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Full text of "Annual report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service"

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Given By 

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UNITED S TAT E S 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Immigration and Naturalization Service 
Washington , D. C. 




FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 



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DEPARTMEIVT OF JUSTICE 



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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 
Washington 25, D. C. 



Report of the Commissioner 
of Immigration and Naturalization 



The Attorney General 

United States Department of Justice 



Sir: I have the honor to submit the Annual Report of the Immigration and Naturalization 
Service for the year ending June 30, 1954. The report consists of a narrative and statis- 
tical tables and charts covering the accomplishments of the Service. 

Mr. Argyle R. Mackey was the Commissioner until May 24, 1954, when I became Commis- 
sioner of the Service. The report lists, in the introduction, some of my plans for the 
fiscal year 1955, as well as the accomplishments of the past year. 



Respectfully submitted, 




Commissioner 



Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 



Introduction 



Legislation and Litigation 4 

Entry and Departure 10 

Immigrants 10 

Visa petitions _ 15 

Nonimmigrants 17 

Border crossers 21 

Emigrants and nonemigrants 23 

Exclusions 24 

Alien Address Reports 25 

Adjustment of Status 26 

Suspension of deportation 26 

Displaced persons in the United States 27 

The Refugee Relief Act (Sec. 6) _ — — 28 

Adjustment of status from nonimmigrant to immigrant _ _ „ _ _ 29 

Adjustment of status of resident aliens to nonimmigrant status . 30 

Creation of record of admission for permanent residence 30 

Rescission of adjustment of status - — 30 

Border P atrol _ 3 1 

Detention 36 

Parole 39 

Deportation _ 41 

Investigations _ _ _ _ 43 

Nationality 47 

Declarations filed _ — 47 

Petitions filed _ 48 

Statutory provisions applied 48 

Persons naturalized 48 

Plans for the future 49 

P etitions denied 50 

N aturalizations revoked _.. 50 

Loss of nationality by expatriation 51 

Citizenship acquired by resumption or repatriation ..._ 51 

D erivative citizenship 52 

Citizenship Services S3 



Page 

Administration 57 

Personnel 57 

Budget 58 

Finance 58 

Statistics 59 

Records administration 60 

Services and supplies 61 

Publications 62 

Appendix I Judicial Opinions in Litigation 63 



APPENDIX II 

Table 1. Immigration to the United States: 1820 - 1954 

Table 2. Aliens and citizens admitted and departed, by months: Years ended June 

30, 1953 and 1954 
Table 3. Aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration laws: Years ended June 

30, 1950 to 1954 
Table 4. Immigration by country, for decades: 1820 to 1954 

Table 5. Immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens departed, by port or district 

Years ended June 30, 1950 to 1954 
Table 6. Immigrant aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and coun- 

try or region of birth: Year ended June 30, 1954 
Table 6A. Immigrant aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and coun- 
try or region of last permanent residence: Year ended June 30, 1954 
Table 6B. Immigrant aliens admitted to the United States under the Displaced Persons 

Act of 1948, as amended, by classes and country or region of birth; June 25, 1948 - 

June 30, 1954 
Table 6C. Refugees, displaced persons, and other immigrant aliens admitted to the 

United States, by country or region of birth: Year ended June 30, 1954 
Table 7. y- Annual quotas and quota immigrants admitted: Years ended June 30, 1950 

to 1^4 
Table-'8. Immigrant aliens admitted, by country or region of birth and major occupa- 

/tion/group: Year ended June 30, 1954 
Table 9. Immigrant aliens admitted, by country or region of birth, sex, and age: Year 

ended June 30, 1954 
Table 10. Immigrant aliens admitted by race, sex, and age: Year ended June 30, 1954 

Table lOA. Immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens departed, by sex, age, 

illiteracy, and major occupation group: Years ended June 30, 1950 to 1954 
Table lOB. Immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens departed, by country or regioi 

of birth, sex, and marital status: Year ended June 30, 1954 
Table 11. Aliens and citizens admitted and departed: Years ended June 30, 1908 to 

1954 
Table 12. Immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens departed, by State of intended 

future or last permanent residence: Years ended June 30, 1950 to 1954 
Table 12A. Immigrant aliens admitted, by rural and urban area and city: Years ended 

June 30, 1950 to 1954 
Table 13. Immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens departed, by country or region 

of last or intended future permanent residence: Years ended June 30, 1950 to 1954 
Table 13A. Immigrant aliens admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 

30, 1945 to 1954 
Table 14. Emigrant aliens departed, by race, sex, and age: Year ended June 30, 1954 
Table 14A. Emigrant aliens departed, by country or region of birth and major occupation 

group: Year ended June 30, 1954 
Table 15. Emigrant aliens departed, by country or region of birth, sex, and age: Year 

ended June 30, 1954 
Table 16. Nonimmigrant aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and 

country or region of birth: Year ended June 30, 1954 
Table 17. Nonimmigrant aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and 

country or region of last permanent residence: Year ended June 30, 1954 



APPENDIX II (Continued) 

Table 18. Nonimmigrant aliens admitted and nonemigrant aliens departed, by country 
or region of last or intended future permanent residence: Years ended June 30, 1950 
to 1954 

Table 19. Nonimmigrant aliens in the United States, by district: On June 30, 1953 and 

1954 
Table 20. Aliens excluded from the United States, by cause: Years ended June 30, 

1948 to 1954 

Table 21. Aliens excluded, by country or region of birth and cause: Year ended June 
30, 1954 

Table 22. Alien crewmen deserted at United States air and seaports, by nationality 

and flag of carrier Year ended June 30, 1954 

Table 23. Vessels and airplanes inspected, crewmen arrived and examined, and 

stowaways arrived, by districts: Years ended June 30, 1953 and 1954 

Table 24. Aliens deported, by country to which deported and cause: Year ended June 
30, 1954 

Table 24A. Aliens deported and aliens departing voluntarily: Years ended June 30, 
1892 to 1954 

Table 25. Aliens deported, by country to which deported and deportation expense 

Year ended June 30, 1954 

Table 26. Inward movement of aliens and citizens over international land boundaries, 
by State and port: Year ended June 30, 1954 

Table 27. United States citizens returning at land border ports, by districts: Years 
ended June 30, 1950 to 1954 

Table 28. Inward movement of aliens and citizens over international land boundaries: 
Years ended June 30, 1928 to 1954 

Table 29. Principal activities and accomplishments of immigration border patrol, by 
districts: Year ended June 30, 1954 

Table 30. Passenger travel between the United States and foreign countries, by port 
of arrival or departure: Year ended June 30, 1954 

Table 31. Passengers arrived in the United States from foreign countries, by country 
of embarkation: Year ended June 30, 1954 

Table 32. Passengers departed from the United States to foreign countries, by country 
of debarkation: Year ended June 30, 1954 

Table 33. Aliens deported, by cause: Years ended June 30, 1908 to 1954 

Table 34. Aliens who reported under the Alien Address Program, by nationality: Dur- 

ing 1954 

Table 35. Aliens who reported under the Alien Address Program, by selected nation- 
alities and States of residence: During 1954 

Table 36. Aliens who reported under the Alien Address Program, by selected nation- 

alities and by rural and urban area and city: During 1954 

Table 37. Declarations of intention filed, petitions for naturalization filed, and per- 
sons naturalized: Years ended June 30, 1907 to 1954 

Table 38. Persons naturalized, by general and special naturalization provisions and 
country or region of former allegiance: Year ended June 30, 1954 

Table 39. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance: Years ended 
June 30, 1945 to 1954 

Table 40. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance and major 
occupation group: Year ended June 30, 1954 

Table 41. Persons naturalized and petitions for naturalization denied: Years ended 
June 30, 1907 to 1954 

Table 42. Persons naturalized, by sex and marital status, with comparative percent of 
total: Years ended June 30, 1946 to 1954 



APPENDIX II (Continued) 

Table 43. Persons naturalized, by sex and age: Years ended June 30, 1946 to 1954 
Table 44. Persons naturalized, by States and territories of residence. Years ended 

June 30, 1950 to 1954 
Table 45. Persons naturalized, by specified countries of former allegiance and by 

rural and urban area and city: Year ended June 30, 1954 
Table 46. Persons naturalized, by country or region of birth and year of entry: Year 

ended June 30, 1954 
Table 46A. Persons naturalized, by country or region of birth and country or region of 

former allegiance: Year ended June 30, 1954 
Table 47. Persons naturalized, by general and special naturalization provisions: 

Years ended June 30, 1950 to 1954 
Table 48. Writs of Habeas Corpus in exclusion and deportation cases: Years ended 

June 30, 1945 to 1954 
Table 49. Prosecutions for immigration and nationality violations: Years ended June 

30, 1945 to 1954 



1- 

Introduction 



This is a report of the activities of the Immigration and Naturalization Service for 
the fiscal year 1954. The work of the Service falls naturally into three major categories -- 
aliens who seek to enter the United States — aliens who are already here — and aliens 
who are becoming citizens through naturalization. 

In the first category were 60 million aliens seeking admission. Among these were 
58 million border crossers from foreign contiguous territory, who were counted on each 
entry; 1,100,000 alien crewmen; 567,000 visitors, students, treaty traders, and govern- 
ment officials. 

Sparked by special legislation, such as the War Brides Act and the Displaced 
Persons Act, immigration has exceeded 200,000 in four of the past five years; yet with- 
out these augmenting influences, "normal" immigration in the year ended June 30, 1954, 
was 208,000 immigrants admitted for permanent residence. Under the authorized quota of 
154,657 (partially mortgaged by the requirements of the Displaced Persons Act) more 
than 94,000 quota immigrants came to the United States. Nonquota immigration of 114,000 
immigrants was a third higher than last year. This result was due in part to the increase 
in husbands of citizens admitted, but in greater degree to the larger number of immigrants 
admitted from Western Hemisphere countries, particularly Mexico. 

Recruitment and importation of agricultural laborers from Mexico, begun as a war 
time measure a decade ago, was continued during the past year, and 214,000 laborers 
were brought into this country through the joint efforts of this Service and the Department 
of Labor. 

Almost 174,000 aliens failed to qualify for admission under the immigration laws. 
Many who were denied admission were turned back at land borders without formal hear- 
ings. Three thousand three hundred thirteen were excluded after formal proceedings, in- 
cluding 111 excluded on subversive grounds and 364 on criminal, immoral, or narcotic 
grounds. 

Possibly the biggest problems and most telling actions in the Service during the 
year occurred in the second category — aliens already here. In this group are aliens here 
illegally who may be subversives or criminals, or laborers hard pressed by the economic 
situation in Mexico. In this group, too, are the aliens seeking authorizations of many 
kinds. The work is extremely varied. The Service is charged with the energetic enforce- 
ment of laws relating to the apprehension and expulsion of aliens who, for any one of 
many reasons, are in the United States illegally. On the other hand, applications for 
issuance of visa petitions, for a change in immigration status, for lost identification 
cards, etc., etc., are received and acted upon in great numbers. 

In the field of enforcement, the investigative work of the Service has been inten- 
sified, with top priorities being directed toward cases looking to the denaturalization or 
deportation of subversives and racketeers. Of the 574,298 investigations completed, 
10,290 were of subversive aliens and 7,512 of racketeers or other criminal, immoral, or 
narcotic aliens. 



- 2- 

Viewed in the perspective of several past years, the influx of aliens illegally 
entered from Mexico appears like an incoming tide, with mounting waves of people enter- 
ing the country, and being sent back, and returning again but in ever greater volume, and 
always reaching further inland with each incoming wave. So, too, have the Mexican 
aliens in greater and greater numbers penetrated each year further and further into the 
interior of the country and away from the farms along the Texas and Southern California 
Borders. Principally as a result of this invasion, 1,035,282 aliens were apprehended by 
the Border Patrol. 

In June, a new stratagem was devised. Instead of spreading a thin line of Border 
Patrol men along the long Mexican Border, like too few sand bags to dam the tide of 
illegal entries, all available personnel were concentrated -- first in Southern California, 
spreading in ever widening circles, and mopping up the pools of illegal aliens as they 
went. As a result of the operation itself and of the attendant publicity, thousands of 
aliens were expelled or departed voluntarily. 

For the first time it appeared that the Mexican illegal entries could be controlled 
if mobile task forces could be used when and where necessary. In such a situation, 
farmers learn to depend on legal labor and the Mexicans themselves, having lost the 
economic incentive to enter, will not have so great a temptation to enter illegally. Al- 
though the effect cannot be fully evaluated at present, it appears from early experience 
that this time aliens expelled and taken to the interior of Mexico are not flocking back 
again, only to become a subject for apprehension another time. 

There is obviously a strong correlation between apprehensions and expulsion of 
aliens, and a total of voluntary departures and deportations equalled 1,101,000. Almost 
27,000 persons were deported under wacrants of deportation, including 61 of the subver- 
sive class and 1,127 racketeers and other criminals. 

Statistics of deportations accomplished fail to tell the story of obstacles to be 
overcome — obstacles such as claims of physical persecution, administrative stays, 
court actions, difficulties in obtaining travel documents, applications for suspension of 
deportation. All of these are delaying actions that sometimes make the final effective 
act of the deportation process next to impossible. 

The responsibility of the Service extends beyond the admission and expulsion of 
aliens to the third category of the group of aliens who become citizens of the United 
States through naturalization or derivation. A tremendous increase in applications to file 
petitions for naturalization has occurred since the passage of the Immigration and Nation- 
ality Act. In the past year United States citizenship was conferred on more than 117,000 
aliens in the Federal and State courts having jurisdiction over such matters. Former 
nationals of the United Kingdom held first place, with 16,565 receiving certificates of 
naturalization. One group that deserves especial mention were the 6,750 Japanese who, 
for the first time, under the new Act became eligible for naturalization. 

In spite of increases in numbers of naturalizations, applications filed continued 
at a much faster pace, due to a number of factors, including the high immigration since 
World War II; changes in law (a) permitting aliens formerly ineligible because of race to 
be naturalized, and (b) permitting aliens over 50 who have been in the United States for 
20 years or more to be naturalized without being able to read and write English; and the 
annual alien address requirement, making noncitizens conscious of their alienage. To 
meet this situation, every employee in the Service who had previous naturalization exper- 
ience was assigned to this work in the closing days of the fiscal year. 



In order to have a goal, and to dramatize and emphasize the value of citizenship 
in the assimilative process of the foreign-born of our country, it was decided to concen- 
trate naturalization ceremonies on November 11, Veterans' Day. 

The few major accomplishments mentioned above suggest some of the problems 
and plans for the future, which are: 

1. To continue the program begun in 1954 of assembling task forces to cope with 
illegal entry across the Mexican Border, and to increase the force in order that there may 
be no recurrence of this mass illegal influx. 

2. To wipe out the naturalization backlog by assigning every available exper- 
ienced person to that work. 

3. To eliminate one major point of criticism of the Service by dramatizing the 
naturalization ceremonies by concentrating as many naturalizations as possible on 
November 11, Veterans' Day. 

4. Under a new detention policy, to enlarge on parole or under bond aliens except 
those likely to abscond, or whose release would be inimical to the public interest and 
safety. 

S As this program progresses, to vacate the detention quarters that are econom- 
ically unsound to operate because capacity is beyond the need. 

6. To have inspection of aliens take place, whenever feasible, before aliens 
arrive at United States ports. This will make for better utilization of personnel and 
better service to the travelling public. It will be accomplished by stationing immigrant 
inspectors at such points as Shannon, Ireland, where most planes stop before taking off 
for the United States, and by having inspectors ride the larger vessels enroute from 
Europe and the Mediterranean to perform the inspections enroute. 

7. In the field of administration, (a) to establish regional headquarters for super- 
vision and management of districts within each region; (b) to bring into these regional 
offices much of the administrative work now performed in the Central Office and District 
Offices; (c) to decefitralize to the Regional Offices the control and review of cases now 
performed in the Central Office, and (d) to establish a new division that will handle the 
field inspections. 

8. To endeavor to obtain funds for a building program that will provide suitable 
quarters for members of the Service, particularly at the land border ports. 

More comprehensive and detailed reports of the accomplishments of the past year 
follow. 



Legislation and Litigation 



Public Legislation 

A number of bills touching immigration and nationality were considered by the 
83rd Congress during the fiscal year. Of these, only six were enacted into law* This 
diminished activity followed the pattern observed after enactment of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act, which became effective December 24, 1952. The new legislation within 
our immediate zone of responsibility consisted of Public Law ,162 . approved July 29, 
1953, providing for the admission for permanent residence of five hundred eligible orphans 
under ten years of age adopted by United States citizens serving abroad in the United 
States armed forces or employed abroad by the United States Government; Public Law 
203, approved August 7, 1953, providing for issuance of two hundred nine thousand 
special nonquota immigration visas to refugees; Public Laws 237 and 309, approved 
August 8, 1953, and March 16, 1954, respectively, amending the Agricultural Act of 1949 
with respect to the Mexican Farm Labor Program; Public Law 257 , approved August 13, 
1953, incorporating the National Conference on Citizenship; and Public Law 419 , ap- 
proved June 18, 1954, designed to facilitate the entry of Philippine traders. In addition. 
Public Law 110 , approved July 13, 1953, granted certain exemptions from the immigra- 
tion laws to alien delegates to the meeting of the Interparliamentary Union held in 
Washington, D. C. 

In addition, a number of bills were pending in different stages of legislative con- 
sideration. Among these were various proposals to amend the Immigration and Nationality 
Act. The legislative committees have not yet scheduled hearings or taken action on any 
of these measures. Another important measure, H.R. 8193, 83rd Congress, seeks a num- 
ber of clarifying amendments of the Refugee Relief Act of 1953. This bill was approved 
on August 31, 1954, as Public Law 751 . 

A bill authored by Senator Watkins (S. 1766) would establish the office of a Com- 
missioner of Refugees to coordinate problems relating to refugees. Another group of 
bills sought to effectuate the recommendation of the President, in his State of the Union 
Message January 7, 1954, that knowing participants in the Communist conspiracy shall 
be deprived of their American citizenship. Another bill, S. 2862, proposed to make spe- 
cial nonquota immigration visas available to 385 skilled sheepherders. Another pending 
legislative proposal, S. 1303, provided for expeditious naturalization of former citizens of 
the United States who lost that citizenship by voting in a political election or plebiscite 
in occupied Japan. This bill became law on July 20, 1954 (68 Stat. 495). 

A final legislative project relates to a projected statutory procedure for judicial 
review of deportation orders. This proposal has been urged by the Attorney General, 
upon the recommendation of the Solicitor General and this Service. On March 10, 1954, 
the Attorney General addressed identical letters to the Speaker of the House and the 
Vice President asking the introduction of bills to permit judicial review of deportation 
orders and enclosing a draft of a proposed bill. No such bills have as yet been intro- 
duced. 



- 5- 
Private Legislation 

A total of 1,615 private bills were introduced during the fiscal 1954 dealing with 
immigration and naturalization matters. Of this number 1,144 were introduced in the 
House and 471 in the Senate. The number of private laws enacted in the past year was 
308, or 19 percent of the number introduced. During the previous year of 1953, 222 private 
laws were enacted, and 477 during the fiscal year 1952. 



Whether or not private bills are en- 
acted into law, their introduction neces- 
sitates exiensive consideration by the 
Service. Investigations must be conducted 
concerning the character and background of 
beneficiaries of private bills. In addition, 
during the fiscal year 1954 the function of 
preparing reports to the appropriate Con- 
gressional Committees, and to the Bureau 
of the Budget when such bills become en- 
rolled, was performed by the Investigation s 
Division. 

With a view to expediting this 
work the preparation of the initial reports 
was decentralized to field offices. This 
procedure has proved successful. Since 
October 1953, when the change was made, 
almost 3,000 reports have been made to 
the Congressional Committees concerned. 
As a result, work in this connection is 
very nearly on a current basis. 



PRIVATE BILLS INTRODUCED IN CONGRESS 

AND ENACTED 

79lh - e3rd CONGRESSES 



4,797 



f ~t Bills Introduced 
HB Laws Enacted 



755 



3,669 — 



SOS 



1,141 
III 



429 

14 



I 



I 






79lh eOlh eisl 82"'' 6Z"i 

CONGRESS 



Litigation 

The expansion in litigation affecting the Service continued during the past year. 
To some extent it was accelerated by the recently enacted Immigration and Nationality 
Act, which has generated many new problems of interpretation. To some extent it repre- 
sents a pattern of increased resort to the courts. Most of the litigation emerged from 
attacks upon orders of deportation or upon incidents of the deportation process. 

1. Supreme Court .— Primary attention is focused, of course, on the decisions of 
the United States Supreme Court, which utter the final word in the interpretation of Fed- 
eral statutes and the Constitution. During the past year that Court decided six cases 
touching the activities of the Service. However, in each instance they were either incon- 
clusive or merely extended previous holdings. These cases were: 

Galvan v. Press , 347 U. S. 522 (1954). This was perhaps the most important de- 
cision. It reaffirmed the Court's previous ruling in Harisiades v. Shaughnessy, 342 U. S. 
580, upholding the provisions of the deportation statute aimed at former members of the 
Communist Party. The Galvan case extended this holding to the Internal Security Act pf 
1950, which specifically named the Communist Party as a proscribed organization. 



International Longshoremen Workers Union v. Boyd , 347 U. S. 222 (1954). A union 
which sought to enjoin the enforcement of an immigration statute affecting some of its 
members was held not to have presented a justifiable controversy since no actual case 
of enforcement was involved. Not reached was the substantial question on the merits: the 



. 6- 
correctness and constitutionality of the irterpretation applying the immigration laws to 
alien residents of continental United States seeking to return from a visit to Alaska. 
This issue will be decided in other litigation now pending in the courts. 

Rubinstein v. Brownell , 346 U. S. 929 (1954). An equally divided court, Justice 
Clark not participating, affirmed without opinion the judgment of the United States Court 
of Appeals for the District of Columbia in this case. The Court of Appeals had con- 
cluded that under the Immigration and Nationality Act an order of deportation could be 
reviewed in a declaratory judgment suit. The Court of Appeals also held that an injunc- 
tion could be issued to restrain taking the alien into custody until the suit is decided. 
Because of the equal division of the Supreme Court the issue is regarded as still open. 

Accardi v. Shaughnessy, 347 U. S. 260 (1954). The impact of this novel decision 
was restricted by the narrow limits of the court's holding. In attacking the order of de- 
portation the alien claimed that suspension of deportation had been denied merely be- 
cause his name was on a list of unsavory characters compiled by the Attorney General. 
The court split five to four. The majority held that under existing regulations the Attor- 
nay General was precluded from commanding that discretion be denied to individuals in- 
cluded on a list of unsavory characters and ordered that a court hearing be held to de- 
termine whether any such improper directions had been made. The minority felt that since 
the Board of Immigration Appeals is merely an arm of the Attorney General, there is 
nothing to prevent the Attorney General from issuing instructions to it as to the manner 
of exercising discretion and that the alien had no legal right to challenge the exercise 
of such discretion. 

Barber v. Gonzalez, 347 U. S. 637 (1954). This case held that a Filipino who had 
entered the United States at a time when he was a noncitizen national of the United 
States was not deportable because 'after entry' he had been twice sentenced for crimes 
involving moral turpitude. Adopting an admittedly narrow reading of "entry" as used in 
the deportation statute, the court found that it related only to an alien who came from a 
foreign country and not to one who arrived from the Philippine Islands when they were a 
possession of the United States. 

In Tost V. United States, 347 U. S. 901 (1954), the Supreme Court reversed, on the 
Government's confession of error, a lower court decision denying naturalization to a con- 
scientious objector. 

During the past term the Supreme Court also refused to review the following de- 
cisions, by denying petitions for certiorari: 

Herrera v. United States . 347 U. S. 927 (constitutionality of criminal statute 
punishing transporting and harboring of illegal aliens). 

Florentine V . Landon. 347 U. S. 927 (administrative remedies must be exhausted 
before court review of deportation order). 

Accardo v. United States . 347 U. S. 952 (denaturalization judgment based on con- 
cealment of criminal record). 

Matranga v. Mackey . 347 U. S. 967 (denial of discretionary relief based on con- 
fidential information). 

Quatrone v. NicoUs , 347 U. S. 976 (deportation of former affiliate of Communist 
Party). 



- 7- 
Ng Yip Yee v. Barber , 347 U. S. 988 (authority of immigration officers to detain 
citizenship claimant). 

CarroUo v. Bode . 346 U. S. 857 (deportation of criminal violator). 

Boyd V. Mangaoang, 346 U. S. 876 (former subversive alien who entered as 
Filipino national not deportable). 

In addition, on June 7, 1954, the Supreme Court granted certiorari in Garcia v. 
L andon . which involves deportation of a former member of the Communist Party, to be 
argued when the Court reconvenes after the summer recess. Undecided petitions for 
certiorari also are pending in the following cases: 

Shomberg v. United States (interpretation of saving clause in Immigration 

United States v. Menasche and Nationality Act). 

Sweet, Chomiak, Charnowola v. United States , (denaturalization based on Com- 
munist Party membership prior to naturalization). 

Marcello v. Ahrens (applicability of Administrative Procedure Act to deportation 
hearing under the Immigration and Nationality Act). 

2. Major current problems .— The litigation of the past year has fallen generally 
into several patterns. Some of the major designs are mentioned in order to describe the 
problems currently facing the Service in the courts. 

a. Nature of judicial remedy .— As indicated above, the nature of the remedy that 
may be invoked for review of deportation orders remains unsettled. One consequence has 
been an increasing concentration of litigation in the District of Columbia. The position 
of the Service and the Department continues to be that habeas corpus is the only method 
for challenging a deportation order. However, the decision of the Court of Appeals of 
the District of Columbia in Rubinstein v. Brownell , 206 F. 2d 449, sanctioned a de- 
claratory judgment remedy with accompanying injunction. Outside the District of Colum- 
bia such suits have been unsuccessful because the Attorney General or the Commis- 
sioner, as indispensable parties to a declaratory judgment action, can be sued only 
in the District of Columbia. Vaz v. Shaughnessy , 208 F. 2d 70 (C.A. 2, 1953; Rod - 
riguez V. Landon , 212 F. 2d 508 (C.A. 9, 1954). And the Court of Appeals for the First 
Circuit recently disagreed with the decision in the Rubinstein case. Batista v. Nicolls , 
213 F. 2d (C.A. 1, 1954). The result has been that many aliens residing in different 
parts of the United States have brought declaratory judgment suits in the District of 
Columbia contesting deportation orders. In the fiscal year 1954, 29 writs of habeas 
corpus involving exclusion and 357 writs involving deportation were served by United 
States marshals upon immigration officers for release of aliens in their custody. Of the 
total 391 cases acted upon during the year, the Federal courts sustained the writs in 
three exclusion and 17 deportation cases and dismissed the writs in 17 exclusion and 
272 deportation cases. Three writs of habeas corpus involving exclusion and 79 involv- 
ing deportation were withdrawn. 

Suits for declaratory judgments were filed in 172 cases during the past year. Of 
this number 96 involved deportation and exclusion cases and 76 involved proceedings for 
declaration of United States nationalities under Sec. 360 of the Immigration and Nation- 
ality Act and Sec. 503 of the Nationality Act of 1950. Of the total 130 suits for declara- 
tory judgment disposed of during the year, 15 were granted, 72 denied, and 43 were 
withdrawn. 



-8- 

The most satisfactory manner to resolve the prevailing difficulties and uncer- 
tainties regarding the appropriate judicial remedy appears to be the enactment by Con- 
gress of the statutory review procedure for deportation cases proposed by the Attorney 
General. 

b. R eview of discretionary action. -In many instances the alien's deportability is 
not seriously questioned but he seeks court relief because his application for some 
form of discretionary action has been denied. One such instance was the Accardi case in 
which the Supreme Court required a hearing to determine whether there was prejudgment 
in denying suspension of deportation. Other aliens have sought to rely on the Accardi 
case by making similar allegations of prejudgment, but thus far their claims have been 
unsuccessful. See Matranga v. Mackey , 115 F. Supp. 45 (S.D. N.Y. 1954) affirmed 210 
Fed. 2d 160; Marcello v. Ahrens, 212 F. 2d 830 (C.A. 5, 1954); De Luca v. O'Rourke, 
213 F. 2d 759 (C.A. 8, 1954). The majority of the courts appear to hold that the exercise 
of discretion is unreviewable ( Lo Duca v. Neelly. 213 F. 2d 161 (C.A. 7, 1954), unless 
there has been an improper failure to exercise discretion. See Brownell v. Gutnayer , 212 
F. 2d 462 (C.A. D.C. 1954). In a number of cases aliens are challenging determinations 
declining to withhold deportation when it was found that the alien's allegation that he 
would be subject to physical persecution is not substantiated. Generally the courts de- 
cline to interfere with the exercise of discretion in such cases. Dolenz v. Shaughnessy, 
206 F. 2d 392 (C.A. 2, 1953). A number of such cases involving Chinese deportees are 
pending in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia. 

c. Saving clause .— A fruitful source of litigation has involved interpretation of 
the so-called saving clause found in Section 405 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, 
8 U.S.C. 1101 note. The changes in various requirements effected by that law often make 
it necessary to determine whether rights and status are controlled by the laws previous- 
ly in effect. The saving clause contains very broad language designed generally to 
safeguard rights which have become fixed or which are in process of acquisition. In two 
circuits the courts have held that naturalization applications under some circumstances 
are controlled by previous law, even though the petitions for naturalization were not 
actually filed until after the effective date of the 1952 Act. United States v. M enasche , 
210 F. 2d 809 (C.A. 1, 1954); United States v. Pringle , 212 F. 2d 878 (C.A. 4, 1954). 
The Government has filed a petition for certiorari in the Menasche case. A seemingly 
conflicting result, although the issue is somewhat different, was announced by the Court 
of Appeals in the Second Circuit in Shomberg v. United States , 210 F. 2d 82 (C.A. 2, 
1954), in which the alien has applied for certiorari. Because of the ramifications of the 
saving clause, it seems likely that explorations of its compass will concern the courts 
for some time. 

d. Exemption from military service .— Another source of litigation has concerned 
the effect of claims by aliens for exemption from military service. The law has declared 
that the making of such claims results in debarment from immigration and citizenship 
benefits. And a new provision in Section 315 of the Immigration and Nationality Act 
appears to apply such disqualifications retroactively. In Petition of Berini , 112 F. Supp. 
837 (E.D. N.Y., 1953) the Court held that the Immigration and Nationality Act did not 
change the principle of Moser v. United States , 341 U. S. 41 (1951) and that a claim of 
exemption made under an officially induced misapprehension did not incur the disquali- 
fication. No appeal was taken and the Service has adopted the view of the Court in the 
Berini case. 

In Petition of Tsuji , 119 F. Supp. 68 (N.D. Cal., 1953), the court held that non- 
declarant Japanese who were granted exemption from military service during World War I 
likewise were not debarred from citizenship. Here too no appeal was taken and the court's 
decision is being followed. 



And in Petition of Caputo , 118 F. Supp. 870 (E.D. N.Y., 1954), an alien enemy 
granted exemption from service during World War II was held not barred from citizenship 
benefits. No appeal was taken. Various other cases involving the effect of claims for 
exemption are pending in the courts. 

e. C onstitutionality of deportation statutes. — In many instances aliens have chal- 
lenged the constitutionality of deportation statutes, particularly insofar as they relate to 
past misconduct. These challenges have been rejected by the Supreme Court. The latest 
example, of course, is Galvan v. Press , 347 U. S. 522. The action of the court in grant- 
ing certiorari in Garcia v. Landon may indicate some further consideration of this issue. 
And the increased retroactivity projected in the Immigration and Nationality Act has 
provoked additional challenges. 

f. Strict construction. — Under the view expressed by the Supreme Court, depor- 
tation is regarded as equivalent to a penalty and deportation statutes are construed 
rigidly. This concept was explored most recently in Barber v. Gonzalez , 347 U. S. 637 
and in De Luca v. O'Rourk e, 213 F. 2d 759 (C.A. 8, 1954). 

g. Subpoenas against naturalized citizens .— It is the view of the Service that the 
Immigration and Nationality Act authorizes subpoenas against naturalized citizens in 
investigation of the legality of their naturalization. This view has been contested in the 
courts, thus far with inconclusive results. Among the favorable decisions is In re Minker , 
118 F. Supp. 264 (E.D. Pa., 1953); among those opposed are Application of Barnes, 116 
F. Supp. 464 (N.D. N.Y., 1953); In re Oddo , 117 F. Supp. 323 (S.D. N.Y., 1953). Appeals 
on this issue are pending in the United States Courts of Appeals in several circuits. 



CONVICTIONS IN COURTS FOR VIOLATING 
IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY LAWS 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1950-1954 




3. Prosecutions for immigration 
and nationality violations .— The number 
of prosecutions increased 31 percent in 
the past fiscal year. Prosecutions were 
instituted during the year in 16,041 cases 
involving immigration violations and 557 
cases involving nationality violations. 
Such prosecutions resulted in a total of 
15,571 convictions during the year, with 
aggregate imprisonment of 3,447 years and 
fines aggregating $84,303. 

Eighty-nine percent of the prose- 
cutions last year were instituted under the 
provisions of Sections 275 and 276 of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act for illegal 
entry. These resulted in 13,934 convic- 
tions with imprisonment aggregating 
2,727 years. Heavy fines and imprison- 
ment were imposed on 623 persons who 
were convicted under Sec. 274 of the Im- 
migration and Nationality Act and Section 

8 of the Act of February 5, 1917, as amended, for smuggling a total number of 3,968 
aliens into this country. During the year a total of 304 suits were instituted for alien 
registration violations, chiefly under Sec. 266 (b) of the Immigration and Nationality Act 
for failure to file an address report. Convictions were obtained in 134 of these cases 
and in 159 cases the suits were dismissed. United States Attorneys have declined pro- 
secution in nearly 15,000 such cases during the past year. 

Of the 557 prosecutions for nationality violations last year, 94 percent were 
instituted under the provisions of Section 911, Title 18, United States Code, for false 
representation as a citizen of the United States. Convictions were obtained in 87 per- 
cent of such cases. 



1951 



1954 



10 



Immigrants 



More than 208,000 aliens were admitted to the United States in 1954. 3y compari- 
son with 1953 this represents an increase of 22 percent. In four of the past five years, 
more than 200,000 aliens have been granted entry as permanent residents, but this is the 
first year in which the high immigration might be termed "normal," since it was the first 
full year of immigration under the Immigration and Nationality Act, and the first year 
since World War II that immigration was practically free of the augmenting influences 
of special legislation. Indeed, the mortgaging of quotas required by the Displaced Persons 
Act would tend to cut down quota immigration. 



. ' ~ THOUSANDS 
" - 1,400 p 



1,200 



IMMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1820 - 1954 



1,000 



600 



400 



200 



Total lmmigraT\ts Admitted 
Europe ( Southern aad Eastern) 
" (Northern and western) 




Nearly two-thirds of the immigrants who came here in the fiscal year 1954 origi- 
nated in only five countries: Mexico (37,456), Germany (32,935), Canada (27,055), United 
Kingdom (19,309), and Italy (15,201). There were 85 male immigrants to every 100 female 
immigrants admitted during the year. The average age of all immigrants was 26.7; the 
females were usually two and one-half years younger than the males. The decline in the 
average age of female immigrants from 28.0 years in the fiscal year 1950 to 25.7 years in 
the fiscal year 1954 may be due, in part, to a rise in the number of Mexican female immi- 
grants, who are about four years younger than the average immigrant. 



Over one-half of the immigrants admitted during the past year were not in the 
labor force. Of those in the labor force, 14 percent were professional and technical 
workers who came here from all parts of the world. According to the 1950 Census, only 



11- 



nine percent of the employed population in 
the United States were in this occupation 
group. One-third of the immigrants in the 
labor force were craftsmen or operatives 
and kindred workers. Proportionately 
fewer farmers have entered this country in 
the past two years than during the period 
1950 - 1953, when many displaced per- 
sons who were farmers entered this coun- 
try under preferences given to them by 
the Displaced Persons Act. During the 
past fiscal year, only nine farmers and 
farm managers came here as first pref- 
erence quota immigrants. 

Quota immigrants .— Under the 
total authorized quota of 154,657 there 
were 94,098 quota immigrants admitted 
from 120 countries and colonial or terri- 
torial possessions of Europe, Africa, 
Asia, Australia, New Zealand, and the 
islands of the Pacific. With the follow- 
ing exceptions, all quota immigrants 
were admitted under the Immigration and 
Nationality Act. There were 5,235 admit- 
ted under Sec. 3(c) of the Displaced 
Persons Act - this provision extended 
the issuance of visas to "out-of-zone* 
refugees until June 30, 1954. In addition, 
there were 847 aliens whose status was 
changed to that of immigrant under Sec. 4 
of the Displaced Persons Act. 



COMPARISON OF U S POPULATION OF 1950 

WITH IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED DURING YEAR 

ENDED JUNE 30, 1954 

AGE DISTRIBUTION 



PERCENT 

18 , , , , , ,- 








- 


~i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 
PL ^ 


12 


/ 


I ^H Immigronts Adm.lted 1954 
1 •>•• u S Populotion 1950 - 


g 


'^ / 


x:^^^ 


6 








3 


" Median 

Age 267 

^ 




:!^i 




~ 


_i 


^ Age 30.2 >v ••«— 





—1 — 1 — 1 1 L 1 1*T««^"~ 



10 20 30 40 50 60 70 75 ond 
AGE Over 



OCCUPATION 
Professional and 

technical workers 
Farmers and 

farm managers 

Clerical and 
sales workers 

Craftsmen and 
foremen 

Operatives 



OCCUPATION 




'. ■ f I 

Occupation ot 
persons in u, S 
lobor force 
■ Reported occu. 
Oalion ot 
iiTimigfonts 



10 20 

PERCENT 



Quota immigrants admitted 

, Years ended June 30, 1953 and 1954 

Class 

Total number 

Skilled immigrants: 

Selected immigrants of special skill or ability!/ 

Skilled agriculturists J/ _ _ 

Skilled sheepherders 2/ _ _ 

Relatives of U. S. citizens 

Relatives of resident aliens 

Nonpreference quota 

Displaced persons admitted under the Displaced Persons Act 
of 1948, as amended _ 

Displaced persons adjusting status under Section 4, Displaced 
Persons Act of 1948, as amended 



1954 



1953 



94.098 
2,456 

4,713 

6,004 

74,843 

5,235 

847 



$4,175 

122 
321 
363 

5,358 

4,644 

67,926 

4,805 

636 



1/ Admitted under Act of May 26, 1924. 

2/ Admitted under Act of April 9, 1952 (66 Stat. 50). 



12 



While 15 percent of quota immigrants admitted under the Immigration and Nation- 
ality Act were under preferences, the 85 percent admitted nonpreference continued to be 
the preponderant number. It is probably true that aliens applying for quota numbers from 
countries with quotas readily available do not use the preferential privilege, since it is 
of no particular advantage. For example, of the 21,092 quota charges made to the British 
quota, 20,205 were in the nonpreference group, and, of the 887 remaining, 46 were dis- 
placed persons. Of the 841 preference numbers charged to the quota of Great Britain, 463, 
or 55 percent, were from the subquota areas where quotas are limited to 100. 



Quota immigrants admitted to the United 
States under the Immigration and Nation- 
ality Act, by classes: 
Year ended June 30, 1954 

Class of admission Number 

Total - 88,016 

First preference quota- 
Selected immigrants of 
special skill or ability — - 2,456 

Second preference quota- 
Parents of U. S. citizens 2,783 

Third preference quota- 
Spouses and children of 
resident aliens ._ 6,004 

Fourth preference quota- 
Brothers or sisters of 
U. S. citizens, children 
over 21 years of age, or 
married, of U. S. citizens.... 1,930 

Nonpreference quota 74,843 



QUOTa IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED 
YESRS ENDED JUNE 30, I950-I95a 



vAii^yMvyyyy.^^^^, 




Northefn ond western 
EUROPE 



One of the changes concerning the 
provisions of the Immigration and Nation- 
ality Act that has been the subject of de- 
bate is the establishment of quotas of 100 
for colonies and dependencies. Experience in the first full year under the Immigration and 
Nationality Act indicates that there was no need for concern. As shown in the table be- 
low, only 15 percent of the subquotas for colonies or dependecies were filled during the 
past fiscal year. 

Quota immigrants charged to colonial quotas 
Year endgd June 30, 1954 



Colonies or 
dependencies of: 



Annual 
subquota 



Quota immigrants 
admitted 



Total 

Belgium 

Denmark 

France _ _ 

Great Britain and Northern Ireland 

British West Indies _ _ 

Netherlands 

P ortugal _ _ 

Spain 



7.800 

100 

100 
1,600 
4,400 

600 II 

300 

800 

300 

200 



1.172 
2 

153 

945 
3871/ 
66 
6 



1/ Included in Great Britain and Northern Ireland. 



- 13- 

Nonquota immiKrants. --The number of 114,079 nonquota immigrants admitted in 
the fiscal year 1954 was 32 percent higher than in the preceding year. The increase was 
due chiefly to a 34 percent rise in the admission of natives of Western Hemisphere coun- 
tries and a 36 percent rise in the number of spouses and children of United States citizens. 



IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1940 - 1954 



T housonds 
200 



NONOUOTfl IMMIGRANTS 



150 



100 



QUOTA IMMIGRANTS 




1945 



I950 



1954 



A comparison of the classes of nonquota immigrant admissions for the past two 
years is shown below. 



Nonquota immigrants admitted 
Years ended Tune 30. 1953 and 1954 



Class of admission 



1954 



Total nonquota immigrants 

Wives of U.S. citizens 

Husbands of U.S. citizens 

Children of U.S. citizens 

Natives of Western Hemisphere countries, 

their spouses, and children 

Persons who had been U.S. citizens 



Ministers, their spouses, and children 

Employees of U.S. Government abroad, 

their spouses, and children 

Refugees admitted under the Refugee Relief Act 
Other nonquota immigrants _ 



114.079 

17, 145 
7,725 
5,819 

80,526 
427 
385 

4 

821 

1,227 



1953 



86.259 

15,916 
3,359 
3,268 

61,099 
104 
387 

2 

2,124 



- 14- 

T he Refugee Relief Act of 1953 .--This Act became law on August 7, 1953, and 
provides for the issuance between that date and December 31, 1956, of 209,000 special 
nonquota immigrant visas to certain refugees, escapees, and German expellees, and the 
spouses and children if accompanying them. Consular officers and immigration officers 
have joint responsibility to determine eligibility under the Act for the issuance of a visa 
and admission to the United States. Sixteen officers and two clerks are stationed in Ger- 
many, Italy, Greece, and the Far East to perform the necessary examination prior to visa 
issuance. An additional group of personnel has been placed on a standby basis for detail 
abroad on 48 hours notice should circumstances demand it. The program was off to a 
slow start because of the requirements for proof of support and housing. During the year 
just 821 immigrants were admitted in the following classes: 

Maximum visas authorized and immigrants admitted 
to the United States under the 
Refugee Relief Act of 1953 
Year ended June 30, 1954 



Class 



Maximum 

visas 
authorized 



Number 
admitted 



Total number 



209,000 1/ 



821 



German expellees in Western Germany, Berlin, 
or Austria 



Escapees in Western Germany, Berlin, or Austria 
Escapees in NATO countries or in Turkey, 

Sweden, Iran, or Trieste 



Polish veteran refugees in the British Isles 

Italian refugees in Italy or Trieste 

Italian relatives of U.S. citizens or alien 

residents, residing in Italy or Trieste 

Greek refugees in Greece 

Greek relatives of U.S. citizens or alien 

residents, residing in Greece 

Dutch refugees in the Netherlsmds 

Dutch relatives of U.S. citizens or alien 

residents, residing in the Netherlands 

Far East refugees (non-Asian) 



Far East refugees (Asian) 

Chinese refugees 

Palestine refugees in the Near East 

Orphans (under 10 years of age) 



55,000 
35,000 

10,000 

2,000 

45,000 

15,000 
15,000 

2,000 
15,000 

2,000 
2,000 
3,000 
2,000 
2,000 
4,000 



613 



59 



43 



106 



1/ In addition, 5,000 visas were authorized for refugees in the United States adjusting 
status under the provisions of Sec. 6 of the Refugee Relief Act of 1953. 

Congress before its adjournment passed amendments to the Refugee Relief Act 
which will make it somewhat easier for aliens to qualify for admission, therefore an up- 
swing in the number of admissions is anticipated. 



Spouses and children of United States citizens .— The number of wives, husbands, 
and children of United States citizens admitted increased 36 percent during the past 
year. Since the new provisions in the Immigration and Nationality Act which removed all 
sex discrimination and accorded nonquota privileges to hisbands of citizens, the number 



- 15- 
of husbands admitted has jumped from 793 in the fiscal year 1952 to 3,359 in 1953 and 
7,725 in the fiscal year 1954. Nearly 40 percent of the husbands of citizens came from 
Italy. During the past year 2,802 wives, 105 husbands, and 285 children of United States 
citizens were admitted to this country from Japan. 



40,000 



SPOUSES AND MINOR CHILDREN OF U. S^ CITIZENS ADMITTED 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1950-1954 



CHILDREN 

WIVES 

HUSBANDS 





1950 



1951 




1952 



Western Hemisphere immigration .-Nonquota immigration from the Western Hemis- 
phere rose 34 percent since last year and was the highest since 1930. Of interest is the 
rise in the past couple of years of 'Mexican immigration, which, in the fiscal year 1954, 
comprised 18 percent of the total immigration and exceeded Canadian immigration by 
10,000. 

Visa Petitions 



The Immigration and Nationality Act increased the number of classes of Immi- 
grants entitled to preferences within quotas as well as to nonquota status, and in the 
majority of such cases requires that a petition for such preference or nonquota status 
must be approved by the Attorney General. 

The most significant change made in the allotment of visas to prospective immi- 
grants is contained in section 203(aXl) of the Immigration and Nationality Act. This 
provides that the first 50 percent of the quota shall be available for the issuance of 
immigrant visas to qualified quota immigrants whose services are needed urgently be- 
cause of the high education, technical training, specialized experience, or exceptional 
ability of such immigrants. Such services must be substantially beneficial to the national 
economy, cultural interest, or welfare of the United States. Section 204(b) of the Immigra- 
tion and Nationality Act provides that any person or agency desiring to have an alien 
classified as a first preference immigrant under section 203(a)(1)(A) shall file a petition 
with the Attorney General for such classification of the alien. The determination as to 
whether the services of the beneficiary are urgently needed in the United States has been 
greatly facilitated by the issuance by the United States Employment Service of lists of 



- 16- 

occupations and professions which are in short supply in this country. This obviates 
the need of a clearance order from the United States Employment Service for the listed 
occupations, which are principally in the professional class. 

In order to expedite visa petitions filed by members of the United States armed 
forces abroad, arrangements have been made with the State Department whereby the of- 
ficers of this Service approving such visa petitions filed in behalf of the wives and 
children may transmit the approved visa petitions directly to the American consul to 
whom application is to be made for issuances of the visa, without forwarding such peti- 
tions to the Visa Office in the State Department in Washington. The visa petitions for 
members of the armed forces serving in the Pacific and Far East are approved by the 
District Director in Honolulu. Petitions submitted by members of the armed forces serv- 
ing in Europe and Africa are approved by members of this Service stationed in Europe in 
connection with the administration of the Refugee Relief Act. This procedure recently has 
been extended to include civilians who are serving with, accompanying, or employed by 
the armed forces abroad. These procedures have resulted in a saving of many days time. 
As a result members of the armed forces returning from assignment overseas often are 
able to bring their alien wives and children to the United States. This would have been 
impossible under the old procedures where all approved visa petitions had to be cleared 
with the Department of State, Washington, D. C. 

During the last quarter of the year, 1,697 wisa petitions were completed overseas, 
most of them by our immigration officers at Frankfort. 

Under certain sections of the Refugee Relief Act a certain number of visas may 
be issued to aliens who qualify under any of the preferences specified in paragraph (2), 
(3), or (4) of Section 203 of the Immigration and Nationality Act. These provisions have 
no doubt contributed to the large number of applications which have been filed for classi- 
fication of aliens under the second, third, or fourth preference. 



Visa petitions completed 
Year ended June 30. 1954 



Class 



Completed 



Total Denied J/ 



Total number 90.049 2.309 



First preference quota - 
Selected immigrants_ 2,579 

Second preference quota- 
Parents of citizens ._ 5,236 

Third preference quota- 
Spouses, children of 
resident aliens 8,466 

Fourth preference quota - 
Brothers, sisters, 
children of U. S. 
citizens 38,019 

Nonquota- 
Spouses, children of 
citizens 35,369 

Nonquota- 
Ministers 380 



330 

186 

386 

649 

730 
28 



1/ Included in figures on total completed 



VISA PETITIONS COMPLETED 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30,1952-1954 



25,000- 



1954 



- 17 



Nonimmigrants 



Nonimmigrants are aliens who enter the United States for temporary periods or 
resident aliens returning from a temporary stay abroad. The figures below do not include 
such special groups as agricultural laborers, border crossers, and crewmen. 



Nonimmigrants admitted, by class of admission 
Years ended June 30, 1952 to 1954 



Class of admission 



1954 



1953 



1952 



Total nonimmigrants admitted 

Foreign government officials 

Temporary visitors for business 

Temporary visitors for pleasure 

Transit aliens 

Treaty traders and investors 

Students 

Representatives to international organizations — 

Temporary workers and industrial trainees 

Representatives of foreign information media 

Exchange aliens 

Returning resident aliens 

Other nonimmigrants 



566.613 485.714 516.082 



23,095 

61,029 

292,725 

78,526 

1,023 

25,425 

5,601 

7,479 

504 

15,260 

55,887 

59 



24,502 

63,496 

243,219 

67,684 

878 

13,533 

6,112 

3,021 

174 

12,584 

50,397 

114 



22,267 

86,745 

269,606 

77,899 

791 

8,613 

5,137 



44,980 
44 



Nonimmigrant admissions reached an all-time high of 566,613 during the past 
year. As shown in the above table, the chief increases since last year were in the num- 
ber of temporary visitors for pleasure, transits, and temporary workers and industrial 
trainees. 



The principal countries from which the nonimmigrants came are shown below: 

Nonimmigrants admitted, by country or region of birth 
Years ended June 30, 1952 to 1954 

Country or region of birth 



1954 



1953 



1952 



All countries 



5 66.613 485.714 516.082 



West Indies _. 

Mexico 

England, Scotland, and Wales 

South America 

Asia 

Canada 

Germany 

Italy 

France 

Central America 

Netherlands 

Spain 

Other countries 



98,175 89,730 82,855 

76,244 51,480 32,120 

67,438 59,839 66,730 

47,410 44,001 41,385 

32,671 30,838 27,404 

29,417 25,365 87,623 

25,373 19,650 17,268 

19,422 12,125 10,042 

18,517 19,247 18,427 

16,610 14,631 13,189 

12,918 11,589 11,212 

11,588 11,513 10,382 

110,830 95,706 97,445 



- 18- 

Foreign Rovernment officials. --During the past fiscal year 23,095 foreign govern- 
ment officials were admitted to this country from all parts of the world. Only 18 percent 
of the' officials were ambassadors, ministers, or career officers, the remainder being 
families and other employees. 

Visitors.--The slight decline from last year in the number of temporary visitors 
for business was more than offset by a 20 percent increase in the number of visitors for 
pleasure, and it was these latter visitors who accounted for most of the rise in the total 
number of nonimmigrants admitted to this country. The countries showing major gains in 
tourist traffic were Mexico, Germany, and Italy. 

As of June 30, 1954, there were 97,562 visitors in the United States: 39,556 in 
the New York District; 15,647 in the Miami District; 11,794 in the San Antonio District; 
with smaller numbers in other Districts. 

Temporary workers and industrial trainees .— Under the provisions of Sec. 101(a) 
(15)(H), the Immigration and Nationality Act established a new class for the admission 
of (i) temporary workers of distinguished merit or ability, (ii) other temporary workers, 
skilled or unskilled, and (iii) industrial trainees. These provisions were adopted by Con- 
gress to alleviate labor shortages, particularly in periods of intensified production, and 
to enable trainees to acquire a knowledge of American industries and agricultural and 
business methods. Petitions to import and employ these temporary workers and trainees 
are required. During fiscal year 1954, 5,938 such petitions were received and 5,513 
were completed. 

During the fiscal year 1954, 4,774 temporary workers of distinguished merit and 
ability were admitted to the United States in the H(i) category. Many of them were in the 
the field of entertainment, and included 1,674 athletes, 580 musicians, 451 artists, 184 
dancers, 127 actors, and 509 other entertainers. Others included were 64 engineers, 52 
scientists, 76 professors and other teachers, and 105 managers and officials. Most of 
those admitted in this category came from Canada, Cuba, Mexico, and the United King- 
dom. During the same period, 1,791 temporary workers were admitted in the H(ii) cate- 
gory, and 914 industrial trainees were admitted in the H(iii) category. 

Returning residents .— The Immigration and Nationality Act provides for the issu- 
ance of a reentry permit to an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence or an 
alien lawfully admitted between July 1, 1924, and July 5, 1932, as a treaty trader pur- 
suant to clause (6) of Sec. 3 of the Immigration Act of 1924, who intends to depart tem- 
porarily from the United States. With a valid reentry permit such an alien may return to 
the United States without obtaining a visa. A similar provision was contained in the Im- 
migration Act of 1924, the principal changes in the new Act being that reentry permits 
may be valid for more than one reentry, and they are limited in validity to a period of one 
year with extensions thereon not exceeding one additional year. By regulation, permits to 
reenter may be delivered to the applicant by mail, whereas under the previous regula- 
tions personal delivery to the applicant was required. This has resulted in more expedi- 
tious action on applications for reentry permits, and has resulted in the saving of consid- 
erable manpower to the Service. 

During the fiscal year 1954, a total of 77,756 reentry permits were issued and 
extended, 40 percent of which were in the New York District. During the year, 55,887 
returning resident aliens were admitted to the United States, as compared with 50,397 
admitted during the previous year. 



- 19- 

S tudents .— The number of student admissions increased 88 percent to 25,425 in 
the figcal year 1954. Much of the rise in student admissions is due to the changes in law 
brought about by the Immigration and Nationality Act. 

Under Sec. 101(a)(15)(F), an alien desiring to enter the United States as a stu- 
dent must be destined to an institution or place of study which has been approved by the 
Attorney General, after consultation with the Office of Education of the United States. 
Unlike the previous Act, the Attorney General may approve places of study which are not 
academic institutions of learning, such as trade and vocational schools. In addition, 
there is no lower age limit. Therefore, students may be admitted to attend public and 
parochial grade schools. A new list of approved schools has been prepared, after con- 
sultation with the Office of Education. The new list will contain many private, parochial, 
trade, and elementary schools. The need for individual petitions by schools desiring to 
be included on the approved list has been largely eliminated by regulations granting 
automatic approval if prescribed conditions are met and if the institutions agree to report 
the attendance and termination of attendance of foreign students to the Service. An addi- 
tional step designed to facilitate the approval of institutions which require a petition 
was accomplished by authorizing a single petition to be filed on behalf of an entire pub- 
lic or parochial school system covering entire school districts. 



On June 30, 1954, there were 33,801 students in the United States. It is interest- 
ing to note that the increase in students in the United States is not in the eastern sea- 
board districts, but rather in the South and West. There appears to be a direct relation 
between the location of students and the fact that the increase in student admissions was 
largely from countries of Central and South America. 



Students in the United States, by District 
on June 30. 1953 and 1954 



District 



1954 1953 



Total 

St. Albans, Vt. __ 

Boston, Mass. 

New York, N. Y. _. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Miami, Fla. 



Buffalo, N. Y. 

Detroit, Mich. 

Chicago, 111. 

Kansas City, Mo. 1/ 
Seattle, Wash. 



San Francisco, Calif. __ 

San Antonio, Tex. 

El Paso, Tex. 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

Honolulu, T. H. 



1/ The Kansas City, Mo, 
abolished in Apri 



33,801 


29.596 


262 


120 


2,761 


2,548 


4,334 


4,366 


1,579 


1,506 


2,025 


1,560 


2,665 


2,257 


998 


1,033 


3,488 


3,098 


4,904 


2,818 


- 


2,702 


1,371 


1,297 


3,465 


2,371 


1,867 


1,127 


1,260 


705 


2,581 


1,943 


241 


145 


., District was 


1 1954. 





STUDENTS ADMITTED 

BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1950-1954 



20,000- 



[ I Europe , 

^$^^^ CQTiadQ 

I . ■ I Latin America 

■H Other 



10,000- 



^ 



5^ 



^^^^^ 




1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 



Agricultural laborers .— On July 1, 1953, there were 13,805 agricultural laborers 
from countries other than Mexico in the United States. During the fiscal year ended June 
30, 1954, 7,946 agricultural laborers were admitted from Canada, the British West Indies, 
and British Honduras; 8,588 of the laborers returned home; and the cases of 767 were 
closed for other reasons. On June 30, 1954, there remained 12,396 of these aliens still 
in the United States. 



-20 



In addition, 213,763 Mexican agricultural workers were admitted during the year 
under the provisions of the Agricultural Act of 1949, as amended. The table which fol- 
lows shows the total number of Mexican and other laborers legally contracted for employ- 
ment in the United States during the past two years. 



Agricultural laborers admitted and contracted 
Years ended June 30, 1953 and 1954 

Class 1954- 1953 

Total number 221.709 192.132 

Mexicans 213,763 178,606 

Others 7,946 13,526 



At the close of the fiscal year there was a total of 163,675 agricultural laborers 
in the United States. The countries from whence they came were as follows: 

Number in U. S. 
Country of last permanent residence on June 30. 1954 

Total 163.675 

Canada 555 

(admitted under Agricultural Act of 1949, 

Mexico ( as amended 136,139 

(admitted under Ninth Proviso 15,140 

Bahamas 3,322 

Jamaica 5,197 

B arbados 1 , 738 

Leeward and Windward Islands 1,294 

British Guiana 124 

British Honduras ^ 63 



21- 



BORDER CROSSERS 



For the first time in 12 years 
total arrivals in the United States failed to 
increase over the previous year. Instead 
the figure levelled off at 118 million ar- 
rivals, as may be noted in the table below. 

Border crossers. —As is always 
the case, 97 percent of this number con- 
sisted of citizen and alien border crossers. 

A security measure taken by the 
Service is the reexamination of all holders 
of nonresident alien's border crossing 
identification cards. In the past these 
cards have been valid indefinitely and in 
the reexamination of the holders of such 
cards many who have become inadmissible 
to the United States since obtaining their 
original cards have been detected and 
barred from further admission to the United 
States. 



ENTRIES OVER CANADIAN 




AND MEXICAN LAND BORDERS 




YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1950-1954 




Number 










1 00,000,000 ^i^ 










' 


CITIZENS 






7 5,000,000 






^- 


, 






■ ■ "^ 














al IENS 
























1950 


1952 1954 



Aliens and citizens arrived and examined at 

U. S. ports of entry during years 

ended June 30, 1953 and 1954 



Total 



Arrived at land borders 

Canadian 

Mexican 

Crewmen 

Arrived at seaports 



Total 



Arrived at land borders 

Canadian .._ 

Mexican 

C rew m en 

Arrived at seaports _ 



Total 



Aliens 



Citizens 



Year ended June 30. 1954 
118,064,738 59,714,754 58,349,984 



114.456.153 

47,571,458 

66,884,695 

1,995,818 

1,612,767 



57.968.104 

23,963,853 

34,004,251 

1,143,386 

603,264 



56.488.049 

23,607,605 

32,880,444 

852,432 

1,009,503 



Year ended June 30. 1953 
118,365,650 59,577,599 58,788,051 



114.946.383 

46,701,040 

68,245,343 

1,932,827 

1,486,440 



57.931.998 

23,918,781 

34,013,217 

1,080,545 

565,056 



57,014.385 

22,782,259 

34,232,126 

852,282 

921,384 



-22 

Crewmen 



The Immigration and Nationality Act made applicable to alien crewmen all 
grounds of exclusion to the same extent that such grounds in the past have been appli- 
cable to nonimmigrant alien passengers. Prior to the new Act an alien crewman was 
denied shore leave in the United States ports on only four grounds: (1) lack of documents; 
(2) malafide; (3) subversive; and (4) previously arrested or excluded and deported. He is 
now refused permission to land on all other grounds of exclusion applicable generally to 
nonimmigrants, such as criminal and narcotic violations, immoral activities, and mental 
and physical deficiencies. 

The new Act also provides that nonimmigrant alien crewmen must obtain indivi- 
dual crewman visas from American consular officers where it is practicable. This require- 
ment is an additional safeguard to the security of the United States, since information is 
available to consular officers in the alien's own country which is not available to immi- 
gration officers who examine crewmen at ports in the United States. This procedure has 
screened out many undesirable crewmen during the past year. The new Act also provides 
for the issuance of conditional landing permits to all alien crewmen found eligible for 
shore leave in the United States. The use of the conditional landing permit has resulted 
in fewer desertions of vessels by crewmen and has, largely, closed one loop-hole by 
which, in the past, many aliens succeeded in entering the United States illegally in the 
guise of crewmen. 

During the year 52,878 vessels and 102,184 planes arrived with 1,143,386 alien 
and 852,432 citizen crewmen aboard. More than 18,000 alien crewmen were ordered held 
on board the carriers on which they arrived. Of those granted shore leave 1,963 deserted, 
a reduction of 15 percent since 1953. The principal nationalities of those deserting were 
295 Italian, 233 Spanish, 209 British, 196 Greek, 190 Norwegian, and 136 Chinese. Most 
of the desertions were from carriers of Norwegian, Panamanian, Spanish, and British 
registry. 

Each year since the World War II air and sea traffic increases have averaged 
ten percent. Air traffic, in particular, is increasing. Two airlines have now inaugurated 
flights from Europe terminating in Chicago rather than on the East Coast, and it is indi- 
cated that other competing lines will soon establish similar flights terminating at in- 
terior airports in the United States. With a decreased force of immigrant inspectors it has 
been necessary to develop new inspectional procedures streamlined to the utmost to 
meet this heavy burden. 



-23 



Emigrants and Nonemigrants 



JEmigrants.--Emigrants are, by definition, aliens who depart from the United States 
after a residence exceeding one year in the United States, with the intention of remain- 
ing abroad. It will be seen from this definition that emigrant, therefore, is not the op- 
posite of immigrant in all cases, since some aliens admitted as nonimmigrants on arrival 
may depart after a year or more and be classed as emigrants. 

The number of emigrants increased to 30,665 in the fiscal year 1954, from 24,256 
in the previous year. The principal countries to which emigrants went are shown in the 
following table. 



Number of emigrants departed by country of 

intended future residence 

Years ended June 30, 1953 and 1954 



Country of 
future residence 



1954 1953 Country of 

future residence 



1954 



1953 



Total number .._ 30,665 24,256 



Europe 

Denmark 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands „ 

Norway 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

United Kingdom ... 
Other Europe 



14,192 

470 

1,937 

1,403 

709 

344 

1,180 

607 

219 

291 

542 

490 

3,378 

2,622 



12,557 
427 

1,484 

1,491 
621 
367 

1,358 
439 
571 
291 
376 
380 

3,185 
1,567 



Asia _ „. 

China 

India 

Israel 

Japan „.._ 

Philippines 
Other Asia . 



4,972 2,757 



459 

391 

486 

1,165 

1,002 

1,469 



North America 7,144 

Canada 2,463 

Mexico 1,208 

West Indies _. 2,547 

Central America 921 

Other North America.. 5 

South America „ 3,248 

Africa „ — 485 

Australia 85 N. Zealand 451 

Other countries 173 



155 
237 
267 
701 
598 
799 

5.957 
1,925 

988 
2,383 

633 
28 

2,180 

363 

352 

90 



Nonemigrants .— Nonemigrants are temporary visitors leaving the country after a 
stay of one year or less, or resident aliens who are leaving for a temporary visit abroad. 



During the year ended June 30, 1954, 568,496 nonemigrants departed from the 
United States. There were 51,643 resident aliens who departed for temporary residence 
abroad. The remainder, 516,853, entered as tourists, transits, government officials, and 
others who were leaving the United States after stays of a few days to a year's duration. 



- 24- 

EXCLUSIONS 



Aliens who arrive at ports in the United States seeking admission may be ex- 
cluded if they fail to qualify under the immigration laws. Great care must be exercised 
toward preventing the entry of any alien whose presence could be inimical to the interests 
of the United States. On the other hand, it is important that inspections be conducted in 
such a manner as to foster good international fellowship. A total of 173,888 aliens were 
denied entry on primary inspection as compared with 155,797 in the prior year. Many of 
those denied admission were aliens who arrived at the land borders and who turned back 
when questioned by a primary inspector without a formal hearing. 

In most instances aliens held for exclusion are given a hearing before a Special 
Inquiry Officer. With certain exceptions an appeal from the order of exclusion by the 
Special Inquiry Officer lies to the Board of Immigration Appeals. There is no appeal in 
those cases in which the excluding decision is based on confidential information, the 
disclosure of which would be detrimental to the public interest. 

" During the fiscal year 1954, 3,313 aliens were excluded from the United States, 

2,334 less than in the previous year. The decline in exclusions was due chiefly to a drop 
ia the number of exclusions of aliens from Canada who attempted entry without proper 
documents. Under regulations in effect last year, documentary requirements were waived 
in many cases of aliens entering from Canada for a temporary stay in this country. 

There were 111 aliens excluded in the past year on subversive grounds and 364 
aliens on criminal, immoral, and narcotic grounds. Three illicit traffickers of drugs were 
excluded from the United States. Twenty-one aliens were excluded as having been con- 
victed of two or more offenses, and 277 aliens were excluded who sought to enter the 
United States by fraud or misrepresentation. 

The table below shows the principal causes for exclusion during the past year. 
Aliens excluded from the United States, by cause 

Year ended ]une 30, 1954 

Cause Number 

All causes 3,313 

Attempted entry without proper documents „ 2,125 

Attempted entry without inspection or by false statements 307 

Criminals 296 

Previously excluded or deported 201 

Mental or physical defectives _ 127 

Subversive or anarchistic _ 111 

Immoral classes 65 

Previously departed to avoid service in armed forces 32 

Likely to become public charges 16 

Stowaways _ 2 

Other classes ..„ _. 3 1 



25 



Alien Address Reports 



Annually, in January, all aliens are required to notify the Service of their current 
addresses. This is a provision of Sec. 265 of the Immigration and Nationality Act. In 
January 1954 more than two and one-half million reports were received. 



More than 71 percent of the 
2,365,811 resident aliens who reported 
lived in the eight States of New York, 
California, Texas, Illinois, Michigan, 
New Jersey, Massachusetts, and Penn- 
sylvania. 

The chart points up the relative 
change in the major centers of alien pop- 
ulation as compared with the 1940 alien 
registration, with Texas moving from 
ninth place in 1940 to third place in 1954 
in terms of alien population. 

The table below shows the prin- 
cipal nationalities and States of residence 
of aliens reporting. 



ALIEN POPULATION IN THE UNITED STATES 
1940 AND 1954 



State 

NEW YORK 

CALIFORNIA 

TEXAS 

ILL INOIS 

MICHIGAN 

NEW JERSEY 



MASSACHUSETTS 



PENNSYLVANIA 



ALL OTHER 



Per ceTit 
10 20 




10 20 

Per ceTi t 



Resident aliens who reported under the Alien Address Program, 
by selected nationalities and States of residence: During 1954.1/ 



State of 
residence 


All 
nation- 
alities 


Great 
Britain 
and Can- 
ada 


Wexico 


Poland 1 


jierraarty 


Italy 


1 

U.S.S.R. 


Other 


United States 


2.365.811 


461.987 


314.77^ 


231.401 


191.456 


189.915 


116.735 


859.546 


New York 


514,569 


92,%2 


1,669 


68,039 


51,869 


71,057 


38,796 


190,177 


California _. _ 


363,730 


70,272 


112,692 


5,768 


15,008 


16,237 


10,846 


132,907 


Texas 


167,379 


5,956 


142,667 


978 


3,484 


916 


379 


12,999 


Illinois 


141,175 


13,442 


8,202 


29,161 


17,273 


6,193 


8,547 


58,357 


Michigan .. 


141,153 


53,078 


3,928 


22,735 


9,672 


6,549 


6,039 


39,152 


New Jersey 


125,85i 


18,155 


214 


21,398 


16,332 


19,704 


10,328 


39,722 


Massachusetts .._ 


123,374 


39,220 


101 


14,890 


3,605 


13,537 


5,425 


46,596 


Pennsylvania 


105,179 


13,808 


569 


15,887 


10,868 


13,761 


10,218 


40,068 


Other __ 


683,399 


155,094 


44,729 


52,545 


63,345 


41,961 


26,157 


299,568 



1/ Figures do not include 31,396 alien address reports that were incomplete and 114,106 
aliens in the United States in temporary status. 



-26- 

Adjustment of Status 



To ameliorate to some extent the inevitable hardships in the enforcement of the 
immigration laws, Congress has provided certain equitable powers to the Attorney Gen- 
eral to adjust the status of such affected persons. 

Suspension of depo r tation .— Section 19(c) of the 1917 Immigration Act, the fore- 
runner of Sec. 244(a) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, provided for the suspen- 
sion of deportation by the Attorney General and adjustment of status to that of permanent 
residents of deportable aliens who meet the legal requirements. Suspension under the 
1917 Act was based on hardship or long residence and required approval of Congress. 

In the fiscal year 1954, 2,241 suspension of deportation cases under the provi- 
sions of Sec. 19(c) of the 1917 Immigration Act were submitted to Congress and 6,035 
cases were approved by Congress. 

The present requirements for suspension of deportation are found in Sec. 244(a) 
of the Immigration and Nationality Act. Suspension under that Act is based on the 
alien's long physical presence in the United States and exceptional and extremely un- 
usual hardship to the alien or his family. While many of the provisions of Sec. 244(a) 
are more restrictive than Sec. 19(c) of the 1917 Act, the present law permits the granting 
of suspension to certain reformed criminals, prostitutes, and other undesirables who 
were ineligible under Sec. 19(c) of the 1917 Act. All grants of suspension of deportation 
must be reported to the Congress, which passes upon them by either affirmative or nega- 
tive action, as provided by law. 

During the past year 293 suspension of deportation cases were submitted to 
Congress under the provisions of Sec. 244(a) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, but 
none were approved. 

The number of aliens who became permanent residents through suspension of 
deportation numbered 7,087 in the fiscal year 1954. 

The table below shows the number of quota immigrants who had adjusted their 
status during the fiscal year 1954, and the quota areas to which charges were made for 
these aliens. 



27 



Quota immigrants who had adjusted their 

status through suspension of deportatJon 

Year ended June 30. 1954 



Quota area 

Total number 

Czechoslovakia 





Number 

5.204 

101 


Germany 




253 


Great Britain and N. 
Greece 

Italy 


Ireland 


601 
408 
596 


Poland 

Rumania 





238 
107 


Spain _ 

Yugoslavia 





161 

107 


Other Europe 




898 


Chinese racial 




1,028 


J ap an 




184 


Philippines 




199 


Other Asia 




215 



All other 



108 



SUSPENSION OF DEPORTATION CASES 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, P950-I954 

I i 



1951 



1950 



2,530 




4 6 

Thousands 



Displaced persons in the United States .-Section 4 of the Displaced Persons Act 
of 1948, as amended, provided that 15,000 eligible displaced persons (as defined in that 
Act), temporarily residing in the United States, could apply to the Attorney General for 
adjustment of their immigration status to that of permanent residents, provided they were 
otherwise admissible to the United States and were lawfully admitted to the United 
States as nonimmigrants under Sec. 3 or students under Sec. 4(e) of the Immigration Act 
of 1924. The time within which to make application for relief under Sec. 4 of the Act 
lapsed on June 16, 1952, by which time 11,610 applications had been filed. Practically 
all of these have now been adjudicated, and only 588 remained pending on June 30, 
1954, which still require adjudication. During the past fiscal year 1,393 applications 
were forwarded to Congressfor approval, and 781 applications were approved by Congress 



Section 4 displaced persons cases 



Year ended June 30, 



Submitted to 
Congress 



Approved by 
Congress 



Total 

1954 
1953 
1952 
1951 
1950 



5.781 

1,393 
1,080 
1,550 
1,231 
527 



3.744 

781 

1,733 

574 

656 



-28- 

The grounds for denial of adjustment of immigration status under Section 4 fall 
into the following categories: 

Years ended Tune 30. 



1954 1953 1952 1951 1950 
Total number 714 580 405 291 491 

Not unable to return to country of birth, residence, 
or nationality; no apparent persecution due to 
race, religion, or political opinion 155 170 200 118 221 

Cause for displacement did not arise from events 
occasioned by and subsequent to outbreak of 
World War II 21 20 12 1 20 

Not a lawful entry under Section 3 or Section 4(e) 
of the Immigration Act of 1924 



Inadmissible to the United States . 



Found haven in another country 



Entered subsequent to April 30, 1949 1/ 

Not in United States when decision was rendered 



321 


230 


103 


103 


73 


116 


62 


49 


16 


6 


32 


69 


32 


53 


69 


69 


27 


9 


- 


99 


_ 


2 


_ 


. 


3 



V The Act of June 16, 1950, (64 Stat. 219) extended the entry date from April I, 1948, 
to April 30, 1949. 

The Refugee Relief Act .--Section 6 of the Refugee Relief Act provides that any 
alien may apply within one year after the effective date of the Act to the Attorney Gen- 
eral of the United States for an adjustment of his immigration status to that of a perman- 
ent resident, if he established that prior to July 1, 1953, he lawfully entered the United 
States as a bona fide nonimmigrant and, because of events which have occurred subse- 
quent to his entry into the United States, he is unable to return to the country of his 
birth or nationality or last residence because of persecution or fear of persecution on 
account of race, religion, or political opinion. 

It further provides that the Attorney General shall report all the pertinent facts 
in the case to the Congress if he determines that such alien has been a person of good 
moral character for the preceding five years, that the alien was physically present in 
the United States on the date of the enactment of the Act, and that he is otherwise 
qualified under the Immigration and Nationality Act except that the quota to which he is 
chargeable is oversubscribed. If, during the session of Congress in which a case is re- 
ported, or prior to the end of the session of Congress next following the session in 
which the case is reported, the Congress passes a concurrent resolution stating in sub- 
stance that it approves the granting of status of an alien lawfully admitted for permanent 
residence to such alien, the Attorney General is authorized, upon payment of the required 
visa fee, to record the alien's lawful admission for permanent residence as of the date 
of the passage of such concurrent resolution. 

Section 6 provides further that the number of aliens who shall be granted the 
status of aliens lawfully admitted for permsment residence under such section shall not 
exceed 5,000. 



- 29 - 

During the fiscal year 5,081 applications were received under this section, and 
41 applications have been approved by the Attorney General and submitted to the Con- 
gress for approval. As of the end of J une 1954, Congress had not approved any of these 
applications. 

The grounds for denial of adjustment of immigration status under Section 6 of the 
Refugee Relief Act of 1953 are as follows: 

Year ended June 30, 1954 

Total number .._ 345 

Not unable to return to country of birth, residence, or 
nationality; no apparent persecution due to race, 
religion, or political opinion -- — - - 169 

Did not enter lawfully as a bona fide nonimmigrant 101 

Eligible for a nonquota visa 24 

Inadmissable to the United States _ 16 

Not physically present in United States when law enacted 14 

Entered subsequent to July 1, 1953 _ - 10 

Admitted as exchange visitors 9 

Cause for displacement did not arise from events which 

occurred subsequent to entry into the United States 2 



The requirement of the section that an alien must be unable to return to the 
country of his birth or nationality or last residence because of events which have occur- 
red subsequent to his entry into the United States produced considerable hardship in a 
large number of cases because the events in question occurred prior to the alien's entry 
into the United States. Public Law 751 of August 31, 1954, overcame this strict require- 
ment and qualified many aliens previously ineligible for adjustment under Sec. 6. The 
law will also greatly facilitate the disposition of applications now pending before the 
Service. 

Adjustment of status from nonimmigrant to immigrant. — Under the provisions of 
Sec. 245 of the Immigration and Nationality Act a bona fide nonimmigrant may adjust his 
status to that of a person admitted for permanent residence if he is found to be eligible 
for an immigrant visa. One of the prerequisites for adjustment is that a quota number be 
available to the applicant at the time of applying and at the time the application is 
finally acted upon. Generally speaking, aliens who entered the United States as non- 
immigrants are not eligible for adjustment under Sec. 245 if at the time of such entry 
they were entitled to nonquota visas by reason of birth in nonquota countries. By regu- 
lation, the benefits of this provision in the law are not available to nonimmigrants who 
enter the United States as exchange visitors under the Information, Educational and 
Exchange Act of 1948, as amended. Under Sec. 245 adjustment of status of an alien may 
be made from a nonimmigrant to that of an immigrant admitted for permanent residence 
without Congressional action. 

During the fiscal year the cases of 1,461 aliens were adjusted to the status of 
permanent residents. Disposition of these cases has been expedited through the use of 



-30- 

quota availability lists furnished on a monthly basis by the Department of State in order 
that the Service may determine that a quota number is available at the time the applica- 
tion is filed. Final orders of adjustment of status are made under Sec. 245 only upon the 
deduction of the appropriate quota number by the State Department. 

Adjustment of status of resident aliens to nonimmigrant status. -Under Sec. 247 
of the Immigration and Nationality Act, the immigrant status of aliens admitted for per- 
manent residence who subsequently acquire the status of treaty traders, foreign govern- 
ment officials, or representatives to international organizations is terminated and they 
become nonimmigrants under the applicable paragraphs 15(A), 15(E), or 15(G) of Sec. 
101(a) of the Act. The alien, however, may request permission to retain his immigrant 
status by filing with the Attorney General a written waiver of rights, privileges, exemp- 
tions, and immunities under any law or executive order which would accrue to him by 
such occupational status. 

From September 1, 1953 to June 30, 1954, 1,980 cases under the provisions of 
Sec. 247 were completed by the field offices. 

Creation of record of admission for permanent residence. — To obtain a reentry 
permit, to be naturalized, and for various other reasons, aliens need to have proof of 
lawful admission for permanent residence. 

Section 249 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, which is the equivalent of 
the registry provisions of Sec. 328(c) of the Nationality Act of 1940, provides that a 
record of lawful admission for permanent residence may be made in the case of an alien 
if no such record is available. To be eligible, the alien must prove that he entered the 
United States prior to July 1, 1924, that he has resided here continuously since, that he 
is a person of good moral character, that he is not subject to deportation, and that he is 
not ineligible to citizenship. When a record of admission has been made, the alien is 
deemed to have been lawfully admitted for permanent residence as of the date of his 
entry and he is issued an alien registration receipt card. Form 1-151. 

During the fiscal year ended June 30, 1954, 8,971 registry or creation of record 
authorizations were completed. 

Rescission of adjustment of status. — The Immigration and Nationality Act pro- 
vides for the rescission of adjustment of status acquired under the various provisions of 
law if within five years information comes to hand indicating that the person was not in 
fact eligible for the adjustment of status. If the adjustment of status was procured under 
Sec. 19(c) of the Immigration Act of 1917 or Sec. 244(a) of the Immigration and Nation- 
ality Act, reports must be submitted to the Congress for affirmative action before rescis- 
sion of such an adjustment of status becomes final. 

Only one such rescission case was referred to the Congress during the fiscal 
year ended June 30, 1954. 

Three cases involving rescission of adjustment of status under other provisions 
of law were handled during the same fiscal year. 



31- 



Border Patrol 



DEPORTABLE ALIENS APPREHENDED 
BY BORDER PATROL OFFICERS 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1950-1954 

Number 



,000,000 



During the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1954, the Border Patrol appre- 
hended 1,035,282 aliens, an increase of 
more than 190,000 over the year previous. 
Each year for the past ten years, as the 
number of aliens apprehended has in- 
creased in volume, nine-tenths of the 
arrests were "wetbacks* from Lower 
California, Arizona, and the Lower Rio 
Grande Valley. In addition to the "wet- 
backs" who have been apprehended along 
or adjacent to the Mexican Border, 37,413 
Mexican nationals were apprehended work- 
ing in industries. 

These aliens who entered the 
United States illegally are responsible for 
75 percent of all crimes committed in some 
Southern California and Texas counties. 
Jails are frequently filled to capacity by 
illegal entrants committed for crimes rang- 
ing from theft and vagrancy to murder. 

Even more serious is the possibility that among the 'wetbacks" who seek employment 
there may be those whose entry would be detrimental to our national security. 



600,000 



400,000 



200,000 



-A 


/ 




/ 








rn 


--^ 


/ 
















i 












■■ 



1950 



53 



1954 



" Operation Wetback ' 

In order to gain control over a situation which had assumed such alarming propor- 
tions, the Attorney General announced on June 9, 1954, that the Border Patrol would be- 
gin an operation on June 17 to rid Southern California and Western Arizona of "wetbacks". 
Simultaneous with the Attorney General's announcement, a band of road and railroad 
blocks was established and manned some distance from the border to prevent the escape 
of those who might flee toward the North unheeded. During the week prior to June 17, 
10,917 aliens were apprehended at these points. 

On June 17 a special force of approximately 800 officers from all Border Patrol 
Sectors was assembled at El Centro and Chula Vista, California. The operation was 
divided into two task forces which, in turn, were divided into command units, consisting 
of 12 men headed by a Senior Patrol Inspector and equipped with trucks, jeeps, and auto- 
mobiles. Radio-equipped vehicles formed a communications link between the unit and 
Patrol aircraft and the task force headquarters. The aircraft pilot and observer were used 
to locate alien groups and direct ground units to them. 



When the task force went into action they used a system of blocking off an area 
and mopping it up. Gradually they enlarged the operation until it embraced the industrial 
emd agriculturetl areas of the entire State of California. As the drive progressed the 
results showed that approximately 10 percent of the "wetbacks" who had been discovered 



-32 



in California were employed in industry. Their forced departure resulted in a drop in 
weekly unemployment claims in the State amounting to some $325,000. The peak in ap- 
prehensions was reached during the first week of operations when a daily average of 
1,727 illegal aliens wa/. apprehended. 

When the number of apprehensions warranted it, a daily commercial bus service 
was inaugurated from the staging areas in California to Nogales, Arizona. Only males 
who were without families in this country 
were expelled through the staging areas, 
all others were allowed to depart through 
the ports of Mexicali and Tijuana. Pro- 
vision was made for feeding and shelter at 
the staging areas and each alien was pro- 
vided with adequate food while travelling 
to his point of repatriation. By arrange- 
ment with the Mexican government, Mexi- 
can officials were responsible for placing 
these deportees on special trains at 
Nogales, destined to the interior of Mexico. 



Before each bus load of aliens left 
the United States, a Border Patrolman 
gave them an informal talk in the Spanish 
language. Clearly and concisely he ex- 
plained to the aliens the reason for their 
repatriation. They were advised that in the 
future their only opportunity to enter the 
United States was to be by legal means. 
Following this, there was a brief period 
during which they might ask questions 
pertinent to their status. 

The Patrol unit at Nogales, Ari- 
zona, was augumented in anticipation of 
the attempted return of any of the de- 
portees. However, largely as the result of 
the excellent cooperation of the Mexican 
officials, very few were able to escape the 
trip to the interior. Only 23 of the 23,222 
aliens deported through the area had at- 
tempted to return to the United States and 
had been apprehended by the Nogales 
Patrol Unit up to the end of June. 

As news of the operation of the 
Special Force spread, unknown thousands 
left the country voluntarily to avoid arrest 
and transfer to the interior of Mexico. Many 
family groups were encountered and coun- 
selled to return to their homes. These 
voluntary departures, an important factor in 
the overall planning, were given impetus 
when the Commissioner, during the week 
preceding the drive, announced over the 
radio and through the press that the 



APPREHENSIONS 

CALIFORNIA SPECIAL FORCE OPERATION - 
LOS ANGELES AND SAN FRANCISCO DISTRICTS 

JUNE 10 - 30, 1954 

Number of Alien Apprehensions 
500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 


DATE 


I 1 1 1 






JUNE 10 
II 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
16 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 

2e 

27 
28 
29 

JUNE 30 


2, /-Jg 




z.ose 






1.831 






1,733 


/,639 






1,526 




1,402 






2,(58 




1,99 7 






', 775 






(,338 






(,632 




(,5(0 




1,588 




1,368 




1,456 




(,2 36 




944 




(,3/8 


(,478 


1,(50 






! 1 











33 



"wetback* population was to be removed. Employers were urged to arrange for contract 
lab6r, and most of them did so. 

Based upon a careful appraisal of the situation with which this country is con- 
fronted, togpther with the accomplishments of an improvised Special Mobile Force in 
Southern California, the need for a more permanent force is indicated. Consequently, a 
Special Mobile Force of 200 men has been planned, which will be able to shift its area 
of operation anywhere in the United States. A supplemental appropriation was requested 
of Congress on June 22, 1954, in the amount of $3,000,000 for personnel, aircraft, ve- 
hicles, and other facilities for this purpose. 

Accomplishments of 1954 

A record of accomplishments, not included in "Operation Wetback", which cli- 
maxed the closing weeks of the fiscal year 1954, but representing the activities of the 
Border Patrol for the entire period of this report, follows: 

With an authorized force of 1,079 officers the Border Patrol has endeavored to 
cover 8,000 miles of boundary lines by automobile, jeep, plane, boat, and on foot. In the 
course of such patrol 173,518 trains, busses, and boats were checked and 8,949,130 
persons questioned. There were 398 arrests of violators of the narcotics and customs 
laws. Drugs, vehicles, and other contraband, having an estimated worth of $952,715, were 
seized and delivered to appropriate agencies for disposition. 



Smugglers of aliens. — Eighteen-hun- 
dred and twenty-two smugglers and trans- 
porters were apprehended by the Border 
Patrol during the past year. The graph 
which follows indicates that there has 
been a 900 percent increase in dealers in 
human contraband in the past decade. 

To curtail moie effectively this 
evil, the Attorney General has proposed 
legislation which, if enacted into law, 
would not only penalize persons or corpo- 
rations who knowingly employ aliens ille- 
gally within the United States, but would 
also permit the seizure of any vessel or 
vehicle knowingly used for the transpor- 
tation of illegal aliens into the United 
States. 



SMUGGLERS OF ALIENS APPREHENDED 
BY BORDER PATROL OFFICERS 

VEiRS ENDED JUNE 30, 1950-1954 



2,000 - 



1,500 



1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 



A firmer attitude adopted by the courts toward immigration law violators, and an 
aroused public concern over illegal and uncontrolled immigration, are other factors that 
will aid in combatting smuggling. 

Canadian border operations. -During the past year 7,893 arrests were made by 
officers stationed on the Canadian Border, among which were 233 European aliens who 
had made their way to Canada in an effort to enter the United States. 

Gulf coast operations. -In the Southeastern part of the country the Border Patrol 
made 5,015 apprehensions during the fiscal year 1954. The Southeast has a long, vulner- 
able coastline. It also comprises large agricultural areas which attract illegal alien farm 
workers from the Mexican Border. This requires the Border Patrol to curtail its work 



-34- 

elsewhere and operate far in the interior, particularly during planting and harvesting 
seasons. 

The most disturbing enforcement problem confronting the Border Patrol in the 
Gulf area results from the existence of more than 100 excellent, hard surface, unattended 
airfields within less than two hours flying time from Havana, Cuba, A number of these 
fields have been used by alien smugglers, but any one of them could be used to convey 
war material, as well as illegal aliens, into the United States. 

Air patrol. —The Border Patrol air arm, consisting of 12 light planes, contributed 
to the accomplishments of the organization in patrolling the international line and appre- 
hending aliens and smugglers of aliens. Pilots and observers surveyed ranch and farm 
areas locating groups of illegal aliens, tracked aliens in the desert sands of the South- 
west, and, in the Southeast, flew patrols over the Florida Keys on the lookout for Cuban 
fishing boats engaged in alien smuggling. The past year has shown that an adequate num- 
ber of planes (used to transport rapidly interceptive forces; keep aircraft, boats, or auto- 
mobiles under surveillance; and to guide the ground section of enforcement groups) would 
provide an effective means of combatting alien smuggling and illegal entry. 

Cooperation with other law enforcement agencies .— The Border Patrol cooperates 
closely with all other law enforcement groups. They make frequent contacts with other 
police agencies to solicit aid and, in turn, lend assistance in emergencies to municipal, 
county. State, and Federal officers. 

During the fiscal year 1954, Patrol Officers arrested and delivered to the appro- 
priate agencies 823 violators of laws other than those relating to immigration and natura- 
lization. In excess of 300 pounds of marijuana, 19 pounds of opium, and various quan- 
tities of other drugs such as heroin, codeine, and demorol were seized. 

BorderPatrol training . —The Border Patrol Training School is currently occupying 
temporary facilities at El Paso, Texas. It is staffed by experienced officers who teach 
immigration law, Spanish, patrol duties and authority, markmanship, self-defense, methods 
of arrest, first aid, and public relations to accepted applicants. There were 165 men who 
successfully completed the eighfr-week training course last year. 

Following basic training, the 'trainee* officer is assigned to a regular duty sta- 
tion where on-the-job training is continued under the direction of a field instructor. 
Throughout his first year, the trainee received persortal guidance, his progress is care- 
fully studied, and every effort is taade to develop his capabilities as an officer to the 
fullest. Officers who lack interest, or ability to learn, or who do not demonstrate an 
aptitude for Border Patrol work are separated from the Service during this probationary 
period. 

Future^ plans. — Plans for the next fiscal year include the following: 

1. The establishment of a Special Mobile Force, appropriately equipped 
on a permanent basis. Such a force can be moved to any locality in the 
United States where the illegal alien situation warrants its use. This 
will enable the campaign for rounding up the illegal aliens from Mexico 
to be extended to include those who have infiltrated into several of our 
industrial cities during the past few years. 

2. The procurement of suitable facilities for the Officer Training School. 

3. The development of more effective methods against smuggling by air 



-35- 
through the use of mobile radar equipment. 

4. Insistence on the prompt removal by the Mexican government of ex- 
pelled aliens away from Border areas. 

5. The encouragement of the legal importation of Mexican agricultural 
workers where a shortage of domestic labor exists. 



36 



Detention 



The total number of aliens detain- 
ed in Service and non-Service facilities 
during the past fiscal year was 508, 566^ 
the highest in the history of the Service. 
This impressive record of detentions, 
representing an increase of 160 percent 
over detentions for the year ending June 
30, 1953, resulted from efforts by the Bor- 
der Patrol to apprehend and clear out Mexi- 
can "wetbacks" from the districts with 
headquarters at San Antonio, El Paso, 
Los Angeles, and Chicago. In all other 
districts detentions either decreased sub- 
stantially or remained the same as last 
year. The priority given to the apprehen- 
sion and deportation of aliens under sub- 
versive, immoral, narcotic, and criminal 
charges, (cases requiring more time to 
complete) accounts for the decrease in 
detentions. 

With fewer persons in detention in 
New York, Buffalo, Miami, and San Juan, 
it was possible to shift excess personnel 
positions from these districts to the deten- 
tion camps at McAllen, Texas, and Chula 
Vista, California, where emergency con- 
ditions existed. 

Aliens detained in contractual 
jails. — About 83,000 aliens were detained 
in 300 State, county, and city jails located 
in the United States, Puerto Rico, Virgin 
Islands, Guam, and Hawaii during the past 
fiscal year. Every attempt is made by jail 
officials to comply with Service regula- 
tions requiring the segregation of aliens 
delivered into their custody from other 
prisoners. It is not always possible, how- 
ever, to do so, since overcrowding of 
jails is common and, in all but a few 
States, buildings are old, and accommoda- 
tions inadequate and incapable of expan- 
sion. Although local officials are cooper- 
ative, the detention of aliens in con- 
tractual jails poses an administrative 
problem where the inadequacy of deten- 
tion space frequently determines or limits 



DETENTION 

SERVICE AND OTHER OPERATED FACILITIES 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1950-1954 



Mon-Doys 



MAN-DAYS OF DETENTION 



1,200,000- 



Faeilitii 



I I 8«>»it» 




1990 1951 1992 1953 1954 



ALIENS DETAINED 



1 1 s«»vie« 



200,000- 




1950 I9SI 1952 1953 1954 



AVERAGE DAYS DETENTION 















Focilities 
^^Service 
Other 








' -• 


N 








* 




"x 






». 




9 


50 19 


51 19 


52 19 


53 19! 


>4 



-37- 
enforcement activities. 

Decrease in length of time aliens are detained .-The rapid expulsion of Mexicans 
after apprehension effected a decrease in the average number of days detention per per- 
son from 5.2 in the fiscal year 1953 to 2.5 as of June 30, 1954. Subversive, criminal, 
narcotic, and immoral cases remain longer in detention than others, but the number in 
this group is comparatively small and does not materially affect the average. 

Security measures .-Aliens held in Service-operated facilities under subversive, 
narcotic, immoral, or criminal charges are segregated from all others; subversives, how- 
ever, are under constant surveillance. All aliens in this group are furnished living ac- 
commodations comparable to other detainees; similar visiting and other privileges are 
permitted. Few complaints have been received relative to treatment, but in every instance 
to date the grievance, which has constituted an attempt to be troublesome rather than 
anything else, has not been sustained by the facts. Detention personnel receive special 
training and instruction in the handling of aliens in these categories in order to avoid 
unnecessary criticism or controversy, and yet to serve the best interests of the Govern- 
ment. 

Public relations .— Good public relations with reference to the detention of aliens 
start within a detention facility ~ it is the only sure way that good will and wider public 
understanding concerning the treatment of aliens will develops on the outside. Such a 
policy of education has been particularly effective in the New York District, where every 
year approximately 1,500 persons, including high school and college students, foreign 
consuls, members of the press, women's and men's civic orginizations, and study clubs 
are granted permission to visit Ellis Island. In addition, annually upwards of 50,000 per- 
sons visit aliens who are detained at the Island. 

In San Francisco, protests relative to the care and treatment of Chinese aliens 
in detention have virtually disappeared. By encouraging inspection of the quarters and 
giving those interested an opportunity to learn the facts, the Service is obtaining a 
favorable response from the press and civic groups. 

Even along the Mexican Border in Texas and in Lower California, where the 
movement of Mexicans in and out of detention takes place on a large scale. Service 
policy governing care and treatment of aliens continues to meet the approval of Mexican 
consuls, who call frequently to inspect the camps and to talk with nationals of their 
country who are awaiting deportation. 

Culinary .— Approximately 2,250,000 meals were served in Service-operated facil- 
ities during the past fiscal year at an average per capita cost of 43 cents per day. The 
23 percent decrease from the per capita cost of 1953 is due primarily to the inclusion of 
the extremely low-cost Mexican "pinto bean and chili" diet at the McAUen and El Centro 
camps on the Mexican Border. 

Condition and capacity of detention facilities .— The appearance and condition of 
all Service facilities are satisfactory. Plant equipment is adequate to accommodate ap- 
proximately 5,000 aliens under normal conditions. In an emergency the capacity of these 
facilities can be increased to about 6,500. 

During the past year, the second half of the new staging camp which serves the 
McAUen-Brownsville area was equipped and staffed, so that the number of aliens who 
may be detained has been increased to approximately 2,000. 

Training and future planning .— Training of all Detention Officers at Ellis Island 



- 38- 

was continued with a 10-hour refresher course in February, following the standard 40-hour 
course of training which was held there last year. Expansion of a training program to in- 
clude detention officers in Los Angeles, San Francisco, and San Antonio is under way. 
On-the-job training of culinary personnel has also been continued. 

Future plans with respect to the overall detention program include evaluation and 
analysis of space, equipment, authorized force, and operating costs in order to effect 
such adjustments and economies as may seem advisable. 



39 



Parole 



Pursuant to law, when any deportable alien is arrested and taken into custody, 
pending final determination of his case, he may be continued in custody or released 
under bond or on conditional parole. Aliens under subversive, criminal, narcotic, and im- 
moral charges are given a "Notice to Depart Within Six Months" at the time the order of 
deportation is entered. 



TOTAL ALIENS ON PAROLE 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1950 -1954 



30,000 



10,000 ij 






w. 



Investigations of aliens under 
criminal and subversive charges are con- 
ducted at least once a year. If it is de- 
termined that such aliens are not comply- 
ing with the conditions of their enlarge- 
ment two actions follow: (1) with respect 
to those on conditional parole or bond, 
parole or bond is revoked and the aliens 
are taken into custody; and (2) where it is 
revealed that they have wilfully failed to 
depart, the facts are presented to the 
local United States Attorney for possible 
prosecution. 

The law also provides that any 
alien, inespective of charges, whose de- 
portation has not been effected within the 
six-month period, must be placed under 
supervision. During the past year, 2,652 

aliens in this group were placed under supervision. All aliens who are subject to super- 
vision must appear in person from time to time before Deportation and Parole Officers to 
divulge information as to their whereabouts, conduct, and associations. If they fail to 
comply with the conditions of supervision they, also, are subject to prosecution. 

During the past year as a result of these investigations, 18 cases were submitted 
to the United States Attorney; four aliens have been indicted and their cases are pending 
final court action. 



1951 



1952 



1953 



The number of deportable aliens who were on parole or bond or under supervision 
during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1954, totalled 34,644. Aliens removed from con- 
ditional parole or bond and placed under supervision, or whose cases were terminated by 
deportation or adjustment of status totalled 17,562. As of the close of the year there were 
16,969 deportable aliens on parole or bond or under supervision. 

As of the close of the fiscal year 1954 there were 744 aliens who were either 
under subversive charges or who had subversive backgrounds in the following parole 
status: 



-40- 

Conditional bond 159 

Court bond 30 

Conditional parole 285 

Under orders of supervision 227 

Unavailable to the Service for deportation 26 

Detained — 17 

Total 744 

As of June 30, 1954, 4,019 criminal, immoral, and narcotic aliens were detained or 
at large, as follows: 

Conditional parole 854 

Conditional bond 498 

Under supervision, with delivery bond 159 

Under orders of supervision 801 

Serving sentences in penal institutions 1,513 

Detained at I&N expense 77 

Unavailable to the Service for deportation 117 

Total 4,019 

A number of writs of habeas corpus have been sued out, some courts having sus- 
tained the action of the Attorney General in the imposition of special restrictions. At 
the present time, there are seven such cases pending before the United States District 
Court for the Southern District of New York. 



41- 



Deportation 



The number of aliens deported during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1954, reach- 
ed a record totSfl of 26,951, an increase of 7,106 over the fiscal year 1953. Among these 
deportees were 61 subversives and 1,127 aliens under criminal, narcotic, and immoral 
charges. 

The total number of aliens deported during the fiscal year 1954 exceeded that of 
any preceding year. Causes and numbers deported 1950 to 1954 are shown in the follow- 
ing table. 

Aliens deported from the United States, by cause 
Years ended June 30, 1950 - 1954 



Cause 


1954 


1953 


1952 


1951 


1950 


All causes 


26, 951 


19,845 


20,181 


13, 544 


6,628 


Sabv^csive or anarchistic 


61 


37 


31 


18 


6 


Criminals _ . „ _ 


783 


689 


778 


1,036 


790 


Immoral classes 


239 


100 


50 


67 


53 


Violators of narcotic laws 


105 


53 


40 


62 


55 


Mental or physical defectives 


43 


48 


56 


45 


53 


Previously excluded or deported... 


336 


276 


539 


940 


553 


Remained longer than authorized ._ 


401 


1,561 


4,469 


3,289 


1,661 


Entered without proper documents.. 


5,344 


9,724 


9,636 


5,322 


1,352 


Failed to maintain status 


644 


387 


475 


298 


224 


Failed to comply with conditions 












of status .. ... _.. 


1,491 


404 


- 


- 


- 


Entered without inspection or by 












false statements _ _. 


17,337 


6,387 


3,706 


2,293 


1,734 


Likely to become public charges... 


31 


35 


24 


14 


38 


Miscellaneous 


136 


144 


377 


160 


109 



Voluntary departures totalled 1,074,277 for the year just ended,. of which 1,058,326 
took place on the Mexican Border, 2,843 at the Canadian Border, and 13,108 at other ports. 

Important factors to be considered in connection with the deportation of aliens 
are election of country, claim of physical persecution, procurement of travel documents, 
and transportation. These take on added significance with respect to the deportation of 
aliens to 'iron curtain" countries, for the problems which are encountered often require 
diplomatic representations by the Department of State to foreign governments. Likewise, 
close liaison between the Service and transportation companies is necessary in arranging 
safe and economical transportation, world-wide in scope. 

Procedures for obtaining reconsideration of cases in which local Mexican consuls 
have refused permission for the entry of deportees into Mexico were revised so that field 
offices might refer these cases directly to the Liaison Officer of the Immigration and 
Naturalization Service, who is stationed at the Embassy in Mexico City, for action. 



42 



Several changes were made in the 
reciprocal arrangement with Canada for the 
acceptance of deportees. These changes 
included the designation of the Stevenson 
Airport at Winnipeg as a port of entry for 
deportees arriving in Canada from the 
United States on nonstop aircraft, thereby 
reducing the expense of escort personnel. 

The law provides that an alien who 
is deportable under subversive charges 
may apply for suspension of deportation 
or other type of adjustment of status if he 
has discontinued membership in subver- 
sive organizations for more than ten years. 
In many cases of this type travel docu- 
ments are regarded as practically unob- 
tainable. These cases are being reopened 
to determine whether discretionary relief 
may be granted. 

Also under the law, an alien may 
request the withholding of deportation 
based upon a claim of physical persecu- 
tion, if deported to the particular country 
designated in the final order of deporta- 
tion. Increasing numbers of Chinese are 
claiming physical persecution, if returned 
to the mainland of China. In these cases, 
each alien is given an opportunity to be 
deported to Formosa, but, up to the 
present, all but a few have declined. No 
travel documents are required for depor- 
tees to China, provided they are of the 
Chinese race. All that is necessary is a 
transit visa through Hong Kong. 

In the fiscal year 1954, 258 appli- 
cations were received for the withholding 
of deportation under the law. Of this 
group, 180 applications were denied, 53 
deportations were withheld, and 25 are 
still under consideration. 

To effect economy in deportation 
cost. Military Sea Transportation Service 
(MSTS) is used for the deportation of aliens 
whenever space is available, and the more 
economiced, non-scheduled planes are used 
to the maximum. During the past year, 
when such planes became available in the 
Chicago area, the Service was able to 
make satisfactory arrangements for the 
transportation of all Mexican deportees to 
the Border. 



DEPORTATIONS AND VOLUNTARY DEPARTURES 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1950 - 1954 
DEPORTATIONS 



1954 
1953 
1952 
1951 
1950 



' --- T' .w-'. 1. I . r- -^.ike^^ji- . >'. 



I'-' r 



10 15 20 2 5 30 

T housands 



VOLUNTARY DEPARTURES 
(EXCLUSIVE OF MEXICANS) 



1950 I9SI 1952 I9S3 1954 



TOTAL EXPULSIONS 

Aliens deported CZl Aliens departing 

voluntarily 



1954 ■ 1,101 228 



i . i 



1950 



400 800 

T housands 



43 



Investigations 



The increased tempo of the investigative work of the Service is reflected in the 
increase of approximately 35 percent in the number of deportations effected, and ap- 
proximately 21 percent in the number of voluntary departures over fiscal year 1953. 
Investigations conducted by Service investigators resulted in the issuance of warrants 
of arrest or in voluntary departures from the United States in the cases of 84,616 aliens. 

The major phases of investigative operations during the fiscal year 1954 are dis- 
cussed below. 

(1) Anti-subversive operations .— In the discharge of the responsibilities of the 
Service as a security agency, it is incumbent upon Service investigators to obtain evi- 
dence upon which the exclusion, deportation, or denaturalization of subversives may be 
predicated. Information received from other security agencies is analyzed and coordi- 
nated with the results of Service investigations. Evidence, either in the form of docu- 
ments or witnesses, is made available to the Criminal Division of the Department of 
Justice for use in denaturalization proceedings which have been instituted as a result 
of Service investigations. 

Investigations calculated to obtain admissible evidence of Communist Party 
membership or subversive activities of aliens and naturalized citizens continue to be 
intricate and time-consuming. Concealment tactics have been overcome, in part, by the 
development of additional sources of information and by encouraging former Communist 
Party members to testify as to the Communist Party membership or subversive activities 
of the naturalized citizen or alien. 

A case illustrating the ramifications involved in anti-subversive investigation is 
that of a Communist functionary deported during the past fiscal year. It came to the atten- 
tion of the Service that he was possibly a subversive alien who had infiltrated into the 
labor field. He had consistenty claimed birth in New York City when applying for li- 
censes, executing Selective Service forms, and in other instances when he was ques- 
tioned concerning his citizenship status. It was necessary, therefore, to ascertain 
whether his claim to United States birth was false, and to verify the allegations regard- 
ing his subversive activities. 

The first break in the investigation came when a 1929 record of the temporary 
admission of an alien seaman was located which appeared to relate to him. He claimed 
that he had been erroneously manifested by the steamship company, as a result of his 
having been signed on the vessel in England, where he had been taken by his parents 
during his early childhood. However, through the cooperation of other governmental 
agencies, a birth certificate was located which appeared to establish his birth abroad, 
even though the certificate was in a name completely different from that which he used. 
The birth certificate was definitely established as relating to him when an older relative 
of his abroad identified his photograph as that of the person whose name appeared on 
the birth certificate. 

Meanwhile, the anti- subversive phase of the investigation had continued to de- 
termine whether admissible, rather than hearsay, evidence was available to establish his 



-44- 

deportafion as a subversive. Known former Communist Party members were located and 
interrogated as to whether they had eyewitness knowledge of the alien's affiliations and 
were willing, or could be persuaded, to appear in an open hearing to testify concerning 
such knowledge. Among those interviewed, several were found who readily recalled the 
alien as a fellow-Communist member, but who, for fear of reprisals, loss of employment, 
etc., were adamant in refusing to testify, and would furnish information and leads only 
in the strictest confidence. Nevertheless, continued inquiries resulted in the location of 
four reliable persons who could, and would, testify from personal knowledge that he was 
an active Communist Party member. With the establishment of a prima facie case of 
alienage and deportability, a warrant of arrest was issued by the District Director con- 
cerned, and the alien was taken into custody pending deportation hearing. When confront- 
ed with the evidence at the deportation hearing, the alien refused to testify concerning 
his place of birth and invoked the Fifth Amendment under cross-examination regarding 
Communist affiliations. His appeal from the order of deportation was dismissed by the 
Board of Immigration Appeals, and he was deported from the United States on June 26, 
1954. 

During the past fiscal year, despite such difficulties, 175 subversive aliens 
were placed under deportation proceedings predicated upon subversive charges and 23 
other subversive aliens on other deportation charges. This action had a far-reachir.g im- 
pact on the subversive alien element in the United States, in that among those placed 
under proceedings were functionaries of the Communist Party in Detroit, Pittsburgh, 
Cleveland, New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles. 

Suits to revoke citizenship were filed in the United States District Courts against 
31 naturalized persons who either prior to or at the time of naturalization were Commu- 
nists. Fiscal year 1954 saw 111 subversive aliens whose entry would have been preju- 
dicial to the best interests of our country excluded from the United States. 

(2) Anti-racketeer, and other anti-criminal, narcotic, and immoral operations. — 
With a view toward dealing a blow to the criminal alien element in the United States 
emphasis was placed on deportation investigations relating to aliens of the racketeer, 
immoral, and narcotic classes. 

Investigations to obtain evidence on which to base deportation proceedings 
against individuals in these classes frequently necessitate time-consuming research 
covering the alien's activities over a period of several years. In one such case a well- 
known racketeer had testified before a Congressional committee investigating organized 
crime that he was a native-born citizen of the United States. He was in possession of a 
delayed birth certificate. This Service, in endeavoring to ascertain the true facts in the 
case, checked the affidavit on which the birth record was created. Through a search of the 
city real estate and building permit records it was found that there was no building at 
the address indicated at the time of the alleged birth. Investigation as to his family 
background disclosed his parents and all of his brothers were born in Italy. One of the 
brothers was a naturalized citizen. This led to an extensive search of records of arrivals 
which disclosed a record of the arrival of a person of the same name from Italy in 1909. 
To further establish alienage, old school and arrest records were found which reflected 
his birthplace as in Italy, and a record of his birth in Italy was obtained. As the entry in 
1909 was a lawful one it was necessary to obtain additional evidence on which to base 
a deportation proceeding. It had been reported the subject had visited a notorious crim- 
inal in Cuba. On the basis of this report an investigation in Cuba and a search of arrival 
records at Miami, Florida, disclosed the subject had entered the United States at Miami, 
at which time he claimed to be a United States citizen. As this constituted an entry by 
false and misleading statements and without documents, it was possible to institute pro- 
ceedings which culminated in an order for the alien's deportation. In addition, on the 



- 45- 

basis of evidence obtained by investigators of this Service, the subject was convicted 
for false testimony before a Senate committee and before a grand jury in the State of 
New Jersey. He was sentenced to serve an aggregate from three to four years' imprison- 
ment. 

As a result of investigations of this type, 1,118 criminal, narcotic, or immoral 
aliens were arrested and deportation proceedings instituted. Cancellation suits were 
filed against eight prominent or notorious racketeers, one of whom had received national 
notoriety during the past few years as a member of a Brooklyn crime organization known 
as "Murder, Inc." Of the hundreds of criminals ordered deported, seven were classified 
as racketeers by police authorities on a local level, and one had been named before the 
United States Senate Special Committee to Investigate Organized Crime in Interstate 
Commerce as one of the leading racketeers in the United States. 

A more effective liaison was developed with police officials, both foreign and 
domestic, with a view to stopping alien criminals from entering the United States and 
expelling those who manage to effect entry. A recent case demonstrates the effective- 
ness of this practice. The Winnipeg, Canada, police recently reported that two wanted 
Canadian criminals were at a tourist camp in Southern California. Within an hour Service 
officers took them into custody. The criminals were quickly placed in the custody of 
Canadian authorities after formal deportation proceedings. 

(3) Anti-smuggling and stowaway operations .— The illegal entry of stowaways and 
smuggled aliens was more effectively combatted by the establishment of specially train- 
ed investigations units at major seaports. Better control over alien crewmen has resulted 
in the quick apprehension of those seamen who violated the terms of their admission or 
who failed to depart with their ships. 

(4) Visa and passport fraud operations .— Service investigators were successful in 
uncovering a scheme whereby aliens obtained visas by the use of fraudulent evidence of 
financial worth supplied by travel agencies abroad. This false evidence was submitted 
to the American consul when the alien applied for an immigrant visa. The aliens who 
were successful in gaining admission to the United States by this means have been plac- 
ed under deportation proceedings, and three of them have been indicted by a Federal 
grand jury. 

Service investigations also revealed that Cubans had succeeded in gaining ad- 
mission to the United States by the use of fraudulent Puerto Rican birth certificates. 
Approximately 70 of these aliens were placed under deportation proceedings and a number 
of others expelled from the United States. An attorney who assisted them was disbarred 
for professional misconduct. A travel agent and Commissioner of Deeds for Puerto Rico 
in New York, a former Registrador Demografico of Puerto Rico, and several other leaders 
involved in the procurement and sale of fraudulent Puerto Rican birth certificates have 
been indicted or sentenced for their participation in this fraudulent racket. 

(5) General operations .— Unlike the more sensational cases in the racketeer and 
subversive classes, the activities in the general investigative operations of the Service 
involve the uncovering of the day to day violations of the immigration and nationality 
laws which usually do not involve prominent persons. They do, nevertheless, frequently 
require considerable investigative effort. 

One case involving an alien illegally in the United States required the combined 
efforts of the investigative forces of the Baltimore and Philadelphia District offices. 
The alien, when apprehended by Service investigators in Baltimore, alleged birth in the 
United States. His cousin, a Baltimore attorney, furnished bond for the alien's release 



-46- 

and represented him at subsequent hearings before this Service. At these hearings the 
attorney submitted affidavits of three persons who attested they knew the alien to have 
been born at Chester, Pa. These witnesses also appeared in person, with a fourth wit- 
ness, and testified before officers of this Service that the alien was born at Chester, Pa. 
Service investigators uncovered the fact that the alien, in endeavoring to establish a 
claim to United States citizenship, was impersonating a deceased person who had been 
born in the United States. As a result of the evidence obtained the attorney, the alien, 
and the four witnesses were indicted for conspiracy. The attorney was also indicted for 
for subornation of perjury. 

The Service is concentrating its major attention in the field of general investiga- 
tive operations upon the apprehension of recently arrived illegal aliens as the most ef- 
fective utilization of the available investigative manpower. 



47. 



Nationality 



The responsibility of the Service toward aliens extends beyond the admissiori of 
eligible aliens and the expulsion of aliens illegally in the United States to the fostering 
of citizenship through naturalization. 

Stimulated by the World War II, naturalizations granted reached a peak of 441,979 
in fiscal year 1944, declined to a low of 54,716 in 1951, and rose again to reach injssi 
in fiscal year 1954. The small immigration during war years accounts, in part, for' the 
decreases, while new immigration after the war and new legislation probably explain 
the reversal in trend. 

The principal changes made by the Immigration and Nationality Act regarding the 
qualifications for naturalization relate to the elimination of the racial bars and the 
declaration of intention as a prerequisite to naturalization. These two factors alone 
have brought about a large increase in the number of aliens applying for naturalization. 



300,000 



200,000 



100,000 



IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED AND PERSONS NATURALIZED 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1945-1954 



300,000 



IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED 
PERSONS N/ITUR4LIZED 




1945 



200,000 



100,000 



1950 



1954 



Declarations filed. -Although the Immigration and Nationality Act no longer 
makes the declaration a prerequisite to naturalization, the option of filing a declaration 
of intention has been left with the alien, since it may be needed in obtaining employ- 
ment. In many States it is a prerequisite for a license to engage in some occupation or 
profession, such as the practice of medicine, nursing, dentistry, etc. Only 9,100 declar- 
ations were filed in the fiscal year 1954. 



48- 



Petitions filed. --The number of 
applications to file petitions for natura- 
lization reflected the general upward turn 
in naturalization activity, with an increase 
of 33 percent over last year. 

During the year, 130,722 petitions 
for naturalizations were filed, and 37,881 
petitions were still pending on June 30, 
1954. 

Statutory provisions applied .— 
From 1948 through 1952, 50 percent or 
more of those who were naturalized were 
granted citizenship under special provi- 
sions of the laws (chiefly "war brides" 
naturalized as persons married to United 
States citizens). In the past fiscal year 73 
percent came under the general provisions, 
reflecting, no doubt, the naturalization of 
displaced persons and others who have 
become resident aliens following the war. 

On June 30, 1953, Public Law 86 
was enacted, providing for a short form 
method of naturalization for aliens who 
serve or have served honorably in the 
United States Armed Forces between June 
24, 1950, and July 1, 1955. Section 2 of 
of the Act provides for the naturalization 
of such persons serving abroad by desig- 
nated representatives of the Attorney 
General, without the necessity of filing a 
petition in any court. Representatives of 
the Service stationed in Germany and 
Italy have been functioning under this 
legislation on the continent of Europe, as 
well as in England and Africa. Other repre- 
sentatives are travelling throughout Japan, 
Korea, and Okinawa naturalizing members 
of the Armed Forces stationed in those 
countries. During the fiscal year 2,981 
members of the Armed Forces were natura- 
lized by Service representatives abroad. 
In addition, 10,076 such aliens were nat- 
uralized under this law by naturalization 
courts in the United States. 

Persons naturalized, by national- 
ities. — As was pointed out last year, the 
distribution of naturalizations by former 
nationality reflects the distribution of the 
total alien population. For example, 20 per- 
cent of the resident aliens who reported their 
addresses in 1954 were Britisher Canadian; 



DECLARATIONS FILED 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1950-1954 



125,000 



100,000 - 



75,000- 



1950 



1952 



APPLICATIONS TO FILE PETITIONS 

FOR NATURALIZATION 
VEiRS ENDED JUNE 30,1950-1954 



250,000 - 



1950 



1952 



PERSONS NATURALIZED 
BY STATUTORY PROVISIONS 

VEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1950 - 1954 



125,000 



I i General Provisions 
g^M.litar, 
100,000 — [)<X] Persons Married 10 Clliienj 
HH Other 



75,000 



25,000 




1950 



1952 



1954 



-49- 

25 percent of those naturalized were British and Canadian. Similarly, eight percent of 
the resident aliens were Italian; nine percent of those naturalized were Italian. In two 
instances this correlation is not borne out. Mexican nationals are slow to naturalize- 
possibly in part because of the literacy requirements. It may be anticipated that many of 
the older persons of Mexican nationality will seek naturalization under the relaxed pro- 
visions of the Act. 

In the other case the effect of legislation may be seen. The largest group bene- 
fited by the removal of racial restrictions are persons of the Japanese race. The Immi- 
gration and Nationality Act excepted aliens who had been living in the United States for 
20 years and who had reached the age of 50 years on the effective date of the Immigra- 
tion and Nationality Act, from the general requirement that they demonstrate ability to 
speak, read, and write English. The use of interpreters for the purpose of conducting the 
examination of the applicants has been utilized. Of the total number of persons natura- 
lized during the fiscal year, 6,750 were persons of Japanese nationality as compared 
with 674 and 40 in the fiscal years 1953 and 1952, respectively. Prior to the Immigration 
and Nationality Act Japanese were ineligible for naturalization. 



PERSONS NATURALIZED 
BY REGION OF FORMER ALLEGIANCE 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1950-1954 



12 5,000 • 



j i Eui'ope 
M^ asio . 

100,000- 223 North amer.ca 
WtM other 



75,000- 



2 5,000-" 



§ 



S 



milk 






1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 



NATIONALITY OF ALIEN RESIDENTS 

IN 1954 AND OF PERSONS NATURALIZED 

DURING YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1954 

100% 100 7o 



British and 
Canodian 



Polish 

German 

Italian 




ALIEN PERSONS 

RESIDENTS NATURALIZED 



Plans for the future .— The Immigration and Nationality Act prohibited the granting 
of citizenship during the period of 60 days preceding the holding of a general election 
within the territorial jurisdiction of a naturalization court. The elections held in the 
various States on November 2, 1954, therefore, will prevent the naturalization courts from 
conferring citizenship during the months of September and October. Because of the extra- 
ordinary increase in the number of applications for citizenship submitted to the Service 
since the effective date of the Immigration and Nationality Act, December 24, 1952, an 
arrearage was created in the filing of petitions for naturalization. The respite which the 
naturalization law gives the courts and the Service presented the Service with the oppor- 
tunity to assist all aliens whose applications had been processed to file their petitions 
for naturalization during those months. 



All available personnel of the Service who can be spared from their regular duties 
are being assigned to the filing of petitions for naturalization, with a view to naturaliz- 
ing as many of the petitioners as possible promptly following the November election. It is 
planned to have these naturalizations take place on a national scale and on a day fitting 



-50- 

for such an occasion.lt was concluded that the naturalizations should take place through- 
out the United States on November 11, 1954, as part of the observance of Veterans' Day. 
Judges of the various naturalization courts are being requested to hold naturalization 
hearings on that day, and various patriotic and civic organizations will participate there- 
in. The vast majority of the naturalization courts have agreed to hold hearings on that 
date, with appropriate ceremonies. Impressive ceremonies will be held at such places as 
the Hollywood Bowl and the Polo Grounds. 

Petitions denied .— As shown below, the number of petitions denied has remained 
approximately the same in the past five years, averaging 2,244 per year. 

Years ended June 30, Petitions denied 
1954 2,084 

1953 2,300 

1952 2,163 

1951 2,395 

1950 2,276 

In the past fiscal year only one petition was denied to every 56 granted. Failure 
to prosecute accounted for 674 denials, and withdrawal of the petition by the petitioner 
for 897. Section 335(e) of the Immigration and Nationality Act provides that after a 
petition has been filed in a court, it can be withdrawn only with the consent of the Attor- 
ney General. 

Most of the reasons for denial of a petition for naturalization have remained 
essentially the same. Failure to establish physical presence in the United States for the 
period required by law is a new ground for denial of the petition under the Immigration 
and Nationality Act. There were seven denials in this category. A new provision. Sec- 
tion 315 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, made 19 petitioners ineligible for citi- 
zenship since they had applied for and been relieved or discharged from military training 
or service because of alienage. While there was no comparable section in the Nationality 
Act of 1940, the selective service laws enacted since 1940 prohibited such aliens from 
becoming citizens of the United States. Eighty-three petitioners failed to establish good 
moral character, and 14 were unable to prove that they were attached to the principles of 
the Constitution and well disposed to the good order and happiness of the United States. 

Naturalizations revoked . —All except 15 of the 165 certificates of naturalization 
revoked last year were initiated by the Foreign Service of the Department of State on 
the ground that the naturalized citizens became residents of foreign states within five 
years after naturalization. Five certificates were revoked on the ground that the aliens 
fraudulently concealed that they were of bad moral character at the time of naturaliza- 
tion. In five cases the ground for revocation was that the aliens were subversives. 

Certificates of naturalization revoked, by grounds for revocation 

Years ended June 30, 1953 and 1954 

Grounds 1954 1953 

Total 165. 335 

Established permanent residence abroad within five years 

after naturalization 150 327 

Bad moral character (Iraud involved) 5 2 

Misrepresentations and concealments relating to marital and 

family status _ _ ^ 1 

Fraudulent concealment of subversive membership 5 6 

Miscellaneous grounds 4 



-51- 

Loss of nationality by expatriation. — In addition to loss of nationality by revoca- 
tion of naturalization, persons may expatriate themselves by voluntary renunciation or 
abandonment of nationeility and allegiance. 

The Immigration and Nationality Act reenacted most of the grounds for expatria- 
tion in the Nationality Act of 1940. The sections of the Nationality Act of 1940 with 
respect to expatriation of naturalized nationals by residence abroad for three or five year 
periods were retained in the new law but the provision with regard to loss of nationality 
of a naturalized national by residence for two years in the foreign state of birth or nation- 
ality and acquiring its nationality, was not reenacted. The exceptions to the provisions 
on residence abroad have been considerably expanded in the new Act, as compared with 
the Nationality Act of 1940. 

As shown below, expatriations numbered 6,938 in the fiscal year 1954. Voting by 
a naturalized citizen in a foreign political election or plebescite was the chief ground 
of expatriation. 

The various ways of losing nationality, which are stipulated in Sections 349 and 
352 of the Immigration and Nationality Act and in prior Acts, are shown in the following 
table. 

Persons expatriated, by grounds for expatriation 
Years ended Tune 30. 1953 and 1954 



Grounds for expatriation Number of persons 

— 1954 1953 



Total 

Voting in a foreign political election or plebiscite 

Residence of a naturalized national in a foreign state 

Naturalization in a foreign state _ _ „ 

Entering or serving in the armed forces of a foreign state 

Renunciation of nationality abroad _ _ 

Taking an oath of allegiance in a foreign state 

Accepting or performing duties under a foreign state 
Departing from or remaining away from the U. S. to avoid 

training and service in land or naval forces _ 

Other grounds _ _ _ 



6,938 


8,350 


2,222 


2,651 


1,557 


2,657 


1,544 


1,677 


696 


700 


425 


398 


220 


152 


134 


67 


134 


45 


6 


3 



Citizenship acquired by resumption or repatriation. — Statutory authority exists for 
the re-acquisition of citizenship by persons who lost United States citizenship under 
certain conditions. 



-52- 
The number of repatriations of former citizens is shown in the table below: 

Y ears ended June 30 , 
1954 1953 

Total number 2.806 2.299 

Persons who lost citizenship by serving in the armed forces 
of allies of the United States, and who were repatriated 

under Sec. 323, Nationality Act of 1940 42 270 

Native-born women who lost citizenship through marriage to 
aliens and who were repatriated under the Act of June 25, 

1936, as amended 240 486 

Native-born women who lost citizenship through maniage to 
aliens and whose marriages terminated: 
Repatriated under Sec. 317(b) of the Nationality Act of 1940 .... 12 172 

Repatriated under Sec. 324(c) of the Immigration and 

Nationality Act ..._ _ _ - 331 34 

Persons who lost citizenship through voting in a political 
election or plebiscite in Italy and repatriated under P.L. 114 
of August 16, 1951 — -_ - 2,181 1,337 

Section 324(c) of the Immigration and Nationality Act has replaced Section 317(b) 
of the Nationality Act of 1940 regarding native-born women who lost citizenship through 
marriage to aliens and whose marriages have terminated. Persons who lost citizenship 
by serving in the armed forces of allied countries may no longer be repatriated but must 
be naturalized in the United States in accordance with the provisions of Section 327 of 
the Immigration and Nationality Act. 

The number of repatriations increased by 500 in the past year. The chief increase 
was in the persons who had lost citizenship through voting in a political election or 
plebiscite in Italy and who were repatriated under the provisions of Public Law 114 of 
August 16, 1951. As of June 30, 1954, 3,834 persons had been repatriated under the pro- 
visions of this law, which expired August 16, 1953. 

Derivative citizenship .— The factors which stimulated naturalization also have 
aroused interest in proof of derivative citizenship. 

The following table shows a steady rise in the number of applicants for deriva- 
tive citizenship certificates during the last few years: 

Applications Applications 

Year ended June 30, received completed 

1954 33,149 24,965 

1953 27,473 18,528 

1952 23,976 18,632 

1951 20,695 15,785 

There were 11,709 certificates of derivative citizenship granted. The Service is 
embarked upon a program urging parents and others to obtain derivative certificates for 
children at the time of their own naturalization. The program inaugurated near the end of 
the fiscal year was not in effect long enough to be reflected in this year's figures as may 
seen from the chart. 



53- 



The principsd nationalities of those 
who received derivative certificates were: 



Total 



11.709 



Italy 

Canada 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. 

Germany 

Poland 

Austria 

Czechoslovakia 

Hungary 

Sweden 

Other 



In addition to the certificates of 
derivative citizenship issued, there were 
6,029 certificates issued by reason of 
birth abroad to citizen parents. 

Citizenship Services 

Text books. — Under the Immigra- 
tion and Nationality Act this Service is 
authorized to promote instruction and train- 
ing in citizenship responsibilities of ap- 
plicants for naturalization. Specifically 
included in such education is the respon- 
sibility for preparation and distribution of 
citizenship textbooks. Candidates for 
naturalization enrolled in, or studying un- 




der the supervision of, public schools in the United States are issued copies of the 
books free of charge. 

During the past fiscal year, this Service revised and reprinted 16 of the 40 parts 
of the Federal Textbook series. The enlarged foldover charts published early in 1953 
were received with great enthusiasm by citizenship teachers. The first printing was 
quickly exhausted and a second printing, with revisions, has proved equally popular. 
Statistics on textbook distribution follow: 

Citizenship textbooks for naturalization applicants distributed 
to the public schools: Years ended June 30. 1948 - 1954 



1948 
1949 
1950 
1951 



149,600 
145,528 
190,038 
166,833 



1952 . 

1953 

1954 _.... 



„„ 158,385 

149,094 

„. .. 137,996 



Names of new immigrants .— Another obligation and responsibility encompassed in 
the Act is the furnishing of names of potential candidates for naturalization to public 
schools. From July 1, 1953, through June 30, 1954, 152,355 names and addresses of 



-54- 

newly arrived immigrants were sent to public school officials in local communities. 
These slips were used by public schools to inform new alien residents of citizenship 
education classes. Public school officials have sent thousands of class announcements 
and personal letters of welcome to these arriving immigrants, thus stimulating their 
interest in rapid integration into community life. Public schools reported 2,987 classes 
held during the year with a total enrollment of 95,524. 

Home study. — In addition to public school courses, home-study courses were spon- 
sored by 37 State colleges and universities through their extension services. These 
courses bring to naturalization candidates living in rural communities the benefits of 
organized instruction. In the past fiscal year, 48,275 aliens were informed of home-study 
courses and 19,687 were enrolled in the courses. 

Citizenship promotion. -Representatives of this Service are frequently engaged 
with other agencies in promoting good citizenship. Some illustrations follow: 

(1) The Pittsburgh Office cooperated with a represetftative Citizenship Education 
Committee whose objective is to strengthen its citizenry through an accelerated integra- 
tion of the foreign bom. The Committee believed that the value of citizenship is enhanced 
both for native-bom and naturalized citizens through participation in naturalization cere- 
monies. Naturalization ceremonies included not only expressions of gratitude by new 
citizens for their acquired status, but talks of welcome by members of local groups repre- 
senting all phases of American life. Radio interviews and feature news articles centered 
attention on the work of the Committee, as did films of both the naturalization ceremony 
and a special library dedication. 

Local public-school citizenship classes were given added impetus by the favor- 
able attitude of the leaders of both native-born and naturalized groups. Study was diver- 
sified with special stress being placed on community activities. In addition, a library was 
set up to accommodate the reading needs of the prospective citizens. On opening day, 
students borrowed all but one of the library books! 

(2) The Buffalo District continued to publish "Citizenship Education News and 
Notes." This newsletter, with a circulation of 400, keeps the Americanization teachers 
in that District advised on such subjects as: dates of final naturalization hearings, news 
about naturalization ceremonies, reports of visits to citizenship classes by Service of- 
ficers, citizenship education activities in various localities, changes in naturalization 
regulations, jurisdiction of Service sub-offices in naturalization matters, and general 
announcements regarding Service publications and other matters. 

(3) The Boston Office reports on military naturalization in that District '....When 
the naturalization session has been assigned by the court, the soldier applicants have 
been brought to this office accompanied by commissioned officers who act as the sub- 
scribing witnesses for the filing of their petitions. The petitions have been filed in the 
morning and the hearing and oath of allegiance administered in the afternoon. After the 
session, the newly naturalized servicemen are conducted by their officers on a tour of 
some of the historical sites of Boston and have concluded their tour by a visit to the 
office of the Governor of Massachusetts, who personally congratulates each soldier." 

(4) The lifting of all racial bars to naturalization has resulted in large enroll- 
ments of nationals from the Orient in citizenship classes. From the far west come reports 
of entire schools composed of these groups alone. The high degree of sincerity in their 
studies is shown by almost perfect class-attendance records. The advanced ages—in 
many cases ranging from 50 to 80 years— indicate a determination to qualify for this 
patiently awaited privilege of citizenship. 



-55- 

(5) During the year, the Assistant Commissioner of the. Citizenship Services and 
Instructions Division spoke on Citizenship problems at two newly-organized State Con- 
ferences on Citizenship. Space was provided at these meetings for display of informa- 
tional pamphlets about the work of the Immigration and Naturalization Service. 

(6) The two Service films, "I Am An American" and "Twentieth Century Pilgrim," 
have continued to prove popular for display before patriotic, civic, school, and other 
groups during the year. At one reported "Thanksgiving" program designed for members of 
a public- school citizenship class, the film "Twentieth Century Pilgram" was featured in 
an interesting leader-audience-response device to illustrate the responsibilities and 
privileges of citizenship. 

Court induction ceremonies. — In 1942 a nation-wide movement was initiated to 
make the naturalization ceremony a more meaningful and inspirational occasion. To help 
accomplish this purpose the Service issued "Gateway to Citizenship," a manual prepared 
in cooperation with the committees on American citizenship of the American Bar Associ- 
ation and the Federsd Bar Association. This manual was distributed again this past 
year to naturalization judges and to civic, educational, and patriotic groups interested in 
furthering the cause of good citizenship. During the past year, about 125,000 copies of 
the Service memento booklet, "Welcome to U.S.A. Citizenship," were distributed to new 
citizens at the time of their naturalization. 

An intense interest in naturalization proceedings has been evidenced during the 
past year. Local civic groups have given much time and effort to help make these cere- 
monies memorable. In many areas receptions for the new citizens were held just after the 
court hearing. In many cases, presiding judges have personally greeted each new citizen, 
and local citizens have extended a welcome to the community. In two instances natura- 
lization ceremonies were recorded on motion picture film by permission of the presiding 
judges-one such film reached the Nation through TV broadcast. 

Under Public Law 86, 83rd Congress, military naturalizations outside the con- 
tinental United States are again permitted. Designated officials of the Immigration and 
Naturalization Service are authorized under the law to conduct these hearings. The Com- 
missioner of Immigration and Naturalization, who attended hearings in Germany and 
Austria, reported the splendid morale-building effect these ceremonies had upon the natu- 
ralized servicemen. The first such ceremonies took place on December 10 and 11, 1953, 
at Orleans, France. 

Under the auspices of the Army, ceremonies were held to celebrate the natura- 
lization of these members of the Armed Forces in practically every country where such 
naturalizations took place. Designated representatives of this Service participated in 
practically all of these ceremonies. 

Eighth National Conference on Citizenship .-On August 13, 1953, President 
Eisenhower signed into law a bill passed by the 83rd Congress granting the National 
Conference on Citizenship a Federal Charter. This signal honor, tendered the Conference 
by unanimous vote of both the Senate and House of Representatives, marked an historic 
milestone in the life of the Conference, whose objectives are: "To re-examine the func- 
tions and duties of American citizenship in today's world; to assist in the development 
of more dynamic procedures for making citizenship more effective; and to indicate the 
ways and means by which various organizations may contribute concretely to the develop- 
ment of a more active, alert, enlightened, conscientious, and progressive citizenry in our 
country." 



-56- 

"Citizenship Day,' September 17, was observed in the District of Columbia at the 
Washington Monument Grounds and on the Ellipse during the 1953 National Conference. 
Following a patriotic program, there was featured a Retreat Parade in which 600 men of 
the Third "Old Guard" Infantry Regiment marched in review-a fitting tribute by the oldest 
active regular Army infantry regiment to the "new' citizens and other guests. Governors, 
or their Representatives, of the 13 original States placed wreaths at the foot of the 
Washington Monument. 

The Service again provided an exhibit which not only displayed the various parts 
of the Federal Textbook and graphically outlined the work accomplished during the 
previous year, but centered around the moving picture 'Twentieth Century Pilgram," 
shown on a continuous projection machine installed as a part of the display itself. 



57- 

Administration 



PERSONNEL 

On June 30, 1954, the Immigration and Naturalization Service consisted of 7,100 
employees. There were 811 in the Central Office and 6,289 in the field. The latter group 
included 124 employees stationed in Alaska, Guam, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin 
Islands, and 51 located in Canada, Cuba, Mexico, Germany, Italy, Austria, and Greece. 

Classification.- A bout 50 Patrol Inspectors, 1,000 Immigrant Inspectors, and 120 
Naturalization Examiner positions were established or reclassified. Thus more equitable 
salaries based on actual duties and responsibilities were paid to a large number of 
officers, thereby improving effectiveness and efficiency of operations. At the same time, 
audit of many of these jobs by the Civil Service Commission, and of many field positions 
by the Central Office, assured that the Government would receive full value for work 
performed. 

Recruitment and placement .-As a security agency, the Service must rely par- 
ticularly upon a force of Investigators, Immigrant Inspectors, and Patrol Inspectors. Be- 
cause of budgetary curtailments the first two groups were maintained at almost full 
strength. For the latter group, which is vitally necessary in the control of the Mexican 
Border problem, the Service was able to hold vacancies to less than six percent in spite 
of a relatively high turnover rate, recruiting problems inherent in complete but lengthly 
preemployment investigations, and vigorous employment standards resulting in the dis- 
qualification of a large percentage of applicants. 

Employee development .— During the past fiscal year the training office lent pro- 
fessional assistance to operational programs for the training of journeyman Investigators 
and of Patrol Inspectors (Trainee). A program for orientation and training of persons 
assigned for the first time to positions of Immigrant Inspector and Investigator has been 
prepared and released, and considerable progress was made in the preparation of neces- 
sary arrangements and lesson material. 

Employee relations and services .— The Immigration and Naturalization Service as a 
security and enforcement agency must insist on a rigorous screening of present and 
prospective employees and scrupulous behavior by its personnel. Employment investiga- 
tions are evaluated to determine whether employees should be retained or separated, and 
whether new employees should be appointed. Disciplinary actions and interviews are, 
whenever possible, geared toward corrective or preventive measures, having as their 
aim the improvement of morale, conduct, and attendance, and the strengthening of overall 
performance and productiveness. 

Active employee participation continued during the year in the following areas: 
Local Chapter of AFGE, Group Hospitalization, Group Insurance, and Federal Credit 
Union. 

Service suggestions .— Daring the year, 108 employees suggestions were consider^ 
ed by the Service Suggestion Committee. Eighty-eight were rejected and 20 were adopted. 
Cash awards totaling $480.00 were paid to 11 suggesters, the largest award being 
$200.00. These cash awards, translated into potential savings, represent a saving of 



-58- 

$13,200 to the operations of this Service. Nine suggesters received Certificates of 
Merit or letters of commendation because of the adoption of their proposals. 

BUDGET 



During the fiscal year 1953 procedures for budgetary planning and management 
were changed through inauguration of a formalized method under which individual allot- 
tees (District Directors) evaluate their requirements in detail early in the calendar year 
and submit their recommendations for use centrally in connection with (1) plans for 
allotment of the appropriation for the fiscal year next ensuing, and (2) the Commissioner's 
recommendation to the Attorney General, in April or May, with respect to items to be 
considered under Department-wide budgetary ceilings for the next budget year. The 
reason for this change in procedure was to bring the budget operation into harmony with 
the decentralized accounting system and to accord with the generally accepted budge- 
tary principle that estimates and plans should have their beginning in the 'grass roots* 
of the organization. Experience during 1954 indicates that the new procedure is working 
Satisfactorily and results in operation personnel being more budget-minded than here- 
tofore. 

A total appropriation of $42,250,000 was made to the Service for the fiscal year 
1954, an increase of $1,851,000 over the amount available for the preceding fiscal year. 
The 1954 annual appropriation of $42,250,000 was included in the Departments of State, 
Justice, Commerce, and the Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1954 (Public Law 195, 83rd 
Congress, approved August 5, 1953). 

Passage of the Appropriation Act was followed shortly by directives requiring 
immediate retrenchment to meet the economy objectives of the administration. It was 
necessary at once to place in reserve $1,000,000 of the 1954 appropriation. This was 
followed later by withdrawal of additional amounts for reserve, thus forcing the gradual 
reduction of Service operations to a level consistent with that planned for the ensuing 
fisced year. 

The establishment of money reserves required concurrent action with respect to 
the authorized force. Additional officer positions which had been provided for 1954 were 
immediately withdrawn and other reductions were made to bring the authorized force 
down to the level projected for the fiscal year 1955. 

In complying with a Bureau of the Budget Circular establishing general policies 
under Title 5 of the Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1952 (5 U.S.C. 40) the 
Service made a formal review as to the adequacy of existing fees or possibilities for 
additional fees for licensing, registration, and related activities. A committee appointed 
for this purpose submitted recommendations for changes in laws and regulations which, 
if and when finally effected, will increase annual revenue by approximately $1,370,000. 

FINANCE 



The fiscal year 1954 was a year of continuing improvements under the new de- 
centralized system of accounting and reporting installed throughout the Service in the 
fiscal year 1953. Substantial savings, both in man-hours and dollars, were accomplished 
through many revisions and refinements. Some of the areas in which the new accounting 
system and procedures were further supplemented and refined are as follows: 

(1) Development and installation of a new fee accounting procedure in the Dis- 
tricts, resulting in Service-wide savings of approximately $100,000, including 20 posi- 
tions, but exclusive of such items as postage, stationery, issuing of receipts, etc. 



-59- 

After the new procedure was in effect six months, it was determined that, through its 
operation, there was no further need to designate only certain offices as "Application R& 
ceiving Offices' since many of the adjudicative functions were absorbed at the sub- 
office level. The results of this change have been a further savings in man-hours, prompt 
service to applicants, and better utilization of officer personnel; 

(2) Placing of leave records at the time and attendance reporting level throughout 
the Service; 

(3) Modification of the method of ordering savings bonds purchased by the payroll 
deduction plan.which permits delivery of bonds due with the salary check for that period; 

(4) Revision of the method of depositing collections by making such deposits di- 
rectly with depository banks which eliminated the use of the Schedules of Collections form; 

(5) Development and installation of an internal audit program as a further phase 
in the decentralized system of accounting which is assisting management in achieving 
efficient administration of the financial operations of the Service. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT - IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE 

FISCAL YEAR 1954 

Net cost of the operation of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 
and the Administration of the Immigration and Naturalization Laws 

Appropriation for salaries and expenses $42,250 000 

Reduction of appropriation by Departmental transfer 1.233,000 

Net approptiatien total $41,017,000 

Reimbursements to the appropriation 1,654,000 

Total funds available $42,671,000 

Amount of available funds not obligated 68.455 

Gross cost of operation $42,602,545 

Less collections other than reimbursements: 

Copying fees $ 24,682 

Fees and permits 4,376,881 

Head tax 48,678 

Sale of Government property 85,984 

Miscellaneous collections 39,207 

Foreitures and bonds forfeited 312,243 

Administrative fines 221.706 

Total collections $ 5,109,381 

Net cost of operations $37,493,164 

STATISTICS 

During the past fiscal year, particular emphasis was placed on the analysis and 
interpretation of reports of operations. Monthly reports have been augumented by the 
development of analytical text, summary tables, and graphs. Sample studies to provide 
bases for estimating man-hour costs for processing to completion such actions as the 
issuance of'visa petitions, reentry permits, and applications for naturalization petitions, 
were devised. The raw data are now being tabulated. 



- 60- 

Major studies completed or already initiated include immigration under the Immi- 
gration and Nationality Act, a revision of the pamphlet " Our ImmiRration ," and a study 
of operating methods to provide bases for estimating time spent on specific activities 
and personnel costs. Articles on immigration and nationality were prepared for a number 
of yearbooks and encyclopedias, as well as the I & N Reporter. Text and tables for the 
1953 Annual Report were completed and the report published. Public and Congressional 
interest has resulted in many requests for additional detailed analyses and other sta- 
tistics. Special emphasis on internal security has resulted in the initiation of two new 
reports on subversives and criminal, immoral, and narcotic classes. Monthly and other 
periodic analyses of operations and passenger travel reports have been continued. Con- 
stant changes in operating procedures have resulted in many changes in field reports and 
the initiation of several new reports. 

RECORDS ADMINISTRATION 

Central Index. -Section 290 of the Immigration and Nationality Act requires that 
there be established "for the use of security and enforcement agencies of the Govern- 
ment of the United States, a central index" containing the names of all aliens admitted 
to the United States. The establishment of the central index was completed during the 
fiscal year 1954, by the incorporation therein of approximately 1,400,000 records relating 
to aliens admitted to the United States as nonimmigrants. The index now contains records 
of all aliens admitted to the United States for permanent residence, in addition to ap- 
proximately 6,625,000 arrival and departure records relating to aliens who have been 
admitted to the United States temporarily as nonimmigrants. Included are records relat- 
ing to approximately 625,000 alien crewmen who have arrived subsequent to December 
24, 1952. 

Files decentralization ." Approximately 600,000 files relating to resident aliens 
were decentralized during the fiscal year to the districts in which the aliens reside. As 
of June 30, 1954, a total of approximately 3,200,000 alien files had been decentralized. 
Approximately 375,000 files had been closed and returned to the Central Office, which 
leaves approximately 2,825,000 active alien files in the districts. 

A program for the review of approximately 3,000,000 alien files in the Central 
Office was inaugurated and carried forward during the fiscal year. On the basis of re- 
view, the files examined were decentralized to the districts in which the aliens reside; 
closed by reason of naturalization, death, or departure of the subject; or were deter- 
mined to be inactive and were transferred to the Federal Records Center. 

Seaport arrival records are currently being microfilmed; the original manifest, 
after microfilming, is destroyed, resulting in a saving of approximately ninety-five per- 
cent in space. In the Central Office, 2,983,000 records of various types were micro- 
filmed, after which the original documents were destroyed. 

During the year, 1,880 cubic feet of record material and 2,503 cubic feet of non- 
record material were disposed of under the Records Retirement Program, in accordance 
with authorities. Approximately 3,530 cubic feet of closed files were reviewed, boxed, 
and transferred to the Records Center under these programs. In addition, approximately 
2,065 cubic feet of records involving derivitive applications and visa petitions were 
transferred to the Federal Records Center. 



-61- 

SERVICES AND SUPPLIES 

Effective July 1, 1953, a broad purchase authority was delegated to the Service 
by the Department. This has resulted in a more effective p^rocurement program both in 
the Central Office and throughout the Field Service. 

Major equipment purchases during this period include approximately 200 pieces 
of automotive ecjuipment. In addition, three airplanes were purchased - a Piper Super- 
cub, a Cessna 170, and a Cessna 170B. A loan was also negotiated with the Department 
of Defense for 11 five-ton Tractor Trailers which were used in connection with the expul- 
sion of aliens on the Mexican Border. In June 1954 a 28- foot patrol boat was purchased 
for use on the St. Lawrence River in the Ogdensburg, New York, area. 

During this period the new Look-out system was placed in operation and the Tab- 
ulating Section was responsible for the preparation and processing of these lists. The 
Tabulating Section also prepared documents for the Central Office Index, Field Index, 
Aliens Identification Cards, and Flexoline Strips in connection with the program of Files 
Decentralization. 

New and improved methods for processing the Alien Address Reports, passenger 
travel, and other statistical reports were inaugurated, with a resultant saving in man- 
power and money. 

Forms controL-During the past year, under the continuing forms review policy of 
the Service, 97 new forms were established, 186 revisions of existing forms were made, 
and 108 forms were declared obsolete. ' 



62 



Publications 



A major accomplishment in the field of publications during the fiscal year 1954 
has been the completion and publication of the 1953 Edition of the law book, "Laws 
Applicable to Immigration and Nationality. * The volume covers all law enacted through 
June 26, 1952, on both subjects including the Immigration and Nationality Act. The 
legislative history of each act is carried in headnotes and prior language, in cases of 
amendment or repeal, is shown in footnotes. In addition, there is included an exhaus- 
tive index of more than 200 pages. The book was published in loose-leaf form for the use 
of members of the Service and of the Department of Justice and in bound volume form for 
the use of Members of Congress and judges of naturalization courts, and for sale by the 
Superintendent of Documents. The first set of inserts for the loose-leaf volume and Sup- 
plement I to the bound volume, covering changes from July 1, 1952, through December 
31, 1953, were also issued during the year. 

Among other publications issued in furtherance of the work of the Service were 
two revisions of the memento pamphlet ' Welcome to USA Citizenship ,' a copy of which 
is given to each new citizen at the time of his naturalization by the presiding judge or 
by an officer of this Service. Over 150,000 copies of this pamphlet have been distributed 
during the year. 

A Staff Bulletin, issued on Wednesday of each week, is written and published for 
the information and guidance of the employees of the Service. 

The I & N Reporter, publication of which as a monthly bulletin was authorized by 
the Act of June 29, 1906, 9th Proviso of Sec. 4, as amended by the Act of May 9, 1918; 
the Act of October 14, 1940 (Nationality Act of 1940), Sec. 327 (c); and the Immigration 
and Nationality Act, Sec. 332 (b), has been issued quarterly during the fiscal year under 
a restriction imposed by the Bureau of the Budget in 1952. This publication, in addition 
to distribution to employees of the Service, is sent to a mailing list consisting of judges 
of naturalization courts. Members of Congress, Executive Departments, depository and 
other libraries, U. S. Attorneys, transportation companies and other firms and organiza- 
tions, governmental agencies of other nations, and attorneys and other individuals in- 
terested in immigration and nationality. 

Passenger travel reports .— At the request of the Bureau of the Budget the Service 
compiles and publishes reports from transportation manifests on aliens and citizens who 
travel between United States ports and all foreign countries, with the exception of foreign 
contiguous territory. The monthly reports, analyses, and tables are distributed to many 
Government agencies and to a subscription list of transportation companies, travel agen- 
cies, and others interested in the economics of international travel. 

A Monthly Analysis of Operations is published monthly with an Operations Re- 
port. The analysis, consisting largely of charts, points up the current trends in opera- 
tions, and is intended to be a summary of operations for the guidance of Service officers. 

Administrative Manual. — Releases relating to various administrative procedures 
in the fields of Finance, Budget, Services and Supplies, Statistics, and Records Adminis- 
tration are published in the Administrative Manual . During the past year, 125 new and 
revised pages were issued, and 318 pages of superseded or obsolete material were removed. 



63- 

Appendix I 



APPENDIX I 



Judicial opinions affecting the Service in courts other than the Supreme Court 
announced during the fiscal year. (Only opinions printed in the published reports are 
listed. The numerous unreported decisions are not listed here.) 

UNITED STATES COURTS OF APPEALS 

Hvndman v. Holton, 205 F. 2d 228 (C.A. 7) 
Nukk V. District Director , 205 F- 2d 242 (C.A. 2) 
United States v. Karahalias , 205 F. 2d 331 (C.A. 2) 
Alvarez y. Floras v. Savoretti. 205 F. 2d 544 (C.A. 5) 
Mangaoang v. Boyd , 205 F. 2d 553 (G.A. 9) 
Takehara v. Dulles, 205 F. 2d 560 (C.A. 9) 
Zank V. Landon , 205 F. 24 615 (C.A. 9) 
Diaz V. Shaughnessy , 206 F. 2d 142 (C.A. 2) 
Carlisle V. Landon , 206 F. 2d 191 (C.A. 9) 
Bojarchuk v. Shaughnessy, 206 F. 2d 238 (C.A. 2) 
Dolenz v. Shaughnessy, 206 F. 2d 392 (C.A. 2) 
Rubinstein v. Brownell, 206 F. 2d 449 (C.A. D.C.) 
Perri v. Dulles , 206 F. 2d 586 (C.A. 3) 
Lehmann v. Acheson , 206 F. 2d 592 (C.A. 3) 
Watts V. Shaughnessy, 206 F. 2d 616 (C.A. 2) 
Accardi v. Shaughnessy , 206 F. 2d 897 (C.A. 2) 
Mendelson V. Dulles. 207 F. 2d 37 (C.A. D.C.) 
Mustafa v. Pederson , 207 F. 2d 112 (C.A. 7) 
Tom We Shung v. Brownell, 207 F. 2d 132 (C.A. D.C.) 
Han Lee Mao v. Brownell , 207 F. 2d 142 (C.A. D.C.) 

Wong You Henn v. Brownell , 207 F. 2d 226 (C.A. D.C.) 
Rongetti v Neellv. 207 F. 2d 281 (C.A. 7) 

Gonzalez v. Barber. 207 F. 2d 398 (C.A. 9) 

United States v. Correia , 207 F. 2d 595 (C.A. 3) 

Garcia v. Landon , 207 F. 2d 693 (C.A. 9) 

Vaz V. Shaughnessy, 208 F. 2d 20 (C.A. 2) 

Herrera v. United States , 208 F. 2d 215 (C.A. 9) 

Giglio v. Neelly. 208 F. 2d 337 (C.A. 7) 

Berrebi v. Grossman, 208 F. 2d 498 (C.A. 5) 

United States v. Vasilatos , 209 F. 2d 195 (C.A. 3) 

United States v. Cunba . 209 F. 2d 326 (C.A. 1) 

Mar Gong v. Brownell , 209 F. 2d 448 (C.A. 9) 

Spector V. Landon , 209 F. 2d 481 (C.A. 9) 

Shomberg v. United States, 210 F. 2d 82 (C.A. 2) 

Quattrone v. Nicolls , 210 F. 2d 513 (C.A. 1) 

Daniman v. Shaughnessy, 210 F. 2d 564 (C.A. 2) 

Frangoulis v. Shaughnessy, 210 F. 2d 572 (C.A. 2) 

Ng Yip Yee v. Barbe r, 210 F. 2d 613 (C.A. 9) 

Monaco v. Dulles , 210 F. 2d 760 (C.A. 2) 

Martinez-Quiroz v. United States , 210 F. 2d 763 (C.A. 9) 

United States v. Menasche , 210 F. 2d 809 (C.A, 1) 

Sweet y. United States, 211 F. 2d 118 (C.A. 6) 



-64- 

Pino V. Nicolls . 211 F. 2d 393 (C.A. 1) 
Vanish v. Barber . 211 F. 2d 467 (C.A. 9) 
Elias V. Dulles, 211 F. 2d 520 (C.A, 1) 
Bnikiewicz v. Savoretti , 211 F. 2d 541 (C.A. 5) 
Impastato v. O'Rourke, 211 F. 2d 609 (C.A. 8) 
United States v. Docherty. 212 F. 2d 40 (C.A. 5) 
Dulles V. Lee Gnan Lung , 212 F. 2d 73 (C.A. 9) 
Belfrage v. Shaughnessy, 212 F. 2d 128 (C.A. 2) 
Acheson v. Furusho, 212 F. 2d 284 (C.A. 9) 
Brownell v. Gutnayer , 212 F. 2d 462 (C.A. D.C.) 
Rodriguez v. Landon, 212 F. 2d 508 (C.A. 9) 
United States v. Lombardo , 212 F. 2d 791 (C.A. 6) 
Marcello v. Ahrens, 212 F. 2d 830 (C.A. 5) 
United States v. Pringle, 212 F. 2d 878 (C.A, 4) 
Samaniego v. Brownell , 212 F. 2d 891 (C.A, 5) 



UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURTS 

Avina v. Brownell, 112 F, Supp. 15 (S.D, Tex,) 

United States v, Vasilatos , 112 F, Supp, 111 (E.D. Pa,) 

Yaris v, Shaughnessy , 112 F, Supp. 143 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Avila-Contreras v, McGranery. 112 F, Supp, 264 (S.D. Cal.) 

Abbenante v. Butterfield, 112 F. Supp. 324 (E.D. Mich.) 

Blankenstein v. Shaughnessy, 112 F. Supp. 607 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Ng Gwong Dung v. Brownell , 112 F. Supp. 673 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Petition of Berini, 112 F, Supp, 837 (E,D, N.Y.) 

Bustos-Ovalle v, Landon , 112 F, Supp. 874 (S.D. Cal.) 

Marcello v. Ahrens, 113 F. Supp. 22 (E.D. La.) 

Kwong Hai Chew v. Shaughnessy, 113 F. Supp. 49 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Belfrage v. Shaughnessy, 113 F. Supp. 56 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Application of Bernasconi, 113 F, Supp, 71 (N.D, Cal.) 

Petition of Benitez , 113 F, Supp. 105 (S.D. N.Y.) 

In re Torchia , 113 F. Supp. 192 (M.D. Pa.) 

De Montez v. Landon , 113 F. Supp. 239 (S.D. Cal.) 

Daniman v. Esperdy, 113 F. Supp. 283 (S.D. N.Y.) 

United States v. Manufacturers Cas. Ins. Co ., 113 F. Supp. 402 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Peduzzi V. Brownell , 113 F. Supp. 419 (D.C.) 

In re Katsumi Yoshida , 113 F. Supp. 631 (Hawaii) 

Vasquez v. Brownell, 113 F. Supp, 722 (W,D. Tex,) 

Scardino v, Acheson , 113 F, Supp, 754 (N.J.) 

United States v, Accardo, 113 F. Supp. 783 (N.J.) 

Leung Sing v. Nicolls , 113 F. Supp. 790 (Mass.) 

lavarone v. Dulles, 113 F. Supp. 932 (D.C.) 

D'Argento v. Dulles, 113 F. Supp. 933 (D.C.) 

Valdez V. McGranery , 114 F. Supp. 173 (S.D. Cal.) 

Lombardo v. Bramblett , 114 F. Supp. 183 (N.D. Ohio) 

I n re Alfonso, 114 F. Supp. 280 (N.J.) 

Kis V. Shaughnessy, 114 F. Supp. 371 (S.D. N.Y.) 

F lorentine v. Landon . 114 F. Supp. 452 (S.D. Cal.) 

Barrios-Macias v. Minton, 114 F. Supp. 470 (W.D. Tex.) 

Pincus V. Savoretti, 114 F. Supp. 574 (S.D. Fla.) 

Gonzalez-Gomez v. Brownell , 114 F. Supp. 660 (S.D. Cal.) 

Petition of Petcheff , 114 F. Supp. 764 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Di Felice v. Shaughnessy, 114 F. Supp, 791 (S,D, N.Y.) 



65 



W ong Fon Haw v. Dulles, 114 F. Supp. 906 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Matranga v. Mackey, 115 F. Supp. 45 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Taylor v. Fine , 115 F. Supp. 68 (S.D. Cal.) 

Caolo V. Dulles, 115 F, Supp. 125 (Puerto Rico) 

In re Vouraxakis , 115 F. Supp. 164 (M.D. Pa.) 

United States v. Matles-Friedman , 115 F. Supp. (E.D. N.Y.) 

Lee Kum Hoy v. Shaughnessy , 115 F. Supp. 302 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Application of ShombetR, 115 F, Supp. 336 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Coelho V. Perlman, 115 F. Supp. 419 (E.D. N.Y.) 

Petition of Menasche , 115 F. Supp. 434 (Puerto Rico) 

Haymes v. Landon , 115 F. Supp. 506 (S.D. Cal.) 

Petition of Plywac ki, 115 F. Supp. 613 (Hawaii) 

Circella v. Neelly , 115 F. Supp. 615 (N.D. 111.) 

Bauer v. Shaughnessy, 115 F. Supp. 780 (S.D. N.Y.) 

United States v. Jerome , 115 F. Supp. 818 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Ragni v. Butterfield , 115 F. Supp. 958 (E.D. Mich.) 

Wong Yoke Sing v. Dulles , 116 F. Supp. 9 (E.D. N.Y.) 

Soo Hop Yin Deep v. Dulles, 116 F. Supp. 25 (Mass.) 

Rowoldt V. Shrode , 116 F. Supp. 143 (Minn.) 

Barile v. Murff, 116 F. Supp. 163 (Md.) 

Rueff V. Brownell, 116 F. Supp. 298 (N.J.) 

Takano v. Dulles , 116 F. Supp. 307 (Hawaii) 

Roggenbihl v. Lusby , 116 F, Supp. 315 (Mass.) 

Application of Barnes (2 cases) , 116 F. Supp. 464 (N.D. N.Y.) 

Insogna v. Dulles, 116 F. Supp. 473 (D.C.) 

Katsumi Yoshida v. Dulles , 116 F. Supp. 618 (Hawaii) 

Riccio V. Dulles , 116 F. Supp. 680 (D.C.) 

Dong Wing Ott v. Shaughnessy, 116 F. Supp. 745 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Ow Yeong Yung v. Dulles, 116 F. Supp. 766 (N.D. Cal,) 

Petition of Leuthold , 116 F. Supp. 777 (N.J.) 

Chin Ming Mow v. Dulles , 117 F. Supp. 108 (S.D. N.Y.) 

De Luca v. O'Rourke, 117 F. Supp. 143 (W.D. Mo.) 

Cumberbatch v. Shaughnessy, 117 F. Supp. 152 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Petition of Field, 117 F. Supp. 154 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Sklar V. Shaughnessy, 117 F. Supp. 160 (S.D. N.Y.) 

In re Oddo, 117 F. Supp. 323 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Daniman v. Shaughnessy, 117 F. Supp. 388 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Fong Nai Sun v. Dulles , 117 F. Supp. 391 (S.D. Cal.) 

Cefalu V. Shaughnessy, 117 F. Supp. 473 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Quong Ngeung v. Dulles , 117 F. Supp. 498 (S.D. N.Y.) 

In re Jocson, 117 F. Supp. 528 (Hawaii) 

Kusman v. District Director , 117 F. Supp. 541 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Blankenstein v. Shaughnessy, 117 F. Supp. 699 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Gensheimer v. Dulles, 117 F. Supp. 836 (J^. J.) 

McLeod V. Garfinkel, 117 F. Supp. 862 (W.D, Pa.) 

Mahamud Abed v. Ahrens , 117 F. Supp. 914 (E.D. La.) 

In re Minker . 118 F. Supp. 264 (E.D. Pa.) 

Chin Ming Mow v. Shaughnessy , 118 F. Supp. 490 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Petition of Witt , 118 F. Supp. 855 (E.D. N.Y.) 

Petition of Caputo . 118 F. Supp. 870 (E.D. N.Y.) 

Ex parte Andal. 118 F. Supp. 949 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Petition of Tsu ji, 119 F. Supp. 68 (N.D. Cal.) 

Pino V. Nicolls , 119 F. Supp. 122 (Mass.) 

United S tates v. Pistilli , 119 F. Supp. 237 (E.D. N.Y.) 



-66- 

Wong Bick Ling v. Dulles , 119 F. Supp. 513 (D.C.) 

United States v. Narvaez-Granillo, 119 F. Supp. 556 (S.D. Cal.) 

Ex parte Robles-Rubio , 119 F. Supp. 610 (N.D. Cal.) 

In re Ballester , 119 F. Supp. 629 (Puerto Rico) 

Lou Goon Hop v. Dulles , 119 F. Supp. 808 (D.C.) 

Matheos v. Garfinkel, 119 F. Supp. 810 (W.D. Pa.) 

United States v. Valenti , 120 F. Supp. 76(E.D. N.Y.) 

Linzalone v. Dulles , 120 F. Supp. 107 (S.D. N.Y.) 

Gay V. Brownell , 120 F. Supp 319 (Puerto Rico) 

United States v. Anastasio , 120 F. Supp. 435 (N.J.) 

United States v. Orrino , 120 F. Supp. 569 (E.D. N.Y.) 

United States v. Alvarado-Soto, 120 F. Supp. 848 (S.D. Cal.) 

American President Lines v. Mackey , 120 F. Supp. 897 (D.C.) 

United States v. Cufari, 120 F. Supp. 941 (Mass.) 

Terada v. Dulles, 121 F. Supp. 6 (Hawaii) 

United States v. Corrado , 121 F. Supp. 75 (E.D. Mich.) 



TABLE 1. naaaiATION to the united STATES: 
1820 - 195U 



^^om 1820 to 1867 figures represent alien passengers atrrived; I868 to I89I 
inclusive and 1895 to 1897 inclusive immigrant aliens arrived; 1892 to I89J4 
inclusive and from I898 to the present time immigrant aliens admitted^/ 





NuB±>er 




Number 




Number 




Nuinber 


Year 


of 


Year 


of 


Year 


of 


Year 


of 




persons 




persons 




persons 




persons 


1820-195U 1/ 


1;0,175.330 


1851-1860 


2.598,211; 


1881;.. 


518,592 


1921-1930 


ii,107,209 


•■■ 




1851. . 


379,U66 


1885.. 


395,3li6 


1921. . 


805,228 


1820 


8,385 


1852.. 


371,603 


1886.. 


331;, 203 


1922.. 


309,556 






1853.. 


368,61;5 


1887.. 


1;90,109 


1923.. 


522,919 


1821-1830 


ll;3,U39 


185U.. 


1;27,833 


1888.. 


5U6,889 


1921;.. 


706,896 


1821. . 


9,127 


1855.. 


200,877 


1889.. 


1M,U27 


1925.. 


29h,3lh 


1822.. 


6,911 


1856.. 


200,1;36 


1890,. 


1;55,302 


1926.. 


30l;,l;88 


1823.. 


6,35li 


1857.. 


251,306 






1927. . 


335,175 


1821;. . 


7,912 


1858.. 


123,126 


1891-1900 


3,687,561; 


1928.. 


307,255 


1825.. 


10,199 


1859.. 


121,282 


1891.. 


560,319 


1929.. 


279,678 


1826.. 


10,837 


i860.. 


153,61;0 


1892.. 


579,663 


1930.. 


2l;l,700 


1827.. 


18,875 






1893.. 


U39,730 






1828.. 


27,382 


1861-1870 


2.3lil.82l; 


I89I;.. 


285,631 


1931-19l;0 


528,1;31 


1829.. 


22,520 


1861. . 


91,918 


1895.. 


258,536 


1931.. 


97,139 


1830.. 


23,322 


1862.. 


91,985 


I896.. 


3l;3,267 


1932.. 


35,576 






1863.. 


176,282 


1897.. 


230,832 


1933.. 


23,068 


I831-I8U0 


599,125 


186U.. 


193,1;18 


1898.. 


2^9,299 


1931;.. 


29,li70 


1831.. 


22,633 


1865. . 


2l;8,120 


1899.. 


311,715 


1935.. 


3h,956 


1832.. 


60,U82 


1866. . 


318,568 


1900.. 


1U;8,572 


1936.. 


36,329 


1833.. 


58,6U0 


1867.. 


315,722 






1937.. 


S0,2kh 


I83ii.. 


65,365 


1868.. 


138,81;0 


1901-1910 


8,795,386 


1938.. 


67,895 


1835.. 


U5,37U 


I869.. 


352,768 


1901. . 


187,918 


1939.. 


82,998 


1836.. 


76,2i42 


1870.. 


387,203 


1902.. 


61;8,7l;3 


19U0.. 


70,756 


1837.. 


79,3i;0 






1903.. 


857,0l;6 






1838.. 


38,9m 


18 71-18 80 


2,812,191 


190I;.. 


812,870 


19l;l-1950 


1,035,039 


1839.. 


68,069 


1871.. 


321,350 


1905.. 


1,026,1;99 


19U1. . 


51,776 


I8U0.. 


81;,066 


1872.. 


l;0l;,806 


1906.. 


1,100,735 


19i;2.. 


28,781 






1873.. 


1;59,803 


1907.. 


l,285,3l;9 


19U3.. 


23,725 


I81a-1850 


1,713,251 


1871;.. 


313,339 


1908.. 


782,870 


19IU;.. 


28,551 


1811. . 


8o;289 


1875.. 


227,1498 


1909.. 


751,786 


19l;5.. 


38,119 


181;2.. 


10U,565 


1876. . 


169,986 


1910.. 


l,Ol;l,570 


19l;6. . 


108,721 


I8li3.. 


52,li96 


1877.. 


ll;l,857 






19li7. . 


ll;7,292 


I8U1.. 


78,615 


1878.. 


138,169 


1911-1920 


5,735,811 


19l;8.. 


170,570 


18U5.. 


llii,37l 


1879.. 


177,826 


1911. . 


878,587 


19U9.. 


188,317 


18U6.. 


15U,U16 


1880.. 


U57,257 


1912.. 


838,172 


1950.. 


21;9,187 


18U7.. 


23U,968 






1913.. 


1,197,892 






18U8.. 


226,527 


1881-1890 


5,21;6,613 


I91I;.. 


1,218,1;80 


1951. . 


205,717 


I8ii9.. 


297,021; 


1881.. 


669,1;31 


1915.. 


326,700 


1952.. 


265,520 


1850.. 


369,980 


1882.. 


788,992 


1916.. 


298,826 


1953.. 


170,l;3i; 






1883.. 


603,322 


1917.. 
1918.. 
1919.. 
1920. . 


295,1;03 
110,618 
liil,132 
1;30,001 


195ii.. 


208,177 



1/ Data are for 
~ inclusive 
sive years 
Sept. 30; 



fiscal years ended June 30, except 1820 to I83I inclusive and l814i to 181;9 
fiscal years ended Sept. 30; 1833 to 181;2 inclusive and 1851 to I867 inclu- 

ended Dec. 31; 1832 covers 15 months ended Dec. 31; 181;3 nine months ended 
1850 fifteen months ended Dec. 31j amd I868 six months ended June 30. 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



I 



TABEE 2. ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AND DEPARTED, 

BY MONTHS: 
"XEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1953 AND 19$h 

IP&tti «xclude travelers between continental United States and its 
possessions, border crossers, and agricultural laborers/ 



Period 



ALIENS ADMITTED 



Immi- 
grant 



Nonim- 
migrant 



Total 



ALIENS DEPARTED 



Emi- 
grant 



Nonemi- 
grant 



Total 



EXCESS 
V 



U. S. CITIZENS 



Ar- 
rived 



De- 
parted 



Fiscal year 19^k • • 

July-Dec, 1953 ... 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November ........ 

December 

Jan. -June, 19514. ... 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Fiscal Tear 1953 •• 

July-Dec, 1952 ... 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December ........ 

Jan. -June, 1953 ... 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 



203.177 



566.613 



77U.790 



30.665 



^68.U96 



599.161 



175.629 



1.021.327 



971.025 



103 » 209 



16,958 
15,310 
15,215 
18,013 
18,985 
18,728 

10U«968 



306.326 



15,800 
1U,812 
I8,ll;6 
17,6U3 
19,81;0 
18,727 



tii;ti95" 

55,098 
66,088 

U8,753 
38,722 
U3,170 

260.287 



h09,^)5 



39,338 
31,U2i; 
ill, 663 
k9,h96 
U8,778 
ii9,588 



71,1153 
70,ii08 
81,303 
66,766 
Si, 101 
61,898 



15.1^03 



55,138 
146,236 
59,809 
67,139 
68,618 
68,315 



h^29Z 
2,398 
2,630 
2,17U 
1,755 
2,150 

15,262 



302. Ul8 



1U,699 
12,858 
13,1;02 
16,178 
16,225 
15,957 

81.115 



12,699 
10,656 
13,1^28 
13,992 
Ii;,25l 
16,089 



UU,269 
U8,U6o 
51;, 218 
39,101 
31,017 
30,999 

237.650 



2XU^ 



33,286 
28,750 
liO,65l 
U3,5ii2 
1;5,968 
U5,l453 



56,968 
61,318 
67,620 
55,279 
U7,2li2 
li6,956 

318.765 



2,730 
l,8ii5 
2,51;5 
2,551 
2,339 
3,252 



12.778 



6l,32U 
5I1, 65U 
52,9l;l 
it8,172 
Ul,50li 
1;3,823 

266.078 



317.821 



U27669 
32,1;12 
U0,637 
l|8,77l; 
1;7,779 
53,807 



65,620 
57,052 
55,571 
50,3ii6 
li3,259 
1^5,973 

281.3UO 



91.71i; 



US7599 
3U,257 
U3,182 
51,325 
50,118 
57,059 

;itU.502 



T7833 
13,356 
25,732 
16,U20 
ll;,U;8 
15,925 

83.915 



567.265 



9,739 
11,979 
16,627 
l5,8:Ui 
18,500 
11,256 

111.61i6 



102,987 

125,^3 

118,077 

86,ii62 

68,61;9 

65,li87 

li5U.062 



Ul;7.196 



60,978 
63,897 
78,521 
75,022 
80,698 
9U,9l;6 

930, 87U 



120, U7 
92,341 
70,225 
57,361 
50,816 
56,336 

523.829 



65,U10 
69,216 

77,855 

87,816 

92,223 

131,309 

925.861 



U5,985 
39,1;06 
5U,079 
57,53U 
60,219 
6l,5U2 



X369 
2,706 
2,110 
1,579 
1,383 
1,631 

11.1;78 



288,881 



T7H77 
1,U76 
2,236 
2,31U 
1,9U5 
2,030 



"5^1538 
58,323 
5l,6U5 
1;U,963 
38,316 
Uo,096 

231,365 



301.659 



32,028 

25,8U7 
36,706 
U5,98l 
ii5,Ui9 
1;5,351; 



58,907 
61,029 
S3,1SS 
U6,51i2 

39,699 
1;1,727 

2li2.8U3 



35.721; 



33,505 
27,323 
38,9U2 
U8,295 
47,391; 
U7,38U 



"51 

289 

13,865 

8,737 

7,51i3 

5,229 

75.922 



506.818 



12,U80 
12,083 
15,137 
9,239 
12,825 
nil, 158 



89,436 
117,447 
107,989 
73,999 
61,121 
56,826 

424.056 



429,944 



60,587 
63,603 
75,624 
69,798 
70,313 
84, 131 



Ul,320 
94,885 
64,01ii 
55,934 
50,954 
52,837 

495.917 



63,149 
71,742 
76,540 
86,349 
85,807 
112,330 



1/ Excess of admissions over departures. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 3. ALIENS ADMITTED, BY CLASSES UNDER raE IMMIOIATION LAWS: 
TEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1950 TO 1954 

^ata exclude travelers between ccxitlnental United States and its 
possess ions J border crossers, crewmen, and agricultural laborers/ 



Class 



1950 



1951 



1952 



1953 



1954 



ALIMS ADMITTED. 



IMMIGRANTS 1/ 

Quota Immigrants. 



Nonquota Immigrants 

Wives of U. S. citizens 

Husbands of U. S. citizens 

Children of U. S. citizens 

Natives of Western Hemisphere countries. 

Their spouses 

Their children 

Persons who had been U. S. citizens 2/.. 
Ministers of religious denominations . . . . 

Their spouses 

Their children 

Eisployaes of U. S. Government abroad, 

their spouses and children 3/ 

Professors of colleges, universities 4/. 

Their wives 

Their children 

Refugees 5/ •• 

Other nonquota immigrants 



NONIMMIGRANTS l/. 



Foreign government officials 

Temporary visitors for bvisiness 

Temporary visitors for pleasure 

Transit aliens 

Treaty traders and investors 

Students 

Representatives to international organizations. 
Temporary workers and industrial trainees 3/... 
Representatives of foreign information media 3/ 

Exchange aliens 3/ • 

Returning resident aliens 1/ 

Other nonimmigrants 



676.024 



670.823 



781.602 



656.148 



774.790 



249.187 



205.717 



265.520 



170.434 



208.177 



197,460 
51.727 



12,291 

1,459 

2,525 

32,790 

278 

170 

86 

454 

U7 

232 



291 

laif 

188 

692 

426.837 



156,547 
49.170 



194,247 



8,685 
822 

1,955 
34,704 
337 
233 
39 
376 
129 
228 



214 
113 
130 

1,205 
465.106 



71.273 

16,058 

793 

2,464 

47,744 

455 

209 

32 

338 

96 

146 



158 
68 
71 

2,641 

516.082 



84,175 
86.25 



94,098 
114.079 



15,91 

3,359 

3,268 

58,985 

1,127 

987 

104 

2U 

69 

74 

2 

169 
71 
81 

1,803 

485. 7U 



17,145 

7,725 

5,819 

78,897 

1,119 

510 

427 

263 

57 

65 



821 
1,227 

566.613 



13,975 

67,984 

219,810 

68,640 

766 

9,744 

5,010 



40,903 
5 



20,881 

83,995 

230,210 

72,027 

850 

7,355 

5,526 



44,212 
50 



22,267 

86,745 

269,606 

77,899 

791 

8,613 

5,137 



44,980 
44 



24,502 

63,496 

243,219 

67,684 

878 

13,533 

6,112 

3,021 

174 

12,584 

50,397 

114 



23,095 

61,029 

292,725 

78,526 

1,023 

25,425 

5,601 

7,4796/ 

504 

15,260 

55,887 

59 



1/ An immigrant is defined in statistics of the Service as an alien admitted for permanent 
residence, or as an addition to the population, A nonljnmigrant is defined as an alien 
admitted for temporary residence. Returning resident aliens who have once been counted 
as Inmigrants are included with nonimmigrants, although the immigration laws define such 
aliens as immigrants. 

2/ Under the Immigration Act of 1924, this class covered only women who had been U. S. citizens. 

3/ New classes under the provisions of the Immigration and Nationality Act. 

4/ Professors admitted as nonquota immigrants under the Immigration Act of 1924. Professors 

are not included in the nraiquota classes as defined in the Immigration and Nationality Act. 

5/ Refugees admitted under the Refugee Relief Act of 1953. 

6/ Does not include 7,946 agricultural laborers admitted under Section 101(a) (15) (h). 
Immigration and Nationality Act. 



United States Department of Justice 
Iffimigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 4. IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRI, FOR DECADES: 
1820 TO 1954 1/ 

/Prom 1820 to 1867 figures represent alien passengers arrived; 1868 to 1891 inclusire and 
1895 to 1897 inclusive immigrant aliens arrived; 1892 to 1894 inclusive and from 1898 to 
present time immigrant aliens admitted. Data for years prior to 1906 relate to country 
whence alien came; thereafter to country of last permanent residence. Because of changes 
in boundaries and changes in lists of countries, data for certain countries are not com- 
parable throughout^ 



Countries 



1820 



1821-1830 



1831-1840 



1841-1850 



1851-1860 



1861-1870 



All countries 

Europe • 

Austria-Hungary 2/ 

Belgium 

Denmark. 

Prance 

Germany 2/.. 

(England... 

Great (Scotland 

Britain(Wales 

(Not spec, 2/»»»» 

Greece •..••. .., 

Ireland • 

Italy 

Netherlands* (.o..* 

Norway) , / 

Sweden) ^ 

Poland ^ 

Poi^ugal 

Spain 

Switzerland ••.•• 

Turkey in Europe.. ....... 

U.S.S,R. 6/ 

Other Europe •• 

Asia 

China 

India , 

Japan 2/ 

Turkey in Asia 8/ 

Other Asia 

America 

Canada & Newfoundland 9/o 

Mexico 10/ 

West Indies 

Central America...... •.«• 

South America •. 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand..,. 
Not specified o 



e.?8? 



7.691 



1 

20 

371 

968 

1,782 

268 

360 

3,6U 
30 
49 



5 

35 

139 

31 

1 
14 



1 
1 



J82_ 



209 
1 

164 

2 

11 



1 
301 



U3.439 



599.125 



1.713-251 



2.59e.2U 



2.?i4.e24 



98.817 



^95.688 



l.^?7.?Ql 



2.452.660 



2.065.270 



27 

169 

8,497 

6,761 

14,055 

2,912 

170 

7,942 

20 

50,724 

409 

1,078 

91 

16 

145 

2,477 

3,226 

20 

75 

3 



22 

1,063 

45,575 

152,454 

7,611 

2,667 

185 

65,347 

49 

207,381 

2,253 

1,412 

1,201 

369 

829 

2,125 

4,821 

7 

277 

40 



5,674 

539 

77,262 

434,626 

32,092 

3,712 

1,261 

229,979 

16 

780,719 

1,870 

8,251 

13,903 

105 

550 

2,209 

4,644 

59 

551 

79 



4,738 

3,749 

76,358 

951,667 

247,125 

38,331 

6,319 

132,199 

31 

914,119 

9,231 

10,789 

20,931 

1,164 

1,055 

9,298 

25,011 

83 

457 

5 



10 



2 

8 



Jd 



82 



8 
39 



11.564 



2,277 

4,817 

3,834 

105 

531 



33.424 

13,624 

6,599 

12,301 

44 

856 



35 
36 



11 

62.469 



JtlA51 



41,397 
43 



15 



a,723 
3,271 

13,528 

368 

3,579 



74.720 



59,309 
3,078 

10,660 

449 

1,224 



16 
33,032 



54 
69,911 



55 
53,144 



210 
29,169 



7,800 

6,734 

17,094 

35,986 

787,468 

222,277 

38,769 

4,313 

341,537 

72 

435,778 

11,725 

9,102 

(71,631 

(37,667 

2,027 

2,658 

6,697 

23,286 

129 

2,512 

8 



64.630 

64,301 

69 

186 

2 

72 



166.607 

153,87^ 

2,191 

9,046 

95 

1,397 



312 
36 

17,969 



See footnotes at end of table. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 4. IMMIGRATION BY COUNTTCf, FOR DECADES: 
1820 TO 1954 1/ (Continued) 



Countries 



1871-1880 



1881-1890 



1891-1900 



1901-1910 



1911-1920 



1921-1930 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria) „/ 

»H;ingary) -^ 
Belgiim 

Bulgaria 11/ 

Czechoslovakia 12/ , 

Denmark ....«•.••• 

Finland 12/ 

France 

German7 2/ , 

Ti^land , 

Great (Scotland •• 

BritaiJi(Wales 

(Not spec, 2/ 

Greece •••...•..••.«• 

Ireland • • 

Italy 

Netherlands 

HOTV&J ^......oe*. ••••.•• 

Sweden ^...•.•.. •• 

Poland ^ 

Portugal • 

Rumania 1^/ •.«••*•••• 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe. ......... 

U.S.S.R. 6/ 

Yugoslavia 11/ 

Other Europe .............. 

Asia e 

China • 

India »..«•.• 

Japan 2/>«*«« 

Turkey in Asia 8/ 

Other Asia • 

America 

Canada & Newfoundland 2/«» 

Mexico 10/ 

West Indies....* 

Central America 

South America •••..e 

Other America 16/ •• 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand 

Pacific Islands 

Not specified 1^ 

See footnotes at end of table* 



2.812.191 



5.246.613 



3.687.564 



8 .79^, 386 



5.735.811 



4.107.209 



2.272.262 



^.7?7,046 



3.558.978 



8.136.016 



72,969 
7,221 

31,771 

72,206 

718,182 

437,706 

87,564 

6,631 

16,142 

210 

436,871 

55,759 

16,541 

95,323 

115,922 

12,970 

14,082 

11 

5,266 

28,293 

337 

39,284 

1,001 



353,719 
20,177 

88,132 

50,464 

1,452,970 

644,680 

149,869 

12,640 

168 

2,308 

655,482 

307,309 

53,701 

176,586 

391,776 

51,806 

16,978 

6,348 

4,419 

81,988 

1,562 

213,282 

682 



123.823 



123,201 

163 

149 

67 

243 



404.044 



383,640 

5,162 

13,957 

157 

1,128 



358 
9,886 
1,028 

790 



592,707 

18,167 
160 

50,231 

30,770 

505,152 

216,726 

44,188 

10,557 

67 

15,979 

388,416 

651,893 

26,758 

95,015 

226,266 

96,720 

27,508 

12,750 

8,731 

31,179 

3,626 

505,290 

122 



2,145,266 

41,635 
39,280 

65,285 

73,379 
341,498 
388,017 
120,469 

17,464 

167,519 
339,065 
2,045,877 
48,262 
190,505 
249,534 

69,149 
53,008 

27,935 

34,922 

79,976 

1,597,306 

665 



4.376,564 

(453,649 

(442,693 

33,746 

22,533 

3,426 

41,983 

756 

61,897 

143,945 

249,944 

78,357 

13,107 

184,201 

146,181 

1,109,524 

43,718 

66,395 

95,074 

4,813 

89,732 

13,311 

68,611 

23,091 

54,677 

921,201 

1,888 

8,111 



2.477.853 



32,868 

30,680 

15,846 

2,945 

102,194 

32,430 

16,691 

49,610 

412,202 

157,420 

159,781 

13,012 

51,084 
220,591 
455,315 
26,948 
68,531 
97,249 
227,734 
29,994 
67,646 
28,958 
29,676 
14,659 
61,742 
49,064 
22,983 



68.380 

61,711 

269 

2,270 

2,220 

1,910 



71.236 



U,799 

68 

25,942 

26,799 

3,628 



2;?.567 

20,605 

4,713 

129,797 
77,393 
11,059 



192.559 



21,278 

2,082 

83,837 

79,389 

5,973 



97.400 



29,907 
1,886 
33,462 
19,165 
12,980 



426.967 



393,304 

1,913 

29,042 

404 

2,304 



?8,972 



3,311 

971 

33,066 

549 

1,075 



361.888 
179,226 

49,642 

107,548 

8,192 

17,280 



1.U3.671 



742,185 

219,004 

123,424 

17,159 

41,899 



1.516.716 



924,515 

459,287 

74,899 

15,769 

42,215 

31 



857 
7,017 
5,557 

789 



350 

2,740 

1,225 

14,063 



7,368 
11,975 

1,049 
33,523 



8,443 

12,348 

1,079 

1,147 



6,286 

8,299 

427 

228 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 4. IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 TO 1954 1/ (Continued) 



Countries 



1931-1940 



1941-1950 



1951 



1952 



1953 



1954 



Total 135 yrs. 
1820-1954 



All countries 

Europe ., 

Albania 12/ 

Austria 2/. o . • 

Hungary 2/ 

Belgium , 

Bulgaria 11/ 

Czechoslovakia 12/. . . , 

Denmark 

Estonia 12/ 

Finland 12/ 

France 

Germany 2/ 

^England...... 

Great (Scotland. . . • , 
Britain(Wales 

(Not spec. 2/» 

Greece 

Ireland , 

Italy 

ijetu Via s^!/ *****"*o**^** 

Lithuania 12/..., 

Luxembourg 17/ 

Netherlands ...» 

t Norway j^ 
Poland ^. 

Portugal o 

Rumania 13/ • 

Spain... CO.... 

Sweden 4/ 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe » 

^ U.S.S.R. 6/. 

^^ Yugoslavia 11/ 

^feother Europe 

Asia 1^ 

China 

India..... 

Japan 2/ • " 

Turkey in Asia 8/. ...» 
Other Asia 



?28. i^ ?l 



1.03? .03? 



20? .717 



265.520 



170.434 



208.177 



40.175.330 



348.289 



2,040 

3,563 

7,861 

4,817 

938 

14,393 

2,559 

506 

2,146 

12,623 

114,058 

21,756 

6,887 

735 

9,119 

13,167 

68,028 

1,192 

2,201 

565 

7,150 

4,740 

17,026 

3,329 

3,871 

3,258 

3,960 

5,512 

737 

1,356 

5,835 

2,361 



15.344 



4,928 
496 

1,948 
328 

7,644 



621.704 



85 

24,860 

3,469 

12,189 

375 

8,347 

5,393 

212 

2,503 

38,809 

226,578 

112,252 

16,131 

3,209 

8,973 

26,967 

57,661 

361 

683 

820 

14,860 

10,100 

7,571 

7,423 

1,076 

2,898 

10,665 

10,547 

580 

548 

1,576 

3,983 



M2x5^ 



7 

9,761 

62 

1,802 

1 

88 

1,076 

532 

4,573 

87,755 

12,393 

2,309 

196 

4,459 

3,144 

8,958 

5 

8 

51 

3,062 

2,289 

98 

1,078 

104 

442 

2,022 

1,485 

118 

10 

454 

1,203 



193.626 



1 

23,088) 

63) 

2,946 

9 

51 

1,152 

7 

500 

4,878 

104,236 

18,539 

3,390 

248 

948 

6,996 

3,526 

11,342 

10 

20 

90 

3,060 

2,354 

235 

953 

34 

481 

1,778 

1,502 

94 

11 

327 

757 



82.352 



1 

2,132) 

96) 

2,162 

1 

77 

993 

38 

473 

4,137 

27,329 

12,921 

3,416 

302 

1,426 

1,296 

4,304 

8,432 

59 

14 

77 

2,973 

2,234 

136 

1,077 

23 

814 

2,171 

1,796 

62 

25 

580 

775 



92.121 



33.763.983 



2,136) 
30) 
2,263 

27 

1,010 

5 

448 

4,263 

33,098 

12,977 

3,442 

253 

215 

1,154 

4,655 

13,145 

6 

5 

59 

3,595 

2,142 

67 

1,455 

7 

542 

2,172 

1,673 

97 

11 

680 

489 



31.780 



16,709 

1,761 

1,555 

218 

11,537 



3.921 



335 

109 

271 

3 

3,203 



9.328 



2iS3" 
123 

3,814 
12 

5,116 



8.231 



528 
104 

2,579 
13 

5,007 



9.970 



254 
144 

3,846 
33 

5,693 



2,134 
4,209,472 

179,567 

66,242 

128,603 

344,649 

768 

24,049 

651,658 

6,500,947 

2,810,273 

762,462 

90,602 

796,330 

453,486 

4,634,704 

4,818,761 

1,633 

2,931 

1,662 

281,309 

823,974 

422,862 

268,030 

158,189 

175,300 

1,236,256 

312,683 

156,824 

3,343,952 

60,404 

43,267 



981.769 
400,262 

12, lU 
289,656 
205,642 

74,095 



See footnotes at end of tableo 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE h. IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 TO 1954 1/ (Continued) 



Countries 



L931-1940 



19a-1950 



1951 



1952 



1953 



1954 



Total 135 yrs. 
1820-1954 



I 



America ....« 

Canada & Newfoundland 9/. 

Mexico 10/ 

West Indies 

Central America o 

South America....... 

Other America 16/ 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand.... 

Pacific Islands 15/ 

Not specified 1477. 



160.037 

22,319 

15,502 

5,861 

7,803 

25 



354.804 

171,71# 

60,589 
49,725 
21,665 
21,831 
29,276 



47.631 



6,153 
5,902 
2,011 
3,596 
4,089 



61.049 



9,079 
6,672 
2,637 
4,591 
4,716 



77.650 



3M5T 
17,183 
8,628 
3,016 
5,511 
7,029 



95.587 



30,645 
8,411 
3,300 
6,575 

11,783 



5.038.187 

901,904 
526,309 

81,783 
163,406 

56,949 



1,750 

2,231 

780 



7,367 

13,805 

5,437 

142 



845 

490 

3,265 

20 



931 

545 

33 

8 



989 

742 

40 

430 



1,248 

845 

65 

8,341 



37,440 

70,959 

19,985 

263,007 



2/ 



2/ 

6/ 

1/ 

10/ 

n/ 



12/ 






16/ 

12/ 



Data are for fiscal years ended June 30, except 1820 to 1831 inclusive and 1844 to 1849 

inclusive fiscal years ended Sept. 30; 1833 to 1842 inclusive and 1851 to 1867 inclusive 

years ended Dec, 31; 1832 covers 15 months ended Dec. 31; 1843 nine months ended Sept. 30; 

1850 fifteen months ended Dec. 31 and 1868 six months ended June 30. 
Data for Austria-Hungary were not reported \intil 1861, Austria and Hungary have been 

recorded separately since 1905. In the years 1938 to 1945 inclusive Austria was included 

with Germany, 
United Kingdom not specified. In the years 1901 to 1951, included in other Europe. 
From 1320 to 1868 the figures for Norway and Sweden were combined, 
Poland was recorded as a separate country from 1820 to 1898 and since 1920, Between 1899 

and 1919 Poland was included with Austria-Hungary, Germany, and Russia. 
Since 1931 the Russian Etopire has been broken down into European U,S,S.R. and Siberia or 

Asiatic U,S,S,R, 
No record of immigration from Japan until 1861, 
No record of immigration from Turkey in Asia until 1869. 
Prior to 1920 Canada and Newfoundland were recorded as British North America, From 1820 

to 1898 the figures include all British North American possessions. 
No record of immigration from Mexico from 1886 to 1893. 
Bulgaria, Serbia, and Montenegro were first reported in 1899. Bulgaria has been reported 

separately since 1920 and in 1920 also a separate enumeration was made for the Kingdom 

of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes. Since 1922 the Serb, Croat, su:id Slovene Kingdom has 

been recorded as Yugoslavia. 
Countries added to the list since the beginning of World War I are theretofore included 

with the countries to which they belonged. Figures are available since 1920 for 

Czechoslovakia and Finland; and since 1924 for Albania, Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. 
No record of immigration from Rumania until 1880. 
The figure 33,523 in column headed 1901-1910, includes 32,897 persons returning in 1906 

to their homes in the United States, 
Beginning with the year 1952, Asia includes the Philippines. From 1934 to 1951 the 

Philippines were included in the Pacific Islands. Prior to 1934 the Philippines were 

recorded in separate tables as insular travel. 
Included with coxintries not specified prior to 1925. 
Figures for Luxembourg are available since 1925. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 5. IMMIGRANT ALIMS ADMITTED AND EMIGRANT ALIENS DEPARTED, 
BI PORT OR DISTRICT: lEARS ©TOED JUNE 30, 1950 TO 1954 



Port or district 



IMMIGRANT 



1950 



1951 



1952 



1953 



1954 



EMIGRANT 



1950 



1951 



1952 



1953 



All ports or districts. 

Atlantic 

New York, N. Y 

Boston, Mass 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Baltimore, Md 

Portland , Me 

Newport News , Va 

Norfolk, Va 

Charleston, S. C....* 

Savannah, Ga 

Jacksonville, Fla.... 

Key West, Fla 

Miami, Fla 

West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands 

Other Atlantic 

Gulf of Mexico 

Tampa, Fla 

Pensacola , Fla 

Mobile, Ala 

New Orleans, La...... 

San Antonio, Tex 

Other Gulf 

Pacific 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Portland, Oi^ 

Seattle, Wash 

Los Angeles, Calif... 

Honolulu, T. H 

Agana, Guam 1/ 

Other Pacific 2/ 

Alaska 

Canadian Border 

Mexican Border 



24?.187 



205 .n? 



265.520 



170.434 



208.177 



27.598 



26.174 



21.880 



24.256 



.630 



154.581 



166,849 

24,222 

370 

260 

23 

22 

183 

16 

20 

9 

110 

5,451 

6 

1,245 

34 

810 

12.19 



2 

224 

11,320 

193 

8 



142,903 

3,787 

134 

148 

34 

19 

42 

47 

15 

7 

106 

5,199 

34 

1,563 

42 

501 

10.035 



197.172 



2,174 

10 

77 

280 

617 



9 

25,564 
8,633 



351 

2 

101 

9,177 

366 

38 

5.274 



183,222 

2,968 

337 

620 

25 

103 

178 

33 

6 

21 

134 

6,209 

42 

1,838 

98 

1,338 

1?.0Q5 



102.?47 



37341 

15 

382 

294 

742 



54 

28,039 

7,734 



335 

2 

166 

12,301 

268 

13 

9.068 



87,483 

2,248 

322 

451 

33 

45 

109 

76 

14 

45 

213 

7,537 

43 

2,651 

94 

983 

2.328 



117.232 



3,178 

26 

3,497 

868 

1,499 



79 
35,451 
10,665 



405 

4 

171 

1,459 

268 

21 

7.??? 



98;Si3 

2,730 

556 

737 

71 

92 

188 

108 

48 

51 

336 

10,433 

90 

1,536 

233 

1,210 

3.125 



19.725 



18.001 



2,36? 
16 
2,520 
1,197 
1,479 



68 
38,613 
19,500 



458 
33 
235 
1,651 
392 
356 

10.675 



15,522 

223 

49 

53 

17 

7 
5 
1 
1 

69 
3,076 

80 
583 

U 

25 

973 



37363 

24 

2,870 

1,133 

2,597 

80 

608 

282 
39,008 
37,855 



146 

2 

23 

622 

176 

4 

2.4?2 



14,295 

218 

22 

39 

2 

14 

10 

10 

5 

4 

50 

2,666 

33 

571 

38 

24 

998 



1 4 . ??8 



12,099 

121 

28 

34 

1 

7 

6 

1 

1 

1 

21 

1,960 

31 

357 

26 

304 

667 



18.350 



U,844 
219 
22 
60 

10 
17 



50 
2,111 

90 
476 

35 
412 



1,021 

1 

51 

136 

1,283 



2,778 
1,630 



180 

2 

17 

636 

155 

8 

1.770 



907 

5 

89 

139 

630 



3,893 
1,512 



73 

5 
439 
148 

2 

1.806 



607 



771 
6 
119 
215 
695 



3,281 
1,128 



17 

423 

98 

8 

2.0Vt 



778 
22 
218 
359 
667 



4 
2,168 
1,083 



1/ Not reported as a separate port before 1954. 

2/ Prior to 1954, included in Seattle and Los Angeles. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



tABtE 6. IMMIGaANT AUEMS AEJOTTED, BY CLASSES 


UNDER THE IMMUHiATION LAie 






AMD ROnU 


TRY OR HHGION 01 


f BIRTH: YEAH EMIffiD JUNE 30. 1954 




Country or 


Number 














6 


?j 


^1 

■ 




region of 


ad- 






g 


9 


s 


2 


^:5 




birth 


mitted 


5 


5 


•H 


^s 




• HO 
^ J3 Q0)J3 

Q. a OS aa 


u 








m 6b 


5§ 


-H 


■S:S 


gs 


«^5 






U • 
• • 


^8 






111 





r. 

IS 


^" 


•■p a ^ 


g = 


-P 
« a 


ss 






II 




3-: 

E> 


•H x c sax am a 


if 


g-s 


All countries 


208,177 


?4.o?8 


114,07? 


17.14? 


7.725 


5.81? 


78.8?7 


1.62? 


427 


2B1 


2.0J2 


Burope 


111.227 


37.104 


24.123 


11.247 


5,779 


4,28? 


5 


1.?^ 


17? 


266 


1,023 


Austria.. ............o* 


2,072 


1,333 


739 


523 


54 


60 


- 


23 




5 


74 


Belgium..,....., 


1,424 


1,356 


68 


32 


15 


2 


- 


11 




5 


3 


Bulgaria... , 


78 


66 


12 


5 


4 


1 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


Czechoslovakia. ........ 


2,235 


1,815 


420 


311 


71 


17 


- 


15 


- 


6 


- 


Denmark.... ..•.«.. 


1,322 


1,152 


170 


93 


48 


9 


- 


15 


- 


2 


3 


Sstonia..,. ,. 


228 


190 


38 


19 


12 


2 


- 


1 


- 


4 


M 


Finland 


681 


560 


121 


54 


44 


9 


- 


10 


- 


4 


- 


France..... 


3,277 


2,663 


614 


458 


55 


55 


1 


26 


- 


2 


17 


Germany •• 


32,935 


26,979 


5,956 


5,179 


153 


408 


1 


60 


- 


14 


141 


Greece.... .«... 


2,127 


602 


1,525 


534 


753 


155 


- 


20 


- 


5 


58 


Hungary,... 


1,163 


979 


184 


78 


67 


3 


- 


17 


- 


19 


- 


Ireland... .e... 


5,232 


5,177 


55 


18 


n 


4 


- 


15 


- 


2 


5 


Italy 


15,201 


6,143 


9,058 


2,020 


3,032 


2,736 


2 


428 


171 


45 


624 


l«atTia ••o...oo.oo...«.e 


296 


253 


43 


23 


13 


1 


- 


5 


- 


1 


- 


Lit huania 


401 


343 


58 


22 


18 


6 


- 


7 


•» 


5 


- 


Netherlands ............ 


3,769 


3,330 


439 


206 


113 


17 


1 


28 


- 


23 


51 




2,420 


2,184 


236 


94 


94 


20 


- 


15 


- 


8 


5 


Poland 


5,663 


5,063 


600 


?42 


250 


10 


- 


76 


- 


22 


- 




1,636 


497 


1,139 


210 


343 


498 


- 


80 


2 


5 


1 


Rumania 


666 


491 


175 


70 


65 


6 


- 


24 


- 


10 


— 




964 


346 


613 


200 


223 


89 


- 


74 


- 


32 


- 


Sweden •........, 


1,811 


1,750 


61 


22 


22 


3 


- 


5 


- 


7 


2 




1,686 


1,593 


93 


58 


16 


4 


- 


8 


- 


i 


6 


(England.. s,,.. 


12,923 


12,452 


471 


168 


41 


6 


- 


235 


- 


2 


19 


United (No. Ireland... 


1,306 


1,284 


22 


9 


2 


- 


- 


10 


- 


•" 


1 


Kingd(»i(3cotlanda . , , . « 


4,5a 


4,426 


115 


23 


9 


3 


- 


70 


- 


i* 


10 




539 


516 


23 


11 


4 


3 


«» 


4 


- 


1 


— 


U,S,SJl. 


1,985 


1,787 


198 


93 


50 


5 


- 


35 


- 


15 


- 




1,432 


947 


485 


251 


82 


121 


•• 


15 


- 


16 


- 


Other Europe. ,,«..•..•. 


1,2U 


827 


387 


221 


115 


36 


" 


8 


" 


4 


3 


Asia 


11.751 


4.239 


7.512 


4.979 


8O5 


1,256 


1 


82 


_1 


75 


}U. 




2,770 


1,502 


1,268 


787 


122 


335 


- 


10 




13 


1 


India... 


308 


190 


118 


53 


49 


6 


1 


4 


1 


3 


1 




515 


391 


124 


42 


44 


25 


— 


9 


- 


3 


1 


Japan...,,.,*.......... 


3,777 


292 


3,485 


2,802 


105 


285 


- 


2 


1 


27 


263 




165 


114 


51 


11 


26 


13 


«» 


— 


•• 


1 


■■ 


Philippines. . ..••• 


1,633 


282 


1,351 


788 


97 


439 


- 


12 


- 


1 


14 




2,583 


1,468 


1,115 


496 


362 


153 


• 


45 


1 


27 


31 




77.772 


1.389 


76.383 


??6 


8?3 


198 


73.658 


16? 


246 


28 


705 


Canada ................. 


27,055 
37,456 


17 


27,038 
37,456 


64 
35 


23 
31 


7 
13 


2^,283 

37,340 




^ 


1 


iU2 




36 


West Indies 


8,999 


1,109 


7,890 


384 


747 


171 


6,392 


161 


- 


13 


22 


Central America.... ,... 


3,488 


104 


3,384 


26 


24 


5 


3,320 


8 


w 


•• 


1 


Other North America... • 


774 


159 


615 


17 


23 


2 


323 


" 


:^46 


^ 


4 


South America 


5,523 


167 


5,356 


31 


70 


8 


5,233 


3 


- 


7 


4 


Africa 


1,187 


779 


408 


179 


159 


50 


- 


18 




1 


1 


Australia & New Zealand.. 


605 


355 


250 


168 


48 10 


- 


U 


■« 


8 


2 




112 


65 


47 


15 


U 81 - 


2 


5 




6 



United States Department of Justice 
LaaigratioD and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 6A. IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED, BT CLASSES UNDER THE IMMIGRATIOM UWS AND COUNTRY 
OB RKCTnTJ nF TJIST PKRMANMT RESIDENCE! YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 19'iL 



Country or 
region of 

last 
permanent 
residence 



Nxmber 

ad- 
mitted 



ss 

-3 a a 
o o i 



B 

d 
« 

■H 

V^ +> 

O -H 

O 

m 
sj • 



n 

a 

%-l o 

O H 

•H 

a 4^ 

TJ -H 



«] CO 



S:S 



3 



CO 



O P 



«> 

o &, 

n 

<n 

•H K 



a 
e 
u 

TJ *H ® 

H O ^1 
■H 0) 

o • " 

•> > 
m Ti 
« -P 
m to _ 
c an 

8.V( . 
CO o a 



n o 



o 



o o 
* • 

CO 

n • 

§=^ 
m c 
u a> 



tig 

-P H 



n o 

>< •> 

c a 

■P « 

n n 

•H 3 



a 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia \,. 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

(England 

United (No. Ireland.. 
Kingdom( Scotland 

(Wales 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Israel 

Japan 

Palestine. 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

infest Indies 

Central America 

Other North America. . . 

South America 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand. 
Other countries 



208.177 



94.098 



114,022 



17lH? 



7.725 



5.819 



28.821 



1.629 



i^I 



^ 



2.052 



92.121 



2,136 
2,263 

27 

1,010 

5 

448 

4,263 

33,098 

1,154 

30 

3,685 

13,145 

6 

5 

3,595 

2,U2 

67 

1,455 

7 

542 

2,172 

1,673 

12,977 

970 

3,442 

253 

U 

680 

860 

9.970 



72.077 



254 
144 
1,778 
3,846 
39 
1,234 
2,675 

89.012 



1,517 
2,215 

22 

918 

5 

370 

3,642 

26,832 

184 

22 

3,653 

4,901 

5 

5 

3,256 

1,996 

56 

396 

3 

164 

2,126 

1,580 

12,610 

960 

3,409 

243 

7 

356 

624 

2.975 



20.044 



34,873 

30,645 

8,411 

3,300 

11,783 

6,575 

1,248 

845 

8.406 



20 
94 

1,545 

155 

26 

77 

1,058 

?A76 



619 
48 

5 
92 

78 

621 

6,266 

970 

8 

32 

8,244 

1 

339 

146 

11 

1,059 

4 

378 

46 

93 

367 

10 

33 

10 

4 

324 

236 

6.99? 



10.083 



7,080 

73 

1,030 

160 

1,133 

1,547 
864 
705 

6.454 



234 

50 

233 

3,691 

13 

1,157 

1,617 

7?,??6 



442 
16 

2 
58 

37 

454 

5,575 

446 

3 

9 

1,843 



161 

70 

6 

184 
1 

136 
17 
57 

201 
4 
9 
7 
1 

180 

164 

4.733 



3.350 



130 

16 

68 

2,937 

2 

691 

889 

1.825 



30 

12 



20 

26 

63 

84 

298 

5 

6 

2,246 

1 

77 

39 

2 

257 

81 
7 
18 
39 
2 
2 
1 

4 
30 



4,180 



27,793 

30,572 

7,381 

3,140 

10,650 

5,028 

384 

140 

1-952 



539 
55 

366 
36 

829 

85 
209 

94 
116 



33 

27 

119 

120 

7 

59 

194 

lA6i 



50 

1 



9 

51 
416 
U7 

3 
2,704 



17 
19 

3 
496 

2 
90 

4 

2 

9 



2 

115 

31 

1.228 



362 



509 

67 

641 

31 

2,217 

157 

88 

26 

80 



Z8 

4 

21 

335 

4 

387 

409 

291 



1 
U 
24 



3 
134 



5 
3 

41 

35 
4 
7 

66 
3 
7 
2 



22. 



J21. 



5 
4 

1 
1 

1 

16 
29 

6 

3 

331 



8 
2 

70 

18 
2 
3 

22 



3 
3 

J0_ 



m. 



173 



308 



10 
7 



4 

7 

14 

7 

2 
42 



19 
8 



17 
10 



1.02? 



2 
4 
2 

2 
13 

72.178 



39 

13 

171 

5 

63 

33 

47 

10 

JO 



25,353 

30,375 

5,967 

3,038 

7,445 

4,611 

18 

3 

1.702 



9 
2 

2 
17 

_2il 



650 
22 

191 
28 

52 

101 

6 

2 

16 



13 



Jtl 



7 

35 

J2. 



30 

1 
8 

2 

1 



1 
9 
4 

JZ6 



11 
27 

2 
35 

_22 



31 

4 

22 

1 
34 

35 
5 
4 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 6b. BOIICaUNT ALIENS ATUITTED TO THE UNITED STATES UNDER THE DISPLACED PERSONS ACT 
OF I9U8, AS AMENDED, BY CUSSES AND COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH? 
JUNE 25, 19ii8 - JUNE 30, 19$h 



Country or region 
of birth 



Nuinber 
admitted 



Total 

displaced 

persona 



Displaced persona 



Quota 

displaced 

persona 



Nonquota 

displaced 

orphans 



Other 
nonquota 
displaced 
persona 



Germans 
ethnics 1/ 



All countries ........ 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgium , 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Estonia , 

Finland 

France 

Germany .... .. . 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Lithuania ....... .... 

Netherlands ^.....^ .... 

Norway 

Poland .0..0 

Portugal ,. , 

Rumania .,,..,, 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

I (England ....... 

United (No. Ireland ... 

Kingdom(Scotland 

(Wales 

U« D« O9 rt* •••••••••■»•• 

Yugoslavia . ..■ 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Israel 

Japan .,. 

Palestine 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

UexLco ... 

West Indies ,... 

Central America 

Other North America .... 

South America ...... .... 

•'^rica ................ .... 

Australia & New Zealand . . 
Other coimtries 



Uoii.933 



tf02 ,^60 

^^92T 

928 

566 

12,2UO 

62 

10,202 

93 

765 

6l,95U 

10,273 

16,269 

31 

2,25Z 

35,787 

2U,659 

62 

30 

13U,602 

21 

lo,U70 

3U 

307 

132 

i,5oU 

28 

185 

103 

35,56U 

1,166 

2.167 



911 
8 

15 
11 
77 
19 
1,126 

283 



2ir 

3 

2 

k 

250 

19 
72 
10 
22 



35lil67 



31^7 .010 



U.065 



3U8.671 



6,398 

925 

55h 

9,li01 

55 

9,939 

92 

757 

51,885 

10,271 

12,765 

31 

2,233 

35,lU2 

23,181 

53 

25 

128,210 

lU 

5,117 

29 

307 

129 

1,502 

27 

185 

99 

31,2lil 

17,208 

896 



M^ ^ ^k 



909 
7 

15 
9 

77 

19 

1,120 

226 



T5~ 
3 
1 
3 

203 

15 
68 
10 
21 



6,222 

92ii 

553 

9,365 

k9 

9,917 

88 

753 

50,713 

9,02U 

12,725 

30 

1,665 

3h,9kO 

23,100 

51 

25 

127, 98U 

10 

5,097 

29 

307 

129 

1,501 

26 

18U 

99 

31,18U 

16,971 

889 



4 *0 ^ 2 



9or 

7 
15 

9 

77 

19 

1,120 

209 



T 
3 

1 
201 

5 
67 
10 
10 



1/ Includes wives and children. 



169 

1 

1 

3U 

6 

17 

h 

h 

1,156 

l,2li6 

39 

1 

568 

202 

69 

2 

211; 

h 

20 



1 
1 

5b 

236 

7 



1 
11 



-2L 



ii. 



2 
5 



16 

1 
1 



12 



12 



7 

1 



JJ- 



12 

1 
2 
2 

10 



53.766 



53.689 



2,529 

3 

12 

2,839 

7 

263 

1 

8 

10,069 

2 

3,5oU 

19 

6U5 
1,U78 

9 

5 
6,392 

7 
5,353 

5 

3 
2 

1 

U 

U,323 

15,936 

270 

11 



2 

1 



SL— 



1 

1 

U7 

k 
k 



United States Department of Justice 
Imaigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 6C. REFUGEES, DISPLACED PERSONS, AND OTHER IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED TO THE 
UNITED STATES, BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1954 



Country or 

region of 

birth 



All countries, 



Europe 

Austria 

Belgium • 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia „ 

Denmark » 

Estonia o 

Finland •«oo««aeeoo*«0oeo*oo 

France. » °°» 

Germany »»» 

Greece <> 

Hungary o s«i>oo<i>>o«i>>a«*«o*o 

Ireland ••••e*o*«oeo»»oeooeo 
Italy. oe»o««*oo«ooooae«**oo 
Xjat via •o«o*oo**«eoe«oa«eo«« 

Lithuania .......e 

Netherlands 

Norway ..o go««»«*o«e«ooa««o* 

Poland o 

Portugal 

Rumania...... 

Spain 

Sweden ........ ............. 

Switzerland 

(England 

United (No. Ireland 

Klhgdom( Scotland 

(Wales 

U.S.S.R.. 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe. .. o .. e . o « o o .. o 

Asia. 

China. •«* 

India ..g.. .......... ....««• 

Israel. 

Japan .......«t* 

Palestine.. *4^* 

Philippines 

Other Asia. ....... ...«#. * 

North America. ..... o ........ . 

Canada ..................... 

Mexico 

West Indies ...... .......... 

Central America 

Other North America 



Total 

immigrants 



eo«ao**oe«o«**oe 



South America 

Ai rica .........oe...... .....< 

Australia & New Zealand 

Other countries.... 



208.177 



111.227 



2,072 

1,424 

78 

2,235 

1,322 

228 

681 

3,277 

32,935 

2,127 

1,163 

5,232 

15,201 

296 

401 

3,769 

2,420 

5,663 

1,636 

666 

964 

1,811 

1,686 

12,923 

1,306 

4,541 

539 

1,985 

1,432 

1,214 

11.751 



Refugees 1/ 



2,770 
308 
515 

3,777 
165 

1,633 

2,583 

77.772 



27,055 

37,456 

8,999 

3,488 

774 

5,523 

1,187 

605 

112 



821 



789 



1 
67 
55 



617 

42 



J2_ 



18 
11 



Displaced 
persons 3/ 



?.2?? 



1,183 

136 

344 

21 

577 

5 

16 

4 

233 

681 

2 

237 

6 

27 

53 

56 

5 

3 

1,751 

68 

132 
16 
39 

2 

3 

623 

118 

25 

y^ 



Other 
Immigrants 



27 

2 

1 
1 

10 



4 
6 

1 



202.121 



105.255 



1,929 
1,080 
57 
1,658 
1,317 
212 
677 
3,043 
32,187 
2,070 
926 
5,226 
14,557 
243 
345 
3,722 
2,417 
3,912 
1,636 
598 
964 
1,679 
1,670 
12,884 
1,306 
4,539 
536 
1,362 
1,314 
1,189 




77.769 



27,055 

37,456 

8,999 

3,488 

771 

5,523 

1,183 

599 

111 



l7 Refugees admitted under the Refugee Relief Act of 1953. 
2/ Displaced persons admitted under Sec. 3(e) of the Displaced Persons Act 
of June 25, 1948, as amended. 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 7. ANNUAL QDDTAS AND CJJOTA IMMICSIANTS AJMITTED: 
lEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1950 TO 19$h 



Quota area 



Annual 
quota 1/ 



Quota Immigranta admitted 



1950 I 19^r~ 1952 I 1953 | 195U 3/ 



All quota areas 



Europe 

Northern and Western Europe 

Belgium 

Denmark 

France 

Germany 

Great Britain, Northern Ireland. 

Iceland •• 

Ireland 

Luxembourg 

Netherlands 

Nonray 

Sweden 

Switzerland « 



Southern and Eastern Europe 

Austria 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovaida 

Estonia 

Finland 

Greece ..• 

Hungary 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Turkey 



U.S.S.R. 



Yugoslavia 

Other Southern & Eastern Europe. 



Asia 

China 

Chinese 

India 

Asia Pacific Triangle 
Other Asia 



Africa . 
Oceania 



1 54.657 



i?7.46o 



156.5U7 



i2ki2J±i 



8Ua75 



9U.098 



lit9.667 



125,165 



1 ^ 5.6 71 



1,297 

1,175 

3,069 

25,8lii 

65,361 

100 

17,756 

100 

3,136 

2,36U 

3,295 

1,698 

Jk402 

1,U05 

100 

2,859 
115 
566 
308 
865 

5,6i;5 
235 
38U 

6,U88 
U38 
289 
250 
225 

2,697 
933 
700 

2.990^ 



im 



^ 



979 

1,101 

3,187 

31,511 

17,19U 

88 

6,Uhh 

7li 

3,067 

2,179 

1,876 

1,666 

126.305 



U7. 026 



^92 ,7^h 



100 

105 

100 
100 

2,585 



^7153 

177 

U,058 

5,387 

518 

285 

U,05U 

5,861 

17,U39 

11,77U 

50,692 

U26 

2,019 

197 

697 

10,85U 

5,359 

355 

1.173 



991 

1,082 

2,900 

U4,637 

15,369 

96 

3,810 

S9 

3,102 

2,2U8 

1,360 

1,372 

107.733 



73.302 



82.231 



loH" 

59 

123 

783 

328 
288 



1,361 

231 

3,870 

2,230 

556 

3,638 

5,079 

U,325 

11,220 

li,568 

U5,766 

38U 

2,0l;2 

286 

liOl 

lli,019 

7,Ull 

3U6 

i,3ia 



1,103 

1,183 

2,935 

35,U53 

20,368 

95 
3,819 
103 
3,032 
2,333 
i,55U 
1,32U 

ii?,452 



63.619 



90.190 



56 
69 

698 

272 
175 



2,236 

330 

5,398 

1,366 

h9k 

5,621 

7,331 

5,901 

Ii,999 

3,330 

li2,665 

388 

5,18U 

256 

37U 

15,269 

17,265 

l,0U5 

li08g 



1,093 

1,12U 

2,98U 

20,866 

2U,219 

89 

U,635 

76 

2,903 

2,259 

1,6U0 

1,761 

18.582 



903 
56 

2,138 
113 
527 
172 
575 

U,970 
22h 
258 

U,U28 
385 
208 

583 
118 
1,926 
690 
308 

1.560 



178 
51 
70 

786 

253 
155 



ToIT 
105 
6k 

987 

235 
m9 



69.267 

1%^ 

1,128 

3,0UU 

28,361 

21,092 

109 

5,169 
79 

3,208 

2,195 

1,803 

1,63U 

20 ,^23 

1,056 

52 

2,005 
156 

555 

571 

801 
6,0li2 

203 

311 
U,85l 

li96 

308 

329 
190 
1,887 
778 
332 

3.286 

63 , 

1,3U83/ 

120l/ 

21 
1,73U 

350 
272 



1/ The annual quota was l5U,206 in the fiscal year 195o, and 151|,277 in the fiscal 
years 1951 and 1952. 

2/ The Philippines are included in Asia; prior to the fiscal year 1952, the Philippines 

~ were included in the Pacific, or Oceania. 

3/ The 195U figures include 7,191 quota immigrants who had adjusted their status in the 
United States, such as by suspension of deportation, by private law, or as 
displaced persons. The 195U figures on Chinese and India include 1,283 Chinese 
and 57 Indians who had adjusted their status during the year. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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TABLE 


10. TIMI GRANT AUBNS ADMITTED BT RACE, SEI,AHD AGEt 










TEAR ENDED JUNE 


30, 195U 




























PadlJfift 


Sex and age 


Nunber 


White 


Chinese 


East 


Fili- 


Japa- 


Kor- 


Regjx) 


Is- 




admitted 






Indian 


pino 


nese 


ean 




lander 


Noaber adoitted 


208,177 


196,892 


2,7U7 


218 


1,503 


U,062 


190 


2,5oU 


61 


Male 


95.591 


91.39U 


1,511 


16U 


U58 


685 


76 


1,278 


28 


Under 5 years 


8,708 


8,2?^ 


87 


3 


29 


1^ 


10 


81 


^ 


5-9 - 


7,769 


7,l4UO 


88 


U 


68 


87 


11 


69 


2 


10-iU •• 


5,513 


5,287 


50 


3 


68 


32 


12 


55 


6 


15 " 


870 


822 


11 


«» 


21 


5 


. 


11 


s 


16-17 « 


2,211 


2,118 


17 


1 


30 


8 


6 


29 


2 


18-19 " 


2,890 


2,795 


2li 


1 


3U 


8 


- 


28 


. 


20-2U «• 


10,3Ul 


10,073 


53 


11 


U7 


21 


8 


127 


1 


25-29 " 


iSMl 


lli,917 


91 


55 


61 


la 


9 


268 


5 


30-3U " 


13,51i3 


13,00U 


191 


35 


33 


35 


5 


235 


5 


35-39 " 


8, 1456 


7,982 


222 


17 


26 


li7 


1 


159 


2 


UO-liU " 


6,950 


6,588 


153 


12 


21 


5U 


6 


nli 


2 


U5-U9 " 


U,975 


U,67li 


185 


3 


10 


52 


5 


U5 


1 


50-5U " 


3,560 


3,311 


168 


12 


8 


3li 


. 


25 


2 


55-59 " 


2, 01^6 


1,911 


98 


h 


- 


20 


1 


12 


• 


60-6U " 


1,107 


1,03U 


kh 


2 


1 


20 


1 


5 


• 


65-69 " 


636 


597 


17 


1 


1 


11; 


1 


$ 


_ 


70-7U " 


309 


296 


3 


- 


- 


7 


- 


3 


. 


75-79 " 


159 


150 


5 


- 


- 


3 


- 


1 


• 


80 jrs. and over.. 


86 


80 


3 


- 


- 


1 


- 


2 


• 


TTnlmnwn . ... 


18 
112,583 


16 

105,198 


1 
1.236 


5U 


i,0U5 


3,377 


llli 


1 
1.226 


^ 


Female 


33 


Under 5 jvara 


8,188 


7,86(5 


63 


3 


■ ■ Y9 ■ 


167 


5 


73 


• 


5-9 » 


7,U29 


7,118 


61 


2 


58 


73 


U 


109 


h 


10-lIi » 


5,639 


5,Uli6 


35 


2 


60 


31 


2 


62 


1 


15 " 


989 


955 


12 


- 


5 


1 


. 


16 


. 


16-17 " 


3,189 


3,095 


lU 


1 


32 


15 


2 


28 


2 


18-19 " 


6,263 


5,955 


U5 


1 


Uo 


15U 


8 


59 


1 


20-2U ■ 


22,126 


19,937 


23li 


5 


179 


1,531 


5U 


181 


5 


25-29 " 


18,730 


16,993 


216 


11 


252 


1,027 


23 


201; 


h 


30-3U " 


12,230 


11,U98 


Ili5 


13 


171 


210 


10 


180 


3 


35-39 " 


7,22U 


6,803 


139 


5 


95 


60 


2 


115 


5 


hCh-hh " 


6,131 


5,85U 


98 


1 


63 


3U 


2 


77 


2 


U5-U9 •• 


U,8a 


U,659 


58 


2 


Uo 


18 


1 


liO 


3 


50-5U ■ 


3,722 


3,595 


55 


3 


16 


18 


- 


3U 


1 


55-59 " 


2,U87 


2,l406 


38 


2 


7 


16 


- 


17 


1 


60-6U ■ 


1,538 


l,li95 


15 


1 


7 


8 


1 


11 


- 


65-69 « 


89U 


875 


2 


1 


1 


6 


- 


8 


1 


70-7l» • 


502 


U8l 


5 


1 


• 


7 


2 


6 




75-79 » 


293 


288 


- 


^ 


• 


1 


- 


1; 


- 


80 yrs, and over.. 


16U 


163 


- 


• 


. 


- 




1 


- 




2li 


22 


1 


•• 


— 


— 


" 


1 


^^ 







United States Department of Justice 
Inmigration and Naturalization Service 



TABIZ lOA. UOIICEEIAHT ALIEMS AMITTBD AMD EMIQRANT ALIENS DBFARTED, BZ SEX, AGE, 

lEARS E WDED J UME 30, 1950 TO 195U 



ILLITERAC Y. AND MAJOR OCCDPATION OtOUPt 



S«x, age. Illiterates, and occupation 



1950 



1951 



1952 



1953 



195U 



Inmigrant aliens admitted 



Sex: 

Male >»..».. 

Female 

Males per 1,000 females 
Age: 

Under l6 years 

16 to hh years ......... 

Ii5 years and over ...... 



Illiterates: 
Number 1/ 
Percent . . 



Major occupation group: 

Professional, technical, and kindred iroikers. 

Farmers and farm managers , 

Managers, officials, and proprietors, 

except farm 

Clerical, sales, and kindred workers 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers 

Operatives and kindred workers 

Private household workers 

Service workers, except private household ... 

Farm laborers and foreman 

Laborers, except farm and mine 

No occi^ation •• , 



Emigrant aliens departed 



Sex: 

Male 

Female ••..«• 

Males per 1,000 females 
Age: 

Under 16 years ......... 

16 to UU years ......... 

k$ years and over 



Major occupation group: 

Professional, technical, and kindred workers. 

Farmers and farm managers 

Managers, officials, and proprietors, 

except farm 

Clerical, sales, and kindred woricers 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers 

Operatives and kindred wo rice rs 

Private household workers 

Service workers, except private household ... 

Farm laborers and foreman 

Laborers, except farm and mine 

No occupation 



2h9,lB7 



20LJ1Z 



265»^20 



170. k3U 



208.177 



119,130 

130,057 

916 

50,U68 

152,358 

li6,36l 



1,677 
»7 



20,502 
17,6ii2 

6,396 

16,796 

21,832 

19,618 

8,900 

U,970 

3,976 

5,693 
122,862 

27.598 



99,327 

106,390 

93li 

Ut,023 

121,823 

39,871 



1,869 
.9 



15,269 
lu,2i]i 

5,U93 

lli,098 

16,183 

17,858 

7,2i;3 

5,292 

U,972 

5,li8l 

103,6m 

26.171; 



123,609 

141,911 

871 

6U,513 

159,788 

Ul,219 



2,026 
.8 



I6,li96 
10,566 

5,968 

16,721; 

21,223 

21,092 

9,653 

6,U18 

6,289 

8,969 

lli2,122 

21.880 



73,073 

97,361 

751 

37,016 

110,860 

22,558 



99^ 
.6 



12,783 
3,393 

5,025 

15,171 

12,257 

111, 718 

6,852 

U,390 

1,538 

5,369 

88,938 

2Ji.256 



95,59U 

112,583 

81i9 

U5,105 

135,731 

27,3Ul 



1,009 
.5 



13,817 
3,8U6 

5,296 
16,018 
15,396 

16,755 
8,096 

5,203 

1,622 

10,06l 

112,067 

30.665 



3ii,331 

13,267 

1,080 

2,333 

15,576 

9,689 



2,631 
335 

1,983 
1,5U0 
929 
1,222 
663 
730 
6ii2 
993 
15,930 



12,843 

13,331 

963 

2,U17 

I5,li22 

8,335 



2,772 
350 

1,95U 
1,799 
950 
1,363 
757 
839 
253 
92li 
14,213 



10,921 

10,959 

997 

1,918 

12,318 

7,644 



2,328 
263 

1,693 
1,179 
437 
902 
470 
908 
158 
4,099 
9,443 



12,511 

11,745 

1,065 

2,117 

14,905 

7,234 



3,053 
266 

1,798 
1,339 
786 
988 
610 
1,181 
114 
654 
13,467 



"y Immigrants over 16 years of age who are unable to read and understand some language 

or H-falatn-h. 



16,520 

14,145 

1,168 

2,795 

19,823 

8,047 



3,773 
240 

1,919 

1,428 

738 

987 

714 

1,333 

9S 

(>19 

18,759 



or dialect. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 






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TABI£ 11. ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AND DEPARTED: 
lEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1908 TO 195U 



Period 



ALIENS AIKITTED 



Immi- 
grant 



Nonimmi- 
grant 



AUaiS DEPARTED 



Emi- 
grant 



Nonemi- 
grant 



U. 3. GITIZaJS 



Ar- 
rived 



De- 
parted 



Total, 1908 to 1951 



1908-1910 1/ 
1911-1920 7.. 

1911 

1912 

1913 

191U 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1920 



1921-1930 

1921 .. 

1922 .. 

1923 .. 
192ii .. 

1925 .. 

1926 .. 

1927 .. 

1928 .. 

1929 .. 

1930 .. 



1931-19UO 

1931 .. 

1932 ., 

1933 .. 
193ii .. 

1935 .. 

1936 .. 

1937 .. 

1938 .. 

1939 .. 
19U0 .. 



19^1-1950 
19U1 .. 
19li2 .. 
19U3 .. 
19hh .. 
19U5 .. 
19U6 .. 
19li7 .. 
19li8 .. 
19U9 .. 
1950 .. 



1951 
1952 
1953 
195U 



lU.832.56it 



9.710.838 



U.73U,li93 



10.029.08U 



16.230.609 



15.996.659 



2.576.226 



341 



3757^ 
838,172 
1,197,892 
I,2l8,li80 
326,700 
298,826 
295, U03 
110,618 
Ul,132 
li30,001 



U90.7UI 



1.376.271 



823.311 



151,713 

178,983 

229,335 

18U,601 

107, 5UU 

67,922 

67,li7U 

101,235 

95,889 

191,575 



2,lh6,99h 
295,666 
333,262 
308,190 
303,338 
20li,07U 
129,765 
66,277 
91;, 585 
123,522 
288,315 



672.327 



1.8U1.163 

222,51*9 

282,030 

303, 73U 

330,li67 

180,100 

111,0U2 

80,102 

98,683 

92,709 

139, 7U7 



660.811 



1.938.508 
269,128 
280,801 
286, 60U 
286,586 
239,579 
121,930 
127, U20 
72,867 
96,1420 
157,173 



3lj2.600 
2.517.889 



3ii9,li72 
353,890 
3U7,702 
368,797 
172,371 
110,733 
126,011 
275,837 
218,929 
19li,ll*7 



It. 107. 209 



805,228 
309,556 
522,919 
706,896 
29U,33ii 
30U,U88 
335,175 
307,255 
279,678 
2UI, 700 



1.77li.88l 
172,935 
122,9^9 
150,1487 
172, U06 
l61i,121 
191,618 
202,826 
193,376 
199, 6U9 
20U,5lll 



1.0U5.076 



2^7,718 
198,712 
8l,U50 
76,789 
92,728 
76,992 
73,366 
77,li57 
69,203 
50,661 



1.61*9.702 



178,313 
11*6,672 
119,136 
139,956 
132, 762 
150,763 
180,11*2 
196,899 
183,295 
221,761* 



3.522.713 



222,712 
21*3,563 
308,1*71 
301,281 
339,239 
370,757 
378,520 
1*30,955 
1*1*9,955 
1*77,260 



3 ,519,51? 



271,560 
309,1*77 
270,601 
277,850 
32l*,323 
372,1*80 
369,788 
U29,575 
1*31,81*2 
1*62,023 



528,1*^1 



97,139 
35,576 
23,068 
29,1*70 
31*, 956 
36,329 
50,21*1* 
67,895 
82,998 
70,756 



1.^7^.071 
183, 5U0 

139,295 
127,660 
131*, 1*31* 
li*l*,765 
15U,570 
181,61*0 
181*, 802 
185,333 
138,032 



1*59.738 



61,882 
103,295 
80,081 
39,771 
38,831* 
35,817 
26,736 
25,210 
26,651 
21,1*61 



1.736.912 



229,03U 
18U,362 
163,721 
137,1*01 
150,216 
157,1*67 
197,81*6 
197,1*01* 
171*, 758 
11*1*, 703 



3^365J*32 



U39,897 
339,262 
305,001 
273,257 
282,515 
318,273 
386,872 

1*06,999 
351*,1*38 
258,918 



?, m»??(> 



■fe 



;386 
380,837 
338,51*5 
262,091 
272,1*00 
311,1*80 
390,196 
397,875 
333,399 
221*, 727 



1.035,039 



^ 



^17773" 

26,781 

23,725 

28,551 

38,115 

108,721 

lii7,292 

170,570 

188,317 

21*9,187 



2.1*61,359 



156,399 



100,008 
82,1*57 
81, U7 
113,61*1 
161*, 21*7 
203,1*69 
366,305 
1*76,006 
1*1*7,272 
1*26,837 



17, U5 

7,363 

5,107 

5,669 

7,U1*2 

I8,li*3 

22,501 

20,875 

2i*,586 

27,598 



2.105.891* 



71,362 

67,189 

53,615 

78,71*0 

85,920 

186,210 

300,921 

U27,3l*3 

1*05,503 

U29,091 



3.223.233 



175,935 
118,1*51* 
105,729 
108,1*1*1* 
175,568 
27U,51*3 
1*37,690 
5U2,932 
620,371 
663,567 



2,880,1*11* 
168,961 
113,216 
62,1*03 
63,525 
103,019 
230,578 
1*51,81*5 
1*78,988 
552,361 
655,518 



205,717 
265,520' 
170,1*31* 
208,177 



1*65,106 
516,082 
1*85,711*, 
566,6133 



26,171* 
21,880 
21*, 256 
30,665 



1*1*6,727 
U87,617 
520,21*6 
568,1*96 



760,1*86 

807,225 

930,871* 

1,021,327 



667,126 
811*, 289 
925,861 
971,025 



1/ Departure of aliens first recorded in I908. Departure of U. S. citizens first recorded 

in 1910. 
2/ Does not ineludo 7,946 agrleultoral lAbonrs admitted under Section 101(a) (15}(H), 
iBBigration and Nationality Act. 

United States Department of Justice 
laiigratlon and laturalisatioD Service 



TABLE 12. mttrGRAHr AUEKS IMnTTED AND EKGRAOT AUBNS DSPAHTBD, 
BT STATE OF INTENDED FUTURE OR LAST PEHMANENT RESIDENCE i 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30 » 19S0 TO 195U 



Futort or last 
rssldenca 



"Wo 



I M U 

"195T 



I G R 
"19^2" 



N T 

"1951 



'i95r 



1950 



B U I OR A 



i95r 



19^ 



N T 
1953" 



All States 

Alabama • 

AriEona •. 

Arkansas < 

California 

Colorado 

Conoecticut. 

Delaware. * 

District of Columbia, 

Florida 

Georgia. . .• «... 

Idaho. ..•...••...•••. 

riHnois , 

Indiana 

Iowa. ..••....•••*..•. 

Kansas • , 

Kentucky. 

Louisiana. ••., 

Main* 

Maryland •...•*. 

Massachusetts. « •••... 

HLchigan....* , 

Minnesota.... 

MissJBBippi. ......*•. < 

Missouri ••..< 

Montana 

Nebraska* •...••.••... 

Nevada •••••.. 

New Hampshire. ., 

New Jersey.. •••.••... 

New Mexico. 

New Tork 

North Carolina 

North Dakota , 

Ohio , 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania. ........ 

Rhode Island. 

South Carolina. ..... < 

South Dakota. 

Tennessee , 

Texas. ., 

Utah , 

Vermont..... •.•...••. 

Virginia 

Washington. ......... , 

Vest Virginia , 

Wisconsin. ........... 

Wyoming. ..*.......... 

All other 



219,187 



205,717 



265,520 



170,U3U 



208.177 



27,598 



26,17t{ 



21,880 



.2li,256 



li69 

950 

725 

20,128 

1,U01 

6,282 

396 

1,670 

2,980 

801 

h2h 

18,673 

3,6U2 

2,139 
958 

918 
2,125 
1,100 
U,330 
10,14i3 
m,68l 
5,287 
1,58U 
2,l497 

802 
1,603 

161* 

637 
13,31*9 

296 

68,9l4U 

1,981 

1,279 

9,829 

755 

l,36li 

15,268 

1,288 

509 
1,601 

953 
6,385 
1,325 

79U 
3,570 
3,825 

690 
5,776 

275 
1,022 



386 

958 

38Ii 

19,588 

1,035 

U,81a 
328 

1,U60 

2,923 

608 

U23 

20,562 

2,777 

1,639 
785 
637 

1,115 
809 

2,275 

8,13U 
13,152 

2,710 
500 

1,721 
663 

1,273 

165 

500 

10,701 

315 

60,113 

1,069 
595 

7,926 
720 

1,27U 
10,666 
938 
371 
1*87 
656 

5,533 
1,192 

511 
1,71*0 
3,1*15 

1*57 
3,162 

222 
1,003 



697 
1,269 

556 

26,599 

1,863 

5,212 

U53 
1,865 
3,789 
1,11*8 

1*1*9 

20,758 

3,1*73 

2,372 

1,137 

757 
1,729 

989 

2,321 

8,7la 

15,1*89 

3,327 

1*1*1* 
3,032 

869 
2,199 

269 

633 
1U,531 

U52 

78,212 

1,11*9 

1,078 

12,11*5 

898 

1,775 

13,772 

1,091* 

537 

78U 

876 
8,la6 
1,U85 

681 
2,157 
1*,629 

663 
5,77U 

276 

1,697 



55U 

1,U05 

278 

2li,9l6 

8U8 

3,279 

270 

1,352 

U,U05 

709 

I*0U 

9,202 

1,818 

812 

672 

565 

1,000 

1,085 
1,367 

6,578 
10,351 

1,709 
303 

1,363 
U50 
li62 
186 
507 

7,916 

701 

1*2,712 

696 

356 

5,082 
565 

1,331* 

6,335 
90h 
31*0 
225 
568 
11*, 115 

1,390 
589 

1,228 

3,571 
U19 

2,093 
I7I* 

2,2la 



595 

1,610 

311 

28,667 

961 

U,273 

268 

l,liOU 

5,326 

691 

31*8 

11,669 

2,ll3 

938 

739 

62li 

1,198 

1,273 

1,875 

7,901 

11,328 

1,765 

322 

1,577 

lae 

582 

216 

666 

9,523 

1,32U 

1*8,757 

773 

391* 

6,266 

586 

1,281 

7,829 

951 

31*2 

2ia 

661 

27,700 

1,522 

558 
1,375 
3,308 

1*91 
2,li9l* 

196 
1^J17 



67 

11*5 

12 

2,616 

105 

50I1 

33 

1,71*3 

1,317 

92 

30 

1,000 

226 

iho 

Qh 

87 

362 

loU 

338 

891* 

880 

361* 

56 

180 

U8 

38 

27 

59 

1,027 

71 

9,519 

m 

38 

508 

89 

91 

777 

98 

U2 

2U 

81i 

622 

83 

86 
I81i 
377 

53 
252 

18 
1,890 



63 

121 

27 

2,531 

lOli 

31*1 

28 

2,051 

1,106 

115 

U2 

957 

228 

103 

71* 

65 

379 

156 

280 

956 

863 

200 

60 

126 

67 

32 

16 

82 

991 

61 

9,380 

90 

31 

l*61i 

78 

116 

71*2 

111 

33 

12 

115 

557 

60 

90 

188 

357 

50 

260 

11* 

1,201 



68 

129 

16 

1,926 

loU 

253 

lU 

1,8U3 

831 

62 

23 

667 

126 

86 

56 

63 

227 

70 

189 

659 

596 

163 

U7 

102 

38 

21 

26 

1*8 

711 

U9 

7,375 

70 

27 

331 

66 

119 
500 

85 

17 

1*1 

67 

810 

62 

58 

129 

2U3 

32 

175 
12 

2,1J|8 



72 

98 

28 

2,112 

120 

355 

31 

2,1*92 

985 

133 

1*1* 
901* 
122 
105 
108 

53 

232 

56 

285 

757 

537 

188 

90 

161* 

U2 

38 

26 

1*9 

900 

109 

8,887 

81* 

11* 

U65 

77 

98 

616 

101 

26 

25 

61 

680 

87 

66 

172 

23U 

35 

152 

23 

1,115 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalisation Service 



TABLE 12A. IMMIC21ANT ALIENS ADMITTED, BY RURAL AND URBAN AREA AND CITY 1/: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1950 TO 195U 



Class of place and city 



1950 



1951 



1952 



1953 



195U 



Total 



Rural 



Urban 



City total ....... .^...».. 

Los Angeles, Calif 

Oakland, Calif 

San Diego, Calif 

San Francisco, Calif 

Bridgeport, Conn. 

Hartford, Conn 

Washington, D. C 

Miami, Fla 

Tanpa, Fla 

Chicago, 111 

New Orleans, La » 

Baltimore, Md. ...»«....• 

Boston, Mass 

Cambridge, Mass 

Detroit, Mich 

Minneapolis , Minn 

St. Louis, Mo 

Jersey City, N. J 

Newark, N. J 

Paterson, N. J .* 

Buffalo, N. Y 

New York, N. Y 

Rochester, N. Y 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Portland, Ore 

Philadelphia, Pa , 

Pittsbiirgh, Pa 

Providence, R. I. ..«.»•*• 

Houston, Tex 

San Antonio, Tex 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

Seattle, Wash 

Milwaukee, Wis. ...».»» 

Other cities .»...».... 

U. S. territories and possessions ... 
All other 



2119.187 



U7.066 



66,157 



13h,^0h 



T33" 

662 

628 

3,59h 

k$h 

l,12li 

1,670 

1,279 

273 

13,152 

668 

2,151 
2,16J^ 

519 
7,128 

1M9 

1,127 

752 

l,6h7 
560 

l,l48l 

50,779 

l,lii3 

682 

3,331 

676 

S,2h2 

1,369 

B9^ 

667 

630 

82ii 

1,565 

1,558 

17,698 

8i;8 
612 



205.717 



265.520 



170. U3U 



27.67I1 



3ii,936 



21.297 



55,8U8 



7l,95U 



52,219 



120jiiO 
U,7li6 

623 

553 
ii,289 

3U5 
1,071 
l,ii6o 
1,237 

221 
U4,ii6l 

586 
1,107 
1,927 

li03 
7,709 

891 

686 

716 
1,339 

316 

1,669 

ii5,650 

1,022 

507 
3,0U8 

609 
i;,062 
l,OUii 

i;20 

5il5 

569 

816 

1,676 

983 
13,h3h 

899 
5S6 



15U.999 



87^83 
682 
755 

3,920 

U71 

808 
1,865 
1,358 

300 
2k,399 

8U0 
1,059 
2,277 

331 
8,539 

891 
1,386 

989 
l,li;6 

51U 
2,686 

^9,333 

l,08Ii 

853 

U,i;37 

8lii 

5,U53 

1,U07 

i;76 

700 

853 

899 

2,088 

2,19U 

20,609 

l,3i+8 
2,283 



93. 915 



7,078 
663 
765 

3,73ii 
25U 
550 

1,352 

1,77U 
3^9 

6,366 
656 
718 

l,Shl 
3Ul 

6,112 

587 
566 
381 
71^3 
3h9 

1,62U 

31,72ii 

696 

U12 

1,U57 
71U 

2,2140 
6U7 
358 
772 

1,123 
919 

1,591 

731 

111, 018 

1,328 
1,675 



208.177 



2li.387 



66,926 



llU.188 



8,272 
763 
Qlh 

h,Uh3 
36U 
Q3h 

l,i;OU 

2,U83 
Uoli 

8,288 
1467 

1,132 

2,227 
362 

6,171 
613 
586 
ii52 

1,277 
U51 

1,987 

35,612 

782 

509 

1,979 
622 

2,989 
79U 
I426 
821 

1,863 

1,087 

l,ii80 

1,011 
20,U19 

1,561 
615 



1/ Rural - Population of less than 2,500. Urban 
Cities - Population of 100,000 or over. 



- Population of 2,500 to 99,999. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



Covintry or region 

of last or future 

residenca 



TABLE 13. nacr GRANT ALIENS ADMITTED AHD EKrCRANT AETBNS DEPARTED, BI 
COUNTHI OR REGION OF LAST OR INTENDED FOTDRE PERMANENT RESIDENCE: 

TEARS ENDED JUNE 30 » 19^0 TO 19gl 



IMMIGRANT 



1950 I 1951 1952 1953 I 195U 



EMIGRANT 



1950 



1951 



1952 



1953 



195r 



All countries..., 

Europe................ 

Austria* ............ 

Belgium , 

Bulgaria. 

Csechoslovakia. ,..., 
Denmark............. 

Estonia. 

Finland 

France .............. 

Germany. ........ . ... 

Greece 

Hungary. 

Ireland. 

Italy 

Latvia. 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain •...« 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

(England..., 

United (N. Ireland, 

Kingdom(Scotland. . , 

(Wales 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia. 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Israel 

Japan 

Palestine ., 

Philippines , , 

Other Asia 

North America. ........ 

Canada 

Ifexico 

West Indies 

Central America 

Other No. America... 

South Amezdca......... 

Africa 

Australia & N.Zealand. 
Other countries , 



219,187 



205,717 



265,520 



170,U3U 



208,177 



27,598 



26,17U 



21,880 



199,115 



1,129 

13 

9U6 

1,09U 

U 

5o6 

U,U30 

128,592 

1,179 

190 

U,837 

l2,li5U 

5 

5 

3,080 

2,262 

696 

1,106 

155 

383 

2,183 

l,85l4 

10,191 

1,005 

2,299 

265 

6 

189 

1,290 

U,508 

1,280 

121 
378 
100 
168 
729 
1,732 

UP, 899 
"21,885 
6,710; 
6,206 
2,169 
3,895 

3,281* 

81i9 

1*60 

72 



Ili9,5l5 

1,802 

1 

88 

1,076 

532 

U,573 

87,755 

l,U59 

62 

2,592 

8,958 

5 

8 

3,062 

2,289 

98 

1,078 

loU 

UU2 

2,022 

l,li85 

12,393 

552 
2,309 

196 
10 

16h 
1,379 

7,lli9 

109 
968 
271 
I6I4 
3,228 
2,07U 

1;U,030 
25,880 
6,153 
5,902 
2,011 
U,08U 

3,596 

81i5 

U90 

62 



193,626 



2,9U6 

9 

51 

1,152 

7 

500 

U,878 

10U,236 

6,996 

63 

2,775 

11,3U2 

10 

20 

3,060 

2,35U 

235 

953 

3ii 

U8l 

1,778 

1,502 

18,539 

751 

3,390 

2li8 

11 

327 

1,890 

9,328 
26:5 
123 
1*85 

3,8lli 
3U 

1,179 

3,U30 

56,U58 

9,079 
6,672 
2,637 
U,716 

U,591 

931 

5U5 

Ul 



82,352 



2,162 

1 

77 

993 

38 

U73 

li,137 

27,329 

1,296 

96 

3,393 

8,132 

59 

11; 

2,973 

2,231; 

136 

1,077 

23 

811; 

2,171 

1,796 

12,921 

911 

3,l;l6 

302 

25 

580 

2,3la 

8,231 



T2E 
lOh 
l,3lii; 
2,579 
32 
1,071; 
2,570 

72,139 



92,121 

2,263 

27 

1,010 

5 

1;,263 

33,098 

1,15U 

30 

3,685 

13,iU5 

6 

5 

3,595 

2,ll;2 

67 

i,l;55 

7 

51;2 

2,172 

1,673 

12,977 

970 

3,1;1;2 

253 

11 

680 

860 

9,970 



12,6U2 



17,183 

8,628 
3,016 
7,029 

5,511 
989 
7l;2 
1;70 



^5ir 

lU; 
1,778 
3,8U6 
39 
1,231; 
2,675 

89,012 



IE 
237 

15 

97 

350 

1 

160 

1,125 

1,309 

588 

27 

372 

1,636 



379 
677 
106 
228 
8 
218 
1;83 
3l;2 
2,919 
189 
IM 

72 
157 

71; 
330 

3,311 



11,1;77 



30,61;5 
8,lAl 
3,300 

11,783 

6,575 

l,2i;8 

81;5 

8,1;06 



1;20 
2liO 
315 
101 
1,181 
626 

7,636 



"HT 
156 
2 

38 

336 

2 

138 

1,019 

1,101 

371; 

30 

539 

1,1;1;0 

3 
301; 
576 

72 
188 
5 
227 
U5i 
311 
2,882 
173 
1;65 

78 
lUo 

61; 
276 



li529 



9,691 



1,257 

3,190 

851 

71 

2,873 
1;33 
U59 
2Wi 



TIE 
31U 
250 
282 
28 
627 
652 

8,199 



IT? 

192 

5 

28 

350 

1 

111; 

1,172 

1,028 

U35 

lit 

229 

1,281 

3 

1 

327 

553 

68 

183 

2 

225 

33U 

3ia 

l,88h 
71 

258 
35 

ll;3 
77 

225 



lipla 



12,557 



"575S? 

l,ll;9 

2,897 

816 

135 

2,817 
393 
197 
26" 



223 
210 
228 
506 
53 
521 
700 

6,722 



155' 

310 

6 

25 

1;27 

3 

130 

1,1;81; 

1,1;91 

621 

23 

367 

1,358 

2 

1;39 
571 

71 
199 
8 
291 
376 
380 
2,736 

56 
3l;5 

1;8 
213 
158 
281; 



li757 



ll;,192 

311 
7 

108 

1;70 

hh 

158 



X7S6 
988 

2,227 
576 
171 

1,981; 
317 
156 
269 



237 
267 
701 
1;3 
598 
756 

5,957 



X9^ 

988 

2,383 

633 

28 

2,180 
363 
352 
90 



United States Department oi Justice 
]jnmigration and Naturalization Servica 



TABLE 13 A. IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED, BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH: 
YEARS ENDED JTJNE 30. 1%5 TO 1954 



Country or region 
of birth 



19/»5 



1946 



1947 



1948 



1949 



1950 



1951 



1952 



1953 



1954 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria l/ 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 1/ 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

RumaLnia 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

United ( England .... 
Kingdom( No . Ireland , 

(Scotland... 

(Vfales 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Israel 2/ 

Japan 

Palestine 2/ 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North America ,. 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Cent rail America 

Other No. America... 

South America 

Africa 

Australia & N.Zealand. 
Other countries 



38.119 



108.721 



147.292 



170.570 



188.317 



249.187 



205.717 



265.520 



170.4 2 ^ 



208.177 



10. lU 



64.877 



92 

11 

289 

108 

19 

58 

207 

1,260 

235 

132 

286 

320 

50 

86 

111 

114 

1,222 

562 

234 

238 

67 

70 

2,627 

340 

515 

100 

399 

184 

205 

?7? 



989 

1,770 

36 

1,075 

291 

136 

197 

5,000 

4,010 

578 

577 

1,387 

3,886 

206 

244 

610 

379 

4,806 

554 

425 

402 

327 

282 

28,763 

1,584 

2,472 

1,495 

1,110 

676 

610 

1.921 



96.865 



1,997 

2,208 

128 

3,601 

1,166 

184 

689 

5,808 

U,674 

2,056 

1,277 

2,446 

U,557 

340 

554 

2,607 

2,316 

8,156 

636 

558 

302 

1,252 

978 

17,889 

1,328 

3,757 

1,071 

2,240 

1,117 

973 

4.098 



11?.7?0 



109 
95 

3 

52 

15 

301 

24.229 



9,379 
6,455 
4,660 
3,395 
340 

1,326 

267 

1,535 

46 



337 
407 

17 
193 
293 
674 

33.125 



18,627 

6,805 

4,876 

2,171 

646 

1,755 

1,098 

5,746 

199 



1,407 
375 

82 

363 

739 

1,132 

40.295 



2,782 

1,757 

132 

3,865 

1,328 

225 

693 

4,697 

21,365 

1,964 

1,471 

7,651 

15,801 

427 

631 

3,739 

2,687 

8,020 

890 

770 

509 

2,022 

1,426 

17,484 

1,940 

5,436 

954 

2,317 

1,190 

1,577 

7.626 



138.301 



22,008 

7,775 

6,299 

3,470 

743 

2,421 
849 

2,532 
232 



3,987 
239 

371 

376 

1,122 

1,531 

42.270 



2,363 
1,592 
84 
4,393 
1,305 
1,840 
704 
3,972 

23,844 
1,759 
1,998 
8,585 

11,157 
3,853 
6,691 
3,200 
2,563 

23,744 
1,235 
1,043 
503 
2,433 
1,585 

13,589 
2,425 
4,805 
656 
3,907 
1,384 
1,089 

6.355 



206.547 



22,612 
8,730 
6,994 
2,884 
1,050 

2,768 
840 

1,110 
206 



2,823 
166 

508 

234 

1,068 

1,556 

39.469 



3,182 
1,108 
190 
5,528 
1,234 
5,422 
645 
3,519 

31,225 
1,242 
5,098 
6,501 
9,839 

17,494 

11,870 
3,148 
2,379 

52,851 
1,075 
3,599 
463 
1,892 
1,728 
8,812 
1,249 
2,983 
393 

10,971 
9,154 
1,753 

^•615 



161.177 



202. 8BI 



21,515 

7,977 

6,518 

2,493 

966 

2,639 
737 
602 
21U 



1,494 
153 
110 
76 
212 
595 

1,975 

34.004 



2,777 
1,238 
231 
3,863 
1,217 
2,073 
646 
3,337 

26,369 
4,447 
4,922 
3,739 
7,348 

10,588 
4,028 
3,170 
2,378 

37,484 

1,048 

2,351 

510 

1,427 

1,408 

8,333 

840 

2,950 

368 

11,953 
8,254 
1,880 

?.166 



18,043 

6,8U 

6,093 

2,151 

876 

2,777 
689 
443 
112 



1,821 
134 
261 
198 
210 
760 

1,782 

35.482 



20,809 

6,372 

5,553 

1,970 

778 

2,724 

700 

390 

78 



5,976 
1,539 
279 
5,0U 
1,345 
1,248 
585 
3,454 

50,283 
7,084 
6,850 
3,796 
9,306 
4,459 
3,044 
3,143 
2,481 

33,211 
1,013 
4,915 
536 
1,478 
1,569 

12,054 

1,031 

4,052 

494 

12,697 

17,223 
2,698 

9.428 



96.177 



1,421 
153 
206 

4,517 
156 

1,066 

1,909 

48.092 



28,141 

9,600 

6,723 

2,642 

986 

3,902 
740 

a6 

58 



1,862 

1,335 

67 

2,173 

1,278 

158 

614 

3,216 

27,305 

1,603 

803 

4,655 

9,701 

294 

314 

3,042 

2,427 

4,395 

1,141 

468 

991 

1,750 

1,794 

12,872 

1,240 

4,540 

578 

1,780 

1,272 

2,509 

8.029 



111.227 



17536 
155 
421 

2,393 
118 

1,160 

2,246 

60.107 



28,967 

18,454 

8,875 

3,056 

755 

4,6yl 

922 

450 

58 



2,072 

1,424 

78 

2,235 

1,322 

228 

681 

3,277 

32,935 

2,127 

1,163 

5,232 

15,201 

296 

401 

3,769 

2,420 

5,663 

1,636 

666 

964 

1,811 

1,686 

12,923 

1,306 

4,541 

539 

1,985 

1,432 

1,214 

11.751 



2,770 
308 
515 

3,777 
165 

1,633 

2,583 

77.772 



27,055 

37,456 

8,999 

3,488 

774 

5,523 

1,187 

605 

112 



1/ In 1945 Austria was included with Germany. 

2/ Israel is included in Palestine prior to 1950. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABUB 


lU. EMKFAin' AT.TENS DEPARTED, BI RACE, 


.<3a,AND AGEt 










TEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 195U 










Sax and age 


Number 
de- 


Ihita 


Chinese 


East 
Indian 


Fili- 
pino 


Japa- 
nese 


Kor- 
ean 


Negro 


Pacific 
Is- 




parted 








r 








lander 


Number departed 


30|^ 


26,780 


733 


U9U 


9U6 


1,179 


91 


Uo6 


36 


Uale 


16,520 


1U,057 


513 


387 


593 


6UU 


59 


252 


15 


Under $ yeara 


355 


333 


11 


1 


5 


6 


- 


1 


- 


5-9 


571 


5U7 


8 


5 


6 


3 


- 


2 


. 


10-lU " 


UlU 


380 


16 


U 


9 


- 


1 


3 


1 


15 


93 


88 


2 


«• 


2 


1 


- 




. 


16-17 " 


200 


186 


u 


- 


7 


3 


-. 


. 




18-19 « 


338 


319 


u 


1 


U 


U 


1 


5 


. 


20-2U " 


2,792 


2,573 


U9 


63 


U7 


37 


7 


15 


1 


25-29 " 


3,173 


2,683 


89 


138 


88 


87 


10 


71 


7 


30-3U " 


2,28U 


1,872 


8U 


75 


90 


8U 


15 


62 


2 


35-39 " 


1,386 


1,11U 


7U 


U2 


U8 


56 


9 


U3 


. 


Uo-UU " 


1,063 


860 


h9 


18 


75 


39 


3 


19 


. 


U5-U9 " 


792 


625 


Ul 


11 


71 


27 


U 


12 


1 


50-5U •• 


566 


U6l 


30 


7 


37 


22 


2 


6 


1 


55-59 


U5U 


380 


13 


2 


32 


18 


3 


6 


- 


60-6U " 


39U 


325 


15 


2 


19 


29 


1 


3 


- 


65-69 


513 


385 


11 


3 


2U 


88 


1 


1 


- 


70-7U " 


292 


22U 


5 


1 


U 


57 


1 


- 


- 


75-79 " 


165 


127 


2! 


- 


2 


32 


1 


- 


1 


80 yrs, and owr... 


86 


72 


1 


1 


- 


12 


- 


- 


- 


TTnlmnwn. ........... 


589 
lU,lii5 


503 
12.723 


5 

220 


13 
107 


25 
353 


39 
535 


32 


3 

15U 


1 


Femal* 


21 


Under 5 years...... 


358 


m 


1 


8 


3 


11 


> 


2 


2 


5-9 


U79 


U52 


5 


5 


8 


U 


- 


3 


2 


10-lli •• 


U62 


U36 


5 


5 


8 


U 


- 


U 


. 


15 


63 


61 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


16-17 " 


233 


22U 


U 


- 


U 


tm 


1 


- 


- 


18-19 " 


377 


350 


10 


1 


11 


2 


- 


3 


> 


20-2li " 


1,6U9 


l,Ul6 


U9 


lU 


U8 


91 


7 


21 


3 


25-29 " 


2,292 


1,968 


U7 


26 


79 


138 


6 


2U 


U 


30-3li " 


1,8U9 


1,631 


30 


22 


75 


59 


7 


20 


5 


35-39 


1,213 


1,085 


26 


9 


U5 


28 


3 


15 


2 


Uo-UU " 


97U 


903 


17 


9 


15 


16 


1 


12 


1 


U5-U9 » 


710 


659 


10 


5 


lU 


10 


2 


9 


1 


50-5U 


637 


580 


7 


1 


16 


18 


1 


lU 


- 


55-59 


625 


578 


3 


. 


6 


3U 


- 


U 


- 


60-6U " 


507 


U59 


2 


. 


U 


3U 


1 


7 


- 


65-69 " 


5UU 


500 


1 


- 


7 


30 


> 


6 


- 


70-7U " 


358 


332 


. 


- 


3 


17 


1 


U 


1 


75-79 » 


226 


212 


- 


. 


1 


12 


- 


1 


«> 


80 yrs. and over..* 


1U6 


1U2 


. 


- 


. 


3 


- 


1 


- 


UnknoTO. ........... 


UU3 


UOU 


3 


2 


6 


23 


2 


3 


. 







United States Depariaient of Justice 
Imnd. gratlon and Naturalixation Seirvice 



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I K> 1-4 vi> CTivo as r—^ rn I 



rH o "~» t^ r- r»^vD eo ^ i cm 

rH rH rH r^CM t^A CM r^ 



r-vo to ^ l«-\V£) J- to KS O CM 
t<-^tOCM KVrHr«^rHI^«OCMCM 
rH^ J- CM CO rH 



K> I ITS KMTV KMTv rH I--J* ^ 
irMr> ITV CM rH 



I I i-IJt 



I rH rH I 



I I rH ^ l^h- CM J- CM I I 



ITv to r<~v ITV I — V^ CM O rH f^VO 

tMcnovcr^toifiCM 



r<^cr>r^K\tocMCT>crvrH^CM 

KVf^CM r-t I-i •-* 



to 

CM 



^ VD r—KNVO r^^ to rH I I 
ffVCM rH 



to KMfvto^ f^CTi r<^o cu^ to 

rH CM ^ J- 10 VO CM I^V* rH r^ 

CM to 



rH VD VO VO rH ^ O ^ I i-t I 
^Or'^rH rH 



ir>rH irMTvo irvo r— r~v£> <t> if> 

ir\ r-^ VD r— irv CM o ir> to to ^ 

K^ ir\ o CTiVD to o cr> J- ir> r-t 

rTlTvrOrH rH ^ 



CMCMvDCMr--ir»r«-vrHOl^'^ 
CM VD KV CM CM r<-\ CM 



rHr—CMOintOrHr-l^rOrH 
rH r^ CM rH rH 



tOVDO^VDrHCTMOrHrOCM 
r^ CM irvO O O "-I rH rH CM 
C\J r-t r-< r-i r-t fi 



rH r^ r-t fOVD tO rH 1^ ITv | I 
CJ r-t r-t r^ 



WavlfVrHCMJ-CMrHj-VDr^ 

irv t^ K\^ vD to VD in to ^ ^ 

r^J* rH(r>OVDCMOirvrHJ 
rH f^ 1^ rH rH rH 



« 

IH 

01 

e 



s^ s 

rH CM r<-v^ invD r- •> S 
• I I I I I I i I >»S 

rH a OOOpOOOOfl 

3 6 irv rH c3 ro5 irvvD t^ w p 



4 r « c 



E -d 

3 






• fe 



Si 



irv o> <Tv cr> cr> crv cTv cr> (Ti • g 
ri CM »^^ irvvD r-- ■ J 

rH Sill 

"^^ CM f'Si 



I I K 



go ooo<?oooo3 
p irv ^ CM f^3 irvvD f- to P 



TABLE 16. NONIMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED, BY CLASSES UNDER THE IMMIGRATION UWS 
AND COUNTRY OR REGION OFBIRTH: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1954 



Country or region 
of birth 



Number 

ad- 
mitted 



13 



u 
o 

U m 
U O 



ID -H 

> <H 

O «-i 

to o 



§0) m 
•rl a 
6-" > ^ 



(4 

o 

E? to © 

n) L< Li 

tH o 9 

o +> m 

Q.-H nj 

e m v 

0) -H rH 



Li i 



0) 
Li 0) 

■a 3 
fl) -p 
u m 

■P D 

^1 
<D -O 



73 

CO 



(1) 

rH > 

nJ -H 
C +J 
o n) 

•H 4J 
+> C 
nJ 0) 

Em 
ID 
<D Li 
■P Q, 

5 2 



.1^ 

Li <0 

ttf en ID 

Li Li ID 
O 0) C 

S Li cd 
S p Li 
El S *> 



« 

Ha 

9 0) 
n Li 

a) o 

Li<H 

a 
aj o 



no 
j: ID 

o -H 



ID 
Li <n 

v <n 
x: to 
•p .-I 
O o 



All countries. 



Europe. 

Austria. 

Belgium^ 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia. ........ 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France, , 

Germany. .«.....<>....... 

Greece ........o. •«»•»»« 

Hungary. ...^...o. ...... 

ireXanu ..oo.es.g.o....* 

Italy...... 

Latvia 

Lithuania •.....•....«.. 

Netherlands. ........... 

Norway. .e.............. 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain........... 

Sweden................. 

Switzerland ............ 

(England....... 

United (No, Ireland... 
Kingdom(Scotland. . .... 

(Wales 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe , 



Asia 

China 

India 

Israel ......i> 

Japan 

Palestine 

Philippines 

v./oner as j^a ..o,.,,.,... 



North America 

Canada 

Mexico,..,. , 

West Indies...... 

Central America., 
Other North America, 



o o , o , . 



South America,,,..., 

Africa, , 

Australia & New Zealand,. 
Other countries..,,,,,... 



?66.61? 



23.095 



61.029 



292.725 



78.526 



1.023 



2S^2^ 



5.601 



7.479 



504 



15.260 



55,887 



241.146 



4,196 
5,311 
140 
3,047 
6,888 
695 
2,176 

18,517 

25,373 
4,014 
3,123 
6,083 

19,422 

834 

1,417 

12,918 
7,145 

10,394 
1,527 
2,606 

11,588 
7,427 
7,244 

52,736 
2,779 

12,861 
1,8a 
3,801 
1,707 
3,336 

32.671 



7.876 



4,275 
3,112 
1,206 
8,027 
606 
4,786 
10,659 

223 .862 



IS 
378 
4 

79 

149 

6 

58 
984 
456 
288 

56 

57 
801 
6 
8 
233 
223 
163 
251 

48 

491 

308 

137 

1,585 

20 
142 

58 
144 
396 
261 

3 .6?0 



36.853 



694 

868 

28 

548 

597 

45 

184 

3,171 

4,709 

793 

503 

361 

1,742 

97 

159 

2,268 

529 

1,676 

130 

476 

1,342 

1,249 

1,527 

10,599 

159 

1,165 

243 

458 

116 

a? 

4.617 



99.722 



539 
211 

87 
420 

10 

551 

1,812 

5.032 



392 

482 

84 

2,051 
107 
446 

1,055 

12.262 



1,932 
2,118 
47 
1,593 
3,045 

455 

809 
6,879 
10,572 
1,379 
1,889 
1,867 
8,602 

550 
1,019 
5,463 
2,132 
6,134 

366 
1,583 
5,730 
3,417 
3,258 
18,377 

997 
4,761 

763 
2,245 

670 
1,070 

7.387 



44.791 



642 



2.531 



400 

786 

17 

186 

1,571 

75 

615 

2,405 

2,089 

453 

212 

1,153 

4,361 

71 

84 

2,735 

2,545 

845 

264 

185 

2,809 

825 

898 

11,700 

1,191 

4,547 

451 

370 

183 

765 

3.939 



12 

16 



17 
2 
8 
3 
9 

22 
2 
4 

69 
3 

■« 

2 

35 

12 
1 
9 

23 
1 

83 

241 

8 

34 
7 
4 
2 

13 

250 



835 
710 
621 
855 
283 
1,137 
2,946 

148.522 



29, a7 
76,2U 
98,175 
16,610 
3,U6 

47,410 
4,285 
9,711 
7,528 



569 

1,879 

1,645 

801 

138 

3,879 
305 
440 

1,933 



764 

3,174 

7,033 

979 

312 

3,303 
765 

2,626 
603 



1,518 
377 
136 
714 
55 
162 
977 

23.021 



TS 

4 

209 

1 
20 

40 



T4 

64 

4 

53 

19 

15 

28 

208 

266 

253 

62 

11 

159 

7 

19 

168 

139 

110 

25 

49 

224 

37 

52 

239 

12 

38 

7 

31 

27 

141 

3.914 



2.600 



2.475 



34 
123 

2 
61 
77 

1 

15 

623 

76 

49 

9 

29 
71 

5 

210 

92 

63 

3 

3 

55 

110 
75 

504 
13 
63 
13 

132 
36 
53 

703 



399 
498 
152 
507 
98 
549 
1,711 

14.848 



11,431 
59,314 
65,408 
10,170 
2,199 

29,163 
1,646 
3,551 
2,734 



7,252 

5,767 

8,744 

913 

345 

3,063 

438 

1,918 

1,356 



7 
5 
18 
7 
3 

64 

13 

4 

10 



■4793? 
4,429 
3,670 
1,719 
94 

3,593 

301 

83 

155 



172 
14 
31 

1 

82 

287 

867 



125^ 
43 
3 
91 
73 
62 
81 

260 

441 
57 
39 
42 

160 

5 

5 

48 

25 

31 

6 

U 

215 
64 
43 

382 
6 
92 
12 
26 
6 
17 

809 



290 



8.260 



35.092 



3 

1 
3 
5 

1 
21 
18 

4 

5 
21 



14 
7 
6 

1 
2 
4 
2 
139 

8 
2 

6 

1 
16 

73 



217 
161 
275 
171 
43 

794 
137 
165 
335 



31 

15 

8 

367 

321 

67 

3.795 



T7585 
524 

1,480 
81 
25 

186 
68 
90 
56 



2 
4 

59 

1 
7 

102 



8 
52 

39 
2 

1 

16 
4 

17 
2 



324 

174 

7 

44 

610 

5 

152 

912 

2,437 

225 

21 

53 

602 

11 

9 

339 

319 

97 

42 

27 

118 

311 

123 

797 

42 

137 

52 

32 

19 

219 

3.433 



278 
556 

48 
466 

18 

737 

1,350 

1.923 



786 
529 
331 
240 
37 

1,025 

294 

239 

86 



524 

738 

27 

389 

72J; 

29 

225 

3,051 

4,298 

491 

330 

2,501 

2,830 

84 

109 

1,438 

1,099 

1,256 

439 

211 

579 

1,099 

1,046 

8,171 

330 

1,874 

233 

352 

251 

364 

3.910 



lU 
103 

56 
2,347 

34 
799 
427 

13.414 



17750 

ao 

9,528 

1,526 

190 

2,324 
314 
578 
255 



Does not include 7,946 agricultural laborers admitted 
under Section 101(a) (15) (H), Immigration and 
Nationality Act. 



United States Department of Justice 
Lnnigration and Naturalization Service 



I 



TABLE 17. MOKBeaGBANT ALIQIS ADMITTED, BI CLASSES UHDEK THE DMiaRATION UNS 
AND COUNTKr OR REGION OF LAST PERMANBIT RESIDEHCE: TEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1954 



Covntrj or raglon 

of last perman«nt 

realdenca 



Number 

ad- 
mlttod 



as*' 

^ C u 

o e 'H 

(< ^ «-( 

o o vi 

b. M o 



^ 



n m 



u 
b o » 

a « g 
I- V XI 



2| 

I O 7 

4} « 



•H a 

an 



■o o 
tl « 



g 

P 

CO 






a 

9 
b 



d □ 

c -H 
» « 

• o 

a 

u o 



a c! 

X! O 
O -H 



I a 

^ s 



v< n 

c a 



All countries. 



Europe • .< 

Austria • 

Belglua 

Bulgaria 

Csechoslovakia • , , 

Deimarlc. 

Estonia 

rinland 

France 

Germany 

Greece ■ 

Hungary , 

Ireland 

Italy 

LatTia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands ■ 

Norway < 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rofflanla 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

(England 

United (No. Ireland., 
KlngdoB( Scotland . . . . , 

(Wales 

U.S.S.R 

Tugoslavla ., 

Other Europe 



Asia 

China 

India 

Israel 

Japan 

Palestine... 
Philippines. 
Other Asia.. 



North America « 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Central America 

Other North America... 



South America. . . 

Africa 

Australia & New 
Other countries, 



Zealand. 



566.613 



2?.0?? 



61.029 



292.725 



78,?26 



1-023 



2^M1 



5-601 



7.^7? 



iO^ 



15.260 



??.887 



l?6.it?? 



3,302 

10 

159 

3,455 

27 

1,288 

13,305 

14,128 

2,246 

85 

2,118 

9,020 

19 

15 

7,101 

5,137 

264 

950 

57 

3,357 

5,614 

5,222 

42,782 

2,131 

8,625 

886 

350 

577 

2,791 

26.??? 



1,145 
2,107 
3,249 
5,780 
170 
4,194 
9,7U 

328.984 



73,263 
85,991 
102,598 
16,840 
50,292 

58,583 
4,255 

10,423 
1,550 



7.7?1 



49 

389 

3 

61 

U2 

3 

54 

1,025 

375 

293 

W 

33 

809 

2 

257 
252 
102 
280 

36 

436 

322 

139 

1,848 

2 

18 

8 

138 

396 

276 

3.?85 



506 
148 
192 
450 
27 
541 
2,121 

6.202 



28.241 

20? 

837 

1 

1 

444 

3 

136 

2,959 

3,502 

561 

8 

235 

1,496 

1 

1,914 

440 

6 

99 

3 

407 

1,234 

1,432 

11,153 

118 

638 

108 

3 

16 
280 

4.?27 



49.812 



511 

1,186 

2 

13 

1,610 

15 

475 

4,3U 

5,475 

489 

8 

852 

2,172 

10 

3 

2,607 

1,5U 

20 

226 

10 

875 

2,858 

2,255 

16,611 

852 

3,630 

478 

26 

64 

621 

5.653 



31.525 



1,139 

2,268 

1,884 

893 

18 

4,307 
273 
427 
110 



42 

320 

524 

2,158 

21 
556 
706 

18 .^?2 



S 



12< 

405 

3 

15 

429 

2 

335 

2,443 

952 

268 

2 

767 

3,181 

2 

3 

1,436 

2,138 

26 

229 

1 

1,265 

548 

690 

9,761 

1,083 

3,987 

229 

63 

45 

1,091 

2.792 



J2i 



334 
1,830 

756 

75 

1,201 

1,397 

194.094 



70 
138 
230 
362 
15 
121 
1,856 

35.754 



5 
20 



21 

7 

1 

16 

3 

77 



a 



19 
2 

90 

249 

3 

U 
2 



_2Jtl 



1-562 



29 
40 



13 

25 

152 
183 
240 

2 
100 



110 
137 

15 

65 

40 

69 

150 

15 

U 

6 

1 

5 

151 

? i811 



2.604 



17 
115 

ui 

68 

10 

653 

35 

42 

16 
110 



194 

81 

49 

5 

17 

96 

253 

546 

6 

31 

5 

107 

35 

65 

662 



2.017 



122 
32 

1 

64 
1 

74 

291 

445 

56 

1 

23 

145 



47 
20 

8 

111 

64 

54 

405 

1 

43 

3 

1 

3 

2 



287 



8.1L4 



3,532 
4,234 
9,367 
1,297 
22 

5,8U 
957 

3,100 
138 



43,004 
65,698 
74,124 
11,168 
100 

36,610 

1,912 

3,893 

751 



16,300 
7,654 

10,7a 

1,021 

38 

5,434 
326 

2,354 
3U 



1 

4 

223 

1 
12 



42 
9 

46 
9 
7 

81 
5 
5 
3 



162 
491 
199 
554 
13 
572 
1,820 

iii6ltl 



5,481 
4,590 
3,816 
1,751 
5 

3,938 

296 

84 

91 



"53 

148 

28 

32 

4 

82 

305 

1.219 



438 
213 
352 
198 
18 

847 

110 

131 

28 



781 
6 
7 

76 

313 

3 

318 

58 

Ju222 



1 
29 
14 

1 

4 
27 



12 
7 



1 

3 

3 

161 



18 



Jl. 



1 

4 

5 

58 

1 
1 
5 

110 



2,163 

600 

1,528 

80 

1 

213 

36 

52 

8 



13 

80 

15 

2 



15 
2 

u 

1 



307 
180 



609 
2 

146 

937 

2,417 

223 

1 

42 

599 



371 
325 

42 

101 
327 
132 
921 

35 
130 

31 

1 

2 

233 

3.W 



3.920 



225 
487 
132 
495 
11 
743 
1,340 

1x1^ 



1,005 

565 

330 

244 

3 

1,062 
264 
239 

1 



96 

1 

20 

51 

1 

25 

501 

728 

57 

22 

Ul 

298 

6 

7 

153 

152 

61 

46 

7 

60 

119 

105 

975 

16 

120 

16 

10 

11 

49 

562 



9 
29 
28 

348 

58 

90 

?0.867 



142 

80 

392 

176 

50,077 

262 
74 

124 
78 



Does not include 7,946 agricultural laborers admitted under 
Section 101(a) (15) (H), lasnigration and Nationality Act. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalisation Serrice 



TABLE 18. NOMIBKIGRAHT ALIENS ADMITTED AND NONEHIGRAKT ALIENS DEPARTED, 
BY COUNTBT OR BBGION OP LAST OR INTENDED FUTURE PERMANENT BESIDENCE: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30« 1950 TO 1954 



Countiy or region 
of last or future 
residence 



NONIMMIGRANT 



1950 



1951 



1952 



J2^ 



J25L 



NONEMIGRANT 



1950 



J^5L 



1952 



im. 



22^ 



All countries . . <, 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgium. 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia. .... 

Dcnmai^c 

Estonia 

Finland • 

France 

German/. ..........o 

Greece. ........ .... 

Hungary. ........... 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Norway. 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania.... 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland ........ 

(England.... 
United (No. Ireland 
Singdam( Scotland. . . 

\ Wales ...... 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 



Asia 

China 

India 

Israel 

Japan. 

Palestine . . , 
Philippines . 
Other Asia,. 



North America........ 

Canada 

Mexico..... 

West Indies........ 

Central America.... 

Other No. America.. 

South America 

Africa 

Australia & N. Zeal.. 
Other countries...... 



426.837 



465.106 



516.082 



'tg^.TH 



566.613 



429.091 



446.727 



487.617 



520.246 



568.496 



97.186 



928 

2,450 

15 

227 

3,532 

18 

833 

10,433 

4,091 

1,5a 

66 

1,229 

7,050 

6 

8 

5,405 

4,576 

411 

1,091 

35 

2,610 

4,598 

3,673 

33,695 

858 

4,648 

718 

472 

290 

1,679 

17«Q40 



104.963 



1,959 
1,890 
3,008 
1,498 
436 
2,517 
6,532 

261.836 



926 

3,254 
9 

97 

3,974 

17 

975 

13,197 

6,022 

3,643 

79 

1,072 

5,389 

24 

5 

7,6a 

4,717 

217 

915 

50 

2,190 

4,289 

3,926 

33,382 

732 

4,550 

606 

427 

285 

2,353 

19.529 



97,084 
30,735 
85,035 
11,207 
37,775 

40,094 

3,320 

5,737 

824 



7S3 
1,506 
2,945 
3,580 

362 
2,728 
7,645 

281.201 



121.902 

1,380 

4,575 

9 

155 

4,227 

10 

1,165 

U,930 

9,965 

1,840 

75 

1,391 

6,240 

7 

15 

8,122 

5,322 

296 

888 

45 

2,623 

4,446 

4,467 

38,827 

780 

6,291 

730 

358 

420 

2,303 

23.638 



124.369 



T;659 

3,547 

3 

131 

3,951 

19 

1,182 

15,252 

11,328 

2,029 

55 

1,499 

6,490 

6 

5 

7,693 

5,258 

198 

974 

38 

3,430 

4,555 

4,356 

38,195 

1,409 

7,015 

865 

414 

653 

2,160 

25.846 



1?6,4^? 



108,887 
32,851 
86,398 
11,832 
a,233 

48,004 

3,125 

7,585 

699 



1,074 
1,882 
2,648 
4,312 
252 
3,424 
10,046 

305.890 



123,471 
28,111 

100,301 
13,875 
40,132 

51,553 
3,704 
8,364 
1,031 



1,357 
2,063 
2,997 
5,484 
181 
3,803 
9,961 

265.852 



1,438 

3,302 

10 

159 

3,455 

27 

1,288 

13,305 

14,128 

2,246 

85 

2,118 

9,020 

19 

15 

7,101 

5,137 

264 

950 

57 

3,357 

5,614 

5,222 

42,782 

2,131 

8,625 

886 

350 

577 

2,791 

26 .3^9 



98 . 477 



48,516 
58,8a 
97,586 
15,132 
45,777 

55,382 
3,950 
7,785 
2,530 



1,U5 
2,107 
3,249 
5,780 
170 
4,194 
9,714 

328.984 



782 

2,448 

23 

219 

3,5U 

24 

823 

9,800 

2,903 

1,578 

70 

1,399 

6,404 

4 

13 

5,115 

5,306 

a6 

717 

30 

2,465 

4,995 

3,a3 

36,773 

987 

5,464 

794 

323 

203 

1,472 

10.756 



99.469 



73,263 
85,991 
102,598 
16,840 
50,292 

58,583 
4,255 

10,423 
1,550 



1,115 
1,581 
1,760 
957 
320 
1,926 
3,097 

269.469 



)87 

2,935 

8 

103 

3,796 

11 

938 

10,785 

5,152 

1,868 

65 

1,267 

4,796 

9 

15 

7,031 

4,715 

221 

738 

48 

2,470 

4,278 

3,598 

35,025 

779 

4,744 

633 

366 

240 

2,148 

12.543 



111.585 



96,117 
25,174 
88,818 
10,849 
48,511 

40,279 
3,033 
5,868 
1,209 



453 
1,133 
2,809 
2,532 

161 
1,925 
3,500 

278.276 



955 
4,101 
3 

96 

3,773 

15 

942 

13,029 

7,457 

1,563 

88 

1,386 

5,159 

16 

12 

7,109 

4,908 

201 

707 

50 

2,366 

4,070 

3,947 

39,696 

676 

6,006 

731 

271 

244 

2,008 

12.889 



127.909 



105,710 
26,471 
89,201 
11,364 
45,530 

44,780 
2,702 
7,443 
1,514 



255 
1,104 
1,913 
3,292 

152 
2,170 
3,993 

300.629 



1,534 

3,598 

10 

133 

3,770 

8 

1,189 

14,567 

10,598 

2,083 

81 

1,830 

6,700 

U 

12 

7,555 

5,634 

232 

736 

64 

3,006 

4,691 

4,334 

42,789 

1,212 

7,631 

977 

391 

6a 

1,892 

iS i?o 



mMi 



119,938 
33,269 
85,606 
12,398 
49, a8 

49,047 
2,846 
8,736 
1,885 



TS8 
1,431 
2,292 
3,852 

188 
2,462 
4,297 

310.625 



1,290 

3,a9 

3 

127 

3,754 

27 

1,261 

13,486 

12,863 

2,010 

58 

2,012 

7,033 

13 

12 

7,188 

5,053 

154 

639 

52 

2,672 

5,508 

4,918 

50,283 

2,185 

9,546 

908 

311 

532 

2,128 

16.252 



81,599 
56,a5 
106,650 
14,263 
51,698 

53,333 
3,469 
7,262 
2,458 



738 
1,222 
2,323 
4,461 

182 
2,537 
4,789 

342.048 



76,733 
83,627 
102,312 
15,947 
63,429 

55,159 
3,927 
9,599 
2,066 



Does not include 7,946 agricultural laborers admitted 
under Section 101(a)(15)(H}, Immigration and 
Nationality Act. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 19. NONIMMIGRANT ALIENS IN THE UNITED STATES, BY DISTRICT, 

ON JUNE ^0, 1953 AND 195U 

(Exclusive of border crossers, agricultural laborers, 
creYnnen, returning residents, and foreign government 

officials and representatives ) 



District 



June 30, 195U: 

All districts 

St. Albans, Vt 

I Boston, Mass 

New York, N. Y 

Philadelphia, Pa. . . . 

Baltimore, Md 

Miami, Fla 

Buffalo, N. Y 

Detroit, Mich 

Chicago, 111 

Seattle , Wash 

San Francisco, Calif. 
San Antonio, Tex. ... 

El Paso, Tex 

Los Angeles, Calif. . 
Honolulu, T. H 

June 30, 1953: 

All districts 



St. Albans, Vt. 
Boston, Mass. .. 
New York, N. Y. 
Philadelphia, Pa 
Baltimore, Md. 
Miami, Fla. . . . 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Chicago, 111. . 
Kansas City, Mo 
Seattle, Wash. 
San Francisco, Calif 
San Antonio, Tex. . 

El Paso, Tex 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
Honolulu, T. H. ... 



Visitors 



97.562 



1;,221 


175 


i,Uoo 


91 


39y6Se 


3,999 


255 


36 


361 


21 


I5,61i7 


Wx 


3,057 


222 


U,123 


82 


1,569 


3U 


3,302 


266 


3,99U 


U07 


11,79U 


1,833 


2,391 


106 


2,956 


2lh 


2,936 


21x3 



99,131 



Transit 
aliens 



5,762 

1,31U 

38,167 

229 

368 

l]t,61i6 

2,319 
6,222 

1,795 

3,812 
3,932 
13,107 
2,088 
3,175 
2,195 



1/ Admitted since December 7, 19U8. 
7/ Admitted since December 2u, 1952. 
3/ Admitted since December 2U, 1952. 



8.173 



6.362 



22U 

11 

2,2U7 

Uo 
67 
52U 
209 
6h 
28 

27U 

1,801 

68 

201 

208 



Students 



33.801 



262 
2,761 
U,33U 
1,579 
2,025 
2,665 

998 
3,U88 
ii,90U 
1,371 
3,U65 
1,867 
1,260 
2,581 

2ia 



29.596 



Treaty- 
traders 

1/ 



Temporary 
workers 

and 
trainees 



120 
2,5W 

U,366 
1,506 
1,560 
2,257 
1,033 
3,098 
2,818 
2,702 
1,297 
2,371 
1,127 
705 
1,9U3 



1.32U 



22 

36 
62U 
11 
Ul 
U9 
30 

5 

21 

56 

237 

3 

1 

66 
122 



1.012 



30 

29 

677 

3 

11 

69 

27 

6 

2 

3 

105 

1 

1 

33 

15 



16.802 



2,872 

28 

790 

13 
570 
227 
308 

22 

9$ 
182 
82 
U5 
I;7 
11,521 



3.5U9 



Represent- 
atives of 
foreign 
information 
media 

i/ 



2,Uii6 

8 

317 

2 

256 

79 

68 

11 

ii6 
122 

ss 

60 
52 
27 



181 



16 

1 
93 

1 

12 

3 



10 
8 
2 
h 
2 

29 



57 



U 

21 



1 
3 



1 
10 

h 

1 

12 



Agricultural laborers are not included. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TART.K 20, ALIENS EXCLUDED FROM THE UNITED STATES, BY ( 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1948 TO 1954 


:ause: 






Cause 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


Nvimber excluded 


7,113 


5,541 


5,256 


5,647 


5,050 


5,647 


3^13 


Cv iminal s. ....<....««.«••• •••••••<■•••••• 


367 
18 

3 

1 

11 
37 
28 
20 
28 

8 
26 

110 

33 
167 

91 
815 

5,156 

17 

46 
2 
2 
2 
2 
123 


402 
31 
31 

4 
13 
37 
22 
32 
22 

7 
18 

33 

4 
207 

160 
217 

4,110 

4 

2 

33 

7 

84 

12 

9 

4 

5 

31 


428 

32 

157 

5 
10 
30 
49 
26 
21 

5 
27 

21 

25 
103 

135 
122 

3,926 

2 

3 
12 

1 

56 
4 

14 
8 
6 

28 


610 

38 

165 

9 
18 
30 
24 
17 
31 

6 
11 

45 

243 
116 

122 
121 

3,963 

2 

1 
1 

14 
1 
3 

15 
2 

39 


534 

29 

148 

7 

14 
35 

9 

23 
19 

8 

17 

22 

10 
41 

115 
74 

3,860 

1 
9 

19 
3 
3 

10 
1 

39 


491 

58 

118 

1 

5 

14 
29 
U 
10 
16 

4 
88 

7 

3 
33 

169 
47 

139 

4,293 

6 
5 

39 

10 

1 
47 


296 


Immoral classes »»*o»**«o*»««*oooaeooo»a 
STibver*sive or anarchi.s'ti.Ca .•<>•...•••••• 


65 
111 


Violators of narcotic laws ,,,«o 

Mental or physical defectives: 

Idiots and imbeciles 1/ 

Feeble minded aliens <> 

Insane aliens or had been insane.,.. 

Psychopathic personality aliens. oo.. 

Eoilentics .......•■>..<i.«**.. ..••.... 


3 

18 

10 

22 

7 


Mental Iv defective aliens. ........ •• 


11 


Chronic alcoholics ....oc... 

Tubercular aliens ........o..... 

Aliens afflicted with other 

Aliens with defect which may 

affect ability to earn a living,. , 

Likely to become public charges 

Previously excluded, deported or 

removed .................••.•••••. <>••. 


3 
27 

27 

2 

16 

201 


Stowawavs .......•.....•.•.•••..<>••.•..* 


2 


Attempted entry without inspection or 
bv false statements. >....... ••....o.. 


307 


Attempted entry without proper 

documents ....o.o.oooooA.oeooo.ooea,.. 

Paupers, professional beggars, 

and vag rant s....o.<....o.« 

Polygamists or advocate polygamy 

Contract laborers ... ......a.. .•..*,.••. 


2,125 


Ineligible to citizenship o.. 

Previously departed from U.S. to 

avoid service in armed forces,,,..... 


2 

32 
3 


Unable to read (over 16 yeai^ of age).. 
Accompanying aliens ...a,.....,,,.....,. 


3 
4 


Assisted aliens. ...........a... ........ 


2 


Other ..,,. 0. 


14 



1/ Cause for exclusion under Immigration Act of February 5, 1917. 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 






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TABLE 23. VESSKT.S AND AIRPLAJiES INSPECTED, CHEWMEN ARRIVED AND EXAMINED, AND STOWAWAYS 
AHRIVED, BY DISTRICTS: YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1953 AND 1954 1/ 




District 


Vessels and airplanes inspected 


Crewmen 


Stowaways arrived 


Arrived 


Departed 


Aliens 


Citizens 


Aliens 






Vessels 


Airplanes 


Vessels and 
airplanes 2/ 


Citieens 


1954 
All districts 


52.878 


102.184 


16.121 


1.U3.386 


852.432 


332 


59 


St, Albans, Vt 


6,547 
2,232 
5,158 
1,967 
2,589 
13,181 
1,834 
2,013 
1,064 
7,691 
1,526 
1,881 

4,502 
693 

45.347 


3,320 
5,561 

12,004 

17 

953 

37,224 
5,269 
2,629 
2,946 

12,683 

134 

4,296 

1,258 

2,651 

11,239 

84.890 


16 

353 

1,368 

56 

701 

6,236 

2,467 

39 

347 

3,234 

118 

391 

541 
254 

30.345 


4,009 
54,395 

407,859 
51,785 
69,469 

227,899 
23,224 
13,260 
16,237 

119,223 
29,624 
46,278 

60,154 
19,970 

1.080.545 


324 

34,720 

218,730 

28,483 

31,104 

206,457 

4,924 

10,764 

5,590 

117,100 

66,259 

20,171 

57,500 
50,306 

852.282 


7 
78 
16 
52 
78 

2 

9 
19 
31 

10 
30 

424 




Boston, Mass. .••••••••••• 


1 


New York. N. Y.. ......... 


25 


Philadelphia , Pa 


2 


Baltimore, Md..o. ••••••*• 


12 


Miami, Fla 


5 






Detroit, Mich 




Chicago, m..... 




Seattle, Wash 




San Francisco, Calif..... 
San Antonio, Tex. ........ 


8 


El P»flo, T^x. ■ . . 0. . . .. • .. 




Los Angeles, Calif 

Honolulu, T. H 

All districts 


5 

1 

40 


St. Albans, Vt 


492 
2,279 
5,645 
1,843 
3,087 
12,791 
1,936 
1,872 
1,094 

5,095 
1,610 
2,006 

4,784 
808 


1,654 

4,962 

10,043 

U 

778 

36,459 

2,931 

1,75S 

1,290 

5 

6,929 

138 

3,561 

2,165 

3,514 

8,688 


10 

607 

8,631 

307 

1,318 

7,552 

450 

70 

162 

3,828 
153 
695 

1,045 
5,517 


2,716 

59,449 

391,893 

48,084 

81,308 

222,208 

9,469 

11,312 

5,628 

95,569 
32,087 
51,267 

52,452 
17,103 


659 

35,257 

236,083 

23,840 

30.574 

211,024 

5,359 

16,638 

6,266 

90,763 
65,716 
20,858 

48,549 
60,696 


12 
131 
18 
92 
67 

17 
21 
26 

22 
18 




Boston, Mass..,., 

New York, N. Y.. 

Philadelphia, Pa 


4 

24 

3 


Baltimore, Md 


3 


Miami, Fla 


L 






Detroit, Mich 




Chicago, ni 






_ 


Seattle, Wash. ........... 




San Francisco, Calif 

San Antonio , Tex. .,,•,.,. 


1 


EL Paso, Tex. ............ 


_ 


Los Angeles, Calif 

Honolulu, T. H..... 


1 



1/ Each and every arrival or departure of the same vessel or crewnan counted separately. 
2/ Separate figures for vessels and airplanes not available. 



Ibiited States Department of Justice 
Xmoigration and Naturalisation Service 



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TABLE 2liA. ALIENS DEPORTED AND AUENS DKPARTING VOLUNTARILY: 


TEARS ENDED JDN 


E 30, 1892 TO 1951* 


Period 


Total 


r '■■"■■■ ■ 
Aliens 


Aliens dei>arting 






deported 


voluntarily 1/ 


1892 - 195U 


5,la6,313 


1*1*3,210 


U.973.103 


1892 - 1900 


3,127 


3,127 


«» 


1901 - 1910 


11,558 


11,558 


- 


1911 - 1920 


27,912 


27,912 


« 


1921 - 1930 


161,.390 


92.157 


72.233 


1921... • 


h!5l7 


1»,517 




1922.... 


U,3U5 


1*,3U5 


- 


1923.... 


3,661 


3,661 


• 


I92I1.... 


6,U09 


6,1*09 


« 


1925.... 


9,U95 


9,h9S 


• 


1926..,. 


10,90U 


10,901* 


- 


1927.... 


26,67U 


11,662 


15,012 


1928.... 


31,571 


11,625 


19,91*6 


1929.... 


38,796 


12,908 


25,888 


1930.... 


28,018 


16,631 


11,387 


1931 - I9U0 


210,Ul6 


117.086 


93,330 


1931.... 


2^,861' 


18;U2 


11,719 


1932.... 


30,201 


19,1*26 


10,775 


1933.... 


30,212 


19,865 


10,31*7 


193U.,.. 


16,889 


8,879 


8,010 


1935.... 


16,297 


8,319 


7,978 


1936.... 


17,Ui6 


9,195 


8,251 


1937.... 


17,617 


8,829 


8,788 


1938.... 


18,553 


9,275 


9,278 


1939.... 


17,792 


8,202 


9,590 


19U0.... 


15,5U8 


6,95U 


8,591* 


i9ia - 1950 


1,581,771* 


110,81*9 


1.U70.925 


19UI.... 


16,m 


U,l*07 


6,531 


19U2.... 


10,613 


3,709 


6,901* 


19li3.... 


16,15U 


1*,207 


11,91*7 


19U1.... 


39,1*1*9 


7,179 


32,270 


19ii5.... 


80,760 


11,270 


69,1*90 


1916.... 


116,320 


ll*,375 


101,91*5 


19U7.... 


211*,5U3 


18,663 


195,880 


191*8.... 


217,555 


20,371 


197,181* 


19li9..., 


296,337 


20,0U0 


276,297 


1950.... 


579,105 


6,628 


572,1*77 


1951 


686,713 


13,51*U 


673,169 


1952 


723,959 


20,181 


703,778 


1953 


905,236 


19,8U5 


885,391 


195U 


1,101,228 


26,951 


1,07U,277 



1/ Aliens departing voluntarily first recorded in 1927. 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturaliiation Service 



TABI£ 25. ALIENS DEPORTED, BI CODNTRI TO raiCH DEPORTED AND DEPCKTATTON EXPENSE: 

TEAR ENDED JUIC 30, 1951* 






Total 


Deportation expense borne 


by: 






Country to which 
dsported 


Inmd grail on 

and 

Naturalisation 

Service 


Other 

QoTemment 

agencies 


Steamship 
ooopsnies 


Airlines 


AUens 

deported 


Aliens 

re shipped 


All countries 


26,9?1 . 


25.290 


ni 


319 


15 


1.182 


31* 


Europe.. •..*.... 


1,570 


1.070 


2 


215 


3 


260 


20 


Denmark. ....••••••. 


30 

31* 

25 

103 

200 

19 
351 

75 
102 

90 
118 

1*0 
299 

11* 

70 

365 


15 
21 
21 
80 

130 
15 

228 
U8 
58 
61 
69 
28 

2U3 
13 
UO 

283 


1 

1 
9 


15 

9 

2 

12 

19 

3 

23 

2U 

26 

11 

29 

10 

20 

12 

29 


2 

1 
1 


3 

2 
10 
1*6 

1 
100 

2 

13 
16 
20 

31 

15 

la 




Finland 


1 


France .•.•«•••••••• 




Gamany * ........... 


1 


Qreece ..••••....••. 


3 


TrQland... .....•..• 


ItaLT 




Netherlands. . ...... 

Norway. ............ 


1 

5 

1 


Portu gal •.*•...•••* 


Spain. ............. 




Sweden. .•...•«..... 


2 


United Kingdom 

Xugoslavia. ........ 


5 


Other Europe • 


1 
2 


China. ............. 


1*1 
25 
1*1* 
10 

13 
86 
92 

51* 

21*, 703 


2^ 
21 
33 
5 
10 
78 
68 
39 

23.722 


9 
98 


3 
7 
3 

7 

3 

1 


i 
11 


6 

1 

2 
2 

3 

1 

12 

11* 

823 


m 


India.. •••••• 




Indonesia.. ..v 

Japan. ............. 


2 


Jordan. ............ 








Philippines 

Other Asia.. 


- 




5 


Canada •.••««.*•*.*• 


1,296 

22,628 

597 

182 

139 

27 

11*7 


1,207 
22,060 

297 
158 

100 
22 
93 


12 

86 

1 
1 


3 

7 

25 

9 

23 

8 


1 

7 
3 


7U 

1*71* 

266 

9 

10 

1* 

1*1* 


^ 


Mexi CO .•.......•*. • 




West Indies 

South America. 

Africa. .............. 


2 

3 

5 
1 




1 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalisation Service 



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TABLE 30. PASSENGER TIIAVEL BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 



BY PORT OF ARRIVAL OR DEPARTURE; YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 195/t 



Port 



By aea and by air 



Aliens 



Citi- 
ssens 



Total 



Aliens 



By sea 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



f' 



Aliens 



By air 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



ARRIVED. 



• o • e 



New York, N, Y, 
Chicopee, Mass.... 

Boston, Mass...... 

Philadelphia Pa... 
Baltimore, Hd...... 

Norfolk, Vao , 

Miami, Fla , 

W, Palm Beach, Fla, 
Key West, Fla... 
San Juan, P. R. . 
Virgin Islands .o 

Tampa, Fla , 

Mobile, Ala 

New Orleans, La.... 
Galvestu?., Tex. . . , . 
San Francisco, Cal, 
Portland, Ore, 
Seattle, Wash... 
Los Angeles, Cal 
San Pedro, Cal, 
Honolulu, T. H... 
Other ports 



• • 



» . . o a 



» . o o 



DEPARTED. 



New York, N. Y 

Chicopee, Mass 

Boston, Mass...,a.a 
Philadelphia, Pa..o 
Baltimore, JM....... 

Norfolk, Va........ 

Miami, Fla.,.o.»a.o 
W, Palm Beach, Fla, 

Key West, Fla 

San Juan, P. R 

Virgin Islands 

Tampa, Fla 

Mobile, Ala 

New Orleans , La ... , 

Galveston, Tex 

San Francisco, Cal, 
Portland, Ore.,..,, 
Seattle, Wash.,,... 
Los Angeles, Cal,,, 

San Pedro, Cal 

Honolulu, T, Ho..., 
Other ports..,,,,.. 



603.264 



l « 009 i^0 ? 



1.612.767 



245.606 



?6l.Q6A 



606.670 



357.658 



6^8.4 ? ? 



1.006.097 



327,187 

2,421 

20,774 

1,298 

1,132 

264 

119,192 

6,667 

6,910 

21,072 

11,669 

4,673 

898 

12,629 

103 

10,866 

135 

4,019 

2,652 

5,546 

21,607 

21,550 

442.742 



228,855 

1,127 

6,476 

457 

810 

118 

110,982 

2,543 

5,925 

13,783 

13,302 

4,153 

237 

10,39? 

197 

7,240 

24 

1,803 

2,088 

3,011 

15,784 

13,430 



519,021 

20,573 

39,309 

1,494 

741 

593 

207,622 

11,062 

29,329 

24,513 

2,999 

5,150 

7,399 

20,302 

75 

22,116 

79 

13,274 

2,221 

2,953 
31,259 
47,419 

969.221 



846,208 

22,994 

60,083 

2,792 

1,873 

857 

326,8U 

17,729 

36,239 

45,585 

14,668 

9,823 

8,297 

32,931 

178 

32,982 

214 

17,293 

4,873 

8,499 

52,866 

68,969 



181,911 

4,808 
1,130 
1,115 

160 
6,365 

401 

12 

2,461 

11,230 

497 

591 
1,628 

103 
9,567 

135 

2,981 

5 

5,401 

3,766 

11,339 

172.623 



254,559 

13,338 

984 

683 

439 

26,593 

1,055 

13 

3,087 

2,236 

400 

1,298 

2,414 

75 

21,568 

79 

12,436 

4 

2,870 

4,034 

12,899 

392.715 



436,470 

18,146 

2,114 

1,798 

599 

32,958 

1,456 

25 

5,548 

13,466 

897 

1,889 

4,042 

178 

31,135 

214 

15,a7 

9 

8,271 

7,800 

24,238 

365.338 



145,276 

2,421 

15,966 

168 

17 

104 

112,827 

6,266 

6,898 

18,611 

439 

4,176 

307 

11,001 

1,299 

1,038 

2,647 

145 

17,841 

10,211 

270.119 



264,462 

20,573 

25,971 

510 

58 

154 

181,029 

10,007 

29,316 

21,426 

763 

4,750 

6,101 

17,888 

548 

838 

2,217 

83 

27,225 

34,520 

576.506 



535,594 

13,106 

21,647 

1,783 

1,405 

186 

203,857 

9,911 

29,615 

24,352 

3,717 

5,060 

195 

21,002 

232 

25,475 

13 

17,569 

2,642 

2,710 

18,872 

30,278 



764,449 

14,233 

28,123 

2,240 

2,215 

304 

314,839 

12,454 

35,540 

38,135 

17,019 

9,213 

432 

31,399 

429 

32,715 

37 

19,372 

4,730 

5,721 

34,656 

43,708 



126,345 

4,766 
262 
806 
118 

6,144 
248 
6 
306 
11,016 
195 
237 

1,522 
197 

6,928 

24 

950 

2,999 
2,127 
7,427 



284,616 

12,770 

409 

1,338 

186 

28, U7 

1,230 

18 

1,198 

2,029 

200 

195 

3,951 

232 

25,441 

13 

15,188 

2,695 

1,156 

11,433 



410,961 

17,536 

671 

2,144 

304 

34,561 

1,478 

24 

1,504 

13,045 

395 

432 

5,473 

429 

32,369 

37 

16,138 

5,694 

3,283 

13,860 



102,510 

1,127 

1,710 

195 

4 

104,838 
2,295 
5,919 
13,477 
2,286 
3,958 

8,875 
312 

853 

2,088 

12 

13,657 

6,003 



250,978 

13,106 

8,877 

1,374 

67 

175,440 

8,681 

29,597 

23,154 

1,688 

4,860 

17,051 

34 

2,381 

2,642 

15 

17,716 

18,845 



409,738 

22,994 

41,937 

678 

75 

258 

293,856 

16,273 

36,214 

40,037 

1,202 

8,926 

6,408 

28,889 

1,847 

1,876 

4,864 

228 

45,066 

44,731 

846.625 



353,488 

14,233 

10,587 

1,569 

71 

280,278 

10,976 

35,516 

36,631 

3,974 

8,818 

25,926 

346 

3,234 

4,730 

27 

31,373 

24,848 



1/ Exclusive of travel over international land boundaries. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 31. PASSENGERS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES FROM FOREIGN COUI^TRIES, 
BY COUNTRY OF EMBARKATION; YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1954 1/ 



Country of 
embarkation 



All countries. 

Surope 

Austria 

Belgium 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Gibraltar 

Greece 

Iceland 

Ireland 

Italy 

Lxixembourg 

Malta 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Trieste 

Turkey in Europe. 
United Kingdom. . . 
Yugoslavia, 

Asia 

Aden 

Bahrein 

Bonin Volcano Is. 

Burma 

Ceylon 

China 

Cyprus 

French India 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Iraq 

Israel 

Japan 

Korea 

Kuwait 

Lebanon 

Malaya 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Ryukjni Islands . . . 

Saudi Arabia 

Singapore 

Syria 

Thailand 

Turkey in Asia.. . 
Vietnam 



By sea and by air 



Aliens 



603.264 



221,218 



6,549 

5,627 

486 

46,114 

36,900 

860 

3,079 

889 

9,886 

27,955 

1 

829 

26,013 

6,476 

3,697 

6,470 

7,672 

3,781 

35 

151 

99,661 

207 

37.353 



9 
6 

3 

36 

297 

2 

3,117 

317 

47 

1 

8 

2,574 

20,168 

1,205 

5 

561 

57 

2 

8,545 

175 

22 

32 

57 

105 



Citi- 
zens 



l|00?i503 



428.436 



7,099 

5,734 

187 

95,531 

70,136 

2,776 

3,932 

1,389 

16,155 

53,142 

12 

39 

24,244 

5,656 

2 

6,977 

3,777 

7,167 

5,481 

400 

330 

118,133 

136 

70.185 



3 

1 

2 

46 

375 

2 

1 

1,795 

322 

38 

21 

1,392 

48,120 

240 

2 

1,222 

116 

2 

9,945 

4,399 

1,965 

62 

37 

67 

6 

4 



total 



1-612.767 



721.774 



1 

13,648 

11,361 

673 

141,645 

107,036 

3,636 

7,011 

2,278 

26, oa 

81,097 

13 

868 

50,257 

12,132 

2 

10,674 

10,247 

14,839 

9,262 

435 

481 

217,794 

343 

107.538 



By sea 



Aliens 



245.606 



184.080 



9 
9 

1 

5 

82 

672 

4 

1 

4,912 

639 

85 

1 

29 

3,966 

68,288 

1,445 

7 

1,783 

173 

4 

18,490 

4,574 

1,987 

94 

94 

172 

6 

6 



766 

1,951 

275 

26,707 

24,636 

860 

2,434 

62 

6,097 

23,548 

829 

16,085 

4,769 

1,358 
3,151 
5,059 

35 

126 

65,125 

207 

21.160 



Citi- 
zens 



361.064 



2?2 ./t84 



24 

284 

2 

2,110 

165 

47 

1 

1,546 

11,125 

1,205 

5 

198 

56 

4,116 

153 

6 

30 

57 
13 



315 

1,502 

66 

61,931 

28,787 

2,776 

2,401 

74 

6,223 

37,111 

39 
11,877 
3,947 
2 
1,793 
1,256 
4,860 

400 

327 

66,661 

136 

:39.892 



3 

1 

25 

230 

2 

1 

1,028 

206 

38 



352 
27,679 
236 
2 
582 
116 

4,951 

4,308 

8 

51 

37 

27 

6 

3 



Total 



606.670 



416,564 



1,081 

3,453 

341 

88,638 

53,423 

3,636 

4,835 

136 

12,320 

60,659 

868 
27,962 
8,716 
2 
3,151 
4,407 
9,919 

435 

453 

131,786 

343 

61,052 



9 
9 

1 

49 

514 

4 

1 

3,138 

371 

85 

1 

1,898 

38,804 

1,441 

7 

780 

172 

9,067 

4,461 

14 

81 

94 

40 

6 

5 



Aliens 



357.658 



109,258 



5,783 

3,676 

211 

19,407 

12,264 

645 

827 

3,789 

4,407 



9,928 
1,707 

2,339 
3,319 
2,613 
3,781 

25 
34,536 



16.193 



3 

12 

13 



1,007 
152 



1,028 
9,043 



363 

1 

2 

4,429 

22 

16 

2 

92 



By air 



Citi- 
zens 



648.439 



195.9 52 



1 

6,784 

4,232 

121 

33,600 

41,349 

1,531 

1,315 

9,932 

16,031 

12 

12,367 
1,709 

5,184 
2,521 
2,307 
5,481 

3 
51,472 



30,29 3 



2 

21 

145 



767 
116 



21 

1,040 

20,441 

4 

640 

2 

4,994 

91 

1,957 

11 

40 

1 



Total 



1.006.097 



305.210 



1 

12,567 

7,908 

332 

53,007 

53,613 

2,176 

2,142 

13,721 

20,438 

13 

22,295 

3,416 

7,523 
5,840 
4,920 
9,262 

28 
86,008 



46.486 



5 
33 

158 



1,774 
268 



29 

2,068 

29,484 

4 

1,003 

1 

4 

9,423 

113 

1,973 

13 

132 
1 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



T4BLE 31. PASSENGERS AR'RIVED IN THE UNITED STATES FHOM FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
BY COUNTRY OF EMBARMTICN: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1954 l/ (Cont'd) 



Country of 
embarkation 



North America 

Canada 

Greenland 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Bermuda 

British West Indies... 

Bahama Islands 

Barbados 

Jamaica 

Leeward Islands 

Trinidad & Tobago... 

Windvfard Islands 

Other Br. W. Ind.... 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic .... 

Guadeloupe 

Haiti 

Martinique 

Neth. VIest Indies 

Central America 

British Honduras 

Canal Zone & Panama... 

' Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

South America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

British Guiana 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

French Guiana 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Surinam (Neth. Guiana).. 

Unaguay 

Venezuela 

Flag of carrier: 

United States 

Foreign 



By sea and 



Aliens 



206.082 



23,561 

45 

8,102 

153,944 



' )y air 



Citi- 
zens 



453.332 



10,145 
46.128 



14,598 

1,527 

14,505 

12,377 

3,028 

88 

5 

83,367 

5,364 

837 

3,852 

1,041 

3,210 

20.430 



17 
6,921 
1,754 
3,122 
3,764 
2,871 
1,981 



6,962 

173 

8,941 

493 

1,468 

13,263 

2,939 

21 

92 

5,181 

124 

534 

15,715 



255,959 
347,305 



45,693 
4,564 
8,245 

357.459 



81,367 
92.702 



65,895 

779 

18,032 

3,761 

4,165 

10 

60 

163,304 

8,522 

255 

8,083 

329 

2,897 

37,371 



Total 



659. a4 



69,254 

4,609 

16,347 

511.403 



91,512 
138.830 



28,411 
1,360 
1,155 
2,913 

2,686 
838 

38.462 



2,837 

256 

7,071 

263 

1,338 

5,055 

989 

33 

113 

4,691 

71 

283 

15,462 



650,941 
358,562 



80,493 

2,306 

32,537 

16,138 

7,193 

98 

65 

246,671 

13,886 

1,092 

11,935 

1,370 

6,107 

37.801 



25 
35,332 
3,114 
4,277 
6,677 
5,557 
2*819 

94.368 



Aliens 



30,240 



4,508 

1 

909 

22.700 



r;676 

12.479 



557 

5 

315 

11,147 

447 

3 

5 

7,718 

186 

20 

320 

9 

292 

2.122 



9,799 

429 

16,012 

756 

2,806 

18,318 

3,928 

54 

205 

9,872 

195 

817 

31,177 



906,900 
705,867 



17 

1,093 

164 

14 
209 
577 

48 

7,A9 3 



By sea 



Citi- 
zens 



78.631 



11,873 

9 

385 

? 3. 835 



14,652 
10,823 



7,051 

1 

394 

2,200 

1,115 

2 

60 

26,376 

129 

1 

1,377 

4 

473 

12.529 



Total 



108.871 



16,381 
10 
1,294 

76, 5 3^ 



16,328 
23,302 



2,120 

1, 

9 
497 
591 
196 



302 

11 

130 

1,769 



60,850)178 
]84,756pS2 



11,245 

155 

3 

319 

783 

24 

6.755 



1,467 

1,675 

58 

514 

431 

268 

2 

459 

2 

49 

1,830 



,463 
,601 



7,608 

6 

709 

13,347 

1,562 

5 

65 

34,094 

315 

21 

1,697 

13 

765 

14.651 



17 

12,338 

319 

17 

528 

1,360 

72 

14.248 



Aliens 



175.842 



19,053 

44 

7,193 

131.244 



8,469 
33.649 



14,041 
1,522 

14,190 

1,230 

2,581 

85 

75,649 
5,178 
817 
3,532 
1,032 
2,918 

18.308 



3,587 

3,543 

67 

1,011 

1,022 

464 

2 

761 

13 

179 

3,599 



239,313 
367,357 



5,828 
1,590 
3,108 
3,555 
2,294 
1,933 

48. W 



By air 



Citi- 
zens 



374.701 



33,820 
4,555 
7,860 

303,624 



66,715 
81.879 



58,844 

778 

17,638 

1,561 

3,050 

8 

136,928 
8,393 

254 
6,706 

325 
2,424 

24.842 



4,842 

173 

7,073 

484 

971 

12,672 

2,743 

21 

92 

4,879 

113 

404 

13,946 



195,109 
162,549 



8 
17,166 
1,205 
1,152 
2,594 
1,903 
814 

31,707 



Total 



550.543 



52,873 

4,599 

15,053 

434.868 



75,184 
115,528 



72,885 
2,300 

31,828 

2,791 

5,631 

93 

212,577 

13,571 

1,071 

10,238 

1,357 

5,342 

43.150 



1,370 

256 

5,396 

205 

824 

4,624 

721 

31 

113 

4,232 

69 

234 

13,632 



472,478 
175,961 



22,994 
2,795 
4,260 
6,149 
4,197 
2,747 

80,120 



6,212 

429 

12,469 

689 

1,795 

17,296 

3,464 

52 

205 

9,111 

182 

638 

27,578 



667,587 
338,510 



1/ Exclusive of travel over land borders. 



United States Department of Justice 
Iramigrition and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 31. PASSENGERS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
BY COUNTRY OF E^SARK'\TION; YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, I954 \J (Cont'd) 



Country of 
embarkation 



Africa 

Algeria 

Angola 

Belgian Congo 

Caraeroons , Fr 

Cape Verde Islands 

Egypt , 

French V/est Africa 

Cold Coast 

Kenya 

Liberia 

Libya 

Madagascar 

Morocco, French , 

Mozambique 

Nigeria 

Sierra Leone 

Somaliland, Fr 

Tanganyika , 

Tangier 

Tunisia , 

Union of South Africa , 

Zanzibar .., 

Other U.K. Ter. & Dep , 

Oceania , 

Australia 

British Solomon Islands...., 

Fiji 

French Oceania 

New Caledonia , 

New Guinea 

New Zealand , 

Pacific Islands (U.S. Adm.), 

VJake & Midway Islands 

Yap 

Other U.K. Ter. & Dep 



By sea and by air 



Aliens 



1,656 



19 

1 

25 

1 

3 

460 

24 

51 

3 

164 

83 

2 

109 

15 

30 

8 

5 

12 

1 

640 



8.929 



4,970 

9 

563 

5 

6 

3 

1,758 

1,455 

112 

48 



Citi- 
zens 



5,777 



22 

9 

120 

1 

15 

701 

56 

109 

5 

348 

186 

1 

3,329 

21 

3i 

12 

15 

25 

5 

24 

735 

2 

5 

1 3, 311 



1,846 

26 

553 

10 

1 

7 

486 

8,347 

1,898 

132 

5 



Total 



7.433 



a 

10 

145 

2 

18 

1,161 

80 

160 

8 

512 

269 

3 

3,438 

36 

61 

12 

23 

30 

17 

25 

1,375 

2 

5 

22,240 



6,816 

35 

1,116 

15 

7 

10 

2,244 

9,802 

2,010 

180 

5 



By sea 



Aliens 



849 



3 

1 

15 

1 

3 

194 

4 

13 

3 

102 

3 

2 

75 

15 

30 



5 
12 

360 



1.784 



891 

26 

5 

6 

3 

370 

479 



Citi- 
zens 



2,146 



1 

9 
40 

1 

15 

155 

23 

40 

5 

181 

77 

1 
984 
21 
31 
12 
15 
25 

5 

503 

2 



1.156 



267 

20 

10 

1 

5 

51 
796 

1 
5 



Total 



Aliens 



2,995 



4 
10 
55 

2 

18 

349 

27 

53 

8 

283 

80 

3 
1,059 
36 
61 
12 
23 
30 
17 

863 
2 



2 ,940 



1,158 

46 

15 

7 

8 

421 

1,275 

5 
5 



807 



16^ 
10 



266 
20 
38 

62 

80 

34 



1 
280 



7.H 5 



4,079 
9 
537 



1,388 

976 

112 

44 



By air 



Citi- 
zens 



3,631 



21 
80 



546 
33 
69 

167 
109 

2,345 



24 
232 



12.155 



1,579 

26 

533 



2 

435 
7,551 
1,898 

131 



Total 



4,438 



37 
90 



812 
53 

107 

229 
189 

2,379 



25 
512 

5 

19.300 



5,658 
35 
1,070 



2 

1,823 

8,527 

2,010 

175 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 32. PASSENGERS DEPARTED FROM THE UNITED STATES TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
BY COUNTRY OF DEBARKATION: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1954 1/ 



^ 



Country of 
debarkation 



Bv sea and bv air 



Aliens 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



By sea 



Aliens 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



iy »ir 



Aliens 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



All countries, 

Europe 

Austria , 

Belgium 

Denmark , 

Finland , 

France , 

Hungary , 

Germany , 

Gibraltar , 

Greece , 

Iceland , 

Ireland , 

Italy , 

Luxembourg , 

Malta , 

Netherlands , 

Norway , 

Portugal , 

Spain , 

Svreden 

Switzerland 

Trieste , 

Turkey , 

United Kingdom.,, 
Yugoslavia , 

Asia 

Aden 

Bahrein 

Burma , 

Ceylon , 

China , 

Hong Kong 

India , 

Indonesia , 

Iran , 

Iraq. 

Israel 

Japan 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Malaya 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands . . . 

Saudi Arabia 

Singapore 

Syria 

Thailand 

Vietnam 



kk2,lk2 



96Q,221 



1,411,963 



172,623 



392,715 



565,338 



270,119 



576,506 



846,625 



199.322 



^^.219 



3,706 

4,600 

323 

37,394 

13,696 

571 

2,481 

509 

4,956 

15,439 

7 

2 

l't,817 

5,674 

2,348 

2,880 

6,812 

3,319 

1 

67 

79,574 

146 

17,415 



3 

6,593 

5,785 

208 

89,004 

3 

85,558 

3,326 

5,568 

1,578 

17,130 

53,024 

18 

1 

25,369 

6,777 

8,261 

4,256 

9,037 

5,950 

104 

762 

113,745 

159 

60.815 



641.541 



120.681 



2 

8 

2 

4 

298 

819 

223 

23 

25 

3 

1,286 

9,389 

108 

569 

17 

4 

4,345 

145 

58 

51 

30 

6 



5 

1 

7 

14 

719 

1,147 

503 

64 

3 

22 

2,093 

41,157 

46 

1,787 

105 

3 

6,619 

4,822 

1,148 

237 

4 

228 

81 



3 

10,299 

10,385 

531 

126,398 

3 

99,254 

3,897 

8,049 

2,087 

22,086 

68,463 

25 

3 

40,186 

12,451 

10,609 

7,136 

15,849 

9,269 

105 

829 

193,319 

305 

78.230 



253.20 7 



373,888 



78.641 



189,012 



7 
9 

9 

18 

1,017 

1,966 

726 

87 

28 

25 

3,379 

50,546 

154 

2,356 

122 

7 

10,964 

4,967 

1,206 

288 

4 

258 

87 



825 

1,895 

164 

23,720 

8,429 

571 

2,099 

84 

3,035 

12,172 

2 

7,161 

4,455 

1,170 

1,168 

4,730 

1 

1 

55 

48,798 

146 

8,133 



1,090 

1,777 

78 

56,493 

3 

44,801 

3,326 

4,034 

92 

9,369 

35,729 

1 

12,480 

4,668 

2,439 

1,866 

6,324 

17 

104 

747 

67,610 

159 

^.332 



1,915 

3,672 

242 

80,213 

3 

53,230 

3,897 

6,133 

176 

12,404 

47,901 

3 

19,641 

9,123 

3,609 

3,034 

11,054 

18 

105 

802 

116,408 

305 

50,465 



2,881 

2,705 

159 

13,674 

5,267 

382 
425 

1,921 

3,267 

7 

7,656 
1,219 
1,178 
1,712 
2,082 
3,318 

12 
30,776 



9,282 



1 

246 

583 

108 

19 

1 

681 

4,216 

108 

249 

17 

3 

1,704 

137 

16 

24 

14 
4 



5 



4 

577 

636 

334 

51 



741 

30,168 

46 

918 

101 

2 

3,721 

4,739 

20 

102 

4 

120 

43 



5 

823 

1,219 

442 
70 

1 

1,422 

34,384 

154 

1,167 

118 

5 

5,425 

4,876 

36 

126 

4 

134 

47 



8 
2 
3 

52 

236 

115 

4 

24 

3 

605 

5,173 

320 

1 

2,6a 

8 
42 
27 

16 
2 



3 

5,503 

4,008 

130 

32,511 

40,757 

1,534 

1,486 

7,761 

17,295 

18 

12,889 
2,109 
5,822 
2,390 
2,713 
5,933 

15 
46,135 



18.483 



267,65 3 



3 

8,384 

6,713 

289 

46,185 

46,024 

1,916 

1,911 

9,682 

20,562 

25 

20,545 
3,328 
7,000 
4,102 
4,795 
9,251 

27 
76,911 



27.765 



1 

7 

10 

142 

511 

169 

13 

3 

22 

1,352 

10,989 

869 

4 

1 

2,898 

83 

1,128 

135 

108 
38 



9 

9 

13 

194 

747 

284 

17 

27 

25 

1,957 

16,162 

1,189 
4 
2 

5,539 

91 

1,170 

162 

124 

40 



United States Department of Justice 



, — 1 r^r^A ^Tj_, 



_o^ ^ 



TABLE 32. PASSENGERS DEPARTED FROM THE UNITED STATES TO FOREIGN CCUNTRIKS, 
BY COUNTRY OF DEBARKATION: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1954 i/ (Cont'd) 



Country of 
debarkation 



By sea and by air 



Aliens 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



Aliens 



By sea 



Citi-I Total 
zens 



Aliens 



By air 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



North America 

Canada 

Greenland 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Bermuda 

British V/est Indies 
Bahama Islands... 

Barbados 

Jamaica 

Leeward Islands.. 
Trinidad & Tobago 
Vv^indward Islands. 

Cuba 

> Dominican Republic. 
Guadeloupe 

Haiti 

Martinique ......... 

Neth. West Indies.. 

Central America 

British Honduras , . , 
Canal Zone & Panama 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

South America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

British Guiana 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

French Gvdana 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Surinam(Neth. Guiana) 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 

Flag of carrier: 

United States 

Foreign , . 



164.378 



),9U 
16 
6,401 



407.936 



8,845 
39.208 



16,564 

2,124 

10,809 

346.906 



^72,^14 



13,852 

956 

9,741 

12,333 

2,179 

147 

75,710 

4,807 

605 

3,221 

695 

2,338 

15.588 



77,663 
87.081 



23,508 

2,140 

17,210 

482.335 



26.848 



86,508 
126.289 



4,010 

158 

21.101 



82.740 109.588 



17 
4,490 
1,618 
2,773 
2,714 
2,380 
1,596 

49.717 



63,451 

994 

15,415 

3,397 

3,819 

5 

158,281 

11,177 

360 

8,881 

478 

2,985 

31.533 



5,524 

286 

9,234 

376 

1,508 

11,495 

2,083 

89 

31 

3,9a 

163 

488 

14,499 



190,216 
252,526 



2^ 
22,717 
1,402 
1,246 
2,716 
2,402 
1,024 

39.837 



77,303 

1,950 

25,156 

15,730 

5,998 

152 

233,991 

15,984 

965 

12,102 

1,173 

5,323 

47.121 



1,639 
11.849 



11,583 
220 

59.742 



15,593 
378 

80.843 



1 37,530 



2,934 

16 

6,243 

114.328 



325.196 



17,721 
11.705 



43 
27,207 
3,020 
4,019 
5,430 
4,782 
2,620 

89.554 



416 

94 

113 

10,976 

235 

15 

6,695 

236 

11 

430 

7 

234 

1.579 



8,073 

175 

425 

2,018 

1,014 

28,042 

956 

4 

842 

472 

11.195 



19,360 
23.554 



7,206 
27.359 



4,981 

2,124 

10,589 

287.164 



462.726 



8,489 

269 

538 

12,994 

1,249 

15 

34,737 

1,192 

15 

1,272 

7 

706 

12 .774 



13,436 

862 

9,628 

1,357 

1,944 

132 

69,015 

4,571 

594 

2,791 



59,942 
75.376 



7,915 

2,140 

16,832 

401,492 



67,148 
102.735 



2,104 
14.009 



2,605 

267 

6,828 

189 

1,358 

5,754 

1,056 

32 

29 

4,532 

78 

440 

16,669 



604,719 
364,502 



8,129 

553 

16,062 

565 

2,866 

17,249 

3,139 

121 

60 

8,473 

241 

928 

31,168 



794,935 
617,028 



829 
102 

74 
160 
401 

13 

11 .765 



9,942 
172 

6 
311 
761 

3 

8,010 



2,153 

3,619 

5 

662 

1,234 

143 

2 

485 

15 

174 

3,273 



40,949 
131,674 



1,217 

1,853 

2 

633 

632 

198 

7 

586 

5 

185 

2,692 



191,987 
200,728 



10,771 

274 

80 

471 

1,162 

16 

19.77 ^ 



3,370 

5,472 

7 

1,295 

1,866 

341 

9 

1,071 

20 

359 

5,965 



232,936 
332,402 



17 
3,661 
1,516 
2,699 
2,554 
1,979 
1,583 

37,952 



55,378 

819 

14,990 

1,379 

2,805 

5 

130,239 

10,221 

356 

8,039 

478 

2,513 

20,338 



3,371 

286 

5,615 

371 

1,846 

10,261 

1,940 

87 

31 

3,456 

148 

314 

11,226 



149,267 
120,852 



26 
12,775 
1,230 
1,240 
2,405 
1,641 
1,021 

31.827 



68,814 

1,681 

24,618 

2,736 

4,749 

137 

199,254 

14,792 

950 

10,830 

1,166 

4,617 

34.347 



1,388 

267 

4,975 

187 

725 

5,122 

858 

25 

29 

3,946 

73 

255 

13,977 



412,732 
163,774 



43 
16,436 

2,746 
3,939 
4,959 
3,620 
2,604 

69.779 



4,759 

553 

10,590 

558 

1,571 

15,383 

2,798 

112 

60 

7,402 

221 

569 

25,203 



561,999 
284,626 



1/ Exclusive of travel over land borders. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 32. PASSENGERS DEPARTED FROM THE UNITED STATES TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
BY COUNTRY OF DEBARKATION; YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 195k l/ (Cont'd) 



Country of 
debarkation 



By sea and by air 



Aliens 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



Aliens 



By sea 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



Aliens 



By air 



Citi- 
zens 



Total 



Africa , 

Algeria 

Angola 

Belgian Congo 

Cameroons , Br 

Cameroons, Fr , 

Cape Verde Islands 

Egypt , 

Ethiopia , 

French West Africa , 

Gambia , 

Gold Coast , 

Kenya 

Liberia , 

Libya 

Madagascar 

Morocco, French , 

Morocco, Spanish , 

Mozambique , 

Nigeria , 

Sierra Leone , 

Tanganyika , 

Tunisia , 

Union of South Africa 

Oceania 

Australia , 

Fiji 

French Oceania 

New Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U,S. Adm. ), 

V,'ake and Midvray Islands 

Yap 



1,748 



9,831 



11,579 



948 



4,283 



5,231 



800 



16 
5 

47 
1 
1 

19 
406 

49 

28 

2 

146 

367 

2 

109 

2 

6 

13 

10 

3 
516 

10.162 



5,432 

660 

37 

2,965 

995 

46 

27 



65 

8 

187 

7 

11 

10 

1,228 

7 

168 

3 

123 

73 

470 

1,613 

4,710 

41 
108 
15 
24 
17 
943 

8. 5 8 ? 



2,917 
557 

75 

964 

3,008 

987 

75 



81 

13 

234 

8 

12 

29 

1,634 

7 

217 

3 

151 

75 

616 

1,980 

2 

4,819 

2 

47 

121 

25 

24 

20 

1,459 

18.745 



8,349 
1,217 

112 
3,929 
4,003 
1,033 

102 



7 
5 

44 
1 
1 

19 
248 

32 

10 

2 

93 



2 

6 

13 

10 



365 
4.248 



2,029 

116 

37 

1,681 
383 



40 

8 

126 

7 

11 

10 

474 

100 

3 

30 

73 

121 

398 

2,006 

41 

108 

15 

24 

688 
2.14 3 



47 
13 

170 

8 

12 

29 

722 

132 
3 

40 

75 

214 

398 

2 

2,094 

2 

47 

121 

25 

24 

1,053 

6.391 



9 
3 

158 
17 
18 

53 

367 

21 



5,548 
25 

61 



754 

7 

68 

93 

349 
1,215 

2,704 



1,105 

71 

75 

465 

426 



3,134 
187 
112 

2,146 
809 



3 
151 

5 .914 



3,403 
5U 

1,284 

612 

46 

25 



17 
255 

6.440 



1,812 
486 

499 

2,582 

987 

74 



6,348 



34 
64 



912 

7 

85 

111 

402 
1,582 

2,725 



20 
406 

12.354 



5,215 
1,030 

1,783 

3,194 

1,033 

99 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 





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YEARS ENDED JUNE 30 


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rHtM|mkf|IA| 



TABIB 3U. ALIENS WHO RKPORTED UNDER THE ALIEN ADDRESS HlOCffiAM, 
BY NATIONALITT l/: DURING 19Sh 



Nationality 



Total 
nvuaber 



Nationality 



Total 
number 



Nationality 



Total 
niusber 



All nationalities 



Europe 

Albania 

Andorra 

Austria 

Austria-Hungary . . . . . 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

CiiechosloTakia 

Dansig, (Free City of) 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany ............. 

Great Britain 

Qreece 

Hungary 

Iceland 

Ireland ............. 

Italy 

Latvia 

Liechtenstein 

Lithuania 

Luxembourg .......... 

Monaco 

Netherlands 

Nonray 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

San Marino .......... 

Spain 

Sireden 

SifLtzerland 

Trieste ............. 

Turkey 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia .......... 



2.365.811 



1.^29.856 



55 

iiO,8W* 

5,14*7 

9,355 

1,791 

37,717 

29k 

11,387 

11,971 

17,6lii 

28,863 

191,U56 

211, OWi 

36,513 

Uo,731 

698 

li8,928 

189,915 

1*0,320 

73 

U7,675 

695 

k9 

23,98U 

22,91*0 

231,1*01 

30,395 

16,236 

5U2 

1U,618 

26,262 

12,379 

233 

7,787 

116,735 

50,1*52 



Asia , 

Afghanistan < 

Arabian Peninsula ... 

Bhutan 

Burma , 

Ceylon ........< 

China , 

India 

Indonesia , 

Iran , 

Iraq , 

Israel 

Japan 

Jordan 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Muscat 

Nepal 

Pakistan ............ 

Palestine ........... 

Philippines 

Saudi Arabia 

Syria , 

Thailand 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies ......... 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic, 

Haiti 

Central America . . . . . 

Costa Rica ........ 

Guatemala ......... 

Honduras .......... 

Nicaragua ......... 

P anama ............ 

Panama Canal Zone . 
Salvador 



171.008 



81 

1*13 

16 

li*8 

51* 

32,9U5 

1,1*28 

199 

2,179 

882 

3,866 

72,360 

1,169 

2,381* 

3,751* 

18 

59 

399 

1,097 

1*1*, 007 

53 

3,U22 

75 

609,712 

250, 9U3 

3U*,771 

28.01*0 



20,358 
6,650 
1,032 

15.958 



1,736 
1,561* 
2,069 
3,975 
3,375 
107 
3,132 



South America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brasil ., 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador ............... 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 

Africa 

Egypt 

Ethiopia 

Liberia 

Union of South Africa . 

Australia 

U. S. and possessions 2/. 

United States 

American Samoa 

Guam 

Midway Island 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands 

U. S. possessions not 
specified 

Unknown and not reported. 



19.806 
3,11*8 

551 
2,881 
1,1*61 
1*,769 
3,002 

li*6 
1,71*6 

367 
1,735 

1.978 

752 

1*1 

118 

1,067 

^ .861 



19.216 



17,560 

89 

623 

67 

133 

77 

667 

8.371* 



1/ Figures do not include 31,396 alien address reports that were inoonplete and lll*,106 aliens in the 

~ United States in temporarj status. 

2/ Persons who filed siddress reports because their citizenship status was in doubt. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABIE 35. ALHUS WHO REPORTED UNDER THE ALIEN ADDRESS PROGRAM, BY SEUSCTED 
NATIONALITIES AND STATES OF RESIDQJOE l/: DURING l9Sk 



State of 
residenca 



All 
nation- 
alities 



Germany 



Great 
Britain 



Italy 



Poland 



U.S.SJl. Canada 



Mexico 



Total 

Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware • 

District of Columbia 

Florida , 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois , 

Indiana 

lorra ................ 

Kansas .............. 

Kentucky ............ 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Uassachvisetts ....... 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi ......... 

Missouri ............ 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota ........ 

Ohio 

Oklahoma ............ 



2»36g.8U 



191. U56 



ZU.OUi 



2321212. 



231. Uoi 



116.735 



250.9ii3 



31i^.771 



3,108 
23,359 

1,800 

363,730 

15,923 

69,162 

2,917 

11,172 

3U,522 

U,li21 

Ii,052 

U4l,l75 

2U,5o5 

10,720 

7,315 

3,505 
8,ia2 

18,115 

2h,689 

123,37U 

lia,l53 
22,850 

1,597 
17,621 

5,261 

8,106 
2,878 
9,908 
125,853 
7,hlh. 

5lh,569 

h,6lh 

3,567 

97,212 

l;,0l4l 



960 

UlO 

353 

15,008 

2,lii8 

3,953 

313 

96k 

2,281 

1,001 

336 

17,273 

3,053 

2,261 

1,022 

853 

712 

331 

3,019 

3,605 

9,672 

2,U21 
2m 

2,885 
576 

1,526 

197 

325 

16,332 

las 

51,869 
725 

li95 

10,736 
7U0 



590 

589 

229 

27,71i4 

1,101 

6,050 

U37 

1,607 

7,633 

850 

3li6 

7,758 

2,Uil 

907 

652 

616 

i,ili5 

1,078 

2,928 

10,117 

16,U1U 

1,116 

285 

1,538 

U66 

380 
229 
767 
13,620 
UOl 

59,506 

91*2 

UiO 

8,078 

583 



71 

138 

109 

16,237 

916 

12,639 

253 

770 

1,157 

108 

86 

6,193 

5li; 

337 

lOU 

136 
1,1;32 

396 

2,955 

13,537 

6,5U9 
23U 
103 

1,815 
126 

158 
29U 
188 
19,701* 
109 

71,057 

68 

11* 

7,660 

87 



71 
121* 

96 

5,768 

83U 

13,06l4 
570 
625 
752 
232 

1*7 

29,161 

3,1*73 

572 

181* 

175 

268 

388 

3,219 

ll*,890 

22,735 

1,765 

U7 

1,971* 

269 

558 
28 

991* 

21,398 

51* 

68,039 
180 
158 

12,888 
152 



35 

130 

63 

10,8U6 

1,221* 

i*,317 
237 
637 
622 
105 

89 

8,51*7 

885 

1*17 

295 

71* 

71* 

278 

2,51*9 

5,1*25 

6,039 

1,367 

25 

1,115 

199 

561 

27 

333 

10,328 

38 

38,796 

92 

2i*7 

5,397 

115 



332 

1,512 

158 

1*2,558 

869 

7,110 
199 
858 

7,077 
501 

787 

5,681* 

1,759 

685 

571 

326 
hk3 

13,061i 
1,1*18 

29,103 

36,661i 

3,186 

11*7 

1,006 

1,332 

31*1* 

365 

1*,870 

1*,535 
2li8 

33,1*56 

529 

1,001* 

5,771* 

1*1*0 



53 

18,025 

157 

112,692 

3,1*71 

51 

10 

109 

262 

31 

150 
8,202 
3,017 

658 
2,6U5 

19 

U66 

13 

72 

101 

3,928 

1*12 

26 

1,331 
322 

956 

1*12 

2 

211* 

5,239 

1,669 
21 

15 

1,265 

670 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 35. ALIENS WHO REPCETED UNDER THE ALIEN ADDRESS PROGRAM, BY SEI£CTED 
NATIONALITIES AND STATES OF RESIDENCE 1/: DURING 195U (Contid) 



State of 
residence 



All 
nation- 
alities 



Germany 



Great 
Britain 



Italy 



Poland 



U.S.SJt. 



Canada 



Mexico 



All 
other 



Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota ..........*.. 

Tennessee ..* 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington ............... 

West Virginia ............ 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Territories and possessions! 

Alaska 

Guam ,.... 

Hawaii 

Panama Canal Zone 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands 

Outside the United States . . 

Unknown or not reported . . . . 



17,551 
105,179 

18,712 
2,17U 
2,0U8 

3,U36 

167,379 

10,877 

6,913 
11,153 

Ii7,07li 
6,996 

27,079 
2,1;10 



1,776 
1,382 
59,912 
6 
3,152 
1,610 

3,317 
3,022 



1,282 

10,868 

568 

1415 

392 

595 
3,hSh 
1,810 

199 
1,805 

2,818 
383 

6,887 
203 



226 

3 
2U9 



12 
226 



1,689 

10,112 

2,385 

li8l 

153 

638 
3,62li 
l,Ui47 

U35 
2,Ii8U 

U,13U 
603 

1,U01 
186 



101 

16 

310 

lii6 
1,2U5 

59 

hh2 



521 

13,761 

3,517 

30 

11 

350 
916 
268 
178 
333 

1,U88 

1,262 

592 

Ik 



18 

51 

31 
2 

7 

251 



327 

15,887 

1,682 

96 

U9 

232 
978 
37 
318 
532 

9U3 

779 

3,i*80 

ii3 



12 

1 
15 



10 
205 



51i2 
10,218 

620 
35 
71 

122 
379 
39 
158 
395 

1,0U8 
315 
907 
122 



55 
25 

1 



U 
151 



5,260 

3,696 

3,115 

2li8 

21;5 

396 
2,332 

798 
li,8l6 
1,238 

15,027 

219 

1,297 

215 



6U2 

6 

278 

63 
7 

1,878 
253 



292 
569 

2k 
7 

26 

hS 

1U2,667 

529 

7 

kS 

808 

62 

721 

606 



16 

3 

kk 

70 

1 

1,205 
308 



7,638 

U0,068 

6,801 

862 

1,101 

1,058 

12,999 

5,9k9 

832 

U,321 

20,808 

3,373 

11,79U 

961 



706 

1,353 

58,9UO 

6 

2,79l4 

355 

U*2 

1,186 



1/ Figures do not include 31,396 alien address reports that were inconplete and llit,106 aliens in 
~ the United States in tenporary status. 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 36. ALIENS TNHO REPORTED UNDER THE ALIEN ADDRESS PROGRAM, BY SEIEGTED 
NATIONALITIES AND BY RURAL AND URBAN AREA AND CITY l/: DURING 195U 



Class of place 
and city 



Total 2/ 



Rural 
Urban 



City total 

Los Angeles, Calif... 

Oakland, Calif 

Sacramento, Calif. . . . 

San Diego, Calif 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Denver, Colo 

Bridgeport, Conn 

Hartford, Conn 

New Haven, Conn 

Washington, D. C 

Miami, Fla 

Chicago, 111 

Baltimore, Md 

Boston, Mass 

Fall River, Mass 

Worcester, Mass 

Detroit, Mich 

Minneapolis, Minn.... 

St. Louis, Mo 

Jersey City, N. J.... 

Newark, N. J 

Paterson, N. J....... 

Buffalo, N. Y 

New York, N. Y 

Rochester, N. Y 

Syracuse, N. Y 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Portland, Ore 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Pittsburgh, Pa 

Providence, R. I.,.., 

El Paso, Texas 

Houston, Texas 

San Antonio, Texas . . , 
Salt Lake City,Utah. . 

Seattle, Wash 

Milwaukee , Wis 

Other cities 

U. S. territories and 

possessions 

All other 



All 
nation- 
alities 



2. 36$. 611 



291.967 



719.2li6 



1.277.516 



37,729 
9,699 
8,519 
7,282 

U0,960 
7,630 
6,976 
9,363 
5,396 

11,172 

12,607 
108,09li 

17,3U8 

27,71*6 
U,839 
5,516 

7U,918 
8,355 
8,857 
6,81i6 

16,875 

7,671 

20,223 

371,833 

12,23U 

6,125 
ai,553 

8,967 
3U,910 
10,307 

7,508 
21,U01 
10,12U 
13,207 

6,959 

20,621 

13,311i 

183,831; 



67,838 
9,21^2 



Germany 



191.U56 



26.6U6 



56.652 



107.116 

3,58U 
507 
311 
265 

2,589 

1,169 
282 
li62 
3li9 
961; 
570 
12,178 

1,711 

9U2 

^9 

170 

h,3S9 
700 

1,U38 
771; 

1,515 
759 

1,881; 
35,613 

1,307 
51;5 

3,979 
591 

1;,191 

1,133 
261 
227 
558 
USo 

i,l;52 
956 

3,519 
11;, 783 



522 
520 



Great 
Britain 



211.0l4li 



27.600 



65 , ^? 



mi.875 



57953 

952 

J;28 

7l;2 

3,373 

598 

577 

81;9 

398 

1,607 

2,811 

1;,387 

1,1;77 

2,3l;9 

193 

283 

9,156 

1;23 

509 

555 

1,126 

Jil)i 

1,607 

k3,h99 

1,062 

515 
1,926 

85t> 
3,1;69 

975 

61;8 
177 
622 
1;22 
939 
1,823 
535 
16,610 



1,818 
792 



Italy 



189.915 



I6.82U 



^U,176 



llS. ^UO 



1,U00 

689 

1;65 

168 

3,158 

1;28 

1,291; 

1,51;3 

1,169 

770 

223 

1;,381; 

2,1;76 

3,763 

61 

h2h 

1;,685 

36 

1,270 

1,182 

3,259 

2,271 

1,919 

52,160 

2,117 

969 

2,97U 

3l;8 

3,81;7 

1,688 

2,2U8 

39 

2h9 

98 

80 

631; 

305 

13,257 



102 
1;73 



Poland 



231. UOl 



20.288 



56.527 



151;. 120 



2,827 

220 

80 

120 

805 

628 

958 

1,935 

783 

625 

327 

26,1;38 

2,909 

2,255 

U98 

821; 

1I;,116 

817 

1,026 

1,837 

3,060 

1,0140 

5,309 

l;7,l;0l; 

1,330 

1,191 

7,115 

215 

5,387 

1,593 

576 

29 

252 

161 

25 

1;37 

2,057 

16,911 



31 
1;35 



U.S.S.R. 



116.735 



8 ,05 ^ 



22.588 



8^.72 6 



3,760 

170 

159 

77 

3,U35 
571 
1;1;7 
862 
791 
637 
278 

7,8ia 

2,285 

2,Ol;6 

89 

251; 

3,967 
875 
51;2 
61;9 

2,31i; 
921 

1,358 
30,583 

1,168 
597 

3,395 
375 

6,275 

61;0 

351; 

12 

110 

h3 

32 

1;96 

khS 

6,872 



81 
285 



Canada 



25D.9l;3 



U6.516 



99.679 



101.228 



17^ 

1,063 
651; 

1,179 

2,215 
1;59 
269 

1,221 
307 
858 

1,736 

3,086 
636 

5,551 

562 

758 

18,903 

1,117 

252 

169 

3l;0 

96 

1;,651; 
10,057 

1,799 
9l;3 

1,531; 

2,612 
857 
1;37 
708 
106 
521; 
197 
375 

6,533 

hho 

18,770 



996 
2,521; 



Mexico 



311;. 771 



1^5.385 



11^5.271; 



122.101 



33,666 

1,258 

l,9l;0 

2,991 

2,865 

850 

3 

2 

3 

109 

61; 

6,215 

38 

23 

2 

3 

1,966 

76 

166 

10 

23 

20 

50 

1,366 

11 

13 

122 
72 

lOl 

92 

15 

20,121 

5,997 

10,1;59 

205 

97 

1;32 

30,650 



131; 
1,877 



All 
other 



859.51;6 



100 .65 3 



218.391 



l;7l;.012 



27,258 
1;,81;0 
1;,1;82 
l,7l;0 

22,520 
2,927 
3,ll;6 
2,1;89 
1,296 
5,602 
6,598 

1;3,565 
5,816 

10,817 
3,395 
2,810 

17,761; 
1;,311 
3,651; 
1,670 
5,238 
2,150 
3,14;2 
151,151 
3,hkO 
1,352 

20,508 
3,898 

10,780 
3,7l;9 
2,698 
690 
1,812 
l,3l;7 
3,851 
9,61;5 
5,580 

65,981 



61;,15U 
2,336 



1/ Rural - Population of less than 2,500. Urban - Population of 2,500 to 99,999. 

Cities - Population of 100,000 or over. 
2/ Does not include 31,396 alien address reports that were incomplete, and lll;,106 

eiliens in temporary status. 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 37. DECIARATI0N3 OF INTENTION FIXED, PETITIOKS FOR NATURALIZATION FILED, 
AND miSONS NATURALIZED: TEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1907 TO 195U 



Period 



1907 - 1951i 
1907 - 1910 

1911 - 1920 

1911 .... 

1912 .... 

1913 .... 
19lli ..». 

1915 .... 

1916 .... 

1917 .... 

1918 .... 

1919 .... 

1920 .... 



1921 - 1930 

1921 .... 

1922 .... 

1923 .... 
192U .... 

1925 .... 

1926 .... 

1927 .... 

1928 .... 

1929 .... 

1930 .... 



1931 - 19U0 

1931 .... 

1932 .... 

1933 .... 
193U .... 

1935 .... 

1936 .... 

1937 .... 

1938 .... 

1939 .... 
19U0 .... 



19U1 - 1950 

19lil .... 

19U2 .... 

19U3 .... 

19UU .... 

19U5 .... 

19U6 .... 

19U7 .... 

19U8 .... 

19U9 .... 

1950 .... 



1951 
1952 
1953 
195U 



Declara- 
tions 
filed 



8.ait7.62U 



526,322 



2.686.909 



189, 2U9 
171,133 
182,095 
2lU,10l4 
2U7,958 
209, 20U 
l;iiO,65l 
3lt2,283 
391,156 
299,076 



2.709.03i; 



303, 90U 
273,511 
296,636 
U2U,51iO 
277,218 
277,539 
258,295 
25I;,588 
280, 6U5 
62,138 



1.369.U79 



106,272 

101,3i45 

83,0U6 

108,079 
136,52Ji 
m8,ll8 
176,195 
150,673 
155,691 
203,536 



920, 28U 



22li,123 
221,796 
115, 66U 
U2,368 
31,195 
28,787 
37,771 
60,187 
61i,866 
93,527 



91,U97 

lll,U6l 

23,558 

9,100 



Petitions 
filed 



7.369.Uli6 



l6ii,036 



1.381.38U 

7U, 7U0 

95,661 

95,380 

12U,U75 

106,399 

108,767 

130,865 

169,507 

256,858 

218,732 



I.88U.277 
195,53U 
162,638 
165,168 
177,117 
162,258 
172,232 
2140,339 
2140,321 
255,519 
113,151 



Persons naturalized 



Civilian Military 



6p8l4.56U 
111.738 



70,310 
83,561 

10U,ll45 
9l,8U8 
87,831 
88,10U 
87,U56 
89,023 

125,711 



1.716.979 



2^ 



131,062 
112,629 
117,125 
131,378 
167,127 
165,1614 
175,U13 
213,U13 
278,028 



1.938.066 



277,807 

3li3,U87 

377,125 

325,717 

195,917 

123, 86U 

88,802- 

68,265 

71,OUl4 

66,038 



163,656 
160,979 
137,975 
lhO,3hD 
152,U57 
1146,239 
195, U93 
228,006 
221^,197 
167,637 



U88.076 



Total 



2UI4.30O 



63,993 

128,335 

51,972 



1.U98.573 



li40,271 
136,598 
112,368 
110,867 
118, 9U5 
ll40,78U 
162,923 
158,1142 
185,175 
232,500 



1.837,229 



6l,63li 

9U,086 

98,128 

130,722 



275, 7U7 

268,762 

281,1459 

392,766 

208,707 

13U,8U9 

77,liii2 

69,080 

614,138 

614,279 



^6,206 

17,636 

9,U68 

7,109 

10,170 

92 

14,311 

5,11+9 

531 

1,7140 



6.872. 6I4O 



111.738 



1.128.972 

70,310 
83,561 

10l4,ll45 

91,8148 

87,831 

88,10i4 

151, U49 

217,358 

177,683 



1.773.185 



19.891 
3,22U 



995 
2,802 

I48I 
2,053 
3,936 
3,638 
2,760 



U49.799 



53,710. 

87,070 

90,1476 

1014,086 



1,602 
37,U7U 1/ 
149,213 1/ 
22,695 1/ 
15,213 1/ 
16,1462 1/ 

1,070 

2,l456 

2,067 



975 

1,585 

1,575 

13, 7I45 



181,292 

170,l4l47 

U45,08U 
150,510 
152,1457 
lli6,331 
199,8014 
233,155 
22U,728 

169,377 



1.5l8.U6t4 



m3,U95 
136,600 
113,363 
113,669 
118,9145 
lla,265 
1614,976 
162,078 
188,813 
235,260 



1.987.028 

277,29U 

270,3614 

318,933 

l4lil,979 

231,1402 

150,062 

93,90l4 

70,150 

66,59U 

66,3U6 



514,716 

88,655 

92,051 

117,831 



1/ Members of the armed forces include 1,1+25 naturalised overseas in 19k3i 
6,k96 in 19UI4J 5,666 in 19U5j 2,05U in I9U6} ^,370 In 1947; and 2,981 

in 1954. 

United States Dripartaant of Justice 
Imudgration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 38. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY GENERAL AND SPECIAL NATURALIZATION PROVISIONS 1/ 
AND COUNTRY OR REGION OF FORMER ALLEGIANCE: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 195U 



Coxmtry or region 
of former 
allegiance 



Total 
nvimber 



Persons naturalized 



Under 
general 
natural- 
ization 
provi- 
sions 



Married 
to 
U. S. 
citizens 



Children 
of U. S. 
citizen 
parents 



Military- 



Other 



All countries 



Europe 

Austria „. 

Belgium ....... 

British Enquire 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Estonia ....... 

Finland ....... 

France 

Germany 

Greece ........ 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia ........ 

Lithuania 

Netherlands ... 



Norway 

Poland 

Portugal . , . , 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland . 

U. S. S . R. a 

Yugoslavia . . 
Other Europe 



Asia 

China 

Israel 

Japan ...... 

Lebanon . . . . 
Palestine .. 
Philippines 

Syria 

Other Asia , 



North America . . . . 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies .... 
Central America 



South America 

Africa 

Stateless & miscellaneous. 



117.831 



83,298 



2,191 

772 

16,565 

93 

2,969 

791 

335 

523 

2,177 

n,679 

2,59U 

1,719 

5,32l4 

10,926 

556 

1,26U 

1,979 

l,li26 

8,5U2 

1,W7 

772 

815 

1,272 

669 

3,832 

l,2i;l 

809 

12.170 



1,880 
177 

6,750 
282 
303 

1,863 
211i 
701 



13,062 

3,710 

1,738 

9Ul 

821 

127 

1,96U 



86,166 



1^»977 



1,208 



60.093 



1,680 

519 

12,322 

63 

2,336 
5U2 
159 
Ul9 

1,251 

6,906 

1,777 

1,293 

3,931 

8,188 

2l;9 

833 

l,liU3 

1,076 

6,588 

1,163 

581 

652 

1,017 

W7 

3,169 

796 

653 

1,515 
132 

6,212 
205 
255 

l,l61i 
160 
532 

9,628 

2,875 

l,261i 

60li 

U98 

66 

963 



11.860 



372 

15U 

2,779 

15 

25ii 

67 

32 

UU 

5U7 

2,83li 

UOU 

152 

235 

1,903 

h-i 

75 

150 

155 
636 

18U 
71 
76 

112 
90 

267 

130 
79 

ifr 

2li 
U19 
57 
12 
228 
38 
78 



1,928 

129 
113 

126 
23 

360 



693 



22 

10 

105 

10 

5 

9 

25 

221 

32 

7 
52 
63 
17 

5 
10 

13 

26 

28 

6 

1 

1 

2 

3 

17 

3 

118 



6 
12 

3 
37 

1 
3 

J62_ 



318 

17 

18 

9 

10 

5 

20 



13.7U5 



10.293 



115 
88 

1,311 
21 
366 
lli7 
120 
38 
3liO 

1,711; 
360 
263 

1,106 
738 
2i;0 
3U9 
367 
160 

1,272 

63 

113 

103 

87 

387 

289 

71 

621 



101 
15 
\xl 
18 
31 

310 
lii 
85 

2.036 



1,158 
387 
317 
171^ 

163 

28 

60li 



2^ 



J^l. 



2 

1 

ue 

3 
30 

2li 
13 
Hi 

U 
21 

h 

3U 
7 
2 

9 
22 
20 
19 

1 
21 

3 
6 
9 
3 

2U2 



50 

60 
2 
2 

12ii 
1 
3 

88 



30 
7 

10 

Ul 

21; 

5 

17 



1/ See also table i;7 for detailed figures by naturalization provisions 



United States Department of Justice 
Imnigration and Naturalization Service 






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TABLE Al. PERSONS NATURALIZED AND PETITIONS FOR NATURALIZATION DENIED: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1907 TO 195L 



Period 



Total 



Persons 
naturalized 



Petitions 
denied 



Percent 
denied 



1907 - 1954. 

1907 - 1910. 

1911 - 1920. 

1921 - 1930. 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 

1928 

1929 

1930 

1931 - 1940. 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

1936 

1937 

1938 

1939 

1940 

19a - 1950. 

1941 

1942 

1943 

1944 

1945 

1946 

1947 

1948 

1949 

1950 

1951 

1952 

1953 

1954 



7«294.108 



12?, 440 



1,247, 6?7 



1«938.678 



200 
199 
169 
168 
168 

159 
211 

245 
236 
178 



,273 
,523 
,968 

,834 
,070 
,605 
,750 
,634 
,576 
,445 



1-564.256 



151,009 
142,078 
118,066 
114,802 
121,710 
144,389 
169 018 
166,932 
194,A43 
241,809 



1,0^ 



285 

278 

332 

449 

2a 

156 

97 

73 

68 

68 




,712 
,589 
,276 
,184 
,637 
,857 
,037 
,865 
,622 



57,111 
90,818 

94,351 
119,915 



6.872.640 



421.468 



111.7?^ 



17.702 



1.128.972 



118*221 



1.773.185 



181,292 
170,447 
145,084 
150,510 
152,457 
146,331 
199,804 
233,155 
224,728 

169,377 



165, 4?? 



1.518.464 



143,495 
136,600 
113,363 
113,669 
118,945 
141,265 
164,976 
162,078 
188,813 
235,260 



1.987.028 



277,294 
270,364 
318,933 
4a,979 
231,402 
150,062 
93,904 
70,150 

66,594 
66,346 



54,716 

88,655 

92,051 

117,831 



18,981 
29,076 
24,884 
18,324 
15,613 
13,274 
11,946 

12,479 

11,848 

9,068 



4^.7?2 



7,514 
5,478 
4,703 
1,133 
2,765 
3,124 
4,042 
4,854 
5,630 

6,549 



64.814 
7,769 
8,348 

13,656 
7,297 
9,782 
6,575 
3,953 
2,887 
2,271 
2,276 



2,395 
2,163 
2,300 
2,084 



-i^ 



13,7 



1^ 



lil 



9.5 

14.6 

14.6 

10.9 

9.3 

8.3 

5.6 

5.1 
5.0 
5.1 



2^ 



5.0 
3.9 
4.0 
1.0 

2.3 
2.2 

2.4 
2.9 
2.9 
2.7 



J^ 



2.7 
3.0 
4.1 
1.6 

4.1 
4.2 
4.0 
4.0 
3.3 
3.3 



4.2 
2.4 
2.4 
1.7 



United States Department of Justice 
Tirnni gration and Naturalization Service 



TART.F, k2. PERSONS NATURALIZED, 
PERCENT OF TOTAL: 


BY SEX AND MARITAL STATUS, WITH COMPARATIVE 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1946 TO 1954 


Sex and 

marital 
status 


19461/ 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 




Number 


Both sexes 


148.008 


93.904 


70.150 


66.594 


66.346 


54.716 


88.655 


92.051 


117.331 


Single... 
Married.. 
Widowed , . 
Divorced, 


30,236 

101,828 

12,207 

3,737 


19,697 

64,704 

6,988 

2,515 


12,206 

50,518 

5,429 

1,997 


9,623 

50,723 

4,604 

1,644 


8,489 

52,025 

4,218 

1,614 


5,859 

44,333 

3,262 

1,262 


8,821 

72,578 

5,450 

1,806 


12,127 

72, U7 

5,886 

1,891 


27,701 

79,034 

8,630 

2,466 


Male 


74.250 


52.998 


33.147 


27.865 


25.745 


18.711 


28.597 


34.657 


54.477 


Single,,, 
Married , , 
Widowed., 
Divorced, 


18,416 

50,668 

3,235 

1,931 


13,567 

35,942 

2,032 

1,457 


7,449 

23,200 

1,466 

1,032 


6,142 

19,833 

1,089 

801 


5,710 

18,345 

921 

769 


3,489 
14,100 

615 
507 


5,276 

21,791 

896 

634 


7,253 

25,777 

926 

701 


19,909 

32,061 

1,608 

899 


Female 


73.758 


40.906 


37.003 


38.729 


40.601 


36.005 


60.058 


57.394 


63.354 


Single.,. 
Married,, 
Widowed,, 
Divorced, 


11,820 

51,160 

8,972 

1,806 


6,130 

28,762 

4,956 

1,058 


4,757 

27,318 

3,963 

965 


3,431 

30,890 

3,515 

843 


2,779 
33,680 

3,297 
845 


2,370 

30,233 

2,647 

755 


3,545 

50,787 

4,554 

1,172 


4,874 

46,370 

4,960 

1,190 


7,792 

46,973 
7,022 

1,567 










Percent 


of tota 


1 








Both sexes 


100.0 


100,0 


lOOftO 


100,0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100,0 


100,0 


Single.., 
Married., 
Widowed . , 
Divorced, 


20,4 

68.9 

8.2 

2.5 


21,0 

68,9 

7.4 

2.7 


17 ft 4 

72.1 

7.7 

2.8 


14,4 
76.2 

6,9 
2.5 


12.8 

78.4 

6.4 

2.4 


10.7 

81.0 

6.0 

2.3 


10.0 

81.9 

6.1 

2.0 


13.2 

78.4 

6,4 

2,0 


23.5 

67,1 

7.3 

2,1 


Male 


50.2 


56.4 


47.3 


41,8 


38.8 


34.2 


32.3 


37.6 


46.2 


Single... 
Married,, 
Widowed . . 
Divorced, 


12.4 

34.3 

2.2 

1.3 


14.4 

38.3 

2.1 

1.6 


10.6 

33.1 

2.1 

1.5 


9,2 

29.8 

1.6 

1.2 


8.6 

27.7 

1.4 

1.1 


6.4 

25.8 

1.1 

0,9 


6.0 

24,6 

1.0 

0.7 


7.9 

28.0 

1.0 

0.7 


16.9 
27,2 

1.3 
0.8 


Female 


49,8 


43.6 


52,7 


58.2 


61.2 


65.8 


67.7 


62,4 


53,8 


Single.., 
Married,, 
Widowed,, 
Divorced . 


8,0 

34,6 

6,0 

1.2 


6,6 

30.6 

5o3 

1.1 


6.8 

39.0 

5.6 

1.3 


5.2 

46.4 

5.3 

1.3 


4.2 

50,7 

5.0 

1.3 


4.3 
55o2 

4.9 
1.4 


4,0 

57.3 

5,1 

1.3 


5,3 

50,4 

5.4 

1.3 


6,6 

39.9 

6,0 

1.3 



1/ Does not include 2,054 members of the armed forces naturalized overseas. 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 





TABLE 43. PJfiHSONS NATURALIZED, BT SEX AND AGE: 








YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, ] 


L946 TO 1954 






Sex and age 


19461/ 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


Both sexes 


14S.008 


9? ,904 


70.150 


-66,1121 


66,?46 


?4,716 


88,655 


92,0^1 


117, 8?1 


Under 21 years 


1,244 


544 


476 


987 


1,003 


726 


1,052 


1,206 


3,787 


21 to 25 " 


7,269 


5,495 


2,970 


6,297 


7,742 


6,238 


9,785 


8,927 


14,810 


26 to 30 " 


7,818 


6,627 


3,783 


6,074 


8,570 


8,295 


14,739 


15,176 


16,290 


31 to 35 " 


10,823 


7,221 


4,131 


4,886 


5,355 


4,751 


8,890 


10,722 


11,569 


36 to /fO " 


16,289 


11,205 


7,867 


7,107 


6,535 


5,479 


8,301 


8,956 


8,831 


41 to 45 " 


19,341 


U,091 


11,113 


9,164 


8,144 


6,127 


9,190 


9,426 


9,895 


46 to 50 " 


20,142 


13,137 


11,170 


9,198 


8,239 


6,699 


9,790 


9,681 


10,584 


51 to 55 " 


20,783 


11,531 


9,481 


7,822 


6,937 


5,554 


9,090 


8,977 


12,650 


56 to 60 " 


18,599 


9,601 


8,018 


6,4U 


5,773 


4,476 


7,337 


7,792 


10,821 


61 to 65 " 


13,185 


7,347 


5,637 


4,473 


4,298 


3,269 


5,318 


5,658 


8,816 


66 to 70 " 


7,636 


4,260 


3,304 


2,551 


2,289 


1,884 


3,077 


3,306 


5,606 


71 to 75 " 


3,298 


1,953 


1,445 


1,084 


926 


823 


1,374 


1,468 


2,707 


Over 75 " 


1,581 


892 


755 


510 


535 


395 


712 


756 


1,465 


Male 


*'74'.256' 


'52!998* 


'33;i47' 


*27!865" 


'25I745' 


'is!?!!* 


*28*.597' 


*34!657' 


**54*.477 


Under 21 years 


1,115 


406 


257 


433 


371 


282 


405 


496 


2,343 


21 to 25 " 


3,297 


3,032 


711 


1,239 


1,732 


1,019 


1,890 


2,804 


10,133 


26 to 30 " 


3,719 


4,ia 


1,094 


1,705 


2,375 


1,835 


3,369 


4,757 


7,295 


31 to 35 " 


5,116 


4,073 


1,569 


1,925 


2,026 


1,510 


2,830 


4,127 


4,622 


36 to 40 " 


7,902 


6,425 


3,672 


3,257 


2,825 


2,003 


3,087 


3,822 


3,908 


41 to 45 " 


9,151 


8,185 


5,625 


4,254 


3,574 


2,387 


3,337 


3,914 


4,187 


46 to 50 « 


9,481 


7,505 


5,679 


4,271 


3,615 


2,868 


3,685 


3,890 


4,294 


51 to 55 " 


10,095 


6,122 


4,535 


3,488 


2,870 


2,192 


3,167 


3,373 


5,129 


56 to 60 " 


9,926 


5,051 


4,098 


2,971 


2,471 


1,779 


2,600 


2,901 


3,997 


61 to 65 " 


7,535 


4,195 


2,981 


2,186 


2,052 


1,356 


2,036 


2,212 


3,710 


66 to 70 " 


4,236 


2,310 


1,737 


1,297 


1,088 


882 


1,253 


1,391 


2,773 


71 to 75 " 


1,819 


1,075 


766 


570 


467 


417 


614 


641 


1,390 


Over 75 " 


858 


478 


423 


269 


279 


181 


324 


329 


696 


Female 


"73*.758* 


'46 '.966* 


'37'.663* 


*38*.729' 


*46*.66i* 


* 36 '.665* 


'66!658* 


*57*.394* 


**63!354 


Under 21 years 


129 


138 


219 


554 


632 


444 


647 


710 


1,444 


21 to 25 " 


3,972 


2,463 


2,259 


5,058 


6,010 


5,219 


7,895 


6,123 


4,677 


26 to 30 " 


4,099 


2,486 


2,689 


4,369 


6,195 


6,460 


11,370 


10,U9 


8,995 


31 to 35 " 


5,707 


3,U8 


2,562 


2,961 


3,329 


3,241 


6,060 


6,595 


6,947 


36 to 40 " 


8,387 


4,780 


4,195 


3,850 


3,710 


3,476 


5,2L4 


5,134 


4,923 


a to 45 " 


10,190 


5,906 


5,488 


4,910 


4,570 


3,740 


5,853 


5,512 


5,708 


46 to 50 " 


10,661 


5,632 


5,491 


4,927 


4,624 


3,831 


6,105 


5,791 


6,290 


51 to 55 " 


10,688 


5,409 


4,946 


4,334 


4,067 


3,362 


5,923 


5,604 


7,521 


56 to 60 " 


8,673 


4,550 


3,920 


3,470 


3,302 


2,697 


4,737 


4,891 


6,824 


61 to 65 " 


5,650 


3,152 


2,656 


2,287 


2,246 


1,913 


3,282 


3,446 


5,106 


66 to 70 " 


3,400 


1,950 


1,567 


1,254 


1,201 


1,002 


1,824 


1,915 


2,833 


71 to 75 " 


1,479 


878 


679 


5U 


459 


406 


760 


827 


1,317 


Over 75 ♦• 


723 


4U 


332 


?41 


256 


214 


388 


427 


769 


1/ Does not Include '. 


2.054 meml 


Ders of t 


.he arme 


d forces 


natural 


ized ove 


rseas. 







United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE UU, PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY STATES AND TERRITORIES OF RESIDENCE: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1950 TO 195/t 



State of residence 



1950 



1951 



1952 



1953 



1954 



Total 

Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia. 

Florida 

Georgia. , 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

lovra .••...••.. 

Kansas • • 

Kentucky 

Louisiana , 

Maine • ..•, 

Maryland ••, 

Massachusetts « 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouzd 

Montana. 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire , 

New Jersey..... 

New Mexico. 

New York 

North Carolina , 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 



66.346 



^4.716 



88.655 



92.0?1 



117.831 



140 

3a 

44 

9,488 

358 

1,753 

90 

466 

957 

200 

85 

3,367 

577 

329 

198 

198 
245 
475 
489 
4,861 

3,475 

567 

60 

502 

166 

156 

68 

318 

3,742 

125 

20,499 
188 

93 

2,254 

160 



126 

283 

52 

7,879 

381 

1,093 
59 

371 
1,276 

126 

93 

2,201 

403 

257 

265 

107 
270 
591 
558 
3,436 

2,763 

545 

86 

451 

136 

170 

55 

252 

2,700 

134 

17,990 

210 

138 

1,386 

234 



231 
387 
108 
12,258 
533 

2,864 
178 
615 

1,524 
553 

156 

2,942 

1,048 

445 

340 

290 
411 
737 
949 
6,593 

5,288 
722 
111 
726 
236 

253 
106 
431 
4,131 
164 

27,120 

359 

108 

2,855 

305 



197 

537 

94 

12,728 

492 

2,9a 
102 
497 

1,757 
374 

U7 
4,236 
848 
379 
348 

235 
582 
802 
975 
5,768 

4,848 
829 
118 
551 
194 

232 
124 
554 
4,143 
215 

29,780 

292 

148 

2,611 

208 



299 

793 

124 

15,533 

1,170 

3,446 
201 
884 

2,844 
407 

274 

6,395 

1,016 

511 

334 

461 

498 

1,093 

2,016 

8,054 

7,368 
959 
189 
643 

a6 
a6 

175 

650 

5,436 

229 

31,118 

787 

231 

2,972 

268 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE kU, PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY STATES AND TERRITORIES OF RESIDENCE: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1950 TO 195/i. (Cont'd) 



State of residence 



1950 



1951 



1952 



1953 



1954 



Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Territories and other ; 

Alaska 

Hawaii 

Puei*to Rico 

Virgin Islands 

All other 



451 
2,443 

521 
93 
89 

106 

1,353 

125 

232 

a3 

1,176 

175 

623 

69 



95 

1,087 

55 

62 

144 



278 
2,312 

a9 

74 
73 

105 

1,192 

81 

224 

456 

1,032 

112 

515 

58 



78 
512 
57 
36 
25 



601 
4,028 

707 

134 

91 

222 

1,989 

162 

258 

712 

1,755 

2U 

796 

80 



104 

526 

78 

35 

56 



431 
4,461 

699 

147 

88 

282 
1,6a 
207 
301 
770 

1,724 

197 

883 

56 



206 
760 
108 
67 
137 



842 
4,657 
958 
170 
216 

202 

2,452 

612 

a9 

827 

3,000 
268 
981 
120 



360 

3,143 

163 

150 

81 



United States Department of Jtistlce 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 45. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY SPECIFIED COUNTRIES OF FORMER ALLEGIANCE 
AND BY RURAL AND URBAN AREA AND CITY 1/: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1954 



Class of place 
and city 



Total. 



Rural. 



Urban. 



City total 

Los Angeles « Calif.... 

Oakland, Calif 

San Diego, Calif 

San Francisco, Calif.. 

Bridgeport , Conn 

Hartford, Conn 

New Haven, Conn 

Washington, D. C 

Miami, Fla 

Chicago, 111 

New Orleans , La 

Baltimore , Hd 

Boston, Mass 

Cambridge, Mass 

Fall River, Mass 

New Bedford, Mass 

Springfield, Mass 

Vforcester, Mass 

Detroit, Mich 

Minneapolis, Minn 

St. Louis, Mo 

Jersey City, N. J 

Newark, N. J 

Paterson, N. J 

Buffalo, N. Y 

New York, N. Y 

Rochester, N. Y 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Cleveland , Ohio 

Portland, Ore 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Pittsburgh, Pa 

Scranton, Pa 

Providence, R. I...... 

San Antonio, Tex 

Seattle, Wash 

Milwaukee, Wis 

Other cities 



Total 



U. S. territories 

possessions 

All others 



and 



117.8?1 



2Ui^ 



32.493 



67.^27 



3,234 
540 
350 

2,642 
290 
598 
400 
884 

1,054 

4,809 
284 

1,062 

2,428 
296 
264 
211 
367 
410 

3,929 
306 
160 
250 
640 
280 
483 
25,166 
428 
301 
824 
399 

1,581 

509 

62 

456 

358 

1,457 

392 

9,423 



3,854 
504 



British 
Empire 



Country of former allegiance 



16 . ?6 ? 



2.26? 



5.488 



8.576 



292 
42 
82 

168 
17 
59 
38 

105 

387 

283 
42 

101 

238 
27 
10 
12 
44 
34 

626 
27 
12 
30 
61 
28 
62 
3,596 
70 
31 
66 
46 

254 
70 
12 
61 
28 

102 

34 

1,379 



194 
38 



Canada 



13.06 2 



2.07? 



5.291 



5,5^i^ 



407 
46 
12 
98 
14 
84 
25 
51 
85 

222 
10 
46 

521 

91 

40 

40 

78 

72 

1,129 

45 

9 

3 

17 
8 

127 

590 

105 
17 
31 

118 
44 
20 

88 

9 

283 

14 
955 



108 
30 



Germany 



11.679 



1.638 



?.078 



6.775 



i 



249 
45 
19 

281 
13 
40 
19 
75 
50 

670 
8 

142 

79 

12 

2 

1 

24 

4 

212 
37 
38 
16 
69 
25 
47 
2,813 
58 
73 
79 
61 

216 
86 
4 
24 
29 
79 

lU 

962 



98 
90 



Italy 



;Q.9?6 



851 



3.025 



7.007 



92 
32 
19 

257 
85 

109 

141 
57 
22 

378 
23 

181 

290 

29 

8 

1 

46 
33 

346 

12 
61 

127 
87 
44 
3,251 
61 
26 
91 
9 

172 
84 
17 
67 
12 
15 
22 

700 



20 
23 



Poland 



8.542 



708 



1.664 



6.093 



15? 
8 
13 
45 
23 
81 
41 
61 

33 

706 

6 

120 

125 

10 

27 

15 

46 

39 

444 

22 

13 

46 

96 

41 

81 

2,901 

29 

7 

77 

7 

134 

63 

12 

20 

9 

19 

45 

472 



14 
63 



U.S.S.R. 



3.832 



J50. 



J§L 



2.692 



155 

8 

4 

93 

8 

42 

26 

43 

31 

134 

1 

80 

228 

7 

4 

6 

13 
10 

139 

3 
5 

8 
39 

7 

11 

1,091 

12 

8 

38 

12 

150 

12 

2 
17 

3 

27 

17 

198 



7 
20 



1/ Rural - Population of less than 2,500. Urban - Population of 2,500 to 99,999. 



Cities - Population of 100,000 or over 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TAHLB 46, PERSOMS NATURALIZED, BT COUNTRT OR REGION OF BIRTH AND YEAH OF ENTHI: 

lEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1954 



Coontrx or region 
of birth 



Number 
























natural- 
ised 


1954 


1953 


1952 


1951 


1950 


1940- 
1949 


1930- 
1939 


1920- 
1929 


1910- 
1919 


Before 
1910 


Un- 
known 


117.831 


80 


606 


2,0?8 


2,?0? 


^.272 


?7.W2 


?.468 


19,772 


1^.20? 


10,047 


244 


79 .4U 


?o 


?8? 


1.52lf 


li?23 


?i?H 


42.228 


?,221 


11.089 


8.788 


6.774 


11? 


2,227 


1 


35 


ji 


51 


61 


1,185 


71 


174 


304 


259 




840 


- 


4 


9 


24 


23 


682 


14 


40 


28 


16 


- 


111 


. 


— 


3 


8 


4 


62 


5 


14 


10 


5 


_ 


3,160 


3 


7 


81 


112 


128 


2,106 


100 


200 


210 


211 


2 


776 


1 


11 


25 


37 


37 


413 


18 


106 


53 


67 


8 


317 


2 


1 


2 


15 


38 


224 


10 


10 


1 


9 


5 


5U 


•> 


3 


3 


6 


10 


203 


24 


79 


119 


91 


3 


1,953 


5 


23 


45 


64 


96 


1,426 


65 


125 


54 


49 


1 


12,483 


18 


132 


670 


515 


801 


7,402 


551 


1,923 


191 


269 


11 


2,443 


3 


16 


23 


152 


69 


859 


208 


a6 


502 


188 


7 


1,817 


- 


6 


26 


72 


90 


861 


57 


128 


303 


273 


1 


5,494 


- 


10 


29 


43 


210 


3,531 


190 


954 


244 


282 


1 


10,776 


4 


30 


60 


74 


340 


4,223 


635 


1,901 


2,006 


1,497 


6 


567 


- 


2 


7 


30 


110 


322 


11 


29 


20 


30 


6 


1,255 


— 


- 


12 


27 


95 


583 


18 


80 


244 


195 


1 


1,809 


2 


7 


a 


48 


103 


1,258 


57 


134 


108 


48 


3 


1,427 


- 


9 


20 


26 


53 


771 


61 


234 


118 


125 


10 


8,989 


1 


8 


100 


246 


381 


5,110 


157 


655 


1,349 


977 


5 


1,408 


1 


7 


10 


4 


23 


289 


60 


282 


450 


275 


7 


928 


1 


3 


34 


30 


51 


449 


60 


132 


88 


78 


2 


793 


- 


5 


3 


5 


11 


198 


76 


184 


231 


70 


10 


1,252 


_ 


5 


12 


13 


17 


440 


37 


347 


196 


176 


9 


666 


- 


9 


12 


U 


33 


385 


31 


109 


U 


30 


2 


7,295 


4 


26 


66 


69 


Ul 


4,934 


272 


1,066 


421 


289 


7 


792 


1 


3 


7 


U 


17 


482 


42 


156 


27 


43 


~ 


2,546 


1 


4 


16 


25 


43 


1,232 


178 


840 


139 


67 


1 


281 


— 


- 


- 


4 


2 


178 


U 


55 


13 


13 


2 


4,226 


_ 


9 


26 


67 


128 


1,4U 


47 


425 


1,080 


1,027 


3 


1,374 


1 


4 


65 


99 


134 


570 


89 


U7 


164 


99 


2 


865 


1 


6 


31 


29 


65 


436 


63 


144 


74 


16 


- 


12.873 


12 


87 


287 


216 


211 


2,??6 


721 


2.989 


3.903 


1.838 


7? 


2,054 


1 


30 


21 


24 


48 


725 


2^5 


538 


260 


120 


22 


137 


1 


2 


- 


- 


5 


85 


10 


U 


13 


7 


— 


6,605 


5 


18 


179 


85 


11 


124 


117 


1,510 


3,101 


1,448 


7 


170 


1 


2 


5 


5 


13 


113 


11 


9 


10 


1 


. 


1,886 


1 


21 


45 


60 


61 


760 


206 


578 


105 


6 


43 


2,021 


3 


14 


37 


42 


73 


729 


112 


340 


4U 


256 


1 


23.168 


10 


^5 


218 


290 


6?0 


HiW 


ii43?, 


5.495 


2.495 


1.317 


?4 


13,233 


1 


2^ 


100 


158 


411 


6,^3 


977 


3,098 


862 


908 


9 


3,726 


3 


9 


18 


13 


30 


730 


196 


1,426 


1,070 


230 


1 


4,758 


1 


23 


64 


75 


150 


2,709 


189 


864 


517 


157 


9 


1,013 


4 


18 


20 


35 


49 


765 


a 


52 


17 


5 


7 


438 


1 


9 


16 


9 


10 


248 


36 


55 


29 


17 


8 


1,023 


2 


21 


30 


35 


52 


619 


54 


133 


48 


21 


8 


472 


6 


23 


19 


22 


27 


323 


12 


17 


U 


10 


2 


590 


- 


5 


1 


6 


9 


522 


6 


15 


9 


12 


5 


294 


- 


> 


19 


17 


9 


69 


15 


34 


49 


75 


7 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgiun 

Bulgaria. 

CeeehosloTakia 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germanjr. 

Greece 

> Hungary 
Ireland 
Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania ............ 

Netherlands. 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania...., 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

(England 

United (N. Ireland.. 
Kingdom (Scotland.... 

(Wales 

U.S.3.R 

Tugoslavia. 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Japan 

Palestine 

niilippines 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada. 

Mexico. .............. 

West Indies 

Central America...... 

Other No. America.... 

South America ....• 

Africa ,, 

Australia & New Zealand 
Other countries........ 



United States Department of Justice 
Lnigratioa and Naturalisation Service 



TABLE 46a. FSaSOHS NATURALIZED, BT COUHTRT OR HBSION OP BIRTH AND COUNTRI OR BBSION 
OF FOBMER ALL8SIKACE; YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1954 



Country or region 
of birth 



a 






O 
O 



o 






Goontrr or region of foraer allegiance 






xt 

SI- 



eg 
O 

S3 



9 M 

U >■ 



■a 



I 






o 

o 
« 
u 

C3 



All coiintrlea .... 

Europe 

Austria. 

BelgluB 

Bulgaria. 

Czechoslovakia. . .... 

Denmark 

Estonia ............ • 

Finland 

France .............. 

Gersanjr 

Greece ••••»... 

Hungary 

Ireland.... 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania. .......... 

Netherlands ......... 

Norway. 

Poland 

Portugal ...........a 

Rumania............. 

Spain 

Sweden 

Swltterland 

(England.... 

United (N. Ireland. 

KingdoB( Scotland. . . 

(Vilales 

U.S.S.H 

Tugoslavla 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Japan 

Palestine........... 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North AmerloA......... 

Canada... 

Mexloe 

N^st Indies ......... 

Central America 

Other North America. 

South America. ........ 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand 
Other coimtries 



117.831 



83.298 



2.1?1 



221 



16.^6? 



79.411 



2,227 

840 

111 

3,160 

776 

317 

541 

1,953 

12,483 

2,443 

1,817 

5,494 

10,776 

567 

1,255 

1,809 

1,427 

8,989 

1,408 

928 

793 

1,252 

666 

7,295 

792 

2,546 

281 

4,226 

1,374 

865 

12.87? 



76.679 



2,054 
137 

6,605 
170 

1,886 

2,021 

2?.168 



13,233 

3,726 

4,758 

1,013 

438 

1,023 
472 
590 
294 



2AA« 

806 

103 

3,038 

761 

309 

529 

1,915 

11,764 

2,434 

1,731 

5,472 

10,719 

541 

1,209 

1,794 

1,4U 

8,529 

1,406 

842 

776 

1,235 

647 

7,067 

777 

2,440 

264 

3,919 

1,255 

835 

1.13? 



2.186 



158 
74 
30 
11 
17 

849 

4.657 



1,235 

23 

3,122 

94 

183 

241 

3U 

164 

74 



1,888 

1 

3 

67 



2 
55 

24 

5 
2 

1 
1 

90 

19 



261 



1 
726 



5 

15 

5 



11.305 



22 
8 
3 

15 
2 



19 
128 

10 

9 

246 

19 
3 
1 
4 
2 

31 



5 

5 

7,004 

700 

2,a7 

264 

35 

3 

345 

390 



45 

71 

2 

9 

7 

256 



1,213 
8 

3,057 
88 
85 

157 
70 

159 
33 



2.969 



2^252 



45 

4 

1 

2,803 



2 
27 

34 

1 
2 

1 
1 



16 
5 



15 
2 



221 



780 



754 



4 
11 



523 



2.177 



121 



1|9?1 



516 



1,778 

40 

4 

2 



17 



12 



6 
21 



30 

6 

J3. 



4 

1 

H 
Jl 



25 

1 
4 

3 
175 

16 



11.679 



2,m 



11 .63 ? 



24 
7 

92 



25 

11,146 

1 

U 
2 
9 
7 

14 

8 

1 

141 

32 
5 

12 

4 



47 
27 
17 

20 



2.474 



5 

6 

2,397 

1 



6 
5 

a 

86 



10 
7 

3 
10 



83 



3 

1 

1 
28 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalisation Servlca 



TABLE Uik- PEBS0N9 IATURALI23ED, BT COQRSI OB BBBIOM OF BIBTH AMD COOVTBI (» RBSIOI 
OP FOMEB ALLBBIAKB: TXtB nm> JIMX 30, 1954 (Cont'd) 



Couotrjr or region 
of birth 



Osttntgr 



or vkLou of fomer aUeglaaae 



I 



t 



£ 



t 



i 

n 



a 



M 



n 

01 



All conntrles 

Earope «.... 

Austria 

BelgluM 

Bulgaria 

Csechoslorakla 

Donmark. 

Estonia 

Finland 

France , 

Gemangr. ............. 

Greece ......... ...... 

ihingary 

Ireland 

Italy 

UtTia 

Lit huanla. ........... 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Ruaanla 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

(Ehgland 

United (H. Ireland.. 
KlngdonC Scotland. ... 

D.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Japan 

Palestine. 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North Aaerlca 

Canada. • 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Central America...... 

Other North America.. 

South America.......... 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand 
Other countries 



.1.22k 



5.315 



1 

1 

1 

5,218 

1 



11 

73 

5 



10t?26 



1m^ 



li97? 



2J^ 



Ix^ 



1.^57 



772 



^i 



1.272 



669 



3.8?2 



10.800 



33 

22 

9 

5 

3 

10,649 



1.259 



1^861 



2 

17 



ljhO± 



8^ 



!.¥« 



161 



788 



1.252 



651 



3.711 



4 
21 
U 



3 
1 

5 



4 
1 
1 
2 
28 

42 
35 

1 
3 



5 
1,173 

1 
8 



61 

1 



3 
59 



1 

1,764 

2 

7 



2 

1 



3 

1 
1 
1 

48 

26 



24 

1 

28 

2 



1 
1,394 



26 

13 



16 

173 

2 

12 



2 
6 

3 

1 

8,024 

2 

8 



155 

1 
3 



4 

1 
21 



4 

1 



1 
1,402 



5 
724 



3 

1 

1 

765 



1,219 
1 
1 

1 



27 



12 
18 

1 
1 

5 

1 

1 
3 

1 

600 



1 

1 

11 



20 

7 

2 



3 

1 
5 



6 
9 



172 

7 
2 



2 

1 

3,473 

1 



4 
12 



15 

3 

1 
8 



3 

1 
2 

U 



21 



112 
~45 



3 

3 



64 



A 



11 

2 
2 



1 
1 

11 



1 
1 



J. 

2 

1 
1 



1 
1 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE U6k, PESSOMS KATURALI2ED, BT COUNTRT OR HBGION OF BIBTH AND COUNTRI OR REGION 
OF FORMER ALLEGIANCE; TSAR BMDED JUNE 30, 1954 (Cont'd) 



Conotrj or region 
of birth 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Geraany. 

Greece...., 

Hungary , 

Ireland , 

Italy , 

Latria , 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Nomsy ., 

Poland 

Portugal. ..«..., 

Roaania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

(£hgland 

United (N. Ireland... 
Kingdom( Scotland 

U.S.S.R 

TugoslaTia 

Other Europe 

Asia ,. 

China 

India 

Japan 

Palestine 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North America , 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Central America 

Other North America... 

South America 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand. 
Other countries 



n 
o 



1.2U 



l,22i 



35 
3. 

1 
5 



& 



l4 

• O 

SI 



1*222 



L^hSl. 



Country or region of former allegiance 



55 
o a 
t- < 



12.170 



1 
U 



7 
1,154 

1 



4 

1 
84 

1 

302 
3 
2 
18 
4 
3 

1 

512 

2 

3 



2 
2 

U 

61 

4 

398 



386 



3 360 



Z 
3 

1 
350 



15 
1 
3 
5 



4 
208 
1 
7 
3 
2 
2 
5 



43 

6 

1 

2 
3 

24 

42 
2 
6 



..880 



1^862 



S: 



5 

o 



Li/t^Z 



J22 



11^ 



1,83 
59 
6,562 
150 
1,859 
1,128 

a. 



4 
7 
3 

39 

4 
2 



1 

1 

l^M 



1,811 

4 

4 
45 



1.854 
2 



1,851 

1 



15 

1 
3 
5 



4 
207 
1 
7 
2 

2 

5 



43 



2 
2 

24 

a 

2 
3 



"S 



13.062 



848 



2^8Zi 



23 

59 

6,558 

150 

4 

1,082 

M 



15 
17 

28 
U 

12 
10 
46 

5 
20 
17 
37 

6 
10 
10 
13 
92 

1 
23 

16 

9 

216 

14 

80 

6 

100 

22 

9 

18 



o 

o 

•>\ 

u 



3.710 



21 






n 






1.738 



Jl 



« 
~ • o 

BO, 



I 



2!ti 



ii 



131 



3 
6 
1 

38 

2 
2 



122 



3 
2 

1 

1 
11 

12.186 



44 



6 

U 



21 



J3-H 
g « 

to -5 



)21 



M 



11,987 
3 
3 
6 
187 

5 
3 



1.62it 



127 



n 

e 

■> 



;i281 



^266 



3 
12 



3,683 
4 
2 
5 



1.630 



5 
1,621 

1 
3 

3 
2 



906 11 

ill 

1 

2 
900 7 

2 3 



- 3 



84 



1 
2 
3 

2 

1 

765 

1 



117 



± 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalisation Serviee 



13- 

9 

5 

80 



14 

430 

3 

56 

7 
18 
25 

4 



270 

1 
44 



4 

1 



148 
93 
10 

_2i 



52 

9 

7 

9 

21 

21 



1 
13 



1 
1 



1 
2 



2 

2 



426 



TABLE 47. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY GENERAL AND SPECIAL NATURALIZATION PROVISIONS: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1950 TO 1954 



Naturalization provisions 



1950 



1951 



1952 



1953 



Total. 



General provisions, 
Special provisions 



ooooooooo*o«oooo««o«ooa«*o 



Persons married to UoSo citizens... 

Children, including adopted children, of 

Former UoSo citizens who lost citizenship 
by marriage 

Philippine citizens who entered the 

United States prior to May 1, 1934, and 
have resided continuously in the United 



OX'^u€S o • • • • • • 



oo»0*fto«o«*«oO9eo*«eoeoo*o« 



Persons who served in U.So anned forces 
for three years o........ 

Persons v:ho served in U.So armed forces 
during World War I or World War II.. co 

Persons serving in U.So armed forces 

after June 24, 1950 (In U.S.) 2/........ 

Persons serving in U.S. armed forces 

after June 24, 1950 (Overseas) 2/..,...,. 

Persons who served on certain U.S. 

vessels 

Former U. S. citizens who lost citizenship 
by entering the armed forces of foreign 
countries during World War II l/... 

Dual nationals expatriated through enter- 
ing or serving in armed forces of 

Former U.S, citizens expatriated through 

expatriation of parents ....... ......... , 

Persons who lost citizenship through 

cancellation of parents' naturalization. 
Persons misinformed prior to July 1, 1920, 

regarding citizenship status, .....o .« ... 
Noncitizen natives of Puerto Rico — 

declaration of allegiance... 
Persons who entered the United States 

while under 16 years of age...,, 
Certain inhabitants of the Virgin Islands. 
Alien veterans of World War I or veterans 

of allied countries 

Nationals but not citizens of the United 

States 

Persons naturalized under private law...,. 



a o o 



ieooo»*o*o 



66 .346 



54.716 



83.655 



92.051 



19,403 
46.943 



14,864 
39.852 



26,920 
61.735 



46,793 
45.258 



40,684 
499 
243 

1,343 

343 

1,724 



1,164 



136 
8 
3 

33 
5 

256 



36,433 
487 
220 

843 
300 
675 



611 



66 

1 

17 

6 

188 
4 



58,027 
760 
223 

722 

194 

1,391 



64 



138 

9 

4 

27 

4 

164 

8 



42,088 
698 
150 

429 
192 

1,383 



110 



123 
9 

7 

14 

51 
2 



y Prior to December 24, 1952, these persons were repatriated \inder the provisions 
of Section 323, Nationality Act of 1940 and, therefore, were not included 
in this table. 
2/ Act of June 30, 1953 (P.L. 86). 

United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABIE i;8. WRITS OF HABEAS CORPUS IN EXCLUSION AND DEPCRTATION CASES: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 19h^ TO 19^h 



Action taken 


19U5- 
195U 


19U5 


19i;6 


19li7 


19h8 


19U9 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


Total Writs of 
























Habeas Corpus 
























Disposed of 


hh9h 


93 


263 


hhh 


306 


511 


3ii7 


39I4 


386 


3?P 


391 


Sustained 

Dismissed 


2iiO 
2,222 
1,032 

115 


3 

35 


9 
133 
121 


1^ 
278 

151 
156 


29 

175 

102 


9 
397 
105 

2hh 


2^ 
169 
153 

118 


^6 

260 

78 

k7 


30 
253 
103 

60 


% 
213 
102 

120 


20 

289 

82 

115 


WithdraTOi • 


Pending end of year .. 


16 


206 


160 


Involving Exclusion 
























Disposed of 


U62 


6 


h 


61; 


U8 


?? 


96 


?7 


67 


38 


23 


Sustained 

Dismissed 

Withdravm 


235 
173 


2 

3 
1 


h 


6 
19 
39 


3 
26 

19 


6 
3& 
15 


8 
li8 
1;0 


3 

27 
27 


16 
32 
19 


1 
21 
10 


3 

17 
3 


Pending end of year. 


17 


1 


1 


15 


12 


16 


21 


13 


8 


11 


17 


Involving Deportation 
























Disposed of 


3,032 


87 


259 


380 


258 


);52 


251 


337 


319 


321 


368 


Sustained 

Dismissed 

Withdrawn 


186 

1,987 

859 


1 
52 
3h 


9 
129 
121 


9 
259 
112 


26 

11x9 

83 


3 

359 

90 


17 
121 
113 


53 

233 

51 


li; 

221 

8ii 


37 

192 

92 


17 

272 

79 


Pending end of year. 


98 


15 


205 


Ihl 


lii8 


128 


97 


3U 


52 


109 


98 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 









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