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Full text of "Annual report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service"

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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ANNUAL 
REPORT,, 

Immigration and Naturalization Service 



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Washington, D.C 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20536 

REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER 
OF IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION 

The Attorney General 

United States Department qf Justice 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the Annual Report of the Immigration 
and Naturalization Service for the year ended June 30, 1965. 

Respectfully submitted. 




Raymond F. Farrell, 

Commissioner. 



Immigration and Naturalization Service. 



i 



For sale by the Superintendent o( Documents, U.S. Government Printing ( 
Washington, D.C, 20402 - Price 76 cents 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

GENERAL 1 

TRAVEL CONTROL AND ADJUDICATIONS 1 

Travel Control 1 

Admissions 2 

Refugees 4 

Inadmissible aliens 5 

Adjustment of status 5 

Adjudications 6 

Service operations outside the United States 7 

BORDER PATROL AND INVESTIGATIONS 7 

Deportable aliens located 8 

Foreign-born law violators 10 

Criminal prosecution 12 

Revocation of naturalization 12 

DETENTION AND DEPORTATION ACTIVITIES 13 

HEARINGS AND LITIGATION 14 

Exclusion and deportation hearings 14 

Litigation 15 

ALIEN ADDRESS REPORTS 16 

CITIZENSHIP. 16 

Judicial naturalization 16 

Related naturalization matters 17 

Derivative citizens 19 

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 20 



TABLES 

1. Immigration to the United States: 1820-1965 

2. Aliens and citizens admitted and departed, by months: Years ended June 30, 1964 and 1965. 

3. Aliens and citizens admitted at United States ports of entry: Years ended June 30, 1964- 

1965 

4. Aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration laws: Years ended June 30, 1961-1965_ 

5. Immigrants admitted, by port: Years ended June 30, 1961-1965 

6. Immigrants admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and country or region of birth: 

Year ended June 30, 1965 

6A. Immigrants admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and country or region of last 

permanent residence: Year ended June 30, 1965 

6B. Aliens who adjusted status to permanent residents in the United States, by country or region 

of birth: Year ended June 30, 1965 

6C. Refugees admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 1946-1965 

6D. Immigrants admitted under the Act of September 11, 1957 (P.L. 85-316), by class of ad- 
mission and country or region of bu-th: September 11, 1957-June 30, 1965 

6E. Immigrants admitted under the Act of September 26, 1961 (P.L. 87-301), September 26, 

1961-June 30, 1965 

6F. Immigrants admitted under the Act of October 24, 1962 (P.L. 87-885), by country or region 
of birth: October 24, 1962-June 30, 1965 

7. Annual quotas and quota immigrants admitted: Years ended June 30, 1961-1965 

7A. Quota immigrants admitted, by quota area and quota preferences: Year ended June 30, 

1965 

8. Immigrants admitted, by country or region of birth and major occupation group: Year 

ended June 30, 1965 

8A. Beneficiaries of first preference visa petitions, and other immigrants admitted, by occupa- 
tion: Year ended June 30, 1965 

9. Immigrants admitted, by country or region of birth, sex, and age: Year ended June 30, 1965. 

10. Immigrants admitted, by sex and age: Years ended June 30, 1956-1965 

lOA. Immigrants admitted by sex, marital status, age, and major occupation group: Years 

ended June 30, 1961-1 965 

11. Aliens and citizens admitted and departed: Years ended June 30, 1908-1965 

12. Immigrants admitted, by State of intended future permanent residence: Years ended June 

30, 1956-1965- - - 

12 A. Immigi'ants admitted, by specified countries of birth and State of intended future permanent 

residence: Year ended June 30, 1965 

12B. Immigrants admitted, by specified countries of birth and rural and urban area and city: 

Year ended June 30, 1965 

13. Immigration by country, for decades: 1820-1965 

14. Immigrants admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 1956-1965 

14 A. Refugee-escapees paroled under Act of July 14, 1960, by country of last residence and 

country of flight: July 14, 1960-June 30, 1965 

14B. Hong Kong Chinese paroled into the United States, by sex, marital status, age, and major 

occupation group: June 4, 1962-June 30, 1965 

14C. Hong Kong Chinese paroled into the United States, by basis for parole and major occupa- 
tion group: June 4, 1962-June 30, 1965 

15. Nonimmigrants admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 1956-1965. 
15 A. Temporary visitors admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 1956- 

1965. -__-_-_-- - 

16. Nonimmigrants admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and country or legion of 

birth: Year ended June 30, 1965 ___ 

16A. Temporary workers admitted under Section 101 (a) (15) (H) of the Immigration and Nation- 
ality Act, by country: Years ended June 30, 1964 and 1965 

17. Nonimmigrants admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and country or region of 

last permanent residence: Year ended June 30, 1965 

17A. Temporary visitors and other noninmiigrants admitted, by port: Year ended June 30, 1965_ 
17B. Temporary visitors admitted at airports, by country of last permanent residence: Year 

ended June 30, 1965 

17C. Temporary visitors admitted at seaports, by country of last permanent residence: Year 

ended June 30, 1965 

17D. Temporary visitors admitted, at land border ports, by country of last permanent residence: 

Year ended June 30, 1965 '_ 



TABLES— Continued Page 

18. Foreign laborers admitted or paroled into the United States: Years ended June 30, 1956- 

1965 ^_ 64 

19. Entries of alien and citizen border crossers over international land boundaries, by State and 

port: Year ended June 30, 1965. 65 

20. Entries of alien and citizen border crossers over international land boundaries: Years ended 

June 30, 1928-1965 . . _ _ 67 

20A. Special inquiiy officer hearings completed, by regions and districts: Years ended June 30, 

1961-1965 68 

21. Aliens excluded from the United States, by cause: Years ended June 30, 1892-1965 69 

22. Aliens excluded, by country or region of birth and cause: Year ended June 30, 1965 70 

23. Aliens apprehended, aliens deported, and aliens required to depart: Years ended June 30, 

1 892-1965 71 

24. Aliens deported, by country to which deported and cause: Year ended June 30, 1965 72 

24A. Aliens required to depart, by nationality and cause: Year ended June 30, 1965 73 

24B. Aliens deported, by nationality and cause: Year ended June 30, 1965 74 

24C. Aliens requii'ed to depart by country of destination and cause: Year ended June 30, 1965 _ 75 

25. Aliens deported, by country to which deported and deportation expense: Year ended June 

30, 1 965 76 

26. Aliens deported, by cause: Years ended June 30, 1908-1965 77 

26A. Aliens deported, by country to which deported: Years ended June 30, 1956-1965 78 

27. Aliens deported, and required to depart, by year of entry and status at entry: Year ended 

June 30, 1965 79 

27A. Aliens deported and required to depart, by status at entry: Years ended June 30, 1961- 

1965 80 

27B. Deportable aliens located, by status at entry and nationality: Year ended June 30, 1965. _ 81 

28. Alien crewmen deserted at United States air and seaports, by nationality and flag of carrier: 

Year ended June 30, 1965 . ' . . 82 

29. Vessels and airplanes inspected, crewmen admitted, alien crewmen deserted, and alien 

stowaways found, by location: Year ended June 30, 1965 83 

30. Principal activities and accomplishments of Immigration Border Patrol: Years ended June 

30, 1956-1965 84 

31. Passengers arrived in the United States, by sea and air, from foreign countries, by country 

of embarkation: Year ended June 30, 1965 85 

32. Passengers departed from the United States, by sea and air, to foreign countries, by country 

of debarkation: Year ended June 30, 1965 88 

33. Passenger travel between the United States and foreign countries, by sea and air, by port 

of arrival or departure: Year ended June 30, 1965 91 

34. Aliens who reported under the Alien Address Program, by selected States of residence and 

nationality: During 1965 92 

35. Aliens who reported under the Alien Address Program, by selected nationalities and States 

of residence: During 1965 93 

36. Alien population, by States of residence: 1940, 1951, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, and 

1965. . .... . 94 

37. Declarations of intention filed, petitions for naturalization filed, persons naturalized, and 

petitions for naturalization denied: Years ended June 30, 1907-1965 95 

37A. Persons naturalized, by general and special naturalization provisions: Years ended June 30, 

1961-1965.... .... .. ... 96 

38. Persons naturalized, by general and special naturalization provisions and country or region 

of former allegiance: Year ended June 30, 1965 97 

39. Pei-sons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance: Years ended June 30, 

1956-1965.... . . . 98 

40. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance and major occupation group: 
Year ended June 30, 1965 99 

41. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance, sex, and age: Year ended 
June 30, 1965 100 

41A. Persons naturalized, by sex, marital status, median age, and major occupation group: 

Years ended June 30, 1961-1965 102 

42. Persons naturalized, by States or territories of residence: Years ended June 30, 1956-1965. 103 
I42A. Persons naturalized, by specified countries of former allegiance and by States or territories 

of residence: Year ended June 30, 1965 104 

42B. Persons naturalized, by type of court and States or territories of residence: Year ended 

June 30, 1965 105 



TABLES— Continued Page 

43. Persons naturalized, by specified countries of former allegiance and by rural and urban 

area and city: Year ended June 30, 1965 106 

44. Persons naturalized, by country or region of birth and year of entry: Year ended June 30, 

1965 107 

45. Persons naturalized, by sex and age: Years ended June 30, 1959-1965 108 

46. Administrative certificates of citizenship issued, by country or region of birth and reason 

for claim: Year ended June 30, 1965__. 109 

47. Administrative certificates of citizenship issued to persons who derived citizenship through 

naturalization of parents or through marriage, by country or region of birth and year 
derived: Year ended June 30, 1965_____- . 110 

48. Administrative certificates of citizenship issued to persons who acquired citizenship at 

birth abroad through citizen parents, by country or region of birth and year acquired: 

Year ended June 30, 1965 111 

49. Petitions for naturalization denied, by reason: Years ended June 30, 1956-1965 112 

50. Certificates of naturalization revoked, by grounds: Years ended June 30, 1956-1965 113 

51. Persons expatriated, by grounds and year reports received: Years ended June 30, 1956- 

1965 113 

52. Persons repatriated: Years ended June 30, 1956-1965 114 

53. Prosecutions for immigration and nationality violations: Years ended June 30, 1956-1 965 _ 115 

54. Convictions for immigration and nationality violations: Years ended June 30, 1956-1965. 11 ' 

55. Writs of habeas corpus, judicial review of order of deportation and declaratory judgments 

in exclusion and deportation cases: Years ended June 30, 1961-1965 11 

56. Private immigration and nationality bills introduced and laws enacted, 75th Congress through 

89th Congress', First Session 118 

57. Private bills and beneficiaries of private bills. First Session, S9th Congress, by type of bill 

and action (country of birth of beneficiaries for bills enacted) 119 



GENERAL 

The Immigration and Naturalization Service is 
responsible for enforcement and administration 
of Federal statutes relating to immigration and 
naturalization. This involves the examination of 
every person seeking entry into the United States 
to determine his admissibility under the provisions 
of immigration laws. It also includes granting or 
denying petitions for benefits such as preferences 
witliin quotas, importation of alien workers, and 
discretionary relief or waivers for those seeking 
permanent re-sidence while in the United States. 

The SerA'ice is also charged with tlie preven- 
tion of illegal entry across the land borders or by 
sea or air as well as the detention, apprehension, 
and deportation of aliens illegally in the United 
States. This involves the investigation of the 
cases of aliens in the United States who through 
violation of status of admission or other violation 
of law become amenable to deportation, and the 
detention and deportation of such aliens. 

Another principal area of responsibility is that 
of naturalization and citizenship. This includes 
the examination of aliens and witnesses to de- 
termine whether the aliens qualify for citizen- 
ship through naturalization; the presentation of 
the facts in each case and recommendations to 
the naturalization courts; and the issuance of cer- 
tificates to derivative citizens. The Service also 
carries forward a program of cooperation with 
the public schools in fostering citizenship educa- 
tion. 

TRAVEL CONTROL AND ADJUDI- 
CATIONS 

Travel Control 

All persons seeking enti-y into the United States 
nust be inspected to determine whether they are 
United States citizens or aliens. If aliens, whether 
mmigrants, returning residents, or aliens admitted 
for temporary periods, they must be examined to 
Jetermine their admissibility into this country. 
Two coordinated policies have marked the conduct 
)f these examinations. First, the Service con- 
inuously has made more efiicient use of manpower. 
5econdly, it has made inspection formalities more 
onvenient for the persons arriving, and at the 
ame time has extended a warm welcome to visitors 
this country. These objectives have been met by 
nnovations in procedures as well as by improve- 
aents in the physical facilities where people are in- 
pected. 

Tlie feasibility of the expanded issuance and 
se of nonresident alien Mexican border crossing 
ards to Mexican nationals in order to further 
acilitate travel across the Mexican border was 
tudied during the year. Under the proposed 
rocedure, the card would be the only document re- 




Aliens and citizens arrived by sea and air, 1956-65. 

quired to be presented by a Mexican national seek- 
ing to enter the United States as a visitor, whether 
for the purpose of shopping for a few hours in 
the border area or to visit the United States for 
a period up to 6 months. 

Regulations relating to the submission of de- 
parture manifests by commercial air and sea car- 
riers were amended during the year to provide for 
a more effective control of nonimmigrants. Some 
of the facilitation programs begun m prior years 
and continued during fiscal year 1965 were : Multi- 
ple inspections whereby an officer for one Federal 
inspection agency performs combined screening 
for the other agencies; preinspection of persons 
bound for the United States at ports in Canada, the 
Bahamas, and Bermuda; en route inspection of 
persons on certain large vessels, and a Service office 
at the New York World's Fair reopened for the 
.second year. 

Among the 5.1 million persons who arrived on 
83,816 vessels and 239,816 aircraft were 1.7 million 
persons preinspected at ports outside the United 




Immigrant Inspector hoarding helicopter at San Diego to 
meet the aircraft carrier "Kitty Hawk" at sea, and in- 
spect civilian technicians returning from Japan. 



States. Contrary to the trend in recent years, the 
number of arriving vessels increased by 26 percent. 
This sharp increment is due in large measure to 
the increase in private pleasure craft. Consistent 
with past trends, the number of arriving aircraft 
increased by 17 percent over 1964. 

Admissions 

More than 186 million persons were inspected 
and admitted into the United States by immigra- 
tion officers during fiscal year 1965. The gain of 
7.7 million was a new high and exceeded last year's 
admissions by 4 percent. Multiple entries of per- 
sons admitted across the land borders or as crew- 
men accounted for 96 percent of the total. The 
other 4 percent arrived as passengers aboard 
vessels or aircraft or crossed the land borders for 
extended stays from Canada or Mexico. Alien 
entries exceeded 106.6 million and included 101.8 
million alien border crossers from Canada and 
Mexico, an increase of 3 percent over the jirevious 
year. The remaining 4,867,332 were immigrants, 
documented nonimmigrants and lawfully admitted 
resident aliens returning from temporary visits 
abroad, crewmen, Mexican agricultural laborers 
admitted under Public Law 78, and others ad- 
mitted on multiple entry documents. 




Port Receptkmist assists alien arrange hin documents for 
inspection. More than 4,210,627 persons arrived hy air, 
and were examined in 1965. 

Imw/lgrants. A total of 296,697 aliens were ac- 
corded status as lawfully admitted permanent resi- 
dents of the United States during the year, an 
increase of 1.5 percent over fiscal year 1964. Of 
this total, 270,696 were issued immigrant visas 
abroad and admitted for pennanent residence 
upon arrival in the United States. The remaining 
26,001 were already in the United States and were 
granted permanent residence through adjustment 
of status procedures. 

The Immigration and Nationality Act provides 
for two major classes of innnigrants: Quota and 
nonquota. A numeric limitation or quota is estab- 
lished for all countries except specified indepen- 
dent countries of the Western Hemisphere. Under 



an established annual quota of 158,561 per annmn, 
each quota area is allocated a fixed nmnber equiva- 
lent to one-sixth of 1 percent of the number of 
persons of that national origin as recorded in the 
1920 census. Quotas range from the minimum of 
100 allotted to 81 countries to the maximum of 
65,361 for Great Britain and Northern Ireland. 
During the year, 99,381 quota immigrants (63 per- 
cent of the total quota) were admitted to the 
United States. 

Aliens with high skills and ability whose s 
ices are urgently needed in the United States and 
their spouses and children may be accorded first 
preference under the quota, upon approval of a 
petition submitted by a ITnited States employer 
The 2,376 highly skilled aliens admitted were ac- 
companied by 2,610 spouses and children. 01 
these, 3,896 came from Europe, 727 from Asia, 14J 
from Africa and 214 from other areas of the world 

Close relatives of citizens and permanent resi 
dent aliens may be accorded second, third anc 
fourth quota preferences depending upon the de 
gree of relationship. Of the 13,082 immigranti 
within these preferences more tlian half were na 
fives of only two countries, Italy and Poland 
countries with a high demand for quota numbers 
and relatively small quotas. Tliere were 81,31.' 
immigrants admitted under the nonpreference por 
tion of the quota. Most of the aliens in the latte- 
category were charged to the quotas for Great Bri 
tain and Northern Ireland, Germany and Ireland 
countries with large quotas and no waiting list o 
applicants for immigrant \isas, so that there wa 
no advantage in seeking preferences. 

In addition to aliens who are natives of specifi© 
Western Hemisphere countries, other nonquot 
immigrants include spouses and children of Unitei 
States citizens, ministers of religion and other im 



IGRflNTS ADMITTED BY CLASSES 
1961 -1965 




Immigrants admitted by classes — 1961-65. 



migrants admitted under special legislation who 
are not subject to the nuniei'ical limitation of the 
immigration quotas. Nonquota innnigrants who 
were admitted during 1965 numbered 197,316. The 
largest class of nonquota immigrants admitted was 
the l-19,o68 nati\cs of AVestern Hemisphere coun- 
tries. Within this aroup, natives of Mexico ac- 
counted for ;36,14(), Canada for 37,679, Cuba for 
19,734 and Colombia, South America, 1(),,S46. The 
number of spouses and children of Cnited States 
citizens who were admitted as immigrants totaled 
32,714. These persons came principally from the 
countries of Italy, Germany, Greece, Japan, For- 
mosa, Philippines, and Korea. 

Special legislation designed to benefit refugees, 
or to reduce heavily oversubscribed quotas in the 
preference categories has been enacted in almost 
every congressional session since the Immigra- 
tion and Nationality Act became law in 1952. In 
1965, fewer immigrants were admitted under spe- 
cial legislation than in any year since the passage 
of the Immigration and Nationality Act: 4,392 
refugees were adjusted to permanent resident 
-status under the Act of July 14, 1960; 411 bene- 
liciaries of second and third preference petitions 
rfwere admitted nonquota under the Act of Septem- 
ijber 26, 1961; and 1,484 beneficiaries of first and 
)r{fourth preferences were admitted nonquota under 

the Act of October 24, 1962. 

I Xdiiiiiiiiiigrants. Aliens coming to the United 

States for temporary periods are admitted under 

(lone of several nonimmigrant classifications. A 

vJtotal of 2,075,967 nonimmigrants were admitted 

[luring the year, an increase of 19 percent over 

1!HU admissions. The phenomenal increase in 

risiiors to the United States may be observed in 

he chart below. 

The success of the "Visit U.S.A." program may 
De measured by the number of tourists from other 



- 


E3 




TEMPOR 


- 




1 


1 


1 


1 



A onimmtgrantt admitted — 1956-65 



countries who visited this country. Visitors for 
pleasure, the largest group of nonimmigrants, 
numbered 1,323,479 an increase of 20 percent over 
the preceding year. Another 175,500 nonimmi- 
grants were admitted temporarily as visitors for 
business. Most of tlie visitors came from Canada, 
Mexico, and other countries of the Western Hem- 
isphere; 476,656 came from European countries, 
26 percent more than last year. The World's Fair 
in New York continued to attract a significant 
number of visitors to the United States from for- 
eign countries. 

Over 50,000 students accompanied by 4,032 
spouses ancl children came from abroad to attend 
educational institutions in the United States. In 
addition, there were 33,768 exchange visitors ad- 
mitted to the United States to participate in Gov- 
ernment and privately-sponsored programs de- 
signed to further the international cultural ex- 
change. There were 9,991 spouses and children of 
these aliens who accompanied them. 

During the year, 8,295 persons of distinguished 
merit and ability, 2,920 trainees and 56,654 other 
nonimmigrant workers were brought to the United 
States temporarily mider the Immigration and 
Nationality Act, which provides for the importa- 
tion of foreign workers if like workers are not 
available in the United States. Included among 
the temporary workers admitted under specific 
agricultural and related labor programs were 13,- 
281 Canadian woodsmen, 15,397 agricultural work- 
ers from the Caribbean area, 31 from Japan and 
453 sheepherders from Europe. Mexican agricul- 
tural laborers brought to the ITnited States under 
Public Law 78 numbered 100,876. This special 
legislation for the importation of agricultural 
workers from Mexico, which has been in effect 
since 1949, expired on December 31, 1964. Mexi- 
can agricultural laborers who entered after that 
date were admitted under the provisions of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act. Only 2,687 
were admitted between December 31, 1964, and the 
end of the fiscal year. 

Other nonimmigrants were 38,544 foreign gov- 
ernment officials, 2,082 North Atlantic Treaty Or- 
ganization officials, 14,026 official representatives 
to international organizations, 2,681 members of 
the foreign news media, and 7,639 treaty traders 
and investors. There were also 142,686 persons 
admitted who were travelling through the United 
States in continuous transit destined to other 
countries. 

Crewmen. There were 1,872,673 alien crewmen 
who arrived at United States ports during the 
year and who were granted temporary shore leave. 
Permanent landing cards designed to serve as iden- 
tification and to facilitate inspection are issued to 
bona fide alien crewmen. Since 1959, a total of 
612,040 such cards have been issued. 

United States Citizens. There were 79.5 million 
United States citizen entries to the United States 
during this year. Of these 74 million were fre- 



quent, border crossers, 934,514 were crewmen, and 
4,564,684 were citizens returning from overseas or 
from extended visits to Mexico or Canada. Citi- 
zen travelers returning from overseas or from ex- 
tended trips to our neighboring countries increased 
by 11 percent over 1964 thus continuing the up- 
ward trend, evidenced since World War II. 

Refugees 

Refugee-escapees from Communist or Commu- 
nist dominated countries of Europe and Western 
Asia, Cuban refugees, and Chinese refugees from 
Hong Kong were the three major refugee pro- 
grams administered by the Service in 1965. 

Cuban Refugees. Despite the more stringent 
measures taken by the Castro regime to prevent 
persons from leaving the island, some 1,142 Cu- 
bans managed to evade the patrols. Most of these 
refugees escaped from Cuba by small boats and 
were picked up at sea by the U.S. Coast Guard in 
the Florida area. After careful screening these 
Cubans were given refuge in the United States 
pending a time when circumstances will permit 
their return to their homeland. Since January 1, 
1959, when Castro seized control, some 227,000 
Cubans have been admitted in temporary status, 
and 56,526 have entered as immigrants. 

Hong Kong Chinese. No new applications have 
been accepted since January 1, 1963, but the Serv- 
ice continued to process applications filed prior to 
that date by Chinese refugees in Hong Kong for 




Cuban refugees en route to United States. 



parole under section 212(d)(5) of the Immigra- 
tion and Nationality Act pursuant to a directive 
of May 23, 1962. Parole authorization has been 
limited to refugees whose cases were analogous to 
the quota preferences and to those who had ap- 
plied for entry under the Refugee Relief Act of 
1953 but who had not been accepted because of 
numerical limitations imposed by law. An alien 
seeking parole must undergo the same comprehen- 
sive security checks, thorough medical examina- 
tions and other prescribed screening procedures as 
an applicant for an immigrant visa. A total oii 
13,619 Chinese persons liad been paroled into tht 
United States by the end of June 1965. No legis- 
lation has been enacted to enable these refugees U. 
become lawful i>ermanent residents of the Unitec 
States but the legislation now pending before th( 
Congress, if enacted, may enable the adjustmen 
of status of some of these refugees. 

Refugee-Escapees (Act of July 14, 1960) 
Refugee-escapees from Communist countries con 
tinned to register with Service officers in France 
Germany, Belgium, Austria, Italy, Greece ant 
Lebanon under the so-called "Fair Share" lav 
which was extended indefinitely by the Act of Jum 
28, 1962. This law provides that the Unite( 
States may accept 25 percent of the total numbe 
of eligible refugee-escapees who have availe< 
themselves of resettlement opportunities oifered b; 
other countries. Thorough examinations are mad 
before parole is authorized to insure that the en 
try of these refugees into the United States wil 
not be prejudicial to the national welfare, safetj 
or security. Each refugee is examined again ! 
years after entry and, if found eligible at tha> 
time, is accorded permanent resident status 
Those granted such status may, after 5 years froni 
the date of their initial arrival, petition fol 
naturalization. 

There were 4,267 refugee-escapees registerei 
during fiscal year 1965 and 3,309 were approvet 
for parole. The 3,184 who ai-rived in the Unitei 
States brought the total to 17,760 since the enact 
ment of the law. Principal countries from whicli 
tliese aliens fled were Yugoslavia (6,290), Ru: 
mania (4,339), United Arab Republic (3,309)j 
Himgary ( 1 ,625 ) , and Poland ( 994 ) . By the em 
of the year 10,503 refugees had fulfilled the 2-yea 
residence requirement and had been accorde( 
]>ermanent resident status. 

Dom in/ran Republic. With the outbreak o 
tlie armed conflict in the Dominican Republic am 2 
tlie entry of Ignited States Armed Forces into tha n 
country, several thousand persons were evacuatw t 
fi-om Santo Domingo by U.S. militai-y forces ^^■ 
These evacuees were brought to San Juan, Puert y^ 
Rico, and emergency procedures were formulate kJ, 
to cope with the problem. Approximately 1,000 o 
tliere evacuees are still in Puerto Rico awaiting! 
oi)portunitj- to return to the Dominican Republii 
wlien the crisis lias come to an end. 



Inadmissible Aliens 

Ed'clwiions. The primary purpose of immigra- 
oii inspection at United States ports of entrj^ is 
1 determine whether an applicant for admission 

I meets the requirements of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act. If the inspecting officer believes 
the applicant to be inadmissible, he refers the case 
to a special inquiry officer for a determination of 
admissibility. 

Service officers at ports of entry intercepted 
iss,:207 inadmissible aliens during the year. 
AiiKing them were 28,811 alien crewmen who were 
refused landing privileges, 160 stowaways who 
wcie detained on board vessels on which they ar- 
i'i\ cd, 110,087 applicants for border crossing privi- 
It'iics, and -1:8,728 other aliens who withdrew their 
.■i])|)lications for admission rather than submit to 
exchision proceedings. Four hundred and twenty- 
iiiiic aliens were excluded and deported from the 
Fnited States after formal hearings in their cases. 
Of those excluded, 317 were not in possession of 
l)roper documents, 24 were found inadmissible on 
1 riniinal, immoral or narcotics grounds, 12 on sub- 
\ersive grounds, and 19 had been certified by 
Tnited States Public Health officers as having 
mental or physical defects. Among those ex- 
cluded were 35 persons born in Europe, 11 natives 
:)f Asia, 359 from North America, and 24 from 
other countries. 

Waivers of Inadmissibility. Cases arise in 
which literal application of the exclusion pro- 
visions of the law may be inhumane or hamper 
piililic causes. The law, therefore, provides for 
■eitain discretionary waivers of inadmissibility. 
rill IS, close relatives of citizens and alien residents 
(otherwise excludable) may be admitted to the 
Tnited States if their exclusion would cause undue 
liardship to the relative in the United States, and 
heir admission would not be contrary to the na- 
ional welfare, safety, and security. Such waivei-s 
tvere approved in 937 cases during the year, 
ieventy-seven percent of the cases were approved 
y Service officers stationed abroad. There were 
123 applications denied. 

Alien "defectors" from communism who can es- 
ablish that they have actively opposed commu- 
lism for 5 years or more and "wjiose admission to 
;he United States would be in tlie public interest 
nay be admitted despite their excludability for 
)ast membership in subversive organizations. In 
'965, 105 such aliens were admitted and their cases 
eported to Congress. 

Waivers may also be granted to inadmissible 
iliens seeking admission for temporary periods as 
ion immigrants. Discretion was exercised favor- 
ihly in 3,636 cases after a finding that admission of 
ii'h aliens would be in the public interest. 

Adjustment of Status 

. 1 itpllcdflon.^ for Status a.s Immigrant. Aliens, 
ther tlian crewmen and natives of contiguous 



countries or nearby islands, who have been in- 
spected at ports of entry and either admitted or 
paroled into the United States may apply under 
section 245 of the Immigration and Nationality 
Act for status as permanent residents without leav- 
ing the country to obtain immigrant visas. 

In fiscal year 1965 there were 18,408 such ap- 
plications approved and 2,439 denied. Included 
among the 18,358 aliens granted lawful perma- 
nent resident status in fiscal year 1965 were 943 
persons whose services were urgently needed in the 
United States and 534 of their spouses and chil- 
dren, 6,217 .spouses and unmarried minor children 
of United States citizens, 1,435 preference quota 
immigrant relatives of citizens or permanent resi- 
dent aliens, 4,837 nonquota natives of Western 
Hemisphere countries and 3,841 nonpreference 
quota immigrants. Over two-thirds of the suc- 
cessful applicants had entered the United States 
as temporary visitors, 17 percent as students and 
the balance in various other nonimmigrant cate- 
gories. Germany, Italy, Poland, United King- 
dom, China, and Colombia were the principal 
countries of birth represented. 




Aliens who became permanent residents by adjustment 
under section 245 of the Immigration and Nationality Act. 

Creation of Record of Lawful Entry. A total 
of 2,326 applications under section 249 of the Im- 
migration and Nationality Act was received dur- 
ing the year from aliens who had resided continu- 
ously in the ITnited States since prior to June 28, 
1940, but in whose cases no record of lawful ad- 
mission for permanent residence existed. Records 
were created in 2,055 cases and denied in 109 cases. 

Other Adjustments. During the year, a total of 
4,392 refugee-escapees, previously paroled into the 
T'nited States under the Act of July 14, 1960, were 
e.xamined by Service officers and were found ad- 
missible and accorded permanent resident status. 
Also adjusted to permanent resident status were 43 
former officials of foreign governments or of inter- 
national organizations and members of their fam- 
ilies under section 13 of the Act of September 11, 



1957, which authorizes a maximum of 50 such ad- 
justments annually. Other adjustments included 
881 suspension of deportation cases and 18 
Hungarian refugees. 

Adjudications 

The applications and petitions adjudicated by 
the Service deal with benefits under the immigra- 
tion laws which vitally atiect both the rights of 
aliens to enter or remain in the United States and 
their activities while in this country. In 1965, 
755,716 applications and petitions for various bene- 
fits under tlie immigration laws were adjudicated 
by Service ofhcers. This was an increase of more 
tlian 37,()(»() over fiscal year 1964. 

The Service is acutely aware of the ne-ed to ex- 
plain the standards of basic fairness and the 
fundamental concepts of due process to appli- 
cants and petitioners, many of whom are un- 
familiar with our language and customs as well as 
our immigration laws. During the year a great 
deal of information, previously unavailable, con- 
cerning procedures was brought to public knowl- 
edge by means of Federal regulations. 

Among the items published were additional in- 
forinatiou regarding the documents required to 
support various applications and petitions; the 
procedui-e for revalidation of immigrant visa peti- 
tions; information concerning validity of visas, re- 
entry i)ermits, and alien i-egistration receipt cards 
wlien used as travel documents; the procedure for 
furnisliing public charge bom 1> prim- to issuance, of 
immigrant \isas; information rcgai-diiig waiver of 
grounds of excludability ; and limitations upon the 
period of initial admission and extension of stay 
of various classes of nonimmigrant aliens. 

In addition to the requirement that notices of 
denial must set forth in writing tlie specific rea- 
sons for denial of any application or petition, the 
regulations were amended to permit tlie ap})]icant, 
petitioner, or his authorized representative to in- 
spect the record of proceeding which constituted 
the basis for the decision. The only information 
which cannot be exhibited for inspection is classi- 
fied material. 

By means of internal supervision and [procedures 
the Service is striving to achieve unifonnity in 
decision making. In order to provide guidelines 
to the public whicli demonstrate tlie bases on whidi 
decisions are tieing made in various lypes of aj) 
plications and petitions, 70 decisions lia\e been 
selected since July 1964 and have been jiublislied 
or are in the process of being inibjislied as prece- 
dents. Published decisions are available on pur- 
chase from the Government Printing Ofhce or for 
examination at the principal offices of the Service. 

V/.m Pefitionfs. A petition must be filed in be- 
half of an alien seeking nonquota status as the 
spouse or child of a United States citizen, or 
preference quota status as the married son or 
daughter of a United States citizen or permanent 
resident alien, or as the parent, brother or sister 



of a United States citizen. During the year, 31,341 
visa petitions were approved for spouses and chil- 
dren of United States citizens. Half of these peti- 
tions were approved by Service officers stationed in 
Europe and the Far East. There were 23,383 close 
relatives of United States citizens and resident 
aliens who were accorded preferences within the 
quotas. 

Nonquota status wiis also accorded 1,538 
"eligible oq^hans" upon petitions filed by their 
adoptive or prospective adoptive parents after in- 
quiry and investigation both in the United States 
and abroad established that the child met the 
statutoiy definition of "eligible orphan," that the 
adoptive or prospective adoptive parents would l)e 
able to properly care for the cliild and, in the cases 
of orphans to be adopted in the Ignited States, that 
the preadoption requirements of the State of pro- 
posed adoption had been met. Three-hundred and 
six of the orphan petitions were received in and 
adjudicated by Service offices in Europe, and 419 
in offices in the Far East. 

The highest quota classification, first preference. 
is reserved for highly educated or liiglily skilled 
aliens whose, services are needed urgently in the 
United States. A total of 9,976 such petitions weit 
receixed ivora employers or prospecti\'e employee 
in the United States to import such pei-sons, of 
which 6,759 were approved and 1,703 denied aftei 
appropriate inquiry and investigation. Detailec 
reports were furnished the Congress in each cast 
approved, as required by law. 

During the year. Service officers adjudicatec; 
14,449 petitions" filed by employers in the United 
States to import, for temporary periods, aliens o:, 
distingiushed merit and ability, other workei-s h 
shoi-t supply in the United States, and industria 
trainees. Of these petitions, 13,635 were approvec 
and 814 denied by the Service after consultatioi 
with other Government agencies, representatives 
of labor and management, and other appropriatt 
agencies. Most of the petitions were for worken 
in short su])ply in the Ignited States and includet 
agricultural workers, woodsmen, s]ieei)lierdei-s 
entertainers, athletes, and othei-s granted admis 
sion for temporary periods. Strict controls an 
exercised over all temporary foreign workers. 

Other Applications. Applications by non- 
immigrants to extend their temporaiT stay in tl« 
United States were adjudicated in •240,964 caseJ 
(lining the year. This represents an increase ol 
10 percent oVer 1964 and is cimiparable to the in 
civa.-^ed tourism to tlie United States. Bordei 
crossing cards permitting temporary entry into tlw 
United States were issued to 179,965 aliens residing 
in Canada and Mexico who have occasion to entei 
the United States frequently; and 12,4'23 non 
immigrants, upon application, were pennitted t( 
change from one nonimmigrant class to another 
i.e., visitor to student, student to treaty trader. 

Schools desiring to enroll foreign students musi , 
be authorized to do so by the Service. Foreigi J 
students or exchange aliens must receive permis- 




Immigrant Inspector interviewing applicants fui change 
of status. 

sion to transfer from one school or exchange pro- 
gram to another, and students must apply for per- 
mission to accept part-time employment. There 
were 39,069 applications in these categories adjudi- 
cated during the year, an increase of 12 percent 
over 1964. During the year the regulations per- 
taining to approval of schools for the attendance 
of foreign students were extensively amended to 
provide for clarification of standards which must 
be met by such schools and for a periodic review 
to determine whether approval of schools should 
be continued or revoked by the Service. 

United States citizens who frequently cross the 
land borders were issued 14,-377 certificates of iden- 
tity to facilitate their reentry into the United 
States; 85,408 applications for reentry permits, ex- 
tension of reenti-y permits and duplicate alien 
registration cards were adjudicated, up 9 per- 
cent over the previous year. Permission to re- 
apply was accorded 3,545 previously deported 
iliiMis and advance permission to return was given 
isii lawfully resident aliens who otherwise would 
!i;n i» lieen inadmissible upon return to the United 
>t ;i t es following brief absences abroad. 

Aliens who participate in exchange programs 
mist leave the United States and reside for 2 years 
n their own country, or in another foreign coun- 
ry which is found by the Secretary of State to 
■oiiiply with the purpose and intent of the Mutual 
Kilncational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961. 
i^iiless this requirement is fulfilled they cannot 
ipply for immigrant visas or adjust tlieir status 
o ])ermanent residents, except where a waiver is 
diluted. Such waivers are granted only when it 
s estahlisiied tliat compliance with the 2-year resi- 
lence requirement would cause exceptional hard- 
hil) to the alien's United States citizen or law- 
ully resident alien spouse or child, or upon re- 
lucst of an interested (lovernment agency. 

( )ut of a total of 1,518 applications received dur- 
ng the year, 726 were granted. Of those granted 
80 were cases of hardship to the exchange alien's 
nmediate family, 446 were waivers granted at 
hf request of other Government agencies and in- 
luded doctors, scientists, and others whose skills 
nd ability were needed in the United States. 



Service Operations Outside the United States 

Service officers stationed abroad were engaged 
in such diversified activities as the obtaining and 
coordinating of information relating to subver- 
sives, criminals, alien smuggling, and counterfeit 
documents. They preinspected passengers at 
points outside the United States, and processed and 
assisted refugees fleeing from Communist tyranny, 
and orphans being adopted by United States 
citizens. 

Additionally, immigration officers in Europe, 
the Far East, and Mexico, adjudicated 30,330 ap- 
plications and petitions filed in foreign countries 
by United States citizens and aliens. Agricultural 
workers, sheepherders, and other temporary work- 
ers were screened and oriented prior to the alien's 
departure for the United States. 

BORDER PATROL AND 
INVESTIGATIONS 

One of the primary functions of the Service is 
to prevent illegal entry into the United States, 
to find aliens in the United States in illegal status, 
and to institute proceedings for the deportation 
or required departure of such aliens. 



DEPORTABLE ALIENS FOUND IN 
I960- 1965 


THE UNITED STATES 









60 60 








65( 
817 
271 
39,124 


l96oH 


■ 


1" 


oe.E 




n» 


MEXICANS '96;l 




i\" 


..E 






-■■^ ... 


1965H 




M~ 


~n '•■'■• 1 










1 41,033 


I960r 












1961 1 






1 59,066 










. 1 6^,486 1 




,963 k 






::i 4...SS 








1 42,753 


1964 1 












,965|~ 






—\ ..,022 










jnREPTITlOUS ENTRIES 
LL OTHER ENTRIES 



Deportable aliens found in the United States — 1960-65. 



Deportable Aliens Located 

For the first time in a decade, the number of 
deportable aliens located exceeded 100,000. The 
1965 total of 110,371 deportable aliens located by 
Service officers represented a 27.5 percent increase 
over 1964. 

One factor in this increase was the greater num- 
ber of Mexican nationals found in illegal status, 
an increase of 26.2 percent (43,844 in 1964 to 
55,349 in 1965). As in fiscal year 1964, Mexican 
nationals accounted for approximately 50 percent 
of the aliens located in illegal status. The various 
nationality groups are shown in the table below : 



Nationality 


Fiscal 


years 


Percent 




1964 


1965 


change 


Mexican 


43, 844 
2,063 
8,230 

1,907 
5,741 
5,290 
3,334 
16, 188 


55, 349 
1,808 
8,063 

1,982 
8,700 
5,925 
4,699 
23, 845 


+ 26. 2 
-12.4 


Canadian 

British West Indian and 

British Honduran 

Other Western Hemisphere. . 

Chinese 

Greek 


-2.0 

+ 3.9 
+ 51.5 
+ 12.0 
+ 40. 9 


All others 


+ 47. 3 






Total aliens found 


86, 597 


110,371 


+ 27. 5 



Status at Entry. Another contributing factor 
to the increase in deportable aliens located was the 
shipping strike along the eastern seaboard. The 
number of alien crewmen (20,557) deportable on 
t«clmical grounds when their ships remained in 
port beyond the 29-day statutory limit represented 
a 70.1 percent increase over last year. Willful 
crewman violations increased 10 percent to 2,389, 
compared with 2,171 in 1964. The 123 stowaways 
found ashore represent a new low since World 
War II. 

Of the 52,666 aliens legally admitted who vio- 
lated their status of admission, 39,213 were visi- 
tors, 3,424 students, 2,753 agricultural workei-s, 
5,672 other nonimmigrants, and 1,604 immigrants. 
Exclusive of the numlier of crewmen technical vio- 
lators, the visitors admitted who violated status 
represent 43.7 percent of the deportable aliens 
located. 

Among the 32,938 who entered without inspec- 
tion were 29,693 Mexican aliens. This represents 
an increase of 31 percent over last year. Most of 
the increase occurred in the last half of fiscal 1965, 
after the Bracero Act expired. 

Of the 110,371 aliens found in illegal status, 
33,179 had been in the United States less than 72 
hours, 19,471 for more than 72 hours but less than 
30 days, and 21,492 from 2 to 6 months. Only 
15,672 or 14 percent had been here for longer than 
6 months. 



Smuggling, Crewmen, and Stowaway Controls. 
Border Patrol officers located 1,730 aliens who had 
been induced or assisted to enter unlawfully or 
who had been transported unlawfully after entry. 
This represents a 45 percent increase in this cate- 
goi*y over last year. Violators of statutes relat- 
ing to the inducing, smuggling and transporting 
of unlawfully entered aliens numbered 525, a fig- 
ure which has been exceeded only nine times in the 
past 41 years. In 1927, 825 smugglers were appre- 
hended, and in the 8-year period, 1949 through 
1956, the number of smugglers rose from 635 to ; 
peak of 1,822 in 1954, dechning to 928 in 1955 and 
to 765 in 1956. The principal attraction for the 
aliens was the opportunity to work. However, 
strengthening of line and backup operations re- 
sulted in better control and interception of more 
violators before they reached interior destinations. 
The trend during the latter part of the year reflects 
larger groups of aliens being smuggled and an 
increase! tendency toward commercialism. 




Persons apprehended hiding under hood of 



Service investigators completed 692 smugglin 
investigations during the year. Suc<"essful prost 
cutions of smugglers were completed in 177 case 
and resulted in aggregate sentences of 145 year 
imprisonment and fines of $10,550. Two exam 
pies of the smuggling operations follow : 

Antoine Clark, a native of Haiti and citizen oJ 
the British West Indies, was found guilty in th( 
United States District Court, Miami, Fla., or 
seven counts of smuggling Haitian aliens into the 
ITnited States from the Bahamas. For fees o: 
$200 each, he furnished the aliens various tyjjes oi 
documentary evidence reflecting the bearere to b« 
citizens of the United States. Clark was sen- 
tenced on January 15, 1965, to serve 30 months 
and a deportation order will be executed upon th( 
completion of liis sentence. 

Investigation is continuing in the case of tw( 
United States citizens who, with others, engager 
in a conspiracy in which farm workers were re 
cruited in Mexico for employment in northern Cal- 
ifornia. After arranging for their euiploymenf 
in advance, aliens were solicited in Tijuana, Mex 
ico, and induced to come to the United States tc 
accept more lucrative employment than was avail 



able in Mexico. With full knowledge that the 
aliens had no legal right to enter the United States, 
these citizens transported approximately 100 such 
aliens from the border area to northern California 
and harbored them in warehouses after admonish- 
ing them of possible danger of apprehension by 
Immigration officers. Eighty-four of the aliens 
were apprehended on June 14 and 15, 1965. 

Operations on the St. Lawrence Seaway closed 
for the winter months on December 5, 1964, and 
reopened on April 8, 1965. During the period the 
Seaway was open to vessels, officers at Massena, 
N.Y., boarded 284 vessels and verified the depar- 
ture of 736 mala fide crewmen who had been denied 
landing privileges and ordered detained on board. 
Since the opening of the Seaway, there have been 
no successful desertions in this area. The 2,389 
crewmen who had succeeded in deserting their ves- 
sels and 123 stowaways who had landed or were 
found as unreported on board vessels were appre- 
hended by Service officers. 




Patrol Inspectors search ing sh ip for stotca nays. 



The effectiveness of these programs is indicated 
in the following cases. Three Chinese crewmen 
who had lieen ordered detained on board the M/T 
''Wnr/J Fn'/rersal absconded on February 12, 1965, 
;>t ^\'iliiiiiioton, Del., and engaged a taxi to take 
thciii to an address in New York City. The taxi 
ilriMT, suspicious of illegal entry, furnished the 
Xcw York address to the dispatcher for transmittal 
to our Philadelphia office. The New Jersey State 
Police were notified and the aliens were appre- 
hended and turned over to this Service. 
;ji ^\\\\\l^ searching the S/S Santa Margarita upon 
imts arrival at Jacksonville, Fla., on August 30, 
Il964, Service officers located four undeclared stow- 
»*aways hiding in a hold. Three of the stowaways 
weie citizens of Chile, and the other, a citizen of 
Peiu. They had taken cans of milk and rice on 
>o;ir(l. liad eaten bananas which were stowed in 
lie liold. and had obtained drinking water from 
, I re fric;-e rat ion drain. 

The American S/S Green Dale arrived coast- 



wise at New Orleans from Wilmington, Del., and 
berthed at the Army terminal. A patrol inspector 
received a call for assistance from the chief officer 
of the vessel. The patrol inspector found the in- 
cident to be an attempt by the officer's bedroom 
steward to remove something from behind an in- 
spection plate in the air vent in the bedroom 
steward's storeroom. Since it appeared to be a 
smuggling attempt a customs agent was called and 
a search revealed 12 pounds of hashish with an 
estimated value of $76,000. 

Cooperation with Other Law Enforcement 
Agencies. Our policy of fostering mutual cooper- 
ation with all law enforcement agencies has again 
reaped dividends during the past fiscal year. Bor- 
der Patrol officers arrested and released to appro- 
priate agencies 727 law violators. Conversely, 
other law enforcement agencies have delivered to 
our officers 4,452 violators of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act. Some typical cases of other law 
violators apprehended follow : 

As a result of a lookout posted in June, officers 
at the Oceanside, Calif., checkpoint intercepted a 
resident alien with 145 pounds of marijuana valued 
at $150,000. Patrol officers, during fiscal year 1965, 
have seized narcotics valued at $393,474. During 
the year two off-duty officers assisted in the appre- 
hension and identification of a bank robber who 
had fled on foot immediately after a holdup. 

In three separate actions at Blaine, Wash., patrol 
inspectors made these apprehensions: Two pris- 
oners who had escaped from a penitentiary in 
Canada and had committed an armed robbei-y after 
their escape; a suspected murderer who has been 
arraigned and charged with first degree murder in 
connection with a series of gasoline station rob- 
beries, during which two service station employ- 
ees were murdered ; and two brothers with exten- 
sive criminal records, the latter are wanted in 
Canada for burglary and are presently awaiting 
trial on a charge of having blown a safe and 
stolen $4,000. More than $3,500 of the money has 
been recovered. 

Programs aimed at the control of boi'der crim- 
inal activity and the identification of alien crim- 
inals likely to attempt entiy "^to the United States 
continued during the year with close liaison be- 
tween Service officers and law enforcement officials 
in Canada and Mexico. The following cases are 
indicative of these liaison efforts : 

Georges Lemay, described as one of Canada's 
"most wanted'' criminals was the subject of an 
outstanding warrant charging conspiracy and 
bank robbeiy involving the Bank of Nova Scotia 
in Montreal, Canada, in July 1961, during which 
$500,000 and other valuables were stolen. His 
photograph was shown on the first worldwide 
television broadcast via "Early Bird" satellite on 
May 3, 1965, and he was identified by a resident 
of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., as a person using the 
alias "Roy"' and residing aboard the sloop "Tnana" 
in a marine basin in that city. His apprehension 



followed on May 6, 1965, and he was ordered 
deported to Canada on June 4, 1965. "While his 
appeal was pending he escaped from the custody 
of the Sheritf of the Dade County jail and has not 
been located. 

Elizabeth Victoria Spedding, who had been con- 
victed in 1960 for her activities in operating an 
international call-girl ring, and who was sub- 
sequently deported on two occasions, boarded an 
aircraft at Toronto, Canada, on July 25, 1964, 
under the name of JA/ax Langley, destined to the 
United States. While en route, her true identity 
was discovered and she was arrested on arrival 
at New York. On July 28, 1964, she was ordered 
deported to Canada, and on January 14, 1965 was 
sentenced to 1 year for illegal reentry. At the end 
of the fiscal year she was confined at Alderson, 
W. Vii. She also served a previous sentence for 
illegal reentry resulting from an earlier attempt 
to resume her unlawful residence in New York 
City in 1962. 

Gaston Giguerre was w-anted in Montreal, Can- 
ada, on warrants charging him with 13 armed 
robberies and an attempted murder. He was 
traced to Pawtucket, R.I., where he was appre- 
hended on January 15, 1965. He was deported 
to Canada on January 18, 1965, and given over to 
the custody of the Montreal police officials. 



:1 


•Mill 


L-Ll 


■ ^ 


IV 


K -I 



An Invcstiyator and a lati I In j t i nninii lli< 
documents of a circiiis intployic in Di ti int Mult 

Foreign-Born Law Violators 

Carfbbean Programs and Problem.^. The unrest 
and political upheavals in Cuba, the Dominican 
Republic, and otJier comitries of the Caribbean 
area have created somewhat special prol)lems of 
enforcement for tlie Service. 

The Service Caribbean Investigations Coordina- 
tion Program and its indexes maintained at Miami 
again proved to be of ever-increasing vahie as one 
of the most eti'ective investigative tools in prevent- 
ing the entry into the United States of Latin 




An investigator checking personnel of circus for report li 
illegal aliens i/n Los Angeles. 

American aliens of the subversive, criminal, im 
moral, and nai-cotic classes. Other agencies a]s( 
continued to find these indexes extremely helpful 

About 15,000 new reference cards were added ti 
the index during the year, bringing the total to ap 
proximately 165,000, including the names of 41' 
individuals who are suspected unregistered Latii 
American foreign agents. Over 80,000 recon 
checks were made of the index during the year 
and relating records were located in over 7,0o( 
cases. iVs a result of these checks 325 subversive 
criminal, innnoral, and narcotic investigation- 
were initiated. 

The 908 investigations of Cubans conducts 
during the year included 445 allegedly of the suli 
\ersive class, and 73 alleged to be of the criminal 
immoral, and narcotic classes. Some of thesi 
cases involved aliens with subvereive background- 
who attemi)ted to enter the United States illegally 
When ai)preliended, they claimed political asylun 
as Cuban refugees. Others, after having beer 
granted Cuban refugee status in the United States 
were found participating in pro-Castro activities. 

Example of such cases follow: Antolin Uset- 
Munoz, a corporal of Castro's Revolutionary Na-i^ 
and suspect e<l Cuban agent was apprehended neai 
San Ysidro, Calif., on February 23, 1964, and de- 
ported to Mexico on July 15, 1964. Rene Pacifico 
Munoz- Hernandez, a former member of the Com- 
numist Party in Cuba was apprehended near 
Brownsville, Tex., on December 21, 1964, and de- 
ported to Mexico on March 4, 1965, after Service 
investigation had pi'oduced evidence of his subver- 
sive background. Hector Manuel Augustin Ed- 
uardo Angulo-Kodriguez, admitted to the United 
States as a student in 1960 and subsequently 
granted asylum on tlie basis of his claim of bein£ 
a Cuban refugee, was arrested in New York City 
for disorderly conduct while participating in 
pro-Castro demonstration, and departed for Cuba 






nil August 11, 1964, after his status as a Cuban 
re I ugee was revoked. 

Other subversive aliens from tlie Caribbean area 
whose departure from the United States was ef- 
fected durino; the year included Manuel Antonio 
Perez Sosa Font, Chief of the Central Information 
Agency of the Dominican Republic under Trujillo. 
He was deported on July 8, 1964. Angel Luis 
Ruis-Sihestre, and Federico Antonio Gerardino- 
Suazo, both officers in the Dominican Military In- 
telligence (SIM) under Trujillo, departed on July 
22, 1964 and February 27, 1965, respectively. 
Jaime Cardona Londono, a Colombian, considered 
a potential threat to the safety of the President 
of the United States liecause of having written 
letters threatening the lives of President Johnson 
and his family, was deported on Decemljer 24, 1964. 
Max Serge Duthely, suspected Haitian Commu- 
nist, wiio disappeared after entering the United 
States as a visitor, was located and required to 
leave the I'nited States on February 1, 1965. 

Carlos Barrinat y Gonzalez de Posada, an offi- 
cer in the intelligence system of the Castro govern- 
ment, was ordered excluded and deported from 
the Ignited States on the charge that he had de- 
parted from or remained outside the United States 
to avoid or evade training or service in the Armed 
Forces of the United States. He had previously 
been a legal resident of the United States, but de- 
serted t lie U.S. Army in 1954 and returned to Cuba. 

Infii-iiii] Siciirify and the Foreign Boim. In 
addition t(; the .specific program concerned with 
aliens from the Caribbean area, the Service con- 
tinued ellectively to pureue its main aims in the 
aiiiisul)versive program. These include detection 
and identification of foreign-born subversives; 
oaihering evidence for use in preventing them 
from receiving any of the benefits administered by 
till' Service, such as naturalization or adjustment 
of status; and effecting their exclusion, denatural- 
ization and deportation. 

Border program i n \ est igal i ve activities resulted 
in the exclusion of se\erai important subversives. 
Among tliese were Hermengilda Pena-Valencia, a 
Mexican Communist leader in the field of educa- 
tion at Ilermosillo, Sonora, Mexico; Samuel Lip- 
szyc, an Argentinian member of the Communist 
Pa rty of France and a writer for Communist pub- 
lications; Gregory Bruce York, a resident of Van- 
I'oin er, British Columbia, and former chairman on 
the York Township Peace Association of the Ca- 
nadian Peace Congress. Subversive aliens re- 
(uired to depart as a result of information de- 
velo]>ed under the Border programs included 
Victor Manuel Alvarez-Gonzalez, a Mexican ad- 
mitted as an agricultural laborer and subsequently 
identified as a Comnnuiist ; and Peter Michael 
Iviedel and Jack De Cock, naturalized Canadians, 
)otli of whom are active in the American Nazi 
>arty. 
I Among aliens with subversive backgrounds who 
vere deported or required to depart during the 



206-147 O— 6B 2 



year were: Johannes Lodewijkx, a Netherlands 
businessman, following his plea of guilty and sen- 
tence suspended on a charge of conspiracy to ship 
heavy machinery secretly from the United States 
to Cuba ; Yatsik Lukasik, a Polish student, against 
whom there were serious subversive allegations, 
and who departed to Poland on July 1, 1965 ; and 
Dr. Shirley Joan Chappie, a plastic surgical spe- 
cialist from Auckland, New Zealand, who gained 
admission to the United States as a visitor by con- 
cealing her prior Communist Party membership. 
She departed January 25, 1965. 

Louie Pon, an official of the Chinese Hand Laun- 
dry Alliance in New York City, was admitted to 
the United States in 1949 as a United States citizen 
on the basis of a false claim to United States citi- 
zenship. Deportation proceedings were instituted 
in 1963, during which he applied for suspension of 
deportation. Service investigation pi'oduced evi- 
dence concerning his affiliation with a New York 
pro-Communist Chinese language publication, the 
China Daily News, and on the basis of this infor- 
mation he was denied relief from deportation as a 
matter of administrative discretion. The Board of 
Immigration Appeals dismissed his appeal on June 
30, 1965. 

Foreign horn of Criiu Inal Classes. Of continued 
interest to the Service in its exclusion, deportation 
and denaturalization efforts, have been the alien or 
naturalized racketeers, and criminals who are en- 
gaged in syndicated crime and vice and who have 
become deeply imbedded in the roots of the coun- 
try's growth and development. During the year 
7,649 investigations of criminal, immoral, or nar- 
cotic cases were completed and 63*2 aliens were de- 
ported from the United States or i-equired to 
depart. 

Results of the Anti-Crime Program are reflected 
in the following cases : 

Lorenzo Di Chiara, sought by Italian authorities 
who considered him a dangerous criminal and held 
a warrant for his arrest for arnied robbery and 
stolen checks and bank notes, entered the United 
States as a stowaway in June 1964. He was ap- 
prehended in Brooklyn, N.Y., and was deported 
to Italy on March 24, 1965. 

Lorenzo Rossano, an employee and associate of 
Joey Aiuppa, Cicero, 111., vice boss, was ordered 
deported to Italy on December 28, 1964. Rossano's 
arrest record extending from 1930 to 1963 con- 
sisted of 17 arrests, including convictions for rob- 
bery with pistol, and burglary. His appeal from 
the December 28, 1964, order was dismissed by the 
Board of Immigration Appeals on July 13, 1965. 

Georgios loannis Psaras, who embezzled the 
equivalent of $33,000 from a Greek government 
agency and fled to the United States before an 
arrest could be made, was apprehended in Los 
Angeles on April 27, 1965, and was ordered de- 
ported on May 4, 1965. He arrived in Greece on 
May 8, 1965, where he was taken into custody by 
Greek authorities. 



The border criminal identification activity in- 
volves posting of lookouts to prevent the entry 
or the deportation of aliens from Mexico and Can- 
ada. Tliis program resulted in the posting of 
2,409 lookouts, and the exclusion or rejection of 
983 aliens. Examples of the benefits of this pro- 
gram are cited above under cooperation with otlier 
law enforcement agencies. 

Frauds. Investigation of possible immigration 
fraud was conducted during the year in 4,047 
cases. 

Major emphasis was given to investigations of 
aliens and other persons engaged in criminal con- 
spiracies to arrange "sham" marriages or to pre- 
pare false documentation with which to circum- 
vent the provisions of the immigration laws 
relating to quota and other restrictions. Other 
frauds frequently encountered have been false 
claims to United States citizenship involving the 
use of spurious identities or fraudulent birth and 
baptismal certificates, and the counterfeiting and 
alteration of immigration docmnents. 

In one case, Ignacio E. Silvas, James W. Dunn, 
and Paul Bernard Dove pleaded guilty in Phoe- 
nix, Ariz., to charges of counterfeiting Forms I- 
151, Alien Registration Receipt Cards. The coun- 
terfeit forms were to have been sold through 
sources in Mexico for amounts up to $500 each. 
All were placed on probation — Silvas for 3 years 
and the others for 2 years. 

Thomas Foti and Josephine Mourtziou nee 
Milazzo, operators of the Milazzo Travel Service, 
New York City, were found guilty on 21 counts 
of a 30-count indictment charging them with con- 
spiring to make false statements and certifications 
in applications for first preference visa petitions. 
They are awaiting imposition of sentence. 

There were 1,998 Chinese aliens who confessed 
during this year to having effected entry into the 
United States tlirough false claims to United 
States citizenship. These confessions exposed 
3,564 other Chinese persons who entered in the 
same manner and made 1,192 "slots" unavailable 
for future use of persons who might, at a later 
date, make false claims to United States citizen- 
ship. 

The Fraudulent Document Center, established 
at El Paso in 1958, had the most productive year 
since its inception. Tlie files increased at an aver- 
age rate of 135 cases a month and now contain 
10,752 cases relating to Mexican aliens who pre- 
sented documents in attempts to support false 
claims to ITnited States citizenship. Service of- 
fices and other agencies, drawing on the extensive 
reserve of information available, directed more 
than 2,000 inquiries to the Center concerning 
doubtful documented claims to citizenship. Af- 
firmative or positive responses, indicating the 
documents presented have been previously used to 
allege citizenship, were made in connection with 
13 percent of the inquiries. 

A typical case in the records at tlie Center in- 



volves a Mexican youth who has been encounterei I 
four times since 1962, and on each occasion lias 
presented either a birth certificate or baptismal 
certificate to back up his citizenship claim. Al- 
though four different documents were used, the 
frauds were detected by search of the various in- 
dexes and cross-references. A converse situation 
concerned an individual encountered in the Detroit 
area who persisted in claiming citizenship until 
a check with the Center revealed the same birth 
certificate had been used to support spurious 
claims by other Mexican nationals on three pre 
vious occasions. 

Valuable assistance to the Service's efforts to 
combat document frauds stems from liaison with 
foreign officials. Mexican authorities have taken 
action against a number of known document ven- 
dors operating in Mexico. Five Mexican subjects 
were recently arrested in Mexicali, B.C., Mexico, 
for involvement in falsification of United States 
immigration documents. Fees of $100 each were 
charged for altered documents to facilitate enti-y 
into the United States. 

In another area, a Mexican citizen, previously 
convicted and sentenced in Mexico for falsifica- 
tion of immigration documents, was arrested 
again by Mexican polic« when 68 immigration 
documents of various tyjjes were confiscated. Ca- 
nadian authorities reportedly discovered 35 blank 
United States immigration forms while searching 
the home of a subject suspected of being involved 
in narcotics traffic. 

Criminal Prosecution 

The United States attorneys authorized prose- 
cution in 3,638 cases involvmg violation of the 
immigration and nationality laws. Of the cases 
disposed of, 93 percent resulted in cxjnvictions witli 
aggregate sentences of 3,421 years and fines of 
$126,150. 

Of the 3,442 convictions, 1,696 aliens were con- 
victed of reenti-y after deportation without per- 
mission (8 U.S.C. 1326), 864 persons were con- 
victed for document frauds (18 U.S.C. 1546), and 
the average sentence in these cases was 13 montlis. 
Of the 405 convictions for nationality violations, 
401 were for false representations as a United 
States citizen ( 18 U.S.C. 911 ) . 

Revocation of Naturalization 

Revocation investigations aimed at discovering 
naturalizations obtained by fraudulent or illegal 
means often prove difficult and time consuming, 
Extensive evidence is needed for tliese court pro- 
ceedings to meet tlie "clear, convincing, and un- 
equivocal" burden of proof laid down by the Su- 
preme Court. 

Anthony Peter Riela, Apalachin "Crime Con- 
vention" delegate, was denaturalized when the 
Court of Appeals on November 4, 1964, affirmed 
a revocation order of the District Court. Riela 



had been natm-alized on August 22, 1933, in the 
United States District Court for the Eastern Dis- 
trict of New York by assuming tlie identity and 
arrival record of another person. It later de- 
veloped that Riela had actually entered the Unit- 
ed States as a stowaway. Following the decision 
of the Court of Appeals there was no attempt 
to seek certiorari and deijortation proceedings were 
instituted on November 23, 1964. These proceed- 
ings are still pending. 

Domenico D'Agostino, who had attended the 
"Crime Convention" at Apalachin, N.Y., in 1957 
was stripped of his fradulently gained naturaliza- 
tion when the Court of Appeals ruled against him 
on November 23, 1964, and upheld the revocation 
order of the United States District Court,. No at- 
tempt was made to petition the Supreme Court 
for writ of certiorari and the denaturalization be- 
came final. D'Agostino's 1927 naturalization in 
the Supreme Court of Niagara County, N.Y., had 
been obtained by misrepresentation of his true 
marital status and concealment of a prior arrest 
record. 

Emanuel Riggi, who had been closely associated 
with racketeers m New Jersey and has been con- 
victed for carrying dangerous weapons and extor- 
tion, was naturalized in Elizabeth, N.J., on Novem- 
ber 28, 1934. Investigation developed concealment 
of an arrest record at the time of naturalization, 
and on November 30, 1964, a suit to revoke his 
naturalization was filed in the United States Dis- 
trict Court, Newark, N.J. These proceedings are 
still pending. 

DETENTION AND DEPORTATION 
ACTIVITIES 

The nmnber of aliens deported in fiscal year 
1965 under orders of deportation was 10,143. This 
is 1,397 more than the 8,746 deported in fiscal year 
1964. 

Of the aliens dejwrted, 90 percent or 9,158 had 
entered without proper documents or entered with- 
out insi>ection or failed to maintain nonimmigrant 
status. There were 581 deported on criminal, im- 
moral, and narcotic charges, 355 who had been pre- 
viously deported and reentered without permission 
and were again deported, and 49 were deported on 
other miscellaneous charges. None were deported 
this year on subversive charges although there 
were a number with subversive backgrounds. By 
destination, 6,518 aliens were deported to Mexico, 
1,1144 to Canada, 513 to Greece, 181 to the Domin- 
ican Republic, 136 to Italy, and 134 to Spain. 

Among the criminals deported was Lorenzo Di 
Chiara. He was wanted in Italy for armed rob- 
bery and was considered a dangerous criminal by 
Italian authorities. Another criminal, Joseph 
St aclier, who has a long record of arrests, left the 
rnited States under an order of exclusion and de- 
portation. His naturalization had previously 



been revoked because of concealment of his crim- 
inal activities. 

Two aliens with subversive backgrounds, Mr. 
and Mrs. Alexandre Sokolov, were also among 
those deported. Sokolov, a native of U.S.S.R., 
had entered this coimtry illegally and assumed the 
identity of a United States citizen named Robert 
K. Baltch. He married an unidentified woman 
who had assumed the identity of a United States 
woman named Joy Ann Garber. Both were in- 
dicted by a Federal Grand Jury for conspiracy to 
commit espionage. After the indictments were 
dismissed they were deported to Czechoslovakia. 





ALIENS DEPORTED AND ALIENS REQUIRED TO DEPART 
1956- 1965 

•Mi T.o„s..« 




- 


REQUIRED TO DEPSST 


' 


DEPORTED 




• 



























56 '60 '63 '64 '65 




" '" ,",. " " 



Aliens deported and aliens required to depart. 

The number of aliens required to depart without 
the issuance of formal orders of deportation in- 
creased from 73,042 in the last fiscal year to 95,263. 
Among them were 18,205 crewmen who were tech- 
nical violators who remained longer than the time 
for which admitted. There were also 30,095 aliens 
who departed imder safeguards, most of them 
Mexicans who entered without inspection; this 
was an increase of 40 percent over last year's figure 
of 21,550 in this category. 

The remaining 46,963 cases of aliens who were 
required to depart included 31,455 nonimmigrants 
who failed to maintain status under which ad- 
mitted, and 13,023 who entered without inspection. 
The principal nationalities of tJiese aliens were 
24,198 Mexicans, 4,025 Cubans, 3,856 Dominicans, 
2,207 Canadians, 1,609 British, and 1,457 Filipinos. 

At their own request 203 aliens who had fallen 
into distress were removed from the United States 
under section 250 of the Immigration and Na- 
tionality Act. 

Forty-eight ment.ally incompetent aliens were 
deported or removed. Up to the time of deporta- 
tion about $293,000 had been expended for their 
care in the United States. If they had continued 
to remain institutionalized at public expense, more 
than $3,900,000 would have been disbursed for 
their maintenance and treatment during their ex- 
pected lifetimes. 



There were 17,041 aliens initially admitted to 
Service detention facilities and 26,918 to non-Serv- 
ice facilities. The increase of 43 percent in initial 
admissions is largely the result of the illegal in- 
flux of Mexican laborers seeking work after the 
"Bracero" law expired. 

With the illegal entry of aliens rising, the 
return of Mexicans to their own country ex- 
peditiously and economically became even more 
important. The Border Patrol continued to be 
responsible for the removal of certain deportable 
aliens to Mexico through the Leon airlift and 
Presidio-Ojinaga trainlift. Throughout the year 
these means were used for returning adult male 
Mexican alien violators under depoi'tation or 
voluntary departure proceedings nearer to their 
homes in Mexico, thereby discouraging their il- 
legal return to the United States. 

During fiscal year 1965, 9,720 aliens were re- 
moved by airlift and 14,822 aliens were removed 
by Presidio-Ojinaga trainlift. As of the close of 
the fiscal year, 66,021 deportable aliens had been 
airlifted to the interior of Mexico since the incep- 
tion of tlie operation on November 29, 1957. Since 
September 26, 1956, 73,356 deportable aliens have 
been moved to Presidio, Tex., by bus for removal 
to Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Mexico, by the train. 
The total includes 120 deportable aliens airlifted 
to Leon from Mexicali, B.C., in May 1965. 

The effectiveness of this procedure is demon- 
strated by the fact that during the year only 2,412 
aliens were located after illegal entry and iden- 
tified as having been previously removed by the 
airlift. Also, 1,931 aliens were located after il- 
legal entry whose records reflect they were pre- 
viously removed by the bus-trainlift. 

HEARINGS AND LITIGATIONS 

Exclusion and Deportation Hearings 

The fiscal year total of deportation hearings 
referred to Special Inquiiy Officers reached a new 
record higii of 19,475. During the month of June 
1965 referrals of 2,120 deportation hearings 
marked the highest number ever reported in any 
single month. Completions of cases kept substan- 
tially abreast of receipts. The number of ex- 
clusion hearings maintained a declining trend, 
showing a 14 percent decrease as compared with 
1964. Applications for withliolding of deporta- 
tion on a claim of physical persecution numbered 
257 in fiscal year 1965 — about the same number as 
during the previous year. To the long list of coun- 
tries concerning which such claims of physical per- 
secution were made in previous years, there were 
added during 1965: Cyprus, Ecuador, England, 
Iran, Lithuania, Jamaica, Panama, South Africa, 
and Trinidad. 

Special Inquiry Officere continued to be faced 
with difficult factual and legal questions calling 
for a careful, scrupulously independent balancing 



of the evidence, especially in those cases calling 
for exercise of discretionary authority to grant 
relief from deportation. Noteworthy is the 56 
percent increase in the receipt of applications 
(923) during 1965 for adjustment of status under 
section 245 of the act. 

A repetitive problem facing Special Inquiry 
Officers was the necessity for adjudicating appli- 
cations for adjustment of status under section 
245 made by natives of Central and South 
America who had come to the United States 
as visitors. The pattern most frequently 
countered presented cases in which it appeared 
that the alien left his job and family behind, came 
to the United States with a romid-trip ticket for 
an alleged vacation, took employment here a few 
days after arrival, and then sought to acquire per- 
manent immigrant status. 

While the customary claim was that the alien's 
intention to remain permanently did not ripen 
until after his arrival, the Special Inquiry Officers 
were faced with evidence indicating such things as 
affirmative falsehoods to American consuls abroad 
at the time of application for nonimmigrant visas., 
marriage to a LTnited States citizen promptly after 
arrival upon a basis of prearrangements made 
abroad, and married women leaving behind themi 
their husbands and children and seeking perma 
nent residence here shortly after arrival. The 
cases are obviously fraught with emotionalism anc 
possibility of fraud, falsehood, and subterfuge 
calling for a courageous, firm, but wholly fail 
approach on the part, of hearing officers, consistent 
with the spirit of the law, the national interest 
and the humanitarian factors involved in each 
individual situation. 

As chief law officer, the General Counsel func- 
tions principally as advisor to the Commissionei 
and operation officials on legal matters in carryinj 
out Service enforcement and administrative dutie 
under the immigration and nationality statutesj 
He provides executive and professional direction 
to the four Service Regional Counsels, who main 
tain professional supervision over trial attorney! 
serving primarily as representatives of tlie Gov- 
ernment in formal exclusion, expulsion, and rescis 
sion hearings before special inquiry officers. Trial 
Attorneys, when requested, assist United Stat 
Attorneys in civil and criminal actions arising 
out of the immigration and nationality laws 

The upward trend in the volume of trial attorney 
work continues. Cases prepared for hearings " 
fore special inquiry officers amounted to 12,455, 31 
percent more than in fiscal year 1964, and appear- 
ances at hearings on issues pertaining to deport- 
ability or availability of administrative relief to a 
deportable alien increased by 1,844 (31 percent) 
over the previous year. These attorneys also ap- 
peared on issues of excludability in 408 cases, plus 
in 153 other hearings, most of the latter involvin 
rescission of status proceedings. 



ies 



Litigation 

There has been a notable increase in litigation 
contesting Service determinations in immigration 
matters, few successfully. None of the cases reach- 
ing tlie Supreme Court resulted unfavorably to 
the Government. Thirty-two more actions were 
disposed of in the district courts during fiscal year 
1965 than the previous year. Only 10 of the 142 
district court decisions were unfavorable to the 
Government. Sixteen more direct petitions for 
review under section 106 of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act, as amended, were disposed of by 
the courts of appeals, only four of 57 such petitions 
having been decided unfavorably to the Govern- 
ment. 

The scope of the Act of September 26, 1961 
(sec. 106, I. & N. Act; 8 U.S.C. 1105a), desigiied 
to eliminate district court review of administra- 
tive exclusion and deportation orders by requiring 
the filiiig of petitions for review direct to the 
United States Courts of Appeals, was further ex- 
panded by tlie Supreme Court in a per curiam 
order on October 26, 1964, when it reversed and 
remanded G'lova v. Rosenberg. 379 U.S. 18 with 
directions to the Court of xVppeals for the Ninth 
Circuit to entertain a petition for review, in efle<"t 
holding that a motion to reopen a deportation 
order is reviewable exclusively in the lower appel- 
late court. Earlier the Supreme Court in Foti v. 
INS, 375 U.S. 217 December 16, 1963, declared that 
not only orders denying suspension of deportation 
but also consideration of other discretionary relief 
during the deportation proceeding are merged in 
the final deportation order, denials of which dur- 
ing the course of the deportation proceeding are 
reviewable only in the courts of appeals. 

Several petitions for certiorari involving ques- 
tions under the Immigration and Nationality Act 
were denied by the Supreme Court in the October 
1964 term. Upheld in Texm State AFL-CIO v. 
Kennedy, 379 IT.S. 826, was the affirmance by the 
Court of Appeals 330 F. 2d 217; C.A.D.C, 1964, 
of the lower court decision which found that the 
plaintiffs did not have legal standing to challenge 
the validity of the alien commuter program. In 
Lam Tat Sin v. Esperdy, 379 U.S. 901, left un- 
disturbed was the ruling by the Second Circuit 
tliiit the Service had not acted arbitrarily in di- 
it'cting the deportation of the Chinese petitioner 
til Ilong Kong, even though deportation of Chinese 
t(i that British Crown colony had been withheld 
ill nianv other cases. Also left undisturbed (Ng 
s„; Saiu/ V. Enperdy, 379 ILS. 970) was the finding 
liy the same circuit court that a crewman granted 
parole was not entitled to a hearing upon revoca- 
tion of his parole. 

The Supreme Court declined 379 U.S. 999, to 
review the holding of the Sixth Circuit Court of 
Appeals in Giacomo D'' Andrea v. INS, that the 
record evidence supported the administrative find- 
ings, that the sole purpose of the alien's marriage 



to a United States citizen was to obtain a nonquota 
visa and evade the immigration laws; and that 
he lacked the good moral character qualification 
because of his commission of adultery. A rehear- 
ing was denied May 17, 1965 of Patsis v. INS, 380 
U.S. 952, wherein the Eighth Circuit ruled that 
if the Attorney General's discretionary power to 
adjust status of an alien crewman is taken away 
after the application has been filed, but before 
final administrative decision, the application must 
be denied; further, that the last deportable act is 
the basis for computing the continuous physical 
presence requirement for suspension of deporta- 
tion. The decision of the Ninth Circuit in Calef 
V. Rosenberg dismissing the petition for judicial 
review and the appeal from denial of a habeas cor- 
pus petition was left undisturbed by the Supreme 
Court 381 IT.S. 914. The question before the lat- 
ter was whether after deportation proceedings had 
been reopened at the petitioner's request to recon- 
sider the designation of Italy as the counti-y of 
deportation, the Court of Appeals properly dis- 
missed the judicial review petition which sought 
a stay of deportation and consideration of pro- 
priety of the designation of Italy. 

In Zimmernuin v. Lehmann, wherein the court; 
of appeals held that the petitioner .should not have 
been excluded from admission to this country, the 
Supreme Court declined to review 381 U.S. 925, 
finding that the petitioner had not acquired Unit- 
ed States citizenship by adoption. The record con- 
tained no facts showing he was in fact adopted 
but many facts indicating to the contraiy, and he. 
did not in the district court claim such citizenship, 
having there specifically alleged he was stateless. 

Three petitions for certiorari were pending be- 
fore the Supreme Court at the close of fiscal year 
1965. In Scalzo v. Hur-ney (No. 996 Misc.), after 
exhausting all administrative remedies and filing 
a complaint in the district court, but prior to argu- 
ment and over objection of the Govemment, plain- 
tiff's attorney took and filed with that court, a dep- 
osition from plaintiff's husband, the information 
so obtained contradicting and enlarging the 
acbninistrative record. The district court granted 
summary judgment for the Government, and on 
appeal was affirmed by the Tliird Circuit 338 F. 
2d 339 which ordered the striking of the deposi- 
tion from the record, stating: "Only the record 
of the administrative proceeding itself is pertinent 
and relevant in tliis type of action." The peti- 
tioner seeks ivview as to the propriety of that 
order. Hitai v. INS (No. 1159) raises the ques- 
tion wlietiier Congress can validly make distinc- 
tions based on racial factors in the terms and con- 
ditions on wliich it admits aliens to this country 
for permanent residence. Review is sought in 
Pavoqouza.s v. INS (No. 136), whether the 1962 
amendment to section 244 of the act barring sus- 
pension of deportation to an alien who entered 
the Ignited States as a crewman applies only to 
aliens of that class who entered thereafter. 



ALIEN ADDRESS REPORTS 



In accordance with the requirements of the Im- 
migration and Nationality Act, 3,393,209 aliens 
filed address reports with this Service in January 
1965. This is an increase of 57,618 reports over 
last year. The three States with the largest num- 
ber of aliens reporting are: California, 810,400; 
New York, 620,119; and Texas, 245,880. Other 
States with large alien populations are Illinois, 
New Jersey, Florida, Massachusetts, Michigan, 
Pennsylvania, and Ohio. 

The largest number of resident aliens were: 
Mexican nationality 631,138; Canada 365,252; 
United Kingdom 257,293; Gennany 241,978; 
Italy 214,618; Poland 126,904; and Cuba 121,051. 
Residents of other nationalities were under 100,- 
000. Tlie largest number of Mexican nationals 
lived in California and Texas; Canadians in Cali- 
fornia, New York, and Michigan; British in 
California and New York ; Germans in California, 
New York, and Illinois ; Italians in New York and 
New Jersey; Poles in New York and Illinois; and 
Cubans in Florida and New York. 



CITIZENSHIP 

Judicial Naturalization 

Persons Naturalized. Pursuant to Service rec- 
ommendations entered in Federal and State courts, 
104,299 aliens were granted United States citizen- 
ship during the fiscal year. This volume, some- 
what lower than that of fiscal year 1964, reflects 
the normal downward trend in naturalization 
which, during the past few years, has paralleled 
the gradually diminishing effect of the former 
Service invitation-to-file program. Recognizing 
this trend and in furtherance of economy, the 
Service reduced its naturalization examiner force 
by 12 positions at the beginning of the 1965 year. 
Nonetheless, operational currency and the highest 
standards in the quality of work performance were 
consistently maintained tliroughout the year, even 
though the reduced examiner force was" generally 
l)elow its authorized strength. 

While a majority of the new citizens were former 
nationals of (Jermany (14,929), Italy (10,742), the 
United Kingdom (9,370), Canada (8,489), Mexico 
(5,(),so), Hungary (4,054), and Poland (4,017), the 
remainder included nationals of 108 other foreign 
countries located in all jiarts of the world. Thus, 
these newly naturalized i>ersons were representa- 
tive of many ditierent cultures which may be ex- 
pected to benefit the American community. Of 
equal value will he the technical and professional 
skills found among them. At one naturalization 
sitting alone, eight aeronautical engineers or aero- 
space technologists were admitted to citizenship 
and are presently engaged in furthering the 
Nation's space effort. 











PERSONS NATURA 
1956- 1965 


_IZED 










- 


1 — ' 










- 




^ 






ZI 


— 






















- — - 








- 


- 







I 



Persons naturalised, 1956-65. 



As in former years, the greatest number of new 
citizens (76,630) qualified for naturalization under' 
the general provisions of the law which require 5 
years' residence. There were 24,516 persons 
naturalized as the spouses and children of citizens 
after 3 years' residence, while 3,085 othe 
found eligible without regard to residence, based 
upon a period of military service. Naturalization! 
under other special provisions of the law totaled 
only 68. 

A substantial number of the naturalized group 
was the 7,914 natural or adopted children oi 
United States citizens, beneficiaries of iDetitioni 
filed by their parents. Age as well as youth was 
also well represented among the new citizens, and 
several petitioners had attauied or passed the cen 
tury mark at the time they were admitted to citi- 
zenship. Illness, often a concomitant of advanced 
years, made it impossible for some elderly jjei-sons 
to appear at the courthouse for naturalization, " 
Under a special statutory provision, these qualified 
applicants were able to realize their desire to be 
come citizens in proceedings conducted at their 
bedside. 

Persons Denied Naturalisation. When Service 
investigation establishes that a petitioner cannot 
meet one of the statutoiy prerequisites foi 
naturalization, a recommendation for denial upoi 
such basis will be presented to the court, unless the 
petitioner elects to withdraw or not prosecute 
petition. Petitions which are withdrawn or not 
prosecuted generally are recommended for denial, 
and are denied by the court, on such grounds, 
without an adjudication on the merits. The dis- 
position of Ciises in this manner saves the time oi 
the courts. Service, and petitionee, for the csises 
are not argued at the court hearing, and the peti- 
tioners need not appear at the proceeding. Peti 
tioners in these categories are advised by the 
naturalization examiners as to what they must dc 
to attain eligibility, and many of them may be ex- 
pected to qualify on a later date. 



Among the latter group was a person who fur- 
nislied false testimony concerning his membership 
in the Communist Party, and another who was 
found to be lacking in good moral character be- 
cause he had falsely represented himself to be a 
United States citizen in connection with his em- 
ployment. Another 50 petitioners were deceased 
prior to the court hearing on their petitions. 

Related Naturalization Matters 







'\.- 



A "shut-in" petitioner, 101 years of age. was naturalized 
in her home in June 1965. Almost 900 of the persons 
naturalized were 75 years of age or over. 

During the fiscal year, 2,059 petitions for 
naturalization were denied. Of this number, 1,855 
petitions for naturalization were denied by the 
courts pursuant to withdrawal applications, or be- 
r fiuise they were not prosecuted by tlie petitioners. 
However, practically all these withdrawals and 
failures to prosecute followed administrative 
(IfU'iminations that the petitioners could not meet 
line or more of the statutory requirements for 
naturalization. 

( )ne petitioner, for example, who passed the 
iiaiunilization literacy test with ease, had previ- 
"ii-ily and falsely claimed lie could not read and 
\\ lite English in order to avoid military service 
iiiidtT the draft. Rather than face a possible 
denial for lack of attachment to the Constitution, 
he decided to withdraw his petition. Other peti- 
tioners within this large group were persons who 
could not meet the good moral character rex^uire- 
nient because they had engaged in criminal activity 
or other misconduct. Illiteracy or lack of knowl- 
edge concerning history, government, and the Con- 
si i tut ion also accounted for a considerable number 
of eases which were withdrawn or not prosecuted. 

Xot all cases, however, were disposed of without 
an adjudication on the merits. There were 107 peti- 
tioners who chose to prosecute their petitions and 
were denied citizenship l)ecause the courts agreed 
with the Service that their knowledge of the Eng- 
lish language, or the history, government, and 
Constitution was insufficient to permit their 
naturalization. 

-Vfter a hearing by the court, 47 other petitioners 
were refused naturalization because of their in- 
eligibility under various provisions of the statute. 



Education Programs. While school attendance 
in preparation to meet the English language and 
other educational prerequisites for admission to 
citizensliip is not statutorily required of naturaliza- 
tion api)licanls, experience has demonstrated that 
such attendance is the most eifective approach to 
learning. Thus, contributing materially to the 
success of the Service mission in the naturaliza- 
tion field were programs and activities which 
furthered the enrollment of resident aliens in the 
3,933 public school citizenship classes which were 
operative during the fiscal year. Throughout the 
period, the names and addresses of 136,834 newly 
admitted immigrants, and an additional 43,737 
actual applicants for naturalization, were fur- 
nished local schools, so that these prospective citi- 
zens could lie invited to attend and participate in 
these study groups. 

Supplementing these, pi'ograms were the per- 
sonal efforts of the naturalization examiners who 
worked in close cooperation with the schools to 
encourage class attendance, and whose frequent 
visits and informal talks to the study groups em- 
phasized the official interest in the students' prog- 
ress and tended to eliminate discouragement and 
consequent "dropouts." The effectiveness of the 
Service measures in this area is demonstrated by 
the fact that the annual enrollment in citizenship 
classes totaled 80,180. 

Citizenship Day, commemorated annually 
throughout the United States, and Law Day and 
Loyalty Day, observed in some States, formed the 
settings for Service activity designed to emphasize 
citizenship responsibility and foster the practice 
of good eit izenshii) by all citizens. Service officers, 
in cooperation with many patriotic and public- 
spirited citizens and organizations, planned and 
participated in many iinpressi\'e observances and 
exercises on such occasions to further these objec- 
tives. At ceremonies on Jamestown Island, Va., 
Vice President Hubert Humphrey was the princi- 
pal speaker. Supreme Court Justice William O. 
Douglas spoke at proceedings in San Antonio, 
Tex., and Gov. John A. Bums of Hawaii par- 
ticipated in impressive observances in Honolulu. 
In a numljer of areas, naturalization proceedings 
were televised for the edification of the general 
public. A Service publication, "Citizenship Day 
and Constitution Week Bulletin,'' once again 
proved its worth as a practical guide to the ar- 
rangement of appropriate, meaningful ceremonies. 






■)ix at a Law Day ceretnmvy at Fort De Riissy. Honolulu, on May 1. I9il 



The Federal Textbook on Citizenship. Since 
1940, citizenship textbook material under tliis gen- 
eral title has been published by the Service, and 
distributed free of cost for the use of naturaliza- 
tion candidates attending public scliool citizenship 
classes. During the fiscal year, 260,6^9 units of 
this publication were distributed, exceeding the 
annual distriluition of recent years by many thou- 
sands. A major part of the increased demand re- 
lated to the units entitled "Our Government," 
"Our American Way of Life," "Our United 
States," and a related "Teachers Guide," which 
were newly published by the end of fiscal year 
1964 as the "Becoming a Citizen Series." The re- 
ception accorded the new series has amply justified 
the Service belief that its use will materially ad- 
vance the objectives of citizenship education and 
training. Indeed, the demand has been so heavy 
that the new series is being edited preliminary to 
a second printing. 

The Service effort to supply effective textbook 
material in the areas of citizenship instruction and 
training has not overlooked the prospectiA'e citizen 
who. becansc of cii-cuiustances beyond his control. 



rl asses. For more than 
study courses have been 
tes in this group for use 



cannot altciid cii i/.i-n-lup 
two decaili-. Si'i\ ice Ikuui 
made a\ailalile Id faiidi(l:i 

in connection with a program of instruction serv- 
iced by extension di\-isions of State universities or 
State educational authorities. New editions of the 
home study textbooks, revised and improved, made 
their a})pearance in the fiscal year. The enroll- 
ineiit of natui'alization candidates in the home 
study courses totaled 3,318 during the period. 

yatuvdlization Courts and Decisions. A co- 
operative relationship between the Service and the 
courts furthered the natui'alization effort during 
tiie year. Invariably, the cotirts responded favor- 
al)ly to Ser\ice requests for special final hearings 



needed to expedite the naturalization of military 
dependents proceeding abroad, or that of othei 
aliens about to depart the United States in con- 
nection with important Government projects. 

The number of active courts was further reduced 
from 622 to 600, promoting economy in operation 
an earlier disposition of cases, and more impres- 
sive final hearings. The year also witnessed the 
extension of the designated examiner system to ah 
courts, an objective which has been long sought 
by the Service in the interest of economy and 
efficiency. 

The decision in the Convento case, finalized by 
appellate action during the fiscal year, solved the 
naturalization problem of many nonresident Fili- 
pinos who enlisted abroad and then served honor- 
ably in the U.S. Navy during a war period. Th( 
court, ruled that such Filipinos could be natural 
ized without a lawful admission to the United 
States for permanent residence, if they reenlisted 
while within this country following the period of 
war service. Under an earlier interpretation, it 
had been held that such reenlistment had to pre- 
cede the war service. In this same area, another 
court ruled tluit a Filipino who enlisted abroad, 
and whose enlistment period was extended for 1 jj^ 
year while he was within the United States, should 
be regarded as having reenlisted in this country 
for purposes of naturalization based upon his war 
service. 

The oath of allegiance and renunciation required 
to be taken by an alien at the time he is natural- 
ized need not inchide a promise to bear arms if 
the alien's I'cligimis training and belief in a "Su- 
preme Being," prctludes the commitment. Under 
the Universal Military Training and Service Act, 
a classification as a conscientious objector may be 
assigned upon the same basis. 

During the fiscal year, in U.S. v. Seeger, the 




An Abilene, Tex., public .school citiz( 

draft act provision was attached as unconstitu- 
tional because it violated the guarantees of the 
firet amendment relating to the establishment and 
exercise of religion, and discriminated between 
forms of religious expression in violation of due 
process under the fifth amendment. However, the 
Supreme Court fomid the provision to be consti- 
tutional, holding that belief in a "Supreme Being" 
is not limited to an orthodox belief in a tradi- 
tional God, but extends to a belief based upon a 
power, being, or faith, to which all else is sub- 
inate, or upon which all else is ultimately de- 
pendent ; and, if the power, belief, or faith occupies 
in the life of the possessor a place parallel to that 
filled by the traditional God, the statutory test of 
belief in a "Supreme Being" will be met. This 
ling has broadened the basis upon which nat- 
ulization candidates can qualify to take the 
modified oath. 

Derivative Citizens 

Cifizennhip Document><. The Service is author- 
ized by statute to issue certificates of citizenship to 
persons who have acquired the status at birth 
aliroiid through citizen parents, or derived citizen- 
ship after foreign birth tlirougli the naturalization 
of i)areiits or marriage to a citizen. From 1957 
through l!)tU, the annual volume of casework in 
this area steadily increased. This trend leveled 
otf in 19fi5 as 35,007 citizens received certificates 
compared with the 35,321 issued documents dur- 
ing the preceding year. Of the total, 17,617 were 
born citizens while the remaining 17,390 derived 
citizenship after birth. 

The implementation of constructive Service pro- 
grams did much to maintain derivative citizenshii) 
casework at a high level during the fiscal year. 



iH tlieti played host at a "graduation party" given for 
Cher. 

Newly naturalized parents were promptly advised 
as to the derivative rights of their children and 
the availability of the certificates. The applica- 
tions of servicemen, in behalf of their citizen 
children born during a tour of duty overseas, con- 
tinued to be processed and heard in large groups 
at military bases within the United States, pro- 
moting economy in operation, and an efficient, 
early disposition of such cases with a minimum of 
inconvenience and expense to the servicemen. 

The special program to facilitate the issuance 
and delivery of certificates to citizens bom and re- 
siding in the Republic of Panama or the Panama 
Canal Zone was brought to a successful close early 
in the fiscal year, only to be reopened as the period 
ended and the vacation season approached. Many 
of these citizens, precluded by law from obtaining 
certificates while outside the United States, vaca- 
tion in this country for the secondary purpose of 
securing the documents. The special arrange- 
ments made during fiscal year 1964 to assure the 
most ex|3editious disposition of these cases proved 
most efl'ective, and they are and will continue to 
be in force as long as they are needed. 

Under the law, a certificate of citizenship is re- 
quired to be accepted as proof of the holder's status 
as a citizen by all courts and Government agencies 
here and abroad. The probative value of the doc- 
ument, and the heavy burden of proof which must 
be met in cancelling it for illegality or fraud, re- 
quire the exercise of extreme care to assure that 
unqualified persons are not issued certificates. 

Illustrating the need for such caution was a re- 
cent ca.se in which the citizenship claim was pre- 
mised upon the alleged birth of a deceased parent 
in the Ignited States. The officer handling the 
case, unconvinced as to the truth of the allegation, 
resolved to tap every source of information which 



could conceivably shed light upon the place of the 
parent's birth. In the process, he caused the tomb- 
stone of the parent to be examined, and discovered 
thereon an inscription which indicated that the 
decedent was a native of China. Confronted with 
this and other evidence, the applicant admitted the 
falsity of his claim, and no certificate issued. 

Despite the care exercised before a certificate of 
citizenship is issued, 603 documents in this cate- 

tory were administratively cancelled during the 
seal year because fraud was practiced by the ap- 
plicants. Occasionally, however, applicants are 
innocent victims of fraud perpetrated by an out- 
sider for monetary gain. In one case, where the 
citizenship claim was based upon the naturaliza- 
tion of a father, his name as alleged by the appli- 
cant was slightly different from the name appear- 
ing in his alleged naturalization record. This 
discrej^ancy prompted further inquiries by the re- 
sponsible officer, and it was determined that the 
naturalized person was not in fact the applicant's 
father. 

The ramifications of this finding were extensive 
for it adversely affected the immigration or citi- 
zenship status of 13 other members of the family. 
The entire family had acted in good faith, since 
they honestly believed the naturalized person to 
be their relative based upon fraudulent representa- 
tions to such effect by a travel agent in the Azores. 
Fortunately, their situation was subsequently ad- 
justed through the efforts of the officer in the case, 
who initiated a further search of naturalization 
records and succeeded in locating one which actu- 
ally did relate to the applicant's father. 

Replacement and Special NationaUty Docu- 
ments. Under the statute, the Service has author- 
ity to replace certificates of naturalization or citi- 
zenship which may be mutilated, lost, or destroyed. 
Similarly, where the holder of one of these docu- 
ments has undergone a legal change of name 
through marriage, or by judicial process, the Serv- 
ice may furnish a replacement document in the 
new name. To protect property rights, and for 
other legitimate reasons, naturalized citizens some- 
times require recognition of their status as such by 
a foreign state. The authority of the Service to 
issue special certificates of naturalization accom- 
modates this need. Additionally, the Service may 
issue certifications as to information in naturaliza- 
tion and citizenship records, where such are re- 
quired for use in compliance with State statutes, in 
judicial proceedings, or for other legitimate pur- 
poses. In this important area of Service opera- 
tion 9,278 applications were completed during 
1965, a figure which has been more or less constant 
in recent years. 

Citizenship Loss. United States citizenship 
can be lost automatically by the voluntary per- 
fonnance of acts designated as expatriative by stat- 
ute, or in court proceedings designed to revoke an 
order of naturalization on the ground that it was 
procured illegally or by material concealment or 



willful misrepresentation. Expatriations by oper 
ation of statutory law, the first category men 
tioned, totaled 2,083 during 1965, a sharp droj 
from the volume of previous years. The lowei 
figure largely reflects the effect of the Supreme 
Court decision in Schneider v. Rusk which elimi 
nated extended foreign residence as a basis foi 
nationality loss by naturalized citizens. The pasi 
year also featured a considerable number of case; 
in which a finding of expatriation was reversed a.' 
a result of the Schneider decision and other restric 
tive rulings by the Supreme Court during recen; 
years. Emphasizing the effectiveness of the Serv 
ice effort to prevent the naturalization of disquali 
fied persons is the fact that only two naturaliza 
tions were revoked by the courts during the fisca 
year. 

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 

Personnel. Employee Development and Train 
ing during fiscal year 1965 included in-Service 
out-Service, and foreign official programs. In 
Service training consisted of 12 principal pro 
grams of instruction, some of which were con 
ducted more than once. Eighteen sessions of thes* 
progi'ams were completed by 417 supervisors 
journeymen officers. Immigration Patrol Inspect© 
trainees, and records personnel. All were traine< 
at the Officer Development Center, Los Fresnof* 
Tex. Three new courses were added to the Ex 
tension Training Program, namely, "Supervise 
Development," "Telecommunications," and "Sta 
tistical Coding." The extension training lesj 
were revised and made current during the y 
Employees enrolled in the Extension Training 
Program completed a total of 840 home-stud; 
courses, and coniDleted 6.055 lessons. 

The Border Patrol Academy conducted an FAi 
Peace Officers Refresher Course for 17 Federa 




A trainee at the Border Patrol Academy studying 
dormitory room at Port Isabet, Tex. 



20 



Aviation Agency Peace Officers and four sessions 
)f a 3-week program entitled "Tlie Border Con- 
rol Operations Course for Foreign Officials." A 
otal of 36 foreign officials from 11 Central and 
50uth American countries attended these sessions, 
n addition, 23 foreign officials from Thailand, 
ran, Turkey, Argentina, Viet-Nam, Pretoria 
Vest, Jordan, Tunisia, and Ethiopia visited vari- 
ms Service offices to observe the work of the 
service mainly in the areas of travel control and 
lorder patrol. Sixty-three employees completed 
nteragency training courses, conferences, and 
eminars. 

During the fiscal year the Personnel Officer 
worked witli the Budget Officer and the operating 
hiefs at the Central Office in carrying out man- 
ower directives from the President, the Bureau 
f the Budget, and the Department of Justice, 
eparations during fiscal year 1965 increased to 
98 as compared with 143 in fiscal 1964 and 160 in 
seal year 1963. Among the separations during 
seal year 1965 were 92 by retirement and 27 by 
eath. 

Incentive Aioards. During the year 496 em- 
loyee suggestions were received, of which 83 were 
Jopted. There were 402 persons recognized for 
Jiperior performance or special acts. Further, 
93 employees were granted quality increases. 
Procuronent and Property Management. In 
965 further economies were effected in the imple- 
lentation of the administration policy. Studies 
f t'(|uipment requirements were made, that re- 
ilted in curtailment of all but absolutely essential 
iH'ds. Greater emphasis upon reassignment of 
luiimient and increased utilization of excess 
idperty were factors in achieving economies. 
h'l cordx and Statistics. During fiscal year 1965, 
Kecords Administration and Information 
ranch added 3,710,520 documents to the Master 
idex. This is the central index required by see- 
on 290 of the Immigration and Nationality Act. 
his index now contains approximately 40 million 
dex cards. All-purpose searches of the index 
nounted to 776,728 for the year. 
The work measurement reporting system con- 
lued to provide information on volume of work 
id man-hours per unit, rising or falling trends, 
icklogs and other pertinent data. Its use at all 
-els of administration frequently formed the 
sis for improved manpower utilization. A 
Duthly analysis furnishes summary data for the 
of Central Office operations and management 
's. 

Statistical information on immigration, natu- 
lization, deportation, alien address reports, and 



passenger travel between the United States and 
foreign countries is compiled and interpreted for 
use in studying the effectiveness of immigration 
and nationality laws in terms of numbers. 

During fiscal year 1965, a number of studies were 
made to detennine the likely effect of the various 
proposals considered by Congress for eliminatmg 
the national origins provisions of the Immigration 
and Nationality Act of 1952. 

Management Improvement Programs. Tlie ef- 
fectiveness of the management analysis programs 
are reflected throughout this report. All forms 
were reviewed and revised, canceled, or continued 
to meet existing needs. Surveys of staffing often 
residted in rescheduling and reassigning of officers 
to effect greater economy and efficiency. In addi- 
tion to many intangible factors, surveys looking 
toward work simplification resulted in savings of 
some $200,000 during the year. 

Building Program. The continuing progi'am of 
improving and modernizing the physical facilities 
of the Service showed progress with a number of 
new and remodeled stations completed during the 
year. Acting jointly with Customs, border inspec- 
tion stations and cottages were completed at Sa- 
sabe, Ariz., Wild Horse, Mont., and Willow Creek, 
Mont. Under the Area Redevelopment Adminis- 
tration, cottages for inspectors and customs officers 
were completed at Eastport and Porthill, Idaho. 
In addition, the General Services Administration 
completed or improved the inspection stations at 
Brownsville, Tex., Nogales, Ariz., Sweetgrass, 
Mont., and Vanceboro, Maine. Border patrol sta- 
tions were constructed by the Service at Fort Han- 
cock and Fort Stockton, Tex., and Shelby, Mont. 




Newly installed open-shelf filing in Seattle. 



TABLE 1. IMMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES i 
1820 - 1965 



^roin 1820 to 1867 figures represent alien passengers arrived; 1868 through 1891 and 
1895 through 1897 immigrant aliens arrived; 1892 through 1894 and from 1898 to the 
present time immigrant aliens admitted^ 





Number 




Number 




Number 




Number 


Year 


of 


Year 


of 


Year 


of 


Year 


of 




oersons 








persons 




oersons 


L820-1965 ^ 


43,291,273 


1855. 
1856. 


200,877 
200,436 


1892. . 
1893. . 


579,663 
439,730 


1931-1940 
1931. . 


^iHii 






97,139 


1820. . 


8,385 


1857. 


251,306 


1894. . 


285,631 


1932. . 


35,576 






1858. 


123,126 


1895. . 


258,536 


1933. . 


23,068 


1821-1830 


^43.439 


1859. 
1860. 


121,282 
153,640 


1896. . 
1897. . 


343,267 
230,832 


1934. . 
1935. . 


29,470 


1821.. 


9,127 


34,956 


1822.. 


6,911 






1898. . 


229,299 


1936. . 


36,329 


1823.. 


6,354 


1861-1870 2.314.824 


1899. . 


311,715 


1937. . 


50,244 


1824.. 


7,912 


1861. 


91,918 


1900. . 


448,572 


1938. . 


67,895 


1825. . 


10,199 


1862. 


91,985 






1939. . 


82,998 


1826.. 


10,837 


1863. 


176,282 


1901-1910 


8.795.386 


1940. . 


70,756 


1827.. 


18,875 


1864. 


193,418 


1901. . 


487,918 






1828. . 


27,382 
22,520 


1865. 
1866. 


248,120 
318,568 


1902.. 
1903. . 


648,743 
857,046 


1941-1950 
1941. . 


1.035.039 


1829. . 


51,776 


1830.. 


23,322 


1867. 


315,722 


1904.. 


812,870 


1942. . 


28,781 






1868. 


138,840 


1905. . 


1,026,499 


1943. . 


23,725 


1831-1840 


599.125 


1869. 


352,768 


1906. . 


1,100,735 


1944. . 


28,551 


1831.. 


22,633 


1870. 


387,203 


1907. . 


1,285,349 


1945. . 


38,119 


1832. . 


60,482 






1908. . 


782,870 


1946. . 


108,721 


1833.. 


58,640 


1871-1880 ^.8^2, m 


1909. . 


751,786 


1947. . 


147,292 


1834. . 


65,365 


1871. 


321,350 


1910.. 


1,041,570 


1948. . 


170,570 


1835.. 


45,374 


1872. 


404,806 






1949. . 


188,317 


1836. . 


76,242 


1873. 


459,803 


1911-1920 


5,735.811, 


1950. . 


249,187 


1837. . 


79,340 


1874. 


313,339 


1911.. 


878,587 






1838. . 


38,914 
68,069 


1875. 
1876. 


227,498 
169,986 


1912. . 
1913.. 


838,172 
1,197,892 


1951-1960 
1951.. 


2.515.479 


1839. . 


205,717 


1840. . 


84,066 


1877. 


141,857 


1914.. 


1,218,480 


1952. . 


265,520 






1878. 


138,469 


1915. . 


326,700 


1953. . 


170,434 


1841-1850 


1.713.251 


1879. 
1880. 


177,826 
457,257 


1916.. 
1917.. 


298,826 
295,403 


1954.. 
1955. . 


208,177 
237,790 


1841. . 


80,289 


1842.. 


104,565 






1918. . 


110,618 


1956.. 


321,625 


1843. . 


52,496 


1881-1890 5,246.613 


1919. . 


141,132 


1957. . 


326,867 


1844.. 


78,615 


1881. 


669,431 


1920. . 


430,001 


1958. . 


253,265 


1845.. 


114,371 


1882. 


788,992 






1959. . 


260,686 


1846.. 


154,416 


1883. 


603,322 


1921-1930 


4.107.209 


1960. . 


265,398 


1847.. 


234,968 


1884. 


518,592 


1921. . 


805,228 






1848.. 


226,527 


1885. 


395,346 


1922. . 


309,556 


1961. . 


271,344 


1849. . 


297,024 


1886. 


334,203 


1923. . 


522,919 


1962. . 


283,763 


1850. . 


369,980 


1887. 


490,109 


1924. . 


706,896 


1963. . 


306,260 






1888. 


546,889 


1925. . 


294,314 


1964.. 


292,248 


1851-1860 


2.598.214 


1889. 
1890. 


444,427 
455,302 


1926. . 
1927. . 


304,488 
335,175 


1965. . 


296,697 


1851.. 


379,466 


1852. . 


371,603 






1928. . 


307,255 






1853. . 


368,645 


1891-190 


D 3.687.564 


1929. . 


279,678 






1854.. 

, ) ^^-^ 


427,833 


1891. 


560,319 


1930. . 


241,700 







Data are for fiscal years ended June 30, except 1820 through 1831 and 1844 through 1849 
fiscal years ended Sept. 30; 1833 through 1842 and 1851 through 1867 years ended Dec. 
31; 1832 covers 15 months ended Dec. 31; 1843 nine months ended Sept. 30; 1850 
fifteen months ended Dec. 31; and 1868 six months ended June 30. 



TABLE 2. ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AND DEPARTED, 
BY MONTHS! YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1964 AND 1965 

^ata exclude border crossers, crevmen, Mexican agricultural laborers, admitted under 
Act of October 31, 1949, as amended and aliens admitted on documentary waiver^ 



ALIEN ADMITTED 



Immi- 
grant 



Nonim- 
migrant 



ALIENS 

DEPARTED 

1/ 



U.S. CITIZENS 1/ 



Arrived Departed 



Fiscal year 1965 



296.697 



2|07?i?67 



2.?7?.66^ 



l|7?4.?j? 



3.0??>??^ 



hm^m 



July-Dec. , 

July 

August .. 
September 
October . 
November 
December 



1964 



154.206 



1.148.674 



1.302.880 



968.925 



Jan. -June 1965 

January 

February . . . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 



27,161 
26,098 
26,528 
27,948 
23,812 
22,659 



229,664 
227,593 
230,747 
187,679 
119,622 
153,369 

927.293 



256 
253 
257, 
215, 
1*3, 
176, 



1.069.784 



172,970 
201,202 
174,202 
174,315 
116,469 
129,767 

766.014 



1.6?*.?25 



314,454 
430,333 
287,847 
238,490 
190,681 
173,120 

1.465.026 



i.W.2e7 



358,796 
302,241 
238,104 
195,053 
167,190 
185,903 

;.6 37.6?4 . 



Fiscal year 1964 

July-Dec, 1963 

July 

August 

September . . . 

October 

November . . . . 
December . . . . 



23,081 
20,020 
23,793 
24,654 
24,843 
26,100 

29?. 248 

154,848. 



121,117 
114,216 
119,466 
177,190 
206,528 
188,776 



896.845 



,198 
,236 
,259 
,844 
,371 
.876 



2>037.0?^ 



97,337 
96,263 
114,532 
133,921 
159,451 
164,510 

^•^30.736 



205,514 
192,995 
243,066 
230,738 
284,275 
308,438 

2.786.907 



^08,006 
224,553 
233,996 
277,708 
295,667 
397,704 

2.709.196 



1.051.693 



7*6. 2U 



1.508.7?1 



1. 3 1?. 6 ^7 



Jan. -June 1964 

January 

February . . . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 



29,790 
25,925 
25,862 
27,017 
23,553 
22,701 

137.400 



161, 
163, 
193, 
1*5, 
107, 
124, 



8*7.96? 



191,016 
189,379 
219,706 
172,777 
131,117 
147,698 

98^36? 



130,954 
140,173 
134,441 
122,695 
102,332 
115,616 

684.525 



295,488 
390,741 
271,044 
218,716 
174,408 
158,394 

1.278.116 



332,570 
283,334 
207,240 
185,382 
146,279 
160,852 

1.393.53? 



21,436 
19,799 
23,045 
23,876 
23,973 
25,271 



,294 
,469 
,401 
,326 
,413 
,060 



122,730 
129,268 
150,446 
176,202 
194,386 
212,331 



86,844 
88,242 
101,320 
103,569 
150,578 
153,972 



173,404 
179,216 
218,110 
210,532 
226,302 
270,552 



171,920 
192,698 
205,635 
214,353 
252,749 
356,184 



/ Includes aliens departed and citizens arrived and departed by sea and air, 
direct arrivals froa or departures to Canada. 



except 



TABLE 3. ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AT UNITED STATES PORTS OF ENTRY: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1964 - 1%5 

2^ach entry of the same person counted separately^/ 




Class 


Total 


Aliens 


Citizens | 


H 




Year ended June 30, 1965 


»» 


Total number • 


186.180.611 


106,674.956 


79,505,655 




Border crossers ^ 


175.814.081 


101.807.624 


74.006.457 




Canadian •••••••••••••••••••••••• 


59,814,872 

115,999,209 

2,807,187 

7,559,343 


33,313,991 

68,493,633 

1,872,673 


26,500,881 

47,505,576 

Q34-514 












Others admitted 


2,994,659^ 4,564,6841 






Year ended June 30, 1964 




Total number 


178.514.408 


103.574.450 


74.939.958 




Border crossers \f 


168.807.677 


98,855.809 


69.951.868 




Canadian ••• •...••••....... 


57,628,322 

111,179,355 

2,743,153 

6.963.578 


31,691,951 

67,163,858 

1,856,286 


25,936,371 
44,015,497 












Others admitted 


2.862.35^ 4.101.2232i 










1/ Partially estimated 

2/ Includes immigrants, documented nonimm 

entry documents, and aliens returning 

extended visits. 
3/ Includes all citizens arrived by sea a 

from Canada or Mexico after extended v 

24 


igrants, aliei 
from Canada o] 

id air and cil 
Lsits. 


IS with multi 
r Mexico afte] 

;izens return 


3le 

r 

ing 





/.Data ascluila border 



ALIENS ADHITTEO 

UMICRAMTS 1/ 

Quota Inalgrantl 

Firat praferanca quota: 

Salacted Inlgranta of apeclal ■kill or ability 

Thalr apouses and children 

Second preference quota: 

Farenta of V. S. cltisena 

Unaarrled aona or daughtera of U. S. eltlsana ^Z 

Third preference quota: 

Spouaei of resident allana 

Unaarried sons or daughter! of resident allana J/ 

Fourth preference quota: 

Brothers or sisters of U. S, cltlsens 

Harried sons or daughters of U. S. cltliens g/ 

Spouses and children of brothers or sisters, sons or daugh 
U. S. cltlsens «/ 

Adopted sons or daughters of U. S. citizens g/ 

Nonpreference quota 5/ . . . . 

Allans adjusted under Sec. 244, Imlgratlon and Nationality 
Foreign governaent officials adjusted under Sec. 13, Act of 

Septeabar 11, 1957 



to be adopted ^/ 



Nonquota Isailgranta 

Wivae of U.S. eltlsana ... 
Huabanda of U.S. cltlsens 
Children of U.S. cltliena: 

Orphans adopted abroad o 

Other Chi Idren 

Natives of Western Healaphare countries 

Their spouses and children 

Persons who had been U.S. citizens 

Ministers of religious denoainations , their spous 
Enployees of U.S. Governaent abroad, their spouses an< 
Children born abroad to resident aliens or aubsequent 



and childr 



of vis 



Allana adjusted under Sec. 244, laalgratlon and Nationality Act 
Aliens adjusted under Sec. 249, laalgratlon and Nationality Act 
Other nonquota Inaigrants under the Innlgration and Nationality . 

Refugees - Refugee Relief Act of 1953 

Ismigrants - Act of Septeaber 11, 1957 

Hungarian paroleea . Act of July 25, 1958 

Azores and Netherlands refugees - Act of Septeaber 2, 1958 

Inilgrants - Sacs. 4 and 6, Act of Septeaber 22, 1959 

Refugee-escapees . Act of July 14, 1960 

lealgrants - Act of Septeaber 26, 1961 

laaigrants - Act of October 24, 1962 



Their spouses end children £/ 

Representatives to international organizations 
Tenporary workers and industrial trainees 

Workers of distinguished aerit and ability ,. 

Other temporary workers 



Reprssentatlves of foreign Inforaation aadia 

Exchange vlaltors 

Thai r spouses and chl Idran £/ 

Returning resident aliens i,/ 

NATO officials 

Other nonlealgrants 



Temporary visitors 
Teaporary visitors 


off 
for 




business ' " 


J 


'' 


Treaty tr. 
Students 


dars and 


inv 







>>"?>■»? 



2,572 

62 

73,810 



30,704 
116,165 
742,307 
106,888 
4,549 

35,072 



7,691 
33,212 
3,360 



2,548 

16 

71,487 



810,779 
110,276 
5,071 
41,202 
1,037 
9,747 



6,814 
46,134 

4,660 

1,766 
26,977 

3,039 
112,261 



2,887 
83,517 



1,312 

5,669 

144,677 

3,067 



2,005 
2,848 
12,672 



34,043 
122,515 
944,929 
105,815 
5,593 
38,991 
2,746 
11,918 



,168 
52,760 
3,549 
1,928 
30,002 



'■"7.056 



4,106 

765 

6,272 



34,644 

144,680 

1,105,268 

119,360 

6,912 

44,952 

3,486 

12,875 

60.470 



6,272 
50,402 

3,796 

2,654 
33,371 

8,875 
165,429 

1,832 



n imnigrant is an alien admitted for permanent 
Returning resident aliens who have once been 
laws define such sllens as laaigrants. 

rlor to Act of September 22, 1959, all sons or 
preference quota. Adopted eons and daughters 
preference. 



Act of September 22 
were classified as 
Act of Septeaber 22 
3 displaced persons 



Claas established by Act of Septeaber 26, 1961. 
Include* 4 foreign government officials In 1961, 

Section 13, Act of September 11, 1957. 
Classes eetabllshed by Act of Septeaber 21, 1961. 



1959, Included only children under 21 of reside 
anpreference quota. 

1959, claasifled as nonpreference quota, 
in 1962 and 1 In 1963 whose status was sdjustad 



1963, 2 In 1964, 



aliens. Adult sons or daughters of resident 

)er See. 4, Displaced Faraona Act of 1948. 
1965 whoae status was adjusted under 



All ports 

At lant i c 

Baltimore, Md 

Boston, Mass 

Charleston, S. C 

Charlotte Ama lie, V. I 

Miami, Fla 

Newark, N. J. (includes McGuire A.F.B. ) 

New York, N. Y 

Norfolk, Va 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Port Everglades , Fla 

San Juan, P. R 

Washington, D. C 

Other Atlantic 

Gulf of Mexico 

Houston, Tex 

New Orleans , La 

San Antonio, Tex 

Tampa, Fla 

Other Gulf 

Pacific 

Agana , Guam 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

Los Angeles , Calif 

San Diego, Calif 

San Francisco, Calif 

Seattle, Wash 

Other Pacific 

Alaska 

Anchorage 

Other Alaska 

Canadian Border 

Blaine, Wash 

Buffalo, N. Y 

Calais, Me 

Champlaln. N. Y 

Chicago, 111 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Derby Line, Vt 

Detroit, Mich 

Eastport , Idaho 

Highgate Springs, Vt 

Jackman, Me 

Lewiston, N. Y 

Madawaska, Me 

Niagara Falls, N. Y 

Norton, Vt 

Noyes , Minn 

Pembina, N. D 

Portal, N. D 

Port Huron, Mich 

Rouses Point, N. Y 

St. Albans, Vt 

Sault Ste. Marie, Mich 

Sweetgrass, Mont 

Thousand Island Bridge, N. Y 

Vanceboro, Me 

Other Canadian Border 

Mexican Border 

Brownsville, Tex 

Calexico, Calif 

Del Rio, Tex 

Eagle Pass, Tex 

El Paso, Tex 

Hidalgo, Tex 

Laredo, Tex 

Nogales, Ariz 

Roma, Tex * 

San Luis, Arlx 

San Ysldro, Calif [',',',, 

Other Mexican Border 

All Other , 



S'^i.W 



22,082 

7,894 

108,953 



469 

409 

5,410 



1,510 
4,344 
3,534 



540 

25,925 

6,512 

103,752 



2,225 
10,191 
2,200 



4,756 


5,033 


5,319 


4,870 


5,078 


4,834 


2,007 


2,550 


2,584 


2,977 


4,381 


5,169 


5,285 


6,716 


7,479 


709 


760 


802 


512 


659 


738 


9,039 


10,327 


11,754 


842 


994 


969 


897 


1,353 


1,344 


449 


421 


434 


189 


202 


699 


247 


343 


442 


1,937 


2,224 


2,039 


308 


387 


419 


1,242 


1,490 


1,708 


405 


601 


804 


188 


277 


277 


2,353 


3,092 


2,861 


1,590 


1,491 


1,594 


1,150 


•1,577 


1,8S6 


338 


445 


601 


938 


1,241 


1,050 


585 


632 


736 



341 
2,083 
8,764 
1,954 
4,710 
3,721 



28,284 

6,921 

108,552 



284 
1,865 
5,578 
1,371 
3,717 
2,319 
1,224 

618 





TABLE 6 IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED BY CLASSES UNDER THE IMMIGRATION L 


WS AND 




















COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH: 


YEAR ENDED JUNE 


30. 1965 


































Adi.l..lon. or 




















. 


t i 




adju.tm.n 


t. und 


t 
































ESS 


. i 




i 










































Courtry or r.gion 


Hu.ber 






I 


; 


1 


" 


Ul 


H 




if 


s? 




: 


: 




admitted 








•s5 


•si 


■sl. 


•5,. . 






2 s 


S 




: 






i 


A 


•sS 




S" 




.:• 


t ■ 


1 


.5 


I 


1 


~ 


J 






=1 


■iis 






III 


s?l 




^! 


»'J 


»:? 


^8 


u 2 

is 








11 


£ gl 


s = 


1 = 


§=• 


II 8 


lil 


11 


Ui 


5=2 


" 0. 

as 


s 


All countrl.. 


296.697 


1' 

99.381 


197.316 


1J.014 


6.417 


7.283 


149.368 


3.831 


494 


10 


18 


4 392 








"SHm. 


114.329 


89.997 


I'l.ni. 


9.339 


3.181 


1.410 




2.587 


212 




18 




29 3 


949 


965 




1,388 


292 




















3 




32 


>.l,... 


lioos 


944 




11 


6 


1 




16 








19 






8 






1,668 




















5 


15 








l!384 


1,150 


234 










27 
















inl.nd 


669 


543 


126 


89 


4 


14 










. 




- 




8 




4,039 




1,284 






208 












52 


1 




22 


• ™«ny 


24. 045 


20,327 


3.718 


2.496 


35 






198 


2 














r.<c. 


3.002 


700 


2.302 


923 


826 


307 












18 


32 


119 


39 


uniiary 


1.574 


909 


665 


175 


















20 




20 


r.l.nd 




5,400 
















-1 - 










fly 


10,821 


5,573 


5.248 




1,337 






381 


36 












107 




3,OR5 


2,792 


293 


137 


42 






















Morvsy 
















3 










I 




26 




b!465 


7)015 




508 




356 




156 


23 






146 










2.005 


438 


1,567 


323 


268 


399 
















95 




Kuiunla 


1.644 














37 


10 






895 


24 


37 


16 


























2 


3 










2.363 


48 


15 


























1,984 


1.813 


171 


88 


16 






23 


















905 


422 


483 


141 




29 




















United Klnidoa 


27.358 


26,954 






17 






134 


2 






I 




I, 


169 






1,594 














8 








7 










1,008 


1,810 


250 


108 


















15 




Other Europe 


1.769 


1,262 








30 




39 


I 






"182 


23 


10 


22 


s::r.^:. 




4.572 


15.206 




1.913 






311 


155 






112 


103 


406 


920 


4,057 


959 


3.098 


1.471 






. 














95 






712 
















5 








1 


16 


5 














15 




18 


37 


















252 














































3 






3 




12 


3 


Iraq 


279 


112 


167 


32 


90 


5 




3 


3 


I 






2 














99 


122 


28 




37 
















Japen 


3,180 


189 


2,991 


2,350 


122 








37 


3 




1 


12 


25 


41 




702 










59 




143 










10 


35 


6 


ulllo. 


^'l\l 


!'l5 


2,051 
313 


1,281 
75 


90 


653 






'4 


: 




47 




13 




Helayila 


311 


258 








10 




5 


- 


I 








2 


1 








3,029 


1,518 


343 


872 






7 


















3 


674 


531 




134 




















Syrian Arab Jlepubllc 


255 


106 






52 






7 


3 






41 


I 


2 


7 


Other Aala 


1,286 


794 


492 


243 


87 


112 


- 


19 


7 


3 


- 




I 




7 


j:«d*r"" 






124.744 


902 


866 


513 


116.906 












10 


93 


2.551 


38,327 




38,298 


23 


2 


'2 


"ii?; 




2 


7 




- 




6 


569 






1 


37,968 
























1,811 




19^760 














11 
















B^.,„,ca„ Republic 


1:1^ 




9. '504 
3,609 


I 


; 




''604 


3 
3 












: 


44 




1. 837 








394 






486 












58 










1,294 


328 






























2,911 








2,901 
























1,768 








1,759 
































1,599 


















Hondurai 


2^355 




2)355 


f, 


2 


', 




^ 












I 


,, 
















1)314 


















Pana^i 


1.933 








2 






















Other Central Aa^rlce 






'405 


























Other north A.»r>ca 


427 


130 


297 


7 


2 




261 


4 


1 










5 


17 


teS.:in:i" 


30.962 


214 


30.748 




3, 


20 


30 453 














10 


,,. 






6 12; 






. 


6 083 


9 


_ 






■ 




. 


21 


allvla 


'976 


. 


976 








■976 


. 


I 


I 




I 




. 






2.869 




2,868 








2,846 




















1.872 




1,871 


























^olosbia 


10.885 


_ 


10.885 


, 






io)e46 












' 




38 


icuador 


4,392 






3 




I 




'l 


I 


I 




I 




I 


20 








1)952 


5 


















. 






'eneiuela 


'969 


2 






_ 




953 


I 














7 


liber South Aoerlca 


922 




717 


39 


30 


20 


589 


12 


11 


- 








10 


3 


;i;:r.. 




1.723 






152 


46 












134 




22 




206 








5 




. 






r 


r 








. 






160 








14 


















2 




156 


150 




























■outh Africa 


372 




124 


67 






























1,273 












2 






1,131 








ther Afrtca "'" " *"" 


'940 


823 


117 


48 


30 


14 




12 




- 


- 






3 


7 


u.tr.Ua 


1.512 








68 


52 




43 


24 






I 




4 


20 


757 




343 






32 


. 






r 


r 








9 


e. Zealand 






140 


103 


12 






















.<lflc I. land. (U S ad- ) 


194 


112 


82 


























.ther Oceania 


252 






35 


11 


6 




2 


. 


- 


- 








2 


.rcountrle. 


4 


. 


4 


1 




, 








. 










, 


Include. « foreign .overn-T^ 


t official 


■ adluated u 






of Septa 


eber 11, 


9 57. 














Includea Porno... 




























Include. Arab Paleatlne. 






































27 























1=1 



Belgium 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

France 

Ireland 

Netherlands 

Poland 

Portuga 1 

Sp™n ..'.'.'..'.'.'.'.'.'.W'.'.'.l'.'.'.. '.'.'..'. 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.H. (Europe and Asia) 

Other Europe 

China 2/ 

Hong Kong 

Israel 

Jordan 2/ 

Lebanon 

Malaysia 

Philippines 

Ryukyu islands 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Other Asia 

North America 

Mexico ...'.'. '.'. '. 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Jamaica 

Other Vest Indies 

El Salvador 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Other Centra 1 America 

Other North America 

South America 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Ecuador 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Algeria"!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!;!!!!!!!!!; 

Nigeria !...!!!! 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 

Other Africa 

Australia ....!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 

Nm Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U. S. adn. ) 

Other Oceania 

Other countries 

IT Includes 42 foreign governnient officials adju 

2/ Includes Formcsa. 

3/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



4,259 
5,442 
2,153 



50,035 
40,686 
13,160 



40,116 
40,518 
13,050 



37,803 
38,619 
12,790 







TABLE 


6B. ALIENS WHO 


ADJUSTED STATUS TO 


PERMAHEHT RE 


SlDEIfTS IK THE UNITED STATES. 




















BY COUHTRY Oil 


RKION OF B1«TH: YEAK ENDED JUHE 30. 1965 




















Nonouot. 1. 














Sao 


245. IkK Act 










S.c. 245 


16N Act 
























nl— Igr.nt to 






























■ 




















s 


s 














3 










Country or r. Ion 


Total 

.dju.t- 




3 


I 






-;? 






s 






5-s 
'I 




0- 

v! 








"""orblrt"* °" 


Ing 
.t.tu. 




'^.h 


£ 




I 


*--"^ 


i 




h, 


?'S 




-ol 


J 


































i T 




























dzi 
























•--o 




















































~ = l 
































dl 


; -o S 


>. ° 




■o » 
» 


i 










J 


i 11 


ti 


i1 


r 


SfS 


i 


S 


Ii5 




!•: 


JJ 






1 














S 0. 


s 


inui £ 




^■ 


u> ; -o 


«> u 


• u 









luiop. 


zttx" 


TMf 




-3ii. 




LiH 


4? 




'?.3'') 




i.tn 


,3,, 




-la- 


4,392 


_2- 


za. 




\f,V)i 


5.?3} 




_4B1 


i,m 


}.n>> 




~ 




g 


a .69? 


273 




_u. 


3Mi 




-22. 




Au.cn. 






























8 








B.l|lu> 








































211 








12 


164 










15 


2 


12 












D.oiurk 




49 




1 








- 


43 




37 








_ 








tlnl.rul 




31 




































494 


288 




23 


70 








206 




















cl^ny 


1,240 










1,070 










67 


3 


24 




57 








Cr..c. 


662 






30 




2 






585 




430 




30 












Bunj.ry 


656 


209 




38 


151 


16 










125 


11 




18 


274 








Ir.land 


189 


174 


































It.lT 




346 




108 
















56 


60 














185 


















39 
















97 


88 








88 
























Portug.l 


B55 


358 

27 




67 


"3 








232 




193 


17 


" 




146 


- 






1.073 




















46 








895 






Sp.ln 


465 


134 




63 


57 


7 






331 






112 


17 






1 




S«.den 


97 


84 








80 










5 
















115 


76 


















34 














Turk., (Europ. .nd A.l.> 


331 


58 




25 


24 


1 


5 




273 




121 


5 


IS 




131 






Italt^d Klntdo. 


1,086 












1 




81 


















l).S.S.«. (lurop. and A.U) 


259 








55 


37 












5 












«ugo.l.,l. 


1.682 


247 




30 


207 




- 


- 


1,435 




130 




a 




1,290 








362 


106 




12 


38 


43 






256 




52 


6 


15 






1 




1,,, 




1.729 




Jit 


437 


179 


32 




3.930 




2.775 














<^'""* i' 
















. 








65 


625 








"^33" 


' »0"I Itong 


143 


53 




27 


« 


6 


. 


. 


90 




79 














Indl. 


265 


62 














203 


















Indon..!. 


422 
164 


39 
92 
57 




30 
30 


48 


5 
10 


] 


-_ 


107 




nt 


13 


: 




13 








I.r..l 




173 








37 






171 




















Japan 


458 






34 


50 












315 


15 














Jordan i/ 


185 


37 














148 




















(oraa 




70 




28 


16 


I 


l 


' 


151 




'9" 


'^ 


J 




47 




I 




Halay.la 


88 


68 














20 
















. 




PhlUpplna. 


685 


46 




7 


16 


1 




2 


639 




518 


14 


I 












«yukr. I.land. 


3« 




















35 
















Syrian Arab Upubllc 


152 


46 




19 


24 


1 






106 






2 


5 




41 








Othar A.la 


280 


166 


- 


65 


51 


50 






114 


- 


104 


6 


3 






. 






"canada" " 










35 


4 










117 


1,737 




















1 






_ 


~z 










185 






— J- 


""t" 






























657 












Cuba 


7 




































, Oo.lnle.n R.publlc 




_ 










I 


I 








_ 


_ 












Haiti 








































14 


4 




- 


. 








10 




i 


'_ 


I 






i 






Othar Wait India. 


28 


















. 








r 










Coat. Ilea 








I 


. 








224 




_ 


222 


J 












U SaUador 


353 














I 






















GutoHla 




- 




I 


I 


I 






347 




2 


345 


_ 






I 






B..d.r.. 


323 
















323 






















226 


. 


- 


. 














4 


219 














Panav 


























2 












Othar C.ntral A..rlea 




38 




6 














88 
















Othar North Africa 


50 








3 


3 




- 


42 






34 


2 












Hith toarlea 
Argantlna 


3.243 


15 




u. 




5 










57 




7 












590 






























" 






BoU.la 








I 




I 






140 




_ 


140 


2 












Braall . 






































ChUa 


330 


1 




I 


z 


1 






329 




, 


326 


J 






" 






Coloabia 


795 










. 






795 




_ 


795 


_ 






1 




' fcu.dor 


341 








- 


. 






341 




2 


339 








I 




P«nj 


461 






















458 












i V.n.iutla 




































Oth.r South te.rle. 


140 


34 




" 


19 


' 


- 




106 




42 


61 


3 










lie. 


1.743 


410 




51 


J, 


267 






1.131 




ISl 


11 














31 


25 
































^gTru :::"::::::::::::::::'":" 


84 






'! 


'! 


il 






52 




47 


5 








- 




South Africi';!!!!;;!!!;!!!!!;!;;! 


93 


60 




17 


37 


J 


] 




33 




32 


, 












'tii'Vrtc '"""" "*""' 












I 


3 


I 


1,201 




64 


i 






1,131 


~_ 






'224 


186 
173 


2_ 


3 

__24 


9 
73 


173 

70 




■ 






















172 


61 


I 


18 


31 




























52 


20 






10 








32 


















■.clflc I.l.nd. (U.S. ula.) 






. 


. 








I 


23 




21 


2 














Jther Ucaanla .' ] 


108 


70 


1 


- 


10 


59 


- 


- 






36 


- 


2 










Includ.. Forwaa. 




















— 




Include. Ar.b P.L.tin.. 






































2i 

























^■5- 



'2ss: 



5:: ""^285 






5i 



gj 









.^ooosoioosu^ 10^ 



'gs: 















=1! I 



^1 



i 

if 

II 



30 



I^MICIIAIITS AiniTTED UKDE* THS ICT OF SEITStBEIt 11, 19S7 
BV CLASS Of ADMISSION AND COUmRY OR BBCION OP BIRTH: 
1, 1957 - JUNE 30, 1965 













■s. 


i^ 


1. 










Adju.ted atatua 
















































1 


■s 


= J 


II 


»?: 


y 


p 




o 






i 


c i 


1" 
































CountrT or r.glon 


Nu.ber 


•| 


? 


U^ 


'! 


£SI 


'X 


5i 




«2 






s t 


\'ii 


t . 


o( birth 




■2 


? 


Hs 


- 1- 


t- 




1 


1 J 


i 




"1 




u 








s 


f j = 


:s 


tlt 


: ^ 


:i 










s = 


"!' 


'i 1. 






1^ 
































2_ 


o " 3 


St- 


els 


ii- 


ih 


h 


i: 




c ' 


s * 


S5S 


11 








• 3 


!s: 


























' " 






• - ; 








■2 S 






u % 


• u • 










































I- 












Ji 


















h 


Ml 


lU 


iU 


VJ 


U"x 


%-z 


u 


ii 


St 


m 


13 












•/< - c 


="- ~ 


o "- 












All countrl.. 


b2.132 


7.169 


3.100 


272 


2.641 


2.949 


3.959 


21.063 


2.430 


1.564 


14.317 


875 


U21 


387 


185 


Eutop. 


44.518 


2.246 


1.815 


64 


1.7B0 


2.069 


3.081 


20.041 


2.424 


1.028 


9.136 


306 


372 


130 


26 


Atialrla 


b?3 


99 


15 




22 


10 


25 


32 


162 


2 


232 










Balflua 
































Ciaclwalovakla 


196 


. 




1 


21 


10 


74 


22 


21 


. 


32 


. 


9 


4 


2 


Danaark 


32 
































96 


18 
117 


13 


: 


3 


12 


jl 


36 






3' 


I 


\ 


: 




Canaanv 


8«7 


379 


32 






84 




89 








27 








Cr.aca 


3,634 




177 


5 


74 




268 






1 


122 




86 


15 


I 


Hungary 


5,729 


3 










263 




307 


2 


4.857 










Ir.la.d 






. 


- 


. 


. 




4 












_ 




Italy 


22,076 


188 


1,252 


19 


1.082 


1.398 


841 


17,042 




- 


125 


117 


7 


2 




Natlierlanda 


1,091 

34 


3 


* 


I 


2 


5 


'I 


16 




1,009 


'I 


: 


\ 


\ 


\ 


Poland 


1,978 


138 


48 


. 






468 




325 


6 


621 


I 


1, 


2 


5 




321 




















27 










Duaanla 


832 






11 


45 




169 


52 
















Spain 




105 


50 






53 


105 








10 


6 


41 


16 


\ 


S..dan 












2 




I 
















S«ltiarland 


90 


11 


35 




11 




3 






'l 


8 


'l 


. 


2 




Turkey ( Europ. and Aala) 


946 


12 


8 


14 


150 


134 




28 






193 


3 


Ill 


31 


11 


United Klngdo. 






1 




5 


16 




















U.S.S R (Europe and Aala) 


438 


1 










159 


42 


103 




108 


. 


2 


. 


. 


Tugoalavla 


3,509 


48 


16 


5 


35 


39 


117 


304 


1,060 






I, 






1, 


Othar Europe 


1,055 


" 






19 


16 


141 


187 


134 


1 


'509 


<• 


' 


- 


- 


Aala . 


14.633 


4.862 




194 


550 




^gO 






^10 


3.767 


^ 


757 


200 


148 


Chin. 1/ 


4.030 


70 




97 






205 


101 






2,398 


^ 


306 


84 


101 


Hong Kong 






325 




12 


10 


2 


11 






457 












313 


5 




12 














5 


2 


72 


9 


6 , 






31 




5 






2 


10 
















Iran 


179 




J7 




16 












3 


3 


46 


4 


5 


Iraq 
lara.l 


101 
509 


6 


^ 


,, 


15 


32 


5 


113 






195 




30 


10 




Japan 


2,077 


1,148 


81 


10 




73 


292 


51 
















Jordan 11 


473 








11 






163 






259 


1 


3 


1 


I 




3,929 


3,258 


189 


32 


16 


J5 


16 








94 


2 




2 


'J 


Halayaia 


52 


3 


3 


- 


6 


4 




. 




1 






13 




3 
















56 










14 


127 


43 


I 


Ryukyu la land. 






2 








30 


















Syrian Arab Republic 


146 


2 




1 


14 


22 


8 


20 






72 


2 




I 




Other Aala 


208 


14 


1' 


3 


16 


16 


16 


41 




I 






14 


' 


10 


North Aaerlca 




17 


146 






108 


126 


281 




. 


20 


. 


24 


11 


7 


Canada 


39 


2 
















. 




T 




8 




































Cub. 














2 


14 






1 










Doalnlcan Republic 


1 






_ 


I 


I 
















_ 




Haiti 
































Jnalc. 


546 




115 


7 


95 


64 


89 


156 




I 




5 


14 


\ 




Other Veat Indie. 


200 




27 










73 




1 








1 




El Salvador 








I 




2 












_ 








Pan... 












1 




















Oth.r Centr.l Aaierle. 


24 




3 


I 






1 


20 










_ 






Other North AiMrlc. 


40 






- 


3 


2 


9 


5 




- 


15 


. 


. 


_ 




South A-erlc. 


n 


, 


9 






4 


^ 






2 


4 




2 


3 




Argentln. 


5 


























1 




Bra.ll 












1 




















Chile 


2 




I 


I 


z 




_ 








1 


1 




_ 




Peru 






- 


- 




- 








I 




1 




I 




Oth""south Aaerlca 


44 


I 




'. 


10 


I 


I 


15 




2 






\ 


1 




Africa 


1.794 


23 










40 






2 


1.379 


^ 


43 






it,l"c' 


34 


12 


5 








i 














;; 




Nigeria 








. 


_ 


- 


1 






. 


. 


. 


_ 


- 




South Africa 


25 


2 


2 






12 














1 






Unltad Arab Republic (Egypt) 


1,647 






6 


88 




25 


22 




1 


1,368 


1 




16 




Other Africa 


81 


5 


1 


- 


6 


9 


8 


28 




1 


11 


I 


7 


3 




Oca.nl. 




14 


I 






41 


2S 


2 




_ 




^ 


23 






Auatralla 


176 








59 


39 




















Ne> Zealand 


9 


I 


. 


I 


3 


2 


_ 






I 


. 


. 


. 


3 




Pacific lalanda (U S ad. ) 




5 




























Other Oceania 


13 




- 


- 


1 




4 


- 




- 


8 


- 


- 


- 




Other countrlea 


29 


6 


20 




- 


- 


1 






1 


I 











aouajajajj 

P-te JO 

AjBTOTjauag 



•-H^HOONr-ooJr^ (f) 



-H ^ O On r- O 
^ •.J ^ S -H 



aouajajajd 
pus JO 
AjEioTjaueo 



oooo^iojr-tiD^r^ in 



•H t~- CN CM -H n 



o \D r-j vo o I 



in n o\ CO 00 r) ■ 



^ rH ii- 



Ov CO CM 



ro c -H t-i < ui 

c -H nj a < 

c o (/) +J a p c 

o o ojfg naj:^ >^>^+j 



Ul < h 

•OH) o 

u) o ro 03 r; ■-' 2 

m t3 O T3 (B 

n XI as c 0) ■*-> a> 

x: n e -H x: c x; 

(0 rt) ra n 4J 0) +J 

CQ DQ ^ (-• O CJ O 






eouaaajajj 
P^e JO 
AieTDjjauee 



cMi-fi--r~cO'a-cooo^oo 
.-ico.-ir-CNjif> .--. 
iD n in 



--< r- o n -Ji- CO ( 



o o r- c^ in 



CO in CO CN 



vo in t*^ in in I 



aouajajajj 
PU2 JO 
AjBTOTjauag 






c^ --H o in c> ' 



13 



cMt~-rHoov'<rr~^ooi 

incMCMCMcococNit-r-' 

in vo ^ .-H oj CO 



o ■* M- vo in 



^ t^ o ■* -a- 



loslovakia 

:e 

ry 

f 

a 

lania 



id 

igal 

lia 

1 

»y (Europe and Asia) 

lavia 


- Europe 

JS 

Kong 



lesia 



g>^ > ^ -p 



3 n) c a c c <u ( 



> ^ -p (D -p g ■ 
•p +J .-» ^ h e 



gJh34Jn)-Hm003CL3 



rap CO c ( 

C IH cr>-H o C CJ- ( 

•H d c -o -D ro ra I 

x: S o c c H n I 



32 



TABLE 6F. IW.IIGfiAMTS ADMITTbD UNDEIi THE ACT OF OCTOBER 24, 
(p. L. 87-885) BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH: 
OCTOBER 24, 1962 - JUNE 30, 1965 



Country or region 
of birth 



.^^ £ 



•H £ C 



AH countries - 

Europe 

Belgium 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Italy 

Malta 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) .... 

United Kingdom 

Yugos lavia 

Other Europe 

Asia ,. 

China 1/ 

Cyprus 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indones ia 

Iran 

Iraq 

Israel 

Japan 

Jordan 2j 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Malaysia 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Other As ia 

North America 

Canada 

Barbados 

Jamaica 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Other West Indies 

Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Africa 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

Other Oceania 



12.585 



11 

27 

17 

1,788 

21 

7,448 

28 

62 

1,852 

106 

424 

11 

586 

38 

128 



6.56]l 



827 
27 
124 
229 



518 
112 



65 

1,035 

54 



49 
506 
102 

22 
9 



200 
19 



270 
2 
3 



1,182 

1 



36 
29 
72 

230 
20 

308 
27 
19 
27 

472 
17 
20 



J06_ 



1,368 
2 



1,040 
3 
72 
295 
11 
27 
32 



36 
382 



Includes Formosa. 
Includes Arab Palestine. 



33 



^Mumbe 



issued and quota Irnmlgrants admittftd will not 



rlly agree. Differences 
itmigTants who are admit- 
issued, or by adjustments 









Quota in 




Quot. ar.a 


Annual 














quota i/ 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


All quota arus 
















149.697 


?2.7?S 






89.729 




Albania 






93 


93 






Austria 


1.405 


1,330 


1,274 


1,450 


1,271 


1.392 


Belgium 


1,297 


1.182 


1,076 


1,052 


1.022 


1.015 


Bulgaria 


100 


82 


84 




100 


96 


Czechoslovakia 


2,859 


2,236 


1,946 


2,098 


1.823 


1,965 


Dennsrk 


1,175 


1,066 


1,124 


1,203 


1.075 


1,129 




115 


110 


116 


96 


129 


85 


Finland 


566 




536 


494 


554 


540 


France 


3,069 


2,892 


2,930 


2,987 


2,876 


3.011 




25,814 


24,273 


22,911 


26,533 


23,997 


21,621 


Great Britain and Northern Ireland 


65,361 


25,100 


23,447 


28.291 


31,759 


29.923 


Greece 


3oe 


321 


339 


308 


308 


233 


Hungary 






825 


914 


854 


813 




100 


105 


106 




112 


95 


Ireland Uiri) 


17,756 


6,273 


5,364 


6,054 


6,134 


5,256 


Italy 


5,666 


5,648 


5,405 


5,560 


5,724 


5,363 


Latvia 


235 


234 


217 


250 


191 


247 


Lithuania 


384 


383 


338 


396 




395 


Luxembourg 


100 


62 


63 


88 


83 


96 


Netherlands 


3,136 


2,969 


3,073 


3.016 


2,828 


3,132 




2,364 


2,2C8 


1,944 


2,071 


2,219 


2,237 


Poland 


6,488 


6.891 


5,435 


7,460 


6,434 


6,238 


Portugal 


438 


425 


426 


445 


434 


428 


Runanla 


289 


297 


273 


311 


289 


294 


San Marino 


100 


96 


96 


105 


100 


100 


Spain 


250 


204 


161 


220 


272 


251 


Sweden 


3,295 


1,656 


1,685 


2,019 


2,160 


2,415 


S.ltzerland 


1.698 


1,510 


1,594 


1,673 


1,681 


1,716 


Turkey 


225 


220 


195 


242 


182 


171 


U. S S R 


2,697 


2,536 


2,765 


2,616 


2,564 


2,707 


Yugoslavia 


942 


932 


888 


915 


969 


926 




500 


74 


85 


83 


109 


146 


Asia 




2.014 






2 290 


.1.292 


Ai ia-Pacific 


100 




88 


98 


80 


93 


Burma 




99 


93 


71 


122 


92 


Ceylon 


100 


52 


76 


92 


90 


84 


China 


100 


78 


99 


90 




93 


Chinese persons 


105 


117 


84 


82 


47 


708i/ 


Cyprus 


100 


94 


94 


98 


102 


100 


India 


100 


92 


111 




100 


99 


Indonesia 


200 


72 


107 


96 


127 


200 


Iran (Persia) 


100 


99 


115 


100 


100 


101 


Iraq 


100 


92 


112 


95 


105 


91 




100 


99 


100 


102 


100 


101 


Japan 


185 


128 


191 


195 


177 


181 


Jordan and Arab Palestine 


2ro 


215 


181 


209 


206 


196 


Korea 


100 


103 


109 


100 


94 


HI 


Lebanon 


100 


102 


91 


103 


100 


100 


Pakistan 


100 


88 


98 


87 


88 




Philippines 


100 


58 


57 


50 




95 


Thailand 


100 




107 




100 




Viet-Nam 


100 


80 


83 


94 


92 


97 




100 




100 


99 




75 


Other Asia 


1,400 


69 


149 


192 


242 


487 


Africa 


4.274 


857 


846 




" 


1.332 


Algeria V 


574 










*'22r 


Ethiopia 


100 


69 


71 


101 


97 




Ghana 


100 


35 


68 


86 


101 


89 


Libya 


100 




73 


107 


101 


80 


Morocco 


100 


100 


101 


92 


105 


96 


South Africa 


100 


120 


102 


98 


102 


93 


Tunisia 


100 










83 


United Arab Hepublic (Egypt) 


100 


119 


74 


116 


100 


101 


Other Africa 


3,000 




258 






481 


Oceania 


700 












North America 










212 


.94 


Jamaica 5/ 


iro 






90 






Trinidad and Tobago 2/ 


100 


- 


- 


86 


102 


100 





jy The annual quota 



In 1965 the 



Quotas established 



Adjustments chargeab 



President's Proclamation No. 3570 of January 7, 1964. 
President's Proclamation No. 3503 of October 23, 1962. Figi 
ions charged to British subquotas July 1 - October 22, 1962. 



QUOTA PREFERENCES: 



Total 
■Blftrants 



All quota areas . . . . 

Albania 

»«lg«u« 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Dannark 

Estonia 

Finland 

Ceniany 

Great Britain and 

Northern Ireland .... 

Hungary 

Iceland 

Ireland (Blre) 

Italy 

Utvla 

Lithuania 

Netherlands 

Poland 

Portugal 

Runanla 

San Marino 

Spain 

Svltzerland 

Turkey 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Aala 

Asia-Faclflc 

Burma 

China 

Chinese persons 

Cyprus 

India 

Iran (Persia) 

Israel 

Jordan and Arab Palestii 
Korea 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Thailand 

Viet.Naai 

YeMH 

Other Aaia 

Africa 

Algeria 

Ethiopia 

Ghana 

Libya 

Morocco 

South Africa 

Tunisia 

United Arab Republic 

(Egypt) 

Other Africa 

Oceania 

North Anerica 

Jasalca 

Trinidad and Tobago . . . 
1/ Figures include adjua 

See Table 6B. 
2/ Includes A2 foreign g 
J/ Includes 667 Section 



Adjustaents chargeable 



Susper 



:lals adjusted under S 
of deportation cases* 



' future year 
t of Septa 



s included 
I, 1957. 



year of adjustnent. 





TAB.Ee. 


'year ended JUNE 30. 1965 


MAJOR OCCUPATION CROUP: 








Country or region 


Number 
admitted 


.1 i 




1^ 

HI 


1 




III 


lis 


sit 


HI 


I c 

Is 

• 

h 


J. 
ill 


|2 

iliil 


All countrl.. 












5.177 
















E"rop. 


114.329 


12.941 


1.325 


2.665 


12.554 


2.606 


9.318 


6.152 


2.420 


5.745 


1.193 


2.887 


54.523 


l!o05 

24[o45 
3,002 
1.574 

lo!«21 
3.0B5 
2.256 

2)005 

2)200 

'905 
i!b53 


159 
307 

2.0E 

256 

406 
473 

540 
293 

138 

"234 
222 


15 

221 

10 
653 
54 

15 

3 


58 
34 

76 

54 

156 

46 
146 


79 
202 

475 

3,506 
67 

577 
129 

349 
71 

365 
30 


34 
90 

167 


160 

1,810 
187 
132 


107 
120 

694 
51^ 

40 
'151 


52 
28 

40 
32 

16 


162 
83 

'26I 
407 
173 

1,176 


43 
25 

182 


37 

608 
314 

12 


861 

2,145 

l!698 

1,437 
5,994 

'.,456 
1,190 

1,255 

602 

5 39 

11,587 

'763 




De''mi''k'° * " 




c:™:/::::::;:::::::;::: 


u""' 


TrT.'Z 






^* 


P°1 'd 




Portugal 


sTln ° 


""'" ■ ■ ■ ■ 




Turkey (Europe and A. la) . 


U.S.S.K. (Lrop. and A.I.) 


uther Europe 


China y 


i:o5? 

712 

804 

882 
3.180 

702 
2. 165 

3.130 


2Sl 

145 
312 


27 

2 


307 

15 
32 

24 

27 
32 


37 
57 

31 


5 


59 

3(1 
53 


287 
21 


20 
24 


47 3 
15 


- 


2 

2 

2 
64 


2,372 
247 

113 
557 

"359 
146 
121 


ong oog 




Iran 

ir«q 


■"pan 

Jordan i/ 


1^°"* 


Halavila 




. . '''j"" ■ 


Syrian Arab Republic 


»ortb Africa 


Canada 


37|9b9 
19,760 

31609 

2!873 

2!355 

l!933 

427 

30.962 


2,406 
113 


60 
106 


923 
107 


3.979 
1.3h2 

305 
251 


37? 

15 
38 


'671 
726 




'l29 

190 
24, 


118 
83 


23 


2)431 
24 

21 


20,539 
29.480 

4:629 

'955 

753 
'731 


^*'" 


Dominican Republic 


j'lJ^j^^ 


Other Ue.t Indle. 


Bl Salvador 




Hondurat' 






Other Central America .... 
South An«rlca 




6,124 


B73 
370 

360 

136 


3 


15 


151 

739 
237 


12 

145 
50 


4114 


k 


it 


i: 


'I 


56 
15 


''•Hi' 

1 ; 1 20 








Colombia 


Ecuador 


Other i,outh America 




280 
372 


23 

30 
43 


I 


,^i 


M 


10 


M 


i 


i 


,3 


I 




' 1"- 

60 

465 
932 


MOTOCCO 


Nl.erla 




United Arab Rep. (Egypt) . 




' " ' ' 


— 4?r 

309 


ill 

54 


i 


2 


32 


3 


- 


-' 


'^ 




'^ 


i 


137 




Pacific l.l.ndl (U.S. .dm.) 






1/ includa. For-o... 


J, Inclu 




al.atine 




3 


6 

















TABLt 8A. BENEFIClftKlES OF FIKST PREfCRHNCt 










admitted 


orcfcrcnc. vis 


of first 


other 




Total 








.24. 1962 2/ 






Admis,ions 












































149 

278 

182 

'l82 

468 

120 
103 

215 

276 

342 

2,012 

112 

154 

140 

2,552 

4,352 

207 

1,181 


107 

2 

14 
18 
184 

22 

2 
202 

37 
13 


88 

3 

2 
2 
1 
3 
1 


19 

7 

8 

52 

18 

8 


I 

1 


13 

1 

1 




Actors and actre.... 


I49 
































178 

685 

3,105 
175 
259 
180 






Dietitian, and nutritionists 


Engineer! ...! ''.".[. .1 .'. .".]"]]" .]...". .1" '..'... . 










4,063 
130 
103 
100 
35 




















1,810 
111 

273 




Reli°ioS!"orke 








53 

2,468 
4,167 




Sports instructors and officials 














1,113 
1,831 


Managers, officials, and proprietors, e«ept farm 


Buyers and shippers, farm products 


83 
6,381 


55 

12. 


3 


1 






94 
34 




*nc"! '^Irtf jll°«!"'a';Ki''on"neer; ' ' ;h; 












Bank ttllek". T". ". !.?.... !?*.'!'. !. °"]". '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 


145 

616 

1,064 

24 

54 
577 

•5,753 
09 

71 

9,266 








] 


': 








Collectors bill and account 


529 










Insurance adjusters, examiners, and investigators 


53 


Mes-engers Tnd office' boy's 
















































.ales .orkers 




Advertising agents and salesmen 


17.510 


1 

825 




110 


-_ 


I 


154 






"a lesmeraL'^Ile! clerks°'""her' ! 1 !! !!!.'.'!! i !! i!! ii! i ! i! ! 


4,707 


Blacksmith's 


464 

342 
1,817 




1 
1 




': 


: 


449 


Bookbinders 






81 














Compositors and typesetters 








See footnotes at ,nd of table.'"" ^ 


43 



37 



I OTHLR LmidlMI^ 



Excavating, grading, and road nvichlnery 


oper 


tors .. 






Js.sleri, -atchnakers, gold.mithi, and 
Linemen and .srvitemen, telegraph, tele 


;i,or.: 


.miths. 












Pattern and model makers, except paper 














PUsterr""'' "^ ''"'°'"'''''"* 









Packers and wrappers , 

Painters, except construction 
Photographic process workers . 

























Janltors'^nd sextons ....'...'"T 


private household. 














Practical nurses 










Service .orkers, except private h 


ousehold, other ... 




Carpenters' helpers, except loggi 


"5 and mining 


Gardeners, except fan,, and groun 


"'"'epers 












Housewives, children, and others an 


d those with no 




Retired 



38 



Austria 

Belgium 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Poland 

Portuga 1 

Rumania 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) 

United Kingdom 

U. ii. S.R. (Europe and Asia) .. 

Asia 

China 1/ 

Hong. Kong 

India 

Indones la 

Japan 

Jordan 2/ 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Malaysia 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Other Asia 

North America 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Other West Indies 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guaterula 

Honduras 

Panama 

Other Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South Anerlca 

Africa 

Algeria 

Nigeria '.'.'.'.....'..'. 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

Nev< Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U. S. adiii. ) 
Other Oceania 

Other countries 



V Includes Fonnosa. 

2/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



24,045 


7,261 




1,449 


1,574 


763 


5,463 


2,153 


10,321 


5,352 






2,256 


862 


8,465 


4,024 


2,005 


1,045 



10,103 
1,510 



38,327 


18,760 


37, %9 


16,082 


19,760 


9,486 


9,504 


4,290 


3,609 


1,763 


1,837 


867 


2,873 


1,392 


2,911 


1,128 



Country or region 



Belgium 

Czechoslovakia 

Finland 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Nether 
Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Saitzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) .... 

United Kingdom 

U. S. S.R. (Europe and Asia) .. 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China l/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iraq 

J^P^n-'v"'"'"'""""-" 
Jordan 2/ 

Lebanon 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cube 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Other West Indies 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Other Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Peru ..^V///.'.. '..'..'.. '.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Algeria 

South Africa 

Nigeria 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Australia !!!!!!!!'. 

Ne» Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U. S. adm. ) 
Other Oceania 

Other < 



2,595 
16,784 
1,553 
811 
3,310 
5,469 
1,692 



1,776 
1,176 

17,255 



1/ Includes Formosa. 

2/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



40 



TABLE 10, IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED, BY SEX AND AGE: 
YEARS ENDED JUNK 30, 1956 - 1965 



Under 5 years 

5-9 years 

10-14 years 

15 years , 

16-17 years 

18-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-29 years 

30-34 years 

35-39 years 

40-44 years 

45-49 years 

50-54 years 

55-59 years 

60-64 years 

65-69 years 

70-74 years 

75-79 years 

BO years and over 
Mot reported 



Males 

Under 5 years 

5-9 years 

10-14 years 

15 years 

16-17 years 

18-19 years 

20-2A years 

25-29 years 

30-34 years 

35-39 years 

40-44 years 

45-49 years 

50-54 years 

55-59 years 

60-64 years 

65-69 years 

70-74 years 

75-79 years 

80 years and over 
Hot reported 



Fenales 

Under 5 years 

5-9 years 

10-14 years 

15 years 

16-17 years 

18-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-29 years 

30-34 years 

35-39 years 

40-44 years 

45-49 years 

50-54 years 

S5-59 years 

60-64 years 

65-69 years 

70-74 years 

75-79 yaars 

80 years and over 
Not reported 



i^m^m 



264,983 
208,070 
171,112 
33,709 
92,008 
155,816 
506, 
429,862 
302,783 
205,913 
145,118 
114,759 
88,462 
63,826 
42,309 
26,224 
14,609 
7,330 
3,852 
460 



135,501 
105,096 
86,331 
16,557 
40,291 
54,070 
179.606 
199,244 
147,819 
102,532 
71,772 
54,912 
39,321 
26,750 
16,966 
10,518 
5,643 
2,819 
1,465 
210 

1.580.739 



infill 



27,748 
24,377 
18.496 
3,808 
10,021 
15,908 
51,434 
48,635 
37,454 
22,945 
20,373 
15.681 
10,349 
6,641 
3,594 
2.073 
1.110 
593 
326 
59 



156.410 



14,087 

12,419 

9,323 

1.847 

4,581 

6.204 

20,537 

23,783 

19,883 

12,581 

11,311 

8.523 

5.306 

3.035 

1.433 

813 

407 

209 

99 

29 

165. ?15 



13,661 

11,958 

9,173 

1,961 

5,440 

9,704 

30,897 

24,852 

17,571 

10,364 

9.062 

7,158 

5,043 

3,606 

2.161 

1,260 

703 

384 

227 

30 



326.867 



30,7 
26,554 
19,224 
3,646 
9,668 
15,339 
51.358 
50.036 
38.464 
24.070 
18,729 
14,049 
9,675 
6,748 
3,934 
2,301 
1,206 
618 
363 
169 

155.20' 



15,766 

13,452 

9,898 

1.764 

4.247 

5.953 

20.114 

23.986 

19.637 

12.652 

9.745 

7.166 

4.561 

2.917 

1,579 

892 

445 

214 

130 

83 

121.666 



14,950 

13,102 

9,326 

1,882 

5,421 

9,386 

31.244 

26.050 

18,827 

11,418 

8.984 

6.883 

5,114 

3,831 

2,355 

1,409 

761 

404 

233 



iSMM 



23,148 
18,727 
15,447 
2,802 
7,899 
13,385 
43,035 
39,674 
27.539 
18.216 
12,492 
10,248 
7,473 
5.455 
3.521 
2,040 
1,208 
582 
286 
88 



109.121 



11,967 

9,488 

7,694 

1,304 

3,190 

4,294 

13,782 

17,493 

12,841 

8,840 

5,836 

4.545 

3.076 

2.050 

1,268 

737 

390 

176 

105 

36 

.44.144 



11,172 

9.239 

7.753 

1.498 

4.709 

9.091 

29,253 

22,181 

14,698 

9,376 

6,656 

5,703 

4,397 

3.405 

2,253 

1,303 

818 

406 

181 

52 



260.686 



22,516 
17,760 
15,786 
2,764 
7,858 
14,204 
46,118 
38,690 
27,072 
19,272 
12,152 
11.417 
8.733 
6.489 
4.501 
2.767 
i.451 
731 
349 
56 

114J167. 



11.511 
8,960 
7,975 
1.363 
3,237 
4,739 
15,999 
17,306 
12,487 
9,199 
5,721 
5,346 
3,784 
2,752 
1,772 
1,168 
579 
317 
129 
23 

146.319 



11,005 

8,800 

7,811 

1,401 

4,621 

9,465 

30,119 

21,384 

14,585 

10,073 

6,431 

6,071 

4,949 

3,737 

2,729 

1,599 

872 

414 

220 

33 



^Is^ 



24,098 
17,523 
15,386 
2,888 
8,255 
14,847 
47,674 
39,543 
27,748 
19,958 
12,059 
11,310 
8,395 
6,256 
4,316 
2,752 
1,359 
680 
321 



116.687 



12,299 
8,570 
7,731 
1,493 
3,565 
4,879 
15,836 
17,788 
12,919 
9,969 
5,827 
5,369 
3,762 
2,646 
1,801 
1,187 
592 
294 
146 
14 



271.344 



26,204 
18,924 

16,434 
2,982 
8,452 
14,996 
47,984 
39,558 
27,274 
19,873 
12,744 
11,082 
8,611 
6,151 
4,240 
2,867 
1,729 
834 
394 



121.380 



13,203 
9,604 
8,295 
1,446 
3,537 
5.171 
16.618 
18.349 
13.063 
9.802 
6.247 
5.326 
3.865 
2,652 
1,756 
1,218 
732 
322 
168 



283.763 



25,494 
19,076 
16,544 
3,417 
8,835 
15.363 
51,487 
42,733 
29,421 
20,973 
13,652 
10,905 
8,808 
6,600 
4,617 
2,924 
1,577 
842 
468 
27 

131.575 



13,126 
9,735 
8,313 
1,683 
3,888 
5,380 
19,541 
21,288 
15,146 
10,877 
6,854 
5,111 
3,810 
2,715 
1,862 
1.151 
580 
343 
164 
8 

152.188 



12.368 

9.341 

8.231 

1.734 

4,947 

9,983 

31.946 

21.445 

14,275 

10,096 

6,798 

5,794 

4,998 

3,885 

2,755 

1.773 

997 

499 

304 

19 



306.260 



28,991 
21,621 
18,006 
3,892 
10,125 
17,518 
55,935 
45,321 
31.669 
21.924 
15,014 
10,815 
9,005 
6,458 
4,552 
2,746 
1,499 
780 
382 
7 

139.297 

14,882 

10,876 

8,945 

1,919 

4,570 

6,016 

20,199 

21,542 

15,981 

11,028 

7,511 

5.154 

4.021 

2,700 

1,814 

1,099 

576 

313 

144 

7 

t^6 .?fe3 



14,109 

10,745 

9,061 

1,973 

5,555 

11,502 

35,736 

23.779 

15.688 

10.896 

7.503 

5,661 

4,984 

3,758 

2,738 

1,647 

923 

467 

238 



TABLE lOA. IMMIGRANTS ADWIITTED, BY SEX, IMRITAL STATUS, AGE, AND MAJOR 
OCCUPATION GROUP: YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1961 - 1965 



Sex, narital status, 
age, and 
occupation 



1964 



Number admitted 

Sex and marital status: 

Ma les 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Females 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Males per 1,000 females 

Median age (years): 

Both sexes 

Ma les 

Females • . . • 

Major occupation group: 

Professional, technical, and kindred workers. 

Farmers and farm managers 

Managers, officials, and proprietors, 

except farm 

Clerical, sales, and kindred workers 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers 

Operatives and kindred workers 

Private household workers 

SejTvice workers, except private household ... 

Farm laborers and foremen 

Laborers, except farm and mine 

Housewives, children, and others with no 
occupation 

Housewives 

Retired persons 

Students 

Children under 14 years of age 

Unknown or not reported 



?71,?44 



283.763 



306. g60 



292.248 



1^1.380 



131 ,575 



139,^97 



126.^14 



68,253 

51,261 

984 

815 

67 

149.964 



73,264 

56,309 

1,037 

915 

50 

152.188 



79,662 

57,703 

965 

912 

55 

1^6. 9 6 ? 



70,489 

71,455 

5,401 

2,565 

54 

809 



25.0 
25.8 
24.5 



21,455 
3,002 

5,363 
25,198 
17,679 
13,288 
8,811 
8,399 
4,799 
15,694 

135.704 



73,318 

70,047 

6,140 

2,626 

57 

865 



25.2 
26.0 
24.6 



23,710 
1,589 

5,554 
26,304 
17,172 
12,976 
9,690 
9,414 
10,801 
17,614 

136.7^^ 



80,747 

77,704 

5,818 

2,646 

48 

834 



23.7 
24.5 
23.3 



27,930 
1,776 

5,986 
28,094 
18,158 
14,286 
9,522 
9,392 
9,463 
16,062 

1^^.470 



73,264 

51,161 

866 

860 

63 

166.034 



80,086 

77,642 

5,584 

2,703 

19 

760 



23.4 
23.8 
23.3 



28,756 
1,732 

6,822 
30,015 
17,568 
14,243 

8,451 
10,396 

3,988 

9,127 

151.076 



59,245 

1,722 

15,923 

58,814 

11,952 



58,153 

1,885 

19,410 

57,304 

12,187 



63,832 

1,903 

22,889 

63,846 

13,121 



62,192 

2,146 

24,226 

62,512 

10,074 



42 



ALIENS AND CITIZENS AD:,;iTTED AND DEPARTED: 
YEAliS ENDED JUNE 30, 1900 - 1965 





ALIENS ADMITTED 


ALIENS 
DEPARTED 2/ 


U. S. CITIZENS 2/ 


Period 


Immi- 


NonimiiU- 
qrant J,/ 


Arrive.;! 


Departed 


1908 - 1965 


17.948.507 


22.669.910 




37.805,748 




1908-1910 3/ 


2.576.226 


490.741 


1.495.638 


660.811 


342.600 




1.376.271 


3.988.157 


1.938.508 


2.517.889 




878,587 
838,172 
1,197,892 
1,218,480 
326,700 
298,826 
295,403 
110,618 
141,132 
430,001 


151,713 
178,983 
229,335 
184,601 
107,544 
67,922 
67,474 
101,235 
95,889 
191,575 

1.774.881 


518,215 
615,292 
611,924 
633,805 
384,174 
240,807 
146,379 
193,268 
216,231 
428,062 

2.694.778 


269,128 
280,801 
286,604 
286,586 
239,579 
121,930 
127,420 
72,867 
96,420 
157,173 

3.522.713 


349,472 


1019 


353 390 










1915 


172,371 
110,733 
126,011 


1Q17 




275,837 




1920 


194,147 




3.519.519 


1921 

1922 


805,228 
309,556 
522,919 
706,396 
294,314 
304,488 
335,175 
307,255 
279,678 
241,700 

528.431 


172,935 
122,949 
150,487 
172,406 
164,121 
191,618 
202,826 
193,376 
199,649 
204,514 

1.574.071 


426,031 
345,384 
200,586 
216,745 
225,490 
227,755 
253,508 
274,356 
252,498 
277,425 

2.196.650 


222,712 
243,563 
308,471 
301,281 
339,239 
370,757 
378,520 
430,955 
449,955 
477,260 


271,560 
309,477 






1925 


324 323 








369,788 
429,575 


1928 








1931-1940 


3.357.936 




97,139 
35,576 
23,068 
29,470 
34,956 
36,329 
50,244 
67,895 
82,998 
70,756 

1.035.039 


183,540 
139,295 
127,660 
134,434 
144,765 
154,570 
181,640 
184,802 
185,333 
138,032 

2.461.359 


290,916 
287,657 
243,802 
177,172 
189,050 
193,284 
224,582 
222,614 
201,409 
166,164 

2.262.293 


439,897 
339,262 
305,001 
273,257 
282,515 
318,273 
386,872 
406,999 
354,438 
258,918 

3.223.233 




1932 


380,837 




1934 

1935 


262,091 
272 400 






1937 


390 196 


1938 . .... 


397 875 










1941-1950 


2.880.414 


1941 


51,776 
28,781 
23,725 
28,551 
38,119 
108,721 
147,292 
170,570 
188,317 
249,187 

2.515.479 


100,008 
82,457 
81,117 
113,641 
164,247 
203,469 
366,305 
476,006 
447,272 
426,837 

7.113.023 


88,477 
74,552 
58,722 
84,409 
93,362 
204,353 
323,422 
448,218 
430,089 
456,689 

6.682.387 


175,935 
118,454 
105,729 
108,444 
175,568 
274,543 
437,690 
542,932 
620,371 
663,567 

12. 531.985 


168,961 
113,216 
62,403 






1944 




103,019 
230,578 
451,845 
478,988 
552,361 
655,518 

12.305.984 


1946 

1947 


1948 


1950 

1951-1960 




205,717 
265,520 
170,434 
208,177 
237,790 
321,625 
326,867 
253,265 
260,686 
265,398 

271,344 
283,763 
306,260 
292,248 
296,697 


465,106 
516,082 
485,714 
566,613 
620,946 
686,259 
758,858 
847,764 
1,024,945 
1,140,736 

1,220,315 
1,331,383 
1,507,091 
1,744,808 
2,075,967 


472,901 
509,497 
544,502 
599,161 
665,800 
715,200 
574,608 
710,428 
885,913 
1,004,377 

1,093,937 
1,158,960 
1,266,843 
1,430,736 
1,734,939 


760,486 
807,225 
930,874 
1,021,327 
1,171,612 
1,281,110 
1,365,075 
1,469,262 
1,804,435 
1,920,582 

2,043,416 
2,199,326 
2,433,463 
2,786,907 
3,099,951 


667,126 

814,289 

925,861 

971,025 

1,096,146 

1,272,516 

1,402,107 

1 483 915 


1952 


1953 


1954 

1955 

1956 




1958 ... ... . 


1959 

1960 


1,739,046 
1,934,953 

1,969,119 
2,159,857 
2,421,348 
2,709,196 
3,084,921 


1962 

1963 

1964 





i/ Excludes border crossers, crewmen, Mexican agricultural laborers admitted under the 
Act of October 31, 1949 and aliens admitted on documentary waivers. 

2/ Prior to 1957, includes emigrant and nonemigrant aliens departed; thereafter 
includes aliens departed by sea and air, except direct departures to Canada. 

3/ Departures of U. S. citizens first recorded in 1910. 



TABLE 12. IMIJIIGRAMTS ADMITTED, 

BY STATE OF lOTENDED FOTURE PERMANErfT RESIDEtCE I 

YEARi. ENDED JUNE 30, 1956-1965 



otate of intended 
future permanent 



All States .... 

Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 
Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania , 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

U. S. terr. and posi 

Guam 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands ... 

All other 



260^ 



2,564 

33,486 

3,741 

622,146 



12,797 
16,034 
4,194 
174,186 
25,397 

9,877 



27,909 
116,283 
91,604 
20,125 
3,934 

19,535 
5,188 
6,551 
5,375 
8,732 

146,835 
15,148 

663,148 
12,048 
3,826 

75,756 
9,164 
16,921 
87,570 
12,788 



20,146 
40,609 

5,896 
27,475 

2,182 



3,547 
20,136 
3,289 



2,428 

469 

50,447 



16,017 
2,174 
70,700 



1,826 

7,027 

512 

2,010 



15,287 

2,718 

367 



2,658 

378 

51,201 



4,121 

621 

2,837 



822 

249 

2,315 

471 

49,673 



3,129 

380 

61,325 



13,611 
1,105 

60,134 
1,179 



3,473 

299 

64,205 



2,336 
12,091 
7,328 
1,852 



1,369 

2,344 
11,578 
6,371 
1,614 
347 



13,367 
2,031 
62,311 



7,535 
1,361 



17,345 
1,052 



1,792 

5,944 

416 

2,495 



429 
16,020 
2,053 



840 
1,784 
1,487 

2,831 
13,571 
6,895 
1,756 



433 



14,099 
2,012 

70,275 

1,335 

415 

5,504 
964 
1,590 
7,463 
1,249 

599 



16,514 
1,167 



I»»IIGRANTS ACMITTEO, BY SPEC 
STATE OF INTENDED FUTURE 
YEAR ENDED JUNE : 



SUt« of intindad 


All 






U it d 










Denn-k 








Philip, 
plnel 




Yugo- 
slavia 




All 


future p«nMn«nt 


coun 




Mexico 


Kingdoa 


CerMny 


Cuba 


Italy 


Poland 


Norway 


Ireland 


China 


Japan 


Greece 


U.S.S.R. 


ot er 


ntttftPt* 


















S""'" 




1/ 












All St.t.. 


















6.051 


5.463 


4.057 


3.180 


3.130 


3.002 


2.818 


1.653 












101 






10 










24 






1 




181 


AU.U 


363 


212 


5 


18 


31 


3 


- 


2 


20 


3 


1 




4 


3 




. 


56 




3.B66 


582 


2.348 


171 


177 


10 


14 


19 


21 
















384 


Arkeniai 


309 


25 


16 


37 


95 


6 


2 




3 


_ 


7 


12 


7 


; 


2 


1 


93 


CUfornl. 






19.562 




3,770 


933 




427 




664 


1,597 


99 3 


1,210 


19B 


372 


383 


19,446 


Colomdo 


1.880 


411 


121 


146 


349 


74 


24 


37 


85 


,3 


18 


41 


16 


23 


14 


, 


497 


Conn.ctlcut 


6,867 


1.598 


24 


1.114 


455 


115 


537 


702 


1B5 


186 


31 


23 


17 




43 


41 


1.719 


D.l.w.r. 


48B 


55 


2 


111 


52 


32 


28 


20 


12 




5 








1 


1 


133 


DUtrlct of Coluabl. 




128 


30 


449 


287 


168 




14 


68 


50 


52 


17 


16 


3f 






1,528 


Florid. 


l5!o77 


1.564 




773 


632 


6,937 


'I 


70 




78 


33 


72 




34 


25 


37 


4.506 


G«orgH 


1.538 


122 


16 


197 


452 


137 


10 


7 


,7 


18 


11 


3B 


23 


20 


1 


2 


467 


(U».U 


1.721 


312 


8 


76 


70 




2 


2 


f, 


1 


92 


261 




1 


. 


1 


441 


Id.ho 


373 


130 


36 


41 


42 




2 








7 








1 


1 


83 


llUnol. 


15.587 


994 


2.656 


1.142 


1,458 


629 


875 


1.903 


307 


423 


137 


107 


70 


353 


372 


85 


4,076 


IndliM 


2.095 


283 


243 


258 


331 


84 


38 


79 


39 


17 


19 


55 


15 






8 


516 


Io<M 


822 


141 


19 


lis 


150 


29 


10 


12 


32 


5 


15 


18 


g 


10 


J 


J 


246 


IUnl>. 


896 


108 


84 




235 


34 






13 






30 


10 


IC 


13 


J 


233 


>C«ntucky 


82'. 


78 


10 


98 




40 


12 


9 




7 


10 


31 


5 




4 


5 


200 


Uul.l.n. 


2,221 


93 


57 


134 


213 


161 


19 


7 


26 


9 




30 


23 


12 


5 


2 


1,414 


H>ln. 


1,491 


1.141 


' 


117 


" 


7 


10 


2 


6 


9 


1 


12 


5 


5 






95 


tUryland 


3.A48 


361 


22 


651 


512 


183 


95 


83 


95 


73 


52 


51 


42 


46 


J 


13 


1,161 




11,455 


3.367 


» 


1.496 


670 


342 


593 


474 


249 


717 


152 


53 


25 


221 


33 


90 


2.940 




7,975 


2.477 


250 


1.104 


939 


132 


258 


355 


110 


77 


54 


57 


48 


98 






1,869 


Hlnti«soCa 


1,733 


466 


25 


204 


257 


32 


11 


29 


141 


31 


40 


32 






15 


e 




Kl..l..lppl 




12 


3 


35 


88 


14 


5 




6 


18 


13 




5 


7 


- 


- 


108 


K».,ourt 


1,968 


270 


100 


282 


386 


84 


56 


26 


30 


53 


13 


31 


20 


34 


14 


12 


557 


Hon tana 


542 


218 


13 


45 


55 


70 


1 


10 




5 






10 


< 


1 


1 


75 




580 


69 


40 


84 


84 


42 


21 


12 


20 


3 


12 


16 




4 


5 


2 


157 


Nevada 


754 




108 


106 


77 


58 


8 


6 


9 


7 


17 




14 


4 


2 




153 


««. Ha^.hlr. 


1,142 


788 


5 


76 


64 


8 


10 


8 


13 


12 


5 


11 


2 


26 




1 


113 


New Jeriay 


15.096 


731 


54 


1,654 


1,267 


2,403 


1,203 


1.121 


372 


360 


73 


67 


33 


180 


388 


150 


5,040 


Ne« Mexico 


1,367 


73 


868 


89 


88 






3 






6 


29 


11 








156 


Nev York 


69,011 


3.387 


332 


5,280 


4,000 


4,256 


4.857 


2.097 


1.484 


2.054 




177 


102 


1,051 


776 


697 


37,535 


North Carolina 


1.431 


159 


17 


234 


401 


42 




12 


15 


17 


4 


55 




28 


5 






North Dakota 


344 


168 


3 


41 


52 


6 


3 


- 


' 


2 


5 


10 


1 


3 




1 


42 


Ohio 


5.444 


776 


96 


781 


838 


146 


269 


29 5 


88 


102 


60 


71 


41 


114 


305 


37 


1.425 


Oklahoaa 


876 


94 


43 


84 


258 


32 


6 


2 


19 


3 


3 


32 


10 


4 






284 


Oregon 


2.040 


652 


59 


205 


213 


32 


14 


15 


82 


21 


141 




19 


10 


9 


66 


44S 


Pann.TN.nl. 


6.976 




38 


1,153 


995 


239 


731 


308 


131 


184 


47 


102 


56 






58 


2.146 


Rhode laland 


1.159 


189 




159 


80 




102 




27 


28 


12 


6 


10 


7 


1 




46R 


South Carolina 


557 


50 


4 


110 






10 


3 


10 


4 


3 


23 


7 


22 


J 


. 


144 


South Dakota 


167 


24 


1 


27 


32 


4 


_ 




13 


I 






9 


2 


_ 


. 


42 


Tenn.etee 


657 


65 


7 


102 




37 


2 


3 


9 




14 


40 


10 




1 




192 


Ie<at 


14.674 


450 


10.118 


545 


1,048 




54 




85 


53 


82 


129 


38 


37 


14 




1.680 


Ut.h 


1.207 


311 


48 


240 


129 


- 




2 


63 


5 


" 


25 










333 


Ver-ont 


615 


351 


3 


75 


52 


5 


4 


7 


„ 






7 


I 


4 


3 


2 


87 


Virginia 


2.654 


240 


26 


522 


494 


191 


29 


12 


69 


39 


36 


60 


45 


30 


6 


11 


844 


Waahlngton 


3.722 


1.247 


HI 


415 


537 


66 


33 


23 


207 




84 


100 




20 


24 


7 


7J6 


'eat Virginia 


443 


20 


3 


50 


1?3 


14 


14 


8 


8 


6 


4 


20 


7 




6 


1 


124 


ilUcon.ln 


2.190 


287 


89 


236 


411 


75 


52 


130 


77 


20 


30 


31 


13 


21 


74 


12 


632 


'yo.lng 


204 


43 


47 


31 


24 


2 


1 


1 


3 


3 


' 


5 


' 




- 


- 


34 


U.S. terr and poaa 




































Cue. 


640 


1 


. 


_ 


4 






1 




. 


10 


13 


457 








154 


Puerto Rico 


4.767 


48 


40 


36 


82 


1,448 


12 


2 


17 


1 




3 


3 


2 


1 


6 


3.065 


Virgin l.l.nda 


505 


14 




5 


21 


9 


- 


- 


2 


- 






" 




- 


- 


454 


Ml Other 


2.321 


2.093 


8 


111 


32 


- 


' 


5 


4 


3 




' 


2 


2 


3 


- 


52 



I of 2,500 - 99,999. 



Total 

Rural 

Cltlesi Total 

Calif., Anaheim 

Glendale 

Long Beach .... 
Los Angeles ... 
Oakland 

Sacramento .... 

San Dlogo 

San Francisco . 

San Jose 

Santa Ana 

Colo. , Denver 

Conn. , Bridgeport 

Hartford 

D. C. , Washington 

Fla., Jacksonville .. 

St. Petersburg 

Ga. , Atlanta 

Hawaii, Honolulu ...;.. 

111. , Chicago 

Ind. , Indianapolis .. 
La., New Orleans ... 

Hd. , Baltimore 

Mass., Boston 

Cambridge 

New Bedford ... 

Springfield ... 

Detroit 

Grand Rapids .. 

St. Paul 

Mo. , Kansas City ... 

St. Louis 

Nebr. , Qnaha 

N. J., Elizabeth 

Jersey City ... 

Peterson 

N. M. , Albu(;rierque . . . 
N. Y. , Albany 

Buffalo 

New York 

Rochester 

Olio, Akron 

Cincinnati .... 

Cleveland 

Coluihbus 

Toledo 

Oreg. , Portland 

Pa., Philadelphia .. 

Pittsburgh .... 
R. I., Providence .... 
Tex. , Corpus Chrlstl 

Dallas 

El Paso 

Fort Worth 

San Antonio ... 
Utah, Salt Lake City 

Va., Norfolk 

Wash. , Seattle 

Milwaukee 

Other cities 

Guam 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands 

U Includes Fonnosa. 



10,798 

306 

1,363 



n Germany Cuba 



/prom 1820 to 1867 figures represent alien passengers arrived; 1868 to 1891 inclusive and 1895 to 
1897 inclusive, immigrant aliens arrived; 1892 to 1894 inclusive and from 1898 to present time 
immigrant aliens admitted. Date for years prior to 1906 relate to country whence alien came; 
thereafter to country of last permanent residence. Because of changes in boundaries and changes 
in lists of countries, date for certain countries are not comparable throughout^ 



TABLE 13. 



IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, 
1820 - 1965 1/ 



FOR DECADES: 



1821-1830 1831-1840 1841-1850 1851-1860 1861-1870 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria-Hungary 2/ 

Belgium 

Denmark 

France 

Germany 2/ 

(England 

Great (Scotland 

Britain (Wales 

(Not specified 3/. 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway) ^j 

Sweden) -' •••*• 

Poland 5/ 

Portugal 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe 

U.S.S.R. 6/ 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Japan 7/ 

Turkey in Asia 8/ 

Other Asia 

America 

Canada & Newfoundland 9/ .. 

Mexico 10/ 

West Indies 

Central America 

South America 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand 

Not specified 



143.439 



599.125 



2.598.214 



7,6?1 



98.817 



495.688 



1.597.501 



2.452.660 



1 

20 

371 

968 

1,782 

268 



3,614 
30 
49 



5 

35 

139 

31 

1 
14 



27 

169 

8,497 

6,761 

14,055 

2,912 

170 

7,942 

20 

50,724 

409 

1,078 

91 

16 

145 

2,477 

3,226 

20 

75 

3 



22 

1,063 

45,575 

152,454 

7,611 

2,667 

185 

65,347 

49 

207,381 

2,253 

1,412 

1,201 

369 

829 

2,125 

4,821 

7 
277 
40 



5,074 

539 

77,262 

434,626 

32,092 

3,712 

1,261 

229,979 

16 

780,719 

1,870 

8,251 

13,903 

105 

550 

2,209 

4,644 

59 

551 

79 



4,738 

3,749 

76,358 

951,667 

247,125 

38,331 

6,319 

132,199 

31 

914,119 

9,231 

10,789 

20,931 

1,164 

1,055 

9,298 

25,011 

83 

457 

5 



10 



82 



41.455 



41,397 
43 



11.564 



33.424 



62.469 



74.720 



209 
1 

164 

2 

11 



2,277 

4,817 

3,834 

105 

531 



13,624 

6,599 

12,301 

44 

856 



41,723 
3,271 

13,528 

368 

3,579 



59,309 
3,078 

10,660 

449 

1,224 



1 

301 



16 

33,032 



54 
69,911 



55 
53,144 



210 
29,169 



See footnotes at end of table. 



47 



TABLE 13. IMMIGRATION BY CX)UNTRY, FOR DECADESt 
1820 - 1965 1/ (Continued) 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria)2/ 
Hungary)-^ 

Belgium 

Bulgaria il/ 

Czechoslovakia ^2/ 

Denmark 

Finland ^ 

France 

Germany 2/ • ••••• 

(England 

Great (Scotland 

Britain (Wales 

(Not specified 3/ 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 4/ 

Sweden 4/ 

Poland b/ 

Portugal 

Rumania 13/ 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe 

U.S.S.R. 6/ 

Yugoslavia il/ 

Other Europe ,. 

Asia 

China 

India 

Japan 7/ 

Turkey in Asia 8/ 

Other Asia 

America 

Canada & Newfoundland 9/ ... 

Mexico 10/ 

West Indies 

Central America 

South America 

Other America 14/ 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand 

Pacific Islands 

Not specified 15/ 



2. 812.191 



5.246.613 



3.687.564 



5.735.811 



2.272.262 



72,969 
7,221 



31,771 

72,206 

718,182 

437,706 

87,564 

6,631 

16,142 

210 

436,871 

55,759 

16,541 

95,323 

115,922 

12,970 

14,082 

11 

5,266 

28,293 

337 

39,284 



1,001 



123.823 



123,201 
163 
149 
67 
243 



404.044 



383,640 

5,162 

13,957 

157 

1,128 



358 
9,886 
1,028 

790 



3.558.973 



3.136.016 



4.376.564 



353,719 
20,177 



88,132 

50,464 

1,452,970 

644,680 

149,869 

12,640 

168 

2,308 

655,482 

307,309 

53,701 

176,586 

391,776 

51,806 

16,978 

6,348 

4,419 

81,988 

1,562 

213,282 



682 



18,167 
160 



30,770 

505,152 

216,726 

44,188 

10,557 

67 

15,979 

388,416 

651,893 

26,758 

95,015 

226,266 

96,720 

27,508 

12,750 

8,731 

31,179 

3,626 

505,290 

122 



68.380 



41,635 
39,280 

65,285 

73,379 
341,498 
388,017 
120,469 

17,464 

167,519 
339,065 
2,045,877 
48,262 
190,505 
249,534 

69,149 
53,008 
27,935 
34,922 
79,976 
1,597,306 

665 

243.567 



(453,649 

(442,693 

33,746 

22,533 

3,426 

41,983 

756 

61,897 

143,945 

249,944 

78,357 

13,107 

184,201 

146,181 

1,109,524 

43,718 

66,395 

95,074 

4,813 

89,732 

13,311 

68,611 

23,091 

54,677 

921,201 

1,888 

8,111 



192.559 



61,711 

269 

2,270 

2,220 

1,910 



14,799 
68 
25,942 
26,799 
3,628 



20,605 
4,713 
129,797 
77,393 
11,059 



21,278 

2,082 

83,837 

79,389 

5,973 



426.967 



38.972 



361.888 



1.143.671 



393,304 

1,913 

29,042 

404 

2,304 



3,311 

971 

33,066 

549 

1,075 



179,226 
49,642 

107,548 
8,192 
17,280 



742,185 
219,004 
123,424 
17,159 
41,899 



857 
7,017 
5,557 

789 



350 
2,740 
1,225 
14,063 



7,368 
11,975 

1,049 
33,523 



8,443 
12,348 
1,079 
1,147 



See footnotes at end of table. 



TABLE 13. IMMIC3RAT10N BY /COUNTRY, FOR DECADES i 
1820 - 1965 ■*' (Continued) 



Total 
146 years 
1820-1965 



All countries 

Europe 

Albania 12/ 

Austria 21 

Hungary 2/ 

Belgium 

Bulgaria Xj 

Czechoslovakia 22/ 

Denmark 

Estonia )2J 

Finland 12/ 

France 

Germany 2/ 

(England 

Great (Scotland 

Britain (Wales 

(Not specified 3/ 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 12/ 

Lithuania H/ 

Luxembourg 16/ 

Netherlands 

Norway 4/ 

Poland 5/ 

Portuga 1 

Rumania 13/ 

Spain 

Sweden 4/ 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe 

U. S.S.R. 6/ 

Yugoslavia H/ 

Other Europe 

Asia 12/ 

China 18/ 

India 

Japan 7/ 

Turkey in Asia 8/ 

Other Asia 



528.431 



348.289 



2,040 

3,563 

7,861 

4,817 

938 

14,393 

2,559 

506 

2,146 

12,623 

114,058 

21,756 

6,887 

735 

9,119 
13,167 
68,028 
1,192 
2,201 
565 
7,150 
4,740 
17,026 
3,329 
3,871 
3,258 
3,960 
5,512 
737 
1,356 
5,835 
2,361 



15.344 



4,928 
496 

1,948 
328 

7,644 



621.704 



;08.53^ ;03. 9 8 9 



24,860 

3,469 

12,189 

375 

8,347 

5,393 

212 

2,503 

38,809 

226,578 

112,252 

16,131 

3,209 

8,973 

26,967 

57,661 

361 

683 

820 

14,860 

10,100 

7,571 

7,423 

1,076 

2,898 

10,665 

10,547 

580 

548 

1,576 

3,983 



67,106) 

36,637) 

18,575 

104 

918 

10,984 

185 

4,925 

51,121 

477,765 

156,171 

32,854 

2,589 

3,884 

47,608 

57,332 

185,491 

352 

242 

684 

52,277 

22,935 

9,985 

19,588 

1,039 

7,894 

21,697 

17,675 

2,653 

584 

8,225 

8,155 



31.780 



147.453 



16,709 

1,761 

1,555 

218 

11,537 



9,657 
1,973 

46,250 
866 

88,707 



,114) 
397) 



^9.495 



900 

292 

4,490 

296 

13,517 



944) 

400) 

959 

37 

103 

957 

14 

505 

3,931 

21,477 

14,970 

2,915 

181 

130 

4,408 

5,118 

20,119 

52 

52 

56 

6,378 

1,839 

5,660 

3,622 

135 

3,353 

1,760 

1,793 

581 

130 

1,086 

312 



20.249 



1,356 

390 

4,054 

304 

14,145 



1,526) 

635) 

922 

36 

111 

1,070 

8 

358 

4,926 

24,727 

18,314 

4,139 

255 

159 

4,744 

5,746 

16,175 

48 

58 

52 

4,086 

1,934 

6,785 

2,911 

126 

2,969 

2,056 

1,952 

834 

119 

972 

304 



23.242 



1,605 

965 

4,147 

307 

16,218 



1,311) 

649) 

1,296 

261 

190 

970 

15 

495 

5,598 

24,494 

21,067 

4,408 

283 



6,055 

12,769 

40 

50 

60 

2,039 

2,145 

7,097 

2,006 

287 

4,069 

2,196 

2,119 

506 

163 

1,098 

326 



3,774 

331 

14,002 



10 
1,743) 
510) 
1,155 
29 
389 



14 

332 

5,573 

22,432 

19,443 

4,440 

252 

144 

3,016 

5,187 

10,874 

37 

59 

85 

2,353 

2,179 

7,093 

1,937 

434 

3,929 

2,413 

2,360 

396 

190 

1,051 

321 



35.105.902 



20.040 



1,611 
467 

3,294 

365 

14,303 



194,432 

66,732 

130,283 

356,389 

997 

29,185 

709,359 

6,845,239 

2,998,344 

802,248 

93,359 

798,321 

506,479 

4,704,251 

5,041,268 

2,166 

3,470 

2,372 

343,114 

848,191 

465,200 

297,363 

160,218 

196,972 

1,259,905 

333,823 

161,833 

3,345,351 

71,983 

49,747 



1.202.077 



416,695 
16,209 
345,155 
208,050 
215,968 



See footnotes at end of table. 



Countries 


1931-1940 


1941-1950 


1951-1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


Total 
146 years 




160.037 


354.804 


996.944 


139.580 


155.871 


169.966 


158.644 


171.019 


6.548.294 


Canada 8. Newfoundland 2/ •• 

Mexico 10/ 

West Indies 


108,527 
22,319 
15,502 
5,861 
7,803 
25 


171,718 
60,589 
49,725 
21,665 
21,831 
29,276 


377,952 
299,811 
123,091 
44,751 
91,628 
59,711 


47,470 
41,476 
20,520 

7,272 
19,095 

3,747 


44,272 
55,805 
20,917 

9,639 
22,550 

2,688 


50,509 
55,986 
22,951 
10,706 
27,759 
2,055 


51,114 
34,448 
24,067 
11,829 
34,891 
2,295 


50,035 
40,686 
31,141 
12,736 
33,757 
2,664 


3,798,798 

1,367,056 

739,383 

167 752 




372,813 
102,492 


Other America ^4/ 




1,750 

2,231 

780 


7,367 

13,805 

5,437 

142 


14,092 
11,506 
4,698 
12,493 


1,851 

1,556 

325 

5 


1,834 
1,427 

144 
249 


1,982 

1,642 

136 

226 


2,015 
1,767 

240 


1,949 

1,803 

155 

263 




Australia 8. New Zealand 


88,038 


Not specified il/ 


267,684 



Data for fiscal years ended June 30, except 1820 to 1831 inclusive and 1844 to 1849 inclusive fiscal 

years ended Sept. 30; 1833 to 1842 inclusive and 1851 to 1867 inclusive years ended Dec. 31; 

1832 covers 15 months ended Dec. 31'; 1843 nine months ended Sept. 30; 1850 fifteen months ended 

Dec. 31; and 1868 six months ended June 30. 
Data for Austria-Hungary were not reported until 1861. Austria and Hungary have been recorded 

separately since 1905. In the years 1938 to 1945 inclusive Austria was included with Germany. 
United Kingdom not specified. In the years 1901 to 1951, included in other Europe. 
From 1820 to 1868 the figures for Norway and Sweden were combined. 
Poland was recorded as a separate country from 1820 to 1898 and since 1920. Between 1899 and 1919 

Poland was included with Austria-Hungary, Germany, and Russia. 
Since 1931 the Russian Empire has been broken down into European U. S. S. R. and Siberia or Asiatic 

U. S. S.R. 
No record of immigration from Japan until 1861. 
No record of irrmigration from Turkey in Asia until 1869. 
Prior to 1920 Canada and Newfoundland were recorded as British North America. From 1820 to 1898 the 

figures include all British North American possessions. 

No record of immigration from Mexico from 1886 to 1893. 

11/ Bulgaria, Serbia, and Montenegro were first reported in 1899. Bulgaria has been reported separately 

since 1920 and in 1920 also a separate enumeration was made for the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and 

Slovenes. Since 1922 the Serb, Croat, and Slovene Kingdom has been recorded as Yugoslavia. 
12/ Countries added to the list since the beginning of VJorld War I are theretofore included with the 

countries to which they belonged. Figures are available since 1920 for Czechoslovakia and Finland 

and since 1924 for Albania, Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. 
No record of immigration from Rumania until 1880. 
Included with countries not specified prior to 1925. 
The figure 33,523 in column headed 1901-1910, includes 32,897 persons returning in 1906 to their 

homes in the United States. 
Figures for Luxembourg are available since 1925. 
12/ Beginning with the year 1952, Asia includes Philippines. From 1934 to 1951 the Philippines were 

included in the Pacific Islands. Prior to 1934 the Philippines were recorded in separate tables 

as insular travel. 
JLS/ Beginning in 1957 China includes Formosa. 



6/ 

2/ 
10/ 



15/ 

16/ 




I 2 -378 .153 

■409.396 
23,227 
ll,bl9 
22,587 



71,023 
197,261 
48,853 
23,4 

28^977 
13,530 
17,1 
20,850 
18,254 
9,345 
248,650 
26, ■ 



,238 



18,425 

5,1 

2,756 
13,0 



4,308 
38 , 390 
10,531 
2,261 
6,483 
39,789 
5,1 
2,548 
8,453 
1,396 
2,328 

1, 



21,582 
3,984 
8,723 



4,109 
1,520 
3,541 
1,373 



9,124 
19,061 
12,416 

2,533 
11,225 

1,537 

2,573 



10,383 
24,479 
3,711 



1,354 
2,224 
1,739 
1,046 
27,613 
2,114 
2,260 
2,025 



7,371 
16,251 
4,005 
2,484 
8,301 
2,694 
1,345 
1,528 
2,079 
1,783 
1, 



23,0 
23,061 
7,021 



30,990 
32,684 
8,2 



2,148 
1,696 
1,777 



30,377 
55,291 
16,254 



4,015 
26,8 
4,825 



25,916 
2,045 
2,560 
1,931 



129.705 
36,003 
55,253 
10,587 
10,683 
1,851 
1,880 
2,599 
1,754 
1,695 



1,391 
2,252 
2,173 



29,108 
1,802 
3,098 



Africa 

Algeria 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

United Arab Republi 
Other Africa 



Oceania 



Pacific Islands (U. 
Other Oceania 



10,191 
46,955 
22,620 
16,825 
8,218 



3,171 
6,986 
7,669 

11.916 
6,270 
2,496 
1,211 



1,973 
1,153 
5,733 



\j Includes Formosa 

2/ Includes Arab Palestine 



Ik O m 
O vC 

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TABLE 14B. HONG KONG CHINESE PAROLED INTO THE UNITED STATES 

BY SEX, TMRITAL STATUS, AGE, AND TMJOR OCCUPATION GROUP: 

JUNE 4, 1962 - JUNE 30, 1965 



Sex, marital status, 
age, and 
occupation 



Number 
admitted 



Number admitted , 

Sex: 

Males 

Fema les , 

fJlarital status: 

Single 

Married 

VV idowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Age: 

Under 5 years 

5-9 years 

10 - 19 years 

20 - 29 years 

30 - 39 years 

40 - 49 years 

50 - 59 years 

60 - 69 years 

70 - 79 years 

80 years and over 

Not reported 

Major occupation group: 

Professional, technical, and kindred workers 

Farmers and farm managers 

Managers, officials, and proprietors, except farm .. 

Clerical, sales, and kindred workers 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers 

Operatives and kindred workers 

Private household workers 

Service workers, except private household 

Farm laborers and foremen 

Laborers , except farm and mine 

Housewives, children, and others with no occupation 

Housewives 

Retired persons 

Students 

Children under 14 years of age 

Unknown or not reported 



13,619 



6,845 
6,774 



8,121 

4,891 

540 

48 

19 



1,898 

1,880 

2,888 

2,176 

2,117 

1,312 

740 

415 

160 

29 

4 



722 
28 
304 
618 
339 
476 
176 
228 
37 
124 
,766 



2,675 

50 

2,027 

5,014 

801 



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Brother or sister of U.S.C. ... 

Married child of U.S.C 

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Spouse of child of U.S.C 

Child of brother or sister 

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Child of son or daughter of 

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Nonpreference (Prior Refugee 
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-^ as 



Country or regio 



Belgium 

Czechoslovakia 

Germany 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Poland 

Portuga 1 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) .... 

United Kingdom 

U. S. S.R. (Europe and Asia) .. 

Other Europe 

China il 

Hong Kong 

India 

1 ndones la 

Jordan 2/ 

Lebanon 

Malaysia 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Other West Indies 

El Salvador 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Other Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Other South America 

Africa 

Algeria 

Nigeria '.'.''.'.'.'.''.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt). 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

New Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U.S. adm. ) . 
Other Oceania 

Other countries 

jy Includes Formosa. 

2/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



8,967 
2,976 
71,163 



6,300 
3,324 
9,81B 
2,686 
3,937 
14,872 



6,967 
4,320 
9,385 

41,150 

22,513 
8,744 

11,755 
2,695 
3,724 

12,772 
9,105 



3,336 
89,173 
4,429 



12,993 

648 

1,798 

1,785 



4,200 
2,834 
6,414 
25,5 
2,549 
4,324 
7,056 
2,162 
2,325 



4,093 
8,313 
2,3 



13,8 
3,901 
32,958 
88,010 
8,993 
5,933 
11,6- 
47,566 



17,208 
40,743 

3,5 

4,535 



78.1?6. 

10,783 
1,279 
8,601 
5,508 

13,071 
3,730 
5,207 

25,979 



543.906 
12,222 
9,278 
3,0 
15,935 
5,350 
37,617 
103,723 
11,253 
9,833 
13,374 



41,391 
11,551 
11,764 



13,: 

4^503 
117,972 
6,728 
5,913 
5,806 

86.903. 



5,373 
29,731 
1,056 



21,027 
49,938 
3,786 



3,0 

3,133 

2,914 



18,485 
5,564 
1,245 



15,311 

41,181 
109,520 
13,981 
13,396 
15,816 
61,494 
39,705 
11,893 
12,842 
4,672 



14, 

17,753 
3.695 
136,021 
5,864 
7,310 
5,683 

87 . 503 
9,221 
1,792 
9,312 
3,001 
3,426 
1,168 



9,102 
3,832 
18,070 
60,361 



89.786 
17,242 " 

1,293 
12,450 

6,012 
13,906 

3,231 

6,489 
24,184 

4,979 



3,643 

3,6 

4,233 



1,476 
1,183 
4,354 
4,378 



25,643 
8,688 
3,528 
1,281 



136,4 
16,759 
10,527 
18,916 
74,366 
43,421 
14,552 
15,451 
9,557 
5,094 
23,927 
20,573 



10,067 
49,212 
2,139 



20,296 

2,947 
15,682 

9,772 
37,553 

9,216 
19,269 
29,126 

7,788 



1,345 
5,135 
5,197 
7,383 



29,888 
9,410 
3,833 
1,644 



27.113 
1,601 
2,155 
1,591 
6,570 
6,443 
8,753 



55.866 



Sec. 10l(a)(l5)(B) 



the Immlgrdtion i 



All countries 

Belgium 

Czechoslovakia 

Finland 

Germa ny 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Poland 

Portuga 1 

sp™" ..;;;;!;;;!!;■.;!!";!!; 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) .... 

United Kingdom 

U. S. S. R. (Europe and Asia) .. 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

China 1/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iraq 

Israel 

Japan 

Jordan 2/ 

Korea 

Ubanon 

Malaysia 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Other West Indies 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Other Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Bolivia '.'.'..'.'.'.. 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Algeria 

Morocco 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania '.' 1 .' 

Australia 

New Zea land 

Pacific Islands (U.S. adm. ) . 
Other Oceania 

Other countries 



471.969 537.760 



■ 021 



■148.982 



90,379 
73,021 
27,526 
98,338 
36,867 
315,815 
759,310 
75,007 
73,175 
77,671 
411,169 



28,912 
33,574 

119,405 

110,587 

127, 
28,438 

945,911 
34,667 
47,648 
45,550 



14,251 

5,916 

42,024 

167,235 



212,184 
1,703,542 

321,682 

166,377 
28,993 
91,861 

400,867 
34,639 



26,008 
30,774 
37,418 



5,940 
7,549 
1,965 



157,267 
49,582 
14,793 
5,042 



2,115 
19,429 
43,223 
3,750 
3,154 
4,739 
29,509 
16,708 
4,576 
9,862 



7,676 
2,100 
48,905 
3,053 



5,396 
28,837 
20,167 



24,119 
5,293 
9,877 
1,762 



2,790 
71,100 
3,140 
3,770 



5,945 
9,507 
2,259 



11,233 
11,230 
13,303 
2,320 



,761 
8,263 
2,362 
11,364 
4,671 
36,104 
86,545 



11,031 
3,143 
3,254 
11,369 
11,392 
15,072 
3,280 
106,284 



?4?.904 



8,841 
2,422 
11,888 



7,138 
48,501 
32,185 



12,369 
14,216 
15,545 
3,151 



11,068 
9,900 
3,859 

11,442 
4,757 

47,518 
102,666 

10,437 
9,307 

53,327 



3,268 

143,172 

3,816 



52,842 
2,621 
2,148 
3,448 

20,308 
1,945 
2,953 
5,057 
1,472 



671 
4,234 
2,113 
7,173 
1,615 
2,656 
10,707 
1,130 

J.M6 



13,194 
95,569 
55,765 
3,092 
1,922 
3,905 
20,986 



5,882 
1,582 
1,684 



1,587 
3,118 
10,390 
1,287 



1,992 
3,976 
23,455 
2,206 



47.651 
6,847 
1,070 
7,546 
3,595 
8,125 
1,861 
3,350 

13,883 
1,374 

4.487 



17,024 

123,223 

56,655 

3,409 



52.281 
7,758 
1,279 
5,465 
3,997 
8,510 
2,414 
3,648 

17,579 
1,631 



2,820 
2,568 
6,841 
33,746 



9,492 
1,370 
6,565 
5,197 



978 


1,360 


4,112 


4,552 


1,214 


1,238 




627 


4,217 


4,971 


18,157 


19,745 



167,062 
30,633 
6,940 
2,314 
7,841 
40,491 
2,347 
3,297 



2,664 
2,162 
1,404 



20,901 
185,892 
10,681 



18,327 
6,192 
1,361 



1,490 


1,604 


4,501 


5,605 


1,534 


1,868 


2,3IC 


2,514 


631 


918 


5.765 


7,067 




33,479 


692 


799 


964 


1,262 


2,599 


2,978 


1,082 


1,336 


7,410 


8,989 



25,208 
217,' 

3,276 
45,584 

2,799 
12,895 



3,370 
4,149 
5,716 
1,801 
2,779 

89. 763 
11,610 
2,376 
10,575 



19,366 
6,251 
2,470 



49,154 
4,399 
16,829 
61,992 



I 


n.ular trav 


alien. 


and retur 




nti. atud 


ntt •- 


rt other! 


entering »ltho 


Jt OOCU- 


tnt.^/ 










Country or raglon 


llu.ber 


Hi 


III 


k 


li 


li 

ii 

n 


1 


1° 

iii 


li 

s 

V 


1 


..1 

III 


li 


i 


f!| 




All countrl.. 




;S.544 


175.500 


1.323.479 


142.686 


7rW 


50.435 


4.032 


14.026 


67,869 


^.^81 


768 


9 991 


203 235 




turop. 


B92.680 


13.267 


108.616 


542.425 


75.276 


3.542 


6.329 


446 


5.765 


7.511 


1.803 


11.306 


3.611 


110.826 






61.618 
15B.711 

lo!702 
23,198 
88.111 

161427 

ll!722 
6.082 

23ia97 
27,366 

2381560 
6.490 


50 
1,813 

1,347 

93 
582 

503 
210 

■392 

3,713 
540 

133 


1,864 
3.044 

■511 
12,002 

'eo5 

644 
1,436 
7,209 

1)379 

705 

4)500 
4,455 

34,526 

'495 
619 


10)80( 

45)22( 

lo)e24 

8.362 

57)051 

6)413 
13.399 

13)946 

3)423 

140,663 

3.306 

5)071 


355 
520 

'217 
11,822 

5)264 

585 
11.763 

4)615 
486 

3.237 
343 

3.933 
594 

18.602 


6! 

24 
318 

109 
33 
34 

30 
717 

90 


105 

128 
76 

259 

90 
297 

329 

1,167 

90 


10 

16 

5 
15 

52 

84 


95 

92 
907 

75 
371 

291 

1,217 
104 


273 
76 

126 
290 

821 

15 
■397 


28 
32 

23 
57 


420 
349 

56 
628 

28 
375 

440 

1,810 
30 


^ 5i 
84 

135 
10 

20 

104 
87 


2.01! 

6,510 
25,479 
1,631 
485 
8,773 
8,773 
5,423 

l)jl; 

3)73; 

18( 
786 






69 


ctach^ilovikis 
















908 


Or™"' 








u.i'.Z ;■ 




lt.ly 

N.th.rUitd> 


35 




Portugal 


24 




12 








Turkey ( Europo and Aila) 


175 


U.S.S.«. (Europ. .nd A<1.) .... 






A.1. 




ChlM 2/ 


3,448 
15,554 
3,560 
5,954 

55)662 

4)717 
5.054 
1.892 

20,264 

755 

1.845 

1 1 , 347 


323 
697 

356 
1,399 

78 

74 

27 


'4I6 

708 
20,193 

573 

1,447 
42 
126 


5,679 
1,880 
5.021 
1.889 
2.707 
834 
7,693 

'889 
1,153 
3,222 

11)113 
216 


2.637 
615 
788 
186 

31 
186 

■315 
314 
476 

1,131 
189 


50 
25 

3,200 

3 

160 
48 


2.696 
2.558 

"231 

"162 

27 
1.332 


58 
11 

61 


15 
51 

34 

27 
182 

427 


12 

5 
169 

48 


292 

3 
14 


2,073 
312 

1,840 

171 

1,634 


86 

1,182 
26 

28 
22 

202 


540 

563 
145 

3)181 

25« 

1,427 

58 
350 


' 


i„;f. "'.:::::::::;:::;::::::: 


4 






Iraq 










' 




4 








Phl'l' In • 


' 










Other"*.!* '*" 


" 








9J:"6 

355,137 

52)638 
8,090 

105)939 
8,575 

14)919 

9)060 
9,274 
2,841 


t;i6i 
349 

209 
150 


8,315 

389 
1,066 

1.334 

4.660 

249 
410 

364 
407 


317)808 
3,299 

18)882 

"'4" 
7)659 

6)l5l 


6,486 

'231 

89 3 

972 

14.571 

495 
132 




5)904 

1,047 

1.002 

2,099 

326 

422 

383 
402 
801 
115 
85 


■|57 


292 

93 

124 

51 
76 


3)653 

12 
9,911 

1 


43 
185 


655 

24 
108 

323 
123 

23 


270 

3 
29 

"1 


8,383 
8,239 

1)050 
1.514 
2.548 
664 
1.105 

'953 
1,432 
739 
158 
236 


15 

27 








32 


Halt"'"" *'"*'"° 


































Other C.ntr.l Amric. 


3 


South A-erlc. 






28,223 
3,343 
19.472 
12.369 
35.729 
9.672 

35)985 
10.093 


187 

1,000 

513 

395 
■330 


1.920 
175 

1,213 

1,015 


19.753 

8)763 
27.863 

26)879 
6.031 


672 
388 

380 
793 
343 
958 
2.185 
1,652 


68 

19 

2 


29, 

171 
1,090 

1,586 
304 


36 
42 
78 

13 
258 
25 


511 
412 

278 


50 

104 
38 
14 

57 
29 


3 
8 


639 
174 

■510 
593 

518 
342 


195 

165 
147 

153 

67 


3,069 

1.495 

3,070 

979 

1.096 

■386 










: 














Peru 


" 














Algeria 


2)155 

6)570 
6,443 
8.753 


32 
130 

265 
1,119 


200 
191 

1,417 
79 3 


3.584 
3.776 
2,708 


57 
70 
78 

313 
350 


1 


12 
31 
302 

670 


1 

93 

64 


45 
41 
101 

185 
726 


13 
17 

34 
38 


3 
13 


113 
376 

333 

1,834 


50 

183 
214 


It 

i 

184 


' 










United Arab tepubUc (Egypt) .. 
Other Africa 


2 








5)o4e 

2.588 
20,086 


i,877 


5)370 

86 
59 


20)755 
7.813 
3.733 
1.253 


5)761 

1,842 

275 


1 


2.3 

70 


■il7 
21 




135 
36 

5 




152 
137 


91 


862 
249 

80 

19,808 








Pacific lalanda lU. S. ad>.) .. 
Other Oceania 


■ 







agricultural laborer*. 



TEHrOKAItY UOKKEKS ACHITTEO UNDER SECTION lOUa 

imiCKATION AND NATIONALITY ACT. BV COUHTIIY: 

YEAHS ENDED JUNE 30, l?** AND 1965 







965 


19 


64 














Workers of 






Country or r.glon 




Distinguished 
Kent and 
Ability 


Other 






Distinguished 
IH (D) 


Other 


TralnM^ 
(HdlD) 


of La.t P.r^nenC 
ItMKI.nct 


Total 


Te.porary 
(H(ll)) 


Trainees 


Total 


Te.por.ry 
Workers 




.&um 




5^,654 


2.920 


60.470 








Europe 


4.278 










1.247 


1.680 


















32 


Bclglo. 


47 


14 


2 


31 


65 


14 


2 




Cttcho.lov.kU 


2M 


241 


2 


1 


30 


26 


2 


2 


Donurk 


60 


34 
















11 


6 


- 


5 


14 


1 


3 


10 


Fran" 


637 


297 






719 








Gcmany 


755 


451 


28 






159 


124 


343 


Grenca 




56 




13 


90 








HunR.ry 


43 


39 


4 


- 


30 


30 








277 




13 






32 


25 


33 


l"i*" 


381 


243 




98 


646 








N.th.rl.nd. 


257 


165 


1 


91 


379 


195 


14 


170 
23 


Poland 


209 


194 


13 


2 


121 


94 


24 




Portugal 


« 


4 


2 


2 


13 


1 


6 


6 




5 


5 






1 


1 






Sp"n 










679 


178 


486 






107 


44 


6 


57 


86 


25 


9 


52 


S»ltr.rland 


















Turkey (Europe and A.la) 


8 


2 


2 


4 


21 




4 


17 


United Klngdoa 


1,753 


1.351 


99 


303 


1,380 


881 


203 


296 


USSR (Europe and A.la) 


















Yugoslavia 


116 


112 


2 


2 


57 


22 


30 


5 


Other Europe 


'3 


' 


' 


5 


84 


60 


3 


" 


A 


1.550 


775 




593 










'chln. i,/ 


51 








52 








Hong Kong 


21 


12 


1 


8 


14 


1 


5 


8 


India 


157 


57 


3 




265 


50 




215 




















Iran 
Iraq 
larael 


10 


ul 


70 


J 


10 


j 


76 


,« 


Japan 


772 


367 


73 


332 


969 


225 


350 


394 


Jordan i/ 


















Korea 


120 

5 


92 


I 


23 

5 


15 


22 


" 


^l 


Malayata 












1 


- 


2 


PhlUppln.a 






24 




160 


89 


25 




Ryukyu I.land. 




- 




4 


61 


55 


- 


6 


Syrian Arab Republic 










12 


12 






Other Aala 


31 


10 


5 


16 


43 


5 


2 


36 


North Africa 


59.082 


3.005 


55.377 


720_ 




Uiai 




fiil_ 




27,710 


2.013 


25.119 


578 




1.836 


24.684 


762 


Healco 


3,722 








l|o4S 


736 


249 


63 


Cuba 


] 


2 


1 




5 


2 


3 


- 


Doalnlcan Republic 


69 


68 




1 


52 


46 


4 


2 


Haiti 










12 




11 


1 


Jaaalca 


9,904 


30 


9.858 




6.738 




6.725 




Other Heat Indlea 


17,610 


37 




7 


16.908 


31 


16,864 


13 


Coata Rica 






1 






2 


- 


6 


El Salvador 


1 
















Cuateula 


5 


[ 


\ 


I 


3 


- 


: 


3 


Klcaragua 


17 


15 




2 




19 


- 


4 




23 










18 






Other Central Aaerlca 


















Other North Ai^rlca 


4 


1 


2 


1 


8 


3 


3 


2 


South Aaarlca 




133 


49 


96 


319 


147 


76 


96 


Argentina 


35 










35 


26 


15 


Bolivia 


1 


















to& 


45 


24 


35 


48 


11 


10 


27 


Chile 




7 




23 


28 


3 






Colo.bl. 


11 












1 


18 


Icuedor 








2 


1 


- 


1 




Peru 








3 


15 






7 




69 


56 


1 






86 


2 


8 


Other South A«rlca 






18 


1 


26 


1 


22 


' 


Afrlc 






11 


49 


101 


25 


34 


42 


Alg^l. 








2 




11 


2 




Nlgerle 


I 


_ 


_ 


I 


4 


1 




3 


South Africa 


32 












29 


19 


United Arab Republic (Egypt) 




5 


. 


11 


12 


2 




10 


Other Africa 


16 




' 


8 


" 


' 


3 


8 


Oc 




92 


7 






71 


14 


«7 . 


lllatralle 


no 


73 


5 








9 


52 


New Zealand 


23 






5 




5 






Eaclflc lalanda (U S Ad. ) 
















2 


Other Oceania 


5 


3 


- 


2 


2 


- 


2 


- 


Other countries 








- 


' 


- 


1 





.a.ul.r t 


a.ell.r.. 


end returning r 


ealdents. 


tudente 


and 


ther. . 


nterln, without docu 


»ents. 
































i 




= 






































































Country or region 






I 







il 




1° 


is 


?2, 


S ci 




•0.. " 






of last p.m.nent 


ed^"ttL 


« - 


iZ . 


tZ „ 






, 




"1 


t 


IH 


.. 


i° " 


?„ 


• 




























« £ S 


























Ul 
















i.t^ 


It: s 


1 s 


%- 


■s 


fSi 




• 00 


J5 


ii i 


E -S c 








I \% 


J^J 


Jfl 




11 


s 


lis' 


II 


«? = 


K\ 


J; 


Ii i 


m 


il 


,„ „„„„„. 


2.075.967 


39.544 


175.500 


1.323.479 


142 686 


7.639 


50.435 


4.032 


14 026 


67.869 


2. 681 


33.768 


9.991 


203.215 


2.082 


Europe 


SJI7.7SP 


12.f53 


101,142 


J75.5i(. 


55.816 


3.470 


4.661 


Ki 


5.782 


6.748 


1.769 




3.482 


3.154 


1.918 


AuatrK 








5,171 




22 


52 


















Bolglu. 


ii;a76 


175 


3,115 




402 






10 


168 


47 


30 


289 


83 


22 


74 


Crecho.lov.kl. 








2)652 
















11 








Denmark 




























37 




Flnl.nd 


(.1919 


47 


'477 


3)622 


127 


22 


79 


9 


85 


11 


22 


349 


107 




. 










































65,274 






563 






755 






488 






Greece 


10. n(. 




'615 




3)900 


17 




14 


80 




11 


'243 




76 


8 


Ire?^!^ 


(..878 
11. 964 


68 


1.^44 


9)646 


32 3 


43 


62 


1 


65 


277 


10 


134 


,5 


58 




Italy 


(.1,550 


574 


6^726 


26,790 






356 


12 


354 




116 


679 


186 


206 


39 


Ketherland. 
































fcr»ay 




297 


1,522 


5,038 


4)606 


















15 






3.899 


368 








2 


32 




85 


209 


9 




19 














2)699 






























65 


























Spain 


16,052 


1,624 




7.597 


2.506 




207 






801 












S.eden 






4,567 






. 




5 


150 




104 


689 




33 










4,821 


13)559 


494 


404 






162 




30 


47 3 








Turkey (Burop. and «.la) 


3,411 




408 


1,433 


50 


22 




















United Klngdo. 


198.900 


3.794 


34,544 


135,254 




742 


935 


55 


1,185 


1,753 


558 


1.873 


1.040 


905 


161 


USSR (Europe and Aala) 




















353 












Yugo.la.la 
























207 


82 


24 




Other Europe 


3.403 


87 


502 


2,279 


194 




66 


10 


70 


13 


2 






" 


- 


*ala 


138.174 


8.790 


28.417 


55.849 


9.179 


3.854 


12.652 


1.114 


1.737 


1.550 


441 


10.810 


3.287 


'.fll 


,3 


China V 


5,514 


475 


265 




786 






110 








-^Wo 


^it 




. 


Hong Kong 


6,095 








1.821 


4 


'e95 




41 


21 


9 




26 


6 




India 
Indoneala 


'!:66i 


561 


'"m 


Wl 


505 


" 


■ 72 


352 


338 


157 


'] 


''ITl 


645 
59 


5 






'■974 


667 


315 


'■374' 


U 


'' 


1.180 


60 


26 


'° 


^_ 


'99 








Israel 


16.658 




1,418 


12,309 


210 


261 


562 


154 


80 


213 


30 


353 




13 




Japan 


51,704 


1.390 






















1,189 






Jordan J/ 
































Korea 






330 


1,016 




60 




102 


38 


120 


39 


595 


128 








2)925 


70 






192 




293 










107 




8 




































Philippine. 


17,105 


903 


1,493 


9,294 




150 


773 




















623 








'l62 






2 


1 


4 


- 


'18I 


7 


12 




Syrian Arab d.publlc 
































Other A.la 


9,939 


2.667 


859 


2,275 


208 


48 


1.298 


39 


419 


31 


9 


1,653 


205 


28 




No th Aae Ic 


1.073.275 


7.029 


24.266 


696.510 


52.781 


170 


25.760 


1.745 


2.196 


59.082 


284 


3.268 


989 


199.055 


140 


Canada" 


230.087 






163,472 


18.590 
























373,790 


3)615 




340,789 


8.053 






'153 












344 




Cuba 


965 






353 










169 
















40,486 


275 


1,321 




1,236 


4 


1.075 


13 


138 


69 


8 


83 


5 


255 






































46.664 


234 




20.095 


13.425 


18 




51 


159 


9,904 












Other Ueit Indies 






5)872 


82.841 






2,170 


57 




17,610 


4 


171 




139 




Cost. «lca 








6,554 
























El Salvador 




175 






236 




436 




136 
















141542 




490 


12)113 




2 


501 


17 




5 


1 


336 


61 


42 












5,371 
















124 


5 






Hicaragua 


7,592 


























20 




Fan.« 


9.096 






6)754 


511 




800 


21 




23 














3.029 


55 


104 












7 






16 


8 


7 


12 


Other North* A..rlca ' 


199.091 


95 


74 


842 


58 


49 


25 


2 


139 


'• 


3 


13 


3 


197.711 


7' 


So th A«e i 


193 790 


5 815 


lfl.967 


15QJ75 


1U89 


117 


5 027 


^j2 


2.889 


278 


96 


4.837 


1.124 


346 


j_ 


Argentina 


29,189 


1.073 


2,389 


23.164 


778 




313 


42 






ii 


657 








BoU.i. 


3,232 




264 




442 




106 


4 


113 


1 




176 


20 


55 




Bra.il 


ll!e72 


■512 


'650 


'iB 


1,362 

407 


3 


324 
176 


35 
39 


^49 


31 


" 


''520 


lU 


19 




Cololbla 








29.724 


1,075 


33 


1,110 


79 


442 


11 


8 


586 


147 


42 




Ecuador 




390 






396 














326 








Peru 


26,540 




69 3 


22,407 


1,378 




507 












83 






Venetuela 




1,396 




36,307 




2 


1,880 


275 


240 


69 


6 


569 


163 


81 




Other South Aiaerice 


9,192 


325 


628 


5,834 


1,364 




312 


25 


267 


19 


2 


334 


72 


10 




Af 


19 990 


1 882 




7.936 


574 


16 


1.319 


213 


1.089 


72 


22 


2.921 


549 






Algeria 
Horocco 


1,080 


116 


136 


113 










39 
30 






102 


3 














363 


56 




286 










376 


52 






SiSIh'lfrio. 






1,654 










45 






6 


271 


98 






United Arab Kepublle (Egypt) 


2il62 


213 




'630 


lie 


6 


170 




154 


16 




305 


184 


3 




Other Africa 


b!656 


1,113 


982 


2.764 


249 


6 


656 


58 


734 


16 


1^ 


1.811 


211 


43 








171 


365 






^^ 


1.016 


135 


326 


139 




804 


560 


120 




Australia 


— S 


1,925 


6,057 


23.750 




To 


~^^ 


-Tit 


244 




46 


490 














1,158 


8.226 


2)503 




62 


13 




23 




152 


95 


28 




Pacific Islands (US ad. I 


4)756 






3.738 






597 


















Other Oceania 


3,000 


12 


54 


1,542 


1,141 


' 


78 


6 








138 


18 


■" 




Othar countries 


87 


4 




39 




\ 












2 


: 


" 





li-147— 66 O- 



Port 


Number 


Je^orary^^ 


Temporary 


nonlrt"ants 


^jj ^^^^ 












1.225.74B 




701.562 


399.247 




2l!769 
32,405 
1,049 
1,377 
9,615 
225,877 

80e',776 
2,255 
3,402 
8,529 
81,097 
7,228 
15,428 
2,671 


2,725 
2,961 

51 
94 
6,444 
130 
108,499 
48 
557 

212 


10,969 

19,173 

882 

850 

4,167 

166,549 

432,177 
719 
1,740 
7,035 
48,714 
3,494 
2,357 
1,454 




Baltimore, Hd 


8,OT5 


Charlotte Amalle, V. I 

Chrlstiansted, V. I 

Cruz Bay, V. I 

Frederlksted, V. I 


10,271 

161 

476 

5,354 


Newark, N. J 

New York, N. Y 


2,247 
268,100 




1,105 
1,391 

3^048 


Phi ladelphia , Pa. 


San Juan, P. R 

Washington, D. C 












lolsu 

22,458 

19,526 

1,599 

705 

2?9.19I 


"596 
784 
786 

28.628 


7:781 
15,428 
15,238 

1,282 
587 

116.419 


2,435 




San Antonio, Tex 


3,502 
291 




Oth'^'culf 




84.144 




9,339 
106,363 
78,867 

u!255 

19,614 

313 


342 
17,159 
4,114 
29 
2,165 
4,801 
18 


4,265 
52,044 
45,019 

5I937 

6,713 

199 


4,732 
37,160 


Agana • '^'^m 






1,169 






8,100 










5,719 
209 


322 
16 


1,401 
125 




0th ^Ala ka 








16,293 
38,745 
2,765 
28,354 
38,105 
1,603 
1,117 

7^140 
3,144 
7,816 

23^358 
1,018 
1,460 
2,476 
2,714 
1,006 
1,452 
7,281 
6,588 
2,962 
3,890 
2,414 
1,921 
1,661 
5,263 
1,357 

15,612 


315 
436 
29 
202 
6,287 
339 
11 
1,548 

93 
27 

11 

29 

229 

6 

29 
7 

39 
174 
128 

44 

12 

38 
43 
12 
663 


13,925 
34,038 
1,736 
26,546 
18,547 

25,956 

19 

5,215 

410 

7,359 

435 

1,790 

22,407 

918 

1,041 

1,478 

'798 
597 
5,824 
5,224 
2,271 

l!745 
759 
4,402 
1,218 
9,307 


4^271 


Buffalo, N. Y 


Champlaln, N. Y 


1,506 
13,271 
405 
359 
6,472 
5,445 








Fort°Kent Me 






2,7Cf7 
378 


Lexiston, N. Y 


Ma''^"^a NY ' 


213 
722 
94 
410 


Niagara Falls, N. Y 

North Troy, Vt 




No "'ninn 


Oodensbura NY 


436 


teovillo Wash 




Pembina, N. D 


715 


Rouses Point, N. Y 


1,236 








^'553 




153 




818 
127 


Thousand Island Bridge, N. Y 








16,821 
29,016 
3,890 
8,942 

U;321 
86,942 
17,870 
3,489 
1,485 
64,076 

sIllB 

168 


•M ■ 

204 

369 

63 

2,383 

1,389 

1,401 

334 

175 

14 

438 

26 

102 


15,332 
25,533 
3,176 
8,564 

9!720 
83,427 
16,475 

3,250 

5l!991 
117 


3,179 
345 
315 

2,984 
212 

2,114 

1,061 
54 

1,647 
469 
187 

51 












Uredo°'T "" 


Noaales Ariz 

















c. 101 (a)(l5)(B) of 



U. S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) , 

Yugoslavia , 

Other Europe 



Philippines 

Ryuky\i Islands 

Syrian Arab Republic 
Other Asia 



Other West In 
Costa Rica .. 
El Salvador • 
Guatemala ... 
Honduras .... 

Other Central 



Other South Amerli 

frlca 

Algeria 



South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 



Pacific Islan 
Other Oceania 



7;.495 ?7.42^ 



1,018 
5,491 
19,956 



2,901 
2,979 
5,158 



Aliens ad.itte 


d under 


Sec. 101 


(a) (15) (B) 


f the Immigration and Natl 


onallty AcV 














Country of Ust Permanent Residence 


TOfA. 


1. 




|l 


lu 


jP 


|i 


8 


i 


1. 


|l 


1 
1^ 


hh 


1^ 

53 


n 




93.569 


46.798 


18.649 


8.074 


4.126 


.:.502 


2.957 


n^l 


873 


,;.a56 


571 


526 


330 


270 


?M 


4.917 „ 






































5ia 

722 
106 

23: 

9!862 

'l57 

342 

6,232 

2,857 

1,504 

148 

82 

15 

825 

1,500 

1,211 

174 

14,000 

382 
175 

5.725 


464 
610 
87 

191 

3,715 

7,961 

875 

157 

314 

4,978 

2,440 

134 

5 

651 

1,265 

1,030 

9,648 
18 
359 
83 

3.474 


14 

341 
58 


3 
5 
31 

31 

5 
1 
1 

48 
892 

768 


1 
28 
19 

712 

39 

2 

10 
1,025 

1 


57 
2 

42 
16 


31 
51 

95 

17 

a 

1 

27 
8 

20 
3 

81 

157 


26 

a 

103 
99 


18 

46 
49 

111 

52 


26 

12 

7 

37 
2 

41 


176 

•36 


2 
5 
16 

3 
12 

30 

7 
15 

21 
16 

11 
23 


154 
30 


5 
11 

5 
12 


3 

81 
32 






40 


Belgium..... 






51 


F^"T^ d 






61 


^""^^ 






179 


^'■°^" 








J"" 


68 


Netherlands 


137 
407 


p"'"^^ 








Portugal 








^f *'" 


94 






bv.lt zerland \".' \") 


21 


U "^ted Klnodom " ' 












Other Europe 


21 




226 
177 

89 

16 

3,228 

1,092 

10 

70 
103 
464 

122 


57 

16 

2,863 

45 

5 

67 
55 

6-1 

37 


; 


107 
17 

1 

l-J 
238 

5 


2 
3 


37 

25 
4U.I 

8 
35 

3 


153 

1 

1 


5 
6 

1 

- 
1 
56 

22 


36 


30 


- 

5 


2 

1 

2 
1 

79 


i 

2 


9 


13 




ys'r."?.:::::::::;:::::::::::::::::: 


6 


Indonesia 






4 






:"^ ■ 


98 


Japan 

Jordan 2/ 


61 






Philippines 


87 






Other As ia 






6,3r6 
2,388 

)17 

374 

'l37 

^i 

251 

122 

9 


1,053 

5 

32 
247 

25 
72 

^3^ 
100 
59 


17,952 


1,7/8 


951 
69 

:,'0 

28 

: 


10 
1 
10 


27 
B 
33 


1" 


- 


905 

2 


8 


53 

10 

5 




; 


U 




'^"l'" 


292 


Cuba 


10 








Other^le-t'lndie 


97 






eT al ad* 


' 


Guatemala ' 




lircfragua'::::::::::::::::::::::::;::: 


51 


Othcr^Cent a'l' Ame' 1 












509 
28 
438 
268 
554 
101 
565 
1,266 
147 


173 
26 
210 
100 
343 
52 
101 
236 
47 


25 


■ 7 
3 

2 


3 
598 


2 
10 

7 
11 


116 

64 
119 

29 
417 
108 

33 


:" 


14 
2 

2 
5 


121 
19 
11 
10 




2 

44 

2 
2 


! 


13 
15 

2 


6 


72 






12 
46 








\ 






15 






^f^j^^ 




Algeria 


9 
87 

31 
135 

7.724 


9 

2 
241 

98 

1.129 


31 


19 

6 

4.323 


2 
440 


10 
526 


10 
16 


542 


13 


2 




1 


2 


15 


123 


- 




l 






United Arab Republic (Egypt) 

Other Africa 






516 




'314 

104 


259 
11 

5 




3,090 
1,164 

67 


67 


418 
89 


....... 


-418 
120 


11 


" 


' 


1 


21 
12 


11 


71 

52 


128 




74 






Other countries 


' 




" 



Last Permanent Residence 



m 



All countries 

Europ« 

Belgium 

Czechoslovakia .. 

Finland 

France 

Greece 

Ireli 
Ital) 
Nethf 

Poland 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China i/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indones la 

Iran 

ja^n .::::::::::;:::::::::::::::::: 

Jordan Z/ 

Malaysia 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Other Asia 

North America 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Jamaica 

Other West Indies 

Costa Rica 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Panama 

Other Centra 1 America 

Other North America 

South America 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Other South America 

Algeria 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 

Other Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

Pacific Islands (U.S. adm. )'.'.'. .'.'.'.'. 
Other Oceania 

Other countries 

1/ Includes Formosa. 2/ Includes 



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1 > 


»H 








c a-r- 




5 3 




J T 








H 1 


I c 


: a> 




1 .5 -^^ 


•i 




a> 


E 


" § 




o •*-> < 


H 














J c 


= 5 


i 5 








•^ 


f 


> o 


















^ ' 


i> 1 




': a. 0, 




: </) 


ij 


1 


1 M 




t J in »■ 




*; 


I 


1 1 




H 1 


-1 1 


-1 1 




9 (1) 


J 






o 








^ 




i c. 




a D 


] 


] (1 


1 1- 


> z 


a 


' "^ i[ 


L 


) D 


9 












T 




















1 


















a 

< 




















s 












1 



^ach entry of the same person counted seperatelv.7 



State and port 



/ill nep onscro 



All persons cross 



All ports 1/ 

;ahadian border . . . 



Anchorage 

Eagle 

Fairbanks 



Ketchikan 
Northway 
Skagway . 






Bangor 

Bridgewater 

Calais 

Ferry Point 

Mllltown Bridge 

Coburn Core 

Daaquam 

Easton 

Eastport 

Estcourt 

Forest City 

Fort Fairfield 

Fort Kent 

Hamlin 

Houlton 

Jackman 

Limestone 

Lubec y 

Madawaska u 

Mar^ Hill-Knoxfoid Line . 

Montlcello 

Orient 

St. Aurelie 

St. Juste 

St. Pamphile 

Van Buren 

Vanceboro 

Michigan 

Algona c 

Alpena 

Amherstburg 

Cheboygan 

Detour 

Detroit 

Ambassador Bridge 

Detroit and Canada 
Tunnel 

Detroit City Airport .. 

Detroit Metropolitan 
Airport 

Detroit River and 
River Rouge Terminal. 

Kean's Detroit Yacht 
Harbor 

Michigan Central Depot. 

Ecorse 

Grosse He 

Houghton 

Isle Royale 

Jefferson Beach Marina .. 

Mackinac Island 

Marine City 

Marquette 

Marysville 

Port Huron M 

Black River 



174 
1,813 
34,049 
6,929 
2,401 
4,099 
1.207 
923 
68,147 



56,832 
149,817 
,456.399 



2,082,118 
374,281 
110,548 
24,560 
27,327 
18,879 
22,540 
16,422 
484,529 
930,906 
269,323 
455,870 
282,229 
154,684 
315,068 
2,702,912 
5,998 
8,076 
39,468 
21,477 
31,340 
21,483 
1,039,416 
349,103 



5,357 
42,676 
2,971 
3,942 



2,377 
2,736,706 

4 456 



1,975 
3,215 
1,197 



28,92E 
97,551 
1. 5 5 4, 



1,299,337 
255,269 
80,933 
22,340 
17,904 
12,815 
18,701 
11,488 
300,694 
564,777 
197,469 
292,199 
158,654 
85,247 
191,739 
1,698 
3 

5,735 
28,171 
20,464 
29,479 
19,654 
634,170 
238,200 

^.?19.M6 



27,904 
52,266 
901.793 



782,781 
il9,012 
29,615 
2,220 
9,423 
6,064 



183,835 

366,129 

71,854 

163,671 

123,575 

69,437 

123,329 

1,004,443 

2,098 

2,341 

11,297 

1,013 

1,861 

1,829 

405,246 

110,903 

7.351.541 



1,768 

27,052 

589 



1,618 

.226^943 

1,945 



Michigan (Cont'd) 
Port Huron (Cont'd) 

Blue Water Bridge 

Canadian National 

Railway Station 

Roberts Landing 

Rogers City 

St. Clair 

St. Clair County Airport 
Sault Ste. Marie 

Minnesota 

Baudette 

Crane Uke 

Duluth 

Ely 

Grand Portage 

Indus 

International Falls 21 .. 

Noyes 

Oak Island 

Pine Creek 

Ranler 

Roseau 

St. Paul 

Warroad 

Montana 

Chief Mountain 3/ 

Cut Bank (Airport) 

Del Bonita 

Great ^alls (Airport) ... 
Havre^ 

Opheira 

Piegan 

Rdynond 

Sweetgrass 

Trail Creek 

Turner 

Whitetail 

Whitlash 

Wild Horse V .^ 

Willow Creek 5/ 

New Hampshire 

Pittsburg 

New York , 

Alexandria Bay , 

Black Rock 

Buffalo 

Buffalo Seaport 

Greater Buffalo Inter- 
national Airport ...., 

Peace Bridge 

Cannons Comers 

Cape Vincent 

Champlain 

Chateaugay , 

Churubusco 

Clayton 

Fort Covington , 

Heart Island sJ 

Hogansburg 

Jamison's Line 

Lewiston 2/ 

Massena 

Morristown 

Niagara Falls 

^\lnicipal Airport 

Rainbow Bridge */ 

Whirlpool Rapids Bridge 

Ogdensburg 

Rochester 

Municipal Airport 

Port Authority 

Rouses Point 



20,878 

1,449 

,200,436 



145,737 

7,423 

3,490 

20,835 

287,816 

191 

781,483 

26,123 

291,792 

1,639 

42,935 

6,847 

28,992 

2,514 

81,879 

■J 18,052 . 



7,755 
11,460 
10,592 
163, 
70,066 
60,243 
21,612 
232,657 

3,555 
17,993 
13,563 

1,141 

2,274 



43 

6,235 

',517,931 

41,477 

27,564 

!, 100,897 

99,296 

40,621 

93,781 

271,805 

63,940 

287,091 

8,172 

,182,122 

848,758 

208,182 

683 

556 
,003,962 
,121,768 
504,134 



11,355 

645 

576,319 



19,489 
79,550 
,K4.g09 



135 
8,380 
8,755 
4,895 
8,785 
6,789 
82,570 
44,579 
30,237 
16,188 
139,177 
1,681 
11,247 



11,054 

55,030 

3,298,4- 



3,296,562 

29,897 

10,221 

1,468,183 

63,895 

20,392 

23,248 

137,727 

28,148 

165,325 

5,013 

582,704 

529,204 

109,270 

468 

3.(M?.824 



2,391,366 
654,184 
299,659 



/Eaqh entry of the sarri 



counted s<?::)eratelv.7 



State 



port 



York (Cont'd) 

d Bridge 
port ) . . . 



Syracus 
Thousan 
Trout R 



Fortune 

Grand Forks (Munic Airport) 
Hannah 



Minot (Airport) 



Northgate . 
Pembina .-. 
Portal y . 
St. John .. 



Sarles 

Sherwood 

Walhalla 

Westhope 

Wllllston, Sloulin 



Cleveland 
Sandusky . 
Toledo . . . 



Vermont 

Alburg Springs .. . . 

Beebe Plain 

Beecher Falls 

Burlington Airport 

Canaan 

Derby Line 

East Rlchford 

Highgate Springs . . 

Morses Line 

Newport ... * 

North Troy 

Norton 

Richford 

St. Albans 

West Berkshire 



Washington 

Bellingham .. 

Blaine 

Pacific Hig 
Peace Arch 



Danville 

Ferry 

Laurier .^ 

Lynden <J 

Metallne Falls 

Neah Bay 

Nighthawk 

Northport 

Oroville 

Point Roberts 

Port Angeles 

Port Townsend 

Seattle 

Spokane (Felts Field) 



,159,008 

478,179 

2,112 

13,214 



12,517 
i2,88S 
14,006 

155.852 
23,933 
2,036 
12.833 
23,fr71 
25,330 
2,360 

117,798 
54,746 
44,849 I 

246,087 I 

195,515 
41,062 
20,014 
26,133 
48,400 
35,089 
657 



3,637 
668,794 
134,900 



5BB.4-^1 I ^21.jai_ 



23,847 
16,365 
1,022 



242,889 
245,345 
5,515 
93,182 
,317,734 
87,464 
763,465 
35,204 



469,907 
440,148 
68,549 



13,643 

396 

8,575 

10,7' 3 

14,422 

591 

68,999 

30,529 

23,673 

134,027 

114.305 

22,192 

6,432 

16,538 

26,681 

21,503 

129 

!3.209 



19,605 

45,455 

254,953 

55,045 

230 

13,219 

145,911 

372,275 

705,505 

1,718 

52,265 

448 

4,701 



77,585 
53,466 
160,019 
169,372 



53,475 
821 ,387 

60.144 
462,596 

20,126 

13,836 
220,331 
335,716 
273,859 

38,062 
142,299 



22,362 

140,669 
26,375 



109,410 

187,135 

636,356 

609 

15,993 



1.647.023 



38,361 
10.649 
82,870 
75,073 
3,434 
39,707 
496.347 
27,320 
300,369 
15,07.- 
2,656 
123,085 
134,191 
166.289 
30,487 
99,707 



860,513 
27,991 
6,719 



158 
6,675 
36,501 
185,140 
69,149 
1,109 
35,272 
420 



otate and port 



Canada 

Montreaj, jueboc .. 
Prince Rupert, B.C. 
Toronto, Ontario 
(Milton Airport) 



B.C. 



uglas 2/. 



Nogales 

Grand Avenue 

Morley Ave.iue 

Noqales Internatio 



Los Angeles (Airport) 

San Diego .^. 

ban Vsidro -J 

recate 



1/^. 



i il ... 
Christi 



Dallas Airport 

Del Rin . 

El Pa-io 2/ 

Ave. of Araeripas 

(Cordova) ^ ....^... 
Santa Fe Bridge^ ••• 
Ysleta Bridge 2J 

Falcon Heights ^ 



Fort Hancock 
:Vath Crossing 2/ • 

Hidalgo 2/ 

Houstc 



Jston Au-po 
jitas 2/ .. 



Marathon 

Polvo 2/ 

Porvenir 1/ 

Presidio 

RioGrande City Z/ 

Roto 2/ ..^ 

Ruidosa 1/ 



V^r. 



San Vincente 
San Yqnacio .. 
StiUwell Cros 



456,164 
81,864 
225,215 



5,827 

1,338,116 

3,682,861 

133,832 



451,577 

11,778,670 

81,675 



1,966, 
29',946,' 



2,232,614 



346,195 
41,776 
45,152 
12,777 



68.49.3.633! 47.505.51 



11,238,351 

2,00-J,153 

6,496 

88,568 

557,221 

5,609,323 

1,735,100 

1,717 

865,388 

2,882,540 

88,350 



20.1^7.621 



297, 

8,925,933 

13,717 

2,585 

10,532,226 

375,162 

129.781 



9,435 

,774,003 

12,550 

11,500 

3,410 



3,731,515 

11,280,101 

727,151 

313,027 

153,932 

26,035 

5,865 

3,560,581 

277 

1,690 

6.518.408 



506 

37,105 

1,475 

239,240 

470,204 

20,546 

1,337,037 

6,500 

2,200 

1,700 

283 



i/ Figures include arrivals 

Z/ Partially Estimated 

i/ July-September 1964 and May^une 1965 

4/ .Tuly 1, 1964-.Tanuary 12, 1965 



aft at border ports 



y January 13-June 30, 1965 

y July-September 1964 and June 1965 

2/ Estimated 



si 



i 



S S 



I o -< m .n o <r o . 



SSS! 



i -> 0^ O <M O > 



;SS(o3^o«2° 






« r- 00 o tr I 



O r- o O O m c 



(r> vo o o o cr t 



s?,; 



I 



- O <A 
eg -. o 



I O <I O O 



isii 






w-i oocOoc>JfnsDr-rsif 



) r- a o CT^ ^o o 



1 



1^ 



iS 



O'^o-OO^O-J'Cf-l o 



S o o S S ' 






f*i>coor^Ofso»^* 









;§sr:;?_ss§g§ 






o ■•:■■::::: g :::: ° 



67 



TABLE 20A. SPECIAL INQUIRY OFFICER HEARINGS COMPLETED, 


BY REGIONS AND DISTRICTS: | 




YEARS ENCED JUNE 30, 1961 - 1965 








Region 
and 


Exclusion hearings 


Deportation hearings j 


district 


1961 


1%2 


196^ 


;964 


1965 


1961 


1962 


i9W 


1964 


1965 


United States total 


2.599 


-L.OlO 


97? 


m 


=Mk 


13.004 


10^431 


12,805 


.15,677 


18.961 


Northeast Region 


- 
330 


221 


269 


156 


150 


4.638 


3.621 




4.981 


5.720 


7.809 


Boston, Mass 


31 


38 


33 


30 


33 


185 


151 


199 


319 


319 


Buffalo, N.Y 


120 


81 


94 


38 


36 


215 


324 


329 


298 


283 


Hartford, Conn 


5 


2 


7 


4 


4 


126 


95 


104 


121 


129 


Newark, N.J 


11 


15 


22 


18 


6 


544 


417 


345 


345 


441 


New York, N.Y 


144 


73 


90 


49 


58 


3,528 


2,595 


3,980 


4,604 


6,605 


Portland, Me 


17 


12 


18 


16 


9 


32 


25 


19 


22 


14 


St. Albans, Vt 


2 


- 


5 


1 


4 


8 


14 


5 


11 


18 


Southeast Region 


1.708 


273 


237 


220 


1?1 


2.247 


894 


911 


1.031 


1.079 


Atlanta, Ga 


5 




4 


2 


3 


50 


31 


54 


56 


54 


Baltimore, Md 


4 


4 


1 


_ 


- 


68 


55 


31 


64 


67 


Cleveland, Ohio 


5 


8 


3 


6 


4 


101 


105 


113 


140 


143 


Miami, Fla 


1,649 


226 


187 


195 


61 


1,579 


229 


231 


267 


298 


New Orleans, La 


13 


6 


9 


3 


2 


109 


84 


68 


58 


48 


Philadelphia, Pa 


7 


5 


4 


- 


11 


154 


179 


178 


171 


158 


San Juan, P.R 


23 


23 


22 


13 


37 


64 


99 


114 


119 


183 


Washington, D.C 


2 


1 


7 


1 


3 


122 


112 


122 


156 


128 


Northwest Region 


107 


«. 


85 


7R 


82 


1.388 


1.124 


1.276 


1.657 


1.775 


Anchorage, Alaska .... 






_ 






1 


1 


1 




1 


Chicago, 111 


25 


12 


13 


15 


19 


681 


505 


545 


835 


856 


Detroit, Mich 


50 


40 


41 


48 


31 


247 


211 


261 


299 


326 


Helena, Mont 


5 


2 


1 


1 


6 


28 


30 


18 


28 


46 


Kansas City, Mo 


5 


4 


4 


1 


2 


94 


43 


52 


62 


72 


Omaha, Nebr 


- 


2 


1 


- 


3 


27 


32 


61 


50 


42 


Portland, Oreg 


1 


- 


1 


- 


1 


67 


44 


51 


54 


49 


St. Paul, Minn 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


- 


79 


71 


79 


109 


113 


Seattle, Wash 


21 


25 


24 


13 


20 


164 


187 


208 


220 


270 


Southwest Region .* 


454 


431 


_^m 


497 


488 


4.731 


4.792 


5.637 


7.269 


8.298 


Dallas, Tex 


8 


i/ 


i7 


1/ 


1/ 


88 


1/ 


1/ 


V 


1/ 


Denver, Colo 


1 


2 


1 


4 


3 


60 


44 


83 


102 


47 


El Paso, Tex 


147 


199 


160 


207 


219 


983 


1,282 


1,898 


2,000 


2,221 


Honolulu, Hawaii 


15 


- 


5 


3 


4 


25 


11 


23 


45 


40 


Los Angeles, Calif. .. 


72 


87 


55 


85 


66 


1.356 


1,533 


1,578 


2,165 


2,137 


Phoenix, Ariz 

Port Isabel, Tex 


12 


4^ ^3?!/ 6^ '" 
76i/ 89^140i/ll7-^l,441 


113 / 102 


/ 1 34I1 


/. 2,272- 
/ 440' 


San Antonio, Tex 


178 


San Francisco, Calif. 


21 


14 1 14 1 14| 17 J 601 


586 1 620 


1,052 


1,044 


1/ Dallas, Texas, Distric 


t was e 


liminated in fiscal year 1962 


and absorbed by 


Port Isabel, I 


Texas, District and th 


e San A 


ntonlo. 


Texas 


, Dij 


trict 


• 











68 



ALIENS tXCLUUElJ FROM TtIK UN ITEU STATES, 
YEAKS ENDED JUNE 30, 1892 - 1965 



An 



1953 figures reprc' 
aliens seeking entt 



ill exc lus 

■ 30 days 



seaports and exclu 
r at land ports_^ 















































-a u- 




















4J <D d 












o 




















Period 


Total 








m 


2 




C ,4 




U 01 














u 11 


3 






















— > 






























































































C "1 










c5 


X) 01 


01 


































01 j: 0) 




















u 


u 




J JD u 






u - 







1R92 - 1P(S5 


619,497 


1,282 


12,40 4 


8,180 


82,503 


219.349 


16,127 


180,8;.6 


41,9'4l 


13,679 


4 3, 18b 


189? - 1900 


2?, 515 




65 


89 


1,309 


15,070 






5,792 




190 


1901 - 1910 


108,211 


10 


1,681 


1,277 


24,42 5 


63.311 






12,991 




4,516 


1911 - 1920 


178,109 


27 


4,353 




42.129 


90.045 


1.904 




15,417 


5,083 


14.327 




189,307 
68,217 


9 

5 


2,082 


'•'53 


11 ,0'.4 
1,530 


37.175 
12.519 


8.447 
2.126 


94.084 
47.858 


6,274 
1,235 


8,202 
258 




1931 - 1940 


1.1 '2 


1941 - 1950 


30.263 


60 


1,134 


80 


1,02 1 


1.072 


3.182 


2 2 . 4 'i 1 


219 


108 


946 


1941 


2,929 




q-, 




73 


3 28 


2 27 


2,076 






72 


1942 


1,833 






10 


51 


161 




1,207 




9 


47 


1943 


1,49 5 


1 




6 


63 




77 


1,106 


26 


8 


44 


1944 


1,642 


- 


63 


8 


92 




155 


1,109 


28 


21 


59 


1945 


2,341 
2,942 


- 


87 
87 


3 


'is 


56 
33 


161 
361 


1,805 
2,^9 4 


18 
13 


23 


76 


1946 


80 


1947 


4,771 


_ 


139 


) 


124 


7 


902 


3,316 


19 


11 


187 




4.905 
3,834 


25 


142 
187 


5 
12 


'05 
112 


67 
99 


709 
216 


3.h90 
2.970 


11 

26 


9 


73 


1949 


178 




3,571 
20,585 


31 

1 , 09 8 


199 
1.735 


16 
361 


125 
9 56 


55 
149 


122 
376 


2,868 
14.657 


12 
13 


13 

26 


130 


1951 - I960 


1.214 




3,7 84 
2,944 
3,637 
3,313 


29 
9 
'.8 


*37 

:'85 

266 
296 


15 
10 

27 
65 


337 
67 
1 iO 
127 


78 
11 
15 
16 


121 

7 '4 
47 


2.783 
2.378 
2,937 
2,4 32 


1 
5 
3 


3 
3 

3 


80 


1952 


102 


1953 


164 


19 54 


261 


1955 


2,667 


89 


206 


124 


113 




15 


1,832 




4 


275 


1956 


1,709 
907 
733 


117 
302 
255 


169 
91 
SI 


84 
30 
18 


87 
'.0 
21 


''2 


10 
35 


1,079 
348 
299 


3 


5 
7 
I 


164 


1957 


70 


1958 


51 


19 59 


480 
41 1 


102 
36 


19 
15 


7 


18 


1 
2 


34 


276 
29 3 


- 


- 


23 


1960 


24 


1961 . 


7 43 
388 
309 


21 
13 

11 


2 4 

17 


3 


7 
.'3 


; 


29 
17 
19 


634 
2 80 
216 


- 


- 


27 


1962 


26 


1963 


18 


1964 


421 


16 


13 


4 


18 


_ 


10 


3^3 


- 


- 




1965 


429 


12 


18 


4 


19 


^ 


17 


333 


- 


- 


24 



ALIENS EXCLUDED, BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH AND CAUSE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1965 



■o > 

3 i 



Country or reglor 
of birth 



o -I 
a o 



u u c 

a 3 0) 

e o e 

41 j: D 



Al 1 countries 

Europe 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 

Asia 

China 1/ 

Hong Kong 

Iran 

Israel 

Japan 

Lebanon 

Philippines 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Central America 

South America 

Chile 

Columbia 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 

Africa 

Oceania 

_!_/ Includes Formosa 



359 
21 

242 



u 



70 



I 



TABLE 23. ALIENS APPREHENDED, ALIENS DEPORTED, AND ALIENS REQUIRED 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1892 - 1965 


TO DEPART: 




Aliens 
apprehended y 


Aliens Expelled 


Period 


Total 


Aliens 
deported 


Aliens required 
to depart 2/ 


1892 - 1965 


5.704.641 


6.398,, 386 




5,864.392 


1892 - 1900 

1901 - 1910 

1911 - 1920 


128,484 
147.457 


3,127 

11,558 

27,912 

164,390 

210.416 


3,127 
11,558 
27,912 
92,157 

117.086 




1921 - 1930 


72,233 
93.330 


1931 - 1940 


1931 . 


22,276 
22,735 
20,949 
10,319 
11,016 
11,728 
13,054 
12,851 
12,037 
10,492 

1.377.210 


29,861 
30,201 
30,212 
16,889 
16,297 
17,446 
17,617 
18,553 
17,792 
15,548 

1.581.774 


18,142 
19,426 
19,865 
8,879 
8,319 
9,195 
8,829 
9,275 
8,202 
6,954 

110.849 


11,719 
10,775 
10,347 
8 010 


1932 

1933 

19 34 


1935 

19 36 


7,978 
8,251 
8,788 
9,278 
9,590 
8,594 

1.470.925 




1938 

19 39 


1940 


1941 - 1950 


1941 


11,294 

11,784 

11,175 

31,174 

69,164 

99,591 

19 3,657 

192,779 

288,253 

468,339 

3.584.229 


10,938 

10,613 

16,154 

39,449 

80.760 

116,320 

214,543 

217,555 

296,337 

579,105 

4.013.547 


4,407 

3,709 

4,207 

7,179 

11,270 

14,375 

18,663 

20,371 

20,040 

6,628 

129.887 




1942 

1943 

1944 

1945 

1946 

1947 

1948 

1949 

1950 

1951 - 1960 


6,904 

11,947 

32,270 

69,490 

101,945 

195,880 

197,184 

276,297 

572,477 

3.883.660 


1951 


509,040 

528,815 

885,587 
1,089,583 

254,096 
87,696 
59,918 
53,474 
45,336 
70,684 y 

88.823 1/ 
92,758 2/ 
88,712 y 
86,597 y 
110,371 i/ 


686,713 

723,959 

905,236 

1,101,228 

247,797 

88,188 

68,461 

67,742 

64,598 

59,625 

59,821 
61,801 
76,846 
81,788 

105,406 


13,544 

20,181 

19,845 

26,951 

15,028 

7,297 

5,082 

7,142 

7,988 

6,829 

7,438 
7,637 
7,454 
8,746 
10,143 


673,169 


1952 

1953 

19 54 


703,778 

885,391 

1 074,277 


1955 


232,769 


1956 




1957 

1958 

19 59 


63,379 
60,600 
56,610 


1960 

1961 

1962 


52,796 

52,383 
54,164 


1963 

1964 

1965 


69,392 
73,042 

95,263 


y Aliens apprehended first 
1/ Aliens required to depart 
i/ Deportable aliens located 


recorded in 1925. 
first recorded in 
- includes nonwil 

71 


1927. 
ful crewman vi 


olators. 





TABLE 24. ALIENS 


DEPORTED, BY COUNTRY TO WHICH DEPORTED AND CAUSE l 
YEAH ENDED JUNE 30, 1%5 






Country to which 
deported 


Total 


Is 


I 


i 


1^ 


1 


1 

1 \ 


II 


III 

m 


1:1 




All countries 


19.143 




?85 


5? 


143 


?3 


?55 


l.M^ 


3.241 


4.981 


?6, 


Euro e 
























Denmarlf 


17 
20 

102 

513 
14 

136 
30 
35 
13 
30 

134 
12 
26 
87 
13 
31 

373 


\ 


2 
1 
17 

2 
2 

2 


1 
1 
1 

4 


2 
2 

2 

1 




3 

7 

5 
1 

1 


3 
3 
2 
1 
5 

9 
4 


15 
12 
68 
467 

105 
24 
34 
10 
20 

120 
10 
24 
61 
11 
23 


3 
33 

2 
17 

9 
1 
4 
2 








Germany 


- 














Norway 








Spa in 








Turkey (Europe and Asia) 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 


- 












41 
90 

12 
48 
11 
35 
51 


- 


1 




6 

2 

3 


: 


1 
1 


3 
2 


40 
64 
20 
20 
12 
40 
10 
35 
45 
34 


19 
4 




Hong Kong 


- 


Iran 








Japan 


- 




















1,044 

6,518 

28 

34 

181 
96 
21 
20 
47 
36 
58 
31 
22 
19 
16 
IB 
16 

230 


-_ 


211 
94 
3 

3 

3 

4 
2 
2 

1 
2 
2 
2 

6 


21 
21 


14 
94 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 


3 


157 
143 

1 
1 

1 
1 
5 
1 


89 

2 

1 

1 

2 

1 
- 
1 


445 
719 
24 
29 
20 
171 
86 
20 
16 
42 
?6 
31 

6 

7 

12 
6 


98 
4,533 

1 
1 

2 

16 
28 
13 

9 
8 
2 

7 












Bahamas 




Barbados 




Dominican Republic 


- 


Netherlands Antilles 




St. Christopher 




Trinidad and Tobago 


- 














Honduras 




Nicaragua 




Panama 








South America 






26 
13 
26 
100 
21 

16 


\ 


2 

1 
1 
1 
1 


3 


3 


1 


14 

2 

1 


2 


19 
10 
11 
68 
12 
24 
11 


2 
13 
12 

6 

1 
3 




























Africa 




























Other Countries 

















































Aliens required to depart totaled 95,263 (see table 23). 
22,255 required departures of crewmen who were technical 
required departures under safeguards - chiefly Mexicans v 



This table does not include 
violators and 26,045 direct 
10 entered without inspect ion^/ 



Nationality 



i 5 



g-. o. 






All countries .. 

Europe 

Belgium 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Poland 

Portuga 1 

Spain 

Sweden 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

China'i/ '..'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

India 

Iran 

Israel 

Jordan Z/ 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North America 

Mexico 

Cuba , 

Dominican Republic . 
Haiti , 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

South America 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Chile 

Columbia 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

New Zealand 

Other Oceania 

Other countries 



i/ Includes Formosa. 

2/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



1,785 
9,445 
3,977 
3,842 



73 



All countries .. 

Europe 

Belgium 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Turkey 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China i/ 

India 

Israel 

Japan 

Jordan 2/ 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic • 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Pa nama 

South America , 

Argentina 

Brazil , 

Chil , 

Colombia , 

Ecuador , 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America . 

Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

New Zealand 

Other countries 



IT Includes Formosa. 

2/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



i,. &67 



yi=^ 



- e 



Aliens required to depart totaled 95,263, (see table 23). 
22,255, required departures of crewmen who were technical 
required departures under safeguards - chiefly Mexicans w 



This table does not include 
/iolators and 26,045 HirPct 
5 entered without inspection^/ 



Country of 
destination 


Total 


i 


j 


11 


1 

1^ 


1 

h 

1^ 


1 £ 


•11 

If! 




i 

J 
1 


1 


























Europe 










4 


3 


24 


3.957 


61 








143 
192 
286 
611 
146 
580 
152 
179 

72 
186 
371 

56 

97 
538 

41 
403 

2.267 


- 
- 

2 
1 


j 


z 

_ 


1 


1 

1 


2 

i 

2 
3 
2 

2 


141 
190 
275 
601 
132 
556 
151 

"I 
180 
359 
54 
97 
530 

403 


2 

9 
10 
14 

2 

3 
9 

5 


- 








Germany 

Greece 


- 








" 


Netherlands 


" 


Norway 

Poland 


- 




" 


Spain 


- 


Turkey (Europe and Asia) 

United Kingdom 


- 




" 




" 


Asia 






50 

2^1 
139 
170 
441 
61 
6 
927 
162 


1 


9 


: 


11 


1 
1 

46 


3 
2.309 


48 
44 
263 
139 
169 
438 
61 
6 
923 
161 


2 
3 

2 




— = — 


Hong Kong 


- 




" 




" 




- 


Japan 


~ 




" 




" 




- 


Other Asia 


- 


North America 




Canada 


7,537 
24,444 
148 
540 
178 
3,123 
1,011 
139 
15 
314 
261 
189 
123 
108 
117 
109 
288 
178 

1.470 


24 


1 
8 


2 


6 


18 
26 

1 

1 


312 
1,975 

3 
1 
8 

! 

2 

1 
1 

2 

6 


7,011 

9,667 

148 

535 

176 

3,110 

1,005 

139 

15 

312 

258 

181 

121 

107 

112 

106 

283 

173 


161 
12,749 

2 
1 
5 
2 

2 
6 
1 
1 
5 
2 
2 
5 

7 


1 


3 






Bahamas 


- 




" 




- 




~ 




" 




- 


Trinidad and Tobago 


- 


British Honduras 


- 




- 




" 


Honduras 


- 




- 




- 




~ 


South America 




Argentina 

Brazil 


146 
151 
50 
305 
191 
433 
194 

140 


i 


1 


: 


I 


: 


3 

3 


146 
150 
45 
299 
191 
428 
193 


4 

1 

1 


: 


- 




- 




" 


Peru 


- 




- 






Africa 




Oceania 


130 


. 
















~ 




Other Countries 


81 










, 




r? 




"T 










1 












1 



75 



ALIENS DEPORTED, BY COUMmY TO vmiCH DEPORTED AND DEPORTATION EXPENSE 1 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1965 



Country to which 
deported 



All countries 

Europe 

Denmark 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

Formosa 

Hong Kong 

India 

Iran 

Israel , 

Japan ■ 

Korea 

Malaysia 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico , 

Antigua 

Bahamas , 

Barbados , 

Dominican Republic 

Jamaica , 

Netherlands Antilles .... 

St. Christopher , 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Other West Indies , 

British Honduras , 

El Salvador , 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Other Central America .., 

South America 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Oceania 

Other Countries 



Innigration 

and 
(laturalization 



is»m 



t.213 



9.227 



1,044 
6,518 



.220 



PeMrt^ticn expsn&e froxne 



.J^SS2= 



J32_ 



7.74? 



6,409 
25 
13 
13 
128 
63 
1 
18 
28 
20 
53 
31 
16 



76 



Other 
Government 



..^3. 



Steamship 
conpanies 



j^a^ 



j^ 



Aliens 
deported 



Aliens 
res hipped 



.m. 



j^ 



, 



snoeuEiTeosTiiv 


If 


1,060 
1,566 
8,537 
2,737 
812 


CM 


Sg|5^S§SS2 


"^s-^s 


(a6e JO 
peej o:^ aiqeun 


5 
t^ 

vi 


704 
5,977 
8,329 
1,746 


in 


1 1 1 CM ^ ^ 1 ^ -i 1 


1 1 1 1 1 


sa6jEM0 oxtqnd 


iT 


474 

9,086 

10,703 

1,886 

143 


in 


■^'S-ini-it^oooooin't 

.-1 CM CO CO CO ^ .H 


OJ 1 ^ 1 CM 


s:).uetuaq.e5.s es^ej 

Aq JO uoTq.oadsuT 

q.noq:HM p9a:aq.ug 


S 

s 


1,106 
4,128 
5,265 
5,159 
50,209 


i 


2,293 
3,706 
6,387 
17,337 
10,064 
3,545 
1,999 
2,995 
3,191 
2,940 


2,916 
3,185 
3,642 
4,580 
4,881 


sq.u9uinoop Jiedojd 
l.noM^.TM pejcattuH 


cr 



31,704 
45,480 
14,288 


in 

CO 


5,322 

9,636 

9,724 

5,344 

1,971 

1,102 

662 

472 

483 

374 


400 
378 
417 
688 
1,036 


-UOU JO SUOT:|.TpUO0 

qq.TM Axduioo JO 
uie:).uieuj o^. paiiej 


5 

n 

r- 


5,556 
14,669 
13,906 


in 


3,587 
4,944 
2,352 
2,536 
1,472 
1,269 
1,264 
2,333 
3,059 
2,444 


3,020 
2,967 
2,302 
2,473 
3,241 


pa:).jodep 
JO pepnxoxa 
AxsnoTAeJj 


2 

iT 


178 

1,842 

9,729 

17,642 


-* 


IsRssssSss 


gsHs 


:;oejep 

•[BOTsAqd 

JO Te^uaw 


0, 



3,228 
6,364 
8,936 
6,301 
1,560 


OJ 

5 


inv£>oocoovo<>r~oor- 
^in-^^voooinot^in 


"J CO 01 CO 
If) in CM CM CM 


SMEX OI^-ODJEU 

JO uot:;biota 


IT 


374 

1,108 

822 


r- 

5 


S§S8§E55S§[^ 


S^g^5 


XEJoimuj 


s 


784 
4,324 
4,238 
4,838 

759 


£ 


^sggss^ggst 


PS55S 


XBUIU11J3 


c^ 

3 


236 

1,209 

8,383 

16,597 

8,945 


CM 
vO 


1,036 
778 
689 
783 
667 
628 
549 
583 
547 
482 


>* -^ 't ^ CO 


OTq.STqDJEUE 

JO OAisjeAqng 


? 


J 00 vO CM 


CM 


OO-tP-'HOvOCMvOr-CM 
rHCOCOvOCO'-H'H -* 


^t CM 'S- 1 1 






6,888 

27,912 

92,157 

117,086 

110,849 


S 


13,544 

20,181 

19,845 

26,951 

15,028 

7,297 

5,082 

7,142 

7,988 

6,829 


7,438 
7,637 
7,454 
8,746 
10,143 


.2 


iT 






_ . . . . 







; ; ; ; ; I r ; I ;;;;;; I i i i i i 
























: : : : : 








- 1910 

- 1920 

- 1930 

- 1940 

- 1950 


7 


:::::::::: 


'.'.:'.'. 


gHSHsH? 


ssUi 


§2222 


2 







Country to which 



All courtrlf 



Europe 

Denmark . . . . 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Ireland .... 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal ... 



Sweden 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 



Formosa ^/ . . 
Hong Kong . . 

India 

Iran 

Israel 

Japan 

Korea 

Malaysia — 
Philippines 
Other Asia . 



North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Antigua II 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Dominican Republic .. 

Jamaica 

Netherlands Antilles 
St. Christopher ^1 .. 
Trinidad and Tobago . 
Other West Indies ... 

British Honduras 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Other Central America 
Other North America . 



South America 
Argentina .. 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia . . . 

Peru 

Venezuela .. 
Other South 



Africa 

Oceania 

Other Countries 



ALIENS DEPORTED, BY COUNTRY TO WHICH DEPORTED: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1956 - 1965 



1956- 
1965 



22^2^ 



221* 
200 


22 
15 


898 


72 


4,948 


188 


160 


30 


2.247 


19C 


448 


48 


474 


38 


106 


3 


471 


73 


1.263 


77 


190 


17 


270 


15 


1,164 


114 



60 




240 


19 


758 


322 


579 


19 


319 


17 


297 


32 


227 


27 


75 


3 



7.438 



1.060 
3,246 



5.957 



y 1956 reported in China. 

Z,l Included in Other West Indies prior to 1959. 



78 

































Total 
deported 




r of en 






1965 


1964 


1963 


1962 


1961 


1960 


1959 


1958 


1957 


1956 


1951- 
1955 


1941- 
1950 


19.n 


Total 






























Immigrant (except displaced person) ... 
Displaced person or refugee 


16 
'214 

35 
98 
83 
178 
1,369 

1 
45 


252 

1 
421 

11 

31 
441 


1,175 

7 
21 

90 

632 

3 

2,721 

16 


36 

1 

1 

287 

16 
130 

266 


32 

1 

147 
23 

1 

10 
12 
58 

92 

1 


13 

7 
13 
10 
30 

1 


" 


31 

9 

1 


13 
19 

12 


■ 




9 

5 

14 
12 


23 

2 
2 


20 


Representative of foreign information 










2 


Aa^^cultu ariab"^ 


Other temporary worker or industrial 




Transit'alien 




Returnina resident alien 




Student 


f 


United States citizenship claimed 


1 
2 






9 


Internee ''^ 















Required to Deodrt ^ 



Immigrant (except displaced person) 

Displaced person or refugee 

Foreign government official 

Representative of foreign informatio 

Temporary visitor 

Other temporary worker or industrial 

Returning resident alien 

i-tudent 

Treaty trader or investor 

Entered without inspection 

i/ Excludes 22,255 required departu 
and 26,045 direct departures ui 



1960 1959 



79 



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ON^ 0_ O^ CN 

in CN nD* r- 


S5§ S §8 

o on X ON r- m 
X* in -T ,-* 00 -T 






C 


1 


c 

3 

8 




3 


a 
( 

i- 


i 

X 


■1- 




1 
< 


1 

C 

■i 


5 


c 

1 

o 


■H 

< 


c 

X 

u 


< 

c 

X 

a. 


i- 
C 


1 

X. 

u 


( 

u 


c 

1 


1 


1 

s 1/ 

•D 1- 

c : 

X - 

Hi 


1 


1 

c 

I 

I 

X 
G 





S 2 



TABLE 28. ALIEN CREWf/EN DESERTED AT UNITED STATES AIR AND SEAPORTt 

BY NATIONALITY AND FLAG OF CARRIER: j/ 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1965 





Total 


._ F 




rom 








d 


Nationality 
of 


1 


1 


I 

S. 


I 


5 
1 


1 


1 

1 
1 


1 




1 






5 
1 

1 


1 


s 
1 
I 


s 


£ 


1 


Number deserted 


4.038 


1.200 


565 


527 


434 


265 


182 


153 


120 


7? 


78 


60 


50 


35 


28 


26 


24 


?i 


m 






820 


56? 


440 


?'^1 


194 


147 


100 


98 


?7 


70 


59 






?R 


?6 






10? 




6 

56 

2 

22 

10 

160 

1,285 

15 

190 

73 

327 

9 

31 

278 

46 

4 

21 

364 

48 

2 

732 


1 
2 

29 

606 

1 

52 
1 

11 
- 
2 

54 
3 
2 

47 
9 

305 


546 

7 

8 


3 

10 

2 
2 
10 

1 

11 

1 

2 
70 
2 

1 
27 
2 


1 
6 

2 

2 
3 
12 

215 
1 

159 


7 
61 

3 

26 

- 

47 
6 

15 


98 
22 
23 


3 
49 

39 
40 


2 

3 

5 

6 
9 

6 
1 
11 

1 

9 
37 

1 
1 
3 

3 
- 

3 


2 

9 

2 

1 
9 

4 

18 


2 

3 
4 

2 

7 

5 

3 
2 


54 


"sn 


]6 


26 


26 




21 




n"i 1^' 




Donma k 




" ° ■ ■ ■ 






,, 


France . 


, 


Germany 




















Poland 




or ug 


IR 


Sweden 
























As la , 


29 


China 2/ 


628 
19 
14 

4 
16 
14 
33 

4 


303 


[ 


33 

7 
13 


143 
12 


\ 


13 

7 
1 
1 
1 


37 

2 


1 


23 
14 


1 




50 


10 
6 


: 


: 




: 


7 






Japan 


" 








3 












59 
16 

35 

17 
11 

1 
65 
2 

73 


11 

23 
16 


1 
1 


6 

2 
3 

1 
11 


6 

2 
2 

3 


10 
20 


1 

1 

2 


2 

2 
8 




2 

7 
2 


1 

2 


: 


\ 


6 
1 


: 


i 




: 












Dominican Republic 

Ha itl 


12 

2 


Jamaica 


Trinidad and Tobago 


- 


El Salvador 






10 


Nlcaraaua 


Panama 




South America 


19 




10 
7 
18 
14 
8 
8 




: 


3 
3 

3 
2 


2 
2 

1 




4 


1 
7 


: 


i 


1 


\ 


\ 


1 


: 


: 




\ 


3 










6 




Peru 


4 
5 




Africa 




3 
3 
2 
2 
2 
3 




: 






\ 


2 






2 


1 


\ 


\ 


\ 


: 


: 


: 


': 


3 








South Africa 






- 








2 




_ 


2 
1 

1 


_ 


_ 


1 


" 


3 


- 


1 

1 


1 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 






: 











i/ Includes deserting 
2/ Includes Formosa. 



reported by ships' 



found in the United States by Service Offic 



TABLE 29, VESSELS AND AIRPLANES INSPECTED, CREWMEN ADMITTED, ALIEN CREWMEN 
DESERTED, AND ALIEN STOWAWAYS FOUND, BY LOCATION: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1965 



/Each arrival of the same c&rrler 



crewman counted separately/ 



Vessels and airplanes 
Inspected on arrival 



Vesse)s 



Crewmen admitted 



Allen U 
crewmen 
deserted 



United States total 

Northeast ReRlon 

Boston, Mass 

Buffalo, N. Y 

Hartford, Conn 

Newark, N. J 

New York, N. Y 

Portland, Me 

St, Albans, Vt 

Southeast Region 

Atlanta, G« 

Baltimore, Md 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Miami, Fla 

New Orleans, La 

Philadelphia, Pa 

San Juan, P. R 

Washington, D. C 

Northwest Region 

Anchorage, Alaska 

Chicago, III 

Detroit, Mich 

Helena, Mont 

Kansas City, Mo 

Omaha, Nebr 

Portland, Oreg 

St. Paul, Minn 

Seattle, Wash 

Southwest Region 

Denver, Colo 

El Paso, Tex 

Honolulu, Hawaii ■ 

Los Angeles, Calif. ... 

Phoenix, Ariz 

Port Isabel, Tex 

San Antonio, Tex 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Preinspectlon offices .. 
Hamilton, Bermuda .... 

Montreal , Can 

Nassau, Bahamas 

Toronto , Can 

Vancouver, Can 

Victoria, Can 

Winnipeg, Can 

Border Patrol Sectors .. 

Miami 

New Orleans 

Buffalo 



1,^^03 

3,670 

253 

5,051 

4,477 



34.772 



1,995 
1,553 
2,463 

11,313 
2,486 
1,839 

11,310 
1,813 

24.090 



1,246 

754 

10,590 



859 

428 

10,213 



1,319 
4,278 

2,290 

1,126 

1.0S7 



40.526 



654.755 



235.740 



3,059 
5,996 
200 
2,656 
24,962 
1,849 
1 , 804 

108.727 



40,115 

27,068 

7,202 

1,197 

549,917 

29,249 

7 

658.942 



15,997 

7,667 

922 

6,713 

199,234 

5,193 

14 

37fi.l35 



131 
11 
35 
431 
945 
65 



610 

245 

4,425 

36,024 

1,479 

1,135 

63,136 

1,673 

31.972 



60,342 
50,461 
70,757 

172,458 
74,332 
70,089 

104,619 
55,884 

175.694 



17,950 
10,655 

7,379 
93,557 
28,292 

8,794 
195.513 
15,995 

92.657 



3,366 
3,398 
5,748 
2.166 

863 
30 

482 
8,757 
7,162 

34.217 



24,777 

33,856 

31,946 

336 

45 

42 

26,238 

11,766 

46,688 

287.088 



19,145 
11,974 
15,158 
2,742 
255 
36 
7,102 
4,802 
31,443 

140.823 



284 
1,754 
6,332 
9,425 
5,090 
3,292 
5,965 
2,075 

24.374 



283 

62,767 
111,333 

1,850 
65.418 

3,885 
41,441 

96.194 



344 

134 

50,219 

34,618 

7 

20,677 

5,404 

29,420 

87.159 



2,071 
5,632 
4,308 
9,098 
2,170 

1,095 



29,340 
12,564 
10,892 
31,475 

69 2 
11,008 

223 



10,230 
15,273 
12,908 
10,305 
10,611 
21,696 
6.136 



153 
299 

21 
258 
453 
271 

87 
138 



II 
228 



205 
131 



1/ 



Includes deserting crewmen reported by ships' masters and those found 
Service officers. 



the U. S. by 



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TABLE 31. PASSENGERS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES, BY SEA AND AIR, 

FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES, BY COUNTRY OF EMBARKATION: 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1965 

/^Exclualve of Canadian travel over land borderfiT 



Cltl- 



All countries 



Finland 

France 

Germany . . . . 
Gibraltar .. 

Greece 

Hungary — . 

Iceland 

Ireland 

Italy 

Luxembourg . 

Malta 

Monaco 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal . . . 
San Marino . 
Spain 



Switzerland ... 

Turkey 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia .... 



Asia 

Aden 

Arabian Peninsula 
Benin Islands . .. . 

Burma 

Ceylon 

Cyprus 

Formosa 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 



lit 



Lebanon 

Malaysia 

Nepal 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Portuguese India . . . . 

Ryukyu Islands 

Saudi Arabia 

Syrian Arab Republic 
Thailand 

Viet-Nam 



3,930 

49,665 

587 

93,297 

1,9 50 

347,697 

334,419 

1,687 

27,129 

138 

54,143 

94,857 

192,908 

3,605 

160 

133,483 

1 1 , 348 

5,330 

61,562 

41 

98,293 

14,560 

64,259 

4,115 

610,803 

57 

1,617 



645 
19,127 



938 

9 

738 

42,452 

54 

9.706 

372 

6 

1,839 



863.4?? 



1.659 

22,119 

375 

45,972 

1,434 

112,617 

117,046 

482 

8,603 

138 

30,437 

33,831 

70,042 

2,534 

34 

1 

65,612 

5, '75 

4,49 5 

16,341 

30 

39,454 

8,432 

26,909 

627 

267,889 

44 

1,123 



■892.464 



..7?5.575 



27,546 

212 

47,325 

516 

235,080 

217,373 

1,205 

18,526 

23,706 

61,026 

122,866 

1,071 

126 



67,871 

6,173 

835 

45,221 

58,839 

6,128 

37,350 

3,488 

342,914 

13 

494 



1.19 3 

3,006 
146 
68,363 
53,957 
1,687 
6,743 

92 
4,695 
48,272 



22,645 
4,571 



1,155 
111 
20,926 
19,017 
482 
3,184 

74 

960 

19,685 

12 

10,711 

2,077 

3,849 

580 

2,876 
2,244 



1,851 
35 
47,437 
34,940 
1,205 
3,559 



28 

11,934 

2,494 

762 

1,938 

5.161 



3,930 
48,472 
587 
90,291 
1,804 
279,334 
280,462 

20,386 

138 

54,051 

90,162 

144,636 

3.605 

120 

110,838 

6,777 

719 

59 .044 

41 

90,256 

9,864 

64,259 

4,077 

527.382 

54 

1.175 



1.659 

21,398 

375 

44,817 

1,323 
91,691 
98,029 



5,419 
138 
30,363 
32,871 
50.357 
2,534 
22 

54,901 

3,098 

646 

15,761 

30 

36,578 

6,188 

26,909 

596 

229.063 



144.446 



14 

16 

33 

286 

8,452 

3,215 

28 

1,093 

70 

1 

11,522 

113,101 



323 
15,327 



10 

359 

10,675 

1,347 

56 

1,173 

40 



27,125 

51 

8,627 



1,381 
1,715 
2,258 



2,671 
9,775 



15 
4,526 



103 


2 


029 


6,268 


379 


3,102 


78 


25 


238 


1,070 


107 


67 


2 


1 


721 


7,281 


403 


107,796 


599 


388 


81 


4 


415 


1.371 


744 


310 


9 


. 


723 


312 


926 


13.775 


54 


3 


800 


1.020 


349 


80 


5 


_ 


830 


456 


095 


384 


931 


687 



TABLE 31. PASSENGERS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES, BY SEA AND AIR, 

FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES, BY COUNTRY OF EMBARKATION: 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1965 (Cont'd) 



/Exclusive of Canadian travel over land border^/ 



Country of 
embarkatior 



Citl- 
_Z£E4_ 



Africa 

Algeria 

Angola 

Cameroon 

Cape Verde Islands 

Congo, Republic of the 

Dahomey 

Ethiopia 

Gabon 

Gambia 

Ghana 

Guinea 

Ivory Coast 

Kenya 

Liberia 

Libya 

Morocco 

Mozambique 

Niger 

Nigeria 

St. Helena 

Senega 1 

Sierra Leone 

Somallland, French 

South Africa 

South West Africa 

Tanganyika 

Tunisia 

Uganda 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Upper Volta 

Oceania 

American Samoa 

Australia 

Christmas Island 

Cook Islands 

FIJI 

Gilbert and EUlce Islands .. 

New Caledonia 

New Guinea 

New Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U.S. Adn.) . 

Polynesia French 

Tonga 

Wake and Midway Islands 

Western Samoa 

North America 

Canada ■ 

Greenland 

Mexico 

St. Pierre and Miquelon .... 

Swan Islands 

West Indies 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Bermuda 

Cayman Islands 

Cuba 

Dominican Rapublic 



16 

55 

56 

408 

40 

9 

2 

I 

979 

127 

158 

31 

2,294 

2,274 

639 

25 

13 

2,236 

984 

1,231 

19 

9 

1,386 

17 

5 

105 

16 

1,956 

5 



1,925 
37.896 



13,712 

4 

7 

140 

5,326 

23,320 

10,987 

6 

3,076 



1,452 

2,175 

409 



12 
1,198 



9 


928 


_ 


127 


8 


136 


25 


_ 


44 


2,195 


1 


2,273 


171 


396 


14 


_ 


_ 


13 


g 


2,213 


_ 


984 


2 


1,217 


6 


_ 


3 


5 


132 


1,057 



1,726 

5 



1.760.891 



373 

26,984 

I 

2 

9,007 

3 

6 

133 

4,506 

6,319 

5,441 

4 

306 



_64ia22. 



820 
17,001 
5,546 



9 

3,766 

846 



3,274 
496 
76 



1,858 
27,190 

5 



1,560 
22,474 
10,886 



1.646.628 



5,823 
5,365 



49,644 

3,615 

441,345 

5 

45 

,118.260 

428,39 5 

19,848 

166,252 

3,437 

3,918 

93,012 



31,977 

219 

166,410 

2 

28 

364,763 

75,155 

9,726 

19.847 

1,451 

804 

67,11 



17,667 

3,396 

274,935 

3 

17 

753,497 

353,240 

10,122 

146,405 

1,986 

3,114 

25,901 



45 

81,927 

16,707 

82 

7,870 

34 

1,120 



47,365 

3,122 

27 

1,244 

16 

630 



34,562 

13,585 

55 

6,626 

18 



17,222 

219 

165,280 



317,398 
72,033 
9,699 
18,603 
1,435 
174 
66.987 



TABLE 31. PASSENGERS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES, BY SEA AND AIR 
FROM FOREIGN OOUNTRIES, BY COUNTRY OF EMBARKATION i 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1965 (Cont'd) 



/Exclusive of Canadian travel 



land borders/ 



rkatio 



North America (Cont'd) i 
West Indies (Cont'd): 

Guadeloupe 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Leeward Islands: 

Antigua 

British Virgin Island 

Montserrat 

St. Christopher 

Martinique 

Netherlands West Indies 
Trinidad and Tobago ... 
Turks and Calcos Island 
Windward Islands: 

Dominica 

Grenada 

St. Lucia 

St. Vincent , 

Centra 1 Amerl ca 

British Honduras 

Canal Zone and Panama ., 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

South America 

Argentina 

Braill 

British Guiana 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

French Guiana 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Surinam (Neth. Guiana) ... 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 

Cruise 

Bermuda 

Caribbean 

Europe and Mediterranean . 

Far East 

Nassau, Bahamas 

Southern South America ... 

World cruise 

Other countries 

lag of Carrier: 

United States 

Foreign 



10,023 
11,997 
212,21- 



43,338 
36 
7,812 
2,270 
49,267 
24,369 
983 

76 



7,133 
62,132 
10,599 

8,442 
42,521 

9,753 

7,397 



33,499 
1,635 
38,941 



15,541 
7 
1,557 
35,622 
639 
1,711 
73,165 

347,162 
35,894 
79,671 
14,2°0 
4,443 
206,271 
2,760 
2,595 
1,238 



6,723 
8,571 
80,602 



81.793 
4,371 

25,984 
7,078 
5,790 

26,538 
6,643 
5,389 

190.966 

25,093 

1,141 

23,311 

1,131 

9,238 

44,662 

11,183 

3 

1,093 

23,921 

277 

1,396 

48,517 

23,261 



628 

562 

12,297 



66.184 
2,762 

36,148 
3,521 
2,652 

15,983 
3,110 
2,0 

86.318 



3,2 
16,369 
4,358 



362 

315 

24,648 

323,901 
34,535 
71,577 
13,662 
3,881 
193,974 
2,641 
2,455 



3,950 
2,169 
5,601 



176 



206,271 
2,760 
2,595 
1,238 



3,779 
2,018 
3,936 



8,094 

628 

562 

12,297 



323,901 
34,535 
71,577 
13,662 



6,073 

9,828 

206,616 



137.180 
7,120 

52, 

10,328 
8,402 

42,358 
8,748 
7,346 



268.290 

31,763 

1,635 

36,089 

1,422 

12,166 

60,682 

14,985 

7 

1,557 

34,983 

632 

1,662 

70,707 



76 . 126 
4,363 

23,228 
6,938 
5,772 

26,459 
6,003 
5,365 

185. 



87 



PASiENGERS DEPARTED FROM THE UNITED STATES, BY SEA AND AIR, 
TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES, BY COUNTRY OF DEBARKATION: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1965 

Exclusive of Canadian travel over land borders^ 



Page 1. 



Country of 
debarkation 



All countries . . . 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgium 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Gibraltar 

Greece 

Iceland 

Ireland 

Italy 

Luxembourg 

Malta 

Monaco 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey 

United Kingdom 

U. S. S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Asia 

Aden 

Arabian Peninsula .. 

Bonin Islands 

Burma 

Cyprus 

Formosa 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Iraq 

Israel 

Japan 

Jordan 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Malaysia 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Saudi Arabia 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Thailand 

Turkey 

Viet-Nam 



4.819.860 



4,883 

47,864 

3 

94,514 

1,764 

279,236 

323,712 

1,723 

32,597 

57,835 

87,035 

192,689 

1,232 

212 

4 

125,650 

13,763 

2,123 

61,798 

77,377 

18,657 

65,854 

6,614 

612,343 

86 

1,873 



46 

558 

10,675 

1,512 

61 

2,772 

220 

41,981 

236,041 

3 

891 

4,770 

384 

947 

37,018 

8,705 



3,434 
4,436 
1,273 



1.734.939 



801.201 



1,090 

97,752 

105,671 

324 

9,021 

27,298 

29,256 

59,166 

1,090 

42 

58,172 

4,742 

1,401 

14,746 

28,560 

9,839 

24,605 

621 

258,077 

47 

929 



39 

10 

25 

139 

3,185 

330 

24 

850 

83 

12,172 

100,518 

2 

279 

1,314 

92 

245 

11,915 

320 

56 

9 

650 

302 

339 



'MiLMg 



3,305 

28,819 

3 

46,385 

674 

181,484 

218,041 

1,399 

23,576 

30,537 

57,779 

133,523 

142 

170 

4 

67,478 

9,021 

722 

47,052 

48,817 

8,818 

41,249 

5,993 

354,266 

39 

944 



1,182 

37 

1,922 

137 

29,809 

135,523 

1 

612 

3,456 

292 

702 

25,103 

8,385 

592 

9 

2,784 

4,134 

934 



3,964 

220 

62,196 

51,184 

1,723 
10,257 



21,825 
6,911 
1,966 
5,479 

11,364 
4,727 

36 

82,711 

14 

367 



420 

3,479 

286 



Aliens ^iti- 
_2ens_ 



226,607 



126.381 



1,925 
139 
20,710 
16,169 
324 
4,533 



24 

10,630 
3,117 
1,350 
1,759 
7,622 
2,045 

25 



15 

1,767 

16 



535.977 



953 

2,039 

81 

41,486 

35,015 

1,399 

5,724 

19 

5,528 

30,656 

74 

4 

11,195 

3,794 
616 

3,720 
3,742 
2,682 

II 

47,895 

11 



344 
2,647 



1 
4,715 
7,646 



2,390 
632 
14 



90,550 

1,544 

217,040 

272,528 

22,340 
57,757 
79,697 
143,835 
1,232 
114 

103,825 

6,852 

157 

56,319 

66,013 

13,930 

65,854 

6,578 

529,632 

72 

1,506 

3^3.787 



138 

7,196 

1,226 

50 

2,763 

218 

33,099 

222,211 

3 

684 

4,396 

178 

918 

32,861 

8,057 

634 

3,375 
4,394 
1,256 



Aliens Citi- 
zens 



1,578 
18,187 



77,042 
89,502 



27,239 
27,446 
40,968 
1,090 
18 

47,542 

1,625 

51 

12,987 

20,938 

7,794 

24,605 

596 

223,26 

4. 

664 

119.450 



21 



850 

32 

8,005 

94,334 

2 

240 

1,239 

24 

230 

10,148 

304 

56 

642 
266 
339 



PASSENGERS DEPARTED FRO.-J THE UNITED STATES, DY SEA AND AIR, 
TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES, BY COUNTRY OF DEBARKATION i 
YE,\R ENDED JUNE 30, 1965 (Cont'd) 

ji^xclusive of Canadian travel over land borders/ 



Country of 
debarkation 



Citi- 
zens 



By sga 



Citi 
zens 



Africa 

Algeria 

Cameroon 

Cape Verde Islands 

Congo 

Congo, Republic of the 

Da homey 

Ethiopia 

Gha na 

Gu i nea 

Ivory Coast 

Kenya 

Liberia 

Libya 

Morocco 

Mozambique 

Nigeria 

St. Helena 

Senega 1 

Sierra Leone 

South Africa 

Sudan 

Tanganyika 

Tunisia 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 

Upper Volta 

Zanzibar 

Oceania 

American Samoa 

Australia 

Cook Islands 

Fiji 

Gilbert and Ellis Islands ... 

New Caledonia 

New Guinea 

New Hebrides (Br. ) 

New Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U.S. Adm. ) . 

Polynesia French 

Tonga 

Wake and Midway Islands 

Western Samoa 

North America 

Canada 

Greenland 

Mexico 

St. Pierre and Miquelon 

West Indies 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Bermuda 

Cayman Islands 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 



16.258 



44 

12 

365 

28 

36 

1,062 

324 

105 

369 

2,902 

2,387 

1,377 

56 

2,773 

63 

1,712 



33,076 

419 

508 

1 

9,934 

23 , 508 

14,060 

1 

4,324 



27,595 

3,501 

426,821 

,030,145 

419,065 

12,327 

161,346 

3,769 

1,902 



11 


33 


44 


2 


10 


12 


117 


248 


15 


17 


11 


_ 


3 


33 


36 


268 


794 


36 


87 


237 


22 


36 


69 


39 


8 


361 


83 


710 


2,192 


116 


129 


2,258 


65 


319 


1,058 


884 


3 


53 


56 


628 


2,145 


77 


16 


47 


54 


470 


1,242 


39 


32 


36 


68 


510 


989 


531 


6 


2 


8 


_ 


91 


5 


25 


176 


_ 


474 


2,615 


220 



565 
10,044 



6,454 
6,525 



15,000 

270 

154,556 

3 

317,004 

83,416 

4,530 

23,503 

1,451 

43 

64,416 



6,116 

J 
9,000 



272 



2o5 



713,141 
335,649 
7,797 
137,843 
2,318 
1,859 
24,872 



9 
6,190 



5,694 
636 
336 



66,769 

12,764 

73 

11,890 

32 

170 

1,406 



4,766 
285 



990 

4,179 

41,064 

1,342 

31 

5,822 

26 

14 

1,206 



9 
1,424 



778 
3,476 



25,705 
11,422 



28 

1,026 
302 
66 
286 
2,786 
2,322 
493 

2,696 

9 

1.673 



201 

2,869 

21 



91.307 

3,260 

9,970 

3 

32,659 



309 



4,240 
22,872 
13,674 

4,318 
2 



25,827 

3,501 

419,166 

963,376 
406,301 
12,254 
149,456 
3,737 
1,732 
87,882 



3,045 
5,998 
6,403 



14,010 

270 

150,377 

3 

275,940 

82,074 

4,499 

17,681 

1,425 

29 

63,210 



89 



PASoENGEHS DEPARTED FUOM THE UNITED JTATEij, BY bEA AND AIR, 
TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES, BY COUNTRY OF DEBARKATION: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1965 (Cont'd) 

Exclusive of Canadian travel over land borders/ 



Country of 
debarkation 



Dv sea and a 



fY sea 



Citi- 
zens 



North America (Cont'd): 
'.'est Indies (Cont'd): 

Guadeloupe 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Leeward Islands: 

Antigua 

British Virgin Islands 

Montserrat 

St. Christopher 

.Martinique 

Netherlands I'Jest Indies 
Trinidad and Tobago .... 

Turks and Caicos 

Windward Islands: 

Dominica 

Grenada 

St. Lucia 

St. Vincent 

Central America 

British Honduras 

Canal Zone and Panama .. 

Costa Rica 

El Sa Ivador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

South America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

British Guiana 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

French Guiana 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Surinam (Neth. Guiana) ... 

Urugua y 

Venezue la 

Cruise 

Bermuda 

Caribbean 

Europe and Mediterranean . 

Far East 

Nassau, Bahamas 

Southern South America ... 

World cruise 

Other countries 

Flag of Carrier: 

United States 

Foreign 



172,629 

30,476 
43,067 
73 
5,543 
2,370 
44,161 
16,545 
178 



10 
1,447 



145.087 



6,295 
71,952 
9,220 
9,288 
32,850 
8,775 
6,707 



1,206 
19,515 
7,378 



9 
893 
14 

71.873 



3,446 
27,678 
5,744 
6,363 
18,442 
5,457 
4,743 

161.993 



2,429 

3,703 

124,667 

23,529 
11,043 



^4,646 

9,167 

143 



73.214 



3,782 

169 

1,319 



3,670 
125 
671 



2,849 
44,274 
3,476 
2,925 
14,408 
3,318 
1,964 



89.741 



7.777 



171,310 

38,438 
9,740 
73 
5,345 
2,329 
43,079 
16,135 
176 



132.803 



11,475 
71 
12 



6,293 
60,477 
9,149 
9,276 
32,753 
8,153 
6,702 

242.933 



2,632 

5,316 

47,291 

14,929 
4,817 
43 
3,704 
1,136 
18,895 
7,275 
34 



67.366 



3,445 
23,665 
5,702 
6,353 
18,406 
5,052 
4,743 

1 57. 09^ 



25,184 

2,050 
39,572 

2,198 
11,261 
58,127 
12,848 
112 

1,107 

29,954 

626 

2,832 
65,863 

343,028 
35,142 
72,446 
18,298 



205,866 
2,847 
2,111 
1,332 



22,502 
1,183 



8,568 

35 

634 

19,430 

216 

1,869 

40,451 

20,202 

1,236 

4,797 

849 

665 

12,279 

176 

148 

52 



553,706 
,181,233 



7,739 

864 

17,070 

1,015 

3,686 

17,228 

4,280 

77 

473 

10,524 

410 

963 

25,412 

322,826 
33,906 
67,649 
17,449 
4,321 
193,587 
2,671 
1,963 



,535,098 
,549,823 



2,561 

343,028 
35,142 
72,446 
18,298 
4,986 
205,866 
2,847 
2,111 
1,332 



20,202 

1,236 

4,797 

849 

665 

12,279 

176 

148 

52 



322,. 
33,906 
67,649 
17,449 

4,3: 

193,587 
2,671 
1,963 
1,280 



119,749 
466,228 



24,029 

2,050 
37,720 

2,148 
10,626 
57,235 
12,158 
109 

1,107 

29,139 

574 

2,736 
63,302 



16,951 

1,186 

21,209 

1,150 

7,263 

40,398 

8,287 

32 

634 

19,189 

202 

1,833 



,945,125 
,062,151 



529,776 1,415,349 
978,556 1,083,595 



Ive of Canadla 



tl over land border^/ 



By its «Ptl ffh 



Alaska, Anchorage 



TUCB 

Los Angeles . . . . 

San Diego 

San Francisco . . 

Quebec 

Hartford 

Washington 

Jacksonville ... 

Mlaal 

Fort Everglades 

West Palm Beach 

Agana 

Honolulu 

Chicago 

New Orleans 



P. R., 
S. C., 
Tex., 



HcCulre A.F.E 

Newark 

New York 

Niagara Falls 



Charleston .. 

Dallas 

Houston 

San Antonio . 

Norfolk 

Charlotte Ana 
Frederlksted 
Seattle 



Anchorage . . 

Tucson 

Los Angeles 
San Diego . . 
San Franclsc 

Quebec 

Hartford ... 
Washington . 
Jacksonville 



Guaa, 

Hawaii, 

111., 



West Palm Beach 

Agsna 

Honolulu 

Chicago 



Baltinore 

Boston 

Detroit 

HcGulre A.F.B. 

New York 

Niagara Falls . 

Cleveland 

Philadelphia .. 
Pittsburgh 



, Charleston 

Dallas 

Houston 

San Antonio 

Norfolk 

, Charlotte Amalie 

Frederlksted 

, Seattle 

ports 



30,285 

2,729 

771,854 

110,202 

3,319 

69,7 37 

26,068 
196,620 
162,305 

72,609 



89 , 305 
25,590 
86,784 

7,491 
,431,056 

2,416 

2,921 
19,413 

1,927 
210,685 
16.824 
14,024 
45,876 
64,203 

6,437 
49,937 
ll,«19 
37,827 
15,492 



69 , 804 

2,560 

101,435 



398 

270,393 

20.649 

1,497 

14.621 

12,775 

89,303 

48,414 

24,632 

1,595 

24,533 

7,247 

7,949 

453 

948,938 

768 

447 

3,936 

253 

126,832 

1,876 

4,522 

20,373 

19,860 

1,740 

35.702 

8,772 

15,073 

4,957 



21,937 

5,872 

136,834 

3,621 



55,116 
13.293 
107.317 
113.891 
47,977 

4.849 
64,772 
18,343 
78,835 

7.038 
1.482,118 

1,648 

2,474 
15.477 

1.674 
83.853 
14,948 

9.502 
25,503 
44,343 

4,697 
14,235 

3,147 
21,754 
10,535 



15,674 

1,678 

24,639 

4,276 

62 

7 

2,005 

150.302 

55.902 

528 

3.186 

4,252 

28,089 

7,012 



1,313 
1,037 
1,134 



3,039 
1,423 
13,146 

5,699 
1,705 
1,475 



222,595 

5,084 

90,597 

635 



621,552 
54,300 

2,791 
66.551 
21,816 
168,531 
162,305 
65,597 

3,702 
86,696 
25,446 
86,784 

7,491 
,975,825 

2,416 

2,607 
17,355 

1,927 
178,878 
15,831 
14,024 
44,545 
54,203 

3,101 
15,432 
11,542 
37,130 

9.405 



69,804 
2,560 

92.858 
2,244 



259,754 
5,031 
1.179 



23,319 

558 

23.399 

7,129 

7,949 

453 

827,031 

758 

265 

3,454 

253 

107,973 

1,373 

4,522 



8,518 
8,673 
15,754 



.81?.8 



37,538 

1,551 

32,959 

1,730 

746,971 

101,544 

4,316 

58,828 

41,985 

240,317 

155,572 

57,726 

3,753 

121,596 

10.892 

72.759 

4.020 

,355.295 

2,352 

3,502 

15.737 

152,076 
18,381 
14,193 
39,493 
58,254 
5,894 
46,993 
17,142 
48,435 
10,051 



65,584 
3,315 

81,458 
3,732 

12,358 

198 

6,755 

231 

260,625 

21,791 

1,905 

4,505 

15,675 

109,852 

40,771 

22,578 

426 

33,416 



81,642 

744 

4,392 

15,830 

19,554 
1,084 

35,328 
9,303 
8,530 
3,231 



25,785 
5,495 
133,809 
5,579 
25,270 

1,353 
26,214 

1,499 
485,345 
79,753 

2,411 
54,323 



3,327 
88,280 

8,757 
70,098 

3,875 
1,493,923 

2.023 

3,224 
14,554 

70,434 
17,537 

9,801 
23,663 
38,710 

4,810 
11,555 

7,839 
39,905 

5,820 



7,402 

630 

3.777 



1,323 
145.742 
54,756 

5.170 
3,317 
26,025 

8,328 
1,481 
13,554 



1,113 
135,754 
37,293 



345,212 

14 
1,588 



53,658 

38.659 

214,292 

156,572 

59,398 

2,272 

108,142 

10,892 

72,759 

4,020 

,885,343 

2,352 

3,457 

14.927 



144.020 
17.273 
14,193 
39,447 
58,264 
1,955 
13,481 
16,745 
47,585 
5,200 



55.584 
3.315 
74,065 



250,538 
4,328 
1,905 
4,218 
13,085 
97,308 
40,771 
20,852 
85 
27,588 
2,135 
2,571 



4,392 
15,827 
19,554 



7,962 
9,298 
8,166 



206-147 — 66 O- 



91 



Nationality 

TOTAL ALIENS 

PERMANENT RESIDENTS 

Albania 

Bslglum 

Czechoslovakia 

Estonia 

Finland 

Ireland 

Italy 

Luxembourg 

Netherlands 

Poland '.'...'..'. 

Portuga 1 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Saltzerlend 

United Klngdon 

U.S.S.R 

Yugos lavla 

Other Europe . . i 

China 2/ 

India 

Indones la 

Iran 

l"q 

ja^n .;:!:::::::;:::.■.'::;:!:: 

Lebanon 

Pakistan 

Palestine 

Philippines , 

Other Asia 

North America 

Mexico '. '...'...'.'.'...'.'.... 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic < 

Jamaica 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

South America 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

iouth Africa 

Tunisia 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) . 
Other Africa , 

Oceania , 

Australia , 

New Zealand 

Other Oceania , 

Statelets , 

All other 

OTHER THAN PERMANENT RESIDEMTS .... 



2,914 
2,927 

10,235 
603 
3,707 
4,991 
3,983 
1,230 

54,468 
3,763 
3,628 



91,733 

315,505 

6,544 



4,263 
7,795 
3,567 



4,339 
1,036 
1,503 



40,727 
2,568 
32,733 



3,834 


2,160 


2,812 


4,605 


4,728 


3,831 


3,765 


23,480 


1,586 


711 






87 


24 


1,814 


2,861 




1,347 


23,010 


14,969 



17,845 
1,304 
38,926 



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- 3 



TABLE 36. ALIEN POPIXATION 
/All. 



STATES OF RESIDENCEi 1940, 1951, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, AND 1965 



1951, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964 AND 1965_7 





..mbor 


Percent 


* ' j ° 




1951 




1961 


1962 




1964 


1965 


IW 


1951 


1960 


1961 


196J 


196.1 


1964 


196'-, 






2.265.032 


2.948.973 




3.128.765 


3.236.684 


3.335.591 


3.393.209 


100.0 




100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 




5,132 
3,405 
31,954 
3,389 
542,464 

27,473 
158,123 
6,428 
14,752 
41,327 

5,187 
91,447 

8,232 
325,070 
44,385 

24,648 
15,955 
5,558 
17,310 
47,233 

37,792 
364,421 
303,103 

61,433 
3,219 

43,550 
13,777 
18,933 
6,118 
30,538 

279,199 

12,402 

1,257,501 

4,20f7 

10,482 

203,038 
6,946 

34,424 
370,020 

52,570 

2,188 

5)137 
213,898 
10,487 

15,927 
10,093 
81,636 
23,662 
75,127 
5,917 

14,854 
3,853 


2,426 
1,103 
24,061 
1,418 
326,158 

13,598 
71,223 
2,571 
9,314 
26,011 

3,061 
66,181 
3,791 
110,563 
18,852 

9,826 
6,127 
2,873 
7,678 
18,931 

22,156 
146,028 
128,816 

19. 970 
1,698 

15,274 
4,738 
6,897 
2,991 

11,031 

118,580 
6,294 

545,990 
3,959 
2,790 

77,351 
2,811 
16,947 
98,481 
20,369 

1,471 
1,822 
3,065 
165,927 
8,848 

45)097 
6,940 

17,293 
2,108 

3,193 
1,378 

11,965 


4,583 
2,597 
35,163 
2,147 
567,484 

19,536 
75,298 
4,942 
17,766 
83,577 

9,006 
51,316 

199 ',405 
29,269 

9,938 
10,650 

5,355 
13,001 
19,967 

28,411 
127,710 
141,719 

25,439 
2,810 

21,162 
5,263 
7,755 
4,465 

10,344 

151,437 
12,712 

553,703 
10,173 
2,865 

108,892 
6,239 

18,421 
126,073 

17,743 

3,879 
2,370 
5,401 
237,514 
12,260 

18)825 
51,217 

6,409 
34,684 

2,491 

8,172 
3)286 


4,494 
2,699 
36,890 
2,173 
617,733 

19,340 
76,869 
5,023 
15,494 
117,619 

8,958 
50,101 

4,808 
197,197 
29,095 

10,644 
11,103 
5,287 
13,404 
20,206 

28,832 
128,458 
144,456 

22,711 
2,850 

20,732 
5,138 

4)680 
10,263 

154,661 
13,033 

563,700 
8,657 
3,012 

109,299 
6,256 

19,049 
123,382 

17,483 

4,198 
2,293 
5,669 
233,579 
12,202 

16)711 
51,684 

6,182 
33,601 

2,451 

3)556 
3,755 


4,585 
3,205 
40,242 
2,316 
660,418 

19,921 
75,100 
4,392 
16,436 
155,810 

9,549 
49,196 

199)001 
27,817 

10,349 
11,228 
5,248 
14,185 
20,081 

29,455 
130,462 
135,378 

22,522 
2,943 

20,076 
5,196 
7,528 
5,262 

10,464 

14)615 

574,637 

9,339 

3,127 

96,561 
7,262 
20,123 
119,058 
17,678 

4,312 
2,354 
6,068 
237,749 
11,992 

7,473 
17,399 
52,016 

6,101 
34,489 

2,412 

5,952 
15,581 


4,640 
2,945 
41,754 
2,432 
710,419 

21,090 
77,153 
4,154 
15,032 
182,250 

10,322 
48,025 
4,708 
194,279 
27,392 

10,359 
10,833 
5,988 
16,157 
20,280 

132)774 

129,160 

21,880 

3,402 

20,223 
5,227 
7,442 
6,080 

10,614 

159,549 
15,139 

600,468 
9,550 
3,099 

92.778 
7,620 
20,476 
109,737 
17,559 

5,355 
'2,299 
6,345 
241,001 
12,408 

7,600 

52)930 
5,944 

33,405 
2,580 

6,985 
21,805 
6,699 


5,271 

2,r76 

43,865 

2,715 

767,022 

21,124 
78,371 
3,711 
17,221 
175,443 

11,661 
47,616 
4,432 
203,406 
27,013 

9,861 
11,160 

6,293 
17,685 
20,007 

31,773 
135,341 
135,412 

21,771 
3,641 

20,247 
5,135 
7,577 
6,933 

10,851 

172,381 
15,777 

608,120 
10,056 
2,967 

86,958 
8,155 
21,032 
104,549 
17,749 

4,754 
2,112 
6,907 
246,280 
12,656 

7,465 
19,149 
52,054 

5,691 
31,267 

7,424 
7)507 


6,069 
2,822 
43,702 
2,470 
810,400 

21,098 

4)627 
16,610 
175,219 

12,596 
46,352 
4,398 
197,734 
27,552 

10,070 
11,766 
6,612 
17,646 
20,040 

33,639 
133,000 
131,210 

20,883 
3,195 

20,381 
4,946 
7,410 

11)121 

176,835 
17,003 

520,119 
11,420 
2,977 

82,320 
8,844 
22,312 
102,465 
17,507 

4,858 
2,024 
7,163 
245,330 
13,000 

7,459 
22,854 
50,914 

5,452 
32,296 

2,352 

7,662 
30,608 
7,955 


0.1 
0.1 

0.1 
10.8 

0.5 

0.1 
0.3 

1)3 
0.2 
6.5 
0.9 

0.5 
0.3 

0)3 
0.9 

0.8 

11 

1:1 

0)3 
0.4 
0.1 
0.6 

5.6 
0.2 

25.1 
0.2 
4.1 

7)4 
1.0 

l\ 

0.1 
4.3 
0.2 

0.3 
0.2 
1.6 
0.5 

0)1 
0.1 


0)1 
1.1 
0.1 

0.6 
3.2 
0.1 

1.2 

0.1 
2.9 
0.2 
4.9 
0.8 

0.4 
0.3 
0.1 

0)3 

1.0 
6.5 

0)9 
0.1 

0)2 
0.3 
0.1 
0.5 

5.2 
0.3 

3.4 

0)7 
4.3 
0.9 

0.1 
0.1 
0.1 
7.3 

0.3 
0.4 
2.0 
0.3 

0)1 

0)1 
0.5 


0)1 

1.2 
19)2 

2)5 
0.2 
0.5 
2.8 

1)7 
0.2 
6.7 
1.0 

0.3 
0.3 
0.2 
0.4 
0.7 

0.9 
4.3 

0)9 
0.1 

0.7 
0.2 
0.3 
0.2 
0.4 

5.1 
0.4 
18.8 
0.3 
0.1 

3.7 
0.2 
0.6 
4.3 
0.6 

0.1 
0.1 
0.2 
8.1 

0.3 
0.6 
1.7 

1.2 
0.1 

0.3 
0)1 


0.1 
0.1 
1.2 

20)3 

0.6 
2.5 
0.2 
0.5 
3.9 

1.6 

0.2 
6.5 
1.0 

0.4 
0.4 
0.2 
0.4 
0.7 

0.9 
4.2 

V. 

0.1 

0)2 
0.2 
0.2 

5.1 
0.4 
18.6 
0.3 
0.1 

0.2 

4)1 

0.5 

0.1 
0.1 
0.2 

0.2 
0.5 
1.7 
0.2 
1.1 
0.1 

0.2 

oil 


0.1 
0.1 
1.3 
0.1 
21.1 

0.6 

0.1 
0.5 

0.3 
1.5 
0.2 
6.3 
0.9 

0.3 
0.4 
0.2 
0.5 
0.5 

0.9 

0)7 
0.1 

0)2 
0.2 
0.2 

4.9 
0.5 
18.4 
0.3 
0.1 

3.1 

0)5 
3.3 
0.6 

0.1 
0.1 
0.2 
7.6 

0)5 
1.7 

1.1 
0.1 

0.2 
0)2 


0)1 
1.3 
0.1 
22.0 

0)1 
0.5 
5.5 

0)1 
6.0 
0.9 

0.3 
0.3 

0)5 
0.5 

0.9 
4.1 

0)7 
0.1 

0.6 
0)2 
0.2 
0.2 
0.3 

5.0 
0.5 
18.5 
0.3 
0.1 

3.0 

0)5 
3.4 
0.5 

0.2 
0.1 
0.2 

0.2 
0.5 
1.6 
0.2 
1.0 

0)2 


o!l 
1.3 

0.5 

0)1 
0.5 
5.3 

1.4 
0.1 
5.1 
0.3 

0.3 
0.3 

0)5 
0.5 

1.0 

0)7 
0.1 

0)2 

5.2 
18.2 

2.5 

0)5 
3.2 
0.5 

0.1 
0.1 
0.2 

0)5 
1.5 
0.2 
0.9 
0.1 

0.2 
0)2 




Alaska 

Arizona .. .. 


0.1 
1.3 










Colorado 


6 


Lonnecticut 


2.4 




0.1 


District of Columbia .. 


0.5 






Hawaii 


1.4 


Idaho 

Illinois . . . 


0.1 

5.8 














Kentucky 

Louisiana 


0.2 
0.5 










Massachusetts 


3.9 


icnigan 


3.9 






Mississippi 


0.1 


M^^ta"'' 




Nebraska 




evada 


0.2 












0.5 


New York 

North Carolina 


18.3 
0.3 
0.1 






Oklahoma 




Oreaon 








Rhode Island 

South Carolina 


0.5 

O.l 
0.1 






Texas 




Vermont 


0.2 






West Virginia 


0.2 


"y<""ln9 

U.S. Terr, and Poss i 
Guam 


0.1 




0.9 
0.2 


Virgin Islands 







TABLE 37. DECLARATIONS OF INTENTION FILED, PETITIONS FOR NATURALIZATION FILED, 
PERSONS NATURALIZED, AND PETITIONS FOR NATURALIZATION DENIED: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1907 - 1965 



Period 



Declara- 
tions 
_lil£d_ 



Petitions 
__£iigd_ 



Persojis natura lized 



Civilian. 



^Hitayy 



.Total. 



1907 - 1965 



1907 - 1910 
1911 - 1920 
1921 - 1930 



1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 
1940 



1941 - 1950 

1941 

1942 

1943 

1944 

1945 

1946 .... 

1947 .... 

1948 .... 

1949 

1950 



1951 - 1960 

1951 

1952 

1953 

1954 

1955 

1956 

1957 

1958 

1959 

1960 



1961 
1962 
1963 
1964 
1965 



8.608.797 



g.844.9^Q 



7.785.596 



^4^2^ 



■309.801 



526.322 



164.036 



111-738 



ill. 7?? 



?. 696,999 



l.?91.?84 



984.^7^ 



^44.?0Q 



1.128.97^ 



2.799.014 



l.?84.^77 



1.716.979 



56.206 



1-773.185 



1931 - 1940 1.369.479 



1.6?7.11? 



1-498.573 



19,891 



1.^18.464 



106,272 
101,345 
83,046 
108,079 
136,524 
148,118 
176,195 
150,673 
155,691 
203,536 

920.284 



224,123 
221,796 
115,664 
42,368 
31,195 
28,787 
37,771 
60,187 
64,866 
93,527 

?2?.918 



145,474 
131,062 
112,629 
117,125 
131,378 
167,127 
165,464 
175,413 
213,413 
278,028 

1-938.066 



140,271 
136,598 
112,368 
110,867 
118,945 
140,784 
162,923 
158,142 
185,175 
232,500 

1.837.229 



3,224 

2 

995 

2,802 

481 
2,053 
3,936 
3,638 
2,760 

149.799 



91 ,497 
111,461 
23,558 
9,100 
10,855 
12,870 
15,911 
16,196 
16,115 
16,255 

15,921 
15,120 
14,478 
14,374 
13,078 



277,807 

343,487 

377,125 

325,717 

195,917 

123,864 

88,802 

68,265 

71,044 

66,038 

l.S30,48? 



275 

268 

281 

392 

208 

134 

77 

69 

64 

64 



,747 
,762 
,459 
,766 
,707 
,849 
,442 
,080 
,138 
,279 



1-148.241 



1,547 

1,602 

37,474 

49,213 

22,695 

15,213 

16,462 

1,070 

2,456 

2,067 

41.705 



143,495 
136,600 
113,363 
113,669 
118,945 
141,265 
164,976 
162,078 
188,813 
235,260 

1.987.028 



277,294 

270,364 

318,933 

441,979 

231,402 

150,062 

93,904 

70,150 

66,594 

66,346 

1.189.946 



61,634 
94,086 
98,128 
130,722 
213,508 
137,701 
140,547 
117,344 
109,270 
127,543 

138,718 
129,682 
121,170 
113,218 
106,813 



53,741 
87,070 
90,476 
104,086 
197,568 
138,681 
137,198 
118,950 
102,623 
117,848 

130,731 
124,972 
121,618 
109,629 
101,214 



975 

1,585 

1,575 

13,745 

11,958 

7,204 

845 

916 

1,308 

1,594 

1,719 
2,335 
2,560 
2,605 
3,085 



54,716 
88,655 
92,051 
117,831 
209,526 
145,885 
138,043 
119,866 
103,931 
119,442 

132,450 
127,307 
124,178 
112,234 
104,299 



TABLE 37A, PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY GENERAL AND SPECIAL NATURALIZATION PRCVISICNSi 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1961 - 1965 



Naturalization provisions 



1961- 



J.261. 



j5§a. 



19^3 



1964 



Total 

General provisions 
Special provisions 



S. 



Persons married to U. 

citizens 

Children, including adopted 
children of U. S. citizen 
parents 

Former U. S. citizens who 
lost citizenship by 
marriage 

Philippine citizens who 
entered the United States 
prior to May 1, 1934, and 
have resided continuously 
in the United States 

Persons who served in U. S. 
armed forces for three 
years 

Persons who served in U. S. 
aimed forces during World 
War I, World War II or the 
Korean hostilities X/ .,.. 

Lodge Act enlistees 

Persons who served on certain 
U. S. vessels 

Former U. S. citizens who 
lost citizenship by enter- 
ing the armed forces of 
foreign countries during 
World War II 

Nationals but not citizens 
of the United States 

Persons naturalized under 
private law 

Other 



127.307 



2^,m. 



m^m. 



455,656 
144.912 



104,341 

29.199 



98,739 
29.^9 



93,325 

3<?.9M 



82,621 

29.^13 



89,570 

42,245 

302 

141 
7,775 



4,216 
313 



18,674 

7,416 

115 

116 
1,175 



492 
52 



133 



y Section 22(b), Act of Septenfcer 26, 1961, 
added J "or the Korean hostilities". 



22 



17,379 
8,723 

55 

17 
1,482 



790 
63 



37 



19,048 

9,136 

53 



1.640 



820 
100 



17,867 

9,056 

41 

1 
1,782 



749 
74 



26 



96 



I 
1 



PERSONS KAIURALIZED, BY GENERAL AND SPECIAL NATURAUZATION IDWISIONS 
AND COUNTRY CR REGIOM OF FCBltR ALLEGIANCE I 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1965 



S»e Table 39A for detai 


od figures b 


y naturallzat 


on provisions. 


7 












Persons 


laturalized 






Country or region 




Under 










of former 


Total 


general 


Married 


Children 






allegiance 


number 


natural- 
ization 


U. S. 


of U. S. 
citizen 


Military 


Other 


All countries 


104.299 


76.630 


16.602 


7.914 


3.085 


^ 


Europe 




' ' 


1P.177 






27 


Albanlt 


1S5 


145 










Austria 


1,063 


863 


121 


76 


2 




Belgium 


406 


323 


51 


29 


3 




Bulgaria 


96 


83 


7 


1 


5 




Czechoslovakia 


658 


580 




19 


16 




Denmark 


374 


302 


57 


7 






Estonia 


159 


148 




5 


1 




Finland 


280 


228 


32 


15 


5 




Franco 


1,521 


935 


458 


98 


30 




Germany 


14,929 


9,373 


3,636 


1,575 


343 




Greece 


3,256 


1,900 


941 


400 


13 




Hungary 


4,054 


3,757 


82 


104 


HI 




Ireland 


3,322 


2,995 


122 


142 






Italy 


10,742 


8,054 


1,656 


979 


48 




1 atYla 


545 


501 


23 


8 


13 




Lithuania 


498 


466 


9 


13 


11 




1 uxombourg 


61 


33 


10 


15 






Netherlands 


2,503 


2,164 


174 


93 


72 




Nomay 


527 


433 


71 


14 






Poland 


4,017 


3,556 


196 


221 


42 




Portugal 


1,718 


1,258 


165 


292 






Rumania 


387 




19 




2 




Spain 


679 


361 


264 


52 








403 


337 


42 


11 


10 




Switzerland 


623 


525 


73 


14 


11 




Turkey 


425 


272 


144 


7 






United Kingdom 


9,370 


7,168 


1,580 


449 


170 




USSR 


1,071 


1,014 


22 


22 


8 




Yugoslavia 


2,013 


1,792 


147 


57 


17 




Other Europe 


165 


123 


26 


12 




. 


Asia 


14.680 










7 


(hlnaV 


3,692 


2,236 


597 




431 


l 


India 


202 


117 


68 


15 


2 




Indonesia 


55 




11 








Iran 


295 


177 


96 


22 






Iraq 


150 


99 


42 




2 




Israel 


2,883 


2,453 


256 


170 






Japan 


2,660 




1,613 


377 






Jordan 


390 


270 




27 


y 




Korea 


1,027 


162 


533 


329 


3 




I ebanon 


343 




81 


33 






Pakistan 


46 


25 


19 


2 


_ 




Palestine 


82 


69 


10 


2 


J 




Philippines 






564 


241 


897 




Syrian Arab Republic 


'l29 


88 


37 








Other Asia 2/ 


227 


125 


60 


34 


8 




North America 


18.626 




1.737 


1.200 


571 


10 


Canada 


8,489 




949 


6ii 


257 




Mexico 

Cube 

Dominican Republic 


5,080 


4,285 


295 


352 




1 


2,522 
261 


2,180 
227 


186 

25 


95 


5 




Haiti 


217 


197 


11 


(, 




Jamaica 


481 


365 


83 


20 


12 




Trinidad and Tobago 




50 


25 








Costa Rica 


188 


131 


18 


31 


I 




El Salvador 


106 


87 


12 




* 




Guatemala 


120 


89 


13 


10 






Honduras 
Nicaragua 


278 
194 


227 
168 


24 
12 


16 

5 


9 
9 




Panama 


610 


438 


B4 








South America 


2.136 












Argentina 


^655 - 


^*^ 


53 








Bolivia 


111 


82 




11 


5 




Brazil 


241 


180 


34 


23 


3 




Chi le 

Colombia 


179 
381 


139 

282 


26 


6 
41 


16 




Ecuador 


203 


166 


20 








Peru 


175 


123 


34 


3 


15 




Venezuela 


133 


97 


18 


17 




Other Sooth America 2/ 


58 


43 


1 




Africa 
















103 


56 










South Africa 

Tunisia 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 

Other Africa 2/ 


85 
295 
70 


73 
74 
242 
48 


26 
6 

14 


7 


1 
1 




Oceania 


aiL_ 


369 


79 


15 


11 




New Zealand! !!!!!!!!!.';;;;;!!;!!;;;!;;;;;;;■.;;;; ";;;;;; 


321 
67 
86 


258 


54 
16 
9 


2 
6 


2 




other Oceania 2/ 


63 


8 




U. S. possessions 

Stateless and not reported 


269 
1,438 


123 
1,258 


93 
68 


25 
70 


23 

25 


J* 


i/ Includes Foinosa. 2/ Independent countries. 















FORMER ALLEGIANCE 1 



Country or region 



Bolglum 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 



Luxembourg . 
Netherlands 

Portuga 1 



U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia .. 
Other Europe 



Philippines 

Syrian Arab Republic 
Other Asia 2/ 



South Africa 

Tunisia 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 4/ 
Other Africa 2/ 



Other Oceania 2/ , 



6,32( 
4,178 
19,490 
179,652 
39,309 
38,465 
37,134 
120,756 
19,742 
13,528 
799 
24,702 



8,569 
6,821 
6,717 



2,070 
1,025 
14,452 
33,644 
2,740 
7,384 
3,085 
385 



754 



100,397 


11,539 


59,789 


6,958 


19,577 


1,372 


2,606 




1,222 


68 


1,056 


- 



y Includes Formosa. 

2/ Independent countries. 

J/ Included in United Kingdom prior to 1963. 

i/ United Arab Republic Includes Egypt only pri 

From 1959 to 1962 Syrian Arab Republic Is 
S/ Tunisia la included in France In 1956. 



3,6 
9,056 
4,482 
2,391 

2,0 
1.2 
16,582 



2,130 
20,4 
3,370 
2,541 
3,259 
8,462 
2,511 
1,487 



1,920 
18,442 
2,457 



2,078 
7,6 



11,303 
3,372 
2,211 



3,507 
17,449 
1,055 



9,601 
4,303 
12,171 



9,479 
5,213 
2,683 



AIXEGIAHCE 



1(1 

■ah 






S2 t Hi 



All countries 

Austria 

Belgium 

Czechoslovakia , 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Italy ..'.'.'.'.'.'.'.. 

Lithuania 

Luxembourg 

Netherlands 

Poland 

Spam ...'.'. 

Switzerland 

United Kingdom . 

U. S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe . . . 

Asia 

China V 

India 

Iran 

Japan 

Korea '. '. 

Palestine 

Philippines 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Jamaica '///^'.'.y.'..... '....'.'.'. 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Honduras 

South America 

Argentina 

BraiH 

Bolivia 

Chilo 

Colo«i>ia 

Venexuela 

Othor South Aimrica 2/ 

Africa 

South Africa '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

Tunisia 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Othor Africa 2/ 

Australia 

New Zealand 

Other Oceania 2/ 

Statela 
V Inc 
2/ 



8,489 
5,080 
2,522 



TABLE 


41. PERSONS 


NATURALIZED, BY 


COUNTRY OR REGION OF FORMER 










ALLEGIANCE, SEX. AND ACE: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1965 










plr."i. 


Ma 




Country or region of 




Under 


18- 


20- 


30- 


40- 


50- 


60- 


70- 


80 


fornier allegiance 




Total 


18 


19 


29 


39 


49 


59 


69 


79 


years 
















Jt£Sl± 


_lMIi 


Yff" 




All countrle. 




48.495 


3.602 


2.'-82 


11.335 


14.122 


8.362 


'■■911 


2.622 






Europe 






2.207 


1.659 


7,736 




5.026 


2.912 




427 




Albania 


155 








15 




35 






5 


I 




1,063 


426 


43 


45 


70 


119 




32 


32 






Betglu. 


406 


168 


14 


5 


27 


61 


32 


18 




3 




Bulgaria 


96 


72 


- 




14 


25 


17 


9 


5 


1 




Czechoslovakia 


658 


323 






32 


85 




60 


27 


9 




Denmark 


374 




4 


13 






42 


23 


12 








159 


78 


. 


5 


16 


u 


17 






1 




Finland 


280 


117 


8 


6 


32 


24 


25 


11 


8 


3 




France 


1.521 


496 


50 


36 


117 


161 


68 


46 


17 


1 




Germany 


14.929 


5,244 


801 


442 






575 




133 








3.256 


1,688 


174 


55 


'433 


'607 




111 


64 


26 




Hungary 




2,390 


38 


93 


767 


714 


363 


276 


102 


35 




Ireland 


3^322 


1,446 


83 


25 


471 


525 


207 


73 


51 


9 




Italy 


10,742 


5,689 


446 


336 


1.819 


1,599 


653 


583 


189 


58 




Lalvla 


545 


273 


3 


18 


86 


30 


51 


46 


27 


u 




Lllhuanla 




233 














35 






Luxembourg 


61 




9 


. 


I 


6 


2 


4 




1 




Nel her lands 


2,503 


1,373 


48 


80 


333 


442 


305 


122 


33 


10 




Noiway 


527 


249 


3 


10 


65 


81 


48 


25 


13 


4 




Poland 


4,017 


1,941 


81 




293 


317 


570 


352 


131 






Poi cugal 




892 




57 


256 


225 


136 




34 


14 




Rumania 


'387 




I 










29 


13 


12 




Spain 


679 


319 


27 


9 


46 


139 


47 


21 




5 




Sveden 


403 


170 


8 


6 


41 


34 


29 


22 


20 


9 




Svltierland 


623 


287 


10 




41 


168 


39 










Turkay . 


425 


203 




4 


19 




54 


23 


14 


5 




United Klngdoa 


9,370 


3,831 


185 










356 


169 


52 




U.S S X. 








29 


63 


46 


132 


90 


77 


45 




Itugoalavla 


2!ol3 


1,103 


21 


26 


263 


393 


179 


150 


55 


14 




Other Europe 


165 


80 


5 


4 


19 


34 


9 


2 


6 


1 




Aala 










936 


2.275 


1.195 


868 


529 


190 


29 


China 1/ 




2. 087 




58 


206 


384 


482 


320 


291 


127 


14 


India 


202 


152 


11 


2 


17 


81 


25 


3 


5 


6 






55 


27 




1 


8 


6 


7 


4 


1 


. 






295 


183 






25 


101 


31 


6 


8 


1 




Iraq 


150 


100 


5 


1 


25 




16 


8 


2 


2 




la.ael 


2,883 


1.500 


59 




177 










15 




Japan 




353 




16 


51 


48 


10 


23 


33 


16 




Joidan 


'390 


250 


U 


5 


82 


107 


22 


8 


13 


2 




Koiea 


1,027 


216 


105 


6 


28 


63 


10 


1 




1 




Lebanon 


343 


179 


13 




38 


86 


13 


15 


4 


5 






46 


37 




1 










2 






Palestine 






I 


3 


13 


21 


7 


3 




1 




Philippines 


2,499 


1.664 


124 


33 


223 


953 


103 


142 


74 


11 




Syilan Arab Republic 


129 


65 


3 


1 


7 


34 


7 


6 


5 


1 




Other Aala V 


227 


121 


12 


2 


30 


46 


15 


7 


8 






North America 






572 


425 


2.137 




1.642 


870 






63 


Canada 




3,835 


322 




765 


973 


895 




177 


38 


7 


Mexico 


5^080 


2,579 


159 


146 


708 


433 


271 


212 


399 


197 


54 


Cuba 








36 


319 


530 


303 


127 


30 


8 




Dominican Republic 


'26I 


'l04 


3 


6 


36 


37 


16 


3 


2 


1 




Haiti 


217 


94 




2 


23 


40 


19 


5 


1 






Jamaica 


481 


203 


2 




50 


61 




17 


12 


3 




Trinidad and Tobago 




34 




2 




13 


9 










Costa Rica 


188 


71 


9 




19 




6 


8 


. 


. 




El Salvador 


106 














2 


I 






Guatemala 


120 


53 


5 


1 


23 


16 


5 


3 










278 


138 


8 


5 


35 


55 


19 


11 


3 


2 




HI. ar4gua 


N4 


82 








23 




2 




- 




Panama 


610 


240 


15 


9 


90 


57 


38 


27 


I 


3 




South America 


2.l» 


I.IZP 


«4 


43 


Ml 


4ii. 


m 


2jj_ 


V 






Argentina 


655 


366 


11 


8 


54 


160 


79 


43 


10 






BolWla 


111 


62 


3 


5 


20 


20 








2 


. 


Brail 1 














19 


8 


6 


1 




ChlU 


179 


85 


5 


1 


17 


36 


19 


5 


2 


- 




Colombia 


381 


186 


17 


10 


48 


83 


20 


5 


3 








203 


116 


3 




42 


41 








1 




Peru 


175 


110 




3 


34 


53 


16 


3 


1 






Venesuela 




72 


7 








16 


e 


3 


1 




Other South America V 


58 


32 


4 


1 


6 


11 


7 


3 


- 


- 




Afrlra 


656 




13 






117 


67 


34 


20 






Morocco 


103 






















South Africa 


103 


49 


2 


1 


7 


21 


11 


6 


1 






Tunisia 


85 


34 


1 


1 


7 


11 




3 


4 


. 




United Arab Republic (Egypt) 


295 


176 




10 


31 


60 


34 




10 


3 




Other Africa i/ 






2 










1 


3 


- 




Oceania 


474 


232 


4 


14 


33 


71 




33 


13 






Australia 


321 


159 


3 


6 


16 


51 




25 








Ne. Zealand 




28 










6 




1 


2 




Other Oceania 11 


86 


45 


1 


8 


16 


9 


8 


1 


2 


- 




V. S poasesslons 


269 


104 


10 


. 


31 


34 


12 


9 


3 


3 




Stateless and not reported 


1,438 


737 


27 


67 


142 


152 


156 


103 


65 


22 





100 



inn YMti ran 



All countries 

Europ* 

Albania 

Austria 

B«lglu» 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

UtYia 

Lithuania 

LuKenbourg 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Ruaania 

Spain 

S«oden 

Switzerland 

United Klngdoffl 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Aaia 

China i/ 

India 

Indonesia 

Iraq 

Israel 

Jap»n 

Korea 

Pakistan 

Palestine 

Philippines 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Other Asia 2/ 

North Aaerica 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Jamaica ..'..'...'.'.'.'.'.'.'.','.'.'.'.'.'. 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Panama 

South America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colootla 

Venezuela 

Other South America 2/ 

Africa 

Korocco 

South Africa 

Tunisia 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 2/ 

Oceania 

Australia 

New Zealand 

Other Oceania 2/ 

U. S. possessions 

Stateless and not reported .... 

1/ Includes Formosa. 
2/ 



1,025 
9,6 
1,S68 
1,664 



9.755 
4,654 
2,501 
1,129 



TABLE 41A. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY SEX, MARITAL STATUS, MEDIAN AGE, 
AND rJlAJOR OCCUPATION GROUPj YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1961 - 1965 



Sex, marital status, median 
age, and occupation _ 

Total naturalized 

Sex and marital status: 

Males 

Single 

Married ■ 

Widowed 

Divorced • 

Unknown ■ 

Fema les • 

Single ■ 

Married ■ 

Widowed • 

Divorced ■ 

Unknown ■ 

Males per 1,000 females 

Median age (years): 

Both sexes ■ 

Males 

Fema les 

Major occupation group: 

Professional, technical, and kindred workers 

Farmers and farm managers ■ 

Managers, officials, and proprietors, 

except farm 

Clerical, sales, and kindred workers 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers ..... 

Operatives and kindred workers 

Private household workers 

Service workers, except private household .. 

Farm laborers and foremen 

Laborers , except farm and mine 

Housewives, children, and others with 

no occupation 



127.307 



124.J.78 



U^.234 



58.795 



17,438 

39,129 

1,327 



73.655 



12,133 

54,716 

5,411 

1,385 

10 

798 



38.2 
38.8 
37.7 



8,408 
601 

3,814 
10,191 
12,746 
16,078 

2,072 
10,477 

1,121 

7,933 

59,009 



60. 



58.303 



51.408 



19,269 

39,986 

919 

814 



66.319 



18,500 

38,210 

690 

900 

3 

65.875 



16,851 

33,188 

593 

776 



60. { 



12,798 

48,433 

3,776 

1,312 



920 



35.3 
36.0 
34.8 



11,053 
389 

4,059 
11,405 
13,769 
13,456 

1,398 

11,269 

744 

7,086 

52,679 



12,991 

48,616 

2,957 

1,308 

3 

885 



33.8 
34.4 
33.3 



12,714 
269 

4,296 
11,588 
13,411 
11,927 

1,368 

10,362 

553 

5,166 

52,524 



12,705 

44,534 

2,451 

1,136 



33.1 
33.6 
32.7 



11,097 
241 

3,891 
10,279 
11,163 
11,027 

1,142 

9,535 
473 

4,145 

49,241 



102 



PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY STATES OR TERRITORIES OF RESIDENCE: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1956 - 1965 



Total 

Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 
Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Hashington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

U.S. terr. and poss.: 

Guam 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands .. .. 

All other 



3,339 

2,946 
7.762 



11,221 
30,975 
2,365 
7,309 
26,710 

7,419 
15,552 

1.975 
91,838 
14,503 



15,307 
54.807 
53,268 
11,178 
1,573 

10,206 
2,927 
5,273 
2,391 
3,819 

83,409 

3,630 

295,564 

5,198 

1,644 

48,420 

8^126 
48,563 
6,646 

2,847 
1,632 
3,059 
46,282 
5,881 

2,198 
11,762 
20,471 

2,184 
14,870 



179 



2,803 

1,717 

824 



1,301 
3,338 



858 
1,865 



971 
738 
979 
462 
524 

2,002 
6,293 
6,750 
1.935 
173 

1,303 
310 
917 
150 
489 

9,014 

445 

37,612 

681 

158 

5,306 

521 

1,044 

5.843 

844 

256 
285 
473 



18,991 

1.384 
3,620 
305 
1,017 
2,345 

582 



1,832 

5,B89 
6,778 



S,630 
359 



327 
3,835 



690 

123 

16,269 

1,110 
2,91 



2,245 

1,254 
1,220 
174 
9,470 
1,460 



1,472 
5,462 
6,017 



237 

6,053 
400 
752 

5,1 
671 



274 

4,170 

650 



197 

632 

2.212 



436 

1.290 

4.727 

5,568 

955 

123 

919 



3,810 
446 
872 

4,325 
572 

266 



233 
1,149 



1,027 

4,398 

243 



1,239 

2,311 

282 



32.450 127.307 



7 54 

116 

21,010 

1,032 

3,219 

233 



6,364 
5,371 
1,197 



341 

5,326 

643 

204 

936 
1,710 

269 
2,014 

125 



5.613 

5,227 

832 



365 
119 
250 
5.815 
635 

187 



1.273 

3,071 

246 

674 

2,754 



9,461 
1,345 



1,071 
200 
465 



8,31 

37 

28,844 



761 

i,508 

539 



276 

i,835 

620 



139 
20,425 

905 

2,605 

219 

568 

2,887 



370 
486 
438 
513 
432 

1,443 

5.027 

4,073 

79 5 



168 



7,758 

366 

25,195 

548 

124 

3,957 
478 
824 

4,21 
558 

292 
109 
306 
4,518 
475 

160 
1,182 
2,102 



HI 
ill. 

y . 



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104 



TABLE 42B. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY TYPE OF COURT AND STATES 
OR TERRITORIES OF RESIDENCE i YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1965 



State or territory 

9f residence 



Total 

Alabama ■ 

Alaska 

Arizona • 

Arkansas 

Ca li f ornia 

Colorado ■ 

Connecticut ■ 

Delaware • 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

U. S. territories and possessions i 

Guam 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands 



104.299 



289 
305 
862 
125 
18,742 

830 

2,625 

231 

606 

2,659 

736 
1,319 

158 
8,271 

992 

359 
500 
286 
590 
316 

1,353 

4,652 

3,451 

741 

143 

738 
196 
346 
273 



7,128 

234 

24,540 

490 

61 

3,399 
456 
673 

3,611 
590 

245 
144 
269 
4,219 
398 

162 
1,152 
1,522 

123 

1,205 

85 



8^.250 



287 
185 
639 
125 
15,498 

623 

2,152 

231 

606 

2,449 

736 

1,198 

94 

8,035 

992 

359 
329 
286 
589 
179 

1,022 

3,110 

2,358 

676 

143 

738 
17 
332 
172 
79 

2,975 

134 

21,376 

490 

53 

2,689 
246 
447 

2,515 



245 
102 
269 
3,815 
172 

126 
1,152 
1,253 

116 



297 
196 
118 



40 



297 
196 
118 



20.049 



120 
223 



3,^44 



207 
473 



1 
137 

331 

1,542 

1,093 

65 



179 
14 
101 
209 

4,153 

100 

3,164 



710 
210 
226 
1,096 
206 



404 
226 



404 
45 



Clati of ptac« 
•nd city 

llur«l 

CItUi: Total 

Aril., FtiooTiK ... 

krksloy .. 

Frt.no 

Clandalo .. 
Long Beach 
Loa Angalal 

Sacraunto 
San Dalgo . 

San Joaa .. 

Santa Ana . 

Colo., Danvar 

Conn., Bridgeport 

Hartford .. 

O.C, u.ihlngton' 
ria., JackionvlU 

Ca., Atlanta .'. . 

Hawaii. Honolulu '.'. 

Hd., Baltliwra . 

Haaa.. Bonton 

ta.brldga . 

Sprlngflald 

Mich., Detroit ... 

Crand Rapid 

St. Paul .. 
Mo., Kansal City 

Habr., Oaaha 

N.J., Elizabeth . 
Jersey City 

Peterson .. 

Buffalo ... 
Niagara Fal 
Syracu.e .'. 

Ohio, Akron 

Cleveland . 

Pa., Phlladelphl. 

Teua, Dalle 

Gl Paso ... 

San Antonio 
Utah, Salt Uke C 
Va., Newport Ne» 



Canada Mexico Hungary Po 



106 



Germny 
Greece . 
Hungary 



Arab Republic (Egypt) 



Iflc Island 
er Oceania 

countries 



16-147—66 O S 



107 



TABLE 45. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY SEX AND AGE: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1959 - 1965 



Sex and age 


1959-1965 


1959 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


Number admitted .. 


823.841 


103.931 


119.442 


132,450 


1?7,307 


1?4.178 


11?, 234 


104.299 


Under 18 years 

18-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-29 years 

30-34 years 

35-39 years 

40-44 years 

45-49 years 

50-54 years 

55-69 years 

60-64 years 

65-69 years 

70-74 years 

75-79 years 

80 years and over . 
Not reported 

Males 


50,787 

30,008 

76,153 

112,065 

122,582 

111,824 

76,814 

59,317 

51,849 

42,890 

36,383 

27,243 

15,063 

6,888 

3,161 

814 

372.604 


5,331 

3,064 

8,437 

12,991 

16,530 

14,324 

8,951 

8,727 

7,140 

6,549 

5,195 

3,514 

1,895 

846 

381 

56 

43.719 


5,849 

3,394 

9,478 

14,478 

17,031 

15,795 

9,769 

9,563 

8,292 

7,733 

6,310 

5,671 

3,323 

1,442 

602 

712 

50.896 


6,931 
3,793 
10,915 
15,851 
17,872 
17,053 
11,229 
10,055 
9,103 
8,402 
8,190 
6,615 
3,827 
1,796 
776 
42 

58.795 


8,950 
4,622 
12,290 
17,792 
18,762 
17,448 
11,750 
9,418 
7,833 
6,059 
5,269 
3,778 
2,004 
932 
397 
3 

60.988 


8,470 

4,774 

12,088 

18,470 

19,152 

17,726 

12,615 

8,288 

7,577 

5,261 

4,393 

2,816 

1,496 

692 

360 

58.303 


8,203 

5,026 

r.l21 

It , 189 

16,908 

15,366 

11,507 

6,938 

6,183 

4,607 

3,733 

2,473 

1,250 

598 

331 

1 

51.408 


7,053 

5,335 

10,824 

15,494 

16,327 

14,112 

10,993 

6,328 

5,721 

4,279 

3.293 

2,376 

1,268 

582 

314 

48.495 


Under 18 years 

18-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-29 years 

30-34 years 

35-39 years 

40-44 years 

45-^9 years 

50-54 years 

55-59 years 

60-64 years 

65-69 years 

70-74 years 

75-79 years 

80 years and over . 
Not reported 

Females 


26,098 

14,588 

33,933 

43,060 

51,752 

51,545 

37,419 

30,063 

25,523 

19,352 

15,406 

11,514 

6,920 

3,423 

1,646 

362 

451.237 


2,805 

1,494 

3,221 

3,737 

6,161 

6,465 

4,372 

4,204 

3,159 

2,766 

2,161 

1,535 

941 

467 

211 

20 

60.212 


3,065 
1,738 
3,920 
4,827 
6,507 
6,911 
4,725 
4,784 
3,751 
3,257 
2,350 
2,169 
1,541 
720 
308 
323 

68.546 


3,626 
1,830 
4,789 
5,890 
7,396 
7,700 
5,441 
5,154 
4,475 
3,557 
3,296 
2,639 
1,705 
870 
410 

73.655 


4,619 

2,236 

5,710 

7,585 

8,646 

8,538 

6,016 

5,051 

4,092 

2,926 

2,385 

1,634 

879 

453 

216 

2 

66.319 


4,288 
2,379 
5,566 
7,818 
8,464 
8,277 
6,113 
4,329 
4,064 
2,568 
1,993 
1,271 
660 
332 
181 

65.875 


4,093 
2,429 
5,677 
6,918 
7,205 
6,905 
5,529 
3,402 
3,128 
2,221 
1,695 
1,170 
577 
292 
167 

60.826 


3,602 
2,482 
5,050 
6,285 
7,373 
6,749 
5,223 
3,139 
2,854 
2,057 
1,526 
1,096 
617 
289 
153 

55.804 


Under 18 years 

18-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-29 years 

30-34 years 

35-39 years 

40-44 years 

45-49 years 

50-54 years 

55-59 years 

60-64 years 

65-69 years 

70-74 years 

75-79 years 

80 years and over . 
Not reported 


24,689 

15,420 

42,220 

69,005 

70,830 

60,279 

39,395 

29,254 

26,326 

23,538 

20,977 

15,729 

8,143 

3,465 

1,515 

452 


2,526 

1,570 

5,216 

9,254 

10,369 

7,859 

4,579 

4,523 

3,981 

3,783 

3,034 

1,979 

954 

379 

170 

36 


2,784 

1,656 

5,558 

9,651 

10,524 

8,884 

5,044 

4,779 

4,541 

4,476 

3,960 

3,502 

1,782 

722 

294 

389 


3,305 

1,963 

6,126 

9,961 

10,476 

9,353 

5,788 

4,901 

4,628 

4,845 

4,894 

3,976 

2,122 

926 

366 

25 


4,331 

2,386 

6,580 

10,207 

10,116 

8,910 

5,734 

4,367 

3,741 

3,133 

2,884 

2,144 

1,125 

479 

181 

1 


4,182 

2,395 

6,522 

10,652 

10,688 

9,449 

6,502 

3,959 

3,513 

2,693 

2,400 

1,545 

836 

360 

179 


4,110 

2,597 

6,444 

10,071 

9,703 

8,461 

5,978 

3,536 

3,055 

2,386 

2,038 

1,303 

673 

306 

164 

1 


3,451 
2,853 
5,774 
9,209 
8,954 
7,363 
5,770 
3,189 
2,867 
2,222 
1,767 
1,280 
651 
293 
161 



Belgium 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Finland 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Poland 

Spain ..'.\. '.'.'..'.'.'.'.. '.'.'.'.\. 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) . 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia 

Yugos lavla 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 2/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Israel ..'..'....'..'.'.'..'.'.'.'.'. 

Jordan 2/ 

Lebanon ....'...'.'..'..'.'.'.'.'.'. 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Other West Indies 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Other Central America 

South Anierica 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

E cuador 

Other South America 

Algeria 

Nigeria '.'.'.'. 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Australia 

Pacific Islands' (ili'si'a;!;..")' 
Other Oceania 

Other countries 

1/ See Tables 47 and 48. 

2/ Includes Formosa. 

a/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



TABLE '.7. ACMINISIRATIVE CERTIFICATES 
OF PARENTS OR THROUGH MARRIAGE, 


OF CITIZENSHIP ISSUED TO PERSONS WHO DERIVED CITIZENSHIP THROUGH NATURALIZATION 
BV COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH AND YEAR DERIVED: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, Itt.S 












ed 




Country or region 


Total 


1965 


1964 


1963 


1962 


96. 


1960 


9 59 


958 


9 57 


956 


955 


9 54 


953 


952 


"' -o|-o- 


1940. 


















44/ 


544 


71? 




<>}} 


Jl? 


170 


'» 


65 


}7 


»8 


4.369 




12.188 


741 


2.447 


815 


676 


381 


v> 


121 




611 


499 


570 


253 


117 


81 


36 


18 


2 19 


3.587 


^""■"^ ■ 


607 
169 

61 
375 

3,598 
225 
660 
184 

1,678 
528 

632 
90 

127 
39 

164 

76 

82 

1,455 

701 

148 


29 
11 

3 

39 
300 

30 
17 
82 
26 

29 

3 
3 

96 
6 
11 


121 

5 
14 
20 

802 
73 

183 
39 

286 

167 
10 

27 
10 
17 
17 
18 
17 
342 
2 
56 
14 


2 
45 
2 34 

13 


19 

10 

5 

2 
15 

208 
22 

135 

97 

2 
2 

10 

3 
3 
71 

3 


27 

1 
15 
144 
13 
6 

78 

2 

12 

1 

42 


25 
U 

9 

160 

5 

11 

2 

2 
3 
3 
3 

41 

5 




20 
12 

10 

56 
22 

37 


48 

304 
16 
50 

53 

11 

22 


259 

14 

30 
23 

17 

39 
15 


42 

21 

3 

3 
39 
25 

18 

32 
21 


14 
96 

8 

2 

3 
33 

3 
10 




27 

5 
2 

14 




3 


2 
10 

1 
56 

2 

38 

28 




"' y 


15 


BelgluTB . . . . 


84 


D k 


37 


Ft 


22 


"""^^ 


37 


l-ermsny 


308 




47 


„ ""^^ 


132 




66 


''■'J'"'' 


662 


K 'h i rf 


69 


n' 


70 


P 1 °d 


434 


p° t" i 




Portugal .. 
umanla .. . 








pain . . . 


76 


s"?t " id 




Turkey (Europe and A.la) 


456 


U.S.S.R. (Europe and A.la) .... 


42 


0th r EurODS 


52 




66 


^'' "1/ 


192 
149 
12 
65 

27 

678 

64 
47 
58 
9 
129 
20 
28 
32 


21 
20 

8 

74 
15 

16 

5 

10 

3 

2 

'• 

161 


5 
28 
14 
10 
415 
37 
19 
23 

3 

11 
15 
8 

771 


3 

105 

3 
6 

313 


13 
15 

27 

6 

5 
3 

147 


14 
11 

1 
10 

136 


5 

10 

3 

2 
1 

3 

115 


- 




8? 


_81. 


3 

1 
1 

- 


3 

3 
1 


_^ 


3 
1 
1 

5 


3 


1 
3 


_a2_ 


13 


Llilna 1/ 


1 


Hong Kong 


1 


I donesla 


1 


I 




I 


- 


raq . 
«rae 




*'''" ■■■ 


- 






K r 


- 


' °"°'' 








Phi?!' 1 


4 


Philippines 




^yukyu '•'""°' •■'• 


s 


n h A 1 "f" ■■ 






682 


°c' d ° ' 
ana a . . 


2,081 
223 

7. 

18 
116 

163 

7 
22 
15 
60 
40 


13 

2 
6 
15 

2 

6 

2 


521 

41 

14 
40 

5 
5 


185 
26 

5 
25 
20 

2 

9 

18 

3 


98 
1 
18 

7 
7 

2 


92 

10 

1 
6 

5 
2 


7 
5 

8 

5 


59 




56 

5 
3 

1 


55 

3 
1 

3 

1 
3 


45 


3 
5 

1 


- 


3 
2 

2 

1 
1 


2 
2 

2 

1 
1 


[ 


3 








c'h 




" * ■ '■ . . 


- 


Uomln can «pu c 
° 








Ofh' w t i di 


15 


C t R?' "•"•• 




Fl's 1 d° 

tl balvador 






- 


Honduras 


- 


Nlcaracua 


- 










South America 


13 .. 




97 

37 
14 
39 
14 
20 
51 
31 


5 
3 

2 

3 


52 
9 
23 

27 
12 


13 

1 

6 

3 


11 

1 
3 


3 
3 
1 

5 


2 
2 

2 




; 


1 


1 


I 


': 


J 


1 


I 


\ 




6 








- 


Chll 


1 


C 1 'bl 


- 


E^ °d ' 


- 


p "' 


1 


^"" " 

aneiuela •••••• 


- 




3 




L_ 


^^J*^' ■ 


2 
33 

14 
lOI 
33 


6 

I 
2 
10 
4 


11 

5 


3 




2 


1 

1 
2 




^ 


: 


1 


- 




[ 


I 


I 










- 




- 


s th Af 1 




United Arab Republic (Egypt) .. 






12 


'^""'* '.' 


65 
13 

3 
12 


5 


3 


5 
1 


2 

1 
1 






- 


: 






: 




': 


' 


[ 


' 


' 


' 


n" Z aland 


'' 


Pacific island. (U.S. .dm.) ... 


1 




I 


Other countries .. 

































J 


1 




i,/ Include. Fonno.a. V Incl 


ude. Ara 


b Pales 


ine. 



































Country or region 


Total 


Cal 


ndar 


vear 


acau 


red 














— 


1?65 


1944 


1943 


1962 


1941 


1949 


1959 


1958 


1957 


1956 


1955 












1940- 


Before 


All countries 


,17.617 


16 


351 


889 


1.136 


1.181 


1.172 


i.;i46 


911 


750 


6^^ 


^0 


53^ 


''?? 


398 




















744 


gov 


?13 


























89 
24 
22 
15 
17 

830 
4,097 

178 
13 
51 

917 
30 
27 
68 

223 
7 

241 
5 
18 

138 
1,425 

n 

30 
34 

3.424 


2 

1 
2 


27 
84 

29 

70 


3 
2 

3i; 
11 

10 

34 

29 
61 

2 
195 


86 

421 

5 

1 

2£ 

( 
X 

24 
125 

219 


1 

100 
450 

3 

20 
3 

1 
7 

42 

22 
156 

223 


1 
2 

95 
469 
11 

25 
2 

1 

3 

28 

1 
11 
156 

2 
210 


2 

1 
103 

21 

2 

1 

38 

10 
117 

224 


5 

21 

2 
2 

5 

11 
97 

_xm. 


63 
248 

9 

2 
3 
94 


43 
229 

75 


37 
204 

48 


15 

1 

2' 
149 

1 
9 

1 

1 

2 
69 

3 


21 

131 

2 

7 

1 

1 
1 
61 


5 
102 

27 


1 

92 

1 

16 


70 

1 
12 


27 
15 

1 
2 
58 
304 
42 
3 
13 
182 
3 

11 

237 

6 
8 


2 

6 
12 
18 
29 
87 

9 
37 
543 






Denmark 


."''"'' 


f' "f ° 






ungary 


Italy 




16 
49 
123 
5 
6 














3 
5 


Turkey (Europe and Asia) 




44 




24 
9 


Other Europe 

Asia 


China 1/ 

Hong Ko"9 

India 


348 
45 
31 
2 
31 
3 
26 
1,574 
22 
127 

'I 

854 

252 

8 

73 

5.055 


1 
1 

- 

9 


30 

2 

24 
5 

2 


13 
2 

5 

73 
10 

50 
26 

1 
15 

131 


11 

5 

5 

- 

112 

20 

22 
31 

11 

129 


10 
3 

1 

2 

2 
115 

23 

24 

34 

115 


2 
2 

136 
10 

30 

106 


u 

3 

3 
149 

10 

17 

25 

101 


101 
9 

20 
28 

2 

117 


139 

20 
12 

l"7 


115 

24 
14 

lOfi 


86 

1 
3 

23 
6 

IP 


2 

2 
84 

6 
24 

111 


2 
77 

2 

1 
35 
5 

1?7 


51 
_i22. 


3 

1 
46 

34 
5 

2 

123 


2 

1 

1 
1 
72 

1 

63 

5 

1 

146 


68 
10 

3 

6 

166 

9 

8 

2 
311 
12 

9 

1.697 


8 

12 




Iraq ! !!! ! !! ! ! [i." i!'.; I!! ! ! !!! ! ! ii! ! 


10 


Japan 

Jordan 2/ 


22 
10 


L°banon 




Malaysia 


1 








5 




North America 


1.599 




2,566 
105 

5 

9 

145 

15 
3 

13 

162 


3 

1 


4? 

2 

1 

1 

1 
15 

19 


40 

1 

5 

6 
31 


36 
51 
2 

1 
3 

23 
10 


33 

- 
1 

2 
25 

4 


26 
51 

15 

a 


21 
51 
2 

9 

14 

7 


29 
60 

3 

12 

1 

10 


29 
48 

5 
12 


25 
55 
3 

7 
1 
2 


25 
60 
2 

6 
18 


18 
2 

1 

4 
12 


7? 
- 

20 


14 

74 

6 
23 

8 


19 
73 

8 
16 

9 


23 
103 

I 


363 

1,053 

24 

1 

43 

1 
6 

1 

123 
79 


776 
602 




Dominican Republic 


36 






Other West Indies 




Costa Rica 


I'' 


El Salvador 












Nicaragua 








South America 


20 


Argentina 


21 

49 
16 
29 
8 
29 
28 


1 


1 
1 


1 
2 

1 

14 


2 

1 
3 

2 

i 


2 

1 


2 
1 

2 


1 
3 


2 
2 
2 

1 

1 


1 
2 


3 


1 
2 


1 

2 

1 

2 

3 


- 
1 


1 
2 


2 

1 
1 




— V 

22 

7 

1 
15 
8 
6 






2 




4 




1 




1 


Peru 






4 






Africa 






2 
113 

3 
11 

6 
179 

105 


1 


2 

6 


2 
13 


12 

1 
1 
18 


6 
24 


19 

16 


23 

1 


12 
10 


8 
11 


9 
14 


7 
5 


5 
5 


3 


r 


2 

1 




2 
2 
2 
5 
1 
22 

74 


. 


Nigeria 


- 






United Arab Republic (Egypt) 


2 


Oceania 




Australia 

Ne. Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U. S. Ada.) 


68 
11 
15 
11 




I 


1 
5 


: 


- 


': 


1 


1 


- 


. 


1 
2 


1 


. 


" 


1 
1 
1 
1 


. 


— s- 

8 
2 


3 

2 


Othe 


3 




" 


2/ Includes Arab Palestine. 

1 












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R 


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r ' -'—- ^ '- "■!.; ^ " ^ - "5= 


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TABLE sa CERTIFICATES OF NATURAUZATION REVOKED, BY CSOUMDSi 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1956 - 1965 



Grounds 

Ttftal 

E«t«blith*d paxnanant 
r«sld«nc« abroad within 
fiv« years aftar 
naturalization 

Sabvarsiva 

Miseallanaous grounds .... 



1956- 
1965 



JfiL 



1,048 
8 
45 



jias. 



.2^ 



TABLE 51. PERSCMS EXPATRIATED, BY GROUNDS AND YEAR REPORTS RECEIVEDt 
YEARS ENEED JUNE 30, 1956 - 1965 



1956- 
1965 



36.W 



4.918 



i^SSSi 



2.899 



3.374 



3.W7 



2,221 



2.231 



Voting in a foreign political 
elaction or plabiscite 

Continuous residanca in a 
foraign atata of birth or 

nationality i/ 



Rasldanca in a foreign stata 
under treaties and conven- 
tions a/ 



1,595 



Naturalixation in a foreign 
Stat 



Entering or serving in the 
armed forces of a foreign 
state 



Renunciation of nationality 



Taking an oath of allegiance 
in a foreign state 



6,179 

2,265 
2,152 

1,142 



Accepting or performing 
duties under a foreign 
state 



Other grounds 



1,748 

2,165 

427 
565 

378 
213 



1,290 



L,017 

96 
642 

187 
183 



1,089 



113 
286 



1/ Cases of 359 persons expatriated for departing from or remaining away from the U. S. to avoid 

military service, reported for 1955-1963, were not included because this statutory provision 

was ruled unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court on February 18, 1963. (Kennedy v. Francisco 

Mendoza-Martinez (372 U.S. 144) and Rusk v. Joseph Henry Cort (372 U.S. 224)). 

2/ The Supreme Court decision in Schneider v. Rusk (377 U.S. 163, Hfey 18, 1964) ruled as unconstitutional 
statutory provisions which cause naturalized citizens to lose their nationality by extended residence 
abroad. 

2/ Naturalized U.S. citizens expatriated in countries with which the United States has treaties or 

conventions providing on a reciprocal basis for loss of nationality through extended residence in 
the country of original citizenship. 



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TABLE 55. WRITS OF HABEAS CORPUS, JUDICIAL REVIEW OF ORDER 

OF DEPORTATION AND DECLARATORY JUDGMENTS IN EXCLUSION AND DEPORTATION CASES: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1961 - 1965 



Action taken 



Total writs of habeas corpus : 



Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government .. 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed 



Pending end of year . 
Involvine exclustor 



Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government .. 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed . 



Pending end of year ... 
Involving deportation : 



Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government .. 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed . 



1961- 
1965 



Writs of habeas corpus 



Pending end of year 



297 


85 


75 


29 


41 


67 


2 5R 


79 


64 


25 


36 


54 


20 


3 


6 


3 


I 


7 


19 


3 


5 


1 


4 


6 


IP 


'' 


6 


3 


9 


18 


51 


10 


9 


10 


9 


13 


'-.1 


R 


9 


8 


7 


9 


5 


_ 




2 


_ 


3 


5 


2 




- 


2 


1 


3 


- 


3 


' 


4 


3 


246 


75 


66 


19 


32 


54 


217 


71 


55 


17 


29 


45 


15 


3 


6 


1 


1 


A 


14 


1 


5 


1 


2 


5 


15 


11 


3 


2 


5 


15 



Total Judicial Review of Order of 
Deportation (Sec. 106 lt,N Act) : 1/ 



Involvine deportation : 



Judicial Review 



Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government .. 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed . 



Pending end of year 

Total declaratory ludgments : 







25 


94 


51 


61 


134 




21 


34 


35 


44 


21 




1 


9 


7 


4 


76 




3 


51 


9 


13 


62 




95 


47 


44 


62 



Declaratory Judgments 





1.048 


364 


327 


169 


87 


101 


Favorable to U.S. Government 

Unfavorable to U.S. Government 

Withdrawn or otherwise closed 

Involving 8 USC I503 

Favorable to U.S. Government 

Unfavorable to U.S. Government 

Withdrawn or otherwise closed 

Involving exclusion or deportation 


825 
113 
110 

45 


322 
24 
18 

18 


226 
59 
42 

5 


120 
21 
28 

10 


69 

1 
17 

3 


88 
8 

5 

9 


27 
9 
9 

1.003 


11 

7 

346 


4 

1 

322 


4 
2 

4 

159 


2 
1 

84 


6 

3 
92 


Favorable to U.S. Government 

Unfavorable to U.S. Government 

Withdrawn or otherwise closed 


798 
104 
101 


311 
17 

18 


222 
59 
41 


116 
19 

24 


67 
1 
16 


82 
8 
2 



1/ Not reported prior to January 1, 1962 



117 



TABLE 56. PRIVATE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY BILLS 
INTRODUCED AND LAWS ENACTED, 75TH CONGRESS 
THROUGH 89TH CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION 



Congress 


Bills 
introduced 


Laws 
enacted 


89 th 


(First Session) 


3,863 


136 


88th 




3,647 


196 


87 th 




3,592 


544 


86th 




3,069 


488 


85 th 




4,364 


927 


84th 




4,474 


1,227 


83 rd 




4,797 


755 


82nd 




3,669 


729 


8Ist 




2,811 


505 


80th 




1,141 


121 


79 th 




429 


14 


78th 




163 


12 


77th 




430 


22 


76th 




601 


65 


75th 




293 


30 









118 



|S 





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