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Full text of "Annual report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service"

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ANNUAL 

RLrURIo/t/ie 

Immigration and Naturalization Service 




Washington, D. C. 




UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 
IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE 

Washington 25. D. C. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER 
OF IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION 



The Attorney General 

United States Department of Justice 

Sin I have the honor to submit the Annual Report of the 
Immigration and Naturalization Service for the year 
ended June 30, 1962. 

Respectfully submitted, 




Raymond F. Farrell 
Commissioner 



Immigration and Naturalization Service 



&0i/ <J)oc 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

ADMISSION 1 

Facilitation of inspection 1 

Arrivals : 2 

Refugees 4 

Exclusion 4 

Visa petitions and other applications 5 

Adjustment of status 5 

Service operations outside the United States 6 

BORDER PATROL AND INVESTIGATION 6 

Deportable aliens located 6 

Caribbean program and problems 8 

Foreign-born law violators ^^^ 8 

Criminal prosecution -, 10 

Revocation of naturalization 10 

EXCLUSION AND EXPULSION PROCEEDINGS 11 

DETENTION AND DEPORTATION ACTIVITIES 11 

LEGAL ACTIVITIES 12 

ALIEN ADDRESS REPORTS 12 

CITIZENSHIP 12 

Encouragement of naturalization 12 

Naturalization courts 13 

Naturalization petitions 14 

Derivative citizenship 14 

Loss of citizenship 15 

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 15 

Employee development and training 15 

Other administratvie services 16 



TABLES 

Page 

1. Immigration to the United States: 1820-1962 18 

2. Aliens and citizens admitted and departed, by months : Years ended June 30, 1961 and 
1962 19 

3. Aliens and citizens admitted at United States ports of entry: Years ended June 30, 
1961-1962 20 

4. Aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration laws: Years ended June 30, 1958- 
1962 21 

5. Immigrants admitted, by port: Years ended June 30, 1958-1962 22 

6. Immigrants admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and country or region 

of birth: Year ended June 30, 1962 23 

6A. Immigrants admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and country or region 

of last permanent residence: Year ended June 30, 1962 ^ 24 

6B. Aliens who adjusted status to permanent residents in the United States, by country or 

region of birth: Year ended June 30, 1962 25 

6C. Refugees admitted, by country or region of birth : Years ended June 30, 1953-1962 26 

6D. Immigrants admitted under the Act of September 11, 1957 (P.L. 85-316), by class of 

admission and country or region of birth: September 11, 1957-June 30, 1962 27 

6E. Immigrants admitted under the Act of September 2, 1958, (P.L. 85-892), by class of 

admission and country or region of birth: September 2, 1958-June 30, 1962 28 

6F. Immigrants admitted under Sections 4 and 6, Act of September 22, 1959 (P.L. 

86-363) , by country or region of birth : September 22, 1959-June 30, 1962 28 

7. Annual quotas and quota immigrants admitted : Years ended June 30, 1958-1962 29 

7A. Quota immigrants admitted, by quota area and quota preferences : Year ended June 

30, 1962 30 

8. Immigrants admitted, by country or region of birth and major occupation group : Year 
ended June 30, 1962 31 

8A. Immigrants and beneficiaries of first preference visa petitions admitted, by occupa- 
tion: Year ended June 30, 1962 32 

9. Immigrants admitted, by country or region of birth, sex, and age : Year ended June 

30, 1962 34 

10. Immigrants admitted, by sex and age: Years ended June 30, 1953-1962 36 

lOA. Immigrants admitted, by sex, marital status, age, and major occupation group : Years 

ended June 30, 1958-1962 37 

11. Aliens admitted and citizens arrived and departed : Years ended June 30, 1908-1962_ 38 

12. Immigrants admitted, by State of intended future permanent residence: Years ended 
June 30, 1953-1962 39 

12A. Immigrants admittted, by specified countries of birth and State of intended future 

permanent residence: Year ended June 30, 1962 40 

12B. Immigrants admitted, by specified countries of birth and rural and urban area and 

city: Years ended June 30, 1962 41 

13. Immigration by country, for decades: 1820-1962 42 

14. Immigrants admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 1953-1962_ 46 
14 A. Refugee-escapees paroled under Act of July 14, 1960, by country of last residence and 

country of flight: July 14, 1960-June 30, 1962 47 

15. Nonimmigrants admitted, by country or region of birth : Years ended June 30, 1953- 
1962 48 

15A. Temporary visitors admitted, by country or region of birth : Years ended June 30, 

1953-1962 ^ 49 

16. Nonimmigrants admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and country or re- 
gion of birth: Year ended June 30, 1962 50 



TABLES— Continued 

Page 

17. Nonimmigrants admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and country or re- 
gion of last permanent residence: Year ended June 30, 1962 51 

17A. Temporary visitors and other nonimmigrants admitted, by port : Year ended June 30, 

1962 52 

18. Agricultural laborers admitted to the United States: Years ended June 30, 1953- 
1962 53 

19. Entries of alien and citizen border crossers over international land boundaries, by 
State and port: Year ended June 30, 1962 54 

20. Entries of alien and citizen border crossers over international land boundaries : Years 
ended June 30, 1928-1962 56 

20A. Special inquiry officer hearings completed, by regions and districts: Years ended June 

30, 1958-1962 57 

21. Aliens excluded from the United States, by cause: Years ended June 30, 1892-1962 __ 58 

22. Aliens excluded, by country or region of birth and cause : Year ended June 30, 1962 ^ 59 

23. Aliens apprehended, aliens deported, and aliens required to depart: Years ended June 

30, 1892-1962 60 

24. Aliens deported, by country to which deported and cause : Year ended June 30, 1962 _ 61 

24A. Aliens required to depart, by nationality and cause: Year ended June 30, 1962 62 

24B. Aliens deported, by nationality and cause: Year ended June 30, 1962 63 

24C. Aliens required to depart, by country of destination and cause: Year ended June 30, 

1962 64 

25. Aliens deported, by country to which deported and deportation expense: Year ended 
June 30, 1962 65 

26. Aliens deported, by cause: Years ended June 30, 1908-1962 66 

26A. Aliens deported, by country to which deported: Years ended June 30, 1953-1962 67 

27. Aliens deported, by year of entry and status at entry: Year ended June 30, 1962 67 

27A. Aliens deported and required to depart, by status at entry : Years ended June 30, 1958- 

1962 68 

27B. Deportable aliens located, by status at entry and nationality: Year ended June 30, 

1962 69 

28. Alien crewmen deserted at United States air and seaports, by nationality and flag of 
carrier: Year ended June 30, 1962 70 

29. Vessels and airplanes inspected, crewmen admitted, alien crewmen deserted, and alien 
stowaways found, by location: Year ended June 30, 1962 71 

30. Principal activities and accomplishments of immigration Border Patrol : Years ended 
June 30, 1953-1962 72 

31. Passengers arrived in the United States, by sea and air, from foreign countries, by 
country of embarkation: Year ended June 30, 1962 73 

32. Passengers departed from the United States, by sea and air,, to foreign countries, by 
country of debarkation: Year ended June 30, 1962 76 

33. Passenger travel between the United States and foreign countries, by sea and air, by 
port of arrival or departure: Year ended June 30, 1962 79 

34. Insular travel-Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands: Years ended June 30, 1953-1962 80 

35. Aliens who reported under the Alien Address Program, by selected States of residence 
and nationality: During 1962 _ 81 

36. Aliens who reported under the Alien Address Program, by selected nationalities and 
States of residence: During 1962 82 

36A. Alien population, by States of residence: 1940, 1951, 1960, 1961, and 1962 83 

37. Declarations of intention filed, petitions for naturalization filed, persons naturalized, 
and petitions for naturalization denied: Years ended June 30, 1907-1962 84 



TABLES— Continued 

Page 

38. Persons naturalized, by general and special naturalization provisions and country or 
region of former allegiance: Year ended June 30, 1962 85 

39. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance : Years ended June 30, 
1953-1962 86 

40. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance and major occupation 
group: Year ended June 30, 1962 87 

41. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance, sex, and age: Year 
ended June 30, 1962 88 

41 A. Persons naturalized, by sex, marital status, age, and major occupation group: Years 

ended June 30, 1958-1962 90 

42. Persons naturalized, by States or territories of residence : Years ended June 30, 1953- 
1962 91 

42 A. Persons naturalized, by specified countries of former allegiance and by States or ter- 
ritories of residence: Year ended June 30, 1962 92 

42B. Persons naturalized, by type of court and States or territoi'ies of residence: Year 

ended June 30, 1962 93 

43. Persons naturalized, by specified countries of former allegiance and by rural and ur- 
ban area and city: Year ended June 30, 1962 94 

44. Persons naturalized, by country or region of birth and year of entry: Year ended 
June 30, 1962 95 

45. Persons naturalized, by general and special naturalization provisions: Years ended 
June 30, 1958-1962 96 

46. Certificates of citizenship granted, by country or region of birth and reason for claim : 
Year ended June 30, 1962 97 

47. Certificates of citizenship granted to persons vi^ho derived citizenship through parent- 
age or marriage, by country or region of birth and year derived: Year ended June 

30, 1962 98 

48. Certificates of citizenship granted to persons who acquired citizenship at birth abroad, 

by country or region of birth and year acquired: Year ended June 30, 1962 _ 99 

49. Petitions for naturalization denied, by reason: Years ended June 30, 1954-1962 100 

50. Certificates of naturalization revoked, by grounds: Years ended June 30, 1953-1962 _ 101 

51. Persons expatriated, by grounds and year reports received: Years ended June 30, 
1953-1962 101 

52. Persons repatriated: Years ended June 30, 1953-1962 102 

53. Prosecutions for immigration and nationality violations : Years ended June 30, 1953- 
1962 103 

54. Convictions for immigration and nationality violations: Years ended June 30, 1953- 
1962 104 

55. Writs of habeas corpus and declaratory judgments in exclusion and deportation cases: 
Years ended June 30, 1958-1962 .. _ _ 105 

56. Private immigration and nationality bills introduced and laws enacted, 75th Congress 
through 87th Congress 106 

57. Private bills and beneficiaries of private bills, 87th Congress, by type of bill and action 
(country of birth of beneficiaries for bills enacted) 107 



GENERAL 

The Immigration and Naturalization Ser- 
vice is responsible for the administration and 
enforcement of the Immigration and Nation- 
ality Act and related federal statutes. The many 
and varied functions relate principally to people 
of foreign birth. This Service is responsible 
for determining whether persons seeking to 
enter the United States are citizens or aliens, 
and if aliens whether they are admissible 
under immigration laws. A parallel function is 
that of granting or denying petitions such as 
those for preferences within quotas, for admis- 
sion of alien spouses or children of United 
States citizens, or for importing alien laborers, 
as well as other applications having to do with 
entry of aliens into the United States. 

Another function of the Service is the ad- 
ministration of the alien registration and the 
annual alien address report programs. 

Citizenship through naturalization is granted 
or denied by Federal and State courts, but it is 
the responsibility of the Service to encourage, 
assist, and facilitate the naturalization of ap- 
plicants who meet the statutory requirements, 
and to prevent the naturalization of persons 
not qualified. 

In the field of enforcement, the Service is 
responsible for preventing illegal entry of per- 
sons into the United States and apprehending 
any aliens found to be in the United States in 
illegal status; for investigating the status of 
aliens who, through violation of the provisions 
of the Immigration and Nationality Act, become 
amenable to deportation or denaturalization ; 
and the detention and the deportation of such 



ADMISSION 

Facilitation of Inspection 

Citizens returning home and aliens arriving 
at ports in the United States meet the Service 
officers who must determine their admissibility 
at the moment of arrival. To make this first 
contact as pleasant and as brief as possible, the 
Service has continued to improve the inspection 
formalities. At some of our largest airports, 
port receptionists are on hand to greet and 
assist arriving passengers. 

At international airports in four Canadian 
cities and at Hamilton, Bermuda, and Nassau, 
Bahamas, the admissibility of passengers is 
determined prior to embarkation for the United 
States. This preinspection abroad makes it pos- 



sible for passengers to come to the United 
States secure in the knowledge that they will 
not be turned back at ports of entry, and that 
they may proceed on their way promptly. 




Port Receptinnist assi'stxng in inspection of passengers 
on Polar flight from London, England. 

The inspection of ships' passengers per- 
formed en route and completed prior to arrival 
at the United States port of destination is 
another important aid to the facilitation of 
travel, conducted on passenger vessels depart- 
ing from two major seaports in the Far East. 
En route inspection is also conducted on some 
railroad lines operating between Canada and 
the United States and on certain vessels depart- 
ing from South American ports destined to 
San Juan, Puerto Rico. 

The most important impact on travel during 
the fiscal year 1962 was the tremendous in- 
crease in international jet fiights, with their 
increased carrying capacity (120 to 160 pas- 
sengers). A total of 6,253,439 passengers ar- 
rived in the United States from all parts of 
the world on 68,828 vessels and 179,648 planes. 
While the number of arriving airplanes in- 
creased only 4 percent over the previous year, 
the number of passengers increased by 11 per- 



cent, reflecting the increased carrying capacity 
and greater flying range of the jets. In anticipa- 
tion of changing conditions, the Service made 
an intensive survey of arrival patterns and, on 
the basis of the study, staffing schedules were 
adjusted to provide a flexible force of immigra- 
tion officers to handle the increased traffic with 
speed and efficiency. 

New facilities at several border ports and at 
a number of airports, together with revised and 
streamlined inspectional procedures, have pro- 
vided more efficient service to the traveler. At 
the land border ports the inspection for both 
Immigration and Customs is conducted by a 
single officer representing both Services. This 
dual inspection shortens inspection time for 
the traveler and provides a substantial man- 
power saving to the Government. 

Arrivals 

The 173 million entries of citizens and aliens 
exceeded last year's figures by 3 percent and 
continued a 21-year trend of growth in inspec- 
tion. The total number of entries made by aliens 
during fiscal year 1962 exceeded 99 million. 
Almost 95 million of these entries were made by 
border crossers, almost 3 percent more than in 
fiscal year 1961. An analysis of the other aliens 
admitted is set forth in detail below. 

Immigrants. A total of 283,763 aliens be- 
came immigrants or permanent resident aliens 
during the fiscal year 1962, an increase of 5 
percent over 1961. Most of these immigi-ants 
(264,368) were admitted at ports of arrival. 
In addition, 19,395 aliens already in the United 
States became permanent residents through ad- 
justment of their immigration status. 

Under the Immigration and Nationality Act, 
all countries except Western Hemisphere coun- 
tries are allotted quotas equal to one-sixth of 
one percent of the number of persons in the 
United States in 1920 who were of the national 
origin of the quota area for which the quota 
is established. Under this formula the total 
quota is 156,687. Less than two-thirds of this 
authorized number, or 90,319 quota immi- 
grants, were admitted. 

As in past years, the principal reason that 
quotas used are less than authorized is that 
Great Britain and Northern Ireland and Eire 
are allotted 53 percent of the quota numbers 
under the formula, but in 1962 just 28,811 
quota immigrants were admitted from these 
countries, thus leaving approximately 54,000 
quota numbers unused. 

First preference within the quota is estab- 
lished for highly skilled persons whose skills 
are urgently needed in the United States. Under 



this provision 3,313 highly skilled aliens, ac- 
companied by 3,721 spouses and children were 
admitted. Of the skilled aliens, 2,480 were from 
Europe, 487 from Asia, and 166 from Africa 
and Oceania. 



S .it'cRoNTs r-1 PI 



Close relatives of citizens and permanent 
resident aliens are given preference within the 
quotas, and 11,729 were admitted with prefer- 
ence visas. People from countries with a large 
quota waiting list, such as Italy, Poland, Yugo- 
slavia, Hungary, Greece, and Portugal, took 
most advantage of the preferences for relatives. 

Immigrants who come to the United States 
from countries where there is no pressure for 
quota numbers usually do not seek preferences 
within quotas. Therefore, within the 71,431 
nonpreference quota admissions are the great- 
est numbers of British, Irish, and German 
immigrants. 

Nonquota immigrants meet all the require- 
ments as to health, moral character, and eco- 
nomic responsibility, but there is no numeric 
limit on the number of admissions. A total of 
193,444 nonquota immigrants were admitted — 
10 percent more than in fiscal year 1961. This 
figure included 30,316 spouses and children of 
United States citizens, as well as 133,505 
natives of the Western Hemisphere (chiefly 
Canada and Mexico) with their spouses and 
children. Also included were 24,005 other non- 
quota immigrants who were admitted under 
special legislation. Of these aliens, 1,809 were 
admitted under the Act of September 11, 1957, 
and included 1,316 orphans, 289 beneficiaries of 
preference quota visas, and 204 refugee-es- 
capees. There were 17,400 admitted under the 
Acts of September 22, 1959, and September 26, 
1961, which provided that certain close relatives 



of citizens and alien residents of the United 
States should be admitted as nonquota immi- 
grants, and 4,796 under the Act of September 2, 
1958. 

Nonimmigrants. Nonimmigrants are aliens 
admitted to the United States for tempo- 
rary periods. During fiscal year 1962, 1,331,383 
such aliens, exclusive of Mexican agricul- 
tural laborers, borders crossers and crew- 
men, were admitted, a 9 percent increase 
over the preceding year. 



Alien visitors to the United States have an 
economic value, since they help to reduce im- 
balance of tourist dollars. Visitors also ob- 
tain firsthand impressions that should improve 
the image of the United States. 

The general increase in income level abroad, 
and the lowered cost of transportation, as well 
as the effect of the International Travel Act of 
1961, contributed to an unprecedented number 
of tourists or visitoi's for pleasure. The number 
reached 810,779—68,000 more than last year. 
A fourth of the visitors came from Europe, 
with largest numbers from United Kingdom, 
Germany, France, Italy, Netherlands, and 
Switzerland. Most of the others came from 
Western Hemisphere countries, although rela- 
tive increases from countries of Asia and 
Oceania were high. Another 117,242 persons 
visited the United States for business reasons. 

There were 340,164 temporary workers im- 
ported in fiscal year 1962. A total of 282,556 
Mexican agricultural workers were admitted 
under P.L. 78, as amended. Other temporary 
workers and laborers numbered 46,134, and 
included 11,420 agricultural workers from the 
British West Indies, 537 from other Carib- 
bean countries, 8,462 from Canada, 354 from 
Japan, and 305 sheepherders from Spain. There 



were, in addition, 6,814 aliens of distinguished 
merit and ability, and 4,660 industrial trainees 
admitted. 

The decline of 11,593 Mexican agricultural 
workers was primarily due to mechanization 
of agricultural operations, adverse weather con- 
ditions in certain portions of the United States, 
and the availability of domestic workers. These 
alien workers supplement domestic workers and 
are not imported unless it is determined by the 
Department of Labor that domestic workers are 
not available at prevailing wages. 

Education as a means to international under- 
standing was furthered by the admission of 
41,202 students. Among them were 9,593 from 
Canada, 5,015 from Mexico, 3,834 from Europe, 
3,203 from South America, 9,073 from Asia, 
1,485 from Africa, and 671 from Oceania. The 
Act of September 26, 1961, authorized the ad- 
mission of alien spouses and minor children 
of students. Under this provision 1,037 spouses 
and children of students were admitted. 

To further international cultural exchange, 
the United States admitted 26,977 exchange 
aliens during the fiscal year 1962 to participate 
in both governmental and private programs. 
The largest groups of exchange aliens again 
came from Japan (2,014), Philippines (1,942), 
United Kingdom (1,906), Germany (1,516), 
and India (1,497). In addition, 3,039 spouses 
and children accompanied or joined the ex- 
change aliens admitted. 

There were 33,373 foreign government of- 
ficials, 9,747 representatives to international 
organizations, 1,005 NATO officials, and 1,766 
representatives of foreign information media 
admitted to the United States in official capac- 
ities during fiscal year 1962. 

Other aliens admitted for temporary periods 
included 5,071 treaty traders and investors 
with their spouses and children, of whom 48 
percent came from Japan, and 110,276 alien 
travelers who passed in transit through the 
United States. 




There were 1,762,356 alien crewmen granted 
shore leave. Crewman landing cards were is- 
sued to 97,557 alien crewmen during fiscal 
year 1962, thus bringing to a total 464,206 
crewman cards issued since the inception of 
the crewman indentification card program in 
May 1958. These cards served to identify and 
facilitate the landing of bona fide crewmen. 

United States Citizens. The total number 
of United States citizen admissions during 
fiscal year 1962 rose from 71,654,927 in fiscal 
year 1961 to 74,107,155, a 3 percent increase. 
Some 70 million of these were border crossers 
and another 860 thousand were crewmen. There 
was an increase from 2,043,416 to 2,199,326, 
or 8 percent, in the number of citizens who 
returned to the United States by sea and air. 
Most of these persons had visited European 
countries, the Caribbean area, and Mexico. 

Refugees 

Cuban Refugees. Immediately following the 
fall of Batista's government in Cuba on Jan- 
uary 1, 1959, and continuing to the present, 
anti-Castro Cubans by the thousands have fled 
to the United States. With the passage of time, 
increasing numbers of Cubans, reaching a rate 
of 1,500 per week, have sought refuge in the 
United States. The number arriving has re- 
mained substantially unchanged. They come by 
common carrier, small boats, commandeered 
aircraft, and across the land boundary from 
Mexico after having made their way to that 
country from Cuba. 




<if ',s ('hinrsr orphans vhn came to the Uyiited 
states bij chartered plane from Hong Kong. 



By the close of the fiscal year, this Service 
had examined 125,800 Cubans, as compared 
with 62,190 at the end of fiscal year 1961. At 
the end of June, there were 62,500 Cuban 
refugees on parole, 6,500 in visitor status, and 
56,800 refugee overstay visitors who will be 
permitted to remain in the United States for 
an indefinite period. 

Hon (J Kong Chinese. On May 23, 1962, 
the President directed that steps be taken 
promptly to parole into the United States sev- 
eral thousand Chinese from Hong Kong under 
section 212(d) (5) of the Immigration and Na- 
tionality Act, to assist in alleviating conditions 
in that colony caused by the influx of persons 
fleeing from Communist tyranny on the main- 
land of China. Chinese relatives of United 
States citizens and resident aliens and Chinese 
persons possessing special skills needed in the 
United States are considered for parole. Before 
parole is authorized, these aliens must undergo 
comprehensive security checks, medical examin- 
ations, and other screening procedures. 

Refugee-Escapees (Act of July H, 1960). 
In France, Germany, Belgium, Austria, Italy, 
Greece, and Lebanon, Service officers continued 
to interview and authorize the parole of refu- 
gee-escapees under the Act of July 14, 1960. 
This law, scheduled to expire on June 30, 1962, 
was extended indefinitely by the Act of June 
28, 1962. Under this "fair share" law, the 
United States can parole up to 25 percent of the 
number of eligible refugee-escapees that have 
availed themselves of resettlement opportu- 
nities oflFered by other nations. The aliens are 
screened before parole is authorized, to insure 
that their entry will not be contrary to the 
national welfare, safety, or security, and after 
two years' residence in the United States they 
may be granted the status of lawfully admitted 
permanent residents. 

During fiscal year 1962, 8,852 applications 
were received in the various Service offices 
abroad and 5,132 persons were found qualified 
for parole. Since July 1960, 8,260 aliens have 
arrived in the United States. This program has 
demonstrated the United States interest in 
closing refugee camps in Western Europe and 
finding permanent homes for refugees and es- 
capees from Communism. 

Exclusion 

Inadmissible Aliens. Aliens seeking admis- 
sion to the United States must establish that 
they are admissible under the law. The in- 
spection accorded them by Service officers is 
to permit entry to those who are legally admis- 
sible and to prevent the entry of those who are 
inadmissible. 



As a result of the inspection accorded by 
Service officers of aliens seeking admission to 
the United States, during fiscal year 1962, 
149,463 were refused entry. 

Included in those not admitted were 29,059 
crewmen who were refused shore leave, 79,243 
prospective border crossers, and 40,542 other 
aliens who withdrew their applications for ad- 
mission upon being advised that they appeared 
prima facie inadmissible. After formal hearings 
before a special inquiry officer, 388 aliens were 
excluded. Most were excluded because they 
attempted entry without proper documents. 

Waiveis of Inadmissihilit]/. During fiscal 
year 1962, Congress enacted legislation (the 
Act of September 26, 1961) incorporating into 
the Immigration and Nationality Act the provi- 
sions of the Act of September 11, 1957, author- 
izing di.scretionary waivers of inadmissibility 
to certain close relatives of citizens and per- 
manent resident aliens of the United States to 
avoid extreme hardship. This authority was 
favorably exercised in behalf of 1,349 exclud- 
able aliens. Of this number 1,106 were approved 
by the Service officers abroad. 

Temporary Admissions Despite Inadmissi- 
bility. The discretion vested in the Attorney 
General to authorize the admission of inadmis- 
sible nonimmigrant aliens for temporary per- 
iods was exercised favorably in 3,813 cases 
after finding that such admission would be in 
the public interest. 

Visa Petitions and Other Applications 

Visa Petitions. Before visas may be issued 
to potential immigrants who claim preference 
within quotas or nonquota status, the United 
States citizen or resident alien must petition 
this Service in behalf of the immigrant to ac- 
cord such status. 

On September 26, 1961, Congress enacted 
legislation which made permanent heretofore 
temporary legislation relating to the admission 
of eligible orphans. The number of petitions 
filed under the new legislation fell off sharply 
from 2,857 filed in fiscal year 1961 to 1,263 
filed in fiscal year 1962. 

Approval of visa petitions to accord certain 
relatives of United States citizens and lawful 
resident aliens nonquota or preference quota 
classification dropped from 63,320 to 59,824. 
The largest number, 30,790 petitions, were ap- 
proved to accord nonquota status to the spouses 
and children of United States citizens. 

Approval of petitions to accord highly edu- 
cated and highly skilled aliens a first preference 
quota classification continued at substantially 
the same rate as during the preceding year. 



with 6,.329 petitions approved in 1962. Twenty- 
three percent of the fir.st preference petitions 
were denied, reflecting the continued careful 
review of these cases in order to be sure that 
such workers will not usurp the positions of 
United States citizen workers. 

The number of petitions approved for tem- 
porary workers and trainees also remained 
almost unchanged, with 12,344 petitions for 
such persons granted during fiscal year 1962. 

Other Applications. In some instances, entry 
documents may be issued by this Service. 
Alien residents of Canada and Mexico were 
issued border crossing cards for temporary 
visits to the United States in 136,751 cases. 

Lawful resident aliens of the United States 
may use the alien registration receipt card 
(Form 1-151) as a travel document when re- 
turning to the United States after an absence 
of less than one year in countries other than 
those behind the iron curtain. During the year, 
cards to replace lost, mutilated, or obsolete 
cards were issued in 49,364 cases. Resident al- 
iens who expected to be out of the United States 
beyond the one-year limit, or to visit an iron 
curtain country recognized by the United 
States, were issued reentry permits in 14,962 
cases last year. 

Applications for extension of temporary stay 
by visitors, students, and other aliens tempo- 
rarily in the United States as nonimmigrants 
numbered 184,820, constituting a decrease of 
4 percent from the previous year. 

School transfers authorized for students and 
program transfers authorized for exchange 
aliens totaled 9,649 in fi.scal year 1962, as com- 
pared with 9,834 during the prior year. Per- 
mission to accept employment was granted to 
13,044 students. 

Adjustment of Status 

Applications for Status as Immigrant. Un- 
der certain conditions, aliens, other than crew- 
men and natives of contiguous countries or near- 
by islands, who have been inspected at a port of 
entry and who have been either admitted or 
paroled into the United States, may apply under 
section 245 of the Immigration and Nationality 
Act for status as lawful permanent residents 
without leaving the country to obtain immigrant 
visas. Since the revision of section 245 on July 
14, 1960, which liberalized the conditions under 
which such adjustment may be made, the num- 
ber of such applications filed with the Service 
has steadily increased. During fiscal year 1962, 
15,711 aliens were granted status as permanent 
residents under this provision of law, an in- 
crease of 38 percent over the number granted 



such status in the previous year. Inckided 
among those granted lawful resident status 
were 5,810 spouses or minor children of United 
States citizens, 1,027 quota immigrants whose 
services were urgently needed in the United 
States, 451 quota immigrants who were parents,' 
sons or daughters, or brothers or sisters of 
United States citizens, 625 quota immigrants 
who were spouses or minor children of alien 
residents, 2,646 nonpreference quota immi- 
grants, and 3,600 natives of Western Hemi- 
sphere countries who do not come within the 
quotas. 

Creation of Record of Lawful Entry. An 
alien who entered the United States prior to 
June 28, 1940, and for whom no record of lawful 
entry as an immigrant exists, may apply to the 
Service under section 249 of the Immigration 
and Nationality Act to have such a record 
created. The number of applications for the 
benefits of this section has been decreasing, 
indicating that the status of a majority of the 
eligible aliens has already been adjusted. Only 
3,399 applications were granted during fiscal 
year 1962, a decrease of 33 percent from the 
number granted during the preceding year. 

Other Adjustments. Congress approved the 
suspension of deportation of 124 aliens under 
section 244 of the Immigration and Nationality 
Act for aliens whose deportation would have 
created extreme hardship for citizen families, 
and gave immigrant status to 80 persons 
through private laws. Fifty-one Hungarian 
refugees who were paroled into the United 
States became permanent residents through ad- 
justment of status, after having fulfilled the 
two-year residence requirement. Thirty others 
were adjusted under various provisions of law. 

Service Operations Outside the 
United States 

In addition to processing aliens for parole as 
refugees in Europe and Hong Kong, and pre- 
inspection in the Bahamas, Bermuda, and Can- 
ada, Service officers abroad have continued to 
process waivers of inadmissibility submitted by 
immigrant visa applicants who are close rela- 
tives of citizens and permanent resident aliens 
of the United States. They also were instru- 
mental in facilitating international travel, as 
well as assisting United States citizens and resi- 
dent aliens abroad, by adjudicating various pe- 
titions and applications rather than having such 
cases referred to ofltices in the United States. 
Fraud, misrepresentation, and other violations 
of the immigration law were discovered and 
prevented by Service officers abroad, including 
cases involving fraudulent or counterfeit docu- 
ments, unqualified beneficiaries of petitions for 



preferences, unqualified and unsuitable orphans 
adopted or to be adopted, mala fide crewmen, 

stowaways, and smuggling. 



BORDER PATROL AND 
INVESTIGATION 

Deportable Aliens Located 

Service officers located 92,758 aliens amen- 
able to deportation proceedings for reasons 
varying from illegal entry or failure to main- 
tain lawful nonimmigrant status to convictions 
of felonies or other crimes. Among them were 
58,265 aliens who had been admitted as visitors, 
students, and other nonimmigrants ; 2,520 agri- 
cultural workers; 1,016 immigrants; 2,492 
crewmen who willfully violated their status: 
11,718 crewmen whose violations were technical 
in that their vessels had remained in port be- 
yond the 29-day limit; 177 stowaways; and 
16,570 illegal entrants. 

There have been drastic changes in the na- 
tionalities of the deportable aliens found since 
1954, when over 99 percent were of Mexican 
nationality. In fiscal year 1962, Mexican aliens 
represented less than a third of the total. Ca- 
nadian aliens averaged 8 percent of the total. 
Marked increases are noted in the apprehen- 
sions of aliens from other Western Hemisphere 
countries and of those of the Chinese race. 

The number of aliens who entered surrepti- 
tiously, either across the land borders or by 
sea, has not changed materially in the past 
three years. It appears that a plateau has been 
reached which will vary but little from year 
to year in the absence of radical changes in 
the factors which affect border violations. 

Decreased illegal entries were accompanied 
by substantial increases in the number of those 
legally admitted who violated status. Principal 
increases were in the visitor and other non- 
immigrant categories. (See chart.) 

Eff"orts to prevent crewman desertions and 
the entry of stowaways brought about some 
concrete results. Wilful crewman violators lo- 
cated dropped from 2,634 in 1961 to 2,492 in 
1962. The number of stowaways found (177) 
was a decrease of 17 percent since last year. 

Smuggling, however, was on the increase. In 
the southern border areas and along the Gulf 
and Florida Coasts, 349 smugglers and 545 
smuggled aliens were apprehended. In attempt- 
ing to evade the continued tight control of the 
border areas, new tactics were used. For ex- 
ample, two smugglers who were apprehended 
last September near Alamogordo, New Mexico, 



^^^P^MWMM^BM| 


HS 




1 


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'— - 







More than 1,100 



riles of drag trails (land clearings paralleling borders, so constructed that tracks will be left 
hy persons crossing them) were continually patrolled. 



were transporting 27 aliens to Colorado. All 
27 had been induced to enter as nonimmigrants, 
without disclosing the true purpose of their 
entry. The smugglers were charged with in- 
ducing aliens to enter illegally and with unlaw- 
ful transportation. In two cases in April 1962, 
smuggled aliens were concealed under the hoods 
of automobiles. 

Previous Annual Reports have referred to 
the case of Reverend Henry T. Jordan, a pro- 
curer of false Canadian documents, who was 




prosecuted on four counts of alien smuggling. 
His trial ended nearly two and one-half years 
of painstaking inquiry by Service and Canadian 
officers. On June 29, 1962, Jordan was convicted 
by a jury and sentenced to two years' imprison- 
ment. 

In the coastal and Great Lakes areas, efforts 
were intensified to control crewmen, stowaways, 
and smugglers. Crewman control operations 
included surveillance of mala fide crewmen 
and alien stowaways who had been ordered 
detained on board. For example, during the 
1961 shipping season on the Great Lakes, 
1,075 such crewmen were checked out on de- 
parture on 263 ocean-going ve.ssels. A number 
of these aliens later deserted in Canada. Fre- 
quently, crewman control activities were co- 
ordinated with investigative search operations. 
Upon receiving reports of crewman desertions, 
mobile units were dispatched to the scene of 
desertion, where immediate investigation pro- 
vided leads, background information, and intel- 




Partol Inspectors verifying departure of creiemen 

ordered detained aboard a Norwegian vessel in the Snell 

Lock, St. Laivrence Seaivay. 



ligence data. Other units simultaneously covered 
transportation terminals and crewman hang- 
outs. At the port of Norfolk, Virginia, alone, 
66 crewmen attempting to desert were promptly 
apprehended and removed from the United 
States on the vessels on which they arrived. 

Development of informants for locating de- 
portable aliens, preventing crewman desertions, 
and the uncovering of stowaway and smug- 
gling activities met with marked success. The 
information gained from this program resulted 
in the apprehension of deserting crewmen and 
other illegal aliens; the identification and dis- 
covering of stowaways, smugglers, and smug- 
gling rings; the location of hitherto unknown 
hiding places of stowaways aboard certain ve.s- 
sels; and the obtaining of information of value 
to the Narcotics Bureau and other agencies. 

In one interesting case, the coordinated ef- 
forts of the Palermo overseas office and the 
New York Smuggling Unit resulted in the 
cracking of an Italian smuggling ring and ap- 
prehension of eight persons involved. Following 
the location of three Italian stowaways on a 
pier in Brooklyn around midnight, September 
24, 1961, a suspicious bystander, Mr. "R", was 
found outside the pier apparently waiting to 
take delivery of the stowaways. Extensive ship- 
board investigation identii^ed the crewman 
smuggler who had assisted the stowaways. The 
stowaways and smuggler were prosecuted, con- 
victed, and deported from the United States 
on January 27, 1962. Mr. "R", who was already 
under deportation proceedings, was deported 
to Italy. Subsequent inquii-y on the part of the 
Palermo overseas office unearthed valuable in- 
formation concerning the workings of the 
smuggling ring in Italy, including the fact that 
the same smugglers had landed a group of 
Italian stowaways a few months earlier from 
the same vessel. Acting on this information, 
the New York office effected the apprehension of 
four additional stowaways in whose cases pro- 
.secution and deportation proceedings have been 
instituted. 

Caribbean Program and Problems 

Investigations of Cubans of the subversive 
class among purported refugees were carried on 
throughout the year. Pressure of these investi- 
gations resulted in the departure from the 
United States of a number of Cuban subver- 
sives while the investigations were still in prog- 
ress. These included Jose Manuel Sanchez-Diaz, 
the leader of the pro-Castro July 26 Movement 
in New York, and Efrain Trujillo-Fernandez, 
who had been the national treasurer of the 
July 26 Movement. Celestino Fernandez-Suarez 



was excluded from the United Sttates on May 
16, 1962, after extensive Service investigation 
had established that he was not a bona fide de- 
fector from the CommunLst Party of the Castro 
regime as he had claimed. Inve.stigation dis- 
closed his long record as a Communist function- 
ary, including training in the Soviet Union 
during the 1930's and his leadership of the 
Communi.st Party of Cuba from 1934 to 1945. 
More recently, Fernandez-Suarez attended the 
World Youth Festival at Vienna, Austria, as 
a Cuban delegate and visited in Moscow with 
his son, an officer of the Soviet Army. 

In August 1961, officers were assigned to ride 
on certain scheduled domestic airline flights to 
prevent hijacking. This action stemmed from 
a directive issued on August 10, 1961, by the 
President, after a Continental Airlines jet 
airplane had been disabled by Service officers 
to prevent its being flown to Cuba. 

Foreign-Born Law Violators 

Internal Security and the Foreign Born. 
Countering the problems of security and sub- 
version presented by Cuba and the restless 
Caribbean area was but one phase of the total 
continuing program of deportation, exclusion, 
and denaturalization of alien subversives. In 
the Southwest the collected intelligence infor- 
mation resulted in the exclusion of a number of 
important Mexican subversives. Among them 
were a Mexican attorney and Government of- 
ficial, a federal school teacher, and a writer. 

Continued investigative efforts culminated in 
the institution of deportation proceedings 
against a number of aliens of the subversive 
class during the year. Among the more promi- 
nent was Nydia Luthy, who had been deported 
in 1951 on subversive grounds, and excluded 
on the same basis in 1959. She was lo- 
cated and arrested in Findlay, Ohio, on May 
14, 1962, following protracted investigation. 
Prosecution and deportation proceedings were 
instituted and, on August 2, 1962, the Board of 
Immigration Appeals dismissed her appeal 
from the deportation order entered by a special 
inquiry officer. Yip Hen Seung and Fang Gar 
Seung, of San Francisco, who had been posing 
as United States citizens, also were exposed as 
frauds and placed under deportation proceed- 
ings. 

Foreign-born of Criminal Classes. The in- 
ternational character of cases involving organ- 
ized racketeering, vice, and narcotics traffic, 
makes this type of investigation most important. 
The potent weapons of exclusion, deportation, 
denaturalization, and prosecution are utilized 
to obstruct, eliminate, prevent, and hinder the 



flow of illegal traffic by criminals over the 
coastal and land boundaries of the nation. 

A typical case is that of Ernesto Barese, an 
associate of the late Lucky Luciano. He was 
considered to be a courier and arranger for 
narcotics traffic between the United States and 
Italy. Deported in 1955 on criminal charges, 
Barese was arrested in 1957 when found, again, 
in the United States. When deported in 1960, 
he clandestinely left the flight, which was re- 
turning him to Italy, in Bermuda and went to 
Canada. On June 12, 1962, he again was appre- 
hended. His depoi-tation is being withheld pend- 
ing disposition of criminal charge of illegal 
reentry after deportation. 

Salvatore Maneri, another alien suspected of 
being deep in international narcotics traflfic, 
jum]ied a $5,000 immigration bond and a 
$10,000 court bond for narcotics conspiracy and 
fled to Spain, thereby executing an outstanding 
deportation warrant. Upon extradition from 
Spain, he was paroled into the United States on 
February 2, 1962, to stand trial for conspiracy 
to smuggle narcotics. Maneri was previously 
deported on three occasions. 

Border criminal identification programs in- 
clude the compilation of information on notori- 
ous criminals in adjacent countries and the 
continued close liaison between Service investi- 
gators and responsible law enforcement ofl!icials 
on both sides of the borders. The following cases 
are examples of the effectiveness of the pro- 
grams. Louis Harold Kendler, one of Canada's 
most notorious criminals, was apprehended by 
Service investigators on March 6, 1962, in Los 
Angeles, California, whei'e he was employed as 
chief accountant for a large corporation. He had 
concealed a criminal record in Canada, which 
included convictions and prison terms for for- 
gery and passing worthless checks. He was 
deported to Vancouver, British Columbia, Can- 
ada, on March 16, 1962, and turned over to the 
Royal Canadian Mounted Police, who wanted 
him on forgery charges. 

Kenneth Lome Turner, a Canadian citizen, 
was wanted by Windsor, Ontario, police for 
armed robbery. He had engaged in a gun battle 
with police officers on April 16, 1962. Service 
investigators found him on the same day in 
Detroit, where he was suffering from gunshot 
wounds. Since he had been previously deported 
from the United States, the order was rein- 
stated and he was deported to Canada to the 
custody of Windsor police on April 25, 1962. 

Lookouts posted for aliens of criminal, im- 
moral, and narcotic classes have resulted in 
the rejection of many aliens seeking entry and 
the speedy location of others who were in the 
United States. 



F rands. Numerous schemes to circumvent 
the immigration laws were exposed as a result 
of the completion of 3,931 immigi-ation fraud 
investigations in 1962. Many frauds perpetrated 
involved using, or obtaining, false visas or 
documents necessary to support the issuance of 
a visa. Also, as in Chinese fraud cases, extensive 
use has been made by aliens of false identities 
and relationships to falsely claim United States 
citizenship. Other cases have involved sham 
marriages to United States citizens to evade 
quota restrictions. Examples of the marked suc- 
cess of these highly complex investigations 
follow. 

Investigations of the V and B Travel Agencies 
disclosed that the agencies had jointly submitted 
a great number of illegal first preference peti- 
tions. Various businessmen were used as fronts 
to sign the documents and clearances required. 
The travel agencies executed the documents 
with false statements as to the nature of the 
business, the urgent need for the services of 
the aliens, the duties required to be performed, 
illegal notarizations, etc. As a result of volumi- 
nous evidence and testimony to support fraud 
charges, a special grand jurv was convened on 
April 26, 1962, in New York. To date, 92 wit- 
nesses have or are scheduled to appear before 
the grand jui-y. Significantly, since the investi- 
gation began, the filing of petitions by these 
travel agencies has fallen from approximately 
500 a year to a mere trickle. 

Jose A. Espinosa, a self-styled immigrant 
consultant was convicted for violation of 18 
U.S.C. 2 and 18 U.S.C. 1001. E.spinosa was 
convicted for aiding and abetting aliens in 
making false statements in applications for 
extensions of stay and requests for voluntary 
departure. Subsequent to conviction, Espinosa 
himself was placed under deportation proceed- 
ings. 

The three-year investigation of a West Indies 
marriage fraud ring was successfully concluded 
recently at New York, where the last three de- 
fendants pleaded guilty to various charges and 
were sentenced on February 6, 1962. The fraud 
ring had arranged sham marriages between 
United States citizens and aliens from the West 
Indies to allow the aliens' entry into the United 
States for permanent residence. Thirty-two 
fraudulent marriages were exposed by the in- 
vestigation and 13 defendants were convicted. 
Following the prosecutions, approximately 40 
aliens were placed under deportation proceed- 
ings and required to depart from the United 
States. 

Since April 15, 1958, Service officers and 
American consuls have forwarded to the 
Fraudulent Document Center at El Paso, Texas, 



6,822 cases in which it was established, that a 
Mexican alien had presented a document in 
supjiort of a false claim to American citizenship. 
During fiscal year 1962, 902 new cases were 
added to the files, 1,332 inquiries were received, 
and positive responses were made in 11 percent 
of these cases, an increase from last year's 9.2 
percent. Cases stored at the Document Center 
undergo searching analysis so that trends and 
patterns may be identified and new combative 
measures developed. 

In the course of Chinese fraud investigations 
during the year, 1,419 persons confessed to 
having fraudulently entered the United States. 
Their confessions exposed 3,003 Chinese per- 
sons who entered in the same manner and made 
1,391 "slots" unavailable for use. 



]iercent resulted in convictions with aggregate 
sentences of 32,007 months and fines of 
$273,160. 

In 1,547 cases convictions were for reentry 
after deportation without permission (8 U.S.C. 
1326) ; 183 persons were convicted for docu- 
ment frauds (18 U.S.C. 1546). The average 
sentence in these cases was 14 months. There 
were 173 persons convicted for nationality vio- 
lations, and of these convictions 165 cases were 
for false representations as United States citi- 
zens (18 U.S.C. 911). 

Revocation of Naturalization 

Revocation of naturalization was ordered in 
4 cases ; 9 revocation suits were pending at the 




0)iginal Gravestone. 



In one Chinese fraud investigation, a visit to 
the 21-year-old grave site of an alleged paternal 
grandfather led to the uncovering of fraudulent 
identities of a group of Chinese. A new head- 
stone had been prepared for the grave with 
altered spelling of the name, but investigators 
also located the old gravestone which bore the 
authentic name of the alleged grandparent in 
Chinese lettering. 

Criminal Prosecution 

The Service j^resented 6,294 cases to United 
States Attorneys for violation of the immigra- 
tion and nationality laws; 2,811 prosecutions 
were authorized. Of the cases disposed of, 89 



Rcplac 



it Gravestone. 



end of the year — 1 subversive, 4 criminal, and 
4 other cases. 

After extensive investigation and litigation, 
the naturalization of John "Bath Beach" Oddo 
was revoked by the United States District 
Court for the Eastern District of New York, 
on April 9, 1962. Oddo was born in Italy on 
January 4, 1903, entered the United States 
in 1907, and was naturalized on December 1, 
1931. In amassing a record of 36 arrests from 
1919 to date, Oddo became one of the more 
notorious racketeers in the country and the 
denaturalization order is based on his failure 
to reveal his criminal record at the time of his 
naturalization. Oddo has filed notice of appeal to 
the Court of Appeals. 



10 



EXCLUSION AND 
EXPULSION PROCEEDINGS 

DuriiiR fiscal year 1962, 1,010 exclusion hear- 
ings were completed, representing a 61 percent 
decrease from 1961. A total of 10,431 deporta- 
tion hearings were held before special inquiry 
officers. In 8,873 ca.ses, 85 percent, deportability 
was conceded by the aliens concerned. With 
respect to the hearings conducted by special 
inquiry officers, 607 appeals were received by 
the Board of Immigration Appeals during fis- 
cal year 1962, representing 5 percent of the 
total hearings, both exculsion and deportation, 
completed during that year. 

The decrease, 27 percent, in hearings com- 
pleted is attributable mainly to a change in 
procedures affecting Cuban refugees, whereby 
such aliens are paroled into the United States 
in lieu of hearing referrals to special inquiry 
ofl[icers in all but limited classes of cases. 

A significant change in Service procedures 
made in January 1962, affects the scope of 
expulsion hearings conducted by special inquiry 
officers. Service administrative procedures were 
integrated to carry out one of the aims of the 
new section 106, Immigration and Nationality 
Act (P.L. 87-301), i.e., the reduction in the 
number of judicial reviews available in an in- 
dividual case. 

Under those regulations, special inquiry of- 
ficers were vested with additional authority to 
determine matters affecting the place of depor- 
tation of aliens under expulsion proceedings, 




A tiipical SIO hearing with Service personnel posing 

from left to right as alien's attorney, the alien, the 

SIO officer, a stenographer, and Trial Attorney. 



claims of physical persecution if deported to 
particular countries, applications for adjust- 
ment of status and acquisition of permanent 
residence status under section 245 of the Immi- 
gration and Nationality Act, and applications 
for adjustment of status and creation of a 
record of lawful admission for permanent resi- 
dence under section 249 of the Act, as an inte- 
gral part of an expulsion hearing. 



DETENTION AND 
DEPORTATION ACTIVITIES 

A total of 7,637 aliens were deported from 
the United States. In addition, 54,164 aliens 
were required to depart without the issuance 
of a formal order of deportation. Included in 
the number of aliens deported were 682 under 
criminal, immoral, or narcotic charges. Among 
them were Simone Scozzari, who had been in 
attendance at the notorious meeting of rack- 
eteers at Apalachin, New York, in 1957; 
Michele Abati, named in the Kefauver Commit- 
tee hearings as an associate of known criminals ; 
and Elizabeth Spedding, alleged to be one of the 
biggest operators in the call-girl racket. Seven 
subversive aliens were deported — two on sub- 
versive charges — the others had subversive 
backgrounds but were deported on other 
charges. Among those deported were Harry 
Carlisle, former editor-in-chief of "Western 
Worker"; Diamond Kimm, editor of the "Ko- 
rean Independence", who invoked the Fifth 
Amendment when questioned concerning his 
Communist affiliation (he was accompanied by 
his common law wife Fania Goorwitch) ; and 
Willie Hirsch, who had been arrested on 
espionage charges, on October 17, 1960. 

One hundred eighty-two aliens who had fallen 
into distress were removed from the United 
States at their request to their home countries. 

Sixty-four mentally incompetent aliens were 
deported or removed. The aliens involved had 
already cost local governments over two hun- 
dred thousand dollars, and, had they continued 
to be institutionalized in the United States for 
their normal life span, over three million dollars 
in public funds would have had to be expended 
for their maintenance and treatment. 

There were 21,505 aliens admitted to Service 
detention facilities and 13,007 to non-Service 
facilities. The Service detention facility at 
McAllen, Texas, was closed and a new, up-to- 
date facility opened at Port Isabel, Texas. To 
temporarily house Cubans being processed for 
entry into the United States, a new facility was 
opened at Opa Locka, Florida, with an auxiliary 



11 



unit at Tampa, Florida, for the detention of 
those cases in which release in the United States 
is not feasible without extensive investigation. 



LEGAL ACTIVITIES 

The fiscal year witnessed a major change in 
the traditional formulas of judicial review of 
immigration orders. Section 5 of the Act of 
September 26, 1961, P.L. 87-301, eliminated the 
district court review of exclusion and deporta- 
tion orders previously allowed under the Ad- 
ministrative Procedure Act. It provided that 
final orders of exclusion could thereafter be 
reviewed only by habeas corpus. It also ])rovided 
for direct review of final orders of deportation 
exclusively by the courts of appeals, although 
it ex]3ressly safeguarded the right of habeas 
corpus for aliens in custody under such orders. 
The interpretation of the new law is still in 
its infancy, but a number of decisions already 
have explored its coverage. The United States 
Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit has 
read the statute quite expansively in Blagaic 
V. INS and Roinueliotis v. INS, holding it appli- 
cable respectively to review of the denial of 
l)hysical persecution claim and of a visa petition. 
The Ninth Circuit ajijiears to have indicated a 
more limited view in Gioni v. Rosoihci-f/, find- 
ing jurisdiction lacking to review a denial of 
a motion to reo])en (;leportation proceedings 
where no review of the final order of deportation 
was sought. 

At the close of the fiscal year,, there had been 
83 original review petitions filed in the various 
courts of appeals and there had been 43 un- 
heard suits pending in the district courts 
transferred to the courts of appeals having 
jurisdiction over them. Of the total of 126 suits, 
31 suits were disposed of by June 30, 1962. 

In the Supreme Court, litigation involving or 
directly affecting the Service was exceptionally 
light. The Court accepted for argument only 
two cases. Of these, only Rusk v. Cort, 369 U.S. 
367, was decided, and it was held that a citizen- 
ship claimant outside the United States could 
maintain a suit to establish his claim under the 
general Declaratory Judgment Act, 28 U.S.C. 
2201. The Coii case also presented a challenge to 
the constitutionality of the statutory provisions 
on loss of citizenship by evaders of military 
scr\ ice. 'I'his case was set down for reargument 
together with the similar case of Kennedy v. 
Mcnduza-Martinez. Also of interest is the Su- 
preme Court's failure to act before its summer 
recess on a petition for certiorari filed October 
27, 1961 in Gustehim-Quinones v. Kemiedy, a 
case challenging the constitutionality of the 



statute and the adequacy of the proof under- 
lying a deportation order against an alien form- 
erly a member of the Communist Party. 

No petitions for certiorari were filed in the 
Supreme Court on behalf of the Government 
in Service cases during fiscal 1962. There were 
19 petitions filed by aliens. One petition was 
carried over from the prior fiscal year. Of 
these 20 petitions, one was granted on sugges- 
tion of the Solicitor General, resulting in a 
reversal of the lower court and a remand of the 
case for further administrative proceedings. 
Two petitions remained unacted upon by the 
court at the end of the fiscal year. The remain- 
ing 17 petitions were denied. 



ALIEN ADDRESS REPORTS 

In accordance with the requirements of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act, 3,128,765 
aliens filed address repoi't cards with the Serv- 
ice in 1962. This is an increase of 90,461 re- 
ports over last year. The three states with 
the largest number of aliens reporting were: 
California— 660,418 or 21 percent; New York 
—574,637 or 18.4 percent; and Texas— 237,749 
or 7.6 percent. The largest number of resident 
aliens were of Mexican nationality (549,070), 
followed by Canada (326,238), Germany 
(255,903), United Kingdom (250,784), Italv 
(234,229), and Poland (135,576). Residents of 
other nationalities were under one hundred 
thousand. The largest number of iVIexican na- 
tionals live in California and Texas ; Canadians 
in Califoimia and New York ; Germans in New 
York and California ; British in New York and 
California ; Italians in New York and New 
Jersey ; and Poles in New York and Illinois. 



CITIZENSHIP 

Encouragement of Naturalization 

Informational Progratns. Administi-ative 
responsibility cannot be properly served with- 
out effective programs publicizing the require- 
ments for naturalization, and realistically 
describing and explaining applicable proce- 
dures. The primary effect of such programs is 
to assure every qualified alien the opportunity 
to proceed with naturalization within a short 
time of attaining eligibility. Secondarily, pro- 
grams of this type eliminate misconceptions 
many aliens have regarding the nature of the 
administrative and judicial naturalization pro- 



12 



A common misconception among aliens po- 
tentially qualified for naturalization is the 
erroneous impression that the desired goal is 
beyond their capacity. To combat these unwar- 
ranted misapprehensions, the Service supple- 
mented the distribution of pamphlets describing 
the naturalization prerequisites and procedures 
with motion picture films. These films take 
the alien behind the scenes and afford him an 
opportunity to actually view a naturalization 
proceeding and become familiar with the na- 
ture of the examination and tests he will be 
required to take. Each viewer is thus enabled 
to evaluate his own qualifications for naturaliz- 
ation upon a sound basis, and develop a self- 
confidence in his ability to qualify. 

The Service practice of promptly notifying 
newly naturalized persons by mail of their 
children's eligibility for naturalization contin- 
ued during the past fiscal year. Before this 
program was conceived, a great majority of 
naturalized persons either failed to apply in 
behalf of their children, or delayed their ap- 
plications until the children were too old to 
qualify under the statute. 

A second notification program is designed 
to notify the newly naturalized citizens that, 
through their naturalization, their children 
automatically derived citizenship and became 
eligible to apply for a certificate of citizenship. 
This notification program benefits the deriva- 
tive citizen since it tends to promote an early 
adjudication of the citizenship claim, when 
the required documentary evidence and testi- 
mony is readily available, thus avoiding com- 
plications in proof which sometimes result from 
the passage of time. 

Citizenship Responsibility. Citizenship Day 
and Constitution Week, designed to inspire 
in all citizens a rededication to the social and 
political ideals of the nation, were once again 
celebrated throughout the country. The Service- 
published Citizenship Day Bulletin was widely 
used as a practical guide for planning appro- 
priate ceremonies and ensuring a maximum of 
participation therein. 

Working with the courts, and civic and patri- 
otic organizations, the Service was instrumental 
in arranging for impressive final naturalization 
ceremonies, that made candidates for citizen- 
ship aware of the necessity for a full acceptance 
of the duties and obligations as well as the 
rights and privileges of their .status. 

Citizenship Iustructio7i. Related to the ful- 
fillment of citizenship responsibility are the 
general statutory requirements that the candi- 
date for citizenship possess an ability to speak, 
understand, read, and write the English lan- 
guage, be familiar with this country's history, 



have a practical understanding of the consti- 
tutional prerogatives, and a fair working 
knowledge of the Government in operation. 
During fiscal year 1962, the Service continued 
its effective citizenship education programs 
formulated to assist naturalization applicants 
in their preparation to meet these educational 
prerequisites. 

Names and addresses of newly arrived im- 
migrants were furnished local schools so that 
these aliens might be invited to attend citizen- 
ship classes. For the purpose of extending 
similar invitations, public schools were fur- 
nished the names and addresses of 52,359 ap- 
plicants for naturalization. Among the aliens 
admitted to citizenship during the past year, 
37,560 attended public school courses and 2,417 
gained instruction through home study courses. 
A total of 205,893 copies of the various parts 
of the "Federal Textbook on Citizenship" were 
distributed to candidates for citizenship, either 
through the public schools or the Government 
Printing Oflfice. 



w=^/'% 




Three (/ciicyations of a r7n/(r.s-c faniihi liini;/ fumni iii 

as United States citizens ui the chambers af a Federal 

District Judge. 

Naturalization Courts 

A cooperative relationship between the Serv- 
ice and the naturalization courts, established 



13 



by the closest liaison between Service represent- 
atives and court personnel, has long been an 
important factor contributing to efficient opera- 
tion in the naturalization area. An example of 
this was seen in the uniform consent of courts 
to Service requests for special final hearings 
to facilitate the travel abroad of military per- 
sonnel and their dependents, or of other resi- 
dent aliens departing from the United States in 
connection with important Government pro- 
jects. 

The harmonious atmosphere surrounding the 
relations between the Service and the naturaliz- 
ation courts in 1962 permitted further progress 
to be made in the court consolidation program. 
An increased concentration of alien population 
in certain areas, disclosed by Service survey, 
prompted a reactivation of a number of courts. 
Nevertheless, the active federal and state courts 
engaged in the naturalization activity were 
further reduced from 662 to 6.39. 

The concentration of naturalization work in 
the larger courts permits more frequent filing 
periods which, in turn, results in additional 
final hearings and a consequent early disposi- 
tion of cases. By increasing the number of 
naturalization candidates to a maximum at each 
final hearing, a better setting is provided for 
more impressive ceremonies, with a fuller par- 
ticipation by civic and patriotic organizations. 

Naturalization Petitions 

Petitions Granted. Currency and quality in 
naturalization case work, which have become 
trademarks of Service accomplishment during 
recent years, were again realized during fiscal 
year 1962. 

The substantial total of 127,307 aliens were 
admitted to United States citizenship during the 
fiscal year. While this number represents a de- 
crease from the extraordinarily high figure of 
1961, reached as a result of the Invitation-to- 
File Program, it is greater by seven thousand 
than the number of persons naturalized in any 
other one year since 1957. There were 98,739 
jjetitions granted under the general provisions 
of the law. Under special provisions, 17,379 
per.sons were naturalized as the spouses of citi- 
zens, and 8,723 as the children of citizens. The 
remaining 2,466 petitions included 2,33.5 filed 
by i^ersons who were granted citizenship based 
upon a period of military service. 

Seventy-one percent of the newly naturalized 
persons formerly owed allegiance to the fol- 
lowing countries: Germany (18,568), Italy 
(17,449), United Kingdom (9,096), Canada 
(9,272), Mexico (7,205), Greece (6,092), Hun- 
gary (5,682), Poland (5,362), China (4,109), 
Japan (3,563), and Ireland (3,507). 



More than one-half of the children naturalized 
during the fiscal year came from only four 
countries: Germany, Greece, Italy, and Korea, 
once again reflecting the very considerable ex- 
tent to which orphans have been adopted by 
United States citizens. It is also interesting to 
note that the great bulk of persons naturalized 
based upon marriage to a citizen spouse were 
formerly nationals of Germany, Japan, United 
Kingdom, Italy, and Canada, countries in which 
many United States citizens have been stationed 
on military or civilian assignment. 

Petitions Denied. Despite the slight de- 
crease in volume of naturalization during the 
fiscal year, 3,557 petitioners were denied citizen- 
ship during the period, an increase of 12 percent 
over the figure of a year ago. Of those denied, 
1,394 petitions were voluntarily withdrawn 
when it was clear that the statutory require- 
ments for naturalization could not be met at the 
time. Another large group of 910 petitions was 
denied because the petitioners failed to prose- 
cute their cases to completion. Many of these 
denials and withdrawals involved petitioners 
who could not meet the educational require- 
ments and required more time for study. 

Literacy deficiency accounted for 103 denials, 
compared with 144 denied on that basis in the 
preceding year. The number of petitions denied 
because the petitioner lacked the necessary 
knowledge of the history and government of 
the United States increased greatly for the 
second consecutive year. There were 847 denials 
in this category, com|:)ared to 434 last year. The 
increase is again attributable to persons of 
advanced age who filed petitions in response to 
the Invititation-to-File Program and who have 
no exemption from the statutory requirement. 

A considerable number of petitioners who 
withdrew qualified for naturalization at a later 
date by the removal of the impediment which 
barred the earlier naturalization. 

Derivative Citizenship 

The issuance of certificates of citizenship, 
after hearing, was another major area of Serv- 
ice responsibility during fiscal year 1962. 
Ordinarily, a by-product of diminished natural- 
ization activity is a decreased number of deriva- 
tive citizenship cases. Notwithstanding this 
generally accepted hypothesis, the record for 
1962 discloses that 31,589 certificates of citizen- 
ship were issued, a 2 percent increase over the 
extremely high figure for 1961. Of these, 14,057 
certificates were issued to persons who acquired 
citizenship at birth abroad to citizen parents. 
The remaining 17,532 certificates were issued 
to former aliens who derived citizenship sub- 



sequent to birth, either through the naturaliza- 
tion of their parents or through marriage to 
United States citizens. 

The continued foreign assignments of service- 
men have resulted in the birth abroad of many 
children qualified to receive certificates of citi- 
zenship. When brought to this country, practi- 
cally all these children reside with their parents 
at military bases. Applications and necessary 
information were furnished the authorities at 
many military bases, and arrangements were 
made to conduct the proceedings, including the 
immediate delivery of the certificates, at the 
bases, rather than at a Service field office. Since 
a large number of cases was invariably pro- 
cessed and completed at one time, it frequently 
was possible to arrange for significant cere- 
monies as a setting for the delivery of the cer- 
tificates. 

The births of children who became citizens 
at birth abroad to citizen parents are frequently 
registered at an American consulate. If the 
documentation presented to the consular au- 
thorities is sufficient in form and substance for 
the derivative certificate, it is utilized in con- 
nection with the case and the applicant relieved 
of presenting duplicate documentation. 

Loss of Citizenship 

During the past fiscal year, 3,226 persons 
were reported as having lost their United States 
citizenship under the expatriation provisions 
of the statute. A breakdown of this total dis- 
closes that of these former citizens, 977 un- 
derwent expatriation by voting in a foreign 
election, 1,113 as a result of extended foreign 
residence, and 642 through naturalization in a 
foreign state. Persons expatriated by reason 
of a renunciation of citizenship or the taking 
of an oath of allegiance to a foreign state 
totaled 229. Citizenship was also lost by 237 
other former citizens through service in the 
armed forces of or employment by a foreign 
state. The other miscellaneous grounds of ex- 
patriation accounted for the remaining 28 ex- 
patriates. Loss of nationality in all these cases 
occurred automatically by operation of the 
statute. 

Orders of naturalization revoked and certifi- 
cates cancelled by court action during the past 
fiscal year totaled 26, compared with the 44 
cases in 1961. As usual, the principal ground 
for revocation was a resumption of foreign 
residence by the naturalized persons within the 
five-year period following their admissions to 
citizenship which, under the statute, gives rise 
to a presumption that they lacked the requisite 
intention to reside permanently in the United 
States. 



On occasion, persons claiming citizenship 
through citizen parents or marriage to citizens 
will commit fraud or engage in misrepresenta- 
tion when they appear for the administrative 
hearings in connection with their applications 
for certificates of citizenship. As a result, they 
will obtain certificates from the Service to 
which they are not entitled under the law. In 
accordance with authority contained in the 
statute, 424 certificates in this category, admin- 
istratively issued during the past years, were 
administratively cancelled during 1962. 

Under a statute which ceased to be effective 
September 22, 1922, citizen women lost their 
nationality upon marriage to aliens. Most of 
the 409 persons regaining United States citizen- 
ship during the year were women in this cate- 
gory. 

ADMINISTRATIVE 
SERVICES 

Employee Development and Training 

The principal Service-wide training activities 
were centralized at Port Isabel, Texas. A new 




Stiidoif practicing speaking Spanish in langxage labc 
atorij at Officer Development Center. 



Officer Development Center was established 
which includes the Border Patrol Academy, the 
Advanced Officers College, and Extension 
Training-. The Border Patrol Academy conducts 
the fourteen-week program of instruction for 
new incoming Patrol Inspector officer trainees. 
A total of 133 trainees completed this program 
in fiscal year 1962. Twelve different courses, 
some of which were scheduled two and three 
times, were conducted at the Advanced Of- 
ficers College. Seven of these courses were 
specifically designed to provide technical train- 
ing need by journeyman investigator, deport- 
ation officer, and immigrant inspector personnel 
as well as naturalization examiners. Two 
hundred and ninety-two officers completed 
these courses. In addition, thi-ee supervisory 
courses for investigators, immigrant inspectors 
and patrol inspectors were presented. One hun- 
dred and thirty-three supervisors completed 
these courses during the fiscal year 1962. 

A new developmental opportunity was pro- 
vided for executives in the Service in the form 
of an Executive Development Seminar. Partic- 
ipants gained a better understanding of the 
nature of important management processes 
such as planning, controlling, coordinating, 
directing and organizing; as well as human 
relations, decision making, and delegation. 
Twenty persons attended the one-week program 
and nineteen attended the two-week one. 

The Service's Extension Training Program 
consists of nine home-study courses that cover 
the Service's key functional activities. Employ- 
ees enrolled in this program completed a total 
of 909 courses during the fiscal year. 

Training effectiveness has been improved 
among those officei-s who serve as instructors 
at the Officer Development Center and else- 
where. Twenty-four of these officers attended 
an intensive two-week Instruction Training 
Course during fiscal year 1962. 

The I&NS Employee Development and Train- 
ing Advisory Board, comprised of Assistant 
Commissioners, was established to provide 
over-all guidance and direction of employee 
development and training activities. As a result 
of the Board's action, greater coordination, 
understanding, and cooperation were achieved 
among personnel engaged in planning and im- 
plementing in-Service programs of instruction. 
In addition, better control measures were de- 
signed and used, resulting in less wasted effort 
and time on the part of personnel concerned 
with training problems and programs. 



Other Administrative Services 

The Management Improvement Program 
covered a wide variety of improvements in 
Service operations. A booklet-type Reentry 
Permit, containing pages for vi.sas, simplified 
the documentation for travel for permanent 
residents of the United States. A new multi- 
purpose form for foreign students was devised, 
which replaced a number of forms and proce- 
dures for the .student, the Service, and the school 
authorities. A few projects that effected savings 
last year were: the record-keeping procedure 
involved in the admission of students who do 
not have proper documents in their possession 
was simplified at Miami ; surveys of manpower 
and travel patterns resulted in savings in a 
number of districts ; other work simplification 
included the installation of a telephone-answer- 
ing service, which relieved duty officers, and 
public address systems where effective. 

The Personnel Branch assisted in the estab- 
lishment of a new district and its headquarters 
at Port Isabel, Texas, and the Officer Develop- 
ment Center located there; in the employee 
development and training programs; in the 
training of foreign officials; and in the long- 
range planning and coordination of in-Service 
training courses. The Branch conducted and 
completed an evaluation of the Personnel Pro- 
grams in the Northeast, Southwest, and South- 
east Regions, and published the I&N Reporter. 
There were 9,177 applications rated by the 
Board of Examiners and 221 selections were 
made for immigration patrol inspector posi- 
tions. 

Under the Incentive Awards Program 844 
suggestions were received — 104 were adopted; 
199 persons were recognized for superior per- 
formance or special acts. Cash awards totaling 
$45,147 were granted to Service employees. 

The Finance Branch extensively revised the 
accounting system to bring it into conformity 
with the principles, standards, and related re- 
quirements as prescribed by the Comptroller 
General. This revision includes a realignment 
of the chart of accounts, an improved provision 
for interlocking accounting relationships be- 
tween the Central Oflice and the regional offices, 
modifications and refinements in the method of 
maintaining the accounts on an accrual basis, 
and other ]:)rocedural modifications. 

The Property Management and Office Services 
Branch ]3rocured and supervised the complex 
installation of sixty mechanical index machines 
of the latest design to hou.se an ultimate 38 
million cards in the Central Oflice Master Index. 
Another accomplishment of interest was the 
conversion of a procedure involving panel 



16 



boards to an automated sequential card system. 
This latter method resulted in faster publication 
time, increased "readability," and monetary 
savings. 

In fiscal year 1962, to improve the controls 
and servicing of records and files, a major 
project of purging obsolete index cards in field 
oflices was started by the Records Administra- 




Rccords searche 



tion and Information Branch. In addition to 
gaining needed space in field oflice indexes, the 
purge will result in faster index searches and 
more positive identification of subjects of re- 
lated records. 

A publicity program was conducted to assure 
that the annual alien address report require- 
ments were brought to the attention of all aliens 
who must submit the reports. 

The program to provide better facilities for 
port formalities and Border Patrol operations 
was continued. Contracts were awarded in co- 
operation with the Bureau of Customs for con- 
struction of seven border inspection stations 
with two residences each. Six Border Patrol 
stations, one sector headquarters, and three 
border inspection stations were completed dur- 
ing the fiscal year. New inspection facilities 
were installed at four international airports. 

Some of the principal accomplishments in the 
Statistics Branch were a handbook for statis- 
tical coding, a plan for a uniform method of 
measuring work efficiency on adjudications, a 
comprehensive study of the development of 
certain principles in immigration law over the 
past 37 years, and other analytical reports re- 
lating to proposed legislation and its eflFect on 
the Service programs. 



17 



TABLE 1. IMMIGRATION TO THE UNHED STATES! 
1820 - 1962 



^rom 1920 to 1867 figures represent alien passengers arrived} 1868 through 1891 and 
1895 through 1897 immigrant aliens arrived} 1892 through 1894 and from 1898 to the 
present time immigrant aliens admitted^ 





Number 




Number 




Number 




Number 


Year 


of 


Year 


of 


Year 


of 


Year 


of 


















1 820-1 962^/ 


42.396.068 


1855.. 


200,877 


1892.. 


579,663 


1931-1940 


528, 4?l 






1856.. 


200,436 


1893.. 


439,730 


1931.. 


97,139 


1820. . 


8,385 


1857. . 


251,306 


1894.. 


285,631 


1932.. 


35,576 






1858.. 


123,126 


1895.. 


258,536 


1933.. 


23,068 


1821-1830 


143.439 


1959.. 
I860.. 


121,282 
153,640 


1896.. 
1897.. 


343,267 
230,832 


1934.. 
1935.. 


29,470 


1821.. 


9,127 


34,956 


1822.. 


6,911 






1898.. 


229,299 


1936.. 


36,329 


1823.. 


6,354 
7,912 


1861-1870 
1861.. 


2.314.824 


1899.. 
1900.. 


311,715 
448,572 


1937.. 
1938.. 


50,244 


1824.. 


91,918 


67,895 


1825.. 


10,199 


1862.. 


91,985 






1939.. 


82,998 


1826.. 


10,837 


1863.. 


176,282 


1901-1910 


8.795,39$ 


1940.. 


70,756 


1827.. 


18,875 


1864.. 


193,418 


1901.. 


487,918 






1828.. 


27,382 


1865.. 


248,120 


1902.. 


648,743 


1941-1950 


1.Q35.939 


1829.. 


22,520 


1866.. 


318,568 


1903.. 


857,046 


1941.. 


51,776 


1830.. 


23,322 


1867.. 


315,722 


1904.. 


812,870 


1942.. 


28,781 






1868.. 


138,840 


1905.. 


1,026,499 


1943.. 


23,725 


1831-1840 


599.125 


1869.. 


352,768 


1906.. 


1,100,735 


1944.. 


28,551 


1831.. 


22,633 


1870.. 


387,203 


1907.. 


1,285,349 


1945.. 


38,119 


1832.. 


60,482 






1908.. 


782,870 


1946.. 


108,721 


1833.. 


58,640 
65,365 


1871-1880 
1871.. 


2.812.191 


1909.. 
1910.. 


751,786 
1,041,570 


1947.. 
1948.. 


147,292 


1834.. 


321,350 


170,570 


1835.. 


45,374 


1872.. 


404,806 






1949. . 


188,317 


1836.. 


76,242 
79,340 


1873.. 
1874.. 


459,803 
313,339 


1911-1920 
1911.. 


5.735.811 


1950.. 


249,187 


1837.. 


878,587 




1838.. 


38,914 


1875.. 


227,498 


1912.. 


838,172 


1951-1960 


2xS:5,479 


1839.. 


68,069 


1876., 


169,986 


1913.. 


1,197,892 


1951.. 


205,717 


1940.. 


84,066 


1877.. 


141,857 


1914.. 


1,218,480 


1952.. 


265,520 






1878.. 


138,469 


1915.. 


326,700 


1953.. 


170,434 


1841-1850 


1.713.251 


1879.. 


177,826 


1916.. 


298,826 


1954.. 


208,177 


1841.. 


80,289 


1880.. 


457,257 


1917.. 


295,403 


1955.. 


237,790 


1842.. 


104,565 






1918.. 


110,618 


1956.. 


321,625 


1843.. 


52,496 


1881-1890 


.5,246.^1? 


1919.. 


141,132 


1957.. 


326,867 


1844.. 


78,615 


1881.. 


669,431 


1920.. 


430,001 


1958.. 


253,265 


1845.. 


114,371 


1882.. 


788,992 






1959.. 


260,686 


1846.. 


154,416 


1883.. 


603,322 


1921-1930 


lxl<?7,?(?9. 


I960.. 


265,398 


1847.. 


234,968 


1884.. 


518,592 


1921.. 


805,228 






1848.. 


226,527 


1885.. 


395,346 


1922.. 


309,556 


1961.. 


271,344 


1849.. 


297,024 


1886.. 


334,203 


1923.. 


522,919 


1962.. 


283,763 


1850. . 


369,980 


1887.. 


490,109 


1924.. 


706,896 










1888.. 


546,889 


1925.. 


294,314 






1851-1860 




1889.. 
1890.. 


444,427 
455,302 


1926.. 
1927.. 


304,488 
335,175 






1851.. 


379,466 




1852.. 


371,603 






1928.. 


307,255 






1853.. 


368,645 


1891-1900 


3-687.564 


1929.. 


279,678 






1854.. 


427,833 


1891.. 


560,319 


1930.. 


241,700 







Data are for fiscal years ended June 30, except 1820 through 1831 and 1844 through 1849 
fiscal years ended Sept. 30| 1833 through 1842 and 1851 through 1867 years ended Dec« 
31| 1832 covers 15 months ended Dec. 31; 1843 nine months ended Sept. 30( 1850 
fifteen months ended Dec. 31| and 1868 six months ended. June 30. 



18 



TABLE 2. ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AND DEPARTED, 
BY MONTHS t YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1961 AND 1962 

^ata exclude border crossers, crewmen, and Mexican agricultural laborer57 



AI,^EN? ADMITTED 



Immi- 
qrant 



Nonim- 
migrant 



ALIENS 
DEPARTED 



l)« S. CITIZENS 2/ 



Arrived 



V^P^lU4. 



Fiscal year 1962 

July-Dec, 1961 . 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Jan. -June 1962 .. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Fiscal year 1961 

July-Dec, 1960 . 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Jan. -June 1961 .. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 



23ia^ 



t.?31.393 



1.^^5.146 



1.158.960 



2.199,326 



?.159,»57 



143.434 



728,378 



971.912 



^16.964 



1.179.Q5^ 



1.Q17.972 



25,010 
24,690 
25,059 
25,035 
22,587 
21,053 

140.329 



129,542 
136,299 
162,355 
112,784 
87,176 
100,222 

603.Q05 



154,552 
160,989 
187,414 
137,819 
109,763 
121,275 

743.334 



112,748 
107,612 
112,064 
100,071 
85.629 
98,840 

^41.99^ 



231,428 
298,874 
223,409 
164,192 
133,256 
127,897 

1.02Q.27P 



262,628 
206,394 
166,376 
136,629 
109,885 
135,960 

1.14 1 .98 $ 



22,015 
18,912 
24,031 
24,395 
25,678 
25.298 

27^.344 



83,058 
65,999 
91,396 
117,662 
120,564 
124,326 

1.220.315 



105,073 
84,911 
115.427 
142,057 
146,242 
149,624 

1.491.659 



71,503 
68,219 
85,812 
94,836 
99,993 
121,628 

1.093.937 



138,556 
144,832 
184,873 
169,911 
177,607 
204,491 



138,293 
157,851 
175,555 
182,585 
183,215 
304,486 

1.969,119 



140.217 



684.563 



824. 78Q 



^91.976 



1.138.426 



96^.55^ 



25,801 
22,477 
21,961 
25,271 
23,185 
21,522 

131.127 



123,838 
133,198 
142,104 
110,029 
82,741 
92,653 

^3^.7^2 



149,639 
155,675 
164,065 
135,300 
105,926 
114,175 

^66.879 



20,544 
18,877 
22,403 
22,335 
23,139 
23,829 



77,884 
62,194 
88,990 
95,959 
106,348 
104,377 



98,428 
81,071 
111,393 
118,294 
129,487 
128,206 



110,432 
100,138 
106,420 
97,851 
79,704 
97,431 

^01.961 



221,809 
283,826 
218,972 
163,181 
131,867 
118,771 

904.990 



257,152 
192,731 
146,998 
135,670 
107,452 
126,553 

1.002.563 



67,275 
61,271 
85,186 
83,315 
94,191 
110,723 



133,659 
120,459 
160,263 
153,686 
149,845 
187,078 



125,533 
128,924 
157,312 
169,719 
163,407 
257,668 



1/ Exclusive of Canadian travel over land borders. 
2/ Citizens arrived and departed by sea and air only. 



TABLE 3. ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AT UNITED STATES PORTS OF ENTRYs 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1961 - 1962 



Class 



Total 



Aliens 



Citizens 



Year ended June 30, 1962 



Total number 

Border crossers 

Canadian 

Mexican 

Crewmen 

Others admitted 

Total number 

Border crossers 

Canadian 

Mexican 

Crewmen 

Others admitted 



173,287,932 


99,180,777 


74.107.155 


164.980.440 


94.835.674 


70.144.766 


57,406,672 


30,778,071 


26,628,601 


107,573,768 


64,057,603 


43,516,165 


2,622,340 


1,762,356 


859,984 


5,685,152 


2,582,747 


3,102,405 



Year ended June 30, 1961 



168.001.645 


96,346,718 


71,654,927 


160.294.175 


92.259.659 


68.034.516 


56,624,149 


30,626,879 


25,997,270 


103,670,026 


61,632,780 


42,037,246 


2,560,884 


1,746,339 


814,545 


5,146,586 


2,340,720 


2,805,866 



20 



^ata sxclude border 
ravel Iftrs, and returning : 



ALIENS ADMnTED 

WUmOlANTS 1/ 

Quota Invnl grants 

First preference quotai 

Selected Immigrants of special skill or ability 

Their spouses and children 

Parents of U. S. citizens 

Unmarried sons or daughters of U. S. citizens 2/ 

Third preference quotai 

Spouses of resident aliens 

Unmarried sons or daughters of resident aliens ^ 

Fourth preference quotai 

Brothers or sisters of U. S. citizens 

Married sons or daughters of U. S. citizens 2/ 

Spouses and children of brtithers or sisters, sons or daughters 
of U. S. citizens 4/ 

Adopted sons or daughters of U. S. citizens 2/ 

Nonpref erence quota 

Displaced persons - Sec. 4, Displaced Persons Act of 1948 

Foreign government officials adjusted under Sec. 13, Act of 

September 11, 1957 

Nonquota InmlgrantE 

Wives of U. S. citizens 

Husbands of U. S. citizens 

Children of U. S. citizens 

Natives of Western Hemisphere countries 

Their spouses 

Their children 

Persons who had been U. S. citizens 

Ministers of religious denominations, their spouses and children .. 
Employees of U. S. Government abroad, their spouses and children .. 

Refugees - Refugee Relief Act of 1953 

Immigrants - Act of September 11, 1957 

Hungarian parolees - Act of July 25, 1958 

Azores and Netherlands refugees - Act of September 2, 1958 

Immigrants - Sees. 4 and 6, Act of September 22, 1959 

Inmlgrants - Act of September 26, 1961 

Children born abroad to resident aliens or subsequent to 

issuance of visa 

Aliens adjusted under Sec. 249, Imnlgratlon and Nationality Act 5/ 
Other nonquota iimigrants 

NONIMMIGRANTS 1/ 

Foreign government officials 

Temporary visitors for business 

Temporary visitors for pleasure 

Transit aliens 

Treaty traders and investors 

Students 

Their spouses and children g/ 

Representatives to International organizations 

Teinxjrary workers and industrial trainees 

Representatives of foreign information media 

Exchange vi sltors 

Their spouses and children g/ 

Returning resident aliens W 

NATO officials 

Other nonimmigrants 



ocumentsv' 



22,620 
6,913 
6,869 

66,386 
1,235 



24,334 
25,424 
1,187 



..24^. 



30,701 
91,434 
597,982 
116,814 
3,036 
35,583 

7,607 
29,339 

1,198 
24,293 



21,621 
6,140 
6,454 

89,566 



6,61^ 
5,067 
8,870 
10,314 



32,569 
108,130 
671,075 
118,291 
3,803 

35,415 



25,233 
97,895 



30,704 
116,165 
742,307 
106,888 
4,549 

35,072 

9,383 
44,263 

1,949 
24 ,345 



33,373 
117,242 
810,779 
110,275 
5,071 
41,202 
1,037 



57,608 
1,756 

25,977 

3,039 

112,251 

1,001 



An iimlgrant is an 
Returning residen 
laws define such 



admitted for permanent residence. A nonimmigrant Is 
ens who have once been counted as Innlgrants are inclu 
s as Irnnigrants. 

r 22, 1959, all sons or daughters of U. S. citizens over 21 years of age were classified as fourth 
preference quota. Adopted sons and daughters with petitions approved prior to September 22, 1959, remained In fourth preferenc*. 
2/ Prior to Act of September 22, 1959, included only children under 21 of resident aliens. Adult sons or daughters of resident 

aliens were classified as nonpreference quota. 
4/ Prior to Act of September 22, 19i9, classified as nonpreference quota. 
S/ Nr.t reported prior to 1959. 

^ Figures are not conparable due to changes in documentary requirements. 

TJ Includes 1 foreign government official in 1960 and 4 in 1961, whose status was adjusted under Sec. 13, Act of September 11, 1957. 
a/ Classes established by Act of September 21, 1961. 



TABLE 5. IMMIGRANTS ADMriTED, BY PORTi 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1958 - 1967 



All ports 

Atlantic 

Baltimore, Md 

Boston, Mass. 

Charleston, S. C 

Charlotte Amslle, V. I 

Miami, Fla 

NeMark, N. J 

New York, N. Y 

Norfolk, Va 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Port Everglades, Fla. 

San Juan, P. R 

Washington, D. C 

Other Atlantic 

Gulf of Mexico 

Houston, Tex 

New Orleans, La 

Tampa, Fla 

Other Gulf 

Pacific 

Agana, Guam 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

Los Angeles, Calif 

San Francisco, Calif 

Seattle, Wash 

Other Pacific 

Alaska 

Anchorage 

Other Alaska 

Canadian Border 

Blaine, Wash 

Buffalo, N. Y 

Calais, Ms 

Champlaln, N. Y 

Chicago, 111 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Derby Line, Vt 

Detroit, Mich 

Eastport, Idaho 

Hlghgate Springs, Vt 

Jackman, Me 

Niagara Falls, N. Y 

Norton, Vt 

Noyes, Minn 

Pembina, N. D 

Port Huron, Mich 

Rouses Point, N. Y 

St. Albans, Vt 

Sault Ste. Marie, Mich 

Sweetgrass, Mont 

Thousand Island Bridge, N. Y. 

Vanceboro, Me 

Other Canadian Border 

Mexican Border 

Brownsville, Tex 

Calexico, Calif 

Del Rio, Tex 

Eagle Pass, Tex 

El Paso, Tex 

Hidalgo, Tex 

Laredo, Tex 

Nogales, Ariz 

Roma, Tex 

San Luis, Ariz. 

San Ysldro, Calif 

Other Mexican Border 

All other 



253.265 



340 

1,211 

330 

137 

17,151 

3,765 

120,751 

235 

740 

160 

2,198 

341 



.3.2?4 



397 

1,562 

504 

761 

20.929 



170 
8,121 
4,633 
3,622 
4,116 

267 

277 



266 
11 



4,694 

4,769 

1,502 

1,692 

2,826 

467 

577 

12,189 

553 

576 

347 

3,367 

359 

2,023 

237 

2,179 

2,066 

825 

218 

775 

441 



2,867 

1,956 

76 

509 
5,891 

997 
3,092 
3,419 

269 

17 

8,838 

193 

137 



260.606 



■I^5, ; .9.3 . 



115 

12,869 

22,406 

122,336 

166 

1,222 

230 

1,513 

460 

2,246 

2.910 



481 

1.269 

360 



28.236 



228 
9,822 
7,509 
5,660 
4,518 

499 

274 



3,9.103. 



3,645 

3,594 

1,142 

1,627 

3,822 

551 

314 

7,951 

470 

475 

290 

2,854 

270 

1,203 

100 

1,572 

1,560 

706 

263 

585 

365 

575 

4,169 

21.759 

506 

1,752 



2,656 

2,680 

228 



335 

7,838 

212 

226 

16,119 

8,483 

116,683 

203 

529 

322 

i,529 
665 

2,099 

_2x222_ 



1^1.716 



25.43 



308 
9,234 
8,582 
4,293 
2,328 

744 

1.138 



4,753 

4,332 

1,610 

2,026 

4,848 

696 

525 

11,424 

611 

652 

358 

2,855 

414 

1,323 

173 

2,263 

1,628 

971 

357 

643 



31.190 
1,470 
2,679 

190 
1,111 
6,245 
1,517 
4,015 
3,366 

459 

179 
9,604 

355 

175 



5,970 

376 

380 

22,082 

7,894 

108,953 

326 

431 

482 

2,498 
496 

1.400 

.. ..3.1 ^6 



603 

1,294 

353 

916 

23.326 



269 
8,914 
8,143 
3,290 
1,907 

803 

1 .579 



^1.135 



5,022 

5,257 

2,048 

2,402 

5,434 

672 

690 

10,283 

786 

747 

333 

2,438 

475 

1,410 

251 

2,404 

1,538 

992 

455 

906 

469 

409 

6,014 



1,904 
4,827 

183 
1,251 
7,977 
1,510 
4,344 
3,534 

603 

409 
13,046 

341 



193 



3I| 



.1 



.11 



Czcchoslovaklt 

Finland 

Irtland 

Italy 

Natharlanda 

Po 1 and 

Portugal 

Spain ..;;!;;!!!!;;;!!!!;!;;;!!;!!!!!!. 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) 

Unltad Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Aala) 

*'^i;;'i/":::::;::::::::::::;::::;::::: 

Hong Kong 

Indl 

IndonaaU 

Iran 

Iraq 

larall 

Japan 

Jordan 2/ 

Phlllpplnea 

Ryukyu lalandi 

Othtr Aala 

North Anarlca 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Rapubllc 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Othsr Wast Indlaa 

Costa Hlca 

El Salvador 

Guatama la 

HondUTsa 

Panama 

Other Central America 

Other North Anerica 

South America 

Argentine 

BrezU 

Clitle 

Co lombl 

Venezuele 

Other South AMrlca 

Afrlc 

Algeria 

Tunisia !!!!!!!!.'!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 

Other Africa 

Oceanl 

Australia 

Pacific Islandi'iuis! idii! )"!!!!!!!!! . 
other Oceania 

Other countries 

^ Includes FonuDse. 
2/ Includes Arab Palestine 
3/ Includes 11 foreign governaient officii 
Sec, 13, Act of Septe^er 11, 19ST, 



21,189 
2,777 
1,857 



adjusted under 



23 



TABU 6A. 


IlttlIGIlA(frS AWnTED, By CUSSES UNDER THE 


ENDED JUNE 30, 


m^ COUNTRy OR 














admitted 


1 

I! 


'A 

If! 


1 


J 


6 = 


t 
1 

ill 


m 

ill 

m 


1 = 
If 


ad" 


^i^'unLr 




Country or 
region of 

roildenca 




,1 


1 
"1 




* 


1 


All countries 






,..., 






6.354 




,7. 


"''1 


1.809 


51 


4.796 






5.116 




































































9M 

103 

957 

505 

3,931 

21,477 

4,408 

400 

4,239 

20,119 

52 

6,378 

1,839 

5,660 

3,622 

3.353 

i;793 

885 

13,895 


901 
62 
778 
404 
2,526 
18,651 

143 

51430 

20 

2,242 

1,776 

l!612 
18,076 


179 

101 

1,405 

2,826 

3,895 

61 

14,689 

32 

4,136 

58 
131 
388 
819 


18 
20 
116 

834 
1,932 
1,296 

1 

2,197 

2 

131 

li 

228 


26 
78 

152 

36 
107 

:5 

40 


2 
12 
12 
207 

1,012 

554 

100 

11 

13 
33 


2 
71 

1,667 
21 
155 

ir 


3l 

I 

3 
21 
39 

110 

234 

1 
5 
2 


1 
1 

1 
36 

5 


5 
281 

13 


^. 


3,850 


3,225 

2 
9 

8 


2 
2 
2 
88 

142 

5,987 
22 

5 

2 
81 














18 




f"nc 


22 


























Nori'v 


23 


























Turkey (Europe and Asia) 


10 


















China U 

Hong Kong 


i:356 
^'"^ 

244 
3,015 
4,054 

1,463 
431 

3,354 
465 

1,186 


- '59 

^i 

2,384 

107 
170 
84 
33 
675 


i;297 
2,359 

156 

631 

3,806 

■311 
'427 


■ 364 
971 

186 
2,749 

1,331 
326 
132 


'"r24 

55 
IK 
137 

'1 

345 

3 

112 


■ Too 

540 

34 
374 

1?7 


3 
80 


: 

21 


a 

5 


3 

26 
27 
16 






34 

92 
12 


140 
553 

50 
43 
109 

36 

625 
16 
67 


■50! 
18 










Iraq 


- 






Jordan 2/ 












Ryukyu I. lands 

Other Aala 


16 




55,805 
6,534 
4,476 
1,243 

3^040 

11337 
971 
1,279 
1,023 
2,496 

2,633 


11,720 

187 
38 

11 
11 

3 
19 


55)709 

4;438 
1,232 

1,272 
1,020 

2,521 


13 

2 
122 


22 

2 

3 
9 

233 


176 


29,685 

6.'l59 
4,366 
1,222 
4,187 

1,932 

1,250 
1,006 
2,334 
335 
1,314 


35 

336 
77 

12 

30 

52 

473 


23 

1 
2 
?4 


33 
17 


\ 




64 


195 
257 

3 

225 












ComlnicanBepubiic 


4 










Other We.t Indie 


8 




3 










Nicaragua 


7 


P»"""' 










67 




3:766 
2,652 

4|624 

2I74I 

3,530 
1,268 


398 

64 

350 
285 


2;6ao 

983 


19 

3 
32 
32 


34 
52 

34 


5 
21 


2:^54 
1,462 
1,067 
4,400 
2,615 

2I283 
826 


i 

14 
81 
23 


3 








35 
75 


1 
35 














17 










Venezuela 














'121 
276 

380 
lCt> 


''no 

154 

319 


11 
122 

123 




3 
8 

38 




1 


2 


5 








20 
19 












4 






United Arab Republic (Egypt) 


2 








■ {:"4 

303 


853 
222 


25? 
81 

1 


■ 95 
20 


26 


15 
9 


21 


13 


16 


- 
















Pacific Island. (U. S. adm.) 


3 


Other countrl 


1 



Xj Includes Fortnoaa. 

2/ Includea Arab Palestine. 

3j Includes 11 foreign offlc 



24 



lAE 


LE 6B. A 


lENS WHO AWUETED STATUS TO PERMANENT RESIDENTS I 
By OOUNTHY OB REGION OF BIRTH. YEAR ENDED JUNE 3 


™E^UNITED ST 


ATES. 
















Total 

adjuat- 

Ing 


e. 


2 

i 

ill 




?:r 


1 


s 
s 
1 




m 

m 


Sec. .'.15, 


In' tf 


It 

m 




1 
SI 


SB 

SI 




Country or rsglon 
of birth 


i 

h 

c5 




1 

£ 
1 


1 


If 


s 
1 








58 










M 


11.070 








S.SJS 


-1.5. 


. 


_J.L 


-21 


Europ. 




































«".trl. 


"'172 
92 
H8 

280 

1,073 

1,023 

283 

136 

1,168 

155 
159 

961 
339 


105 
56 
10 

109 
271 
13 
103 

82 
75 
56 

HI 
134 




10 
6 
30 
12 

3 
18 

36 
26 

27 
15 


17 
55 
39 

29 

11 

21 

50 

u 

51 
31 


17 
50 
872 

I 

11 

75 
29 

51 
23 


I 


1 

3 
5 

1 
1 


103 

113 
111 

925 
127 

312 
129 

13 
213 
122 

87 


I 


39 

51 

121 

83 

35 
135 
11 
31 


3 
2 

10 

13 

1 

185 

21 
23 


53 

23 

27 

25 

12 
119 
23 
25 

i 
39 






I 


1 


Belgium ...^. 


9 
























1 






:"; 


a 






















Rum nl' 
















Turk.v (Europ. and A.l.) 

U.S.S.R, (Europa and Aala) 


I 










China i/ 

Hong Konq 


v.™ 

90 

128 

235 

31 


■ 70 

58 
13 

116 

38 
82 


33 


1 
32 

7 
15 


18 

3 
10 

13 
39 

39 
2 


3 
2 




2 


IM 

25 
262 

168 
132 

3.086 


23 


120 
11 

223 
67 

103 
62 
510 

17 


11 

36 

13 
55 


738 

U 
10 

1.519 


2 


i 




3 


















]"" 




J"""" 2/ 
















OtharAala 








Canada 


1,237 

100 
269 
399 

285 
35 


13 




13 






': 


i 


^'273 
1,237 

15 
27 

139 

51 

2.205 


■ 3 




100 

137 

213 
278 

2.129 


271 
1,219 

26 






': 


' 






Dominic nRa'biic 


_ 


















Guatemala 
















Othar North A«ric 






321 
127 
191 

209 
196 


173 




13 


53 


79 


: 




191 

637 
301 

115 




123 


32V 

632 

215 


6 


i 




: 










1 




























53 


'a 
us 




12 


5 

22 

5 

86 


2 
67 
20 


': 


I 


3 
72 

111 




7 

15 
131 


1 
14 


1 
2 


': 


': 


; 














. 


Unltad Arab Rapubllc (Egypt) 


- 


Ocaanla 






19 
32 


18 




32 
1 


3S 

19 




I 




'so 

18 


= 


18 
13 


3 
1 


1 


'_ 




; 




Nai'zaaland 


. 


Pacific lalanda (U.S. ad>.) 














25 



All 



*u«trl» 

Belgium 

Bulbar Is 

Estonia 

Germany 

Italy ." 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe) 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 2/ 

India 

Indonesia 

Palestine '. 

Phi 1 ipplnes 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Central America 

Other North America 

South Anierlca 

Africa 

Other countries 

^ includes 6,130 Hungarian refugees 
2/ Includes Fonnosa. 



7,584 
21,158 
2,662 



20,922 
16,922 
9,658 



5,826 
17,125 
2,184 



6,902 

46 

3,148 



3t. 22, 1959 
(Sec. 6) 
(Refugee 
relatives! 



26 



IMMir.RArfIS ADMITTEO UNPER THE ACT OF SEPTEMBEFt 

BY CLASS OF ADMISSION AND COUNTRY OR REGION 

SEPTEMHER 11, 1957 - JUNE 30,1062 



Bslglum 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Netherlands 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Eurcpe and Asia) .... 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) .. 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China \J 

Honq Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Iraq 

Jordan 2/ 

Lebanon 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Other West Indies 

El Salvador 

Other Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Chile 

Peru 

Other South America 

Africa 

Algeria 

South Africa 

Tunisia 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Other Oceania 

Other countries 

17 Includes Formosa. 

i/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



IVMIGRAOTS ADMITTED UHOIin THE ACT Or SElTEfWER 7, 195n (P.L. 

BV CLASS OF ADMISSION AND COU(JT!iy OH nEGIC It OF BIRTH i 

SEPTEMBER 2. 958 - JUHF. 30, 1962 



All 

Indonesia 
Netherlan 
Portugal 
Other ecu 






^DM^TED UNDER SECTIONS 4 AND 6, ACT OF SEPTEMBER 22, 1959 (P.L. B6-353), 
BV COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTHi 
SEPTEMBER 22. 959 - JUNE 30. 1962 



Europe 

Austria 

Belgium 

Finland 

Germany 

Greece 

Italy ! '.. 

Latvia 

Netherlands 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) .. 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 1/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iraq 

Japan 

Jordan 2/ 

Lebanon 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Jamaica 

Other West Indies 

Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt). 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

IT Includes Formosa. 

2/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



Spouses and 



S. citlze 
( Sec. 4) 



of U.S. 
citizens 
(S^t. 6) 



28 



TAFfLE 7. ANNUAL CUCTAS ANO I^IXTA V.'MCRMnS ADMITTEn: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 19b8 - 196? 



Annual 
quota y 



Quota immigrants admitted 2/ 



All quota areas 

Europe 

Albania 

Austria 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Denma rk 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Great Britain and Northern Ireland 

Greece 

Hungary 

Iceland 

Ireland (Eire) 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Luxembourg 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

San Marino 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

Asia-Pacific 

Burma 

China 

Chinese persons 

Ceylon 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran (Persia) 

I req 

I srael 

Japan 

Jordan and Arab Palestine 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Thailand 

Vietnam 

Yemen 

Other Asia 

Africa 

Ethiopia 

Ghana 

Libya 

Morocco 

South Africa 

Tunisia 

ether Africa 

Cceania 

IT The annual quota was lb^,9b7 in T^Mi 15^,3b7 i 
1962 the total quota was Increased to 156,687 
newly independent countries. 

2/ Figures include adjustment of status cases. 5e 



100 
,859 
,175 
115 
566 
,069 



,364 
,488 
438 
239 
100 
250 
,295 
,698 
225 
,697 
94 2 



100 
100 
105 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 

200 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
,200 



ICO 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
?,6C0 



94.325 



31 
1,296 
1,135 

76 
1,955 
1,163 

79 
567 



24,243 

29,338 

317 

739 

106 

10,312 

5,366 

176 

304 

68 



5,302 
454 
274 
81 
278 

2,252 

1,587 
205 

2,016 
383 
144 



102 

1,431 

1,140 

95 

3,002 

1,128 

138 

541 

2,979 

24,789 

22,652 

392 

954 

93 



4 26 

3,097 

2,267 

6,480 

4 53 

355 

114 

292 

2,081 

1,604 

263 

2,378 

1,016 



1,310 

1,069 

100 

2,541 

1,199 

100 

554 

2,903 

25,859 

27,034 

344 

805 

112 

7,479 

5,609 

217 

330 

78 

3,035 

2,345 

6,057 

427 

314 

236 



32 
1,330 



2,236 

1,066 

110 

554 

2,092 

24,273 

25,100 

321 

844 

105 

6,273 

5,648 

234 

383 

62 

2,969 

2,208 

6,891 

425 

297 

96 

204 

1,656 



220 

2,536 

932 



221 



85 


111 


304 


371 


28 


42 


109 


111 


97 


98 


141 


125 


115 


94 


103 


104 


154 


129 


194 


214 


99 


106 


91 


113 


108 


95 


105 


91 


37 


69 


34 


35 



107 


99 


103 


78 


454 


117 


75 


52 


99 


92 


104 


72 


112 


99 


103 


92 


106 


99 


142 


128 


202 


215 


94 


103 


98 


102 


39 


88 


70 


58 


110 


93 


51 


80 


90 


97 



?37 in 19h0, and 1 56^,437 in 
3lishnent of additional quot 



and 



All quota area 

Europe 

Albania 

Austria 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoelovakla .. 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Great Britain and 
Northern 

Greece 

Hungary 

Iceland 

Ireland (Eire) . 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Luxembourg 

Netherlands .... 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

San Marino 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland .... 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe ... 

Asia 

Asla-Paclflc ... 

Burma 

China 

Chinese persons 

Ceylon 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran (Persia) .. 
Iraq 



Korea 

Lebanon 

Pakistan 

Philippines . 

Thailand 

Vietnam 

Yemen 

Other Asia .. 

Africa 

Ethiopia 

Ghana 

Libya 

Morocco 

South Africa 

Tunisia 

Other Africa 

Oceania 



1,685 

1,591 

195 

2,765 



Selected 

Immigrantj 

of special 

skills 



\J Figures include adjustment of status cases* 
Table 



3ns, daughter 
of resident 
iiisni 



Adjustments chargeable to future years are Included in year of adjustment. 



2/ Includes 11 foreign government officials adjusted 



Section 13, Act of September 



30 



TABLE 8. IMMIGRAffTS ACMITTED, BY QOUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH AND MAJOR OCCUF 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1962 


AT ION G 


OUPi 








Country or region 


Number 


III 




til 


1 
G3S 


ll 


u £3 


111 


III 

£5S 


is 

il 


i! 


It? 


lllf} 


All countrUa 




23.710 


1.589 


5.554 


21.049 


5.255 


17.172 


12.976 


9.590 


94,4 


10.801 


17,614 


143,939 






















-7;;;;^ 










1,633 
1,042 
1,691 
1,413 
691 
3,732 

24,088 
4,702 
l,3b5 
5,436 

21,442 

4,317 
1,983 
8,093 
3,730 

2,148 
1,696 
1,777 
914 
21,189 
2,277 
1,857 
1,377 


163 
157 
199 
220 
59 
302 
1,723 

204 
820 
525 

439 
232 
546 
38 
114 
307 

328 
143 
3,234 
262 
152 

2.064 


3 

24 
10 

21 
105 

366 

88 

1 

29 
51 

55 


32 

12 
87 

290 
91 
52 
83 

215 
13 
87 
27 

163 

115 

37 

573 
102 
17 
41 

589 


117 
65 
182 
190 

332 
3,149 
83 
53 
585 
261 

311 
292 

57 

364 

3,528 
109 
94 

82 

1.054 


29 
19 

62 
15 

28 
13 
132 
96 

113 

64 
25 

37 

91 

659 

24 
193 


132 
56 
156 
135 

171 

1,825 
308 
121 
346 

3,309 

278 
155 
793 

133 
77 

105 

143 

1,205 
295 
177 
165 

619 


113 
53 

108 
75 

132 
1,091 
367 
102 
477 
1,369 

163 
129 
451 
107 

52 
87 

70 
39 
1,272 
155 
123 
155 

533 


43 
27 
36 
40 
19 
76 
591 

29 
443 
624 

26 

43 
200 

50 
10 
404 
50 

18 

203 


119 

73 
39 

248 

1,212 

312 

64 

711 

135 
151 

59 

167 
17 

344 
75 

70 

754 


2 

52 

93 
32 
109 
3 
229 
851 

32 
14 
363 
415 

1 
15 

119 


16 
64 
26 

33 
503 
119 

46 

324 

1,773 

16 

292 
174 

55 

24 

8 

287 

72 

65 

236 


545 


Belgium 




Denmark 


488 






I „l 


2 150 


Germany 


12,911 






jl"^ 


1,530 




11,327 


ill 


Nethe landa' ' ' 








Poland 

Portugal 


4,564 
2,313 




1,254 


V"\" 






Turkey (Europe and Aela) .... 


554 


U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) .. 


1,037 




'''^l 




15.686 


China 1/ 

Hong Kong 


4,017 
652 
545 

3,056 
601 
314 

1,127 

3,897 
771 

1.538 

3,437 

371 

1,373 


167 
211 
143 

65 
129 
131 

91 
109 

72 
360 

268 


3 

2 

8 

3 
10 

12 


239 

115 
21 
18 
11 

25 
46 

23 
15 

43 


168 

377 
23 
31 
42 

32 
18 
21 
86 

39 


25 

9 
22 
13 

S 

25 

15 
24 

22 


62 

8 
275 
17 
15 

27 
45 

13 
52 

50 


233 
2 

121 

10 
22 
10 
15 
2 
10 
43 

41 


55 

5 
14 

12 

81 
10 


332 

9 

85 

16 
32 
18 
10 

124 


5 

5 

33 
16 


7 
45 
11 

3 

3 

13 

1 

'! 

68 


I,5l6 
543 


Indonesia 






''298 


,"" 








j,p,n 


3 495 


Jordan j/ 


453 


Lebanon 


''230 




















30,'377 
55,291 
16,254 
4,603 
1,322 
1,573 
2,720 
1,407 
1,289 

1,154 
1,083 

'435 
631 


3,532 

2,433 
353 
223 
140 
237 
99 
100 

95 
55 

34 


91 

169 

60 

8 

8 
2 

14 


648 
231 
958 
110 
20 

31 
19 
39 

20 
22 

5 
41 


3,062 
759 

1,492 
362 

142 
197 
173 
156 
120 
138 
142 

31 
29 


848 
463 
604 

9 

23 
26 
32 
22 

5 
20 


1,539 
1,706 
604 
211 
98 
143 
310 
89 
45 

71 
64 

29 
41 


1,073 

952 
610 
196 
161 
236 
62 
62 
43 
83 

29 
17 


195 

3,916 

211 

357 

26 
143 
185 
120 

39 
97 

1 


1,110 

472 
147 
54 

142 
96 
17 
29 
36 
18 

132 
23 
13 


155 

' 27 
15 

35 
11 

10 
20 


1,550 

10,303 
172 
57 

25 
114 

13 

24 
2 

33 




u'"l''o 


27'l73 






Dominican Republic 






^'545 




769 












Guatemala 


467 










p.nlmr!.::::::::::::::::::: 


I 155 




234 








2,935 
1,560 
1,137 
4,391 
2,562 
2,667 
1,037 
1,253 


455 

127 

455 
207 
183 
57 
191 


2 

5 
15 

2 


29 
24 
147 

25 
17 
32 

59 


1% 
135 

615 

227 
85 
135 

190 


20 
35 
95 

28 

8 


222 

36 
189 
153 
88 
31 
55 

99 


164 
37 
41 
171 
215 
161 
16 
43 


47 
217 
169 
134 
12 
30 

„ 


72 

30 
101 

42 
11 

30 


3 
15 

11 

10 


35 

13 

35 

93 
12 
17 




Brazil 










1,357 






Oth«r"so'th Aiiie' lea 


705 


Africa 


1.105 




139 
274 
308 
144 
384 


15 
25 
61 

99 


2 


5 

3 
18 
21 

15 


n 

30 
25 


■ 3 
2 

2 
12 

24 


15 

17 
35 


7 
8 

3 
5 

21 


3 


... ^. 

2 
19 
29 


1 
2 


3 

3 

14 










193 
95 
195 




United Arab Republic (Egypt). 


Oceania 


749 




'•^2 
255 
145 
250 


}03 
55 

14 




8 


15 
17 


12 


u 

15 


7 

5 
3 
5 


18 


3 
3 


13 


5 

1 
1 
7 




Ne« Zealand 

Pacific lalandi (U.S. ad>.) . 


157 
113 
146 


Other countrlea 



31 





Number 


















Admissions 






All occu .tlon. 


293.763 


3.313 


2.236 


1.027 


230.450 






1.764 






21.946 




306 
51 

58'3 

s 

569 

'163 
160 

' 79 

88 
39 

319 
96 

34 
72 
96 
1,838 
3,182 
166 

981 

1,539 


23 
2 
3 

69 

124 

5 
45 

361 

29 
246 

103 

85 




1 
35 

65 

12 

221 
1 

3 
15 

1 

52 

134 

43 








AlroUne"cllot ''nd'n'viaato'j 












Athltt " " teachers 


87 








405 


Cle"a men 






DanceTand'd cln te ch' 


120 










Dletltl'n "d'li titi' i t 


43 






Ed 1 tors'^cid ' r " ' te 


275 








151 








«u>lclanj'and "music teachers 






' 73 




Rloloalcarsclentlsts 








34 








Ph« rmac 1 s 1 5 


224 






'•^5 








765 










Psvcholoal si 


39 




32 


Sport 5 Instructors'and"! flciais 








1,735 
2,960 

896 


Te'^chenoi ifi'd 


Therapists and healers, not specified 














28 
132 

21.009 


"2 
2 

2 

3 
105 

34 






72 


Buyers 'nd '*hlc'^*"'"'f*'^'''^rod'ct* 








66 








130 


Forelan ao'e rment ffTl r* ''" administration 




Manaqers 'of f Ulals" and''D'^OD Ictors^ othe 


4 813 








84 

831 
598 
39 

50 

31 

390 

89 

144 

7,656 

352 

514 

54 
8,844 


1 

2 

1 

2 
12 




i 
: 






84 




















Insurance adjusters, examiners, and Investigators 


31 


Hesscnoers^'nd'office bo 








40 






Receptionists 


301 








7 644 


Stock clerks and storekeepers 


351 










52 
8,832 


Clerlcal'and kindred workers ^othe 






m 

39 
172 
78 

17.172 


1 
1 

1.162 




1 
95 


118 
39 
171 










4 840 








380 
2,027 

45 


2 

77 
18 




: 

1 
10 










77 








303 








Coioposltors and typesetters" 


111 




45 





32 





Number 
admitted 


Beneficiaries 


1 






Total 




Immigrants 








Craftsrwn, for^msn, and klndr»d workers (Cont'd) 


962 

334 

165 
271 
106 
681 
4,400 

53 

563 
41 
106 
448 

385 

1,971 

369 
142 
809 






29 
16 


162 


Decorators and -Indow drsssors 






Encavatlnq, grading, and road machinery operators ... 




Furriers 












Linemen end servicemen, telegraph, telephone, and po«er 

Mechlnl St s 


671 










Mill "^I'ht"^' "°"''" ""'' °" 




lllwrlqhts 






45 










Plasterers 


100 










Pressmen and P'^te printers, printing 




Stone cutters and stone carvers 


85 




108 






Tinsmiths, coppersmiths, and sheet metal workers 


103 












768 








121 
109 
126 

88 

60 
2.399 

45 
284 
380 

30 
278 

51 
756 

1,010 
669 
153 
551 

4,439 

9.690 


2 
55 






587 


''P""r 






109 


Attendants, auto service and parking 








Checker!, eKamlners, and Inspectors, manufacturing 

Conductors, bus and street railway 


88 










Knitters, loopers, and toppers, textile 


' 44 








378 




30 


Milliners ",",' iL 








Painters, except construction and maintenance 


301 






Ihotographlc process workers 








Sewers and stitchers, manufacturing 


1,010 








150 
















3,280 
6,410 










Housekeepers , private household 


6,408 








"■459 
527 
208 
166 
224 
1,333 
75 
49 
87 
1,190 
573 
149 

194 
397 

136 

124 

30 

1,637 

1,376 

10,801 


■■ 3 

14 






456 


Barbers, beauticians, and manicurists 

Bartenders """■■■ 


208 


Chambermaids and maids 


166 








1,279 


Cooks, ""^^Pt private household 

Counter and fountain workers 


75 














Housekeepers "nd ^^^"["^exceDt'orlvate hV isehcld 








Kitchen workers, other 






^46 


Policemen' and detective 




u. s>. military 






209 


Porter" " '' 




: 






30 


Ushers, recreation and amusement 




alters and waitresses .. .. ■■'■■■■■■■■ ,u 












carpenters helpers, exc_pt logging an mining . 


' 36 
188 

33 

750 

16,364 

148.939 






z 










243 


Gardeners, except farm, and iroundskeepers 

Longshoremen and ' ^^^^^ "■■■■"■ ' ' " ' ' 










16,364 


Hsut»lve«, children, and others and thoee with no reported occupation . 
Housewives 


148.939 


1.073 
1.885 
19,410 
57,304 
11,114 


" 




I 


58,153 








1,885 


«'rt"t 

students 


19.410 








11,114 







OF BIRTH, SEX, 



Belgium 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark , 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Netherlands 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Eurtipe and Asia) .... 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) .. 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 1/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Iraq 

Jordan 2/ 

Lebanon 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

tominican Republic 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Other West Indies 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Panama 

Other Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Algeria 

Morocco 

South Africa 

Tunisia 

Jnlted Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Otn«r Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

Ne» Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U.S. adm.) . 
Other Oceania 

Other countries 

V Includes Formosa. 

i/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



24,038 


7,934 


-1,702 


2,030 


1,355 


651 


5,186 


2,102 


21,442 


11,074 



30,377 


'14 


632 


2,632 


55,291 


32 


,650 


2,982 


16,254 


f 


,B04 


762 


4,603 


2 


,099 


116 


1,322 




577 


12 


1,573 




752 


34 


2,720 


1 


,360 


74 


1,407 




5,30 


56 


1,289 




509 


41 


939 




372 


36 


1,154 




513 


46 


1,083 




430 


34 


2,098 




820 


56 



2,985 


1,432 


1,560 




1,137 


4 90 


4,391 


1,847 


2,562 


1,185 


2,667 


1,449 


1,037 


486 


1,253 


575 



2,390 
6,931 
2,318 



34 



All 






Austria 

Belgium 

Czechoslovakia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Italy ..!;;;;!;!!..;;!!;!!!.; 

Latvia 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) .... 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) .. 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 1/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iraq 

Jordan 2/ 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Other Asia 

North America 

Mexico 

Cubs 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Other West Indies 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Other Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Algeria 

South Africa 

Tunisia 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

Pacific Islands (U.S. adm.) . 
Other Oceania 

Other countries 

IT Includes Formosa. 

2/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



1,243 
1,258 
1,059 



Number admitted 

Males 

Under 5 years 

5-9 years 

10-14 years 

15 years 

16-17 years 

18-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-29 years 

30-34 years 

35-39 years 

40-44 years 

45-49 years 

50-54 years 

55-59 years 

60-64 years 

65-69 years 

70-74 years 

75-79 years 

80 years and over 
^^ot reported 

Females 

Under 5 years 

5-9 years 

10-14 years 

15 years 

16-17 years 

18-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-29 years 

30-34 years ...... 

35-39 years 

40-44 years 

45-49 years 

50-54 years 

55-59 years 

60-64 years 

65-69 years 

70-74 years 

75-79 years 

80 years and over 

Not reported 



117,489 

95,053 

75,817 

13,805 

33,321 

45,839 

154,531 

184,987 

144,130 

98,270 

72,124 

56,076 

37,831 

24,389 

14,508 

8.897 

4,600 

2,295 

1,235 

243 



73.073 
7,226 
6,273 
4,345 
732 
1,761 
2,103 
7,777 

11,922 
9,661 



5,141 
3,587 
2,404 
1,511 



8,703 

7,769 

5,513 

870 

2,211 

2,890 

10,341 

15,447 

13,543 

8,456 

6,950 

4.975 

3,560 

2,046 

1,107 

636 

309 

159 



a 2.032 

9,537 

8,783 

6,730 

1,303 

3,104 

4,226 

13,986 

17,625 

14,950 

9,106 

8,492 

6,128 

3,703 

2,065 

1,100 

587 

289 

143 

109 



18 



16 



156^ 

14,037 

12,419 

9,323 

1,847 

4,581 

6,204 

20,537 

23,783 

19,883 

12,581 

11,311 

8,523 

5,306 

3,035 

1,433 

813 

407 

209 

99 

29 



155.201 

15,766 

13,452 

9,^98 

1,764 

4,247 

5,953 

20,114 

23,986 

19,637 

12,652 

9,745 

7,166 

4,561 

2,917 

1,579 

892 

445 

214 

130 

83 



109.121 

11,976 

9,48 

7,694 

1,304 

3,190 

4,294 

13,782 

17,493 

12,8 

8,840 

5,836 

4,545 

3,076 

2,050 

1,268 

737 

390 

176 

105 



125.758 



171.666 



36 



144.144 



114.367 
11.511 
8,960 
7,975 
1,363 
3,237 
4,739 
15,999 
17,306 
12,487 
9,199 
5,721 
5,346 
3,784 
2,752 
1,772 
1,168 
579 
317 
129 
23 



116.687 
12,299 
8,570 
7,731 
1,493 
3,565 



15,836 

12,*919 

9,969 

5.827 

5,369 

3,762 

2,646 

1,801 

1,187 

592 

294 

146 



112,371 
92,591 
74,742 
14,571 
44,997 
86,695 

282, 

213,844 

144,8 
93,150 
69,074 
57,592 
45,016 
33,156 
21,881 
13,395 
7,527 
3, 
2,031 
291 



,878 
,950 
,996 
,317 
,323 
,783 
,460 
,162 
,437 
,386 
,422 
890 
500 
273 
137 



9,065 
8,342 
6,604 
1,335 
4,137 
8,060 
24,466 
19,921 



3,299 

7,756 

6,823 

5,303 

3,977 

2,710 

1,669 

1,053 

610 

315 

164 

19 



9,173 
1,961 
5,440 
9,704 
30,897 
24,852 
17,571 
10,364 
9,062 



2,161 
1,260 
703 
384 
227 
30 



14,950 

13,102 

9,326 

1,882 

5,421 

9,336 

31,24 

26,050 

18,827 

11, 

8, 

6,883 

5,114 

3,831 

2,355 

1,409 

761 

404 

233 



11,172 
9,239 
7,753 
1,498 
4,709 
9,091 

29,253 

22, 

14,693 
9,376 
6,656 
5,703 
4,397 
3,405 
2,253 
1,303 
818 
406 



11,005 

8,800 

7,811 

1,401 

4,621 

9,465 

30,119 

21,384 

14,585 

10,073 

6,431 

6,071 

4,949 

3,737 

2,729 

1,599 

872 

414 

220 

33 



148.7U 



11,799 

8,953 

7,655 

1,395 

4,690 

9,968 

31,833 

21,755 

14,829 

9,989 

6,232 

5,941 

4,633 

3,610 

2,515 

1,565 

767 

386 

175 

16 



121.330 
13,203 
9,604 
3,295 
1,446 
3,537 
5,171 
16,618 
18,349 
13,063 
9,802 
6,247 
5,326 
3,865 
2,652 
1,756 
1,218 
732 
322 



I4?,964 



13,001 
9,320 
8,139 
1,536 
4,915 
9,825 
31,366 
21,209 
14,211 
10,071 
6,497 
5,756 
4,746 
3,499 
2,484 
1,649 
997 
512 
226 
5 



131.57^ 

13,126 
9,735 
8,313 
1,633 



5,380 

19,541 

21,288 

15,146 

10,877 

6,854 

5.111 

3,810 

2,715 

1,862 

1,151 

580 

343 

164 



12,368 

9,341 

8,231 

1,734 

4,947 

9,983 

31,946 

21,445 

14,275 

10,0% 

6,798 

5,794 

4,998 

3,885 

2,755 

1,773 

997 

499 

304 

19 



TABLE lOA. IMMIGRAhTTS ADMITTED, BY SEX, MARITAL STATUS, AGE, AND MAJOR OCCUPATION GROUP: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1958 - 1962 



Sex, marital status, 
age, and 



Number admitted 

Sex and marital statusi 

Males 

Single 

Married 

W idowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Females 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown < 

Males per 1,000 females ■ 

Median age (years): 

Both sexes ° ' 

Males 

Females < 

Major occupation group: 

Professional, technical, and kindred workers^ 

Farmers and farm managers 

Managers, officials, and proprietors, 

except farm 

Clerical, sales, and kindred workers 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers ..... 

Operatives and kindred workers ■ 

Private household workers 

Service workers, except private household ... 

Farm laborers and foremen 

Laborers, except farm and mine 

Housewives, children, and others with no 
occupation 

Housewives 

Retired persons 

Students 

Children under 14 years of age 

Unknown or not reported 



253.265 



109.121 



61,979 

45,245 

807 

819 

271 

144.144 



62,903 

73,035 

5,596 

2,368 

242 

757 



25.3 
25.8 
24.9 



22,482 
2,221 

4,646 
22,140 
19,113 
12,405 
7,521 
7,362 
2,511 
11,100 

129.800 



62,380 

925 

12,688 

53,807 

11,964 



265.398 



271.344 



114.367 



U6. 6B7 



121.380 



64,347 
47,482 

992 
1,252 

294 

146.319 



62,268 

74,869 

6,184 

2,811 

187 

782 



25.4 
26.0 
25.0 



23,287 
2,187 



21,475 
20,521 
16,031 
7,465 
9,641 
2,729 
11,937 

130.778 



64,646 

50,055 

1,016 

897 

73 

143.711 



67,331 

73,236 

5,496 

2,598 

50 

785 



25,0 
25.9 
23.8 



21,940 
3,050 

5,309 
24,386 
19,156 
14,979 
8,173 
8,812 
3,914 
12,838 

132.716 



68,253 

51,261 

984 

815 

67 

]149.964 



70,489 

71,455 

5,401 

2,565 

54 

809 



25.0 

25.8 
24.5 



21,455 
3,002 

5,363 
25,198 
17,679 
13,288 
8,811 
8,399 
4,799 
15,694 

135.704 



62,215 

1,168 

14,647 

52,748 

9,947 



62,084 

1,289 

13,888 

55,455 

10,125 



59,245 

1,722 

15,923 

58,814 

11,952 



37 



TABLE 11. ALIENS ADMITTED AND CITIZEN^; ARRIVED AND DEPARTEDi 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1908 -• 1%2 



ALIENS ADMITTED 
Imml- Nonimmi-- 

■flrant grant ^ 



ALIENS 
DEPARTED 2/ 



Arrived 



1908-1910 1/ 
1911-1920 ... 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1920 



1921-1930 

1921 ... 

1922 ... 

1923 ... 

1924 ... 

1925 ... 

1926 ... 

1927 ... 

1928 ... 

1929 ... 

1930 ... 



1931-1940 

1931 ... 

1932 ... 

1933 ... 

1934 ... 

1935 ... 

1936 ... 

1937 ... 

1938 ... 

1939 ... 

1940 ... 



1941-1950 

1941 ... 

1942 ... 

1943 ... 

1944 ... 

1945 ... 

1946 ... 

1947 ... 

1948 ... 

1949 ... 

1950 ... 



1951-1960 

1951 ... 

1952 ... 

1953 ... 

1954 ... 

1955 ... 

1956 ... 

1957 ... 

1958 ... 

1959 ... 

1960 ... 



1961 
1962 



17.053.302 



?g8.4? l 



,139 
,576 
,068 
,470 
,956 
,329 
,244 
,095 



1.035.039 



51,776 
28,781 
23,725 
28,551 
38,119 
108,721 
147,292 
170,570 
188,317 
249,187 



205,717 
265,520 
170,434 
208,177 
237,790 
321,625 
326,867 
253,265 
260,686 
265,398 

271,344 
283,763 



^ 90. 74 1 



660. 8U 




3.93 8 .157 



518,215 
615,292 
611,924 
633,805 
384,174 
240,807 
146,379 
193,268 
216,231 
428,062 



269,123 
280,801 
286,604 
286,586 
239,579 
121,930 
127,420 
72,867 
96,420 
157,173 



172,935 
122,949 
150,487 
172,406 
164,121 
191,618 
202,826 
193,376 
199,649 
204,514 



183,540 
139,295 
127,660 
134,434 
144,765 
154,570 
181,640 
184,802 
185,333 
138,032 

2. 46].. 3^9 



426,031 
345,384 
200,586 
216.745 
225,490 
227,755 
253,508 
274,356 
252.498 
272,425 

2.196.6^) 



290,916 
287,657 
243,802 
177,172 
189,050 
193,284 
224,582 
222,614 
201,409 
166,164 

2.262.293 



222,712 
243,563 
303,471 
301.281 
339,239 
370.757 
378,520 
430,955 
449,955 
477,260 

3.365.43? 



439,897 
339,262 
305,001 
273,257 
282,515 
318,273 
386,872 
406,999 
354,438 
253,918 

3.223.233 



100,008 
82,457 
81,117 
113,641 
164,247 
203,469 
366,305 
476,006 
447,272 
426,837 



88,477 
74,552 
58,722 
84,409 
93,362 
204,353 
323,422 
448,218 
430,089 
456,689 



175,935 
118,454 
105.729 
108,444 
175,568 
274.543 
437,690 
542,932 
620,371 
663,567 



1 2,531 , 



465 
516 
485 
566 
620 
636 
758 
847 
1,024 
1,140 



,106 
,082 
,714 
,613 
,946 
,259 
,858 
,764 
,945 
,736 



1,220,315 
1,331,383 



472,901 
509,497 
544,502 
599,161 
665,800 
715,200 
574,608 
710,428 
885,913 
1,004,377 

1,093,937 
1,158,960 



760,486 
807,225 
930,874 
1,021,327 
1,171,612 
1,281,110 
1,365,075 
1,469,262 
1,804,435 
1,920,582 

2,043,416 
2,199,326 



Departures of U. S. citizens first recorded in 1910. 
Excludes Mexican agricultural laborers and those admitted 

prior to March 8, 1957, border crossers and crewmen. 
Excludes Canadian travel over land borders after 1956. 
Citizens arrived and departed by sea and air only. 

38 



the West Indies and Canada 



TABLE 12. IVMIGRANTS Aa^ITTED, 

BY STATE OF INTENDED FLTTURE rERWNEN'- RESIDENCE: 

YEARS ENDED JiJNE 30, 1953 - 19t)2 



State of intended 
future permanent 
r^fldenc^ 

All States 

Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia .. 

Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Ind i ana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon , 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island , 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

U. S. terr. and possi 

Guam 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands 

All other 



1953-1962 1953 



6,637 

1,985 
25,557 

3,610 
495,265 
13,933 
56,357 

3,634 
18,058 
96, 
10, 



162,602 

25,052 

10,073 

9,026 

7,482 

14,911 

14,932 

23,573 

101,903 

101,563 

19,886 

3,790 

18,613 

5,001 

6,427 

3,795 

7,388 

132,439 

13,855 

602,238 



8,150 
15,213 
88,463 
12,203 

4,998 

2,534 

7,565 
202,219 
12,138 

6.612 
16,657 
38,388 

5,830 
27,768 

2,163 



1,785 
9,227 
2,280 



1,405 

278 

24,916 

848 

3,279 
270 

1,352 



1,085 

1,367 

6,578 

10,351 

1,709 

303 

1,363 

450 

462 



1,334 

6,335 

904 

340 

225 

568 

14,115 

1,390 

589 

1,228 

3,571 

419 

2,093 



1208.177 

595 

155 

1,610 

31 

23,567 



739 

624 

1,198 

1,273 

1,875 

7,901 

11,328 

1,765 

322 

1,577 

418 

582 



9,523 

1,324 

48,757 

773 



241 

661 

27,700 

1,522 

558 

1,375 

3,308 



23.7.790 

60-1 
116 
1,580 
339 
33,704 
979 

281 
1,32: 



723 

695 

1.131 

1,297 

1,844 

8,817 

10 

1,707 

359 

1,609 

524 

594 



11,91 

1,521 
55,536 



7,133 

647 

1,129 

8,655 

1,111 

451 

243 



1,343 
3, 
603 



160 

2,428 

469 



2,717 
11,742 
14,209 

2, 



. 32%9fe7, 

740 

180 
2,940 

403 
58,452 
1,826 
7,027 

512 
2,010 
11,182 
1,140 
1,384 

486 
25,238 
3,626 
1,265 
1,086 

953 
1,616 
1,794 
3,635 
11,260 
15,287 
2,71 

367 
2,424 

645 

777 



17,303 

1,586 

77,356 

1,118 

4 55 

12,149 

995 

1,798 

11. 

1,158 

552 



371 

977 

39,070 

1.387 



292 



726 

103 
2,658 

378 
51,201 
1,357 
5,940 

399 



1,407 

423 

16,447 



1,744 

2,464 

10,128 

9,727 

2,006 

394 

1,862 

497 

636 



13,420 

1,046 

59,605 

1,067 

330 

8,219 

927 

1,529 

9,062 

1,152 

539 

250 

754 

9,254 

1,096 

732 

1,815 

4.121 



429 
2,036 
9,262 
1,376 
1,616 

441 
16,275 
2,949 
1,003 
1,094 

844 
1,999 
1,626 
2,592 
9,855 
3,243 
2,133 

481 



1,206 
358 

9,783 
941 

1,353 
10,296 

1,244 
580 
287 
921 

9,160 

1,229 
726 

2,012 

4,045 
666 

2,727 



201 



3,129 

380 
61,325 
1,653 
5,769 

353 
1,942 
10,713 
1,222 
1,6 

464 
15.132 
2,373 
1,041 

969 

803 
1,443 
1,553 
2,399 
11,953 
8,271 
1,970 

421 
1,884 

467 

650 



1,179 

358 

6,829 

891 

1,715 

7,933 

1,578 

554 

185 

803 



1,743 
3.897 

605 
2,504 

201 

292 

369 

1,206 



TABLE 12A. IMMIGRAm-S ADMrTTED, BY SPECIFIED rOIIKTRIES OF BIRTH 
AND STATE OF INTENrtD FOniRE PEHMAI 
yEAB ENDED JUNE 30, lli 



Callfornl. 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

D.la»ar« 

Dlttrlct of Columbia 
Florida 

Idaho 

Indiana 

Uul.lana 

Maryland 

Michigan 

Mlnneaota 

Mlsalaslppi 

Navada 

Nftw Hampshire 

Ne« Jersey 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Oklahoma 

Rhode Island 

South Dakota 

Te.aa 

Utah ,... 

Virginia 

■est Virginia 

Hlaconeln 

Puerto Rico .'. 

Virgin Islands .•.. 

i/ Includes Formosa. 



40 



BIPTH AND RURAL 



Total 

Cltlesi Total 

Aril., Phoenl» 

Berkeley 

Ixng Beach .... 

Oakland 

Pasadena 

Sacramento .... 
San Dleoo 

San Jose 

Colo., Denver 

D. C, Kashlniton 

111., ' Chicago 

Md., Baltimore 

tie- Bedford ... 

Blch., Dearborn 

Grand laplds .. 

St. Louis 

N. J., Elizabeth 

Trenton 

Buffalo 

Bochpster 

Ohio, Cincinnati 

Columbus 

Toledo 

Pa., Philadelphia .. 

Pittsburnh 

B. I., Providence 

TeK., Corpus Chrlstl 

Dallas 

El Paso 

Utah, Salt Lake Cltv 
Wash., Seattle 

Other cities 

Virgin Islands 

All other 

U Includes Fonnosa. 



IMMIGRATION BY COUOTRY, 
1820 - 1962 i/ 



FOR DECADES: 



/?Tom 1820 to 1867 figures represent alien passengers arrived; 1868 to 1891 inclusive and 
1895 to 1897 inclusive, immigrant aliens arrived; 1892 to 1894 inclusive and from 1898 to 
present time immigrant aliens admitted. Data for years prior to 1906 relate to country 
whence alien camej thereafter to country of last permanent residence. Because of changes 
in boundaries and changes in lists of countries, data for certain countries are not com- 
parable throughout^ 



Countries 


1820 


1821-1830 


1831-1840 


1841-1850 


1851-1860 


1861-1870 


All countries 


8.3aL^ 


143,''39 


599, 1?5 


1,713.251 


2.598.214 






7.691 


98.817 


495.688 


1.597.501 




2.065.270 


Austria-Hungary 2/ 


1 

20 

371 

963 

1,782 

268 

360 

3,614 
30 

49 

3 

5 
35 
139 
31 

1 
14 


27 

169 

8,497 

6,761 

14,055 

2,912 

170 

7,942 

20 

50,724 

409 

1,073 

91 

16 

145 

2,477 

3,226 

20 

75 

3 


22 

1,063 

45,575 

152,454 

7,611 

2,667 

185 

65,347 

49 

207,381 
2,253 
1,412 

1,201 

369 

329 

2,125 

4,821 

7 

277 

40 


5,074 

539 

77,262 

434,626 

32,092 

3,712 

1,261 

229,979 

16 

780,719 

1,870 

8,251 

13,903 

105 
550 
2,209 
4,644 
59 
551 
7, 


4,738 

3,749 

76,358 

951,667 

247,125 

38,331 

6,319 

132,199 

31 

914,119 

9,231 

10,789 

20,931 
1,164 
1,055 
9,293 

25,011 


7,800 
6,734 




17,094 




35,986 


Germany 2/ 

(England 

Great (Scotland 

Bt-1 tal n^Wal oc . 


787,468 

222,277 

38,769 

4,313 


(Not spec. 2/ ... 


341,537 
72 


Ireland 


435,778 
11,725 




Netherlands 

Norway) . 

Sweden)^ 

Poland 5/ 

Portugal 


9,102 
(71,631 
(37,667 
2,027 
2,653 
6,697 




23,286 


Turkey in Europe 

U.S.S.R. ^ 

Other Europe 


129 

2,512 

8 


Asia 


5 


10 


4P, 


8? 


41.455 


64.630 




1 
1 

3 


2 
8 


39 

1 


35 
36 

11 


41,397 
43 

15 


64,301 


India 


69 


Japan jJ 

Turkey in Asia S/ 

Other Acia 


186 

2 

72 






America 


387 


11.564 


33.424 


62.469 


74.720 


166.607 


Canada & Newfoundland 2/' 

Mexico 12/ 

West Indies 


209 
1 

164 

2 

11 


2,277 

4,817 

3,834 

105 

531 


13,624 

6,599 

12,301 

44 

856 


41,723 
3,271 

13,528 

363 

3,579 


59,309 
3,078 

10,660 

449 

1,224 


153,878 

2,191 

9,046 

95 




1,397 






Africa 


1 
301 


16 
33,032 


54 
69,911 


55 
53,144 


210 
29,169 


312 


Australia & New Zealand ... 


36 







See footnotes at end of table. 



42 



TABLE 13. IMMIGRATION BY OOUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 - 1962 1/ (Continued) 



1871-1880 1881-1890 1891-1900 1901-1910 1911-1920 1921-1930 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria) / 

Hungary) -' 

Belgium 

Bulgaria Ji/ 

Czechoslovakia 12/ 

Denmark 

Finland 12/ 

France 

Germany 2/ 

(England 

Great (Scotland 

Britain(Wales 

(Not spec. 3/ .. 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands ■ 

Norway 4/ , 

Sweden 4/ , 

Poland 5/ 

Portugal 

Rumania 13/ ■ 

Spain 

Switzerland , 

Turkey in Europe 

U.S.S.R. 6/ 

Yugoslavia H/ , 

Other Europe ~ 

Asia 

China 

India 

Japan 7/ 

Turkey in Asia 8/ 

Other Asia 

America 

Canada & Newfoundland 2/ 

Mexico 10/ 

West Indies 

Central America 

South America 

Other America 16/ , 

Africa » 

Australia & New Zealand ... 

Pacific Islands 

Not specified 14/ , 



2.812.191 



^.?4^.613 



3.687.5^4 



8.79^.33(> 



5.735.311 



g. ^72.26? 



4.737.046 



3.5^,978 



9.1136,016 



4.376.564 



72,969 
7,221 



31,771 

72,206 

718,182 

437,706 

87,564 

6,631 

16,142 

210 

436,871 

55,759 

16,541 

95,323 

115,922 

12,970 

14,082 

11 

5,266 

28,293 

337 

39,284 

1,001 



353,719 
20,177 



88,132 

50,464 

1,452,970 

644,680 

149,869 

12,640 

168 

2,308 

655,482 

307,309 

53,701 

176,536 

391,776 

51,806 

16,978 

6,348 

4,419 

81,988 

1,562 

213,282 



123. 823 



123,201 
163 
149 
67 
243 



404.044 



383,640 

5,162 

13,957 

157 

1,128 



358 
9,886 
1,028 

790 



682 



592,707 

18,167 
160 



50,231 

30,770 

505,152 

216,726 

44,188 

10,557 

67 

15,979 

388,416 

651,893 

26,758 

95,015 

220,266 

96,720 

27,503 

12,750 

8,731 

31,179 

3,626 

505,290 

122 



2,145,266 

41,635 
39,230 

65,285 

73,379 
341,498 
388,017 
120,469 

17,464 

167,519 
339,065 
2,045,877 
48,262 
190,505 
249,534 

69,149 
53,008 
27,935 
34,922 
79,976 
1,597,306 

665 



(453,649 

(442,693 

33,746 

22,533 

3,426 

41,983 

756 

61,897 

143,945 

249,944 

78,357 

13,107 

184,201 

146,181 

1,109,524 

43,718 

66,395 

95,074 

4,813 

89,732 

13,311 

68,611 

23,091 

54,677 

921,201 

1,888 

8,111 



68.380 



JI.t231 



243,567 



192.5^9 



61,711 

269 
2,270 
2,220 
1,910 



14,799 

68 

25,942 

26,799 

3,628 



20,605 

4,713 

129,797 

77,393 

11,059 



21,278 

2,082 

83,837 

79,339 

5,973 



426.967 



33.,T12. 



361.888 



1.143.671 



393,304 

1,913 

29,042 

404 

2,304 



3,311 

971 

33,066 

549 

1,075 



179,226 
49,642 

107,548 
8,192 
17,280 



742,185 
219,004 
123,424 
17,159 
41,899 



857 
7,017 
5,557 

789 



350 
2,740 
1,225 
14,063 



7,368 
11,975 

1,049 
33,523 



8,443 

12,348 

1,079 

1,147 



See footnotes at end of table. 



43 



TABLE 13. IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 - 1962 i/ (Continued) 



1931-19^0 1941-1950 1951-1960 



Total 143 yrs. 
1820-1962 



All countries 

Europe 

Albania Ul 

Austria 2/ 

Hungary 2/ 

Belgium 

Bulgaria H/ 

Czechoslovakia 12/ 

Denmark 

Estonia 12/ 

Finland 12/ 

France 

Germany £/ 

(England 

Great (Scotland 

Britain (Wales 

(Not specified 2/ 

Greece 

Ireland <> 

Italy 

Latvia 12/ 

Lithuania 12/ 

Luxembourg 17/ 

Netherlands 

Norway 4/ 

Poland 5/ 

Portugal 

Rumania 13/ 

Spain 

Sweden 4/ 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe 

U.S.S.R. 6/ 

Yugoslavia H/ 

Other Europe 

Asia 15/ 

China 

India 

Japan 2/ 

Turkey in Asia §/ 

Other Asia 



528.431 



1.035.039 



2.515.479 



283.763 



,040 
,563 
,861 
,817 

938 
,393 
,559 

506 
,146 
,623 
,058 
,756 
,837 

735 

,119 

,167 
,028 
,192 
,201 

565 
,150 
,740 
,026 
,329 
,871 
,253 
,960 
,512 

737 
,356 
,835 
,361 



1^.344 



4,928 
496 

1,948 
328 

7,644 



621.704 



24,360 

3,469 

12,189 

375 

8,347 

5,393 

212 

2,503 

38,809 

226,573 

112,252 

16,131 

3,209 

8,973 

26,967 

57,661 

361 

683 

820 

14,860 

10,100 

7,571 

7,423 

1,076 

2,898 

10,665 

10,547 

580 

548 

1,576 

3.983 



1.328.293 



■ 532 



103,939 



59 

67,106) 

36,637) 

18,575 

104 

918 

10,984 

135 

4,925 

51,121 

477,765 

156,171 

32,354 

2,539 

3,884 

47,608 

57,332 

185,491 

352 

242 

684 

52,277 

22,935 

9,985 

19,583 

1,039 

7,894 

21,697 

17,675 

2,653 

584 

8,225 

8,155 



31.780 



147.45 3 



16.709 

1,761 

1,555 

218 

11,537 



9,657 

1,973 

46,250 

866 

88,707 



9 

1,114) 

397) 

1,131 

34 

212 

902 

43 

474 

4,403 

25,815 

14,936 

3,537 

196 

124 

3,124 

5,738 

18,956 

84 

125 

42 

7,362 

2,204 

6,254 

3,832 

176 

1,737 

1,670 

1,697 

410 

270 

1,188 



:i 9.^95 



900 

292 

4,490 

296 

13,517 



12 

944) 

400) 

959 

37 

103 

957 

14 

505 

3,931 

21,477 

14,970 

2,915 

181 

130 

4,408 

5,118 

20,119 

52 

52 

56 

6,378 

1,839 

5,660 

3,622 

135 

3,353 

1,760 

1,793 

581 

130 

1,086 

312 



2 0. ^49 



1,356 

390 

4,054 

304 

14,145 



See footnotes at end of table. 



44 



TABLE 13. IMMIGRATION BY a^UMTRY, FOR DHCADES 
1820 - 1962 1/ (Continued) 



Total 143 yrs. 



America 

Canada & Newfoundland 2/ 

Mexico iO/ , 

West Indies 

Central America ......... 

South America 

Other America 16/ 

Africa 

Australia 8. New Zealand ... 

Pacific Islands 15/ 

Not specified 14/ 




L..„3M. 



'^B01_ 
171,718 
60,589 
49,725 
21,665 
21,831 
29,276 



_296.»24^ 
377,952 
299,811 
123,091 
44,751 
91,628 
59,711 



47,470 
41,476 
20,520 

7,272 
19,095 

3,747 



44,272 
55,805 
20,917 

9,639 
22,550 

2,688 



3,647,140 

1,235,936 

661,224 

132,431 

276,406 

95,478 



1,750 

2,231 

780 



7,367 

13,805 

5,437 

142 



14,092 
11,506 
4,698 
12,493 



1,851 

1,556 

325 

5 



1,834 

1,427 

144 

249 



51,204 

82,826 
21,749 

266,955 



2/ 



Data for fiscal years ended June 30, except 1820 to 1831 inclusive and 1844 to 1849 

inclusive fiscal years ended Sept. 30; 1833 to 1842 inclusive and 1851 to 1867 inclusive 
years ended Dec. 31; 1832 covers 15 months ended Dec. 31; 1843 nine months ended Sept. 30; 
1850 fifteen months ended Dec. 31; and 1868 six months ended June 30. 

Data for Austria-Hungary were not reported until 1861. Austria and Hungary have been re- 
corded separately since 1905. In the years 1938 to 1945 inclusive Austria was included 
with Germany. 

United Kingdom not specified. In the years 1901 to 1951, included in other Europe. 

From 1820 to 1868 the figures for Norway and Sweden were combined. 

Poland was recorded as a separate country from 1820 to 1898 and since 1920. Between 1899 
and 1919 Poland was included with Austria-Hungary, Germany, and Russia. 

Since 1931 the Russian Empire has been broken down into European U.S.S.R. and Siberia or 
Asiatic U.S.S.R. 

No record of immigration from Japan until 1861. 

No record of immigration from Turkey in Asia until 1869. 

Prior to 1920 Canada and Newfoundland were recorded as British North America. From 1820 
to 1898 the figures include all British North American possessions. 

No record of immigration from Mexico from 1886 to 1893. 

Bulgaria, Serbia, and Montenegro were first reported in 1899. Bulgaria has been reported 
separately since 1920 and in 1920 also a separate enumeration was made for the Kingdom 
of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes. Since 1922 the Serb, Croat, and Slovene Kingdom has 
been recorded as Yugoslavia. 

Countries added to the list since the beginning of World War I are theretofore included 
with the countries to which they belonged. Figures are available since 1920 for 
Czechoslovakia and Finland; and since 1924 for Albania, Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. 

No record of immigration from Rumania until 1880. 

The figure 33,523 in column headed 1901-1910, includes 32,897 persons returning in 1906 
to their homes in the United States. 

Beginning with the year 1952, Asia includes the Philippines. From 1934 to 1951 the 
Philippines were included in the Pacific Islands. Prior to 1934 the Philippines were 
recorded in separate tables as insular travel. 

Included with countries not specified prior to 1925. 

Figures for Luxembourg are available since 1925. 



Austria 

nelglum 

Czechoslovakia 

nenfnark 

Finland 

Germany 

Ireland 

Italy 

Utvla 

Norway 

Poland 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China )J 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Iraq 

Israel 

Jordan 2/ 

Lebanon 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Other West Indies 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Panama 

Other Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Algeria 

South Africa 

Tunisia 2/ 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) .. 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

New Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U.S. adm.) ... 
Other Oceania 

Other countries 

U Includes Formosa. 

2J Includes Arab Palestine. 

a/ Not reported separately prior 



IM.eOl 139.670 127 , 



321,931 
45,001 
55,505 
69,937 

213,434 
4,663 
49,9 
24,1 
74,669 
26,063 
11,763 



222,556 
26,304 
37,033 



1,117 
1,993 
1,321 

6 
3,4 
29,603 
6,311 



1,163 
5,232 
15,201 
2 
3,7 
2,420 
5,663 
1,636 



4,309 
38,390 
10,531 

2,261 



1,520 
3,541 
1,373 



1,077 
12,416 
2,533 



2,236 

209 

1,115 



23,091 
50,772 
9,294 



1,016 
1,326 
1,744 



4,497 


4,253 


31,422 


31,769 


4,507 


3,797 


30,099 


7,257 


7,371 


7,697 


16,251 


14,933 


459 


353 


4,005 


5,070 


2,494 


2,533 


8,301 


7,949 


2,694 


6,969 


1,345 


993 


1,529 


1,737 


2,079 


2,351 


1,793 


1,896 


1,069 


085 


20,954 


24,6.43 


2,972 


2,472 


4,349 


2,742 


2,293 


1,707 



23,032 
23,061 
7,021 



,949 


2,878 


,190 


1,399 


699 


924 


,524 




,130 


1,576 


907 


1,507 



46 



Uh o 

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c 




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X 

c 

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J 

X 

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X 

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47 



1953-1962 1953 



All 



Belgium 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Finland 

Germany 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) ... 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China i/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Iraq 

Jordan 2/ 

Lebanon 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Other West Indies 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Other Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Peru 

Other South America 

Africa 

Algeria 

Morocco 

South Africa 

Tunisia 2/ 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) . 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

New Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U.S. adm.) .. 
Other Oceania 

Other countries 

IT Includes Fonnosa. 

2/ Includes Arab Palestine. 

2/ Not reported separately prio] 



85,560 
72,021 
30,20-1 



657, 
80,879 
62,280 
99,128 

401,191 
9,294 

264,614 
95,493 

115,129 
31,099 
32,608 

169,978 

105,058 

119,435 
34,754 

952,1 
49,483 
42,763 
47,177 



5,904 
2,042 
19,247 



5,579 
3,537 
7,353 
2,3: 



3, 

6,702 
27,532 



3,354 
13,050 
7,340 



2,164 
70,217 
4,263 
1,707 



9,296 
55,700 
21,058 
22,654 

8,501 
34,215 
182,321 

9,257 
19,259 
21,754 
77,436 

3,237 
65,681 



1,113 
627 

10,037 
745 
2,615 
1,505 
5,822 
107 
4,655 

232.17' 



122,072 

375, 
29,022 
43,01 
55,779 
26,563 
28,246 
36,025 



34,153 



3,599 
2,535 
2,244 
20,585 
1,841 
3,055 
3,755 
1,753 
1,810 
2,138 
269 
3,375 



102,613 
88,579 
45,919 

129,993 
29,980 
51,917 

185,119 
45,455 

8? . ?79 



28,909 
75,155 
63,143 
4,732 
2,857 
7,806 
24,801 

4,223 
5,807 
2,103 
2,833 
2,574 



^1.7^ 



3,295 
11,290 
2,346 



7,335 
5,782 
2,770 
13,579 

2,598 
3,619 



2,695 
3,724 
12,772 
9,105 



1,798 
1,785 
5,799 



7,056 
2,152 
2,325 
3,573 



4,093 
8,313 
2,340 



4,674 
6,250 
22,168 
2,711 
22,608 
23,958 

i94.9^4 



1,403 

159 

1,744 



135,776 
42,788 
11,449 



8,620 
2,701 
1,04 5 



5,512 2,343 2,257 



48 



Austria 

Belgium 
Ciechosl 
Denmark 
Finland 

Germany 

Hungary 
Ireland 
Italy .. 
Latvia . 
Netherlai 



Spain 

Sneden 

Snitzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) .. 

United Kingdom 

U.S.5.R. (Europe and Asia) 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

ila 

China 1/ 

Hong Kong 

India 



Philippines ... 
Ryukyu Islands 
Other Asia .... 



Cuba 

Dominican Republic 
Haiti 



Colombia 
Ecuador 
Peru ... 



Tunisia 3/ 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 



New Zealand 
Pacific IsL 
Other Oceani 

Other countrie 



nds (U. S. adm. 



y Includes Formosa. 

2/ Includes Arab Palestine. 

J/ Not reported separately prlo 



Sec. 101(a)(15)(B) of 



2,936 

2,1' 

3,542 



24,673 
4,706 
23,375 
9,323 
7,177 
4,150 
23,003 
81,430 
4,875 
2,873 
14,349 
29,292 



152,210 

1,072,241 

456,631 



30,405 
52,388 
16,849 



39.976 



,2,604 
12,947 
50,082 
2,451 
1,838 
1,414 
15,722 
1,339 
2,220 
2,822 
1,241 
1,180 
1,367 



77,914 


3,088 


50,348 


4,459 


32,123 


1,236 


93,702 


9,946 


19,721 


1,388 


36,845 


2,334 


28,718 


7,973 


26,646 


1,310 



2,172 
2,39 
2,228 



12,195 
62,488 
47,121 
2,359 
1,773 
3,109 
18,079 
1,496 
2,255 



3,516 
2,636 



633 
2,797 
7,700 
4,819 
5,533 
1,735 
41,288 
2,747 



64,553 
49,513 
2,545 



2,354 
8,718 
1,556 



32,623 
2,927 
3,381 



2,900 
7,929 
6,033 



1??.»32 



13,895 
86,125 

21621 
2,148 
3,448 
20,308 
1,945 
2,953 
5,057 
1,472 
1,832 
2,233 
285 
2,468 



2,656 
10,707 
1,801 



19,429 
43,223 
3,750 
3,154 



648 



,728 



5,431 
403 
163 

1,195 

1,955 



95,569 
55,765 
3,092 
1,922 
3,905 
20,995 
1,917 
3,117 



5,098 
8,001 
2,931 



23,455 
2,206 
3,000 
5,97 



«.291 



7,753 
5,465 
3,997 

8,510 
2,- 



10,043 
12,318 
3,026 



3,648 


4,217 


2,329 


18,157 


524 


650 


339 


539 


2,023 


2,092 


3,772 


4,391 



265.002 



18,225 
,33,845 
43,123 
2,820 
2,568 
6,841 
33,745 



9,E«8 
7,528 
2,132 
11,591 



12,180 
9,280 

44,491 
755 

30,161 
6,234 

10,206 
2,630 
3,097 

11,233 

11,230 

13,303 
2,320 

95,565 
3,745 
5,592 
3,435 



20,901 
185,892 
10,681 
13,487 



49 



/Dat« 



of birth 


Number 
admitted 


III 


III 


lit 


ll 


II 

ij 


j 


1^ 
ill 


H 


lis 


2 , 


1 


iii 


III 










117.242 


910.779 


110.276 


5.071 
























li>121 








2.209 


5.295 


112 


4,^9^ 


6.547 


1.103 


10.986 


962 


75.454 


879 




■ 12;365 
10,669 
3,037 
15,731 
6,1M 
50,552 
113,817 
15,823 
11,871 

6o!935 

41,397 
12,852 
13,59.1 

5,881 

3,861 
23,853 
15,530 
19,649 

4,910 
149,959 

5,710 

4i586 


159 
336 
102 
187 
50 
1,249 
1,180 
104 

97 
1,551 

294 
297 

202 
82 

4 26 
206 

2,688 
416 
152 
112 

8.349 


2,003 

1,316 
343 

11,'569 
567 

1,022 

5,582 

56 

5,003 

1,071 

1,197 

325 

331 

2)456 
3,214 

23,440 
713 

482 

17.779 


6,260 

2,062 
10,048 

4,328 
27,870 
74,976 

9,040 
10,261 

7,297 
39,251 

26,429 
5,177 

2I8I8 
2,873 

8i936 
11,358 

2,827 
82,844 

2,940 

2^:82 

34.319 


117 
1,607 

514 
5,212 
5,466 
3,831 

205 

749 
6,581 

3,972 
3,771 

443 
1,619 

168 

'599 
767 
121 
12,232 
281 

201 

6.434 


33 

76 
3 

151 

11 
1 
35 
338 
1 
62 
22 
42 

12 

7 
287 
22 
548 

1 

2.680 


71 
70 

83 
271 
552 
680 
146 

421 
23 
436 
212 
133 
59 
57 
296 
127 
122 
255 
768 
94 

120 

9.330 


2 
3 

2 

2 

30 
3 

1 
1 

5 
17 

3 


no 

149 
35 

117 
51 

803 

50 

50 

224 
1 

110 
105 

51 

59 
236 
152 
121 

52 
831 
511 

88 

1.370 


254 

48 
199 

26 
535 

135 

144 
539 

59 
257 

721 
147 

250 

1,302 
376 
212 
34 

1.767 


24 
13 

29 
12 

12 

50 

21 
24 

17 
37 
12 
8 
304 
42 

n 


24 9 
235 
20 
411 
350 
1,048 

'225 

43 

113 

1,038 

6 

LI 
248 


38 

26 

25 

125 
10 
5 
13 
37 

30 
13 


1,207 
955 
225 

1,463 
352 

4,700 

'443 
6,167 
5,286 

60 

l!593 

833 

721 

170 

1,015 

2,095 

2,369 

243 

22.637 

159 

300 

575 




BelQlum 


15 






155 




P 


18- 


Germ'nv " 


51 






^""^' 




J "^"^ 


i 


Italv" 


30 








49 




^"'J 


p° ' : 


, 






g '" 


406 29 
475 70 
389 46 
492 95 




S»«den" "" 








Turk.y (Europe and A.U) 


78 


U.S.S.R. (Europ. and A.la) .... 


174 
508 

9.120 


2 
25 
14 


- 




: 


Alia 




China 2/ 

Hong Kong 


9;9^ 

2,296 
10,209 
3,094 
3,614 
1,229 
7,316 
32,478 
1,408 
2,112 

ll!l33 

449 

10,374 


'969 

346 
478 
892 
51 
315 
950 

219 
55 
871 

3,096 

6.006 


522 
150 
1,441 
185 
159 
127 
M3 
12,274 
101 
200 
337 

796 


4,131 
1,210 

l|o79 

4,408 
7,471 

i 


1,503 
218 

141 
22 
22 

292 
2,090 

132 
45 

315 

636 


28 

26 
2 

11 
8 

87 

2,436 

1 

32 
31 


1,559 

533 

2.029 

673 
287 
427 
1,190 
222 
604 
239 
506 

968 

21.452 


■ ''e 

2 

no 

24 
30 
35 
39 

6 
15 


223 
11 

349 
76 
50 
22 
25 

141 
24 

52 

95 

274 

1.279 


-'■■■63 
5 
178 
133 
12 
24 
31 
921 

30 
36 
174 

26 
78 

43.613 


26 
3 

14 

208 

225 


413 
1,567 

194 
2,011 

255 

121 

1,928 

1,379 

2.191 


10 

3 

191 

30 
34 

12 

4 57 

13 
96 

93 

442 


104 
267 

797 

2,290 

126 

1,028 
82 
259 


; 


Vltl' '[', 








Y'" 




l"^.[ 




Jspsn 

Jordan 2/ 








Lebanon 








Ryukyu Islands 




North America 


75 


Canada 


7;;243 

205,996 
17,119 
18,227 
4,694 
23,226 
70,485 
3,880 
5,451 

3'22e 
3:967 
5,131 
2,065 
3,711 


i;428 
28 
128 

31 
213 
192 

91 
115 

18 
150 

5.410 


1,091 

4,248 

463 

'216 
708 
3,912 
132 
132 
192 

65 
202 

285 

5.899 


i9;8id 

181,644 
10,218 

2;616 
8,997 
40,851 
2,863 
3,845 
6,398 
2,237 
2,620 
3,384 
1,520 
2,633 


7,817 

5,069 

208 

1,081 

732 

5,494 

7,838 

136 

180 

238 

152 

103 

293 

119 

193 


11 
79 


8;i75 

3i917 
515 
95 
565 

1,273 
176 
314 
429 
253 
226 
485 

99 

2.865 


-230 
32 

6 
16 
3 
3 

5 


214 

286 
143 

132 
51 

27 
50 
81 

17 
43 
3 
67 

1.565 


26:697 
783 
184 
122 

6,460 

14,033 

3 

2 

3 
20 

48 

320 


2 

2 
I 

- 
- 

10 

5T 


■ ■'73^ 
769 

31 
25 

113 
74 
77 

100 

22 
55 

23 

2.231 


■■219 
111 

1 

17 
7 
30 
11 
22 

3 

6 

340 


4,379 

1,946 

2,510 

732 

755 

2,279 

403 

623 

710 

333 

794 

174 
7.113 


23 


















Other «a.t Indies 




El balvador 








Hond "^ 












Panama .... . . .^. 




Other North America ' 




South America 






21,146 
11,836 

8,010 
19,124 

4,261 
11,105 
21,941 

9,067 


'783 
769 

113 

478 

298 


1,887 
1,285 

105 
261 

639 


14,061 
7,170 
5,371 

13,140 

2,981 
8,253 
14,783 
4,806 


369 

304 

2,139 

276 

910 

3,349 

2,017 


M 


136 
153 
97 

tit 

239 

'221 


15 
10 
16 

12 


285 
328 
234 
168 
84 
117 

245 


■ -125 
49 
32 

3 

38 

31 


35 

5 

3 
6 
3 


391 
537 
290 
221 
110 
147 
212 
373 


103 

33 

36 
20 


1,794 
1,029 

1,529 
448 

597 

399 








^"J 




Colo bia 




Ecuador 








Venezuela 














780 
1,292 
3,560 

4,091 
6,137 


40 
141 

306 


91 
719 

407 


853 

1,391 

249 


137 
13 

286 




14 
24 
146 

1,026 


5 
14 

80 
34 


34 
43 
15 

44 2 


28 
43 

37 
27 


2 

2 
5 
1 
7 


100 

188 

273 
1,203 


33 
50 


22 

56 
187 

20 
112 

95 








Solh'^Af ic 








United Arab Republic (Egypt) .. 
Other Africa 






23;672 
8,029 
1,961 
1,154 

694 


147 
2 

8 


3,9i? 
698 
300 
76 


M;382 
5,494 
1,061 


2.882 

1,191 

110 




■ 792 
80 
365 


■■■ 36 


■l82 
66 

1 


140 
23 
14 

3 


43 


383 


112 


510 
185 
lin 
36 

532 




New'zealand 




Pacific I. land. (U.S. adm.) ... 













1/ E«cludee 232,556 I 



All countriei 

Auttrt 

Btlglum 

FlnUnd 

Hungary 

Itily 

Litvl. 

V»th«rl«nd« 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain ..'.'. '. 

S.ltieriand 

Turkay {Europe and Asia) 

Unltad Kingdom 

U.S.5.R. {Europa and Asll 

Othar Europa 

Aaia 

China 2/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Iran 

Iraq 

Jordan '3/ 

Korea 

Philippines';!!!!;!;! 

Ryukyu Islands 

Othar Asia 

North America 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Other Neat Indies 

Coata Rica 

El Salvador 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Other Central America 

Othar North America 

South Anerlca 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Other South America 

Africa 

Algeria 

South Africa 

Tunisia 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) ... 
Other Africa 

Auatrall 

New Zealand 

Pacific lalanda (U.S. adm.) .... 
Other Oceania 

Other csuntrla 

1/ Eicludes 282, JS6 Mexican agrlc 

2/ Includes Foraoss. 

3/ Includes Arab Palaatlna. 



21,619 
13,615 
7,682 
19, 6M 



3,309 

295 

2,036 



607 


y.iii 




3,625 


25 




1,113 


4,462 


308 


2,770 






10,122 


31,127 


404 


3,493 



2,B26 
3,808 
6,602 
2,150 
2,628 
3,363 



3,043 
20,573 



III 



S £, 



3 



i 



,: Jia -2»2I2 __, 



1,542 
2.354 



XQ2J3S. -oaa 



108,373 
.2U 



/Data exclude border crossers, crevmen, Mexican agricultural laborers, 
lar travellers, and returning residents, students and others entering without documents7 



visitors for 



Temporary 
visitors for 



All ports 

Atlantic 

Baltimore, Md 

Boston, Mass 

Charleston, S. C 

Charlotte Amalle, V. I 

Chrlstlansted, V. I 

Frederlksted, V. I 

Miami, Fla 

Newark, N. J 

New York, N. Y 

Norfolk, Va 

Philadelphia, P» 

Port Everqladee, Fla. 

St. Augustine, Fla 

San Juan, P. R 

Washington, D. C 

West Palm Beach, Fla 

Other Atlantic 

Gulf of Mexico 

Houston, Tex 

New Orleans, La 

San Antonio, Tex. 

Tampa, Fla 

Other Gulf 

Pacific 

Agana , Guam 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

Los Angeles, Calif 

San Francisco, Calif 

Seattle, Wash 

Other Pacific 

Alaska 

Anchorage 

Other Alaska 

Canadian Border 

Blaine, Wash 

Buffalo, N. Y 

Calais, Me 

Champlaln, N. Y 

Chicago, 111 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Derby Line, Vt 

Detroit, Mich 

Eastport, Idaho 

Highgate Springs, Vt 

Jackman, Me 

Lewiston, N. Y 

Madawaska, Me 

Niagara Falls, N. Y 

Norton, Vt 

Noyes, Minn 

Port Huron, Mich 

Rouses Point, N. Y 

St. Albans, Vt 

Sault Ste. Marie, Mich 

SweetgrasB, Mont 

Thousand Island Bridge, N. Y. 
Other Canadian Border 

Mexican Border 

Brownsville, Tex. 

Calexico, Calif 

Dallas. Tex 

Eagle Pass, Tex 

El Paso, Tex 

Hidalgo, Tex 

Laredo, Tex 

Nogales, Ariz 

San Yaldro, Calif 

Tecate, Calif 

Other Mexican Border 

All other 



6,706 
lb, 65a 
10,619 

1,765 



.J..?l.n 9 
3,837 
67,198 
45,475 
6,686 
7,025 
897 

9. 3? 9 



17,999 
39,192 
2,487 



5,104 
1,907 
7,925 

22,881 



8,253 
2,954 
2,442 
1,977 
4,370 
28,952 

lil.V? 

10,157 
16,466 
1,817 
6,093 
28,938 
5,128 
49,955 
11,377 
23,523 
9,733 
3,985 



1 


,723 


73 


,590 




474 


256 


,076 




644 




996 


4 


,945 


1 


,210 


22 


,949 



15,842 
35,562 
1,677 
20,439 
10,861 
760 
531 



743 
2,578 
6,680 
6.551 
2,283 
1,963 
1,132 



155.171 
9,172 
15,721 
1,224 
5,711 
25,883 
4,773 
46,829 
10,324 
22,366 



@§ 



il 



1 


8 


282,556 

8,462 

5 

216 

11,567 

169 


I s 


i 


? 


§ s § ' S^ " s s 

g^ co" cjT 


i 




O a 1 t^ OJ CM 0< m 

s, i 2 5^ ^ § S 


1 


3 


s i s^ ' ^ ^ g ^ 


1 


^ig 


S «„ ' " 8 S S S 




2 


^ 3 " ' 1 " i ' 


1 


1 


CO CM ON 


i 


i 


g CO . . r^ , . , 


i 


^ 


c^ CO 1 o CD r ! j 

CO -" ^ 


1 


8i~ 


>D I-- 1 M- in 1 ( ( 
ro in co' 


11 


ON 

i 


§ § § ^ § ^ § g 

5 5 S " - 


III 

(J « h 


1 


1 


1 




fc 

1 




a 

1 


c 

s 


1 

1 

1 

1 



53 















state and port 


All 


ersons cros 


ing 


State and port 


A 


1 oersons cro'isina 


Total 


Aliens 


Citizens 


Total 


Aliens 


Citizens 


All ports 1/ 


16^.980.4^0 


94.835.674 


70.144.766 


Michigan (Cont'd) 


95,988 


51,986 












44,002 
















2,708 
37,257 


293 
22,752 


2,415 




2:i87 

4,269 
7,44b 
2,633 

l|l90 
16,007 
42,255 


1,875 

3,577 

17 

1,582 

2,798 


1,113 
315 
3,882 
5,570 
2,413 
1,265 
1,173 
14,425 
39,467 










1,173 

82 

1,084 

314 

1,571 

1,470 
1,878 

846,586 


261 

45 

241 

648 

24 

1,251 

1 

409,741 

304.231 


912 
81 

' 73 
923 
593 
219 
1,877 
436,945 




Ch'^b"^ n 




etour 


Juneau 






^"^^"j ^ 


Northway 


Mackinac Island 

arquette 








Sault Ste. Marie 

Minnesota 


Eastport 


284,583 
105,067 


212,142 
78,717 

5.146 


72,441 
26,350 

30.687 


302.523 


or . . 


Baudette 


137,294 

3,676 

3,710 

17,985 

603 

660.209 

19,889 

314,771 

1,175 

273,258 

63,356 

5,369 

24,913 

1,882 

78,664 


'blO 

1,551 

2,033 

369 

278,015 

12,949 

199,791 

410 

93,038 

'353 

20,538 

145 

58,947 


44,396 
3,155 
2,159 






Illinois 


Duluth 




35,B33 
9.146.282 


5,146 
5.924.633 


30,687 
3.221.649 




15,952 

234 

382,194 


' 




Maine 






174|489 


28,756 
114,314 


31,130 
60,175 


6,940 
114,980 


Brldaewater 


fj^""^ ^^ 


Calais 




Ferry Point 


i;b3i;594 

II6I2OI 

32,122 

32,361 

39,750 

21,715 

15,360 

457,839 

719,271 

263,951 

5,770 

440,971 

309,116 

176,425 

8,028 

75,930 

2,387,179 

8,512 

4l|865 
25,803 
40,564 
45,481 
1,078,998 
290,852 

12.286.046 


{ 1223:790 
301,257 
88,364 
28,945 
19,652 
32,343 
16,048 
10,807 
285,573 
435,993 
200,316 
5,081 
208,236 
172,896 
86,485 
7,046 
56,979 
1,503,802 
5,846 
6,600 
31,093 
23,369 
39,294 
38,319 
668,431 
204,948 

6.093.718 


611,904 

121,196 

27,837 

3,177 

12,709 

7,407 

5,667 

4,553 

182,265 

283,278 

53,535 

589 

152,585 

136,220 

89,940 

982 

18,959 

883,377 

2,555 

10^772 
2,434 
1,270 
7,162 
410,567 

85,904 

5.192.328 




180,220 
20,672 
5,016 
4,375 
1,737 
19,717 


Mllltown Bridge 


Pi''°C k^ 




Da o"^" "^^ 

aquam 






""^p" ■ 


' ^j " ■ 

astport 


^ 'i 














65,845 
571 

13',827 
13,850 
10,050 

8,859 
190,083 
69,249 
44,925 
17,831 
247,292 

3,017 
19,525 
14,354 

2,595 

29.467 


24,045 
154 
7,458 
5,348 
9,695 
8,131 
5,559 
109,143 
47,108 
25,354 
13,594 
152,939 
1,171 
13,356 
11,623 
1,844 

13.853 


42,800 
517 
8,031 
8,479 
4,155 
1,919 
3,X0 
80,940 
22,141 
19,072 
4,237 
84,353 
1,846 
6,159 
2,731 
851 




Cut Bank (Airport) 




Hodgdon 


Great Falls (Airport) .... 




Morgan 




Littleton 


p?'^^ 




„'^'"^ 


" .^'' , 


Raymond 




Scobe " 




*' 




bweetgrass . 
iraii ree . 








WMf^t 


St. Pamphlle 


WMM h 




New Hampshire 


Vanceboro 


15.609 






— ^tt^tr 


13,858 


15,609 


Michigan 






72,496 


44,110 










85,951 
9.494.951 


38,090 




Ambassador Bridge 


3,126,617 
47,872 

5,464,628 
1,703 

2,331 

4,937 

11,359 
45,797 
9,476 
9,257 
197 
77,769 
2.420.774 


1,145,686 
31,724 

3,017,951 
344 

554 

326 

3,828 

30,047 

1,020 

287 

150 

46,689 

1 .283.757 


i:980:931 
16,148 

2,446,577 
1,359 

1,777 

4,511 

7,531 
15,750 
8,455 
8,970 
47 
31,080 


Buffalo 


6.835.717 


Amherstburg 

Detroit and Canada 


Black Rock 

Buffalo Seaport 

Greater Buffalo Inter- 
national Airport 

Peace Bridge 


198,030 
786 

4,644 

9,291,451 

34,494 

23,233 

2,372,738 

110,718 

34,994 

85,185 

232,807 

288,003 

12,891 

797,235 

894,324 

207,702 

1,343 


56,224 
99 

1,472 

2,601,449 

25,155 

10,517 

1,610,639 

70,533 

19,189 

13,853 

116,117 

181,080 

7,262 

505,550 

557,259 

120,713 

748 


141,856 
687 


Detroit City Airport ... 
Detroit Metropolitan 


3,172 

5,690,002 

9,339 




annons orners 


Rouge Tertnlnals 


Chamol in'" " 




Chate UQ 








15,805 


Michigan Central Depot.. 
Ecorse 


uru usco 




105;928 
5,629 




' ' " 




Hogansburg .... 

Jamison s 


Marine City 




Port Huron 


r^" 


337065 




4,536 
2,335,630 

74,863 
3,648 
1,097 


2,586 
1,230,232 

49,461 

1,013 

355 


1,850 
1,106,398 

25,402 

2,635 

732 


J™^^^"^ 


36,984 


Blue Water Bridge 

Canadian National 

Rall»ay Station 


J*"'*" 






St. Clair County Airport 





54 



TABU 19. Eh^rni 



UiOCR raos:;!:Ra cvm international 

ENDED JUNE 30, 1952 (Cont'd) 
person counted separatelyj? 



State and port 




State and port 






Aliens 








New York (Cont'd) 








Washington (Cont'd) 


3,386 

19,799 

5,505 

566,225 


1.355 

18,988 

2,817 

370,512 


2,031 

30,811 

2,659 

195,683 




3,605,180 

1,250,952 

509,55b 


117 

1,972,414 

789,460 

321,933 


208 

1,533,056 

471,492 

187,723 




Rainbow Bridge 

Whirlpool Rapids Bridge ... 


Spokane (Felts Field) ... 










517 

10 

547,317 

8,806 

965,816 

153,608 

18 

1,871 

10,583 


130 

358,053 

3,711 

155,138 

315,101 

12 

627 

5,853 

615.233 


437 

9 

189,281 

5,095 

511,678 

137,201 

6 

1,217 

1,725 

111.624 




892 


322 


570 












Montreal, Quebec 

Toronto, Ontario 

Vancouver, B. C 

Victoria, B. C 

Winnipeg, Manitoba 


225,117 
363,815 

78,882 
302,101 

25,063 


122,151 
273,108 
11,759 
50,512 
12,652 


103,266 
85,737 
37,123 

251,792 
12,111 


Thousand Island Bridge 






Yo'^no^to" '"■P"''*' 






North Dakota 












15,562 
13,851 
17,666 

125,911 
14,833 
2,467 
13,659 
21,997 
21,738 
2,807 

116,315 
52,201 
11,758 

220,619 

175,711 
45,164 
14,565 
28,850 
55,512 
37,437 

35.983 


12,102 
9,535 
15,591 
11,967 
9,085 
535 
8,116 
12,657 
12,813 

77,155 
31,341 
25,591 
133,150 
104,857 
26,772 
6,291 
20,585 
37,350 
27,501 

12.330 


1,250 
1,229 
2,072 
83,971 
5,718 
1,932 
5,213 
12,310 
3,925 
2,023 
39,189 
30,863 
19,157 
87,169 
71,857 
18,392 
8,271 
8,275 
17,762 
9,933 

23.153 


ft 032 591 






3,161,826 
7,080 

186,785 
1,103,383 
8,198,002 
1,719,603 

110,911 

31.758.431 


1,596,291 

3,510 

76,331 

573,329 

1,911,267 

1,253,169 

73,577 

18.448.665 


1,568,532 
3,510 
109,951 
530,059 
3,285,735 
195,131 
37,337 


r i"^ 


1 "9las 


^^^ "^J 


1 J ^J 


cortuna 


Naco * 


"rand Forks (Hunic. Airport). 


Noaal 


2 ' ,^f 


Hansboro 


g^ " 




California 


Minot (Airport) 


13.319.759 


Neche 


Andrade 


297,142 

9,733,489 

39,578 

6,942 

21,188,078 

503,205 


132,764 

6,318,140 

6,857 

557 

11,629,359 

310,988 


114,378 

3,415,349 

32,721 

5,385 

9,558,719 

192,217 


H°°1t" t 


Los Angeles (Airport) ... 

San Diego 

San Ysidro 


P°'bi'^ 

emblna 




" J 




Sarlcs 












2,370 

228,970 

120 


9l|l36 
120 


171 
131,534 


We tho e 


Columbus 




Ohio 


Texas 




Cleveland 


23,509 

11,874 

500 


12,175 
115 
209 


11,431 

11,423 

291 


21 023 797 






9,238 

8,592,583 

8,220 

12,238 

1,319 

137 

1,631 

1,542,796 

3,116,531 

29,655,985 

8,259,525 

19,707,551 

1,698,903 

505,930 

261,109 

10,835 

5,599 

5,179,855 

12,511 

5,939 

9,381,652 

85,085 

13,193 

560 

482,229 

657,705 

39,584 

957,751 

7,259 

36,018 

660 

283 

650 


7,817 

6,690,010 

7,002 

10,310 

1,116 

75 

36 

613,729 

2,079,718 

15,807,901 

3,303,811 

11,821,529 

679,561 

320,302 

7I32I 

5,581 

3,551,525 

1,165 

5,026 

6,338,777 

51,691 

11,158 

558 

251,010 

100,523 

27,199 

626,587 

6,113 

1,635 

558 

227 

559 


1,121 

2,002,518 

1,218 




B°o n ill • • • 




_"" " ^^'J'^ 




Castolon 


Alburg 


110,503 
57,780 
213,411 
181,595 
1,207 
98,918 
985,673 
75,795 
953,752 
33,920 
11,231 
313,398 
416,025 
391,728 
58,217 
220,533 


80,511 
14,727 

147,885 

125,770 
1,872 
51,238 

612,313 
54,263 

573,681 
18,605 
10,180 

198,175 

237^727 
33,717 
126,101 


59,962 
13,053 
95,528 
55,825 
2,335 
47,710 
373,360 
21,533 
335,068 
15,315 
1,051 
114,922 
131,027 
157,001 
24,500 
94,232 

1.471.015 


Chlnati 

Corpus Chrlstl 


203 

52 

1,595 

929,067 

1,356,916 

13,858,081 

1,955,715 

7,883,022 

1,019,311 

185,628 

178,658 

3,515 

1,015 

1,515,331 

1 1 ,079 

913 

3,015,875 

34,391 




^' f p ?, 

Beecner halls 


?^!'^^ 




P ° 




El^P so ' 




Ave.ofAmericas(Cordova) 

Santa Fe Bridge 

sleta Bri ge 










N "^ t 




N^"th T 

ort Iroy 






H°^th"r"'^°'^'f 




Hidalgo ^ 




Houston 




L iitas 




aj s 


Washington 


Los Ebanos 




80,137 
3,087 
2,911,578 
37,956 
21,105 
175,751 
185,931 
59,818 
15,306 
277,253 
310,511 


15,981 

1,002 

2,079,835 

13,377 

15,375 

147,419 

121,438 

38,520 

9,285 

212,949 

206,940 


64,206 
2,085 
851,813 
19,579 
6,030 
28,335 
65,196 
21,328 
6,021 
31,301 
133,601 




2,030 

102 

228,189 

257,032 

12,085 


Bellinaham 


Porvenir 














,Y'\ 




. "j 


u ™ 

Kuiaosa 


1 115 


Metaline Falls 




34,413 
102 


c'" VI t 


Northoort 






Still-ell Crossing 









^ CO O S 



Nr-toOOrXJO-HCT* AJ 



O O OsoO CO C^ t 



S'S,; 



;R§»^ P< 



K) S 



iS&£3 ^ 









I O O^ 3^ -^ rW (M K\ 
> O t^ ^^ f\J r^ vO nj 









jMDC^C^COChiJ^CrN OO 



^8(5^'^5i.^Rg,S^ 



3 «'^ 

5 3 » 



i h 

a 



\ o" O" rH r^ LA 



.8^^ S;^ 






^O^M'^^ J O J- Q O 

MAryiMLfNONLfwOO <M 






cocr*-H'jDrHa>0'j3cr.u 
.ijco ONONco o o f\j J- r 






« K> o\ c^ o r^ 

I K^ K> rA »A M-\ 0\ 






fs^S ^« 



3 b -h 



t J J 



J- O K^ ONOO U) O J- vo ^<^ 



K^° maS ° 1h J J !Xfu o 



i*^ 9| 






-a^f^Jr^^£)00'X^OK^J- nj 

IvO00(NOfMOiDK-\O vO 









^ s 
9 4 






gS^^IS^I'^S' ^ 



^oo'^^^o■^^•c 






!o^Ih^o'^_^E 






56 



TABLE 20A. SPECIAL INQUIRY OFFICER HEARINGS COMPLETED, BY REGIONS AND DISTRICTS! 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1958 - 1962 



Region 
and 



Exclusion hearings 



Deportation hearings 



United States total 

Northeast Region 

Boston, Mass 

Buffalo, N. Y 

Hartford, Conn 

Newark, N. J 

New York, N. Y 

Portland, Me 

St. Albans, Vt 

Southeast Region 

Atlanta, Ga 

Baltimore, Md 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Miami, Fla 

New Orleans, La 

Philadelphia, Pa 

San Juan, P. R 

Washington, D. C 

Northwest Region 

Anchorage, Alaska 

Chicago, 111 

Detroit, Mich 

Helena, Mont 

Kansas City, Mo 

Omaha, Nebr 

Portland, Oreg 

St. Paul, Minn 

Seattle, Wash 

Southwest Region 

Dallas, Tex 

Denver, Colo 

El Paso, Tex 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

Los Angeles, Calif. ... 

Phoenix, Ariz 

Port Isabel, Tex 

San Antonio, Tex 

San Francisco, Calif. . 



14.652 



J2»446 



t?,OP4 



jja»4ii 



J122 



_222 



.^2a 



336 



339 



A^nn 



JJl 



1.709 



JJ2. 



271 
322 
177 
808 
1,487 
29 



2.1Q5 



263 
257 
147 
587 
3,456 
16 
33 

1.565 



197 
96 
488 
2,633 
26 
16 



185 
215 
126 
544 
3,528 
32 



2*2£Z 



5 

1,649 

13 

7 
23 
2 

107 



63 
203 
205 
949 
162 
288 

56 
179 

1.3P6 



67 
140 
165 
656 
103 
239 

93 
102 

i.2?l 



53 
72 

113 
1,358 

107 

199 
48 

128 



50 
68 

101 
1,579 

109 

154 
64 

122 

1.38? 



J13^ 



6 
471 
337 
62 
61 
40 
56 
53 
220 

5.108 



1 
557 
279 
30 
60 
35 
50 
49 
190 

^•871 



536 
202 
18 
77 
23 
51 
43 
169 

Ad31 



1 
681 
247 
28 
94 
27 
67 
79 
164 

±,221 



Ail/ 
76 " 
14 



182 
123 

1,073 
43 

1,503 
161 

1,062 
961 



139 
62 
1,231 
22 
1,332 
208 

1,137 
740 



69 
1,071 

11 

1,272 

212 

1,432 
626 



25 

1,356 

177 

1,441 
601 



?.^?1 



151 

324 

95 

417 

2,595 

25 

14 

894 



31 

55 
105 
229 

84 
179 

99 
112 



1 
505 
211 
30 
43 
32 
44 
71 
187 

4.79,2 



1,282 
11 

1,533 
113 
627 
596 
586 



l/ Dallas, Texas, District was eliminated in 
fiscal year 1962 and absorbed by new 
Port Isabel, Texas, District and the 
San Antonio, Texas, District. 



57 



TABLE 21. ALIENS EXCLUDED FROM THE UNITED STATES, BY CAUSES 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1892 - 1962 

/fn 1941-1953 figures represent all exclusions at seaports and exclusions 
of aliens seeking entry for 30 days or longer at land portsj/ 



|S 



+> <D O Q) 

c Q.X: e 

•D •r^ 's O 

a p o (H 

e o 01 

Q> s: c a. 

■M -p o o 

< s -u a 



1892 - 1962 

1892 - 1900 

1901 - 1910 

1911 - 1920 

1921 - 1930 

1931 - 1940 

1941 - 1950 

1941 

1942 

1943 

1944 

1945 

1946 

1947 

1948 

1949 

1950 

1951 - 1960 

1951 

1952 

1953 

1954 

1955 

1956 

1957 

1958 

1959 

1960 

1961 

1962 



618.338 



..243 



12.356 



8.170 



82.444 



219.343 



179.954 



l.?'^! 



13.679 



43.127 



22,515 
108,211 
178,109 
189,307 

68,217 

30.263 



65 
1,681 
4,353 
2,082 
1,261 

M34 



99 

1,277 

4,824 

1,281 

253 



1,309 
24,425 
42,129 
11,044 

1,530 

l ,02 t 



15,070 
63,311 
90,045 
37,175 
12,519 

_lj072 



1,904 
8,447 
2,126 



94,084 
47,853 



5,792 
12,991 
15,417 
6,274 
1,235 

211 



5,083 

8,202 

253 



190 
4,516 
14,327 
20,709 
1,172 

946 



2,929 
1,833 
1,495 
1,642 
2,341 
2,942 
4,771 
4,905 
3,834 
3,571 

20. ^35 



92 
70 
68 
63 
87 
87 
139 
142 
187 
199 

1.735 



.161 



14.657 



59 
76 
80 
187 
73 
178 
130 

1-214 



3,784 

2,944 

3,637 

3,313 

2,667 

1,709 

907 

733 

480 

411 



2,783 

2,378 

2,937 

2,432 

1,832 

1,079 

348 

299 

276 

293 

634 
280 



102 

164 
261 
275 
164 
70 
51 
23 
24 

27 

26 



TABLE 22. ALIENS EXCLUDED, 


BY COUNTRY 


OR REGION OF BIRTH AND CAUSE 












YEAR 


ENDED JUNE 30, 1962 


































































































0) 




." 


% 


^^ 




^•:>% 


^ 






























Country or region 


Total 


o 








x; 


ii t^ 








C D. 


ol 


of birth 




0) ^ 




Jh 






-° Ij 








0) o 


w 
































































O -H 




































%ll^ 


^Sf^ 
















































































































*^ 






J a. 




O) 


< 5 XI 


< 5 -D 


O 


All countries 


388 


13 


24 


2 


10 


23 


1 


u 


17 


14 


266 


7 


Europe 


38 




4 






1 






5 




21 




France 


1 
























Germany 


4 




- 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3 






























Hungary 


3 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


: 


_ 




2 


~ 


Italy 


4 




1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




3 




Lithuania 


2 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 










Poland 


2 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 










1 




Portugal 


1 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 










2 


I 






















Spain 


3 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 




2 


~ 


Sweden 


1 
























Switzerland 
















" 


~ 


2 
2 


- 


Turkey (Europe and Asia) ... 


3 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 






United Kingdom 


3 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 




1 




U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) . 


1 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 








2 


1 






















Asia 








1 




1 


5 








China i/ 


2 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 








2 


■ 


India 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


J 
































2 










2 




















" 


Philippines 


4 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




3 




1 




Syrian Arab Republic 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




- 


1 


- 


North America 


325 


8 


20 


? 


9 


17 




^ 


^ 


12 


238 


7 


















5 
2 




3 
9 


31 
135 


2 
5 


Mexico 


192 


6 


3 


2 


8 


16 


_ 


1 


Cuba 


40 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 






33 






5 




















4 
6 
8 
16 


























" 




10 


1 


















~ 


Other North America 


16 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


South America 


5 








1 


2 


1 




1 








Brazil 


1 
1 











































~ 


" 


" 






















~ 


~ 


Peru 


2 












1 












Africa 


























4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 






2 








\J Includes Formosa. 



























TABLE 23. ALIENS APPREHENDED, ALIENS DEPORTED, AND ALIENS REQUIRED TO DEPART: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1892 - 1962 





Aliens 
apprehended ]J 




Aliens expelled 


Period 


Total 


Aliens 
deported 


Aliens required to 
depart 2/ 


1892 - 1962 .... 


5^418^961 


6.134.346 


507.651 


5.626-695 


1892 - 1900 




3,127 


3,127 




1901 - 1910 .... 


- 


11,558 


11,558 


- 


1911 - 1920 .... 


- 


27,912 


27,912 


- 


1921 - 1930 


128,484 


164,390 


92,157 


72,233 


1931 - 1940 .... 


147,457 


210,416 


117.086 


93.330 


1931 


22,276 


29,861 


18,142 


11,719 


1932 


22,735 


30,201 


19,426 


10,775 


1933 


20,949 


30,212 


19,865 


10,347 


1934 


10,319 


16,889 


8,879 


8,010 


1935 


11,016 


16,297 


8,319 


7,978 


1936 


11,728 


17,446 


9,195 


8,251 


1937 


13,054 


17,617 


8,829 


8,788 


1938 


12,851 


18,553 


9,275 


9,273 


1939 


12,037 


17,792 


8,202 


9,590 


1940 


10,492 


15,548 


6,954 


8,594 


1941 - 1950 .... 


1.377.210 


1.581.774 


110.849 


1.470.925 


1941 


11,294 


10,938 


4,407 


6,531 


1942 


11,784 


10,613 


3,709 


6,904 


1943 


11,175 


16,154 


4,207 


11,947 


1944 


31,174 


39,449 


7,179 


32,270 


1945 


69,164 


80,760 


11,270 


69,490 


1946 


99,591 


116,320 


14,375 


101,945 


1947 


193,657 


214,543 


18,663 


195,880 


1948 


192,779 


217,555 


20,371 


197,184 


1949 


288,253 


296,337 


20,040 


276,297 


1950 


468,339 


579,105 


6,628 


572,477 


1951 - 1960 .... 


3.584.229 


4.013.547 


129.887 


3.883.660 


1951 


509,040 


686,713 


13,544 


673,169 


1952 


528,815 


723,959 


20,181 


703,778 


1953 


885,587 


905,236 


19,845 


885,391 


1954 


1,089,583 


1,101,228 


26,951 


1,074,277 


1955 


254,096 


247,797 


15,028 


232,769 


1956 


87,696 


88,188 


7,297 


80,891 


1957 


59,918 


68,461 


5,082 


63,379 


1958 


53,474 


67,742 


7,142 


60,600 


1959 


45,336 
70,684 3/ 


64,598 


7,988 


56,610 


1960 


59,625 


6,829 


52,796 


1961 


88,823 '^ 
92,758 3/ 


59,821 


7,438 


52,383 


1962 


61,801 


7,637 


54,164 



i/ Aliens apprehended first recorded in 1925. 

2/ Aliens required to depart first recorded in 1927. 

3/ Deportable aliens located - includes nonwilful crewman violators. 



60 



Country to which 
deported 



All countries 

Europe 

Belgium 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) ... 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

Formosa 

Hong Kong 

India 

Iran 

Israel 

Japan 

Jordan 

Korea 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Singapore 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Antigua 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic , 

Jamaica 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Other West Indies , 

British Honduras 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Panama 

Other Central America 

South America 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Other countries 



7.637 



35 
15 
17 
148 
562 
215 





32 




15 




50 


4 


5 




3 




a 



/^llens required to depart totaled 54,161 (see tabl 
11,718 required departures of crewmen who were tec 
required departures under safequards - chiefly Mex 



3). This table does not include 
cal violators and 12,610 direct 
ns who entered without Inspection^ 



All countries 

Europe 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Turkey 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 1/ 

India 

Iran 

Israel 

Japan 

Jordan 2/ 

Korea 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Panama 

Other Central America 

South America 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

Other Oceania 

Other countries 

1/ Includes Formosa 

2/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



2,161 
13,695 
1,033 
1,341 
177 
27 



1, 15 t 



i2. 693 
1,795 
5,225 
3,958 
1,339 
173 
23 



Si 



62 



TABLE 21B. ALIENS DEPORTED, BY NATIONALITY AND CAUSE 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, l')6? 



™ g 






All countries 

Europe 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Turkey 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 1/ 

India 

Iran 

Israel 

Japan 

Jordan 2/ 

Korea 

Pakistan 

Philippines , 

Other Asia , 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico , 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Panama 

Other Central America ....... 

South America 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt). 
Other Africa 

Oceania .» 

Australia 

Other Oceania 

Other countries 

l7 Includes Formosa. 

2/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



634 
26 
11 

224 
32 
35 
14 
48 

191 
20 



308 
10 



.178, 



203 
168 



_23L 



90 


474 


71 


202 


278 


2,743 


1 


104 


27 


1 


28 


2 


- 


14 


_ 


2 


4 


25 


1 


6 


17 


3 


4 


6 



J L 



Country of 
destination 


Total 


E 


1 






1 


11 


3 1 r 

ill 


1:1 
III 


1 
1 


i 
1 


All countries 


29.836 


51 


1" 


^ 


25 


58 


1.005 


20.677 


7.993 


5 


4 


Europe 


2.498 


2 


1 




7 


3 


12 


2.444 


34 






Belgium 


32 
91 
18 
169 
183 
4 94 
450 
61 
98 
40 
260 
38 
52 
336 
22 
154 

1.051 


2 




: 


1 


1 


1 
5 


32 
86 
18 
163 
180 
487 
427 
57 
98 
38 
259 
38 
52 
331 

151 

1.043 


1 

2 

19 
2 

1 
1 

3 
2 


\ 








Finland 








Germany 


- 


Italy 


- 






p t 1 




Spain 








Turkey (Europe and Asia) ... 
United Kingdom 


- 






Other Europe 

Asia 


- 




43 
27 
82 
47 
62 
399 

17 
12 
292 
3 
63 

22.899 










■^1 


: 

1 

2 

1 

944 


42 
27 
82 
46 
62 

397 
4 
17 
11 

290 
3 
62 

14.095 


1 
7.720 


[ 


_ 


Hong Kong 








Iran 




Israel 








Jordan 




Korea 

Pakistan 


- 
















^ 


Canada 

Mexico 


6,189 
13,606 
174 
283 
133 
369 
514 
405 
83 
546 
81 
45 
103 
149 
215 

869 


29 

1 


2 
11 


2 

1 

1 

_ 


12 
9 

1 


19 

29 


241 

665 

2 

1 

3 

7 
1 
5 

4 
5 
2 

7 


5,735 
5,342 
174 
273 
131 
364 
510 
393 
82 
533 
67 

97 

203 

855 


147 
7,533 

6 

1 

7 
10 
2 

2 
4 


'-_ 


1 










Cuba 








Jamaica . .. 


1 


Trinidad and Tobago 

Other West Indies 

British Honduras 








Guatemala 








Other Central America 

Other North America 

South America 


" 




115 
92 
46 

142 
79 

286 

109 

68 




: 


': 


j 


1 


3 
2 


111 
91 
46 

139 
75 

285 

108 




\ 




Brazil 








Colombia 












Other South America 

Africa 


- 


United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 


27 
41 

2,451 


8 


- 


- 


- 


3 


37 


27 
40 

2,173 


230 


- 


- 











G4 



TABLE 25. ALIENS DEPORTED, BY COUNTRY TO WHICH DEPORTED AND DEPORTATION EXPENSEi 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1962 



Country to which 
deported 



-Ee, 



Immigration 
and 
Naturalization 
Service 



pprtatlgg g 



other 
Government 

agenclRfi 



steamship 
companle 



Aliens 

deporJLRd 



Aliens 

reshlpped 



All countries 

Europe 

Belgium 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) ... 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

Formosa 

Hong Kong 

India 

Iran 

Israel 

Japan 

Jordan 

Korea 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Singapore 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Antigua 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Jamaica 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Other West Indies 

British Honduras 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Panama , 

Other Central America 

South America 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Other countries 



7.637 



?.433 



1,206 
3,743 
25 
39 
31 
23 
33 
54 
21 
72 
53 
31 
27 
34 
41 

1 93 



?.^11 



-LLL 



_4*2S5_ 



997 

3,652 

24 

17 

28 
1 
6 

38 
7 

52 

49 



87 
443 
90 



.^26. 



.^20_ 



J22_ 



snoauena^s^W 



(a6e }0 
SjeaA 91 jbao) 
peaj 01 aiqeufi 



sa5jeq3 oHcirid 



s:vuauja^e:vs asie; 
Aq JO uo^^oadsui 
:vnoM^lM paja^ug 



s:^uaiiin3op jadoad 
:inoq:ktM paaatkug 



sn^e^s :).uej6^uiuji 

-uou JO suo^^tpuoo 

H^^^M A^duioo JO 

j^e^uieiu o:^ pailBj 



pa:^JOdap 

JO papnToxa 

Xisno^AaJcj 



lA^oajap 
XBOisAqd 
let^uaw 



JO sjo:teiotA 



sassBjo 

lejoiuiui 



D^:^stqojeue 
JO aA^sjaAqns 



O MD C^ O- ( 
vj? ^ K\ f^ , 
O lA lA C^o 



--(OO OJ rH 



Cr '^ J" 
. 0> K> C^ 



-S- O l>-00 



t OJ GN rvj 

. J- f\J J- 

I OO C^^ 

iH cr. [> 



ISRJ 



J- -3- OO OO a> 

OO f\J K> KN lA 
C^ rA f\JCO D- 



vD r- f\j o- o 



C^ l>--3- lA C^ LA r 
OO rA vi) -4- 0^ UN < 
rA rA O lA ON ON , 



. O rA H fM rA f\J 



rj VO -* 
Kj rA fM 



-± r-t <\i 
K\ On rH < 



--:*■ r\J MD OJ On, 
' -J lA lA CNVD V 
\ ON rA lA^ OJ ( 



rA ON.:f 
rA lA-t 
rA O 3- 



ONvD vx) vD vn rA 
rA [N rA^ rH ^D ' 
lA OJ rA rA rA OJ I 



1 On o ON C>00 Cn. 
n£) OO lA O r- lA 



'^f: 



^^S^' 



, rH CO O OJ OJ c 
lA OJ ONOO J- C 
ON O OJ O H I 



rAOONv£iiAOlAC^[>-N 






_COONrACN-0OONrAI>-OJ OQ 
rA l>- OO OO vo OJ J- 00 J- 00 on 
O I>- NO Cn- NO vo lA lA lA Jf -:)■ 



OJ o o o o o 
so rH OJ rA -4" ir\ 
On UN on on on on 



6 Q rH OJ rA J- lA 

ON ON ON ON ON UN On 



l>. 



66 



Country to which 
deportsd 


19M- 
1962 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


I960 


1961 


1952 


AH countries 
























' 


208 

962 
1,148 
2,785 

670 
1,640 
4,377 
3,112 

226 
10,549 
74,187 
2,003 

148 
2,390 
2,906 

926 


30 
129 
220 
374 
128 
251 
594 
332 

28 

1,073 

15,857 

209 

7 

210 

265 

138 


25 
103 
200 
351 

90 
299 
502 
365 

27 

1,296 

22,628 

363 

9 

225 

321 

147 


15 

81 
135 
216 

73 
196 
360 
290 

27 

1,074 

11,870 

200 

230 
203 
50 


15 

72 
188 
190 

73 
114 
336 
265 

24 

4,350 
234 

17 
293 
229 

19 


23 

51 
279 
205 

81 
119 
332 
318 

18 

938 

2,039 

149 

10 
203 
283 

34 


22 

75 
525 
288 

76 
150 
491 
299 

21 

1,060 

3,246 

189 

269 
305 
102 


20 
122 
749 
409 

69 
105 
525 
302 

17 

992 

3,608 

357 

23 
315 
352 

23 


15 

91 
610 
282 

34 
119 
384 
252 

15 

881 

3,442 

153 

15 
219 
264 

53 


26 

90 

680 

255 

21 

152 

452 

273 

27 

1,151 

3,404 

125 

2 

184 


17 
148 
562 
215 

25 
135 
401 
416 

22 
1,206 
3,743 

23 

33 
242 
369 

80 




c' ece 


". 


' '" 'j 




Other Europe 






° ico ' 


."" 













Total 

Immigrant (except displaced person 

Displaced person or refugee 

Foreign government official 

Representative to International 

organization 

Exchange visitor 

Agricultural laborer 

Other temporary worker or Industrl 

Transit alien 

Returning resident alien 

Student 

United Statet cltUenship claimed 
Crewman 

Entered without inspection 

Internee 



67 



25 

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55 
oo 



DESERTED AT UNITCD bTATES 













YEAR 


ENIIED JUNE 30, 


1962 




























Total 


Flag of carrl 










•d 


N«tlon«lltv 
of 


1 


1 


t 


1 




1 


S 


1 
1 


i 


s 


^ 


s 

.5 


I 


I 


•s 

1 


5 


1 


1 


s 


1 
















































3.735 


883 


536 


308 


367 


24 9 


232 


216 


142 


135 


114 








15 


26 


1 — 




22 




333 


'T'l'i 


10 
239 
10 
35 
25 
203 
1,213 

276 

415 

324 
135 
50 
533 
42 
28 

422 


1 
3 
1 

3 
39 

45 
12 
11 

5 

1 
86 

27 


5 
1 

17 
331 

2 
54 
16 

2 
25 

35 


13 

10 
24 9 

104 




35 

37 
53 

?0 


1 

3 
12 

21 
15 

3 

31 

2 


153 

17 

5 

in 


28 
33 

71 


1 

a 


90 
1 

3 


65 


: 

7" 


31 


10 


1 
6 

3 


30 




: 


1 




Denmark 


27 


Flnl.nd 


10 


reman 






91 


J ""' 




Italy 


22 


Norway ' 


23 






p ' : 




ortugal 








l"'^^"" 


g 


n [t d Kl'd 

unite ing om . . 


53 






Othe' Eurooe 






H^ 


China j/ 


■-313 
5 
38 
U 
10 

'I 




30 
17 


90 
19 




20 
49 


5 


3 


21 


I 


i 




70 


31 


13 


I 










43 


I"..l 


-> 


i'?'.", 


2 


Phlll 1 


19 


Othe A la' 






114 




84 
19 
72 
38 

65 
13 
25 
10 


18 
15 

5 
3 
19 


10 


5 


I 


20 
12 


I 


I 


1 




■ 


I 




;; 


17 


i 


;; 


24 






36 


Jjj'"' 

'" 






7-' 


Do Inic li RDUbiic 


3 


Haiti 


1 


Honduras 




Nicaragua 


g 






Other Central America 




Argentina 


20 
8 
15 
35 
10 

6 


3 


3 

1 

2 
2 




-_ 




\ 


I 


I 


I 


I 


I 


1 




-_ 


': 


: 






15 






2 


qI\1 












J"" ■ ■ ■ 


^ 


Other South America 


3 


United Arab Republic 3/ 


12 
10 

5 

36 


1 


2 
3 




1 


2 

1 


3 

1 


1 






1 












- 


- 


- 






Oceania 


^ 






1/ Includes deserting cre-men rep. 


orted b 


y ship- 


B mas 


ers, 


and 


those 


foun 


d In 


the U 


nlted 


Stat 























Service officers, 
udes Forirasi. 
udeg Egypt end Syria 



Arab Republic 



70 



TABLE 29. VESSELS AND AIRPLANES INSPECTED, CREW;>«;m ADMITTED, ALIEN CREWMEN 

DESERTED, AND ALIEN STOWAWAYS FCliNO, BY LOCATION: 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1962 



/Each arrival of the same 


carrier or crewman counted separately7 




Location 


Vessels e 
insoectec 


nd airplanes 
on arrival 


Crewmen admitted 


Alien \/ 

crewmen 

deserted 


Alien 
stowaways 




Vessels 


Airplanes 


Aliens 


Citizens 


United States total 


68.828 


179,648 


1,762,356 


859.984 


4.659 


177 




13,520 


32,181 


636,879 


227,694 


1,862 


103 






1,400 

1,581 

191 

5,476 
4,872 

30.265 


2,868 

4,807 

89 

3,175 

19,176 

686 

1,380 

70.655 


43,279 

19,264 

6,391 

1,434 

538,744 

27,757 

10 

589.633 


20,175 
6,095 
1,167 
7,509 
189,991 
2,748 
9 

327.244 


132 
27 
27 

348 

1,248 

80 

1.888 


4 
3 

8 

84 

2 

1 6 


Buffalo, N. Y 


Newark, N. J 

New York, N. Y 

Portland Me. . . 


St. Albans, Vt 

Southeast Region 


Atlanta, Ga. 


1,647 
1,467 
2,344 
9,939 
2,537 
1,937 
8,628 
1,766 

14.478 


1,019 

405 

3,262 

24,612 

1,278 

623 

38,606 

850 

24.080 


47,755 
49,560 
63,437 
131,205 
74,235 
77,962 
86,777 
58,702 

147.459 


17,569 
12,226 

9,415 
88,497 
36,287 

8,530 

142,682 

11,988 

73.857 


136 
295 

19 
289 
394 
432 

68 
255 

248 


2 

1 
1 
6 
4 
2 

6 


Baltimore, Md 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Miami, Fla 

New Orleans, La 

Philadelphia, Pa 


San Juan, P. R 

Washington, D. C 

Northwest Region 




748 

550 

3,338 

745 

513 

8,584 

9.300 


3,211 

2,089 

4,204 

2,102 

17 

7 

205 

7,067 

5,178 

28.086 


17,803 

17,790 

23,046 

305 

10 

23,757 
15,223 
49,524 

27B.197 


11,377 

7,953 

14,735 

2,698 

39 

18 

5,726 

3,313 

27,998 

149.673 


1 
45 
27 

73 
28 
74 

661 






4 


Detroit, Mich. 


Helena, Mont 

Kansas City, Mo. 


1 










~ 


Seattle, Wash. 


1 
13 


Southwest Region 




1,178 
4,077 
2,863 

1,182 
1.265 


228 
1,640 
6,651 
6,374 
3,124 
5,970 

717 
3,382 

24.646 


319 

59 

53,419 

106,465 

66,373 

3,033 

46,889 

1,640 

110,189 


579 

74 

48,799 
29,625 
39,298 
5,370 
25,386 
547 

81.511 


27 
289 
199 

146 








Honolulu Hawaii 


1 
3 
3 


Los Angeles, Calif 

Port Isabel, Tex. 




San Francisco, Calif 


6 


Preinspection 




Hamilton, Bermuda 


174 
9 

1 
1,081 


2,051 
6,085 
4,946 
8,215 
2,230 

1,119 


24,909 
15,581 
12,529 
34,519 
1,910 
20,030 
711 


9,972 
16,736 
12,049 

7,349 

9,109 
21,681 

4,615 






























Border Patrol Sectors 


39 


Miami 


- 


- 


' 


- 


- 


16 
14 
9 




Other 





Includes deserting crewmen reported by ships' masters and those found in the U. S, 
by Service officers. „i 





i 




S 


5,574 

4,005 
13,779 

4,683 
1,856 

349 

9,419 

4,000 

1.537.506 




2 


c 




1 


S33 


i 


2,147,249 

85 
17 


S 








1 


1 ! 


2 


S £§ »i S S 1 S 




-0 .0 0- CN 

^ c-T (o r-^ oT vo if 






1 


i 1 


§ 




a. 


2 


^ 1 


g 
S 


s IS. 11 s 1 ?. S 








s 


S 


1 ^ 


! 


2 ?f si ? 3 1 ^ 

^' "S 0^- f -.- g 




-H -0 r~_ ^ 1- 

00 ^ (N "^ 


SI 

Ii" 




2 


5 S 


s 


^ ?i s? § § ^ s 


(N 00 






p 


i 


1 5 
r- -f) 


s 


1 5S II ? 1 ^. 1 

^ *5 <0^ CO - g 




mill " § 










'^ 


S S§ S§ & E S S 








ii 
> >■ 


2 


i I 




a 5S H s p s 5 
? s'g "-' - p- - g 


oIcT ro r^r^ (> 






< 
< 

a: 


a 






a s s ^ 


S S R S S 8 


2iSH§ s § 

<o c)^ n to ■fl 






1^ 

m x: 
a, u 

5 Ji 


1 

5 

1 


1 

, t 


c 

s 
. 1 


i 


2 

a 

-g 

- 2 i 
S 


t 
i 


i 
] 






1 

] 

i 

; i 


Is 

5 


c 
c 

5 




j 




^ 


i 


.2 

s 




I 


i 


1 
c 


s 
1 

c 

c 


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I 


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ii 

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c 


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3 




D 



S5 

>-< a 



? J- 

01 v re 

II- 
a. o +> 

41 



&&i 



gg 



^^^ 



72 



/Exclusive of Canadian travel over land borders/ 



iy sea 



By air 



All countries 



Austria 

Belgium 

Czechoslovakia . . . 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Gibraltar 

Greece 

Iceland 

Ireland 

Italy 

Luxembourg 

Malta 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey 

United Kingdom ... 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Asia 

Aden 

Arabian Peninsula 
Bonin Islands . . . . 

Burma 

Cambodia 

Ceylon 

Cyprus 

Formosa 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Iraq 

Israel 

Japan 

Jordan 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Malaya 

Nepal 

New Guinea 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands . . . 



2,531 

29,482 

173 

69,742 

2,902 

263,899 

242,274 

1,501 

18,290 

15,539 

55,855 

135,907 

5,196 

292 

109,647 

15,521 

2,495 

32,055 

57,010 

10,428 

37,148 

1,199 

404,415 

28 

640 

247,650 



147 

1,401 

16,232 

2,359 

465 

1,087 

141 

22,075 

160,136 

15 

618 

2,983 

186 

109 

17 

584 

26,733 

6,631 



1,319 

13,690 

54 

32,978 

2,272 

77,961 

76,856 

411 

7,878 

8,731 

21,151 

52,910 

2,382 

90 

56,266 

7,576 

1,792 

10,133 

22,912 

5,135 

15,672 

391 

168,889 

28 



9,079 

70,952 

6 

391 

1,335 

154 

34 



926.218 

1,212 

15,792 

119 

36,764 

630 

185,938 

165,418 

1,090 

10,412 

6,808 

34,704 

82,997 

2,814 

202 

53,381 

7,945 

703 

21,922 

34,098 

5,293 

21,476 

808 

235,526 



931 

9,429 

754 

181 

571 

82 

12,996 

89,184 

9 

227 

1,648 

32 

75 

269 
lfc,620 
5,214 



1,109 

3,937 
123 
66,745 
57,133 
1,501 
10,601 
72 
5,788 
59,481 

292 
27,733 
7,099 
1,743 
1,766 
11,734 
5,664 

64 



1,303 

3,769 

210 



7,956 

16,094 

2 

439 

260 

186 



1,658 

61 

20,834 

20,857 

411 

5,191 

32 

1,622 

25,803 

90 
14,835 
3,281 
1,661 
600 
5,424 
2,581 

50 
35,203 



454 

1,983 

104 

5 

12 

4,790 

7,C41 

2 

252 

66 

154 



1,701 
46 



445 

2,279 
62 
45,911 
36,276 
1,090 
5,410 
40 
4,166 
33,678 

202 
12,898 
3,818 
82 
1,166 
6,310 
3,083 

14 
46,581 



849 

1,786 

106 



■169.266 

2,531 

28,373 

173 

65,805 

2, 

197,154 

185,141 



15,467 
50,067 
76,426 
5,196 

81,914 

8,422 

752 

30,289 

45,276 
4,764 

37,148 



2,589 
534 



12,463 

2,149 

456 

1,069 

141 

14,119 

144,042 

13 

179 

2,723 

109 

12 

569 

22,443 

6,051 



31,320 
2,211 
57,127 
55,999 

2,687 
8,699 
19,529 
27,107 
2,382 



131 
9,533 
17,488 
2,554 
15,672 
341 
133,686 



4,820 

1,501 

279 

504 

59 

4,289 

63,911 

139 
1,269 



73 



PASSENGERS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES, BY SEA AND AIR, FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
BY CDUNTRY OF EMBARKATIONi YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1962 (Cont'd) 



/Exclusive of Canadian travel 



land borders/ 





By 


sea and a 


r 


By sea 


By air 


embarkation 


Total 


Aliens 


Citi- 
zens 


Total 


Aliens 


Citi- 


Total 


Aliens 


Citi- 
zens 


Asia (Cont'd)i 


1,137 

1,038 

39 

1,475 

66 

501 

1,229 

14,907 


484 
470 

39 
618 

23 
160 
554 

3,258 


653 
568 

857 
43 
341 
675 

11,649 


52 
492 
39 
26 
7 
24 
38 

2,133 


50 
295 
39 

21 
22 

861 


2 
197 

18 

3 
16 

1,272 


1,085 
546 

1,449 

59 

477 

1,191 

12,774 


434 
175 

610 
16 
139 
532 

2,397 


651 




371 


Syrian Arab Republic 

Thailand 


839 
43 




338 




659 


Africa 


10,377 


Algeria 


12 
5 

92 

23 

6 

405 

43 

1,043 

5 

22 

21 

1,830 

1,674 

4,557 

748 

766 

668 

76 

17 

1,337 

7 

U 

1,520 

78,305 


6 
3 
20 
2 

168 
13 

4 
369 

16 

14 
521 

68 
300 
200 
2 
272 

46 

6 

603 

2 

6 

609 

45,102 


6 
2 
72 
21 

6 

237 
30 

674 

6 

7 

1,309 

1,606 

4,257 

548 

764 

396 

30 

734 
10 
5 
5 

911 

33,203 


92 

41 

4 

25 

5 

22 

20 

408 

2 

548 

7 

12 

18 

76 

17 

249 

7 

3 

571 

27.635 


20 

13 

13 

1.6 

13 
80 

167 

11 

46 

127 

327 
23,155 


2 
72 

28 

12 
1 
6 
7 
328 

381 
2 
12 
7 
30 
11 
122 

2 
244 

4,480 


11 

23 

6 

405 

2 

1,018 

1,422 

1,672 

4.009 

741 

754 

650 

1,088 
14 

8 
949 

50,670 


5 

2 
168 

356 

1 

441 
66 
133 
195 
2 
261 

476 
4 

5 
282 

21,947 


6 






Cape Verde Islands 


21 


Congo 

Congo, Republic of the ... 
Ethiopia 


6 

237 

2 






Gambia 


_ 


Ghana 


662 








_ 


Liberia 


981 








3,876 






St Helena 


752 




389 






Somali land, French 


- 


Southern Rhodesia 

South West Africa 

Tunisia 


10 
3 


United Arab Rep. (Egypt) . 
Oceania 


667 
28,723 


Australia 


311469 

9,114 

476 

4 
2 

10,367 
16,044 
6,527 
6 
4,221 
71 

1,276,798 


23|637 

5,951 

12 

4 
9,131 
2,727 
2,989 

639 
12 

514.724 


71832 

3,163 

464 

2 

1,236 
13,317 
3,538 
6 
3,582 
59 

762,074 


15,904 
1,107 

2 

4 

9,360 

1,187 

'I 
6 

98,696 


13;095 
758 

4 

8,398 

852 

48 

52,188 


21809 
349 

2 

962 
355 
17 

6 

46,508 


151565 

8,007 

476 

4 

1,007 
14,857 
6,462 
6 
4,215 
71 

1.178,102 


101542 

5,193 

12 

733 
1,875 
2,941 

639 
12 

462,536 


5I023 




2,184 


Gilbert and Ellice Islands 


464 


New Guinea 








New Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U.S. adtn.) 

Polynesia, French 

Solomon Islands, British . 
Wake and Midway Islands .. 
Western Samoa 


274 

12,982 

3,521 

6 

3,576 

59 


North America 


715,566 


Canada 


37,350 

4,373 

295,676 

37 


23,080 

159 

103,823 

6 


14,270 

4,214 

191,853 

32 


23;734 

12 

2,708 

2 


16; 746 

6 

1,170 

2 


6; 988 

6 

1,538 


13;616 

4,361 

292,968 

35 


6,334 

153 

102,653 

3 






4,208 






St. Pierre and Mlqualcn .. 


32 



74 



PASSENGERS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES, BY SEA AND AIR, FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
BY COUNTRY OF EMBARKATIONi YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1962 (Cont'd) 



/Exclusive of Canadian travel 



land borders/ 



By air 



North America (Cont'd) i 

West Indies 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Bermuda 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Guadeloupe 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Leeward Islands! 

Antigua 

British Virgin Islands 

Montserrat 

St. Christopher 

Martinique 

Netherlands West Indies. 
Trinidad and Tobago .... 
Windward Islandsi 

Dominica 

Grenada 

St. Lucia 

St. Vincent 



Central America 

British Honduras 

Canal Zone and Panama 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 



South America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

British Guiana 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

French Guiana 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Surinam (Neth. Guiana) , 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 



Caribbean 

Europe and Mediterranean 

Far East 

Southern South America .. 

World cruise 

Other countries 



I Flag of Carrieri 
United States 
Foreign 



819.415 



329.377 



266,028 
20,060 

135,985 
84,860 
36,713 
4,761 
19,175 

150,312 

17,166 
21,612 

24 
3,388 
4,399 
31,603 
22,373 

389 



119,947 



5,222 
52,443 
7,686 
3,620 
38,207 
8,616 
4,153 



203.778 



30,437 
1,440 

32,221 
2,471 
9,967 

37,550 

9,254 

5 

1,736 

22,555 



272,071 



40,730 
11,259 
11,393 
1,968 
403 
2,673 
3,645 



1,620,213 
1,992,465 



45,690 
12,044 
18,340 
80,672 
25 

2 

6,969 
76,083 



2 

2,667 
17,170 
13,523 



58,280 



220,338 
8,016 
117,645 
4,188 
11,518 
1,763 
12,206 
74,229 



966 
1,732 

14,433 
8,850 



61,667 



30.721 



297.769 



2,422 
4,087 
102 
722 
2,907 
2,783 



20,347 

386 
2,478 
6,153 
1,802 



378 



16,567 

376 
1,530 
4,511 
1,076 

28 



,182 
1,255 
2,260 
1,271 
21 
198 
1,970 
2,010 



249,792 
18,689 

133,563 
80,773 
36,611 
4,039 
16,268 

147,529 



24 
3,002 
1,921 
25,450 
20,571 



43,636 
11,928 
18,178 
77,856 
25,114 
2,474 
6,032 
75,310 



3,269 
17,191 
4,951 
2,586 
21,791 
5,535 
2,957 

140,820 



1,953 
35,252 
2,735 
1,034 
16,416 
3,081 
1,196 

67,958 



7,255 



55,624 



22,316 
956 

18,682 
2,088 
7,392 

27,1 
6,742 

1,055 

14,757 

150 

722 

38,846 

15,357 



8,121 

484 

13,539 

383 

2,575 

10,436 

2,512 

5 

681 

7,798 

268 

342 

20,814 

256.714 



2,557 

2,816 
60 
591 
568 
500 



5,189 
44,403 
7,341 
3,571 
37,879 
7,526 
4,127 

193,931 



3,243 
15,335 
4,843 
2,565 
21,670 
5,034 
2,934 

130,722 



1,161 

5 

243 

399 

360 



27,880 
1,440 

29,405 
2,411 
9,376 

36,982 

8,754 

5 

1,736 

21,829 

394 

1,058 

52,661 



20,739 
956 

17,027 
2,033 
7,044 

26,945 
6,602 

1,055 

14,588 

133 

716 

32,884 



15,357 



464,482 
928,870 



10,628 
1,809 
377 
2,432 
3,454 



1,135,731 
1,063,595 



40,730 
211,259 
11,393 
1,968 
403 
2,673 
3,645 



1,790 
12,185 
765 
159 
26 
241 
191 



38,940 
199,074 
10,628 
1,809 
377 
2,432 
3,454 



1,446,531 
1,369,784 



United States Department of Justice 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 



75 



PASSENGERS DEPARTED FROM THE UNITED STATES, BY SEA AND AIR, 
TO FOREIGN COUtn-RIES, BY COUNTRY OF DEBARKATIONi 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1962 

^xcluelve of Canadian travel over land borders/ 



Country of 
debarkation 



Clti- 

_s£a5_ 



By ?ea 



All countries • ••. 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgium 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Gibraltar 

Greece 

Iceland 

Ireland 

Italy 

Luxembourg 

Malta 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sneden 

Switzerland 

Turkey 

United Kingdom 

U.S.3.R 

Yugoslavia 

Asia 

Aden 

Arabian Peninsula •.. 

Bonin Islands 

Burma 

Cambodia 

Ceylon 

Cyprus 

Formosa 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Iraq 

Israel 

Japan 

Jordan 

Korea 

Laos 

Lebanon 

Malaya 

Nepal 

New Guinea 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Saudi Arabia 

Singapore 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Thailand 

Turkey 

Vietnam .. , 



2,995 

27,851 

60 

71,633 

3,764 

223,196 

208,731 

2,375 

19,626 

29,374 

52,971 

134,723 

231 



98,668 
14,490 
467 
29,116 
54,278 
10,415 
33,353 
1,982 
434,682 



65 

26 

158 

557 

7,387 

1,405 

532 

910 

149 

23,560 

156,967 

105 

587 

12 



727 
25,591 

7,020 



33,279 
2,363 
70,072 
66,803 
587 
5,965 
13.272 
17,465 
41,106 
62 



129 
2,055 
441 
308 
225 
61 



90". 688 

2,397 

18,750 

50 

38,354 

1,401 

153,124 

141,928 

1,788 

13,661 

16,102 

35,506 

93,617 

169 



21,627 
29,560 
5,710 
24,090 
1,632 
244,657 

209 



5,256 

680 

67,910 



22,952 

9,076 

123 

3,545 

14.309 
6,552 



36 

23 

539 

17,783 

6,339 

974 

711 

31 

934 

575 

2,373 



26 
158 
505 
2,817 
368 
252 
16 

7,600 
14,318 



4,227 

455 



2,641 

365 

21,285 

20,059 



1,185 
10,082 
3,047 



887 

2,615 
315 
46,625 
24,528 
1,788 
8,206 



2,360 
4,227 
3,505 



120 
729 

128 



2,835 
5,740 



2,995 
26,176 



155,236 
164,144 

6,717 
29,303 
43.007 
77,187 



231 



344 

25,571 

39,969 

3,863 

38,353 

1,931 

339,608 

33 

62 



30,633 

1, 
48,787 
46.744 

1,262 
13,226 
14,736 
20,763 
62 



125 

6,304 

14,636 

1,658 

14,263 

311 

148,286 

33 



4,570 

1,037 

280 

894 

149 

15,960 

142,649 

102 

81 

12 

2,646 



21,364 
6,573 
1,170 



1,143 

683 

2,660 



6,073 
672 
356 
139 

287 
116 

340 



76 



PASSENGERS DEPARTED FROM THE UNITED STATES, BY SEA ANI AIR, 
TO FOREIGN ODIWTRIES, BY COUNTRY OF DtBAnKATIONi 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1962 (Cont'd) 



/Exclusive of Can; 



dlan travel 



Jrderv 



Africa 

Algeria 

Angola 

Cape Verde Islands 

Chad 

Congo 

Congo, Republic of the 

Ethiopia 

Ghana 

Ivory Coast 

Kenya 

Liberia 

Libya 

Malagasy Republic 

Morocco 

Mozambique 

Nigeria 

St. Helena 

Senegal 

Seychelles 

Sierra Leone 

Somaliland. French 

South Africa 

South West Africa 

Spanish Sahara 

Sudan 

Tanganyika 

Tunisia 

Uganda 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Zanzibar 

Oceania 

Australia 

Fiji 

Gilbert and Ellice Islands . 

New Caledonia 

New Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U.S. adm.) . 

Pltcairn Island , 

Polynesia, French , 

Solomon Islands, British .... 

Tonga 

Wake and Midway Islands 

Western Samoa 

North America 

Canada 

Greenland , 

Mexico 

St. Pierre and Mlquelon 

West Indies 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Bermuda 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic ........ 

Guadeloupe 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Leeward Islandsi 

Antigua 

British Virgin Islands .. 

Montserrat 

St. Christopher 

Martinique 

Netherlands West Indies ... 
Trinidad and Tobago ....... 

Windward Islandsi 

Dominica 

Grenada 

St. Lucia 

St. Vincent 



693 2.653 



63 
2,2W 
1,759 



23,211 

3,922 

283,481 

62 

6W.P51 

254,688 

11,445 

139,990 

10,578 

32,586 

4,022 

18,638 

104,519 

15,254 

22,981 

28 

2,928 

2,007 

25,103 

17,1 



? 


4 


214 


5,230 


7 


11 


180 


665 



10,733 

13,573 

43 



45,110 
6,020 

22,272 
7,636 

20,194 
2,492 
6,083 

33,320 



6,630 
5,609 
2,735 



12,408 

3,800 

187,320 

56 

468.876 

209,578 

5,425 

117,718 

2,942 

12,392 

1,530 

12,605 

71,199 

8,063 

3,799 

23 

924 

731 

13,389 

8,323 

14 



77 



12 

1,445 

1,027 

1 

289 



9,377 
159 
14,059 
2,459 
337 
1,342 
1,786 
1,352 



505 

1,097 

729 



3,702 

772 

53 

640 

5 

38 



19,006 
2,778 



2,553 
13,574 



6,388 
42 
1 

3,808 
61 

997.560 



2,036 
13,439 



12,126 

3,922 

281,000 

62 

607.788 

245,311 

11,286 

125,931 

8, 119 

32,249 

2,680 

16,902 

103,167 



2,872 
1,502 
24,006 
16,957 



163.723 
43,952 

5,953 
16,925 

5,752 
19,956 

1,340 

5,712 
32,777 



PASSE^J^>ERS DEPARTED FROM THE UNHED STATES, BY SEA AND AIR, 
TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES, BY OOURTRY OF DEBARKATIONi 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1962 (Cont'd) 

^Exclusive of Canadian travel over land border^/ 



By sea and air 



Total Aliens 



I Cltl- 



Clti- 



North America (Cont'd): 

Central America 

British Honduras 

Canal Zone and Panama . 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

South America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

British Guiana 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

French Guiana 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Surinam (Neth. Guiana) .. 

Uruguay 

Venezuela •••• 

Cruise 

Bermuda 

Caribbean 

Europe and Mediterranean 

Far East 

Southern South America .. 

World cruise 

Other countries 

Flag of Carrieri 

United States 

Foreign 



3,978 
30,381 
8,045 



33,380 

9I376 

34,375 

7,421 

2 

550 

20,944 

1,158 

1,373 

49,024 



29,308 
213,491 



1,734 
15,732 

4,004 

2,480 
15,815 

4,837 



1,943 
30,062 
3,229 
1,498 
14,566 
3,208 
1,770 

72.632 



26 
3,635 



23 
6,461 



43.515 



19,306 

835 

13,463 

1,126 

5,939 

23,915 

5,050 

1 

269 

12,634 

271 

903 

29,048 

20.027 



10,024 

725 

14,927 

763 

3,437 

10,460 

2,371 

1 

231 

8,310 

887 

470 

19,976 

246.136 



792 

13,754 

4,140 

926! 

21 
267 
127 



28,516 

199,737 

9,994 

2,202 

953 



792 
13,754 



14,134 
3,128 
974 
2,867 
2,261 



3,934 
30,220 



175.431 



1,685 
15 
483 



727 
13 
105 

1,062 



25,043 
1,560 

28,067 
1,864 
8,407 

33,825 

7,000 

2 

550 

20,035 
1,118 
1,112 

45,848 



1,708 
12,097 
3,958 
2,468 
15,733 
4,457 
3,094 

I09.6Q2 



17,305 
835 

14,825 
1,116 
5,453 

23,547 
4,874 

269 

12,452 

244 

747 

26,934 



28,516, 
I99,737i 
9,994 
2,202 
953 
2,600 
2,134 



125,508 1,232,885 
404,772 1,314,361 



"9.147 
1,920 
23,601 



2,761 
1,754 



66.829 

8,738 

725 

13,24: 



924,755 
704,822 



78 



ARRIVED 

Alaska, Anchorage 

Arliona, Tucson 

Calif., Los Angeles 

San Diego 

San Francisco 

Canada , Quebec 

Conn., Hartford 

D. C. , Washington 

Fla., Jacksonville 

Key West 

Miami 

Port Everglades ... 

Tampa 

West Palm Beach 

Guam, Agana 

Hawaii, Honolulu 

111. , Chicago , 

La., New Orleans , 

Md., Baltimore 

Mass., Boston 

Mich., Detroit 

N. C. , Wilmington , 

N. J., McGuire, A.F.B 

Newark , 

N. Y., New York , 

Pa., Philadelphia 

P. R., San Juan 

S. C. , Charleston 

Tex. , Dallas 

Houston 

San Antonio 

Va., Norfolk 

V. I., Charlotte Amalie ... 

Frederiksted 

Wash., Seattle 

Other ports 

DEPARTED 

Alaska, Anchorage 

Arizona, Tucson 

Calif,, Los Angeles 

San Diego 

San Francisco 

Canada, Quebec 

Conn. , Hart ford 

D, C. , Washington 

Fla., Jacksonville 

Key West 

Miami 

Port Everglades .. . . 

Tampa 

West Palm Beach 

Guam, Agana 

Hawaii, Honolulu 

111., Chicago 

La. , New Orleans 

Md., Baltimore 

Mass. , Boston 

Mich., Detroit 

N. C. , Wilmington 

N. J., McGuire, A.F.B. .... 

Newark 

N. Y, , New York 

Pa., Philadelphia 

P. R. , San Juan 

S. C. , Charleston 

Tex., Dallas 

Houston 

San Antonio 

Va., Norfolk 

V. I., Charlotte Amalie ... 

Frederiksted 

Wash., Seattle 

Other ports 



^xcl"^i^ 



travel over 



and borders/ 







Citi- 






Citi- 








Total 


Aliens 




Total 


Aliens 




Total 


Aliens 


zens 


3,612,678 


1,413,352 


2,199,326 


796,363 


260,193 


536,170 


2,816,315 


1,153,159 


1,663,156 


66,359 


48,090 


18,269 


. 


_ 


_ 


66,359 


48,090 


18,269 


5,902 


1,917 


3,985 


- 


_ 


- 


5,902 


1,917 


3,985 


167,996 


69,369 


98,627 


13,953 


7,732 


6,221 


154,043 


61,637 


92,406 


2,438 


1,027 


1,411 


170 


67 


103 


2,268 


960 


1,308 


145,103 


61,447 


83,656 


36,554 


19,041 


17,513 


108,549 


42,406 


66,143 


1,622 


1,560 


62 


1,622 


1,560 


62 


_ 


_ 




1,839 


230 


1,609 


284 


34 


250 


1,555 


196 


1,359 


12,855 


1,044 


11,811 


1,651 


44 


1,607 


11,204 


1,000 


10,204 


2,119 


306 


1,813 


1,638 


280 


1,358 


481 


26 


455 


1,858 


1,764 


94 


1,606 


1,566 


40 


252 


198 


54 


597,046 


258,901 


338,145 


120,117 


9,291 


1 10,826 


476,929 


249,610 


227,319 


87,974 


18,004 


69,970 


38,382 


12,990 


25,392 


49,592 


5,014 


44,578 


2,927 


1,844 


1,083 


284 


188 


96 


2,643 


1,656 


987 


46,028 


10,829 


35,199 


810 


495 


315 


45,218 


10,334 


34,684 


14,835 


6,117 


8,718 


2,361 


1,005 


1,356 


12,474 


5,112 


7,362 


79,092 


31,554 


47,538 


22,321 


13,892 


8,429 


56,771 


17,662 


39,109 


77,808 


23,029 


54,779 


- 


- 


_ 


77,808 


23,029 


54,779 


51,050 


17,643 


33,407 


7,842 


1,801 


6,041 


43,208 


15,842 


27,366 


14,118 


4,205 


9,913 


1,929 


700 


1,229 


12,189 


3,505 


8,684 


62,880 


17,333 


45.547 


5,222 


1,240 


3,982 


57,658 


16,093 


41,565 


13,730 


3,626 


10,104 


161 


76 




13,569 


3,550 


10,019 


1,517 


115 


1,402 


1,452 


115 


1,337 


65 




65 


99,989 


9,148 


90,841 


_ 


_ 


_ 


99,989 


9,148 


90,841 


3,107 


359 


2,748 


- 


- 


- 


3,107 


359 


2,748 


1,741,929 


679,038 


1,062,891 


473,797 


144,706 


329,091 


1,268,132 


534,332 


733,800 


16,905 


2,976 


13,929 


4,800 


1,026 


3,774 


12,105 


1,950 


10,155 


126,272 


76,920 


49,352 


26,536 


18,881 


7,655 


99,736 


58,039 


41,697 


15,459 


1,698 


13,761 


1,374 


422 


952 


14,085 


1,276 


12,809 


7,192 


2,247 


4,945 


. 


_ 


_ 


7,192 


2,247 


4,945 


32,765 


13,240 


19,525 


1,021 


740 


281 


31,744 


12,500 


19,244 


47,590 


13,147 


34,443 


. 


. 


- 


47,590 


13,147 


34,443 


4,511 


1,136 


3,375 


2,210 


1,022 


1,188 


2,301 


114 


2,187 


31,228 


22,026 


9,202 


20,278 


16,523 


3,755 


10,950 


5,503 


5,447 


3,817 


3,013 


804 


8 


8 


. 


3,809 


3,005 


804 


10,498 


4,315 


6,183 


2,924 


2,311 


613 


7,574 


2,004 


5,570 


14,320 


4,135 


10,185 


5,056 


2,437 


2,619 


9,264 


1,698 


7,566 


3,318,817 


1,158,960 


2,159,857 


771,571 


241,291 


530,280 


2,547,246 


917,669 


1,629,577 


71,124 


43,496 


27,628 








71,124 


43,496 


27,628 


5,575 


1,940 


3,635 


. 


_ 


_ 


5,575 


1,940 


3,635 


144,087 


53,656 


90,431 


16,843 


7,983 


8,860 


127,244 


45,673 


81,571 


2,967 


1,161 


1,806 


768 


301 


467 


2,199 


860 


1,339 


20,588 


6,047 


14,541 


9,722 


2,599 


7,123 


10,866 


3,448 


7,418 


2,060 


81 


1,979 


259 


14 


245 


1,801 


67 


1,734 


10,647 


700 


9,947 


220 


_ 


220 


10,427 


700 


9,727 


777 


353 


424 


435 


340 


95 


342 


13 


329 


485,598 


159,173 


326,425 


121,680 


7,985 


113,695 


363,918 


151,188 


212,730 


79,629 


22,821 


56,808 


31,403 


18,484 


12,919 


48,226 


4,337 


43,889 


3,665 


1,813 


1,852 


71 


53 


18 


3,594 


1,760 


1,834 


37,517 


2,349 


35,168 


345 


59 


286 


37,172 


2,290 


34,882 


33,185 


10,273 


22,912 


2,599 


1,109 


1,490 


30,586 


9,164 


21,422 


186,948 


70,948 


116,000 


35,688 


19,076 


16,612 


151,260 


51,872 


99,388 


68,794 


16,516 


52,278 


50 


22 


28 


68,744 


16,494 


52,250 


48,506 


15,167 


33,339 


7,397 


1,503 


5,894 


41,109 


13,664 


27,445 


3,792 


504 


3,288 


909 


307 


602 


2,883 


197 


2,686 


97,250 


28,154 


69,096 


14,627 


5,947 


8,680 


82,623 


22,207 


60,416 


13,812 


2,928 


10,884 


19 


12 


7 


13,793 


2,916 


10,877 


2,424 


725 


1,699 


2,203 


719 


1,484 


221 


6 


215 


59,701 


2,661 


57,040 


- 


- 


_ 


59,701 


2,661 


57,040 


6,856 


2,665 


4,191 


_ 


_ 


_ 


6,856 


2,665 


4,191 


1,671,452 


593,107 


1,078,345 


482,809 


143,359 


339,450 


1,188,643 


449,748 


738,895 


1,407 


281 


1,126 


1,405 


279 


1,126 


2 


2 


_ 


100,475 


59,654 


40,821 


10,270 


9,264 


1,006 


90,205 


50,390 


39,815 


14,275 


1.169J 


13,106 


1,116 


283 


833 


13,159 


886 


12,273 


7,798 


1,974 


5,824 


- 




- 


7,798 


1,974 


5,824 


29,049 


10,877 


18,172 


1,069 


196 


873 


27,980 


10,681 


17,299 


47,456 


13,976 


33,480 


_ 






47,456 


13,976 


33,480 


5,569 


1,137 


4,432 


2,949 


1,096 


1,853 


2,620 




2,579 


32,411 


23,881 


8,530 


22,171 


18,599 


3,572 


10,240 


5,282 


4,958 


6,175 


4,219 


1,956 


9 




2 


6,166 


4,212 


1,954 


6,719 


2,140 


4,579 


1,392 


515 


877 


5,327 


1,625 


3,702 


10,529 


2,414 


8,115 


3,143 


1,180 


1,963 


7,386 


1,234 


6,152 



By air 



79 



So 







o 


o 


__, 


o 




CN 


CN 


CN 


f^ 




^ 


'T 


r- 


in 


1 


CN 




ro (N 


f- •»! 




0-- 


O -H 




o ^r 


in Tj 


>o 






O C3^ 




in 


r^ 






o o 


O 
























o^ 


Jo '^ 




CO 

CO 


00 




c^ 


in ^ 








CN so 




^ .n 


s^s 




CO o 


CN O 






O CO 


o rr 








r- ^r 


J^ 9i 


•o 




r- •-< 






■c '^ 


T r~- 




o -• 


o in 


a> 






















vO 


S^" 




^" 


in 




vO 


^^ 






^ .n 


CM ^ 




CN O 


Ti in 




O^ 00 


vO ^o 


o 






vo r- 




CO --1 


CN o 




CN 


CJs ^ 






CO 00 






in ^j- 




O 


CO t- 






















-^ 




in 


vD 




2 






in 


§ 






r- ^o 


in 00 




vO sO 


r- -"J- 




.O -1 


o in 


o 




CM CM 


M O 




O ■^ 


CN CM 




O CO 


^ Ch 


U-) 




CN 


-< in 






o^ in 




CO 


-H CO 


o^ 
























CO 


S 




>o 


s 




CO 


^ 






vO o 


.n CO 




M t- 


CN O 




rr 1 


2: '^ 


s 






n ^ 




O -i 


M o 




in 


9; ^ 












'~L^ 




CN 


in CN 






















'^ 




CM 


CO 




in 






CM 


r- 






in c^ 


_ ,H 




-H n 


o ^ 




vo en 


O vO 


r~ 




^r f~ 


fO r~ 




S" 


00 -H 




c^ 


O CO 


In 






CDOO^ 




00 r- 






c^ ^o 


o 






















CN 


3 '^ 




r~ 


§ 




CN 


^T 






o o 


vO CM 




•-I r~ 


in CO 




r- o 


ss 


;8 




^ t- 


^ CD 




CN (J> 


CO CO 








r~ 


n^vo 




r- 


C> v£ 




^r^"" 


^r CO 


o 






















■"' 


CT- rH 




^* 






" 


s^'-^" 






CO "-1 


o in 




^ vO 


CN CO 




O vC 


OJ 00 


in 




o^ .n 


T --I 




00 vO 


CO r- 




r~- 




in 






CM f^ 




1 


O 00 




CO 


^"^ 


o^ 






















'"' 


O^ 




"? 


r 




^ 


cn'-T 






SS 


—1 CT- 




in o 


— 1 CO 




00 CN 


in <o 


a 




in o- 




S°= 


CO CN 




c^ 








o C^ 




^ CN 




o 


vo r~_ 


o 






















'^ 


o^c^ 




^ 


^^ 




"^ 


CO '^ 






CO r- 


■d a 




t- r- 


vO ^ 




gf 


1^ -H 


s 






S^:: 




o a 

vO — 


3.S 




^;8 


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'^ 


CO '~ 




CN 


r 




■^ 


^'-^^ 






CO CN 


O -J 
sO iT 




00 o- 


m ^ 




in 5 


r- in 












•J3 - 




00 6 o ■sf 


1 




00 vC 


o^- 




^M 


00^ iT 




-H^co t- ^r 1 


1* 






















1 


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CO <- 




00 


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o - 










ca 










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nj u 




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■> C >- 5 


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-> c >~ > 


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3 0, CQ ff 


in ^ 


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1 



L ALIENS 

RESIDEWTS 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Greece 

"""gary 

Luxembourg 

Rumania 

Switzerland 

Turkey 

United Kingdom 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 2/ 

India 

Indoneala 

Lebanon 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican nepubllc 

Costa Rica 

Honduras 

Other Central America 

Chile 

Colombia 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Morocco 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt' 
Other Africa 

Australia 

Ne» Zealand 

Stateless 

OTHER THAN PERMANE((T RESICErfTS 

1/ Aliens who are required by 
2/ Includes Fcnnosa. 



56,2 
22,473 
135,576 



77,136 

242,-119 

2,051 



3,623 
1,586 
1,244 
2,341 



5,182 
6,313 
30,467 
2,170 



2,298 
1,749 
23,342 



12,055 
2,775 



15.013 
3,385 
2,206 



2,978 
645 

9,528 



81 



«■> 



III 

III 


I 


i 


^ 


H 




i 


|i 


f 


.p? 


■1?-^ 


_5 


^ 


■^ 




j 


: 


? 


R 


s^ 


^ 


j 


£ 


.?sg 


slj 


J 


Is 


9B 


jpj 


IS 3 


■' 


1 


III 


1 




1 


g 

s 


=^§5S|§P^SSSSS5p_3S8S2S|p28R5g?S^|'S::pS|?SC:S|SSSg2g^ •;:- 


1 

1 
1 


R 
S 


-RS?|pS§HS2SiPSSR"H.P^S2S-PP-|SBiSSSSSR_S5S^^ -2" 


1 


2 


^^2-p|2S§S« = P5SE^88ggS33SSS£|?|S;;8Sg8§5^2S5««555R -2 ' 


1 


§ 


sSSS£2gKg^sp|jasRgs^2?^sss^2SpSH^?sss^s^E|a^ ^- ' 


"! 

= 


^ 


-S-HSS5R-"gSH-S5§srp2s"S§-H-2§^£3S-^^ '" ' 


1 






1 
s 


K 
S 


" °-' a-^' "°-"f 2 s" ■"" 2* 


1 


S 

s 




11 


i 




i 


i 




1 


i 


5 S Is 2 s.s ft § p g S P 5 g P 1 S 5 1 ipj IP s P g ? SI i P i I P § s «j^gj^s_g 3 g 2 g s 


1 


g 
^ 


5SSS55S-S8SP2S^§S«§252S§S§Sg|-SSS?^52 = pS3?gS-£g?aS -2' 


» 1 1 

ql 


£ 




13 

5S 






1 
1 


1 


1 


: 


ll 


ii 


i 


1 

8 


: 


i 


III 


. 


-_ 


1 


llll 


1 


: 


1 


1 


ll 


3 

J 


J 


i 

1 


III 


35i 


1 


1 

IJ 




iil 


• : s 
: : ° 

Ifjl 


8 

t 

1 


1 

f 



82 



TABLE 36A. ALIEN POPULATION, BY STATES OF RESIDENCEi 1940, 1951, 1960, 1961, and 1962 

/Allen reqistration of I'^'"^, alien address reports received 1951, 1960, 1961, and 19b2_J 



State of 
residence 



Total , 

Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georqia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana • . 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

U.S. Terr, and Poss.i 

Guam 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands 

Other 



5,132 

3,405 
31,954 

3,389 
542,464 
27,473 
158,128 

6,428 
14,752 
41,327 

5,187 
91,447 

8,232 
325,070 
44,385 
24,648 
15,955 

5,558 
17,310 
47,233 
37,792 
364,421 
303,103 
61,433 

3,219 
43,550 
13,777 
18,933 

6,118 

30,538 

279,199 

12,402 

,257,501 

4,207 
10,482 
203,038 

6,946 

34,424 

370,020 

52,570 

2,188 

7,400 

5,137 
213,898 
10,487 
15,927 
10,093 
81,636 
23,662 
75,127 

5,917 



14,854 
3,853 



2.265.032 



2,426 
1,103 

24 ,061 

1,418 

326,158 

13,593 

71,223 
2,571 
9,314 

26,011 
3,061 

66,181 

3,791 

110,563 

18,852 
9,826 
6,127 
2,873 
7,678 

18,931 

22,156 
146,028 
128,816 

19,970 
1,698 

15,274 
4,738 
6,897 
2,991 

11,031 
118,580 
6,294 
54 5,990 
3,959 
2,790 

77,351 
2,811 

16,947 

98,481 

20,369 
1,471 
1,822 
3,065 
165,927 
3,848 
7,704 
9,260 

4 5,097 
6,940 

17,293 
2,108 



3,193 
1,378 



11,965 



2.943.973 



4,533 

2,597 
35,163 

2,147 
567, 
19,536 
7 5,298 

4,942 
17,766 
83,577 

9,006 
51,316 

4,832 
199,405 
29,269 

9,938 
10,650 

5,355 
13,001 
19,967 
28,411 
127,710 
141,719 
25,439 

2,810 
21,162 

5,263 

7,755 

4,465 
10,344 
151,437 
12,712 
553,703 
10,173 

2,865 
108,892 

6,239 
18,421 
126,073 
17,743 

3,879 

2,370 

5,401 
237,514 
12,260 

7,669 
18,825 
51,217 

6,409 
34,634 

2,491 



8,172 
5,578 
3,286 



19611 



4,494 

2,699 
36,890 

2,173 

617,733 

19,340 

76,869 

5,029 

15,494 

117,619 

8,953 
50,101 

4,808 
197,197 
29,095 
10,644 
11,103 

5,287 
13,404 
20,206 
23,832 
128,458 
14^,456 
22,711 

2.850 
20,732 

5,138 

7,226 

4,680 
10,263 
154,661 
13,033 
563,700 

3,657 

3,012 
109,299 

6,256 
19,049 
123,382 
17,483 

4,198 

2,293 

5,669 
233,579 
12,202 

7,557 
16,711 
51,684 

6,182 
33,601 

2,451 



6,846 
8,556 
3,755 



4,585 

3,205 
40,242 

2,316 

660,418 

19,921 

75,100 

4,392 
16,436 
155,310 

9,549 
49,196 

4,992 
199,001 
27,817 
10,349 
11,228 

5,248 
14,185 
20,081 
29,455 
130,462 
135,378 
22,522 

2,943 
20,076 

5,196 

7,528 

5,262 
10,464 
153,179 
14,615 
574,637 

9,339 

3,127 
96,561 

7,262 
20,128 
119,058 
17,678 

4,312 

2,354 

6,063 
237,749 
11,992 

7,473 
17,399 
52,016 

6,101 
34,489 

2,412 



5,952 
15,581 
5,926 



940 1951 1960 1961 196? 



100.0 



0.1 
0.1 
0.6 


10.8 
0.5 
3.2 
0.1 
0.3 
0.3 
0.1 
1.3 
0.2 
6.5 
0.9 
0.5 
0.3 
0.1 
0.3 
0.9 
0.8 
7.3 
6.1 
1.2 
0.1 
0.9 
0.3 
0.4 
0.1 
0.6 
5.6 
0.2 

25.1 
0.1 
0.2 
4.1 
0.1 
0.7 
7.4 
1.0 
0.1 
0.1 
0.1 
4.3 
0.2 
0.3 
0.2 
1.6 
0.5 
1.5 
0.1 



100.0 



0.1 
0.1 
1.1 

0.1 

o'.6 
3.2 
0.1 
0.4 
1.2 
0.1 
2.9 
0.2 
4.9 
0.8 
0.4 
0.3 
0.1 
0.3 
0.8 
1.0 
6.5 
5.7 
0.9 
0.1 
0.7 
0.2 
0.3 
0.1 
0.5 
5.2 
0.3 
24.1 
0.2 
0.1 
3.4 
0.1 
0.7 
4.3 
0.9 
0.1 
0.1 
0.1 
7.3 
0.4 
0.3 
0.4 
2.0 
0.3 
0.8 
0.1 



Percent 



100.0 



0.2 
0.1 
1.2 
0.1 

19.2 
0.7 
2.6 
0.2 
0.6 
2.8 
0.3 
1.7 
0.2 
6.7 
1.0 
0.3 
0.3 
0.2 
0.4 
0.7 
0.9 
4.3 
4.3 
0.9 
0.1 
0.7 
0.2 
0.3 
0.2 
0.4 
5.1 
0.4 

18.8 
0.3 
0.1 
3.7 
0.2 
0.6 
4.3 
0.6 
0.1 
0.1 
0.2 
8.1 
0.4 
0.3 
0.6 
1.7 
0.2 
1.2 
0.1 



83 



TABLE 37. DECLARATIONS OF INTENTION FILED, PETITIONS FOR NATURALIZATION FILED, 

PERSONS NATURALIZED,. AND PETITIONS FOR NATURALIZATION DENIEDj 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1907 - 1962 



Period 


Declara- 
tions 
filed 


Petitions 
filed 


Persons naturalized 


Petitions 


Civilian 


Military 


Total 


denied 


1907 - 1962 .. 


8,566,867 


8,503,759 


7,453,135 


515,955 


7,969.090 


446.827 


1907 - 1910 


526.322 


164,036 


111.738 




111.738 


17.702 


1911 - 1920 


2.686.909 


1.381.384 


884.672 


244.300 


1.128.972 


118.725 


1921 - 1930 


2.709.014 


1,884,277 


1.716.979 


56.206 


1.773.185 


165,493 


1931 - 1940 


1.369.479 


1.637.113 


1.498.573 


19.891 


1.518.464 


45.792 


1931 


106,272 
101,345 
83,046 
108,079 
136,524 
148,118 
176,195 
150,673 
155,691 
203,536 

920.284 


145,474 
131,062 
112,629 
117,125 
131,378 
167,127 
165,464 
175,413 
213,413 
278,028 

1.938.066 


140,271 
136,598 
112,368 
110,867 
118,945 
140,784 
162,923 
158,142 
185,175 
232,500 

1.837.229 


3,224 

2 

995 

2,802 

481 
2,053 
3,936 
3,638 
2,760 

149.799 


143,495 
136,600 
113,363 
113,669 
118,945 
141,265 
164,976 
162,078 
188,813 
235,260 

1.987.028 


7,514 
5,478 
4,703 
1,133 
2,765 
3,124 
4,042 
4,854 
5,630 
6,549 

64.814 


1932 


1933 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1937 


1938 


1939 


1940 


1941 - 1950 


1941 


224,123 
221,796 
115,664 
42,368 
31,195 
28,787 
37,771 
60,187 
64,866 
93,527 

323.818 


277,807 

343,487 

377,125 

325,717 

195,917 

123,864 

88,802 

68,265 

71,044 

66,038 

1.230.483 


275,747 

268,762 

281,459 

392,766 

208,707 

134,849 

77,442 

69,080 

64,138 

64,279 

1.148.241 


1,547 

1,602 

37,474 

49,213 

22,695 

15,213 

16,462 

1,070 

2,456 

2,067 

41.705 


277,294 

270,364 

318,933 

441,979 

231,402 

150,062 

93,904 

70,150 

66,594 

66,346 

1.189.946 


7,769 
8,348 
13,656 
7,297 
9,782 
6,575 
3,953 , 
2,887 
2,271 
2,276 

27.569 


1942 


1943 


1944 


1945 


1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 - 1960 


1951 


91,497 
111,461 
23,558 
9,100 
10,855 
12,870 
15,911 
16,196 
16,115 
16,255 

15,921 
15,120 


61,634 
94,086 
98,128 
130,722 
213,508 
137,701 
140,547 
117,344 
109,270 
127,543 

138,718 
129,682 


53,741 
87,070 
90,476 
104,086 
197,568 
138,681 
137,198 
118,950 
102,623 
117,848 

130,731 
124,972 


975 

1,585 

1,575 

13,745 

11,958 

7,204 

845 

916 

1,308 

1,594 

1,719 
2,335 


54,716 
88,655 
92,051 
117,831 
209,526 
145,885 
138,043 
119,866 
103,931 
119,442 

132,450 
127,307 


2,395 
2,163 
2,300 
2,084 
4,571 
3,935 
2,948 
2,688 
2,208 
2,277 

3,175 
3,557 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


I960 


1961 


1962 








8 


4 









ABLE 38. PERSON? MATI' 



LIZEI, BY GENERAL AND SPECIAL 

IWRY OR REGION OF FORMER ALL 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1962 



Z5ee- 



All 



Albania 

Pelqlum 

Eulqarla 

Czechoslovakia 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Greece 

Hungary 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Luxembourg 

Netherlands 

Poland .'.'..'.'..'. '.'..'.'.'.'...'..'...'.'..'..'.. 

Portugal 

Soeden 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

China i/ 

India 

Iran '.'.'..'...'..'.'..'....'...'.'.'. !... 

Israel 

Pakl Stan 

Palestine 

Philippines 

Other Asia i/ 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Costa Rica 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Other Central America 

South America 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 2/ 

South Africa 

Tunisia 

United Arab Republic 3/ 

Other Africa 2/ 

Oceania 

Australia 

Ne« Zealand 

Other Oceania 2/ 

U. S. poasessionB 

Stateleas and not reported 

y Includes Formosa. 

2/ Independent countries. 

J/ Includes Egypt and Syrian Arab Republic 



6,092 


4,664 


5,632 


5,397 


3,507 


3,151 


17,449 


13,893 


1,055 





9,272 
7,205 
2,211 



Pttsgns natwaUiesI 



7,338 
2,198 
2,339 



7,502 
6,499 
1,887 



85 



TABL£ - 


9. PERSONS NATURAL IZEO, DV COIIOTRY OR REGION 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1953 - 196? 


OF FC;iVER 


ALLEGIANCE. 








Country or region of 
former alleolance 


1953- 
1967 


1953 


1951 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1953 


1959 


1960 


1961 


1962 




1.30{>.3?2 


9,2.051 


U7.331 


209.526 


115.835 


^33 013_ 


U9.?t<J 




ii?.ii; 


13^,iW 


137.;07 




























20,098 
6,592 
1,229 
25,011 
7,613 
3,021 
5,105 
21,909 
171,130 
37,022 
27,138 
13,123 
122,326 
21,657 
19,115 

22,010 

117)719 
13,311 
10,938 
7,307 
9,385 
8,125 
1,197 
131,655 
17,222 
29,107 
1,560 


99 

2,075 

657 

2,376 
603 
175 

2,029 

12,997 

1,830 

1,310 

2,871 

9,752 

327 

703 

70 

1,187 

955 

5,963 

1,195 

621 

565 

930 

539 

379 

13,315 

2,581 

925 

108 


2,191 

772 

99 

2,969 

791 

335 

523 

2,177 

11,679 

2,591 

1,719 

5.321 

10.926 

556 

1.261 

55 

1.979 

1.425 

8,512 

1,157 

772 

815 

1,272 

669 

167 

16,565 

3,832 

1,211 

130 


236 
3,067 
1,112 
119 
5.890 
1.226 
1.773 
872 
3.320 

17.812 
3,785 
4,292 
9,115 

15,128 
3.057 
5,321 
128 
2,979 
2,021 

27,777 
2,502 
2,231 
1.152 
1.835 
1.153 
762 

22.971 

8,527 

3,539 

238 


117 
2,332 

719 

143 
3,171 

899 
1.845 

519 
2,105 
15,230 
2,550 
3,513 
1,832 
9,549 
1,988 
3,572 
78 
2,229 
1,311 
17,255 
1,210 
1,525 

661 
1.056 

939 

552 
13.600 
7.771 
1.681 

161 


163 
2,319 

653 

209 
2,739 

777 
1,132 

160 
2,357 
17,115 
1,791 
3,921 
3,621 
9.056 
1.182 
2.391 

2.060 

I5I582 

931 

1.585 

561 

905 

837 

509 

13.210 

5.993 

1.647 

175 


120 

1.858 

594 

131 

2.271 

768 

739 

397 

2.130 

20.186 

3.370 

2.541 

3.259 

8.462 

2.511 

1.487 

73 

2,000 

1,117 

11,038 

1.049 

1.351 

531 

757 

781 

316 

12.123 

4,582 

4.154 

167 


87 

1,510 

528 

82 

1,171 

629 

523 

105 

1,920 

18,112 

2,157 

1.111 

3.163 

8.079 

1.631 

1.132 

73 

2.078 

911 

7,503 

976 

532 

533 

581 

768 

312 

10,990 

3,205 

2.121 

135 


1,602 

515 

71 

1,522 

583 

111 

502 

1,979 

19,003 

3,113 

1,437 

3,573 

11,560 

1,562 

1,154 

62 

2,131 

971 

8.021 

1.258 

624 

805 

754 

799 

385 

11.303 

3.372 

2.211 

140 


236 

1,660 

511 

87 

1,499 

554 

122 

555 

1,351 

18.738 

5,110 

1,516 

3,751 

18,365 

1,185 

1,287 

63 

2,131 

1,005 

8,505 

1.493 

752 

862 

632 

857 

470 

10.544 

3.850 

2.810 

152 


303 


Austria 




„ , , 


'471 


B 1 1 










603 


?*""^r'' 


362 


P° l"^ 


104 


France 


1,737 






^/ 


5,682 


Hungary . . . 


;"i " 


17,149 


' J' 


1,055 


j'^j!' ■ 


821 


Luxemboura 




N therl nds 




No ' 




p f"'!' 


5,362 
1.153 


p ? J 

Portugal 




587 


"""J" 


616 


Sweden 




S It e 1 nd 




T k "^ 






9.595 


U.S.S.R 


2,305 


Other Eurore 








China 1/ 


21,981 

961 

215 

1,591 

931 

6,899 

39,181 

1,770 

1,296 

2,893 

309 

1,217 

20,129 

975 


1,056 

10 
93 
63 
177 
671 
17 
46 
191 
16 
211 
2.010 
172 
117 


lIsBO 

55 

6 

139 

105 

177 

6,750 

73 

243 

282 

20 

303 

1,853 

214 

50 


116 

30 
153 
151 
279 
7,593 

98 
295 
415 

53 

213 

2.686 

301 

80 


2.330 
69 
32 
159 
76 
465 
4,231 
119 
155 
327 
21 
122 
2.056 
192 
57 


1.191 
80 
16 
119 
67 
405 
2,851 
112 
122 
246 
25 
74 
1.695 
138 
57 


1.542 
76 
7 
138 
85 
516 
2,735 
140 
158 
263 
24 

1,431 
129 
95 


1,395 
89 
16 
150 
55 
916 
3,091 
172 
115 
283 
28 
37 
1,505 
i/ 
115 


i:958 

133 

70 

187 

81 

1.145 

4.189 

187 

551 

259 

32 

10 

2.085 

81 


2:693 

119 

38 

206 

106 

1.113 

3.790 

287 

1,031 

323 

54 

59 

2,329 

lf{ 








Iran 


207 


J"' J 


1 "vi^ 










Ko 


1,169 


, "' 


291 


p ^ f "?" 












Syria 


158 




20.378 




111,001 
60,815 
15,656 
2,158 
786 
1,199 
1,716 
1,711 
3,910 
2,052 


10,303 
2,728 
932 
137 
31 
103 
169 
133 
199 
127 


13,062 
3,710 
1,482 
217 
39 
87 
212 
155 
252 
225 


18.151 
10,156 
1,921 
379 
71 
148 
232 
268 
481 
356 


11.539 

6,958 

1,372 

269 

119 
152 
172 

238 


10.391 

5.511 

1.311 

237 

115 
119 
133 
323 
157 


10,211 
5,012 
1,323 
185 
70 
121 
153 
120 
351 
167 


10,324 

5,117 

1,319 

199 

120 
163 
151 
378 
155 


10.215 
5,913 
1,928 
237 
136 
107 
167 
173 
119 
178 


10,033 
8,105 
2,771 
280 
111 
129 
155 
215 

212 








Cuba 


2,211 

318 






Costa Rlca 


147 


Honduras 




Nlc 




a ag a 


521 


Oth^^V t A "l 








rgentlna 


2,075 

1,710 

885 

2,176 

1.285 

1,048 

723 

828 


133 

107 
61 
52 
59 
32 

119 


IM 
150 

158 

54 
52 

127 


255 
251 
100 
232 
117 
121 
95 
82 


166 
161 
101 
191 
108 
118 
59 
57 

177 


i56 
138 

202 
123 

91 
52 
62 

210 


171 
141 
55 
227 
106 
87 
15 
71 

207 


196 
113 
103 
244 
121 
102 
67 
117 


253 
184 
105 
258 
178 
134 

120 


291 
207 
117 
270 
183 
116 
102 
105 


■ ■ 323 
















155 


p*^"' ""^ 








Other South America 2/ 

Africa 


120 
620 




312 
536 
236 
1,531 
306 

1.567 


33 

75 
10 

199 


31 

5/ 

85 
11 

472 


85 

1§^ 
18 

757 


45 

1^5 
17 

533 


48 
27 
106 
29 

491 


52 
28 
85 
24 

383 


51 
75 
28 
211 
40 

327 


75 
78 
33 
208 
57 

372 


68 
25 
250 
3, 

315 




s'^h'^Af'i 








United Arab Republic 3/ 

Other Africa 2/ 

Oceania 


264 
51 

378 




3,726 
771 
70 

1,521 
17,783 


49 
22 

20 
2,102 


-39: 
77 

1 

97 
1,395 


■-620 
137 
10 

170 
3,321 


151 
75 

181 
1,659 


396 
93 

2 

135 
2.433 


315 

1 

106 
1,405 


250 
51 

181 
951 


293 
73 

201 
1,409 


271 
67 

7 








Other Oceania 2/ 


7 
267 






po 


' 



2/ Independent countries. 

3/ Includes Egypt only prior to 1959. 

i/ Since 1959 Syrian Arab Republic Is Included 

part of the United Arab Republic. 
5/ Included In France prior to 1957. 



Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Estonia 

Finland 

Germany 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Luxembourg •< 

Netherlands 

Poland 

Portugal 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Euit)pe 

China 1/ 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Iraq 

Israel 

Jordan 

Korea 

Pakistan 

Palestine 

Philippines 

Other Asia ij 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Costa Rica 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Other Central America 

South America 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Peru 

Other South America 2/ ■■■ 

Africa 

South Africa 

Tunisia 

United Arab Republic 2/ .. 
Other Africa y 

Oceania 

Australia 

New Zealand 

Other Oceania 2J 

U. S. poesessions 

Stateless and not reported . 

\J Includes Formosa. 

2/ Independent countries. 

2/ Includes Egypt and Syria 



18,568 
6,095 
5,682 



9,272 
7,205 
2,211 



^ 



87 



All-anla 

BplQlum 

Bulqaria 

CzfChoslovakla 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Luxembourg 

Netherlands 

Poland 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

S»ltzerland 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 1/ 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Iraq 

Israel 

Japan 

Lebanon 

Pakistan 

Palestine 

Philippines 

Other Asia 2j 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Costa Rica 

Panama 

Other Central America .. 

South America 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Other South America 2/ . 

Africa 

South Africa 

Tunisia 

United Arab Republic 2/ 
Other Africa 2/ 

Oceania 

Australia 

New Zealand 

Other Oceania 2/ 

Stateless and not reported 

XJ Includes Formosa. 

2/ Independent countries. 

2/ Includes Eqypt and Syr 



1,737 


603 


18, %8 


6,987 


6,092 


3,825 


5,682 


3,2i: 


3,507 


\,W 



9,696 
2,306 
2,623 



3,890 
3,595 
1,244 



an Arab Republl 



EurtT' 

Pelglum 

Pulqarla 

Czfchoelovakla 

Estonia 

Finland 

Francf 

Germanv 

Greece 

Hunqary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania , 

Luxembourg 

Netherlands 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

S»eden 

Switzerland 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China V 

India 

Indonesia 

Iraq 

Israel 

Japan 

Jordan 

Lebanon 

Pakistan 

Palestine 

Philippines 

Other Asia 2/ 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Panama 

Other Central America 

South America 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Peru 

Other South America i/ . . . 

Africa 

South Africa 

Tunisia 

United Ar^b Republic 3/ .. 

Other Cceanla 2/ 

Statelet', and not reported . 

J inclul.s For^sa. 

2/ Indep^ndrnt countries. 
2/ Inclule', L'lypt and '.yrla 



TABLE 41A, PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY SEX, MARITAL STATUS, AGE, 
AND MAJOR OCCUPATION GROUP: YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1958-1962 



Sex, marital status, 
age and occupation 



Total naturalized 

Sex and marital status: 

Males 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Females 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Males per 1,000 females 

Median age (years) : 

Both sexes 

Males 

Females 

Major occupation group: 

Professional, technical, and kindred workers .... 

Farmers and farm managers 

Managers, officials, and proprietors, except farm 

Clerical, sales, and kindred workers 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers 

Operatives and kindred workers 

Private household workers 

Service workers, except private household 

Farm laborers and foremen 

Laborers, except farm and mine 

Housewives, children, and others with no 

occupation 



51,350 



13,314 

36,019 

1,106 

891 

20 

68,516 



10,255 

52,404 

4,384 

1,429 

44 

749 



8,364 
592 
4,025 
9,929 
11,772 
16,238 
2,133 
8,828 
785 
5,262 

51,930 



12,076 
29,928 



60,212 



9,342 

45,725 

3,872 

1,253 

20 

726 



37.0 
38.4 
35,7 



7,413 

470 

3,409 

8,746 

9,692 

11,826 

1,626 

7,291 

638 

4,505 

48,315 



50,896 



14,341 

34,517 

1,183 

852 

3 

68,546 



10,330 

52,252 

4,694 

1,262 



38.0 
38.9 
37.3 



7,768 

549 

3,548 

9,089 

11,204 

15,116 

1,995 

8,896 

932 

5,307 

55,038 



17,438 

39,129 

1,327 



73,655 



12,133 

54,716 

5,411 

1,385 

10 

798 



38,2 
38.8 
37,7 



8,408 
601 

3,814 
10,191 
12,746 
16,078 

2,072 
10,477 

1,121 

7,933 

59,009 



60,988 



19,269 

39,986 

919 

814 



66,319 



12,798 

48,433 

3,776 

1,312 



35.3 
36,0 
34,8 



11,053 
389 

4,059 
11,405 
13,769 
13,456 

1,398 

11,269 

744 

7,086 

52,679 



90 



state or territory 
of residence 



Total 

Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbl; 
Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

U.S. terr. and poss. 

Guam 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands ... 

All other 



3,453 
2,895 
7,106 



10,961 
35,355 
2,306 



17,706 
2,17. 
87,016 
11,888 

6,094 
6,279 



16,229 
65,008 
62,927 
12,320 



10,497 
3,217 
5,281 
2,098 
4,830 

83,952 
3,455 
339,560 
5,211 
1,991 



2,569 
1,693 
3,140 
41,878 
6,180 

2,959 
10,876 
22,374 

2,653 
14,748 

1,128 



492 
2,941 



2,844 

407 
3,143 

274 
6,395 
1,016 

511 



2,016 
8,054 
7, 
959 



416 

175 
650 

5,436 

229 

31,118 

787 



2,972 
268 
842 

4,657 
958 

170 
216 
202 
2,452 
612 



696 
2,741 

291 
10,394 
1,930 

527 
714 
505 
713 
992 



521 
255 
722 

14,164 

353 

61,677 



1,467 

262 
191 
448 
5,075 
973 

542 
1,133 
2,855 



3,338 

218 

1,013 

2,543 

358 
1,865 



971 
738 
979 
462 
524 

2,002 
6,293 
6,750 
1,935 
173 

1,303 
310 
917 



9,014 

445 

37,612 



671 

242 
1,303 
2,370 

322 
2,075 

234 



18,991 

1,384 
3,620 
305 
1,017 
2,345 



1,116 
322 
711 



35,432 
452 
353 



690 

123 

16,269 



1,254 
1,220 



401 

1,472 
5,462 
6,017 
1,198 
146 

1,043 
299 
671 



237 

6,053 
400 
752 

5,197 



671 



201 

1,013 

2,160 

278 

649 

140 



760 

126 

14,944 



2,439 
197 
632 

2,212 



1,029 
397 
482 



1,990 
135 
836 



179 

790 

118 

17,006 



3,209 

719 
2,377 

256 
8,223 
1,472 

695 
594 
558 
422 



5,146 

5,854 

660 

146 

861 
489 
549 



7,415 

332 

28,363 

326 

118 

4,335 



349 
1,239 
2,311 

282 

2,041 

87 



1,668 

252 

10,478 

1,612 



8,761 

525 

31,467 



911 

5,251 

877 



169 

341 

5,326 

643 

204 

936 
1,710 

269 
2,014 

125 



91 



ALLEGIANCE AND BV 



State I 

of rasldsncfl 

Total 

Alaek 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Dela-are 

DUtrlct of Columbia . 
Florida 

Ha-all 

Idaho 

Indiana 

Massachusetts 

Blaslsslppi '..'. 

Missouri 

Nabra.ka 

Hm Hainpshlra 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Pannsylvanla 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wyoming 

U. S. terrltorlet 

Virgin 
All othe: 
1/ Incli 



92 



TABLE 42B. , PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY TYPE OF COIJKT AND TTATEb 
OR TERRITORIES OF RESIDENCE: YEAR ENDED JUIJE JO. 1962 



State or territory 
of residence 

Total 

Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

DelaMare 

District of Columbia 

Florida , 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

U. S. territories and possesslonsi 

Guam 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands 

Unknown or not reported 



37<3 
307 

116 
21,010 

1,032 

3,219 

233 

799 

2,907 

547 

1,534 

203 

9,542 
1,268 

493 
647 
308 
460 
441 

1,213 

5,613 

5,227 

832 

159 

1,047 
298 
332 
201 
417 

8,869 

387 

31,225 

604 

139 

4,283 
414 
744 

4,602 
685 

365 
119 
250 
5,816 
635 

187 
1,193 
2,172 

204 

1,801 

94 



742 
163 



379 
178- 
560 
116 
17,122 

679 

2,646 

233 

799 

2,696 

547 
1,232 

118 
9,107 
1,268 

493 
433 
308 
460 
233 

1,026 

3,855 

3,796 

782 

159 

1,047 
92 
294 
122 
142 

3,437 

193 

27,018 

604 

133 

3,251 
205 
491 

3,062 
434 

365 

79 

250 

5,176 



144 
1,193 
1,802 

189 

1,355 

34 



25.9B9 



353 
573 



302 
85 
435 



208 

187 

1,758 

1,431 

50 



206 
38 



5,432 

194 

4.207 



1,032 
209 
253 

1,540 
251 



640 
635 



370 
15 

446 
60 



742 

168 
55 



93 



NE 30, 1%J 



Cltltti Total 

Aril., Phosnlx 

C.Uf., Berkeley 

Pa.adena 

San Jose 

Conn., Bridgeport .... 

Fla.,' Miami 

Ga., Columbus 

Ha»ail, Honolulu 

Indianapolis .. 
La., Ne» Orleans ... 
Md., Baltlncre 

N. J. I ElUabeth 

Jersey City ... 

Buffalo 

Syracuse 

Cincinnati 

Columbus 

Youngstown .... 

Pa., Philadelphia .. 

Pittsburgh 

R. I., Provldenc 

Utah, Salt Lake City 

Tacoma 

"lie, Milwaukee 

1/ Includes Fonnoea. 



Auttrl> 

Belqlum 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Netherlands 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain ..'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) ... 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) . 

Other Europe'!'.!!!;!!!'.!!!!! 

Afla 

China 1/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Jordan 2/ 

Lebanon 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Other Asia 

North America 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Other West Indies 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Other Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Peru 

Other South America 

Africa 

Algeria 

South Africa 

Tunisia 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Australia 

Ne« Zealand 

Pacific lalanda (U.S. adm.) 
Other Oceania 

:ther countries 

T/ Includes Formosa. 

2/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



598 

1,528 
16,939 
5,770 
5,909 
3,631 
16,962 
1,158 
2,736 
804 
6,858 



8,293 
7,194 
2,168 



PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY GENERAL AND SPECIAL NATURALIZATION PROVISIONS: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1958 - 1962 



Naturalization provisions 



1958- 
1962 



1962 



Total 

General provisions 

Special provisions 

Persons married to U. S. citizens .... 
Children, including adopted children, 

of U. S. citizen parents 

Former U. S. citizens who lost 

citizenship by marriage 

Philippine citizens who entered 

the United States prior to 

May 1, 1934, and have resided 

continuously in the United States .. 
Persons who served in U. S. armed 

forces for three years 

Persons who served in U. S. armed 

forces during World War I, World 

War II or the Korean hostilities i/ 

Lodge Act enlistees 

Persons who served on certain 

U. S. vessels 

Former U. S. citizens who lost 

citizenship by entering the 

armed forces of foreign 

countries during World War II 

Nationals but not citizens of 

the United States 

Persons naturalized under private law 
Other 



602.996 



119,866 



466,238 
136.758 



94,380 

2 5.486 



77,230 
26.701 



91,548 
27.894 



104,341 

28409, 



98,739 
28.568 



94,717 

32,886 

595 

247 
4,745 



2,606 
512 



19,353 

4,966 

150 



19,512 

5,632 

121 

26 
730 



399 
179 



19,799 

6,149 

154 



438 
45 



18,674 

7,416 

115 

116 
1,175 



17,379 
8,723 

55 

17 
1,482 



790 
63 



1/ Section 22(b), Act of September 26, 1961, 
added: "or the Korean hostilities". 



96 



TABLE 46. CtBTIFICATES OF CITIZ£Nb.Xil GRa:jiiD. 

BY ODUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH AND REASON FOR CLAIMi 

YEAH ENDED JUNE 30, 1962 





Total 
2/ 


Reason 


for claim 


Country or region 
of birth 


h 


§ 


1 

Is 
II 


II 

S 2. 


S 

!l 


si 

h 

3^ 




1 
1! 


1 


All countrltl 


iUKf 


14.057 


4.864 


2.591 


?,P25 


9i. 


*?? 




5 


114 


























769 
188 
273 
124 
91 

1,002 

7,330 
481 
324 
216 

3.364 
86 
85 
573 
201 
798 
308 
140 
145 
203 
134 
133 

2,535 
909 
200 
134 

3.885 


'"73 
15 
23 
16 
13 
628 
3.453 
167 
15 
61 
1,094 

7 

23 

31 

75 

229 

5 

100 

18 

15 

74 

1,205 

7 

18 

24 

2.716 


149 
17 

109 
23 
25 
46 

380 
60 

130 

859 
11 
21 
59 

472 
51 
74 
16 
66 
21 
28 
482 
711 
63 
23 

170 


106 
20 
21 
8 

86 
932 
30 
21 
20 
184 
19 
12 
23 
25 
45 
7 
7 

17 
9 

147 
28 
30 
13 

241 


\08 
133 
99 
71 
36 
323 
2,500 
200 
126 
62 
1,042 
52 
36 

'11 
134 
13 

23 
84 
86 
3 
630 
55 
78 
67 

725 


2 

1 

\ 

7 
8 
1 
2 

1 
3 

2 

1 

9 
6 


26 
3 

16 
2 

14 

14 

22 
16 
108 

2 

15 
44 

7 
14 

2 
15 

2 
16 
51 
75 

3 

10 




1 
1 




B loluii 




C h l" kl 




"•'J 












'\ 


Gr»«ce 


Hungtry 








38 




Llth nl 




N th"*! d. 




[1 










_ ? 




S In 




^'"' ■ ■ ■ 




q"l t " 1 " H 










11 






Oth»r Eurooe 


Asia 


Chin. 1/ 

Hong Kong 


704 
157 
49 
44 
41 
260 
1,512 
100 
53 
60 
628 
162 
115 


469 
57 
28 
13 
20 
12 
1,337 
21 
29 
20 
508 
146 
56 


28 
10 
3 

3 

IB 
27 
13 
1 
10 

2 
6 


57 
6 

2 
19 
84 

14 

3^ 
3 


l43 
81 
14 
19 
14 

211 
60 
58 
9 
21 

6 
45 

1.350 


2 
3 

3 

22 


= 
' 




2 




Indoniila 




: 




J *" ■ 








Jord.n 2/ 

Kor«« 




PhU (""l 








Othti- Alia 




North America , 


.6 




3,335 
1,779 
221 
375 
320 
22 


1,407 

1,526 

102 

150 

225 


539 
25 
16 
28 
16 


242 
72 
24 
75 
38 


1.054 
62 
77 
115 
39 
3 


18 


51 

85 
1 
6 
1 
2 




2 








C b "" 






















82 
51 
26 
33 
15 
32 
50 


2t 
30 
15 
18 
5 
24 
19 
14 


17 

5 

1 
1 
17 


3 

3 

5 

7 
17 


34 
12 
6 
12 

5 
3 
27 
21 

80 


; 


1 

2 
2 




\ 




Brazil 




Chlla 




i": * J 

to lomoia 




















Africa 






93 
163 
18 
45 
88 


140 

11 

46 


8 


7 


6 
18 

16 

34 

40 


\ 


1 
1 




: 








Soth^Aflc 




United Areb Republic (Egypt) 










109 
14 
14 
21 

6 


67 
9 
8 
9 

2 


3 


9 


27 
2 


- 


3 


: 


: 






_ 




_ 


Other Oceania 


- 







IT 

2/ Includes 
2/ See Table 



97 



TABLE -17. CERTIFICATES ( 



CITIZENSHIP GRANTED TO PERSONS WHO DERIVED CITIZENSHIP THROUGH PARENTAGE OR 
BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH AND YEAR DEHIVEDi 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1962 



Country or regio: 



Europe 

Belgium 

Denmark 

Finland 

Germany 

Ireland 

Italy 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) ... 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) . 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 1/ 

India ..; 

Indonesia 

Israel 

Jordan 2/ 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Other Asia 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Other West indies 

Central America 

South America 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Libya 

Morocco 

United Arab Republic (Eygpt) 
Other Africa 

New Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U. S. adm. ) 
Other Oceania 

Other countries 

1/ Includes Formosa. 

2/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



17.532 
13.357 



CERTIFICATES OF CITIZENSHIP GRANTED TO PERSONS WHO ACQUIRED cniZENSHIP AT BIRTH ABROAD, 
BY OOUOTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH AND YEAR ACQUIHEDl 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1952 



Country or region 


Total 














Calendar 


I'ear acquired 












of birth 


1362 


l?41 


1960 


19S9 


1950 


1957 


19!XJ 


19W 


I9M 


PM 








1940- 


1930- 


Before 


All countries 


H.PW 


,ltt 


212 


_fe^ 


1.029 


Ui% 


1.232 


1.051 


7C9 


5?9 


'"27 


?1S 


32" 


31" 


.2.531. 


1.982 


1.501 








































73 
15 
23 
16 
13 

628 
3,4 53 

167 

15 

61 

1,094 

7 

23 

31 

75 

229 

5 

100 

18 

15 

74 

1,205 

7 

18 

24 


2 

1 
3 

1 


26 
3 


2 

47 

242 
5 

10 
2 

19 

1 

18 
72 

1 


1 
91 
431 

7 

18 

5 

2 

3 

21 

1 

9 

117 

3 


2 

1 

116 

4 85 

5 

29 

2 

5 

19 
3 

2 


2 

108 

507 

5 

1 

2 
9 
13 

8 
158 

3 


2 

101 
10 

1 
1 

3 

13 

1 

1 

153 

: 
- 




38 
231 

75 


5 

16 
135 

57 


106 
10 

32 


25 


104 


6 
4 

5 
20 
289 
39 
2 
17 
216 

1 

2 

16 
27 

1 

5 

2 
178 
2 
3 
1 


2 
12 

3 

15 
24 
79 
8 
31 
552 

5 

3 

57 

3 
3 

5 

25 

11 
5 


10 






7 

5 

12 
15 
17 

12 
198 










Greece 


„ 


I el d 












U 
12 

33 




Poland 


p . . 


Rumania 


Spain 


" 








3 
1 
37 
5 


Turkey (Europe and Asia) . 
United Kingdom 


U.S.S.R. (Europt mdAsla).. 




2 






469 
57 
28 
13 
20 
12 
1,337 
21 
29 
20 
508 
146 
56 

3.419 


] 


5 
2 

2 

16 

1 
1 

10 

1 


3 

54 

2 

34 
7 

7 

61 


8 

5 
113 

30 
23 
6 

75 


3 
1 
1 

168 

25 
22 

7 

75 


6 
5 

5 
3 

176 

5 

16 
32 
1 

93 


3 

162 

22 

20 

73 


i 

71 


2 


81 
27 
57 


53 
I 

25 
3 

49 


2 
2 

50 
18 
65 


11 

2 

64 

26 
71 


106 
7 
5 
2 

3 
150 

7 
2 

152 

7 
7 

1.059 


152 
15 
10 

2 

6 
15 
10 

2 

6 
27 

2 
13 

734 


159 




India ^ 


9 


J . , 




, 


"^°' 


* 




3 






3 
6 












, 


North America 


777 




1,407 

1,526 

102 

150 

225 

8 


2 


29 
23 


31 
19 

5 
2 
6 


32 
19 
5 
9 


24 

26 
18 


35 
21 
3 
13 
10 

|0 


29 

22 

12 


29 

26 
2 

2 




19 
23 
1 
6 
7 
2 


11 
25 
2 
2 

1 


18 
28 

10 
2 


11 
11 


280 
533 
23 
35 
07 


311 

408 

25 
25 












Other West Indies 


13 


Other North America 


1 




25 
30 
15 
18 
5 
24 
19 
14 






3 
1 

3 
1 


1 
1 
1 
3 

2 

1 


2 

2 

1 


2 




1 

1 
3 




2 

2 

2 
If) 


I 
1 

1 
1 


2 




15 
9 
2 
3 

5 
5 
7 


2 
2 

2 

1 


























3 


Other South America 


1 


Libya 


86 
140 

11 






16 
15 

1 
5 


10 
28 

1 
1 
7 


16 

2 
2 


16 
27 


15 


5 


- 


2 

1 


1 
3 


5 

2 


2 


2 
2 
13 


2 
5 




South Africa 




United Arab Republic (^ypt) . 
Other Africa 


2 
1 








67 

9 
9 
9 

2 




3 


2 


1 


1 


1 






: 


1 


" 


2 


- - 


5i 
5 


3 
3 


5 






Pacific Islands (U.S. admj 













U Includes Formosa. 

2/ Includes Arab Palestine 



99 



■25 CN 



^ lO « o < 



.OCMiD-O OlO O P)l 



8S S 



O CO Tt Tr I- ( 



. r- n ■>» o to « 



""32 S 



O -H -O 



00 O^ r^ CD lO GO 



iD CM ^ CN in ( 









<??? Si 



in S 



jC O 10 C *> 3 

h » o B V »< *> 



-< -H « F J £ +• 
(D (TJ rt C--^ J 






t> a K >H c 



* z ^ z S 

Oi C CT' C -5 5 
C O C O "^ ° 

8(4 Q »^ E * n) re 
en £ a^-*. 5 c^-- -< 

1-1 13 c o c -I w 
<0 « ♦> 3 C 

"-*£ 



h •oTicai+'Sra 

p oovooooioowqoo'*. 



■tj S S jS g 



:8 35«-S«5«5iS 



o'*'oj25a>ic 



i-'Sl- 






Grounds 


1953- 
1962 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


1960 


1961 


1962 




1.778 


335 


165 


197 


288 


269 


176 


154 


124 


44 


26 


Established permanent residence 
abroad within five years 


1,691 
31 
56 


327 

6 
2 


150 
5 
10 


177 
12 

8 


276 
8 


260 
3 

6 


168 

7 


119 

5 


120 
4 


3 












' 





TABLE 51 


. PERSONS EXPATRIATED, BY GROUNDS AND YEAR REPORTS RECEIVEDi 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1953 - 1962 








Grounds 


1953- 
1962 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


1960 


1961 


1962 


























Voting In a foreign political 
election or plebiscite 


15,307 


2,651 


2,222 


1,237 


1,436 


1,515 


1,748 


992 


1,239 


1,290 


977 


Residence In a foreign state .... 


16,111 


2,657 


1,557 


1,063 


1,776 


2,223 


2,592 


1,017 


962 


1,151 


1,113 


Naturalization In a foreign 




















619 
209 




Entering or serving in the armed 
forces of a foreign state 


3,591 


700 


696 


269 


356 


423 


378 


171 


202 


187 


Renunciation of nationality 


2,538 


398 


425 


331 


167 


250 


213 


188 


194 


189 


183 


Taking an oath of allegiance In 


1,614 


152 


220 


233 


237 


248 


230 




85 


99 




Departing from or remaining 
away from the U.S. to avoid 
service In armed forces 


535 


45 


134 


139 


69 


61 


45 


13 


3 


12 


14 


Accepting or performing duties 


915 


67 


134 






146 














181 


3 


6 


5 


5 


82 


12 


6 


10 


38 


14 





101 



K 2 



a. o 



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r^ CO S 'C 



^ OO CM 

O CO o 



■^ O CN CM O 

CM r- lO ^ 



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(^ c^ (^ rH 



00 c^ CM 

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gco 



r- CO ■ 






r~ -o CO CN 



CN CM O 

p- r~ o 

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iT) r^ CO 



CM .-( CO ( 



:8 ^ 



in o CD vo 



CM iD 
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104 



TABLE 55. WRITS OF HABEAS CORPUS AND L'ECLARATORY JUDGMENTS 
IN EXCLUSION AND DEPORTATION CASES: YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1958 - 1962 



Action taken 



1958- 
1962 



1958 1959 1960 1961 



Total writs of habeas corpus: 

Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government .... 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government .. 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed ... 

Pending end of year 

Involvj^nq excj,u?iippt 

Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government .. 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed . 

Pending end of year 

Inv<?lYinq <Jepprtati«?n« 

Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government .. 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed . 

Pending end of year 

T.Ota; 'j?cil9rat9rY Iv^Jqingnl;?* 

Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government .... 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government .. 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed ... 

InvglYlnq 9 V?g 1^? 

Favorable to U.S. Government .... 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government .. 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed ... 

InYPlYlnq exclvsjgn or dep9rtfltipn« 

Favorable to U.S. Government .... 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government .. 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed ... 



1,047 
214 
245 

189 



94 
29 
66 

1,317 



953 
185 
179 



105 



Writs of habeas corpus 



539 


128 


154 


97 


85 


75 


467 
42 
30 


105 
14 
9 


142 
9 
3 


77 
10 
10 


79 
3 
3 


64 

6 
5 


6 


24 


18 


18 


'' 


6 


8? 


34 


24 


5 


10 


9 


68 
11 
3 


25 
8 
1 


21 
3 


5 


8 
2 


9 


3 


9 


2 


1 




3 


4 57 


94 


130 


92 


75 


66 


399 
31 
27 


80 
6 
8 


121 


72 
10 
10 


71 
3 
1 


55 
6 
5 


3 


15 


16 


17 


11 


3 



Declaratory judgments 



189 

55 

124 

JL02_ 



2^L. 



147 
48 
71 



130 
47 
33 

-J0_ 



ASSL 



110 
43 
27 



17 
11 
6 

2Q2. 



322 
24 
18 



163 
18 
22 



J46. 



311 
17 

18 



TABLE 56. PRIVATE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY BILLS 
INTRODUCED AND LAWS ENACTED, 75TH CONGRESS 
THROUGH B7TH CONGRESS 



Congress 


Bills 
introduced 


Laws 
enacted 


87th 


3,592 

3,069 

4,364 

4,474 

4,797 

3,669 

2,811 

1,141 

429 

163 

430 

601 

293 


544 


86th 

85th 


-88 
927 


84th 


1,227 


83rd 

82nd 


755 
729 


81st 


505 


80th 

79th 

TBth 

77th 

76th ......... 


121 
14 
12 
22 

65 


75th 


30 



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107