in the following cases, 
which were continued to the 1952 - 1953 calendar: G o rdon v. 
Heikkinen . 343 U.S. 903; Chew v. Cold inq , 343 U.S. 933; Mandol i 
V. Acheson . 343 U.S. 976. Other cases filed with the court for 
consideration and continued to the 1952 - 1953 term include 



- 8 - 

Yan i sh v. Barbe r . petition for certiorari to the Court of Appeals, 
Ninth Circuit, to review — F. 2d — ; Lutwac k v U nited States , 
petition for certiorari to the Court of Appeals, Seventh Circuit, 
to review 195 F. 2d 748; Reved i n v. A c heson , petition for certi- 
orari to the Court of Appeals, Second Circuit, to review 194 F. 
2d 482; Shauqhness.y v. Meze i . petition for certiorari to the Court 
of Appeals, Second Circuit, to review 195 F. 2d 964; M art i nez v. 
Nee II y . petition for certiorari to the Court of Appeals, Seventh 
Circuit, to review 197 F 2d 462, and W oh I mut h v Acheson , peti- 
tion for certiorari to the Court of Appeals, District of Columbia 
Circuit to review 196 F 2d 866. 

Of the many issues disposed of during the fiscal year by the 
Supreme Court Or pending before it for disposition in the ensuing 
year, some mention must be made of the high lights. In the 
H a r i s i ades case, supra, the Supreme Court at long last passed 
upon and sustained the constitutionality of the deportation pro- 
visions of the Act of October 16, 1918, as amended, which make 
former membership in the Communist Party in the United States 
grounds for deportation. This has been one of the chief weapons 
of the Service in the struggle against subversive aliens. Of 

comparable importance, the Carl son case, supra, confirmed the 
power granted by Section 23 of the Internal Security Act of 
1950 to detain without bail aliens in deportation proceedings who 
are currently active adherents of Communism and who are likely to 
aid in carrying out the objectives of the world Communist move- 
ment „ The Spec to r decision, supra, sustained against a charge 
of unconstitutionality for vagueness the penal provisions of 
Section 23, of the Internal Security Act of 1950, which require 
aliens ordered deported as subversive to cooperate in obtaining 
the travel documents prerequisite to deportation Cumulatively, 
these three decisions are of monumental importance in the battle 
against subversion, since they make possible the effective use of 
the legislation Con,gress has designed for that purpose 



Other important issues relating to subversive aliens are 
raised in the cases which the Supreme Court wi I I consider at its 
next term The He i k k i ne n case raises anew the question of the 
Attorney GeneraMs power to detain an alien Communist w.thout 
bail during pendency of deportation proceedings. The Chew case 
questions the power to exclude subversive aliens without hearing 
on the basis of confidential information (hitherto sustained in 
Knauf f V. Shauqhnessy , 33^ U.S. 537) when applied to a returning 
resident The Me^eJ_ case involves the power to restrain from 

entering the United States by continued detention at the port of 
arrival if necessary such an excluded alien whom allegedly no 
other country will accept. In addition to raising a question as 
to judicial review of deportation orders under Section 10 of the 
Administrative Procedure Act, the Mart i nez case involves the ade- 
quacy of the evidence of the proscribed nature of the Communist 
Party in a deportation proceeding under the Act of October 16, 
19 18, as amended 



- 9 - 

Questions of expatriation also loomed large in the cases be- 
fore the Supreme Court Among the cases passed upon by the court 
during the last fiscal year, such questions were involved in the 
Qk i mu ra, Mu rata , Kavyak i t a. Abo ,. A ok i . and K u n i y u k i cases Ex~ 

pat ri at ion is also in issue in the M ando I i . Woh I mut h and Reved i n 
cases, which wi I i be before the court at its next term 

Comparable issues, and many more, were before the Courts of 
Appeal and District Courts in Service litigation during the past 
fiscal year A reference to some of the reported opinions, which 
are listed in the Appendix, should give a clear idea of the grow 
I ng volume of litigated cases affecting the Service 

One of the effective deterrents to smuggling and kindred 
offenses is successful criminal prosecution. Prosecutions are 

generally Instituted by compiaint filed with the United States 
Commissioner, by indictment, or presentment of a grand jury, or 
by information filed by the United States Attorney 



During the fiscal year ended June 30, '952,- prosecutions 
were instituted in 14; 164 cases involving .mmigrat.on matters 
and 557 cases nvolving nationality matters. Such prosecutions 
resulted in a totai of :3,809 court convictions during the year, 
with an aggregate imprisonment of 3 284 years and fines aggre- 
gating $96,677 

Ninety-one percent of the total convctions last year were 
made under Sections 1 and 2 of the Act of March 4, 1929, for 
illegal ent ry= Convictions resulted In 495 cases for vio.ation 
of nationality matters, chiefiy under Section 9 1 of Title .8 
United States Code, for false representation as a citizen of the 
United States, There were 2,294 smuggled a i t ens involved in these 
cases. Most of the convictions were under Section 8 of the Act 
of February 5, ^9!7, as amended by Pub i ic Law 283 of March 20, :952 

There were presented to United States Attorneys for pro- 
secution under the internal Security Act the cases of7 6 a.iens 
ordered deported who wiifuiiy refused or faiied to show di. gent 
effort to depart within six months after notice This number in- 
cluded 68 criminal, narcotic and immoral cases and e,ght subversive 
cases. Aliens involved in these cases are of the most undesirable 
type, and every effort is made to see that these cases are presented 
for prosecution as promptly as possible after the expiration of the 
s I X month pe r : od 



- iO - 

The chart which fallows shows a sharp rise In the number of 
convictions In the past fiscal years: 



CONVICTIONS m CO*JftT$ FOR VK3LATINS IMMiSaATION AND NAT!ONAL!TV LAWS 
VEARS ENDED WWE 50, !9SS - r9S£ 



i»a/»seH 



BSjO'JU 




ao,ci:!0 


— 


! 9,000 




■^ 


/ 


10,000 




r^^ 




,,-^ 


^ 












/I 














— -- 




~~ r — ■ .■■-, 

1 

1 


"'"'^^'- 


-"^^--1 


r<' 

















:"^ 



193* 



1940 



l»4S 



(950 



196a 



W rits of Habeas jCorpus .-^'^ihe institution of habeas, corpus- 
actions as a means of defftyTTTg deportation presents a continuing 
problem to the Service, Writs of habeas corpus may be granted In 
the Federal Courts to determine the legality of the detention of 
aliens In the custody of Immigration officers. In the fiscal 
year 1952, 62 writs of habeas corpus involving exclusion and 337 
writs involving deportation were served by the United States 
Marshals upon Immigration officers for release of aliens in their 
custody. A total of 386 cases were acted upon by the Federal 
Courts, 67 cases Involving exclusion and 319 involving deportation, 
in 30 of the cases, the courts sustained the writ and ordered dis- 
charge of the persons from the custody of the Service, The writs 
of habeas corpus were dismissed In 253 cases and in 103 cases the 
applications for writs of habeas corpus were withdrawn. 



CHAPTER 




Immigration 

AND 

Emigration 




Year by year the problems of inspection at our land and sea- 
ports become more involved, and the job of our immigrant inspectors 
becomes one requiring almost super-human qualities of wisdom and 
judgment. in the first place, much of the direction of Communist 
movements is in the hands of aliens, therefore, great care must be 
exercised to. see that no alien enters the United States whose pre^ 
sence could be inimical to the interests of the democratic principles 
of this country. On the other hand, to best serve a democracy, the 
immigration laws must be administered so that no person who meets 
the legal requirements to entry is denied such entry. Secondly, in- 
spections must be conducted in such a manner as to foster good inter- 
national fellowship with our neighboring and overseas countries. 
Again, care must be exercised in the admission of visitors, because, 
despite the fact that the great majority of students, visitors, and 
other temporarily admitted aliens depart at the expiration of their 
authorized stay, those who do remain create enforcement problems. 
The cases of many overstayed persons come to light when the alien 
himself reports and simultaneously applies for suspension of deporta- 
tion following marriage to an American citizen. And, finally, the 
importance of individual inspection must not be overshadowed by the 
sheer volume of inspections confronting a small force of inspectors. 

After immigrant inspectors have examined aliens seeking admis- 
sion, those refused admission have, in most instances, theright of 
appeal . 

By regulations published in the Federal Register on May 24, 
1952, effective the same day, jurisdiction over cases formerly 
appealable to the Commissioner, with a further right of appeal to 
the Board of immigration Appeals by an aggrieved party, was con- 
ferred exclusively to the Board of Immigration Appeals. The saving 
6f time in arriving at a final determination of a case by the elimi- 
nation of double appeals was expected to redound to the benefit of 
the government and the subject of the proceedings. In the short time 



- 12 - 

durinq which the procedure has been in effect, this expectat.on has 
been rea I i zed 

Another benefit of this procedure was to free much needed person-^ 
nel from the burden of individual case review and enabled them to de- 
vote time and attention to the pressing, but previously neglected 
policy and management problems These include the dissemination of 
information on pol icies and trends as indicated by the Board of immi- 
gration Appeals decisions, and the general supervision of .nspections 
p rocedures toinsure uniformity inthe application of imm,gration I aws 

During the past year, two changes of particular Interest .n the 
field of inspections took place Our headquarters in Europe .n con- 
nection with the Displaced Persons Act were closed, and our difficult 
and complex share in the processing of over three hundred thousand 
displaced persons i n a mass mi g rat i on to the united States was finished 
On June 16, 1952. following a survey of three months by Service person 
nel, an office was established in Agana. Guam, and the enforcement of 
the immigration lawsof the United States, former:y the responsibility 
of the Navy and interior Departments, came under the jurisdiction of 
the Immigration and Naturalization Service 

Since the end of Wo rid War li. the number of entries of aliens 
and citizens into the United States goes up and up in the millions. 
More than doubling the World War 11 figure, t he vo 1 ume du ri ng the past 
year has for the first time passed the iOO million mark to reach 107 
million. As may be seen from the tabie that follows, the greatest 
increase was in Canadian and Mexican i and border traffic. 



Aliens and Citizens arrived and examined at 

U. S Ports of Entry during years 
ended June 50. 195 1 and 1952 



Year ended June 30 '952 



Tota i 


A 1 ens 


C it i zens 


'07 084.527 


52 852 677 


54 23 850 


:03 7:2 099 


51- :29 42 


52.582.957 



Total 

Arrived at 
Can ad i an 
Mex I can 
Crewmen , 
Arrived at 



land borders 



seaports 



Total, , . 

Arrived at land borders 
Canad i an ,,...,,.„ . 
Mex i can . . , „ ,. .. „ o . . 

C rewmen 

Arrived at seaports 



44,212.088 20,898,541 


23 3 13, 


547 


59,500,0 1 1 30,230 60! 


29,269. 


410 


1,939, 4 18 1,087,633 


85 L 


785 


1,433.0 10 635 902 


7 97 


108 


Year ended June 30 


■95i 





95,396 5:9 


46 ;02 008 


49 294 51 . 


92 400 356 


44 620 


47 780 346 



4 i 


, 34 ; 


4i0 


:8 680 987 


22 660 423 


5i 


058. 


946 


25 939.023 


25, 1 19,923 


1 


,7 :3.- 


,938 


949 535 


764,463 


1 


,282. 


165, 


532 463 


749.702 



Travel across the Mexican Border has been in recent years from 
25 to 35 percent higher than traffic over the Canadian Border Cana- 
dian traffic has increased^, however, seven percent since last year, 
the major increase being in alien land border traffic. 



- 13 - 

It Is anticipated that Canadian border traffic will continue to 
increase in view of the beginning of a large industrial and national 
resources expansion period in Canada and the building of new roads. 
Some of the new industries will soon be in operation adjacent to the 
international border and will attract many of the European aliens who 
have recently arrived in Canada. These workers will, no doubt, want 
to visit the United States. The increase in traffic has presented 
greater problems in inspection and enforcement. 



ENTRIES OVE^ CANADIAN AND MEXICAN LAND BORQERS 
YEARS ENOEu JUNC 30, I94i - 1952 



NUMBER. 
150,000,000- 



125,000,000 - 



lOO.OOO.OOO 



75,000,000 - 



SO.QOO.OOO- 



'25,000,000 



TOTAL (ALIEN ANO CITiZEN) BORDER CfiOSSERS 




1944 



1950 



1992 



Crewmen 



The authority given the Immigration and Naturalization 
Service, by Section 20 of the Immigration Act of 1924, to examine 
alien crewmen was further confirmed on March 17, 1952, by the United 

States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in the case of LK S. 

Lines v. Shauqhnessy. ( 195 F. 2d 385). The court dismissed the com- 
plaint filed in an action in which the transportation line sought 
a ji'dgment declaring that alien seamen signed on in the united States 
for round trip voyages were not subject to inspection on returnto 
United States ports and could not be detained on board vessels on 
which they arrived. 

During the fiscal year 1952, 62, 179 vesse I s and 97,886 airplanes 
were inspected on arrival. The number of airplane inspections has 
more than doubled since the end of World War II. The 1,939,418 in- 
spections of crewmen on arrival in the past year represent a 13 per- 
cent increase since 1951, and include 1,087,633 aliens and 851,785 
citizens. The excluding provisions of the internal Security Act, of 
course, applied to crewmen as well as to other aliens. Temporary 
admission under the Ninth Proviso was authorized in the cases of 57 1 



- 14 - 

alien crewmen whose membership in proscribed organizations was found, 
after investigation, to have been involuntary. 

Records indicate that 3,021 alien crewmen deserted from vessels 
at American seaports. Four hundred sixty-eight were Italian, 450 
British, 308 Norwegian, 207 Greek, 20 1 Netherlandish, 193 Chinese, 
and 182 Spanish. 



IM^fllGRATI0N TO THE UNITED STATES 
YEARS ENPFD JUNE 30, 1820 - 1952 



THOUSANDS 
l,400( 



TOTAL ( NUMBER OF 
EUROPE (SOUTHERN 
EUROPE (NORTHERN 



" llll|IIU|ll^l| 

rezo '40 




I mmi grants 

Immigration, an important source of population growth prior to 
1930, is affected to a large extent by political, social, and eco- 
nomic events both in this country and abroad. In the 30's and 
early 40's restrictive legislation, depression, and World-War II re- 
duced immigration to an insignificant factor. However, the arrival 
of war brides and displaced persons under special legislation has re- 
versed this trend during the years since World War II. In this fiscal 
year, the number of aliens admitted for legal permanent residence rose 
to 265,520, which represents the highest figure since 1929. The rise 
was due chiefly to the admission of 42,786 ethnic Germans under Sec- 
tion 12 of the Displaced Persons Act of 1948, as amended, as well as 
a 45 percent increase in nonquota immigration. 



Displaced Persons . — The major provisions of the Di spl aced Persons 
Program, which reached its peak in the fiscal year 1950, expired in 
December 1951, and the program was nearly completed at the close of 
the fiscal year. The chief objectives of the law may be said to have 
been accomplished, since out of a maximum number of 400,744 visas 
authorized under the law, a total of 393,542 visas were used. In the 
next few months an additional 1,300 ethnic Germans may be admitted 



- 15 - 

since the maximum number of 54,744 ethnic Gentian visas were issued by 
June 30, 1952, and 53,448 were actually admitted by that time. 

during the past fiscal year 79, I7fi d isplaced persons, including 
1,963 adopted and other orphans, were admitted to this country, which 
brought the total number of displaced persons admissions under the Act 
(exclusive of ethnic Germans) to 340,094. In addition, the cases of 
3,308 displaced persons inthe United States had been submitted to Con- 
gress for adjustment of their immigration status under t he p^r&vi sioi\s 
of Section 4 of the Displaced Persons /^ct. 



IMMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES - BY COUNTRY OF BIRTH 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1925 - 1952 



THOUSANDS 



400 



300 



2001 



T-| — j—r 



I I I { I I I I 



IMMIGRATION TO THE 

UNITED STATES FOR YEAR 
Thou.ord. ^"0" Jun. 30. 1952 




"rn — r-r 



1950 -1952 



The maximuir number of visas authorized and the number of immi- 
grants admitted are shown in the following table. 



4 000 1/ 


3 3i2 


a 000 J./ 


10 485 


0,000 J 


8 979 




5 52 i 




53 460 



- 16 - 

Maximum visas authorized and immigrant aliens admitted 
to the United States, by ciasses under Displaced 
Persons Act of 1948, as amended. 

June 25, 1948 - June 30. 195 2 

Maximum number Totai number 
Class of admission of visas admitted thru 

autho r! zed June 30 1952 

Totai all Ciasses...,,.: ....,.,. _ 393 542 

Section 2 displaced persons,.,. ,,., 3 I 1 785 

Displaced persons ,.,... 34 ',000 306,7692/ 

Recent political ref ugees, , = . . . . . . 500 J./ 162 

Di spi aced orphans . . „ , . » . 5 000 U 1 ,950 

Adopted orphans ..... 5.000 1.087 

Venezi a Gu i I i a d i sp i aced persons. „ 2, O.QQ J./ 1,817 

Section 3 displaced persons, ....... 28 297 

Displaced persons from China...,,. 
Polish veterans in Great Britain 
Greek D, P s and pref erent i a I s. , 
Displaced persons outside of 
Germany Austria, or Italy , 

Sect i on 12 persons , . . , . ,. 

Ethn.c Germans 54 744 53,448 

Adopted ,ch i i d ren ^ 1 2 

\_l This number of visas is authorized within ihe total numerical 
limitation of 341,000 Visas not issued to this special group 
may be issued to the general group of displaced persons 
2/ Includes 538 Czech refugees. 

Three-quarters of ail the displaced persons admitted were born 
in five countries; Poland, Germany, Latvia, the US S R.,, and Yugo- 
s i av i a„ 

Immigrant aliens admitted to the United States under 
the Displaced Persons Act of 1948,, as amended. 

by country of birth: June 25 '948 June 30 1952 

Total number 
Country of birth admitted thru Displaced Ethnic 
^ June 50, 1952 persons Germans 1/ 

A i I count r I es ........... 

Po I and , ....... 

Ge rmany ....................... 

Latv I a ...........'.........,. . 

USSR, . , . 

Yugoslavia.. ........... 

L i thuan i a, , . ,.,,.,...... 

Hungary 

Czechoslovakia,. ....... ....... 

Ruman i a ................ 

Eston la 

Greece ....... 

O ther count i nes ........ 17,614 :4. 676 2,938 

1/ Includes wives and children 



393,542 


340,094 


53 , 448 


13 1, 222 


'24 866 


6,356 


60 , 52 1 


50,536 


9 985 


35 645 


35 ON 


634 


34, 183 


29 909 


4 27 4 


32,78^ 


16,913 


15,876 


24, 504 


23,034 


1 , 470 


15,795 


\2 306 


3,489 


1 , 97 5 


8 :44 


2 83 


10 285 


4,955 


5,330 


10, 158 


9.895 


263 


9 851 


9 849 


2 



Most of the 79, i78 displaced persons came inunderthe occupational ■ 
preference w Ithi n the quotas This preference gave advantage to 78 per- 
cent of the quota displaced persons in 1952. In 1951, 88 percent had 
f i rst preference. 



Years ended June 30. 
1952 1951 



Total 



Quota 



First preference quota . o ............... . 

(Persons who are farm, household, con- 
struction, clothing and garment workers, 
and others with special training and 
professional qualifications, and their 
w i ves and ch i i d ren ) 

Second preference quota ................. 

(Biood relatives of citizens or resi- 
dent aliens of the United States, and 
their wives and children) 



79. 178 
77,. 196 
60.034 



96.5 15 
95-920 

84, !36 



340 



Non-preference quota 
Sect on 2 , , 
Sect I on 3, ...... 

Nonquota _ ,. . 

Displaced orphans,... 
Other nonquota ...... 



44 


250 


17, 103 


1 1, 194 


1.982 


591? 


1,963 


57 1 


!9 


24 



The effect of the provisions of the Displaced Persons Act, which 
authorized the mortgaging of 25 percent of the respective quotas for 
the fiscal years 1951 to 1954, and 50 percent of the quotas for the 
years thereafter, will be felt far into the future. immigration will 
be curtailed for many years from a number of Southern and Eastern 
European countries, such as Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania, with small 
quotas which have been heavi ly mortgaged. 



- 18 - 




QWOTA mil(W6RANTS ADMIT TED 
YEARS eWEO WHS. k>, I92S - 1SS2 



IT I' 1 1 "1 "I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 



NUMSER 
200,000 




050 



1950 - 52 



Other quota immigrants . — The following table shows that the ad- 
mission of ethnic Germans const ituted the princi pal factor in the rise 
in quota immigration. The number 6f d isp I aced persons declined 20 per- 
cent since last year: 



Quota immigrants admitted 
Years ended June 50. 195 1 and 1952 



■9 ^2 

Tota I 194.247 

First preference quota 

Relatives of citizens 5,335 

Skilled agriculturists 649 

Second preference quota 

Wives and children of resident aliens 4,447 

Nonpreference quota 106.620 

Et hn i c Ge rmans 42, 786 

Other nonpreference quota 63,834 

Displaced persons admitted under the 
Displaced Persons Act of 1948, as 

amended 77, 196 



1951 



1^6 


547 


5 


002 
445 


4. 


029 


51 


151 


2 
49 


040 
1 1 1 



95,920 



The annual established quota for 1952 was 154, 277 . Neverthe less, 
under the mortgaging provisions of the Displaced Persons Act of 1948, 



- 19 - 

as amended, quota immigration reached 194,247. With the exception of 
Germany, Northern and Western European quota immigrat I on has been I ittle 
affected by the Displaced Persons Program. Indicative of the continued 
drawing power of the United States as an immigrant receiving country 
is the fact that Denmarl<, France, Iceland, Luxembourg, Netherlands, 
and Norway have practically filled their quotas. Great Britain and 
Northern I re I and used less than one-third of its quota and Ireland used 
only 21 percent. Finland and Portugal, which were not affected bythe 
Displaced Persons Program, filled seven-eights of their respective 

quotas. 

Most of the Southern and Eastern quotas were oversubscribed due 
to the admission of displaced persons and ethnic Germans. The quota 
of Spain was oversubscribed last year because of the admission of 115 
sheep herders, under the Act of June 30, 1950, which provided for the 
relief of the sheep-rais i ng industry by making 250 special quota visas 
available for certain sheep herders for one year. This law was ex- 
tended for another year, by the Act of April 9, 1952 ( Publ ic Law 507 ) . 

Nonquota immigrants . — When Congress limited immigration by means 
of quotas, it also provided for certain c ! asses of al i ens who could be 
admitted without regard to quotas. The nonquota immigrants may be 
roughly divided into three groups — (I) geographic — natives of the 
independent countries of the Western Hemisphere; (2) professional — 
m in isters and teachers; and (3) wi ves,chi Idren, and, in some i nstances, 
husbands of United States citizens. 



IMMIGRANT ALJCNS AOMITTEO 

VEARS ENDED JUNE JO, 1940-1352 



NUMDCR 
200,000 



1 50,000 



lOQ.OOO 



50,000 



NONaUOTtt iMM)6RANTS 



QUOTA IMMIGRANTS 




1940 1946 t944 t94e 1948 I9SO 1332 



- 20 - 

Nonquota immigration rose 45 percent last fiscal year largely 
because of the greater number of wives of citizens and natives of non- 
quota countries admitted. 

A comparison of the classes of nonquota immigrant admissions for 
the past two years is shown below: 

Nonquota immigrants admitted in 
Years ended June 30. 1951 and 1952 

1252 i2M 

Total nonquota immigrants 7 1 . 275 49. 170 

Natives of nonquota countries and their 

wives and children. 48,408 35,274 

Husbands, wives, children of citizens 19,315 11,462 

Ministers, their wives and children 580 733 

Professors, their wives and children 297 457 

Other nonquota immigrants 2,673 1,244 



W^'- 



NONQUOTA IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED - BY CLASSES 



«*T|V€» Of WMMU074 COUHTRIE3, 
THEi« Wives, A«C Mt«OB CWLOflSN 

TN0Ui«l»3 

r i I I I I I I I I ' I ' I ' ' ' 




WIVES, HUSSANCS.AHO MINOR CHILOREM 
Of UWiTtO SrATES ClTtZEWS 

vt*»is t*aza Mttt so. tm - nn 

♦Of' T t 1 




WHISTCItS, THEIR WIVES aso CWtDReN 
1Km% EROCO .'UR? Kl, I9» - !•»« 




RBOPESSORS THEIR WIVES ABO CRtt-WEil 
TEARS CROEO JURE 90. IMft - l*K 




iWA IRRO t»4» IfRO-U 



The number of wives of citizens admitted almost doubled. It is 
of interest that over three-fifths of the wives of citizens admitted 
in the fiscal year 1952 came from three countries occupied by United 
States troops: Germany, Italy and Japan. Most of the 4,220 wives of 



1952 


I9'?l 


1950 


1949 1948 


1947 


208 


148 


241 


9 14 1.843 


7, I6C 


3,768 


2,042 


3,798 


iO. 130 3,638 


701 


1,799 


1,534 


2, 168 


3,081 6,385 


5,7 1 1 



- 2! - 

citizens from japan were admitted under special legislation which was 
passed to permit the admission of war brides racially ineligible for 
admi ss i on 

Number of wives of citizens 

Count ry of b i rth 

Great Britain and 

Northe rn i re I and 
Germany ....... 

Italy. ........ 

China......... 959 826 1,062 2,1433,192 902 

japan.... ......... 4,220 125 9 445 298 14 

Australia & New Zealand..... 157 159 184 286 852 2,225 

Nonquota immigration from Western Hemisphere countries rose 36 

percent since last year and was the highest since 1930 Pr.'nc'rpai 

countries of origin were Canada, with 58 percent, and Mexico with 20 
percent 

Non immi grants 

Nonimmigrants are aliens who enter the United States for tem- 
porary periods or resident aliens returning from a temporary stay 
abroad The figures below do not include such special groups as 
agricultural laborers, border crossers, and crewmen. 

Nonimmigrants admitted 
Years ended June 30, 1950-1952 



1952 1951 1950 



Total nonimmigrants admitted. 



Government off ic i a 1 s. ................. . 

Members of international organizations. 
Temporary visitors for business........ 

Temporary visitors for pleasure........ 

I n t rans it . ..... ............... 

Returning residents. ................... 

Students 

Treaty t rade rs. 

Other noni mm 1 grants., 



516, 


,082 


465. 106 


426.837 


22. 


267 


20,88 1 


13.975 


5. 


. 137 


5,526 


5,010 


86, 


,745 


83,995 


67 . 984 


269, 


,606 


230 2 10 


219,810 


77, 


899 


72,027 


68,640 


44, 


,980 


44, 2 1 2 


40,903 


8, 


6!3 


7,355 


9,744 




79 1 


850 


766 




44 


50 


5 



For the past six years nonimmigrant arrivals have exceeded, in 
each year, such arrivals in any single year since the first records 
of 1908. The il percent rise inthe fiscal year 1952 reflected chiefly 
increases in temporary visitors, transits, and foreign government 
officials. 



- 22 - 

The principal countries from which non i Rim i grants came are shown 



be low: 



Number of nonimmigrants 



Country or regions of birth 

Al ! countries. 

Canada. , 

West Indies 

England, Scotland, and Wales. 

South America , . 

Mexico 

Asia 

France 

Ge rmany 

Central America 

Netherlands 

Spa! n , 

Italy..... 

Other countries 



1952 


1951 


516.082 


465. 106 


87.623 


78,58 1 


82,855 


79,613 


66,730 


59, 1 19 


4 1 , 385 


39,317 


32, 120 


28,060 


27 , 404 


22,845 


18,427 


16,419 


17,268 


12,670 


13, 189 


1 1 , 462 


11,212 


10,307 


10,382 


9,602 


10,042 


9,764 


97 , 445 


87,347 



NONIMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED TO THE UNITED STATES 
YEARS ENDED JONE 30, 1931 - i952 



600,000 



400,000 



300,000 



100,000 



ill 1 t 1 i Ml! ! 1! 1 1 1 


NONIMMIGRANT AUt£NS AOMITTEO 


X 




y 


/ 


VISITORS AOMlTTtD 


h 








• 


X 

^ 




I 




' 


"■ 








7 , 


t 
















/^ 


1 
/ 
1 












\ 


^ 






r- 


■^ 






\ 


K 




A 


/ 

^ 


-~. 


■-- 


'-' 


--- 


-•' 


" 


'" 


" 


"■s.^ 


■s. 
























1931 



1935 



1940 



1945 



I960 - 1992 



Government officals . — WIththe exception of thefiscal year 1944, 
the 22,267 government officials admitted inthe fiscal year 1952 repre- 
sents the highest figure since the passage of the Immigration Act of 
1924. The number of European government officials declined slightly 
since last year, and the number from Asia and Mexico nearly doubled. 



- 23 - 

V I s itors . — A thirteen percent rise in the number of temporary 
V I si tors wast he most important factor in the larger number of nonimmi- 
grants during the past year. Possibly the reduced tourist rate for 
European air travel was a cont ri but i ng factor in increasing the number 
of visitors. Pleasure travel from Great Britain, France, Germany, 
Poland, and Spain increased 23 percent since last year. Canadian 
tourist travel was larger by 18 percent and Mexican travel rose 25 
percent . 

As of June 30, 1952, there were 104,198 visitors in the United 
States; 39,050 inthe New York District; 15,191 in the Miami District; 
12,287 in the San Antonio District, with smaller numbers in other 
d ist r icts. 

Students . — The number of student admissions increased by 1,258 
during the past year, chiefly from Asia, Mexico, and the West Indies, 
and South America. On June 30, 1952, there were 25,705 students in 
the United States. 

Students in the United States by District 
on June 30. 1951 and 1952 

District 1952 1951 

Total 25.705 24.859 

St. Albans, Vt 108 123 

Boston, Mass 2,178 2,059 

New-York, N. Y 4,368 4,235 

Philadelphia, Pa 1,245 1,292 

Baltimore, Md 1,554 1,563 

Miami, Fla 1,763 1,668 

Buffalo, N. Y 929 990 

Detroit, Mich 3,016 2,501 

Chicago, 111 2,466 2,405 

Kansas City, Mo 2,153 2,2 19 

Seattle, Wash 1,023 1,093 

San Francisco, Calif . 2,128 2,275 

San Antonio, Tex 680 356 

El Paso, Tex 586 626 

Los Angeles, Calif 1,422 1,390 

Honolulu, T. H 86 64 



Exercise .of the Ninth Proviso 

Aliens, except Agricultural Laborers . — Under the terms of the 
Ninth Proviso to Section 3 of the Immigration Act of 1917, the 
Attorney General is permitted in his discretion to admit, for tem- 
porary periods, certain persons who otherwise are inadmissible to 
the United States. 



2,208 


2,036 


172 


4 1 , 493 


15,904 


15,733 


17 1 


47 , 87 1 


1,068 


886 


182 


11.916 


933 


784 


149 


2 1., i 46 


628 


55 1 


77 


6,009 



- 24 - 

AppI ications for exercise of Ninth Proviso J./ 

Years ended June 30, 1948 - 1952 

Number Pi spos it i on Number of 

Year ended of Admission Admission persons 

June 30, applications authorized den i ed i nvo I ved 

Total .............. _ 20,74J 19.990 75j 128.435 

1952. .............. 

195 1.. ........... .. 

1950. .............. 

1949. .............. 

1948. .............. 

U Exclusive of Mexican agricultural laborers 

As shown in the table above, in the fiscal year 1952, the 
number of applications for exercise of the Ninth proviso dropped 
to 2,208 from a total of 15,904 in 1951 In 1951, many aliens 

whose membership in Communist or totalitarian organizations was 
purely nominal, were found excludable under the Internal Security 
Act and later admitted temporari ly under the Ninth ProvisO: In- 
cluded in the 1951 figures were 12,778 alien seamen and many aliens 
applying for permanent residence who were temporarily admitted 
under the Ninth Proviso pending clarification of their status under 
the Internal Security Act. When P ub lie Law 14 clarified the mean- 
ing of "membership", it was found that in most cases, membership of 
the alien seamen in subversive or totalitarian groups was either 
when the seaman was under 16 years of age, or involuntary by opera- 
tion of law, or for purposes of obtaining employment. These sea- 
men were found admissible under the provisions of P ub I i c Law i 4 
and it was unnecessary to exercise the Ninth Proviso in such cases. 

The appi icants sought the exercise of the Ninth Proviso in 
I, 129 cases as temporary visitors for business or pleasure, to re- 
ceive medical treatment, to visit relatives, attend school or 
conventions, or as contract laborers. Applications were received 
in the past year to import, or for extension of authority to import 
39,731 contract laborers. In 82 cases the applications were for 
border crossing privileges; i n 43 cases for transits, in 586 cases for 
seamen and in 368 cases for extension of temporary stay to continue 
medical treatment, extension of border crossing privi leges, etc. 

A gricultural laborers admitted under Public Law 78 and Ninth 
i^ rov i so ■ — Included among those admitted through the exercise of 
the Ninth Proviso were unskilled agricultural and industrial 
laborers who would be subject to exclusion from the United States 
as contract laborers. Before importation is authorized, a showing 
is requi red that there is a need for the labor, that prevai i ing 
wage rates in the areas of employment will be paid, and that 
American labor will not be displaced by the aliens imported. 

In the past fiscal year 1 1,430 agricultural laborers were 



- 25 - 

admitted under the N:nth Proviso from Canada, the Bahamas, Jamaica. 
Barbados, Honduras Leeward Islands, Trinidad, and British Guiana, 
and 345 iiiegai entrants were contracted Dur,ng the year, 8,945 
of these laborers returned home, and the cases of 2, !80 were closed 
for other reasons On june 50. 1952, there remained 13 584 of 
these laborers st : m .n the United States 

Until the passage of P ub I i c L aw 7 8 . on July 1 2, 1951, 
Mexican agricultural laborers were admitted under the Ninth Pro- 
viso At the beginning of the fiscal year, there were 83 447 
Mexican agricultural laborers in the United States and an 
additional 4,467 were admitted in July under the Ninth Proviso 
prior to passage of the law Public Law 7 8 set up a new pro- 
gram for recruitment of agricultural workers from Mexico The 
law provided for the establishment of reception centers at or 
near places of entry and included provisions for transportation, 
subsistence and othe'' details with respect to Mexican laborers in 
accordance with the Mgrant Labor Agreement with Mexico of !95i 
While the task of recru tment and management of the Mexican worker 
program was piaced w th the Department of Labor, the responsibility 
for entry and departure control underthe immgration i aws applying to 
aii aliens remaned with the immigration and Naturalization Service 

The recruitment of Mexican agricultural workers under P ub I i c 
L aw 78 was .nt ated toward the end of Juiy ■951, and took on momentum 
dur ; ng the months of September and October when 47 582 and 57 270 labor- 
ers, respectively, were admitted from Mex.co through the reception 
centers. The importat : on of Mex i can i aborers d ropped during the winter 
months andbegantop ck up aga.n .n May in June, .2 184 such laborers 
were admitted through the recept i on centers During the entire fiscal 
year, 2i9 074 Mex. can agr,cuitura; I abo rers were adm ■ tted to the United 
States under Pub i ic Law 78 , nc I ud i ng ;84 560 admitted through recep- 
tion centers 23,099 :aborers previously employed under the N . nth Pro- 
viso and extended or recontracted under P ub t i c Law 78 . and transfers 
from other Districts The table below shows the total number of ad- 
missions and Mex can laborers illegally in the United States who were 
contracted in pursuance to the agreement with Mex i co of August ;, !949 



Mexican agricultural laborers admitted 

and contracted 

Years ended June 30 1950-1952 



i952 



'95; 



1950 



Total number 

Under N i nt h Pro.' i so 

Admitted to the Un ted States 
I I legal entrants contracted 



4 467 



223 54 


- :5 742 


6 052 


4 467 


1 15,742 


t 16,052 



2,, ' 16 
3,626 



9.8 3 
96 239 



Under Pud I ic Law 78 



2 19 074 



124 


454 




352 


89 


9 !6 


20, 


,954 


4, 


,286 


b: 


,722 


1. 


,46 1 


1 


,233 




187 




181 




162 



- 26 - 

At the close of the fiscal year there was a total of \2A, A3A- agri- 
cultural laborers in the United States- The countries from whence they 
came were as foi lows. 

Number in U S 
Country of last permanent residence on June 30. 1952 

Total . , o . o . . . - 

Canada 

..^ (admitted under PL 78 
Mex i CO , 

(admitted under Ninth Proviso, 

Bahamas 

J amaica ... 

Barbados 

Leeward and Windward Islands 

Tr i n I dad 

Brit i sh Gu i ana 

British Hond u ras . , , . . ....,,. . ■ 

Canadian woodsmen --The program of perm tting importation of 
skilled Canadian woodsmen under bond to guarantee ma i ntenance of status 
and departure was continued in effect during the year The processing 
of these workers, especially woodsmen, throws a heavy burden on our 
inspectors at the several control ports. There was a t , me when once 
the workers were in the United States, they remained for the season 
and required little work after the first entry was recorded m recent 
years, however, it s not unusuai for hundreds of these workers to re- 
turn to their homes and fam.i.es every weekend Since they are re- 
quired to surrender their woodsmen cards upon departure much time and 
labor is expended every time they come back nto the Un ted States 

They generally travel in groups and it is not unusuai for two 
hundred, or more, of these workers toappiy for reentry n one day 
and the control ports are not staffed to hand I e t hat ki nd of work a i ong 
with the regular run of traffic 

Petitions for Immigration Visas and Reentry Perrfiits 

Wh i I e in most in stances theappiications for admi ss ion to the -Un i ted 
States ape hand I ed by the State Department, in two instances at least, 
the initial applicationisinitiated through our Serv ice. For the past 
two and one -half years the authority to pass on these app I i cat i ons has 
been delegated to the District Director in the various districts. 

Pet i t i ons for imm i q rat ion v i sas . - -The Immigration Act of 1924 
provides that nonquota or pref.e rence-quota status may be granted to 
certain near relatives of citizens of the United States In order to 
obtain such status, the United States citizen must fiie with th s 
Serviceapetitionforthe issuance of an immig rat lon visa iForm I-! 33) 
accompanied by proof of his citizenship, h i s re 1 at i onsh i p to the bene- 
ficiary, and other facts If, after examination, the petition is 
approved, it is forwarded to the Department of State for transmittal 



to the appropriate American Coos 

stationed in Germany, Itaiv 

of visa petitions filed 

married In foreign count 

alien wives. During ths yea: just 

were received; of tliat number 25,7:_ 

784 were rejected, and 24 approvals wer 



iLiuxea to the 

: 1 y/ ra r A f f 






rvned forces 

arge number 

: r + hey we re 

or the! r 

i it. petitions 

ere aooroved. 



Reentry permits . — Section 10 of the Immigration Act of 1924 
provides that resident aliens who have been lawfully admitted for 
permanent residence who depart for a temporary visit abroad may ob- 
tain reentry permits to facilitate their readmission to the United 
States. The years since the end of the war have shown a steady in- 
crease in the number to apply for documents with which to travel out- 
side the United States. The travel toEurnoean countries in particular 
has shown a large increase. 



^RY FFH-i.aS IJ 



NUMSER Of fi- 
IZO.OCO - 



iOO.OOO ■ 



«0,000 





II ■■ 1 \ . 


-'^v 


j 




I 1 ! \ 


/ 


1. 




! 


w 



During the fiscal year of 1952 a ' 66,243 applications 

for these reentry permits were rece i > this nu-mber 65,695 

were approved and issued, and at th .he year 2,034 applica- 

tions were pending. Almost half the reentry permits were issued in 
New Yori<. 



Extensions of reent 
1952 as compared with 13,: 
applications for extensic 
c lose of the year, 552a 



re granted in 13,208 cases in 

■i previous fiscal year. Sixty 

nied. There were pending at the 

P reentry permits. 



- 28 - 

Emigrants and Nonemiqrant s 

Emigrants , — Emigrants are, by definition, aliens who depart from 
the United States after residence of a year or more in the United 
States, with the intention of remaining abroad It will be seen 

from this definition that emigrant, therefore, is not the opposite 
of immigrant in all cases, sincesome aliens admitted as nonimmigrants 
on arrival may depart after a yearormore and be classed as emigrants. 

The number of em, grants declined to 2 1 880 in the fiscal year 
1952, from 26, 174 in the previous year The principal countries to 
which they went are shown in the following table 

Number of em. grants departed by country of 

intended future res dence 

Y ear end e d June 50 9 B2 



Count ry 


Number 


CoUnt ry 


Number 


of 


of 


of 


of 


future residence 


em 1 q rants 


future residence 


em grants 


Totals .,....,, 


21„880 


As i a , , , , 
China 


2.441 






223 


Europe. » . „ . . , 


9.69 1 


nd I a 
Isrea i , , . o o o . , . o . . , . = 


210 


Denmark^ .„...„ 


350 


228 


France ,.,..... 


1 172 


Japan .,.,.,,„,,..., 


506 


Germany . 


: 028 


Ph i i ^ pp i nes , 


52! 


Greece , 


435 


Other As i a . . 


753 


1 re 1 and 


229 






Italy, 


i ,28! 


North America 


6,722 


Nether 1 ands. . . . . , 


327 


Canada, .„.,„„.,.. „o. ,. 


2,760 


Norway. , ., „ 


553 


Mex 1 CO , , ..,..,..„„.„. o 


988 


Spai n 


225 


Vi/est 1 nd ies. „,,..., . 


2 227 


Sweden, ,.,..„, 


334 


Cent ral America 


576 


Swi tzer 1 and , . . , , 


34 ' 


Other North America 


171 


Un i ted K 1 ngdom 


2.248 






Other Europe 


i , 168 


South Amer ica, o o . , , . , o . 


! . 984 






Africa, „,,... 


3 17 






Australia & N Zea,and,., 


456 






Other count ri es, . , „ 


269 


Nonem i g rants 


— Nonem . g rants 


are temporary visitors 


1 eav 1 ng the: 



country after a stay of less than a year, or resident al lens whoare 
leaving for a temporary visit abroad 

During the year ended June 30,, 1952,487,617 nonemi grants departed 
from the United States There were 49,972 a,ien res i dents whodeparted 
for temporary residence abroad. Two treaty t raders had return permits. 
The remainder, 437,643, entered as tour i sts, transits, gove mment of f i- 
cials, and others who were leaving the United States after stays of a 
few days to a years duration 



CHAPTER 4 



AoJUStMENT OF StaTUS 



-;-■■■■■■*■■■ 



Immigration laws have become increasingly restrictive. Inevi- 
tably, such laws on -occasion impose undue hardship on aliens. Parents 
of citizens and other al iens with close ties in this country are 
often the sufferers of such restrictions. To ameliorate these situa- 
tions, there are certain provisions in the law and regulations. 

Suspension of Deportation 

Section I9(c> of the Immigration Act of 19 17, as amended, pro- 
vides that the Attorney General may suspend the deportation of an alien 
who is deportable under law other than one who is deportable en charges 
relating to subversives, criminals, narcotics, immoral persons, and 
the mentally and physically deficient, if the Attorney General finds 
( I) that such deportation would result in a serious economi c detriment 
to a citizen or legally resident alien who is the spouse, parent, or 
minor child of the deportable alien, or (2) that such alien was resid- 
ing continuously in the United States for seven years or more, andwas 
residing in this country on July l_, 1948. In addition to the 194,247 
quota immigrants admitted from abroad during the past fiscal year, 

there were 1,780 aliens who became legal permanent residents through 
suspension of deportation under the provisions of Section 19(c) ofthe 
Immigration Act of 19 17, as amended, and for whom a quota charge was 
made in the fiscal year 1952. Charges to the quotas of the following 
countries were made for these aliens by the Department of State for the 
year ended June 30, 1952: 



- 30 - 

Quota aliotments in suspension of 
deportation cases J./ 
Year ended June 30 952 

Country Number 

Tot a i _._„.,....... . 1.780 

Austral ia„ . . . . , ... 42 

Austri a, ,,..,., , ...... 56 

China ,.... = ,..,............ 58 

Czechoslovakia . 47 

Fin! and , . . _ 54 

France , 46 

Germany „ . '36 

Great Britain. „ . 206 

Greece. .,„.. ,.,....... o .... . 78 

Italy. ,'.....,....,„. . . .. 123 

Japan. , 50 

Netherl ands, 84 

Norway...................... 78 

Poland. .................... .. 132 

Portugal .... ,......, 78 

Ruman i a. ................... . 67 

Spain. ...•.......,...,.., . ■ 42 

USSR.. 52 

Other 35 1 

J./ Source; Visa Division, Department 
of State 

Section iQ'cJ of the Immigration Act of '917, requires that the 
pertinent facts in a! I cases in which the suspension of deportation 
is proposed shall be reported to Congress with the reasons for such 
action If dur.ng the session at wh ; c h a case is reported or in 

the next following session Congress approves by concurrent resolu- 
tion the granting of suspension to the alien, deportation proceedings 
are thereafter cancelled and the alien is accorded the status of a 
lawful permanent resident of the United States. if the Congress does 
not pass such a resolution, the Attorney General is directed to de- 
port the alien in the manner provided by law 

During the fiscai year 1952, 7,300 suspension cases were sub- 
mitted td Congress, Congress approved 2,899 cases during the fiscal 
year. 

D i sp I aced Pe rsons residing in the United States 

Section 4 of the Displaced Persons Act of 1948, as amended, pro- 
vides that 15.000 eligible displaced persons las defined in that Act) 
temporarily residing in the United States may apply to the Attorney 
General for adjustment of their immigration status to that of perma- 
nent residents, provided that they are otherwise adm^ssibie to the 



- 3 I - 

United States and were lawfully adfnitted to the United States as 
nonimmigrants under Section 3, or as students under Section 4(e) 
of the Immigration Act of 1924- Final approval rests with Congress 
under a procedure similar to that for suspension cases. 

Those who file applications for adjustment of their immigra- 
tion status are required to establish by c red i >) I e evidence that 
they have been displaced as a result of events occurring subsequent 
to the outbreak on September I, 1959, of World War II. They must 
prove that they cannot return to their native countries, nor to 
the countries of last residence or nationality, because of persecu- 
tion or fear of persecution on account of race, religion, or politi- 
cal op i n i ons. 

By June 30, 1952, 11,610 applications had been received for ad- 
justment of status under Section 4 of the Dis|)laced Persons Act of 
'948, as amended There have been 3,308 cases Approved by the 
Commissioner and submitted to Congress, and 1,230 cases approved by 
Congress. Most of those who had their status adjusted had been ad- 
mitted as students, visitors, or seamen. 

The grounds for denial of adjustment of immigration status 
under Section 4 in the fiscal year 1952, fall into the following 
categories: 

Total number. ........................ 405 

Not unable to return to country of 
birth, residence, or nationality; 
no apparent persecution due to race, 
religion, or political opinion........... 200 

Cause for displacement did not arise 
from events occasioned by and sub- 
sequent to outbreak of World War II...... 12 

Not a lawful entry under Section 3 or 
Section 4(e) of the Immigration Act 
of 1924................ 103 

Inadmissible to the United States 49 

Found haven in another country............. 32 

Entered subsequent to April I, 1949 9 



> P reexami nat ion 

Preexami nat i on is a privilege accorded to certain aliens who are 
in the United States in a status other than that for permanent resi- 
dence. They wish to adjust their immigration status by goi ng to Canada 



- 32 - 

to apply to an American consul -n that country for an i mm i g rat i on visa 
with which to appiy to the United States for permanent residence,. 

If the application for p reexami nat i on Js approved,, the alien 
is given a hearing to determine his adm;ssibility to the United 
States The aiien must be admissible to Canada, of good moral 
character, and have assurance from the Arerican consul in Canada 
that an imm.gration visa can be 'Ssucd p rompt !y If the alien is 

found to be et.gible for an , mm , g rat t on v.sa he is issued a pre- 
examination border-cross.ng card to faciitate ent ry into Canada. 
During the year. 904 new appi cat.ons tor preexam i nat i on were 

submitted by ai^ens who were not subject to deportation proceedings; 
i 855 applications for preexam i nat . on were approved^ 272 were denied, 
and the authority for preexam i nat i on was revoked in the cases of 2 
individuals in the preceding year, .945 new applications for pre- 
exam i nat ion were received 

Exercise of Seventh Proviso 

Aliens returning after a temporar'y absence to an unrelinquished 
domicile in the United States of seven consecutve years may b'e ad- 
mitted by the Attorney General under the authority contained in the 
7th Proviso to Section 3 of the immigration Act of '9i7. notwithstand- 
ing a g round or grounds of Inadmissibility under the immig rat i on i aws. 
iHowever, it s to be noted that the interna. Security Act of '950con- 
tains a prohibition that the 7th Proviso shau have no application to 
cases failing within the purview of Section i of the Act of October 
16, 19 18, as amended ) 

The table which f o i i ows shows the number of applications for 
consideration under the 7th Proviso final y disposed of dur.ng the 
past five years and the manner of disposit on of such applications 

Applications for exercise of Seventh Proviso 
Years ended June 30 948- 952 



Number Dispos.tion of applications 
Years ended of Adm . ss i on Admiss on 
June 50, applications authorized den i ed 

Total I ,059 _2._£ 12; 

(952 
'195! 
i950 
1949 
1 948 - _ 



145 


130 


15 


140 


121 


,9 


172 


158 


34 


354 


506 


28 


248 


223 


25 



Most of the appiicationsforSeventh Prov iso reiief during thepast 
fiscal ye^r arose i n deportat I on or p reexami nat i on proceedings of resi- 
dent aliens who wouid have been excludable cr minais or mental or 
physical defectives, or illiterates Practical ly all of the 130 cases 



- 33 - 

in which favorable action was taken represented persons who, in addi- 
tion to having the statutory requisite of seven years prior domicile 
in the United States, had established family ties in this country and 
had otherwise unblemished records for years past. Grounds waived in 
order to authorize readmission were: 21 physical or mental defects, 
87 criminals, 13 unable to read, and nine other excludable classes 

Registry of aliens under Section 328(b) of the 
Nationality Act of 1940. 

To obtain a reentry permit, to be naturalized, and for various 
other reasons, aliens need to have proof of lawful permanent entry in- 
to the United States. After the alien's record of entry is verified, 
a certificate of arrival or other appropriate document is issued by 
this Serv ice. 

An alien may make application to the Commi ss ionsr of Immigration 
and Naturalization for the creation of a record of lawful entry where 
no record exists of his admission for permanent residence To be 
eligible to have a record of registry created, the alien must prove 
that he is eligible for c i t i zensh i p, t hat he entered the United States 
prior to July I. 1924, and has resided here continuously since, that 
he is a person of good moral character, and that he is not subject 
to deportatidn When registry is approved a record is created estab- 
Mshing the aliens admission for permanent residence as of the date 
of his entry. During the past year, 5 464 applications for registry 
were received, and 4, 138 records of registry completed. 





CHAPTER 5 




DsPORTfeTlON. i 




Detention and 


>- 


Border Patro| 


s 





The ever expanding problemsof internal security made a divi- 
sion of functions and responsibility within the Service a logical 
step toward greater security protection, and faster detention and 
apprehension of aliens whose presence may be inimical to the best 
interests of the country. 

Thus the work was divided into two major divisions: i.e., 
Investigations Division, and Border Patrol, Detention and Deporta- 
tion Division. 

Deportations and Voluntary Departures 

The final objective of al I enforcement work of the Service is 
to rid the country of aliens who under the immigration and national- 
ity laws have no legal right to be here, either because they came in 
illegally, or having made a legal entrance, have failed to meet legal 
requirements for remaining. To this end investigations are made, the 
borders are patrolled, detention quarters are maintained and aliens, 
who cannot be immediately deported, are placed on supervised parole. 
Since the measure of achievement of enforcement is deportation and 
voluntary departures, this chapter will report first on the accom- 
plishments. This will be followed by the methods whereby they are 
ach i eved . 

Year by year since World War II, the volume of aliens deported 
or required to depart has multiplied, largely because of the spread- 
ing encroachment of Mexican illegal entrants into rural and indust- 
rial areas in the United States. It is these illegal entrants who 
swell the volume, particularly of voluntary departure's. |n the 
fiscal year 1952, the total reached 723,959, an increase of five 
percent over last year. 



- 35 - 



DEPORTATIONS AND VOLUNTARY DEPARTURES 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1946 - 1952 



1952 



1951 



1980 



ALIENS 
DEPORTED 



□ ALIENS 0EPARTIN5 VOLUNTARILY 
UNDER PROCEEDINGS 



eo.iai 



13,544 



'03,778 





6,628 






1949 1 


1 80,040 




1948 1 




r 20.S7I 1 

liU ' ' 


1947 1 






18,663 

1 






1946 1 





?7£,<77 



276,297 



I 
195.680 



101,945 




666,713 

979,109 

296.357 

217,555 

214, 545 

116,320 



200 



400 600 

TKOUBANpe 



600 



1,000 



( I) D eportat ions . — Deportations effected — When a warrant of 
deportation has been executed, aliens who depart either through de- 
portation at the expense of the Government, or who depart at their 
own expense are included in deportation statistics. Following the 
World War II, deportations averaged about H8,000 until I950when the 
number dropped to 6,628. In the fiscal year 1951, however, the 
number more than doubled to reach 13,544, and during 1952 there was 
a further increase to 20, 18 1. 

In 1950 and 1951 formal deportations of Mexican aliens were 
limited to those of the criminal and immoral classes or to those who 
had previously been granted four voluntary departures. This largely 
accounts for the small numbers of deportations effected. 

Contrary to the procedure outlined above, the Service, in so far 
as the limitations of funds and personnel permits, is now deporting 
Mexican illegal entrants. This is because deportation is known to 
be a better deterrent to a quick attempt at return than is voluntary 
departure. 



The following tables are indicative of the changed policies. 
I t wi II be noted that there are increases in deportations to 
practically all geographic areas, but most of the increase is to 
Mexico. Note, too, that the cause for deportation that increased 
most was "entered without proper documents." Of the 13,342 who 
entered illegally, II, 042 were deported to Mex ico. 



?6 



Aliens deported from the United States by country 
or region to which deported 
Years ended June 50, 1949 - 1952 



Count ry or reg i on 
to wh i ch deported 



I9?2 



195 I 



1950 



1949 



Al I count r i es. 



Eu rope 

Asi a. ............. ,, 

Canada. 

Mex i CO. ........... . 

West I nd i es. ...... . 

Cent ral America. . . . 

South America. ..... 

Africa. ........... . 

Other count ri es. . . . 



20. 18 I 15.544 6.628 20.04C 



5 


549 


1,537 




AQO 


ono 


1 


525 


1, 100 


2 


783 


8,928 


1 


350 


1,07 1 




205 


163 




352 


269 




60, 


46 




77 


131 



947 

2PB 

737 

,319 

722 

144 

160 

47 

264 



985 

865 

,903 

346 

152 

149 

35 

334 



Aliens deporte"! frcn the United States by cause 
Yee^rs enijed June 30, 1949 - 1952 



Cause 



1952 



All causes................ 20, 181 

Criminals 778 

I mmora I c I asses. ................... . 50 

Violators of narcotic laws 40 

Mental or physical defectives....... 56 

Previously excluded or deported..... 539 

Remained longer than authorized..... 4,469 

Entered without proper documents.... 9,636 

Abandoned status of admission 475 

Entered without inspection or by 

false statements 3,706 

Likely to become public charges..... 24 

Subversive or anarchistic 31 

Mi see i I an ecus. ..................... . 377 



194'' 



15,544 6,628 20,040 



1,056 


790 


1 . 02^- 


<^n 


55 


T-S 


62 


55 


70 


45 


55 


82 


940 


555 


5,815 


3,289 


1,66 1 


1,379 


5,322 


1,552 


998 


298 


224 


329 


2,295 


1,754 


i2,09A 


14 


58 


20 


18 


6 


L 


160 


109 


149 



The effect of the Internal Security Act is indicated in the 
continued increase in the number under subversive charges who were 
deported or who departed with warrants of deportation outstanding. 
Eight of these subversive classes and 68 of the criminal, narcotic 
or immoral classes, a total of 76 cases, were presented to United 
States Attorneys for prosecution as having willfully refused or 
fai led to show di I igent effort to depart within six months after 
notification of the provisions of Sec. 20(c) of the Act of 1917, 
as amended by the Internal Security Act. 



- 37 - 

(2) Voluntary Departures . — Of the total of 703,778 who were 
permitted to depart, warrants of arrest were issued in 9,578 cases. 
In many cases the usual hearings required for deportation were held, 
the essential difference being that the decision was to grant the 
privilege of departure in lieu of deportation prior to the issuance 
of a warrant of deportation. In most of the cases however, where 
warrants of arrest were issued, many man-hours of the hearings pro- 
cedure were eliminated by the granting of the departure privilege 
early in the proceedings. 

In the other 694,200 cases In which warrants of arrest were 
not issued, the procedure is to obtain a statement from the a! ien 
showing illegal presence in the United States, and a request for 
privilege of departure. This streamlined procedure, in use almost 
exclusively on the Mexican Border, accomplished the expelling of 
many more al iens than could have been effected under the formal 
deportation procedure, but It was far from a solution of the pro- 
blem of the i I legal entrants from Mexico. 

(3) Outstanding Warrants of Deportation . — At the close of the 
fiscal year, there were outstanding 8,505 unexecuted warrants of 
deportation. Of these, 5, 183 had been outstanding six months or 
less, and 5,322 had been outstanding more than six months, some for 
years. 

Tot a I number, ................................ . 8 , 505 

Deferred for reconsideration or stay ................. . 493 

Deferred account Int roduct ion private bills........... .357 

Awaiting travel documents............................. 3,612 

Awaiting transportation............................... 529 

Serving sentence, 

Travel document available........................... 673 

Travel document not available....................... 149 

In hospital or asylum: 

Waiting travel document or transportation........... 279 

Travel document obtainable, unable to travel........ Ml 

Travel document not aval I ab I e. ..................... . 270 

Travel document not available: 

At large... 940 

Whereabouts unknown................................. 741 

Travel document obtainable, whereabouts unknown....... 351 

AM but the first group of cases shown above are unexecuted 
for reasons beyond Service control. 

The continuing increase in the number of private bills is 
shown in another section of this report. Those awaiting travel 
documents or completion of transportation arrangements represent 
both the normal lag between the issuance of final order and actual 
deportation, and also, the increasing number of cases in which trans- 
portation arrangements cannot be completed because of the war situa- 



- 38 - 

tion in the Far East. Other delays are occas,oned by the fact that 
some aliens are destined to areas where transportation facilities for 
deportees are scant. This difficulty can sometimes be surmounted by 
t he assemb i i ng of groups and deporting by chartered p i ane when the 
relative expense favors that operation, or by arranging for trans- 
shipment enroute. 

Changes in territorial j u r , sd i ct i on, st r ct expatriation laws, 
and inability to establish birth as claimed or other evidence of 
nationality, are the usual causes for Service inability to obtain 
travel documents, and few reversals are anticipated of previOus 
refusals to accept as deportees. 

Of the 2, !0D cases in which the Service has been unable to 
obtain travel documents, 270 are in hospitais or asylums, mostly at 
State expense, and ! 49 aliens are serving sentences in penai inst^ 
tutions. Many of these aliens would be available for deportation 
if documents could be obtained. Practically aii of these aliens 
on discharge from the institutions are subject to the penalties of 
the Internal Security Act if they wiiifuiiy fail or refuse to depart 
Many of the 940 reported as at large are also subject to those same 
penalties and a comparatively few are unabie to travel. The 74' re 
ported as "whereabouts unknown'' have not been brought under the 
supervision provisions of the internal Security Act 

(4) Transportation of Deportees . -For overseas transportation, 
the Service was able to deport 276 ai lens on the vessels of the 
Military Sea Transport Service; 'I5 to Germany. 49 to Eng ' and, 58 to 
Italy, 3' to the Philippines, and 23 to other countries Last year 
the Office of Chief of Transportation issued 694 authorizations but 
the Port Authorities supplied oniy the 276 spaces mentioned., Efforts 
to overcome this situation are being made on pro rata share of opera- 
tions cost on passenger--miies basis The total cost last year was 
$22,640.53 - an average of $82 03 each, substantially less than by 
commercial carrier. 

The most noteworthy deportation by commercia vessels was in 
May 1952 when '83 departed on a vessel for Naples These deportees 
to the Mediterranean, Middle Eastern and Far Eastern countries were 
transshipped at Naples to their destinations, 85 be ' ng sent by char 
tered p i anes to Pakistan 

Transportation to border ports for deportation continued by ai r • 
coach when practicable, but the number moved by train and by Service 
busses greatly exceeded this number. Emphasis is placed on the re- 
duction of over-al I expense by the use of the most economical means 
of transportation concomitant with the best use to be made of excort 
personnel, and to decreased detention 

« 

The coordination of these parties somet,mes becomes qu : te in- 
volved. For example, an alien at Seattle for deportation to M i am 
is transferred to San Francisco for re-transfer to New York for" 



- 39 - 

re-transfer to Miami From Seattle he may travel with deportees on 
their way to Mexico. From San Francisco he may be with deportees 
who will leave Chicago for deportation through Detroit to Canada, 
The New York-Miami transfer would be with deportees previously 
assembled at Eilis | s i and from the Great Lakes and North Atlantic 
Coast areas for deportation through Miami. This series of actions 
must be timed to reach New York in time for a specified sailing date 
and the reverse movements are also coordinated to the greatest extent 
possible toassure themost economical ut i I izat ion of service personnel . 

(5) Acceptance of Deportees by other Countries .--Under the Inte rnai 
Security Act, deportation shall betothecountry specfiedbythe alien, 
if that country w, i ' accept him. Those countries to which the aliens 
hadnoprevious ties usually dec line to accept them as deportees. Since 
January 1951, Canada has accepted but one of the 729 non -Canad i ans, and 
Mexico has not accepted any of the 3$ persons of other than Mexican 
nationality who specified Mexico,, in the past five months. 

The number of cases continues to increase whifch are' referred 
through the Department of State to home authorities for final deci- 
sion because consular representatives in this country have refused to 
issue travel docurhents. In 63 casfeS the- consuisrwere tnstrudted to 
issue the documents, and :n 61 others their adverse decisions were 
sustained. There were 597 such cases pending at the ciose of the fis- 
cal year as compared to 43! at the close of the preceding year. 

Border Patrol 



The Border Patrol iS the police arm of the immigration and 
Naturalization Service As such, it is the nation's only civil lan 
uniformed armed border patrol Through the Border Patrol, the immi- 
gration and Nat u ra , I zat : on Service provides our country its first 
line of defense aganst i legal aliens, smugglers and other violators 
along our land borders and coasts. The f o I lowing excerpt from the 
Annual Report of the Commissioner General of immigration for the fis- 
cal year ended June 30, 1927, described the Border Patrol of today 
as it did then . 

"The border patrol is a young man's organization; 
it appeals strongiy to the lover of the big outdoors.... 
The business upon which t is engaged cal is for manhood, 
stamina, versati.ty, and resourcefulness in the highest 
degree. The pride of these men in their organization 

Is equaled on y by the pride and esteem in which they are 
held by common, ties in which they operate ,,,.. . 

"Ex--service men predominate in the border patrol; 
they must be and are physically fit; they are accustomed 
to discipline, take readily to it, and like it; they are 
charged w,th a serious responsibility and keenly realize 
it in the vast majority of cases their work is a reli- 
gion." 



- 40 - 

In the twenty-five years since these lines were written, the 
vital character of the organization has not changed. The Border 
Patrol each year is faced with appalling numbers of aliens illegally 
in the United States who must be arrested and taken to points of exT 
pulsion from our country. That the number of apprehensions each year 
has been increasing by the tens and hundreds of thousands is evident 
from the following chart. 



DEPORTABLE ALIENS APPREHENDED BY BORDER PATROL OFFICERS 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1941 - 1952 



NUMBER 
«00,000 



500,000 



400,000 



200,000 



100,000 



1941 



1944 



1947 



1990 



1992 



For the fiscal year just ended, Border Patrol officers patrol- 
led more than 11,000,000 mi I es, quest ioned 8,700,000 persons, examined 
3,000,000 conveyances. These operations resulted in the apprehension 
of 551,719 deportable aliens. Of th^se, 1,215 were aliens with 
criminal records, and I, 122 were smugglers. 



These vital statistics of the Border Patrol have further mean- 
ing in relation to the past decade when it is realized that there 
are 350 less men in the authorized force of the Border Patrol today 
than there were in 1941. This larger force apprehended annually 
only about 12,000 aliens, about two percent of the number arrested 
and disposed of today. But great numbers of apprehensions are not 
necessarily the best kind of law enforcement. Not enough aliens 
are being arrested yet to serve as a deterrent. in addition, the 
sheer volume of apprehensions may so submerge the Border Patrol 
effort that others individually more dangerous to the security of 
our country may be missed. Officers cannot give their full atten- 
tion to the apprehension of dangerous aliens when they are promptly 
enmeshed in the many problems invariably associated with the arrest 
and transportation of hundreds of illegal aliens every time they go 
upon the highways or crossing places. This is true even though 
most of the aliens apprehended are not immediately dangerous. 



( I) The Ai r I I ft ., — A vital part of the Border Patrol operation 
consists in making ef f ect i ve the apprehensi on and expulsion of aliens. 
It is futi le for our smai i Border Patrol force to apprehend al lens 
unless there is a planned program for discouraging such aliens from 
immediate i I legal return to the United States. To return i I legal 
aliens repeatedly to Mexico, for example, at small border towns 
hundreds of miles from their homes and lawful means for getting em- 
ployment is like using a broom against the tide. If these people 
are to escape actual hunger, they can see no alternative but to re- 
turn unlawfully to the United States 

The Border Patrol, therefore, has been compel led to seek a 
method for expelling iMegai aliens which itself does not contain 
tiie seeds of its own defeat. Surveys revealed that 75 percent of 
the Mexican aliens apprehended in the Lower Rio Qrande Valley-of 
Texas came from deep n the interior of Mexico, The answer there- 
fore, approached wth the most careful calculations as to men and 
money, was the airlift (reported in last year's Annual Report) of 
aliens into the interior of Mexico at places near their homes The 
airlift, then, as amethod for immigration I aw enforcement became 
the means for syphoning away from the border area the tremendous 
reservoir of illegally entered aliens who, if merely put across the 
shai low Rio Grande or the western international boundary, return 
again and again to engulf more deeply the meager Border Patrol force. 
A total of 5 1,504 aiiens were so removed during the fiscal year. 

Funds for the airlift for the fiscal year 1953 were notappro-^- 
priated by Congress, so it was necessary that the airiift to Mexico 
be discontinued during July 1952. This operation had had a yery 
obvious beneficial effect upon the problem of i- legal ent ry from 
Mexico, Its benefits were so apparent to the Government of Mexico 
that,_upon learnng of the discontinuance of the airlift, that 
Government agreed for the first time to provide mi I ita ry surveil- 
lance in connection with movements by train of its nationals from 
border points to the interior of Mexico following their apprehen- 
sion after i i iega entry into the United States. Hence, the train- 
i i f t may carry forward the proven values of the airlift. 

(2) S mugglers Apprehended . — As a result of the high prices 
oaid for smugging aiiens, hardened criminals have entered into 
organized smuggling in a businesslike manner. The dangerous nature 
of this traffic can be understood best by a brief description of 
typical alien smuggling activities. 

Along the Florida coasts, a typical smuggi ing case involves 
European and Chinese aliens, brought from Cuba to the mainland by 
airplane. Pilots in the United States will fly to the no rt hern 
coast of Cuba. There are hundreds of well-hidden airfields or strips 
in northern Cuba from which pilots pickuptheir human cargo, and land 
in this country at any one of several abondoned fields. There con- 
federates take over the responsibility for further travel, most often 



- 42 - 



SMUGGLERS OF ALIENS APPREHENDED BY BORDER PATROL OFFICERS 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1925 - 1952 



i,400 
1,200 










1 










! 






























. 






1 


BOO 
600 
400 




























y 
























i 


y 


/ 




























/ 


















(._ 










>4^ 


/ 










200 










■^ 
























J 


Y 




'1 _. 


/ 













I92S 



1950 



lass 



tSflO 



1945 



1980 - 1958 



to points in the East or in the interior of the country, where they 
can become submerged in large foreign language groups. 

The smugglers usually collect their fee f rom re I at i ves or friends 
of aliens at the final destination, or the alien, upon safe delivery, 
sends a code telegram to the contact man in Cuba containing a code 
word known only to the alien and a relative or friend. The contact 
man, on the basis of the code word, collects his fee. 

A spectacular case involving the use of aircraft to smuggle 
aliens i nto the Un ited States came to a dramatic end during the latter 
part of the fiscal year. It involved one Gregorio Simonovich. 
Simonovich had been engaged in an air smuggling operation between 
Havana and Florida for a number of years, smuggling mostly aliens 
of European or Chinese nationality for fees ranging from $1,000 to 
$2,500 per alien smuggled. An officer of the Service, operating 
undercover, was successful in infiltrating the smuggling ring headed 
by SimonQvich. Simonov ich was apprehended and indicted for conspiracy 
to smuggle aliens into the Un ited States. He was convicted in February 
1952 and sentenced to two years imprisonment. In May 1952 he pleaded 
guilty to an additional charge of smuggling aliens into the United 
States and recei ved a further sentence to 13 years imprisonment. This 
put an end to the operations of an Tmportant smuggler of aliens. 

White not so expensive, smuggling is much more widespread on 
the Mexican Border. In a typical case, a contact man assembles the 
aliens and collects one-half of the fee for travel to Kansas City, 
Chicago or other interior points, the remainder to be paid upon 
arrival. The aliens, brought to the United States through the 
efforts of a second party, are delivered to a man who may appear 
to operate a travel bureau or a taxi service. The balance of the 
sum owed the smugglers is often mailed to a friend or relative at 
the point of destination. The sums paid for transportation to 



- 43- 



Chicago from points along the Mexican Border range from $100 each 
to $500 each, depending upon the size of the group and the method 
of travel. Road blocks, bus checks, and good cooperation in Mexican 



nabled the Border Patrol to make this smuggling 
costly venture. Several hundred smugglers engaged in these oper 



Border towns have en 



tions are arrested each year, and the price for each alien has risen 
to its present high level from $5.00 and $10.00 per alien only ten 
years ago. 

Along the Canadian Border 29 smugglers were apprehended last 
year. In the East the persons smuggled across the Mexican Border are 
often Europeans or persons of immoral classes. In the West they may 
be either Europeans or Asiatics. Often the smuggler conducts the 

alien to a point near the international boundary. There he is in- 
structed to proceed to a near-by point in the United States where a 
confederate will convey him further into the interior. The amount of 
money paid here again depends upon the class of alien involved. The 
risks are quite as great, and the methods by which the aliens protect 
themselves and their money are not unlike that found in other local i- 
t i es. 

Smuggling at seaports usually involves stowaways, a description 
of which operation is contained elsewhere in this report. A new 
problem has arisen in the last few years, however, regarding the 
shrimping fleet in the Gulf of Mexico, During the past year, the 
shrimping fleet has worked very close to Mexican waters in fact, 
the Mexican Navy has seized several vessels claiming they were 
operating in Mexican waters. A spot check by the Border Patrol at 
Port Isabel, Te.xas, for a thirty-day period in November 1951 re- 
sulted in the apprehension of over 700 aliens working in the shrimp- 
ing fleet from that one port alone. 

(3) Aliens Apprehended . — This problem, in terms of volume, has 
grown into fantastic proportions along the Mexican Border. While 
510,716 of the illegal aliens apprehended were in the three Mexican 
Border districts, it is no longer true that Mexican aliens stay in 
localities close to the border. They have spread to almost Q'^&r^ 
section of the country. Their apprehension in the Seattle and 
Chicago Districts especial ly, showed marked increases From 
January 30, to March 14, 1952, a fifteen-man Border Patrol detail 
to Chicago apprehended 1,229 aliens, almost all of whr- vvere Mexi- 
cans. During the past year, 25, 036 il-gal Me;<ican aliens were 
apprehended in trades, crafts, and indusuries. The dangers to the 
American economy and to the standards of the American working man 
are clear. 

(4) Co operation with and from other Of f i ce rs . --Du r i ng the 
past fiscal year the Border Patrol apprehended 1,051 violators of 
other than immigration laws. Seized contraband and vehicles were 
valued at $323,7 18. 

(5) Ai r Pat roi . — The Border Patrol has a fleet of twelve planes 
used for patrolling, signcutting and general scouting duties. During 
the past year, hundreds of aliens were apprehended by air operations. 



- 44 - 

Along the Florida coast, Border Patrol airplanes, guided by radio and 
by information previously received, search for boats coming in with 
smuggled aliens. They also are used for rapid contact to any one of 
hundreds of airfields in Florida where information is received re- 
garding smuggling activities. Along the Mexican Border, Border 
Patrol airplanes are most often used for general scouting,. In re- 
mote sections of the country, a prompt radio message from plane to a 
rad 1 o-eqqipped ' jeep brings a team of patrol officers to arrest aliens 
discovered by plane. In the Lower Rio Grande Vai ley of Texas, 
several task groups of five patrol officers each, with a bus, a radio- 
equipped car or a jeep, and a truck, wi I I meet to form a task force. 
This force guided by airplanes may apprehend as many as ;,000 or 
2,000 illegal aliens per day, This is a spectacular operation 
which, in size and in accomplishment, has never before existed in 
the field of civilian law enforcement in this country,, 

(6) Pad i o . --"Rad i o equipment is vital to the success of Border 
Patrol operations. Throughout the Borders, the headquarters of 
Border Patrol sectors are I inked together and then Sach sector 
headquarters is linked to its men through radio-equipped automo- 
biles, jeeps, and airplanes,. During the past year, the entire 
Mexican Border has been linked with FM, and now, throughout the Bor- 
der, officers can communicate with their headquarters and with their 
brother officers with te I ephone- I i ke efficiency 

(7) Border Patrol Training School ,.- The Border Patrol Train- 
ing School staffed with experienced Border Pat ro i Officers has been 
located at New Mexico A & M. Col lege, near Las Cruces, New Mexico 
--less than forty miles from E! Paso, Texas., Here, through class- 
room instruction drill and demonstrations, Border Patrol recruits 
are taught immigration law, Spanish, their duties and authority as 
patrol inspectors, marksmanship, self-defense methods, first aid, 
and the methods of Border Pat ro i operations. 

The assignment of trained officers to other branches of the 
Service, fn addition to normal depletion of force, emphasized the 
importance of effective, early, and rapid officer training The 
Border Patrol offers an interesting and hazardous life, 

While there were the usual number of encounters with lawless 
men of the Border, only one officer was seriously injured in I ine of 
duty. The Pat ro i Inspector in Charge at Eag i e Pass, Texas, was shot 
and gravely wounded by a smuggler, but has now recovered 

Detent ion 

Stated in the simplest of terms, ai lens are detained by this 
Service (1) because they have arrived seeking admission to the 
United States, and their entry is denied or delayed because they 
cannot or do not appear to meet the requi rements of immigration 
laws for admission, and (2) because they have been apprehended in 
the United States and are detained pending deportation or other 



- 45 - 

formal action For a number of reasons, th# number of aliens de- 
tained was greater in 1952 than in 1951. The Internal Security 
Act empowered the Attorney General to detain certain aliens pend- 
ing a determination of deportabi I i ty . The operation of the airlift 
meant that large numbers of aliens were collected in one place and 
detained for short periods. The care with which suspected subver- 
sive aliens had to be examined when they sought admission, and the 
extensive research into the backgrounds of Chinese claiming United 
States citizenship, all contributed to an increase in detentions 

The fiscal year 1952 was marked by progress in e\/ery phaseof 
the detention operation, notwithstanding the fact that therewas 
sufficient personnel during a year for an increase of 62 percent in 
the total number of aliens detained, and of 46 percent of the total 
mandays of detention. The detention situation was under constant 
review particularly at Ellis Island, San Francisco and along the 
Mexican Border. When necessary, instructions were issued by the 
Central Office to release under parole so-called "hanfchip" cases. 

The result of such review Is indicated by the fact that the 
average number of days detention per person was 8.5, slightly less 
•than that of fiscal year ending 1951. Extraordinary efforts were re- 
quired, particularly by supervisory personnel throughout the deten- 
tion operation, to minimize security risks and keep the many compN- 
cated processing procedures moving so that aliens would not remain 
in custody any longer than necessary pending determination of de - 
portability and would be deported as soon as practicable after an 
order of deportation is entered. 

( I ) Mandays of Detention and Aliens Detaine d. --The figures 
which follow show that an increase of 46 percent in mandays of 
detention has taken place since June 30, 1951: 



Total 



Service operated facilities 
Non-,-Serv ice operated facilities 



Mandays of detention 
Years ended June 30. 



1952 
. 187.617 

739,875 

447,742 



1951 

8 1 3 ■ 427 

446 ,911 
366,5 16 



The average number of days detention was slightly less than the 
previous year, as shown in the following figures: 



- 46 - 

Aliens detained and average days detention 
Years ended June 50. 1950-1952 



Years ended: 



Total 



In Serv ice 

operated 

f ac i I it i es 



In non- 
Serv ice 
operated 
f acilities 



1952 : 

No. of aliens detained 201,618 
Average days detention 5.9 



86,570 

8.5 



I 15,048 

3.8 



12^: 

No. of aliens detained 124,187 48,627 

Average days detention 6.6 9.2 



75,560 

4.8 



1250: 

No. of aliens detained 97,7 10 
Average days detention 6.9 



38,515 
10.6 



59, 195 

4.4 



MfiNOAYS OF 

MANOfiYS 


DETENTION IN SERVICE AND OTHER OPERATED FACILITIES 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1949 - 1952 








'■^°°'°°° wm 


SERVICE FA 
OTHER FAC 




CILITIES 


1 


— 


LITtES 
















H 






P 

1 


'W 














■ 






400,000 
































dmm~j^ 










949 1950 I9SI 1952 





The number of aliens who remain in detention beyond the average 
length of time is wery small. Most prolonged detentions result from 
( I) appeals and legal efforts on the part of the detainees to remain 
In the United States following exclusion or the issuance of an order 
of deportation, and (2) difficulties experienced by our Service in 
the procurement of passports and travel documents to their native 
countries. During the past year, the number of Chinese nationals in 
detention has been reduced as a result of an Administrative Order 



- 47 - 

issued April 8, 1952, '0! '45 !/ which authorized the District 
Director to parole Chinese aliens whenever in his discretion such 
parole would not be prejudicial to the best interests of the United 
States. 

( 2 ) C u I i n a r y . --More than two miiiion mea;s were served at 
Service operated fac; i ities during the fiscal year ended June 30, 
!952, This represents an increase of some 850,000 meais over the 
previous year. AM foods,tuffs are procured from depots maintained 
by the Bureau of Federal Supply or under competitive bids from 
wholesalers, whichever is more advantageous to the government. 
Although many economies were achieved during the last year, per 
capita food costsper day increased seven and one-half cents over 
the previous year. The average cost per meal is now 22 cents, as 
compared with .. 195 at the close of business June 30, !95L 

The planning of low cost, we I : balanced, nutrit.ous meais con- 
tinues to receive careful attention since it is recognized that food 
is not only related to health, but ;t is an important factor in pro- 
moting a generally cooperative attitude among the detainees., 

(3) Visiting Pr i v i I eqes --Two other phases of detention work 
which contribute substantially to the contentment and morale of de- 
tainees are visiting privileges and assistance in settling persona! 
affairs prior to departure. Last year approximately 75,0,00 persons 
visited aliens who were detained in Service operated facilities To 
provide for efficient control of this activity, existing procedures 
require that a request for a visit be initiated by the detainee 
The request is screened by the Chief Security Officer and, if approved 
a pass IS issued for a specific timeand mailed by the Service to the 
person named in the request. Upon arrivai at the facility, the 
visitor identifies himself and presents the pass When he leaves, 
the pass is turned in and placed on file for reference,. 

(4) Escorts away from Detention Fac i I i t ; es , - -A i i ai iens who 
are deported are conveyed under guard to ports of deportation, how 
ever prior to departure many of them must be assisted in matters 
which require escort away from the facility. During the past year 
there were more than 25,000 escorts, the majority of which concerned 
the recovery of personal belongings, t he sett 1 ement of financial 
affa.rs, collection of wages, the procurement of travel documents 
and passports from consulates. in addition to the foregoing escorts, 
which are specifically associated with deportation and departure 
there were others which relate to the presentation of aiiens at 
courts for prosecution; the transfer of aliens from one Service f ac . - 

I ity to another for hospitalization and medicai attention, etc Aliens 
under escort frequently belong to criminal, insane, immorai or subver- 
sive groups, are often difficult to handle and represent a maximum 
security risk. 



(5' improved Detention Facilities . -With the larger numbers of 
aiiens detained, the need for new or improved detention facilit.es 



- 48 - 

became ever more pressing. A number of new projects were undertaken 
and some remodel I i ng was completed during the year. 

Work was begun on a new detention faciiity at C hu I a Vista , 
C a I i f orn i a , located on the southeast perimeter of San Diego, seven 
miles north of the Mexican Border, which will house from 200 to 400 
persons. Upon completion of this station. Camp Gillespie at El Cajon, 
a portion ofwhich this Service now rents from the county of San Diego, 
will be closed All equipment and personnel will be transferred to 
the new station. Eventually the Chula Vista station wiii be enlarged 
to include the Border Patrol Sector in that area. 

To meet the demand for more adequate housing accommodations the 
Service detention quarters at El Centre, California , which has been 
operated upon a standby basis since 1945, w: I 1 become a permanent 
station in the near future. Extensive repairs are under way and 
new equipment is being installed. This faciiity with a maximum 
capacity of 500 will serve our own expanding needs It also will 

allow the Service to cooperate to a greater extent with the U, S. 
Marshal in connection with al iens who must be held as Government 
witnesses for prosecution. 

In June plans were completed and contracts iet for the con- 
struction of a detention camp at Hidalgo, T exas withia maximum 

capacity of i , 000 for the purpose of processing Mexican ai i en 
"wetbacks" apprehended in the Brownsv i 1 I e-Mc Ai i en-H i da I go area and 
expediting their departure to Mexico This camp wiii be ready for 
operation within 30 days. 

For many years j ails &;i,ongi, the entire Mexicain Bbrder have been 
over-crowded with al iens who were taken into custody and placed in 
detention by this Service until their deportation or removal could 
be effected. The new facilities at Hidalgo, Chula Vista, and the 
enlarged station at El Centre will help to fill a long felt need 
with regard to the apprehension, detention and deportation or re- 
moval of Mexican aliens in the Imperial Valley, along the West 
Coast and in East Texas. It is estimated that these camps will more 
than pay for their construction during the first year of operation 
by the greatly reduced use of contractual jaiis. 

The program of renovation and repair of E I ii s Is! and . which has 
been under way for the past three years, isbeginning to show results. 
Several major physical changes were effected during June.' These in- 
cluded the transfer of security unit supervisory offices to the first 
floor of the f ac i 1 ity and the installation of a public address system, 
both of which will assist greatly i n coord i nat i ng the various security 
functions in one area and provide a means of contact at ai! times 
between security personnel and e\/ery post inside and outside the 
Stat ion. Much time will be saved and more efficiency will, result 
from this integrated system of surveillance. 

The 30-bed infirmary, which is under the supervision of the U S. 



- 49 - 

Public Health Service and which was opened last year, is almost com- 
pleted. The space is divided into a ward for women and chi idren, a 
maie ward and an isolat'on ward. The general heaith of the detainees 
is good, due, in no smai part, to the excellent service rendered in 
the clinic in treating minor com plaints Detainees suffer;ng from 
serious illnesses are sent to the U. S. Marine Hospitals at Staten 
island and Hudson and Jay Streets, and to the Be,levue, New York, 
and Willard Parker Hospitals in New York City,, 

Fifty additional beds and other dormitory equipment have been 
instai led inthe w ng adjacent tothe infi rmary for medica' hold cases,, 
thus giving fu;, mean ng to a Service policy wh ch requires the segre- 
gation of newiy arrived detainees untii a ciean b^i, of health can be 
given by the Public Heaith Service. 

Preliminary plans anddrawings have been submitted by the District 
Director for furnishing and equipping the passengers ounge, family 
quarters and warrant room The Prisons Industries have been asked to 
submit est. mates of cost and to cooperate in subm.tt ng pians for the 
design and manufacture of a type of furniture which wiii stand heavy 
wear and yet present an attractive appearance 

This detent on station, with .ts great, wide haiis and corridors, 
high ceilings, unusable spaces and outmoded uti'ities, wiii always 
present the dua problem of how to uti lize It with economy and yet 
make it serve our purposes efficiently,. 

During the past yea'' when the housing situation became acute due 
to overcrowding at the San Franc i sco Detention Facility, arrangements 
were made with A,ameda County to occupy a section of the Santa R'ta 
Rehabilitation Farm which is located at Pieasanton, about 40 miles 
from San Francisco, for overflow detainee population,, it "s planned 
to cont.nue the use of ths faculty whenever the population exceeds 
200. 

A I i en Paro I e 

Under the prov sions of Sec,, 20(a) of the immigration Act of 
February 5, '■ 9 ' 'I . as amended September 22,, 19^0 by the interna 
Secur ty Act. the Attorney General may detain., release under bond, 
or release under cond t.ona, parole apprehended aliens pending de- 
termination of t he I ' deport ab I I 1 ty and for a further period of six 
months following order of deportation. Under Sec, 20(b) such aliens 
may be subject to supervision if deportation has not been effected 
during that period At the end of the fiscal year, there were 24,965 
aliens at large under these provisions. The vast majority were on 
conditional paro e awa t i ng a hearing or a determination of deporta- 
biiity. Others were on conditional parole pend ng the results of 
appeals or because of the introduction of private bills. There was, 
however, a steady increase n the number who were placed under super- 
vision after ordersofdeportatonhadbeen outstanding for six months. 
This was 'argeiy because the Service was unable to procure the needed 
travel documents or to complete travel arrangements. 



- 50 - 

During the fiscal year, 2,915 were placed under bond and 1,518 
oonds were terminated, a net increase of 1,397; 22,085 were paroled, 
and 11,274 paroles were terminated, a net increase of 10,811; 1,938 
were placed under supervision and 866 terminated, a net increase of 
1,072; a grand total of 26,938 additional and 13,658 terminated, 
leaving a net grand increase of 13,280 under the control provisions 
of the Act. 

The number of aliens under bond or conditional parole at the end 
of the fiscal year was approximately double the number in such status 
on June 30, 1951; while the number under supervision was one and one- 
half times as great. 



NUMBCR 
iO.OOO 

ZS.OOO 

20,000 

IS. 000 

10,000 

S.OOO 




ALIENS ON PAROLE 
YEARS ENOEO JUNE 30, 1950 - 


1952 






















195. 


i 


















— — — 


1950 _„--^ 




-1 































^^ 






























T^. 


•». 


_ 




■ 










- - 




^ 












































au 


LY 


AUO. SEPT. OCT. WOV. DEC. JAN. 


FEB. MAft. 


APR. 


MAY au 



iens at Large under Contro; Provisions of 
internal Securty Act of 1950 
June 30 i95! June 30 '952 





)f 


Grand 


Sect '.on 
20( b; 


Bond 


- Sec 20 ■ a ; 


Paro^ 


e Sec 


20i a) 


As c 




Pend 


After 




Pend"" 


After 


end 


of 


tota, 


Super - 


Tot a. 


i ng 


order 


Tota 


ing 


oi'der 








vision 




order 






order 




J une 


:952 


24 966 


i ,75' 


2 8 i/ 


2, 5 '8 


299 


20 398 


19 486 


9'2 


May 


M 


24, 403 


■ . /98 


2,73 


2,435 


296 


-9. 874 


9 000 


87 4 


Apr_ 


ft 


23,573 


!,7 !5 


2,657 


2, 340 


3 7 


9 , 20 1 


'8 4:6 


785 


Mar 


11 


22,557 


1,585 


2.563 


2,234 


3 29 


1 8 , 409 


;7,665 


744 


Feb_ 


II 


2 1.575 


, 438 


2 523 


2,20/ 


3 6 


!7.6'4 


16,775 


839 


Jan. 


ri 


20,693 


1 . 340 


2 493 


2 49 


344 


■ e , 860 


16, 06: 


799 


Dec . 


'951 


18,666 


,269 


2, 18 


2,066 


;5 


5,2;6 


!4,658 


558 


Nov. 


11 


;8 '85 


208 


■964 


: .878 


86 


'3,0 '3 


4,425 


588 


Oct 


!I 


' 7 , 30 ' 


^ 080 


1 93 


; „ 850 


8 : 


;4,.290 


3,722 


568 


Sep 


11 


'5.628 


934 


!,937 


' ,852 


85 


'2, /57 


12, '90 


567 


Aug 


'' 


4, '56 


848 


1.788 


' , i ' 4 


/4 


1 ' , 520 


, 96 • 


559 


July 


'95 


'2,924 


7 '5 


' , 550 


' , 490 


60 


: , 659 


:0 '46 


5-3 


June 


95' 


'686 

. 


67 9 


' 420 


'365 


55 


9 587 


9,056 


53- 



It is of interest that the -eat ve.y sma numbe en a-ged' Af- 
ter Order" (after f.nai order of deportation has been made) reflects 
the reiativeiy few cases ;n which it was found des rab.e to change 
the conditions of bond or paroie Four cases we'-e presented to the 
United States Attorneys fo' prosecuton for v'o;at on of cond t . ons 
of supervision 

There st remain some 2 500 cases to be b'ought under con- 

ditional parole or formai supervision pu suant to the internal 
Security Act. This is n contrast to the backlog of '5 600 cases 
at the close of i ast fiscal year Of these 2 500 many had been 
paroled or reieased under bond prior to the passage of the interna. 
Security Act, but the conditions of their en a gement must never- 
theiess be formalized n accordance w th the present aw 

Exc I usi ons 

Aliens who arrive at ports of entry seeking admission to the 
United States may be exciuded .f they fai ■ to quaiify under the 
immigraton i aws of the United States in most instances a iens 

held for exclusion ai-e given a hearing before a three-member Board 
of Special inquiry. From an order of exc.usion by the Board^ an 
appeal lies to the Board of immigration Appeals except in certain 
'nstances when the Public Health Officer certifies an a,ien to be 
t nadm i ss 1 b I e 



Other cases in which there is no appea are those cases in 
which the excluding decision is based on confidential information, 
the disclosure of which wouid be detrimental to the pub^-c nterest , 



- 52 - 

During the fiscal year 1952, 5,050 aliens were excluded from 
the United States, 2,106 of whom sought admission at the Canadian 
and Mexican land borders for less than 30 days. Seventy-six percent 
were exc I uded on documentary grounds. During the past year, 139 alien 
border crossers and nine other aliens were excluded on subversive 
g rounds. 

Aliens excluded from the United States, by cause 

Year ended June 30, 1952 

Number exc I uded 



Cause Total Border Other 
c rossers _[/ a i i ens 

All causes.... ................ 5.050 2, 106 2.944 

Without proper documents................. 3,860 1,482 2,378 

Criminals......... 534 

Mental or physical defectives............ 164 

Subversive or anarchistic................ 148 

Stowaways. ............................... 74 

Had been previously excluded or deported. Il5 

Likely to become public charges 41 

Immoral classes........ 29 

Previously departed to avoid military 

service. ...................... ......... 19 

Unable to read (over 16 years of age).... 3 

Cont ract I abore rs ....... 9 

Other c I asses. 54 



±/ Aliens seeking admission at land borders for less than 30 days. 



49 


285 


97 


67 


39 


9 


- 


74 


63 


52 


30 


1 1 


19 


10 


1 1 


8 


- 


3 


4 


5 


12 


42 



■■ .^ ■ [ ■ . ■ t p i. ii;ii jy_. . . I .. i . i .i.i. i . i .j.i. i . i . i . i .w.M 'iiiK'yffffBrS v !' ! •" ' •"• ! ! 



r^t9;mri y. ■ ■ 1 1 i.w 



CHAPTER 



iNVESfiaATION 



The Service is keenly aware that its law enforcement responsi- 
bilities are constantly expanding in scope under the prevailing 
conditions of international political and economic instability. The 
investigative activities of the Service are of prime importance. 
They play an especially vital role in three areas of the Service's 
enforcement responsibilities. 

The most important area is the expulsion of aliens and the de- 
naturalization of persons illegally naturalized who are or have been 
connected with the world-wide Communist movement. In this connection 
the Congress, inthe Internal Security Act of 1950, madefindings based 
upon evidence adduced byvarious Congressional committees that the 
world Communist movement operates through affiliated constituent ele- 
ments in the various countries of the world, and depends upon the 
travel of Communist members, representatives and agents from country 
to country for the furtherance of its purposes. Furthermore, the 
Congress found that Communist activity in the United States is in- 
spired and controlled largely by foreign agents. Accordingly, 
severance of the foreign control of this Communist activity in the 
United States is, in large measure, an immigration problem. 

The second most vital area of investigative responsibility is 
the ferreting put at the earliest possible time after entry and the 
expulsion from the United States of aliens who are criminals, immoral 
persons, narcotic law violators, or mentally or physically unfit. 

The third most essential enforcement task of the Service in which 
investigations are important involvesthe stamping out of the smuggling 
of aliens i nto the Un i ted States, andthe early detection and expulsion 
of the mounting numbers of illegal entrants who seek to reside unlaw- 
fully in the United States. These activities threaten the controls 
that our country has found necessary to impose because of the large 
numbers of persons who desire to come here and share our bounty. The 



54 

law abiding i mm 'grant patientiy waits his turn overseas for the visa 
which wi i i permit h.is iawfu, ent ry and r es .dence ,n the Un.ted States 
In justice to h:m the i aw breaker who enters by iilegai means and 
who resides here in violation of the i aw must be prompt, y detected 
and expe I I ed 

These and the other enforcement responsi b i i ! t i es .ncumbent upon 
the Servce in administering the immigration and nationality , aws are 
prodigious. Competent administration of these i aws depends on eff;- 
cient and expeditious i nvest ' gat i ons for severa. reasons npaticular 
Our American traditions require that in each case the Service deve.op 
the facts through carefui investigation before act i ng to deny, revoke, 
or I imit any privi leges or rights it confers or recommends under the 
immigration and nat ■ onai i ty . i aws , At the same time, it ;S essent . ai 
that the Service's investigations be promptly conducted so that decays 
in enforcement wiii not frustrate the i aw 

The recogn 1 1 i on of the vita, ro i e of nvestigative responsibility 
led to the estab ; , shment of a separate D v,s on under an Assistant 
Comm I ss i oner for 1 nvest i gat i ons, report ng d i '"ect y to the Commissioner. 
This marks a new page in the development of the Service s nvest gat ve 
activities. Inthefiscai year ;948 investigationswasestabishedas 
a Section in the Enforcement D, vision in order to organize, coord, nate 
and direct the , nvest , gat i ve activities of the Service During the 
fiscal year 1949 the investigations Section was fuiy organized and 
its activities commenced to assist in ai phases of the enforcement 
work of the Service in fiscai years -950 and 95 the effect ve work 
done by the investigations Section ied to expansion of the Centra! 
Office investigative force, and more vigorous investigative activities 
inthefieid in each of these years an increasing number of investi 
gati^e cases was competed by the Service, in fiscal year 95. the 
large number of 256,990 investigations was completed Yet, during 
the current fiscai year nearly doub.e that number,, 498 237 investi- 
gations, were completed However,,, at the cose of this fiscal year 
a great deal of invest gative work rema.ns to be done. The year 
closed with a backlog of i nvest , gat i ons tota ing '43,626 cases it 
is thus read I ly apparent that to carry out the nvest i gat , ve prog ram 
of the Service it is necessary that the Service redouble its invest 
gative efforts. The Divsion with ,ts personnel augmented and the 
scope of its activities extended, proposes to work toward th,s end 
during the next year. 

The current fiscai year marked some notabie achievements. During 
this year investigations conducted a training program designed tomore 
fully qualify the Serv.ce s investigative personnel to discharge the 
mounting i aw enforcement respons : b i I i t i es of the Service. invest. ga- 
te rs from all districts were g.ven an intensWe and comprehensive 
course dealing with nvest :g at ive technques and the spec a,, zed pro 
cedures applicable to immigration and nat.onai.ty nvest i gat i ons . 
The course was designed to benefit newy appointed . nvest ^ gators as 
well as investigators i ong exper.enced in the Service. Other accom 
plishments in the various areas of our investigative work are as set 



- 55 - 

out below under the appropriate headings. 

( I) Anti-Subversive Operations . — (a) Exclusion Cases. — Inves- 
tigators have been expecially active in procuring intelligence 
information leading to the temporary exclusion of aliens seeking ad- 
mission to the United States whose entry might be prejudicial to the 
public interest, safety or security. These exclusions are effectuated 
under the authority conferred by the Internal Security Act of 1950, 
temporar i ly to exc I ude any alien whose entry may appear to be a threat 
to the internal security of the United States. Under the law, if it 
is determined on the basis of information of a confidential nature, 
the disclosure of which would be prejudicial to the public interest, 
safety or security, that the individual's entry would be or would 
I ikely be a security threat, further inquiry into the case must be 
denied and the individual must be deported. At all times the Service 
seeks to procure all the relevant facts, so that this power may be 
administered in conformity with our American standards of fairness 
to the fullest possible extent consistent with our national security 
i nte rests. 

(b) Deportation Cases. — The Internal Security Act of 1950, by 
amending the Act of October 16, I9'8, the basic immigration statute 
deal ing with the exclusion and deportation of subversives, has 
facilitated the conduct of subversive investigations by the Service 
with a view to deportation. The Internal Security Act of 1950 took 
it as established that the Communist Party of theUnited States or 
in any other country has as its purpose the establishment in the 
United States and throughout the world of Communist totalitarian 
dictatorships. Accordingly, it eliminated the need to prove this 
fact in each and every case of an alien charged with being deportable 
on subversive grounds. This relieved the Service of the burdensome 
task of repeatedly showing this fact in subversive deportation cases. 

During the current fiscal year 6, 10 1 investigations were con- 
ducted and completed with a view to establishing deportabiiity on 
subversive grounds. This represents an almost three-fold increase 
over the number of such investigations completed during fiscal year 
1951. Since such investigations are difficult and represent the 
expenditure of many productive man-hours of investigative work, this 
figure represents a noteworthy accomplishment. 

In sum, the Service carried on a vigorous investigative cam- 
paign during the past year with a view to the denaturalization, 
expulsion and exclusion from the United States of persons connected 
with the world Communist movement. In close cooperation with the 
various security agencies of the Government, the Service has broad- 
ened its facilities for analysis, coordination and Service-wide 
dissemination of intelligence information bearing upon this important 
phase of the work of the Service. 

Exemplifying the outstanding results ofthe investigative 
efforts of the Service to rid the country of subversive aliens is 



- 56 - 

the case of Andrew Dmytryshyn He was accorded a deportation hear- 
ing on a charge of membership in the international Workers Order. 
It was contended by the Service that the International Workers Order 
was aff I i I ated with the Communist Party of the United States and 
that Dmytryshyn, through his mernbership and activities in the Inter- 
national Workers Order, had af f i I lated himself with the Communist 
Party of the United States On December 26, !95!, the Board of Immi- 
gration Appeals upheld the Service and determined that Dmytryshyn was 
deportable from the Un ted States on the subversive charge This 
decision is the culmination of long and intensive efforts of the 
Service to procure competent evidence establishing the subversive 
connection between the international Workers Order and the Communist 
movement . 

(c) Denial of Natural izatlon Cases - The ,nterna' Security Act 
of 1950 amended the provision in the Nationa; ity Act of '940 which 
bars from naturalization persons engaged in subvers.ve activities.. 
The Act enlarged the ciassesof persons and the types of organizations 
deemed to fall within the statutory prohibition designed to bar the 
naturalization of subversives. An increased number of investigations 
was conducted of applicants for natura; zat on during the year to de- 
termine whether they were wthin this proscr'pton of the naturaliza- 
tion i aw„ 

(d) Revocation of Naturalization Cases. The interna Security 
Act of '950 amended the Nationality Act to provide that subversive 
activity Within a per.od of five years after naturalization shall be 
ground for revocation of naturalization. This applies to any person 
naturalized after January I, 1951, and opens a new field for subver- 
s 1 ve investigations During th^s f i sea i year the Serv.ce competed 
a total of 1,824 investigations which sought to determine possible 
revocation of naturalization on subversive grounds 

The Service considers that every Investigative effort should be 
expended to the end that subversives wii! not be naturalized as citi- 
zens of the United States and that if perchance any subversive is 
naturalized in violation of the law, the naturalization wii: be re- 
voked at the earliest possible time,. In this class of investigations, 
each case successfully completed represents many man-hours of diffi- 
cult work _ 

(2) Ant i-smu g g I I ng and Stowaway Operations . — During the fiscai 
year just ended the Service has continued to combat the illegal entry 
of aliens Into the United States, and especially to prevent the smug- 
gling of aliens across the land borders of the United States or as 



- 57 

stowaways aboard vessels or aircraft The number of apprehensions 
during this year of natives of countries other than those bordering 
on the United States who were smuggled into the United Statesh'as" 
nearly doubled over the preceding year. Al I led with the ai ;en smug- 
gling problem is the problem posed by the use of the seaman avenue 
to gain illegal entry into the United States This continues to be a 
tremendous problem in view of the large numbers of foreign seamen who 
annually come to our shores The investigative forces have endeavored, 
through centralized coordination and direction, to prevent the use of 
all these routes of iilega; entry. 

With respect to the detection of stowaways, the Service has been 
following the practice of searching, wherever practicable, vesseis on 
which it appears that stowaways may be transported, especaliy where 
information is received that members of the crew have been aiding the 
stowaways. The value of this operation is exemp'ifed by the case of 
the SS "Paol ina" in February 1952 a search of this vessei on its 
arrival at Phi iadeiphia resulted in the apprehension of two ital ian 
stowaways It developed that one of these stov/aways had been refus- 
ed entry in the United States The other had been deported pre. .ousiy 
as a narcotics violator 

(3) Fraud Ope rat i on s -- Du r i nq this f sea year the Service 
succeeded in uncovering some 40 cases Invoiving fraudulent procure- 
ment of United States passport? Dy Filipinos in the Honolulu area. 
A number of these law vioiators '.v.-i re prosecuted, 

A case closed in this year involved the operation of a large 
fraud ring in the Rio Grande Vai i ey invest gat:on by the Service 

established that one Salome Quintan! I la, a resident of Monterrey. 
:\^exico, had assisted possibly hundreds of a, .ens of Mex.can nation- 
ality to secure false documents which enabled them to app y for 
immigration visas to enter the United States Quintaniiia is 

presently under arrest in Mexico, charged wth obtaining fraudulent 
documents from Mexican officials. 

(4) Genera l Operat 1 ons . --The Service increased ^ts general 
investigative operations a!i along the line In fiscal year '952 
Almost one and o e-haif as many warrants of arrest were issued dur- 
ing this fisca; year as were issued during the preceding year. This 
increase resulted in part from the conduct by the Service of "free 
lance" investigations seekng to find aliens ii legal iy in the United 
States in the various piaces where ai lens are known to congregate. 
It is noteworthy that these "free lance" operations resulted in the 
■nstitution of deportation proceedings against a large number of 
aliens who otherwise wouid not have been apprehended by the Service. 

It is with pride that the Service points to these achievements 

n the field of investigations. Yet, ahead lie even greater tasks. 

The new Immigration and Nationality Act extensive y increases the 

investigative, as well as the other responsibilities of the Service. 

When its provisions become effective on December 24. '952, the 



- 58 - 

Service's investigative forces will have to effect an unprecedented 
expansion to meet the new operational responsibilities placed upon 
them by this legislation. if the Service is given the additional 
investigative personnel needed to meet these new responsibilities 
the Service's investigative forces will be able to accomplish un-- 
paralleled achievements in the effective enforcement of the immigra- 
tion and nationality laws in the next fiscal year. 



CHAPTER 7 




ATURALIZATION 



While the Service has uppermost in its program, enforcement for 
internal security, it has a role in another and different type of 
program, that played in the naturalization process. Possibly aliens 
who become naturalized, by the very requirements for nati ural i zat ion, 
come to have a more specific knowledge ofour Constitution and Govern- 
ment than do many native-born citizens. Certainly, such knowledge is 
one bulwark against communist ideologies. The correlation between 
immigration and naturalization is not too perfect; nevertheless, 
naturalization, with various time lags due to differences in length 
of residence requirements, follows the pattern of immigration. Thus, 
fiat ural i zat i ons in the past three or four years, have been low be- 
cause immigration was very low during the war. This year, however, 
seven years after the end of the war, the naturalization trend line 
takes a sharp upward turn. 

Immigration, particularly of .var brides and displaced personsbe- 
gan immediately after the termination of World War II. These immi- 
grants, excepting those recently admitted in the final stages of the 
Displaced Persons Program, are now rapidly becoming eligible for natu- 
ralization by reason of the lapse of residence period requirements. 
Other factors have, no doubt, accelerated interest in naturalizations: 
(I) the near-war in Korea; (2) the annual Alien Address Report Prog ram, 
which reminds aliens of their alien status, and (5) the requirement 
by the various branches of the Department of Defense that companies 
engaged in defense production hire aliens only if they have declara- 
tions of intention, and the further requirement that in sensitive pro- 
duction, companies hire only citizens of the United States. All of 
these things make United States citizenship attractive. 



The Internal Security Act changed some of the requirements 
with regard to naturalization. Included among the changes were 
the provisions that the petitioner must establish that he was not 



- 60 - 

a member of a totalitarian organization during the ten years prior 
to the date he filed his petition; that no person can be naturalized 
against whom there is outstanding an order of deportation; and that 
each petitioner must be able to read and write, as well as speak the 
English language. Persons with 20 years residence in the United 
States and who are over 50 years of age are exempted from the 
literacy provision in the law. 

Declarations filed . — Generally, the first step toward naturali- 
zation is to file an application for a declaration of intention to 
become a citizen and prove admission for lawful residence. In the 
past fiscal year, applications for declarations numbered 133,341, 
six percent more than the 125,262 filed last year. Certificates of 
arrival were issued by field offices to 131,255 persons. Declara- 
tions filed equaled 111,461, almost 20 thousand over last year's 
figure of 9 1, 497. 

Pet i t ions f i I ed . — There were 94,086 petitions for naturalization 
filed last year. This figure represents a 53 percent rise since 1951, 
and is the highest in any year since 1946. At the end of the fiscal 
year, there were st i 1 I 29,473 petitions pending which required action. 

Pet i t ions granted . — The number of natural i zat ions, which declined 
rapidly since the peak year In 1944, for the first time took an up- 
swing in the past year to 88,655, or 33,939 higher than 54,7 16 natu- 
ralized in the fiscal year 1951. The reasons wh i ch i nf I uenced a change 
in the trend are given in the paragraphs above. 



NATURALIZATION 
VEAflS ENDED SEPT. 27, 1907 - JUNE 30. 1952 



THOUSANDS 

SOO, lint 



DECLARATIONS OF INTENTION FILED 




1907 -10 



1920 



1930 



1940 



1980-52 



- 61 - 



DECLARATIONS OF INTENTION FILED AND PERSONS NATURALIZED 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1946 - 1952 



NUMBER 
200,000 



150,000 



100,000 

















PERSONS 


NATURALIZED 




^ ' 












r=^ 








"~ . 


^-'-' 


\, DEC 


LARATIONS 


OF INTENTION FILED 











1946 



1946 



I9S0 



1 952 



An analysis of the 1952 figures shows that the chief increases 
were inthe number of persons naturalized who were married to citizens, 
which rose from 36,433 in 1951, to 58,027 in 1952. This group, which 
represented two-thirds of all naturalizations, no doubt, included 
many war brides who have come to this country since the War. The 
principal nationalities represented were British, German, Italian and 
Canadian. Naturalizations under general provisions of the laws 
nearly doubled to 26,920. Military naturalizations of 1,585 exceeded 
last year's f igures by 610. 

PERSONS NATURALIZED IN THE UNITED STATES BY STATUTORY PROVISIONS 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1948 - 1952 



60.000 



OTHER 



UNDER GENERAL PROVISIONS 



20,000 




1948 



1949 



19 50 



1951 



1952 



88.655 


54, 


:7i6 


66,346 


66 ; 594 


70 ; 150 


14,993 


10, 


,867 


12,697 


13,284 


1 2 , 36 1 


13,538 


5, 


.439 


6,065 


5,777 


7,486 


10,004 


5, 


,872 


5,882 


5,347 


3 , 860 


9,720 


5, 


,97 5 


8,743 


8,30 1 


9,452 


5,858 


3, 


, 100 


3,793 


4,37 1 


5, !36 


2,851 


1, 


,830 


2, 122 


2,752 


3, !43 


2,496 


1, 


,969 


2,323 


2,227 


1,895 


1,813 


1, 


,595 


3,257 


3,478 


5,768 



- 62 - 

The table which follows shows the principal countries of former 
allegiance of persons naturalized: 

Years ended June 30, 
F ormer national ity 1952 1 951 1950 1949 1948 

Total 

Brit ish. ...... , 

German. 

Canad i an. ....... . 

Ital ian. .................. . 

Pol ish. ................... . 

U.S.S.R. . 

Vlex i can. .................. . 

F i I i pi no. ................. . 

Other...... 27,382 18,069 2 1,464 21,057 21,049 



Pet it ions den ied . — The number of pet i t i ons den i ed has been si i ght- 
\y over 2,000 for the past four years. Three-fourths of the 2, 163 
petitions denied inthe fiscal year 1952 were denied because the peti- 
tioner withdrew or failed to prosecute the petition. 

In fiscal year 1951, 219 pet it i ons were den i ed because of failure 
to establish knowledge and understanding of the fundamentals of the 
history, and the principles and form of Government of the United 
States. In 1952 only 105 were denied for this cause. Six petitions 
were denied because the petitioner was unable to write, read, and 
speak English. There appears to be no s ign i f leant change in the figures 
of denials on this ground since 1949 and 1950, when the requirment 
was only the ability to speak English. 

Ninety petitions were denied last year because of lack of good 
moral character. Denials on this ground, which were re I at i ve ly h i gh 
before and during the war, were 16 percent of the total denials in 
1943, but have since declined to four percent in I952. Seven peti- 
tions were denied because there was an outstanding order of deporta- 
tion. 

N aturalizations revoked . — All except four of the 279 certifi- 
cates of naturalization revoked last year were initiated by the 
Foreign Service of the State Department because naturalized citizens 
became residents of foreign states within five years of naturiliza- 
tion. The number revoked in the past two years, by cause, is shown 
in the table which follows: 



- 65 - 

Certificates of naturalization revoked, by 
grounds for revocation 
Years ended June 50. 1951 and 1952 



Grounds 1952 i95l 

Total , 279 405 

Established permanent residence abroad within five 

years after naturalization 275 534 

Failed to meet residence requirements (false 

a I I egat ions ) - 5 

Bad moral character (frawd i nvo I ved 1 ............. . I 1 

Misrepresentations and concealcnents relating to 

marital and family' status....................... 2 3 

Bad moral character (no fraud involved).. - 2 

Dishonorable discharge foMpwing naturalization 

based' on rnilitar^ service during World V>(ar II... | 2 
Unwilling to b«ar arms (path taken with mental 

reservat i ons )..................... - l 

Naturalization fraudulently or illegally procured. - 2 

Other grounds, - . , ...,..■.,....,..■.....„,■...... . ...■■ . . . . . - 3_ 

J..OSS of nat 1 ona 1 1 t.v . — 1 n add 1 1 i on to i oss of nat i ona 11 ty by revo- 
cat ion of natura I i zat i on, persons may expatriate themse I ves by af f i rma- 
t ive action, such asby naturalization in a foreign state. Following 
the end of World War II, the number of expatriations rose to a high of 
8,575 in 1949. Since then the number has declined steadily, and in the 
fiscal year 1952, 3,265 persons expatriated themselves. Voting in a 
foreign political election orplebiscite has been the chief ground for 
expatriation in the last few years. Most of the certificates of loss 
of nationality are received from American consuls of the Department of 
State. The various ways of losing nationality, wh 1 ch are st i pu I ated in 
Chapter IV of the Nationality Act of 1950 and in previous acts, and the 
numbers of persons are shown in the following table: 

Persons expatriated, by grounds for expatriation 
Years ende:^ June 50. 195 1 and 1952 

Grounds for exoatriation 

Total .......................................... 

Voting in a foreign political election or plebiscite 
Residence of a naturalized national in a foreiqn 

state (Sec, 404, Nationality Act of 1940).,....,,. 

Naturalization in a foreign state. 

Entering or serving in the armed forces of a foreign 

st ate 

Renunciation of nationality abroad..... 

Taking an oath of alle.nance in a foreign state..... 
Accepting or performing duties under a foreign state 
Departing from or remaining away from the U.S. to 

avoid training and service in land or naval forces 

Desertion from the armed forces.. 

Qt.hg r g rounds ■ - . . ...................... 



N umbe r of 


pe rsons 


1952 




951 


5,265 


4 


,44; 


1 1, 186 


1 


,40 1 


676 


1 


,084 


622 




836 


370 




565 


136 




228 


123 




147 


56 




75 


59 




6C 


- 




Z. 


37 




5F 



- 64 - 

C itizenship acquired by resumption or repat r i at i ori . — Statutory 
authority exists for the re-acquisition of citizenship by persons who 
lost United States citizenship under certain conditions. 

The number of former citizens who received certificates of citi- 
zenship under such conditions is shown in the table below. 

Years ended June 50 . 

1952 195 1 1950 

Total number............................. 1,406 I .242 1.219 

Persons who lost citizenship by serving in the 
armed forces of al I ies of the United States, 
and who were repatriated under Sec. 323, 
Nationality Act of 1940..................... 147 256 275 

Native-born women who lost citizenship through 
marriage to aliens and who were repatriated 
under the Act of June 25, 1936, as amended.. 778 839 773 

Native-born women who lost citizenship through 
marriage to aliens and whose marriages termi- 
nated, and who were repatriated under Sec. 
317(b) of the Nationality Act of 1940....... 160 145 170 

Persons repatriated under private laws........ 5 2 I 

Persons who lost citizenship through voting in 
a political election or plebiscite in Italy 
andrepatriatedunderP.L. ll4ofAug. 16,1951 316 

Until passage of the Act of August 7, 1946, (60 Stat. 866), there 
were no special provisions in the nationality laws concerning the re- 
gaining of citizenship by persons who lost their citizenship by voting 
in a foreign political election or plebiscite. The Act provided for 
the expeditious naturalization of persons who lost citizenship by vot- 
ing in a foreign political election after January 12, 1951, in a non- 
enemy country. This law expired on August 6, 1947, and 1,320 persons 
were repatriated under its provisions. On August 16, 1951, Pub I i c 
L aw I 1 4 was enacted, which replied the Act of August 7, 1946, and 
provided for the expeditious naturalization of former citizens of the 
United States who .ost citizenship through voting in a political 
e lect i on o r p I eb i sc i te held in Italy. As of June 30, 1952, 316 persons 
had been repatriated under the provisions of this law. 

D erivative citizenship . — The requirements of the Internal Security 
Act stimulated the interest in proof of derivative citizenship. During 
the fiscal year 1952, there were 23,976 applications by persons who 
claimed that they derived c i t i zensh i p at some prior time through the 
naturalization of parents. There were 18,632 derivative certificates 
comp I eted. 

In addition, certificates of citizenship were issued to 
5,912 persons by reason of their birth abroad to citizen parents. 



- 65 - 

Citizenship Education 




The Internal Security Act of 1950, with certain exceptions 
St rengt hened the requ i rements for naturalization by making the ability 
to read, write, and speak English a prerequisite to naturalization. 
In addition, the candidate for naturalization must not only know and 
unde rstand t he pr i nc I p I es and form of Government of the United States, 
but must also have knowledge of its history. The citizenship educa- 
tion program consists of. cooperating with public schools through 
editing and distributing citizenship textbooks for use in public 
school classes or home study courses, informing the public schools of 
potential candidates for citizenship; and promoting meaningful natu- 
ralization ceremonies. 

The statistics on the citizenship program follow 

Citizenship textbooks for naturalization ap- 
plicants distributed to the public schools 
Years ended June 50. 1946 - 1932 



194-6........ 179,694 1950........ 190,038 

1947.,..;... 190,354 19511/..... 166,833 

1948........ 149,600 1952 2/..... 158,385 

1949........ 145,528 

Names of newiy-arr i ved immigrants 

Transmitted to the public schools by the field offices.... 198,826 
Noncitizens referred by the field offices to public- 
school c I asses. ........................................ . 142,076 

Home Stud.y 

Names of noncitizens supplied by the field offices to 

State universities and State correspondence centers..... 32,546 
Noncitizens informed by the field offices of facilities ., 

for correspondence courses.............................. 39,715 

Publ ic-school classes and enrol Iments 

Public-school (and Home Study Course) classes organized 

during fiscal year 1952 3/............................. 3,001 

Candidates for naturalization enrolled in all classes 

during the last fiscal year 5/ ..■-■-•.■•.■.•■.■■...... . 89,941 

_[/ In add ition 75,689 books were ordered, but were not distributed 

because they were out of stock 
2/ In addition 5 1,249 books were ordered, but were not distributed 

due to supply shortages. 
_J/ This information is taken from reports made by public schools at 
the time textbooks are requisitioned, and may be regarded as 
reasonably complete. 



- 66 - 

N ames of newly-arrived i mm i a rants . -- S i nee March I, i950, all 
work pertaining to the preparation and dissemination of visa-name 
slips has been accomplished by the Field Offices of the Service 
From July I, '951, through June 30, 1952, a total of 186,691 such 
slips were sent to public-school officials. They were used to 
notify alien naturalization applicants of citizenship education 
classes. The value of this program is reflected in the great increase 
in public-school c I ass f ac i ii t i es — from 1,860 m fiscal year !951; to 
3-001 in fiscal year 1952. 



Home-study program . — State colleges anduniversities^particularly 
through their extension services, conduct the Home Study Courses. Text- 
books used in the courses are distributed by the Service under provi- 
sion of the law. This program brings to outlying districts of the 
United States the benefits of organized instruction in this important 
phase of adult education. 

Pub I i c -schoo I certificates of proficiency . -The Servi ce and courts 
cont 1 nued to accept public-school certificates showi ng the sat i sf actory 
completion by candidates for naturalization of courses of study upon 
the basic pr i nc i p I es of the Const i t ut i on and Government and the History 
of theUnited States. The following natural! zat ion courts haveaccepted 
such cert i f I cates as ev idence of the petitioner's educational prepara-- 
tion to meet naturalization requirements: All Federal Courts in the 
States of Connect icut, Massachusetts, and Rhode I si and, and the Di st r i ct 
Courts in Chicago, Illinois, Wayne, Indiana, Baltimore, Mary land, 
Det roi t and Grand Rapids, Michigan, Duluth, Minneapolis, and St. Paul, 
Minnesota, Camden and Trenton, New Jersey, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 
Toledo, Ohio, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Milwaukee, Wisconsin: 
the Supreme Court of New York State at Niagara Falls, N. Y., District 
and Superior Courts at Sacramento, California, all State Courts in 
the States of Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island, one State 
Court in Indiana, 37 State Courts in Michigan, and four State Courts 
in Ohio; and County Courts in the New Jersey Counties of Atlantic, 
3uriington, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester, Ocean and Saiem. 

Spec I a i prog rams . — The fiscal year 1952 marks the tenth year in 
which the Immigration and Naturalization Service has participated 
in several special programs emphasizing the importance of citizenship. 
In 1942 a nation-wide movement was i n i t i ated to make the naturalization 
ceremony a more meaningful and inspirational occasion. To help 

accomplish this purpose the Service issued Gateway to Citizenship , 
a manual prepared in cooperation with the committees on American 
citizenship of the American Bar Association and the Federal Bar 
Association — this cooperation has continued to the present. 

This publication was designed primarily for use by the courts, 
the staff of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, civic and 
educational authorities, veterans' and other interested organizations, 
in their efforts to stress the worth and meaning of citizenship — 
particularly at the time of admission to citizenship through the 
naturalization process. 



- 67 - 

The response to letters cal i ing attention to G ateway to C tizen - 
s h 1 p , sent to al i United States District Court Judges and others, by 
the Honorable Harlan F Stone, then Chief Justice of the United States, 
and the Commissioner of Immigration and Naturalization, showed great 
interest in the subject of citizenship. Many letters received also 
suggested that emphasis on citizenship should not be limited to the 
naturalization ceremony, but extended to a long-range, larger citi- 
zenship program that would precede and f o , i ow citizenship Induction. 

In !946, therefore,, the Attorney Genera: appointed an Advisory 
Committee of distinguished citizens who had made outstand i ng':cont ri- 
butions in various aspects of the citizenship field. The Commissioner 
and the General Counsel of the Immigration and Naturalization Serv'ce, 
and the present Assistant Comm i ss i oner of the C'tizenshJp Services and 
instructions Di v i s i on of the Service, were inciuded on this committee. 

The committee at its first meeting recommended, among otherthings, 
"...,. a continuous effort to stress the ideals of th;s count ry and 
the significance of American citizenship from the time of entry of a 
potential citizen tothe moment when citizenship is granted h m by the 
court and even beyond that." The comm,ttee further recommended "that 
the Department of Justice jointly sponsor the Annuai Nationa Confer- 
ence on Citizenship composed of representatives of pubi c and private 
organizations and agencies interested .n c t zenship. Some signifi- 
cant results are; the publication Gateway to Citizenship , which was 
revised in 1948 to . nc : ude materia that wouid be heipfui in the pre- 
paration of "I Am An American Day", now "Ct, zenship Day", and other 
patriotic programs, Lii<e the first edition the publication was sent 
to all Judges of Natural.zaton Courts and :s sent to ai. i United 
States District Judges immediately after their appointment, and to ail 
State Judges following their election to the bench whohoid naturali- 
zation proceed, ngs. i Twenty--t hree percent of the natura, zat i on hear- 
ings are heid in the State Courts i 

The publication. Road to U S_A. Citizensh p designed as an aid 
toward naturalization, was re-issued in a rev sed edit, on th s fiscal 
year. During the year 24,500 copies of thiS book were fu^n.shed by 
Service Field off.cers to applicants for natura zat onatthe time of 
filing declarations of intention or petitions for natura.izat on. 

The book I et , We I come to USA C.tizensh.p with a d'Stribut on of 
28,500 copies, was desgned as a memento for new citizens on the occa - 
sionoftheirnaturalization. its inspirationaivauehasbeen mater i ai iy 
i nc r eased dun ng the past year by an add.tionai number of judges person- 
all endorsingcopiesatthetimethe books arepresented to new citizens 

Letter of We I come to the newiy arrived immigrant — The Comm i ss i one r 
of Immigration and Natura i i zat i on sends to the newiy arrived immigrant 
h s best wi shes i n a I et-te rof we icome to the Un ted States with whch is 
enc losed the AI i en Reg ist rat i on Rece i pt Card of the a i i en Th i s I etter 
a so contains information concern.ngtheprov/s ons of the i aw re. at ing 



- 68 - 

to address reports and ca I I s attention to the educational requirements 
of the natura I i zat i on lawsandthe availability inthe public schools of 
classes for instruction in English and History and Government. 

C i t i zensh i p Day . — By a Joint Resolution ( Pub I ic Law 26 I , 82nd 
Congress), approved February 29, 1952, t he ce I eb rat i on formerly designated 
"I Am An American Day" was changed to "Citizenship Day", and is to be 
ce lebrated on September 17 of each year, i nstead of ' the former date of 
the third Sunday in May. 

Since ci t i zenshi p and the Constitution are inseparable, it seemed 
appropriate that the Congress should establish "Citizenship Day" in 
commemorat i on of the signing of the Constitution on September 17, 1787. 
Observance of "C it i zenshi p Day", on each September 17, will afford all 
c it i zens of the United States — native-born and naturalized — a golden 
opportunity to rededicate themselves to the ideals of our democracy. 

National Conference on C i t i zensh i p . —Sponsored by the Department 
of J ust ice andt he National Education Association, over 1000 public and 
private organizations have part ic i pated inthe Conference since its in- 
itiation in 194-6 , 

The object i ves of the Conference are: "To re-exami ne the funct i ons 
and duties of American citizenship in today's world. To assist in the 
development of more dynamic procedures for making citizenship more 
effective. To i nd icate the ways and means by wh ich vari ous organ i zat i ons 
may contribute concretely to the development of a more active, alert, 
en I I ghtened,consc i ent i ous, and progressive citizenry in our country " 

The Immigration and Naturalization Service has actively partici- 
pated in all the annual meetings of the conferences, and in the plan- 
ning of its programs. At the recent Seventh Conference held in 
Washington, D.C., September 17, 1952, an outst and i ng and inspirational 
feature of the opening session was a natural i zat i on hearing by the 
United States District Court in which 51 petitioners became citizens. 
The President of the United States, the Attorney General and the Com- 
missioner of Immigration and Naturalization were among those who aid- 
dressed the new citizens. 

The Service again provided an exhibit which not only displayed 
the various parts of the Federal Textbook and graphically outlined 
the work accomplished during the previous year, but centered around a 
moving picture entitled "Twentieth Century Pilgrim", shownon a conti- 
nuous projecting machine installed as a part of the display itself. 

This movie, produced and directed by the Service, outlines the 
naturalization process in the United States, following an "alien" 
from his landing to the oath-taking at a final naturalization hear- 
ing In a Naturalization Court. Copies of the film are available upon 
request for loan to civic, patriotic, and other groups interested in 
furthering the cause of good citizenship. The film is also available 
f o r te 1 ecdst i ng . 




twMuwww;vnv«Mi 



CHAPTER 



8 



Statistics 



NFORMATiON AND 



% 



I 



NSTRUCTIONS 



*^^ -•■-" •" 



MMAMkMMMMaMl 



To keep the employees of the Service and the interested public 
informed of the work of the Service in terms of statistics, policies 
and procedures, is one of the important by-products of the responsi- 
bility for enforcing immigration and nationality laws. 

Stat i st ics 

Pub I i cat i ons . — During the year the analyses of recent natural- 
izations were continued. Articles were published in the M ont h I y 
Rev i ew on the social characteristics of nationals of Mexico and 
Norway. Two reports were prepared relating to the United Nations 
statistical program, one on international definitions to be used 
in reporting migration statistics, and a second in reply to a 
questionnaire relating to the suppression of traffic in persons, 
and of the exploitation of the prostitition of others. A study 
of international overseas travel was republished, in whole or in 
part, by travel magazines and newspapers. 

Statistical Analysis . — As in years past, immigration and 
nationality statistics have been collected, presented, analyzed, 
and interpreted during the fiscal year covering data on migration, 
including agricultural laborers, naturalization, derivative citizen- 
ship, expatriation, repatriation, exclusion of inadmissible aliens, 
the apprehension and deportation of aliens illegally in the United 
States, and data on the adjudicative functions delegated to the 
Service by .law and regulations. Detailed tables on displaced persons 
admitted under the Displaced Persons Act of 1948, have been prepared 
on a monthly basis for the Displaced Persons Commission, and special 
tables have been prepared semi-annually on the displaced persons al- 
ready in this country. Current statistics have been published peri- 
odically in the Month l.y Rev! ew . 



Field Operations Reports . — Operations reports from the field 



- 70 • 

and stat'Stica! analyses have proven of increasing value ,n the 
study and determination of administrative procedures and policies 
of the Se rv i ce . 

Alien Address Report . --The annual Ai en Address Repo t„ e - 
quired by the Internal Secu'-ity Act,, formed the basis for a se ^es 
of tables on the residence and nationality of ai'en residents. 

O ther Reports ■- -Qt he r statistcal work :n the past year in- 
cluded articles for 17 standard reference yearbooks^ material for 
talks by the Commissioner, and analyses of procedural changes. 
From the passenger manifests the Service published, monthly, a 
series of tables on air and sea t rave ' that form the basic data 
for much of the travel analysis made by other agencies 

This Annual Report, insofar as it reflects the statist'CS of 
the Service, and the tables that follow, ■. s part of the stat'st cs 
program of the Service,, 

1 nf o rmat i on 

The Month i y Rev i ew , published under authority of Sec. 327(c), 
Nat'onality Act of 1940, as amended, p esented articles of current 
and lasting interest concerning the Se.-ice program Articles 
interpreting new legislation and its effort on the Service program 
research into the meaning of the statistics of the Service, the 
operation of inspection as carried on at var'ous ports,, and other 
articles of wide variety, most of them written by members of the 
Service staff, have been publ ished in the Mont h 1 y Re v ' ew during 
this and pre^'lous years. 



1943, the Month ly Re view 



During ts lifetime, beginning 
has had six Service Editors. Publicat'on was suspended only once, 
fo" the months of March, April, May and june of 1948 - a pe'ioo 
which saw the removal of the Centi'al Office of the Service from 
PhHadelph'a Pennsylvania, to Washington,, D C„ 

The June 1952 issue of the Rev.ew announced that, in ac- 
cordance with a f u I ing of the Bureau of the Budget, its pub' ica- 
tion ceased with that issue However,, a per;odical. T he I . and N » 
Reporte r „ will be published quarterly after IJune 30, 1952. 

The INS Bu I 1 et I n is a weekly newsletter which keeps the officer 
personnel of the Service informed of events and substantive mate''ai 
that is of immediate interest to them. 



Inquiries keep phones ringing and typew; .te'S clatte, i ng as 
aliens and citizens alike, seek to know How to become a citizen, 
how to file an ' mm g ;-at ion visa to b i i ng an alien parent ' nt o the 
United States, all about Italian (or Mex-can or Canadian) i mm : - 
g'at'on for the past 100 years; the date of naturalization of a 
parent, and vai-'ous other items of 'nte est 



During the f sea' year !952, 57,070 letters of inquiry were 
answered by the Centra^ Office information Section, wh i i e 162,994 
orai 'nqur.es were handled 

in the w der f e!d of pubi'c relations^ great interest has 
been shown n the Ser^.ce, and the mass media of news releases, 
r ad i 0, ■ t e I ev ; 5 : on , motion pictures, and magazine articles were 
used throughout the year to keep the pubiic Informed of the Service 
work and the reasons for the administrative actions taken, 

I nst ruct ions 

Digests and Man ua t s , --The re were ',64' manuscript pages of 
new and revised text prepared for publication in manuals. These 
mainiy were for the Nationality and Immigration Manuals, the 
analytical work-books of some 2,200 printed loose--ieaf pages that 
concisely state the substantive and p.rocedurai law from all sources 
on those subjects ^ddi t , onfei i . y ^ in t h£ interest of accurate 

public information, private publishers were assisted in bringing 
to date theiegai information for a number of yearbook articles on 
nationality and immigration 

in connection with the manuals and the digest functions, 
18,578 administrative and judicial decisions or opinions were ex- 
amined From these ',445 digests were prepared, indexed, and 
entered into the ndex Digest, an exhaustive coi lection of prece- 
dents that envisages the assembly behind specific fundamental 
titles of the substantive and procedural law from ail sources. 

Other re ated duties included providing the Secretary of 
Defense, both ,n techn'cai and nontechnical form, with statements 
of the current , aws and regulations as to naturalization benefits 
based on se-. ce in the armed forces of the United States, and the 
da iy digesting for the Service of the Congressional Record, prep- 
aration of correspondence and answers to technical inquiries, and 
,964 persona consultations with representatives of this Service 
and other agenc es on subjects covered by t|ie Manuals and index 
Di gest 

Regulat ions a nd I nst ruc t I ons , --Nume rous regulations imple- 
menting existing as we i i as newiy enacted legislation for inclu- 
sion in Ttie 8 of the Code of Federal Regulations were drafted. 
Because of the additiona; functions that were decentralized to 
the field offces, there were also prepared new and amended 
operations instruct. ons for the internal guidance of Service pe r- 
sonne , to better effect the uniform and efficient administration 
of the imm-g.'-ation and nationality laws. 




CHAPTER 



OMINISTRATION 



A reorganization of the Central Office was formally approved 
during the latter part of the fiscal year. Similar action will 
be taken with respect to the Field Service during the ensuing 
fiscal year. The new organization has been planned to give greater 
efficiency in operation based on experience since the passage of 
the Internal Security Act of 1950, and in anticipation of changes 
to arise from the newly enacted Immigration and Nationality Act 
which becomes effective in Decembe'r 1952. 

Personne I 

One major phase of the reorganization was the separation of 
the Personnel Office from the Administrative Division and its 
transfer to the Office of the Deputy Commissioner. 

With the termination of the Displaced Persons Program, 
practically all of the employees assigned to Germany to assist 
the Displaced Persons Commission had been recalled to the United 
States by the last of the year. During the year the Service 

arranged to take jurisdcition over enforcement of the immigration 
and nationality laws on the Island of Guam and a small office was 
opened in Mexico City, Mexico. 

On June 30, 1952, the Immigration and Natu ra I i zat ton Service 
consisted of 7,324 employees. There were 877 in the Central Office 
and 6,447 in the field. The latter group includes y\5 employees 
stationed in Alaska, Guam, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin 
Islands of the United States and 75 located in Canada, Cuba, and 
Mex i CO. 



Placement and Training . — Approximately 10,800 personnel actions 
of al I types were processed duri ng theyear; 7,700 concerned the Field 



- 73 - 

Service and 3.100 the Centra! Office,, 

I n tfie Cent ra I Of f i ce approx i mate iy 6 , 200 i nt e rv i ews we re conducted 
and 4,7000 I etters and memoranda were prepared inconnection with place- 
ment act i V i t I es . 

The Board of U. S Civil Service Examiners for the i mm i g rat i on and 
Naturalization Service r6ce i ved and processed applications for exam! 
nations for the positions of Patrol Inspector (Trainee) and immigrant 
Inspector as follows: 

Applications Rece i ved ,,„„,.,., .o. . 7,228 
Applications on hand at end of 

preced i ng f i sea 1 year,. ,,„„_.„.,. 1 , 137 

Applications rated.. .....o... 7,393 

P I acements. ,...,,,,„......„..,.. . . 348 

The two correspondence training programs were continued during 
the year. Twenty-seven lessons were in circulation in the general 
program on immigration and nationality ,aw Aii of these lessons 
must be withdrawn and replaced during the forthcoming fiscai year to 
conform with the changes arising from Pub i i c Law 4 14 and the reguia 
tions to be issued thereunder.. En ro i i ees- in this program completed 
I ,688 I essons = In addition, 6,053 lessons were completed by enroiiees 
in the course of study for probationary patrol inspectors consisting 
of I I law lessons and 15 Spanish lessons and a diagnostic test i n each. 

Twenty-nine new tests in law and Spanish were devised during the 
year for use in examining probationary patrol inspectors. A total of 
1,047 tests were furnished to field offices. Two tests were devised 
in connection with the establishment of promotion registers for the 
position of Senior Patrol Inspector. Three hundred and eleven of 
these tests were furnished to f ieid offices. 

Three resident school sessions were conducted for a total of 
103 investigators and hearing officers who received instruction in 
the laws, procedures and methods. 

Special training programs were conducted for nine representa- 
tives of foreign governments during the year. 

ClassificationandEmpioyee Services .- During the year Classi- 
fication surveys were conducted which resulted in the establishment 
of the new field positions of Adjudicator and Examining Officer and 
the reallocations of those Investigators engaged in the more diffi- 
cult phases of investigative work and a number of positions of Chief, 
Investigations Section in the various districts. A comprehensive 
study was made of the duties and res ppn s : b i I i t i es of Detention 
Officers and action was initiettec) toward the close of the year toward 
the allocation of these positions. Cooperation was given to repre- 
sentatives of the Civil Service Comm,ission in an extensive study of 



- 74- 

Immigranit I nfepectof' posit ions throughout the Service. It is expected 
that classification standards covering these positions will be pub- 
I ished in the near future. 

Thirty-five hundred positions were reviewed during the year„ 
Approximately 900 position descriptions were written or reviewed 
and allocated; of these, 215 involved Central Office pos i t i ons, I 45 of 
which arose from the reorganization program. 

Over 17,000 treatments were given by the Health Unit during 
the fiscal year. Approximately 6,000 sick leave applications were 
processed by the nurses. Seven hundred and thirty-four character 
and loyalty investigation reports were processed; 39 d i sc I p I inary 
cases were adjudicated and appropriate action taken; fifty-one ap- 
plications were processed for retirement under Public Law 879 > and 
over 1,600 employee service interviews were conducted. 



Participation by employees in Group Hospitalization and 
Credit Union continued to be active during the year. 



Fede ra 



F i nance 

Gene ra I . — During the fiscal year 1952, the Finance Branch of 
the Administrative Division accomplished two rnajor objectives in 
fulfilling its responsibility under the Accounting and Procedures 
Act of 1950 to establish and maintain an adequate and complete 
accounting system. 

The first step was the installation in September 195', of an 
accounting system for reporting expenditures by activity. These 
activities are nine in number, namely. Inspection, Detention and 
Deportation, Naturalization, Border Patrol, Investigations, Alien 
Registration, Field Administrative Services, Executive Direction, 
and Central Administrative Services. This reporting process will 
give more appropriate support for the performance budget. 

The second step was the preparation and distribution of an 
accounting manual prescribing a decentralized accounting system 
for the Service, effective July I, 1952. The system is based on 
branch-office accounting methods, whereby each District Director 
s allotted funds on a quarterly and annual basis to operate his 
District. Under this system each district office will maintain 
its own accounting records and the Central Office will be advised 
as to the budgetary status of funds on a monthly report basis. Con- 
trol accounts over the districts will be maintained in the Finance 
Branch in the Central Office. 



The accompi ishment of these two major objectives stems from the 
programs prescribed by the Congress through the Accounting Systems 
Division of the General Accounting Office, The Service has been 
commended by that Office for its steps forward in the accounting 
field. Future objectives are the insta! I at i on of cost accounting 



/5 - 

methods wherever appropriate and the Gommencemerit of an on-the-site 
audit of our account i ng records by t he Genera :■ Account i ng Office. 

Ex tra Compensatio n under the Act of March 2, 193' There were 
five accountings totaling $ i , 6 i2„ 7 ! ' cert i f i ed to the Ciaims Division, 
General Accounting Office, for c i aims received n the Centra: Office 
These claim's were based on the decision rendered May 6, '946. by 
the U. S Court of C a i ms in the R e n n e r - K rupp cases. The Court 
held that emp I oyees of thi s Service are entitled to extra compensation 
under t he prov i s i ons of the Act of March 2 ;93i, fo'' overtime services 
performed on Sundays and holidays in connection with the- exam i nat i on 
and i and i ng, of passengers and crews arriving in the United States from 
a foreign port by water, land or a r 

The G'enerai Accounting Office has advised this Service that 
settlements are being 'saued in the cases of t^s thre.e c I a'mants who 
were seeking extri compensation fpr overt iirie services performed as 
immig-rant inspectors on week-days and. -for W^^l^^h extra compensation 
had not ai ready been pa.fd These settlements issued on these cases 
covered extra compensation for overtime ser. ces renaered between 
5;00 p.m and 8:00- a.m., outside of the regu;ar tour of duty pur- 
suant to the provisions of the Act of March 2. 93 ' , i 46 Stat. 1467;, 

There were approximately 4Q. ciaims received for extra compensa- 
tion under the provisions of the Act of March 2, !93:, fo^ duties 
performed as members of the Border Patrol of th's Service, These 
cia.ms were denied for payment and returned to the Genera: Accounting 
Off'ce as a ^esuit of the dec:sion i-endered by the U S, Court of 
C'ams on January 6. 195 1; in the cases of H a'-.y B. Greene No 474 8; 
and Glen I. Toney, No. 475M, in which the Court heid that the 
piatnt:ffs, Greene and Toney , were not ent t ed to recover under the 
provisions of the Act of March 2, i 93 ' 146 Stat. i467-'468) for 
duties performed by them while acting as members of the Border Patroi, 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 

There is still pending befO'^e the U S Court of C a ms. Peti- 
tion No. 49879 filed October 23, !950, by four emp oyees of this 
Service seeking to enforce their demands that immigrant inspectors 
performing duties in a supervisory capac:ty are entitled to extra 
compensation under the provisions of the Act of March 2, '93i. for 
overtime services performed on Sundays and hondays 

There have been approximately 877 emp, oyees and former employees 
of this Service who have fi led suits n the U. S. Court of Claims 
seeking to collect extra compensation under the provisions of the 
Act of March 2, 193!, for-overtime services performed during fiscal 
year i948 These suits are based on the dec s ion rendered June 6, 
' 94 . by the U. S, Court of Claims in the cases of T homas G Gibney , 
No 4857 2, Joseph M. Ahear n, -No. 4Q6I0, and Don a id M. T ay or. 
No 486 M. The resuiti ng. certificationsfor s m .ar suits f.ied in 
the Court of Claims tota! $586,467,07 w.th Court of C'a:ms judgments 



- 76 - 

in the amount of $532,683.8 1 having been rendered in favor of 764 
of the approximately 877 claimants who have filed suits in the Court 
of C I aims. 

A total of approximately 500 individual claims were processed 
during fiscal year 1952. Certifications in the total amount of 
$80,539: 15 were prepared for approximately 65 of these claims. The 
remaining claims were returned to the General Accounting Office with- 
out certifications, either as a result of a Court of Claims decision 
or because Service records d i d not reflect overtime services performed 
for which extra compensation was due under the provisions of the Act 
of March 2, 1931. 

The table below gives a compar i son of account i ngs certified under 
the May 6, 1946 precedent, both to the Court of Claims and the General 
Account i ng Off ice. 



77 



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- 78 - 

Financial Statement 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 
Fiscal Year 1952 

Appropriation for the conduct of the Immigration and 

Naturalization Service and the administration of the 

Immigration and Naturalization Laws 



Appropr i at i on : 



Salaries and Expenses. 
Reimbursements. ....... 



Total 



$4 1,400,000.00 

1.475.552. 51 

$42,875,552.51 



Less: 

Reserve. 



.............. 200 .000 .00 

Total......... $42,675,552.51 



Balanced against obligations 
are collections as follows: 

income and Source 
( Co 1 1 ect i ons ) 



Copying Fees.... 

Clerks of Court Fees............ 

Fees and Permits 

Head Tax 

Sale of Government Property..... 

Miscellaneous Col I ections. ...... 

Forfeitures and Bonds Forfeited. 
Administrative Fines 

Total .. . 



; 22,504. 16 

87 5,725.00 

495,752.8 I 

2,590,672.88 

2,959.77 

46,665.58 

621,575.47 

192.049.55 



4.845.861.02 
$57,829,49 1 29 



Transfers From Other Agencies 



Obligations against funds transferred 
from: Displaced Persons Commission $ 



5 1 1,000.00 



Less: 

Unobligated balance. 



10. 158.68 



500.86 I ,52 



Net cost of operations. 



$58.550.552.6 



- 79 

' B udget 

A tola, appropriation of $41,400,000 was made to the Service 
for the fiscal year 1952, an increase of $7,000,000 over the amount 
available for the preceding year. The 1952 annual appropriation 
in the amount of $36,400,000 was included in the Department of State, 
Justice, Commerce, and the Judiciary Appropriation Act, !952 i Pub i i c 
Law 188 , 82nd Congress, approved October 22, 1951). A supp.eraental 
amount of $1,00,0,000 for inspection and processing of alien agri- 
cultural laborers and to remove illegal aliens to Mexico was included 
in the Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1952 T P ublic Law 255 , 82nd 
Congress, approved November i, 1951 ). A supplemental amount of 
$1,390,000 to provide for establishing detention camps, strengthening 
the Border Patrol, and air remova I of iliegai aliens was included in 
the Third Supplemental Appropriation Act, i952 ( Public Law 3 75, 
82nd Congress, approved June 5, '952' Also included In the Third 
Supplemental Appropriation /^ct was the sum of $2,610,000 to cover 
increased pay costs authorized tjy Pu blic Law ,20 I , 82nd Congress, 
approved October 24, 195', increasing^ rates of compensation for 
employees of the Federal Government, effective Juiy 8, '95' 

Pursuant to Pub I i c Law 233 , 82nd Congress, approved October 20, 
' 95 ,, annual leave was reauced from 26 days to 3 days for employees 
with I - than tfireeyears serviCR, and from 26 days to 20 days for employees 
With three, but less than 15 years of service. Theoretically, con- 
sidering the distribution of immigration and Naturalization Service 
employees according to length of service, the change in the annual 
i eave law shouid result in an increase of approximately 1,8 percent 
in the amount of productive time. On this basis the Bureau of the 
Budget required that the Service cut back its average employment 
to a level equivalent to an annual saving of 141 positions. 

Budgetary adjustments to meet special operational needs were 
somewhat hampered during the fiscal year by reason of a statutory 
I imitation upon the amount avai lable for personal services. Such a 
I imitation was tantamount to operating two distinct appropriations, 
requiring special accounting and controis and at the same time re 
stricting flexibility of administration. This defeated, in part, 
the improvement which accrued a few years ago when Congress saw fit 
to combine several appropriations into a single lump sum appropria- 
tion for all expenses of the Service, 

By provision in Title V of the Independent Offices Appropria- 
tibn Act, 1952 ( Pub I i c L aw ! 57 , 82nd Congress, approved August 31, 
i 95 I ) , the Congress authorized the head of each Federal Agency to 
prescribe regulations covering fees, charges or prices for services, 
permits, etc., where such are not covered by existing statutes. 
Various Cong.ress i ona I Committee reports have stressed the importance 
of putting direct Government Services as nearly as possible on a fee 
basis adequate to cover the costs. Recommendations concerning the 
fixing of fees and charges were obtained from each District Director 
and Assistant Commissioner. Consideration of these recommendations 



- 80 - 

and the drafting of appropriate regulations were in progress at the 
close of the fiscal year. 

The six months extension granted on June 28, 1951, upon certain 
provisions of the Displaced Persons Act of 1948, as amended, required 
revision of program and budget schedules to permit operation in anti- 
cipation of appropriation of supplemental funds consistent with the 
law's extension. Uncertainty as to availability of funds on this 
project continued throughout the year, requiring frequent reassess- 
ments of needs and justification therefor to the Displaced Persons 
Commission, the Bureau of the Budget and Congress. 

Space. Services and Supplies 

Space . — The need of suitable housing for our offices continues 
to be one of our most urgent requirements. In districts which have 
many small ports, adequate offices for border inspections and suit- 
able living quarters for i nspectors at i so I ated locations are urgently 
needed. Over 100 building projects to relieve space problems have 
been recommended to the General Services Administration, but such 
construction is dependent upon authorization by Congress. During 
the past year, the General Services Administration took over many 
leases covering space occupied by this Service. 

A new suboffice was established at Billings, Montana, 

After several years of negotiations, a privately-owned build- 
ing is being erected at Pigeon River, Minnesota, to house the i n- 
spectional activities of this Service and the Customs Service. The 
building is being occupied under a leasing arrangement. New quarters 
were constructed for the use of the Border Patrol at Baltimore, 
Maryland, which are leased to this Service. 

Plans and specifications were prepared and a contract awarded 
for the erection of a 200-man detention f ac i I I ty at Chu I a Vista, 
Ca i i f orn i a. 

Office space in the Central Office was reassigned as a result 
of the reorganization program. 

S e rv i c es . --Du ring the past year, an additional muitilith 
machine was purchased for use in the Duplicating Unit. During the 
year a total of 15,883,815 sheets were duplicated. 

Plate making equipment was purchased for the Photo Laboratory, 
This consists of a muitilith camera, arc lamps, vacuum frame and 
wh i r I e r. 

The program to convert many of the AM radio stations to FM was 
continued. Fourteen FM repeater stations have been installed or are 
in the process of being installed on mountain-top or high tower lo- 
cations. Fifteen fixed stations, a few of which are in the installa- 
tion stage, are being provided. 



- 81 - 

On June 25. !952; a contract was awarded for the elimination of 
fire hazards on Eiiis island. 

Initial steps were taken to convert the electric power on El Ms 
Island from dc to ac current and to purchase the required electric 
power instead of generating it This is a continuing program. 

A Civil Defense program was inaugurated n the Central Office. 
Approximately 85 employees were trained as wardens and first-aid 
workers. 

Equi pm ent and Stipplies . — Du.ring; the fiscal year '952 the 
activities of the Tabulating Unit reached a new peak. Approximately 
' 3. 000,000 punched cards were processed that reiated to the compil- 
ing of statistics on £^i i types of aliens, the Files Decentralization 
Program, and the Accounting and Activity Pay Ro I i Additional types 
of information emanating from punched cards during '952 were Look- 
out Notices and Alien Travel Control, which resulted in a sharp 
rise in tabulating work. 

The Internal Security Act of I950 aiso p.aced upon the Tabu- 
lating Unit the responsibility of com pi ling several types of reports 
for the Immigration and Naturalization Service and other govern- 
mental intelligence agencies This information was. and is^obtained 
from approximately 2, 300,, 000 'c ards. 

During the past fiscal year purchase orders were issued for two 
hundred and eleven passenger carrying vehic.es. These included 
passenger cars, busses, and station wagons Of this number^ 1 50 
represented replacements. Aiso during the year.se.enty-five. trucks 
were purchased of which 28 were replacements 

A 40-foot boat was purchased during the year. This wi i i be 
used for pat ro i work off the Florida coast. 

Management Improvement Program 

Forms Cont roj . --The Forms Control Program which is now in its 
second year of operation represents an effective management tool to 
eliminate duplication of effort and to keep man power requirements 
to a minimum where necessary records must be created and processed. 
The Forms Control Program provides for improvement in forms design, 
consolidation or elimination of overlapping forms, standardization 
of format and wording, and clearance with the Bureau of the Budget 
when requ i red . 

During the latter part of fiscal year '952, the Forms Program 
was extended to include forms used primarily at district level. An 
analysis is presently underway to standardize district forms and to 
eliminate unnecessary forms ' All districts ha>/e forwarded copies of 
forms designed and, rep,roduce,d. locally for analysis. 



- 82 - 

Seven hundred and sixty eight forms were reviewed during the 
fiscal year. Of these, 100 were new forms, !7! were forms requiring 
revision, and 448 were approved for reprint without change, 49 forms 
were eliminated. Seventy-one of the forms approved required Bureau 
of the Budget approval. 

Administrative Manual and Other Administrative Releases . — Dur i ng 
the year there were released 13 Administ rat ive Manuai Transmittal Memo% 
encompassing 1 49 new and revised pages of instruction and 42 exhibits 
Four revision sheets requiring pen and ink insertions and changes 
were also released. Among the releases were new i nstruct i ons for exe- 
cuting contracts, revised filing procedures, institution of a compre- 
hensive motor vehicle expense and mai ntenance program, the institution 
of various statistical reports, instructions fortheuse of Government 
property and records, and disposal schedules for certain files and 
other miscel ianeous instructions. Several new series of code words 
and a number of revisions vyere devised and released as a part of the 
Telegraphic Code. Work was continued in bringing up to date the 
numbered releases known asthe Centra: Office Memo Series which neces- 
sitated the rev i s i on and elimination of much of the obsolete material. 

R eview of Service Reports . — At the suggestion of the District 
Directors Conference, a committee was established to analyze and re- 
view the operating reports presently being received by the Service. 
The committee found a lack of a central i zed control in the Central 
Office for the reports requested from the districts. This led to 
duplication of items in reports received by different operating 
divisions in the Central Office and in the fai lure on the part of 
the operating divisions to use data already aval i ab I e in the Central 
Office. It was found too, that there was a tendency to continue 
indefinitely a report which was requested for a particular purpose 
and for which purpose the report was no longer required. As a re- 
sult of the survey 37 of the 94 reports being received in the Central 
Office were discontinued, 19 reports were revised and 38 reports 
were continued in their present status. The committee also recom- 
mended the establishment of a permanent Central Office control of 
reports. The control requires the designation of a Reports Control 
Officer by whom al I new reports must be approved and the estabi ish- 
ment of a permanent committee to give periodical review to al i Out- 
Stand i ng reports. 

Work Measu rement . --The work measurement reporting system, which 
has been in effect since 1947, required complete revision. After re- 
view by Central Office representatives and the field offices, a draft 
was drawn upwhich served as a working basis for the reports committee 
work. The committee established the principle that the work measure- 
ment system was the basic operating work report for the Service Ai I 
other reports were to supplement this report on a more or less tempo- 
rary basis. 

S urvey of Lookout System . --A survey of the lOokout system of 
3" x 5" cards listing the name and identifying information for those 



- 83 - 

aliens whose admission or departure the Service desired to prevent 
because of criminal, narcotic, subversive, etc. charges, revealed 
the fact that thesystem was cumbersome and inefficient. 

The objective of the survey was to develop a better lookout 
system which would provide each Immigrant Inspector with a complete, 
portable, andreadily accessible iist of aliens on whom the Service 
had issued lookouts 

The system devised places ah information concerning "lookouts" 
into a portable loose-ieaf book, which 1 s kept cu r rent through the 
use of tabulating and photographic equipment. 

The advantages are; (!) An Immigrant Inspector can carry with 
him a iist of ail names of aliens on whom the Service has "lookouts" 
in loose- leaf form This will enabie the inspector to make a quicker 
and more certain identification of inadmissible aliens. (2> 't makes 
it poss i b i e for the inspector to render quicker service to the public. 
', 3 ) The mechanical means of reproducing the lookout notices is econo- 
mical in terms of time and personnel 

M otor Vehicle Prog ram .---Pr i or to this fiscai year, the Service 
did not have a formal automotive maintenance program. procedures 
have now been developed to furnish complete accounting data relating 
to the automobiles in the Service fieet. These procedures together 
With others which had been developed as a part of the Motor Vehic'e 
Management Program will insure that proper preventive maintenance 
measures are being observed; that operating supplies such as gaso-- 
■ ine and oi i are being procured at lowest cost, that ordinary main- 
tenance and repairs are effected with a maximum of efficiency and 
.economy; and that manpower engaged i n t he automot i ve program is produc- 
ing fully with respect to both quality and quantty Deta'-ied in- 
structions and relating forms have been reproduced, distributed 
and will become effective with the month of Juiy. 

Warrant Docket Control -—During the latter part of the fiscai 
year '952, a procedure for. a uniform controi of Warrant of Arrest 
cases was prepared. The procedure provides that complete informa 
t i on will be available on aii warrant cases from the time the Warrant 
of Arrest is issued unt i i such time as the case is concluded. The 
i6 district offices of the Service wi.i maintain a district control 
over the progress of each individual case in their district while 
the Central Office wili be provided with a quantitative control over 
aii Warrant of Arrest cases in process. Control is ma'ntained through 
the use of a Service-wide standard muiti-copy form. The original copy 
becomes the Master District Control Record and the first carbon copy 
is senttothe Central Office asthe i n it i al report . The original copy 
is maintained at district levei in the visible index system (alpha- 
bet i ca I i . 

The remai n I ng, cop I es are usecj for reporting subsequent actions. 
When deportat ion .or other final action has occurred, the original 



- 84 - 

Master District Control Record is forwarded to the Central Office. 
Where the final action results in the expulsion of the alien, the 
original copy of Control Form is cut to 3" x 5" card size in the 
Central Office and sent to the State Department as their record of 
the case. 

The proposed system which will be installed during the first 
part of fiscal year 1953, will provide 100 percent coverage control 
of warrant cases. In the past, such control has never been extended 
to all cases and has been maintained on individual district basis. 
The procedure also wi I I el iminate the use of certain reports now re- 
quired to be forwarded to the Central Office on selective types of 
c ases. 

M i c rof i I m Prog ram . — a. Naturalization Certificate Files. — The 
microfilming of the Naturalization Certificate Files was initiated 
at the beginning of the fiscal year. Approximately 20,000,000 ex- 
posures were completed during the year with the result that approxi- 
mately 5,20-0,000 of the 6,500,000 naturalization files scheduled for 
microfilming were photographed. 

Themicrofilming of the Naturalization Certificate Files is con- 
sidered as a major step in combating the increasing volume of Service 
f i 1 es which present housing and maintenance problems. Also the ' f i I m- 
I ng of these records provides security thereby el iminating the pos- 
sibility that the records might be destroyed by fire or other catas- 
trophe. The remaining Naturalization Certificate Files will be 
microfilmed during the first half of fiscal year 1953 When completed 
all naturalization documents, with the exception of the normal ac- 
cumulation required for operating purposes, will be on film. This 
program integrates the microti Im operation into the regular f i les 
program of the Service. When completed, approximately 12,000 square 
feetoffloor space will bereleased for more urgent needs. The mic ro- 
film file requires only several hundred square feetoffloor space for 
i ts operat i on. 

b. Service-wide Microfilm Program.. — The Service completed a 
survey of records adaptable to microfilm and has made recommendations 
concerning the installation and operation of such a program. This 
program, which is Servi ce-wi de, will involve the mic ro filming of ap- 
proximately 6,000,000 manifest records at the various ports, 4,000,000 
non- i mmi g rant visas housed in the Central Office, and 11,000,000 i and 
border port manifests. In addition, the Service is proposihg the 
microfilming for security purposes, the Alien Index, the Naturaliza- 
tion Index and the Visa Index in the Central Office. 



The program, which has now been forwarded to National Archives 
for review, will bring current the microfilming of manifest records 
at the ports. The microti Iming of manifests was initiated in 1944 

and to date work on this phase of microti Iming has gone fo rwa rd i n 
five of the Service's !6 districts. When completed ai ; passenger 
manifests up to 1948 wi 1 1 be on microti Im, wh i le ai • crew manifests 



- 8.5 - 

up to the present date will be photographed For the period f o i I ow- 
ing !948, it has been decided that the passenger manifests are a 
records disposal program problem rather than one for microfilming 

Alien Address Report Program , — The Internal Security Act of 
1950 requi res that each ai ien resident in the United States on 
January ' of each year report his address within days of that 
date to the Commissioner of the Immigration and Nat u ral i zat i on Service. 
When the reporting system was initiated in 1951, the punched card 
equipment was selected as the means of processing and tabulating the 
reports. From experience gained during the initial report in January 
195!^ modifications were made in the system to the extent that tabu- 
lating procedures were shortened and at the same time a more positive 
control oyer the individual reports was established. In addition^ a 
major operation carried forward in i95' was eliminated - that of fil- 
ing the actual reports In the individual aliens' files. Under the 
'952 program the reports are to be placed in numerical sequence and 
microfi imed„ This change in procedure el iminates a .arge scale f i i - 
1 ng operation and at the same time creates a sing e central r zed re- 
cord for reports submitted in any single report'ng year 

By the end of June 1952, approximately 2, '25,000 reports had 
been received for the reporting year 1952. Punched cards had been 
prepared from which lists containing the names and addresses of 
aliens by a specified nationality or geographic ocation could be 
prepared at immediate notice. This "security deck" is available to 
furnish such information to other Government agencies shou.d the 
need arise. 

Decent ra I i zat i on . — The procedure for decentralization of f : i es 
is under constant rev iew and ref 1 nement . During the year an addition- 
al means of act Ivating fiiesfor decentraiizationwas added to current 
procedure. The address reports submitted by aliens during January 
of each year wiM be used to supplement the normal decentralization 
requests received from the districts The address reports which con- 
tain the current addfess of the aiien are used on a se ect , , e bas s 
to build up the decentralization rates for the districts, Du'ing 
the last quarter of fiscal year 1952. approximately i05,000 f'es 
were decentralized through the use of the address reports 

Work S implification . — Work on analysis charts covering selective 
field operations was continued dur.ng the-year. Also, sim; lar charts 
were prepared for Central Office operations. These charts have been 
used by Central Office officials and district officials as guides 
in establishing uniform and standardized procedures. The charts 
have proved particularly helpful in simplifying and unifying files 
operations andwarrant processing, it is the objective of the Service 
to have such charts established for all major operations and avaii- 
ab 1 e for imnied'ate use by all authorized personnel. 

S ervice Suggestion System . — The Service Suggestion System which 



- 86 - 

was revitalized in fiscal year 195 1 continued at a rapid pace. Sug- 
gestions from the field are first reviewed by the District Suggestion 
Committee for approval or disapproval. The suggestions are then for- 
warded to the Central Office for action by a committee composed of 
top level officials. Those suggestions involving monetary awards 
are further cleared through the Departmental Committee. At the be- 
ginning of the year 104 suggestions were on hand for action before 
the Central Office Committee. An additional 90 were received during 
the fiscal year. The committee acted on a total of 153 suggestions 
during the year. Of this number, jgwere adopted; four of the 16 were 
recommended for cash awards. During the latter part of fiscal year 
1952 a publicity campaign was initiated for the Service Suggestion 
Program. Posters for bulletin boards, we re made available to aii 
offices of the Service. 

Records Administration 

The most important accomplishment during the year affecting 
records administration was the adoption of a new procedure for Service 
files, providing that all Service files for aiiens opened in the 
future wi I I bear either an "A", "V" or "T" number, depending on the 
status of the subject. The system is designed to meet the require- 
ments of the new Immigration and Nationality Act concerning a centra: 
index of al I al i ens admitted to or excluded from the country. It 
also provides for the d i spos i t i on of the various types of files to 
be created, and constitutes in substance the records control schedule 
required by GSA Regulations 3-IV-I0I.03. 

The Service during the year had additional disposal lists and 
schedules approved by Congress, and made excel lent progress in the 
disposition of inactive records. Several districts were able to dis- 
pose of all records for which disposal authority had been obtained, 
and in each case reported increased efficiency in operations. Practi- 
cally all districts made substantial progress in their records re- 
tirement programs, and 15,947 cubic feet of record and non-record 
material were disposed of in the field during the fiscal year. The 
Central Office disposed of 1,971 cubic feet. Before the close of the 
year, certificate files through number 5,259,999 had been micro- 
filmed, but the paper had not been destroyed. Four freight cars 
have been loaded and shipped since that time. 

The decentralization of "A" files has progressed satisfactorily, 
and during the last three months of the yea^r funds were available to 
double the rate of decentralization, using address report cards as 
activators in addition to new visas, requests from the field and 
change of address reports. During the year 587,330 flies were de- 
centralized, making a total since March I, 1950 of 1,303,412. The 
activating media for decentralization are distributed as follows: 

New V i sas. ........... 5 18, 80 I 

Request^ .ffqm field.. 623,696 

Change of address..., 56,039 

Address reports. .... . 104,876 



APPENDIX I 

JUDICIAL OPINIONS IN LITIGATION AFFECTING THE SERVICE ANNOUNCED 
DURIMG THE FISCAL YEAR. (ONLY OPINIONS PRINTED IN THE PUBLISHED 
REPORTS ARE LISTED. THERE ARE ALSO NUMEROUS UNREPORTED DECISIONS). 

UNITED STATES COURTS OF APPEALS 

United States v. Sine! ro . 190 F. 2cl (C. A. 3); United States v. Yin Liu . 

190 F. 2d 400 (C. A. 2);- Kawakita v. United States . 1 90 F. 2d 506 ( C. A. 9); 
U.S. ex rel. Rubio v. Jordan . 190 F. 2d 575 (C.A. 7 ): Stevens v. United 
States , 190 F. 2d 880 ( CA .7); Acheson v. Kuni.yuki . I90f. 2d 897 (C.A. 9); 
Paiz-Nunez V. united States , 191 F. 2d 146 (C.A. 9); Zimmer v. Acheson . 

191 F. 2d 209 (C.A. 10); U. S. ex rel. Adamant ides v. Neel »y . 191 F. 2d 
997 (C. A. 7 ); D' Aquino v. United States . 192 F. 2d33e (C.A. 9); Sepul vida 
V. Squier . I92F. 2d 796 (C.A. 9): U.S. ex re I . Kwono Hai Chew v. Col d i nq . 

192 F. 2d 1009 (C.A. 2); Uhited Sfates v. Jen Foon . 193 F. 2d I 17 ( C. A. 8); 
United States v. Sine! ro . 193 F.2d 136 (C.A. 3); Machado v. McGrath . 

193 F. 2d 706 (C.A. D.C.); Mandol i v. Acheson. I93F. 2d 920 (C.A. D.C. ); 
United States v. Kwan Shun Yue . 194 F. 2d 225 (C.A. 9); Krausse v. 
United States . I94F. 2d 440 (C.A. 2); U.S. ex rel .Young v. Shauqhness.y. 

194 F. 2d 4 74 (C.A. 2); Reved i n v. Acheson. 194 F. 2d 482 (C. A. 2); U. S . 
ex rel . Kustas v. Wi II iams . 194 F. 2d 642 (C.A. 2); Sohaiby v. Savorett i , 

195 F. 2d 139 (C.A. 5); Seqret i v. Acheson . 195F. 2d 205 (C.A. D.C. ) 
United States Lines Co . v. Shauqhnessy . 195 F. 2d 385 I C. A. 2); Andqo^ - 
I apos V. Johnson . 195 F. 2d 444 (C.A. 4); Kokoris v. Johnson . 195 F. 
2d 518 (C.A. 4); Acheson v. Albert . 195 F. 2d 573 (C.A. D.C); 
goq i at i z i s v. Ha! I . 195 F. 2d 66 1 (C.A. 4); United States v. Lutwack . 

195 F. 2d 748 (C.A. 7); U.S. ex rel. Meze i v. Shauqhnessv . 195 F. 2d 
964 (C.A. 2); Sardo v. McGrath . I96F. 2d20 (C.A. D.C); Wong Wing Foo 
V. McGrath. 196 F. 2d 120 (C.A. 9); Mi randa v. United States . 196 F. 
2d 408 (C.A. 9); Bisceg I ia v. . Acheson . 196 F, 2d 865 (C.A. D.C); 
Acheson v. Wohlmuth, 196 F. 2d 866 (C.A. D.C. ) : U. S. ex rel Catalano 
V. Shauqhnessv. 197 F. 2d 65 (C.A. 2); Ke II y v . United States . 197 F. 
2d 162 (C.A. 5); Martinez v. Neel ly . 197 F. 2d 462 (C.A. 7). 

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURTS 

Lum Man Sing v. Acheson . 98 F. Supp. 777 (D Hawaii); U. S. ex rel . 
Bittelman v. District Direct or, 99 F. Supp. 306 ( SD NY); Qkimura v. 
Acheson, 99 F. Supp. 587 (D Hawaii); Murata v. Acheson . 99 F. Supp. 
591 (D Hawaii); United States v. Spector . 99 F. Supp. 778 ( SD Cal.); 
Federici v. Mi I ler . 99 F. Supp. 962 (WD Pa.); Federici v. Clark . 99 
F. Supp. 1019 (WD Pa.); Petition of Sad in . 100 F. Supp. 14 ( SD NY); 
In re Bespatow. 100 F. Supp. 44 (WD Pa.); Petition of Wi I! is . 100 F. 
Supp. 337 (ED Va. ); Petition of Contreras . 100 F. Supp. 4I9(SD Cal.); 
Sannino v. Bode . 100 F. Supp. 897 (WD Mo. ); United States v. Anzalone . 
100 F. Supp. 987 (WD Pa. ); U.S. ex rel. Burleigh v. Shauqhnessv . 100 
F. Supp. 993 (SD NY); United States Lines v. Shauqhnessv. 10 1 F.Supp. 
61 (SD NY); U. S. ex rel. Mezei v. Shauqhness.y . 101 F. Supp. 66 
'SD NY); Boissonnas v. Acheson . 101 F. Supp. 138 ( SD NY); Petition of 
Mo.y Jeunq Dun. 10 1 F. Supp. 203 (D NJ); De Gi ro I amo v. Acheson . 10 1 
F. Supp. 380 (DC DC); Aiexiou v. McGrath . 10 1 F. Supp. 421 : DC DC ) ; 



Grass! v. Acheson . 10 1 F. Supp. 431 (DC DC); U. S. ex rel . Hadrosek 
V. ShauQhness.y . 101 F. Supp. 432 ( SD NY); Spector v. Landon . 101 F. 
Supp. 439 ( SD Cal.); Application of Mannerfrid , 10 1 F. Supp. 44 6 
( SD NY); U. S. ex rel. Di Dente v. Ault . 101 F. Supp. 496 ( ND Ohio); 
Mori zumi v. Acheson . 10 1 F. Supp. 976 (ND Cal . ) : U. S. ex re I . Cec i I ia 
V, U. S. Dept. of Justice . 102 F. Supp. 204 ( SD NY); U. S. ex rel. Lee 
Ah Youw V. Shauqhnessy . 102 F. Supp. 799 ( SD NY); Medalha v. Shauqhness.y . 

102 F. Supp. 950 ( SD NY); Lee Hung v. Acheson . 103 F. Supp. 35 ( D Nevada); 
Scavone v. Acheson . 103 F. Supp. 59 ( SD NY); Paracchini v. McGrath. 

103 F. Supp. 184 ( SD NY); Tom We Shunq v. McGrath. 103 F. Supp. 507 
(DC DC); Kanbara v. Acheson . 103 F. Supp. 565 ( SD Cal . ): U. S. ex rel . 
Rowaldt V. Shrode . 103 F. Supp. 752 (D Minn. ); Barsant i v. Acheson . 
103 F. Supp. lOII ( D. Mass.); Jost v. Acheson . 104 F. Supp. 41 
( SD NY); Petition of Yee Shee Dong , 104 F. Supp. 123 (ED Mich.); 
Mazza v. Acheson . 104 F. Supp. 157 (ND Cal.); Scott v. McGrath . 104 
F. Supp. 267 (ED NY); Vidal v Planas v. Landon . 104 F. Supp. 384 ( SD 
Cal.); Ex parte Rogers . 104 F. Supp. 393 (D Guam); u. S. ex rel. Soo 
Hoo Chew Yee v. Shauqhness.y . 104 F. Supp. 425 ( SD NY); United States 
V. Kessler. 104 F. Supp. 434 (ED Pa.); Lee Pong Tai v. Acheson . 104 
F. Supp. 503 (ED Pa.); United States v. Lazarescu, 104 F. Supp. 77 1 
(D Md.); U. S. ex rel . Lee Ti I I Seem v. Shauqhnessy. 104 F. Supp. 819 
( SD NY); Fukumoto v. Acheson. 105 F. Supp. I ( D Hawai i ); U.S. ex rel . 
Kenq Ho Chang v. Shaughness.y , 105 F. Supp. 22 ( SD NY); U. S. ex rel . 
Camezon v. District Di rector . 105 F. Supp. 32 ( SD NY); United States 
V. De Cadena . 105 F. Supp. 202 (ND Cal . ); Zacharias v. McGrath . 105 F. 
Supp. 421 (DC DC) Perri v. Acheson , 105 F. Supp. 454 (D NJ ) . 



TABLE 1, IMMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES 
1820 ^ 1952 

^rom 1820 to 186? figijxes represent alien passengers ?.rrivedj 1868 to 1891 
inclusive and 189$ to 1897 inclusive immigrant aliens arrivedj 1892 to 1894 
inclusive and from 1898 to the present time immigrant aliens admitted^ 



lear 



persons 



1820^1952 1/ 39.796 



1820, o 

1821-1830 
1821 o o 
18.22 » o 
• 182^ o o 
1824»o 
1825 
1826 0. 
1827o. 
1828 „„ 
1829,. 
1830. o 

1831-1840 

1831.0 
: '^32. , 
.■^^33 oo 



J: - '.1 

o 

L8U-1850 

1341 

l=?Uo. 

-^43 CO 

1844 o 
- a '. i. 

' ■'*^y 

1848., 
1849,. 
1350., 




8,335 




6,354 

7.912 

10, 199 

10^8^7 

IS, 8-75 

275 3?^ 2 
22^520 
23p322 

5990.25 
22^ 6^-3 
60,482 
58p6*0 
65.365 
45.374 
76. 242 
79.340 
38.914 
68,0^.? 
84. 056 

1,713 .,251 

80s?.S9 

104,565 

52.49^ 

78.6lr 

114,371 
154.416 
234.563 
226,52-^ 
297. 024 
369.9s: 



1851-1860 
1851.. 
1852. . 
1853.. 
1854, . 
1855.. 
1856. . 

1857.. 
1858,. 

1859.. 
I860. . 

1861-1870 
1861, . 
1862.. 
1863.. 
1864.. 
1865,. 
1866,. 
1867. . 
1868, . 
I869.. 
1870, . 



1871-1880 

1871. 
1872, 
1873. 
1874. 
1875. 
1876, 
1877. 
1878. 

1879. 
1880, 



1881^1890 
1881c . 
18o2o . 
1883,. 



2,^3.214 
3. '■^.466 
371.603 
368,645 
427,833 
200,877 
200,436 
251,306 
123,126 
121,282 
15 3 0640 

2sJ.14^,82i 
r^, 913 
91,985 
176,282 
193,418 
248,120 
318., 568 
315,722 
138,840 
3 =.2, ''68 
3^7,203 

2.812.191 
3"4j350 
4ai>,^06 
459,803 
313,339 
227.498 
169,986 
141.357 
138.469 
177,826 
45;-,257 

6^'-, 431 
788,992 
603,322 



N:.a3.ber 



Year 



: r>D« 



1884, . 
1885,. 
1886, , 
1887o . 
1888.. 
1889, , 
1890, , 

1891-1900 
1891- , 
1892. , 
1893.. 
1894, . 
1895 o. 
1896.0 
1897. , 
1898,0 
1899,. 
1900,. 

1901-1910 

I9OI0 

1902, , 
1903c o 
1904 00 
1905,0 
19060, 

1907,0 
1908,. 
1909,, 

1910, 

1911-1920 
1911,, 
1912,, 
1913 0. 
1914.0 
1915- 
19160, 

1917. . 



;-'.592 

395.346 
334,203 
490,109 
546.889 
444,427 
455,302 

560,319 
579,663 
439,730 
235,631 
258,536 
343.267 
230,832 
229,299 
311.715 
448,572 

i^ Z9S.<iM4 

487.918 

648,743 

857.046 

812,870 

1,026,499 

1,100,735 

l5,aS5,349 

782,870 

751.786 

1,041,570 



875, 5S 
838,172 
1,197,8'32{ 
1,218,480! 
326, 700 
298,826 
295,403. 



Year 



N\imber 

of 
persons 



1918, , 
1919. . 
1920, , 

1921=-1930 
1921,0 
1922,. 
1923 00 

1924 a 

1925 00 
1926. „ 
1927o o 
1928,0 
1929. , 
1930, o 

1931=1940 
1931 o , 
1932. o 
1933 00 
1934o o 
1935 00 
1936,0 
1937o o 
193800 
1939,0 
194O00 

1941-1950 
194I00 
1942o o 

lyi*.^ o o 



L 



1945.0 

194600 

194-^0 

19480 o 

1949.0 
1950, , 

1951. o 

19520.., 



110,618 
141,132 
430, 001 

4o 107, 209 
805, 228 
309,556 
522, 919 
706,896 
294,314 
304,488 

335,175 
307,255 
279,678 
241.700 

528,, 431 
97.139 
35,576 
23.068 
29,470 
34,956 
36,329 
50,244 
67,895 
82,998 
70,756 



51, 77" 

28,781 

23.725 

28,551 

38,119 

108,721 

147,292 

170,570 

188,317 

249,187 



205,717 
265,520 



Data are for fiscal ^^ears ended June 30. except 1820 to 1831 Inclusive and 1844 to 1849 
inclusive fiscal vears ended Sept. 30; 1833 to 1842 inclijsive and I85I to 1867 inclu- 
•sive years ended b--^c, 31; 1832 covers 15 months ended Deo. 31| 1843 nine months ended 
3ept, 3O; 1850 fifteen months ended Dec, 31, and 1868 six months ended June 30, 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 2. ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AI\ID DEPARTED, 

BY MONTHS: 
YEAES ENDED JUNE 30, 1951 AND 1952 

(Data exclude travelers between continental United States and insular posses- 
sions, border crossers and agricultural laborers) 



'eriod 



L year 1951 

)ec., 1950. 

r 

ist 

ember 

ber 

mber 

mber 

une, 1951. 

ary 

aary 

a 

L 

year 1952 
3C.5 1951. 

iit 

jmber..... 

jer 

' iber... . . . 

••iber. ..... 

Mne, 1952. 

I .ry 

>'■ ary. ..... 

'u 

o«o«*oa«o 

II 



ALIENS ADMITTED 



Tmnri — 

grant 



205.717 



103.047 



Nonimmi- 
■ fi^ant 



465.106 



252,196 



17,478 
18, 690 
15,987 
lif,044 
16,379 
20,469 

102. 670 



18, 569 
12,654 
15,360 

14,537 
17,945 
23,605 

265.520 



48, 522 
47,226 
52.485 
39,981 
29, 702 
34, 280 



Total 



670,823 



3 5^,24 3 



66, 000 
65, 916 
68,472 
54, 025 
46, 081 
54, 749 



ALIENS DEPARTED 



Emi- 
grant 



26,174 



15.149 



212.910 315,580 



37,305 
28,946 
33,145 
33,694 
37,493 
42,327 

516.082 



55,874 
41, 600 
48,505 
48,231 
55,438 
65,932 



3,803 
2,921 
2,468 
2,075 
1,599 
2,283 

11,025 



Nonemi- 
grant 



446,727 



236,003 



2,023 
1,635 
1,661 
1,686 
1,809 
2,211 



- 



781.602 21.880 



135,617 



17, 943 
18, 020 
19, 001 
25,847 
28,347 
26,459 

129,903 



252,519 388,136 



27,792 
19, 509 
24,201 
21,142 
18,898 
18,361 



47,575 
47.411 
55,135 
40. 565 
35.882 
25,951 

263,563 



58.367 
36. 742 
38.130 
39.712 
41^ 636 
48,976 



65,518 
65,431 
74,136 
66,412 
64,229 
52,410 

393,466 



12.397 



86,159 
56,251 
62,331 
60,854 
60, 534 
67,337 



2,658 
2,474 
2,197 
1,834 
1,606 
1,628 

9i483 



47, 671 
49,855 
42, 969 
34, 988 
28, 632 
31,888 

210, 724 



Total 



472,901 



251,152 



26, 538 
25,595 
40, 983 
38,970 
37,659 
40, 979 

487.617 



51,474 
52, 776 
45,437 
37, 063 
30,231 
34,171 

221,749 




U. S, CITIZ ENS 

Ar- j De- 

rived I parted 



197,922 j 760.486 



104,091 






1,661 
1,417 
1,439 
1,518 
1,704 
1,744 



243,182 
42, 946 
50, 785 
45,352 
36,424 
33, Ul 
34,534 




28,561 
27,230 
42,644 
40,656 
39,468 
43,190 

509,497 



14, 526 
13,140 
23, 035 
16. 962 
15,850 
20,578 

! 93.831 



27,313 
14.370 
5,861 
7. 575 
15,970 
22, 742 



78, 030 
96.425 
88, 706 
59, 768 
46,242 
44,810 



667, 126 



296. 532 
81, 288 
62.159 
45,172 
36, 200 
31", 969 
39,744 



346.505 370,594 



52, 209 
59,093 
63,969 
60.854 
51,413 
58,-967 



48,822 
57,163 
65, 028 
58,242 
58,259 
83,080 



272,1051 807,225 18143,282 



45,604 
53,259 
47, 549 
38,258 

34, 747 
36,162 



244i43M 253,918 



33, 938 
32, 093 
46, 209 
49, 727 
41, 602 
40, 866 



35>599 
33,510 
47, 648 
51,245 
43,306 
42, 610 



132,557 
19.914 
12.172 
26.587 
28,154 
29,482 
16,248 

139,548 



50,560 
22, 741 
14,683 
9,609 
17, 228 
24,727 



428. 580 
74,203 
95,978 
86,849 
65, 535 
52,105 
53,910 

378.645 
51,489 
62,323 
65, 747 
62,431 
59,462 

77,193 




^^^^014 



865 433 
75,748 
51. 918 
46,595 
44.129 
52,191 



54,619 
71,441 
68, 726 
72,338 
80, 150 
110, 001 



iJ3ss of admissions over departures. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 3. ALIENS ADMITTED, BY CLASSES UM)ER THE BIMIGRATION LAWS, 
YEARS ENDED JUWE 30^, 1948 TO 1952 

/Tata exclude travelers between continental United States and insu- 
lar possessions^ border crossers, and agricultural and railway 
track laborers admitted from Mexico c 



Class 



ALIEIMS ADl'UTTED.oo 
IMMIGRANTS 1/ 
Quota Immigrants 



0UO0UO0000OO0OO00OO09 



0OUOOO000O{>O00OO0OOU«O«0OOu400 



OOOO 0000000000000000000600 



' O O W O O u 



> o O O O O 



Nonquota Immigrants oeooo»»ooooooooooo<.oooo 
Husbands of Uo S„ citizens. 
Wives of Uo So citizens, 
Unmarried children of Uo S. citizens « 
Natives of nonquota countries. 

Their wives o o o ^ o » « « 

Their unmarried children c 
Ministers of religious denominations o . 

Their wives „ o o „ o o . - 

Their unmarried children^ „ o o 
Professors of colleges ^ universities, 

X X16^X^ Vv I'.r^o ooooooooooooouooouooooooooo 

Their unmarried children o ooo««ooooo<.oo 
Women who had been U, S„ citizenSooouooo 
Other nonquota immigrants c 



NONIMMIGRANTS 



Government officialsn their familieSj 

attendants^ sei^rants^ and employees. 
Temporary visitors for business «, 
Temporary irisitors for pleasxureo o o » « o c . t. o o 
In continuous transit thr"! the Uo S„„„oooo 
To carry on trade under treaty,, 
Members of international organizations. 
Returning residents c 
Students „ oo : 
Other nonimmigrants « 




'ooooooeoooooooo 



o ooooonoooooouoooooooooooooooo 



' u <t 9 Q O 



>oooooooooo 



>o ooooooooo 



'OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOA 
<00O00U0O00C>0U000C0000O000k*O0O0 



'OOOO-J^OOOOOOOOOOO 0OO4«O 



16,. 822 

78,876 

206^10? 

124. 780 

711 

4,059 

32,464 

11,914 

273 



13^722 

73 n 338 

225^745 

81^615 

632 

4^723 

36. 984 

10,481 

32 



219^810 

68. 640 

766 

5,010 

40,903 

9o744 




20,881 

83,995 

230, 210 

72o 027 

850 

5,526 

44,212 

7,355 

50 



22., 267 

86,745 
269^606 

77,899 

791 

5,137 

44,980 

8,613 

44 



An immigrant is defined in statistics of the Service as an alien admitted for permanent 



residence, or as an addition to the population, Therefore, students who are admitted 
for temporary periods and returning resident aliens who have once been counted as 
in!migranx.s are included with nonimmigrant s^ although Section 4 defines such classes as 
iiraaigrants o 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 4. BOtLOiATION BI OOUNTEI, FOa DECADES: 
1820 to 1952 1/ 

^rom 1820 to 1867 figures represent alien passeigers arrivadj 1868 to 1891 Inclusive and 
1895 to 1897 inclusire ijaniigrant aljens arrived; 1892 to 1(594 inclusive and from 1898 to 
present time immigrant aliens admitted. Data far years prior to 1906 relate to country 
whence alien came; thereafter to country of last permanent residence. Because of changes 
in boundaries and changes in lists of countries, data for certain countries are not com- 
parable throughout,? 



Countries 



1820 



1821-1830 ' 1831-1840 1841-1850 



1851-1860 



1861-1870 



LI countries 

Europe , 

Austria-Hungary 2/, . , , . . . 

Belgium 

Denmark 

France 

Germany 2/ 

(England, ........ 

n®fx . (Scotland 

Britain(^^^gg 

(Not specified 2^ 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway) , 

Sweden) i/ 

Poland y 

Portugal 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Exirope 

Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics 6/., 
Other Europe 

Hsia.. „ 

China 

India 

Japan 2J 

Turkey in Asia 8/ 

Other Asia 

^erica 

Canada and Newfoundland ^ 

Mexico 10/ 

West Indies , 

Central America 

South America. 

Ifrica 

Australia & New Zealand.... 
_ «'ot specified 

5s footnotes at end of table. 



8,^81 



7»6?1 



1 

20 

371 

968 

1,782 

268 

360 

3,6U 
30 
49 



5 

35 

139 

31 

1 

14 



1 
1 



J8L 



209 

1 

164 

2 

11 



301 



143.439 599.125 1.713.251 



2.598,214 



2t?14i824 



98.817 495,688 



75 
3 



10 



11.564 



2,277 

4,817 

3,834 

105 

531 



16 



3?|032 



22 

1,063 

45,575 

152,454 

7,611 

2,667 

185 

65,347 

49 

207,381 

2,253 

1,412 

1,201 

369 
829 

2,125 

4,821 

7 

277 
40 



J^ 



8 
39 



J2 



42^ 
^624 



13,624 

6,599 

12,301 

44 

856 



i,??7t?oi 



2,452.660 



2,065,270 



5,074 

539 

77,262 

434,626 

32,092 

3,712 

1,261 

229,979 
16 

780,719 
1,870 
8,251 

13,903 

105 

550 

2,209 

4,644 

59 

551 
79 



82 



35 
36 



11 



62,469 



54 
69.911 



41,723 
3,271 

13,528 

368 

3,579 



55 



4,738 

3,749 

76,358 

951,667 

247,125 

38,331 

6,319 

132,199 

31 

914,119 

9,231 

10,789 

20,931 

1,164 

1,055 

9,298 

25,011 

83 

457 

5 



4ii4?^ 



41,397 
43 



15 



74.720 



59,309 
3,078 

10,660 

449 

1,224 



210 
29,169 



7,800 

6,734 

17,094 

35,986 

787,468 

222,277 

38,769 

4,313 

341,537 

72 

435,778 

11,725 

9,102 

(71,631 

(37,667 

2,027 

2,658 

6,697 

23,286 

129 

2,512 
8 



64,630 

64,301 

69 

186 

2 

72 



166.607 



153,878 
2,191 
9,046 
95 
1,397 



312 

36 

17.969 



United States Department of Justice 
iDBoigratlon and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 4. IMmCiRATION BY OOUNTRY, FOR DECADESs 
1820 to 1952 1/ (Continued) 



Countries 



1871-1880 



1881-1890 



1891-1900 



1901-1910 



1911-1920 



All coTin tries. 



Europe 

Austria) , 
Hungary) sJ * 



Belgium , 

Bulgaria 11/ 

Czechoslovakia 12/ 

Denmark 

Finland 12/ 

France 

Germany 2/ 

^England 

Great (Scotland 

Britain(wales 

(Not specified "^ , 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway ij 

Sweden y 

Poland ^ 

Portugal 

Rumania }^ 

Spain 

Switzerland. 

Turkey in Eiirope 

Union of Soviet 

Socialist Republics 6/... 

Yugoslavia 11/ 

Other Europe 



Asia 

China 

India 

Japan "jj 

Turkey in Asia 8/, 
Other Asia 



^erica 

Canada and Newfoundland ^ , 

Mexico 10/ 

West Indies 

Central America. 

South America 



2.812.191 



5.246.613 3. 687. 56/. 



8. 7??, 386 



5.735.811 



2.272.262 4.737.046! 3.558.978 



8.136.016 



4. 376. 564 



Ifrica 

Australia and New Zealand, 
i^acific Islands 

<ot specified li^/. 



72,969 i 
7,221 



72,206 

718,182 

437,706 

87,564 

6,631 

16,142 

210 

436,871 

55,759 

16,541 

95,323 

115,922 

12,970 

14,082 

11 

5,266 

28,293 

337 

39,284 

1,001 



353,719 
20,177 



31,771 88,132 



123.823 



123,201 
163 
149 
>7 
243 



^C4«Q^ 

383,640 

5,162 

13,957 

157 

1,128 



358 
9,886 
1,028 

790 



50,464 

1,452,970 

644,680 

149,869 

12,640 

168 

2,308 

655,482 

307,309 

53,701 , 

176,586 \ 

391,7761 

51,806 ■ 

16,978 

6,348 

4,419 

81,988 1 

1,562 

213,282 

682 



68.380 



61,711 

269 

2,270 

2,220 

1,910 



^6.967 



393,304 

1,913 

29,042 

404 

2,304 



857 
7,017 
5,557 

789 



592,707 

18,167 
160 

50,231 

30,770 

505,152 

216,726 

44,188 

10,557 

67 

15,979 

388,416 

651,893 

26,758 

95,015 

226,266 

96,720 

27,508 

12,750 

8,731 

31,179 

3,626 

505,290 

122 



71.236 



14,799 

68 

25,942 

26,799 

3,628 



38.972 



3,311 

971 

33,066 

549 

1,075 



350 

2,740 

1,225 

14.063 



2,145,266 

41,635 
39,280 

65,285 

73,379 
3a, 498 
388,017 
120,469 

17,464 

167,519 
339,065 
2,045,877 
48,262 
190,505 
249,534 

69,149 
53,008 
27,935 
34,922 
79,976 

1,597,306 

665 



56^ 
64S 



243,^67 



20,605 

4,713 

129,797 

77,393 

11,059 



361.888 



179,226 
49,642 

107,548 

8,192 

17,280 



7,368 
11,975 

1,049 
??|52? 



(453,649 

(442,693 

33,746 

22,533 

3,426 

41,983 

756 

61,897 

143,945 

249,944 

78,357 

13,107 

184,201 

146,181 

,109,524 

43,718 

66,395 

95,074 

4,813 

89,732 

13,311 
68,611 

23,091 
54,677 

921,201 
1,888 
8,111 



1, 



192.559 



21,278 

2,082 

83,837 

79,389 

5,973 



liH3,671 



742,185 

219,004 

123,424 

17,159 

41,899 



8,443 

12,348 

1,079 

l'H7 



>ee footnotes at end of table. 



.United^ States D,^ 
ration and 



of Justice 
at ion Service 



TABLE 4„ IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 to 1952 1/ (Continued) 



Total 133 yrs, 
1820-1952 




rope 

/abania Ig 
Austria 2 
Hungary 2/ 
Belgium 
Bulgaria 11/ 
Czechoslovakia 12/ 

Denmark 

istonia 12/ » . . . 

i-inland 12/.«.c 

' ranee c •oo«»«9«9oc»«»»oeoc 

terraany 2/ ........ . 

(England, 
rreat (Scotland. 
Britain (Wales 

(Not specified 2/ 

reXancL. ..........oo. 

UaXy. woooo.eo.e.o.o. 
atVia lie/ ft.eeo*9«..e 

ithiiania 12/ 
uxembourg 12/. » 
etherlands 
orway Z^/ . . o » o 
oland ^ 
ortugal 
umania 1^/ « o „ 
pain 

witserland. „o 
arkey in Europe 
aion of Soviet 
Socialist Republics 
ugoslavia li/. 
ther Europe. 



o o V « • a • 
oo»«eoo« 

« e o o o 

>0 «9iS9««9«00 



0*00' 

9 e 9 o « 
• o o o < 

O « W O < 



ooooa94*e' 



'oooooft««dO 



O • O U 4 

o o e I 



iOO«0«OOOI 



ooouoooo ooooe 



• • o ' 
O C O O I 



i0OO'>0O0OO«*Oe9OOC>^6 



OW^nftVOO^OO* 



0O«OO«OOO< 



6/., 



>ao9«*o*o 



I tf O O O 9 O O I 



nina.. .....,........< 

adia. *.. 

ipan 2/. ••• 

irkey in Asia 8/, . . . , 
ther Asia. .......... 



,?■?, 85: 

1,663 

32,, 868 

30„680 

15 846 

2,945 

102a94 

32,430 

1,576 

16, 691 

49,610 

412,202 

157o420 

15 9 o 781 

13,012 

51.084 

220, 591 

455,315 

3,399 

6„015 

727 

26,948 

68, 531 

227, 734 

29^994 

67, 646 

28.958 

97,249 

29,676 

14,659 

61,742 

49,064 

9,603 



J o rt e ) • » 



97., 400 
29, 907 
1,886 
33,462 
1^.165 
12, 980 



21,756 

6,887 

735 

9,119 

13,167 

68,028 

1,192 

2,201 

565 
7,150 
4,740 
17^026 
3,329 
3,871 
3,258 
3,960 
5,512 

737 

1,356 

5,835 
2,361 



15,344 



4,928 
496 

1,948 
328 

7,644 



85 

24,860 

3,469 

12,189 

375 

8,347 

5,393 

212 

2,503 

38,809 

226,578 

112,252 

16,131 

3,209 

8,973 

26,967 

57,661 

361 

683 

820 

14,860 

10,100 

7,571 

7,423 

1,076 

2,898 

10,665 

10,547 

580 

548 
1,576 
3,983 

31,780 



16,709 

1,761 

1,555 

218 

11,537 



532 

4,573 
87,755 
12,393 

2,309 
196 

4,459 

3,144 

8, 958 

5 

8 

51 

3,062 

2„289 

98 

1,0?8 

104 

442 

2,022 

i,485 

118 



2,354 



• > e o o < 



3,203 



?n^28 



175,142 

66,241 

128,499 

342,646 

2,301 

23,128 

643,258 

6,440,520 

2,78^,375 

755,604 

90,04? 

79/^, 689 

451,036 

4,625,745 

4,797,184 

4,967 

8c 927 

2,253 

274, 741 

819, 598 

422,659 

265,498 

158,159 

173,944 

1,231,913 

309,214 

156,665 

3,343,916 

59,144 
28,623 



• •ei eooo9o«< 



963,568 



o • • • • • • 



5,116 



399,480 

11,866 

283,231 

205,596 

63,395 



e footnotes at end of table ^ 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 4o IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES s 
1820 to 1952 1/ (Continued) 




Countries 



1921-1930 1931-1940 



1941-1950 



Total 133 Yrs. 
1820-1952 



JiIIl6Z*2.Cd OOOOOOCOO0OOOOOOCOCOO 

Canada and Newfoundland 2/ 

J<l6^CXC0 XU/ oOOVOUOOOOOOOOOtf 

nCSXf J.nQX6S oao«o»ooooooo*o 

Central America 
South America 
Other America 16/, 



1,516.716 160.037 



oo((OOev>CfOUO 
OtfOOOOOOOOO 

eeoooooo 



AlI*lCa 9009000009000000000000 

Australia and New Zealand. „ o 
Pacific Islands 1$/, 
Not specified 1477o c 



000900000 



O o O u O O a . 



92*^,515 

459,287 

74.899 

15 n 769 

42,215 

31 

OOOOOOOOOOO 

6j286 

8.299 

427 

228 



H 



2/ 



2/ 
12/ 



12/ 



11/ 

y^/ 

Li/ 



L6/ 



108, 52? 

22o319 

15,502 

5,861 

7.803 

25 

lOOOOOOCOOO 

1,750 

2j231 

780 



^^4.804 



171^718 
60,589 
49,725 
21,665 
21.831 
29,276 



ceosodooooo 



4.864.950 



7,367 

13,805 

5,437 

142 



,236,680 

854,076 

509,270 

75,467 

151,320 

38,137 

oooooeoooo«**« 

35,203 

69,372 

19^880 

254.236 



Data are for fiscal years ended June 30^ except 1820 to I83I inclusive and 1844 to 1849 
inclusive fiscal years ended Sept^ 30; 1833 to 1842 inclusive and 1851 to 1867 inclusive 
years ended Dec. 31| 1832 covers 15 months ended Deco 31| 1843 nine months ended Sept, 
30| I85O fifteen months ended DeCo 31 and 1868 six months ended June 3O0 

Data for Austria-Hungary were not reported until I86I0 Austria and Hxmgary have been 
recorded separately since 1905o In the years 1938 to 1945 inclusive Austria was in- 
cluded with Germany^ 

United Kingdom not specifiedo In the years 1901 to 1951.i included ia. other Europeo 

From 1820 to 1868 the figures for Norway and Sweden were combinedo 

Poland was recorded as a separate country from 1820 to 1898 and since 1920o Between 
1899 and 1919 Poland v/as included with Austria-Hungary, Germany, and Russia. 

Since 1931 the Russian Empire has been broken down into Europeain Russia and Siberia or 
Asiatic Russia. 

No record of immigration from Japan until 186l« 

No record of immigration from T\ii-key in Asia until 1869o 

Prior to 1920 Canada and Newfoundland were recortied as British North America o From 
1820 to 1898 the figures include all British North American possessions. 

No record of immigration from Mexico from 1886 to 1893'- 

Bulgaria, Serbia-, and Montenegro were first reported in 1899o Bulgaria has been 
reported separately since 1920 and in 1920 also a separate enumeration was made for 
the Kingdom of Serbs. Croats, and Slovenes « Since 1922 the Serb, Croat, and Slovene 
Kingdom has been recorded as Yugoslaviao 

Countries added to the list since the beginning of World War I are theretofore included 
with the countries to which they belonged^ Figures are available since 1920 for Czech- 
oslovakia and Finland; since 1924 for Albania, Estonia^ Latvia., and Lithuania; and 
since 1925 for Luxembourg o 

No record of immigration from Rumania tmtil 1880. 

The figure 33,523 in column headed I9OI-I9IO3 includes 32,897 persons returning in 1906 
to their homes in the United States, 

In 1952 Asia includes the Philippines o From 1934 to 1951 the Philippines were included 
in the Pacific Islands, Prior to 1934 the Philippines were recorded in separate p 
tables as insular travels [i 

Included with countries not specified prior to 1925 o " '1 



T 



United States Department of Jvistice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 5. IMMIGHANT ALUMS ADMITTED AND EMISiANT ALIEWS DEPARTED, 
BY POET OR DISTRICT: YEARS ENDED .fUNE 30, 1948 TO 1952 



Port or district 



IMMIGRANT 



1948 



1949 1950 1951 



1952 



EMIGRANT 



1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 



All ports or districts 

Atlantic 

New York, N. Y 

Boston, Mass 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Baltimore, Md 

Portland, Me 

Newport News, Va 

Norfolk, 7a 

Charleston, S. C 

Savannah, Ga. 

Jacksonville, Fla 

Key West, Fla 

Miami, Fla 

West Palm Beach, Fla. . 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands 

Other Atlantic 

Gulf of Mexico 

Tampa, Fla 

Pensacola, Fla........ 

Mobile, Ala 

New Orleans, La 

San Antonio, Tex 

Other Gulf 

Pacific 

San Francisco, Calif.. 

Po rtland, Ore 

Seattle, Wash 

Los Angeles, Calif.... 
Honolulu, T. H 

Alaska 

Canadian Border 

Mexican Border. 



170.570 



188.317 



249.187 



205.717 



265. ?20 



20.875 



24.^86 



27.598 



26.174 



21.880 



116.008 



104,665 

1,772 

467 

1,227 

27 

124 

318 

54 

39 

44 

156 

6,476 

2 

355 

43 

239 

2.262 



136.656 



374 
28 

219 

1,366 

245 

30 

11.097 



9,714 

7 

288 

352 

736 

31 
30,380 
10,792 



113,050 

14,318 

263 

559 

16 

103 

187 

29 

20 

34 

109 

5,711 

13 

503 

43 

1,698 

4.706 



199.630 



381 

8 

303 

3,805 

190 

19 

6.531 



4,167 

21 

552 

249 

1,542 

15 
30,238 
10,171 



166,849 

24,222 

370 

260 

23 
22 
183 
16 
20 
9 

no 
5,451 

6 

1,245 

34 

810 



154.581 



1A2,903 

3,787 

134 

148 

34 

19 

42 

47 

15 

7 

106 

5,199 

34 

1,563 

42 

501 



197.172 



183,222 
2,968 
337 
620 
25 
103 
178 

33 
6 

21 

134 

6,209 

42 

1,838 

98 

1,338 



15.101 



12.193 10.035! 13.085 



446 

2 

224 

11,320 

193 
8 

3.158 



2,174 

10 

77 

280 

617 

9 

25, 564 

8,633 



351 

2 

101 

9,177 

366 
38 

5.274 



3,841 

15 

382 

294 
742 

54 

28,039 

7,734 



335 

2 

166 

12,301 

268 

13 

9.068 



14,211 
111 
64 
206 

10 

11 

7 

12 

358 

3 

11 

10 

87 

528 



18.934 



3,178 

26 

3,497 

868 

1,499 

79 
35,451 
10,665 



18 
507 

1 



3.?62 



3,270 

16 

209 

67 



760 
924 



14,367 

193 

40 

118 

8 

14 

5 

1 

1 

41 

3,590 

31 

5U 

2 

9 

664 



19.725 



18.001 



64 

21 

531 

46 

2 

1.791 



'25 

1 

41 

71 

1,053 

2 
1,734 
1,461 



15,522 

223 

49 

53 

17 
7 

5 

1 

1 

69 

3,076 

80 

583 

14 

25 



1A,295 

218 

22 

39 

2 

14 

10 

10 

5 

4 

50 

2,666 

33 

571 

38 

24 



14.998 



m. 998 



14< 
2 

23 

622 

176 

4 

2.492 



1,021 

1 

51 

136 

1,283 



2,778 
1,630 



180 

2 

17 

636 

155 
8 

1.770 



12,099 

121 

28 

34 

1 

7 

6 

1 

1 

1 

21 

1,960 

31 

357 

26 

304 

667 



907 

5 

89 

139 

630 



3,893 
1,512 



73 

5 
439 
148 

2 

1.806 



771 
6 
119 
215 
695 



3,281 
1,128 



Ibiited States Department of Justice 
Immigration euid Naturalization Seirvice 



TABU 6. IMKXCUUrr ALHIB AHHRKD, il CLASSES ONDSB THE BfrlCSATION LAMS 
AMD COINTBY OR BBSICM OF KBTK; YEAR HiPED JUME 30. 1952 



Country or 
region of 
birth 




All ceuatries 

Exirope 

AuBtria 

Belgim. 

Btilgaria 

Czechoslorakia 

Deanark 

Estonia 

Finland 

Franc* 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

lonray 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

(England 
United (So. Ireland.. 
KingdoB(Seotland 

(Wales 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 
Other Europe 



Asia... 
Chijaa 
India 
Japan 
Palestine 
Philippines 
Other Asia 

Horth Aoerica 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies.... 
Central America 
Other North America... 

South America 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand. 
Othy ^ountri,e3,,,,,,,Tt 



salted States l)«partii.eat of Justice 
Sraicratioa aad laturfilisatioa Sarrloe 



TAbLE 6A. Bji-ilGRAlMT .JLI^ijiS .'dJi.lTTLD, bY CLASSES MtihiH THK ^.iUuiu...'1Um LiiiyS 
aMD CQUNTIiY OF L/^T P^^-i^jMHmT JtLSIDEiMCi^; YEiih MbED JU i. E 30. 19?2 



T 



Country of 
last residence 



iill countries. 



Eiirope 

Austria 

belgium 

Bulgaria 

Chechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Estonia 

P'inland 

France 

Geriaany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

L; tvia 

Lithiiania 

K' etherlands 

Norway 

Fcland 

Portugal 

Kxiii^nia 

Spain 

Sweden 

I'witzerland 

(iingland 

United (No. Irelond. 

Kingdom (Scotland. . . . 

(Wales 

u.s.s.h 

Yugoslavia 

Other Evirope 



Asia 

China 

India 

Japan 

Palestine. . . 
Philippines . 
Other Asia. . 



North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

i<est Indies 

Central America 

Ciher North America... 



Number 

ad- 
mitted 



265.52. 



193.626 



Sovth America. , 
Africa 



23,088 

2,9Ub 

9 

51 

1,152 

7 

500 

4,878 

104, 236 

6,996 

63 

2,775 

U,342 

10 

20 

3,060 

2,354 

235 

953 

34 

481 

1,778 

1,502 

18,539 

751 

3,390 

248 

11 

327 

1,890 

?t^28 



194.247 



1 79 . B . 31 



263 

123 

3,814 

34 

1,179 

3,915 

56.458 



AU£,t.t£lia &. New Le aland. 
Other countries 



33,354 
9,079 
6, 072 
2,637 
4,716 

t 4,591 
} 931 1 
545 



22,331 

2,855 

9 

34 

1,068 

7 

439 

4,404 

98,971 

5,614 

49 

2,731 

8,059 

5 

16 

2,923 

2,223 

128 

364 

23 

282 

1,721 

1,441 

18, 200 

724 

3,346 

205 

11 

134 

1,514 

2.205 



O 

CO 01 

CD N 

33 o 



793 



482 



a 

V 
01 CJ 



« 

> 



o 



u u 



o 



1> 
•H 

o o 



01 -P 

0) o 

> ^ 

•H 






nj o o 

■3: a o 



(D ^ 
1: O 



16.058 f 2.404 47.744 



70 
99 
82 
18 
286 
1,650 



4,900 
112 

2,710 
231 

1,906 

1,:.66 
752 

4io 

24. 



5 
1 

1 
3 

6 

13 

23 

23 

1 

2 

253 



10 

8 

60 

40 

11 

3 
1 
9 

2 

1 



M. 



8.500 



2 
2 
2 

13 
22 

246 



50 
3 

21 

1 

171 

9 
11 

4 



614 
53 

14 
66 

32 

317 ! 
4,271 i 
429 1 
9) 
9 
1,545 
5 
3 

66 

70 

36 

153 

78 I 
21 
37 
152 

10 

15 
- 2 

131 

358 

6.211 



1.644 



163 
10 

3,443 

6 

598 

1,991 

1.071 



308 
36 

134 
19 

574 

40 

120 

108 

8 



33 

7 

1 
3 

17 

29 

194 

90 

3 
6 

749 

1 
7 

16 

d 

320 

2 

42 
2 
3 

14 
3 
2 

25 

60 
7 

656 



282 



19 

1 

237 

6 

252 

141 

127 



22 
12 

61 

1 
31 



23 

26 

2 

1 
77 



3 
4 

21 
1 
9 
2 
4 

81 

3 
16 

1 



JI 



1 
2 

3 

11 

20 

44.090 



I 



25 
8 



27,282 
8,869 
3,687 
2,378 

1,874 

3,324 
6 

5 



I If) 
a <i> 

O -H 

:i U 
"■p 
in 

•V 

> 

■H 



664 



200 



1 

5 

18 

6 



96 



2 

3 

1 

26 

10 

3 
19 



_ - c 
(o :i « 

Vh -H rH 

O 0) -H 

ux: s: 

li -P o 



580 



^11 



10 
21 



.21 



8 
13 

424 



393 

3 

19 
2 

7 

13 
4 



30 

23 

9 

1 
22 
41 



24 
21 
1 
1 
4 
31 
1 

5 
37 
10 

14 



102 



(0 

to a> 
u > 



297 



1^ 



1 
1 



T3 W 

0,H 

x:-p 

o 

a 

IS 

oi> 



32 2,641 



10 j2.2i: - 



4 


— 


46 


- 


15 


2 


— 


1 


13 


6 


11 


~ 


5 


- 


1 




10 


— 


21 


- 


3 


- 


15 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 



6 


- 


2 


7 


26 


3 


4 


- 


3 


2 


61 


11 



m 



59 

6 
10 

1 
57 

21 
4 



_21 



109 1 14 



17 
2 

9 

1 
80 

6 
3 

1 
4 



Unitec States Department of Jxistics 
Immigrc-tion and Naturaliii ation oervice 



TABLE 6Bc Immigrant aliens admitted to the united states under the displaced persons act 

OF 1948, AS AIcjENDEDj BY CLASSES AND COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH 

OC n Q) £> TITMTT _, 



Country or 

region of 

birth 



JUNE 25. IM.- «^""E 30, 1952 



Ntimber 
admitted 



I 



All countries 



o o V e 



iooao90ooooooi 



OOSOOOOOO 



ioeeoeocb«ooo 



kd o o o o a o I 



O K O O O O 



• oeoooooo 



' o 9 o « a » o 



'Oce»oot>e»e*oe« 



^9oououc4Joede090i 



o J o o u 



l> V o o o >> < 



Europe o o o . 
Austria, . .. 
Belgiunio « . 
Bulgaria. « 
Czechoslovakia. 
Denmark, 
Estonia , 
Finland, 
France; 
Germany, 

n\in^3»<r^o e*o»ooooo«ooooo 
XT' 6Xd^Cl uooeoouuooooouoe 

Jija V 7 X^ o9u9ueo uo«eooootto 

Lithuania o , <> » 
Netherlands „ „ 
Norway „ .. 
Poland „„ , 
Portugal, 
Rumania, 
Spain o „ o 
Sweden o 

OWXT'Z6I^JL3JlCIo ouooootioooe 

( England,, „o « « » o 

United (No, Ireland„oo 

Kingdom( Scotland, 

(Wales 
UoSoSoR< 
Yugoslavia 
Other Europe, 



^LM 




Displaced persons 



Total 

displaced 

persons 




J2kM 



»*oeeooo9 



oooeooooo 



>UOOOa>OUUU' 



ooooooouuuavb 



>&ooooooeooo 



luuooowoooooouoe< 



louoooooooeocboo 



> O t» u J U U t 



I e • w o < 



, o u o o g 



>l>00t»00(^W0 



kooou ououoaooooo> 



nooooooooo 



' U O U O «> O I 



XXlQXcL u(/ouuuu900UOOOO««0 

Palestine 
Philippines,, ^ 
Other Asia.„o 



Uub0;>V9U<t00<>00 

<,« e o 



I t» o tf o a 






>0 oo oobOuw&OO 



3rth America 
Canada. ^ . 
MexicOaoo 
West Indies 
Central America » ^ „ . » . . q 
Other North Araericao.o. 

)uth Americao <,.oo»oooi.oe 
• istralia & New Zealand, o 



8.598 
322 
528 

10,975 

48 

10,158 

87 

392 

60.521 

9.851 

15^795 

25 

1^956 

35,645 

24.504 

55 

26 

131.222 

20 

10,285 

32 

77 

95 

1,441 

28 

175 
100 

34,183 

32j 789 

l',115 

2olI4 



881 
8 

10 

■^6 

19 

lol20 



6.088 

319 

516 

8,144 

43 

9.895 

86 

384 

50-536 

9,849 

12,306 

25 

1,937 

35,011 

23p034 

46 

21 

124.866 

13 

4,955 

27 

77 

92 

1,439 

27 

175 

96 

29s 909 

16,913 

847 

2,103 




• 'JlgL -COunt rigs „ , 

Includes wives and children « 



24 
3 
2 

4 

245 

18 
62 

2 
20 



879 

7 

8 
76 

19 
1,114 

222 
16 

3 

1 

3 
199 

14 

58 

2 

19 



(■iuota 

displaced 

persons 



r 



336.970 



5p965 

318 

515 

8,109 

38 

9,873 

84 

380 

49,640 

9,017 

12, 267 

24 

1,634 

34,809 

22,954 

44 

21 

124,642 

10 

4,937 

27 

77 

92 

1,438 

26 

174 

96 

29,855 

16.682 

840 

2,102 



878 
7 
8 

76 

19 

1.114 



1 
199 

5 

57 
2 



Nonquota 

displaced 

Orphans 



3,037 



3,025 

116 

1 

1 

33 

5 

17 

2 

4 

881 

831 

38 

1 

303 

202 

69 

2 

212 

3 

18 



Other 

nonquota 

displaced 

persons 



1 
1 

47 
230 

7 



1 
10 



JI. 



il 



2 
5 



15 

1 
1 



11 



12 



Ethnic 
Germans 1/ 



7 

1 



JlI 



12 

1 
2 



5^448 



2,510 

3 
12 

2,831 

5 

263 

1 

8 

9,985 
2 

3., 489 

19 

634 

lp470 

9 

5 

6,356 

7 

5,330 

5 

3 
2 

1 

4 

4,274 

15,876 

268 

U 



2 
1 
2 



_i6. 



8 

1 

1 

46 

4 

4 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 6C. DISPLACED PERSONS 1/ AND CTHER M-IGRANT jS.LIENS ATMITTED TO THE UNITED STATES 
BI COUNTRY C& HEGIOh OF BIHTH: YEAI^ EMDED JUNE 30. 1952 



Countjry or 
region of 
birth 



I Displaced persons 



Other Imniifjaata 




All countries 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgium. 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark. 

Estonia. 

Finland. 

France 

Germany. 

Greece, 

H\mgary. 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

(England 
United (No. Ireland.. 
Kingdom( S cotland 

(Wales 

U.S^^ 

Yugoslavia 
Other Europe 



Asia 

China 

India 

Japan...... . 

Palestine. . . 
Philippines . 
Other Asia. . 



9.h2B 



1,421 
153 

4,517 
156 

1,066 

2,115 

46.092 



28,141 

9,600 

6,723 

2,642 

986 

3,902 
740 
416 



2.200 



301 
101 

a 

120 

84 

1,553 



2,582 
108 
421 

163 
573 
216 



7.228 



1,120 

52 

4,476 

36 

982 

562 

44.975 



North America 

Canada 

Mexico..... 

West Indies ........... 

Central America 

Other North America. . . 

South America 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand. 

Other countries 

"^ Displaced persons admitted under the Displaced Persons Act of June 25, 1948, as amended. 
2/ Includes 42,786 ethnic Germans adaitted imder Section 12 of the Displaced Persons Act. 

United States Department of Justice 
lamigratioa and Naturalization Service 



28,135 

9,600 

4,141 

2,534 

565 

3,739 
167 
200 

24 



J^ 



131 

5 

1 

51 

167 

60 



55 

3 
30 

2 

-i 



J^ 



130 

5 

1 

51 

167 



55 

1 

29 

2 



?i073 



1,290 

148 
4,516 

105 
1,066 
1,948 

48.032 



28,136 
9,600 
6,723 
2,642 

931 

3,899 
710 
414 
-51 



1.846 



171 
96 
40 
69 
84 
1,386 

.1^062 



2,582 
108 
366 

162 
544 
214 
Jk 



7.227 



1,119 

52 

4,476 

36 

982 

562 

44,?70 



28, 130 

9,600 

4,141 

2,534 

565 

3,737 

166 

200 

19 



TABLE 7. ANNUAL QUOTAS AND ^VOIk EMIGRANTS ADMllTliD 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1948 TO 1952 

/Persons born in colonies, dependencies, or protectorates of European countries are charged 
to the quotas of the countries to which they belong. Nationality for quota purposes does 
not always coincide with actual nationality (Section 12 of the Immigration Act of 1924i/ 



(.iuota nationality 



All coimtries , 



)9«»»«»0*ft0«0 



Europe „„vii.o«ii..»«5»«««»«»»<'»« "••"'''' 
Northern aind Western Eiirope. o . . . o . 

Belgium • • ■> 

Denjoark 

France ...o<>..= 

Germany, •••• 

Great Britain, Northern Ireland„ 

Iceland. o ... . 

Ireland o .. . 

Liixembourg 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Sweden 

Switzerland. 

Southern and Eastern Europe ....... 

Austria o. . 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Estonia. ...... ...«.«...».o»»'>»o» 

Finland ,.....,.........«•»<>••■>»» 

Greece. ......... «.«....»»o»i>«<>«» 

Hungary. ......o..... 

Italy 

Latvia ........•••. .......oo.o'^' 

Lithuania ....e 

Poland ....••.••(•••••.«ooo'>«*<>'>o 

Portugal. .o....« 

Rumania .«...•• «.••«« 

Spanji. ,..#...... .........•.•••o. 

Turkey 

Utt 3. S. It. ..«•*••••••••. .ooe... 

Ixigoslavia » « • • 

Other Southern & Eastern Europe. 

Asia 3.. I.. 

China .....o 

Chinese race. . , ,,.... 

(East Indian race, ,.,,.,.... 

India (;^ii other 

Other Asia. .«.«.... 

Africa 

Oceania. • 

1/ The anniial quota was 153,929 in 
the fiscal year 1950. 

2/ The Philippines are included in 
Pacific, or Oceania. 



Annual 
quota 1/ 



1^4,277 



150,572 



125,853 



1,304 

1,181 

3,086 

25,957 

65,721 

100 

17,853 
100 

3,153 
2,377 
3,314 
1,707 

24.719 



(iuota incnigrants admitted 



1948 



92.526 



90,632 



i2il21 



1,413 
100 

2,874 
116 
569 
310 
869 

5,677 
236 
386 

6,524 
440 
291 
252 
226 

2,798 
938 
700 



1,308 

1,172 

3,059 

17,229 

27, 774 

56 

7,444 

82 

3,515 
2,460 
1,965 
1,331 

23.237 



1949 



113.046 



905^ 




1,692 
81 

2,831 
127 
516 
213 
882 

5,631 
300 
458 

6,143 
445 
400 
189 
188 

2,061 
794 
286 

1.248 



1,200 
6O0S/ 



377 

80 

( 20 

(no 

661 

328 

318 



111^443 



59.578 



1,270 

1,109 

2,997 

12j819 

23,543 
68 

8,505 
94 
2,991 
2,303 
2.376 
1,503 



1950 



197.460 



1951 



195,671 



iiJ6i 



51,865 

1,327 

65 

3,255 

1,716 

497 

426 

1,445 

5,207 

3,534 

6,452 

21,462 

462 

699 

194 

177 

3.710 

976 

261 



979 

1,101 

3,187 

31,511 

17,194 

88 

6,444 

74 

3,067 

2,179 

1,876 

1,666 

126,305 



156,547 



154,7^? 



47,02b 




6,153 

177 

4,058 

5,387 

518 

285 

4,054 

5,861 

17,439 

11,774 

50,692 

426 

2,019 

197 

697 

10,854 

5,359 

355 

I1I7? 



991 

1,082 

2, 900 

14, 637 

15,369 

96 

3,810 

59 

3,102 

2,248 

1,360 

1,372 

107,733 



1952 



194,247 



208 

59 

( 55 
( 68 

783 

328 
288 



1,361 

231 

3,870 

2,230 

556 

3,638 

5,079 

4,325 

11,220 

4,568 

45,766 

384 

2,042 

286 

401 

14,019 

7,411 

346 

1.341 



192.754 

73,302 

1,103 

1,183 

2,935 

35,453 

20,368 

95 
3,819 
103 
3,032 
2,333 
1,554 
1,324 

119,452 



518 

56 

( 50 

( 19 

698 

272 
175 



2,236 
330 

5,398 

1,366 
494 

5,621 

7,331 
5,901 
4,999 
3,330 
42,66$ 
388 

5,184 
256 

374 

15,269 

17,265 

1,045 



1,085 

178 

51 

( 62 

( 8 

786 

253 
155 



the fiscal years 1947 to 1949 inclusive, and 154,206 in 

Asia; previously the Philippines were included in the 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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TABLE 10. BttilGRAi^IT ALIENS ADMITTED 3Y 


RACE, SEX AND AGE 


t 










YEAR 


ENDED JUNE 30, 1952 ^ 






Nximber 






East 


Fili- 


Japa- 


Kor^J 


Pacific 


Sex and age 


admitted 


White 


Chinese 


Indian 


pino 


nese 


ean 


Negro 


Is- 
lander 


Number admitted 


265,520 


257,09? 


1,152 


74 


957 


4,734 


83 


1,411 


10 


Male 


123,609 


122,515 


118 


43 


174 


153 


9 


594 


3 


Under 5 years 


U,581 


14,401 


30 




11 


106 


1 


32 




5-9 " 


9,514 


9,403 


4 


3 


60 


8 


3 


33 


- 


10-14 " 


7,245 


7,173 


13 


- 


33 


3 


2 


21 


- 


15 " 


1,422 


1,403 


2 


1 


9 


1 


— 


6 


- 


16-17 " 


3,270 


3,238 


8 


1 


12 


1 


— 


10 


- 


18-19 " 


3,679 


3,650 


6 


- 


9 


— 


_ 


14 


- 


20-24 " 


11,401 


11,317 


4 


8 


7 


3 


— 


63 


1 


25"29f " 


16,826 


16,664 


3 


12 


8 


14 


- 


125 


- 


30-34 " 


13,398 


13,265 


16 


9 


"7 


5 


\ 


95 


- 


35-39 " 


12,205 


12,092 


10 


4 


5 


4 


" 


90 


- 


40-44 " 


10^039 


9,968 


9 


1 


5 


- 


1 


54 


1 


45-49 " 


7,478 


7,435 


7 


1 


4 


5 


J. 


2^ 


- 


50-54 " 


5,493 


5,467 


3 




2 


- 


„ 


19 


1 


55-59 " 


3,491 


3,433 


- 


- 


2 


1 


- 


5 


- 


60-64 " 


1,-^67 


1,758 


3 


1 


- 


2 


- 


3 


- 


65-69 " 


93? 


"936 


- 


1 


^ 


~ 


^ 


^ 


- 


70-74 " 


491 


490 


— 


- 


^ 




- 


1 


- 


75-79 " 


257 


257 


- 


- 


- 


mm 


- 


- 


- 


80 yrs. and over,. 


ni 


TIT 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


~ 


Unknown, ••..•.•,«* 


4 
]Jtl.^ll 


4 

134,584 


1,034 


31 


783 


4,581 


Ik 


817 


_ 


'emale 
Under 5 years 


7 


13,681 


13,490 


24 


2 


16 


102 


■"»' 


41 


1 


5-9 " 


9,581 


9,485 


8 


2 


52 


4 


1 


28 




10-14 " 


?,ri4 


7,014 


11 


- 


48 


3 


4 


34 


- 


15 " 


1,375 


1,360 


4 




3 


- 


- 


7 


m» 


16-17 " 


. 3,744 


3,690 


6 


4 


12 


15 


2 


14 


'-^ 


18-19 " 


5,48C 


5,163 


36 


2 


22 


223 


i 


27 


- 


20-24 " 


22,381 


19,151 


316 


7 


161 


2,521 


36 


188 


1 


25-29 " 


23,472 


21,697 


lUS 


4 


182 


1,328 


14 


97 


2 


30-34 " 


1 /., ,209 


13,533 


113 


3 


135 


301 


3 


121 


- 


35-39 " 


10,771 


10,433 


120 


2 


70 


57 


1 


88 


- 


40-44 " 


8,913 


8,697 


85 


1 


42 


23 


1 


63 


1 


45-49 " 


6,986 


6,845 


79 


2 


13 


3 


- 


44 


- 


50-54 " 


5,307 


5,220 


43 


1 


15 


1 


- 


27 


- 


55-59 " 


3,763 


3,716 


31 


- 


T 


- 


- 


13 


- 


60-64 " 


2,171 


2,152 


7 


- 


3 


- 


- 


9 


- 


65-69 " 


1,434 


1,423 


2 


>. 


2 


„ 


- 


7 


- 


70-74 •' 


856 


845 


- 


— 


2 


- 


- 


9 


- 


75-79 " 


453 


451 


1 


— 


1 


— 


- 


- 


- 


80 yrs, and over,. 


216 


216 


— 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Unknown 


4 


3 


— 


«■ 


1 


— 


^ 


** 


^ 








. — r 

United Sta 


tes Dej 


jartment oi 


1 t. 

" Justice 










Imnii 


gration 


and Na1 


^uralizatic 


)n Ser 


vice 





TABI£ lOA. IMMIGRANT ALUMS ADMITTED AND OaGRANT ALIENS DEPARTED, BY SEX, AGE, 
ILLITERACY. AND MAJOR OCCUPATION (aOUP; YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 19i!^8 TO 1952 



Sex, age, illiterates, and occupation 



1948 



1949 



1950 



1951 



1952 



nunigreLnt aliens admitted. 



Sex: 
Male 

Female 

Males per 1,000 females, 
Age: 

Under 16 years 

16 to 44 years 

45 years and over 



Illiterates: 
Number l/. , 
Percent..., 



Major Occupation Group: 

Professional, technical, and kindred workers 

Farmers and farm managers • 

Managers, officials, and proprietors, except farm 

Clerical,, sales, and kindred workers 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers 

Operatives and kindred workers 

Private household workers 

Service workers, except private household • 

Farm laborers and foremen..... ...•••.. 

Laborers, except farm and mine ..•»..... 

No occupation , •• 



aigrant aliens departed. 



Sex: 

Male 

Female 

Male per 1,000 females, 
Age: 

Under l6 years 

16 to 44 years , 

45 years and over, . . . . . 



Major Occupation Group: 
Professional, technical, and kindred workers...,. 

Farmers and farm managers ,,,,..,,,.•*«•••,•• 

Managers, officials, and proprietors, except farm 
Clerical, sales , and kindred workers ...«.,••••*•• 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers 

Operatives and kindred workers «•• 

Private household workers , 

Service workers, except private household 

Farm laborers and foremen .,.,,, 

Laborers except farm and mine 

No occupation .,, .^ff* 



170. 570 



188, 317 



249,187 



205.717 



26^,520 



67,322 

103, 24B 

652 

24,095 

112,453 

34,022 



2,766 
1.6 



12,619 

4,884 

6,207 

15,298 

11, 019 

12,797 

6,389 

4,350 

946 

4,826 

91,235 

.20,822 



11,505 
9,370 
1,228 

1,530 

10,426 

8,919 



2,250 
416 

1,735 
898 
550 

1,294 
450 
740 
108 

1,841 
10. 593 



80,340 

107, 977 

744 

32, 728 

123,340 

32,249 



1,983 
1.1 



13,884 

8,937 

6,014 

14,797 

13,693 

14,271 

6,990 

3,937 

933 

6,192 

98, 669 

.2^yiS6 



12,950 

11,636 

1,113 

2,032 

13,895 

8,659 



2,150 
306 

1,819 

1,280 
879 

1,265 
643 
690 
976 

1,702 
12. 876 



119,130 

130, 057 

916 

50,468 

152,358 

46,361 



1,677 
.7 



20, 502 

17,642 

6,396 

16, 796 

21,832 

19, 618 

8,900 

4,970 

3,976 

5,693 
122,862 

-2_Z,i98 



14,331 

13,267 

1,080 

2,333 

15,576 

9,689 



2,631 
335 

1,983 

1,540 
929 

1,222 
663 
730 
642 
993 
15,930 



99,327 

106,390 

934 

44,023 

121,823 

39,871 



1,869 
.9 



15,269 
10,214 

5,493 
14,098 
16, 183 
17,858 

7,243 
5,292 
4,972 
5,4fil 
103,614 

26,174 



12,843 

13,331 

963 

2,417 

15,422 

8,335 



2,772 
350 

1,954 

1,799 
950 

1,363 
757 
839 
253 
924 
14.213 



123, 609 

141,911 

871 

64,513 

159, 788 

41,219 



2,026 
.8 



16,496 
10, 566 
5,968 
16,724 
21, 223 
21,092 

9,653 
6,418 
6,289 
8,969 
142,122 



21,880 



10,921 

10, 959 

997 

1,918 

12,318 

7,644 



2,328 
263 

1,693 

1,179 
437 
902 
470 
908 
158 

4,099 



Immigrants 16 years of age or over who are unable to read or write any language. 

United States Department of Justice 
Iinnigration and Naturalization Seirvice 






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TART.K 11. ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED 

YEAKS ENDED JUIE 30, 


AND DEPARTED, ALIENS EXCLUDED 
1908 to 1952 






ALIENS ADMITTED 


ALIEI\IS DEPARTED 


AI,TKI\IS 
EX- 
CLUDED 


u. s. crrizEMs 


Period 


Immi- 
grant 


Nonimmi- 
grant 


Emi- 
grant 


Nonemi- 
grant 


Ar- 
rived 


De- 
parted 


Total, 1908 to 1952 


I4i4??,??? 


8.658.511 


4.679.572 


8,940,342 


518.207 


14.278.408 


U. 099. 773 


1908-1910 1/ 


2.576.226 


490.741 


823.311 


672.327 


45.583 


660.811 


342.600 


1911-1920 


5.735.811 


1.376.271 


2.146.994 


1.841.163 


178.109 


1.938.508 


2.517.889 


1911 

1912 


878,587 
838,172 
1,197,892 
1,218,480 
326, 700 
298,826 
295,403 
110,618 
141,132 
430,001 


151,713 

178,983 

229,335 

184, 601 

107,544 

67,922 

67,474 

101,235 

95,889 

191,575 


295,666 
333,262 
308,190 
303,338 
204,074 
129,765 
66,277 
94,585 
123,522 
288,315 


222, 549 

282, 030 

303,734 

330,467 

180,100 

111,042 

80,102 

98,683 

92,709 

139,747 


22,349 
16,057 
19,938 
33,041 
24,111 
18,867 
16,028 
7,297 
8,626 
11,795 


269,128 
280,801 
286,604 
286,586 
239,579 
1 ?1 , 930 
127,420 
72,867 
96,420 
157,173 


349,472 
353,890 


1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 


347,702 
368,797 
172,371 
110,733 
126, Oil 


1918 

1919 

1920 


275,837 
218,929 

194,147 






1921-1930 


4.107.209 


1.774.881 


1.045.076 


1.649.702 


189.307 


3.522.713 


3.519.519 


1921 

1922 

1923 


805, 228 
309,556 
522, 919 
706,896 
294,314 
304,488 
335,175 
307,255 
279,678 
241, 700 


172, 935 
122,949 
150,487 
172,406 
164,121 
191,618 
202,826 
193,376 
199,649 
204,514 


247, 718 
198, 712 
81,450 
76,789 
92,728 
76,992 
73,366 
77,457 
69,203 
50,661 


178,313 
146,672 
119,136 
139,956 
132,762 
150,763 
180,1/,?, 
196,899 
183,295 
221,764 


13,779 
13,731 
20,619 
30,284 
25,390 
20,550 
19,755 
18,839 
18,127 
8,233 


222,712 
243,563 
308,471 
301,281 
339,239 
370,757 
378,520 
430,955 
449, 955 
477,260 


271,560 
309,477 
270, 601 


1924 


277,850 


1925 

1926 

1927 

1928 


324,323 
372,480 
369,788 
429, 575 


1929 

1930 


431,842 
462, 023 






1931-1940 


** '528*431 


1. 574. 071 


"'459.738 


*i.*736.*9i2' 


**68.217* 


"3.365.432 


3.357.936 


1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

1936 

1937 


97,139 
35, 576 
23,068 
29,470 
34, 956 
36,329 
50,244 
67,895 
82, 998 
70, 756 


183, 540 
139,295 
127, 660 
134,434 
144,765 
154,570 
181, 640 
184, 802 
185,333 
138,032 


61,882 

103,295 
80,081 
39,771 
38,834 
35,817 
26,736 
25,210 
26, 651 
21,461 


229,034 
184,362 
163,721 
137,401 
150,216 
157,467 
197,846 
197,404 
174, 758 
144,703 


9,744 
7,064 
5,527 
5,384 
5,558 
7,000 
8,076 
8,066 
6,498 
5,300 


439,897 
339,262 
305,001 
273,257 
282,515 
318,273 
386,872 
406,999 
354,438 
258, 918 


446,386 
380,837 
338, 545 
262, 091 
272,400 
311,480 
390,196 
397,875 
333,399 
224, 727 


1938 

1939 

1940 


1941-1950 


1.035.039 


2.461.359 


156.399 


2.105.894 


"30*263* 


3.223.233 


2.880.414 


1941 

1942 

1943 

1944 

1945 

1946 

1947 


51, 776 

28,781 

23, 725 

28,551 

38,119 

108,721 

147,292 

170, 570 

188,317 

249,187 


100,008 
82,457 
81,117 
113,641 
164,247 
203,469 
366,305 
476,006 
447,272 
426,837 


17,115 

7,363 

5,107 

5,669 

7,442 

18,143 

22,501 

20,875 

24,586 

27,598 


71,362 

67,189 

53,615 

78,740 

85,920 

186,210 

300,921 

427,343 

405,503 

429,091 


2,929 
1,833 
1,495 
1,642 
2,341 
2,942 
4,771 
4,905 
3,834 
3,571 


175,935 
118,454 
105,729 
108,444 
175,568 
274,543 
437,690 
542,932 
620,371 
663,567 


168, 961 
113, 216 
62,403 
63,525 
103,019 
230,578 
451,845 


1948 


478, 988 


1949 

1950 


552,361 
655, 518 






1951 


205,717 
265.520 


465,106 
516, 082 


26,174 
21.880 


446,727 
487,61? 


3,784 
2,944 


760,486 
807.225 


667,126 


1952 


814.289 



y Departure of alliens first recorded in 1908. Departure of U. S. Citizens first recorded in 1910. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABI£ 12. IMHIGRANT ALUVS AEMIVTED AND EMIC£ANT illElJS DSPAETBD 

BI STATE OF BttSSBiSi FUTUBE OR LAST PEBMANENT BESHSiCE 

YEtBS HJPED JUNE 30. 19^B TO 195; 



Fuitire or last 
residence 



E M I QB AM T 




All States 

Alabana 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delanare 

District of ColuBbia. 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana. 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland • 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada • 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

PennsylTanla 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota......... 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Venaont 

Virginia.... 

Washington •• 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin .••.. 

Wyoming 

All other 



United States Departaant of Justice 
Innlgration and lIatuT«iizatlon Seinrlce 



TABI£ 12. ZMMIGRANT AUHiS ADMII'TQ) AND EHI(£ANT iUQJS DEPABTH) 

BI STATS OF SaaiBm FUTUES OB LAST FEBMANBIT S&SHaiCB 

aABS QJUED JUNJS 30. 19it6 TO 1952 



Future or last 
residence 



I M M I Q R A N T 



19AS 



1949 



1950 1951 



1952 



1948 



K M I QB AM T 



1949 



1950 



1951 



1952 



All States 

AlabaJia 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

CaliTomla 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

D«laK&re 

District of ColuBbia. 

Florida 

Greorgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

llaryland........ 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana ....• 

Nebraska. 

Nevada • 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Bhode Island r. 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington • 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

WTomlng 

All other 



170.570 



188.317 249.187 205.717 



458 

1,117 

238 

22,666 

594 

3,904 

271 

1,473 

3,064 

564 

376 

9,102 

1,571 

890 

545 

450 

982 

1,362 

1,493 

8,319 

9,278 

1,639 

296 

1,393 

489 

406 

241 

679 

8,457 

286 

54*056 

684 

357 

4,809 

443 

1,271 

8,153 

1,091 

292 

253 

480 

5,595 

1,077 

803 

1,1M. 

>,52i-, 

564 

1,870 

222 



538 

1,252 

417 

21,014 

729 

5,036 

279 

1,564 

2,736 

661 

367 

11,469 

2,172 

1,425 

605 

734 

2,151 

1,089 

2,747 

9,259 

10,267 

2,288 

1,058 

1,613 

646 

578 

180 

644 

9,832 

264 

53,926 

1,203 

718 

6,158 

596 

1,382 

10,162 

1,156 

436 

350 

694 

6,071 

1,293 

757 

1,483 

3,492 

730 

2,451 

169 

1.476 



26^1^20 



469 
950 

725 

20,428 

1,401 

6,282 

396 

1,670 

2,980 

801 

424 

18,673 

3,642 

2,139 

958 

918 

2,125 

1,100 

4,330 

10,443 

14,681 

5,287 
1,584 
2,497 

802 
1,603 

164 

637 
13,349 

296 

68,944 

1,981 

1,279 

9,829 

755 

1,364 

15,268 

1,288 

509 
1,601 

953 
6,385 
1,325 

794 
3,570 
3,825 

690 
5,776 

275 
1.022 



386 

958 

384 

19,588 

1,035 

4,841 
328 

1,460 

2,923 

608 

423 

20,562 

2,777 

1,639 
785 
637 

1,115 
809 

2,275 

8,134 
13,452 

2,710 
500 

1,721 
663 

1,273 

165 

500 

10,701 

315 

60,113 

1,069 
595 

7,926 
720 

1,274 
10,666 
938 
371 
487 
656 

5,533 

1,192 

5n 

1,740 
3,U5 

457 
3,162 

222 
1.003 



697 
1,269 

556 

26,599 

1,863 

5,212 

453 
1,865 
3,789 
1,148 

449 
20,758 

3,473 

2,372 

1,137 

757 

1,729 

989 

2,321 

8,741 

15,489 

3,327 

3,032 
869 

2,199 

269 

633 

14,531 

452 

78,212 

1,IA9 

1,078 

12,145 
898 

1,775 
13,772 

1,094 
537 
784 
876 

8,416 

1,485 
681 

2,157 

4,629 
663 

5,774 
276 

1.697 



20,822 



Ski^ 



27.598 



26.174 



21.880 



46 
101 

12 
2,837 

85 
258 

17 

987 

422 

43 

26 

621 

88 

61 

37 

24 

160 

79 

167 

713 

556 

141 

35 

94 

35 

21 

28 

34 

593 

20 

7,214 

65 

24 

309 

22 

115 

674 

84 

16 

10 

28 

193 
26 
42 

115 

232 
39 

135 

17 

2,17^ 



53 
132 

16 
2,038 

74 
559 

18 
1,295 
1,449 

72 

27 
730 
132 

85 

62 

56 
285 

74 
221 
736 

633 

176 
37 

115 
25 
29 
17 
44 

785 

30 

9,267 

86 

33 

394 
64 

101 

631 
92 
34 
15 
83 

452 
34 
42 

187 

283 
50 

156 

13 

2.M 



67 

145 

12 

2,616 

105 

504 

33 

1,743 

1,317 

92 

30 

1,000 

226 

140 

84 

87 

362 

104 

338 

894 

880 

364 

56 

180 

48 

38 

27 

59 

1,027 

71 

9,519 

ru 

38 

508 

89 

91 

777 

98 

42 

24 

84 

622 

83 

86 
184 
377 

53 
252 

18 



63 
121 

27 

2,531 

104 

3a 

28 

2,051 

1,106 

115 

42 

957 

228 

103 

74 

65 

379 

156 

280 

956 

863 

200 

60 

126 

67 

32 

16 

82 

991 

61 

9,380 

90 

31 

464 

78 

116 

742 

111 

33 

12 
115 
557 

60 

90 
168 
357 

50 
260 

14 
1.201 



68 

129 

16 

1,926 

104 

253 

14 

1,843 

831 

62 

23 

667 

126 

86 

56 

63 

227 

70 

189 

659 

596 

163 

47 

102 

38 

21 

26 

48 

711 

49 

7,375 

70 

27 

331 

66 

119 

500 

85 

17 

41 

67 

810 

62 

58 

129 

243 

32 

175 

12 

2.448 



United States Departasnt of Justice 
Iianigration and Naturs^Liaatlon Senrice 



TABLE 12A. DISPLACED PERSOWS 1/ MB OTHER IMt-JIGRAI^iT ALIEI\I3 ADfflTTED TO THE UNITED STATES 
BY RUR/i AND URBAN AREA AND CITY 2/: YEAR Si^IDED JUNE 30, 1952 



Class of place 
and city 



Immigrants 



Total 



t^uot? 



Non- 
quota 



Displaced persons 



Total 



>^uota 



Non- 
quota 



Other immi'^rants 



Total 



Quota 
_1^ 



Non- 
quota 




:ity total 

Los Angeles, Calif... 

Oakland^ Calif. 

San Diego, Calif 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Bridgeport. Conn 

Hartf oixi, Conn'>, „ . . „ , . 

Washington, D. C 

Miami, Fla... 

Tampa, Fla..... 

Chicago, 111 

New Orleans J La 

Baltimore, Md 

Boston, Mass „.,.„. o. . 
Cambridge , Mass ...,., 
Detroit 5 Mich. ....... 

Minneapolis, Minn, „ . , 

St, Louis, Mo 

Jersey City, N. J..., 

Newark, N, J,, 

Paterson, N. J....... 

Buffalo/ N. Y,.o...,, 
New Yorkj N. Y. .o..,. 
Rochester, N. Y...... 

Cincinnati, Ohio , , „ , , 
Cleveland,, OhiOcc,... 
Portland, Ore,....„,. 

Philadelphia, Pa .... . 

Pittsburgh, Pa,.„..,, 

Providence, R, I 

Houston, Tex. ....,„ .. 

San Antonio, Tex. .... 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 
Seattle, V/ash. ..,..., 
Milwaukee, Wis ....... 

Other cities, „ o J .... o . 

'ilying territories 
md possessions, .„. .. 
I giown or not reported 



265,520 



194, 247 



71^273 



79,178 



77,196 



1^982 



34,936 26.433 



8,503 



8,096 



■L.i21. 



71,954 48,202 



23,752 



13.955 



15,458 



154,999 117,596 



8,583 
682 

755 
3,920 

471 

808 
1,865 
1,358 

300 
1A,399 

840 
1,059 
2,277 

331 
8,539 

891 
1,386 

989 



37,403 



1,146 

514 

2, 686 

59,333 
1,084 

853 
4.43? 

814 

5,453 
1,407 

476 

700 

853 

899 

2,088 

2,194 

20,609 



1,348! 
2.283! 



4,497 
357 
247 

2,085 
354 
652 

1. 275 

409 

93 

12,58? 

36? 

790 

1,652 
184 

5,.^)59 
596 

1,193 
834 
948 
432 

1,608 

50, 158 

845 

744 

3,997 
349 

4,815 

1, 163 
330 

37? 
198 

794 

786 

2,008 

14,313 



279 



4,086 
325 
508 

1,835 
117 
156 
590 
949 
207 

1,812 
473 
269 
625 
147 

2,980 
295 
193 
155 
198 
82 

1,078 

9,175 
239 
109 
440 
465 
638 
244 
146 
323 
655 
105 

1,302 
186 

6,296 



,069 

546 



54,880 



964 
82 

79 
587 

173 

362 

472 

93 

5 

6,270 

182 

342 

885 

47 

2,612 
298 
215 
545 
546 
149 
708 

25,429 

432 

231 

2,325 

97 

2,938 

661 

165 

11? 

63 

33 

185 

703 

5,885 



19 
228 



^3i^72 



945 

79 

7? 

561 

168 

362 

456 

92 

5 

65 084 

181 

338 

872 

4? 

2,577 

292 

209 

544 

538 

148 

706 

24, 664 

429 

22? 

2,314 

93 

2,921 

651 

165 

115 

57 

32 

180 

699 

5,744 



19 
226 



186,342[ll7,051 69,291 




35 
6 
6 
1 
8 
1 
2 
765 
3 
4 

11 
4 

17 

10 

2 
6 
1 
5 
4 
141 



295 
8,129 

658 

717 
1,392 

284 
5,92? 

593 

1,171 

444 

600 

365 

1,978 

33,904 

652 

622 
2,112 

717 

2,515 
746 

311 

583 

790 

866 

1,903 

1,491 

14, 724 



1,329 



137 


147 


2^982 


2,945 


304 


289 


984 


18? 


290 


154 


410 


190 


284 


81 


902 


1,076 


25,494 


8,410 


416 


236 


517 


105 


1,683 


429 


256 


461 


1,894 


621 


512 


234 


165 


146 


262 


321 


2A1 


649 


762 


104 


606 


1,29? 


1,309 


182 


8, 569 


6,155 


260 


1,069 


-IjJillJ 


?¥f 



i Displaced persons admitted under the Displaced Persons Act of Jime 25, 1948, as amended, 
I Rural - Population of less than 2,500, Urban - Population of 2,500 to 99,999, 

Cities " Population of 100.000 or over. 
3 Includes 42,786 ethnic Germans admitted under Section 12 of the Displaced Persons Act of 1948. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 12B. IMCIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED TO THE UNITED STATES, BY RURAL 
AND URBAN AREA MB CITY l/; YEARS ENDED JUNE 30o 1948 TO 1952 



Class of place and city 



1948 



1949 



1950 



1951 



1952 



Total, 



Rural. 



Urban. 



City total. 



Los Angeles^ Calif.., 
Oakland, Calif...,.., 
San Diego, Calif.,.., 
San Francis CO; Calif. 
Bridgeport, Conn. . . , , 
Hartford, Conn. 
Vifashington, D, C. 
Miami, Fla. ..,.,. 



» • « 9 < 



I O • O O 



L O U V • • • I 



> O O 4 O O I 



I e o « o I 



Tampa;, Fla . , . 
Chicago, 111. 
New Orleans. La. , 
Baltimore, Md, . . . 
Boston, 14ass,,.., 
Cambridge, Mass.. 
Detroit, Mich. „ , . 
Minneapolis, Minn 
St. Louis, Mo...„ 
Jersey City, N. J 
Newark, N. J.... 
Paterson, N. J.,. 
Buffalo, 'n. Y.„ 
New York, N. Y. 
Rochester, N, Y 
Cincinnati -, Ohio ..,..., 
Cleveland, Ohio ,.,,,.., 
Portland, Ore ., ... .... . 

Philadelphia., Pa 

Pittsbiirgh, Pa 

Providence, R. I 

Hoxiston., Tex, , . . . . 

San Antonio, Tex 



e«o«o«««oi 



• • e • • e < 



• o • • < 



o e e • ( 



I • O • • I 



• coo 



o • • a • 



Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Seattle, VJash 

Milwaukee, Wis 

Other cities 



Outlying territories and possessions. 
Unknown or not reported. 



170.570 



188,317 



249.187 



205,717 



27.377 



32,715 



47,066 



27, 674 



46.469 



52,304 



66,157 



55.848 



95.196 101.510 



5,962 

734 

656 

4,903 

476 

653 

1,473 

1,261 

293 
6,565 

639 

976 
1,682 

374 
5,479 

486 

583 
542 
947 
385 

1,008 

38,418 

712 

360 

1,308 
603 

2,757 
891 
402 
398 
538 
650 

1,540 
551 

9,991 

1,033 
495 



5,668 
684 
758 

4,118 
469 
878 

1,564 

1,120 
267 

8,376 
759 

1,301 

1,763 
481 

5,897 
564 
548 
670 

1,111 
452 

1,172 

38,194 

815 

375 

2,062 

594 
,408 
,014 
502 
540 
665 
789 
1,465 
741 
11, 726 

1,185 

ioi 



134,504 



3, 
1, 



1, 
1, 
1, 



5,263 

662 

628 

3,594 

454 

,124 

,670 

,279 

273 
13,152 

668 
2,151 
2,164 

519 
7,128 
1,449 
1,127 

752 
1,647 

560 

1,481 

50, 779 

1,143 

682 

3,331 

676 

5,242 

1,369 

595 

667 

630 

824 

1,565 

1,558 

17, 698 

848 
612 



120, 740 



4,746 
623 
553 

4,289 
345 

1,071 

1,460 

1,237 

221 
U,46l 

586 
1,107 
1,927 

403 
7,709 

891 

686 

716 
1,339 

316 

1,669 

45,650 

1,022 

507 
3,048 

609 
4,062 
1,044 

420 

545 
569 
816 
1,676 
983 
13,434 

899 



265.520 



34i?36 



7ii?54 



154.999 



J. 



17 Rural - Population of less than 2,500. Urban - Population of 2,500 to 99,999. 
Cities - Population of 100,000 or over. 



8,583 
682 
755 

3,920 
471 
808 

1,865 

1,358 

300 

14,399 

840 

1,059 
2,277 

331 
8,539 

891 
1,366 

989 
1,146 

514 

2,686 

59,333 

1,084 

853 
4,437 

81A 
5,453 
1,407 

476 

700 

853 

899 

2,088 

2,194 

20, 609 

1,348 
2 .283 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



Countr7 of last 
or future resldoDca 

An countries . , . . 

Europe. 

Austria 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslorakla 

Deomark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

(Qigland.... 

United (N. Ireland. 

Eingdom(Scotland . . . 

(Wales 

D.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 
Other Europe 



TABLE 13. IMMICKANT AIJSNS ADHrTTO) AIID EMIGRANT ALIENS DEPARTED, 
BT COUNTRI or LAST OE INTEtlDED FUTURE PEEKfilENT RESIDENCE 
YEARS ENDH) JUNE 30. JiiS TO 1952 




Asia... 
China 
India 
Israel 1/ 
Japan 

Palestine ^ 
Philippines 
Other Asia 

North America 
Canada 
Mexico 
West Indies 
Central America 
Other No. America... 

Sooth America 

Africa 

Australia & Sew Zeal. 
Other countries 



y Israel is included in Palestine prior to 1950. 



United States Department of Justice 
loBiigi'atlon and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 13k. aiMIQRAM' ALIQJS AKCETTH) BT CCUMTRY OR HBGION OF BIRTH 
lEABS EMDED JUNE 30. 19L3 1p 1952 



Country or region 
of birth 



1943 



19U 



1945 



1946 ! 1947 



1948 



1949 



1950 



1951 



1952 



All cotintries . . . 

Europe 

Austria 1/ 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia. .... 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 1/ 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland... ......... 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania. 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

United (England... 
Kingdom( No . Ireland 

(Scotland. . 

(Wales 

U.S.S.R 

Yxigoslavia 

Other Europe 



Asia 

China 

India 

Japan 

Palestine.. , 
Philippines . 
Other Asia.. 



North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Central Aoerioa. ... 
Other No. America.. 

South Aaerica 

Africa 

Australia & N.Zealand 



23.725 



28.551 



38.119 108.721 147.2921170.570 



188.317 



249.167 



^O^^ZLZ 



265.520 



S|?» 



gther countries \ 25 

i/ In the years 1943 to 1945, 



210 

11 

375 

142 

21 

113 

524 

1,295 

309 

167 

227 

81 

65 

139 

199 

123 

1,647 

301 

230 

318 

113 

127 

1,114 

112 

287 

43 

444 

99 

117 

362 



8.6'94 



10.141 64.877 



5^ 
40 
16 
47 
9 
194 

13.718 



7,429 
3,985 
1,116 
1,181 
7 

474 
83 

no 



135 

23 

341 

119 

28 

72 

232 

1,360 

292 

227 

146 

177 

66 

105 

217 

195 

1,420 

429 

249 

291 

90 

50 

1,135 

92 

357 

47 

433 

178 

188 

364 



72 
43 
9 
35 
15 
190 

17.961 



738^ 
6,399 
2,299 
1,876 

1 

899 

75 
533 



92 

11 

289 

108 

19 

58 

207 

1,260 

235 

132 

286 

320 

50 

86 

111 

114 

1,222 

562 

234 

238 

67 

70 

2,627 

340 

515 

100 

399 

184 

205 

_-52i 



109 

95 

3 

52 

15 

301 

2 4|22? 



9,379 
6,455 
4,660 

3,395 
340 

1,326 

267 

1,535 

Ji6 



989 

1,770 

36 

1,075 

291 

136 

197 

5,000 

4,010 

578 

577 

1,387 

3,886 

206 

244 

610 

379 

4,806 

554 

425 

402 

327 

282 

28,763 

1,584 

2,472 

1,495 

1,110 

676 

610 

1.921 



96.86^ 



337 
407 
17 
193 
293 
674 



187627 

6,805 

4,876 

2,171 

646 

1,755 
1,098 

5,746 
199 



1,997 

2,208 

128 

3,601 

1,166 

184 

689 

5,808 

14,674 

2,056 

1,277 

2,446 

14,557 

340 

554 

2,607 

2,316 

8,156 

636 

558 

302 

1,252 

978 

17,889 

1,328 

3,757 

1,071 

2,240 

1,117 

973 

4.098 



1,407 

375 

82 

363 

739 

1,132 

40.29 ^ 



22,008 

7,775 

6,299 

3,470 

743 

2,421 
849 

2,532 
232 



115.750 



2,782 

1,757 

132 

3,865 

1,328 

225 

693 

4,697 

21,365 

1,964 

1,471 

7,651 

15,801 

427 

631 

3,739 

2,687 

8,020 

890 

770 

509 

2,022 

1,426 

17,484 

1,940 

5,436 

954 

2,317 

1,190 

1,577 

7.626 



3,987 

239 

371 

376 

1,122 

1,531 

42.270 



22,612 
8,730 
6,994 
2,884 
1,050 

2,768 
840 

1,110 
206 



^,391 
2,363 
1,592 
84 
4,393 
1,305 
1,840 
704 
3,972 

23,844 
1,759 
1,998 
8,585 

11,157 
3,853 
6,691 
3,200 
2,563 

23,744 
1,235 
1,043 
503 
2,433 
1,585 

13,589 
2,425 
4,805 
656 
3,907 
1,384 
1,089 

6.^?5 



206,547 



2j823 

166 

506 

234 

1,068 

1,556 

2?.46? 



3,182 
1,108 
190 
5,528 
1,234 
5,422 
645 
3,519 

31,225 
1,242 
5,098 
6,501 
9,839 

17,494 

11,870 
3,148 
2,379 

52,851 
1,075 
3,599 
463 
1,892 
1,728 
8,812 
1,249 
2,983 
393 

10,971 
9,154 
1,753 

4,615 



mjji 



202.8 



21,515 

7,977 

6,518 

2,493 

966 

2,639 
737 
602 

m. 



1,494 

153 

76 

212 

595 

2,085 

24i004 



2,777 
1,238 

231 

3,863 
1,217 
2,073 
646 
3,337 

26,369 
4,447 
4,922 
3,739 
7,348 

10, 588 
4,028 
3,170 
2,378 

37,484 

1,048 

2,351 

510 

1,427 

1,408 

8,333 

840 

2,950 

368 

11,953 
8,254 
1,880 

?|166 



i 



18,043 

6,841 

6,093 

2,151 

876 

2,777 
689 
443 
112 



1,821 
134 
198 

210 

760 

2,043 

35.482 



20,809 

6,372 

5,553 

1,970 

778 

2,724 

700 

390 

78 



5,976 
1,539 
279 
5,041 
1,345 
1,248 

585 
3,454 

50,283 
7,084 
6, §50 
3,796 
9,306 
4,459 
3,044 
3,143 
2,481 

33,211 
1,013 
4,915 
536 
1,478 
1,569 

12,054 

1,031 

4,052 

494 

12,697 

17,223 
2,698 

9.428 



1,421 
153 

4,517 
156 

1,066 

2,115 

48.092 



28,141 

9,600 

6,723 

2,642 

986 

3,902 

740 

416 

S8 



A\iptria was included witb Geraaniy. 



United states Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 14. MIGRANT ALIENS DEPARTED BY RACE, SEX AND AGE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1952 





Number 
















Pacific 


Sex and age 


de- 


White 


Chinese 


East 


Fili- 


Japa- 


Kor- 


Negro 


Is- 




parted 






Indian 


pino 


nese 


ean 




lander 


Kumber departed,..,. 


21.880 


19,792 


297 


282 


495 


475 


?? 


367 


38 


Male 


10.921 


9.563 


245 


209 


339 


323 


23 


185 


34 


Under 5 years 


320 


307 


6 


2 


2 


3 








5-9 " 


351 


332 


3 


7 


4 


3 


1 


1 


— 


10-14 " 


272 


258 


2 


5 


5 


— 


— 


2 


_ 


15 " 


68 


66 


1 


1 


_ 


.. 


_ 


_ 


. 


16-17 " 


127 


119 


4 


— 


2 


_ 


_ 


2 


_ 


18-19 " 


250 


241 


3 


- 


4 


1 


_ 


1 


— 


20-24 " 


1,496 


1,388 


11 


26 


22 


7 


1 


21 


20 


25-29 " 


1,695 


1,501 


32 


56 


34 


31 


2 


28 


11 


30^34 " 


1,332 


1,125 


44 


41 


46 


24 


6 


44 


2 


35-39 •• 


1,046 


878 


43 


21 


52 


22 


5 


25 


- 


40-44 " 


789 


660 


25 


15 


54 


17 


_ 


18 


_ 


45-49 " 


560 


474 


9 


9 


40 


14 


2 


12 


_ 


50-54 " 


450 


389 


14 


3 


21 


12 


2 


9 


_ 


55-59 " 


396 


344 


12 


1 


21 


U 


1 


3 


. 


60-64 " 


320 


254 


8 


1 


17 


33 


_ 


7 


m. 


65-69 " 


387 


323 


4 


- 


7 


48 


2 


3 


— 


70-74 " 


300 


238 


1 


1 


1 


57 


^ 


2 


— 


75-79 " 


151 


124 


3 


- 


1 


23 




— 


— 


80 yrs. and over,. 


104 


95 


- 


- 


- 


9 


«. 


_ 


. 


Unknown, .,,..,,«•• 


507 
10,959 


447 
10,230 


20 
152 


20 
73 


156 


5 
152 


1 
10 


7 
182 


1 


Female 


4 


Under 5 years 


263 


248 


4 


2 


5 


1 


■) 


2 




5-9 " 


321 


306 


2 


4 


1 


1 


1 


6 


_ 


10-14 " 


260 


237 


9 


5 


4 


2 


_ 


3 


^ 


15 " 


63 


62 


» 


_ 


.. 


^ 


_ 


1 


M. 


16-17 " 


145 


144 


1 


. 


_ 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 


18-19 " 


252 


243 


3 


_ 


3 


1 


_ 


2 


_ 


20-24 " 


1,030 


966 


17 


5 


17 


9 


Ua 


16 


— 


25-29 " 


1,525 


1,409 


32 


16 


29 


14 


4 


21 


_ 


30-34 " 


1,144 


1,058 


23 


13 


22 


11 


— 


16 


1 


35-39 " 


866 


793 


17 


6 


17 


9 


1 


22 


a. 


40-44 " 


621 


585 


6 


5 


13 


2 


1 


9 


— 


45-49 " 


511 


489 


4 


2 


6 


3 


1 


6 


i_ 


50-54 " 


485 


447 


4 


m. 


4 


20 


_ 


10 


. 


55-59 " 


447 


423 


2 


1 


3 


11 


1 


5 


1 


60-64 " 


426 


402 


. 


. 


2 


12 


_ 


10 


« 


65-69 " 


421 


400 


1 


1 


— 


15 


_ 


4 


. 


70-74 " 


384 


363 


— 


- 


2 


13 


_ 


6 


.. 


75-79 " 


233 


226 


1 


- 


— 


6 


_ 


_ 


_ 


80 yrs, and over,. 


124 


121 


- 


— 


— 


3 


_ 


,. 


_ 


Unknown...... 


1,438 


1,308 


26 


13 


28 


19 


— 


43 


1 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 







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TABLE 16. U0NIMMI(2iANT ALIH^IS ADMITTED, BY CLASSES UNDER THE IMMIGRATION LAWS 
AND COUMTRY OR REGIOM OF BIRTH; YEAB laiDED JUNE 30. 1952 



j caorry 

on 
trade 



Country or region 
of birth 



Number 

ad- 
Biitted 



Govern- 
ment 
offi- 
cials 



Tairporary 
visitors for 



Busi- 
ness 



Pleas- 
lire 



In 

trans- 
it 



Bet lim- 
ing 
resi- 
dents 



Stu- 
dents 



Inter- 
nat'l 
offi- 
cials. 



Other 
classes 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgium 

k Bulgaria 
Czechoslovakia 
Denmark 
Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany. 

Greece 

Hungary. 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithtiania 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania. 

Spain. 

Sweden. 

Switzerland 

(England 

United (N. Ireland.. 
Kingdom(Scotland. . . . 

(Wales 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia. • 

China. 

India. 

Japan 

Palestine 

Philippines .......... 

Other Asia. 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies.... 

Central America. ..... 

Other North America.. 

South America 

Africa. 

Australia &. New Zealand 
Other countries ........ 



516.082 



22.267 



86,74? 



203.781 



3,523 
5,815 
153 
1,809 
5,634 
210 
1,931 

18,427 

17,268 
3,097 
1,530 
4,077 

10,042 
394 
807 

11,212 
6,991 
7,886 
1,382 
2,076 

10,382 
5,857 
5,528 

52,702 
1,866 

12,303 

1,725 

5,023 

952 

3,179 

27iW 



9.145 



4,688 
2,717 
6,-- 



84 
629 
4 

63 

325 

9 

47 

1,351 

249 

324 

60 

61 
803 
8 
8 
638 
439 
216 
223 

36 

178 

218 

152 

2,070 

31 
173 

56 
242 
335 
113 



hh22k 



3, 
9, 



,034 
641 
600 
724 



224.229 



87,623 
32,120 
82,855 
13,189 
8,442 

41,585 
3,763 
8,093 
7»427 



157 
252 

345 

12 

586 

1,878 

4.962 



1,088 

1,119 

34 

408 

1,094 

31 

418 

5,401 

5,855 

584 

330 

366 

2,461 

94 

187 

2,705 

1,215 

1,689 

223 

457 

1,583 

1,474 

1,502 

9,764 

177 

1,326 

257 

673 

111 

598 

7.478 



269.606 



77.899 



:z2i. 



44.980 



8.613 



5.137 



J6^S2, 



935 

2,128 

1,071 

715 

113 

3,157 

343 

394 

liO:?6 



547 

901 

2,011 

140 

1,199 

2,680 

25.817 



8,996 
5,468 
9,334 
1,436 
583 

6,303 

1,097 

2,297 

529 



1,504 

1,U6 

66 

726 

1,824 

65 

527 
4,465 
6,171 
1,040 

652 
1,585 
2,851 

172 

475 
3,289 
1,833 
4,052 

311 

1,163 
4,906 
2,356 
1,823 
21,257 

878 
5,736 

780 
3,099 

225 

933 



42,953 



622 



27.628 



46, 



462 
581 
563 
266 
817 
2,451 

156.781 



64,882 

19,851 

56,967 

8,006 

7,075 

23,996 
1,220 
2,588 
3.701 



)2 

1,757 

18 

214 

1,732 

56 

744 

3,668 

1,723 

504 

217 

639 

1,954 

52 

70 

3,364 

2,466 

669 

250 

212 

2,995 

768 

942 

11,888 

355 

3,296 

352 

453 

95 

1,138 

?J48 



12 
21 

1 
45 

25 

11 

8 

21 

1 
52 



1 

24 

8 

1 

6 

60 

67 

207 

4 

24 

10 

4 

2 

7 



396 
679 
20 
293 
491 
37 
148 

2,794 

2,991 
372 
225 

1,403 

1,763 

62 

64 

971 

860 

1,113 
335 
154 
4S2 
943 
953 

6,911 
403 

1,694 
256 
400 
149 
266 



1.569 



2,791 

417 

958 

69 

109 

1,004 

21.424 



9,943 

3,575 

6,445 

998 

463 

4,039 

409 

2,023 

1.703 



31 2.987 



8 

10 



13 



6 

2 

24 

16 

6 

53 

14 

6 

11 



134 
100 
1,841 
50 
417 
445 

11.454 



1,570 

469 

7,891 

1,370 

154 

1,756 
336 
559 
260 



39 
27 

6 

43 

35 

10 

16 

123 

212 

217 

34 

6 
86 

4 

3 

99 
85 
99 
23 
39 
92 
33 
29 
64 

6 
10 

2 
28 

9 
90 

2.545 



2.459 



391 
315 
307 
100 
393 
1,039 

2.806 



980 
449 
817 
535 
25 

1,380 

214 

85 

Ik 



38 
167 

5 
61 
88 

2 

6 
6IA 
59 
35 
12 
16 
72 

2 

145 
69 
40 
16 
9 
86 
65 
60 

541 
12 
44 
12 

123 
26 
34 

645 



198 

141 

9 

4 

79 

214 

888 



268 
178 
306 
113 
23 

701 
130 
141 
173 



M. 



JiL 



43 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 17. NONIMMICaAITr .ILIENS ADMITTEI), BY CLASSES UI^TJIE THE IMMIGRATION LAWS 
AND COUNTRY OR REGION 0? LAST PEEMAInIENT KSSIPasCE; YE;.R EIfl)lD JUNli: ^30. 1952 



Cotintry or region of 
last residence 



All coxintries 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgium 

Bulgaria. 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France. 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

(England 

United (No. Ireland.. 
Kingdom (Scotland 

(Wales 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Japan. 

Palestine. ............ 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Central America 

Other North America... 

South America 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand. 
Other countries 




United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 18. NONIMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTID AND NONEMIGRANT ALUMS DEPARTED, 
BY COUNTRY OF LAST OR INTENDED FUTURE PERMANENT RESIDEKCE 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 19 LB TO 1952 



Count r7 of last 
or future residence 



NONIMHIGRANT 



1948 



1949 



22^ 



1951 I 1952 



NONEMIGRANT 



J2hL 



1949 



JL2^ 



1951 



1952 



All countries. 



Europe 

Austria 

Belgiim 

Bulgaria 

I Czechoslovakia. . . . 
Denmark 
Estonia 
Finland 
France 
Germany 

Greece 

Hungary...., 

(Ireland.... 
Italy 
Latvia 
Lithuania.. 
Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal.. . 
Rvimania. . .. 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

(England . . . 

United (No. Ireland 

Kiiig±ni(Scot land 

(Vales... 

U*i.>*0«lt* e • • • 

(Yugoslavia.. 
Other Europe 



>••••• 



Asia 

China 

India 

Israel l/. . . . 

Japan 

Palestine 1/. 
Philippines . . 
Other Asia. . . 



North America. 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies , 

Central America. . 
Other No. America 



476.006 



447.272 426,837 



-f 



465.106 516.082 



427. 343 



405.503 



429.091 



446.727 



487.617 



1??.2?? 



642 

3,954 

47 

1,674 

4,255 

42 

1,404 

15,557 

1,276 

2,582 

847 
1,772 
8,823 
13 
12 
7,018 
5,825 

828 
1,791 

173 
5,276 
5,286 
3,748 
49,113 
1,482 
8,465 
1,129 

504 

176 
1,645 

19.812 



6,890 
2,774 

219 
2,819 
2,525 
4,585 

266.113 



106,107 

37,023 

82,522 

9,975 

30,486 



41,200 
4,358 
5,138 

4. 026 



South America 

Africa , 

Hustralia & N. Zeal 

)ther countries .... J 

U Israel is included in Palestine prior to 1950. 



111.590 97.186 



854 

3,037 

47 

684 

3,680 

47 

877 

11,842 

4,394 

1,948 

657 

1,530 

7,830 

24 

25 

6,712 

5,305 

699 

1,577 

93 

3,067 

5,053 

3,519 

37,971 

1,011 

5,769 

848 

527 

158 

1,805 

17.914 



,234 
2,412 



488 
1,256 
2,497 
5,027 

268.191 



102, 020 
34,405 
87,517 
10, 701 
33,548 



39,291 
3,912 
5,062 
1.^12 



928 

2,450 

15 

227 

3,532 

IS 

833 

10,433 

4,091 

1,541 

66 

1,229 

7,050 

6 

8 

5,405 

4,576 

411 

1,091 

35 

2,610 

4,598 

3,673 

33, 695 

858 

4,648 

718 

472 

290 

1,679 

17-840 
1,959 
1,890 
3,008 
1,498 
436 
2,517 
6,532 

261.836 



104.963 



926 
3,254 
9 

97 

3,974 

17 

975 

13,197 

6,022 

3,643 

79 

1,072 

5,389 

24 

5 

7,641 

4,717 

217 

915 

50 

2,190 

4,289 

3,926 

33,382 

732 

4,550 

606 

427 

285 

2,353 

1?.?2? 



763 
1,506 
2,945 
3,580 

362 
2,728 
7,645 

281.201 



97,084 
30,735 
85,035 
11,207 
37,775 



108,887 
32,851 
86,398 
11,832 
41,233 



40,094 
3,320 

5,737 
824 



48,004 

3,125 

7,585 

699 



121.902 



1,380 
4,575 

9 

155 

4,227 

10 

1,165 

14,930 

9,965 

1,840 

75 

1,391 

6,240 

7 

15 

8,122 

5,322 

296 

888 

45 

2,623 

4,446 

4,467 

38,827 

780 

6,291 

730 

358 

420 

2,303 

22,638 



118|0^7 



1,074 
1,882 
2,648 
4,312 
252 

3,424 
10,046 

305.890 1 



221 

3,620 

38 

1,229 

3,419 

18 

604 

12,404 

313 

1,227 

506 

2,277 

4,508 

6 

14 

5,667 

3,977 

775 

1,211 

58 

3,936 

4,585 

3,066 

52,334 

1,027 

8,309 

1,000 

561 

137 

1,000 

17.252 



107.217 



123,471 
28,111 

100,301 
13,875 
40,132 

51,553 
3,704 
8,364 
1.031 



9,822 

1,796 

330 
1,778 
1,466 
2,060 

227. 560 



391 
3,075 
32 

533 

3,680 

15 

741 

11,197 

1,592 

1,383 

357 

1,678 

6,654 

20 

14 

6,662 

4,875 

676 

1,582 

71 

2,665 

5,108 

3,455 

40,403 

1,035 

6,395 

993 

362 

107 

1,466 

12.369 



98.477 



782 

2,448 

23 

219 

3,514 

24 

823 

9,800 

2,903 

1,578 

70 

1,399 

6,404 

4 

13 

5,115 

5,306 

416 

717 

30 

2,465 

4,995 

3,413 

36,773 

987 

5,464 

794 

323 

203 

1,472 

10.756 



?9.46? 



97,070 
22,892 
73,763 
8,167 
25,668 

33,576 
3,642 
5,159 

22.107 



3,885 
1,702 

322 
1,337 
1,795 
3,328 

238.916 



93,187 
24,131 
89,263 
9,657 
22,678 

37,651 
3,574 
4,730 
1. 046 



1,115 
1,581 
1,760 
957 
320 
1,926 
3,097 

269.469 



687 

2,935 

8 

103 

3,796 

11 

938 

10, 785 

5,152 

1,868 

65 

1,267 

4,796 

9 

15 

7,031 

4,715 

221 

738 

48 

2,470 

4,278 

3,598 

35,025 

779 

4,744 

633 

366 

240 

2,148 

12,543 



111.585 



96,117 
25,174 
88,818 
10,849 
48,511 

40,279 
3,033 
5,868 
1,20? 



483 
1,133 
2,809 
2,532 

161 
1,925 
3,500 

278.276 



105, 710 
26,471 
89,201 
11,364 
45,530 

44,780 
2,702 
7,443 
1 , 51 4 



955 

4,101 

3 

96 

3,773 

15 

942 

13,029 

7,457 

1,563 

88 

1,386 

5,159 

16 

12 

7,109 

4,908 

201 

707 

50 

2,366 

4,070 

3,947 

39,696 

676 

6,006 

731 

271 

244 

2,008 

12.889 
265 
1,104 
1,913 
3,292 
152 
2,170 
3,993 

300.629 



United States Department of Justice 
IramleTAtion And liatural ir.Ation Servi r., 



119,938 
33,269 
85,606 
12,398 
49,418 

49,047 
2,846 
8,736 

1.883 



TABLE 19. NONIMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED AS TEMPORARY VISITORS, TRANSITS, 
STUDENTS, OR TREATY TRADERS 1/ II\i THE UNITED STATES, BY DISTRICT 

ON JUNE 30, 1951 AND 1952 



District 



June 30, 1951: 
All districts. 



I 



St. Albans, Vt 

Boston, Mass 

New York, N. Y 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Baltimore, Md 

Miami, Fla 

Buffalo, N. Y 

Detroit, Mich 

Chicago, 111 

Kansas City, Mo 

Seattle, Wash 

San Francisco, Calif. 

San Antonio, Tex 

El Paso, Tex 

Los Angeles, Calif. . . 
Honolulu, T. H 



June 30, 1952: 
All districts, 



St, Albans, Vt. 



Visitors 



Boston, Mass 

New York, N. Y 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Baltimore, Md 

Miami y Fla 

Buffalo, N. Y 

Detroit, Mich 

Chicago, 111 

Kansas City, Mo.,...,,., 

Seattle, Wash 

San Francisco, Calif.... 

San Antonio, Tex 

El Paso, Tex 

Los Angeles, Calif 

Honolulu, T. H 



88.176 



7,463 
790 

35,295 

212 

374 
15, 200 

1,952 

5,894 
1,687 

4,364 
4,392 
5,946 
1,561 
2,087 
959 



104.198 



Transits 



T7 Admitted since December 7, 1948 



7i8H 



284 

75 

3,702 

46 

25 

496 

136 

266 

87 

599 

489 

1,337 

76 
127 

69 



li^A. 



students 



24.859 



8,737 


230 


108 


1,200 


116 


2,178 


39,050 


3,233 


4,368 


235 


30 


1,245 


473 


50 


1,554 


15,191 


503 


1,763 


2,329 


94 


929 


6,479 


75 


3,016 


2,296 


71 


2,466 


- 


- 


2,153 


5,713 


550 


1,023 


4,664 


448 


2,128 


12,287 


1,363 


680 


1,672 


46 


586 


2,785 


134 


1,422 


1,087 


89 


86 



123 
2,059 
4,235 

1,292 

1,563 

1,668 

990 

2,501 

2,405 

2,219 

1,093 

2,275 

356 

626 

1,390 

64 



25,705 



Treaty 
traders 1/ 



857 



a 

17 

537 

3 

9 

100 

20 



10 
111 



2 
7 



933 



45 

25 

580 

4 
11 
87 
27 

5 



3 
88 

2 

35 
21 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 20. /iLIENS EXCLUDED FROM THE UNITED STATES, BY CAUSE 
YEARS ElffiED JUWE 30, 1943 TO 1952 

(Figures represent all exclusions at seaports and exclusions 
of aliens seeking entry for 30 days or longer at land ports,) 



Cause 



1943 



1944 



1945 



1946 



1947 



1948 



1949 1950 



1951 



1952 



Number excluded. 



liASi 



v.:> ! 



[diots and imbeciles 

'eeble minded 

insane or had been insane 

Ipileptics 

institutional psychopathic 
inferiority. 

urgeon's certificate of mental 
defect other than above....... 

uberculosis 

ther loathsome or dangerous 
contagious disease 

'iTgeon's certificate of physical 
defect other than contagious 
disease 

tironic alcoholism 

ikely to become public charges.,,. 

iupers, professional beggars, 
and vagrants , . . 

Dntract laborers 

ssisted aliens 

^owaways 

jcompanying aliens (Sec. 18), 

ider 16 years of age, unaccom- 
panied by parents 

'imnals 

ibversive or anarchistic 

moral classes 

id been deported or excluded „ ,„o . 

lable to read 
(over 16 years of age) 

■ought by nonsignatory lines 

thout proper doctunents 

■eviously departed to avoid 
military service 

her 



X (Kale... 
(Female. 



2 

8 
17 

3 



2 
6 

161 



4 

1 
95 

1 
26 

4 

77 

3 

3 
68 

1 

6 

31 

8 
3 



1.642 



2,^41 



2.942 4,771 



1,106 



1 

5 

22 

4 

15 

3 
11 

15 



15 

1 

106 

1 
28 

155 
3 



63 

8 
45 

21 

4 

1,109 



L,043 
452 



2 

15 
10 

19 

15 
11 

22 



13 
4 

53 

3 
18 

4 
161 

4 

16 
87 

4 
45 

23 

1 

1.805 



1,037 1,523 
605 818 



2 

4 

14 

3 



11 
8 



4.905 



,^->8^4bi^7l 



1 
23 
10 

17 

20 
10 

28 



41 12 
1 3 

33 70 



13 
3 
361 
3 

7 
87 

2 

y\ 

44 

4 

2 

2,294 

21 



2,158 
784 



19 

1 

902 

1 

11 
139 

3 
45 

11 
2 

3,316 

111 

16 



3,679 
1,092 



4 

22 

9 

11 

14 
16 

981 



26 

5 

67 



11 
1 
709 
21 

5 

142 

1 

5 

30 

2 
2 



3,690 

30 
3 



3,676 

1,229 



3 

3 
20 

19 

11 

12 
17 

21 



3 

3 

97 

2 
26 

2 

216 

4 

12 
187 

25 
12 
66 

9 
11 

2,970 

66 
17 



^.784 



2,M 



2,, 731 



3 

3 

23 

10 

17 

10 
21 

13 



23 
2 

53 

2 

12 

6 

122 

4 

12 
199 
31 
16 
50 

13 

3 

2,868 

43 
12 



2,341 



1,103 1,230 



5 

9 

23 

7 



13 
11 

19 



240 

1 

78 



121 
8 

4 
337 
29 
15 
47 

3 

2,783 

4 
17 



2 
3 

17 
8 



5 
12 



9 

2 

11 

1 

5 

1 

74 

8 

2 

285 

9 

10 

52 

3 

2 

2,378 

8 

28 



2,361 
1,423 



1,860 
1,084 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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TABIE 24A. ALIENS DEPORTED AKD ALIENS DEPARTING VOLUNTARILY 

UNDER PROCEEDI NGS; YEARS ENDED JUNE 30 , 1892 TO 1952 

I 'Aliens departing 

Total I Aliens | voluntarily 

f deported 1 under proceed- 
I I ings 1/ 



Period 



1892 = 1952 

1892 - 1900 
1901 - 1910 
1911 - 1920 
1921 ~ 1930 
1921,,.. 

i/^^o « • o 

1924.... 

J- Z'^P O O • O 

1926.... 
1927.... 
1928. ... 
1929. ... 
1930.... 



1931 - 1940 
1931... 
1932... 
1933... 
1934... 
1935... 
1936... 
1937... 
1938. . . 
1939... 
1940... 

1941 = 1950 
1941... 
1942... 
1943... 
1944... 
1945. 
1946 
1947... 
1948 
1949 
1950 



> Q O 
> Q Q 9 



> o • • 
'a o « 



J^ O O O O I 



o o e o a 




409.849 



t 



3,127 

11,558 

27,912 

164.390 



4,517 

4,345 

3,661 

6,409 

9,u95 

10,904 

26,674 

31,571 

38,79'D 

28,018 

210.416 



29,861 
30,201 
30,212 
lo,88'^ 
16,297 
17,446 
17561'^ 

18,553 
17,702 
15,548 



1.58] 



nn, 

g 1 I V 



lO,Q38 

10,613 

16,154 

3^,449 

80,760 

116,320 

214,543 

217,555 

296,337 

579,105 

686,713 
723,959 



396,414 



3. 013 J 



3,127 

11, 5 S3 

2'',912 

_92^-5'^ 



k,: 



p345 
3,66i 
6,409 
9,495 
10,90^ 
11,652 
11,625 
12,908 
16,631 

II '',086 



'2,233 



19,i.26 
19,865 
8,879 
8,319 
'5,195 
8,829 

9,275 
8,202 

6,«554 



11C.&4^ 



15,012 

19,946 

25,888 

11,387 
93,330 



11, (19 
10,775 
10,347 
8,010 
7,978 
8,251 
8, "88 
Q,278 
°,590 
8,594 



1.470 o92.'^ 



4,40" 

4,207 

'^jl?? 
n,270 
14,375 
18,665 
20,371 
20,040 

6,628 



13,54*^ 
20,:.81 



6,531 

6,904 

11,947 

32,270 

6Q,490 

101,945 

195,880 

197,184 

276,297 

5';'2,477 

673,169 
703,778 



1951 
1952. 

^ !_ _____ 

1/ Voluntary departures of aliens under procaedings first 

recorded in 1927 » „ ^ ^. 

United S:.at,es Bepartmeni, of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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TARTK 26. ALIEtIS WHO BEPQETED UNDEB TUS ALIEN y^IBESS PROGRAM BY SELECTED NATIQHALITIES AND 

BY RURAL AND URBAN AREA AND CITY l/: DURIlilG 1951 



Class of place 
and city 



All 
nation- 
alities 



Germany 



Great 
Britain 



Italy 



Poland 



U.S.S.R. Canada 



Mexico 



All 
other 



Total 2/. 
Rural. . . . 



Urban. 



City total 

Los Angeles, Calif... 

Oakland, Calif 

Sacramento, Calif . . » . 

San Diego, Calif 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Denver, Colo 

Bridgeport, Conn 

Hartford, Conn 

New HaTen, Conn 

Washington, D. C 

Miami, Fla 

Chicago, 111 

Baltijaore, Md 

Boston, Mass 

Fall Rirer, Mass 

New Bedford, Mass.... 

Worcester, Mass 

Detroit, Mich 

Minneapolis, Minn.... 

St. Louis, Mo 

Jersey City, N. J.... 

New£urk, N. J 

Paterson, N. J 

Buffalo, N. Y 

New York, N. Y 

Rochester, N. Y 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Portland, Ore 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Pittsburg, Pa 

Providence, R. I 

El Paso, Tex 

Houston, Tex 

San Antonio, Tex. .... 

Seattle, Wash 

Milwaukee, Wis 

Other cities.. 



2.265.032 



118.003 



192. 723 



229.062 



213.319 



126.010 217.397 



224.10^ 



6UU. LIA 



34^.1?7 



21.273 



30|^ 



26.731 



27i?24 



13.989 /.3.339 



?4.22^ 



127. 582 



672.24? 



30.201 



^.209 



62. 729 



5U. 526 



25.557 87.682 



1^5- 6U 



207.697 



68,426 
8,618 
8,434 
5,435 

34,851 
5,474 
6,798 
8«261 
5,155 
9,314 
9,682 

80,152 

14,779 

11,161 
5,157 
6,114 
6,676 

67,647 
6,964 
8,020 
5,958 

16,878 
7,173 

13,097 

392,270 

9,966 

31,208 
7,984 

31,908 
7,638 
7,049 

17,793 
7,945 

25,096 

18,350 

6,191 

146,682 



6i..754 



1,805 
418 
224 
140 

1,930 
488 
149 
233 
126 

465 

385 

5,605 

968 

158 

27 

31 

72 

2,221 

328 

939 

366 

877 

3a 

687 

29,109 

630 

1,489 
413 

2,303 
626 
161 
139 
280 
288 
517 

1,333 

8,483 



1Q0.3?2 



3,439 
799 
403 
449 

2,686 
435 
U5 
745 
299 

1,366 

2,767 

3,317 
962 
966 
187 
356 
365 

8,033 
406 
418 
453 

1,036 
451 

1,053 
42,660 

1,018 

1,748 
859 

3,077 
622 
461 
111 
412 
340 

1,785 

353 

14,900 



134.867 



71,949 
4?.;77 



403 
3,i372 



1,345 



1,310 

797 

531 

175 

3,560 

410 

1,612 

1,583 

1,802 

683 

166 

4,380 

2,488 

2,275 

90 

53 

575 

4,625 

46 

1,470 

1,421 

4,321 

2,897 

1,180 

66,378 

2,363 

3,167 

388 

4,535 

976 

2,490 

45 

174 

92 

633 

294 

14,662 



127.477 



98 
4.617 



1,677 

124 

62 

67 

486 

393 

756 

1,442 

682 

401 

299 

17,990 

2,370 

594 

518 

533 

875 

12,404 

587 

942 

1,360 

2,626 

958 

4,054 

47,065 

833 

5,630 

162 

4,112 

1,062 

521 

28 

198 

99 

321 

1,050 

14,196 



84.650 82.108 



1560 



Tn,QQ" 



a 

3.7a 



62 
1.732 



644 
3.624 



31,804 

1,288 

2,003 

2,457 

2,727 

722 

4 

6 

3 

97 
62 
4,936 
15 
19 
1 

4 

1,448 

103 

148 

7 

22 

34 

26 

1,417 

7 

103 

61 

86 

103 

15 

16,844 

5,378 

22,654 

100 

233 

16,853 



424.286 



97 
12.150 



Outlying territories 
and possessions...... 

ill other. ...... ««...«« 

^ Rural - Population of less than 2,500. Urban - Population of 2,500 to 99,999. 

Cities - Population of 100,000 or ever. 
2/ Does not include approxloately 100,000 alien address reports that were incoaplete. 

Ibiited States Departnent of Justice 
Imitation and Naturalization Service 



20,564 
4,492 
4,649 
1,474 

19,580 
2,263 
3,128 
2,445 
1,227 
4,881 
4,822 

33,985 
5,333 
4,461 
3,563 
4,351 
3,456 

16,415 
3,770 
3,100 
1,540 
5,221 
1,993 
2,137 
158,463 
2,258 

15,194 
3,709 

10,011 
2,964 
2,258 

543 
1,140 
1,188 
9,466 
2,395 
55,825 



69,239 
15.610 





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TABLE 30. PASSEI\IGER TRAVEL BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND FOREIGN COUNTRIES 
BY PORT OF ARRIVAL OR DEPARTURE; YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1952 1/ 



Port 



ARRIVED. 



New Yorkj N. Y = 

Chicopee_, 14ass 

Boston-, Mass 

Philadelphia, Pa. . . . 

Baltimore, Md 

Norfolk, Va 

Miaiiiij Fla 

W, Palm Beach, Fla.. 

Key VJ'est; Fla 

San Juan, P. R. . . ... 

Virgin Islands 

Tampa. Fla 

Mobile;, Ala.......o. 

New Orleans, La 

jalveston, Tex 

3an Francisco, Cal. . 
Portland, Ore 



o » » « « « » 



3eattle_T Wash. 2/. 
Los Angeles, Cal. . 
San Pedro ;, Calif.. 
Honolulu; T . H . o .. . 
Other ports, . . , 



9 • « « • 



DEPARTED,... 



« ft • 



I e a • • e • « 



New York, N. Y. . 
Chi cope 6;, Mass . , 
Sostonj Mass, 
Philadelphia, Pa. . . . 

Baltimore, Md 

!>orf olk,^ Va..,.,.o.o 
Miami, Fla <,. ....... . 

', Palm Beachj Fla.. 
Key West., Fla 
San Juan. P. R.. . 
^irgin Islands, 
rampa Fla.,..,,,,, 

iobile^ Ala , , 

Jew Orleans^ La. ... , 

Jalveston_, Tex. ..... 

3an Francisco, Cal. 



L»«flt«9« 



!«««•« 



By sea and by air 



Aliens 



Citi- 



zens 



635,902 



\ 



3B4.236 

2-084 

13,123 

iai8 

1,289 

481 

9,012 

4,175 
24,809 

5,643 

6,365 

636 

23,809 

185 

11,970 

122 

5 , 048 

5,369 

830 

13., 895 
9,989 



79 "",108 



375,282 

15,353 

25,128 

670 

1,036 

420 

jl99,835 

4,741 

22, 274 

23, 737 

3,186 

7,644 

6,005 

21^ 289 

143 

20, 884 

39 

19.904 

10,880 

1,143 
17,306 
20„ 209 



Total 



1,433,010 325,016 



Aliens 



759,518 

17,437 

38,251 

1,788 

2,325 
901 

311, 549 
13,753 
26,449 
48,546 

8,829 
U,009 

6,641 
45,098 
328 
32,854 
161 
24,952 
16,249 

1,973 
31, 201 
30,198 



385.859 812.644 1.198,503 



196„ 852 424.110 

607! 20,884 

5,088 



364 

388 

112 

10'7,381 

914 

3,628 

16, 092 

5,550 

4,945 

132 

10, 525 

244 

5,774 

102 

617 

4,534 

791 

13,762 

7,457 



'ortland_, Ore 
Seattle,, V/ash, 2/... 
■iOS iingeles, Cal..., 
San Pedro, Cal,.... . 

ionoLolu, T. H. ..... 

)the r port s. ........ 

■J Exclusive of travel over international land 
y Includes Anchorage, Alaska, 



16,273 

460 

794 

261 

194, 502 

4,665 

22., 243 

21,697 

3,199 

7,039 

261 

22, 298 

290 

17, 082 

59 

13 n 746 

9,781 

1,810 

15,382 

15. 808 



620, 962 
21,491 
21, 361 
824 
1,182 
373 
301, 883 
5,579 
25,871 
37,789 
8,749 
11, 984 
393 
32,823 
534 
22,856 
161 
14,363 
14,315 
2,601 

29,144 
23,265 



265, 246 

5,557 

1,048 

1,263 

455 

5,923 

130 

7 

5,671 

4,317 

263 

518 

12,685 

185 

10, 041 

' 122 
2,868 
20 
830 
1,907 
5,960 

1^-634 



By sec 



Citi- 
zens 



297,689 



210,477 

12, 923 

608 

930 

399 

23, 934 

620 

16 

4,075 

1,804 

168 

1,000 

3,129 

143 

20, 100 

39 

9,494 

8 

1,143 
1, 241 
5,438 



Total Aliens 



By air 



Citi- 
zens 



622,705 310,866 499,419 



475,723 

18, 480 

1.656 

2,193 

854 

29,857 

750 

23 

9,746 

6,121 

431 

1,518 

15,814 

328 

30,141 

161 

12,362 

28 

1,973 

3,U8 

11,398 



118, 990 

2,084 

7,566 

70 

26 

26 

05, 791 
8,882 
4,168 

19,138 
1,326 
6,102 
118 

11,124 

1,929! 



164,805 

15,353 

12, 205 

62 

106 

21 

175,901 

4,121 

22, 258 

19, 662 

1,382 

7,476 

5,005 

18, 160 



Total 



810,305 



283, 795 

17,437 

19,771 

132 

132 

47 

281, 692 

13,003 

26,426 

38,800 

2,708 

13,578 

5,123 

29,284 



784 2,713 



2., 180 10.410 
5,349 10,872 



11,988 
4,029 



16, 065 

14, 771 



110,713 244,338 

4, 069 10, 722 
338 348 
368 726 
112 261 
27, 616 
'617 




479.467 241,225 477.811 



12,590 
16, 221 

28,053 
18,800 

112^016 



355,051 

14,791 

686 

1,094 

373 

35,483 
724 

5,308 

6,297 

177 

393 

5,927 

534 

20, 625 

161 

13,403 

20 

2; 600 

3,496 

12,324 



86,139 179,772 
607 20,884 
1,0191 5,551 
112 
201 68 



99,514 166,886 
807 1 4,048 



3,' 



628 

13,804 
1,127 
4,858 

9,039 

1,688 

- 

267 

4, 519 

1 

11,436 

2,726 



22,243 
18', 677 

1,325 
6,949 

17,857 

543 

693 
9,776 

14,212 
8,215 



265, 911 

21,491 

6,570 

138 

86 

266, 400 

4,855 

25,871 

32,481 

2,452 

11,807 

26,896 
2,231 

960 

14,295 

1 

25, 648 

10,941 



boundaries , 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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TABLE 31. PASSENGER TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
BY COUNRTY OF MBARKATION : YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1952 1/ 



Country of 
embarkation 



All countries. 



Europe 

Belgium 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Iceland 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Portugal 

Spain.... 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe. 
United Kingdom... 
Yugoslavia. ...... 

Other Europe 



By sea and by air 



Aliens 



Asia , 

China , 

India , 

Iraq 

Israel 

Japan and Korea. . , 

Lebanon 

Philippines 

Saudi Arabia 

Other Asia 



Oceania. 

Australia 

New Zealand. . , 
Other Oceania. 



Africa , 

Egypt , 

Union of S. Africa, 
Other Africa , 



635.902 



367.905 | 



4,751 

4,746 

253 

44,718 

128,433 

7,617 

623 

5,884 

21,4«1 

22,665 

7,077 

3,480 

9,270 

7,420 

2,770 

86 

93,631 

209 

2,7a 

25.251 



Citi- 
zens 



797 ,108 



285.416 



776 

247 

163 

1,075 

13,571 

717 

4,221 

30 

4,451 

5.546 



3,853 

1,332 

361 



593 
554 
550 



3,0 a 

3,060 

49 

78,100 

36,951 

3,650 

1,274 

9,677 

30,920 

13,896 

4,522 

6,352 

2,729 

6,215 

2,855 

112 

78,731 

91 

3,201 



Total 



1.433.010 



6 5 3. 341 



58.0/J . 



372 

317 

1,463 

40,049 

981 

6,0£5 

1,340 

6,653 

3.079 



1,5a 
581 
957 

6,139 



714 
688 
4,737 



7,802 

7,806 

302 

122,818 

165,434 

11,267 

1,897 

15,561 

52,401 

36,561 

11,599 

9,832 

11,999 

13,635 

5,625 

198 

172,362 

300 

5,942 

8 3.29 5 



Aliens 



325.016 



278,459 



1,620 

619 

480 

2,538 

53,620 

1,698 

10,246 

1,370 

11,104 

8.625 



5,394 
1,913 
1,318 

7,836 



1,242 
5,287 



1,383 

2,836 

193 

31,384 

112,652 

7,006 

237 

3,823 

18,352 

14,281 

5,549 

858 

5,358 

5,630 

82 

65,991 

209 

2,635 

15.566 



By sea 



Citi- 
zens^ 



297.6 89 



179.968 



139 
127 
101 
534 

8,884 
425 

1,847 
10 

3,499 

363 



280 
58 
25 

907 



347 

220 



473 

1,449 

25 

53,566 

21,424 

2,737 

57 

5,054 

24,394 

7,965 

3,676 

934 

794 

5,023 

108 

49,874 

91 

2,324 

31.777 



Total 



622.705 



458. 427 



202 

224 

218 

865 

21,967 

504 

3,824 

5 

3,968 

m. 



178 

47 

115 

1,374 



"215 
508 
648 



1,856 

4,285 

218 

84,950 

134,076 

9,743 

294 

8,877 

42,746 

22,246 

9,225 

1,792 

6,152 

10,653 

190 

115,865 

300 

4,959 

47.343 



Aliens 



310.886 



8 9.446 



341 

351 

319 

1,399 

30,851 

929 

5,671 

15 

7,467 

703 



458 
105 
140 

2,281 



855 
868 



3,368 

1,910 

60 

13,334 

15,831 

611 

386 

2,061 

3,129 

8,384 

1,528 

2,622 

3,912 

1,790 

2,770 

4 

27,640 

106 

9.685 



By air 



Citi- 
zens 



499.419 



105.468 



637 

120 

62 

5a 

4,687 
292 

2,374 

20 

952 

5.183 



3,573 

1,274 

336 

790 



"25J 
207 
330 



2,578 

1,611 

24 

24,534 

15,527 

913 

1,217 

4,623 

6,526 

5,931 

846 

5,a8 

1,935 

1,192 

2,855 

4 

28,857 

877 

26.267 



Total 



810.305 



194.914 



642 

148 

99 

598 

18,082 

477 

2,201 

1,335 

2,685 

2,739 



1,363 
534 
842 

4,765 

180 
4,089 



5,946 
3,521 

84 

37,868 

31,358 

1,524 

1,603 

6,684 

9,655 

14,315 

2,374 

8,040 

5,847 

2,982 

5,625 

8 

56,497 

983 

35.952 



1,279 

268 

161 

1,139 

22,769 

769 

4,575 

1,355 

3,637 

7.922 



4,936 
1,808 
1,178 

5,555 



11^ 
387 
4,a9 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 31. PASSENGER TRAVEL TO THE UMTTED STATES FRai FOREIGN COUNTRIES j 
BY COUOTRY OF EMBARKATIONS YEAR END5D JUNE 30, 1952 l/ (Cont'd) 



By sea and by air 




Coutntry of 
embarkation 

3rth America 

H6XXCO0 ooooooeoowoooo 

n6SL XnCLXOS •oooooooao 
D 6t*~!ulllQ a oooueeooooo 

British West Indies 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic » 

French West Indies » 

n&XvX ooo*aoo»ooooeo 

Netho West Indies 

Central America, 0090. 
British Honduras 
Canal Zone & Panama 

vOSX'a XkXCoo 00000000 

El Salvadoro.oo.oo. 

LrUcl v6iL3.JL» 9 oaooooeoo 

nOntJXUT'd.S 0OO000O0004 

Nicaraguaooooo 

lull America o ooa*o«ooo 
ir^enttXna ooosooee»«oo 

jOXlvXau ouoooottoeoAeo 
^FaZXX oao»oooooo«a(i«o 

British Guiana»eoooe« 
Mle 
Colombia, 
Seuador«,»a. 
Falkland Islands 
'rench Guiana 
|'araguay«,09e 

lurinamC Netho Gxiiana) 

'rU^'UB.yo voooooooooooe 
9n6ZlieX& «*o«ooooeo«o 

•g of carriers 

'nited States aaoosaa* 

vreX^no ooooaoooooooa 



1 Exclusive of travel over land borders 



oooooooooooeooeo 

ooo»«e90oooft 

»»oaooa90 

o o « 

OO09«0OO 



»OOO0900« 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



I 



TABLE 32. PASoENGER TRAVEL FROM THE UNITED STATES TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
BY COUNTRY OF DEBARKATION: YEAR EI\IDED JUNE 30, 1952 1/ 



Cotmtry of 
debarkation 



By sea and by air 



Aliens 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



Aliens 



By sea 



Citi" 
zens 



Total 



Aliens 



Citi-^! 



zens 



Total 



All countries . . . . 



Lurope 

Belgium 

Denmark... 

Finland 

France. , 

Germany 

Greece , 

Iceland. 

Ireland,.. , 

Italy 

Netherlands , 

Norway, , 

Portugal , 

Spain ., 

Sweden , 

Switzerland , . 

Turkey in Europe,., 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

3ia. 

China 

India 

Iraq 

Israel,, 

Japan and Korea,.., 

Lebanon 

Philippines , , 

Saudi Arabia, 

Other Asia, 

:eania, , 

Australia 

New Zealand 

Other Oceania, 

'rica 

Egypt 

Union of S. Africa. 
Other Africa 



J85,859 



812.644 



1,198.503 144,634 



334,833 



479,467 



241,225 



477.811 719.036 



163,218 



322,868 



2,568 

3,197 

263 

33,638 

8,428 

2,376 

320 

3,669 

10,708 

11,604 

4,990 

2,504 

3,483 

■5,656 

2,433 

77 

66,496 

82 

726 

12,900 



353 

199 

7 

1,136 

6,701 

468 

2,670 

47 

1,319 

7,000 



3,169 

3,875 

334 

77,138 

44,503 

5,035 

616 

10,800 

35,409 

16,779 

5,525 

6,234 

3,346 

6,665 

3,526 

188 

97,238 

155 

2,333 

52.273 



486.086 



4,861 

1,615 

524 

1,482 



836 

544 

94 

2,787 

31,142 

1,844 

5,656 

1,925 

7,445 

2,714 



5,737 

7,072 

597 

110,776 

52,931 

7,411 

936 

14,469 

46.117 

28,383 

10,515 

8,738 

6,829 

12,321 

5,959 

265 

163,734 

237 

3,059 

65,173 



-,631 
511 
572 

10.527 



1,189 

743 

101 

3,923 

37,843 

2,312 

8,326 

1,972 

8,764 



Ji^L 



6,492 
2,126 
1,096 

12,009 



423 

565 
494 



1,115 

985 

8,427 



1,538 
1,550 
8,921 



102,095 



206.559 



308.654 



955 
1,659 

257 

21,184 

4,631 

2,089 

147 
2,505 
8,561 
6,137 
4,180 
1,098 
1,126 
4,246 

39 

42,697 

82 

502 

7,675 



82 
151 

647 
4,054 

314 

1,475 

10 

942 

508 



1,082 

1,619 

328 

53,194 

26,089 

4,045 

44 

6,616 

27,188 

9,522 

4,406 

2,128 

1,218 

5,183 

96 

61,779 

152 

1,870 

34,004 



2,037 

3,278 

585 

74,378 

30,720 

6,134 

191 

9,121 

35,749 
15,659 
8,586 
3,226 
2,344 
9,429 

135 

104,476 

234 

2,372 

41,679 



61.123 



Il6,309!l7?,432 



1,613 


2,087 


1,538 


2,256 


6 


b 


12,454 


23,944 


3,797 


18,414 


287 


990 


173 


572 


1,164 


4,184 


2,147 


8,221 


5,467 


7,257 


810 


1A19 


1,406 


4 s 106 


2,357 


2,128 


1,410 


1,482 


2,433 


3,526 


38 


92 


23,799 


35,459 



224 
5 ,225 



3 

463 

,18.269 



203 
kl7 

1,758 

23,217 

965 

3,469 

44 

3,931 

435 



285 
568 

2,405 
27,271 
1,279 
4,944 
54 
4,873 

943 



271 

48 

7 

489 

2,647 

154 

1,195 

37 

377 

6,492 



633 

127 

94 

1,029 

7,925 

879 

2,187 

1,881 

3,514 

2.279 



3,700 

3,794 

12 

36,398 

223211, 

1,27? 

745 

5.348 

10,368 

12,724 

1,929 

5,512 

4.485 

2,892 

5,959 

130 

59,258 

3 

687 



904 

175 

101 
1.518 
10,572 
1,033 
3,382 
1,918 
3.891 



328 
55 

125 

926 



252 

17 

166 

3,137 



580 

72 

291 

4.063 



4,533 

1,560 

399 

556 



258 
439 
229 



412 

796 

1,929 



670 
1,235 

2,158 



165 

126 
265 



l.,379 
494 
406 

7.390 




703 
189 
6,498 j 6,763 



^ 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



I 



TABLE 32. PASSENGER TRAVEL FROM THE UNITED STATES TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
BY COUl-JTRY OF DEBARKATION: YEAR ETJDED JUNE 30, 1952 (Cont'd) 1/ 



Country of 
debarkation 



By sea and by air 



Aliens 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



Aliens 



By sea 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



Aliens 



By air 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



North Araerica, 

Canada 

Greenland,,, 
Mexico 



West Indies,,, 

Beinnuda 

British West Indies 
Cuba,... 

Dominican Republic, 
French V/est Indies, 
Haiti 

Neth,j 'tjTest Indies., 

Central America. , ..,♦ 
British Honduras 
Canal Zone & Panama 
Costa Rica,,,,.,,,, 
El Salvador,...,,,, 

Guatemala , 

Honduras , . , , , 

Nicaragua , 

iOuth America. ......... 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

British Guiana, ,...,, 

Chile 

Colombia ,.,, 

Ecuador , 

French Guiana 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Surinam(Neth, Guiana) 

Uruguay , ,, 

Venezuela, ,, 



La^^ of carrier; 
United States. 
Foreign 



131,/f ^ ? 



385.307 



536.766 



22,536 



80.897 



10 3A 33 



128 ,9 2 3 



304.410 



433.333 



6,983 

12 

6,409 

124.739 



7,051 
30,620 
76,486 

5,026 
759 

2,344 

2,453 

13.316 



17,871 

5,694 

14,846 

315.884 



24,854 
5,706 

21,255 
440,623 



70,713 

69,526 

154,706 

12,450 

317 

5,172 

3,000 

31,012 



77,764 

100,146 

231,192 

17,476 

1,076 

7,516 

5,453 

44 » 328 



3,644 

286 

16,899 



9,856 

6 

488 

58.565 



4,338 
817 
1,858 
3,550 
1,884 
869 

49.800 



4,907 

366 

9,801 

620 

1,605 

10,695 

1,504 

75 

25 

3,876 

320 

763 

15,243 



183,678 
202,181 



2 

21,663 

836 

1,580 

4,568 

1,825 

538 

38 ,9^^ 



3,462 

161 

8,071 

490 

1,639 

4,512 

719 

44 

21 

3,635 

110 

610 

15,481 



506,429 
306,215 



2 
26,001 
1.653 
3,438 
8,118 
3,709 
1,407 

88,755 



8,369 

527 

17,872 

1,110 

3.244 

15,207 

2,223 

119 

46 

7,511 

430 

1,373 

30,724 



690.107 
508,396 



T 



1,583 

5,512 

3,258 

995 

131 

67 

353 

1,707 



18,810 

8,568 

28,185 

2,U3 

21 

97 

741 

11.982 



13,500 

6 

774 

7^,464 



3,339 

12 

6,123 

107.840 



20,393 

14,080 

36,443 

3,138 

152 

164 

1,094 

13.689 



5,468 
25,108 
68,228 

4,031 
628 

2,277 
2,100 

11.609 



8,015 

5,688 

14,358 

257.319 



11,354 

5,700 

20,481 

365,1^9. 



51,903 

60,958 

126,521 

10,307 

296 

5,075 

2,259 

19.030 



57,371 

86,066 

194,749' 

14,338 

924 

7,352 

4,359 

30,639 



758 

71 

64 

318 

496 



10«894 



2 

9,853 

155 

32 

1,247 

691 
2 

9.801 



2 

10,611 

226 

96 

1,565 

1,187 

2 

20.695 



3,580 
746 
1,794 
3,232 
1,388 
869 

38,906 



1,793 

2,225 
53 

618 
1,400 

157 



395 

13 

292 

3,948 



38,461 
106,173 



1,790 

2,346 
183 
718 
708 
251 
5 

592 

21 

298 

2,889 



155,294 
179,539 



3,583 

4,571 

236 
1,336 
2,108 

408 
5 

987 
34 

590 
6,837 



193.755 
285,712 



3,114 

366 

7,576 

5b7 

987 

9,295 

1,347 

75 

2*^ 

3,481 

307 

471 

11,295 



11,810 

681 

1,548 

3,321 

1,134 

536 

29.154 



1,672 
161 

5,725 

307 

921 

3,804 

468 

39 

21 

3,043 

89 

312 

12.592 



15,390 
1,427 
3,342 

6,553 
2,522 
1>405 

68,060 



4,786 

527 

13,301 

874 

1,908 

13,099 

1,815 

114 

46 

6,524 

396 

783 

23,887 



145,217 
96,008 



351,135 496,352 
126,676 222,684 



1 



Exclusive of travel over land borders. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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■< BD O » 



TABLE 37. DECLARATIONS OF INTE[^TION FILED, PETITIONS FOR NATUR/iLI^ATION FILED, 
AND PERSONS NATURALI2.ED : YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1907 to 1952 





Declara- 


Petitions 


Persons naturalized i 


Period 


tions 
filed 


filed 








Civilian 


Military 


Total 


1907 - 1952 


8,414,966 


7.160.596 


6,190,002 


472,756 


6.662,758 


1907 - 1910 


526.322 


164,036 


111,738 




111, 738 


1911 - 1920 


2,686,909 


1,381,384 


884.672 


244,300 


1,128,972 


1911 


189, 249 


74,740 


56,683 


- 


56, 683 


1912 


171,133 


95,661 


70,310 


- 


70,310 


1913 


182, 095 


95,380 


83, 561 


- 


83, 561 


1914 


214, 104 


124,475 


104, 145 


- 


104,145 


1915 


247,958 


106,399 


91,848 


- 


91,848 


1916 


209, 204 


108, 767 


87,831 


- 


87,831 


1917 


A /i 0,651 


130,865 


88,104 


- 


88, 104 


1918 


342, 283 


169,507 


87,456 


63,993 


151,449 


1919 


391,156 


256,858 


89, 023 


128,335 


217,358 


1920 


299, 076 


218, 732 


125, 711 


51,972 


177,683 


1921 - 1930 


'2,* 769*614'* 


949*«*«9«99«9« 

1,884,277 


"i,' 716 '979°° 


"*56,*266'" 


'1*773 ,'185 


1921 


303, 904 


195,534 


163,656 


17,636 


181, 292 " 


1922 


273, 511 


162, 638 


160, 979 


9,468 


170,447 


1923 


296,636 


165, 168 


137,975 


7,109 


145, 084 •• 


1924 


424, 540 


177,117 


140,340 


10, 170 


150, 510 1 


1925 


277, 218 


162, 258 


152,457 


- 


152,457 


1926 


277,539 


172, 232 


146, 239 


92 


U6,331 


1927 


258,295 


240,339 


195,493 


4,311 


199,804 j 


1928 


254,588 


240,321 


228, 006 


5,1A9 


233,155 


1929 


280, 645 


255,519 


224,197 


531 


224, 728 


1930 


62, 138 


113,151 


167,637 


1,740 


169,377 


1931 - 1940 


*i°369,°479*' 


"i*637'ii3*** 


'*i,°498.°573°* 


Q9909e9«9«9O 

19,891 


'i*5i8,*464 


1931 


106, 272 


145,474 


140, 271 


3,224 


143,495 


1932 


101,345 


131, 062 


136, 598 


2 


136, 600 


1933 


83, 046 


112,629 


112, 368 


995 


113,363 


1934 


108, 079 


117,125 


110,867 


2,802 


113, 669 


1935 


136,524 


131,378 


118,945 


- 


118,945 


1936 


148, 118 


167,127 


140, 784 


481 


141,265 


1937 


176,195 


165,464 


162, 923 


2,053 


164,976 


1938 


150,673 


175,413 


158,142 


3,936 


162, 078 


1939 


155,691 


213,413 


185,175 


3,638 


188,813 


1940 


203,536 


278 . 028 


232, 500 


2,760 


235, 260 


1941 - 1950 


a90909e9«99« 

920, 284 


"i!938.'666'*' 


*'i,'837*229" 


OO99«9««««0« 

149,799 


1,987,* 628 


1941 


224, 123 


277,807 


275, 747 


1,547 


277,294 


1942 


221, 796 


343,487 


268, 762 


1,602 


270,364 


1943 


115, 664 


377,125 


281,459 


37,474 1/ 


318,933 


1944 


42,368 


325,717 


392, 766 


49, 213 1/ 


441,979 


1945 


31,195 


195, 917 


208, 707 


22,695 y 


231,402 


1946 


28, 787 


123,864 


134,849 


15,213 1/ 


150, 062 


1947 


37, 771 


88,802 


77,442 


16,462 y 


93, 904 


1948 


60,187 


68, 265 


69, 080 


1,070 


70,150 


1949 


64,866 


71,044 


64,138 


2,456 


66,594 


1950 


93, 527 


66, 038 


64,279 


2,067 


66,346 j 

'1 


1951 


»9ft««099C09C 

91,497 


*°***6i,'634*" 


• 99999999C990 

53, 741 


975 


««990&9999. 

54,716 


1952 


111, 461 


94.086 


87,070 1,585 1 


88,655 1 


1/ Members of tl 


ae armed for 


:es include l,i 


+25 naturalized overseas i 


n 1943; 


6,496 in 1 


944j 5,666 ii 


1 1945; 2,054 : 


Ln 1946; and f 


.,370 in 1947 


e 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 







■ 


r 

1 



TABLE 38. PERSONS NATURALISED, BY ULiiSSES UNbKt. THE iJATlONALIiY LAWS 1/ ANL COUNTRY 
OR REGION OF FOkl^iER /jLLEGIAIm'CE; Yiuhii. ^lu.hhl) JUi.-. 30. 19^2 



Country or region 
of forraer 
allegiance 



All countries ......... 



Europe„ , „ 

Axistria 

Belgiiim 

British Empire. 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia , 

Denmark. ,> 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece, ........ 

H^jngary. , 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lith\xania 

Netherlands. ... 

Norway. 

Poland. ........ 

Portugal 



Rumania 

Spain, „ „ o . . . . 
Sweden ,,..... 

Switzerland, . 

JoOoOerLo e • • • « 

Yugoslavia. . , 
O^ner Europe, 



» • o o o I 



iisia, ,0.. .,.. 

Cnina , « 

Israel, o . . 

Japan ....o, 

Lebanon 

Palestine >. 

Philippines 

Syria ••• 

O^-Zner Asia 



North America, . . . . 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Central America. 



Total 
number 



2,043 

13, 538 

1,707 



Under 
general 
natural- 
ization 
provi- 
sions 



26,920 



20^^^0 



^__ 



933 
128 






J^xi£kk. 



10, 004 

2,496 

942 

602 

508 
99 
l2_882 



AJiSl. 



2,993 
871 
420 
207 

152 

31 
933 



South America 

Africa, , . , , , 

Stateless & miscellaneous,, 

l7~" See also table 47 for detailed figures on naturalization by statutory provisions, 
2^/ Figure included 722 Filipinos with U. 



Persons naturalized 

1 



l^arried 
to 
U. S. 
citizens 



58.027 



46.457 



1,213 

491 

11,087 

36 

1,059 

361 

99 

316 

1,625 

9,292 

1,181 

792 

1,572 

7,295 

140 

349 

609 

571 

3,073 

771 

355 

359 

658 

260 

1,993 
481 

419 

1-457 



490 

69 

1 

154 

69 

416 

101 

157 



8j_818 



6,561 

1,424 

481 

352 

334 

66 

895 



Children 
of U. S, 
citizens 



760 



Jt22_ 



23 
10 

99 

14 

1 

4 

5 

18 

92 

31 

5 

10 

77 
1 
2 
6 

13 
28 

23 
3 
1 
4 
2 
8 
9 
3 

60 



Military i Other 



1^585 



li36j 



2/ 



28 
4 

2 

2 

13 
2 

9 

198 



160" 
22 

7 



8 



.611 



11 
8 

164 

1 

14 

10 

1 

10 

19 
62 
16 

14 

21 

89 

3 

5 

14 

14 

59 

5 

7 

8 

13 
4 

26 
9 
6 

502 



23 



469 

1 
6 



214 

170 

20 

20 

14 
2 
JO. 



461 



7 
6 
96 

9 

4 

3 

3 

13 

42 

11 

6 

5 

134 

1 

3 

3 

8 

24 

16 

6 

15 

10 

6 

20 

8 

2 

JZ6L 



28 

1 
730 



76 
9 

14 
14 



16 



S. residence prior to May 1, 1934. 
United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 





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CN-5-4tOOCMCM-4cnOenNO>nCMCONO'nNOrHrH<MtOC~-CMCMUM/NenC7Na)0-4NO 
H incnCpH"^ -4-rHHOmir\rHNOC^en-4 tO-40rHCMCM-4mrHrH-3- 

CnrHC^rH rHNOrHrHrH cn 1-1 



(D I o 

^ -g -p 



■u 



NO 

to 

to 



\«o cn-4enOrHrH-4CMcMm«ot>-c7NOOmrHcMC-if\a)NOif\CTNCMm«OrH-4CM 

-jCjNCq ONONCOON-4--4NOCM-4-o^OrHCOCMNOONUNtOmmCOC^CN-COH-4u>-4c^ 
•j rHNOON o mrHmOir\C^enrHC^CM>r\ CJN00<OrHuMr\to-4-cn00ON 



CM 



CM eni 



CM CJN 



ir\ r-i 



CM 



a 
o 

•H 
(DUO 

^ g u 

u f, ^ 

O O -ri 
■P O 



o 



5 






■p 



o 

o 



P,JQ 




3 +5 bb+J - 

«0 rH -rl H 

E* a) p, ^ 



: CQ PQ m o Q 



irJ'c^ J- UN O if\0 00 CO u-,«NtX)OsCNl 0-T(r\ o 
"4jo^ ^H CO, CV'0CtCCVC\JCMC\JvO 





9 
O 

■p a> 

CO 



3 



o 

O -P 

§ H 

a oj 

<t5 -P 
<D 2! 

8 § 
+3 

cd a 

+> g 

CO -H 

-p 



TABLE 42. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY SEX AND MAHITAL STATUS WITH COMPARATIVE 
PERC ENT OF TOTAL; YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 19hU TO 1952 



Sex and 

iflarital 
status 



19AA1/ 



19451/ 



19461/ 



1947 



194S 



1949 



1950 



1951 



1952 



Nvuaber 



Both sexes 

Single. . . 
Married. . 
Widowed. , 
Divorced. 

Male 

Single... 
Married. . 
V/idowed., 
Divorced. 

Female 
Single... 
Married. . 
Midowed. . 
Divorced. 



4^5,48^ 225,7^6 



14B,008 93.904 



71,278 

327,459 

29, 067 

7,679 



40,014 
163:, 200 

17,335 
5.187 



196,22'; 

45.725 

139, 950 

7,007 

3,545 



30, 236 

101,828 

12,207 

3,737 



19,697 

64, 704 

6^988 

2,515 



35^942 
2,032 
1,457 




239i2^6 114,672. 

25,553 16,713 

187, 509 82, 629 



70.150 



12, 206 

50,518 

5,429 

In 997 



T 



66,594 



31 
7,449 

23, 200 
1,466 
1,032 



9,623 

50, 723 

4,604 

1,644 



8,489 

52,025 

4,218 

1,614 




5,859 

44,333 

3,262 

1,262 



19,833 

1,089 

801 



745 18. 711 

5,710 3,489' 

18,345 14,100 

921 615 

769 ! 507 



83821 

72, 578 

5,450 

I08O6 



28^2L 



37,003 38,729 



4,757 
27,318 
3,963 
965 

• • c e o o o < 



3.481 t 

30,890 

3o515 

843 



40., 601 



5,276 

21,, 791 

896 

634 



2, 7?9 
33, 680 
3.297 
845 

I o o o o o • 




2,370 
30,233 



o<>oo«eo«ooooo*«oe* 




Both sexgs_ 

Single „., 
I4arried, . 

viTidowed. . 
Divorced. 

Male 

Single... 
Married. . 
Vi/'idowed.. 
Divorced. 

Female 
Single., , 
Married.. 
Widowed. . 
Divorced. 



Does not include 6,496 members of the armed forces naturalized overseas in 1944j 
5,666 in 19455 and 2,054 in 1946. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Natxxralization Service 



TABLE 43. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY SEX AND AGE 
YEARS EIMDED JUNE 30. 19/Ji TO 1952 



Sex and age 



19Ui/ 



1945i/ 



19461/ 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 



1952 



B oth sexes 

Undei' 21 years 

21 to 25 " 

26 to 30 " 

31 to 35 " 

36 to 40 " 

ifl to 45 •-' 

46 to 50 " 

51 to 55 " 

56 to 60 •• 

61 to 65 " 

66 to 70 " 

71 to 75 " 

Over 75 " 

^le 

Under 21 years 
21 to 25 
26 to 30 
31 to 35 
36 to 40 
41 to 45 
46 to 50 
.51 to 55 
56 to 60 
61 to 65 
6<: to 70 
71 to 75 
Over 75 



ferny, e 

Under 21 years 

21 to 25 " 

26 to 30 " 

31 to 35 " 

36 to 40 " 

41 to 45 " 

46 to 50 " 

51 to 55 " 

56 to 60 " 

61 to 65 " 

66 to 70 " 

71 to 75 " 

Over 75 " 



^35.483 



225.736 



148,008 93.904 70.150 66.594 66 



W^ 



5,609 
19,441 
22,979 
43,893 
61,139 
65, 517 
65, 280 
57,915 
44,273 
27,173 
14,418 
5,534 
2,312 

196. 227 



5,378 
11,915 
11,394 
19, 636 
24,960 
25,416 

24, 659 

25,108 

21,986 

14,303 

7,371 

2,904 

1,197 

239,256 

231 ' 

7,526 

11,585 

24,257 

36,179 

40, 101 

40, 621 

32, 807 

22,287 

12,870 

7,047 

2,630 

1,115 



1,669 

8,246 

11,540 

14,902 

24,399 

29, 976 

32,131 

32,856 

29,409 

20, 864 

11,952 

5,226 

2,566 

111.05? 



1, 579 
4,115 
5,191 
6,668 
10,772 

13, 777 

14,770 

15,788 

15,658 

11,955 

6,537 

2,846 

1,403 

114,67' 

90 

4,131 

6,349 

8,234 

13, 627 

16,199 

17,361 

17, 068 

13,751 

8,909 

5,415 

2,380 

1,163 



1,244 

7,269 

7,818 

10,823 

16, 289 

19,341 

20,142 

20, 783 

18, 599 

13,185 

7,636 

3,298 

1,581 

• o o o o e • < 

74,250 



544 

5,495 

6,627 

7,221 

11,205 

14,091 

13,137 

11, 531 

9,601 

7,347 

4,260 

1,953 
892 



47?^ 

2,970 

3,783 

4,131 

7,867 

11,113 

11,170 

9,481 

8,018 

5,637 

3,304 

1,445 

755 



987 
6,297 



-.==± 



8i,i^ 



6, 074 8, 570 



4, 



1,115 
3,297 
3,719 
5,116 
7,902 
9,151 
9,481 

10,095 
9,926 

7,535 

4, 236 

1,819 

858 

> « » « O O « ' 

,758 

129 

3,972 

4,099 

5,707 

8,387 

10,190 

10, 661 

10, 688 

8,673 
5,650 
3,400 
1,479 
723 



!••••• 



52.998 



6,122 
5,051 
4,195 
2,310 
1,075 
478 

40.?06 



138 
2,463 
2,486 
3,148 
4,780 
5,906 
5,632 
5,409 
4,550 
3,152 
1,950 
878 
414 



:?3,147 



1,003 
7,742 



886 5,355 

7,107 6,535 

9,164 8,144 

9,198 8,239 

7,822 6.937 

6,441 5,773 

4,473 4,298 

2,551 2,289 



1, 052 
9,785 
14,739 
8,890 
8,301 
9,190 
9,790 
9,090 
7,337 
5,318 
3,077 
1,374 
712 



• • o o • ii o •[« eoooooo''o«oo*o* 



257 

711 

1,094 

1,569 

3,672 

5,625 

5,679 

4,535 

4,098 

2,981 

1,737 

766 

423 

» « ft tt o o 



2,259 
2,689 
2,562 

4,195 
5,488 

5,491 
4,946 
3,920 
2,656 
1,567 
679 
332 



1,239 
1,705 
1,925 
3,257 
4,254 
4,271 
3,488 
2,971 
2,186 
1,297 
570 
269 



371 
1,732 

2,375 
2,026 
2,825 
3,574 
3,615 
2,870 
2,471 
2, 052 
1,088 
■467 
279 



c o o e e o o oPo o e o o • c « 



38.729 

554 
5,058 

4,369 
2,961 
3,850 
4,910 
4,927 
4,334 
3,470 
2,287 
1,254 
514 
241 



282 
1,019 
1,835 
1,510 
2, 003 
2,387 
2,868 
2,192 
1,779 
1,356 

882 

417 
181 



ccveeo^tt 



Mx52Z 



5,219 
6,460 
3,241 
3,476 
3,740 
3,831 
3,362 
2,697 
1,913 
1,002 
406 
214 



Does not include 6,496 members of the armed forces nattiralized overseas in 1944; 
5,666 in 1945 j and 2,054 in 1946. 



• a • • e • 

60., 05s 



64? 

7,895 

11,370 

6,060 

5,214 

6,105 
5,923 
4,737 

3.282 

1,824 

760 

388 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 44. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY STATES AImD TERRITORIES OF RESIDENCE 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1948 TO 1952 



State of residence 



1948 



1949 



1950 



1951 1952 



Total. 



Alabama.... 
Arizona. ... 
Arkansas. . . 
California, 
Colorado.. . 



Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia I 

Florida. , 

Georgia 



Idaho . . . , 
Illinois. 
Indiana.. 

Iowa 

Kansas. .. 



Kentucky , 

Louisiana.. .. , 

Maine , 

Maryland 

Massachusetts, 



Michigan.. . , 
Minnesota. .. 
Mississippi, 
Missouri. , . . 
Montana. . . .. 



Nebraska. . . . . , 

Nevada » . , 

New Hampshire. 
New Jersey. . . , 
New Mexico. , , , 



New York, ...... 

North Carolina. 
North Dakota, . . 

Ohio ..,.,. 

Oklahoma 



70.150 



66.594 



66,346 



34.716 



8^^655 



102 

305 

30 

9,194 

243 

1,987 

77 

350 

823 

62 

125 
3,259 
505 
245 
159 

68 

342 

517 

539 

4,618 

3,665 

560 

47 

413 

172 

148 

116 

322 

4,114 

98 

25,238 

103 

148 

1,848 

no 



109 

329 

60 

9,370 

324 

1,861 

85 

430 

1,069 

157 

76 

3,297 

418 

224 

159 

55 

273 

557 

509 

5,021 

3,301 

660 

60 

483 

193 

135 

71 

371 

3,448 

117 

21,174 

126 

lifl 

2,285 

120 



140 

341 

44 

9,488 

358 

1,753 

90 

466 

957 
200 

85 

3,367 

577 

329 

198 

198 
245 
475 
489 
4,861 

3,475 

567 

60 

502 

166 

156 

68 

318 

3,742 

125 

20,499 
188 

93 

2,254 

160 



126 

283 

52 

7,879 

381 

1,093 
59 

371 
1,276 

126 

93 

2,201 

403 

257 

265 

107 
270 
591 
558 
3,436 

2,763 

545 

86 

451 
136 

170 

55 

252 

2,700 

134 

17,990 

210 

138 

1,386 

234 



231 
387 
108 
12,258 
533 

2,864 
178 
615 

1,524 
553 

156 

2,942 

1,048 

445 

340 

290 

411 

737 

949 

6,593 

5,288 
722 
111 
726 
236 

253 
106 

431 

4,131 

164 

27, 120 
359 
108 

2,855 
305 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE Wfo PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY STATES AND TERRITORIES OF RESIDENCE 
YEARS EI\'D£D JUNE 

State of residence 



UX^6^0n oooooooo**900oeoooecoo 
lkXXOLL6 ^v^^aXiUo eaoftoooovoooooe 

South Carolinao oooooo.oooooo 

OOUX*fl ^o.iCOX>3,o ooo*ooeoooooooo 



Tennessee^ 
Texas. 



'ooooooooooeovoooeoo 
>oooooooooo««eooo9oeoooo 
U ualio «eooooo*ooso*ooeooooooo 

V 6x HLOIiXr oooooooooooaeoooooeco 

V X"^JXlJ.a eoooo«Doo*eooooooooo 

W a, iJ n Xn ^ L/ Oil o ooeoooo««ooooooe» 

West Virginia., ».. o. o ..,,«.. . 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming a,. 



eooooooooooeeo«oooo 
ooooo«09oseee*«oee 



Territories and possessions 
Alaska 
Hawaii o » . . 
Puerto RicOo . 
Virgin Islands » <>.<.. o 
All other, . . » . » 



ooooe«o9soeoeoeeoo 
oooooo«*O00<»oeo 

o o o e e o o 
ooooooooovooo 




United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 45. PERSONS NATUiiALIZED, cY SPECIFIED COUNTRIES OF FORI-lER ALLEGIANCE 
AND BY RURAL At.D U RB/iN AKEA A1\ID CITY l/; YEAR M D lJJ JUNE 30 . 1952 



Class of place 
and city 



Tctalo 



■ 9oef)tsettoo< 



) • » o • • • 



an 



oeooo«»o«9ooei 



0? Angeles J, Calif., 

. p.kland <, Calif 

•an Diego, Calif, , . . 

an Francisco, Calif. 

ridgeportp Conn. . . . 

idrt ford, Conno 

New Haven, Conn 

' 1!= b ingt on., D . C . . = , 

riicago. 111, 



Total 



MaML 



2i,JM. 



51,428 



> o o • o • o 



'M Orleans, La 

altimores Md,.,.,.. 

jston<, Mass ,, 

jabridge. Mass . . . , , 

ill River^ Mass . , , . 

'W Bedford.. Mass.., 

: ingf ield , Mass . , . 

rcester, l-Iass,,.., 

'.-■rtroitj Mich.....,, 

inneapolis^ Minn . . , 
-to Louis, Mo.o..,.. 
Jersey City, N, J,,. 
Newarkj No J... 



o o o o o 



New York, N. 
Rochester, N 



o o o e o o 



• o 9 e o 



' o o o e 



Paterson, No J 
Buffalo, N, Y,,,,,. 
Y, 

Y 

Cincinnati, Ohio.. 
Cleveland., Ohio 
Portland, Ore....... 

Philadelphia, Pa, , . . 
Pittsburgh, Pao^.,,, 
Scranton, Pa,..,.,,. 
Pi c-ridence, R. I« . . . 
San Antonio, Tex. . . . 

Seattle, Wash. „ 

Milwaukee, Wis ...... 

Other cities. 



2,859 
432 
663 

2,187 
274 
416 
342 
615 
575 

1,969 
221 
521 

1,558 
249 
270 
198 
203 
268 

2,746 
199 
304 
247 
426 
158 
546 



21, 



357 



o o • ft e o o 



Jtlying territories 

and possessions. „o 

»L1 others 
7^ 



. 9. £* ^ }* .** ^^ ^ P** ^^ 



272 
287 
771 
329 

1,408 
362 
37 
300 
281 
612 
280 

6,686 



746 
230 



British 
Empire 



14,993 



lOx^^L. 2,313 



^,42^ 



7,142 



290 

109 

151 

339 

27 

78 

39 

95 

181 

199 
29 
66 

146 
41 
33 
40 
71 
31 

361 
11 
41 
25 
48 
20 
76 
2,579 
53 
43 
96 
46 

229 

73 

6 

80 

53 
80 

17 

1,240 



73 



Canada 



10. 004 



Country of former alle giance 



Germany 



1,522 



3.758 



4.668 



540 

3 
6 

14 

27 

64 

23 

61 

61 

174 

10 

25 

394 

63 

15 

13 

3 

64 

1,065 

34 

14 

4 

12 

4 

148 

599 

54 

8 

58 

120 

39 

10 

1 

26 

2 

210 

22 

678 



38 
18 



12, »8 



1,85? 



3,?82 



7.539 



Rural - Population of less than 2,500, Urban 
Cities •= Population of 100,000 or over. 



169 
39 
35 

202 
22 
22 
13 
84 
58 

366 

33 

8B 

81 

21 

6 

2 

12 

12 

188 

34 

71 

26 

61 

19 

78 

3,824 

43 

106 

99 

39 

263 

50 

6 

24 
39 
62 

95 
1,147 



108 
-JO 



Italy 



9.720 



786 



2,66^ 



6.241 



121 
38 
51 

218 

85 
97 

139 

49 

4 

183 
18 
76 

279 

25 

3 

2 

38 

31 
253 

6 

30 

90 

102 

57 

74 

3,103 

39 

25 

77 

9 

182 

54 

3 

52 

6 

18 

18 

586 



13 



Poland 




Ix^^ 



2,851 j 31,691 



J21 



1.103 



4, 3 5 



1^ 

2 

7 

46 

16 

45 

34 

29 

18 

231 

8 

46 
86 
10 

15 

8 

17 

19 

230 

10 

17 
21 

39 
15 
71 

2,552 

20 

7 

74 

4 

100 

34 

7 

16 

1 
10 

19 

299 



h 



216 



2,045 

154 

11 

11 

94 

4 

22 

24 

26 

18 

65 

1 

46 

124 

4 

3 

4 

8 

6 

50 

4 

18 

5 
30 
3 
7 
933 
7 
8 

29 
10 
150 
6 
1 
9 
1 
7 

10 
132 



JJ^ 



-^81_1__8,J20 



1,418 
230 
402 
1.274 
93 
88 
70 
271 
235 
751 
122 
174 
448 
B5 
195 
129 
54 
105 
599 
100 

113 

76 

134 

40 

92 

7,767 

56 

90 

338 

101 

445 

135 

13 

93 

179 

225 

99 

2,604 



511 



- Population of 2,500 to 99,999. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE k6. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIETH AND YEAE OF ENTRY: 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1952 



Country or region 
of birth 



Number 
natu- 
ral- 
ize.. 



1952 



1951 



1950 



1940- 
1949 



Year of entry 



1930- 
1222_ 



1920- 
1929 



1910- 
1?1? 



1900- 
1909 



1890- 
1899 



Be- 
fore 
1890 



All countries . . . 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Norway. 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain.. 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

(England. . . 

United (N. Ireland 

Kingdom( Scotland. . 

(Wales 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe ...,.., 

Asia 

China 

India 

Japan 

A aj.esuxne. ......... 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada..... 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Central America,.., 
Other No. America,, 

South America, ..,..., 
Africa 

Australia & New Zeal. 
Other countries ....,, 



88.655 



6i*6li 



2,115 

741 

83 

2,258 

530 

154 

546 

1,822 

14,637 

1,539 

1,391 

2,316 

9,518 

297 

601 

879 

851 

6,267 

1,119 

671 

56a 

880 

4i:3 

6,601 
602 

2,090 
297 

3,281 
956 
592 

4.367 



1,115 

137 

39 

85 

1,824 

1,167 

iz^m 



11,268 

2,479 

2,841 

659 

467 

675 

421 

778 

§1 



JiL 



JOk. 



Ml. 



48.198 



5.085 17.551 



?.?io 



iii^ 



ML 



467 



il. 



221 



6 
5 

1 

2 



5 

2 

2 

1 



20 
7 

2 

1 

2 

6 

20 

31 

5 

3 

2 

31 

1 

4 
1 
6 
7 

5 

3 

5 

15 

1 



4 
4 
7 

29 



5 

1 

1 
12 
10 



15 

5 

7 

10 

26 

7 
7 

1 



22 
7 
2 
8 
4 
2 
3 

15 

103 

9 

9 

6 

60 
1 
4 
1 
3 

20 
8 
1 
2 
3 
3 

21 



7 

5 

1 



334 36.023 



8 

1 

n 

15 



36 
6 

18 
3 

36 

6 
5 
2 
2 



17467 
619 
46 

1,545 
258 
128 
204 

1,502 

10,675 

699 

668 

662 

3,874 
209 
203 
566 
397 

3,644 
253 
349 
186 
190 
211 

4,573 
294 
676 
177 
920 
510 
318 

1.749 



3. 463 



499 

87 

26 

50 

486 

601 



72 

16 

9 

116 

27 

7 

37 

55 

830 

133 
65 

188 

684 
6 

23 
41 
44 

161 
49 
32 
43 
43 
30 

312 
58 

193 
18 
48 
58 
65 

Ml 



103 

7 

4 

14 

215 
60 



8.92511.139 



5,946! 
477 

1,747 
532 
223 

406 

350 

717 

28 



829 
131 
130 

24 
25 

45 
15 
19 

1 



11.638 



174 

43 

7 

203 

125 
12 
94 

122 

2,521 
255 
131 

1,060 

1,855 
18 

55 
135 
216 
653 
207 
130 
132 
346 
89 

1,040 
176 

1,053 

74 

463 

144 

105 

1.174 



2A^ 



295 

20 

5 

15 

652 

187 

4.558 



2,904 

1,004 

539 

52 

59 

123 
24 
22 

12 



191 
32 
18 

215 

66 

2 

134 

54 
202 
322 
271 
190 
1,758 

25 
181 

81 

90 
1,095 
370 

85 
151 
155 

39 
375 

36 
109 

17 
968 
148 

73 

477 



4.611 



145 

16 

2 

5 

no 

199 

1.901 



848 

694 

31k 

23 

22 

53 

12 

8 

6 



141 
13 

1 

142 

29 

1 

60 

33 

151 

113 

221 

154 

1,107 

31 

119 

40 

79 

611 

195 

70 

45 

102 

23 

185 

31 

38 

7 

774 

79 

16 

140 



J2L 



42 
5 

1 

12 
80 

-5^ 



368 

in 

69 

1 
5 

26 

4 

5 

21 



18 

2 

15 

n 

6 

2 

50 

13 
37 

n2 

4 

15 

5 

n 

56 

21 
2 
2 

25 
4 

31 
3 
9 
2 

75 
3 
2 

-22_ 



326 



23 
9 

.261 



200 

28 

8 

4 

23 

2 
2 

1 

A. 



2 
2 

12 
9 

2 
13 
69 

8 

17 

32 

2 

1 

6 

8 

21 

9 

2 

2 

12 

9 

46 

3 

8 

2 

20 

5 

4 

16 



9 

1 



iiL 



99 
n 

1 

6 



1 
2 



United States Department of Jiistice 
Immigration and Nat\iralization Service 



TABLE 46A. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH AND COUNTRY OR nEGION 
O F FORIiER ALLEGIANCE; YEAR fflPED JUNE 30. 1952 ■ 



Country or region 
of birth 



All countries . . . . 



Europe , 

Austria 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hvingary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

R\miania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

(England.... 

United (N. Ireland. 

Kingdom(Scotland. . . 

(Wales 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 



Asia 

China , 

India 

Japan , 

Palestine. . , 
Philippines , 
Other Asia. . 



iNorth America 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Central America 

Other North America. 



South America , 

Africa , 

Australia & New Zealand 
Other countries 



3 



CO 
0) 



U 
+> 



o 



88.655 



64.615 



2,115 

741 

83 

2,258 

530 

154 

546 

1,822 

14,637 

1,539 

1,391 

2,316 

9,518 

297 

601 

879 

851 

6,267 

1,119 

671 

568 

880 

413 

6,601 

602 

2,090 

297 

3,281 

956 

592 

4.^67 



<D 
O 



M 



68 , 3 7 3 



61.924 



1,115 

137 

39 

85 

1,824 

1,167 

17.7IA 



11,268 

2,479 

2,841 

659 

467 

675 

421 

778 

8i 



1,990 

724 

76 

2,163 

522 

152 

531 

1,801 

13,654 

1,530 

1,333 

2,304 

.9,475 

278 

577 

860 

844 

5,806 

1,114 

606 

551 
868 
399 

6,468 
589 

1,997 
292 

2,934 
920 
566 

862 



•H 
U 



2.183 



2.176 



183 

93 

27 

9 

23 

527 

4. 55 9 



1,790 



92 



71 

1 

35 

8 



130 

20 

2 
2 

1 



8 
12 

3 



2,187 
18 

1,995 

79 

280 

196 
323 
458 

a 



3 

1 

1 
1 
1 



Co\jntry or region of former allegiance 



•H 
H 



i2^ 



690 



2 
641 



10 

8 
2 



<n a) 

■H U 

■H a, 
^1 



14.993 



9,788 



10 



11 
9 
1 

11 
4 
1 
5 

17 

76 

1 

9 

187 

29 
1 
4 
3 
2 

35 

2 

8 

5 

9 

8 

6,422 

526 

1,979 

291 

27 

5 

100 

292 



I 
o 

H 
CQ 
O 

sz nj 

0) ^ 
O > 



2.091 



2.086 



42 

1 
1,928 



5 
41 

33 



^Ml 



122 



508 



16 



51 

85 

8 

5 
12 

131 
4.266 



2,154 

7 

1,920 

69 

116 

112 
82 

449 
A 



522 



ii8 



510 









2.043 



1,811 



2 

9 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1,684 

34 

3 



10 

1 



16 
1 
2 
3 

7 

13 



15 
1 
3 

29 



13.536 



13.484 



26 
9 

82 

2 
5 

2 
25 

13,1P9 



o 

<a 

(0 

U 
J2- 



1.707 



1.602 



1.313 



9 

2 

1 
4 

13 

Jk. 



84 

10 
2 
1 

15 
4 
1 



35 

7 

27 

16 



4 

6 

1,507 

1 
8 






1.319 



lA 

1 

28 



1 
26 



1,214 



4 

1 
21 



150 
19 



6 
5 

5 
12 



2 

1 

1 

15 

5 
5 
1 
8 



4 

1 

63 

80 



15 



1 
7 



78 



20 

1 
1 



_L. 



United States Department of Justice 
Imm igration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 46A. FEBSONS HA2^JBALIZBD, BI OOWWKt OB BEGICB OF BIBTH AND OOOOftr QB BEGION 
QSt FCRMBB ALLBGIASCB: XEikE WDSD JOMK 30. 1952 CCoat'd) 






Cov 


fatnr <; 


r v»gi 


|on of former allc 


«J4^ 


ce 


Countiy or region 
of birth 


J5 

1 


4 


;5 


4 
t 

6 


f 

d 

1 


^ 
^ 

b 

A 

S 


4 
• 


1 


3 

1 
1 


II 


o 
o 

« tt 
g| 


o 

,81 


<« 

u 

■ri 
U 


n 

s 

■s 
3? 


s 

•H 

53 


All cotintrles . . . . 


944 


^7i795 


3tW 


933 


illii 


XiOp3 


1,0,004 


^,494 


942 


^0? 


-ia 


596 


99 


;,49? 


i22 


Europs. , • 


228. 


26.986 


2^ 


? 


^ 


247 


753 


?i 


112 


« 


1 


36 


7 


1,424 


40 


Austria 

Rfll irinn. ••.••••••••* 


21 

1 
1 
1 

1 
5 

3 

lA 

14 

1 

3 

1 

12 
859 

1 

3 


82 
52 
70 
20 
6 

lU 
11 

54 

267 

13 

19 

2,116 

9,392 

265 

568 

837 

838 

5,511 

1,110 

542 

541 

851 

365 

25 

62 

17 

1 

2,810 

34 

361 

432 


12 

1 
3 
4 

1 

2 

90 

2 

1 

2 
3 

1 
43 

1 
3 

1 
2 

1 
43 

38 

1 
9 

3.413 


1 

3 

1 

?o? 


1 

1 
1 
1 

7 

i 


10 

1 
3 
4 

1 

2 

86 

2 

1 

1 
3 

43 
3 

1 
2 

1 
43 

31 
1 
6 

70? 


9 
13 

29 

5 

1 

15 

11 

17 

3 

16 

11 

30 

4 

11 

12 

6 

151 
2 

35 

1 

10 

8 

123 

n 

49 

2 

144 

16 
8 

22 


1 

2 
2 

13 
2 

1 
1 

9 
3 


2 

1 

1 

3 

1 

2 

64 
1 
3 

12 

2 

1 

15 

4 


1 

7 

1 
1 

1 

6 

2 
2 

1 
1 

2 


1 


1 

11 
3 

1 

11 

3 

1 

5 
2 


1 

2 

1 

1 

1 
1 


95 
2 
4 

60 
3 

6 

842 

35 

5 

13 
8 
6 

172 

1 

16 

2 

2 

1 

131 

17 

3 

52 


4 


Buls&ria. ....•*•*•■•• 




CzechosloTakia 

Dennark •• • 


1 


Estonia. ..•..*.•..** 


_ 


Finland 


^ 


France. ...*•..•••.•• 


2 


Geraany. • .• 


9 


Qreece. ...••.••••••• 


1 


Himearv. ............ 


1 


Ireland 

Italy 


1 
4 


Latvia 




T.if.hiiani A 


«. 


Netherlands .••••.••• 


<» 


Poland ••(••'>••••••*• 


1 






Ruoan ia oa»«..»ia>*** 


., 


Sp^in ■.•••••••••ttt** 


e. 


Sweden. •.•.*•••••••• 


c 


Switzerland 

(England. . . . 

United (N. Ireland. 

KingdoB(Scotland. . . 

U.S.S.B 


7 

1 

3 
3 

1 


Other Eiurope 

Asia 


1 
6 




1 

2 
2 


no 

5 
10 

10 
297 

a6 


43 
5 

75 

1,795 

604 

3? 


885 

1 

2 
21 

14 


2 

1,791 
2 


4 

43 

4 

75 

2 

581 


4 

1 
2 

15 
9.228 


1 
2 

2,460 


a?7 


1 
1 

576 


2 


2 


1 

4 
3 


35 

5 

4 
8 

12 


1 


India 




Palestine. 


1 


Other Asia... •*••••• 


4 


North America. ...•••• • 


«J 




1 

I 

1 


23 

6 

49 

7 

131 

77 

63 

4 

17 


3 

5 

3 

17 

5 
5 

2?7 


4 
1 
5 
1 
3 

3 


2 

1 


3 
2 

14 

1 
5 


9,065 

1 

9 

6 

147 

1 


1 

2,449 
5 

1 

4 

1 
1 


3 

819 

2 

3 
3 


2 

1 

4 

568 

1 

1 


2 

1 

6 


1 
2 

467 


I 
1 
1 

83 

1 


2 

n 

1 

8 

1 




Mexico 


3 




1 


Central Anerlea..... 
Sotith America.... ..••• 


3 

1 


Africa 




Australia ftlnrZwOAal 
Other countries.^ ^>... 


319 














Ux 


LitedSt 


ates I 


lepaz 


■taai 


it ol 


' Jus 


tic* 


} 





iHBifratlon and Naturalisation Serrice 



TABLE 47. PEHSONS NATURALIZED, BY STATUTORY 
PIi0VISI0N3 FOR MTUR/^IZATION: 
YEARS EtsiPED JUNE 30, 1948 to 1952 



Statutory provisions 



1948 



1949 



1950 



1951 



1952 



Total naturalized. 



Nationality Act of 1940 

General provisions .o... « 

Sees. 310(a) (b), 311, and 312 - persons 
married to U, S. citizens, 

Sees, 315 ;» 316 - Children, including 
adopted children of U. S. citizen 
parents .c. o 

Sec. 317(a) - Women who lost U.S. citizen- 
ship through marriage 

Sec, 317(c) ~ Dual U.S. nationals expatri- 
ated by entering or serving in armed 
forces of a foreign state, ,,.....,. 

Sec. 318(a) - Former U.S. citizens expat- 
riated through expatriation of parents.. 

Sec. 319(a) - Persons who lost citizenship 
through cancellation of parents' natura- 



XX2ia.LrX0Xl ••o*«o*«oe«»oi 



cw«9wo«ooe«oe«»i>a* 



SeCo 320 - Persons misinformed prior to 
Ju2^ 1, 1920., regarding citizenship 
status ov «o.,.^...o 

Sec» 32IA - Filipino persons whose continu- 
ous residence in U,S, commenced prior to 
May 1, 1934 1/.. 

Sec. 322 - Noncitizen natives of Puerto 
Rico - declaration of allegiance.,,.,... 

Sec, 324 - Persons who served in U, S, 
armed forces for three years,., ,, 

Sec, 324A - Persons who served in U, S, 
armed forces in World War I or World War 
II or were honorably discharged 2/...,., 

Sec, 325 ~ Persons who served on certain 



<tOoooo«o«e«eo*oeu««i 



U. So vessels,.. 
Act of July 2. 1940 



Persons who entered the United States 
while under I6 years of age 



Other. , . 



i>00»9*«390< 



70.150 



66.594 



66.346 



54,716 



34,347 
28,898 

a9 

296 

29 

12 



26 

4,200 

15 
98 



24,566 
35,131 

448 
243 

91 
10 



19,403 
40, 684 

499 
243 

136 
8 



21 



33 



2,675 1,843 
111 5 
450 343 



l,07o2| 2,006 



418 

316 

5 



622 



315 

1 



1,724 
1,164 

256 

2 



14,864 
36,433 

487 
220 

66 

1 



17 

843 

6 

300 

675 

611 



188 
5 



-88.61^ 



26 , 920 
58,027 

760 
223 

138 
9 



27 

722 

4 

194 

1,391 
64 

164 

8 



1/ Act of July 2, 1946. 
2/ Act of June 1,, 1948, 
2/ Persons naturalized under Sec. 701. Petitions filed under Sec. 701, which were 

still pending on June 1, 1948, were determined in accordance with Sec. 324A of 

the Nationality Act of 1940. 

United States Department of Justice 
Imm igration and Naturalization Service 



TABIE 48. WRITS OF HABEAS COItPUS IN EXCLUSION AND DEPORTATION CASES 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1943 TO 1952 



Action taken 



1943- 
1952 



Total Writs of 
^Ha beas Corpus 

Di*.pof^l of... 

Sustained. ,,,..... 

Dismissed,, ........ 

Wxthdrawp .,..,.... 

Pending end of yearo 

■Lyrolv.i ng Exclusion 

Disposed of. ...... 

Sustained. 

Dismissed 
Withdrawn 



UiHi 



179 
1,828 
918 

60 



tt o a • 



lao«o*«* 




Pending end of 



yr.a:r 



oooooa»o««oo 



T.n"7olving Deport.atior 



O U O O O o 



Disposed of ,. . . 
Sustained „ 
Dismissed. . . „. 
Withdrawn. o . . . 



p,=., 



nd.ing end of 



2,508 



>oo«oooeo«* 



133 
1, 622 
7?3 



52 



1943 



1944 



^ 



1 
62 
34 

27 



10 



_81 



Jk 



2 

46 
36 

20 



1945 



1946 



^ 



3 
55 
35 

16 



1 

3 
2 



2 

3 

1 



JZS 



56 

31 



25 



1 

43 
34 



J2. 



263 



9 
133 
121 

206 



1947 



ML 



15 
278 

151 
156 



ik. 



18 



1 
52 

34 



15 



2^ 



9 
129 
121 



205 



6 
19 
39 



15 



1948 1949 



306 



29 
175 
102 

160 




M 



3 
26 
19 



12 



4 



11, 

397 
105 

144 



1950 



25 
169 
153 

118 



1951 



347 394 



59 96 



9 
259 
112 



141 



380 258 



26 

149 
83 



6] 
38 
15 



16 



8 
48 
40 



21 



56 
260 
78 

47 



3 

27 
27 



13 



452 251 337 



3 
359 
90 



148 128 



17 
121 
113 



97 



53 
233 

51 



34 



1952 



J86. 



30 
253 

103 

60 



57 67 



16 
32 
19 



Jil 



14 
221 

84 



52 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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