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Full text of "Annual report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service"

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ANNUAL 

KEl UKIo/t/ie 

Immigration and Naturalization Service 



m^ 1 - 1955 




Washington, D,C, |H 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 
IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE 

Washington 25. D. C. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER 
OF IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION 



The Attorney General 

United States Department of Justice 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the Annual Report of the 
Immigration and Naturalization Service for the year 
ended June 30, 1963. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Raymond F. Farrell 
Commissioner 



Immigration and Naturalization Service 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



GENERAL. 



Inadmissible aliens. 



TRAVEL CONTROL AND ADJUDICATIONS 1 

Foreign travel and documentation i 

Admissions " " 2 

Refugees- 



Visa petitions and other applications " " 5 

Adjustment of status " '_'__' g 

Service operations outside the United States '_'___ 7 

BORDER PATROL AND INVESTIGATIONS 8 

Deportable aliens located ^ ' g 

Caribbean program and problems ]^ ' 10 

Foreign-born law violators " '_'___ jq 

Criminal prosecution ..'.__ ._ 12 

Assistance to U.S. marshals '___ 12 

HEARINGS AND LITIGATION 13 

DETENTION AND DEPORTATION ACTIVITIES 14 

ALIEN ADDRESS REPORTS 15 

CITIZENSHIP 15 

Encouragement of naturalization '..'.__ 15 

Naturalization petitions. I5 

Derivative citizenship I7 

Loss of citizenship Ig 

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 18 



TABLES 

1. Immigration to the United States: 1820-1963 

2. Aliens and citizens admitted and departed, by months: Years ended June 30, 1962 and 

1963 

3. AUens and citizens admittedatUnitedStatesportsof entry: Years ended June 30, 1962-1963. 

4. Aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration laws: Years ended June 30, 1959-1963- 

5. Immigrants admitted, by port : Years ended June 30, 1959-1963 

6 Immigrants admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and country or region of 

birth : Year ended June 30, 1963 

6A. Immigrants admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and country or region of last 

permanent residence: Year ended June 30, 1963 

6B. Aliens who adjusted status to permanent residents in the United States, by country or 

region of bu-th: Year ended June 30, 1963 

6C. Refugees admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 1946-1963 

6D. Immigrants admitted under the Act of September 11, 1957 (P.L. 85-316), by class of admis- 
sion and country or region of birth: September 11, 1957-June 30, 1963 

6E. Immigrants admitted under the Act of September 2, 1958 (P.L. 85-892), by class of admis- 
sion and country or region of birth: September 2, 1958-June 30, 1963 

6F. Immigrants admitted under Sections 4 and 6, Act of September 22, 1959 (P.L. 86-363) by 
country or region of birth : September 22, 1959-June 30, 1963 

7. Annual quotas and quota immigrants admitted: Years ended June 30, 1959-1963 

7A. Quota immigrants admitted, by quota area and quota preferences: Year ended June 30, 

1963 

8. Immigrants admitted, by country or region of birth and major occupation group: Year 

ended June 30, 1963 

8A. Beneficiaries of first preference visa petitions, and other immigrants admitted, by occupation : 
Year ended June 30, 1963 

9. Immigrants admitted, by country or region of birth, sex, and age: Year ended June 30, 

1963 

10. Immigrants admitted, by sex and ag3: Years ended June 30, 1954-1963 

lOA. Immigrants admitted, by sex, marital status, age, and major occupation group: Years 

ended June 30, 1959- 1 963 

11. Aliens admitted and citizens arrived and departed: Years ended June 30, 1908-1963 

12. Immigrants admitted, by State of intended future permanent residence: Years ended 

June 30, 1954- 1963 - - 

12A. Immigrants admitted, by specified countries of birth and State of intended future permanent 

residence : Year ended June 30, 1963 

12B. Immigrants admitted, by specified countries of birth and rural and urban area and city: 

Year ended June 30, 1963 

13. Immigration by country, for decades: 1820-1963 

14. Immigrants admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 1954-1963 

14A. Refugee-escapees paroled under Act of July 14, 1960, by country of last residence and 

country of flight : July 14, 1960-June 30, 1963 

14B. Hong Kong parolees admitted bv sex, marital status, age, and major occupation group: 
June 4, 1962-June 30, 1963 . - 

15. Nonimmigrants admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 1954-1963- 
15A. Temporary visitors admitted, by country or region of birth : Years ended June 30, 1954-1963- 

16. Nonimmigrants admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and country or region of 

birth : Year ended June 30, 1963 '- 

17. Nonimmigrants admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and country or region of 

last permanent residence: Year ended June 30, 1963 

17A. Temporary visitors and other nonimmigrants admitted, by port: Year ended June 30, 1963- 

18. Foreign laborers admitted or paroled into the United States: Years ended June 30, 1954-1963- 

19. Entries of alien and citizen border crossers over international land boundaries, by State and 

port: Year ended June 30, 1963 

20. Entries of alien and citizen border crossers over international land boundaries: Years ended 

June 30, 1928-1963 



'ABLES— Continued Page 

OA. Special inquiry officer hearings completed, by regions and districts: Years ended June 30, 

1959-1963- ' 59 

21. Aliens excluded from the United States, by cause: Years ended June 30, 1892-1963 60 

22. Ahens excluded, by country or region of birth and cause: Year ended June 30, 1963 61 

23. Aliens apprehended, aliens deported, and aliens required to depart: Years ended June 30, 

1892-1963 62 

24. Aliens deported, by country to which deported and cause: Year ended June 30, 1963 63 

'4A. Ahens required to depart, by nationahty and cause: Year ended June 30, 1963 64 

4B. Aliens deported, by nationality and cause : Year ended June 30, 1963 65 

IC. Aliens required to depart, by country of destination and cause: Year ended June 30, 1963^ 66 

25. Aliens deported, by country to which deported and deportation expense: Year ended 

June 30, 1963 67 

26. Aliens deported, by cause: Years ended June 30,1908-1963 68 

)A. Aliens deported, by country or region to which deported : Years ended June 30, 1954-1963- 69 

'27. Aliens deported, by year of entry and status at entry: Year ended June 30, 1963 69 

:'A. Aliens deported and required to depart, by status at entry : Years ended June 30, 1959-1963. 70 
!'B. Deportable ahens located, by status at entry and nationality: Year ended June 30, 1963-_ 71 

28. Alien crewmen deserted at United States air and seaports, by nationahty and flag of carrier: 

Year ended June 30, 1963 " - 72 

29. Vessels and airplanes inspected, crewmen admitted, alien crewmen deserted, and alien 

stowaways found, by location : Year ended June 30, 1963 73 

50. Principal activities and accomplishments of Immigration Border Patrol: Years ended 

June 30, 1954-1963 74 

il. Passengers arrived in the United States, by sea and air, from foreign countries, by country 

of embarkation: Year ended June 30, 1963 75 

12. Passengers departed from the United States, by sea and air, to foreign countries, by country 

of debarkation: Year ended June 30, 1963 78 

•3. Passenger travel between the United States and foreign countries, by sea and air, by port 

of arrival or departure: Year ended June 30, 1963 81 

4. Insular travel — Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands: Years ended June 30, 1954-1963 82 

5. Aliens who reported under the Alien Address program, by selected States of residence and 

nationality: During 1963 83 

6. Aliens who reported under the Alien Address program, by selected nationalities and States 

of residence: During 1963 84 

i\. Alien population, by States of residence: 1940, 1951, 1960, 1961, 1962, and 1963 85 

7. Declarations of intention filed, petitions for naturalization filed, persons naturalized, and 

petitions for naturalization denied: Years ended June 30, 1907-1963 86 

8. Persons naturalized, by general and special naturalization provisions and country or region 

of former allegiance: Year ended June 30, 1963 87 

9. Persons naturahzed, by country or region of former allegiance: Years ended June 30, 

1954-1963 88 

0. Persons naturahzed, by country or region of former allegiance and major occupation 

group: Year ended June 30, 1963__- 89 

1. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance, sex, and age: Year ended 

June 30, 1963 90 

l\.. Persons naturalized, by sex, marital status, age, and major occupation group: Years ended 

June 30, 1959-1 963 ' 92 

2. Persons naturalized, by States or territories of residence: Years ended June 30, 1954-1963- 93 
1:L Persons naturalized, by specified countries of former allegiance and by States or territories 

of residence: Year ended June 30, 1963 94 

['A. Persons naturalized, by type of court and States or territories of residence: Year ended 

June 30, 1963 95 

!. Persons naturalized, by specified countries of former allegiance and by rural and urban 

area and city: Year ended June 30, 1963 96 

I. Persons naturalized, by country or region of birth and year of entry: Year ended June 30, 

1963 97 



TABLES— Continued Pag 

45. Persons aaturalized, by general and special naturalization provisions: Years ended June 30, 

1959-1963 9i 

46. Administrative certificates of citizenship issued, by country or region of birth and reason 

for claim: Year ended June 30, 1963 9' 

47. Administrative certificates of citizenship issued to persons who derived citizenship through 

naturalization of parents or through marriage, by country or region of birth and year 
derived: Year ended June 30, 1963 lOi 

48. Administrative certificates of citizenship issued to persons who acquired citizenship at birth 

abroad through citizen parents, by country or region of birth and year acquired: Year 
ended June 30, 1963 10: 

49. Petitions for naturalization denied, by reason: Years ended June 30, 1954-1963 101 

50. Certificates of naturalization revoked, by grounds: Years ended June 30, 1954-1963 101 

51. Persons e.xpatriated, by grounds and year reports received: Years ended June 30, 1954-1963- lOi 

52. Persons repatriated: Years ended June 30, 1954-1963 10 

53. Prosecutions for immigration and nationality violations: Years ended June 30, 1954-1963. 10 

54. Convictions for immigration and nationality violations: Years ended June 30, 1954-1963- 10 

55. Writs of habeas corpus and declaratory iudgments in e.xclusion and deportation cases: 

Years ended June 30, 1959-1963 _^ 10 

56. Private immigration and nationality bills introduced and laws enacted, 75th Congress 

through 88th Congress, first session 



GENERAL 

Tlie Immigration and Naturalization Service is 
esponsible for the administration and enforce- 
iient of tlie Immigration and Nationality Act and 
elated Federal statutes. Tlie many and varied 
unctions relate principally to people of foreign 
'irth. This Service is responsible for determin- 
ing whether persons seeking to enter the United 
Itates are citizens or aliens, and if aliens whether 
ley are admissible under immigration laws. A 
arallel function is that of granting or denying 
etitions such as those for preferences within 
uotas, for admission of alien spouses or children 
f United States citizens, or for importing alien 
jborers, as well as other applications having to 
ij with entry of aliens into the United States. 
Another function of the Service is the adminis- 
ation of the alien registration and the annual 
|ien address report programs. 
' Citizenship through naturalization is granted 
■ denied by federal and state courts, but it is 
16 responsibility of the Service to encourage, 
sist, and facilitate the naturalization of appli- 
nts who meet the statutory requirements ancl to 
•event the naturalization ot persons not qualified. 
In tlie field of enforcement, the Service is re- 
.onsible for preventing illegal entry of persons 
to the United States and apprehending any 
ijiens found to be in the United States in illegal 
I'ltus; for investigating the status of aliens who, 
irough violation of the provisions of the Im- 
I gration and Nationality Act, become amena- 
\i to deportation or denaturalization; and the 
(tention and the deportation of such aliens. 
The General Counsel, chief law officer of the 
' rvice, functions as advisor to the Commissioner 
( legal questions and cooperates with the United 
fates Attorneys in the conduct of litigation 
uanating from the enforcement and adminis- 
titive responsibilities of the Service. 



TRAVEL CONTROL AND 
ADJUDICATIONS 

Foreign Travel and Documentation 

Qnited States citizens, resident aliens returning 
ttheir homes, otlier aliens coming for temporary 
siys or for permanent residence, and all other per- 
s< s seeking admission to tlie United States must 
b examined to determine their admissibility. In 
fitherance of the President's directive to facili- 
ti6 travel to the United States and to promote 
rundly understanding and good will between the 
n ions of the world, the Service continued its in- 
tfsive program to achieve these objectives. Im- 



migrant inspectors are now charged with definite 
responsibility to extend a welcome to travelers and 
to offer all possible assistance over and above the 
immigration inspection. Immigration Port Re- 
ceptionists, assigned to major international air- 
ports in the United States, give additional assist- 
ance to all arriving passengers and are especially 
helpful to the aged, infirm, and to passengers tra- 
veling with young children. 

The most important single accomplishment by 
the Service in tlie facilitation of inspections dur- 
ing the year was put into effect along the Mexican 
border across which 108.8 million persons entered 
the country. This Service, in cooperation with the 
Bureau of Customs, the United States Public 
Health Service, and the Bureau of Plant Quaran- 
tine, inaugurated procedures wliereby a single of- 
ficer of any one Service performs the combined 
inspection for all four agencies. This system 
shortened inspection formalities, resulting in 
greater convenience to the traveler, and generally 
provided substantially improved service to the 
public with no additional expense. 

Similarly, at the Canadian border the practice 
of dual inspection, whereby a single officer rep- 
resenting either this Service or Customs conducts 
the inspection for both agencies, has been con- 
tinued and extended. Where feasible, this practice 
is also used at ports of preinspection abroad. 

During the year, 1,659,019 persons departing 
from Bermuda, the Bahamas, and Canada were in- 
spected by Service and Customs officers prior to 
embarking for the United States. This preinspec- 
tion abroad eliminates inspection at busy United 
States air and sea ports. Passengers, their inspec- 
tions completed, come to the United States know- 
ing that they will be admitted and that they will 
not be delayed by the inspection formalities upon 
arrival. Similarly, passengers on large vessels 
from Japan, the Fiji Islands, Vancouver, B.C., 
certain South American ports, some European 
ports, and on trains from Canada are inspected 
en route by Service officers. Such en route inspec- 
tion is a convenience for the travelers who arrive 
at United States ports with the inspection 
formalities completed. 

Many other actions taken during the year in- 
creased efficiency in inspection procedures. For 
example, a simplified procedure was adopted 
under which alien passengers without entry visas 
who arrive at ports of entry on cruise ships may 
be admitted without delay as visitors. The effec- 
tiveness of this procedure was demonstrated upon 
arrival- of the SS Canberra at New York City, 
when approximately 1,700 British tourists were 
cleared for landing in 55 minutes. In collabora- 
tion with the Department of State, the Service 
extended the use of waivers of visa and passport 
requirements for foreign visitors coming to the 



I 



United States for short periods. A study re- 
sulted in the simplification of vessel manifest 
records whereby Service arrival-departure cards 
prepared for each passenger may now be used as 
the manifest record in lieu of additional, separate 
passenger manifests. Several transportation lines 
have adopted this optional procedure which has 
been used by all airlines for several years. 

During 1963, 70,840 vessels and 186,778 planes 
carried 6,910,034 persons to the United States 
from all parts of the world, an increase of 10 per- 
cent over 1962 in the number of passengers. 
Significantly, however, the increase of but 4 per- 
cent in the number of aircraft arrivals accounted 
for 9 percent more passengers, reflecting the 
greater use and increased carrying capacity of the 
large jet aircraft. 

Physical facilities also improved inspection 
procedures. Three new international bridges 
were opened during the year, one at Lubec, Maine, 
in August 1962, connecting the United States and 
Campobello Island, New Brunswick; one at 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., in October 1962; and in 
November 1962, one at Lewiston, N.Y., replacing 
the antiquated sti-ucture spanning the Niagara 
River gorge. Several new facilities at other bor- 
der ports were completed to provide more 
efficient service to the traveler. 

Admissions 

During fiscal year 1963, almost 173.7 million 
persons seeking admission to the United States 
were inspected and admitted by immigration 
officers, exceeding last year's figures slightly. 
Approximately 96 percent of those were border 
crossers and crewmen. Most of the others arrived 
at United States ports of entry by vessel and air- 
plane as passengers. The total number of entries 
made by aliens during fiscal year 1963 exceeded 
99 million. Over 94 million of those entries were 
made by border crossers from Canada and Mex- 
ico, a slightly lower number than in fiscal year 
1962. The remaining 4.5 million consisted of 
immigrants and documented nonimmigrants. 

Irmnigrants. A total of 306,260 aliens became 
immigrants or permanent resident aliens during 
the year, an increase of 8 percent over 1962 and 
the highest number since 1957, when the Refugee 
Relief Act was in effect. Of the total, 281,600 
were admitted at ports of arrival as immigrants, 
and 24,660 already in the United States adjusted 
their status to that of permanent residents. 

Under the Immigration and Nationality Act, a 
quota is placed upon the number of aliens who 
may immigrate to the United States from coun- 
tries other than the specified independent coun- 
tries of the Western Hemisphere. Sixty-seven 
percent of the total annual quota of 156,987, or 
103,036 quota immigrants, were admitted. This 
exceeds the number of quota immigrants admitted 



in any single year since 1930, except for the year_ 
1949-51 when the Displaced Persons Act, which "*,' 
permitted the mortgaging of quotas, was in effectj '■ 
The fact that a third of the total quota was nofi "' 
used, again was due principally to the excess o4 ' 
(juota numbers over demand for Great Britain I* 
and Northern Ireland, and Ireland. W 

First preference immigrants^ highly skilled 
aliens whose services are determined to be needec 



i 



2,288 of the total, plus 2,374 quota numbers usee 
for their accompanying spouses and children 
Of these skilled aliens, 1,746 were from Europe 
379 from Asia, 67 from Africa, and 96 from othei r , 
areas. P 

While the number of first preference immi ™ 
grants admitted decreased by almost a third com .: 
pared with 1962, the proportion in the profes 
sional categories increased from 53 percent of th , , 
total in 1962 to 62 percent in 1963. Among thi ''' 
1,429 professional persons admitted were 325 pre fl 
fessors and teachers, 297 engineers, 179 nurses, 15 
physicians, and 72 chemists. Practically all o 
the remainder were admitted as highly skillec... 
craftsmen. ';' 

Second, third, and fourth preferences withi .jjl 
the quotas are accorded to close relatives of citi ;' l 
zens and permanent resident aliens. In thes ", 
categories, 14,770 immigrants were admitteo 
more than half were from Italy and Polani f"' 
The 83,604 nonpreference quota immigrants a« 
counted for the balance, and exceeded the com 
parable number in 1962 by over 12,000. Ma , ! 
of the increase was due to the greater number } 
of persons charged to the quotas of Great Brita^ "f" 
and Northern Ireland, Germany, and Irelam JJ^J 
countries whose quotas are current and whe^ 
there is no need to seek preferences in order 
obtain immigrant visas. 



Immigrants admitted 1954~6S. 



liiiniigrants not subject to the numeric limita- 
ioiis of quotas numbered 203,224. They are 

atives of specified Western Hemisphere coun- 
ties, spouses and children of United States citi- 
eiiSj ministers, and other aliens admitted under 
pecial legislation supplementing the basic Immi- 
ration and Nationality Act. Such legislation 
ras the Act of October 24, 1962. Under this Act, 
,;i'.»7 highly skilled aliens for whom first pref- 
rence petitions had been filed prior to April 
*-Hr2 and 2,594 of their spouses and children, and 
,G.S1 relatives of citizens for whom fourth pref- 
rence petitions had been filed prior to January 
962 were admitted without charge to the quota. 
Jnder prior special legislation, 7,257 other aliens 
ecame permanent residents. 

The largest group of nonquota innnigrants ad- 
litted was 144,677 natives of Westei-n Hemisphere 
Duntries, an increase of 11 percent over 1962, and 
le highest number admitted in this category in 
iiy single year. Natives of Mexico accounted for 
^.,572 (about the same as 1962), Canada (35,351, 
n increase of 5,622 over 1962), Cuba (10,571, a 
ecrease of 5,645), and the Dominican Republic 
10,665, an increase of 6,072) . 

t Spouses and children of citizens numbered 
1,606. Greece, Italy, China, Japan, Korea, and 
e Philippines were the principal countries of 
rth for these families of citizens. Included 
mong the children were 1,312 orphan children 
dopted or to be adopted. 

Xon/mmigmnts. Nonimmigrants are aliens ad- 
litted to the United States for temporary periods. 
Exclusive of Mexican agricultural laborers, 
order crossers, and crewmen, a total of 1,507,091 
ich aliens were admitted during the year, a 13 
ercent increase over the preceding year. 
There were more foreign visitors for pleasure 
lan ever before in history: 944,929, an increase 



of more than 134,000 over 1962. Additionally, 
122,515 persons visited the United States tempo- 
rarily for business. Most of these visitors came 
from Canada, Mexico, and the islands of the 
Caribbean; 318,276 came from countries in Eu- 
rope, an increase of 48,300 over 1962. Included 
were 116,007 from the United Kingdom, 51,831 
from Germany, 34,638 from France, and 21,453 
from Italy. 

During 1963, 243,120 temporary workers on 
specific lalior programs were admitted. Included 
under tlie geiu'nil iimnigration law were 23,998 
Canadian agricultunil workers and woodsmen, 
15,407 agricultural workers from the Caribbean 
area, 810 from Japan, 411 sheepherders from 
Spain, and 4,576 others. Under special legislation, 
195,450 Mexican agricultural laborers were ad- 
mitted. On November 15, 1962, the Service au- 
thorized the importation into (Juam of 1,500 
additional workers from the Trust Territories and 
the Philippine Islands, desperately needed for 
emergency repairs to homes and other installations 
caused by the typhoon which battered Guam a 
week earlier. When recovery eft'orts from that 
typhoon were severely set back by a second ty- 
phoon, the time of the temporary workers was 
extended in order that the recovery and rehabilita- 
tion projects could be completed. The island of 
Guam is a vital defense area, and the emergency 
rehabilitation program is an important factor in 
maintaining a strong defense position. In total, 
2,468 aliens were paroled into Guam for support 
of defense projects and rehabilitation. 



m^ 




Nonimmigrants admitted 1954-63. 



i proudly ilisitlat/^ 
lit, and hi6 (.umpaiu 
UjaKe of > ecent typhoons. 



In addition to the above laborers, 7,168 persons 
of distinguished merit and ability, 3,549 trainees, 
and 7,558 other nonimmigrants were admitted for 
temporary work. 

A total of 38,991 forpijrii students were admitted 
to attend educatioiKil insriiutions in the United 
States. They were .ir,-,,in]Kiiiied by 2,746 spouses 
and children. (i()vcniiiiciit;il and privately spon- 
sored programs to further international cultural 
exchange brought 30,002 exchange visitors and 
students and 7,666 spouses and children to the 
United States to participate in such programs. 

Other aliens admitted for temporary periods 
included 34,043 foreign government officials, 11,- 
918 representatives to international organizations, 
1,767 NATO officials, 1,928 foreign press corre- 
spondents, 5,593 treaty traders and investors, and 
105,815 travelers passing in transit tlirough the 
United States. 

During the year, almost 1.8 million alien crew- 
men were inspected by Service officers and granted 
shore leave. The issuance of crewmen landing 
cards which serve to identify and facilitate the 
landing of bona fide crewmen continued to be 
emphasized. Altogether, a total of 528,535 such 
cards have now been issued. 

United States Citizens. The admission of 
United States citizens rose slightly, from 74,107,- 
155 in 1962 to 74,493,918 this year. Of the total, 
70,187,437 were border crossers, 862,382 were 
crewmen, and the I'emaining 3,444,099 were those 
who returned to the United States from overseas 
countries or those citizens who visited Mexico and 
Canada for extended periods. 

It is of interest to note that arrivals of U.S. 
citizens from overseas countries, particularly from 
Europe, increased at about the same rate as the in- 
crease in alien visitors to the United States during 
the year, indicating the upward trend in travel 
both here and abroad. 

Refugees 

A number of Service programs have demon- 
strated tlie United States" interest in and compas- 
sion for refugees and escapees from political op- 
pression and persecution. Major groups were the 
European lefugee- escapees, Cubans, and Chinese 
from Hong Kong. 

Cuhini licfugees. From January 1, 1959, when 
the Batista government fell, there was a steady 
flow of Cuban refugees arriving in the United 
States vmtil October 22j 1962, when the Cuban 

Quarantine was placed ni effect. Prior to that 
ate, Cubans had arrived on regularly scheduled 
commercial aircraft at tiie rate of 1,600 or 1,700 
per week. On October 22, 1962, all commercial 
transportation between the United States and 
Cuba ceased, thereby reducing the number of Cu- 



ban refugee arrivals to a mere trickle, mostly by 
small privately owned boats. 

Ten American Red Cross sponsored aircraft ar- 
rived in December 1962, bringing 1,117 prisonen 
of war from the ill-fated "Bay of Pigs" invasior 
of Cuba. During the remainder of fiscal yeai 
1963, 18 additional Red Cross sponsored flights 
from Cuba brought a total of 890 Cuban refugees 
many of whom were relatives of United States 
citizens. The first of se\eral Red Cross sponsorec 
vessels arrived at Port Everglades, Fla., fron 
Cuba on December 27, 1962, bringing 922 refugees 
most of whom were related to the Cuban invasioi 
prisoners. Six more such vessels arrived later h 
the year with refugees, bringing the total to 4,903, 




•'Bay 0/ Pigs" prisoners arriving from Cuba. 



All Cuban refugees are carefully screened b( 
fore being permitted to enter the United Stati 
to remain until such time as circumstances perm 
return to their homeland. A total of 40,864 refi 
gees from Cuba entered the United States durin 
1963, making a total of 256,187 who have entere 
the United States since the Castro governmei 
was formed in January 1959. 

Hong Kong Chinese. The Service continue 
to parole Chinese refugees from Hong Kong und( 
section 212(d)(5) of the Immigration and X: 
tionality Act as a result of the President's dire' 
tive of "May 23, 1962, to assist in alleviating toi 
ditions in that colony caused by the influx { 
persons fleeing Communist tyranny on the mail 
land of China. There has been a total of 7,04 
such persons paroled into the United States undt| 
this program. These persons are relatives c 
United States citizens and resident aliens, thosi 
with special skills needed in the United States, an 
those M-ho had applied for entry into the Unite 
States under prior refugee laws but had not bee ftspi 
accepted only because of numerical limitation li 
Before parole is authorized, these aliens must ui 
dergo comprehensive security checks, medical 62 



all I illations and other regular screening procedures. 
Refugee-Escapees {Act of July lli.^ 1960). Under 
the "Fair Share" law, the Act of July 14, 1960 
(P.L. 86-648) extended indefinitely by the Act of 
June 28, 1962 (P.L. 87-510), processing by Serv- 
ice officers of registrations for refugee-escapee 
status continued in France, Germany, Belgium, 
Austria, Italy, Greece, and Lebanon. Twenty- 
five percent ot the total number of eligible refugee- 
escapees that have availed themselves of resettle- 
ment opportunities offered by other countries may 
be paroled into this country under this refugee 
legislation. There were 4,389 persons registered 
with Senice offices abroad during fiscal year 1963 
for parole. Of this number, 1,427 persons were 
approved for parole. During the year, 3,563 
I refugee-escapees arrived in this country. 




//(/)((/ Kong family in their one-room home in Kicaloon 
shortly before they left for the United States. 

I Inadmissible Aliens 

Exclusions. Aliens seeking to enter the United 
States must establish their admissibility under 
applicable laws. The inspecting officer admits 
.those persons who he determines are admissible 
under existing inuuigration laws and regulations 
and either defers inspection or refers to a special 
jinquiry officer for final determination those who 
he believes are inadmissible. 

' As a result of the inspection accorded by Service 
officers of aliens seeking admission to the United 
States during fiscal year 1963, 153,417 were re- 
fused entry. 

Included in those denied entry were 23,711 crew- 
men who were refused landing privileges, 86,834 
prospective border crossers, 145 stowaways, and 
42,400 other aliens who withdrew their applica- 
tions for admission upon being advised that they 
were inadmissible. After being accorded formal 
hearing before a special inquiry officer, 309 aliens 



were excluded. Of those excluded, 209 attempted 
entry without proper documents. There were 25 
in criminal, immoral, or narcotic classes, 11 sub- 
versives, and 22 with mental or physical defects. 

Waivers of Inadmissibility. The law provides 
that certain close relatives of United States citi- 
zens or lawfully resident aliens may be admitted 
to the United States for permanent residence de- 
spite their inadmissibility, if it has been estab- 
lished to the satisfaction of the Attorney General 
that their exclusion would cause extreme hardship 
to their relatives in the United States, and if their 
admission would not be contrary to the national 
welfare, safety, and security. This discretionary 
waiver was granted to 1,232 excludable aliens. 
Service officers abroad approved 1,065 of these 
cases. Such applications were denied in 178 cases. 

Temporary Adinissions Despite Inadm,issihility. 
In 3,770 cases aliens seeking admission to the 
United States for temporary periods, but inadmis- 
sible under the general immigration laws, were 
permitted to enter the United States temporarily 
under special provisions of the law after finding 
that such admission would be in the public interest. 

Visa Petitions and Other Applications 

Service officers adjudicated a total of 693,190 ap- 
plications and petitions for various privileges af- 
fecting entry or status of aliens in the United 
States. 

Visa Petitions. Petitions to accord a preference 
under the immigration quota or nonquota status 
are submitted to this Service by United States 
citizen or resident alien relatives of pei-sons who 
desire to immigrate to the United States. 

The highest quota classification, first preference, 
does not dej>end on any family relationship, but 
may be accorded highly educated or highly skilled 
persons whose services are urgently needed in the 
United States. Of the 10,250 petitions filed by 
United States employers to import, such workers, 
7,540 were adjudicated, of which 5,844 were 
granted. 

The number of visa petitions approved dur- 
ing fiscal year 1963 for relatives of United States 
citizens and i-esident aliens increased to 63,982 
from 59,824 during fiscal year 1962. Fourth pref- 
erence petitions adjudicated were about 3,000 more 
than last year and accounted for most of the in- 
crease in petitions approved. Legislation, like the 
Act of October 24, 1962, which granted nonprefer- 
ence petitions probably is a factor in increasing 
fourth preference petitions. 

Both petitions for orphans and petitions for 
temporary workers and trainees increased over 
the previous year. There were 1,877 petitions re- 
ceived for orphans adopted or to be adopted, com- 
pared to 1,263 filed in fiscal year 1962. During 



Hscal year 1963, 13,431 petitions for temporary 
workers and trainees were approved, compared 
to 12,344 petitions for such persons o^ranted dur- 
ing fiscal year 1962. 

Other Applieations. There are many other 
kinds of applications adjudicated by Service of- 
ficers. Aliens admitted in one temporary status 
may wish to cliange to another nonimmigrant sta- 
tus. A temporary visitor, for example, may wish 
to change to a student status. The Service ap- 
proved 1 1,472 such applications. Schools must be 
approved for foreign students, or students or ex- 
change aliens may wish to transfer to other 
schools, or students may wish pennission to work 
in connection with their studies. There were 
30,875 applications in these categories approved. 

United States citizens who frecjuently cross the 
land borders made application for 14,935 certif- 
icates of identity. Resident aliens applied for 
17,782 reentry permits and sought extension of 
such permits in 5,526 cases. 

Waiver of two-year foreign resident requirement 
in the cases of exchange visitors and students was 
granted in 504 cases ( including requests from other 
federal agencies) and denied in 582 cases. Ex- 
change aliens requesting this waiver on their own 
behalf must establish that their residence abroad 
for 2 years would result in exceptional hardship 
to their citizen or lawfully resident alien spouse 
or children. 

Extensions of stay, granted to 183,928 nonim- 
migrants, an increase of nine percent over fiscal 
year 1962, reflected the increased travel to the 
United States by temporary visitors and other 
nonimmigrants. 

Adjustment of Status 

Applications for Status as Immigrant. Under 
section 245 of the Immigration and Nationality 
Act, certain nonresident aliens physically present 
in the United States may have tlieir status ad- 
justed to that of permanent residents without 
leaving the country and applying for immigrant 
visas. An amendment of July 14, 1960, liberal- 
ized section 245, and the Act of October 24, 1962, 
accorded nonquota status to many aliens in the 
United States previously ineligible to apply be- 
cause they were chargeable to oversubscribed 
quotas. As a result, receipts of 24,884 applicix- 
tions for adjustment in fiscal year 1963 repre- 
sented an increase of 31 percent over the preced- 
ing year, while the 19,778 aliens who acquired 
status as permanent residents in fiscal year 1963 
under this provision of law also represented an 
increase of 26 percent over the 15,708 such aliens 
in the previous year. Included among those 
granted lawful permanent resident status were 
3,141 persons whose services wcie urgently needed 
in the United States (841 were first preference 



zens, 1,312 preference quota immigrants otherwist Ijean 
related to United States citizens or to permanen- ikes 
resident aliens, 2,836 nonpreference quota iimni utiis 
grants, and 4,773 natives of Western Hemispheri jti; 
countries. 

Of those who adjusted status imder section -245 
12,560 had been admitted as temporary visit or:- 
4,591 as students, and the balance in various othe 
nonimmigrant categories. Under the liberalizinj 
provisions of recent legislation, there were also 75' 
parolees granted adjustment to permanent resi 
dent status. Germany, Greece, Italy, Unitei 
Kingdom, China, India, Japan, Philippines, Co 
lombia, and El Salvador were the principal coun 
tries of birth of those whose status was adjusteclijuii 



lENS WHO BECAME PERMANENT RESIDENTS BY ADJUSTMENT 
UNDER SECTION 245. IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT 

1954 - 1963 ^ 






Aliens wlw became permanent residents by adjustme 
under Section2i5, Immigration and Nationality Act. 



Creation of Record of Lawful Ad/missio', 
Certain aliens who entered the United States prit 
to June 28, 1940, in whose cases there is no recor 
of lawful admission for permanent residence, ai 
eligible, upon application, for the creation of sue 
a record under section 249 of the Immigration an 
Nationality Act, as amended. Witli the passaj 
of time, as the reservoir of eligible aliens is bein 
depleted, there has been a decrease in the numbc 
of such applications filed with the Service. Tl: 
3,133 such applications filed in fiscal year 196 
amounted to a decrease of 13 i>ercent from th 
previous year's receipts, while the 2,680 aliei 
whose a[)plications were granted during fisci 
year VM'.\ represented a decrease of 13 percer 
from the number of aliens in whose cases recorc 
of lawful admission for permanent residence wei 
created in the preceding year. 



m 

lion 
M 

iers, 

Wf 

He 



lu'fugee-Escapees. The Act of July 14, 1960, 
no\icles that a refugee-escapee paroled into the 
'nited States pursuant thereto, who has completed 
> years' residence in this country and who is found 
o he admissible upon inspection, may be granted 
;tatus as lawful permanent resident as of the date 
)f his arrival in the United States. Since the first 
efuiree-escapee paroled into the United States 
)iiisiiant to this act arrived during November of 
1»(>|), none of them completed the 2 years' resi- 
lence required for acquisition of permanent resi- 
lence status pursuant to that act, until November 
)f 1962. From November of 1962 through the end 
)f June 1963, a total of 2,005 such aliens were 
icciirded status as permanent residents. 

(J the)' Adjustments. A total of 43 fonner ofR- 
ials of foreign governments or of international 
: irganizations and members of their families were 
; granted lawful permanent residence status during 

Iiscal year 1963 under section 13 of the Act of 
September 11, 1957. That statute imposes a limit 
if 50 in any fiscal year upon the number of aliens 
irho may benefit thereunder. Other adjustments 
ncluded 67 suspension of deportation cases, 38 
)rivate bills, 20 Hungarian refugees, and 29 
ithers. 

iervice Operations Outside tlie United States 

The Service maintains offices in Europe, the Far 
^ast, Canada, Mexico, Bermuda, and the Baha- 
In addition to the pre-departure inspection 



of travelers destined to the United States, the 
processing and screening of refugee-escapees from 
Europe and the Chinese refugees from Hong 
Kong, Service officers abroad regularly adjudicate 
various petitions and applications submitted by 
United States citizens and aliens residing abroad. 
Primary examples are waivers of inadmissibility 
submitted by immigrant visa applicants, petitions 
to accord nonquota and preference quota status 
to relatives of citizens and resident aliens, peti- 
tions in behalf of eligible orphans, reentry permit 
extensions, etc. Additionally, agricultural work- 
ers, sheepherders, and other temporary workers are 
screened and indoctrinated by these officers prior 
to the aliens' departure for the United States. 
Service officers abroad have also been successful 
in unco^'ering fraud and misrepresentation in 
matters pending before the Service and have dis- 
covered and prevented other violations of the im- 
migration law, including alien smuggling, stow- 
aways, mala fide crewmen, and cases involving- 
fraudulent or counterfeit documents. 

During the year, a realignment of Service offices 
in Europe was effected by the designation of the 
Rome, Italy, office as a district headquarters with 
jurisdiction over Italy, the Iberian Peninsula, the 
Middle East, and Africa. This provided closer 
supervision and better service of these areas which 
had previously been under the jurisdiction of the 
District Office' in Frankfurt, Germany. That of- 
fice retained responsibility over Service operations 
elsewhere izi Europe. 




Japanese agricultural laborers processed in Tokyo and ready to take off for the United States. 



BORDER PATROL AND 
INVESTIGATIONS 

Deportable Aliens Located 

Service officers located 88,712 deportable aliens 
during the year. Principal classes of violators 
were 40,663 visitors, students, and other nonimmi- 
grants who were found out of status and 23,496 
illegal entrants. Also included in the total were 
1,911 alien crewmen who had willfully violated 
the terms of their admission, 1,855 aliens who had 
been admitted temporarily as agricultural la- 
borers, and 1,446 immigrants. Crewmen who be- 
came deportable on tecnnical grounds when their 
vessels remained in port beyond the 29-day limit 
accounted for 17,610 of the total. The 166 stow- 
aways foimd ashore represents a new low since 
World War II. 

A 4-percent decrease was noted in the total num- 
ber of deportable aliens located. However, there 
was a 29 percent increase in the number of Mexican 
aliens located which was accompanied by a 41 
percent increase in the number of aliens who en- 
tered illegally. Deportable crewmen located on 
29-day vessels increased 77 percent, in part due to 
the longshoremen's strike which held vessels in 



DEPORTfiBLE ALIENS 


FOL 


ND IN U.S. 


1961-1963 


MEXICANS sj 






* /. J%" 






1 


30,... 


I 


,,.u-. 


; 


|.„,,. 








OTHER .^2 
NATIONALITIES 










5e,94e 




1 


e2..6. 






.,,5«8 




1 i 








SURREPTITIOUS, 
ENTRANTS ^^ 


^ 


]•' 


■".3 % 




„,,,! 




ENTERED 
THROUGH '^'^' 
PORTS 01- 
ENTRY AND ^^ 
VIOLATED 
STATUS '' 




1 


.e,o,, 






n— ■ 


e.,050 






-r-' 1 1 


] L 




1. . \ 1 



F I SC«L YEAR. 

Deportable aUens located in the United States, 1961-63. 



United States ports beyond the 29-day period pre- 
scribed by law. The 30 percent decrease in th( fci 
number of students, visitors, and nonimmigranti 
more than oifsets these increases. The greatesi 
reduction was made in the ninnber of Cubar 
visitors found in violation of status, from 26,16i ^k 
last year to 3,432. A procedural change wherebi 
most Cubans were paroled into the United Statei (iiil, 
rather than being admitted as nonimmigrants ac 
counts for this reduction. Significant increase Ig 
in the number of Canadian and Chinese alien 
made subject to Service action are also reflectet 
in the following statistics: 



Deportable aliens located 



Mexican 

Cuban 

Canadian 

British West Indies and British 

Honduras 

Other Western Hemisphere 

Chinese 

All others 

Total aliens except technical violators 

Technical violations (alien crewmen in 

U.S. over 29 days) 

Mexican 

Other 

Grand total 



Fiscal years 



27, 485 
7,082 

1,726 
4,086 
2,572 
9,816 



82, 797 
9,961 



242 
9,719 



92, 758 



Along the land borders and in the Gulf an 
Florida coastal areas, 348 alien smugglers wei 
apprehended by border patrol officers, exactly t\ 
same number as in 1962. However, the numbf 
of smuggled aliens found in this area increase, 
38 percent to 751. Most of this increase occur 
in southwestern United States where many aliei 
were seeking employment in agriculture. Du: 
ing August 1962, officers from the Livermor 
Calif., sector encountered one case in which 
Mexican alien had smuggled three aliens throu, 
Calexico, Calif., by concealing them under t. 
hood of his truck. 

A special situation existed in the Lower Ri 
Grande Valley of Texas throughout the yen 
especially during the cotton picking months c 
July and August 1962. The combined total c 
surreptitious entries in the McAllen and Port Is:i 
bel Border Patrol sectors during this period wa 
349 percent greater than for the correspondin 
period of the previous year. Contributmg fac 
tors were the continuation of one of the mos| 
severe droughts in history in the agriculturs 
areas of northern and central Mexico, now in it 
second year, and the etfects of the high unemploj 



nent level it created. Economic hardsliip in 

VIexico, coupled with mechanization of the U.S. 

otton harvest, which resulted in a reduction in 

he number of requests for contract laborei-s, 

j' saused tremendous pressure to be exerted on the 

■'■ )order. Despite greatly increased activity, there 

. vas no loss of continued control in this area. 

'IVhile surreptitious entries quadrupled in these 

sectors over the previous year, those picked up 

ifter eluding forces on the border increased but 

te percent, from 71 during the first 8 months of 

iscal year 1962 to 104 during the same period in 

iscal year 1963. 

AVliile cotton pickers in adjacent Mexico were 
jeino; paid 75 cents per hundred pounds, the 
tandard price in the Lower Rio Grande Valley 
vas $2.50. This situation made it easy for labor 
contractors to induce workers to enter illegally, 
md it also made it easier for the aliens so induced 
o be exploited. In one such case, a contractor was 
etaining a third of the wages of a crew of 33 de- 
)ortable aliens he had induced and assisted to 
nter unlawfully. 

To assist border patrol officers in their job of 
preventing smuggling and unlawful entry of 
diens across the land borders and in the Gulf and 
P'lorida coastal areas, observation aircraft are 
ised. Constant radio communication is main- 
ained with ground units who are called when a 
uspected illegal entrant is observed. They assist 




atrol inspector examines evidence of "entry without 
inspection" in sand trap along a railroad on the 
international boundary. 



ground units in patrol of over 1,000 miles of drag 
trails so constructed that aliens entering will leave 
their tracks. Observation aircraft are also used 
to seek out concentrations of aliens in farm and 
ranch areas. During the year, these aircraft 
assisted in locating 4,031 deportable aliens. 

The fleet of six transport aircraft logged 
13,915,022 passenger miles without incident. 
Although used primarily to provide rapid 
transportation of deportable aliens to staging 
areas along the Mexican border, they are utilized 
in other areas to transport aliens and prisoners 
being moved by U.S. mai-shals and the Bureau of 
Prisons. 

The increased illegal entries over the Mexican 
border are reflected in a 60 percent increase to 
10,560 in the number of aliens removed by airlift 
to Leon, Guanajuato, Mexico, and a 55-percent 
increase to 4,062 in the use of the bus-trainlift to 
Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Mexico. Since its incep- 
tion in September 1956, 45,081 aliens have been re- 
moved by the Leon airlift to the interior of Mex- 
ico. The primary purpose of this operation is 
to transport illegal entrants, many of whom are 
without funds, to places near their homes. Its 
effectiveness is borne out by the fact that only 
2,137 aliens who had previously been airlifted 
were found this year. 

The continued emphasis placed on the develop- 
ment of informants and other sources of informa- 
tion and the stress placed on the crewman control, 
antismuggling and stowaway programs as a whole 
resulted in their successful operation. Informa- 
tion gathered through these programs resulted 
in the apprehension of crewmen and other illegal 
aliens; the identification and detection of stow- 
aways, smugglers, and the securing of informa- 
tion of value to other government agencies. 
These operations are carried on at seaports in the 
Great Lakes area and along the St. Lawrence 
Seaway. The success of these operations is at- 
tested by a reduction in willful violations from 
2,492 in 1962 to 1,911 in 1963, and a new low in 
landed stowaways. When reports are received 
that an alien crewman has deserted, immediate 
shipboard investigation is made to obtain leads 
and intelligence data. Mobile units are alerted 
and coverage of transportation terminals is 
provided. 

To illustrate the effectiveness of the program, 
information was received from the Palermo office 
that several stowaways had boarded the M/S 
Andrea Gritti at Genoa, Italy, destined for the 
United States, and that they were assisted by 
crewmen on the vessel. Early in March 1963, the 
vessel arrived at Houston, Tex., with seven de- 
clared Italian stowaways on board. Investigation 
by Italian speaking investigators disclosed that 
a longshoreman in Genoa was paid 10,000 lire for 



takiiK' the stowaways aboard the vessel and that 
a cook on the vessel was paid 700,000 lire for 
assist in<r them en route by hiding them and 
bringiiifi them food. The operation of the smug- 
glino- ring was broken ui). Prosecution was de- 
clinecl in favor of the return to Italy of the 
smuggler and the stowaways on the same vessel. 

Another example was the arrest by Service in_ 
vestigators in New York City on June 4, 1963, of 
three persons wanted by the Italian authorities 
for suspicion of murder, extortion, and kidnap- 
ping, who had entered the United States as stow- 
aways. A fourth member of the group had 
deserted a vessel in June 1962. These arrests 
culminated an extensive investigation based on 
information obtained by the Palermo overseas 
office and furnished the New York office. One of 
the men was arrested at a New York bakery at 
3 a.m. on June 4, 1963. His suspicious actions led 
the investigators to an apartment where his son 
and the two other men were found. All four 
have been deported to Italy. 

Crewman desertions in Canada along the St. 
Lawrence Seaway are of concern, because of the 
proximity of our border. Through liaison and 
cooperation with Canadian officials, the Service is 
informed when desertions occur in that country. 
During the 1962 shmping season, there were 225 
desertions in the Ciinadian border province of 
Quebec. Seven crewmen who deserted in eastern 
Canadian ports were later picked up in the United 
States. Officers at Massena, N.Y., boarded 270 
vessels to verify the departures of 883 crewmen 
detained on board. 

Caribbean Program and Problems 

Investigation of Cuban refugees increased dur- 
ing this year. Under this pressure, a number of 
Cubans alleged to be subversive departed prior to 
the completion of the investigations. These in- 
cluded Jesus Alcala-Martinez and Vincent Luis 
Perez y Gonzalez, alleged propagandists for the 
Fair Play for Cuba Committee at Tampa, Fla. ; 
Antonio Denis- Jordan, suspected Cuban G-2 agent 
in New York City, and Ignacio Fernandez-San- 
chez, an alleged Castro agent in Bridgeport, Conn. 

The index maintained under the Caribbean In- 
vestigations Coordination Program at Miami con- 
tinues to be one of the most important and effec- 
tive investigative tools to combat entry into the 
United Staines of Latin American aliens in the 
subversive, criminal, immoral, and narcotic classes. 
The index now contains more than 142,000 ref- 
erence cards, including references to a list of 303 
suspected unregistered Latin American foreign 
agents. During this year, approximately 27,000 
new cards were added, and 333,991 cliecks of the 
index were made, with a record located in 37,481 



cases. As a result of these checks, over 500 sub 
versive, crimanal, immoral, and narcotic type in 
vestigations were initiated. 



ikileil 



Operation Skyward, which was activated 
November 1, 1959, to prevent the unauthorized de- 1*'*'' 
parture of i)ri\!ite aircraft from the United State^fi"' 




Land and air operations are coordinated for operatw 
"Skyicard." 

to or over Cuba, continued, and 295 notices o 
prevention of departure were in effect at the en 
of the year. 

Foreign-Born Law Violators 

Internal Security and the Foreign Born. Th 
anti-subversive program, aimed at the detectioi 
identification and exclusion, denaturalization an 
deportation of foreign-born subversives, has bee<[ 
continued throughout the United States. 

Border program investigative activities resulted 
in the exclusion of several important subversivd, 
including Daniel Navarroc Avila and Emilian 
Obezo-Inzunza, who sought entry into the Unite' 
States as agricultural contract laborers; Manut'^ 
Bernal-Lopez, a member of the Partido Populai W 
Socialista; Elizabeth Jane Fordluim, a resident ci "jl 
Vancouver, B.C., Canada, and an admitted Con "U- 
munist; and Orville Garfield Braaten and Angi; '^ 
McPhee, scheduled to be British Columbia dele H 
gates to the Pulp and Sulphite Workers Unio * 
International Convention at Detroit, Mich. «' 

Investigative efforts culminated in the institx' 5''' 
tion of deportation proceedings against a nuiubel 



1 




deportation entered on February 4, 1963, was af' 
pealed, and the Board of Immigration Appeal 
dismissed the appeal on May 14, 1963. Eng Le 
Poy, admitted Communist Party member. Lam St * 



'hail, a suspected espionage agent, and his close 
ssociate, Chan Chung Fun, all returned to China 
rliile their cases were under investigation. 
Foreign-horn of Criminal Classes. Special em- 
hasis is accorded to investigations of alien racket- 
ers, narcotics traffickers, prostitutes, procurers, 
nd perpetrators of frauds against the United 
itates. The threats of exclusion, deportation, de- 
aturalization, and prosecution are effective weap- 
ns in the campaign against organized crime and 
1 combating illegal traffic across the international 
oundaries. 

The following cases exemplify the results of the 
ervice's anti-crime and racketeering program : 
I On August 9, 1962, an order of deportation was 
t, 'Cured against Anthony Pino, key figure in tlie 
rinks" million dollar robbery of 1950. Pino was 
■iitenced on October 10, 1956, to life imprison- 
lent after conviction for the Brinks' robbery, 
eportation will be effected if he is released from 
rison. 




Investigator filing a criminal complaint. 

Deportation proceedings were initiated on Feb- 
ary 12, 1963, in the case of Thomas Fontanella, 
well-known criminal figure in the Kansas City 
ea. Fontanella had successfully concealed his 
ienage for many years, aided by a delayed birth 
irtificate showing birth in Kansas City, Mo. 
-linstaking investigation developed evidence that 
] was born at Ragusa, Italy. 
Border criminal identification programs contin- 
vd with excellent liaison established with respon- 
S3le law enforcement officials of our border coun- 
ties. An example of the effectiveness of the pro- 
iams was the apprehension of Elizabeth Victoria 
)edding, a "call-girl madam" with international 
cnnections, at New York City on October 23, 
162. She had been convicted on vice charges in 
160 and deported to Canada on April 19, 1962. 
] vestigation developed that she had returned to 



the United States, where she was located in New 
York under an assumed name. After serving a 
9-months' prison sentence, received upon convic- 
tion for illegally returning to this country after 
deportation, she was again deported to Canada on 
July 13, 1963. 

Frauds. A total of 4,729 immigrant fraud in- 
vestigations wei'e completed ; a 20 percent increase 
over 1962. This rise reflects the growing number 
of schemes employed to circumvent the immigra- 
tion laws. These investigations frequently involve 
inquiry into criminal conspiracies between aliens 
and other persons who, for gain, provide them the 
documentation needed to evade quota and other 
restrictions enil)odied in (lie immigration statutes. 
Other schemes involved sliaiu marriages to United 
States citizens to avoid (juota restrictions and, in 
Cliinese fraud cases, the use of false identities to 
claim United States citizenship. 

An example of one of these cases is tlie wide 
scale investigation at New York whicli culminated 
in the indictment on February 20, 1963, of "Y," a 
well-known immigration attorney, on nine counts 
charging that he conspired with numerous persons 
in arranging fraudulent marriages to circumvent 
quota restrictions of the immigration laws. In- 
vestigations disclosed that he counseled alien 
clients and United States citizen "spouses" in 
furtherance of the frauds and abetted such per- 
sons in making false statements in documents sub- 
mitted to this Service and to American consulates 
abroad in applications for visas to the ITnited 
States. 

In another case, Vincent A. Romano, also an 
immigration attorney, pleaded guilty on January 
29, 1963, to five counts of an eight count indict- 
ment in which he was accused of arranging fraud- 
ulent marriages of Italian aliens to United 
States citizen spouses in violation of 18 U.S.C. 371 
(conspiracy to violate 18 U.S.C. 1001 and 18 
U.S.C. 1546). He is awaiting imposition of 
sentence. 

The lengthy investigation of the "V" and "B" 
Travel Agencies, referred to in last year's report, 
has continued and resulted in the indictment on 
February 26, 1963, of the president of the "V" 
Travel Agency and three other persons on 73 
counts by the federal grand jury. Southern Dis- 
trict of New York. The travel agencies had ex- 
ecuted supporting documents for first preference 
visa petitions containing false statements as to 
the nature of the business, urgent need for the 
services of the aliens, the duties required to be 
performed, illegal notarizations, etc. The case is 
now awaiting trial. 

The Fraudulent Docimient Center at El Paso, 
Tex., established in 1958, received 1,027 new cases 
which brought the total number on file to 7,849. 
Each case represents a Mexican alien who falsely 



(•laiiiied to be ;xii Aniericaii citizen and presented 
a document to prove it. 

The value of a central index is illustrated by the 
following cases: The ('enter in May 1963, was 
able to establish that Martin (ionzales-Garcia, who 
told officers at Moses Lake, Wash., that he was 
born in Alamo, Tex., in 1926, was actually Jesus 
Soto-Arenas who had used another copy of the 




same certilicate in Arizona in 1961 for the same 
purpose. During calendar year 1962, four Mexi- 
can aliens in three States made false claims to 
American citizenship and presented copies of the 
same document. 

An example of the type of violations the Center 
is trying to combat is that of a Mexican female 
legal resident who tried to register her child as a 
native-born citizen with the city registrar in 
Brownsville, Tex. Actually the child was unlaw- 
fully broiight into the United States after birth in 
Mexico. To support this fraudulent delayed reg- 
istration, a neighbor had been induced to perjure 
herself before tJie registering official. The Center 
responded to a record total of 1,600 inquiries last 
year. Information relating to the subject or the 
document used was furnished in 12 percent of 
the responses. 



Chinese fraud investigations during the y 
resulted in 2,241 pei-sons confessing to havir 
fraudulently entered the United States. The 
confessions exposed 4,233 Chinese persons wl: 
entered in the same manner and made l,9<|f j 
"slots" imavailable for use. 

Fraudulent Naturalisations. After comprehe 
sive investigation and litigation, the naturaliz 
tion of Anthony Peter Riela was revoked by tl 
United States District Court for the District > 
New Jersey, on April 4, 1963. Riela has filt 
notice of appeal to the Court of Appeals, 
was born in Italy in 1897, entered the Unitt 
States during 1926, date and manner unknow 
and was naturalized on August 22, 1933, und§!ore 
an assumed name. Reputedly one of the leadii 
hoodlums in the United States, Riela gained n 



ma 
!i 
mil 



tional notoriety as a delegate to the "crime co jctfi 



vention" held at Apalachin, N.Y., in Novemb 
1957. 

After lengthy investigation and litigation, t 
naturalization of Hugo Rossi, a major narcot: 
trafficker, was revoked by the United States D 
trict Court, for the Southern District of N( A: 
York, on December 26, 1962. Rossi was bom 
Italy on December 10, 1901, entered the Unitlijiiii 
States for permanent residence on March 5, 19' i 
and was naturalized on December 6, 1951. T 
order of revocation is based on his failure to revi 
his foreign criminal record at the time of 
naturalization. He originally entered the Unit 
States as a stowaway in 1937, and continued 
criminal activities here. In 1954, he was s 
tenced to 5 years' imprisonment for narcotics v 
lations. The Court of Appeals affirmed 
denaturalization order on July 17, 1963. 



Criminal Prosecution 



The Service presented 6,741 cases to Unit 
States Attorneys for violations of the immigi 
tion and nationality laws. Of the cases dispos* '^^^ 
92 percent resulted in convictions with agg. 

fate sentences of 32,837 months and fines "^ 
133,125.00. 

In 1,761 cases, aliens were convicted of reenlK', 
after deportation without permission (8 U.S juf" 
1326) ; 167 persons were convicted for documt dm 
frauds (18 U.S.C. 1546), and the average senter (dl 
in these cases was 10 months; 196 persons wi 
convicted for nationality violations, and of thi 
convictions, 195 cases were for false represen; 
tions as United States citizens (18 U.S.C. 911). 



Assistance to U.S. Marshals 



Service officers were alerted on several occasic 'tie 
to assist United States mai-shals in enforci 'fe 
court orders relating to civil rights, protecti 



12 



(II 



b 



ublic property, and preserving the peace. A 

fecial group of officers was trained in crowd con- 

!i( :ol procedures. This type of duty was per- 

ivl jrmed by officers at Oxford, Miss., during Sep- 

l,^mber 1962, and at Tuscaloosa and Huntsville, 

la., during June 1963. 

HEARINGS AND LITIGATION 

Exclusion and Expuhion Hearings. During 

•" seal year 1963, the number of exclusion hearings 

ecreased slightly from the number conducted 

I 1962; but there was a tremendous increase in 

18 number of expulsion proceedings conducted 

'" sfore sjaecial inquiry officers. The latter rose 

;lf-om 10,431 in 1962 to 12,805 in 1963. 

Special inquiry officer activities were greatly 
fected during fiscal year 1963 by section 4 of the 
ct of October 24, 1962 (P.L. 87-885) , which pro- 
ided more lenient qualifications for suspension 
I deportation under section 244 of the 1952 Act. 
Because of the new bases for eligibility, 
umerous applications for reopening of cases were 
lade for reconsideration under the new law, and 
ra iditional classes of aliens commenced making 
nil 'iginal applications for relief under new stand- 
19 'ds. Because the recent law established new 
■iteria for the exercise of this form of discretion- 
-y relief, special inquiry officers, and necessarily 
16 Board of Immigration Appeals, are without 
se precedents in many instances, requiring the 
termination of legal questions of novel impres- 
on. During fiscal year 1963, 215 cases were 
ferred to Congress for approval of orders 
ranting suspension of deportation, as contrasted 
ith 73 during fiscal year 1962. The greatest 
)rtion of the 1963 number, of course, was trans- 
itted subsequent to the Act of October 24, 1962, 
dicating the present and undoubtedly future 
"ffect of that statute. 

The broadening impact of the new regulations 
"*|Iective Januai^ 22, 1962, whereunder authority 
t1 as placed in special inquiry officers to consider 
pplications for discretionary relief in deporta- 
3n proceedings, brought about increased activity. 
*« uring the fiscal year, 525 applications for ad- 
stment of status under sections 245 and 249 of 
Immigration and Nationality Act were re- 
ived by special inquiry officers in contrast to 237 
fiscal year 1962. 

The powers granted those officers with respect 
passing upon applications for relief by deport- 
)le aliens claiming physical persecution if de- 
)rted to designated countries has had the effect 
■ len^hening hearings and hearing records, 
dicative of the problems which arise is the fact 
at there were 526 claims of physical persecution 
yolving 27 countries including: Korea, Haiti, 
i-itish Guiana, Indonesia, Viet-Nam, U.S.S.R., 



Rumania, Hungary, Albania, Jordan, Egypt, 
Syria, Turkey, Israel, Iraq, Colombia, Honduras, 
Formosa (Republic of China), Poland, Yugo- 
slavia, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and 
Morocco. 

Trial attorneys, qualified members of the bar, 
serve as representatives of the Government at for- 
mal Service exclusion and expulsion proceedings, 
or as assigned in other complex proceedings and 
when requested, assist United States Attorneys in 
civil and criminal cases arising under the immi- 
gration and nationality laws. Despite the fact 
that over 84 percent more cases were prepared 
during fiscal year 1963 than in fiscal 1962, the trial 
attorneys carried out successfully their function 
of preparing for and appearing in deportation 
hearings, without accrual of backlogs. 

The two Service representatives at the Board of 
Immigration Appeals reviewed 71 more appellate 
cases to be considered by that body, and though 
those officers presented fewer oral arguments dur- 
ing fiscal year 1963 than in the preceding year, 
they filed more legal memoranda. The increased 
activity was due largely to the legislative amend- 
ment and new regulations mentioned above, 
whereunder authority was placed in special in- 
quii-y officers to consider applications for discre- 
tionary relief in deportation proceedings, with 
appeals from the latter's decisions to the Board. 

Litigation. In the 1962 Annual Report, atten- 
tion was called to the provisions of the Act of 
September 26, 1961 (P.L. 87-301), designed to 
eliminate district court review of exclusion and 
deportation orders (previously allowed under the 
Administrative Procedure Act) by requiring the 
filing of petitions for review direct to the United 
States Circuit Courts of Appeals. Though that 
statute has decreased litigation in the district 
courts, appraisal of its full impact is still too early 
and depends largely on the ultimate interpretation 
of the statute by the Supreme Court. Certain fac- 
tors could contribute to a lessening of judicial 
challenges of Service orders. Among these are 
the further liberalization of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act which permits more discretion in 
the adjustment of cases; the improvement in the 
administrative process in the making of the orig- 
inal orders; and perhaps more care in determin- 
ing those orders which will be defended in the 
courts, thus leaving less room for successful 
judicial attack. The scope of the 1961 judicial 
review law is now before the Supreme Court in 
Foti v. INS, certiorari granted 371 U.S. 947. 

Of the 117 cases considered by the United 
States Courts of Appeals in fiscal year 1963, 17 
were decided on their merits in favor of and 9 
against the Government, 18 were dismissed for 
lack of jurisdiction, and 73 were dismissed on 
other grounds. 



Three decisions iiffecting Service operations 
were rendered by the Supreme Court during its 
last term. In Kennedy v. Meiuloza -Martinez^ 372 
T^.S. U4, theSupreme'Coui'l lield unconstitutional 
section 349(a) (10) of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act and its predecessor section 401 (j) 
of the Nationality Act of 1940, providing for the 
automatic expatriation of United States citizens 
who remain outside the United States to evade 
military ser\ace, as imposing punishment without 
affording procedural safeguards guaranteed by 
the fifth and sixth Amendments. 

In Rosenberg v. Fleuti, 374 U.S. 449, the 
Supreme Court held that the resident alien's 
return to the United States from an innocent, 
casual and brief excursion of a few hours to 
Mexico did not constitute an "entry" within the 
meaning of section 101(a) (13) of the 1952 Act; 
and factors relevant to determining the alien's 
intent would include duration and purpose of the 
trip and the need of travel documents. 

In Gastelum-Qu'mones v. Kenne&y^ 374 U.S. 
469, the Supreme Court, ruled that the Govern- 
ment's proof showing the alien, during a 2-year 
period, had paid dues to and attended several 
meetings of the local Connnunist Party club, was 
not sufficient evidence of "meaningful association" 
to warrant deportation for membership in the 
Communist Party, thus increasing the burden of 
proof by the Government. 

Certiorari also was granted by the Supreme 
Court in CoHteUo v. INS (311 F. 2d 343, below), 
on the question whether deportation could be 
ordered for criminal misconduct which occurred 
while he was apparently a naturalized citizen, 
his naturalization having been subsequently 
revoked. 

Pending before the Supreme Court at the close 
of the fiscal year were petitions for certiorari in 
Oddo V. U.S., 314 F. 2d 115, involving the burden 
of proof in denaturalization eases; and in 'W'e'i 
Fang v. Kennedy, 317 F. 2d 180, on the question 
whether Nationalist China properly was deemed 
the country of nationality of a Chinese alien for 
the purposes of the deportation statute. 

DETENTION AND DEPORTATION 
ACTIVITIES 

The number of aliens deported under orders of 
deportation continued at the same pace as in fiscal 
year 1962, reaching a total this year of 7,454. The 
number of aliens leiiuirwl to depart without the 
issuance of formal order of deportation made a 
substantial increase to 69,392. Of those actually 
deported, 671 were under criminal, immoral, or 
narcotic charges, and 4 under subversive charges. 



deported or removed. Up to the time of depo 
tation, over $320,000 had been expended up( 
their care in the United States. Had they co 
tinned to remain institutionalized at publ 
expense, over $4 million in public funds would 
expended for their maintenance and treatment 
their expected lifetime. 

Of the aliens deported, 85 percent had enter»fl„ 
without proper documents or failed to maintai , 
nonimmigrant status, or had entered without i f! 
spection. By nationalities, 4,385 were frc^ 
Mexico, 986 from Canada, 410 from Greece, a; 
271 from the I'nited Kingdom. 

Of the 69,392 who conceded deportability a 
were requiretl to depart, 14,807 were crewmen w 
were technical violators who remained longer th 
the statutory period. An increase in this catego 
of 6,503 over 1962, is partially accounted for 
the longshoremen's strike in Januaiy and Fe 
ruary of 1963. Aliens who entered witlic 
inspection numbered 18,796 who departed unc 
safeguards, and 11,261 who departed after t 
issuance of orders to show cause. 

The increase of more than 6,000 who enter 
without inspection was largely due to the incref ^j! 
ing number wlio were attempting illegal ent 
at the Mexican border. 

The other principal category was in the numl 
of nonimmigrant aliens (22,955) who failed 
maintain the noninunigrant status under whi 
they had been admitted. As the number of ali 
visitors has increased each year, so too, have t j^J! 
nmnber who violate status by staying longer th " 
the temporary period for which tliey whe "^i 
admitted, or by accepting employment, or by othP 
violation of the terms of admission. 



There were 17,119 aliens initially acbnitted to 
ervice detention facilities and 16,571 to non- 
ervice facilities. Full-scale activities at the Opa 
ocka Processing Center in Florida were dis- 
mtinued on October 29, 1962. It is maintained 
i a state of readiness and has been used to provide 
'mporai-y housing for refugees arriving on Red 
ross vessels from Cuba and awaiting placement 
/ the Department of Health, Education, and 
'el fa re. 

I ALIEN ADDRESS REPORTS 

In accordance with the requirements of the Im- 
igration and Nationality Act, 3,236,684 aliens 
ied address report cards with the Service in 1963. 
his is an increase of 107,919 reports over last 
>ar. The 3 States with the largest number of 
jjiens reporting were: California, 710,419 or 22 

fircent; New York, 600,468 or 18.5 percent; 
jxas, 241,001 or 7.4 percent. 
The largest number of resident aliens were of 
"exiean nationality (577,895), followed by Can- 
la (339,659), the United Kingdom (247,811), 
ermany (247,805), Italy (228,766), and Poland 
.•21),.S84). Residents of other nationalities were 
kUt 100,000. The largest number of Mexican 
itionals live in California and Texas; Canadians 
California and New York; British in New York 
id California; Germans in New York and Cali- 
rnia; Italians in New York and New Jersey; 
fp id Poles in New York and Illinois. 

CITIZENSHIP 

Encouragement of Naturalization 

Informational Programs. In the public interest, 
' ery qualified alien who wishes to become a citi- 
n should be afforded that opportunity. Experi- 
Ace has shown that some aliens do not apply for 
^ituralization because they are unaware of their 
])tential eligibility. Others do not fully under- 
iand the naturalization process and refrain from 
rtion in the belief that they are iiicapable of 
lalifying for one reason or another. Thus, the 
ssemination of information relating to these 
atters is essential to the fulfillment of adminis- 
ative responsibility and the accomplishment of 
e naturalization mission. 

rvice pamphlets and other material describ- 
g and explaining the naturalization prerequisites 
id procedures in the simplest of terms were made 
adily available to all interested parties. Similar 
lidance was given personally by trained contact 
presentatives at the various field offices and by 
turalization officers during their frequent visits 
public school citizenship classes and to military 
stallations in the United States. In addition, 



the several Service films that portray the natural- 
ization process explain tlie educational and othei 
prerequisites for citizenship to potential candi- 
dates and encourage them to submit applications. 
The film "Are You a Citizen" continued to be in 
great demand. At one adult education center 
alone, o\er 700 prospective citizens viewed the film 
in a single week. The Service also continued to 
notify newly naturalized persons of their right 
to file petitions for naturalization in behalf of 
their children. It is a matter of record that par- 
ents frequently failed to exercise this right through 
ignorance of its existence. 

Each year September 17, the date of the signing 
of the Constitution, is proclaimed by the President 
as "Citizenship Day" and the beginning of "Con- 
stitution Week." In many instances, Service rep- 
resentatives appeared on radio and television or 
participated personally in suitable public observ- 
ances sponsored by civic, fraternal, and patriotic 
organizations. Whenever possible, final natural- 
ization proceedings were conducted on "Citizen- 
ship Day" in conjunction with the commemorative 
ceremonies held in local comnuinities. Once more, 
the Service "Citizenship Day Bulletin" received 
wide distribution and proved itself an effective 
guide in planning appropriate observances. In 
May 1963, the Service received the (Jreorge Wash- 
ington Honor Medal, awarded by the Freedoms 
Foundation for this Bulletin. Special naturaliza- 
tion hearings were also arranged as a part of Law 
Day programs in a number of States, as a means 
of stressing the relationship between responsible 
citizenship and the law. 

Citizenshi]} Education. While the naturaliza- 
tion law accords an exemption from the English 
literacy requirements to elderly, long-time resi- 
dent aliens, the overwhelming majority of natural- 
ization candidates must be able to speak, under- 
stand, read, and write the English language. 
Furthermore, the statute requires that all candi- 
dates possess a fair knowledge and understanding 
of this country's history, government, and Consti- 
tution. Accordingly, an integral part of Service 
responsibility in the naturalization field is the 
furtherance of adult education in these areas. As- 
sistance to prospective citizens to meet the educa- 
tional requirements for naturalization begins with 
their admission to the TTnited States and does not 
end until they have qualified. Names and ad- 
dresses of 134,385 immigrants who arrived during 
the fiscal year were furnished local public schools 
in order that invitations to attend citizenship 
classes might be extended. For the same purpose, 
similar information was supplied for 44,572 nat- 
uralization candidates, either upon receipt of their 
applications or the continuance of their petitions 
for failure to satisfy the educational prerequisites. 



nd 



The naturalization examiners continued to co- 
operate with the public schools and authorized or- 
ganizations in the establishment and manitenance 
of needed citizenship classes. Throu<rh their et- 
forts, as well as that of other Service personnel 
stationed outside the ITnited States, special educa- 
tional facilities required to meet the citizenship 
education needs of forei^i-born dependents of 
servicemen were established or continued at mili- 
tary installations here and abroad. Acting in a 
liaison capacity between naturalization applicant 
and citizenship education authorities, tlie exami 
ners were largely instrumental in encouraging air 
facilitating school attendance when needed. Thei 
were 104,164 candidates for citizenship in classes 
during the fiscal year; and 5,079 other candidates 
who could not attend school enrolled in home study 
courses. . , ,. , , 

The Federal Textbook on Citizenship, published 
and distributed by the Service, was once again 
used extensively by the public schools and by 
others who purchased the textbook at a nominal 
charge through the Government Printing Office. 
A total of 151,859 copies of the various parts of 
the textbook were distributed by the Service dur- 
ing the past fiscal year. 

Naturalization Petitions 

Persons Naturalized. A large nuinber of new 
naturalization examiners were effectively trained 
during this fiscal year. There was no break in the 
maintenance of current status in naturalization 
activities. Naturalization of servicemen, their de- 
pendents, and other persons engaged in activities 
essential to the public interest was expedited. 
This was often accomplished because of the full 
cooperation of the courts, which, almost without 
exception, made special naturalization proceed- 
ings possible whenever the necessity arose. 

In fiscal year 1963, a total of 124,178 persons 
were naturalized 2.5 percent less than in the 
preceding year, but a number exceeding the high 
annual volume for all but 2 of the past 5 years. 

The nationality composition of the majority 
of persons naturalized bears a close relation to the 
total permanent alien population in the United 
States. Sixty-eight percent of the 124,178 persons 
naturalized were former nationals of the follow- 
ing countries: Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ire- 
land, Italy, Poland, United Kingdom, China, 
Canada, and Mexico. These same nationalities 
also constituted 68 percent of the total resident 
alien population in 1968, numbering 2,892,015. 

Since 1957, German nationals have constituted 
the highest single nationality group among the 
persons naturalized. A nuinber of these persons 
were alien dependents of .servicemen, and their 
naturalization was facilitated by the citizenship 



classes described above. Italy, the United KiiU ''■ 

dom, and Canada also have ranked high amoB * 

the nationalities of the persons naturalized. Du r , 

ing the past 2 years, there was an upsurge in tj '" 

naturalizations of Hungarians (5,682 in 1962, afl "", 

9,601 in 1963). Most of these persons were Hul '^ 

garian parolees whose status had been adjusted ; ^' 

that of permanent residents under the Act of Jui ''"' 

25, 1958, but who did not become eligible for na "'" 

uralization until 1962. '" , 

Three-fourths of the 124,178 naturalizations ^^ 

1963 were under the general provisions of lai •*? 

Fifteen percent, 19,048 persons, were naturalizi J"*' 

as the spouses of U.S. citizens. Sixty percent '''''" 

these persons were former nationals of German "''J 

Italy, the United Kingdom, Japan, and Canad i"" 




.1 small adopted Korean orphan as looked ichen he 
rived in the United States, and 2 years later nhen 
became a United States citizen. 



Many of the 9,13() children of U.S. citizens ni ^ 
uralized were adopted orphans admitted to tl 
country under special legislation. Nearly t 
thirds of these children came from Austria, G' 
many, Greece, Italy, China, Japan, Korea, and 
Philippines — the native countries of most of 
orphans admitted during the past decade. Mc 
than half of the 1,249 Korean naturalizations 
1963 were under special provisions relating to ch 
dren of U.S. citizens. 

Waves of military naturalizations have beK 
high during war years, when members of the U 
Armed Forces were given the opportunity to \ 
come naturalized as expeditiously as possib 
The 2,560 naturalizations based on military serv 
in 1963 consisted chiefly of persons who served 
the U.S. Armed Forces for 3 years or duri: j|j 
World War I, World War II, or the Kore ^ 
hostilities. 



16 



r.lit'ionx Denied. The 2,43() petitions for nat- 
1 all /.at ion denied represent a 31 percent decrease 
(iiipared with 1962. Denials. l)ecause ])etitioners 
Mc deficient in their knowledge of the history, 
uvcriinu'iit, and the Constitution of the United 
Mtrs. dr.ipiHMl from S-t7 denials in 1962 to just 111 
IIM').',. Literal y failures were reduced from 103 
I Cm ill the same period. The informational pro- 
i-aiiis (if the Service and a more realistic evalua- 
DH (if their own lack of the educational ([ualifica- 
nns may lia\e led many prospective candidates 
1 delay liliii^- ])ei il ions "until ^ffreater proficiency 
: these areas was att:iiiiiHl. 

The courts also disposed of 1,278 petitions vol- 
ntarily withdrawn by petitioners who realized 
ley could not qualify under the statute. An ad- 
iitional 818 petitions were denied when the peti- 
iners elected not to prosecute their cases for one 
ason or another. Petitions denied upon the basis 
withdrawal action or for lack of prosecution 
e not decided upon the merits, and many peti- 
)ners who have been refused citizenship' under 
eh circumstances may be expected to qualify on 
later date. 



Derivative Citizenship 

Certi-ficates Ixmied. Children born abroad to 
tizen parents are citizens at birth ; other children 
ay derive citizenship after birth upon the nat- 
•alization of their parents. Some alien women 
)tained citizenship through marriage to a citi- 
ai husband. For all of these persons, the deriva- 
^ ve certificate of citizenship has value as a 
invenient means of proving and protecting citi- 
nship status. For several reasons, there has 
ien a consistent upward trend in the number of 
ich administratively issued certificates. Our far- 
img commitments abroad have required military 
)rces and other U.S. representatives with their 
imilies to be stationed in every part of the globe. 
his Service and the military establishments have 
id a definite policy of encouraging members of 
16 Armed Forces to apply for certificates for their 
)reign-born children promptly upon their return 
> the United States. Another factor which 
•" mded to increase the number of applications was 
"■' 16 Service practice of notifying newly natural- 
'' ed parents of the citizenship rights of 'their chil- 
ren. Simplification and improvement in proce- 
ures, including the acceptance of evidence in 
tato Department files as to birth of citizen chil- 
ren abroad, also was a contributing factor. 
During fiscal year 1963, 34,755 derivative cer- 
ficates were issued, 10 percent more than in 1962, 
irec times as many as were issued 10 years ago. 
'f the total, 15,875 were issued to children who 



cquired citizenship at birth abroad (1,818 more 
lan last year) ; 17,968 to children who derived 



through the naturalization of parents (1,488 over 
last year) ; and 758 to women who became citizens 
by marriage, a very considerable number when one 
recalls that citizenship through marriage has not 
been conferred since September 22, 1922. 

Principal countries of birth were in about the 
same ratio to the total as naturalizations, i.e., Ger- 
many (8,001), Canada (3,632), Italy (3,042), the 
United Kingdom (2,997), Mexico (2,020), and 
Japan (1,675). 

Certificates Canceled. Derivative certificates 
may be administratively canceled if persons ob- 
tained such certificates through fraudulent or il- 
legal claims to birth abroad of citizen parents, or 
through naturalization of parents. Of the 475 de- 
rivative certificates canceled in 1963, 461 had been 
issued to persons born in China, most of whom 
claimed derivation through birth abroad to a citi- 
zen parent, a tangible result of the Chinese con- 
fession program mentioned elsewhere in this 
report. 

Repatriation. Persons who have lost their 
United States citizenship by operation of law, or as 
a result of proceedings in court, must take affirma- 
tive action to fully regain their citizenship; and 
generally, they must have recourse to the natural- 
ization process. However, the statute accords 
special benefits to certain expatriates, among 
whom are tliose women who lost their citizenship 
by marrying aliens prior to September 22, 1922. 
All but 1 of the 354 persons restored to citizen- 
ship during fiscal year 1963 were women in this 
category. One was restored to citizenship by pri- 
vate law. 

Miscellaneous Nationality Applications. Fre- 
quently obscured by the more dramatic programs 
of citizenship education and naturalization is the 
importance of the miscellaneous applications for 
nationality documents which are processed and 
adjudicated by the Service. Pursuant to statute, 
certificates of naturalization and citizenship and 
declarations of intention that have been lost, muti- 
lated, or destroyed can be replaced, '\\nien names 
have been legally changed, replacement documents 
can be issued in the new name. Special certifi- 
cates of naturalization to be used by naturalized 
citizens in obtaining recognition as such by foreign 
states may also be issued. Certifications from na- 
tionality documents for use in compliance with 
federal and state statutes and in judicial pro- 
ceedings, or where they are to be used for some 
other legitimate purpose may be made. There were 
8,759 applications completed throughout 1963, a 
figure which has remained relatively constant dur- 
ing recent years. It was the rule rather than the 
exception for the various documents to be issued 
and delivered irmnediately following a hearing, 
and hearings were conducted within a short time 
after receipt of the application. 



Loss of Citizenship 

United States citizens, whether they be native- 
born or naturalized, may lose their citizenship 
automatically upon the voluntary performance of 
specific acts described in the statutes. The citi- 
zenship of naturalized citizens may also be re- 
voked in judicial proceedings where it appears 
that their admission to citizenship was illegal or 
fraudulent in nature. However, the courts have 
held that citizenship is not extinguished under 
these conditions, unless the expatriative act, ille- 
gality or fraud, is established oy evidence which 
IS clear, convincing, and unequivocal and does not 
leave the issue in doubt. Despite this very 
exacting burden of proof, which is extremely dif- 
ficult to satisfy, the naturalized status of seven 
persons was revoked and the certificates canceled 
during the past fiscal year. 

In addition, 3,164 citizens were held to have 
been expatriated, including 943 persons who lost 
their nationality by voting in a foreign election, 
1,156 by residing in a foreign state, and 585 by 
naturalization in a foreign state. There were 
also 307 persons who were expatriated by either 
renouncing their citizenship or taking an oath of 
allegiance to a foreign state, and 154 by either 
serving in the Armed Forces or accepting em- 
ployment with the government of a foreign state. 
The remaining expatriates, 19 in number, lost 
their citizenship upon miscellaneous grounds pro- 
vided for by the law. 

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 

Development and training activities sponsored 
by the Service during fiscal year 1963 included in- 
Service training, interagency training, training 
in non-Government facilities and foreign official 
training. In-Service training consisted of 14 
formal journeyman, supervisory and executive 
programs of instruction. A total of 23 sessions 
were completed by 622 officers at the Officer Devel- 
opment Center at Port Isabel, Tex. This number 
included 121 officers who successfully completed 
the initial 14-week session at the Border Patrol 



Academy. The Border Patrol Academy con 
ducted a special 40-hour F.A.A. Peace Officer 
Refresher Course for 18 Federal Aviation Agenc 
Peace officers. In addition, 887 home-stud' 
courses in the Service's Extension Training Prt 
gram were completed. 

Two Executive Development Seminar session 
were conducted. Forty executives attendee 
Twenty officers completed the Instructor Trainin 
Course conducted by the United States Arm 
Engineer School at Fort Belvoir, Va. 

A total of 45 foreign officials from Japan, I 
Salvador, United Arab Republic, Thailan 
Indonesia, Sudan, Trinidad and Tobago, Irai 
Philippines, Upper Volta, Ivory Coast, Ira- 
Libya, Guatemala, Liberia, China, Finland, an 
Panama studied one or more functions of tl 
Service. 

During the year, 441 employee suggestions we] 
received, of which 80 were adopted. There we 
578 persons recognized for superior performam 
or special acts. 

During fiscal year 1963, seven Joint Custom 
and Immigi-ation and Naturalization inspectif 
station projects and 10 Border Patrol station pro 
ects were begun. During the same period, s 
moves into new or improved quarters were accor 
plished. As a result of these moves, procureme 
activities were increased to provide new equi 
ment and furniture for these installations. 

Work performed by the Service is measun 
in terms of work units and man-hours for i 
activities. This information is used at every c 
ganizational level to plan work, determine tren( 
evaluate new procedures, and to improve wo 
methods. 

The statistical information collected on imn 
gration, nationality, citizen and alien travele: 
and deportation is widely used by other goveri||||.i 
ment agencies, transportation companies, studeBi 
of demography, and the general public. In i, 
sponse to a request of the House Subcommittee • 
Immigration, a report was prepared covering t 
Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952 ai 
subsequent legislation. Another study was co 
cerned with naturalized citizens in relation to t 
time such citizens were in the United States pri 
to naturalization. 



18 









TABLE 1, 


IMMIGRATION 


TO THE UNITED STATESt 






eg 






1820 - 1963 






Pi 


Zf"roni 


1820 to 1367 figures represent alien passengers arrived} 1863 through 1391 


and 


1895 through 1897 itntnigrant 


aliens arrived; 1892 


through 1894 and from 1893 to 


the 


ID 


present time immigrant aliens admitted^/ 






4 




Number 




Number 




Number 




Number 


ni 


Year 


of 


Year 


of 


Year 


of 


Year 


of 


Ji 




Dersons 












persons 


, 


J20-1963i/ 


42,702,328 


1855.. 


200,377 


1892. 


579,663 


1931-1940 


528,431 


ag 






1356,. 


200,436 


1893. 


439,730 


1931.. 


97,139 


n 


1820. . 


8,385 


1857.. 


251,306 


1894. 


285,631 


1932.. 


35,576 


ti 






1858.. 


123,126 


1895. 


258,536 


1933.. 


23,068 




(21-1830 


.143.439 


1859.. 


121,282 


1896. 


343,267 


1934.. 


29,470 




1821.. 


9,127 


I860.. 


153,640 


1897. 


230,832 


1935.. 


34,956 




1822.. 


6,911 






1898. 


229,299 


1936.. 


36,329 


m 


1823.. 


6,354 


1861-1870 


.2.314.824 


1899. 


311,715 


1937.. 


50,244 




1824.. 


7,912 


1861.. 


91,913 


1900. 


448,572 


1938.. 


67,895 


an 


1825.. 


10,199 


1862.. 


91,985 






1939.. 


82,993 


1826.. 


10,337 


1363., 


176,282 


1901-1910 8.795.386 


1940.. 


70,756 




1827.. 


13,875 


1864.. 


193,418 


1901. 


487,913 






:; 1828.. 


27,382 


1865.. 


243,120 


1902. 


648,743 


1941-1950 i 


.Q35.03^ 


: 1329.. 


22,520 


1866.. 


318,568 


1903. 


857,046 


1941.. 


51,776 


1830.. 


23,322 


1867.. 


315,722 


1904. 


812,870 


1942.. 


23,781 






1868.. 


138,840 


1905. 


1,026.499 


1943.. 


23,725 


!31-1840 


599.125 


1369.. 


352,763 


1906. 


1,100,735 


1944.. 


28,551 


1831.. 


22,633 


1370.. 


387,203 


1907. 


1,285.349 


1945.. 


38,119 


1832.. 


60,482 






1908. 


782,870 


1946.. 


108,721 


1833.. 


58,640 


1871-1880 


2.812.191 


1909. 


751,786 


1947.. 


147,292 


1834.. 


65,365 


1371.. 


321,350 


1910. 


1,041,570 


1948.. 


170,570 


1335.. 


45.374 


1872.. 


404,806 






1949.. 


188,317 


1R36.. 


76,242 


1873.. 


4 59,803 


1911-1920 5.735.811 


1950.. 


249,187 


: 1837.. 


79,340 


1874.. 


313,339 


1911. 


878,587 






'" 1838.. 


38,914 


1875.. 


227,498 


1912. 


838,172 


1951-1960 2 


.^15.479 


1839.. 


68,069 


1876.. 


169,986 


1913. 


1,197,892 


1951.. 


205,717 


- 1840.. 


84,066 


1377.. 


141,357 


1914. 


1,218,480 


1952.. 


265,520 






1878.. 


138,469 


1915. 


326,700 


1953.. 


170,434 


841-1850 


.J.713,251 


1879.. 


177,826 


1916. 


298,826 


1954.. 


208,177 


■ 1341.. 


80,289 


1880.. 


4 57,257 


1917. 


295,403 


1955.. 


237,790 


1842.. 


104,565 






1918. 


110,618 


1956.. 


321,625 


1843.. 


52,496 


1831-1890 


5.246.613 


1919. 


141,132 


1957.. 


326,867 


1844.. 


78,615 


1831.. 


669,431 


1920. 


430,001 


1953.. 


253,265 


1345.. 


114,371 


1882.. 


788,992 






1959.. 


260,686 


1846.. 


154,416 


1883.. 


603,322 


1921-1930 4.107.209 


I960.. 


265,398 


1847.. 


234,963 


1084.. 


518,592 


1921. 


805,228 






C: 1848.. 


226,527 


1885.. 


395,346 


1922. 


309,556 


1961.. 


271,344 


U 1849.. 


297,024 


1886.. 


334,203 


1923. 


522,919 


1962.. 


283,763 




1850.. 


369,980 


18 J7.. 
1888.. 


490,109 
546,889 


1924. 
1925. 


706,896 
294,314 


1963.. 


306,260 




151-1360 


2.598.214 


1889.. 


444,427 


1926. 


304,483 








1851.. 


379,466 


1890.. 


455,302 


1927. 


335,175 








1852.. 


371,603 






1928. 


307,255 








1853.. 


368,645 


1891-1900 


3.687.564 


1929. 


279,678 








1354.. 


427,833 


1891.. 


560,319 


1930. 


241,700 








' Data are 


for fiscal years ended 


June 30, except 1820 through 1331 and 1844 through 


1849 




fiscal 


years ended Sept. 30i 


1833 through 1842 and 


1851 through 1367 years ended 


Dec* 




31| 1332 covers 15 months ended Dec. 31; 1343 nine 


months ended Sept. 30; 1350 






fifteen months en 


ded Dec. 31 


and 1868 si 

1 


X months 
9 


ended June 30. 







TABLE 2. ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AND DEPARTED, 
BY MONTHS: YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1962 AND 1963 

/Data exclude border crossers, crewmen, Mexican agricultural laborers, 
and aliens admitted on documentary walverSj/ 



ALIENS ADMITTED 



Imml- 
grant 



Nonlm- 
mlerant 



ALIENS 
DEPARTED 
1/ 



U. S. CITIZENS 



Arrived Departed 



Fiscal year 1963 . 

July-Dec, 1962 

July 

August 

September . . . . 

October 

November 

December 

Jan. -June 1963 . 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Fiscal year 1962 . 

July-Dec, 1961 

July 

August 

September . . . . 

October 

November 

December 

Jan. -June 1962 . 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 



306.260 



2.A33.463 



2.^21,3481 



159.291 



781.753 



941.044 



693.614 



28,494 
26,936 
27,931 
28,004 
24,672 
23,254 

146.969 



153,896 
151,786 
179,582 
106,215 
105,177 
85,097 

725.338 



182,390 
178,722 
207,513 
134,219 
129,849 
108,351 

872.307 



126,283 
124,593 
129,151 
112,095 
96,538 
104,954 

573.229 



265,321 
332,568 
249,577 
186,075 
151,690 
140,399 

1.107.833 



1.149.600 



22,932 
21.879 
24,958 
26,037 
25,575 
25,588 

283.763 



117,069 
75,366 
95,111 
125.469 
152,110 
160,213 

1.331,383 



140,001 
97,245 
120,069 
151,506 
177,685 
185,801 



70,285 
74,318 
91,185 
103,234 
107,851 
126,356 

1.158.960 



142,623 
148,414 
210,051 
187,225 
189,385 
230,135 



282,1 

246,215 

189,493 

156,414 

128,955 

146,364 

1.271.748 



141,729 

176,206 

200,977 

212,338 

199,659. 

340,839 

2.159.857 



143.434 



728.378 



871,812 



616^64 



1.017.872 



25,010 
24,690 
25,059 
25,035 
22,587 
21,053 

140.329 



129,542 
136,299 
162,355 
112,784 
87,176 
100,222 

603.005 



154,552 
160,989 
187,414 
137,819 
109,763 
121,275 

743.334 



112,748 
107,612 
112,064 
100,071 
85,629 
98,840 

?^1.9?6 



231,428 
298,874 
223,409 
164,192 
133,256 
127,897 



22,015 
18,912 
24,031 
24,395 
25,678 
25,298 



83,058 
65,999 
91,396 
117.662 
120,564 
124,326 



105,073 
84,911 
115,427 
142,057 
146,242 
149,624 



71,508 
68*219 
85,812 
94,836 
99,993 
121,628 



262,628 
206,394 
166,376 
136,629 
109 , 885 
135,960 

1.141.985 



llll 



138,556 
144,832 
184,873 
169,911 
177.607 
204,491 



138,293 
157.851. 
175,555 
182,585 
183,215 
304,486 



_!/ Includes aliens departed and citizens arrived and departed by sea and air, except 
direct arrivals from or departures to Canada, 



20 



TABLE 3. ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AT UNITED STATES PORTS OF ENTRY: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1962 - 1963 



Class 



Total 



Citizens 



Year ended June 30, 1963 



•tal number 

Border crossers 

Canadian 

Mexican 

Crewmen 

Others admitted 

tal number 
Border crossers 

Canadian 

Mexican . 
Crewmen 
Others admitted 



173.693.807 


99,199,889. 


74,493,918 


164.881.601 


94.694,164 


70.187,437 


56,785,973 


29,957,041 


26,828,932 


108,095,628 


64,737,123 


43,358,505 


2,657,800 


1,795,418 


862,382 


6,154,406 


2,710,307 


3,444,099 



Year ended June 30, 1962 



173,287,932 


99,180,777 


74,107.155 


164.980.440 


94.835.674 


r 

70.144.766 


57,406,672 


30,778,071 


26,628,601 


107,573,768 


64,057,603 


43,516,165 


2,622,340 


1,762,356 


859,984 


5.685,152 


2,582,747 


3,102,405 



/Data 



ALIENS ADMITTED 

imiGBAHTS 1/ 

Quota Innlgrantl 

Firnt preference quota: 

Their apouaea and children 

Second preference quota: 

Parents of U. S. citizen 

Third preference quota: 

Spouses of resident allena 

Unmarried Boni or daughters of realdent aliens 3/ 

Brothers or sisters of U. S. citizens 

Harried sons or daughters of U. S. cltltens 2> 

of U. 3, citizens 4/ 

Adopted sons or daughters of U. S. citizens 2/ 

Displaced persons - Sec. ^4, Displaced Persons Act of If-S 

Foreign government officials adjusted under Sec. 13, Act of 

September 11, 1957 

Nonquota Immigrants 

Wives of U. S. citizens 

Husbands of U. S. citizens 

Children of U. S. cltiicne: 

Orphans adopted abroad or to be adopted ^Z 

Their spouses and chi Idren 

Persons who had been U. S. citizens 

Ministers of religious denominations, their spouses and children 

Employees of U. S. Government abroad, their spouses and children 

Refugees - Refugee Relief Act of 1953 

Immigrants - Act of September U, 1957 

Hungarian parolees - Act of July 25. 1958 

Azores and NetherUnda refugees - Act of September 2, 1958 

Immigrants - Sees. <■ and 6. Act of September 22. 1959 

Refugee-escapees - Act of July l*., 1960 

Immigrants - Act of September 26, 1961 

Immigrants - Act of October 24. 1962 

Children born abroad to resident aliens or subsequent to issuance 

Aliens adjusted under Sec. 249, Immigration and Nationality Act 

Other nonquota Immigrants 

NONII*IICRANTS 1/ 

Foreign government officials 

Temporary visitors for pleasure 

Transit aliens 

Treaty tradera and investors 

Students 

Their spouses and chi Idren 7/ 

Representatives to International organizations 

Representatives of foreign information media 

Ejichange visitors 

Returning resident aliens 1/ S' 

NATO officials 

\/ An immigrant Is an alien admitted for permanent residence. A nonimmigrant 
Returning resident aliens who have once been counted as immigrants are iw 

2/ Prior to Act of September 22, 1959, all sons or daughters of U. S, citizen: 

2' Prior to Act of September 22, 1959, Included only children under 21 of res 

aliens were classified as nonpref erence quota, 
4/ Prior to Act of September 22, 1959, classified as nonpref erence quota. 

6/ includes I foreign government official in 1960, 4 in 1961, and 3 In 1963, 

Section 13, Act of September II, 1957. 
2/ Classes established by Act of September 21, 1961. 
S' Figures are not comparable due to changes In documentary requirements. 



30,701 
597,982 



7,607 
29,339 

1,198 
24,293 

85,915 
1,043 






Port 


19 59 


1960 


1951 


1962 


1963 


All port. 


260.685 


265.398 


271.344 


283.75? 


_J06a69 


Atlantic 


169.217 


155.293 


151.716 


151.139 


158.541 


Baltimore, Md 


^55 


385 


428 


699 


439 




4,812 


7.838 


5.970 


6.147 


5.045 


Charleston, S. C 


386 


217 


375 


325 


740 


Charlotte Araalle, V. I 




226 


380 


540 


251 


Hartford. Conn 


B52 


207 


223 


285 


362 


Miami, FIfl 


12,669 


16.119 


22.082 


25.925 


24.038 


Newark, N. J 


22,406 


a.4R3 


7.894 


5,512 


8.739 




122,336 


116.683 


108.953 


103,752 


108.945 


Philadelphia, Pa 


1,222 


529 


431 


401 


307 


Port Everglades, Fla 


2 30 


322 


482 


416 


405 


San Juan, P. R 


1,513 


1.529 


2.498 


4.824 


6.752 


Washington, D. C 


460 


665 


49 6 


674 


801 


Other Atlantic 


1.550 


2.09 5 


1.503 


539 


705 


Culf of Me«lco 


2.910 


2.929 


3.155 


2.502 


2.732 


Houston. TeK 


481 


599 


603 


499 


535 


New Orleans, La 


1.269 


1.184 


1.294 


1.265 


1.335 


San Antonio, Tex 


615 


621 


768 


194 


250 


Tampa, Fla 


360 


39 5 


353 


423 


470 


Other Cu If 


185 


130 


148 


121 


142 


Pacific 


28.236 


25.489 


23.326 


24.396 


26.377 


Agana . Guam 




308 


269 


208 


589 


Honolulu, Hawaii 


9.822 


9.234 


8.914 


10.271 


11.141 


Los Angeles, Calif 


7.509 


8.582 


8.143 


8,463 


10.559 


San Diego, Calif 


118 


266 


254 


233 


575 


San Francisco, Calif 


5.650 


4.293 


3.290 


2,687 


2.591 


Seattle. Mash 


4.518 


2.328 


1.907 


2,311 


2.739 


Other Pacific 


381 


478 


549 


223 


82 


Alaska 


274 


1.138 


1.579 


1.792 




Anchorag 


238 




1.442 


1,695 


2.165 


Other Alaska 


36 


' 44 


137 


96 


108 


Canadian Border 




49.184 


51.435 




59.012 


Blaine, Wash 


3,545 


4.753 


5.022 


4,756 


5.033 


Buffalo. N. Y 


3.594 


4.332 


5.257 


4,870 


5.078 


Calais. Me 


1,142 


1,610 


2.048 


2,007 


2.550 


Chainplaln. N. Y 


1,627 


2,025 


2.402 


2,977 


4.381 


Chicago. Ill 


3,822 


4,848 


5.434 


5,285 


6.716 


Cleveland, Ohio 


551 


696 


57 2 


709 


760 


Derby Line. Vt 


314 


525 


690 


512 


559 


Detroit, Mich 


7,951 


11,424 


10.283 


9,039 


10.327 


Eflstport, Idaho 


470 


511 


786 


842 


994 


Hlghgate Springs, Vt 


47 5 


552 


747 


89 7 


1.353 


Jackman, Me 


290 


358 


333 


449 


421 


Madawaska, Me 


165 


147 


165 


247 


343 


Niagara Falls, N. Y 


2.854 


2,855 


2.438 


1,937 


2.224 


Norton, Vt 


270 




475 


308 


387 


Noyes, Minn 


1.203 


1,323 


1,410 




1.490 


Pembina, N. D 


100 


173 


251 


'405 


501 


Portal, N, D 


183 


198 


222 


188 




Port Huron, Mich 


1.572 


2,263 


2.404 


2,353 


3.092 


Rouses Point, N. Y 


1.560 


1,628 


1.538 


1,590 


1.491 


St. Albans, Vt 


706 


971 


992 


1,150 


1.577 


Sault Ste. Marie, Mich 


263 


357 


455 


338 


445 


Sweetgrasa, Mont 


585 


543 


906 


938 


1.241 


Thousand Island Bridge. N. Y 


365 


488 


459 


585 


632 


Trout River. N. Y 


246 


327 


412 


95 


255 


Vanceboro. Me 


57 5 


613 


409 


323 


563 


Other Canadian Border 


3.574 


4,949 


5.215 


5,125 


6.122 


Mexican Border 


21.759 


31.190 


39.929 


54.757 


55.257 


Brownsville. Tex 


506 


1.470 


1.904 


1,900 


1.669 


Calexlco. Calif 


1.752 


2.679 


4.827 


8,503 


8.504 


Del Rio. Tex 


81 




183 


357 


341 


Eagle Pass. Tex 


575 


1.111 


1.251 


2,225 


2.083 


El Paso, Tex 


4.881 


6.245 


7,977 


10,191 


8.764 


Hidalgo, Tex 


858 


1.517 


1,510 


2,200 


1.9 54 


Uredo, Tex 


2.556 


4.015 


4,344 


4,9 30 




Nogales. Ariz 


2.680 


3.366 


3,534 


3,646 


3.'721 


Roma. Tex 


228 


459 


603 


778 


995 


San Luis. Ariz 


56 




409 


807 


1.441 


San Ysldro. Calif 


7.190 


9.504 


13.046 


18,860 


20.539 


Other Mexican Border 


294 


355 


341 


350 


446 


Al I other 


187 


175 


193 


10 


58 





23 



TABLE 6. ]KMICIW>fTS ADMITTEO. 
COUNTKY OK HCION OF 


Sy CUSSES UN 


OEK IHE IMMIGRATION 
ENDED JUNE 30. 1963 


Lnus 


. 


















^ 




Kunbar 
•d.ltt.d 


• 

1! 


lii 






3.,; 
5= 


1 

m 


ill 


u i 

11 


*"" 


tncit 'under 






-7^U"'-' 




".5 

m 


1 


1 


A 

113 


1 

i 
11 


i 


ii«i 




106 260 














3.06.7. 


462 


JU 


20 


1.888 


_m_ 


2.005 


2J46 


2.672 


^ 


""" 
















. » 


2.150- 


-228. 


-^ 


2.0 


_yi 


2'° 


'.'" 


1.665 


8.138 


JL. 


ii" 




lists 

623 

l:'l78 
16.588 

2.'o<.5 
2.560 
1.931 


6ill8 


1.483 

60 
46 


'm 

536 

7 983 


174 


24 
12 
231 
246 
4 39 
20 




153 

290 






'! 


1,268 


: 


146 


65 
94.7 


10 
16 










C.echoilovakl. 


^'. 










C""", 


:: 


















Pound 

fo't"8« 1 


s;' 










?:;::r;Ll„.-;;.-A.;.i-:::;::::::::::::: 


K 
















~; 




2.580 


- 27<. 
'3 


1,347 

'S2C 

'327 

3,561 

313 


80 
44 

2.1 
1.350 
1.445 

122 


31 

69 


440 
55 








'? 






1 






127 
660 

681 
105 




i<«i 




































































°.r 




l!615 




10.683 
1,504 








294 






[ 






; 


1 


": 


107 


104 


'• 
































=' s""-"" 












Panl™*"' 




oJh^r n"I"I.^Mc1" 


, 


So^th *,erlc. 






.... 


lll"l\"" 


?!'3: 

4.283 












■■it?oi 


13 


'2 


': 










- 


: 




« 


















V.n.iu.l. 


* 


Atrlc. 


» 


;;^j;^'j; 


'2: 

760 


'211 

253 

82 
223 


22 


17 








■" 


'^ 


5 








'I 


24i 




6' 








I 










„^„„,. 




«• 








355 

45 


137 


■ 39 






" 


' 












I 




" 






s 


P.clflc I.l.ndi (U, S. .to.) 








f 


2/ Include! Fori»». 

J/ Include! Arab PalMtln*. 


dju.t.d u 






of Sa 

2 


ta»b, 

4 

































REXJION OF MSI P 


EKHANEBT 


RESIDE 


CE: 


EAR E 


DED JON 


30. 1963 




















Nu.ber 
•dnltted 


li- 


35 


1""' 


•1 


1 

5 = 


i 

ill 

Us 


: 

S St 

m 

i 




adiu 


1..10 


'unLr 




:r:::: ;i:?r. 




i 


ol 




i! 


1 




1 


,,, ^^^^^^^ 








17,J90 








3,067 




211 


20 


1,888 


280 
















































'63! 
l'9J'. 


4.942 


70 
17.962 


7.877 


1.15. 

'4 


150 


111 


3 

729 
57 


114 


92 


3 


3 
10 


3 


25 


956 


3.485 




B«U1"« 


i? 


















>"""■' 


in" 


































T 'k'r'tlroo.'inj *ii«) 


jj 














' Oth.r Europa 


■ 8 




14!. 207 


14.390 


127.817 


57 
989 


"1 
1.291 


1 

54 
465 


3 


1.627 


13 

81 


15 


5 


a 


^ 




SO 
540 
10 


27 5 
59 2 

640 
































■'»'■'"■ J' 


I 










S,rl.n Ar.b ».p„bHc ..! '.'.'..'..'..'.. 


] 


rth /l..rlc. 






501509 

l!843 

l!372 

2,055 
27.759 


"l37 
33 


l!363 

2.345 

499 

1.868 

24.979 


■3™ 

5 

] 

45 
35 


5 
2 
,1 


26 


35.459 


2 
5 








I 


i 




^i 


'l\ 


569 


Ih'™" ::;:::::':::: 
















10 




Co.ts »lc« 


3 


CuSttMl. 


t 














uth A».rlc. 










5!877 
2!7!3 


35 


41 
8! 


5 
3 


2;355 
972 


86 










■i 




'? 


















^•'"'" 


6 












„ 


»'!"'• 




' 61 


3 


3 
34 


: 


14 














■j 




; 






South Africa . 


















136 

27 


'998 
8 




" 103- 


49 

5 

5 


25 


■■■ is 


7 


18 












; 


74 








P.clfle l.l.nd. (U. S. .d..) 


1 










Include. 40 foreign gov,rn,«nt offlcl.l. ., 


Ju.ted uti 






of Sep 

21 


> 





























TASLC 6B 


-r^orayriSi^r 


S TO PEHMAIIENT kes 
BIRTH: YEAR ENDE 


;s^ 


\r.i 


' - 


TATES, 














.d|u.t- 


1 


5ii 


.quota l...l,rant. 


. = ^ 


1 


1 




^S^I^r] 


1 


5. 
~ i 

A 5 

ii 


1 

~o| 

22 


1 


Country or r.glo" 


I 


i. 


I 

1 


It 

^11 


|o 
jj t I 

ill 


it 


— 


24 660 




47 


841 








26. 


19.262 


20 








-ifV- 


,'.°°,^, 


" 


















6,JB5 




?'°" 


89 3 


67} 




1,752 




■550 






104 


57 


128 

72 
38 




16 


48 

1,041 
6.026 


2 


137 
2.370 


2.824 




2^ 


109 


I 

6 , 


















T,V.ll ::::::::::::;:::::::::::::: 


ifiy 

Nitherlindi 














Turkey 1 Eorop. .nd A.t.l 


U.S.S.K. (Europe and Alia) 








180 
319 
699 

563 

n 

85 
3.347 


36 
3' 


,8 


i 


34 

e 


1 


5 




32 
344 

3.328 


11 


16 

40 


2.085 






6 


3 

: ; 


Hong Kon, 






\"" 
















Syrian Arab Kapubllc 




89 5 
48 


















I 




266 
2.755 


14 


: 










Do.lnlcan ..public 






E' Salvador 


H"*du"l° 






Othar C.ntr.l Africa 






1 


; 


; 


[ 


i 


: 


] 


': 


1 


: 


i 
























Africa 


















[ 






u 


28 






i 


\ 








Unlt.d Arab Republic lEjypt) 


Oceania 










22 


■ "19 


5 






1,3 
34 




81 


50 








': 










U Include. 1 .dju.ti.ent under Sec. 4 
1/ Include. Por«,.«. 


Dl.place 










26 























s°'"g- ' ' 2r: 









155-gog-g ■g 












lit I 

^5-* l-SS"'?^ I '-8 



715 - 352 O - 64 - 3 



MIGRANTS ADMITTED UNDER THE ACT OF SEPTEMBER 

BY CLASS OF ADMISSION AND COUNTRY OR RSCION ( 

SEPTEMBER 11, 1957 - JUNE 30, 1963 



Finland 

Frsnc. 

"unRAry 

Irtlsnd 

Nether l«nd 

Poland 

SpAln 

United Kingdom 

Other Europe 

China X' 

Hong Kong 

India 

Iran 

Iraq 

Jord'" 1' 

Philippine 

Other Alia 

North Anerlca 

Canada 

Dominican Republic 

Other Wait Indl 

El Salvador 

Other Central America 

Other South America 

Algeria ...'.'.'.'.['.'.[[['.'.'.[['. 

United Arab Republic I Egypt 



IMMIGRAIITS ADMITTED UNDER THE ACT OF SEPTEMBER 2, 1958 ( 
BY CUSS OF ADMISSION AND COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH: 
SEPTEMBER 2, 1956 - JUNE 10, 1963 



Country or region 
of birth 


Number 
admitted 


-1 

S >. 

H 


III 


1 

h 

111 


1 I2 

iilli 
















12,133 

5,033 


1,975 




5,381 

39 


6.750 


N th rl ndn 


Portugal 


5 







TABLE 6P. IMMIGRANTS 



ITTEO UNDER SECTIONS 4 AND 6, ACT OF SEPTEMBER 

BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF EIRTII: 

SEPTEMBER 22, 1959 - JUNE 30, 1963 









Spouses and 


Brothers, 






Spouses and 






Parents 


children of 


slaters, sons. 




Parents 




Country or region 


Number 


of U.S. 


resident 


or dauRhters of 


Other 


of U.S. 


resident 


of birth 


admlttet 


citizens 


aliens 


U.S. cltli ns 


relatives 


citizens 


aliens 






(Sec. 41 


(Sec. 4) 


(Sec. 4) 


(Sec. 4; 


(Sec. 6) 


(Sec. 6) 














12 
















10 


1,367 


Austria 


12 


2 




3 






_ 


Belglun 


30 




. 




29 




. 


Flnlnnd 


23 




1 


10 


10 




. 


France 


67 


1 




11 


50 


- 


5 


Germany 


39 


2 


3 


8 


26 


- 


- 


Greece 


2,148 


20 


168 


669 


894 


1 


396 


Hungary 


38 




2 


22 






1 


Italy 


16,934 


47 


611 


5,329 


9,994 


6 


947 


Netherlands 


14 


2 


1 


3 


B 




_ 


Poland 


145 


6 


2 


69 


66 


- 


2 


Portugal 


4,389 




17 


i,353 


3,015 


3 


1 






31 


1 


83 


50 






Spain 


536 


1 


I 


234 


300 


. 


- 


Turkey (Europe and Asia) 


194 


18 


2 


114 


59 




1 


United Kingdom 


51 


1 


1 


7 


42 




. 


USSR (Europe and Asia) 


26 


5 


_ 


10 


11 




. 


Yugoslavia 


839 


9 


23 


381 


425 




1 


Other Europe 


217 


8 


5 


101 


99 


- 




Asia 


2.164 


44 


134 


705 


851 


1 


429 


China 1/ 


337 


6 






53 






Hong Kong 
Indonesia 


103 


' 


15 


10 


48 


- 


29 


15 


, 


I 


'' 


5 




■ 


Iran 


100 






36 


53 








144 


3 


'I 


21 








Japan 


426 


I, 


6 










Jordan 2/ 






7 


122 








Lebanon 


200 


3 


5 










Philippines 


2R1 


8 




133 


137 




2 


Syrian Arab Republic 














. 




167 


12 


12 


73 
594 


86 


1 


3 
10 


















Jamaica 






g 




93 




^ 


Other Kest Indies 


362 




(, 


194 




, 


Central America 


8 








, 




. 


Other North America 




11 


2 


190 


9 


. 


2 


South America 


44 


1 


1 


10 


30 




J 






















1 


1 






- 


" 


Africa 




United Arab Republic (Egypt) ... 


192 


3 














64 


1 


1 


4 


58 










Oceania 


87 


3 


- 


20 


64 











TABLE 7. ANNUAL QUOTAS AND QUOTA IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED: 



YEARS ENDED JU 


E 30, 1959 


- 1963 










Quot, ares 


Annual 
quota i/ 


Quota Irunlg 

1959 I960 


1961 1962 


1963 




156,9fl7 


97,657 


101,373 


96,104 


'0.>.31' 


JO,3,.036 


All quota ar 


149.597 


94.325 


97.850 


9 2,79 5 


85,814 


99,244 


A an a . 


100 

1,40 5 

1,297 

100 

2,R59 

1,175 

115 

566 

3,069 

25,814 

65,361 

308 

B65 

100 

17,756 

5,666 

235 

384 

100 

3,136 

2,364 

6,488 

438 

289 

100 

2 50 

3,295 

1,698 

225 

2,697 

942 

400 


102 
1,431 

95 

3,002 

1,128 

138 

541 

2,979 

24,789 

22,652 

39 2 

9 54 

93 

7,251 

5,746 

263 

426 

82 

3,097 

2,267 

6,480 

453 

355 

114 

292 

2,081 

1,604 

263 

2,878 

1,016 

221 


70 

1,310 

1,069 

100 

2,541 

1,199 

100 

554 

2,908 

25,859 

27,034 

344 

805 

112 

7,479 

5,609 

217 

330 

78 

3,035 

2,345 

6,057 

427 

314 

98 

236 

2,307 

1,717 

211 

'901 
62 


1,330 

1,182 

82 

2,236 

1.066 

110 

554 

2,892 

24,273 

25,100 

321 

844 

105 

6,273 

5,648 

2 34 

383 

62 

2,969 

2,208 

6,891 

4?5 

29 7 

96 

204 

1,656 

1,510 

220 

2,536 

932 

74 


93 

1,274 

1,075 

84 

1,946 

1,124 

116 

536 

2,930 

22,911 

23,447 

339 

825 

106 

5,364 

5,405 

217 

338 

63 

3,073 

5!435 
426 
273 
96 
161 

1,685 

1,594 
195 

2,755 
888 
85 

2.245 


93 






*", , * 








Bulgaria ■•••■•• • 




Czechoslovakia 




P "™y 




°" ' 




p'" 




* 










308 


J;''**'^* 




Iceland •••••• 


85 






re an re 


5,560 


• '' 


250 


f^'"'" ■ 


396 




88 


Luxemburg 


3,015 




2,071 


_ . J 


7,460 


° ^^ : 


445 


R ?a 


311 




105 




220 




2,019 




1,673 




242 


U.S.S.R 


2,616 
915 


Other Eurooe 


83 




2,256 




100 
100 
100 
100 
105 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
185 
200 
100 

100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
1,200 

3.300 


87 

70 

111 
371 
111 

104 

214 
106 
113 
95 

35 
46 
701 


86 
107 

75 
103 

454 

104 

103 
106 

202 

89 

51 
90 
54 

746 


87 

52 
78 
117 

72 
99 

128 
215 
103 
102 
88 
58 

80 

163 

857 


88 
93 

84 

107 
115 

100 
191 
191 

91 

57 
107 

83 
100 
243 

846 


98 




71 




92 




90 






1 dla '' 


108 




96 


1 a (Persia) 




Iran 


95 


, . 


102 








209 








103 


Pakistan 


87 








95 


Viet Nam 




Yemen 




Other As la 


290 


Africa 


1.010 




100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
2,700 

600 


40 
30 

94 
114 

118 
101 
204 

436 


43 
34 

67 

124 

107 
257 

418 


69 
35 

94 
100 
120 

90 
349 

438 


71 

68 
73 
101 
102 
99 
332 

414 




Gha '' 




Libya 


107 
92 

9B 


South Africa 






Other Africa 


442 










J«™'<^« 3/ 


100 
100 










90 
86 





1/ The annual quota was 154,857 

1963 the total quota was in 

newly Independent countries 

2/ Figures Include adjustment of 

3/ Quotas established by Preside 

Include admissions charged 



Table 68. 
3. 3503 of October 23, 1962. 
9 July 1 - October 22, 1962. 



30 



All quota areas 



B«lglun .... 

CiechoBlovak 

Estonia .... 

Finland 

France 

Great Brltal 
Northern 1 

Greece 

Hungary .... 



Ireland (Eire) 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Luxembourg . . . . 






San Marino .. 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland . 

Turkey 

U.S.S.R 

Kugoslavla .. 
Other Buropa 



frlca ... 
Ethiopia 
Ghana .. 
Libya .. 
Morocco 



orth Anerlca 

Jamaica 

Trinidad and Tobago 



10;}.036 



Includes UO foreign gove 



a. Adjustnen 
adjusted unde 



8 chargeable to future years are include 
Section 13, Act of Septeaber II, 1957. 



year of adjustment. 



31 



TABLE 


8. IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED. 8Y COUNTRY OR RECIOH 


OF BlRl 
1963 


D AND MAJ 


0R«:cu. 


TION CRO 


U. 






1 




"""ir.".""'"" 


Number 


111 

2:- 




1, 

i 


1 

^11 


5s 


In 


If . 


m 


sr« 

ill 

Hi 


h 


E 


ml 








27,930 


1^76 


5,986 


23,105 




L8.159 


14,2a6_ 


^-^ 


9,392 


9j46! 


JMM= 


165.5 








12.636 


1.383 


2.474 


11.961 


2,40? 


10.513 


6.992 


2,794 


5,25? 


2.056 


J, 710 


«,7( 




^'°''' • 


l!o!9 

'623 

26!867 
4.825 

b'.ne 

2.089 
9.546 
2.975 

2,187 

l!8a9 

U931 


2 36 

369 

'364 

1,061 

259 
163 


5 

3 

6 

3 

5 
25 

39 
16 

37 


16 

53 

76 

90 
183 

583 


173 

652 
330 

321 
'103 

960 


54 

78 

35 

18 

214 


165 

192 
'359 

'287 

131 

302 
231 

494 


40 
1,090 

510 

907 

154 

1.605 
153 

139 

522 


45 
20 

592 

25 

467 
276 

51 
137 


255 

'330 

505 
385 

65 

151 

1,059 

772 


3 
291 

25 

328 

91 


19 

342 
1,201 

95 

26 

45 
157 
94 

209 


9!5S 
15.8 








Cuchollov.kl. 












^ 












?J"" 








j"[° 








^" " 












J"""*' 








!''"'" 








Turkey (Europs and A. la) 




U.S.S.R. (Europ. .nd A.I.) 




Oth°''Eu" 








*'chl 1/ 


712 
U566 

1.325 
'752 

226 


170 
196 

370 
56 


6 


25 

13 
37 

2.191 


29 
86 

7.436 


12 
38 

1.89 3 


B 

23 

34 
5.639 


18 

39 

9 

5.648 


5 

30 

5.744 


2.900 


2 
15 

7.215 


3' 

63 
U.920 










I°d 1« °"' 












J '" 












''''" "; 




°'" 
















SyrUn Ar.b R.pibUc 

Other A.l. 






36.003 
55.253 

lo!683 

lisBO 

l!754 
1.695 

480 


'627 
'454 
255 

100 
32 


3 
3 


343 

36 

36 

3 
27 

639 


159 

155 
705 

34 

2.342 


■973 

15 
25 

406 


2:036 

'439 
577 
164 

69 

1.365 


;:406 

223 

54 

20 
1.045 


255 
2.085 

1.214 
29 2 

817 


■38O 
75 
22 

394 


93 
39 

3 
91 


25 
23 

197 


5!2 

'2 

12.9 












d" I ic«n Re ublic 








j'^^,^' 












E°'s*lv«d'r 












Nlc«ra"« 








Other Centr.l A«.rlc. 










l!973 
5!733 

l!l69 


243 
631 




37 


782 


39 

146 
52 




86 




■ 103 
35 

51 

39 


3 
6 

2 


45 

34 


2,4 








^"J 




















Oth""s *th * i « 




Afrle. 






7 60 
1.289 












18 




9 








21 

8; 




j^?'"° 












United Ar.b Republic (Egypt) ... 
Other Afrlc. 






200 


d 


' 


I 


" 


lo 


,: 


'^ 


5 


; 


' 


' 


12 
11 








P.CH1C I.l.nd. (U.S. .d..) .... 






















32 





















TABLI BA BENETICIABIES OF FIBST PBETUOICE VISA PETITIONS 


AND OTH 


> inMIOANTS 






A»1T,E., I» occupation: Vm O.Dg, 


UHE )0, 












B.naflcl.rla. 


of rir.t 




OccupAClon 


ad^'tti 










Tota 


Ad-laalo. 


AdJ.at.ant. 


' 1-lgrInta 


All occupAtlon. 


306.;m 


L 5.669 


2.540 - 






Profaiilonal, t.chnlcAl, and klndrad oorkira 


V.?} 


'•Oi? 


1.276 




^''■"' 






34 


8 








\l 






'! 




Alrplam plloca and uCtiatori i i ! i i i i i ! i i i ! i i !!!! i !! i !!!!!...!!!. i !..'!!!..' .' 










ii 


; 


29 




j;5j;j;' •; "•.'"::;!:;;;::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 


133 


























Profaaiora and InacnjcCora 


n 


"'. 


'! 


'] 




Dancara and daiKln, caachar "" 

Oantlat 


130 


S!l«t";.'.„;™»i«;;;«. 


3B 

8 
67 


I 


10 


'"i 


Drattaaar. !!!!!!!!!!!!!'!! 




Idltori and raportara !!!!!! i !!!!!!.'! i i ! ! 
















Jntar talnaci I ■■\... .....\'. ..\.'.]\'.'.'.'. .'.'.'.'.'.]]]]['.]'.]['.[[[[['.'.',','.[',',','. 


'"l6 


1.041 


"7 


875 


2.918 




1 


37 
31 
398 


i 


35 




ubrarian i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i ! i ! i i i i !!! i i !! i !!!!!!! i i i !! ! 








Bur "" *"•*'!. i i i i i i i i !!! i ! i !!! i !!!!!! i ! i !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!' i ■ 


3,957 






M.tha~tician. ::;;:: 


64 


ft'y'ici.t :;!!!!;;;!;!!;!:;;■; 


" 


Ml.c.Il.naou. natural actandat 










Phar-cl.t. 

Photographar. i i i i ! ! ! ! i i ! ii i i i i i ! ! 


206 

315 

2.m] 


II 


6 


16 


27 
184 


Phy.lclana and aursaon 

Public ral.tlona -n and publicity vrltara 


s'! 


235 


138 


304 


Badlo oparator. i i i ! ! i i i ! ! i i i ! i ! i i i i i i i ii ! ! ! ! ] 


u\ 


! 




! 








BconoiaUt ! ?..*""?. ! ! 


'?i 


50 


\ 


13 
5 
11 

5 


U7 


sJItJ»°?l"; iii:::::::::::::::::::::::: 


38 


sJ^IJor"!"""!.'"^."!"!!*!'.;:::::::::;:;:::::::::;::::;;;:;;;;;;;;;;;; 














106 


T«char.t"Ilor.pacifi;di!!;!;!i :;;;;::::::::;;::::;::::;;:; ::;;;;;;;;;;;;;; 


3;727 


l!l 


l" 


in 
















Pro,a..lon.l. tachn.cal. andi;nd;ad.„;a;;: «ha;' i i i i i i i ! ! i i ! ! i ! ! ! ! ! ! ] ! ! i 


1.3o" 


24? 


57 


1.6' 


1.064 


Panara and fan aanagara 

M.n.,ar.. official., and proprlatora. a.cap. far. 

Buyara and dapartaant haada, itora .. 


— ^ 




.-IJ 


2fi 


1,775 


Buyara and .hlppar.. tar. pnjducta ." i i i i ii i i ! ! ! ! i i ii i i i ! ! i i ! i i i i i 




' 






76' 












sjftHir^uT"'"""'''""'"" 












101 


- 




- 


87 




110 


















108 


Purchailng aganci and buyara iiit'aMcif ild 


144 


' 


1 


2 




"ana.ar.. official., and proirlator^ o.har i i i i i i i ii i i i iii i i i i i i i i i ! " i! ! ! ! 


5.366 


I2I 


39 


>U 


5.243 


*«"'. '. "•—•"'"". iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii::;:;;:; ;:;.:::: 


23.105 


55_ 


11 


45 






' 




I 


"'34J 


Bo^kkllpa^'.iiiiiiiiiiiii;;;::;;;;;; 


MS 






. 


498 


Caahlar i i i iii i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i ii i i ! ! ! ! ' ' ' 










1,030 














flla Clark. i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i ! 


28 






. 


28 




62 






- 


33 


S""^i;;Mn^ l",[ll '"" iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 


25 








25 














Payroll and tlsakaaplna Clark. 












Po.Ul Clark. 












aacaptlonlat. 












Shipping and racalvln, dark i . ii i i i ii i i iii i i i i iii i 


386 






1 


385 


3 J^'c I Jrk";nd"l"Ika'"''r""""' i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i 


8.562 




; 


,5 


8 54° 




371 










Talaphona oparator. i i ii i i i i i i i ii i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i " 


84 








84 




519 










Clarlcal and klndrad uorkara. otbar i i i i iii i i i i i i i iiii i i ii i ! 


, ,'| 




■ 


' 


39 


Salaa oorkar. 








" 


9.718 




'.?«? 






12 




Huck.tar. and paddlar. .,', 


131 




- 


I - 


130 


In.uranc. aganta and brokara i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i ! ! ! 














172 












4.588 


,; 


- 


- 


74 
4.577 


Craft.aan. foraaan, and klndrad 














_1S.1}8 


JMi - 


1.065 


137 




Bi.cka.uhi' ;;;:::; 


491 




24 






Bookblndar 












«tick«aon.. .ton.«.on. a^'iiii';:;;:;; 


68 








68 


Cablnat^k.r 












Carpantara i i i i ! ! 
























Coapo.ltor. and typaaettar!" 


41 




2 


. 


39 


Ctana^n. darrlckaan. and h<>i«»^n' i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i .' i .' ! [ ! ! ! ] .' .' .' 1 i ] ; ] ; ; ; ^ ; ] ; 


''' 




- 


- 


138 



TABLE ».. ;^^'^";j=<^^„;i?tJ,^";5irwDlii"u»r"o'.°iU3"< 


.°n"" 


IMmCKTS 




7. 




.r:::d 


'*f!""*'vlI.°n.'tltlon. 1 


Oth.r 


0C.UP...O. 


Tot., 


.d.l...on. 


A4J..t..nt. 


U-Ur.nt. 


C,.(....a. for...n, ..1 klno,«. «o,k... <Confd) 


30i 
561 


89« 






183 




306 
51 






S;u":;";:\.n/.;.„.,;/.ndpou.h.,.-::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 


585 






JlJIU'r^i'pip.'fut.r.' ::;:;::;::;:::::;::::::::::::::::::::!::::::::::::: 


iii 














T.llor. .nd t.llor 

Tlr..lth.. cop|..r..lth., .nd .h..t ..t.l -ork.r 


1.097 














Op.r.tlv.i and klndr.d vork.r. 


176 
Bl 
135 


—"\ 






545 










S:cn;r:...>n;;.;-.;d\;..;;.;r.;-„™;f.;;.;i;,-::::;:::::::::::::::::::;: 


135 






Dr...-k.,. .nd .....tr C.pt f.ctor, 


7.64B 
33 


l;;«^'!;."^r.."r;;'ogh:""Tp.;iin,'ho...':::::::;:::::::::::::::::::: 


351 

398 




343 






P.lnt.r.. ..c.pt con.truoon .nd «.nt.n.nc. 


305 






























hcu..hold -ork.r. 


9 516 




-" 


' 


I 
















' '3 

1.371 

«5 

184 

1.760 
9.463 


: 


J 


-_ 






























'J 


'Z"T,:.V^l''lZ\lTJZl\"'tV' 








166 
372 
57 
155 

444 
184 






Pollc.».n .nd d.t.ctlv.. 




ror.ljn •! II t.ry 




P.r. l.bor.r. .nd for...n 


Ubor.r.. ..c.pt f.f.nd .U. 


9.46, 




33 


'° 


; 


I 








SEHiE:?^rl;;ir~^ 


15,130 


Ulwt.r.. oth.r '■'' 


Unnploy«) 

««lr.<l 


ll!760 






: 


i;903 
63!846 


und.r 14 ,..r. o( .,. ! ! !!! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! 


1/ •"='j''«; '•''' wot. l".l»t.nt. .d>ltt.d und.r the I i II Act, l,«J nonixiot. 


und.r Act 


of Octo 


b.t 24, H6;, 


• nd 1 aiKl.r 





21 Inclad.i 841 quoti 



34 



IMMIGRANTS ADMITTE 



YEAH ENDED Jl'NE 30. 



rinland 

Creeca 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Rumnla 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) ... 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) . 

Other &jrope 

China X' 

Hong Kong 

India 

Jordan 2f 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Other Meat Indies 

Coata Rica 

El Salvador 

Other Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Argentina 

Brail 1 

Chile 

Colombia 

Other South America 

Africa 

Algeria 

Morocco 

South Africa 

TunUla 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 

New Zea\and '....'.....'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 
Pacific Islands (U. 3. adm. ) 
Other Oceania 

Other countrle 

P Includes Formosa. 

2/ Include. Arab Palestine. 



35 



Europe 

Belgium '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.]'.'.[.'. 
Czectiofllovakla 

Finland .....'...'..'.'.'.'.'.'. 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Norway 

PoUnd 

Spain ..'.\'.\'.'.'.'.['.'.'.'.'.'.'. 
Sweden 

Turkey (Europe and Aela) 

United Kingdom 

U.S.3.R. (Europe and A.l, 

Other Europe 

China 1/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Iraq ......'. 

Jordan 2' . .....'.'.'.'.'.'.'..'. 

Lebanon 

Philippine 

Ryukyu Island 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Other Asia 

Canada ,[ 

Keiclco 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Other Heat Indies' !!.'.!! . 
Costa Rica 

Panama .........'.'.'.'.'.'.." 

Other Central Asierica . . .'. 
Other North America 

Argentina ..".[]]]'.]'.[]'.['.'. 
Chile .■...'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'..'.'. 

Other South America 

Africa 

Algeria 

Oceania 

Other Oceania . . .'. \ 

Other countries 

U Includes Fornoaa. 

2/ Includes Arab Falastlna 





TABLE 10. 


IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED, BY 


SEX AND 


AGE: 












YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1954-1963 






Sex and age 


1954-1963 


1954 


1955 


1955 


1957 


1958 


1959 


1960 


1961 


1952 


1963 


Number admitted 


.2.735.175 


208,177 


237.790 


321,525 


325.857 




250,685 


265,398 


271,344 


28?, 763 


J06,260 


1.251.664 


95.594 


112.032 


155,410 


155,201 


109,121 


114,367 


116,587 


1 

121,380 


131,575 


139,297 




125,145 
99,655 
80.417 
14,992 
36,130 
49,752 


8,708 
7,769 
5.513 
870 
2.211 
2,890 


9.587 
8,783 
6,730 
1,303 
3,104 
4,226 


14,087 
12,419 
9,323 
1,847 
4,581 
5,204 


15,766 
13,452 
9.898 
1,764 
4,247 
5,953 


11,976 
9,488 
7,694 
1,304 
3,190 
4,294 


11,511 
8.950 
7,975 
1,363 

3.237 
4,739 


12,299 
8,570 
7,731 
1.493 
3.565 
4,879 


13,203 
9,604 
8,295 

3! 537 

5,171 


13,125 
9,735 
8,313 
1.583 
3,888 
5,380 






10,876 






15 years 


1 ,919 


















20,537 


20,114 


13,782 


15,999 


15,835 


16,518 






25-29 years 


194.607 


15,447 


17,625 


23,783 


23,985 


17,493 


17,306 


17,788 


18.349 


21,288 


21,542 








14,950 


19,883 






12,487 


12,919 








35-39 years 


102.510 


8,455 


9,106 


12,581 


12,552 


8,840 


9,199 


9,969 


9,802 


10,877 


11,028 




74,494 
57,643 
39.448 


6,950 
4,975 
3,560 


8,492 
6,128 
3,703 


11,311 
8,523 
5,306 


9,745 
7,165 
4,551 


5,835 
4,545 
3,075 


5,721 
5,345 
3,784 


5,827 
5,359 
3 752 


5,247 
5,326 
3,855 


6,854 
5,111 
3,810 




45-49 years 


5,154 


50-54 years 


4,021 












2,917 


2.050 


2,752 


2.646 


2,652 


2,715 


2,700 


60 54 years 


15,492 


1,107 


1,100 


1,433 


1,579 


1,268 


1,772 


1,801 


1,755 


1,862 


1,814 






636 


587 


813 


892 


737 


1,168 


1,187 




1,151 




70-74 years 


4,899 


309 


289 


407 


445 


390 


579 


59 2 


732 


580 


576 


75-79 years 


2,490 


159 


143 


209 


214 


175 


317 


294 


322 


343 


313 


80 years and over .... 


1,280 


85 


109 




130 


105 


129 


145 


158 


164 


144 


Not reported 


240 


18 


16 


29 


83 


36 


23 


14 


5 


Q 


7 


Females 


1,483,511 


112.583 


125.758 


165,215 


171,665 


144,144 


145,319 


148,711 


149,954 


152,188 


166,953 




119,318 






13,651 




11,172 












5-9 years 


97.229 


7,429 


8.342 


11,958 


13,102 


9,239 


8,800 


8,953 


9,320 


9,341 


10,745 




79,472 


5.639 


5,684 


9,173 




7,753 






8 ,39 






15 years 


15,704 


989 


1,335 


1.951 


1,882 


1,498 


1,401 


1,395 


1.536 


1,734 


1,973 


16-17 years 


47.674 


3.189 


4,187 


5,440 










4,915 




















9,465 




9,825 
31,366 
21,209 


9,983 
31,946 
21,445 
14,275 
10,096 
5,798 
5.794 
4,998 


U 502 
35.736 
23,779 
15.688 
10,896 
7,503 
5,661 
4,984 


20-24 years 


298 991 


22 126 


24 466 


30 89 7 






31 838 
21,755 


















30-34 years 


150 213 


12 230 


13 299 


17 571 


18 827 




14,585 








7,756 
























5 555 
5,703 
4,397 


6,431 
6,071 
4,949 


5,232 
5,941 
4.633 


6,497 
5,755 
4,746 


45-49 years . 


59 091 


4 821 




7,158 
5.043 


6,883 
5,114 


50-54 years 


46,563 


3,722 


3,977 


55-59 years . 


34 528 


2 487 


2 710 


3 606 


3,831 
2.355 


3,405 
2,253 


3,737 
2,729 


3,610 
2,515 


3 499 

2,484 


3,885 
2,755 


3,758 
2,738 


60-64 years 


23,197 


1,538 


1.569 


2,161 


65-69 years 


14 152 


894 


1 053 






1,303 

818 
406 
181 


1,599 
87 2 


1,565 

767 
385 
175 


1,649 
997 
512 
225 


1,773 
997 
499 
304 


1,647 
923 
467 
238 


70-74 years 


7 9 50 






703 
384 
227 


751 
404 
233 








315 

154 


80 years and over 


2,132 


154 


220 


Not reported 


284 


24 


19 


30 


85 


52 


33 


15 


5 


19 












37 

















TABLE lOA. IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED. BY SEX, MARITAL STATUS, AGE, AND MAJOR 
OCCUPATION GROUP: YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1959 - 1963 



Sex, marital status, 

age, and 
occupation 



Number admitted 

Sex and marital status: 

Males 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Fema les 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Males per 1,000 females 

Median age (years): 

Both sexes 

Males 

Females 

Major occupation group: 

Professional, technical, and kindred workers. 

Farmers and farm managers 

Managers, officials, and proprietors, 

except farm 

Clerical, sales, and kindred workers 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers 

Operatives and kindred workers 

Private househo Id workers 

Service workers, except private household ... 

Farm laborers and foremen 

Laborers, except farm and mine 

Housewives, children, and others with no 

occupation 

Housewives 

Retired persons 

Students 

Children under 14 years of age 

Unknown or not reported 



1U.367 



64,3i7 

47,482 

99 2 

1,252 

294 

146.319 



62,268 

74,869 

6,184 

2,811 

187 

782 



25.4 
26.0 
25.0 



23,287 
2,187 



21,475 
20,521 
16,031 
7,465 
9,641 
2,729 
11,937 

130.778 



62,215 

1,168 

14,647 

52,748 

9,947 



265.398 



116,687 



64,646 

50,055 

1,016 

897 

73 

148.711 



67,331 

73,236 

5,496 

2,598 

50 

785 



25.0 
25.9 
23.8 



21,940 
3,050 

5,309 
24,386 
19,156 
14,979 
8,173 
8,812 
3,914 
12,838 

132.716 



62,084 

1,289 

13,888 

55,455 

10,125 



271,344 



68,253 
51,261 



149_,964 



70,489 

71,455 

5,401 

2,565 

54 



25.0 
25.8 
24.5 



21,455 
3,002 

5,363 
25,198 
17,679 
13,288 
8,811 
8,399 
4,799 
15,694 

135.704 



59,245 

1,722 

15.923 

58,814 

11,952 



131,575 



73,264 

56,309 

1,037 

915 

50 

152,188 



73,318 

70,047 

6,140 

2,626 

57 

865 



25.2 
26.0 

24.6 



23,710 
1,589 

5,554 
26,304 
17,172 
12,976 
9,690 
9,414 
10,801 
17,614 

136.752 



58,153 

1,885 

19,410 

57,304 

12,187 



ALIENS ADMITTED AND CITIZENS ARRIVED AND DEPARTED: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1908 - 1963 





ALIENS ADMITTED 


ALIENS 
DEPARTED 2/ 


U. S. CIT 


IZENS 2/ 


Period 


Imnil- 
Rrant 


Nontmmi- 
.rant y 


Arrived 






17.359,562 


18,849,135 


22,839,643 


31.918.890 


31,475,656 




2.576.226 


490,741 


1,495,638 


660,811 


342,600 






1,376.271 


3,988,157 


1,938,508 


2,517,889 




878:587 
838,172 
1,197,892 
1,218,480 
326,700 
298,826 
295,403 
110,618 
141,132 
430,001 

4 , 107 , 209 


151,713 
178,983 
229.335 
184,601 
107,544 
67,922 
57,474 
101,235 
95,889 
191.575 

1,774,881 


518,215 
515,292 
611,924 
633,805 
384,174 
240,807 
146,379 
193,268 
216,231 
428,062 

2,694,778 


269,128 
280,801 
286,604 
286,586 
239,579 
121,930 
127,420 
72,857 
96,420 
157,173 

3,522,713 


349,47 2 


, . , 


353,890 


... 


347,702 


, 


368,797 












126,011 












194, 147 




3,519.519 




805,228 
309,556 
522,919 
706,896 
294.314 
304,488 
335,175 
307.255 
279,678 
241,700 

528,431 


172,935 
122,949 
150,487 
172,406 
164,121 
191,618 
202,826 
193,375 
199,549 
204 514 

1,574,071 


426,031 
345,384 
200,586 
216,745 
225,490 
227,755 
253,508 
274,356 
252,498 
272,425 

2,196,650 


222:712 
243,553 
308,471 
301,281 
339.239 
370,757 
378,520 
430,955 
449,955 
477,260 

3,365,432 


27 1 . 560 




309 477 








277 850 


, 


324 323 






1927 


359 788 












452 023 


1931-19'iO 


3.357.936 




97,139 
35,576 
23,058 
29,470 
34,956 
36,329 
50,244 
57.895 
82,998 
70,756 

1,035,039 


183,540 
139,295 
127,660 
134,434 
144,755 
154,570 
181,640 
184,802 
185,333 
138,032 


290,916 
287 657 
243,802 
177,172 
189,050 
193,284 
224,582 
222,614 
201,409 
166,164 


439,897 
339,252 
305,001 
273,257 
282,515 
318,273 
385,87 2 
405,999 
354,438 
258,918 








1933 


338 545 




262 091 










1937 


390 195 


1938 


397 875 
















51,776 
28,781 
23,725 
28,551 
38, M9 
108,721 
147,292 
170,570 
188,317 
249,187 

2,515.479 


100,008 
82,457 
81,117 
113,641 
154,247 
203,459 
366,305 
476,006 
447,272 
426,837 


74,552 
58.722 
84 , 409 
93.362 
204,353 
323,422 
448,218 
430.089 
456,689 


175,935 

118,454 
105,729 
108,444 
175,568 
274,543 
437,690 
542,932 
620,371 
663,567 




19i,2 










63,525 


1945 




230,578 
451.845 


1947 




1949 


552.361 




1951-1960 






205,717 
265.520 
170,434 
208,177 
237,790 
321,625 
326,857 
253,255 
260,585 
255,398 

271,344 
283,763 
305,260 


465,105 
516,082 
485,714 
566,613 
620,946 
586,259 
758,858 
847,764 
1,024,945 
1,140 736 

1,220,315 
1,331.383 
1,507.091 


472,901 
509,497 
544,502 
599,151 
665,800 
715,200 
574,608 
710,428 
885,913 
1,004,377 

1,093,937 
1,158,960 
1,266,843 


760,485 
807,225 
930,874 
1,021,327 
1,171,612 
1,281.110 
1,365.075 
1.469,262 
1,804,435 
1,920,582 

2,043,415 
2,199,325 
2,433,453 


667,126 

814,289 

925.861 

971,025 

1.095,146 

1,272,516 

1,402,107 

1,483,915 

1,739,046 

1.934 953 

1,969,119 
2,159,857 
2,421,348 




1953 




1955 






1958 










1953 





1/ Excludes Mexican agricultural laborers and agrlcu 
Canada prior to March 8, 1957, border crossers 

2/ After 1956 Includes aliens departed and citizens 
except direct arrivals from or departures to Ca 

3/ Departures of U. S. citizens first recorded In 1910. 



ural laborers from the West Indies and 

d crewmen. 

rived and departed by sea and air. 



TABLE 12. IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED, 

BY STATE OF ItfTENDED FUTURE PERIMNENT RESIDENCE i 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1954 - 1963 



State of intended 
future permanent 
jf^sldepge 

All States 

Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware ••••• 

District of Columbia .. 

Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

U. S, terr. and possi 

Guam 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands 

All other , 



6,754 

2,126 

29,201 

3,742 

549,439 

14,877 

59,032 

3,700 

19,201 

103,888 

11,157 

14,462 

4,147 

169,420 

25,287 

10,085 

9,295 

7,757 

15,695 

15,334 

25,037 

108,896 

98,107 

19,933 

3,920 

19,000 

5,073 

6,550 

4,328 

7,858 

138,622 

15,166 

629,801 

10,927 

3,762 

78,092 

8,549 

15,469 

89,591 

12,548 

5,257 

2,560 

7,042 

204,618 

11,915 

6,805 

17,706 

39,338 

5,978 

27,909 

2,215 



2,435 
12,074 
2,631 



1,610 

311 

23,667 

961 

4,273 
268 

1,404 

5,326 

691 

821 

348 

11,669 

2,143 
930 
739 



1,875 
7,901 
11,323 
1,765 



9,523 
1,324 
48,757 



241 

661 
27,700 
1,522 

558 
1,375 
3,308 

491 
2,494 

196 



604 

116 
1,580 

339 
33,704 

979 
5,222 



1,131 
1,297 

1,844 
8,817 



385 
7,133 

647 
1,129 
8,655 

i,ii: 

451 
243 
664 



746 

160 

2,428 

50, 
1,594 
7,183 
430 
1,846 
10,503 
1, 
1,037 
455 



1,210 
852 
1,541 
1,726 
2,717 
11,742 
14,209 
2,412 



274 
782 
16,017 
2,174 
70,700 
1,167 
421 
11,267 



371 

977 
39,078 
1,387 

693 
1,8 
3,643 

827 
3,916 

207 



2,940 
408 

58,452 
1,826 
7,027 
512 
2,010 

11,182 
1,140 
1,384 



12,149 

995 

1,798 

11,148 



16,447 

2,419 

962 

931 

764 

1,798 

1,744 

2,464 

10,123 

9,727 

2,006 

394 



2,424 
645 
777 



1,046 
59,605 
1,067 

330 
8,219 

927 
1,529 
9,062 
1,152 

539 



4,121 
621 

2,837 
133 



249 
2,315 

471 
49,673 
1,737 
6,004 

429 
2,006 
9,262 
1,376 
1,616 

441 
16,275 
2,949 
1,003 
1,094 

844 
1,999 
1,626 
2,592 
9,855 
8,243 
2,133 

431 
2,150 

495 

644 



64,698 
1,206 

358 
9,783 

941 

1,353 

10,296 

1,244 

■ 580 

287 

921 
9,160 
1,229 

726 
2,012 
4.045 



734 

218 
3,129 

380 
61,325 
1,653 
5,769 

353 



2,399 
11,953 
8,271 



13,611 
1,105 
60,134 



6,829 

891 

1,715 

7,933 

1,570 

554 

106 

003 

12,992 

949 

780 

1,743 

3,897 



3,473 

299 

64,205 



1,993 
13,009 
1,099 
1,762 



1,645 
1,465 
2,336 
12,091 
7,328 
1,852 

350 
1,737 

448 



13,556 

1,473 

60,429 

1,119 

319 

5,741 

849 

1,857 

8,052 

1,403 

533 

220 

762 

14,952 



40 



IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED, 

STATE OF INTENDED Fl/I 

YEAR ENDED Jl 



41 



Clendale . 

Pasadena . 

San Diego 
San Francl 

Colo., Dan.er ... 

0. C, UaihlngCon 
Pla., Jack.onvU 

St. Fatera 

Ca., Atlanta .. 

La.. New Orlean 

Hij., Baltlmra 

Haas., Boaton ... 

Sprlngfl.l 

Hleh., Dearborn . 

Grand Rapl 

St. Paul . 

St. Uula 

Nabr., Ouha 

H. J., Elizabeth 

Patation . 
Buffalo .. 
Syracu.e . 

Dayton ... 

Oreg., Portland . 

Pa.. Phlladalph 

Pltt.burgh 

Tai..' Austin ... 

El Paao'!! 
Fort Worth 

San Antoni. 

Other ritlaa 

Virgin Iilanda .... 
1/ Ineludaa Pomoia. 



42 



TABLE 13. IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 - 1963 1/ 

^Frotn 1820 to 1867 figures represent alien passengers arrived; 1868 to 1891 inclusive and 1895 
to 1897 Inclusive, Immigrant aliens arrived; 1892 to 1894 Inclusive and from 1898 to present 
tlrae immigrant aliens admitted. Data for years prior to 1906 relate to country whence alien 
came; thereafter to country of last permanent residence. Because of changes in boundaries and 
changes in lists of countries, data for certain countries are not comparable throughoutj/ 



1821-1830 1831-1840 1841-1850 1851-1 



All countries 



Europe 

Austria-Hungary 2/ 

Belgium 

Denmark 

France 

Germany 2/ 

( England 
Great 
Britain 



(Scotland 

(Wales 

(Not specified 3/ 



Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway) 

Sweden) ^' 

Poland 5/ 

Portugal 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe 

U.S.S.R. 6/ 

Other Europe . . . . 



Mia 

China 

India 

Japan 7/ 

Turkey in Asia 
Other Asia 



rica 



. Canada 5. Newfoundland 9/ 
I Mexico ^0/ 

West Indies 

Central America 

South America 



frica 

lustralia 6. New Zealand 
ot specified 



>.385 



7.691 



1 

20 

371 

968 

1,782 

268 

360 

3,614 
30 
49 



3 
387 



143.439 



1.713.251 



98.817 



495.688 



2.452.660 



27 

169 

8,497 

6,761 

14,055 

2.912 

170 

7,942 

20 

50,724 

409 

1,078 

91 

16 

145 

2,477 

3,226 

20 

75 

3 



22 

1,063 

45,575 

152,454 

7,611 

2.667 

185 

65,347 

49 

207,381 

2,253 

1,412 

1.201 

369 

829 

2,125 

4,821 

7 

277 



5.074 

539 

77,262 

434,626 

32,092 

3,712 

1,261 

229,979 

16 

780,719 

1,870 

8,251 

13,903 

105 

550 

2,209 

4,644 

59 

551 

79 



4,738 

3,749 

76,358 

951,667 

247,125 

38,331 

6,319 

132,199 

31 

914,119 

9,231 

10,789 

20,931 

1,164 

1,055 

9,298 

25,011 

83 

457 

5 



10 



82 



41,397 
43 



11.564 



62.469 



74.720 



2,277 

4,817 

3,834 

105 

531 



13,624 
6,599 
12,301 



41,723 
3,271 

13,528 

368 

3,579 



59 , 309 
3.078 

10,660 

449 

1.224 



16 
33,032 



54 
69,911 



55 
53.144 



210 



ee footnotes at end of table. 



43 



TABLE 13. IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 - 1963 1/ (Continued) 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria) 

Hungary) -' 

Belgium 

Bulgaria U^/ 

Czechoslovakia _12/ 

Denmark 

Finland 12/ 

France 

Germany 21 

( England 

Great (Scotland 

Britain (Wales 

(Not spec. 3/ . 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 4/ 

Sweden hi 

Poland 5/ 

Portugal 

Rumania _13/ 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Turkey In Europe 

U.S.S.R. 6/ 

Yugoslavia \\l 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Japan 7/ 

Turkey in Asia 8/ 

Other Asia 

America 

Canada & Newfoundland 9/ 

Mexico 10/ 

West Indies 

Central America 

South America 

Other America _14/ 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand ... 

Pacific Islands 

Not specified 15/ 



72,969 
7,221 



31,771 

72,206 

718,182 

437,706 

87,564 

6,631 

16,142 

210 

436,871 

55,759 

16,541 

95,323 

115,922 

12,970 

14,082 

11 

5,266 

28,293 

337 

39 , 284 



1,001 



123,823 



123,201 
163 
149 
67 
243 



404,044 



383,640 

5,162 

13,957 

157 

1,128 



1,028 
790 



See footnotes at end of table. 



5.246.613 



353.719 
20,177 



88,132 

50,464 

1,452.970 

644,680 

149,869 

12,640 

168 

2,308 

655,482 

307 , 309 

53,701 

176,586 

391,776 

51,806 

16,978 

6,348 

4,419 

81.988 

1 , 562 

213,282 

682 



68,3 80 



61,711 

269 

2,270 

2,220 

1,910 



426.967 



39 3,304 

1,913 

29,042 

404 

2,304 



857 
7,017 
5,557 

789 



59 2,707 

18,167 

160 

50,231 

30,770 

505,152 

216,726 

44,188 

10,557 

67 

15,979 

388,416 

651,893 

26,758 

95,015 

226,266 

96,720 

27,508 

12,750 

8,731 

31,179 

3.626 

505.290 

122 



25,942 
26,799 
3,628 



38^972 



3,311 

971 

33,066 

549 

1,075 



350 
2,740 
1,225 
14,063 



8.795.386 



2.145,266 

41,635 
39,280 



65,285 

73.379 
341,498 
388,017 
120,469 

17,464 

167,519 
339,065 
2,045,877 
48.262 
190,505 
249.534 

69,149 
53,008 
27,935 
34,922 
79,976 
1,597,306 

665 



243,567 



20,605 
4,713 
129,797 
77,393 
11,059 



361,888 



179,226 
49,642 

107,548 
8,192 
17,280 



7,368 
11,975 

1,049 
33,523 



4,376.564 



(453,649 

(442,693 

33,746 

22.533 

3,426 

41.983 

756 

61.897 

143,945 

249,944 

78,357 

13,107 

184,201 

146.181 

1,109,524 

43,718 

66,395 

95,074 

4,813 

89,732 

13,311 

68,611 

23,091 

54,677 

921,201 

l,88f 

8,111 



192^559 



21,278 

2,082 

83,837 

79,389 

5,973 



742,185 

219,004 

123.424 

17.159 

41,899 



8,443 

12,348 

1,079 

1.147 



44 



IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 - 1963 1/ (Continued) 



11 countries 

urope 

Albania 12/ 

Austria 2/ 

Hungary 2/ 

Belgium 

Bulgaria Ul 

Czechoslovakia _12/ 

Denmark 

Estonia \2! 

Finland \2/ 

France 

Germany 2/ 

(England 

Great (Scotland , 

Britain (Wales 

(Not specified J/ 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Utvla 12/ 

Lithuania 12/ 

Luxembourg 16/ 

Netherlands 

Norway 4/ 

Poland i/ 

Portugal 

Rumania \^/ 

Spain 

Sweden 4/ 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe 

U.S.S.R. 6/ 

Yugoslavia U/ 

Other Europe 

■ la 17/ 

China 

India 

Japan 7/ 

Turkey~ln Asia 8/ 

Other Asia ....7 



528.431 



348.289 



2,040 

3,563 

7,861 

4,817 

938 

14.393 

2.559 

506 

2.146 

12,623 

114,058 

21.756 

6,887 

735 

9,119 

13,167 

68,028 

1.192 

2,201 

565 

7,150 

4,740 

17,026 

3,329 

3,871 

3,258 

3.960 

5,512 

737 

1.356 

5,835 

2.361 



JiJitl 



4.928 
496 

1,948 
328 

7,644 



621.704 



85 

24.860 

3,469 

12.189 

375 

8,347 

5,393 

212 

2,503 

38,809 

226,578 

112,252 

16,131 

3,209 

8,973 

26,967 

57,661 

361 

683 

820 

14,860 

10,100 

7,571 

7.423 

1.076 

2.898 

10,665 

10.547 

580 

548 

1,576 

3.983 



Ji. 



16,709 

1.761 

1.555 

218 

11.537 



.328.293 



59 

67.106) 

36.637) 

18.575 

104 

918 

10.984 

185 

4,925 

51,121 

477,765 

156,171 

32.854 

2.589 

3.884 

47,608 

57,332 

185,491 

352 

242 

684 

52,277 

22,935 

9,985 

19,588 

1,039 

7,894 

21,697 

17,675 

2,653 

584 

8,225 

8,155 



108.532 103.989 109.066 34 



1^7,^53 



9,657 
1,973 

46,250 
866 

88,707 



9 
,114) 

397) 

.131 

34 

212 

902 
43 

474 
,403 
,815 
,936 
,587 

196 

124 
,124 
,738 
,956 
84 

125 
42 
.36? 
,204 
,254 
,832 

176 
.737 
.670 
,697 

410 

270 
,188 

286 



19.495 



900 

292 

4,490 

296 

13,517 



12 
944) 
400) 
959 
37 
103 
957 
14 
505 
,931 
,477 
,970 
,915 
181 
130 
,408 
,118 
,119 
52 
52 
56 
,378 
,839 
,660 
,622 
135 
,353 
,760 
.793 
581 
130 



Total 
144 years 
1820-1963 

42.702.328 



20.249 



1,356 

390 

4,054 

304 

14,145 



9 
,526) 
635) 
922 
36 
HI 
,070 
8 
358 
,926 
,727 
,314 
,139 
255 
159 
,744 
,746 
.175 
48 
58 
52 
,086 
,934 
,785 
,911 
126 
,969 
,056 
,952 
834 
119 
972 
304 



23.242 



790 

965 

4,147 

307 

17,033 



ie footnotes at end of table. 



45 



TABLE 13. IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 - 1963 1/ (Continued) 



Total 
144 yea 
1820-19 



America 

Canada & Newfoundland 9/ 

Mexico 10/ T.. 

West Indies 

Central America 

South America 

Other America ^4/ 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand ... 

Pacific Islands 1?/ 

Not specified 15/ 



160.037 



J5iu 



996.944 



139.580 



155.671 



169.966 



6.218J 



108,527 
22,319 
15,502 
5,861 
7,803 
25 



171,718 
60,589 
49,725 
21,665 
21,831 
29,276 



377,952 
299,811 
123,091 
44,751 
91,628 
59,711 



47,470 
41,476 
20,520 

7,272 
19,095 

3,747 



44,272 
55,805 
20,917 

9,639 
22,550 

2,688 



50,509 
55,986 
22,951 
10.706 
27,759 
2,055 



3,697,f 

1,291 
684,1 
143,1 
304 
97 



1,750 

2,231 

780 



7,367 

13,805 

5,437 

142 



14,092 
11,506 
4,698 
12,493 



1,851 

1.556 

325 

5 



1,834 

1,427 

144 

249 



1,982 

1,642 

136 

226 



53, 



21, 
267, 



If 



1' 



10/ 
11/ 



13/ 
14/ 
11' 

16/ 
17/ 



Data for fiscal years ended June 30, except 1820 to 1831 Inclusive and 1844 to 1849 

inclusive fiscal years ended Sept. 30; 1833 to 1842 Inclusive and 1851 to 1867 inclusive 
years ended Dec. 31; 1832 covers 15 months ended Dec. 31; 1843 nine months ended Sept. 3' 
1850 fifteen months ended Dec. 31; and 1868 six months ended June 30. 

Data for Austria-Hungary were not reported until 1861. Austria and Hungary have been re- 
corded separately since 1905. In the years 1938 to 1945 inclusive Austria was included 
with Germany. 

United Kingdom not specified. In the years 1901 to 1951, included in other Europe. 

From 1820 to 1868 the figures for Norway and Sweden were combined. 

Poland was recorded as a separate country from 1820 to 1898 and since 1920. Between 1899 
and 1919 Poland was Included with Austria-Hungary, Germany, and Russia. 

Since 1931 the Russian Empire has been broken down Into European U.S.S.R. and Siberia or 
Asiatic U.S.S.R. 

No record of immigration from Japan until 1861. 

No record of immigration from Turkey in Asia until 1869. 

Prior to 1920 Canada and Newfoundland were recorded as British North America. From 1820 
to 1898 the figures include all British North American possessions. 

No record of immigration from Mexico from 1886 to 1893. 

Bulgaria, Serbia, and Montenegro were first reported in 1899. Bulgaria has been reported 
separately since 1920 and in 1920 also a separate enumeration was made for the Kingdom 
of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes. Since 1922 the Serb, Croat, and Slovene Kingdom has 
been recorded as Yugoslavia, 

Countries added to the list since the beginning of World War 1 are theretofore included 
with the countries to which they belonged. Figures are available since 1920 for 
Czechoslovakia and Finland; and since 1924 for Albania, Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. 

No record of immigration from Rumania until 1880. 

Included with countries not specified prior to 1925. 

The figure 33,523 in column headed 1901-1910, includes 32,897 persons returning in 1906 
to their homes in the United States. 

Figures for Luxembourg are available since 1925. 

Beginning with the year 1952, Asia Includes the Philippines. From 1934 to 1951 the 
Philippines were Included in the Pacific Islands. Prior to 1934 the Philippines were 
recorded In separate tables as Insular travel. 



46 



I 



Belglu 



Spain ..'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

Sweden 

SwItierUnd 

Turkey (Europe and As 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and i 

Kugosl.vle 

Other Europe 



Chin 



Colombia 
Ecuador 



Algerl, 



47 






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vjjinlll^ll-jvoinvo 1 


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48 



TABLE 14B. HONG KONG PAROLEES ADMITTED, BY SEX, MARITAL STATUS, AGE, AND 
MAJOR OCCUPATION GROUP: JUNE 4, 1962 - JUNE 30, 1963 



Sex, marital status, 
age, and 
occupation 



Number 
admitted 



Number admitted 



Sex: 

Males .. 
Females 



Marital status! 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced . , . . 
Unknown 



Age; 

Under 18 years 



19 years 

29 years 

39 years . ... 

49 years 

59 years 

69 years . . . . 

79 years 

80 years and over 
Not reported 



Major occupation group: 

Professional, technical, and kindred workers 

Fanners and farm managers 

Managers, officials, and proprietors, except farm .. 

Clerical, sales, and kindred workers 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers 

Operatives and kindred workers 

Private household workers 

Service workers, except private household 

Farm laborers and foremen 

Laborers, except farm and mine 

Housewives, children, and others with no occupation 

Housewives 

Retired persons 

Students 

Children under 14 years of age 



Unknown or not reported 



7,015 



3,514 
3,501 



4,176 

2,531 

270 

23 

15 



3,189 

160 

1,202 

1,084 

693 

383 

201 

82 

17 



443 

10 

158 

365 

171 

213 

90 

121 

20 

53 

^957 



1,356 

19 

1,106 

2,476 

414 



BY COUNTkV 



ENDED JUNE 30. 



o.u»,ent,J 



Belgium 

CzechoBloVBkl. 

""ng»fy 

Ireland 

Italy 

NetherUnd 

Po 1 end 

fortugal 

Spain • 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) .. 
U.S.S.R. (Europe and Aela) 
Other Europe 

At la 

China I' 

Iran 

Iraq 

Japan .' 

Jordan 2/ 

Philippine 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Other Aala 

Canada 

Cuba 

Haiti 

Other West Indies 

Costa Rica 

Guatemala 

Panama 

Other Central America 

Brail I ...'...'.[.....'.'.'.['.[[ 

Chile 

Colombia 

Peru ...'...'..'.'.'.]'..'.'.'.['.'.'.'. 

Other South America 

Africa 

Algeria 

South Africa 

Tuniaia 

United Arab Republic (Egypt 
Other Africa 

New Zealand 

Pacific islands (U. S. adsi. 
Other Oceania 

Other countrlea 

1/ Includes Pormosa, 

i/ Includes Arab Paleattne. 



3,215 



AW.n f, 1.220.3 



5,683 
67.503 



50 



dmlt 



TABLE 

^H 

of birth 

Belglun 

Ctechoslovakla 

France 

G.r«.ny 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

N#therlandl 

Poland 

Rumania 

Spain 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) . 

United Klngdoti 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China U 

Hong Kong 

India 

Iran 

Jordan 2/' 

Korea .'. 

Philippine! 

Ryukyu islands 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Mexico 

Doslnlcan Republic 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Other Keet Indies 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Honduras 

Other Central America 

South America 

Brarll ...'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

Chile 

Colombia 

Other South America 

Africa 

A'g«rl« 

South Ht'vlci '..... ....'.'.'. . 

Tunisia 

United Arab Republic (Egypt 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Ne» Zealand 

Pacific Island! (U. S. adm 
Other Oceania 

Other countries 



3.746 
16,107 
34.762 



.23.223 
56.655 
3.409 



526 


8 


ill 


n 




4 


135 


36 


7 5n 


, 


180 


10 


2 BO 


8 






161 


31 


214 




206 


'\ 


233 


11 


303 


15 


665 


106 


692 


I 




3 



S',5 


167 


820 


'b 


566 








746 


40 


360 




023 




245 





51 



-"rj;.r"'- 


ad^-d 


Hi 


m 


ill 


ll 


2-1 

ll 


1 


IJ! 


ll 

it 


lii 


III 


H 


iil 




ll 




1 50; 09 1 


34.043 


122.515 


944.929 


105,815 


5.593 


38.991 


2, ".6 


11.918 


63,4^7 


1,928 


30,00 7 


7,666 




14^62 


a-rop. 


673 809 






409.312 


55.385 


2.609 


5.150 


348 


5.201 


6,901 


1,234 


10,162 


3,029 


8}, 638 


1,351 


l2t'.UI,] 
15.083 

;2iso6 

113.75; 


78 

134 
106 

8.425 


905 
5.967 
5.172 

19.523 


6'.731 
2.099 

7',968 
6,233 
'.2.534 
77.013 
5.153 


516 

152 

1.466 

489 

3i69R 
4 39 

7.826 


13 
186 

32 
7.763 


9,919 


5 
5 

618 


241 
164 


87 3 
169 

1.372 

2.267 


3 

8 
332 


29 

433 

348 

1.105 

422 
603 

10.541 


5 
29 

2.376 


1.625 

5.213 
20.482 

340 
577 

6.930 






















89 


1-""^'' 
















































!I:s"!.!'rL'",;-.„yA;i.;-:;::: 


'«i 








13 




11,030 
534.723 


6.663 


1 3 . 580 

17.988 


2.235 


iV6,3 
582 

355 
26.807 


2.388 
58 


18.398 


73 
1.126 


15>. 
1.616 


39 
53.589 


5 
216 


316 

90 

3,170 


1.004 
69 2 


29.320 
























i"l^\ 








Jordan J/ 












IT^Z l;ir«U;ii; 




„^,^^,_,^_ 


370 








239 


K775 
7.555 


710 


" 




I 








866 


339 


790 
























































Othar Horth*A.arl'«'^* 


' 


3„„,,,.„.„ 






16.572 
14.845 

27^45 


795 
1.045 

'344 


555 


10.158 
5!470 


3,474 
1,506 


,; 












7 25 
351 


106 


i:i83 
1.164 




























Other South Aiaarica 


' 


„,,„ 






932 

1.476 

4.378 
7.176 


26 
250 










36 

B96 


"' 






...... 




79' 


n 

78 








South Alrlc. 

Tunt.la 


\ 


Oc.aol. 




*"""'[* 










l!705 










3 


2 


— 5rr 


-^ 


'605 
47 


1 


Faclflc l.l.nd. (U. S. ad..) ... 
Oth.r Ot.anla 








' 


" 



°'"'"::.EH"-°' 


.dr::d 


III 


lii 


Ill 




1 s 


1 


iii 




in 


it! 


n 

a; 


1 

s I s 

m 


1 


: 
s 


All countrle. 






(73.515 


944.929 










11.918 






30,002 


7,666 








































3! 501 

is.'in 

15.607 
2.649 

97.598 


7?e 

365 
203 

2,600 
83 


5,547 

32 

1.214 
2.950 

269 


5.31- 

5!l35 
15.906 

1.360 


2,962 

157 
135 






6 
2 


369 

59 

522 




32 


435 
1,655 


123 
835 


15 

35 






307 












f^l„ll 


359 




























84 


p^J"'j 






















Turk.y llorope and >.l.) 


176 


■("S"!"'!" 

Oth.r Europ. 


^•""•i' 

"""S """B 


l!5<.5 
88n 

2! 006 


500 


288 

' 63 
205 

1.072 


■259 


36 


13 


'631 
2.078 

522 
153 




31 

75 
143 


9^9 

5 

3 

122 

1.333 

293 


22 
248 


463 
332 

■ 85 


51 

307 
1,005 

193 


5 


: 


















J,'' 


" 


Joil'" 3' 


- 














SyrlL »r»b"R'pubi ic 


" 












1.062 

29^340 
84,426 
5.627 

4!e23 
6,722 


1,703 

168 

84 

93 
146 
113 

112 


1.751 

202 

1 .046 

4.922 

300 
33 


232'.265 

2:563 
53,954 

7!023 


'933 

175 
316 


6 


662 


3 




28,478 
13 

37 




994 
894 


396 

5 


10 






329 




Do.lnlc.n Republic 








oth.r we.t'i;di..'::': 












Cuat«m«l«°' 




















"t;:'»"[h'L^cT'.:::::::::: 


45 


South «..rlc. 




6,839 
27.693 
6.310 


1.236 
331 


'496 


ll!625 

13!302 
24,656 


852 


3 


2 39 
364 


-^ 


ill 

310 


203 


,J 


468 
4J4 


lii 


12 












Colombl. 




















*frlc. 










669 


52 
2.161 

2.030 


18 




3 


95 








255 


156 


8 










4,079 248 




























2!252 




160 






6 
5 






320 
84 


57 








othll'oolli"'" '"'^' ""■' ■■•■ 












i/ Excluds. 195,450 Mexican .grlcul 


urel l.bo 


ere. 





























53 



Port 


Number 
admitted 


Temporary 
visitors for 


vlsUorrior 


Other 

nonimmigrants 






122,515 


944,929 


439,547 








478,746 


304,185 


Baltimore, 'W 

Boston, Mass 

Charleston, S. c 

Charlotte Amalle, V. I 

Chrlstlansted, V. I 

Cruz Bay, V. I 

Froderlksted, V. I 

New York.'N.'v." 


- ■21840 
15,324 
1,813 
24,911 
1,292 
1,558 
4,679 
131,130 
3,231 
575,305 
2,755 
9,497 

lisBS 
12,375 

30,071 


■221 ■ 

' 21 

75 

20 

4,321 

129 

130 

2,769 

152 

169 

1,570 


1,340 

6,996 

508 

12,778 

811 

575 

1,791 

96,959 

344 

295,982 

1,090 

6,759 

49,067 

1,354 
26,915 


11279 
6.503 
1,274 
9,045 

908 
2,858 
29,900 
2,758 
202,950 
1,371 






San Juan, P. R 

Washington, D. C 


29,153 
753 






Gulf of Mexico 


9,578 




7^-175 
14,151 
14,037 
2,050 


.... .j.^.^ . 

3B1 
555 
24 
13 


10,416 
10,372 




New Orleans 'la ' 




,. ftntonio' Tex 


















5)250 
75,6t,7 
47,002 
1,965 
7,736 
6,349 
.'31 


'587 

12,307 

2,807 

26 

'722 
13 


33]021 
26,151 

4; 175 

4,072 
150 




Honolulu"^Ha 'ai i 


30,339 








San Francisco, Calif 


2 238 


Seattle, v/ash 


1,555 












9,323 
212 


2,456 
15 


1,712 
176 


5,160 
21 






Blaine, Wash 

Buffalo, N. Y 


17,883 
38,524 

22 1480 
26,308 
1,356 

28.422 

6^565 
3,305 
1,806 
8,030 

211370 
1,674 
3,205 
1,951 
8,594 
7,852 
2,977 
2,232 
2,418 
1,925 
1,689 
4.681 
1,681 

19,043 

197,139 


'3i6 

449 

20 

216 

3,927 

319 

1,145 

107 

34 

5 

23 

290 

13 

125 
198 

27 

5 

103 

456 
2.954 


*15;876 

34,541 

1,525 

20,907 

12,347 

799 

22,723 

83 

5,590 

367 

1,769 

1.797 
20.354 
806 
,341 
1,640 
6,625 
5,912 
2,270 

1,928 
1,700 

3,920 
1,531 
11,931 


1,691 

3,434 

896 

1,365 

9,034 

238 

4,549 

4,370 

868 

3,407 

83 

8,373 

68 

725 

853 

868 

290 

1,844 

1,742 


Champlaln, N. Y 


Cleveland, Ohio 




Fort Kent, Me 




Le«lston, N. Y 




Noyes, Minn 

Ogdensburg, N. Y 


Rouses Point, N. Y 




2,232 
463 
140 






Sweetgrass .Mont. .. 


Thousand Island Bridge, N. Y 

Trout River, N. Y 


717 

141 

6,556 


Mexican Border 




11,413 
19,841 

7io32 
27,060 
1,972 

7,452 
56,208 
11,559 

3,333 
42,977 

217 


257 
83 
155 
50 
1,116 
34 
186 
522 
132 
114 

45 

21 


10,368 
19,435 
2,214 
7,372 

l!850 

7,020 
53,561 
10,543 

3,128 
41,221 

3,405 

87 


'788 
323 


Dallas, Tex 


Eagle Pass, Tex 




El Paso, Tex 




Falcon Heights, Tex 

Hidalgo, Tex 

Nogaie^. ^VizV '^\v/^]\y^v/^\"v^^.^.'.'.'.'.'. 

Roma, Tex 


88 

246 

2,025 

784 

91 






All other 









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55 





. tNTRIES OF ALIEN AND C 
BY STATE A 

/Each entry o 


ITI2EN BORDE 
ND PORT: YE, 


ft CROSStRS OVER INTERNATIONAL LAND BOUNDARIES, 
dR ENDED JUNE 30, 1963 

arson counted separately. 7 

State and port ^^^-^""^ 


rsons crossing | 




Stiito and port 


Total , 
16'4. 88 1.601 


Aliens 
94,694,164 


CltUena. 
70,187,437 


Michigan (Cont'd) 


2.878 
1.298 

34 '.291 


565 

507 

53,952 

18.402 


2,31 

44,82 
15,88 


•^ 




56 7B5 973 


29.957.041 


26.828.932 












77.828 






St %Ulr * 




*'"''* 


179 
2.743 
8.343 
2,119 
4.826 
1.090 
16.216 
52.731 


1.348 

396 
2.479 

290 
3.691 

1.640 
2.848 

185.384 


988 
135 
2,347 
5.864 
1,829 
1.135 
1.071 
14.576 
49,883 

95.798 


St Clair 


31^613 


269 
18,113 
507.343 


2,38 
13,50 


0|' 












Fairbanks 




1,091 

l,2Bl 

1,423 

1.902 

988.851 

1.575,310 


533 

715 

30 

505,322 

7 32.888 


55 
11 
70 

7 
78 

70 

483 ',52 

842.42 










J"""" 


D tour^ 


Sit 






Ito 






Ira 


Skaguay 




M 








Idaho 


Rogers City 


la 




'11. M6 
89.666 


120,901 
64,483 

6.297 


25!l83 

34.961 






Porthlll 




till 








Baudette 


132,350 

3!465 
18,933 
508 
676,191 
17,831 
292,698 
1.392 
259,751 

l!903 
70,646 


82,927 
1,413 
1,275 

lo!733 
171,311 

587 
89.076 
38.770 

222 
21,626 

52,086 

396,732 


49,43 
3,22 
2,19 

16, se 

17 

5]3S 
5,8: 

1.7: 

18,51 
325.3: 




ii?" 


41.25B 


••"' 


34.961 




















62,291 

147.079 

2,167.590 


90^596 


32.730 
56.483 
726.716 






Bridge te 


unL^tei"? !.'!!! !.:::::::: 










l',765:72e 
381,862 
110,077 

3o',794 
22,095 
9,593 
16,468 
460,565 
690,030 
201,832 
5,770 
395,798 
319,148 

232!l03 

2.372,161 

6.250 

9.452 

37.427 

25.593 

24.292 

23.481 

1.101.833 

290.672 


'268 ,"404 
78.833 
22.086 
19,193 
17,243 

274^049 
431,311 
153,467 

5,081 
252,433 
176,730 
81.300 

7.046 

1.4eo!632 
3.952 
5.956 
27,663 
21,825 
22,932 
21,108 
688,005 
203,038 


113.'458 
31.244 

1U601 

4.852 

2.767 

4.492 

186.516 

258.719 

48.365 

689 

143.365 

142.418 

81,311 

982 

88,254 

891,529 

3!496 

31768 
1,360 
2.373 
413.828 
87.634 




' 


Ferry f"'"' • 


Oalc Island 




MllUown Bridge 

Coburn Gore 


PI Rfvor 


1 




Pine Creek ..::::::::::::.:. 








, 


?°''°" ■ 




, 


f" ''°'' 






Estcourt 


Warroad 




F 't Falrtl Id 




,1 


Fort Kent 




'" '" 


Chief Mountain 


18,273 
13,243 

10 ',062. 
175.232 
65.606 
57,143 
18.437 

19 '32 I 
12,652 
2,533 

23.576 


17.571 
136 
8,770 
5,226 
7.505 

6!o38 
87,859 
40,665 
30,726 
12,780 
148,274 

13.191 


48,85 
3: 
9,5( 
8,0; 
4,61 

2 ,o;i 
4,0; 

87, 31 
24,9: 
26,4 

5,6 
92.9: 

7,21; 

2.31 
9< 










nou ton 








Great Falls (Airport) 








Uttl'^t"' 

Littleton 




:' 






' 


Jj"^'"^ • • 


Plegan 




Mara HlU-Knoxford Line ... 
Montlcello 






Roosvllle 






Scobey 




o"^ j' •■■ 

St. Aurelle 






St. Juste 


Turner 










t . amp 1 e . . . 

an uren 


Whitlash 
















Pittsburg 


23.576 


13,191 
10.066.994 








69.647 


4 3.040 




New York 




*'^°"*^ 




Ao.bae.ador Bridge 


3.189.899 

38,656 

5,494,674 

1,821 

5,741 

34.323 

5,911 

5,539 

165 


1,139,658 

28,7 54 

2,924,896 

418 

548 

267 

23^067 
563 

36,961 


2,050.241 

9,902 

2,569,778 

1,403 

5.474 

11^256 
5,348 
5.242 

29.118 




88.959 
9,299.969 


39,285 
2.511,102 


6.688,86 




Buffalo 


ii 


Detroit and Canada Tunnel 
Detroit City Airport 




6,993 

9.111.134 

33,985 

2.257,780 
105.419 
36,133 
87.091 
227,149 
294,690 
12.293 
758.225 
926.561 
205,886 


50;896 
162 

2.054 

2.557.990 

25,236 

8,478 

1,572,183 

64,677 

20.512 

14,344 

108,633 

176,038 

7,182 

457,011 

571,596 

115,394 


130,61 
K 

4,9: 
6,553,1' 

685 !5S 
40, 7« 
15, 6S 
72,7* 
118,51 
118,6S 
5,11 
301,21 
354,96 
90,49 
50 






u 


Greater Buffalo Inter- 
national Airport 


ii 


Detroit River and River 

Rouge Terminal. 

Keen-. Detroit Yacht 








C VI t 


bi 


Champlaln 


k 


Michigan Central Depot .. 






Churubusco 


Ii 


Cros.e 11 


























4,763 
2.532,768 

78.691 


2.806 
1,434,566 

49,932 


1.957 
1.098,200 

28,759 






Blue Water Bridge 

Canadian National 

Railway Station 






Hooers 


It. 


Morrlstow 






% 










56 













. Al, 




t the same 
sine 


erson counted separately^/ 








N.» York (Cont'd) 

Niagara Fall. 


4.937.88? 


AUens . 


Cltl«ns 
2.036.71 


Washington (Cont'd) 


, . Total 

4,320 
5931480 


_ .Aliens 

1,669 
17,452 


- CUUens 


Munlclp.l Airport 


3.80(,,504 

1.132,936 

508,054 


267 

'693^433 
309,397 


1,597,028 

439.503 

198,657 

580 


s "^^ "^''" 




Rainbow Bridge .. 


Spokane (Felts Field) 




Whirlpool Rapids Bridge .. 


2,208 




Wisconsin 




Rochester 




Municipal Airport 


6,995 

984,520 

420.001 

22 

7!517 


180 

1.07 1 

328.663 

3,383 

425,772 

300,254 

598 


511 

170,519 

3,612 

558.748 

119.747 

3!32l 


Mlluaukee 


4 39 


,6 


343 


Port Authority 

Rouse. Point 


Canada 


Thousand Island Bridge 


Montreal, Quebec 

Toronto, Ontario 

Vancouver, B. C 

Victoria, B. C 


215,147 
371,279 

70,533 
383.654 

23,124 

106,095,628 


127,436 
304,630 
35,005 
51,322 
10,256 

64.737.123 


66,649 






Watortown (Airport) 


332,332 
12,868 

43,358.50,5 


Youngstown 

North Dakota 


MEXICAN BORDER 


Ambrose 

Antler 

C.rbury 

Dunselth 

Fortune 

Grand Fork. (Munlc. Airport). 

Hannah 

Hansboro 

Halda 

Mlnot (Airport) 

Neche . 


13,883 

13^856 

136,790 

17.052 

2.369 

25!519 
25,102 
2,359 
114,699 
66.013 
41,376 
221.509 
155.978 
44,233 
15,760 
26,769 
50,867 
37.231 


8,970 
7,235 

9!32l 

9,235 
13,679 
13,224 

75,97? 
28,944 
20,565 
123.153 
87,479 

51736 
17,841 
28.266 
24,434 


4.913 
5,443 
2,437 
96,644 

l!e95 

ll!840 
11,678 

38i727 
37,069 
20.811 
98.356 
68,499 
17,553 
10,024 
8,928 


Dougiaj;:;;;:;;:::;;:;;:::.' 

LukevUl .\ ..[[.'.'.'. .'.'. 

Naco 

''°8»le. 

San Luis 

Saiabe 

Androde .....'!.'!.'.'!.'[!!.'.'.'.'; 

CaleKlco 

Los Angeles (Airport) 

San Diego 

San Ysldro 

Tecate 

New Mexico 

Antelope Wells 

Columbus 

Monument 67 




8.665.099 


5.818,272 


3,250,182 

216,625 
1,021,016 
7,799,971 
2,101,673 

32.799.446 


1.772,434 

3,571 

68,735 

538.781 

1,491. '803 
69,034 

19,172.071 


1.477,748 

147.890 
482,235 
3.059,230 
609,870 
37,728 


Northgat .'.'!!!!!!!!.'.".'! 

Pe.blna 

Portal 

St. John 

Series 


365,614 

10,347,108 

54.994 

7,561 

21,464,498 

559,673 

252.690 


2 36.849 

6,816,901 

14,306 

1.679 

11.757.327 

345.009 

120.57? 


126,765 

3,530,207 

40,688 

5,882 

9,707,171 

214,664 


Sherwood 

Valhalla . 


132.118 


Westhope 

Ohio 


24e.'438 
60.540.119 


119,625 
36.759.381 


3,305 
128,813 


Cleveland 

Sandu.ky 


25,622 

13.769 

586 


11,737 
84 


' T^ 

13,272 
502 


Texas 

Boqulllas 


23,780.738 


4,795 
8,351,247 

6,'594 
2.997 

2.329 
1.690,097 
3,252,586 


3,966 

6,429,076 

7,932 

5,454 

27 

755,902 
1,975.704 








Vermont 


CandoUrla 


1,658 


Alburg 

Alburg Springs 

Beebe Plain 

Beecher Falls 

Burlington Airport 


'i24;T78 
52,440 
216,719 
194,267 
4,348 
100,009 
1,024,302 
78,988 
712,905 
32,614 
13,348 
309.024 
421.026 
397.311 
62.413 
225,424 


42,070 
137,670 
137,517 

54,'512 
632,140 

53,572 
441.514 

17,419 

10,837 
196,054 
291.867 
237.372 

33,668 
125,961 


' '13:086 
10,370 
79.049 
56.750 
3,058 
45,497 
392,162 
25.416 
271,391 
15,195 
2,511 
112,970 
129,159 
159,939 
28,745 
99,463 


Chl'°tl" 


1,140 




518 






Del Rio 




Eagle Pas. 


1,276,882 


Derby Line 

East Rlchford 


El Paso 


Ave. of Amerlcns (Cordova) 
Santa Fe Bridge 


7,936,022 

19,064,555 

1,698.114 

439,302 

335,116 

12.426 

8.392 

4.945.631 

4.195 
9,793,429 
91.953 
13.786 
3,204 
503,678 
711,561 

1,566,369 
4,195 
39,562 


3.174,410 

11,436,415 

679,238 

261,203 

8,231 

6,941 

3.461,716 

585 

3,470 

6,641,317 

55,165 

272i744 
426,935 
21,357 
982,734 
3,470 
1,665 


4,761,612 

7,628,140 

1,018,876 

176.099 

210,162 

4,197 


Morses Line 

""-P"" 

North Troy 

Norton 


Ysleta Bridge 

Falcon Heights .....'.'.'.['.'..'. 

Fort Hancock 

Heath Crossing 


St. Albans 

West Berkshire '. 

Washington 


Hidalgo 




Houston 

l-'ntas 

Laredo 


14,263 

725 

3.152,112 




86,338 
2,621 
3,003,357 
40,639 
26,615 
64,370 
186,195 
52,376 
16.561 
134,774 
319,357 


12,693 

849 
2,071,858 
20,547 
19,159 
37,934 
103,631 
31,814 
8,560 
106,619 
163,341 


73,645 

1,772 

931,499 

20,092 

7,656 

26,436 

82,564 

20,562 

8,001 

28,155 

156,016 


Polvo 


36,788 

2,383 

725 

230,934 

9,' 040 
563,635 


Blaine* ['.['.'.'.'..'" 


Presidio 

Progreso 






Uurler 


Rio Grande City 






Metallne Falls 

Nlghthawk 




San Antonio 


37,697 
207 


Son Vicente 






429 "'1 


Figures Include arrivals by air 


Stlllwell Crossing 




,., 


207 



57 





1 


I 


1 


I 

s 


s 




\l 


S 


I 


.SISJ 


' 00 r- 


i 


Is 


n 


i 


IS: 


J 


,1 


5 


2 3 




37,154,105 
37,804,699 
40,214,929 
41,196,418 
39,303,607 

42,037,246 
43,516,165 
43,358,505 


a 
Inl 

fcl! 




5 


O 


s'-is s 


sgHS_s_R_gp_q § 


S's'^'i^'isSs's' K 






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sis 3 






2 rl >£>_ 00 ,-. <-i -c o._ r- .0 


irtfo 

mrk 

ttli 
1, Al 


1 

h 


1 
1 

5 


S 


I 


sS? i 




SSSR22gSS^ 3 
-" 2 <^' o -A -£ 2 2 s SJ S 


fn fM 1-' r- cr ^' 0' -J <o' r-" oo »" 


;li»t 
iltlic 
evel 
to. 
fe.Ot 


^^1 


1 


D 

3 


s_s| r 


UMiiiiii s 


sSp.SS.ip.l ° 




lllii 


11 


H 


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'i 


2 A ;^ '^ 

i i i s. 


s" K IS £ i i i i i K £ 




-^r:°R§sSSs5 si? 


icig 
ttol 
lira 

DSIS 

■111, 

itlm 
Pv 


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\ 


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i i i i i K i i •5 i s 


s's's'iBSS's'^'s' s'2'2' 


uttle 

Iwest 
lis, 

KH, 
(ISO 


ii 


1 


% 
S 


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s ;i i s 








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mil 
til 
Jut 
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TABLE 20A. 



SPECIAL INQUIRY OFFICER HEARINGS COMPLETED, BY REGIONS AND DISTRICTS: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1959 - 1963 



Region 

and 
district 



Exclusion hearings 



Deportation hearings 



United States total 

;heast Region 

iston, Mass 

iffalo, N. Y 

irtford, Conn 

■wark. N. J 

•w York, N. Y 

irtland. Me 

. Albans, Vt 

iheast Region 

lanta, Ga 

Itlmore, Md 

eveland , Ohio 

ami, Fla 

>w Orleans, La 

liladelphla. Pa 

in Juan, P. R 

shlngton, D, C 

ihwest Region 

jiichorage, Alaska 

ilcago, ill 

itrolt, Mich 

lena , Mont 

nsas City , Mo 

laha, Nebr 

rtland, Oreg 

. Paul, Minn 

attle. Wash 

Mhwest Region 

,llas, Tex 

^nver , Colo 

Paso, Tex 

- inolulu, Hawaii 

• a Angeles, Calif. ... 

loenlx, Ariz 

Tt Isabel, Tex 

n Antonio, Tex 

n Francisco, Calif. . 



J[39. 



,759 



263 
257 
147 
587 
3,456 
16 
33 



180 
197 

96 

488 

2,633 

26 



2.071 



215 
126 
544 
3,528 
32 



417 
2,595 



140 
165 
656 
103 
239 
93 
102 



53 
72 

113 
1,358 

107 

199 
48 

128 



388 



!.5i/ 5^1/ 
76 I 89 



1,272 
212 



1,432 
626 



88 
60 
983 
25 
1,356 
177 

1,441 
601 



[2.805 



52 
61 
51 
79 
208 



23 

1,578 
102 
f,27l' 98li 
596 I 352 
586 620 



Dal las, Texas, District was eliminated In fiscal year 1962 and absorbed by new 
Port Isabel, Texas, District and the San Antonio, Texas, District. 



TABLE 21. 


ALIENS 


EXCLUDED FROM THE UNITED STATES, BY CAUSE: 












YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 189 2 - 1963 






















■ — 


/in 1941. 


-1953 figures represen 


t all exclusions at seaports and exc_ 


Luslons 






of 


aliens seeking entry 


for 30 days or longer 


at land ports,^/ 






Period 


Total 




a 
u 


II 


U 01 
-^ > 


M U it 

3.2 -g 


i 


Attempted entry 
without inspec- 
tion or without 


u 

82 


•a to 

11° 


1 
o 


Co 


1892 - 1963 


618.647 


1,254 


12,373 


8,172 


82,466 


219,347 


16,100 


180.170 


41,941 


13.679 


itU. 


w 


























Wr 


1892 - 1900 


22,515 
108,211 
178,109 
189,307 

68,217 


10 

27 
9 

5 


65 
1.681 
4,353 
2,082 
1,261 


89 

1,277 

4,824 

1,281 

253 


1,309 
24,425 
42,129 
11,044 

1,530 


15,070 
63,311 
90,045 
37,175 
12,519 


1.904 

8.447 
2.126 


94,084 
47,858 


5,792 
12,991 
15,417 
6,274 
1,235 


5,083 

8,202 

258 


4,5 
14,3 
20,7 

1,11 


kill 




tah 






1921 - 1930 ... 




1931 - 1940 


** 


1941 - 1950 


30.263 


60 


1.134 


80 


1,021 


1.07 2 


3.182 


22,441 


219 


108 


9 


Itlti 


1941 


2,929 




92 


13 


73 


328 


227 


2,076 


40 






kt. 


1942 


1,833 


_ 


70 


10 


51 


161 


252 


1,207 


26 






1943 


1,495 




68 


6 


63 


96 


77 


1,106 


26 








1944 


1,642 


- 


63 


8 


92 


107 


155 


1,109 


28 


21 




Ml! 


1945 


2,341 


- 


87 


4 


111 


56 


161 


1,805 


18 


23 




Iltte 


1946 


2,942 




87 


3 


65 


33 


361 


2.294 


13 






kit! 


1947 


4,771 




139 


3 


124 


70 


902 


3,316 


19 


11 


ll 


lltOi 


1948 .... 


4,905 
3,834 


25 


142 
187 


,5 


205 
112 


67 
99 


709 
216 


3,690 
2,970 


11 

26 




1 




1949 




1950 


3,571 




199 


16 


125 


55 


122 


2,868 


12 


13 


I 


,p 


1951 - 1960 


20.585 


1.098 


1.735 


361 


9 56 


149 


376 


14,657 


13 


26 


1,^ 


iim 


















2,783 








III! 


1952 


2,944 




285 


10 


67 




74 






till 


1953 


3,637 




266 


27 


130 


15 


47 


2,937 


3 




1 


Sill 










65 

124 
64 




16 

9 
14 


2 
15 
10 


2,432 
1,832 
1,079 






2 
2 

u 




1955 


2 667 




206 


113 

87 




1) 


1956 


1,709 


117 


169 


_ 


iui 






302 
255 




30 
18 


40 
21 


I 


14 
35 


348 
299 


3 

1 






1958 


733 


51 




it. 




480 


102 


19 
15 


7 
1 


18 
16 




34 

24 


276 
293 












411 




2 


_ 


_ 










1961 


743 




21 
24 
17 


3 

2 
2 


7 
23 
22 


^ 


29 
17 
19 


634 
280 
216 








it 


1962 


388 
309 






~ 


2 




(U 


1963 


4 


_ 




























^,1 
















M 
















h|iii 
































ki, 


























6 




















TABLE 22. ALIENS EXCLUDED, BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH AND CAUSE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1963 





Country or region 
of birth 


Total 




U X. 

11 


1 


1 


1% 
u u 


a o 
11 




■s'-s 

s " 

>s O 

\ % 


1 


ft! 


111 


% 
o 




All countries 


309 


11 


n 




6 


22 


^ 


7 


19 


7 


209 


5 






43 










5 






9 


I 


19 








11 


1 

1 

1 


- 




\ 


1 






2 

1 
2 

5 










Belgium 


























1 




Fif 1 






iNetharlands 






[Poland 
























ISwitzerland 






Turkey (Europe and Asia) . 






ii'ugoslavla 












"vprus 


241 


6 


15 


2 


6 


16 


: 


7 


2 
3 

3 


5 


179 






I 






Japan 












?hl Upplnes 












Nrth America 


2 






145 
23 


2 
4 




- 


1 

1 

I 


U 
11 

1 
1 




5 


1 


3 
2 

1 


16 








2 








)omlnlcan Republic 

Other West Indies 

Central America 


- 




)ther North America 

Sith America 






vr^entlna 


7 


^ 


- 


- 


- 


1 




- 

- 


- 

2 


1 








Irazl 1 


" 




:olombla .. 


~ 






' 




> 






* lea .. . 








1 



61 



TABLE 23. ALIENS APPREHENDED, ALIENS DEI 
YEARS ENDED JUNE : 


ORTED, AND ALIENS REQUIRED 
0, 1892 - 1963 


TO DEPART: 


Period 


Aliens 
apprehended \l 


Total 


Aliens expei 

Aliens 
...deported , 


ed 

Aliens require) 
to depart 2/ 




5.507,673 


6.211.192 


...515,105 


5j 69 6^087 




128,484 
147.457 


3.127 
11,558 
27,912 
164,390 

210.416 


3,127 
11,558 

27,912 
92,157 

117,086 


72,233 
93.330 


loni 1 Q 1 n 


1911 - 19 20 




1931 - 1940 

1931 


22,276 
22,735 
20,949 
10,319 
11,016 
11,728 
13,054 
12,851 
12,037 
10,492 

1,377,210 


29,861 
30,201 
30,212 
16,889 
16,297 
17,446 
17.617 
18,553 
17,792 
15,548 

1.581,774 


18,142 
19,426 
19,865 
8,879 
8,319 
9,195 
8.829 
9,275 
8,202 
6.954 

110,849 


11,719 
10,775 
10,347 
8,010 
7,978 
8,251 
8,788 
9,278 
9,590 
8,594 

1,470,925 






1934 






19 37 


1938 


1939 




1941 _ 1950 




11,294 

11,784 

11.175 

31,174 

69,164 

99,591 

193,657 

192,779 

288,253 

468,339 

3,584,229 


10,938 

10,613 

16,154 

39,449 

80,760 

116,320 

214,543 

217,555 

296,337 

579,105 

4,013,547 


4,407 
3,709 
4,207 
7,179 
11,270 
14,375 
18,663 
20,371 
20,040 
6,628 

129,887 


6,531 
6,904 
11,947 
32,270 
69,490 
101.945 
19 5,880 
197,184 
276,297 
572,477 

3.883.660 




1943 


1944 


1945 








1949 




1951 - 1960 




509,040 
528,815 
885,587 
1,089,583 
254,096 

87,69 6 

59,918 

53.474 

45.336 

70,684 3/ 

88,823 3/ 
92,758 3/ 
88,712 3/ 


686,713 

723,959 

905,236 

1,101,228 

247,797 

88,188 

68,461 

67,742 

64,598 

59,625 

59,821 
61,801 
76,846 


13,544 
20,181 
19,845 
26,951 
15,028 
7,297 
5.082 
7,142 
7,988 
6,829 

7,438 
7,637 
7,454 


673,169 

703,778 ' 

885,391 
1,074,277 

232,769 
80,891 
63,379 
60,600 
56,610 
52,796 

52,383 
54,164 '1 
69,392 


1952 


1953 


19 54 

1955 


1956 

1957 


1958 


19 59 


1960 

1961 


1962 


1963 


\/ Aliens apprehended first 
2/ Aliens required to depar 
3/ Deportable aliens locate 


recorded in 1925. 
t first recorded i 
d - Includes nonwl 

65 


n 1927. 

Iful crewman vi 


olators. 





TABLE 24. ALIENS 


DEPORTED, BY COUNTRY TO 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 


WHICH 
1963 


DEPORTED AND CAUSE: 






Country to uhich 
deported 


Totnl 


It 


I 


1 




11 


1 

i i 


1 1 

li 


Hi 

III 


III 

til 




All countries 


7 454 


^ 






158 


29 


368 


417 


2,302 


3,642 


21 




1 ,015 


3 


58 


8 


3 


13 


16 


12 


813 


88 






14 
1 
24 
69 
363 
133 
29 
36 
32 
111 
12 
32 
93 
22 
35 

192 


3 


15 
12 


1 
1 




1 
2 

1 
1 

1 


1 
3 


1 
5 

1 

1 

2 

2 


13 

1 

45 
325 
91 
27 
34 
16 
95 
10 
27 
68 
20 
16 

170 


1 

1 
5 
18 
22 

13 
13 

1 
5 
6 
1 
2 

5 






































. 










Turkey (Europe and Asia) 

United Kingdom 


- 






Other Europe 


- 


Formosa 


18 
45 
12 
1 
19 
34 

e 

25 

5 
12 

5,957 




3 
377 


S3 


3 

1 
2 

1 


1 




1 
1 


11 
12 

1 
18 
30 

5 

19 
3 
11 


1 

2 
1 

1 




Hone Konp 
































Philippines 








Other Asia 




North America 




Canada 


1,098 
4,405 
13 
26 
13 
11 
68 
46 
23 
49 
60 
45 
36 
14 
50 

183 




206 
152 

1 
2 

2 
1 
1 

1 
6 


26 
26 

1 


18 
120 

? 


2 
9 

1 


153 

- 


93 
257 

3 
2 

13 
8 
3 

2 
5 


514 

379 
10 
18 
12 

61 
39 
16 

20 
6 
10 

8 


64 
3,340 




Mexico 


19 


Antigua 


Bahamas 


" 


Barbados 


■ 


Cuba 


- 




- 






Trinidad and Tobago 

Other West Indies . . 




British Honduras 




El Salvador .. 








Panama 








South America 




Argentina 


15 

29 
56 
39 

23 

23 




3 
2 


: 








2 


11 

12 
43 
30 

15 






Brazil 












Peru 




Venezuela 




Other South America ... 




Africa 




United Arab Republic (Egypt) .. 
Other Africa ... 


2 
21 

84 


- 


2 

1 


- 






- 


6 


2 
13 

72 




; 


Other countries 


" 




" 



lENS ROIUIRED TO UEFART. BY NAflONALlTY AND CAUSE: 
YEAR CNDED JUNE 30, 1963 



allien, required to depart totaled 69.392 (see ''"le 23 
^19,175 required departure, of crewmen who were technlc 
required departure, under aafeguards - clileE ly^n««icar 



i s 1 



All 



Plnl 

Fran 
Cern 
Cree 

Irel 
Ital 
Netherlands 

Spain 

Sweden 

United Klngdon 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 1/ 

India 7 

Iran 

Jordan 2f 

Korea .7 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North America 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Panama 

South America 

Argentina 

Brail I 

Chile 

Colombia 

Venejuels 

Other South America 

Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Other Oceania 

Other countries 

1/ includes Formosa. 



64 



TABLE 2'.B. 



Europe 

Denmark 

Finland . .■ 

Hungary 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Spain 

Sweden 

Turkey 

United KlnRdoni 

YugoeUvla 

Other Europe 

China II 

India 

Iran 

Israel 

Jordan 2/ 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North Araerlca 

Canada 

Mexico 

Dominican Republic 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatema la 

Panama 

South America 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

Other countries 

\l Includes Formosa. 

21 Includes Arab Palestine. 



5 3 U 



65 



TABLE 24C. ALIENS REQUIRED TO DEPART, BY 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 


COUNTRY OF 
30, 1963 


DEST 


1 NAT ION 


AND CAUSE 








Country of 
deatlnatlon 


Total 


1 


i 
1 




1 

11 


1 
1 1 


li 

ii 


111 
5 S S 

III 


1 

fA 


So 
1 

s 


1 
I 

r 




35.789 


60 


17 




15 


67.. 


_i..''03 . 


22,9,5 


_Ll.i5i. 


_J_ 


-5- 




2.672 


3 






4 




20 


2,612.. 


29 


. 


-J_ 




31 

16 
198 
175 
416 
431 
104 
134 

69 
34 5 

35 

377 
26 
156 


2 


\ 


: 


1 
- 


- 


1 
2 

I 


30 
77 
16 
194 
169 

410 
103 
133 

67 
344 

34 

81 
368 

26 
149 

1,217 


3 

il 

1 
2 

1 
4 

13. 


\ 


- 


D ^ k 


- 


p. , . 


- 








- 1 - 


'' 






- 1 - 


N th* 1 da 




- 


N 


- 


norwsy 


- 


ortug 


- 


S*" d 


- 


Turkey (Europe and Asia) 


- 




_ 




_ 




_ 


_ 


34 
23 

118 
38 
89 

309 
10 
45 
9 

464 

94 
29.864 


54 


17 


3 


u 


61 


1,370 


33 

23 

88 
297 

45 
9 
462 
1 
93 

17,133 


I 
8 

2 

11.210 


: 


- 


H Kon 


- 


1°H? ^ ' 


- 




_ 




_ 




. 




_ 


Korea 


. 


p . 


_ 


p.,., . 


. 


Sin a''ore 


. 


Other Asia 


_ 




J 




7,140 

18,306 

65 

394 


24 
28 


3 

14 


1 
2 


4 




1,069 


6,681 
6,113 

64 
387 
137 
118 

'576 
225 

347 


135 
11,034 

3 

1 


3 


_ 










Bahamas 




Barbados 


139 ! 






121 
1,616 
580 
226 
354 
297 
53 
91 
203 
269 
10 

964 


2 






_ 




. 


Trinidad and Tobago 


- 




281 1 8 
49 1 3 












Panama 


194 
263 

5 


5 




Other Central America 






1 


South America 








90 
113 

19 
224 

83 
308 
127 

67 


': 


: 


\ 


: 






89 

19 
222 

305 
127 




: 








Chile 




Colombia 
















Africa 




United Arab Republic (Egypt) 

Other Africa 


19 

48 

988 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 




19 
47 

973 


6 


- 


- 











TABLE 25. ALIENS DEPORTED 


BY COUNTRY TO WHICH 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 


DEPORTED AND DEPORTATION EXPENSE: 
963 




Total 






Country to which 
deported 


Immigration 

and 

Naturalization 

Service 


Other 
Government 
agencies 


Steamship 
companies 


deported 


Aliens 
reshlpped 




i_,t>y-> 


6,078 


46 


839 


L 374 


117 




1.015 


2 59 


12 


625 


62 


57 




9 
1 

2 '4 

69 
363 
133 
29 
36 
32 
111 
12 
32 
93 
22 
35 

192 


1 
20 
27 
44 
53 
4 
6 
18 
12 
3 
5 
35 

19 

67 


4 

1 
1 
1 

2 

1 


4 

35 

279 
54 
?3 
2? 

9 
85 

8 

48 
9 
65 


3 
I] 

7 
1 

2 

5 
5 

23 






1 






France 


2 






rr 












Norway 


7 


Spain 


h 


Sweden 




Turkey (Europe and Asia) 














36 


Poriiio<ifl 


18 

'.5 
12 
1 
19 
34 

q 
25 
12 

5,957 


2 
6 

1 

8 
9 

17 

1 
7 

5,608 


30 


15 

5 
3 

5 
2 5 

3 

3 

40 


3 
7 
3 

2 

3 

1 

2 

261 




Hong Kong 


31 




























, 






Other Asia 




North America 


18 




1,098 

A, 405 

13 

26 

13 

68 
46 
23 

60 

■5 
36 

50 

183 


951 
4,332 
13 
18 
11 
1 
39 
32 
U 
27 
58 
42 
30 

36 

118 


1 
1 

1 


a 

2 

2 

7 
1 

6 
46 


103 

69 

2 
10 

8 

3 

2 

7 
8 

14 




















Cuba 












Trinidad and Tobago 

Other West Indies 


1 
6 


British Honduras 


El Salvador 
















South America 


4 




15 
10 
29 
56 
39 
11 
23 

2 3 


19 
50 
12 

13 

15 


1 


6 
3 

3 

6 


1 

1 

3 
1 
1 
3 












Colombia 




Peru 




Venezuela 








Africa 




United Arab Republic (Egvpt) .. 


21 


2 
13 

U 




5 

5R 


14 













67 



snoauBxiaDSTW 


s 

00 


1,060 
1,566 
8,537 
2,737 
812 

K112 




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5,322 

9,636 

9,724 

5,344 

1,971 

1,102 

662 

472 

483 

374 

400 
378 
417 


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5;^55sgK^?s:;^ :^^?:, 


SrtBl DT30DJIBU 

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49 3 
452 


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71 



TABLE 28. 


ALIEN CREWMEN DESERTED AT UNITED STATES 
BY NATIONALITY AND FLAG OF CARRIER: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1963 


MR AND SEAPORT 


















Nationality 
of 


Total 


3 


5 


I 


1 


1 


1 
1 


1 


1 


1 


s 


1 
3 


1 


1 


J 


1 


1 


3 

1 


1. 






















172 


132 


75 


70 


47 


Jll. 


hJi- 


-ji- 


LJ9_ 


-^ 


27 




Europ. 

Belgium 
Denmark 

Finland 

C.r.»n, 

Hungary 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Turkey 

United Kingdom 
Vugo.Uvla 
Other Ekiropa 


ijni 








^ 














69 


14 


2.6 




" 




10 


27 


kill' 

los 

Hit 
He* 

to 
Po 
St 

Soiit 
tt 

Bi 
CI 

m 
it 
pk 

Sa 


13 

5 

17 

6 

142 

1.035 

17 

233 

6 

370 
301 

57 

5 

578 


536 

56 

5 

54 
8 


\ 

3 

23 

3 
1 

45 


23 

1 
234 

161 


2 
386 

2 


34 
35 

70 


1 

14 
43 

35 
71 


10 

54 


85 

2 

10 


85 

3 


I 


65 


5 
28 




5 


32 


23 


7 


I 


Chin. 21 
India 

J.pen 
Korea 

PhUlpplnea 
Other Alia 


487 
15 
25 

9 
238 


55 

; 

46 


37 


1 
16 


\ 


36 


■■-66 


10 


I 


19 


72 


: 




15 


77 




7 


5 

: 


': 


kit 

Ch 
Hi 

H! 
h 


Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Other Central America 
Other North America 

South America 


73 
30 

10 

5 


1 
2 


8 

3 

3 
1 

10 


1 


: 




] 




: 


2 
1 




I 


'. 




27 


: 


2 




I 1 


Po 
S 
Si 

Sou 

1 


Argentina 

Chile 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South Aieerlca 

Africa 


28 


■ 


3 
3 


1 






1 


1 
1 








: 


1 


I 


i 


i 


3 


; 


: 


i 


Congo Republic of 

Other Africa 
Oceania 
Other countries 


II 

5 
12 

3 

85 


12 


15 


1 
13 


2 
















^ 


; 


; 


; 


; 


I 


- 


!t( 


U Includes deserting crewmen reported b 
2/ Includes Formosa. 


y ship 








those 


Cou 

75 








Stat 


es by 


Serv 




fflce 












k 



TABLE 29. VESSELS AND AIRPLANES INSPF.CTED, CRliWMEN ADHITTED, 4L1EN CREWMEN 

DESERTED, AND ALIEN STOWAWAYS FOUND, BY LOCATION: 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, l<t63 



:rewman counted separately/ 



United States total 

Northeast Region 

Boston, Mass 

Buffalo, N. Y 

Hartford, Conn 

Newark, N. J 

New York, N. Y 

Portland , Me 

St. Albans, Vt 

Southeast Region 

Atlanta , Ga 

Baltimore, Md 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Miami, Fla 

New Orleans, La 

Philadelphia, Pa 

San Juan, P. R 

Washington, D. C 

Northwest Region 

Anchorage, Alaska 

Chicago, 111 

Detroit, Mich 

Helena, Mont 

Kansas City, Mo 

Omaha, Nebr 

Portland, Oreg 

St. Paul, Minn 

Seattle, Wash 

Southwest Region 

Denver, Colo 

El Paso, Tex 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

Los Angeles, Calif. ... 

Port Isabel, Tex 

San Antonio, Tex 

San Francisco, Calif. . 
Phoenix, Ariz 

Prelnspectlon offices ... 

Hamilton, Bermuda 

Montreal, Can 

Nassau , Bahamas 

Toronto, Can 

Vancouver, Can 

Victoria, Can 

Winnipeg, Can 

Border Patrol Sectors ... 

Miami 

New Orleans 

Other 



VesKels and airplanes 
Inspected on arrival 



1,371 

1,769 

207 

5,325 
4,633 



1 


A49 


2 


272 


11 


221 


2 


619 


1 


89i 


9 


,628 


I 


7 68 


15 


024 




999 




585 


3 


,122 



771 

467 

9,080 



1.U5 
4,005 
2,464 



34.155 



3,044 

4,864 

116 

3,354 

20 , 640 

7 19 

1,418 

74,2 29 



779 

29 3 

3,488 

25,101 

i,io:i 

636 
41,656 



25.264 



2,834 
2,665 

4,564 

1,862 

35 

1 

274 

7,435 

5,594 

30.581 



251 
1,707 
7,022 
7,791 
3.177 
5,874 

942 
3,817 

22,549 



1,658 
5.326 
4,393 
8,109 
2.013 



Crewmen admitted 



43.078 
20.606 
6.557 
2.197 
553.681 
28.029 
5 

599.0 41 



49,626 
48,681 
60,063 
140,9 58 
76,086 
74,911 
90,9 22 
57,794 

149,786 



18,200 

23,721 

21,900 

343 

27 

3 

24,296 



267.527 



62 

53,573 

104,9 68 

62,706 

3,046 

41.192 

1,821 

124,911 



13,974 
11,848 
33,113 

440 
38,582 

167 



231,492 



18.277 
5,499 
1,157 
11,413 
92, 164 
2,981 
1 



12,595 
7,947 
90,282 
32,094 
8,883 
145,569 
12,674 

81,643 



13,058 
10,496 
14,946 
2,609 
18 

7,199 



142,964 



703 
6 
51,150 
29,083 
33,165 
5,760 
23,082 



77,971 



7,679 
12,608 
11,770 

7,394 

9,512 
23,632 

5,376 



Allen U 
crewmen 
deserted 

4,023 



1,729 



128 
53 
31 
39 6 
,073 



1.553 



\l Includes deserting ere 
by Service officers. 



;n reported by ships' masters and those found In the U. S. 



73 





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74 



TABLE 31. PASSENGERS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES, BY SEA AND AIR, 

FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES, BY COUNTRY OF EMBARKATION: 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1953 



/ixclus 



ve of Canadla 



land borderaj 



All countries 

Europe 

Auatrla 

Belgium , 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark , 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Gibraltar 

Greece 

Iceland 

Ireland 

Italy 

Luxembourg 

Netherlands 

Po 1 and 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey 

United KlngdoD 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Arabian Peninsula ... 

Bonin Islands 

Burma 

Ceylon 

Formosa 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iraq 

Japan 

Kuwait 

Lebanon 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Portuguese India .... 

Ryukyu Islands 

Saudi Arabia 

Singapore 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Thailand 

Turkey 

Vlet-Nam 



75,971 

2,295 

285,110 

281,335 

1,723 

21,518 

20,985 

64,787 

155,475 

9,252 

111,496 

14,895 

3,989 

40,525 

58,262 

12,808 

45,462 

3,290 

456,258 

185 

502 



155 

91 

234 

905 

20,245 

3,346 

376 

1,983 



53 

683 

31,782 

14 
5,767 
1,095 
1.086 

57 
1,359 
1,593 
1,563 



35,797 
1,372 



54.332 
7,015 
2,775 



9,896 

82,753 

495 



1,123 

20,221 

309 



200,870 

194.392 

1,270 



28,350 
36,390 

5,678 
27,003 

2,57 
257,065 



549 

10,129 

999 



27,431 
7,207 
3,822 
1,948 
8,056 
5,534 



115 

73B 

4,082 



13,692 
3,452 
2,683 
628 
3,947 
2,723 

231 



71,833 


34,073 


2,176 


1,298 


215,442 


53.603 


224,475 

15 

12,942 


56,193 


3,384 


20,928 


11,148 


58,888 


23,761 


102,403 


32,478 


9.252 


4,280 


84,065 


40,640 


7.588 


3,554 


157 


92 


38,577 


11,547 


50,206 


17,925 


7,274 


4,407 


45,462 


18,459 


3,049 


485 


366,725 


155,793 



5.422 

1,070 

910 



33 

7,615 

2,253 

226 

1,022 





PASSENGERS ARRIVED 


IN THE UNITED STATES, BY SEA AND AIR, 








FROM FOREIGN 


COUNTRIES 














YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1963 (Cont'd) 










/Exclusive 


of Canadlo 


n travel o 


vcr lend borders/ 
_ , 






Page 






By 


sea and a. 






M.^.«a 


Clti- 






Cltl- 




embarkation 


Total 


Aliens 


zcns 




Aliens 






.■.?¥P». 






17,291 


4.164 


13,127 


2,049 


920 


...>,,1?^ 


15,242 


3,244. 


11,< 


lis 




16 
35 


3 
25 


13 
10 


16 


3 


13 


35 


25 












143 


46 




143 
















Ub2 


261 


1 
201 


u 


4 


8 


450 


2 57 






Congo, Republic of the 


























r hiA 


13 

9 30 

6 

89 

88 

2,137 

1,943 


1? 

424 

2 

mI 

165 


506 

68 

1,522 
1,778 


13 
31 
6 
9 

36 
294 

10 


2 
9 
6 
53 
6 


7 

20 
241 
12 
10 


899 

80 

62 

1,843 

1,925 


400 

12 

3 
562 
159 


1, 




. 












^ 




* '' 




Llbva 






il 


Mauritius 


1 


1 




1 


1 


- 




_ 








5,087 
1,153 


451 
423 


4,636 
7 30 


640 


223 
2 


417 
6 


4,447 
1,145 


228 
421 


"• 


III 




11 




883 
860 
18 


3 
319 

16 


880 

541 

2 


18 


2 
16 


2 


883 
856 


3 

317 




111 






Sierra Leone 




South Africa 


1,196 


70? 


49 4 


307 


211 


96 


889 


491 








2 








_ 


2 


















(, 




p 


44 










54 


5 


49 




. 


_ 


54 


5 


1 




United Arab Republic (Egypt) .. 


2,098 


659 


1,439 


470 


299 


171 


1,628 


360 


!■ 
















3.517 


62,064 


28.433 


33. 


Bl 




29,575 
1,757 
11,522 

7 


21,528 

57 

8,121 

7 


8,047 
1,700 
3,401 


11,623 
2,713 


9,457 
2,305 


2.166 

408 


17,952 

1,757 
8,809 

7 


12,071 

57 

5.816 

7 


5. 
1, 

2, 


t. 




h 




lir 










New Zealand 


8,765 


7,696 


1,069 


7 , 104 


6,602 


502 


1,661 


1.094 




h, 


Pacific Islands (U. S. adra.) .. 


19,4R2 


5.290 


14,192 


1,048 


642 


406 


18,434 


4,648 


13 


l»! 


Polynesia, French 


7,739 


3.903 


3,836 


77 


64 


13 


7,662 


3,839 


3 




Solomon Islands. British 


2 


2 




2 


2 










Illl 


Wake and Midway Islands 


5,646 


862 


4,784 


15 


- 


15 


5,631 


862 


4 


ki. 








119 


7 


_ 


7 










North America 


1.321,403 


511,867 


809,616 


102, ?56 


54,184 


48.072 


1,219.227 


457,683 


761. 


III 


Canada 


41,064 


25.691 


15.373 


18,581 


12,082 


6.499 


2 2,483 


13,609 


8. 


at 


Greenland 


4,037 


142 


3,895 


2 


2 




4,035 


140 


3. 


hi 


Mexico 


331 557 


fO 519 


211 038 






781 


329 . 207 
391 


118,952 




*V 


St. Pierre and Mlguelon 


410 


55 


355 


19 


13 


6 


' 




West Indies 


826,697 


307.753 


518,944 


70.958 


37,892 


33.066 


755,739 


269,861 


485,! 


|) 


Bahamas 


277,067 


49,288 


227,779 


18,288 


2,273 


16,015 


258,779 


47,015 


211, 


III 




16,279 


















kl! 


















15,949 

26,749 
68,857 
















5.477 
708 


3,392 
598 


29,977 
98,358 


3, 

29, 






99 664 






1,306 






















1,459 
4,097 






9,827 
132.023 


4,581 
55.503 


5,1 
76,1 




Jamaica 


136,120 


57,860 


78,260 


2,357 


1,740 










76 




' 













TABLE 31. PASSENGERS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES, BY SEA AND AIR, 

FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES, BY COUNTRY OF EMBARKATION: 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1963 (Cont'd) 



^xcl 



travel over l*ind borders/ 



North America (Cont'd): 

West Indies (Cont'd): 

Leeward Islands: 

Antigua 

British Virgin Islan 

Montserrat 

St. Christopher 

Martinique 

Netherlands West Indle 
Trinidad and Tobago . . 
Windward Islands: 

St. Lucia 

St. Vincent 

Central America 

British Honduras 

Canal Zone and Panaoa .. 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

iouth America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

British Guiana 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Surinam (Neth. Guiana) . 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 

' Bernruda 

Caribbean 

Europe and Mediterranean 

Far East 

Southern South America . 

World cruise 

Other countries 

Tag of Carrier: 

United States 

Foreign 



5,305 
3.821 
27,380 
23,267 



i.8,953 
8,625 
5,580 

35,680 



1,356 
62,086 



2,8,3 
16,010 
5,410 
4,008 
19,886 
5.604 
3.915 



21,816 
78 
5.864 
31.330 
9,042 
507 
17,873 



350 



1,57 2 
15,794 
2,957 



4,872 
40,220 
8,271 
5,533 
35,441 
7,656 
5,379 



19,765 
5,1 
3,897 



16,106 
1,204 

20,236 

744 

5,615 

30,972 
8,856 



77 



PASSENGERS DEPARTED FROM THE UNITED STATES, BY SEA AND AIR, 
TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES, BY COUNTRY OF DEBARKATION: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1963 



/ixclus 



borders7 



All countrlea .. 

Europe 

Austria 

B.lglum 

Czechoalovakla , . . . 

Finland 

Germany 

Gibraltar 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Luxembourg 

Malta 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R 

Asia 

Aden 

Arabian Peninsula . 

Bonln Islands 

Burma 

Ceylon 

Cyprus 

Formosa 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iraq '.'.['.'.['.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

Lebanon 

Malaya 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Snudl Arabia 

Singapore 

Syrian Arab RepubUi 
Thailand 

VIet-Nara ! 



74 
75.966 
2,479 
252,244 
262,964 
2.097 
21,432 
37,971 
58,342 
155 

539 
254 
110.060 
14,797 
1,490 
38,329 
51. 

12.775 

43,201 

5,029 

455,024 

237 

563 



25,321 

177.572 

1,011 

3.454 

5 

796 

29,584 

10,358 



529 
5,957 
17,391 
19,427 
45,851 
126 
95 



2,421 340^805.388 



1,545 

21,340 

69 

40.540 

1,324 

174,599 

190 588 

1.558 

15,475 

20,580 

38,915 

109,555 

413 

169 

58,088 

9,080 

72? 

?8,21' 

37,521 

7,099 

27 , 500 

5,352 

271,5 

239 



56,658 
2,097 
10.899 



335 
20,856 
19,387 



755 

2,583 
364 
49,25 
37 28 
1 568 
5,843 
35 



10,533 
37,870 
49,529 



6,943 

43,201 

5,794 

363.818 



78 



TABLE 32. 


PASSENGERS DEPARTED FROM THE UNITED STATES. BY SEA AND 
TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES, BY COUNTRY OF DEBARKATION: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1963 (Cont'd) 

/Exclusive of Canadian travel over land bordera7 


AIR, 




Page 2. 


Country of 
debarkation 


By 






By sea 






By air 




Total 




Citi- 
zens 


Total 


Aliens 


zens 


Total 


AUena 








2.761 


13,476 


2.855 


653 


2,192 


13,382 


2,098 


11,284 




2 

19 

11 

24 

754 

115 

924 

19 

146 

71 

2,362 

1.928 

11 

3.557 

12 

1.551 

184 

961 

9 

53 

45 

6 

1.153 

16 

21 

12 

67 

2,204 


I 
2 

6 
379 
13 
2 36 
2 
13 
2 
504 
65 

289 
5 
272 
13 
182 

27 

1 

420 

6 

321 


17 
11 
18 
375 
102 
688 
17 
133 
69 
1,858 
1,863 

3,268 

,.„', 

171 
779 

2I 
45 
5 
733 
10 
21 
10 
67 


19 

24 

67 
27 
1 
12 

128 
93 
11 
1.131 
12 

1 

53 

6 

531 
16 

12 

376 

9.431 


\ 

6 
32 
10 

9 

6 
2 
41 
18 

5 

19 
6 

5 

27 

1 

210 

6 

in 

5,799 


17 
1 
18 
85 

57 

6 
69 
87 
75 
11 
987 

54 
12 
22 
9 
26 

5 
329 
10 

10 

265 

3.532 


637 
48 
897 

134 

2.234 
1,835 

2,425 

1,468 
166 
934 

45 

614 

21 

67 
1,828 

61,561 


347 
3 

227 
2 

7 

453 

145 

253 

7 
177 

210 

210 
29.748 






. 


' r * 


10 




_ 


1 Congo, Republic of the 


290 
45 




670 




16 


T C t 


127 


"^ 




'' 


1,771 




1,788 




_ 




2,281 


Mn bl 




"* 


1,215 


^ 


159 




757 






Sl^ I 














404 






, Swaziland 


21 






T fata 


57 


United Arab Republic (Egypt) .. 


1,618 
31.813 


Australia 


7,432 
456 

26,716 
108 
56 
91 

5.678 

17,655 

8,891 

79 

3,814 
8 

1,184,729 


3,141 
24 

19,656 
108 

81 
3,809 
4,372 
3,733 

56 

561 
416,277 


4,291 
43: 

7,060 

55 

10 

1,869 

13,283 

5,158 

23 

6 

3.253 

768,452 


2.305 

3,557 

56 

2,39 5 
894 
213 

8 
78,282 


674 

2.849 

1,562 
661 

47 

40,405 


1.631 

1 
708 

55 

833 
233 
166 

37.877 


5.127 
456 

23.159 
108 

91 
3,283 
16.761 
8,678 
79 
5 
3,814 

1,106,447 


2.467 
24 

15.807 
108 

81 
2.247 
3,711 
3,686 

55 

561 

375.872 


2,660 


1 Christmas Island 


432 


FIJI 


6,352 


Nauru 
















Pacific Islands (U. S. adra. ) .. 


13,050 
4 992 


Solomon Islands, British 

Tonga 

Wake and Midway Islands 


23 

5 

3,253 




730.575 


Canada , 


16,908 

4,244 

315,845 

352 

737,852 


8.058 

236 

109.468 

37 

248.507 


8.850 
4.008 

206,377 
315 

489.345 


2,425 

3.130 

11 

62.607 


628 
2,056 
34. .■'16 


1.797 
1.074 
28,391 


14,483 

4,244 

312,715 

341 

675,245 


7,430 

236 

107,412 

37 

214.291 


7 053 








205,303 

304 

450.9 54 


: St. Pierre and Mlquelon 

West Indies 


Bahamas 


265,441 
10,469 

140,281 
2,867 
88,845 


50,778 
5.577 

22,922 
1,408 

58,376 


214.663 
4.892 

117.359 
1.459 
30 469 


10.260 
109 

18,070 
549 
460 


1.075 
42 

8.078 
361 
324 


9,184 
67 

9,992 
188 
136 


255,181 
10.350 

122.211 
2.318 
88,385 


49,702 
5,535 

14,844 
1,047 

58,052 


205 479 


Barbados 




Bermuda . . 


107.367 




Dominican Republic 


30,333 





79 



























DEPARTED FROM THE UNITED STATES, BY 


SEA AND AIR, 








TO FOREIGN 


COUNTRIES, 


BY COUNTRY OF DEBARKATION 














YEAR ENDED JUNE 30 1963 (Cont'd) 












/Exclusive 


of Canadla 


n travel o 


ver land bordersj 
:: r 






Page 3. 




Country of 
dabarkAtlon 


5JU 

Total 


sea and a 
Aliens 


^-cmr- 


Total 


Allen. 


Cltl- 


Total 


Aliens 


Cltl- 

— ssDa — 




North Anerlca (Cont'd): 






















Wast Indies (Cont'd): 


4.453 
10,348 


2.984 
4,221 


1.469 
6,127 


1,472 
3.116 


1.353 
1,003 


119 
2,113 


2.981 

7,232 

113,698 

22,160 

2,582 

34 

4,212 

1,702 

22.771 


1,631 
3.218 
43,454 

11,037 
1,665 
20 
2,864 
839 
10,246 


1,350 
4,014 
70,244 

11,123 

917 

14 

1,348 

863 

12,52: 








,* . 


114.592 

22,224 
28,572 
34 
4.359 
1.811 
23,602 


43.572 

11,068 
22,683 
20 
2,983 
932 
10,611 


71,020 

11,156 
5,889 
14 
1.376 
879 
12,991 


64 
25,990 

147 
109 
831 


31 
21,018 

119 
93 
365 


33 

4,972 

28 
16 
466 




Leeward Island.: 




British Virgin islands ... 




St. Christopher 




Netherlands West Indies .... 




Trinidad and Tobago 


18.730 


9,226 


9,504 


524 


230 












Windward Islands: 














7 

13 

1,169 

23 










13 
1,171 


12 

1.116 

18 


1 
55 
15 


2 
10 


5 


2 

5 


12 
1,116 


5: 
1( 








rena a . 










109.528 


49.971 


59.557 


10,109 


J, 505 


6,604 


99.419 


46,466 


■-^•Hll 






4,488 
46.162 


2,386 
14.750 


2,102 
31.412 


12 
8,867 


2.850 


8 
6.017 


4.476 
37,295 


11,900 


25.39: 




Canal Zone and Fanana 






8.526 
5.274 
31.954 
7.423 


4,895 
3,474 
16.241 
4.447 


3,631 
1,800 
15,713 
2.976 
1,923 


151 
19 
109 
920 
31 


55 

58 
508 
19 


96 
8 
51 
412 
12 


8,375 
5.255 
31,845 
6,503 
5,670 


4,840 
3.463 
16,183 
3,939 
3.759 


1,79; 
15.66: 
2,56* 
1,91; 




_ , . 
























11,742 


7.294 


4.448 


184.025 


114.272 


69.75 






22,065 
1.624 

33,263 
1,488 


14.267 
89 2 

17,506 
764 


7,798 

732 

15,757 

724 


3,375 

2,620 
34 


2,641 

1,544 
18 


734 

1,076 
16 


18.690 
1,624 

30,643 
1,454 


11,626 
892 

15,962 
746 


7. 06* 

73! 

14,681 

701 


















8.561 
39.573 
9,030 
754 
23,185 
860 


5.044 
27,274 
6,170 
435 
14,839 
257 


3.517 
12,299 
2,860 
319 
8,346 
603 


711 
720 
386 

899 
32 


316 
432 
173 

238 
12 


395 
288 
213 

661 
20 


7,850 
38,853 
8.644 
754 
22.286 
828 


4.728 
26,842 
5,997 
435 
14,601 
245 


3.12: 
12.01 
2,64-. 
3M 
7.68)1 
58 
















Peru 




Surlnaa (Heth. Culana) 




Uruguay 


1,711 


1,073 


63E 


155 


93 


62 


1,556 


980 


57r 




Venezuela 


53,653 
301.660 


33.045 
18,526 


20,608 
283.134 


2,810 
301,660 


1,827 
18.526 


983 
283.134 


50.843 


31,218 


19,62! 




Cruise 






28,806 
249,227 
16,019 


823 
14,750 
2,107 


271983 
234.477 
13,912 


28,806 
249,227 
16.019 


823 
14,750 
2,107 


27,983 
234,477 
13,912 


- 


-\ 










Europe and Mediterranean 






704 
316 


22 
28 


682 
288 


704 
316 


22 
28 


682 
288 


- 








Southern South Aaerlca 




World cruise 


2,401 


204 


2,191 


2,401 


204 


2. 197 












4,187 




















Flag of Carrier: 






























159,802 
645,586 


26,556 
199,191 


133,246 
446,395 


1,433.676 
1,449,127 


373,799 
667,297 


1,059,877 
781,83C 




Foreign 


2,094,713 


866,488 


1,228,225 










80 

















/inci 



ARRIVED 

Alaska, Anchorage 

Arizona, Tucson 

Calif., Los Angeles 

San Diego 

Canada, Quebec 

Conn. , Hartford 

Fla., Jacksonville 

Key West 

Miami 

Port Everglades , 

Tampa 

West Pala Beach 

Cuan, Agana 

111. . Chicago 

La.. New Orleans 

Hd. , Baltimore 

Mass. , Boston 

Mich. , Detroit 

N. J. , McCulre, A.r.B. 

N. Y., New York 

Ohio. Cleveland 

Pa., Philadelphia 

Pltfbu'-gh 

P. R. , San Juan 

S. C, Charleston 

Tex. . Dal Us 

San Antonio .... 

Va., Norfolk 

V. 1. , Charlotte Amalle 

Frederlksted . . . 

Wash. , Seattle 

Other ports 

DEPARTED 

Alaska, Anchorage 

Arizona, Tucson 

Calif., Los Angeles .... 

San Diego 

San Francisco . . 

Canada , Quebec 

Conn., Hartford 

D. C. , Washington 

Fla., Jacksonville .. . 

Key West 

Fort Everglades 

West Palm Beach 

Hawaii, Honolulu 

La., New Orleans 

Md., Baltimore 

Mass., Boston 

Mich., Detroit 

N. J., McGulre, A.F.B. 

Newark 

N. Y. . New York 

Ohio, Cleveland 

Pa, , Philadelphia . .. 

Pittsburgh 

P. R. , San Juan 

S. C. , Charleston 

Te», . Dallas 

San Antonio 

Va, , Norfolk 

V, 1. . Charlotte Amalie 

Wash., Seattle 

Other ports 



83.750 


53,456 


6,839 


2,204 


96, 100 


80,226 


6,591 


2,741 


45,553 


64,741 


3,740 


2,577 


1,305 


207 



1,537 
590,333 
99,595 
3,051 
54,728 
20,158 
95,638 
104,9 87 



12,563 



83,296 

7, 180 

159,854 

6,903 

20,726 

1,254 
9,774 



56,863 
2,575 
5,507 



22,811 


54,548 


2,384 


2,126 


2,699 


39,518 


11,485 


25,447 


75,401 


124,698 



7,050 
3,262 
7,689 



7,564 


. 


20,056 


978 


34,460 




3,914 


2,390 


10,042 


26,280 



2,702 

53,2 

18,210 

75,549 

104,979 

37,558 

9,301 

62,277 

15,055 

128,307 

1,489 

,396.003 

1,805 

13,459 



6,443 
1,281 
13,815 
9,589 
27,890 
29,922 
15,209 



109,059 
3,040 
65,825 



39,477 
8,621 
47,659 
75,057 
22,349 
6,869 
45,570 



,427 



20,089 
38,145 
3,057 
5.686 



46,835 
2.848 

51.892 
2,575 



170,686 
5,199 
2.359 
2,634 
10.481 
62,072 
24.262 
13.352 



75,913 

904 

3,313 



6,257 

821 

52,218 

14,347 

7,564 
19,326 
34,460 

2,519 



6,005 
6.414 
1,727 



81 



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STATES 


RESTDEN 


CE AND ^ 


THE ALIEN 
ATIONALIT 


ADDRESS I'ROGRAM, BY SELECTED 
y 1/1 DURING 1963 










Nationality 


Total 


Callfornl 




Texas 


Illinois 


Florida 




Massachusetts 


Michigan 


PennsyWanla 


Ohio 




TOTAL ALIENS 

EBMANENT RESIDENTS 




710.119 


609.163 


:ii.oo 


191.279 


181. ?50 


159.;.'9 


132.771 


129.160 




92.779 


691.269 


2.a92.01t. 


665.558 


511.167 


233.23 


181.133 


98.107 


115.337 


123.186 


121.719 










196.239 






126.369 




110.215 














9I220 

16|061 

3|687 
12,103 
36,316 

2«7,805 
39,358 
13,023 
61,102 

228,766 
15,107 
23,556 

55,107 
21,659 
129,881 
36,961 
7,192 
15,819 
22,155 

7^655 
217,811 

30I76I 
1,668 


51 
3,010 

1,119 

33I12I 
2,927 

16)336 

'619 

22,003 
2,875 

11)157 

5)010 
1,099 
1,162 
19,896 
1.621 
3.536 


■■■ 68^0 

1)761 

213 

2,891 

1,681 

2)227 

18)l29 
9,955 

25)105 
87.196 

2)825 

6)386 
31.036 
2.305 

3)619 
3,531 

2)116 
55,098 
18,101 


176 
31! 

2' 

6,615 
337 

59. 
2( 

36 
33 
391 
158 

5,126 
211 
125 


'79; 

'806 

10^ 

26)815 
1,169 

5)115 

1)711 
6,811 
103 
2,090 
1,162 

2,706 

311 

5)529 

6,580 

112 


15 
292 

182 

31E 

1,096 
596 

585 
1,111 

139 
20 

933 

867 
193 

08 

'101 
101 


'606 
23 

537 

18)061 
2,001 
5,170 
3,871 

25,312 
808 

3,271 

2)61fl 
1,275 

538 
5)010 
'299 


526 
723 

125 

213 
63 

1)361 
5,200 

'703 

15)6;c 
909 

' 19 
1,596 

8,615 
13,192 

229 

1,012 

327 

573 

138 


169 
1,129 

15! 

10,518 
1,896 
2,198 

7,576 

1)513 

21 

1,197 

12,707 

919 
223 

199 

11,116 

2,988 

1,951 

718 


'307 

31 

2,971 

209 

75 

1,073 
12,072 
2.137 
3,277 
3,173 
18,930 

1,155 

'221 
9,909 

308 
320 
331 

10.112 

5,108 

2,865 

893 


'268 

1,725 
192 

382 
931 

3)895 

5,055 

981 

6,821 

1,111 

'125 
5,683 

710 

308 

289 

201 

7,670 

1,982 

2,233 




: ^"j' 


577 




2,079 


g :' J 








^'"""f 


901 
1,523 
8,801 

9)185 






g '"'^' 




u'lll' 






31,008 

5)035 
219 

9)227 


I I , 




L embou a 






pr"i 




6,966 
1,085 




"""f" 




S It " i'lid 


3,327 

56)689 
10,912 
7,073 






U.S.S.R 


Oth"''!"'^ 


A,l, 






3;011 

3,757 

23! 066 
61,913 
3,731 
6,866 
1,597 
612 
183 
16,509 
5,110 


2,013 

■792 

'56I 

176 

110 

16,932 


9.181 
125 

812 

15,695 

'186 

120 

767 


765 

116 

13 
16 

98 
118 

295 


1,939 

12 

^6 

I.™ 
'631 

111 
32 

55 
169 


130 

99 
90 


'910 
111 
15 

38 

160 
20 


'2I8 
139 
315 

235 

25 
191 
301 


223 

211 

209 


122 

605 

113 
239 

22 

183 


90 

52 

127 
151 

13 
19 
229 


6,930 




j"^ '1 


351 




,"" 


196 
1,166 




:"'' 




Kor«!" ■■ ■ ■ 






131 
26,825 


p J 'f" 




Oth« A l" 


North America 




339,659 
577,895 

18|l31 
5.112 
8,181 
1,317 
5,390 
7,337 

5)732 
9.665 


80,152 
266,577 

'3O6 

338 

2,379 

6,118 

2,612 

981 


I3)ei2 
5)717 

987 
'316 

6,569 


3,359 
201,382 

77 
281 
292 


8,79? 

'207 
231 

159 

211 


15,968 

'125 
158 

258 
336 


7,007 

269 
116 

li 

111 

237 


187 
1,012 

99 

21 
32 

20 


36,762 

1,717 

139 

U 

22 


5,171 
558 

50 

10 

38 
31 
12 


16 

5 
12 
20 


65)825 
10,135 

'337 

138 

199 
1,198 




I-^^ 






J . 




cosinic 




Guatemala""^ 




Nicaragua 


?'n72 




1,685 


South Africa 




15:M6 
9,013 
5,015 

ll!715 
9,018 
5,117 


1,366 
1,512 
2,616 
3,031 

'691 


5,305 
2,052 
1,365 

5)277 

1)559 


157 

259 
82 
171 
135 
172 


791 
166 

913 
173 


301 

2,181 

510 

132 


1,107 
962 

958 

391 
317 
122 


99 


100 
117 


..U4p... 

121 
155 


129 
53 

57 
103 
152 


l)615 

939 

2,293 

1,106 

1)115 






^j^^j 








Oth.r South Am.rlc. 




319 
1,913 

378 
1,795 
1,191 


125 
65 
HI 


297 
381 
192 
520 


26 
50 

31 


35 
59 


13 


36 


62 
171 


57 

18 


57 
21 

31, 


21 
36 
16 

^0 


397 
320 




TuM si a 


United Arab R.pubUc (Egypt) .... 






2)130 

39,651 
33,537 

311,669 


2,921 
835 

3)102 
11,861 


1,111 

15,096 


193 

21 


19I 
61 

130 


-■ ii 




231 

1,370 
2,125 


12 
1,511 


63 
3 

2,800 
8,106 


251 
19 

9)217 
6,069 


2,123 

5)116 
83,683 


New Zealand 






93,913 11.212 


(ER THAN PERMANENT RESIDENTS 


56,301 7,769 


Include" Fo^sir" " 

1 








8 


3 

















it 



S § § 8 S § § |l I SI I ? S S 5 3 S S S S § S p ?,2 S IS p P.S R « S B P i ^ S 2 pj |k 3 P 3 S S 






S 5?;?S8§§S7Sgpa§g|S!;SR§SS|5'gS!S^?g^S3:;85X|SSP88£S|8Si 



12?IS«oo2E3322?;Xro3SS^8"SS2£RSr3?22SSSS8f>o8o!Slln^2r-?S3S< 






• (N-oinmtNOJrtc^^*oincrf^oo*'00ir^cj'OMO^aj-^inoD(DO'OO^^^f^^or)CNDOQcoo>otnc2cnCMinm OP 



3 S"s?;^s<??5Ssa"S! 



'K"SS5'^''S 



?;?r3S2"2tSSi 



§ti 



*j o^aJ^oQ^•H^^o^oroocnOQ<^or^o^NOCN^^^-Q•-<<^oc*^o*t^<^^r^^(0>f^^^)c^o^nlnr-cN^noc^'r(^CT•o io 

CD ^J^^lnco^o■A^r)0\|^^c^lnc^^n^r^Oc^f^--«Olnc^JO^r^^OC^*^(^^cot^lncDoo<^o•-^^•--»CD{^^p•H^ 



icNi-Hr^nlnS^ o-^r 



i•-^nC^^^I«f^^n|^nO'inc^\0^{nv■--^C^'7'-^CNf^tnnrJ^O.--^CJ--^^CDlOfO>f)^.^n 



oc^c^c^l^'JDlIO'^^■^«^o^OlnlOo*^o^^TJOl^otD^'^c^^^-^mtn^rHOT(^r^^^^IJ^oc^o^^vcNu^r^^*OJ{D t-^f^ 

n(^na>fslln<£lt^(DaDl~lO•c^.-HC^QCNQcoaJ^o^o■-HfOrta3^nt^^o(Nc^Jc^lr-f^a^r^ fon^j 



^ ^0g^^r~■'OOf0^^lr^f^.-Hd^c^li^u^r^rl^DC^^D^^w^CDr:-^(^oaDmc^JOgJt^c^omcNCN^*-^c^Ja^o^-cD00M 



^r^u^f^l«o>CT•^')l^o^c^oco|^■4c^^-lnoo'0--.(^^-^^nh^lO--toSJ^No(^^oKo•-^c^lOc^^-f^■^Jco^ c^ 



■Q ^ in >n ~i oiO r-mtn%oM if) ^^r..£i «nmoo r>i?iN ^oocoin noo -<o ^cd (M 









:^sss3iasSaS^55 a! 









84 






MIEN POl'ULAr! 
ZMIe 



BY STATES OF RESIDHNCEi 1940, 1951, 1960, 



7eqi5tration of 1910, alien address reoorts 
-cived I9D;, 1960, 1961, 1962, and 1963/ 



1962, AND 1963 



1960! 1961. 1%2 1963 



2.265.032 2.948.973 3.038.304 



3.128.765 3.236. 6B4 



sUfornla . 
ilorado ... 
jnnectlcut 



ssachusetts 
chlqan .... 



Hampshlr 
Jersey . 



jdlahoma .... 

' egon 

nnsylvanla 
_ode Island 
,.uth Carolln 
^. Ijth Dakota 

jnnessee — 

xas 

*h.- 

clkrmont 

;irglnia 

jshington . . 
Jst Virginia 
rrsconsln ... 

bming 

li. Terr, an 



5,132 

3,405 
31,954 

3,389 
542,464 
27,473 
158,128 

6,428 
14,752 
41,327 

5,187 
91,447 

8,232 
325,070 
44,385 
24,648 
15,955 

5,558 
17,310 
47,233 
37,792 
364,421 
303,103 
61,433 

3,219 
43,550 
13,777 
18,933 



30,538 
279,199 
12,402 
,257,501 
4,207 
10,492 
203,038 



34,424 

370,020 

52,570 

2,ie 

7,400 

5,137 

213,8 

10,487 

15,927 

10,093 

81,636 

23,662 

75,127 

5,917 



14,854 
3,853 



24,061 

1,418 

326,158 

13,598 

71,223 
2,571 
9,314 

26,011 
3,061 

66,181 

3,791 

110,563 

18,852 
9,826 
6,127 
2,873 
7,678 

18,931 

22,156 
146,028 
128,816 

19,970 
1,698 

15,274 
4,738 
6,897 
2,991 

11,031 
118,580 
6,294 
545,990 
3,959 
2,790 

77,351 
2,811 

16,947 

98,481 

20,369 
1,471 
1,822 
3,065 
165,927 

7)704 

9,260 
45,097 

6,940 
17,293 

2,108 



3,193 
1,378 



4,583 

2,597 
35,163 

2,147 
567,484 
19,536 
75,298 

4,942 
17,766 
83,577 

9,006 
51,316 

4,882 
199,405 
29,269 

9,938 
10,650 

5,355 
13,001 
19,967 
28,4 
127,710 



,719 



25,439 
2,810 

21,162 
5,263 
7,755 
4,465 

10,344 
151,437 

12,712 
553,703 

10,173 

2,865 

108,892 

6,239 

18,421 
126,073 

17,743 
3,879 
2,370 
5,401 
237,514 

12,260 
7,669 

18,825 

51,217 
6,409 

34,684 
2,491 



4,494 

2,699 
36,890 

2,173 
617,733 
19,340 
76,869 

5,028 
15,494 
117,619 

8,958 
50,101 

197*197 
29,095 
10,644 



20,206 
28,832 
123,458 
144,456 
22,711 
2,850 
20,732 
5,138 
7,226 



10,263 
154,661 

13,033 
563,700 



19,049 
123,382 
17,483 



2,293 

5,669 
233,579 
12,202 

7,557 
16,711 
51,684 

6,182 



4,585 

3,205 
40,242 

2,316 
660,418 
19,921 
75,100 

4,392 
16,436 
155,810 

9,549 
49,196 

4,992 
199,001 
27,817 
10,349 
11,228 

5,248 
14,185 
20,081 
29,455 
130,462 
135,378 
22,522 

2,943 
20,076 

5,196 

7,528 

5,262 
10,464 
153,179 
14,615 
574,637 

9,339 

3,127 
96,561 

7,262 
20,128 
119,058 
17,678 

4,312 

2,354 

6,068 
237,749 
11,992 

7,473 
17,399 
52,016 

6,101 



5,952 
15,581 
5,926 



2,945 
41,754 

2,432 

710,419 

21,090 

77,153 

4,154 

15,032 

182,250 

10,322 

48,025 

4,708 

194,279 

27,892 

10,359 

10,833 

5,988 

16,157 

20,230 

30,853 

132,774 

129,160 

21,830 

3,402 

20,223 

5,227 

7,442 

6,080 

10,614 

159,549 

15,139 

600,468 

9,550 

3,099 

92,778 

7,620 

20,476 

109,737 

17,559 

5,355 

2,299 

6,345 

241,001 

12,408 

7,600 

52)930 
5,944 

33,405 
2,580 



100.0 100. Q . 100.0 ^00.9 



1.2 
0. 
20. 
0.6 
2.5 
0.2 
0.5 



0.3 



0.7 
0.1 
0.7 
0.2 



0.5 
1.7 
0.2 



TABLE 37. DECURATIONS OF INTENTION FILED, PETITIONS FOR NATURALIZATION FILED, 
PERSONS NATURALIZED, AND PETITIONS FOR NATURALIZATION DENIED: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1907 - 1963_ 



Period 



1907 - 1963 

1907 - 1910 

1911 - 19 20 

1921 - 1930 

1931 - 1940 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

1936 

1937 

1938 

1939 

1940 

1941 - 1950 

1941 

1942 

1943 

1944 

1945 

1946 

1947 

1948 

1949 

1950 

1951 - 1960 

1951 

1952 

1953 

1954 

1955 

1956 

1957 

1958 

1959 

1960 

1961 

1962 

1963 



Declara- 
tions 
filed 



8,581.346 



526,322 



2, 686.909 



106,272 
101,345 
83,046 
108,079 
136,524 
148,118 
176,195 
150,673 
155,691 
203,536 

9 20^284 



,123 
,796 
,664 
,368 
,19 5 
,787 
,771 
,187 
,866 
,527 



323,818 



91,497 
111,461 
23,558 
9,100 
10,855 
12,870 
15,911 
16,196 
16,115 
16,255 

15,921 
15,120 
14,479 



Petitions 
filed 



Persons naturalized 



164,036 



1,381.384 



1.884.277 



1.637.113 



,573 



145,474 
131,062 
112,629 
117,125 
131,378 
167,127 
165,464 
175,413 
213,413 
278,028 



140.271 
136,598 
112,368 
110,867 
118,945 
140,784 
162,923 
158,142 
185,175 
232,500 



277,807 
343,487 
377,125 
325,717 
195,917 
123,864 
88,802 
68.265 
71.044 
66.038 



275,747 
268,762 
281,459 
392,766 
208,707 
134,849 
77,442 
69,080 
64,138 
64,279 

1,148,241 



61,634 
94,086 
98,128 
130.722 
213,508 
137,701 
140,547 
117,344 
109,270 
127,543 

138,718 
129,682 
121,170 



53,741 
87,070 
90,476 
104,086 
197,568 
138,681 
137,198 
118,950 
102,623 
117,848 

130,731 
124,972 
121.618 



Military 



56,206 



19,891 



3,224 

2 

995 

2,802 

481 
2,053 
3,936 
3,638 
2,760 

149,799 



1 , 547 

1,602 

37,474 

49,213 

22,695 

15,213 

16,462 

1,070 

2,456 

2,067 

41,705 



975 

1,585 

1,575 

13,745 

11,958 

7,204 

845 

916 

1,308 

1,594 

1,719 
2,335 
2,560 



1.128.972 



1.773.185 



143,495 
136,600 
113,363 
113,669 
118,945 
141,265 
164,976 
162,078 
188,813 
235,260 



277,294 

270,364 

318,933 

441,979 

231,402 

150,062 

93,904 

70,150 

66,594 

66,346 



54,716 
88,655 
92,051 
117,831 
209,526 
145,885 
138,043 
119,866 
103,931 
119,442 

132,450 
127,307 
124,178 



Petitioi 
denied 



PERSONS NATimALlZED, BY CFNERAI 

AND CCLfNTRY OH REGION ( 

YEAH ENUEU JUI 



ZSeelaUe.. fordM.ile 


tlqures tY 


naturalization proYUion.J 








Zti, 


r.rso 


s natural! red 


rounlrv or "qlor, 




Married 


parents 


.UUarY 


Other 


All countries 


124, 17B 


93,325 


19,048 




, 


109 


Europe 


64,040 


65,707 


12,099 


5,605 


1,294 


35 




b>~2 
241 

1,860 

3!b74 
9,601 

12!l71 
Bbb 

4.426 
1.3!.6 

392 
10,on9 

21264 
15,253 


'396 

2! 366 
9,036 

366 
i;751 


202 

1,656 

237 
66 


16 
'526 

19 
60 
425 


393 
63 

172 








gj, ,„ 


" 




























3 




















J 














f°;;,';^^; 


■■ 










Switzerland 


" 






u?s!s'r"'?''"". :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::;:;:::::::: 


° 


other Europe 


- 


<^'- V 


4:266 
66 

3! 450 
'362 

'125 
19,560 


2:777 

217 
16.285 


492 
1 ,60' 


1 


4,°6 


t 














,5„j, 




















P3|,|5,3„ 
















0?^^*^^'^:':'^::::::::;::;:::::::::::::::::::::: 






'330 

46 
163 

205 


i:646 

290 

207 
1,580 


160 
13 
26 

272 


53 
18 

29 


Wr^ 

124 

6 

11 

35 




„j,ijo 
















j3„,j„ 


- 










El Salvador 






- 














South America 




bIHu'"" 


215 

533 


z 

126 
337 


23 

155 


30 


B 

7 


- 




- 






Ecuador 




Peru . . . 






- 


Africa 






61 
391 




20 

15 
66 




; 
















Oceania 






67 
1,232 


206 


62 


I 


2 

23 




New Zealand 




Other Oceania 2/ 


' 




' 





87 



TAELB 39. PERSONS 


NATUP.AUZEO. BY COUNTRY OR 


- "" ^ 


ALLEGIANCE: 









Country or region of 


195<.- 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1959 


.959 


1960 


'"' 


'"" 


1963 


t"'-" ■n..l.nc. 




117.831 


209.526 


145.885 


ne,».''3. 


119,866 . 


103^ 


119,44.2. _ 


m.K^. 


JJZJSI 


124.178 


All coontn.i 








110.596 


107.358 


91.595 


.74,6ii 


J-JjJii. - 


.J3.'" 


,4,940 


arop" 


U267 

b!o87 
i,965 

35.6')') 

\2l-.T,i 
22.166 
19.098 
87 S 
24,409 
11.638 

13!475 
10.798 

B!97e 

iisio 

30 ! 466 


'556 

' 65 

e!542 

915 

'669 

16.565 

130 


5.990 
1.226 

3!785 

5!324 
128 

2'.024 

"762 
8!627 


2,332 

719 

3,175 

'519 

16:230 

3:513 
4,832 

2,229 
17:256 

'164 


209 

460 
2.357 

3:924 

2:391 
r.288 

1.586 
905 
509 

6:993 


1,968 
594 
134 

2,130 

3:370 
2,541 

2:511 

2,000 
ir,038 
r,354 

12.420 
'l67 


'528 

'629 
405 

19:442 

2,457 

3:i63 
i:634 

2,079 

682 
681 
312 
3:205 
'136 

6,313 


'545 
1,522 

414 

3:413 
1,437 

14:560 

80S 
754 

11.303 

2:211 
140 

11.071 


1,660 
541 
97 

'664 

55S 

1,854 
18,738 
6,140 

r.495 

^005 

8,605 

1,493 

752 

692 

3:850 

'l52 

12,308 


'471 

175 
1.127 

362 

1,737 
18.560 

5:682 

'821 
3,260 
5.362 

616 
513 

345 
9.696 

2:628 


1.352 






*"■''" 


U8 










Cr«chotlov.kH 










1.BB9 




19.165 


{""'^' 










4,303 


lr.?.nd 












Lithuania 


3.556 


K.therlanda 


Poland 


1,356 

484 






719 

10,989 
1.877 
2,284 


!""'" 




Turk., 

Unlt.d Ungdo. 

«s:;'^r:pr-'--'::::::::::::::: 




15.253 


CMnai/ 


l!0B8' 

1.758 
984 

42^266 

5!499 
3.061 

'989 


1.880 

6 

105 

6,750 
73 

282 

303 

60 


■ 3:527 

30 
163 
151 

279 

53 

'301 


159 
76 

4.231 

155 

122 


16 

2,861 
112 

246 

57 


136 
616 

169 
263 

24 

1.431 


3,094 
37 


197 

1,145 

'l97 

269 


149 

206 

1.143 
3,790 

'323 
54 

2,329 

no 

22,820 


70 

134 

3:563 

20,379 


'It 


}"^'° ■; 






, '" 


2.274 








J ■"'" 












p ^*"°" 


67 














Syr Ian *rab Republ Ic 


161 




1?,}60 




63!372 
17.775 

41310 


87 
252 


18.151 
'379 

21! 
23: 
491 


11,539 
6,950 

15? 


5:541 
1,344 


1:323 

153 

120 


7: 
15; 


5:913 

'237 


131 


131 

ib: 

52 




^'2', 








Dominican apu He 






199 










Trinidad and Tobago j 


163 


El alvador 






123 






Nlcara"a 


205 












'99: 
962 


158 
6( 

52 


■265 
10( 


101 

108 


166 
8' 

123 
5 


174 
6! 


196 
10: 

10 


253 

184 
105 

259 

134 
120 


20 

27' 




545 






jjj"" 


149 








215 


f.n. 


119 












29 


y 


i 

11 


y 

17 








57 


y 

2 
3 








104 






Unlt.d Ar.b R.publU (Egypt) 4/ .. 
Oth.r Africa 2/ 


170 




3:58 
16191 


394 


620 


4^51 


9: 

13 


'•'" 


6 


7 
1,409 


V 


26 
1.36 




N^» Z.aland 








L!;.n;""r ;;;;;;;d-;:::::::: 


2B3 
1,232 



1959 and In 1963. 



T«BLE '.0. PERSONS I 



""Siirf"" 


r:H:L 


.11 

III 


: 1 
It 


.'is 

ill 






111 


II J, 

111 


LM 


?|:o 


^1 


iii 




All countn.. 


l?'..n8 


a. 11'. 


2 69 


4.296 


1^68 


2.4;.0 


13, '.11 


_ti,92; 


1 ..3.'.8 


_io,)'.: 


553 


5,166 


52^5-4 
































1.35! 

328 
1.889 

656 

l!356 

52 3 

392 
10,989 

2! 284 
15.233 


24 
31 

5 
42 
132 

1.880 


10 


5 
60 

52 

365 
76 

10 

1 

152 

24 

31 

52 
803 


57 2 

132 
711 


5 

51 

155 
73 

22 
252 


l.ion 

63 
666 


2.184 
70 

1.05', 


IB 

112 

57 
5 

32 
56 


595 

1.191 


15! 














J ['^""^ 


,j 






















l''""' 


9 99 7 










[^^^'JIJ 


1266 


















Nth l«^d« 


1 394 


















5"™" 


301 












160 






"SS.K 


7 50 


Other Europs 


8.137 




174 
113 

'125 
161 


16 
341 




430 

30 
6 


60 


3 


3 
26 




1 
5 


504 

I'i 




3 
136 








IncJonejls 


21 














J'P'" 


2,842 








152 








p'uipplLi 


904 


















25 
I? 


46 




35 

27 


■-••o? 


" 


33 






17 




4,308 






543 


Domlnicln Republic 




57 






c^lJ";^:'",'?!'!'?. ;:;::: :::::::: 


56 








5 3 


„,„jj,^„ 










south A..r.c. 






'545 
353 

533 


168 

23 

117 




5 
31 


I 


; 




I 


'3 


\ 


; 














Colonbli 












Veneiuel» 


48 




,,^,^, 






391 


68 
76 




17 


3 


I 


3 


\ 




] 












Tunl.l. 




United Ar.b Republic (Egyptl 


5? 


Oce.nl. 


200 








: 




■ 


3 




1 




,?! 


; 


-t 






Other Oceania 2/ 








St. tele., .nd not reported 


161 




466 



TABU 41. FERSONS BATUIIALIZBD, 


BV COUBTRY OR REGION OF FORMER 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1963 








'• 




Tot.l 


M< 


le> 










Country or region of 




Under 
18 




20- 


30- 




59 


years. 


Jieats. 


years 




124.176 


58.303 


4,j8e 


2.379 


13.384 


16.741 


.10,442 


«..6iL 


3.264 


992 


'" 












.10,081 


11.812 


6,951 


4.412, 


1^74 


_49i_ 


—^— 




961 

241 
328 

19," 165 

3.874 

9,601 

4,303 

12,171 

856 

656 

62 

1^356 

675 
523 
719 
392 

l!877 
15.253 


90 

258 

134 

622 

7.019 

2,162 

5,837 

6)443 

347 

1,905 
354 

338 

318 

4,594 

1,227 


5 
5 
37 

243 

96 

731 

6 

32 

32 

5 

193 

852 


45 

10 
13 

30 
408 

56 
133 

22 

3 
10 

163 


13 

38 

22 

2,033 
599 

'703 

1.810 

HI 

141 

37 

21 

113 
300 

85' 


60 

10! 
25 
35 

202 

'724 

'776 
1.592 

48 

701 

552 
170 

70 
121 

59 
172 

'l42 
1.741 


SI 

24 

90 
857 

1.030 
285 

83 

73 

432 
696 
40 

53 

39 

1,055 

6 
1.262 


26 

564 

735 

72 

37 
466 

56 

26 
22 
15 

549 

3 
986 


5 
21 
11 
211 

243 

56 
25 

38 
19 

32 

17 
230 

73 

1 

550 


2 

9 

5 

5 
6 
33 

8 

9 

14 

10 

50 
56 
24 

171 








, , y 




llll^', 












E t'°'la 
























Ir«I>nd 








ill , 








^,'ZTZl. 












p°'°" ; 








„""" 












T rk'v''* '' 








n!s*V "''?".:::::::::::::::: 




Othej'&jroDa 










260 
2,274 
'435 
'j6! 

108 
'125 

19.560 


129 
37 
155 

1.194 

281 

198 

58 

' 67 

9.152 


196- 

5 
39 
25 

2 
491 


13 

3 

423 


224 

6 
39 
22 

53 

9 
181 

1.962 


531 

17 
40 
75 
55 
25 

34 


517 
6 

23 
22 

187 

1.792 


5 

34 

20 
5 

997 


73 
36 

5 
115 
729 


17 
6 

19 

1 

297 




[^jl,° ■* 
















{"'' : 








j'J"^ 








(^^^1,^ 












Phlll' l' 


















5!285 

'330 

201 

163 
113 

251 

599 


-4-:4ir 

2,593 

'l46 

106 
15 

77 

111 
220 


6 
6 

10 


■■■2I8 
136 

3 


763 
560 

20 

n 

n 

34 
75 


1.214 

43 
39 
26 

5 

48 
27 


1,121 

257 

26 
29 

5 
5 


574 
13 

3 
3 


176 
511 

5 

5 

2 


37 




Mexico 








Dominion Republic 








Trinidad «dTb 




Costa Rica ' 








Cuatemala"" 








Hlcaraeua 








3„„„,.„.^. 






545 
254 
149 

215 

185 

166 


333 

115 

116 

86 


1 
5 




54 

37 


45 

53 

13 

36 


■ -74 
24 
14 


14 
8 


— 16 

5 
3 

2 
3 

3 










Chile 












Pern 




Other South Aaerlca 2/ 

Africa 






104 

72 
391 


33 
41 
151 


3 
1 
5 

6 


3 
5 


15 
21 


14 

20 
51 






1 


I 












United Arab Republic (Egypt) .. 
Other Africa 2/ 




Oceania 






285 
67 
39 

283 


109 
18 


...... 

1 

30 




37 


37 
31 


k 

3 

151 


3 
89 


2 


_4 






' 


Other Oceania 2/ ... 








Stateleas and not reported 


- 



























Independent countrle 



90 



TABLB 41. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY COUKTRY 0« KECION OF FORMER 












Fe 




tomer «llegi»nc« 


Total 


Under 


I9" 


29" 


39 


t 


59 


60- 
69 


n' 


80 


All countrl.. 














































55 
286 
481 
123 
1.267 

1)712 

3.764 
2.271 
5.728 

309 

35 

1.651 

357 

2,074 

653 

337 

401 

6,355 

1.057 
72 

8.643 


3 

5 
3 
52 

251 

76 

653 
6 
29 

24 

8 

178 

27 

3 

1.106 


3 

11 

5 

22 
384 
105 
137 

2J 
431 

70 
11 

42 

6 

137 

47 

5 

182 


11 

40 

25 

417 
4.335 

931 

952 

1.744 

388 
95 
292 
136 

53 
1.6^7 

299 
22 

1.910 


5 

133 
15 

459 

1.130 
1.134 

515 
108 

51 
2.074 

3.536 


51 

35 
177 
'203 

'e3 

53 

72 

1,239 
138 

1.004 


18 
67 
31 

88 

22 

79 

135 
431 

538 

35 

157 

309 
68 
46 
27 
32 

674 
183 

2 

483 


' 7" 
8 

21 

14 

103 

341 
43 
38 

41 
25 

40 
38 

24 

28 

247 

2 

252 


3 

23 

26 

27 
113 

18 

5 

109 
15 

23 

15 

78 
73 




^^j'^J^ 




















B«tonl. 








G.n«lny 




„^"" 




Ireland 




Italy 












l^»e»lx.v,rg 




Norway'* ''' 




Poland 




Portugal 








Spain 








Svlturland 












U.S.S.«. .' 




Other ' Euro 




A.I. 




?r^:.;:::::::::::::::::::::-: 


■^tod- 

45 

105 

1.080 
3.015 

881 

50 
906 
58 

10.408 


2 
10 

223 

445 

3 
386 


12 

417 


461 
11 

27 

704 
45 

212 
49 

15 

174 

15 
1.9S6 


1.822 

191 
51 

14 
337 

17 

2.876 


14 

299 
139 

13 

142 
7 
12 

2.157 


41 
16 

8 

5 

2 
1.267 


2 

54 

5 
12 

15 

2 

910 


13 

5 
2 

332 












I 








Japan 










































2!692 

184 
105 

31 

140 
379 


178 
133 

25 

7 


149 
26 

5 

3 
5 


'450 
221 

23 

19 
16 

45 


'307 
350 

39 
32 

25 
38 


1.357 
337 

16 

16 
IB 


715 

72 
23 

10 

13 


233 

3 






„^^(^jj 


















Trinidad and Toliago . . 








El Salvador 












Nicaragua 




panaM ...::::;:::"": 










212 

73 

173 

69 
80 


8 
10 


■ 6 

3 


-3-8- 
30 


87 

36 

13 
28 

75 


32 
15 

20 


5 


5 
3 


1 




trltil 




CSll. 












Peru 












Africa 






85 
63 






15 
16 
15 


;i 


13 

2 


3 


1 










Tunisia 








Other Africa 2/ . . . 




Oceania 






543 




5 
24 


63 




13 


5 
2 


I 
2 

5 


3 








Other Oceania 2/ 


- 






Stateleaa and not reportid 


- 




' 



91 



TABLE 41A. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY SEX, MARITAL STATUS, AGE, 
AND MAJOR OCCUPATION GROUP: YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1959-1963 



Sex. marital status, 
age and occupation 



Total naturalized 

Sex and marital status: 

Males 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Females 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Males per 1,000 females 

Median age (years): 

Both sexes 

Males 

Females 

Major occupation group: 

Professional, technical, and kindred workers 

Farmers and farm managers 

Managers, officials, and proprietors, except farm. 

Clerical, sales, and kindred workers 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers 

Operatives and kindred workers 

Private household workers 

Service workers, except private household 

Farm laborers and foremen 

Laborers, except farm and mine 

Housewives, children, and others with no 

occupation 



103.931 



132.^50 



127,307 



m. 



43.719 



50.896 



58.795 



60.988 



12.076 
29,928 



60.212 



14,341 

34,517 

1,183 

852 

3 

68,546 



17,438 

39 , 1 29 

1,327 

888 

13 

73.655 



19,269 

39,986 

919 

814 



66,319 



9,342 

45,725 

3,872 

1,253 

20 

726 



37.0 
38.4 
35.7 



7,413 
470 
3,409 
8,746 
9,692 
11,826 
1,626 
7,291 
638 
4,505 



10,330 

52,252 

4,694 

1,262 

8 

743 



38.0 
38.9 
37.3 



7,768 

549 

3,548 

9,089 

11,204 

15,116 

1,995 

8,896 

932 

5,307 



12,133 

54,716 

5,411 

1,385 

10 

798 



38.2 
38.8 
37.7 



8,408 
601 

3,814 
10.191 
12,746 
16,078 

2,072 
10,477 

1,121 

7,933 



12,798 

48,433 

3,776 

1,312 



35.3 
36.0 
34.8 



11.053 
389 

4,059 
11,405 
13,769 
13,456 

1,398 

11,269 

744 

7,086 



5, 



48,315 55.038 59,009 52,679 52, 



PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY STATES OR TERRITORIES OF RESIDENCE: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1954 - 1963 



7,069 
18,575 
2,234 



6,136 

6,542 



62,25fl 
12,412 
1,649 



2,016 
8,054 
7,368 



5,436 
31, 



2,002 
6,293 
6,750 
1,935 



9,014 

445 
37.512 



285 

47 3 

4,782 



401 

1,472 
5.462 
6,017 
1,198 
146 



1,290 

4,727 

5,568 

955 



3,209 2,944 



1,688 
5,146 
5,854 



618 

1,481 
6,364 

5,37 1 

1,197 

208 



8,761 

525 

31,467 



269 

2,014 
125 



1,213 
5,613 

5,227 



8,869 

387 

31,225 



TULt <.:a. PUSOHS I 



Timironies op ntsiowct. 



1 C0UIIT«1K or PORMM ALLEClANCt / 
YEAR EKOED JUNE 30. 1963 



Toul 

AUbax ... 

Arliona ... 

blltornll 

Colorado .. 

Dolaoara .. 
DIatrlct ol 
riorlda .. 

Idaho 
Illino 

Uiulal 
Htchigan ... 

South Caroll 
South DaVoti 
Tcnnaatea . 

Vlr,li.la .. 
Vaahlngton 



94 



TABLE ^.26. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY TYPE OF COURT AND STATES 
OR TERRITORIES OF RESIDENCE: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1963 



State or territory 

pf rsfltdtpcc 

Total 

Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas < 

California 

Co lorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georg la 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Lou 1 s 1 ana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode 1 9 land 

South Caro Una 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

U. S. territories and possessions: 

Guam 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands 



12A.178 

304 
361 
864 
103 
21,948 

1,273 

3,071 

246 

674 

2,754 

688 
1,629 

207 
9,461 
1,345 

421 



1,533 

5,634 

4,179 

921 

194 

1,071 
200 
465 
289 
326 

8,314 

372 

28,844 



5,133 
495 



276 

4,835 

620 

179 
1,282 
2,052 

205 
1,595 

116 



99,398 

304 
202 
676 
103 
18,098 



2,561 
246 
674 

2,564 

688 
1,394 

137 
9,100 
1,345 

421 
379 
379 
526 
206 

1,161 
4,125 



194 

1,071 

17 

434 

188 

101 

3,415 

142 

24,889 



483 

3,084 

362 

320 
133 
276 
4,105 
177 

137 
1,282 
1,667 

200 

1,159 

27 



183 
31 
101 

225 

4,899 

230 

3,955 



932 
204 
278 
1,424 
177 



95 



; HATUHALIZED, BY 



Aut.I: Popul.tlon ot 1... tun l.JOO. Urb.n; Popul.tlon < 
'- Cltl..: Popal.tloo of 100.000 or m.J 





































U» Arig.l.. 

O.kl.nd 




S«r...nto 














Colo.. 
Corn.. 


tzTit't"'^'."-'.'.'.'.'-. '.'..'.. 














H.»ll 


Er'°'----::::;:::;:: 
















"•■• 


clbtldii !! 


















Klnn. 


"'.n..>»U. 














». J. 


«""'•'>' 








"""■>" 


















OMO, 


cl"l™"d' V.'.'.V.'.V^J.'. 




D.ytor. 


Or.,. 


PortUod 

11 P.io 


Utah, 


s!it*ulkl!'cu,': 




?not 


-i.e. 








S 







\l ,t 



TABLE UU. PERSONS NATURALIZ 


D.^8V»UNT|.V^0K^ 


"IZ ' 




AND Y 


.AR OP 


ENTRY 
















lied 








f «nt 7 


'-'11 lu""'" 


1963 


19^? 


PM 


l?60 


1959 


19>S 


19}7 


1956 


1955 


I'y 


l?,U 


1952 


1951 


1959 


(949 


(93? 


193P 




124. 17B 


182 


1,082 


1,(26 


}.'-0} 


8,019 


8,721 


31.571 


23.553 


10.100 


?.5!P 


3.508 


'.216 


.\if? 


i.v«,5 


7..2.W 


(.JSi 


e.Mi 




B5.533 




380 


698 


2.037 


5.047 


6.164 


23.456 


18.311 


7.326 


},69} 


2,128 


?,808 


2,747 


?.?2' 


4,Q44 


m 


4.118 


°'" : 


'530 

2.057 
357 

i,6se 

17,738 
3.690 
9.732 
4.485 

2!903 

713 

6,100 

l!l92 

499 

560 
8.339 

2,585 

2;693 
14.938 


102 


3 

20 
51 

55 

5 
2 

1 
5 

3 
591 


8 

341 
39 

3 

80 

2 

40 
10 

355 


■ 35 
15 

'214 
19 5 

97 

6 

15 

5 
22 
19 

1.075 


58 

1,652 
571 
45 

32 
150 

11 

86 
40 

2.030 


41 

37 
18 

1,637 

192 

1,401 

27 

120 
66 
94 

1.486 


150 
718 
138 
91 
372 

4,295 
324 

5.708 

"150 

110 

235 
147 
2,194 
500 
775 
470 

3.226 


103 
434 

68 

3,263 

31049 

2,875 
788 
113 

'102 

132 

'437 

1,118 

451 

1.956 


50 
138 

34 

139 

1.599 

360 

350 
56 

38 

70 

760 
175 
390 
133 

605 


96 

^23 

2?^ 

137 
37 
139 

39 

28 

590 

36 
50 

329 


35 
19 

69 
636 
26 

144 
220 
114 
43 
74 
34 

17 

26 

432 

31 

240 


15 

100 

269 

80 
21 

33 

364 
132 
235 

349 


21 
39 
137 

54 

546 
66 
'J 
11 

204 

209 
257 

203 


34 
20 

28 

15 

43 

387 

34 

8 

16 

132 
ISO 

143 


191 

98 
58 
191 

100 

552 

85 

20 
34 
42 

ae 
933 

61 

806 


23 

5 
2 
9 

27 

50 

34 

9 
11 
6 

3 

105 
390 










103 




33 


■'M.li :':':'.\'.::'.'.:'.'.\'.'.'.'.'.. '.'.'.'. 






41 


.""" 








'""^' 




r.i.nd ■"::::::::!:;::;!::::::" 




[,[" 


731 


iltLi.nj;':::::::::::::::::::::: 








'mI°6 :;::;::::::::::::;;:::::::: 


477 


°""*'' 






59 






«L':::::::::::::::::::::::::: 


1)1 


"".H.;j 


24 




67 
356 

70 


th°''E ro • 






1.052 


^h:'^-:::}}E-::E:}E 


'411 
237 
630 

145 
3.278 
1,278 
2,160 

164 

20.261 


10 

30 
21 

22 


66 

83 
39 
215 

69 


104 
103 

62 

45 


2 

8 
13 

298 

453 
16 

102 
!3 

5 

211 


66 
13 
29 

696 
46 

281 
58 

249 

28 
681 


42 
12 

17 
556 

23 
157 

809 


381 

56 

465 

70 
234 

60 
3.803 


30 

18 
338 

38 
122 

11 

2.753 


20 
22 

166 
22 
82 

1.924 


8 
10 

5 
122 

33 

1 

1.314 


1 
81 

5 
34 

1.003 


1, 

2 

5 
113 

3 
951 


: 
1 

27 

5 
5 
5 

1 

573 


3 
1 

i 

428 


439 
12 
16 

18 

J 
8 
16 

250 

3 

2.134 


■252 
6 

1 

U 

; 

275 


-493 


ji, .. . . . . 


15 






"" 


5 






;„,! : 












'jj° ^ 








; luippu.i 




■uky^ I. i.n^;"::;. ::::::::.::;:: 


15 


. i.nA.bllp:; ; 




h.r A.i. ...!......::.::.;::;. 






3.266 




8.6Si 

5.274 

2.049 

328 

791 
1,029 

1S7 

256 
204 
540 
223 
326 

1.982 


9 


■ 15 

7 

9 
22 


2 
1 

: 

- 

8 

3 


33 
12 

26 

3 


-27b 

11 

8] 

22 
3 
82 


■343 

8 

87 
83 
12 

IS 

42 
22 
119 


1.840 
179 

201 


i,2» 
391 

28 

83 

53 

103 
45 
62 

356 


■ ■ 827 
58 

174 


"52^ 

2C 

25 
32 

f 

1! 

36 

18 


--549 

70 
14 

If 


■■ i57 
145 

56 

15 

5 
5 
8 

75 


361 
75 
31 
22 

1( 

• 

3 
12 


2f 
1: 

i 

: 

3 

37 


■'99J 

5: 

73 
61 
18 
43 

17 

le 

124 


- "16 
123 

3 
11 








. '^ 


'^16 


: !. ni;;n'i.pubii; : 








lie. : 


60 


"J".;;i„di;. ::::::::;::::::: 






's^vlS^r':::::::::;':::::":: 




.ULu .;:::;::::;::::::;::::: 








„ , 








hrc.;;;;;^.;;;;':::::::::::: 




her North *..rlc. ..::!!: 










216 
357 

71 
325 

985 


1 
2 

2 

1 


e 

3 

14 


4 

1 
10 


i 


12 
17 
• 

135 


13 
IC 


36 
101 
55 

117 


27 
69 


1: 


25 
9 

2 


^i 


14 
8 
6 

17 


2 
5 


6 


16 
21 

21 
1( 


1 




:,ii . 


. : : : 




lo-bl. 




'"or .:::::::::::::;;:::::::::; 








„,j„,,, 








1;. 






185 
90 


1 


3 
5 


3 


11 


6 
48 


IC 
48 


38 
142 


13 


3 
5 

20 


9 


— T 

3 

6 


2 
3 

5 


2 


2 


1 










.th"t;;c."::::::::::::;:::::::: 






:;:rAr.;^.;p:hii;-i^;p;;-::::: 








i,.7 




3 


■ 1 


23 


I 


11 


13 
35 


5 
16 


; 


5 
1 




7 
1 

8 


1 
2 


; 


H 

; 
I 


2 




i.n..*„i'::::::;::::;:::::::::: 




i::ti:r:.:."-:.'-::.:::: 








_ 




, 












9 


7 

























TABLE 45. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY GENERAL AND SPECIAL NATURALl 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1959 - 1963 


ZATION PROVISIONS: 


Naturalization provisions 


1959- 
1963 


19 59 


1960 


1961 


1962 


19< 


Total 


607.308 


103,931 


H9j442 


132,450 


^127.307 


124,: 




465,183 
142,125 


77,230 
26,701 


91,548 
27,894 


104,341 
28.109 


98,739 
28.568 


93,; 

30.i 




Persons married to U. S. citizens 

Children, including adopted children, 


94,412 

37,056 

498 

251 
6,138 

2,939 

439 

18R 

56 

99 
15 
34 


19,512 

5.632 

121 

26 
730 

399 

170 

58 

15 

14 

3 
12 


19,799 

6,149 

154 

88 
1,111 

438 
45 

41 

24 

24 
8 
13 


18,674 

7,416 

115 

116 

1,175 

49 2 
52 

22 

13 

24 
3 

7 


17,379 
8,723 

17 
1,482 

790 
63 

37 

3 

17 
2 


19,1 
9, 

1, 


Former U. S. citizens who lost 


Philippine citizens who entered 
the United States prior to 
May 1, 1934, and have resided 
continuously in the United States ... 

Persons who served in U. S. armed 


Persons who served in U. S. armed 
forces during World War 1, World 
War II or the Korean hostilities _1/ . 


Persons who served on certain 

U S vessels 


Former U. S. citizens who lost 

citizenship by entering the 

armed forces of foreign 

countries during World War II 

Nationals but not citizens of 


Persons naturalized under private law . 
Other 




1/ Section 22(b), Act of September 26, 196 
added: "or the Korean hostilities". 


1, 













COUNTRY OR REGION ( 





Total 
1' 




aaaoh for claln. 


--:;\"."-" 


h 

Ij 


1 


Is 


lo 


s 

i 

15 


2| 
It 


or 

55 


i 

Si 

Si 


1 

5 
1 


All couotrlt. 






4,709 








































241 

278 

3.042 

92 

684 

214 

790 

4.436 


'153 

65 

22 
71 

3.127 


68 
143 

72 

26 

40 
31 

134 


30 

30 
287 




I 


56 


5 
3 


I 




























































P°^'" j 




















Tuck., lEurop. .nd A.I.) 
















A.U 






849 
6.880 


3.955 


■ 16 


440 


I 

1.632 


12 


143 




















,,,„ 








































Oth.r Alia "" 




North An,rlc« 




'^""'" 


'254 
53 

414 


1.781 
320 


8 




1.266 

106 

3 








- 


27 


c„i„ 
















T.V.u'cl I:'!?'.:::::::::::::::::::::: 




























South A.„,c. 








3 
333 


13 


24 




: 






I 


. 






Colo«bl. 
















Afru, 




*'*•'■'" 


198 


132 






l 




■ 






_ 


South Africa 
















Ocnl. 










I 


[ 


20 


; 


: 






— 


P.clflc I. land. (U. S. .d™.) ; 




F Sa. Tab... » and .8 ^ 


' 







TABLE 47. ADMINISTRATIVE CERTIFICATES 


OF CITIZENSHIP ISSUED TO PERSONS 
BY COIIHTRV OR REGION OF BIRTll AND 


mo DERIVED CIT 
YEAR DERIVED: 


ZENSHIP THROUGH NATURALIZATION 
mRENDED JUNE, 30, 1963 




_ 




Country or region 
of birth 


Tot.,1 






,96, 










mJsii 


1955 


1954 


19f3 


i?;2 


1?11. 


1950, 


im. 


19 30- 
i9i2 


^ 








1.496 


5.296 


1.285 


638 




603 
1 


7 67 


7 37 








}05 


I'? 


104 


J90 


1,177 






■urop. 

Belgium 

C.echoalovakla 

Denmark 

Unland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Italy 
Lithuania 

Nor»ay 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sveden 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) 

United Kingdom 

U S,S R (Europe and Asia) 

Other Europe 





M=^=^ 




















111 




1J9 






813 




V 


' ' H 

239 
107 

369 

4.236 

282- 

213 
2,010 

727 
163 
605 

196 

'781 
171 


26 

5 

55 
39 5 

87 
20 

37 
8 

5 

3 
144 


31 

122 
630 

370 

6 

n 

33 
332 
13 


23 

10 

6 

36 

290 

3 
13 
214 

5 

6 
2 
15 
8 

9 

5 


35 
9 

13 

196 

57 
37 

3 

J 
38 

5 


22 

a 

3 

162 

^6 

28 

1 
12 


25 

5 

13 
191 

5 

3 
48 

5 
3 

10 

I 

3 
15 


19 
325 

18 
15 


3 
14 
303 

14 
13 

24 

i 

25 


43 

5 

15 

5 
23 

21 
6 
45 

3 
5 

48 
13 
13 

12 


16 

19 

3 
3 

6 

31 

51 
6 

1 


29 


366 

21 
19 


I 
.04 


3 
2 

40 

3 

2 




17 
30 

167 
17 
13 

190 

15 
15 

5 

7 
134 
25 

i[ 




if 

III" 

»» 

k> 

111 

HI 

h! 
Ill 
ka 

ll 


Chin. 1/ 
Hong Kong 
India 
Indonesia 

Iraq 

Japan 
Jordan 2/ 
Korea 
Lebanon 

Ryuky^ul.nd. 
Syrian Arab Republic 
Other Asia 


230 

62 
35 

139 
92 
39 

12 

24 

2.925 


8 

3 

83 
29 

2 
2 
5 

217 


125 

179 
57 
48 
19 

28 
6 

5 

790 


1 

31 
13 
15 

5 
242 


3 
8 

lii 


6 
10 

129 


- 

6 
116 


5 
78 


5 
U 


3 
68 


10 

3 


56 


36 




2 
22 


Bl 


5 

2 
2 

334 




in 

Ilu 
N 

Jul 
M 

M 

lill 
kin 


Canada 
M««lco 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Coita Rica 
El Salvador 
Guatemala 
Honduras 
Nicaragua 

Other North'Amerlla" 
South America 


2.188 
2 39 
142 

90 
102 
15 

28 

21 

5 

246 


11 

22 

5 
10 

46 


55 
58 

17 

5 

106 


162 
21 
17 

2 
22 


6 
11 

1 
1 


90 
15 

1 
10 


81 

5 
2 


50 

2 


2 
3 




61 

3 
5 


42 


4 


': 






320 

2 




HI 

II 


Argentina 

Brail 1 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Other South America 

Africa 


22 
12 
13 

37 

151 


16 

1 
3 

24 


32 

2 


10 

3 

13 


1 

3 
3 

5 


8 


I 


1 


] 


: 


; 






1 


• 








hi 


South Africa 

Tunisia 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 

Other Africa 

Oceania 


39 
66 


2 
13 

5 


a 

12 
13 

21 


1 
2 


i 

3 

I 


I 


2 
1 


1 
1 


3 


\ 


; 


3 


I 


I 










iiii 


New Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U 3 adm ) 

Other Oceania 


39 
11 


5 


5 
2 


1 
1 


' 




! 


'- 


[ 








1 












kli 

kll 


i/ Incudes Arab Paie.tlna. 










100 































TABLE 48. ADMINISTRATIVE CERTIPICA 
THROUGH CITIZEN PARENTS. BY 


TES OF CITIZENSHIP ISSUED TO PERSONS WHO ACQUIRED ClTIZENSl 
COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH AND YEAR ACQUIRED; YEAR ENDED J 


IP AT BIRTH ABROAD 
UNE 30, 1963 






Country or region 
1 of birth 


Total 








1?63 


1962 


1961 [1960 


,19 59 


1958 


1957 


1956 


1955 


19J4 


mx 


l?ij. 


J95i 


125.0 


1940- 


1930- Before 
1?39 19?0 




15.875 


17 


2112 


671 


990 


1.327 


1.343 


1.269 


9 24 


666 


535 


490 


361 


3^6 


342 


2,9?> 


1,71? 


1,*2J 




8.154 




164 


438 


652 


915 


906 


840 


590 


39? 


3?6 


255 


M7 


1}6 


123 


938 


778 


504 


^ '"'a'I ia 


23 
25 
12 
6 

717 

3,763 

153 

65 
1,032 

5 

256 

169 
18 

22 

41 




80 
36 


51 

202 

5 

13 
23 

113 


363 
33 

"1 


2 

124 
517 

30 

2 

37 

5 

159 


1 
517 

3 
34 


1 
105 
31 

i 
'1 


1 
120 


2 

42 
249 

5 


15 

76 

- 
- 


14 
159 


109 
41 


! 
20 


89 


I 


75 

2 
58 

16 
18 




B^laluiB 


2 


Ct.cho.lovakl. 

Denmark 


16 

3 






Germany 


19 






Hungary 

Ireland 




Netherlandi'!!!. !!!!!!!!..!. ...!.... 
1 Norv.y 


3 
18 


1 Portugal 




1 Rumania 




Sweden 






J 


t" k'"^(E!! d A i ) 


4 


U^lt'd Kl 'd*"™ '" *' 


37 


Yugoilavla 

Other Europ 


13 


^ Sr^i;:::::::::::::::::::::::::: 


423 
56 
17 
6 
23 

12 
1,536 

22 
50 
22 

157 
8 
66 

3.955 




5 
2 

11 

I 

66 


■■ 7 

5 

61 

6 
75 


1 

; 
'; 

2 
14 

88 


11 

5 

2 
176 

11 

30 

11 
90 


3 
181 

36 
112 


10 
200 

3 
98 


157 
2 
23 

86 


2 
25 

78 


1 
76 


1 

86 
29 

85 


1 
3 

2 

31 

3 

85 


-4 
55 

31 

80 


6 

63 

I 




li 

3 
34 

660 


■■l6i 










J" °"" ' 


? 


{"L.::::::::;::::::::::::::::::;: 






J 




' 


°' ' - 






^ 




49 












^ 




852 




l!781 
112 
39 

2 

14 
168 


7 




25 

2 
6 


3 

: 
- 

2 


43 


37 


12 
6 


19 

11 
3 


22 
32 




22 


42 

3 

19 


37 


11 
50 

2 

3 
1 




230 
386 

12 

28 


578 


^f^^^^„ 


Cuba 


37 




!i : 




I 


8 










" 


Co.ta Rica 


1 




' 


„, '" 




pan'ir .::::::::::::::::::'::"": 


15 












2? 

13 

3 

26 
21 


: 




3 
1 


: 

3 




..... 


3 


I 

■ 


1 


2 




I 


2 


1 




2 
2 
5 

5 
6 




Brazil 


' 


Chile 


6 


Colombia 








" 






0th r S th A« i 


- 


^1^, 




— Alg„la 


5 

3 
165 


- 


3 


17 


12 

- 
14 
7 


22 

27 


'! 


22 










! 


I 






5 






" 






United Arab Republic (Egypt) 

Other Africa 


6 




- Australia 


94 
18 

6 


■ 
- 


1 
1 


5 


I 


; 




- 


1 
2 


1 


I 




' 


- 




79 
6 


3 
I 


* 


New Zealand 

Pacific Islandi (U, S. adm. ) 




1 - 








, Includea Formoaa. 

. Include! Arab Pataatlne. 










1 


01 



























2a 



s 


: 






'E 






^ ^ 


. , , ,. 


.^^2- 


3 


s 


? '-S::-^ • - '-Sg ^ 2 2 5:2-^22- 


i 


)C 


. -r- ^ -i5 ^ -^ ^ r-^^s' 


s 


^ 


S — g ■:: ■ - -'2S_ - - 8 7-^ ' 'S- 


s 


1 


- ...... , ..g^^ o - - £--"g- 


s 


! 


- -S-- - —^1 - ' S S2 — 3- 


1 


5 


, ..,.3^ . ^.p_ . ^ . 5.-^^2 = 


^ 


m 


3 -"SPin- S "-22 S ' S 2-S"^5 


1 


^ 


g - 'S-:: ' 2 ::-S2 2 '^ 2 ^'^::2SS 


;?, 


g 


" '"^'^'^ ^ '^^^^ :: - ^ P^^ 


J) - |r> CO 


S 


' '''''' " '11 " " " fr 


I 


1 


1 
i 

1 
1 


IS 
s § 


1 

j 

i 


s 
1 

] 

1 
1 


8 


f 2 ^ 

.sl| 
^; s 

ii! 

° ° °i 

III i 

III! 


s 
1 

3 

s 

1 

1 

fl 
-2- 


1 
1 

i 

1 
I 

1 

i 


■a 
1 1 

1 


I 
1 

i 
g 

t 

s 

ii 

a! 


^ ^ s 


jl : : 

Sg : : 
<" 'S. : : 

S g : : 

!r ^ 

"1 : : 

"fc : : 
°l : : 

gS : : 
^i : : 

jlji 

§gs : 

» 5 S » 

iill 



102 



TABLE 50 


CERTIFICATES OF NATURALIZATION REVOKED, BY GROUNDS: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1954 - 1963 








Grounds 


1954- 
1963 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 




1,450 


165 


197 


288 


2 69 


176 


154 


124 




26 


7 


istabllshed permanent 
residence abroad within 
five years after 


1,365 
25 
60 


150 

5 
10 


177 
12 
8 


276 
8 


2 60 

3 
6 


168 

7 

.J 


149 

5 


120 


41 
3 


23 
3 




ubverslve 




llscellaneous grounds 


6 


TABLE 51. PERSONS EXPATRIATED, BY GROUNDS AND YEAR REPORTS RECEIVED: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 195^ - 1963 


Grounds 


1954- 
1963 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


I960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


Total number 1/ 


43,457 


6,804 


4,063 


4,918 


5,503 


5.863 


2,899 


3,374 


3.657 


3.212 


3,164 


Jting In a foreign political 
election or plebiscite 

ssldence In a foreign state . 

iturallzatlon In a foreign 


13,599 
14,610 

7,249 

3,025 
2,388 

1.521 

868 
197 


2,222 
1.557 

1.544 

69 6 
425 

2 20 

134 
6 


1.237 
1,063 

841 

269 
331 

233 

84 

5 


1.436 
1,776 

829 

356 
167 

237 

112 
5 


1.515 
2.223 

616 

423 
2 50 

248 

146 
82 


1,748 
2,592 

565 

378 
213 

230 

125 

12 


992 
1,017 

383 

171 
188 

64 
6 


1,239 
9 62 

625 

202 
194 

85 

57 
10 


1.290 
1,151 

619 

209 
189 

99 

62 
38 


977 
1,113 

642 

187 
183 

46 

50 
14 


943 
1,156 

585 


iterlng or serving In the 
armed forces of a foreign 


134 


inundation of nationality .. 
iklng an oath of allegiance 


248 


jxeptlng or performing 
duties under a foreign 


20 


her grounds 


19 


Cases of 493 persons expatrl 


ated for 


depart 


Ing fro 


m or re 


Tiainlng 


away f 


rom the 


U.S. t 


o avoid 







military service, reported 
was ruled unconstitutional 
Francisco Mendoza-Martlnez 



for 1954-1963, 
by the U.S. Su[ 
(372 U.S. 144) 



were not Included be- 
rerae Court on Februa 
and Rusk v. Joseph H 



cause this statutory provls 

18, 1963. (Kennedy v. 

ry Cort (372 U.S. 224)). 



103 



62 










<: tjy 


fil- 




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sll 




M 




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^^ 


93 



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^ 




s 


^ 




1 




S 


§ 


n 


>c 


I 


S ' s - 


S 

s 


5 


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2 


1 


tn -< 








r~ 


r^ 


5 . g , g . 


2 


00 


S ' S ' 5 " 


2 


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' ^ ' g * s -^ 


S 




^5 ::i s 1 ' • 


^S 


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^ i ^ ft ^^ i ^ 




1 
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N -2 -2 2 


111 

2 3 cr 
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pi 


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if f 

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if P 

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TABLE 55. WRITS OF HABEAS CORPUS AND DECLARATORY JUDGMENTS 
IN EXCLUSION AND DEPORTATION CASES: YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1959 - 1963 



Action taken 



1959- 
1963 



T otal writs of habeas corpus : 

Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government .... 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government .. 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed ... 

Pending end of year 

Involvlna exclusion : 

Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government .. 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed . 

Pending end of year 

Involving deportation : 

Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government .. 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed . 

Pending end of year 

Total declaratory judgments : 



Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government .... 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government .. 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed ... 

Involving 8 use 1503 

Favorable to U.S. Government .... 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government .. 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed ... 

Involving exclusion or deportation 
Favorable to U.S. Government .... 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government .. 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed ... 



978 
180 
149 



922 
156 
132 



107 



Writs of habeas corpus 



440 


154 


97 


85 


75 


29 


387 


142 


77 


79 


64 


25 


31 


9 


10 


3 


6 


3 


22 


3 


10 


3 


5 


1 


3 


18 


18 


11 


6 


3 


58 


24 


5 


10 


9 


10 


51 


21 


5 


8 


9 


8 


5 


3 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2 


2 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


1 


2 


1 


- 


3 


1 


382 


130 


92 


75 


.. 


19 


336 


121 


72 


71 


55 


17 


26 


6 


10 


3 


6 


1 


20 


3 


10 


1 


5 


1 


2 


16 


17 


11 


3 


2 



Declaratory judgments 



130 
47 
33 



6 
180 



110 
43 
27 



17 
11 
6 

J03_ 



163 
18 
22 



322 
24 
18 



311 
17 



.127_ 



226 
59 
42 



J22_ 



222 
59 
41 



TABLE 56. PRIVATE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY BILLS 
INTRODUCED AND LAWS ENACTED, 75TH CONGRESS 
THROUGH 8BTH CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION 



Congress 


Bills 
introduced 


Laws 
enacted 


88th (First Session) .. 
87th 


2,533 

3,592 

3,069 

4,364 

4,474 

4,797 

3,669 

2,811 

1,141 

429 

163 

430 

601 

293 


100 
544 


86th 


488 


85th 


927 


84th 


1,227 


83rd 


755 


82nd 


729 


8l6t 


505 


80th 


121 


79th 


14 


78th 


12 


77th 


22 


76th 


65 


75th 


30 







108 



. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1984 



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