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Full text of "Annual report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service"

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UNITED STATES 



ANNUAL REPORT 

~7 OF THE 

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., Lmmigration and Naturalization Service 

Washington , D. C. 




FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 

1953 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 




ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

IMMIGRATION and NATURALIZATION SERVICE 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

WASHINGTON , D. C. 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1953 




ARGYLE R. MACKEY 



PUBLIC 



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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

Immigration and Naturalization Service 

Washington 25, D. C. 



Report of the Commissioner 
of Immigration and Naturalization 



The Attorney General 

United States Department of Justice 

Sir I have the honor to submit the Annual Report of the Immigration and Naturali- 

zation Service for the year ending June 30, 1953. The Immigration and Nationality Act 
touched almost every phase of operation of the Service. This report describes some of 
the more important changes and their effect on our work. 

Respectfully submitted, 




J^fee*^ 



Immigration and Naturalization Service 
November 25, 1953 




TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Chapter 1 Highlights 1 

Chapter 2 Legislation and Litigation 5 

Chapter 3 Entry and Departure 11 

Immigrants _ _ _ - 13 

Visa petitions _ — _ 15 

Nonimmigrants „ __ _ 27 

Emigrants _ - — 32 

Nonemigrants _ _ _ _ 33 

Exclusions _ _ 33 

Chapter 4 Adjustment of Status 35 

Suspension of deportation _ _. 35 

Displaced persons in the United States _ _ _... 35 

Adjustment of status from nonimmigrant to immigrant _ 38 

Adjustment of status of resident alien to nonimmigrant status _ _ 33 

Creation of record of admission for permanent residence ..„ __ 33 

Chapter 5 Deportation, Detention, Border Patrol 39 

Deportation _ _ _ _ _ _ 4Q 

Voluntary departures _.. 44 

Conditional parole, bond, or supervision _ _. 44 

Detention ._ _. _ 4g 

Border P atrol ..„ _ 5O 

Chapter 6 Investigations 57 

Anti-subversive operations _ 53 

Anti-racketeer and other anti-criminal operations „ 59 

Anti-smuggling and stowaway operations 59 

Visa and passport fraud operations _ „ _ 1^9 

General operations gn 

Chapter 7 Nationality 51 

Removal of racial restrictions upon naturalization __ 52 

Declarations filed _ __ _ 53 

Petitions filed _ _ _ _ _ 53 

Persons naturalized 53 

Petitions denied _ _ 55 

Naturalizations revoked _ _ _ _ 65 

Loss of nationality by expatriation _ _ _.._ _.._ _ 56 

Citizenship acquired by resumption or repatriation _ _ 67 

Derivative citizenship _ _ _ 57 

Citizenship services _ 68 



Chapter 8 Administration 



Personnel 

Budget 

Finance .. 
Statistics 



Instructions 

Information 

Alien Address Program 

Management improvement 

Files and records 



Space, services and supplies 



Appendix I Judicial Opinions in Litigation 85 



^^ 



APPENDIX II 



Table 1. Immigration to the United States: 1820 - 1953 

Table 2. Aliens and citizens admitted and departed, by months; Years ended June 30, 

1952 and 1953 
Table 3. Aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration laws: Years ended June 

30, 1949 to 1953 
Table 4. Immigration by country, for decades: 1820 to 1953 
Table 5. Immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens departed, by port or district: 

Years ended June 30, 1949 to 1953 
Table 6. Immigrant aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and coun- 
try or region of birth: Year ended June 30, 1953 
Table 6A. Immigrant aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and coun- 
try of last permanent residence: Year ended June 30, 1953 
Table 6B. Immigrant aliens admitted to the United States under the Displaced Persons 

Act of 1948, as amended, by classes and country or region of birth: June 25, 1948 

to June 30, 1953 
Table 6C. Displaced persons and other immigrant aliens admitted to the United States, 

by country or region of birth: Year ended June 30, 1953 
Table 7. Annual quotas and quota immigrants admitted: Years ended June 30, 1949 

to 1953 
able 8. Immigrant aliens admitted, by country or region of birth and major occupa- 

tioij. group: Year ended June 30, 1953 
Tabre 9. Immigrant aliens admitted, by country or region of birth, sex and age: Year 

ended June 30, 1953 
Table 10. Immigrant aliens admitted, by race, sex and age: Year ended June 30, 1953 
Table 10 A. Immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens departed, by sex, age, illiter- 
acy, and major occupation group: Years ended June 30, 1949 to 1953 
Table lOB. Immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens departed, by country or region 

of birth, sex, and marital status: Year ended June 30, 1953 
Table 11. Aliens and citizens admitted and departed: Years ended June 30, 1908 to 

1953 
Table 12. Immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens departed, by State of intended 

future or last permanent residence: Years ended June 30, 1949 to 1953 
Table 12A. Immigrant aliens admitted to the United States, by rural and urban area and 

city: Years ended June 30, 1949 to 1953 
Table 13. Immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens departed, by country or region 

of last or intended future permanent residence: Years ended June 30, 1949 to 1953 
Table 13A. Immigrant aliens admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 

30, 1944 to 1953 
Table 14. Emigrant aliens departed, by race, sex and age: Year ended June 30, 1953 
Table 14A. Emigrant aliens departed, by country or region of birth, and major occupa- 
tion group: Year ended June 30, 1953 
Table 15. Emigrant aliens departed, by country or region of birth, sex and age: Year 

ended June 30, 1953 
Table 16. Nonimmigrant aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and 

country or region of birth: Year ended June 30, 1953 
Table 17. Nonimmigrant aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and 

country or region of last permanent residence: Year ended June 30, 1953 
Table 18. Nonimmigrant aliens admitted and nonemigrant aliens departed, by country 

or region of last or intended future permanent residence: Years ended June 30, 1949 

to 1953 
Table 19. Nonimmigrant aliens in the United States, by district: On June 30, 1952 and 

1953 
Table 20. Aliens excluded from the United States, by cause: Years ended June 30, 

1947 to 1953 



APPENDIX II (Continued) 

Table 21. Aliens excluded from the United States, by country or region of birth and 

cause: Year ended June 30, 1953 
Table 22. Alien crewmen deserted from vessels anived at American seaports, by 

nationality and flag of vessel: Year ended June 30, 1953 
Table 23. Vessels and airplanes inspected, crewmen examined, and stowaways found 

on arriving vessels, by districts: Years ended June 30, 1952 and 1953 
Table 24. Aliens deported, by cause and country to which deported: Year ended June 

30, 1953 
Table 24A. Aliens deported and aliens departing voluntarily under proceedings: Years 

ended June 30, 1892 to 1953 
Table 25. Aliens deported, by deportation expense and country to which deported: 

Year ended June 30, 1953 
Table 26. Inward movement of aliens and citizens over international land boundaries, 

by State and port: Year ended June 30, 1953 
Table 27. United States citizens returning at land border ports, by districts: Years 

ended June 30, 1949 to 1953 
Table 28. Inward movement of aliens and citizens over international land boundaries: 

Years ended June 30, 1928 to 1953 
Table 29. Principal activities and accomplishments of Immigration Border Patrol, by 

districts: Year ended June 30, 1953 
Table 30. Passenger travel between the United States and foreign countries, by port 

of arrival or departure: Year ended June 30, 1953 
Table 31. Passengers arrived in the United States from foreign countries, by country 

of embarkation: Year ended June 30, 1953 
Table 32. Passengers departed from the United States to foreign countries, by country 

of debarkation: Year ended June 30, 1953 
Table 33. Aliens deported, by cause: Years ended June 30, 1908 to 1953 
Table 34. Aliens who reported under the Alien Address Program, by nationality: Dur- 
ing 1953 
Table 35. Aliens who reported under the Alien Address Program, by selected nation- 
alities and States of residence: During 1953 
Table 36. Aliens who reported under the Alien Address Program, by selected national- 
ities and urban area and city: During 1953 
Table 37. Declarations of intention filed, petitions for naturalization filed, and persons 

naturalized: Years ended June 30, 1907 to 1953 
Table 38. Persons naturalized, by general and special naturalization provisions and 

country or region of former allegiance: Year ended June 30, 1953 
Table 39. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance: Years ended 

June 30, 1944 to 1953 
Table 40. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance and major 

occupation group: Year ended June 30, 1953 
Table 41. Persons naturalized and petitions for naturalization denied: Years ended 

June 30, 1907 to 1953 
Table 42. Persons naturalized, by sex and marital status with comparative percent of 

total: Years ended June 30, 1945 to 1953 
Table 43. Persons naturalized, by sex and age: Years ended June 30, 1945 to 1953 
Table 44. Persons naturalized, by States and territories of residence: Years ended 

June 30, 1949 to 1953 
Table 45. Persons naturalized, by specified countries of former allegiance and by 

rural and urban area and city: Year ended June 30, 1953 
Table 46. Persons naturalized, by country or region of birth and year of entry: Year 

ended June 30, 1953 



APPENDIX II (Continued) 



Table 46A. Persons naturalized, by country or region of birth and country or region of 

former allegiance: Year ended June 30, 1953 
Table 47. Persons naturalized, by general and special naturalization provisions: Years 

ended June 30, 1949 to 1953 
Table 48. Writs of Habeas Corpus in exclusion and deportation cases: Years ended 

June 30, 1944 to 1953 
Table 49. Prosecutions for immigration and nationality violations: Years ended June 

30, 1944 to 1953 



CHAPTER 



Highlights 



L 



The fiscal year 1953 is destined to become a bench-mark in the history of the 
Immigration and Naturalization Service, because in that year the Immigration and Nation- 
ality Act became effective. Designed to be all-inclusive, the new statute wrapped up in 
one bundle many pieces of legislation administered by the Immigration and Naturaliza- 
tion Service; it also amended and added to previous legislation. The provisions of the 
new Act did not become effective until December 24, 1952, but the changes involved 
were so extensive that much of the past fiscal year was spent in learning, implementing, 
and initiating its provisions. 

The new law made a number of basic changes in immigrant classes. Industries 
are finding the new first preference quota useful as an aid to admission of engineers 
and other badly needed technicians. For many naturalized citizens born in countries 
with over-subscribed quotas, the fourth-preference right to petition to bring in brothers 
and sisters is the realization of a long lost hope. Husbands of citizen wives, who former- 
ly would have had to wait for quota numbers, may now be admitted nonquota. Aliens from 
Asiatic countries, barred from the quota system by the 1924 Immigration Act, now have 
quota allotments. New nonimmigrant classes include representatives of foreign press, 
radio, and television media, and temporary workers of ability and industrial trainees. 

The new Act sharpened the weapons of enforcement. With its passage, crewmen 
for the first time became subject to all the excluding provisions of immigration laws, and 
were issued landing permits on each arrival in the United States. The more stringent 
causes for deportation made it possible to proceed against known subversives, criminals, 
and racketeers, who could not have been reached under previous legislation. Denaturali- 
zation of members of subversive organizations is facilitated. Similarly, the causes for 
exclusion are more clearly defined. Among new excludable classes are narcotic addicts 
and narcotic traffickers. 



Two of the most important changes in the field of nationality legislation ate the 
elimination of the declaration of intention, or "first paper," as a requisite to naturaliza- 
tion, and the removal of the racial barriers to naturalization. 

Midway in the fiscal year came the transition from prior legislation to the cunent 
statute. It was an orderly and comparatively smooth change. Sparked by representatives 
of the -Operating Divisions, Operations Advisors, and members of theGeneral Counsel's 
staff, many groups of Service employees met together in the Central Office, at regional. 
District, and sub-office conferences and classes to study the new documentary and in- 
spectional requirements, the new visa petition and naturalization procedures, and measures 
for meeting other anticipated problems. 

While some sections of the new Act seemed to affect every phase of immigration 
and nationality work, in broad terms the duties and responsibilities were still the same. 
Oversimplified, responsibilities of the Service continue to be admitting eligible aliens, 
keeping out ineligible aliens, finding and getting rid of undesirable or illegally present 
aliens, fostering citizenship education, and presenting desirable aliens to the court for 
naturalization. 

Aliens and citizens seeking entry at ports still had to be inspected for admis- 
sibility, and more than 118 million were so inspected in the fiscal year 1953. By far the 
greater part of this vast number was made up of border crossers coming from Canada or 
Mexico. Almost two million alien and citizen crewmen were included in this number, and 
one and a half million passengers who arrived at sea and airports. 

Immigration declined from 265 thousand in 1952 to 170 thousand in 1953. The 
decrease, entirely in quota classes, was attributable to the expiration of the Displaced 
Persons Act, and to the time it took to institute the new quota provisions of the law. 

Nonimmigrants admitted, exclusive of agricultural laborers, equalled 486 thousand, 
an apparent decrease that actually was caused by the regilatory changes whereby Cana- 
dians were admitted for six months or less without documentation, rather than for 29 days, 
as had been true prior to the effective date of the new Act. 

The agreements with Mexico were continued and about 200 thousand agricultural 
laborers, principally Mexican nationals, were imported during the year to work on farms 
and ranches in the United States. 

In the 134 years since records of immigration have been kept, 40 million immi- 
grants have come to the United States. History is filled with the magnificient contribu- 
tions that have been made to our country, both by the famous immigrants and by the 
humbler ones who fostered development by building railways and factories and settling 
the land. Unfortunately, today's history also has among the alien groups some who are 
notorious, rather than noteworthy, and whose deeds are full of malicious intent rather 
than of contributions to democratic ideals. 

It was a fortuitous combination of circumstances that brought together an in- 
vestigative force growing in size and efficiency, a sharpened law, and the Attorney 
General's special program for intensifying efforts looking toward the deportation and 
denaturalization of subversives, criminals, racketeers, narcotics law violators, and 
others who have demonstrated that their presence is inimical to the United States. By 
the close of the fiscal year, denaturalization suits had been instituted against 17 natu- 
ralized citizens considered leading racketeers in the United States, and deportations 
had been instituted in 23 top racketeer cases. 



Investigations were completed in 11,683 denaturalization and deportation cases 
on subversive grounds. 

Other types of investigations, some of which are required by the current law, in- 
clude investigations: of naturalization applicants; of beneficiaries of private bills in- 
troduced in Congress (of which there were 2,980 during the year); of aliens who overstay 
their time of authorized admission; of aliens who fail to file an address report in January; 
of stowaways, and other illegal entrants. 

The human tide of "wetbacks" continues to be the most serious enforcement 
problem of the Service, volumewise. For every agricultural laborer admitted legally, 
four aliens were apprehended by the Border Patrol. If all of the 875 thousand aliens 
apprehended by the Service were docile agricultural laborers, as is the popular belief, 
the problem might not be quite so grave. But among those apprehended were 1,545 
smugglers of aliens, 30,000 who were not in farms, but in trade and industry. In addi- 
tion, there are tremendous odds against the small force of a thousand Border Patrolmen 
being able to prevent communists or foreign agents from entering across the Borders, 
when they are so enmeshed in apprehending thousands of aliens. 

A concomitant of apprehension of illegal aliens is expulsion of such aliens from 
the United States. In the past year more than 905 thousand expulsions were accom- 
plished, an increase of 25 percent over last year. The increase was in the "deportable 
aliens required to depart,* and reflected the Service effort to handle quickly the mass 
invasion of aliens from Mexico. 

Of direct assistance to this program was the completion of two detention facili- 
ties, at McAllen, Texas, and Chula Vista, California, where apprehended aliens could 
be collected and processed for expulsion or prosecution. 

The number of aliens deported under formal proceedings was 19,845, the slight 
decrease from last year being more than offset by the number of voluntary departures 
under warrants of arrest. 

Through the deportation process 46 subversive aliens were expelled from the 
country. The uphill battle against delays in deportation continues, with large numbers 
of persons held in detention or parole, while the Service struggles with non-cooperative 
foreign governments who refuse to issue travel documents for their own nationals, and 
with wily aliens who select impossible countries for deportation, or claim persecution 
as means of delaying deportation. 

The antithesis of deportation, which reduces the alien population by expulsion, 
is the naturalization process, whereby the alien population is reduced when aliens be- 
come citizens. The rising trend in naturalizations, begun in 1952, continued into 1953 
when 92,051 naturalization certiiicates were issued. Relatively high immigration since 
the war, the new Act with its attendant publicity, the Alien Address Program, the lifting 
of racial barriers to naturalization, and the easing of literacy requirements for older 
aliens, all contributed to the increase. These same factors give a solid basis for antici- 
^jating a continued rise in naturalization. 

The past year was the first year in which "Citizenship Day" was celebrated on 
September 17th, the anniversary of the signing of the Constitution. As part of its citi- 
zenship education program, the Service actively promoted and participated in the cele- 
bration of the day, dedicated to fostering the principles of democracy for all citizens ~ 
both native-born and naturalized. 



The fiscal year was characterized by new legislation, with its problems of 
administration and interpretation; by the tidal waves of humanity breaching our Southern 
Borders; by national security commanding a growing share of our energies and resources; 
and by the naturalization of non-citizens in growing numbers. The relating accomplish- 
ments and problems are presented in the pages that follow. 



CHAPTER 



Legislation 

AND 

Litigation 



Public Laws 

Only one public law of the type administered solely by this Service was enacted 
during the past fiscal year. Public Law 86, 83d Congress, 1st Session, approved June 
30, 1953, provides for the expeditious naturalization of aliens serving, or who have 
served, in the armed forces after June 24, 1950. The statute was designed to accord 
aliens serving during the period of the Korean conflict substantially the same benefits 
as were granted to aliens who were members of the armed forces during World War II. 

This dearth ef public legislation was not attributable to lack of Congressional 
interest or concern for immigration and nationality problems, but was primarily due to the 
fact that on June 27, 1952, Congress had passed, over Presidential veto, the Immigra- 
tion and Nationality Act which became effective December 24, 1952. That Act revised 
and codified all laws relating to immigration, exclusion, expulsion, naturalization, and 
citizenship. Several bills were under active consideration during the closing months of 
the fiscal year, but only the one referred to above became law prior to July 1, 1953. 

Private Legislation 

Although the number of bills designed individually to adjust the immigration 
status of otherwise illegally resident aliens followed the upward trend discernible in 
recent years, the number actually passed was smaller. Nine hundred twenty-two such 
bills were introduced in the Senate, 2,058 in the House of Representatives, a total of 
2,980, as compared to 2,008 in the previous year. Of this number, only 222, or about 7.5 
percent, finally became laws, 166 during the second session of the 82d Congress and 
56 during the first session of the 83d Congress. 

The introduction of legislation of this character necessitates extensive con- 
sideration by the Service. Investigations must be made and reports must be prepared 



- 6- 

when requested by the appropriate Congressional committees. The number of requests 
increases, of course, in proportion to the number of bills introduced. In addition, mem- 
bers of the General Counsel's Office appear before the Congressional Committees from 
time to time to lend personal assistance to the members considering the bills. 

Litigation 

The institution of suits challenging the application of various immigration and 
nationality statutes continues to increase. Broadly speaking, these suits fall into a few 
general categories: the validity of deportation proceedings, the right to detain deportable 
aliens, the administrative denial of United States citizenship, money claims arising out 
of the enforcement -of the immigration and kindred laws, and appeals from, and revoca- 
tions of, orders of naturalization. With few exceptions, such litigation originated in the 
Federal courts. 

From the standpoint of Service precedent, of course, the rulings of the United 
States Supreme Court are of the greatest importance. Twenty cases directly involving 
application of the immigration, citizenship, or naturalization laws were considered by 
the Court during 1952-1953 term and all were finally disposed of by the Court, certiorari 
being granted in nine and denied in eleven. It is interesting to note, in the light of the 
Government's efforts to control subversive activities in this country, that of the seven 
opinions handed down by the Court, four involved persons believed to be dangerous to 
the national security. The nine cases considered on the merits by the Court, and the 
points at issue in each case, are briefly as follows: 

Mandoli v. Acheson , 344 U.S. 133, from the Court of Appeals for the District of 
Columbia. The lower court was reversed, the Supreme Court holding that continued 
residence abroad by a native-born United States citizen who possessed duel nationality 
at birth, did not in and of itself cause expatriation under the Act of March 2, 1907. 

Kwong Hai Chew v. Colding et al , 344 U.S. 590, from the Court of Appeals for 
the Second Circuit. The lower court was reversed, the Supreme Court holding that the 
detention of an alien previously admitted for permanent residence, without notice of the 
charges upon which he was excluded upon his return to the United States, was not 
authorized by 8 C.F.R. 175.57(b) but that in that case the alien was to be "assimilated* 
to one resident within the United States. 

United States v. Lutwak , 344 U.S. 604, from the Court of Appeals for the Seventh 
Circuit. Judgment of the lower court affirmed; the case involved conviction of conspiracy 
to violate the so-called War Brides' Act. 

Gordon v. Heikkinen , 344 U.S. 870, from the Court of Appeals for the Eighth Cir- 
cuit. The authority of the Attorney General to deny bail was challenged and the Supreme 
Court vacated the judgment of the lower court, remanding the case to the District Court 
for dismissal on the ground the cause was moot. 

Martinez v. Neelly, 344 U.S. 916, from the Court of Appeals for the Seventh 
Circuit. Judgment of the lower court affirmed without opinion, it having held that proof 
that the Communist Party advocated overthrow of the United States Government by force 
and violence was not necessary to establish deportability under the Act of October 16, 
1918, as amended. 

Shaughnessy v. United States ex rel Mezei, 345 U.S. 206, from the Court of 
Appeals for the Second Circuit. The judgment of the lower court was reversed, the 



- 7- 

Supreme Court holding that the continued detention of a returning resident alien pursuant 
to a proper order of exclusion did not violate any statutory or constitutional right. 

Heikkila v. Barber et al , 345 U.S. 229, from the Court of Appeals for the Ninth 
Circuit. The judgment of the lower court was affirmed, the Supreme Court holding that 
deportation orders entered prior to December 24, 19S2, are judicially reviewable only in 
habeas corpus proceedings. 

Bridges et al v. United States , 346 U.S. 209, from the Court of Appeals for the 
Ninth Circuit. The judgment of the lower court, which had affirmed a conviction for 
violation of 8 U.S.C. 346(a)(1), was reversed, the Supreme Court holding that the gen- 
eral three year statute of limitations was applicable to each offense charged and the 
indictment came too late. 

Bridges v. United States , 345 U.S. 979, a companion case to the case immediate- 
ly above. Judgment of the lower court upholding revocation of naturalization incidental 
to conviction was reversed. 

Certiorari was denied in the following cases: 

V anish v. Barber , 344 U.S. 817 (deportation) 

Revedin v. Acheson , 344 U.S. 820 (expatriation) 

Wohlmuth V. Acheson , 344 U.S. 833 (expatriation) 

Miranda v. United States , 344 U.S. 842 (criminal prosecution) 

American President Lines. Ltd. v. Immigration and Naturalization Service, et al, 344 

U. S. 892 (jurisdiction of Court of Appeals to review rule making) 
Mannerfrid v. United States , 345 U.S. 918 (ineligibility for naturalization) 
United States ex rel Dolenz v. Shaughnessy , 345 U.S. 928 (deportation) 
lames v. Shaughnessy , 345 U.S. 969 (administrative relief) 
U nited States ex rel Spinella v. Savoretti, 345 U.S. 975 (right to bail) 
United States ex rel Beck v. Neelly , 345 U.S. 997 (deportation) 
Gonzalez-Martinez v. Landon , 345 U.S. 998 (administrative relief) 

Potentially, the most far-reaching effect from the standpoint of volume of litiga- 
tion may be expected from the Heikkila case. In recent years, the practice of challeng- 
ing orders of deportation by every possible judicial means had grown up. In addition to 
habeas corpus, resort was had to the declaratory judgment and injunction statutes, and 
to section 10 of the Administrative Procedure Act. In many cases, all were invoked. 
Under the Heikkila case, relief is limited to a single form of remedy: habeas corpus. 
Because of the factual background of the Heikkila case, however, it remains to be seen 
whether the rule laid down will be followed by the lower courts in all cases involving 
judicial challenge of a deportation order, or whether it will be restricted to cases in 
which, like Heikkila, the administrative proceedings were completed, and the suit filed, 
prior to December 24, 1952, the effective date of the Immigration and Nationality Act. 
Already its authority is being questioned in cases in which deportation proceedings are 
instituted under the current Act - or if instituted under the former statutes, were not com- 
pleted until after the effective date of the current Act - as well as in cases in which 
judicial relief was not sought until after December 24, 1952, whether or not orders of 
deportation had been entered prior thereto. 

A number of cases reached the appellate courts during the past fiscal year, and 
these, if reported, are enumerated in the Appendix. Some laid down new principles of 
law, some re-affirmed existing precedents. Several of the more important are worthy of 
mention. In the Third Circuit, the Appellate Court held that the Commissioner of 



-8- 

Immigration and Naturalization was an indispensable party in any proceeding to review 
an order of deportation. Paolo v. Garfinckel , 200 K. 2d 280. There has been conflict 
among the courts on this point. The same Court upheld the constitutionality of the pro- 
vision in the Supplemental Appropriation Act of 1951 (64 Stat. 1048) under which de- 
portation proceedings were exempted from the requirements of sections 5, 7 and 8 of the 
Administrative Procedure Act. Belizaro v. Zimmerman , 200 F. 2d 282. In the Second 
Circuit, the Appellate Court in United States ex rel Dolenz v. Shaughnessy, 200 F. 2d 
288, held that in determining whether an alien would be subject to persecution if de- 
deported to a given country, no prescribed procedure or particular findings were neces- 
SBiy to support a decision that the alien would not be subject to persecution where the 
alien had been given an opportunity to present evidence to support his claim of perse- 
cution. In this Circuit also, an alien's refusal either to admit or to deny membership in 
the Communist Party, as charged in the warrant of deportation, was held sufficient to 
show that his detention was not an arbitrary or capricious action of the Attorney GeneraL 
United States ex rel Yaris v. Esper dy, 202 F. 2d 109. 

In the Ninth Circuit, the Appellate Court rejected an alien's contention that the 
Internal Security Act, which amended the Act of October 16, 1918, infringed his con- 
stitutional rights as guaranteed by the Fifth Amendment by making membership in the 
Communist Party a ground for deportation. Galvan v. Press , 201 F. 2d 302. 

The Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia took the rather novel viev; 
that where an excluded alien was detained in the United States for the purpose of prose- 
cuting him for violation of the immigration laws, his deportation must conform to the 
requirements of the deportation statutes, rather than those of the exclusion statutes. 
Ng Lin Chong v. McGrath , 202 F. 2d 316. 

On the District Court level, the right of the Attorney General to deny bail to aliens 
whose deportation was sought on subversive grounds, and alleged procedural defects 
in hearings accorded such aliens, were questions frequently presented to the courts for 
determination. Suits for declaratory judgments of United States citizenship by persons 
whose claims thereto had been denied by either the Attorney General or the Secretary 
of State increased greatly in volume due primarily to the imminent repeal by the Immi- 
gration and Nationality Act of Section 503 of the Nationality Act of 1940. The latter was 
very broad in scope and many who invoked it would have been precluded from proceed- 
ing under the more stringent provisions of the new Immigration and Nationality Act. 

A very important case - American President Lines, Ltd. v. United States of 
America - is now pending in the United States Court of Claims. The question at issue 
is whether the plaintiff carriers are liable for expenses incident to detention of appli- 
cants seeking admission as United States citizens, during the period required for admin- 
istrative determination of the validity of their claim to citizenship. The Service has 
long applied the rule that the carrier is responsible, and it is this application of the law 
which is drawn into question. The petition seeks judgment for more than $613,000, and it 
is expected that other cases will be joined in the litigation, bringing the total amount 
of the claims to considerably more than $1,000,000. 

Relatively few of the provisions of the new Immigration and Nationality Act 
have as yet been tested out in the courts. Among those which have is section 212(d)(7), 
which involves excluding provisions applicable to resident aliens returning to continen- 
tal United States from outlying possessions. The Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit 
upheld the constitutionality of the statute and a petition for certiorari is now pending 
in the United States Supreme Court, the petition having been filed by the International 
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, Local No. 37. Several cases challenging 



-9- 

the Attorney General's right to detain an alien without bond under section 244 have reach- 
ed the appellate courts and one case in which this issue is raised is now awaiting dis- 
position of the Government's petition for certiorari to the Supreme Court. 

In its advisory capacity, the Office of the General Counsel was flooded with re- 
quests for interpretations of various provisions of the new Immigration and Nationality 
Act. This phase of its work will probably decrease in volume as the new Act's provi- 
sions are tested out in the courts. 

The Attorney General's announced drive to rid the country of aliens whose sub- 
versive and criminal activities were considered dangerous to the national peace and se- 
curity was aided by the institution of suits to revoke the naturalization of such persons 
where investigation revealed sufficient grounds therefor. A number of such suits are now 
pending in the District Courts. 



CONVICTIONS IN COURTS FOR VIOLATING IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY LAWS 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1935 - 1953 
NUMBER 
20,000 



15,000 



10,000 



5,000 




1935 



1940 



1945 



1950 



1953 




E N T R Y 
AND 

Departure 



When the Immigration and Nationality Act became effective, the new and complex 
requirements for admission and new and additional classifications of alien applicants 
posed many problems. The transition was accomplished, however, with remarkable ease, 
based in large part on the considerable preparation by the Service, during the six-month 
period between the enactment and effective date of the law, in the form of field con- 
ferences and advance instructions. The inspection and examination of applicants for 
admission to the United States continues, volumewise, to be the major activity of the 
Service. 

The total number of admissions to the country reflects a continuation of the 
steady rise in international travel apparent since the close of World War II. For the 
second consecutive year the volume has passed the 100 million mark, to reach more 
than 118 million in the fiscal year 1953. Most of this vast number, of course, reflected 
land border traffic across the Canadian and Mexican Borders. The economic and indus- 
trial development in Canada, and highway improvements on both sides of the Interna- 
tional Boundary, give every prospect for increased travel across that border in future 
years. Similarly, migration from south of the border also has risen as economic develop- 
ment and closer trade relations increased. 



- 12- 

Aliens and citizens arrived and examined at 
U. S. Ports of entry during years 
ended June 30, 1952 and 1953 



Total 



Aliens 



Citizens 



Year ended June 30, 1953 



46,701,040 

68,245,343 

1,932,827 

1,486,440 



Total __ 118,365,650 

Arrived at land borders 

Canadian _ _ _ 

Mexican 

Crewmen _ _ 

Arrived at seaports 

Total 

Arrived at land borders 

Canadian 44,212,088 

Mexican .._ 59,300,011 

Crewmen __ _ 1,939,418 

Anived at seaports 1,433,010 



59,577,599 58,788,051 



114,946,383 57,931,998 57,014,385 



23,918,781 

34,013,217 

1,080,545 

565,056 



22,782,259 

34,232,126 

852,282 

921,384 



Year ended June 30, 1952 



107,084,527 52,852,677 



54,231,850 



103.712.099 51,129,142 52,582.957 



20,898,541 

30,230,601 

1,087,633 

635,902 



23,313,547 

29,269,410 

851,785 

797,108 



Travel of aliens and citizens across the Mexican Border, which usually is con- 
considerably higher than along the Canadian Border, increased 15 percent during t he 
past year. Alien traffic across the Canadian Border rose 14 percent but citizen traffic 
declined two percent. 



ENTRIES OVER CANADIAN AND MEXICAN LAND BORDERS 
YEARS ENDED JUME 30, 1941 - 1953 



NUMBER 
125,000,000 



100,000,000 
75,000,000 
50,000,000 


TOTAL ( ftLIEN 


AND CITIZEN ) 


BORDER CROSSERS 




^^ 




\ 




f^ 






^ 


A- 




^ 




^^ 


y^ 




CITI 


ZENS 








^^ 


























25,000,000 














. 












i- 


ALIENS 




















1944 



1947 



1950 



- 13- 

Crewmen 

With the passage of the Immigration and Nationality Act, crewmen for the first 
time became subject to all the excluding provisions of immigration laws. This includes 
the issuance of landing permits on each arrival in the United States. To ease the transi- 
tion to this new procedure and eliminate delays in the turn-around period of the large 
Atlantic passenger liners arriving at New York, arrangements were made for immigrant 
inspectors to conduct the more extensive interrogation of crewmen, and to process the 
individual landing permits, enroute. This experiment, conducted on board approximately 
twenty vessels during, a three-month period commencing on December 24, 1952, served 
completely to allay fears of lengthy inspectional delays and of wholesale refusals to 
grant shore leave, which were extensively publicized in the early days of the Act. By 
April 1, 1953, the need for the special procedure having eased, regular inspection was 
resumed for all crewmen at the United States port of arrival. As a result of the stricter 
provisions concerning control, fewer alien crewmen are remaining ashore or on the beach, 
and a lesser number have deserted or are being apprehended as over-stays. 

During the fiscal year ended June 30, 1953, 45,347 vessels and 84,890 airplanes 
were inspected on arrival in the United States. The 1,932,827 crewmen inspected on 
arrival during that period included 1,080,545 aliens and 852,282 citizens. Of the alien 
crewmen granted shore leave, 2,317 deserted from their vessels; of these, 310 were 
British, 275 Italian, 271 Norwegian, 162 Spanish, and 186 Chinese. 

Immigrants 

Throughout our history, immigration has felt the impact of political, social, and 
economic events both here and abroad. In the 30 's and early 40 's, restrictive legisla- 
tion, depression, and World War II reduced immigration to an insignificant factor. Special 
legislation in the form of the "War Brides" Act and the Displaced Persons Act of 1948 
changed the trend and raised the immigration figures to the level of the late 1920's. 

The trend in immigration during the fiscal year 1953 has been free, for the first 
time since 1946, of the augmenting influence of special legislation. Rather, the upward 
trend has been retarded by the expiration and the mortgaging provisions of the Dis- 
placed Persons Act. To some extent, the implementation of the Immigration and Nation- 
ality Act also slowed immigration during the year. Nonetheless, the 170,434 immigrants 
admitted was more than double the annual immigration of the pre-war period. 



14- 



IMMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1820 - 1953 



THOUSANDS 




ZOO 



1900 



40 53 



Immigration to the United States declined from 265,520 in the fiscal year 1952 to 
170,434 in the fiscal year 1953, a drop of 36 percent. This decline was in quota immi- 
gration, and was due to the expiration of the Displaced Persons Act. Normal quota immi- 
gration, that is, quota immigration exclusive of displaced persons and German ethnics, 
was six percent higher in the fiscal year 1953 as compared with 1952, and nonquota immi- 
gration rose 21 percent. The resettlement of thousands of European refugees and ex- 
pellees, however, is still a major problem facing the world today. Shortly after the clos- 
ing period of this report. Congress passed the FJefugee Act for the admission of 214,000 
German, Italian, Greek, Far-Eastern, and other refugees, expellees, and escapees from 
the Soviet or other Communist-dominated countries. 



15 



CLASSES OF IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED TO THE UNITED STATES 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1952 AND 1953 
THOUSANDS 
160 




/952 (953 

QUOTA 
DISPLACED PERSONS and 
GERMAN ETH.NICS 



1952 1953 

QUOTA ( OTHER ) 
IMMIGRANTS 



1952 
NONQUOTA 



IMM 



1953 
IGRANTS 



While the Immigration and Nationality Act did not increase the volume of immi- 
gration, it modified and extended the classes of immigrants entering this country. One- 
fifth of the immigrants who came to the United States during the last half of the fiscal 
year 1953 entered with visas issued prior to December 24, 1952, the effective date of 
the Immigration and Nationality Act. Under a savings clause in Section 405 of the Act, 
these aliens were permitted to enter under the provisions of the laws in effect at the time 
the visas were issued. Quota immigrant admissions were reduced in January and Febru- 
ary during the transition from the old to the new law. By the end of June 1953, however, 
practically all of the immigrants were being admitted under the provisions of the new 
Act. 



Visa Petitions .— The Immigration Act of 1924 required visa petitions to be 
filed by United States citizens for the issuance of immigration visas to their parents, 
spouses, or children. With the exception of certain Western Hemisphere natives, return- 
ing residents, former citizens. United States Government employees, and natives of 
undersubscribed quota areas, immigrants, whether of the quota or nonquota classifica- 
tion, are required by the new law to be beneficiaries of Service - approved visa petitions 
filed by relatives and other interested United States citizens or organizations. Since 
this requirement became effective on December 24, 1952, the number of visa petitions 
filed with this Service has increased threefold. 



- 16- 

Visa Petitions 
January 1, 1953 to June 30, 1953 







Completed 






Received 


Jan. 1, 1953 




Pending 


Jan. 1, 


to 


Pending 


on 


1953 to 


June 30, 1953 


on 



Class 

Jan. 1. June 30, Total Denied June 30, 
1953 1953 Completed \J 1953 

Total number 499 47.119 39.948 783 7.670 

First preference quota- 
Selected immigrants - 995 873 66 122 

Second preference quota- 
Parents of citizens 97 2,404 2,039 26 462 

Third preference quota- 
Spouses, children of 
resident aliens 6 5,994 5,310 142 690 

Fourth preference quota- 
Brothers, sisters, 
children of U.S. 
citizens 4 19,917 15,722 77 4,199 

Nonquota- 
Spouses, children of 
citizens 392 17,630 15.827 463 2,165 

Nonquota- 
Ministers - 209 177 9 32 



\/ Included in figures on total completed. 



As shown in the above table, only about 1,000 visa petitions were receiv- 
ed on behalf of selected quota immigrants with special skills. It is of interest 
that the chief class of beneficiaries of visa petitions in the last half of the fiscal 
year 1953, representing 42 percent of the total petitions received during the 
period, consisted of the new fourth-preference quota class of brothers, sisters, 
and children over 21 years of age, or married, of citizens of the United States. 
Of the 19,917 visa petitions in this category received 15,645, were approved, 
77 denied, and 4,199 were still pending on June 30, 1953. 

Visa petitions for nonquota status for spouses and children of United 
States citizens, required both by the new and old laws, were completed in 15.827 
cases. In addition, 209 visa petitions for nonquota status were received in be- 
half of ministers of religion, 166 of which were approved and nine denied. The 
1924 Act did not require visa petitions for ministers. Five-thousand one-hundred 
sixty-eight visa petitions were approved on behalf of relatives of resident aliens. 

Quota immigrants.— Normal quota immigration, exclusive of displaced per- 
sons and German ethnics, numbered 79,052. Chief among the countries from which 



- 17 - 

these quota immigrants came were Germany (19,924), the United Kingdom (18,594), Italy 
(4,977), and Ireland (4,601). 



T housonds 
200 



QUOTA IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1925-1953 













- TOTAL 


ADMITTED 






























\ 










1 


\ 1 






/ 


v 




1 c n 










V 










/ 




\ 


N 






























































































/ 












<^ 




N 


S 


y 


u 


NORTHERN AND WESTERN EUROPE 












, 










1 o r\ 










































S 








































1 


\ 


.' 1 


















































1 


1 
1 




f 


1 




1 r\C\ 
















































/ 


1 






1 
















\ 


































/ 








' 
























_s 


ou 


THE 


:rn 


A 


ND 


E/ 


4ST 


ER 


N 


EU 


^OF 


>E 


i 




; 
/ 






1 
\ 
















\ 


















k 
















1 


^ 


1 

V 


\ 


J 


1 

1 


) 




























/ 


\ 
















r ; 




\ 


/ 


1 




A r\ 
























/ 


/ 


^ 


\ 












I ] 


i 


/ 






u 


1 

1 
















l\\ 












/ 


/ 


\ 


N 
















/ 








1 














\\! 








/ 




/ 




N 


\ 








/ 


I 


,,- 


/ 












c\J 












'^ ITS. 


^ 


>.«^ 


i^- 


/. 




• 




•s. 


N 


?i 




^ 




i/ 














- 












, 




















""' 1 ' 




— \ ^ 








— ^ 



Thousands 
200 



180 



160 



140 



120 



100 



80 



60 



40 



20 



1925 



1930 



1935 



1940 1945 



1950 1953 



The principal classes of quota immigrants admitted in the past two years are 
shown in the table below: 



- 18- 

Quota immigrants admitted 
Years ended June 30, 1952 and 1953 



Class 1953 1952 



Total number 



Skilled immigrants „_ 

Selected immigrants of special skill or 

ability V 

Skilled agriculturists_l/ 

Skilled sheepherders^/ 



Relatives of U.S. citizens 
Relatives of resident aliens 



Nonp reference quota 

German ethnics „ 

Other nonpreference quota 



84, 


,175 




806 




122 




321 




363 


5. 


,358 


4, 


,644 


67, 


,926 




318 


67 


,608 



194. 


247 




764 




649 




115 


5, 


,335 


4 


,447 


106, 


505 


42, 


786 


63, 


719 



Displaced persons admitted under the 

Displaced Persons Act of 1948, as amended .._. 4,805 77, 196 

Displaced persons adjusting status under 
Section 4, Displaced Persons Act of 1948, 
as amended .._ 636 3/ 



_1/ Including spouses and children. 

2/ Admitted under Act of April 9, 1952 (P.L. 307, 82nd Cong.). 

3/ This class was not included in the fiscal year 1952 quota immigrant figures. 



Changes in the new Act affecting quotas .--The Immigration and Nationality Act 
introduced a number of basic changes in quota admissions over the Immigration Act of 
1924. Some of these changes, and their effect on quota immigration, are discussed below: 

(1) Allocation of visas within quotas. The Immigration and Nationality Act re- 
tained and simplified the national origins formula of the Immigration Act of 1924 for 
determining the annual quota for each quota area. A total quota of 154,657 was estab- 
lished by President's Proclamation No. 2980 of June 30, 1952, which became effective 
on January 1, 1953. The quota prior to that date was 154,277. New minimum quotas ol 
100 were set up for about a dozen countries that have recently become independent, and 
a separate quota of 100 was established for the new Asia-Pacific Triangle as defined 
in the Immigration and Nationality Act. 

The method of allocating visas within quotas was changed considerably by the 
new Act. The table below shows the percentage allocations to the various preference 
groups and the number admitted in each preference group since December 24, 1952. 



19 



Quota immigrants admitted to the United States under the 
Iimnigration and Nationality Act, by classes: 
December 24, 1952, to June 30, 1953 

Quota immigrants admitted Percent 

Class of admission allotted 

Number Percent under law 1/ 

Total .._ „__ _ 26. 529 100.0 IQQ. Q 

First preference quota- 
Selected immigrants of 
special skill or ability _ 122 0.5 50.0 

Second preference quota- 
Parents of U.S. citizens _ 983 3.7 30.0 

Third preference quota- 
Spouses and children of 
resident aliens .._ 511 1,9 20. 

Fourth preference quota- 
Brothers or sisters of Quotas not used 
U.S. citizens, children by first three 
over 21 years of age, or groups (25 per- 

married, of U.S. citizens - 85 q. 3 cent). 



Nonpreference quota _ 24 828 



93. 6 



Quotas not used 
by any pref- 
ence groups. 



J/ Section 203(a), Immigration and Nationality Act. 



As may be observed from the above table, of the 26,529 quot& immigrants admitted 
under the provisions of the Immigration and Nationality Act, six percent were preference 
quota and 94 percent nonpreference quota. Section 203 of the Act provides that before 
any portion of a quota of a quota area is available to the non-preference category, the 
demand for preference quotas must be met. An analysis of the 24,828 nonpreference quota 
immigrants admitted under the Act shows that nine-tenths v;ere charged to Northern and 
Western European quotas areas, chiefly Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Germany, 
Ireland, and the Netherlands. These four countries have a combined quota of 112,067 out 
of a total annual quota of 154,657, and the demand for preference quota is relatively 
low possibly because there is no particular advantage to be gained when quota numbers 
are plentiful. The time element in getting visa petitions approved under the new Act 
also operated to keep the number of preference immigrants admitted low. 



(2) Selectivity. The new Act introduced a system of selectivity into the quota 
immigration by giving first preference of 50 percent to skilled aliens urgently needed 
in the United States. 



-20- 

From December 24, 1952, to June 30, 1953, 77 selected immigrants and 45 
spouses and children of such immigrants entered the United States in the first preference 
quota category. These selected immigrants were chiefly professional and technical 
workers, including engineers, religious workers, chemists, physicians, physicists, tech- 
nicians, artists, professors, and others. It is anticipated that a much larger number of 
selected immigrants will enter in the near future, since 807 visa petitions in behalf of 
selected immigrants were approved as of June 30, 1953, and a number are still being 
processed 

(3) Relatives of United States citizens and resident aliens. The Immigration and 
Nationality Act retained and modified the preferential treatment given in the 1924 Act 
to close relatives of United States citizens and resident aliens, consistent with the 
well established policy of maintaining a family unit whenever possible. All husbands 
of citizens, regardless of the date of marriage, were removed to the nonquota category, 
and preferential treatment was also given to children over 21 years of age or married, 
and to brothers and sisters of citizens. In all of these cases a visa petition must be 
filed by the citizen in the United States on behalf of the beneficiary, with supporting 
documents establishing relationship. 

While only 85 brothers, sisters, and children over 21, of citizens have been ad- 
mitted in the fourth preference quota category during the last half of the fiscal year 1953, 
nearly 16,000 visa petitions in behalf of these, aliens were filed and approved and over 
4,000 were still pending at the end of the fiscal year. Many of the naturalized citizens 
originate in countries where quotas are oversubscribed. For these United States citi- 
zens, the right to petition to bring in brothers and sisters is the realization of long 
lost hope. 

(4) Race. Another basic change in the new Act was the elimination of race as a 
bar to immigration and naturalization. In doing so. Congress felt that this would have 
a favorable effect on our international relations, particularly in the Far East. Minimum 
quotas of 100 were set up for the independent far-eastern countries, such as Korea and 
Indonesia, and a separate quota of 100 v/as established for an area defined in the law 
as the Asia-Pacific Triangle. From December 24, 1952, to June 30, 1953, 60 Japanese, 
seven Korean, and eight Pacific Islander quota immigrants were admitted to the United 
States. Only two of the quota immigrants admitted were charged to the Asia-Pacific 
Triangle. 

(5) Colonial immigration. Section 202 (c) of the Immigration and Nationality Act 
provides that not m.ore than 100 immigrants from colonies or other component or depen- 
dent areas of a governing country who are not chargeable to the Asia-Pacific Triangle 
quota may be charged to the quota of the mother country in any one year. This new pro- 
vision was designed by Congress to prevent undue absorption of a governing country's 
quota by a colony or dependency. 

As shown in the table below there are only eight mother countries involved, 
seven in Europe and one in Asia. These countries have a combined total of 78 colonies 
or dependencies with maximum subquotas of 7,800. As may be observed from the table, 
on the basis of past experience, the present subquotas are adequate for quota immigra- 
tion from all colonies or dependencies except the British West Indies, which has maxi- 
mum subquotas of 600 for its six colonies and an average yearly immigration during the 
past five years of 2,388 quota immigrants. 



21- 



Colonies 
d ependencies of : 

Total „__ 

B elgium _ 

Denmark _ 

France „ _ _ 

Great Britain 3i Northern Ireland 

British West Indies _ 

Netherlands „„ _ „. 

Portugal _ 

Spain 

India 



Q uota immigrants 






admitted 




Number of 


(5 year average) 


1953 


colonies, or 


( 1949 - 1953 ) 


subquotas 


dependencies 


4.542 


7,800 


78 


5 


100 


1 


1/ 


100 


1 


266 


1,600 


16 


4,176 


4,400 


44 


2, 388 2/ 


600 2/ 


6 2/ 


85 


300 


3 


8 


800 


8 


2 


300 


3 


3/ 


200 


2 



_1/ Less than 1 

_2/ Included in Great Britain and Northern Ireland. 
3/ Figures not available prior to January 1953. 



Displaced persons. —The provisions of the Displaced Persons Act of 1948 expired 
on June 30, 1952, with respect to the issuance of visas to all classes of aliens except 
out-of-zone refugees admitted under Section 3(c) of the Act. Section 3(c) authorizes the 
use of 50 percent of the nonpreference quota for this class to June 30, 1954. A relatively 
small number of German ethnics, orphans, and other displaced persons have entered this 
country in the past year with visas issued before July 1, 1952. During the fiscal year 
1953, a total of 5,838 displaced persons and 318 German ethnics were admitted to the 
United' States. The chief objectives of the law may be said to have been accomplished, 
since out of a maximum number of 400,744 visas authorized, a total of 399,698 were 
admitted. 



-22 



Maximum visas authorized and immigrant aliens admitted to the United States, 
by classes under Displaced Persons Act of 1948, as amended: 
June 25, 1948 - June 30, 1953 

Maximum number Total number 
Class of admission of visas admitted thru 
^ authorized J une 30, 1953 

Total all classes ....„ _ „ _.. 3^^' ^^8 

Section 2 displaced persons __ 313. 009 

Displaced persons _ _ 341^ 000 306, 961 2/ 

Recent political refugees _ __ 5Q0 y 155 

Displaced orphans „ _ __.. 5,000 1/ 2,369 

Adopted orphans „ _ 5 qqO 1,696 

Venezia Guilia displaced persons „ 2 000 1/ 1 817 

Section 3 displaced persons _ 32,910 

Displaced persons from China 4,000 1/ 3,312 

Polish veterans in Great Britain 18,000 1/ 10,485 

Greek D. P.' s and preferential s _ 10,000 1/ 8,979 

Displaced persons outside of 

Germany, Austria,, or Italy „ _ _ ^' ^^^ 

Section 12 persons „ ^^' ^^^ 

Gernan ethnics _ _ 54,744 53,766 

Adopted children _ 13 

1/ This number of visas is authorized within the total numerical limitation of 
341,000. Visas not issued to this special group may be issued to the 
general group of displaced persons. 

2/ Includes 533 Czech, refugees. 



It is of interest that out of a total of 10,000 visas authorized for displaced and 
adopted orphans, only 4,065 were used. The Act of July 29, 1953 ( Public Law 162 ) 
authorized the admission of 500 orphans, adopted or to be adopted by United States 
military personnel or employees abroad. 



Three-quarters of all the displaced persons admitted were born in five countries: 
Poland, Germany, Latvia, U.S.S.R., and Yugoslavia. 



23 



Immigrant aliens admitted to the United States under the Displaced Persons 
Act of 1948, as amended, by country of birth: June 25, 1948 - June 30, 1953 





Total number 






Country of birth 


admitted thru 


Displaced 


German 




June 30, 1953 


persons 


Ethnics 1/ 



All countries 

Poland 

Germany 

Latvia 

U.S.S.R. 

Yugoslavia 

Lithuania 

Hungary 

Czechoslovakia 

Rumania 

Greece 

Estonia 

Other countries 



399,698 



345,932 



53,766 



132,851 


126, 459 


6,392 


61,273 


51,204 


10,069 


35.734 


35, 089 


645 


34,941 


30, 618 


4,323 


33,026 


17, 090 


15,936 


24,603 


23,125 


1,478 


16,032 


12, 528 


3,504 


11,663 


8,824 


2,839 


10,402 


5,049 


5,353 


10,271 


10, 269 


2 


10,186 


9,923 


263 


18,716 


15, 754 


2,962 



1/ Includes wives and children. 



The extent to which mortgaging provisions of the Displaced Persons Act will 
affect the volume of future immigration from some of the Southern and Eastern European 
countries becomes evident from the following table, which shows the fiscal year to 
which one-half of the quotas have been mortgaged when the Displaced Persons Act 
expired on December 31, 1952. 



Country 

Latvia 

Estonia 

Lithuania ... 

Greece 

Yugoslavia 

Poland 

U.S.S.R. __. 



Source: Visa Office, Department of State. 



Year 

2,274 
2,146 
2,089 
2,013 
2,009 
2,000 
1.980 



Nonquota immigrants.— Nonquota immigration rose 21 percent in the last fiscal 
year largely because of the admission of a greater number of natives of Western Hemis- 
phere countries, their spouses and children. Immigration from Mexico, particularly,doubled 
the figure of last year. 



24- 



IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1940 - 1953 




1953 



A comparison of the classes of nonquota immigrant admissions for the past two 
years is shown below: 

Nonquota immigrants admitted in 
Years ended June 30, 1952 and 1953 





1953 


1952 


Total nonquota immigrants 


86,259 


71,273 


Wives of U.S. citizens _.. 


15,916 


16,058 


Husbands of U.S. citizens „ 


3,359 


793 


Children of U.S. citizens 


3,268 


2,464 


Natives of Western Hemisphere countries, their 






spouses, and children _ 


61,099 


48,408 


Persons who had been U.S. citizens _ „ 


104 


32 


Ministers, their spouses, and children 


387 


580 


Employees of U.S. Government abroad, their spouses, 






and children _ _ 


2 


- 


Other nonquota immigrants „ 


2,124 


2,938 



-25 



THOUSANDS 
70 



NATIVES OF NONQUOTA COUNTRIES, 
THEIR WIVES, AND MINOR CHILDREN 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1930 - 1953 




SPOUSES AND MINOR CHILDREN OF U.S. CITIZENS 



YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1925" 1953 



THOUSANDS 
60 




1925 



-26- 

The number of wives of citizens admitted was slightly bj low last year's figures. 
As in 1952, over three- fifths of the wives of citizens admitted came from the countries 
where there are numbers of United States civilian and military personnel— Germany, 
Italy, and Japan. 



Number of wives of citizens 



Country of birth 



1953 


1952 


1951 


1950 


1949 


1948 


175 


208 


148 


241 


914 


1,S43 


6,042 


3,768 


2,042 


3,798 


10, 130 


3,638 


1,654 


1,799 


1,534 


2,168 


3,081 


6,385 


722 


959 


826 


1,062 


2,143 


3,192 


2,042 


4,220 


125 


9 


445 


298 



Great Britain and 

Northern Ireland 

Germany _ 

Italy _ 

China __ 

Japan 

Australia & New Zealand .. 159 157 159 184 286 852 



The number of ministers of religious denominations, their spouses, and children, 
declined in the past year to 387. This may be due, to some extent, to the modified pro- 
visions with regard to ministers in the new Act requiring a visa petition and proof that 
the services of the minister are needed by a religious denomination having a bona fide 
organization in the United States. 

Ctenges in nonquota classes .— The Immigration and Nationality Act modified 
and extended the nonquota classes of the 1924 Act. 

(1) Sex discrimination. One of the basic features of the new Act was the elim- 
ination of sex discrimination. Thus, all alien husbands of United States citizens were 
granted nonquota privileges the same as wives, whereas, under the provisions of the 
1924 Act husbands of United States citizens were admitted as first preference quota if 
the marriage occurred on or after January 1, 1948. The change in the new Act, no doubt, 
accounts for the sudden rise in the number of husbands of citizens admitted as nonquota 
immigrants from 793 in the fiscal year 1952 to 3,359 in the fiscal year 1953. There "'ere 
also 356 husbands of natives of Western Hemisphere countries admitted as nonquota imini- 
grants. These aliens would have had to enter as quota immigrants under the 1924 Act. 

(2) Professors. Professors are no longer admitted as nonquota immigrants since 
Congress felt that adequate provision for their admission was made under Section 2Q3 
(aXl) of the Act, which allocates 50 percent of each quota to immigrants of exceptional 
ability, and Section 101 (a)(15)(H), which provides for the temporary admission of such 
aliens. In the last half of the fiscal year, four professors and instructors entered the 
United States as selected immigrants under the provisions of Section 203(a)(1), and 15 
for temporary residence under the provisions of Section 101 (a)(15)(H)). 

(3) Persons who lost U.S. citizenship. The Immigration and Nationality Act ex- 
tended the nonquota class of women v/ho had lost United States citizenship by marriage 
to include persons who lost United States citizenship by serving in the foreign armed 
forces (Section 101 (a)(27)(D)) or through the parent's foreign naturalization (Section 
101 (a)(27)(E)). Since December 24, 1952, 15 nonquota immigrants were admitted in the 
(D) category and 50 in the (E) category. 

(4) Employees of U.S. Government. A new class of nonquota immigrant, employees 
or former employees of the United States Government who have performed faithful services 
abroad for a total of 15 years, and their spouses and children may be admitted as non- 
quota immigrants. Only two immigrants in this category were admitted by June 30, 1953. 



-27- 
Notiimmigrants 

Nonimmigrants are aliens who enter the United States for temporary periods or 
resident aliens returning from a temporary stay abroad. The figures below do not in- 
clude such special groups as agricultural laborers, border crossers, and crewmen. 

Nonimmigrants admitted, by class of admission 
Years ended June 30, 1951 to 1953 

Class of admission 1953 1952 1951 

Total nonimmigrants admitted 485,714 516,082 465,106 

Foreign government officials 24,502 22,267 20,881 

Temporary visitors for business 63,496 86,745 83,995 

Temporary visitors for pleasure 243,219 269,606 230,210 

Transit aliens 67,684 77,899 72,027 

Treaty traders 878 791 850 

Students 13,533 8,613 7,355 

Representatives to international organizations 6,112 5,137 5,526 

Temporary workers and industrial traineesj/ 3,021 

Representatives of foreign information media _1/ 174 

Exchange aliens^/ , 12,584 

Returning resident aliens _„.. 50,397 44,980 44,212 

Other nonimmigrants 114 44 50 

1/ New classes under the provisions of the Immigration and Nationality Act. 

Because of a change in documentary requirements the figures on nonimmigrants 
are not comparable with previous years in some respects. Such documentary changes 
made necessary a revision in the definition of the terms "nonimmigrants" and "border 
crossers*, which threw a relatively large number of aliens formerly counted as non- 
immigrants into the border crosser category. Canadian citizens and British subjects 
resident in Canada admitted to the United States for more than 29 days were formerly 
counted as nonimmigrants, but, in the past fiscal year, in accordance with new regula- 
tions which exempted them from certain documentary requirements, they were counted 
as border crossers if admitted for less than six months. 

The change in the definition of nonimmigrants accounts for the sudden drop in 
the admission of nonimmigrants born in Canada, as shown in the table below, and also 
of those born in England, Scotland, and Wales who reside in Canada. Temporary admis- 
sions from most of the other areas show increases since last year. The Mexican non- 
immigrant figures went up also, to some extent, due to a change in the definition which 
added to the nonimmigrant class aliens who were formerly admitted as border crossers 
for a period of from three to 29 days. 



- 28- 

Nonimmigrants admitted, by country or region of birth 
Years ended June 30, 1951 to 1953 



82,855 


79,613 


56,730 


59,119 


32,120 


28,060 


41,385 


39,317 


27,404 


22,845 


87,623 


78,581 


17,268 


12,670 


18,427 


16,419 


13,189 


11,462 


10,042 


9,764 


11,212 


10,307 


10,382 


9,602 


97,445 


87,347 



Country or region of birth 1953 1952 1951 

All countries ..__ 485,714 516,082 465,106 

West Indies 89,730 

England, Scotland, and Wales 59,839 

Mexico _ 51,480 

South America 44,001 

Asia :.._ 30,838 

Canada 25,365 

Germany 19,650 

France _ 19,247 

Central America 14,631 

Italy 12,125 

Netherlands _ 11,589 

Spain 11,513 

Other countries 95,706 



Unlike immigrants, most of the nonimmigrants who entered the United States 
on or after December 24, 1952, have been admitted under the provisions of the Immi- 
gration and Nationality Act, regardless of the date the visa or other document was issued. 
The new Act modified some of the existing classes of nonimmigrants and added three 
new classes, which will be discussed below. 

Foreign government officials. — The number of 24,502 foreign government officials 
admitted in the fiscal year 1953 represents a 10 percent increase since last year and is 
the highest figure since passage of the Immigration Act of 1924. Increases have been 
noted in the admission of foreign government officials from Denmark, France, Norway, 
China, Japan, the West Indies, and South America. The Immigration and Nationality Act 
modified this class so that foreign government officials must not only be accredited by a 
foreign government recognized by the United States but must also be accepted as such by 
the Secretary of State. Three separate categories were established, as shown in the table 
below: 

Number admitted 
December 24,1952 
to June 30^953 1/ 
Ambassadors, public ministers, career 

diplomatic or consular officers 2,203 

Other foreign government officials or employees 9,505 

Attendants, servants, or personal employees of 

above classes 511 

1/ Figures include members of immediate family. 

Temporary visitors .— The number of nonimmigrant aliens admitted as temporary 
visitors for business and pleasure declined 14 percent in the past fiscal year. Some of 
this decline is due to the change in the definition of nonimmigrant, which accounts for 
the drop in the number of temporary visitors who resided in Canada from 104,275 in the 
fiscal year 1952 to 29,256 in the fiscal year 1953. On the other hand, because of the 
closer documentation on the Mexican -Border the figures on temporary visitors admitted 
from Mexico increased to 48,729 in the fiscal year 1953 from 19,529 in the preceding 
year. 



-29- 

Another reason for the decline in the number of temporary visitors was the change 
in the Immigration and Nationality Act which removed from the temporary-visitor class 
and set up separate categories of exchange aliens, temporary workers and trainees, and 
representatives of foreign information media. 

As of June 30, 1953, there were 99,131 visitors in the United States: 38,167 in 
the New York District, 14,646 in the Miami District, 13,107 in the San Antonio District, 
with smaller numbers in other Districts. 

Treaty traders .—The number of treaty traders admitted in the fiscal year 1953 
increased to 878 from 791 in the preceding year. Over one-half came from Great Britain 
and Northern Ireland, Switzerland, Italy, and Colombia. The Immigration and Nationality 
Act provides that the trade must be substantial in nature and it must be carried on prin- 
cipally between the United States and a foreign state of which the alien is a national. 
An additional category of treaty investors was added by the Act to cover aliens enter- 
ing the United States to develop and direct the operations of enterprises in which they 
have invested a substantial amount of capital. At the present time there are no treaties 
contemplating the status of treaty investors as provided in the law. Consequently, 
there have been no aliens admitted in this category to the United States. The records 
of the Service show that as of June 30, 1953, there were 1,012 treaty traders in the 
United States. 

Students. —The number of student admissions increased 57 percent to 13,533 in 
the fiscal year 1953. The chief increases were from Western Hemisphere countries. the 
principal reason for the rise is the change in the legal definition of students. Under 
the new Act all students are classified as nonimmigrants. There is no minimum age 
limit in the new law. Therefore, thousands of schools and technical institutions, such 
as trade, business, and other vocational schools, have been added to the lists of ap- 
proved schools. A petition for school approval must be filed by the institution of learn- 
ing and must be approved by the Attorney General after consultation with the United 
States Office of Education. 

The change in the new law permitting approval of other than so-called "aca- 
demic" schools for attendance of students resulted in an increase of applications for 
such approvals filed. During the year 1,167 such applications were completed by the 
Service. Some applications covered public or private school systems, rather than single 
schools. 

On June 30, 1953, there were 29,596 students in the United States. 



- 30- 

Students in the United States, by District 
on June 30, 1952 and 1953 



District 1953 1952 

Total 29,59*^ 25,705 

St. Albans, Vt _.... 120 108 

Boston, Mass. 2,548 2,178 

New York, N. Y. 4,366 4,368 

Hnuadelphia, Ha. 1,506 1,245 

Baltimore, Md. 1,560 1,554 

Miami, Fla. ___ „ 2,257 1,763 

Buffalo, N. Y. __ _.. 1,033 929 

Detroit, Mich. „_ 3,098 3,016 

Chicago, 111. „ _ 2,818 2,466 

Kansas City, Mo. _ 2,702 2,153 

Seattle, Wash. 1,297 1,023 

San Francisco, Calif. 2,371 2,128 

San Antonio, Tex. __ 1,127 680 

El Paso, Tex. .._ _ „_ 705 586 

Los Angeles, Calif. _ 1,943 1,422 

Honolulu, T. H. 145 86 



Representatives to international organizations . —The number of foreign govern- 
ment representatives to international organizations admitted increased by 975 during 
the past year, chiefly from Denmark, France, the Netherlands, and the U.S.S.R. This 
class has been substantially revised in the new law so that the aliens admitted in this 
class may be clearly identified. In addition, the class has been divided into five sepa- 
rate categories, as indicated in the table which follows: 

Number admitted 
December 24, 1952 to 
June 30, 1953 
Principal resident representatives of recognized 
foreign member governments to international 
organizations 328 

Other representatives of recognized foreign 

member governments to international organizations 1,638 

Representatives of nonrecognized or nonmember 

governments to international organizations 19 

International organization officers or employees 1,056 

Attendants, servants, or employees of above 81 



Representatives of foreign information media .— The Immigration and Nationality 
Act established a new class of nonimmigrant aliens by providing for the admission of 
representatives of foreign press, radio, film, or other foreign information media, who seek 



-31- 

to enter the United States to engage in such vocation. This class was designed by Con- 
gress to facilitate, on a basis of reciprocity, the exchange of information among nations. 
In the last half of the fiscal year 113 such representatives and their 61 spouses and 
children had been admitted in this category, and 57 remained here on June 30, 1953. 
Most of these aliens came here from England, France, Germany, and Japan. 

Exchange aliens .— Nonimmigrant aliens admitted under the Information and Educa- 
tional Exchange Act are now being admitted as a separate nonimmigrant class, whereas, 
previously they were admitted as temporary visitors for business. In the fiscal year 
1953, 12,584 such aliens were admitted to this country, chiefly from Europe, Japan, the 
Philippines, Canada, and Mexico. 

Temporary workers and industrial trainees. — Prior to the enactment of the Immi- 
gration and Nationality Act no specific provision was made for the employment of non- 
immigrant aliens. Aliens permitted to accept employment while temporarily in the United 
States were admitted as visitors, and permission to accept employment was authorized 
under the Ninth Proviso to Section 3, Immigration Act of February 5, 1917, to waive 
contract labor prohibitions. Under the provisions of Section 101 (a)(15)(H), the Immigra- 
tion and Nationality Act established a new class for the admission of (i) temporary 
workers of distinguished merit or ability, (ii) other temporary workers, skilled or un- 
skilled, and (iii) industrial trainees. These provisions were adopted by Congress to 
alleviate labor shortages, particularly in periods of intensified production, and to enable 
trainees to acquire a knowledge of American industries and agricultural and business 
methods. 

Petitions to import and employ these temporary workers and trainees are re- 
quired. During the last half of the fiscal year 1953, 2,952 such petitions were received 
and 2,812 were completed. 

From December 24, 1952, to June 30, 1953, 1,949 temporary workers of distin- 
guished merit and ability were admitted to the United States in the H(i) category, in- 
cluding 774 athletes, 241 artists and art teachers, 209 entertainers, 164 musicians, 
40 actors and actresses, and 521 others. These aliens came chiefly from Canada, Mexi- 
co, Cuba, England, and Spain. During the same period, 485 temporary workers, chiefly 
laborers from the British West Indies, were admitted in the H(ii) category, and 587 in- 
dustrial trainees, who came from all parts of world, including 117 from Japan, were ad- 
mitted in the H(iii) category. 

Agricultural laborers .— Agricultural laborers from the British West Indies were 
admitted under the Ninth Proviso to Section 3, Immigration Act of 1917, before Decem- 
ber 24, 1952, and under the new petition procedure thereafter. At the beginning of the 
fiscal year there were 13,584 agricultural laborers from countries other than Mexico in 
the United States. During the .year 13,526 agricultural laborers were admitted from Canada, 
the British West Indies, British Honduras, and British Guiana; 8,457 of these laborers 
returned home; and the cases of 4,848 were closed for other reasons. On June 30, 1953, 
there remained 13,805 of these aliens still in the United States. 

In addition, 178,606 Mexican agricultural workers were admitted during the year 
under the provisions of the Act of June 12, 1951 ( Public Law 78 ), which was not repealed 
by the Immigration and Nationality Act, and the Migrant Labor Agreement with Mexico 
negotiated thereunder. The table which follows shows the total number of Mexican 
laborers legally contracted for employment in the United States during the past three 
years. 



- 32- 

Mexican agricultural laborers admitted 
and contracted 
Years ended June 30, 1951 - 1953 



1953 1952 1951 



Total number __ 178,606 223,541 115,742 

Under Ninth Proviso . 4,467 115,742 

Admitted to the United States ___ - 4,467 112,116 

Illegal entrants contracted - - 3,626 

Under Act of June 12, 1951 178,606 219,074 

At the close of the fiscal year there was a total of 149,178 agricultural laborers 
in the United States. The countries from whence they came were as follows: 

Number in U. S. 
Country of last permanent residence on June 30, 1953 

Total 149,178 



Canada 454 

.. . (admitted under Act of June 12, 1951 (P.L. 78) ___ 116,404 

Mexico ^ F V / F 

(admitted under Ninth Proviso 18,969 

Bahamas __ 3,682 

Jamaica 6,114 

Barbados 1,761 

Leeward and Windward Islands 1,350 

Trinidad _ 149 

British Guiana 167 

British Honduras 128 



Reentry Permits 

Returning residents may be admitted with border crossing cards, if absent only 
in Canada or Mexico, or with visas or reentry permits. During the fiscal year 1953, a 
total of 94,085 reentry permits were issued and extended, nearly one-half in the New 
York District. While formerly a reentry permit could be used for but a single trip abroad, 
since December 24, 1952, the permit may be used for any number of entries into the 
United States during the period of its validity. 

E migrants and Nonemigrants 

Emigrants .— Emigrants are, by definition, aliens who depart from the United States 
after residence of a year or more in the United States, with the intention of remaining 
abroad. It will be seen from this definition that emigrant, therefore, is not the opposite 
of immigrant in all cases, since some aliens admitted as nonimmigrants on arrival may 
depart after a year or more and be classed as emigrants. 

The number of emigrants increased to 24,256 in the fiscal year 1953, from 21,880 



-33- 

in the previous year. Departure to Europe rose 30 percent since last year, particularly 
to France, Germany, Italy, and the United Kingdom. The principal countries to which 
emigrants went are shown in the following table. 

Number of emigrants departed by country of 

intended future residence 

Years ended June 30, 1952 and 1953 



Country 
of 
future residence 



C ountry 
1953 1952 of 

future residence 



1953 



Total number .... 24, 256 



Europe __ 

Denmark 

France .._ 

Germany 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy _„_ 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

United Kingdom 
Other Europe 



12.557 

427 

1,484 

1,491 

621 

367 

1, 358. 

439 

571 

291 

376 

380 

3, 185 

1,567 



21,880 

9.691 

350 

1,172 

1,028 

435 

229 

1,281 

327 

553 

225 

334 

341 

2, 248 

1,168 



Asia 2, 757 

China. _.. 155 

India 237 

Israel 267 

Japan _ 701 

Philippines 598 

Other Asia 799 

North America 5.957 

Canada ....„ _ 1,925 

Mexico „„ 988 

West Indies 2,383 

Central America .... 633 

Other North A merici 28 

South America 2, 180 

Africa 363 

Australia & N.Zealand 352 
Other countries .._ 90 



1952 



2,441 
223 
210 
228 
506 
521 
753 

6.722 

2,760 

988 

2,227 

576 

171 

1,984 
317 
456 
269 



Nonemigrants.—Nonemigrants are temporary visitors leaving the country after 
a stay of less than a year, or resident aliens who areleaving for a temporary visit abroad. 

During the year ended June 30, 1953, 520,246 nonemigrants departed from the 
United States. There were 54,618 resident aliens who departed for temporary residence 
abroad. The remainder, 465,628, entered as tourists, transits, government officials, and 
others who were leaving the United States after stays of a few days to a year's duration. 

Exclusions 



Aliens who arrive at .ports in the United States seeking admission may be ex- 
cluded if they fail to qualify under the immigration laws. Great care must be exercised 
toward preventing the entry of any alien whose presence could be inimical to the in- 
terests of the United States. On the other hand, it is important that inspections be con- 
ducted in such a manner as to foster good international fellowship. A total of 155,797 
aUens were denied entry on primary inspection as compared with 67,399 in the prior 
year. Many of those denied admission were aliens who arrived at the land borders, and 
who turned back when questioned by a primary inspector, without a formal hearing. 

In most instances aliens held for exclusion are given a hearing before a Special 
Inquiry Officer. With certain exceptions an appeal from the order of exclusion by the 
Special Inquiry Officer lies to the Board of Immigration Appeals. There is no appeal in 



- 34- 

those cases in which the excluding decision is based on confidential information, the 
disclosure of which would be detrimental to the public interest. 

During the fiscal year 1953, 5, 647 aliens were excluded from the United States, 
2,010 of whom sought admission at the Canadian and Mexican land borders for less than 
30 days. Seventy-six percent were excluded on documentary grounds. 

There were 118 aliens excluded in the past year on subversive grounds. The 
provisions on the exclusion of subversives of Section 1 of the Act of October 16, 1918, 
as amended by the Internal Security Act of 1950, were modified and incorporated into the 
Immigration and Nationality Act. 

The new Act created new classes of excludable aliens, which include: (1) aliens 
who are narcotic drug addicts, and violators of narcotic laws; (2) aliens afflicted with 
leprosy; (3) aliens convicted of two or more offenses for which the aggregate sentences 
of confinement actually imposed were five years or more; and (4) entry into the United 
States or procuring documents by fraud or misrepresentation. 

Since December 24, 1952, the effective date of the new Act, only one illicit 
trafficker of drugs was excluded from the United States. Twenty aliens were excluded 
as having been convicted of two or more offenses, and 116 aliens were excluded who 
sought to enter the United States by fraud or misrepresentation. 

The table below shows the principal causes for exclusion during the past year. 

Aliens excluded from the United States, by cause 
Year ended June 30, 1953 

Cause Number 

All causes 5,647 

Entered without proper documents 4,293 

Criminals 491 

Mental or physical defectives : 190 

Previously excluded or deported 169 

Entered without inspection or by 

false statements 139 

Subversive or anarchistic 118 

Immoral classes 58 

Stowaways 47 

Previously departed to avoid 

service in armed forces 39 

Likely to become public charges 33 

Contract laborers 6 

Other classes 64 



CHAPTER 



Adjustment of Status 



To ameliorate to some extent the inevitable hardships in the enforcement of the 
immigration laws, Congress has provided certain equitable powers to the Attorney Gen- 
eral to adjust the status of such affected persons. 

Suspension of deportation .--Section 244 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, 
the equivalent of Section 19(c) of the Immigration Act of 1917, provides for the suspen- 
sion of deportation by the Attorney General and adjustment of status to that of per- 
manent residents of deportable aliens who meet the legal requirements. Suspension of 
deportation is based on the alien's long residence in the United States and exceptional 
and extremely unusual hardship to the alien or his family. All cases approved by the 
Attorney General must be reported to Congress, which passes upon them by either af- 
firmative or negative action, as provided by law. 

As of June 30, 1953, there were no deportations suspended on the basis of Sec- 
tion 244 of the Immigration and Nationality Act. The following table shows the number 
of suspension of deportation cases since 1950 under the provisions of Section 19(c) 
of the Immigration Act of 1917. 





Suspension of 


depo 


rtation cases 


Year ended June 30, 


Submitted to 
Congress 




Approved by 
Congress 


1953 _ _„ 

1952 _ 


5,792 
7,300 

3,553 

4,452 




3,617 
2,899 


1951 „ 

1950 .._ 


4,267 
3,288 



-36- 

During the past fiscal year, 2,195 aliens became legal permanent residents 
through the suspension of deportation proceedings. Charges to the quotas of the follow- 
ing countries were made for these aliens by the Department of State for the year ended 
June 30, 1953: 

Quota numbers issued in suspension of 
deportation cases _1/ 
Year ended June 30, 1953 

Quota area Number 

Total area 2,195 

Australia 32 

Austria- 81 

China 18 

Chinese 49 

Czechoslovakia 54 

Finland 21 

France 70 

Germany 196 

Great Britain 2/ 219 

Greece 78 

Hungary 95 

India 29 

Italy 457 

Japan 49 

Netherlands 23 

Norway 30 

Philippines 38 

Poland 166 

Portugal 45 

Rumania __ 34 

Spain . 47 

Turkey 78 

U.S.S.R. 55 

Yugoslavia _ 51 

All others _ _ 180 

1/ Source: Visa Division, Department of State 
2/ Includes 7 charged to sub-quota colonies 

Displaced persons in the United States. —Section 4 of the Displaced Persons 
Act of 1948, as amended, provides that 15,000 eligible displaced persons (as defined 
in that Act) temporarily residing in the United States may apply to the Attorney General 
for adjustment of their immigration status to that of permanent residents, provided that 
they are otherwise admissible to the United States and were lawfully admitted to the 
United States as nonimmigrants under Section 3, or as students under Section 4(e) of 
the Immigration Act of 1924. Final approval rests with Congress under a procedure 
similar to that for suspension cases. 

Those who file applications for adjustment of their immigration status are re- 
quired to establish by credible evidence that they have been displaced as a result of 
events occurring subsequent to the outbreak on September 1, 1939, of World War II. 



-37- 

They must prove that they cannot return to their native countries, nor to the countries of 
last residence or nationality, because of persecution or fear of persecution on account 
of race, religion, or political opinions. 

The time within which to make application for relief under Section 4 lapsed on 
June 16, 1952, by which time 11,610 applications had been filed. The date of applica- 
tion was extended to November 29, 1952, by Private Law 655, approved by the 82nd 
Congress on May 29, 1952, to cover 386 natives of Estonia, Latvia, Finland, Sweden, 
Poland, and the U.S.S.R. who sought refuge in Sweden after fleeing from their native 
countries because of their fear of Russian Communists. They formed groups, purchased 
sloops and schooners, and sailed for the United States, arriving at various ports along 
the eastern coast between the years 1945 and 1950. Inasmuch as they had no documents 
for admission to the United States, they were excluded and subsequently paroled into 
this country. The law made these aliens eligible to apply for adjustment of their immi- 
gration status under Section 4 of the Displaced Person Act. Each case has to be proces- 
sed in accordance with outstanding regulations under the usual Section 4 proceedings. 

By June 30, 1953, a total of 11,964 applications had been received for adjust- 
ment of status under the provisions of Section 4. As indicated below, over two-thirds 
of the 4,388 cases submitted to Congress had been approved by the end of June 1953. 
Most of those who had their status adjusted had been admitted as students, visitors, 
or seamen. 

Section 4 displaced persons cases 
Submitted to Approved By" 

Year ended June 30, Congress Congress 

Total 4,388 2,963 



1953 1,080 1,733 

1952 1,550 574 

1951 1,231 656 

1950 527 

The grounds for denial of adjustment of immigration status under Section 4 fall 
into the following categories: 

Years ended ]une 30, 
1 953 1952 1951 1950 

Total number 580 405 291 491 

Not unable to return to country of birth, residence, or 
nationality; no apparent persecution due to race, 
religion, or political opinion 170 200 118 221 

Cause for displacement did not arise from events occa- 
sioned by and subsequent to outbreak of World War 11 „ 20 12 1 20 

Not a lawful entry under Section 3 or Section 4(e) of 

the Immigration Act of 1924 230 103 103 73 

Inadmissible to the United States __ 62 49 16 6 

Found haven in another country 69 ^2 53 69 

Entered subsequent to April 30, 1949 j./ 27 9-99 

Not in United States when decision was rendered 2 - - 3 



1/ Public Law 555 of June 16, 1950, extended the entry date from April 1, 1948, to April 
30, 1949. 



-38- 

Adjustment of status from nonimmigrant to immigrant. — Under the provisions of 
Section 245 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, a bona fide nonimmigrant may adjust 
his status to that of a person admitted for permanent residence if he is found to be 
eligible for an immigration visa. Under this provision 54 nonimmigrants adjusted their 
status to that of immigrants during the fiscal year. 

Prior to the new Act nonimmigrants in the United States who wished to remain 
permanently were, under certain conditions, granted preexaraination. If found to be 
eligible for admission as an immigrant, such a person adjusted his status by going to 
Canada and applying for an immigration visa in that country. During the year 2,912 
p reexamination applications submitted prior to December 24, 1952, were acted upon. 

Adju stment of status of resident aliens to nonimmigrant status . —For the first 
time, under the current Act, lan immigrant may lose his permanent status while in the 
United States. Under Section 247 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, the immigrant 
status of aliens admitted for permanent residence who subsequently acquire the status 
of treaty traders, foreign government officials, or representatives to international organ- 
izations, is terminated and they become nonimmigrants under the applicable paragraphs 
15(A), 15(E), or 15(G) of Section 101(a) of the Act. The alien, however, may request 
permission to retain his immigrant status by filing with the Attorney General a written 
waiver of rights, privileges, exemptions, and immunities under any law or executive 
order which would accrue to him by reason of such occupational status. 

Creation of record of admission for permanent residence .— To obtain a reentry 
permit, to be naturalized, and for various other reasons, aliens need to have proof of 
lawful admission for permanent residence. 

Section 249 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, which is the equivalent of 
the registry provisions of Section 328(c) of the Nationality Act of 1940, provides that 
a record of lawful admission for permanent residence may be made in the case of an 
alien if no such record is available. To be eligible, the alien must prove that he entered 
the United States prior to July 1, 1924, that he has resided here continuously since, 
that he is a person of good moral character, that he is not subject to deportation, and 
that he is not ineligible to citizenship. When a record of admission has been made, the 
alien is deemed to have been lawfully admitted for permanent residence as of the date 
of his entry and he is issued an alien registration receipt card. Form 1-151. 

During the fiscal year ended June 30, 1953, 7,646 registry or creation of record 
authorizations were completed. 




Deportation, 
Detention and 
Border Patrol 



If an alien is found to be unlawfully within the United States, deportation pro- 
ceedings are instituted and carried through to an adjudication. When it is found that the 
alien is deportable, the expulsion of the deportable alien is accomplished either through 
deportation at the expense of the Government or by the alien's departing voluntarily at 
his own expense. There were 905,236 expulsions accomplished during the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1953. 



200 



400 



600 
T HOUSANOS 



800 







DEPORTATIONS AND VOLUNTARY 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1947 


DEPARTURES 

- 1953 
























TOTAL 
905,236 

723,959 

686,713 

579,105 

Z96.337 

217,555 

214 ,543 

1 


1953 


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1952 


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1949 


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LIENS DEPORTED 

LIENS DEPARTING VOLUNTARILY 


1947 


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1,000 



-40- 

Deportation 

There were 19,845 aliens deported during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1953. 
While this is slightly less than the 20,181 deported last year, the increase in the num- 
ber of voluntary departures under warrants of arrest much more than offsets the decrease. 

Of the 18,567 males and 1,278 females deported, 15,857 were returned to Mexico, 
1,073 to Canada, 374 to Italy, 251 to the United Kingdom and 2,290 to all other countries. 

The effect of the Internal Security Act of 1950, which was followed by the en- 
actment of Public Law 414, is indicated by the continued increase in the number of sub- 
versive aliens who were deported or departed under orders of deportation. 

Subversive cases closed by deportation or voluntary depar- 
ture under outstanding orders of deportation 37 

Subversive aliens departed voluntarily under warrants of 

arrest 9 

(Included in this number are 4 aliens in whose cases sub- 
versive charges were not lodged, but whose background 
indicated subversive activities) 

As may be noted in the table below, numerically the principal causes for de- 
portation continue to be those related to illegal entry into the United States. 

Aliens deported from the United States, by cause 

Years ended June 30, 1949 - 1953 

Cause 1953 1952 1951 1950 1949" 

All causes 19,845 20,181 13,544 6,628 20,040 

Subversive or anarchistic 37 31 18 6 4 

Criminals 689 778 1,036 790 1,024 

Immoral classes 100 50 67 53 76 

Violators of narcotic laws 53 40 62 55 70 

Mental or physical defectives 48 56 45 53 82 

Previously excluded or deported __ 276 539 940 553 3,815 

Remained longer than authorized 1,561 4,469 3,289 1,661 1,379 

Entered without proper documents _ 9,724 9,636 5,322 1,352 998 

Failed to maintain status _ __ 791 475 298 224 329 

Entered without inspection or by false 

statements _ 6,387 3,706 2,293 1,734 12:094 

Likely to become pifclic charges 35 24 14 38 20 

Miscellaneous 144 377 160 109 149 



-41- 



ALIENS DEPORTED FROM THE UNITED STATES 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1944 - 1953 





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9 10 II 12 13 14 15 16 . 17 18 19 20 21 

THOUSANDS 



Deportation problems.— The problems involved in actually accomplishing a depor- 
tation, especially in cases of persons destined to "iron curtain countries", are myriad 
in number and time-consuming in the extreme. Included in these problems are the fol- 
lowing: 

(1) Election of countries. —Under the law, an alien may designate one country 
to which he wishes to be deported except that he may not designate any foreign ter- 
ritory contiguous to the United States or any island adjacent thereto or adjacent to the 
United States, unless he is a citizen or has had residence in such countries. 

When election by the deportable alien of a country is made, an application is 
promptly presented to the authorities of the country of the alien's choice. Since ex- 
perience has proved that permission to enter the country of the alien's choice is rarely 
granted, applications are simultaneously presented by the Field Offices to the author- 
ities of the country to which deportation appears most practicable. Under the law, if 
the government of the country of the alien's choice does not advise the Attorney Gen- 
eral, within three months' time following the date of original inquiry, as to whether 
that government will or will not accept such alien, then deportation shall be directed 
to such other country as is within the jurisdiction of the Attorney General. This new 
provision in the law has already assisted this Service in avoiding dilatory tactics on 
the part of the aliens by designating countries where applications are not acknowledged. 
In two instances where replies or acknowledgments had not been received within the 
three-month period from the authorities of the country designated, the Service proceeded 
to effect deportation of those aliens to the country of their nationality. 

(2) Procurement of travel documents.— The procurement of travel documents con- 
tinues to be a major problem in effecting the deportation of aliens. Changes in territorial 
jurisdiction, strict expatriation laws, inability to establish birth as claimed or other 
evidence of nationality, together with arbitrary denials by countries to accept their own 



nationals, are hindering the deportation of a vast number of aliens. Nevertheless, this 
Service makes every possible effort to carry out the statutory requirements relating to 
deportation, even though the likelihood of success is remote. Anything less would amount 
to putting a premium on an alien's illegal residence in the United States. 

The U.S.S.R. and Poland have failed to cooperate with this Service in furnish- 
ing travel documents for deportations to those countries. Recently, the Polish Consul 
in New York City advised that his Government would not consider an application for a 
passport unless the application was signed by the deportee and the alien furnished an 
autobiography of himself written in his own handwriting. Of course, this will make it 
impossible to obtain any Polish documents in the future, unless the alien desires to 
return to Poland. Section 243(g) of the Immigration and NationcJity Act provides: 

•Upon the notification by the Attorney General that 
any country upon request denies or unduly delays 
acceptance of the return of any alien who is a na- 
tional, citizen, subject, or resident thereof, the Secre- 
tary of State shall instruct consular officers perform- 
ing their duties in the territory of such country to dis- 
continue the issuance of immigrant visas to nationals, 
citizens, subjects, or residents of such country, until 
such time as the Attorney General shall inform the 
Secretary of State that such country has accepted 
such alien." 

After much consideration, on April 21, 1953, the Attorney General addressed a letter to 
the Secretary of State giving notification pursuant to this Section of the refusal of the 
U.S.S.R. and Poland to accept into their territories their nationals, citizens, subjects, 
or residents in deportation proceedings. The State Department advised the Attorney 
General on May 26, 1953, that the American Embassies at Warsaw, Poland, and at 
Moscow, U.S.S.R., had been advised of the invoking of the provisions of Section 243(g). 
Foreign Service officers at these stations were to discontinue the issuance of visas to 
immigrants who were nationals, citizens, subjects, or residents of Poland and U.S.S.R. 
This is the first time since the enactment of the Internal Security Act of 1950, which 
was superseded by the Immigration and Nationality Act, that sanctions were invoked 
against any country. What result this will have upon future applications for travel docu- 
ments to these countries is not known at present. 

During 1953, the reciprocal agreement between this Service and the Canadian 
immigration authorities for the acceptance of deportees from either country was amended 
so that neither country is required to accept the return of an alien who had less than 
five years' residence in the receiving country. It is expected that this amendment will 
have a considerable effect in discouraging European aliens from legally entering one 
country for the purpose of later entering the other country illegally. 

The initial responsibility for the procurement of travel documents lies in the 
Field Offices. Cases are referred to the Central Office when all local efforts have 
failed or consular officers are not available to this Service and further reference to the 
authorities abroad through the Department of State is required. The number of such 
referrals increased from 214 in 1951 to 325 in 1952 and 672 in 1953. 

(3) Claims of physical persecution. —Section 243(h) of the Immigration and Na- 
tionality Act of 1952 authorizes the Attorney General to withhold deportation of any 
alien to any country in which, in his opinion, the alien would be subject to physical 
persecution and for such period of time as he deems to be necessary for such reason. 



- 43- 

The regulations provide that in any case in which a request for a stay of deportation 
is predicated upon a claim by the alien that he would be subject to physical persecution 
if deported to a particular country, he may file an affidavit setting forth the reasons for 
the request accompanied by such other evidentiary material as may support his claim. 
After the alien has been accorded an interview and permitted to submit evidence in 
support of his claim, this record is forwarded to the Central Office where it is care- 
fully reviewed and a finding made as to whether or not the alien would be subject to 
physical persecution if deported to the country designated. Each case is decided upon 
its own merits, with consideration given all pertinent facts which the case may present. 
If a decision cannot be reached on the basis of the evidence the alien has submitted, 
includifig his sworn testimony, appropriate and independent inquiry is made for the pur- 
pose of getting all facts necessary to enable the Commissioner to make a finding. 

During the fiscal year 1953, the Service has had 110 applications for stays of 
deportation under the above section. 

Stays of deportation granted 8 

Stays of deportation denied __ 64 

Applications still under consideration „ 38 

Total _ ..110 

This Service has an accumulation of approximately 600 Chinese under orders of 
deportation because of inability to procure travel documents for deportation to China. 
The British consul in New York City recently advised the Service that transit visas will 
be granted through Hong Kong. 

In the first planned group of 55 deportable Chinese aliens, each has requested 
a stay of deportation pursuant to this Section predicated upon claims that he would be 
"physically persecuted' if deported to the Chinese mainland. Therefore, it can be antici- 
pated that practically all of the Chinese will claim "physical persecution" when arrange- 
ments for their deportation are completed. 

In addition to the above, there are several hundred Polish nationals who are 
residing in the United States illegally and who, undoubtedly, will make this claim of 
physical persecution when ordered deported to Poland. The Service has had requests 
for stays of deportation predicated upon the claim of physical persecution by aliens of 
other nationalities, namely, Yugoslavia, Korea, France, England, Greece, Albania, 
Italy, Pakistan, etc. It is not possible to estimate at this time the number otsuch claims 
which will be made during the fiscal year 1954. 

Many writs of habeas corpus have been sued out on the basis of the Commis- 
sioner's findings that an alien would not be subject to physical persecution if deported 
to a particular country, and in this connection, in the case of United States ex rel 
Nereo Dolenz v. The District Director of Immigration and Naturalization, New York , 
the Second Circuit sustained the action of the Attorney General, and upon application 
to the Supreme Court, a petition by the alien for certiorari was denied. 

(4) Transportation.-This Service has continued to use the vessels of the Mil- 
itary Sea Transport Service (MSTS) whenever such space was available. Savings of over 
$43,000 were effected by the use of these vessels. One hundred sixty aliens were de- 
ported to trans-Pacific degtinations at a cost of $75 per alien, and 44 aliens were 
deported trans-Atlantic at the rate of $50 per alien to channel ports and $60 per alien 
to Mediterranean ports. 



- 44 - 

During the fiscal year 1953, M.S.T.S. vessels were also utilized from San Fran- 
cisco to Manila for the deportation of 74 aliens in two groups of deportees destined to 
Pakistan. This Service arranged for their transfer from Manila to Pakistan by plane. 
These two deportation parties were effected at a total savings of approximately $12,100 
when compared to the cost of commercial carrier. 

Transfer to ports of departure from within the United States for deportation is 
continued by air coach, which has reduced detention costs, and the coordination of 
reverse movements to the greatest extent possible assures the most economical util- 
ization of escorting personnel. 

Voluntary Departures 

Of the 885,391 voluntary departures 874,074 were accomplished at the Mexican 
Border, 2,553 at the Canadian Border, and 8,764 at other ports. Of the total voluntary 
departures 26,075 were permitted to depart after the issuance of warrants of arrest. 
Of these 23,153 departed across the Mexican Border, 463 across the Canadian Border, 
and 2,459 left from other ports for foreign countries. 

Parole 

Conditional parole, bond, or supervision. —From the service of the warrant of 
arrest in deportation proceedings until final disposition of the case, deportable aliens 
who have been released from custody are placed under orders of conditional parole, 
bond, or supervision pursuant to Section 242 of the Immigration and Nationality Act. 
At the end of the fiscal year 1953, there were 21,002 deportable aliens at large under 
the provisions of this Section. A great majority of these cases were on conditional 
parole awaiting hearings or a final determination of deportability. During fiscal year 
1953, there were 13,646 aliens placed on conditional parole, while 16,096 were removed 
from conditional parole to orders of supervision or the cases were terminated by de- 
portation or adjustment of status. During this same period, there were 3,677 aliens 
placed under supervision and 2,422 removed from supervision for the same reasons as 
stated above. 

The enactment of P ublic Law 414 has increased the importance and necessity 
of having restrictions inserted in the conditions of bond, especially in the subversive, 
criminal, immoral and narcotic cases. Since January, all subversive cases are being 
brought in to post new bonds under the new Act, containing restrictions as to the alien's 
conduct, associations and activities. In the cases of aliens under supervision, the 
aliens are served with new orders containing additional restrictions. Should aliens 
refuse to post new bonds or execute orders of conditional parole with the prescribed 
conditions therein, they are held in custody. A number of writs of habeas corpus have 
been sued out and, although some of the courts have sustained the action of the Attorney 
General imposing restrictions in cases falling within this category, there are 20 cases 
in Detroit where the Federal judges have reserved decision. Because of the penal pro- 
visions contained in the law, the Central Office supervises all cases involving sub- 
versive, criminal, immoral, and narcotic aliens. There are 607 subversive cases in the 
following categories: 

Detained 25 

Released under bond 260 

On conditional parole 94 

Under orders of supervision 154 

Released under court bonds „ 44 

''/hereabouts unknown, in hospitals, or in prison 30 



- 45- 

The Central Office record shows that there are 5,998 criminal, immoral and 
narcotic cases, broken down as to detention and release status as follows: 

Conditional parole 756 

Under supervision 546 

Bond 207 

Detained I&N expense 81 

Detained (serving sentence) 806 

(a) Pending service W/A - 

replies from field 216 

Closeouts 696 

To be reviewed 2,690 

Investigations are conducted at least once yearly in all cases involving sub- 
versive, criminal, immoral, and narcotic cases to determine whether the aliens are com- 
plying with the conditions of their release. Where it is established that the alien has 
wilfully violated any conditions contained in the order of conditional parole or bond, 
the parole or bond is revoked and the alien taken into custody. If it is established that 
the alien has violated any conditions contained in the order of supervision, a prompt in- 
vestigation is conducted and, in cases of wilful violation, the facts are developed and 
presented to the local United States Attorney for possible prosecution. At the time the 
order of deportation is entered, each alien is given a "Notice to Depart Within Six Months 
After Entry of Final Order of Deportation." If after the six-month period has expired, the 
alien has failed to depart, and it appears that he has made no effort to depart, a ques- 
tion and answer statement, under oath, is taken by the Deportation and Parole Officer 
to determine what efforts have been made to effect departure. If the alien has wilfully 
failed or refused to make such efforts, the facts are presented to the local United States 
Attorney for possible prosecution. 

There were, in fiscal year 1953, 101 cases presented to the local United States 
Attorney. Seventeen cases were declined, seven were indicted, three were prosecuted 
and 74 cases are still pending. 

ALIENS ON PAROLE 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1950 - 1953 



THOUSANDS 
30 



THOUSANDS 
30 



25- 



-25 



20 

15 

10 

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10 



July 



Dec 


June 


July 


Dec 


June 


July 


Dec 


June 


July 


Dec 


1950 






1951 






1952 






1953 



-46- 

Under the law, all aliens who are subject to supervision must appear in person 
from time to time to give information, under oath, as to their conduct, associations, and 
activities, and the efforts they are making to depart from the United States. This provi- 
sion has had a salutary effect in that aliens fearing possible prosecution have pro- 
cured the necessary travel documents with which to effect their departure from this 
country with little or no difficulty, where efforts made by this Service were to no avail. 
It is felt that with closer supervision and personal contact with the individual, it will 
bring about compliance with the requirements of the law. 

By the close of the fiscal year, there had been nine subversive aliens sentenced 
under the Smith Act; three serving sentences; and six at large under orders of super- 
vision by this Service pending appeals of their convictions. 

Detention 

As a direct consequence of the apprehension of great numbers of Mexican illegal 
entrants by the Border Patrol, two new detention facilities were opened, one at McAllen, 
Texas, and the other at Chula Vista, California. Additional accomplishments include 
continued progress in the Service-wide program of renovation and furnishing of detention 
facilities; a reduction in the length of time aliens are held in detention; revision of 
monthly culinary reports; a decrease in unit food costs; and the enlargement of the 
Service in-training program for the employees in the Detention Branch. 

Aliens detained. —As expected, by far the greatest numbers of aliens detained 
were in custody in the Southwest, although Mexican nationals were detained in great 
numbers throughout the United States. 

For many years Chinese aliens who were excluded by Boards of Special Inquiry 
upon seeking admission to the United States not only comprised the largest group of 
aliens held in the San Francisco detention facility, but remained longer than any other 
group because of the extensive investigations which were required in most cases. Asa 
result, there were many unusual problems relating to their care and treatment, including 
the necissity of providing separate living quarters and a special diet. The situation 
has changed, however, under the Immigration and Nationality Act, the investigation is 
conducted in China by the Consular Service before the application is approved. 

Today, Mexican nationals predominate at the San Francisco facility. 

The report on Border Patrol reflected an increasing belligerence on the part of 
Mexican aliens apprehended. This same attitude has made the job of security officers 
increasingly difficult. The number of aliens who escaped from custody increased during 
the past year, particularly along the Mexican Border. In one instance recently nine 
detainees went over the 11-foot fence enclosing the Chula Vista Camp in accordance 
with a well thought-out plan. In the past, Mexicans have been a fairly docile group of 
individuals, requiring only minimum safeguards and limited detention personnel. How- 
ever, aggravated economic conditions in Mexico, plus tougher Border Patrol enforce- 
ment during the last three years, have had a cumulative effect upon the Mexican illegal 
entrant, especially the teen-ager. He now frequently resents apprehension, detention, 
and efforts to deport him, is abusive and displays little respect for authority. This 
situation, which is general along the Border, has compelled the Service to adopt stricter 
security measures in detention facilities. 

The prevention of escapes of detained aliens from hospitals presents an addi- 
tional problem. Generally speaking few hospitals set aside wards for detention purposes 



-47- 

or maintain surveillance over patients. Consequently, whenever it is necessary for the 
Service to hospitalize a subversive alien, a criminal or one who may abscond, a special 
consisting of three men must be provided. This action is only taken, however, where 
a known security hazard exists due to a shortage of security personnel and, as a result, 
it is not too difficult for an alien to walk out of the hospital without detection. 

The number of aliens detained throughout the year is shown below. It will be 
noted that the average number of days detention per person in Service-operated facilities 
continues to decrease. Vigorous efforts to process aliens for deportation and to see to 
it that all cases are frequently examined have been responsible for this highly satis- 
factory situation. 

Aliens detained and average days detention 
Years ended June 30, 1951 - 1953 



Years ended Total 

1953 : 

No. of aliens detained 195,016 

Average days detention 5.2 

1952 : 

No. of aliens detained __ 201,618 

Average days detention 5.9 

1951 : 

No. of aliens detained 124,187 

Average days detention 6.6 





In non- 


In Service 


Service 


operated 
Facilities 


operated 
Facilities 


122,867 
5.2 


72,149 
5.3 


86,570 
8.5 


115,048 
3.8 


48,627 
9.2 


75,560 
4.8 



Man-days of detention.—During the past year man-days detention decreased 14 
percent below those for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1952, as indicated in the follow- 
ing figures: 

Man-days of detention 
Years ended June 30, 
1953 1952 



Total __„ _ 

Service-operated facilities 

Non-Service operated facilities 



1,017,990 1,187,617 



632,294 
385,696 



739,875 
447,742 



48- 



MANDAYS OF DETENTION IN SERVICE AND OTHER OPERATED FACILITIES 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1949 - 1953 
MflNDflYS ( THOUSANDS ) 

I ,400 



1,200- 



,000 



800 



600 



400 



200 



[ I SERVICE FACILITIES 

OTHER FACILITIES 




1949 



1950 



195 I 



1952 



1953 



Detention facilities. — A transit detention camp was opened on March 6, 1953, 
at McAUen, Texas, in Hidalgo County. It is located on an ll-acre tract owned by the 
Service and has an overnight capacity of 640 with a transit capacity of 1,000. The 
construction of such a camp with accomodations for the temporary detention of large 
groups of Mexican aliens had been proposed many times as an aid to Border Patrol 
activities in the Brownsville-McAUen area. The operation is proving the success long 
predicted for it. Approximately 1,000 aliens have been processed every day for deporta- 
tion or prosecution since it has been opened. 

From the beginning the camp at McAllen was planned as a temporary, low-cost 
operation with a minimum of personnel and equipment. Food cost is only 10 cents per 
person per day while unit overhead or operating costs are only six cents per day. In 
this connection, it is significant that the care and treatment provided for those who are 
detained in this camp a few hours or overnight is more wholesome and sanitary and the 
food more nutritious and ample than many have ever known before, undoubtedly better 
than the, living accomodations made available by many of those who employ illegal 
labor. The social and economic implications of the contrast are sharply etched in the 
McAllen operation. 

Since the opening of the McAUen Camp, detentions in contractual jails are 
gradually decreasing and it is anticipated that in one year's operation the initial cost 
of establishing the camp will be repaid through saving in jail costs alone. 

Due to the fact that all jails are overcrowded along the Mexican Border, the 
Service has assisted U. S. Marshals wherever possible in lower California and in the 
Imperial Valley by holding United States prisoners in its detention facilities. This 
assistance will be expanded to include a portion of the McAllen Camp for that purpose. 



-49- 

Consequently, before the end of the fiscal year 1954, it is expected that reimbursements 
received for the detention of United States prisoners will more than offset operating 
costs. 

The other new facility which has been completed is located at Chula Vista, 
a few miles west of San Diego on the Mexican Border overlooking San Ysidro in Mexico. 
This facility, which has an overnight capacity of 400, was opened on February 16, 1953, 
at which time Camp Gillespie at El Cajon, which the Service had operated on a rental 
basis from the County of San Diego, was closed. 

During the past year further progress has been made in the over-all program of 
repair, renovation, and furnishing of Service-operated facilities. For example, black, 
brown, and gray paints, formerly considered appropriate for institutional purposes and 
economical because "they don't show the dirt*, have been replaced by bright colors 
throughout all facilities and additional modern stainless steel culinary equipment has 
been installed. 

In June, following^ a visit to Ellis Island, the Attorney General approved the pur- 
chase of furniture for the Immigrant Passenger's Lounge, as recommended by the Com- 
missioner. Thus, the first phase of a proposed over-all plan for the renovation and 
refurnishing of the family quarters, women's dormitories, chapel, library, and passen- 
gers' visiting room was undertaken. 

The San Francisco detention facility was completely renovated, new equipment 
was installed and several physical changes were made in the quarters. The El Centre 
facility in the Imperial Valley was improved. The camp now has an overnight capacity 
of 500. 

Culinary ." During 1953 more than 1,500,000 meals were served in Service-oper- 
ated facilities at the amazingly low cost of 56 cents per day. This is 15 percent below 
the daily cost in 1952. This unusual decrease in unit food costs results, of course, 
from the inclusion of figures submitted by the recently opened McAUen Camp which, as 
stated previously, are extremely low as compared with other facilities. However, food 
cost per day would have been 63 cents, or three cents below last year's figure. This 
record of economy in the culinary operation is especially meritorious inasmuch as man- 
days of detention decreased approximately 25 percent from the previous fiscal year. 
It is very difficult to hold costs down when population is low. 

Close cooperation is maintained with other Federal agencies engaged in the 
procurement and utilization of foodstuffs and expendable property. In a number of in- 
stances quantities of surplus foodstuffs have been obtained through these sources either 
without cost or at reduced prices. One such food transfer amounted to a savings of 
approximately $8,000. Likewise, considerable savings have been possible due to the 
transfer by General Services Administration of surplus clothing, bedding, and other 
expendable items required in the operation of the facilities. 

In-Service training.—Every effort is being made to develop leaders among those 
who are willing to assume responsibility, to improve and make more effective operating 
procedures, and to foster a greater degree of loyalty and interest in the success of the 
detention operation. 

Two examples of in-Service training are cited below: 

Ninety-seven Detention Officers employed at Ellis Island Detention Facility 
completed the 40-hour training course which was held at the Island from January 19 to 



-50- 

February 27, 1953. Lectures, based upon the Manual of Instruction and Public Law 414, 
were conducted by officers from the Enforcement Division, Personnel Division, Cul- 
inary Unit, and the U. S. Public Health Service. During the past year a program of 
on-the-job training for Squad Leaders and newly appointed Security Officers was initi- 
ated by the Chief of the Detention Branch. A group training program for culinary person- 
nel was also begun under the direction of the Supervisor of the Culinary Unit. 

The Immigration and Naturalization Service participated again this year in the 
five-week Culinary Training School which was held at the Federal Correctional Institu- 
tion at Texarkana, Texas, sponsored by the Bureau of Prisons. Employees of the 
Service are afforded an opportunity through attendance at this school to obtain training 
in improved culinary methods and cost accounting under qualified instructors. 

Border Patrol 

The demands on the Border Patrol and its accomplishments were vast in 1953. 
Hordes of Mexican nationals unable to find work in their own country, or lured by higher 
wages in this country, swarmed across our Southwestern Border. Recent European 
immigrants to Canada and the Carribean area saw in the Northern Border and Gulf 
Coast a means of easy access to the United States. The concomitant to the urgent 
desire to get into the United States was an upswing in commercialized smuggling. The 
knowledge that among the hundreds of thousands attempting entry for economic better- 
ment there were some whose purposes were far more sinister was an ever present chal- 
lenge to the Border Patrol officers. With the smallest force of Border Patrol officers in 
12 years (approximately 1,000) there were 839,149 apprehensions including 1,540 
smugglers of aliens. 



THOUSANDS 

900 



DEPORTABLE ALIENS APPREHENDED BY BORDER PATROL OFFICERS 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1942 - 1953 



800 



700 



600 



500 



400 



300 



200 



100 




1942 



1945 



1950 



1953 



-51- 

Apprehensions of Mexican nationals. — Total apprehensions of Mexican nationals, 
including apprehensions made by investigators at interior points, reached more than 
875,000. 'Significantly, about 30,000 were working in trade or industry at the time of 
anest Although the number of aliens arrested is a phenomenal figure, the problem is 
greater than arrest figures indicate. While it is impossible to determine how many 
illegal aliens are not arrested, it has become clear that the small force of Border Patrol 
officers is not able to apprehend nearly all of those who are effecting illegal entry 
into our country. Some idea of the magnitude of the problem may be gained from the 
following officer's report: 

'One night at Yuma, Arizona, local law enforcement officers 
joined with the Border Patrol to clear the railroad yards there, of a group 
of illegal aliens who had missed outgoing trains. There were an esti- 
mated fifteen hundred illegal aliens in the railroad yards, at one time, 
at Yuma that night.* 

With the small force of officers available it would have been impossible to 
pile up such numbers of apprehensions without the 12 airplanes assigned to border 
patrol work. Pilots survey ranch and farm areas, locating groups of possible illegal 
entrants, or sweep across deserts to locate tracks leading away from the border, or 
patrol the boundaries late in the evening or at sun-up times when aliens congregate 
at crossing places. The intelligence thus gained from the air is relayed by radio to 
the men of the ground, who then can proceed by jeep or horseback to the place where 
the aliens are. An example is found in this typical flight report: 

'This flight was made as a result of information received indi- 
cating that a large group of aliens had left. Tijuana, B. C, Mexico, 
under circumstances indicating that they proposed to walk through the 
mountainous area east of San Diego to a distant northern destination. 
The probable area of passage was covered and a group of seven aliens 
located in the San Miguel Mesa. This information was relayed by radio 
to ground teams with instructions to proceed to the location of the 
aliens by horseback, where the apprehension was made." 

Border Patrol planes also provide an effective means of combatting alien smug- 
gling, not only by land, but by sea and air as well. They are used to furnish rapid 
transportation of interceptive forces; to keep under surveillance suspected aircraft 
and boats; to establish and maintain contact at widespread airports; and to make fast 
and repeated searches for smugglers, boats, planes and automobiles, as well as for the 
smugglers and aliens after a landing is made. 

One of the best preventives to illegal entry is effective expulsion. This was 
proved in 1952, when Mexicans were transported by air to places near their homes in 
the interior of Mexico. When the airlift had to be discontinued for lack of funds, a train- 
lift operation was inaugurated in July of 1952 in the San Antonio and Los Angeles 
Districts. This operation closely parallelled the airlift, in that its basic idea was to 
transport aliens from areas of concentration near the border to points near their homes 
well in the interior of Mexico. The entire trainlift operation continued for about five 
months. During that time 25,297 aliens were transported from the border areas. 

In the vicinity of McAUen, Texas, the Rio Grande River, for the greater part of 
the past year, was nearly empty of water. The arrest of 333,079 aliens in this area 
made it apparent that some means would have to be devised to remove aliens from the 
border area where illegal entry was so easy. A detention camp was constructed at 



-52- 

McAllen, from which assembled aliens were taken by bus to Zapata and Laredo, Texas. 
Aliens returned to Mexico through Zapata and Laredo could more readily be prevented 
from reentry into the United States. In the last half of the year 71,834 illegal aliens 
were so expelled. 

It is popular to believe that the tide of illegal entrants consists of innocent 
agricultural laborers, and this has been largely true. During this fiscal year, however, 
opposition to the law enforcement efforts of the Border Patrol became mote pronounced 
than ever before. In a few instances, there has been evidence indicating that agitators 
are at work. An example of the opposition encountered by Border Patrol officers, which 
is becoming increasingly frequent, is that of the "Andtade Incident* at Andrade, Cali- 
fornia, in March 1953. 

A train, entering the United States at that point, was inspected by four Border 
Patrol officers. Approximately 200 illegal aliens were on the train. As the train stopped 
near the line on the American side, a group of about 300 to 400 aliens became turbulent 
and riotous. They shouted insults and curses and hurled stones at a Border Patrol 
automobile and buildings nearby. Mexican troops have been furnished to prevent repeti- 
tion of such incidents at Andrade, but continuing reports from Texas to California re- 
veal a great change in the temper and manner of illegal aliens. 

Furthermore, during the past year statistics for Southern California and Texas 
reveal the alarming fact that, in some counties, 75 to 95 percent of all crime com.nitted 
has been by aliens illegally in this country. In some places stockades have been built 
around county jails to contain illegal aliens after hundreds have already jammed the 
crowded regular quarters. 

Apprehensions other than Mexican Border .— The phenomenal numbers of aliens 
arrested on the Mexican Border tend to overshadow activity along the Canadian Border. 
However, illegal alien entry and alien smuggling along that border are growing steadily. 
In order to combat the problem on the Mexican Border, Border Patrol Sectors on the 
Canadian Border have been so weakened as to create a serious problem there. For 
instance, there are only 74 patrolmen to cover 1,400 miles of international boundary 
in the St. Albans District. Many of the sdiens arrested along the Canadian Border are 
Europeans who have either immigrated to Canada or have entered that country illegally. 
A similar problem exists along the Gulf Coast, where in Florida alone there are 100 
unattended airports within two hours flying time of Havana, Cuba. 

Smugglin^.--Smuggling was on the increase in the last year as evidenced by 
the arrest of some 1,540 smugglers, approximately 400 more than in the preceding year. 
Reasons for the increase are not hard to find. Aliens know that higher wages are paid 
in the large industrial centers away from the borders and will pay to get there; poor eco- 
nomic conditions in Mexico make jobs in the United States attractive; and smuggling 
rings quickly come into existence when unscrupulous people know of the quick profit 
to be made. 

Border Patrol officers apprehended 1,447 smugglers on the Mexican Border. 
Many cases have been made in which smugglers have charged aliens fees up to $300 
for transportation to Chicago, or to the Northwestern States of Oregon and Washington. 

Close coordination of Border Patrol intelligence work and interceptive forces 
uncovered a smuggling scheme devised to avoid arrest. A smuggled alien who can speak 
English and drive an automobile frequently is furnished free transportation into the 
interior of the country provided he drives the car loaded with the other smuggled aliens. 
The operator of the smuggling activity enters the United States legally, buys an old 



- 53- 

car, and parks it at a spot near which the smuggling is to occur. The person who plans 
the smuggling and reaps the benefit then brings the aliens to the border but does not 
himself cross the International Boundary, thereby escaping arrest and prosecution. 
The alien driver, upon arrival at the interior destination, either keeps the car, or, if it 
should break down enroute, abandons it. 

SMUGGLERS OF ALIENS APPREHENDED BY BORDER PATROL OFFICERS 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1925 - 1953 



PERSONS 
1,600 



I ,400 



I ,200 



1,000 



800 



600 



400 



200 



^ 


/ 


^ 


/ 


/ 




/l 


/ 


/ 






/ 












—' 


■^ 


^ 


r~> 


F=r ^ 


/ 
















J 












^ 


1 

















1925 



1930 



1935 



1940 



1945 



1950 - 1953 



Counter-measures developed to meet such an operation met with encouraging 
success. Mexican officials agreed to prosecute in the Mexican courts, under Mexican 
law, any such smugglers against whom suitable evidence could be produced. The Service 
has produced such evidence by furnishing copies of sworn testimony and delivering 
the smuggled aliens to the Mexican officials to be used as witnesses. Reports have 
been received indicating that three smugglers were sentenced to terms of three years 
each, and the case of one alien reported to have smuggled hundreds of aliens into the 
United States in recent years is pending prosecution in the Mexican courts. 

The salutary effect of punishment has been evident in the Miami Oistrict. Since 
the United States District Court at Miami some time ago meted out several severe 
sentences for smuggling aliens, including a fifteen-year sentence in the Federal pen- 
itentiary to the leader of the largest smuggling ring then operating, no important smug- 
gling case has come to the attention of the Service in Florida. 

The problem along the Canadian Border, although much smaller numerically 
than that on the Mexican Border, is to stop the operation of well-organized smuggling 
rings which bring European aliens from Canada to the United States and transport them 
to large centers of population within this country. During the past year. Border Patrol 
officers effected the arrest of 44 alien smugglers along the Canadian Border. 



One smuggling ring broken during the year involved two partners, one of whom 
organized the smuggling parties in Canada, and the other one smuggled the aliens into 



- 54- 

the United States by boat. The partner who operated the boat has been arrested and con- 
victed. 

At Buffalo, a smuggler was arrested who had built a small compartment under 
the floor boards of his station wagon, in which he concealed aliens while he crossed 
the border with his own valid documents. 

Again, in this type of operation, the danger to the United States must be empha- 
sized. Encouraging progress has been made through intensified training efforts and the 
development of improved methods of operation, utilizing Border Patrol airplanes, radio- 
equipped cars, jeeps, trucks, and buses. By these means the small force of officers 
has been able to make an impressive record in apprehending alien smugglers and their 
human contraband. 

Cooperation with other law enforcement agencies .— During the past year. Border 
Patrol officers, incidental to their regular duties, arrested and delivered to other agen- 
cies a total of 509 persons for violations of other laws. This total included four arrested 
for murder, twenty-nine for automobile theft, ten for burglary, nine for robbery, and the 
remainder for other violations. 

The total value of seizures made by the Border Patrol officers was $416,903.00, 
as follows: 

Narcotics __ $ 10,433.00 

300 vehicles 346,579.00 

Others _ 59,891.00 

Total $416,903.00 

The Border Patrol places great value upon cooperation with other agencies and 
law enforcement officers. Patrol officers in all sectors make frequent and regular con- 
tact with other police agencies to solicit their cooperation and assistance. In turn, 
officers are frequen*^ly called upon to render assistance to municipal, county, state, 
and other Federal '~>t"ficers. 

An example of the cooperation received by Border Patrol officers is well demon- 
strated by operations in the Sacramento Sector of the San Francisco District. In that 
area there are sixteen Border Patrol officers, who, last year, apprehended a total of 
26,822 aliens. In many cities and counties in that area, city police and sheriffs' officers 
work as second members of a team with Patrol officers, enabling them to double their 
effectiveness and coverage. Such close cooperation is not uncommon to the entire 
Border Patrol. 

Border Patrol Training .— The Border Patrol Training School, staffed by exper- 
ienced Border Patrol officers, teaches new Border Patrol officers immigration laws, the 
Spanish language, duties and authority to act, marksmanship, self-defense, methods of 
arrest, first aid, methods of Border Patrol operation, and related subjects. After the 
Training School instruction, an outstanding Patrol officer is assigned to be counsellor 
and instructor to new officers during the probationary year. Emphasis continues in the 
study of the immigration laws, the Spanish language, and officer's duties and authority 
to act. Careful attention is given to the development of other officer qualifications. 

Each Border Patrol officer receives sixty hours of intensive training in the use 



- 55- 

of firearms at the Border Patrol Training School. This training consists of instruction in 
safety precautions, in the care of equipment, and in actual firing for record of the Service 
revolver, high powered rifle, riot-type shot guns, and submachine guns. This training 
is extended throughout the career of a Border Patrol officer. During the past year the Bor- 
der Patrol Firearms Instructor won the United States National Pistol Championship. 

Officers participate in their training with enthusiasm and interest because they 
are impressed, immediately upon entering on duty in the Border Patrol, with the fact 
that an officer cannot function without an adequate knowledge of the law and, along the 
Southern Border, of the Spanish language. Furthermore, the usual hazards of a Border 
Patrol officer's life promptly impress him with the difficulties, and perhaps disasters, he 
may encounter if he is not personally qualified in the arts of an officer. Unless the high 
standards established are met by probationary officers, they are separated from the 
Service. 



CHAPTER 



Investigation 



During the past fiscal year under a special program of the Attorney General 
the Service intensified its efforts to expel from the country all notorious subversives, 
racketeers, and other criminal aliens. This comprehensive and vigorous program de- 
signed to denaturalize and deport such classes of aliens has been, and continues to 
be, enforced to the limits of the investigative resources available to the Service. 

The effectiveness of this program has been demonstrated by its strong impact 
on the racketeering and subversive elements, who are currently finding themselves 
enmeshed in denaturalization and deportation proceedings. Efforts to this end have 
borne fruit in the institution of denaturalization and deportation proceedings against 
a number of the national leaders and functionaries of the Communist Party of the United 
States. Organized subversion, in its close alliance with alien elements, has sustained 
punishing blows to its espionage operations. Moreover, a serious setback to organized 
crime in the United States has been accomplished by placing some of its top leader- 
ship under denaturalization and deportation proceedings. 

Coordination, supervision, and planning of Service investigative activities have 
been emphasized. These have been attained in a large measure by a uniform system 
of investigative reporting. Reports of investigations submitted periodically to the 
Investigations Division of the Central Office during the pendency of the investigation 
in the more important types of cases involving subversives, racketeers, narcotic ped- 
dlers, and other criminals, and the information reflected in these reports has been cor- 
related with other information furnished by government intelligence agencies,, legis- 
lative investigating committees, and other sources accessible to the Central Office, 
Analysis and dissemination to the Field Offices of this correlated information has en- 
abled the investigative arm of the Service to deal more effectively with problems nation- 
wide in scope, such as subversive activities, organized crime, or organized rings for 



-58- 

the production and use of fraudulent entry documents. 

In the interest of efficient and economical investigative operations, plans have 
been formulated for training investigators in the techniques and procedures particularly 
important and applicable in the conduct of investigations within the jurisdiction of the 
Service. To meet the long felt need, the Investigations Division has prepared and dis- 
tributed to the investigators a handbook to be used in conjunction with the training pro- 
gram. This is particularly valuable for recently appointed investigators, but it should 
also prove effective in raising the efficiency of all the investigative force. 

The major phases of investigative operations during the past year are discussed 
below under the following headings: (1) Anti-subversive operations; (2) A nti- racketeer, 
and other anti-criminal, narcotic, and immoral operations; (3) Anti-smuggling and stow- 
away operations; (4) Visa and passport fraud operations; and (5) General operations. 

(1) Anti-subversive operations .— The anti-subversive investigative operations 
are primarily concerned with exclusion, deportation, and the prevention of naturalization 
of aliens of subversive classes and with the denaturalization of Communist, naturalized 
citizens. 

a. Investigations of deportable subversive aliens.— The vigorous program looking 
toward deportation has resulted in the institution of deportation proceedings in a grati- 
fying number of cases. A few of the more prominent aliens were Vera Hathaway, wife 
of the former editor of the "Daily Worker"; Max Young, international representative of 
the Young Communist International; Israel Blankenstein, a charter member of the Com- 
munist Party of the United States; Anita Cohen Boyer Field, wife of the alleged "angel' 
of the Communist Party; Felix Kusman, former bodyguard to Gerhart Eisler; and Gordon 
Barrager, communist functionary in the transportation field. 

An example ot the difficulties confronting this Service in establishing deport- 
ability in subversive cases is illustrated by that of Edunia Ramirez de Carrion Mirabel, 
who had been a member of the Partido Socialista Popular of Cuba. Section 241(a)(6) of 
the Immigration and Nationality Act provides for the deportability of aliens who have been 
members of the Communist Party of any foreign state, or the direct successor of such 
organizations. The difficulty in the Mirabel case was to establish by admissible evi- 
dence that the Partido Socialista Popular was either the Communist Party of Cuba, or 
its direct successor. Despite the fact that the organization was a foreign one, intensive 
investigation conducted by the Service adduced competent evidence, both in the United 
States and abroad, which was sufficient to establish that the organization came within 
the purview of the cited section. Her deportation followed. With this precedent available, 
proceedings are now under way in other cases to enforce the deportation of members of 
that organization who have succeeded in entering the United States. 

The fiscal year saw 178 subversive aliens arrested under deportation proceedings. 

b. Cancellation.— A companion to the program looking toward the deportation of 
subversive aliens has been the drive to revoke the naturalization of Communists who 
had succeeded in becoming citizens of the United States. Successful investigations 
conducted by the Service resulted in 38 cases being referred to the Criminal Division 
of the Department for the possible institution of court proceedings. The locations of the 
courts wherein suits have been filed reflect the nation-wide activities of the Communist 
Party and the necessity for coordinated investigation. Subversive activities subsequent 
to naturalization are now grounds for possible revocation of citizenship is such citizen- 
ship was attained after the Immigration and Nationality Act became effective. However, 



-59- 

this provision of law is of no assistance in those cases where naturalization occurred 
many years ago. These latter cases still require exhaustive, detailed, and painstaking 
investigations. 

c. Prevention of naturalization of subversive aliens. —Investigations conducted 
to prevent the naturalization of subversives are very important because once naturaliza- 
tion is obtained, its revocation becomes extremely difficult. Naturalization is prohibited 
to members of Communist or affiliated organizations. To assist in the determination of 
an alien's eligibility for naturalization, the Investigations Division has compiled in- 
formation with respect to numerous affiliated and 'front' organizations. The central- 
ization of this information makes it readily available to the Field Service. This has not 
only served the purpose of preventing the naturalization of subversives, but has provided 
for Service uniformity in the disposition of the naturalization petitions of members of 
such organizations. 

d. Exclusion of subversive aliens.— The exclusion of subversive aliens from the 
United States is one of the important phases in the fight to protect the internal security 
of this country. The Investigations Division, when necessary, assists in procuring the 
evidence upon which such exclusion proceedings may be predicated. Over one hundred 
aliens were excluded on subversive grounds during the past fiscal year, any of whom 
could well have been a potential espionage agent or saboteur. 

(2) Anti-racketeer, and other anti-criminal, narcotic, and immoral operations. ..The 
anti-subversive operations are parallelled in the investigation of criminal activities, 
such as racketeering or trafficking in narcotics. Deportation, exclusion, prevention of 
naturalization or the revocation of naturalization of persons of these undesirable classes 
are the end results vigorously sought after in these investigations. 

Especially in relation to deportation, the cases of all racketeers and other crim- 
inals have been closely investigated and the investigative results carefully studied 
with a view to determining whether these undesirable aliens may be amenable to Service 
action on any ground which would enable the country to rid itself of their presence. 
In many of these cases, while the reputed racketeer or criminal may have been suc- 
cessful in avoiding criminal prosecution and conviction for his nefarious activities, he 
may have brought himself within the reach of the Service's deportation process by 
effecting an unlawful reentry, or by failing to comply with other requirements of the 
immigration laws. Many well-known underworld characters have been ordered deported, 
are under deportation proceedings, or are subject of suits to cancel their illegally 
obtained citizenship as a result of these efforts. 

(3) A nti-smuggling and stowaway operations .— During this year the Service accel- 
erated its efforts to break up the organized smuggling of aliens into the United States. 
Special attention has been given to anti-smuggling and stowaway operations. The danger 
to the national security of the use of surreptitious means to gain entry to the United 
States by subversive and criminal aliens is obvious. To prevent such activities from 
being successfully carried out requires many man-hours of painstaking investigative 
work. The thorough searching of vessels believed to have stowaways aboard and the 
patrolling of docks and other places are essential preventive measures to which many 
hours of time must be devoted if they are to result in the apprehension of the parties 
involved. 

(4) Visa and passport fraud operations. — The procurement of fraudulent visas, 
passports, and other documents permitting entry to the United States is often resorted 
to by aliens unable to obtain entry in a legal manner. Ofttimes considerable ingenuity 



-60- 

is employed in devising the fraudulent schemes to evade the immigration laws. 

During the past year there was uncovered a visa fraud ring which operated by 
furnishing fraudulent documents to aliens falsely attesting to their being in sound 
financial status. These documents were submitted in connection with visa applications 
and were relied on by consular officers in issuing immigration visas. Over one hundred 
aliens managed to obtain visas on the strength of such false documents and entered 
the United States. They have been apprehended and deported. 

There was also uncovered another organized scheme under which a number of 
young girls obtained entry to the British West Indies. Thereafter, arrangements were 
made whereby male United States citizens went to the British West Indies solely for the 
purpose of going through a marriage ceremony with the girls in order that the girls could 
thereby qualify for nonquota immigrant visas to enter the United States. Investigation 
established that there was no intent on the part of any of the parties involved to estab- 
lish a legitimate marital status in the United States. These marriages were thus fraudu- 
lently entered into to evade the quota restrictions of the immigration law. 

(5) GenereJ operations .— The concentration of investigative effort on the cases 
of subversive, racketeer, and other criminal aliens has made necessary some shift of 
investigative personnel to such activities from our general investigative personnel to 
such activities from our general investigative operations. 

However, efforts have been made to continue unabated our investigative activi- 
ties looking to the detection and apprehension of aliens illegally in the United States. 
Only certain phases of our general operations which in the past have proved least 
productive of good results from the viewpoint of law enforcement have been directed 
to be curtailed during this year. 

Certain of the provisions in the new Immigration and Nationality Act should 
prove helpful to the Service in combating the illegal influx of aliens to the United 
States. The new law contains additional restrictions relative to the length of time 
alien crewmen coming into the country may remain. It generally requires all aliens in 
the United States to report their addresses regularly, under penalty of prosecution and 
deportation. 

Moreover, while the Service has always received excellent cooperation from 
other law enforcement agencies in relation to locating aliens illegally in the United 
States, the new law contains provisions making it possible to utilize records of other 
Government agencies, not heretofore available to the Service, to obtain information as 
to the whereabouts of aliens who may be illegally here. 

The publicity given immigration matters in connection with the new Immigration 
and Nationality Act has made the general public increasingly aware of the provisions 
of law governing the stay of aliens in the United States. Reports by individuals con- 
cerning aliens illegally in the United States frequently lead to the apprehension and 
deportation of aliens who would otherwise escape detection. 

The Service is well aware that its general investigative operations seeking to 
detect and apprehend aliens illegally in the United States provide the base for the entire 
deportation process of the Service. When apprehensions of illegal aliens fall off, de- 
tentions, hearings, adjudications, and deportations decline accordingly. Hence, while 
emphasizing our program against subversives, racketeers, and other criminals, we are 
continuing, and even endeavoring to expand by efficient management, the general investi- 
gative operations of the Service. 



CHAPTER 



7 



Nationality 



The preceding chapters have dealt with the enforcement of immigration laws, and 
with the steps the Service must take to get rid of undesirable aliens illegally in the 
United States. 



The antithesis of reducing the alien population by deportation is the naturaliza- 
tion process, whereby persons, owing allegiance to foreign countries, by choice meet 
the requirements for United States citizenship, and thereby move out of the alien and 
into the citizen population group. In this process, the Service, through investigation 
and examination, determines whether aliens are qualified to become citizens through 
naturalization and fosters the citizenship activity through its citizenship education 
program. 

The rising trend in the number of petitions filed and persons naturalized, which 
began in the fiscal year 1952, continued through the fiscal year 1953. The emphasis 
upon the value of citizenship, stimulated by the new law and its attendant publicity, 
the annual Alien Address Report Program, which reminds aliens of their alien status, 
the elimination of the declaration of intention as a prerequisite to citizenship, the lift- 
ing of racial barriers, and the easing of literacy requirements -- all are factors which 
have accelerated interest in naturalizations. Recent immigrants, including the war 
brides and displaced persons admitted since the war, are now rapidly becoming eligible 
for naturalization by reason of the lapse of residence period requirements. 

Fewer changes were made in the nationality provisions than in the immigration 
provisions of the Immigration and Nationality Act, since most of the naturalization laws 
were revised and codified in the Nationality Act of 1940. However, in the intervening 
years, some thirty amendments were made to the Nationality Act, and Congress felt that 
the post-war era had shown the need for additional revisions. Therefore, the Nationality 



- 62- 

Act of 1940 was again reappraised and rewritten into the new Immigration and Nation- 
ality Act. 

Some of the new highlights on nationality in the Immigration and Nationality Act 
are: (1) elimination of racial barriers to naturalization; (2) elimination of the declara- 
tion of intention as a prerequisite to naturalization; (3) change of basis for revocation 
of naturalization from fraud and illegality to concealment of a material fact or wilful 
misrepresentation; and (4) special provisions facilitating the denaturalization and 
deportation of subversive aliens. The provisions of the Internal Security Act of 1950 
with respect to denial of naturalization to subversives, and the exceptions from the 
literacy requirements of persons with 20 years' residence in the United States and who 
are over 50 years of age, were renewed in the new law. 

Removal of racial restrictions upon naturalization. —Prior to 1871 naturaliza- 
tion privileges were extended only to white persons. Since then there has been a gradual 
extension of the privilege of naturalization to various racial or national groups, includ- 
ing persons of African nativity or descent, races indigenous to the continents of North 
or South America, Chinese (Act of December 17, 1943), Filipinos, and East Indians 
(Act of July 2, 1946). Guamanian persons were made eligible to naturalization by the 
Act of August 1, 1950 (Public Law 630) . Before passage of the Immigration and Nation- 
ality Act, which removed all racial bars to naturalization, the principal ineligible groups 
were Japanese, Koreans, Burmese, Indonesians, Maoris, Polynesians, Samoans, and 
Thailanders. 

The 1953 alien address reports showed that there were about 80,000 persons of 
these formerly ineligible races resident in the United States. As shown in the table be- 
low, the bulk are Japanese nationals, numbering 77,174. 

Number in the 
N ationality United States 

Total 8 0,217 

Japan „ 77,174 

Korea 2,463 

American Samoa 260 

Indonesia 198 

Thailand (Siam) 71 

Midway Island .._ 51 



The removal of the racial barrier to naturalization is the change in law having 
the most immediate effect as reported by the Districts. 

Most of the Japanese residing in this country (including Hawaii) came before 
1924, when the Immigration Act was passed excluding racially ineligible aliens. In the 
past twenty-five years, less than lO.JOO Japanese immigrants entered the United States, 
including 7,554 Japanese wives of United States citizens who were admitted since 1948 
under special legislation, ministers, and some professors. Many of the Japanese are 
over 50 years old and have resided in the United States more than 20 years. They, there- 
fore, are exempted from the literacy requirements of the law and are qualifying for citi- 
zenship in their native tongue with the help of an interpreter. Hawaii and the West Coast 
Districts report a great interest in naturalization. Japanese organizations are taking an 
active part in promoting the naturalization of all eligible Japanese aliens. In Hawaii, in 
a naturalization ceremony on February 26, 1953, 107 newly-eligible aliens were 



- 63- 

naturalized, the largest single group ever admitted to citizenship at any one time in any 
court in the Territory of Hawaii. 

Declarations filed. -Until passage of the new Act, the filing of a declaration of 
intention was the first step to becoming a citizen for aliens qualifying under the general 
provisions of nationality laws. Although the Immigration and Nationality Act no longer 
makes the declaration a prerequisite to naturalization, the option of filing a declaration 
of intention has been left with the alien, since it may be needed in obtaining employ- 
ment. In many States it is a prerequisite for a license to engage in some occupation or 
profession, such as the practice of medicine, nursing, dentistry, etc. The figures on 
declarations filed dropped to 23,558 in the fiscal year 1953 from 111,461 in the preced- 
ing year. Only 5,746 declarations were filed in the last half of the fiscal year. 

Petitions filed .— The number of applications to file petitions for naturalization 
doubled after the new law went into effect. Such applications numbered 167,328 during 
the fiscal year 1953, more than 50,000 over last year's figure. During the year, 98,128 
petitions for naturalization were filed, a four percent increase since last year, and 
30,675 petitions were still pending on June 30, 1953. 

P ersons naturalized .— The number of naturalizations, which went from a post-war 
low of 54,716 to 88,655 in 1952, continued to rise to 92,051 in the fiscal year 1953. 

Two-thirds of the naturalizations were under the provisions of the Nationality 
Act of 1940, since the savings clause in Section 405 of the new Act provided that peti- 
tions pending on the effective date of the Act are to be heard and determined in accord- 
ance with the law in effect at the time the petition was filed. 



THOUSiNDS 
150 



100 



DECLARATIONS OF INTENTION FILED AND PERSONS NATURALIZED 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1946-1953 




1946 



Naturalizations under the general provisions of the naturalization laws increased 
to 46,793, or 74 percent, since the previous year, and for the first time since 1948 ex- 
ceeded naturalizations of spouses of United States citizens. The latter group, which 
includes a number of war brides who came here after the war, declined to 42,088 in the 
fiscal year 1953, from 58,027 in the previous year. The new Act provides that spouses 
of citizens may be eligible for naturalization after three years' residence! Under the old 
law the residence requirements for this class varied from one to three years. 

Military naturalizations, including persons who served in the armed forces during 



- 64 



World War I or World War II, numbered 1,575 in the past year, as compared with 1,585 in 
the fiscal year 1952. 

PERSONS NATURALIZED IN THE UNITED STATES BY STATUTORY PROVISIONS 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1948 - 1955 
MJMBER 

100,000 



I I OTHER 



UNDER GENERAL PROVISIONS 



80,000 



PERSONS MARRIED 
TO CITIZENS 



60,000 ^ =5 



40,000 




1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 

The nationality composition of the majority of persons naturalized in the fiscal 
year 1953 bears a close ratio to the total permanent alien population of the United States, 
as reported in the 1953 Alien Address Program. Sixty-one percent of the 92,051 persons 
naturalized in the past year formerly were nationals of the following six countries: the 
United Kingdom, Germany, Canada, Italy, Mexico, and Poland. These same nationalities 
constituted 56 percent of the total resident alien population of the United States in 1953, 
numbering 2,348,881. Immigration statistics indicate that most of the German and Polish 
aliens in the United States came here in the past five years, whereas the British, Mexi- 
cans, and Italians have been here considerably longer. Sizeable increases have been 
noted in the past year in the naturalization of nationals of Ireland, the Netherlands, 
Poland, Japan, Korea, and Mexico. The removal of racial restrictions upon naturaliza- 
tion brought a jump in the naturalization of nationals of Japan from 40 in the fiscal year 
1952 to 674 in the fiscal year 1953, and of Korean nationals from 2 to 46 in the same 
period. 

The table which follows shows the principal countries of former allegiance of 
persons naturalized: 

Years ended |une 3L) , 
Former nationality 1953 1952 1951 1950 1949 

Total __.. 9 2.051 8 8.655 54,716 66,346 66,594 

British 13,345 14,993 10,867 12,697 13,284 

German .. 12,997 13,538 5,439 6,065 5,777 

Canadian „„ _.. 10,299 10,004 5,872 5,882 5,347 

Italian ..__ __„ 9,750 9,720 5,975 8,743 8,301 

Polish _ 6,963 5,858 3,100 3,793 4,371 

Mexican _ 2,726 2,496 1,969 2,323 2,227 

U.S.S.R. „ ___ 2,684 2,851 1,830 2,122 2,752 

Filipino _ 2,040 1,813 1,595 3,257 3,478 

Other 31,247 27,382 18,069 21,464 21,057 



-65- 

P etitions denied .— As shown below, the number of petitions denied has remained 
approximately the same in the past five years, averaging 2,281 per year. 

Years ended June 30 , Petitions denied 

1953 2,300 

1952 2,163 

1951 2,395 

1950 2,276 

1949 2,271 

In the past fiscal year only one petition was denied to every 40 granted. Failure 
to prosecute or withdrawal of the petition by the petitioner have been the principal 
grounds for denial of a petition in recent years. Section 335(e) of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act provides that after a petition has been filed in a court, it can be with- 
drawn only with the consent of the Attorney General. 

Most of the reasons for denial of a petition for naturalization have remained es- 
sentially the same. Racial ineligibility is no longer a reason for denying the petition. 
Nor is the lack of a valid declaration of intention a reason for the denial if the petition 
was filed under the new Act, but such reason is still valid if the petition was filed be- 
fore December 24, 1952. Failure to establish physical presence in the United States for 
the period required by law is a new ground for denial of the petition. A new provision. 
Section 315 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, makes the petitioner ineligible for 
citizenship if he has applied for and has been relieved or discharged from military 
training or service because of alienage. While there was no comparable section in the 
Nationality Act of 1940, the selective service laws enacted since 1940 prohibited such 
aliens from becoming citizens of the United States. 

N aturalizations revoked. — All except eight of the 335 certificates of naturaliza- 
tion revoked last year were initiated by the Foreign Service of the Department of State 
on the ground that the naturalized citizens became residents of foreign states within 
five years after naturalization. Two certificates were revoked on the ground that the 
aliens fraudulently concealed that they were of bad moral character at the time of natura- 
lization. In six c&ses the ground for revocation was that the aliens fraudulently con- 
cealed or denied, at the time of naturalization, membership in the Communist Party and, 
therefore, were within the class of persons whose naturalization was prohibited by Sec- 
tion 305 of the Nationality Act of 1940. 

Certificates of naturalization revoked, by grounds for revocation 
Years ended June 30, 1952 and 1953 

Grounds 1953 1952 

Total ...._ _.. 335 279^ 

F.stablished permer>ent residence abroad within five years after 

naturalization _ 327 275 

Bad moral character (fraud involved) 2 1 

Misrepresentations and concealments relating to marital and 

family status _ _ - 2 

Dishonorable discharge following naturalization based on military 

service during World War II _ - 1 

Fraudulent concealment of subversive membership 6 



- 66- 

One of the major changes in the Immigration and Nationality Act was in Section 
340, which changed the basis for revocation of naturalization from fraud and illegality 
to concealment of a material fact or by wilful misrepresentation. A reason given in one 
of the Congressional reports was the confusion existing in the court decisions as to 
what constitutes fraud. The Act does not define "concealment of a material fact* or 
'wilful misrepresentation* but has added several new grounds for revocation which are 
held to constitute concealment of a material fact or wilful misrepresentation. 

One of these provisions is found in Section 340(a). A naturalized citizen who, 
within 10 years after naturalization, refuses to testify before a Congressional Com- 
mittee concerning his subversive activities, if convicted of contempt for such refusal 
shall be held to have effectuated a ground for revocation of his naturalization under this 
section. 

Loss of nationality by expatriation. — In addition to loss of nationality by revoca- 
tion of naturalization, persons may expatriate themselves by voluntary renunciation or 
abandonment of nationality and allegiance. 

The Immigration and Nationality Act reenacted most of the grounds for expatria- 
tion in the Nationality Act of 1940. The sections of the Nationality Act of 1940 with 
respect to expatriation of naturalized nationals by residence abroad for three or five 
year periods were retained in the new law but the provision with regard to loss of 
nationality of a naturalized national by residence for two years in the foreign state of 
birth or nationality and acquiring its nationality, was not reenacted. The exceptions to 
the provisions on residence abroad have been considerably expanded in the new Act, as 
compared with the Nationality Act of 1940. 

As shown below, expatriations, numbering 8,350 in the fiscal year 1953, almost 
tripled since last year and nearly equaled the high of 8,575 expatriations in 1949. Resi- 
dence of a naturalized citizen in a foreign state was the chief ground of expatriation. 
Only 167 of the 8,350 expatriations reported in the past year were under the provisions 
of the Immigration and Nationality Act. 

The various ways of losing nationality, which are stipulated in Sections 349 and 
352 of the Immigration and Nationality Act and in prior Acts, are shown in the following 
table: 

Persons expatriated, by grounds for expatriation 

Years ended June 30. 1952 and 1953 

Grounds for expatriation 

Total 

Residence of a naturalized national in a foreign state 

Voting in a foreign political election or plebiscite 

Naturalization in a foreign state 

Entering or serving in the armed forces of a foreign state 

Renunciation of nationality abroad _„ 

Taking an oath of allegiance in a foreign state 

Accepting or performing duties under a foreign state 

Departing from or remaining away from the U.S. to avoid training and 

service in land or naval forces 

Other grounds 



Number 


of persons 


1953 


1952 


8,350 


3,265 


2,657 


711 


2,651 


1,186 


1,677 


622 


700 


370 


398 


136 


152 


123 


67 


56 


45 


59 


3 


2 



- 67- 

Citizenship acquired by resumption or repatriation .— Statutory authority exists 
for the re-acquisition of citizenship by persons who lost United States citizenship under 
certain conditious. 

The number of repatriations of former citizens is shown in the table below: 

Y ears ended June 30 , 
1953 1952 1951 

Total number „ „.._ „ 2,299 1,406 1,242 

Persons who lost citizenship by serving in the armed forces of 
allies of the United Sta.tes, and who were repatriated under 

Sec. 323, Nationality Act of 1940 _ 270 147 256 

Native-born women who lost citizenship through marriage to 
aliens and who were repatriated under the Act of June 25, 

1936, as amended _ 486 778 839 

Native-born women who lost citizenship through marriage to 
aliens and whose marriages terminated: 
Repatriated under Sec. 317(b) of the Nationality Act of 1940.. 172 160 145 

Repatriated under Sec. 324(c) of the Immigration and 

Nationality Act _ _„ 34 - - 

Persons repatriated under private laws - 5 2 

Persons who lost citizenship through voting in a political 

election or plebiscite in Italy and repatriated under P.L. 114 

of Aug. 16, 1951 __ „ _.._ 1,337 316 



Section 324(c) of the Immigration and Nationality Act has replaced Section 
317(b) of the Nationality Act of 1940 regarding native-born women who lost citizenship 
through marriage to aliens and whose marriages have terminated. Persons who lost citi- 
zenship by serving in the armed forces of allied countries may no longer be repatriated 
but must be naturalized in the United States in accordance with the provisions of Sec- 
tion 327 of the Immigration and Nationality Act. 

The number of repatriations increased by nearly 900 in the past year. The chief 
increase was in the persons who had lost citizenship through voting in a political elec- 
tion or plebiscite in Italy and who were repatriated under the provisions of Public Law 
114 of August 16, 1951. As of June 30, 1953, 1,635 persons had been repatriated under 
the provisions of this law, which expires August 16, 1953. 

Derivative citizenship .— The factors which stimulated naturalization also have 
aroused interest in proof of derivative citizenship. 

The following table shows a steady rise in the number of applicants for deriva- 
tive citizenship certificates during the last few years; 

Year ended June 30 , 

1953 
1952 
1951 
1950 



Applications 


Applications 


received 


completed 


27,473 


24,882 


23,976 


18,632 


20,695 


15,785 


19,078 


16,502 



-68- 

During the fiscal year ended June 30, 1953, certificates were issued to 5,771 
persons by reason of birth abroad to citizen parents. 

Citizenship Services 

The Iminigration and Nationality Act continued to charge this agency with the 
responsibility of serving educational programs for the foreign born through the printing 
and distribution of citizenship textbooks. Candidates for naturalization enrolled in, or 
studying under the supervision of, public schools of the United States are issued copies 
of the books free of charge. Similar provisions have appeared in each law on this sub- 
ject since the Act of May 9, 1918. 

Additionally, ^he law authorizes the Service to send the names of candidates for 
naturalization to the public schools; to prepare and distribute an immigration and natura- 
lization bulletin; and to secure the aid of and cooperate with official state and national 
organizations, including those concerned with vocational education. 

The new Act carried forward the educational requirements of the Internal Security 
Act of 1950. Before they may be naturalized, petitioners must be able to speak, read, and 
write in the English language and have a knowledge and understanding of the fundamen- 
tals of the history and the principles and form of government of the United States. Per- 
sons who on December 24, 1952, were over 50 years of age, and had been living in the 
United States for 20 years or longer, are excused from the requirements for reading, 
writing, and speaking English. 

During the past fiscal year, the Service revised and reprinted 12 of the 41 parts 
of the Federal Textbook series. The set of enlarged charts was re-designed and pub- 
lished on light-weight paper to facilitate handling and ease storage problems. 

Statistics on the program follow: 

Citizenship textbooks for naturalization applicants distributed to the public schools 
Years ended June 30, 1947 - 1953 

1947 _ 190,354 1951^/ 166,833 

1948 149,600 1952 1/ 158,385 

1949 _„„ 145,528 1953 1/ 149,094 

1950 _ 190P38 

Names of newly-arrived immigrants 

Transmitted to the public schools and Home Study Centers by the 

Field Offices .._ __ __ 155,668 

1/ In addition, 75,689 books in 1951, 51,249 in 1952, and 40,159 in 1953, were order- 
ed, but were not distributed due to stock shortages. 



- 69- 

Noncitizens referred, by Field Offices 

To public-school citizenship classes 118,791 

To Home Study Centers _ 43,373 

Public-school classes and enrollments 

Public-school (and Home Study Course) classes in operation 

during fiscal year 1953^/ „ 3,454 

Candidates for naturalization enrolled in all classes and 

courses during the last fiscal year^/ 112,832 

2/ This information is taken from reports made by public schools at the time 
textbooks are requisitioned and may be regarded as reasonably complete. Of 
this total, 15,880 persons were enrolled in 37 Home Study Courses conducted 
by State colleges and universities in 37 States. 

Names of newly-arrived immigrants. — From July 1, 1952, through June 30, 1953 
155,668 visa-name slips were prepared by the Field Offices of the Service and sent to 
public-school officials to inform them of new immigrants arriving in their communities. 
Carrying certain identifying information, they were used under public-school supervi- 
sion to inform potential naturalization candidates of citizenship education classes. One 
State Department of Education reports that its Division of Adult Education has urged its 
schools to include in their programs aliens living in nearby towns, providing them with 
an opportunity to become good citizens in their communities. This State also reports an 
incfeasing interest in adult education at the county level as well as the community. 

In 1951 the total number of citizenship classes reported in progress was 1,060; 
in 1952, 3,001; and in 1953, 3,454. The visa-name program was partly responsible for 
this increase. Interest in naturalization, brought about by Alien Address TJeport publicity, 
was also a contributing factor. 

Home-study Program. — Thirty-seven Home Study Centers in as many States were 
active during the past year in processing Home-study courses. An enrollment in these 
courses of 15,880 potential citizens was reported. This program, sponsored by State 
colleges and universities through their extension services, brings to outlying districts 
of the United States the benefits of organized instruction. One such program reports 
enrollees from 57 different countries, ranging in age from 20 to 80 years, having educa- 
tional backgrounds from no formal schooling to six years of college, and engaging in 
70 different occupations. Several enrollees had been in the United States only one or 
two months before registering in the course. 

Public-school Certificates of Proficiency .— The Service and the courts continued 
to accept public-school certificates showing the satisfactory completion by candidates 
for naturalization of courses of study upon the basic principles of the Constitution and 
Government and the History of the United States. These certificates are given weight as 
evidence of the petitioner's preparation to meet the educational requirements of the 
naturalization laws. The District Court in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, has been added to 
the list of courts reported last year as accepting such certificates. 

Citizenship activities in the field. — Some illustrations of promoting good citizen- 
ship follow: 

(1) The Buffalo District publishes a "Citizenship Education News and Notts' 
monthly. This newsletter, with a circulation of 400, keeps the Americanization teachers 
in that District advised on such subjects as: Dates of final naturalization hearings; news 
about naturalization ceremonies; reports on visits to citizenship classes by Service 
officers; citizenship education activities in various localities; changes in naturalization 



- 70- 

regulations; jurisdiction of Service sub-offices in naturalization matters; and general 
announcements regarding Service publications and other matters. 

(2) Through its Buffalo office, the Service participated in the International 'Reci- 
procal Community Visits Program inaugurated by adult education authorities in New York 
State and Toronto, Canada, several months ago. Two community visits between foreign- 
born adults in the United States and similar groups in Canada have taken place. This 
program is directed by a self-established committee to advise and guide inter-community 
visits. It recognizes the importance of providing an opportunity for foreign-born adults of 
one nation to see for themselves how the people in another section of this continent 
live, act, feel, and think. These informal face-to-face contacts provide an opportunity 
for adult students to see for them.selves how two nations live side by side in an amicable 
relationship. 

(3) Service officials again cooperated with one community in its "Seventy-second 
New Citizens Dinner'~an affair held in May of each year and sponsored by the local 
chamber of commerce, with cooperation of Federal, State, county and city governments, 
the American Legion, women's groups, and the local newspapers. The dinner was attend- 
ed by over 400 persons, most of whom had been naturalized during the previous 12 months. 
Such affairs promote a better understanding between "old' and "new* citizens and a 
greater appreciation of the contributions each can make to the Nation. 

(4) Service officers visit public-school citizenship classes to determine whether 
standards of instruction meet with the approval of the Service and the courts in connec- 
tion with the school certificate program. They find that public-school teachers exhibit 
both imagination and tact in arranging social functions and field trips to augment class- 
room study. They employ such visual aids as charts and moving pictures, and provide 
"go and see' trips to local post offices, libraries, and public service companies. His- 
toric shrines are visited by these groups, and guest speakers address them on varied 
subjects including local government, voting procedure, the free enterprise system in 
America, and the threat of foreign ideologies. 

(5) Social service agencies have been especially active in cooperating with this 
Service and the public schools in a "Visitation Program* among the foreign born. In 
some localities such agencies have furnished classroom facilities where English, his- 
tory, and government are taught by qualified teachers, under the direct supervision of the 
local public schools. Other activities of these agencies give the newcomer an oppor- 
tunity to participate in community events and become familiar with American ways and 
traditions. 

C ourt induction ceremonies . —In 1942 a nation-wide movement was initiated to 
make the naturalization ceremony a more meaningful and inspirational occasion. To help 
accomplish this purpose the Service issued "Gateway to Citizenship,* a manual pre- 
pared in cooperation with the committees on American citizenship of the American Bar 
Association and the Federal Bar Association. This manual was distributed again this 
past year to naturalization judges and to civic, educational, and patriotic groups inter- 
ested in furthering the cause of good citizenship. Over 40,000 copies of the Service 
memento booklet, "Welcome to U.S.A. Citizenship," were distributed to new citizens at 
the time of their naturalization. 

Reports from Field Offices reflect new levels of impressiveness and significance 
in the naturalization ceremonies. For example, one such ceremony was recorded ver- 
batim in the March 18, 1953, issue of the Congressional Record— put there by a U.S. 
Congressman who felt that statements on "Why 1 Sought American Citizenship" made by 
three of the petitioners were so outstanding as to deserve the attention of all America. 
Valley Forge provided an historic setting and for another fine ceremony, in which repre- 
sentatives of this Service participated. At AUentown, Pennsylvania, the thirty-year 



-71- 

practice of honoring new citizens by holding naturalization ceremonies in an open air 
theater was continued. 

S eventh National Conference o n Citizenship. — For the first time in the history of 
our country, a naturalization class was addressed by the President of the United States. 
The occasion was the Seventh National Conference on Citizenship, held September 
17-19, 1952. This Conference, held in Washington, D. C, and sponsored by the Depart- 
ment of Justice and the National Education Association, had as part of its opening pro- 
gram a naturalization ceremony at which 53 petitioners were naturalized. More than 
1,000 delegates to the Conference witnessed the ceremony which featured the President's 
address. 

The 1952 Conference program was built around the newly established "Citizen- 
ship Day* ~ a Day henceforth to be observed annually in commemoration of the forma- 
tion and signing of the Constitution of the United States on September 17, 1787. Not only 
is this Day an occasion to honor those v;ho, by coming of age or by naturalization, have 
attained the full status of citizenship — the right to full participation in the civic and 
political life of their community, State, and Nation; but it also affords an opportunity 
for all citizens to rededicate themselves to the ideals of the democratic way of life. 

'Citizenship Day' was observed by the District of Columbia in the afternoon of 
September 17, at a ceremony on the Washington Monument Grounds. Delegates of the 
Seventh National Conference, with many townspeople, witnessed the fitting-tribute paid 
to our first President and to other signers of the Constitution in an impressive wreath- 
laying ceremony. Representatives of the Governors of the 13 original States placed 
wreaths at the foot of the Washington Monument. 

The objectives of the National Conference on Citizenship — in which this Service 
has actively participated during all annual meetings are: "To re-examine the functions 
and duties of American citizenship in today's world; to assist in the development of 
more dynamic procedures for making citizenship more effective; and to indicate the ways 
and means by which various organizations may contribute concretely to the development 
of a more active, alert, enlightened, conscientious, and progressive citizenry in our 
country. " 

The Service again provided an exhibit which not only displayed the various parts 
of the Federal Textbook and graphically outlined the work accomplished during the pre- 
vious year, but centered around a moving picture entitled 'Twentieth Century Pilgrim,' 
shown on a continuous 'projection machine installed as a part of the display itself. 

Twentieth Century Pil,,rim'' .-On April 1, 1953, an award of the "George Wash- 
ington Honor Medal' was made to the Service by the Freedoms Foundation, Inc., for the 
production of the 16 mm, sound, color motion picture, "Twentieth Century Pilgrim." This 
is the second such award to be made to the Service for having «... contributed to a 
better understanding of the American way of life.' The first honor was received in 1951 
for the publication of the pamphlet, "Welcome to U.S.A. Citizenship." 

Ten copies of this film have been made available during the fiscal year to edu- 
cational, patriotic, and civic groups on a loan basis. There has been a constant demand, 
making it necessary to book the film as far as eight months in advance of any viewing 
date. Most bookings have been made through the Central Office, although some Field 
Offices have held copies on a permanent assignment basis. 

T ravelling exhibit. — In line with a suggestion made at the 1952 District Direc- 
tors' Conference, the Service made available for use in the Chicago District the exhibit 

used at the Seventh National Conference on Citizenship. Tie occasion was a yearly 
meeting of several hundred educators working in the midwestern section of the United 
States. Many favorable comments have emphasized the value of this visual approach to 
presentation of Service activities. 





CHAPTER 8 


"■'■'■'''"■■■■■Ao^:i ::■::: 


■ymm^: ^m m m^mmmmm 

mimmim:: .. mmmm::m<<m::.:. 



All of the administrative activities conducted for the benefit of the program 
divisions of the Service were affected by the many changes brought about by the new 
Act. Personnel classifications were surveyed in the light of such changes; the central 
index requirement necessitated a reorganization of the files function; the alien address 
report coverage was expanded; fiscal and budget procedures were reviewed and rea- 
ligned to fit new legal requirements; knowledge of procedures to be followed in imple- 
menting the Act was furthered by conferences, discussion groups, and training courses; 
new forms were devised; and methods of obtaining improved efficiency were instituted. 

Personnel 

On June 3i), 1953, the Immigration and Naturalization Service consisted of 7,170 
employees. There were 818 in the Central Office and 6,352 in the field. The latter group 
included 119 employees stationed in Alaska, Guam, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin 
Islands of the United States, and 66 located in Canada, Cuba, and Mexico. 

Classification .— During the year, 3,500 positions were reviewed. Seven hundred 
twenty-five position descriptions were written or reviewed and allocated; 225 of these 
involving Central Office positions. The success of the classification program in the 
Central Office was confirmed by the generally complimentary report made by the Civil 
Service Commission based on its post-audit conducted during the latter part of the fiscal 
year. In the Field Service, the important positions of Adjudicator and Hearing Officer 
were surveyed in the light of changes required by the new Act, and a new position of 
Special Inquiry Officer was established to include work in connection with hearings in 
exclusion and deportation proceedings. During the year, the Civil Service Commission 
issued position classification standards covering approximately 1,100 Immigrant In- 
spector positions. Although final action in classifying the positions under the standards 
was temporarily deferred because of the financial situation, completion of this project 
is expected to be attained during the first part of fiscal year 1954. 



-74- 

R ecruitment and placement .— In the two important field positions of Immigrant 
Inspector and Patrol Inspector, the Service was able to maintain an average force on 
duty of 971 Immigrant Inspectors and 1,034 Patrol Inspectors out of an authorized force 
of 1,016 and 1,073, respectively. It is vital and difficult to maintain these forces at 
full strength because standards for employment are high and the time required for pre- 
appointment investigations makes recruitment difficult. Also, turnover is relatively high 
because, in addition to separations for the usual reasons, many reassignments to other 
officer positions are made by selection from the ranks of Immigrant Inspectors and 
Patrol Inspectors. 

The Board of U.S. Civil Service Examiners for the Immigration and Naturaliza- 
tion Service received and processed applications for examinations for the positions of 
Patrol Inspector (Trainee) and Immigrant Inspector as follows: 

Applications received 14,832 

Applications on hand at end of 

preceding fiscal year 972 

Applications rated 12,124 

Placements 113 

Qualifications standards and examining and selection procedures were drawn up 
during the year for approximately one hundred newly established positions of Special 
Inquiry Officer and approval obtained from the Civil Service Commission. The examining 
program was in process at the end of the fiscal year. Standards were initiated for posi- 
tions above the entrance grade for the field positions of Immigrant Inspector, Patrol 
Inspector, Security Officer, Adjudicator, and Deportation and Parole Officer, and plans 
drawn up for a formal reassignment and promotion program in the Central Office covering 
the higher clerical grades. 

Employee development .— The realignment of responsibilities and authorities 
among operating personnel, made necessary by new Service regulations and operations 
instructions issued under the Immigration and Nationality Act, also required drastic 
revision of the Service's training program. A reorganized training program keyed to these 
changes was approved by the Commissioner. 

By the close of the fiscal year one phase of the program for retraining of Journey- 
men Investigators had been approved and resident classes will begin during August or 
September. A training program for new employees in Trainee Investigator positions is 
being formulated and will be in operation by the time the new appointees enter on duty. 

As part of the program for selection of Border Patrol Officers to fill vacancies 
in the position of Senior Patrol Inspectors, three tests were devised and 232 sets of 
examination papers were furnished to Field Offices. 

Personnel records .— Approximately 9,000 personnel actions of all types were 
processed during the year 6,700 concerned the Field Service, and 2,300 the Central 
Office. 

During the year the Service history records and position control records were 
combined in a new and simpler file. At the same time, the detailed service history cards 
previously maintained for field employees were eliminated and a simple index system 
established in its place. By the end of the fiscal year all employee personnel files were 
converted to the official personnel folder prescribed by Civil Service regulations. 



-75- 

Employee relations and services .—Over SCO employee and applicant investiga- 
tion reports were received and analyzed; 100 disciplinary cases were adjudicated and 
necessary action taken; 60 applications for retirement under Section 1 (d) of the Retire- 
ment Act were acted upon ( Public Law 879) ; approximately 5,000 performance ratings 
were processed; and over 1,700 employee service interviews were conducted. 

Four superior accomplishment awards were made for outstanding work; five cer- 
tificates of merit and eight cash awards were given to employees of the Service for sug- 
gestions that improved the efficiency of the Service. 

Active employee participation continued during the year in the following areas: 
Local Chapter of A. F. G. E., Group Hospitalization, Group Insurance, and Federal 
Credit Union, 

Budget 

A total appropriation of $40,399,000 was made to the Service for the fiscal year 
1953, a decrease of $1,001,000 below the amount available for the preceding fiscal year. 
The 1953 annual appropriation of $40,399,000 was included in the Departments of State, 
Justice, Commerce, and the Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1953 ( Public Law 495 . 82nd 
Congress, approved July 10, 1952). 

In a 1952 supplemental appropriation enacted June 5, 1952, Congress had indica- 
ted approval of a program for strengthening the Border Patrol, establishing detention 
camps, and air removal of illegal aliens into Mexico. Commitments as to personnel, 
equipment, and construction were made during June 1952 and it was expected that funds 
would be approved to carry the newly inaugurated program forward during the fiscal 
year 1953. However, all money for continuance of this program ($4,001,000) was stricken 
from the 1953 appropriation prior to passage on July 10, 1953. The Service sought im- 
mediate reconsideration in the form of a supplemental estimate of $2,000,000 to carry 
forward the most essential phases of the new program. That, too, was rejected by the 
Congress. This left the Service in the awkward position of having personnel and equip- 
ment on hand and on order in excess of the level which could be carried throughout the 
fiscal year. It was therefore necessary, pursuant to arrangements with the Department 
and the Bureau of the Budget, to reschedule the Mexican Border Program and scale it 
down within the limitation of available funds. An item of $794,200 previously earmarked 
for air removal of aliens was reallocated to finance operation of the two new detention 
camps, train transportation of aliens to Mexico, temporary overemployment, and other 
expenses resulting from the expansion started in June but necessarily cut back during 
the fiscal year 1953. 

The current fiscal year marked the beginning of the decentralized system of ac- 
counting and fund administration. This made it necessary to subdivide the total appro- 
priation into 34 separate allotments, two for each District and the Central Office. 

Administration of the 1953 budget was complicated by the Immigration and Nation- 
ality Act ( Public Law 414 ), which became effective December 24, 1952, although no 
funds in contemplation of the legislation were included in the annual appropriation to 
the Service. Policy prohibited increasing the obligations through additions to the force 
for the purpose of beginning operations under the new law. However, budgetary adjust- 
ments had to be made to meet the additional obligation placed upon the Government on 
account of relief granted transportation lines for expenses of detention, hospitalization, 
and deportation of aliens. 

The Immigration and Nationality Act prescribed fees for certain items for which 



- 76- 

no charge had been made previously and increased many of the fees specified in prior 
law. The net result with respect to Government revenue is an estimated increase of 
approximately $2,500,000 per annum. 

Aside from the fees prescribed specifically in the Immigration and Nationality 
Act, the Attorney General, through authority of the Independent Offices Appropriation 
Act, 1952, (65 Stat. 290), prescribed by regulation, effective December 24, 1952, fees 
and charges with respect to some 18 items. The additional revenue from this source is 
estimated at $1,300,000, per annum. 

During the latter half of the fiscal year there was a heavy workload in connec- 
tion with the budget for the fiscal year 1954. A succession of proposals and policy 
changes required five separate revisions of schedules and supporting tables before 
final hearings were held before the Senate Appropriations Committee on March 21, 1953. 
As the year ended, the appropriation bill for the succeeding fiscal year was still pend- 
ing in Congress. 

Finance 

During the fiscal year 1953, the Finance Branch of the Administrative Division 
successfully accomplished the decentralization of accounting to the District Office 
level. The new system was designed for and has been successful in achieving a simpli- 
fied accounting procedure, effective control over the use of appropriated funds, and more 
accurate and more current financial statements. This step has resulted in a substantial 
savings in man-hours in the Central Office without additional costs being added to the 
Field Offices. The placement of responsibility for the control of obligations and funds 
in the personnel responsible for execution of the programs of the Service has resulted in 
the location of controls at the same level of responsibility as the primary preparation of 
budget support and justification. 

Financial Statement 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 
Fiscal Year 1953 
Net cost of the operation of the Immigration and Naturalization Service and the 
administration of the Immigration and Naturalization Laws. 

Appropriation for salaries and expenses $40,399,000.00 

Reduction of appropriation by Departmental 

transfer 820,000.00 

Net appropriation total $39,579,000.00 

Reimbursements to the appropriation 1,598,000.00 

Total funds available $41,177,000.00 

Amount of available funds not obligated 289.275.69 

Gross cost of operation $40,887,724.31 

Less collections other than reimbursements: 

Copying fees 118,401.10 

Fees and permits 3,106,745.36 

Head tax 1,763,209.50 

Sale of Government property 23,537.85 

Miscellaneous collections 810,193.09 

Forfeitures and bonds forfeited 617,683.28 

Administrative fines 163.944.69 

Total collections 6.603.714.87 

Net cost of operations $34,284,009.44 



- 77- 

S tatistics 

The magnitude of the diversified activities of the Service is reflected in statis- 
tical form throughout this Report and the appended tables, as well as in studies, publica- 
tions, statistical analyses, and field and other reports. 

Studies and publications. — Continuous review of new legislation has continued, 
as in past years, to provide up-to-date statistical information on all phases of immigra- 
tion and nationality. During the past year an intensive study was made of the provisions 
of the Immigration and Nationality Act, resulting in a thorough reappraisal of the basic 
sources of statistical material and revisions of reporting procedures. 

Studies already initiated or presently considered include the effect of the quota 
provisions of the Immigration and Nationality Act upon future immigration, including 
colonial immigration, the extent of occupational selectivity under this law and the Dis- 
placed Persons Act, and the effect of removal of racial bars upon immigration and natu- 
ralization. Statistical summaries, including an analysis of the Service operations during 
the first four months of the Immigration and Nationality Act, have been published period- 
ically in the I&N Reporter. 

In the field of international statistics, this Service has continued to work with the 
United Nations Committee on International Statistics to perfect definitions and procedures, 
and has contributed toward the Comments on Draft Recommendations on International 
Statistics. Representatives of other countries, including Canada, Peru and Thailand, 
have studied the United States methods of collecting migration statistics during the 
past year. 

Statistical analyses. — As in years past, immigration and nationality statistics 
were collected, presented, analyzed, and interpreted during the fiscal year covering 
data on migration, including agricultural laborers, naturalization, derivative citizenship, 
expatriation, repatriation, exclusion of inadmissable aliens, the apprehension and de- 
portation of aliens illegally in the United States, and data on the adjudicative functions 
delegated to the Service by law and regulations. Statistical tables on the operation of the 
Displaced Persons Act have been completed. Public and Congressional interest in pro- 
posed or new legislation dealing with immigration and naturalization has resulted in many 
requests for additional detailed statistics and analyses. 

Field reports. — Periodic operations and other reports from the field, including 
analytical text, summary tables, and charts, have proven of increasing value in the study 
and determination of administrative procedures and policies of the Service. These reports 
have been completely revised in line with the provisions of the Immigration and Nation- 
ality Act. 

Alien Address Report .— Every alien required to be registered under the 1940 Act, 
who is in the United States on January 1, must report his address during the month of 
January. This includes aliens temporarily in the United States. The address reports form 
the basis for a series of tables on the residence and nationality of aliens in the United 
States. 

Other statistics. — From the passenger manifests, the Service published periodic 
tables and analytical text on air and sea passenger travel that form the basic data for 
much of the travel analyses made by other agencies. Special reports also were prepared 
for budget purposes. Congressional committees, and other Government agencies. 



Instructions 

Regulations and operations instructions . —With the new Immigration and Nation- 
ality Act signed, the Service immediately went about implementing the Act. The Chief 
Operations Advisor coordinated this activity, and Operations Advisors and representa- 
tives of the operating divisions and the Instruction Branch worked on the project, which 
resulted in the publication in the Federal Register of a complete revision of the chapters 
on immigration and nationality. An entire new body of operations instructions was also 
prepared for the internal guidance of the Service personnel to better effect the uniform 
and efficient administration. The Operations Advisors carried primary responsibility for 
drafting new forms and revising existing forms to comply with that legislation. About 
200 forms were originated or completely revised to conform with the Immigration and 
Nationality Act. Administrative and judicial opinions were examined and indexed. In 
addition, the Instructions Branch processed interim administrative decisions for the pur- 
pose of editing Volume IV of the Administrative Decisions under the Immigration and 
Nationality Laws of the United States, and assisted in the preparation of the index to 
the forthcoming volume of the Immigration and Nationality Laws. 

Administrative Manual .— Many sections of the Administrative Manual were revised 
to instruct the field and Central Office personnel of changes in internal procedures, 
calculated to yield more efficient administration. Among the major releases were in- 
structions for the revised 'Operations Report," and the new fiscal reporting procedures. 

I nformation 

The I & N Reporter is a quarterly bulletin. It presents articles of current and 
lasting interest concerning the Service program, research into the meaning of the statis- 
tics of the Service, the operation of inspection as carried on at various ports, and other 
articles of wide variety, most of them written by members of the Service staff. 

Three short television films and a radio recording were made to inform aliens of 
the Annual Address Report in January. 

In the wider field of public relations, the mass media of news releases, radio, 
television, motion pictures, and magazine articles were used throughout the year to keep 
the public informed of the Service work and the reasons for the administrative actions 
taken. Several articles were edited and drafted for inclusion in year-books by private 
publishers. 

In the field, many discussions and conferences were held with transportation 
companies, social agencies, and individuals to inform them of the effect of the new legis- 
lation that became effective December 24, 1952, 

While much of the correspondence is now relayed to the field for reply when it 
relates to individuals in the Districts, the Central Office still must answer many in- 
quiries. 

Alien Address Program 

History and purposes. — Until 1940 the traditional policy of the United States, as 
expressed through the action of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, was to ex- 
amine a prospective immigrant at the time of his entrance into the United States in order 
to determine his fitness and acceptability into the country. Once it was determined that 
the immigrant was acceptable to our society, he was permitted to enter the country and 



-79- 

lose himself, so to speak, among the multitudes of our population. No planned, sys- 
tematic follow-up was made to determine the whereabouts or the activities of an immi- 
grant unless he proceeded with the acquisition of United States citizenship. However, 
the events in Europe in 1940 called for a modification of our traditional policy. 

In 1940 Congress passed the Alien Registration Act. Under the provisions of 
this Act, the United States Department of Justice was directed to register the alien 
population of the country. Therefore, for the first time in the history of our Nation, a 
complete inventory was to be made of noncitizens. The 1940 Alien Registration Act also 
required that resident aliens should report their changes of address within 10 days after 
such change of address. 

Again in 1950 it was deemed necessary by Congress to know the whereabouts of 
alien residents of the United States. Under the Internal Security Act of 1950, each alien 
resident in the United States on January 1st of each year was required to report his 
address during the first ten days of January. 

Under the new Immigration and Nationality Act, this requirement was revised to 
provide that each alien required to be registered under the 1940 Act, who is in the 
United States on January 1, must report his address during the month of January. Thus 
the requirement was changed to include aliens in the United States temporarily, and the 
period for reporting addresses was extended from ten days to thirty days. 

The distribution and receipt of the Address Report is a joint project of the Immi- 
gration and Naturalization Service and the Post Office Department. Cards may be obtain- 
ed and returned through any of the 41,000 Post Offices in the United States, or the 450 
Immigration Offices of the Service. The cards when processed and completed serve a 
number of purposes: 

(1) A census of aliens in the United States by geographic location and 

nationality. 

(2) A current address file for all aliens in the United States. 

(3) A security file whereby names and addresses of aliens may be furnish- 

ed to security agencies on request. 

(4) A non-compliance list of aliens who failed to keep this provision of 

law and thereby became subject to fine, imprisonment, or deporta- 
tion. 

S tatistics of Alien Reports .--In 1940 five million aliens registered in the United 
States. During 1953 2,536,550 reported their addresses. 

The principal States of residence and nationality groups of resident aliens sub- 
mitting complete reports are shown below. 



80 



Resident aliens who reported under the Alien Address Program, by 
selected nationalities and States of residence: During 1953 J/ 

Nationality States '^^^ ^°'^ California Texas Illinois 

All nationalities 2,348,881 532,929 348,749 154,969 139,001 

German 150,956 42,264 11,502 2,798 13,068 

British 203,830 59,297 25,086 3,155 7,333 

Italian 202,312 77,649 16,952 784 6,645 

Polish 233,230 68,477 4,666 1,015 28,592 

U.S.S.R. 108,077 37,407 8,347 351 7,421 

Canadian 232.320 32,237 35,512 1,975 5,360 

Mexican 301,605 1,621 109,557 134,994 7,323 

Other 916,551 213,977 137,127 9,897 63,259 



All nationalities 

German 

British _... 

Italian 

Polish 22,589 

U.S.S.R. 

Canadian 34,441 

Mexican 

Other 



Michigan 


Massa- 
chusetts 


New Jersey 


Penn- 
sylvania 


Other 
States 


138,214 


128,765 


128,668 


109,409 


668,177 


7,286 


2,575 


12.807 


8,116 


50,540 


16.043 


10,418 


13,334' 


9,941 


59,223 


6,493 


14,543 


22,246 


14.625 


42.375 


22,589 


15,165 


21,391 


18,197 


53,138 


6,505 


5,828 


8,717 


8,867 


24,634 


34,441 


29,537 


4,284 


3,398 


85,576 


3,485 


183 


206 


592 


43,644 


41,372 


50,516 


45,683 


45,673 


309^047 



1/ Figures do not include 77.419 alien address reports that were incomplete and 
110,250 aliens in the United States in temporary status. 

Management Improvement 

During the fiscal year the Service has continued its program of management im- 
provement by installing improved methods of work, a more smoothly functioning organ- 
ization, greater utilization of space, and a continuing review of forms, procedures, and 
methods with a view to administering the immigration and nationality laws in the most 
efficient and economical manner possible. 



Typical examples are described briefly below: 



(1) Manpower utilization. — The Service carries on a continuing program of study- 
ing manpower utilization and recommending measures to effect manpower conservation. 
In a typical survey, teams composed of Operations Advisors and representatives of the 
Inspections and Examinations Division completed detailed and comprehensive analyses 
of manpower requirements at ports of entry. Recommendations based on this survey re- 
sulted in the elimination of 14 Immigrant Inspector positions, one Special Inquiry Officer 
position, and seven clerical positions throughout the Service, as well as numerous re- 
assignments and transfers designed to increase operating efficiency. Immigrant Inspec- 
tors at airports and railroad stations were assigned suitable work to fill in their pre- 
viously nonproductive stand-by time. In offices in which Special Inquiry Officers or 
Naturalization Examiners were found to be scheduling too few cases per day, improved 
schedules were established. 



-81- 

(2) Work simplification .—Some significant contributions to work simplification in 
the field were: 

(a) The elimination, in many cases, of lengthy formal memorandums or orders in 
connection with applications, petitions, or actions before the Service. 

(b) The granting or denying an extension of stay immediately when an applicant 
appears personally at a Service office. Benefits are twofold: quicker service to the pub- 
lic, and avoidance of the administrative costs of refunds in denial cases. 

(c) The transmitting of reentry permits to applicants by mail instead of by person- 
al delivery in Service offices. 

In the Central Office some improved work procedures were: 

(a) Budgetary planning and management through inauguration of a formalized 
method under which individual allottees evaluate tneir requirements in detail early in 
the calendar year and submit their recommendations early in March covering the ensuing 
two fiscal years. This provides "grass roots" recommendations for planning allotment of 
the appropriation for the fiscal year next ensuing, and for the Commissioner's recom- 
mendation to the Attorney General, usually in April or May, with respect to items to be 
considered under Department-wide budgetary ceilings for the next budget year. 

(b) A completely new decentralized accounting system, developed in accordance 
with the principles and objectives of the Joint Accounting Improvement Program, was 
installed in the 16 District Offices and the Central Office as of July 1, 1952. 

(c) Near the close of the fiscal year authority for the purchase of most goods and 
services was delegated to the Service by the Department. The Service, by the end of the 
fiscal year was engaged in the decentralization of procurement authority to the Dis- 
tricts, and it was expected that all District Offices would have nearly complete respon- 
sibility for the procurement of goods and services by the second quarter of the fiscal 
year 1954. 

(3) F orms control. — The Forms Control Program which is now in its third year of 
operation represents an effective management tool to eliminate duplication of effort and 
to keep manpower requirements to a minimum where necessary records must be created 
and processed. The Forms Control Program provides for improvement in forms design, 
consolidation or elimination of overlapping forms, standardization of format and wording, 
and clearance with the Bureau of the Budget when required. The total of 60 new forms 
have been created. Existing methods for controlling, identifying and reviewing forms 
have been revised to the extent that a basic historical file for each form has been 
created. 

(4) Reports Committee. —A permanent "Committee on Reports' continuously 
reviews and analyzes reports submitted to the Central Office by the field covering many 
phases of the work of the agency. This committee, with a designated Reports Control 
Officer, has responsibility for approving new reports desired by the staff, and conduct- 
ing a continuing review of existing forms in an effort to reduce to a minimum the num- 
ber of reports needed by management. The committee has to a great extent fulfilled the 
purpose for which it was established. During the fiscal year most of the information 
which would ordinarily have been requested from the field has been made available from 
Central Office sources. The Central Office Committee on Reports has met at scheduled 
intervals and has extended and developed its original concept that the work measure- 
ment system, comprising a variety of detailed operational reports, was the basic 



-82- 

management tool of the Service. This system was extensively revised by the committee 
to incorporate operations that were new or revised under the Immigration and Nationality 
Act, and to relate man-hours and operations to fiscal activity reporting. 

(5) Service suggestions system.~As a result of Service-wide distribution of pos- 
ters and pronotional releases, the Service Suggestion Committee has acted upon 148 
suggestions, of which 120 were rejected and 28 adopted. Cash awards totaling $330, 
representing a potential savings of $25,000 to the Service in annual operation, were pre- 
sented to 13 employees. In addition. Certificates of Merit were presented to eight em- 
ployees and Letters of Commendation were given to seven. Several of the suggestions 
had the effect of bettering the relations of the Service with the public. 

F iles and Records 

Central Index .— Section 290 of the Immigration and Nationality Act requires that 
there be established 'for the use of security and enforcement agencies of the Government 
of the United States, a central index* containing the names of all aliens admitted to the 
United States. The Index now contains records of all aliens admitted to the United 
States for permanent residence, in addition to approximately 5,525,000 arrival and depar- 
ture records relating to aliens who have been admitted to the United States temporarily 
as nonimmigrants. In the near future, records relating to approximately 400,000 alien 
crewmen will be included. 

Reorganization and procedure changes .— Possibly the most important working 
tools of the Service are the files. To facilitate the handling of records efficiently, re- 
organization both of personnel and of the physical layout was accomplished in the 
Central Office. The realignment of functions and authority has resulted in improved 
grouping of activities, and effectuated greater efficiency and economy in the files ad- 
ministration of the Service. In conjunction with the reorganization, physical moves neces- 
sary to condense the working and files areas into compact and easily supervised loca- 
tions have been completed. For example, the alien, immigration, and naturalization 
files were moved from dispersed locations and consolidated into adjacent areas. Related 
card indexes were moved from several locations and combined into one index in a single 
area. 

Since 1950 the Service has been engaged in sending files relating to resident 
aliens to the Districts in which the aliens reside. As of June 30, 1953, a total of approx- 
imately 2,241,000 alien files had been decentralized. Approximately 200,000 files had 
been closed and returned to the Central Office, leaving approximately 2,041,000 active 
alien files in the Districts. 

Records retirement. — During the year, 16,118 cubic feet of record material and 
6,436 cubic feet of non-record material were disposed of under the Records Retirement 
Program, in accordance with existing authorities. 

Approximately 3,000 square feet of closed files were reviewed, boxed, and trans- 
ferred to the Records Centers under these programs. In addition, approximately 800 
square feet of records involving visas, visa petitions, derivative applications, and stu- 
dent visas were transferred to the Federal Records Centers. 

Space, Services and Supplies 

Buildings and construction .— The new detention facilities completed at McAUen, 
Texas, and Chula Vista, California, are described in the report on Detentions. Work on 



- 83- 

additional buildings is going forward at both these locations. Other buildings for which 
contracts were let during the year included a Customs and Border Inspection Station at 
Falcon Dam, Texas, and the relocation of the buildings owned by this Service at Zapata, 
Texas. These latter buildings will be moved to the new Zapata townsite to make way 
for the Falcon Dam. 

Repairs and improvements were made in Service buildings at such widely scatter- 
ed places as Ellis Island, New York; Guam; and El Centro, California. 

Radio and communications .— The program to convert the AM radio system to FM 
was continued. A number of installations were under way at the close of the fiscal year, 
and FM base stations or repeater installations were completed at New Orleans, Louisiana; 
San Benito, Rio Grande City, Laredo, and McAUen, Texas; and White Tanks Mountain 
and Juniper Flats, Arizona. A plan of operation was devised and equipment ordered for 
two unattended radio repeater stations to be set up in remote and inaccessible mountain 
locations in the Big Bend area of Texas, where commercial electric power is not avail- 
able. Electric power will be provided by wind-driven generators supplemented by a gaso- 
line engine-driven generator. 

Tabulating .— The Tabulating Section has five major fields of activity. They are: 
the machine processing of the Annual Alien Address Reports; the maintenance of warrant 
docket control and files; the preparation and maintenance of punched card indexes for 
the decentralization of files to the field; the tabulation of statistical tables on immigra- 
tion, naturalization, and related subjects; and the maintenance of lookout notices through 
the use of punched card equipment. 

For the Alien Address Report Program, a master card file of approximately 2.7 
million cards for permanent resident aliens was established. This file was mechanically 
compared with the address reports received from aliens to establish compliance or non- 
compliance with legal requirements. Duplicate cards for the maintenance of a security 
file of the addresses of aliens in the United States and for the compilation of statistical 
tables were processed, and index cards for noncompliance cases were prepared and sent 
to Field Offices for investigation. 

The Warrant Docket Control was initiated on September 1, 1952. This system 
established a Central Office index and action record of all cases where a warrant of 
arrest is issued against an alien. Since the adoption of this program, the Central Office 
Warrant Docket Control Unit has received approximately 67,000 initial reports from the 
Field Offices. Various investigative and statistical reports are assembled from the 
warrant docket control records. 

In the program for the decentral ization of all active files to Field Offices, the 
tabulating equipment has been used to good advantage. For each alien file decentralized, 
a tabulating master card record is created, which becomes part of the master card file of 
decentralization cases. Supplementary cards (Flexoline Strips, Field Index, Central 
Office Index and Alien Identification Cards) are processed as part of the decentraliza- 
tion program. 

Additional types of information emanating from punched card records, during the 
fiscal year 1953, were lookout notices and statistical reports, including passenger 
travel control, which resulted in a sharp rise in tabulating work. 

Supplies. — Major equipment purchases included three airplanes, a patrol boat for 
the Baltimore District, and approximately 200 pieces of automotive equipment. One Piper 
Super Cub and two Cessna 170B airplanes were bought to replace planes at Laredo and 



84 - 



Marfa, Texas, and El Centre. California. A 40-foot patrol boat was delivered to the 
Miami District, having been ordered in June 1952. and an order was placed in June 1953 
for a 38-foot patrol boat in the Baltimore District. 



-85- 

APPENDIX 

Judicial opinions in litigation affecting the Service announced during the fiscal 
year. (Only opinions printed in the published reports are listed. The numerous unreported 
decisions are not listed here.) 

UNITED STATES COURTS OF APPEAL 

U nited States ex rel Kaloudis v. ShauRhnessy . 198 F. 2d. 568 (C.A. 2) 
R oberson v. Acheson , 198 F. 2d 985 (C.A., Dist. Col.) 
B arber v. Varleta, 199 F. 2d 419 (C.A. 9) 
Bridges v. United States , 199 F. 2d 811, 845 (C.A. 9) 
Lazarescu v. United States , 199 F. 2d 898 (C.A. 4) 
Paolo V. Garfinckel , 200 F. 2d 280 (C.A. 3) 
B elizaro v. Zimmerman , 200 F. 2d 282 (C.A. 3) 
United States ex rel Dolenz v. Shaughnessy , 200 F. 2d 288 (C.A. 2) 
Arakas v. Zimmerman , 200 F. 2d 322 (C.A. 3) 

U nited States ex rel McKenzie v. Savoretti , 200 F. 2d 546 (C.A. 5) 
* Mannerfrid v. United States . 200 F. 2d 730 (C.A. 2) 
United States v. Stewart . 201 F. 2d 135 (C.A. 5) 
B ridges v. United States , 201 F. 2d 254 (C.A. 9) 
Galvan v. Press , 201 F. 2d 302 (C.A. 9) 

United States ex rel Spinella v. Savoretti , 201 F. 2d 364 (C.A. 5) 
United States v. Kwai Tim Tom , 201 F. 2d 595 (C.A. 9) 
Pandolfo v. Acheson , 202 F. 2d 38 (C.A. 2) 
United States ex rel Yaris v. Esperdy . 202 F. 2d 109 (C.A. 2) 
United States ex rel Beck v. Neelly , 202 F. 2d 221 (C.A. 7) 
United States ex rel Ciannamea v. Neelly , 202 F. 2d 289 (C.A. 7) 
Ng Lin Chong v. McGrath , 202 F. 2d 316 (C.A., Dist. Col.) 
United States ex rel McLeod v. Garfinckel , 202 F. 2d 392 (C.A. 3) 
Acheson v. Maenza , 202 F. 2d 453 (C.A., Dist. Col.) 
United States ex rel lames v. Shaughnessy, 202 F. 2d 519 (C.A. 2) 
Tew Sing V. United States , 202 F. 2d 715 (C.A. 9) 
Caddeo v. McGranery , 202 F. 2d 807 (C.A., Dist. Col.) 
United States ex rel Figueiredo v. District Director , 202 F. 2d 958 (C.A. 2) 
Gonzales-Martinez v. Landon, 203 F. 2d 196 (C.A. 9) 
Vanish v. Barber , 203 F. 2d 673 (C.A. 9) 
Coons v. Boyd , 203 F. 2d 804 (C.A. 9) 

United States ex rel Carrollo v. Bode , 204 F. 2d 220 (C.A. 8) 
S tenerman v. McGranery , 204 F. 2d 336 (C.A. 9) 
Longobardi v. Dulles , 204 F. 2d 407 (C.A., Dist. Col.) 
Banks v. United States , 204 F. 2d 583 (C.A. 4) 
Arbolina v. Shaughnessy , 204 F. 2d 684 (C.A. 2) 

* Barsanti v. Acheson , 200 F. 2d 562 (C.A. 1) 

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURTS 

* *Navarro v. Landon , 106 F. Supp. 73 (S.D. Cal.) 
Petition of Dweck , 106 F. Supp. 169, (E.D. N.Y.) 
Paolo V. Garfinckel , 106 F. Supp. 279 (W.D. Pa.) 
Bauer v. Acheson , 106 F. Supp. 445 (Dist. Col.) 
I n re Harnett , 106 F. Supp. 467 (N.D. Tex.) 



-86- 

U NITED STATES DISTRICT COURTS (continued) 

United States ex rel Kaion di s v. Shaugh nessy, 106 F. Supp. 483 (S.D. N. Y.) 

United States v. Sweet , 106 F. Supp. 634 (E.D. Mich.) 

Latva V. Nicoils , 1D6 F. Supp, 658 (Mass.) 

Ryckman v. Acheson , 106 F. Supp. 739 (S.D. Tex.) 

Gualco V. Acheson , 106 F. Supp. 760 (N.D. Cal.) 

Naito V. Acheson, 106 F. Supp. 770 (S.D. Cal.) 

F uruno v. Acheson , 106 F. Supp. 775 (S.D. Cal.) 

In re Molo , 107 F. Supp. 137 (S.D. N.Y.) 

United States ex rel James v. Shau^hnessy , 107 F. Supp. 280 (S.D. N.Y.) 

United States ex rel Straubet v. Shaughnessy , 107 F. Supp. 399 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Alves V. ShauRhnessy , 107 F Supp. 443 (S.D. N.Y.) 

P etition of Plywacki , 107 F. Supp. 593 (Hawaii) 

Sang Ryup Par k v. Barber , 107 F. Supp. 603 (N.D. Cal.) 

Sang Ryup Park v. Barber , 107 F. Supp. 605 (N.D. Cal.) 

United States ex rel Chen Ping Zee v. Shaughnessy, 107 F. Supp. 607 (S.D. N.Y.) 

United States ex rel Dolenz v. Shaughnessy , 107 F. Supp. 611 (S.D. N.Y.) 
United States ex rel Watts v. Shaughnessy , 107 F. Supp. 613 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Petition of Anzalone , 107 F. Supp. 770 (N.J.) 
Carpenter v. United States , 108 F. Supp. 107 (Ct. CI.). 
Nieto V. McGrath , 108 F. Supp. 150 (S.D. Tex.) 
Martinez v. McGrath , 108 F. Supp. 155 (S.D. Tex.) 
Chavez v. McGranery , 108 F. Supp. 255 (S.D. Cal.) 
Gutmayer v. McGranery , 108 F. Supp. 290 (Dist. Col.) 
Yee Gwing Mee v. Acheson, 108 F. Supp. 502 (N.D. Cal.) 
U nited States v. Chomia k, 108 F. Supp. 527 (E.D. Mich.) 

United States v. Kawakita , 108 F. Supp. 627 (S.D. Cal.) 
U nited States v. Schneider , 108 F. Supp. 640 (S.D. N.Y.) 
Eng V. Acheson , 108 F. Supp. 682 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Barreiro v. McGrath, 108 F. Supp. 685 (N.D. Cal.) 

U nited States ex rel Miletic v. District Director , 108 F. Supp. 719 (S.D. N.Y.) 

United State s ex rel Yaris v. Esperdy, 108 F. Supp. 735 (S.D. N.Y.) 
*** United States ex rel Nukk v. District Director , 108 F. Supp. 916 (S.D. N.Y.) 

N avarro v. Landon , 108 F. Supp. 922 (S.D. Cal.) 

Lee Yow v. Acheson , 109 F. Supp. 98 (S.D. Tex.) 

i^ehmann v. Acheson , 109 F. Supp. 751 (E.D. Pa.) 

United States v. Charnowolo , 109 F. Supp. 810 (E.D. Mich.) 

M ar Gong v. McGranery , 109 F. Supp. 821 (S.D. Cal.) 

In re Yaris , 109 F. Supp. 921 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Hong et al v. Acheson , 110 F. Supp. 48 (Hawaii) 

Lv Shew V. Acheson , 110 F. Supp. 50 (N.D. Cal.) 

L ee Hong v. Acheson , 110 F. Supp. 60 (N.D. Cal.) 

Lee Mun Way v. Acheson , 110 F. Supp. 64 (S.D. Cal.) 

Talbot V. Acheson , 110 F. Supp. 182 (Dist. Col.) 

United States ex rel Athanasopoulos v. Reid , 110 F. Supp. 200 (Dist. Col.) 

Akiyo Oye v. Acheson , 110 F. Supp. 635 (N.D. Cal.) 

Lee Mon Hong v. McGranery , 110 F. Supp. 682 (N.D. Cal.) 

Augello v. Dulles , 110 F. Supp. 689 (E.D. N.Y.) 

Gaudio v. Dulles , 110 F. Supp. 706 (Dist. Col.) 

** United States v. Pecora , 105 F. Supp. 559 (W.D. Pa.) 

Mastrocolo v. Acheson , 105 F. Supp. 580 (S.D. N.Y.) J 

Monaco et al v. Acheson , 105 F. Supp. 739 (S.D. N.Y.) 1 

*** Vitale v. Hunter . 108 F. Supp. 826 (Kans.) 



- 87- 
UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURTS (continued) 

United States v. Lustig , 110 F. Supp. 806 (S.D. N.Y.) 

United States ex rel Ailcorn v. District Directo r, HI F. Supp. 6 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Yep Why Sun v. Dulles, 111 F. Supp. 30 (N.D. Tex.) 

Wong Gum v. McGranery , 111 F. Supp. 114 (N.D. Cal.) 

Savala-Cisneros v. Landon , 111 F. Supp. 129 (S.D. Cal.) 

Corona v. Landon , 111 F. Supp. 191 (S.D. Cal.) 

Torres v. McGranery , 111 F. Supp. 241 (S.D. Cal.) 

Okimura v. Acheson , 111 F. Supp. 303 (Hawaii) 

Murata v. Acheson , 111 F. Supp. 306 (Hawaii) 

Sakamoto v. Dulles , 111 F. Supp. 308 (Hawaii) 

Chun V. Brownell . Ill F. Supp. 454 (Dist. Col.) 

Petition of Miranda , 111 F. Supp. 481 (E.D. N.Y.) 

Kletter v. Dulles , 111 F. Supp. 593 (Dist. Col.) 

International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union v. Boyd, 111 F. Supp. 802 

(W.D. Wash.) 





TABLE lo IMMIGRATION TO THE UNITED 


STATES: 












1820 - 1953 








^rom 1820 to 186? figxires represent alien passengers arrived; 


1868 to 1891 


incliisive and 1895 to 1897 inclusive immigrant aliens arrived] 


1892 to 1894 


inclusive and from 1898 to the present 1 


time immigrant aliens admitted_^ 






Number 




Number 




Nimiber 




Number 


Year 


of 


Year 


of 


Year 


of 


Year 


of 




persons 




persons 




persons 




persons 


1820-1953 1/ 


39.967.153 


1851-1860 


2.598.m 
379,46^ 


1884.. 


518,592 


1918., 


110,618 






1851.. 


1885.. 


395,346 


1919., 


141,132 


1820,, 


8,385 


1852.. 


371,603 


1886.. 


334,203 


1920.. 


430,001 






1853.. 


368,645 


1887.. 


490,109 






1821-1830 


U3.439 


1854.0 


427,833 


1888,. 


546,889 


1921-1930 


4,107,209 


1821.. 


9,127 


1855., 


200,877 


1889,. 


444,427 


1921.. 


805,228 


1822.. 


6,911 


1856., 


200,436 


1890.. 


455,302 


1922., 


309,556 


1823., 


6,354 


1857.. 


251,306 






1923,, 


522,919 


1824.. 


7,912 


1858., 


123,126 


1891-1900 


3.687.564 


1924.. 


706,896 


1825.. 


10,199 


1859.. 


121,282 


1891.. 


560,319 


1925.. 


294,314 


1826,0 


10,837 


I860., 


153,640 


1892.. 


579,663 


1926,. 


304,488 


1827.. 


18,875 






1893.. 


439,730 


1927.. 


335,175 


1828,, 


27,382 


1861-1870 


2,?14.824 
91,918 


1894.. 


285,631 


1928., 


307,255 


1829., 


22,520 


1861.. 


1895,. 


258,536 


1929.. 


279,678 


1830.. 


23,322 


1862.0 


91,985 


1896.. 


343,267 


1930. . 


241,700 






1863.. 


176,282 


1897,. 


230,832 






1831-1840 


599.125 


1864,, 


193,U8 


1898,. 


229,299 


1931-1940 


528.431 


1831.0 


22,633 


1865,0 


248,120 


1899.. 


3n,715 


1931,. 


97,139 


1832.. 


60,482 


1866,, 


318,568 


1900., 


448,572 


1932., 


35,576 


1833.. 


58,640 


1867, . 


315,722 






1933., 


23,068 


1834.. 


65,365 


1868., 


138,840 


1901-1910 


8.795.386 


1934. o 


29,470 


1835.. 


45,374 


1869, , 


352,768 


1901.. 


487,918 


1935., 


34,956 


1836., 


76,242 


1870,, 


387,203 


1902.. 


648,743 


1936,, 


36,329 


1837., 


79,340 






1903c, 


857,046 


1937,. 


50,244 


1838,, 


38,914 


1871-1880 


2.812.191 


1904., 


812,870 


1938., 


67,895 


1839,, 


68,069 


1871., 


321,350 


1905., 


1,026,499 


1939., 


82,998 


1840,. 


84,066 


1872., 


404,806 


1906,, 


1,100,735 


1940., 


70,756 






1873.. 


459,803 


1907,, 


1,285,349 






18U-1850 


1.713.251 


1874.. 


313,339 


1908.. 


782,870 


19a-1950 


1.0??, 0?9 
51,776 


1841.. 


80,289 


1875., 


227,498 


1909., 


751,786 


19a., 


1842., 


104,565 


1876., 


169,986 


1910,, 


1,041,570 


1942.. 


28,781 


1843.. 


52,496 


1877.. 


ia,857 






1943.0 


23,725 


18A4.0 


78,615 


1878,0 


138,469 


1911-1920 


5.735.811 


1944.0 


28,551 


1845, , 


114,371 


1879,, 


177,826 


1911,, 


878,587 


1945.. 


38,119 


1846,0 


154,a6 


1880., 


457,257 


1912,. 


838,172 


1946., 


108,721 


1847,, 


234,968 






1913.. 


1,197,892 


1947., 


U7,292 


1848.0 


226,527 


1881-1890 


5.2Z^6.613 
669,431 


1914.. 


1,218,480 


1948.. 


170,570 


1849., 


297,024 


1881.. 


1915,, 


326,700 


1949,. 


188,317 


1850.. 


369,980 


1882. o 


788,992 


1916,, 


298,826 


1950.. 


249,187 






1883., 


603,322 


1917,, 


295,403 


1951.. 
1952,. 

1??2.. 


205,717 
265,520 

170,4?4 



Data are for fiscal years ended June 30, except 1820 to 1831 inclusive and 1844 to 184* 
inclusive fiscal years ended Sept, 30; 1833 to 1842 inclusive and 1851 to 1867 inclu- 
sive years ended Dec, 31; 1832 covers 15 months ended Dec, 31; 1843 nine months ende< 
Sept, 30; 1850 fifteen months ended Dec. 31, and 1868 six months ended June 30. 



United States Department of Justice 
Imnigration and Nattiralization Service 



TABLE 2« ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AND DEPARTED, 

BY MONTHS: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1952 AND 1953 

^ata exclude travelers between continental United States and its po-ses- 
ions, border crossers and agriciiltural laborers admitted from Mexlcoj/ 



Period 



Fiscal year 1953 

July-Dec, 1952. 
July 

August* a.*«.o« 

September* * • • e 
October. ..*•.. 
November o 

December*... o. 

Jan. -June, 1953. 

January « 

Febiruary 

March* o o .... o . 

April 

May*.*.*..,.., 
J\ine *. 

Fiscal year 1952 

July-Dec, 1951. 

July 

August 

September. .... 

October 

November 

December 

Jan.-Jime, 1952. 

January 

February 

March.. o 

April...*..*,, 
May,...,.,.... 
June,.., 



ALIENS ADMITTED 



Immi— 
grant 



170.434 



e?i2i? 



U,699 
12,858 
13,402 
16,178 
16,225 
15,957 

8i«n? 



12,699 
10,656 
13,428 
13,992 
14,251 
16,089 

265.520 



135.617 



17,943 
18,020 
19,001 
25,847 
28,347 
26,459 

129.903 



27,792 
19,509 
24,201 
21,142 
18,898 
18,361 



Nonimmi- 
grant 



^85.714 



656 .3A8 



248.064 337.383 



447269 
48,460 
54,218 
39,101 
31,017 
30,999 



237.650 
33,286 
28,750 
40,651 
43,542 
45,968 
45,453 

5 1 6^082 



Total 



58,968 
61,318 
67,620 
55,279 
47,242 
46,956 

318.765 



45,985 
39,406 
54,079 
57,534 
60,219 
61,542 



252.519 388.136 



47,575 
47,411 
55,135 
40,565 
35,882 
25,951 

263.563 



58,367 
36,742 
38,130 
39,712 
41,636 
48,976 



ALIENS DEPARTED 



Emi- Nonemi- 
grant grant 



Total 



24.256 



12.778 

3^ 

2,706 

2,110 

1,579 

1,383 

1,631 

11.478 



1,477 
1,476 
2,236 
2,3U 
1,945 
2,030 



21.880 



65,518 
65,431 
74,136 
66,412 
64,229 
52,410 



1i 



,159 
56,251 
62,331 
60,854 
60,534 
67,337 



12.397 



2,658 
2,474 
2,197 
1,834 
1,606 
1,628 



520.246 



288.881 



55,538 
58,323 
51,645 
44,963 
38,316 
40,096 

2?1 J 6 ? 



32,028 
25,847 
36,706 
45,981 
45,449 
45,354 



5¥n502 



?01.65? 



58,907 
61,029 
53,755 
46,542 
39,699 
41,727 

242,8^? 



243.182 



9.483 
1,661 
1,417 
1,439 
1,518 
1,704 
1,744 



42,946 
50,785 
45,352 
36,424 
33,1a 
34,534 

244.435 



33,938 
32,093 
46,209 
49,727 
41,602 
40,866 



33,505 
27,323 
38,942 
48,295 
47,394 
47,384 

509.497 



EXCESS 
1/ 



111.646 



35i724 

5i 

289 

13,865 

8,737 

7,543 

5,229 

75.922 



U. S. CniZENS 



Ar- 
rived 



930.874 



506.818 
89,436 
117,447 
107,989 
73,999 
61,121 
56,826 

424.056 



De- 
parted 



925.861 



429. 9U 



255.57? 



45,604 
53,259 
47,549 
38,258 
34,747 
36,162 

253.918 



35,599 
33,510 
47,648 
51,245 
43,306 
42,610 



12,480 
12,083 
15,137 
9,239 
12,825 
14,158 

272.105 



132.557 



19,914 
12,172 
26,587 
28,154 
29,482 
16,248 



2^njl 



50,560 
22,7a 
14,683 
9,609 
17,228 
24,727 



60,587 
63,603 
75,624 
69,798 
70,313 
84,131 

807.225 



111,320 
94,885 
64,014 
55,934 
50,954 
52,837 

495.917 



428.580 



63,149 
71,742 
76,540 
86,349 
85,807 
112,330 

814.289 



74,203 
95,978 
86,849 
65,535 
52,105 
53,910 

?78,645 



51,489 
62,323 
65,747 
62,431 
59,462 

77,193 



357.014 



86,433 
75,748 
51,918 
46,595 
44,3J29 
52,191 

457.275 



54,619 
71,441 
68,726 
72,338 
80,150 
110,001 



1/ Excess of admissions over departures* 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Natiiralization Service 



TABLE 3. ALIENS ADMITTED, BY CLASSES UNDER THE IMMIGRATION LAWS: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE JO, 1949 TO 1953 

^ata exclude travelers between continental United States and its 
possessions, border crossers, ci*ewmen, and agricultural laborers 
admitted from MexLcOj^/ 



Class 



ALIENS ADMITTED. 



IMMIGRANTS I/..0... 
Quota Immigrants, 



Nonquota Immigrants 

Wives of U. S. citizens 

Husbands of U. S. citizens 

Children of U. S. citizens 

Natives of Western Hemisphere countries. 

Their spouses 

Their children 

Persons who had been U, S, citizens 2/,, 
Ministers of religious denominations,... 

Their spouses 

Their children 

Employees of U, S, Government abroad, 

their spouses and children 2/ 

Professors of colleges, universities Ij/, 

Their wives 

Their children 

Other nonquota immigrants ............... 



1949 



635.589 



188.317 



U3,046 



NONIMMIGRANTS l/. 



Foreign government officials 

Temporary visitors for business 

Temporary visitors for pleasure 

Transit aliens 

Treaty traders 

Students .....o.......... 

Representatives to international organizations.. 
Temporary workers and industrial trainees 2/»<>»« 
Representatives of foreign information media 2/o 

Exchange aliens 2/* »»*« <>•<> ° 

Returning resident aliens l/. 

Other nonimmigrants .«.. 



;.271 

27"7967 

3,239 

4,648 

35,969 

282 

143 
110 
623 
244 
366 



424 
212 
233 
811 

447.272 



1950 



676.024 



249.187 



197,460 



13,722 

73,338 

225,745 

81,615 

632 

10,481 

4,723 



36,984 
32 



12,291 

1,459 

2,525 

32,790 

278 

170 

86 

454 

U7 

232 



291 

124 
188 
692 

426.837 



1951 



670.823 



295.717 



156,547 



13,975 

67,984 

219,810 

68,640 

766 

9,744 

5,010 



40,903 
5 



4?.i70 

8,685 
822 

1,955 
34,704 
337 
233 
39 
376 
129 
228 



214 

113 

130 

1,205 

465.106 



1952 



781.602 



265. ?20 



194,247 
71.273 



20,881 

83,995 

230,210 

72,027 

850 

7,355 

5,526 



44,212 
50 



16,058 

793 

2,464 

47,744 

455 

209 

32 

338 

96 

146 



158 

68 

71 

2,641 

516.082 



1953 



656.148 



170.424 



84,175 



22,267 

86,745 

269,606 

77,899 

791 

8,613 

5,137 



44,980 
44 



86.259 

15,916 

3,359 

3,268 

58,985 

1,127 

987 

104 

244 

69 

74 

2 

169 

71 

81 

1,803 

485.714 i/ 



24,502 

63,496 

243,219 

67,684 

878 

13,533 

6,112 

3,021 

174 

12,584 

50,397 

114 



IT 



i/ 
1/ 



An immigrant is defined in statistics of the Service as an alien admitted for permanent 
residence, or as an addition to the population, A nonimmigrant is defined as an alien 
admitted for temporary residence. Returning resident aliens who have once been counted 
as immigrants are included with nonimmigrants, although the immigration laws define such 
aliens as immigrants. 
Under the Immigration Act of 1924, this class covered only women who had been U, S. citizens. 
New classes under the provisions of the Immigration and Nationality Act, 
Professors admitted as nonquota immigrants under the Immigration Act of 1924, Professors 

are not included in the nonquota classes as defined in the Immigration and Nationality Act. 
In 1953 the nonimmigrant figures exclude, with certain exceptions, Canadian citizens and 
British subjects resident in Canada who were admitted for six months or less. In prior 
years the noninmigrant figures excluded entries over the Canadian border for 29 days or less. 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 4. IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 TO 1953 1/ 

^Tcm 1820 to 1867 figxires represent alien passengers arrived; 1868 to 1891 inclusive and 
1895 to 1897 inclusive Ijmnigrant aliens arrived; 1892 to 1894 inclusive and from 1898 to 
present time immigrant aliens admitted. Data for years prior to 1906 relate to coxintry 
whence alien came; thereafter to country of last permanent residence. Because of changes 
in boimdaries and changes in lists of countries, data for certain countries are not com- 
parable throughout^/ 



Countries 



1820 



1821-1830 



1831-1840 



1841-1850 



1851-1860 



1861-1870 



All countries. ««.o« ««• 

Europe , 

Austria-Hungary 2/ 

Belgium 

Denmark 

France 

Germany 2/ 

TEngland 

Great (Scotland 

BritainfWales 

(Not spec, ^...,,, 

Gi>eece • ,.,, 

Ireland, 

Italy o., 

Netherlands,, 

Norway) , / 

Sweden) =' ° 

Poland ^ 

Portugal ,..*o 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Exirope 

U.S.S.R, 6/ 

Other Evirope , 

Asia. .,.,. , 

China .•..., 

India , 

Japan 2/ e 

Turkey in Asia 8/ 

Other Asia, ,. 

America, ,..,,. o,* 

Canada and Newfovindland 2/» 

Mexico 10/ , . o o . o . . . . 

West Indies, o 

Central America,,,,,,,,,,,, 
South America ,,, 

Africa , ,, 

Australia & New Zealand, 

Not specified 

See footnotes at end of table. 



8«385 



7.691 



1 

20 

371 

968 

1,782 

268 

360 

3,61A 
30 
49 



5 

35 

139 

31 

1 
14 



1 
1 



387 



209 

1 

164 

2 

U 



1 
301 



1A3.439 



599.125 1.713.251 



2.598.2U 



98.817 



495.688 



1.597.501 



2.452.660 



2.065.270 



27 

169 

8,497 

6,761 

14,055 

2,912 

170 

7,942 

20 

50,724 

409 

1,078 

91 

16 
145 

2,477 

3,226 

20 

75 

3 



22 

1,063 

45,575 

152,454 

7,611 

2,667 

185 

65,347 

49 

207,381 

2,253 

1,412 

1,201 

369 

829 

2,125 

4,821 

7 

277 

40 



5,074 

539 

77,262 

434,626 

32,092 

3,712 

1,261 

229,979 

16 

780,719 

1,870 

8,251 

13,903 

105 

550 

2,209 

4,644 

59 

551 

79 



4,738 

3,749 

76,358 

951,667 

247,125 

38,331 

6,319 

132,199 

31 

914,119 

9,231 

10,789 

20,931 

1,164 

1,055 

9,298 

25,011 

83 

457 

5 



10 



M. 



82 



6 
39 



35 
36 



11 



^«4 ?^ 



41,397 
43 



15 



11|?64 



2,277 

4,817 

3,834 

105 

531 



Jl 



^24 



13,624 
6,599 
12,301 

44 
856 



62.46? 



a,723 
3,271 

13,528 

368 

3,579 



JZu220 



59,309 
3,078 

10,660 

449 

1,224 



16 
33,032 



54 
69,911 



55 
53,144 



210 
29,169 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Servici 



TABLE Up immigration BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 TO 1953 1/ (Continued) 



Countries 



All coTintries 

Europe .••• • ••••• 

Austria) 2/ 

Hungary) -' 

Belgium ...o..* 

Bulgaria 11/ • 

Czechoslovakia 12/ 

Denmark 

Finland 12/ 

France. . •o*o.oo 

Germany 2/ • 

XEnglande ...o.**** 

Great (Scotland 

Britalji(waies 

(Not speco 2/ • 

Greece •• 

Ireland. .....o ..caoeooe 

Italy 

Netherlands. • ..•.••••• 

Norway l^, ............••• 

Sweden i^/. 

Poland ^ 

Portugal. o 

Rumania 13/ o 

Spain 

Switzerland ...........o. 

Turkey in Evirope .o* 

U.S.S.R. 6/ 

Yugoslavia ll/o 

Other Europe. » 

Asia 

China 

India 

Japan 2/ 

T\irkey in Asia 8/ 

Other Asia 

America, 

Ceinada and Newfoundland 2/..... 

Mexico 10/ 

West In^es..... 

Central America, 

South America. •..., •• 

Africa ...ooe 

Australia and New Zealand........ 

Pacific Islands 

Not specified 1^. 

See footnotes at end of table. 



1871-1880 



2.812.191 



2.272.262 



72,969 
7,221 

31,771 

72,206 

718,182 

437,706 

87,564 

6,631 

16,142 

210 

436,871 

55,759 

16,541 

95,323 

115,922 

12,970 

14,082 

11 

5,266 

28,293 

337 

39,284 

1,001 



1881-1890 



5.246.613 



4.737.046 



123.823 



123,201 

163 

149 

67 

243 



404.044 



383,640 

5,162 

13,957 

157 

1,128 



358 
9,886 
1,028 

790 



353,719 
20,177 

88,132 

50,464 

1,452,970 

644,680 

149,869 

12,640 

168 

2,308 

655,482 

307,309 

53,701 

176,586 

391,776 

51,806 

16,978 

6,348 

4,419 

81,988 

1,562 

213,282 

682 



1891-1900 



3.687.564 



3.558.978 



68.380 



6i77n 

269 
2,270 
2,220 
1,910 



^6,?67 



393,304 

1,913 

29,042 

404 

2,304 



857 
7,017 
5,557 

789 



592,707 

18,167 
160 

50,231 

30,770 

505,152 

216,726 

44,188 

10,557 

67 

15,979 

388,416 

651,893 

26,758 

95,015 

226,266 

96,720 

27,508 

12,750 

8,731 

31,179 

3,626 

505,290 

122 



1901-1910 



8.795.386 



8.136.016 



71-236 



14,799 

68 

25,942 

26,799 
3,628 



38.972 



3,311 

971 

33,066 

549 

1,075 



350 

2,740 

1,225 

U,063 



2,145,266 

a,635 
39,280 

65,285 

73,379 
3a,498 
388,017 
120,469 

17,464 

167,519 

339,065 

2,045,877 

48,262 

190,505 
249,534 

69,149 
53,008 

27,935 

34,922 

79,976 

1,597,306 

665 



1911-1920 



?i7?h^ii 



243.567 



20,605 

4,713 

129,797 

77,393 

11,059 



361.888 



179,226 
49,642 

107,548 

8,192 

17,280 



7,368 
11,975 

1,049 
33,523 



4t?76,564 

(455,649 

(442,693 

33,746 

22,533 

3,426 

41,983 

756 

61,897 

143,945 

249,944 

78,357 

13,107 

184,201 

146,181 

1,109,524 

43,718 

66,395 

95,074 

4,813 

89,732 

13,311 

68,611 

23,091 

54,677 

921,201 

1,888 

8,111 



192.559 

21,278 

2,082 

83,837 

79,389 

5,973 



1.143.671 



742,185 

219,004 

123,424 

17,159 

41,899 



8,443 

12,348 

1,079 

1,147 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Servic 



TABLE 4. IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DSCADES: 
1820 TO 1953 1/ (Continued) 



Countries 



1921-1930 



1931-1940 



19a-1950 



1951 



1952 



1953 



Total 134 yrs, 
1820-1953 



All countries, 



Exirope. 

Albania 12/ 

Austria ^. 

Hungary 2/. ..........o 

Belgium 

Bulgaria n/ 

Czechoslovakia 12/..,, 

Denmark. 

Estonia 12/ 

Finland 12/,,,c. 

France .e 

Germany 2/ , 

TEngland 

Great (Scotland, . , , , 

BritainjWales 

(Not spec. 2/» 

Greece 

Ireland. « ,, 

Italy..,.. 

Latvia 12/ 

Lithuania 12/ 

Lixxsmbourg 12/ 

Netherlands 

Norway j^ o... 

Poland y 

Portugal. ,,. 

Rumania 1^/ 

Spain .,.,, 

Sweden Z^/ ....ooo* 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe 

U,S,S,R, 6/ 

Yugoslavia ll/o« 

Other Eiirope,,,,,,,,,, 

Asia ly 

China 

India 

Japan ]/ 

Turkey in Asia 8/ 

Other Asiao , 



^«107«209 



528.431 



1-035.039 



205.717 



265.520 



170.434 



39.967.153 



2.^77.853 

32j868 

30,680 

15,846 

2,945 

102,194 

32,430 

1,576 

16,691 

49,610 

412,202 

157,420 

159,781 

13,012 

51,084 

220,591 

455,315 

3,399 

6,015 

727 

26,948 

68,531 

227,734 

29,994 

67,646 

28,958 

97,249 

29,676 

U,659 

61,742 

49,064 

9,603 



3^*8.289 



2,040 

3,563 

7,861 

4,817 

938 

U,393 

2,559 

506 

2,U6 

12,623 

114,058 

21,756 

6,887 

735 

9,119 

13,167 

68,028 

1,192 

2,201 

565 

7,150 

4,740 

17,026 

3,329 

3,871 

3,258 

3,960 

5,512 

737 

1,356 

5,835 

2,361 



621.704 



?7.^00 



29,907 
1,886 
33,462 
19,165 
12,980 



15.344 



4,928 
496 

1,948 
328 

7,644 



85 

24,860 

3,469 

12,189 

375 

8,347 

5,393 

212 

2,503 

38,809 

226,578 

112,252 

16,131 

3,209 

8,973 

26,967 

57,661 

361 

683 

820 

14,860 

10,100 

7,571 

7,423 

1,076 

2,898 

10,665 

10,547 

580 

548 

1,576 

3,983 



1^9.545 



7 

9,761 

62 

1,802 

1 

88 

1,076 

532 

4,573 

87,755 

12,393 

2,309 

196 

4,459 

3,144 

8,958 

5 

8 

51 
3,062 

2,289 

98 

1,078 

104 

442 
2,022 
1,485 

118 
10 

454 
1,203 



193.626 



1 

23,088) 

63) 

2,946 

9 

51 

1,152 

7 

500 

4,878 

104,236 

18,539 

3,390 

248 

948 

6,996 

3,526 

n,342 

10 

20 

90 

3,060 

2,354 

235 

953 

34 

481 

1,778 

1,502 

94 

11 

327 

757 



82.352 



31.780 



16,709 

1,761 

1,555 

218 

11,537 



3.921 



335 

109 

271 

3 

3,203 



? »328 



263 
123 

3,814 
12 

5,116 



1 

2,132) 

96) 

2,162 

1 

77 

993 

38 

473 

4,137 

27,329 

12,921 

3,a6 

302 

1,426 

1,296 

4,304 

8,432 

59 

14 

77 

2,973 

2,234 

136 

1,077 

23 

814 

2,171 

1,796 

62 

25 
580 
775 



33.671.862 



8«231 



528 
104 

2,579 
13 

5,007 



3,797 
4,207,306 

177,304 

66,242 

128,576 

343,639 

2,339 

23,601 

647,395 

6,467,849 

2,797,296 

759,020 

90,349 

796,115 

452,332 

4,630,049 

4,805,616 

5,026 

8,941 

2,330 

277,714 

821,832 

422,795 
266,575 
158,182 
174,758 

1,234,084 
311,010 
156,727 

3,343,9a 
59,724 
29,398 



971.799 
400,008 

11,970 
285,810 
205,609 

68,402 



See footnotes at end of table. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 4. IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 TO 1953 1/ (Continued) 



Countries 



America • 

Canada and 

Newfotindland 2/« 
Mexico 10/..O..... 

West Indies 

Central America,, , 
South America, o,,. 
Other America 16/ , 



Africa 

Australia and New Zealand 
Pacific Islands 15/o , , , . 
Not specified litTT*..... 



1921-1930 



1.516.716 



924,515 

459,287 

74,899 

15,769 

42,215 

31 



1931-1940 



160.037 



6,286 

8,299 

427 

228 



108,527 

22,319 

15,502 

5,861 

7,803 

25 



1941-1950 



35 4. 80 4 



1,750 

2,231 

780 



171,718 
60,589 
49,725 
21,665 
21,831 
29,276 



1951 



47,631 



7,367 

13,805 

5,437 

142 



25,880 
6,153 
5,902 
2,011 
3,596 
4,089 



1952 



61.049 



845 

490 

3,265 

20 



33,354 
9,079 
6,672 
2,637 
4,591 
4,716 



1953 



77.650 



931 

545 

33 

8 



36,283 
17,183 
8,628 
3,016 
5,511 
7,029 



Total 134 yrs, 
1820-1953 



^.942.600 



989 

742 

40 

430 



3,272,963 
871,259 
517,898 

78,483 
156,831 

45,166 



36,192 

70,114 

19,920 

254,666 



1/ Data are for fiscal years ended June 30, except 1820 to 1831 inclusive and 1844 to 1849 

inclusive fiscal years ended Sept. 30; 1833 to 1842 inclusive and 1851 to 1867 inclusive 
years ended Dec. 31; 1832 covers 15 months ended Dec. 31; 1843 nine months ended Sept. 
30; 1850 fifteen months ended Dec, 31 and 1868 six months ended June 30, 

2/ Data for Austria-Hungary were not reported until I86I, Austria and Hungary have been 
recorded separately since 1905. In the years 1938 to 1945 inclusive Austria was in- 
cluded with Germany, 

3/ United Kingdom not specified. In the years 1901 to 1951, included in other Europe, 

4/ From 1820 to 1868 the figures for Norway and Sweden were combined. 

5/ Poland was recorded as a separate country from 1820 to 1898 and since 1920. _ Between 
1899 and 1919 Poland was included with Austria-Hvmgary, Germany, and Russia, 

6/ Since 1931 the Russian Empire has been broken down into European Russia and Siberia or 
Asiatic Russia. 

7/ No record of immigration from Japan until 1861. 

8/ No record of inmigration from Turkey in Asia until 1869. 

9/ Prior to 1920 Canada and Newfoundland were recorded as British North America. From 
1820 to 1898 the figures include all British North American possessions, 

10/ No record of immigration from Mexico from 1886 to 1893. 

U/ Bulgaria, Serbia, and Montenegro were first reported in 1899. Bulgaria has been 

reported separately since 1920 and in 1920 also a separate enumeration was made for 
the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes. Since 1922 the Serb, Croat, and Slovene 
Kingdom has been recorded as Yugoslavia, 

12/ Countries added to the list since the beginning of World War I are theretofore included 

with the countries to which they belonged. Figures are available since 1920 for Czech- 
oslovakia and Finland; since 1924 for Albania, Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania; and 
since 1925 for Luxembourg, 

13/ No record of immigration from Rumania until 1880, 

^ The figure 33,523 in column headed 1901-1910, includes 32,897 persons returning in 1906 
to their homes in the United States, 

15/ In 1952 and 1953 Asia includes the Philippines, From 1934 to 1951 the Philippines were in- 
eluded in the Pacific Islands, Prior to 1934 the Philippines were recorded in separate 
tables as insular travel, 

16/ Included with comtries not specified prior to 1925, 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 5, I1'3'3(21AOT ALIENS ADIITTED AID EMIGPAOT ALIENS DEPARTED, 
BY PORT OR DISTRICT: YEARS EIDED JUlffi 30, 19A9 to 1953 



Port or district 



All ports or districts. 

Atlantic 

New York, N. Y 

Boston, >oass. ....... . 

Philadelphia, Ps 

Baltimore, Kd 

Portland, Vb 

Hewport News, Va. . . . , 

Norfolk, Va 

Charleston, S. C... 

Savannah, Ga... 

Jacksonville, Fla.. . » 

Key Vfest, Fla 

Miarci, Fla 

West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Puerto Rico, 

Virgin Islands 

Other Atlantic 

Gulf of Kexico 

Tanpa, Fla 

Pensacola , Fla. 

Mobile, Ala 

New Orleans, La o 

Sen Antonio, Tex 

Other Gulf 

Pacific 

San Francisco, Calif , 

Portland, Ore 

Serttle , Wash o 

Los Angeles, Calif,, . 
HonoltJlu, T. H 

Alaska 

Canadian Border , 

Mexican Border..,,,.... . 



IKMIGRANT 



19A9 



188.317 



136.656 



113,050 

U,318 

263 

559 

16 

103 

187 

29 

20 

3A 

109 

5,711 

13 

503 

A3 

1,698 

A. 706 



1950 



2A9.187 



199.630 



166,849 

24., 222 

370 

260 

23 

22 

183 

16 

20 

9 

110 

5,451 

6 

1,245 

34 

810 



381 

8 

303 

3,805 

190 

19 

6.531 



4,167 

21 

552 

249 

1,542 

15 
30,238 
10,171 



1951 



205.717 



1^4,581 



1952 



265.520 



1953 



170.434 



197. r72 



12.193 



446 
2 

224. 
11,320 

193 
8 

?.1?8 



U2,903 
3,787 
134 
US 
34 
19 
42 
47 
15 
7 
106 
5,199 
34 
1,563 
42 
501 



2,174 

10 

77 

280 

617 

9 

25,564 

8,633 



183,222 
2,968 
337 
620 
25 
103 
178 
33 
6 
21 
134 
6,209 
42 
1,838 
98 
1,338 



102.347 



EMIGRANT 



1949 



24.586 



10.035 13.085 



351 

2 

101 

9,177 

366 

38 

5.27A 



3,841 

15 

382 

294 

742 

54 

28,039 

7,734 



335 

2 

16)6 

12,301 

268 

13 

9^068 



3,178 

26 

3,497 

868 

1,499 

79 
35,451 
10,665 



87,483 

2,248 

322 

451 

33 

45 

109 

76 

U 

45 

213 

7,537 

43 

2,651 

94 

983 

2.328 



18.934 



405 

4 

171 

1,459 

268 

21 

if78 



2,366 
16 
2,520 
1,197 
1,479 

68 
38,613 
19,500 



1950 



27.59.' 



14,367 

193 

40 

118 

8 

14 

5 

1 

1 

41 

3,590 

31 

5U 

2 

9 



19.725 



664 
64 



21 

531 

46 

2 

1.791 



625 

1 

41 

71 

1,053 

2 
1,734 
1,461 



1951 



26.174 



18.001 



15,522 

223 

49 

53 

17 
7 
5 
1 
1 

69 
3,076 

80 
583 

U 

25 

973 



1952 



;i.880 



1953 



24. 256 



14.998 



U6 

2 

23 

622 

176 

4 

2.492 



U,295 

218 

22 

39 

2 

U 

10 

10 

5 

4 

50 

2,666 

33 

571 

38 

24 

998 



1,021 

1 

51 

136 

1,283 



2,778 
1,630 



180 

2 

17 

636 

155 

8 

1.770 



18.?50 



12,099 

121 
28 
34 

1 

7 

6 

1 

1 

1 

21 

1,960 

31 

357 

26 

304 

667 



907 

5 

89 

139 

630 



3,^03 
1,512 



73 

5 
439 
14s 

2 

1.806 



219 
22 
60 

10 
17 



50 

2,111 

90 

476 

35 

607 



771 

6 

119 

215 

695 



3,281 
1,128 



61 

17 
423 

98 
8 

2.044 



778 
22 

;i8 
359 
667 

4 
2,168 

1,083 



United States Department of Jurtice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 6. D-CilGMOT ALIENS ADMITTED, BY CLASSES UfDER THE H-MGRATION L'WS 
AND COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH; YEAR. ENDID JUNE 30. 195? 



Goimtry or 

region of 

birth 



All countries. 



Europe 

Austria. 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary. 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania. 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerlahd 

(England., ... 

United (No. Ireland, 

Kingdom(Scotland . . . , 

(Wales 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 



Asia 

China 

Iirlia 

Israel 

Japan 

Palestine.. . 
Philippines. 
Other Asia.. 



North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

VJest Indies 

Central America 

Other North America... 

South America 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand. 
Other countries 



Number 

ad- 
mitted 



Y70.L-iL 



96.177 



8/.. 175 



1,862 

1,335 

67 

2,173 

1,278 

158 

6Li 

3,216 

27,305 

1,603 

803 

-i,655 

9,701 

294 

3U 

3,0/12 

2,A27 

il,395 

1,U1 

468 

991 

1,750 

1,794 

12,872 

1,240 

4,540 

578 

1,780 

1,272 

2,509 

8.029 



77.089 




86.259 



1,536 
155 
421 

2,393 
118 

1,160 

2,246 

60,107 



1,093 

1,252 

57 

1,831 

1,114 

125 

529 

2,773 

20,400 

220 

634 

4,601 

4,981 

258 

267 

2,844 

2,266 

3,907 

387 

335 

593 

1,700 

1,739 

12,419 

1,209 

4,432 

566 

1,610 

817 

2,130 

2.8A3 



19.088 



to 

c 

•H 
+J 
H 
O 



11.216 



28,967 

18,454 

8,875 

3,056 

755 

4,691 

922 

450 

S8 



596 
96 

320 

93 

71 

67 

1,600 

3.156 



2,885 

75 

194 

150 

702 

213 

22 



769 

83 

10 

342 

164 

33 

85 

443 

6,905 

1,383 

169 

54 

4,720 

36 

47 

198 

161 

488 

754 

133 

398 

50 

55 

453 

31 

108 

12 

170 

455 

379 



11.37? 



n 
C 

<M 1> 

O N 

■H 

0) +> 

XS -H 

J3 • 

(0 CO 

3 • 

X 3 



?.??? 



?.186 



940 

59 

101 

2,300 

47 

1,093 

646 

56.951 



582 

42 

5 

272 

108 

19 

40 

335 

6,042 

496 

84 

23 

1,654 

28 

24 

99 

77 

230 

144 

64 

Li2 

19 

32 

144 

11 

19 

2 

83 

269 

286 

3.?02 



2.741 



n 
, C 

O M 

•H 
C -tJ 
(U -H 

u o 

•a 

•H CO 

x: • 
o 3 



3.268 



2.301 



28,965 

18,454 

5,990 

2,981 

561 

4,541 

220 

237 

26 



722 

33 

48 

2,042 

12 

675 

370 

307 



40 

10 

3 

20 

33 

4 

21 

22 

100 

356 

29 

8 

1,325 

4 

8 

29 

49 

118 

209 

31 

126 

7 

8 

28 

2 

3 

1 

31 

52 

64 

270 



u 

u 

v 
<M x; 
cam 

n <a 

<D E u 

> 0) +J 

•H a: g 

c« • O 



Cms: 



?8.98? 



70 

48 

169 

11 

9 

28 
121 
159 

24 



19 

11 
17 
12 
12 
47 
152 



245 

~U 

44 

177 

5 

6 

U 
58 
30 

1 



56 
3 

12 
8 
3 
8 

32 
360 

99 

6 

7 

1,137 

3 

6 

9 

8 

351 

2 

48 

1 

3 

18 



2 

103 

14 

770 



O 



> 



■H •! 

E U 



(0 n) 4) -P 
3 C 0= 



o 
to o 



2.114 



1.000 



118 
2 

n 

190 
15 

355 
79 



17 
15 

2 

9 

5 

3 

4 
20 
58 
11 

9 

9 
246 

2 

4 
24 
10 
55 
36 
16 
38 

5 

4 

229 

17 

81 

9 
33 
19 
10 

_56. 



en 

C 

<u 

t3 « 

•H 
O O 



CO 

0) • 

C O 






104 



, c 

U 10 

H U 

4) t3 

X: rH 

«x: 

m o 

u •> 

a> (0 

m (0 

•H 3 

C O 

2: to 



387 



11 



12 



251. 



155 

— ^ 

27 

116 

4 



7 
22 
12 

1 



54.511 



28,009 

17,820 

5,390 

2,950 

342 

4,472 



11 
5 
7 
7 
6 
10 
10 



1,020 



2 
9 

20 
1 
3 
4 
3 

13 
3 

29 
2 

22 

5 
20 

1 
50 

1 
12 
29 

1 
1 



15 
6 

1 

80 



to 

<0 
U to 

0) to 
x: <fl 

■P r-l 

o o 



2^126 



1.40? 



45r 

481 

96 

6 

12 

14 

7 

17 



85 



12 
1 

14 
33 

1 

19 
34 



2 
15 



2 

3 

U 

1 



72 
4 

9 

9 

1 

8 

31 

332 

418 

12 

5 

324 

2 

3 

20 

15 

27 

13 

8 

14 

18 

7 

33 

1 

3 

6 
6 
4 

107 

57 

7 

4 

16 

1 

6 

16 



591 

32 

27 

5 

104 

4 

9 

5 

^ 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 6A. 
AM) 


E-2-1IGR/.NT ALIENS ADITTTED. BY CLASSES UIDER TIIE Ba^JORATION UXIS 
COUIWRY OF 1A3T PERMNENT RESIDENCES YE.\R ENDED JUNE 30. 1953 






Country or 
region of 

Last 
permanent 
residence 


Number 

ad- 
mitted 


1 

n) 00 

+J -rH 

o g 


n 

o u 


<n 

B 

a> 

•H 

O -H 
O 

n 

<B • 
> OT 
•H • 

:s 3 


(0 

c 

O N 

•H 

(0 -P 

■d -H 
2 o 

to CO 
• 

a: 3 


n 

O N 

•H 
C -P 
0) ^ 
U <J 

-d 

rH • 
•iH CO 

6=.- 


Natives of 
W. Hemisphere 
countries 

Spouses , cniiaren 
of natives of 
W. Hemisphere 
countries 
Persons wno naa 
been U.S. citizens 


Li <D 
H fc, 

0) X( 
£: i-H 

(0 o 

tl « 
d) n 

(0 to 

■H p 

.5 a 


n 

U n 
0) to 

■P rH 
O O 


All countries 


170.434 


84.175 


86.259 


15,916 


3,359 


3,268 


58,985 


2,rLi 


104 


387 


2jl26 


Europe 


82.352 


66.236 


16.116 


10,127 


1.486 


2.256 


304 


321 


41 


162 


1^419 


Austria ....••,......•• 


2,132 

2,162 

1 

77 

993 

38 

473 

4,137 

27,329 

1,296 

96 

3,393 

8,432 

59 

14 

2,973 

2,234 

136 

1,077 

23 

814 

2,171 

1,796 

12,921 

911 

3,a6 

302 

25 

580 

2,341 

8.231 


1,466 

2,097 

1 

67 

897 

38 

426 

3,718 

20,123 

218 

88 

3,379 

4,362 

59 

U 

2,853 

2,122 

120 

343 

17 

569 

2,136 

1,727 

12,578 

906 

3,386 

299 

24 

324 

1,879 

3.360 


666 
65 

10 
96 

47 

419 

7,206 

1,078 

8 

4,070 

120 

112 

16 

734 

6 

245 

35 

69 

343 

5 

30 

3 

1 

256 

462 

4.871 


534 
16 

6 

64 

21 

283 

6,396 

389 

7 

9 

1,332 

57 

52 

10 

133 

86 
8 

37 

139 

2 

11 
1 

157 
377 

3.713 


16 
5 

1 
11 

9 

20 

59 

Li5 

909 

21 

21 

3 

162 
3 

49 
1 
2 

23 
1 
1 
2 

6 
16 

168 


5 

1 
8 

8 

32 

381 

97 

1,126 

3 
9 

352 
45 

3 

21 

2 

1 
88 
47 

750 


6 
2 

3 

22 

24 
2 

88 

3 
6 

22 

15 
2 

11 

84 
1 

10 

3 

30 


5 

1 

5 

32 

8 

204 

2 
2 

1 
30 

6 
1 

12 

4 

3 
5 

41 


2 

1 

1 
1 

27 

2 

2 
5 

16 


10 
28 

2 

1 

2 

17 

9 

7 

22 

13 
6 

1 

3 
27 

1 
9 

4 
81 


66 


Belfrium. .........••••. 


8 


Bulgaria. .• 


^ 


Czechoslovakia 

Deninark. .............. 


8 


Estonia, .............. 


. 


Finland 


7 


France ......•.....•••• 


39 


Germ^mv- .......•«*.>.« 


304 


Gree co ••••••••••••••• 


430 


Ihinparv- .......«.••••• 


1 


Ireland 


5 


Italy 


362 


Latvia 

Lithuania. ............ 




Netherlands ........«•• 


21 




16 


Poland 


1 
35 


Rumania 






15 


Sweden. 


23 




15 


(England 

United (No. Ireland.. 
Kingdom(Scotland 

U.S.S.R 

Other Europe 

Asia 


55 
1 
2 

5 
72 


China 


528 
104 
1,344 
2,579 
32 
1,074 
2,570 

72.139 


435 

86 

1,199 

120 

30 

85 

1,405 

11.592 


93 

18 

145 

2,459 

2 

989 

1,165 

60.547 


74 

8 

56 

2,152 

1 

613 

809 

1.765 


3 
3 
47 
15 
1 
28 
71 

1.606 


12 

11 
213 

334 
180 

220 


1 
1 
3 
2 

1 
22 

54.492 


5 
7 

9 

20 

1.677 


1 

15 

45 


1 

1 

20 

30 

1 
28 

125 


2 


India 


5 


Japan ................. 


3 

39 


Philippines 


3 




20 
617 


Canada 


36,283 

17,183 

8,628 

3,016 

7,029 

5,511 
989 
742 
470 


6,454 
133 

2,705 
218 

2,082 

1,268 
793 
595 
331 


29,829 

17,050 

5,923 

2,798 

4,947 

4,243 
196 
147 
13? 


557 
82 

189 
16 

921 

57 

127 

93 

34 


259 

64 

206 

8 

1,069 

53 
29 
12 

5 


37 

26 

115 

4 

38 

13 
18 
10 

1 


27,437 

16,371 

5,244 

2,753 

2,687 

4,048 

11 

9 

91 


1,022 

465 

118 

11 

61 

62 

1 
8 
4 


37 
3 

1 
1 
3 

1 

1 


44 

5 

19 

57 

5 
4 
9 

1 


436 


West Indies ....•• 


34 
31 


Other North America... 
South America 


5 
111 

4 


Africa 


6 


Australia & New Zealand. 


5 
2 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 6B. immigrant ALIENS ADMITTED TO THE UNITED STATES UNDER THE DISPLACED PERSONS ACT 
OF 1948, AS AMENDED, BY CLASSES AND COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH: 

JUNE 25. 1948 - JUNE 30. 1953 



Country or 
region of 
birth 



Number 
admitted 



Total 

displaced 

persons 



Displaced persons 



Quota 

displaced 

persons 



Nonquota 

displaced 

orphans 



Other 
nonquota 
displaced 
persons 



Germans 
ethnics 1/ 



All countries' 



Europe , 

Austria , 

Belgium , 

Bulgaria , 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland , 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

(England 

United (No. Ireland. 
Kingdom( Scotland. . . . 

(Wales 

U.3.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 



Asia , 

China 

India 

Israel 

Japan 

Palestine. . , 
Philippines . 
Other Asia. , 



North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Central America 

Other North America, 



South America 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand. 
Other countries 



399.698 



397,177 



11 

10 



61 
10 
16 

2 
35 
24 



132 

10 



34 
33 

1 



779r 

584 

545 

,663 

57 

,186 

89 

532 

,273 

,271 

,032 

25 

,225 

,734 

,603 

57 

27 

,851 

21 

,402 

34 

175 

116 

,465 

28 

133 

100 

,941 

,026 

,141 



2.126 



884 
8 
13 
10 
76 
19 
1,116 

283 



24 

3 

2 

4 

250 

19 

68 

4 

21 



345.932 



341.775 



4.065 



343,488 



6,262 

581 

533 

8,824 

50 

9,923 

88 

524 

51,204 

10,269 

12,528 

25 

2,206 

35,089 

23,125 

48 

22 

126,459 

14 

5,049 

29 

175 

113 

1,463 

27 

183 

96 

30,618 

17,090 

871 

2.115 



882 

7 

13 

8 

76 

19 

1,110 

226 

IT 

3 
1 
3 

203 

15 

64 

4 

20 



339,371 

580 

532 

8,738 

44 

9,901 

84 

520 

50,032 

9,022 

12,488 

24 

1,638 

34,887 

23,044 

46 

22 

126,233 

10 

5,029 

29 

175 

113 

1,462 

26 

182 

96 

30,561 

16,853 

864 

2.114 



4.052 

-^w 

1 

1 

34 

6 

17 

4 

4 

1,156 

1,246 

39 

1 

568 

202 

69 

2 

214 

4 

20 



1 
1 

50 

236 

7 



881 

7 

13 

8 

76 

19 

1,110 

209 



4 
3 

1 
201 

5 
63 

4 
9 



1 
11 



_22_ 



65 



2 

5 



16 

1 
1 



12 



12 



7 

1 



17 



12 

1 
2 
2 

10 



33.766 



53.689 



2,529 

3 

12 

2,839 

7 

263 

1 

8 

10,069 

2 

3,504 

19 

645 

1,478 

9 

5 

6,392 

7 

5,353 

5 

3 
2 

1 

4 

4,323 

15,936 

270 

11 



2 

1 



iL 



8 

1 

1 

47 

4 
4 



1/ Includes wives and children. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 






TABLE 6C. DISPUCED PERSONS 1/ AND OTHER IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED TO THE UNITED STATES, 
BY COUNTRY OR R EGION OF BIRTH: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1953 



Country or 
region of 
birth 



All countries. 



Europe 

Austria 

Belgium. 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

(England 

United (No. Ireland. 
Kingdom(Scotland. . , . 

(V/ales 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia , . . 

Other Europe 



Asia 

China 

India 

Israel 

Japan 

Palestine.. . 
Philippines. 
Other Asia.. 



North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Central America 

Other North America, 



South America 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand. 
Other coxintries. 



Immigrants 



Total 



170.434 



96.177 



1,862 

1,335 

67 

2,173 

1,278 

158 

614 

3,216 

27,305 

1,603 

803 

4,655 

9,701 

294 

314 

3,042 

2,427 

4,395 

1,141 

468 

991 

1,750 

1,794 

12,872 

1,240 

A, 540 

578 

1,780 

1,272 

2,509 

8.029 



Quota 



8^.17 ^ 



77.089 



Yj 



1,536 
155 
421 

2,393 
118 

1,160 

2,246 

60.107 



28,967 

18,454 

8,875 

3,056 

755 

4,691 
922 
450 
J8 



1,093 
1,252 

57 

1,831 

1,114 

125 

529 

2,773 

20,400 

220 

634 

4,601 

4,981 

258 

267 

2,844 

2,266 

3,907 

387 

335 

593 

1,700 

1,739 

12,419 

1,209 

4,432 

566 

1,610 

817 

2,130 

2.843 



Non- 
quota 



86.259 



19.088 



596 
96 

320 

93 

71 

67 

1,600 



2 



2,885 

75 
194 

150 

702 

213 

22 



769 

83 

10 

342 

164 

33 

85 

443 

6,905 

1,383 

169 

54 

4,720 

36 

47 

198 

161 

488 

754 

133 

398 

50 

55 

453 

31 

108 

12 

170 

455 

379 

5.186 



Displaced persons 



Total 



5.838 



Quota 



5.812 



940 

59 

101 

2,300 

47 

1,093 

646 

^6.? 51 



28,965 

18,454 

5,990 

2,981 

561 

4,541 
220 
237 



174 

262 

17 

680 

7 
28 

2 
140 
668 
420 
222 

269 
78 
91 

2 

1 
1,593 

1 
94 

2 
98 
21 
24 

8 

709 

177 

24 

12 



4.805 



4.783 



121 
262 

17 

679 

6 

28 

140 

392 

5 

221 

4 

78 

90 

2 

1 

1,591 

92 
2 
98 
21 
24 

8 

706 

171 

24 

12 



Non- 
quota 



it03 ? 



1.029 



53 



276 
415 

1 

265 

1 



Other immigrants 



Total 



164.596 



90. 36 ? 



1,688 

1,073 

50 

1,493 

1,271 

130 

612 

3,076 

26,637 

1,183 

581 

4,655 

9,432 

216 

223 

3,040 

2,426 

2,802 

1,140 

374 

939 

1,652 

1,773 

12,848 

1,240 

4,532 

578 

1,071 

1,095 

2,485 

8.017 



Quota 



79.370 



72. ^06 



1,533 
155 
417 

2,393 
118 

1,160 

2,241 

60.103 



972 

990 

40 

1,152 

1,108 

97 

529 

2,633 

20,008 

215 

413 

4,601 

4,977 

180 

177 

2,842 

2,265 

2,316 

387 

243 

591 

1,602 

1,718 

12,395 

1,209 

4,424 

566 

904 

646 

2,106 

2.831 



28,967 

18,454 

8,875 

3,056 

751 

4,690 

916 

448 

57 



593 
96 

316 

93 

71 

67 

1,595 

3.154 



2,885 

75 

192 

150 

696 

211 

22 



t 



Displaced persons admitted under the Displaced Persons Act of June 25, 1948, as amended. 
Includes 318 German ethnics admitted under Section 12 of the Displaced Persons Act. 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 7, ANNUAL QUOTAS AND QUOTA IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED : 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1949 TO 1953 



Quota area 



All quota areas. 



Europe 

Northern and Western Europe 

Belgium o....a 

Denmark , <> 

France • 

Germany •• 

Great Britain, Northern Ireland, 

Iceland •.. 

Ireland 

Luxembourg *.•« .* 

Netherlands 

Norvray 

Sweden o.. 

Switzerlauid oo. 

Southern and Eastern Europe 

Austria. • 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia oo*o 

Estonia 

Finland 

Greece 

Hungary o 

Italy.., 

Latvia ,....,..,, 

Lithuania 

Poland o 

Portugal, 

Riimania 

Spaing ,•••• 

Tiirkey , 

U,S,S,R 

Yvigoslavia o,.... 

Other Southern & Eastern Europe, 



Asia....,..., 
China 

f Chinese,.., 
India 
Other Asia, 



Africa., 
Oceania, 



Annual 
quota l/ 



1?^|6^7 



U9.667 



12?,16? 



1,297 

1,175 

3,069 

25,814 

65,361 

100 

17,756 

100 

3,136 

2,364 

3,295 

1,698 

24.502 



1,405 

100 
2,859 

115 

566 

308 

865 
5,645 

235 

384 
6,488 

438 

289 

250 

225 
2,697 

933 

700 

2.990^ 



Quota immigrants admitted 



1949 



113.046 



111.443 



??i?78 



1,270 

1,109 

2,997 

12,819 

23,543 

68 

8,505 

94 

2,991 

2,303 

2,376 

1,503 

51.865 



100 

105 

100 

2,685 



1,327 

65 

3,255 

1,716 

497 

426 

1,445 

5,207 

3,534 

6,452 

21,462 

462 

699 

194 

177 

3,710 

976 

261 

1.003 



1950 



1951 



197.460 



195.671 



69.366 



979 

1,101 

3,187 

31,511 

17,194 

88 

6,444 

74 

3,067 

2,179 

1,876 

1,666 

126.305 



281 

36 

110 

576 

328 
272 



M53 

177 

4,058 

5,387 

518 

285 

4,054 

5,861 

17,439 

11,774 

50,692 

426 

2,019 

197 

697 

10,854 

5,359 

355 

1.173 



156.547 



154.7 5? 



47.026 



991 

1,082 

2,900 

14,637 

15,369 

96 

3,810 

59 

3,102 

2,248 

1,360 

1,372 

107.733 



1952 



m.247 



192.754 



7?.?02 



208 

59 

123 

783 

328 
288 



17361 

231 

3,870 

2,230 

556 

3,638 

5,079 

4,325 

11,220 

4,568 

45,766 

384 

2,042 

286 

401 

14,019 

7,411 

346 

1.3^1 



518 
56 
69 

698 

272 
175 



1,103 

1,183 

2,935 

35,453 

20,368 

95 

3,819 

103 

3,032 

2,333 

1,554 

1,324 

119.452 



%23^ 

330 

5,398 

1,366 

494 

5,621 

7,331 

5,901 

4,999 

3,330 

42,665 

388 

5,184 

256 

374 

15,269 

17,265 

1,045 

1.085 



178 
51 
70 

786 

253 
155 



1953 



84.175 



82.231 



63.649 
1,093 
1,124 
2,984 

20,866 

24,219 
89 
4,635 
76 
2,903 
2,259 
1,640 
1,761 



18.^82 

903 
56 

2,138 
113 
527 
172 
575 

4,970 
224 
258 

4,428 
385 
208 
583 
118 

1,926 
690 
308 

1.^60 




1/ The annual quota was 153,929 in the fiscal year 1949, 154,206 in the fiscal year 1950, 

and 154,277 in the fiscal years 1951 and 1952, 
2/ The Philippines are included in Asia; prior to the fiscal year 1952, the Philippines 

were included in the Pacific, or Oceania, 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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TABLE 10. IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED BY RACE, SEX AND AGE: 












YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1953 






























Pacific 


Sex and age 


Number 


White 


Cfhlnese 


East 


Fili- 


Japa- 


Kor- 


Negro 


Is- 




admitted 






Indian 


pino 


nese 


ean 




lander 


Number admitted 


170.434 


163.735 


1.093 


96 


1.078 


2,48? 


88 


1.816 


39 


Hale 


73.073 


71.478 


203 


58 


261 


198 


20 


842 


13 


Under 5 years 


7,226 


7,045 


32 


3 


20 


79 


3 


kU 


- 


5-9 " 


6,273 


6,119 


19 


4 


50 


23 


2 


55 


1 


10-U " 


4,345 


4,229 


20 


7 


48 


9 


2 


28 


2 


15 " 


732 


705 


4 


- 


13 


1 


- 


8 


1 


16-17 " 


1,761 


1,712 


13 


1 


19 


3 


- 


13 


- 


18-19 " 


2,103 


2,051 


6 


1 


32 


2 


1 


10 


- 


20-24 " 


7,777 


7,615 


16 


7 


26 


3 


8 


101 


1 


25-29 " 


11,922 


11,679 


16 


9 


15 


35 


- 


162 


6 


30-34 " 


9,661 


9,419 


24 


13 


15 


12 


- 


177 


1 


35-39 " 


6,788 


6,647 


21 


5 


8 


8 


- 


99 


- 


40-44 " 


5,141 


5,035 


9 


1 


6 


6 


- 


84 


- 


45-49 " 


3,587 


3,530 


11 


3 


2 


6 


1 


34 


- 


50-54 " 


2,404 


2,368 


7 


2 


3 


5 


1 


17 


1 


55-59 " 


1,511 


1,495 


3 


1 


3 


3 


- 


6 


- 


60-64 " 


830 


826 


1 


1 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


65-69 " 


508 


502 


1 


- 


- 


1 


2 


2 


- 


70-74 " 


277 


275 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


75-79 " 


118 


118 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


80 yrs. and over.. 


99 


98 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


Unknown 


10 
97.361 


10 
92.257 


890 


38 


817 


2.291 


68 


974 


_ 


Female 


26 


Under 5 years 


7,162 


6,976 


36 


5 


12 


70 


2 


^1 


- 


5-9 " 


6,107 


5,966 


23 


2 


44 


18 


- 


53 


1 


10-14 " 


4,331 


4,202 


14 


1 


52 


12 


- 


49 


1 


15 " 


840 


814 


3 


- 


7 


1 


- 


14 


1 


16-17 " 


2,878 


2,802 


5 


1 


18 


19 


1 


32 


- 


18-19 " 


4,950 


4,720 


20 


- 


23 


128 


8 


50 


1 


20-24 " 


18,996 


17,348 


192 


6 


144 


1,122 


41 


141 


2 


25-29 " 


16,317 


15,064 


154 


6 


217 


706 


13 


150 


7 


30-34 " 


10,323 


9,806 


90 


5 


138 


154 


- 


127 


3 


35-39 " 


6,783 


6,480 


100 


3 


75 


27 


3 


89 


6 


40-44 " 


5,460 


5,225 


92 


2 


43 


10 


- 


87 


1 


45-49 " 


4,162 


4,014 


62 


2 


24 


12 


- 


47 


1 


50-54 " 


3,437 


3,330 


51 


3 


10 


6 


- 


35 


2 


55-59 " 


2,386 


2,338 


29 


1 


1 


2 


- 


15 


- 


60-64 " 


1,422 


1,396 


14 


1 


2 


1 


- 


8 


- 


65-69 " 


890 


873 


3 


- 


3 


2 


- 


9 


- 


70-74 " 


500 


492 


2 


- 


3 


1 


- 


2 


- 


75-79 " 


273 


269 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


3 


- 


80 yrs. and over.. 


137 


135 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


Unknown 


7 


7 














. 







United States Department of Justice 
Imnigration and Naturalization Service 






TABLE lOA. IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED AND EMIGRANT ALIENS DEPARTED, BY SEX, AGE, 
ILLITBRACY. AND MAJOR OCCUPATION GROUP; YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1949 TO 1953 



Sex, age, illiterates, and occupation 



1949 



1950 



1951 



1952 



1953 



Immigrant aliens admitted,. 



Sex: 

Male o 

Female .««.».. ••< 

Males per 1,000 females. 
Age: 

Under 16 yeat'8.,,.o.o..c 

16 to 44 years 

45 years and over 



Illiterates: 
Number l/, , 
Percent,,,, 



Major Occupation Group: 

Professional, technical, and kindred workers o,o<,»« 

Farmers and farm managers ,oa,, , 

Managers, officials, and proprietors, except farm. 

Clerical, sales, and kindred workers ,, 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers .,...o>,,,. 

Operatives and kindred workers 

Private household workers ,., •*,,• 

Service workers, except private hoiisehold,,,,^,,,. 

Farm laborers and foremen. 

Laborers, except farm and mine ,,,,, 

No occupatione ,.,, , 



Emigrant aliens departed. 



Sex: 

Male o 

Female .o,,,*,,,*, 

Male per 1,000 females. 
Age: 

Under 16 years e,> 

16 to 44 years 

45 years and over 



Major Occupation Group: 

Professional, technical, and kindred workers 

Fanners and farm managers o,.^.,,, « 

Managers, officials, and proprietors, except farm. 

Clerical, sales, and kindired workers,,,,. o 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers,,,,, 

Operatives and kindred workers. 

Private household workers o,,,,, e,,,,( 

Service workers, except private household,, 

Farm laborers and foremen , «< 

Laborers except farm and mine , 



>o,ooooo,,o,o,,,,oo,o 



188«?17 



249.187 



205.717 



265,520 



170.434 



80,340 

107,977 

744 

32,728 

123,340 

32,249 



1,983 
1*1 



13,884 

8,937 

6,014 

14,797 

13,693 

U,271 

6,990 

3,937 

933 

6,192 

98,669 

24.586 



No occupation. 



••o*«*o*oo«oo««o*«*o«o««*e«»o«*ooooo 



119,130 

130,057 

916 

50,468 
152,358 

46,361 



1,677 
,7 



20,502 

17,642 

6,396 

16,796 

21,832 

19,618 

8,900 

4,970 

3,976 

5,693 

122,862 

27i?98 



99,327 123,609 



106,390 
934 

44,023 

121,823 

39,871 



1,869 
.9 



15,269 
10,214 
5,493 
U,098 
16,183 
17,858 

7,243 
5,292 
4,972 
5,481 
103,614 

26.174 



12,950 

11,636 

1,113 

2,032 

13,895 

8,659 



2.3^0 

306 

1,819 

1,280 
879 

1,265 
643 
690 
976 

1,702 
12,876 



14,331 

13,267 

1,080 

2,333 

15,576 

9,689 



2,631 
335 

1,983 

1,540 
929 

1,222 
663 
730 
642 
993 
15,930 



141,911 
871 

64,513 

159,788 

41,219 



2,026 
.8 



16,496 

10,566 

5,968 

16,724 

21,223 

21,092 

9,653 

6,418 

6,289 

8,969 

142,122 

21.880 



12,843 

13,331 

963 

2,a7 
15,422 

8,335 



2,772 
350 

1,954 

1,799 
950 

1,363 
757 
839 
253 
924 
14,213 



73,073 

97,361 

751 

37,016 

110,860 

22,558 



995 
,6 



12,783 

3,393 

5,025 

15,171 

12,257 

14,718 

6,852 

4,390 

1,538 

5,369 

88,938 

24.256 



10,921 

10,959 

997 

1,918 

12,318 

7,644 



2,328 

263 

1,693 

1,179 

437 

902 

470 

908 

158 

4,099 

9,443 



12,511 

11,745 

1,065 

2,117 

14,905 

7,234 



3,053 
266 

1,798 

1,339 
786 
988 
610 

1,181 

114 

654 

13,467 



1/ Immigrants 16 years of age or over who are unable to read or write any language , 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 






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TABLE 11. ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AND DEPARTED : 
YEARS ENDED JWIE 30, 1908 TO 1953 



Period 



ALIENS ADMTTH) 



Imnl- 
grant 



NonimTni- 
grant 



ALIENS DEPARTED 



Eml- 
grant 



Nonemi- 
grant 



U.S. CITIZENS 



Ar- 
rived 



De- 
parted 



Total, 1908 to 1953 



1908-1910 l/. 
1911-1920.... 

1911 

1912 

1913 

lOU 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1920 



1921-1930. 
1921... 
1922... 
1923... 
192A... 
1925... 
1926... 
1927. . . 
1928. , . 
1929. . . 
1930... 



1931-19A0. 
1931... 
1932. . . 
1933... 
193A. . . 
1935... 
1936... 
1937. . . 
1938... 
1939. . . 
19/^0... 



19A1-1950. 
19-41. . . 
1942... 
1943... 
19U... 
1945... 
1946... 
1947. . . 
1948. . . 
1949. . . 
1950. . . 



1951. 
1952. 



U. 624. 387 



9.144.225 



4.703.828 



9.460.588 



15.209.282 



1 ?. 02 ?. 6? 4 



2.576.226 



5.735.811 



490.741 



878,587 
838,172 
1,197,892 
1,218,4?0 
326,700 
298,826 
295,403 
110,618 
Ul,132 
430,001 



1.376.271 



823,311 



151,713 
178,983 
229,335 
184,601 

107, 5U 
67,922 

67,474 
101,235 

95,f^89 
191,575 



2.346.994 



672.327 



660_^811 



295,666 
333,262 
308,190 
303,338 
204,074 
129,765 
66,277 
94,585 
123,522 
288,315 



1.841.163 



222,549 

282,030 

303,734 

330,467 

180,100 

111,042 

80,102 

9^,683 

92,709 

139,747 



b6U.Sll 

1-938.508 

269,128 

280,801 

286,604 

286,586 

239,579 

121,930 

127,420' 

72,867 

96,420 

157,173 



4.107.209 



805,228 
309,556 
522,919 
706,896 
294,314 
304,488 
335,175 
307,255 
279,678 
241,700 



1.774.881 



1.045.076 



172,935 
122,949 
150,487 
172,406 
164,121 
191,618 
202,826 
193,376 
199,649 
204,514 



247,718 
198,712 
81,450 
76,789 
92,728 
76,992 
73,366 
77,457 
69,203 
50,661 



ltH9, 702 



3.522.713 



178,313 
146,672 
119,136 
139,956 
132,762 
150,763 
1?'0,142 
196,899 
183,295 
221,764 



222,712 
243,563 
308,471 
301,281 
339,239 
370,757 
378,520 
430,955 
U9,955 
477,260 



?28.431 



97,139 
35,576 
23,068 
29,470 
34,956 
36,329 
50,244 
67,895 
82,998 
70,756 



1.574.071 



183,540 
139,295 
127,660 
134,434 
14^,765 
154,570 
181,640 
184,802 
185,333 
138,032 



459.738 



61,882 
103,295 
80,081 
39,771 
38,834 
35,817 
26,736 
25,210 
26,651 
21,461 



1.736.912 



229,034 
184,362 
163,721 
137,401 
150,216 
157,467 
197,846 
197,404 
174,758 
144,703 



3.365.432 



liO^^iO?? 



51,776 

28,781 

23,725 

28,551 

38,119 

108,721 

347,292 

170,570 

188,317 

249,187 



2,461,^^9 



100,008 
82,457 
81,117 
113,641 
164,247 
203,469 
366,305 
476,006 
447,272 
426,837 



136.399 



205,717 
265,520 
170.434 



465,106 
516,082 

48gt714 



17,115 

7,363 

5,107 

5,669 

7,442 

18,3^3 

22,501 

20,875 

24,586 

27,598 



2.105.894 



26,174 
21,880 
24.256 



71,362 

67,189 

53,615 

78,740 

85,920 

186,210 

300,921 

427,343 

405,503 

429,091 



446,727 
487,617 
520.246 



439,897 
339,262 
305,001 
273,257 
282,515 
318,273 
386,872 
406,999 
354,438 
258,918 



3t22^,233 



175,935 
118,454 
105,729 
108,44^ 
175,568 
274,543 
437,690 
542,932 
620,371 
663,567 



760,486 
807,225 
930.874 



J.4.2,600 



2.517.889 



349,472 
353,890 
347,702 
368,797 
172,371 
110,733 
126,011 
275,837 
218,929 
194,147 



3.519.519 



271,560 
309,477 
270,601 
277,850 
324,323 
372,480 
369,788 
429,575 
431,842 
462,023 



3.357.936 



446,386 
380,837 
338,545 
262,091 
272,400 
311,480 
390,196 
397,875 
333,399 
224,727 



2.880.414. 



168,961 
113,216 
62,403 
63,525 
103,019 
230,578 
451,845 
478,988 
552,361 
655,518 



667,126 
814,289 
925.861 



Departure of aliens fiiot recorded in 1908, 
in 1910. 



Departure of U, So citizens first recorded 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 12. IMMIGR.Wr ALIENS ADMITTSi: 
BY STATE OF INTENDED FUTURE OR 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 


) AND EMIGRANT ALIENS DEPARTED, 
LAST PEllMANENT RESIDENCE: 
1949 TO 1953 








Future or last 




I M M I G R / 


I N T 






E M ] 


. G R A 


N T 




residence 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


All States 


188.317 


249.187 


205.717 


265.520 


170.434 


24.586 


27,598 


26.174 


21,880 


24.256 


Alabama 


538 

1,252 

417 

21,014 

729 

5,036 

279 

1,564 

2,736 

661 

367 

11,469 

2,172 

1,425 

605 

734 

2,151 

1,089 

2,747 

9,259 

10,267 

2,288 

1,058 

1,613 

646 

578 

180 

644 

9,832 

264 

53,926 

1,203 

718 

6,158 

596 

1,382 

10,162 

1,156 

436 

350 

694 

6,071 

1,293 

757 

1,483 

3,492 

730 

2,451 

169 

1.476 


469 

950 

725 

20,428 

1,401 

6,282 

396 
1,670 
2,980 

801 

424 

18,673 

3,642 

2,139 

958 

918 
2,125 
1,100 
4,330 
10,443 
14,681 
5,287 
1,584 
2,497 

802 
1,603 

164 

637 
13,349 

296 

68,944 

1,981 

1,279 

9,829 

755 

1,364 

15,268 

1,288 

509 
1,601 

953 
6,385 
1,325 

794 
3,570 
3,825 

690 
5,776 

275 
1.022 


386 

958 

384 

19,588 

1,035 

4,841 
328 

1,460 

2,923 

608 

423 

20,562 

2,777 

1,639 
785 
637 

1,115 
809 

2,275 

8,134 
13,452 

2,710 
500 

1,721 
663 

1,273 

165 

500 

10,701 

315 

60,113 

1,069 
595 

7,926 
720 

1,274 
10,666 
938 
371 
487 
656 

5,533 

1,192 
511 

1,740 

3,415 
457 

3,162 
222 

1.003 


697 
1,269 

556 

26,599 

1,863 

5,212 

453 
1,865 
3,789 
1,148 

449 

20,758 

3,473 

2,372 

1,137 

757 
1,729 

989 

2,321 

8,741 

15,489 

3,327 

444 
3,032 

869 
2,199 

269 

633 
14,531 

452 

78,212 

1,149 

1,078 

12,145 

898 

1,775 

13,772 

1,094 

537 

784 

876 
8,416 
1,485 

681 
2,157 
4,629 

663 
5,774 

276 

i.6?7 


554 

1,405 

278 

24,916 

848 

3,279 

270 

1,352 

4,405 

709 

404 

9,202 

1,818 

842 

672 

565 

1,000 

1,085 

1,367 

6,578 

10,351 

1,709 

303 

1,363 

450 

462 

186 

507 

7,916 

701 

42,712 

696 

356 

5,082 

565 

1,334 

6,335 

904 

340 

225 

568 

14,115 

1,390 

589 

1,228 

3,571 

419 

2,093 

174 

2.241 


53 

132 

16 

2,038 

74 

559 

18 

1,295 

1,449 

72 

27 

730 

132 

85 

62 

56 

285 

74 

221 

736 

633 

176 

37 

115 

25 

29 

17 

44 

785 

30 

9,267 

86 

33 

394 

64 

101 

631 

92 

34 

15 

83 

452 

34 

42 

187 

283 

50 

156 

13 

2.564 


67 

145 

12 

2,616 

105 

504 

33 

1,743 

1,317 

92 

30 

1,000 

226 

140 

84 

87 

362 

104 

338 

894 

880 

364 

56 

180 

48 

38 

27 

59 

1,027 

71 

9,519 

114 

38 

508 

89 

91 

777 

98 

42 

24 

84 

622 

83 

86 
184 
377 

53 
252 

18 
1.890 


63 

121 

27 

2,531 

104 

341 

28 

2,051 

1,106 

115 

42 

957 

228 

103 

74 

65 

379 

156 

280 

956 

863 

200 

60 

126 

67 

32 

16 

82 

991 

61 

9,380 

90 

31 

464 

78 

116 

742 

111 

33 
12 

115 
557 

60 

90 
188 
357 

50 
260 

14 
1.201 


68 

129 

16 

1,926 

104 

253 

14 

1,843 

831 

62 

23 

667 

126 

86 

56 

63 

227 

70 

189 

659 

596 

163 

47 

102 

38 

21 

26 

48 

711 

49 

7,375 

70 

27 

331 

66 

119 

500 

85 

17 

41 

67 

810 

62 

58 

129 

243 

32 

175 

12 

2.448 


72 


Arizona .............. 


98 


Arkansas ............. 


28 


Cal i f o mia ........... 


2,112 


Holorado ........••••• 


120 


nonnpct.ic'U't .....*«.•* 


355 


Delaware 

District of Columbia. 
Florida 


34 

2,492 

985 


Georeia. ............. 


133 


Idaho 


44 


Tl 11 no is .^........A** 


904 


Indiana. ...,....•.•••• 


122 


Iowa •••••••••••o»»*** 


105 


Kansas .....••.••••••• 


108 


Kentucky. ............ 


53 


Louisiana. ........... 


232 


Maine ................ 


56 


Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan ............. 


285 
757 
537 


Minnesota ............ 


188 


Mississippi 

Missouri ............. 


90 
164 


Montana .............. 


42 




38 


Nevada ............... 


26 


New Hampshire 

New Jersev. .......... 


49 
900 




109 


New York 


8,887 


North Dakota 


84 
14 




465 


Oklahoma ............o 


77 




98 


Pennsvlvania ......... 


616 




101 


South Carolina 

Tennessee ............ 


26 
25 
61 




680 


Utah 


87 




66 


Virginia 

Washington. .......... 


172 

234 


West Virginia , 

Wisconsin. ........... 


35 
152 


Wyoming 


23 
1.115 



V 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED TO TH£ UNITED STATES, BY RURAL 
y% YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1949 TO 1953 



TABLE 12A. 

AND URBAN AREA AND CITY 



Class of place and city 



1949 



1950 



1951 



1952 



1953 



Total. 



188,317 



Rural. 



32.715 



Urban. 



City total 

Los Angeles , Calif 

Oakland, Calif. 

San Diego, Calif 

San Francisco, Calif 

Bridgeport , Conn 

Hartford , Conn 

Washington, D. C 

Miami, Fla 

Tampa, Fla 

Chicago , 111 ..« 

New Orleans, La 

Baltimore, Md 

Boston, Mass 

Cambridge, Mass 

Detroit, Mich 

Minneapolis , Minn 

St . Loiiis , Mo 

Jersey City, N. J 

Newark, N. J 

Paterson, N. J 

Buffalo, N. Y 

New York, N. Y 

Rochester, N. Y 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Cleveland , Ohio 

Portland , Ore 

Philadelphia , Pa 

Pittsburgh, Pa 

Providence , R. I.................. 

Houston, Tex 

San Antonio , Tex 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

Seattle , Wash 

Milwaukee, Wis 

Other cities 

Outlying territories and possessions 
Unknown or not reported 



.iL^oL 



101.510 

5,66d 
684 
758 

4,118 
469 
878 

1,564 

1,120 
267 

8,376 
759 

1,301 

1,763 
481 

5,897 
564 
548 
670 

1,111 
452 

1,172 

38,194 

815 

375 

2,062 

594 

3,408 

1,0U 

502 

540 

665 

789 

1,465 

741 

11,726 

1,185 
603 



249.187 



205.717 



265.520 



47.066 



27.674 



34.936 



66.157 



?S848 



71.?^4 



l?4i^0^ 



57263 

662 

628 
3,594 

454 
1,124 
1,670 
1,279 

273 
13,152 

668 
2,151 
2,164 

519 
7,128 
1,449 
1,127 

752 
1,647 

560 

1,481 

50,779 

1,143 

682 

3,331 

676 

5,242 

1,369 

595 

667 

630 

824 

1,565 

1,558 

17,698 

848 
612 



120.740 

4,746 

623 

553 

4,289 

345 

1,071 

1,460 

1,237 

221 

14,461 

586 

1,107 

1,927 

403 

7,709 

891 

686 

716 

1,339 

316 

1,669 

45,650 

1,022 

507 

3,048 

609 

4,062 

1,044 

420 

545 

569 

816 

1,676 

983 

13,434 

899 
§11 



134.999 



8,583 

682 

755 
3,920 

471 

808 
1,865 
1,358 

300 
14,399 

840 
1,059 
2,277 

331 
8,539 

891 
1,386 

989 
1,146 

5U 
2,686 

59,333 

1,084 

853 

4,437 

814 

5,453 

1,407 

476 

700 

853 

899 

2,088 

2,194 

20,609 

1,348 
2.283 



170.4 3 4 



21.297 



52.219 



93.915 



7,078 
663 
765 

3,734 
254 
550 

1,352 

1,774 
359 

6,366 
656 
718 

1,541 
341 

6,112 

587 
566 
381 
743 
349 
1,624 
31,724 
696 

a2 

1,457 
714 

2,240 
647 
358 
772 

1,123 
919 

1,591 

731 

14,018 

1,328 
1.675 



Rural - Population of less than 2,500. Urban 
Cities - Population of 100,000 or over. 



- Population of 2,500 to 99,999. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 13 IMMERAM' ALIENS ADMITTED AND EMIGRAOT ALIENS DEPARTED, BY 
COUNTRY OR REGION OF LAST OR INTENDED FUTURE PERMANENT RESIDENCE: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30> 1949 TO 1953 



Country or region 

of last or future 

residence 



All countries^.., 



Europe* ••oo*o«o*«**«o* 

Austria* • • o o » 

BelgXUHlo o«oottuoo«ooe 

Bui-garxa* o*ootto««oo* 
Czechoslovaklao o o • • » 
Denmark* •oa.*«o.e..« 

Estonia* •ooo«*«oe*«« 

r inJ-anQ *oo«oooeo**oo 

r ranc e**eo*o*ooooo»o 
LremQany* ooo*oooooo«o 
Lrreece ooo«o«oo«*oooo 
Hungary* •oo«oooooao6 

j.X*e J.anCl *eoaooe*oooeo 
XuaXyo oooo«eeooeo«eo 
Ia'CV Hxk e*oo****«oo«oe 

ijXonuama* «ooo«oooeo 
Netherlands* oaooooso 
noin'fay* *e*ooooooo«*o 

■T OXanO. 00*00000000000 

r OrtUgaJ. ooeooooooooo 

Kumanxa* oooooooeooo* 

bpain* o«oooooo«o*o«o 

oweden* ooo*o*eo«o*o« 
Swit zerlando o o a o o o o 

(Englandoooo 

United (N* Ireland© 

Kingdom(Scotlando o 

(Wales*. 
U*S*S«R* 
Yugoslavia!, *e*****o 
Other Europe 



0* 

oooooeoooooo 



'-ooooooeo 



Asia* *oo*oo«oooooeoooo 

Unina* **oooooooooooo 

Xnma ooooo**oeoooooo 

Israel 1/ •ooo«oo«o«e 

O apan *ooo*oooooooooe 

Palestine 1/ 
Philippines 
Other Asia, 



ooooooeo 
ooooooooo 
ooooooooo 



0000*000 
0*0000000 



North America, 
Canada.., so 

Mexico, .,.a..,e*oe.. 

West Indies,,,, o,,,o 
Central America,,.,, 
Other No, America, », 



South America,, 
AX rxca ,,. ,,.,,, 
Australia & N, Zealand 
Other countries o ,,,,, o 



O O O O • O 

o o o o . o o 



IMMIGRANT 



1949 



ies.317 



129.592 



4,447 

2,057 

22 

2,018 

1,239 

14 

567 

4,816 

55,284 

1,734 

748 

6,552 

11,695 

22 

67 

3,330 

2,476 

1,673 

1,282 

155 

409 

2,847 

1,967 

16,634 

2,126 

4,075 

440 

24 

198 

674 



3,a5 
175 

529 

421 

1,157 

1,898 

46.218 



25,156 
8,083 
6,733 
2,431 
3,815 

3,107 
995 
661 

149 



1950 



249.187 



199.115 



16^67 

1,429 

13 

946 

1,094 

4 

506 

4,430 

128,592 

1,179 

190 

4,837 

12,454 

5 

5 

3,080 

2,262 

696 

1,106 

155 

383 

2,183 

1,854 

10,191 

1,005 

2,299 

265 

6 

189 

1,290 

4i?08 



1,280 
121 
378 
100 
168 
729 

1,732 

40.899 



21,885 
6,744 
6,206 
2,169 
3,895 

3,284 

849 

460 

72 



1951 



20^,717 



U9.545 

9,761 

1,802 

1 

88 

1,076 

532 

4,573 

87,755 

4,459 

62 

2,592 

8,958 

5 

8 

3,062 

2,289 

98 

1,078 

104 

442 

2,022 

1,485 

12,393 

552 

2,309 

196 

10 

454 

1,379 

7il4? 



335 
109 
968 
271 
164 
3,228 
2,074 

44.030 



25,880 

6,153 
5,902 
2,0U 
4,084 

3,596 

845 

490 

62 



1952 



265.520 



193.626 



23,088 

2,946 

9 

51 

1,152 

7 

500 

4,878 

104,236 

6,996 

63 

2,775 

11,342 

10 

20 

3,060 

2,354 

235 

953 

34 

481 

1,778 

1,502 

18,539 

751 

3,390 

248 

11 

327 

1,890 

?.?28 



263 

123 

485 

3,814 

34 

1,179 

3,430 

^6.4^8 



33,354 
9,079 
6,672 

2,637 
4,716 

4,591 
931 
545 

a 



1/ Israel is included in Palestine prior to 1950 



1953 



170.434 



82.352 



2,132 

2,162 

1 

77 

993 

38 

473 

4,137 

27,329 

1,296 

96 

3,393 

8,432 

59 

14 

2,973 

2,234 

136 

1,077 

23 

814 

2,171 

1,796 

12,921 

911 

3,416 

302 

25 

580 

2,3a 

8,2?1 



528 
104 
1,344 
2,579 
32 
1,074 
2,570 

7?. 1 ?9 



36,283 

17,183 

8,628 

3,016 

7,029 

5,511 
989 
742 
470 



EMIGRANT 



1949 



24.586 



11|89 ? 



79 
225 

18 
113 
324 
1 
123 
1,274 
622 
389 

29 
302 

1,494 

4 
368 
596 
133 
230 

11 

262 

425 

300 

2,988 

97 
443 
103 
627 

82 
231 

2.568 



365 
243 

230 
378 
926 
426 

6.767 



1,233 

1,096 

3,603 

775 

60 

2,538 
345 
244 
231 



1950 



27.598 



12.642 



98 

237 

15 

97 

350 

1 

160 

1,125 

1,309 

588 

27 

372 

1,636 

1 
379 
677 
106 
228 
8 
218 
483 
342 
2,919 
189 
444 

72 
157 

74 
330 

3.311 



428 
420 
240 

315 

101 

1,181 

626 

7.636 



27267 

1,257 

3,190 

851 

71 

2,873 
433 
459 
244 



1951 



26.174 



ii «47 7 



87 

156 

2 

38 

336 

2 

138 

1,019 

1,101 

374 

30 

539 

1,440 

3 
304 
576 

72 
188 
5 
227 
451 
311 
2,882 
173 
465 

78 
140 

64 
276 

2.529 



1952 



21.880 24.256 



9.691 



376 
3U 
250 
282 
28 
627 
652 

8.199 



3,202 

1,149 

2,897 

816 

135 

2,817 
393 
497 
262 



112 

192 

5 

28 

350 

1 

114 

1,172 

1,028 

435 

14 

229 

1,281 

3 

1 

327 

553 

68 

183 

2 

225 

334 

3a 

1,884 
71 

258 
35 

3if3 
77 

225 

2.4a 



12 . ?? 7 



223 

210 

228 

506 

53 

521 
700 

6.722 



TtSo 

988 

2,227 

576 

171 

1,984 
317 
456 
269 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 13A. 



IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED, BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH i 



YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 19LL TO 1953 



Country or region 
of birth 



19A4 



1945 



1946 



1947 



1948 



1949 



1950 



1951 



1952 



1953 



All coiontries. 



»ooo«o**« 



Europe 

Austria l/, 
Belgium. o**e.««...o 

Bulgaria. cc.o....oo 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark. ,..oo 

HiStonxa .o«oo..«.ooo 
r 1 n I ano ...o.oo.oooo 

France 

Germany l/, ..o.o.o. 

Greece a«* 

Hungary 

Ireland. ,, 

Italy..... .....CO 

Latvia.. 

Lithuania. ..ato*o»o 
Netherlands. . . . o . . o 
Norway. ..•ooo.o.o.o 

I O J.anCl oo«ooooo...oo 

Portugal. 

Rumania 

Spain., 

Sweden. 

Switzerland. 

United (England 

Kingdom (No. Ireland 

(Scotland, 

(Wales. 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 



>o,o,o,e,.o 



» o o . . . . o 



• o .....eoo 



^000,00 



..••ooo.ooo 
o . o . . • 

oeoe,o,oo 



Asxa, .«..•.«...... 

China 

India 

Israel 2/. 
Japan.. 

Palestine 2/o,,, 
Philippines, . . , . 
Other Asia,.,,,, 



North America. ,„,.„., 
oanaoa .,., ,.00.0.00 
Mexico . 00.0. .0000,, 
West Indies...., 00. 
Central America,,,. 
Other No. America,, 



South America 
Africa... 
Australia & N.Zealand 
Other countries,, 0,00 



b.. 0.0.0. 



lOOOO.O.,,,,, 



28.551 



38.119 108.721 



147.292 



170.570 



188.317 



249.187 



205.717 



265.520 



170.434 



8.694 



10.141 



6 4.877 



135 
23 

3a 

119 

28 

72 

232 

1,360 

292 

227 

U6 

177 

66 

105 

217 

195 

1,420 

429 

249 

291 

90 

50 

1,135 

92 

357 

47 

433 

178 

188 

364 



72 
43 

9 

35 

15 

190 

17.961 



92 

11 

289 

108 

19 

58 

207 

1,260 

235 

132 

286 

320 

50 

86 

111 

114 

1,222 

562 

234 

238 

67 

70 

2,627 

340 

515 

100 

399 

184 

205 

J21 



989 

1,770 

36 

1,075 

291 

136 

197 

5,000 

4,010 

578 

577 

1,387 

3,886 

206 

244 

610 

379 
4,806 

554 
425 
402 

327 
282 

28,763 
1,584 
2,472 
1,495 
1,110 
676 
610 

1.921 



96.865 



1,997 

2,208 

128 

3,601 

1,166 

184 

689 

5,808 

14,674 

2,056 

1,277 

2,446 

14,557 

340 

554 

2,607 

2,316 

8,156 

636 

558 

302 

1,252 

978 

17,889 

1,328 

3,757 

1,071 

2,240 

1,U7 

973 

4.098 



113.750 



2,782 

1,757 

132 

3,865 

1,328 

225 

693 

4,697 

21,365 

1,964 

1,471 

7,651 

15,801 

427 

631 

3,739 

2,687 

8,020 

890 

770 

509 

2,022 

1,426 

17,484 

1,940 

5,436 

954 

2,317 

1,190 

1,577 

7.626 



138.301 



^73ST 
1,592 
84 
4,393 
1,305 
1,840 
704 
3,972 

23,844 
1,759 
1,998 
8,585 

11,157 
3,853 
6,691 
3,200 
2,563 

23,744 
1,235 
1,043 
503 
2,433 
1,585 

13,589 
2,425 
4,805 
656 
3,907 
1,384 
1,089 

6.355 



206.547 



7738^ 
6,399 
2,299 
1,876 

1 

899 
75 

533 
25 



109 
95 

3 

52 

15 

301 

2 4.22? 



9,379 
6,455 
4,660 
3,395 
340 

1,326 

267 

1,535 

46 



337 
407 

17 
193 
293 
674 



18,627 

6,805 

4,876 

2,171 

646 

1,755 

1,098 

5,746 

199 



1,407 
375 

82 

363 

739 

1,132 

^0. 2 ? ^ 



22,008 

7,775 

6,299 

3,470 

743 

2,421 
849 

2,532 
232 



3,987 
239 

371 

376 

1,122 

1,531 

^.270 



22,612 
8,730 
6,994 
2,884 
1,050 

2,768 
840 

1,110 
206 



2,823 
166 

508 

234 

1,068 

1,556 

39.469 



3,182 
1,108 
190 
5,528 
1,234 
5,422 
645 
3,519 

31,225 
1,242 
5,098 
6,501 
9,839 

17,494 

11,870 
3,U8 
2,379 

52,851 
1,075 
3,599 
463 
1,892 
1,728 
8,812 
1,249 
2,983 
393 

10,971 
9,154 
1,753 

4. 61 ^ 



161.177 



21,515 

7,977 

6,518 

2,493 

966 

2,639 
737 
602 
21A 



1,494 
153 
110 
76 
212 
595 

1,975 

34.004 



2,777 
1,238 
231 
3,863 
1,217 
2,073 
646 
3,337 

26,369 
4,447 
4,922 
3,739 
7,348 

10,588 
4,028 
3,170 
2,378 

37,484 
1,048 

2,351 
510 

1,427 
1,408 
8,333 

840 
2,950 

368 

11,953 

8,254 

1,880 

5.166 



202.88^ 



18,043 

6,841 

6,093 

2,151 

876 

2,777 
689 
443 
112 



1,821 
134 
261 
198 
210 
760 

1,782 

^^ .482 



20,809 

6,372 

5,553 

1,970 

778 

2,724 

700 

390 

78 



5,97 
1,539 
279 
5,041 
1,345 
1,248 
585 
3,454 

50,283 
7,084 
6,850 
3,796 
9,306 
4,459 
3,044 
3,143 
2,481 

33,211 
1,013 
4,915 
536 
1,478 
1,569 

12,054 

1,031 

4,052 

494 

12,697 

17,223 
2,698 

9.428 



96.177 



1,421 
153 
206 

4,517 
156 

1,066 

1,909 

^8.092 



28,141 

9,600 

6,723 

2,642 

986 

3,902 

740 

416 

58 



1,862 

1,335 

67 

2,173 

1,278 

158 

614 

3,216 

27,305 

1,603 

803 

4,655 

9,701 

294 

314 

3,042 

2,427 

4,395 

1,141 

468 

991 

1,750 

1,794 

12,872 

1,240 

4,540 

578 

1,780 

1,272 

2,509 



8,029 

1,536 

155 

421 

2,393 

U8 

1,160 

2,246 

60.107 



28,967 

18,454 

8,875 

3,056 

755 

4,691 

922 

450 

58 



1/ In the years 19i!i4to 1945, Austria was included with Germany. 
2/ Israel is included in Palestine prior to 1950, 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 





TABLE 14. 


EMIGRANT ALIENS 
YEAR ENDED 


DEPARTEI 
JUNE 30 


), BY RACE, SEX AND AGE 
1953 


• 




Sex and age 


Number 

de- 
parted 


White 


Chinese 


East 
Indian 


Fili- 
pino 


Japa- 
nese 


Kor- 
ean 


Negro 


Pacific 

Is- 
lander 


Number departed 


24,256 


21.909 


293 


349 


551 


636 


42 


440 


36 


Male 


12.511 


10.910 


202 


249 


352 


440 


29 


307 


22 


Under 5 years 

5-9 " 

10-14 " 
15 " 

16-17 " 

18-19 " 

20-24 " 

25-29 " 

30-34 " 

35-39 " 

40-44 " 

45-49 " 

50-54 " 

55-59 " 

60-64 " 

65-69 " 

70-74 " 

75-79 " 
80 yrs. and over.. 
Unknown 


334 

432 

273 

77 

206 

334 

1,552 

2,233 

1,602 

1,147 

953 

633 

518 

430 

340 

474 

280 

160 

87 

446 

11.745 


314 

407 

262 

74 

198 

319 

1,429 

1,948 

1,340 

954 

780 

564 
453 
378 
297 
382 
219 
124 
73 
395 

10.999 


4 

4 

3 

1 

1 

4 

21 

34 

15 

26 

19 

16 

16 

8 

6 

7 

1 

1 
15 

91 


10 
7 
3 

3 
2 

33 
60 

43 
39 
22 
6 
4 
2 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
8 

100 


1 
6 

3 

1 

1 

4 

30 

51 

45 

41 

53 

23 

25 

21 

11 

16 

7 

1 

1 

11 

199 


3 

1 

1 
1 
19 
64 
62 
34 
33 
15 
15 
15 
20 
60 
50 
33 
10 
4 

196 


1 
2 
10 
5 
6 
4 
1 

13 


2 
7 
2 

1 

1 

1 

15 

63 

89 

43 

38 

8 

5 

6 

5 
6 
2 

1 

1 

11 

133 


1 
2 
3 
3 
3 
4 
4 

2 


Female 


14 


Under 5 years 

5-9 •• 

10-14 " 
15 " 

16-17 " 

18-19 " 

20-24 " 

25-29 " 

30-34 " 

35-39 " 

40-44 " 

45-49 " 

50-54 " 

55-59 " 

60-64 " 

65-69 " 

70-74 " 

75-79 " 
80 yrs. and over.. 
Unknown 


275 
348 
312 
66 
222 
302 
1,217 
1,945 
1,440 
971 
781 
631 
660 
567 
458 
460 
366 
228 
113 
383 


254 
326 
294 
64 
213 
290 
1,134 
1,812 
1,328 
908 
722 
592 
611 
535 
433 
436 
350 
222 
110 
365 


2 
5 
4 

2 

2 

12 

15 

15 

13 

3 

4 

7 

2 

5 


10 
4 
6 
1 
3 
3 
9 
18 
19 
5 
9 
3 
5 

1 
4 


3 
6 

7 

2 

3 

21 

48 

30 

22 

14 

14 

13 

3 

5 

1 
7 


4 

5 
1 

1 

19 
35 
25 
11 
11 

3 
17 
21 
13 
17 

7 

6 


1 
6 

1 
3 

1 

1 


2 
2 

1 

3 

21 

14 

16 

10 

17 

11 

6 

8 

7 

5 

7 

1 
2 


2 

1 
2 
1 
2 
4 
1 

1 







United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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TABLE 16, NONIWIIGRAKT ALIENS ADMITTED, BY CUSSES OTTDER THE IMKIGR.ATION UWS 
AMD COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH: YEAR EfDED JWffi 30, 1953 





Number 




fe 


^4 










to 

(D 
rH > 
CO -H 
C -P 


V 


atives 
n in- 
media 








Countiry or region 
of birth 


ad- 
mitted 


Foreign 

government 

officials 


Temporary 
visitors f 
business 


Temporary 
visitors f 
pleasure 


-p 

•H to 
a C 

C 0) 
t. r-i 


E-i -P 


to 

-P 

C 

"S 

-p 
to 


4J C 

CI'. QJ 

p to 


Tcmporarj'- 
workers ai 
trainees 


Represent: 
of foreig! 
formation 


ni C 


Returning 

resident 

aliens 


to 
. <» 

Ui to 
(U to 

+) .-1 



All countries.., „„,».. 


4C5.714 


24.502 


63.496 


243.219 


67.684 


878 


13.533 


6.112 


3,021 


174 


12,584 


50,397 


114 


Europe ,,a«.«****«««o**... 


206.296 


9.759 


34.781 


77.990 


37.987 


677 


1.951 


_3,268 


963 


103 


7.951 


30,860 


6 


Austria ,,# .•••. 


3,793 
5,112 


100 
601 


650 
1,008 


1,499 
1,630 


430 
814 


13 
16 


49 
33 


10 
173 


81 
12 


4 
3 


571 
94 


384 
728 


2 


Belgium ,„„., 


- 


Bulgaria 


127 


2 


23 


55 


14 


- 


6 


3 


2 


- 


1 


21 


- 


Czechoslovalda ..... o.. . 


2,185 


61 


437 


978 


207 


5 


U 


47 


13 


- 


67 


329 


- 


Denmark. ....... a ...... . 


5,904 


492 


676 


2,046 


1,507 


33 


28 


113 


29 


3 


442 


535 


- 


Estonia 


355 


7 


61 


175 


60 


3 


8 


- 


- 


- 


4 


37 


- 


Finland 


2,042 
19,247 


U 
1,834 


305 
3,683 


635 
5,905 


635 
2,519 


16 
8 


17 

131 


16 

i,m 


5 

127 


17 


89 
1,050 


283 
2,862 


— 


France..... 


- 


Germany. 


19,650 


356 


3,790 


7,564 


1,520 


12 


231 


57 


133 


16 


2,507 


3,464 


- 


Greece 


3,4U 


313 


575 


1,208 


439 


20 


281 


30 


8 


- 


96 


444 


- 


Hungary. ............... 


2,049 


67 


376 


1,036 


245 


4 


40 


3 


12 


1 


U 


251 


- 


Ireland. .... .......... . 


4,669 


65 


336 


1,476 


668 


2 


9 


26 


6 


1 


47 


2,033 


- 


Italy.................. 


12,125 


643 


1,830 


4,368 


2,031 


55 


141 


68 


59 


5 


498 


2,426 


1 


Latvia, ................ 


497 


6 


101 


269 


43 


- 


1 


1 


3 


- 


8 


65 


— 


Lithuania. ............. 


888 


9 


165 


589 


41 


- 


6 


4 


1 


- 


3 


70 


- 


Netherlands ............ 


11,589 


592 


2,380 


4,143 


2,535 


6 


106 


302 


40 


3 


421 


1,061 


- 


Norway. ................ 


6,979 


698 


664 


1,919 


1,967 


28 


101 


102 


21 


1 


420 


1,058 




Poland................. 


8,347 


132 


1,503 


4,553 


698 


16 


113 


68 


16 


- 


83 


1,165 


- 


Portugal. .............. 


1,496 


241 


185 


349 


239 


3 


26 


24 


3 


- 


32 


394 


- 


Rumania. ............... 


2,046 


50 


479 


1,082 


178 


11 


46 


3 


5 


2 


21 


169 


— 


Spain... .....,,,....... 


11,513 


232 


1,454 


5,416 


3,445 


46 


130 


47 


154 


3 


64 


522 


- 


Svfeden. ................ 


6,122 


191 


1,174 


2,595 


689 


- 


30 


110 


4 


2 


269 


1,058 


- 


Switzerland. ........... 


5,776 


110 


1,356 


2,256 


618 


87 


44 


64 


23 


1 


142 


1,070 


- 


(England.,...., 


47,091 


1,839 


9,083 


16,905 


10,493 


221 


141 


522 


125 


oA 


603 


7,123 


- 




2,227 


29 


146 


789 


705 


7 


13 


13 


25 


1 


21 


47c 


— 


Kingdom(Sootland. . , , , 


11,145 


149 


1,080 


4,313 


3,603 


28 


21 


56 


26 


2 


94 


1,773 


- 




1,603 


50 


237 


650 


399 


10 


4 


14 


8 


1 


41 


189 


— 


u.s.s.n.. .............. 


3,957 


175 


543 


2,196 


402 


9 


31 


211 


5 


- 


28 


357 


- 




1,412 


516 


87 


400 


131 


1 


16 


39 


2 


- 


19 


201 


■" 


Other Europe ........... 


2,936 


158 


394 


991 


712 


17 


107 


31 


10 


1 


202 


310 


3 


Asia. ,....,..,,,.,......, 


30.838 


3.610 


6.037 


5.973 


4.694 


56 


3.241 


668 


221 


53 


2.476 


3,765 


4^+ 


China........... .,„,,., 


4,325 


486 


359 


491 


1,940 


25 


446 


140 


7 


2 


252 


137 


40 


India.. 


3,007 


266 


603 


673 


430 


4 


356 


170 


14 


1 


397 


93 


- 




940 


59 


173 


407 


92 


- 


138 


6 


3 


- 


24 


38 


— 


Japan ,«..,.....«....,., 


8,036 


455 


2,199 


693 


1,095 


2 


396 


3 


151 


46 


416 


2,578 


2 




587 


7 


111 


297 


62 


- 


67 


4 


1 


- 


8 


30 


— 


Philippines. . .......,,, 


4,132 


479 


939 


1,001 


42 


2 


535 


66 


14 


2 


518 


534 


- 




9,811 


1,858 


1,653 


2,411 


1,033 


23 


1,303 


279 


31 


2 


861 


355 


2 


North America, ... o ,...,« 


184^582 


4.980 


14.732 


125.244 


18.129 


44 


5.950 


795 


1,672 


10 


1.175 


11.803 


43 


Canada ........,,.« 


25,365 


627 


1,182 


11,422 


7,510 


9 


1,851 


256 


390 


1 


515 


1,594 


8 




51,480 


2,160 


4,502 


38,445 


3,588 


- 


1,608 


155 


249 


7 


345 


421 


— 


West Indies...,.....,., 


89,730 


1,346 


7,432 


64,085 


5,764 


17 


1,623 


213 


963 


- 


145 


8,142 


- 




14,631 


739 


1,233 


9,138 


868 


17 


818 


151 


62 


- 


136 


1,469 


— 


Other North America..., 


3,376 


108 


383 


2,154 


399 


1 


50 


20 


8 


2 


34 


177 


40 


South America, ,......,.., 


44,001 


3,429 


4,581 


27,163 


3,447 


72 


2,011 


718 


107 


1 


575 


1,897 


- 




3,913 


300 


897 


i,a8 


388 


11 


256 


143 


21 


1 


201 


277 


- 


Australia & New Zealand,, 


7,409 


488 


1,926 


2,702 


1,307 


4 


75 


va 


22 


5 


158 


581 


" 




8,675 


1,936 


542 


2,729 


1,732 


14 


49 


379 


15 


1 


48 


1,214 


16 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 17. NONIMMIGRANT ALIENS ADKITTED, BY CLASSES UM)ER THE IMMIGRATION LAWS 
AND COUNTRY OR REGION OF UST PERIIANENT RESIDENCE: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1953 



















0) 




L 

g<2 
























r-t > 




-p 1- 

<i) Cx) 








Country or region 


Nvimber 
ad- 


+> 




u 

<2 










rary 
rs and 
ees 








of last permanent 
residence 


mitted 


§-3 

6|3 


rary 

ors 

ess 


rary 

ors 

ure 


••«„ 


>,Z 


m 

C 


*> c 


+3 bO© 
Q) IL> 

m t, C 


C m 


com 


to 







•H C u 


+3 c 


jJ m 
P4T< ri 


m C 


43 0) 


0) 


0) c 


«j 


a c 


b ■0 C 


1^ n 






a> a> 'H 


S.S 


n) -o 


-a 


0) t. 


tn <*H -rt 


s: di 


0) tn 






t, > <M 


i.3 3 


B m V 


(D 0) 


3 


+J 0. 


6^.0) 


D. -tJ 


-H 


+j m -H 


S a 






"H 


0) -H H 


»-. l-t 


bii 


+> 


52 


a u 


Q) tH CI) 


&li 


D 0) r-( 


■P rH 






bn bO 


f- > * 


E-i > a 


E- n) 


to 


E- S -P 


« e 


ai u tt 





All countries oo.co 00 o 


485. 7U 


24.502 


63.496 


243.219 


67.684 


878 


13.533 


6,112 


3,021 


174 


12,584 


50,397 


114 


Europe o.<.>>oo<oo«<o<>>>o>« 


124.369 


9.792 


27.118 


44,469 


26.979 


621 


1.384 


3,311 


872 


9? 


7,920 


1,797 


6 


Austria ,,...,o,o..o°<.o<io 


1,659 


72 


210 


450 


198 


6 


13 


3 


84 


5 


584 


32 


2 


Belgiunio .» .o...<.oo. 


3,547 


625 


990 


i,m 


480 


17 


7 


176 


12 


3 


84 


42 


- 


Bulgaria. ..o...... •..••• 


3 


- 


1 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


— 


— 


Czechoslovakia, ........ 


131 


40 


2 


7 


32 


- 


7 


42 


- 


- 


— 


1 


— 


Denmark. ................ 


3,951 


489 


549 


1,315 


965 


31 


21 


no 


2 


3 


442 


24 


_ 


Estonia •oao..ab.o«aooooo 


19 


4 


_ 


1 


1 


- 


10 


2 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


Finland..... 


1,182 


49 


283 


453 


260 


15 


15 


4 


5 


- 


84 


14 




France . ..•••........oooo 


15,252 


1,879 


3,659 


4,426 


2,559 


5 


119 


1,150 


132 


U 


1,033 


226 




Germany, .....o.. 


U,328 


276 


2,642 


4,358 


825 


5 


164 


19 


114 


17 


2,568 


340 




Lrreece. .o............... 


2,029 


333 


356 


609 


266 


18 


263 


29 


2 


1 


102 


50 


- 


Hungary. ....,.,... 


55 


39 


3 


8 


4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


Ireland. ................ 


1,499 


25 


248 


782 


328 


4 


6 


10 


1 


1 


36 


58 


- 


Italy .,,.,....., 


6,490 


656 


1,667 


1,876 


1,342 


60 


107 


86 


58 


4 


491 


143 


- 


Latvia ......osoeeeoooo,. 


6 


- 


3 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Lithuania. .,,.„,.....„.. 


5 


_ 


2 


2 


1 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


Netherlands. ...... ..... . 


7,693 


666 


2,152 


2,421 


1,562 


2 


73 


281 


39 


3 


443 


51 


- 


Non-ray. ................. 


5,253 


720 


601 


1,532 


1,662 


37 


95 


102 


14 


1 


429 


65 


- 


Poland. ................. 


198 


87 


12 


19 


26 


1 


2 


48 


- 


- 


1 


2 


- 


Portugal. .,,.„....,.. o . 


974 


255 


148 


202 


258 


~ 


20 


27 


2 


- 


30 


32 


- 


Ruraania. . .......o....... 


38 


28 


2 


2 


3 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


Spain ......0....... 


3,430 


191 


483 


712 


1,750 


U 


43 


12 


129 


1 


31 


37 


- 


Sweden ,.....,..,..««,... 


4,555 


201 


1,155 


2,288 


415 


- 


42 


92 


^ 


1 


289 


68 


- 




4,356 


121 


1,313 


1,799 


454 


95 


44 


282 


31 


1 


157 


59 


- 


(England., 0...., 


38,195 


2,154 


9,5a 


15,226 


9,003 


222 


169 


513 


179 


42 


702 


444 


- 


United (No, Ireland,,,, 


1,409 


2 


101 


630 


583 


27 


18 


3 


9 


2 


18 


16 


- 


Kingdom(Scotland„ . , . . . , 


7,015 


38 


615 


3,102 


3,052 


12 


10 


32 


16 




90 


48 


- 


(vjales.,.....,,. 


865 


10 


122 


443 


229 


5 


4 


6 


3 


- 


32 


11 


- 


UoOoO«lt«|io oa**«oo«oaoooo 


414 


Ul 


4 


13 


44 


- 


- 


212 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




653 


503 


8 


51 


42 


- 


4 


39 


- 


- 


1 


5 


- 


other Europe ............ 


2,160 


188 


246 


627 


634 


18 


127 


31 


37 


- 


222 


26 


4 


Asia. O..0OO......O..O..,,, 


25.846 


3.822 


6.019 


5.101 


3.752 


% 


3.199 


600 


200 


?Jt 


2.439 


535 


^ 


China ......,,,.,...,.... 


113^7 


4fc 


70 


66 


167 


7 


240 


91 


2 


1 


212 


4 


16 


India. ..,,,..«,.. 


2,063 


176 


437 


334 


243 


1 


350 


120 


9 


- 


384 


9 


" 


Israel. o...,...,, ....... 


2,997 


192 


709 


1,575 


184 


- 


214 


32 


6 


- 


63 


22 


- 


Japan 


5,484 


555 


2,325 


697 


389 


1 


433 


5 


152 


50 


453 


375 


49 




181 


7 


42 


80 


31 


- 


16 


- 


- 


- 


5 


- 


- 


Philippines, . ........... 


3,803 


479 


1,049 


1,017 


58 


2 


549 


66 


13 


2 


520 


/^8 


- 


Other Asia, .o,,,.,,..... 


9,961 


1,931 


1,387 


1,332 


2,680 


23 


1,397 


286 


18 


1 


803 


77 


26 




265.852 


6.270 


19.953 


154.142 


28.735 


114 


6.421 


1.144 


1,814 


15 


1.288 


45.945 


11 


Canada ,....,.,...., 


43,516 


1,091 


3,184 


26,072 


14,296 


42 


2,108 


510 


477 


4 


624 


99 


9 


Mexico ... .0,90.00.0.0.., 


58,841 


2,562 


5,373 


43,356 


4,942 


4 


1,678 


168 


293 


10 


374 


81 


- 


West Indies,.,,,.,.,,,., 


97,586 


1,753 


9,801 


74,137 


8,459 


36 


1,685 


296 


979 


1 


146 


293 


- 




15,132 


840 


1,552 


10,394 


975 


19 


829 


159 


64 


- 


142 


15s 


- 


Other North America 


45,777 


24 


43 


183 


63 


13 


121 


U 


1 


- 


2 


45,3U 


2 


South America,,.....,,..., 


55,382 


3,825 


7,012 


34,479 


6,065 


104 


2,188 


824 


108 


1 


591 


135 


_ 




3,950 


288 


1,076 


1,677 


283 


3 


247 


n? 


16 


1 


198 


48 


1 


Australia & New Zealand,,, 


7,785 


424 


2,201 


2,973 


1,685 


1 


75 


105 


9 


4 


144 


164 


- 


Other countries,,,... ,..., 


2,530 


81 


117 


378 


185 


1 


19 


16 


1 


- 


4 


1,723 


5 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 18. NONIMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED AND NONEMIGRANT ALIENS DEPARTED, 
BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF LAST OR INTENDED FUTURE PERMANENT RESIDENCE: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1949 TO 19^3 



Country or region 

of last or future 

residence 



1949 



N N IMMIGRANT 



1950 



1951 



1952 



2951 



NONEMIGRANT 



1949 



1950 



1951 



1952 



1953 



All countries . . . 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

(England. .. • 

United (No. Ireland. 

Kingdai( Scotland . . . 

(Wales 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 



As ia 

China 

India 

Israel l/. . . . 

Japan 

Palestine l/. 
Philippines.. 
Other Asia, .. 



North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Central America..., 
Other No. America.. 



South America 

Africa 

Australia & N. Zeal. 
Other countries . 



W.272 



^26.837 



465.106 



516.082 



^85.714 



^05.503 



429.091 



¥f6,727 



487.617 



520.246 



111.590 



^54 

3,037 

47 

684 

3,680 

47 

877 

11,842 

4,394 

1,948 

657 

1,530 

7,830 

24 

25 

6,712 

5,305 

699 

1,577 

93 

3,067 

5,053 

3,519 

37,971 

1,011 

5,769 

848 

527 

158 

1,805 

17.9L4 



97.186 



6,234 
2,412 

488 
1,256 
2,497 
5,027 

268.191 



928 

2,450 

15 

227 

3,532 

18 

833 

10,433 

4,091 

1,541 

66 

1,229 

7,050 

6 

8 

5,405 

4,576 

411 

1,091 

35 

2,610 

4,598 

3,673 

33,695 

858 

4,648 

718 

472 

290 

1,679 

17.840 



10^. 96 3 



1,959 
1,890 
3,008 
1,498 
436 
2,517 
6,532 

261.836 



926 

3,254 

9 

97 

3,974 

17 

975 

13,197 

6,022 

3,643 

79 

1,072 

5,389 

24 

5 

7,641 

4,717 

217 

915 

50 

2,190 

4,289 

3,926 

33,382 

732 

4,550 

606 

427 

285 

2,353 

19.529 



121.902 



763 
1,506 
2,945 
3,580 

362 
2,728 
7,645 

281.201 



1,380 

4,575 

9 

155 

4,227 

10 

1,165 

14,930 

9,965 

1,840 

75 

1,391 

6,240 

7 

15 

8,122 

5,322 

296 

888 

45 

2,623 

4,446 

4,467 

38,827 

780 

6,291 

730 

358 

420 

2,303 

2?.6?8 



124.369 



102,020 
34,405 
87,517 
10,701 
33,548 

39,291 
3,912 
5,062 
1.312 



97,084 
30,735 
85,035 
11,207 
37,775 

40,094 
3,320 
5,737 
824 



108,887 
32,851 
86,398 
11,832 
41,233 

48,004 
3,125 
7,585 
699 



1,074 
1,882 
2,648 
4,312 
252 
3,424 
10,046 

305.890 



1,659 

3,547 

3 

131 

3,951 

19 

1,182 

15,252 

11,328 

2,029 

55 

1,499 

6,490 

6 

5 

7,693 

5,258 

198 

974 

38 

3,430 

4,555 

4,356 

38,195 

1,409 

7,015 

865 

414 

653 

2,160 

25.846 



107.217 



y Israel is included in Palestine prior to 1950 



123,471 
28,111 

100,301 
13,875 
40,132 

51,553 
3,704 
8,364 
1.031 



1,357 
2,063 
2,997 
5,484 
181 
3,803 
9,961 

265.852 



391 

3,075 

32 

533 

3,680 

15 

741 

11,197 

1,592 

1,383 

357 

1,678 

6,654 

20 

14 

6,662 

4,875 

676 

1,582 

71 

2,665 

5,108 

3,455 

40,403 

1,035 

6,395 

993 

362 

107 

1,466 

12.369 



?gA77 



48,516 
58,841 
97,586 
15,132 
45,777 

55,382 
3,950 
7,785 
2.^?0 



3,885 
1,702 

322 
1,337 
1,795 
3,328 

238.916 



782 

2,448 

23 

219 

3,514 

24 

823 

9,800 

2,903 

1,578 

70 

1,399 

6,404 

4 

13 

5,115 

5,306 

416 

717 

30 

2,465 

4,995 

3,413 

36,773 

987 

5,464 

794 

323 

203 

1,472 

10.756 



99.469 



93,187 
24,131 
89,263 
9,657 
22,678 

37,651 
3,574 
4,730 
1.046 



1,115 
1,581 
1,760 
957 
320 
1,926 
3,097 

269.469 



387 

2,935 

8 

103 

3,796 

11 

938 

10,785 

5,152 

1,868 

65 

1,267 

4,796 

9 

15 

7,031 

4,715 

221 

738 

48 

2,470 

4,278 

3,598 

35,025 

779 

4,744 

633 

366 

240 

2,148 

12.543 



111.585 



96,117 
25,174 
88,818 
10,849 
48,511 

40,279 
3,033 
5,868 
1.209 



483 
1,133 
2,809 
2,532 

161 
1,925 
3,500 

278.276 



955 

4,101 

3 

96 

3,773 

15 

942 

13,029 

7,457 

1,563 

88 

1,386 

5,159 

16 

12 

7,109 

4,908 

201 

707 

50 

2,366 

4,070 

3,947 

39,696 

676 

6,006 

731 

271 

244 

2,008 

12.889 



127.909 



105,710 
26,471 
89,201 
11,364 
45,530 

44,780 
2,702 
7,443 
l .^H 



265 
1,104 
1,913 
3,292 

152 
2,170 
3,993 

300.629 



1,534 

3,598- 

10 

133 

3,770 

8 

1,189 

14,567 

10,598 

2,083 

81 

1,830 

6,700 

11 

12 . 

7,555 .''■ 

5,634 

232 

736 

64 

3,006 

4,691 

4,334 

42,789 

1,212 

7,631 

977 

391 

641 

1,892 

15.190 



119,938 
33,269 
85,606 
12,398 
49,418 

49,047 
2,846 
8,736 
1.885 



668. 
1,431 
2,292 
3,852 

188 
2,462 
4,297 

310.625 



81,599: 
56,415 
106,650 
14,263 
51,698 

53,333 
3,469 
7,262 
2.458 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 19. NONIMMIGaOT ALIENS IN THE TJW1T53) STATES, BY DISTRICT 

CW JUNE 30, 1952 AMD 1953 

(Exclusive of border croBsers, agricultural, laborers, 

crewmen, returning residents, and foreign government 

officials and representatives) 



District 



June 30, 1953: 
All districts, 



Visitors 



St, Albans, Vt , 

Boston, Mass.... ,, 

New York, N. Y 

Philadelphia, Fa 

Baltimore, Md 

Miami, Fla 

Buffalo, N, Y 

Detroit, Mich 

Chicago, 111 

Kansas Ciiy, hfo 

Seattle, Wash 

San Francisco, Calif.... 

San Antonio, Tex 

El Paso, Tex , 

Los Angeles, Calif,..,, 
Honolulu, T. H , 



99,131 



June 30, 1952: 
All districts, 



St. Albans, Vt 

Boston, Mass 

New Yorfc, N. Y 

Hiiladelphia, Pa 

Baltimore, Ma,.,,,,,,,,, 

Miami, Fla 

Buffalo, N, Y,, 

Detroit, Mich , 

Chicago, 111 

Kansas City, Mo 

Seattle, Wash,,,,. 

San Francisco, Calif..,. 

San Antonio, Tex 

El Paso, Tex 

Los Angeles, Calif , 



5,762 

l,31t 

38,167 

229 

368 

2,319 
6,222 
1,795 

3,812 
3,932 
13,107 
2,088 
3,175 
2,195 

1041^98 



Transit 
aliens 



6,362 



8,737 

1,200 

39,050 

235 

473 

15,191 

2,329 

6,ii79 

2,296 

5,713 
4,664 

12,287 
1,672 
2,785 

_i«082L 



22A 

2,2A7 
40 
67 
52^ 
209 
64 
28 

274 
333 
1,801 
68 
201 
208 



7tO?^ 



1/ Admitted since December 7, 1948. 

2/ Admitted since December 24, 1952, 

2/ Admitted since December 24, 1952. 



230 

116 

3,233 

30 

50 

503 

9A. 

75 

71 

550 
448 

1,363 

46 

134 

82_ 



Students 



29,596 



120 
2,548 
4,366 
1^506 
1,560 
2,257 

1,033 
3,098 
2,818 
2,702 
1,297 
2,371 
1,127 

705 
1,943 

345 



2g,70? 



108 
2,178 
4,368 
1,245 
1,554 
1,763 

929 
3,016 
2,466 
2,153 
1,023 
2,128 

680 

586 

1,422 

B6 



Trealy 
traders 



1,012 



30 

29 

677 

3 

11 

69 

27 

6 

2 

3 
105 

1 

1 

33 

15 



.221 



Temporary 
workers 
and 
trainees 



3,549 



45 

25 

580 

4 
11 
87 
27 

5 



3 
88 

2 

35 
21. 



2,446 

8 

317 

2 
256 

79 
68 
11 

46 
122 

55 
60 
52 
27 



Represent- 
atives of 
foreign 
information 
media 



57 



4 
21 



1 
3 



1 

10 

4 

1 
12 



Agricultural laborers are not included. 



Ifeited States Department of Justice 
Imm igration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 20. ALTKNS EXCLUDED FROM THE UNITED STATES, BY CAUSI 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1947 TO 1953 


U 






Cause 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


Ntimber excluded ....o ;>...• 


7.435 


7.113 


5.5a 


5.256 


5.647 


5.050 


5i647 


Cr''\ mlnala ...............•.•••••••••••••••<> 


442 

12 

9 

2 
8 
42 
44 
26 
61 
6 
24 

47 

17 
212 
160 
947 

5,141 
3 

22 

4 

135 

2 

12 

7 

2 

46 


367 

18 

3 

1 
11 
37 
28 
20 
28 

8 
26 

110 

33 
167 

91 
815 

5,156 

17 

46 
2 
2 
2 
2 
123 


402 
31 
31 

~ 

4 
13 
37 
22 
32 
22 

7 
18 

33 

4 
207 
160 
217 

4,110 

4 

2 

33 
7 

84 
12 

9 

4 

5 

31 


428 

32 

157 

5 
10 
30 

49 
26 
21 
5 
27 

21 

25 
103 
135 
1?? 

3,926 

2 

3 
12 

1 

56 
4 

U 
8 
6 

28 


610 

38 

165 

9 
18 
30 
24 
17 
31 

6 
11 

45 

243 
116 
122 
121 

3,963 

2 

1 
1 

U 

1 
3 

15 
2 

39 


534 

29 

H8 

7 
14 
35 

9 
23 
19 

8 
17 

22 

10 

41 

115 

74 

3,860 

1 
9 

19 
3 
3 

10 

1 
39 


491 


TmmoT^l classes ....••••••••••.••.••..•••.. 


58 


SiihvftT^I ve OT* anarchistic .....•...•....•.• 


118 


Violators of narcotic laws.. .............. 


1 


Mental or physical defectives: 

Idiots and imbeciles l/. •.••••••••••••« 


5 


Feeble minded aliens ........•.••••a..** 


14 


Insane aliens or had been insane 

PsTchopathic personality aliens 

EoileDtics . ...... ..••a..... *••*•*••. ..a 


29 
14 
10 


Mentally defective aliens ..•••••••o*.a. 


16 


Chronic alcoholics. ..•*«••■•■.••••.•••. 


4 


Tubercular aliens ........ •....•••••.••. 


88 


dangerous, contagious disease ,, 

affect ability to earn a living 

Likely to become public charges,. 

Previously excluded, deported or removed,. 
Stowaways ...........a.......,,..,,,,...,,. 


7 

3 

33 

169 

47 


Entered without inspection or by 

false statements ,,,,,,..,,,,,,,,.,,,,,. 


139 


Entered without Dj?oper documents •,,.,..,,. 


4,293 


Paupers, professional beggars, 

and vaerant s ........ ..a,....,. •«■...,•. 




Polveamists or advocate polygamy. ......... 


^^ 


Contract laborers ••.....a.a....aa.a,aaa,a. 


6 


Ineligible to citizenship. .....a.a.a.aa .a. 


5 


Previously departed from U,S, to 

avoid service in anned forces .>>...•..• 


39 


Brought by nonsicnatory lines..aaa....... . 




AccomDanyinK aliens ..........aaaaa,.,.,,,. 


10 


Assisted aliens. ..aaaaaa.aaaaaaaaaaaa.aaoe 


1 


Other 


47 



1/ Cause for exclusion under Immigration Act of Februaiy 5, 1917. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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TABLE 23, VESSELS AND AIRPLANES INSPECTED, CREWMEN EXAMINED, AND STCWAWAYS FOUND ON ARRIVING 
VESSELS. BY DISTRICTS; YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1952 AND 1953 1/ 



District 



Vessels and airplanes inspected 



Arrived 



Vessels 



Airplanes 



Departed 



Vessels and 
airplanes 2/ 



Crevnnen 
arrived and examined 



Aliens 



Citizens 



Stowaways arrived 



Aliens 



1953 
All districts. 



St. Albans, Vt, 

Boston, Mass 

New York, N. Y., 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Baltimore, Md. .oo,...s 

Miami, Fla , 

Btjffalo, N. Y...,o 

Detroit, Mich ,. 

L^mCagO, JJ.J.. eoo*aooe*«..eo 

Kansas City, Mo,*...o>a...o 

Seattle, Wash.,,,, 

San Francisco, Calif ,, 

San Antonio, Tex ..,« 

El Paso, Tex 

Los Angeles, Calif. „, , 

Honolulu, T. H,.,.o. 

1952 

All districts 

5t . Albans , Vt oe*o.o«»oo..e 

Boston, Mass 

New York, N. Y.. 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Baltimore, Md .,, 

Miami, Fla „ 

Buffalo, N, Y 

Detroit, Mich 

Chicago, HI , 

Kansas City, Mo..* 

oeattle, Washe o..e.eoee**.o 

San Francisco, Calif „„ 

San Antonio, Tex. ........ ,. 

ij-L raso, iex. .. o •••••..• e e 

Los Angeles, Calif 

Honolulu, T. H 



Mj2!lL 



492 
2,279 
5,645 
1,84S 
3,087 
12,791 
1,936 
1,872 
1,094 

5,095 
1,610 
2,006 

4,784 
808 



62.179 



> e o • • o 



12,128 
2,473 
6,317 
2,036 
5,073 

ir,925 

3,ia 

2,519 
1,103 

5,633 
1,619 
2,ia 

4,581 
490 



84.890 



1,654 

4,962 

10,043 

U 

778 

36,459 

2,931 

1,759 

1,290 

5 

6,929 

138 

3,561 

2,165 

3,514 

8,688 



?7.886 



4,480 

4,864 

10,779 

16 

752 

34,401 

6,791 

2,019 

3,109 

7,959 
130 
4,577 
3,988 
2,810 
11,211 



?0 . ? 4 ? 



10 

607 

8,631 

307 

1,318 

7,552 

450 

70 

162 

3,828 
153 
695 

1,045 
5,517 



26. ?8? 



1.080^545 



852.282 



8 

3,288 

667 

423 

1,885 

7,497 

62 

41 

456 

2,819 

153 

1,317 

1,114 
6,855 



2,716 

59,449 

391,893 

48,084 

81,308 

222,208 

9,469 

n,312 

5,628 

95,569 
32,087 
51,267 

52,452 
17,103 



1.087.633 



4,849 

49,775 

368,374 

44,824 

U3,226 

203,689 

21,275 

11,727 

3,727 

89,301 
29,084 
54,126 

45,379 
18,277 



659 

35,257 

236,083 

23,840 

30,574 

211,024 

5,359 

16,638 

6,266 

90,763 
65,716 
20,858 

48,549 
60,696 



851.785 



598 

33,641 

219,555 

32,434 

75,569 

207,248 

8,872 

19,721 

6,457 

65,328 
58,366 
26,839 

44,530 
52,627 



424 



17 
21 
26 

22 
18 



482 



8 

13 
22 

38 
15 



JiO. 



12 


4 


131 


24 


18 


3 


92 


3 


67 


4 



89 



15 


9 


126 


35 


29 


7 


116 


4 


100 


13 



3 

10 

7 



1/ Each and every arrival or departure of the same vessel or crewman counted separately. 
2/ Separate figures for vessels and aiiT^Ianes not available. 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Natxiralization Service 



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TABLE 2M. ALIENS DEPORTED AND ALIENS DEPARTING VOLUNTARILY 
UNDER PROCEEDINGS; YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1892 TO 1953 









Aliens departing 


Period 


Total 


Aliens 


voluntarily 






deported 


rmder proceed- 
ings 1/ 


1892 - 1953 


4.315.085 


416.259 


3.898.826 


1892 - 1900 


3,127 


3,127 




1901 - 1910 


11,558 


11,558 


— 


1911 - 1920 


27,912 


27,912 


• 


1921 - 1930 


164.390 


92.157 


72.233 


1921..., 


4,517 


4,517 




1922,... 


4,345 


4,345 


. 


1923..., 


3,661 


3,661 


. 


1924.... 


6,409 


6,409 


> 


1925..., 


9,495 


9,495 


- 


1926.,.. 


10,904 


10,904 


— 


1927.... 


26,674 


11,662 


15,012 


1928,.., 


31,571 


11,625 


19,946 


1929,,., 


38,796 


12,908 


25,888 


1930,... 


28,018 


16,631 


11,387 


1931 - 1940 


210.416 


117.086 


93.330 


1931..., 


29,^61 


18,1/,? 


11,719^ 


1932. c. 


30,201 


19,426 


10,775 


1933. e.. 


30,?12 


19,865 


10,347 


1934. c. 


16,889 


8,879 


8,010 


1935. ... 


16,297 


8,319 


7,978 


1936.,., 


17,446 


9,195 


8,251 


1937.... 


17,617 


8,829 


8,788 


1938.... 


18,553 


9,275 


9,278 


1939.... 


17,792 


8,202 


9,590 


1940.,,, 


15,548 


6,954 


8,594 


1941 - 1950 


1.581.774 


110.849 


1.470.925 


19a..., 


10,938 


4,407 


6,531 


1942,,., 


10,613 


3,709 


6,904 


1943..., 


16,154 


4,207 


11,947 


1944..,, 


39,449 


7,179 


32,270 


1945o... 


80,760 


11,270 


69,490 


1946..., 


116,320 


14,375 


101,945 


1947,, oo 


214,543 


18,663 


195,880 


1948,,,, 


217,555 


20,371 


197,184 


1949.,. 


296,337 


20,040 


276,297 


1950,,,, 


579,105 


6,628 


572,477 


1951 


686,713 


13,544 


673,169 


1952. 


723,959 


20,181 


703,778 


1953 


905,236 


19,845 


885,391 



1/ Volimtary 
recorded 



departures of aliens imder proceedings first 
in 1927, 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 25. ALIENS DEPORTED, BY DEPCKTATION EXPENSE kW COUT-ITRY 

YEAR ENDED JTJhJE 30. 1953 


TO WHICH DEPORTED: 






Total 


Denortation expense borne by: i 




Country to which 
deported 


immlgratTon 

and 

NatToralization 

Service 


Other 

Government 

agencies 


Steamship 
conoanies 


Airlines 


Aliens 
deported 


Aliens 
reshlT)ried 


All countries 


19.8A5 


17.060 


972 


212 


23 


1.525 


53 


Europe 


1.726 


1.107 


250 


92 


4 


232 


41 


Denmark, • 


50 

51 

30 

129 

220 

28 

37A 

91 

125 

123 

93 

66 

251 

U 

76 

332 


38 
34 
23 

100 

132 
21 

186 
65 
87 
74 
50 
51 

199 
10 
37 

227 


9 
9 
3 

13 

25 

4 

86 

11 

22 

12 

19 

5 

17 

1 

U 

32 


2 
5 
1 
9 
8 
1 

9 

6 

10 

10 

4 

10 

3 

a 


1 
1 

2 

1 


2 

I 

42 
2 

84 
3 
9 

30 

U 
4 

12 

3 
21 

28 


1 


Finland ............ 


1 


France ............. 


— 


Germany 

Greece ............. 


3 
12 


Ireland 


•_ 


Italy 


2 


Netherlands ........ 

Norway 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 


3 

1 
2 

2 


United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 


13 
1 
3 


China 


13 
11 
AO 
5 
24 
100 
70 
69 

17.A73 


7 
6 
34 
A 
21 
64 
43 
48 

15.542 


1 

2 

5 

21 

3 

650 


2 
5 

26 
4 
4 

50 


1 
17 


3 
4 

1 
1 

3 
2 

U 

1.208 


1 


India 


— 


Indonesia 


_ 


Japan 

Jordan 


- 


Pakistan 


2 


Philippines 

Other Asia 


- 


North America 


6 


Canada , 


1,073 

15,857 

^26 

113 

152 

28 

13A 


924 

14,291 

229 

94 

4 

91 
15 
78 


93 

514 

33 

10 

19 

4 

17 


1 
23 
23 

3 

20 
2 
7 


16 

1 

1 


54 

1,026 

124 

4 

20 

7 

30 


1 


^fexico 


3 


West Indies 

Central America.... 
Other No. America.. 

South America 

Africa 


1 
1 

1 


Other countries 


2 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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OO -:f 1 


(jN rH O 


m cn -* CO 


NO O 


m 1 


nO 






n 


O -^ l^uj ,H NO CO 


encv CD m o 
CV -:f tjN o "^ 


r^ lA o c\ o irs 


CO in cn c^ 


tn 


00 






0) 


_j o CO ^ -o -d- vo 


O>o c^ n-\ l>- vo 


CT- rH cn rH 


tv H 




00 






n r-l 




i« •« 




« •« •« 






n m 








« 






o a> 


-jl?Q 


CV rH rH rH 

r- en rj 


O ^CO 00 o 


U~\ C^ CTN r^ >o O' 


CO 






c^ 






►J W) 


c^ 


\ 


rH UN en 


o 


r^ C^ Cr^ O ^ CO 


CO 










5 


C\J 




(JN 


CO 


-d 


CNi O sO rH fv n^ 


m 






«9 








(\ 


cv 




H 


rH 


m 


-* 


















ij 




CM 1 CM <t 00 


en O 00 1 c~- rH 


00 o 00 1 r^ o^ ir\ 


tn CV o o 


NO C- 


;?'^ 


^ 


(D 




O 


r- 


S2 ;^ s. 


T CO 


NO rH r- en en 


0-\-* CO O J 


t sO 


Ono mNO 


o o 


O 




to 


in 


c^ 


rH O On Cn- 


o en en rH in 


O ir\ */^ oj r-\ ^^ 


r-< tV 


00 ,-1 




00 


© -H 




(TJ 






•* 


* • 


* ■» •» 


•I « 


*>•«■« •« 


Pt • 


•1 








.S t 




a. 


<X) 


^ 


^^ -^ 


CO in 00 CV 00 


O- O to O Oi 00 


CO 






C3 






O 


to 
o 


CO f*^ o 


C^ rH 


m 


rHsO NO ^ C^ -^ 


-J 






■J 


4J <[} 




rH 


rn 


rH 


rH 




m 


rH CS( 








«* 


to CO 






rv 


(N 






















^ § 




o 


O 


r^ ir\ Oij ir\ tr\ u-\ r\i 

rH <0 -4- CV rH vO ^ 


00 C--NO CV ON CN- 


-4 CO Oc^ C^ C\ 
CV sO r\i r^O f\ 


f*^ 


CTN tn -* CN- 


NO NO 


CV 1 


CTN 


<M -rl 
O p 




•H 


4 


~0 CM O enO ^ 


O 


nO m c^ 


in c^ 


r-{ 


o 


0} 




§ § 


CO CJN o m ry O 


O O UN fv ir\ c^ _j- 


tv o 


r-l CV 




CV 


P ta 








•t 


^ • 






*>•»•!•« 


n « 


•s 








C -H 




cn *:> 


O 


o 


'^■4 O 


-d- m ON 


CTn 


(J^r-i USrH C 


CV 


CV 


-* 




CO 


i-s 




5 


r-^ 


ur, vi 


J LTN 


NO rH 


nO 


cn (V CO CV nO 


NO 


CJN 




tn 




<M 


rH 


NO 


NO 


CN- 


O rH s£ 


m 


m 






«* 


-p t. 


















•t 












t. 3 






r^ 


en 








cv 


rH 












CO P 
a efl 
« 2 
T3 




8 

3 o 


^O 




1 1 1 en O 


fV NO nD 1 NO CO 


vO rH O 1 rH C 


rv 


O O O -cf 


in r-l 


f-i r 


m 




00 


CM NO 


O <t CV O C7> 


o^<j^r-i cr r= 


CV 


J-NO ^ 


CTN NO 




CN- 


•o 




^ 


CV 


CV en 


C-- J- 


CV 


O CV ON ir\vO CO 


c^ 


-d- 




-:f 


0) (3 




"^S 








^ • 


«s 


« 




M «i 










s 


'& 


rH 


tn c^ 


CV 


en 


m r^ m fV nO 


NO* 






H 


p 


^ 


5 








NO 


f-i ~t CM 


tv 






©» 


n) C 




tL, 


rH 






















P o 

to -H 


g 


a) 


rH 


JC 


m 1 1 H O 


c>J r- m 1 CO en 


t>- o*>nO I o^ -4 -4- 


rH O tv rH 


CO cn 


lr^ r^ 


rH 


P 


CO 


rH 


-J3 


C^ 


-* ^ S 


-d- CN- sO O CV 


C^ CO nO C^ C^ O^ 


rH rH C^ 


tnNO 


NO 


NO 


ei> H 
P ab 


M 


-tJ 


c^ 


o^ 


C7N o 


en en H 


fNy 


C^ -3- O O r- 


nO 


nO^ 


H 




CTN 


Q 


*3 


• 






" 


^ ^ •. 




•* Wl •» 


p« • 














Ifl 


CM 


c^ 


pt 'Ol 


-rf UAnO 


NO 


~:t r-i CV vC 


H 


i-i 






CN- 


c e 


S 


CO 


s 






1 rH 




<» 


H C\ 










a 


o B 


i-T 


o 


l/% 


^ Q 1 n^ v^ «0 vO 


C- o en rH NO CO 


CO CV NO CV O r- 


_* 


CTN no tnNO 


CTN crN\ 


cn r-i 


?? 






no 


o 


qe - - 


J NO O CV NO 




no c^ w>co no m c\J 


rH rH tv nO 


nO O 


<r\ 




S 


o 


rH 


-4- -J c^ mvo c>- 


o^ o o 00 cr- o^ 


c- m 

as 


H 




NO 




a. 


•H 


CO 
(V 


S 


rH r- 00 


CV en en 


CO 

cn 


^.d ^ CV 


r-l 










(^ 


CJ 


^ 


-4- 
























§ 


+3 


C^ 


5 ' 


1 rH 1 CD en 


en i/> m C7N en no 


m Q onnO m r— 

-* ON :^ ^ CM rH 


CV 


C^ Cr\ r~i r-i 


tn -d 


i~i rH 


g 




•H 


vO 


rH 


NO a 


C^ 


rH nO in C^nO o 


cn 


m t- 


CO NO 






o 


O 


^0 


-^^ 


CO en UN 


rH CV CV H rH CV 


CV -J- rH tn o o 


m 


CV 


H 




u^ 






^ 








« 






■t *t •« 


K • 


•s 












+J 


m 


UA 


CN- rH 


rH 


CV 


cnen CO CN- rH 


l-{ 






eg 






V 


ir> 


;^ 








-;* 


CV 










*^ 




M 


Q 


CM 


OJ 


























O 


IM 


f^ ' 


1 00 1 lA NO 


CV m en o nO cv 


CV O m <f t-- _;t rH 


1 rH rH O 


in CO 


1 1 


1 




«H 


[^ 


l/N 


en rv CV 


en rH en -J en 


en en -o o o 


ir. 


Ht 


NO rH 








o 


(0 


CO 


O 


rH o in 


O CV en en On 


CN- CO c^ O m -:f 


-* 


r-l 








M C^ 


tM 




•i 




► • 


^ * 




«v ^ as as 












S "^ 


«M 


c^ 


-* 


o m 


CV CV 


CV 


CTN m no c\ 
















3 


4 


rH 




rH 


rH 


On 


m rH rH 














So 




o 


::? ' 


vO itnnO CO NO 


CJNnO ^ CTncO CV 


O -* CTN m rH en cv 


CO CV CO -J- 


C^ r^ 


, 


r 




c*> 


•H 


o 


ITN 


'^^^ic' ^ 


rH O cn rH NO m 


cn CV <f ^ -JnC 


>o 


O CO NO 


ON CV 








to 




c^ 


-* 


en o a 


•^ 


in in c^ CO CO m 


O moo ^r^ r- o 


o 


tn NO 


A 








f- (il 






•1 


■K .K 


» 


^ "V •» .s 


» • 


•« «v ^ at as as a 


^ 












•H 


co' 


00 


CV ~t en -31 


rH nO CTN CV en CO 


rH O OCO O CC 


-4 


cn 












E 


-J 


fV 


o CV en 


rH 


r- 


CV rH CO ^ 












g "^ 




03 


r^ 








H 
















ag 


1 


o 


r;:^ ' 


1 u^ 1 .- 


H 


CV -J- CTN rH in pN. 


nO in CO rH m CV 


rH 


rH CN- rH CV 


-t -t 


1 1 


1 




►J Q 


•H (1) 


o 


<J*N 


CO NO enl 


CV (jN 


(M 


H o cn ON t^ o 


ON 


o 








^i 


*J ti 


I> 


o 


rH VN NO 


H J- 


-* 


rH CV tnNO 


^ 


cn 


rH 








^ O 








" 






a* as av 












8 


m B 


o 


r-{ 


CV en 




o 


CV -3- en 












8S 


pa 


-J 


-^ 








CV 


1 — 1 
















. .3 


>■ 


^ 1 


III-* CV 


1 m m CV 1 


CO 


1 ON CV tn 1 ^ 


■sO 


1 NO 1 1 


m 1 


1 1 






O 


n) 2. 


r-\ 


r-\ 


s 


en 


CV o 


CV 


CV m m ,-1 en 


rn 












•H ,H 


nO 


O 


en 


rH CV 


c^ 


cn CV H rH 
•* av 


r-l 










2 


SI o 
ft. T3 


^ 




'~~ 






rH 


NO cn 

rH 












g 




o 


S ' 


' "^ ' '£. 


rH 


1 m en en 1 


CN- 


1 O cn CO rH CV 


00 


1 CO 1 1 


O m 


1 1 


1 




M 


^ -^^ 


t^ 


C^ 


o <> c~-^ 


CO 00 


cv 


-* o O CN- cn 


m 


H 








> 


I S^ 


c^ 


ir\ 


rH nC 


rH 




o 


CV m CO -* en 


tn 










l-l 














as 


■> 












H 


3 >-■ 


00 


vO 


r— 






o 


cn m 












O 




fV 


OJ 








rH 
















•A 




l/^ 


:j"^ 


1 ON 1 CjN CV 


NO cn rH ^oc 


cn 


nO m cn CV o t> rH 


C^ rH nO C^ 


ON c^ 


cn 00 


^ 




•9 


m 


o 


H ~J c^ ir\ r\? 


rH CO cn t^ rH -*1 


-J- e> cn o m rH 
eV 00 CO On ,H -< 


c^ 


CO rH NO 


C^ o 


CV 




a. 


-p c3 


r>j 


C^ -d 


r o c 


r-l 


NO m H o c 


<t 


ON 


CO 


CV 


rH 


-J 




hH 






^ 


p» • 


•**•*•» 


•^ • 


a, as •( as as as 












O 


CO J3 


c^ 


^" 


rH en to 


CN- o CN- rH CV rnl 


CN- O CV -t ON CTN 








__. 




•z, 


iH 


-J 


e\ 


CN- 


m 


ON 


rH m m rH rr^ 














< 


S. 


o 








cv 


rH 










s 




ou 


01 


r- 


tn c\ 


CV rH l/\ -* CO 


NO rH nO rH J- m 


H On CM 00 m o 


ON 


O H ON CTN 


en r-i 


-4nO 


cn 






+J 


c^ 


S5 2; 


rH CO CV U~> r-\ 


CO C-- c-no n; 


8 


O CO mNO -J- in JH 


-J- rH CTN On 


en cn 


00 ^ 


g 


>f 


• 


o 


<f 


o o c^ en o en en 


r- m cnND r- 


rH CO rH NO in NO 


r^ 


m cn o rH 


en r^ 


CV 




rH !-. 


-1 


-trH 


rn at •« ■! 
CV C^nO C\ 


nO 


•t a^ ^ A •« • 

CV NO cnNO CN- en 


as as a. as as 

m en NO -j o tv 




^ iT\ r-l f~l 


as as 

NO H 




nO 


§ 




< -P 


o 


en 


O ^ NO| 


m CN- rH r- 


-J 


m CO rH CV CTN C^ fVN 


tn 


CTN 




r- 




[d 


m 


tvj 


m 


UN C\ 


CO 


nO rH 


in 


m cTNy o rn cn co 


00 






<3 


(0 


a 


•H 


H 


CD* 




CV 


CV 


<> 


ai as as 

nO .H H 








S 








H 


rH 






















§ 






• • 


















. . 




• a 




, . 






a 






' 


































• 

a 




a CD a 


• • 

a T3 






tn 






" 


































• 
a 




• CO* a 


• o 






O 






• 
































CO 


, 




• rD * 


a O 
a 0) 


n • 




TT^ 






































a> 




to • to 


T3 t. 


j»; • 


en 


0) a> 






• 














t3 


















o 


• 


c • CO t. 


0) 


o • 


(U 


-a ^ 




















0) 






(fl 












§ 


t3 11) m o 


P H 


3 m 


S 


c x» 


























Qi 


T3 








0) -H C "P 


La cH 


i~> OJ 


0) d) 




m 






















C 


0) 








>> 


•O rH 0) n (fl 


g..s 


+J o 


N 


-C; rH 




-O-P 
















E 






> 


c 


to 




eu 


C to -H t. ,H 


C 


•H 


0) -H 




c3 0) 














^ 






O 

> -H 


0) 
rH 




> 
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0) HOC 
£ <M efl p .H 
(DO ifl t> 


-§.§ 


ca rt 


tn 






Cf)^ 


rH 












eu 


(D 




<L 


P 


•H 




o in 


fc, 


to d) 




Ou 03 




rH 














0) 




> 


en 


J3 




"S 


t, J) rH 


>. o 


<D > 


rH 


ClJ 




0) 0) 


O 










en 


r-{ 




C 


0) to o 




a en rH o S 


r-\ 


rH C 


r- 


to 




•H-H 


l-i t, c 
-P o ••- 


a 


(» 


» 


•^^ 







3 c H B m t. -H 

er -r-i O 0) pr 0) tr 


a fcr J3 .H rt 
ed eu CD S rH 


en en 


•H O 


(« 


to d) 




PrH 


en P q 
t. eO 3 


o 


J3 




c 


3 3 


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c u 




•H a. 


rt P J3 


C n Q 






a) P m eel j= p 


rH P 


o o 


to o 


<M 


2.^ 




> g 


a o I- 


O O rH -1- 


ci3 c 6 CO eo Jh 
>s-H o 0) P « 


n t. 3 3 P en 


n bO la Lr Ih 


•H -H 


a> 6 ^ 


o 




•H 5 


e *^ 


x: J3 o. c 


C P 0) 43 ^ o ei) 


C Ml O Q) 0) 


> > 


t-. O 4) 






+5 O 


"> .. 





4) iti P m nj j: 


O T3 


o 3 ax x; 


0) 0; 


;3 4-> x 


(l> 


<D tt, 




o o 


rH OQ a: 


*m*m ra* -a: 


> t< =1 3 O P 

c H << m III c 


sa^fisss 


£t^S8S 


Lr L, 

0- a. 


N 3 +? 

•H < O 


:3 

rH 


CU 






■H 

•s. 














o 
o 










a. 












0) 






* * 


0) 
CO 


CO 

> 


* h1 



r 



TABLE 30o PASSENGER TRAVEL BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
BY PORT OF ARRIVAI. OR DEPARTURE: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1953 1/ 



Port 



By sea and by air 



Aliens 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



Aliens 



By sea 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



Aliens 



By air 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



ARRIVED, 



New York, N. Y 

Chicopee, Mass...... 

Boston, Masssoo 

Philadelphia, Pa.,,, 
Baltimore, Md,.,,,., 

Norfolk, Va 

Miami, Fla 

W. Palm Beach, Fla,, 
Key West, Fla, .,,.,, 
San Juan, P, R,,,,** 
Virgin Islands., ••«. 
Tan^, Fla,, ,,,..,,• 

Mobile, Ala ,... 

New Orleans, La.,,o» 
Galveston, Tex,,,,,, 
San Francisco, Cal,, 
Portland, Ore,oo*«*e 
Seattle, Wash, 2/oao 
Los Angeles, Calcoo 
San Pedro, Cal,,.,.« 
Honolulu, T, H,,,.,, 
Other ports, • 



DEPARTED. 



New York, N, Y, ,,,,, 
Chicopee, Mass,,,,,, 

Boston, Mass ,, 

Philadelphia, Pa.,,, 

Baltimore, Md 

Norfolk, Va .,,, 

Miami, Fla ,,.,0 

W. Palm Beach, Fla,. 
Key West, Fla,,,,... 

San Juan, P. R 

Virgin Inlands 

Tan^, Fla,... ,.,,,, 

Mobile, Ala 

New Orleans, La,,,,, 
Gailveston, Tex,,,,,, 
San Framcisco, Cal,. 
Portland, Or©,,,,,,. 
Seattle, Wash. 2/,oo 
Los Angeles, Cal..,. 
San Pedro, Cal...... 

Honolulu, T, H,o,,,o 
Other ports,,,,,,,, » 



?6?«0?6 



921,?8^ 



•i^6.W) 



232.961 



^3»^7 



302,711 

1,504 

17,664 

1,098 

721 

311 

116,461 

7,812 

5,455 

30,018 

9,190 

5,572 

698 

13,092 

71 

11,909 

67 

4,189 

4,438 

1,338 

16,240 

14,497 

^6.735 



468,869 

17,571 

34,523 

1,043 

340 

527 

^5,338 

8,024 

26,619 

22,611 

2,955 

7,574 

7,298 

20,698 

79 

19,457 

43 

16,816 

8,505 

1,458 

19,920 

31,116 

?2?i?60 



771,580 

19,075 

52,187 

2,141 

1,061 

838 

321,799 
15,836 

32,074 
52,629 
12,145 
13,146 

7,996 
33,790 
150 
31,366 
110 
21,005 
12,943 

2,796 
36,160 
45,613 



174,278 

4,882 
886 
567 
274 

7,744 

258 

40 

8,657 

8,675 
421 
509 

2,011 

71 
10,102 

67 
1,556 

13 
1,293 
2,998 
7,659 

164.557 



245,905 

14,799 

574 

306 

500 

27,3a 

934 

25 

5,423 

2,529 

852 

1,623 

2,473 

79 

18,a5 

43 

8,092 

1,406 
2,789 
9,319 

37I1I72 



212,961 

497 

5,635 

93 

151 

128 

111,284 

1,061 

4,704 

''22,330: 

8,685^ 

4,522 

205 

10,821 

237 

4,728 

23 

1,004 

4,003 

1,420 

13,408 

8,835 



511,972 

17,647 

18,363 

645 

244 

121 

L99,564 

6,421 

27,282 

22,191 

2,189 

7,118 

798 

21,406 

311 

19,712 

7 

16,239 

9,026 

2,405 

18,080 

21,819 



724,933 

18,144 

23,998 

738 

395 

249 

310,848 

7,482 

31,986 

44,521 

10,874 

11,640 

1,003 

32,227 

548 

24,440 

30 

17,243 

13,029 

3,825 

31,488 

30,654 



122,104 

4,180 

47 

151 

128 

7,196 
184 

8,177 

7,865 

139 

172 

1,453 

237 

3,712 

23 

245 

84 

l,a9 

2,021 

5,020 



y Exclusive of travel over international land boundaries 
2/ Includes Anchorage, Alaska. 



275,249 

11,158 

75 

243 

118 

28,899 
1,134 

2,047 

1,611 

376 

359 

3,719 

311 

19,554 

7 

13,593 

173 

2,396 

980 

9.170 



576.388 



332.095 



577.957 



910.052 



420,183 

19,681 

1,460 

873 

774 

35,085 

1,192 

65 

14,080 

11,204 

1,273 

2,132 

4,484 

150 

28,517 

no 

9,648 

13 

2,699 

5,787 

16,978 



128,433 

1,504 

12,782 

212 

154 

37 

108,717 

7,554 

5,415 

21,361 

515 

5,151 

189 

11,081 

1,807 

2,633 

4,425 

45 

13,242 

6,838 



535.72? 252,178 



397,353 

15,338 
122 

394 

246 

36,095 

1,318 

10,224 

9,476 

515 

531 

5,172 

548 

23,266 

30 

13,838 

257 

3,815 

3,001 

U.I90 



222,964 

17,571 

19,724 

469 

34 

27 

177,997 

7,090 

26,594 

17,188 

426 

6,722 

5,675 

18,225 

1,042 

8,724 

8,505 

52 

17,131 

21,797 

552.388 



351,397 

19,075 

32,506 

681 

188 

64 

286,714 

U,6A4 

32,009 

38,549 

9a 

11,873 

5,864 

29,306 

2,849 

11,357 

12,930 

97 

30,373 
28,635 

804.566 



90,857 

497 

1,455 

46 



104,088 

877 

4,704 

14,153 

820 

4,383 

33 

9,368 

1,016 

759 

3,919 

1 

11,387 

3,815 



236,723 

17,647 

7,205 

570 

1 

3 

170,665 

5,287 

27,282 

20,144 

578 

6,742 

439 

17,687 

158 

2,646 

8,853 

9 

17,100 

12,649 



327,580 

18,144 

8,660 

616 

1 

3 

274,753 

6,164 

31,986 

34,297 

1,398 

n,125 

472 

27,055 

1,174 

3,/rf)5 

12,772 

10 

28,487 

16,464 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 31, PASSENGERS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES FROM F0REIC2J COUNTRIES, 
BY COUNTRY OF EMBARKATION: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1953 1/ 



Country of 
embarkation 



By sea and by air 



Aliens 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



Aliens 



By sea 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



Aliens 



By air 



Citi- 
zens 



All countries 

Europe 

Belgium 

Denmark. 

Finland 

France 

Gemaoy • 

Greece 

Iceland 

Ireland. ..•.. 

Italy 

Luxembourg. 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Trieste 

Turkey in E\irope.... 

United Kingdom 

U.K. Ter. & Dep 

Yugoslavia 

Asia 

Bonin Volcano Is.... 

Burma 

Ceylon 

China 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Iraq.... 

Israel 

Japan 

Korea 

Kuwait 

Lebanon 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

I^yiikyu Islands 

Saudi Arabia 

Singapore 

Syria.... 

Thailand 

Other U.K. Ter. &Dep 



?6 ?.0?6 



921.382. 



i.u6e.hitO 



232.961 



3/^3.427 



576.388 



332.095 



?77,??7 



910.052 



272.548 



4,975 

5,505 

331 

48,371 

30,609 

3,045 

545 

8,388 

21,506 

3 

22,291 

7,170 

3,245 

11,266 

7,627 

3,348 

343 

504 

90,461 

2,764 

251 

30.336 

1 

16 

655 

3,123 

228 

48 

3 

3 

1,679 

13,560 

1,217 

10 

534 

1 

8,745 

217 

72 

55 

29 

85 

39 



375.815 



5,223 

4,832 

614 

101,132 

53,470 

3,604 

794 

13,569 

42,931 

13 

20,466 

5,347 

1 

5,426 

3,164 

6,607 

4,039 

1,009 

270 

100,647 

2,488 

169 

58.266 



648. ^63 



10,198 

10,337 

945 

149,503 

84,079 

6,649 

1,339 

21,957 

64,437 

16 

42,757 

12,517 

1 

8,671 

14,430 

14,234 

7,387 

1,352 

774 

191,108 

5,252 

420 

88.602 



177.122 



441 

6 

42 

900 

1,274 

271 

17 

5 

19 

1,179 

40,111 

38 

1,136 

12 

7,768 

3,055 

1,690 

74 

18 

104 

106 



457 

7 

58 

1,555 

4,397 

499 

65 

8 

22 

2,858 

53,671 

1,255 

10 

1,670 

13 

16,513 

3,272 

1,762 

129 

47 

189 

145 



909 

2,158 

130 

29,476 

20,833 

2,234 

141 

5,416 

18,155 

14,335 
5,697 

988 

7,119 

5,464 

13 

343 

393 

60,303 

2,764 

251 

16.408 



21?.?20 



567 

lr594 

272 

66,371 

26,370 

2,406 

28 

5,852 

32,786 

10,656 

4,097 

1 

1,430 

1,140 

4,901 

9 

1,009 

229 

57,555 

2,488 

169 

?Q.077 



3 97. o ?2 



13 

115 

2,581 

101 

44 



585 

7,002 

1,199 

10 

173 

1 

4,199 

205 

45 

55 

29 

9 

39 



8 

5 

32 

154 

940 

187 

17 



277 

20,684 

17 

525 

6 

4,150 

2,845 

20 

74 

18 

16 

102 



1^476 

3,752 

402 

95,847 

47,203 

4,640 

169 

11,268 

50,9a 

24,991 
9,794 

1 

2,a8 

8,259 

10,365 

22 

1,352 

622 

117,858 

5,252 

420 

46.485 



9?A26 



11 

5 

45 

269 

3,521 

288 

61 



862 

27,686 

1,216 

10 

698 

7 

8,349 

3,050 

65 

129 

47 

25 

141 



4,066 

3,347 

201 

18,895 

9,776 

811 

404 

2,972 

3,351 

3 

7,956 

1,473 

2,257 
4,U7 
2,163 
3,335 

111 

30,158 



1?.?28 



l??. ?8 i 



13 

1 

3 

540 

542 

127 

4 

3 

3 

1,094 

6,558 

18 

361 

4,546 
12 
27 



76 



476^ 

3,238 

342 

34,761 

27,100 

1,198 

766 

7,717 

10,145 

13 

9,810 

1,250 

3,996 
2,024 
1,706 
4,030 

41 
43,092 



28.189 



251.3U 



433 
1 

10 
746 
334 

84 

5 

19 

902 

19,427 

21 

611 

6 

3,618 

210 
1,670 



88 
4 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 3I0 PASSENGERS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
m COUNTRY OF EMBARKATION: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1953 1/ (Cont'd) 



Covmtry of 
embarkation 



By sea and by air 



Aliens 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



By sea 



Aliens 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



Aliens 



By air 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



Africa 

Egypt 

Liberia 0.0.. 

Libyao , 

Morocco, French, 0.00. 
Tangamyika. « . . . . o o . . 
Tangier. ...o o* 

Union of SOo Africa,, 
Belgian Ter, & Dep,,, 
Other French T. & D,, 
Portugese T, & Doo».. 
Other U.Ko T, & D.,o, 

Oceamia .., o,,*.oa, 

Australia o«..o,. 

New Zealand o,*,. 

Western Samoa,, o»..,. 
French Ter, & Dep,,,, 
U.K. Ter, & Dep , 

North America, o....o.,o 

Canada. ,o.o..o....*oe 

Greenland 

Mexico. ..o, ,,,,,...,, 

West Indies 

Bermuda ,..,o,a..o,, 

British West Indies 

Cuba ,o.o.o..,o 

Dominican Republic. 
French West Indies. 

Haiti...., 

Xetho West Indies. . 

Central America..,., . 
British Honduras... 
Canal Zone & Panama 
Costa Rica e..,,.... 
El Salvador........ 

Guatemala. ,, 

Honduras 

Nicaragua, ......... 



1.701 



8 *071 



9.772 



649 



1.^3 



2.272 



852 



6.648 



7.^00 



509 

179 

28 

120 

4 

660 

39 
62 
12 
74 

^.704 



4,019 

1,255 

5 

15 

410 

196.232 



734 

253 

234 

5,646 

4 

6 

662 

106 

250 

44 

132 

2 .946 



1,243 

432 

262 

5,766 

8 

20 

1,322 

145 

312 

56 

206 

8.650 



1,687 

488 

24 

13 

734 

437.749 



5,706 

1,743 

29 

28 

1,144 

6?3i?81 



171 
125 

48 

4 

14 

399 

21 

7 
12 
48 

Jt22 



156 
86 

504 

4 

6 

502 

41 

9 

44 

71 

281 



409 

53 

5 

15 

15 

29.867 



171 
41 
24 
13 
32 

83.305 



327 
211 

552 

8 

20 

901 
62 
16 
56 

119 

J21 



580 
94 
29 
28 
47 

113.172 



338 
54 
28 
72 



261 
18 
55 

26 
5.207 



578 

167 

234 

5,142 



160 
65 

2a 



37610 
1,202 



395 
166.36^ 



61 



2.665 



"17516 
447 



702 



??4.¥t4 



916 

221 

262 

5,214 



421 

83 

296 

87 
7.872 



5,126 
1,649 



1,097 
520.809. 



20,377 

91 

8,326 

148.274 



8,332 
a,198 
83,558 
6,420 
1,779 
3,583 
3,404 

19.164 



37,618 

5,178 

13,103 

? 4^.ie? 



39 

6,516 

1,499 
4,011 
3,499 
2,392 
1,208 



78,755 

83,342 

162,756 

8,858 

423 

5,937 

3,118 

38.661 



57,995 

5,269 

21,429 

4?i.46 ? 



33 
29,392 
1,235 
1,684 
3,774 
2,001 
542 



87,087 

124,540 

246,334 

15,278 

2,202 

9,520 

6,522 

37.825 



72 
35,908 
2,734 
5,695 
7,273 
4,393 
1,750 



4,003 

8 

953 

22.280 

1,630 

9,612 

10,026 

330 

174 

188 

320 

2.623 



13,547 

32 

414 

55.068 



15,987 

9,416 

28,099 

764 

34 

221 

547 

14.244 



17,550 

40 

1,367 

77.348 



17,617 

19,028 

38,125 

1,094 

208 

409 

867 

16.86' 



16,374 

83 

7,373 

12 5 , ??4 



24,071 

5,146 

12,689 



40,445 

5,229 

20,062 



16 
,208 
144 

13 
286 
868 

88 



12,762 
189 

1 
409 
879 

4 



1 

13,970 

333 

14 

695 

1,747 

92 



67702 
31,586 
73,532 
6,090 
1,605 
3,395 
3,084 

16.541 



28 8.121 [414.115 
T2,768 



23 

5,308 

1,355 
3,998 
3,213 
1,524 
1,120 



73,926 

134,657 

8,094 

389 

5,716 

2,571 

24.417 



33 
16,630 
1,046 
1,683 
3,365 
1,122 
538 



69,470 

105,512 

208,189 

14,184 

1,994 

9,111 

5,655 

40.958 



56 
21,938 
2,401 
5,681 
6,578 
2,646 
1,658 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 31o PASSENGERS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
BY COUNTRY OF EMBARKATION: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1953 l/ (Cont'd) 



Country of 
embarkation 



By sea and by air 



Aliens 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



By sea 



Aliens 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



Aliens 



By air 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



South America. 



Argentina o.... 

Bolivia c*.>**«*««»«o* 
Brazil. .o 

British Guiana,,,.,., 

Chile 

Colombia, 0.....0....0 

Ecuador, o...* • 

French Guiana , , , 

Paragiiay, ., 

Peru, 0,0.0. o... 

Surinam(Netho Guiana) 

Uruguay, , 

Venezuela, 0..0 



Flag of carrier: 
United States,, 
Foreign, o 



58.535 



38 . ^ 37 



97.072 



8.218 



8 t^l 



16.629 



50.317 



^0.126 



5yhU9 

128 

10,342 

947 

1,489 

14,086 

2,755 

74 

155 

5,267 

197 

619 

17,027 



254,878 
310,178 



3,197 

36 

6,954 

257 

1,434 

4,933 

1,218 

32 

50 

4,884 

86 

220 

15,236 



582,320 
339,064 



8,646 

164 

17,296 

1,204 

2,923 

19,019 

3,973 

106 

205 

10,151 

283 

839 

32,263 



837,198 
649,242 



1,807 

1 

2,0a 

21 

494 

979 

418 

5 

293 

18 

111 

2,030 



65,608 
167,353 



1,820 

1,943 

81 

583 

456 

503 

5 

505 

11 

54 

2,450 



167,447 
175,980 



3,627 

1 

3,984 

102 

1,077 

1,435 

921 

10 

798 

29 

165 

4,480 



233,055 
343,333 



3,642 

127 

8,301 

926 

995 

13,107 

2,337 

69 

155 

4,974 

179 

508 

14,997 



189,270 
142,825 



1,377 

36 

5,011 

176 

851 

4,477 

715 

27 

50 

4,379 

75 

166 

12,786 



414,873 
163,084 



80 ,44 ? 



5,019 

163 

13,312 

1,102 

1,846 

17,584 

3,052 

96 

205 

9,353 

254 

674 

27,783 



604,143 
305,909 



1/ Exclusive of travel over land borders. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 32 i PASSENGERS DEPARTED FROM THE UNITED STATES TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
BY COUNTRY OF DEBARKATION: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1953 1/ 



Country of 
debarkation 



By sea and by air 



Aliens 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



Aliens 



By sea 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



By air 



Aliens 



Citi- 
zens 



All count irles coo.. 

Europe.. 

Austria. o 

Belgiunio 

Czechoslovakia„ . , , , , 

Dfinzig. o.o 

Denmark o 

Finland o 

France .o..« 

Germany. ............ 

Gireece 

Iceland 

Ireland, o. ..o. 

Italy o 

Luxembourg .o. ....... 

Netherlands ......o.. 

woiTway. 0......O.O0.. 

Poland 0...0. 

Portiigalo oo 

Spain. 

Sweden. 0..00 • 

Switzerland 

1 rxeste ........o.... 

Turkeye 

United Kingdom o 

U.K. Ter. & Dep.,.,, 
Yitgoslavia. 

Asia.....ooo o. 

Bonin Volcano Is.... 

Bunna o 

Ceylon. • 

China 

French India 

Hong Kong 

India o 

Indonesia, •.0...0.00 

Iran ..•.. 

Iraq, .o,.,. o*. 

Israel • 

Japan, ,,•,«, 

Korea, o.o .,,0. 

Kxiwait o 000 

Lebanon. ,..o.,,,o... 
Pakistan, .•,...oo..e 

raleStiJie, e.*»eo.eeo 

Philippines ., , 

Ryukyu Islands 

Saudi Arabia ,,0 

Singapore .,,,,oo..»« 

Syria , 

Thailand, 

Other UpK.Tero & Dep 



416.7 ^? 



923.560 



1.340.295 



164.557 



27I1I72 



^2^.729 



252.178 



552.388 



804.^66 



185.046 



18 

3,319 

14 

3 

4,242 

243 

37,623 

10,507 

2,399 

437 

4,445 

14,089 

17 

13,122 

5,890 

7 

2,214 

4,392 

5,848 

2,716 

3 

75 

72,475 

764 

184 

14.610 



415.196 



217 
5,028 

1 

5,803 

801 

91,373 

75,837 

5,017 

1,848 

i3,ao 

48,717 

200 

20,124 

6,399 

6,316 
3,440 
7,779 
4,872 

471 

114,681 

2,672 

190 

58.877 



600.242 



11 4. 2 ?? 



240.183 



354.522 



70 »70 7 



8 

353 

1 

446 

159 

38 

2 

1 

885 

8,171 

50 

kl7 

1 

2 

3,779 

139 

25 

54 

56 
20 



428 
13 

1,259 

570 

567 

76 

6 

51 

1,625 

37,479 

80 

2,143 
2 

5 

6,845 

4,831 

2,332 

289 

1 

191 

84 



235 

8,347 

14 

4 

10,045 

1,044 

128,996 

86,344 

7,416 

2,285 

17,855 

62,806 

217 

33,246 

12,289 

7 

8,530 

7,832 

13,627 

7,588 

3 

546 

187,156 

3,436 

374 

73.487 



431 

13 

8 

1,612 

1 

1,016 

726 

lU 

8 

52 

2,510 

45,650 

130 

2,560 

3 

7 

10,624 

4,970 

2,357 

343 

1 

247 

104 



1,009 

3 
2,042 

234 

23,712 

6,148 

1,983 

145 

2,633 

11,295 

7,162 
4,802 

1,058 
2,232 
4,113 

3 

68 

44,750 

764 

183 

7.??9 



1,347 

1 

2,041 

367 

57,697 

35,655 

3,635 

93 

6,917 

36,375 

10,844 
4,956 

2,003 
1,475 
5,718 



463 

67,746 

2,672 

178 

37.128 



2,356 

4 

4,083 

601 

81,409 

41,803 

5,618 

238 

9,550 

47,670 

18,006 
9,758 

3,061 
3,707 
9,831 

3 

531 

112,496 

3,436 

361 

Vf.487 



18 
2,310 
14 

2,200 

9 

13,911 

4,359 

416 

292 

1,812 

2,794 

17 

5,960 

1,088 

7 

1,156 

2,160 

1,735 

2,716 

7 
27,725 



7.251 



175.013 



245.720 



217 
3,681 



3,762 

434 

33,676 

40,182 

1,382 

1,755 

6,493 

12,342 

200 

9,280 

1,443 

4,313 
1,965 
2,061 
4,872 

8 
46,935 

12 
21,749 



4 


_ 


m 


557 


1 


_ 


356 


398 


125 


494 


36 


69 


2 


6 


1 


7 


335 


518 


4,274 


25,640 


32 


31 



253 



1,638 

133 

10 

7 

21 
20 



1,093 
2 

3,554 
4,438 
51 
91 
1 
92 
83 



4 
668 

1 
754 
619 
105 

8 

8 

853 

29,914 

63 

1,346 
2 

5,192 

4,571 

61 

98 

1 

113 

103 



4 
242 

90 

34 

2 



550 

3,897 

18 

164 

1 
2 

2,1a 

6 

15 

47 

35 



425 
13 

702 

172 

73 

7 

44 

1,107 

11,839 

49 

1,050 

5 

3,291 
393 

2,281 
198 

99 

1 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



I 



TABLE 32, PASSENGERS DEPARTED FROM Tfffi UNITED STATES TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
BY COUNTRY OF DEBARKATION: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1953 l/ (Cont'd) 



Cotintry of 
debarkation 



Africa ,. 

Sgypt..... 

Liberia <>.... 

Libya. .,.0.0 

Morocco, Frencho 

Morocco, Spanish,.., e 
South-West Africa,,.. 

Tangamylka 

Tangier ,,, 

Union of So, Africa,. 
Belgian Ter. & Dep... 
Other French T, & D,, 

Portugese T, & D 

Other U,K, T, & D,o,. 

Oc eania .,,,0,,,,., 

Australia, ,, 

New Zealand,,,,,.,,,, 
Western Sajnoa,,,,,,,, 
French Ter, & Dep,.,, 
U.K. Ter. & Dep 

North America,, o, 

Canada ,,,,..,,,,.,,.. 

Greenland. ....o 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Bemnida. , 

British West Indies 
Cuba o...... 

Dominican Republic, 
French West Indies. 
Haiti o 

Netho West Indies. . 

Central America,,,, o. 
British Honduras,,, 
Canal Zone & Panama 

Costa Rica. , 

El Salvador 

Guatemala, ,,, , 

Honduras 

Nicaragua, , . . , 



By sea and by air 



Aliens 



1.679 



389 
109 
274 
103 
5 

4 

1 

5a 
34 

152 
20 
47 

^« 46? 



Citi- 
zens 



10.047 



Total 



3,738 
1,333 

48 
346 



1,063 

437 

1,959 

4,609 

15 

U 

28 

1 

957 

202 

372 

25 

365 

3.14^ 



158./.48 



6,378 

29 

6 ,.218 

130.351 



7,268 
33,027 
77,973 

5,677 
845 

3,020 

2,5a 

1 S472 



30 
5,034 
1,499 
2,537 
2,840 
2,157 
1,375 



2,099 
489 
4 
105 
451 

398.095 



16,267 
4,966 

14,429 
328.728 



11.726 



1,452 

546 

2,233 

4,712 

20 

14 

32 

2 

1,498 

236 

524 

45 

412 

8.613 



5,837 

1,822 

4 

153 

797 

^^6.543 



Aliens 



878 



238 
63 

92 
5 



1 

393 

12 

24 
20 
30 



By sea 



Citi- 
zens 



3 .4?? 



76,182 

77,380 

155,443 

10,505 

235 

6,054 

2,929 

33.705 



37 

24,675 

1,434 

1,198 

3,311 

2,298 

752 



22,645 

4,995 

20,647 

4^?.079 



83,450 

110,407 

233,a6 

16,182 

1,080 

9,074 

5,470 

4? . 1 77 



.7 

29,709 
2,933 
3,735 
6,151 
4,455 
2,127 



276 
12 

48 
6 

26.404 



3,672 

349 

20.453 



1,470 

8,975 

8,335 

1,001 

129 

218 

325 

li?30 



937 
121 
47 
179 
642 
4 



398 
133 

1,728 

15 

lA 

6 

1 

701 

133 

70 

24 

276 

409 



270 
22 

4 
105 

8 

80.861 



Total 



4.377 



636 
196 

1,820 

20 

14 

6 

2 

1,094 

145 

94 

UU 

306 

751 



10,591 

1 

396 

57.802 



18,036 

8,656 

29,717 

467 

13 

347 

566 

12.071 



10,491 

183 

14 

438 

945 



54^ 

34 

4 

153 
U 

107.265 



Aliens 



801 



151 
46 

274 
11 



148 

22 

128 

17 

SI23 



14,263 

1 

745 

78.255 



19,506 

17,631 

38,052 

1,468 

142 

565 

891 

14.001 



11,428 

304 

61 

617 

1,587 

4 



374S2 
1,321 



340 
132.044 



By air 



Citi- 
zens 



6.548 



665 

304 

1,959 

2,881 



22 

256 

69 

302 

1 

89 

2 .73? 



1,829 
467 



443 



2,706 

29 

5,869 

109.898 



5,798 
24,052 
69,638 

4,676 
716 

2,802 

2,216 

13 .^42 



30 
4,097 
1,378 
2,490 
2,661 
1,515 
1,371 



317.234 



5,676 

4,965 

14,033 

270.926 



58,146 

68,724 

125,726 

10,038 

222 

5,707 

2,363 

21.634 



37 
U,184 
1,251 
1,184 
2,873 
1,353 
752 



Total 



7. 3 4? 



816 

350 

2,233 

2,892 



26 

404 

91 

430 

1 

106 



7.862 
5,291 
1,788 



783 
4 49.278 



8,382 

4,994 

iq,902 

380.824 



63,944 

92,776 

195,364 

14, 7U 

938 

8,509 

4,5"9 

2i»m 



'7 

18,281 
2,629 
3,674 
5,534 
2,868 
2,123 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE yZo PASSENGERS DEPARTED FROM THE UNITED STATES TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
BY COUNTRY OF DEBARKATION: YEAR END ED JUNE 30, 1953 1/ (Cont'd) 



Countr7 of 
debarkation 



By sea and b: 



Aliens 



Y air 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



Aliens 



By sea 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



Aliens 



By air 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



South America. .oxxof. o 

Argentina. , .o.«o«.>*o 

Bolivia.... 

Brazil 

British Guiana 

Chile 

Colombia. oo«e***oo*«o 

Ecviador. ee 

French Guiana 

Paraguay. ......e.o.oe 

Peru. .••o*o..o*o....o 

STirinam(Neth, Guiana) 

Uruguay. 

Venezuela, c.......*. 



Flag of carrier: 
United States. 
Foreign, <...,. 



51.487 



38.197 



89.684 



15.235 



9.092 



24.327 



36,252 



29.105 



65.357 



4,365 

246 

8,168 

287 

1,543 

11,206 

1,928 

67 

a 

4,311 

128 

514 

18,683 



189,838 
226,897 



2,567 

223 

6,601 

290 

1,603 

4,811 

1,029 

36 

27 

4,568 

76 

388 

15,978 



590,722 
332,838 



6,932 

469 

U,769 

577 

3,146 

16,017 

2,957 

103 

68 

8,879 

204 

902 

34,661 



780,560 
559,735 



2,044 

2,665 
8 

695 
1,381 

229 



455 

10 

213 

7,535 



44,338 
120,219 



1,288 

2,180 

71 

681 

759 

333 



688 

10 

160 

2,922 



188,901 
182,271 



3,332 

4,845 

79 

1,376 

2,U0 

562 



1,143 

20 

373 

10,457 



233,239 
302,490 



2,321 

246 

5,503 

279 

848 

9,825 

1,699 

67 

41 

3,856 

118 

301 

11,148 



145,500 
106,678 



1,279 

223 

4,421 

219 

922 

4,052 

696 

36 

27 

3,880 

66 

228 

13,056 



401,821 
150,567 



3,600 

469 

9,924 

498 

1,770 

13,877 

2,395 

103 

68 

7,736 

184 

529 

24,204 



547,321 
257,245 



1/ Exclusive of travel over land borders. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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TABLE 3k. ALIENS VmO REPORTED UNDER THE ALIEN ADDRESS PROGRAM, 
BY NATIONALITY l/: DURING 1953 



Nationality 



All nationalities 



Europe ...o.. •<>... 

Albania 

Andorra 

Austria 

Austria-Hungary 

Belgixmi o.. 

Bulgaria,...,.. 
Czechoslovakia. 
Danzig, (Free City of) 

U3nm3.rK. o*.*o.eooo..o 

Estonia. ...,....o.... 
Finland .......o...... 

France 

Germany. ............c 

Great Britain » 

Greece 

Hungary 

Iceland. , 

Ireland 

Italy. , 

Latvia „ , 

Liechtenstein. ....... 

Lithuania ............ 

Luxembourg, .......... 

Monaco ..............e 

Netherlands o,........ 

Non-ray, , , , . . , 

roXand .•,,00,000,,.., 

Portugal .0 

Rumania 

San Marino ,.... 

opain ..o.*.e...o..o.o 
ovfeQen . .....eoo...... 

Switzerland 
Trieste. .. 
Turkey. . . . 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia... 



J^oovcoooooo 



)*****«eee 



Total 



2.348.881 



1.456.788 



2,356 

lU 

35,651 

5,353 

8,125 

1,628 

34,924 

301 

10,789 

11,748 

18,099 

26,489 

150,956 

203,830 

38,394 

37,901 

752 

48,864 

202,312 

39,798 

98 

48,768 

740 

72 

21,946 

22,774 

233,230 

30,992 

12,917 

595 

14,838 

25,874 

11,062 

142 

7,026 

108,077 

39,253 



Nationality 



Asia. 



Afghanistan 

Arabian Peninsula, . , . 

Bhutan 

Burma 

Ceylon. 

China 

India 

Indonesia. ., 

Iran, o 

Iraq... 

Israel 

Japan 

Jordan o.. 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Muscat .0 

Pakistan .....o.. 

Palestine 

Philippines .. ....... . 

Saudi Arabia ... o .... . 

Syria...., 

Thailand........ 



*000...000 



North America. 

Canada, ......... ,,.., 

Mexico 

Vfest Indies 

Cuba.,.. 

Dominican Republic, 
nax^x. ....... ...... 

Central America. ... ., 

Costa Rica 

Guatemala, .o, ,«...<> 

Honduras ,. 

Nicaragua.......... 

r anajTia .... ...... ... 

Panama Canal Zone . . 
Salvador. . 



>o..o..«o 



Total 



171.480 



122 

400 

18 

98 

60 

31,305 

1,315 

198 

1,674 

896 

2,770 

77,174 

761 

2,463 

3,352 

18 

100 

492 

1,675 

42,694 

32 

3,792 

71 

572.792 



232,320 
301,605 

17,906 

6,354 

670 

13.937 



1,565 
1,268 
1,904 
3,619 
2,742 
107 
2,732 



Nationality 



South America, 



Argentina, 
Bolivia,.. 
Brazil. . . . 

Chile 

Colombia. , 
Ecuador. . . 
Paraguay,. 

Peru. 

Uruguay. . . 
Venezuela. 



Africa , 

Egypt , . , o . 

Ethiopia ............... 

Liberia 

Union of South Africa.. 



Australia. 



....... 1 



.S. Possessions 2/. ... .. 

United States .......... 

American Somoa. ...» ... . 

Gua^o 0.. 

Midway Island. ......... 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands 

U.S. TossesRions not 
specified o.oeo.o 



Stateless. 

Unknown and not reported, 



1/ 



Figures do not include 77,419 alien address reports that vrere incomplete and 110,250 aliens in the 
United States in temporary status. 
2/ Persons who filed address reports because their citizenship status was in doubt. 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



I 



TABLE 35. ALIENS WHO REPORTED UNDER THE ALIEN ADDRESS PROGRAM, BY SELECTED 
NATIONALITIES AND STATES OF RESIDENCE l/: DURING 195? 



State of 
residence 



All 
nation- 
alities 



Germany 



Great 
Britain 



Italy 



Poland 



U.S.S.R 



Canada 



Mexico 



All 
other 



[ Total o. 

Alabama. .., 

Arizona ..........,.,.<, 

Arkansas .oc* 

California ,.o.o.. 

Colorado , 

Connecticut oooo** 

Delawai>e. o.« 

District of Colimbiao. 

Florida 0..0 

Georgia. .....o.o..aooa 

Idaho ..o(>*«*«aoo 

Illinois ooooo 

j-ndiana .e...o«oeooo«oo 

J.OV/a ..ooo*oo**o«o*o*oo 
IvanSaS ..oee«oooooooooo 

Kentucky. .»., 0,000.... 
LfOuisxanao .0.0000....0 
riai. n e ..oe.. 000.000.000 
Maryland, ........0...0 

Massachusetts .0000...0 

mcniLgano 000000.000.0. 
Minnesota. ...,,o..o... 

Mississippi. .oseoo.o.o 

r]X S S OUrX ooo.*ooo...oeo 

Montana, o.. o.... 

Nebraska ...ooo 

Nevada. .......o 

New Hampshire ....00.00 
New Jersey, o.......... 

New Mexico o...aaoo..oo 
1M6W lOrKo . . o o o o . . o • . o o 

North Carolina, 

North Dakota, o........ 

Ohio oo....ooo..a 

Oklahoma. ....oo.o.oo.o 



2.32.8.881 



150.956 



20?|g?0 



202.312 



233.230 



108.077 



232.320 



301.605 



3,052 
21,447 

2,776 

348,749 

15,838 

69,682 
2,967 
9,979 

29,125 
3,930 

3,908 

139,001 

22,863 

11,603 

7,183 

3,432 

6,929 

18,381 

22,251 

128,765 

138,2U 
22,304 

1,545 
16,962 

5,190 

8,451 

2,914 

10,415 

128,668 

6,728 

532,929 

4,090 

3,324 

95,393 

3,880 



768 

328 

313 
11,502 

1,771 

2,884 
237 
653 

1,679 
766 

256 

13,068 

2,098 

2,137 

902 

711 

508 

242 

2,279 

2,575 

7,286 
1,918 

201 
2,417 

556 

1,314 

180 

252 

12,807 

265 

42,264 
497 
500 

8,397 
580 



607 

593 

200 

25,086 

1,071 

5,788 

426 

1,460 

6,713 

788 

337 

7,333 

1,961 

985 

618 

556 

941 

1,223 

2,534 

10,418 

16,043 
1,030 

243 

1,439 

450 

396 
198 
842 
13,334 
451 

59,297 

748 

118 

7,731 

589 



110 
131 
103 
16,952 
886 

13,239 

269 

680 

1,045 

103 

77 

6,645 

477 

380 

131 

137 
1,062 

409 

2,689 

liv,543 

6,493 

197 

91 

1,691 
142 

210 
330 
196 
22,246 
116 

77,649 

83 

8 

7,885 

90 



78 

120 

122 

4,666 

916 

13,008 
687 
490 
624 
274 

82 

28,592 

3,299 

629 

211 

190 

291 

407 

2,896 

15,165 

22,589 
2,02s 

45 
2,001 

273 

661 

34 

1,073 

21,391 

73 

68,477 
168 
160 

12,647 
168 



39 
106 

41 
8,347 
1,197 

4,153 

182 

516 

497 

96 

65 

7,421 

839 

434 

309 

82 

64 

309 

2,227 

5,828 

6,505 

1,188 

26 

1,050 

162 

554 

25 

353 

8,717 

35 

37,407 

89 

205 

4,979 

98 



305 

1,333 

122 

35,512 
795 

6,523 
225 
781 

5,463 
422 

682 

5,360 

1,416 

711 

504 

290 
347 

13,187 
1,258 

29,537 

34,441 

2,841 

111 

925 

1,2U 

337 

308 

5,003 

4,284 

222 

32,237 
433 
850 

5,293 
370 



95 

16,635 

1,268 

109,557 
3,536 

58 
20 

99 

208 

18 

132 
7,323 
2,545 

677 
2,695 

10 

403 
36 
48 

183 

3,485 

415 

29 

1,349 
307 

929 
386 

17 

206 

4,739 

1,621 
29 
25 

1,201 
621 



916.551 



1,050 
2,201 
607 
137,127 
5,666 

24,029 
921 

5,300 
12,896 

1,463 

2,277 

63,259 

10,228 

5,650 

1,813 

1,456 
3,313 
2,568 
8,320 
50,516 

41,372 

12,687 

799 

6,090 

2,086 

4,050 

1,453 

2,679 

45,683 

827 

213,977 

2,043 

1,458 

47,260 

1,364 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 35» ALIENS WO REPORTED UNDER THE ALIEN ADDRESS PROGRAM, BY SELECTED 
NATIONALTTIES AND STATES OF RESIDENCE l/: DURING 1953 (Cont'd) 



State of 
residence 


All 
nation- 
alities 


Germany 


Great 
Britain 


Italy 


Poland 


U.S.S.R. 


Canada 


Mexico 


All 
other 


Oregon ......••.•.••....... 


16,872 
109,409 

19,452 
2,001 
2,049 

3,121 

154,969 

10,289 

7,189 

9,295 

44,907 
7,042 

28,006 
2,370 

1,324 

15 

169 

63,366 

106 

3,491 

1,579 

2,823 

6,169 


1,137 

8,116 

468 

317 

391 

458 
2,798 
1,280 

157 
1,188 

2,192 
334 

6,089 
185 

96 

5 
237 

46 
3 

6 

342 


1,760 

9,941 

2,484 

404 

152 

544 
3,155 
1,461 

450 
2,117 

3,982 
634 

1,495 
205 

89 

9 

23 

312 

207 
1,165 

58 

636 


559 

14,625 

3,604 

42 

n 

309 
784 
266 
193 
252 

1,321 

1,172 

724 

88 

10 

1 

46 

300 
4 

7 

499 


289 

18,197 

1,806 

126 

66 

258 

1,015 

33 

329 

505 

852 

863 

3,817 

38 

9 

1 

24 
1 
4 
3 

7 

452 


5UV 
8,867 

712 
35 
42 

95 
351 

35 
157 
322 

963 

308 

1,012 

125 

35 

32 
3 

4 
320 


4,715 
3,398 
3,286 

21? 

200 

311 
1,975 

701 
4,934 

963 

13,514 

201 

1,324 

165 

453 

2 

258 

2 

62 

21 

1,445 
536 


265 
592 

26 
8 

26 

44 

134,994 

522 

17 

47 

705 

76 

656 

563 

17 

48 
2 

64 
4 

1,213 

811 


7,633 


Pennsylvania .............. 


45,673 


Rhode Island ..... ..o ..... . 

South Carolina. .••....•• .. 


7,066 
857 


South Dakota 

Tennessee. o 

Texas .....oto............. 


1,161 

1,102 
9,897 


Utah... ...0 

Vermont o....... 

Virginia. o 

Washinston. ............... 


5,991 

952 

3,901 

21,378 


West Virginia , o 


3,454 


Wisconsin, , ..•..••.••••••o 


12,889 




1,001 


Territories and possessions: 
Alaska, ,,,,,, ,,,,,,, ••••so 


615 


American Somoa , 


5 


Guam , ,,,.,,,o 


138 


Hawaii .,.,..,.., 

Panama Canal Zone . , . . . . . , . 
Puerto Rico 


62,409 

101 

2,805 


Virgin Islands, . „ » » 

Outside the United States,,, 
Unknown or not reported„oooo 


379 

83 

2,573 



1/ Figures do not include 77,419 alien address reports that were incomplete and 110,250 aliens in 
the United States in temporary status. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



I 



TABLE 360 ALIENS WHO REPORTED UNDER THE ALIEN ADDRESS PROGRAM, BY SELECTED 
NATIONALITIES AND URBAN AREA AND CITY l/: DURING 1953 



Class of place 
and city 



Total ^1 o0O0*00*O0O«4 

Rural <> 



Urban, 



All 
nation- 
alities 



Germany 



2.3i^8.881 



295.061 



699.800 



1.268.992 



150.956 



23.970 



¥n ??2 



Great 
Britain 



203.830 



26.828 



i2,II2 



81,189 

9,618 
8,679 
6,435 

40,813 
7,225 
7,376 
9,330 
5,618 
9,979 

10,961 
107,142 

15,714 

29,115 
5,110 
5,829 

74,465 
7,939 
8,293 
6,909 

17,213 
8,032 

18,786 
391,640 

10,810 
6,364 

40,461 
8,689 

35,809 

10,046 
7,297 

19,228 
8,506 

26,163 
6,420 

19,016 

13,567 
163,206 



70,050 
3A,978 



81.338 



City total. ..,,. 

Los Angeles, Calif,,, 

Oakland, Calif • 

Sacramento, Calif,,, « 

San Diego, Calif 

San Francisco, Calif, 
Denver, Colo,,.,.,,,, 
Bridgeport, Conn,,,,, 

Hartford, Conn o 

New Haven, Conn , 

Washingtoh, D, C,.,,, 
Miami, Fla.... ,0 

Chicago, Ill,,o,,a,ao 

Baltimore, Md , 

Boston, Mass,....,... 
Fall River, Mass.,.,, 

Worcester, Mass 

Detroit, Mich,. 

Minneapolis, Minn,.., 

St. Louis, Mo 

Jersey City, N, Jo... 
Newark, N. J.....,,.. 
Paterson, N. J..,,.., 

Buffalo, No Ya,o.a..a 

New York, N, Y 

Rochester, N, Y 

Syracuse, N, Y,,..,,, 
Cleveland, Ohio, ,. 0.0 

Portland, Ore,,, 

Philadelphia, Pa, , . , . . 

Pittsburgh, Pa 

Providence, R, I,,,oa 
El Paso, Texas,,, o.»o 

Houston, Texas, 

San Antonio, Texas,, , 
Salt Lake City, Utah, 
Seattle, Wash,,,,,,., 
Milwaukee, Wis, ,,,,,, 
Other cities,. 

Outlying territories 

and possessions,,,,,, 
AJ.X oLher, o,,,,,,,..,.^ 
17 Rural - Population of less than 2,500 



2,550 
423 
276 
185 
1,971 
847 
195: 
289 
236 
653 
424 
8,907 
1,209 
586 
28 
104 
3,190 
505 
1,178 
516 
936 
541 
1,227 
29,380 
881 
390 
2,865 
535 
2,874 
800 
200 
165 
348 
371 
1,021 
654 
2,948 
10,930 



387 
929 



111.482 



Etaly 



202.312 



18.^3 



57, g2 5 



5,087 

901 

443 

606 

3,320 

568 

535 

813 

425 

1,460 

2,667 

4,219 

1,300 

2,496 

201 

332 

9,146 

407 

470 

569 

1,073 

440 

1,577 

43,428 

1,049 
520 

1,747 
838 

3,403 
898 
593 
152 
447 
401 

935 

1,621 

616 

15,779 



1,805 
1,336 



125.357 



Poland 



233.230 



22.323 



^6 ,94 9 



1,384 
717 
492 
149 
3,179 
394 
1,407 
1,559 
1,637 
680 
188 
4,764 
2,299 
4,015 
76 
459 
4,665 
34 
1,171 
1,274 
3,570 
2,540 
1,787 
57,681 
2,104 
1,148 
3,069 
380 
4,271 
1,483 
2,227 
50 
142 
107 
86 
483 
383 
13,303 



361 
846 



153.025 



U.S.S.R. 



108.077 



8.085 



21.385 



Canada 



232.320 



itli021 



91.471 



78.013 



2,212 
182 
77 
89 
626 
648 
935 

1,995 

861 

490 

299 

25,911 

2,603 

2,231 
524 
838 

13,845 
922 

954 
1,833 
3,279 
1,101 
5,113 
47,250 
1,355 
1,205 
6,981 

192 
6,345 
1,771 

573 
34 

225 

156 
21 

352 

2,270 

16,727 



42 
891 



Mexico 



301.605 



Vf.7 ? 7 



138.841 



94.162 115.308 



All 
other 



916.551 



107.662 



227.118 



519. ^^ 



3,073 


7,742 


32,255 


26,886 


1(^5 


974 


1,331 


4,945 


146 


630 


1,964 


4,651 


77 


941 


2,725 


1,663 


1,982 


2,136 


2,929 


24,670 


512 


409 


857 


2,990 


389 


298 


6 


3,611 


782 


1,105 


8 


2,779 


693 


310 


- 


1,456 


516 


781 


99 


5,300 


231 


1,423 


65 


5,664 


6,718 


2,996 


5,477 


48,150 


1,943 


575 


23 


5,762 


2,124 


5,764 


48 


11,851 


100 


597 


5 


3,579 


265 


717 


9 


3,105 


4,166 


18,428 


1,640 


19,385 


744 


993 


87 


4,247 


577 


229 


165 


3,549 


596 


167 


5 


1,949 


2,030 


304 


19 


6,002 


557 


112 


23 


2,718 


1,144 


4,087 


52 


3,799 


30,101 


10,066 


1,304 


172,430 


1,002 


1,757 


9 


2,653 


514 


884 


15 


1,688 


2,946 


1,365 


120 


21,368 


384 


2,404 


59 


3,897 


5,132 


814 


106 


12,864 


571 


405 


101 


4,017 


420 


656 


15 


2,613 


7 


112 


18,122 


586 


71 


368 


5,560 


1,345 


36 


231 


23,463 


1,398 


18 


3a 


164 


3,834 


383 


5,751 


82 


9,690 


495 


494 


372 


5,989 


6,423 


16,796 


16,024 


67,224 


70 


798 


135 


66,452 


524 


2,856 


2,584 


5,012 



Urban - Population of 2,500 to 99, 999 « 
Cities -Population of 100,000 or over. 
2/ Does not include 77,419 alien address reports that were incomplete, and 110,250 

aliens in temporary status, ^ , ^ . 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 37. DECLARATIONS OF INTENTION FILED 


, PETITIONS FOR NATURALIZATION FILED, 


AND PERSONS NATURALIZED: YEARS J 


ENDED JUNE 30 


. 1907 TO 195: 


} 




Declara- 










Period 


tions 
filed 


Petitions 
filed 


Persons naturalized 




Civilian 


Military 


Total 


1907 - 1953 


8.438.524 


7.258.724 


6.280.478 


47/t,??l 


6.754.809 


1907 - 1910 


526.322 


164.036 


111.738 




111.738 


1911 - 1920 


2.686.909 


1.381.384 


88if.672 


244.300 


1.128.972 


1911 


189,249 


74,740 


5^,683 




56,683 


1912 


171,133 


95,661 


70,310 


- 


70,310 


1913 


182,095 


95,380 


83,561 


- 


83,561 


1914 


214,104 


124,475 


104,145 


- 


104,145 


1915 


247,958 


106,399 


91,848 


- 


91,848 


1916 


209,204 


108,767 


87,831 


- 


87,831 


1917 


440,651 


130,865 


88,104 


- 


88,104 


1918 


342,283 


169,507 


87,456 


63,993 


151,449 


1919 


391,156 


256,858 


89,023 


128,335 


217,358 


1920 


299,076 


218,732 


125,711 


51,972 


177,683 


1921 - 1930 


*2'.709*.6i4** 


'i'.884*.277" 


**i*.7i6*.979* 


**'56*.206**' 


*i*.773'.i85 


1921 


303,904 


195,534 


163,656 


17,636 


181,292 


1922 


273,511 


162,638 


160,979 


9,468 


170,447 


1923 


296,636 


165,168 


137,975 


7,109 


145,084 


1924 


424,540 


177,117 


UO,340 


10,170 


150,510 


1925 


277,218 


162,258 


152,457 


- 


152,457 


1926 


277,539 


172,232 


146,239 


92 


146,331 


1927 


258,295 


240,339 


195,493 


4,311 


199,804 


1928 


254,588 


240,321 


228,006 


5,149 


233,155 


1929 


280,645 


255,519 


224,197 


531 


224,728 


1930 


62,138 


113,151 


167,637 


1,740 


169,377 


1931 - 1940 


*i'.369*.479*' 


*i*.637!n3*' 


**i*.498*.573* 


***i9*.89i**' 


*i*.5i8*.464 


1931 


10^;272 


145,474 


140,271 


3,224 


143,495 


1932 


101,345 


131,062 


136,598 


2 


136,600 


1933 


83,046 


112,629 


112,368 


995 


113,363 


1934 


108,079 


117,125 


110,867 


2,802 


113,669 


1935 


136,524 


131,378 


118,945 


- 


118,945 


1936 


148,118 


167,127 


140,784 


481 


141,265 


1937 


176,195 


165,464 


162,923 


2,053 


164,976 


1938 


150,673 


175,413 


158,142 


3,936 


162,078 


1939 


155,691 


213,413 


185,175 


3,638 


188,813 


1940 


203,536 


278,028 


232,500 


2,760 


235,260 


1941 - 1950 


926! 284 


1*.938!666* 


'"i'.837*.229* 


**i49!799*** 


'i*.987!o28 


1941 


224,123 


277,807 


275,747 


1,547 


277,294 


1942 


221,796 


343,487 


268,762 


1,602 


270,364 


1943 


115,664 


377,125 


281,459 


37,474 1/ 


318,933 


1944 


42,368 


325,717 


392,766 


49,213 y 


441,979 


1945 


31,195 


195,917 


208,707 


22,695 y 


231,402 


1946 


28,787 


123,864 


134,849 


15,213 y 


150,062 


1947 


37,771 


88,802 


77,U2 


16,462 y 


93,904 


1948 


60,187 


68,265 


69,080 


1,070 


70,150 


1949 


64,866 


71,044 


64,138 


2,456 


66,594 


1950 


93,527 


66,038 


64,279 


2,067 


66,346 


1951 


"**9ii497" 


""61*634** 


531741* 


975*** 


54^716 


1952 


111,461 


94,086 


87,070 


1,585 


88,655 


1??? 


2?. 558 


98.128 


?0,/t76 


1,?7? 


92.051 



1/ Members of the armed forces include 1,425 naturalized overseas in 1943} 
6,496 in 1944; 5,666 in 1945; 2,054 in 1946; and 5,370 in 1947. 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 38, PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY GENERAL AIvD SPECIAL NATURALIZATION PROVISIONS l/ 
AND COUNTRY OR REGION OF FORMER ALLEGIANCE J YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1953 



Persons naturalized 



Country or region 
of former 
allegiance 



Total 
number 



Under 
general 
natural- 
ization 
prcvi- 
sions 



Married 
to 
U. S. 
citizens 



Children 
of U. S. 
citizen 
parents 



Military- 



All coimtries. 



Eiirope 

Austria 

Belgium 

British Empire 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia , . , « 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany. ...«.« 

Greece o.. 

Hungary. 

Ireland. ..,..,., 

Italy., ...o o 

Latvia. ,.., ., 

Lithuania. , 

Netherlands, o .o, 

IMOrV/ay, ,eo,oa.o..o.ooo,o 

Poland o ...• 

r O jTuUgaj. .oo,.oo,.ooo.o.o 

Rumania, o,.., o..., 

Spain. ,co»o oo.ooo, 

oweoen. ooo,,..,..,...... 

Switzerland, o...... 

U.S,S.R. 
Ytigoslavia., 
Other Europe 



to.oo9o...eoo..,o 



Asia, , o o • 
China... 
Israel,, 
Japan. . , 
Lebanon, 



Palestine., 
Philippines 
Syria...... 

Other Asia. 



0.o..0.00d... 



North America 

Canada 

Mexico,,.., 

West Indies.... o. 
Central America. . 



...00.0 



South America, 
Africa 



92i0^1 



68ji86l 



2,075 

657 

13,345 

80 

2,376 

603 

175 

468 

2,029 

12,997 

1,830 

1,340 

2,871 

9,752 

327 

703 

1,187 

965 

6,963 

1,195 

624 

565 

930 

539 

2,684 

925 

656 

4i966 
1,056 
177 
674 
194 
2U 
2,040 
172 
439 

1^.915 



10,303 
2,728 

1,153 
731 

569 
119 



..46,793 



2^107 



1,160 
274 

5,872 
50 

1,529 

316 

85 

259 

757 

6,910 
825 
754 

1,695 

4,024 
183 
391 
712 
530 

4,495 
507 
334 
299 
489 
307 

1,519 
516 
315 

2.400 



560 
103 
576 

78 
168 
575 

79 
261 

7«183 



4,729 

1,342 

705 

407 

279 
42 



Hirica..o..o.... .......... -U-V k^ 

Stateless & miscellaneous. | 2,621 f 1,782 



42.088 



698 



?2.^12 



887 
368 

7,243 

28 

825 

269 

76 

193 

1,233 

5,914 
964 
568 

1,126 

5,471 
121 
301 
465 
415 

2,383 
646 
279 
2U 
425 
224 

1,123 
391 
333 

1-417 



403 



437 
70 
73 

111 
46 

426 
89 

165 

7.026 



5,U6 

1,191 

404 

285 

272 

67 

794 



17 
11 
67 

3 
4 
4 
5 
19 
100 

9 

5 

14 

51 

13 

3 

11 
17 
23 
3 
5 
3 
3 
2 
8 
3 

61 



27 
2 

1 

mm 

23 

8 



211 

IW 

19 

13 

12 

4 

4 

15 



1 .^7 5 



523 



5 

4 

121 

2 

17 

6 

3 

8 

16 

53 

23 

7 

31 

87 

5 

5 

7 

4 

58 

6 

6 

8 

4 

3 

26 
5 
3 

610 



16 
1 
7 
3 

577 
3 
3 

412 



199 

166 

27 
20 

9 

3 

18 



1/ See also table 47 for detailed figures by naturalization provisions. 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration & Naturalization Service 




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TABLE 41. PERSONS NATURALIZED AND PSTITIONS FOR NATURALIZATION 
DENIED: YEARS EMDKD JUN£ 30. 1907 TO 1953 



Period 



1907 - 1953. 
1907 - 1910. 

1911 - 1920. 

1911 

1912 

1913 

19U 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1920 

1921 - 1930. 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 

1928 

1929..... 
1930 

1931 - 1940. 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

1936 

1937 

1938 

1939 

1940 

1941 - 1950. 

1941 

1942 

1943 

1944 

1945 

1946 

1947 

1948 

1949 

1950 

1951 

1952 

1953 



Total 



12? .440 



1.247. 6?? 



)5,700 

79,945 

94,452 

117,278 

105,539 

99,758 

■ 97,648 

163,631 

230,477 

193,269 



1.938.678 



200,273 
199,523 
169,968 
168,834 
168,070 
159,605 
211,750 
245,634 
236,576 
178,445 



1.564.256 



151,009 
142,078 
118,066 
114,802 
121,710 
144,389 
169,018 
166,932 
194,443 
241,809 



2.051 



285 

278 

332 

449 

241 

156 

97 

73 

68 

68 



a842_ 

losr 

,712 
,589 
,276 
,184 
,637 
,857 
,037 
,865 
,622 



57,111 
90,818 
94,351 



Persons 
naturalized 



7.174.1^3 I 6,754.809 



1U.738 



1.128.972_ 



5S7m 

70,310 

83,561 

104,145 

91,848 

87,831 

88,104 

151,449 

217,358 

177,683 



Petitions 
denied 



419.384 



17.702 



118.725 



9,017 
9,635 
10,891 
13,133 
13,691 
11,927 
9,544 
12,182 
13,119 
15,586 



1.773.185 



181,292 
170,447 
145,084 
•150,510 
152,457 
146,331 
199,804 
233,155 
224,728 
169,377 



1.518.464 



165.493 



18,981 
29,076 
24,884 
18,324 
15,613 
13,274 
11,946 
12,479 
11,848 
9,068 



45.792 



143,495 
136,600 
113,363 
113,669 
118,945 
141,265 
164,976 
162,078 
188,813 
235,260 



1.987.028 



277,294 

270,364 

318,933 

441,979 

231,402 

150,062 

93,904 

70,150 

66,594 

66,346 



54,716 
88,655 
92,051 



7,514 
5,478 
4,703 
1,133 
2,765 
3,124 
4,042 
4,854 
5,630 
6,549 



64.814 
7,769 
8,348 

13,656 
7,297 
9,782 
6,575 
3,953 
2,887 
2,271 
2,276 



2,395 
2,163 
2,300 



Percent 
denied 



5.8 



13.7 



.2^ 



13.7 

12.1 

11.5 

11.2 

13.0 

12.0 

9.8 

7.4 

5.7 

8.1 



111. 



9.5 

14.6 

14.6 

10.9 

9.3 

8.3 

5.6 

5.1 

5.0 

5.1 



2.9 



5.0 
3.9 
4.0 
1.0 
2.3 
2.2 
2.4 
2.9 
2.9 
2,7 



Jhl. 



2.7 
3.0 
4.1 
1.6 
4.1 
4.2 
4.0 
4.0 
3.3 
3.3 



4.2 
2.4 
2.4 



United States Department of Justice 
Inmigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 42. PERSONS NATURALIZED, Wl SEX AND MARITAL STATUS WITH COMPARATIVE 
PERCENT OF TOTAL: YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1945 TO 1953 


Sex and 
marital 
status 


1945^/ 


19461/ 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 




Number 


Both sexes 


22?,7?6 


148,008 


9? ,904 


70.150 


66,^94 


66.346 


54.716 


88,655 


92.051 


Single... 
Married,, 
Widowed.. 
Divorced. 


40,014 

163,200 

17,335 

5,187 


30,236 

101,828 

12,207 

3,737 


19,697 

64,704 

6,988 

2,515 


12,206 

50,518 

5,429 

1,997 


9,623 

50,723 

4,604 

1,644 


8,489 

52,025 

4,218 

1,614 


5,859 

44,333 

3,262 

1,262 


8,821 

72,578 

5,450 

1,806 


12,127 

72,147 

5,886 

1,891 


Male 


111.059 


74.250 


52.998 


33 .U7 


27,865 


25.745 


18*. 711^ 


28.597 


34.657 


Single... 
Married . . 
Widowed,. 
Divorced. 


23,301 

80,571 

4,635 

2,552 


18,416 

50,668 

3,235 

1,931 


13,567 

35,942 

2,032 

1,457 


7,449 

23,200 

1,466 

1,032 


6,142 

19,833 

1,089 

801 


5,710 

18,345 

921 

769 


3,489 

14,100 

615 

507 


5,276 

21,791 

896 

634 


7,253 

25,777 

926 

701 


Female 


114.677 


73.758 


40.906 


37.003 


38.729 


40.601 


'36;665^ 


60.058 


57.394 


Single . . . 
Married.. 
Widowed . , 
Divorced . 


16,713 

82,629 

12,700 

2,635 


11,820 

51,160 

8,972 

1,806 


6,130 

28,762 

4,956 

1,058 


4,757 

27,318 

3,963 

965 


3,481 

30,890 

3,515 

843 


2,779 
33,680 

3,297 
845 


2,370 

30,233 

2,647 

755 


3,545 

50,787 

4,554 

1,172 


4,874 

46,370 

4,960 

1,190 










Percen 


t of tot 


al 








Both sexes 


100,0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


Single... 
Married . . 
Widowed , , 
Divorced. 


17,7 

72,3 

7,7 

2.3 


20.4 

68.9 

8.2 

2.5 


21.0 

68.9 

7.4 

2.7 


17.4 

72.1 

7.7 

2.8 


14.4 

76.2 

6.9 

2.5 


12.8 

78.4 

6.4 

2.4 


10.7 

81.0 

6.0 

2.3 


10.0 

81.9 

6.1 

2.0 


13.2 

78.4 

6.4 

2.0 


Male 


49.2 


50.2 


56.4 


47.3 


41.8 


38.8 


34.2 


32.3 


37.6 


Single... 
Married . . 
Widowed . . 
Divorced. 


10,3 

35.7 

2.1 

1.1 


12.4 

34.3 

2.2 

1.3 


U.4 

38.3 

2.1 

1.6 


10.6 

33.1 
2.1 

1.5 


9.2 

29.8 

1.6 

1.2 


8.6 

27.7 

1.4 

1.1 


6.4 

25.8 

1.1 

0.9 


6.0 

24.6 

1.0 

0.7 


7.9 

28.0 

1.0 

0.7 


Female 


50.8 


49.8 


43.6 


52.7 


58.2 


61.2 


65.8 


67.7 


62.4 


Single... 
Married,. 
Widowed.. 
Divorced, 


7.4 

36.6 

5.6 

1.2 


8.0 

34.6 

6.0 

1.2 


6,6 

30.6 

5.3 

1.1 


6.8 

39.0 

5.6 

1.3 


5.2 

46.4 

5.3 

1.3 


4.2 

50.7 

5.0 

1.3 


4.3 

55.2 

4.9 

1.4 


4.0 

57.3 

5.1 

1.3 


5.3 

50.4 

5.4 

1.3 



1/ Does not include 5,666 members of the armed forces naturalized overseas in 1945; 
and 2,054 in 1946. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



■ 




TABLE 43. 


PERSONS NATUR<U,IZ£D, BI . 


BEX AND 


AGE: 












YEARS EmKD JUNE 30. 1945 TO 1953 






Sex and 


age 


1945i/ 


194^ 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


Both sexes 


years 


22?, 736 


148.008 


93,,2P4 


70.150 


66, m 


66,2^6 


54.716 


88.655 


92,051 


Under 21 


1,669 


1,244 


544 


476 


987 


1,003 


726 


1,052 


1,206 


21 to 25 


II 


8,246 


7,269 


5,495 


2,970 


6,297 


7,742 


6,238 


9,785 


8,927 


26 to 30 


II 


11,540 


7,818 


6,627 


3,783 


6,074 


8,570 


8,295 


14,739 


15,176 


31 to 35 


II 


14,902 


10,823 


7,221 


4,131 


4,886 


5,355 


4,751 


8,890 


10,722 


36 to 40 


II 


24,399 


16,289 


11,205 


7,867 


7,107 


6,535 


5,479 


8,301 


8,956 


a to 45 


II 


29,976 


19,341 


14,091 


11,113 


9,164 


8,144 


6,127 


9,190 


9,426 


46 to 50 


•1 


32,131 


20,142 


13,137 


11,170 


9,198 


8,239 


6,699 


9,790 


9,681 


51 to 55 


II 


32,856 


20,783 


11,531 


9,481 


7,822 


6,937 


5,554 


9,090 


8,977 


56 to 60 


11 


29,409 


18,599 


9,601 


8,018 


6,441 


5,773 


4,476 


7,337 


7,792 


61 to 65 


II 


20,864 


13,185 


7,347 


5,637 


4,473 


4,298 


3,269 


5,318 


5,658 


66 to 70 


II 


11,952 


7,636 


4,260 


3,304 


2,551 


2,289 


1,884 


3,077 


3,306 


71 to 75 


II 


5,226 


3,298 


1,953 


1,445 


1,084 


926 


823 


1,374 


1,468 


Over 75 


II 
years 


2,566 


1,581 


892 


755 


510 


535 


395 


712 


756 


Male 


*m*.659* 


"74*.256' 


* 52 '.998' 


'33 '.147* 


*27*.865* 


*25*.745* 


'is*. 711* 


*28!597* 


*34*.657 


Under 21 


1,579 


1,115 


406 


257 


433 


371 


282 


405 


496 


21 to 25 


II 


4,115 


3,297 


3,032 


711 


1,239 


1,732 


1,019 


1,890 


2,804 


26 to 30 


II 


5,191 


3,719 


4,141 


1,094 


1,705 


2,375 


1,835 


3,369 


4,757 


31 to 35 


II 


6,668 


5,116 


4,073 


1,569 


1,925 


2,026 


1,510 


2,830 


4,127 


36 to 40 


II 


10,772 


7,902 


6,425 


3,672 


3,257 


2,825 


2,003 


3,087 


3,822 


41 to 45 


II 


13,777 


9,151 


8,185 


5,625 


4,254 


3,574 


2,387 


3,337 


3,914 


46 to 50 


II 


14,770 


9,481 


7,505 


5,679 


4,271 


3,615 


2,868 


3,685 


3,890 


51 to 55 


II 


15,788 


10,095 


6,122 


4,535 


3,488 


2,870 


2,192 


3,167 


3,373 


56 to 60 


II 


15,658 


9,926 


5,051 


4,098 


2,971 


2,471 


1,779 


2,600 


2,901 


61 to 65 


II 


11,955 


7,535 


4,195 


2,981 


2,186 


2,052 


1,356 


2,036 


2,212 


66 to 70 


11 


6,537 


4,236 


2,310 


1,737 


1,297 


1,088 


882 


1,253 


1,391 


71 to 75 


II 


2,846 


1,819 


1,075 


766 


570 


467 


417 


614 


641 


Over 75 
Female 


II 
years 


1,403 


858 


478 


423 


269 


279 


181 


324 


329 


* 114 '.677* 


**73*.758* 


*4C)*.966* 


'37 '.063* 


'38*.729* 


'46*,6oi* 


* 36*. 605* 


'60 '.058* 


*57*.394 


Under 21 


90 


129 


138 


219 


554 


632 


444 


647 


710 


21 to 25 


II 


4,131 


3,972 


2,463 


2,259 


5,058 


6,010 


5,219 


7,395 


6,123 


26 to 30 


It 


6,349 


4,099 


2,486 


2,689 


4,369 


6,195 


6,460 


11,370 


10,419 


31 to 35 


II 


8,234 


5,707 


3,148 


2,562 


2,961 


3,329 


3,241 


6,060 


6,595 


36 to 40 


II 


13,627 


8,387 


4,780 


4,195 


3,850 


3,710 


3,476 


5,214 


5,134 


41 to 45 


II 


16,199 


10,190 


5,906 


5,488 


4,910 


4,570 


3,740 


5,853 


5,512 


46 to 50 


II 


17,361 


10,661 


5,632 


5,491 


4,927 


4,624 


3,831 


6,105 


5,791 


51 to 55 


II 


17,068 


10,688 


5,409 


4,946 


4,334 


4,067 


3,362 


5,923 


5,604 


56 to 60 


II 


13,751 


8,673 


4,550 


3,920 


3,470 


3,302 


2,697 


4,737 


4,891 


61 to 65 


II 


8,909 


5,650 


3,152 


2,656 


2,287 


2,246 


1,913 


3,282 


3,446 


66 to 70 


II 


5,415 


3,400 


1,950 


1,567 


1,254 


1,201 


1,002 


1,824 


1,915 


71 to 75 


II 


2,380 


1,479 


878 


679 


514 


459 


406 


760 


827 


Over 75 


II 


1,163 


723 


414 


332 


241 


256 


214 


388 


427 


1/ Does not incluc 


le 5,666 m 


embers of the armed forces naturalized overseas i 


n 1945, 




and 2 


,054 in 


1946. 


Uiited States Department o 


f Justic 


6 














ligration 


and Nat 


uralizat 


ion Serv 


dee 



TABLE 44. PERSONS NATUMLIZED, BY STATES AND TERRITORIES OF RESIDENCE: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1949 TO 1953 



State of residence 



1949 



1950 



1951 



1952 



1953 



Total 

Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia, 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana , 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 



66.594 



66.346 54.716 



88.655 



109 

329 

60 

9,370 

324 

1,861 
85 

430 
1,069 

157 

76 

3,297 

418 

224 

159 

55 

273 

557 

509 

5,021 

3,301 

660 

60 

483 

193 

135 

71 

371 

3,448 

117 

21,174 

126 

141 

2,285 

120 



140 

341 

44 

9,488 

358 

1,753 

90 

466 

957 

200 

85 

3,367 

577 

329 

198 

198 
245 
475 
489 
4,861 

3,475 

567 

60 

502 

166 

156 

68 

318 

3,742 

125 

20,499 

188 

93 

2,254 

160 



126 

283 

52 

7,879 

381 

1,093 
59 

371 
1,276 

126 

93 

2,201 

403 

257 

265 

107 
270 
591 
558 
3,436 

2,763 

545 

86 

451 

136 

170 

55 

252 

2,700 

134 

17,990 

210 

138 

1,386 

234 



231 
387 
108 
12,258 
533 

2,864 
178 
615 

1,524 
553 

156 

2,942 

1,048 

445 

340 

290 
411 
737 
949 
6,593 

5,288 
722 
111 
726 
236 

253 

106 

431 

4,131 

164 

27,120 

359 

108 

2,855 

305 



92.051 



197 

537 

94 

12,728 

492 

2,941 
102 
497 

1,757 
374 

U7 
4,236 
848 
379 
348 

235 
582 
802 

975 
5,768 

4,848 
829 
118 
551 
194 

232 
124 
554 
4,143 
215 

29,780 

292 

148 

2,611 

208 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 44. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY STATES AND TERRITORIES OF RESIDENCE; 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1949 TO 1953 (Cont'd) 



State of residence 



1949 



1950 



1951 



1952 



1953 



Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Pihode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Territories and other 

Alaska 

Hawaii 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands 

All other 



301 

2,685 
650 

69 
46 

92 

1,122 

105 

277 

332 

1,345 

166 

726 

46 



87 

1,362 

73 

37 

5 



451 

2,443 

521 

93 
89 

106 

1,353 

125 

232 

413 

1,176 

175 

623 

69 



95 

1,087 

55 

62 

144 



278 
2,312 

419 
74 
73 

105 

1,192 

81 

224 

456 

1,032 

112 

515 

58 



78 
512 
57 
36 
25 



601 

4,028 

707 

134 

91 

222 

1,989 
162 
258 
712 

1,755 

244 

796 

80 



104 

526 

78 

35 

56 



431 

4,461 

699 

U7 

88 

282 
1,641 
207 
301 
770 

1,724 

197 

883 

56 



206 
760 
108 
67 
137 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 45 PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY SPECIFIED COUNTRIES OF FORMER ALLEGIANCE 
AND BY RURAL AND URBAN AREA AND CITY l/j YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1953 



Glass of place 
and city- 



Country of former allegiance 



Total 



British 
"jipire 



Canada 



Germany 



Italy Poland 



U.S.S.R. 



Other 



Total, 



Rural, 



Urban, 



City total 

Los Angeles, Calif o.. 

Oakland, Calif 

San Diego, Calif 

San Francisco, Calif, 
Bridgeport, Conno,,.. 

Hartford, Conno, 

New Haven, Conn 

Washington, D, C 

Miami, Fla, ,.... 

Chicago, 111,0 

New Orleans , La , 

Baltimore, Md,,o.,..o 
Boston, MasSoo 00 *a, o, 
Cambridge, Masse,,,oo 
Fall River, Mass.,,,, 
New Bedford, Mass.,,, 
Springfield, Mass,.,. 

Worcester, Mass , 

Detroit, Mich,,, 

Minneapolis , Minn , . , , 

St, Louis, Mo,a«e»««* 

Jersey City, N, J,,oo 

Newark, N, J o,.* 

Paterson, N, J,.,«,,« 

Buffalo, N. Y 

New York, N, Y. , 

Rochester, N, Yoo««oo 
Cincinnati, Ohio, , , , , 
Cleveland, Ohio,,,,,, 
Portland, Ore ,o«*oea« 
Philadelphia, Pa,,,,, 
Pittsburgh, Pa,,,,,,o 

Scranton, Pa , 

Providence, R, I,,,,* 
San Antonio, Tex,,,,, 

Seattle, Wash,,, 

Milwaukee, V/iso...... 

Other cities 

Outlying territories 
and possessions,,,, «• 

ivXX OtnerS ooo*oeoeooo«o 



92.051 



?«602 



24J1? 



56. U9 



2,991 
431 
590 

2,592 
303 
564 
306 

497 
770 

3,098 
316 
564 

1,175 
220 
330 
210 
204 
154 

2,708 
330 
181 
225 
491 
165 
469 
24,586 
386 
184 
756 
166 

1,619 
461 
65 
256 
279 
766 
378 

6,363 



1,223 
358 



13.345 



10i30? 



12.997 



9.752 



6.963 



2.684 



1.902 



1.546 



lt?g? 



769 



358 



186 



^.381 



JuOfl 



6.904 



311 
76 

123 

226 
24 

100 
28 
46 

220 

232 
56 
56 

134 
23 
13 
16 
67 
5 

386 

29 
21 
21 
39 
17 
53 
2,838 
61 
25 
64 
27 

It 

10 

40 
27 
83 
31 
1,056 

106 
52 



Ai581 



5U 
24 
20 
62 
14 
97 
22 

27 

67 

198 

12 

23 
237 
67 
30 
28 
20 
43 
908 

63 
9 
7 

22 

8 

144 

633 

99 

11 

61 

49 

64 

19 

2 

36 

6 

243 

18 

674 



61 
62 



Rural - Population of less than 2,500, Urban 
Cities - Population of 100,000 or over. 



?|24? 



2.565 



1.158 



Jt22_ 



8.246 



327 
54 
30 

458 
7 

37 
23 
63 
50 

652 
31 

119 
64 
16 

5 
2 

13 

3 

151 

68 

31 
21 
62 
12 
48 
4,196 
56 
62 

103 
19 

247 
71 
3 
13 
43 
79 

119 



85 
28 



6.381 



97 
32 
45 

165 
89 

121 

108 
38 
28 

266 
Ik 
73 

181 

17 

5 

29 

17 

270 

6 

27 
63 
95 

5l 

3,288 
60 

15 
100 

4 

222 

83 

17 

56 

5 
12 

17 
605 



7 

30 



^,^12 



173 

3 

3 

59 

23 

58 

25 

35 

26 

426 

6 

65 
72 
11 
20 
16 
18 
17 
273 
24 
9 
32 
63 
23 
66 

3,153 

26 

10 

84 

4 

151 

44 

13 

7 

5 

15 

44 

310 



5 
30 



1.999 



126 

1 

6 

100 

6 

34 

13 

12 

25 

93 

1 

27 

95 

7 

10 

1 

5 

6 

73 

8 

5 

1 

24 

4 

9 

990 

4 

2 

26 

4 

114 

9 



9 

17 
114 



5 
6 



36.007 



3.4^2 



8.816 



- Population of 2,500 to 99,999. 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Natursilization Service 



TABLE 46. 


PEHS0M3 


WTURALIZKn, 
YEAB 


BY COUNTRY OR REGION 
i ENDED JUNE 30. 1953 


OF BIRTH AND YEAR OF ENTRY: 




■1 




Number 
natural- 
ized 


Year of entry 










Country or region 
of birth 


1953 


1952 


1951 


1950 


1940- 
1949 


1930- 
1939 


1920- 
1929 


1910- 
1919 


1900- 1 
1909 


Before 
1900 


Un ! 
known- 


All countries 


92,051 


?4 


4?2 


??o 


?.877 


52.744 


4.380 


l?.2Vf 


9.078 


^1.707 


1.108 


?7 ■ 


Europe , 


66.037 


35 


276 


232 


2.894 


39,288 


2.873 


9.609 


6.472 


3.727 


578 


?? I 


Austria .o.a. .•••••••. 


2,147 

701 

95 

2,616 
598 
157 
463 

1,787 
U,536 

1,699 

1,382 

3,1U 

9,578 
308 
691 

1,059 
976 

7,452 

1,134 
706 
530 
9U 
542 

5,801 
461 

1,959 
277 

2,636 
943 
775 

5.767 


4 

1 

2 
3 
6 

6 

1 

1 

1 
2 

1 
2 

2 
3 

5 


35 

5 

6 

2 

21 

64 

9 

2 

1 

61 

1 
4 
4 
6 
5 
2 
6 
4 
3 
16 
2 

1 

3 

10 

3 
104 


34 
3 

6 
2 

1 
8 
51 
5 
6 
2 

1 
1 
3 
6 

10 
2 
3 
1 
3 

13 

3 

2 
4 
2 

46 


153 
25 
4 
90 
36 
16 
15 

105 

935 
90 
64 
37 

548 
U 
12 
62 
45 

193 
31 
46 
16 
16 
25 

145 
9 

33 
5 
42 
50 
32 

243 


1,351 

591 

58 

1,946 
357 
117 
201 

1,408 

10,511 

701 

753 

1,590 

4,166 
214 
327 
753 
561 

4,981 
252 
320 
158 
283 
347 

4,079 
278 
900 
192 

1,032 
467 
394 

2.480 


84 

13 

5 

88 

17 

8 

36 

46 

614 

152 

50 

204 

553 

7 

16 

25 

42 

138 

37 

42 

55 

38 

18 

33 

162 

9 
31 

50 
58 

394 


129 

26 

10 

183 

105 

10 

67 

120 

1,995 

293 

109 

917 

1,555 

36 

37 

no 

189 
562 
232 
129 
134 
289 

80 
818 
106 
727 

51 
288 
140 
162 

1.238 


196 

25 

13 

163 

42 

1 

87 

32 

146 

350 

206 

159 

1,630 

21 

189 

74 

70 

9a 

370 

91 

119 

144 

40 

316 

21 

89 

10 

695 

140 

92 

768 


146 

10 

5 

116 

28 

3 

46 

31 

117 
96 

178 

144 

898 
10 
97 
25 
53 

556 

175 
69 
35 

104 
19 

123 

9 

29 

3 

499 
78 
25 

367 


15 

1 

17 

10 

2 

6 

9 

86 

1 

11 

57 

94 

3 

10 

4 

9 

60 

22 

4 

2 

35 

5 

42 

3 

16 
6 

44 
2 
2 

122 


1 : 

_ ) 

1 • 
1 • 

4 . 
11 . 

2 . 

3 ' 
3 

9 
1 

1 

8 

1 
5 

2 


Belgium. ...,,,...,,,, 


Bulgaria,., 0,0 

Czechoslovakia, , 

Denmark. .....o ., 

Estonia .............. 


Finland, , „ ,,,.,, 

France ,, ,, 

Germany. ,,,.«,,.,.,,, 


Greece ,,,,.....0,,... 


HuneaiTv. ............. 


Ireland ,....•.....•.. 


Italy. ,.,.,,. 

Latvia, .,.. ,,, 


Lithuania o,,,,,,,,... 


Netherlands. ......... 


Non^ray. .......,,,,.,. 


Portugal ,.., ,,,.,.... 


Spain .,,,, 


Switzerland. .,,..,,,. 


(England 

United (N. Ireland.. 

Kingdom(Scotland, ... 

(Wales 

Yugoslavia 




_ 


China „ 


1,167 

119 

680 

94 

2,047 

1,660 

18.319 


1 

1 
3 

6 


15 

27 

49 
13 


5 

18 
1 

17 
5 

67 


7i 

13 

4 

9 

83 
73 

637 


510 

80 

44 

65 

1,041 

740 

9.539 


125 

2 

18 

9 

180 

60 

1,028 


308 
18 
167 
4 
509 
232 

4.251 


m 

4 

255 

5 

87 

304 

1.768 


22 

2 

128 

9 

206 

581 


8 

18 

1 

71 

24 

387 


. 


Japan, ,, 

Philippines .....o..*e 


4 


Canada. ,, 


10,909 

2,721 

3,537 

794 

358 

723 

401 

742 

62 


3 

1 
2 

3 
2 

3 


12 

1 

7 

10 

21 

7 
8 
4 
2 


30 
2 

n 

4 
20 

2 
3 


a6 

25 

136 

38 

22 

32 

38 

30 

3 


5,900 
584 

2,245 
632 
178 

479 

291 

647 

20 


721 

122 

139 

31 

15 

45 

15 

20 

5 


2,461 

1,093 

594 

59 

44 

97 

26 

16 

7 


697 

727 

308 

14 

22 

43 

12 

13 

2 


384 

115 

73 

1 
8 

12 
7 
5 
8 


285 

52 

20 

3 

27 

3 
2 

4 
12 




West Indies 

Other No, America..., 

South America 

Africa ,., 

Australia & New Zealand 
Other countries 


3 

1 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 46A. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH AND COUNTRY OR REGION 
OF FORMER ALLEGUMCE: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 19!)3 



Country or region 
of birth 



CountiT or region of former allegiance 



m 
a> 

•H 
•-* +2 

<< c 

o 
o 






s 



m 



CQ 



•H O. 



I 
o 

rH 

n 
o 
s: 0) 

t) -H 

N 0) 

O > 






Q 



T3 
C 

•H 



o 

C 



0} 

u 

w 
u 
O 



All countries. . . . 

Europe , 

Austria , 

Belgium , 

Bulgaria , 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France , 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

ftumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Svd.tzerland 

(England 

United (N. Ireland. ., . 
Kingdom( Scotland 

(V/ales 

U.S.S.R 

Yugc slavia 

Other Europe 

Asia , 

China 

India 

Japan 

Palestine 

Philippines 

Other Asia , 

North America 

Canada , 

Mexico 

V/est Indies 

Central America 

Other North America.., 

South America 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand, 
Other countries 



92.0^1 



68.861 



2.075 



6a 



13.345 



2.376 



603 



468 



2.029 



12.997 



1.830 



66.037 



2,147 

701 

95 

2,616 
598 
157 
463 

1,787 
14,536 

1,699 

1,382 

3,114 

9,578 
308 
691 

1,059 
976 

7,452 

1,134 
706 
530 
914 
542 

5,801 
461 

1,959 
277 

2,636 
943 
775 

?, 767 



62.795 



2.068 



2,007 

683 

84 

2,492 
589 
156 
453 

1,76S 
13,091 

1,690 

1,312 

3,096 

9,539 
298 
672 

1,041 
961 

6,958 

1,133 
644 
521 
909 
531 

5,688 
415 

1,801 
262 

2,354 
902 
745 

1.128 



1,816 

1 
102 



1 
35 

12 
5 



656 



1 
633 



8.744 



1,167 
119 

680 

94 

2,047 

1,660 

18.319 



10,909 

2,721 

3,537 

794 

358 

723 

401 

742 

62 



109 

71 

24 

7 

15 

902 

4.i?o 



1,424 
17 

2,455 

69 

185 

183 

282 

291 

32 



63 

1 
9 



12 

6 



13 
9 
2 

15 

1 

2 

13 

90 

7 

7 

259 

10 
3 
6 
6 
4 

27 

12 

6 

1 

8 

5,634 

377 

1,789 

261 

37 

7 

138 

232 



2.369 



33 
3 

2,241 

1 

1 

1 

23 

24 
1 
2 



14 



i26 



ML 



1.811 



12. 94 ^ 



579 
2 



444 



11 
4 

1 



1 

1,683 

43 

1 
2 
1 
9 



14 

4 

1 

4 
18 



10 

5 

22 



29 
3 

60 
2 
1 
1 
18 
12,626 
2 
5 
2 
2 
5 
3 
9 
2 
101 
1 
6 
1 
2 
6 
3 



21 
10 
24 

22 



1. 767 



5 

1,673 



28 

67 

3 

2 

5 

127 

J^882 



21 



1,391 
8 

2,367 
66 
50 

123 

68 

289 

7 



2 

15 

4 



1 

2 

1 

15 

Jil 



21 



8 
63 

Jti. 



42 



5 

1 

29 



1 
144 



4 
2 
2 
1 
12 

1 
3 



8 



1 

1 

15 

1 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE U6k. PERSONS NATURi^.LIZED, BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH AND COUNTRY OR REGION 
OF FORMER ALLEGIANCE: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1953 (Cont'd) 



Country or region 
of birth 



Country or region of former allegiance 



r-i 
0) 
O 



u a 

<D o 

o w 



n) 
•H 
m 



o 



c 

•H 

a. 
a. 

•H 



XI 

-p 

o 



§ 

O 



o 
o 

S 



05 
V 
•H 

T3 



to 
<]} 



rH n) 
<l) O 
(^ -H 

■P t( 
C 4) 
<U S 



tn 
c 
o 

m 
tn 
<i> 

o CO 

m to 
• o 

3 CL, 



t> 

-Pf-i 

30) 
oB 



to 
a> 

r-\ 
0) 

1^ 
■P 
CO 



All coiintries,.o.o. 

Austria, o o • c o 

Belgium„ ....,....>... 
Bulgaria .„ 

Czechoslovakia „ . 

Denmark, ,„,,.,,,,of 

Estoniao ..o.oo 

r inj-ancio o««d«««***0*« 
r rdnc B»o*ooo««o*«**«o 

Germany o.*oo« 

Lireece •o««*«oooo«o*«« 

MuXlgaiTy Q o*o**oooooooo 
Xa ej-3.nQ ••oooooooo«ooo 
XX'B'Xj' « ••oo««««oooooeo 
1j3.Xi vXo. •00OO««0O«0*0«0 

Lithuania. oooo.o<....o 

Netherlands . , „ » » 

Norway, o«o«*«o*«oo«oo 

Poland, oo.o ,.00 

rorougax, ,o,ooo,oo,oo 
Rumania ,oooooo«,o«,o« 

Spain, ,., ,.,..., 

oweaen. o,,o,oooooo,oo 

Svritzerland ,.,,,, .,», 

(England.,,,, 

United (N. Ireland ,0 

Kingdom(Scotland. ... 

(Wales,,,,, o, 

Yugoslavia. ...,.,,,,, 
Other Europe, , ,,,,,,, 

Asia, „.„„.,,,, o,,.,,.,, 
o n j.na o,,,.,,,,,,..,,, 

Jj^Qia «,,,o,o,.oO,,,,0 

v apan o,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 
raxestrine, ,,,,00.0,,, 
Philippines, ,.,,,,,,, 
Other Asia,,,, „,,,,,, 

North America, ,,.,.0,., 
Canada o..,,o,,o,,«,,, 

Me>d.co ,,. ,.,,,., 

West Indies,,,,,,,,,. 
Central America,,,,,. 
Other North America,, 

South America,,,,,,,,,, 

Africa, ,.,,..,, 

Australia & New Zealand 
Other countries 0.0,,,,. 



.221 



^M. 



19 

1 



12 
855 



30.216 



kiM 



hM 



2.040 



1.370 



10*201 



2.728 



1*1^ 



221 



20 



^ 



112 



2.090 



29.1A3 

76 

28 

73 

34 

6 

153 

4 

41 

231 

7 

23 

2,833 

9,505 

290 

66: 

1,018 

952 

6,724 

1,131 

592 

512 

904 

507 

25 

38 

11 

1 

2,240 

10 

512 

793 



_k22 



411 



652 



21 



JZ8 



18 



28 



59 

2 

15 

3 

9 

705 

163 



17 
6 

39 
2 

99 

56 

49 

2 

10 



13 
3 
6 
9 



163 

2 

1 



41 

7 

1 



33 

92 

31 
13 
4.490 



1,021 

48 

648 

81 

2,028 

664 

—2k 



2 

4 
6 

1 
21 

3 
5 

n 



13 
3 
6 
9 



162 

2 
1 



2 

2 
1 .038 



3 
2 
2.026 



1,013 
3 

1 
21 

11 



2 

1 

2,022 

1 



40 
7 



33 
92 

26 

9 
l^it26 



6 

48 

644 

81 

5 

642 

21 



13 

8 

1 

21 

8 

1 

7 

7 

28 

4 

11 

15 

31 

1 

7 

11 

15 

111 

22 

5 

4 

108 

11 

63 

5 

107 

23 

4 

_22_ 



imi 



107 
5 

4 
83 



U2 

2 



2 
10 



3 

9 

1,223 

3 

54 
2 
3 
6 
4 
4 



37 

4 
6 



290 

1 

25 



10 
3 
7 



122 

17 

6 

_22 



35 



2 

19 

9.618 



2 
4 

15 

2 
5 

5 



9,477 

2 

5 

134 

3 

4 
1 
2 



1 

1 
2 

2.703 



1 
2,696 

1 



1.067 



712 



8 

3 

1 

45 
11 



1 

1 
1,064 

1 



1 

1 

1 

709 



4 
3 

1 

530 



1 
105 



1 
1 

1 
10 

2 

4 



12 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 47. PERSONS NATORALIZEU, BY GENERAL km 

SPECIAL NATURALIZATION PROVISIONS: 
YE.\RS ENDED JUNE 30. 1949 to 1953 



Naturalization provisions 



1949 



1950 



1951 



1952 



1953 



Total. 



General provisions. 
Special provisions. 



Persons married to U.S. citizens 

Children, including adopted children, 
of U. S. citizen i»rents 

Former U.S. citizens who lost citizen- 
ship by marriage 

Philippine citizens who entered the 
United States prior to May 1, 1934 , 
and have ire sided continuously in the 
United States 

Persons who served in U.S. armed forces 
for three years 

Persons who served in U.S. armed forces 
during World War I or World War II . . . 

Persons vrho served on certain U.S. 
vessels 

Former U.S. citizens iiriio lost citizen- 
ship by entering the anned forces of , 
foireign countries during V/orld War 11=/ 

Dual nationals expatriated through 
entering or serving in armed forces 
of foreign states 

Former U.S. citizens expatriated 

through expatriation of parents 

Persons who lost citizenship through 
cancellation of parents' naturali- ^ 
zation 

Persons misinformed prior to July 1, 
1920, regarding citizenship status... 

Noncitizen natives of Puerto Rico — 
declaration of allegiance ,,oo 

Persons who entered the United States 
while under 16 years of age 

Certain inhabitants of the Virgin 

Islands 

Alien veterans of World War I or vete- 
rans of allied countries 



66,^94 



24.566 



42.028 



35,131 
448 

243 

2,675 
450 

2,006 
622 



91 
10 

4 

21 

11 

315 

1 



66.346 



?4.716 



MJi^ 



19.403 



14.864 



26.920 



46.943 



39.852 



61,7^^ 



40,684 
499 
243 

1,843 

343 

1,724 

1,164 



136 

8 

3 

33 

5 

256 



36,433 
487 
220 

843 
300 
675 
611 



66 

1 



17 

6 

188 

4 

1 



58,027 
760 
223 

722 

194 

1,391 

64 



138 
9 

4 

27 

4 

164 

8 



92.Q51 



46.793 



45.258 



42,088 
698 
150 

429 

192 

1,383 

lie 



123 
9 



7 

U 

51 

2 

1 



1/ Prior to December 24, 1952, these persons were repatriated under the provisions 
of Section 323, Nationality Act of 1940 and, therefore, were not included in this 
table. 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalixation Service 



TABLE 48. WRITS OF HABEAS CORPUS IN EXCLUSION AND DEPORTATION CASES: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1944 TO 1953 



Action taken 


19U- 
1953 


19/.4 


1945 


1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


Total Writs of 
Habeas Corrnis 
























Disposed of 


3.187 


84 


93 


263 


IM 


306 


511 


347 


394 


386 


35? 


Sustained •••••••••o 


222 

1,979 
986 

120 


2 
46 
36 

20 


3 
55 
35 

16 


9 
133 
121 

206 


15 
278 
151 

156 


29 
175 
102 

160 


9 
397 
105 

144 


25 
169 
153 

118 


56 

260 

78 

47 


30 
253 
103 

60 


44 


Dismissed. .••••••*■ 


213 


Withdrawn. , ••*.•••• 


102 


Pending end of year,. 


120 


Involving Exclusion 
























Disposed of 


445 


6 


6 


/f 


62. 


48 


59 


96 


?7 


^1 


38 


Sustained • 

Dismissed. .....o* 

Withdravm 


52 

221 
172 


1 
3 
2 


2 

3 

1 


k 


I 
19 
39 


3 
26 

19 


38 
15 


8 
48 
40 


3 
27 
27 


32 
19 


7 
21 
10 


Pending end of 
year. .....o 


n 


2 


1 


1 


15 


12 


16 


21 


13 


8 


11 


Involving Deportation 


2.742 


78 


87 


25? 


380 


258 


452 


251 


??7 


319 




Disposed of........ 


321 


Sustained 

Dismissed 

Withdrawn 


170 

1,758 

814 


1 
43 
34 


1 
52 
3U 


9 
129 
121 


9 
259 
112 


26 

149 

83 


3 

359 

90 


17 
121 
113 


53 
233 
51 


14 
221 

84 


37 

192 

92 


Pending end of 
vear, ..•. ■■....«■ 


109 


18 


15 


205 


141 


Mifi 


128 


97 


34 


52 


109 







United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



"^'^"llllli 



lllii'oMSI 973 8