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Full text of "Annual report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service"

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ANNUAL "- ' ' 

KLPURIo/f/ie 

Immigration and Naturalization Service 




UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE 
Washington 25, D. C. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER 
OF IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION 



The Attorney General 

United States Department of Justice 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the Annual Report of the 
Immigration and Naturalization Service for the year ended 
June 30, 1958. 



Respectfully submitted, 



\fiC&^ 



J. M. SWING 
Commissioner 



Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

INTRODUCTION , 1 

ADMISSIONS TO THE UNITED STATES 4 

Facilitation of international travel 4 

Imn-iigrants 4 

Act of September 11, 1957 5 

Quota immigrants ^ 

Nonquota immigrants 5 

Noninnm ig r ant s 5 

Visitors 5 

Students and exchange visitors i> 

Temporary workers 6 

Nonimmigrants - other 6 

ADJUSTMENT OF STi^TUS 6 

Private bills 6 

Act of September 11, 1957 6 

Change of status from nonimnnigrant to immigrant 7 

Registry 7 

Suspension of deportation 7 

Hungarian parolees 7 

WAIVERS OF INADMISSIBILITY 7 

ALIEN ADDRESS REPORTS 8 

EXCLUSIONS 8 

CITIZENSHIP 9 

Naturalization 9 

Derivative citizenship 9 

Citizenship education 10 

CREWMEN 11 

ENFORCEMENT 13 

Deportations , 13 

Surreptitious entries 13 

Alien criminals and subversives , 15 

Frauds used to gain entry , , 1^ 

Mental or physical defectives 16 

Violation of nonimnnigrant status 17 

Unexecuted orders of deportation 17 

Prosecutions 17 

TRAINING PROGRAMS 18 

ADMINISTRATION 18 



Page 

1. Immigration to the United States: 1820-1958 19 

2. Aliens and citizens admitted and departed, by months: Years ended June 30, 
1957 and 1958 20 

3. Aliens ajid citizens admitted at United States ports of entry: Years ended 
June 30, 1957 - 1958 21 

4. Aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration laws: Years ended June 

30, 1954 - 1P58 22 

5. Immigrant alieni. admitted, by port: Years ended June 30, 1954- 1958 23 

6. Immigrant aliens adnnitted, by classes under the immigration laws and coun- 
try or region of birth: Year ended June 30, 1958 24 

6A. Immigrant aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and coun- 
try or region of last permanent residence: Year ended June 30, 1958 25 

6B. Maximum visas authorized and immigrant aliens admitted to the United 
States under the Refugee Relief Act of 1953: Years ended June 30, 1954 - 
1958 26 

6C. Immigrant aliens admitted under the Refugee Relief Act of 1953, by class of 

admission and country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 1954 - 1958. 27 

6D. Immigrant aliens who adjusted status to permajient residents in the United 

States, by country or region of birth: Year ended June 30, 1958 28 

6E. Immigrant aliens admitted to the United States under the Act of September 11, 
1957 (P.L. 85-316), by class of admission and country or region of birth: 
September 11, 1957 - June 30, 1958 29 

7. Annual quotas and quota immigrants admitted: Years ended June 30, 1954 - 
1958 30 

7A. Quota immigrants admitted, by quota area and quota preferences: Year 

ended June 30, 1958 31 

8. Immigrant aliens admitted, by country or region of birth and major occupa- 
tion group: Year ended June 30, 1958 32 

9. Immigrant aliens admitted, by country or region of birth, sex, and age: Year 
ended June 30, 1958 33 

10. Immigrant aliens admitted, by race, sex, and age: Year ended June 30, 1958 35 
lOA. Immigrant aliens admitted, by sex, marital status, age, illiteracy, and major 

occupation group: Years ended June 30, 1954 - 1958 36 

lOB. Hungarian refugees and parolees admitted, by sex, marital status, age, and 

major occupation group: November 1956 - June 30, 1958 37 

11. Aliens admitted and citizens arrived and departed: Years ended Jiine 30, 
1908-1958 38 

12. Immigrant aliens admitted, by state of intended future pernnanent residence: 
Years ended June 30, 1949 - 1958 39 

12A. Immigrant aliens admitted, by specified countries of birth and state of in- 
tended future permanent residence: Year ended June 30, 1958 40 

i2B, Immigrant aliens admitted, by specified countries of birth and rural cind 

urban area and city: Year ended June 30, 1958 41 

13. Immigration by co\intry, for decades: 1820 - 1958 42 

14. Immigrant aliens admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 

30, 1949 - 1958.. 46 

15. Smigrant aliens departed, by race, sex, and age: Year ended June 30, 1958.. 47 

16. Nonimmigrant aliens admitted, by classes under ihe immigration laws and 
country or region of birth: Year ended June 30, 1958 48 

17. Nonimmigrant aliens admitted, by classes under che immigration laws and 
country or region of last permanent residence: Year ended June 30, 1958.... 49 

18. Agricultural laborers admitted to the United States: Years ended June 30, 
1951 - 1958 50 

19. Sntries of alien and citizen border croasers over iriternational land bounda- 
ries, bv state and rsort: Year ended June ? " ''■'' 31 



T AB LES - - Continued 

Page 

20. Entries of alien and citizen border crossers over international land bounda- 
ries: Years ended June 30, 1928 - 1958 53 

21. Aliens excluded: Years ended June 30, 1892 - 1958 54 

22. Aliens excluded, by country or region of birth and cause: Year ended June 

30, 1958 55 

23. Aliens excluded, by cause: Years ended June 30, 1952 - 1958 56 

24. Aliens deported, by country to which deported and cause: Year ended June 

30, 1958 57 

24 A, Aliens apprehended, aliens deported, and aliens departing voluntarily: Years 

ended June 30, 1892 - 1958 58 

24B, Aliens departing voluntarily, by nationality and cause: Year ended Jiine 30, 

1958 59 

25. Aliens deported, by country to which deported and deportation expense: Year 
ended June 30, 1958 60 

26. Aliens deported, by cause: Years ended June 30, 1908 - 1958 61 

27. Aliens deported, by year of entry and status at entry: Year ended June 30, 
1958 62 

28. Alien crewmen deserted at United States air and seaports, by nationality and 

flag of carrier: Year ended June 30, 1958 63 

29. Vessels and airplanes inspected, crewmen admitted, and stowaways arrived, 

by regions and districts: Year ended June 30, 1958 64 

30. Principal activities and accomplishments of Immigration Border Patrol: 
Years ended June 30, 1949 - 1958 65 

31. Passengers arrived in the United States from foreign countries, by country 

of embarkation: Year ended June 30, 1958 66 

32. Passengers departed from the United States to foreign countries, by country 

of debarkation: Year ended June 30, 1958 69 

33. Passenger travel between the United States and foreign countries, by port of 
arrival or departure: Year ended June 30, 1958 72 

34. Passenger travel by air and by sea between Puerto Rico and continental 
United States (mainland) and the Virgin Islands: Years ended June 30, 
1949 - 1958 73 

35. Passenger travel by air and by sea between Hawaii and continental United 
States (mainland) and insular or outlying possessions: Years ended June 30, 
1949 - 1958 74 

36. Aliens who reported under the Alien Address Program, by selected national- 
ities cind states of residence: During 1958 75 

37. Declarations of intention filed, petitions for naturalization filed, and persons 
naturalized: Years ended June 30, 1907 - 1958 76 

38. Persons naturalized, by general and special naturalization provisions and 
country or region of former allegiance: Year ended June 30, 1958 77 

39. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance: Years 
ended June 30, 1949 - 1958 78 

40. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance and major 
occupation group: Year ended June 30, 1958 80 

41. Persons naturalized and petitions for naturalization denied: Years ended 
June 30, 1907 - 1958 81 

42. Persons naturalized, by sex and marital status, with comparative percent of 
total: Years ended June 30, 1950 - 1958 82 

43. Persons naturalized, by sex and age: Years ended June 30, 1950 - 1958 83 

44. Persons naturalized, by States and Territories of residence: Years ended 
June 30, 1954 - 1958 84 

45. Persons naturalized, by country or region of birth and year of entry: Year 
ended June 30, 1958 85 

46. Persons naturalized, by specified countries of former allegiance and by rural 

and urban area and city: Year ended June 30, 1958 86 



TABLES --Continued 

Page 

47. Persons naturalized, by general ajid special naturalization provisions: 
Years ended June 30, 1954 - 1958 87 

48. Prosecutions for immigration and nationality violations: Years ended June 

30, 1949 - 1958 88 

49. Writs of habeas corpus in exclusion and deportation cases: Years ended 
June 30, 1949 - 1958 89 

49A. Convictions for immigration and nationality violations: Years ended June 30, 

1949 - 1958 90 

50. Private immigration cind nationality bills introduced and laws enacted, 7 5th 
Congress to 85th Congress 91 

51. Petitions for naturalization denied, by reason: Years ended June 30, 1953 - 
1958 9 2 

52. Certificates of naturalization revoked, by grounds: Years ended June 30, 
1953-1958 93 

53. Persons expatriated, by grounds: Years ended June 30, 1953 - 1958 94 

54. Persons repatriated: Years ended June 30, 1953 - 1958 95 

55. Certificates of derivative citizenship granted, by country or region of birth: 
Years ended June 30, 1954 - 1958 96 



Annual Report of J. M. Swing, Commissioner 
of Immigration and Naturalization 



INTRODUCTION 



The successes achieved by the changes 
in organizational structure within the Im- 
migration and Naturalization Service, 
commencing in 1955, have not been per- 
mitted to interrupt the continuous scrutiny 
of the Service programs. 

We have streamlined inspections and 
simplified documentation, so that, without 
additional immigration officers, we have 
been able to deternnine admissibility for 
a constantly growing number of persons 
seeking entry at our ports. We cleared a 
backlog of naturalization applications, so 
that naturalizations may be granted within 
two months of application rather than with- 
in two years. However, the Service is 
concerned over the fact that the number 
of applications for naturalization have been 
decreasing despite the high innmigration. 
A program is now under way to call to 
the attention of potential citizens their 
right to apply for United States citizenship. 

To prevent illegal entries via the crew- 
man route, intelligence concerning 
desertion-prone or stowaway -carrying 
vessels was collected and dissenninated; 
mobile search teams of investigators 
and patrolmen covered the waterfront 
areas and searched vessels for stowaways. 
Largely because of the intensified pro- 
gram to control alien crewnnen, deporta- 
tions and voluntary departures of crewmen 
reached new highs. 

The fight against subversion and or- 
ganized crime goes on relentlessly. The 
year witnessed the deportation or the order 
of deportation of some of the important 
Communist Party functionaries and a num- 
ber of notorious racketeers. 

The Act of September 11, 1957, affected 
nnany phases of Service work in 1958. One 
of a number of relief laws enacted in the 
past ten years, this Act released over- 



subscribed quotas by wiping out mortgages 
on quotas in^posed by the Displaced Per- 
sons Act, and by granting nonquota status 
to beneficiaries of approved preference 
quota visa petitions. 

Until June 30, 1959, alien orphans 
adopted by United States citizens nnay be 
adnnitted without regard to the quota, the 
sole restriction being a limit of two 
orphans to each family unless necessary 
to prevent separation of brothers and 
sisters. This legislation also provided for 
the issuance of 18,000 nonquota visas to 
refugees. 

Waivers of certain grounds of excluda- 
bility may be accorded to close relatives 
of citizens and aliens. This necessitated 
the assignment abroad of Service officers 
whose job it is to interrogate applicants 
for waivers of excludability, and to deter- 
mine their eligibility for such discre- 
tionary relief. To date, however, the con- 
currence of the Secretary of State in the 
assignment of officers abroad has been 
limited to Frankfurt, Vienna, Athens, 
Rome, Naples, Tokyo, Havana, and Mexico 
City. 

Other new laws passed since the end of 
the fiscal year, such as provision for 
permanent resident status for Hungarian 
parolees, more comprehensive coverage 
of aliens who may adjust status while in 
the United States, and the inclusion of 
more persons for whom a record of ad- 
mission for lawful permanent residence 
may be created, will affect Service work 
in the current year. The September llth 
Act and recent legislation will relieve the 
President and Congress of some of the 
burden caused by private bills. However, 
unless further discretionary power is 
vested in the Attorney General, no marked 
decrease can be anticipated. 




Land border inspection at Detroit. 




New border inspection building at Santa Fe Bridge, El Paso. Te; 





pr^ 


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9 



Secondary inspection at El Paso, Te 



ADMISSIONS TO THE UNITED STATES 

Facilitation of International 
Travel 



International travel as a means of im- 
proving world understanding is an accepted 
proven fact. 3y simplifying and reducing 
documentation and speeding the inspection 
process at our ports of entry, international 
travel becomes easier and more pleasant. 

The Service has actively participated in 
interdepartmental and government -industry 
committees whose objective is the facilita- 
tion of international travel. In furtherance 
of the recommendations contained in the 
report on "International Travel"' we have 
continued our studies of the feasibility of 
extending inspection abroad or enroute. 
Whenever it is possible to do so con- 
sistent with the other agencies involved, 
preinspection will be initiated at embarka- 
tion points anywhere in the world. 

Two of our largest points of entry-- 
Idlewild International Airport and Santa Fe 
Bridge at El Paso--have new quarters with 
a well-planned traffic flow that is a vast 
improvement. In many other ports the 
physical layout has been rearranged for 
better inspection practices. 

A most important step in simplifying 
travel documentation was the substitution 
on Decennber 1, 1957, of an arrival -depar- 
ture card for the air manifest lists pre- 
viously required in addition to individual 
documents. The cards satisfy the mani- 
festing requirements for immigration pur- 
poses, the Bureau of Customs, and the 
United States Public Health Service. A 
permanent record of arrivals and depar- 
tures is preserved through microfilming 
the cards. They also serve as a basis for 
the control of aliens temporarily admitted. 

With some 400,000 border crossers pro- 
vided with lanninated identification cards 
at the Mexican border during 1956 and 
1957, we made available a sinnilar border 
crossing card to Canadians and British 
nationals living in Canada. Although the 
entry card is not a prerequisite for entry, 
it identifies the holder and facilitates his 
admission. 

A United States resident alien traveling 
abroad for periods of less than a year nnay 
now use his Alien Registration Receipt 
Card, Fornn 1-151, as a valid document 



upon return. This relieves him and our 
Service of the processing of an application 
and issuing a reentry permit. 

An alien in direct transit on a bonded 
carrier may, since August 7, 1957, go 
through the United States if he presents 
evidence that he is able to enter some 
country other than the United States. He 
need not present a passport or visa for 
this passage. 

In fiscal year 1958 inspections numbered 
over 151 nnillion. There were almost 79 
million alien and 65 million citizen entries 
across our land borders. (These figures 
are a count of each entry, not of indi- 
viduals.) There were, in addition, 634,644 
passengers inspected who arrived on 
67,095 vessels, and 1,792,896 who arrived 
on 160,737 airplanes. 



NO CITIZENS ADMITTED AT U. 



PORTS OF ENTRY 






' "Report to the President of the United States." by Clarence 
B. Randall, Special Assistant to the President. April 17, 1958. 



immigrants 

The highs and lows in recent immigration 
history have been largely influenced by 
legislation passed to permit the immigra- 
tion of specific classes of distressed per- 
sons. Thus, immigration went ua to 265,520 
in 1952 and dropped to 170,4'34 in 1953 
after the Displaced Persons Act expired. 
With the passage of the Refugee Relief 
Act, immigration rose again to a 30 -year 
high in 1957 of 326,867. In fiscal year 
1958, chiefly because of the expiration of 
the Refugee Relief Act, immigration de- 
clined to 253,265. Principal countries of 
emigration were Germany ( 32,145), United 



Kingdom (27,613), Italy (24,479), Canada 
(30,055), and Mexico (26,712). 

Act of September 11, 1967. TMs Act somewhat 
offset the expiration of the Refugee Relief 
Act by making provision for the admission 
of certain refugees, orphans, and benefi- 
ciaries of quota preference visa petitions. 

Of the 24,467 immigrants admitted or 
pernnitted to adjust their statuses in the 
United States were 21,599 who would nor- 
mally have been granted special pref- 
erences, 828 special nonquota refugees, 
and 2,040 orphans. 



Quota immigrants. Oi a possible 154,957 quota 
innmigrants, 102,153 were admitted to the 
United States in 1958. This was an increase 
of five percent over last year, and was the 
highest figure since the expiration of the 
Displaced Persons Act in 1952. The Act 
of September 11, 1957, restored quotas 
mortgaged under the Displaced Persons 
Act and made 8,200 additional numbers 
available during the year. 

Within the quotas preferences are es- 
tablished. The first preference is assigned 
50 percent of the quota and is to be used 
by highly skilled professional and technical 
persons needed in the United States econ- 
omy. 7,695 visa petitions were approved 
and 3,941 such persons were admitted, 
accompanied by 3,179 wives and children. 
28,480 citizens and resident aliens had 
petitions approved for their parents, wives 
and children, or other close relatives to be 
admitted preference quota. Admissions 
equaled 2,608 parents of citizens, 5,387 
spouses and children of resident aliens, 
and 4,932 other relatives of citizens. 

In addition to the preference quota ad- 
missions, there were 82,030 nonpreference. 
Since countries with pressures to emigrate 
and small quotas tend to absorb most of 
the quota numbers in the preference 
groups, it is not surprising to find most 
of the nonpreference immigrants coming 
from Germany (19,465), United Kingdom 
(26,730), and Ireland (10,260). 

Nonquota immigrants. Nonquota immigrants are 
not restricted numerically, although they 
must meet all other standards of health, 
nnorals, literacy, and economics estab- 
lished for all immigrants. Total nonquota 
immigration equaled 151,112, From the 
independent countries of the Western 
Hemisphere came 86,523 immigrants. 



BENEFICIARIES OF PREFERENCE QUOTA PETITIONS 
ADMITTED AS QUOTA AND NONQUOTA IMMIQRANTS 

TEARS ENDED JUNE 30 , 1957 - 1956 







The decrease from 111,344 last year was 
due largely to the decline in immigration 
from Mexico. 

Wives, husbands, and children of United 
States citizens, totaling 35,320 and 24,467 
admitted under the September 11th Act 
are the only other large groups of non- 
quota immigrants. 



Nonimmigrants 

International understanding is developed 
as people learn about other countries 
through travel. Nonimmigrants are aliens 
who enter the United States for tennporary 
stays. In addition to border crossers, 
crewmen, and agricultural workers dis- 
cussed elsewhere in this report, there 
were 847,764 visitors, students, temporary 
workers and others who were admitted. 



Visitors. "Visitors for pleasure," or tour- 
ists numbered 514,599, a 13 percent in- 
crease over last year. Notable increases 
were in travel from United Kingdom, 
Germany, Netherlands, Asia, and South 
America, as well as the neighboring coun- 
tries of Mexico and the West Indies. Com- 
parable figures for Canada are not avail- 
able, since Canadians may visit the United 
States for six months or less without 
obtaining a visa. 



In addition, there were 81,405 nonimmi- 
grant visitors whose business interests 
brought them to the United States. 

Students and exchange visitors. 34,848 students 
were admitted in fiscal year 1958. Except 
for Canada (7,982) and Mexico (4,535), 
largest nunnbers of students were from 
Cuba (3,477), Venezuela ( 1 ,851 ), China and 
Formosa (956), India (949), Iran (897), 
Colombia (698), Japan (645), Philippines 
(620), and United Kingdom (616). 

In addition, 20,349 engineers, teachers, 
and other aliens entered the United States 
on an exchange basis, with United States 
citizens going to the respective foreign 
countries. 7,720 were from Europe, 7,495 
from Asia, 469 from Africa, 344 from 
Oceania, and the remainder from countries 
of the Western Hemisphere. 



laborers from Mexico are admitted under 
special legislation. 

There were 24,402 tennporary workers 
admitted, including 5,352 persons of dis- 
tinguished merit and ability, 16,7Z^ otner 
temporary workers, and 2,157 industrial 
trainees. Two -fifths of the first group 
were from Europe, and one -fourth from 
Canada, 

Agricultural workers admitted from 
Mexico totaled 418,885. This was a de- 
crease of only 33,009 from the same 
period last year. 

During 1958 less than seven-tenths of 
one percent of Mexican contract workers 
abandoned their status. The low percentage 
of "skips" is attributed chiefly to the 
identification card progrann, which enables 
the Service to admit workers who have 
been approved and security-screened. 



TempoTary workers. Nonimmigrant status as a 
temporary worker is accorded an alien 
having a foreign residence who is coming 
to the United States to perform temporary 
services of an exceptional nature, or who 
is coming to perform temporary work for 
which no workers are available in the 
United States, or who is coming as an 
industrial trainee. In addition, agricultural 



Nonimmigrants- other. Other nonimmigrants in- 
cluded 29,265 foreign government officials, 
6,781 members of international organiza- 
tions such as the United Nations, and 1,027 
aliens admitted as reporters and other 
representatives of foreign information 
media, 2,500 treaty traders, and 99,190 
aliens in direct transit through the United 
States. 



ADJUSTMENT OF STATUS 



Private bills. 4,364 private immigration bills 
affecting 5,282 persons constituted 20 per- 
cent of all legislation introduced in the 
85th Congress. 501 of these bills became 
private laws in fiscal year 1958. Some 60 
percent of the current beneficiaries were 
aliens in the United States. 

The Service submits the required factual 
reports directly to the Comnnittees on the 
Judiciary on each private bill. 

The close of each Congress usually 
finds about 50 percent (some 2,000) of the 
introduced bills still pending, no action 
having been taken on them by the Con- 
gress. Approximately two -thirds of such 
bills have been reintroduced in the suc- 
ceeding Congress. 

Fiscal Year 
1953 1955 1957 1958 

Private bills 

introduced 2,980 3,099 3,144 1,217 

Private laws 

enacted 222 201 647 50i 



Consistent patterns in types of bills 
introduced and enacted are studied by the 
Service and have been made the subject 
of recommendations to the Congress by 
the Department of Justice and by the 
President for remedial general legisla- 
tion. While no general legislation has been 
passed, there have been laws passed that 
take care of some of the recommenda- 
tions. 

Actof September 11, 1957. Th.e September ilth 
Act provided tor a number of adjustments 
for specific groups of aliens. 744 orphans 
of the 925 paroled into the United States 
had their status adjusted to that of per- 
nnanent resident aliens under section 4(d) 
of the Act. 

The status of 1,362 aliens was adjusted 
under section 9 of the Act, which authorized 
such adjustment for aliens in the highly 
skilled category. 

Section 13 provides for adjustment of 
status of specified diplomatic classes of 
aliens, to afford them lawful permanent 



residence. Cases of no more than 50 such 
officials can be approved and reported to 
Congress for concurrence per year. At 
the end of June, 76 applications had been 
received, 10 approved, and 5 denied. 
Change of status from nonimmigrant to immigrant. Under 
section 245 of the Immigration and Nation- 
ality Act, certain nonimmigrants with close 
family ties may apply for immigrant 
status, and be granted such status if eligi- 
ble and if a quota visa is available, if a 
quota charge is necessary. 5,309 persons 
acquired immigrant status under section 
245 of the Immigration and Nationality Act. 

Revisions of section 245 which became 
law after the end of the fiscal year 
broadened the scope of section 245 to such 
an extent that the preexamination proce- 
dure ultinnately may no longer be neces- 
sary. 

During 1958, however, the preexamina- 
tion procedure was continued. Under this 
program 4,822 aliens, found to be eligible 
for an immigration visa while in the United 
States, were able to go to Canada, obtain 
visas, and return to the United States as 
immigrants. 

Registry. When a record of entiry for per- 
manent residence cannot be located for an 



alien who entered prior to July I, 1924, 
section 249 of the Immigration and Nation- 
ality Act provides that such a record may 
be created. 3,745 such records were 
created in 1958. Under an Act approved 
August 8, 1958, applications for creation 
of such record of adnnission may be made 
by aliens who entered the United States 
prior to June 28, 1940, thereby increasing 
the number who may apply and, if they can 
meet the conditions prescribed, be granted 
permanent residence status. 

Suspension of deportation. During the year 747 
applications for suspension of deportation 
were approved and submitted to Congress. 
A total of 705 were approved by Congress 
during the year, the applicants thereby 
becoming permanent residents. 

Hungarian parolees. The 31,915 Hungarians pa- 
roled into the United States will, inaccord- 
ance with the Act of July 25, 1958 (P.L. 
85-559), be inspected after they have been 
in the United States for two years. If 
they nneet the requirements for admis- 
sion as inmiigrants, a record of their 
admission for permanent residence will 
be created. 



WAIVERS OF INADMISSIBILITY 



Under the September 11th Act 315 appli- 
cations for waiver of exclusion for crimi- 
nal and immoral grounds, and 62 for 
documentary' fraud grounds for exclusion 
have been approved in behalf of aliens 
seeking permanent residence visas. Ex- 
clusion would result in extreme hardship 
for the family resident in the United States. 
Germans, Italians, and Mexicans were the 
principal nationalities of those for whom 
approval was granted. 

An alien ineligible to receive a visa 
because afflicted with tuberculosis (sec- 
tion 6) may be adnnitted on or before June 
30, 1959, if he is of the immediate family 
of a United States citizen or resident alien. 
An alien admitted under this section of the 
law must agree that, if required, he will be 
hospitalized in the United States until the 
Public Health Service approves his dis- 
charge. At the end of the fiscal year, 491 
aliens had been admitted under this waiver 
and reported to Congress. 



Most of the above applications for 
waivers are received by foreign offices, 
principally Frankfurt, Naples, and Mexico 
City, and lesser numbers received by the 
offices at Tokyo, Hong Kong, Montreal, and 
Havana, so that they were part of the job 
of the officers stationed in foreign coun- 
tries. 

An alien fomnerly excludable as a menn- 
ber of the subversive class who now meets 
the criteria established by Congress for 
"defector" nrxay be admitted if it is within 
the public interest. Detailed reports of 
the 82 defectors admitted in the public 
interest were sent to Congress. 

Grounds of inadnrissibility may be 
waived for nonimmigrants in the discretion 
of the Attorney General. This discretion 
was exercised in 1,263 cases. The Con- 
gress is furnished a detailed report in any 
case in which this authority is exercised 
to admit aliens of the criminal or sub- 
versive classes. 



ALIEN ADDRESS REPORTS 



The Immigration and Nationality Act re- 
quires that every alien in the United States 
on January 1 of each year report his 
address during this month. In 1958, 
2,899,691 reported. Each year the center 
of alien population mioves a little more to 
the Southwest. The Northeast Region, com- 
prising the States of New York, New Jer- 
sey, and those north and east of New York, 



accounted for 970,156 of the aliens who 
reported. The Southwest Region, made up 
of the States from Texas and Arkansas 
west to California and north to Wyoming, 
had 901,504 aliens who reported. The total 
increase over last year was only 2.3 per- 
cent, while in the Southwest it was 5 per- 
cent. 



ALIENS WHO REPORTED UNDER THE ALIEN ADDRESS PROGRAM IN 1958 
BY REGION AND NATIONALITY 



NORTHEAST 




0-" 



EXCLUSIONS 



Continued facilitation in inspection pro- 
cedures was accompanied by a constant 
awareness by our inspectors of the need 
to be guardians of the gateways of entry 
to the United States. 139,386 aliens whose 
admissibility was questioned chose to 
withdraw their applications and were not 
admitted. Most of these aliens were appli- 
cants at land borders. 

Special inquiry officers completed hear- 
ings in 1,683 exclusion cases, and 733 



aliens were excluded. Included were 255 
subversive, 77 of the criminal, immoral 
and narcotics classes, and 273 who at- 
tennpted entry without proper documents. 

Investigation to determine excludability 
of criminal, immoral or narcotic aliens 
likely to seek entry fronn Mexico resulted 
in the procurennent of evidence to estab- 
lish excludability in 1,698 cases of such 
aliens. Sinnilar investigations are being 
conducted to identify criminal, immoral. 



or narcotic aliens in Canada. As informa- 
tion to justify exclusion is obtained, photo- 
graphs of these aliens are distributed to 
the border ports so that such aliens will 
be recognized and excluded. 

In the Southwest, 277 such potential 
applicants for admission were specifically 
identified as excludable by reason of sub- 



versive affiliations. Eighty of the 277 sub- 
versives shown above were aliens refused 
admission in the Southwest. These in- 
cluded members of foreign Communist 
Parties, as well as a group of 1 aliens, 
all Conrununist Party members, who were 
applying for admission as agricultural 
laborers. 



CITIZENSHIP 



The naturalization and citizenship work of 
the Service was maintained on a current 
basis throughout the fiscal year. Petitions 
for naturalization are filed within a few 
weeks following receipt of the applica- 
tions, and are generally presented to the 
court at the first scheduled hearing after 
the date of filing. The greater efficiency 
achieved was largely through improved 
procedures. 

Uniform controls over pending peti- 
tions; the use of a Service-wide notice to 
file petitions that is designed to reduce the 
number of times a petitioner and his 
witnesses must appear before the natu- 
ralization examiner; better use of travel 
time between offices and naturalization 
courts; and continued improvement in the 
conduct of naturalization hearings were 
some of the factors that made the natu- 
ralization activities more efficient. 

Because of this greater efficiency and a 
marked decline in applications received, 
we reduced the force of naturalization 
examiners by 16. The examiner force of 
154 is distributed in 45 cities throughout 
the United States and the territories and 
possessions, and services 752 Federal and 
State naturalization courts. Except for 19 
of these courts, all operate under a statu- 
tory system which authorizes hearings to 
be conducted and held before examiners 
who report their findings and make recom- 
mendations as to eligibility to the natu- 
ralization courts. 

The program to concentrate naturaliza- 
tion jurisdiction in the larger courts at 
focal points convenient to the public was 
marked by further reduction from 781 to 
752 courts. This program, designed to 
render better service to the applicants 
for naturalization and to bring about 
greater economy in the naturalization 
work, is continuing. As the number of 
small courts decreases the number of 
cases in the larger courts increases. This 



permits more frequent hearings in these 
courts, with consequent early disposition 
of cases. More impressive ceremonies 
with full participation by civic and patriotic 
organizations are held, and the "uniform 
rule of naturalization" which the Con- 
stitution requires is more fully realized 
in the decisions by the courts. 

Naturalization. During the fiscal year 119,866 
petitioners were admitted to citizenship. 
Under the general provisions of the Immi- 
gration and Nationality Act, resident aliens 
must have five years residence before 
they can become citizens. In practice, the 
median average number of years residence 
is slightly over 7. 76 percent of the new 
citizens were from Europe, 6 percent fronn 
Asia, 9 percent from Canada, and 4 per^ 
cent from Mexico. 

2,688 petitions for naturalization were 
denied. Included were 2,256 because the 
petitioner withdrew the petition or failed 
to prosecute it, 150 who lacked knowledge 
of English or failed to understand our 
history and form of government, and 52 
who failed to establish good character. 

While the filing of a declaration of in- 
tention is optional, the receipts continue 
to be high. Sonne State licensing laws 
require an alien to have filed a declara- 
tion in order to qualify. Some employers, 
particularly those doing national defense 
work, require a "first paper" as a pre- 
requisite to employment. An alien must 
have filed a declaration in order to be able 
to enlist in the armed forces. During the 
fiscal year, 16,196 declarations of inten- 
tion were filed, an increase of 285 over 
the preceding fiscal year. 

Derivative ciiizensMp. Citizenship may be de- 
rived through naturalized parents, or it 
may have been derived by a wife through 
marriage. As evidence of citizenship 
status, 18,350 derivative certificates were 




New citizens swear allegiance to the United States during a naturalization ceremony. 



issued. Citizenship may also be acquired 
through birth abroad to citizen parents, 
and 8,209 certificates were issued to those 
who thus acquired citizenship. In order to 
handle these cases more efficiently the 
Service has inaugurated a procedure for 
the immediate delivery of the certificate 
so that only one appearance of the appli- 



cant is required, instead of two as here- 
tofore. 

Citizenship education. Last year we sent 169,722 
names of newly arrived immigrants to 
public school authorities holding citizen- 
ship classes, so that the new arrivals could 
be invited to attend citizenship classes. 




citizenship education class in Honolulu. 
10 




Three foreign-born wives in a citizenship class conducted at an Air Force base. 



Naturalization examiners helped and 
encouraged the establishment of citizen- 
ship classes during the year. For example, 
our officers were instrumental in the or- 
ganization of classes and in training the 
teachers at Fort Huachuca and Lioke Air 
Force Base, Arizona, for alien dependents 
of military personnel. Many alien de- 
pendents need to acquire citizenship so 
that they can accompany their husbands 
when they are rotated abroad. We are now 
negotiating with the Defense Department 
for the opening of citizenship classes at 



all military posts where the number of 
applicants for naturalization so warrants. 
Recently there has been a reprinting of 
the various parts of the "Federal Textbook 
on Citizenship". The textbook is issued at 
several educational levels to meet indi- 
vidual needs. Free distribution of books 
was made to candidates studying under 
public school sponsorship. The books may 
be purchased through the Government 
Printing Office by those not attending 
public school classes. 



CREWMEN 



Since the crewnnan program entered into 
every phase of operations, it has been 
taken out of context and treated as a sepa- 
rate entity. 

For the inspection operation the crew- 
man control program meant using very 
careful judgment in granting shore leave, 
so that shore leave did not become a 
method of gaining entry for more or less 
permanent illegal stays. In total, 1,673,475 
alien and 957,108 citizen crewmen were 
admitted. 17,692 crewmen were ordered 
held on board and refused shore leave 
during the year. 



For better crewman control and more 
efficient inspection, we began issuing a 
laminated landing permit and identification 
card to security-screened alien crewmen. 
16,314 cards were issued to crewmen in 
New York City from May 1 through June 
30, 1958. Other seaports will issue these 
cards in fiscal year 1959. 

The number of crewmen illegally 
seeking permanent entry, plus a de- 
termination to close the stowaway route 
to entry, prompted an all-out enforce- 
ment program in relation to such 
aliens. 




The captain of the Liberte' receives his new crewman"; 
identification card. 



Mobile investigative search teams were 
established in seaport areas to prevent 
smuggling and crewman desertions. Border 
Patrol motor launches were in use to 
patrol coastal areas. Intelligence collected 
was converted into indexes now main- 
tained on stowaway-and desertion-prone 
vessels. 

Approximately 12,000 crewmen who had 
deserted or remained longer in the United 
States than permitted and 360 stow- 
aways were located by officers of this 
Service. 

During the year 1,615 crewmen and 164 
stowaways were deported and 10,758 and 
74, respectively, were granted voluntary 
departure. 

As part of the intensive crewman control 
program this year, 1,210 cases of over- 
stayed alien crewnnen were submitted to 
United States Attorneys for prosecution. 
Criminal proceedings were not begun in 
most of the cases, and the crewmen were 




A ship search squad at work. 

expelled through the deportation process 
or by voluntary departure. 

Liaison with shipping companies, unions, 
and other sources of information has 
proven productive in locating stowaways. 
Since stowaways who are not aided by 
crewmen are usually discovered en route 
and reported by the ship's company to 
Service officers on arrival, particular 
emphasis was placed on the apprehension 
and prosecution of those who aid stow- 
aways, either en route or after arrival. 

Criminal prosecution was instituted 
against 187 persons engaged as smug- 
glers, transporters, or harborers. Con- 
victions were obtained in 142 smuggling 
cases involving 481 smuggled aliens. 
Fines totaling $7,570 were imposed, and 
imprisonment aggregated 90 years. 




Border Patrol boat approaches a ship on the 
St. Lawrence River. 



ENFORCEMENT 



The battle against alien criminals, sub- 
version, and illegal entries by land, sea 
or air routes continued in 1958 as 53,474 
aliens in illegal status were apprehended, 
64,004 investigations were conducted, and 
7,142 aliens were deported and 60,600 
were granted voluntary departure. Mexi- 
can border violations were again reduced. 
The reason that deportations and volun- 
tary departures exceed apprehensions is 
because some aliens found in illegal status 
are issued orders to show cause without 
being taken into custody. Apprehensions 
of aliens other than Mexicans increased, 
particularly in the Northwest. We were 
successful in deporting some notorious 
criminals and Communist Party leaders, 
and in concluding investigations in other 
cases with orders of deportation. 

Deportations. Some of the major categories 
of aliens who violate immigration and 
nationality laws and become deportable 
follow. 

Surreptitious entries. In addition to the stow- 
away and crewman methods of entry were 
the surreptitious entries across the land 
borders. 



ALIENS APPREHENDED 
rEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1955-1958 



\ — •■ 


\ 


L^. tttxiUiif 






\ 


V 




„ 


!r^.. '■ 


__^^|__| 


^l__HHL-^ 



to strengthen our determination to main- 
tain control of the southern border. In 
1957, 79 percent of the Mexican nationals 
found in illegal status had entered without 
inspection. In 1958, the figure had dropped 
to 70 percent of the Mexican nationals 
located. 

As entry became more difficult, aliens 
sometimes walked long distances across 
almost impassable country to make an 
entry. To combat this, patrol officers 
often searched on foot for signs that indi- 
cated a recent border violation, and 
radioed information by walkie talkie to 
patrol cars. By these and other tactics 
we were able to apprehend 59 percent of 
the Mexican aliens who entered illegally, 
either at entry or within 72 hours. 




X<<^'^ 



udy sians made when alien jumped 
barbed-wire fence. 



Appre 
tionals. 



hensions of 37,242 Mexican na- 
16 percent under last year, served 



Other methods of entry became more 
prevalent. In 1957, 12 percent of the aliens 
apprehended at the Mexican border had 
entered with nonimmigrant visas. By 1958 
the number had increased to 18 percent. 
A plan of questioning persons in cars was 
devised, so that many were stopped before 
they got far from the border and into the 
interior of the country. 

Aliens other than Mexicans were appre- 
hended in increasing nunnbers. Throughout 
areas adjacent to the northwest borders, 
Europeans, particularly Hungarians, con- 
tinue to pose a threat from the standpoint 
of illegal documents. Scarcity of work in 
Canada, unrest, and general dissatisfac- 
tion are the principal reasons for these 
groups wanting to leave Canada. In the 




Border Patrolman checks a lumbering camp in Alaska. 



Northwest, 143 of those taken into custody 
were Hungarians, and 413 were of various 
European and Asiatic nationalities. 42 per- 
cent of the deportations and over half of 
the voluntary departures resulted from 
surreptitious entries. 

Aliens returned to Mexico have been 
returned by bus lift or air lift to their 
homes away from the border. With the 
full cooperation of the Mexican Govern- 
ment, arrangements were rriade for their 
apprehended nationals to travel to the 
interior of Mexico on contracted Mexican 
aircraft. Since the first flight on Novem- 
ber 27, 1957, 6,251 aliens have been trans- 
ported to the interior of Mexico. The pro- 
cedure has been very effective, as only four 
percent have been encountered who re- 
entered the United States illegally. Service 
planes have been used in returning aliens 
from other parts of the United States to 
the Mexican border for return to Mexico. 



The speed of airplanes and the num.erous 
small air fields in the United States have 
created the need for an intensive air in- 
telligence program. At the northern border 
the newly established program is col- 
lecting valuable data on the movement of 
planes into and out of the region. 

In the Southwest the air intelligence 
program has been in effect for two and 
a half years. 38 violations of section 239 
of the Immigration and Nationality Act 
were established. 

While guarding the borders against 
illegal entry of aliens, contraband is fre- 
quently found and turned over to the 
Customs officers. The value of all sei- 
zures by patrol inspectors alone totaled 
$573,404. Narcotics seizures made by 
patrol inspectors, generally while as- 
signed to traffic checking operations and 
jointly with Customs officers, totaled 
$172,085. Other contraband delivered to 



I 




Border Patrolmen check a foreign plane which made an emergency landing in New York State. 



Customs officers included 297 automobiles 
and trucks, 28 other conveyances, and 
firearms and ammunition valued at $6,964. 

Alien criminals and subversives. On November 14, 
1957, 65 persons gathered at the residence 
of John Barbara, St., at Appalachin, New 
York, a quiet hamlet of 500 people. Thirty 
of the 65 "delegates" were naturalized 
citizens, 5 were aliens. Nineteen of the 
30 are not subject to denaturalization. One, 
Vito Genovese, was denaturalized in 1955. 
Cancellation proceedings had been insti- 
tuted against Joseph Profaci in March 
1957. Nine of those naturalized remain 
under active investigation. Two aliens, 
previously investigated, could not be de- 
ported. In two of the three remaining 
cases deportation orders have been is- 
sued, and deportation proceedings are 
being deferred in the third case because 
of illness. 

Action against racketeers is exemplified 
by the case of Simone Scozzari, one of the 
5 aliens at the Appalachin meeting. He 
was a native and citizen of Italy, who 
entered the United States as a stowaway 
in 1923. His record of arrests dating from 
1928 dealt with violations of gambling 
and bookmaking laws. He had also been 
convicted for failure to report a gunshot 
wound in connection with a murder near 
Downey, California. He was ordered de- 
ported by the special inquiry officer in 
February 1958. His case is now pending 



before the Board of Immigration Ap- 
peals. 

At least 14 other notorious leaders 
within organized and syndicated crime and 
many lesser known criminals felt the im- 
pact of Service operations as 890 persons 
were deported and 43 were granted volun- 
tary departure on crinainal, innmoral or 
narcotics charges. 

The most significant developments in 
the fiscal year in connection with sub- 
versive cases have been the far-reaching 
judicial decisions which have so increased 
the requirements for successful proceed- 
ings as to make our operations extremely 
difficult. In Rawoldt v. Perfetto the 
Supreme Court held that it was necessary, 
in addition to proving membership in the 
Communist Party, to establish an intan- 
gible "meaningful association" with that 
organization in order to establish deport- 
ability. Similarly, a series of decisions 
in the Supreme Court denaturalization 
cases have caused a number of prominent 
revocation cases to be returned from the 
courts for further extensive investigation. 

Nevertheless, 21 aliens were placed 
under deportation proceedings based on 
subversive grounds, and 15 under de- 
naturalization proceedings. 

One of the persons placed under de- 
portation proceedings was Jean Kramer, 
a native of U.S.S.R. and wife of Harry 
Klatz -Kramer, circulation manager of the 
"Peoples World", a communist newspaper. 



who was identified as a person holding 
responsible positions in the Communist 
Party and various front organizations. 

Curt Leopold Ponger, who, with Otto 
Verber, was convicted in 1953 of con- 
spiracy to deliver to U.S.S.R. informiation 
relating to national defense, was de- 
naturalized. Deportation proceedings were 
then instituted against both men, and de- 
portation orders entered against them will 
be executed upon completion of their 
prison sentences. 

Six subversive aliens were deported. 
One of them was Julius Saar, a native of 
Estonia and citizen of U.S.S.R., who was 
deported to Russia. After much probing 
by Service officers it was learned that 
Saar had in his possession a valid travel 
document issued by the U.S.S.R. This is 
the first involuntary deportation to Russia 
effected since the end of World War II, 
because Russia has consistently refused 
to issue the necessary travel documents. 

Frauds used to gain entry. Spurious documents 
used for admission to the United States 
take many forms. False letters of support 
or false first preference visa petitions 
are used as a basis for visa applications 
abroad. 

Alteration and sale of Forms 1-151, 
Alien Registration Receipt Card, has be- 
come an increasing problem, particularly 
in the Southwest. For example, Rafael 
Muro -Saldivar and Miguel Zavala-Solis 
have been indicted and are presently at 
liberty under bond. They were both part 
of a large ring offering and selling these 
cards for considerable sunns. 16 aliens 
have been apprehended who had purchased 
these cards. 

In New York it has been established 
that at least 20 British West Indians 
entered the United States as citizens. In 
each case they presented birth certificates 
furnished by friends or relatives, relating 
to some other living or deceased relative 
or friend. In the Southwest, Cubans using 
Puerto Rican birth certificates are seek- 
ing entry. 

The use of altered United States pass- 
ports was another aspect of docunnent 
fraud. The apprehension of an Italian sea- 
nnan in possession of an altered passport 
led to the uncovering of a ring in Palermo, 
Italy, engaged in supplying Italians with 
passports lost by, or stolen from. United 
States citizens. 

Success in overcoming Chinese fraud 
problems continued during the year. In one 



instance, known as the Sai Kay Village 
fraud, approximately 22 5 members of the 
Huey clan of the village of Sai Kay, China, 
were exposed as having entered the United 
States under false identities and various 
clan names. They claimed to be descend- 
ants of 12 progenitors whose United States 
nativity was established in habeas corpus 
proceedings in San Francisco between 1889 
and 1910. Confessions obtained from the 
foregoing individuals prevented more than 
150 others from obtaining entry documents 
abroad. 

Another type of fraud is the entering 
into sham marriages with United States 
citizen women. An example will show how 
the system works. A Greek crewnnan, 
formerly a Greek police officer, conspired 
with three others for his entry into the 
United States and nnarriage to a 17-year- 
old United States citizen high school girl. 
By the marriage he would acquire non- 
quota status. The girl was to receive 
$500 to marry the crewman, with the 
understanding that the marriage would not 
be consummated and a divorce would be 
secured at the expense of the crewman, 
after he had gained legal status. Success- 
ful prosecution of the case was concluded 
in March 1958. 




Two investigators ask for identification from two Mexicans 
in Chicago's "Spanish Skid Ftow." 

1,430 persons were deported or granted 
voluntary departure because they had im- 
proper entry documents. 

Mental or physical defectives. Aliens who were 
excludable at entry as nnental or physical 
defectives, or those mentally ill aliens 
who are institutionalized within 5 years 
after entry (unless the infirnnity arose 
after entry) are deportable. 107 persons 
were deported and 30 were granted volun- 
tary departure in these cases. 



119 were deported or removed from the 
United States by Service airplane, result- 
ing in savings to our taxpayers estimated 
at more than $3,700,000. The Service's 
hospital-type plane has a dispensary and 
all modern medicines and equipment to 
provide for the needs of the aliens while 
en route. The medical personnel accom- 
panying these Service plane flights, as 
well as our own officers, are convinced 
that this mode of travel is the most hu- 
mane way to handle mentally ill deportees, 
because the shorter travel time greatly 
decreases travel anxiety. 

Violation of nonimTrdgrant status. The second larg- 
est group of forced departures arose out 
of a violation of nonimmigrant status. 
There were 21,822 aliens deported or 
granted voluntary departure who violated 
their nonimmigrant status. Many of these 
aliens were crewmen, some of whom were 
unwilful violators who could not leave 
because their vessels were in port longer 
than 29 days; others were visitors who 
stayed beyond their authorized period, or 
students who ceased to be students and 
became employees, and other violators 
of status. 



Unexecuted orders of deportation. Although more 
aliens were deported in the past fiscal 
year than in 1957, there still remained 
7,347 unexecuted orders of deportation 
on June 30, 1958. One of the primary 
difficulties encountered in effecting de- 
portation of major crinriinals and sub- 
versives is prolonged and repetitious court 
attacks on deportation orders. One case 
finally came to a successful conclusion 
last year, but it exemplifies nnany still 
in the count of unexecuted orders of de- 
portation. 

In this case, Martin Jiminez, a sub- 
versive alien, was located on May 29, 
1951. Delays usually met in this type of 
case were encountered. Deportation was 
ordered on May 14, 1952, and his appeal 
to the Board of Immigration Appeals was 
dismissed March 9, 1954. During all 
proceedings before the Service, Jiminez 
refused to answer questions relating to 
his membership in the Communist Party 
or his affiliations with any other sub- 
versive organization. 

His application for discretionary relief 
was denied. Nunnerous motions to reopen, 
all of which were denied, were filed with 
the Board of Immigration Appeals. 



Before the last restraining order was 
removed, this subversive alien's case had 
been reviewed by the United States Dis- 
trict Court three times, by the United 
States Court of Appeals for the Ninth 
Circuit three times, and by the United 
States Supreme Court twice. The last legal 
impediment was removed February 11, 
1958, and he was deported to Mexico that 
very day. Service records leave no doubt 
but that the alien remained actively asso- 
ciated with subversive organizations until 
the date of his departure. 

Until Congress acts to limit these de- 
laying repetitious appeals available to the 
deportable alien, the Service has no re- 
course but to expend years of continous 
effort to accomplish deportation. 

The major reason deportation cannot be 
effected is lack of documents with which 
to effect entry into some other country. 
While progress has been made in the 
past year in getting some consulates to 
issue expeditiously travel documents for 
aliens who have made comparatively re- 
cent entries, obtention of documents for 
those who have resided outside their 
native countries for many years continues 
to present great difficulties. Under exist- 
ing statutes of many coxintries, long ab- 
sence causes loss of citizenship, and such 
aliens must be considered stateless. While 
an alien remains in this category, the 
likelihood is small that he may be de- 
ported from the United States. 

ProseciUuMS. Cases involving 2,797 imnni- 
gration violations were instituted in the 
courts. These cases resulted in 2,548 
convictions, with aggregate imprisonment 
of 1,667 years and fines of $42,155. 

Convictions for illegal entry declined 
to 593 this year, about one -third of the 
1,676 in 1956. The decrease follows the 
trend of fewer illegal entries and is 
attributable to the successful control of 
the Mexican border. 

A program was directed during the year 
to prosecute violators who repeatedly 
enter the United States, resulting in more 
aliens being prosecuted and convicted for 
reentry after deportation- -1,462 were con- 
victed in the past year, compared to 1,209 
in 1957 and 961 in 1956. 

Persistent violators are given more 
severe sentences. The average sentence 
for persons convicted for imnnigration 
violations doubled from 4 months in fiscal 
year 1953 to 8.5 in 1957 and 8.7 months 
in 1958. In the aggravated cases where 



prosecutions are not possible, formal de- 
portation proceedings are undertaken, A 
recent example involves an alien who was 
granted voluntary return to Mexico on 
four occasions. At the time of his next 
apprehension he received a two-year sus- 
pended sentence and was formally de- 
ported. Upon reentry after deportation, 
the two-year suspended sentence was re- 



voked, and an additional penalty of four 
months was imposed. This over -all pro- 
gram has helped to reduce the number 
of illegal entries. 

The 206 prosecutions instituted for na- 
tionality violations resulted in 178 con- 
victions. All but 6 of the aliens convicted 
had falsely represented thennselves as 
citizens of the United States. 



TRAINING PROGRAMS 



To improve the calibre of candidates for 
employment, 66 officers were trained for 
special recruiting and participated in a 
formal college recruitment drive, the 
purpose of which was to interest upper- 
classmen in careers as officers in the 
Immigration and Naturalization Service. 
252 men completed the initial training 
curriculum at the Border Patrol Academy. 
This is a prerequisite for most Service 
careers. 222 others attended the advanced 
courses at the Officers Training School. 
In both of these schools revised curricu- 
lums to focus on changing conditions and 
new techniques, and innproved standards of 
instruction marked the year. 

To provide better supervision and uni- 
form application of Service policies, 210 
Supervisory Border Patrol Officers at- 
tended refresher courses during the 
year. 

The new correspondence courses, cov- 
ering nine segments of Service respon- 



sibilities, programs, and procedures, were 
enthusiastically received, and 2,193 em- 
ployees took one or more courses during 
the year. 

A training course of lectures and train- 
ing materials designed to acquaint Service 
officers with practical intelligence tech- 
niques, to stimulate their participation in 
such programs, and to point out the poten- 
tials of liaison sources, was prepared and 
conducted by Intelligence. 

The Service, in implementing its per- 
sonnel promotion program, has become 
increasingly aware of the need for con- 
tinuous and better training to fit officers 
for advancement. A succession of new 
laws, changing techniques in enforcement, 
and streamlined procedures require, more 
than ever, officers of good judgment based 
on adequate knowledge and training. To 
this end, training programs and refresher 
courses are being constantly studied, re- 
vised, and coordinated. 



ADMINISTRATION 



The service functions of accounting, prop- 
erty management, record keeping, man- 
agement planning, budget preparation and 
presentation, statistics, and personnel 
were carried out during the year with a 
number of changes for greater efficiency 
and economy. (1) A new punched card file 
for each employee, containing an inventory 
of his skills, education, and experience, 
enables the personnel officer to locate 
persons best suited for specific jobs more 
quickly and scientifically. (2) A complete 
property accounting system was designed 
and installed. (3) A program was success- 
fully concluded whereby 400,000 files were 
closed and sent to Records Centers re- 
lating to persons bom prior to 1890, 
where no action was pending. This project 



alone released 3,500 square feet of office 
space for current records. Other projects 
for retirennent of records, improved in- 
dexes and controls were in process or 
completed during the year. (4) Funds for 
seven much needed border stations and 
expansion of another one were made avail- 
able in fiscal year 1958. In three cases 
contracts have been let by the Service. 
In the others the Service is working with 
the General Services Adnninistration to 
expedite construction. (5) Space and layout 
standards were established for inspection 
facilities at airports. (6) Under the Incen- 
tive Awards Program, $18,395 was 
awarded to 152 persons for suggestions or 
superior performance. In addition, there 
were 114 honorary awards. 



TABLE 1. IMMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES: 
1820 - I95B 



/From 1820 to I867 figures represent alien passengers arrived; 1868 through I89I and 
1895 through 1897 Immigrant aliens arrived; I892 through iSglt and from I898 to the 
present time immigreint aliens admlttedj'' 



Number 

of 
persons 



1820-1958^/ Ul.Bll^.eTT 



1820 . . 

1821-1830 
1821.. 
1822.. 
1823.. 
1824.. 
1825.. 
1826.. 
1827.. 
1828.. 
1829.. 
1830.. 

1831-181*0 
1831.. 
1832.. 
1833.. 
1831*.. 
1835.. 
1836.. 
1837.. 
1838.. 
1839- . 
l8i«D.. 

18U1-1850 
181H.. 
181*2.. 
181*3.. 
18M*.. 
181*5.. 
181*6.. 
181*7.. 
181*8.. 
181*9.. 
1850.. 

1851-1860 
1851 



8,385 
11*3 A39 



9,127 
6,911 
6,351* 
7,912 
10,199 
10,837 
18,875 
27,382 
22,520 
23,322 

399,125 
22,633 
60,1*82 
58,61*0 
65,365 
1*5,37^ 
76,21*2 
79,31*0 
38,911* 
68,069 
81*, 066 

1.713,251 



80,289 
10l*,565 
52,1*96 
78,615 
lll*,371 
151*, 1*16 
23l*,968 
226,527 
297,021* 
369,980 

2»^98,2li* 
379.'*fc'6 



1852.. 
1853.. 
1851*.. 
1855.. 
1856. . 
1857.. 
1858.. 
1859.. 
i860.. 

1861-1870 
1861.. 
1862.. 
1863.. 
1861*.. 
1865.. 
1866.. 
1867.. 
1868.. 
1869.. 
1870.. 

1871-1880 
1871.. 
1872.. 
1873.. 
187I*.. 
1875.. 
1876.. 
1877.. 
1878.. 
1879.. 
1880.. 

1881-1890 
1881.. 
1882.. 
1883.. 
1881*.. 
1885.. 
1886.. 
1887.. 



Number 

of 
persons 



371,603 
368,61*5 
1*27,833 
200,877 
200,1*36 
251,306 
123,126 
121,282 
153,61*0 

2,3ll*,8 2l* 



91,9l5 
91,985 
176,282 
193,1*18 
2l*a,120 
318,568 
315,722 
138,81*0 
352,768 
387,203 

2,812,19 1 



321,350 
l*0l*,806 
1*59,803 
313,339 
227,1*98 
169,986 
11*1,857 
138,1*69 
177,826 
1*57,257 

5.21*6,613 
669,1*31 
788,992 
603,322 
518,592 
395,31*6 
331*, 203 
1*90.109 



Number 

of 
persons 



1889.. 
1890.. 

1891-1900 
1891.. 
1892.. 
1893.. 
I89I*.. 
1895.. 
1896.. 
1897.. 
1898.. 
1899.. 
1900.. 

1901-1910 
1901.. 
1902.. 
1903.. 
I90I*.. 
1905.. 
1906. . 
1907.. 
1908.. 
1909.. 
1910.. 

1911-1920 
1911.. 
1912.. 
1913.. 
I91I*.. 
1915.. 
1916.. 
1917.. 
1918. . 
1919.. 
1920.. 

1921-1930 

i92;l.. 



51*6,889 
1*1*1*, 1*27 
1*55,302 

3.687.561* 



560,319 
579,663 
1*39,730 
285,631 
258,536 
31*3,267 
230,832 
229,299 
311,715 
1*1*6,572 

8.795,386 

'l*B7!9iB 

61*8,71*3 

857,01*6 

812,870 

1,026,1*99 

1,100,735 

1,285,31*9 

782,870 

751,786 

1,01*1,570 

5,735,811 
878,587 
838,172 
1,197,892 
1,218,1*80 
326,700 
298,826 
295,^*03 
110,618 
11*1,132 
1*30,001 

1*. 107, 209 



805.228 



1922.. 
1923.. 
1921*. . 
1925.. 
1926. . 
1927.. 
1928.. 
1929.. 
1930.. 

193l-19'*0 
1931.. 
1932.. 
1933.. 
1931*.. 
1935.. 
1936.. 
1937.. 
1938.. 
1939.. 
191*0.. 

191*1-1950 
191*1.. 
191*2.. 
191*3.. 
191*1*.. 
191*5.. 
191*6. . 
19'*7.. 
191*8.. 
191*9.. 
1950.. 



1951. 
1952. 
1953. 
195^+. 
1955. 
1956. 
1957. 
1956. 



Number 

of 
persons 



309,556 
522,919 
706,896 
29l*,3l'* 
30l*,it88 
335,175 
307,255 
279,678 
21*1,700 

528,1*31 
97,139 
35,576 
23,068 
29,1+70 
3i*,956 
36,329 
50,21*1* 
67,895 
82,998 
.70,756 

28,781 
23,725 
28,551 
38,119 
108,721 
11*7,292 
170,570 
188,317 
21*9,187 

205,717 
265,520 
170,1*31* 
208,177 
237,790 
321,625 
326,867 
253.265 



1/ Data are for fiscal years ended June 30, except l820 through 1S31 and l81*l* through l81*9 

fiscal years ended Sept. 30; I833 through l8!*2 and 1851 through 1867 years ended Dec. 31; 
1832 covers 15 months ended Dec. 31; l81*3 nine months ended Sept. 30; I850 fifteen months 
ended Dec. 31; and 1868 six months ended June 30. 



TABLE 2. ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AND DEPARTED, 

BY MONTHS: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1957 AFTO 1958 

^Data exclude border crossers, crewmen, and Mexican agricultural laborers/ 



Period 



ALIENS ADMITTED 



Immi- 
grant 



Nonim- 
migrant 



EMIGRANTS 
DEPARTED^ 



U. S. CITIZENS 



Arrived Departed 



Fiscal year 1958 



July-Dec 
July .... 

August .. 

September 
October . 
November 
December 



1957 



Jan. -June, 1958 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May , 

June 



Fiscal year 1957 



July- Dec 
July .... 

August .. 
September 
October . 
November 
December 



1956 



Jan. -J vine, 1957 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 



253.265 



847.764 



1.101.029 



4.024 



1.469.262 



1.483.915 



127.562 



19,683 
20,565 
19,804 
22,037 
22,473 
23,000 

125.703 



442.553 



79,718 
82,223 
90,951 
56,593 
65,905 
67,163 

405.211 



570.115 



99,401 
102,788 
110,755 
78,630 
88,378 
90,163 

??0.914 



1 .65 ? 



758 
228 
170 
136 
165 
196 

2. 371 



803.276 



20,258 
18,321 
23,051 
19,429 
22,595 
22,049 

326.867 



57,570 
45,076 
69,812 
70,137 
79,974 
82,642 

758.858 



77,828 
63,397 
92,863 
89,566 
102,569 
104,691 

1.085.725 



644 
220 
296 
319 
378 
514 

5.572 



149,640 
186,508 
157,049 
119,148 
95,909 
95,022 

665.986 



711.217 



97,333 
95,585 
109,116 
105,173 
117,417 
141,362 

1.365.075 



175,608 
144,292 
115,945 
95,824 
79,431 
100,117 

772. 6?8 



107,711 
103,472 
113,162 
117,156 
134,768 
196,429 

1.402.107 



184.925 



32,165 
28,814 
28,267 
32,198 
30,833 
32,648 

14 1.942 



39S401 



26,826 
24,530 
26,609 
23,323 
20,582 
20,072 



72,391 
74,494 
82,590 
64,650 
43,163 
58,113 

363 .^57 



580.326 



50,774 
39,361 
61,578 
71,987 
69,901 
69,856 



104,556 

103,308 

110,857 

96,848 

73,996 

90,761 

JOI492 



?i7^1. 



77,600 
63,891 
88,187 
95,310 
90,48^ 
89,928 



572 
674 
760 
639 
578 
518 

1.831 



743.319 



917 
246 
194 
127 
123 
224 



144,294 
168,916 
144,661 
110,808 
88,653 
85,987 

621.756 



86,989 
91,217 
109,421 
103,026 
105,765 
125,338 



652 ,433 



157,539 

133,981 

101,622 

90,223 

78,796 

90,272 

7^9.674 



95,826r 
104,618 
116,920 
115,179 
137,790 
179,341 



1/ Resident aliens permanently departing 



TABLE 3. ALIENS 



CITIZENS AmiTTED AT UNITED STATES PORTS OF ENTRY: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30> 1937 - 19^6 



Aliens 



Total number 

Border cross ers 

Canadian 

Mexlcem 

Crewmen 

Others admitted 



Year 


ended June 30, 1958 


15l,38U,396 


82,U70,8olt 


68,913,592 


iM^, 298, 007 


78,982,718 


65,315,289 


53,363,327 


28,262,967 


25,100,360 


90, 931*, 680 


50,719,751 


Uo,2lJ^,929 


2,630,583 


1,673,1^75 


957,108 


'^,'^55,806 


l,8lU,6ll 


2,641,195 



Year ended June 30, 1957 



Total number 


11^,591,023 


77,862,895 


66,728,128 




137,590,261 

53,522,956 

81^,067,305 

2,66l,62lf 

'+,339,138 


71^,271,162 

28,008,556 

1*6,262,606 

1,688,7^9 

1,902,981* 


63,319,099 
25,5l'+,'+00 
37,8oU,699 . 

972,875 
2,1*36,151+ 




Mexican 




Othpr*? n^ml tt"1 .,,,.,....,.... 





21 



CLASSES UNDEB THE IMraGRATICM LAWS : 

UHE 30, xgji^ - 1958 



/pa.ta. exelixde border orossere and crevmea7 



ALIENS AIMnTED 



771*, 790 



9,736 



1,007, 



1,065,725 



ItOaOIUNTS 1/ 



206,177 



237,790 



321,625 



326,867 



Quota Imnlgranta 

First preference quota: 

Selected InmlgrantB of special skill 

or ability 

Their spouses and children 

Second preference quota: 

Parents of U.S. citizens 

Third preference quota: 

Spouses and children of resident 
aliens 

Fourth preference quota: 

Other relatives of U.S. citizens .... 

Nonpref erence quota 

Displaced persons admitted under Dis- 
placed Persons Act of igUfl, as 
amended 

Displaced persona adjusting status 
under Section k, Displaced Persons 
Act of igitB, as amended 



git. 098 



69.310 



97.178 



Nonquota Immigrants 

Wives of U.S. citizens 

Husbands of U.S. citizens 

Children of U.S. citizens 

Natives of Western Hemisphere countries 

Their spouses 

Their children 

Persons who had been U.S. citizens .... 
Ministers of religious denominations . . 

Their spouses 

Their children 

Qnployees of U.S. Government abroad, 

their spouses and children 

Refugees 2/ 

Act of September 11, 1957, inmlgranta . 
Other nonquota Immigrants 



HONIMMIGRAMTS l/ 



1,1*29 
1,027 



6,00l* 



1.930 
7'*,8l*3 



5,235 

81*7 

U't,079 

7,725 

5,819 

78,897 

1,119 

510 

!*27 

263 

57 

65 



566.613 



1.776 
1,236 



2,39^ 



3,075 
65,7U 



1,093 

1,522 

155.558 



ia,504 
6,716 
5.662 

92,620 
1.059 

595 
87 

191* 
50 
63 



620,9't6 



1,9U6 
l,l»20 



2,81*3 



2,121 
73,529 



232,315 



2.992 
2,739 



3,677 



6,631 



3,158 
77,887 



229,669 



21,21* 

5,788 

U,710 

122,063 

1,398 

551 

Uk 

210 

55 

65 



75, 1*73 

672 

686,259 



21,791* 

5.767 

'^,796 

111,3M* 

1,581* 

560 

58 

231 

68 

loU 



758,858 



Foreign government officials 

Temporary visitors for business 

Temporary visitors for pleasure 

Transit aliens 

Treaty traders and investors 

Students 

Representatives to international organi- 
zations 

Temporary workers and Industrial 

trainees 3/ 

Representatives of foreign Information 
media 

Exchange aliens 

Returning resident aliens l/ 

NATO officials 

Other nonlimnlgrants 



23,095 
61,029 
292.725 
78,526 
1,023 
25,1*25 

5,601 

7,1*79 

50I* 
15,260 
55.887 

59 



26,268 
68,696 
332,391* 
71,301 
1,203 
27,192 

6,003 

9,750 

575 
16,077 
6l,itU2 

25 



27,109 
72,265 
399,701* 
65,211* 
1,619 
28,013 

5,190 

17,077 

697 
17,201* 
52,136 

31 



28,1*96 
81*, 21*6 
1*53,51'* 
107.399 
1,71*0 
30.760 

6.1*06 

16,856 



253,265 



j£2xia_ 



3.9^*1 
3.179 



5,387 



'•.932 

82,030 



151,112 



23.517 

5,833 

5,970 

86,523 

1,529 

523 

1*3 

218 

71* 

11*3 

23 
1,012 
2l*,i»67 
1,237 

81*7.761* 



29,265 
61,1*05 
511*, 599 
99,190 
2,500 
3l*,8i*8 

6,781 

2U,U02 



1,027 
17,81*9 20,31*9 

10,6l7lj/{ 32,71*7 V 



13 



17 An immigrant is an alien admitted for permanent residence. A nonlmiilgrant Is an alien admitted 
for temporary residence. Returning resident aliens who have once been counted as imnlgrants are 
included with nonimmigrants, although the Immigration laws define such aliens as Inmlgrants. 

2/ Refugees, admitted under the Refugee Relief Act of 1953. 

3/ Excludes agricultural laborers except those admitted from Japan and those admitted from the West 
Indies and Canada after March 6, 1957. See Table I6. 

J*/ Not comparable with previous years due to changes In documentary requirements. 



22 



TABLE 5. IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED, BY PORT: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1954 - 19M 



Port 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


All ports 


208.177 


237.790 


321,625 


326.867 


253.265 


Atlantic 


117,232 


137,863 


192,689 


205.161 


152.230 




2,730 

336 

10,433 

98,813 

1,536 

233 

2,595 

3,125 


2,565 

843 

13,612 

2 

115,787 

552 

2,024 

114 

2,364 

2.897 


3,104 

1,230 

18,882 

97 

161.545 

3,794 

2,431 

92 

1,514 

3,709 


3,722 
1,409 
16,462 
7,802 
169,550 
2,322 
2,112 
140 
1,642 

3,547 


4,211 


Key West, Fla 


1,225 








3,765 


New York, N, Y 

Philadelphia, Pa 


120,751 
740 




2,201 


Virgin Islands 


159 




2,027 


Gulf of Mexico 


3.224 




1,651 
392 
458 
624 

10.675 


1,452 
523 
437 
485 

10,904 


1,434 

1,151 

572 

552 

16,600 


1,473 

1,021 

498 

555 

20,045 


1,562 




619 




504 


Other Gulf 


539 




20,929 




80 
2,597 
1,678 
3,363 
2,870 

87 

282 
39.008 


115 
4,081 
1,411 
2,727 
2,430 

140 

608 
34.143 


120 
6,922 
2,503 
3.294 
3,661 

100 

540 
42.847 


185 
8,771 
3,895 
2,984 
4,083 

127 

418 
48,076 


170 


Honolulu, T. H 

Los Angeles, Calif 


8,121 
4,633 




3,622 


Seattle, Wash 


4,116 


Other Pacific 


267 




277 




48,344 




3,807 

4,615 

1,121 

971 

827 

192 

509 

8,868 

320 

544 

3,303 

1,694 

1,904 

2,437 

1,303 

474 

960 

5,159 

37.855 


3,305 

3,975 

1,023 

1,018 

777 

152 

485 

7,783 

363 

424 

2,947 

1,429 

1,608 

2,025 

1,053 

530 

691 

4,555 

51,375 


31798 

4,614 

1,318 

1,250 

1,317 

236 

590 

10,329 

311 

607 

3,358 

2,238 

2,190 

2,124 

971 

425 

786 

6,385 

65.240 


41679 

4,626 

1,566 

1,496 

1,953 

299 

576 

11,881 

564 

565 

3,116 

2,781 

2,335 

1,832 

877 

833 

1,183 

6,914 

49,549 


4,694 


Buffalo, N. Y 

Calais, Me 


4,769 
1,502 


Champlain, N. Y 

Chicago, 111 


1,692 
2,826 




467 


Derby Line, Vt 


577 


Detroit, Mich 


12,189 




553 


Highgate Springs, Vt 


576 


Niagara Falls, N. Y 

Noyes, Minn 


3,367 
2,023 




2,179 


Rouses Point, N. Y 


2,066 
825 




775 




735 




6,529 




28.124 




4,164 
920 
2,205 
10,174 
8,252 
5,757 
1,426 
3,668 
1,289 


7,058 
780 
3,032 
14,085 
8,887 
6,122 
1,708 
7,298 
2,405 


7,215 
1,528 
2,790 
19,272 
8,047 
8,967 
3,209 
9,987 
4,225 


4,642 
2,405 
1,850 

10,071 
4,865 
7,559 
3,594 

11,786 
2,777 

71 


2,867 


Calexico, Calif 


1,956 




509 




5,891 


Hidalgo, Tex 


997 


Laredo, Tex 


3,092 




3,419 


San Ysidro, Calif 


8,838 




555 


All other 


137 







23 



TABLE 6. IMMCRANT ALIENS ADMITTED, BY CLASSES UNDER THE IMMIGRATION LAWS 
AND COUOTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1958 



Country or 
region of 
birth 


Number 

ad- 
mitted 


2 

ll 


^ 2 

III 


1 

1"! 


1^ 






III 


15 


1 


1 


i 


All countries 


25^.26? 


102,153 


151.112 


23.517 


5.833 


5,970 


86,523 


2.052 


42? 


1.012 


24.467 


i.?03 




138,311 


94.321 


43.990 


14.356 


3.803 


3.681 




1.598 










Austria 


21005 
1,164 
2,156 
1,492 
738 
4,100 

32,145 
3,07'' 
1.583 

10,383 

24,479 

319 

448 

3,711 

2,385 

6,607 

1,635 

805 

1,354 

2,224 

1,739 

730 

27.613 
1,899 
2,260 
1.258 

19.867 


1.344 

1,064 

1,608 

1,186 

576 

2,481 

23,170 

342 

833 

10,325 

5,439 

212 

331 

2,805 

2,178 

5,084 

411 

377 

301 

2,171 

1,556 

182 

26,946 

1,568 

1.024 

809 

4.280 


hi 

100 

548 

306 

162 

1,619 

8.975 

2,737 

752 

58 

19,040 

107 

117 

906 

207 

1,523 

1.224 

428 

1,053 

53 

183 

548 

667 

331 

1.236 

449 

15,587 


348 
55 

320 

191 

76 

1.217 

6.989 

693 
95 
21 
1,871 
25 
22 

252 
91 

401 

199 
86 

345 
21 
96 
94 

200 
85 

394 

169 

7,968 


41 
5 
37 
39 
20 
63 
U9 
748 
42 
4 
1,490 
23 
18 
57 
51 
148 
308 
54 
198 
4 
28 
96 
27 
29 
91 
33 

976 


112 

9 

20 

14 

6 

185 

1,352 

217 

25 

682 

2 
23 
16 
210 
422 
24 
62 
7 
5 
12 
27 
11 
196 
42 

1,622 


- 

: 


25 
9 
32 
28 
9 

a 

103 
20 
29 
U 

366 
5 
20 
44 
14 

102 

124 
23 

154 
9 
9 
4 

310 
51 
38 
15 

113 


3 
4 

10 
3 
1 
2 
7 
8 
113 
1 

29 
4 
5 

12 

9 

14 
30 
2 
2 
2 
3 
6 
16 
4 

89 


2 
12 

19 

15 

59 
10 

19 
L4 

834 


13 
116 
23 
48 
99 
290 
1.037 
428 
4 
L4.547 
46 
42 
500 
22 
588 
169 
216 
258 
3 
32 
327 
29 
129 
479 
168 

3,937 


'4 

5 
1 




Czechoslovakia ...... 












80 


Greece 


10 






L4 

40 


Italy 


Latvia 

Lithuania 


5 




'I 


Poland 


Portugcil 


2 










Sweden 


6 








13 

71 
16 

3 
4 

48 


United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 


Other Europe 




3!2l3 
342 
513 
433 

1.681 

6.543 
528 

1.604 


■■ US 

130 
214 
220 
1.283 
155 
195 
103 


2.765 

212 

299 

213 

398 

6.388 

333 

1.501 

2.117 

1,361 

79.439 


980 
54 
58 
22 
70 

4.8a 

33 

410 

1.063 

437 

661 


142 
10 
46 
73 
61 

171 
69 
25 

132 

247 

830 


262 

73 
15 
3 
21 

492 
27 
25 

617 
87 

575 


75.868 


5 
7 
4 

10 
3 

21 
2 
4 

49 

234 


10 

3 

20 
44 

2 
4 
6 

28 


-1S7S 

79 

64 


68 
170 
104 
212 
748 
177 
968 
290 
518 

379 




Hong Kong 

India 


2 


Iran 


6 






Japan ............... 


10 


Jordan 2/ 


3 
5 






Other Asia.... 


2.774 1 -/ilT 


9 


North America 


80,788 


1.349 


864 


Canada .............. 


30.055 
26,712 
11.581 
5.181 
6.573 
686 

11.039 


22 
5 
3 
943 
106 
270 

188 


30,033 
26,707 
11,578 
4,238 

6,467 
hl6 

10.851 


59 

27 

18 
500 
43 
L4 

48 


32 
14 
7 
719 
20 
38 

58 


13 

2 

3 

551 

6 

12 


29,565 
26,278 
11,437 
1,920 
6,353 
315 

10.654 


1 
4 
3 
215 
8 
3 

7 


19 
6 

3 




-24 
9 
16 

297 
23 
10 

32 




Mexico 


373 


Cuba 


94 


Other West Indies... 

Central America 

Other North America 

South America ......... 


17 
8 
35 

36 




—2^225 
2.891 
5.483 

2.040 
937 
283 


2 

1 

185 

1,268 
5U 
236 


2,663 
2,890 
5.298 

772 
426 
47 


5 
42 

264 
199 
21 


2 
13 
43 

112 
43 
11 


12 

55 
18 


2t^2 
2,861 
5,L41 

1 


7 

67 
32 


- 

3 

7 
18 




3 

29 

264 
112 

4 


5 


Colombia ............ 


11 


Other South America. 


20 
3 


Australia and N.Zealand 
Other countries ...... 


4 
2 



1/ Admissions under Refugee Relief Act of 1953 - figures include 842 refugees in the 
United States who had adjusted their status under Sec. 6, 156 orphans, and 14 
others not previously reported. 

2/ Includes Formosa. 

2/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



24 



TABLE 6A. IIMGRAm' AI.IENS ADtOTTED, BY CLASSES UNDER THE IWIGRATIOK LAWS AND COUNTRY 
OR REGION OF UST PERMA^re:NT RESIDENCE: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1958 






Country or 
region of 

last 
permanent 
residence 


ad- 
mitted 


1 

si 


III 


£=■ 


-J 

h 


g5 




lis 

M 

t ° s 

III 




1 


J! 
m 


1 

u 

1 


All countries.... 


253.265 


102A51 


151.112 


23, W 


S833 


S970 


86.523 


2.012 


W? 


1.012 


2kM7 


1,303 




1 

115.198 


74.503 


40.695 


13.733 


2,922 


3,658 


445 


489 


193 


62 


18.866 


327 




116^6 

1,231 

98 

1,126 

520 

5,136 

29, W8 

2,733 

5W 

7.956 

23, U5 

27 

lU 

3,102 

2,268 

1,470 

1,556 

11/* 

899 

2,346 

1,820 

553 

25,325 

65 

1,202 

816 

20.870 


1,107 

1,U9 

35 

926 

4U 

3,021 

19,877 

331 

192 

7,923 

4,533 

I 

2,259 

2,103 

584 

389 

29 

191 

2,280 

1,633 

154 

24,433 

27 

468 

6.154 


559 

82 

63 

200 

106 

2,115 

9,621 

2,402 

350 

33 

18,582 

22 

6 

843 

165 

886 

1.167 

85 

708 

66 

187 

399 

892 

38 

734 

384 

14.716 


148 

28 
123 
57 
1.524 
7.5a 
610 

6 

1.842 

3 

1 
169 

21I 
193 
6 
254 
21 
81 
86 
326 
8 
261 
131 

7.733 


30 
10 
3 

24 

12 

97 

L46 

540 

7 

2 

1.241 

5 

1 

54 

42 

54 

266 

13 

131 

8 

31 

69 

83 

2 

27 

24 

809 


60 

5 

14 

10 

7 

201 

1.390 

211 

U 

699 

19 
19 
216 
421 
25 
53 

11 
10 
43 
4 
181 
48 

1.595 


1 
4 

5 

31 
30 

2 

n 
I 

46 

i 

138 

4 
45 


7 

1 

6 
1 
15 
26 
3 

6 
4 

76 

1 
41 

I 

1 

2 

41 


99 
5 

2 

3 
2 
5 

1 
31 
5 

7 

2 

13 
2 
8 

5 

3 

108 


1 
- 

9 

4 

3 

16 
2 

1 

9 

2 

3 
2 

2 

1 
5 
2 

/,56 


211 
24 
18 
22 

421 

1,022 

305 

7 

14.374 

6 

1 

559 

22 

379 

163 

1^6 
19 
36 
223 
1A8 
14 
251 
168 

3.877 




J, ? . 


s 


_ ^. ■!_„ W^ 




Denmark 


? 


France 

Germany 


n 
76 


Hungary 

Ire land. 


1 


Italy 


39 

1 


Lithuania. 

Netherlands ............ 


2 

16 


Norway 

Poland 

Portugal. ............... 


U 
6 
2 


Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey 

United Kingdom 


2 

6 
12 
10 
78 


U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia. 

Other Europe 


9 
2 

4 




52 


China 2/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Iran 

Israel ................. 


1,143 

1,458 

323 

454 

4,788 

6,847 

442 

1,470 

2,034 

1,911 

98.828 


135 
194 
122 
279 
3,996 
204 
157 
83 
112 
872 

15.197 


ijooe 

1.264 

201 

175 

792 

6.643 

285 

1.387 

1,922 

1,039 

8?. 631 


215 
636 

24 

5.027 

332 
952 
359 

1.598 


67 
27 

30 

62 

127 
170 
37 
25 
94 
170 

1.827 


53 
261 

13 
3 

21 
527 

27 

18 
583 

89 

623 


1 
- 

: 
9 

i 

75.809 


2 

6 
2 

5 

2 
24 


4 
2 
1 
44 
45 
1 

4 
7 

10/, 


291 
16 

2 

1 
78 

62 
2 
4 

488 


380 
318 
130 
80 
440 
771 
177 
944 
282 
355 

1.172 


1 
5 




17 




3 




5 


Philippines 


1 


Other Asia 

North America 


12 
885 


Canada 


45;i43 
26,791 
11,701 
5,282 
6,718 
3,193 

U.304 


12,851 
113 
142 
1.082 
239 
770 

3.229 


32,292 
26,678 
11,559 
4,200 
6,479 
2,423 

11.075 


619 
73 
48 

448 
53 

357 

77 


622 
U 
35 

698 
38 

393 

152 


45 
7 
6 
532 
6 

27 

22 


29.251 
26.133 
11.213 
2.041 
6,254 
917 

10.183 


'748 
23 
93 
175 
56 
30 

357 


45 
6 
1 
24 
12 
16 


1 
487 


624 
34 
68 

268 
49 

129 

236 


338 




Cuba 

Other West Indies 

Central America 

Other North America .... 

South America 


95 
U 

32 




3; 552 
2,977 
7,775 

2,008 

1,783 

274 


791 

146 

2,292 

229 


21761 
2,831 
5.483 

638 
312 
45 


"6 
60 

221 
138 
17 


31 
15 
106 

86 
29 
8 


1 
2 
19 

48 
U 

.0 


2)506 
2.756 
4.921 

28 

11 
2 


154 
33 
170 

30 
9 

1 


2 

11 

11 
6 


2 
1 
2 


49 
10 
177 

209 

102 

5 


6 






Other South America .... 


17 
4 


Australia and New Zealand. 


3 







1/ Admissions under Refugee Relief Act of 1953 - figures include 842 refugees in the 
United States who had adjusted their status under Sac. 6, 156 orphans, and 14 
others not previously reported. 

2/ Includes Formosa. 

2/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



25 



MAXIMUM VISAS AU!IHORIZED AND DOaORAKT AUBS AIiaTTED 
TO THE UNITED 

REiUOKB RELIEF 
YEARS QTDED JUNE 



ACT OF 1953 J 
30, WSl* - 1958 



Number adadT^eT 



Maxiinum 

vlaaa 

authorized 



1956 



195s 



Total number 

German expellees In Western Germany, 
Berlin, or Austria 

Escapees In Western Germany, Berlin 
or Austria ; Total 

BuBffvlan refugees 

Escapees In NATO countries or In 
Turkey, Sweden, Iran or Trieste . . . . 

Polish veteran refugees In the United 
Kingdom 

Italleoi refugees in Italy or Trieste . 

Italian relatives of U.S. citizens or 
alien residents, residing in Italy 
or Trieste 

Greek refugees in Greece 

Greek relatives of U.S. citizens or 
alien residents, residing In Greece 

Dutch refugees in the Netherlands .... 

Dutch relatives of U.S. citizens or 
alien residents, residing In the 
Netherlands 

Fbr East refugees (non-Asian) 

Far East refugees (Asian) 

Chinese refugees 

Palestine refugees in the Near Bast .. 

Orphans (under 10 years of ar^s ) 

Persons adjusting status under 

Section 6 



2l't,000 



55,000 



2,000 
2,000 

3,000 

2,000 
2,000 
U,000 

5,000 



18S»752 



29,002 



1^M3 



27,631 
6,130 

9,867 



2,000 


1,996 


45,000 


r 13,153 


15,000 


lu6,308 


15,000 


J 9,198 


2,000 


\ 7,518 


15,000 


r 13,839 



2,996 

1,997 
1,939 
3,727 

3M3 



613 



106 



2,60lt 



569 



93 
U98 

18,183 

2,275 

2,654 

59 

429 



14,154 



4,836 

1,361 
6,710 

24,114 
5,051 
3,814 
1,552 

275 

114 

2,426 

422 

738 

1,325 

493 



20,433 

18,971 
6,130 

4,510 

542 
5,940 

3,394 

1,872 

991 

12,228 



766 

4o3 

1,527 

1,165 

1,281 

2,108 



156 
842 



26 



TABLE 6C. IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED UNDER THE REFUGEE RELIEF ACT OF 1953, 

BY CLASS OF ADMISSION AND COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1954 - 1958 



Total 
•efugees 



All countries. 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgium. ................ 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania. .............. 

Netherlands 

Norway. . ................ 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania. ................ 

Spain 

Sweden. ................. 

Switzerland. . ........... 

Turkey 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 1/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Iran 

Israel. 

Japan 

Jordan 2/ 

Korea 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North America. ............ 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Other West Indies 

Central America ...< 

Other North America...., 

South America 

Argentina < 

Colombia 

Other South America..... 

Africa 

Australia and New Zealand. 
Other Countries... 



16.716 



2jJ27 



IMl 



171.625 



;657 

451 

2,912 

29 

17 

660 

20,922 

16,921 

9,650 

18 

57,017 

1,567 

1,680 

11,337 

20 

11,896 

34 

4,364 

122 

79 

38 

538 

679 

5,823 

17,418 

2,776 

16. 1?0 



37. PCS 



3,050 
11 
1.701 



40 
9,955 

17 
1,923 

38 

461 

751 

17 

7 

3,650 

7 

3,071 

57 

1 

8 

3 

79 

1,630 

10,197 

325 

115 



43.278 



1,123 

419 

1,114 

20 

11 

572 

10, 586 

368 

7,543 

2 

510 

1,047 

907 

81 

12 

6,694 

5 

1,072 

24 

71 

15 

103 



3,994 
5,063 
1,840 



58.831 



92 
3 
7 
1 

19 

34 
L89 

29 
8 
55,946 
4 
1 
2 
1 

23 
2 

61 



3 

12 
13 
21 
2,003 
350 



16.421 



16 
15,724 

5 
5 
28 
25 



302 



1.615 



18 



6,735 
479 
46 
107 
520 

2,246 

1,039 
624 
121 

4,213 



3,164 



JTWT 

448 

B 

2 

459 

935 

1,011 

161 

27 

435 



2.066 



1*7 

27 

5 

11 

2 

1,296 

11 

454 



TABLE 6D. IMMIGRANT ALIENS WHO ADJUSTED STATUS TO PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN THE UNITED STATES 
BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH; YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1958 ' 



Total 
adjust- 
ing 
status 



Quota immigrants 



S §1 



Nonquota immigrants 



3o 

.1% 



ill 



Europe 

Austria 

Belgium 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands ... 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland ... 

Turkey 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. .. 

Yugoslavia .... 
Other Europe . . 



Asia 

China i/ ... 
Hong Kong . . 

India 

Iran 

Israel 

Japan 

Jordan 2/ .. 

Korea 

Philippines 
Other Asia . 



J^ 



2.065 



.382 



113 


87 


32 


28 


27 


18 


135 


103 


304 


249 


317 


44 



3. 18-; 



<ico 



Cuba 

Other West Indies .. 
Central America .... 
Other North America 



South America 
Argentina .. 
Colombia ... 
Other South 



Africa I 

Australia and New Zealand ] 

Other countries 



T/ Includes Formosa. 

2/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



Ml. 



J9i 



2^504 



1.336 



75 


12 


74 


- 


17 


2 


405 


134 



TABLE 5S. IMi;lGRANT jiLUMS ADMITTED TO THK UNITED 3TATEJ UHDEH THE ACT OF 3EPTEHBEH 11, 1957 (P.L. 85-JI6), 

BY CLA3a OF .iDHlnalON AND COUNTHY OR RMION OF BIRTH: 

SEPTEMBEI) 11, 1957 - JUNK JO, I958 



All countries 

Austria 

Belgium 

Czechoslovakia 

Denniark 

Finland 

Greece 

Huncary 

Italy 

Lctvia 

Lithuania ,.• 

Netherlands 

Norv/ay 

Poland 

Portugal •• 

Kumania 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Turkey 

UnitPd Kin-dom 

U.S.S.R 

Yueoolavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 1/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Israel 

Jordan 2j 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Other West Indies 

Central America o« 

Other North America .... 

South America 

Arcentina 

Colombia « 

Other South America .... 

Africa 

Australia pnd Hew ^ealand. 

Othor countries 

U Includes Formosa. 

2/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



o— - 






(■I Si 



15, 336 
lit, 506 



19 


30 


h', 


61. 


126 


1.56 


l^ 


29 



Adjusted status 



M^ 



_506_ 



ANNUAL QUOTAS AND QUOTA IMMIGRANTS ADIOTTED: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1954 - 1958 





Annual 
quota 1/ 


Quota immiR 


-ants adm tted 2/ 


Quota area 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


All quota areas 


15/..957 


94,098 


82,232 


89,310 


97^178 


102,153 


Europe 


149.667 


90.190 


78,926 


86.246 


93.698 


98.601 


Northern and Western Europe 


125.165 


691267 


62.307 


69.332 


77.826 


78)169 




1,297 
1,175 
3,069 
25,814 
65,361 
100 
17,756 
100 
3,136 
2,364 
3,295 
1,693 

24.502 


1,445 

1,128 

3,044 

28,361 

21,092 

109 

5,169 

79 

3,208 

2,195 

1,803 

1.634 

20.923 


1,068 

1,129 

2,903 

23,430 

19,267 

93 

5,825 

74 

3,020 

2,310 

1,561 

1,627 

16.619 


1,098 
1,201 
3,013 
25,618 
22,695 
142 
6,235 
52 
3,270 
2,391 
1,867 
1,750 

16.914 


1,419 

1,137 

2,954 

24,952 

28,914 

134 

8,933 

73 

2,993 

2,346 

2,289 

1,682 

15.872 






1,163 


p 


_ 


24,172 

29,335 

106 


Great Britain, Northern Ireland 


Ireland 


10,312 
68 






2,997 
2,213 
2,252 




Sweden •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 


Svd.tzerland ..•••••.••••••••••••••••••• 


1,587 


Southern and Eastern Europe 


20.432 


Austria 

Bulgaria 


1,405 
100 

2,859 
115 
566 
308 
865 

5,645 
235 
384 

6,488 
438 
289 
250 
225 

2,697 
933 
700 

3.090 


1,056 
52 

2,005 
156 
555 
571 
801 

6,042 
203 
311 

4,851 
496 
308 
329 
190 

1,887 
778 
332 

3.286 


923 
83 

1,615 
166 
496 
267 
528 

5,398 
239 
199 

3,657 
414 
225 
201 
129 

1,283 
562 
234 

2.653 


1)398 
67 

1,343 
123 
578 
252 
510 

5,649 
173 
236 

3,428 
427 
205 
176 
140 

1,392 
560 
257 

2.294 


1)430 
47 

1,242 
72 
568 
262 
490 

5,454 
U3 
204 

3,037 
457 
206 
163 
133 

1,154 
526 
284 

2.343 


1)285 
75 

1,899 
79 






567 




317 


' 


736 




5,366 




176 


Lithuania 

Poland 


302 

5,225 

454 


Rumania. ••.••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 


271 




278 




205 


U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Southern & Eastern Europe 

Asia 


2,009 
882 
306 

2.422 


Asia Pacific Triangle 

India 

Iran 

Iraq 

Israel • 

Japan 


100 
100 
105 
100 
100 
100 
100 
185 
200 
100 
100 
100 
1,700 

1,600 
600 


21 

63 

1,348 

120 

89 
107 
111 
319 
184 
121 

48 
262 
493 

350 
272 


9 
/*9 
1,066 
116 
87 
86 
139 
216 
174 
80 
79 
130 
422 

425 
228 


37 
90 
470 
105 
66 
105 
256 
151 
2U 
96 
93 
113 
498 

46I 
309 


59 
60 
267 
139 
120 
101 
422 
159 
205 
102 
74 
84 
551 

679 
458 


108 
82 
304 
109 
141 
115 
341* 
154 
192 


Korea 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

Africa 

Oceania 


99 
108 
105 
561 

707 
423 



1/ The annual quota was 154,657 in 1954 - 1956; 154,857 in 1957; and 154,957 in 1958. On 

June 20, 1958, the total quota was reduced to 154,857, the quotas of 100 each for Egypt, 
and Syria were abolished and a quota of 100 was established for the United Arab Republic. 

2/ Figures Include adjustment of status cases. See ;rable 6D. 



30 



TADLE 7A.. yUOTA II'.MlCr(ANTS ADMIT 

y-:ar ended 


I;D, CT ylFOTA AHi-;A tH'A (^UOTA 
JUN : 50. l«58 


I'DtFiHEIiCES 








Total 


F.rst 
preference 1 


rroforo])ce 


Third 


Fourth 
preference 


Nonpreference 




>,-uota area 


quota 
mm! grants 


mmiBr!.nts 

.f or-erial 

skills 


Their 

and 
children 


Parents of 
U.S. 


Gpo.ice5, 
childien 
of resi- 
dent aliens 


nther rel- 
atives of 
U.S. 
citizens 


Sec. 4 
persons 1/ 




io:!,i5J 


5,9^1 


3,179 


?,6n8 


?,J87 


't,952 


32,050 








5,1*55 


2,889 


2,429 


4,984 


4,815 


79,988 


43 








1.177 


5^9 


1,966 


2,5'.8 


70,5'.5 






l|l35 
1,165 
2.829 
2l<,172 
29.535 
106 
10,512 
68 
2,997 
2,215 
2,252 
1.587 


■ 19 
93 
159 
W7 
192 
2 
3 

179 
73 
11 

151 


20 
82 
118 
382 

120 
3 

2 

24S 
51 
13 

158 


15 
26 
87 
251 
130 
4 
2 
2 
24 
26 
4 
20 

1,840 


15 
125 
222 

716 

585 
5 
58 

156 

252 

5 

75 

3.018 


56 

190 

1,950 

112 

10 

21 

2 

80 

109 

2 

50 

2.267 


1,064 
786 

2.075 
20.406 
28.598 

10,246 
64 
2,510 
1.722 
2,217 
1,175 

9,44^ 








J, 









Great Britain, N. Ireland. 
Iceland 








, . 












orway .... 




q t» ° i"rt 




Southern and Eastern Europe. 
Austria 


"? 


75 

1,899 
79 
567 
517 
756 

5,366 
176 
502 

5.225 
451. 
271 
278 
205 

2.009 
882 
506 

2,lt22 


'14 

9 

94 

9 

26 

M» 

117 

1.01(2 

18 

20 

2I.I4 

25 

47 

57 

'<5 

9C 
19 

371. 


'I2I 
6 
60 
9 
43 
li» 
115 
912 
12 
21 
206 
8 
35 
19 
36 
47 
41 
7 

184 


66 
5 
65 
11 
9 

718 
19 
20 

567 
76 
58 
58 
48 

120 

108 
10 

129 


185 
6 

167 
8 
71 
99 
75 
1.5'«3 
17 
20 

546 

125 
59 
47 
13 
91 

157 
58 

503 


151 
8 

259 
8 

ao 

84 
259 

29 

58 
913 

41 

25 

195 
115 
55 

70 


619 

59 

1,268 

51 

558 

106 

258 

1,094 

79 

165 

2,940 

183 

99 

92 

56 

1,495 

386 

199 

1,329 


2 


CzechoslOTakia 


5 


Finland 

Greece 

Hungary 

Italy 

UtTia 


8 

1 
2 


Poland 


9 


Rumania 


2 


Turkey 

U.S.S.R 


1 
7 


ugoa V a ... . 


- 




55 


Asia Pacific Triangle 


10« 
B2 
50'. 
109 
\h\ 
115 
5'»'. 
154 

99 
lOM 
105 
561 

707 
".25 


It 
7 
20 
Ml 
51 
53 
25 
26 
27 
51 
19 
20 
72 

65 

h3 


3 

7 

11 
25 
59 
21 

4 
57 
72 


12 

4 
24 
8 

25 

10 

7 
50 

26 

24 


17 

9 
le 

12 
12 

80 
20 
57 
10 

15 
51 

76 
24 


1 
8 

2 
5 
4 

21 
2 

10 
3 

15 

35 

12 


'•5 
224 
52 
60 
35 
173 
62 
77 
51 
BO 
56 
555 

'*53 
280 












Iran 


- 


. 


- 




- 




- 


Jordan 2/ 


; 




- 








. 




- 






1/ Persona adjuBting status un 
2/ Includes Arab Palestine. 


er Cection 


1., Di,,r.i£.c. 


A Fersonc 


,ct of 19'i8, 


as amended. 









TABLE 8. IMHIC,SfJ<V ALIENS ADMITT^D, BY COUNTHY OR REGION OF EIRTII 
YEAR ENDED JUNE JO. 1958 


.aND major OXUPATION GROUP! 






Country or region 
of birth 


Number 
ad- 
mitted 


1 ".1 

III 


ll 


in 


1 
III 

G:3i 


.1 


M 

III 
III 


il 


5ic 

III 


ill 


If 


E 

It! 


.1: 

mi 


All countries 


255.265 


22. '♦82 


2,221 


4,646 


17.968 


4,172 


19,113 


12,405 


7.521 


7.362 


2,511 


11,100 


141,764 


Surope 


138.311 


12.139 


1,682 




9,935 


2,595 


15.742 


8.428 


3.617 


5,065 


1.558 


4,333 


72,707 




2,005 

i.iei* 

2.156 

i.itga 

738 
it, 100 
32.1't5 
3.079 
1.583 
10,583 
2^,47? 
319 
-♦1,8 
3.711 
2.385 
6,607 
1,635 
805 
1,35'* 
2,22lt 
1.739 
730 
27,613 
1,899 
2,260 
1,258 

19,867 


'2hU 
118 
283 
185 

63 
292 
2.051 
273 
329 
1,0'*8 
57'* 

50 

53 
383 
289 
662 

'♦1 
128 
2'^8 
386 
3'*8 
200 
3.328 
275 
171 
117 

2,2 '.3 


-g 

2 
10 
23 

% 
109 
3'* 
23 
25'* 
537 

3 
58 

153 

90 
7 

22 
8 

16 
2 

"♦9 

21 
104 

17 

100 


■^■4o 
23 
o7 
58 

61 
380 

89 

31 

175 

18? 

8 

13 
101 

59 
197 

27 

28 

28 
62 
38 
33 
683 
71 
21 
30 

317 


■■^■■54- 
58 
151 
134 

j; 

2,304 
44 
71 
872 
180 
23 
27 
225 
262 
278 
41 
17 
32 
364 
253 
11 
3,427 
124 
60 
72 

457 


28 
19 

40 
60 
12 

8^4^ 
16 
14 

289 
44 

I 
62 

50 

95 

i 

13 

J? 

6 
743 
24 
17 

21 

101 


195 
90 
275 
153 
54 
202 
3.402 
216 
157 
1,030 
2,684 
41 
73 
295 
290 

^•T9 
92 
81 
160 
128 
52 
2,351 
247 
212 
136 

255 


78 
174 
99 
50 
159 
1.658 
157 
74 
1,032 
1,368 
21 
43 
164 
194 
739 
42 
55 
59 
117 
63 
16 
1,668 
143 
135 
75 

205 


16 
45 
34 
25 
70 
972 

i 
707 
515 
7 
5 
35 
58 
81 

4i( 
16 
15 
47 
60 
2 
576 

1 

57 


41 
87 
66 
33 

171 
1.133 

219 
47 

695 

614 
9 

120 
98 
203 

M 

41 
112 
154 

14 

1 

43 
381 


2 
7 

15 
13 
43 

65 
55 
11 
363 
473 
1 
3 

36 
15 
121 
177 
6 
7 
9 
3 

62 
3 

73 

5 

51 


30 

l\ 
32 

^1 

629 
80 
12 

934 
1,107 
14 
37 
72 
80 

294 

125 
15 
45 
32 
23 
7 

416 
45 
88 
42 

148 


iliss 


Belgiuni 

Czechoslovakia 


681 
989 
655 




375 




2,595 


Germany 


18,102 


Greece 


1,861 




766 




2,984 


Italy 


16.196 
140 




175 




2,160 


N 


966 




2,727 


Portugal 

Rumania 


905 
411 




763 




878 


Switzerland 


609 
387 


United Kingdom 

U.S.G.H 


13,425 

861 

1,259 




684 


Asia 


15,562 


China 1_/ 

Hong Kong 


3.213 

3't2 

513 

'♦35 

1,681 

6,5'*3 

528 

1,60'» 

2,236 

2.77't 

80.788 


5fa9 
52 
208 
l'*3 
123 

150 
65 
108 
303 
'192 
5.8'^7 


6 

1 
1 
'♦5 
11 

- 

"♦01 


108 
6 
11 

20 
12 
14 
24 
k 
11 
107 
1.418 


101 
50 
33 
12 
36 
33 
17 
13 
18 

144 

6.240 


29 

5 
7 

3 
5 
4 
11 

5 
32 

1.327 


25 

12 
6 
52 
15 
17 

11 

139 

4.586 


5S 
1 
k 
8 

13 
9 
9 
2 

14 

107 

3.242 


22 

3 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
6 
18 

3.413 


235 
3 

8 
5 
3 
12 
6 
1 
31 
77 

1.755 


10 

16 

3 

2 
19 
867 


9 

1 
3 
2 
32 
6 

87 
6.'.55 


2,045 
224 
220 




231 




1,452 




6,212 


Jordan^ 

Korea 


358 
1,475 
1,823 




1,524 




45.439 




— kk 

26,712 
11,581 
5,181 
6,573 
686 

11 0^9 


-^t55t 

'♦23 

750 
W5 

1 772 


155 

'.■■8 

'♦e 

39 
38 
25 

29 


200 
236 
110 
91 
18 

314 


-5tW 
596 
944 
374 
840 
51 

1,078 


-^9^ 
187 
208 

54 
49 
51 

103 


i;95o 

875 

648 
415 
403 
95 

556 


■ i;053 

437 
802 
516 
405 
29 

435 


24g 

2,162 

147 

181 

668 

9 

410 


75l^ 
491 
203 
159 
131 
17 

101 


170 
587 
22 
70 
6 
12 

23 


1.043 

4,882 
176 
247 
48 
57 

130 






15,774 




7,599 


Other West Indies 

Central America 

Other North America ... 


2,531 

5,357 

254 

6,090 




2,891 
5, '♦83 

2, CO 
937 
283 


738 

299 
167 

25 


3 
5 
21 

7 

2 


9B- 

95 
123 

15 

2 


363 
464 

157 
84 
19 


25 

41 
59 

26 
16 
k 


259 
110 
187 

112 

36 
26 


-121 
114 
198 

75 
14 
8 


19 
145 
246 

14 

5 
5 


17 
29 
55 

32 
18 
10 


12 

I 

6 
1 

5 


21 

88 

29 

3 
k 






1,553 


Other South America ... 
Africa 


1,215 
578 
173 


Australia and New ileland. 







1 7 Includes Formosa 

2 / Includes Arab Palestine 



IMllIGKANT ALIEN3 ADMITTED, BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH, SEX, AND AGE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 50, 1958 



Country or region 
of birth 



Total 

immigrants 



20- 

29 

y«"5 



30- 

59 

years 



'»9 
years 



60- 
69 
years 



70- 

79 

years 



All countrie 



Europe , 

Austria 

Belgium 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands ... 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Ritmania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland . . . 

Turkey 

United Kingdom 



138.511 



Yugoslavia . . 
Other Europe 



Asia 

China 1/... 
Hong Kong . 

India 

Iran 

Israel .... 

Jordan 2/.. 

Korea 

Philippines 
Other Asia 



North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Other West Indies .. 
Central America .... 
Other North America 



South America 

Argentina 

Colombia 

Other South America 



Africa 

Australia and New Zealand 
Other countries 



2,005 
1,164 
2,156 
1,'*92 

758 
4,100 
52,145 
3,079 
1,585 
10,585 
24,479 

519 

448 
3,711 
2,585 
6,607 
1,655 

805 
1,554 
2,224 
1,759 

750 
27,615 
1,899 
2,260 
1,258 

19.867 



699 
505 

1,580 
11,181 

1,542 
710 

4,999 

11,168 

142 

258 

1,807 

1,100 

5.510 

940 
373 
598 
834 
718 
585 
10,559 



206 
1,873 
169 
19 
276 
764 



21 
65 

61 

18 

1,218 



6,885 



3, 

342 

513 

433 

1,681 

6,543 

528 

1,604 

2,256 

2,774 



1.356 
164 
304 
281 
828 
915 
525 
590 
711 

1,409 

37.704 



J28Z 



30,055 
26,712 
11,581 
5,181 
6,575 
686 

_U452. 



2,665 
2,891 
5,485 

2,040 
957 
283 



15,405 
15,278 
5.568 
2,486 
2,591 
578 



17 
33 
9 
15 

174 
251 
31 
346 
57 
74 

4,928 



705 
456 
121 

248 



iToF 
1,328 
2,508 

1,006 

580 
157 



31,2^ 



9.163 



57 
19 
42 
51 
138 
1,006 

52 

151 

1,507 



105 
62 
83 
85 
39 

219 
1,890 

184 
58 

715 

3,214 

11 

15 

258 

156 

215 

180 
26 
55 

116 
55 
25 
1.155 
46 

159 
87 

1.005 



16.222 



201 
159 
155 
229 

62 

415 

3.568 

566 

105 

2,365 

2,545 

21 

31 
502 
376 
581 
209 

55 
I5h 
279 
565 

80 
3,002 

53 
214 
136 



5.432 



478 



1,720 

1,827 

876 

461 
546 



.1,100 

3.296 

4,146 

1,904 

768 

925 

61 

2.060 



231 

1,597 
545 
168 
941 

1,526 
45 
75 
595 
225 

1,124 
167 
104 
168 
179 
146 
129 

2,372 
166 
235 
134 

1|373| 



1.882 



99 
46 
237 
65 
46 
94 
670 
96 
116 
566 
819 
25 
59 
190 
155 
853 
139 
73 
80 
75 
50 
45 
1,085 
216 
122 
85 



1.645 



2,560 
2,766 
,190 
591 
423 
113 

.008 



58 
19 
8 
29 
128 

4450 



388 



1.539. 



32L 



1/ Includes Formosa. 

Z/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



33 



TABLK 9. iri-MGDANT AU™3 ADMITTED, BY COUNTRY OH RKGION OF BIRTH, SEX, AND AGS 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 195^ (CONT'D.) 



Under 

5 
years 



5- iO- 

9 19 

years years 



30- 

39 

years 



50- 

59 

years 



60- 

69 

years 



70- 

79 

years 



years 
and 
over 



AH countries ..... 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgium 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece • 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Li thuania 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey 

United Kingdom 

U.3.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 1/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Iran 

Israel 

Japan 

Jordan 2/' 

Korea 

Philippines ••.. 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Other West Indies 

Central America 

Other North America .... 

Couth .'jnerica 

^gentina 

Colombia 

Other South .America .... 

Africa 

Australia and New Zealand 
Other countries 



7.802 3.556 



80.39'' 



1,169 
632 

1,176 
795 
'*33 

2,720 
20,964 

1,537 
873 

13,311 
177 
210 

l,90'i 
1.2SS 

3.297 

695 

'^32 

756 

1,390 

1,021 

5''5 

17,05't 

1,028 

1,326 

682 

12.98'» 



4.916 



1,357 

178 

209 

152 

853 

5.628 

203 

l.Olif 

1,525 

1,265 

'*3.08't 



60 

31 
25 

185 
1,70't 

166 
25 

221 

bOl 



_25S 



13,711 



15b 
56 
126 
111 
64 
322 
3,565 
252 
64 
1,536 
3,259 
11 
17 
223 
172 
265 
171 
'*5 
52 
244 
67 
28 
2,55't 
51 
212 
90 

1.053 



16,652 
15,454 
6,013 
2,695 
3,982 



5.765 



227 
1,563 
2,975 

1,034 
557 
126 



2,234 

1,526 

425 

119 

238 



.^61 



14 
12 
288 
217 
23 
106 
59 
76 

3.502 



1^ 
20 
24 
29 
179 
185 
44 
45 
1S9 
150 

7.272 



571 

208 

329 

349 

155 

1,328 

9,255 

518 

125 

2,081 

2,422 

35 

40 

680 

492 

505 

142 

S6 

282 

578 

573 

69 

7,107 

97 

281 

244 

6.23? 



13,170 



1,370 

1,142 

391 

165 

256 



TTTlF 

2,576 

"32 

573 

772 



_Z62 



6b7 
62 
102 
45 
120 
3,748 
46 
578 
587 
478 

1''.239 



275 
120 
351 
138 

78 
438 
5,0S6 
229 
157 
756 
1,977 

41 

56 
570 
210 
852 

85 
108 
170 
250 
169 

79 
2,585 
211 
276 
123 

2.579 



7.375 



106 
76 51 
12 13 



5.754 
4.555 
1.964 
304 
1,3'»8 
34 

2.065 



445 

564 

1,056 

343 
185 
43 



569 



59 
19 
56 
1,055 
37 
65 
460 
251 

7.184 



9" 
57 
162 
69 
56 
125 
1,080 
lia 
116 
314 
2,001 
25 
■43 
184 
145 
615 
64 
43 
79 
116 
66 
48 
1.283 
193 
219 
64 

671 



5.15'» 



497 



.M 



1.947 

1,306 

492 

698 

70 

1.054 



5,745 



167 



1.838 



L,350 
997 
625 
260 

451 

82 



1/ Includes Formosa. 

2/ Includes i\rab Palestine. 



34 



TABLE 10. IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED, BY RACE, SEX, AND AGE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1958 



Sex and age 



All races 



East 
[ndian 



Fili- 
pino 



Japa- 
nese 



Ko- 
rean 



Negro 



Pacific 

Is- 
lander 



Number admitted..., 

Male 

Under 5 years 

5-9 years 

10-14 years 

15 years 

16-17 years 

18-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-29 years 

30-34 years 

35-39 years 

40-44 years 

45-49 years 

50-54 years 

55-59 years 

6O-64 years 

65-69 years 

70-74 years 

75-79 years 

80 yrs. and over 
Unknown 

Female 

Under 5 years 

5-9 years 

10-14 years..... 

15 years 

16-17 years 

18-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-29 years 

30-34 years 

^5-39 years 

40-44 years 

45-49 years 

50-54 years 

55-59 years 

6O-64 years 

65-69 years 

70-74 years 

75-79 years 

80 yrs. and over 
Unknovm 



253,265 



109.121 



11,976 

9,488 

7,694 

1,304 

3,190 

4,29/. 

13,782 

17,493 

12,841 

8,840 

5,836 

4,545 

3,076 

2,050 

1,268 

737 

390 

176 

105 

36 

144. IV4 



11,172 

9,239 

7,753 

1,498 

4,709 

9,091 

29,253 

22,181 

14,698 

9.376 

6,656 

5,703 

4,397 

3,405 

2,253 

1,303 

818 

406 

181 

52 



233,539 



3,195 



492 



2,013 



6,427 



1,190 



6.216 



102.475 



1.396 



328 



619 



868 



425 



2.905 



11,245 

8,836 

7,172 

1,227 

2,976 

4,050 

13,129 

16, 539 

11,936 

8,248 

5,480 

4,331 

2,868 

1,921 

1,185 

677 

354 

165 

103 

33 

131.064 



48 

105 

59 

6 

30 

]9 

105 

205 

224 

175 

91 

75 

106 

72 

44 

21 

9 

1 



1.799 



164 



54 
51 
106 
12 
53 
72 
75 
56 
81 
24 
15 
10 
5 

4 
1 



1.394 



198 

167 

71 

15 

17 

11 

27 

63 

78 

37 

33 

29 

23 

30 

15 

27 

17 

7 

2 

1 

i.559 



10,459 

8,594 

7,183 

1,410 

4,500 

8,727 

26,461 

18,751 

12,903 

8,541 

6,189 

5,328 

4,126 

3,208 

2,113 

1,218 

764 

375 

166 

48 



43 

86 

54 

7 

26 

68 

328 

318 

202 

156 

110 

121 

84 

74 

53 

27 

24 

10 



217 
81 
19 

1 
3 

11 
35 
29 

5 
3 

5 

1 



m- 



187 

218 

245 

40 

101 

121 

384 

496 

403 

304 

192 

93 

63 

22 

16 

9 



3.311 



42 

54 

88 

13 

39 

37 

226 

297 

262 

162 

68 

50 

32 

11 

7 
1 
3 



130 

196 

95 

13 

14 

81 

1,565 

2,126 

856 

206 

61 

28 

40 

50 

42 

28 

11 

10 

5 

2 



267 
73 

17 

6 

16 

161 

161 

39 

11 

3 

9 

1 



204 

216 

298 

55 

122 

151 

451 

483 

409 

279 

215 

166 

111 

58 

38 

28 

15 

10 



Ji^ 



TABLE lOA. IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED.BY SEX, MARITAL STAT\JS, AGE, ILLITERACY, 
AND MAJOR OCCUPATION GROUP i "^ YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1954 - 1958 




Marital status, age, illiterates, 
and occupation 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


Imiigrant allsns admlttad 


208.177 


237.790 


321.625 


326.867 


253,265 


Marital status and sex« 

Males 


95.594 


112.032 


156.410 


155.201 


109.J2L 


Single 


45,303 

43,317 

712 

749 

5,513 

112.583 


58,436 

49,380 

911 

824 

2,481 

125.758 


85,441 

67,707 

1,273 

1,174 

815 

165.215 


87,236 

65,114 

1,121 

1,428 

302 

171.666 


61,97'9 


Married 


45,245 


Widowed 


807 




819 


Unknown • 


271 




144.144 


Single 


47,660 

56,091 

4,457 

2,174 

2,201 

849 

26.7 
28.1 
25.7 

1,009 
0.5 

13,817 
3,846 

5,296 

16,018 

15,396 

16,755 

8,096 

5,203 

1,622 

10,061 

112,067 


56,498 

60,655 

5,146 

2,366 

1,093 

891 

26.2 
27.4 
25.2 

1,677 
0.7 

14,109 
4,446 

5,114 
18,060 
18,867 
15,351 
11,824 
6,512 
5,486 
17,518 

120,503 


76,112 

78,949 

6,642 

3,123 

389 

947 

25.9 
26.9 
25.0 

1,525 
0.5 

18,995 
5,727 

5,814 
23,413 
25,914 
19,036 
15,347 
7,922 
9,050 
27,807 

162,600 


77,841 

83,716 

6,630 

3,287 

192 

904 

25.7 
26.3 
25.1 

676 
0.2 

24,489 
3,506 

6,127 
25,897 
26,976 
19,362 
11,457 
8,761 
4,585 
21,826 

173,881 


62,903 


Married 


73,035 




5,596 




2,368 




242 




757 


Median age (years): 


25.3 


Males 


25.8 


Females .«..>...•••• •• 


24.9 


Illiterates: 

Number l/ 


420 




0.2 


Major occupation group: 

Professional, technical, and kindred workers . 


22,482 
2,221 


Managers, officials, and proprietors. 


4,646 


Clerical, sales, and kindred workers 


22,140 


Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers 


19,113 
12,405 


Private household workers 


7,521 


Service workers, except private household 

Farm laborers and foremen 


7,362 
2,511 


Laborers • except farm and mine 


11,100 


Housewives, children, and others with no 


141,764 







y Immigrants over 16 years of age who are unable to read and understand some language 
or dialect. 



TABLE lOB. HUNGARIAN REFUGEES AND PAROLEES ADHITTED , 
BY SEX, MARITAL STATUS, AGE, AND MAJOR OCCUPATIC» GROUP: 
NOVEMBER 19^6 - JUNE 30# 19^8 



Sex, marital status, age, and 
major occupation group 



Refugees 



1/ 



Number admitted 



Sex ; 

Male .. 
Female 



Marital status ; 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 



Age ; 

Under 5 years . . . . 
5-9 years .... 
10 - lit- years .... 
15 - 19 years .... 
20 - 29 years . . . . 
30 - 39 years .... 
ho - 1+9 years .... 
50 - 59 yeaxs . . . . 
6o years and over 
Not reported 



Major occupation group ; 

Professional, technical, emd kindred workers .... 

Farmers and farm managers 

Managers, officials, and proprietors, except farm 

Clerical and kindred workers 

Sales workers 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers 

Operatives and kindred workers 

Private household workers 

Service workers, except private household 

Form laborers and foremen 

Laborers , except farm and mine 



No occupation 



Housewives 

Retired 

Students 

Children under ik years of age 
Not reported 



38,0^5 



23,562 
1U,U83 



20,050 

15,971 

780 

1,207 

37 



2,U02 

2,576 

2,131 

5,383 

12,517 

7,229 

3,99^ 

1,389 

1+03 

21 



U,3U6 
690 
679 

2,557 
U35 

7,177 

5,815 
235 
9'*3 
311 

1,798 

13,059 



3,155 

12 

3,332 

6,356 

26k 



6,130 



U,lU6 
1,984 



3,573 
2,218 

96 
222 

21 



3ho 

klk 

26U 

925 

2,189 

1,205 

^kl 

197 

51 

k 



817 
79 
91 

361 

51* 

1,21+2 

1,0^+5 

38 

179 
6»t 

332 



«f22 

3 

396 

970 

37 



1/ Visaed refugees admitted under Section U(a)(2) of the Refugee Relief Act 
of 1953, and parolees who entered under the parolee provisions of 
Section 212(d)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act. 



TABLE 11. ALIENS ADMITTED AND CITIZENS ARRIVED AND DEPARTED: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1908 - 1958 






ALIENS ADMITTED 


U. 3. C 


TIZENS 


Period 


Immi- 
Rrant 


Nonitrani- 
Rrant 2/ 


Arrived 


Departed 


1908 - 1958 


15,972,111 


12,62/^,665 


21.517.668 


21.251.343 


1903-1910 1/ 


2.576.226 


490.741 


660.811 


342.600 


1911-1920 


5.735.811 


1.376.271 


1,938.503 


2.517.889 


1911 


878,587 
838,172 
1,197,892 
1,218,480 
326,700 
298,826 
295,403 
110,618 
141,132 
430,001 


151 1713 
178,983 
229,335 
184,601 
107,544 
67,922 
67,474 
101,235 
95,889 
191,575 


269,128 
280,801 
286,604 
286,586 
239,579 
121,930 
127,420 
72,867 
96,420 
157,173 


349:472 
353,890 
347,702 
368,797 




igi3 ,^ 


1914 




172,371 


1916 

1917 


110,733 
126,011 
275,837 
218,929 


1919 




194,147 






1921-1930 


4.107.209 


1.774.881 


3.522.713 


3.519.519 


1921 


^051228 
309, S 56 
522,919 
706,896 
294,3U 
304,488 
335,175 
307,255 
279,678 
241,700 


1721935 
122,949 
150,487 
172,406 
164,121 
191,618 
202,826 
193,376 
199,649 
204,514 


222,712 
243,563 
308,471 
301,281 
339,239 
370,757 
378,520 
430,955 
449,955 
477,260 


271:560 




309,477 




270,601 


1924 


277,850 


1925 ......................... 


324,323 
372,480 




1927 


369,788 




429,575 




431,842 


1930 


462,023 






1931-1940 


528.431 


" 

1.574.071 


3,365^432 


3.357.936 


1931 


97,139 
35,576 
23,068 
29,470 
34,956 
36,329 
50,244 
67,895 
82,998 
70,756 


183:540 
139,295 
127,660 
134,434 
144,765 
154,570 
181,640 
184,802 
185,333 
138,032 


439,897 
339,262 
305,001 
273,257 
282,515 
318,273 
386,372 
406,999 
354,438 
258,918 


446,386 
380,837 
338,545 
262,091 
272,400 
311,480 
390,196 
397,875 
333,399 
224,727 


1932 


1933 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1937 


1938 


1939 


1940 




1941-1950 


1.035.039 


2.461.359 


3.223.233 


2.880,/a4 


1941 


51)77^ 

28,781 

23,725 

28,551 

38,119 

108,721 

147,292 

170,570 

188,317 

249,187 


100,008 
82,457 
81,117 
113,641 
164,247 
203,469 
366,305 
476,006 
447,272 
426,837 


175:935 
118,454 
105,729 
108,444 
175,568 
274,543 
437,690 
542,932 
620,371 
663,567 


113,216 
62,403 
63,525 
103,019 
230,578 
451,345 
473,983 
552,361 
655,518 


1942 


1943 


1944 


1945 


1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 




1951 


205,717 
265,520 
170,434 
208,177 
237,790 
321,625 
326 867 


465,106 
516,082 
485,714 
566,613 
620,946 
686,259 


760,486 
807,225 
930,874 
1,021,327 
1,171,612 
1,281,110 
1,365,075 
1.469.262 


667,126 

814,239 

92s, 361 

971,02; 

1,096,146 

1,272,516 

1,402,107 

1,433.915 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 




253.265 347. 76i 


y Departures of U. 3. citizens fir 


St recorded in 


1910. 







1 



2/ Excludes agricultural laborers from Mexico and those admitted from the West Indies 
and Canada prior to March 8, 1957- 



state of intended future 
permanent residence 



TABLE 12. IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED, 
BY STATE OF INTENDED FUTURE PERMANENT RESIDENCE: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1949 - 1958 



1951 



All States 

Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

peorgla 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

lovra 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Elaine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Tu.chigan 

^^nne^ota 

Mississippi 

Missouri. 

Montana 

Nebraska *... 

Nevada. 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey. 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina. 

§outh Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

V/ashington 

•//est Virginia 

'.'/isconsin 

Wyorijig 

All other 



Ji: 



2/>9.187 



265.520 



170.434 



208,177 



237.790 



321.625 



326.867 



538 

1,2'">2 

417 

21,014 

729 

5,036 

279 

1,564 

2,736 

661 

367 

11,469 

2,172 

1,425 

605 

734 

2,151 

1,089 

2,747 

9,259 

10,267 

2,288 

1,058 

1,613 

646 

578 

180 

644 

9,832 

264 

53,926 

1,203 

718 

6,158 

596 

1,382 

10,162 

1,156 

436 

350 

694 

6,071 

1,293 

757 

1,483 

3,492 

730 

2,451 

169 

1,476 



469 

950 

725 
20,428 
1,401 
6,282 

396 
1,670 
2,980 

801 

424 
18,673 
3,642 
2,139 

958 

918 
2,125 
1,100 
4,330 
10,443 
14,681 
5,287 
1,584 
2,497 

802 
1,603 

164 

637 
13,349 

296 
68,944 
1,931 
1,279 
9,829 

755 
1,364 
15,268 
1,288 

509 
1,601 

953 
6,385 
1,325 

794 
3,570 
3,825 

690 
5,776 

275 
1,022 



958 

384 
19,588 
1,035 
4,841 

328 
1,460 
2,923 

608 

423 
20,562 
2,777 
1,639 

785 

637 
1,115 

809 
2,275 
8,134 
13,452 
2,710 

500 
1,721 

663 
1,273 

165 

500 
10,701 

315 
60,113 
1,069 

595 
7,926 

720 
1,274 
10,666 

938 

371 

487 

656 
5,533 
1,192 

511 
1,740 
3,415 

457 
3,162 

222 
1,003 



697 
1,269 

556 

26, 599 

1,863 

5,212 

453 
1,865 
3,789 
1,148 

449 
20,758 
3,473 
2,372 
1,137 

757 
1,729 

989 
2,121 
8,741 
15,489 
3,327 

444 
3,032 

869 
2,199 

269 

633 
14,531 

452 
78,212 
1,149 
1,078 
12,145 

898 
1,775 
13,772 
1,094 

537 

784 

876 
8,416 
1,485 

681 
2,157 
4,629 

663 
5,774 

276 
1,697 



554 

1,405 

278 

24,916 

848 

3,279 

270 

1,352 

4,405 

709 

404 

9,202 

1,818 

842 

672 

565 

1,000 

1,085 

1,367 

6,578 

10,351 

1,709 

303 

1,363 

450 

462 

186 

507 

7,916 

701 

42,712 

696 

356 

5/ 

565 

1,334 

6,335 

904 

340 

225 

568 

14,115 

1,390 

589 

1,228 

3,571 

U9 

2,0^3 

174 

2,241 



595 

1,610 

3U 

28,667 

961 

4,273 

268 

1,404 

5,326 

691 

348 

11,669 

2,143 

938 

739 

624 

1,198 

1,273 

1,875 

7,901 

11,328 

1,765 

322 

1,577 

418 

582 

216 

666 

9,523 

1,324 

48,757 

773 

394 

6,266 

586 

1,281 

7,829 

951 

342 

241 

661 

27,700 

1,522 

558 

1,375 

3,308 

491 

2,494 

196 

1,917 



604 

1,580 

339 

33,704 

979 

5,222 

281 

1,322 

7,079 

803 

348 

14,786 

2,093 

998 

723 

695 

1,131 

1,297 

1,8U 

8,817 

10,448 

1,707 

359 

1,609 

524 

594 

274 

626 

11,919 

1,521 

55,536 

886 

385 

7,133 

647 

1,129 

8,655 

1,111 

451 

243 

664 

35,333 

1,147 

537 

1,343 

3,004 

603 

2,4U 

220 

2,091 



746 
2,428 

469 
50,447 
1,594 
7,183 

430 
1,846 
10,508 
1,282 

455 
23,832 
3,400 
1,384 
1,210 

852 
1,541 
1,726 
2,717 
11,742 
14,209 
2,412 

446 
2,440 

586 

873 

274 

782 
16,017 
2,174 
70,700 
1,167 

421 
11,267 

890 
1,627 
11,618 
1,3a 

626 

371 

977 

39,078 

1,387 

693 
1,83 
3,643 

827 
3,916 

207 
3,029 



39 



IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED, BY SPECIFIED COUNTRIES OF BIRTH 
AND STATE OF INTENDED FITTURE PERMANENT RESIDENCE i 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1958 



State of intended 

future permanent 

residence 



All 
countrie 



Germany 



Poland 



United 
Kingdom 



1/ 
China 



All States 

Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia.. 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan....^ 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska. 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey. ........... 

New Mexico.. 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Ok lahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

^outh Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyomi ng 

All other 

1/ Includes Formosa. 



32,145 



6,607 27,613 



378 
,201 
,357 
,940 
399 
,803 
,396 
,279 
423 
,447 
,419 
962 
931 
764 
,798 
,744 
,464 
,128 
,727 
,006 
394 
,862 
497 
636 
311 
689 
,420 
,046 
,605 
,067 
330 
,219 
927 
,529 
,062 
,152 
539 
250 
754 
,254 
096 
732 
,815 
121 
621 
837 
133 
417 



249 
140 
135 

3,544 
320 
536 
69 
190 
610 
446 
90 

2,740 
455 
306 
287 
268 
199 
125 
497 
802 

1,393 
420 
128 
556 
88 
176 
43 
82 

2,095 
104 

6,590 
338 
63 

1,611 
259 
225 

1,694 
107 
191 
73 
230 

1,011 
320 
51 
454 
478 
217 
956 
26 
158 



1,098 

67 

11 

U 

7 

15 

18 

75 

1,135 

159 

39 

3 

57 

10 

20 

7 

26 

710 

7 

4,577 

9 

3 

282 

6 

27 

450 

66 



13 

28 

6 

1,149 

59 

1,465 

62 

143 

112 

31 

6 

1,954 

76 

12 

3 

13 

39 

34 

303 

1,634 

946 

29 

6 

119 

8 

20 

16 

9 

2,925 

16 

9,513 

25 

967 

14 

27 

1,916 

253 
6 
1 
16 
55 
13 
38 
56 
59 
47 

220 



11 

6 

3 

703 

1 

2,361 

11 

1 

301 

10 

10 

332 

24 

2 
16 
42 



118 
103 

65 

5,287 

215 

759 

85 
230 
801 
201 

57 

1,481 

325 

154 

125 

134 

139 

127 

356 

1,151 

1,516 

238 

71 
248 

49 

84 

27 

67 
1,751 

76 

5,443 

195 

37 
1,427 
128 
138 
1,400 
139 

93 

36 
136 
588 
153 

58 
413 
604 

95 
280 

25 
185 



35 
459 

25 
8,083 

82 
935 

33 

115 

2,385 

72 

70 
782 
231 



54 

176 

1,250 

171 

2,300 

2,194 

427 

24 

97 

175 



52 
343 
504 

40 
3,113 

83 
125 
779 

61 
433 
473 
128 

45 

28 

44 
312 
121 
441 
138 
1,282 

38 
163 

16 
912 



14,736 
112 



2,112 

283 

27 

56 

5 

52 

2 

10 

38 

217 

39 

5 

105 

14 



46 
650 
256 



31 
26 
47 

2 
21 
11 
5,603 
43 



40 



TAILE 12B. If.WIGRANT ALIEMS ADMITTED, BY SPECIFIED COUNTRIES OF BIRTH AND RURAL 
AND URBAN AR;;A AND CITY: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1958 

/^ural: Population of less than 2,600. Urban: Population of 2,500 -99,999. 
Cities: Population of 100,000 or more7 



Class of place and city 


All 
countries 


Germany 


I re lane 


Italy 


Poland 


United 
Kingdom 


China 
.1/ 


Japan 


Canada 


Mexico 


Cuba 


All 
other 


Total 


253,265 


32,145 


10.383 


24 ,479 


6^607 


27.613 


3,213 


6,543 


30,055 


26,712 


11,581 


73.934 


Rural . 




31,194 


4 522 


499 


877 


275 


4,063 


160 


1,2^7 


5,603 


6.455 


^07 


6.836 


Urban 


73,829 


12.062 


2.489 


7.410 


1.494 


9,929 


603 


2,153 


11.244 


6,399 


1,809 


18,237 


Cities: 


Total 


142,715 


14.433 


7.362 


16,109 


4.790 


13,205 


2.343 


2,322 


12.143 


13,765 


9.446 


46,797 




Phoenix 


658 

431 

688 

13,735 

954 

697 

653 

4,313 

6,255 

535 

1,109 

551 

1,8U3 

5,512 

815 

11,814 

1,043 

1,339 

2,462 

415 

401 

4,910 

650 

744 

532 

1,045 
755 
873 
45,419 
668 
606 
609 
2,764 
407 

2,929 
1,063 
592 
457 
2,416 
974 
759 
834 

1^257 
10,658 

2,506 
3,021 


65 
44 
54 
739 
100 
76 
66 
156 
458 
155 
35 
65 
43 
190 
103 
48 
1,688 
55 
199 
144 
30 
22 
536 
108 
189 
37 
73 
123 
91 
147 
4,101 
85 
73 
211 
380 

108 
476 
137 

1 

119 
95 
271 
170 
423 
1,700 

127 
601 


9 
11 
185 

19 
5 
12 
20 
181 
22 
19 
66 
39 
40 

'1 

476 
32 
40 
89 
13 
31 
23 
84 
83 
13 
30 
3,787 
19 
53 
34 
111 

5 
233 
50 
38 

4 

3 
13 
25 

1 
31 

360 
32 


13 
11 

5 
176 
27 
5 
17 
64 
242 
38 
167 
271 
174 
143 
33 
11 
1,534 
26 
248 
555 
30 
68 
671 

89 
145 
187 
422 
305 
146 
6,942 
208 
170 

50 
424 

58 

10 
621 
335 
192 

4 
13 

6 

36 

99 

1,103 

13 

70 


12 
6 
8 
220 
9 
5 
3 
17 
54 
14 
26 
55 
23 

28 
1 
773 
6 
71 
50 
5 

260 
42 
11 
50 
58 
95 
40 
52 
1,960 
13 
17 
10 
162 
5 
7 
148 
29 
9 
8 
4 
11 
5 

22 
40 
314 

2 

46 


51 
65 

113 
1,271 

104 
99 

436 
511 
100 
59 
87 
78 
230 
160 
70 
894 
45 
181 
270 
49 
49 
731 
74 
89 
46 
51 
103 
50 
142 
3,296 
121 

84 
495 
47 
64 
418 
139 
51 
80 
20 
105 
56 
119 
299 
86 
1,389 

62 
354 


7 

21 

3 

164 

7 
42 
19 
475 

'I 

7 
53 
6 

145 
7 
36 
42 
12 

36 
4 

15 
3 

7 
3 
3 
810 
6 
2 
5 
23 
7 
16 
41 
32 
7 
5 
1 
16 
8 
13 
46 
16 
116 

92 
15 


15 
23 
34 
466 
49 
29 
46 
105 
198 
23 

2 

4 
41 
14 
19 
153 
14 
47 
15 
10 

4 
39 
17 
23 

- 

7 
13 

3 
12 
181 

7 

2 
14 
32 
20 
32 
44 
13 

6 
U 
15 
16 
31 
23 
106 
21 
322 

502 
269 


302 
50 
232 
2,238 
118 
136 
123 
483 
532 

3? 

246 
61 

115 

541 

136 

429 
33 
80 

325 
81 

135 
1,123 

124 
27 
15 
17 
42 
19 

209 
1,106 
96 
22 
24 

231 
36 

271 

122 
62 
35 
40 
25 
69 
28 
71 

595 

60 

1,204 

232 
833 


98 
22 
46 
4,467 
183 
83 
171 
2,491 
403 

^1 
2 
1 
25 
31 

1,753 

13 
1 
2 

97 

7 

1 

3 

5 

196 

3 
2 
16 

5 
13 

7 

2,209 
301 
376 
21 
16 
75 
379 

16 
77 


1 

5 
1 
123 
2 
4 

7 

8 

1 

63 

15 

8 

67 

3,177 

385 

287 

47 

30 

48 

2 

6 

51 

13 

7 

106 

41 

217 

33 

4,353 
8 

24 
3 

18 
5 
2 

61 

6 
7 
3 
23 
3 
1 
1 
9 
163 

106 
13 


90 


Calif. 


Berkeley 


175 






3 686 










Pasadena ... 


248 










San Diego 


515 
3,193 








Conn. 


Bridgeport 


131 




New Haven 


113 






884 


Fla. 


Miami 


1,405 


111. 


Tampa 

Chicago 


141 
3,195 


La 


New Orleans . .. 


773 






401 






524 






163 




Springfield ... 


70 






1,277 






244 


ll.o. 
H J. 


Elizabeth 


219 

106 




Jersey City 

Newark 


169 

534 




Paters on . ... 


195 






127 






18,687 






100 






154 






172 




Cleveland 


872 






131 






228 


Pa 


Philadelphia 


752 






258 


R.I. 




2Q7 


Tfcx 


Dallas 


129 






72 






288 






128 






300 


Wash 




565 




1/ ■ 1 ■ - \< 


420 


Other cities 

U.S. territories and pcr.so:.sions . 


3,608 

1,353 
711 









i/ Includes Formosa. 



41 



TABLE 13. 



IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 - 1958 1/ 



^From 1820 to 1867 figures represent alien passengers arrived; 1868 to 1891 Inclusive and 
1895 to 1897 inclusive immigrant aliens arrived; 1892 to 1894 inclusive and from 1898 to 
present time immigrant aliens admitted. Data for years prior to 1906 relate to country 
whence alien came; thereafter to country of last permanent residence. Because of changes 
in boundaries and changes in lists of countries, data for certain countries are not com- 
parable throughout_7 



Countries 


1820 


1821-1830 


1831-1840 


1841-1850 


1851-1860 


1861-1870 


All countries 


8,335 


143.439 


599,125 


1,713,2?1 


2,598.214 


2,314,824 


Europe 


7.691 


98.817 


495.688 


1.597.501 


2.452.660 


2.065.270 


Austria-Hungary 2/ 

Belgium. , 

Denmark. ••.•*•■.••.••...• 


1 

20 

371 

968 

1,782 

268 

360 

3,614 
30 
49 

< ; 

35 

139 

31 

1 
14 


27 

169 

8,497 

6,761 

14,055 

2,912 

170 

7,942 

20 

50,724 

409 

1,078 

91 

16 

145 

2,477 

3,226 

20 

75 

3 


22 

1,063 

45,575 

152,454 

7,611 

2,667 

185 

65,347 

49 

207,381 

2,253 

i,a2 

1,201 

369 

829 

2,125 

4,821 

7 

277 

40 


5,074 

539 

77,262 

434,626 

32,092 

3,712 

1,261 

229,979 

16 

780,719 

1,870 

8,251 

13,903 

105 

550 

2,209 

4,6/,4 

59 

551 

79 


4,738 

3,749 

76,358 

951,667 

247,125 

38,331 

6,319 

132,199 

" 31 

914,119 

9,231 

10,789 

20,931 

1,164 

1,055 

9,298 

25,011 

83 

457 

5 


7,800 

6,734 

17,094 


France .•••..•.••.•....*.• 


35,986 

787,468 

222,277 

38,769 

4,313 

341,537 

72 




(England 


Great (Scotland 

Britain(Wales 

(Not spec, 2/.... 


Ireland 


435,778 


Italy 


11,725 


Netherlands 


9,102 


Norway \/ 

Sweden /»' 

Poland ^ 

Portugal ................. 


(71,631 

(37,667 

2,027 

2,658 


Spain 


6,697 


Switzerland 


23,286 


Turkey in Europe ..•.••.•• 


129 


U.S.S.R. 6/ 

Other Europe 


2,512 


Asia 


5 


10 


48 


82 


41.455 


64.630 


China 


1 
1 

3 


2 
8 


8 
39 

1 


35 
36 

11 


a, 397 
43 

15 


64,301 


Ind ia 


69 


Japan 2/ 


186 


Turkey in Asia 8/ 

Other Asia 


2 

72 








""387** 


11.564 


33,424 


62.469 


74.720 


166,607 


Canada & Newfoundland 9/. 

Mexico 10/ 

West Indies 

Central America. •....•.•. 


209 
1 

164 

2 

11 


2)277 

4,817 

3,834 

105 

531 


13,S 

6,599 

12,301 

44 

856 


41,723 
3,271 

13,528 

368 

3,579 


59,309 
3,078 

10,660 

449 

1,224 


153,878 

2,191 

9,046 

95 


South America ............ 


1,397 






Africa 


1 
301 


16 
33,032 


54 
69,911 


55 
53,144 


210 
29,169 


312 


Australia & New Zealand.... 
Not specified 


36 
17,969 






See footnotes at end of table 


, 













42 



TABLE 13. IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES i 
1820 - 1958 1/ (Continued) 



1871-1880 1881-1890 1891-1900 1901-1910 1911-1920 1921-1930 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria „ / 

Hungary -^ 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 11/ 

Czechoslovakia 12/ 

Denmark 

Finland 12/ 

France • 

Germany 2/ 

(England 

Great (Scotland 

Britain(Wales 

(Not spec, 2/ 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway ij 

Sweden Uj • 

Poland 1/ 

Portugal. 

Rumania 13/ •• 

Spain 

Swlt zerland 

Turkey in Eui*ope.. ......•• 

U.S.S.R. 6/ 

Yugoslavia 11/ 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Japan 7/ 

Turkey in Asia 8/ 

Other Asia 

America 

Canada & Newfoundland 2/«» 

Mexico 10/ 

West Indies 

Central America 

South America 

Other America 16/ 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand 

Pacific Islands • 

Not specified 1^ 

See footnotes at end of table, 



2.812.191 



5.246.613 



.687.564 8.795.386 5.735.811 4.107.209 



2.272.262 



4.737.046 



?.^38.978 



8.136.016 



4.376.564 



72,969 
7,221 

31,771 

72,206 

718,182 

437,706 

87,564 

6,631 

16,142 

210 

436,871 

55,759 

16,541 

95,323 

115,922 

12,970 

14,082 

11 

5,266 

28,293 

337 

39,284 

1.001 



353,719 
20,177 

88,132 

50,464 

1,452,970 

644,680 

149,869 

12,640 

168 

2,308 

655,482 

307,309 

53,701 

176,586 

391,776 

51,806 

16,978 

6,348 

4,419 

81,988 

1,562 

213,282 

682 



12 3,82? 



123,201 

163 

149 

67 

243 



404.0V+ 



383,640 

5,162 

13,957 

157 

1,128 



358 
9,886 
1,028 

790 



592,707 

18,167 
160 

50,231 

30,770 

505,152 

216,726 

44,188 

10,557 

67 

15,979 

388,a6 

651,893 

26,758 

95,015 

226,266 

96,720 

27,508 

12,750 

8,731 

31,179 

3,626 

505,290 

122 



2,145,266 

U,635 
39,280 

65,285 

73,379 
3a, 498 
388,017 
120,469 

17,464 

167,519 
339,065 
2,045,877 
48,262 
190,505 
249,534 

69,149 
53,008 
27,935 
34,922 
79,976 
1,597,306 

665 



453,649 

442,693 

33,746 

22,533 

3,426 

41,983 

756 

61,897 

143,945 

249,944 

78,357 

13,107 

184,201 

146,181 

1,109,524 

43,718 

66,395 

95,074 

4,813 

89,732 

13,311 

68,611 

23,091 

54,677 

921,201 

1,888 

8,111 



68.380 



61,711 

269 

2,270 

2,220 

1,910 



71.236 



243.567 



U,799 

68 

25,942 

26,799 

3,628 



20,605 

4,713 

129,797 

77,393 

11,059 



192.559 



21,273 

2,082 

83,837 

79,389 

5,973 



426.967 



393,304 

1,913 

29,042 

404 

2,304 



?g.972 



361.888 



3,311 

971 

33,066 

549 

1,075 



179,226 
49,642 

107,548 

8,192 

17,280 



1.143.671 



742,185 

219,004 

123,424 

17,159 

41,899 



857 
7,017 
5,557 

789 



350 

2,740 

1,225 

14,063 



7,368 
11,975 

1,049 
33,523 



8,443 

12,348 

1,079 

1,147 



43 



TABLE 13. IMMIGRATION BY CCUNTRY, FOR DECADES i 
1820 - 1958 1/ (Continued) 



1951-1955 



Total 139 yrs. 
1820-1958 



All countries 

Europe 

Albania 12/ 

Austria 2/. 

Hungary 2/ 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 11/ 

Czechoslovakia 12/ 

Denmark 

Estonia 12/ 

Finland 12/ 

France 

Germany 2/ 

(England 

Great (Scotland 

Britain(Wales 

(Not specified 3/ 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 12/ 

Lithuania 12/ 

Luxembourg 17/ 

Netherlands 

Norway 4/ 

Poland 5/ 

Portugal 

Rumania 13/ - 

Spain , 

Sweden 4/ , 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe 

U.S.S.R. 6/ 

Yugoslavia 11/ 

Other Europe 

Asia 15/ 

China 

India 

Japan 7/ 

Turkey in Asia 8/ 

Other Asia 



528.431 



1.087.638 



253.265 



348.289 



2,040 

3,563 

7,861 

4,817 

938 

14,393 

2,559 

506 

2,146 

12,623 

114,058 

21,756 

6,887 

735 

9,119 

13,167 

68,028 

1,192 

2,201 

565 

7,150 

4,740 

17,026 

3,329 

3,871 

3,258 

3,960 

5,512 

737 

1,356 

5,835 

2,361 



15.344 



4,928 
496 

1,948 
328 

7,644 



621.704 



628.235 



156.866 



85 

24,860 

3,469 

12,189 

375 

8,347 

5,393 

212 

2,503 

38,809 

226,578 

112,252 

16,131 

3,209 

8,973 

26,967 

57,661 

361 

683 

820 

14,860 

10,100 

7,571 

7,423 

1,076 

2,898 

10,665 

10,547 

580 

548 

1,576 

3,983 



14 

40,521 

334 

10,444 

12 

278 

5,251 

60 

2,403 

21,978 

282,014 

69,701 

15,199 

1,247 

2,755 

20,087 

20,851 

72,149 

103 

59 

338 

16,245 

11,315 

665 

5,856 

193 

3,081 

9,845 

8,149 

479 

85 

2,652 

3,872 



7 

9,340 

109 

2,098 

40 

68 

1,069 

39 

468 

6,185 

44,409 

15,890 

2,847 

271 

221 

11,216 

5,607 

40,430 

58 

26 

57 

5,040 

2,292 

263 

1,322 

83 

576 

2,151 

1,874 

271 

52 

767 

1,720 



17 

8,171 

6,383 

2,211 

16 

86 

1,109 

27 

498 

6,017 

60,353 

19,279 

4,425 

316 

205 

5,326 

8,227 

19,624 

51 

22 

76 

14,958 

2,337 

571 

1,457 

152 

748 

2,563 

1,847 

390 

65 

858 

1,240 



4 

1,666 

542 

1,231 

6 

98 

1,126 

15 

520 

5,136 

29,498 

19,780 

4,090 

277 

288 

2,733 

9,134 

23,115 

27 

14 

75 

3,102 

2,268 

1,470 

1,556 

114 

899 

2,346 

1,820 

553 

65 

1,202 

428 



31.780 



42.385 



17.327 



20,008 



20,870 



16,709 

1,761 

1,555 

218 

11,537 



1,948 

674 

14,660 

115 

24,988 



1,386 

185 

5,967 

48 

9,741 



2,098 

196 

6,829 

77 

10,808 



1,143 
323 

6,847 

197 

12,360 



See footnotes at end of table. 



TABLE 13. IMMIGRATION BY CXHJNTRY, FOR DECADES t 
1820 - 1958 1/ (Continued) 






Countries 


1931-1940 


1941-1950 


1951-1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


Total 139 yrs. 
1820-1958 


America 


160.037 


354.804 


392,353 


144.713 


134.160 


113.132 


5.540.628 


Canada & Newfoundland 9/ . 


108,527 

22,319 

15,502 

5,861 

7,803 

25 


171,718 
60,589 
49,725 
21,665 
21,831 
29,276 


162,825 
106,762 
42,489 
14,631 
27,927 
37,719 


42.363 
61,320 
19,512 
4,916 
9,187 
7,415 


46,354 
49,321 
18,362 

5,731 
10,851 

3,541 


45,143 
26,791 
16,983 

6,718 
14,304 

3,193 


3,474,131 
1,083,038 




594,042 


Central America 


102,815 


South America 


205,402 


Other America 16/ 


81,200 


Africa 


1,750 

2,231 

780 


7,367 

13,805 

5,437 

142 


5,216 
3,554 
3,499 
12,396 


1,351 

1,171 

175 

22 


1,600 

1,228 

230 

16 


2,008 

1,783 

262 

12 


43,602 


Australia S. New Zealand .... 

Pacific Islands 15/ 

Not specified 14/ 


76,073 
20,748 
266,654 



2/ 



6/ 

% 

9/ 

10/ 
11/ 



12/ 



14/ 
15/ 



16/ 
17/ 



Data for fiscal years ended June 30, except 1820 to 1831 inclusive and 1844 to 1849 

inclusive fiscal years ended Sept. 30} 1833 to 1842 inclusive and 1851 to 1867 inclusive 
years ended Dec. 31; 1832 covers 15 months ended Dec. 31; 1843 nine months ended Sept. 30; 
1850 fifteen months ended Dec. 31 and 1868 six months ended June 30. 

Data for Austria-Hungary were not reported until 1861. Austria and Hungary have been re- 
corded separately since 1905, In the years 1938 to 1945 inclusive Austria was included 
with Germany. 

United Kingdom not specified. In the years 1901 to 1951, included in other turope. 

From 1820 to 1868 the figures for Norway and Sweden were combined. 

Poland was recorded as a separate country from 1820 to 1898 and since 1920, Between 1899 
and 1919 Poland was included with Austria-Hungary, Germany, and Russia. 

Since 1931 the Russian Empire has been broken down into European U.S.S.R, and Siberia or 
Asiatic U.S.S.R, 

No record of immigration from Japan until 1861. 

No record of immigration from Turkey in Asia until 1869. 

Prior to 1920 Canada and Newfoundland were recorded as British North America. From 1820 
to 1898 the figures include all British North American possessions. 

No record of immigration from Mexico from 1886 to 1893, 

Bulgaria, Serbia, and Montenegro were first reported in 1899. Bulgaria has been reported 
separately since 1920 and in 1920 also a separate enumeration was made for the Kingdom 
of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes. Since 1922 the Serb, Croat, and Slovene Kingdom has 
been recorded as Yugoslavia. 

Countries added to the list since the beginning of World War I are theretofore included 
with the countries to which they belonged. Figures are available since 192U for 
Czechoslovakia and Finland; and since 1924 for Albania, Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. 

No record of immigration from Rumania until 1880. 

The figure 33,523 in column headed 1901-1910, includes 32,897 persons returning in 1906 
to their homes in the United States. 

Beginning with the year 1952, Asia includes the Philippines. From 1934 to 1951 the 
Philippines were included in the Pacific Islands. Prior to 1934 the Philippines were 
recorded in separate tables as insular travel. 

Included with countries not specified pribr to 1925. 

Figures for Luxembourg are available sin^e 1925. 



45 



IMMIGRANT ALIENS ADMITTED, BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTHi 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1949 - 1958 



Country or region 
of birth 


Total 
1949-1958 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 






188,317 




161.177 




170.434 


208.177 


237^90 
127.492 


175.555 


185.115 


253,265 




96.177 


111.227 


138.311 




30,900 
13,407 
33,525 
13,300 
6,584 
36,774 

337,329 
43,135 
34,287 
64,473 

177,806 
39,661 
29,354 
44,465 
24,592 

188,330 
13,082 
19,736 
8,428 
18,761 
16,827 
3,361 

198,187 
55,278 
62,111 
29,093 

117.982 


2,363 
1,592 
4,393 
1,305 
704 
3,972 

23,844 
1,759 
1,998 
8,585 

11,157 
3,853 
6,691 
3,200 
2,563 

23,744 
1,235 
1,043 
503 
2,433 
1,585 
157 

21,475 
3,907 
1,384 
2,856 

6.355 


3,182 
1,108 
5,528 
1,234 
645 
3,519 
31,225 
1,242 

6^501 
9,839 
17,494 
11,870 
3,148 
2,379 
52,851 
1,075 
3,599 
463 
1,892 
1,728 
206 
13,437 
10,971 
9,154 
7,159 

4.615 


2,777 
1,238 
3,863 
1,217 
646 
3,337 

26,369 
4,447 
4,922 
3,739 
7,348 

10,588 
4,028 
3,170 
2,378 

37,484 
1,048 
2,351 
510 
1,427 
1,408 
231 

12,491 

11,953 
8,254 
3,953 

5.166 


5,976 
1,539 
5,041 
1,345 
585 
3,454 
50,283 
7,084 
6,850 
3,796 
9,306 
4,459 
3,044 
3,143 
2,481 
33,211 
1,013 
4,915 
536 
1,478 
1,569 
192 
17,631 
12,697 
17,223 
4,033 

9.428 


1,862 
1,335 
2,173 
1,278 

614 
3,216 
27,305 
1,603 

803 
4,655 
9,701 

294 

314 
3,042 
2,427 
4,395 
1,141 

460 

991 
1,750 
1,794 

147 
19,230 
1,780 
1,272 
2,587 

8.029 


2,072 

1,424 

2,235 

1,322 

681 

3,277 

32,^35 

2,127 

1,163 

5,232 

15,201 

296 

401 

3,769 

2,420 

5,663 

1,636 

666 

964 

1,811 

1,686 

311 

19,309 

1,985 

1,432 

1,209 

11.751 


2,228 
1,117 
1,983 
1,321 

619 
3,411 
29,603 
6,311 

904 
5,975 
31,925 

425 

384 
3,732 
2,478 
4,697 
1,366 

i.ni 

1,5^46 
1,670 
243 
17,849 
1,694 
2,567 
1,322 

12.131 


4,326 
1,370 
2,612 
1,413 
677 
4,308 

38,390 

10,531 
2,261 
6,483 

39,789 

856 

908 

5,134 

2,548 

8,453 

1,396 

2.328 

964 

1,906 

1,848 

556 

21,582 
3,864 
8,723 
2,329 

17.538 


4,109 
1,520 
3,541 
1,373 
675 
4,180 

45,230 
4,952 
8,705 
9,124 

19,061 
1,077 
1,266 

12,416 
2,533 

11,225 
1,537 
2.573 
1,009 
2,294 
1,800 
588 

27,570 
4,528 
0,842 
2,387 

23.102 


2)005 
1,164 


Belgium 


Czechoslovakia 


2,156 


Finland 


738 




4,100 


Germanv 




f. 


3,079 


Hi 


1,583 




10,383 
24,479 


Italy 


Lithuania • 


448 




3,711 


Norway 


2,385 




6,607 




1,635 














Switzerland 


1,739 






United Kingdom 


27,613 


U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 


1,899 
2,260 




1,258 


Asia 


19.867 


China Jl/ 

Hong Kong 2/ 

India 


27,658 
1,795 
2,565 
2,516 
5,797 

33,936 
4,433 
3,848 

14,171 

21,263 

692.805 


2,823 

166 
195 

508 

238 

40 

1,068 

1,317 

39.469 


1,494 

153 
245 
110 
76 
226 
10 
595 
1,706 

34.004 


1,821 

134 
237 
261 
198 
284 
32 
760 
1,439 

35.482 


1,421 
54 
153 
223 
206 

4,517 
288 
127 

1,066 

1,373 

48.092 


i;536 
98 
155 
160 
421 

2,393 
304 
115 

1,160 

1,687 

60.107 


2)770 
177 
308 
249 
515 

3,777 
346 
254 

1,633 

1,722 

77.772 


2)705 
160 
332 
219 
471 

3,984 
411 
315 

1,784 

1,750 

90.732 


4,450 
418 
314 
227 
857 

5,586 
814 
703 

1,873 

2,296 

119.417 


5)425 

546 

337 

328 

1,275 

6,354 

994 

648 

1,996 

5,199 

106.942 


3)213 
342 
513 




433 


Israel 3/ 

Japan 

Jordan 3/ 

Korea 

Philippines 


1,681 
6,543 

52n 

1.60-1 
2,236 
2,774 


North America 


80.708 


Canada 

Mexico 


260)412 
278,385 
67,882 
41,218 
36,817 
8,091 

54.742 


21,515 
7,977 
2,677 
3,841 
2,493 
966 

2.639 


18,043 
6,841 
2,179 
3,914 
2,151 
876 

2.777 


20,809 
6,372 
1,893 
3,660 
1,970 
778 

2.724 


28,141 
9,600 
2,536 
4,187 
2,642 
986 

3.902 


28,967 
18,454 
3,509 
5,366 
3,056 
755 

4.691 


27,055 
37,456 
5,527 
3,472 
3,488 
774 

5.523 


23,091 
50,772 
9,294 
3,205 
3,683 
687 

5.599 


29,533 
65,047 
14,953 
4,069 
4,981 
834 

6.846 


33,203 
49,154 
13,733 
4,323 
5,780 
749 

9.002 


30,055 
26,712 




11,581 


Other West Indies 

Central America 

Other North America 


5,181 

6,573 
686 

11.039 




10,277 
13,091 
31,374 

11,315 
5,675 
1,594 


395 

431 

1,813 

737 
602 
214 


364 

592 

1,821 

689 
443 
112 


423 

750 

1,551 

700 
390 
78 


506 
1,140 
2,256 

740 
416 
58 


691 
1,322 
2,678 

922 
450 
58 


932 
1,202 
3,389 

1,187 
605 
112 


961 
1,226 
3,412 

1,186 
474 
176 


1,282 
1,576 
3,988 

1,441 
602 
226 


2,058 
1,961 
4,983 

1,673 
756 
277 


2,665 


Colombia 


2,891 


Other South America 


5,483 
2,040 


Australia and New Zealand ... 


937 
283 







1/ Includes Formosa. 

2/ Not reported separately prior to 1952. 

3/ Jordan includes Palestine and, in 1949, Israel, 



46 



TABLE 15. EMIGRANT ALIENS DEPARTED, BY RACE, SEX, AND AGE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1958 



Sex and age 


All 
races 


White 


Chinese 


East 
Indian 


Fili- 
pino 


Japa- 
nese 


Ko- 
rean 


Negro 


lander 


Number departed 


't.024 . 


2.920 


2 


k 


h 


_JJ_ 


-L 


hZ 


1 


Maie 


1.935 


1.885 


1 


3 


3 


21 


4 


17 


1 


Under 5 years 

5-9 years. ...*... 

10 - 14 vears 

15 years 

16 - 17 years 

18 - 19 years 

20 - 24 years 

25 - 29 years 

30 - 34 years 

35 - 39 years 

40-44 years 

45 - 49 years 

50 - 54 years 

55 - 59 years 

60-64 years 

65 - 69 years 

70 - 74 years 

75 - 79 years 

80 yrs. and over 


85 

144 

106 

9 

41 

43 

194 

264 

282 

209 

162 

lU 

91 

51 

25 

36 

38 

17 

14 

10 

2.089 


85 

144 

105 

9 

41 

42 

191 

257 

274 

206 

158 

109 

89 

51 

24 

34 

32 

14 

11 

9 

2.045 


1 
1 


1 
1 
1 

1 


1 

1 

1 
1 


1 

1 
1 
2 
2 

1 

2 
6 
3 
2 

16 


1 
2 

1 


_ 
2 

1 

1 
25 


1 


Female 




Under 5 years 

5-9 years 

10-14 years 

15 years 

16 - 17 years 

18 - 19 years 

20-24 years 

25 - 29 years 

30 - 34 years 

35 - 39 years 

40-44 years 

45 - 49 years 

50 - 54 years 

55 - 59 years 

60-64 years 

65 - 69 years 

70 - 74 years 

75 - 79 years 

80 yrs. and over..... 
Unknown. ......•.••... 


90 

127 

88 

15 

25 

52 

337 

330 

262 

177 

118 

109 

83 

59 

68 

54 

36 

21 

16 

22 


89 

126 

87 

15 

23 

50 

333 

321 

259 

172 

116 

108 

81 

58 

66 

53 

35 

20 

15 

18 


1 


- 
- 

1 


1 


1 
2 
2 

5 

2 

1 

2 

1 


_ 


1 
1 

1 

1 

2 

4 
2 
2 

1 
1 
2 
1 

1 

1 
4 


- 







TABLE 


6. NONimiGRANT ALIENS ADfJlITTED, BY CLASSES UNDER THE IfJlMIGRATION LAWS 
AND COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH: YtAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1958 






Countrv or region 
of birth 


Number 
ad- 
mitted 


&|3 


III 




2-^ 


li 


1 


Is 

li 


III 


1-S.2 


II 


1 

■p 
11 


ll 


All countries ... 


847.764 


29.265 


81,405 


514.599 


99,190 


2,500 


34,848 


6.781 


24,402 


1,027 


20.349 


32,747 


651 




376.613 


9.604 


48.752 


217.122 


60.517 


1.104 


3.803 


3,486 


4.048 


586 


7,720 


19.315 


556 


Austria 


9,268 
6,641 
2,489 

11,052 
3,439 

27,934 

64,592 
6,353 
3,782 
8,451 

41,815 

966 

1,106 

26,367 
9,218 

11,502 
3,838 
3,168 

15,719 
9,611 

11,304 
3,432 

82,455 
4,029 
4,536 
3,546 

61.141 


98 
301 
148 
225 

57 

864 

1,646 

z 

86 

1,009 

1 

..I 

227 
314 
144 
101 
494 
214 
193 
191 
2,001 
468 
364 
82 

7,572 


839 

1,135 

256 

944 

162 

4,911 

7,184 

405 

402 

537 

2,947 

54 

114 

3,085 

741 

1,288 

191 

342 

1,586 

1,938 

2,091 

415 

16,424 

348 

109 

304 

6.993 


6,410 
3,627 
1,520 
6,178 
1.865 

15,264 

42,005 
3,808 
2,582 
4,859 

25,890 
762 
842 

17,082 
4,102 
8,200 
1,262 
2,273 
7,412 
5,285 
6,764 
1,793 

39,984 
2,121 
3,162 
2,070 

15.055 


934 

785 

264 

2,562 

910 

3,364 

7,128 

1,078 

457 

1,501 

8,955 

76 

69 

4,231 

2,961 

903 

1,878 

229 

4,457 

1,008 

887 

173 

14,101 

467 

607 

532 

9.335 


5 
21 

59 
10 
14 
229 
17 
1 
6 
144 

10 
22 
9 

4 
19 
11 
131 
8 
368 
3 
6 
6 

1.079 


78 
75 
75 
34 
45 
269 
363 
319 
85 
56 
248 
25 
15 
273 
124 
174 
47 
42 
257 
73 
100 
193 
616 
55 
52 
110 

6.394 


66 
138 
58 
91 
50 
667 
82 
56 
30 
49 
142 
1 
4 
189 
54 
67 
18J 
67 
171 
131 
123 
64 
750 
308 
33 
77 

994 


206 
51 
22 
67 
23 

326 

604 
42 
45 
77 

285 

6 
88 
45 
97 
32 
20 

538 
53 

133 
22 
1,089 
99 
46 
19 

3.563 


11 
6 

4 
109 

1 

18 

'I 
2 
16 
22 

7 
3 
1 
10 
15 
7 

214 
5 
2 

119 


301 
204 
23 
440 
218 
801 
1,284 
217 
33 
71 
509 
17 
22 
280 
243 
118 
42 
23 
544 
360 
201 
479 
1,106 
36 
33 
115 

7.495 


319 
286 
118 
391 

94 

1,216 

3,948 

315 

99 
1,182 
1,651 

22 

27 
834 
622 
321 
221 

65 
230 
511 
674 

68 
5,631 
118 
122 
230 

2.528 








Czechoslovakia 


47 


Finland 


1 




l?o 


Germany 


37 


„ 






9 




I? 


Latvia 




Lithuania 

Netherlands 


33 
■S-i 




4 






Rumania 


1 








7 


Switzerland 


25 


United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R 


171 


Other Europe 

Asia 


l" 




7,948 
802 
4,706 
2,595 
3,583 
15,039 
864 
1,995 
10,058 
13,551 

315.049 


1,194 
5 
292 
400 
258 
923 
60 
765 
787 

2,888 

5.541 


377 
35 
558 
127 
414 
3,566 
96 
67 
737 
1,016 

16.233 


2,246 

327 

1,245 

581 

1,883 

1,934 

343 

152 

1,895 

4,449 

224.233 


2,488 
221 
382 
56 
321 
3,724 
82 
63 
834 
1,164 

20.471 


32 

7 

4 

25 

974 

i 

20 
59 


956 
177 
949 
897 
265 
645 
148 
425 
620 
1,312 

19.779 


138 
6 

224 
39 
32 
93 
18 
16 
92 

336 

1,011 


41 

2 

71 

3 

39 

481 

14 

8 

2,786 

118 

16.228 


3 

16 

19 
41 
3 
1 
15 
20 

255 


'345 

19 

880 

441 

232 

1,471 

61 

474 

1,652 

1,920 

2.633 


127 
9 
79 
44 
95 
1,186 
39 
21 
627 
301 

8.542 






_ 


Xndla 


3 


Iran 


2 








1 


Jordan if 








Philippines 


7 


North America 


64 


Canada 


40,957 
123,627 
72,618 
50,479 
24,079 
3,289 

66.106 


551 
1,612 
1,282 

632 
1,321 

143 

5.086 


1 382 
4,964 
5,366 
3,035 
1,179 
307 

4.464 


14,346 
105,468 
55,850 
29,640 
16,609 
2,320 

43.187 


6,973 
4,614 
1,194 
6,474 
1,004 
212 

5.193 


5 

7 
12 

9 
21 

5 

?15 


7,982 
4,535 
3,477 
1,420 
2,268 
97 

3.725 


202 
242 
189 
143 
194 
41 

895 


7,412 
535 
694 
7,478 
60 
49 

281 


16 
180 
34 
12 
13 

20 


1,006 
751 
97 
269 
486 
24 

1.615 


1,040 

717 

4,409 

1,365 

921 

90 

1.422 


4? 


Mexico 




Cuba 

Other West Indies .. 
Central America .... 
Other North America. 

South America 


14 

2 
3 




8,863 
11,062 
46,181 

7,413 
18,366 
3,076 


687 

373 

4,026 

640 
767 
55 


1,053 

645 

2,766 

1,155 

3,581 

227 


5,794 
7,480 
29,913 

3,332 
10,414 
1,256 


391 
1,156 
3,646 

740 

2,331 

603 


^182 
6 
27 

'I 
21 


105 

698 

2,922 

594 
203 
350 


137 
122 
636 

184 
189 
22 


55 
22 
204 

95 
154 
33 


2 
2 
16 

11 
35 

1 


205 

190 

1,220 

469 
335 
82 


252 
367 
803 

172 
348 
420 


_ 




J 


Other South America. 


2 

7 


Australia and N.Zealand 
Other countries 


5 
6 



17 Excludes 418,885 Mexican agricultural laborers. 

2/ Includes Formosa, 

2/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



48 



TABLE 17. NONK.WIQiANT ALIliMS ADMITTED, BY Cl.AJoE:; UNDEII THE IIWIGHATIOM IhViS 
AND COUNTHY OH HEGION OF 1.A:jT I'ERMANFNT RESIDENCE: YEAR ENDED IIiriE 30, . 19'i8 



Country or 
region of 

last 
permanent 
residence 



All countries ... 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgium 

Czechoslovakia .... 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey 

United Kingdom .... 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 2/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Iran 

Israel 

Japan 

Jordan 3/ 

Korea 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North Araeri ca 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Other West Indies . 
Central America ... 
Other No. America . 

South America 

Argentina 

Colombia 

Other So. America . 



Africa 

Australia &N. Zealand. 
Other countries 



Number 

ad- 
mitted 



52.863 
2,92S 
2,370 
3,524 
2,392 
5,240 

14,063 

444 

1,918 

9,640 

10,347 

480.619 
159,912 
137,429 
72,921 
56,161 
24,701 
29,495. 

79.673 
9,967 
12,150 
57,556 

6,429 
21,221 
2,992 



1/ Excludes 418,885 Mexican 

2/ Includes Formosa. 

2/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



14 
187 
395 
375 
932 
56 
770 
776 
2,904 



774 

124 

4,764 

5,675 

245 

26 

403 

2,492 

5 



1,901 
1,963 



115 
387 
115 
734 
3,625 
24 
53 



6.171 

768 

1,717 

1,339 



371 
t,153 



2,417 

9,768 
12,902 
973 
51 
1,709 
4,668 



19 
5,357 
2,373 
1,401 
699 
56 
2.162 



1,142 

35,069 

165 

710 

795 



10.940 
381 
415 
723 
487 



1,925 
2,156 



2,689 
2,662 



7.507 
353 

1,351 
209 
35 
443 

3,406 



21.685 
3,469 
6. 
6,270 
4,042 
1,378 
115 

6.734 

1,368 

858 

4,508 

1,277 

4,236 

253 



114,026 
116,349 
58,783 



6,630 
8,197 
36,673 



708 
144 
422 
628 
,282 



22,494 
6,226 
1, 



585 
1,597 



116 

695 

3,258 



1^ 



zs. 



1,0^7 



436 

315 

1,554 

56 

445 

1,677 

1,933 



228 

130 

27,826 



jltural laborers. 



49 





^ 


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• 


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8 


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m 




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50 



ENTRIES OF ALIEN AND CITIZEN BORDER CR0S3ERS OVER INTERNATIONAL LAND BOUNDARIES, 
BY STATE AND PORT: YEAR ENDED JXJNE 30, 1958 

/Each entry of the same person cotmted separately"/ 

All persons crossing 



State and port 



State and port 



Aliens 



All ports 1/. 

Canadian Border 

Idaho 

Bastport ........ 

Porthill 

Illinois 

Chicago 

Maine 

Bangor 2/ 

Brldgewater 3/».. 

Calais k/ 

Cobum Gore 3/ . • . 

Eastport 2/ 

Fort T^irf ield 3/ 

Fort Kent V 

Hamlin 3/ 

Houlton 5/ 

Jackman bj 

Limestone 3/ .... 
Madavaska 7/ .... 

Portland 87 

St. Aurelie 3/ .. 
Vanceboro 2/ . . . . 
Van Buren y .... 

Michigan 

Algonac 

Detroit 

Marine City 

Port Huron 

Roberts I /i n dlng . 

St. Clair 

Sault Ste. Marie. 

Minnesota 

Baudette 

Duluth 

Ely 

Intemat'l. Falls 

Lancaster 

Noyes 

Pigeon River .... 

Pine Creek 

Roseau 

St. Paul 

Warroad 



78,982.718 



65,315,289 



28,262,967 



25,100,360 



'H8,l8l 



303,918 
114,263 



281,15't 



197,861 
83,293 



137,027 
106,957 



57590 
7,5W,665 



9,909 
88,393 
2,203,897 
^3,580 
52,705 
221,776 
381,675 
89,329 
767,31*9 
373,330 
103,675 
2,557,608 
37,8it7' 
28,871 
178,1+28 
1+10,293 

13.66o,8u 



792 
l+,6o'»,750 



106,000 
10,659,990 
82,618 
2,135,925 
80,272 
15,709 
780,297 

5,775 



5,076 
5i+,696 
1,1+66,583 
29,976 
1+7,525 
li+5,ool+ 
231,170 
61,61+0 
l+9i+,963 
218,278 
1+9,750 
l,6ll+,387 
10,96!+ 
25,1+60 
U8,011 
231,267 

6,611,109 



2,7l»3,915 



U7,'+'H 
6,1+09 

12,083 
669,211 

15,932 
6oi,0l+9 
21+7,716 

38,873 

29,633 
8,722 

59,706 



80,01+2 
4,925,1+18 

52,126 
1,057,731* 

1+5,559 

11,186 
1+39, oM+ 

1,053,077 



33,697 
737,311* 

13,601+ 
5,180 

76,772 
150,505 

27,689 
272,386 
155,052 

53,925 
91*3,221 

26,883 

3,1*11 
60,1+17 
179,026 

7,21+9,702 



86,1+06 

1,261+ 

1,633 

325,721 

9,873 

1*02,358 

118,798 

28,595 

2l+,l+9l+ 

2,967 

50,968 



25,958 

5,73l*,572 

30,1+92 

1,078,191 

34,713 

4,523 

341,253 

753,698 



31,035 

5,145 

10,450 

343,490 

6,059 

198,691 

128,918 

10,278 

5,139 

5,755 

8,738 



Montana 

Babb 

Chief Mountain .... 

Cut Bank 

Great Polls 

Havre 

Morgan 

Opheim 

Raymond 

Roosvllle .-. 

Scobey 

Sweetgrass 

Turner 

Whitetail 

New York 

Charaplain 2/' 

Chateaugay 2/ 

Fort Covington 2/ . 

Mooers 2/ 

Niagara Falls 3/ .. 

Ogdensburg £/ 

Peace Bridge 10/ .. 
Rooseveltovn "^ ... 
Souses Point Uj . . 

Syracuse 

Thousand Is. Br. 2/ 
Trout River 2/ .... 

North Dakota 

Ambrose 

Antler 

Carbvtry 

Dunseith 

Portuna 

nansb( 
Maida ... 
Neche ... 
Noonan .. 
Northgate 
Portal .. 
St. John 
Sarles .. 
Sherwood 
Walhalla 
Westhope 



713,485 



141,529 
81,292 
5,143 
2,993 
17,823 
14,055 
14,099 
63,947 
31,186 
15,244 

294,502 
14,678 
16,994 

20,240,379 



956,332 

60,621 

152,559 

70,029 

2,974,900 

1,487,403 

11,196,589 

430,586 

2,318,222 

6,187 

321,597 

265,354 

624,548 



24,311 
12,929 
16,761 
85,111 
14,992 
16,621 
25,700 
20,455 

127,394 
52,507 
51,884 

209,435 

15A0O 
34,914 
49,015 
30,491 



449,840 



-59:552 
28,113 
1,633 
713 
13,238 
10,901 
9,329 
45,035 
17,843 
12,003 
196,925 
9,852 
l4,403 

9,379,697 



655:891 

38,838 

77,399 

42,011 

1,711,510 

795,743 

3,971,498 

302,614 

1,409,326 

2,961 

168,852 

183,054 

522,085 



263,61+5 
5l'877 
53,179 
3,310 
2,280 
4,585 
3,154 
4,770 
16,912 
13,343 
3,241 
97,577 
4,826 
2,591 

10,860,682 



300, 1+1+1 

21,783 

75,160 

26,018 

1,263,390 

691,660 

7,225,091 

127,972 

908,896 

3,226 

132,745 

82,300 

302.463 



17,090 
9,817 
14,687 
47,525 
9,825 
10,548 
U,155 
12,506 
73,242 
36,637 
31,900 
133,387 
23,325 
4,114 
26,995 
36,531 
22,801 



7,221 
3,112 
2,074 
37,566 
5,167 
6,073 
14,545 
7,949 
54,152 
15,870 
19,984 
76,048 
13,603 
10,986 
7,919 
12,484 
7,690 



state and port 



OF AIJEH AND CmZEM DORDES CHOGSERS OVKR INTEMWTIOIIAL LAND BOUNDARIES, 
Uy STATE KID PORT: YEAR ETOED JUKE 30, 1958 (ContM). 

/iacli entry of the sarac person counted separately "7 

' ' All persona 



State and port 



Ohio 

Cleveland 

Sandusky 

Toledo 

Pennsylvania 

Pittsburgh 

Vermont 

Alburg 3/ 

Alburg Springs 3/ . . 
Eeebe Plain 3/ • • 
Eeecher BiUs 3/. 

Canfum 3/ 

Derby Line 3/ ... 
aist Richford 3/. 
Hlghgate Springs 3/ 

Newport 12/ 

North Troy 3/ • • • . 

Norton 3/ 

Richford 3/ 

St. Albans I?/ ... 
West Berkshire 3/ 

Washington 

Anacortes . • 

Belllnghan 

Blaine 

Danville 

Laurier 

Lynden 

Metallne FSlla ... 

Northport 

Orovllle 

Port Angeles 

Seattle 

Spokane 

Sumas 

Tticoma lU/ 

Wisconsin 

Green Bay 

Mllvaukee 

AlASka 

Anchorage 

Fairbanks 

Juneau 

Ketchikan 

Skaguay 

Ttok Junction 



lb, 579 

13,9'»9 

131* 



7.550 

13,620 

37 



Canadian Stations . 
Montreal, Quebec 
Toronto, Ontario 
Winnipeg, Man. .. 
Victoria, B. C. . 



36l*,75g 



317,038 



U,6U6 
222,51*6 



.^kk.eoi 



26,3t)5 
17,329 
73,969 
1*5,255 
25,299 
251,113 
23,209 
200,35'* 
561,999 
58,368 
U1,615 
100,770 
'*33,3'*5 
15,591 

2.630.59 6 



17,Wi8 

531* 

1,700,810 

16,085 

l't5,87'* 

96,182 

38,751* 

217, U6 

222,139 

1*67 

1*6,732 

233 

328,137 

1*5 

l,5't5 



19,M3 
5,5'»3 
53,68U 
17.301 
17,91*5 

123,781 
18,217 

136,901 

35'',717 
1*5,765 
1*0,866 
69,618 

305,537 
15,1*27 

1.156,582 



Klcan Borde 



Arizona .... 

Douglas .. 
Lukovllle 

Noco 

Hogales .. 
Ban Luis . 
Saaabe ... 



?o. 719,751 



77,o42 

79,1*91 

2,1.2U 

158,061 

'*0.gll<,929 



13, Bolt, 893 



California ... 
Androde .... 
Calexlco ... 
Los Angeles 
San Diego •. 
San Xsldro , 
Tecate 



2,790,239 

221,052 

668,250 

8,771,l'*8 

1,073.133 

81,071 

25,159,''l*6 



7.792,'* 5 )* 



6,012, U39 



206,325 

8,618,321* 

32,311 

'*,699 

16,033,590 

261*, 197 

160,692 



1*57,763 

5,131,935 

71'*,079 

5'*,055 

10,61*2,595 



5,602,030 

1.,016 

1*53 

'*,783,7'*'. 

158,1*81* 

61*, 321 



;Ul*o,505 
136,163 
Ulo,li67 
3,639,213 
359,0?** 
27,016 

lU, 516,851 



1127:57 

3,016,291* 

28,295 

U,2l*6 

U, 21*9,81*6 

105,713 

96,571 



27,b63 

l,06l* 

633,902 

23,850 

26,321 

1*7,01*0 

20,211* 

39,068 

129,786 

1,128 

57,586 

50I* 

11*6,31*0 

116 

58U 



.1*1*9 



Del Rio 

Eagle Pass 

rabens 

I^con Heights 15/ 



72,253 



252 
1,293 



9,'t'H 



3,710 
5,73"* 
5,619 
9.163 
16,3'*3 
31,681* 



355" 

526 

727 

1,61*6 

U,390 

1,781* 



62.812 



3:355- 
5,208 
1*,892 
7,515 
11,953 
29,900 



[elgh 

16^. 

Houston 

Laredo 

Los Ebanos 15/ 

Presidio 

ProgresGo 15/ 

Rio Grande City IS/ 

Roma 17/ 

San Antonio . . . 
Santa Fe Bridge 
Ysleta 18/ 



3,115,996 

51 

1,963 

L, 381*, 970 

J,755,''51 

1*73,1*1*0 

26l*,l56 

*,933,929 

12,657 

r,855,73'* 

65,780 

1*1*2,376 

31*0,381 

38,112 

1*69,21*8 

36,851 

5,135.939 

1*82,1*15 



5;685;275 

27 

18U 

553,781* 

1,6U7,905 

357,621* 

87,936 

3,'*J'5,917 

577 

5,106,231 

39,795 

265,509 

20l*,229 

22,628 

268,779 

1,1*66 

15,369,120 

163,295 



^ 



721 

2U 

1.779 

831,186 

1,107,556 

115,616 

176,220 

1,1*88,012 

12,180 

2,759,503 

25,965 

176,667 

136,152 

15,581. 

200,1*69 

35,385 

10,766,819 

319,120 



Plguree include arrivals by aircraft. 

October 1957 through June 1958. 

November 1957 through June 1958. 

Calais, Maine, included Eastport and Vanceboro prior to October 1957. 

Houlton, Maln^ Included Brldgewater and Fort Fairfield prior to 

November 1957. 
Jackman, Maine, Included Coburn Core and St. Aurelie prior to 

November 1957- 
Madavaska, Maine, included Fort Kent, Hamlin, Limestone, and 

Van Buren prior to October 1957. 
Portland, Maine, figures are for July, August and September 1957 

only. After September 1957 Portland figures were reported by 

Bangor. 
Ogdensburg, Nev York, Included Rooseveltovn and Thousand Island 

Bridge prior to October 1957. 



10/ Peace Bridge, New York, included Niagara 
Talle prior to November 1957. 

11/ Rouses Point, New York, Included Champlaln, 
Chateaugay, Fcvrt Covington, Mooers, and 
Trout River prior to October 1957. 

12/ Newport, Vermont, Included Beebe Plain, 

Beecher Falls, Canaan, Derby Line, North 
Troy, and Norton prior to November 1957- 

13/ St. Albans, Vermont, Included Alburg, Alburg 
Springs, East Richford, Hlghgate Springs, 
Richford, and West Berkshire prior to 
November 1957. 

ll*/ Tacoma, Washington, figures are for July 

through October 1957 only. After October 
1957; Tacoma figures were reported by Seattle. 

15/ September 1957 through June I958. 

W/ Hidalgo, Texas, included Los Ebanos and 
Progresso prior to September 1957. 

17/ Roma, Texas, included flalcon Heights and Rio 
Orande City prior to September 1957. 

16/ Ysleta, Texas, figures are for July, August 
and September 1957 only. After September 
1957, Ysleta figures were reported by 
Santa Fe Bridge. 



52 






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53 



TABLE 21. ALIENS EKCLUDED: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1892 - 1958 



Number Yon». Number 



Year iMurauex- year 



excluded excluded 



1892-1958 630,559 1926 20,550 

=^ 1927 19,755 

1892-1900 22,515 1928 18,839 

1892 2;iy^ 1929 18,127 

1893 1*053 1930 8,233 

189U 1,389 

1895 2,1(19 1931-191*0. • 68,217 

1896 2,799 1931 9,7**^ 

1897 1.617 1932 7,06U 

1898 3,030 1933 5,527 

1899 3,798 193»* 5,38U 

1900 1^,21^6 1935 5,558 

1936... 7,000 

1901-1910 " 108,211 1937 e,076 

1901 5,516 1938 8,066 

1902 ^97'* 1939 6,1^98 

1903 8,769 19'«) 5,300 

190»fr 7,99** 

1905 11,879 19»H-1950 38,527 

1906 12,1+32 19»*1 2,929 

1907 13,06lf 191*2 1,833 

1908 10,902 191*3 1,^*95 

1909 10,l*U 1^ 1,642 

1910 24,270 1945 2,341 

1946 2,942 

1911-1920 178,109 1947 7,435 

1911 ^i;349 1948 7,113 

1912 16,057 1949 5,541 

1913 19,938 1950 5,256 

1914 33,041 

1915 24,111 1951 5,647 

1916 18,867 1952 5,050 

1917 16,028 1953 5,647 

1918 7,297 1954 3,313 

1919 8,626 1955 2,667 

1920 11,795 1956 1,709 

1957 907 

1921-1930 189,307 1958 733 

1921 13,779 

1922 13,731 

1923 20,619 

1924 30,284 

1925 25,390 



54 





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55 



TABLE 23. AUENS EXCLUDED, BY CAUSE: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1952 - 1958 



Number excluded 

Criminals • 

Immoral classes 

Subversive or einarchistic 

Violators of narcotic laws 

Mental or physical defectives 

Likely to become public charges 

Previously excluded, deported, or 

removed 

Stowaways 

Attempted entry without inspection or 

by false statements 

Attempted entry without proper 

documents 

Paupers, professional beggars, and 

vagrants 

Polygamists or advocate polygamy 

Contract laborers 

Ineligible to citizenship or previously 

departed from U. S. to avoid service 

in armed forces 

Brought by nonsignatory lines 

Unable to read (over l6 years of age) , 

Accompanying aliens 

Assisted aliens 

Other 



1952 1953 195*^ 



5>050 



53»^ 

29 

ikQ 

kl 

115 
71^ 



3,860 

1 
9 



hM 



»^91 

5a 

118 

1 

190 

33 

169 
1^7 

139 

U,293 



kk 



1955 1956 1957 



3,313 2,667 



296 
65 

111 
3 

127 
16 

201 



307 
2,125 



206 

12U 

89 

10 

113 

9 

187 
15 

356 



1,709 



169 

6k 

IIT 

5 

87 

Ik 

89 

10 

163 
916 



907 



91 
30 
302 
12 
ko 

2 

27 

Ik 

36 
312 



1958 



J33 



51 

18 

255 

8 

21 

1 

10 

35 

26 

273 

1 
1 



56 



TABLE 24. ALIENS DEPORTED, BY COUNTRY TO WHICH DEPORTED AND CAUSEi 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1958 



Country to which 
deported 



5 tn 

' -^ O " 



^Si 



I s 



All countries ... 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgium 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands ....>... 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Turkey 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China l/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Japan 

Jordan 

Korea 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Central America .... 
Other North America 

South America 

Africa 

Other countries 

TJ Includes Foimosa. 



10 


1 


11 


- 


30 




31 




22 




75 




525 




15 




288 


12 


65 




70 




29 




76 




130 




29 




21 


_ 


150 


24 



4.959 

1,060 

3,246 

482 

170 

1 



2.617 

154 

2,240 

130 

92 



TABLE 2UA. aliens APPREHENDED, ALIENS DEPORTED, AND ALIENS DEPARTING VOLUNTARILY: 




YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, I892 


- 1958 






Aliens 
apprehended l/ 


Aliens expelled 


Period 


Total 


Aliens 


Aliens departing 








deported 


voluntarily 2/ 


1892 - 1958 


5,121,360 


5,888,501 


1*77,759 


5,1*10,71*2 


1892 - 1900 


. 


3,127 


3,127 




1901 - 1910 


- 


11,558 


11,558 


- 


1911 - 1920 


- 


27,912 


27,912 


- 


1921 - 1930 


128,I+8U 


161*,390 


92,157 


72,233 


1921.... 


_ 


i*,517 


i*,517 




1922.... 


- 


i*,3i*5 


i*,3i*5 


- 


1923.... 


_ 


3,661 


3,661 


. 


192U.... 


- 


6,1+09 


6,1*09 


. 


1925.... 


22,199 


9,1*95 


9,1*95 


- 


1926.... 


12,735 


10,901* 


10,901* 


- 


1927.... 


16,393 


26,671* 


11,662 


15,012 


1928.... 


23,566 


31,571 


11,625 


19,91*6 


1929.... 


32,711 


38,796 


12,908 


25,888 


1930.... 


20,880 


28,018 


16,631 


11,387 


1931 - 19*«) 


11*7,1*57 


210,1*16 


117,086 


93,330 


1931.... 


^2:276 


29,861 


18,142 


11,719 


1932.... 


22,735 


30,201 


19,1*26 


10,775 


1933 . . . . 


20,91*9 


30,212 


^9,865 


10,31*7 


193*^.... 


10,319 


16,889 


8,879 


8,010 


1935.... 


11,016 


16,297 


8,319 


7,978 


1936.... 


11,728 


17,1*1*6 


9,195 


8,251 


1937.... 


13,051* 


17,617 


8,829 


8,788 


1938.... 


12,851 


18,553 


9,275 


9,278 


1939.... 


12,037 


17,792 


8,202 


9,590 


I9U0.... 


10,1*92 


15,51*8 


6,95^* 


8,591* 


19'^! - 1950 


1,377,210 


1,581,771* 


110,81*9 


1,1*70,925 


191*1.... 


11, 29^* 


10,938 


i*,i*07 


6,531 


191*2.... 


11,781+ 


10,613 


3,709 


6,901* 


191*3.... 


11,175 


16,151* 


1*,207 


11,91*7 


191*1*.... 


31,171* 


39,1*^9 


7,179 


32,270 


191*5.... 


69,161* 


80,760 


11,270 


69,1*90 


191*6. . . . 


99,591 


116,320 


li*,375 


101,91*5 


191*7.... 


193,657 


211*, 51*3 


18,663 


195,880 


191*8.... 


192,779 


217,555 


20,-371 


197,181* 


191*9.... 


288,253 


296,337 


20,01*0 


276,297 


1950.... 


1*68,339 


579,105 


6,628 


572,1*77 


1951 


509,01*0 


686,713 


13,51*1* 


673,169 


1952 


528,815 


723,959 


20,181 


703,778 


1953 


885,587 


905,236 


19,81*5 


885,391 


1951* 


1,089,583 


1,101,228 


26,951 


1,071*, 277 


1955 


25i+,096 


21*7,797 


15,028 


232,769 


1956 


87,696 


88,188 


7,297 


80,891 


1957 


59,918 


68,1*61 


5,082 


63,379 


1958 


53,1*71* 


67,71*2 


7,11*2 


60,600 



I 



Aliens apprehended first recorded in 1925 . 

Aliens departing voluntarily first recorded In I927. 



TABLE 24B. ALIENS DEPARTING VOLUNTARILY, BY NATIONALITY AND CAUSE:. 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1958 

/Aliens departing voluntarily totaled 60,600 (see table 24A). 

This table does not include 36,231 direct voluntary departures under 

safeguards - chiefly Mexicans who entered without inspection_7 



Nationality 



o <u 
x: e 



c j: j-j 



4J — o c 
T3 E +^ M 



All countries . 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgium 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Turkey 

United Kingdom ... 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China \J 

India 

Indonesia 

Israel 

Japan 

Jordan 

Korea 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Central America .. 

South Ameri ca 

Africa 

Other countries . . . , 

V Includes Formosa 



12.505 



Ob 

37 

638 

141 

196 

709 

3,176 

51 

1,272 

523 

1,130 

94 

177 

674 

228 

311 

2,694 

125 

253 

2,162 



284 

260 
81 
202 
235 
33 
147 
164 
516 
240 



3,980 

1.531 

308 

■^69 

63 

i 463 



19,592 



11,583 



55 

35 

632 

107 

182 

654 

2,987 

42 

1,177 

491 

1,043 

83 

150 

618 

206 

301 

2,535 

112 

173 

2. 037 



1 

1 
26 
31 
12 
42 
162 

6 
56 
26 
85 

6 
18 
43 
17 



- i 



J ^ I 



252 

258 
79 
199 
181 
32 
145 
160 
499 
232 



153 

539 

9 

2 



1,784 

1,131 

1,454 

415 

701 

59 

428 



391 
2,200 



TABLE 25. ALIENS DEPORTED, BY COUNTRY TO WHICH DEPORTED AND DEPORTATION EXPENSE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1958 



Country to which 
deported 



Immigration 
and 
Naturalization 
Service 



Deportation expense 



Other 

Government 

agencies 



Steamship 
companies 



borne by 



Aliens 
deported 



All countries .. 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgium 

Denmark 

Finland 

France ■ 

Germany 

Greece ■ 

Ireland ■ 

Italy ■ 

Netherlands ....... 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Turkey 

United Kingdom ... 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

\sia 

China l/ 

Hong-Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Japan 

Jordan 

Korea 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

lorth America 

Canada 

Mexico 

'//est Indies 

Central America .. 
Other N. America . 

^outh America 

vfrica 

ither countries .... 

~/ Includes Formosa. 



7.142 



1. 627 



10 
11 
30 
31 
22 
75 

525 
15 

288 
65 
70 
29 
76 

130 
29 
21 

150 
17 
33 



85 
29 
8 
14 
14 
12 
11 
23 
55 
48 

4.959 



1,060 

3,246 

482 

170 

1 

135 
21 
101 



5,053 



28 
5 
6 
7 
4 
11 
9 
11 
29 
21 

,402 



894 

3,128 

244 

135 

1 

50 

9 

23 



66 



848 



2 
9 

17 

19 

7 

32 

348 

1 

128 

50 

49 

4 

23 

77 

19 



170 



133 

100 

140 

19 



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63 



TABLE 29. VESJEU AND AIRPLANEJ INSPECTED, CREWMEN ADMITTED, AND oTO/JA/JAYS 
ARRIVED, BY REGIONS AND DISTRICTS: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1958 

/Each arrival or departure of the same vessel or crewman counted separately/ 



Regi on 

and 

district 



Vessels and airplanes 
inspected 



Air- 
planes 



Vessels 
and air- 
planes i/ 



Crewmen admitted 



jtowaways 
arrived 



United States total 



Northeast Region .. 
Boston, Mass . . . . 
Buffalo, N. Y. .. 
Hartford, Conn. . 
Newark, N.J. . . . 
New York, N. Y. . 
Portland, Me. ... 
St. Albans, Vt. . 
Hamilton. Bermuda 



Southeast Region . . . 

Atlanta, Ga 

Baltimore, Md. . . , 
Cleveland, Ohio .. 

Miami , Fla 

New Orleans , La. i 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
San Juan, P. R. . , 
Washington, D. C. 



Northwest Region ... 
Anchorage, Alaska 

Chicago, 111 

Detroit, Mich. ... 

Helena, Mont. ' 

Kansas City, Mo. . 

Omaha, Neb 

Portland, Ore. ... 
St. Paul, Minn. .. 
Seattle, Wash. ... 



Southwest Region 

Dallas, Tex 

Denver, Colo 

El Paso, Tex 

Honolulu, T. H„ 

Los Angeles, Calif. . 
San Antonio, Tex. ... 
San Francisco, Calif. 
Phoenix, Ariz 



1,586 

2,647 

125 

5,463 

6,569 

409 

148 

28.230 



1,916 
2,138 
2,008 
6,860 
2,574 
2,984 
6,208 
3,542 

13.049 



765 

499 

1,025 



719 

390 

9,651 



1,724 



916 
4,245 

580 
1,404 



633^351 



287,339 



2,588 
13,217 
56 
3,225 
18,211 
544 
9,267 
2,115 

60.290 



781 

218 

2,077 

32,451 

2,253 

127 

21,398 

985 

23,546 



5 

1,400 

263 

95 



3.777 



46,419 

30,244 

3,955 

599 

4P0,017 

35,523 

15,5^1 

21,013 

662.102 



25,239 
11,387 
1,017 
681 
218,581 
5,135 
16,252 
9,047 

31^.102 



180 

35 

2 

480 

282 

65 

2,684 



48,669 
64,392 
43,186 

144,721 
70,285 
99,543 
76,059 

115,247 

155.381 



25,930 
22,083 
12,640 
87,030 
33,335 
17,907 
96,744 
20,433 

128,946 



1,541 

867 

3,820 

1,811 

9 

6 

72 

5,217 

10,203 

27,678 



265 

3 

1 
66 

1 

46 

12 

296 



10,352 

10,434 

12,553 

538 

11 

10 

19,741 

9,210 

92,532 

222.641 



6,364 

3,774 

9,191 

2,187 

38 

8 

10,725 

6,805 

89,854 



771 

90 

1,608 

12,948 

5,078 

5,727 

284 

1,172 



50,494 
131 

33,437 
82,397 
14,685 
41,291 
206 



15,839 
258 

94,652 
52,925 
10,697 
49,967 
383 



1/ Separate figures for vessels and airplanes not avallabl 





I 


I 




^ 


6,310 

3,756 
22,490 

6,042 
1,906 

402 
402/ 
1,115 

14,643 
5,293 

3.934.794 








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65 



TABLE 31. PASSENGERS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
BY COUNTRY OF EMBARKATION: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1958 

^^clusive of travel over land border37 





By 


sea and by 


air 


Bv sea 


By air 


ewbarkation 


Aliens 


Citi- 
zens 


Total 


Aliens 


zenr Total 


aiens 


Citi- 
zens 


Tota 




958.278 


l,469j262 


2.427,540 


283.482 


351.162 


63/,, 6V. 


67/^,796 


1.118.100 


1.792.896 




431,7i*6 


633.055 


U 064. 801 


182.889 


229.602 


412.491 


248.857 


403.453 


652.310 


Andorra 

Austria 


2,762 
8,377 

19,819 

588 

62, no 

54,371 

506 

4,405 

1 

4,059 

15,686 

48,749 

26 

3 

66 
36,209 

' 90 

6,746 

12 

15 

13.354 

8,313 

8,956 

641 

876 

125,858 

180 

1,734 

14 


1,191 

11,990 

5 

1 

20,254 

319 

134,255 

129,822 

1,340 

6.238 

3 

4,667 

23,955 

57,278 

1 

3 

20 

33,939 

6,793 

526 

14,280 

5 

13,603 

8,138 

10,159 

405 

1,037 

152,644 

103 

68 

5 

97.933 


2 

3,953 

20,367 

5 

1 

40,073 

907 

196,395 

184,193 

1,846 

10,643 

4 

8,726 

39,641 

106,027 

27 

6 

86 

70,148 

13.981 

616 

21,026 

20 

20 

26,957 

16,451 

19,115 

1,046 

1.913 

278, 502 

233 

1,802 

19 

161. 00/, 


767 

2,677 
185 
27,014 
21,672 
506 
3,407 

40 
4,351 
37,108 

1 

64 

16,913 

4,Vt3 

88 

756 

4 

15 

5,410 

4,503 

641 

51,859 
63 

307 
7 

22.926 


441 

3.041 
48 
59,627 
33.268 
1,340 
4.569 

21 

S368 

35,383 

2 

16 

13,100 

4.530 

521 

1.381 

6 

4 

5,152 

5.116 

405 
284 
55.80S 
103 
65 
3 

31. 5U 


1,208 

5,718 
233 
86,641 
54.940 
1,846 
7,976 

61 
9.719 
72,491 

3 

80 

30,013 

8,973 

609 

2.137 

10 

19 

10,562 

9.619 

1,046 
372 
107,667 
166 
372 
10 

54.440 


2 
2,762 
7,610 

17,142 

403 

35.126 

32.699 

998 

1 

4.019 

11,335 

11,641 

26 

2 

2 

19.296 

2,745 

2 

5,990 

7.944 
3,810 
8,956 

788 

73,999 

117 

1,427 

7 

40,145 


1,191 

11.549 

5 

1 

17.213 

271 

74.628 

96.554 

1,669 

4,646 
18,587 
21,895 

1 

4 

20,839 

2,263 

5 

12,899 

I 

8,451 
3,022 
10,159 

753 
96,836 

3 
2 

66./4I9 


2 
3.953 
19,159 


Czech03loval<ia 

Darz ig.. 


5 
1 




34,355 


„. I , 


674 




109,754 




129.253 




- 




2,667 


,, 


4 




8,665 




29,922 


It aly 


33,536 




27 




3 


Malta 


6 




40,135 




5,008 


Pol nd 


7 


Portugal 

[{umania 


18,889 
10 




1 




16,395 




6,832 




19,115 




- 


_ . 


1,541 


United Kin?.dom 

U.S.S.R 


170,835 

117 

1,430 


Other U.K. Ter. k Dep. 


9 
106,^64 




3 

6 
8 
17 

46 
571 

1 

3.711 

529 

27 

533 

86 

6,086 

35,449 

4 

1,255 

33 

644 
42 
1 
26 

139 


1 

94 
6 
2 
1 

38 

1.929 

6 

2,717 

380 

35 

263 

155 

3,447 

64,056 

42 

625 

5 

12 

1,640 

59 

11 

132 


4 

6 

102 

23 

2 

1 

84 

2,500 

6 

1 

6,/,28 

909 

62 

796 

241 

9,533 

99,505 

46 

' 38 
12 
2,28/. 
101 
12 
26 
271 


3 
2 

16 
310 

1 

2,038 

104 

10 

5 

4,254 
11,700 

475 
19 

110 
41 

1 


2 

2 

17 

1,495 

2 

1,418 
114 

1,246 
19.131 

398 

5 

565 
59 


3 

4 

2 

33 

1.805 

2 

3.456 
218 
12 

6 

5.50c 
30,831 

873 
24 

67; 
IOC 

9 


6 
6 

17 

30 

261 

1,673 

425 

17 

528 

86 

1,832 

23.749 

4 

780 

14 

534 
1 
1 
26 

138 


1 

92 
6 

1 

21 

434 

4 

1.299 
266 
33 
262 
155 
2,201 
44.925 
42 
227 

12 
1.075 

11 

124 


1 


„ . 1 ^ „ 




Bonin Volcano Is 


98 
23 


_. 


- 








51 


-, T 




(, 


4 




- 




2,972 


India 

Indonesia 

Iran 


50 
790 


T-ran ... . . 






4,033 


Japan 


68,674 
46 


„ 




K ft' 


14 


Laos 


L2 














Ne« Guinea (Neth.).... 


262 











66 



TABLE 31 . PASSENGERS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED OTATES FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 

BY COUmRY OF EMBARKATION: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1958 (Conttd) 

/^clualve of travel over land borders? 



By sea and by air 



Citi- 
zena 



Citi- 
zona 



Asia (Cont'd) I 

Philippines 

Portugese India 

Ryukyu Islands 

Saudi Arabia 

Singapore c 

Syria 

Thailand .c 

Timor ..., 

Turkey , 

Vietnam 

Other Portuguese 

Ter. & Dep 

Other U.K. 

Ter. & Dep 

Africa 

Algeria 

Angola 

Belgian Congo 

Cameroons (U.K.) 

Cape Verde Is 

Comoro Archipelago 

Egypt 

Ethiopia 

French West Africa 

Ghana 

Kenya 

Uberia 

Ubya 

Madagascar 

Morocco, French 

Morocco, Spanish..... 

Mozambique 

Nigeria 

Principe and Sao Tome..,..., 

Rio Muni 

St. Helena 

Sierra Leone 

Somaltland (Fr.) 

Southern Rhodesia. 

South West Africa 

Sudan 

Tanganyika 

Tangier 

Tunisia 

Uganda 

Union of So. Africa 

Other French 

Ter. & Dep 

Other Spanish 

Ter. & Dep 

Other U.K. Ter. 

& Dep 

Oceania 

Australia 

Fiji 

French Oceania. 

Gilbert and EUice Islands. 

Nauru 

New Caledonia 

New Guinea. 

New Hebrides 

New Zealand 

Pacific Island3(U.S. Adm.). 

Solomon Islands (Br.) 

Wake and Midway Is 

Western Samoa 

Other U.K. Ter. & Dep 



10,553 

lA 

1,W4 

551 
53 
155 



1A,827 

li. 

/„660 

1,650 

367 

110 

1A6 

5 

335 

153 

5 

5 



5T 

2 
2/»9 
U 
61 
26 

18 

57 

223 

3 

469 

1,955 

1 

4,606 



25,380 

28 

6,094 

2,134 

918 

163 

301 



12,776 



8,451 

2,123 
3 
136 
12 
38 
7 
110 



6,989 
14 
1,267 
481 
510 
4J. 
136 



9,940 

14 

2,704 

1,650 

272 

107 

127 

256 
153 



39 

295 

14 

75 

31 

924 

37 

85 

389 

U 

729 

2,301 

1 

5,035 



1 
18 
284 
2 
48 
212 

383 
1,556 



15,528 

3,733 

35 



1 
3 

4,626 

2,292 
39 

1,021 
1 

2,093 



4,868 

2,557 

104 



1,264 

14,265 

36 

4,665 



20,396 

6,290 

139 

20 

3 

16 

1 

3 

5,890 

16,557 

75 

5,686 



8,101 

1,123 

13 

12 

3 



?.298 



2,558 
916 
47 



763 

3,909 

5 



21*2^ 



10,659 
2,039 
60 
17 
3 
16 



4,398 
7 
85 



49 



7,427 
2,610 



1 
3 

1,401 

1,803 
37 

1,019 
1 

2,083 



19 . ai 



3,971 
2,131 



3.620 



539 

1,889 



2,310 
1,641 
57 



501 

10,356 

31 

4,582 



3?.941. 



9,737 

4,251 

79 

3 



1 

3 

1,902 

12,159 

68 

5,601 



49 



TABLE 31,PA3SENGEaS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES FROM FOREIGN COOOTRIEa, 
BY COUNTRY OF EMBARKATION: YEAR ENIEO JUNE 30, 1958 (Cont'd) 

^Exclusive of travel ovar land borders7 





By 


tea and by air I 


By eea 1 


By air 


embarkation 


aiens 


Citi- 
zens 


Total 


Aliem 


Citi- 


Tota 


Aliens 


Citi- 
zens 


Total 


North America 


3W.861 


640.575 


983.436 


56.462 


70.669 


127.131 


286,39? 


569,906 


8?6,305 


Canada* ..•..••..••••• 


U.O76 

142 

27,380 

260.070 


8,214 
2,478 
48,205 

U 

533.926 


22,290 
2,620 
75,585 

11 

793.996 


6,422 
22 
653 

45.692 


2,163 

112 

1,354 

55.572 


8,585 

134 

2,007 

101,264 


7,654 

120 

26,727 

2U.378 


6,051 
2,366 
46,851 

11 

478,354 


13,705 


Greenland 


2,486 
73,578 


St. Pierre and 


U 


West Indies 


692,732 


Bermuda 


U,6oo 
67.566 


l&2;te5 
191.940 


1171425 
259.506 


1,313 
11.870 


15;354 


16,667 
26.186 


13,2*7 
55.696 


*?,471 
177.624 


lo6,75S 
233.320 


Bahama Islands... 


23.519 
3,886 
20,865 
13,193 

5,728 

215 

160 

U8,675 

13,659 

2,35;* 

5,775 

1,799 

5,642 

U..I93 


133,613 
4.469 
40,753 
6,435 

6,123 

289 

258 

205,786 

16,016 

1,389 

9,304 

1,479 

5,187 

47.741 


157,132 
8,355 
61,618 
19.628 

U,851 

504 

418 

354,461 

29,675 

3,743 

15,079 

3,278 

10,829 

88.934 


658 

275 

134 

10,125 

659 

11 

8 

26,528 

2,723 

946 

1,197 

481 

634 

3.673 


9,470 

52 

1,313 

2,206 

1,254 

21 

21,370 

1,392 

476 

1,422 

607 

635 

11.468 


10,128 

327 

1,447 

12,331 

1,913 
11 
29 
47,898 
4,115 
1,422 
2,619 
1,088 
1.269 

15.141 


22,861 
3,611 
20,731 

3,068 

5,069 

204 

152 

122,147 

10,936 

1,408 

4,573 

1,318 

^,008 

37.520 


124,143 
4.417 
39,440 
4,229 

4,869 

289 

237 

184,a6 

14,624 

913 

'872 
4,552 

36.273 


147,004 
8,028 




60,171 


Leeward Islands.. 
Trinidad t 
Tobago 

aher Br. W.I.... 


7,297 

9,938 
493 
389 

306.563 


Dominican Rep 

Guadeloupe 

Haiti 

Martinique 

Neth. Meet Indies.. 

Central America...... 


25,560 
2,321 

12,460 
2,190 
9,560 

73.793 


Br. Honduras 

Canal Zone & 


-747 

15,2U 
3,135 
5,268 
8,328 
4,167 
4,33A 

88.194 


-574 

30,819 
2,424 
2,211 

3)039 
1,791 

60.106 


i;32i 

46,033 
5,559 

7,479 
15,211 

7,206 
6,125 

148.300 


10 

2,667 
7 79 
35 
473 
396 
13 

7.093 


22 

10,077 
323 
51 
432 
556 
7 

8.051 


32 

12,744 
402 

86 
905 
952 

20 

15.144 


737 

12,547 
3,056 
5,233 
7,855 
3.771 
4.321 

81.101 


552 

20,742 
2,101 
2,160 
6,451 
2,483 
1,784 

52.055 


1,289 
33,289 




5,157 


El Salvador 


7,393 
U,306 




6,254 




6,105 


South America 


133,156 




^-^119 

621 

16,030 

878 

6,680 

L4,582 

4,226 

49 

459 

7,575 

165 

390 

29,420 

354,505 
603,773 


3,809 

441 

10,170 

449 

2,302 

6,699 

'.- 

140 
5,657 

112 

243 

27,949 

936,527 
532,735 


10,928 
1,062 

26,200 
1.327 
8.982 

21,281 

6,334 

76 

599 

13,232 

277 

633 

57,369 

,291.032 
.,136,508 


1I632 

2 

1,761 

9 

346 

304 

157 

260 

8 

11 

2.603 

46,604 
236,878 


l!581 

1,599 
IU2 
507 
391 
508 

613 

6 

2 

2,702 

144,025 
207,137 


3,213 
2 

3,360 
151 
853 
695 
665 

873 

14 

13 

5,303 

190,629 
444,015 


5.487 

619 

14.269 

869 

6.334 

14,278 

4.069 

49 

459 

7,315 

157 

379 

26,817 

307,901 
366,895 


2,228 

441 
8,571 

307 

1,795 

6,308 

1,600 

27 

140 
5,044 

106 

241 

25,247 

792,502 
325,598 




Bolivia 

Brazil .............. 


1,060 
22,840 


British Guiana 

Chile....... 


1,176 
8,129 


Colombia ............ 


20,586 




5,669 


French Guiana 


76 
599 


Peru................. 


12,359 


Surinam (Neth. 

Guiana) 


263 






Venezuela 




Flag of carrier: 

United States 

gn 


1,100,403 
692,493 











68 



TABLE32. PASSENGERS DEPARTED FROM TIE UNITED STATES TO FOREIGN COUOTRIES, 
BY COUNTRY OF DEBARKATION: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1958 
/Exclusive of travel over land borders/ 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria. 

Belgium 

Danzig 

Denmark. ............ 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Gibraltar 

Greece 

Iceland. 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Luxembourg. ......... 

Malta 

Monaco 

Netherlands 

Norvray 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumsunia 

San Marino 

Spain 

Sweden. 

Svntzerland 

Trieste 

Turkey 

U.S,3.R 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 

Other U.K. Ter.&Dep. 

Asia 

Aden 

Afghanistan 

Bahrein ...„ 

Bonin Volcano Is.... 

Burma 

Ceylon. 

China 

Cyprus 

French India 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia. 

Iran 

Iraq 

Israel 

Japan 

Jordan 

Korea 

Kuwait 

Lebanon 

Malaya 

Nepal 

New Guinea (Neth.).. 

Pakistan 

Palestine 

Philippines 

Portuguese India.... 

Ryukyu Islands 

Saudi .Arabia 

Singapore 

Syria 

Thailand 

Turkey 

Viotnam 

Yemen 



1.609.f.37 



645.861 



6,769 

15,/. 83 
541 
50,296 
31,594 
583 
4,397 
1,118 
6,527 
25,153 



25,319 

7,284 

235 

11,256 

16 

4 

10,169 

8,499 

6,269 

s60 

370 

24 

100,103 

235 

10 



1,297 

208 

19 

116 

35 

3,419 

24,050 

2 

840 

2 

679 



1,297 

19,479 

1 

23.973 

697 

109,795 

119,687 

2,158 

9,043 

1,460 

24,788 

56,629 

12 

141 

3 

6 

38,618 

9,258 

585 

16,706 



16,852 

12,178 

12,694 

718 

2,035 

1 

166,961 

63 



52 
2 

1 
30 
40 
34 
1,216 

1 

2,046 
434 
30 
422 
90 
7,073 
49.351 

141 

2,043 
36 



124 

U,474 

13 

3,496 

1,290 

435 

58 

431 

384 

462 



1,970 
26,248 

39,456 
1.238 
160,091 
151,281 
2,741 
13,440 
2,578 
31,315 
81,782 



63.937 

16,542 

820 

27,962 

20 

5 

27,021 

20,677 

18,963 

1,278 

2,405 

25 

267,064 

298 

26 

126,037 



243.1^9 



391.93? 



164.780 



402.722 



1,103 

2,219 

330 

23,195 

14,593 

583 

' 48 
3,026 
18,533 



12,062 

5,026 

235 

7,624 



3,464 
5,073 



46,915 
233 



2,005 

2,340 
395 
51,018 
37,937 
2,158 
6,886 
28 
7,250 
32, 



13.640 

5,161 

585 

2.812 



5,153 
7,345 



64,268 
63 

6 



51 

47 

1,391 

1 

5 

3,343 

642 

49 

•538 

125 

10,492 

73,401 

10 

981 

2 

2,722 

47 

238 

7 

166 

5 

23,095 

57 

4,153 

1,800 

667 

101 

593 

509 



3,108 

4,559 
725 
74,213 
52,530 
2,741 
10,774 
76 
10,276 
50,922 



3 
6 

25,702 

10,187 
820 

10,436 

8 

5 

8,617 

12,418 

1,278 
1,036 



47.523 



13,264 

211 

27,101 

17,001 

509 
1,070 
3.501 
6,620 



1.297 
17,474 
1 
21.633 
302 
58,777 
81,750 

2.157 

1.432 

17.538 

24,240 

2 

12 

141 



24,978 
4,097 



11,699 
4,833 
12,694 

1.063 

1 

102.693 

10 

53.340 



567.502 



1.970 
23,140 
1 
34,897 
513 
85.878 
98,751 

2,666 
2,502 
21,039 
30,860 



17.526 
12 

18.404 
8.259 
18,963 

1,369 

25 

155,881 



2,327 

7.504 



4,345 
48 



3,265 
16,421 



2.300 

6 

136 



1.563 
344 
43 



5.592 
23.925 



1,030 
47 
238 



2.348 
6 

177 



17 
1,269 



119 

5 

9,219 

13 

1.196 

1,284 

299 

53 

346 

253 

442 



4.900 
49.476 



7 

155 

5 

13,495 

57 

1,805 

1,794 

490 

92 

483 

350 

653 



69 



TABLE 3J, PASSENGERS lEPARTED FROM THE UKITED STATES TO FOREIGN COUKTRIES, 
BY COUNTRY OF DEBARKATION: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1958 (Cont'd) 
/Exclusive of travel over land borders/ 



Country of 
debarkation 




By sea 1 


Bv air 


Aliens 


Citi- 
zens 


Total 


Miens 


Cltl- 


Total 


Aliens 


Clti- 


Total 


Africa. 


1.789 


11.208 


12.997 


904 


4.055 


4.959 


885 


7.153 


8,038 




' 16 
1 
86 
16 

20 
24 
281 

15 

36 
8 
52 
10 
U9 
229 
132 
2 
20 
U 
9 
18 
2 
1 
1 
1 

3 

1 
639 

3 

26. W5 


35 

21 

249 

185 

30 

27 

92 

861 

37 

2 

181 

25 

227 

51 

793 

1,892 

5,054 

13 

61 

80 

72 

28 

13 

8 
3 
1 
25 

1,128 

14 

25.401 


51 
22 

335 

201 

30 

47 

116 

1,142 

52 

2 

217 

33 

279 

61 

942 

2,121 

5,186 

15 

31 

94 

81 

46 

15 

1 

9 

4 

1 

28 

1 

1,767 

17 

51.806 


1 
69 

1 

20 

168 
7 

35 
8 
4 

10 

45 
7 

77 
2 

20 

11 
9 

18 
2 
1 
1 
1 

1 
386 

8.770 


11 

21 

149 

8 

27 

308 
11 
2 

164 
25 
32 
50 

125 

386 
1,810 
13 
61 
69 
4 
28 
11 

8 

3 

729 
5.793 


11 

22 

218 

9 

47 

476 
18 
2 

199 
33 
36 
60 

170 

393 
1,88? 
15 
81 
80 
13 
46 
13 
1 

I 

1 
1,115 

14.563 


16 

17 
15 

24 

U3 

8 

1 

48 

104 
222 
55 

3 

- 

3 

253 

3 

17.635 


24 

100 
177 
30 

92 
553 
26 

17 

195 
1 

668 
1,506 
3,244 

11 
68 

2 

1 

25 

399 

14 

19.608 


40 








117 


Cameroons (U.K.) 

Cameroun (Fr. ) 


192 

30 








116 


Egypt 


666 




34 


French Equatorial Afrloa... 

French West Africa. 

Gambia. 


18 


Cheina, 


243 


Kenya, 


1 


Uberla. 

Libya. 


772 
1,728 


Morocco, French. ,..,.,..,,. 


3,299 


Mozambique 


_ 




14 




68 


Sierra Leone. 


- 


South West Africa, 


2 








- 


Tangier. 

Togo(Fr.) 

Tunisia, . .. 


1 
28 


Uganda, 




Union of So. Africa. 

Other U<Ji. Ter. 

& Dep, 


652 
17 




37.243 




2,506 
70 

3 
5 

1 

4,U5 

2,210 
16 

691 

5 

2,741 


5,940 

1,496 

195 

1 
33 
13 
5 
1,759 

12,024 
6 

3,917 

6 

6 


19.952 

4,002 

265 

4 

38 

14 

5 

5,904 

14,234 
22 

4,608 

11 

2,747 


5,815 
88 
68 

3 
3 

1 

2,206 
450 

5 
131 


3,735 
152 
185 

1 
33 
9 
5 
1,095 

568 

4 
6 


9.550 
240 
253 

4 
36 

10 

5 

3,301 

1,018 

4 
11 
131 


8,197 

2,418 

2 

2 

1,939 

1,760 
16 

691 
2,610 


2,205 

1,344 

10 

4 

664 

11,456 

3,913 
6 


10,402 




3,762 




12 


Gilbert and 


. 


New Caledonia... 


2 




4 




- 




2,603 


Pacific Islands 

(U.S. Adm.) 

Solomon Island (Br.) 

Wake and Midway 


13,216 
22 

4,604 


Other French 

Ter. & Dep. 


_ 


Other U.K. Ter. 


2,616 







70 



PASSENGERS DEPARTED FROM THE UNITED STATES TO F(»EIGN COOWPRIES, 
BY COONTHY OF DEBARKATION: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1958 (Cont'd) 
/Exclusive of travel over land border37 



Country of 
debarkation 




By sea 


Bv air 


Aliens 


Citi- 
zens 


Total 


Aliens 


Citi- 


Total 


Aliens 


Citi- 
zens 


Total 


North America 


253.921 


652.035 


905.956 


41.328 


63.561 


104.889 


212.593 


588.474 


801.067 


Canada • 


12:569 

59 

20,771 

193.857 


5,756 
1,699 
57,183 

48 

539.860 


18,325 
1,758 
77,954 

48 

733.717 


7:^53 

1 

353 

31.916 


2:207 

2 

554 

52.384 


9,860 

3 
907 

3 

84.300 


4,916 

58 

20,418 

161.941 


3,549 
1,697 
56,629 

40 

487.476 


8:4^5 - 

1.755 
77.047 

40 

649.417 




Mexico... 


St. Pierre and 

Miquelon.......... 


West Indies 


Bermuda 


9,531 
60.231 


99,325 
192.740 


108:856 
252.971 


1,511 
10.574 


14,164 
14.417 


15:^75 
24.991 


8:020 
49.657 


85:161 
178.323 


93:i81 
227.980 


Br. West Indies... 


Bahama Islands.. 
Barbados 


21.312 
3,244 
19,297 
11,739 

4,518 

104 

17 

105,829 

3,181 

1,124 

4,150 

961 

3,850 

26.665 


134,709 
4,572 
39,35 
6,366 

7,023 

340 

372 

213,043 

17,871 

939 

10,047 

1,308 

4,587 

47.489 


156,021 
7,816 
58,655 
18,105 

11, 5U 

444 

389 

318,872 

26,052 

2,063 

14,197 

2,269 

8.437 

74.154 


95? 

79 

72 

9,137 

309 
10 
11 
18.449 
270 
239 
504 
53 
316 

1.405 


10,789 

68 

649 

2,044 

837 
9 

21 
21,232 
955 
20 
616 
396 
584 

8.406 


11,745 
147 
721 

11.181 

1.146 

19 

32 

39,681 

1,225 

259 

1,120 

44? 

900 

9.811 


20,356 
3,165 

19.225 
2.602 

4.209 

94 

6 

87,380 

7,911 

885 

3,646 

908 

3,534 

25.260 


123,920 
4,504 
38,709 
4,322 

6.186 

331 

351 

191.811 

16,916 

919 

9,431 

912 

4.003 

39.083 


144:276 
7.669 
57.934 
6.924 

10,395 

425 
357 
279.191 
24,827 
1,804 
13.077 
1.820 
7.537 

64.343 


Leeward Islnnds. 
Trinidau & 

Tobago 

Windward Islands 
Other Br. W. I.. 


Dominican Rep..... 
Guadeloupe 


Martinique 

Neth, West Indies. 

Central America 


Br. Honduras...... 

Canal Zone i 


432 

8,628 
2,513 
3,625 
5,669 
3,138 
2,660 

73.116 


971 

28,930 
2.420 
2,222 
7,542 
3,224 

64.996 


1,403 

37,558 
4,933 
5,847 

13.211 
6,362 
4,840 

138.112 


2 

759 
28 
B 
158 
434 
16 

11.108 


18 

7,458 
65 
14 
180 
659 
12 

9.931 


20 

8,217 
93 
22 

338 

1,093 
28 

21.039 


430 

7,869 
2,485 
3,617 
5.511 
2.704 
2.644 

62,008 


953 

21.472 
2.355 
2.208 
7.362 
2.565 
2,168 

55.065 


1,383 

29,341 

5:825 
12,873 
5,269 
4,812 

117.073 


Costa Rica 

El Salvador 


Honduras 


South America 




437 
14,308 
614 
S,009 
10,562 
3,125 
1 

6,331 

126 

611 

25,311 

246,686 
403,742 


4:285 
534 
10,749 
430 
2,722 
8,011 
2,136 

68 
153 

116 

549 

29,331 

869,998 
613,917 


10,812 
971 

25,057 
1,044 
7,731 

18.573 
5.311 

132 
243 

12.193 

242 
1,160 
54.642 

1,116,684 
1,077,659 


2.190 

3.112 
12 
716 
508 
139 

324 

4 

167 

3,936 

35,742 
191 611 


1,845 

2,205 
22 
710 
473 

371 

577 

14 

127 

3,587 

128,292 
229,261 


4,035 

5,317 
34 

1,426 
981 
510 

901 

18 

294 

7,523 

164,034 
420,872 


4.337 

437 

11.196 

602 

4,293 

10,054 

2,986 

1 

64 

90 

6,007 

122 

444 

21,375 

210,944 
272,131 


2,440 
534 
8,544 
408 
2,012 
7,538 
1,815 

68 

153 

5,285 

102 

422 

25,744 

741,706 
384,656 


6,777 
971 

19,740 
1,010 
6,305 

17 592 


Bolivia 


Brazil 


British Guiana 


Colombia 




4,801 

1 

132 

243 

11,292 

224 


Falkland Islands.... 
French Guiana 


Paru . 


Surinam (Neth. 

Guiana) 


Venezuela 

Flag of Carrier: 

United States 


47,119 

952,650 
656,787 







TABLE 33. PASSENGER TRAVEL BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
BY PORT OF ARRIVAL OR DEPARTURE! YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1958 
^Exclusive of travel over international land borders/ 



ARRIVED 

Agana, Guam 

Anchorage, Alaska .. 

Baltimore, Md 

Boston, Mass 

Brownsville, Tex. .. 
Charleston, S. C. .. 

Chicago, 111 

Detroit, Mich 

Honolulu, T. H 

Houston, Tex 

Jacksonville, Fla. . 

Key West, Fla 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Miami, Fla 

Montreal, Can 

Newark, N. J 

New Orleans, La. ... 

New York, N. Y 

Norfolk, Va 

Philadelphia, Pa. .. 
Port Everglades, Fla 
San Francisco, Cal. 

San Juan, P. R 

Seattle, Wash 

Tampa, Fla 

Vancouver, Can 

Virgin Islands 

Washington, D. C. .. 
West Palm Beach, Fla 
Other ports 

DEPARTED 

Agana, Guam , 

Anchorage, Alaska ... 

Baltimore, Md 

Boston, Mass , 

Brownsville, Tex. .., 
Charleston, S. C. .., 

Chicago, 111 , 

Detroit, Mich 

Honolulu, T. H , 

Houston, Tex 

Jacksonville, Fla. .. 

Key West, Fla 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Miami, Fla 

Montreal, Can 

Newark, N. J 

New Orleans, La 

New York, N. Y , 

Norfolk, Va 

Philadelphia, Pa. .,, 
Port Everglades, Fla, 
San Francisco, Cal. , 

San Juan, P. R 

Seattle, Wash 

Tampa, Fla 

Vancouver, Can 

Virgin Islands 

Washington, D. C. .., 
West Palm Beach, Fla, 
Other ports 



958.278 



674.796 



1.118.100 



1.792.8 



6,421 
9,842 
1,463 

11,494 
5,723 
1,769 
5,270 
6,443 

59,467 

1,848 

347 

24,787 

14,861 

180,195 

561 

5,980 

18,702 

491,600 

1,547 

1,456 

11,281 

11,815 

7,627 
4,625 
1,209 
12,331 
2,001 
6,997 
3,638 

710.428 



14,015 
2,914 
1,745 
27,236 
4,408 
8,585 
14,456 
10,768 
75,829 
1,747 
1,482 
40,594 
14,141 
273,556 
1,953 
38,146 
40,604 
736,882 
2,741 
2,558 
28,035 
15,438 
42,108 
13,565 
4,581 
1,238 
5,476 
13,071 
25,286 
6,104 



20,436 
12,756 
3,208 
38,730 
10,131 
10,354 
19,726 
17,211 
135,296 
3,595 
1,829 
65,381 
29,002 
453,751 
2,514 
44,126 
59,306 
,228,482 
4,288 
4,014 
39,316 
27,253 
89,006 
21,192 
9,206 
2,527 
17,807 
15,072 
32,283 
9,742 



3,721 
2 
1,308 
1,421 
41 
1,155 



17,082 
449 
201 
14,501 
7,481 
2,253 



1,473 

185,022 

1,279 

748 

8,760 

8,499 

12,378 

2,360 

199 

620 

10,698 

19 

318 

2,569 

227,353 



,252 3,890 
2 9,842 



9,483 
5,622 
1,425 
5,270 
6,443 

42,385 

1,399 

146 

10,286 
7.380 



3,432 

142 

1,499 

31,226 
770 



3,003 
256,414 

1,212 
494 

3,422 
12,578 

7,740 

7,720 
141 
223 

3,720 
484 
656 

4,578 



621 
25,603 
11,549 
11,389 
2,465 

4,476 

441,436 

2,491 

1,242 

12,182 

21,077 

20,118 

10,080 

340 

843 

14,418 

503 

974 

7,147 

584.906 



17,229 

306,578 

268 

708 

2,521 

3,316 

34,520 

5,267 

4,426 

669 

1,633 

1,982 

6,679 

1,069 

483.075 



10,294 
2,912 
437 
25,815 
4,367 
7,430 
14,456 
10,768 
61,685 
1,426 
1,062 
29,492 
10,073 
264,420 
15 
38,146 
37,601 
480,468 
1,529 
2,064 
24,613 
2,860 
34,368 
5,845 
4,440 
1,015 
1,756 
12,587 
24,630 
1,526 



14,184 

12,754 

841 

35,298 

9,989 

8,855 

19,726 

17,211 

104,070 

2,825 

1,208 

39,778 

17,453 

442,362 

49 

44,126 

54,830 

787,046 

1,797 

2,772 

27,134 

6,176 

68,888 

11,112 

8,866 

1,684 

3,389 

14,569 

31,309 

2,595 



9,494 

7,916 

770 

15,711 

298 

1,253 

3,960 

2,383 

50,605 

1,372 

122 

23,342 

16,844 

140,264 

2,073 

1,384 

13,030 

347,669 

638 

248 

10,932 

3,374 

28,193 

4,163 

4,031 

39 

13,255 

524 

4,671 

1,870 



17,467 

1,975 

2,148 

44,298 

415 

7,056 

17,637 

12,079 

53,955 

1,969 

593 

42,827 

24,750 

290,133 

7,278 

13,111 

42,882 

754,385 

1,279 

1,305 

26,261 

12,579 

38,100 

17,511 

4,613 

536 

7,869 

8,336 



26,961 

9,891 

2,918 

60,009 

713 

8,309 
21,597 
14,462 
104,560 

3,34: 

715 

66,169 

41,594 

430,397 

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14,495 

55,917 

,102,054 

1,917 

1,553 
37,193 
15,953 
66,293 
21,674 

8,644 

575 

21,124 

8,860 
29,865 

7,239 



3,214 

261 

3,241 

103 

148 



1,730 

147,222 

617 

189 

8,408 

2,213 

1,677 

1,921 

141 



4,647 

264,258 

911 

143 

2,058 

8,853 

922 

10,024 

110 

2,206 



6,621 

572 

8,070 

185 

736 

33 
26,221 
251 
296 
28,540 
13,907 
15,412 
9,351 

6,377 

111,480 

1,528 

332 

10,466 

11,066 

2,599 

11,945 

251 



11,758 

546 

1,085 

5,278 



509 

12,470 

195 

1,105 

3,960 

2,373 

33,438 

1,244 

13 

8,181 

9,035 

137,880 

1,384 

11,300 

200,447 

21 

59 

2,524 

1,161 

26,516 

2,242 

3,890 

39 

3,703 

512 

4,442 

236 



14,060 

1,975 

1,837 

39,469 

333 

6,468 

17,637 

12,056 

44,901 

1,846 

406 

29,448 

18,652 

277,105 

13,111 

38,240 

490,127 

368 

1,162 
24,203 

3,726 
37,178 

7,487 

4,503 
536 

5,663 

7,802 
24,338 

1,725 



20,34u 

9,891 

2,346 

51,939 

528 

7,573 

21,597 

14,429 

78,339 

3,090 

419 

37,629 

27,687 

414,985 

14,495 
49,540 
690,574 



63,694 
9,729 
8,393 
575 
9,366 
8,314 

28,780 
1,961 





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TABLE 36. ALIENS WHO REPORTED UNDER THE ALIEIJ ADDREoS PROGRAM, BY SELECTED NATIONALITIES 
AND STATES OE RESIDENCE: DURING 1958 



State 

of 

residence 



Total 

Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columb 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

_Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina.. .. 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina.... 

^outh Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

'//est Virginia 

VJi scons in 

V/yoming 

U.S. Terr. £ Poss. 

Alaska 

Guam 

Hawaii 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands.. 



nation- 
alities 



2,181 
7,924 
J2,984 
4,769 
2,918 



1,099 

852 

435 

24,063 

2,818 

5,755 

552 

1,447 

4,224 

1,958 

439 

29,518 

4,028 

2,327 

1,959 

1,572 

1,182 

474 

3,962 

5,738 

15,071 

3,327 

327 

3,500 

643 

1,662 

309 

463 

22,106 

560 

58,502 

1,431 

440 

15,820 

1,010 

1,780 

14,565 

659 

695 

491 

735 

5,118 

2,668 

254 

2,714 

3,734 

511 

10,302 

217 



560.700 



1,228 

3,654 

546 

100,670 

2,819 

17,010 
1,267 
3,584 

26,154 
2,034 
1,352 

20,710 
5,190 
1,949 
1,704 
1,198 
2,273 

15,918 
5,081 

40,333 

61,509 
5,579 
618 
2,870 
2,120 
1,070 
980 
6,312 

22,045 
957 

91,765 
2,183 
1,101 

19,052 
1,085 
8,064 

17,694 
5,511 
1,171 
444 
1,456 
7,718 
2,782 
5,865 
4,554 

21,604 

896 

3,972 

415 



855 

382 

2,413 



48.474 



3,792 

329 

1,165 

121 

727 

652 

233 

74 

5,313 

1,113 

253 

63 

107 

71 

151 

999 

4,152 

2,678 

273 

45 

447 

77 

105 

81 

577 

2,168 

83 

12,284 

540 

19 

2,983 

107 

286 

2,584 

207 

194 

25 

125 

436 

455 

32 

583 

568 

341 

380 

119 



252.702 



199 

187 

121 

17,881 

1,046 

15,972 

391 

1,233 

1,628 

173 

79 

14,492 

741 

378 

156 

135 

1,682 

370 

2,791 

16,833 

9,999 

275 

128 

2,110 

140 

164 

307 

177 

27,723 

122 

94,219 

141 

17 

10,293 

67 

629 

19,695 

3,709 

44 

16 

309 

952 

286 

214 

462 

1,331 

1,316 

1,183 

78 



174.160 



43 

104 

78 

3,903 

690 

10,672 

576 

397 

826 

170 

50 

26,241 

2,529 

266 

150 

103 

168 

329 

2,310 

11,962 

19,122 

1,003 

18 

1,262 

165 

277 



43,343 

110 

65 

10,083 

90 

248 

12,628 

1,305 



79.014 



19 

94 

17 

7,699 

1,171 

2,389 

166 

413 

565 

80 

57 

7,477 

734 

293 

249 

52 

59 

. 276 

1,424 

4,642 

3,771 

684 

16 

865 

164 

459 

34 

391 

6,891 

16 

28,280 

22 

135 

2,124 

43 

538 

3,649 

391 

23 

50 

75 

212 

17 

120 

249 

571 

190 



35 
309 

98 

12,977 

188 

259 

50 
972 
196 
101 

54 

2,056 

257 

97 
160 



26 
380 
1,292 
888 
289 
211 
309 

71 



10,708 
135 
18 
634 
110 
480 
959 
168 



24,409 

195 

180,553 

3,473 

120 

25 

311 

1,082 

74 

316 

25,365 

4,806 

727 

2,794 

67 

677 

35 

148 

211 

5,429 



354 

1,107 

691 

20 

282 

9,627 

2,404 

63 

45 

1,769 

778 

619 

720 

14 



169 
1,409 



704 

161,282 

6,742 

23,510 

1,760 

10,064 

36,122 

2,482 

2,439 

66,237 

10,076 

4,609 

3,268 

2,083 

6,685 

1,860 

10,037 

44,875 

51,768 

11,370 

887 

6,914 

1,789 

3,002 

1,388 

2,121 

50,570 

997 

216,957 

2,854 

950 

46,661 

2,361 

7,111 

51,736 

5,819 

1,115 

1,004 

1,790 

10,447 

5,640 

823 

5,769 

21,355 

2,768 

13,828 



TABLE 37. DffiLARATIONS OF INTENTION FIIiiD, PETITIONS FOR MATURALIZATION FILED, 
AND PERC0K3 NATURALIZED: YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1907 - 1958 



Period 


Declara- 
tions 
filed 


Potitiono 
filed 


Persons naturalized 




Civilian 


Military 


Total 


1907 - 1958.. 


8,503,456 


7,998,546 


6,976,961 


508,999 


7,485,960 


1907 - 1910 


526,322 


164.036 


111.738 




111.738 


1911 - 1920 


2.686,909 


1.381,384 


884.672 


244.300 


1.120,972 


1911 


169,ait9 
171,133 
182,095 
214,104 
247,958 
209,204 
440,651 
342,283 
391,156 
299,076 


74,740 
95,661 
95,380 
124,475 
106,399 
108,767 
130,865 
169,507 
256,858 
a8,732 


56,683 
70,310 
83,561 

104,145 
91,848 
87,831 
88,104 
87,456 
89,023 

125,711 


63,993 

128,335 

51,972 


56,683 
70,310 
83,561 


1912 


1913 


1914 


104,145 
91,348 
37,831 
38,104 


1915 

1916 


1917 


I9I8 


151,449 
217,358 
177,683 




1920,. 




1921 - 1930 


2.709.014 


1,884.277 


1.716.979 


56.206 


1.773.185 




303,904 
273,511 
296,636 
424, 540 
277,218 
277,539 
258,295 
254,588 
280,645 
62,138 


195,534 
162,638 
165,168 
177, U7 
162,258 
172,232 
240,339 
240,321 
255,519 
113,151 


163,656 
160,979 
137,975 
140,340 
152,457 
146,239 
195,493 
228,006 
224,197 
167,637 


17,636 
9,468 
7,109 

10,170 

92 

4,3U 

5,149 

531 

1,740 


131,292 


1922 


170,447 


1923 


iyt5,084 




150, 510 


1925.... 


152,457 


1926 


146,331 
199,804 


1928 

1929 


233.155 
224,723 


1930 


169,377 






1931 - 1940 


1.369.479 


1.637.113 


1.498,573 


19.891 


1.518,464 


1931 


106,272 
101,345 
83,046 
108,079 
136, 524 
148,118 
176,195 
150,673 
155,691 
203,536 


145,474 
131,062 
112,629 
117,125 
131,378 
167,127 
165,464 
175, a3 
213,413 
278,028 


140,271 
136, 598 
112,368 
110,867 
118,945 
140,784 
162,923 
158,142 
185,175 
232, 500 


3,224 

2 

995 

2,302 

481 
2,053 
3,936 
3,638 
2,760 


143,495 


1932 


136,600 


1933 


113,363 


1934 


113,669 


1935 


118,945 


1936 


141,265 


1937 


164,976 


1938 


162,078 


1939 


188,313 


1940. 


235,260 






19/a - 1950 


920,284 


1.938.066 


1,337.229 


U9,799 


1.937.028 


1941 


224,123 
221,796 
115,664 
42,368 
31,195 
28,787 
37,771 
60,187 
64,866 
93,527 


277,807 

343,487 

377,125 

325,717 

195,917 

123,864 

88,802 

68,265 

71,0U 

66,038 


275,747 

268,762 

281,459 

392,766 

208,707 

134,849 

77,442 

69,080 

64,138 

64,279 


1,547 

1,602 

37,474 

49, a3 

22,695 

15,213 

16,462 

1,070 

2,456 

2,067 


277,294 


1942 


270,364 




318,933 


1944 


4U,979 


1945 

1946 


231,402 
150,062 


1947 


93,904 




70,150 


1949 

1950... 


66,594 
66,346 






1951 

1952 


91,497 
111,461 
23,558 
9,100 
10,855 
12.870 
1' ,911 
16,196 


61,634 
94,086 
98,128 
130,722 
a3,508 
137.701 
140,547 
117,344 


53,741 
•87,070 
90,476 
104,086 
197,568 
138.681 
137,198 
118,950 


975 
1,585 
1,575 
13,745 
U,958 
7,204 
845 
916 


54,716 
36,655 


1953 


92,051 


1954 


U7.831 


1955 


209, 526 


19$6 


145,885 


1957 


138,043 




119,866 







76 



TABLE 38. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY GENERAL AND SPECIAL NATURALIZATION PROVISIONS 
AND COUNTRY OR REGION OF FORMER ALLEGIANCE! YEAR ENDED JUNh 30, 1958 

^ee also table 47 for detailed figures by naturalization provisions/ 





Total 
number 




zed 


Country or region 
of former 
allegiance 


Under 
general 
natural- 
ization 

prov- 


Married 

to 

U. S. 

citizens 


Children 
of U. S. 
citizen 
parents 


Military 


Other 


All countries 




94.380 


19.353 


4.966 


916 


251 




91.595 


73.521 


14.072 


3.500 


423 


79 


Austria 


1,868 

594 

12,428 

134 

2,271 

768 

739 

397 

2,130 

20,486 

3,370 

2,541 

3,259 

8,462 

2,511 

1,487 

2,000 

1,117 

11,038 

1,049 

1,354 

634 

757 

784 

316 

4,582 

4,154 

365 

7,496 


1,326 

491 

9,893 

116 

2,047 

634 

691 

325 

1,459 

13,423 

2,609 

2,412 

2,918 

5,458 

2,378 

1,427 

1,727 

963 

10,574 

733 

1,275 

437 

673 

661 

245 

4,439 

3,900 

287 

3.818 


431 
87 
2,262 
5 
127 
115 
19 
48 
592 
5,273 
615 
85 
173 
2,631 
34 
18 
250 
118 
280 
160 
56 
180 
56 
98 
65 

1^^ 
58 

2,635 


108 
15 

209 
2 
28 
12 
23 
22 
71 
1,734 

138 
27 

156 

343 
86 
38 
19 
30 
81 

154 
15 
14 
25 
21 
2 
41 
69 
17 

693 


2 

45 
10 
68 
6 
6 
2 
8 
43 
6 
15 
10 
16 
12 
2 
2 
2 
97 
1 
8 

3 

16 
32 
2 

238 








British Empire 

Bulgaria 


19 




J 


Denmark 


1 










France 


13 






Hungary 


2 


Ireland 


2 


Latvi a 


1 


Lithuania 


2 






Norway 


4 






Portuga 1 


1 


Rumania 








Sweden 








Turkey 




U. S. S. R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 


1 
2 

1 

112 




1,542 
76 
138 
616 

2,736 
140 
168 
263 
44 

1,431 
129 
213 

17.757 


1,095 
35 
66 
440 
857 
100 
33 
166 
32 
746 
94 
154 

14,741 


'203 
39 
66 

170 

1,503 

24 

107 
85 
10 

342 
32 
54 

2.129 


102 
2 
6 
6 
314 
16 
28 
11 

201 
3 
3 

659 


130 

7 

1 

1 

196 


12 


India 

Iran 








Japan 


55 


Jordan 

Korea 

Lebanon 








Syria 








North America 


32 




10;211 

5,042 

1,323 

256 

925 

917 


8,298 

4,498 

1,078 

231 

636 

688 


1,364 
360 
195 
16 
194 

172 


455 
101 

36 
9 

58 

,43 


85 
74 
9 

28 

9 




Mexico 








Other West Indies 2/... 
Central America 2/7.... 

South America 






174 
227 
516 

207 
1,894 


137 
177 
374 

121 
1,491 


27 
29 
116 

75 
270 


17 
18 

9 
62 


2 
6 

2 
48 




Colombia 


2 


Other South America 2/. 
Africa 2/ 


2 


Stateless S. Miscellaneous 


23 



X/ Includes Formosa. 

2/ Independent countries. 



77 



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79 



TABLE ItO, F 


:rsons naturalised 


, BY COUNTRY OR R^.GION OF FORMER ALLEGIANCE AND MAJOR OCCUPATION GROUP: 
YEAR ENHED JUNE 30, 1958 




Country or recion 
of former 
alleciance 


Total 
natu- 
ralized 


III 


S 1 

i2 -2 


1 

gi-S'C 


'Si 


ll 


lii 


IS 

ll 

II 


3 

III 


111 


ii 


m 




All countries 


119.866 


8j_364 


592 


4,025 


7,594 


2,55? 




16,238 


2,133 


8,828 


785 


5,262 


51.938 




91.595 


6,174 


446 


2.861 


5.762 


1.564 


9,7't7 


15,369 


1.756 


7.051 


419 


4,060 


38.386 


Austria 


I Mi 
59^ 

12, 1*28 

13'* 

2,271 

768 

739 

397 

2,130 

20.i.86 

3.370 

2,5'tl 

3.259 

8,462 

2.511 

l.itH? 

2,000 

1,117 

11,038 

1,0'.9 

l,35'i 

63't 

757 

784 

4,582 

4,15"* 

681 

7.496 


125 
57 
940 
40 
238 
88 
107 
19 
131 
1,195 
118 
258 
308 
219 
326 
164 
207 
94 
607 
15 
80 
44 
68 
114 
405 
158 
49 

496 


h ■ 

2 
18 

1 
15 

9 

6 

11 
98 

6 
13 

2 
22 

8 

6 
53 
16 
80 
16 
11 

3 

6 

5 

20 
11 

6 

65 


5fi 
14 
408 

138 
42 
12 
14 
74 
369 
233 
107 
62 
242 
49 
31 
90 
35 

44q 

19 
67 

31 
29 
56 
129 
67 
33 

379 


lh5 
50 
1,204 
7 
157 
39 
85 
18 
153 
1,463 
126 
l't3 
323 
202 
215 
130 
131 
39 
473 
18 
68 
23 
40 
56 
221 
209 
24 

263 


57 
13 
344 

47 
20 
12 
3 
35 
356 
47 

43 
76 

ll 
62 
10 
176 

5 
32 

8 

17 
19 
67 
36 

4 

143 


'109 

44 

1,102 

9 

212 

.97 

68 
37 
115 
2,021 
329 
308 
212 
1,159 
243 
113 
205 
176 
1.529 
93 
180 
44 

70 
472 
652 

62 

315 


204 
60 

1,300 
19 
289 

52 
101 

34 

202 

1,916 

552 

420 

288 

1.731 

327 

335 

181 

92 

2,616 

211 

275 

98 

66 

43 

859 

1.025 

75 

609 


38 

4 

469 

39 

15 
12 
25 
36 

316 
20 
57 

196 
66 
46 
12 
24 
42 

112 
12 
16 
6 
22 
16 
68 
75 
11 

66 


122 
40 
1,061 
10 
206 
54 
51 
19 
225 
1,212 
592 
188 
457 
519 
223 
80 
111 
62 
679 
38 
95 
73 
55 
75 
372 
364 
68 

645 


5 
3't 
1 
9 
10 
4 
6 
10 

69 

5 

7 
11 
31 
10 

6 
37 

7 
58 
26 

5 
14 

4 
20 
11 
12 

3 

101 


22 
11 
254 

6 

73 
33 
29 

7 

124 
119 
155 
780 
156 
88 
68 
69 
644 
108 
60 
59 
22 
11 
274 
339 
28 

^?° 


982 
294 


British Empire 


5.294 
35 


Czechoslovakia 


850 
309 




258 




209 


France 


1,104 




10,986 


Cf 


1.218 




887 




1,202 




3.415 




883 




504 




831 


N 


475 




3.615 






Hi 1 


465 


5. . 








. , 


299 


U.3.S.R 


1,208 


Other Europe 


318 


China 1/ 


1,542 
76 
616 

2, 7 "^6 
168 
263 

1,431 
129 
535 


117 
24 

118 
44 
14 
22 
66 
7 
84 


1 

42 
1 
1 

11 

1 

60 


163 

4 
58 

61 

24 
17 

39 

669 


62 

5 
53 
38 

4 
13 
44 

3 
41 

1,330 


18 
29 

:'3 

2 

12 

14 
4 
30 

556 


26 
3 

76 

58 

18 
84 
10 
40 

1,457 


194 
3 
56 
120 
9 
34 

112 
12 
69 

1.859 


8 

12 

24 

6 

10 
4 

1 

285 


252 
1 
17 

136 
5 
9 

'% 
16 

926 


5 
4 

24 

1 

63 

4 

260 


2 

71 
1 
4 
113 
1 
46 

. 8y 


23 


Israel 


2,085 




Korea 


120 

692 
76 
164 


Lob.non 






Other Asia 2/ 


C A 


10,211 

5,042 

1,579 

925 

917 

207 

1.894 


1,078 
110 
105 
80 

132 

40 
149 


3? 
17 

3 
1 

21 


4S7 
120 
50 
12 

5'' 
14 


949 
122 
158 
101 

89 
20 
130 


11 

40 
19 

20 
11 
41 


966 
307 
137 
47 

51 
11 
191 


807 
518 
387 
147 

140 
15 
246 


112 
123 
20 
30 

1 
17 


268 
141 
69 

50 

148 


219 
4 

3 

2 
3 


193 
613 
39 

14 

22 

3 
68 




1' 1 


495 

402 

349 
84 
832 


West Indies 2/ 

Central America 2/..., 

South America 2/ 

Africa 2/ 

Stateless & Miscelloneous 



Includes Formosa, 
2/ Independent count 



TABLE 41. PERSONS NATURALIZED AND PETITIONS FOR NATURALIZATION DENIED: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1907 ~ 1958 


Period 


Total 


Persons 
naturalized 


Petitions 
denied 


Percent 
denied 


1907 - 1958 


7,921,570 


7,485,960 


435,610 


5.5 


1907 - 1910 


129.440 


1U.738 


17.702 


13.7 


1911 - 1920 


1.247.697 


1.128.972 


118.725 


9.5 


1921 - 1930 


1.938.678 


1.773.185 


165.493 


8.5 


1921 


200,273 
199,523 
169,968 
168,834 
168,070 
159,605 
211,750 
245,634 
236,576 
178,445 


181,292 
170,447 
145,084 
150,510 
152,457 
146,331 
199,804 
233,155 
224,728 
169,377 


18,981 
29,076 
24,884 
18,324 
15,613 
13,274 
11,946 
12,479 
11,848 
9,068 


9.5 


1922 


14.6 


1923 


14.6 


1924 


10,9 


1925 


9.3 


1926 


8,3 


1927 


5.6 


1928, 


5.1 


1929 


5.0 


1930 


5.1 






1931 - 1940 


1.564,256 


1,518.464 


45.792 


2.9 


1931 


151,009 
142,078 
118,066 
114,802 
121,710 
144,389 
169,018 
166,932 
194,443 
2a, 809 


143,495 
136,600 
113,363 
113,669 
118,945 
141,265 
164,976 
162,078 
188,813 
235,260 


7,514 
5,478 
4,703 
1,133 
2,765 
3,124 
4,042 
4,854 
5,630 
6,549 


5,0 
3.9 


1932 


1933.. 


4,0 


1934 


1.0 


1935 


2.3 


1936 

1937 


2.2 
2.4 


1938. 

1939.. 


2.9 
2.9 


1940 


2.7 






19a - 1950 


2.051.842 


1.987,020 


64.814 


3.2 


1941 


2851063 

278,712 

332,589 

449,276 

241,184 

156,637 

97,857 

73,037 

68,865 

68,622 


277,294 

270,364 

318,933 

441,979 

231,402 

150,062 

93,904 

70,150 

66,594 

66,346 


7)769 
8,348 
13,656 
7,297 
9,782 
6,575 
3,953 
2,887 
2,271 
2,276 


2.7 


1942 


3.0 


1943.... 


4.1 


1944.... 


1.6 


1945... 


4,1 


1946.. 

1947.. 

1948... 


4.2 
4.0 
4.0 


1949. 


3.3 


1950...... 


3.3 


1951 ,.... 


57,111 
90,818 
94,351 
119,915 
214,097 
149,820 
140,991 
122 554 


54,716 
88,655 
92,051 
117,831 
209,526 
145,885 
138,043 
119,866 


2,395 
2,163 
2,300 
2,084 
4,571 
3,935 
2,948 
2,688 


4.2 


1952 

1953 .- 

1954 ^ 


2.4 
2.4 
1.7 


1955 , , 


2.1 


1956 


2.6 


1957 .... . 


2.1 


1958 


2 









TABLE 42. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY SEX AND MARITAL STATUS. WITH COMPARATIVE 
PERCENT OF TOTAL; YEARS ENDED J.UNE 30. 1950 - 1958 



1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 



Mu2hL 



8,489 
52,025 
4,218 
1,614 



25.745 



5,710 

18,345 

921 

769 



40.601 



2,779 

33,680 

3,297 

845 



54. 7J-6 



5,859 

44,333 

3,262 

1,262 



18.711 



3,489 

14,100 

615 

507 



36.005 



2,370 

30,233 

2,647 

755 



■ 655 



8,821 

72,578 

5,450 

1.806 



28, S 97 
5,276 

21,791 
896 
634 



60.058 



3,545 
50,787 
4,554 
1,172 



92.051 



12,127 

72,147 

5,886 

1,891 



3^.657 



7,253 

25,777 

926 

701 



57,394 



,874 

46,370 

4,960 

1,190 



117,831 



27,701 

79,034 

8,630 

2,466 



54.477 



19,909 

32,061 

1,608 

899 



63.354 



7,792 

46,973 

7,022 

1,567 



209.526 



39,bVB 

151,303 

14,470 

4,055 



95.850 



25,548 
65,683 
3,070 
1,549 



113.676 



14,150 

85,620 

11,400 

2,506 



145.885 



28,243 

106,398 

8,437 

2,807 



64.962 



18,159 

43,877 

1,825 

1.101 



80.923 



10,084 

62,521 

6,612 

1,706 



138.043 



257845 

102,408 

6,962 

2,827 



60.289 



14,972 

42,833 

1,391 

1,093 



77.754 



10,874 

59,575 

5,571 

1,734 



Percent of total 



Both sexes.... 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 


• 12.8 

78.4 

6.4 

2.4 


10.7 

81.0 
6.0 
2.3 


81.9 
6.1 
2.0 


6.4 
2.0 


25.5 

67.1 
7.3 
2.1 


1^.0 

72.2 

6.9 

1.9 


19.4 

72.9 

5.8 

1.9 


18.8 

74.2. 

5.0 

2.0 


19.7 

73.8 

4.6 
1.9 


Male 


"\'^\V' 


34.2 


32.3 


37.6 


46.2 


45.7 


44.5 


43.7 


42.8 


Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 


8.6 

27.7 

1.4 

1.1 


25.8 
1.1 
0.9 


6.0 

24.6 
1.0 

0.7 


7.9 

28.0 

1.0 

0.7 


16.9 

27.2 

1.3 

0.8 


12.2 

31.3 

1.5 

0.7 


12.5 

30.0 

1.3 

0.7 


10.9 

31.0 

1.0 

0.8 


11.1 

30.1 

0.9 

0.7 


Female 


'*6i!2** 


65.8 


***67!7" 


62.4 


53.8 


54.3 


55.5 


56.3 


^l'\ 


Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 


4.2 

50.7 

5.0 

1.3 


4.3 
55.2 
4.9 
1.4 


4.0 

57.3 

5.1 

1.3 


5.3 

50.4 

5.4 

1.3 


6.6 

39.9 

6.0 

1.3 


6.8 

40.9 

5.4 

1.2 


42!9 
4.5 
1.2 


7.9 

43.2 

4.0 

1.2 


8.6 

43.7 

3.7 

1.2 



82 



TABLE 43. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY SEX AND AGE: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1950 - 1958 



Sex and age 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1953 


Both sexes* 


66.346 


'^4.716 


88.655 


92,051 


117,831 


209,526 


145,885 


138.043 


119.866 


Under 21 years... 


1,003 


726 


1,052 


1,206 


3,787 


7,839 


8,771 


9,210 


10,448 


21 to 25 years... 


7,742 


6,238 


9,785 


8,927 


L4,810 


17,635 


13,329 


10,646 


10,747 


26 to 30 years... 


3,570 


8,295 


L4,739 


15,176 


16,290 


27,617 


20,771 


18,176 


15,851 


31 to 35 years... 


5,355 


4,751 


8,890 


10,722 


11,569 


28,080 


21,943 


23,688 


19,991 


36 to 40 years... 


6,535 


5,479 


8,301 


8,956 


8.831 


19,911 


13,682 


15,382 


13,845 


41 to 45 years... 


8,144 


6,127 


9,190 


9,426 


9,895 


20,464 


14,219 


14,134 


11,297 


46 to 50 years... 


8,239 


6,699 


9,790 


9,681 


10,584 


19,693 


12,719 


12,353 


9,998 


51 to 55 years... 


6,937 


5,554 


9,090 


8,977 


12,650 


20,369 


12,576 


10,901 


8,837 


56 to 60 years... 


5,773 


4,476 


7,337 


7,792 


10,821 


17,933 


9,540 


9,308 


7,342 


61 to 65 years... 


4,298 


3,269 


5,318 


5,658 


8,816 


13,913 


8,246 


7,071 


5,671 


66 to 70 years... 


2,289 


1,884 


3,077 


3,306 


5,606 


9,199 


5,011 


4,101 


3,288 


71 to 75 years... 


926 


823 


1,374 


1,468 


2,707 


4,103 


2,312 


1,846 


1,589 


Over 75 years... 


535 


395 


712 


756 


1,465 


2,770 


1,420 


1,136 


842 


Not reported 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1,346 


91 


70 


Male 


25.745 


18.711 


28.597 


34.657 


54.477 


95.850 


64.962 


60.289 


51,350 


Under 21 years.. 


371 


282 


405 


496 


2,343 


4,252 


4,737 


4,670 


5,225 


21 to 25 years.. 


1,732 


1,019 


1,890 


2,804 


10,133 


9,540 


5,999 


3,513 


3,431 


26 to 30 years.. 


2,375 


1,835 


3,369 


4,757 


7,295 


10,779 


6,998 


5,464 


4,664 


31 to 35 years.. 


2,026 


1,510 


2,830 


4,127 


4,622 


12,509 


9,406 


10,540 


8,653 


36 to 40 years.. 


2,825 


2,003 


3,087 


3,822 


3,908 


9,752 


6,589 


7,559 


6,601 


41 to 45 years.. 


3,574 


2,387 


3,337 


3,914 


4,187 


10,206 


7,123 


7,248 


5,705 


46 to 50 years.. 


3,615 


2,868 


3,685 


3,890 


4,294 


8,913 


5,953 


6,016 


4,749 


51 to 55 years.. 


2,870 


2,192 


3,167 


3,373 


5,129 


3,599 


5,512 


4,804 


3,968 


56 to 60 years.. 


2,471 


1,779 


2,600 


2,901 


3,997 


7,163 


3,972 


3,900 


3,088 


61 to 65 years.. 


2,052 


1,356 


2,036 


2,2L2 


3,710 


5,916 


3,502 


2,967 


2,357 


66 to 70 years.. 


1,088 


882 


1,253 


1,391 


2,773 


4,561 


2,540 


2,008 


1,600 


71 to 75 years.. 


467 


417 


6L4 


641 


1,390 


2,246 


1,264 


947 


809 


Over 75 years.. 


279 


181 


324 


329 


696 


1,414 


776 


607 


/;64 


Not reported.... 


- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


591 


46 


36 


Female 


40,601 


36,005 


60.058 


57.394 


63.354 


113.676 


80.923 


77.754 


68.516 


Under 21 years.. 


'^32 


444 


647 


710 


1,444 


3,587 


4,034 


4)540 


5,223 


21 to 25 years.. 


6,010 


5,219 


7,895 


6,123 


4,677 


8,095 


7,330 


7,133 


7,316 


26 to 30 years.. 


6,195 


6,460 


11,370 


10,419 


8,995 


16,838 


13,773 


12,712 


11,187 


31 to 35 years.. 


3,329 


3,241 


6,060 


6,595 


6,947 


15,571 


12,537 


13, US 


11,338 


36 to 40 years.. 


3,710 


3,476 


5,2U 


5,134 


4,923 


10,159 


7,093 


7,823 


7,244 


41 to 45 years.. 


4,570 


3,740 


5,353 


5,512 


5,708 


10,258 


7,096 


6,886 


5,592 


46 to 50 years.. 


4,624 


3,831 


6,105 


5,791 


6,290 


10,780 


6,766 


6,337 


5,249 


5l to 55 years.. 


4,067 


3,362 


5,923 


5,604 


7,521 


11,770 


7,064 


6,097 


4,919 


56 to 60 years.. 


3,302 


2,697 


4,737 


4,391 


6,824 


10,770 


5,568 


5,408 


4,254 


61 to 65 years.. 


2,246 


1,913 


3,282 


3,446 


5,106 


7,997 


4,744 


4,104 


3,314 


66 to 70 years.. 


1,201 


1,002 


1,824 


1,915 


2,833 


4,638 


2,471 


2,093 


1,688 


71 to 75 years.. 


459 


406 


760 


327 


1,317 


1,857 


1,048 


399 


780 


Over 75 years.. 


256 


214 


383 


427 


769 


1,356 


644 


529 


378 


Not reported.... 


- 


- 




- 


- 




755 


45 


34 



TABLE 44. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY STATES AND TERRITORIES OF RESIDENCE: 
YEARS ENDED JUiffi 30, 1954 - 1958 



State and territory 
of residence 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


Total 


117.831 


209.526 


145.885 


138.043 


119.866 


Alabama 

Arizona 


299 

793 

124 

15,533 

1,170 

3,446 

201 

884 

2,844 

407 

274 

6,395 

1,016 

'511 

334 

461 

498 

1,093 

2,016 

8,054 

7,368 

959 

189 

643 

416 

416 
175 
650 

5,436 

229 

31,118 

787 

231 

2,972 
268 
842 

4,657 
958 
170 
216 
202 

2,452 
612 
419 
827 

3,000 
268 
981 
120 

360 

3,143 

163 

150 

81 


574 

621 

176 

36,358 

1,086 

6,294 

334 

1,152 

3,028 

696 

291 

10,394 

1,930 

527 

714 

505 

713 

992 

2,260 

11,692 

9,146 

1,811 

198 

1,831 

343 

521 

255 

722 

14,164 

353 

61,677 

661 

286 

7,156 

281 

1,527 

8,767 

1,467 

262 

191 

448 

5,075 

973 

542 

1,133 

2,855 

493 

2,182 

66 

370 

2,741 

168 

104 

^^5 


379 

420 

192 

21,194 

1,301 

3.338 

218 

1,013 

2,548 

858 

192 

11,205 

1,653 

971 

738 

979 

462 

524 

2,002 

6,293 

6,750 

1,935 

173 

1,303 

310 

917 

150 

489 

9,014 

445 

37,612 

681 

158 

5,306 

521 

1,044 

5,843 

844 

256 

285 

473 
4,782 

671 

242 
1,303 
2,370 

322 
2,075 

234 

445 

1,865 

171 

49 

367 


284 
822 

142 

18,991 

1,384 

3,620 

305 

1,017 

2,345 

582 

194 

10,010 

2,164 

878 

522 

634 

514 

479 

1.832 

5,889 

6,778 

1,944 

113 

1,116 

322 

711 

264 

391 

10,055 

307 

35,432 

452 

353 

6,630 

359 

894 

6,147 

720 

242 

223 

327 

3,835 

509 

281 

1,313 

2.082 

205 

1,286 

131 

288 
1,287 

uo 

83 

i 215 


301 
690 
123 




16.269 




1,110 




2.917 




231 




661 




2,245 


_ . *' 


1,254 


Idah^ 


174 


JJ^lJ^fjOig 


9,470 




1,460 


Iowa 


725 
568 


Kentucky. 


360 




482 




401 




1,472 




5,462 




6,017 




1,198 




146 




1,043 


Montana 


299 




671 




170 




340 


New Jersey. ................... 


8,779 




338 


New York 


28,898 




480 




237 




6,053 


Oklahoma 


400 




752 




5,197 


Rhode Island.......... 


671 




271 




205 




274 


Texas . . ............... 


4,170 




650 




201 




1,013 




2,160 


Wnct iri rai nia 


278 


Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Territories and other: 


649 
140 

219 


Hawaii .................••»•• 


1,220 


Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands 

All other 


108 

i 90 



UHALIZED, BY COUNTRY OR li.nCION OF BIHTH AND 

YSAR ehu-,:d juns 30, 1958 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgium 

Czechoslovakia . . • • 

Denmark 

Finland 

Qernany 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Noi-v;ay 

Poland 

Portueal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Turkey 

United Kingdom 

U.S.3.H 

YuEOslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 1/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Jordan 2/ 

Korea 

Fhilippines 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Other West Indies, 
Central America... 
Other North /uneric 

South America 

Argentina 

Colombia 

Other South Americ 

Africa 

Australia 

Other countries 



2,061 
621 

2,910 
779 

1,861. 
18, JUS 
3,269 
2,768 
3.505 
8,207 
2,562 
1.591 
1,8(.2 
1,12 

12, '♦e? 

. 9^6 

1.913 

616 

736 

789 

281 

8.190 

If, 232 

'♦.750 

1,819 

9.0OO 



136 

12't 

151 

2.623 

176 

187 

l,'i'v2 

2,1(12 



20,015 
9,279 
5.035 
1,256 
3,033 
1,01*6 
366 

_ 1.03'' 



-^ 



L956_ 



ISA. 



i.l?** 

229 
82 
396 

6,387 
582 
957 
967 

1.187 
296 
220 
635 
2'<5 

2,970 



1,851 

9IK) 

2,150 

503 



itlt? 
127 

5^4 

319 

2,733 

1,131 

853 

363 

758 

659 

27". 

328 

173 

3,71.1. 



827 
1,019 
1.320 

31.7 



1.293 
123 
163 
258 



-ill 



191.0- 1930- 1920- Before 
191*9 I 1939 1929 1920 



203 
700 
1.098 
552 
630 



2.1.83 
625 



^ Includes Fornosa 
2/ Includes Arab Pu: 



35 



6. PERSONS NATUHAL1/,ED, BY SPSCiriKD COUNTKI'':S OF FORHRR ALLEGIANCE AND BY RURAL 
AND UllBAN AHKA AND CITY: YEAR fUDED JUNIv 50, 1958 
^ural: Population of leas th^vn 2,500 - Urban: Population of 2,500 - 99,999. 
Cities: Population of 100,000 or inoi-e7 







All 


British 


■T 


1 







1 




All ■ 


Class of 


place and city 




Empire 


Canada Germany! 


Italy Polandlu.S. S.R.I 


Mexico 


Other 


Total 




119.866 


12.428 


10.211 


20.486 


8,462 


11,058 


'♦.582 


5.042 


^7.617 


Rural .. 




8.5'*2 


917 


950 


2,205 


?65 


450 


222 


584 


3.071 


,^ f 


Itlf.OltO 


't.492 


5. '♦25 


8.944 


2,815 


5,075 


1.070 


2,600 


15.625 


Cities: 1 


"otal 

Phoenix 


eittSoa 


6.773 


5.755 


8.815 


5,226 


7.427 


3.255 


2.055 


27.242 


Ariz. 


'li9 


1.2 


92 


62 


10 


^^ 


9 


"^2 


104 


Calif. 


LonR Beach .. 


292 


46 


96 


20 


7 


5 


7 


10 


105 




Los Aneeles . 


5,1*90 


525 


466 


552 


89 


195 


153 


507 


1.405 




Oakland 


562 


31 


29 


45 


15 


30 


7 


25 


186 




San Diego ... 


478 


56 


82 


48 


15 


11 


4 


60 


202 




San Francisco 


1.950 


178 


92 


161 


97 


40 


193 


ks 


1,140 


Colo. 


Denver 


V*7 


26 


16 


152 


12 


29 


16 


17 


199 


Conii. 


Bridgeport .. 


505 


28 


15 


29 


35 


61 


6 




129 




Hartford .... 


k^S 


89 


45 


•*5 


65 


105 


8 




103 




New Haven ... 


235 


19 


9 


57 


30 


59 


13 




68 


D.C. 


Washington .. 


661 


82 


21 


120 


37 


52 


24 




544 


ria. 


Miami 


70l| 


122 


80 


64 


16 


19 


12 




584 


111. 


Chicago 


6,760 


258 


158 


1.045 


594 


1,419 


400 


105 


5.005 


Ind. 


Indianapolis 


217 


20 


14 


57 


8 


9 


6 




123 


La. 


New Orleans . 


210 


27 


5 


28 


15 


5 


- 




128 


Hd. 


Baltimore ... 


651 


50 


15 


117 


65 


98 


61 




227 


Mass. 


Boston 


lt26 


"♦0 


60 


19 


91 


37 


11 




168 




Fall River .. 


221 


7 


24 


6 


2 


7 


3 




172 




Springfield . 


268 


59 


50 


18 


50 


41 


10 




79 




Worcester ... 


211 


8 


51 


8 


12 


42 


1 




105 


Mich. 


Detroit 


2,594 


3'*2 


446 


272 


151 


521 


57 


20 


785 




Grand Rapids 


507 


7 


12 


27 


6 


22 


5 




226 


mnn. 


Minneapolis . 


506 


52 


51* 


104 


5 


36 


41 




232 




St. Paul .... 


208 


10 


19 


55 


4 


21 


11 




84 


Ho. 


St. Louis ... 


579 


29 


lU 


152 


50 


44 


8 




295 


N«br. 


Omaha 


259 


13 


4 


80 


4 


23 


^^ 




90 


N. J. 


.vlizabeth ... 


511 


26 


4 


48 


27 


65 


26 




115 




Jersey City . 


469 


27 


6 


53 


72 


124 


37 




148 




Newark 


B76 


43 


14 


83 


97 


152 


150 




557 




iaterson .... 


470 


28 


2 


79 


82 


56 


94 




128 




Trenton 


500 


20 


9 


34 


22 


67 


48 




99 


N.Y. 


Buffalo 


S06 


66 


144 


129 


81 


132 


69 




181 




New York .... 


21,728 


3,279 


555 


2,290 


2,659 


2,598 


1,074 


46 


9.647 




Rochester . . . 


576 


78 


73 


119 


65 


47 


56 




139 




Syracuse .... 


519 


41 


41 


42 


'•5 


25 


42 




85 




Yonkers 


262 


29 


9 


40 


56 


32 


25 




90 


Ohio, 


/Jcron 


285 


12 




47 


14 


13 


2 




186 




Cincinnati . . 


565 


50 


29 


114 


9 


12 


5 




165 




Cleveland ... 


2,225 


62 


58 


294 


99 


351 


84 




1.272 




Columbus .... 


512 


24 


9 


84 


17 


16 


12 




149 




DaytoD 

Toledo 


211 
222 


28 
14 


5 
17 


82 
42 


4 


7 
42 


1 
1 




88 

89 




Youncstown . . 


244 


8 


6 


IS 


21 


57 


2 




150 


Ore. 


Portland .... 


330 


26 


9S 


54 


10 


7 


2 




130 


Pa. 


Philadelphia 


1,695 


177 


59 


269 


165 


227 


246 




569 
254 




Pittsburgh .. 


640 


62 


25 


118 


87 


67 


29 




R.I. 


Providence . . 


248 


14 


15 


20 


52 


12 


10 




124 

87 


Texas 


El Paso 


659 


15 


8 


13S 


8 


5 


2 


4o£ 




Houston 


328 


34 


16 


53 


5 


12 


1 




112 




San Antonio . 


586 


37 


18 


84 


4 


14 


- 


541 


Utah 


SaU Lake City 


470 


54 


21 


180 


3 


1 


5 




222 
445 


Wash. 


Seattle 


550 


72 


286 


100 


8 


27 


14 






Tacoma 


203 


10 


15 


58 


5 


1 


2 




112 


Wise. 


Miluaiikeo 


645 


24 


13 


271 


9 


103 


1 


2 


222 


Other cities 


'*,597 


529 


459 


803 


503 


428 


155 


195 


1,7'»5 


U.S. terr. and poss. ... 


1,704 


15? 


79 


118 


10 


11 


17 


7 
18 


1.505 
37'. 


All other 


1,078 


89 


46 


408 


48 


77 


18 









86 



TABLE 47. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY GENERAL AND SPECIAL NATURALIZATION PROVISIONS* 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1954 - 1958 



provisions 



Total 

General provisions 
Special provisions 



Persons married to U.S. citizens 

Children, including adopted children, of U.S. 
citizen parents 

Fonner U.S. citizens who lost citizenship by 
marriage 

Philippine citizens who entered the United States 
prior to May 1, 1934, and have resided continu- 
ously in the United States 

Persons who served in U.S. anned forces for 

three years 

Persons who served in U.S. aimed forces during 
World War I or World War II 

Lodge Act enlistees 

Persons serving in U.S. armed forces after 

June 24, 1950 (In U.S.) 2/ 

Persons serving in U.S. armed forces after 

June 24, 1950 (overseas) 2/ 

Persons who served on certain U.S. vessels 

Former U.S. citizens who lost citizenship by 
entering the aimed forces of foreign countries 
during World War II 

Dual nationals expatriated through entering or 
serving in aimed forces of foreign states 3/ . . . 

Former U.S. citizens expatriated through expatri- 
ation of parents 3/ 

Persons who lost citizenship through cancellation 
of parents' naturalization 3/ 

Persons misinformed prior to July 1, 1920, 

regarding citizenship status 3/ 

Noncitizen natives of Puerto Rico — 

declaration of allegiance 3/ 

Persons who entered the United States while 

under 16 years of age 

Certain inhabitants of the Virgin Islands 

Alien veterans of World War I or veterans of 

allied countries 

Nationals but not citizens of the United States .. 

Persons naturalized under private law 



86,166 
31.665 



15,977 

1,208 

120 

74 
61 
627 



2,981 
476 



35.572 



20,460 

2,600 

146 

22 

36 

981 



2,539 
205 



117,161 



28.724 



18,224 

2,865 

123 

11 

75 
575 

4,318 

2,236 
186 

31 
10 
2 
24 
16 i 



9 ! 

3 1 



114,827 



23.216 



18,212 

3,779 

211 

6 
229 
469i/ 

147 

71 



119.866 



94,380 
25.486 



19,353 

4,966 

150 



487 
173 



y 1957 figures include naturalization of Lodge Act enlistees (Act of June 30, 1950). 

2/ Act of June 30, 1953 {P.L. 36) . 

3/ Naturalizations under Nationality Act of 1940. 



5S 



< a- 



Ik 



CM If) in CM •q- 
in ^ csj — I uo 



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inia 
n|c\' 



CM CM --I ' 



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in o 



in r) CM 
lO I- oo 
o o^ 



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O CM 00 



> 



Ui 



u) >J o .H n! re 

c +J +J 4-> </) 

O —-I T3 O 4J IT 

■rt ^1 0) tH .h .h 

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!> 



88 



TABLE k9, WRITS OF HABEAS CORPUS IN EXCLUSION AND DEPORTATION CASES: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, I9I+9 - 1958 






Action taken 


I9U9- 
1958 


I9U9 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


195^+ 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


Total writs of 
habeas corpus : 

Disposed of ...» 


3,03»* 


511 


3i.7 


39U 


386 


359 


391 




160 


105 


128 


Sustained ...••.•...•.•. 


2kii 

2,059 
727 

2k 

k6i 


9 
397 
105 

Ikk 
59 


25 
169 
153 

118 
96 


56 

260 

78 

k7 
57 


30 
253 
103 

60 
67 


213 
102 

120 
38 


20 

11 

115 
23 


176 
90 

52 


19 
106 
35 

62 
33 


9 

91 

5 

'^7 
8 


iT 




105 




9 


Pending end of year 

Involving exclusion: 

Disposed of 


2k 

^k 


Sustained 


63 
271 
133 

9 

2,567 


6 

38 
15 

16 
452 


8 
k8 
ko 

21 

251 


3 

27 
27 

13 
337 


16 
32 
19 

8 
319 


7 
21 
10 

11 
321 


3 
17 

3 

17 
368 


1+ 
38 
10 

201 


18 
8 

8 
127 


1 
7 

10 
97 


■ ' 7? 




25 


Withdrawn 

Pending end of year .... 
Involving deportation: 
Disposed of 


1 
9 

9k 




1,788 

^9k 


3 

359 

90 

128 


17 
121 
113 

97 


53 

233 

51 

3h 


ll^ 

221 

81^ 

52 


37 

192 

92 

109 


17 

272 

79 

98 


iB 

138 

1*5 

72 


12 
88 
27 

3h 


--3 
Qk 

5 

37 


7; 


Dismissed ..... ••..... 


80 


Withdrawn 


8 


Pending end of year .... 


15 


15 



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90 



TABLE $0, PRIVATE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY BILLS 

INTRODUCTED AND LAWS ENACTED, 75th CONGRESS 

TO 85th CONGRESS 




91 



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95 



CERTIFICATES OF DERIVATIVE CITIZENSHIP GRANTED, 
COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1954 - 1958 



Country or region 
of birth 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria • 

Belgium •• 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary • 

Ireland • 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Norway ••• 

Poland • 

Portugal 

Rumania • 

Spain 

Sweden* ••.. ..•.. 

Switzerland 

Turkey. • 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 1/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Iran 

Israel 

Japan. 

Jordan 2/...... 

Korea 

Philippines 

Other Asis. 

North America 

Canada • 

Mexico 

Cuba... 

Other West Indies.. 

Central Americi^ 

Other North America 

South America 

Argentina. 

Colombia 

Other South America...... 

Africa 

Australia and New Zealand.. 
Other countries 

1/ Includes Formosa. 

^ Includes Arab Palestine, 



17.773 



9.352 



lki22. 



U5 

272 

85 

87 

169 

1,123 

131 

269 

159 

1,91A 

38 

77 

170 

186 

826 

76 

183 

54 

218 

56 

77 

l,2i4* 

1,187 

127 

71 

305 



491 

146 

330 

114 

98 

206 

1,556 

203 

310 

206 

2,303 

86 

120 

318 

241 

1,000 

97 

199 

65 

222 

77 

36 

1,381 

1,433 

159 

102 

^3. 



16 .^^ 



785 
192 
504 
177 
100 
278 

3,565 
209 
460 
221 

2,477 
232 
293 
391 
293 

1,474 
119 
269 
76 
286 
136 
81 

1,580 

1,796 
284 
213 



H.312 



646 
159 
426 
135 
113 
268 

3,469 
247 
451 
201 

1,857 
320 
222 
331 
204 

1,160 
75 
239 
47 
236 
102 
64 

1,418 

1,511 
232 
179 

597 



13 
13 
23 

6 
37 

2 
46 
67 

1.921 



1,672 
132 
73 
13 
23 
8 

73 



153 
9 
9 
12 
38 
16 
46 

68 
168 

3.065 



2,358 
377 
109 
145 
62 
14 

108 



2.743 



170 

5 

8 

18 

54 

32 

40 

3 

124 

143 

2,575 



2,116 
281 
120 
153 
58 
15 

2i3_ 



2,014 
202 
101 
162 
74 
22 

149 



96 



GPO B71762 



^ 




3 9999 06351 974