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Full text of "Annual report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service"



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UNITED S TAT E S 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Immigration and Naturalization Service 
Washington, D. C. 




FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 



1956 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

Immigration and Naturalization Service 
Washington 25, D. C. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER 
OF IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION 



The Attorney General 

United States Department of Justice 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the Annual Report of the 
Immigration and Naturalization Service for the year ended 
June 30, 1956. 

This report narrates our accomplishments of the past year 
and some of our aims for the future. 



Respectfully submitted, 



J. M. SWING 

Commissioner 



Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Foreword 1 

Inspections 2 

Admissions . 3 

Citizens 3 

Immigrants 3 

Visa petitions 4 

Nonimmigrants and resident aliens 4 

Agricultural laborers 4 

Admission of otherwise inadmissible aliens 5 

Exclusions 5 

Exclusion hearings 5 

Exclusions 5 

Detention and parole of applicants for admission 6 

Aliens in the United States 6 

Alien Address reports 6 

Adjustment of status 6 

Preexamination 6 

Section 6 Refugee Relief Act 7 

Section 4 Displaced Persons Act 7 

Suspension of deportation 7 

Other adjustment of status --- 7 

Enforcement 8 

Prevention of illegal entries 8 

Land border security operations 8 

Anti-smuggling and stowaway operations 9 

Investigation of aliens illegally in the United States 10 

Document control 10 

Anti-subversive operations 11 

Anti-criminal operations 11 

Visa fraud and false document operations... 11 

Prevention of illegal entries through coastal areas 12 

Intelligence 12 

Detention and Parole 13 

Deportation 14 

Order to show cause procedure 14 

Deportation hearings 15 

Stay of deportation 16 

Boatlift, Airlift 16 

Unexecuted orders 17 



TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) 

Page 

Nationality 17 

Applications for Naturalization 18 

Naturalization Courts 18 

Naturalization 19 

Repatriations 20 

Derivative citizenship 20 

Citizenship services 20 

Petitions denied 21 

Revocation and Expatriation 21 

Legislation and Litigation 22 

Public laws 22 

Private legislation 24 

Prosecutions 25 

Internal Management 26 

Field Inspection and Security..... 26 

Administration 27 

Personnel. 27 

Training 27 

Finance 27 

Space allocation and construction 27 

Reports and Forms Control 27 

Information and records 28 

Statistics 28 



IV 



I 



APPENDIX 



Table Page 

1. Immigration to the United States: 1820 to 1956 29 

2. Aliens and citizens admitted and departed, by months: Years ended 

June 30, 1955 and 1956 30 

2-A. Aliens and citizens arrived and examined at United States ports of 

entry: Years ended June 30, 1955 and 1956. 31 

3. Aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration laws: Years ended 

June 30, 1952 to 1956 32 

4. Immigration by country, for decades: 1820 to 1956 33 

5. Immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens departed, by port or 

district: Years ended June 30, 1952 to 1956 37 

6. Immigrant aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and 

country or region of birth: Year ended June 30, 1956 38 

6-A. Immigrant aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and 
country or region of last permanent residence: Year ended June 30, 

1956 39 

6-B. Maximum visas authorized and immigrant aliens admitted to the 
United States under the Refugee Relief Act of 1953: Years ended 
June 30, 1954 to 1956 41 

7. Annual quotas and quota immigrants admitted: Years ended June 30, 

1952 to 1956 _ 42 

7-A. Quota immigrants admitted by preferences: Years ended June 30, 1954 

to 1956 43 

8. Immigrant aliens admitted, by country or region of birth and major 

occupation group: Year ended June 30, 1956 44 

9. Immigrant aliens admitted, by country or region of birth, sex, marital 

status, and age: Year ended June 30, 1956 45 

10. Immigrant aliens admitted by race, sex, and age: Year ended June 30, 

1956 _. 46 

10-A. Immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens departed, by sex, age, 
illiteracy and major occupation group: Years ended June 30, 1952 to 
1956 47 

11. Aliens and citizens admitted and departed: Years ended June 30, 1908 

to 1956 48 

12. Immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens departed, by State of 

intended future or last permanent residence: Years ended Jnne 30, 

1952 to 1956 49 

12-A. Immigrant aliens admitted, by specified countries of birth and State 

of intended future permanent residence: Year ended June 30, 1956.. 50 
12-B. Immigrant aliens admitted, by specified countries of birth and rural 

and urban area and city: Year ended June 30, 1956... 52 

13. Immigrant aliens admitted and emigrant aliens departed, by country 

or region of last or intended future permanent residence: Years ended 

June 30, 1952 to 1956 54 

13-A. Immigrant aliens admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended 

June 30, 1947 to 1956 55 

14. Emigrant aliens departed, by race, sex, and age: Years ended June 30, 

1956 56 

14-A. Emigrant aliens departed, by country or region of birth and major 

occupation group: Year ended June 30, 1956 57 

15. Emigrant aliens departed, by country or region of birth, sex, and age: 

Year ended June 30, 1956 59 

16. Nonimmigrant aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration laws 

and country or region of birth: Year ended June 30, 1956... 60 

17. Nonimmigrant aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration laws 

and country or region of last permanent residence: Year ended June 

30, 1956 62 

17-A. Agricultural laborers admitted to the United States: Years ended June 

30, 1950 to 1956 64 



APPENDIX (Continued) 

Table Page 

18. Nonimmigrant aliens admitted and nonemigrant aliens departed, by 

country or region of last or intended future permanent residence: 
Years ended June 30, 1952 to 1956 65 

19. Aliens excluded fron the United States: Years ended June 30, 1892 to 

1956 66 

20. Aliens excluded from the United States, by cause: Years ended June 30, 

1950 to 1956 67 

21. Aliens excluded, by country or region of birth and cause: Year ended 

June 30, 1956 68 

22. Aliens crewmen deserted at United States air and seaports, by nation- 

ality and fiag of carrier: Year ended June 30, 1956 70 

23. Vessels and airplanes inspected, crewmen admitted, and stowaways 

arrived, by regions and districts: Year ended June 30, 1956 71 

24. Aliens deported, by country to which deported and cause: Year ended 

June 30, 1956. 72 

24-A. Aliens apprehended, aliens deported, and aliens departing voluntarily: 

Years ended June 30, 1892 to 1956 73 

25. Aliens deported, by country to which deported and deportation ex- 

pense: Year ended June 30, 1956 74 

26. Inward movement of aliens and citizens over international land bound- 

aries, by State and port: Year ended June 30, 1956 75 

27. Aliens deported, by year of entry and status at entry: Year ended June 

30, 1956 78 

28. Inward movement of aliens and citizens over international land bound- 

aries: Years ended June 30, 1928 to 1956 79 

29. Principal activities and accomplishments of immigration Border Patrol: 

Years ended June 30, 1947 to 1956 80 

30. Passenger travel between the United States and foreign countries, by 

port of arrival or departure: Year ended June 30, 1956 81 

31. Passengers arrived in the United States from foreign countries, by 

country of embarkation: Year ended June 30, 1956 83 

32. Passengers departed from the United States to foreign countries, by 

country of debarkation: Year ended June 30, 1956 89 

33. Aliens deported, by cause: Years ended June 30, 1908 to 1956... 95 

34. Passenger travel by air and by sea between Puerto Rico and continen- 

tal United States (mainland) and the Virgin Islands: Years ended 
June 30, 1947 to 1956 98 

35. Passenger travel by air and sea between Hawaii and continental 

United States (mainland) and insular or outlying possessions: Years 
ended June 30, 1947 to 1956 99 

36. Aliens who reported under the Alien Address Program, by selected 

nationalities and States of residence: During 1956 100 

37. Declarations of intention filed, petitions for naturalization filed, and 

persons naturalized: Years ended June 30, 1907 to 1956 102 

38. Persons naturalized, by general and special naturalization provisions 

and country or region of former allegiance: Year ended June 30, 1956 103 

39. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance: Years 

ended June 30, 1947 to 1956 104 

40. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance and 

major occupation group: Year ended June 30, 1956 106 

41. Persons naturalized and petitions for naturalization denied: Years 

ended June 30, 1907 to 1956 108 

42. Persons naturalized, by sex and marital status, with comparative per- 

cent of total: Years ended June 30, 1948 to 1956 109 

43. Persons naturalized, by sex and age: Years ended June 30, 1948 to 1956 110 

44. Persons naturalized, by States and territories of residence: Years ended 

June 30, 1952 to 1956 Ill 



APPENDIX (Continued) 

Table Page 

45. Persons naturalized, by specified countries of former allegiance and 

by rural and urban area and city: Year ended June 30, 1956 112 

46. Persons naturalized, by country or region of birth and year of entry: 

Year ended June 30, 1956 113 

47. Persons naturalized, by general and special naturalization provisions: 

Years ended June 30, 1952 to 1956 115 

48. Writs of habeas corpus in exclusion and deportation cases: Years ended 

June 30, 1947 to 1956 116 

49. Prosecutions for immigration and nationality violations: Years ended 

June 30, 1947 to 1956 117 

50. Private bills introduced and laws enacted, 75th Congress to 84th 

Congress: 118 

51. Petitions for naturalization denied, by reason: Years ended June 30, 

1951 to 1956 119 

52. Certificates of naturalization revoked, by grounds: Years ended June 

30, 1951 to 1956 119 

53. Persons expatriated, by grounds: Years ended June 30, 1951 to 1956.. 120 

54. Persons repatriated: Years ended June 30, 1951 to 1956 120 

55. Certificates of derivative citizenship granted, by country or region of 

birth: Years ended June 30, 1954 to 1956 ! 121 



Vll 



ANNUAL REPORT OF 

J. M. SWING, COMMISSIONER 

OF IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION 



FOREWORD 

The Immigration and Naturalization Service is responsible for 
the administration and enforcement of the Immigration and Na- 
tionality Act and related statutes. Its fields of work are: (1) in- 
spection of persons applying for entry into the United States; 
(2) alien registration, adjustment of status and other activities 
relating to aliens in the United States; (3) enforcement, including 
control of the borders against illegal entry of aliens, seeking, tak- 
ing into custody, and deporting aliens illegally in the United 
States; (4) naturalization and related activities ; and (5) internal 
management. 

While the fiscal year 1956 had nothing so dramatic as the drive 
which resulted in control of the southwest border or the mass 
naturalizations of 1955, it was a year of solid gains in efficiency, 
manpower utilization, and operation of the Service. 

The successful control of the southwest border against mass 
illegal entries resulted in fewer apprehensions, fewer detentions, 
and fewer deportations than in recent years, so that the Border Pa- 
trol could fulfill its true function of preventing illegal entry, in- 
vestigators could concentrate on concluding the many subversive 
and criminal cases, and on effecting substantial reductions in back- 
logs of all investigative cases. 

Better use of the inspection force and improved procedures en- 
abled the Service to examine an unprecedented number of aliens 
seeking admission to the United States and, at the same time, to 
give better public service without increasing the number of in- 
spectors. 

Following the 1955 drive, naturalization officers succeeded in 
placing all naturalization work on a current basis, so that peti- 
tioners for naturalization usually become citizens within a month 
or six weeks after they file petitions. 

The operation and supervision of the Service was bettered in 
1956, when 21 additional district offices were established, with 
greater authority for independent action and smaller areas to 
supervise. 



2 Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 

Inspections 

With an unprecedented 134,000,000 citizen and alien entries last 
year, the Service was challenged to speed up and improve inspec- 
tions at the land and sea ports of the United States and, at the 
same time, to insure that no inadmissible aliens were permitted to 
enter. 

A combined passenger manifest and crew-list, devised to replace 
the eight different manifests now in use, is the culmination of 
almost two years of conference and study between the Government 
agencies concerned and the transportation companies. The con- 
solidated manifest has been approved by the agencies concerned 
and will be placed in effect as soon as approved by the Bureau of 
the Budget. 

Aliens traveling between Honolulu and Guam are inspected at 
the first port of arrival for both places. With approval of the 
Canadian Government, Vancouver and Victoria, B.C., shortly will 
be added to Canadian cities where aliens departing by air for the 
United States are inspected before the plane takes off, rather than 
when it lands in the Unites States. 

The waiver of passport and visa requirements was extended to 
all countries of the Western Hemisphere for resident aliens visit- 
ing these countries for less than six months. This is a convenience 
to the alien traveler, who needs only to present his alien registra- 
tion card as identification, a savings in time to the Service, since 
reentry permits need not be issued, and, likewise, a boon to trans- 
portation companies, who no longer need to prepare individual 
departure documents in these cases. 

Non-resident alien border crossers will soon be issued laminated 
cards that will be valid indefinitely. Holders of the cards will be 
checked periodically to determine their continued admissibility. 

Each student applying for admission to the United States must 
now present to the consular office a document from the school he 
expects to attend, certifying that the student has been accepted, 
and that the school is an approved place of study for foreign stu- 
dents. Thus, the school, from the beginning, accepts responsibility 
for the student and for obtaining certification. The cumbersome 
and-time consuming task of publishing lists of acceptable schools 
for consular offices is no longer necessary. 

A number of the Service offices are several miles back from the 
Canadian Border. Until the new building program can be com- 
pleted, signs are being placed on all roads leading out of Canada, 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 3 

directing aliens to the nearest station. Close cooperation is main- 
tained with Canadian immigration officers. In some places serially- 
numbered cards are given aliens by the Canadian authorities, to 
be turned in at the United States offices. These steps have improved 
the inspection coverage at designited ports of entry for inspection. 

Admissions 

An expanding economy, improved transportation facilities, and 
the encouragement of travel to promote international understand- 
ing, all contributed to a heavy workload for immigrant inspectors. 

Admissions at land, sea, and air ports reached the all-time high 
of 63,024,943 citizens and 71,115,577 aliens. As in past years, 97 
percent of all entries were repeated alien and citizen border cross- 
ings. 

Citizens. While immigration inspection deals for the most part 
with the admissibility of aliens, citizens, too, must be examined 
to determine that they are citizens and, therefore, admissible. In 
addition to the citizen border crossers, 1,281,110 citizens returned 
to the United States at sea and air ports. Traffic was about evenly 
divided between Europe and the vacation spots in the Caribbean. 

Immigrants. Not since 1927 have so many immigrants been ad- 
mitted to the United States as in 1956, when there were 321,625. 
Factors that raised immigration 35 percent over last year were 
the refugees admitted under the Refugee Relief Act of 1953, and 
a 32 percent increase in the number of natives of Western Hemi- 
sphere countries. Since both of these groups are nonquota, they 
contributed to the highest nonquota immigration (232,315) since 
the passage of the Immigration Act of 1924. 

As Mexican illegal entries were stopped, legal admissions in- 
creased. For the third consecutive year Mexico was the chief source 
of immigration, with 65,047 admissions in the past year. Canada, 
with 29,533 admissions, and the West Indies with 19,022, also 
showed increases. 

Under the Refugee Relief Act of 1953, which expires on Decem- 
ber 31, 1956, 209,000 visas were authorized for refugees and rela- 
tives of citizens or alien residents of the United States. By June 
30, a total of 104,803 refugees and relatives had been admitted, 
including 74,980 admitted in fiscal 1956. 

Citizens, both military and civilian, stationed abroad influenced 
the third largest class of nonquota immigrants. Of the 31,742 
wives, husbands, and children admitted as nonquota immigrants. 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



7,460 came from Germany, 4,484 from Italy, and 4,226 from Japan. 

In addition to those immigrants who were admitted outside the 
quota provisions of the Immigration and Nationality Act, 89,310 
quota immigrants, chiefly from Europe, were charged to the estab- 
lished quotas of 154,657. While quota immigration was nine per- 
cent higher than last year, it was still only 58 percent of authorized 
quotas. 

The continued effect of the mortgaging of quotas by the south- 
ern and eastern European countries under the Displaced Persons 
Act, and the fact that higher quotas for United Kingdom and Ire- 
land are not used, are principal reasons for quotas not being filled. 

Visa Petitions. A total of 72,547 visa petitions were approved 
for quota preference and for nonquota status. 59,634 petitions 
were approved for close relatives of United States citizens. 

Petitions for first preference quota visas for persons of special 
skills and ability still remain low ; with 50 percent, or 77,328, quota 
numbers available for use, only 4,427 such petitions were received 
and only 3,366 immigrants were admitted first preference. 

Nonimmigrants and Resident Aliens. These figures are exclusive 
of crewmen, agricultural laborers, or border crossers. In this year 
of record-breaking admissions, an all-time high of 686,259 non- 
immigrants were admitted. The 399,704 visitors for pleasure 
brought about most of the increase over last year. Returning resi- 
dents, exclusive of those for whom documents were waived, totaled 
52,136. 

Agricultural laborers. Another record was reached with the ad- 
mission of 431,985 agricultural workers to the United States. In- 
cluded in this total were 416,833 Mexican nationals, known as 
"braceros," (an increase of 23 percent over 1955), 7,210 Canadian 
workers, 7,911 from the British West Indies, and 31 from the 
French West Indies. 

To speed the processing of employed Mexican workers, those 
who have been security screened and who have fulfilled their con- 
tractual obligations are given laminated identification cards (mi- 
cas) upon their departure from the United States. 

A program of recruitment and control of British Virgin Islands 
workers entering the American Virgin Islands, similar to that used 
on the Mexican Border, insures adequate supply of competent 
workers in that area. 

Interested agencies and organizations are planning a program 
for the importation of agricultural workers from Japan. 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 5 

Creiumen. Crewmen admissions were nine percent higher in the 
fiscal year 1956 than in 1955. During the year, 1,533,249 alien and 
920,088 citizen crewmen were examined and admitted. 

Desertions numbered 2,968. Greek crewmen deserting, chiefly 
from Liberian and Panamanian vessels, increaped by 70 percent 
from 491 in 1955 to 837 in fiscal 1956. Other large groups were 
313 British, 448 Italian, 162 Norwegian, and 247 Spanish. 

Admission of Otherivise Inadmissible Aliens. The Immigration 
and Nationality Act provides that, under certain conditions, 
grounds of inadmissibility may be waived by the Attorney General 
for the temporary admission of aliens where extenuating circum- 
stances exist. In each case where a security or moral ground of 
inadmissibility is waived, a report must be made to Congress. Dur- 
ing this fiscal year there were 561 cases reported to Congress in 
which such grounds of inadmissibility were waived. 

Aliens who are excludibles because of their former membership 
in proscribed organizations may be admitted to the United States 
if it is found that they have been actively opposed to Communism 
during at least five years prior to their application for visas. A re- 
port must be submitted to Congress in each case in which an alien 
is found to be a defector. During this fiscal year there were 76 such 
reports submitted to Congress. 

Exclusions 

Exclusion Hearings. Despite the over-all increase in interna- 
tional travel, the Service conducted fewer exclusion hearings than 
in any of the previous years within the past decade, 5,392 hearings 
in 1956 as compared with 10,467 in 1955 and 13,254 in 1954. This 
downward trend is the result of the Service policy that requires 
supervisory ofl!icers in the field to resolve as many cases of technical 
inadmissibility as possible through review action or by the exer- 
cise of discretionary powers. 

Exclusions. Final exclusions totaling 1,709 were the lowest since 
1944, when admissions were but a seventh of the present number. 
As in prior years, many aliens were excluded because of attempted 
entries without proper documents, but waivers of documentary re- 
quirements account for some of the decline in exclusions on this 
ground. Through preinspections and preexaminations many ex- 
cludable aliens are weeded out before arrival in this country. Ex- 
clusions included 117 subversive and 238 in the criminal, immoral, 
and narcotic categories. 



6 Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 

In addition to aliens formally excluded, 168,811 aliens who ap- 
pled for admission were not admitted. Included in this group were 
many aliens applying at land border ports who, when advised that 
they did not appear to be eligible for admission, elected to return 
to their homes rather than appear for a hearing before a Special 
Inquiry Officer. 

Detention and Parole of Applicants for Admission. Since No- 
vember 1954 only those aliens likely to abscond and those whose 
release would be inimical to the security of the United States are 
held in detention. Detention of excludable aliens, which had aver- 
aged close to 225 monthly prior to the new program, dropped to a 
monthly average of less than 40. Documented applicants for ad- 
mission at seaports who have purely technical difficulties are per- 
mitted to go to their final destinations, where hearings are held 
and final decisions made. At land border ports aliens are returned 
to Canada or Mexico immediately, pending Special Inquiry hear- 
ing, if necessary, at a later date. 

Aliens in the United States 

2,622,462 aliens reported their addresses in January of 1956 in 
compliance with the requirements of the Immigration and Nation- 
ality Act. This was a gain of more than 100,000 over the preceding 
five years, and was the result of better publicity and high immi- 
gration. 

There were some interesting contrasts with reports of 1954. 
For example, 337,730 nationals of Mexico reported in 1954, and 
424,325 in 1956. In 1954, a total of 489,937 Canadians and British 
reported, in 1956 the figure was 505,729. On the other hand, only 
187,888 nationals of Poland reported in 1956. In 1954 the figure 
was 231,890. Similarly, there were 76,089 nationals of U.S.S.R. 
who reported in 1956. In 1954 there were 116,960. The rapid natu- 
ralization of displaced persons and low immigration from these 
countries account for much of this reduction. 

Adjustment of Status 

No law affecting the lives of human beings can cover all contin- 
gencies, nor eliminate all hardships. The Immigration and Nation- 
ality Act and special legislation for specific groups have provided 
certain areas wherein adjustments can be made. 

Preexamination. A procedure whereby an alien in the United 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 7 

States may be examined to determine eligibility for admission as 
an immigrant was reinstated in May 1955, with the approval of 
Congress. If found eligible, and if a visa is available, the applicant 
may go to Canada, obtain his visa at an American Consulate, and 
upon return to the United States be admitted as an immigrant. 
Aliens, to be eligible, must have entered the United States prior 
to January 1, 1956. 2,366 applications were approved during the 
year and 149 denied. 

Section 6, Refugee Relief Act. Section 6 of the Refugee Relief 
Act provided that 5,000 persons could adjust their status under 
that Act. As of June 30, 1956, 4,777 applications had been approved 
and forwarded to Congress for consideration. If approved by Con- 
gress, permanent resident status will be conferred on the appli- 
cant. Efforts are being made to complete the pending applications 
during the next fiscal year. 

Section h. Displaced Persons Act. During the fiscal year just 
completed, 155 applications for adjustment of status under section 
4 of the Displaced Persons Act of 1948 were approved and sub- 
mitted to Congress. This practically wipes out the remainder of 
such applications which were filed prior to the closing date of June 
16, 1952. Of the 15,000 applications for adjustment which might 
have been granted under the provisions of Section 4 of the Dis- 
placed Persons Act, a total of 5,503 have been approved by Con- 
gress. 

Suspension of Deportation. The Attorney General is authorized 
under the Immigration and Nationality Act to suspend the depor- 
tation of an alien and to adjust his status to that of an alien law- 
fully admitted for permanent residence, under certain conditions. 
Similar authority existed under the prior immigration law. 

1,021 applications for suspension of deportation were approved 
and submitted to Congress. Congress approved 1,088 applications 
during the year, and the alien's status was adjusted to that of per- 
manent resident. In most of these cases the deportable alien has 
led an exemplary life in the United States for a long time. Fre- 
quently, deportation would cause extreme hardship for a citizen 
spouse and children. 

Other Adjustment of Status. Applications for change of status 
from nonimmigrant to immigrant continued to be relatively high 
during this fiscal year. There were 4,226 applications adjudicated, 
with 3,702 granted and 524 denied for various reasons. There were 
68 aliens whose status was changed from that of immigrant to non- 



8 Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 

immigrant in connection with employment with foreign govern- 
ments. 

When a record of entry for permanent residence cannot be lo- 
cated for an alien who entered prior to July 1, 1924, the Act pro- 
vides that such a record may be created. During the fiscal year 
there were 8,438 applications for such adjustment granted. The 
backlog of such cases, which was 4,742 on June 30, 1955, has been 
further reduced to 1,085 such applications pending. 

Enforcement 

The programs of enforcement fall into three general groups: 
(1) the prevention of illegal entries, (2) the investigation of aliens 
illegally in the United States, and (3) the development of intelli- 
gence information. 

Prevention of Illegal Entries 

Prevention of Illegal Entries. Enforcement begins with guarding 
the border against illegal entry and apprehending and expelling 
those who, in spite of our diligent efforts, manage unauthorized 
entries. The decade in which "wetbacks," in ever-increasing num- 
bers, crossed the Mexican Border, was brought to an end with the 
"Operation Wetback" that began in June 1954. The excellent prog- 
ress made in effective control is demonstrated by the reduction in 
number of apprehensions— 90,122 in 1956, from 256,290 in 1955 
and 1,096,619 in 1954. 

Land Border Security Operations. When there were no longer 
any mass movements of aliens across our southern border, the 
mere checking of farms and communities along the border was 
not enough. Many aliens now entering illegally are criminals or 
other aliens whose past experience in evading the law makes de- 
tection and apprehension more difficult. A higher proportion are 
assisted by smugglers. These are not the simple Mex'can laborers 
bent on working on farms on the United States side of the Rio 
Grande. In fact, fully a fifth of those apprehended at present are 
of nationalities other than Mexican. 

Direction of operational activities of the Border Patrol was 
placed under the regional offices. This enables better coordination 
of activities between the sectors and speeds up movements of 
officers and equipment to meet changing conditions and workloads. 

The deployment of task forces further into the interior was 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



another method used duririR the past year. 6,457 Mexican aliens 
were apprehended working in industries, thus releasing an equal 
number of jobs for citizens or resident aliens. 

During the year 10 airplanes were seized for illegal entry and 
6 additional planes were seized by Mexican authorities as a re- 
sult of air intelligence activities. 

The improved situation along the southern border permitted the 
strengthening of the oflker force in all other areas toward the end 
of the year. At the Canadian Border, which extends more than 
4,000 miles, a wider deployment of officers and transportation and 
communications equipment was made possible. Electronic warning 
devices are employed on certain roads and railroads where illegal 
crossings occur. 

Steps were taken in cooperation with Canadian authorities to 
divert traffic away from roads without inspection facilities and 
channel it through established ports of entry. Friendly contacts 
with inhabitants of rural areas often enable patrol officers to trace 
the progress of suspects illegally entering, by means of telephone 
reports from farm homes in the area. Such information is then 
relayed by radio to the nearest patrol unit for appropriate inter- 
ceptive action. 

All Border Patrol officers were designated as Customs Patrol 
Inspectors during this year. Statutory authority was thereby con- 
ferred upon our officers to make arrests and seizures for violations 
of the customs laws. Without cost and with no loss of effective im- 
migration law enforcement, material gain in over-all border law 
enforcement has resulted. In fiscal 1956 the value of all seizures 
was estimated at $683,000. 

Anti-Smuggling and Stoivaivay Operations. Investigation uncov- 
ered two instances where seamen were smuggling aliens into the 
United States by assisting them to stow away. One of these in- 
volved the SS CRISTOFORO COLOMBO, flagship of the Italian 
fleet. In this case fifteen persons were prosecuted, two as smug- 
glers, six for smuggling into the United States as stowaways, and 
seven for transporting and harboring the aliens after illegal en- 
tries. In the other case a seaman who assisted aliens to stow away 
on the SS CIUDAD DE BARQUISIMETO was prosecuted and 
sentenced to one year imprisonment. Four aliens whom he assisted 
to enter as stowaways were also prosecuted. 

The proximity of Cuba to numerous abandoned airfields in the 
United States presents easy opportunities for smuggling. To com- 



10 Report of the Immigration and Natural iz ation Service 

bat the smuggling and illegal entry of aliens by air or by sea, the 
Border Patrol utilizes 18 patrol boats based at strategic points, 
whose operations are closely coordinated with air patrol. 

Seven hundred sixty-five smugglers of aliens were apprehended 
in fiscal 1956, a reduction of 18 percent from the previous year. 
Convictions were obtained in 216 smuggling cases involving 890 
aliens. 256 stowaways were found on the carriers inspected. 

Investigation of Aliens Illegally in the United States 

A major function of the Service is to locate aliens who entered 
the United States illegally or who have become deportable after 
entry. Where a case warrants it, an active investigation is initiated 
to develop facts leading to the institution of proceedings against 
such aliens. 

On July 1, 1955, revised operational reporting procedures, de- 
signed to insure accurate reporting of investigations workloads 
and accomplishments, became effective. Many routine matters are 
no longer carried as investigative cases. Although investigations 
may be conducted in various cities concerning one individual, the 
net result is reported as a single investigation. Under this system 
the number of investigative cases reported is much smaller than 
in previous years. In conjunction with the new reporting proce- 
dures, a uniform case control system on investigative cases was 
installed in each office. 

With the realignment of the investigative force effective in Jan- 
uary 1956, efforts were turned to the filling of investigator posi- 
tion vacancies and the reduction of pending caseloads which had 
risen from a pending figure of 27,262 on July 1, 1955, to 31,058 on 
January 31, 1956. 

Document Control. Departures of nonimmigrants are verified 
upon expiration of their authorized stay in this country by match- 
ing the document turned in on departure with an arrival document. 
During the past year about 70,000 overstay cases were referred 
for investigation. This is a major source of information in the in- 
vestigation, apprehension, and expulsion of aliens who remain in 
the United States beyond their authorized time. 

Investigative Searches. Another source of information is the 
investigative search program, whereby search is made of likely 
places for aliens in illegal status. Early detection and expulsion 
of the recently arrived illegal alien serves not only as a deterrent 
to others who seek to enter illegally, but eliminates later unpro- 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 11 



ductive investigation when the alien may have acquired equities 
entitling him to discretionary relief from deportation. 

An adjunct to the investigative search program is the develop- 
ment of liaison with penal and mental institutions. Cooperation 
between these institutions and the Service and a continued flow 
of information from them will decrease the time required of inves- 
tigators in screening patients and inmates. It will also reduce the 
financial burden on the various States by expediting the deporta- 
tion of aliens being treated at public expense. 

Anti-Subversive Operations. Efforts to reduce arrearages in sub- 
versive cases resulted in a decrease from 14,852 cases pending on 
July 1, 1955, to 9,520 at the end of the fiscal year. A primary goal 
for fiscal 1957 is the attainment of a current status in subversive 
investigations, and every resource available to achieve this end 
will be used. 

In addition to the subversives deported as a result of investiga- 
tions and reported under "Deportations," were other cases brought 
to a successful conclusion, such as : Two employees of a pro-Com- 
munist Chinese newspaper in this country were arrested and 
placed under deportation proceedings; or the case of a 59-year- 
old native of Poland which was referred to the Attorney General 
with recommendation that proceedings be instituted to cancel his 
naturalization. He was an important member of the Communist 
Party and the national vice president of an organization affiliated 
with the Party. 

4,164 investigations were conducted in regard to citizens who 
obtained naturalization fraudulently, involving possible revocation 
of citizenship. 15 denaturalization suits were instituted during the 
year, of which three involved subversive classes. 

During 1956, there were 95 Mexican aliens excluded from ad- 
mission because of subversive activity or affiliations. This was the 
result of an effectively integrated program of all branches of the 
Service designed to prevent the entry of subversive aliens from 
Mexico. 

Anti-Criminal Operations. Close attention was given to the de- 
naturalization and deportation of persons of the criminal, immor- 
al, and narcotic classes. During the year, 3,838 such cases were 
completed and the cases were in the deportation process. 

Visa Fraud and False Document Operations. During the past 
year, evidence of increased fraudulent document activity was un- 
covered, principally in Mexico and Cuba. The modus operandi of 



12 Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 

these rings was to obtain documents for the use of aliens in support 
of their applications for immigration visas at the various consu- 
lates in Mexico and Cuba. The Service investigation of these activ- 
ities resulted in criminal proceedings against 37 individuals. 

Special arrangements were entered into whereby Service inves- 
tigators worked closely with United States Attorneys in New York 
and San Francisco in the investigation of Chinese cases. In the 
New York District, numerous confessions of Chinese have been 
obtained which revealed that there existed a lucrative racket in the 
sale of "slots," or positions on the family tree, which were used to 
assist Chinese to enter the United States posing illegally as citi- 
zens. Persons in the United States have acted as brokers, buying 
and selling "slots" and notarizing fraudulent affidavits which were 
used to establish the false claims to United States citizenship. 

Thirteen persons, including four who were engaged in this 
racket as a regular business, have been indicted by the Federal 
Grand Jury in New York. Approximately 24 who were successful 
in gaining entry into the United States have been found amenable 
to deportation as a result of this investigation. The investigation 
is continuing. 

Prevention of Illegal Entries through Coastal Areas. As man- 
power becomes available, more emphasis will be placed on investi- 
gative port activities, in order to detect stowaways, smugglers, 
and deserting crewmen before they leave the area in which they 
arrive. The desertion of alien crewmen of the subversive and crim- 
inal classes, particularly Chinese, is one of the primary concerns 
of the Service at this time. 

Intelligence 

While there has been intelligence work done, and there have 
been intelligence units in the operating divisions, there was not, 
until October 1955, a staff office to plan a program to develop, coor- 
dinate, and make available to the various operating divisions all 
useful information. 

The Intelligence Branch is the primary liaison for the Service 
with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Central Intelligence 
Agency, and other Government agencies at the seat of Govern- 
ment, without disturbing existing liaison channels, and it is 
charged with improving intelligence liaison with other agencies. 
The branch also coordinates special projects where Service interest 
embraces more than one operating division. 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Se rvice 1 3 

Intelligence channels have been set up in each operational divi- 
sion in the regional offices, district headquarters, suboffices, and 
Border Patrol sectors. The responsibilities of developing, collect- 
ing, and disseminating information of intelligence value have been 
assigned to designated officers in the several divisions at all levels. 
Procedures have been adopted to facilitate the flow of intelligence 
direct from the collecting field office to the office or offices which 
best can take action, without following official channels. 

Matters of more than local significance are reported, through 
intelligence channels, to the regional and Central Offices. The rec- 
ognition and freer exchange of useful information has contributed 
materially to Service operations. Intelligence reports have aided in 
determining work areas where additional effort should be made. 

In the Border Patrol operation, surveys of conditions affecting 
alien movements and a rapid interchange of information between 
sectors were part of the intelligence program. An air intelligence 
center for tracking planes illegally entering the United States was 
established in June of 1955. 

In investigations work, the development of informants and the 
intelligence gained is of increasing benefit, both in the develop- 
ment of cases and in the investigative search operation. 

Detention and Parole 

When, almost two years ago, it was determined that most aliens 
did not need to be placed in detention in order that they be avail- 
able for deportation, the number of aliens in detention dropped 
overnight from thousands to hundreds. At that time the policy 
established was that only those aliens whose freedom would en- 
danger the public safety or security, or who were considered likely 
to abscond, should be detained. 

During the past year there were only 145 aliens in detention per 
day, exclusive of those Mexicans held in the staging areas for 
transportation to Central Mexico. 

The Service was thus able to close the detention facility at De- 
troit, Michigan, and plans were perfected to curtail operations at 
the Chula Vista, California, facility. A small part of the latter fa- 
cility will be utilized as a staging area to process Mexican volun- 
tary departures. Most of the facility will be placed on a standby 
basis. 

When the detention policy proved feasible, it was determined 
that frequent reporting to the Service by aliens on bond, parole. 



14 Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 

or supervision also was not necessary in most cases. Thus, the 
large majority of aliens released on conditional parole, conditional 
bond, or under supervision, report in writing once each year in- 
stead of reporting in person at periodic intervals to Service offices. 
During the year 11,179 aliens were released on conditional parole, 
under bond, or supervision. At the end of the year there were only 
2,214 reporting in person of the 10,686 under bond, parole, or su- 
pervision. 

Deportations 

Deportations numbered 7,297 in the fiscal year 1956, less than 
half of the 15,028 deportations in the preceding year. Included in 
the 1956 figures were 16 aliens deported on subversive grounds, 
818 deported on criminal, immoral, or narcotic charges, and 6,463 
others. In addition, 80,891, principally Mexican illegal entrants, 
were granted voluntary departure. 

Among subversives expelled from the United States during the 
year were Cedric Belfrage, a national Communist functionary and 
editor of the publication NATIONAL GUARDIAN ; and Claudia 
Jones, a Communist offiicial at national level, who had been con- 
victed under the Smith Act, Sam Sweet, a prominent Communist 
in the Detroit area, and Morris Ginn, an instructor in Communist 
Party schools in the Philadelphia area, were placed under final 
orders of deportation. 

Included among those deported on criminal, immoral, or nar- 
cotic grounds were Joseph Accardi, a New Jersey racketeer ; Nic- 
olo Impostato, long known and prominent in narcotic activities in 
the Kansas City area; Giuseppe Gagliano, a narcotics peddler; 
Salvatore Maneri, a Brooklyn racketeer who had been convicted 
in absentia in Italy for murder; Joseph Doto, also known as Joe 
Adonis, racketeer kingpin in the New York City and northern 
New Jersey area ; Angelo Macri, wanted for murder in Italy ; and 
Sebastiano Vermiglio, narcotics trafficker who was apprehended 
in Chicago after he had absconded. 

Order to Show Cause Procedure. Curtailment of detentions 
proved that only a very few aliens needed to be detained or to be 
forced to report frequently while on parole, bond, or supervision. 
In February 1956 the Service instituted changes in its regulations 
which were designed to take account of this factor, and to make 
deportation proceedings as fair and effective as possible. Deporta- 
tion proceedings are now commenced by the issuance of an order 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 15 



to show cause rather than by the issuance of a warrant of arrest. 

The order to show cause sets forth numbered factual allegations 
as well as the deportation charge. The show cause order also con- 
tains notice to the alien of the date and place of hearing, and ad- 
vises him of his right to counsel. 

Under this procedure, warrants of arrest were issued and served 
in approximately 25 percent of the cases in which custody of the 
alien is considered necessary as a security measure, or in which 
the alien is likely to abscond. Thus, most aliens placed under de- 
portation proceedings do not suffer the stigma of arrest and are 
not detained or placed under bond, supervision, or parole. 

The policy of granting voluntary departure whenever possible 
prior to the Issuance of an order to show cause, or subsequent 
thereto but prior to an administrative hearing, will be continued 
during the coming year. Formal deportation cases will be held to 
a minimum, with resultant savings in time and effort. 

Deportation Hem^bigs. Special Inquiry Officers are now com- 
pletely insulated from control or supervision by officers with en- 
forcement or investigative responsibilities. Through a change in 
organization they were placed under the immediate direction of 
the Regional Special Inquiry Officers, who, in turn, were made 
reponsible solely to the Chief Special Inquiry Officer in the Cen- 
tral Office. 

A change made in the hearing regulations permits the alien to 
plead to the matter of his deportability. If the alien admits that 
he is deportable as charged in the order to show cause, the Special 
Inquiry Officer is authorized to determine by the alien's admissions 
that deportability has been established. The "pleading" process 
thus affords a practical and economical method for resolving de- 
portability without the need for extended hearings in the numer- 
ous cases where the issues are simple and the alien does not desire 
to dispute the charge. 

In 80 percent of the cases heard, the alien conceded his deporta- 
bility and left only the issue of discretionary relief to be heard by 
the Special Inquiry Officers. 

In cases where the alien does not concede, or questions any as- 
pect of his deportability under the show cause order, he receives 
a full scale hearing at which an examing officer, as prosecutor, is 
assigned to present the Government's evidence. This relieves the 
Special Inquiry Officer from the necessity of offering evidence in 
support of the deportation charges, and has left him completely 



16 Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 

free to perform the duties of an adjudicating officer. Obviously, 
this makes for greater fairness to all concerned. 

Stay of Deportation — Physical Persecution. There were 87 5 
orders pending as of June 30 which could not be executed because 
the aliens claimed that to be deported to the country of birth would 
subject them to physical persecution. Under section 243(h) of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act, an alien may make such claim, 
which, if sustained, will prevent his deportation to the country 
designated. 

While many requests for stays of deportation were submitted 
by aliens who sincerely believed they would be physically perse- 
cuted if deported to certain countries, the majority used the stat- 
ute as a means to delay deportation. The Service is paricularly con- 
cerned with the increasing number of deserting crewmen who file 
243(h) applications solely to defeat or delay deportation. The de- 
termination of these cases requires careful study of world condi- 
tions by Service officers. 

Of the 1,493 applications under section 243(h) received, 629 
cases were completed, of which 159 were denied. 

Boatlift. While Mexican alien apprehensions decreased, the need 
for rapid return to Mexico of those apprehended continued. Many 
Mexican nationals were repatriated to Mexico on vessels which, 
with the cooperation of the Mexican Government, operated be- 
tween Port Isabel, Texas, and Veracruz, Mexico. 

Frequent trips resulted in a substantial decrease in the number 
of days detention per alien in the McAllen Detention Facility, and 
allowed for the more rapid movement of aliens from other staging 
facilities at Chula Vista, El Centro, and El Paso. 

Airlift. The removal by chartered aircraft and Service-operated 
planes of deportable aliens confined in hospitals and mental insti- 
titions continued during 1956. 153 mentally and physically infirm 
aliens were delivered to a number of countries in Europe, North 
Africa, and Asia, and 64 to the Caribbean, Central and South 
American ports. The airlift is the most humane and practical 
means of returning these aliens to their home countries. On each 
flight the personnel included a psychiatrist, and a male and female 
attendant, each of whom was experienced in caring for infirm per- 
sons. 

The removal of these aliens from tax-supported hospitals and 
institutions within the United States will result in an annual sav- 
ings of approximately $800,000, and will provide space for United 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service T? 

States citizens and lawful resident aliens who are in need of hos- 
pitalization. 

Unexecuted Orders. One of the major concerns of the Service is 
the number of orders of deportation that cannot be executed. Near- 
ly one-fifth of these orders relate to aliens of the subversive, crim- 
inal, immoral, or narcotic classes. 

More than half of the 10,874 unexecuted orders pending at the 
end of June related to cases involving travel document applications 
(1,693), private bills (1,313), institutions (1,776), section 243(h) 
(815) , and litigation (262) . During the coming fiscal year all cases 
will be reviewed and appropriate action taken to reduce the num- 
ber of such cases pending. 

Travel Documents. The reluctance of foreign consuls to issue 
documents for nationals of their countries still constitutes the 
greatest single obstruction to effecting deportation. 

Among the 1,693 cases mentioned above were 80 in which the 
charge of deportability was subversive and 423 other cases in 
which the charge was criminal, immoral, or narcotic, in which 
travel documents could not be obtained. 

In the past, travel documents were requested from consuls very 
early in the proceedings. To save time, travel documents are not 
requested, now, in most cases until after the entry of a final order 
of deportation, or after a determination has been made that no 
further extension of time within which to depart will be given an 
alien who was granted voluntary departure with an alternate order 
of deportation. Since an application is made only when the need 
for a travel document has been ascertained, both the foreign con- 
suls and this Service are saved from processing useless documents. 

Nationality 

The outstanding achievement during the fiscal year 1956 in na- 
tionality matters was the placement and maintenance of naturali- 
zation activities on a current basis. At the end of the year there 
were no substantial arrearages in any of the districts of the Serv- 
ice. 

The elimination of arrearages was probably the chief reason 
for the reduction in persons naturalized to 145,885 from a record 
high in fiscal 1955 of 209,526. 

Declarations of Intention. The number of declarations of inten- 
tion (12,870) filed was higher than in 1955 but was low when com- 
pared with 111,461 filed in fiscal year 1952, the last year that a 



18 Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 

declaration was a prerequisite for naturalization. Only persona 
who have some need for a "first paper" to obtain employment or 
for other similar reasons now make applications for "first papers." 

Applications for Naturalization. Although the 169,639 applica- 
tions for naturalization received was 20 percent less than last year, 
receipts were 15 percent higher in the last half of the year, indicat- 
ing an upward trend. 

During the fiscal year, arrearages in applications for naturali- 
zation were kept below 29,000. On June 30, 1956, there were 22,884 
applications for naturalization pending, in contrast with 87,420 
such applications pending two years ago when a drive to eliminate 
arrearages began. 

Greater efficiency through revision of policies, procedures, and 
organization made it possible to maintain a current status. Some of 
the changes follow: 

A new deposition procedure was put into effect whereby the peti- 
tioner himself insures that the testimony of his witnesses is taken 
before a notary public and forwarded. Lack of depositions fre- 
quently had been a major reason for the continuance of naturaliza- 
tion petitions. 

Applications for certificates of citizenship may be closed when 
an applicant fails to prosecute within the reasonable time of 30 
days. 

A one year period, rather than two, for reexamination was pro- 
vided, during which the petitioner for naturalization has four op- 
portunities to demonstrate the required knowledge and under- 
standing. 

A special effort has been made to reduce the number of petitions 
for naturalization pending in the courts and to present petitions 
to the courts as soon as possible after filing. The great majority 
of such petitions are heard by the courts shortly after filing, and 
those which remain in a pending status for longer periods are those 
which require additional action, such as completion of depositions 
of witnesses or conducting special investigations. Often, infre- 
quency of court hearings delays final disposition of cases. 

The success of these changes is demonstrated by the fact that 
in most areas a petition for naturalization may be filed within a 
period from 30 to 45 days after receipt of an application. 

Naturalization Courts. For a number of years the Service has 
sought to concentrate the filing of naturalization petitions in the 
larger courts, because more frequent court sessions expedite the 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 19 

processing of naturalization proceedings and promote economy 
and efficiency. With larger hearings and fewer courts, it is also 
possible to hold more impressive ceremonies that add new dignity 
and deeper significance to the occasions. 

Progress with the program has been made through the coopera- 
tion of the judges of the various courts, and filings have been dis- 
continued in a particular court only with the consent of the court. 
Under the program the number of courts exercising naturalization 
jurisdiction has been reduced from the approximately 950 reported 
last year to 795. 

Naturalization. A comparison of the 1956 figure of 145,885 nat- 
uralizations with the 209,526 in fiscal 1955 is distorted by the fact 
that the 1955 figure was abnormally high as the result of special 
drives made during the year to reduce arrearages and expedite 
naturalizations. The 1956 figure on naturalizations was 24 percent 
higher than 1954 and 58 percent above the naturalization figure 
in 1953. 

Eighty percent of the naturalizations in the fiscal year 1956 
were under the general provisions of the naturalization laws, 12 
percent under the provisions relating to spouses of United States 
citizens, and 5 percent relating to military naturalizations. Among 
the new citizens were former nationals of Poland (17,256), Ger- 
many (16,230), British Empire (13,600), Canada (11,539), and 
Italy (9,549). 

Naturalization this past year, as always, had its share of human 
interest stories : 

On February 6, 1956, Dr. Leslie Cheng, together with his wife 
and two children, was admitted by the United States District 
Court, Kansas City, Kansas. He had been at one time consult- 
ant to the personal physician to General Chiang Kai-shek of 
China. 

In April 1956, Tomida Morimota Breeze was naturalized at 
River Falls, Wisconsin. She is a survivor of the atomic bomb at 
Hiroshima in 1945 and came to the United States as the wife of 
a United States Army veteran. 

Naturalization of Members of Armed Forces. Public Laiv 86, 
which provided for the naturalization of persons in the armed 
forces of the United States after June 24, 1950, and prior to July 
2, 1955, expired on December 31, 1955. The various branches of 
the armed forces cooperated by alerting all prospective applicants 
regarding the expiration date, and special action was taken by 



20 Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 

this Service to complete the processing of the cases or to allow the 
applicants to file petitions for naturalization up to 12 midnight on 
December 31. 

6,554 persons were naturalized under this Act during the year, 
including 2,236 outside the United States. While the Act was in 
elffect a total of 30,552 were naturalized, 7,756 receiving their 
United States citizenship in proceedings conducted by Service rep- 
resentatives in the Azores, Austria, England, France, Germany, 
Italy, Africa, Korea, Okinawa, Newfoundland, and the Canal Zone. 

Repatriations. During the year 798 persons who had lost their 
United States citizenship reacquired citizenship by repatriation. 
The majority of these persons were native-born women who lost 
citizenship through marriage to aliens and who were repatriated 
under the Act of June 25, 1936, as amended. For example, Lydia 
Lorrance, a 75-year-old widow, native of the United States, was 
repatriated, thereby regaining the citizenship which she lost upon 
marriage in 1912 to an alien husband. This petitioner had ances- 
tors who fought in the Civil and Revolutionary Wars. 

Derivative Citizenship. The practice of suggesting to parents 
that they obtain certificates of citizenship for children who derive 
citizenship through the parents' naturalization has continued. Dur- 
ing this fiscal year there was a total of 30,728 applications for 
certificates of citizenship filed. 20,264 certificates were issued to 
persons who derived citizenship through naturalization of their 
parents. In addition, 7,748 certificates were issued to persons who 
were born abroad to United States citizens and thereby acquired 
citizenship at birth. 

Citizenship Services. Under law this Service assists in promot- 
ing instruction and training in citizenship responsib'lities of ap- 
plicants for naturalization. Under this program, the names of new- 
ly arrived immigrants are furnished to school authorities by the 
Service, since these immigrants are potential candidates for nat- 
uralization. The names are furnished as a part of the promotion of 
citizenship education. During the past fiscal year, 217,519 names 
were referred to the public schools, 45,426 persons attended citi- 
zenship classes, and 5,872 persons enrolled for home study courses 
sponsored by many State colleges and universities. 

The Federal Textbook on Citizenship for the use of candidates 
for naturalization is furnished free to public schools. This text- 
book, prepared in several parts, meets the different educational 
levels of individual candidates. Schools last year received 122,809 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 21 

copies of the various parts of the textbook, which are distributed 
by the various offices of the Service. Persons not qualified for a 
free copy may buy one from the Government Printing Office. 

Petitions Denied. During the year, there v^ere 9,189 naturaHza- 
tion investigations completed, including 999 investigations in nat- 
uralization cases involving subversive persons. 

As a result, 163 petitions were denied because the petitioner 
failed to establish good moral character, and 8 because there was 
lack of attachment to the principles of the Constitution of the 
United States. Of the 3,935 petitions denied during the year, the 
chief grounds for denial were, as in the past, withdrawal of the 
petition by petitioner and lack of prosecution. 

Revocation and Expatriation. The citizenship of 288 persons 
was revoked. The majority of these cases were initiated by the 
Foreign Service of the Department of State on the ground that 
the naturalized persons became residents of a foreign state within 
five years after naturalization. However, some cases are initiated 
because naturalization was obtained through fraud. 

District Court orders were entered revok-ng the naturalization 
of Rebecca Maisenberg, a high level communist in Detroit, and Leo 
Fisher, who had been active in Chicago as a Communist Party 
officer and teacher. The citizenship of Michael Li Mandri, a Los 
Angeles racketeer and international narcotics suspect, was revoked 
through judicial proceedings. 

The Supreme Court passed upon two controversial questions in- 
volving revocation of naturalization during the year. In U.S. v. 
Minker, 350 U.S. 179, it held that the 1952 Act did not authorize 
the Service under its subpoena power to obtain evidence from a 
naturalized citizen in an investigation directed toward that indi- 
vidual's denaturalization. This interpretation results in clothing 
the naturalized person with the same protection granted by the 
Constitution to one accused of crime, despite the fact that denatu- 
ralization has always been held to be a civil, and not a criminal, 
proceeding. 

In the other case, U.S. v. Zucca, 351 U.S. 91, the Court ruled that 
an affidavit of cause is a procedural prerequisite to the institution 
of revocation proceedings. 

With earlier decisions requiring that evidence to revoke must be 
clear, unequivocal and convincing, these decisions increase the al- 
ready heavy burden upon the Government when it moves to denat- 
uralize, even in apparently flagrant cases. 



22 Report of the Immigration and Na t uralization Service 

A total of 4,987 persons lost citizenship through expatriation. 
Voting in a foregn political election or plebiscite, residence in a 
foreign state, and naturalization in a foreign state were the prin- 
cipal grounds for expatriation. 

Legislation and Litigation 

During the fiscal year 1956, six bills affecting laws administered 
by the Service were enacted into law. Three were passed during 
the First Session and three during the Second Session of the 
Eighty-Fourth Congress. 

Public Law H9, approved July 12, 1955, extends for two years 
or until June 30, 1957, the authority for enlistment of aliens in the 
Regular Army authorized by the Act of June 30, 1950, as amended 
by Title II of the Act of June 19, 1951, and section 402(e) of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act. These statutes authorize the 
enlistment of not to exceed 12,500 aliens in the Regular Army. 
Such enlisted aliens are entitled to certain benefits if they apply 
for naturalization after completion of five or more years in mili- 
tary service. 

Public Law 165, the "Atomic Weapons Rewards Act of 1955," 
approved July 15, 1955, authorizes awards to persons furnishing 
original information to the United States concerning atomic wea- 
pons and nuclear material which has been introduced, manufac- 
tured, or acquired in the United States contrary to law. Section 4 
of the Act provides that if such information leading to an award 
is furnished by an alien, the Secretary of State, the Attorney Gen- 
eral, and the Director of Central Intelligence, acting jointly, may 
determine that the entry of such alien into the United States is 
in the public interest and, in that event, such alien and the mem- 
bers of his immediate family may receive immigrant visas and be 
admitted for permanent residence, notwithstanding the require- 
ments of the Immigration and Nationality Act. 

Public Laiv 319, approved August 9, 1955, amends Title V of the 
Agricultural Act of 1949, as amended. The new statute extends 
for three and a half years, or until June 30, 1959, the authority 
for the recruitment and importation of Mexican agricultural la- 
borers. The Act also provides for the relief of employers from 
liability to the United States for workers' transportation and sub- 
sistence costs when such costs have once been paid or provided to 
the workers by the employers. The amended Act also requires con- 
sultation by the Secretary of Labor with agricultural employers 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 23 



and workers for the purpose of obtaining facts relevant to the 
supply of domestic farm workers and the wages paid such workers 
engaged in similar employment. 

Public Law JfSO, approved March 16, 1956, grants the benefits 
of section 301(a) (7) of the Immigration and Nationality Act to 
certain children of United States citizens. It extends the provisions 
of that section to all cases involving children born to one alien 
parent and to one parent who is a citizen of this country who 
served in the armed forces of the United States after December 31, 
1946, and before December 24, 1952, if the child was born outside 
of the United States and its outlying possessions after January 12, 
1941, and before December 24, 1952, and if the child's case does 
not come within the provisions of section 201 (g) or (i) of the Na- 
tionality Act of 1940. 

Public Laiv 528, approved May 18, 1956, amends the Act entitled 
"An Act to provide better facilities for the enforcement of the 
customs and immigration laws," to increase the amounts author- 
ized to be expended. The law amends the Act of June 26, 1930, as 
amended, by increasing the limit which may be expended by one 
department for one project from $15,000 to $30,000, and increases 
the limit for the joint use of the Customs and the Immigration and 
Naturalization Service from $30,000 to $60,000. 

Public Law 555, approved June 4, 1956, amends the United 
States Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948, as 
amended. It requires a person who is admitted to the United States 
as an exchange visitor, or who acquired that status after admis- 
sion, to return to a cooperating country and to reside there for a 
total of two years before he becomes eligible for an immigrant 
visa or for a nonimmigrant visa under section 101(a) (15) (H) of 
the Immigration and Nationality Act. The Attorney General is 
authorized to waive the two-year foreign residence requirement 
under some circumstances. This amendment, by its own terms, 
applies only to persons acquiring exchange visitor status after the 
enactment of the amendment. 

Soon after the close of fiscal year 1956, acts were approved af- 
fecting the Service. Public Laiv 728 was approved on July 18, 1956. 
This law, known as "The Narcotic Control Act of 1956," contains 
provisions adding conviction of "conspiracy" to violate narcotics 
laws and conviction of "illicit possession" of narcotics as grounds 
for exclusion or deportation of narcotic law violators. It further 
provides that section 241(b) of the Immigration and Nationality 



24 Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



Act does not apply to aliens charged with deportability under sec- 
tion 241(a) (11) of that Act. 

Public Laiv 880, approved August 1, 1956, known as the "Social 
Security Amendments of 1956," contains provisions directing that 
monthly social security benefits shall not be paid to aliens outside 
the United States for designated continuous periods of time, with 
some exceptions based on reciprocity. The Attorney General is re- 
quired to certify to the Secretary of Health, Education and Wel- 
fare such information regarding aliens who depart from the 
United States to any foreign country (other than foreign contig- 
uous territory) as may be necessary to enable the Secretary to 
carry out the purposes of this portion of the Act. He is also re- 
quired to assist the Secretary in obtaining such other information 
as may be needed by the Secretary. 

Private Legislation. Service functions relative to private immi- 
gration bills include the timely submission of investigative reports 
to Congress on these bills, the prompt completion of all adminis- 
trative procedures during the pendency of private legislation, and, 
following disposition by Congress, summary enforcement of de- 
partures or effectuation of the terms of the bill. The effectiveness 
of the program has been immeasurably improved by instituting 
inter-agency conferences to improve policy coordination between 
the interested agencies. 

In fiscal 1956, there were 1,474 private imm-gration bills intro- 
duced in Congress. The Judiciary Committees were furnished com- 
prehensive reports in 1,421 cases. During this period, 573 bills 
were enacted into private laws, and 725 bills were adversely 
acted upon by the House and Senate Judiciary Committees. The 
reinstitution of preexamination made such adverse action possible 
in more than 500 of these cases and obviated the necessity for 
countless future bills. As of June 30, 1956, there were 2,492 bills 
still pending, which had received no final action in the Congress. 

A comprehensive analysis of private immigration legislation in 
the first session of the 84th Congress resulted in proposals that 
led to the introduction of public bills which would provide adminis- 
trative relief for deserving aliens who now have no recourse other 
than through private legislation. More than 85 percent of the 
private immigration bills enacted during the past year would 
have been unnecessary, had these proposals been law. 

Litigation. Aliens found deportable through administrative pro- 
cess continued in large numbers to besiege the courts with suits 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 25 



attacking the deportation statutes on a wide variety of grounds. 
The denial of suspension of deportation, voluntary departure, ad- 
justment of status, and similar forms of administrative relief 
formed the basis for another large number of suits filed by deport- 
able aliens. Many cases involved revocation of naturalization, 
which, in many instances, opens the door to deportation proceed- 
ings. 

While the Service is not disposed to deny any alien the full right 
of review to which he is entitled, it is a fact that litigation of this 
type is often without merit and serves only to further delay the 
alien's deportation. One of the questions of vital importance in 
the administration of the deportation laws now pending before the 
Supreme Court is the validity of section 241(d) of the 1952 Act 
making certain offenses grounds for deportation irrespective of 
the date of commission or of the date of the alien's entry, consid- 
ered in connection with the savings clause of section 405. 

Thirty-three cases directly involving laws administered by the 
Service were calendared by the Supreme Court during the year, 
including eleven carried over from the preceding term. Certiorari 
was denied by the court in 18 cases. Nine decisions were rendered, 
two favorable and seven adverse to the Government. In two other 
cases the lower court's judgments were vacated for mootness. Four 
cases had not been reached when the court adjourned and will be 
placed on the 1956-1957 calendar. Certiorari has been granted in 
three of these cases. 

Prosecutions. Cases involving 3,369 immigration law violations 
were instituted during the year, only a third of the cases instituted 
in the previous year. These cases resulted in 3,246 convictions, 
with aggregate imprisonment of 1,391 years and fines totaling 
$37,072. 

The decrease was in prosecutions for illegal entry, and is directly 
attributable to the successful control maintained on the Mexican 
Border. 

Convictions were obtained in 216 smuggling cases involving 890 
smuggled aliens. Fines totaling $14,775 were imposed and impris- 
onment aggregated 226 years. 

Of the 556 prosecutions instituted for nationality violations, con- 
victions were obtained in 378 cases. All but ten of these convictions 
involved aliens who falsely represented themselves as citizens of 
the United States. 



26 Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



Internal Management 

The vast improvement in the Mexican Border control, the new 
detention policy, the order to show cause procedure, the naturaliza- 
tion drive last year, all were contributing factors that brought 
about the gratifying result of a current or near current status in 
every phase of immigration and nationality work during the past 
fiscal year. 

Continuous appraisal of the work and organization of the Serv- 
ice indicated that the decentralized organization plan installed in 
January 1955 could be further extended by designating additional 
subofRces as district offices. On April 6, 1956, 21 additional offices 
became district offices. The immediate effect was broader decision- 
making authority, which meant that immigration and nationality 
applications could be handled more expeditiously ; shortened lines 
of supervision with the regional offices, and better supervision of 
the smaller geographic areas by district offices were other results 
of the reorganization. 

Field Inspection. With a decentralized organization it is impor- 
tant that continuous efforts be made to see that procedures and 
regulations are interpreted and carried out in a uniform manner 
throughout the Service. 

Field Inspection Officers inspected 107 offices during the fiscal 
year 1956. Deficiencies observed and other matters requiring atten- 
tion were reported to the Commissioner and his staff for remedial 
measures. This program of continual inspections is contributing 
effectively in progressive over-all improvement toward increased 
efficiency and greater consistency in operations, supervision, and 
administrative management. 

One of the several special projects assigned to the Field Inspec- 
tion Officers was in connection with a request by the Department 
of State that this Service ascertain by personal contact with offi- 
cials of State penal institutions, the names of Chinese nationals 
serving prison sentences, and the feasibility of permitting release 
of such prisoners by parole or commutation of sentence, if their 
release was requested for deportation or voluntary departure. The 
data were to be used in facilitating negotiations at Geneva with 
the China Communist Government for release of American citizens 
now imprisoned on the Chinese mainland. This operation has con- 
tinued at the request of the Department of State, giving physical 
control and required contacts to the Field Inspection Officers until 
active release of United States citizens. 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization S ervi ce 2 7 

Security. Work was completed during the fiscal year 1956 on the 
granting of formal clearance for access to classified information 
to all Service employees whose duties require such access. Improve- 
ments were made in security practices in various offices. 

Administration 

During the fiscal year, emphasis was directed toward a more 
efficient and economic operation throughout the Service. 

Personnel. Major emphasis was placed upon in-Service promo- 
tion during the year. Senior and junior selection boards evaluated 
the training and experience of officers and established rosters of 
Service employees recommended for promotion. Within this frame- 
work more than 500 promotions were made. 

Training. Training programs included the initial training of 671 
officers who graduated from the Border Patrol Academy after 
eight weeks spent on Spanish, law, fingerprinting, intelligence, 
and enforcement methods. In the advanced Officers Training 
School, 200 career officers attended six-weeks courses designed to 
broaden their knowledge, sharpen capacity for independent judg- 
ment, and to qualify officers for advancement to supervisory posi- 
tions. 

Finance. The fiscal year 1956 was devoted to evaluating the pre- 
vious year's decentralization of accounting and procurement func- 
tions. As a result, fiscal operations were more completely standard- 
ized through formulation and revision of accounting and procure- 
ment instructions. 

Sjmce Allocation and Construction. The Central Office was moved 
from a temporary structure to a modern building in September 
1955. Decentralization made it possible to reduce from 125,000 to 
60,000 square feet the amount of space needed for the Central 
Office. 

After numerous conferences with the Bureau of the Budget, 
General Services, the Customs Bureau, and other agencies, prelim- 
inary plans have been developed for a number of proposed build- 
ings, including inspection stations (particularly along the northern 
border) , and Border Patrol stations and sector headquarters. 

Reports and Forms Control. Under the reports and forms con- 
trol procedures, reporting directives have been simplified, and a 
number of reports have been eliminated or are submitted less fre- 
quently. Progress has been made by the Central and Regional Of- 



28 Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 

fices in consolidating district forms into regional or Service-wide 
forms. 

Information and Records. The Service completed the microfilm- 
ing of manifests and other documents for all arrivals prior to De- 
cember 1, 1954, with resultant savings of more than 10,000 square 
feet of space. A files inventory taken during the year was used to 
purge indexes in the eleven original files control offices, and to 
bring an index card for each active case file into the Central Office 
file. 

Statistics. Included in the statistics work during fiscal year 1956 
were formulas established to insure consistent personnel assign- 
ments in relation to workloads ; a study on the agricultural labor 
program ; calculations for new quotas in connection with the intro- 
duction in Congress of several Administration-sponsored bills ; and 
analyses of deportation charges, Chinese immigration, and the mi- 
gration of the alien population. 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



29 



TABLE 1. IMMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES: 
1820 - 1956 

From 1820 to 1867 figures represent alien passengers arrived; 1868 to 1891 inclusive and 1895 to 1897 Inclusive 
immigrant aliens arrived; 1892 to 1894 inclusive and from 1898 to the present time immigrant aliens admitted. 



Year 


Number 

of 
persons 


Year 


Number 

of 
persons 


Year 


Number 

of 
persons 


Year 


Number 

of 
persons 










1820-1956(1) 


40.734.745 


1851-1860 

1851.. 

1852. . 

1853.. 

1854.. 

1855.. 

1856. . 

1857. 

1858 . 

18,59.. 

I860.. 

1861-1870 

1861.. 
1862.. 
1863.. 
1864.. 
1865. . 
1866. . 
1867.. 
1818.. 
1869.. 
1870.. 

1871-1880 

1871.. 
1S72. . 
1873.. 
1874. . 
1875.. 
1876.. 
1877. . 
1878. , 
1879.. 
1880.. 

1881-1890 

1881.. 
1882.. 
1883.. 


2,598.214 


1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 

1891-19( 

1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 

1901-191 

1901 
1902 
1903. 
1904. 
1905. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 

1911-192 

1911. 
1912. 
1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 
1919. 
1920. 


518.592 
395.346 
334.203 
490.109 
546,889 
444,427 
455.302 

)0 3,687.564 


1921-1930 

1921.. 
1922. . 
1923.. 
1924.. 
1925. . 
1926. . 
1927. . 
1928.. 
1929.. 
1930.. 

1931-1940 

1931.. 
1932. . 
1933.. 
1934.. 
1935. . 
1936. . 
1937. . 
1938. . 
1939. . 
1940.. 

1941-1950 

1941.. 
1942.. 
1943.. 
1944.. 
1945.. 
1946. . 
1947.. 
1948.. 
1949. . 
1950.. 

1951.. 
1952. . 
1953.. 
1954. . 
1955.. 
1956. . 


4.107,209 


1820 
1821-1830 


8,385 
143.439 


379,466 
371,603 
3(i8.645 
427,833 
200.877 
200.436 
251.306 
123.126 
121.282 
153.640 

2,314,824 


805.228 
309.556 
522,919 


1821.. 
1822.. 
1823.. 
1824 


9.127 

6,911 

6.354 

7,912 

10.199 

10,837 

18,875 

27.382 

22,520 

23.322 

599,125 


294,314 
304,488 
335,175 
307,255 
279,678 
241,700 

528.431 


1825 . 

1826 . 
1827.. 
1828.. 
1829 


560.319 
579.663 
439,730 
285.631 
258.536 
343.267 
230.832 
229.299 
311.715 
448,572 

8,795,386 


1830. . 
1831-1840 


91.918 
91.985 
176,282 
193,418 
248, 120 
318,568 
315,722 
138,840 
352,768 
387,203 

2.812,191 


97,139 
35,576 
23,068 
29,470 
34.956 
36,329 
60,244 
67,896 
82,998 
70,756 

1.035.039 


1831.. 
1832.. 
1833.. 
1834.. 
1835.. 
1836.. 
1837. . 
1838.. 
1839.. 
1849. . 

1841-1850 


22,633 
60,482 
58.640 
65,365 
45,374 
76,242 
79,340 
38,914 
68,069 
84,066 

1.713,251 


487,918 

648,743 

857,046 

812.870 

1.026.499 

1,100,735 

1,285.349 

782.870 

761.786 

1,041.570 

5,7.^5,811 


321.350 
404,806 
459,803 
313,339 
227.498 
169.986 
141,857 
138.469 
177.826 
457,257 

5.246,613 


51,776 

28,781 

23,725 

28,551 

38,119 

108,721 

147,292 

170,570 

188.317 

249,187 

205,717 
265.520 
170.434 
208.177 
237.790 
321,625 


1841.. 
1842 . 
1843.. 


80,289 
104,565 
52.496 
78,615 
114.371 
154.416 
234,968 
226,527 
297.024 
369,980 


1845. . 
1846.. 
1847.. 
1848.. 
1849. . 
1850.. 


878.. 587 
8.H8.172 
1.197,892 
1,218.480 
326.700 
298,826 
295.403 
110.618 
141,132 
430.001 


669.431 
788,992 
603.322 



(1) Data are for fiscal years ended June 30, except 1820 tol831 Inclusive and 1844 to 1849 Inclusive fiscal 
years ended Sept. 30; 1833 to 1842 inclusive and 1851 to 1867 Inclusive years ended Dec. 31; 1832 covers 
15 months ended Dec. 31; 1843 nine months ended Sept. 30; 1850 fifteen months ended Dec.31; and 
1868 six months ended June 30. 



30 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 2. ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AND DEPARTED 

BY MONTHS: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1955 AND 1956 

(Data exclude travelers between continental United States and its possessions, border crossers, 
and agricultural laborers) 



Period 



Fiscal year 1956 

July-December, 1955 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January-June, 1956. . 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Fiscal year 1955 

July-December, 1954 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January-June, 1955. . 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 



Aliens admitted 



Immi- 
grant 



321,625 



158,864 



26,763 
25,027 
24,124 
27,297 
27,39c( 
28,260 

162,761 



24,501 
24,264 
28,237 
28,467 
28,831 
28,461 

237,790 



120,785 



20,394 
19,036 
19,260 
20,373 
20,752 
20,970 

117,005 



17,470 
16,965 
20,611 
18,952 
22,053 
20,954 



Non- 
immi- 
grant 



686,259 



368,615 



66,672 
69,215 
76,81u 
58,029 
46,889 
50,994 

317,644 



47,658 
37,541 
55,608 
55,719 
59,096 
62,022 

620,946 



327,447 



57,224 
60,785 
72,727 
50,060 
41,616 
45,035 

293,499 



44,848 
36.135 
46,908 
55,074 
54,323 
56,211 



Total 



1,007,884 



527,479 



93,435 

94,242 
100,940 
8o,32o 
74,282 
79,254 

480,405 



72,159 
61,805 
83,845 
84,180 
87,927 
90,483 

858,736 



448,232 



77,618 
79,821 
91,987 
70,433 
62,368 
66,005 

410,504 



62,318 
53.100 
67,519 
74,026 
76,376 
77,165 



Aliens departed 



Emi- 
grant 



22,824 



13,104 



2,712 
2,838 
2,583 
1,90b 
1,369 
1,696 

9,720 



1,502 
1,160 
1,614 
1,417 
1,552 
2,475 

31,245 



19,725 



5,804 
3,739 
3,379 
3,007 
2,044 
1,752 

11,520 



1,312 
1,413 
2,107 

2,144 
2,027 
2,517 



Non- 
emi- 
grant 



692,376 



369,929 



70,156 
b7,047 
bo, 1)91 
00,092 
46,741 
00,203 

322,447 



49,184 
40,774 
52,337 
60,347 
60,912 
58,893 

634,555 



315,445 



63,214 
57,615 
56,944 
49,247 
42,063 
46,362 

319,110 



48,440 
39,578 
50,192 
60.311 
56,520 
64,069 



Total 



383,033 



72,867 
09,885 
08,274 
61,998 
48,110 
61,899 

332,167 



50,686 
41,934 
53,951 
61 , 764 
62,464 
61,368 

665,800 



335,170 



09,018 
61,354 
60,323 
52,254 
44,107 
48,114 

330,630 



49,752 
40,991 
52,299 
62,455 
58,547 
66,586 



Excess 
(1) 



292,684 



144,446 



20,568 
24,357 
32,666 
23,328 
26,172 
17,355 

148,238 



21,473 
19,871 
29,894 
22,422 
25,463 
29,115 

192,936 



113,062 



8,600 
18,467 
31,664 
18,179 
18,261 
17,891 

79,874 



12,566 
12,109 
15,220 
11,571 
17,829 
10,579 



U.S. Citizens 



Ar- 
rived 



1,281,110 



699,656 



134,363 
157,479 
134,903 
104,192 
84,890 
83,769 

581,454 



84,006 
87,568 

100,607 
95,512 
97,163 

116,598 



623,361 



113,386 
147,103 
127,129 
89,089 
73,576 
73,078 

548,251 



69,644 
80,191 
91,868 
90,333 
109,893 
106,322 



De- 
parted 



1,272,516 



573,149 



149,959 
113,468 
87,. 534 
75,861 
68,484 
77,843 

699,367 



88,208 
96,072 
113,450 
115,267 
116,504 
169,866 

1,096,146 



482,668 



127,669 
94,171 
74,136 
60,627 
56,175 
69,890 

613,478 



76,763 
85,661 
98,678 
104,666 
107,399 
140,311 



(1) Excess of admissions over departures. 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



31 



TABLE 2-A. ALIENS AND CITIZENS ARRIVED AND EXAMINED AT 

UNITED STATES PORTS OF ENTRY: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 3U, 1955 AND 1956 



Class 


Total 


Aliens 


Citizens 




Year 


ended June 30 


195G 




134,140,520 


71.115,577 


63 024 943 






Arrived at land borders 


129,616,053 


68,792,308 


(■)0,823,745 




Canadian 


49,767,313 

79,848,740 

2,45;l,337 

2,071,130 


26,097,673 

42,694,635 

1,533,249 

790,020 


23.669,640 
37 154 105 




Crewmen 


920,088 
1 281 110 


Arrived at seaports 








Year 


ended June 30 


1955 




123,859.654 


63,627.764 


60,231.890 






Arrived at land borders 


119,763,360 


61,611,311 


58,152,049 






Canadian 


48,000,554 

71,762,806 

2,257,138 

1,839,156 


24,812,698 

36,798,613 

1,344,890 

671,563 


23,187,856 


Mexican 


34 964 193 


Crewmen ....'. 


912,248 




1,167,593 







32 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 3 ALIENS ADMITTED, 

BY CLASSES UNDER THE IMMIGRATION LAWS: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1952 TO 1956 

Data exclude travelers between continental United States and its possessions, border crossers, crewmen, 
and agricultural laborers. 



Class 



ALIENS admitted. 



Immigrants (I) . 



Quota Immigrants ,£!.•. 

Nonquota Immigrants 



Wives of U. S. citizens 

Husbands of U. S. citizens 

Children of U. S. citizens 

Natives of Western Hemisphere countries 

Their spouses 

Their children 

Persons who had been U. S. citizens 

Ministers of religious denominations 

Their spwuses 

Their children 

Employees of U. S. Government abroad, their 

spouses and children 

Refugees (2) 

Other nonquota immigrants 



Nonimmigrants (1) . 



Foreign government officials 

Temporary visitors for business 

Temporary visitors for pleasure 

Transit aliens 

Treaty traders and Investors 

Students 

Representatives to international organizations. 

Temporary workers and industrial trainees 

Representative? of foreign Information media . 

Exchange aliens 

Returning resident aliens (1) 

Other nonimmigrants 



781,602 



2r>.5.520 



194,247 
71.273 



16,058 

793 

2,464 

47,744 

455 

209 

32 

338 

96 

146 



2,938 
516,082 



22, 26' 

86,745 

269,606 

77,899 

791 

8,613 

5,137 



44,980 
44 



1953 



656,148 



170.434 



84,175 
86,259 



15,916 

3,359 

3,268 

58,985 

1,127 

987 

104 

244 



2 

2,124 

485,714 



24,502 

63,496 

243,219 

67,684 

878 

13,533 

6,112 

3,021 

174 

12,.';84 

50,397 

114 



774.790 



208.177 



94,098 
114,079 



17,145 

7,725 

5,819 

78,897 

1,119 

510 

427 

263 

57 

65 

4 

821 
1,227 

.566.613 



23,095 

61,029 

292.725 

78,526 

1,023 

25,425 

5,601 

(3) 7.479 

504 

15.260 

55,887 

59 



1955 



858,736 



82,232 
155,558 



18,504 

6,716 

5,662 

92.620 

1,059 

595 

87 

194 

50 

63 



29,002 
997 



620,946 



26,288 

68,696 

332,39'! 

71.301 

1,203 

27,192 

6.003 

(S) 9,7.50 

,575 

16,077 

61,442 

25 



1056 



1,007,884 



321,625 



89,310 
232,315 



21,244 

5,788 

4,710 

122,083 

1,398 

551 

44 

210 

55 

85 

2 

75,473 
672 

686,259 



27,109 

72,265 

399,704 

65,214 

1,619 

28,013 

5,190 

(3) 17,077 

697 

17,204 

52,136 

31 



(1) An Immigrant Is defined in statistics of the Service as an alien admitted for permanent residence, or as 
an addition to the population. A nonimmigrant is defined as an alien admitted for temporary residence. 
Returning resident aliens who have once been counted as immigrants are Included with nonimmi- 
grants, although the immigration laws define such aliens as Immigrants. 

(2) Refugees admitted under the Refugee Relief Act of 1953. 

(3) Does not include agricultural laborers admitted under Section 101 (a) (1 .5) (H), Immigration and Nation- 
ality Act, of whom there were 7,946 in 1954, 13,195 In 19.55, and 15,152 In 1955. 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



33 



TABLE 4. IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 TO 1956^ 

(From 1820 to 1867 figures represent alien passengers arrived; 1808 to 1891 inclusive and 1895 to 
1897 inclusive immigrant aliens arrived; 1892 to 1894 inclusive and from 1898 to present time Im- 
mipraiit aliens admitted. Data for years prior to 19(iii relate to country whence alien came; thereafter 
to country of hist permanent residence. Because of changes in boundaries and clianges in lists of 
countries, data for certain countries are not comparable throughout.) 



Countries 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria-Hungary (2) 

Belgium 

Denmark 

France 

Germany (2) 

(England 

Great (Scotland 

Britain (Wales 

(.Vot specified (3) 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway ) 

(4) 

Sweden ) 

Poland (5) 

Portugal 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe 

U. S. S. R (6) 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

.Japan f") 

Turkey in Asia (8) 

Other Asia 

America 

Canada and Newfoundland (9) 

Mexico (10) 

West Indies 

Centeral America 

South America -.•,•■■_ 

Africa 

Australia and New Zealand 

Not specified 



1820 



1 

20 

371 

9tJ8 
1,782 

2t)8 

3t)0 

3,614 
30 
49 



5 
35 
139 
31 

1 
14 



209 

] 

164 

2 

11 



1 
301 



1821 
to 
1830 



143,439 



98,817 



27 

169 

8,497 

6,761 

14,055 

2,912 

170 

7,942 

20 

50,724 

409 

1,078 

91 

16 

145 

2,477 

3,226 

20 

75 

3 



11,564 



2,277 

4.817 

3,834 

105 

531 



33,032 



1831 
to 
1840 



495,688 



22 

1,063 

45,575 

152,454 

7,611 

2,667 

185 

65,347 

49 

207,381 

2,253 

1,412 

1,201 

369 

829 
2,125 
4,821 

277 
40 



48 



33,424 



13,624 

6,.'i99 

12,301 

44 

856 



54 
69,911 



1841 
to 
1850 



1.713,251 



1,597,501 



5,074 

539 

77,262 

434,626 

32,092 

3,712 

1,261 

229,979 

16 

780,719 

1,870 

8,251 

13,903 

105 
550 
2,209 
4,644 
59 
551 
79 



62,469 



41,723 
3,271 

13,528 

368 

3,579 



53,144 



1851 
to 
1860 



2,598.214 



2,452,660 



4,738 

3,719 

76,358 

951,667 

247,125 

38.331 

6,319 

132,199 

31 

914,119 

9.231 

10,789 

20,931 

1,164 

1,055 

9,298 

25,011 

83 

457 

5 



41,397 
43 



74,720 



59,309 
3,078 

10,660 

449 

1,224 



210 
29.169 



1861 
to 
1870 



2.314,824 



2,065,270 



7,800 

6,734 

17.094 

35.986 

787,418 

222,277 

38,769 

4,313 

341,537 

72 

435,778 

11,725 

9,102 

(71,631 

(37,667 
2,027 
2,658 
6,697 
23,286 
129 
2,512 



64,630 



64,301 

69 

186 

2 

72 



166,607 



153,878 

2,191 

9,046 

95 

1,397 



312 

36 

17,969 



See footnotes at end of table. 



34 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 4. IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 TO 1956' (Continued) 



Countries 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria) 

(2) 

Hungary) 

Belgium 

Bulgaria (11) 

Czechoslovakia (12) 

Denmark 

Finland (12) 

France 

Germany (2) 

(England 

Great (Scotland 

Britain (Wales 

(Not specified (3) 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway (4) 

Sweden (4) 

Poland (5) 

Portugal 

Rumania (13) 

Spain . 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe 

U.S. S. R (6) 

Yugoslavia (11) 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Japan (7) 

Turkey in Asia (8) 

Other Asia 

America 

Canada and Newfoundland (9) 

Mexico (10) 

West Indies 

Central America 

South America 

Other America (16) 

Africa 

Australia and New Zealand 

Pacific Islands 

Not specified (14) 



1871 
to 
1880 



2,812,191 



2,272,262 



72,969 
7,221 

31,771 

72,206 

718,182 

437,700 

87,564 

6,631 

16,142 

210 

436,871 

55,759 

16,541 

95,323 

115,922 

12,970 

14,082 

11 

5,266 

28,293 

337 

39,284 

1,001 

123,823 



123,201 
163 
149 
6' 
243 

404,044 



383,640 

5,162 

13,957 

157 

1,128 



358 
9,886 
1,028 

790 



1881 
to 
1890 



5,246,613 



4,737,046 



353,719 
20,177 

88,132 

50,464 

1,452,970 

644,680 

149,809 

12,640 

168 

2,308 

655,482 

307,309 

53,701 

176,586 

391,776 

51,806 

16,978 

6,348 

4,419 

81,988 

1,562 

213,282 

682 

68,380 



61,711 

269 

2,270 

2,220 

1,910 

426,967 



393,304 

1,913 

29,042 

404 

2,304 



857 
7,017 

5,557 
789 



1891 
to 
1900 



3,687,564 



3,558,978 



592,707 

18,167 
160 

50,231 

30,770 

505,152 

216,726 

44,188 

10,557 

67 

15,979 

3^8,416 

651,893 

26,758 

95,015 

226,266 

96,720 

27,508 

12,7.50 

8,731 

31,179 

3,626 

505,290 

122 

71,236 



14,799 
68 
25,942 
26,799 
3,628 

38,972 



3,311 

971 

33,066 

549 

1,075 



350 

2,740 

1,225 

14,063 



1901 
to 
1910 



8,795,386 



8,136,016 



2,145,266 

41,635 
39,280 

65,285 

73,379 
341,498 
388,017 
120,469 

17,464 

167,519 
339,065 
2,045,8 
48,262 
190,505 
249,534 

69,149 
53,008 
27,935 
34,922 
79,976 
1,597,306 

665 

243,567 



20.605 
4,713 
129,797 
77,393 
11,059 

361,888 



179,226 
49,642 

107,548 
8,192 
17,280 



7,368 
11,975 

1,049 
33,523 



1911 
to 
1920 



5,735,811 



4,376,564 



(453,649 

(442,693 

33,746 

22,533 

3,426 

41,983 

756 

61,897 

143,945 

249,944 

78,357 

13,107 

184,201 

146,181 

1,109,524 

43,718 

66,395 

95,074 

4,813 

89,732 

13,311 

68,611 

23,091 

54,677 

921,201 

1, 

8,111 

192,559 



21,278 

2,082 

83,837 

79,389 

5,973 

1,143,671 



742, 185 

219,004 

123,424 

17,159 

41,899 



8,443 

12,348 

1,079 

1,147 



1921 
to 
1930 



4,107,209 



2,477,853 



32,868 

30,680 
15,846 
2,945 
102,194 
32,430 
16,691 
49,610 
412,202 
157,420 
159,781 
13,012 

51,084 
220,591 
455,315 
26,948 
68,531 
97,249 
227,734 
29,994 
67,646 
28,958 
29,676 
14,659 
61,742 
49,064 
22,983 

97,400 



29,907 
1,886 
33,462 
19,165 
12,980 

1,516,716 



924,515 

459,287 

74,899 

15,769 

42,215 

31 

6,286 

8,299 

427 

228 



See footnotes at end of table. 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



35 



TABLE 4. IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 TO 1956' (Continued) 



Countries 



All countries 

Europe 

Albania (12) 

Austria (2) 

Hungary (2) 

Belgium 

Bulgaria (11) 

Czechoslovakia . . . (12) 

Denmark 

Estonia (12) 

Finland (12) 

Franco 

fJcrmany (2) 

(England 

Great (Scotland 

Britain (Wales 

(Not spec. .(3) 

Clreece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia (12) 

Lithuania (12) 

Luxembourg (17) 

N'etherlands 

Xorway (4) 

Poland (5) 

Portugal 

Rumania (13) 

Spain 

Sweden (4) 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe. . . 

U.S. S. R (6) 

Yugoslavia (11) 

Other Europe 

Asia (15) 

China 

India 

Japan (7) 

Turkey in Asia. ... (8) 
Other Asia 



1931 
to 
1940 



528,431 



348,289 

2,040 

3,5()3 

7,801 

4,817 

9a8 

14,393 

2,559 

506 

2,146 

12,623 

114,058 

21,75t 

6,88; 

735 

9,119 

13,167 

68,028 

1,192 

2,201 

565 

7,150 

4,740 

17,026 

3,329 

3,871 

3,258 

3,960 

5,512 

737 

1,35P 

5,835 

2,361 

15,344 



4,928 
496 

1,948 
328 

7,644 



1941 
to 
1950 



1,035,039 



621,704 



85 

24,860 

3,469 

12,189 

375 

8,34 

5,393 

212 

2,503 

38,809 

226,. 578 

112,252 

16.131 

3,209 

8,973 

26,967 

57,661 

361 

683 

820 

14,8ti0 

10,100 

7,571 

7,423 

1,076 

2,898 

10,665 

10,547 

580 

548 

1,576 

3,983 

31,780 



16,709 

1,761 

1,555 

218 

11,537 



1951 



205,717 



149,545 



9,761 

62 

1,802 



1,076 

532 
4,573 
87,755 
12,393 
2,309 
196 

4,459 
3,144 

8,958 

5 

8 

51 

3,062 

2,289 

98 

1,078 

104 

442 

2,022 

1,485 

118 

10 

4.54 

1,203 

3,921 



335 
109 
271 
3 
,203 



265,520 



193,626 



23,088 

63 

2,946 

9 

51 

1,152 

500 

4,878 

104,236 

18,539 

3,390 

248 

948 

6,996 

3,526 

11,342 

10 

20 

90 

3.060 

2,354 

235 

953 

34 

481 

1,778 

1,502 

94 

11 

327 

757 

9,328 



263 

123 

3,814 

12 
5,116, 



1953 



170,434 



82,352 



1 

2,132 

96 

2,162 

1 

77 

993 

38 

473 

4,137 

27,329 

12,921 

3,416 

302 

1,426 

1.296 

4,304 

8,432 

59 

14 



2,973 

2,234 

136 

1,077 

23 

814 

2,171 

1,796 

62 

25 

580 

775 



8,231 



528 
104 

2,579 
13 

5,007 



208,177 



92,121 



2,136 

30 

2,263 

2 

1,010 

5 

448 

4,263 

33,098 

12,977 

3,442 

253 

215 

1,154 

4,655 

13,145 

6 

5 

59 

3,. 595 

2,142 

67 

1,4,55 

7 

542 

2,172 

1,673 

97 

11 

680 



)70 



254 
144 

3,846 
33 

5,693 



237,790 



110,591 



5 

3,404 

83 

1,271 

1 

35 

1,020 

10 

450 

4,127 

29,596 

12,871 

2,642 

248 

166 

6,182 

5,222 

30.272 

23 

12 

61 

3,555 

2,296 

129 

1,293 

25 

802 

1,702 

1,693 

108 

28 

611 

648 

10,935 



568 
194 

4,150 
54 

5,969 



321,625 



156,866 



9,340 
109 

2,098 

40 

68 

1,069 

39 

4r)8 

6,185 

44,409 

15,890 

2,847 

271 

221 

11,216 

5,60 

40,430 

58 

26 

5' 

5,040 

2,292 

263 

1,322 

83 

576 

2,151 

1,874 

271 

52 

767 

1,720 

17,327 



1,386 

185 

5,967 

48 

9,741 



Total 

137 years 

1820 

to 

1956 



40,7.34,745 



34,031,440 



2,146 

'4,222,408 

182,936 

66,283 

128,706 

346,738 

817 

24,967 

661,970 

6,574,952 

2,839,034 

767,951 

91,121 

796,717 

470,884 

4,645,533 

4,889.463 

1,714 

2,969 

1,780 

289.904 

828,562 

423,254 

270,645 

158,297 

176,678 

1,240,109 

316,250 

1.57,203 

3,344,032 

61.782 

45,635 

1,010,031 



402,216 
12,493 
299,773 
205,744 
89,805 



See footnotes at end of table. 



36 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 4. IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 TO 1956' (Continued) 



Countries 



America 

Canada and Newfound- 
land (9) 

Mexico (10) 

West Indies 

Central America 

South America 

Other America (16) 

Africa 

Australia and New Zea- 
land 

Pacific Islands (15) 

Not specified (14) 



1931 


1941 














to 


to 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1940 


1950 














160,037 


354,804 


47,631 


61,049 


77,650 


95,587 


110,436 


144,713 


108,527 


171,718 


25,880 


33,354 


36,283 


34,873 


32,435 


42,363 


22,319 


60,589 


6,153 


9,079 


17,183 


30,645 


43,702 


61,320 


15,502 


49,725 


5,902 


6,672 


8,628 


8,411 


12,876 


19,512 


5,861 


21,665 


2,011 


2,637 


3,016 


3,300 


3,667 


4,916 


7,803 


21,831 


3,596 


4,591 


5,511 


6,575 


7,654 


9,187 


25 


29,276 


4,089 


4,716 


7,029 


11,783 


10,102 


7,415 


1,750 


7,367 


845 


931 


989 


1,248 


1,203 


1,351 


2,231 


13,805 


490 


545 


742 


845 


932 


1,171 


780 


5,437 


3,265 


33 


40 


65 


96 


175 


" 


142 


20 


8 


430 


8,341 


3,597 


22 



Total 

137 years 

1820 

to 

1956 



5,293.336 



3,382,634 
1,006,926 

558,697 
90,366 

180,247 
74,466 

39,994 

73,062 

20,256 

266,626 



(1) Data are for fiscal years ended June 30, except 1820 to 1831 inclusive and 1844 to 1849 inclusive 
fiscal years ended September 30; 1833 to 1842 inclusive and 1851 to 1867 inclusive years ended 
December 31; 1832 covers 15 months ended December 31; 1843 nine months ended September 
30; 1850 fifteen months ended December 31 and 18J8 six months ended June 30. 

(2) Data for Austria-Hungary were not reported until 1861. Austria and Hungary have been record- 
ed separately since 1905. In the years 1938 to 1945 inclusive Austria was included with Germany. 

(3) United Kingdom not specified. In the years 1901 to 1951, included in other Europe. 

(4) From 1820 to 1868 the figures for Norway and Sweden were combined. 

(5) Poland was recorded as a separate country from 1820 to 1898 and since 1920. Between 1899 and 
1919 Poland was included with Austria-Hungary, Germany, and Russia. 

(6) Since 1931 the Russian Empire has been broken down into European U. S. S. R. and Siberia 
or Asiatic U. S. S. R. 

(7) No record of immigration from Japan until 1861. 

(8) No record of immigration from Turkey in .\sia until 1869. 

(9) Prior to 1920 Canada and Newfoundland were recorded as British North America. From 1820 
to 1898 the figures include all British North American possessions. 

(10) No record of immigration from Mexico from 1886 to 1893. 

(11) Bulgaria, Serbia, and Montenegro were first reported in 1899. Bulgaria has been reported sepa- 
rately since 1920 and in 1920 also a separate enumeration was made for the Kingdom of Serbs, 
Croats, and Slovenes. Since 1922 the Serb, Croat, and Slovene Kingdom has been recorded as 
Yugoslavia. 

(12) Countries added to the list since the beginning of World War I are theretofore included with 
the countries to which they belonged. Figures are available since 1920 for Czechoslovakia and 
Finland; and since 1924 for Albania, Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. 

(13) No record of immigration from Rumania until 1880. 

(14) The figure 33, ,523 in column headed 1901-1910, includes 32,897 persons returning in 1906 to their 
homes in the United States. 

(15) Beginning with the year 1952, Asia includes the Philippines. From 1934 to 1951 the Philippines 
were included in the Pacific Islands. Prior to 1934 the Philippines were recorded in separate 
tables as insular travel. 

(16) Included with countries not specified prior to 1925. 

(17) Figures for Lu.xembourg are available since 1925. 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



37 



TABLE 5. IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED AND EMIGRANT 

ALIENS DEPARTED, BY PORT OR DISTRICT: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1952 TO 1956 



Port or district 


Immigrant 


Emigrant 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


All ports or districts 


265,520 


170,434 


208,177 


237,790 


321,625 


21.880 


24,256 


30,665 


31,245 


22,824 




197,172 


102,347 


117,232 


137,863 


192.689 


14.998 


18,350 


22,121 


23,532 


18,750 






New York, N. Y 


183,222 

2,968 

337 

620 

25 

103 

178 

33 

6 

21 

134 

6,209 

42 

1,838 

98 

1,338 

13,085 


87,483 

2,248 

322 

451 

33 

45 

109 

76 

14 

45 

213 

7,537 

43 

2,651 

94 

983 

2,328 


98,813 

2,730 

556 

737 

71 

92 

188 

108 

48 

51 

336 

10,433 

90 

1,536 

233 

1,210 

3,125 


115,787 

2,565 

552 

471 

43 

74 

97 

69 

30 

111 

843 

13,612 

137 

2,024 

114 

1,334 

2,897 


161.545 

3,104 

3.794 

457 

36 

69 

233 

102 

18 

85 

1.230 

18.882 

149 

2.431 

92 

462 

3,709 


12,099 

121 

28 

34 

1 

7 

6 

1 

1 

1 

21 

1,900 

31 

357 

26 

304 

667 


14,844 

219 

22 

60 

10 
17 

4 

50 
2,111 
90 
476 
35 
412 

607 


17,195 

283 

78 

199 

2 

26 

38 

6 

6 

4 

2,925 

93 

489 

57 

668 

998 


20,105 
293 
46 
100 
6 
14 
28 

12 

105 
2,033 

43 
273 

28 
439 

630 


17.800 




117 




24 




3 


Portland Ale. 


6 


Newport News, Va 


1 




5 


Charleston, S. C 


26 




10 






Key West, Fla 


28 


Miami, Fla 


618 


West Palm Beach, Fla. 




Puerto Rico 


6 


Virgin Islands 


17 


Other Atlantic. 


89 


Qulf of Mexico 


108 






Tampa, Fla 


335 

2 

166 

12,301 

151 

117 

13 

9,068 


405 
4 
171 
1,459 
156 
112 
21 

7,578 


458 
33 
235 
1,651 
201 
392 
95 

10,675 


437 
22 
173 
1,452 
205 
523 
85 

10,904 


572 

15 

116 

1,434 

370 

1,151 

51 

16.600 


73 

5 

439 

65 

83 

2 

1,806 


61 

17 

423 

44 

54 

8 

2,044 


49 
5 

43 
724 
65 
94 
18 

3,420 


23 
7 

52 
380 
75 
83 
10 

2.810 


9 


Pensacola, Fla 




Mobile, Ala 


5 


New Orleans, La 


54 




37 


San Antonio, Tex 




Other Qulf 


3 


Pacific 


1.110 






San Francisco, Calif 


3,178 

26 

3,497 

868 

1,499 

79 
35,451 
10,665 


2,366 
16 
2,520 
1,197 
1,479 

68 
38,613 
19,500 


3,363 

24 

2,870 

1,678 

2,597 

80 

63 

282 
39,008 
37,855 


2.727 

32 

2,430 

1,411 

4,081 

115 

108 

608 
34,143 
51,375 


3,294 

26 

3,661 

2.503 

6.922 

120 

74 

540 
42.847 
65.240 


771 
6 
119 
215 
695 

3,281 
1,128 


778 
22 
218 
359 
667 

4 
2,168 
1,083 


1,326 

7 

283 

531 

1,144 

54 

75 

20 

2,841 
1,265 


881 

8 

377 

351 

1.106 

49 

38 

19 
3.407 

847 


67 


Portland, Ore 




Seattle, Wash 


114 


Los Angeles, Calif. (1) 

Honolulu, T. H 


54 
871 


Agana, Guam (2) 

Other Pacific (3) 

Alaska . .... 


2 
2 

4 


Canadian Border 


2.729 




123 







(1) Includes San Pedro. California. 

(2) Not reported as a separate port before 1954. 

(3) Prior to 1954, Included in Seattle and Los Angeles. 



38 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 6. IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED, 

BY CLASSES UNDER THE IMMIGRATION LAWS 

AND COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH: 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1956 



















o^ 
















a 






a 




>'o 










































a 


c 


M 


5 


a 




a 








Country 

or 

region of birth 


1 

03 
Ut 

a 

a 

3 


a 
a 

bib 

a 

a 

OS 
o 
3 


a 

03 
O 

3 

o- 
a 

o 

C 

5 


CO 

o 


CO 

P 

"o 

■o 
a 
a 

,c 

3 


CO 

"o 
a 

2 
5 


m o 

^ CB 

"o S 

11 


il 

« a 

,9 t- 

8S 


X2 

1 

a '3 
o . 


13 

M 




o 




z 


& 


ir^ 


!S 


w 


o 


ZK 


co:s 


PhP 


■>4it 


tf 


O 
























(1) 




All countries 


321,625 


89,310 


232,315 


21,244 


5,788 


4,710 


122.083 


1,949 


44 


350 


75,473 


674 


Europe 


175,555 


83,555 


92,000 


13,741 


3,816 


2,724 


- 


1,489 


7 


211 


69,797 


215 






Austria ... . 


4,326 

1,370 

282 

2,612 


1,489 

1,034 

73 

1,279 


2,837 
336 
209 

1,333 


684 

34 

9 

302 


44 
5 
8 

54 


65 
2 
1 

19 


- 


16 
12 
3 

29 


- 


1 

2 

1 
7 


2,019 
279 
187 
922 


8 


Belgium ... 


2 


Bulgaria 




Cteclioslovakia. . . 


- 


Denmark 


1,413 

469 

677 

4,308 

38,390 

10.531 

2,261 

6,483 

39,789 

856 

908 

5,134 


1,205 
141 
586 

2,663 

24,873 

276 

575 

6,418 

5,769 
200 
253 

3,136 


208 

328 

91 

1,645 

13,517 

10.255 

1,686 

65 

34,020 

656 

655 

1.998 


131 

16 

42 

1,155 

6.793 

551 

76 

20 

1,816 

19 

31 

250 


38 

21 

27 

59 

132 

570 

38 

9 

1,651 

17 

23 

71 


11 

3 

11 

82 

535 

215 

8 

1 

1.017 

3 

21 


- 


10 

2 

8 

29 

76 

19 

14 

16 

3.59 

1 

14 

29 


1 

1 

4 


2 

2 
12 

17 

31 

4 
14 


12 

286 

3 

312 

5,931 

8,895 

1,533 

10 

29,108 

616 

581 

1.606 


4 


Estonia 




Finland 


_ 




6 




37 


Greece ... . 


4 


Hungary 




Ireland 


9 


Italy 


34 


Latvia 




Lithuania . . . . 


2 


Netherlands 


7 


Norway .... 


2,548 
8,453 


2,373 
3,593 


175 
4,860 


73 
261 


59 
181 


16 
32 


~ 


12 
110 


_ 


8 
23 


4 
4,250 


3 


Poland 


3 


Portugal 


1,396 


418 


978 


20U 


261 


399 


- 


103 


- 


2 


12 


1 


Rumania 


2,328 


304 


2,024 


103 


54 


8 




26 


- 


8 


1,823 


2 


Spain . 


964 
1,906 


194 

1,818 


770 
88 


264 
14 


165 
13 


62 
5 


_ 


147 
3 


: 


36 


62 
51 


34 


Sweden 


2 


Switzerland 


1,848 


1,700 


148 


77 


30 


6 


- 


18 


- 


1 


13 


3 


United Kingdom: 


























England 


15,605 


14,786 


819 


169 


20 


22 


- 


266 


- 


8 


305 


29 


North. Ireland.. 


1,190 


1,167 


23 


8 


2 


1 


- 


11 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Scotland 


4,245 


4,104 


141 


18 


3 


1 


- 


82 


1 


2 


28 


6 


Wales 


542 


464 


78 


4 


- 


6 


- 


5 


- 


- 


63 


- 


U. S.S. R 


3,864 


1,288 


2,576 


102 


60 


4 


- 


33 


- 


11 


2,356 


10 


Yugoslavia 


8,723 


665 


8,058 


290 


100 


139 


- 


25 


- 


8 


7,493 


3 


Other Europe 


2,134 


711 


1,423 


229 


101 


29 


- 


11 


- 


11 


1,037 


5 


Asia 


17,538 


3,111 


14,427 


6,520 


929 


1.595 


- 


84 


- 


91 


5,194 


14 


China 


4,450 
314 


647 
164 


3,803 
150 


1,055 
53 


138 
49 


360 
9 


- 


12 
10 


- 


18 
3 


2,219 

2ti 


1 


India 






857 
5,586 


507 
129 


350 
5,457 


52 
3,661 


55 
174 


23 
391 


- 


11 
3 


- 


14 
33 


194 
1,195 


1 


Japan 




Palestine 


384 
1,873 


74 
118 


310 
1,755 


20 
934 


35 
115 


7 
645 


- 


10 

1 


: 


2 
2 


235 
53 


1 


Philippines 


5 


Other Asia 


4,074 


1,472 


2,602 


745 


363 


160 


- 


37 


- 


19 


1,272 


6 


North America 


119,417 


1,149 


118,268 


579 


824 


306 


115.. 545 


290 


35 


35 


219 


435 


Canada 


29,. 533 


2 


29,531 


67 


34 


10 


29,083 


30 


_ 


5 


4 


298 


Mexico 


65,047 


1 


65.046 


22 


16 


9 


64,898 


8 


- 


- 


2 


91 


West Indies 


19,022 


902 


18,120 


446 


715 


281 


16,361 


231 


- 


26 


17 


43 


Central America . 


4,981 


90 


4,891 


32 


23 


5 


4,812 


12 


- 


4 


- 


3 


Other .Morth 


























America 


834 


154 


680 


12 


36 


1 


391 


9 


35 


- 


196 


- 


South America 


6,846 


159 


6,687 


33 


63 


18 


6,536 


26 


_ 


1 


5 


6 


.\frlca 


1,441 


835 


606 


196 


100 


44 


- 


27 


- 


3 


234 


2 


Australia and 




New Zealand 


602 


3.57 


245 


147 


38 


12 


- 


33 


- 


9 


6 


- 


Other countries 


226 


144 


82 


28 


18 


U 


2 




2 




18 


3 



(I) Figures Include 493 refugees in the United States who had adjusted their status under Sec. 6 ol the 
Refugee Relief Act of 1953. 



rttpqpt of the Im?.iigkation and Naturalization Service 



39 



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Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



41 



TABLE 6-B. MAXIMUM VISAS AUTHORIZED AND IMMIGRANT 

ALIENS ADMITTED TO THE UNITED STATES UNDER THE 

REFUGEE RELIEF ACT OF 1933: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1954 TO 1956 



Class 



Total number 

German expellees In Western Germany, Berlin, or Austria. 

Escapees in West Germany, Berlin or Austria 

Escapees in NATO countries or in Turkey, Sweden, Iran 
or Trieste 

Polish veteran refugees in the United Kingdom 

Italian refugees in Italy or Trieste 

Italian relatives of U. S. citizens or alien residents, residing 
In Italy or Trieste 

Greek refugees in Greece 

Greek relatives of U. S. citizens or alien residents, residing 
In Greece 

Dutch refugees in the Netherlands 

Dutch relatives of U. S. citizens or alien residents, residing 
in the Netherlands 

Far East refugees (non- Asian) 

Far East refugees (Asian) 

Chinese refugees 

Palestine refugees In the Near East 

Orphans (under 10 years of age) 



Maximum 

visas 
authorized 




10,000 

2,000 

(45,000 

( 

(15,000 

(15,000 

( 

( 2,000 

(15,000 

( 

( 2,000 

2,000 
3,000 
2,000 
2,000 
4,000 



Number admitted 



Total 1954 



104,803 



10,758 
8,657 

5,356 

1,454 

7,208 

42,910 

7,326 

6,527 

1,611 

747 

122 

2,593 

470 

774 

2,290 



29,002 



74,980 



2,004 


14,154 


569 


8,088 


520 


4.836 


93 


1.3G1 


498 


6,710 


8,183 


24,114 


2.275 


5.051 


2,654 


3,814 


59 


1,552 


429 


275 


8 

167 

48 

36 

859 


114 

2,426 
422 
738 

1,325 



(1) In addition, 5,000 visas were authorized for refugees In the United States adjusting status under Sec. 
6 of the Refugee Relief Act of 1953. 



42 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 7. ANNUAL QUOTAS AND QUOTA IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1952 TO 1956 



Quota area 



All quota areas 

Europe 

Northern and Western Europe 

Belgium 

Denmark 

France 

Germany 

Great Britain, Northern Ireland 

Iceland 

Ireland 

Luxembourg 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Southern and Eastern Europe 

Austria 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Estonia 

Finland 

Greece 

Hungary 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Turkey 

U. S. S. R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Southern and Eastern Europe 

Asia 

China 

Chinese 

India 

Asia Pacific Triangle 

Other Asia 

Africa 

Oceania 







Quota in: 


migrants admitted 




Annual 












quota 












(1) 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 








(2) 


(2) 


(2) 


154,657 


194,247 


84,175 


94,098 


82,232 


89,310 


149,667 


192,754 


82,231 


90,190 


78,926 


86,246 


125,165 


73,302 


63,649 


69,267 


62,307 


69,332 


1,297 


1,103 


1,093 


1,445 


1,068 


1,098 


1,175 


1,183 


1,124 


1,128 


1,129 


1,201 


3,069 


2,935 


2,984 


3,044 


2,903 


3,013 


25,814 


35,453 


20,866 


28,361 


23,430 


25,618 


65,361 


20,358 


24,219 


21,092 


19,267 


22,695 


100 


95 


89 


109 


93 


142 


17,756 


3,819 


4,6.35 


5, 169 


5,825 


6,235 


100 


103 


76 


79 


74 


52 


3,136 


3,032 


2.903 


3,208 


3,020 


3,270 


2,364 


2,333 


2,259 


2,195 


2,310 


2,391 


3,295 


1,554 


1,640 


1,803 


1,561 


1,867 


1,698 


1,324 


1,761 


1,634 


1,627 


1,750 


24,502 


119,452 


18,. 582 


20,923 


16,619 


16,914 


1,405 


2,2.36 


903 


1,056 


923 


1.398 


100 


330 


56 


52 


83 


67 


2,859 


5,398 


2. 1.38 


2,005 


1,615 


1,343 


115 


1,366 


113 


156 


166 


123 


566 


494 


527 


555 


496 


578 


308 


5,621 


172 


571 


267 


252 


865 


7,331 


575 


SOI 


528 


.510 


5.645 


5,901 


4,970 


6,042 


5,398 


5,649 


235 


4,999 


224 


203 


239 


173 


384 


3,330 


258 


311 


199 


236 


6,488 


42,665 


4,428 


4,851 


3,657 


3,428 


438 


388 


385 


496 


414 


427 


289 


5,184 


208 


308 


225 


205 


250 


256 


583 


329 


201 


176 


225 


374 


118 


190 


129 


140 


2,697 


15,269 


1,926 


1,887 


1,283 


1,392 


933 


17,265 


690 


778 


562 


560 


700 


3,045 


308 


.332 


234 


257 


2,990 


1,085 


1,560 


3,286 


2.653 


2,294 




100 
105 
100 
100 
2,585 

1,400 
600 


178 
51 
70 

786 

253 
155 


404 
105 
64 

987 

235 
149 


63 

1,348 

120 

21 
1,7.34 

350 
272 


49 

1,066 

116 

9 

1,413 

425 
228 


90 


(2) 470 


105 


37 


1,592 


461 


309 





(1) The annual quota was 1,54,277 in the fiscal year 19.52. 

(2) The 1954, 1955, and 1956 figures include 7,191, 4,325, and 3,282 respectively, quota immigrants who 
had adjusted their status in the United States, such as by suspension of deportation, by private law, 
or as displaced persons. The 1956 figures on Chinese include 404 Chinese who had adjusted their status 
during the year. 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



43 



TABLE 7-A. QUOTA IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED, BY PREFERENCES: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1954 TO 1956 



Preferences 



Total number 

First preference quota: Selected immigrants of special skill or ability 

Second preference quota: Parents of U. S. citizens 

Third preference quota: Spouses and children of resident aliens 

Fourth preference quota; Brothers or sisters of U. S. citizens, children over 21 
years of age, or married, of U. S. citizens 

Nonprcference quota 

Displaced persons admitted under the Displaced Persons Act of 1948, as amended 

Displaced persons adjusting status under Section 4, Displaced Persons Act of 1948, 
as amended 



1954 


1955 


94,098 


82,232 


2,45C 


3,012 


2,783 


2,394 


6,004 


5,425 


1,930 


3,075 


74,843 


65,711 


5,235 


1,093 


847 


1,522 



89,310 



3,366 
2,843 
6.966 

2,121 
73,529 



^ Rep ort of the Immigration and Natu ralizattot^j Service 



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46 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 10. IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED BY RACE, SEX, AND 

AGE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1956 



Sex and age 



Number admitted . 



Male. 



Under 5 years. 
5 - 9 "■ 
10 - 14 
15 
16 - 17 
18 - 19 
20 - 24 
25 - 29 
30 - 34 
35 - 39 
40 - 44 
45 - 49 
50 - 54 
55 - 59 
60 - 64 
65 - 69 
70 - 74 
75 - 79 
80 years and over . 
Unknown 



Female. 



Under 5 years. 
5 - 9 •• 
10 - 14 
15 
16 - 17 
18 - 19 
20 - 24 
25 - 29 
30 - 34 
35 - 39 
40 - 44 
45 - 49 
50 - 54 
55 - 59 
60 - 64 
65 - 69 
70 - 74 
75 - 79 
80 years and over . 
Unknown 



Num- 
ber 
ad- 
mitted 



156,410 



14,087 

12,419 

9,323 

1,847 

4,581 

6,204 

20,537 

23,783 

19,883 

12,581 

11,311 

8,523 

5,306 

3,035 

1,433 

813 

407 

209 

99 

29 

165,215 



13,661 

11,958 

9,173 

1,961 

5,440 

9,704 

30,897 

24,852 

17,571 

10,364 

9,062 

7,158 

5,043 

3,606 

2,161 

1,260 

703 

384 

227 

30 



White 



304,068 



149,677 



13,510 

11.76(1 

8,861 

1,761 

4,357 

5,927 

19,653 

22,770 

19,012 

11,965 

10,872 

8,282 

5,118 

2,923 

1,384 

789 

398 

202 

96 

25 

154,391 



13,088 

11,298 

8,753 

1,875 

5,257 

9.287 

28,389 

22.272 

16,181 

9,680 

8,554 

6,850 

4,855 

3,478 

2,070 

1,202 

676 

376 

221 

29 



Chinese 



2,007 



123 

242 

138 

24 

58 

57 

161 

199 

239 

243 

183 

114 

105 

69 

29 

14 

2 

4 

1 

2 

2,443 



110 
225 
107 
24 
62 
140 
379 
355 
287 
214 
162 
114 



East 
Indian 



208 



Fili- 
pino 



1,724 



540 



1,184 



30 

56 

83 

14 

31 

47 

167 

263 

210 

114 



.Japa- 
nese 



218 

175 

71 

7 

27 

49 

253 

190 

115 

81 

66 

33 

23 

14 

11 

6 

2 

1 



4,280 



Kor- 
ean 



573 



396 



Neprro 



2,406 



146 

135 

136 

28 

67 

75 

358 

492 

411 

240 

163 

72 

44 

19 

9 

4 

2 

1 

2 

2 

2,377 

141 

158 

158 

35 

67 

109 

376 

342 

33' 

213 

194 

113 

52 

35 

22 

14 

8 

1 

2 



Pacific 

Is- 
lander 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



47 



TABLE 10-A. IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED AND EMIGRANT 

ALIENS DEPARTED, BY SEX, AGE, ILLITERACY, AND MAJOR 

OCCUPATION GROUP: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1952 TO 1956 



Sex, age, illiterates, and occupation 



Immigrant aliens admitted . 



Sex: 

Male 

Femile 

Males per 1,000 females. 



Age: 

Under 16 years 

16 to 44 years 

45 years and over 

Illiterates: 

Number (1) 

PtTcent 



Major occupation group: 

Professional, technical, and kindred workers 

Farmers and farm managers 

Managers, ollicials, and proprietors, except farm. 

Clerical, sales, and kindred workers 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers 

Operatives and kindred workers 

Private houseliold workers 

Service workers, except private household 

Farm laborers and foremen 

Laborers, except farm and mine 

No occupation 



Emigrant aliens departed. 



Sex: 

Male 

Female 

Males per !,000 femal.'is. 



Age: 
Under 16 years. . . 

16 to 44 years 

4.5 years and over. 



Major occupation group' 

Professional, technical, and kindred workers 

Farmers and farm managers 

Managers, officials, and proprii^tnrs, except farm . 

Clerical, sales, and kindred workers 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers 

Operatives and kindred workers 

Private houseliold workers 

Service workers, except private household 

Farm laborers and foremen 

Laborers, except farm and mine 

No occupation 



26,5,520 



123,f>09 

141,911 

871 



64,513 
159,788 
41,219 



496 
566 
968 
724 
223 
092 
653 
418 
,289 
,969 
,122 



21, 8W 



10,921 
10,959 



1.918 
12,318 
7,644 



2,328 

263 

1,693 

1,179 

437 

902 

470 

908 

158 

4.099 

9,443 



1953 



170,434 



73,073 

97,361 

751 



37,016 
110,860 
22,558 



995 
.6 



12,783 
3,393 

5,025 
15,171 
12.257 
14,718 
6,852 
4,390 
1,538 
5,369 
88,938 

24,256 



12,511 

11,745 

1,065 



2,117 
14,905 
7.234 



3,053 
266 

1,798 

1,339 
786 
988 
610 

1,181 

114 

654 

13,467 



208,17 



95,594 

112.. 583 

849 



45.105 
135.731 
27.341 



1,009 
.5 



13,817 
3.846 
5,296 
16.018 
15.391 
16.755 
8,096 
5,203 
1,622 
10.061 
112,067 

30,665 



16,520 

14,145 

1,168 



2,795 
19,823 
8,04 



3,773 
240 

1,919 

1,428 
738 
987 
714 

1,333 

95 

679 

18.759 



1955 



237,790 



112,032 

125,7,58 

891 



.51.829 
156.001 
29.960 



1,67; 



14,109 
4,446 
5,114 
18,060 
18,867 
15,351 
11,824 
6,512 
5,48f 
17,518 
120,503 

31,245 



17,169 

14.076 

1.220 



3.073 

20,382 

7,799 



4,261 
187 

2,169 

1.539 
740 

1,060 
665 

1,394 

229 

573 

18.428 



1956 



321.625 



156.410 

165,215 

947 



74.429 
206.770 
40.426 



1.525 
.5 



18.995 

5.727 

5.814 

23,413 

25,914 

19,036 

15,347 

7,922 

9,050 

27,807 

162,600 

22,824 



12,062 
10,762 
1,121 



2,535 
14.380 
5.909 



3,452 

104 

1,668 

1.216 

668 

753 

469 

866 

229 

601 

12,798 



(1) Immigrants over 16 years of ago who are unable to read and understand some language or dialect. 



48 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 11. ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AND DEPARTED: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1908 TO 1956 





Aliens admitted 


Aliens departed 


U. S. Citizens 


Period 


Immi- 
grant 


Nonimmi- 
grant 


Emi- 
grant 


Nonemi- 
grant 


Arrived 


Departed 


Total, 1908 to 1956 


15,391,979 


11,018,043 


4,788,562 


11,356,016 


18,683,331 


18,365.321 


1908 - 1910 (1) 


2,576,22(. 


490,741 


823,311 


672,327 


660,811 


342,600 


1911 - 1920 


5,735,811 


1,376,271 


2,146,99, 


1.841.16;. 


1,938,508 


2,517,889 




1911 


878,587 
838,171 
1,197,89: 
1,218,48( 
326,700 
298,821 
295,40;- 
110, 61S 
141,131 
430,001 

4,107,20, 


151,71 
178,98; 
229,33' 
184,601 
107,544 
67,92: 
67,471 
101, 23f 
95,88' 
191,57; 

1,774,88 


295, 66i 
333,26. 
308,191 
303,338 
204,074 
129,76c 
66,277 
94,58; 
123,521 
288, 3U. 

1,045,071 


222,549 

282, 03C: 

303,734 

330,467 

480,106 

111.042 

80,102 

98,683 

92,709 

: 139,747 

1.649,702 


269,12? 
280,801 
286,604 
286,580 
239,579 
121,930 
127,420 
72,867 
96,420 
157,173 

3,522,713 


349,472 
353.890 
347 702 


1912 


1913 


1914 


368 797 


1915 


172 371 


1916 


110.733 
126,011 
275,837 
218,929 
194.147 

3.519 519 


1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


1921 - 1930 






1921 


805,228 
"309,55' 
• 522,919 
■ 706,89 
: 294,314 

304,488 
'335,17."^ 

■307,255 

279,678 
' 241,700 

: 528,431 


j 172,93.^ 

• 122,94' 

' 150,487 

172, 40< 

164,12] 

191, 61S 

■ 202, 82( 

193, 37( 

199,649 

204,514 

1,574,071 


247, 71>; 

198,71. 
81,45( 
76,78S- 
92,728 
76,991' 
73,36( 
77,457 
69,20: 
50,661 

459,738 


178,313 
146,672 
119, 13f 
139, 95f 
132,762 
150,763 
180,142 
196,899 
183,295 
221.764 

1,736,912 


222.712 
243,56? 
308,471 
301,281 
339,239 
370,757 
378,520 
430,955 
449,955 
477,260 

3,365,432 


271 , 560 
309,477 
270,601 
277,8,50 
324,323 
372,480 
369.788 
429,575 
431,842 
462,023 

■<,357,936 


1922 


1923 


1924 


1925 


1926 


1927 


1928 


1929 


1930 


1931 - 1940 




1931 ... 


97,139 
35,57( 
23,068 
29,470 
34,956 
36,329 
50,244 
67.895 
82,998 
70,756 

1,035,039 


183, 54t 
139,29.' 
127, 66C 
134,434 
144, 76f 
154, 57r 
181,640 
184,802 
185,33? 
138,032 

2,461,359 


61,882 
103,29: 
- 80,081 
39,771 
38,834 
35,817 
26,73' 
25,210 
26,651 
21,461 

156, 39c 


229,034 
184,362 
163,721 
137,401 
150,216 
157,467 
197, 84f 
197,404 
174,758 
144,703 

2,105,89^ 


439,897 
339,262 
305,001 
273,257 
282,515 
318,273 
386,872 
406,999 
354,4.38 
258,918 

3,223,233 


446,386 
380,837 
338,545 
262,091 
272,400 
311,480 
390,196 
397 875 


1932 


1933. . . . 


1934. . . . 


1935. . 


1936 




1938 




333.399 


1940 


1941 - 1950 


2.880 414 






1941 


51,776 
28,781 
23,725 
28,551 
38,119 
108,721 
147,292 
170,570 
188,317 
249,187 

205,717 
265,520 
170,434 
208,177 
237,790 
321,625 


100,008 
82,457 
81,117 
113,641 
164,247 
203,469 
366,305 
476,006 
447,272 
426,837 

465,106 

516,082 

485,714 

(2) .566, 613 

(2)620,946 

(•2)686,259 


17,11.' 

7,36? 

5,107 

5,666 

7,442 

18,14? 

22,501 

20,87.'- 

24,586 

27,598 

26,174 
21,880 
24.256 
30,665 
31,245 
22,824 


71,362 
67,189 
53,61,'- 
78,740 
85,920 
186,210 
300,921 
427,343 
405,503 
429,091 

446,727 
487,617 
520,246 
568,496 
634,. 155 
692,376 


175, 93." 
118,454 
105,729 
108,444 
175,568 
274,543 
437,690 
542,932 
620,371 
663,567 

760,486 

807,225 

930,874 

1,021,327 

1,171,612 

1,281,110 


168,961 
113,216 
62 403 


1943 




63,525 
103,019 
230., 578 
451 845 


1945 




1947 




478 988 


1949 


552 361 


1950. 


655 518 


1951 


667 126 


1952 


814 289 


1953 


925 861 


1954 


971 025 




1.096 146 


1956 


1,272 516 







(1) Departure of aliens first recorded in 1908. Departure of U. S. citizens first recorded in 1910. 

(2) Does not include agricultural laborers admitted under Section 101(a)(15)(II), Immigration and Na- 
tionality Act, of whom there were 7,946 in 19,54. 13.195 in 1955. and 15,152 in 19.56, 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



49 



TABLE 12. IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED AND EMIGRANT 

ALIENS DEPARTED, BY STATE OF INTENDED FUTURE OR LAST 

PERMANENT RESDIENCE: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1952 TO 1956 



Future or last residence 



All States 

Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Another 





Immigrant 






Emigrant 




1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


19.^6 


1952 


19,J3 


19.54 


1955 


1956 


265,520 


170,434 


208, 177 


237.790 


321,625 


21,880 


24,256 


30,665 


31,245 


22.824 


697 


554 


595 


604 


746 


68 


72 


88 


82 


36 


1,269 


1,405 


1,610 


1,580 


2,428 


129 


98 


179 


115 


95 


556 


278 


311 


339 


469 


16 


28 


33 


24 


23 


26,599 


24,916 


28,667 


33,704 


50,447 


1,926 


2,112 


3,084 


2,, 513 


1.587 


1.863 


818 


961 


979 


1.594 


104 


120 


173 


116 


130 


5,212 


3,279 


4,273 


5.222 


7,183 


253 


355 


390 


459 


373 


453 


270 


268 


281 


430 


14 


34 


.SO 


28 


22 


1,865 


1,352 


1,404 


1,322 


1,840 


1,843 


2,492 


2,691 


2,962 


2,323 


3,789 


4,405 


5,326 


7,079 


10,,'i08 


Sil 


985 


1,128 


810 


315 


1,148 


709 


691 


803 


1,282 


62 


133 


227 


147 


101 


449 


404 


348 


348 


455 


23 


44 


39 


40 


48 


20,758 


9,202 


11,669 


14,786 


23,832 


667 


904 


1.217 


1,260 


1,087 


3,473 


1,818 


2,143 


2,093 


3,400 


126 


122 


266 


276 


214 


2,372 


842 


938 


998 


1,384 


86 


105 


133 


145 


147 


1,137 


672 


739 


723 


1,210 


56 


108 


137 


179 


173 


757 


565 


624 


695 


852 


63 


53 


78 


84 


63 


1,729 


1,000 


1,198 


1.131 


1,541 


227 


232 


387 


274 


74 


989 


1,085 


1,273 


1,297 


1,726 


70 


56 


59 


85 


75 


2.321 


1,367 


1.875 


1,844 


2.717 


189 


285 


331 


436 


268 


8,741 


6,578 


7,901 


8,817 


11,742 


659 


757 


995 


1,004 


759 


15,489 


10,351 


11,328 


10,448 


14,209 


596 


537 


962 


943 


7.55 


3,327 


1,709 


1,765 


1,707 


2,412 


163 


188 


226 


287 


192 


444 


303 


322 


359 


446 


47 


90 


158 


83 


23 


3,032 


1,363 


1,577 


1.609 


2,440 


102 


164 


257 


262 


148 


869 


450 


418 


524 


586 


38 


42 


43 


43 


58 


2,199 


462 


582 


594 


873 


21 


38 


51 


48 


67 


269 


186 


216 


274 


274 


26 


26 


43 


25 


20 


a33 


507 


666 


626 


782 


48 


49 


46 


63 


69 


14,531 


7,916 


9,523 


11,919 


16,017 


711 


900 


997 


1,173 


923 


452 


701 


1,324 


1,521 


2,174 


49 


109 


96 


53 


24 


78,212 


42,712 


48.757 


,55.536 


70,700 


7,375 


8,887 


9,960 


9.797 


6,793 


1,149 


696 


773 


886 


1,167 


70 


84 


172 


166 


88 


1,078 


356 


394 


385 


421 


27 


14 


42 


34 


20 


12.145 


5,082 


6,266 


7.133 


11,267 


331 


465 


586 


688 


476 


898 


565 


586 


647 


890 


66 


77 


126 


129 


53 


1,775 


1,334 


1,281 


1,129 


1,627 


119 


98 


151 


142 


118 


13,772 


6,335 


7,829 


8,655 


11,618 


.500 


616 


767 


790 


706 


1,094 


904 


951 


1,111 


1.341 


85 


101 


108 


110 


77 


537 


340 


342 


451 


626 


17 


26 


32 


46 


27 


784 


225 


241 


243 


371 


41 


25 


23 


26 


19 


876 


568 


661 


664 


977 


67 


61 


118 


127 


85 


8,416 


14,115 


27,700 


35.338 


■39,078 


810 


680 


940 


1,258 


383 


1,485 


1,390 


1,522 


1,147 


1,387 


62 


87 


115 


133 


71 


681 


589 


558 


537 


693 


58 


66 


61 


68 


52 


2,157 


1.228 


1.375 


1,343 


1.835 


129 


172 


236 


241 


179 


4,629 


3,571 


3,308 


3,004 


3,643 


243 


234 


4.'-,8 


387 


383 


663 


419 


491 


603 


827 


32 


35 


71 


60 


43 


5,774 


2,093 


2,494 


2,441 


3,916 


175 


152 


228 


275 


216 


276 


174 


196 


220 


207 


12 


23 


18 


23 


21 


1,697 


2.241 


1.917 


2,091 


3,029 


2,448 


1,115 


1,909 


2.726 


2,8.32 



50 



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TABLE 13. IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED AND EMIGRANT 

ALIENS DEPARTED, BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF LAST OR 

INTENDED FUTURE PERMANENT RESIDENCE: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1952 TO 1956 



Country or region 

of last or future 

residence 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

United Kingdom: 

England 

Northern Ireland 

Scotland 

Wales 

U. S. S. R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Israel 

Japan 

Palestine 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Africa 

Australia and New Zealand 
Other countries 



Immigrant 



1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 



193,626 



23,088 

2,940 

9 

51 

1,152 

7 

500 

4,878 

104,230 

6,996 

63 

2,775 

11,342 

10 

20 

3,060 

2,354 

235 

953 

34 

481 

1,778 

1,502 

18,539 

751 

3,390 

248 

11 

327 

1,890 

9,328 



263 

123 

485 

3,814 

34 

1,179 

3,430 

.56,458 



33,354 
9,079 
6,672 
2,637 
4,716 

4,591 

931 

,545 

41 



170,434 



82,352 



2,132 

2,162 

1 

77 

993 

38 

473 

4,137 

27,329 

1,290 

96 

3,393 

8,432 

59 

14 

2,973 

2,2.34 

136 

1,077 

23 

814 

2,171 

1,796 

12,921 
911 

3, 4111 

302 

25 

580 

2.341 

8,231 



528 
104 
1,344 
2,. 579 
32 
1,074 
2,570 

72,139 



36,283 
17,183 
8,628 
3.016 
7,029 

5.511 
989 
742 
470 



92,121 



2,136 
2,263 

27 

1,010 

5 

448 

4,263 

33,098 

1,154 

30 

3,685 

13,145 

6 

5 

3,595 

2,142 

67 

1,4,55 

542 
2,172 
1,673 

12,977 
970 
3,442 
253 
11 
680 
860 

9.970 



254 
144 
1,778 
3,846 
39 
1,2.34 
2,675 

89,012 



34,873 

.30,645 

8.411 

3,300 

11,783 

6,. 575 

1.248 

845 

8,406 



237,790 



110,591 



3,404 

1.271 

1 

35 

1,020 

10 

4,50 

4,127 

29,590 

6,182 

83 

4,424 

30,272 

23 

12 

3,555 

2,296 

129 

1,293 

25 

802 

1,702 

1,693 

12,871 

798 
2,642 
248 
28 
611 
988 

10,935 



568 
194 
1,525 
4,150 
34 
1,598 
2,866 

102,782 



32.435 
43,702 
12,876 
3,667 
10,102 

7,6.54 

1,203 

932 

3,693 



156,866 



9,340 

2,098 

40 

68 

1,069 

39 

408 

6, 185 

44,4(!9 

11,216 

109 

4,744 

40,430 

58 

26 

5,040 

2,292 

263 

1,322 

83 

570 

2,151 

1,874 

15,890 

863 

2,847 

271 

52 

767 

2,276 

17.327 



1.380 
185 
2.175 
5,967 
40 
1,792 
5,782 

135,520 



42.303 

61,320 

19,512 

4.916 

7,415 

9,187 

1,.351 

1,171 

197 



Emigrant 



1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 



21,880 



9,691 



112 

192 

5 

28 

350 

1 

114 

1,172 

1,028 

435 

14 

229 

1,281 

3 

1 

327 

553 

68 

183 

2 

225 

.334 

341 

1,884 
71 

258 
35 

143 
77 

225 

2,441 



223 
210 
228 
506 
53 
.521 
700 

6,722 



2,227 

570 
171 

1,984 
317 

4.5(i 
269 



24.2.56 



12,557 



135 

310 

6 

25 

427 

3 

130 

1,484 

1,491 

621 

23 

367 

1,358 

2 

439 
571 
71 
199 
8 
291 
376 
380 

2,736 
50 
345 
48 
213 
158 
284 

2,7.57 



155 
237 
207 
701 
43 
598 
7.50 

5,957 



1,925 
988 

2,. 383 
033 

28 

2,180 
363 
352 
90 



30.665 



14,192 



214 
311 

7 

108 

470 

44 

158 

1,937 

1 , 403 

709 

158 

344 

1,180 

23 

6 

563 

607 

219 

183 

68 

291 

542 

490 



42( 
42 
19;^ 
108 
418 

4,972 



4,5Si 

39! 

480 

1,10.'-. 

07 

1,002 

1,402 

7,144 



2,463 

1,208 

2,. 547 

921 

5 

3,248 
485 
451 
173 



278 
407 
8 
131 
478 

53 

150 

2,040 

1,808 

720 

120 

403 

1,179 

92 

10 
031 
654 
182 
205 

83 
394 
579 
509 

3, 180 
93 
429 
67 
177 
240 
oil 

4,924 



094 
52(1 
.507 
837 
44 
703 
1.559 

6,467 



2,918 
8i'.o 

2,002 

01.x 

8 

2.922 

020 
401 
288 



22,824 



12,545 



216 
251 

34 

418 

119 
1,091 
1,639 

618 
19 

479 
1,115 



499 
600 

67 
225 

30 
310 
437 
447 

2.784 
31 
364 
57 
163 
147 
379 

2,996 

70 
510 
366 
461 
3 
406 
1.179 

4,199 

2.599 
232 

1.231 
129 



1,9.30 
432 
223 
500 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



55 



TABLE 13-A. IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED, BY COUNTRY OR 

REGION OF BIRTH: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1947 TO 1956 



Country or region of birth 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

(England 

United (N'o. Ireland. . 
Kingdom (Scotland 

(Wales 

U.S. S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Israel (1) 

Japan 

Palestine (1) 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Africa 

Australia and New Zealand. . 
Other countries 



147,292 



96,865 



1,997 

2,208 

128 

3,601 

1,166 

184 

689 

5,808 

14,674 

2,056 

1,277 

2,446 

14,557 

340 

554 

2,607 

2,316 

8,156 

636 

558 

302 

1,252 

978 

17,889 

1,328 

3,757 

1,071 

2,240 

1,117 

973 

4,098 



1,407 
375 

82 

363 

739 

1,132 

40,295 

22,008 

7,775 

6,299 

3,470 

743 

2,421 
849 

2,532 
232 



1948 



115,750 



2,782 

1,757 

132 

3,865 

1,328 

225 

693 

4,697 

21,365 

1,964 

1,471 

7,651 

15,801 

427 

631 

3,739 

2,687 

8,020 

890 

770 

509 

2,022 

1.426 

17,484 

1,940 

5,436 

954 

2,317 

1,190 

1,577 

7.626 



3.987 
239 

371 

376 

1,122 

1,531 

42,270 



138,301 



2,363 
1,592 
84 
4,303 
1,305 
1,840 
704 
3,972 

23,844 
1,759 
1,998 
8,585 

11,157 
3.853 
6,691 
3,200 
2,563 

23,744 
1,235 
1,043 
503 
2,433 
1,585 

13,589 
2,425 
4,805 
656 
3,907 
1,384 
1,089 

6,355 



2,823 
166 

508 

234 

1,068 

1,556 

39,469 



249,187 



206.547 



3,182 
1,108 
190 
5,528 
1,234 
5,422 
645 
3,519 

31,225 
1,242 
5,098 
6,501 
9,839 

17,494 

11,870 
3,148 
2,379 

52,851 
1,U75 
3,599 
463 
1,892 
1.728 
8,812 
1,249 
2,983 
39;-! 

10.971 
9,154 
1,753 

4.615 



205, 7i; 



101,177 



1.494 
1.53 
110 
76 
212 
595 

1,975 

34,004 

18,043 
6,841 
6.093 
2,151 
876 

2,777 
689 
443 
112 



2,777 
1,238 
231 
3,863 
1,217 
2,073 
646 
3,337 

26,369 
4,447 
4.922 
3,739 
7,348 

10,r.88 
4,028 
3,170 
2,378 

37,484 

1,048 

2,351 

510 

1,427 

1,408 

8,333 

840 

2,950 

368 

11,95J 
8,254 
1,880 

5,166 



1,821 
134 
261 
198 
210 
760 

1,782 

35,482 



20,809 
6,372 

5,553 

1.970 

778 

2,724 
700 
390 

78 



265,520 



202.884 



5,976 
1,539 
279 
5,041 
1,345 
1,248 
585 
3,454 

50,283 
7,084 
6.850 
3,796 
9,306 
4,459 
3,044 
3,143 
2,481 

33.211 
1,013 
4.915 
536 
1.478 
1,569 

12,054 

1,031 

4,0.52 

494 

12.697 

17,223 
2,698 

9.428 



1.421 
1.53 
206 

4,517 
156 

1,066 

1,909 

48,092 



28,141 
9,600 
6,723 
2,642 
986 

3,902 

740 

416 

58 



1953 



170,434 



96,177 



1,862 

1,335 

67 

2,173 

1,278 

158 

614 

3.216 

27,305 

1,603 

803 

4,655 

9,701 

294 

314 

3,042 

2,427 

4,395 

1,141 

468 

991 

1,750 

1.794 

12,872 

1.240 

4., 540 

,578 

1,780 

1,272 

2,509 

8,029 



1,536 
155 
421 

2,393 
118 

1,160 

2,246 

60,107 



28.967 
18,454 
8,875 
3,056 
755 

4.691 

922 

450 

58 



208.17; 



2,072 

1,424 

78 

2,235 

1,322 

228 

081 

3 277 

32^935 

2,127 

1,163 

5,232 

15,201 

296 

401 

3,769 

2,420 

5,663 

1,636 

666 

964 

1,811 

1,686 

12,923 

1,306 

4,541 

539 

1,985 

1,432 

1,214 

11,751 



2,770 
308 
515 

3,777 
165 

1.633 

2,583 

77,772 



27,055 
37,4.56 
8,999 
3,488 
774 

5,523 

1.187 

605 

112 



1955 



237,790 



127,492 



2,228 
1,117 

117 
1,983 
1,321 

229 

619 

3,411 

29,603 

6,311 

904 

5,975 

31,925 

425 

384 
3,732 
2.478 
4,697 
1.366 

988 
1,134 
1,546 
1,670 
12,475 
1,074 
3,824 

476 
1,694 
2,, 567 
1,219 

12,131 



2,705 
332 
471 

3,984 
140 

1,784 

2.715 

90,732 



23,091 

50,772 

12,499 

3,683 

687 

5,599 

1.186 

474 

176 



195G 



321,625 



175,555 



4.326 
1,370 

282 
2,612 
1,413 

469 

677 

4,308 

38,390 

10,531 

2,261 

6,483 

39,789 

856 

908 
5,134 
2,548 
8.453 
1,396 
2,328 

964 
1,906 
1,848 
15,605 
1,190 
4,245 

542 
3,864 
8,723 
2,134 

17,538 



4.450 
314 
857 

5,586 
384 

1,873 

4,074 

119,417 



29,533 
65,047 
19,022 
4,981 
834 

6,846 

1,441 

602 

226 



(1) Israel is included In Palestine prior to 1950. 



56 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 14. EMIGRANT ALIENS DEPARTED, BY RACE, SEX, AND 

AGE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1956 



Sex a 


Niim- 
nd age ^|[ 
parted 


White 


Chinese 


East 
Indian 


Fili- 
pino 


Japa- 
nese 


Kor- 
ean 


Nepro 


Pacific 

Is- 
lander 


Number dep 


irted ... 22,824 


20,525 


224 


660 


389 


478 


63 


480 


5 








12,062 


10,547 


158 


495 


200 


309 


52 


240 


1 










ars 384 


362 

498 

359 

58 

92 

204 

1,319 

2,017 

1,606 

933 

715 

511 

384 

317 

229 

326 

213 

113 

62 

229 

9,978 


1 
1 
1 

3 

6 

27 

35 

24 

20 

13 

ti 

8 

7 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

66 


10 
13 

1 

2 

11 

64 

148 

119 

59 

24 

17 

7 

3 

3 

1 

6 
165 


2 

2 

2 
1 
19 
32 
27 
17 
22 
21 
11 
22 
19 
54 
4 
2 

3 

129 


5 
6 

1 

3 

3 

21 

51 

56 

31 

27 

13 

10 

4 

7 

25 

22 

9 

1 

169 


1 

1 
2 
12 
20 
8 
3 
2 

1 

2 
11 


4 
5 
3 

4 

28 

52 

63 

31 

14 

10 

5 

4 

4 

1 

1 

11 

240 




5 - 9 ' 


' 523 


_ 


10-14 ' 


' 380 


_ 


15 ' 


' 60 


_ 


16-17 ' 


• 106 


_ 


18-19 ' 


226 


_ 


20-24 ' 


' 1 , 480 


_ 


25-29 ' 


' 2,347 


_ 


30-34 ' 


' 1,915 


_ 


35-39 ' 


' 1,099 


_ 


40-44 ' 


' 818 


_ 


45-49 ' 


' 580 


_ 


50-54 ' 


' 425 


_ 


55 - 59 


' 358 


_ 


60-64 ' 


' 263 


_ 


65 - 69 ' 


' 409 


1 


70 - 74 ' 


' 241 




75-79 ' 
80 years an 
Unknown. 


' 125 

i over 69 

254 


- 




10,762 


4 








Under 5 ye 
5 - 9 ' 


ars 345 

' 424 


330 
403 
329 
68 
131 
218 
1,160 
1,543 
1,298 
841 
625 
534 
433 
458 
449 
389 
253 
158 
113 
245 


2 

1 
1 

27 
10 
8 
6 
1 
3 
4 

1 
1 

1 


11 
10 
6 
1 
2 

23 
33 

40 

22 

6 

7 
1 
1 
1 

1 


1 
1 

2 

19 
30 
29 
16 
11 
3 
3 
6 
3 
2 

1 

2 


2 
6 
5 

6 

6 

29 

38 

15 
7 
8 
1 
3 
9 

16 
1 
2 

3 

5 


1 

3 

4 
2 

1 


2 

4 

3 

2 

4 

5 

27 

35 

41 

32 

21 

16 

16 

7 

11 

6 

1 

1 

6 


- 


10-14 ' 
15 ' 


' 347 

' 72 


- 


16 - 17 ' 


' 146 


_ 


18-19 ' 


' 230 


1 


20-24 ' 


' 1 , 289 


1 


25 - 29 ' 
30-34 ' 


' 1,694 

' 1,433 


1 


35-39 ' 


' 925 


1 


40-44 


' 672 




45-49 ' 


• 564 


_ 


50-54 ' 


' 460 


_ 


55 - 59 


' 482 


_ 


60-64 ' 


' 481 


_ 


65 - 69 


399 


_ 


70 - 74 


• 256 


_ 


75 - 79 


' 167 


_ 


80 years an 
Unknown, 


d over 117 

259 


- 



Report op the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



I I ^— I I I I -H I I I I 1 I 



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64 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 17-A. AGRICULTURAL LABORERS ADMITTED TO THE 

UNITED STATES: 

YEARS ENDED JUNi. 30, 1950 TO 1956 



Country of last 
permanent residence 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 




122,676 


130,630 


235,316 


192,132 


221,709 


351,191 


431,985 






Mexico 


(1)116,052 
1,503 

5,121 


(2)115,742 
3,158 

11,730 


223,541 

2,796 

184 

184 

8,611 


178,606 
5,467 

4 
8,055 


213,763 
1,448 

10 

6,488 


337,996 

7,578 

5,617 


416,833 




7,210 


British Guiana 




British Honduras 




British West Indies. .. . 


7,911 


French West Indies 


31 



(1) Figure includes 96,239 illegal entrants contracted. 

(2) Figure includes 3,626 illegal entrants contracted. 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



65 



I 



TABLE 18. NONIMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED 
AND NONEMIGRANT ALIENS DEPARTED, BY COUNTRY OR 
REGION OF LAST OR INTENDED FUTURE PERMANENT 

RESIDENCE: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1952 TO 1956 



Country or region 
of last or future residence 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria 

Helgium 

Bulgaria 

Czecnoslovakia 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

(England 

United (No. Ireland. . . 
Kingdom (Scotland 

(Wales 

U. S. S. R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Israel 

Japan 

Palestine 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Central America 

Other North America . . . . 

South America 

Africa 

Australia and New Zealand 
Other countries 



Nonimmigrant 



1952 1953 1954 1955 



121.902 



23,638 

1,074 
1.882 
2,648 
4,312 
252 
3,424 
10,04() 

305,890 



123,471 
28,111 

100,301 
13,875 
40,132 

51,553 
3,704 
8.364 
1,031 



124,369 



25,846 



1,357 
2,063 
2,997 
5,484 
181 
3,803 
9,961 

265,852 



48,516 
58,841 
97,. 586 
15,132 
45,777 

55,382 
3,950 
7,785 
2.. 530 



(1) 
566,613 



136,459 



1,438 

3,302 

10 

159 

3,455 

27 

1,288 

13,305 

14,128 

2,24ij 

85 

2,118 

9,020 

19 

15 

7,101 

5,137 

264 

950 

57 

3,357 

5,614 

5,222 

42,782 

2,131 

8,625 

886 

350 

577 

2,791 

26,359 



1,145 
2,107 
3,249 
5,780 
170 
4,194 
9,714 

328,984 



(1) 
620,946 



142,153 



1,521 

3,116 

34 

214 

3,857 

25 

1,231 

14,023 

15,808 

2,072 

98 

1,997 

10,731 

36 

25 

7,269 

5,292 

443 

974 

106 

5,034 

5,235 

5,724 

43,8.50 

1 , 130 

6,413 

1,054 

635 

681 

2,925 

32,646 



1,716 
2,785 
3,107 
7,215 
148 
5,260 
12,415 

364.461 



(1) 
686,259 



155,231 



1,908 

3,160 

33 

212 

4,310 

35 

1,395 

15,444 

21,762 

2,311 

144 

2,565 

10,068 

30 

62 

7,990 

5,665 

409 

1,207 

145 

4,946 

6,117 

5,809 

46,884 

1,262 

6,199 

796 

684 

697 

2,976 

36,843 



2,340 
2,595 
3,602 
8,602 
71 
5,627 
14,006 

412,710 

122,748 
107.409 
111.378 
22,784 
48,391 

59,626 
4,729 

14.322 
2,798 



Nonemlgrant 



1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 



487,617 



111,585 



955 

4,101 

3 

96 

3,773 

15 

942 

13,029 

7,457 

1,563 

88 

1,386 

5,159 

16 

12 

7,109 

4,908 

201 

707 

50 

2,366 

4,070 

3,947 

39,696 

676 

6,006 

731 

271 

244 

2,008 

12,889 



265 
1,104 
1,913 
3,292 

152 
2,170 
3,993 

300,629 

119,938 
33,269 
85,606 
12,398 
49,418 

49.047 
2,846 
8,736 
1,885 



520,246 



127,909 



15,190 



668 
1,431 
2,292 
3,852 

188 
2,462 
4,297 

310,625 



81 , 599 
56,415 
106,650 
14,263 
51,698 

.53,333 
3,469 

7,262 
2.458 



139,445 



1,290 

3,419 

3 

127 

3,754 

27 

1,261 

13,486 

12,863 

2,010 

58 

2,012 

7,033 

13 

12 

7,188 

5,053 

154 

639 

52 

2,672 

5,508 

4,918 

50,283 

2,185 

9,546 

908 

311 

532 

2,128 

16,252 



738 
1,222 
2,323 
4,461 

182 
2,. 537 
4,789 

342,048 



76,733 
83,627 
102,312 
15,947 
63,429 

55,159 
3,927 
9,599 
2.066 



143,800 



1,383 

3,232 

9 

18' 

3,879 

13 

1,136 

14,984 

14,224 

2,198 

75 

2,481 

8,922 

8 

16 

7,127 

5,010 

255 

953 

52 

3,731 

5,714 

5,491 

.50,144 

1,004 

7,036 

1,077 

348 

654 

2,457 

20,895 

967 
1,689 
2,819 
4,908 
98 
3.124 
7,290 

386, 193 



102,406 
84 , 406 

110,404 
19,746 
69,231 

61,882 
4,450 

11,844 
5,491 



692,376 



148,169 



1,493 

3,289 

12 

161 

3,905 

18 

1,228 

15,931 

17,922 

2,202 

69 

3,042 

9,711 



7,671 

5,416 

231 

1,195 

62 

4,639 

6,374 

6,016 

46.138 

717 

6,555 

878 

541 

460 

2,277 

27,467 



1,593 
1,545 
3,088 
7,366 
24 
4,134 
9,717 

427,526 



124.416 
105,543 
116,103 
22,263 
59,201 

64,279 
4,784 

14,791 
5,360 



(1) Does not include agricultural laborers admitted under Section 101(a) (15) (H), Immigration and 
Nationality Act, of whom there were 7,946 in 19.54, 13,195 in 1955, and 15,152 in 19.56. 



66 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 19. ALIENS EXCLUDED FROM THE UNITED STATES: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1892 TO 1956 



Year 



Number 
excluded 



Total 1892 - 1956 628,919 

1892 - 1900 22.515 

1892 2,164 

1893 1,053 

1894 1,389 

1895 2,419 

1896 2,799 

1897 1,017 

1898 3,030 

1899 3,798 

1900 4,246 

1901 - 1910 108,211 

1901 3,516 

1902 4,974 

1903 8,769 

1904 7,994 

1905 11,879 

1906 12,432 

1907 13,064 

1908 10,902 

1909 10,411 

1910 24,270 

1911 - 1920 178,109 

1911 22,349 

1912 16,057 

1913 19,938 

1914 33,041 

1915 24,111 

1916 18,867 

1917 16,028 

1918 7,297 

1919 8,626 

1920 11,795 



Year 



Number 
excluded 



1921 - 1930 189,307 

1921 13,779 

1922 13,731 

1923 20,619 

1924 30,284 

1925 25,390 

1926 20,550 

1927 19,755 

1928 18,839 

1929 18,127 

1930 8,233 

1931-1940 68,217 

1931 9,744 

1932 7,064 

1933 5,527 

1934 5,384 

1935 5,558 

1936 7,000 

1937 8,076 

1938 8,066 

1939 6,498 

1940 5,300 

1941 - 1950 38,527 

1941 2,929 

1942 1,833 

1943 1,495 

1944 1,642 

1945 2,341 

1946 2,942 

1947 7,435 

1948 7,113 

1949 5,541 

1950 5,256 

1951 5,647 

1952 5,050 

1953 5.647 

1954 3,313 

1955 2,667 

19,56 1,709 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



67 



TABLE 20. ALIENS EXCLUDED FROM THE UNITED STATES, 

BY CAUSE: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1950 TO 1956 



Cause 



Number excluded 

Criminals 

Immoral classes 

Subversive or anarcliistlc 

Violators of narcotit- laws 

Mental or physical defectives: 

Idiots and imbeciles (1) 

Feeble minded aliens 

Insane aliens or had been insane 

Psychopathic personality aliens 

Epileptics 

Mentally defective aliens 

Chronic alcoholics 

Tubercular aliens 

Aliens afflicted with other dangerous, contagious disease . 

Aliens with defect which may affect ability toeiirn a living 

Likely to become public charges 

Previously excluded, deported, or removed 

Stowaways 

Attempted entry without inspection or by false statements 

Attempted entry without proper documents 

Paupers, professional beggars, and vagrants 

Polygamists or advocate polygamy 

Contract laborers 

Ineligible to citizeaship 

Previously departed from U. S. to avoid service in armed 

forces 

Brought by nonsignatory lines 

Unable to read (over 16 years of age) 

Accompanying aliens 

Assisted aliens 

Other 



1950 


1951 


1952 


1053 


1954 


1955 


5,256 


5,647 


5,050 


5,647 


3,313 


2,667 


428 


610 


534 


491 


296 


206 


32 


38 


29 


58 


65 


124 


157 


165 


148 


118 


111 


89 


- 


- 


- 


1 


3 


10 


5 


9 


7 


5 


_ 


_ 


10 


18 


14 


14 


18 


9 


30 


30 


35 


29 


10 


13 


49 


24 


9 


14 


22 


10 


26 


17 


23 


10 


/ 


9 


21 


31 


19 


16 


11 


7 


5 


6 


8 


4 


3 


- 


27 


11 


17 


88 


27 


37 


21 


45 


22 


7 


27 


26 


25 


243 


10 


3 


2 


2 


103 


116 


41 


33 


16 


9 


135 


122 


115 


169 


201 


187 


122 


121 


74 


47 


2 


15 


- 


_ 


- 


139 


307 


356 


3,926 


3,963 


3,860 


4,293 


2,125 


1,476 


2 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


3 


2 


- 


- 


- 


3 


12 


1 


9 


6 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


5 


2 


4 


56 


14 


19 


39 


32 


50 


4 


1 


3 


- 


3 


1 


14 


3 


3 


- 


3 


4 


8 


15 


10 


10 


4 


9 


6 


2 


1 


1 


2 


3 


28 


39 


39 


47 


14 


8 



1956 



1,709 



169 

64 

117 

5 



10 
163 
916 



CI) Cause for exclusion under Immigration Act of February 5, 1917. 



68 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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70 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 22. ALIEN CREWMEN DESERTED AT UNITED STATES 

AIR AND SEAPORTS, BY NATIONALITY AND FLAG OF CARRIER: 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1956 





Total 


Flag of carrier from which deserted 


Nationality of crewmen 


(3 


SI 

C 

Q 




a 
.2 
"3 


c 
.2 

3 


J3 

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a 
— 

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z 


a 
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c 

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320 


3 
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20 


c 
105 


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m 

135 


c 
15 


O 




2,968 


328 


84 


166 


205 


723 


122 


461 








313 
49 
28 
62 

837 

448 
99 

162 
4 
62 

247 
66 
66 

130 
33 
2(1 
17 
35 
22 

268 


191 

4 
54 
2 
6 

2 

1 

23 

1 

1 
43 


26 

5 

2 

1 

4 

1 

4 

8 
4 

1 
28 


6 

147 
8 

1 
4 


2 

195 

2 

3 
3 


29 
1 
2 

15 
430 
97 
11 
19 

38 
23 

8 

2 

5 

9 
34 


21 

2 

63 

6 

2 
6 

5 

1 

16 


15 

11 

2 

3 

1 

41 

8 

125 

2 

26 
13 

21 

2 

1 

2 
11 


27 

1 

11 

130 

76 

3 

5 

31 
2 

11 
2 

1 
20 


3 

16 
1 


105 


2 

7 

10 
7 
2 
10 
5 
4 

2 
24 
42 

2 

2 
3 

13 


2 

1 
1 
2 

1 
3 
5 


20 


Denmark 


3 


Finland . . 


14 


Germany 


22 


Greece 


67 


Italy 


12 




3 




1 


Poland . 


- 


Portugal 


2 


Spain 


25 




1 




61 




64 




32 


Philippines 

Cuba 


4 

1 


Argentina 


33 


Honduras 

All other 


5 
91 







Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



71 



TABLE 23. VESSELS AND AIRPLANES INSPECTED. CREWMEN 
ADMITTED, AND STOWAWAYS ARRIVED, BY REGIONS AND 

DISTRICTS:' 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1956 





Vessels and airplanes 
inspected 


Crewmen 
admitted 


Stowaways 
arrived 


Region and District 


Arrived 


De- 
parted 


Aliens 


Citi- 
zens 


Aliens 






Vessels 


Air- 
planes 


Vessels 
and 

air- 
planes 

(2) 


Citi- 
zens 


United States total 


65,171 


127,872 


13,159 


1,533,249 


920,088 


222 


34 




19,080 


34,389 


5,381 


609,176 


308,447 


81 


21 








1,652 

1,953 

107 

1 

5,398 

9,542 

370 

57 

25,995 


2,553 

9,178 

42 

13,973 

450 

6,568 

1,625 

51,463 


203 

6 
8 

4,119 

39 

1,006 

6,152 


44,231 
54,143 
3,595 

436,521 

40,604 

8,560 

21,522 

568,951 


25,115 

15,818 

422 

236,751 
7,028 
14,492 
8,821 

302,831 


12 

68 

1 

99 


- 


BulTalo, N . Y 


- 


Hartford, Conn 


- 




- 


New York, N. Y 


21 


Portland, Me 


- 


St. Albans, Vt 


- 




- 




7 






Atlanta, Ga. ... 


1,641 
2,096 
2,378 
5,938 
2,143 
2,879 
5,480 
3,440 

12,050 


346 

338 

1,707 

28,220 

1,401 

3,200 

15,321 

930 

19,659 


171 

100 

2 

2,052 
276 
115 

3,313 
123 

934 


39,424 

57,718 
49,498 

112,951 
58,847 
84,418 
60,353 

105,742 

174,662 


29,585 
27,226 
13,831 
78,992 
30,241 
27.919 
74,879 
20,158 

130,488 


25 
12 

16 
15 
11 
7 
13 

5 


_ 




2 


Cleveland, Ohio 


- 




- 




- 




1 


San Juan, P. R 


- 




4 




_ 






Anchorage, Alaska 


781 

405 

1,145 

12 

549 

684 

8,474 

8,046 


1,479 

342 

3,091 

1,771 

7 

5 

43 

3,459 

9,462 

22,361 


^1 

22 

15 
612 
692 


8,312 

8,185 

16,297 

485 

6 

14,691 

24,571 

102,115 

180,460 


5,610 

2,606 

15,497 

2,719 

9 

10 

8,475 

8.364 

87,198 

178,322 


5 
37 


- 


Chicago, 111 


- 


Detroit, Mich 


- 


Helena, Mont 


- 


Kansas City, Mo 


- 


Omaha, Xeb 


- 


Portland, Ore 


- 


St. Paul, Minn 


- 


Seattle, Wash.. 


- 


Southwest Region 


6 






Dallas, Tex 


1,618 

587 
3,866 

723 
1,252 


663 

8 

1,074 

12,153 

3,526 

4,227 

101 

609 


95 

7 

99 

254 

190 

47 


46,070 

22,161 
70,861 
14,544 
26,817 


15,142 
18 

62,-361 
40,743 
12,979 
47,079 


15 

6 
fi 
4 
6 


_ 


Denver, Colo 


- 


El Paso, Tex 


- 


Honolulu, T. H 


- 




5 


San Antonio, Tex 


- 




1 




- 







(1) Each and every arrival or departure of the same vessel or crewman counted separately. 

(2) Separate figures for vessels and airplanes not available. 



72 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 24. ALIENS DEPORTED, BY COUNTRY TO WHICH 
DEPORTED AND CAUSE: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1956 



Country to which 








1 
o 


> 

■o 

•3 
o 


o 

•s 


2 

3 


§ 
a 

to ■S 




a 
o 

as 
i § 
"1 


3 

3 

a 
B 


.2 

03 




deported 




•i 


"3 


a 
"3 
2 


a 

u 
O 






io 

li 


■an 


o 


O 

> 


1 




o 


o 


S 


1 

> 


03 

a 
1 


II 




T3 & 


11 






> 

3 
W 


1 


All countries . . . 


7.297 


628 


103 


87 


80 


316 


1,102 


462 


674 


3,545 


48 


16 


236 




988 


116 


5 


3 


43 


28 


221 


88 


213 


139 


28 


7 


97 






Denmarlc 


22 


6 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


5 


6 


2 


- 


- 


2 


Finland 


20 
15 
72 
188 


6 
2 
8 
10 


- 


- 


2 
10 
4 


2 
6 


2 
2 
14 

52 


1 
2 
4 
19 


7 

2 

5 

49 


3 

2 

20 

25 


1 
4 
4 


1 
2 


1 


France . .... 


2 


Germany 


4 


Greece 


17 


Ireland . . 


30 
190 

48 


9 

33 

4 


1 


1 

1 


6 
5 


1 

8 

1 


1 
57 
10 


11 
10 


3 
23 
16 


19 

6 


10 
4 




- 


Italy 


28 


Netherlands 


- 


Norway 


38 


7 


- 


- 


- 


1 


3 


4 


17 


5 


- 


- 


1 


Portugal 


73 
77 
17 
114 


2 
4 
2 
16 


1 
1 


1 


1 
2 

7 


5 
2 

1 


18 
16 
3 
23 


5 

9 

1 

10 


16 
16 
9 
29 


6 
13 

1 
19 


1 
1 

1 


1 
2 


19 




11 


Sweden 


1 


United Kingdom 


5 


Yugoslavia 


10 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


- 


1 


1 


1 




3 


Other Europe — 


74 


7 


2 


- 


6 


- 


16 


7 


14 


17 


1 


1 


3 


Asia 


265 


12 


- 


11 


2 


3 


73 


28 


74 


20 


3 


1 


38 






China 


88 
13 
24 


5 


- 


8 
1 


- 


1 


26 
5 
12 


9 

1 


20 
4 
10 


4 
1 
1 


1 


1 


14 


India 


- 


Indonesia 


1 


Japan 


4 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Jordan 


9 
27 
45 


2 
1 
4 


- 


1 


2 


1 


12 

7 


3 

5 


11 
13 


3 

7 


- 


- 


1 


Pakistan 


2 


Philippines 


6 


Other Asia 


55 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


10 


9 


14 


4 


2 


~ 


14 


North America 


5,894 


489 


97 


72 


25 


278 


787 


321 


353 


3.300 


15 


8 


89 




878 

4,350 

544 


138 

287 

56 


23 
66 
8 


3 

60 
5 


10 
4 
10 


78 
176 
21 


241 
433 

94 


88 
76 
148 


187 
58 
96 


101 

3,137 

66 


3 
1 

8 


2 
2 
3 


4 




50 


West Indies 


29 


Central America. 


121 


8 


- 


4 


1 


3 


19 


9 


12 


55 


3 


1 


6 


Other North 




























America 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


~ 


~ 


*" 


South America 


108 


10 


_ 


1 


10 


6 


9 


18 


21 


23 


2 


- 


8 




24 
18 


1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


5 
7 


6 
1 


8 
5 


1 
2 


- 


- 


2 


Other countries 


2 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



73 



TABLE 24-A. ALIENS APPREHENDED, ALIENS DEPORTED, AND 

ALIENS DEPARTING VOLUNTARILY: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1892 TO 1956 





Aliens 
appre- 
hended 
(1) 


Aliens expelled 


Period 


Total 


Aliens 
deported 


Aliens 

departing 

voluntarily 

(2) 


1892 - 1956 


5,007,908 


5,752,298 


465,535 


5.286,763 


1S'J2 - 1900 


128,484 


3,127 
11,558 
27,912 

164,390 


3,127 
11,558 
27,912 

92,1,57 




1901-1910 




1911 - 1920 




1921 - 1930 


72,233 






1921 


22, 199 
12,735 
16,393 
23,566 
32,711 
20,880 

147,4.S7 


4,517 
4,345 
3,661 
6,409 
9,495 
10,904 
26,674 
31,571 
38,796 
28.018 

210.416 


4,517 
4,345 
3,6(il 
6,409 
9,495 
10,904 
11,662 
11,625 
12,908 
16,631 

117,086 




1922 


_ 


1923 




1924 


_ 


1925 


. 


1926 


_ 


1927 


15,012 


1928 


19,946 


1929 


25,888 


1930 

1931 - 1940 


11,387 
93,330 






1931 


22,276 
22,735 
20,949 
10,319 
11,016 
11,728 
13,054 
12,851 
12,037 
10,492 

1,377,210 


29.801 
30.201 
30.212 
16.889 
16,297 
17.446 
17.617 
18,553 
17,792 
15,. 548 

1,581,774 


18,142 
19,426 
19,865 
8,879 
8,319 
9, 195 
8,829 
9.275 
8.202 
6.954 

110,849 


11,719 


1932 


10,775 


1933 


10, ,347 


1934 


8,010 




7,978 


1936 


8,251 


1937 


8,788 


1938 


9,278 


1939 


9,590 


1940 


8,594 


1941 - 1950 


1,470,925 






1941 


11,294 
11.784 
11,175 
31,174 
69,164 
99,591 
193,6,57 
192.779 
288.2,')3 
468,339 

509,040 
528.815 
885.587 
1.089.. 583 
254.096 
87,696 


10.938 
10,613 
16,154 
39,449 
80,760 
116,320 
214.543 
217.555 
296,337 
579.105 

686.713 
723.959 
905,236 
1,101.228 
247,797 
88,188 


4,407 
3,709 
4.207 
7,179 
11,270 
14,375 
18.663 
20.. 371 
20.040 
6.628 

13,544 
20.181 
19.845 
26.951 
15.028 
7.297 


6,531 


1942 


6.904 


1943 


11,947 


1944 


32,270 




69,490 


1946 


101,945 


1947 


195,880 


1948 


197,184 




276,297 


1950 


.')72,477 


1951 


673,169 


1952 


703,778 


1953 


885,391 




1,074,277 


19.55 


232,769 




80,891 







(1) Aliens apprehended first recorded in 1925. 

(2) Aliens departing voluntarily first recorded in 1927. 



74 



Report of the Immi gration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 25. ALIENS DEPORTED, BY COUNTRY TO 
DEPORTED AND DEPORTATION EXPENSE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1956 



WHICH 



Country to which deported 



All countries 

Europe 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Indonesia 

Japan 

Jordan 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Africa 

Other countries 



Total 



7,297 



22 
20 
15 

72 
188 
30 
190 
48 
38 
73 
77 
17 
114 
10 
74 

265 



13 

24 
4 
9 

27 
45 
55 

5,894 



878 

4,350 

544 

121 

1 

108 
24 
18 



Deportation expense borne by: 



Immi- 
gration 
and 
Natu- 
raliza- 
tion 
Service 



11 
14 
10 
56 
89 
25 
114 
19 
22 
50 
43 
12 
78 
6 
40 



801 
,188 
358 
103 
1 

67 
16 
12 



Other 
Govern- 
ment 
agencies 



Steam- 
ship 
com- 
panies 



Airlines 



Aliens 

de- 
ported 



547 



53 
142 
140 

12 



Aliens 

re- 
shipped 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



75 



TABLE 26. INWARD MOVEMENT OF ALIENS AND CITIZENS OVER 

INTERNATIONAL LAND BOUNDARIES, BY STATE AND PORT: 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 195(5 



state and port 



All ports (2) 

Canadian ISorder 

Idaho 

Eastport 

PortldU 

Illinois 

Chicago 

Maine 

Calais (3) 

Houlton 

Jackman 

Madawaska : (4) 

Michigan 

Detroit 

Port Huron 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Minnesota 

Baudette 

Duluth 

International Falls 

Lancaster 

Noyes 

Pigeon River 

Pine Creek 

Ranier 

Roseau 

St. Paul 

Warroad 

Winton 

Montana 

Babb 

Chief Mountain 

Cut Bank 

Great Falls 

Havre 

Morgan 

Opheim 

Raymond 

Roosville 

Scobey 

Sweetgrass 

Turner 

Whitetail 

New York ., ^ 

Albany 

Ogdensburg (5) 

Peace Bridge (6) 

Rouses Point 

Syracuse 



All persons crossing (1) 



Total 



49,707,313 



410,951 



308,371 
108,580 



7,073,076 



2,349,429 

1,107,020 

487,201 

3,729,360 

12,928,044 



10,000,630 

2,190,090 

077,924 

1,070,011 



109,234 

2,724 

079,465 

10,595 

424,422 

275,895 

34,788 

13,360 

33,003 

5,003 

72,761 

9,361 

008,001 



125,070 
08,408 
2,970 
4,380 
15,724 
15,523 
13,680 
68,885 
28,177 
13,901 

282,727 
12,189 
10,907 

18,009,075 



09 

2,416,840 

13,703,401 

2,541,762 

6,943 



Aliens 



26,097,673 



272,246 



194,353 
77,893 



385 
4,909,288 



1,547,840 
739,418 
308,292 

2,313,738 

6,030,718 



4,589,279 

1,086,517 

354,922 

941,580 



80,943 

701 

324,679 

9,657 

282,239 

123,235 

24,444 

1,819 

27,441 

1,874 

63,745 

803 

432,332 



72,533 

21,683 

1,169 

1,040 

12,323 

12,870 

10,034 

50,826 

14,774 

10,849 

200,797 

9,098 

14,336 

8,671,608 



40 

1,405,905 

5,511,097 

1,751.347 

3,219 



Citizens 



60,823,745 



23,069,640 



144,705 



114,018 
30,087 



513 



513 
2,763,788 



801,589 

307,608 

178,969 

1,415,622 

6,897,926 



5,471,351 

1,103,573 

323,002 

735,031 



28,291 

2,023 

354,786 

6,938 

142,183 

152,660 

10,344 

11,541 

5,502 

3,129 

9,016 

8,658 

236,269 



52,537 
46,725 
1,801 
3,340 
3,401 
2,653 
3,646 
18,059 
13,403 
3,052 
81,930 
3,091 
2,631 

9,997,467 



29 

1,010,935 

8,192,304 

790,415 

3.724 



(1) Each entry of the same person counted separately. 

(2) Fierures include arrivals by aircraft. 

(3) Calais, Me., includes Bangor and Vanceboro, Me. 

(4) Madawaska, Me., includes Van Buren, Me. 

(5) Ogdensburg, N. Y., includes Thousand Island Bridge and Malone, N. Y. 

(6) Peace Bridge, N. Y., includes Niagara Falls, N. Y., and Toronto (Malton Airport), Ont., 
Canada. 

(7) Newport, Vt., includes Norton, Vt. 

(8) St. Albans, Vt., includes Highgate Springs, Vt., and Montreal, Que., Canada. 

(9) Bellingham, Wash., includes Victoria, B. C, Canada. 
(10) Brownsville, Tex., includes Corpus Christi, Tex. 



76 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 26. INWARD MOVEMENT OF ALIENS AND CITIZENS OVER 
INTERNATIONAL LAND BOUNDARIES, BY STATE AND PORT: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1956 (Cont'd) 



state and port 



Canadian Border — Continued 

North Dakota 

Ambrose 

Antler 

Carbury 

Dunseith 

Fortuna 

Hannah 

Hansboro 

Maida 

Neche 

Noonan 

Northgate 

Pembina 

Portal 

St. John 

Sarles 

Sherwood 

Walhalla 

Westhope 

Ohio 

Cleveland 

Sandusky 

Toledo 

Oregon 

Portland 

Vermont 

Newport (7) 

St. Albans (8) 

Washington 

Auacortes 

Bellingham (9) 

Blaine 

Danville 

Laurier 

Lynden 

Metaline Falls 

Northport 

Oroville 

Port Angeles 

Seattle 

Spokane 

Sumas 

Taeoma 

Wisconsin 

Green Bay 

Milwaukee 

Alaska 

Anchorage 

Fairbanks 

Juneau 

Skagway 

Tok Junction 



All persons crossing (1) 



Total 



932,313 



20,470 
11,753 
20,427 
75,471 
17,774 
16,551 
15,023 
17,292 
116,968 
37,774 
42,647 
189,056 
193,765 
32,803 
10,696 
31,301 
46,129 
36,413 

26,795 



11,576 

15,066 

153 

789 



789 
3,197,127 



1,885,041 
1,312,086 



3,517,030 



45,619 

148,973 

1,886,918 

47,708 

135,240 

136,234 

57,192 

231,582 

316,235 

673 

85,912 

626 

423,863 

255 

553 



59 
494 



58,850 



1,870 

5,021 

5,727 

15,884 

30,348 



Aliens 



602,825 



13,474 

9,557 

18,574 

46,253 

11,988 

10, 761 

6,070 

10,706 

71,331 

23,775 

25,988 

127,831 

113,389 

22,418 

3,397 

25,466 

33,193 

28,654 

6,896 



6,386 

466 

44 



145 
1,885,505 



1,143,528 
741,977 



2,335,916 



15,560 

40,384 

1,299,600 

15,684 

104,286 

91,687 

39,994 

193,757 

205,455 

260 

40,840 

109 

288,164 

136 

259 



31 
228 



7,970 



210 

239 

1,430 

4,209 

1,882 



(1) Ench cnlry of the same person counted separately. 

(2) Figures include arriva's by aircraft. 

(3) Ca'ais, Me., includes Bangor and Vanceboro, Me. 

(4) Madawaska, Me., includes Van Buren, Me. 

(5) Ogdensburg, N. Y., includes Thousand Island Bridge and Malone, N. Y. 

(6) Peace Bridge, N. Y., includes Niagara Falls, N. Y., and 'Toronto (Malton Airport), Ont., 
Canada. 

(7) Newport, Vt., includes Norton, Vt. 

(8) St. Albans, Vt., includes Highgate Springs, Vt., and Montreal, Que., Canada. 

(9) Bellingham, Wash., includes Victoria, B. C, Canada. 
(10) Brownsville, Tex., includes Corpus Christi, Tex. 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



77 



TABLE 26. INWARD MOVEMENT OF ALIENS AND CITIZENS OVER 

INTERNATIONAL LAND BOUNDARIES, BY STATE AND PORT: 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1956 (Cont'd) 



State and port 



Mexican Border 

Arizona 

Douglas 

Lukeville 

Naco 

Nogales 

San Luis 

Sasabe 

California 

Andrade 

Calexico 

San Diego 

San Pedro 

San Ysidro 

Tecate 

New Mexico 

Columbus 

Texas 

Brownsville (10) 

Dallas 

Del Rio 

Eagle Pass 

El Paso 

Fabens 

Hidalgo 

Houston 

Laredo 

Presidio 

Roma 

San Antonio 

Yslcta 



All persons crossing (1) 



Total 



79,848,740 



12,084,530 



2,450,668 

161,690 

1,132,723 

7,321,242 

950,274 

67,933 

21,263,825 



168,964 

7,493,083 

3,053 

18,128 

13,366,065 

214,532 

137,395 



137,395 
46,362,990 



5,490,018 

237 

1,139,758 

2,329,358 

21,743,285 

341,940 

5,065,902 

17,116 

7,676,991 

456,400 

730,020 

40,727 

1,331,238 



Aliens 



42,694,635 



6,914,912 



1,185,761 
81,403 
543,797 
4,391,522 
666,811 
45,618 

9,112,137 



86,389 

4, 870,. 503 

244 

2,077 

4,024,329 

128,595 

54,905 



54,905 
26,612,681 



3,661,413 

32 

456,065 

1,397,613 

11,685,318 

219,736 

3,039,910 

2,364 

4,953,335 

293,848 

373,695 

1,816 

527,536 



Citlzeas 



37, 154, 105 



5,169,618 



1,264,907 

80,287 

588,926 

2,929,720 

283,463 

22,315 

12,151,688 



82,575 

2,622,580 

2,809 

16,051 
9,341,736 

85,937 

82,490 



82,490 
19,750,309 



1,828,605 

205 

683,693 

931,745 

10,057,967 

122,204 

2,025,992 

14,752 

2,723,656 

162,552 

356,325 

38,911 

803,702 



(1) Each entry of the same person counted separately. 

(2) Figures include arrivals by aircraft. 

(3) Calais, Me., includes Bangor and V'anceboro, Me. 

(4) Madawaska, Me., includes Van Buren, Me. 

(5) Ogdensburg, X. Y. , includes Thousand Island Bridge and Malone, N. Y. 

(6) Peace Bridge, .V. Y., includes Niagara Falls, N. Y., and Toronto (Malton Airport), Ont., Canada. 

(7) Newport, Vt., includes Norton, Vt. 

(8) St. .\lbans, Vt., includes Highgate Springs, Vt., and Montreal, Que., Canada. 

(9) Bellingham, Wash., includes Victoria, B. C, Canada. 
(10) Brownsville, Tex., includes Corpus Christi, Tex. 



78 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 27. ALIENS DEPORTED, BY YEAR OF ENTRY AND STATUS 

AT ENTRY: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1956 





Total 
de- 
port- 
ed 


Year of entry 


status at entry 


1956 


1955 


1954 
856 


1953 
440 


1952 


1951 
209 


1946 
to 
1950 

564 


1941 
to 
1945 

145 


1931 
to 
1940 

93 


1921 
to 
1930 

139 


1911 
to 
1920 

60 


Be- 
fore 
1911 

33 


Un- 
Icnown 


Total 


7,297 


412 
35 

147 

4 

9 

60 

1 

6 
1 
19 

125 

1 

3 

1 


4,028 

154 

1 

1 

457 

78 

21 

226 

2 

1 

25 

7 

46 

2,944 

4 

54 

7 


276 


42 






Immigrant (except dis- 


541 

5 

980 

248 

52 

824 

3 
132 

51 
147 

4,123 

1 

7 

1 

93 

75 


53 

1 
124 
49 

5 
88 

20 
2 
17 

482 

1 
1 

6 

7 


36 

1 
69 
29 

6 
52 

1 

17 
13 
12 

191 

1 

11 

1 


31 

1 
37 
18 

1 
70 

5 
4 
11 

94 

2 
2 


24 

1 

1 

29 

27 

1 
52 

6 
2 

5 

56 

3 

2 


73 

3 

2 

86 

25 

3 

148 

1 
27 
17 

27 

137 

8 
7 


11 

4 
16 

5 
68 

6 
3 

2 

27 

2 

1 


16 

14 

1 

24 
2 

12 
2 
2 

16 
4 


50 

9 

33 
2 

6 
5 

22 
12 


37 

1 

1 
1 

2 
1 

12 
1 

4 


21 

1 
1 

1 

1 
8 




Displaced person or re- 




Qovernment official 

Temporary visitor 

Agricultm'al laborer 

Transit alien 


2 




1 


Treaty merchant or in- 




Representative to inter- 
national organization, . 

Returning resident 

Student 


- 


Stowaway 


- 


Surreptitious entrant or 
entrant without inspec- 
tion 


16 




- 


Other temporary worker 

or industrial trainee 

Exchange alien. 


- 


United States citizenship 


_ 


Unknown or not reported 


23 



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t^ T -"f CO C-( 
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Unable 

to 
read 
(over 

16 
years 

of 
age) 

(8) 


1 1 1 C^ -H « 


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versive 

or 
anar- 
chistic 

(7) 


cc.-< t^ -- c tc 

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Likely 

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public 
charges 

(61 


M- ^ >r^ — t~ 00 
— (N TOCO CO -r 


En- 
tered 
without 
inspec- 
tion 
or bv 
false 
state- 
ments 


2.293 
3,706 
6,387 
17.337 
10,064 
3,, 545 


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without 
proper 
docu- 
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(4) 


5,322 
9,636 
9.724 
5.344 
1,971 
1,102 


Re- 
mained 
longer 
than 
author- 
ized 
(41 


3,289 
4,469 

401 
22(i 
133 


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viously 

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or 

de- 
ported 

(3) 


05 tC -.C CC 

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1.036 
778 
689 
783 
667 
628 


■5 


13,, 544 
20.181 
19.845 
26,951 
15,028 
7,297 


.0 


1951 

19,52 

19.53 

19.54 

19.55 

19.56 



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102 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 37. DECLARATIONS OF INTENTION FILED, 

PETITIONS FOR NATURALIZATION FILED, 

AND PERSONS NATURALIZED: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1907 TO 1956 



Period 


Declara- 
tions 
filed 


Petitions 
filed 


Pers 
Civilian 


ens natura 
Military 


lized 

Total 


1907 - 1956 


8,471,349 


7,740,655 


6,720,813 


507,238 


7,228,051 






1907 - 1910 


526,322 


164,036 


111,738 


- 


111,738 






1911 - 1920 


2,686,909 


1,381,384 


884,672 


244,300 


1,128,972 






1911 


189,249 
171,133 
182,095 
214,104 
247,958 
209,204 
440,651 
342,283 
391,156 
299,076 


74,740 
95,661 
95,380 
124,475 
106,399 
108,767 
130,865 
169,507 
256,858 
218,732 


56,683 
70,310 
83,561 

104,145 
91,848 
87,831 
88,104 
87,456 
89,023 

125,711 


63,993 
128,335 
51,972 


56,683 


1912 

1913 


70,310 
83,561 


1914 


104,145 


1915 


91,848 


1916 


87,831 


1917 


88,104 


1918 


151,449 


1919 

1920 


217,358 
177,683 


1921 - 1930 


2,709,014 


1,884,277 


1,716,979 


56,206 


1,773,185 






1921 


303,904 
273,511 
296,636 
424,540 
277,218 
277,539 
258,295 
254,588 
280,645 
62,138 


195,534 
162,638 
165,168 
177,117 
162,258 
172,232 
240,339 
240,321 
255,519 
113,151 


163,656 
160,979 
137,975 
140,340 
152,457 
146,239 
195,493 
228,006 
224,197 
167,637 


17,636 
9,468 
7,109 

10,170 

92 

4,311 

5,149 

531 

1,740 


181,292 


1922 


170,447 


1923 


145,084 


1924 


150,510 


1925 


152,457 


1926 

1927 


146,331 
199,804 


1928 


233,155 


1929 

1930 


224,728 
169,377 






1931 - 1940 


1,369,479 


1,637,113 


1,498,573 


19,891 


1,518,464 






1931 


106,272 
101,345 
83,046 
108,079 
136,524 
148,118 
176,195 
150,673 
155,691 
203,536 


145,474 
131,062 
112,629 
117,125 
131,378 
167,127 
165,464 
175,413 
213,413 
278,028 


140,271 
136,598 
112,368 
110,867 
118,945 
140,784 
162,923 
158,142 
185,175 
232,500 


3,224 

2 

995 

2,802 

481 
2,053 
3,936 
3,638 
2,760 


143,495 


1932 


136,600 


1933 


113,363 


1934 


113,669 


1935 


118,945 


1936 


141,265 


1937 


164,976 


1938 


162,078 


1939 

1940 


188,813 
235,260 






1941 - 1950 


920,284 


1,938,066 


1,837,229 


149,799 


1,987,028 


1941 

1942 


224,123 
221,796 
115,664 
42,368 
31,195 
28,787 
37,771 
60,187 
64,866 
93,527 


277,807 

343,487 

377,125 

325,717 

195,917 

123,864 

88,802 

68,265 

71,044 

66,038 


275,747 

268,762 

281,459 

392,766 

208,707 

134,849 

77,442 

69,080 

64,138 

64,279 


1,547 
1,602 
37,474 
49,213 
22,695 
15,213 
16,462 
1,070 
2,456 
2,067 


277,294 
270,364 


1943 

1944 

1945 

1946 


318,933 
441,979 
231,402 
150,062 


1947 

1948 

1949 

1950 


93.904 
70,150 
66,594 
66,346 


1951 

1952 

1953 

1954 

1955 


91,497 
111,461 
23,558 
9,100 
10,855 
12,870 


61,634 
94,086 
98,128 
130,722 
213,508 
137,701 


53,741 
87,070 
90,476 
104,086 
197,568 
138,681 


975 

1,585 

1,575 

13,745 

11,958 

7.204 


54,716 
88,655 
92,051 
117.831 
209,526 


1956 


145,885 







Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



103 



TABLE 38. PERSONS NATURALIZED, 
BY GENERAL AND SPECIAL NATURALIZATION PROVISIONS' 
AND COUNTRY OR REGION OF FORMER ALLEGIANCE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1956 



Country or region of former allegiance 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgium 

British Empire 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

U. S. S. R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

Israel 

Japan 

Lebanon 

Palestine 

Philippines 

S>Tia 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Central America 

South America 

Africa 

Stateless and mLscellaneous 



Total 
number 



145,885 



110,586 



10,412 



2,330 
466 

4,231 
327 
122 

2,056 
192 



21,363 



11,539 
6,958 
1,708 
1,158 

971 

177 

2,376 



Persons naturalized 



Under 
general 
natural- 
ization 
provi- 
sions 



117,161 



90,436 



1,735 

533 

10,597 

131 

2,881 

719 

1,702 

435 

1,686 

9,014 

1,899 

3,275 

4,190 

7,051 

4,710 

3,364 

1.860 

1,101 

16,307 

997 

1,501 

542 

915 

738 

7,476 

4,319 

758 

7,202 



1,951 
322 

2,807 
254 
93 

1,139 
163 
473 

17,050 



8,997 

6,126 

1,292 

635 

663 

124 

1,686 



Married 
to U. S. 
citizens 



18,224 



13,402 



510 

116 

2,058 

10 

211 

103 

43 

67 

531 

5.300 

409 

141 

139 

2,008 

49 

44 

161 

126 

474 

103 

87 

77 

72 

115 

151 

172 

125 

2,146 



177 

120 

1,240 

50 

20 

375 
23 

141 

2,159 



1,456 
346 
173 
184 

158 
35 
324 



Children 
of U. S. 
citizen 
parents 



2,865 



2,058 



55 
23 

170 



31 

6 

39 

779 

50 

32 

149 

197 

64 

49 

35 

21 

100 

90 

5 

2 

11 

8 

50 

61 

3 



102 



121 

1 

11 



276 
44 
49 
39 

25 
6 
29 



Military 



7,204 



4,493 



32 

44 

731 

2 

61 

65 

64 

10 

145 

1,117 

188 

58 

349 

279 

161 

112 

171 

85 

361 

42 

30 

29 

49 

78 

83 

124 

23 

592 



82 
16 
22 
17 

7 

386 

5 

57 

1,672 



779 
415 
191 
287 

118 

11 

318 



Other 



431 
197 



11 

5 
2 

133 

18 



(1) See also table 47 for detailed figures by naturalization provisions. 



104 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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108 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 41. PERSONS NATURALIZED AND PETITIONS FOR 
NATURALIZATION DENIED: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 19U7 TO 1956 



Period 


Total 


Persons 
natu- 
ralized 


Petitions 
denied 


Percent 
denied 


1907-1956 


7,658,025 


7,228,051 


429,974 


5 6 






1907 - 1910 


129,440 


111,738 


17,702 


13 7 






1911-1920 


1,247,697 


1,128,972 


118,725 


9 5 






1921 - 1930 


1,938,678 


1,773,185 


165,493 


8 5 






1921 


200,273 
199,523 
109,968 
168,834 
168,070 
159,605 
211,750 
245,634 
236,576 
178,445 

1,564,256 


181,292 
170,447 
145,084 
150,510 
152,457 
146,331 
199,804 
233,155 
224,728 
169,377 

1,518,464 


18,981 
29,076 
24,884 
18,324 
15,613 
13,274 
11,946 
12,479 
11,848 
9,068 

45,792 


9 5 


1922 


14 6 


1923 


14 6 


1924 


10 9 


1925 


9 3 


1926 


8 3 


1927 


5 6 


1928 


5 1 


1929 


5 


1930 


5 1 


1931 - 1940 


2 9 






1931 


151,009 
142,078 
118,066 
114,802 
121,710 
144,389 
169,018 
166,932 
194,443 
241,809 

2,051,842 


143,495 
136,600 
113,363 
113,669 
118,945 
141,265 
164,976 
162,078 
188,813 
235,260 

1,987,028 


7,514 
5,478 
4,703 
1,133 
2,765 
3,124 
4,042 
4,854 
5,630 
6,549 

64,814 


5 


1932 


3 9 


1933 


4 


1934 


1 


1935 


2 3 


1936 


2 2 


1937 


2 4 


1938 


2 9 




2 9 


1940 


2 7 


1941 - 1950 


3 2 






1941 


285,063 
278,712 
332,589 
449,276 
241,184 
156,637 
97,857 
73,037 
68,865 
68,622 

57,111 

90,818 

94,351 

119,915 

214,097 

149,820 


277,294 
270,364 
318,933 
441,979 
231,402 
150,062 
93,904 
70,150 
66,594 
66,346 

54,716 
88,655 
92,051 
117,831 
209,526 
145,885 


7,769 
8,348 
13,656 
7,297 
9,782 
6,575 
3,953 
2,887 
2,271 
2,276 

2.395 
2.163 
2.300 
2,084 
4.571 
3,935 


2 7 


1942 


3 


1943 


4 1 




1 6 


1945 


4 1 


1946 


4 2 


1947 


4 


1948 


4 


1949 


3 3 


1950 


3 3 


1951 


4 2 


1952 


2 4 


1953 


2 4 


1954 


1.7 


1955 

1956 


2.1 
2 6 







Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



109 



TABLE 42. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY SEX AND MARITAL 

STATUS, WITH COMPARATIVE PERCENT OF TOTAL: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1948 TO 1956 



Sex and marital status 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 




-N'umber 


Botk sexes 


70,150 


66,594 


66,346 


54,716 


88,655 


92,051 


117,831 


209,526 


145,885 


Single 

Married 


12,206 

50,518 

5,429 

1,997 

33,147 


9,623 

50,723 

4,604 

1,644 

27,865 


8,489 

52,025 

4,218 

1.614 

25,745 


5,859 

44,333 

3,262 

1,262 

18,711 


8,821 

72,578 

5,450 

1,806 

28,597 


12,127 

72,147 

5,88.) 

1,891 

34,657 


27,701 
79,034 
8,630 
2,460 

54,477 


39,098 

151,303 

14,470 

4,055 

95,850 


28.243 
106 398 


Widowed 


8,437 
2,807 

64,962 


Male 






Single 

Married 

Widowed 


7,449 

23,200 

1,406 

1,032 

37,003 


6,142 

19,833 

1,089 

801 

38,729 


5,710 

18,345 

921 

769 

40,601 


3,489 

14,100 

615 

507 

36,005 


5,276 
21,791 

89ii 
634 

60,058 


7,253 

25,777 
926 
701 

57,394 


19,909 

32,061 

l,fi08 

899 

63,354 


25,548 

05,683 

3,070 

1,549 

113,676 


18,159 

43,877 

1,825 




1,101 




80,923 






Single 

Married 


4,757 

27,318 

3,963 

965 


3,481 

30,890 

3,515 

843 


2,779 

33,680 

3,297 

845 


2,370 

30,233 

2,647 

755 


3,545 

50,787 
4,554 
1,172 


4,874 

46,370 

4,960 

1,190 


7,792 

46,973 

7,022 

1,507 


14,150 
85,620 
11,400 
2,506 


10,084 

62,521 

6,612 


Divorced 


1,700 




Percent of total 


Bnth sexes 


100.0 

17.4 
72.1 

7.7 
2.8 

47.3 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


Single 


14.4 
76.2 
6.9 
2.5 

41.8 


12.8 

78.4 

6.4 

2.4 

38.8 


10.7 

81.0 

6.0 

2.3 

34.2 


10.0 

81.9 

6.1 

2.0 

32.3 


13.2 

78.4 
6.4 
2.0 

37.6 


23.5 

67.1 
7 3 
2 1 

46.2 


19.0 

72.2 

6.9 

1.9 

45.7 


19.4 
72.9 


Widowed 


5.8 


Divorced 

Male 


1.9 
44.5 


Single 

Married 

Widowed 


10.6 

33.1 

2.1 

1.5 

52.7 


9.2 

29.8 

1.6 

1.2 

58.2 


8.6 

27.7 

1.4 

1.1 

61.2 


6.4 

25.8 

1.1 

0.9 

65.8 


6.0 

24.6 

1.0 

0.7 

67.7 


7.9 

28.0 

10 

7 

62.4 


16.9 

27.2 

1.3 

0.8 

53.8 


12.2 
31.3 

1.5 
0.7 

54.3 


12.5 

30.0 

1.3 


Divorced 

Female 


0.7 

55.5 


Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 


6.8 

39.0 

5.6 

1.3 


5.2 

46.4 

5.3 

1.3 


4.2 

.50.7 

5.0 

1.3 


4.3 

55.2 

4.9 

1.4 


4.0 

57.3 

5.1 

1.3 


5.3 

50.4 

5.4 

1.3 


6.6 

39.9 

6.0 

1.3 


6.8 

40.9 

5.4 

12 


6.9 

42.9 

4.5 

1.2 



110 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 43. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY SEX AND AGE 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1948 TO 1956 



Sex and age 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


Both sexes 


70,150 


66,594 


66,346 


54,716 


88,655 


92,051 


117,831 


209,526 


145,885 








476 

2,970 

3,783 

4,131 

7,867 

11,113 

11,170 

9,481 

8,018 

5,637 

3,304 

1,445 

755 

33,147 


987 
6,297 
0,074 
4,88b 
7,107 
9,164 
9,198 
7,822 
6,441 
4,473 
2,551 
1,084 

510 

27,865 


1,003 

7,742 
8,570 
5,355 
6,635 
8,144 
8,239 
6,937 
5,773 
4,298 
2,289 
926 
535 

25,745 


726 
6,238 

8,295 
4,751 
5,479 
6,127 
6,699 
5,554 
4,476 
3,269 
1,884 
823 
395 

18,711 


1,052 

9,785 
14,739 
8,890 
8,301 
9,190 
9,790 
9,090 
7,337 
5,318 
3,077 
1,374 
712 

28,597 


],206 

8,927 

15,176 

10,722 

8,956 

9,426 

9,681 

8,977 

7,792 

5,658 

3,306 

1,468 

756 

34,657 


3,787 

14,810 

16,290 

11,509 

8,831 

9,895 

10,584 

12,650 

10,821 

8,816 

5,006 

2,707 

1,465 

54,477 


7,839 

17,635 

27,617 

28,080 

19,911 

20,464 

19,693 

20,369 

17,933 

13,913 

9,199 

4,103 

2,770 

95,850 


8,771 


21 - 2b " 


13,329 


26-30 " 


20,771 


31-35 " 


21,943 


36-40 " 


13,682 


41-45 " 


14,219 


46-50 " 


12,719 


51-55 " 


12,576 


56-60 " 


9,540 


61-65 " 


8,246 


66-70 " 


5,011 


71-75 " 


2,312 


Over 75 " 


1,420 


Not reported . . 


1,346 


Male 


64,962 






Under 21 years 


257 

711 

1,094 

1,569 

3,672 

5,625 

5,679 

4,535 

4,098 

2,981 

1,737 

766 

423 

37,003 

219 
2,259 
2,689 
2,562 
4,195 
5,488 
5,491 
4,946 
3,920 
2,656 
1,567 
679 
332 


433 
1,239 
1,705 
1,925 
3,257 
4,254 
4,271 
3,488 
2,971 
2,186 
1,297 
570 
269 

38,729 


371 
1,732 
2,375 
2,026 
2,825 
3,574 
3,615 
2,870 
2,471 
2,052 
1,088 
467 
279 

40,601 


282 

1,019 

1,835 

1,510 

2,003 

2,387 

2,868 

2,192 

1,779 

1,356 

882 

417 

181 

36,005 


405 
1,890 
3,369 
2,830 
3,087 
3,337 
3,685 
3,167 
2,600 
2,036 
1,253 
614 
324 

60,058 


496 
2,804 
4,757 
4,127 
3,822 
3,914 
3,890 
3,373 
2,901 
2,212 
1,391 
641 
329 

57,394 


2,343 
10,133 
7,295 
4,622 
3,908 
4,187 
4,294 
5,129 
3,997 
3,710 
2,773 
1.390 
696 

63,354 


4,252 
9,540 
10,779 
12,509 
9,752 
10,206 
8,913 
8,599 
7,163 
5,916 
4,561 
2,246 
1,414 

113,676 


4,737 


21-25 " 


5,999 


26-30 " 


6,998 


31-35 " 


9,406 


36-40 " 


6,589 


41-45 " 


7,123 


46-50 " 


5,953 


51-55 " 


5,512 


56-60 " 


3,972 


61-65 " 


3,502 


66-70 " 


2,540 


71-75 " 


1,264 


Over 75 " 


776 




591 


Female 


80,923 


Under 21 years 

21-25 " 


554 
5,058 
4,369 
2,961 
3,850 
4,910 
4,927 
4,334 
3,470 
2,287 
1,254 
514 
241 


632 
6,010 
6,195 
3,329 
3,710 
4,570 
4.624 
4,067 
3,302 
2,246 
1,201 
459 
256 


444 
5,219 
6,460 
3,241 
3,476 
3,740 
3,831 
3,362 
2,697 
1,913 
1,002 
406 
214 


647 

7,895 

11,370 

6,060 

5,214 

5,853 

6,105 

5,923 

4,737 

3,282 

1,824 

760 

388 


710 

6,123 

10,419 

6,595 

5,134 

5,512 

5,791 

5,604 

4.891 

3.446 

1.915 

827 

427 


1,444 
4,677 
8,995 
6,947 
4,923 
5,708 
6,290 
7,521 
6,824 
5.106 
2.833 
1,317 
769 


3,587 
8.095 
16.838 
15,571 
10,159 
10.258 
10,780 
11,770 
10,770 
7,997 
4,638 
1,857 
1,356 


4,034 
7,330 


26-30 " 


13,773 


31-35 " 


12,537 


36-40 " 


7,093 


41 - 45 " 


7,096 


46-50 " 


6,766 


51-55 " 


7,064 


56-60 " 


5,568 


61-65 " 


4.744 


66 - 70 ".... 


2,471 


71 - 75 ".. 


1,048 


Over 75 " ... . 


644 


Not reported 


755 







Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



111 



TABLE 44. PERSONS NATURALIZED, 

BY STATES AND TERRITORIES OF RESIDENCE: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1952 TO 1956 



state of residence 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


Total 


88,655 


92,051 


117.831 


209,526 


145,885 








231 
387 
108 
12,258 
533 

2,864 
178 
615 

1,524 
553 

156 

2,942 

1,048 

445 

340 

290 
411 
737 
949 
6,593 

5,288 
722 
111 
726 
236 

253 
106 
431 
4,131 
164 

27,120 

359 

108 

2,855 

305 

601 

4,028 

707 

134 

91 

222 
1,989 
162 
258 
712 

1,755 
244 
796 
80 

104 
526 
78 
35 
56 


197 
537 
94 
12,728 
492 

2,941 
102 
497 

1,757 
374 

147 
4,236 
848 
379 
348 

235 
582 
802 
975 
5,768 

4,848 
829 
118 
551 
194 

232 
124 
554 
4,143 
215 

29,780 

292 

148 

2,611 

208 

431 

4,461 

699 

147 

88 

282 
1,641 
207 
301 
770 

1,724 

197 

883 

56 

206 
760 
108 
67 
137 


299 

793 

124 

15,533 

1,170 

3,446 
201 
884 

2,844 
407 

274 

6,395 

1,016 

511 

334 

461 

498 

1,093 

2,016 

8,054 

7,368 
959 
189 
643 
416 

416 
175 
650 
5,436 
229 

31,118 

787 

231 

2,972 

268 

842 
4,657 
958 
170 
216 

202 
2,452 
612 
419 
827 

3,000 
268 
981 
120 

360 

3,143 

163 

150 

81 


574 

621 

176 

36,358 

1,086 

6,294 

334 

1,152 

3,028 

690 

291 

10,394 

1,930 

527 

714 

505 

713 

992 

2,260 

11,692 

9,146 
1,811 

198 
1,831 

348 

521 
255 
722 
14,164 
353 

61,677 

661 

286 

7,156 

281 

1,527 

8,767 

1,467 

262 

191 

448 

5,075 

973 

542 

1,133 

2.855 

493 

2,182 

66 

370 
2,741 
168 
104 
415 


379 




420 




192 




21,194 




1,301 




3,338 




218 


District oi Columbia 


1,013 


Florida 


2,548 




858 




192 




11,205 




1,653 




971 


Kansas 


738 




979 




462 




524 




2,002 




6,293 




6,750 


Minnesota 


1,935 




173 




1,303 




310 




917 




150 




489 




9,014 




445 




37,612 




681 


North Dakota 


158 


Ohio 


5,306 




521 




1,044 


Pennsylvania 


5,843 


Rhode Island 


844 




256 




285 




473 


Texas 


4,782 


Utah 


671 


Vermont 


242 


Virginia 


1,303 


Washington 


2,370 


West Virginia 


322 


Wisconsin 


2,075 


Wyoming 


234 


TeTTitories and other: 
Alaska 


445 


Hawaii 


1,865 




171 


Virgin Islands 


49 


All other 


367 







112 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 45. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY SPECIFIED COUNTRIES 

OF FORMER ALLEGIANCE AND BY RURAL AND URBAN AREA 

AND CITY^: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1956 











Country of former allegiance 






Class of place 


Total 






























and city 


British 
Empire 


Canada 


Germany 


Italy 


Poland 


U.S.S.R. 


Other 


Total 


145,885 


13,600 


11,539 


16,230 


9,549 


17,256 


7,771 


69,940 


Rural 


10,710 


1,169 


1,210 


1,781 


490 


704 


363 


4,993 






Urban 


44,«79 


4,645 


5,136 


6,245 


2,832 


3,472 


1,670 


20,679 






City total 


86, lb2 


7,491 


4,942 


7,520 


0,146 


13,006 


5,700 


41,357 






Los Angeles, Calif. . 


5,488 


417 


590 


260 


123 


386 


351 


3,361 


Oakland, Calif 


608 


37 


43 


57 


31 


27 


21 


392 


San Diego, Calif.. . . 


572 


66 


104 


42 


7 


19 


9 


325 


6an Francisco, Calif. 


3,356 


191 


127 


181 


178 


150 


628 


1,901 


Bridgeport, Conn... 


136 


10 


5 





16 


29 


3 


68 


Hartford, Conn 


1,146 


109 


130 


72 


114 


294 


47 


380 


New Haven, Conn. . 


1,339 


152 


81 


113 


164 


256 


48 


525 


Washington, D. C. . 


1,013 


97 


45 


109 


46 


76 


79 


561 




904 
8,415 


189 
345 


81 
192 


46 
739 


23 

408 


47 
1,767 


42 
388 


476 


Chicago, 111 


4,576 


New Orleans, La. . . 


196 


26 


11 


4 


9 


23 


4 


119 


Baltimore, Md 


1,040 


74 


34 


135 


160 


158 


67 


412 


Boston, Mass 


1,763 


174 


326 


105 


212 


117 


68 


761 


Cambridge, Mass.. . 


178 


26 


36 


9 


12 


12 


4 


79 


Fall River, Mass.. . 


159 


8 


16 


3 


2 


15 


2 


113 


New Bedford, Mass. 


182 


11 


28 


3 


3 


19 


1 


117 


Springfield, Mass. . . 


331 


39 


52 


21 


20 


65 


18 


110 


Worcester, Mass 


427 


11 


63 


18 


39 


77 


12 


207 


Detroit, Mich 


3,366 


381 


593 


201 


173 


787 


73 


1,158 


Minneapolis, Minn.. 


928 


27 


54 


59 


4 


147 


115 


522 


St. Louis, Mo 


505 


27 


11 


95 


34 


61 


19 


258 


Jersey City, N.J... 


429 


29 


9 


29 


68 


77 


95 


122 


Newark, N. J 


1,175 


48 


11 


82 


HI 


293 


252 


378 


Paterson, N. J 


524 


33 


8 


40 


92 


122 


44 


185 


Buflalo, N. Y 


647 


50 


109 


61 


55 


106 


82 


184 


New York, N. Y. .. 


28,555 


3,193 


539 


2,211 


2,802 


5,450 


1,933 


12,427 


Rochester, N. Y.. . 


786 


66 


91 


88 


86 


64 


131 


260 


Cincinnati, Ohio. . . 


260 


13 


8 


44 


14 


16 


2 


163 


Cleveland, Ohio 


2,508 


105 


54 


184 


144 


435 


125 


1,461 


Portland, Ore 


599 


53 


150 


42 


7 


21 


10 


316 


Philadelphia, Pa... 


1,947 


163 


48 


204 


137 


315 


377 


703 


Pittsburgh, Pa 


623 


80 


20 


59 


89 


114 


27 


234 


Scranton, Pa 


97 


12 


1 


9 


12 


19 


10 


34 


Providence, R. I. ... 


347 


17 


26 


14 


69 


44 


21 


156 


San Antonio, Tex... 


717 


49 


12 


90 


12 


17 


5 


532 


Seattle, Wash 


899 


73 


258 


64 


16 


24 


28 


436 


Milwaukee, Wis 


1,137 


38 


52 


273 


40 


143 


28 


563 


Other cities 


12,860 


1,052 


924 


1,749 


608 


1,214 


531 


6,782 


U. S. territories and 




possessions 


2,727 


117 


129 


229 


23 


21 


11 


2,197 


Another 


1,607 


178 


122 


455 


58 


53 


27 


714 



(1) Rural— Population of less than 2,500. Urban- 
100,000 or over. 



-Population of 2,500 to 99,999. Cities— Population of 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 113 



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Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



115 



TABLE 47. PERSONS NATURALIZED, 

BY GENERAL AND SPECIAL NATURALIZATION PROVISIONS: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1952 TO 1956 



Naturalization provisions 



Total 

General provisions 

Special provisions 

Persons married to U. S. citizens 

Children, including adopted children, of U. S. citizen parents 

Former U. S. citizens who lost citizenship by marriage 

I'liUippine citizens who entered the United States prior to May 
1, 1934, and have resided continuously in the United States. 

Persons who served in U. S. armed forces for three years 

Persons who served in U. S. armed forces during World War I 
or World War II 

Persons serving in U. S. armed forces after June 24, 1950. 
(In U.S.) (1) 

Persons serving in U. S. armed forces after June 24, 1950. 
(Overseas) (1) 

Persons who served on certain U. S. vessels 

Former U. S. citizens who lost citizenship by entering the 
armed forces of foreign countries during World War II.. (2) 

Dual nationals expatriated through entering or serving In 
armed forces of foreign states 

Former U. S. citizens expatriated through expatriation of 
parents 

Persons who lost citizenship through cancellation of par- 
ents' naturalization 

Persons misinformed prior to July 1, 1920, regarding citizen- 
ship status 

Noncitizen natives of Puerto Rico — declaration of allegiance . . 

Persons who entered the United States while under 16 
years of age 

Certain inhabitants of the Virgin Islands 

Alien veterans of World War I or veterans of allied countries. 

Nationals but not citizens of the United States 

Persons naturalized under private law 



88,655 



26,920 
61,735 



58,027 
760 
223 

722 
194 

1,391 



1953 



92,051 



40,793 
45,258 



42,088 
698 
150 



429 
192 



1,383 



1954 



117,831 



86,166 
31,665 



15,977 

1,208 

120 

74 
61 

627 

10,076 

2,981 
476 

3 

43 

1 

4 



1955 



209,526 



173,954 
35,572 



20,460 

2,600 

146 

22 
36 

981 

8,402 

2,539 

205 

15 
28 



145,885 



117,161 
28,724 



18,224 

2,865 

123 

11 

75 

575 

4,318 

2,236 
186 

31 

10 

2 

24 

16 



(1) Act of June 30, W.-iS (P. L. 86). 

(2) Prior to December 24, 1952, these persons were repatriated under the provisions of Section 323, Nation- 
ality Act of 1940, and therefore, were not included In this table. 



116 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 48. WRITS OF HABEAS CORPUS IN EXCLUSION AND 
DEPORTATION CASES: YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1947 TO 1956 



Action taken 


1947 
to 
1956 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


Total Writs of Habeas Corpus 


3,551 


444 


306 


511 


347 


394 


386 


359 


391 


253 


160 








269 

2,31B 

960 

62 
537 


15 

278 
151 

156 
64 


29 
175 
102 

160 
48 


9 
397 
105 

144 
59 


25 

169 
153 

118 

96 


56 
260 

78 

47 

57 


30 
253 
103 

60 

67 


44 
213 
102 

120 
38 


20 

289 
82 

115 
23 


22 
176 
55 

90 
52 


19 




106 


Withdrawn 


35 




62 


Involving Exclusion 
Disposed of 


33 








63 
284 
190 

8 

3,014 

206 

2,032 

776 

54 


6 

19 
39 

15 
380 


3 

26 
19 

12 
258 


P 
38 
15 

16 
452 


8 
48 
40 

21 
251 


3 

27 
27 

13 
337 


16 
32 
19 

8 
319 


21 
10 

11 
321 


3 

17 
3 

17 
368 


4 
38 
10 

18 
201 


7 


Dismissed 


18 


Withdrawn 


8 


Pending end of year 


8 


Involving Deportation 
Disposed of 


127 






Sustained 


9 
259 
112 

141 


26 
149 
83 

148 


3 

359 

90 

128 


17 
121 
113 

97 


53 

233 

51 

34 


14 
221 

84 

52 


37 
192 
92 

109 


17 

272 

79 

98 


18 
138 
45 

72 


12 


Dismissed 

Withdrawn 

Pending end of year. . . 


88 
27 

54 







Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 117 







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Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 50. PRIVATE BILLS INTRODUCED AND LAWS ENACTED, 
75TH CONGRESS TO 84TH CONGRESS 





Congress 


Bills 
intro- 
duced 


Laws 
enacted 


84th 


4,474 

4.797 

3.669 

2,811 

1,141 

429 

163 

430 

601 

293 


1.227 


83rd 


755 


82nd 


729 


81st 


505 


80th 


121 


79th 


14 


78th 


12 


77th 


22 


76th 


65 


75th 


30 







Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 119 



TABLE 51. PETITIONS FOR NATURALIZATION DENIED, BY 

REASON: YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1951 TO 1956 



Reason for denial 


I95I 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 




2,395 


2,163 


1,122 


2,084 


4,571 


3,935 






Lack of knowledge and understanding of the history, 
principles, and form of government of the United 


219 
105 


105 
90 


IG 
49 


32 
83 


175 

ior> 


218 


Petitioner has failed to establish good moral character. 


163 


Petitioner has failed to establish that he is an alien or 
national of the United States eligible for natural- 


45 
19 
17 


25 
21 
6 


8 

14 

1 


13 
14 
30 


19 
15 

68 


26 


Lack of attachment to the principles of the Constitu- 
tion of the United States 


8 


Petitioner cannot speak (read, write) the English Ian- 


66 


Petition not signed in petitioner's own handwriting... 


5 


8 


2 


2 


7 


1 




1 


1 


2 


6 


11 


17 


Petitioner not resident within jurisdiction of court 


24 


26 


15 


6 


7 


37 


Petitioner failed to establish continuous residence in 
United States and/or State 


14 


15 


5 


16 


11 


13 




4 


6 


1 


7 


10 


30 


Petitioner applied for and was relieved (or discharged) 
from military training or service because of alienage . . 


3 


9 


2 


19 


16 


34 


Petition not supported by aflidavits of witnesses 


2 


- 


- 


- 


6 


6 


Petition not supported by oral testimony or depositions 
of witnesses. . . 


1 

772 


4 

747 


2 
503 


2 

897 


5 
2,010 


2 


Petition withdrawn by petitioner . 


1,619 


Lack of prosecution 


908 


884 


400 


674 


1,665 


1,363 


Petitioner deceased 


168 


173 


89 


255 


385 


255 


Other reasons .... 


88 


43 


13 


28 


55 


77 







TABLE 52. CERTIFICATES OF NATURALIZATION REVOKED, 
BY GROUNDS: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1951 TO 1956 



Grounds 



Total number 

Established permanent residence abroad within five 
years after naturalization 

Bad moral character 

Misrepresentations and concealments relating to mari- 
tal and family status 

Fraudulent concealment of subversive membership. . . 

Became, within five years after naturalization, mem- 
bers of subversive organizations 

Refused to testify before Congressional Committee con- 
cerning subversive activities 

Dishonorable discharge following naturalization based 
on military service during World War II 

Miscellaneous grounds 



403 



384 
3 



275 
1 



335 



327 
2 



1954 



150 
5 

1 

5 



197 



177 
1 

7 
4 



1956 



288 



276 
3 



120 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE 53. PERSONS EXPATRIATED, BY GROUNDS: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1951 TO 1956 



Grounds 



Total number 

Voting in a foreign political election or plebiscite 

Residence in a foreign state 

Naturalization in a foreign state 

Entering or serving in tiie armed forces of a foreign state 

Renunciation of nationality 

Taking an oath of allegiance in a foreign state 

Departing from or remaining away from the U. S. to 

avoid training and service in land or naval forces 

Accepting or performing duties under a foreign state . . 
Other grounds 



4,443 



1,401 
1,084 
836 
565 
228 
147 



3,265 



1,186 
711 
622 
370 
136 
123 

59 

56 

2 



1953 



8,350 



2,651 

2,657 

1,677 

700 

398 

152 

45 
67 
3 



1954 



6,938 



2,222 

1,557 

1,544 

696 

425 

220 

134 

134 

6 



,237 
,063 
841 
269 
331 
233 

139 

84 

5 



1,436 
1,776 
829 
356 
167 
237 

69 

112 

5 



TABLE 54. PERSONS REPATRIATED: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1951 TO 1956 



Class 



Total number. 



Persom who lost citizenship by serving in the armed 
forces of allies of the United States, and who were re- 
patriated under Section 323, Nationality Act of 1940. 
Native-born women who lost citizenship through mar- 
riage to aliens and who were repatriated under the 

Act of June 25, 1936, as amended 

Native-born women who lost citizenship through mar- 
riage to aliens and whose marriages terminated: 
Repatriated under Section 317(b) of the Nation- 
ality Act of 1940 

Repatriated under Section 324(c) of the Immigra- 
tion and Nationality Act 

Persons who lost citizenship through voting in a politi- 
cal election or plebiscite in Italy and were repatriated 

under P. L. m of August 16, 1951 

Former U. S. citizens who lost citizenship by voting in 
political elections or plebiscites held in occupied Ja- 
pan (Act of July 20, 1954) 

Private law 



1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1,242 


1,406 


2,299 


2,885 


851 


256 


147 


270 


42 


- 


839 


778 


486 


240 


416 


145 


160 


172 


12 


- 


- 


- 


34 


331 


259 


- 


316 


1,337 


2,260 


- 






_ 


_ 


175 


2 


5 


~ 


~ 


1 




123 
2 



Report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 



121 



TABLE 55. CERTIFICATES OF DERIVATIVE CITIZENSHIP GRANTED, 
BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1954 TO 1956 



Country or region of birth 



All countries. 



Europe. 



Austria 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

United Kingdom: 

England 

Northern Ireland. 

Scotland 

Wales 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 



Asia. 



China 

India 

Japan 

Palestine . . . 
Philippines. 
Other Asia. . 



North America. 



Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Central America 

Other North America. 



South America 

Africa 

Australia and New Zealand. 
Other countries 



1954 



11,709 



9,352 



408 

145 

16 

272 

85 

14 

87 

169 

1,123 

131 

2C9 

159 

1,914 

38 

77 

170 

186 

826 

76 

183 

54 

218 

56 

( 



1,187 
127 
118 



6 
37 
46 
105 

1,921 



1,672 
132 
86 
23 



1955 



15,323 



11,490 



491 
146 

12 
330 
114 

22 

98 
206 
1,556 
203 
310 
206 
2,303 

86 

120 

318 

241 

1,000 

97 
199 

65 
222 

77 

861 
58 

429 

33 

1,433 

159 

104 

519 



153 
9 
16 
45 
68 

228 

3,065 



2,358 

377 

254 

62 

14 

108 
70 



1956 



20,264 



16,541 



785 
192 
10 
504 
177 
95 
100 
278 

3,565 
209 
4(J0 
221 

2,477 
282 
293 
391 
293 

1,474 
119 
269 
76 
286 
136 

1,002 

74 

474 

30 

1,796 

284 

189 

659 



164 
13 
30 
49 
86 

317 

2,743 



FPI- LK— 3-11-57— 1,800— 4373