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Full text of "Annual report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service"

mm PUBLIC LIBRARY 



I 



ANNUAL 
REPORT. 



^LVlini of the 

Immigration and Naturalization Service 



m 



W«v. 



Washington, D.C 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20536 

REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER 
OF IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION 

The Attorney General 

United States Department of Justice 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the Annual Report of the Immigration 
and Naturalization Service for the year ended June 30, 1964. 

Respectfully submitted. 




Raymond F. Farrell, 

Commissioner. 



Immigration and Naturalization Service. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office 
Washington, D.C, 20402 - Price 75 cents 



ABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

ENERAL 1 

RAVEL CONTROL AND ADJUDICATIONS 1 

Facilitation of Travel 1 

Admissions 2 

Refugees 4 

Inadmissible aliens 4 

Adjustment of status 5 

Visa Petitions and other applications 5 

Service operations outside the LTnited States 7 

ORDER PATROL AND INVESTIGATION 7 

Deportable aliens located 7 

Caribbean program and problems 9 

Foreign-born law violators 10 

Criminal prosecution 11 

ETENTION AND DEPORTATION ACTIVITIES 11 

EARINGS AND LITIGATION 12 

LIEN ADDRESS REPORTS - 14 

ITIZENSHIP 14 

Naturalizations 14 

Derivative citizenship 15 

Loss of citizenship 16 

Related nationality activities 17 

DMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 17 



TABLES 

1. Immigration to the United States: 1820-1964 

2. Aliens and citizens admitted and departed, by months: Years ended June 30, 1963 and 

1964 

3. Aliens and citizens admitted at United States ports of entry: Years ended June 30 1963- 

1964 

4. Aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration laws: Years ended June 30, 1960-1964 _ _ . 

5. Immigrants admitted, by port: Years ended June 30, 1960-1964 

6. Immigrants admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and country or region of 

birth: Year ended June 30, 1964 

6A. Immigrants admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and country or region of last 

permanent residence: Year ended June 30, 1964 

6B. Aliens who adjusted status to permanent residents in the United States, by country or 

region of birth: Year ended June 30, 1964 

6C. Refugees admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 1946-1964 

6D. Immigrants admitted under the Act of September 11, 1957 (P.L. 85-316), by class of 

admission and country or region of birth: September 1 1 , 1957-June 30, 1964 

6E. Immigrants admitted under the Act of September 26, 1961 (P.L. 87-301), September 26, 

1961-June30, 1964 

6F. Immigrants admitted under the Act of October 24, 1962 (P.L. 87-885), by country or 

region of birth: October 24, 1962-June 30, 1964 

7. Annual quotas and quota immigrants admitted: Years ended June 30, 1960-1964 

7A. Quota immigrants admitted, by quota area and quota preferences: Year ended June 30, 

1964 

8. Immigrants admitted, by country or region of birth and major occupation group: Year 

ended June 30, 1964 

8A. Beneficiaries of first preference visa petitions, and other immigrants admitted, by occu- 
pation: Year ended June 30, 1964 

9. Immigrants admitted, by country or region of birth: sex, and age: Year ended June 30, 

1964 

10. Immigrants admitted, by sex and age: Years ended June 30, 1955-1964 

lOA. Immigrants admitted, by sex, marital status, age, and major occupation group: Years 

ended June 30, 1 960-1 964 

11. Ahens and citizens admitted and departed: Years ended June 30, 1908-1964 

12. Immigrants admitted, by State of intended future permanent residence: Years ended 

June 30, 1 955- 1 964 

12A. Immigrants admitted, by specified countries of birth and State of intended future per- 
manent residence: Year ended June 30, 1964 

12B. Immigrants admitted, by specified countries of birth and rural and urban area and city: 
Year ended June 30, 1964 

13. Immigration by country, for decades: 1820-1964 

14. Immigrants admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 1955-1964 

14A. Refugee-escapees paroled under Act of July 14, 1960, by country of last residence and 

country of flight: July 14, 1960-June 30, 1964 

14B. Hong Kong Chinese paroled, by sex, marital status, age, and major occupation group: 

June 4, 1962-June 30, 1964 . -.- 

14C. Hong Kong Chinese paroled in the United States by basis for parole, and major occupation 

group : June 4, 1 962-June 30, 1 964 . ' 

15. Nonimmigrants admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 1955-1964 

15A. Temporary visitors admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 1955- 

1964^. - 

16. Nonimmigrants admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and country or region of 

birth: Year ended June 30, 1964 

17. Nonimmigrants admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and country or region of 

last permanent residence: Year ended June 30, 1964 

17 A. Temporary visitors and other nonimmigrants admitted, by port: Year ended June 30, 

1 964 . . 

17B. Temporary visitors admitted at airports, by country of last permanent residence: Year 

ended June 30, 1 964 

17C. Temporary visitors admitted at seaports, by country of last permanent residence: Year 

ended June 30, 1964 

17D. Temporary visitors admitted, at land border ports, by country of last permanent residence: 

Year ended June 30, 1954 



ABLES— Continued Page 

18. Foreign laborers admitted or paroled into the United States: Years ended June 30, 1955- 

1964 . 60 

19. Entries of alien and citizen border crossers over international land boundaries, by State 

and port: Year ended June 30, 1964 61 

20. Entries of alien and citizen border crossers over international land boundaries: Years ended 
June 30, 1928-1964 63 

Special inquiiy officer bearings completed, by regions and districts: Years ended June 30, 

1960-1964 64 

21. Aliens excluded from the United States, by cause: Years ended June 30, 1892-1964 65 

22. Aliens excluded, by country or region of birth and cause: Year ended June 30, 1964 66 

23. Aliens apprehended, aliens deported, and aliens required to depart: Years ended June 30, 

1892-1964 67 

24. Aliens deported, by country to which deported and cause: Year ended June 30, 1964 68 

A. Aliens required to depart, by nationality and cause: Year ended June 30, 1964 69 

B. Aliens deported, by nationality and cause: Year ended June 30, 1964 70 

C. Aliens required to depart by country of destination and cause: Year ended June 30, 1964. 71 

25. Aliens deported, by country to which deported and deportation expense: Year ended 

June 30, 1964 72 

26. Aliens deported, by cause: Years ended June 30, 1908-1964 73 

A. Aliens deported, by country to which deported: Years ended June 30, 1955-1964 74 

27. Aliens deported, and required to depart, by year of entry and status at entry: Year ended 

June 30, 1964 75 

A. Aliensdeportedandrequiied to depart, by status at entry: Years ended June 30, 1960-1964. 76 

B. Deportable aliens located, by status at entry and nationality: Year ended June 30, 1964. 77 

28. Alien crewmen deserted at United States air and seaports, by nationality and flag of carrier: 

Year ended June 30, 1964 ■ 78 

29. Vessels and airplanes inspected, crewmen admitted, alien crewmen deserted, and alien 
stowaways found, by location: Year ended June 30, 1964 79 

30. Principal activities and accomplishments of Immigration Border Patrol: Years ended June 
30, 1955-1964 80 

31. Passengers arrived in the United States, by sea and air, from foreign countries, by country 

of embarkation: Year ended June 30, 1964 81 

32. Passengers departed from the United States, by sea and air, to foreign countries, by country 

of debarkation: Year ended June 30, 1964 \ 84 

33. Passenger travel between the United States and foreign countries, by sea and air, by port of 

arrival or departure: Year ended June 30, 1964 87 

34. Insular travel — Puerto Rico and Vii-gin Islands: Years ended June 30, 1955-1964 88 

35. Aliens who reported under the Alien Address Program, by selected States of residence and 
nationality: During 1964 89 

36. Aliens who reported under the Alien Address Program, by selected nationalities and States 

of residence: During 1964 90 

6A. Alien population, by States of residence: 1940, 1951, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, and 1964 91 

37. Declarations ot intention filed, petitions for natm-alization fUed, persons natmalized, and 
petitions for natm-alization denied: Years ended June 30, 1907-1964 92 

38. Persons naturahzed, by general and special naturalization provisions and country or region 

of former allegiance: Year ended June 30, 1964 93 

39. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance: Years ended June 30, 

1955-1964 94 

40. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance and major occupation group: 

Year ended June 30, 1964 95 

41. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance, sex, and age: Year ended 

June 30, 1964 96 

A. Persons naturalized, by sex, marital status, median age, and major occupation group: 

Years ended June 30^ 1960-1964 98 

42. Persons naturalized, by States or territories of residence: Years ended June 30, 1955-1964. 99 
A. Persons naturalized, by specified countries of former allegiance and by States or territories 

of residence: Year ended June 30, 1964 100 

Persons naturalized, by type of court and States or territories of residence: Year ended 

June 30, 1964 101 

43. Persons naturalized, by specified countries of former allegiance and by rural and urban 
area and city: Year ended June 30, 1964 102 



TABLES— Continued 

44. Persons naturalized, by country or region of birth and year of entry: Year ended June 30, 

1964 

45. Persons naturalized, by general and special naturalization provisions: Years ended June 30, 

1960-1964 _- 

46. Administrative certificates of citizenship issued, by country or region of birth and reason for 

claim: Year ended June 30, 1964 

47. Administrative certificates of citizenship issued to persons who derived citizenship through 

naturahzation of parents or through marriage, by country or region of birth and year 
derived: Year ended June 30, 1964 

48. Administrative certificates of citizenship issued to persons who acquired citizenship at birth 

abroad through citizen parents, by country or region of birth and year acquired: Year 
ended June 30, 1964 

49. Petitions for naturalization denied, by reason: Years ended June 30, 1955-1964 

50. Certificates of naturalization revoked, by grounds: Years ended June 30, 1955-1964 

51. Persons expatriated, by grounds and year reports received: Years ended June 30, 1955-1964, 

52. Persons repatriated: Years ended June 30, 1955-1964 

53. Prosecutions for immigration and nationality violations: Years ended June 30, 1955-1964, 

54. Convictions for immigration and nationality violations: Years ended June 30, 1955-1964__ 

55. Writs of habeas corpus, judicial review of order of deportation and declaratory judgments 

in exclusion and deportation cases: Years ended June 30, 1960-1964 

56. Private immigration and nationality bills introduced and laws enacted, 75th Congress 

through 88th Congress 

57. Private bills and beneficiaries of private bills, 88th Congress, by type of bill and action 

(country of birth of beneficiaries for bills enacted) 



GENERAL 

The Immigration and Naturalization Service 
ministers and enforces the laws relating to 
iniigration and naturalization. Service officers 
spect all persons arriving in the United States to 
(tei-nihie whether they are citizens or aliens, and 

aliens, whether they are admissible under the 
nnigration laws. A related function is that of 
anting or denying petitions such as those for 
eferences within quotas, extensions of tempo- 
ry stay, waivers, or change of status of 
mission. 

In the field of enforcement, the Sei'vice has 
ree major responsibilities: to prevent illegal 
try of persons into the United States and to 
preliend any aliens found to be in the United 
ates in illegal status; to investigate the status of 
lens wlio, through violation of the provisions of 
e Immigration and Nationality Act, become 
iienable to deportation or denaturalization; and 

detain and deport such aliens. 
Tlie General Counsel, chief law officer of the 
rvice, advises the Commissioner on ]egvA ques- 
)ns and cooperates with the United States Attor- 
ys in the conduct of litigation emanating from 
e enforcement and administrative responsibili- 
of the Service. The General Counsel is also 
sponsible for representations of the Service he- 
re the Board of Immigration Appeals. 
Another principal area of responsibility is that 

naturalization and citizenship. This includes 
e examination of aliens and witnesses to deter- 
ine whether the aliens qualify for citizenship 
rough naturalization; the presentation of the 
cts in each case and recommendations to the nat- 
•alization courts; and the issuance of certificates 

derivative citizens. The Service also carries 
rward a program of cooperating with the public 
hools in fostering citizenship education. 

TRAVEL CONTROL AND 
ADJUDICATIONS 

Facilitation of Travel 

In 1964, the Service continued to place great 
nphasis upon established United States policy to 
cilitate travel to this country and to promote 
iendly undei'standing and good will among trav- 
ers of the nations of the world. Inspection pro- 
dures continued to be constantly reviewed to 
sure that, consistent with proper administration 
' the law, the travelers would be made to feel wel- 
me to the Ignited States. Immigrant inspectors 
ports of entry have a definite responsibility to 
:tend such a welcome and to offer all possible 
sistance. Immigration port receptionists, as- 
pied to major international airports, give addi- 
jnal assistance to arriving passengers with 
ecial consideration for the aged, infirm, and pas- 
ngers with small children. 




hii ni iyrant Inspi c to? , Poi t h' 

pastiVnytrs at Stalth 



riving 



The procedure established at ports along the 
Mexican border m 1963 wlieieb} a single officer of 
any one of the four Federal inspection agencies 
performed the combined screening for all four 
agencies has, after a year of experience, been 
brought to full effectiveness. This progi-am has 
provided substantially improved service to the 
public by streamlining the inspection procedures, 
yet the "interests of all four agencies are safe- 
guarded. On the Canadian border, the practice of 
dual inspection, whereby a single officer performs 
Customs and Immigration inspection of automo- 
bilists and pedestrians, has now been expanded to 
include inspection of passengers arriving by bus 
and train. 

During fiscal year 1964, 1,519,666 persons de- 
parting from major ports in Canada, Bermuda, 
and the Bahamas were inspected prior to boarding 
aircraft or vessels destined to the United States. 
Such passengers embark on their journey knowing 
that they will encounter no difficulties or delays by 
inspection formalities upon arrival in the United 
States and will be free to go directly to their 
intended destination in this country. Passengers 
on some large vessels from Japan, the Fiji Islands, 
certain South American ports, and Vancouver, 
British Columbia are offered much the same con- 
venience in that the inspection is conducted enroute 
and they arrive at United States ports with the 
inspection formalities completed. The multiple 
inspections of passengers on cruise vessels arriving 
in the Virgin Islands and/or Puerto Kico destined 
to the United States were also eliminated. The 
inspection accorded these persons at the first 
United States port of call in the Islands now con- 
stitutes preinspection for the arrival in the conti- 
nental United States. 

The inspection of persons coming to the World's 
Fair to operate foreign exhibits and concessions 
was given special attention and procedures were 
instituted, designed to facilitate their entry. A 
temporary Service office has been established at the 
Fair to offer prompt service to those persons. 

During fiscal year 1964, 66,499 vessels and 
205,167 planes carried 4,475,324 persons to the 





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United States from all parts of the world, an in- 
crease of 13 percent in the number of passengers 
over 1963. 

Admissions 

More than 178 million persons were inspected 
and admitted into the United States by immigra- 
tion officers during fiscal year 1964, exceeding last 
year's figure by three percent and reaching a new 
high. Pei-sons seeking admission over the land 
borders or arriving as crewmen accounted for 9<; 
percent of that total. The others arrived as vessel 
or aircraft passengers at United States sea and air 
ports of entry. The number of entries made by 
aliens exceeded 103 million and, of these entries, 
98,855,809 were made by border ci-ossers from Can- 
ada and Mexico, an increase of 4 percent over last 
year. Alien crewmen numbered 1,856,286, a 3 per- 
cent increase over 1963. The remaining 2,862,355 
consisted of immigrants, documented nonimmi- 
grants, Mexican agricultural laborers, insular 
travelers, and lawful residents returning from tem- 
porary visits to Canada, Mexico, and the adjacent 
islands. 

Immigrants. A total of 292,248 aliens were ad- 
mitted or accorded status as lawful permanent 
residents of the United States during the year, 4.6 
percent less than the number of immigrants in 
1963. Of the total, 265,424 obtained immigrant 
visas abroad and were admitted at ports of arrival 
as immigrants. The remaining 26,824 already in 
the United States were granted an adjustment 
of status to that of pemianent residents. 

Under the terms of the Immigration and Na- 
tionality Act, quotas are established for all coun- 
tries except specified independent countries of the 
Western Hemisphere. An annual quota of 158,161 
is allocated among the quota area.s. During the 
year, 102,844 quota immigrants, amounting to 65 
percent of that quota, were admitted. Highly 
skilled aliens whose services are urgently needed 
in the United States, and their spouses and chil- 
dren, are accorded first preference under the quota. 
Such aliens accounted for 4,862 of tlie total. Of 
these, 3,831 came from Europe, 654 from Asia, 162 
from Africa, and 215 from other areas. 



Immigranii Admitted— 195.5-64. 

Among the 2,475 principal applicants were 5( 
tailors and tailoresses, 328 engineers, 200 teachei 
190 physicians and surgeons, 167 nurses, 129 pr 
fessors and instructors, 86 chemists, and 45 oth 
scientists. 

Close relatives of citizens and permanent res 
dent aliens are accorded second, third, and four 
preferences under the various quotas, dependii 
upon the particular relationship. There 
14,745 relatives admitted in such preference cat 
gories. Tlie balance, 83,237 immigrants, were a. 
mitted under the nonpreference portion of tli 
quotas. Most of the latter were charged to t' 
quotas of Great Britain and Northern Irelan 
Germany, and Ireland, countries which have 
waiting list of applicants for immigrant visas. 

Immigrants who are natives of specified Wes- 
em Hemisphere countries, and certain othe 
(principally spouses and children of United Stat 
citizens) are not subject to quota limitation 
These "nonquota" immigrants numbered 189,4' 
in fiscal year 1964. Of these, 135,816 were nativ 
of Western Hemisphere countries, 6 percent belc 
last year's figure. Most of the reduction in nur 
bers of immigrants admitted compared to 1963 
in this category. Natives of Mexico accounted f 
32,965, Canada 38,065, Colombia 10,446, Cub 
15,807, and the Dominican Republic 7,537. 

The number of spouses and children of citize) 
admitted as immigrants totaled 33,669, comii 
principally from the countries of China, German 
Greece, Italy, Japan, Kore^i, and the Philippine 
There were 1,651 orphans from Greece, Hor 
Kong, Italy, Japan, and Korea. 

Nonimm-igrants. All aliens admitted to tl 
United States for temporary periods are nonimm 
grants, but there are various classifications with 
that general category. Exclusive of the citizei '''' 
of Canada and Mexico who enter frequently 
border crossers, alien crewmen and the agricuBfsi 
tural workers from Mexico, a total of 1,744 " 
documented nonimmigrants were admitted durir 
tlie year. 



:ent of quota used, by selectee 

1964 



Nonimmigrants Admitted by Class Fiscal Year 1964 




NONPREFERENCE 



[ j RELATIVES 



Nonimmigrant admissions have increased rap- 
(lly (luring the past 10 years and the 16-perc6nt 
nciease over 1963 continued the rising trend, 
jnder the stimuKis of the New York World's Fair, 
"urther rapid "growth in these admissions maj' be 
apected during the coming fiscal year. Visitors 
for pleasure (up 17 percent to 1,105,268) exceeded 
ast year's all time high. Returning resident 
iliens registered a relatively large increase (22 
)er(ent) and exceeded 165 thousand. Tlie table 
vliicli follows shows the nonimmigrants admitted 
his year. 

Almost two-thirds of the nonimmigrants ad- 
nit ted this year were from Western Hemisphere 
■oiiiitries, with over half a million from Canada or 
Mexico. Another 27 percent were fi'om European 
■oiiiitries, chiefly the United Kingdom (164,544), 
lit'iiiuiny (74,051), and France (51,668). The 
fallowing graph shows the steep climb in non- 
iin Migrant admissions registered over the last 10 

I >iiring the year, 6,272 persons of distinguished 
mi It and ability, 3,796 trainees and 50,402 other 
Kiiiinnnigrants were bi-ought to the United 
states temporarily under the provisions of the Im- 
iiiiCiation and Nationality Act which provides for 
mportation of foreign workere if like workers 
ire not available in the United States. Included 
n the latter group were 9,530 Canadian agricul- 
tural workers and 17,916 woodsmen, 12,667 agri- 
iultural workers from the Caribbean area, 210 from 
Fapan, and 338 sheepherders from Europe. Mexi- 
!an agricultural workers, brought to the United 
States under special legislation, numbered 181,738, 



Class of admission 


1964 


1963 


1962 


Total 


1, 744, 808 


1, 507, 091 


1, 331, 383 






Foreign government 








officials 


34 644 


34, 043 


33 373 


Temporary visitors 








for business 


144, 680 


122, 515 


117,242 


Temporary visitors 








for pleasure 


1, 105, 268 


944, 929 


810, 779 


Transit aliens.. . 


119,360 


105, 815 


110,276 


Treaty traders and 








investors 


6,912 


5,593 


5,071 


Students, spouses, 








and children 


48, 438 


41, 737 


42, 239 


International Rep- 








resentatives 


12, 875 


11,918 


9,747 


Temporary workers 










60, 470 


63, 477 


57, 608 


Representatives of 








foreign information 








media __ 


2,654 


1,928 


1,766 


Exchange aliens, 








spouses, and 










42, 246 


37, 668 


30, 016 


Returning resident 






165, 429 
1,832 


135, 701 
1,767 


112,261 


NATO officials 


1,005 



the lowest figure since that particular program 
began in 1949. 

Alien crewmen who arrived at United States 
ports during the year and were granted shore leave 
numbered 1,856,286. Continued emphasis was 
placed on the issuance to bona fide crewmen of 
landing cards designed to serve as a means of iden- 
tification to facilitate their landing. As of June 
30, 1964, a total of 575,049 such cards have been 



United States Citizens. The number of United 
States citizens admitted during fiscal year 1964 
was 74,939,958, a slight increase over fiscal year 




1963. There were 69,951,868 border crossers, 
886,867 crewmen and 4,101,223 citizens who were 
returning from overseas countries or from ex- 
tended visits in Mexico or Canada. While the 
total number of admissions of citizens rose only 
slightly, the number returning from abroad in- 
creased by 19 percent, indicating a continuii^ up- 
ward trend in tourist travel by United States 
citizens. 

Refugees 

There are three major refugee programs ad- 
ministered by the Service: Tlie processing of 
Cuban refugees who have fled the Castro regime 
in Cuba, Chinese refugees in Hong Kong who ha^e 
fled from the mainland, and refugee-escapees from 
the Iron Curtain coimtries in Europe. 

Cuban Refugees. The steady flow of Cuban ref- 
ugees arriving in the United States which began 
in January 1959 diminished considerably during 
fiscal year 1964. All commercial transportation 
between the United States and Cuba has ceased 
and except for one shipload of prisoners who ar- 
rived July 3, 1963, the only Cuban refugees ar- 
riving are those who manage to escape from Cuba 
on small craft. During the year, 3,254 such Cuban 
refugees arrived at points in Florida directly from 
Cuba and, after careful screening, they were per- 
mitted to enter the United States until such time 
as circumstances permit their return. Since the 
Castro Government took over on January 1, 1959, 
a total of 223,771 Cuban refugees have entered the 
United States in temporary status. In addition, 
43,365 Cuban nationals have been admitted as 
immigrants. 

Hong Kong Chinese. Although no new applica- 
tions have been accepted since January 1, 1963, 
other than from the beneficiaries of visa petitions 
filed prior to that date, the Service continued to 
process such applications of Chinese refvigees in 
Hong Kong for parole into the United States 
under Section 212(d) (5) of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act pursuant to President Kennedy's 
directive of May 23, 1962. That directive was 'is- 
sued as the result of the mass exodus earlier in the 
month, of thousands of Chinese refugees from the 
mainland of China to Hong Kong and was de- 
signed to assist in alleviating the overcrowded con- 
ditions in the British colony. Parole lias been 
limited to Chinese who are relatives of United 
States citizens and resident aliens, those with spe- 
cial skills urgently needed in the United States, 
and those who had applied for entiy into the 
United States under prior refugee laws but who 
had not been ac^-epted only because of numerical 
limitations. Before parole is authorized, these 
aliens must undergo comprehensive security 
checks, medical examinations and other regular 
screening procedures in all respects like applicants 
for immigrant visas. At year end, a total of 10,617 
such persons had been paroled into the United 
States. Spe^'ial legislation will be necessars- be- 
fore most of these refugees can become lawful per- 



manent residents and qualify for naturalization ai 
United States citizens. 

Refugee Escapees {Act of July H, 1960) . Serv 
ice officere continued to process registrants ii 
France, Gennany, Belgium, Austria, Italy, Greece 
and Lebanon for refugee-escapee status under th- 
"Fair Share" law which was extended indefinitel' 
by the Act of June 28, 1962. Under this law, th" 
United States may accept durmg each 6-montl 
period 25 percent of the total number of eligibl 
refugee-escapees who, during the preceding • 
months, have availed themselves of resettlemen 
opportunities offered by other coimtries. Carefu 
medical, security and other screening procedure 
are followed before parole imder Section 21 
(d) (5) of the Immigration and Nationality Ac 
is authorized, to insure that the entry of the rel 
ugees into the United States will not be prejud 
cial to the national welfare, safety or security 
Two years after entry each refugee is again ex 
amined and, if found eligible in all respects, ac 
corded permanent resident status. Those grante 
such status may apply for naturalization 5 yeai 
after their initial entry. 

Of the 3,954 persons registered, 2,841 were aj 
proved for parole and 2,753 were actually parole 
into the United States. A total of 14,576 refugei 
escapees have been paroled into the United Stat< 
since the inception of the program in July 196' 
To date, 6,111 have been accorded permaner 
resident status. 

Inadmissible Aliens 

Exclusions. The purpose of the immigratic 
inspection conducted at United States ports ( 
enti-y is to detennine whether applicants for ac 
mission meet the requirements of the Immigratic 
and Nationality Act. The inspecting officer c 
only admit those foimd clearly admissible and 
there is any doubt as to admissibility he will deffi 
inspection for further examination or he will ref( 
the matter to a special inquiry officer for a formi 
exclusion hearing. 

During 1964, Service officers at ports of enti 
intercepted 177,004 inadmissible aliens. Include 
in that group were 25,605 alien crewmen who wei 
refused landing privileges, 159 stowaways wl 
were detained on board the vessels on which the 
arrived, 102,720 applicants for the border crossir 
privilege, and 48,099 otliers who withdrew thei 
applications for admission rather than go to 
formal liearing. After holding formal hearing 
special inquii-y officers ordered 421 aliens 
eluded. Of those excluded, 329 were not in pa 
session of proper documents, 24 were madmissib. 
on criminal, immoral or narcotics grounds, 16 o 
subversive grounds, and 18 were certified by Publ: 
Health officers to have mental or physical defect 

Waivers of Inadmissihility. Discretional 
waivers of certain grounds of inadmissibility 
authorized in the cases of close relatives of Unite 
States citizens and lawfully resident aliens in tl 
interest of miiting families, providing it has bee 



Adjustment of Status 

Application for Status as Immigrant. Aliens, 
)tlier than crewmen and natives of contiguous 
countries or nearby islands, who have been in- 
ipected at a port of entry axid either admitted or 
paroled into the United States may apply imder 
Section 245 of the Inunigration and Nationality 
let for status as pemianent residents without 
eaving the coimtry to obtain immigrant visas. A 
otal of 21,874 such applications were completed 
>f which 20,124 were approved and 1,750 denied. 
Receipts were down 14 percent from tlie previous 
gear's high of 24,884, occasioned by tlie Act of 
October 24, 1962, which accorded nonquota status 
o thousands of aliens previously ineligible for ad- 

* iustment because they were chargeable to over- 
ubscribed quotas. 

A recurring problem in the adjudication of ap- 
jlications under Section 245 arose in cases of na- 
ives of Central and South America who came to 
he United States as nonimmigrant visitors and 

gjjfcromptly sought pennanent resident status under 

tlf section 245. 

Included among the 19,879 aliens granted lawful 
'lenuanent resident status were 3,049 persons 
vliose sen'ices were urgently needed in the T^nited 
^tutcs, and their spouses and children, 6,198 
pdiises and unmarried minor children of United 
■^full's citizens, 1,388 preference quota immigi-ant 
elatives of citizens or permanent resident aliens, 

jii,381 nonquota natives of Western Hemisphere 
ountries and 3,466 nonpreference quota immi- 
;rants. The principal countries of birth repre- 

jt! ented were Argentina, China, Colombia, Ger- 

ta lany, Greece, Italy, Poland, and United Kingdom. 






Aliens Who Became Permanent Residents hy Adjustment 
Under Section 245, Immigration and Nationality Act — 
1955-64. 

Creation of Record of Lawful Entry. There 
were 2,916 applications under Section 249 of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act received during 
the year from aliens who had resided continuously 
in tiie United States since prior to June 28, 1940, 
but in whose cases no record of lawful admission 
for permanent residence existed. Receipts of such 
applications again decreased, 7 percent under the 
previously year. Records were created in 2,585 
cases and denied in 90 cases. 

Other Adjustnientf!. During the year, 4,106 
refugee-escapees, previously paroled into the 
United States under the Act of July 14, 1960, were 
examined by Service officers, found admissible and 
accorded permanent resident status. Also ad- 
justed to permanent resident status wei-e 32 former 
officials of foreign governments or of international 
organizations and members of tlieir families, 
under Section 13 of the Act of September 11, 1957, 
which authorizes a maximum of 50 such adjust- 
ments annually. Other adjustments included 37 
suspension of deportation cases, 17 Hungarian 
refugees and 168 other cases. 

Visa Petitions and Other Applications 

During the year, a total of 718,618 applications 
and petitions for various benefits and privileges 
under the immigration laws were adjudicated by 
Service officei-s. This was an increase of more 
than 25,000 over 1963. 1 )e(isions on many of these 
applications and petitions vitally affect the rights 
of aliens to enter or remain in the United States, 
and their activities while here. 

While appeals are provided in some instances to 
tlie Board of Immigration Appeals or the Regional 
Commissioners, many applications and petitions 
may be denied as a matter of discretion by the 
Service District Director or Officer-In-Charge 
having jurisdiction over the applicant's or peti- 
tioner's residence. For example, an application 
by an alien for adjustment of status to that of per- 
manent resident, or an application by a visitor, 



student, or other nonimmigrant for extension of 
stay is not appealable. 

Kec£)gnizing tlie need for fairness and consist- 
ency in dealing with applicants and petitionere, 
many of whom are unfamiliar with our language 
and customs as well as our immigration laws, the 
Service instituted additional procedures for these 
administrative adjudications. Among these newly 
instituted procedures are the following: Peti- 
tioners and applicants are given adverse informa- 
tion of which they may be unaware and have an 
opportunity to rebut it before a decision is made in 
their cases; orders reflecting adverse decisions 
recite the evidence considered in arriving at the 
decision, the weight given various items of evi- 
dence and the rationale of the decision; a copy of 
any order adverse to the applicant or petitioner is 
furnished him or his attorney, thus facilitating 
effective administrative or judicial review if de- 
sired by the parties affected: and various Service 
material relating to policies, procedures and ad- 
ministrative rulings, were selected for publication 
in the Federal Register to be made matters of 
public knowledge. 

Uniformity of decisions throughout the Service 
was achieved by means of increased and central- 
ized review and dissemination of decisions, and the 
imposition of limitations upon the redelegation of 
authority. More administrative decisions likely 
to recur that involved novel or complex issues of 
law or fact were published as precedents for the 

fuidance of future applicants and petitioners, 
'ersons seeking Service benefits are now assisted 
by Service employees in filling out applications and 
forms, where such assistance is requested or needed. 
This obviates the need of many such persons to 
seek outside assistance that they cannot afford and 
eliminates tlie possibility that they may fall into 
the liands of unscrupulous immigi'ation "fixers." 
VhdPefition.s. Nonquota status, i.e. the prima 
facie right to obtain an immigrant visa for per- 
manent residence without obtaining a number 
under the annual quota of the country of the alien's 
birth, may be accorded the spouse and unmarried 
minor children of a United States citizen upon 
petition by the latter, filed with and approved by 
this Service. During the year, 33,454 such peti- 
tions were approved, an increase of 9 percent over 
the previous year. Similarly, second or fourth 
preference under the appropriate quota may be 
accorded other relatives of Ignited States citizens, 
and third preference status may be conferred upon 
the spouses and unmarried sons and daughters of 
lawfully resident aliens. 

A total of 26,706 such petitions were approved, 
a decrease from 33,405 last year. Nonquota status 
was also accorded 1,790 "eligible orphans" upon 
petitions filed by their adoptive or prospective 
adoptive parents after inquiry and investigation 
both in the United States and abroad established 
that the child met the statutor.y definition of "eli- 
gible orphan", that the adoptive or prospective 
adoptive parents would be able to properly care 



for the child and, in the cases of oi-phans to be 
adopted in the United States, that the preadoption 
requirements of the state of proposed adoption had 
been met. Forty-seven percent of these petitions 
(842) were received in and adjudicated by Service 
officers abroad. 

The highest quota classification, first preference, 
is reserved for highly educated or highly skilled 
aliens whose services are needed urgently in the 
United States. A total of 9,722 such petitions 
were received from employers or prospective em- 
ployers in tlie United States to import such per- 
sons, of which 6,723 were approved and 1,708 
denied after appropriate inquiry and investiga- 
tion. Detailed reports were furnished the Con- 
gress in each case approved, as required by law. 

Petitions filed by employers in the United States 
to import, aliens of distinguished merit and ability, 
ordinary workers in short, supply in the United 
States and industrial trainees for temporary peri- 
ods, amounted to 15,732 in fiscal year 1964 




An '•eligihle orphan" in the arms of a ca^e worker i 
British government sponsored orphanage. 



)aie(l to 14,847 received in the previous year. 
Viler consultation with other Government agen- 
ies, represe.ntati\es of labor and management, 
lid other appropriate inquiries, 14,146 petitions 
\ fit' approved, and 548 denied. During the year, 
lit' Hure^au of Employment Security, Department 
if Labor, undertook to determine the availability 
II ihe U2iit©d States of the various categories of 
ntt'itainers when petitions for such persons were 
ulmiitted to the Service. Previously, the Service 
uid to rely upon consultations with labor and man- 
ai' II lent representatives and other inquiries. 
^tint controls were exercised over all temporary 
ore i 2^1 workers. 

Other Applications. There were 208,794 appli- 
atif)ns by nonimmigrants to extend their tempo- 
;uy sta,y in the United States approved. This 

as an increase of 14 percent over 1963, and was 
lU' indication of increased tourism in the United 
States. Border crossing cards permitting tempo- 
ary entry into the United States were issued to 
64,266 aliens residing in Canada and Mexico who 
lave occasion to enter the United States frequently, 
nd 11,378 nonimmigrants who, upon application, 
rere permitted to change from one nonimmigrant 
lass to another (i.e. visitor to student, or student 
treaty trader, and the like) . 

Schools desiring to enroll foreign students must 
e authorized to do so by the Service. Foreign 
tudents or exchange aliens must receive peimis- 
ion to transfer from one school or exchange pro- 
;ram to another, and students must apply for 
lermission to accept part-time employment, 
^here were 34,859 applications in these categories 
djudicated during the year, an increase of 10 per- 
ent over 1963. 

United States citizens who frequently cross the 
pd borders were issued 14,734 certificates of iden- 
ity to facilitate their reentry into the United 
"tates; resident aliens applied for and received 
0,888 reentry permits and duplicate alien regis- 
ration cards. 

Permission to reapply for admission was ac- 
orded 4,080 previously depoi-ted aliens and ad- 
ance permission to return was given 192 lawfully 
esident aliens who otherwise would have been in- 
dmissible upon return to the United States follow- 
iig brief absences abroad. 

Aliens admitted to the United States to partici- 
ate in exchange programs cannot return to the 
Jnited States as immigrants for 2 years after 
heir exchange status has ended. During this 
iod they must reside in the counti-y of former 
esidence, or nationality, or in another foreign 
ountry adjudged by the Secretary of State to 
ave served the purpose and intent of the Mutual 
Mucation and Cultui-al Exchange Act of 1961. 
P'aivers of this requirement may be granted only 
here it is found to be in the public interest and is 



established that compliance with the 2-year resi- 
dence requirement would cause exceptional hard- 
ship to the alien's United States citizen or lawfully 
resident alien spouse or child, or upon request of an 
interested government agency. This provision of 
law is administered strictly and in cooperation 
with the Department of State. Only 672 such 
waivers were granted during the year out of a 
total of 1,277 received. 

Service Operations Outside the United States 

Service officers stationed abroad continued to 
render invaluable assistance in detecting and pre- 
venting fraud and misrepresentation in Service 
matters and other violations of law, including 
fraudulent and counterfeit document operations, 
and alien smuggling. Normal operations, which 
include the adjudication of various types of appli- 
cations and petitions filed by United States citi- 
zens and aliens residing abroad, were carried out 
in addition to the pre-departure inspection of trav- 
elers destined to the United States from various 
points in Canada, Bermuda, and the Bahamas. 
Service offices are maintained in Europe, the Far 
East, and Mexico. 

Service officers continued to interview and proc- 
ess refugee-escapees in Europe, and Chinese refu- 
gees in Hong Kong for parole into the United 
States. Additionally, agricultural workers, 
sheepherders, and other temporary workei-s are 
screened and indoctrinated by these officers prior 
to the aliens' departure for the United States. 

BORDER PATROL AND 
INVESTIGATIONS 

Deportable Aliens Located 

Service officers located 86,597 deportable aliens 
during 1964, a 2-percent decrease from 1963. The 
principal factors in this reduction were the decline 
in the number of Cuban nonimmigrant violators, 
and the number of alien crewmen who were found 
to be deportable on teclmical grounds when their 
vessels remained in port beyond the 29-day statu- 
tory limit — 12,083 as compared to 17,610 last year, 
a 31-percent decrease. Willful crewmen viola- 
tions increa.sed 14 percent to 2,171. The 153 stow- 
aways found is the lowest number since World 
War II. Of the 45,082 aliens legally admitted 
who violated their status of admission, 33,618 were 
visitors, 2,753 students, 1,818 agricultural work- 
ers, 5,417 other nonimmigrants, and 1,476 immi- 
grants. Illegal entrants increased 9 percent to 
25,515, of whom 22,620 were Mexican nationals. 

The following table compares the number of 
deportable aliens found in 1963 and 1964 : 



Nationality 


Fiscal 


years 


Percent 




1963 


1964 


change 


Mexican 


38, 866 
4,798 
7,454 

1,605 
5,209 
3,066 
10, 104 


43, 789 
2,057 
8,219 

1,770 
5,449 
3,515 
9,715 


+ 13 


Cuban 


-57 




+ 10 


British West Indian and 

British Honduran 

Other Western Hemisphere.. 


+ 10 
+ 5 
+ 15 


All other 


— 4 






Total except techni- 
cal violators 


71, 102 


74, 514 


+ 5 


Technical violators (alien 


17,610 


12, 083 


-31 






Total aliens found. _ . 


88, 712 


86, 597 


-2 



Mexican aliens accounted for 59 percent of the 
number found. Principal contributing factors to 
the 13-percent increase in the number of Mexican 
nationals found to be here milawfully were the 
expected termination of the "Bracero" program 
(the agricultural labor program whereby laborers 
have been imported under Public Law 78 since 
1949) and the far reaching effects of a continued 
severe drought in Mexico, accompanied by a 
marked deterioration of the ranch economy there. 

These factors probably will result in continued 
efforts to cross the border surreptitiously. The 
significant drop in the number of Cuban aliens 



DEPORTABLE 


ALIENS FOUND IN THE UNITED STATES 
1960-1964 




20 40 60 80 


MEXICANS 




-■■ID -- 




OTHER 
NATIONALITIES 




-i 1 ^-" 




.,b |„.. 




...^ i.„„. 




"'1 1 '''''' 




..I 1 .,.3 






[-] ... OTH.„ E.T»,.S 



found was principally in the nonimmigrant visi' 
tor class, as that category decreased 70 percent 
from 3,432 last year to 1,029. Surreptitious entry 
by Cubans decreased slightly, from 589 to 540. 

Border Patrol officers located 1,196 deportable 
aliens who had been induced or assisted to entei 
unlawfully or who had been unlawfully trans- 
ported after illegal entry. This was a 59-percen1 
increase over last year and was accompanied bj 
a 47-percent rise to 513 in the number of persons 
located who had violated the statutes relating tc 
the inducing, smuggling and transporting of 
lawfully entered aliens. 

Four hundred-forty smugglers and 1,106 aliens 
whom they assisted were located along the Mexi- 
can border. "WTaile many of the smuggled alien 
were seeking employment on farms and ranches ii 
nearby areas, it was noted that a considerabli 
nimiber were destined to places such as Chicago 
and the States of Oregon, Wyoming, and Nev 
York. In a niunber of instances, the aliens wen 
concealed in automobile trimks by the smugglers 
Two aliens entered by being hidden in the tank O' 
a water truck. In another case, 16 Mexican alieni 
were induced to enter with their nonimmigram 
documents to work unlawfully for a citizen farmei 
who told them he would arrange for their lawfu 
entries as immigrants while they were workinj 
for him; each was to pay him a $50.00 fee. 
naturalized citizen paid $2,200 to three individual 
to smuggle her son, an Italian, across the Mexicai 
border and to transport him to New York. 

In five cases involving 48 aliens, aircraft wen 
used or scheduled to be used to transport the alien: 
to their destinations. Analysis of these five case 
indicates that smugglers and transporters are a( 
tempting to facilitate their illegal activities b; 
transporting aliens who are violators of nonimmii 
grant status rather than surreptitious entrant!! 
For example, in July 1963, 35 aliens of a group & 
37 who were intercepted at Deming, New Mexic( 
had entered as nonimmigrants and were awaitin 
arrival of a chartered aircraft for their trip t 
Oregon. Civil penalties are pro\aded for flyin 
across the border without advance notice bein 
given. Continued efforts to control entry by pr 
vate aircraft resulted in establishing 110 violation 
as compared to 86 during fiscal year 1963. 

The Ijeon Airlift and Presidio-Ojinaga Trail 
lift, utilized throughout the year, were especiaU 
useful during a July-August 1963 upsurge of boi 
der violations just mentioned. By transportin 
adult Mexican male aliens, many of wliom wei 
without funds, by air to Leon, Guanajuato, and b 
train to Chihuahua, Chihuahua, they were release 
nearer their homes, and their illegal return to tl 
United States was discouraged. 

To date, 56,301 aliens have been transported o 
the airlift. Last year only 5 percent of them wer 
again fomid unlawfully in the United States. C 
53,913 Mexican aliens transported by train to Ch 
huahua, to date, only 1.618, or 3 percent, unla-w 
fully returned to the" United States last year. 



Service Aircraft. The Service continues to use 
ircraft in its enforcement efforts. Light observa- 
,\on aircraft are assigned to every sector on the 
Mexican border, in Florida, and along the Cana- 
lian border. During the year, these aircraft, in 
adio communication with ground crews, assisted 
" icating 3,699 deportable aliens. The use of 
(irao- trails" made this type of operation more 
ll'trtive. Tractoi-s were procured during the year 
(. maintain over a thousand miles of these trails 
IdiiiT the Mexican border. Obsen^ers are able to 
lett'it tracks left by aliens and direct the ground 
lews to intercept. 
Durmg the year, transport aircraft logged 
et 11,801,315 passenger miles, without incident, 
carrying aliens from all parts of the United States 
to and between staging areas on the Mexican 
border. In addition, 2,640,832 passenger miles 
were logged transporting prisoners for the Bureau 
>f Prisons. 

Violators of Other Laws. In carrying out tlieir 
responsibilities, Border Patrol officers encoun- 
tered violators of various city, State and Federal 
laws, and turned them over to appropriate 
agencies. Narcotics valued at $251,692 were con- 
fiscated, and property valued at $593,'005 was 
seized or re-covered. 

In one case $130,000 in cash was recovered and 
;he absconding bank employee was arrested before 
the crime was reported to the police in Canada, 
[n another case an unreported robbery and mur- 
der in Canada was solved by the arrest of an alien 
near Havre, Mont. Cooperation with other en- 
forcement agencies is carried on at all levels and 
a direct result, 3,248 deportable aliens were 
turned over to the Service. 

Deserting Crewmen and Sto^oaways. At sea- 
ports, in the Great Lakes area, and along the St. 
Lawrence Seaway, Service officei-s continued to em- 
phasize programs geared to the prevention of il- 
legal entries of deserting crewmen and stowaways, 
,j and the apprehension of such violatoi-s before they 
, established footholds and equities in the United 
[j, States. At the port, of Norfolk, Va., alone, 50 



crewmen in the act of deserting or absconding 
were apprehended and removed from the United 
States on the vessels on which they arrived. At 
Duluth, Minn., only 14 crewmen attempted to 
desert or abscond from a total of 220 overseas ves- 
sels arriving at that port. All 14 were appre- 
hended before they could leave the area and all 
departed on the vessels on which they arrived. 
At the port of New York, Service officers located 
1,770 crewmen who had deserted their vessels. Of- 
ficers at the Massena, N.Y., Border Patrol Station 
boarded 224 vessels and verified the departure of 
624 malafide crewmen who had been denied land- 
ing privileges and ordered detained on board. 
Since the opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway, 
there have been no successful desertions in this 
area. 

As a result of these strmgent Service enforce- 
ment measures, crewmen desertions declined 4 per- 
cent and landed stowaways found in the United 
States and unreported stowaways found on board 
vessels declined 8 percent compared to 1963. 

An illustration of the effectiveness and field co- 
ordination of these iirograins is fomid in the fol- 
lowing case. Information was received from the 
Hong Kong office that Fong Chau, crewman who 
deserted the M/V RoeUahon May 10, 1963, and 
Fai Po Yeung, who deserted the M/V Sumatra on 
July 30, 1963, were alleged to be pro-Communist. 
Foiig Chau was apprehended on July 3, 1963, and 
Fai Po Yeung on January 20, 1964, by Service in- 
vestigators at New York. Deportation proceed- 
ings were instituted. 

Caribbean Program and Problems 

The Caribbean Investigations Coordination 
Program is designed to combat the entij into the 
United States of Latin American aliens in the sub- 
versive, criminal, immoral and narcotic classes. 
Principal tool of this program is an index main- 
tained at the Miami Office. Approximately 8,000 
new reference cards were added to the index dur- 
ing the year, bringing the total to approximately 
150,000 including 374 suspected unregistered Latin 
American foreign agents. During the year, 




Pari of the mcmey seized as result of check of passengers 
at bus station. 



Immigrant Inspector briefing Investigator on possible 
desertions. 



110,200 checks were made of the index, and records 
were located in about 10,000 cases. As a result of 
these checks, 340 subversive, criminal, immoral and 
narcotic investigations relating to Latin Ameri- 
cans were initiated. 

Investigations of Cubans were conducted in 
2,193 cases, including 669 suspected of being sub- 
versive, and 92 alleged to be of the criminal, im- 
moral and narcotic category. Some of these cases 
involved stowaways. One such case was that of 
Moises Salti-Marchelo who arrived at New Or- 
leans, La., on December 26, 1961, as a stowaway on 
the SS Theoforos and was paroled into the United 
States as a Cuban refugee. Exhaustive investiga- 
tion produced evidence that he had been an in- 
formant for the Cuban police in 1961. His parole 
was revoked and he departed from the United 
States at Miami on December 31, 1963. 

Foreign-Born Law Violators 

Internal Security and the Foreign Bom. The 
Service has continued its hard-hitting, nationwide 
anti-subversive effort, to detect, exclude, denatur- 
alize and deport foreign-bom subversives. 

Investigations under the border programs re- 
sulted in tlie exclusion of several important sub- 
versives among whom were Jesus Coello Aven- 
dano. Director of the Federal Schools of Chi- 
huahua, Mexico, who was involved in a scheme to 
provide Mexican aliens with fraudulent Mexican 
Government credentials for use in illegally enter- 
ing the United States. Another was Edwin M. 
Alpin, fonner chainnan of the Toronto, Canada, 
Peace Council. 

Among subversive aliens deported during the 
year were Chen Kung Cheng, a suspected Pana- 
manian Intelligence Agent for Communist China, 
Roger Tetreault, a member of the terrorist Quebec 
Liberation Front, and Antonio Rodriguez-Echaza- 
bal, former Cuban Ambassador to Haiti and 
Guatemala, and Minister to Pakistan. Ordered 
deported was Antonio Hector Millan-Garcia, Mex- 
ican member of the Fair Play for Cuba Commit- 
tee in Los Angeles, in whose case litigation is still 
pending. Sevei-al subversive aliens departed from 
the United States while under investigation. 
Among these were Jolin Caimcross, formerly 
chairman of Romance Languages at Western Re- 
sen^e University, Cleveland, Ohio, and Stanislaw 
Dychowski, former member of the United Polish 
Worker's Party and suspected espionage agent. 

Anti-Crime Operations. A consistent goal of 
the Service in the area of anti-crime investigations 
has been the exclusion, expulsion and denaturali- 
zation of alien or naturalized racketeers known to 
be leaders of the underworld or of prime impor- 
tance to the syndicated crime and vice existing on 
a national or international scale. Generally these 
individuals are deeply rooted in the life of the 
Nation and their activities concealed behind legit- 
imate persons and enterprises. This increases the 
difficulty in bringing these proceedings to a suc- 



conclusion. During the year, 8,007 investi- 
gations of such cases were completed and 661 were 
deported or required to depart. 

Results of this program are reflected in the 
following cases: Ernesto Barese, international 
narcotics trafficker and an associate of the late 
"Lucky" Luciano, was deported to Italy on May 1, 
1964, for the third time in his sordid criminal 
career, following his completion of a term of im 
prisonment for illegal entry. He had amassed a 
long criminal record and had been deported previ- 
ously on criminal charges. Angelo Frank Brvmo 
former Detroit and Kansas City hoodlum who was 
previously deported to Italy on narcotic charges 
arrived at San Juan, Puerto Rico, October 30. 
1963, as a passenger on the M/V Liana claiming tc 
be David Michael William Bames, a British sub 
ject. He was removed from the vessel, ordered 
excluded, and was deported to Italy on Januarj 
25, 1964. 

Umberto Bauco, wanted by Italian authorities 
for embezzlement, fraud, bankruptcy, and issuing 
worthless chex-ks, evaded Canadian authorities anc 
fled to the United States. His apprehension fol 
lowed, and he Avas deported to Italv on August 29 
1963. Walter Sekaly, a Beaumont, Tex., night 
club owner and a reported central vice figure ir 
that area, was the subject of a long and compre- 
hensive investigation which resulted in an order o 
deportation being issued in June 1964. Bordei 
criminal identification programs continued witl 
emphasis on close liaison between Service investi 
gators and responsible law enforcement officials oi- 
both sides of the borders. There were 1,858 look 
outs posted. As a result of such lookout notic 
267 aliens were rejected or excluded. 

Frauds. Investigations of possible immigratioi 
frauds were conducted during the year, numbering 
4,333. The investigation of persons involve(' 
these schemes include aliens and other persons wht 
engage in criminal conspiracies to obtain falsi 
documentation with M'hich to avoid the provision 
of the immigration laws relating to the quota am 
exclusion of persons with criminal or immora 
backgrounds. Other methods included the ar 
rangmg of sham marriages between aliens 
United States citizens to gain nonquota benefits 
the furnishing of fraudulent employment assur 
ances to obtain quota preferences and in Chines< 
fraud cases, the use of false or spurious identit' 
to claim United States citizenship. One shan 
marriage case involved Richard R. Cody, a Loi 
Angeles attorney who reportedly had arrange( 
sham marriages for $1,350, with $1,000 being paic 
to the "bride" and $350 for himself. His convic 
tion resulted in a sentence of 2 years imprisonmen 
on two counts of conspiracy as well as probatioi 
for 5 years on other charges. 

In another case, Everardo Abelardo Martinez 
Larrudet, a former owner and operator of a travc 
agency in New York City received a sentence of ' 
years imprisonment on conviction of conspiracj 
after fleecing aliens in connection with preparatioi 



d submission of fraudulent employment assur- 
ices. 

During the year 2,579 Chinese who had entered 
lis country through false claims to I'nited States 
tizenshipconfessed and revealed their true iden- 
ties. These confessions exposed 5,911 other Chi- 
ise persons who entered in the same manner and 
ade 2,003 "slots" unavailable for future use. 
Files at the Fraudulent Document Center at El 
aso have grown at the rate of 100 cases a month 
f'l nee its creation in April 1958. This growing 
M jservoir now contains 9,123 cases relating to Mex- 
«^i an aliens who have backed up false claims to 
merican citizenship by producing fraudulent 
ocuments. Information at the Center is avail- 
ile to all Service offices and other Government 
^encies having a need for it on a 24-hour, 7-day 
asis. There are positive responses to inquiries in 
bout 12 percent of the cases. Illustrating the 
inction of the Center is the case of an applicant 
the American Consulate in Juarez, Mexico, who 
resented a birth certificate showing birth in the 
Tnited States. Although no record of this person 
found, the records disclosed that the names of 
le same parents appeared on a birth certificate 
' some time previously bj^ another person who 
ad falsely claimed citizenship. With this inf or- 
ation, the consular officials were able to deter- 
ine that their applicant was the wife of the 
ibject of the record at the Center and that both 
jre bom in Mexico. 

The Center also initiated inquiries from analyses 
f records. For example, information furnished 
le Phoenix Border Patrol Station on January 10, 
964, resulted in finding nine Mexican aliens 
ilsely claiming citizenship. Information fur- 
ished Del Rio on March 15, 1964, aided in the 
iscovery of eight false claim cases. 

Criminal Prosecution 

The Service presented 7,154 cases to United 
tates attorneys for violations of the immigration 
ad nationality laws. 3,297 prosecutions were 
athorized. Of the 3,076 cases disposed of, 94 per- 
jnt resulted in convictions with aggregate sen- 
>nces of 31,660 months and fines of $98,096. 

There were 1,820 aliens convicted of reentry 
ithout permission (8 U.S.C. 1326), after depor- 
ition, and 265 persons convicted for document 
-auds (18 U.S.C. 1546). The average sentence 
1 these cases was 11.4 months. Of the 290 persons 
mvicted for nationality violations, 286 cases were 
jr false representations as a United States 
tizen (18 U.S.C. 911). 

Revoeiition of Naturalization. Among the 
lost difficult cases processed by investigators are 
lose in which revocation of naturalization is 
)ug]it because the naturalization was procured 
irough fraud. After lengthy investigation, the 
aturalization of Domenico D'Agostino, Appa- 
ichian "Crime Convention" delegate, was revoked 
y the U.S. District Court for the Western Dis- 

ict of New York at Buffalo on January 13, 1964. 



D'Agostino has filed notice of appeal to the Court 
of Appeals. He was born in Italy in 1889, entered 
the United States in 1905, returned to Italy in 
1911, reentered the United States in 1921, and 
was naturalized on March 21, 1927. The order of 
revocation was based on concealment of marital 
record at the time of naturalization. 

An exhaustive investigation of Anton Bimba, 
a Lithuanian-born Communist, resulted in a revo- 
cation suit being filed in the U.S. District Court 
for the Eastern District of New York at Brook- 
lyn, N.Y. On December 17, 1963, Bimba, who 
was bom in 1894 and entered the United States in 
1914, was charged with having intentionally and 
deliberately concealed material facts concerning 
his arrest record at the time of his naturalization 
in 1927. In addition to membership in the Central 
Committee of the Communist Part.y, he has for 
many years edited the New York Lithuanian news- 
paper "Laisve", referred to by the Daily Worker 
as a "Lithuanian Communist Daily". The suit is 
pending. 

John "Bathbeach" Oddo lost his fight to retain 
his falsely gained naturalization when his peti- 
tion for writ of certiorari was denied by the Su- 
preme Court on October 14, 1963. Oddo was born 
in Italy in 1903, entered the United States in 1907, 
and was naturalized in 1931. He compiled a rec- 
ord of 36 arrests beginning in 1919, and became 
one of the more notorious racketeers in the coun- 
try. His "Cosa Nostra" ties were described in the 
recent "McClellan Committee" hearings. 

DETENTION AND DEPORTATION 
ACTIVITIES 

The number of aliens deported in fiscal year 
1964 under orders of deportation was 8,746, an 
increase of 1,292 over the number deported in 
1963. Among those deported were 603 on crimi- 
nal, immoral, and narcotic charges. 

In addition to the criminals deported who are 
listed elsewhere in this report were Michele La 
Centra, who has a long criminal record including 
convictions for forgery, counterfeiting and extor- 
tion; Elizabeth V. Spedding, reported to have 
been the operator of a large call girl ring; and 
Maria del Carmen Moreno-Pato, who was con- 
victed of crimes such as shoplifting, pocket pick- 
ing, bui-glary, and smuggling marijuana into the 
United States. 

Of the aliens deported, 89 percent had entered 
without proper documents or failed to maintain 
nonimmigrant status or entered without inspec- 
tion. By nationalities, 5,191 were from Mexico, 
534 froni Greece, 493 from Canada, and 266 from 
the United Kingdom. 

The number of aliens required to depart witliout 
the issuance of formal orders of deportation in- 
creased from 69,392 in the last fiscal year to 73,042. 
The three principal classes of aliens required to 
depart are crewmen who were technical violators 



because they remained longer than the time for 
which admitted, nonimmigrants who failed to 
maintain the status under which admitted and 
aliens who entered without inspection. 

Of those required to depart 32,770 departed 
under safeguards, 13,676 were crewmen technical 
violators, and 19,094 (principally Mexicans), 
were those who entered without inspection. The 
remaining 40,272 cases of persons who were re- 
quired to depart consisted of 26,687 nonimmi- 
grants who failed to mamtain status, 2,334 crew- 
men, and 11,703 surreptitious entrants. The 
number of those who violated status at entry by 
remaining longer or by accepting employment in- 
creased by 18 percent over last year. The num- 
ber of such violations increases as the number of 
nonimmigrants admitted increases. 

Principal countries of nationality of the 40,272 
aliens required to depart were 20,150 Mexico, 4,676 
Cuba, 3,939 Dommican Republic, 1,998 Canada 
and 1,530 United Kingdom. 

One hundred fifty-two who had fallen into dis- 
tress were removed from the United States at their 
own requests. 

Forty mentally incompetent aliens were de- 
ported or removed. Up to the time of deporta- 
tion approximately $404,000 had been expended 
for their care in the United States. If they had 
continued to remain institutionalized at public ex- 
pense, an estimated $3,287,000 would have been 
disbui'sed for their maintenance and treatment 
during their expected lifetimes. 

There were 11,426 aliens initially admitted to 
Service detention facilities and 19,372 to non- 
Service facilities. The detention facility at 
Tampa, Florida, was closed due to the cessation 
of transportation between Cuba and the United 
States. 




HEARINGS AND LITIGATION 

Exclusion and Expulsion Hearings. The risin Jr 
trend in the number of hearings conducted by Sp( J 
cial Inquiry Officers, which manifested its begir 
nings during 1963, continued through 196' 1"! 
Contrasted with a 3-percent decrease in exclusio 
hearings, the number of expulsion proceeding 
before Special Inquii-y Officere continued to ris 
from 10,431 in 1962, to 12,805 in 1963, and to 15,67 !"' 
in fiscal year 1964, a 22-percent increase over 196: j°j 

In addition to the tremendous surge in receipt 
Special Inquiry Officers were confronted with pei [, 
plexing cases which were often complicated by th 
necessity of applying and interpretmg novel legf 
principles. Typical is the recurring questio 



whether a respondent returning from abroa^ 
made an "entry" within the meaning of the in 
migration law, as it was recently and newly inte: 
preted by the Supreme Court in the Fleuti cai 
(374 U.S. 449) . Similar problems came to light i 
respect to minors going abroad with or undt 
direction of their parents, raising the questio 
whether, upon return, they made an "entry". 

Difficult questions of citizenship and expat: 
tion were often presented for determination 
Special Inquiry Officers. For example, a hot! 
contested expulsion case, important in the light c 
recent world events, was concerned with the 
of service of a native-boni American in the Casti 
army. The conclusion of the Special Inquir|iiij 
Officer as to expatriation and deport ability w; 
eventually upheld by the Court, of Appeals and a 
firmed, without opinion, by an equally divided Si 
preme Court {Marks v. Esperdy, No. 253, May 1 
1964). 

The effects of Section 4 of the Act of October 2- 
1962 (P.L. 87-885), revising the basis for gnxii- m 
ing discretionary relief in the fonn of suspensio 
of deportation to deportable aliens, continued ( 
be evident in the varying types and growing nun 
her of cases being presented to Special Inquir 
Officers for adjudication. Unsettled issues of la 
and fact, arising from the new law, were fi'equer 
and, considering the paucity of case precedent 
called for extended research, analysis and siftinieei 
of evidence, and an application of judicial acumei w 

During fiscal year 1964, 1,336 cases were referre 
to Congress for approval of orders granting sus 
pension of deportation as contrasted with 215 dui 
ing fiscal year 1963, and only 73 during fiscal yea 
1962. There is no indication of any future falloi 
in receipts of suspension cases. 

Serious and contentious claims with respect t 
he place of deportation continued to be presentee ii« 
particularly regarding countries in which the alie; 
•laimed he would be persecuted if deported thert 
To the long list of 35 countries concerning whicl 
such claims were made in fiscal year 1963, addi 
tional allegations of possible physical persecutioi in 



'ere made during 1964 in respect to Canada, India, 
[acao, Netherlands, Nicaragua, Afghanistan, 
latvia, Pakistan, Holland, Malaysia, Gennany, 
id Venezuela. This plea always requiring an ad- 
idication on a case-by-case basis, was encountered 
•equently in proceedings involving comparatively 
scent arrivals wlio claimed possible physical per- 
5cution if deported to Yugoslavia or Poland. 

The regulations promulgated in January 1962, 
nposed additional responsibilities upon Special 
[iquiry Officers to detennine applications, by re- 
wndents in expulsion proceedings, for adjust- 
lent of immigration status under Sections 245 and 
t9 of the Immigration and Nationality Act. 
taring fiscal year 1964, the number of such cases 
)mpleted by "Special Inquiiy Offieere was 479 as 
jntrasted with 421 during the previous year. 

Tlie factual determination in these cases often 
ecessitates lengthy hearings, a development which 
[so frequently manifests itself in cases involving 
ther types of discretionary relief applications. 
. contributing factor, indicating the gravity and 
>mplexity ascribed to expulsion cases in general, 
as the increase in the number of hearmgs in 
hich either the Government or the respondent, 
r both, were represented by counsel. 

Trial attorneys represent the Government in 
>rmal exclusion and expulsion hearings before 
pecial Inquiry Officers, serve as legal consultants 
) the field office staffs, and when requested, assist 
Tnited States Attorneys in civil and criminal cases 
rising out of the immigration and nationality 
iws. 

The trial attorneys prepared 9,535 cases for 
resentation before Special Inquiry Officers (1,458 
lore than in 1963). They made appearances at 
,859 hearings (832 more than in the previous 
ear) . There was a 35-percent increase in appear- 
nces where application for discretionary relief 
as the sole issue, indicative of the expanded scope 
f the regulations promulgated January 22, 1962. 

The two attorneys who represent the Service be- 
jre the Board of Immigration Appeals reviewed 
,003 appellate cases, 36 percent more than last 
ear. They prepared for presentation to the 
)oard of Immigration Appeals 429 mattere and 
resented 277 oral arguments, 97 percent and 48 
ercent, respectively, over last year. 

Early in fiscal 1964 there was prepared a sum- 
lary of major judicial decisions constraing certain 
rovisions of the Immigration and Nationality 
.ct. The summary was furnished the Subcom- 
littee on Immigration of the Judiciary Committee 
f the House of Representati\^es at its request, as 
as also a supplement updating the summary 
irough June 30, 1964. Tliis resume will serve not 
nly the pui-poses of the Committee but its distri- 
ution throughout the Service makes available for 
iady reference significant judicial interpretations 
f various sections of the Act. 

Another important accomplishment was the 
)mpilation for internal use only, of a Handbook 
Trial Attorneys, printing of which is now in 



progress. Supplements will be issued by the Gen- 
eral Counsel to keep the work current. 

Litigation. In the annual report for 1963 it was 
pointed out that it was then too early to appraise 
the full impact of the Act of September 26, 1961 
( Section 106, 1 & N Act ; 8 U.S.C. 1105 (a )) , which 
was designed to eliminate district court review of 
administrative deportation oi-ders by requiring the 
filing of petitions for review direct to the United 
States Courts of Appeals. The question of the 
scope of that law was then pendnig before the 
United States Supreme Court in Foti v. INS (cer- 
tiorari granted 371 U.S. 947). On December 16, 
1963 that Court rejected the narrow reading of the 
statute adopted by some of the lower courts. The 
Supreme Court declared (375 U.S. 217) that dis- 
cretionary relief, authorized under regulations to 
be considered in a deportation proceeding is 
merged in the final deportation order and that 
denials of such relief during the course of the 
deportation proceeding are reviewable only in the 
Courts of Appeals. Left open was the question 
whether the denial of a motion to reopen the de- 
portation proceeding likewise is reviewable only 
by the Courts of Appeals. On this issue the Su- 
preme Court has granted certiorari in Giova v. 
Roi^enberg (No. 15 Misc., October Tenn 1963) 
wliich should be argued and decided during the 
Court's October 1964 Term. An affirmative an- 
swer to the question would further reduce litiga- 
tion in the district courts. 

At the beginning of fiscal year 1964 there were 
40 Section 106 actions pending in the United States 
Court of Appeals, 43 actions were filed and 42 
disposed of, leaving 41 pending at the close of the 
year. Those courts considered 86 cases in the pre- 
ceding year. Only a few of all the decisions 
rendered were adverse to the Government, reflect- 
ing improvement in the administrative enforce- 
ment and decisional processes during the last few 
years. 

Petitions for certiorari were denied by the Su- 
preme Court in Fmig v. Kennedy (375 U.S. 833), 
on the question whether Nationalist China prop- 
erly was deemed the country of nationality of a 
Chinese alien for the purpose of the deportation 
statute; and in Zupieieh v. Enpenly (376 U.S. 933 
motion for leave to file petition for rehearing de- 
nied, 377 U.S. 913), wherein the lower court held 
that the denial of a stay of deportation was not 
arbitrary or capricious where the evidence did not 
establish the appellant would be physically perse- 
cuted because of his religious beliefs and since pos- 
sible incarceration for 1 or 2 years for deserting a 
vessel is not physical persecution within the mean- 
ing of Section 243(h) of the Act. In Mrvica v. 
Efsperdy (376 U.S. 560), reciting the definition of 
deportation in earlier law, which is carried for- 
ward in tlie present statute, the Supreme Court 
found that an alien who had left the ITnited States 
while an order of deportation was outstanding 
against him had been deported. In all three of 
the above cases briefs in opposition to the peti- 



tions were prepared in the office and at the direc- 
tion of the Genera! Counsel. 

The decision of the Supreme Court in Schneider 
V. Rusk (377 U.S. 163), is noted under Loss of Cit- 
izenship in this report. In Marks v. Esperdy 
(377 U.S. 214) , wherein an attorney on the staff of 
the General Counsel prepared the brief and pre- 
sented the oral argument on behalf of the Govern- 
ment, the Supreme Court upheld the constitu- 
tionality of Section 349(a) (3) of the Immigration 
and Nationality Act prescribing loss of United 
States citizenship upon service in the armed forces 
of a foreign state. 

In CosteUo v. INS (376 U.S. 120), reiterating 
and applying the principle that deportation stat- 
utes must be narrowly construed, the Supreme 
Court ruled that under the language in Section 
241 (a) (4) of the Act relating to deportation upon 
conviction for two crimes involving moral turpi- 
tude, a deportation order was not properly entered 
against a person who was a naturalized citizen at 
the time of conviction, even though his naturaliza- 
tion was later revoked for fraud. 

A petition for certiorari is pending in the Su- 
preme Court in Texas State AFL-CIO v. Ken- 
nedy, wherein the lower court decision was af- 
firmed by the Court of Appeals (330 F. 2d 217; 
C.A.D.C, 1964) which foimd that the plaintiffs 
did not have legal standing to challenge the valid- 
ity of the alien commuter program. 

ALIEN ADDRESS REPORTS 

In accordance witli the requirements of the Im- 
migration and Nationality Act, 3,335,591 aliens 
filed address reports with this Service in January 
1964. This is an increase of 98,907 reports over 
last year. The three States with the largest num- 
ber of aliens repoiting were : California, 767,022 ; 
New York, 608,120; and Texas, 246,280. Other 
States with large alien populations wei-e Illinois, 
New Jersey, Florida, Massachusetts, Michigan, 
Pennsylvania, and Ohio. 

Of the 2,966,732 resident aliens reporting, the 
largest number were of Mexican nationality 
(611,950), followed by Canada (357,111), United 
Kingdom (257,896), Germany (247,645), Italy 
(225,320), Poland (127,459), and Cuba (100,847). 
Residents of other nationalities were under 100,000. 
Most Mexican nationals lived in California and 
Texas; Canadians in California and Michigan; 
British in California and New York ; Germans in 
California and New York; Italians in New York 
and New Jersey; Poles in New York and Illinois; 
and Cubans in Florida and New York. 



CITIZENSHIP 

Naturalizations 

Certificates of Naturalization Granted. The 
oath of allegiance declaring support and defense 



of the Constitution and the laws of the Unite 
States against all enemies foreign and domestic 
was administered to 112,234 persons who becare 
new citizens in 622 courts throughout the Unite 
States last year. Both the number of applicatior 
for naturalization received, and the number of \ 
sons naturalized have decreased somewhat sm( 
the unusually high naturalization volume of fisci 
year 1961. Among those who became citizer 
through naturalization were 16,646 German ni 
tionals, 12,323 Italians, 9,826 British, 9,479 Can: 
dians, 5,213 Mexicans, 4,045 Chinese, 3,061 Jap: 
nese, and 3,029 Israelis. 

Overall, three-fourths of the new citizens 
naturalized under the general provisions of tl 
nationality laws requiring 5 years' residence 
the United States. The remaining naturalizt 
persons, for the most part, were the spouses ar 
children of United States citizens, who are givt 
special benefits under the law. Among tl 
spouses were 4,372 Germans (26 percent of a 
Germans naturalized), 1,940 Japanese (63 perce] 
of all Japanese naturalized), and 591 Filipin 
(26 percent of all Filipinos naturalized) . 

During recent years, a considerable number i 
children born in Germany, Greece, Italy, Chin 
Japan, Korea, and the Philippines have be« 
adopted by United States citizens and brought 
this country. Thus, it is not surprising that mai 
of the 9,056 persons naturalized as the cliildren 
United States citizens formerly owed allegian 
to one of these countries. 

Petitions for Naturalization Denied. Of tl 
2,309 petitions denied by the courts, 2,015 eith 
were withdrawn or not prosecuted by the petitio 
ers. However, most of the withdrawals were m 
tivated by knowledge that the petitions were like 
to be denied on one of the grounds specified in 
law. Sixty-eight petitioners were refused cii 
zenship because they lacked proficiency in t' 
English language, while 50 othei-s failed to quali 
because of an insufficient knowledge and unde 
standing of this country's histoi-y, Govemmen 




A New Citizen Cltitches the American Flag, After Being 
Naturalized. 



u nd Constitution. Many of the unsuccessful peti- 

itf ioners who elected not to prosecute their petitions 

,,l ef rained solely on account of their inability to 

,i atisfy one or the other of these educational pre- 

equisites, and may be expected to renew their 

pjilications after further study. Twenty-three 

(Mitional petitions were denied for lack of good 

loral character, lack of attachment to constitu- 

ional principles, or because the petitioner was 

nder a final finding of deportability. Tlie re- 

laining denials were on t«clmical grounds such as 

failure to meet residence or special requirements 

f the naturalization law. 

Derivative Citizenship 

Certificates iss^ied. Exceeding by 2 percent the 
igh volume of last year, then unequaled in Sen-- 
36 history, were the 35,321 certificates of citizen- 
hip administratively issued to persons who 
,cquired citizenship at birth abroad to United 
states citizen parents, or who derived such status 
hrough the naturalization of their parents or mar- 
iage to a citizen. 

Tlie exceptionally heavy caseload in this area 
luring the past few years may be attributed in 
>art to constructive inf onnational and operational 
)rograms of the Service. Under one program. 



each newly naturalized person is promptly in- 
formed of his children's derivative rights and the 
availability of the certificate, and similar advice 
and assistance is readily available to other types of 
derivative citizens at our field offices. Procedures 
have been streamlined, consistent with the require- 
ments of the law, to assiire an efficient, expeditious 
disposition of the cases, with benefit to tlie Service 
and applicant alike. 

Noteworthy in the operational area has been the 
Service effort at various military encampments 
in the United States, where officers have worked 
in close cooperation with the military authorities 
to plan for the group issuance of certificates to the 
children of servicemen who have returned from 
overseas duty. Many impressive and meaningful 
ceremonies have been conducted in conjunction 
with these proceedings at the military installa- 
tions. The efficacy of the programing is strikingly 
demonstrated by "the fact that the elapsed years 
between acquisition of citizenship at birth abroad 
and the issuance of the certificate has steadily 
declined from an average of 15.8 years in 1960 to 
9.3 years in 1964. 

Effectively implemented during the year was a 
special program to meet the citizenship needs of 
Panamanian and Canal Zone residents. Many 
persons who were bom and have always resided 
in those areas acquired United States citizenships 
at birth, and are qualified for certificates of citizen- 
ship. However, since the Immigration and Na- 
tionality Act precludes deliverv of the document 




Two Drrivati 



Citizen Children Receive Certificates 
Military Installation. 



outside the United States, these citizens have never 
been in a position to obtain one. Learning that a 
considerable number of them planned to vacation 
in the United States for this secondary purpose, 
the Service took prompt action to assure the suc- 
cess of their mission. 

A Service representative visited Panama and 
the Canal Zone to offer advice and assistance and 
to arrange for an advance submission of the ap- 
plications to the appropriate field offices. Prob- 
lems which could conceivably delay timely dis- 
position of tlie cases were foreseen and resolved in 
advance and, generally, the foundation for an ef- 
fective progi-am was laid. Applications were 
processed upon receipt and, where necessary, field 
offices communicated directly with the applicants, 
or took other action to assure that each case would 
be prima facie ready for hearing immediately 
upon the applicant's arrival in the United States. 
So efficient were the preliminary planning and 
action that, in most instances, hearings on the ap- 
plications were conducted when the applicants ap- 
peared at the field offices, and a great majority of 
the 691 certificates issued under the program were 
delivered immediately thereafter. 

Certificates issued to persons who acquired 
citizenship at birth abroad totaled 17,194. A 
breakdown according to country of birth discloses 
that 4,250 of th&se citizens were bom in Germany, 
2,317 in Mexico, 1,537 in the United Kingdom, 
1,429 in Canada, 904 in Italy, 800 in France, and 
the remainder in a number of other foreign coun- 
tries. It is interesting to note that the greatest 
number of births occurred in Germany where 
many servicemen are stationed with their wives. 

A total of 18,127 certificates were issued to per- 
sons who derived citizenship through the naturali- 
zation of their parents or as a result of marriage 
to a citizen. Numbered among them were 4,086 
bom in Germany (reflecting once again the con- 
siderable number of servicemen assigned to that 
country) , 2,357 bom in Canada, 1,858 in Italy, and 
1,428 in the TTnited Kingdom. Of interest is the 
fact that most of the 712 natives of the U.S.S.R. 
who received such certificates derived citizenship 
during the period 1910-29, whereas the great 
majority of the remaining certificate recipients 
derived their citizenship within the past 4% years. 

Certifrnfrx canceled. Certificates of citizen- 
ship may lie administratively canceled if persons 
obtained surli documents through fraudulent or 
illegal claims to citizenship acquired at birth 
abroad or to derivative citizenship in the other 
recognizexi forms. Of the 578 certificates can- 
celed, 575 falsely claimed birth abroad to citizen 
parents. Y'w^ hundred and sixty-seven of these 
cancellations involved persons bom in China, at- 
testing to the effectiveness of the Chinese confes- 
sion program out of which they evolved. 

RepufrUifJon. Under the statute, native-born 
women wlio married aliens prior to September 
22, 1922, lost their United States citizensliip. 
Depending upon the circumstances involved, these 



women must take affirmative action to regain eithe 
the privileges of citizenship, or citizenship statu 
itself. In the past 7 years all but a few of th 
citizens repatriated have been women in this cate 
gory. In 1964, there were 276 such repatriation 
and three under private law. As might be antici 
pated, the number of such repatriations is declin 
ing each year, and this year was 22 percent lowe 
than in 1963 and 47 percent lower than in 1958. 

Nationality Appli-cations. Fiscal year 1964 als 
registered a heavy demand for other importan 
nationality documents and benefits,' which ap 
proached the substantial volume of 1963. Amon 
the 8,588 cases processed and adjudicated durin 
the past fiscal year were included applications fo 
new naturalization and citizenship certificates, o 
new declarations of intention, to replace the orig 
inal documents which had been lost, mutilated, c 
destroyed. Others involved the issuance of thes 
documents in another name which had been newl 
acquired by the holder through marriage or apprc 
priate legal proceedings. Naturalized persor 
also sought special certificates of naturalizatio 
for use in obtaining recognition of their citizer 
ship by foreign states. A considerable number c 
applicants requested certified information froi 
naturalization and citizenship records, needed fc 
compliance with State and Federal statutes, for us 
in legal proceedings; or for some other legitimai 
purpose. 

Loss of Citizenship 

During 1964, 2,321 persons were held to ha-v 
expatriated themselves through actions taken in 
foreign state. Of these, 1,366 voted in foreig 
elections, were naturalized, swore allegiance to c 
served in the armed forces of a foreign state. Tw 
hundred and thirty-four renounced ITnited Stat< 
citizenship, and 701 naturalized citizens were e: 
patriated by continuous residence in a foi-eig 
state, established after their naturalization in th 
country. 

This last ground for expatriation is no longf 
valid since the Supreme Court on May 18, 1964, i 
Schneider v. Rusk, 377 U.S. 163, struck down tl 
statutory provision providing for loss of nationa 
ity solely through extended foreign resident 
The court found the provision unconstitutional i 
that it discriminated against naturalized citizen 
Persons whose loss of citizenship has been affecte 
by the decision may a[>ply to tliis Service to hav 
their records corrected, if tliey are in the Unite 
States. If abroad, they should seek similar rem< 
dial action by the State Depai'tment by applyin 
to the nearest American consulate. 

The citizenship of naturalized citizens may als 
be revoked in judicial proceedings where it appeni 
that their admission to citizenship was illegal c 
fraudulent in natui-e. The burden of proof in 
posed upon the Government is heavy in these cases 
but nevertheless there were four cases in whic 
revocation was ordered in 1964. 



Related Nationality Activities 

Citizenship Responsibility. The function of 
he naturalization officer is not limited to action on 
3 of aliens applying for citizenship or other 
.ationality applications, processed administra- 
ively or in the courts. He also cooperates with, 
m nd coordinates much that is done by, patriotic 
nd public-spirited citizens and organizations hav- 
ig a special interest in fostering citizenship 
sponsibility. Thus, each year, these officers plan 
,nd participate in impressive naturalization cere- 
lonies and other meaningful exercises on "Cit- 
zenship Day" when newly naturalized citizens, as 
rell as the new voting citizens are honored, "Law 
)ay" when the fundamental relationship of the 
iw to citizenship responsibility is stressed, and on 
lany other occasions affording a suitable setting 
or furthering good citizenship. 

The year brought with it the unique opportunity 
or an estimated 30 million people to view, many 
or the first time, a court proceeding in natural- 
zation. With the fullest cooperation of the Serv- 
;e, a naturalization proceeding conducted in the 
JnJted States District Court at San Diego was 
limed by the National Broadcasting Company. 
Thereafter, on June 9, this impressive ceremony 
ras presented by the company as one of the most 
mportant sequences in its televised "Project 20" 
rogram entitled "The Red White and Blue". 
Citizenship Education. The statutes require 
lost applicants for naturalization to have an effec- 
ive knowledge of English and, without exception, 
knowledge and understanding of this country's 
istory. Government, and Constitution. Accord- 
agly, activity designed to assist and encourage 
mmigrants in their preparation to meet these edu- 
ational prerequisites is a major responsibility of 
he Service. 

In fulfillment of this responsibility, the Service 
lade available to local public schools the names 
nd addresses of 155,321 immigrants who arrived 
luring 1964, so that the schools could extend to the 
ewcomers an invitation to attend EngUsh and 
itizenship classes. Similar information pertain- 
ig to 60,285 actual applicants for naturalization 
Fas also furnished the schools. Supplementing 
school program were the home study courses 
ponsored by the Service, which were utilized by 
M ,707 prospective citizens. 

its During the year, the naturalization officers con- 
iiji inued to be an effective force in the realization of 
liif he educational objectives. Acting in a liaison 
ffs apacity, they offered maximum cooperation to 
,i, he school authorities in the establishment and 
laintenance of citizenship classes and, through 
heir frequent visits to the classes they did much 
) encourage the students to continue their efforts 
sward the goal of citizenship. It is worthy of 
lote that 92,360 candidates for naturalization at- 
tended classes during the past year and that, in 
11 but two States, classes were available. The 
reatest enrollment occurred in New York 
30,343), California (16,494), Illinois (9,337), 



Massachusetts (5,306), and New Jersey (4,272). 

The Federal Textbook on Citizenship published 
and distributed by the Service, again was used 
extensively in public school classes. A total of 
146,040 copies of the various parts of the textbook 
were distributed by the Service during this past 
year. 

A notable development in the area of study and 
instructional material was the recent publication 
and distribution of "Our American Way of Life", 
"Our United States", "Our Government", and a 
related "Teacher's Guide", which comprise the 
Becoming a Citizen Series, a new unit of the Fed- 
eral Textbook on Citizensliip, which wiU supplant 
24 small booklets formerly included in the text- 

These new texts were published by the Service 
in collaboration with outstanding educators from 
all over the United States, and only after they had 
been thoroughly tested by use in citizenship classes 
in many parts of the country. The Service is 
convinced that the use of these publications wiU 
materially advance the objectives of citizenship 
education and training, a conviction that has been 
strengthened by the already tremendous demand 
for the new textbooks. 

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 

Personnel. Employee development and train- 
ing during fiscal year 1964 included in-Service, 
out-Service, and foreign official programs. In- 
Service training consisted of 13 principal pro- 
grams of instruction some of which were con- 
ducted more than once. Seventeen sessions of 
these programs were completed by 336 supervi- 
sors, journeyman officers, records personnel, and 
port receptionists. All but the port receptionists 
were trained at the Officer Development Center, 
Los Fresnos, Tex. Employees enrolled in the Ex- 
tension Training Program completed a total of 
986 home-study courses. The regions conducted 
a large number of short training courses in which 
a total of 16,844 completions occurred throughout 
the fiscal year (some employees attended more than 
one session). 

The Border Patrol Academy conducted an FAA 
Peace Officers Refresher Course for 17 Federal 
Aviation Agency Peace Officers who are respon- 
sible for protecting American aircraft, passengers 
and crew members during flight. Sixty-eight em- 
ployees completed the training course, including 
conferences and seminars outside the Service. 

A total of 66 foreign officials from Iraq, Saudi 
Arabia, Vietnam, Brazil, Iran, United Arab Re- 
public, Afghanistan, Sudan, Trinidad-Tobago, St. 
Lucia, Great Britain, Tunisia, Australia, Bolivia, 
Korea, Liberia, Somali Republic, Indonesia, Vene- 
zuela, India, and Mexico received training in the 
Service's enforcement and examination operations, 
as well as the records administration program. 



Incentive Awards. During the year, 549 em- 
ployee suggestions were received, of wliich 78 
were adopted. Tliere were 514 persons recognized 
for superior performance or special acts. Fur- 
ther, 109 employees were granted quality increases. 

Building Program. In line with the continuing 
Service program to improve and modernize the 
physical facilities, 10 new border stations, and 
10 new Border Patrol Stations were completed by 
the Service on the northern and southern borders. 
In addition, the General Services Adjninistration 
completed Border Stations at Jackman, Maine, 
Massena, N.Y., and Pembina, N. Dak. In Detroit 
the new District Office and Border Patrol Head- 
quarters were occupied during the year. Miami 
District Office mov^ed into a new Federal Office 
Building. 

Records and Statistics. During 1964, 3,259,751 
documents were added to the central index re- 
quired by Section 290 of the Immigration and Na- 
tionality Act. This index now contains approxi- 
mately 37,000,000 index cards. All types of 
searches of the index amoimted to 607,415 for the 
year. 

A well-established work measurement system 
provided the basis for the manpower utilization 
program. All work performed by Service officers 
is recorded in terms of work units, and measured 
in relation to the time it takes to do the work. 
This information is used at every ai'ganizational 
level to plan work, avoid or get rid of backlogs, 
detennine trends, evaluate new procedures and 
improve work methods. Statistical information 
on immigration, naturalization, deportation, and 
passengers manifested is compiled and interjireted 
for use in judging the effectiveness of the laws 
administered by the Immigration and Naturaliza- 
tion Service as they relate to numerical data and 
for use in demographic, transportation, and otlier 
studies by other Government and private agencies. 

Management Improvement Programs. A pilot 
operation for mechanized visa processing was suc- 



cessfully installed in the New York District Offic 
Tliis process has led to much faster and more ai 
curate processing of visas at a lower overall co< 
to the Service. This procedure is now being e; 
panded to other offices. A Service-wide study ( 
the use, distribution, age and other major cha 
acteristics of dictating and transcribing machini 
led to improveiiieiits in the use of such equipmen 




18 



1851. 



n 



IMMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES* 
1820 - 1964 



/From 1820 to 1867 figures represent alien passengers arrived; 1868 through 
1895 through 1897 immigrant aliens arrived; 1892 through 1894 and from 1898 
present time immigrant aliens adraittedV 



1891 and 
to the 





Number 




Number 




Number 




Number 


Year 


of 


Year 


of 


Year 


of 


Year 


of 
















Dersons 


320-1964 i/ 


42,994,576 


1355 


200,377 


1392.. 


579,663 


1931-1940 


528.431 






1856 


200,436 


1893. . 


439,730 


1931.. 


97,139 


1820.. 


8,385 


1357 


251,306 


1394.. 


285,631 


1932.. 


35,576 






1858 


123,126 


1395.. 


258,536 


1933.. 


23,068 


1821-1830 


14?.439 


1859 


121,282 


1896.. 


343,267 


1934.. 


29,470 


1821.. 


9,127 


1860 


153,640 


1897.. 


230,332 


1935.. 


34,956 


1822.. 


6,911 






1898.. 


229,299 


1936.. 


36,329 


1823.. 


6,354 


1861-1870 2.314.824 


1899.. 


311,715 


1937.. 


50,244 


1824.. 


7,912 


1861 


91,918 


1900.. 


448,572 


1938.. 


67,895 


1825.. 


10,199 


1362 


91,985 






1939.. 


32,998 


1826.. 


10,837 


1863 


176,282 


1901-1910 


3,795.38^, 


1940.. 


70,756 


1327.. 


13,875 


1864 


193,413 


1901.. 


487,913 






1828.. 


27,332 


1865 


248,120 


1902.. 


648,743 


1941-1950 


1.Q35.P22 


1829.. 


22,520 


1366 


318,568 


1903.. 


357,046 


1941.. 


51,776 


1830.. 


23,322 


1867 


315,722 


1904.. 


812,870 


1942.. 


28,781 






1363 


138,840 


1905.. 


1,026,499 


1943.. 


23,725 


1831-1840 


599,125 


1869 


352,768 


1906.. 


1,100,735 


1944.. 


28,551 


1831.. 


22,633 


1870 


387,203 


1907.. 


1,285,349 


1945.. 


38,119 


1832.. 


60,432 






1903.. 


782,870 


1946.. 


108,721 


1833.. 


58,640 


1371-18? 


50 2,m,\n 


1909.. 


751,736 


1947.. 


147,292 


1834.. 


65,365 


1871 


321,350 


1910.. 


1,041,570 


1943.. 


170,570 


1335.. 


45.374 


1872 


404,806 






1949.. 


188,317 


1836.. 


76,242 


1873 


459,803 


1911-1920 


5.735.311 


1950.. 


249,187 


1837.. 


79,340 


1874 


313,339 


1911.. 


878,587 






1838.. 


38,914 


1875 


227,498 


1912.. 


838,172 


1951-1960 


3.51?..£72 


1839.. 


68,069 


1876 


169,986 


1913.. 


1,197,892 


1951.. 


205,717 


184C.. 


84,066 


1877 


141,857 


1914.. 


1,213,480 


1952.. 


265,520 






1873 


133,469 


1915.. 


326,700 


1953.. 


170,434 


1841-1850 


.1.713,?51 


1879 


177,826 


1916.. 


298,826 


1954.. 


208,177 


1341.. 


80,289 


1830 


457,257 


1917.. 


295,403 


1955.. 


237,790 


1342.. 


104,565 






1918.. 


110,618 


1956.. 


321,625 


1843.. 


52,496 


1881-18^ 


>0 5.246.613 


1919.. 


141,132 


1957.. 


326,867 


1844.. 


78,615 


1881 


669,431 


1920.. 


430,001 


1958.. 


253,265 


1845.. 


114,371 


1882 


788,992 






1959.. 


260,686 


1846.. 


154,416 


1833 


603,322 


1921-1930 


4.107.209 


I960.. 


265,398 


1847.. 


234,968 


1834 


518,592 


1921.. 


805,228 






1348.. 


226,527 


1885 


395,346 


1922.. 


309,556 


1961.. 


271,344 


1849.. 


297,024 


1836 


334,203 


1923.. 


522,919 


1962.. 


283,763 


1850.. 


369,980 


1887 


490,109 


1924.. 


706,896 


1963.. 


306,260 






1888 


546,889 


1925.. 


294,314 


1964., 


292,248 


1851-1860 


2.598.?14. 


1889 


444,427 


1926.. 


304,483 






1851.. 


379,466 


1390 


455,302 


1927.. 


335,175 






1852.. 


371,603 






1923.. 


307,255 






1853.. 


368,645 


1391-19C 


3.687.564 


1929.. 


279,673 






1854.. 


427,833 


1891 


560,319 


1930.. 


241,700 







Data are for fiscal years ended June 30, except 1820 through 1831 and 1844 through 1849 
fiscal years ended Sept. 30; 1833 through 1842 and 1851 through 1867 years ended Dec. 
31; 1832 covers 15 months ended Dec. 31; 1343 nine months ended Sept. 30; 1350 
fifteen months ended Dec. 31; and 1863 six months ended June 30. 



19 



TABLE 2. ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AND DEPARTED, 
BY MONTHS: YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1963 AND 1964 

/Data exclude border crossers, crewmen, Mexican agricultural laborers, 
and aliens admitted on documentary waivers^ 



ALIEN ABMIITED 



Immi- Nonlm- 

grant migrant 



ALIENS 
DEPARTED 
U 



U.S. CITIZENS 1^ 



Arrived Departec 



Fiscal year 1964 . 

July -Dec, 1963 

July 

August 

September .... 

October 

November 

December 

Jan. -June 1964 . 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Fiscal year 1963 . 

July -Dec, 1962 

July 

August 

September . . . . 

October 

November 

December 

Jan. -June 1963 . 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 



2,037,056 



1.430,736 



2.786,907 



2,709,196 



154.848 



896.845 



1.051.693 



746,211 



1.508.791 



1.315. 651 



29,790 
25,925 
25,862 
27,017 
23,553 
22,701 

137.400 



161,226 
163,454 
193,844 
145,760 
107,564 
124,997 

847.963 



191,016 
189,379 
219,706 
172,777 
131,117 
147,698 

985,363 



130,954 
140,173 
134,441 
122,695 
102,332 
115,616 

684.525 



295,488 
390,741 
271,044 
218,716 
174,408 
158,394 

1.278.116 



332, 57( 
283,33' 
207, 24( 
185,38; 
146,27' 
160,85; 

1.393.53! 



21,436 
19,799 
23,045 
23,876 
23,973 
25,271 

306,260 



101,294 
109,469 
127,401 
152,326 
170,413 
187.060 

1,507.091 



122,730 
129,268 
150,446 
176,202 
194,386 
212,331 



86,844 
88,242 
101,320 
103,569 
150,578 
153,972 

1,266,843 



173,404 
179,216 
218,110 
210,532 
226,302 
270,552 



171,921 
192,691 
205,63: 
214,35: 
252,74' 
356,18. 

2.421.34. 



159.291 



781,753 



941.044 



693.614 



28,494 
26,936 
27,931 
28,004 
24,672 
23,254 

146.969 



153,896 
151,786 
179,582 
106,215 
105,177 
85,097 

725,338 



182,390 
178,722 
207,513 
134,219 
129,849 
108,351 

872.307 



126,283 
124,593 
129,151 
112,095 
96,538 
104,954 

573.229 



265,321 
332,568 
249,577 
186,075 
151,690 
140,399 



282,15 
246,21 
189,49 
156,41 
128,95 
146,36 



22,932 
21,879 
24,958 
26,037 
25,575 
25,588 



117,069 
75,366 
95,111 
125,469 
152,110 
160,213 



140,001 
97,245 
120,069 
151,506 
177,685 
185,801 



70,285 
74,318 
91,185 
103,234 
107,851 
126,356 



142,623 
148,414 
210,051 
187,225 
189,385 
230,135 



141,72 

176,20 

200,97 

212,33 

199,651 

340 



\_l Includes aliens departed and citizens arrived and departed by sea and air, 
direct arrivals from or departures to Canada. 



20 



TABLE 3. 


ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AT UNITED STATES PORTS OF ENTRY: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1963 - 1964 

/Each entry of the same person counted separ.itelyj^7 


Class 


Total 


Aliens 


Citizens 



Year ended June 30, 1964 



Total number 

Border crossers. 

Canadian 

Mexican 

Crewmen 

Others admitted. 

Total number 

Border crossers. 

Canadian 

Mexican 

Crewmen 

Others admitted. 



178.514.408 


103,574.450 


74.939.958 


168.807.677 


98,855,809 


69,951,868 


57,628,322 


31,691,951 


25,936,371 


111,179,355 


67,163,858 


44,015,497 


2,743,153 


1,856,286 


886,867 


6,963,578 


2,862,355 


4,101,223 



Year ended June 30, 1963 



1/3,693,807 


99,199,889 


74,493,918 


164.881.601 


94.694.164 


70.187.437 


56,785,973 


29,957,041 


26,828,932 




108,095,628 


64,737,123 


43,358,505 




2,657,800 


1,795,418 


862,382 




6,154,406 


2,710,307 


3,444,099 





elude border crossers. 



ALl ENS AUMlTTtD 

Quota Imitiisrnnts 

fourth preference quota: 

Brothers or sisters of U. S. citizens 

Aliens adjusted under Sec- 2'.4, Immigration and Nntlonallty Act 

Nonquota Immigrants 

Husbands of U. S. citizens 

Orphans adopted abroad or to be adopted 6/ 

Natives of Western Hemisphere countries 

Aliens adjusted under Sec. 2'.;. ImmlRrntlon and Nationality Act 

Aliens adjusted under Sec. 2-.1, ImmlRrotlon and Nationality Act 

Other nonquota Immiprants 

Refugees - Refugee KeHef Act of 1Q53 

Immigrants - Act of September 11,1157 

Hungarian parolees-Act of July 25, l')5« 

Immigrants - Sees. 1 and fi , Act of September 22, 1959 

Refugee-escapees - Act of July 14. 1960 

NONIMMIGRANTS U 

Temporary visitors for business 

Temporary visitors for pleasure 

Transit aliens 

Treaty traders and Investors 

Their spouses and children fl/ 

Representatives of foreign Information media . 

Exchange visitors 

Their spouses and children B/ 

NATO officials 7 

2/ Prior to Act of September 2?, 1959, all sons or daughters of U. S. citizens 

4/ Prior to Act of September 22, 1959, classified as non preference quota. 

i/ Includes 3 displaced persons in 1962 and I in 1963 whose status was adjuste 

6/ Class established by Act of September 26, 1961. 

1/ Includes 1 foreign goverment official in I960, 4 in 1961, 3 In 1963, and 2 

Section 13. Act of September 11, 1957. 
S' Classes established by Act of September 21, 1961. 



ssslCled as four 
lined in fourth 



Port 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


AU ports 


265.398 


271.344 


283.763 


306,260 


292.248 


At Unt Ic 


155.293 


151,716 


151,139 


158,541 


159.518 


Baltimore, Md 


385 


428 


699 


439 


378 


Boston , Mass 


7,838 


5.970 


6,147 


6,045 


5,393 


Charleston, S. C 


212 


376 


325 


740 


1,231 


Charlotte Amalle, V. I 


226 


380 


540 


261 


334 


Miami, Fla 


16,119 


22,082 


25,925 


24,038 


28,284 


Newark, N. J 


8,483 


7,894 


6,512 


8,739 


6,921 


New York , N . Y 


116,683 


108,953 


103,752 


108,945 


108,552 


Norfolk, Va 


203 


326 


316 


241 


378 


Philadelphia, Pa 


529 


431 


401 


307 


392 


Port Everglades, FU 


322 


482 


416 


406 


378 


San Juan, P. R 


1,529 


2,498 


4,824 


6,752 


6,212 


Washington, D. C 


665 


496 


674 


801 


388 


Other Atlantic 


2,099 


1,400 


608 


82 7 


677 


Gulf of Mexico 


2.929 


3.166 


2.502 




3,200 


Houston, Tex 


599 


603 


499 


535 


659 


New Orleans, La 


1,184 


1,29'. 


1,265 


1,335 


1.589 


San Antonio, Tex 


621 


768 


194 


250 


258 


Tampa, Fla 


395 


353 


423 


470 


527 


Other Gu If 


130 


148 


121 


142 


167 


Pacific 


25.489 


23.326 


24.396 


28.377 


30.382 


Agana, Guam 


308 


'269 


208 


689 


621 


Honolulu, Hawaii 


9,234 


8,914 


10,271 


11,141 


9,355 


Los Angeles, Calif 


8,582 


8,143 


8,463 


10.559 


13,158 


San Diego, Calif 


266 


254 


233 


576 


538 


San Francisco, Calif 


4,293 


3,290 


2,687 


2,591 


3,172 


Seattle, Wash 


2,328 


1,907 


2,311 


2,739 


3,385 


Other Pacific 


478 


549 


223 


82 


153 


Alaska 


1.138 


1.579 


1,792 


2.273 


2.828 


Anchorage 


1,094 


1,442 


1,696 


2,165 


2.719 


Other Alaska 


44 


137 


96 


108 


109 


Canadian Border 


49,184 


51,435 


49.167 


59.012 


63.093 


Blaine, Wash 


4,753 


5,022 


4,756 


5,033 


5.319 


Buffalo, N. Y 


4,332 


5,257 


4,870 


5.078 


4,834 


Calais, Me 


1,610 




2,007 


2.550 


2,584 


Champlatn, N. Y 


2,026 


2] 402 


2.977 


4,381 


5,169 


Chicago, 111 


4,848 


5,434 


5.285 


6,716 


7,479 


Cleveland, Ohio - . 


696 


672 


709 


760 


802 


Derby Line, Vt 


525 


690 


512 


659 


738 


Detroit , Mich 


n,424 


10,283 


9,039 


10,327 


11,754 


Eastport , Idaho 


611 


786 


842 


994 


969 


Highgate Springe, Vt 


652 


747 


897 


1,353 


1,344 


Jackman, Me 


358 


333 


449 


421 


434 


Lewiston, N. Y 


216 


217 


189 


202 


699 


Madawaska , Me 


147 


165 


247 


343 


442 


Niagara Falls, N. Y 


2,855 


2,438 


1,937 


2,224 


2.039 


Norton , Vt 


414 


475 


308 


387 


419 


Noyes, Minn 


1,323 


1,410 


1,242 


1,490 


1.708 


Pembina, N. D 


173 


251 


405 


601 


804 


Portal, N. D 


198 


222 


188 


277 


277 


Port Huron, Mich 


2,263 


2,404 


2,353 


3,092 


2,861 


Rouses Point , N. Y 


1,628 


1,538 


1,590 


1.491 


1,594 


St. Albans, Vt 


971 


992 


1,150 


1.577 


1.856 


Sault Ste. Marie, Mich 


357 


455 


338 


445 


601 


Sweetgrass, Mont 


643 


906 


938 


1.241 


1,050 


Thousand Island Bridge, N. Y 


488 


469 


585 


632 


736 


Vanceboro, Me 


613 


409 


323 


563 


457 


Other Canadian Border 


5,060 


5,410 


5,031 


6.175 


6,124 


Mexican Border 


31.190 


39.929 


54.757 


55.267 


33.081 


Brownsville, Tex 


1,470 


1,904 


1.900 


1.669 


1,026 


Calexlco, Calif 


2,679 


4,827 


8,503 


8,604 


3.670 


Del Rio, Tex 


190 


163 


367 


341 


2B4 


Eagle Pass, Tex 


1,111 


1,251 


2,225 


2,083 


1,865 


El Paso, Tex 


6,245 


7,977 


10.191 


8,764 


5,578 


Hidalgo, Tex 


1,517 


1,510 


2.200 


1,954 


1,371 


Laredo, Tex 


4,015 


4,344 


4.930 


4,710 


3.717 


Nogales, Ariz 


3,366 


3.534 


3.646 


3,721 


2,319 


Roma, Tex 


459 


603 


778 


995 


1,224 


San Luis, Ariz 


179 


409 


807 


1.441 


618 


San Ysidro, Calif 


9,604 


13,046 


18,860 


20.539 


11,016 


Other Mexican Border 


355 


341 


350 


446 


393 


All Other 


175 


193 


10 


58 


146 







23 











cusses 






























|[ 


li! 






i 


1 

m 


iii 
iff 

II! 


11 


.Z'['ZT,' Z , 


i 


-' 


-"":r.".r-" 








i 

51 


1 

si 




.„ „„„.„.. 


292.2<.« 


102. sil 


181 . ■,0', 


19.701 


6.437 


7.531 




3.468 


478 


11 


17 


4.106 


765 


6 272 


4.782 
































3 498 




^ 




2i2JB 
20.885 


3.537 


17.348 


301 
8.008 


58 
1.923 


3.303 


1 


203 


86 
151 


- 
: 




39 


185 


;i 

'n 

2.381 


164 

91 

» 

152 

1.133 








E~':;:::ii:i:;;:i:::;:::;;:;: 




Ir.l.nd 


\ 






fo""S"l 


Sr-H':*--:-"'-':^^ 


I 


S:r.=:. ,:::::::: 


].6«n 
3.006 


316 
140 
















"\ 








'n 


» 

5 


^^ 


1- 










"""""" 






's')'. 


; 




63 


59 


.;:i 


30.516 


31 


" 


; 






■^ 


■:: 


19. 
1241 




cib. ..'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.':'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 










I: 


|ri;°:;-;;::::::::;:::;;;;^ 


-J" 5:rL-;r ■::::::;::;::::::; 


"n 


•'S"""" 


l!"65 










45 


l.'wB 




\ 










,: 


IS 


" 










^:i=E=E 


t 


"i"'' 




108 




"28 


i 


] 


, 




I 


" 




4„; 






; 


h- 


^'S.rl. 


^ 




679 


175 




;8i 


'5 


30 




■ 16 


'I 




- 




1 












SJhit'oJ:;:"" '"• '• •"' ' 


::: 


Oth.p count,.,. 








































d),i.t.d ur 






' 


11. 195 






















\ 







IMMlCRAIflS ADHl-n-ED, BY CUSSES UNDER THE 
REGION OF LAST PERMANENT RESIDENCE: YEAR 


'^DEd"uNE 30^ 


i,\"r° 


UNTRV 


OR 














T::.i;:zt:: 


admitted 


i 
Jf 


2 1 
ill 


s 


5 = 


.1 

5 = 


1 
Ill 

Hi 


° . • 

1? 
ill 


11 


' 


'"''"' 


salons 


P-r 






2 


"J 




2 

"I 

SI 


1 


1 
1 






2a2.?4H 


102.844 


189.404 


19.701 


6.437 


7.531 


135 81i_ 


3 468 


478 


11 


17 




76^ 


6.272 


li.m 










28.715 


10.005 


2.926 


3.603 




912 


157 


9 


16 


3.690 


499 


3.119 


790 




"L^trla 


i;296 

970 

5.59B 

2)039 

2'.006 

287 

4,069 

2I119 

1137 

2f,.859 

163 

1,098 


137 

2,683 
l!o79 

6)076 
56 

i;945 

26,032 
75 


480 
53 
160 

7,008 
3,772 


12 

109 

1)09 2 

361 

23 
658 

83 


2 

1.212 

142 

5 


15 

42 

10 

315 
158 

27 

2 


23 

,8 
2,356 


56 

29 7 

3 




1 
2 




417 

'512 
557 

96 


22 

: 

50 

57 

190 


23 
457 

1.921 

36 

• 




















10 
















'i"'"'"y 


47 










J "^'"'j 


34 
















Norw.v 


















J '""'' 


14 






















Jnu:d K^ngT™ "" *!'" :•■.■:;;::::::;::: 


144 




U.S. S.R (Europe nod Anla) 








1, 




Other Europ; '.". 














2,684 
2,166 

72 

2,320 
'519 

2,862 

1,127 


■ 37 
122 

26 
1,775 

63 
637 


2,647 
2,044 

3,526 
339 

'546 
2,799 

'93 

490 


1,020 

' 65 

1,315 
20 


13 
86 


132 

707 

62 




20 

5 


5 




\ 


263 




"105 

65 
82 

57 






SX*«s;-::::::::::::::::::;;::::;::::::: 


19 
















["" 












jIp" 


56 










' 




^ "' 












Ryukyu ""tlnds 






Syrian Ar.b Republic ' 1 i! i!: i!. i..:! I! i! i! ! 


" 










>rth toerlc. 








9!561 
l|86l 

2!859 
l!498 

r,750 
2,295 
34.891 


96 
1,622 

105 


40.136 
34,358 

7)525 
1,'367 

1)454 

32.411 


387 
274 

70 
147 


320 
334 

15 

31 

275 


26 

190 

1 
2 

62 


37,667 
9)302 
l)e38 

2,805 

1)666 

1.220 
30.724 


12 
16 

12 
809 


5 

1 
1 

23 


: 






5 








„j^,j^ 




Cub. 


















n 






8 


















1' 










Other North America 


' 




,„,h ^„,„ 






Brail 1 


8.336 

lieos 

10,762 
2,'711 
2,015 


66 

294 

1.495 


2)586 
1,491 

3)851 

1,480 
520 


27 

28 
200 


45 
36 

27 
45 


I 

1 
1 

47 


7)006 

3)818 
l)850 

55 


■ 375- 
1B4 
28 

82 
19 










3 
1 


86 
36 

2 

55 
38 


21 




Chile ... . 








6 










Peru 








15 




Other s'outhAmerica 








' 

" 






133 
2.070 


130 
65 

1.525 


23 

545 


13 
261 


75 


54 


5 
2 

41 

22 


1 
5 

3 


■ 


\ 




^l 




i 


























2 












' 




rz":i:„d- ::::::: 


215 


1,022 




87 


55 

3 


31 
10 






'° 








- 


79 

1 






faclflc l.land, J u! s! ad™! i ' ! ! ! ! : 

Other Oceania 


I 






1 






2 




iEEiiEs:::™-'" - 


ted under S 




2 


Septeub 


r 11, 























TABLE 6D. ALIENS I 



'. COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH: 



ill .;= 



ill liH 



China 1/ 

Kong Kong 

Jordan 2/ 

Syrian Arab HepubUc 

Canada 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Brail I '. 

Chi la 

Colonbla 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 



:| ^\l 



;l I 



I " 



■S'-g 3SSS 



: 11 



S"2R'~2""S~S '2; 


















I 



I. 



27 



TABLE 6D. IHMICRAKTS ADHITTED UNDER THE ACT OF 1 









SEPT EH 


6F.R 11. 


957 - JUNE 30, 


1964 




















.r^tid 


1 
t 


1 

s 


t'ii 
III 


Is 

y 
^ 


"Is 
: s ° 






1 

is 


I"" 

1: 

.5 s 

II 


1 




'-z\v.r- 


11 
n 


'A 
li 


= ".! 

it = 
III 


U 

S i 
o3 




62.010 


7.166 


3.094 


272 


2.641 


',949 


1.9',9 


21 061 


2.410 


1.56'. 


1'..317 


8^5 


1.221 


387 


72 








1 "11 




1.780 


2.069 


3.081 


20.041 




1.028 


9.136 


306 


372 


130 




Belgl.in, ... 


3,634 
5,727 

'321 
832 

937 

70 


9$ 


50 






2 
12 

1.39B 


25 
2 

468 
105 

159 


32 


12) 


530 


31 

125 
621 

3.767 


27 

55'. 


3 
1 

757 


15 

'i 
'I 

200 


I 


Greece 












304 
669 


"j 




Netherlands 


1,| 14 








Poland 


84 


53 


I 








59 




3,982 

6<.7 
176 

3.917 

11.6 
245 


3,258 


338 
37 

5 




164 
15 
13 


10 


2 


30 






"457 

37 
195 

64 

6 

72 
67 


3 
10 


72 
30 






^ '^-^ 












j" 
















Lebanon ... 
RyukyruU.:,!.. 


I 


0th'"" ela'' *"""""' 










39 
546 
35 








95 

- 
3 


- 




156 
73 


: 


- 


: 
: 
: 

4 


5 


3 


3 




Kexlco 








Cuba .. ...^...^.. 








jLalca 




Other Uest Indies 




p 




o;;;:r»:r;ni::"r'.;;:::::::::::: 


- 






















' 


2 






?o 












f^^' 












Africa 






34 




5 




3 








- 




10 




23 


23 
















lunl.la 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 


'- 








13 






- 


I 


I 










° 


[ 


: 























AaB|3Tjauoa 



O^I<-lOOO^O>OOI^O ^ 

■^ rt t -< O -H CJ 



0»OiDO^O^C^nO CO on 

n CM -H Tt •* oo ^r 



a3uai8j8j(] 
pus }o 
AjceiOTjauag 



croooo lojojiDTtr^ 



lOr^iDOo^Ttr* in 



0\ vO fM <o o 



11 



n o op CO CO ro 00 
•* CD in r- ^ vo ijf) 



§ 



. .. .s ^ 5 -c; 

c 'H n> a < 

o u) 4J a p c 

J3 -H !ii -H 3 fH £ 

<u 10 n> j: >•>-+> 
J S a. o. a: to O 



in • T) a) o 4! 
O TO 10 s ^ z § 

TD O Xi 10 ^ 



•H T> cn 
I o in 01 oj h 

p >< c .^ j: 



souaaejajd 
pJE JO 
AjeiDTjauag 



^ vO o t^ o ( 



aouajajaj;] 
pug JO 
AjB^ofjauag 



c^ CO ■>! vo 



■>T >o in < 

-H ^ o I 



CM >M ^ ,H —I 



I -t CM CM 



tocM'TCN— '5Mroin^r>-o^O( 
&-inc0'<TCMOCMN0C0-H-0»}-< 

icocM ino-H^cM CO 






i 



O <V C 

o c e 
0) 10 C 

O 3 N h <D 
>< < O U. O 



P'-' 10 p 



U <0 >~-rt 3 10 

<u CT"H > x: ■»-> 

^It-lJjEO." -•-■ 



C C ai to in >< 

m .rt ji! .00) 

U (/) CTiJ= 

5 



fi Ol-r-l 



T) -D 

10 j: >. o c c 

^ U U X ►-< w I 



29 



TABLE 6F. IMMIGRANTS ADMITTEE 

(P, L. 87-885) BY C 

OCTOBER 24, 


UNDER THE ACT C 
OUNTRY OR REGION 
1962 - JUNE 30, 


F OCTOBER 24, 1 
OF BIRTH. 
1964 


962 






Country or region 
of birth 


Number 
admitted 


1 J 


1 ^^ 




1 ^^ 






18,944 




4,459 




6,356 






11.636 


1,254 


1.760 


3.048 


5.574 






11 

25 

16 
1,669 

19 
6,856 

19 

58 
1,757 

69 
390 

10 
557 

34 
113 

33 

6.155 


2 
4 

181 
2 

626 

3 

3 

147 

1 

263 

2 
2 
4 

2.954 


3 
3 
149 
9 
1,248 
2 
27 

46 
6 
217 
28 
8 
9 

2.306 


2 

603 
5 
1,694 
11 
9 
520 
35 
67 

43 

52 

305 


11 

18 
9 
736 
3 
3,288 
6 

1,230 

30 

130 

3 

34 

51 
13 




e gi .... 
hran e .. . 








Greece 

Hungary 

Italy 

Malta 
























United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 










2,196 
24 
172 
783 
26 
112 
211 
191 
471 
253 
500 
99 
48 
53 
930 
52 
34 

692 


l!l58 
1 
80 

463 
15 
35 
29 
71 

225 
20 

303 
26 
18 
26 

447 
17 
20 

227 


980 

3 

62 

266 

26 
31 
81 
211 

197 
16 

30 
25 
342 

7 
14 

209 


29 
6 
3 

22 

21 
42 

13 

79 

20 

54 

7 

143 


29 
14 
27 
32 

30 
109 
31 ' 
22 

150 

37 

87 
21 

113 
















Indones i a 




















































North America 




Canada 

Barbados 


47 
448 
86 
16 
9 
42 

94 

267 


9 

167 
34 
4 
8 
5 

35 

102 


31 

3 

117 

46 

8 

1 
3 

54 

97 


18 

5 
3 

29 
20 


4 
26 
76 

1 

5 
5 
48 




Trinidad and Tobago 

Other West Indies 








Other North America 








Africa 






70 
181 
16 


23 

75 

39 


43 
52 
2 

33 


1 
18 

1 

2 


3 
36 
9 

26 




United Arab Republic (Egypt) 




Oceania 




Australia 


95 
5 


36 
3 


31 
2 


2 


26 













1/ Includes Formosa. 

2/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



30 



re of t 





quota 1/ 


Quota Inm 


irants admitted 2/ 


<)uot» »re. 


1960 


1961 


1962 


,96, 


1,64 




I3B.16I 


101.373 




90.319 


103.036 


102. R44 


















'ino 

l!l75 

566 
5.061 

'235 
184 

2,36'. 

209 
100 
250 

i;698 
3.690 


1,310 

1,069 

100 

2.908 
27!o34 

112 
5)609 

3.035 

6io57 

314 

2.5 

■901 
2.359 


■ 82 ■ 

l!o66 
2,892 

62 
21208 

204 

1^510 

.'.536 
9 32 

2.014 


■93 

1.946 

536 
2.930 

825 

5/405 

63 

51435 
27 3 

1)594 

2.765 
888 

2.245 


93 
1,"052 

U203 

2,987 
2s!291 

2)071 

2.'0 

2.25b 




'""<■'■"■ 








d":!;:;'°:°':',:;::::::;::;:::::;::::::::::;; 


!:o?5' 


fi'i 'U 








j.'"^*^^ 


23997 


Cr„. Britain „nd Northern IreUnd 


31.759 


^"" 








/pl»nd ( Eire) 


6 134 


Itnlv 


5' 724 






l^'^l^ j ■ " 




L mbo r 








Nor « 








° "" I 




R miinla 




aan «rlno 






272 


^''° 




Swlt7erl«rd 






• 


u.^.s." 


2,564 


Uth°''E^'o e 


109 








100 

100 

200 
100 

185 

100 
1,400 
4 074 


75 
103 

103 
51 


72 
?15 

80 
69 
857 


88 
76 
84 

115 

57 
83 


71 

100 
95 

19 5 

103 
50 

192 




g" " '^ ' 


122 










^I^J"" 












, j' ^j^ 








,'° '^''' " 


105 


, '' j 


100 


J"P«n 

o an and rob Pale tl 


177 




94 


^orea ... . 


100 






p'l'l""" 


47 


Th 11 ''d"" 


100 


Vl"t N 


92 






'"'" ^'j 


242 






'jj"^'j 


100 

100 
100 


43 
34 

124 
114 

257 


69 
35 

120 


71 

101 
102 


107 




'"" 






101 


H '' 




South Africa 






98 


0th Afi 










200 










212 




100 
100 








90 




Trl'ld'd" d T b ■/ 


102 


' 





ee Table 68. 



1961: 156,687 In 1962; and 156,987 

jstmenta chargeable to future years . 

:>. 3503 of October 23, 1962. Figure 
quotas July 1 - October 22, 1962. 



TABLE 7A. QUOTA IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED, BY QUOTA AREA AND QUOTA PREFERENCESi 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1964 j/ 






^ 




Total 

quota 

Immigrants 


First 1 


Second 


Third Fourth 


Non- 
preference 






Selected Their 
Inmigrants spouses 
of special 1 and 


Parents Unmarried 1 

U.S. daughter! of | 
rftl,»n^ U.S. cltlzensl 


Spouses 1 Unmarried 1 
of tons, daughters 
resident! of resident 

iUens. 1. Jilififls 


Other rel- 
atives of 
U.S. 
















83.237_2^ 














1.720 


S.-^Sl 


'(.1?2 


ei.SS2 _ 




Albania 

Austria 


^'l02 

1,271 

1,022 

100 

1,823 

1,075 

129 

554 

2,876 

23,997 

31,759 

308 

854 

112 

6,134 

5,724 

191 

374 

83 

2,828 

2,219 

6,434 

434 

100 

272 

2,160 

1,681 

182 

2,564 

969 

109 

2.290 


37 
10 

21 

7 
9 

12 

99 
96 
111 

787 

12 

70 

139 
23 
61 

83 

53 
42 
17 
73 
- 
422 


24 
2 

33 

15 
51 
12 

95 
48 
114 

1,041 
11 
91 

loe 

35 
73 

41 

49 
35 
26 
58 

232 


15 
28 
2 
8 
42 

10 
11 
85 
17 

139 
90 
329 

1 

1,778 

16 

29 

21 

320 
246 
92 

72 
1 
11 
49 
87 
171 
3 

263 


2 

1 
1 

1 
8 
3 

30 

5 

83 
2 

63 
33 
11 

1 
37 
42 


13 
39 

12 
13 
3 
18 
88 
80 

174 
10 

55 

2 
324 

13 

58 

5 
436 
19 
17 
12 
12 

3 
24 

5 
38 
232 

1 

179 


14 
34 
6 
3 
6 
10 
1 
10 
78 
114 

406 
43 
82 
2 
3 
1,661 
5 

74 

475 
76 
16 
20 
38 

"l 
25 
206 

318 


33 
80 

24 
45 
9 
7 
33 
196 
436 

256 

76 

3 
9 
36 
73 

137 

7 

11 

39 

17i 
89 
13 

123 


1,027 

1,002 

46 

1,715 

984 

94 

457 

2.294 

23,323 

30,560 

11 

76 

105 

6,124 

119 

230 

82 

2.376 

2.207 

2,500 

2 

12 

10 
2,154 
1,493 

29 

2,193 

103 

90 

711 


"tv. 




•s. 


Belgium 


|r«- 


Bulgaria..... 




Denmark 


I* 


Finland 


Hi"' 


g "°^ 


' 


Great Britlan and 

Northern Ireland 

Greece 




ungary 


\r> 


l"l lirtfEl") 


*•■■ 


Ireland V ira; 


f" 


Latvia 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 


t 


P°l"^H 

Poland.. 








Rumania 


.. 




y 




!«■ 


Switzerland 


to 


U.S.S.R 


t 




'■' 




l; 




30 
122 
90 

102 
100 
127 
100 
105 
100 
177 
206 
94 
100 
88 
47 
100 
92 
97 
242 


5 
9 

7 

29 
12 
37 
34 
27 
46 
25 
28 
43 
52 
13 
19 
1 

23 


2 

5 
3 
9 
24 
13 
12 
16 
30 
40 
10 
22 
11 

2 

10 


6 
2 

1 
5 

15 
25 
8 
29 
27 
11 
42 
37 
24 
14 

6 
9 


1 
3 
2 

7 
7 
3 

1 

8 


18 

5 

6 

14 

8 
24 

3 
5 
11 
16 
10 
10 
15 
3 
5 
1 
1 
16 


33 
10 

29 

24 
9 
13 
13 
18 
16 
26 
58 
7 
21 
3 
6 
6 
1 
2 
23 


9 
15 
12 
25 

28 

2 

1 

13 
9 


12 
85 
39 

40 
19 

3 
32 

1 

2 

1 
25 

3 
67 
89 
80 
151 


k 




Hi 


Ceylon 






' 




"' 






Indone'la 


(1 




1, 


Iraq 


b 


Israel 




Japan 

Jordan and Arab Palestine. 


: 




'i- 


Pakistan 


,. 




I. 






Viet-Na 






•1 




^' 




;. 


Ethiopia 


*'97 
101 
101 
105 
102 
98 
628 

381 

212 


2 
8 

34 
1 
30 

64 

66 


9 
6 
47 

2 
23 

67 

18 


18 
3 
11 
25 

23 

37 


1 

1 
17 


1 
1 
6 
9 
5 
6 

a 

26 

16 


2 
42 

5 
12 
28 

29 

42 


1 

11 
11 

30 

1 

30 
5 


95 
100 

67 

10 
8 

36 
506 

141 

11 


t 


Libya ... . . 














^ 




''■ 




< 


North America 


^ 


Jamaica 

Trinidad and Tobago 


110 
102 


37 
29 


12 
6 


20 
17 


8 
9 


12 


13 
29 


5 


11 


i 


V Figures Include adjustmen 

Sea Table 6B. 
2/ Includes 30 foreign gover 


t of status 
nment offic 


cases. Ad J 
lals adjuate 


ustments c 
d under Se 


hargeablo 
ction 13. 

32 


to future yea. 
Act of Sa{>teiil 


re are in 

bar 11. 1 


eluded in year 
957. 


of adjustasn 




- 





TABLE 


a. IMMICRAKTS ADMITTED, BY COUNTRY OR RDCION 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 


?9%r"" 


AND MAJOR OCCUPATION CROUPr 








i 




'-7z.r- 


.d^-d 


15! 

Ill 


i! 


1, 
ill 


1 

ill 

u5S 


=1 


iii 




m 


i s 

i 5 

* is 

•si 


ii 


.5 

III 


Ml 




KU co^ntrl.. 


















8.451 




















2.713 




2.607 




6.786 


2.631 


5.70; 


1.662 


3.407 


59.858 






1.055 

1.666 

1.322 

694 

26;739 
3.909 
1.813 
6.307 

13.245 
2.651 
2.238 
8.884 
2,077 
1.391 
2,252 

l!865 
960 

3!o9« 


186 
207 

59 

'268 
936 

292 
587 

360 
378 
175 

"219 
202 


59 

693 
\l 

2 

38 
*3 


30 

22 

82 
40 

161 

37 

58 

80 
38 


75 
184 

' 73 
84 

166 

373 
364 

55 

39 5 
4.889 


15 

22 

46 
93 

21 

95 

32 
26 


67 
■325 

ii 

130 

1.802 
242 

200 


101 

36 

136 

1.013 

333 

550 

824 

487 

130 
91 

50 

236 
159 


31 

23 

257 

70 

37 

67 

30 

54 


56 

168 
57 
28 


3 

66 
11 
246 
262 

453 

22 

60 
34 
30 


465 
62 
939 

345 

25 
34 

12 

232 


700 




J""'" 






C.«tio.lov.kl. 


le? 




"'"""■J 


341 
















'""* 








'"866 










1", 


7 370 










Kor<<«y 


835 
















J ""'* 


I 294 
















Turk., (Europ. .od A.1.) .. 


525 




U.S.S.R. (Eorop. .nd A.I.). 


1.435 




Oth.r Europ. 






5.009 
639 
634 

754 

940 
3.680 

2.362 

3.006 
462 

1.357 


1.014 
53 

220 

57 
169 

137 
177 

134 


1 
10 


13 

23 
10 

40 


33 

31 
71 
125 


19 

5 

'4 
>8 

10 

5 

13 


40 


10 

23 
25 

3' 

30 


3 

; 


11 

12 
32 
15 

15 

149 
50 




1 

•i 

3 

2 

36 






To"\t' ;■"■:■ 


517 




ZTJ 






140 










J""' 


1" 




I'rael 

J»P«" 


651 






2,163 




j;""' 










Sytl.n Amb Hepubllc 

Oth.r A,l. 


123 

657 






38.074 

15!rOB 
7,537 
2,082 
1,762 

1^436 

l!53l 

'594 
472 


4)376 

2,250 
251 

252 

i 

82 


95 
37 

5 


897 
833 

18 

56 

32 

33 


3,952 

'283 
133 

280 

266 

165 
37 


995 

307 
96 

31 


2.184 
561 

225 
97 


1.436 
1. 101 

157 

143 
30 


265 

999 
21 

340 
161 

163 
110 

43 


1.420 

622 
258 

91 

26 

27 
28 


!29 
51 


1.623 

2.945 

280 

33 

17 
32 






J,*"' 






Cub. 

Domlnic.n Republic 


8.400 

'988 
825 

1)303 




oth'r'j.si'i^di..'!!!!!!!!! 














890 

1.037 

359 












Other Z"" l^rVz". .'.'.'.'.'. 






l!509 
10,446 

2)585 
1,250 


169 
924 

311 

w 


'i 


40 
52 


984 
337 
215 


168 
54 


57 
107 


78 
387 
71 


143 
440 

55 


68 
153 
54 
50 


5 
30 

5 


IB 
86 

36 

2 


3.758 
1.307 

6.452 

1)448 
897 
99J 




jri'.i .. :'."::': 








- * ' ■ 








Peru 

V.n.juel. 

Oth.r South A.erlc. 

frlc. 






432 
151 


15 
99 
136 


- 


6 


38 
104 


3 

5 
1 
27 


30 


5 
12 
34 


16 


10 

1 
I 
23 


I 


3 


114 
55 




Morocco 










llhUed Ar.b R.pubUe (Egypt) 


430 












s 


130 
57 


; 


6 


54 

28 


8 


;! 


3 
5 


5 


10 


I 


\ 


■ lU 








Pacific I.l.nd. (U.S. .d..). 


78 
134 
























3 


3 

















»i»tFia««iB or rusT pnErottKci vis* ptniions. 



Amiirro. «y occu 


PAIION: »!« EHDM JUHS 30, 196 




















of (ir.t 






Nu.bar 














To... 


1 6 V'^n.' 












W)u.t>ant. 




«"""•"• 








_U£2_ 












rtor...l.Ml t«:hrlc.l .~l l.l~lr.« «.rk.r. 












776 


26.186 


l,M3 


24 




























Alrpl.n. pilot, .nd r,.,„.tor. 


Hi, 


38 










"5 


Mhllll."^ "' "" ' 


'ii 












'h 


a.M'.'t. 


"25 


170 










Ml 
















Frof.»or> and ln«ltuct r. 


839 


220 










116 


ssr ""'"' '"""" 


367 


i 










HO 
337 


Dc.fCiMn 


7M 


SI 










ili 




275 












fajl^.r. 


3. MO 


Ml 


118 






288 


''l43 


Ir.t.rl«ln.ri 
















































Bu.lcl.'i'.nd pu.le tMrhir. 


431 


28 










403 


Kirioi 


4,230 


266 


125 








3.964 












} 






Blologlc.l .cl.ntl.t. 
















Olotl.f .^ ,«.,h,.lcl.t. 


50 


11 










39 


Phy.lcl.t."' 


242 


37 










205 


JI;;"!u!t*Ii;* .-r,«.n. 


1" 


1 


.,i 








112 
1.973 


















I>«<ll<> oparacort 


















53 








3 J77 




213 










4 201 


E<:ono.l.r. 












5 102 

' 1 lit 


F.ycholotlX' 


" 


'° 










"o\ 


] 








104 














24 2,34( 




i'.OM 


275 








63 3.«ll 


Th.r.pl... .nd h..l.r. «.t .p.ciri^l 


IM 


3 








115 




H 










I 57 


Pro£e..lon«l t.chnlol. .nd kindisd »ork.c. ocliar 


1,207 


135 








57 1,071 


r..»,r. .nd r.r. .n.^.r. 


1,732 


1 






- 


1 1,731 


Haucari offlcLli .nd proprl.tor. auapc far. 


t B22 


m 








B t.73a 


Buy.r. .nd dep»r.....t h..d> .tor. 


99 


1 








98 


Buy.r. .rd .hlpp.r. f.r. product. 












24 
















Intp^'t"" public .d.lnl.tr.tlon 


51 


I 








50 


M.r.B.r. .od .up.rlnt.^l.nt. b>.!ldlr. 






















































1 JJ 
















H.„,g.r. offlcl.l. .rd proprl.tor. oth.r 


6,134 


75 










6,059 


Cl.rlc.l .nd klndrod >ork.r. 


24.919 


32 












Ag.m. 








'5 




3 


37. 
















































1.053 
















































29 


File cl.rk. 


























I 1 51 
















45 


H....n«.r. .nd ofdc. toy. 


54 






. 






54 
















608 


P.yrcll and tmk.aplr* cl.rk. 
































lt.c.ptloal.t. 


494 












4t4 


















St.nonr.ph.r. typl.t. and .Mr.t.rla. 


'3«9 


'! 


I 


' 






'■'sSJ 


T.I.I rap), operator. 
















TaUphone oparator. 


549 












549 


















Cl.rlc.l and klndr.d »orkar. oth.r 


9,«e4 


10 


5 


4 






9.67* 


Sala. M.rk.r< 




12 




5 






5.0B4 


Adv.itl.lng aaant. .nd .ala.aan 


■ I?; 














Huck.t.r and paddlar. 














53 
















223 
















92 


SaUiaan and ul.. Clark, otiiac 


4,548 


8 




5 






4,5*0 


Craft.«,n rorai..n .nd klndrad Mrk.r. 


17.5*8 


850 


647 


,3 






16 718 




49 1 


20 




3 
























Bookblndar. 


84 
















eoa 












796 


















Carpant.r. 


1,877 












1,863 


Cant and concrat. finl.h.r. 














35 


Coin«.ltor. and typa..ttar. 


159 












155 














' 





34 



TABLl lA. KtHfflCU 



BWirtMl TlM I 



i at gst>». ItM 






CoNdwcton, Ws . 



iUu«ht»r «n4 ^cklna k 



MKufAeturlnt 






llcvAter ep«ritora 



L4bor«ri, •scvpt tmrm t 

C«rpant«rt' halpari 
FtahtrMn and eyacvn 



,31.07ft 

62.1*1 



35 



TABLE 9. IMMIGRANTS AttHTTED. BY COUWTRY OR 


REGION or BIRTH. SEX 
1964 












I, 




Total 
migrants 








Country or region 
of birth 




"5" 
years 


5- 
years 


yejira 


29 
yea re 


39 
years 


40- 
years 


50- 
59 
Years. 


60- 
69 
years 


70- 
years 


80 
year 

over 


Hot 
reported 










10.724 


20.696 


36.998 


22.208 


10.736 


6.215 


2.969 


958 


167 


4 


K„„p > 














8.927 












2 




1,645 
1.055 
1,666 
1,322 
694 
4,039 

26,739 
3,909 
1,813 
6,307 

13,245 

2^238 

8,884 
2,077 
1,391 
2,252 
2.173 
1,865 
960 


682 

481 
265 
1,330 
8,185 
1,875 
896 
2,460 
6,588 

"854 
4,201 

'656 

532 

772 

1,653 
895 

7.979 


35 

28 
37 
183 
1,601 
159 
5 
145 
488 

60 
253 
83 
6 
79 
48 
76 

635 


30 

14 
29 

613 
79 
34 
40 

406 
79 
38 

383 

103 
28 
40 
28 
25 

703 

23 

597 


57 
45 
46 

'299 
96 
506 

'150 
113 

iE 

48 
82 
36 

' 49 
130 


132 
162 

500 

3,008 

686 

260 

1,139 

1.834 

445 

382 

583 

229 
226 

464 
76 

617 
207 

2.104 


121 
93 
139 

234 
1,126 

203 

'299 
136 

145 

247 
75 
115 

2,021 
151 
496 
192 

1.658 


71 
35 

23 
95 
358 

502 
127 

35 

933 
194 
145 

591 


38 
27 

13 

41 

100 

77 
672 

31 
488 

79 
111 
127 

498 
132 

418 


12 
U 
32 

26 

64 
297 

52 

42 

41 
245 
117 

50 

447 


5 

114 
147 


15 
16 




*""^'* 






Belgium ..^. 

CMCho»lov la 








"" 








1^'"'^' 




r""*"*' 








Hungary 




j"' 




N th i i^< 




N^rwa"^ 








p ° : 




J '^ "*° 








Sweden 
















U. S. S. R. (Europe end A.i.) 




Oth"''? " ■" ' 








*'chl « 1/ 


5,009 

281 
754 
381 

3,680 

726 

2,362 

3,006 

244 
1,357 

112.973 


2,340 

355 
128 
538 

493 
569 
468 
453 

' 60 
142 
648 


35 

11 

2 

48 

93 
22 

7.257 


13 

8 

78 
55 

10 
96 

5.678 


61 
25 
13 
39 
21 
149 
115 

21 
302 
15 
14 
75 

10.085 


35 
155 

87 
160 
114 
195 

80 

102 

246 

6 

274 

13.133 


20 
106 

130 
84 

56 
188 

3 
43 

8.285 


342 
13 
25 

15 

2 

9 
11 
46 

10 

4.675 


261 

9 

9 

6 
8 
43 

2,261 


324 

3 

6 

6 

2 

7 
5 
8 
29 

9 
640 


279 


14 
53 






Bona rtoni 








Indoneela 








,'*" 




larael 








Jordan 2/ 




Lebanon 




Philippines 




yuKyu s anda 








0th "abU ''' 






2 




32,9f.7 
15,808 
7,537 

\B 
2,729 

1,531 

472 




1.974 
2.012 

79 
68 
97 

48 
67 
73 
70 
26 


3,055 
3,871 

978 

165 
248 

107 
137 
154 

177 
63 

5 

2.354 


5.103 
2.915 
1.381 

'315 
235 

238 
203 
321 

166 
58 
29 

5.365 


2.849 
1.559 
1.706 

244 
197 
262 

123 
82 

62 
42 
58 

2.926 


1.545 
867 

1.378 
248 
113 
85 
126 

46 
32 
42 

35 
15 

853 


642 

40 
43 

37 
12 
8 

I 
296 


161 
317 
251 

14 

6 

3 

3 
2 

120 




16 
25 




J;'"* 


'^,7^; 

3.314 
1.004 
841 
1,357 
1,202 

236 
216 

14.937 


2,742 
517 

63 
29 
87 
130 
51 
61 
50 
71 

23 

I 

1.675 


[ 




[ 


Doolnlcan Republic 










," ; 




0th r'w at'l'di a' ' 




Coeta Rica 




c'et^'ala""^ 




Honduras 




Nlcaraeua 








anama ....... ^..... 








South America 








2,416 
1.509 
10,446 

2 ',585 
1,250 
1,865 


3.722 

1.030 

658 

1^230 
552 
887 


- 491 
162 
63 

102 
93 
63 


350 
84 
59 
391 
176 
92 
93 
75 


425 
127 

774 
375 
254 
132 
177 


1.096 
345 

'666 
480 
137 
300 


984 
195 
134 

297 
220 
58 


277 
82 
34 

247 
99 
49 
20 
45 


76 
23 

38 
21 

n 


22 

36 
17 
10 






















E°'ad''" 






















■l89 
303 
148 
431 
151 
828 
837 


98 
103 
193 

452 
452 


6 
5 
31 

50 


9 

4 
26 
38 


12 
27 
3 
25 

72 
58 


24 
35 

5t 

107 
192 


13 
15 

11 

120 
81 


9 
6 

3 

8 
61 
17 


2 

3 
45 


5 

2 
9 

5 














siSth'tt;;;. 






















67; 

329 

207 
12 


259 
115 
50 

90 

5 


■ 69 
17 
8 

2 


14 
6 

3 


24 
15 

5 


■39 

27 
19 


■ 61 
25 


■ 13 
11 

9 


7 
2 


3 
2 

2 














Pacific Island. (U. S. adn..) 




Other countrle 











36 



Belglu. .. 



Turkey (Europe and 
United Kingdom .... 
U.S.S.R. (Europe «n. 

Other Europe 



Lebanon 
PhlUppli 
Ryukyu I 



Pacific lelanda (U.I 
Other Oceania 

ether count r lea 

^/ Includcf Ponioaa. 
1,1 Includee Arab Pal< 



19,5381 2,8 
18,130 2,626 



2!o3t| 



207 
3U 
779 



J 684; l.?0?j ?.2j7 



51 154 



■ 788 9.'i69; 5.3'>6 
,5731 2,507| 1,508 



_66i|_328. 



37 



TABLE 10. IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED, BY SEX AND AGE; 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1955 - l<»h4 



Number 



nitted 



.246 



237,790 



321.625 



Under 5 years 

5 - 9 years 

10-14 years 

15 years 

16-17 years 

18-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-29 years 

30-34 years 

35-39 years 

40-44 years 

45-49 years 

50-54 years 

55-59 years 

60-64 years 

65-69 years 

70-74 years 

75-79 years 
80 years and 
Not reported 

Hales 

Under 5 years 
5-9 years 
10-14 years 
15 years 
16-17 years 
18-19 years 
20-24 years 
25-29 years 
30-34 years 
35-39 years 
40-44 years 
45-49 years 
50-54 years 
55-59 years 
60-64 years 
65-69 years 
70-74 years 
75-79 years 
80 years and 
Not reported 

Females 

Under 5 years 
5 - 9 years 
10-14 years 
15 years 
16-17 years 
18-19 years 
20-24 years 
25-29 years 
30-34 years 
35-39 years 
40-44 years 
45-49 years 
50-54 years 
55-59 years 
60-64 years 
65-69 years 
70-74 years 
75-79 years 
80 years and 
Not reported 



255,961 
203,049 
165,884 
32,378 
88,595 
150,833 
488,400 
424,534 
303,487 
203,548 
146,400 
116,549 
87,407 
61,975 
40,540 
24,966 
13,715 
6,923 
3,607 
495 

.282.284 

130,976 

102,611 

83,595 

15,839 

38,528 

52,541 

174,654 

198,116 

150,191 

102,978 

74,013 

56,935 

39,507 

26,128 

16,260 

9,946 

5,245 

2,634 

1,361 

226 



124,985 
100,438 
82,289 
16,539 
50,067 
98,292 
313,746 
226,418 
153,296 
100,570 
72,387 
59,614 
47,900 
35,847 
24,280 
15,020 
8,470 
4,289 
2,246 
269 



7,291 
12,286 
38,452 
37,546 
28,249 
16,862 
15,315 
11,431 

7,680 



),587 
3,783 
3,730 
1,303 



27,748 
24,377 
18,496 
3,808 
10,021 
15,908 
51,434 
48,635 
37,454 
22,945 
20,373 



),986 
7,625 
*,950 
M06 
3,492 
5,128 



1,335 
4,187 
8,060 
24,466 
19,921 
13,299 
7,756 
6,823 
5,303 
3,977 
2,710 
1,669 
1,053 
610 
315 



15, 



10,349 
6,641 
3,594 



6,204 
20,537 
23,783 



165.215 
13,661 
11,958 
9,173 
1,961 
5,440 
9,704 
30,897 
24,852 
17,571 
10,354 
9,062 
7,158 
5,043 
3,606 
2,161 
1,260 
703 
384 
227 



326.867 



30,716 
26,554 
19,224 
3,646 
9,668 
15,339 
51,358 
50,036 
38,464 
24,070 
18,729 
14,049 
9,675 
6,748 
3,934 
2,301 
1,206 
618 
363 



1,764 
4,247 
5,953 
20,114 
23,986 
19,637 
12,652 
9,745 
7,166 



,561 



5,421 
9,386 



11,418 
8,984 
6,883 
5,114 
3,831 
2,355 
1,409 



253.265 



23,148 
18,727 
15,447 
2,802 
7,899 
13,385 
43,035 
39,674 
27,539 
18,216 
12,492 
10,248 
7,473 
5,455 
3,521 
2,040 
1,208 
582 
286 



109,121 
11,976 
9,488 
7,694 
1,304 
3,190 
4,294 
13,782 
17,493 
12,841 



5,836 
4,545 
3,076 
2,050 
1,268 
737 
390 



9,239 
7,753 



29,253 
22,181 
14,698 
9,376 
6,656 
5,703 
4,397 
3,405 
2,253 
1,303 



22,516 
17,760 
15,786 
2,764 
7,858 
14,204 
46,118 
38,690 
27,072 
19,272 
12,152 
11,417 



4,501 
2,767 



11,511 
8,960 
7,975 
1,363 
3,237 
4,739 
15,999 
17,306 
12,487 
9,199 
5,721 
5,346 
3,784 
2,752 
1,772 
1,168 



7,811 

1,401 

4,621 

9,465 

30,119 

21,384 

14,585 

10,073 

6,431 

6,071 

4,949 

3,737 

2,729 

1,599 

872 

414 

220 

33 



.398 



271.344 



^83.763 



306.260 



24,098 
17,523 
15,386 

8,255 
14,847 
47,674 
39,543 
27,748 
19,958 
12,059 
11,310 
8,395 
6,256 
4,316 
2,752 
1,359 
680 
321 
30 

116,687 
12,299 
8,570 
7,731 
1,493 
3,565 
4,879 
15,836 
17,788 
12,919 
9.969 
5, 
5,369 
3,762 
2, 
1, 
1,187 



7,655 
1,395 
4,690 
9,968 
31,838 
21,755 
14,829 



26,204 
18,924 
16,434 
2,982 
8,452 
14,996 
47,984 
39,558 
27,274 
19,873 
12,744 
11,082 
8,611 
6,151 
4,240 
2, 
1,729 
834 



13,203 
9,604 
8,29 5 
1,446 
3,537 
5,171 
16,618 
18,349 
13,063 
9,802 
5,247 
5,326 
3,865 
2,652 
1,756 
1,218 
732 
322 



1,535 
4,915 
9,825 
31,356 
21,209 
14,211 
10,071 
6,497 
5,756 
4,746 
3,499 
2,484 
1,649 
997 



25,494 
19,075 
16,544 
3,417 
8,835 
15,363 
51,487 
42,733 
29,421 
20,973 
13,652 
10,905 
8,1 
6,600 
4,617 
2,924 
1,577 
842 



13,126 
9,735 
8,313 
1,683 
3, 
5,380 
19,541 
21,288 
15,146 
10,877 
6,854 
5,111 
3, 
2,715 
1,862 
1,151 
580 
343 



9,341 

8,231 

1,734 

4,947 

9,983 

31,946 

21,445 

14,275 

10,096 

6,798 

5,794 

4,998 

3,885 

2,755 

1,773 

997 

499 

304 

19 



TABLE lOA. IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED, BY SEX, MARITAL STATUS, AGE, AND MAJOR 
OCCUPATION GROUP: YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1960 - 1964 



Sex, marital status, 

age, and 
occupation 



■nber admitted 



Sex and marital status: 



Males 

Single .. 
Married . 
Widowed . 
Divorced 
Unknown . 



Females ... 
Single .. 
Married . 
Widowed , 
Divorced 
Unknown , 



Males per 1,000 females 

i^edian age (years): 

Both sexes 

Males 

Females 



^ajor occupation group: 

Professional, technical, and kindred workers. 

Farmers and farm managers 

Managers, officials, and proprietors, 

except farm 

Clerical, sales, and kindred workers 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers .,,,, 

Operatives and kindred workers , 

Private household workers ................... 

Service workers, except private household ... 

Farm laborers and foremen 

Laborers, except farm and mine 

Housewives, children, and others with no 
occupation 



Housewives 

Retired persons 

Students 

Children under 14 years of age 



Unknown or not reported 



271.344 



116.687 



12L. 



131.575 



139.297 



64,646 

50,055 

1,016 

897 

73 



68,253 

51,261 

984 

815 

67 

149.964 



73,264 

56,309 

1,037 

915 

50 



67,331 

73,236 

5,496 

2,598 

50 

785 



25.0 
25.9 
23.8 



21,940 
3,050 

5,309 
24,386 
19,156 
14,979 
8,173 
8,812 
3,914 
12,838 

132.716 



70,489 
71,455 
5,401 
2,565 
54 

809 



25.0 
25.8 
24.5 



21,455 
3,002 

5,363 
25,198 
17,679 
13,288 
8,811 
8,399 
4,799 
15,694 

135^704 



73,318 

70,047 

6,140 

2,626 

57 

865 



25.2 
26.0 
24.6 



23,710 
1,589 

5,554 
26,304 
17,172 
12,976 
9,690 
9,414 
10,801 
17,614 

136.752 



79,662 

57,703 

965 

912 

55 

166,963 



73,264 
51,161 



166.034 



80,747 

77,704 

5,818 

2,646 



23.7 
24.5 
23.3 



27,930 
1,776 

5,986 
28,094 
18,158 
14,286 
9,522 
9,392 
9,463 
16,062 

152.470 



80,086 

77,642 

5,584 

2,703 

19 

760 



23.4 
23.8 
23.3 



28,756 
1,732 

6,822 
30,015 
17,568 
14,243 

8,451 
10,396 

3,988 

9,127 

151.076 



62,084 

1,289 

13,888 

55,455 

10,125 



59,245 

1,722 

15,923 

58,814 

11,952 



58,153 

1,885 

19,410 

57,304 

12,187 



63,832 

1,903 

22,889 

63,846 

13,121 



62,192 

2,146 

24,226 

62,512 

10,074 





ALIENS 


ADMITTED 


ALIENS 
DEPARTEDS/ 


U. S. CITIZENS 2/ 


Pwlod 


Immi- 


Nonimmi- 
qrant J./ 


Arrived 


Departed 




2.576.226 


, ^0^593.943 










490.741 


1.495.638 




342.600 






1.376:27t 


3.988.157 








878,587 
838,172 
1,197,892 
1,218,480 
326,700 
298,826 
295,403 
110,618 
141,132 
430,001 

4.107.209 


151,713 
178,983 
229,335 
184,601 
107,544 
67,922 
67,474 
101,236 
95,889 
191,575 

1.774.881 


518;215 
615,292 
611,924 
633,805 
384,174 
240,807 
146,379 
193,268 
216,231 
428,062 

2.694.778 


269,128 
280,801 
286,604 
286,586 
239,579 
121,930 
127,420 
72,867 
%,420 
157,173 

3.522.713 


349,472 




353,890 


1913 ,, 


347,702 


1914,, , 


368,797 


1915 ,,, ,, , 


172,371 




110,733 


1917, ,,, 


126,011 


1918 

1919 , ,,,.... 


275,837 
218,929 
194,147 






3.519.519 




805,228 
309,556 
522,919 
706,896 
294,314 
304,488 
335,175 
307,255 
279,678 
241,700 

528.431 


172,935 
122,949 
150,487 
172,406 
164,121 
191,618 
202,826 
193,376 
199,649 
204,514 

1.574.071 


426,031 
345,384 
200,586 
216,745 
225,490 
227,755 
253,508 
274,356 
252,498 
272,425 

2.196.650 


222,712 
243,563 
308,471 
301,281 
339,239 
370,757 
378,520 
430,955 
449,955 
477,260 


27i;560 




309,477 
270,601 






277,850 








372,480 






429,575 
431,842 


1929 , 


1930 

1931-1940 


462,023 




97,139 
35,576 
23,068 
29,470 
34,956 
36,329 
50,244 
67,895 
82,998 
70,756 

1.035.039 


183,540 
139,295 
127,660 
134,434 
144,765 
154,570 
181,640 
184,802 
185,333 
138,032 

2.461.359 


290,916 
287,657 
243,802 
177,172 
189,050 
193,284 
224,582 
222,614 
201,409 
166,164 

2.262.293 


439,897 
339,262 
305,001 
273,257 
282,515 
318,273 
386,872 
406,999 
354,438 
258,918 

3.223.233 


380|837 
338,545 


1932..... 


1933 


1934...... 


262,091 
272,400 
311,480 
390,196 
397,875 
333,399 




1936 

1937 


1938 

1939. 




224,727 
2.880.414 


1941-1950 


1941.. ... . ..................... 


51,776 
28,781 
23,725 
28,551 
38,119 
108,721 
147,292 
170,570 
188,317 
249,187 

2.515.479 


100,008 
82,457 
81,117 
113,641 
164,247 
203,469 
366,305 
476,006 
447,272 
426,837 

7.113.023 


88,477 
74,552 
58,722 
84,409 
93,362 
204,353 
323,422 
448,218 
430,089 
456,689 

6.682.387 


175,935 
118,454 
105,729 
108,444 
175,568 
274,543 
437,690 
542,932 
620,371 
663,567 

12.531.988 


168,961 
113,216 
62,403 
63 525 






1944 


1945, , , , 


103,019 
230,578 
451,845 








1949 


552,361 
655,518 

12.306.984 


1950 


1951-1960 




2aj;7i7 

265,520 
170,434 
208,177 
237,790 
321,625 
326,867 
253,265 
260,686 
265,398 

271,344 
283,763 
306,260 
292,248 


4651106 
516,082 
485,714 
566,613 
620,946 
686,259 
758,858 
847,764 
1,024,945 
1,140,736 

1,220,315 
1,331,383 
1,507,091 
1,744,808 


472,901 
509,497 
544,502 
599,161 
665,800 
715,200 
574,608 
7: 0,428 
885,913 
1,004,377 

1,093,937 
1,158,960 
1,266,843 
1,430,736 


760,486 
807,225 
930,874 
1,021,327 
1,171,612 
1,281,110 
1,365,075 
1,469,262 
1,804,435 
1,920,582 

2,043,416 
2,199,326 
2,433,463 
2,786,907 


667,126 

814,289 

925,861 

971,025 

1,096,146 

1,272,516 

1,402,107 

1,483,915 

1,739,046 

1,934,953 

1,969,119 
2,159,857 
2,421,348 
2,709,196 




1953 


1954................ 




1956 

1957 






I960 




1962 









i/ Excludes border crossers, crewmen, Mexican agricultural laborers and aliens 

admitted on documentary waivers. 
2/ After 1956 excludes Canadian travel over land borders, 
a/ Departures of U. S. citizens first recorded in 1910. 



40 







TABLE 12. 


IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED, 
















BY STATE OF lOTENDED FUTURE 


PERMANENT RESIDENCE. 














YEARS ENDED JUNE 30 


, 1955-1954 






































1955-1964 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


1950 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 




























2.819.245 


237.790 


321.625 


325.867 


253.255 


250.686 


265.398 


27^.344 


283.763 


305.260 


292.248 




6,857 
2.317 


604 
116 


746 
160 


740 
180 


725 
103 


822 
249 


734 
218 


603 
300 


513 
348 


681 
297 






345 


Arizona 


31,200 


1,580 


2,428 


2,940 


2,658 


2,315 


3,129 


3,473 


4,019 


5,049 


3,609 


Arkansas 


3,771 


339 


469 


406 


378 


471 


380 


299 


277 


410 


340 


California 


588,179 


33,704 


50,447 


58,452 


51,201 


49.673 


61,325 


64,205 


72,575 


79,090 


57,407 




15,623 
61,346 
4,024 


979 

5,222 

281 


1.594 

7,183 

430 


1,826 

7,027 

512 


1.357 

5.940 

399 


1,737 

6,004 

429 


1.553 

5.769 

353 


1,483 

5.692 

336 


1,495 

5,978 

356 


1.792 

5,944 

416 




coZltTc:A\\y^v^v^v^y^'.'.'.'.'.'. 






512 


District of Columbia 


20,593 


1,322 


1,845 


2,010 


1,803 


2.086 


1.942 


1,993 


2,300 


2,495 


2,796 




111,976 


7,079 


10,508 


11,182 


11,396 


9,262 


10,713 


13.009 


14,009 


11,404 


13,414 




12.062 
15,264 


803 
951 


1,282 
1,087 


1,140 
1,384 


1,279 
1,407 


1,375 
1,516 


1,222 
1,519 


1,099 
1,762 


988 
2,048 


1,277 
1,757 


1,596 




1,623 




4,169 
173,385 


348 
14,785 


455 
23,832 


25.238 


423 
16,447 


441 
15,275 


464 
15,132 


379 
15,311 


374 
14,710 


429 
16,020 




Illinois 


15,634 


Indiana 


25,395 


2,093 


3,400 


3.526 


2.419 


2,949 


2,373 


2,240 


1,991 


2,053 


2,251 




10,053 
9,513 


998 
723 


1,384 
1,210 


1,255 
1,085 


962 
931 


1,003 
1,094 


1,041 
959 


898 
779 


746 
823 


849 
941 


906 




1,057 




8,081 


695 


852 


953 


764 


844 


803 


733 


549 


840 


948 


Louisiana 


16,538 


1,131 


1,541 


1,516 


1.798 


1,999 


1,443 


1,645 


1,540 


1,784 


2,041 




15,550 

26,305 
113,645 


1,297 
1 844 


1,726 

2.717 
11,742 


1,794 
3 535 


1.744 

2,464 
10,128 


1,526 
2 592 


1,553 

2,399 
11,953 


1,455 

2,336 
12,091 


1,359 
2,344 


1,487 


1,489 








8,817 


11,250 


9.855 


11.578 


13)571 


12,650 




94,077 


10,448 


14,209 


15,287 


9,727 


8,243 


8,271 


7,328 


6.371 


5,895 


7,298 




20,099 
3.962 


1,707 
359 


2,412 
446 


2,718 
357 


2,006 
394 


2,133 
481 


1,970 
421 


1,852 
350 


1.614 
347 


1,756 
433 




Mississippi 


354 


Missouri 


19,175 


1.609 


2.440 


2,424 


1,862 


2.150 


1,884 


1,737 


1,567 


1.750 


1,753 




5,170 
6,565 


524 
594 


586 
873 


777 


497 
636 


495 
644 


467 
550 


448 
537 


471 
572 


522 
585 


515 


iSr'k;:::::::::::::::::::::::::: 


597 




4,895 
8.216 


274 
626 


274 
782 


890 


311 
689 


406 
713 


489 
797 


542 
975 


711 
742 


719 
977 


783 




1,024 


r 




11.919 


16,017 


17 303 


13 420 


15.807 


13,611 


13,556 


13,357 


14 099 


14,559 












Nen York 


649,673 


55.535 


70,700 


77,'356 


59,505 


64.698 


60,134 


50,429 


62,311 


70.275 


68,529 




11,503 
3,857 


385 


1,167 
421 


1,118 
455 


1,057 
330 


1.206 
358 


1,179 
358 


1,119 
319 


1,077 
327 


1.335 
415 


1,349 
499 






77,445 


7,133 


11,267 


12,149 


8,219 


9,783 


6,829 


5,741 


5,201 


5.504 


5,619 


Oklahoma 


8,935 


647 


890 


995 


927 


941 


891 


849 


859 


964 


972 


Oregon 


16,010 


1.129 


1,527 


1.798 


1,529 


1,353 


1,715 


1,857 


1,590 


1.590 


1,822 


Pennsylvania 


89,249 


8.655 


11,518 


11.148 


9,062 


10,296 


7,933 


8,052 


7,535 


7.463 


7,487 




12.740 


1,111 


1.341 


1.158 


1,152 


1,244 


1,578 


1,403 


1.351 


1.249 


1,143 




5,533 

2,605 

8,093 

190,187 


451 

243 

664 

35 338 


625 

371 

977 

39,078 


552 
292 
788 


539 

250 
754 


580 

287 

921 

9,160 


554 

186 

803 

12,992 


533 
220 
762 


481 

219 

557 

17,345 


599 
251 
845 






286 






Taxas . . 


13,269 
















6,918 
18 835 


537 
1,343 


693 
1,835 


781 
1.946 


732 
1,815 


726 
2.012 
4,045 


780 
1 743 


639 
1 639 


577 
1 721 


782 


671 
2,504 
3,861 




•"^hington 


39,891 


3,004 


3,543 


4.678 


4,121 


3,897 


3,977 


4,144 


4.521 


West Virginia 


6,056 




827 


588 
















Wisconsin 










































































2,986 


79 


224 


165 


135 


207 


292 










Puerto Rico 


15,781 


412 


618 


615 


696 


575 


848 


1,557 


2,956 


3.303 


4,101 


Virgin Islands 


2.880 


96 


95 


151 


165 


155 


369 


450 


569 


434 


386 




11.468 


437 


845 


877 


911 


520 


1,206 


1,311 


1,601 


1,906 


1,854 










41 





















TABLE 


AND STATE OF INTEXDtD FirrUHE PERMANENT RESIDENCE. 
YEAR ENDED JtWE 30, 1964 


BIRTH 




















cou"tile. 


Ca„.da 


Me.lco 




0...,hV 


C.jb, 


Ual, 


P6la„d 


Ire- 


5-edeo 


CH^a 


Greece 


Japan 


YU90- 




U.5.S.R. 










38.074 


32.967 


29.108 


26.739 


15.80B 


13.245 


8.BB4 


6.307 


5.733 


5.009 


3.910 


3.680 


3.098 


3.006 


1.B02 


94.871 




:i:r.:::::::::::::::::::::::: 


68B 

346 

3,609 

67,407 
6!s87 

15.634 

906 

'948 
2,041 

3,143 

'364 
l,7M 

793 

68i6?9 

1.349 

499 

5,619 

618 

286 

671 
2,504 
3,861 

2,311 
1,854 


194 
-^ 

1,594 

? 
788 
324 

123 
108 

257 
2!o31 

lei 

226 
59 

756 

3,534 
115 
250 

8; 

450 

1,29'; 

32 


2.141 
17,205 

24 
80 

22 

s 

34 
123 

306 
6 

5 

; 
8,759 

70 


34 
161 

199 

43 
1,133 

123 
116 

585 

1,569 

933 

217 

55 

1,896 
'l87 

134 
39 

664 

65 

420 

91 


171 

129 

4,526 

352 
502 

1.646 

191 

366 
70 

657 
897 

79 
112 

76 

'1O6 
58 

157 

60 

265 

1,045 

26 


5.6?^ 

746 

39 

254 
36 

60 

8 

3,878 

18 
1.231 


620 

B13 
277 

58 

2 
24 

a 

1,439 

2 

126 

1 


; 

526 
462 

1 
10 

2,26t 
3 

3 


10 

3 

187 

10 

5 

836 

402 
210 

54 


29 
1,565 

156 

17 

31 

255 
85 

26 

' 20 

126 
15 

8 
21 

3 


5 
1,571 

19 

88 

?1 

163 

1,106 
20 

1« 
22 


8 

27: 
23 

10 
277 

1.306 
33 

5 

14 

27 


29 

1,208 

10 

50 

72 
71 

22 
215 
82 
15 

49 

33 


384 
11 

22 
133 

JO 

2 
3 

287 
91i 


1,096 
34 

8 
32 

22 

15 

3 

6 

16 
468 


325 

103 

25 
'! 

743 

5 
16 

6 
18 

2 
12 

2 


23- 
.9,3 

4;o9 

40 

3,84 
53 

2)9: 

33,6 

3 

1,5 
2 
3 

1.9 

l.« 

; 
1 

2,< 




j^U""^j 










„ 


























\1l''°^ii 












•=-'" 








•""" 




Massachusetts 

ll>brT%L'v^v^v^".'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 






' 


liTcTl""""::::::::::::: 
















^l'° ' 


t^ 






Rhode IsUhd 


^ 


Snn^.see"!!.;;!;!;!!;!;!;!!!!;; 


■ 








































35 1 








i/ Includes Forms.. 












4 


2 






















<i 



ailf., Anaheim 

0»kl«nd 

D.C.. Wa.hlngton 

PI... J.ck.onvlUe ... 

St. Pei^iwig'! 

C«., Atl.nt. 

III., " Chicago 

U. , New Or lean. .!!. 

Hd., Baltliure 

M.B.. Boston 

Springfield ...'. 

Detroit 

Buftsio'!!!!!!!! 

Syi-ecu.e 

Deyton ..'.'.'.'.'..'. 

Oreg. , Portland 

P*. , Philadelphia ... 

El Paso'!!!!!!!! 

Other'cltle .'..'.'.'. 

Puerto Rico !!!!!.!!!!!! 

virgin Island. 



43 



76i7-02l2 O— 64 



TABLE 13. IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 - 1964 1/ 

^rom 1820 to 1867 figures represent alien passengers arrived; 1868 to 1891 inclusive and 1895 to 
1897 inclusive, immigrant aliens arrived; 1892 to 1894 inclusive and from 1898 to present time 
immigrant aliens admitted. Date for years prior to 1906 relate to country whence alien came; 
thereafter to country of last permanent residence. Because of changes in boundaries and changes 
in lists of countries, date for certain countries are not comparable throughout^ 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria-Hungary 2/ 

Belgium 

Denmark 

France 

Germany 2/ 

(England 

Great (Scotland 

Britain (Wales 

(Not specified 3/. 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway) , 

Sweden) ^ 

Poland V 

Portugal 

Spain 

Switzerland ............... 

Turkey in Europe 

U.S.S.R. 6/ 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Japan 7/ 

Turkey in Asia 8/ 

Other Asia 

America 

Canada & Newfoundland 2/ .. 

Mexico 10/ 

West Indies 

Central America 

South America 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand 

Not specified 



1 

20 

371 

968 

1,782 

268 



3,614 
30 
49 



5 
35 
139 
31 

1 
14 



209 

1 

164 

2 

11 



1 

301 



.817 



27 

169 

8,497 

6,761 

14,055 

2,912 

170 

7,942 

20 

50,724 

409 

1,078 

91 
16 

145 

2,477 

3,226 

20 

75 

3 



10 



11.564 



2,277 

4,817 

3,834 

105 

531 



16 

33,032 



495.688 



1.597.5Q1 



2.452,660 



22 

1,063 

45,575 

152,454 

7,611 

2,667 

185 

65,347 

49 

207,381 

2,253 

1,412 

1,201 

369 

829 

2,125 

4,821 

7 

277 

40 



5,074 

539 

77,262 

434,626 

32,092 

3,712 

1,261 

229,979 

16 

780,719 

1,870 

8,251 

13,903 

105 
550 
2,209 
4,644 
59 
551 
79 



82 



62.469 



13,624 
6,599 
12,301 



41,723 
3,271 

13,528 

368 

3,579 



54 
69,911 



55 
53,144 



4,738 

3,749 

76,358 

951,667 

247,125 

38,331 

6,319 

132,199 

31 

914,119 

9,231 

10,789 

20,931 

1,164 

1,055 

9,298 

25,011 

83 

457 

5 



41.455 



41,397 
43 



_74,720. 



59,309 
3,078 

10,660 

449 

1,224 



210 
29,169 



See footnotes at end of table. 



TABLE 13. IMMIGflATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADESi 
1820 - 1964 1/ (Continued) 



All countries 



Europe 

"• Au$trla)2/ 

Hungary)-' 

Belglutn 

^ Bulgaria ii/ 

Czechoslovakia 12/ 

Denmark 

Finland 12/ 

France 

Germany 2/ 

(England 

Great (Scotland 

Britain (Wales 

(Not specified 3/ 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 4/ .................. 

Sweden 4/ .................. 

Poland 5/ 

Portugal 

Rumania 13/ 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe 

U.S.S.R. 6/ 

Yugoslavia H/ 

Other Euro(>e 



Asia 

China 

India 

Japan 7/ 

Turkey in Asia 8/ 
li Other Asia 



America 

Canada & Newfoundland 9/ 

Mexico 10/ 

West Indies 

Central America 

South America 

Other America ^4/ 



Africa 

i^ustralia & New Zealand 

Il'acific Islands 

tot specified 15/ 



2- 812-191 



72,969 
7,221 



31,771 

72,206 

718,182 

437,706 

87,564 

6,631 

16,142 

210 

436,871 

55,759 

16,541 

95,323 

115,922 

12,970 

14,082 

11 

5,266 

28,293 

337 

39,284 

1,001 



123.823 



123,201 
163 
149 
67 
243 



404.044 



383,640 

5,162 

13,957 

157 

1,128 



358 
9,886 
1,028 

790 



353,719 
20.177 



88,132 

50,464 

1,452,970 

644,680 

149,869 

12,640 

168 

2,308 

655,482 

307,309 

53,701 

176,586 

391,776 

51,806 

16,978 

6,348 

4,419 

81,988 

1,562 

213,282 



682 



68.380 



61,711 
269 
2,270 
2,220 
1,910 



426.967 



393,304 

1,913 

29,042 

404 

2,304 



857 
7,017 
5,557 

789 



3.687.564 



18,167 
160 

50,231 

30,770 

505,152 

216,726 

44,188 

10,557 

67 

15,979 

388,416 

651,893 

26,758 

95,015 

226,266 

96,720 

27,508 

12,750 

8,731 

31,179 

3,626 

505,290 

122 



14,799 
68 
25,942 
26,799 
3,628 



38.972 



3,311 

971 

33,066 

549 

1,075 



350 
2,740 
1,225 
14,063 



'».735.8^ 



.136.016 



4-3"^6.564 



41,635 
39,280 

65,285 

73,379 
341,498 
388,017 
120,469 

17,464 

167,519 
339,065 
2,045,877 
48,262 
190,505 
249,534 

69,149 
53,008 
27,935 
34,922 
79,976 
1,597,306 

665 



(453,649 

(442,693 

33,746 

22,533 

3,426 

41,983 

756 

61,897 

143,945 

249,944 

78,357 

13,107 

184,201 

146,181 

1,109,524 

43,718 

66,395 

95,074 

4,813 

89,732 

13,311 

68,611 

23,091 

54,677 

921,201 

sliu 



243.567 



192.559 



20,605 
4,713 
129,797 
77,393 
11,059 



21,278 
2,082 
83,837 
79,389 
5,973 



361.888 



179,226 
49,642 

107,548 
8,192 
17,280 



1.143.671 



742,185 
219,004 
123,424 
17,159 
41,899 



7,368 
11,975 

1,049 
33,523 



8,443 
12,348 
1,079 
1,147 



Jee footnotes at end of table. 



TABLE 13. IMMIGRATION BY C»UNTRY, FOR DECADESj 
1820 - 1964 1/ (Continued) 



All countries 528.431 

Europe 

Albania VlJ 

Austria 2/ 

Hungary 2/ 

Belgium 

Bulgaria U/ 

Czechoslovakia 12/ 

Oenmark .................... 

Estonia 12/ 

Finland VZj 

France 

Germany 2/ 

(England 

Great (Scotland 

Britain (Wales 

(Not specified 3/. 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 12/ o 

Lithuania 12/ 

Luxembourg 16/ 

Netherlands ................ 

Norway 4/ 

Poland 5/ 

Portugal 

Rumania 13/ 

Spain 

Sweden 4/ .................. 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe 

U.S.S.R. 6/ 

Yugoslavia U/ 

Other Europe 

Aala 17/ 

China 18/ 

India 

Japan 7/ 

Turkey in Asia 8/ 

Other Asia 

See footnotes at end of table. 



4,817 

938 

14,393 

2,559 

506 

2,146 

12,623 

114,058 

21,756 

6,887 

735 

9,119 
13,167 
68,028 
1,192 
2,201 
565 
7,150 
4,740 
17,026 
3,329 
3,871 
3,258 
3,960 
5,512 
737 
1,356 
5,835 
2,361 



15.344 



328 
7,644 



621.704 



85 

24,860 

3,469 

12,189 

375 

8,347 

5,393 

212 

2,503 

38,809 

226,578 

112,252 

16,131 

3,209 

8,973 

26,967 

57,661 

361 

683 

820 

14,860 

10,100 

7,571 

7,423 

1,076 

2,898 

10,665 

10,547 

580 

548 

1,576 

3,983 



31.780 



16,709 

1,761 

1,555 

218 

11,537 



59 

67,106) 

36,637) 

18,575 

104 

918 

10,984 

185 

4,925 

51,121 

477,765 

156,171 

32,854 

2,589 

3,884 

47,608 

57,332 

185,491 

352 

242 

684 

52,277 

22,935 

9,985 

19, 

1,039 

7,894 

21,697 

17,675 

2,653 

584 

8,225 

8,155 



147.453 



9,657 
1,973 
46,250 



9 

1,114) 

397) 

1,131 

34 

212 

902 

43 

474 

4,403 

25,815 

14,936 

3,587 

196 

124 

3,124 

5,738 

18,956 

84 

125 

42 

7,362 

2,204 

6,254 

3,832 

176 

1,737 

1,670 

1,697 

410 

270 

1,188 

286 



19.495 



900 

292 

4,490 

296 

13,517 



12 
944) 
400) 
959 

37 



505 

3,931 

21,477 

14,970 

2,915 

181 

130 

4,408 

5,118 

20,119 

52 

52 

56 

6,378 

1,839 

5,660 

3,622 

135 

3,353 

1,760 

1,793 

581 

130 

1,086 

312 



20.2^9 



9 

1,526) 

635) 

922 

36 

111 

1,070 

8 

358 

4,926 

24,727 

18,314 

4.139 

255 

159 

4,744 

5,746 

16,175 

48 

58 



1,934 

6,785 

2,911 

126 

2,969 

2,056 

1,952 

834 

119 

972 

304 



108.215 35 



Total 
145 yean 
1820-196- 



23.242 



,605 

965 

4,147 

307 

16,218 



1,311) 

649) 

1,296 

261 

190 

970 

15 

495 

5,598 

24,494 

21.067 

4,408 

283 

139 

3,998 

6,055 

12,769 

40 

50 

68 

2,039 

2,145 

7,097 

2,006 

287 

4,069 

2,196 

2,119 

506 

163 

1,098 

326 



2Ll272 



3,774 

331 

14,002 



1-182-04 



'M' Countries 



Africa 

JOllAustralia & New Zealand 

aclfic Islands 17/ 

SSlNot specified 15/ 



TABLE 13. IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 - 1964 1/ (Continued) 



America 

Canada & Newfoundland 9/ .. 

Mexico 10/ 

West Indies 

Central America 

South America 

Other America 14/ 



160.037 



108,527 
22,319 
15,502 
5,861 
7,803 
25 



1,750 
2,231 

780 



354.804 



171,718 
60,589 
49,725 
21,665 
21,831 
29,276 



7,367 

13,805 

5,437 

142 



996.944 



377,952 
299,811 
123,091 
44,751 
91,628 
59,711 



14,092 
11,506 



139.580 



47,470 
41 ,476 
20,520 

7,272 
19,095 

3,747 



1,851 

1,556 

325 

5 



1^5 , 871 



,272 
55,805 
20,917 

9,639 
22,550 

2,688 



169.966 



50,509 
55,986 
22,951 
10,706 
27,759 
2,055 



1,982 

1,642 

136 

226 



158.644 



51,11. 
34,448 
24,067 
11,829 
34,891 
2,295 



Total 
145 years 
1820-1964 

6.377.275 



3,748,763 
,326.370 
708,242 
155,016 
339,056 
99,828 



55,201 
86,235 
21,973 
267,421 



Data for fiscal years ended June 30, except 1820 to 1831 inclusive and 1844 to 1849 inclusive fiscal 

years ended Sept, 30) 1833 to 1842 inclusive and 1851 to 1867 inclusive years ended Dec. 31 i 

1832 covers 15 months ended Dec, 31; 1843 nine month ended Sept. 30) 1850 fifteen months ended 

Dec. 31) and 1868 six months ended June 30. 
Date for Austria -Hungary were not reported until 1861. Austria and Hungary have been recorded 

separately since 1905. In the years 1938 to 1945 inclusive Austria was included with Germany. 
United Kingdom not specified. In the years 1901 to 1951, included In other Europe. 
From 1820 to 1868 the figures for Norway and Sweden were combined. 
Poland was recorded as a separate country from 1820 to 1898 and since 1920. Between 1899 and 1919 

Poland was Included with Austria-Hungary, Germany, and Russia. 
Since 1931 the Russian Empire has been broken down into European U.S.S.R. anu Siberia or Asiatic 

U.S.S.R. 
No record of immigration from Japan until 1861. 
No record of immigration from Turkey in Asia until 1869. 
Prior to 1920 Canada and Newfoundland were recorded as British North America. From 1820 to 1898 the 

figures include all British North American possessions. 
No record of Immigration from Mexico from 1886 to 1893. 
Bulgaria, Serbia, and Montenegro were first reported In 1899. Bulgaria has been reported separately 

since 1920 and in 1920 also a separate enumeration was made for the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and 

Slovenes. Since 1922 the Serb, Croat, and Slovene Kingdom has been recorded as Yugoslavia, 
Countries added to the list since the beginning of World War I are theretofore Included with the 

countries to which they belonged. Figures are available since 1920 for Czechoslovakia and Finland 

and since 1924 for Albania, Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. 
No record of immigration from Rumania until 1880. 
Included with countries not specified prior to 1925, 
The figure 33,523 in column headed 1901-1910, includes 32,897 persons returning in 1906 to their 

homes in the United States, 
Figures for Luxembourg are available since 1925. 
Beginning with the year 1952, Asia includes Philippines. From 1934 to 1951 the Philippines were 

included in the Pacific Islands. Prior to 1934 the Philippines were recorded In separate tables 

as Insular travel. 
Beginning in 1957 China includes Formosa, 



47 



Germany 



Nether Ian 
Poland .. 



Turkey (Europe and ABla) 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Ael 



Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Syrian Arab Republic 
Other Asia 



ther Central ; 



4,180 
45,230 
4,952 
8,705 
9,124 
19,061 
12,416 
2,533 
11,225 
1,537 
2,573 
1,009 
2, 

1,800 

771 

27,570 

91842 



■ 790 



2,472 
2,060 



1,983 
8,098 
3,730 



Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Other South America 



Algeria 

South Af 

United A 
Other Af 



New Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U. 
Other Oceania 



Republic (Egypt) 



f^°3 






iaife . 




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a» . 


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aS.- 








r.', 1^ 




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<rc»>n(ii^-<(r~o^invO r- 
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1^ 1 1 CM 


CM 1 


t-l 


3 






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m 1 


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CM n in 


1 1 CM f^ 


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< 


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ii 





TABLE 14B. HONG KONG CHINESE PAROLED, BY ShX, MARITAL STATUS, AGE, 
AND MAJOR OCCUPATION GROUP: JUNE 4, 1962 - JUNE 30, 1964 



Sex, marital status, 

age, and 
occupation 



Number admitted 

Sex: 

Males 

Females 

Marital status: 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Age: 

Under 5 years 

5 - 9 years 

10 - 19 years 

20 - 29 years 

30 - 39 years 

AO - 49 years 

50 - 59 years 

60 - 69 years 

70 - 79 years 

80 years and over 

Not reported 

Major occupation group: 

Professional, technical, and kindred workers 

Farmers and farm managers 

Managers, officials, and proprietors, except farm .. 

Clerical, sales, and kindred workers 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers 

Operatives and kindred workers 

Private household workers 

Service workers, except private household 

Farm laborers and foremen 

Laborers, except farm and mine 

Housewives, children, and others with no occupation 

Housewives 

Retired persons 

Students 

Children under 14 years of age 

Unknown or not reported 



60 



5 

i 

a • 

5° 






JO UMOUHUfl 

a&e }0 

SJeeX fl 

japun uajpTTMD 



suosjsd 
paj^ea 

saA^MBsnoH 

au^ui pue 

•sJaJoqeT 



pjoqasnoq 

aiBA^jd idaox 

'SJa^lJOM eo^Aja 

sje^jOM 

p^oqasnot) 

etjEA^Jd 

SJa)(JOM 
pajpu;^ pue 
98At:»ejado 

tJeJiJOM pajpuf)) 

pus 'uauiejoj 

•uaujs^jejn 



sjoia^jdojd 

pueHieTOT^jo 

*sja6euew 

tJa6eueiii uue^ 
pue sjaiuej 

»ja)(jOM pajpu^n 
pue 'leoTutjDa^ 
'leuo^ssajojj 



12 



SS 



g:2S 



c c g 



a 2:i 



?8 



00 -< 00 -H -. 



g;^; 



5 "' 
11 



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5:: 



I" 



;sl6 8^1 i^5 UM^^ ^6 6 5 I"' 



51 




52 



/Aliens admitted under See. 101(a)(l5)(B) of the Iimlgratlon and Nationality ActjJ 



Country or region 


1955-1964 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1954 




•?. 579.329 


401.090 


471.969 


ir.lio 


546.004 


689.416 


779.205 


858.472 


928.021 


1.067.444 






3.515.035 


171.600 






266.545 


329.067 


388.962 


423.713 


448.992 


485,958 




Austria 

Belgium 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Finland 


63,651 
24,815 
89,591 
32,401 

271,233 

661,647 
65,955 
67,387 
67,762 

364,591 

240,072 
54.226 

102,859 
22,894 
31,248 

106,962 
95,960 

112,544 
26,130 

812,010 
33,085 
42,029 
44,089 


3,556 
3,516 
2,636 
4,280 
1,242 

12,646 

21,752 
2,587 
3,218 
3,147 

17,589 
9,919 
3,256 
9,145 
633 
2,797 
7,700 
4,819 
5,688 
1,735 

41,288 
2,747 

4! 429 


4,805 
3,644 
2,671 
5,198 
1,605 
15,142 
32,623 
2,927 

4|l58 
23,804 
13,229 
4,286 
9,145 
828 
2,900 
7,929 
5,033 
6,606 
1,893 
45,325 
2,815 
1,844 
4,960 


6,702 
4,366 
2,576 
6,262 
2,115 
19,429 
43,223 
3,750 
3,154 
4,739 
29,f<)9 
16,708 
4,576 
9,852 
1,050 
3,232 
8,753 
7,035 
7,676 
2,100 
48,905 
3,053 
2,788 
4,958 


7 

2 
20 

5 
20 

2 
8 

8 
2 
56 

3 


249 
762 
775 
122 
027 
175 
189 
213 
984 
396 
837 
157 
843 

453 
515 
998 
223 
855 
567 
408 
782 
271 
146 

376 


1:^5 

5,693 
2,136 
9,383 
2,540 

22,801 

66,152 
6,222 
5,126 
7,392 

33,065 

24,119 
5,298 
9,877 
1,762 
2,698 

10,623 
9,284 

10,794 
2,790 

71,100 
3,140 
3,770 
4,367 


9,643 
7,138 
2,245 

11,061 
4,079 

26,269 

7:655 
8,837 
8,698 
40,535 
28,908 
5,945 
9,507 
2,259 
2,829 
11,646 
10,043 
12,318 
3,026 
83,228 
3,642 
4,793 
4,514 

35.582 


9,568 
7,528 
2,132 
11,591 
4,681 
29,135 
84,662 
8,758 
12,180 
9,280 
44,491 
30,161 
6,234 
10,206 
2,530 
3,097 
11,233 
11,230 
13,303 
2,320 
95,665 
3,745 
5,692 
4,191 

45.744 


9,761 
8,253 
2,362 
11,364 
4,571 
36,104 
86,545 
9,507 
10,816 
8,319 
44,833 
31,432 
5,248 
11,031 
3,143 
3,254 
11,359 
11,392 
15,072 
3,280 
106,284 
3,553 
5,247 
3,932 

52.098 


9,696 
8.841 

■s 

42,014 
94,691 
9,809 
8,384 
7,138 
48,501 
32,185 

11:539 
4,249 
3,663 
12,369 
14,216 
15,545 
3,151 
120,634 
3,693 
5,253 
4,095 


11,068 
9,900 
3,859 

11,442 
4,757 

47,518 


V^'"" 


102,666 


Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland ^..^ 

Italy 

Nomay 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 


10,437 
9,307 
9,485 

53,327 

33,244 
7,232 

12,959 
4,877 
4,163 

16,342 


|P^' 






15,687 


Turkey (Europe and Asia) 


3,268 


U.S.S.R. (Europe a^ Asia) 


3,816 
6,196 


TV'"'?*'' 


4,497 




78.213 


China i/ 

Hong Kong 

Indonesia!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!.!!.. 


33,023 
7,537 
31,013 
11,690 
11,518 
5,254 
34,550 
131,854 
5,489 
4,897 
18,241 
42,168 
1,288 

22! 124 


1,284 
161 

1,402 
560 
300 
306 
927 

2,902 
407 
132 

'.,954 

39 

616 

1,013 


1,550 

208 

1,532 

643 

483 

357 

1,315 

3,899 

405 

158 

1,148 

1,938 

36 

1,129 


2,013 

230 

1,738 

881 

648 

465 

1,728 

5,431 

408 

168 

1,195 

2,486 

530 
1,425 


2 


623 
362 
803 
949 


3,064 

2,451 

1,213 

936 

397 

2,615 

'455 
284 

2;838 
103 

1,728 


3,416 

651 

3,317 

1,206 

1,167 

564 

3,648 

12,329 

524 

338 

2,023 

3,772 

112 

553 

2,052 


3,993 

978 

4,112 

1,343 

1,214 

646 

4,217 

18,157 

660 

589 

4:391 
140 
633 

2,579 


4,653 

1,360 

4,552 

1,493 

1,238 

627 

4,971 

19,745 

689 

783 

2,242 

5,758 

237 

727 

3,023 


4,883 

1,490 

4,501 

1,534 

2,3)0 

631 

5,765 

22,743 

592 

964 

2,599 

7,410 

185 

888 

3,445 


5,544 
1,604 
5,505 
1,868 




343 
2,297 

'439 

219 

1,346 

2,632 

90 

1,519 


918 


}'"'" 


7.067 




33,479 


Jordan 2/ 


Korea 


1,262 




8,989 


Ryukyu Islands 

Syrian Arab Republic 


305 
1,080 






Canada 


183,943 
1,442,077 

365,507 

133,004 
25,146 
74,588 

344,213 
29,595 
37,951 
62,333 
21,978 
26,163 
32,097 
8,024 
27,721 

614.345 


10,330 
64,658 
48 513 

l^^ 
2,943 
20,038 
1,691 
3,015 
4,134 
1,341 
1,904 
1,571 
262 
2,401 

34.742 


13,895 
85,125 
52,842 
2,621 
2,148 
3,448 
20,308 
1,945 
2,953 
5,057 
1,472 
1,832 
2,233 
285 
2,468 

34.903 


13,194 
95,569 
55,755 
3,092 
1,922 
3,905 
20,986 
1,917 
3,117 
5,882 
1,582 
1,684 
2,524 
301 
2,623 

40.405 


15,728 
110,432 

61,216 
3,252 
1,992 
3,976 

23,455 
2,206 
3,000 
5,971 
1,875 
2,095 
2,244 
397 
2,627 

47.651 


17,024 
123,223 

56,555 
3,409 
2,412 
5,206 

27,928 
2,670 
3,211 
6,194 
2,024 
2,148 
2,565 
534 
2,903 

52.281 


18,225 
133,845 

43,123 
2,820 
2,568 
6,941 

33,746 
2,884 
3,360 
7,023 
1,969 
2,245 
2,953 
583 
2,817 

52.786 


18,114 
167,052 

30,633 
6,940 
2,314 
7,841 

40,491 
2,347 
3,297 
5,543 
1.845 
1,948 
3,125 
518 
2,740 

52.576 


20,901 
185,892 

10,681 

13,487 
2,832 
9,705 

44,763 
2,995 
3,977 
6,590 
2,301 
2,585 
3,586 
1,575 
2,923 

76.464 


25,208 

217,569 

3,276 

45,584 
2,799 

12,895 

50,506 
4,606 
5,556 
6,884 
3,370 
4,149 
5,716 
1,801 
2,779 

89.763 


31.324 




3,803 


DomlnicanReDublic 




Haiti 

Jamaica 

Other West Indies 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Quatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 


4,399 
16,829 
61,992 
6,334 
6,465 
9,055 
4,199 
5,473 


Other Central America 

Other North America 

South America 


1,768 
3,440 

112.775 


Argentina 

Braiil 

Chile 

Colorable . 


96,577 
72,739 
42,040 

125,056 
27,883 
59,155 

153,970 
36,926 

65.592 


5,728 
3,297 
1,687 
9,778 
1,524 
2,354 
8,718 
1,656 

2.973 


2)113 
7,173 
1,615 
2,656 
10,707 
1,801 

3.046 


«,098 
8,001 
2,931 
6,076 
1,587 
3,118 
10,390 
2,204 

3.658 


6,847 
7,546 
3,595 
8,125 
1,851 
3,350 
13,883 
2,444 

4.487 


7,758 
5,465 
3,997 
8,510 
2,414 

17)579 
2,910 

5.156 


9:492 
6,565 
5,197 

11,494 
2,717 
4,279 

19,449 
3,593 


13,724 
7,995 
4,457 
9,279 
2,197 
4,523 

16,551 
3,850 


15:548 
8,455 
5,760 

13,826 
3,086 
8,514 

15,430 
5,445 


11,510 
10,575 

5,048 
20,801 

4,735 
11,795 
19,174 

5,025 


14:7M 
10,606 

7,255 
29,994 

6,147 
14,918 
22,089 


Ecuador 














*.^9 
6,051 
1,548 
20,956 
2,066 
17,509 
12,513 


142 

1,124 

817 
549 


^■m7 
184 

38 
842 

75 
883 
817 


''30i 
227 

1,040 
104 
997 
915 


24a 
381 

1,536 

113 

1,141 

1,009 


'ill 

476 

91 

1,839 

181 
1,288 

840 


573 

638 

146 

2,277 

201 

1,729 

1,035 


582 
845 
153 

= 'S 
2,162 
1,176 


■■ 6M 

944 

241 

2,610 

297 

2,476 

1,850 


- -'"■'697 

980 

288 

3,126 

392 

2,746 

1,937 


911 
1,234 

408 
3,898 

401 
3,370 
2,384 


Morocco 

Nigeria 






United Arab Republic (Egypt).... 
Other Africa 


Oceanl 




137,474 
42,410 
11,467 
3,917 

6,407 


6,332 

1,853 

493 

187 

2.713 


7,403 

2,006 

483 

163 

1,217 


8:935 

2,379 

700 

288 

1,415 


10,922 

3,073 

750 

219 

514 


12:547 

3,589 

654 

253 

178 


320 
103 


15,888 

^•oi2 
875 

414 
71 


18,327 

5,192 

1,361 

593 

40 


19:366 

6,251 

2.470 

640 

81 


22;090 
7.036 

7S 


Nn. Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U.S. ada.) 

Other Oceania 

Other ceuntrles 




2/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



























53 



ITTEU, BY CLASSES UNDER THE [MM1C«ATIUN I 



'-jw.r'- 




41 


! s i 

m 


lii 


II 


I2 


J 


Hi 


n 

II 




if 

Vd 
III 


n 


if 


ill 


|£ 




i.7W.ao« 


3'..6W 


144,680 


1.105.268 


119.360 


6.912 


44.952 


3.486 


12,875 


60.470 


2.654 


33.171 


8.875 


165.429 


1.832 


Euro. 


































138.953 


186 


25.875 


88 ! 399 

2^854 
52.338 


5;2'7 
9.398 


3.539 


94 
424 

11.855 


935 


111 

'56I 
1.786 


64 

1.506 
1.848 


53 

355 


1,095 
10.931 


2.707 


1:536 

1.651 
502 

27.577 
8.382 












"-""."k 


164 


c":::,::;::::::::;;::::::::::; 


IT. 














Norxnv 


T, 


fo't-B-l 


" 










s'lt"" id 




J"u" !cl"T' "' """' 


■ 88 


U.S.S.R. .E„rop..„d A.I.I 












'^I'—,-'' 


31735 
10.067 

1.67'8 
628.528 


100 

2.678 
6.76(. 


254 

no 

89? 
15.353 


452.064 


385 
658 

3.132 
31.377 


30 

64 


1,540 
687 

21,128 


1.338 


27 
1,780 


13 

12 
51.775 


26 
350 


2.029 
349 


2 59 
253 

453 

67 
275 

15 
850 


42.475 


' 


















i:;::\::::;;;:::;:;::::::::;::: 


; 


Kjj^^^ ■' 












syl'ni;!^;^;;-:::::;::::: 




NoVth ».„ic. 


50 




9',4(.8 
36!85! 


86 
208 


l:Z 


252!694 


6,643 


!j 


8,998 


- 
,5 


-^ifJ 


106 






\l 














Doa.>„.c,„ «,p„bl.c 








Co'" kI" '""" 




El Solvodor 








>"->'"" 


) 






Other Central toerlc. 


' 




5 




19 [269 


'■358 


339 

728 


2a;997 


894 
1.682 


27 
30 




"S 


130 




I 
3I 


-^ 


-S55- 
184 


l!590 
















Ej^,j„^ 
















^f,,^. 






6;692 


837 


594 


■792 
1,082 

■330 
2,692 


■55 

1 


2 


i 




50 


6 
70 


6 


102 
346 


\i 


15 
















Tunisia 






■' 


Uth.r countrl. 








6!o38 
"769 


''m 


'- 


1 


19 


'"i 


'j 


[ 


101 


89 


iii 





54 



■n.ul.r 


travellers 


and returning 


resident. 


studen 


. and 


other. 


enter 


ng w,t 


ouJ ,locu.e„tT7 










IT".. 


fi 


jii 




u 


II 

11 


5 

1 


ii 


u 

U 


,P 


lii 


ii 




lis 


s? 




1.7«.TO» 


J4^V. 


14...6H0 










3.^86 






























,0„ 


















nislB 


359 


'362 

5)576 

1.'270 

378 


51521 

50)277 
4)108 

14)534 
4.599 

109)428 


1.723 
270 

'566 
15.516 


't 


7; 

66 

49 




1.000 

1,073 
538 


it 

266 

"159 

8^1 


14 
12 






204 
38 








Czecho.lov.Vl 


- 






P " 


234 






















lletherlands 






34 


















S.eden 






, 


Turkey <6,rop. .nd *...) 


, ivj n';; 


190 


U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) 


Wo 


5^ 




Oth.r Europa 






U!l30 
45. 781 

10.437 


2.654 


18!796 


844 

10.225 
13.995 

876 

6.609 

300 
2.739 


734 

2.997 
19 3 


245 

- 
69 


1.674 

552 
1.561 

'2.716 


65 
1.508 


157 
53 

1.969 


15 

46 




■572 


464 

2^ 
...04 

272 
889 


161.102 




J J- 








l"""""'* - 


- 














J '■'" •;; 


' 2 i "n8 






380 


95 

2,899 
3.861 




Lebanon 


















79 




30o!u7 

(.65 

53.92S 

2;372 


1.6(13 

«9 
120 

23 


' 35 


48.772 

67)066 

6)508 
9.377 
4,080 
5.276 
5.404 


10.169 

430 
458 
181 


i 

- 
2 


1.683 

543 
371 

77: 


1.224 

15 
33 

3 


288 

127 
102 

99 


l)04B 

6,738 
16,908 


56 


106 




47 6 
40 

'3 




"««"=■> 




Dominican Republic 








cLtl Rica .".."'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 


! 




3 
3 

b' 10 
















Other Central taarUa 


,1 




.. 




20.254 
l/.(52 

10;i52 


1.035 
■350 


'soo 


3l)l96 


371 

3)508 
1,099 

421 


] 


131 
1.030 

47C 
1.260 


235 


352 
996 








I 




Argentina 


1 016i 260 






2.753 


100 
39; 














27 
101 


12 














, 


*^'"" 


4!'!50 




1.360 

844 


2.057 


1S6 


] 






36 






22; 
1.558 


121 








I 










^out ^Africa 




United Arab tapublu (Egypt) .. 


i 








lo'.55') 

2!o08 

56 


1.20R 


235 
62 


33 


2)088 
605 


^ 


231 




33 






98 












Pacific Islands (U.S. .d». ) ... 










1 



Port 


number 


Temporary 

visitors for 

business 


Temporary 

visitors for 

pleasure 


Other 
noniinmigrants 





1.744.300 


144.680 




494,860 


P 








344.995 


Baltimore, (« 


11671 
13,007 

1,216 
28,650 

2! 075 

6,273 
181,879 

3,051 
677,533 

1,549 

2,497 
13,583 
78,079 

5,433 
10,527 

1,651 


2,207 
18 

2,959 
22 
66 

6,336 

120 

88,655 

263 

115 

2,805 

166 


3,226 

330 

16,262 

1,363 

974 

2,431 

133,073 

456 

351,731 

819 

1,110 

9,794 

53,299 

2,470 

1,825 

926 


611 
7.654 


Charleston, S. C 

Charlotte Amalie, V. I 

Chrlstiansted, V. I 

Cruz Bay, V. I 

Frederlksted, V. 1 


9,429 
305 
1,035 
3,782 
42,469 


Newark, N. J 


2.475 

237,147 

690 








3,679 


San Juan, P. R 

■Jashington, b. C 


21,975 
2,535 
8,536 


0th* ''Atl ^fi°*'' ^ 


681 






Houston, Tex 

New Orleans, La 

San Antonio, Tex 

Tampa, Fla 

Other Gulf 


9,021 
17,607 
16,808 

1,654 
670 

173.905 


459 

25 
13 

22.647 


6,130 
12,493 
13,166 

1,462 
525 

91.034 


4,582 

2,983 

167 

132 

65.224 


Agana, Guam 

Honolulu, Hawai i 


6,631 
88,009 
59,419 

4,294 
10,079 
10,064 


429 
15,234 
3,003 

2,099 
1,909 

15 


3,181 
40,739 
33,811 

5^171 

4,674 

247 

1.495 


3.021 
31,986 
22,605 




1,075 


aan Diego, Calif.... 




ban Francisco, Calit 






147 






Anchorage 


-■ 8)660 
78 


2;l27 


1,436 
59 


5.097 
15 








15:l97 
35,813 

2,738 
25,162 
30,373 

1,572 

1,340 
30,278 

6,521 

3^355 
5,831 
6,832 
1,809 
21,986 
1,262 
2,809 
2,200 
7,846 
7,592 
3,053 
2,422 
1,572 

4|a25 
1,720 
20,107 

222.904 


345 

26 

204 

4,883 

1,531 

3 

81 
5 

24 

243 

9 

16 

163 
145 
47 
11 

5 

11 
4.283 


13,434 

31,097 

1,576 

23,235 

15,074 

861 

43 

23,490 

166 

6,052 

325 

5,530 

260 

20|981 
726 
1,731 
1,342 
6,135 
5,858 
2,343 
1,931 
1,441 
654 
4,008 

I1I6O3 


1,718 


Buffalo, N. Y 

Calais, Ke 

Champlain, N. Y 


4,260 
1,136 

1,723 
10.416 










Detroit, Mich 

Fort Kent, Me 

Highgate Springs, Vt 

Jackman, 1-^ 

Lewiston, N. Y 


5,257 
6,352 

831 
2,969 

220 


l/assena, N. Y 

Niagara Falls, H. Y 


97 

757 






H^^'h '"""h "■'■ 

goensburg, . i 


342 






St"' Albans, \lt/..^y^........ ............. 

Sault Ste. .Vjrie, .;ich 


1,589 
658 
480 


s"eetcira''s I'ont 






773 


Trout iliver, 11. Y 


156 




9.458 




12,396 
22,384 

9!604 
28,513 
5,627 
3,096 
49,985 
13,770 

1I236 
55,096 
1,045 
1,243 
1,518 

61 


409 
222 

37 
1,791 

195 
604 

156 
11 
312 

37 


11,378 
21,671 
2,595 
9,159 
24,129 
5,446 
7,687 
47,903 
12,658 
8,587 
1,249 
53,591 
1,036 
801 
1,273 

21 


609 




491 




468 




2,593 








Laredo, Tex 


1,478 
947 


Roma!'?;x!'!!:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 


302 








1,193 


Tecate, Calif 






422 











^ 


ABLE 17B. lEMTORARY VISITORS AWmED *I AIRPORTS 
RESIDENCE. VEAR ENDED JUNE 

■Aliens Admitted und.r S.c. 101 (.)(15)(B) of the I 


0, 1964 














TOTAL 


1' 


si 


ji:- 


ii 


s 




9 


^l' 


S . 


ii 


ill 


1 




# 


H 


All countrl.l 


792. M4 


39l.?96 


138.370 


55.441 


49.174 








12.252 


7.481 


6.199 


^.242 


Sum 


6.098 


5.110 


39 . 16,1 






































6)209 
5. "670 
33.'052 
2IB82 


5;i69 

2)369 
24.433 
37,734 


547 
530 

3.406 
20 


731 
252 

5 


71 






55 

5 

3 


19 
169 

108 

3 

30 


'i 


121 

3 

33 

154 
13 
845 


30 

5 

34 

15 

33 


48 

72 
104 

lib! 




276 




;-t»j 










f"— 


'jo* 






■l26| 






337 
'439 




7.303 ! 6.<.<,3 
19.71.5 15.076 

2.012 1.334 


.\i\ .:; 


807 
"2 

339 

30 
3.570 


] 

37 

lol 

; 










'i 

759 
57 

3 


291 


390 
164 






:::?:'■:■;:••■:•;••■■;;;•;■;; 


492 




6.632 




140 
401 
346 

8.737 


''s""'R!'ilS"p.„i'A...;';;:::::::: 


S!:;'e;:„:': :::: 










?[■'-::--;-:;;--; 


I'.mi 

l.OOi 

3.002 


2.210 
1)357 






17.021 
'l90 


20 

1.635 
11 

iS 


37 




23 
131 

8.845 


27 
4.774 




1.451 
237 

2 
12! 

w 


4.751 


171 
35 
17 

1,364 

1 




lOI 
132 


Itli':'l:- 


69 
48 

183 

57 


llv„V™''l.l.nd. 




5rn.':l;ir«U;ic- :::::::;:::::::: 


16 




11.151 




«!ooi 

531379 
5)530 


10.867 
16)305 

70 


1)027 

2)232 

2)057 
2.520 
4.118 
1.245 
99 


'(.06 

53 

186 
13 

5.720 


19 
32 


' 25 

24 
57 

584 
1,140 

938 

■340 
56 

40 

4.954 


1.160 
5.582 

3 
30 

43 


5 

37 
2! 
105 

453 


' 15 
15 

88 

8 

3 32 

324 
1.719 


33 

45 


3 

5.946 


115 

5 

104 


3.464 

5 

373 


130 


3,398 
151 








c:br. ::;;::;::;:::;:::::■■:;;::::;: 


■ , 


Cn.c.n ..public .:...:; 








:r:...-.„....-:;::::::;::::.::::: 




w-==^- 




o^:r.rc,„»., >-.,.. :::::;:;;::;;:; 


ii 


So th *„,lo 


1.049 




16)673 


8.678 
4.175 


2)226 

«)271 
1.823 


526 

558 

57 
143 

3.510 


33 
26 


7*5 

546 




50 








5 




34 

17 

27 

5 






















~..=::;;:;:;::;ii::;: 


199 
150 
83 


''Mgtri.':':::;:::;'';::::;:::'':' :: 


72<, 


2.675 


■ "; 


5 
















2 




2 
13 






M.r'I„ ;:.:...:: 












j;w::i:„.::; 


5 


lion 


l)652 

170 








604 








: 


2 


" 




536 






S:b:t'o.l:r---:'.:;::::::; 


















57 

























/aIIius aitolttad tiaOar 


Sec. 101 (a> (15) <» of the 


.Igratlo. a. 


d Natio 


aallt 


'.^W 


J 




























c 


































' 




















•S 








: 










i ■ 


I 


Co.,rt,v of U.t P.™.r.« ll..ld.nc. 


TITAL 


I-' 




|i 


„ f . 


:^ 


■ . 


i- 


5 j 


L 


u 


ii 


1 . 


5 = 






r' 


U 


»>£ 


if5 


a * 


Ji3 


1 


li 


s 


ii 


li 


J" 


i 

s 


All cou«r... 


^O.Z'.l 


49.100 


17.738 


6-849 


4.599 


1.701 


1.019 


1.028 


_m. 


w 


S41. 


jii. 


■JIJL 


-m. 


3.m 


'"z:ir„ 








955 


1.948 


897 


98 


199 


300 


228 


260 


201 


155 


57 




613 


526 










— T 
















32 


Belglua 


7J3 


615 




8 


6 


7 




1 


11 


4 






3 


1 


67 




lOS 








3 






























5 








3 














143 


Finland 


214 
































iiiou 


4.058 




30 


29 


;; 


30 


3 


j' 


'5 


13 


10 


,[ 


3 


68 

787 


crirr 




■915 




3 


1 


I 




I 


22 




'! 




'! 




135 


I"!*"" 


3.869 


3.648 




6 


105 


"; 


3 


I 


5 


25 


I 




8 


I 


51 


NatsIrUnda 












66 




7 






5 




12 


2 




Nomav 


l!iB7 


819 




3 


5 


94 


5 


19 


92 




46 


17 


10 




475 


Poland 


183 




























5 




116 


109 




1 




1 




- 


- 


1 


3 






I 




Ru—nla 


11 






























Spain 




907 
































1.445 












3 










3 




150 


Sviccarland 


lil38 


955 




47 


17 


15 


1 


6 


1 


25 


7 






2 


53 


Turk.v (Eoropa and A.la) 
































Unlt-d Klmtdo. 


14.164 


10.362 


204 


697 


1.074 


516 


40 


123 


57 


55 


37 


147 


28 


43 


781 


U.S.b R (Europa and A.la) 


- 




- 


- 


- 






- 


- 


- 


- 




- 


- 




YuRo.la.la 
































Othei Suropa 


104 


" 


' 


2 


- 


' 










' 




5 




U 


A 


3.245 




2 


793 


6 


410 


3 


155 


_Ii. 


. 


, 


3g 


_2i. 




lai 


'chlna 11 




















. 


. 


1 




I 




Hong Kong 


14» 


34 




89 


1 


R 




6 


- 


- 










8 


India 






























52 


Indonaala 


15 


15 






























166 


156 


. 


. 


. 




- 


2 


. 




2 








6 


































Israal 


2,944 


2.750 


- 


1 


4 


7 


1 


. 


68 




4 




26 




78 


Japan 


m<> 


69 




360 




291 




102 








22 






55 


Jordan 1/ 


15 


12 




























Korea 






























2 


Lebanon 


44 


43 


- 










- 


. 


- 






. 


. 


































55 


»yukya I.landa 


13 






- 




12 


- 


- 




. 






. 






Syrian Arab Kapubllc 


































167 


124 




30 




" 




' 














3 


north Africa 


26.602 


3.B67 


17.384 


1.687 




105 


739 


St 


-341 


237 


-Si. 


-121. 


_6i. 


_-Jl 


971 


Canada 


4.955 


1.214 




lt6?r 


707 


30 


395 




' 


Tf6 


52 


91 


10 




625 












65 




59 






59 






36 


37 


118 


Cuba 


24 


12 


3 


2 


5 






















Do.lnl<:an Republic 














3 




1 


14 










31 




65 








8 


























269 








12 


7 


















Othei Wait Indlaa 


18.077 




17.307 


2 


77 






3 




27 






2 


1 


84 


Co.ta Rica 


116 


69 






13 






























1 




4 


3 


. 










I 




7 






46 










8 


















Hondurai 


306 






1 


. 






. 


210 








3 




22 


Panal!*"' 


187 


101 




I 


'2 


24 


I 




10 


14 










22 


Otbei Cantral AMrtca 








. 




5 


2 




55 


2 










5 


Oth.i North AMFlca 


52 


' 




- 




- 


39 


- 






- 




I 






South Aaarlca 








m 




92 




3 


„ 


187 


189 


, 


117 




280 


Argentina 


316 


US 




. 




33 


22 




14 


15 




3 


41 


I 


33 


Brail 1 


2J3 


65 




1 


22 


23 








37 












Chi I. 














30 


. 


2 


1 


34 




2 


1 


70 


Colo.bla 


522 


379 




1 


15 


12 


25 


2 


2 


6 












Ecuador 


107 


























2 


25 


Peru 




154 




2 


15 


1, 


47 


z 


2 


2 






2 






Veneiuala 


1.166 


263 






558 












65 










Othei South Aaarlea 


175 




21 


- 




6 


37 


I 


I 


5 


6 




5 




11 


Africa 


646 




10 




1 


3 




2 


4 




_1 


. 


4 




'f 


Alg.ila 












. 


. 




. 




- 


I 


I 






Klgeila 
South Africa 


139 


133 




1 


- 


- 






- 


5 


. 










JI4 


227 




21 


1 


3 




j 


J 


\ 






I 




J 


Tunlala 
































Unltad Arab Republic (E„pr) 


JI 


]) 






















I 






Othei Africa 


132 


96 




8 


- 


- 




- 


> 


- 


3 






1 


22 


Oceania 


7.030 


\.U} 




J.}?' 


l.Ptl 


u* 


1 


n> 


_u 




. 


_S2 


J 


-lii 


133 




4.M5 


BBO 




2.340 






3 


















Hav Zealand 


1.879 


230 




1,027 


253 


30 




205 








14 






75 




234 






























Othei Oceania 




) 




7 


1 


5 


- 
















1 




13 


' 


- 




" 


- 






- 


- 






_ 


- 





58 







] 




■ '" 




'\ ' 


'7 " 


'' - 


_ 


; 




"" 






°r 






















Country of U>t P,rm.n,nt n..ld<nc. 


T.iTAL 


li 


--■ 


J^ 


St 


S-j 


Nl" 


P 


Ui 


J-' 


si 






IS" 






i'- 


s^ 


"" 




i t"- 


_SJ_ 


A.I countr,.. 


367.173 


53,903 


4fl.S07 


J14S9. 


24.072 


22.450^ 


21.582 


20.351 


12.823 


U.23^ 


6.743 


117. B27 


Eorop. 




2JJL 


49 3 


267 


_4..3n 


_iU?^ 


47 


.-2^1^ 


U? 


'41 




17.378 


























167 


Beig'u' ; ; 


Mi 




III 


6 




77 




81 


5 




3 




Deni..rl. 


47h 


10 


6 


; 


« 


« 


: 


60 


2 




; 


26 


ll"J'T 


2 542 


,j 


139 


29 




128 


J 


565 


19 


jj 


14 


1.252 


:Br^ 


343 

2.3PO 
1.27B 


10 


12* 


22 


7 

2B7 


269 
472 


; 


5 


li 


I 


3 


1 . B46 

196 
152 

'196 




























«u»«ol- 


IB 








3 






) 






- 


12 




345 


23 










3 












bwtdfn 






17 


5 


39 


145 




53 


5 




7 


2 38 
















13 


109 










Turk,, lEurop. .od A.l»> 


112 






3 


10 




- 


10 






- 


77 


Unlt.d Kln,do. 














5 


5.604 








9.100 


U.S.S.R. (Europe .nd A.I.I 


5 




















- 




»u,o.l.«l. 






- 




27 


54 




13 








26 




rf. 


4 


' 




" 


' 




24 


' 






36 


A 


4.527 


76 


44 


28 


740 


652_ 


27 


567 


2, 




4 


2.337 


Chin. !/■ . . 


II. 






















111 


Honii kond 


432 




































••6 














Indonesia 


50 








2 




- 


5 








38 


Imr 


103 




2 


2 


3 


4 




9 








83 


I"^,i ::::.;:, 


532 


I 




- 


,} 


36 


: 


.10 


] 






299 


jIp" 




42 


13 


10 


129 


99 


27 


91 


16 


24 


3 


480 


Jo'l'" i' 


20 






; 


2 


15 


; 


3 


[ 






'' 


Leblnon ........ 


133 




1 








- 




- 






72 


Phlllp-ln.. 






7 


1 


205 


194 




86 


2 




1 


368 




























sil^ll" Ara""Rep.ibllc 


27 








5 






2 


- 






20 


""'" ""• 


480 




'" 


' 


87 


55 


" 


" 








276 


North A..rlc, 


321.(109 


53.337 


47.455 


25.079 






21.475 




u^iak. 


10.991 


«>669 


■ii.m 




113.528 




46.3B4 


24.522 


17.835 
126 


'231 




10.813 
361 


12,327 


10.754 


B.597 


67.763 


Mexico !!!! ^ !!!'!!.. . 


26.021 


Cuba 


' f,7 


1 










2 










22 


Do.ln can Republic 


224 




11 


en 


13 


8 




12 








9! 


























172 


j!»lr. 


570 


2 


7 


3 


144 


82 


1. 


52 


1 






267 












146 






112 


2l' 






546 


Co.t. Rlc. 


356 


























773 


295 


152 
276 
83 


I'J 


3 


I 


34 


30 


50 

3 




13 


109 


NIcsraeua 


600 


199 


141 


6. 


2 




28 




59 




4 


79 


Paoa» 










5 


6 


















56 


36 




















Other North Africa 


•>1 






14 


5 


' 




15 


' 




10 


19 


S th An rli 




205 


466 


258 


224 


205 


28 




43 




y. 


941 


Arsentlna 




36 


96 


5B 




63 












171 


Brazil 


2 ns 


15 


31 


15 


23 


26 


1 


22 


4 






.47 


Chile 












9 












75 


Colo.bla 


436 


27 


09 


40 


24 


23 


13 


40 


1 




3 


.46 


Ecuador 


















2 




2 




Peri, 






95 
























15 




2« 


5J 


50 














Other''south <.erlca 


n 




26 


22 




15 




24 


3 




2 


142 


AC 


2_ 


J 




146 


103 


2_ 


115 


5 




. 


468 


ioS::/:!!' 












> 












3 














10 












30 


South Africa ' 










57 
















Tunl.l. 


<t 






















9 


United Arab Republic 1 f«vp. 1 




























327 




5 


' 


57 






43 


' 






176 


Oceania 


2 32B 


52 


43 




260 


192 


3_ 


343 


10 




1 


1.373 




1.656 








195 






252 






1 


951 




f.35 
























Pacific Islanda iu!s! adia! > , ! . - - , 
























2 


Other Oceania 


3'; 


11 






7 


' 




5 


7 


- 




14 


Other countrle. 


3 










i ■ 






- 






' 



7157-022 0—64 





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c 






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TABLE 19. 


ENTRIES OF ALIEN .\ND CITIZEN BOROE 
BY STATE AND PORT: YE 

^ch entry of the same p 
All persons crossing 


R CROSSERS OVER INTERNATIONAL LAND 
AR ENDED JUNE 30, 1964 


BOUNDARIES 


persons cro 




_ '"^° '"" ''"" 


Total .. 
.l^B.S07.f,77 


98.855.809 


■ Citizens 


Mlch).^an (Cont'd) 

HarysvUle 


2,582 


55,553 
16,710 






57,628,322 


31.691.951 


25.936.371 


2,127 
45,539 




101,158 


"'':\ 


"•\H 


St. Cl.,lr County Airport.. 




14,993 


Anchorage 


172 
2,5«B 
15,618 
2,547 
<.,6B3 
I,na2 
16,265 
56,792 


62 

3,68'. 
345 

2,080 
2,430 

150,958 


110 
2.189 
11.934 
2.202 
1,131 

14,185 
54,362 

91,376 


Jefferson Beach Marina ... 


3,390 

28,313 

1,217,006 


^ 


2:ao3" 

12.190 






Sault Ste Marie 






Alpena 


932 

'503 

1,72.-' 

2,391 

1,209,076 


61 
1.214 

758.576 




Jurenii 


Chcbovgan 


159 


Ketchikan 






Northuav 


Escanaba 


38 




Houghton 










Marquette 


508 


Eastport 

Porthlll 


UJ,332 


62,859 
8,637 


- -64,233 

27.140 

3 

40,731 


Rogers City 


559,207 








921,616 


Baudette 


■145,^5 

8,857 

'.,102 

20,070 

286 

714,828 

299 1850 
1,543 
48,952 

3l!o86 

78/-.55 
296,685 


255.247 
12.829 
178.940 

32,583 

23,518 

777 

56,779 

103,106 






■ M:36e 


8.637 


40.731 


Crane Uke 








2,693 


gly 


18,129 




162,801 
2,253,219 


29,418 

106,2'44 

1,473,146 


27.924 
56.557 
780.073 






B ("rt"' t 


International Falls 

Lancaster 




Calais 


7,712 




1.957 ,7. 10 

26[«46 

27, /.SI 

18,373 

446,689 

861,080 

247,495 

464,307 

279.432 

148,379 

271,437 

2,573,745 

6,624 

8,716 

29! 334 
30,009 

'348',039 
13,672,517 


-0557^15 

274,066 

13,273 
20,571 
13,752 
273,493 
536,035 

294,143 
163,42:' 
77,522 

1,642|442 
4,398 
6,129 
30,104 
27,200 
28,584 
27,218 

245!206 

6,791,715 


B5ft.656 

121.423 

4,757 

6,880 

4,621 

173,196 

325,045 

17o!l6i 
116,010 
70,857 
105,435 
931,303 

2^587 
11,537 
2,134 
1,425 
1,332 
394,391 
102,833 

6,880,802 






MlUtown Bridge 

Coburn Core 








16,369 






6.013 


a/iquam 


R s au 




Eastport 


St P I 




Estcourt 


W ' °d " 




For St Cltv 


r."'°,'f, "f 




F t F Irfl Id 






Fort Kent 






Chief Mountain 


77^89^ 

19,473 
16,004 
13,521 
12,452 
10,364 
144,324 
73,104 
55,777 

244,047 

'2^'4^l' 

27,252 


' 98 
9,488 

73:713 
45,366 
26,988 
16,580 
139,671 
11,855 


54,224 


Houlton ' 




399 


Jackman 


D 1 B It "" 




Great Falls (Airport) 


9,441 


Lubec 




Morgan 


2,663 


Mars HUl-Knoxford Line ... 
Montlcello 




70,611 




Raymond 


27,738 
28,789 

6,026 
104,376 

7,293 . 

2 538 






°°^ " ° 




^'^° * 


Van Buren 


bweetgrass 


Vanceboro 

Michigan 


Wh t t 1 ' 






New Hampshire 


■ 


Algonnc 


9,282!l64 


46,167 
4,337,790 


31.560 
4.944.374 


10.973 






27,252 
20,261,275 


10,294.509 




Ambassador Bridge 

Amherstburg 

Detroit and Canada Tunnel 
Detroit City Airport .... 
Detroit Metropolitan 


31,109 

5,954,394 

2,307 

2,567 

5,94? 
44,856 
4,238 
4,995 
1'.7 

2,872,'4i6 


1,174,415 

22,417 

3,109,685 

647 

733 

512 

7,293 

27,088 

466 

392 

94 

47,157 


2.0621376 
8,692 

2,844,709 
1,660 

1,834 

3,686 

3,6'.9 
17,768 
3,772 
4,603 
53 
33.842 


Alexandria Bay 


9.966.766 


-■ 22:521 


12:490 


10,031 




' 95:713 

8,578 

7,365,675 

4,038 

26,073 

2,251,800 

n2,225 

39,121 

95,746 

256,118 

279,905 

919:721 
882,203 


- ' 60:727 
49 

2,192 
2,638,508 

1,603:784 
64,667 
20,760 

125:289 
167,271 
5,354 
473,778 
534,968 








Detroit River and River 
Rouge Terminals 


Greater Buffalo Inter- 
national Airport 


6.386 


Kcan's Detroit Vacht 

Harbor 


Cannons Corners 








Michigan Central Depot .. 
Ecorse 


Cham lal"^*^"* 


648*016 




37.558 
18.361 
75.118 
130,829 
112,634 


Crosse He 


huru u. CO 


Isle Rovole 




Marine Cltv 


Clayton 


Port Huron 


rt ngton 




4,503 
2,796,072 

67,872 


' 2:613 
1,583,974 

47,413 


1,890 
1,212.098 

20,459 




Blue Jater Bridge 

Canadian National 

Railway St.tlon 


445:943 
347.235 


Lewlston . 


Massena 












61 









."Ty:^^ 



Stata end port 



Net. York (Cont'd) 

Horrlitown 

Niagara faUa 

Municipal Airport 

Rainbow BrldRt 

Whirlpool Rapid! Brldga 

Ogdanaburg 

Rochaatar 

Hunlcipal Airport 

fort Authority 

Rouaai Point • 

Thouiand laland Bridge .. 

Trout Rlvar 

Waddlngton 

Watirtown (Airport) 

Haart llland 

North Dakota 

Antlar .'.'.'. 

Carbury 

Grand Forka (Munic. Airpo 

Hannah 

Haniboro 

Malda 

Hlnot (Airport) 

Nach 

Northgata , , . .' 

Paiabina 

Portal 

at. John .. , 

Sarlaa 

Sherwood 

Walhalla 

Weithope 

Sloulln Int'l Airport ... 

Ohio 

Clavalnnd 

Sanduaky 

Vermont 

Alburg 

Alburg Sprlnga 

Daeba Plain 

Baachar Falla 

Burlington Airport 

Darby Line 

bat Rtchford 

Highgate Sprlnga 

Moraaa Lin 

North Troy 

Norton 

Rlchford 

St. Albona 

Wait Barkahir* 

Waahlngcon 

Belllngham 

Bl.ln 

Laurlar 

Lyndan 

Matalln. f.Ua 

1/ rigurei include arrivnla by 



116,528 
60,867 
38,738 
224,523 
197,723 
<.1,30« 
20,180 
26, '.60 
50,505 
40,542 
431 



Istfe" 



132,623 
58,468 
239,962 
239,940 



35, 

14, 
329,037 
479,850 
392,839 

63,501 
238,610 



53,591 

2,755 

3,302,312 



5 82,893 

— tkr 

7,230 
10,667 
45,4 
12,834 
448 

8,219 
12,657 
14,327 



l?5,n2 
113,359 
23,39? 



10,502 

936 

?,354, 

17,343 

15,427 

25,2 

119,034 

lf,22i . 



Waahlngton (Cont'd) 

Nlghthawk 

Northport 



Airport) 
,'b. C. . 



MEXICAN BOKDER 



Loa Angelen (Alrpor 

San Dalgo 

San Yaidro 

Tecata 



CandaUr 



El Paio 

Ave. of Anerlcai (Cordova) 

Santa Fe Bridge 

Yaleta Bridge 

Felcon Heighta 

Fort Hnncock 

Heath Croaaing 

Hidalgo 



17,139 


9,522 


143,823 


117,176 


345,862 


173,361 


4,011 


1,191 


47,830 


14,424 


3,575 


1,488 



401,478 
72,307 

196,732 
23,906 



15,613,705 



5,200 

7,173,091 

9,700 

8,000 



^B, HOI, 179 
8,149,761 
19,004,728 
1,654,690 
455.555 
560,729 



Pretidlo 

Rio Grande City 



,500 



3,220 
371, 
682,869 
25,787 
.455, 



330,272 
36,082 
42,478 



67,163,856 



557,582 

5,270,891 

1,982,230 

68,870 



270,770 

8,763,858 

12,134 



285,01 
219.045 
27,693 



18,038 

,459,718 

3,500 





1 

2 




^ 
1 


9,789,199 
10.709.292 
11,488.873 

87.287.632 


10.500.518 
10.679,098 
9,658.140 
8.618.536 
8,385.339 
7.309,454 
7,527,322 
8.601,983 
8,014,669 
7,991,353 


8.998.413 
10.477,431 
11,156.214 
13.193.889 
15,372,275 
20,434,852 
19,353,866 
20,115,89/ 
21,540,587 
24,068,108 






1 


i 


17,339.783 
15,341,719 
15.535.218 

137,362.011 


13,551,529 
12,587,350 
12,126,111 
12,522,328 
13,331,299 
13,878,127 
15,172.057 
14,421.370 
14.717.308 
15.054,532 


14.521.163 
15,721.746 
14.754.845 
14,820.610 
16.913,269 
23,642.190 
23.147.206 
23.357,036 
24,023,094 
24,670.872 


25,939,023 
30,230,501 
34,013,217 
34,004,251 
36,798,613 
42,594.535 
46,252,606 
50,719,751 
55,629,577 
59,236,486 

61.632.780 
64,057.503 
54,737.123 
57,163,858 




H 


i 


27.128.982 
27.051.011 
27,025,091 

2 24.649.543 


24.052.047 
23.266.448 
21.784,251 
21,140,864 
21,717,538 
21.187.591 
22.699.379 
23,023.353 
22.732,177 
23,045,895 


23.519.576 
26.199.177 
25,911,050 
28,014,499 
32,285,544 
44.077.052 
42.511.072 
43,473,933 
45,553,781 
48,738,980 


51.058.945 
59.500.011 
58,245.343 
66,884,695 
71.752,805 
79,848,740 
84.067.305 
90.934.680 
96,825,995 
98,540,093 

103,570,025 
107,573,768 
108,095,628 
111,179.355 


1 ^^ 
§ U 


J 

? 


S 


3 


13.587,558 
15,633,459 
17,753,455 

134.494.151 


16,009,968 
13,316,924 
10,443,241 
10,503,385 
11,541.520 
13.104.166 
15.353.701 
15,740.505 
14,490,747 
13.989,994 


11.357.952 
12.227.188 
9.182.720 
10,607.527 
13,033,370 
161719,510 
19,065,230 
19,352,765 
23,581,848 
22,144,174 


22,660,423 
23,313,547 
22.782,259 
23,607,605 
23,187,855 
23,669,640 
25.514.400 
25,100,360 
24,334,159 
25,738,912 

25,997,270 
25,528,501 
25,828,932 
25.936.371 


ER CROSSERS OVER INTERNATION 
30, 1928 - 1964 

over International land bou 
the same person countac sepa 


1 

" 


i 

3 


823.152 
221,215 
498,083 

878.795 


929,750 
275.347 
434.715 
105,383 
165,752 
851,151 
569,009 
230,131 
141.028 
066,509 


096,470 
253,535 
523,592 
621,217 
482,226 
443,528 
773,954 
535,509 
054,649 
526,902 


18.580.987 
20.898.541 
23.918,781 
23,963,853 
24,812,698 
25,097.673 
28,008,556 
28,262,967 
28,497,753 
29,755,395 

30,625,879 
30.778.071 
29.957.041 
31.691.951 


==. s 






^ 


S 


25,410,720 
30,854,574 
32,251,548 

252.372.946 


28,939.718 
23.592,271 
18,877.956 
19.608.758 
21,707.282 
24.955,327 
29,022,710 
29,970,636 
28,631,775 
27,056,503 

L __257.8_83.986 


15,454.432 
17.480,723 
14,806,312 
18,228.744 
23,515,596 
30.153,138 
34,839,19 4 
3'., 888, 274 
39,736,497 
38,771,075 


41,341.410 
44,212,088 
46,701,040 
47,571,458 
48,000,554 
49,767,313 
53,522,955 
53,363,327 
52,831,912 
55,494.307 

56.524,149 
57,406,672 
56,785,973 
57,628.322 


BORD 
JUNE 

zens 

of 




1 


s 

5 


c^;;;s s 


IssSsssIsS S 


SsSsssiiss s 


47.780.346 
52.582.957 
57.014,385 
56.488.049 
58.152.049 
60.823,745 
53.319.099 
65.315.289 
55,530,577 
55,042,519 

58,034.515 
70.144.766 
70.187.437 
69,951.868 


^i 9^ 


S33 s 


SIsSsSissi 21 


SISssSsIs^ 5 




;:::^s ^ 


----- s 


----- ^ 


s ii 


1 


i 

s 


S^s i 


SsSSssliSI s 


5s3s?"?s^K i 


44,620.010 
51,129.142 
57,931,998 
57,958,104 
61,611,311 
68,792.308 
74.271.152 
78.982.718 
84.127.330 
88.991.881 

92,259,659 
94,835,674 
94,594,16'. 
98,855,809 


ENTRIES OF AL 

rd movement of 
recorded In 1 


30,162 
31.552 
30,034 

255.240 


26.481 
22.862 
20,560 
21,627 
23,497 
25,739 
28,841 
28,651 
28,858 
28,121 

306.083 


18,517 
20,975 
20,378 
22,441 
27,395 
37,085 
38,921 
38,892 
40,077 
41,297 


1 


s 


= i=S 




igS5§2S°KS s 


SSsSSgSool ^Sod 


t- 


53.539 
57.905 
59.275 

477.022 


52.991 
46,858 
40.552 
40,749 
43,424 
46,152 
^1.722 
52.993 
51.363 
,■-,0.102 

628.278 


38,974 
4 3.679 
40.717 
46,24 3 
55,801 
74,240 
77,350 
78,362 
85.400 
87.510 

1.260.474 


9 2,400 
103,712 
114,946 
114.456 
119.763 
129.616 
137.590 
144.298 
149.657 
154.034 

150.294 
164.980 

158! 807 




J 


., 


928 

929 

930 

1 - 1940 

931 

932 

933 

934 

935 

936 

937 

938 

940 

1 - 1950 

942 

943 

944 

945 

946 

947 

948 

950 

1 - 1960 

951 

9 52 

953 

954 

955 

955 

957 

958 

959 

960 

961 

962 

963 

«64 




2 


z 


2 


2 


1 



TABLE 20A. SPECIAL INQUIRY OFFICER HEARINGS COMPLETED, 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 19 60 - 19 64 


BY REGIONS AND DISTRICTS 






Region 
and 


Exclusion hearings 


Deportation hearings 1 


district 




1961 


1962 


1963 


19 64 


1960 


1961 








United States total 


1.464 




1.010 


979 


951 


11.615 


13.004 


10.431 


12.805 


15.67; 


Northeast Region 


338 


330 


221 


269 


156 


3.636 


4.638 


3.621 


4.981 


5.7 2C 


Boston, Mass 


45 
142 

7 
10 
104 

2 2 

672 


31 
120 

5 
11 

144 
17 

2 

1.708 


38 
81 
2 
15 
73 
12 

273 


33 

94 
7 
22 
90 
18 
5 

2 37 


30 
38 
4 
18 
49 
16 

2?0 


180 
197 
96 
488 
2,633 
26 
16 

2.078 


185 
215 
126 
544 
3.528 
32 

2.247 


151 
324 
95 
417 
?,595 
25 
14 

894 


199 
329 

104 

34 5 

3.980 

911 


319 
?9f 
121 

34; 

4.60' 

11 

1.031 


Buffalo, N.Y 

Hartford, Conn 


Newark. N.J 

New York, N.Y 

Portland, Me 


St. Albans, Vt 


Southeast Region 


Atlanta, Ca 


18 

4 
609 
8 
5 
21 
7 

90 


5 

5 

1,649 

13 

7 
23 

2 

107 


8 
226 
6 
5 
23 
1 

85 


4 

3 
187 
9 
4 
22 

^ 
f15 


2 

6 

195 

3 

13 
1 

78 


53 
72 

113 
1,358 

107 

199 
48 

128 

1.119 


50 
68 

101 
1.579 

109 

154 
64 

122 

1.388 


31 

55 
105 
229 

84 
179 

99 
112 

1.124 


54 

31 

113 

231 

68 
178 
114 
122 

1.276 


5( 
b'- 
14( 
7b-. 
5f 
17! 
11< 
151 

1,65- 


Baltimore, Md 


Cleveland, Ohio 


Miami, Fla 


New Orleans, La 


Philadelphia Pa 


San Juan, P. R 

Washington, D.C 




17 
27 

1 
2 

3 
39 

364 


25 

50 

5 
5 

1 
454 


12 

40 
2 

2 

25 
431 


13 

4 

1 

24 

388 


15 

48 

1 
1 

13 

497 


536 
202 
18 
77 
23 
51 
43 
169 

4.782 


681 

94 
27 
67 
79 
164 

4.731 


505 
211 
30 

43 
32 
44 
71 
187 

4.792 


545 
261 
18 
52 
61 
51 
79 
708 

5.637 


83: 

29' 
21 

6; 

51 
5' 
10' 
221 

7.26' 


Chicago, 111 


Detroit, Mich 


Helena, Mont 


Kansas City, Mo 


Omaha , Nebr 


Portland, Oreg 

St Paul Minn 








7 

63 
6 

57 


8 

1 

147 

15 

72 

178 
21 


1' 

2 

199 

87 


1' 

160 

5 
55 


1' 

207 

3 
85 


89 

69 

1.07 1 

11 

1.272 


88 
60 
983 
25 
1,356 
177 

1,441 
601 


44 
1,282 

11 
1.533 


I' 
83 

1,898 
23 

1.578 


I 
10 
2.00 
4 
2.16 
10 


Denver, Colo 










Port Isabel, Tex 


W^' ^oX' 35i' 

76 89 140 1,432 

14 14 14 626 


627-i' 981-^' l,34l 
596 352 45-1 
586 620 ^05 1 








\l Dallas, Texas, District was elimin 
Port Isabel, Texas, District and 


ated in 
the Sa 


fiscal 
1 Anton 


year 1 
o, Tex 

64 


962 .-1 
as, C 


nd ab 
istri 


sorbed b 

= t. 











TABLE 21. ALIENS EXCLUDED FROM THE UNITED STATES, BY CAUSE: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 189? - 1964 

/in 19A1-1953 figures represent all exclusions at seaports and exclusions 
of aliens seeking entry for 30 days or longer at land portSjJ 



i s 



J5 01 
to > ' 
COO 



'*l - 1950 

1941 

1942 

1943 

1944 

1945 .... 

1946 

1947 

1948 

1949 

1950 



51 
1951 
1952 
1953 
1954 
1955 
1956 
1957 
1958 
1959 
1960 

1961 
1962 
1963 
1964 



1960 



619.068 



8.176 



82.484 



219.347 



180.513 



^1.9^ 



22,515 
108,211 
178,109 
189,307 

68,217 

30.263 



65 
1,681 
4,353 
2,082 
1,261 

1.134 



89 

1,277 

4,824 

1,281 

253 



1,309 
24,425 
42,129 
11,044 

1,530 

K021 



15,070 
63,311 
90,045 
37,175 
12,519 

1^072 



1,904 
8,447 
2,126 



94,084 
47,858 



22_.441 



5,792 
12,991 
15,417 
6,274 
1,235 

219 



5,083 

8,202 

258 



2,929 
1,833 
1,49 5 
1,642 
2,341 
2,942 
4,771 
4,905 
3,834 
3,571 



2,076 
1,207 
1,106 
1,109 
1,805 
2,294 
3,316 
3,690 
2,970 
2,868 

14.657 

2,783 

2,378 

2,937 

2,432 

1,832 

1,079 

348 

299 

276 

29 3 

634 
280 
216 
343 



65 



TABLE 22. ALIENS EXCLUDED, BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH AND CAUSE: 














YEAR ENDED JUNE 


30, 1964 










I 



































































































































1 « 






















s 


ai 


M 






cr, s 


i: u 






Country or region 
of birth 


Total 


° o 




s 


-oi 


-g. 


S £? 


" u 




S g-5 


sl 


s 




































































































-. iJ 








a 3 -• 


























gHJS 


%? ^ 














^ 








i,"n 












^S 


























































2 -o 


J a 




en 


< 3 -O 




o 




All countries 




16 


13 


A 


7 


18 






10 


14 


329 


4 




Europe 






3 


I 




4 




2 


3 


. 


21 










I 




1 


1 


] 


" 




'- 


" 


I 






Czechoslovakia 




France 




Germany 




- 




- 


_ 


1 


_ 


I 




_ 


3 










_ 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


I 




























, 






Italy 












1 




1 






3 






Norway 




_ 




_ 


_ 




_ 




- 


_ 












- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


3 






































Turkey (Europe and Asia) . 








_ 


- 


_ 


- 


- 




- 


2 






United Kingdom 




I 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


2 












_ 
















3 






Asia 




I 






1 


1 






I 




9 






China 1/ 




I 






1 


















India ... ... 






_ 








- 


-_ 




" 


2 










Korea 




Philippines 


356 


12 


10 


- 

3 


6 


13 


" 


3 




- 
12 


292 










Canada 


261 




8 
2 


I 


4 


12 


- 


2 


1 


9 
3 


15 

228 






Mexico 




West Indies 


28 








I 
I 




" 


! 






14 
9 
26 






Central America 




Other North America 




South America 














_ 


I 




2 


5 






















1 












Brazil 








- 


- 


- 


- 






- 


- 






Chile 






2 


' 




: 


: 


" 


: 


: 




; 


4 

I 






Africa 






2 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 






- 


I 










U Includes Formosa 
























- 










66 





















TABLE 23. ALIENS APPREHENDED, ALIENS DEPORTED, AND ALIENS REQUIRED TO DEPART: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1892 - 1964 


Period 


Aliens 
apprehended \l 


Aliens expelled 


Total 


Aliens 
deported 


Aliens required 
to depart 2/ 


1892 - 1964 


5.594.270 


6.29.\980 


523.851 


5,769,129 


89 2 _ 1900 


128,484 
147.457 


3,127 

11,558 

27,912 

164,390 

210.416 


3,127 
11.558 
27.912 
92,157 

117.036 






_ 




_ 


J21 1930 


72,233 


931 - 1940 


93.330 




22,276 
22,735 
20,949 
10,319 
11,016 
11,728 
13,054 
12,851 
12,037 
10,492 

1.377.210 


29,861 
30,201 
30.212 
16,889 
16,297 
17,446 
17,617 
18,553 
17,792 
15.548 

1.581.774 


18,142 
19,426 
19,865 
8,879 
8,319 
9.195 
8.829 
9.275 
8.202 
6,9 54 

110.849 


11,719 


19 32 


10,775 




10,347 




8,010 


1935 


7,978 


1936 


8,251 


19 37 


8,788 




9,278 




9,590 




8,594 


941 - 1950 

1941 


1.470.925 


11,294 

11,784 

11,175 

31.174 

69,164 

99,591 

193,657 

192,779 

288,253 

468,339 

3.584.229 


10,938 

10,613 

16,154 

39,449 

80,760 

116,320 

214,543 

217,555 

296,337 

579,105 

4.013.547 


4.407 
3.709 
4,207 
7,179 
11,270 
14,375 
18.663 
20,371 
20,040 
6,628 

129.887 


6,531 


1942 


6,904 


1943 


11,947 


1944 


32,270 




69,490 




101,945 


1947 


195,880 


1948 


197,184 


1949 


276,297 


1950 


572,477 


951 - I960 


3.883.660 


1951 


509,040 

528,815 

885,587 
1,089,583 

254,096 
87,696 
59,918 
53,474 
45,336 
70,684 3/ 

88,823 3/ 
92,758 3/ 
88,712 3/ 
86,597 3/ 


686,713 

723,959 

905.236 

1,101.228 

247,797 

88,188 

68,461 

67,742 

64,598 

59,625 

59,821 
61,801 
76,846 
81,788 


13,544 
20,181 
19,845 
26.951 
15,028 
7,297 
5,082 
7,142 
7,988 
6,829 

7,438 
7,637 
7,454 
8,746 


673,169 




703,778 




885,391 


1954 

1955 


1,074,277 
232,769 


1955 


80,891 


1957 .... 


63,379 


1958 

1959 . 


60,600 
56,610 


I960 


52,796 




52,383 


1962 

1963 

1964 


54,164 
69,392 
73,042 






J Aliens apprehended firs 
;/ Aliens required to depa 
[/ Deportable aliens locat 


t recorded in 192! 
rt first recorded 
ed - includes nonv 

e 


in 1927. 
;ilful crewman 

7 


violators. 





TABLE 24. ALIENS 


DEPORTED, BY COUNTRY TO 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 


WHICH 
1964 


DEPORTED AND CAUSE: 






Country to which 
deported 


Total 


1 s 


1 


1 


O U 

S 2 




i 

1! 


1 I 

li 

1 1 


Hi 
ifi 


lii 


1 
I 


All countries 


6.746 


_ 


417 


40 


146 


22 


37 3 


6BR 


2_,473 


4,580 


7 


g^^^p^ 


1.150 




67 


H 


6 




24 


25 


918 


93 






10 
Ifi 

19 

30 
110 

1'4 

14 
26 

2?5 


: 


3 

21 

1 

3 
1 
16 

2 


1 
2 


- 


: 

3 
1 

1 


6 

5 


2 

1 
6 


12 

4 39 
12 

35 

97 

49 
14 


3 
5 

''. 
'I 
2 
13 

2 




D 1< 












_ ^ 




Ireland 


- 


Netherlands 

Norway 


- 














Turkey (Europe and Asia) 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 








,,,^ 






10 
37 
12 
12 
68 
14 
14 
10 
31 
17 

7.129 


: 


2 

1 

3 
331 


31 


- 
'I 

1 19 


1 
7 


1 

- 

335 


3 


19 
10 
10 
63 

14 

20 
15 


3 
3 




Hong Kong 


- 






Japan. 




Jordan 1/ 




Korea 






- 




- 




" 


North America 


^ 




1.003 

5,557 
20 
28 
19 

107 

49 
29 


: 


204 
109 

3 
3 

1 
2 

1 
1 

3 


19 
11 


16 

2 

6 


3 
1 
1 

3 


137 

1 
3 

1 
2 

2 
12 


74 
545 

2 
1 

5 
1 
2 


433 
410 
16 
19 

99 
69 

25 
40 
38 

5 

5 
16 

3 

104 


76 
4,246 

3 
1 

2 

27 
39 
15 

32 




Mexico 


' 


A""g"» 


- 






Cuba . 








Jamaica 




Trinidad and Tobago 












Guatemala 












Other Central America 


- 


South America.. . 


- 




- 






- 


2 

2 
3 
2 

1 




2 


1 


1 


1 
I 

1 

1 


14 

5 

39 

13 

11 


1 
2 
19 
6 

2 


- 


Chile 




Colombia 


- 




- 




. 


Other South America 


. 


Africa 


- 






Oceania 
























Other Oceania 


6 
32 


- 


- 


- 


- 




- 




6 
31 


. 




Other Countries 


- 


U Includes Arab Palestine 


- 



68 



Aliens required to depai 
13,676 required departui 
required departures undi 



f3,042 (see table 23 



Belgium 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Poland 

Portugal 

iipain 

Sweden 

Turkey 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

China 1/ 

India 

Jordan 2/ 

Lebanon 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic . 

Jamaica 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Argentina ..'.'.'.'.'.'.'.. 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Peru 

Uruguay 

Other South America 

Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

Other Oceania 

Other countries 

1/ Includes Fornosa. 
2/ Includes Arab Pale 



M. 



2^ i; 



^:gi 



LITY AND CAUSE: 



Nationality 


Total 


li 


i 

1 


i 


^1 

1 s 


s 

1 


Is 

P 


li 
It 


° i I 

ill 


1:! 


1 

1 


All countries 


8.7.6 




417 


40 


145 


22 


371 


688 


2,473 


i.5B0 


7 


Europe 


1.505 




84 


9 






41 


43 


1. 152 






Belgium 


11 

5 
16 

547 
19 

140 
28 
48 
12 
32 

120 

29 
315 
27 
23 

225 




22 

3 
3 
1 

1 
3 

3 

24 

2 


I 
2 


" 




1 

2 
15 


3 
2 

2 
1 

2 
2 


13 

5 

i9 
500 

104 
42 
15 
11 

9 


IB 
45 




Denmark 

Finland. 




France 


- 




- 


Greece 


- 


Hungary 


- 




- 
















" 


Portugal 

Spain 


- 


Sweden 

Turkey 

United Kingdom 










- 


,,^^ 






13 
13 

8 
16 

5 
32 
10 




I 
2 

3 


1 






1 


3 
3 


88 
21 


1 

I 
3 








Israel 








Jordan 2/ 








Pakistan 
















Canada 

Mexico 


902 

5,542 

71 

12 
59 
20 

27 

8 
17 

146 




199 
108 

2 


19 


89 




173 
136 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
2 

11 


72 
544 

2 

1 
3 

2 
3 

1 


371 

402 

97 
10 
60 

2 

5 
2 
5 

83 


50 

4,245 
17 

2 

3 
1 
1 
37 
15 
15 
3 
2 

30 


1 
6 


















Trinidad and Tobago 




El Salvador 










_ 






Panama 




South America 






19 

31 
56 

5 
5 


] 


1 
2 








2 
8 


1 


13 

2 
9 

3 
15 


2 
18 

2 
2 


- 




. 










Peru . 




Uruguay 










. 


















1 


6 






Australia 


7 


■ 










- 


1 




' 




Other 





70 







hief 


V Mex 


cans 


who e 


ntere 


wlthou 




on./ 






Country of 


Total 


i 


1 


si 
U 

S 2 


1 

1^ 


1 
1 


li 
It 
II 


S|3 

ix Si 

£ So 


I it!. 


1 


1 
1 




40,272 


44 


12 




14 


65 


1.858 




11.584 


-L 


3_ 




3.063 






. 






3'' 


2,975 


43 




1 




89 
137 
17S 
521 

183 
368 

390 
48 
203 

1,390 


• 




- 


3 


■ 


5 
2 

2 


31 
137 
508 

101 
183 

51 
386 

1.372 


1 
7 
1 

- 














Germanv 




_ ' 












N^th' 1 d '" 




Norway 
















Turkey (Europe and Asia) 


- 






Other Europe 


' 








29 
154 
114 
2 39 

15 

16 
594 

34.275 


40 


': 




■ 


: 

60 


1.814 


29 
154 
114 

14 

16 
590 

20.820 


2 
11.514 


1 




»°"S K°"8 

India 


- 






j*''° " ■ 








Lebanon 


- 


Other A.la 

North America 


' 


Canada 


8.326 

20,425 
109 
442 

2.453 
647 

340 
351 
45 
97 
101 
353 
147 
2 

1.051 


20 
19 




2 


\ 


23 
28 

1 
1 


290 
1.499 


7.844 

7,526 

107 

435 

lOR 

2.443 
643 
231 
329 
3 38 

96 

351 

146 

1.037 


■ 145 
11.333 

3 
1 
3 




- 


A""g"* 


- 


Barbados 

Cuba 








Trinidad and Tobago 




British Honduras 

Kl Salvador 

Guatemala 








Panama 

Other Central America 




South America 






37 
262 

93 
309 

58 






-_ 


; 




I 


112 
86 
36 

92 
305 
128 


3 


: 




Brazil 








Colombia 












Africa 




Oceania 


















,^ 






Auatralla 


39 

4S 

348 


- 




- 


1 






35 


3 


- 








Other countries 




1/ Includes Arab Palestine 




















— 





TABLE 25. ALIENS LlEPORTEU. BY COUNTRY TO WHICH DEPORTED AND 
YE,\R ENDED JUNE 30, 196'. 


DEPORTATION EXPENSt 






Total 


Deportation expense borne by: 


Country to which 
deported 


Immigration 

and 

Naturalization 


co::^::ent 


Steamship 
companies 


Aliens 
deported 


reshlpped 




8,7^6 


7.285 


39 


869 


430 


123 






303 


U 


681 


90 




Belgium 


16 
10 
18 
78 

19 
13'. 
'.2 

30 
110 

1'. 

29 
90 
1'-. 
26 

2?5 


5 
3 
12 
38 
69 

53 

7 
10 
1'-. 

i 

10 


1 
1 

1 

3 

1 


U 

5 

22 
J49 
5 
5'. 
34 
30 

14 
88 

19 
31 
3 

72 


3 
5 

24 
5 

19 
1 
3 
6 
6 

3 
5 

6 




Denm.irk 




















1 ta 1 V 




Netherl.inds 

Norway 




Spain 








Turkey (Europe and Asia). 
















Formosa 


10 
37 
12 
12 

;" 
;: 

17 
7.129 


I 

7 
10 
16 

6.753 


1 
1 

25 


5 

22 
4 
5 

23 

5 
50 


2 

a 

5 

1 

2 
291 




Hong Kong 

India 








Japan 






Korea 




Lebanon. 




Philippines 








North America 






1.003 
5,557 
20 
2R 
19 
7 
107 

28 
'.9 
79 
49 
29 
21 
31 
20 

170 


865 
5. '-.66 

16 
15 

5 
71 
5'. 
22 
36 
68 

26 
18 
15 
15 

119 


16 

7 


11 

3 
3 

3 
3 


107 
80 

3 

29 
24 
3 

5 
7 
3 

13 

3 






Antipufl 




Bahamas 








Cuba 




Dominican Republic 




Trinidad and Tobago 

Other West Indies 


1 


El Salvador 








Honduras 




Panama 


- 


• Other Central America 

South America 




Brazil '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'..' 


19 
10 
34 
58 
17 
13 
19 

24 


14 
7 
23 
49 
12 
4 
10 

8 


1 


3 

11 

2 
? 
8 
6 


2 
7 
2 




Chile 


- 


Colombia 


_ 


Peru 


_ 




2 


Other South America 

Africa 


^ 


Oceania 


16 


9 










Other Oceania... 


10 
6 

32 


3 
6 

12 


- 


14 


3 




Other Countries 


- 




3 



72 





snoauen^^s^H 


i 


1,060 
1,566 
8.537 
2,737 
812 

1.112 


oi-~<r<frntNO<rox xt^or~ 






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SJB3i< 91 J3AO) 

pcaa o3 aiqeun 


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saSaeqa OTiqna 


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<r<riA-.r-xxov>n<r c-j i-i 1 






siuaiuaqeqs 3S]Pj 

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2HSI 5 


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' 'lis § 








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m (y (T- u^ - — 






snqBrjs 3UBaaT"<nT 

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U-i vC CT^ CM 








>n^ rn ^ 


«<rrg^^--_cMr.fsi .^rs<o4tM 




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paqjodap 

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2 2 2 2 2 2 







TABLE 26A. ALIENS DEFORTEU, BY COUNTRY To UMICtI DEFURTEU: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1955 - 196'. 












Country to which 


1955. 
1964 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


19 59 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


19." 


All countries 


SO. 641 


15.028 


7,297 


5.082 


7.142 


7.988 


6.829 


7,438 


7,637 


7,454 


8^4( " 




13.6RP 


1.085 


9 88 


1.093 


1.630 




1.541 


1.676 


1.503 


1.015 


1.15( 


' 


228 
195 

4,570 

2,327 

'503 
514 

1,204 
200 
261 

1,?73 


5 
21 
15 

135 

216 
38 
6', 

75 

196 
91 


15 
72 

ISR 
30 

190 
48 
38 
]] 

15 

ir- 


15 
205 
36 
57 
81 

19 
16 

5'- 


11 
30 
72 
75 

525 
15 

288 
65 

130 

24 
150 
17 


10 
26 

12? 
749 
10 

70 

72 
69 
153 

105 

54 


18 

91 
610 
14 

53 
45 
34 
118 

42 


34 

90 
6B0 
19 
■55 

21 

152 
50 
50 

277 


12 
35 
17 
148 
562 

215 
28 
30 
25 

168 
19 

135 

37 


363 
16 

36 

111 
12 
32 
93 

20 


11 
•' 

13' 

4; 

r 

2< 
2( 

22; 








Greece^ 


Ireland 


N th''rla ds 


^ 


p *" , 


"* 


J' A - 


^ ° . . A , ) 


U It d Klnedom 


11 


Other Europe 




' ■ 


316 

4 30 
116 
112 

B5 
59 


681' 

3 

3 
32 
58 


56 
5,894 


10 

in 

15 

5 
13 
30 
51 
162 

3.520 


5 

14 

11 

23 
55 
126 

4.959 


57 
13 

14 

5 

43 
95 

5.470 


34 

59 
4.858 


38 
13 

32 

5.044 


171 
16 

5 
9 
41 

5.433 


45 
12 
19 
34 
8 
9 
2 

25 
5.957 


3". 
1. 
1; 

1' 
1' 
K 

31 

1: 

7.12? 






I r 1 
8 a 




l"""" 


K 


^° 


p , 




0th ""a 


North America 




45,664 
492 
192 

'307 
626 
194 
759 
319 
294 
231 
151 


1.074 

11,870 

23 

3 

200 

8 

30 

1 

173 

31 

19 

23 

2 

32 

2 

96 


878 

4.350 

65 

17 

2 34 
17 
98 
19 

32 
27 
17 

I 

108 


9 38 
31 

149 

14 

37 

2? 
10 

102 


1.060 

3,246 

76 

17 

189 

21 
108 
30 

13 

60 

135 


992 
3,608 

127 
25 

357 
23 
76 
15 
51 

30 
23 

86 
21 


55 

20 
153 
15 
64 

53 

21 
11 
11 
83 


1,151 

3.404 

22 

2 
55 
29 
51 

25 
29 

79 

5 

138 


1.206 

3.743 

39 

31 

33 
54 
21 
72 

18 
34 
76 
25 

183 


1.098 
4.405 
26 
13 
11 
68 

2 3 

45 
36 
23 
14 

13 

183 


1. 00; 
5.55; 

•■ 

10- 

21 

2t 
21 
2"., 
10: 

17CJ 




B h 




C b 


" ? 1 R hii 






0th W t 1 dl s* 






Honduras 












171 
99 
260 
330 
171 
152 
225 

214 


17 

13 

10 
21 

27 


16 

10 
27 

24 


10 

19 
16 
14 


18 

29 

15 
21 
21 

21 


22 
16 
39 

14 
17 


5 
2? 

13 

15 


27 
17 

23 


20 
31 
53 
15 

21 


15 

29 
56 

11 

23 


19 

34 
56 

13 


B * 11 












Africa 






















17 






60 




2 


17 


15 


11 

5 


16 

3 


12 
249 


57 


2 
67 




Other 1 




























1/ In 1955 and 1956 reported as China. 

























74 



Igrant (except displaced 
placed person or refugee 
aign government official 

Itural laborer 



Depart 



ntatlve of foreign Information 
ntatlve to International orflanl- 



lited States 



tlzenship claimed 



rti/ 



75 



year of entry 












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m 


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t^ 




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00 — 


to 




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CM 
















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r- 


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rt 00 00 en m o^ <J< 


CM 


o m t- 


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CM ■* O ON 


ss 






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in 


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o 




p- 




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c 


injTTH 




















<o 


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7> 






















ao3BXOTA 


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<N a< 1^ O ly 


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ingiT" 


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-uoN 


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00 


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CM m 










f" 


CM -^ - Sn t- 






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auapnqs 


r^ 


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a^ 


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U-, >£> O 


^ 


u-i m ON 00 


m 00 








00 




vo r~ m vt CO CM -- 


O 


>o o c 




<J vO (M (O 


CM r- 




J03TSTA 


^_ 


<r 


rr 




f^ 




CM 


5,6 

17,1 

1,0 

1.0 


in m 


ja^iaon 


oo 






1 1 1 <N n 1 


c^ 


-< m c" 


In 


2 NO 1 00 


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lBan3Tn3T-i3v 


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00 — oo — O <M <t 


_^ 


O vt o 


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o <f en r- 


^S 




01 u 


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r^ 




-< CM i-~ <r vo -H — 


r~ 




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A eg 


m 






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CM__ 00__ 0_ ON 


r-- CM 




E U 
3 


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c 


^ 






in -Tvo 




<^ " 


m -< 




2 - 


00 








" 




in 














































■o 


















































01 












































■8 


0) 














































.c 












































01 V 


a 






















































































•a V- 


" a! 






































C 3 


e -^ 


















B 




















i-l t 


V *J 
















^1 

























X -H 




;:j 


c 










« 


■a -l 






U) 


eg 






u C 


E "i 


















c m c 








o 






0) 


















> 








c ■- 








3 X 


0) 







s 






P-. 


<e 


^il 






o.< 


01 


^ * 


« l! 










a 


u -w -a -* 




a 


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0) a 










a >,-T3 c V vi k 




<o -^ »- 


^ -o o -« -^ 


s c 






< 


(U a 


S)-r c -; u a 




c -i a 


« -d S " i 










a d 


C <S 0) <S 'H BOX 


^ -H X 


j: C X J3 -< 03 










O 1- 


3 13 o a c 3 j- 


o j: x *J 


4J qj 0) 3 V- 


u u 










3, 


t_ 


i 




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c 


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t. 


a 


a 




u 


X 


u 


00 


X 

c 


C 


1 



77 



T.B. 




lEN CREWMEN DESERTED 
BY NATIONALITY AND 


AT UNITED STATES A 


IR AND SEAPORTS 
























Nationality 


Total 


I 


i 


•J 


£ 


i 
1 


1 


1 
1 


I 


1 


1 


i 

6 


I 


i 

I 




3 


1 


I 






3.615 


883 


>}-> 


520 


.3?! 


224 


174 


140 


13.0. 


112 


64 


.62 


-•.s 


..39 


37. 


» 


« 


24 














































25 
92 

3 

20 
213 

65 

319 

5 

36 

66 
21 
325 
26 


15 

508 

43 

43 

2 


12 

27R 

1 

3 


505 


1 
3 

3 
2 

206 




2 

5 
13 
52 

8 


28 


3 


J 


. 


61 


33 


^ 


32 

2 




■ 


13 




*"l'['° ■ ■ 




°'^ " 


}l 


Estonia 


I, 


p'"'"""* 




^'■'"'^* 


f 


er y 
rcece 








Hungary 




J ' 


■io' 


Netherland 








P 1 d 




° ° : 




fortuga .. . 




^P"'" 




■I^'J'" 




M "^ rf t: A 




"' '. ' 




Oth"' Eu ' 




*"'*■•■"' 






15 

20 

3 

13 


1 

1 
2 


27 

1 
26 


3 


90 
11 

3 
29 


26 

40 


3 
2 




1 
5 


3 




61 


14 
19 


30 






1 






J '"* - 


h 


• 




srae 




apan 




°"'' ■ 




nalnysla 




PMlff' 




n h A i*° 










7B 
12 

3 


5 


1 


[ 


16 

I 
2 

5 
1 




: 


1 
1 


1 


2 


'_ 




'. 




: 




20 


^. 




^°''"''' 




c'b 




" 1 " ■ .^. 




Uomln cp 
' ' 




Jamaica 


, 




■ 


Hondura . . . 
















South America 


r 

5 
10 
13 

14 

5 
3 


5 
5 
1 


; 


[ 


1 




^ 


^ 


1 


\ 




[ 












1 








CM 1 




"I ■ 




tolombla 

Ecuador 








h" ■ ■■ ' ■■■■' '" 






( 


"^J"'" • 


3 

5 
3 


3 


I 


1 




I 




; 










-. 




: 










"• 




s'th'^Af 1 




ni rt A h's bil (E VDt) 




United Arab epu c s p 








Australia 


■io 

2 




— 






1 










































~~ 
















1 








T 











1/ Includes deserting crewmen reported by shl 
gl Includes Formosa. 


ps' mas 




and 


lose 


toun 

78 








Sta 























TABLE 29. VESSELS AND AIRl>LANES INSPECTED, CREWMEN ADMITTED, ALIEN CREWMEN 

DESERTED, AND ALIEN STOWAWAYS FOUND, BY LOCATION: 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1964 



/Each arrival of the same 



rewman counted separately/ 



Vessels and airplanes 
Inspected on arrival 



Crewmen admitted 



Citizens 



crewmen 
deserted 



Allen 

stowaways 

found 



United States total 



Northeast Region . . 
Boston, Mass. ... 
Buffalo, N. Y. .. 
Hartford , Conn. . 

Newark, N. J. 

New York, N. Y. .. 

Portland, Me. 

St. Albans, Vt. .. 



Southeast Region ... 

Atlanta, Ca 

Baltimore, Md. ... 
Cleveland, Ohio . . 

Miami, Fla 

New Orleans, La. . 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
San Juan, P. R. . . 
Washington, D. C. 



Northwest Region . . 
Anchorage, Alaska 
Chicago, III. . . . 
Detroit, Mich. .. 
Helena, Mont. . . . 
Kansas City, Mo. 

Omaha, Nebr 

Portland, Oreg. . 
St. Paul, Minn. . 
Seattle, Wash. .. 



Southwest Region 

Denver, Colo 

El Paso, Tex 

Honolulu, Hawaii .... 
Los Angeles, Calif. . 

Phoenix, Ariz 

Port Isabel, Tex. ... 
San Antonio, Tex. . . . 
San Francisco, Calif. 



Preinspection offices 
Hamilton, Bermuda .. 
Montreal, Canada ... 
Nassau, Bahamas .... 
Toronto, Canada .... 
Vancouver, Canada ., 
Victoria, Canada . . , 
Winnipeg, Canada . . . 



Border Patrol Sectors 

Miami 

New Orleans 

Other 



13.914 



1,452 

3,472 

183 

5,384 
3,423 



33.404 



1,895 
1,529 
2,357 

10,870 
2,463 
1,937 

10,423 
1,930 

9.033 



1,244 

616 

1,592 



871 

436 

.,274 

?.960 



1,423 
3,986 



2,389 
1,162 



1 
1,000 



3.615 



36.103 



665.005 



2-'5.805 



1.541 



2,846 
5,595 
167 
2,973 
21,606 
1,362 
1,55'. 

87,425 



42,692 
27,616 
6,446 
1,390 
560,011 
26,850 



652.021 



16,470 

5,189 

724 

8,333 

190.649 



3^?. 837 



117 
18 
32 

309 

1,035 

30 



680 
751 
,293 
,150 
,256 
867 



27.34^ 



56,134 
51,609 
63,878 
176,903 
75,856 
74,9 49 
91,378 
61,314 

163.650 



20,659 
17,275 
11,046 
9 3,7 30 
26,546 
8,949 
169,748 
12,884 

91.897 



119 
212 

30 
235 
369 
263 

79 



3,002 

2,824 

4,820 

2,094 

24 

13 

331 

8,213 

6,024 

31.317 



20,002 

76,972 

26,47 3 

412 

19 

U 

26,641 

13,255 

49,865 

285.853 



71,408 

11,466 

16,111 

2,733 

3 

14 

7,991 

3,399 

28,772 

131.669 



211 
1,737 
5,783 
8,804 
4,587 
3,115 
5,914 
1,166 

22.977 



218 

82 

63,192 

105,244 

41,898 

1,841 

69,603 

3,775 

89.757 



22,427 
5,855 
25,080 

81.659 



1,908 
5,926 
4,086 
8,010 
1,960 

1,087 



27, '431 
12,271 
10,926 
28,345 

346 
10,286 

152 



8,820 
16,827 
11.762 

8,576 

8,295 
21,323 

6,056 



1/ Includes deserting crewmer 
Service officers. 



reported by ships' 



iters and those found 






O r. I^ <r — 






:is'. 



o (N o> mo ( 



O <N •r, o O 






1 



si8 = .: ':■ 



I : 2 :^' I : 






^° :..;:., 



TABLE 31. PASSENGERS ARRIVED IN Tlfi UNITED STATES, BY SEA AND AIR, 

FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES, BY COUNTRY OF EMBARKATION: 

YEAR ENDED JUNE JO.l'je'i 

/Exclusive of Canadian travel over land borders/ 



BelgluB 

Czechoa lovakla 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Gibraltar 

Greece 

Iceland 

Ireland 

Italy 

Luxembourg 

Netherlands 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Turkey 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

ila 

Aden 

Afghanistan 

Arabian Peninsula 

Bonin Islands 

Ceylon 

Cocos (Keeling) Islands 
Cyprus 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Irian BaraC 

Korea 

Kuvialt 

Lebanon 

Malaysia 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Portuguese India 

Ryukyu Islands 

Saudi Arabia 

Syrian Arab Republic ... 

Thailand 

Turkey 

Vlet-Nam 



1.952.169 

2.595 

42,B24 

582 

81,361 

2,200 

321,054 

301.332 

1,836 

27,735 

38,.>56 

77,607 

182,023 

3.1U 



3 
116,435 
1 5 . 180 
5.510 
47.132 
79,981 
14,526 
53,116 
4,613 
531.722 



22.830 

215.029 

23 

1,028 



37,792 
1,530 
91.383 
97,773 
459 
8,465 
20,949 
29,064 
51.958 
1,665 



56.485 
7,821 
4,597 
13,290 
31,640 
8,099 
70.947 
9 50 
230,478 



204 
9.390 
2,97<» 



43,559 

670 

229,671 

203,559 

1,377 

19,270 

17,307 

48,543 

120,065 

1,449 

11 



33,842 
48,341 
6,427 
32,169 
3,668 
301,244 



26.074 
6,716 
5,510 



256,710 620,556 



137.234 I 206.709 



50,498 
35,707 
1.377 
4,846 



13,740 

3,703 

913 



582 

77,731 

2,080 

252,754 

245.705 

18,856 
38,188 
72,505 
126,659 



45,335 
70,659 
9,104 



4,432 
20,906 
27,789 
41,505 

1,665 



12,676 
27,679 
5,439 
20,947 



TABLE 31. PASSENGERS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES, BY SEA 
FROM FOREIGN COUKTRIES, BY COUNTRY OF EMBARKATION: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1964 (Cont'd) 



^«clu«ive of Can»dl« 



and bordersy 



Africa 

Algeria 

Angola 

Burundi 

Cape Verda U lands 

Congo, Republic of the 

DahoBey 

Ethiopia 

French Sooia 1 1 land 

Canbia 

Guinea 

Ivory Coast 

Liberia 

Libya 

Morocco 

Hozaablque 

Nigeria 

St. Helena 

Sierra Leone 

South Africa 

Southern Rhodesia 

South-West Africa 

Sudan 

Tanganyika 

United Arab Republic (Egypt). 

Oceania 

Anerlcan Samoa 

Australia 

Chrlstaas Island 

Fiji 

New Caledonia 

New Guinea 

Hew Hebrides, British 

New Hebrides, French 

New Zea land 

Pacific Islands (U.S. adn. ) . 

Polynesia, French 

Solomon Islands, British .... 
Wake and Hldway Islands 

North America 

Canada 

Greenland 

Me«lco 

St. Pierre and Hlqualon 

Swan Islands 

West Indies 

Barbados 

Bennuda 

Cayisan Islands 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Jamaica 



346,679 
18.134 

148,007 
1,766 
5,076 

105,985 
5,940 
7,716 



1,273 
1,114 



3,522 
5.597 
4,366 



22,845 

3,619 

384,321 

257 

60 

846.300 



62,220 
9,784 
18,352 



77,323 
3,845 
5,606 



2,838 
28.662 
2,095 



1.783 
2,531 
8,284 



836 

I 

2,070 

143 
1.689 
2,295 
6,189 



327,581 
17,675 

140,865 
1.764 
2,170 

105,289 
4,157 
5,185 

143.366 





TABLE n 


. PASSENGERS ARRIVED 1 

FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES. 

YEAR ENDED JUN 

/E.clu.lve of Canadian 


BY COUNTRY 
E 30, 1964 ( 


STATES, BY SEA AND A 
OF EMBARKATION: 
Cont'd) 

land border^ 


R. 






3. 




•^rr ■" 




By sea and a 


r 


By ae. 


By air 


a 


Total 


Aliens 


Cltl- 


Total 


Alien. 


Cltl- 


Total 


Allena 


citi: 


"-.iir.z: a::::^'; 


J9.027 
3f.,306 
51 
6,712 
2,330 
38,156 
21,403 

35 


12.659 
27,464 
26 
4,654 
1,437 
17,223 
11,727 

35 

700 
17 

68.111 


16.368 

25 

2.058 

89 3 

20,933 

16 
21 

62.136 


580 
30.793 

1.232 

3 
13 

10.746 


24.257 

831 

3 50 

1,973 

236 

3 
12 

2.677 


410 
6,536 

401 

1,837 
338 

3 
1 
4 


28,447 
5,513 

5,480 
1,903 
34,346 
20,829 

19 
1,115 


12,489 
3,207 
19 
3,823 
i,087 
15,250 
11,491 
15 

32 

688 


15,958 
2,306 
25 
1,657 
816 
19,096 

12 
18 




BrlttllSv.rg.nUUnd.:;: 








M ti 1 '' 




"'S-:t:Li"""; 




Gr^i^ia . 




St uci; 




St Vl^c'nt 


14 






,ti 


?Ii:;trr^.«:::::::: 


5.174 
53,102 
10,134 

7,492 
40,296 

7,756 

6,293 

251. R08 


3,268 
19,731 
6,935 
5,136 
23,486 
5,152 
4,403 

175.519 


1.906 
33,371 
3,199 
2.356 
16.810 

1.890 


9.080 
39 3 

906 
92 

9.251 


94 

24 

5.013 


'250 

108 
364 

68 

3.240 


5,154 
44,022 

7[439 
40,094 
6,850 
6,201 

242.555 


3,257 
17,897 
6,792 
5,107 
23,392 

4)379 

169.506 


1,897 
26,125 
2,949 
2,332 
16.702 
2.240 
1.822 

73.049 


,1 




,1 


Lteiltf 










II 








27:777 

37i92B 
1,244 
10,429 
.16,638 
14,038 

964 
32,424 

931 
1,592 
66,168 


20,517 

23[lll 
911 
7,147 
42,876 
10,175 

684 

22,066 

365 

1,233 

45,236 


7,260 

475 

14,817 

333 

3,282 

13,762 

3,863 

2 

280 

10,358 

566 

359 

20,932 


950 
2.498 

431 
751 

2 

421 

45 
3,582 


570 

1,666 

352 
243 
202 

2 

33 


380 

832 

175 
188 

301 
20 
12 

783 


26.827 
1,671 

35,430 
1,232 
9,902 

56.207 

13,287 

32,003 

897 

1.547 

62,586 


l,'l96 

21,445 

899 

6,795 
42,633 

9,973 

684 

21,946 

351 

1,200 

42,437 


6,880 

475 

13,985 

333 

3.107 

13,574 

3,314 

2 

280 

10,057 

546 

347 

20,149 






'■ 






."' ■ ■ ■ 




Chll ' " •"• 




- ' ■ 












p 


ill 


P«ru ... . 


"rug-y ■■■■■•■ 


I 


Cn,... 




C«rlbb..n .]....'.'...'.'.'.'.'.'.['.[[ 


34)557 
123,099 
14,285 
3,825 
174,934 
5,941 
3,420 

1,981,279 
2,494,045 


953 

10,503 

1,364 

209 

l!65l 

396 

3 

562,945 
1,125,472 


33,604 

112,596 

12.921 

3,616 

165.616 

4.290 

3.024 

108 

1,418.334 
1,368,573 


34,557 

123.099 

14,285 

3,825 

174,934 

5,941 

3,420 

HI 

169,414 
707,852 


953 

10,503 

1,364 

209 

9,318 

1,651 

396 

3 

28,775 
227,935 


33,604 
112.596 

'3;M6 

165,616 

4,290 

3,024 

108 


1.811,865 
1,786.193 


534,170 
897.537 


; 








I* 




- 


FUg of carrier: 


1,277,695 
8H,6S6 




Foreign 


.f 




II 

J 
i« 
,11 
,» 

II 

,11 

!« 
,« 








82 















TABLE 32, 


PASSENGERS DEPARTED FROM THE UNITED STATES, BY SEA AND AIR, 
TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES, BY COUNTRY OF DEBARKATION. 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1964 

/Exclusive of Canadian travel over land borders7 




Page 1. 






By 






V sea 


B 


air 






Country of 


Total 


Aliens 


Citi- 
zens 


Total 


Aliens 


Citl- 


Total 


Aliens 


Citi- 


^ 




4.139.932 


1.430.736 




833.011 


224.841 


608.170 








11.: 


Europe 

Austria 


1.832.572 


659.323 


1.173.249 






218.802 






954.447 




31599 

38,424 

200 

83,058 

1.978 

260,399 

261,915 

2,039 

26,371 

39,780 

70,453 

186,664 

581 

99 

108,502 

13,424 

2,056 

44,611 

64,305 

17,616 

53,476 

7.858 

523,724 

339 

1.101 

306.667 


1.042 

14.263 

32 

38.991 

1.046 

81.829 

84,276 

577 

7,094 

18,290 

23,465 

55.205 

268 

50.831 
5.399 
1,300 

221808 

8,872 

18,366 

922 

212,719 

113 

486 

105.253 


2.557 

24,161 

168 

44,067 

932 

178,570 

197,639 

1.462 

19.277 

21.490 

46.988 

131.459 

313 

58 

57,671 

8,025 

756 

33.523 

41,497 

8,744 

35.110 

6.936 

311.005 

226 

615 

201.414 


1.920 

4.339 
206 
64.939 
54,406 
2.039 
10.380 
65 
7.125 
58.915 

99 
25,263 
7,989 
2,056 
4,534 
11.454 
5.868 

42 

92,276 

30 

417 

33,494 


861 

1,868 

117 

19,523 

17,716 

577 

4,393 

38 

1,714 

20,627 

41 
12,140 
3,699 
1,300 
1,423 
6,877 
2,613 

30 

39,738 

10 

255 

12.330 


1,059 

2,471 
89 
45,416 
36,590 
1,462 
5.987 
27 
5,411 
38,288 

58 
13,123 

4,290 
756 
3,111 
4,577 
3.255 

12 

52,538 

20 

162 

21.164 


3,599 
36,504 
200 
78,719 
1,772 
195,460 
227,509 

15,991 
39,715 
63,328 
127,749 
581 

83,239 
5,435 

40,077 

52,851 

11,748 

53,476 

7,816 

431,448 

309 

684 

273.173 


1.042 
13,402 
32 
37,123 
929 
62,306 
66,560 

2,701 
18,252 
21,751 
34,578 
268 

38,691 
1,700 

9,665 

15.931 

6,259 

18,366 

892 

172,981 

103 

231 

92.923 


2.557 
23,102 
168 
41,596 
843 
133.154 
160.949 

13,290 
21.463 
41.577 
93,171 
313 

44,548 
3,735 

30,412 

36.920 

5,489 

35,110 

6,924 

258,467 

206 

453 

180.250 


Oi 




■■ 


Denmark 


t 


France 

Germany 

Gibraltar 


!« 


Greece 

Iceland 


11 




■■ 




" 


Malta 


'' 




'■ 


N 










'■ 


Spain 


.'J 




-■ 


Switzerland 

Turkey 




U.S.S.R 






*' 


Aden 


106 

21 

7 

85 

24 

3 

291 

117 

393 

7.785 

2.623 

436 

2,300 

178 

6 

34,402 

204,806 

828 

7 

4,481 

933 

1,230 

30,860 

6 

5,234 

662 

46 

2.882 

3,758 

2,153 


82 
21 

22 

i 

2.271 

983 

204 

631 

77 

6 

9,279 

77,915 

74 

6 

1.186 

269 

335 

9.081 

487 
114 
28 
829 
336 
571 


24 

63 

IJ 

2 

103 

81 

183 

5,514 

1.640 

232 

1.669 

101 

25,123 

126,891 

4 

754 

3,295 

664 

895 

21.779 

6 

4,747 

548 

18 

2.053 

3.422 

1.582 


106 

1 

291 
117 
254 
2,244 
901 
61 
4 

6 

7,548 

17,543 

4 

604 

495 

307 

49 

2,363 

6 

320 
24 
46 
72 

100 
17 


82 

188 
36 
88 
727 
490 
24 

2 

6 

3,204 

6,187 

52 

113 

94 

6 

897 

15 
5 

28 
9 

76 


24 

1 

103 

81 

166 

1,517 

411 

37 

4 

2 

4,344 

11,356 

4 

552 

382 
213 
43 
1,466 
6 
305 
19 
18 
63 
24 
16 


21 

85 
24 
2 

139 
5,541 
1.722 

375 
2.296 

174 

26,85* 
187,263 

224 

7 

3,986 

626 

1.181 

28,497 

4,914 
638 

2,810 
3,658 
2,136 


21 

22 
11 
1 

122 
1,544 
493 
180 
631 
75 

6,075 
71,728 

22 

6 

1.073 

175 

329 

8.184 

472 
109 

820 
260 
570 


63 
13 

17 

3,997 

1,229 

195' 

1,665 

99 

20,779 
115,535 

202 

2.913 

451 

852 

20.313 

4.442 
529 

1,990 
3,398 
1,566 


'' 










Bonin Islands 

Burma 

Cambodia 


li 


Cyprus 


I! 


Formosa 


b 




It 




li 


Indonesia 


'; 


Iran 
















Jordan 


j! 


Korea 


» 










Malaysia 




Pakistan 




Philippines 












Saudi Arabia 

Syrian Arab Republic 


- 


Thailand .... , . 






















84 

















PASSENGERS DEPARTED FROM THE UNITED STATES, BY SEA AND AIR, 
TO RDREIGN COUNTRIES, BY COUNTRY Of DHBARKATIONi 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1964 (Cont'd) 



^Jixciusive of Canadi 



i borders/ 
By sea 



Ango la 

Cameroon 

Cape Verde Islands 

Congo 

Congo, Republic of 

Dahomey 

Ethiopia 

Ghana 

Guinea 

Ivory Coast 

Kenya 

Liberia 

Libya 

Morocco 

Mozambique 

Nigeria 

St, Helena 

Senegal 



402 
2,821 
2,044 
1,908 



370 
2,249 
1,853 
1,60? 



292 
2,676 
1,946 

913 

1,990 

38 

1,538 



Tanganyika 

Uganda 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 

Dceanla 

American Samoa • 

Australia 

Christmas Island 

Cook Islands 

Fiji 

New Caledonia 

New Guinea ,. 

New Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U. S. Adm. ) 

Polynesia French 

Tonga 

Wake and Midway Islands 

Western Samoa 



6,329 
24,731 
10,714 



635 
4,662 
6,549 
4,459 



1,667 
18,182 
6,255 



635 
1,841 



796 

7,972 

43 



3,711 

24,081 
10,650 



orth America 

Canada 

Greenland 

Mexico 

St. Pierre and Miquelon 

Swan Islands 

west Indies 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Bermuda 

Cayman Islands 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic ... 



20,702 

3,668 

364,190 



268.093 
63,633 
3,616 
24,787 
445 
41 
69,067 



10,239 

3,543 

237,450 

218 

55 

562.667 

266,854 

4,564 

124,636 

1,130 

228 

27,436 



61.613 



902 

3 

1,372 



11,340 

55 

7,379 



3,659 

361,386 

232 

52 

769.147 

316,737 

8,113 

134,339 

1,575 

144 

95,962 



232^421 
61,223 
3,604 
17,082 
445 
39 
68,753 



TABLE 32. 


PASSENGERS DEPARTED FROM THE UNITED STATES. 


BY SEA AND AIR, 








TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES, BY COUNTRY OF 


DEBARKATIONi 










YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 


1964 (Co 


nt'd) 


















nd borders7 






Page 3. 


Zixclusive 


of Canadian trave 


over la 












IV sea a 


d air 






By a 


r 








Citi- 






Citi- 








debarkation 


Total 


Aliens 


zens 












zens 


North America (Cont'd) i 




















West Indies (Cont'd) i 




















Guadeloupe 


4.276 


2,436 


1,840 


238 














5.557 
116,010 


3.165 
36,456 


2,392 
79,554 


175 
892 


HI 
513 


64 

379 


5,382 
115,118 


3,054 
35,943 


2,328 
79,175 




Leeward Islandsi 




30,733 
34,681 


13,512 
26,849 


17,221 
7,832 


39 
29,159 


13 
23,756 


26 
5,403 


30,694 
5,522 


13,499 
3,093 


17,195 
2,429 






23 
5.296 


14 
3,658 


9 
1,638 


10 
165 


10 
120 


45 


13 
5,131 


3,538 


9 
1,593 






1.544 
31.416 


860 
12,817 


684 
18,599 


61 

765 


32 
379 


29 
386 


1,483 
30,651 


828 
12,438 


655 
18,213 




Trinidad and Tobago 


13,835 


6,158 


7,677 


532 


120 


41? 


13,303 


6,038 


7,265 


Turks and Calcos Islands ... 


58 


22 


36 


- 




- 


58 


22 


36 


Windward Islandsi 




















Dominica 


24 


6 


18 

6 


6 


1 


5 


18 
8 


5 
2 


13 
6 






858 
115.952 


545 
56.805 


313 

59.147 




5.311 


7.214 


858 
103.427 


545 
51.494 


313 
51.933 






5;il4 

47,550 


2:834 
17,221 


2,280 
30,329 


15 
11,403 


2 
4,702 


13 
6,701 


5,099 
36,147 


2,832 
12,519 


2,267 
23,628 






9,046 
3,04? 
32,353 
7,154 


5,471 
5,212 
17,232 
4,419 


3,575 
2,830 
15,121 

2,735 


105 
29 
125 
837 


33 

44 
517 


72 
22 
81 
320 


8,941 
8,013 
32,228 
6,317 


5,438 
5,205 
17.188 
3,90? 


3,503 
2,808 
15,040 
2,415 




Guatemala 


Honduras 


Nicaragua 


6,693 


4,416 


2,277 


11 


6 


5 


6,682 


4,410 


2,272 


South America 


213.854 


133.468 


80.386 


9.202 


5.063 


4,, 39 


204.652 


128.405 


76.247 




20,844 
1,818 


13,323 

1,110 


7,521 
708 


i:256 


489 


767 


19:588 
1.818 


12,834 
1,110 


6;754 
708 


Bolivia 


Brazil 


32,491 
1,032 
9,858 
49,364 
11,817 
720 


18,042 
516 
5,999 
33,975 
7,651 
403 


14.449 
516 
3.859 
15.389 
4,166 
317 


2,086 
16 

766 
793 
648 


1,226 

8 

367 

468 

276 


860 

8 

399 

325 
372 


30,405 
1,016 
9,092 
48,571 
11,169 
720 


16,816 
508 
5,632 
33,507 
7,375 
403 


13,589 
508 
3,460 
15,064 
3,794 
317 






Colombia 






Peru 


27,372 


17,166 


10,206 


640 


175 


465 


26,73? 


16,991 


9,741 


Surinam (Neth. Guiana) 


797 


29 -^ 


503 


31 


11 


20 


766 


283 


483 




2,148 
55,593 

343,336 
35,516 

110,884 
15,264 


1.303 
33,686 

19,843 

1,175 

6,584 

728 


845 
21,907 

323,493 
34,341 

104,300 
14,536 


97 
2,869 

343,336 
35,516 

110,884 
15,264 


57 
1,986 

19.843 

1.175 

6,584 

728 


40 
883 

323,493 
34,341 

104,300 
14,536 


2,051 
52,724 


1,246 
31,700 


80b 
21,024 




Cruise 


Bermuda 




Europe and Mediterranean ... 


Far East 


6,318 


1,34- 


4,975 


6,318 


1,343 


4,975 


- 




. 




171,975 
1,365 


9,719 


162,256 
1,248 


171,975 
1,365 


9,719 


162,256 
1,?48 


" 




" 


Southern South America 




1,606 
408 


132 
45 


1,474 
363 


1,606 
408 


132 
45 


1,474 
363 


- 




- 




Flag of Carrier! 


United States 


1,785,297 


457,315 


1,327,982 


157,290 


27,425 


129,865 


1,628,007 


429,890 


1,198,117 


Foreign 


2,354,635 


973,421 


1,381,214 


675,721 


197,416 


478,305 


1,678,914 


776,005 


902,909 








86 






























1 



^cl 



AMtlVED 

AUlka, Anchorage 

Arl«on«.Tuc«on 

Calif., Lot An|t*lM 

San Francisco ■ ■ . 
Canada , Quabec 

D. C.I Washington 

ria., Jackaonvllla 

Mla.l 

Port Evargladea . 

West Pol» Beach . 

Ca. Atlanta 

Cuaa, Agana 

Ill, , Chicago 

La. , N«w Orlaana 

Maaa.. Boston 

Hich. , Detroit 

N. J., HcCulrc A.F.B. .. 

Nauark 

K. T. , Nav York 

Niagara Falls ... 

Ohio, Claveland 

Pa., Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh 

P. R. , San Juan 

S. C, Charleston 

Tex., Dallaa 

Houston 

San Antonio 

Va., Norfolk 

V. I., Charlotte Aaulla 

Frederiksted 

Wash., Seattle 

Other ports 

DEPAKTED 

Alaska, Anchorage 

Calif., Us Angeles 

San Delgo 

Canada , Quebec 

Conn., Hartford 

D. C, Washington 

Fla., Jacksonville ... 

Port Evargladea 

West Pais teach 

Ca., Atlanta 

Cuaa, Agana 

Havall. Honlutu 

111., Chicago 

La. , New Orleans 

Hd., Baltlaore 

Mass . , Boston 

Mich., Detroit 

N. J., HcCuire A.F.B. . 

Newark 

H. V. , New Vork 

Niagara Falls .. 

Ohio, Cleveland 

Pa., Philadelphia ... 

Pittsburgh 

P. R., San Juan 

S. C. Charleston 

San Antonio .. . . 

Va., Norfolk 

V. I., Charlotte Aaalle 

Frederiksted ... 

Waah., Seattle 

Other ports 



47,521 
2,863 

65,710 
3,315 
9,550 

23 



1*,354 
95,437 
29,593 
18,299 

71 
28,601 
1,952 
3,271 
1,775 
712,896 



420,382 
65,722 
2,369 
54,774 



76,093 
1,133 
3,659 



30,9 
6,866 
3,843 
3,574 



1,034 
152,536 
43,060 



14,88] 
5,780 



5,606 
2,176 



1,859 

4 
5.9 



20,053 
5,282 
9,559 



7,578 
5,555 
6,893 



85,983 

7,839 

167,687 

10,078 



37,714 

189,831 

124,204 

46,846 

2,272 

96,498 

11,399 

83.162 

6,323 

1,522,365 



,934 



11,799 
ll-,582 
14,808 



3,271 

1,775 

581,191 



3,659 
13,874 
16,345 



87 



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TABLE 35. 


ALIENS WHO REPORTED UNDER 


THE ALIEN ADDRESS PROGRAM, BY SEL 


CTED 
















URING 1 


64 






















New 












Hutlonnllty 


Total 


California 


York 


Texas 


UllnolG 


Florida 


Jersey 


Michigan 


Haiaachuaatta 


Pannaylyanla 


Ohio 


other 


TOTAL ALIKHS 


3.335.391 


767.022 


608.120 


246.260 


203.406 


175.448 


172,381 


135.412 


135.341 


104.549 


86.938 


700.674 




2.966.732 




545.396 


236.973 








127.260 




93.786 


81.121 


607.070 


Europe . 


1.422.374 






18.501 


127.793 




117.557 


74.293 


77.259 


79.379 


52.603 


305.251 


Albania 


2.399 




680 




174 


11 


163 


153 








532 




30.237 


2,680 




320 


3.203 






1.265 


676 


3.502 


1.559 


5.909 


bm\glu. 


9.225 


1.808 


l)684 


189 




291 


'647 


8B1 


261 


299 


27 3 


2.047 




1.204 




280 








43 










236 


Cc.choilovakU 


15.822 


532 


3,097 


295 


2,555 


175 


1.206 


736 


117 


2.817 


1.555 


2,737 


Dainaik 


12.249 




1.586 


154 




355 




385 


177 


205 


174 


3,646 




3.197 


365 


1,063 


23 






591 










754 


riMand 








29 


428 


403 




1.063 


1.191 


132 


335 


4,121 




36 ".27 3 


7)362 


10)096 


852 


1.710 








1.245 


1,111 


817 


9,291 


olraany 




35.657 


45,959 






4.390 


20,274 


11,264 


5.335 


11,710 


10,852 


70,330 




361592 


2.975 


9.750 


'344 




390 




1.845 


3.113 


1,760 


1,919 


8,039 


Hung.iy 


38.115 


3,585 




295 


3)176 


507 


5.054 


3.128 


575 


2,927 


3,815 


6,524 


Ir.l.nl 


59,128 
















6,525 


2,797 


934 






225,320 


15,359 


86,334 




14.621 


1,417 


27.361 


6.574 


14,571 




6.996 


32.970 


L.tvla 








63 








1.686 


781 


715 


916 


4.452 




22)308 


516 


2)582 


20 


6)905 


141 


1.026 


1.439 






952 


4.518 


UixealjourR 


658 






24 


102 




26 


19 


16 


25 




216 




54.499 


23.135 


5,140 


657 


1.925 




3.175 






1,086 


1,211 


11.866 


Norway 


20.686 










200 


1.200 


288 


532 


227 


138 


7.529 


Poland 


127.459 


2^329 


30)290 


420 


23)483 


721 


13.460 


12.855 


8,678 


9,320 


4,965 


20.938 


Portugal 


37.727 


11.045 


2,367 




47 




2.875 




13.634 


212 


47 


7.367 




7.633 


351 


2,486 


36 


1,359 


78 


396 






514 


628 


975 


S^n ' 


16.135 


3.572 


3.366 


418 


353 


1,046 


1.371 


222 


228 


204 


248 


5.107 




21.355 


4.692 


3.675 


167 


2,637 


482 


832 


491 


959 




283 


6.817 


SwlttHrland 


12.990 


3,900 






525 






190 


339 


341 


249 


3.338 


Turk ay 


7.898 


1,153 


2)386 


95 


455 


100 




623 


528 




196 


1.409 


Unltad Kingdom 


257.896 


55.790 


54.970 




9,806 




16.496 


16.392 


10.519 


10,079 


7.838 


59.855 




54.654 




16.977 


208 


6,506 




5.091 


3.072 


2.027 


5.229 




9.858 


Yugoaiavla 


32,481 


3)050 


4.885 


113 


7,910 


115 




2.018 


149 


2.695 


3,393 


6,050 


Oth.r Europ. 






808 


40 


163 


59 


"348 


871 


88 


898 


294 


904 


Aala ... 




68.572 


30.371 


3.048 


6.810 


1.786 


4.596 


3.744 








74.236 


China 2/ 


421287 


16,824 


10.814 


765 


1,960 


155 






1.619 


877 


461 


7,292 




3,667 




526 








204 


113 


148 








Indo'a.la 


1.228 


"185 




115 


224 


2 








4 




479 




4.247 




765 


45 


325 


21 


15! 


7! 


138 








Ira^ ] 


1.500 


'258 






408 




984 


263 


313 


25 


23 


195 
1,379 


Japan 


59|043 


24)657 


1)592 


911 




529 








627 


6e( 


26,586 




3,721 




466 


90 


'471 




234 


487 








743 


Korea 


7,893 


1,646 








103 






192 


301 


17: 


3,666 


Lebanc n 


4.356 


603 


660 


121 


127 


84 


173 


379 








1.118 




664 
















17 


37 


14 


167 


Pal.Itln. 


406 






















91 




46,917 


16,550 


817 


289 


530 


363 


272 


222 


159 


230 






Oth.r A.l. 


8,921 


1.569 


1.609 


170 


293 






334 






173 


3.558 


North Anerlcs 


1.163.357 


412.029 


116.382 


213.019 


47.094 






45.927 




7.762 


9.917 


l?8.66p 










3.424 






8.187 


40.075 


33.671 


5.419 


7.225 


103.321 




61l!950 


292)592 


2)406 


207.230 


32)889 


1)097 


351 


4,921 


203 


571 




68.382 


Cuba . 


100,847 


4,635 


30.297 


1.186 


3.080 




12,518 






1.036 


888 


13.389 


Dominican R.public 


23,269 




17.830 




261 


"480 


508 


46 


' 67 


40 


50 


3,637 




6,465 


115 


4,965 


8 


363 


215 


144 


13 








413 


Jaaalca 


10,305 








292 


486 


363 




264 


216 


135 


1,101 


Trinidad and Tobago 


1,942 


78 


1)440 


10 


45 




60 










181 




6,842 








134 


273 




45 


148 


58 




1,104 


Kl'salvador 


8,413 


6)905 


■401 




75 


86 












710 


Guatemala 


5,584 






231 


272 


191 


53 


27 


42 


40 




1,229 


Honduraa 


7,478 


1)243 


2,203 




205 


900 


319 


30 








2,251 




10,578 


7.800 


932 


110 


107 


291 


125 


12 


15 


27 


27 


1,132 


plnli!'"' 


12,573 


1.931 


7,142 


277 


253 


365 


225 


93 


176 


179 


122 


1,810 


South America 


92.748 


22.009 


32.203 


U773 


4.591 


5.616 


6.406 


973 


1.927 


1.925 


1.004 


14.321 


Argentina 


20.002 


5.497 


6,617 413 


1.086 






282 




557 


318 


2,602 




8.744 


1.610 


2,347 169 


102 


339 


1)224 


161 


516 








Chile 


5.746 






206 


349 




70 


75 


85 


63 


1,090 


Colombia 


22,858 


3)598 


9)838 396 


1,084 


2,661 


1.289 




381 


324 








14,365 




6,477 


113 








65 


123 




49 


1,478 




10.645 


3)941 


2,584 


209 


642 


51« 


'483 


85 


123 




88 




Venetuel. 


6,029 




1.662 




278 




347 




133 


206 


178 


1,428 




4,359 


1,185 


1.152 


176 


216 


115 


143 


59 


62 


109 




1,102 


Africa 


7.31* 


1.289 


2.168 


216 


564 


131 


428 








149 


1.553 


Morocco 


892 


144 












17 




17 


20 


223 


South Africa 




506 


395 


65 


157 


73 


124 


44 


101 


60 




499 


Tunl.la 


'409 


83 


193 
















1; 


41 


United Arab Republic (IgypC) 


2,096 


308 


663 


76 


190 


14 


164 


48 


139 


44 




402 


Other Africa 


1,873 




618 


45 


136 


6 


91 


59 


64 


169 


49 


388 


Oceania 


12.500 


4.275 


1.383 


221 


402 


297 


340 


301 


303 


335 


27*1 


4.3W 




8.514 




1.170| 182 


339 


225 


269 


258 


218 




237 


2.234 


New zt.Und 


2.271 


"846 


208 


38 


63 










65 




752 


Other Oceania 


1,715 


315 


5 






' 


I 


J 


I 


2 


1 


1.381 


St 


33,166 


5,368 

4,242 

49,742 


11,473 
6,541 


168 
9.307 


66- 
16.086 


672 
87,958 


l)l80 
15,532 


'782 
8.152 


1.235 
11,156 


1.846 
8.763 


4.379 
5.837 


4.330 


All other !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 


4.352 


OIHEK THAN PEMUNBIT gBSIDDfTS . . . 


93.604 



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90 



TABLJ 


36A. AUDI POPULATION. BY STATES OF RESIDENCE: 1940, 1951. 


1960, 1961 


. 1962 


. 1963 


, AKD 


1954 








• 




/^llen 




on of 1940 


, all.n addraaa report, received 




















1951, 


960. 1961 


1962, 1963, and 1964/ 
















^ 








Nu.b.r 












Percent 








> TMldenc* 






























1940 


1951 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1940 


1951 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


Tot.l 


5.009.857 


2.265.032 




3.038.304 


3.128.765 


3.235.684 


3.335.591 


100. 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100,0 


W.O 


5.132 

3,405 

31.954 

3,389 

542.464 

27,473 


2,426 
1.103 
24.061 
1,418 
326.158 

13.598 


4,583 
2,597 
35,163 
2.147 
567.484 

19.536 


2 '.699 

36.890 

2.173 

617.733 

19.340 


4,585 
3,205 

2',316 
660,418 

19,921 


4,640 
2,945 

41,754 

710^419 
21,090 


5.271 
2.776 
43.865 
2.715 
767.022 

21.124 


0.1 
0.1 
0.5 
0.1 
10.8 

0.5 


0.1 
1.1 
0.1 

14.4 

0.6 


0.2 
0.1 
1.2 
0.1 
19.2 


0.1 
1.2 
0.1 
20.3 


0.1 
1.3 
0.1 
21.1 


1.3 
22.0 
0.7 


0.2 


' l„lu, 


O.l 






'. 


0.1 


'ill rnli 


23.0 


- .lorado 


0.6 




158.128 
6,428 
14.752 


71.223 
2.571 
9,314 


75.298 
4.942 
17.766 


76,869 
5,028 
15.494 


75,100 
4,392 
16,436 


77,153 
4,154 
15,032 


78.371 
3.711 
17,221 


3.2 
0.3 


3.2 
0.1 


2.6 
0.2 
0.6 


2.5 
0.2 
0.5 


2.4 
0.1 
0.5 


0.1 
0.5 










0.5 




41,327 


26.011 


83.577 
9,006 


117.619 


155.810 


182.250 
10.322 


175.448 
11,561 


0.8 
0.1 


0.1 


0.3 


3.9 
0.3 


0.3 


0.3 




-»r i. 


0.3 




91,447 

8.232 

325,070 

44,385 

24,648 
15.955 


66,181 

3,791 

110.563 

18.852 

9,826 
6,127 


51,316 

4.882 

199.405 

29 , 269 

9,938 
10.650 


50.101 

197.' 197 
29.09 5 

10.644 


199.' 001 
27.817 

10.349 
11.228 


194^279 
27,892 

10,359 
10,833 


47,616 

4.482 

203,406 

27.013 

9.861 
11,160 


1.8 
0.2 
6.5 
0.9 

0.5 
0.3 


2.9 
0.2 
4.9 
0.8 

0.4 
0.3 


0.2 
6.7 
1.0 

0.3 
0.3 


1.6 
0.2 
6.5 
1.0 

0.4 
0.4 


1.5 
0.2 
6.3 
0.9 

0.3 


1.5 

0.1 
6.0 
0.9 

0.3 




. . ■ 


0.1 


... ■ ■ 


6.1 


~ Hi-no ' 


0.8 




0.3 


■nlai 


0.3 


entucky 


5.55( 


2.873 


5.355 


5.287 


5.248 


5,988 


6.293 


0.1 


0.1 


0.2 


0.2 


0.2 


0.2 


0.2 


'^ }ulalaiu 


17.310 


7,578 


13,001 


13.404 


14.185 


16,157 


17,685 


0.3 


0.3 


0.4 


0.4 


0.5 


0.5 


0.5 


-, iln 


47.233 


18,931 


19,967 


20.206 


20,081 




20.007 


0.9 


0.8 


0.7 


0.7 


0.6 


0.6 


0.5 


•ryUnd 


37.792 


22,156 


28,411 


28.832 


29.455 


30.853 


31.778 


0.8 


1.0 


0.9 


0.9 


0.9 


0.9 


1.0 




364.421 


146,028 


127.710 


128,458 


130.462 


132.774 


135,341 


7.3 


6.5 


4.3 


4.2 


4.2 


4.1 


4.1 




303.103 
61,433 
3.219 


128,816 
19.970 
1.698 


141,719 
25,439 
2,810 


144.456 
22.711 
2,850 


135.378 

22.522 
2,943 


129.160 
21,880 
3.402 


135,412 
21.771 
3.641 


6.1 
1.2 
O.l 


5.7 
0.9 
0.1 


4.8 
0.9 
0.1 


4.8 


4.3 
0.7 


4.0 
0.7 




1 • t« 


0.7 


liltsslppl 


0.1 




43.550 


15.274 


21.162 


20,732 


20,076 


20.223 


20,247 


0.9 


0.7 


0.7 


0.7 


0.5 


0.5 


0.6 




13.777 
18.933 
6,118 


4.738 
6,897 
2,991 


5,263 

7.755 
4.465 


5,138 
7,226 
4,680 


5,196 
7.528 
5,262 
10,464 


5,227 
7.442 
6,080 
10.514 


5,136 

7,577 
5.933 
10,851 


0.3 

0.1 
0.5 


0.2 
0.3 
0.1 
0.5 


0.2 
0.3 

0.4 


0.2 
0.2 
0.2 
0.3 


0.2 
0.2 
0.2 
0.3 


0.2 
0.2 
0.2 
0.3 


0.2 


. . 


0.2 


gvada 


0.2 




0.3 




279.199 


118,580 


151,437 


154,661 


153,179 


159.549 


172,381 


5.6 


5.2 


5.1 


5.1 


4.9 


5.0 


5.2 




12.402 

1,257.501 

4.207 


6,294 

545.990 

3.9 59 


12.712 
553,703 
10.173 


13,033 

563,700 

8,657 


14.615 

574.637 

9.339 


15.139 

600.458 

9.550 


15.777 
508,120 
10,056 


0.2 
25.1 
0.1 


0.3 
24.0 
0.2 


18.8 
0.3 


18.6 
0.3 


18.4 
0.3 


18.5 
0.3 








nth Carolina 


0.3 


" orth Dakota 


10.482 

203.038 
6.946 
34.424 


2.790 

77,351 
2.811 
16.947 


2.865 

108.892 
6,239 
18,421 


3,012 

109,299 
6,256 
19,049 


3.127 

96.561 
7.262 
20,128 


3.099 

92.778 
7,620 


2.967 

86.958 
8.155 
21,032 


0.2 

o!l 
0.7 


0.1 

3.4 
0.1 
0.7 


0.1 

3.7 
0.2 
0.5 


0.1 

3.6 
0.2 
0.6 


0.1 

3.1 

0.2 
0.5 


0.1 

3.0 
0.2 
0.5 






7 6 








0.6 




370.020 
52,570 


98.481 
20.369 


126,073 
17,743 


123,382 
17.483 


119.058 
17,678 


109,737 
17.559 


104,549 
17,749 


7.4 
1.0 


4.3 
0.9 


O.l 


4.1 


3.8 
0.6 


3.4 
0.5 


3.2 


hode laland 


0.5 


outh Carolina 


2,188 


1.471 


3.879 


4.198 


4,312 


5.355 


4.754 


0.1 


O.l 


0.1 


0.1 


0.1 


0.2 


0.1 




7.400 

5.137 

213.898 

10.487 

15.927 
10.093 


1.822 

3.065 

165.927 

8.848 

7.704 
9,260 


2.370 

5.401 

237.514 

12.260 

7.669 
18,825 


2.293 

5.669 

233,579 

7,557 
16,711 


2,354 

6,068 

237.749 

11.992 

7.473 
17,399 


2.299 

6.345 

241.001 

12.408 

7.600 
16,986 


2.112 

6.907 

245.280 

12.655 

7.465 
19.149 


0.1 

4.3 
0.2 

0.3 
0.2 


0.1 
7.3 
0.4 

0.3 
0.4 


0.2 
8.1 

0.3 
0.5 


O.l 

o!4 

0.2 
0.5 


0.1 
0.2 
7.6 
0.4 

0.2 
0.5 


0.1 

0.4 

0.2 
0.5 






















0.6 


lahlngton 


81.636 


45.097 


51,217 


51.684 


52.016 


52,930 


52.054 


1.6 


2.0 


1.7 


1.7 


1.7 


1.6 


1.6 


•at Virginia 


23.662 


6,940 


6,409 


6,182 


6.101 


5,944 


5,691 


0.5 


0.3 


0.2 


0.2 


0.2 


0.2 


0.2 




75.127 
5,917 


17,293 


34.684 


33.601 


34.489 


33,405 


31,267 


1.5 


0.8 






1.1 






J 




.S. larr. and Poaa.: 




























Gua- 


. 














. 


. 




0.2 


0.2 


0.2 


0.2 


Puerto Rico 


14.854 


3.193 


5.578 


8. 556 


15.581 


21.805 


25.784 


0.3 


0.1 


0.2 


0.3 


0.5 


0.7 


0.8 


Virgin lalanda 


3.853 


1.378 


3,286 


3.755 


5.926 


6.699 


7.507 


0.1 


0.1 


0.1 


0.1 


0.2 


0.2 


0.2 


th.r 


6.528 


11,965 






- 


- 


- 


0.1 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 












91 





















TABLE 37. DECLARATIONS OF INTENTION FILED, PETITIONS FOR NATURALIZATION FILED, 
PERSONS NATURALIZED, AND PETITIONS FOR NATURALIZATION DENIED: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1907 - 19 64 



Period 



Declara- 
tions 
filed 



Petitions 
filed 



Persons naturalized 



Military 



1907 - I9 6'h 

1907 - 1910 

1911 - 1920 

1921 - 1930 

1931 - 1940 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

1936 

1937 

1938 

1939 

1940 

1941 - 1950 

1941 

1942 

1943 

1944 

1945 

1946 

1947 

1948 

1949 

1950 

1951 - 1960 

1951 

1952 

1953 

1954 

1955 

1956 

1957 

1958 

1959 

1960 

1961 

1962 

1963 

1964 



8,595.719 



526.322 



164.036 



111.738 



2.686.909 



1,128.972 



2.709.014 



..277 



1.716.979 



19, 



1.518.464 



106,272 
101,345 
83,046 
108,079 
136,524 
148,118 
176,195 
150,673 
155.691 
203,536 

920,284 



145,474 
131,062 
112,629 
117,125 
131,378 
167,127 
165,464 
175,413 
213.413 
278,028 

1.938.066 



.271 
,598 
,368 
,867 
,945 
,784 
,923 
,142 
.175 
,500 



3.224 

2 

995 

2,802 

481 
2,053 
3,936 
3.638 
2,760 



224,123 
221,796 
115.664 
42,368 
31,195 
28.787 
37,771 
60,187 
64,866 
93.527 

323.818 



277,807 

343,487 

377,125 

325,717 

195,917 

123.864 

88.802 

68.265 

71.044 

66.038 



275.747 

268.762 

281.459 

392,766 

208,707 

134,849 

77,442 

69,080 

64,138 

64,279 

1.148.241 



149.799 

1.547 

1.602 

37.474 

49,213 

22,695 

15,213 

16,462 

1,070 

2,456 

2,067 

41.705 



143,495 
136,600 
113,363 
113,669 
118,945 
141.265 
164,976 
162,078 
188,813 
235,260 

1,987,028 



277,294 

270,364 

318,933 

441,979 

231,402 

150,062 

93,904 

70,150 

66,594 

66,346 



,497 
,461 
,558 
,100 
,855 
,870 
.911 
,196 
.115 
.255 



15,921 
15,120 

14,478 
VU2J± 



61,634 
94,086 
98,128 
130,722 
213,508 
137,701 
140,547 
117,344 
109,270 
127,543 

138,718 
129,682 
121.170 

113.218 



53,741 
87,070 
90,476 
104,086 
197,568 
138,681 
137,198 
118,950 
102,623 
117,848 

130,731 
124,972 
121,618 

109,629 



975 

1,585 

1,575 

13.745 

11.958 

7,204 

845 

916 

1,308 

1.594 

1,719 
2,335 
2,560 

2,605 



54,716 
88,655 
92,051 
117,831 
209,526 
145.885 
138.043 
119,866 
103,931 
119,442 

132,450 
127,307 
124,178 

112,234 



92 



fORMER ALLEC!^ 



^.. Table «, or deuned 




rovlslon,./ 








^zyr-''-' 


i::ii 


ii- 






„n„.r. 


oth„ 








17.867 


9.056 


2.605 


85 
















'"'I'' 


138 

lilBl 
'106 


300 

2,154 
'58O 

3.503 

7.383 

l!730 
75 


150 

125 
1.771 

159 


1.230 


13 

7 29 


. 






^""1'* 


































3 










;"[* 


J 


































5 "[J ■ 


^ 










Turkey 




"•s-s.« 


3 










China 1/ 


4,045 

3,029 

'37B 
52 

19,782 


1.091 


591 


378 
374 














Iran 








lar.el 

Japan 


I 














Paleitlne 
















Cuba 




5.243 
2,683 


'259 
163 


'270 

73 
25 

80 
760 


644 
35 


258 


■ 7 


Dominican Republic 


: 


Trinidad and Tobago 

Co.t. Kic, 

El Sal«,dor 


; 


Guatemala 




Honduras 

pin™"*.;;:::::;:::::;;::-: •■•■■••• 


I 


Argentina 

Bra.il 

Chile 

Colo.bla 

•cuador 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South taerlca 2/ 




59 
589 


46 


56 
114 


28 


'° 








South Africa 

Tunl.l. 

oti:r\?r"cVr.'" "''^" '■ 

Oceania 


2 70 
55 


305 




*■ 


^l 




Ne. Zealand 

Other Oceania 2, ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ] ] 


251 






43 
86 


2 


: 


SCateUas and not reported ... 




1/ Include! Por».a. — 


* 



TABtt 39. PERSONS NATURAL 


IZEO. BV COUNTRY OR REGION 




ALLECIA 


CE: 








Country or region of 


lllt 


1955 


1956 


1,57 


1958 


1,59 


1,60 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 






209.526 


145.885 


138.041 
















turo . 




155 560 


11^ 


107 
















*_;^j;';« 


59!rjB 

looses 

3l!l90 
118.69B 


1,320 
17,842 
3,785 

'|28 
2!o24 

U453 
762 

16.000 


2,406 

91549 

1)344 
17,256 
1,240 

'939 
10.412 


2,357 
31924 

7,060 

1.586 

837 
509 

4)647 

7.548 


120 

3)259 

2.000 

ll)038 
1,049 

'634 
757 
784 

4)582 
7.496 


s)o79 

1)132 

682 

10,990 
3,205 

8,313 


l)l37 

1)562 
1,164 

2,134 

1)258 

754 

11.071 


'664 
1,85'. 

1)297 

8)605 

1.493 

752 

682 
12.308 


'603 
1,737 
5,682 

1)055 

165 
3.260 

5,362 
1,163 

513 

2)106 

'150 

14.573 


— ^ 

562 

1,889 

3)374 
9,601 
4,303 

'b56 

4.426 

1,356 

484 

675 

523 

392 

'll7 
15.253 












C.echo.lov.V.a 


6«I 






fl„,„^j 


32fl 


f""" 






,"^*°^J 


4,723 




12.323 


ui;;!;.-::::;::::::::::::::::: 


Netherl«nd» 




Norway 


673 








69'2 




^l,Jl„ 










United Klncdon 


9.826 
1,329 

'1O6 

15.724 


"•^■S-" 


oX''^top;'::;:::::;::::;:;::; 






27,358 

iiims 

38,577 


3,527 
'301 


2,330 


405 
2,861 

12.- 

25 


1,5'.2 

168 
'96 


37 


1,968 

32 

i' 


206 
3)790 

4' 


70 
'565 

' 4' 


4)268 
113 


4,045 


India 




54 


Iran 














j*Jj^^ 


313 




[^^°° 


''378 








r, 










Other A.l» ;/ '"' 




North America 






64|e75 


232 


6)958 
1,372 

68 
152 


5)541 

70 
328 


5.042 

1,323 

186 

153 


163 


10.215 
5.913 
1.928 


b)405 


7)205 
2.211 


113 
251 








Cuba 


2,683 


Haiti 




Irlnld.d and Tobago J/ 






115 










Nlcar^'a 








South An,erlc. 






1,905 
2 [683 


39 
232 


2 3 
59 


138 

89 
202 




196 

143 


253 
178 

452 


183 


323 

96 
165 

42 


545 

254 
149 

215 
533 










224 










U^lj°j^/ 


206 










Other''sooth Aii. rici 2/ 


59 




589 


"^;t"°fri;. 


M 


85 

i' 

767 


45 


27 


i 


75 
28 

327 


;6 
33 

57 


79 

25 

250 

345 


8, 
264 
378 


72 
391 




United Arab Republic (Egypt) 4/. 
Other Africa 2/ 






2,038 


137 


451 
1,659 


^_nj 


1,:" 






271 

67 


73 
267 








69 






Lt.>:r::r::;;;;;;;ed-::::::: 


JI5 



Bulgaria 

Finland 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Utvla 

Luxembourg 

Poland 

Portugal 

spHn '. ;;::;:::;;;::::::: 

Switzerland 

Turkey 

China X' 

India 

Iran 

Pakl.tan 

Other Asia 

Dominican ftepubllc 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Panana 

Bolivia ..'. ! '.'. 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Africa 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic lEgypI 

New Zealand 

Other Oceania 2/ 



5Z0 I 
2,748 I 



I 



m 



I .» 



ul I 1, I 



; = i 538. 



I '■■;• 

I 25 

i 1 






95 





Total 




Country or region of 


Total 


Under 


18- 


20- 


30- 


40- 


50- 


60- 


70- 


80 


for™r .lleglance 


n.t";in.d 




yl'r. 


ywr. 


yfar. 


39 


vtlr. 


59 


ye!r. 


y'elr. 


,nd'o".r 






51.408 


^■091 


2.429 


U.595 


14,110 


8. 931 




z-"" 


>'■■> 


'" 




71.616 


32.711 


2.468 


1.689 


8.923 


9.211 


5.320 


3.191 




398 


57 


^tlb' 








2 




32 












Auitrla 


1,196 


496 


34 




105 


127 


87 


54 


23 


11 




BelgluiK 


'399 


172 


17 


9 


31 


68 


26 


12 


6 


2 




Bulgaria 


87 


66 




1 


8 


27 


11 


' 


11 


' 




Ciechoalovakla 




356 


5 


















Danaark 












95 




15 










182 


















3 




France 




128 


38 


5^ 


162 


29 
1B5 


8? 


37 


23 


3 






I6;646 


5,830 






1,766 






398 




34 




Greece 




1,772 


175 


75 


504 


554 


223 


132 


74 


31 




Hungary 


4!723 


2,855 






981 








120 


25 




3,697 






27 




621 


225 










Italy 


12,323 


6i426 


571 




2,277 






571 


196 


56 


11 










30 


103 


35 








7 




Lithuania 


520 


2B2 


5 








57 


46 


26 


7 












2 
















Nether land! 


2.74K 














127 


11 








673 


336 


12 


23 












5 




Foland 








102 


269 


385 


620 


378 


156 


34 




Portugal 


liiss 


'59s 


131 


53 


139 


144 


56 


36 


27 


11 








187 






30 














Spain 


69 2 


359 


26 


12 


54 


140 


58 


28 


34 


7 




Sw.den 










27 




35 






















186 












Turkey 


421 


197 


2 


7 


20 


Bl 


50 


15 


16 


5 
















1,302 


886 


376 










1,329 


630 


IB 


36 


85 














Vufoelavla 


1,965 










320 


182 


153 


54 


19 




Other lurope 


106 


' 45 


2 




13 


20 


<■ 


' 


' 








15.724 


6.869 


920 


211 


954 




1.343 


976 


566 


170 


20 


China X' 


4,045 


2,168 




54 






509 


^TT 


312 


108 






252 


182 


12 




32 


91 


26 


4 


6 


9 






54 






















Iran 


319 


19 3 


6 








34 










Iraq 








3 


27 


46 


13 


2 


4 


1 






3,029 


1,516 






153 




480 


337 








jlp" 






177 


16 




59 


22 




31 


15 




Korea 


'333 


215 


18 


9 


2! 


85 


23 


I 


5 


; 




Lebanon 


'378 




24 


4 


51 


















46 








32 


3 


3 


3 






laleatlne 


























2,274 






50 


234 


314 




240 








Syrian Arab Republic 




64 


3 








5 




3 


3 




Other Aela g/ 


216 


103 


10 


2 


21 


45 


14 


' 


3 


2 




N th A. I 


19.782 


9.215 


561 


423 


2.133 


2.374 


1.750 


915 


710 


260 


89 


Canada 




4,043 


329 














29 


8 




5!213 


2,643 


139 


137 


687 


'425 


'256 


239 


458 


223 




Cuba 


















35 


B 




Do.lnlcan KepubUc 


'290 


'125 


8 


6 


'.5 


37 


20 


6 


3 






























Jamaica 


374 


156 






29 


39 


54 


22 


6 






Irlnldad and Tobago 








2 
















Coat. Klca 






15 






14 






3 








115 


48 




3 


23 




3 










Cuat™la°' 


119 


57 








20 


3 




2 








250 




6 


3 


46 


44 




13 






. 


Klcaru^a 


207 


94 


2 




36 


36 


9 


3 


3 




. 


Fanau 


647 


258 


16 


12 


82 


64 


63 


20 


1 






South teerlca 


2.139 


1.149 


64 


^ 


292 


435 


216 


8^ 


24 






Argantlna 


629 




14 




60 














kllvia 




70 




2 


33 


18 


7 


6 








•rarll 


224 


96 


11 




17 




17 


9 


3 






Chll. 




73 








33 




3 








Colombia 


419 


227 


14 


8 


BO 




30 




4 


2 






206 






2 


39 














Peru 


176 












13 










Venezuela 




61 


(, 


4 


9 


10 




11 


4 


I 




Other South Anarlca 2/ 


59 


29 


3 


2 


6 


<• 


10 


' 








Afilca 




298 


10 


12 


56 


100 


65 


33 


15 


7 




Morocco 








3 




II 


5 




2 






South Africa 


141 


67 


; 




,1 






, 




3 




lunlela 




g 




. 


4 


1 


1 


1 


1 






United Arab Republic (Egypt) 












55 












Other Africa g/ 


55 


30 


3 


- 


6 


12 


7 




- 


2 


- 


Oceania 


421 


173 


13 


6 




55 


37 


22 


, 


2 




Auatralia 


297 






















Nw Zealand 










5 






2 








Other Oceania g/ 


55 


35 


5 


2 




10 


3 






i 




U. S. posaeaslona 


251 


89 


2, 






23 






5 


2 










36 


55 


178 


203 


195 


128 






' 



96 



Table 41. persons naturalized, by country or 

ALLtCIANCE, SEX, AND ACE: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30 


R8C10N Of roRMBl 
1964 (Cont'd) 










Female. 




former .lUglmce 


Total 




yelr. 


I. 


30- 


yeara 


59 


yE;. 


70-- 


BO 


All eountrl.. 


60.826 


4.110 


2,5?7 


16.515 


18.164 


9.514 


5.441 


3.341 


979 


165 


E„„p, 
























227 
26R 

1.B68 

36 
■5S5 

5.902 


50 

548 

6 
220 

1.175 


1 

1! 

374 
95 

488 
46 


372 
4,070 

425 

53 

290 
35 

53 
1.559 


10 
57 

'35B 

425 

66 
1.931 


48 

"215 

726 
56 

271 

408 

39 
1.065 


22 

529 

500 
63 
40 

128 

35 
565 


70 
57 

206 

219 

35 


15 

as 
12 

6 




^^^l I 
















D^'^rk ""'' 


























uTrZ ::::::::::;::::::::::::;:::;::::::: 








L°thulrl« 
















p°J^'j 
















|'"'J" 






Turkey 




"■S-S-K 












CM-.i/ 


1.055 

20 
57 


157 
11 

15 

72 
225 

476 
1 
22 


34 
8 


16 

32 
15 

53 
269 

222 


637 

34 
15 

■ 30 
27 5 

5 

35 


360 
10 

3 

16 

1 


6 

3 

3 
8 

3 

3 


56 

2 

2 
73 
32 

5 
1 

823 


- 








Iran"" 
















J*"""" 












p'^'"^" 








PhlllDDlnes 








o"-" "'i-a' 






5.436 
2.570 

"165 
45 


238 
158 

3 

5 
3 

13 

75 


221 
166 

5 


1.018 
'.95 

24 
37 


1.703 
337 

43 
341 


1.263 
295 

25 

5 


315 
6 
15 


505 

2 

5 
2 

3 
5 

37 


52 








j" ° 






. 






j' 1 




Trlnld.6 end Tob.go 












Hondura. 


















55 
RO 


3 


4 
6 


27 
26 


46 


43 

24 

15 

5 




5 
6 


I 








r° "[* 








^ : ■ 












^'" ■'[ 














13 


3 


' 


21 
8 


15 


1 


1 


2 


3 








Sout ^ frlca 








Other Afrlc. 2/ 






I 


20 






58 
17 

9 

60 


9 




B 


1 








°'^"''"-"^' 


103 29 




Stat'l'^s'o'd'^t reported 












L 





97 



TABLE 41A, PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY SEX, MARITAL STATUS, MEDIAN AGE, 
AND MAJOR OCCUPATION GROUP? YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1960 - 1964 



Sex, marital status, median 
age, and occupation 



Total naturalized 

Sex and marital statusi 

Males 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Females 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Males per 1,000 females 

Median age { years) « 

Both sexes 

Males 

Females 

Major occupation group: 

Professional, technical, and kindred workers 

Farmers and farm managers 

Managers, officials, and proprietors, 

except farm 

Clerical, sales, and kindred workers 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers 

Operatives and kindred workers 

Private household workers 

Service workers, except private household ... 

Farm laborers and foremen 

Laborers, except farm and mine 

Housewives, children, and others with 

no occupation 



127,307 



50,896 



14,341 

34,517 

1,183 

852 

3 

68,546 



10,330 

52,252 

4,694 

1,262 



38.0 
38.9 
37.3 



7,768 
549 



11,204 
15,116 
1,995 
8,896 
932 
5,307 

55,038 



58,795 



17,438 

39,129 

1,327 

888 

13 

73,655 



12,133 

54,716 

5,411 

1,385 

10 

798 



36.2 
38.8 
37.7 



8,408 
601 

3,814 
10,191 
12,746 
16,078 

2,072 
10,477 

1,121 

7,933 

59,009 



60, t 



58,303 



19,269 

39,986 

919 



66,319 



18,500 

38,210 

690 

900 

3 

65,875 



12,798 

48,433 

3,776 

1,312 



35.3 
36.0 
34.8 



11,053 
389 

4,059 
11,405 
13,769 
13,456 

1,398 

11,269 

744 

7,086 

52,679 



12,991 

48,616 

2,957 

1,308 

3 

885 



33,8 
34.4 
33.3 



12,714 
269 

4,296 
11,588 
13,411 
11,927 

1,368 

10,362 

553 

5,166 

52,524 



98 



TERRITORIES OF RESIDENCE: 



^0! -daho 



llchigan 



m!^ 



)hio 
HI )klah 



I'irgln 



Guam 

Puerto Rico .. 
Virgin Islands 



.332.862 

3,624 
3,011 
7,521 
1,358 
209,029 



93,961 
15,4 



16,214 
61,647 
58,963 
12,248 
1,628 

11,29 
3,079 
5,448 



90,445 

3,749 

332,701 

5,369 



8,980 
53,719 
7,523 



21,804 
2,554 
15,847 



1,C 
5,843 



18,991 

1,384 
3,620 
305 
1,017 
2,345 

582 



1,832 


1,472 


5,889 


5,462 


6,778 


6,017 


1,944 


1,198 



600 

123 

16,269 



237 

6,053 
400 
752 

5,197 
671 



7,316 

324 

23,988 



2,377 

256 

8,223 



8,761 
525 

31,467 

404 



547 


688 


1,534 


1,629 


203 


207 


9,542 


9,461 


1,268 


1,345 



5,133 
495 
761 

4,508 



99 



TABLE 42B. PERSONS NATURAUZED, BY TYPE OF COURT AND STATES 
OR TERRnORIES OF RESIDEMCEj YEAR ENDED JUNE 30,1964 



State or territory 
nf residence 

Total 

Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California... 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

HaMall 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

loMa • 

Kansas .< 

Kentucky 

Louisiana ..••< 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

(Hah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington.... 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoaiing 

U.S. territories and possession* i 

Guam 

Puerto Rico... 

Virgin Islands 



_2SU12_ 



21.915 



363 
321 
881 
139 
20,425 

905 

2,605 

219 

568 

2,887 

717 
1,542 

148 
8,115 
1,072 

370 
486 
438 
513 
432 

1,443 

5,027 

4,073 

795 

168 

925 
272 
350 
285 
301 

7,758 

366 

25,195 

548 

124 

3,957 
478 
824 

4,212 
558 

292 
109 
306 
4,518 
475 

160 
1,182 
2,102 

161 

1,368 

92 



443 
129 
92 



363 
146 
693 
139 
16,914 

695 

2,071 

219 

568 

2,729 

717 

1,303 

62 

7,855 

1,072 

370 
288 
438 
513 
232 



3,438 

2,876 

747 

168 

925 
50 
331 
191 
95 

3,255 

186 

22,013 

548 

120 

3,101 
204 
564 

2,934 
384 

292 
74 
306 
4,046 
162 

107 
1,182 
1,792 
157 
955 
35 



210 
534 



239 
86 
260 



200 

463 

1,589 

1,197 

48 



222 
19 

94 
206 

4,503 

180 

3,182 



856 
274 
260 
1,228 
174 



472 
313 



310 

4 

413 

57 



Rural: Population 















.ru 


. Pho.rU 


CM 


..B"".!" 












— ""s"" 


















































Fl.. 


J"""""" 


































Md.i 


elmi!^""!. ;!:!::!:::: 




^';^»'j;;;2 


























































N.Me. 


•'""■"""I- 
















"■■=''"'" 
































;™^«;<° 










?.[.; 


iTovia.nce 














v«..' 


»::;o»".^r^: ::::::: 














other 


cUIei"''" 


• 11 o 


th^r •" ' 



102 





.A..... 


POSOIIS KATURAUZED, BY COUia«Y OH RffilOU OF Bit 
VSA> ENDED JUNE 30, 1964 


..D 


EA* OF 


.™Y: 


















Country or ra|lon 


JZ"l 


Ca 


. . . 


-.r„ 




-1964 


1963 


1962 


-|961 








1957 




■ 955 


1,54 


1953 


1952 


1951 


1950 


, '1?'. 


''IZ' 




Auatrla 
•a lulu. 

llnland 
Iranea 

Ifa^Iy 

Matharlandi 
Koniay 

Spain 

lurkay (turop. and Aala) 
Unltad Klnidoa 


ii:.2» 


189 


1.056 


1.255 


3.147 


6.903 


7.766 


25.620 


16.111 


13.308 


7.046 


4,315 


2.938 


i.L48. 


3,065 


2.202^ 


.±Aii. 


i^n. 
































,,3. 






j.-ies. 


J 


437 

l,M3 

509 

341 

1.512 

15.916 

silM 
3,821 
11,998 

'664 
5,892 

2)049 


■ 3 
1! 


1 


37 


' 


58 

40 
67 

24 

131 

47 

26 
59 

37 
79 
51 


88 
15 

54 
360 
89 


340 

130 
94 

3.159 

735 

'l69 

153 

197 

1.217 
571 
674 
403 


208 
2 50 

2.405 
'909 

'208 
305 
162 


58 

1,933 

475 

1.684 
80 

37 


BO 
559 


48 
39 


25 


108 
90 


13 
117 


24 

25 
46 
37 
66 
34 
13 
341 
30 


25 
68 

153 

265 

49 5 


95 

289 
259 

50 
101 

379 


Chl,»l/ 
Hon, ICor« 
India 

Jordan i/ 

si^tlll Al.rilp«bllc 
1 Othar Aala 


307 
253 
530 

1.405 

299 

2.294 

155 






143 
5 
96 

19 




46 

2 34 
46 


198 
10 


1.038 
109 

500 
1" 

3« 


72 


16 




75 




38 


50 
53 








111,,. 

Haiti 

Othar Uaat Indlai 


2.S4. 

5.217 

2.617 
286 
169 
714 

1.064 
153 

123 
257 
208 

2 30 
278 




3 
2 


26 

2 
4 

4 

2 
12 




306 

117 

5 
20 


95 

105 

9 

74 

6 

8 


204 
511 


36 

146 

401 


368 
259 


564 
406 

34 
135 




105 


33 

'5 

4ft 


34 


75 
25 


885 
652 

55 


10 
35 


oJhtr'soitk Aaarlca 


136 




f 


2 

2 


5 


19 


20 

23 
10 


27 
35 


34 


25 
56 

25 
6 


17 




13 

5 
30 
22 

6 
3 


'2 
1: 


2 
3 


! 


4 


3 




«l|(arla 
Ho roc CO 

lunl.la "" 

Unltad Arrt laptibllc II||ypt) 

Othai Africa 

Oeaania 

Othar 'ocalnta ' "^ 
Othar countrlaa 


190 

72 




1 


2 


2 
8 

5 

10 


33 

8 
2 
42 
16 


13 

8 
118 
17 


33 

308 


22 


15 

6 
12 
22 

25 


18 


'4 

6 


6 


19 




) 
10 


112 


5 

13 




49 


: 


I 


] 


3 


12 


15 


37 


13 

5 
15 




6 
5 


^ 


2 

2 


2 


2 


: 

5 
I 


73 

13 
10 


5 
3 




V Includaa Arab Palaatlna. 














103 

























TABLE 45. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY GENERAL AND SPECIAL NATURALIZATION PROVISIONS: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 196)0 - 1964 



naturalization provisions 

Total 

General provisions 

Special provisions 

Persons married to U. S. 

citizens ..>,....... 

Children, including adopted 
children of U. S. citizen 
parents 

Former U. S. citizens who 
lost citizenship by 
marriage o . . 

Philippine citizens who 
entered the United States 
prior to May 1, 1934, and 
have resided continuously 
in the United States ...... 

Persons who served in U. S. 
armed forces for three 
years 

Persons who served in U . S. 
armed forces during World 
War I, World War II or the 
Korean hostilities \/ .... 

Lodge Act enlistees 

Persons who served on certain 
U. 8. vessels ,. 

Former U. S. citizens who 
lost citizenship by enter- 
ing the armed forces of 
foreign countries during 
World War II 

Nationals but not citizens 
of the United States ...... 

Persons naturalized under 
private law 

Other 

1/ Section 22(b), Act of Septembe 
added: "or the Korean hostili 



I960- 
1964 



127,307 



470,574 
145,037 



3,289 
334 



91,548 
27,894 



104,341 
28,109 



98,739 
28,568 



93,325 
30,853 



19,799 



438 
45 



7,416 



492 
52 



8,723 



790 
63 



820 
100 



r 26, 1961, 
ties" . 



104 



TABUI i6. AOminSTJATlVI ( 



»KD KEASON F0« CLAIH: YEM ENDED 


UNE 30. 


1964 


















°i' 






-":r.-.""- 


1 


1^ 


1 

1^ 


li 

s i 
"0 


li 


r 

¥■ 


L 
ll 

II 


i 
1: 


I 


Ml counT... 














































145 
2,965 

184 


904 
57 

15 

30 
31 


■'■154 

547 


20 


101 


I 

' 


19- 


































HunSTy 
















Norway 




















































46 

9 20 
7.8B1 


3S4 

1.473 
32 

4.775 


595 


507 


1.822 




120 


>n 


10 
































J»P«n 




































245 

3' 
220 


2;317 
122 

163 
532 


5i4 
13 




I.4J5 
























































Nicaragua 




























37 


'29 

37 


] 


17 


139 




1 


': 






























: 
























27 
66 








63 


': 










^'*"''" 


. 




























!! 


16 


3 
5 








1 


1 










P.clfU I. land. (U. S. .d». ) 


[ 








L_ 


J 










II S.a Tabl, 
2/ Includa. 
J/ Include. 



Belgl"" 

Finland 

France 

Italy 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) ... 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) . 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

China 1/ 

Hong Kong 

Indonesia 

Iraq V.'.'.'.'.'.'.W.'.W'.WW'.'.'.'. 
Israel 

Jordan 2/ 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Syrian Arab Republic 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Other West Indies 

Coata Rica 

El Salvador 

Honduras 

Other Central America 

Argent Ina 

Chll '...'.'.'..'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Venezuela 

Algeria 

South Africa 

Tunisia 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Pacific Islands (U. s. adm.) 
Other Oceania 

Other countries 

1/ Includes Formosa 

2/ Includes Arab Palestine 



I 1?1 



l\ ll 



106 



T.», ■: a« ADMINISTRATIVE CERTIFICATES OF CITIZENSHIP ISSUED TO PERSONS WHO ACQUIRED CITIZENSHIP AT BIRTH ABROAD 
' 1;u»2S cJ?"eJ pLenIs! BY COIWTRY OH REGION OF BIRTH AND YEAR ACQUIRED. YEAR mOW JUNE 30. 1964 





Country or region 


Total 




;j 


i?Ji??7|i956li9aU^h''^^li?^^li?-nliH '^ n^""" 










A 




m= 










J 


815 


m 467 JSI Ji2 -2i5 .162 _U2 ^ W- l4i%_ 


Belgium 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumani a 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) 

united Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

China'!/'!!!!.! 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iraq 

Jordan 2/ 


83 
20 
27 
12 

800 
4,250 
149 
15 
52 

34 
57 

217 
3 

178 
30 
15 

102 
1.537 
10 
30 
31 










1 


; ': 1 '? i : i ; '? 


2 


- 14 
3 117 


1 

50 91 
290 387 
2 4 
1 
1 1 






1 


'■■::::: \ 




523 


107 
573 


482 


87 54 44 27 18 7 3 5 49 

391 278 235 198 137 107 101 84 316 

3 I - 1 - 2 - 1 35 

18 


20 

28 
80 
9 
32 


18 


17 


28 


14 16 10 4 7 6 4 6 171 


575 




4 3 




3 
2 

12 


\ 


3 1 1 1 - - - - 3 

\ I I : : \ : : A 

6 4 1 2 1 1 4 - 24 


41 

127 




14 39 
2 
l 
17 15 
99 155 

2 1 


34 
162 


47 

1 
14 


11 

1 
2 

140 

1 


8 - 2 2 I - - - 2 
2 - 2 - 2 1 - - 2 

1 ^2 1 ; 2 3 : : 2 
103 102 73 61 68 29 15 8 293 

! 1 I - - - - - 9 

.2iiJLiJ.-U2.i42ji2_2i_il_li8 _^ 


9 
17 

56 
8 

22 
9 


41 
33 

23 
5 
10 
1.473 
20 
101 
32 

241 

4B 


— 4-f 


■V 11 
1 1 

1 1 

2 6 

62 111 

15 18 

27 37 
32 21 


10 


' 9 

2 

140 
12 

32 

35 


I 
1 

136 


142 104 121 il 7^ 4^ 49 76 157 


14 
U 

3 

2 
14 


26 


10 8 4 I 1 - 1 - 5 

25 19 26 33 21 35 32 46 280 
19 14 14 7 9 3 4 2 4 


2 
24 
89 

3 


Syrian Arab Republic 


- ' 


6 3 


120 


" 


3 
99 


4 1 3 

107 89 100 .K _S3. Aa± AIL A3SL UZ22_ 


8 


orth America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

jamaic'a'!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 

other West Indies 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Other Central AiKrica 

togentlna 

Brazil 

Chile 

Coloicbla 

Ecuador 

Peru 


um- 


1.429 
2,317 
122 
36 
3 
12 
134 

3 

10 

163 


-i-i- 

5 35 


■H|--3r 

36 30 
2 


40 


25 
29 


— 3? 
34 


51 50 47 56 52 60 77 76 997 
------ 2 


642 
67 
27 
1 




1 1 

2 7 


12 


; 


It 


n 5 5 i 2 4 - 3 40 




1 

- 13 


1 

I 

2 3 
28 20 














: 




2 

1 


7 


18 


li 


3 
10 


3 2 5 3 9 4 7 72 
20 10 19 16 17 16 21 26 179 

__2. 4 4 7 _6 _l_i_l_S2_ 


41 

101 


29 

25 
22 

23 

13 

310 


- - 1 


1 2 
3 1 

2 1 
1 

16 33 


1 
38 




2 

1 
.i 


' ' ■ 1 ; I i I '4 
'j : 'j 1 - 1 I - 6 

11^112-1 B 
4 3 1 4 2 3 I 3 16 
1.-6 


9 
9 

3 
3 


llorocco 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

Tunisia 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 


--^ 


^-3 

112 

10 

11 

164 


n 


7 10 

1 
1 1 

8 21 

e 




2 
3 


1 


- I : : I \ : \ I 

1 . - 1 - I - * 

3 

1 1 1 - - - - 3 
16 7 8 4 2 2 1 1 10 


2 
3 

1 
9 


New Zealand 

Pacific Island. (U. S. A<ta.) 


s 


—4^ 

15 
13 
16 

9 


- 






3 


1 


: I I : i : I : \l 
I I . 1 - 1 1 - 
1 - 2 1 - - - - 5 

1 - I ' 


2 


Ither countrle 


•1 


3 


ly Includes Fornota. 
•y Includes Arab Pdtstlne. 

757-022 O - 64 - 8 






] 


07 











< c 
3o- 



3 
2 


I 




" 


^ 




' 




' 




' 


S 


" 


■ 


<^ 


s 


" 


" 


2 


S 


' 




i 


3 


- -^ -£- - - - -2S_ " . o ^- . ^s- 


2 


: 


. . .§. ^ • ^ -2^_ . . s .. ^ ..- 


i 


IC 


- - -3- - - - — II - - - 5" - ns- 


s 


§ 


S - -S ' n ' -^ - '2£ - - S 3-^ ' 'S-» 


s 


S 


- - -S- - -^ ' --g^ 2 - :: :2" - "^^ 


2 


1 


~„ -..-.-- .-g| . ..-.= - -r 


2 


5 


, .„,,,„, „,g^^^ . . . 5. . ~s = 


1^ 


S 


5 ---= = - ° -s.| ~ ' " r = -s- 


S 


! 


s = '-^ = ■ = "It = " - r = =s= 


sl 


2 




1 

s 

J 


J 
1 


£ 

i 

j: 


^£ 

1 c 

jj 

]jj 

.2 


i 
1 

2 

1 
1 


^^ £ 
til 

II! 

1 is 1 

S 5 .2 2 


1 
1 

2 1 


S 

L 

s 1 


I 

g „ 
si 

1 i 


'1 


1 

1 
i 


1 
1 


si 


^1 
|g 

-S M 
gl 

IS 

21 


^1 

51 

^^ 
^^ 

IS 

j: c 
1 " 

2-i 

ill 

r si 


li 

!« 

II 
|t 

IP 

III 
m 


:l 

li 

K 
si 

.1=1 


1 
L 

V'. 


.1 







TABLE 50. CERTIFICATES OF NATURALIZATION REVOKEU, BY GROUNUS: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1955 - 196'. 



1955- 
1964 



Total number 

stabllshed permanent 
residence abroad withli 
five years after 
naturalization 

jbversive 

iscellaneous grounds .. 



TABLE 51. PERSONS EXPATRIATED, BY GROUNUS AND YEAR REPORTS RECEIVED: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1955 - 196'. 



Total number 1/ 



Residence In a foreign state 
Naturalization In a foreign 



Entering 






rvl 


iR 


in 


the 


armed 


fore 


es 


of 




fo 


eign 


state 















11,945 
13,754 



2,421 
2,197 



1,237 
1,063 



1,436 
1,776 



1.515 

2,2?3 



1,748 

2,59 2 



992 
1.017 



1,?90 
1,151 



977 
1,113 



Taking an oath of aUegiar 
n a foreign state 



Accepting or performing 
duties under a foreign 
state 



Other grounds 



12 



i/ Cases of 359 persons expatriated for departing from or remaining away from the U.S. 

military service, reported for 1955 - 1963, were not included because this statutory provl 
was ruled unconstitutional bv the U.S. Supreme Court on February 18, 1963. (Kennedy v. 
Francisco Mendoza-Mart Inez (372 U.S. 144) and Rusk v. Joseph Henry Cort (372 U.S. 2;'4)). 
- This ground of expatriation no longer valid. Supreme Court decision in Schneider vs. Rusk 
(377 U.S. 163, May 18, 19641 ruled as unconstitutional, statutory provisions which cause 
naturalized citizens to loose their nationality by extended residence abroad. 



109 



■rf a. 



w 3 u-i u 3 



o ■-! 0) j: 



«! o o 3 c 



o -I ^ ^ 



- i 



3 ■-< C 0) 

X c is ffl 

3 I H >- 

'^ 01 k. (U 

■O ti > I- -o 



r I 



no 



23 






O Q 



2 2 



2 


o 


i 


'' 


c 


2 






CM 

CM 


K°? 


i 






S 


i 




en <o 


s 

00* 


5S 

en r^ 
oS S 




c 


oc 




2 


o 


vO CM vj vO 


CM O vD <N u^ 


<o n vo in u~i 

2 ^ - 2^ 

-• 


mo m 

r^ m CI 

m r- CM 




3 

2 




o a^a^ ^ <t 


r-. r- O <o <r 

;c5_-s S 2 


en CM a> ci o 
r~ -• -3- v£ 


S2 ?! 

ON^CM^ vD 
>0 ^O (M 


^§ 


3 
2 


^, 


O — O m t^ 


-• o vo 00 <r 

P; - - ^ 2 


o^ -1 <r m in 

2 -- - In 

m 


<r\ o ci 

f;2* '^" 


oJ S 


S 

2 




(N CM 


rs § 1 


r- — vD — m 

in CM CM 00 


—1 ON 


-< C) 


C7^ 


vO 


CI CM >o <r o 
CO r^ u^ - <f 
sf_ CM CO uy 


s°S 1 S 


<r CM m vc r-i 

2 " - g^_ 


cn o CJN 

CT> o — ' 
t^ CM p~ 


s^ 


00 
2 


vO 


vO <f >0 CT^ 00 


5-S S S 


i 


-« O r^ 


r- tn 
>c Cl 


2 


O 


in n iTi -o 

(M (VJ 


m c-i >3- CM 


O >0 CC -• (M 

CTv m -a vf 


si S 


(^ 1^ 


a> 


c 


%o m <t in 


Pa £ s 


00 0> en vO CN 

r~ r- r^ r^ 
en c^ 


si I 


-H 00 


0^ 


00 

c 


CT% O CM CM m 

!n<r OO <r <N 
m w^ <r <f 

o' c 


?^;3;2 s ;s 

aD_ m 00 m 


r- vD ro CM r^ 
00 >o 00 -. 

<f CM 


2.". ^. 


^ 2 


22 


oo' 


.c -» m o> u-i 


<f o -• <n o 

5 2;g S s 




00 in (N o" -^ 
<^ r- CM CM 


c 

1 




e 

*- 

i 

'8 


1 


■1 

5 


1 





" 3 



u 


o 
a 



> 

c 



2 

01 


o 

\ 

a 


2 

c 

4 


1 


6 

5 


1 


>2 

O 


§ 
* 

> 

1 



i 




"S 

U) 


c 


i 


< 

s 1 

B C 
0. 


m 
1 

Q 


c 

c 

> 

c 
c 

1 


c 


> 

M 

Z 


I 

c 

i 
s 

i 


> 
1 


1 





rs K 



^ ^ o 



111 



-J o o cN m 



>o r^ m \o 



OCNOOtMO-^ <M 00 a^ o 



-% 



O \0 






^^^COCOQO \Of*^CT^ 



ON M >0 vD 



vO N -H -H 



vC -H vO -H 
t^ ^ -< <f 



si 



^ in in o o 



CT^r^oo•n^a -^xo^ 



S5 

u u 
■^ • q « 



O -w ^ O 
> " O C 



«l^g| 



« 00 4J 00- 



£rS 8.5 z: ^ 



j: -> > ^ o 



H4 OS 0) iv, o < 



eo 

60 



TABLE 55. WRITS OF HABEAS CORPUS, JUDICIAL REVIEW OF CRt£R 
OT DEPORTATION AND DECLARATORY JUOGNENTS DJ EXCLUSION AND DEPCRTATION CASES i 
YEARS ENI£D JUNE 30, 1960 - 1964 



Action taken 



1960- 
1964 



Total Mlta of habeas corpus t 

Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government 

Unfavorable to U.S. Governnent... 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed.... 

Pending end of year 

Involving exclusion: 

Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government... 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government. 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed.. 

Pending end of year 

^nvQlvino deportation I 

Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government... 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government. 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed.. 

Pending end of year 

Total Judicial Review of Order of 
Deportation (Sec. 106 18H Act.) .l/ 

inY?tvJ,nq dep<?rtatt<?ni 

Disposed of...... 

Favorable to U.S. Government... 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government. 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed.. 

Pending end of year 

Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. 
Unfavorable to U.: 
Withdrawn or othe: 

^nYolYinq s use iscy 

Favorable to U.S. 
Unfavorable to U.! 
Withdrawn or othe: 

InY9lYinq exciusiffl 

Favorable to U.S. 
Unfavorable to U.: 
Withdrawn or othe: 

1/ Not reported prior to January 1, 1962 



Writs of habeas corpus 





97 


85 


75 


29 


41 


281 
23 
23 


77 
10 

10 


79 
3 
3 


64 
6 

5 


25 
3 

1 


36 

1 
4 


9 


18 


11 


6 


3 


9 


43 


5 


10 


9 


10 


9 


37 
2 
4 


5 


8 
2 


9 


8 
2 


7 
2 


4 


1 


- 


3 


1 


4 


284 


92 


75 


66 


19 




244 
21 
19 


72 
10 
10 


71 

3 

1 


55 
6 
5 


17 

1 


29 

1 
2 


5 


17 


n 


3 


2 


5 





Judicial 


Review 












25 


94 


51 








21 


34 


35 








1 


9 


7 








3 


51 


9 








95 


47 


44 







Declaratory judgments 






Disposed of«»**»**»**««««««««*« •••••••• 


1.184 


237 


364 


327 


169 


87 




917 
134 
133 

70 


l80 
29 
28 

34 


322 
24 
18 

18 


226 
59 
42 

5 


120 
21 
28 

10 


69 


Unfavorable to U.S. Government 

Withdrawn or otherwise closed 


1 
17 

3 




20 
12 

1.114 


17 
11 
6 


11 
7 

346 


4 

1 
322 


4 

2 

4 

159 


■ 2 — 


Unfavorable to U.S. Government 

Withdrawn or otherwise closed 


1 

84 


879 
114 
121 


163 
18 
22 


311 
17 
18 


222 
59 
41 


116 
19 
24 


67 


Unfavorable to U.S. Government 

Withdrawn or otherwise closed 


1 
16 



TABLE 56, PRIVATE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY BILLS 
INTRODUCED AND LAWS ENACTED, 75TH CONO^ESS 
THROUGH 88TH CONGRESS 



Congress 



Bills 
introduced 


Laws 


3,647 


196 


3,592 


544 


3,069 


488 


4,364 


927 


4,474 


1,227 


4,797 


755 


3,669 


729 


2,811 


505 


1,141 


121 


429 


14 


163 


12 


430 


22 


601 


65 


293 


30 



88th, 
87th, 
86th. 
85th. 
84th. 
83rd. 
82nd. 
81st. 
80th. 
79th. 
78th. 
77th. 
76th. 
75th. 



114 





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as. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 



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