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Full text of "Annual report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service"

BOSTOIM 

PUBLIC 

LIBRARY 




ANNUAL 



of the 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 




Washington, D.C. 



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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE 
WASHINGTON, D.C 20536 

REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER 
OF IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION 



The Attorney General 

United States Department of Justice 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the Annual Report of the Immigration 
and NaturaUzation Service for the year ended June 30, 1966. 

Respectfully submitted. 

^ton Public Libr, ,, 
Superintendent of Docm.e, 

II IN 9 9 1QC7 Raymond F. Farrell, 

*'"'• C <i 130/ Commissioner. 

Immigration and Nxi't'BALizATiON Service. 




For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing 0fl5ce 
Washington, D.C. 20402 - Price .$1.00 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

GENERAL 1 

TRAVEL CONTROL AND ADJUDICATIONS 2 

Travel control 2 

Admissions 2 

Refugees 6 

Inadmissible aliens 7 

Adjustment of status 8 

Adjudications 9 

Service operations outside the United States 11 

BORDER PATROL AND INVESTIGATIONS 11 

Deportable aliens located 11 

Foreign-born law violators 15 

Criminal prosecution 18 

Revocation of naturalization 18 

DETENTION AND DEPORTATION ACTIVITIES 18 

HEARINGS AND LITIGATION, 19 

Exclusion and deportation hearings 19 

Litigation 19 

ALIEN ADDRESS REPORTS 21 

CITIZENSHIP- 21 

Naturalization activities 21 

Related naturalization matters 23 

Derivative citizenship activities 25 

Other citizenship activities 25 

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 25 

TABLES Page 

1. Immigration to the United States: 1820-1966 29 

2. Aliens and citizens admitted and departed, by months: Years ended June 30, 1965-66 30 

3. Aliens and citizens admitted at U.S. ports of entry: Years ended June 30, 1965-66 31 

4. Aliens admitted by classes under the immigration laws: Years ended Jiuie 30, 1962-66 32 

5. Immigi-ants admitted, by port: Years ended June 30, 1962-66 33 

6. Immigrants admitted by classes under the immigration laws and country or region of birth: 

Year ended June 30, "l 966 . 34 

6A. Immigrants admitted by classes under the immigration laws and country or region of last 

permanent residence: Year ended June 30, 1966 35 

6B. Aliens who adjusted status to pernument residents in the United States, by country or 

region of birth: Year ended June 30, 1966 --- 36 

6C. Aliens who were adjusted to pernu\nent resident status in the United States under Section 

245, Immigration and Nationality Act, by status at entry and country or region of bu-th: 

Year ended June 30, 1966 _ _ _ . _ -". -^ 37 

6D. Refugees admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 1946-66 38 

6E. Immigrants admitted, mider the Act of September 26, 1961 (Public Law S7-301 ) : September 

26, 1961-June 30, 1966, 39 

6F. Immigrants admitted under the Act of October 24, 1962 (Public Law 87-885) by country 

or region of birth: October 24, 1962-June 30, 1966 40 

6G. Immigrants admitted under Public Law 89-236 and Immigration and Nationality Act of 

1952 by country or region of birth: Year ended June 30, 1966 41 

7. Immigi-ants admitted by quota charge: Year ended June 30, 1966 42 

7A. Immigrants admitted by quota charge and quota preferences: Year ended June 30, 1966.- 43 

S. Immigrants admitted, by country or region of birth and major occupation group: Year ended 

June 30, 1966 '_ - 44/' 



Pag, 
8A. Beneficiaries of occupational preferences and other immigrants admitted by occupation: 

Year ended June 30, 1 966 45 

9. Immigrants admitted, by coimtry or region of bii-th, sex, and age: Year ended Jime 30, 1966_ 47 

10. Immigrants admitted, by sex and age: Years ended June 30, 1957-66 49 

lOA. Immigrants admitted by sex, marital status, age, and major occupation group: Years ended 

Jime 30, 1962-66 5( i 

11. Aliens and citizens admitted and departed: Years ended June 30, 1908-66 51 

12. Immigrants admitted, by state of intended future permanent residence: Years ended June 

30, 1957-66 52 

12 A. Immigrants admitted, by specified countries of birth and state of intended future perma- 
nent residence: Year ended June 30, 1966 53 

12B. Immigrants admitted, by specified countries of birth and rural and urban area and city: 

Year ended June 30, 1966 54 

13. Immigration by country, for decades: 1820-1966 55 

14. Immigrants admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 1957-66 59 

14A Refugee-escapees paroled under Act of July 14, 1960, by country of last residence and 

country of flight: Jidy 14, 1960-June 30, 1966 60 

14B. Hong Kong Chinese paroled into the United States by sex, marital status, age, and major 

occupation group: June 4, 1962-June 30, 1966 61 

14C. Hong Kong Chinese paroled into the United States, by basis for parole and major occupa- 
tion group: June 4, 1962-June 30, 1966 62 

15. Nonimmigi-ants admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 1957-66 63 

15A. Temporary visitors admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 1957-66. 64 

16. Nonimmigrants admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and country or region of 

birth: Year ended June 30, 1966 - - 65 

16A. Temporary workers admitted under Section 101(a)(15)(H) of the Immigration and Nation- 
ality Act, by country: Years ended June 30, 1965-66 66 

17. Nonimmigrants admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and country or region of 

last permanent residence: Year ended June 30, 1966 67 

17A. Temporary visitors and other nonimmigrants admitted, by port: Year ended June 30, 1966_ 68 
17B. Temporary visitors admitted at airports, by country of last permanent residence: Year 

ended June 30, 1966 ' - 69 

17C. Temporary visitors admitted at seaports, by country of last permanent residence: Year 

ended June 30, 1966 70 

17D. Temporary visitors admitted, at land border ports, by country of last permanent residence: 

Year ended June 30, 1966 71 

18. Foreign laborers admitted or paroled into the United States: Years ended June 30, 1957-66. _ 72 

19. Entries of alien and citizen border crossers over international land boundaries by state and 

port: Year ended June 30, 1966 73 

20. Entries of alien and citizen border crossers over international land boundaries: Years ended 

June 30, 1928-66 . . -— - 75 

20A. Special inquiry officer hearings completed, by regions and districts: Years ended June 30, 

1962-66- __' -■- 76 

21. Aliens excluded from the United States, by cause: Years ended June 30, 1892-1966 77 

22. Aliens excluded, by country or region of bu'th and cause: Year ended June 30, 1966 78 

23. Aliens apprehended, aliens deported, and aliens required to depart: Years ended June 30, 

1892-1966 -. . 79 

24. Aliens deported, by country to which deported and cause: Year ended June 30, 1966 80 

24A. Aliens required to depart, by nationality and cause: Year ended June 30, 1966 81 

24B. Aliens deported, by nationality and cause: Year ended June 30, 1966 82 

24C. Aliens required to depart, by country of destination and cause: Year ended June 30, 1966-- 83 

25. Aliens deported, by country to which deported and deportation expense: Year ended 

June 30, 1966 84 

26. Aliens deported, by cause: Years ended June 30, 1908-66 85 

26A. Aliens deported, by country to which deported: Years ended June 30, 1957-66 86 

27. Aliens deported and required to depart, bv year of entry and status at entry: Year ended 

June 30, 1966 ! -' 87 

27A. Aliens deported and required to depart, by status at entry: Years ended June 30, 1962-66_ 88 
27B. Deportable aliens located, by status at entry and nationality: Year ended June 30, 1966-.. 89 

28. Alien crewmen deserted at U.S. air and seaports, by nationality and flag of carrier: Year 

ended June 30, 1966 . --- 90 

29. Vessels and airplanes inspected, crewmen admitted, alien crewmen deserted, and alien 

stowaways found, by location: Year ended June 30, 1966 91 



Page 
I. Principal activities and accomplishments of immigration border patrol: Years ended 

June 30, 1957-66 92 

. Passengers arrived in the United States, by sea and air, from foreign countries, by country 

of embarkation: Year ended June 30, 1966 93 

. Passengers departed from the United States, by sea and air, to foreign countries, by country 

of debarkation: Year ended June 30, 1966 96 

. Passenger travel between the United States and foreign countries, by sea and air, by port 

of arrival or departure: Year ended June 30, 1966 99 

. Aliens who reported under the alien address program, by selected states of residence and 

nationahty: Diu-ing 1966 100 

. Aliens who reported under the alien address program, by selected nationalities and states 

of residence: During 1966 101 

. Alien population, by states of residence: 1940, 1951, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 

and 1966 . - _- _--- 102 

. Declarations of intention filed, petitions for naturalization filed, persons natiu-alized, and 

petitions for naturalization denied: Years ended June 30, 1907-66 103 

. Persons naturalized, by general and special naturalization provisions: Years ended June 30, 

1 962-66 - - - - 104 

. Persons naturalized, by general and special naturalization provisions and country or re- 
gion of former allegiance: Year ended June 30, 1966 105 

. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance: Years ended June 30, 

1957-66 ' 106 

. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance and major occupation group: 

Year ended June 30, 1966 107 

. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance, sex, and age: Year ended 

June 30, 1966 . . 1 08 

. Persons naturalized, by sex, marital status, median age, and major occupation group: 

Years ended Jime 30, 1962-66 HO 

. Persons naturalized, by states or territories of residence: Years ended June 30, 1957-66__ 111 
. Persons naturalized, by specified countries of former allegiance and by states or territories 

of residence: Year ended June 30, 1966 112 

. Persons naturalized, by type of court and states or territories of residence: Year ended 

June 30, 1966 113 

. Persons naturalized by specified countries of former allegiance and by rural and lu^ban 

area and city: Year ended June 30, 1966 114 

. Persons naturalized, by country or region of bu'th and year of entry: Year ended June 30, 

1966 115 

. Persons naturalized, by sex and age: Years ended June 30, 1959-66 116 

. Administrative certificates of citizenship issued, by country or region of birth and reason 

for claim: Year ended June 30, 1966 1 17 

. Administrative certificates of citizenship issued to persons who derived citizenship tlirough 

naturalization of parents or through marriage, by country or region of birth and year 

derived: Year ended June 30, 1966^ .___ 118 

. Administrative certificates of citizenship issued to persons who acquired citizenship at 

birth abroad through citizen parents, by country or region of birth and year acquired: 

Year ended June 30, 1 966 1 19 

49. Petitions for naturalization denied, by reason: Years ended June 30, 1957-66 120 

50. Certificates of naturalization revoked, by grounds: Years ended June 30, 1957-66 121 

51. Persons expatriated, by grounds and year reports received: Years ended June 30, 1957-66_ 121 

52. Persons repatriated: Years ended June 30, 1957-66 122 

53. Prosecutions for immigration and nationality \iolations: Years ended June 30, 1 957-66 __ 123 

54. Convictions for immigration and nationality violations: Years ended June 30, 1957-66 124 

55. Writs of habeas corpus, judicial review of order of deportation and declaratory judgments 

in exclusion and deportation cases: Years ended June 30, 1962-66 125 

56. Private immigration and nationality bills introduced and laws enacted, 75th Congress 

through 89th Congress 126 

57. Private bills and beneficiaries of private bills, 89th Congress, by type of bill and action 

(country of birth of beneficiaries for bills enacted) 127 



Report of the Commissioner of Immigration and Naturalization 



GENERAL 

The Immigration and Naturalization Service is 
responsible for the administration and enfoi'ce- 
ment of tlie immigi'ation and nationality laws. 
For the Service, the fiscal year 1966 was an event- 
ful one. After almost 40 years in which immigra- 
tion from much of tlie world was limited by the 
national origins quota systems, Congress enacted 
legislation to bring to a close this system of control- 
ling the nmnber of immigrants to be admitted to 
the United States. After a transition period 
which ends June 30, 1968, all numerical limitations 
will be witliin a grand total of 170,000, witli a 
maximum of 20,000 for any one country of the 
Eastern Hemisphere, and if not provided other- 
wise by Congress, a numerical limitation of 120,- 
000 will go into effect for Western Hemisphere 
immigrants. During the phaseout period, imused 
visa numbers will be placed in a pool from whicli 
countries with preference waiting lists may draw. 
The fact that visa numbers became available and 
that new preferences were established by the Act 
of October 3, 1965, made the task of assimilating 



and eifectuating the provisions of the new Act one 
of great priority within the travel control areas 
and increased the workload tremendously. 

The elimination of the Agricultural Labor Act 
of 19-19 under which thousands of Mexican labor- 
ers had been imported created a challenge and a 
problem for tlie officers responsible for preventing 
surreptitious entries. Mexican workers, cut off 
from the legal avenues of obtaining a livelihood 
which they had become accustomed to over the 
years, souglit to enter illegally and thus obtain 
work. The political climate in the Caribbean area 
also absorbed special attention as careful investi- 
gation was made of Cubans, Dominicans, and 
others of possible sulnersive taint. 

The examination of aliens seeking citizenship 
through naturalization and the recommendations 
to the courts for gi-anting or denying sucli natural- 
ization is also a responsibility of the Service. 
Closely related is the function of fostering citizen- 
shi}) education for naturalization. In 1966, the 
publication of new textbooks by the Service en- 
gendered greater interest in the citizenship classes, 
and proved to be effective tools for teaching. 




One iiiillidiith visitor to conic to the United i<tatcs in ll>6.j 



TRAVEL CONTROL AND 
ADJUDICATIONS 

Travel Control 

The Service is charged witli the responsibility 
of determining whether persons seeking admission 
to the United States are citizens or aliens, and if 
aliens, whether they are admissible mider the im- 
migration laws. Dm'ing the fiscal year 1966, more 
than 197 million persons were inspected at the more 
than 400 U.S. ports of entry. In line with estab- 
lished Service policy, continued emphasis was 
placed on facilitation and efficiency of inspections 
in order to cope with the record number of arrivals, 
and at the same time to extend a warm welcome to 
visitors to this country. 

A study of the feasibility of reducing the number 
of documents required to be presented to the Fed- 
eral inspectional agencies by arriving international 
passengers resulted in an agreement between this 
Service and the Bureau of Customs for a combined 
entry/departure card and baggage declaration. 
The use of this docvunent on a test basis will coiu- 
mence early in fiscal year 1967 at one of the major 
international airports. 

A most significant step designed to facilitate the 
travel of visitors to the United States from, Mexico 
was taken during the year. On September 15, 



1965, the Service and the Department of State 
inaugurated a program for the expanded use of 
noni-esident alien Mexican border crossing cards. 
Passport and visa requirements have been waived 
for Mexican nationals with border crossing cards 
who seek to enter the United States as visitors for 
business or pleasure. A Mexican national now 
need present only a border crossing card when 
applying for admission to the United States as a 
visitor, whether he enters for the purpose of shop- 
ping for a few hours or to visit anywhere in the 
United States for a period up to 6 months. The 
Mexican Government reciprocated by extending 
the validity of their equivalent tourist card from 
30 days to 6 months. In another facilitation meas- 
ure, simjilified procedures were adopted for the 
inspection of Canadians arriving in small boats 
from Canada, and for the inspection of crewmen 
on Great Lakes vessels. 

The implementation of these programs was an 
important factor in enabling the Service to cope 
with the tremendous increase in inspection volume 
without additional personnel, and with no detri- 
ment to the security of the country nor to the com- 
fort of the traveling public. 

Admissions 

More tlian 197 million jjersons were inspected 
and admitted into the United States by immigra- 



ALIENS AND CITIZENS ARRIVED BY SEA AND AIR 
1962-1966 

8,000,000 I f 8,000,000 



6,000,000 




4,000,000 



2,000,000 



965 1966 



tion officers during fiscal year 1966, exceeding last 
year's figure by 6 percent and reaching an alltime 
high. Persons who made multiple entries at the 
land borders or as crewmen accounted for 189 mil- 
lion of the total admissions. The others arrived 
on 83,151 vessels and 236,798 aircraft. The num- 
ber of aliens admitted exceeded 114 million, and, 
of these- entries. 109 million were made by border 
crossers from Mexico and Canada, an increase of 7 
percent over last year. Alien crewmen accounted 
for 2 million admissions. Other aliens admitted 
were immigrants, documented nonimmigrants, and 
lawful residents returning from temporary visits 
to countries other than Canada or Mexico. 

Immigrcmts. A total of 323,040 aliens were ac- 
corded status as lawful permanent residents of the 
United States during the year, an increase of 9 per- 
cent over fiscal year 1965. Of the total, 287,270 
obtained immigrant visas abroad and were 
admitted to the United States. The remaining 
35,770 were already in the United States and ad- 
justed their status to that of permanent residents. 

The Immigration and Nationality Act was 
amended by the Act of October 3, 1965, which 
became effective December 1, 1965. Parents (who 



were removed from the quota classes by the 1965 
amendments), spouses, and children of U.S. citi- 
zens termed ''immediate relatives" vmder the new 
Act are not. limited numerically. Similarly, "spe- 
cial immigrants," consisting of natives of inde- 
pendent countries in the Western Hemisphere and 
other small groups, have no numeric ceiling at 
present. Exclusive of these classes, a numerical 
limitation of 170,000 was placed on the number of 
aliens who may be issued immigrant visas or who 
may otherwise acquire the status of lawful perma- 
nent residents in the United States each year. 

Public Law 89-236 amends section 203(a) by 
setting up a new system of prefei'ences consisting 
of seven classes in place of the four which existed 
previously. The new first, second, fourth, and 
fifth preferences are allocated to specified relatives 
of citizens and lawful permanent residents of the 
United States. The new third and sixth prefer- 
ences are occupational preferences, while the new 
seventh preference pertains to certain I'efugees. 

During a transition period from July 1, 1965, 
through June 30, 1968, each quota area is to have a 
quota equal to that of June 30, 1965. However, 
quota visas not used during the previous fiscal year 



QUOTA IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED 
1962-1966 



150,000 



100,000 



50,000 




(50,000 



— 100,000 



50,000 



SEtATiVCS OF CtT)Ze«S AND RESIDENT ALIENS 

WORKERS WITH KEEOED SKJCLS, THEIR SPOBSES hm CKItOfiEH 

COSDJTJONAL ENTRANTS 

NONPREFESENCE ANB OTHER 



will be placed in a pool, from which visas may te 
drawn in the preferences and priorities established 
on a tirst-come, first-served basis. 

The following table points up some of the effects 
of the new legislation. 

Immiqrants admitted: Years ended June 30, 1.965 
and 1966 



Class of admission 


1966 


1965 




323,040 


296, 697 






I. Immigrants subject to numerical limitations 


126, 310 


99,381 


Relative preferences 


54,935 


13,082 


Parents of U.S. citizens, Immigration and 


1,954 
1,205 

14,494 
3,944 
9,328 

24, 010 
10. 525 


3,799 


Unmarried sons and daughters of U.S. citizens.. 
Spouses, unmarried sons and daughters of 


392 
4,934 


Married sons and daughters of U.S. citizens 

Brothers and sisters of U.S. citizens 

Spouses and children of married sons and 
daughters and brothers and sisters of U.S. 


148 
1,532 

2, 277 




4,986 






First preference, Immigration and Nationality 
Act - 


1,394 
3,628 
694 
4,809 
6,444 
53,700 

1706 
39, 231 


2,376 


Third preference. Act of Octobers, 1965 

Sixth preference, Act of October 3, 1965 


2,610 






Nonpreference immigrants 

Aliens adjusted under Section 244, Immigration 


80,428 


II. Immediate Relatives 


32, 714 


Parents of U.S. citizens (Act of October 3, 1965) ... 

Spouses of U.S. citizens 

Children of U.S. citizens . . 


5,142 

26,297 

7,792 

148,623 


25,431 
7,283 




153, 782 






Natives of Western Hemisphere countries .-_ 

Spouses and children of natives of Western Hemi- 


144,911 

2,995 

717 

3,451 


149, 368 
3,831 




583 


IV. Immigrants admitted imder prior special legislation. 


6,315 


Refugee-escapees who adjusted status— Act of 
July 14, 1960 - 


2,359 
869 
223 

5,425 


4,392 


Immigrants, Act of October 24,1962 _._ 


1,484 


V. other immigrants not subject to numerical limita- 
tion 


4,505 






Aliens adjusted under Section 244, Immigration 


169 

2,695 
2, 661 




Aliens adjusted under Section 249, Immigration 


2,064 











> Includes 9 aliens adjusting under special legislation in 1966 and 47 in 
1965. 

The 320-percent increase in perference relatives 
over last year is due largely to the pool provisions 
of the 1965 amendments. Countries that bene- 



fited most from this provision were Italy, Greece, 
Portugal, China, and the Philippines. 

The immediate relatives of citizens numbered 
39,231, including 5,142 parents. Among the par- 
ents of citizens (for the first time not subject to 
quota limits) were 1,195 from China, 941 from 
Italy, 824 from Greece, 280 from Portugal, and 
279 from Turkey. 

Among those admitted with professional or 
highly skilled occupational preferences were 1,331 
engineers, 902 professors, teachei"S, and instructoi-s, 
520 physicians and surgeons, 287 nurses, 251 
chemists, and 125 technicians. 

Other needed workers admitted under the old 
first preference and the new sixth preference in- 
cluded 613 tailors, 82 dressmakers and 51 
technicians. 

Nonpreference admissions numbered 53,700, a 
reduction of 26,728 since 1965. 

Among the reasons for the decrease were: (1) 
nonpreference immigrants were required to have a 
labor certification to assure that they would not 
fill positions that could be filled by U.S. citizens; 
(2) the preference groups with access to pool num- 
bers could use all the numbers alloted to a coun- 
try, and leave none at all for the nonpreference 
immigrants who do not have access to the pool; 
and (3) immigrant spouses and children of citi- 
zens who, prior to the Act of October 3, 1965, often 
used nonpreference quota numbers to avoid tlie 
bother and expense of a visa petition, can no longer 
do this, and are therefore not using quota numbers 
in countries such as Germany, the ITnited 
Kingdom, and Ireland. 

Immigrant refugees numbered 8,803, including 
2,456 persons in the seventh preference category 
who will not attain permanent resident status 
until 2 years after entry. 

Among the 148,623 immigrants classified as spe- 
cial immigrants were 144,911 who were natives of 
independent countries of the Western Hemisphere. 
Seventy-two percent of these immigrants were 
from Mexico, Canada, Cul)a, and the Dominican 
Republic. 

Nonimmigrants. Aliens admitted to the United 
States for temporary periods are classified as non- 
immigrants. Aliens who have occasion to make 
frequent entries, such as those who live close to 
tlie Canadian and Mexican borders or alien crew- 
men, have documents for multiple entries. Other 
nonimmigrants who came to the United States as 
tourists, students, foieigii government officials, and 
the like numbered 2,341,923, thus extending the 
consistent upward trend by exceeding last year's 
total by 13 percent. 

The following table indicates the various legal 
classes under which nonimmigrants are admitted. 



Nonimmigrants admitted: Years ended June 30, 
1965 and 1966 



Nonimmigrant classes 



Total 

Foreign government officials. 

Temporary visitors for business 

Temporary visitors for pleasure — 

Transit aliens 

Treaty traders and investors — 

Students 

Spouses and children of students 

International representatives 

Temporary workers and industrial 
trainees 

Workers of distinguished merit and 
ability 

Other temporary workers 

Industrial trainees 

Representatives of foreign information 

media 

Exchange aliens 

Spouses and children of exchange aliens. 

Returning residents 

NATO officials 



39. 327 
201,358 
472,830 



65, 716 
4,851 
16, 369 



8,213 
64,636 



2,925 
35, 253 
11,204 
238, 013 

1,774 



38, 544 

175,500 

1, 323, 479 

142, 686 

7,639 

50, 435 

4,032 

14,026 

67,869 



8,295 
56,654 
2,920 

2,681 
33,768 
9,991 
203, 235 
2,082 



Sixty-three percent of the iioiiiiiiniignuits were 
visitors for pleasure or what are commonly con- 
sidered tourists. Two-thirds of tliese tourists 
came from countries of Xortii and ( 'entral America 
and tlie adjacent islands. P^uroijeans were tlie 
next largest group of visitors with the United 
Kingdom (143,904), Germany (67,883), and 



France (43,084 being the principal countries of 
residence. 

Among the 201,358 aliens admitted temporarily 
for business enterprises involving dealings with 
American firms and business institutions were 
38,024 from the United Kingdom, 23,084 from 
Japan, 18,244 from Germany, 14,504 from France, 
10,459 from Mexico, 8,765 from Italy, and 7,063 
from Australia. 

Students and exchange aliens come to attend the 
colleges and universities in this country or to teach, 
or study, or participate in other exchange pro- 
grams. In 1966, there was a 10-percent increase in 
the number of students. There were 2i4 times as 
many students from Asia (13,384) as from Europe 
(5,171). More students came from Canada 
(13,490) than from any other single country. Of 
the 11,835 exchange visitors from Europe, 2,277 
were from the United Kingdom, 1,428 from 
France, and 1,839 from Germany. The Asian 
total of 10,365 included 2,765 from the Philip- 
pines, 1,828 from Japan, and 1,698 from India. 

Tile law provides that aliens may be admitted 
temporarily as pei-sons of distinguished merit and 
ability, or as industrial trainees, or as other needed 
workers. In the latter group were 62,452 admit- 
ted under specific labor programs. Of these, 
17,028 were Canadian woodsmen and agricultural 
workers; 18,544 agricultural workers from Mex- 
ico; 26,403 from the Caribbean area; and 477 
Spanish sheepherdei-s. 

Among the remaining nonimmigrants were 
39,327 foreign government officials, 1,774 XATO 
officials, 16,369 official representatives to interna- 



NONIMMIGRANTS ADMITTED 
1962-1966 



3,000,000- 



2,000,000- 



1,000,000 — 



L. 



3,000,000 



TOTAL NONIMMIGRANTS 
TOTAl TEMPORARY VISITORS 



— 2,000,000 



1,000,000 



^ — 



1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 



tional organizations, 2,925 members of the foreign 
news media, and 8,628 treaty tradei-s and investors. 
There were 177,827 travelers admitted who were 
transiting tlie United States destined to otlier 
countries. 

Crewmen. More than 2 million alien crewmen 
arrived at U.S. ports during the year and were 
granted shore leave. The program was continued 
under which bona fide crewmen are issued landing 
cards designed to provide a means of ready iden- 
tification to facilitate their landings. As of June 
30, 1966, a total of 640,212 such cards had been 
issued. 

United States Citizens. International travel of 
citizens also continues to increase each year. 
Citizens made 76.9 million border crossings, and 
more than 900,000 crewmen admissions were re- 
corded. Other citizens admitted numbered 4.8 
million. Of the 3.6 million who arrived by sea 
and air, 1.5 million returned from Europe and 1.4 
million arrived from North and Central America, 
principally from Mexico, the Bahamas, Bermuda, 
and Jamaica. Other citizens included those 
returning from extended visits to Canada and 
Mexico. 

Refugees 

The following refugee programs were adminis- 
tered by the Service during fiscal year 1966. 

Cuban Refugees. During the ceremony at the 



Statue of Liberty on October 3, 1965, where the 
new immigration act was signed, President John- 
son declared tliat Cubans seeking refuge in the 
United States would find such refuge here. 
Negotiations were then entered into to provide 
for the orderly movement of refugees to this 
counti-y from Cuba. 

Prior to these negotiations only a small number 
of Cuban refugees had managed to reach this 
country during the fiscal year, but almost 5,000 
refugees arrived by boat while the negotiations 
were being carried out. The negotiations were 
completed on November 6, 1965, with the inaugura- 
tion of an airlift of from 3,000 to 4,000 refugees 
monthly from Cuba to the United States. 

Acting in cooperation with the Department of 
State, the Department of Health, Education, and 
Welfare, and other agencies of the Government, 
the Service established effective screening proce- 
dures for these refugees. By the end of the fiscal 
year, 26,159 had arrived by the airlift. 

Refugees From Europe and the Middle East. 
The processing of refugee-escapees under the Act 
of July 14, 1960, known as the "Fair Share Refugee 
Act" continued during the first 5 months of the 
fiscal year in Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, 
Greece, Italy, and Lebanon. During that period, 
2,631 applied and 1,723 were approved for parole 
into the United States. Since July 14, 1960, 19,705 
refugees have been admitted under this Act. Per- 








Flay-raisimj ceremony at dedication of Swanton Sector Ileudquartcrs, November 3, 196J. 



sons from Yufjoslavia (6,800), Rumania (5,194)," 
the United xvrab Republic (3,543), Hungary 
(1,744), and Poland (1,053) were the principal 
numbers paroled under this Act. The Fair Share 
Act was repealed by Public Law 89-236, which 
provides for the conditional entry of refugees 
under the seventh preference. 




Seven North American Indian children being readied for 
their trio to Vancouver. B.C.. to join their mother. 





Port Receptionist assi.si« Cuhan refugees at Opa Locka 
Processing Center. 



Transfer of Cuban refugees from airlift to Service buses' 
at Miami International Airport. From the inaugura- 
tion of the airlift on November 6, 1965, through June 30, 
1966, 25,979 Cuban refugees arrived in the United States. 



Subsequent to December 1, 1965, 5,320 refugees 
applied and 3,191 were approved for conditional 
entry in tlie seventh preference, and 2,456 refugees 
entered tlie United States. Also, 3,988 refugees 
who were already in this country were accorded 
the status of permanent residents under the pro- 
\-isions of the seventh preference. The effective 
screening procedures established inider the fair 
sliare law to insure tliat the entry of refugees into 
the United States would not be prejudicial to the 
national welfare, safety, or security are followed 
in the case of applicants for conditional entry. 

Chinese Refugees From Hong Kong. The ex- 
amination and screening of refugees in Hong Kong 
for parole into the United States under the Hong 
Kong refugee parole program, begmi as the result 
of a presidential directive of May 23, 1962, was 
completed. During the year, 846 applicants were 
approved for parole into the United States, mak- 
ing a total of 15,111 approved under the program. 
Between December 1, 1965, the effective date of 
Public Law 89-236, and the end of the fiscal year, 
9,126 Hong Kong refugees who had been paroled 
into the United States were accorded status as 
permanent residents. 

Inadmissible Aliens 

Exclimon. The reasons for examination of 
aliens at our ports of entry are : to make sure that 
aliens admitted meet the criteria established by 
law; to set time limits for departure control of 
aliens admitted in temporary status; and to ex- 
clude those aliens who do not meet the requirements 
for admission. 

Of the 211,416 aliens not admitted, 25,216 
were crewmen refused landing privileges, 129 were 
stowaways who were discovered and detained on 
the vessels on which they arrived, 136,506 were in 
tlie border crosser category, and 49,053 others with- 
di-ew their applications for admission rather than 
- go through formal exclusion proceedings. 

Admission was denied 512 aliens after formal 
hearings and the issuance of orders of exclusion 



and deportation. In four-fifths of tlaese cases per- 
sons were excluded because tliey lacked tlie proper 
documents for admission. Natives of Mexico, 
Cuba, and the Dominican Republic accounted for 
335 of the 404 excluded for this cause. Ten were 
excluded on subversive grounds. Thirty-three 
witli criminal, innnoral, or narcotic records and 21 
who were certified by the U.S. Public Health Serv- 
ice as mental or physical defectives, were also 
excluded. 

Waivers of Inadmisslhility. Congress has au- 
thorized the Attorney General to waive inadmis- 
sibility for the alien spouses, parents, or children 
of citizens or permanent resident aliens. Waivers 
may be granted to such specified relatives if the 
alien's exclusion would result in extreme hardship 
to the U.S. resident relative, and if the admission 
of such alien would not be contrary to the national 
welfare, safety, or security of the United States. 
In fiscal year 1966, 928 such waivers of excludabil- 
ity were approved. 

Alien "defectors" fi'om communism may be 
granted visas for entry into the United States if 
they can establish that for at least 5 years prior to 
their applications for waiver, they had been 
actively opposed to sucli ideologies, and that their 
admissions would be in the public interest. In 
1966, 49 such waivers were granted. 

Waivers of excludability for applicants for non- 
immigrant visas may be granted also, in the discre- 
tion of the Attorney General. After a finding 
that admission of such aliens would be in tlie jjublic 
interest, 4,594 waivers were approved. 



Adjustment of Status 

Prior to the enactment of Public Law 89-236 on 
October 3, 1965, aliens, other than crewmen and 
natives of contiguous countries or nearby islands, 
who had been inspected at jiorts of entiy and eitlier 
adni.itted or paroled into tlie United States, could 
apply under Section 'J45 of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act for status as permanent residents 
without leaving the country to obtain immigrant 
visas. The Act of October 3, 1965, removed from 
those eligible for such adjustment an alien who was 
born in any country of the Western Hemisphere. 
Despite this additional restriction on eligibility, 
the Service received a record number of applica 
tions for adjustment of status during tlie year. 
This was due to the immediate availability on 
December 1, 1965, of thousands of visa numbers 
resulting from tlie provisions of the 1965 Act. \ 
total of 52,714 such apjjlications was received in 
fiscal year 1966. Receipts were the highest in 
Service history and were up 131 percent from the 
previous year's total of 22,814. 

The new Act eliminated the former first prefer- 
ence classification for .skilled pei'sons whose serv- 
ices were urgently needed in the United States. 
In its place, the Act provided the new third and 
sixth prefei'ence categories. Included among the 
aliens granted a change of status to lawful perma- 
nent residents in fiscal year 1966 were 499 persons 
wIk) were beneficiaries of petitions under the 
former first preference classification, 2,821 persons 
who were beneficiaries of the new third preference 



ALIENS WHO BECAME PERMANENT RESIDENTS BY ADJUSTMENT 
UNDER SECTION 245, IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT 
NUMBCB 1962 - 1966 



40,000 



30,000 



20,000 



1 0,0 00 



ACT OF OCT. 24, 1962 
I ST AND 4TH PREFERENCE 
PETITIONERS MADE 
NONQUOTA 



ACT OF OCT. 3,1965 

QUOTA NUMBERS RELEASED 

UNDER POOL PROVISIONS OF 



THE ACT 




NUMBER 

40.000 



30,000 



20,000 



10,000 



1962 



1965 



1964 



1965 



1966 



classitication, and 24-i persons who were benefi- 
ciaries of the new sixth preference classification. 
Also changed to lawful permanent residents were 
7,020 spouses and unmarried minor children of 
U.S. citizens. Before December 1, liHi,"), tlie status 
of '2,86(i nonquota natives of Western Hemisphere 
countries was adjusted to that of permanent 
resident. 

I'nder the numeric ])references established for 
relatives of citizens and alien residents, 6,095 per- 
sons were adjusted to permanent resident status. 
In addition, a i)reference was provided for refu- 
gees, now termed conditional entrants and 3,988 
refugees were adjusted under the proviso to section 
20;i(a) (7) (A). Eighty-nine percent of these ad- 
justments benefited Hong Kong parolees and other 
refugees from China. 

(U-ciit'ion of Record of Lawful E'tifry. The Act 
of October ;5; H)(ir), advanced to June ;'i0, 1948, the 
date j)rior to which an applicant foi' creation of a 
record of lawful entry must establish that he has 
resided continuously in the United States. As a 
result, 41 records of lawful entry were created in 
2,595 cases, a 26-percent increase over the ])revious 
year. 



Other Adjunfmenffi. During the year a total of 
2,359 refugee-escapees, previously paroled into the 
United States under the Act of July 14, 1960, were 
examined by Service officers, found admissible and 
accorded i)ermanent resident status. Also ad- 
justed to permanent resilient status were 8 former 
officials of foreign governments or of international 
organizations and members of their families under 
Section 13 of the Act of September 11, 1957, whicli 
authorizes a maximum of 50 such adjustments an- 
iiuall}\ Other adjustments included 866 suspen- 
sion of deportation cases and 18 Hungarian 
refugees. 

Adjudications 

The applications and petitions adjudicated by 
the Service deal with benehts under the immigra- 
tion laws which affect vitally the rights of aliens 
to enter or remain in the United States and their 
activities while in this country. Many of the appli- 
cations and petitions may be denied as a matter of 
discretion by the Service immigrant inspector or 
officer in charge who has jurisdiction over the ap- 
l)licant's or i)etitioner's residence. 

The Sen'ice. acutely aware of the need to relate 



ADJUSTMENT OF STATUS UNDER SECTION 245 OF THE 
IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT BY STATUS AT ENTRY 



NUMBER 



1962-1966 



NUMSEft 




^ STUDENTS 

^ EXCHANGE ALIENS 

TEMPORARY WORKERS AND TRAINEES 



standards of basic fairness and the fundamental 
concepts of due process to these applicants and 
l)etitioners, continued in its etl'orts to apply these 
standards in all of its administrative adjudications. 
Service regulations which contain information af- 
fecting the public were further exj^anded during 
the year. Among the items publisiied was addi- 
tional information regarding the issuance and use 
of nonresident alien border crossing cards and the 
relation to these cards of the validity of authoriza- 
tions to enter temporarily despite inadmissibility 
under certain sections of the law; procedure for 
filing petition to import aliens for temporary serv- 
ices or labor; listing of factors considered by the 
Service in adjudicating petitions for alien enter- 
tainers; clarification of regulations in connection 
with petitions wliich require certifications from the 
Department of Labor; information regarding 
waiver of excludability for mental retardation oi- 
])ast history of mental illness; provisions relating 
to oral argument in cases which are appealable to a 
Service officer; and the complete rewriting of regu- 
lations occasioned by the amendments to the immi- 
gration statute. 

Uniformity of decisions continued to receive ma- 
jor empliasis. In order to place at the disposal of 
tlie public guidelines whicli would serve to dem- 
onstrate the basis on which decisions could rea- 
sonably be expected to be made in various types of 
applications and petitions, 48 decisions have been 
selected for publication or have been published 
dui'ing the year as precedents. Published decisions 
are available for purchase from the (iovernment 
Printing Office or for examination at the principal 
offices of the Service. 

The Act of October :i, 19(i5 (Public Law 89- 
236), which became effective on December 1, 1965, 
had great impact on the adjudications area of 
travel control operations. During 1966, a total of 
855,369 applications and petitions for various ben- 
efits and privileges under the immigration laws 
was adjudicated by Service offices. Tliis was an 
increase of almost 100,000 cases over fiscal year 
1965. The striking impetus of the new Act oii ad- 
judications work can be judged more effectively 
wlien it is realized that the increase in the number 
of applications and petitions adjudicated in 1965 
over 1964 was only about 37,000. 

V{w Petitionii' Tlie Act of October 3, 1965, 
abolished the term "nonquota" and substituted two 
general classes of innnigrants not subject to nu- 
merical limitations. The law now provides for 
the equivalent status to be accorded to "immediate 
relatives" of U.S. citizens, i.e., the cliildren, spouses, 
ancl parents of citizens. During tlie year, 48,528 
petitions to accord either nonquota or immediate 
relative status were approved, an increase of 48 
percent over the previous yeai-. The increase re- 
sulted, not only because of "the inclusion of parents 
in the immediate relative category, but also be- 
cause Congress indicated that any person wlio 
could qualify for innnediate relative status should 
be admitted as such. This is in line witli the legis- 



lative intent not to waste visa numbers. Thus, 
persons who are exempt from the numerical limi- 
tations on visa issuance are not permitted to re- 
ceive numbers, which are conserved for aliens who 
are subject to the limitations. 

Included in the total petitions for immediate 
relatives of citizens were 1,912 petitions approved 
for orjjhans. an increase of 24 percent over last 
year. Service offices abroad adjudicated 1,086 of 
these petitions on behalf of orjjhans. 

The second class not ninnerically controlled is 
designated "special immigrants" and is made up 
largely of natives of Western Hemisphere coun- 
tries. 

The Act established other new preference cate- 
gories for relatives of U.S. citizens. A new first 
preference category was i*eserved for unmarried 
sons and daughters of U.S. citizens (formerly ac- 
corded second preference). Spouses and unmar- 
ried sons and daughters of aliens lawfully ad- 
mitted for permanent residence (formerly ac- 
corded third preference status) are now accorded 
second preference status. 

Fourth preference, formerly established for 
brothers and sisters and married sons and daugh- 
ters of American citizens, is now accorded only to 
married sons and daughters of citizens. A new 
fifth preference classification was created for 
brothers and sisters of U.S. citizens. The avail- 
ability of visa numbers resulted in an increase of 
90 "percent over the number of petitions approved 
in 1965 for pi'eference relatives. Most striking 
was the increase in numbers of visa petitions for 
persons in the fourtli and fifth preferences where 
the number of approved petitions more than tri- 
pled— 25,888 in 1966 versus 8,250 in 1965. 

The Act eliminated tlie old first preference for 
highly skilled persons and established two occu- 
pational preferences. A third preference clas- 
sification is for aliens who qualify as members of 
the professions or j^er-sons of exceptional ability in 
the sciences or arts. For the first time the jjetition 
could be filed by the beneficiaiy himself, or by any 
person in his behalf. A total of 8,128 such peti- 
tions, including petitions filed under the former 
first preference category, was approved, and 812 
denied after approj^riate incpiiry and investiga- 
tion. Detailed reports were furnished the Con- 
gress in each approved case, as required by law. 
The Act also created a sixth preference classifica- 
tion for aliens who qualify as skilled or unskilled 
workers in occupations for which workers in the 
Ignited States are in short supply. There were 
1,689 such petitions a])i)roved and 266 denied. 

In addition to petitions for admission of immi- 
grants who will come under the occupational pref- 
erences are petitions for temporary workers. 
Petitions filed by employers in the United States 
to import, for temporary periods, aliens of distin- 
guished merit and ability, workers in short supply 
in the ITnited States, and industrial trainees 
amounted to 14,699 compared to 15,714 received 
the previous year. The Service approved 12,795 , 



10 



such petitions and denied 693 after consultation 
with other Goveniment ajrencies, representatives 
of hibor and management, and otlier appropriate 
inquiries. Imjiortation of all foreij^n agricultural 
laborers must be ju'eceded by approved petitions 
filed with the Service under the <reneral provisions 
of the Immigration and Nationality Act. 

Otlier Applications. During the year, 265,269 
applications by nonimmigrants to extend their 
temporary stay in the United States were adjudi- 
cated as compared to 2-10,964 last year, an increase 
of 24,305 over 1965, an indication of the continuing 
rise in alien tourists to the United States. Alien 
border crossing cards permitting teniporaiy entry 
into the United States were issued to 186,788 resi- 
dents of Canada and Mexico who enter the Ignited 
States frequently. There were 13,217 nonimmi- 
grants in the United States, who upon application, 
were permitted to change from one nonnnmigrant 
class to another. 

Schools desiring to enroll foreign students must 
be authorized to do so by the Service, foreign stu- 
dents or exchange aliens must receive permission 
to transfer from one school or exchange program 
to another, and .students must apply for permis- 
sion to accept part-time employment. There were 
39,875 aiiplications in these categories approved 
during the year, an increase of 8 percent over last 
year. 

U.S. citizens who frequently cross the land bor- 
dei-s were issued 11,926 certificates of identity to 
facilitate their reentry into the United States; 105,- 
487 applications for reentry permits, extension of 
reentry pennits, and duplicate alien registration 
cards were adjudicated, up 19 jiercent over fiscal 
year 1965. Permission to reapply was accorded 
2,608 previously deported aliens and advance ))er- 
mission to return was given 180 lawfully resident 
aliens who otherwise would have been inadmissible 
upon return to the United States following brief 
al)sences abroad. 

Aliens admitted to the United States to partic- 
ipate in exchange programs must depart and re- 
side in the country of their birth or last residence, 
or under certain circumstances in another foreign 
countr-y, for 2 years before they can apply for 
immigrant visas or adjust their status to perma- 
nent residents. The foreign residence requirement 
may be waived only when it is established that 
comjiliance with the requirement would cause ex- 
ce]3tional hardship to the alien's U.S. citizen or 
lawfully resident alien spouse or child, or upon re- 
quest of an interested Governmeut agency. The 
Secretary of State must recommend whether the 
waiver should be granted and the Attorney Gen- 
eral then makes the decision to grant or deny. 
During the year, 1,930 such waivers were granted. 

Service Operations Outside the United States 

Service officers stationed abroad continued to 
render invaluable assistance in detecting and pre- 
venting fraud, misrepresentation, and other vio- 



lations of law, including counterfeit document 
operations, organized marriage frauds, and alien 
smuggling. Adjudication of various types of ap- 
plications and petitions filed by T^.S. citizens and 
aliens residing abroad were current, notwithstand- 
ing that the provisions of the Act of October 3, 
1965, greatly increased the workloads of these 
officers. 



BORDER PATROL AND 
INVESTIGATIONS 

Aliens come to the United States through many 
gates. As we have seen, many millions arrive, are 
examined at ports of entry, and are legally ad- 
mitted. Others who cannot or do not meet the 
criteria may seek to enter illegally, or once legally 
admitted may seek to stay in violation of the terms 
of their admi.ssion. Still others may seek to be- 
come naturalized citizens through fraudulent 
means. For such as these, the task of enforcement 
of the immigration and nationality laws becomes 
one of guarding the borders against illegal entry, 
finding and deporting those found to be in illegal 
status, unraveling marriage fraud rings, discov- 
ering the source of counterfeit documents, locating 
and apprehending alien criminals, and the like. 
Such enforcement of the laws is the responsibility 
of two cooi'dinated arms of the Service — the in- 
vestigations and the border patrol. 

Deportable Aliens Located 

Service officers located 138,520 deportable aliens 
during fiscal year 1966, representing a 26-percent 
increase over fiscal 1965. Dominating the pi'ob- 
lem of increasing nuinbers of aliens illegally in 
the United States was the major one of Mexican 
nationals seeking work in the United States. Six- 
ty-five percent of all aliens located in illegal status 
were of Mexican nationality, and the number of 
such violators increased by 62 percent from the 
55,349 in 1965 to 89,751 iii 1966. The following 
table reflects a comparison of the violators by na- 
tionality group for 1965 and 1966 : 





Fiscal years 


Percent 




1966 


1965 


change 


Mexican 


89, 751 
1,001 
9, 089 
2,336 
6,557 
5,779 
4,279 

19, 728 


55, 349 
1,808 
8,063 
1,982 
8,700 
5, 925 
4,699 

23, 845 


-1-62. 1 
-44. 6 




-f 12. 7 


BWI and British Honduran. 
Other Western Hemisphere.- 


-f 17. 9 

-24.6 

-2.5 




-8.9 




-17.3 






Total aliens found 


138, 520 


110,371 


-1-25.5 



236 O - 67 - 2 



11 



Sfafi/.^ lit Entry. Of the 138,5-20 violators of 
ininiicration laws, 44 percent had entered illegally, 
and the remaining 56 percent (78,062) became de- 
portable after violating the status for which they 
were admitted. Tlie number of aliens who made 
surreptitious entries (60,458) was an increase of 
S4 percent over last year and a continuation of the 
upward trend that has accelerated each year since 
a record low of 16,570 in fiscal year 1962. Ninety- 
six percent of the total illegal entrants were Mex- 
ican nationals, and 65 percent of all Mexicans lo- 
cated made surreptitious entries. Only 5 pei'cent 
of the 48,769 aliens of otlier nationalities had 
entered illegally. 

Since most of the immigration violations were 
created by an influx of Mexican aliens across the 
land border of tlie Southwest Region, it is not sur- 
prising to find that 81 percent of tlie 77,285 Mex- 
ican adult aliens were located within the 10 border 
sectors in tlie Southwest Region. In fact, over 
the past 5 years the number of adult Mexican male 
aliens located increased by 265 percent, and of 
these the luimber who entered surreptitiously rose 
by 353 percent. 

The number of alien crewmen found deportable 
on technical grounds when their ships remained 
in port beyond the 29-day statutory limit was ab- 
normally high in 1965 due to shipping strikes. 
This accounts for tlie 45-percent decline from 



20,557 in 1965 to 11,347 in 1966. Willful crew- 
man violations increased by 11 percent to 2,652. 

The 62,021 aliens (other than crewmen) who 
were legally admitted and who violated their sta- 
tus of admission included 45,665 visitors, 3,883 
students, 1,055 agricultural workers, 9,584 other 
nonimmigrants, and 1,834 innnigrants. Exclud- 
ing the number of crewmen who were found in 
technical violation of status, the nonimmigrants 
admitted who violated status represented 51 
percent of the deportable aliens located. 

Emphasis was given throughout the year to 
eft'ect speedy apprehension of aliens before they 
had become firmly entrenched. Of the 127,173 
aliens (otlier than technical crewmen violators) 
found in illegal status, 50,026, or 39 percent, had 
been in the United States less than 72 hours; 
29,005, or 23 percent, for moi-e than 72 hours but 
less than 30 days; 31,093, or 24 percent, from 1 to 
6 months. Only 17,049, or 13 percent, had been 
liere for longer than 6 months. 

Smugc/Iivg. Creirmen. and Stoivaway Controls. 
Border Patrol officers located 3,813 aliens who had 
been induced or assisted to enter unlawfully or 
wlio had been transported unlawfully after entry. 
This was more than double the number of smug- 
gled aliens found in 1965. Violators of statutes 
relating to the inducing, smuggling, and trans- 
porting of unlawfully entered aliens numbered 



DEPORTABLE ALIENS FOUND IN THE UNITED STATES 

1962-1966 

1 00,000 1 '-<>-"^^"«^''<'^<^— —--<- • ■ • II . ^^'^«'-^—--^>^^>^«< „_-. 100^000 



1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 
MEXICANS 




1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 
OTHER NATIONALITIES 



SURftCf-TITfOUS ENTRIIS [:/' ■\ ALt OTHER ENTRIES 



12 



959, representing an increase of 83 percent over 
the r)'25 violators apprehended in 1965. The num- 
ber of sniufifilers reported in 19fi6 exceeds tlie 
number reported in all years since 19r)4, when the 
official figure was 1,822. 

To locate the smugglers before they reach the 
intei'ior destinations with their smuggled human 
cargo has been one of the major aims. Reports 
show that 204, or 21 percent, of the principals 
were aj)])rehended in line watch, and 565, or 59 
percent, in traffic-check operations, thus indicating 
the etfectiveness of these operations. Most of the 
violations involving assistance rendered to aliens 
occurred in the Southwest Region. The alanning 
growth of snmggling practices in recent years is 
shown in the table below. 

Smugglers and smuggled alien>i located in Southwest 
Region 



Total: 

Principals 

Smuggled aliens 

Percent Increase by years: 

Principals 

Smuggled aliens 



Fiscal years 



1966 1965 1964 1963 1962 



-1-91% 
-1-122% 



-1-4% 
-1-47% 



-1-37% 
-1-66% 



-1-1% 
-1-38% 



Service investigators completed 1,046 smug- 
gling investigations during the year. Prosecu- 
tions of smugglers of aliens were successful in 
371 cases, resulting in aggregate sentences of 3,286 
months' imprisonment and fines totaling $18,850. 

The facts disclosed in the following cited typical 
cases reflect the trend toward inci'eased commer- 
cialism and larger groups of aliens being 
smuggled. 

On August 26, 1965, Border Patrol officers in 
the Chula Vista Sector apprehended 5 smug- 
glers and 38 aliens who were brought into the 
United States illegally from the Rosarito Reach 
area, Baja California, Mexico, in 3 small boats 
and wei-e landed in the Mission Bay basin near San 
Diego, Calif. The aliens were met at San Diego 
by P^dward E. Wilson, a U.S. citizen, and Richard 
Bruce Loughran, a Canadian citizen and alleged 
legal resident alien. A Hertz van-type truck to 
convey the aliens to interior points in California 
had been rented and was found in the area. The 
aliens were charged fees ranging from $125 to 
$150 for the assistance rendered, and had already 
paid a total of $740 to the smugglers, with the 
balance to be paid from subsequent earnings. 

The smugglers were arraigned before the U.S. 
Commissioner on August 26, 1965, and charged 
with violation of 8 U.S.C. 1324 (bringing in or 
harboring aliens) . Wilson was sentenced to serve 
3 years. Canadian alien Loughran received an 
18-month suspended sentence; was placed on pro- 



bation for 2 yeai's; and was advised to leave the 
T'nited States and not return. 

Jesus Alfonso Romero-Ramirez, a Venezuelan 
pilot for the, Venezuelan airline LEBCxV, was con- 
victed on January 12, 1966, in Miami, Fla., of 
smuggling two Cuban aliens from Venezuela to 
the Ignited States in a LEBCA plane. Fees of 
$300 and $500 were charged. The aliens were con- 
cealed in the plane's baggage compartment during 
the immigration ins]:)ection. Romero-Ramirez 
was sentenced to serve 2 years and fined $2,000. 

Additional cases briefly summarized below re- 
veal increased commercialism, larger groups being 
smuggled, and devious means used by smugglers 
to evade detection. Yuma, Ariz., officers appre- 
hended 44 smuggled aliens being convej'ed to Colo- 
rado in a cattle truck for a fee of $350 per alien. 
An El Centro case involved a I^.S. citizen smug- 
gling 22 aliens in a rented camper for a fee of $1.50 
for each alien. In May, three smuggling cases 
were reported by Chula Vista at the San Diego 
Airport terminal in which case the smugglers 
were preparing to transport the aliens to the in- 
terior via commercial plane. A naturalized U.S. 
citizen smuggler was apprehended by Ogdensburg 
Sector officers in the act of smuggling three natives 
of Greece from Canada by walking the aliens 
around the port of entry to avoid inspection and 
picking them up a short distance from the border. 

(Viiitinued emphasis given to crewman control 
and antistowaway and antismuggling programs 
resulted in the apprehension of 2,652 crewmen 
who had succeeded in deserting their vessels and 
115 stowaways who were landed or were found as 
unreported on board vessels. Liaison and mutual 
cooperation with all law enforcement agencies and 
the general public played an important part in the 
Service's success in control of crewmen. The fol- 
lowing incident demonstrates crewman control and 
liaison activities at peak efficiency. 

p]arly on the UKU'iiing of November 4, 1965, the 
Xew York office received a telephonic alert from 
Baltimore that six Chinese ci'ewmen were believed 
to have deserted the M/V Williani V. S. Tubman 
and were reported to be on a train arriving shortly 
at Xew York. New York investigators immedi- 
ately called the railroad police at Pennsylvania 
Station. By the time the investigators arrived 
at Xew York's Pennsylvania Station, the railroad 
l)olice had placed watches at terminals en route, 
had ascertained that six Chinese males were on 
an approaching train and had pinpointed the very 
car in which they were riding. Immediately on 
the train's arrival at Xew York, the six Chinese 
passengers were located and identified as the de- 
serters from Baltimore. That same day their land 
permits were revoked, and they were returned to 
their ship in Baltimore for deportation. 

Complete etfectiveness of the crewman control 
etfort in the St. Lawrence Seaway was again 
demonstrated by results during fiscal year 1966. 
Officers of the Massena unit verified departure of 



13 



980 detained crewmen aboard 31'2 outgoing vessels. 
There were no successful desertions. The success 
of this operation during a period of rising deser- 
tions in Canadian St. Lawrence River ports is 
credited, in part, to the deterrent efl'ect of the 
frequent appearance of uniformed officers con- 
ducting surveillance of vessels and scrupulous 
checlving of detained crewmen at the locks. In 
one attempted desertion during the year, a German 
crewman reported missing by the ship's captain 
was quickly located in downtown Ogdensburg. 
When the crewman declared his intention of re- 
maining ashore, he was returned to the vessel and 
ordered detained on board. 

.1//' Operations. The use of observation air- 
craft continued to be a valuable adjunct to mobile 
ground units in ferreting out illegal aliens walking 
through the desert and mountainous terrain ad- 
jacent to the border and also in locating; groups 
of aliens employed in agriculture and industry. 
During the year, use of the aircraft is credited with 
locating 8,075 deportable aliens, exceeding the 1965 
figure by 69 percent. 

A typical example of the efl'ect ive use of ob- 
servation aircraft is the smuggling case reported 
above involving aliens smuggled into the Mission 
Bay area by boat from Mexico. These boats were 
sighted and kept under surveillance by Service 
aircraft as they journeyed northward along the 
Pacific Coast proceeding to their ultimate point of 
landing. 

During the year, transport aircraft logged 5,146 
flight-hours and 22,825,589 passenger-miles with- 
out incident. Of the total 19,740,792 passenger- 
miles accrued in carrying aliens from all parts of 
the United States to and between staging areas on 
the Mexican border for expulsion to Mexico by air, 
train, or local departure at border points. In ad- 
dition, 3,134,797 passenger-miles were logged in 
conveying prisoners for the Bureau of Prisons. 

In view of the increased illegal entries encoun- 
tered this year, use of the Leon airlift and Presidio- 
Ojinaga ti-ainlift was also increased to remove 
more illegal adult Mexican male aliens into the 
interior of Mexico nearer their homes. During the 
year, 15,057 aliens were airlifted to Leon, Guana- 
juato, Mexico, as compared to 9,720 aliens in fiscal 
year 1965. The regular Matamoras-Leon flights 
were supplemented by flights conveying 6,600 
aliens from Mexicali to Leon and 900 from Juarez 
to Leon. As of the close of the fiscal year, 81,078 
aliens have been airlifted to Leon since the incep- 
tion of the program on November 29, 1957. The 
number removed via the Presidio-Ojinaga train- 
lift to Chihuahua City, Chihuahua, Mexico, in- 
creased by 133 percent, from 14,822 in fiscal year 
1965 to 34,583 in fiscal year 1966. By June 30, 
1966, 107,939 aliens had been removed by train to 
Chihuahua. 

The effectiveness of these programs is demon- 
strated by the fact that during fiscal year 1966 only 
4,803 or 4 percent of the previously bus- and train- 
lifted aliens and 2,331 or 3 percent of the aliens air- 



lifted had returned illegally and been apprehended 
again. 

Cooperation With Other Law Enforcement 
Agencies. Effectiveness of an active program of 
mutual cooperation with other agencies as a means 
of extending the influence of each Border Patrol 
officer is well established. Officers represented the 
Service at regular meetings of organizations whose 
membership included officers of city, county. State, 
and Federal law enforcement agencies and repre- 
sentatives of various agencies in Canada and 
Mexico. Other agencies delivered to our officers 
6,900 violators of the Immigration and Nationality 
Act, 55 percent more than the 4,452 turned over to 
our officers during fiscal 1965. Border Patrol of- 
ficers, incident to performing their duties, arrested 
and released to appropriate agencies 740 violators 
of other laws. Coincidental to the apprehension 
of such AJolators, Border Patrol officers seized and 
recovered merchandise, narcotics, and property 
ha\ing a total value of $473,407. The value of all 
narcotics seized amounted to $382,185. Some 
typical cases of other law violators apprehended 
follow. 

Officers at the Oceanside, Calif., checkpoint ap- 
prehended a resident Mexican alien in possession 
of 100 pounds of marijuana valued at $100,000, 
which he concealed above the springs in the back 
seat of the automobile. At the Campo Station 
early in October 1965, officers arrested 3 U.S. citi- 
zens at a traffic checkpoint, and seized 37 bricks of 
marijuana. Later in the same month, officers at 
the same station encomitered four U.S. citizens 
with 50 pounds of marijuana. The combined 
value of both seizures was $39,500. 

Canadian alien Conrad Brunelle, wanted for 
armed robbeiy of a postal truck in Richmond, 
Quebec, Canada, was apprehended by a pati-ol in- 
spector at the airport at Massena, N.Y., after he 
had made inquiries about air transportation to 
Minnesota and Mexico. At the time of his ari-est, 
he had $2,300 in cash of an alleged $7,000 in cash 
stolen from the mailtruck. Inquiiy established 
that he has been linked with organized crime in 
Canada as a pusher of counterfeit money. His 
convictions for crimes in Canada date back to 1942. 

In the area of conununity relations, officers of the 
Van Buren Station, Maine, on July 26, 1965, were 
requested to make an emergency delivery of a rare- 
type blood from Loring Air Force Ba.se to the 
hospital in Edmundston, New Brunswick, Canada, 
some 60 miles distant. The officers delivered the 
blood in time to save the life of a man who had been 
injured. The pilot of a Border Patrol plane at El 
Paso, returning from a patrol flight on October 22, 
1965, spotted a child about 5 years of age walking 
in the desert about 20 miles west of El Paso. 
Through radio contact with a patrol vehicle, the 
child was ])icked up and returned to his family, 
who live in Mexico about 30 miles southwest of 
Juarez, Mexico. 

In September, following the devastation left by 
a hurricane which hit the New Orleans, La., area, 



14 



officers of the sector assisted in rescue work, trans- 
jiorted food and water to disaster shelters, and 
assisted tlie local law enforcement officers in vari- 
ous ways. 

Foreign- Born Law Violators 

( 'ar/bbean Program and ProbJems. The Service 
Caribbean investigations coordination program 
and related indexes maintained at Miami, Fla., 
continued to be veiy valuable investigative instru- 
ments in keeping Latin American subversive, crim- 
inal, inmioral, and narcotic aliens out of the I'nited 
States. These indexes were especially helpful in 
screening out subvei-sives from among the thou- 
sands of Cubans attempting to enter via the refugee 
airlift and sealift. Of 150,000 index checks made, 
7,000 relating records were located. As a result, 
300 subversive and 101 criminal, immoral, or nar- 
cotic investigations were initiated. 

An example of the effectiveness of the index is 
the case of Luis Romero-Toledo, a native and citi- 
zen of Cuba wlio had l)eeu admitted to the United 
States for permanent residence in 1050, but 3 years 
later was deported to Cuba because of prior meni- 
bershi]) in the Cuban Communist Party. In Janu- 
ai-y 1962, and again on December 13, 1965, he 
applied for admission as a refugee. In both in- 
stances, checks of the index revealed his prior 
record and background. On May 17, 1966, he was 
ordered excluded and deported because of his 
Connnunist Party membership in Cuba. 

Another Cuban, Armando Redondo Montalvo, 
arrived as a stowaway at Philadelphia on May 11, 
1966, and was ordered detained on l)oard. The 
Caribbean index reflected him to be a Cul)an Com- 
munist. He had previously attempted to enter the 
United States at Brownsville, Tex., and was re- 
fused, and subsequently entered illegally at Chula 
Vista, California., and was apprehended and 
returned to Mexico. 

There were 656 investigations of Cubans con- 
ducted during the year, including 'MU allegedly of 
the subversi\e class and 77 alleged to be of tlie 
criminal, immoral, and narcotic classes. Among 
the Cubans deported as a result of these investiga- 
tions was Celestino Fernandez-Suarez, a Cuban 
Commiuiist, who was excluded from the United 
.States in 19(i2, l)ut entered clandestinely at Hi- 
dalgo, Tex., on February 26, 1966. He was found 
in New York City and deported from there to 
Honduras on April 13, 1966. 

Several false claims to Cuban refugee status 
were exposed. Rene Reyes-Leyva and Francisco 
Menendez-Herrera, alleged Cuban refugees who 
had been residing in the Ignited States, were inter- 
cepted attempting to reenter the United States at 
Trout River, N.Y., on September 10, 1966, as XLS. 
citizens, following a visit to the Cuban Consulate 
in Montreal, Canada. The veliicle in which they 
attempted to reenter had written on the side of it 
in tlie Spanish language, "Viva Cuba. Abaje el 
rmi)erialismo Yankee." (Live Cuba. Down with 



the Imperialist Yankee.) They were paroled into 
the United States for prosecution for false claim 
to I'.S. citizenship, on which charge they were con- 
victed in Federal court at Syracuse, N. Y., and sen- 
tenced to 3 months" imprisonment. They were re- 
turned to Canada on February 14, 1966. 

As an aftermath of the 1965 Dominican crisis, 
investigations of alleged subversive Dominicans 
were intensified. Results of these investigations 
included the departure from the United States of 
the following Dominican revolutionaries: Wash- 
ington Anibal de Pena y Pena, an alleged Commu- 
nist, who departed from San Juan, P.R., on Sep- 
tember 5, 1965, while under deportation proceed- 
ings; Santana Elias Belliard-Frias, an alleged 
functionary of the Marxist-Leninist Connnunist 
I^arty in New York City, wjio departed for the 
Dominican Republic on February 3, 1966, while 
under investigation at New York City; Clara Yo- 
casta Brugal-Mena, 1-ltli of June Movement func- 
tionary at New York City, who was required to 
depart on February 9, 196(5 ; Cesar Arias-Otei'o, 
wlio allegedly engaged in pro-Castro propaganda 
activities in New York City and was required to 
depart from the United States on October 8, 1965; 
Rinaldo AUwrto Aquino-Inoa, who was mentioned 
advei-sely in testimony before the Senate Internal 
Security Subconnnittee, and was required to de- 
part on August 30, 1965; Angelo Antonio Elmu- 
desi-Porcella, Dominican attorney who partici- 
pated in anti-United States demonstrations in New 
York City and was required to depart on Septem- 
ber 9, 1965; Marcelo Felipe Bermudez-Estrella, a 
functionai-y of the pro-Communist 14th of June 
Movement, who was apprehended at New York 
City on August 16, 1965, and departed from the 
I'nited States at San Juan, P.R., on September 15. 
1965, while under deportation proceedings. 

Infernal Security and the Foreign Born. The 
Service continued its effective antisubversive in- 
vestigative program aimed at promptly detecting 
and identifying foreign-born subversives and 
thereafter providing the necessary evidence for 
denying them the benefits of naturalization or ad- 
justment of status or excluding, deporting, or 
denaturalizing them. 

Investigations under the border program re- 
sulted in the exclusion of several important sub- 
versive aliens, including Jacinto Lopez-Moreno, a 
Sonora, Mexico, State congressman and an alleged 
Communist; Gilberto Apiilar-Ojeda, who claimed 
to be a government officuil when applying for ad- 
mission at San Ysidro, Calif., on April 29, 1966; 
(\)sme Rico-Ruiz, who claimed to be a teacher 
from the State of Chihuahua, Mexico, when ap- 
plying for admission at El Paso, Tex., on April 8, 
1966; Ruben Vizcaino-Valencia, who claimed to 
be an official of the municipal government of 
Tijuana, Mexico, when applying for admission at 
San Ysidro, Calif. ; EutemioGri jalva Bernal, who 
claimed to be a Mexican Federal Post Office em- 
ployee when attempting to enter the United States 
at El Paso, Tex., on December 5, 1965. 



15 



Continued special attention was given to the 
problem of aliens of the subversive class of Asiatic 
origin. Alleged subversive aliens from the Orient 
required to depart following Service investiga- 
tions included: Yee Sun Jok, a Chinese who en- 
tered the Ignited States by falsely claiming to be 
a U.S. citizen. He l)ecame affiliated with the Xew 
York City pro-Conununist Chinese publication 
'"China Daily News," and departed from the 
T'nited States on March 1, 1966; Vinsong Men, a 
Cambodian student at the California State College 
at Los Angeles, Calif., who was cited in a 1959 
House Un-American Activities Committee hear- 
ing, departed from the United States; and Takashi 
Tanaka, a Japanese treaty trader alleged to have 
been involved in Communist activities in Japan, 
departed from the United States on March 11, 
1966. 

Among others required to dej^art from the 
United States following a Service investigation 
was Ali Mohamed Yahya, a Tanzanian revolu- 
tionary and general secretary of the "Pan African 
Students Organization in the Americas," who de- 
parted from New York City on November 9, 1965. 

Foreign- Born of the Criminal C/a-sxe.s. In the 
field of anticrime and antiracketeering, 8,262 in- 
xestigations involving aliens of the criminal, 
inunoral, and narcotic classes were completed dvn-- 
ing the year. 

The following are specific examples of individ- 
ual cases handled under this program. 

Andrea Bussa, wanted by Italian police authoi-- 
ities for theft, assault, and the attempted murder 
of a police officer, was reported bv Interpol to have 
fled to the United States. On February 9, 1966, he 
was apin-ehended in Brooklyn, N.Y., where he was 
residing under an alias. He had gone from Italy 
to Germany to Canada and then to tlie United 
States, efl'ecting a .surreptitious entry near Cham- 
])lain, N.Y., around May 6, 1964. Following a 
hearing in dejjortation i^roceedings, he was de- 
])orted to Italy on February 24, 19(56, and turned 
over to waiting Italian authorities. 

Alfonso Schembri, a native of Italy and an asso- 
ciate of racketeers, in Tucson, Ariz., who had been 
convicted in Los Angeles on bogus check charges, 
was dejjorted to Italy on October 1, 1965. He had 
previously gained entry into Canada, and from 
thei'e into the United States by obtaining false doc- 
umentation showing birth in l^razil. 

Antonino Mangiameli, a native of Corleone, 
Italy, entered the t'nited States as a nonimmigrant 
visitor and attem])ted to effect an adjustment of 
status to that of permanent resident. Subse- 
quently, Italian law enforcement authorities ad- 
vised a warrant for his arrest had been issued in 
Palermo, Italy, charging him with complicity in 
the nuirders of one Luciano Riggio and 10 other 
l)ersons in Italy. Mangiameli, apprehended in 
New York, N.Y., by Service investigators, was or- 
dered de])orted on March 18, 1966, and his subse- 
fiuent a])peal to the Board of Innnigi'ation Appeals 
vpas dismissed. On June 22, 1966, he was deported 



to Italy where he was taken into custody by Italian 
police authorities on arrival at Rome. 

Programs aimed at the control of border crim- 
inal activity and the identification of alien crimi- 
nals likely to attempt entry into the United States 
continued during the year with close liaison be- 
tween Service officers and law enforcement officials 
in Canada and Mexico. The following cases are 
indicative of efforts made in the border programs. 

Ronald Dale Haas, a subject of the Service's 
anticriminal and antiracketeer program — Cana- 
dian border, was found to have disappeared from 
Canada and was reported to be in Miami, Fla., in 
January 1966. Service and local authorities were 
alerted. He ran afoul of ]:)olice in Clearwater, Fla., 
who were investigating hotel biirglaries, and he 
was promptly identified by Service officers. He 
was charged with violation of 8 IT.S.C. 1326 (il- 
legal reentry) in view of a previous deportation 
and held on $10,000 bond. Deportation proceed- 
ings were also initiated. Haas' extensive criminal 
record in Canada includes convictions for theft, 
shopbreaking, and possession of stolen goods. He 
is an accomplished safeblower and a professional 
gamlJer. On June 3, 1966, he entered a plea of 
guilty to the illegal reentry charge and on June 10, 
1966, he was sentenced to a year in prison. De- 
]>ortation to Canada is expected to follow upon 
completion of the prison sentence. 

Roger Marentette, a citizen of Canada who has 
l)een wanted since 1962 by Canadian authorities for 
fraud and forgery in the amount of $300,000, was 
ajii^rehended in Dallas, Tex., on October 7, 1965, as 
a result of information developed through the 
Sei-vice Canadian border CIN program. On Oc- 
tober 11, 1965, he was returned to Canada under 
safeguards and relinquished to the custody of pro- 
vincial ])olice. When located in Dallas, Tex., Mar- 
entette was operating the National Pension Funds 
Investment Com])any. 

The identification, apprehension, and deporta- 
tion of Latin American criminals, who have spe- 
cialized in large-scale pickjjocketing and shoplift- 
ing on an organized basis, has been another field 
of active endeavor. Their activity has resulted in 
heavy losses to individuals and business enter])rises 
each year. When arrested, they use false identi- 
ties and post the small bonds required to gain re- 
lease before proper identification can be made. 
They are then free to continue their operations. 
Special procedures ])roviding for rapid finger- 
])riiU checks have met with outstanding success in 
obtaining quick identification of tlie criminals, 
tliereby enabling the Service to take custody im- 
mediately upon their release by local authorities. 

Friiiifls. Completion of 3,821 immigration 
fraud investigations during the last year exposed 
luunerous schemes to circumvent the immigration 
laws. 

Many of these investigations involved inquiry 
into criminal conspiracies between aliens and other 
l)ersons who, for high fees, provided the aliens 
with the documentation needed to circumvent 



16 



quota and other restrictions embodied in the im- 
mifiration statutes. Otlier schemes involved 
''sliam" marriages to U.S. citizens to evade quota 
restrictions or labor certification requirements, or 
to gain inuiiediate relative or special immigrant 
status, and the use of fraudulent or altered pass- 
ports and immigration documents. 



the "brides" were paid $300 to $500. After trial 
on the first indictment, six were found guilty. 
Four have been sentenced and two are awaiting 
sentencing. Further trial is being awaited on the 
second indictment. 




Seattle investigator checking docum<?iits in the shadow 
of the Space Needle iciih a statue of Chief Seattle in the 
foreground. 

An example is the case of Amadeo Luciano- 
Santelises, operator of the Union Travel Agency, 
New York City, who, with an associate, pleaded 
guilty to IS counts of an indictment charging them 
with conspiracy to make false statements and cer- 
tifications in connection with applications for visa 
petitions and other Service benefits. On January 
28, 1966, both were placed on prol)ation for 1 year. 
As a result of the convictions, deportation proceed- 
ings were instituted against Luciano, and his asso- 
ciate's notarial commission was revoked. 

In another case, 8 persons were indicted Janu- 
ary 21, 1966, and March 25, 1966, on 28 counts for 
arranging "sham" marriages Itetween (xreek alien 
crewmen and U.S. citizens to evade quota re- 
strictions of the immigration laws. The alien 
grooms paid fees of up to $1,000 each from which 



Cheeking shrimp hasin at Port Isabel, Tex. 

During tlie last year, 43 aliens from tlie Domini- 
can Republic were found at San Juan, P.R., with 
altered passports and/or nonimmigrant visas re- 
flecting an increasing trend to this fraud. The 
most common alterations involved photograph 
substitution or actual alterations of nonimmigrant 
visas. Investigations revealed the jjrice of the al- 
tered documents varied from $25 to $300 and the 
sources of the altered documents to be various in- 
dividuals operating near U.S. visa-issuing offices 
in the Dominican Republic. The cases of the ali- 
ens located are being presented to the United 
States Attorney for consideration of prosecution, 
that matter being disposed of before their depar- 
tures are effected. All Service officers have been 



17 



alerted to give Dominican passports the most care- 
ful scrutiny and close liaison is being maintained 
with the Department of State on a local and seat- 
of 'government level. 

The workload at the Fraudulent Document Cen- 
ter again exceeded that of previous years. At the 
end of the fiscal year, there were 12,699 cases on file 
relating to ^lexican aliens who attempted to use 
documents to support false claims to U.S. citizen- 
ship as compared to 10,752 in fiscal year 1965 to 
2,401 in fiscal year 1966. Positive responses in 
;^73, or 15 percent, of the cases were funiislied the 
inquiring offices. 

The number of false claims to citizenship en- 
countered by the Border Patrol increased for the 
fifth consecutive year, from 1,293 in fiscal year 
1965 to 1,385 cases for the current period. The 
citizenship of the aliens involved was 1,361 Mexi- 
cans, 7 Canadians, and 17 aliens of other nation- 
alities. 

A case developed in May 1966, by Chicago 
Travel Control illustrated the ready availability 
and depth of information on file at the Center. 
Inspection of a passenger arriving from ^lexico 
City and claiming U.S. citizenship was deferred 
1 day while a check was made of the records at the 
Center. The response indicated a false claim to 
citizenship had previously been made under the 
name the passenger used. Description of the 
former claimant included a cut scar on the inside 
of the left index finger, which led to positive iden- 
tification of the passenger as the individual who 
had made the prior claim. Exclusion proceedings 
were instituted upon receipt of the information 
from the Center. 

A case of interest illustrating the results from 
use of the Center was developed in the Cleveland 
District. An investigator questioned a subject 
regarding his citizenship and was presented a birth 
certificate indicating birth in Los Fresnos, Tex. 
The investigator abstracted information from the 
certificate and later made inquiry of the Center. 
Xo record of the certificate was found, but infor- 
mation was under index regarding the affiant 
named on the certificate, indicating he had pre- 
viously received $30 for signing as <me of the 
witnesses in creating a fraudulent delayed birth 
record. The investigator encountered "the same 
subject some weeks later, and when confronted 
with the information regarding the professional 
witness, the subject admitted that he was an alien 
and hacl assumed the identity of the person named 
on the certificate. When the subject's true name 
was checked at the Center, another case was'located 
relating to a ])rior apprehension in 1964 as a false 
claimant. 

Service efforts to detect false claims to citizen- 
ship by Mexican aliens have been aided substan- 
tially by the recordkeeping and availability of 
infonnation at the Fraudulent Document Center. 
American consulates in Mexico, State registrai'S, 
and other agencies have also benefited in lesser 
degrees from the operation of this facility. 



Criminal Prosecution 

The United States Attorneys authorized 3,63(> 
prosecutions. Of the 3,496 cases completed, 91 
]iercent resulted in convictions with aggregate 
sentences of 32,830 months and fines of $103,168. 

Of the aliens convicted, 1,476 were convicted of 
reentry after deportation without permission (8 
I^.S.C. 1326), and 509 persons were convicted for 
document frauds (18 U.S.C. 1546). The average 
sentence in these latter cases was 13 months. 
There were 307 persons convicted for nationality 
violations and of these convictions, 306 cases were 
for false representations as a U.S. citizen (18 
U.S.C. 911). 

Revocation of Naturalization 

AVhere an alien is granted citizenship through 
naturalization, and it later appears that such 
naturalization was based upon fraudulent state- 
ments or false documents or was otherwise obtained 
in an illegal manner, he continues to be a citizen 
until his citizenship is revoked in judicial pro- 
ceedings. The naturalizations of only two citizens 
were revoked by the courts in 1966. 



DETENTION AND DEPORTATION 
ACTIVITIES 

The number of aliens deported in fiscal year 
1966 under orders of deiwrtation was 9,168. This 
is 975 less than the 10,143 deported in fiscal year 
1965. Among those deported were 483 on criminal, 
innnoral, and narcotic charges. 

Among the criminals deported was Maurice 
Marcel Chavigny, a much-decorated war hero of 
France. He entered as a visitor in 1955 and 2 years 
later he was convicted of the murder of Brig. Gen. 
(Ret.) Wilbur R. Reynolds and his wife. Chavi- 
gny was deported to France in May 1966, after 
being paroled from ])rison. Other criminals de- 
ported this fiscal year upon release from prison 
were Jean Louis Toupin who had been convicted 
several t imes for theft, burglary, larceny, and other 
crimes; and Thahir Elias Salim who had been im- 
prisoned three times for armed i-obbery. 

Of the aliens deported, 90 percent, or 8,267, had 
entered without inspection or without proper docu- 
ments or failed to maintain nonimmigrant status. 
There were 4,770 deported to ^lexico, 964 to Can- 
ada, 706 to Greece. 207 to Jamaica, 163 to Italy, 
158 to the Dominican Republic, and 117 to Spain. 

The number of aliens required to depart without 
issuance of formal orders of deportation increased 
from 95,263 in the last fiscal year to 123,683. The 
number of surreptitious entries doubled rising 
from 39,068 in 1965 to 78,165 in 1966. In addi- 
tion to 13,274 crewmen technical violators, 70,899 
of those who entered without inspection were per- 



18 



niitted to depart without the issuance of formal 
orders. 

The remaining 39,510 were required to depart 
after issuance of orders to sliow cause. This num- 
ber inclvuU'd 7,266 wlio entered surreptitiously, 
2!),8()1 noninunigrants who failed to maintain the 
status under which admitted and 2,227 aliens who 
entered without proper documents. The princi- 
pal countries to which these aliens were destined 
were Mexico, 16,989; Canada, 7,626; Dominican 
Kepublic, 2,361; Jamaica, 1,078; Philippines, 987; 
Greece, 627 ; and Italy, 577. 

At their own request, 107 aliens who had fallen 
into distress were removed from the T'nited States 
under Section 250 of the Inunigration and Nation- 
ality Act. 

Fifty-seven mentally incompetent aliens were 
(lej)orted or removed. Up to the time of deporta- 
tion, approximately $241,000 had been expended 
for tlieir care in the Ignited States. If they had 
continued to remain institutionalized at public 
expense, over $5,700,000 would have t^een dis- 
bursed for their maintenance and treatment 
during their expected lifetimes. 

There were 35,027 aliens initially admitted to 
Service detention facilities and 43,0-41 to non- 
Service facilities. 



HEARINGS AND LITIGATION 

Hearings to determine the excludability of a 
person seeking admission to the United States, 
or the deportability of an alien after entry, are 
conducted by Special In<iuiry Officers. These are 
immigration officers specially designated to con- 
duct these proceedings in accordance with the 
terms and procedures specified in the Immigration 
and Nationality Act. 

Exclusion and Deportation Hearings 

Special Inquiry Officers completed 876 exclu- 
sion hearings during the fiscal year, including 90 
cases with criminal, immoral, or narcotic charges, 
13 subversive, and 681 cases in which aliens sought 
to enter without the necessary documents for ad- 
mission. 

The fiscal year total of deportation hearings re- 
ferred to Special Inquiry Officers amounted to 17,- 
944, a decrease from the number received in the 
previous year, but nevertheless representing the 
second highest total on record for any single year. 
During this fiscal year the New York District alone 
accounted for 32 percent of such cases. The num- 
ber of exclusion hearings referred to Special In- 
quiry Officers totaled 881, i-epreseuting an increase 
as compared to 1965. 

The nnpact of the Act of October 3, 1965, which 
had a definite effect upon other Service operations, 
also made itself felt in Special Inquiry (Officer ac- 
tivities. "With the elimination of the national ori- 



gins quota system, and the new method for alloca- 
tion of visas, more visas became available for new 
and additional classes of aliens originating in 
countries whose quotas were traditionally and al- 
most permanently oversubscribed. Hence, many 
aliens under deportation proceedings found them- 
selves in a position to apply for adjustment of stat- 
us under Section 245 of the Act. This resulted in 
1,522 motions addressed to Special Inquiry Offi- 
cers fen- reopening of proceedings to permit re- 
newal of, or new applications for relief. This 
represented an increase of 65 percent over 1965. 

The 1965 Act amended Section 249 of the Immi- 
gration and Nationality Act by moving forward 
the date from 1940 to 1948 under which an alien 
may apply for the creation of a record of admis- 
sion. Initial applications for such adjustments 
jumped from 16 in fiscal year 1965 to 240 in 1966. 

Another aspect of the 1965 Act is the amend- 
ment of Section 243 (h) of the basic Act. This 
section, permiting withholding of deportation was 
changed from a requirement of proof of alleged 
physical persecution as a basis for relief, to proof 
of persecution (without reference to "physical"'), 
on accoimt of race, religion, or political opinion. 
During the fiscal year, applications for withhold- 
ing of deportation on a claim of persecution num- 
bered 302 representing an 18-percent increase iis 
compared with 1965. However, to the list of coun- 
tries concerning which such claims were made in 
previous years, now totaling 62, there were added 
during 1966, Bolivia, Guyana, Guatemala, and 
Yemen. 

Litigation 

The major functions of the General Counsel, as 
chief law officer of the Service, include advising 
the Commissioner and his staff of operating offi- 
cials, and conferring with the Solicitor General, the 
approin-iate divisions of the Department and the 
United States Attorneys concerning litigation. 

The Office of the General Counsel, through the 
four Regional Counsels, maintains professional 
supervision over Trial Attorneys serving primarily 
as representatives of the Government in formal 
exclusion, expulsion, and rescission hearings before 
Special Inquiry Oflicers. This Office also repre- 
sents the Service before the Board of Immigration 
Appeals; two Appellate Trial Attorneys of the 
start' being regularly assigned that duty. 

The amount of litigation challenging Service 
determinations has continued upward. In admin- 
istrative proceedings. Trial Attorneys prepared 
1,683 legal briefs and memoranda, 462 (38 percent) 
more than in the previous fiscal year. The in- 
creased appellate work in those proceedings is more 
em])hatical]y reflected by the Service Appellate 
Trial Attorneys. These officers prepared 44 per- 
cent more cases, with a concomitant increase in 
presenting oral arguments before the Board of 
Immigration Appeals, and the preparation of 67 
jjercent more operational memoranda in connection 
with those cases. 



19 



Judicial litigation in the district courts rose to 
200 cases from that of 14ii tlie i)rior year. Of those, 
only 5 were unfavorable to the (xovernment, and of 
the 14 (22 in fiscal year 1965) reaching the courts 
of appeals none were adverse to the Government 
(9 the previous year). The effect of the Act of 
September 26, 1961 (Sec. 106, Immigration and 
Xationality Act; 8U.S.C. 1105a), designed to elim- 
inate district court review of administrative exclu- 
sion and deportation orders by requiring the filing 
of petitions for review direct to the U.S. courts of 
appeals, was more pronounced in that 84 cases 
reached those courts the past fiscal year, only 3 
thereof unfavorable to the Grovernment, compared 
to 57 and 4 in the preceding year. 

The number of decisions rendei-ed by the Su- 
preme Court during its last term affecting Service 
oijerations was unusually heavy, 16 petitions for 
certiorari having been denied, 7 gi'anted. In 
Scaho v. Tluincy. 382 U.S. 849, the Court denied 
certiorari leaving in effect lower court rulings 
approving Service regulations, in implementing 
Section 205 of the Act, prescribing automatic revo- 
cation of a visa petition in behalf of a spouse when 
the petitioner requests withdrawal. 

In another case the Court refused to reexamine 
its decision holding that statutes relating to depor- 
tation of aliens are not subject to the constitutional 
))rohibition against ex post facto laws {Fiuutts- 
Torres v. /^V,S', 382 U.S. 846). Where the admin- 
istrative order of deportation was predicated on 
the finding that ]Detitioner contracted a marriage 
for the purpose of evading the inunigration laws, 
the Supreme Court denied review on the claim that 
hearing was not fair and impartial, in support of 
which the i^etitioner cited the holding in Iixmhedo 
V. Illinois, 378 U.S. 478, as applicable to his case 
with respect to his statement taken by an officer of 
the Immigration and Naturalization Service, no 
objection having been made thereto at the admin- 
istrative hearing, but now contended such state- 
ment was not voluntarily made (Ilamadeh v. INS. 
382 U.S. 838). 

The Supreme Court in Garcia-GomaJes v. INS. 
382 U.S. 840, denied review of a decision by the 
court below agreeing with the Board of Immigra- 
tion Appeals that expungement inirsuant to Sec- 
tion 1203.4, California Penal Code, of a narcotic 
conviction did not render the petitioner nonde- 
portable. Section 241(a) (11) of the Immigration 
and Nationality Act supporting that decision. 

To the same efl'ect was the decision in Rainirvd- 
ViUax. INS, 382 U.S. 908. Again, with regard to 
the same California statute, the Supreme Court 
left undisturbed the ruling by the Ninth Circuit 
that a conviction (issuing an insnfRcient-fnnds 
check with intent to cheat and defraud) is within 
the statutory provision pertaining to deportation 
(Sec. 241(a)(4), Immigration and Nationality 
Act), even though the conviction miglit be subse- 
quently expunged. 

A petitioner, confined to prison, declared his 
intention to return to his native Norway at his 



own expense and claimed he executed all the forms 
presented to him by the Immigration and Natu- 
ralization Service; that he served the minimum 
term imposed but the State of California refused 
to release him. His motion, seeking an order 
directing his immediate deportation, was denied 
by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, which 
pointed out that the relief prayed for was beyond 
its jurisdiction; further that Section 242(h) of the 
Act provides that no alien sentenced to imprison- 
ment shall be deported until the termination of 
such imprisonment. Certiorari was denied by the 
Supreme Court (FjeUhammer v. People of State 
of California and the USA, 383 U.S. 923). 

In another case in which an alien was serving a 
sentence in California as a second offender, the 
alien applied to the U.S. district court for an order 
that he be taken from State custody and deported 
under an outstanding warrant of deportation. 
Because of the specific provisions of section 
242 (li), the district court denied that api^lication. 
The Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit denied 
a similar request on like grounds. The Supreme 
Court denied certiorari and a rehearing (382 U.S. 
883, 934). Lower court rulings adverse to the 
petitioner were denied review in Masuccl v. INS. 
384 U.S. 911. There, petitioner sought a writ of 
habeas corpus to be directed to the warden of the 
Now York State Prison and the Immigration and 
Naturalization Service, in order to obtain his re- 
lease from imprisonment and deportation to Cuba, 
of which he claimed to have become a citizen. 

The question presented on certiorari, whether 
the Special Inquiry Officer exceeded his author- 
ity in directing deportation of concededly deport- 
able aliens to countries designated by them, was 
denied review {Civrng Leung et al v. Esperdy, 382 
U.S. 891). Left undisturbed was the affirmance 
l)y the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Cir- 
cuit of the petitioner's conviction for violation of 
18 l^.S.C. 101 in making a false and fraudulent 
statement in a matter within the jurisdiction of the 
Department of State. On certiorari, petitioner 
contended that he was previouslj- punished 
(double jeopardy) because when he applied for 
naturalization, the Immigration and Naturali- 
zation Service found he failed to establish good 
moral character, relying upon the forged letter 
as one of the grounds for that conclusion; and 
that the trial court was without jurisdiction be- 
cause the letter was sent to a consul {Haddad v. 
f'..S'.. 382U.S. 896). 

In Roclia v. INS (383 U.S. 927) review was 
denied of the judgment below (C.A. 1, 351 F. 2d 
523), affirming the denial of a certificate of citi- 
zenship, sustaining an order of deportation, re- 
jecting the contended unconstitutionality of Sec- 
tion 3, Act of March 2, 1907, which terminated 
the U.S. citizenship of a woman marrying a 
foreign national; and pointing out that its con- 
stitutionality had been upheld in Mackenzie v. 
Hare. 1915, 239 U.S. 299, which was relied upon 
liy the Supreme Couit in several recent decisions. 



20 



Denial of certiorari in Gar/Vano v. INS (384 
U.S. 945) left undisturbed the decision of the 
Court of Appeals (C.A. 2, 353 F. 2d 922). The 
alien was deported in 1955 because of a conviction 
in 1927 for unlawfully selling narcotics. He re- 
entered the United States as a stowaway in 1958. 
Deportation proceedings were instituted under 
Section 241(f) of the Act, predicated upon the 
1955 order of deportation. The alien contended 
that he qualified for suspension of deportation 
under sul)division (1) of Section 244(a) of the Act 
on the basis that he had been ordered deported only 
for nuiking an illegal entry. The court disagreed, 
finding the substantive ground of deportation to 
be section 241(a) (11) relating to narcotic viola- 
tions, hence the provisions of subdivision (2) of 
section 244(a) had to be satisfied for .suspension. 
The circuit court also held that the 10-year period 
applicable under subdivision (2) began ruiniing 
from the commission of the last deportable act, 
here the illegal reentry as a stowaway in 1958. 

In a per curiam oi'der, the Supreme Court 
granted certiorari in MiUan-Garcia v. INS. and 
remanded the case for further consideration. The 
petitioner first failed to pursue an application for 
naturalization and an order of deportation ensued 
for entry without an inunigrant visa. The So- 
licitor General submitted a memorandum to the 
Court bottomed on the theory that since deport- 
ability was premised on unlawful entry, which 
Congress had declared was not a bar to naturaliza- 
tion under Section 329 of the Act, it would l)e in- 
congruous to suppose Congress had intended to 
preclude (notwithstanding the provision of sec- 
tion 318) access to the courts for section 329 appli- 
cants because of deportability on that ground. 

Left pending for the next October term of the 
Supreme Court are five cases in which petitions 
for certiorari have been granted. In Woodhy v. 
INS (No. 825) the question presented is whether 
the court of appeals erroneously affirmed the de- 
portation orders in light of the petitioner's claim 
that she engaged in prostitution only for a limited 
period and under circumstances of financial 
distress. In Bereny'i v. INS, ( No. 960 ) , the Court 
will consider whether the evidence sustained the 
finding of the trial court that the petitioner, an 
applicant for citizenship, was not a ];)erson of good 
moral character in that he had falsely denied he 
had ever been a member of the Commimist Party 
in Hungary. 

S'he>v)um v. INS (No. 1090) raises the question 
whether, in a deportation proceeding against a 
resident alien, the Government must bear its bur- 
den of proof to establish the facts by reasonable, 
substantial and probative evidence, or as con- 
tended by the petitioner, by either "clear, un- 
equivocal and convincing" pi'oof or proof "beyond 
a reasonable doubt." 

In INS V. Errico (No. 898) and Scott v. INS 
(No. 1007, Misc.) the Supreme Court will con- 
sider opposing conclusions on whether the statu- 
tory waiver of deportability for misrepresentations 



for certain relatives of American citizens or resi- 
dent aliens benefits one whose misrepresentation 
enabled him to evade the established numerical 
limitations. The Second Circuit ruled in the 
negative, finding the alien not "otherwise admis- 
sible" as required by the statute (350 F. 2d 279). 
The Ninth Circuit ruled it in the affirmative, find- 
ing that the statutory bounty in such cases was 
intended to waive numerical limitations (349 F. 2d 
541). 

ALIEN ADDRESS REPORTS 

Under the provisions of Section 265 of the Im- 
migration and Nationality Act, aliens in the 
United States are required to report their ad- 
dresses in January of each year. In 1966, 
;),4S2,553 persons so reported. Of this number, 
3,088 J 33 were permanent resident aliens, and 
394,420 were in a temporary status. Almost 
three-fourths of the permanent resident aliens re- 
sided in just eight States as shown in the table on 
the following page. 

Each year since 1960, California has crept a 
little fui-ther ahead of New York in terms of resi- 
dent aliens in the State. In 1940, at the time of 
the Alien Registration, 1,257,501 aliens were regis- 
tered in New York; less than half as many, 
542,464, were registered in California. However, 
the westward movement of aliens as well as citi- 
zens and the high immigration from Mexico, are 
two factors that helped reverse the relative posi- 
tions of these two States in the 1960"s. In 1965, 
the gap between them was 201,751 ; in 1966, 233,947. 

Other States showing increases of 5 percent or 
more over last year were Florida, where the num- 
ber of Cubans reporting rose from 38,926 perma- 
nent residents in 1965 to 44,251 in 1966; and 
Illinois, where there were numerous small gains 
over last year, including 3.800 Mexican nationals, 
1,000 Cubans, and 1,500 Polish resident aliens. 

CITIZENSHIP 

Naturalization Activities 

Trends in Naturalization. The downward trend 
in the number of aliens applying for citizenship, 
which had persisted since 1962, leveled off during 
fiscal year 1966, at 148,450, when just 69 more 
applications to file petitions for naturalization 
were received than in the preceding year. 

By dint of close supervision and a mobile foice 
of liaturalization examiners who moved to meet 
the fiuctuating workload, as well as the reduction 
in the number of natm-alization courts, the Service 
was able to absorb the reduction of 11 naturaliza- 
tion examiners. 

Naturalizations Granted. During the fiscal 
year, Sei'vice officers appeared at over 2,000 final 
court hearings in the continental United States, 
Alaska, Hawaii, (iuam, Puerto Rico, and the Vir- 
gin Islands, for the purpose of presenting recom- 
mendations regarding the eligibility of aliens for 



21 



Aliens who reported under the alien address program, by selected states oj residence and nationality, 

during 1966 



Nationality 


Total 


California 


New York 


Texas 


Illinois 


Florida 


New Jersey 


Michigan 


Massachu- 
setts 


All other 




3, 482, 553 


848,846 


629, 052 


240,954 


208,427 


184,869 


177,351 


136,596 


136,417 










3,088,133 


795, 187 


661,240 


230,838 


189, 748 


104,277 


159, 109 


125, 624 


123,692 


798,418 






1,378,711 


210,180 


326,212 


18,846 


119,401 


25,882 


110,377 


68,981 


75,981 


422,851 






235,628 
210,649 
128,200 
264,599 
539,635 

215,300 


36,402 
15,816 
3,049 
57,915 
96, 998 

78,265 


42,970 
80,896 
28,319 
65, 017 
119,010 

30,827 


6,749 

755 

358 

5,597 

6,387 

3,222 


21,970 
14,053 
24,647 
10, 740 
48,091 

7,152 


4,629 
1,336 
695 
10, 740 
8,482 

2,000 


16,490 
23,614 
14,622 
18,022 
37,629 

4,712 


10, 795 
7,048 
12,363 
14,108 
24, 667 

4,111 


5,129 
13,879 

8,870 
11,279 
36, 824 

4.254 




Italy 


53,252 
35,377 
81,181 




United Kingdom 




80,767 






45,634 
60, 160 
49, 523 
60,083 

1,283,691 


19, 078 
25,253 
19,543 
14,391 

462,529 


11,232 
1,662 
1,202 

16, 731 

136,908 


773 

917 

314 

1,218 

206, 691 


1,947 

1,678 

991 

2,636 

53,268 


235 
645 
285 
835 

66,862 


1,207 
565 
347 

2,603 

28,758 


522 

586 

266 

2,737 

48, 274 


1,676 
470 
194 

1,915 

38,216 


8,866 
28,394 
26,381 










243,285 






373, 045 
646, 579 
135, 617 
38,227 
90,223 

134,903 
9,241 
14,421 
51,866 

394,420 


95,488 

325, 931 

9,699 

385 

31,026 

32,853 
2,286 
4,869 
4,205 

53,659 


39, 181 
2,769 
33,555 
27,402 
34,001 

47,496 
2,631 
1,302 

15,864 

67,812 


3,838 

198, 675 

1,614 

65 

1,399 

2,289 
229 
268 
393 

10,116 


9,572 
37,104 
3,948 
292 
2,352 

7,211 
401 
488 

1,827 

18, 679 


16,916 
1,411 

44,261 

698 

3,686 

7,736 
157 
340 

1,300 

80,592 


8,141 
405 
17,065 
1,016 
2, 131 

9,994 
487 
463 

4,318 

,18,242 


41,810 

4,999 

856 

64 

545 

1,645 
212 
319 

2,082 

10,972 


34,986 

211 

1,583 

122 

1,315 

2,633 
398 
302 

1,908 

11,725 






75, 074 




Dominican Republic. _ 
Other North America. . 


8,183 
13,868 

23,046 
2,440 


Africa 




All other 




Other than permanent 









naturalization. At these proceedings, conducted in 
botli Federal and State courts, 103,059 petitioners 
for naturalization were admitted to U.S. citizen- 
ship by the presiding judges; in addition there 
were 292 repatriations, bringing the total to 103,- 
351. As in years gone by, the great bulk of the 
new citizens, 76,214, petitioned under the general 




Twelve-year-old Tibetan hoy, who was among the thou- 
sands of refugees who fled across the Himalayas into 
India in 1959 following the unsuccessful revolt against 
Chinese Communist rule, becomes naturalized citizen. 



provisions of the statute, based upon 5 or more 
years' residence. Next in number, respectively, 
were the 16,448 spouses and the 7,695 natural or 
adopted children of U.S. citizens, who became 
eligible after lesser periods of residence. Others 
naturalized included 2,561 aliens granted citizen- 
ship upon the basis of their honorable military 
service, and 141 others who qualified for the privi- 
lege under special sections of the law. 

Noteworthy was the Service effort to bring im- 
mediate citizenship to members of the Armed 
Forces serving in the South Vietnam theater of 
hostilities. Since aliens cannot be naturalized 
abroad under the present statute, special expedi- 
tious naturalization proceedings and ceremonies 
were held in Guam. Through the cooperation of 
the military authorities, qualified servicemen were 
flown there to receive their well-deserved citizen- 
ship. This will be a continuing program of the 
Service. 

The greatest naturalization potential is to be 
found in the largest nationality groups among resi- 
dent aliens, and yet this potential is not always 
realized in the actual number of applications for 
naturalization. The 7 nationalities with the 
greatest number of alien residents as reported in 
1966 were: Mexico (646,579), Canada (373,045), 
the United Kingdom (264,559), Germany (235,- 



22 




Army men naturalized in the U.S. District Court, Agana, Oiiam. The servicemen were flown to Guam 
especially for the ceremony, returning to the fighting front in Vietnam within 24 hours. 



628), Italy (210,649), Cuba (135,617), and Poland 
(128,200). While some of these aliens may not be 
eliirible for naturalization because they cannot ful- 
fill the residence requirements, it does give an idea 
of the magnitude of the potential for naturaliza- 
tion. These seven nationalities represent 65 per- 
cent of the resident aliens who tiled alien address 
reports in 1966. In contrast just 5-t percent of the 
persons naturalized were nationals of the seven 
countries listed above. In order, they were as fol- 
lows : (n'nnany (13,700), Italy ('10,983), the 
United Kingdoin (8,928), Canad:i (8,579), Mexico 
(5,678), Poland (3,833), and Cuba (3,829). 

The fiscal year had its usual quota of cases 
which, in the public interest, elicited the most ex- 
peditious action on the part of the Service and the 
courts. Special petition tilings and court pro- 
ceedings were arranged to facilitate military en- 
listments and attendance at officer candidate 
schools. By similar action, citizenship was made 
promptly available to foreign-bound servicemen 
and their dependents, as well as to aliens about to 
be assigned abroad in connection with important 
Government projects. 

Natiirulizdt/ons Denied. There were 2,029 per- 
sons denied citizenship during the fiscal year, 
following determination by the courts at final 
hearings that one or more of the statutory pre- 
requisites for naturalization had not been met. 
Seventy of these unsuccessful candidates did not 
have the requisite knowledge of the history, gov- 
ernment, and Constitution of the United States, 
while 71 others were disqualified because they were 
unable to speak, understand, read, or write the 
English language. An inability to satisfy require- 
ments related to residence, witnesses, good moral 
character, attachment to the Constitution, the oath 
of allegiance, or a willingness to serve in the Armed 



Forces formed the basis for denial in most of the 
remaining cases. The overall statistical break- 
down was substantially the same as that of former 
years. 

When Service investigations and examinations 
disclose the ineligibility of the petitioners, they 
may elect not to appear at the court proceeding 
by withdrawing or not prosecuting their petitions, 
lender such circumstances, valuable time is saved 
by the jietitioners, the courts, and the Service. 

" Of the 2,029 [letitions denied, 1,690 or 83 percent 
wei-e disposed of without a determination on the 
merits by the courts. A high percentage of these 
denials involved petitioners unable to meet the 
educational requirements for naturalization. Act- 
ing upon Service advice, many of these candidates 
will attend courses of study which will overcome 
their educational deficiencies, thus permitting 
them to qualify at some future date. Others un- 
able to meet other requirements, were fully ad- 
vised as to what they must do to achieve eligibility, 
and a considerable number of them also may 
eventually realize their desire to become citizens. 

Related Naturalization Matters 

Citizenfihip Educittion and Responsibility. An 
important aspect of Service operation in the citi- 
zenship field is the implementation of programs 
designed to assist aliens in their preparation to 
meet the English language and other educational 
requirements for naturalization. Service officers 
at the various administrative levels continued to 
cooperate fully with the educational and military 
authorities, and the voluntary organizations, in 
the establishment and maintenance of citizenship 
classes at public schools and military installations. 
A new feature of the educational drive during tlie 
fiscal year was the liaison maintained with the 



23 



PERSONS NATURALIZED 
1962 -* 1966 



150,000 



150.000 



100,000- 



50,000 — 




1 — i00,000 



50,000 



1962 1963 

EUROPE 1 



1964 

ASIA 



965 

^ NORTH AMERICA 



1966 



ALL OTHER 



Office of Economic Opportunity in connection 
witli its adult basic education and urban and rural 
community action programs, ati'ording an etl'ective 
basis for directing aliens ultimately toward 
citizenship. 

There were 823,040 immigrants who entered the 
United States during the fiscal 3'ear and, promptly 
upon their admission, the names and addresses of 
those old enough to jiroht by the education were 
furnished local schools so that they might be ex- 
tended invitations to attend citizenship education 
classes. Additionally, to assure maximum attend- 
ance by other resident aliens needing instruction 
and training in connection with naturalization, the 
school authorities were sent the names and ad- 
dresses of 32,778 candidates upon receipt of their 
applications. Throughout the period, 93,925 aliens 
attended over 4,303 ])ublic school classes located in 
all sections of the United States. 

A total of 2,753 aliens, unable to attend citizen- 
ship classes, also enrolled in the Service home study 
coui'ses under the direction and supervision of 
State imi versifies or State educational authorities. 
Revised Service textbooks, improved as to size, 
illustrations, and other content, and specially 
adapted to this method of learning, were made 
available to the enrollees. 

The fiscal year witnessed the extensive use of the 
Federal Textbook on Citizenship, a Service publi- 
cation comprised of separate units especially pre- 
pared at ditferent literacy and educational levels 



to meet the vax-ying study needs of aliens seeking 
luituralization. More than 121,000 copies of the 
textbook were furnished gratis to the public schools 
for use in citizenship classes or were purchased at 
a reasonable cost through the Government Printing 
(Office. Greatly in demand was the relatively new 
"'Becoming a Citizen Series" consisting of the in- 
structional and study texts "Our American Way 
of Life," "Our United States."' and "Our Govern- 
ment," and a related "Teacher's Guide," which 
entered its second printing during the year. 

For use in furthering citizenshij) education and 
responsibility, the Service has various films avail- 
able for loan to civic and patriotic organizations, 
and other recognized groups. During the fiscal 
year, "The American Flag," a film dramatically 
l)ortraying the history and growth of the signifi- 
cance of our national fiag was added to the Service 
portfolio. A second film entitled "Early Settlers 
of New England" which, with authentic settings 
and costumes, ])ictures the hardships confronting 
the i^ioneers of Salem in 162(5, and shows how their 
faith and spirit of cooperation contributed to the 
successful growth and development of the com- 
munity. 

Two other new films, "The Declaration of Inde- 
])endence by the Colonies" and "The Bill of Eights 
of the United States" became available for loan. 
The first of these companion documentaries drama- 
tizes the conditions which led to the adoption of 
the Declaration while the second, realistically tells 



24 



of tlie strn<T<j;le for huniun freedom whicli led to 
the Bill of Ri<<;hts. The Service is confident that 
the new films will contribute niaterisilly to the 
realization of the educational objectives. 

The well-beino; of the Nation is dependent upon 
the devotion of all citizens to the social and polit- 
ical ideals which <i;overn the American society, as 
well as upon the constant active participation of 
all citizens in the atfairs of the community. To 
impress these truths upon ])ersons naturalized dur- 
ing the year. Service officers assisted in ari-an<iin<r 
inijiressive, meaniniiful ceremonies at many final 
naturalization hearinfis. 

Similarly, on commemorative occasions such as 
Citizenship Day, Constitution Week, Law Day, 
and Loyalty Day, other inspirational ])rograms 
and exercises were ]>lanned and conducted through 
the coo])erative etl'orts of the Service, the courts, 
public-spirited citizens, bar associations, and other 
civic-minded and ]>atriotic organizations. Once 
again, 20,000 copies of ''Citizenship Day" and 
''Constitution Week Bulletin" were made available 
by the Service, and proved effective in jilanning 
the observances. 

Derivative Citizenship Activities 

Certificates Isnued. Certificates were adminis- 
trati\ely issued to foreign-born persons who estab- 
lished tliat they had become citizens through deri- 
\ation. A numiier of factoi's have contributed to 
the relatively high number of applications for 
derivati\e certificates in the past se\eral years. 
The farfiung foreign commitments of 'the United 
States, which have required servicemen and other 
Government representatives and their families to 
be stationed in many parts of the world, constitute 
a natural jjotential for citizenship acrjuired at 
birth abroad. The Service has furthered the 
policy of the military authorities of encouraging- 
servicemen to api:)ly for certificates in behalf of 
their foreign-born children, by holding hearings at 
military installations. This has accomited for the 
subnussion of nmny applications in this category. 
Similarly, the Service practice of notifying newly 
naturalized citizens of the citizenship rights of 
their children, and of the availability of the certi- 
ficate, has contributed to the greater number of 
applications received in the past few years. 

Except for the exti-emely hea\y annual volume 
of the past ',\ years, the 32,-i-t6 certificates issued 
during the period exceeded the number granted in 
any 1 year of the i)ast decade. Documents totaling 
l(i,297 were issued to persons who acquired citizen- 
ship at birth abroad to citizen parents, and 15,155 
to those who derived the status of citizen through 
the naturalization of parents. Although citizen- 
ship has not Ijeen derived upon marriage to a T'.S. 
citizen since 1922, 744 women received deri\ati\e 
certificates upon such basis. 

Certifcates Canceled. Despite the extensive in- 
\estigation and comprehensive inquiries conducted 
by the Service preliminary to the issuance of a 



certificate of citizenship, fraud in the form, of sub- 
mission of bogus documents or other substantive 
factors, may be discovered after the certificate is 
issued. Under such circumstances, the Service is 
statutorily authorized to conduct proceedings lead- 
ing to the administrative cancellation of the certi- 
ficate, and the action may be initiated even though 
the document may have been issued years l>efore. 
Certificates of citizenship were canceled in 572 
cases during the fiscal year, approximately the 
same number as in 1965. 

Other Citizenship Activities 

Ndtionalitij and Replacement Documents. Ex- 
ceeding the annual volume in 1964 and 1965, were 
the 10,()(;(» api)lications for special certificates of 
naturalization for the use of naturalized citizens 
in proving their status as such to foreign states, or 
for replacement of certificates of naturalization. 
There were also nuiny certifications as to informa- 
tion contained in Service naturalization and citi- 
zenship records lequired for use in compliance with 
Federal and State statutes or judicial proceedings, 
or for some other legitimate purpose. 

Loss of Citizenship. Both native- and natural- 
born citizens, as well as those who acquire the sta- 
tus through the naturalization process, may lose 
their citizenship by operation of statutory law. 
Certain actions described in the naturalization 
statute, considered inconsistent with the continu- 
ance of U.S. citizenship, have this expatriatory ef- 
fect without any action by the courts. During the 
fiscal year, 2,000 citizens automatically expatriated 
themselves by becoming naturalized in or taking an 
oath of allegiance to a foreign state, by formally 
renouncing their U.S. citizenship, by voting in a 
political election, or serving in the armed forces 
of a foreign state, as well as upon other miscel- 
laneous grounds set forth in the statute. If these 
former citizens wish to regain their citizenship, 
they must apply for naturalization like any other 
alien. 

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 

Fei'sonnel. The employee development and 
training program was somewhat curtailed dur- 
ing fiscal year 1966. The number of inservice 
training courses at the Officer Development Center 
at Port Isabel, Tex., consisted of two 14-week ses- 
sions of the Patrol Inspector Trainee Course for 
lo9 trainees, a 2-week course for Senior Patrol 
Inspectors, and a o-day Operational Conference 
for Supervisory Investigators. A total of 103 
employees completed a variety of courses con- 
(bu-ted by other Government agencies. The Serv- 
ice continued its interagency agreement with the 
Agency for International iDevelopment, and 79 
foreign officials from 22 countries were trained 
in the Service's records administration, border pa- 
trol, and travel control activities. Seven persons 
completed courses in automatic data processing. 



25 



Under tlie program of keeping manpower re- 
quirements within the present ceiling, the Person- 
nel Officer worked closely with the Budget Officer 
and the operating officials of the Service in the 
Central Office in determining where the manpower 
needs of the Service were most pressing and those 
operational areas and geographic locations from 
which this manpower could best be spared. 

One of the most significant programs under- 
taken involved the planning to meet the increased 
demands for Patrol Inspectors on the Mexican 
border. The termination of the Agricultural Act 
of 1949, on December 31, 1964, caused a marked 
increase in the number of agricultural laborers, 
and other workers from south of the border, thus 
creating a need for more patrolmen to control the 
influx. Another problem of great concern re- 
quired tlie meeting of the increased workload in 
the adjudication of applications for benefits and 
privileges sought under immigration and related 
laws, created for the most part by the amendment 
of the Immigration and Nationality Act by Public 
Law 89-236. 

During fiscal year 1966, exclusive recognition 
under the provisions of Executive Order 10988 
was granted to employee organizations at four 
Service offices and supplemental agreements were 
negotiated with employee organiza/tions at three 
offices. 

Employee participation in the U.S. savings 
bond program was raised from a Servicewide rate 
of 45.4 percent to 56.8 percent. 

Incentive Awards. During the year, 437 per- 
sons were recognized for superior performance or 
special acts. In addition, 169 employees were 
granted quality increases. A total of 376 em- 
ployees' suggestions were received during the year 
and 62 of these suggestions were adopted. 

Procurement and Property Management. Em- 
phasis on the use of greater ingenuity rather than 
more dollars in meeting both new and recurring 
obligations is continuing. One example worth 
noting is the method employed in satisfying a 
rapidly expanding requirement to transpoi't aliens 
by bus. After efforts to obtain buses through 
GSA excess property failed, administrative re- 
search uncovered several sources of used buses of 
the type needed. Nine used buses M-ere subse- 
quently bought from the lowest bidder at a total 
price not much more than the price of one 
new bus. The critical need of the Service was 
thus met — without a request for any additional 
appropriation. 

Another example of increasing efficiency and 
lowering costs for a recurring procurement cost is 
the Service Lookout Book. The book is now be- 
ing computer oriented and it is believed that with- 
in 2 months the system will be in full operation. 
Savings of approximately $3,000 the first year, 
and $4,500 each year thereafter, as well as a re- 
duction in employee man-hours and an increase in 
the vitally necessary accuracy will be realized. 



Records. Two congi-essional actions had a sub- 
stantial imjiact upon Records Administration and 
Inf onnation functions last year. The first was tlu' 
passage of Public Law 89-236 (Immigration and 
Nationality Act) and the other was passage of 
Public Law 89-97 (Medicare). The new Act had 
its effect on all areas of Records, but especially on 
the Information Units. The Information wait- 
ing rooms in the larger offices were filled to capac- 
ity or ovei-flowing and Service telephones rang 
continuously after passage of the law. Persons 
seeking proof of date of birth under the Medicare 
Program placed a heavy burden upon Service 
verification centers. The task was made more 
difficult because of the sketchy information about 
arrivals that so many older people submitted. 

The visas submitted by immigrants at the tinu' 
of their admission into the United States arc 
placed in active case files opened by the Service' 
files control office having jurisdiction in the 
area of the immigrant's residence. Case files 
are also opened on conditional entrants and 
other persons subject to action by this Service, if 
a previous file for the individual does not exist. 
There were 725,064 new files prepared during the 
fiscal year 1966, a 4.7-percent increase over the 
number opened in the previous year. 

The arrival-departure records containing infor 
mation regarding each alien's admission and dc 
parture are retained permanently in the master 
index in accordance with the provisions of Section 
290(a) of the Immigration and Nationality Act. 
Also, in this index there is an index card for each 
Service case file. The index contains over 44 mil- 
lion cards and almost 4 million cards were added 
in the fiscal year 1966. In March 1966, the mas- 
ter index was relocated in a separate building in 
Washington, D.C. 

Stafi.stics. To support the management im- 
pro\-ement programs in every operation of the 
Ser\ice, the work-measurement system was re- 
viewed and revised in order to supply data on units 
of work and man-hours tliat will be the most effec- 
tive guides to an efficient and smooth-operating 
organization. 

The interest engendered by the Act of October 3, 
1965, the most far-reaching legislation since the 
Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952, created 
a need for greater detail and additional statistics 
on innnigration in i-elation to the provisions of the 
new law. Other items of frequent interest were 
Cuban refugees; adjustment of status of students 
and exchange aliens in relation to the "brain drain" 
from the developing countries ; admissions and re- 
strictions relating to farm labor and other labor 
programs; passengers in international travel as 
such statistics related to cases before the Federal 
Aviation Administration and the Maritime Com- 
mission; and alien toui-ists and the work of the 
United States Travel Service. Other statistics 
compiled included those on alien address reports, 
depoi'tations, and naturalization. 



26 



Management Improvement and Control. The 
Service has been absorbing; workload increases in 
nost Service activities over tlie i)ast years without 
increases ni peisonnel. This has been made pos- 
sible through diligent application of management 
improvement and control techniques. The usual 
administrative support activities have been supple- 
mented by heavy emphasis upon work measure- 
ment, work simplilication, methods and {procedures 
improvements, and audit programs. These ert'orts 
have been rewarded by increased productivity and 
imijroved service to the public. 

Build inff Program. During the fiscal year 1966 
construction projects were completed at tive loca- 
tions to replace substandard facilities at inspection 
ports. These projects were constructed jointly 
with the Bureau of Customs. There are currently 
13 projects underway to replace or improve inspec- 
tion stations, adjunct buildings, or employee cot- 



tages. These projects ai"e being executed jointly 
with the Bureau of Customs under prior year con- 
tracts. One border patrol station is nearing com- 
pletion under a contract awarded April 6, 1965. 

The construction of a new border patrol sector 
headquarters and alien detention facility at El 
Paso, Tex., as a result of the Chamizal Boundaiy 
Treaty has been started with transferred funds 
appropriated to the Department of State. Plans 
are being worked out for construction by the Gen- 
eral Services Administration of new inspection 
facilities at El Paso, Tex. 

During the fiscal year 1966, six border patrol fa- 
cilities and three inspection stations were com- 
pleted by the General Services Administration. 

In May 1966, the Washington, D.C., District 
Ofhce was moved to better accommodations at 1025 
Vermont .\. venue Northwest. 



245-236 O - 67 - 3 



27 



IMMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES: 
1820 - 1966 



/^Frora 1820 to 1867 figures represent alien passengers arrived; 1868 through 1891 
and 1895 through 1897 immigrant aliens arrivedj^ 1892 through 1894 and from 1898 
to the present time Immigrant aliens adralttedj^/ 





Number 




Number 




Number 




Number 


Year 


of 


Year 


of 


Year 


of 


Year 


of 




persons 




persons 




persons 




persons 


1820-1966 


1/ 43.614.313 


1855 . 

1856 . 


200,877 
200,436 


189 2 . 
1893 . 


579,663 
439,730 


1931-1940 
1931 . 


528.431 






97,139 


1820 . 


8,385 


1857 . 


251,306 


1894 . 


285,631 


1932 . 


35,576 






1858 . 


123,126 


1895 . 


258,536 


1933 . 


23,068 


1821-1830 


143,439 


1859 . 


121,282 


1896 . 


343,267 


1934 . 


29,470 


1821 . 


9,127 


1860 . 


153,640 


1897 . 


230,832 


1935 . 


34.956 


1822 . 


6,911 






1898 . 


229,299 


1936 . 


36,329 


1823 . 


6,354 


1861-1870 


. 2.314,824 


1899 . 


311,715 


1937 . 


50,244 


1824 . 


7,912 


1861 . 


91,918 


1900 . 


448,572 


1938 . 


67,895 


1825 . 


10,199 


1862 . 


91,985 






1939 . 


82,998 


1826 . 


10,837 


1863 . 


176,282 


1901-1910 


. 8.795.386 


1940 . 


70,756 


1827 . 


18,875 


1864 . 


193,418 


1901 . 


487,918 






1828 . 


27,382 


1865 . 


248,120 


1902 . 


648,743 


1941-1950 


. 1,035.039 


1829 . 


22,520 


1866 . 


318,568 


1903 . 


857,046 


1941 . 


^1,776 


1830 . 


23,322 


1867 . 


315,722 


1904 . 


812,870 


1942 . 


28,781 






1868 . 


138,840 


1905 . 


. 1,026,499 


1943 . 


23,725 


1831-1840 


599.125 


1869 . 


352,768 


1906 . 


. 1,100,735 


19 44 . 


28,551 


1831 . 


22,633 


1870 . 


387,203 


1907 . 


. 1,285,349 


1945 . 


38,119 


1832 . 


60,482 






1908 . 


782,870 


1946 . 


108,721 


1833 . 


58,640 


1871-1880 


. 2,812.191 


1909 . 


751,786 


1947 . 


147,292 


1834 . 


65,365 


1871 . 


321,350 


1910 . 


. 1,041,570 


1948 . 


170,570 


1835 . 


45,374 


1872 . 


404,806 






1949 . 


188,317 


1836 . 


76,242 


1873 . 


459,803 


1911-1920 


. 5.735.811 


19 50 . 


249,187 


1837 . 


79,340 


1874 . 


313,339 


1911 . 


878,587 






1838 . 


38,914 


1875 . 


227,498 


1912 . 


838,172 


1951-1960 


. 2.515.479 


1839 . 


68,069 


1876 . 


169,986 


1913 . 


. 1,197,892 


1951 . 


205,717 


1840 . 


84,066 


1877 . 


141,857 


1914 . 


. 1,218,480 


1952 . 


265,520 






1878 . 


138,469 


1915 . 


326,700 


1953 . 


170,434 


1841-1850 


1.713.251 


1879 . 


177,826 


1916 . 


298,826 


19 54 . 


208,177 


1841 . 


80,289 


1880 . 


457,257 


1917 . 


295,403 


1955 . 


237,790 


1842 . 


104,565 






1918 . 


110,618 


1956 . 


321,625 


1843 . 


52,496 


1881-1890 


. 5.246,613 


1919 . 


141,132 


19 57 . 


326,867 


1844 . 


78,615 


1881 . 


669,431 


1920 . 


430,001 


1958 . 


253,265 


1845 . 


114,371 


1882 . 


788,992 






1959 . 


260,686 


1846 . 


154,416 


1883 . 


603,322 


1921-1930 


. 4.107.209 


1960 . 


265,398 


1847 . 


234,968 


1884 . 


518,592 


1921 . 


805,228 






1848 . 


226,527 


1885 . 


39 5,346 


1922 . 


309,556 


1961 . 


271,344 


1849 . 


297,024 


1886 . 


334,203 


1923 . 


522,919 


1962 . 


283,763 


1850 . 


369,980 


1887 . 


490,109 


1924 . 


706,896 


1963 . 


306,260 






1888 . 


546,889 


1925 . 


294,314 


1964 . 


292,248 


1851-1860 


2.598.214 


1889 . 


444,427 


1926 . 


304,488 


19 65 . 


296,697 


1851 . 


379,466 


1890 . 


455,302 


1927 . 


335,175 


1966 . 


323,040 


1852 . 


371,603 






19 28 . 


307,255 






1853 . 


368,645 


1891-1900 


. 3.687,564 


1929 . 


279,678 






1854 . 


427,833 


1891 . 


560,319 


1930 . 


241,700 







1/ Data are for fiscal years ended June 30, except 1820 through 1831 and 1844 through 1849 
fiscal years ended September 30; 1833 through 1842 and 1851 through 1867 years ended 
December 31; 1832 covers 15 months ended December 31; 1843 nine months ended September 30; 
1850 fifteen months ended December 31; and 1868 six months ended June 30. 



29 



TABLE 2. ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AND DEPARTED, 
BY MONTHS: YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1965 AND 1966 

/Data exclude border crossers, crewmen, and aliens admitted on documentary waiver^/ 



Period 



ALIENS ADMITTED 



Imml- 
grant 



Nonlm- 
mlgrant 



Total 



ALIENS 

DEPARTED 

1/ 



U.S. CITIZENS 1/ 



Arrived 



Departed i 



Fiscal year 1966 .... 

July-December 1965 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January-June 1966 . 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Fiscal year 1965 . . . . 

July-December 1964 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November ........ 

December 

January-June 1965 . 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 



323. OAO 



2.3A1.923 



2.664.963 



1.919.951 



3.613.855 



3.542.7 51 



169.177 



1.296.577 



1.465.754 



1.052.527 



1.886.043 



1.703.452 ; 



30,483 
28,287 
28,164 
30,095 
26,073 
26,075 

153.863 



223,191 
243,622 
285,130 
204,455 
160,720 
179,459 

1.045.346 



253,674 
271,909 
313,294 
234,550 
186,793 
205,534 

1.199.209 



181,580 
212,861 
184,257 
187,826 
133,754 
152,249 

867.424 



349,817 
504,156 
348,197 
258,020 
225,525 
200,328 

1.727.812 



432,621' 
365,422! 
264,823 
223,764! 
195,335 
221,487 

1.839.299 1 



20,127 
18,976 
27,995 
30,663 
30,302 
25,800 

296.697 



125,881 
139,059 
140,537 
196,014 
232,610 
211,245 
2/ 
2.075.967 



146,008 
158,035 
168,532 
226,677 
262,912 
237,045 

2.372.664 



119,306 
110,516 
133,479 
152,544 
163,446 
188,133 

1.734.939 



231,464 
227,453 
279,643 
300,594 
333,121 
355,537 

3.099.951 



232,453! 
248,204 
262,1551 
329,508 ' 
307,906 j 
459,073 j 

3.084.921 



154.206 



1.148.674 



I.302.i 



968.925 



1.634.925 



1.447.287 



27,161 
26,098 
26,528 
27,948 
23,812 
22,659 

142.491 



229,664 
227,593 
230,747 
187,679 
119,622 
153,369 

927.293 



256,825 
253,691 
257,275 
215,627 
143,434 
176,028 

1.069.784 



23,081 
20,020 
23,793 
24,654 
24,843 
26,100 



121,117 
114,216 
119,466 
177,190 
206,528 
188,776 



144,198 
134,236 
143,259 
201,844 
231,371 
214,876 



172,970 
201,202 
174,202 
174,315 
116,469 
129,767 

766.014 



97,337 
96,263 
114,532 
133,921 
159,451 
164,510 



314,454 
430,333 
287,847 
238,490 
190,681 
173,120 

1.465.026 



205,514 
192,995 
243,066 
230,738 
284,275 
308,438 



358,796 
302,241 
238,104 
195,053 
167,190 
185,903 

1.637.634 



208,006 

224,553 
233,996 
277,708 
295,667 
397,704 



l_/ Includes aliens departed and citizens arrived and departed by sea and air, except 

direct arrivals from or departures to Canada. 
2/ Excludes Mexican agricultural laborers admitted July-December 1964 under the Act of 

October 31, 1949, as amended. 



30 



TABLE 3. ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AT UNITED STATES PORTS OF ENTRY: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1965 - 19 66 

/Each entry of the same person counted separately,^/ 



Class 



Total number 

Border crossers J./ 

Canadian 

Mexican 

Crewmen 

Others admitted . . 



Total number 

Border crossers \l 

Canadian 

Mexican ■ 

Crewmen 

Others admitted . . 



Total 



Aliens 



Year ended June 30, 1966 



197,025,052 


114,436,674_ 


82.588.378 


186.139,285 


109.237,567 


76.901.718 


63,573,664 


35,629,433 


27,944,231 


122,565,621 


73,608,134 


48,957,487 


2,986,084 


2,053,459 


932,625 


7,899,683 


3,145,648 2/ 4,754,035 . 



Year ended June 30, 1965 



186.180.611 



175.814,081 



59,814,872 

115,999,209 

2,807,187 

7,559,343 



106.674.956 



101.807,624 



33,313,991 

68,493,633 

1,872,673 



79.505.655 



74.006.457 



26,500,881 

47,505,576 

934,514 



2,994,659 2/ 4,564,684 3/ 



1/ Partially estimated. , . , ^ 

2/ Includes immigrants, documented nonimmigrants, aliens with multiple entry 
~ documents other than border crossers and crewmen, and aliens returning from 

Canada or Mexico after extended visits. 
3/ Includes all citizens arrived by sea and air and citizens returning from 

Canada or Mexico after extended visits. 



cultural labc 



admitted prior 



December 31, 1964, 



ALIENS ADMITTED 
IMMIGRANTS 1/ 



emigrants aubje 
Relative prete 



rlc limitations . 
n«, 2nd pref , liN 



of U.S. citizens, 
Unmarried sons and daughters of U.S. citizens 

2nd pref. I6.N Act 

Ut pref. Act of October 3. 1965 

Spouses, unmarried sons and daughters of resident 

aliens and their children 

3rd pref . 15. N Act 

2nd pref. Act of October 3. 1965 

Married sons and daughters of U.S. citizens 

4th preference, I&N Act 

4th preference. Act of October 3, 1965 

Brothers and sisters of U.S. citizens 

4th preference, liN Act 

5th preference. Act of October 3, 1965 

Spouses and children of married sons and daughters 

and brothers and sisters of U.S. citizens 

4th preference, I6.N Act 

4th preference. Act of October 3, 1965 

5th preference. Act of October 3. 1965 

Occupational preferences 

1st pref. Selected Immigrants of special skills liN Act 
3rd pref. Immigrants In professlona Act of October 3. 



The 



1965 

pref. Othe 
Ir spouses 



Act of October 3, 1965 



1 Idr 



7th pref. Conditional entries Act of October 3, 1965 2/ 
Nonpreference quota (Note: Includes private bill cases 

Adjustments under Sec. 244 of the liN Act 

Foreign government officials adjusted under Sec. 13 of 
the Act of September U, 1957 

c limitations 



1,954 
1,205 



24.010 
1,424 
10,9 39 
11,647 
10,525 
1,394 



be adopted 



Wives of U.S. citizens 
Husbands of U.S. cltlze 
Children of U.S. cltlze 

Orphans adopted abroa 

Other chl Idren 

Parents of U.S. citizens Act of October 3, 1965 

Special Immlaranta 

Natives of Western Hemisphere Countries, their spouses 

and children 

Ministers of religion, their spouses and children 

Employees of U.S. Government abroad, their spouses and 

chl Idren 

Children born abroad to resident aliens or subsequent 

to Issuance pf visa 

Aliens adjuated under Sec. 244, I&N Act 

Aliens adjusted under Sec. 249, I&N Act 

Immigrants, Act of September 11, 1957 

Hungarian Parolees, Act of July 25, 1958 

Refugee-escapees, Act of July 14, 1960 

Immigrants, Act of September 26, 1961 

Immigrants. Act of October 24, 1962 

Other nonquota immigrants 2/ 

NONIMMIGRANTS i/ 

Foreign government officials 

Temporary visitors for business 

Temporary visitors for pleasure 



Stud 



Thel 



and Investo 
and chl Idr 



Temporary workers and Industrial trainees ... 

Workers of distinguished merit and ability 

Other temporary workers 

Industrial trainees 

Representatives of foreign information 

Exchange visitors 

Their spouses and children 

Returning resident aliens IJ 

NATO officials 



alie 



adml 



Itted fo 


' pc 




n 


who have 


one 


e been 


ch alien 


as 


1mm 




2,456 CO 


dlt 


ona 





34,644 

144,680 

, 105,268 

119,360 

6,912 

44,952 

3,486 



12, 



60.470 
6,272 

50,402 
3,796 
2,654 

33,371 

8,875 

165,429 

1,832 

nl"™l| 



2,075.967 

38,544 

175,500 

1,323.479 

142,686 

7,639 

50.435 

4.032 

14,026 

67,869 

8,29 5 

56,654 

2,9 20 

2,681 

33,768 

9,991 

203,235 

2,082 



39,327 
201,358 
,472,830 



16,369 
75.848 
8.213 
64.636 
2,999 
2,925 
35,253 
11 ,204 
238,013 



2,682 
101,197 



39,327 

201,358 

I ,472.630 



177 



827 



8,628 
55,716 

4,851 
16,369 
7 5,646 

8,213 
64,636 

2,999 

2,925 
35,253 
11,204 
238,013 

1,774 



e, and 3,988 whose 
efugee, I in 1964 



203 (a)(7)(A), 



the Refugee Relief Act of 1953. 



TABLE 5. IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED, BV PORT: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1962 - 1966 



All ports 

tUntIc 

Baltimore, Md 

Boston, Mass 

Charleston, S.C 

Charlotte Amalle, V.I 

Miami, FU 

Newark, N.J. (Includes McGuIre A.F.B.) 

New York, N.Y 

Norfolk, Va 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Port Everglades, Fla 

San Juan, P.R 

Washington, D.C 

Other Atlantic 

Gulf of Mexico 

Houston, Tex 

New Orleans, La 

San Antonio, Tex 

Tampa, Fla 

Other Gulf 

Pacific 

Agana , Guam 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

Los Angeles, Calif 

San Diego, Calif 

San Francisco, Calif 

Seattle, Wash 

Other Pacific 

laska 

Anchorage 

Other Alaska 

Canadian Border 

Blaine, Wash 

Buffalo. N.Y 

Calais, Me 

Champlaln, N.Y 

Chicago, 111 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Derby Line, Vt 

Detroit, Mich 

Eastport, Idaho 

Hlghgale Springs, Vt 

Jackman , Me 

Lewlston, N.Y 

Madauaska , Me 

Niagara Falls, N.Y 

Norton, Vt 

Noyes, Minn 

Pembina, N.D 

Portal, N.D ■ 

Port Huron, Mich 

Rouses Point, N.Y 

St. Albans, Vt 

Sault Ste. Marie, Mich 

Sweetgrass, Mont 

Thousand Island Bridge, N.Y 

Vanceboro, Me 

Other Canadian Border 

Mexican Border 

BrovmsvlUe, Tex 

Calexlco, Calif 

Del Rio, Tex 

Eagle Pass, Tex 

El Paso, Tex 

Hidalgo, Tex 

Laredo , Tex 

Nogales, Ariz 

Roma, Tex 

San Luis, Ariz 

San Ysidro, Calif 

Other Mexican Border 



10,271 
8, 463 



,200 
,930 
,646 



24,038 

8,739 

108,945 



•> 


033 


5 


078 


2 


,550 


4 


,381 


6 


,716 




760 




659 





.32' 




994 


I 


,353 



3,092 
1,491 
1,577 



341 
2,083 
8,764 
1,954 
4,710 
3,721 



28,284 

6,921 

108,552 



63,093 
5,319 
4,834 
2,584 
5.169 
7,479 
802 
7 38 
11,754 



995 
.4-,l 



33.081 
1,026 
3,670 
284 
1,865 
5,578 
1,371 
3,717 
2,319 
1 ,224 
618 

11.016 



31,820 

5,437 

106,270 



696 
1.693 



4.446 
3,818 



61 ,592 

5,577 

4,790 

2,111 

5,335 

6,744 

744 

946 

11,397 

772 

1,186 



866 

460 

2,157 



2,882 
1,352 
1,571 



348 
1,846 
6,049 
1,773 
5,130 
2,651 
1,335 

885 
12,316 



507 

534 

27,511 

5,157 

122,516 

220 

729 



10,640 
1,017 



10,036 
5,323 



75 

49,106 

3,526 

3,501 

1,424 

3,646 

7,357 

603 

589 

9,740 

446 

1,000 

560 

809 

328 

2,147 

435 

1,064 

411 

388 

2,321 

753 

1,276 

425 

7 20 

686 



436 
1,615 
4,372 
2,200 
5,172 
3,004 
1.740 
1,304 
lb, 2-0 
564 



All Othe 



33 



Poland .. 
Portugal 
Runanla . 
Spain ... 



El Salvador 
Guatemala . 
Konduraa .. 



Other Central . 
Other North Ab' 



.rab Republic (Egypt 



4,4U 
708 
2.397 
1,260 
9,504 
4,111 
1,474 
824 
1,144 



2.031 


1,144 


13,368 


4.871 


966 


699 


3,094 


147 


19,135 


6,019 


1,880 


395 


1,601 


75 


7,924 


1 .480 


6,944 


1.769 


1,166 


772 


1,036 


1.918 


1.754 


53 


1,370 


185 


795 


759 


19,838 


1.603 


1,078 


284 


2,400 


1.32B 



2.364 
1.250 
9,440 



Include! 1 


954 pai 


l^lgrant ■ 


tatu! d 


nu.erlc.1 1 


l.ltac 


Include! Ta 


Iwan. 


Include! Ar 


ab Pale 



dnltted with vital Itsued prli 

al until 2 years after e 

eluded In quota ImlgrantB until Decei 



rant* under Sec. 203(a)( 
under Sec. 13 of t 



Septenber It. 1957. 



34 





ItlU 


1 i-. 


2I1 


j 


':l 


It 


h 


■zi . 


s:s 


M^llmen'.Tu'Ser 




"f"';«;^£^"-"" 




.°ss 


S: 


zt 


" 


AM ^ni.ntrles 




126 310 


196 730 




19 457 


6 840 


7.792 


144.911 


2.995 


2.359 


19 . 


869 


6 171 






























Emo e 


116.263 


87 728 


28.535 


2 874 


10.495 


3.092 


4.211 


3.406 


862 


1.745 


116 


616 


1.098 


A t 1 


171654 
e.236 

2.603 

l!924 
1.599 

'242 

1.995 
941. 


1.057 
75B 
206 

l!535 

7.476 

567 
17.728 

23.630 


389 

5.617 

2.900 

3 57 

117 

l.OU 
1 .696 

60 

161 

16.118 


11 

13 

72 

1.781 


107 

806 

3.673 

B5B 

336 

76 
7.217 


13 

5 

100 

106 

1.132 
13 

85 
1.976 


1.377 

32 

13 

1.003 

IB 

399 

50 
34 

3.055 


88 
75 


15 

3 
57 

229 


226 

89 
751 

455 


5 


15 




B iHlum 












Fl 1 d 


I J 


Franc«> 


3B 


C 


H.2 


Cr ce 


16 


H nB*rv 


31 


I Und 


47 


It 1 




N th lands 




Norwav 


2i, 


P->l d 




P I 




R mania 


q 


S In 


bU 




12 






T k (& rope and Aaia) 






202 


O.S.S.R. .Europe .nd A.l.> 










I 2\U 




13!b03 
2.293 

1.122 
1.13 3 
5.B94 
1.336 


1.476 

1 .966 

574 
433 

504 
869 

2.631 
9.909 


135 

563 
124.529 


90 

3 

32 

2 

302 


384 
849 

12 


117 
114 

215 
95 

36 
332 

65 
1.328 


179 
557 

3 

86 
888 
90 


3 


3 




2 

3 
3 

23 


11 

52 

3 

10 
29 


fi84 




70 


I d? 


1 7 


1 d I 


7 


Iran 


i, 


, 


n 


Urael 


7 




b7 




19 


K 






) ^ 




2 




2hh 


R k Ulandfl 




_ . . J, jj. , 


I. 


Vl^ t N m 


J 




IH 




3.546 




37.273 
3!553 

'655 
28.113 


1 .768 

3 
29 

1.863 


30 . 380 
16!531 

l'.618 

1.602 
1.985 

26.250 


101 
97 


152 


456 
41 
8 

253 
200 


131 

170 

19 

41 


441908 
10.765 

l'.769 

l!566 

1 .550 

913 


210 

232 
153 

10 

5 

551 


51 


3 


': 


626 




2 014 




14 




64 


H 1 tl 


3 


J , 


36 


, y I dl e 


24 


Ri 




El ^"■"•"■' 


7 
15 


H d as 


3 




13 




6 




8 


0th No th Am lea 


699 




218 


Ar ntlna 


5,118 
3.054 
91736 

1.506 


433 
508 

31 
270 


4.685 

674 

2.546 

9!614 
4.063 
1.470 
1.236 
719 


30 


32 

30 

174 


30 

3 

28 


9 

3 
21 


4.320 

669 

2.286 

9.430 
'572 


3 
3 


105 


2 


] 
3 

17 


43 




1 




29 


Chi le 


U 


Colo bla 


51 


Ecuador 


31 




23 




14 


0th So th Am rica 


15 




42 


Ala ria 


30 
212 

360 
391 


164 


83 

108 
227 

633 


39 


2 


15 
97 


3 
69 


3 
43 


21 


3 


2 




- 


Morocco 




Nleeria 






le 


United Arab Republic (Egypt) 


11^ 




5, 


Auatral fa 


1.457 
429 


'304 
353 


361 

63 
76 




68 


10 








: 




: 


37 




h 


Pacific Islands (U.S. adm. ) 


5 




^ 






















1 








admitted w 


1th vU.s 1 


aeued pilo 


r CO Dec 


ember 1 , 


965. 2, 


56 cnndl 


clonal ent 


ranCB u 


dec Sec 


. 203 ( 


)(7)( 


A) o£ 



P.L. 89-236. whose linin 
of Act of Septetnbei 11 
Parents of United Stat. 

Includes Taiwan. 
Includes Arab Paleetin 





adju.tlng 










Nonq 


jota ImmlRrant 


a 








1 




Sec. 

nnnl 

Id. 


45. If.N Act 
nmlgrant to 






ill 


Sec. 245. UH 
grant to 






f 1 






ll 




I 




Country or region 
of birth 




1 1 






35.770 


18.498 


697 


3.564 


11.971 


2,257 


9 


17.272 


169 


7,020 


4.742. 


2,595 


18 


2,359 


367 




11.489 


4.820 


5, 


752 


2.031 


1.977 




6.669 


32 


3.344 


875 


560 


18 


1,799 


41 


Austria 


145 
59 
156 
89 
69 
494 
877 
871 
652 
137 
1.560 
195 
62 
820 
384 
792 
763 
66 
125 
546 
776 
297 
1,234 
320 


73 
118 

32 
314 
626 
163 
265 
105 
401 
130 

42 
410 

65 
136 
362 

49 

78 
251 
585 
118 
285 
124 


5 

2 

5 
5 

14 
3 

1 
9 


2 

3 
23 
9 

156 

35 
93 

15 
109 
13 
13 
34 
12 


6 
17 

59 

199 

233 

6 

56 
91 

135 

237 
45 


33 
94 
18 
12 
2 32 
568 
3 
16 
83 

96 
32 
20 

3 
46 
25 
6 
530 
35 

60 


1 
8 


72 
18 

37 

708 
387 
32 
1.159 
65 
20 

319 
656 
401 

295 
191 
179 
949 
196 

5.410 


1 

1 
6 

2 

1 

1 
5 

93 


45 
5 
19 
33 
30 
138 
189 
499 
128 
9 
942 
54 
8 
215 
252 
56 

10 
34 
117 

28 
159 
50 

3.211 


2 
2 

15 
22 
153 

9 

129 

3 

1 
58 

25 
168 

5 

25 
38 
20 

938 


23 
2 
It 

10 

17 
39 
16 
14 
68 
8 
9 

16 

6 

22 
664 


15 


17 

169 
15 

51 
563 

91 

95 










3 




_ 




_ 






_ 


4 


„ 


1 


H 


2 




_ 




3 




_ 




2 




5 




2 




2 








I 




2 




1 




It 




7 




_ 




2 




215 




8,875 
2,425 
1,796 
76 
659 
224 
404 
728 
233 
598 

1.445 
45 
120 

340 


6,761 
2,322 
1,565 

209 
112 
234 
302 

57 
170 
399 

36 
30 
232 


580 

3 

9 

3 


45 3 

66 

1 .019 

84 
138 

229 

132 

227 

9 


5,705 

540 
26 
96 

136 

157 

203 
27 

161 
7 
18 

146 

27 


20 
14 

39 

8 


3 
2 


2.114 
103 

231 
25 
450 
112 

159 
155 
120 

56 
1.046 

37 

108 
2.383 


75 
5 

3 
2 

6 

1 


526 
69 

210 
20 

340 
122 
122 

54 
814 
33 
57 
10 
86 

62 


15 

31 
9 
8 

56 

29 
10 

1 
51 

3 

1,024 


7 

27 

13 

1 

1,146 




13 
23 


40 




_ 




_ 




_ 


J 


_ 




_ 




_ 




_ 




_ 




_ 








_ 




171 




. 




_ 








U 




111 




219 

1.033 

3 

13 
40 
140 
183 
272 
207 
66 
116 
90 
53 


3 
13 

25 
10 


1 

3 
3 

1 




13 




: 


218 
I .033 

3 

10 

27 
140 
183 
272 
207 

116 
65 
43 

1.923 


5 
26 

2 

1 
3 

1 


1 
5 

5 

6 
36 
5 

38 


139 

183 
267 
206 
65 
107 

31 

1,871 


202 
908 

3 

18 


: 


': 


9 


Mexico 


99 




_ 




_ 




_ 




1 




2 




_ 








_ 




_ 


Nicaragua 


- 








_ 








311 
60 
110 
185 
488 
175 
388 
138 
88 


17 


1 


3 
101 


13 
137 


1 
134 


: 


310 
60 

no 

185 

175 
388 
137 

683 


3 


26 
185 


306 
60 

183 

484 
172 
384 
134 
42 

19 


6 


j 


1*1Q 






_ 




_ 




_ 








_ 




_ 










Africa 






15 
66 
52 
101 
652 
170 

430 


6 

37 

53 
99 
131 

228 


1 


1 
25 
47 
17 

58 


17 
6 
25 
49 
40 

141 


6 
9 
40 

29 


I 


9 
29 

5 
48 
553 
39 

202 


1 
2 


8 
28 

5 
38 
74 
32 

180 


1 
I 

8 
5 

17 


1 
3 
2 

5 


I 


469 

1 


_ 












_ 








_ 








230 
59 
38 

103 


112 
25 
30 


- 


48 

2 


62 
14 
30 
35 


2 
3 

24 


-_ 


lie 

34 
8 
42 




101 

34 
8 
37 


3 


3 

2 

2 


- 


: 





















































lENS WHO WERE ADJUSTED TO PERMANENT RESIDENT STATL'S IN TTIE UNITED STATES 
UNDER SECTION 245, IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT. 
BY STATUS AT ENTRY AND COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1966 



All <:ountrl«« 

Eu rop« 

AutCrU 

»«I«lu» 

Cttchollovalcla 

Danaark 

Finland 

Cersany 

Craece 

Hungary 

Iraland 

Italy 

Nacharlanda 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

S«adan 

Sultiarland 

Turkey (Europa and Aala) ... 

United KingdoK 

U.S.S.R. (Oiropa and Aala) . 

Yugoalavla 

Other Europe 

Aala 

China 1/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indoneala 

Iran 

Jordan 2/ 

Korea 

Paklatan 

Phlllpplnaa 

Ryukyu lalanda 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Viet Nan 

Other Aala 

North America 

Canada 

Weat Indlea 

Coata Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatema la 

Honduraa 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Other Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brail 1 

Chile 

Colombia 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

*lg«rla 

Morocco 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (^ypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Auatralla 

Nan Zealand 

Pacific lalanda (U.S. adm.) . 
Other Oceania 

Other countrlea 



37 



Act of 
Oct. 3, 196 
(Conditlona 
Entries By 
Refugees) 


< 


•c 


^ 


- 


s 


s 


■ 


• 


• 


- 


- 


o 


2 


' 


r 


' 


. 


- 


- 


? 


' 


5 


2 


■ 


- 


„ 


S 


s 


S 5 


-T 


., 






- 


- 


1 


■ 


■ 


• 


■ 


' 'S 






Act of 
July 14, 

1960 
(Refugee- 
escapees) 


^ 


c 


= ..-..3p, = -.,-,..~ = ,p, 




, , , ,- -^ 






Act of 
Sept. 22, 

1959 
(Sec. 6) 
(Refugee 


g 


K 


^-^"'■'~" ^ 


5'— S--S - 








Act of 

Sept. 2, 

1958 

(Azores and 

Netherlands 

ref,]i>ee«) 


S 


! 




2-S '"- '-8 S 


, ,« ,. .. 


„. 




Act of 
July 25, 

1958 
(Hungarian 

parolees) 




1 




,,,-,,,,., ^ 


^111^ II 






Act of 
Sept. 11, 

1957 
(Sees. 4 

and 15) 




:■ 




|=i=55S=5 5 


rv — -J <n « rN (N 


r oi 




Act of 
July 29, 

1953 
(Orphans) 


-J 


3 


- --■" '^ ^ S 


"'^'T'-^ , 








Refugee 

Relief Act 

of 1953 

1/ 


!• 


S 






2-8-1 3| 


■N rt 






f~ 


§ 




CM -- *» 1 w t 1 1 CM r- 


m , ^ -,g „ ^ 


1 - 




Displaced 
persons 

adjusting 
under 
S^c. 4 


^ 


-J 


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^ -i '^ ' ^ '^ ?^ '^ 


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IP 


2 


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|SSS.-s.-g|p.Ss5s-l-q"55ISql s 




r.r,-r,g ^„< 


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■ 

President's 

Directive 

of Dec. 22. 

1945 


S 


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pss.-2-srs^2K?rrs '25Ssp2 i 


2- ' '" 'S"S S 


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SSSSKS^SS g 


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fn 




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J 


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1 

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1 




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j 


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■j 

1 


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E 


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5 


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52 


1 






£ 


j 


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1 


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3 

1 

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pJC 30 



O xO *0 CT\ O CT» 00 



/I 93U9J3g3JJ 

Xjbtdt jauag 



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^O^OU'lp^^ CJx 

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rf ^ ^ _H 



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Arab Republic . 
Asia 

erica 


c 


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T^UCJIMh-IMl-li-l 



;'>!) 



IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED UNDER THE ACT OF OCTOBER 24, 1962 
(P.L. 87-885) BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH: 
OCTOBER 24, 1962 - JUNE 30, 1966 



Country or r«glor 
of birth 



Number 
admitted 



AIL countries 

Europe 

Belgium 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Italy 

Malta 

Poland , 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) .... 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 2/ 

Cyprus 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

I raq 

Israel 

Japan 

Jordan 3/ 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Malaysia 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Barbados 

Jamaica 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Other West Indies 

Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Africa 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

Other Oceania 



13.239 



7,909 



1,913 
110 
424 



518 

105 

24 

10 



101 
5 



3.044 



196 


84 


847 


475 


27 


16 


137 


37 


230 


29 


206 


72 


498 


230 


339 


20 


522 


310 


117 


27 


50 


19 


65 


27 


1,064 


474 


65 


17 


37 


20 



36 

3 

152 



645 

5 

1,850 

15 

11 

550 



U Act of June 27, 1952 

2/ Includes Taiwan. 

3/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



.L. 89-236 



Alt countrlai 

Auitrl* 

Bslgluii 

Citchoalovakia 

Finland 

Franca 

Cannany 

Graace 

Hungary 

Iraland 

Italy 

Netherlanda 

Norway 

Poland 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Aala) .. 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Aaia) 

Vugoalavia 

Other Europe 

Aala 

China 2/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indoneala 

Iran 

Jordan 3/ 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Paklatan 

PhlUpplnea 

Ryukyu la lands 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Other Aala 

North America 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Jamaica 

Other Wear Indlea 

Coata Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Other Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Co lombi a 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Algeria 

Morocco 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

New Zealand 

Pacific lalands ( U. S. adm. 



519 
3.175 

lfl.239 
B,265 
1.665 
3.241 

25.154 
2.275 
1.676 
9.404 
8.713 
1.938 
2.954 
1,807 
1.555 



3.394 
1.325 
2.492 



1 .260 
9.504 
4. Ill 
1.474 



4.497 
7.735 
1.054 



1/ Im 



permanent resident status two years oft 

ludes Taiwan. 

ludes Arab Palestine. 



pen 



who may be adju 



41 



nbers of vlaaa Issued and 
caused by failure of the 

• Itcad CO the United State 
by adjuatnents chargeable 



ti adaitted wl 
make uae of t 
year CoUovIn 





Annual 
quotaa U 

(I) 


Quota Imlirante Admitted 2/ 




1964 
(2) 


1965 

(3) 


1966 




Total 

(4) 


Regular Quota 
(5) 


Pool 

(6) 


All quota «re«a 


I5«.56l 


102.844 


99.381 


126.310 


78.023 


48j287 




149.697 


98.729 


94.128 


102.197 


73.191 


29.006 




100 
1,405 
1,297 

100 
2,859 
1,175 

115 

566 
3,069 
25,814 

65,361 

308 

865 

17,756 

5,666 

235 

384 

100 

3,136 

2,364 

6,488 

438 

289 

250 

3,295 

1,698 

225 

2,697 

942 

700 

3.690 


102 
1,271 
1,022 

100 
1,823 
1.075 

129 

554 
2,876 
23,997 

31,759 

308 

854 

6,134 

5,724 

191 

374 

75 

2,828 

2,219 

6,434 

434 

289 

272 

2,160 

1,681 

182 

2,564 

969 

329 

2.290 


92 
1,392 
1,015 

96 
1,965 
1,129 

85 

540 

3,011 

21,621 

29,923 

233 

813 

5,256 

5,363 

247 

395 

41 

3,132 

2,237 

6,238 

428 

294 

251 

2,415 

1,716 

171 

2,707 

926 

396 

3.292 


145 

905 

784 

221 

1,415 

901 

91 

377 

2,283 

14,461 

23.721 
4.906 

942 
3,068 
18,955 

174 

273 

228 
2,242 
1,584 
7,103 
7,163 
1,090 

982 
1,778 
1,310 

672 
1,748 
2,370 

305 

21.644 


100 
905 
784 
100 

1,415 
901 
91 
377 

2,283 
14,461 

23,721 

308 

865 

3.068 

5,666 

174 

273 

100 

2,242 

1,584 

6,488 

438 

289 

250 

1,778 

1,310 

225 

1,748 

942 

305 

3.069 
















Ctachoalovakla 












Prance 


- 


Great Britain and Northern 
















Italy 


13.289 






































Switzerland 




U.S.S.R 








Asia 


18.575 




100 
100 
100 
105 
100 
100 
200 
100 
100 
100 
185 
200 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
1,400 

4.274 


80 
122 
74 
47 
102 
100 
127 
100 
105 
100 
177 
206 
94 
100 
88 
47 
94 
100 
92 
97 
238 

1.232 


93 

92 

93 
708 4/ 
100 

99 
200 
101 

91 
101 
181 
196 
HI 
100 

99 

95 
108 

89 

97 

75 
463 

1.332 


42 3/ 42 

154| 100 

11.379 100 


















226 
1.946 
214 
331 
475 
411 
677 
687 
528 
227 
2 56 
2,687 
155 
88 
104 
103 
370 

1.656 


100 
100 
200 
100 
100 
100 
185 
200 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
88 
100 
100 
370 

1.164 










14 










Israel 








Jordan and Arab Palestine 


487 


































Africa 


474 




574 il 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
3,000 

700 


67 
97 
101 
101 
105 
102 
98 
100 
461 

381 


223 
86 
89 
80 
96 
93 
83 
101 
481 

435 


148 
61 
71 
67 
145 
168 
94 
461 
443 

708 


148 
61 
71 
67 
100 
100 
94 
100 
443 

476 




















South Africa 


68 


United Arab Republic (Egypt) 


361 




232 




100 
100 
500 

200 


100 
113 
168 

212 


100 
88 

247 

194 


274 
122 
312 

103 


100 
100 

276 

103 












North Aoerlca 






100 
100 


110 
102 


94 
100 


45 3/ 45 




Trinidad and Tobago 


58 


3/ 58 


- 



The annual quota for 1964 waa 158,161, for 1965 vas 158,561 due 

Independent countries. During the tranaltlon period P.L. 89-236 

158.261 ulch the eUalnatlon of the Asla-PacIflc Triangle, Jamais 

Charges after December 1, 1965. 

Flgurea Include adjuatmant of status cases. Adjustments chargeable to fu 

In year of adjuatment. 

Admlaalona with visas Issued prior to December 1, 1965. 

Includes 667 Section 244 suspension of deportation cases In 1965 and 552 

Quotaa eatabllshed by Presldenai Proclamation No. 3570 of January 7, 1964 



the assignment of quotaa for newly 
he established quota will equAl 
, and Trinldad-Tobego, as quota 



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43 



TABLE 8. IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED, BY 



Country or r«glon 



S-5 8 



Is s 



"•Iglum 

Csachos lovakla 

Danaark 

Finland 

Franca 

Germany 

Graeca 

Hungary 

Ireland 

i"iy 

Natharlsnd 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Sueden 

Swltierlend 

Turkey (Europe and Aala) . 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R, (Europe and Aala] 

Yugo.lavla 

Other Eu ropa 

Aala 

China U 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indoneala 

Iran 

Iraq 

larael 

Jordan 2/ 

Lebanon 

Paklatan 

Phlllpplnai 

Ryukyu lalandi 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Viet Nam 

Other Aala 

North America 

Canada 

Hexlco 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Other Wait India 

El Salvador 

Cuataniala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Other Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brail I 

ChU 

Colombia • 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Vaneiuala 

Other South America 

Africa 

Algeria 

Horocco 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

United Arab Rep. (Egypt) . 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Auatralla 

New Zealand 

Pacific lalanda (U.S. ada. 
Other Oceania 

Other countrlee 



1.137 

519 

3,175 

18,239 
B,265 
1,665 
3.241 

25,154 
2,275 
1,676 
9,404 
6,713 
1,938 
2,954 
1,807 
1,555 
1,554 

21,441 
1,362 
3.728 
1.764 



13.736 
3.872 
2.458 



3,394 
1,325 
2,492 



28.358 
45.163 
17.355 
16,503 



1,582 
1,415 
1,584 
1,958 



2.397 
1,260 
9,504 



3.703 

59 3 

2.134 



1/ In 



44 



K\ 1 occupation* 

Profaatlonal. Ctchnical. •r>d kindred wrkar* 

Accountant! and auditor* 

Actora and actraaaa* 

Alrplana pllota and navigator* 

Archltact* 

Artl*t* and art t«ach«ra 

Athlata» 

Author* 

Chaatata 

Clar|y»*n 

Prof«*tor* and Inatructor* 

Dancar* and dancing taachar* 

Dent I* t* 

P' a 1 --nar* 

Dietitian* and nutrlttonlat* 

Draf C*iiwn 

Editor* and raportar* 

B"8l"«''* 

Kntartalner* 

Para and hotna managanent advlaor* 

Foreatar* and conaervatlonlat* 

Funaral dlractor* and enbalaara 

Lawyer* and Judge* 

Llbrarlana 

Hualclan* and mialc taachar* 

Murae* 

Par*onnel and labor relation* vorkar* 

Agricultural aclentUt* 

Biological •clantUt* 

Caologl*t* and g€ophy*lcl*ta 

Hathmatlclan* 

Phy*lclat* 

HUcellaneou* natural •clantiat* 

Photographer* 

Physician* and *urgaon* 

Public relation* ncn and publicity wrltara 

Recreation and group workftra 

Rflllglou* worker* 

Social and welfare workera, except group 

Econoalat* 

P*ycho legist* 

Statlatlclana and actuarle* 

Hl*cellaneou* *oclel *clentl*ta 

Sport* Instructor* end officials 

Surveyor* 

Technician* , 

Teachera 

Tharaplst* and healara , not epeclf led 

Vetarlnarlana 

Profe**lonal, technical, and kindred worker*, other 

FarBer* and farm aanagars 

Hanagars, official*, and proprietor*, except far* .... 

Buyare and department heada , atore 

Manager* and auparlntandents, building 

Of fleer a , pi lots , purser* , and engineer* , ship . . . . . 
Official* and adalnlatrator* , public adalnUtratlon 

Foreign government offlcUl* 

Purchaalng agents and buyers^ not *peclfled 

Hanagars, officials, and proprietor*, other 

Clerical and kindred worker* 

A«ent* 

Attandanta, phyalclan** and dentist** office 

Bank taller* 

Bookkaeper* 

Cashiers 

File clerk* 

Office aachln* operators 

Postal cUrk* 

Recaptlonlata 

Shipping and receiving clerk* 

Stcnographare, typlet*. and aecretarle* 

Stock clerk* and atorekeepera 

Telegraph operetora 

Telephone operator* 

Ticket, e tat ion, and axprea* agent* 

Clerical and kindred worker*, other 

Advertising agents and aaleanen 

Insurance agenta and brokers 

Real estate agenta and brokara 

Salesaen and sale* clerk*, other 

aftaman. foreaen, and kindred workers 

Baker* 

Black*nlth* 

Bookbinder* 

Brlckoaaon*, *toneBaaon*. and tile aattera 

Cabinetmaker* 

Coapoaltora and type* at t era 

<e footnote* at end of table. 



Sal 



1.254 
2.964 



6,297 
18.669 



3,673 
16.535 



1.266 

397 

1,673 



45 



TABLE BA. BENEFICIARIES OF OCCUPATIONAL PREFERENCES AMD OTHER IMMIGRANTS ACMITTED BY OCCUPATION 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1966 



f Occupational FreCe 



t of October 3. 1965 



Si»th Preferenct 



CrafttiMn, foraaen. and kindred workara (Cont'd) 

Dacoratora and wlndotf draaaara 

Blectrlclana 

Forasan 

Furrlera 

Inapcctora, other 

Jawalera, vatchnakera, goldamltha, and al tveranltha .. 
Llneaen and aervlcemen, telegraph, telephone, and powei 

Hachlnlats 

Machanlca and repairmen 

Falnteri. construction and maintenance 

Fhotoengravera and llthographara , 

Flaaterara 

Plunbera and pipe f Ittera 

Preaanen and plate prtntera, printing 

Shoemakera and repalrera, except factory 

Structural metal workera 

Tallora and talloreasea 

Tlnamitha, copperamltha , and ahaet metal workera 

Tool makers, and die makers and settera 

Upholaterers 

Craftsmen and kindred workera. other 

Operatives and kindred workera 

Apprenticea : 

Assemblers 

Attendants, auto service and parking 

Bus drivers 

Checkers, examiners, and Inspectors, manufacturing .... 

Conductors, bus and atreet railway 

Dellverymen and rouCemen 

Dressmakers and seamstresses, except factory 

Knlttera, loopera, and toppera, textile 

Laundry and dry cleaning operatives 

Heat cutters, except slaughter and packing houae 

Hlne operatives and laborers 

Packers and wrappera 

Palntera, except construction and maintenance 

Photographic process workera 

Sai lors and deck hands 

Sewers and stitchers , manufacturing 

Texlcab drivers and chauffeura 

Truck and tractor drivers 

Weavera, textile 

Welders and f lame-cuttera 

Operativea and kindred workers, other 

Private household workera 

Housekeepers , private houaehold 

Private household workers, other 

Service workers, except private household 

Attendants 

Barbers, beauticians, and manlcuriata 

Bartendera .T 

Chambermalda and maids 

Charwomen and cleaners 

Cooks, except private houaehold 

Counter and fountain hnrkera 

Firemen, fire protection 

Guards , watchmen, and doorkeepers 

Hairdressers and cosmetologists 

Housekeepers and stewards, except private household ... 

Janitors and sextons 

Kitchen workers, other 

Midwlves 

Policemen and detectives 

U.S. military 

Foreign military 

Porters 

Practical nurses 

Waitera and waltreases 

Service workera, except private houaehold, other 

Fam laborers and foremen 

Laborers, except farm and mine 

Fishermen and oystermen 

Gardeners, except farm, and groundskeepera 

Lumbermen, raftsmen, and woodchoppera 

Laborers , other 

Housewives, children, and others with no reported 

Housewives 

Retired 

Students 

Under 14 years of age 

Unknown or not reported 



69,833 
3,396 
30,676 
77,729 



1/ Includes 25 beneficiaries of Sectloi 
2/ Other admissions and adjustments. 



2 of the Act of October 24, 1962. 



40 



All countrlM 

Belgium 

Czechoa lovakla 

Denmark 

Finland 

Franca 

Hungary 

Ira land 

Italy 

Nether landa 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Sxltrerland 

Turkey (Europe and Aala) .... 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Aala) .. 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Aala 

China U 

Rong Kong 

India 

Iran 

Iraq 

larael 

Jordan 2/ 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Paklatan 

PhlUpplnei 

Ryukyu la lands 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Viet Nam 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Other West Indies 

Costs Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Other Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Co lombl a 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Algeria 

Morocco 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

New Zealand 

Pacific Islsnda (U.S. adm. ) . 
Other Oceania 

Other countrlea 

T7 Includes Taiwan. 

2/ includes Arab Palestine. 



519 
3.175 

18.239 
8,265 
1,665 
3,241 

25,154 
2,275 
1,676 
9,404 
8,713 
1,938 
2,9 54 
1,807 
1,555 
1,554 

21,441 
1,362 
3,728 
1,764 

39.876 
13,736 
3,872 
2,458 



3,394 
1,325 

2,492 



127.340 
28,358 
45.163 
17,355 
16.503 
3,801 
2,743 
3,402 
1,582 
1,415 
1,584 
1,958 
984 
1,594 



1,085 
5,218 
4,186 
770 
1.146 
12,530 
1,007 



6,605 
2,008 
1,624 



56.300 
13,131 
19,706 
8,021 
7,150 
1,725 
1,188 
1,648 



2.397 


1,009 


1,260 


543 


9,504 


4,216 


4,111 


1,794 


1,474 


628 



13.942 
2,207 
6,987 
1,239 
1,712 
349 
234 



3.045 
3,464 
1,239 
1,955 



7.447 
2,053 
1,294 
1,418 
1,121 
395 
297 



47 



IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED. BY COUWIRY OR REGION OF BIRTH. SEX, AND AGE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1966 (Cont'd) 



All 



rl«s 



Eu 



Auitria 

Belgium 

CKchoa lovakla 

D«niii«rk 

Finland 

Franca 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlandi 

Norxay 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Aala) .... 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Aala) .. 

Yugoalavla 

Other Europe 

Aala 

China U 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indoneala 

Iran 

Iirael 

Jordan 2/ 

Korea .T 

Lebanon 

Paklatan 

Philippine! 

Ryukyu lilanda 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Viet Nam 

Other Aala 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Other Weat Indlea 

Coata Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduraa 

Nicaragua 

Other Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Braill 

Chile 

Co lonbla 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Vaneauela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Algeria 

Morocco 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Auatralla 

New Zealand 

Pacific Islanda (U.S. adm.) . 
Other Oceania 

Other countrlea 



2.090 
13.021 
4.079 
895 
2.095 
12,624 
1.268 
1.139 
4.895 
4.383 
984 



15.227 
25.457 
9.334 
9.353 
2.076 
1.555 
1.7 54 
9 36 
984 



15.123 



2.511 
6,217 
1.204 



25.693 



10.281 



1.827 
3.094 
1.755 
1.584 
434 
337 



1.116 
1.820 
1.652 



1/ 



cludea Tal 



48 



TABLE 10. IMMIGRANTS ACMITTED, BY SEX AND AGEi 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1957 - 1966 



Sex and age 



Number adnltted 

Under 5 years 

5- 9 years 

10-14 years 

15 years 

16-17 years 

18-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-29 years 

30-34 years 

35-39 years 

40-44 years 

45-49 years 

50-54 years 

55-59 years 

60-64 years 

65-69 years 

70-74 years 

75-79 years 

60 years and over ... 
Not reported 

Males 

Under 5 years 

5- 9 years 

10-14 years 

IS years 

16-17 years 

18-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-29 years 

30-34 years 

35-39 years 

40-44 years 

45-49 years 

50-54 years 

55-59 years 

60-64 years 

65-69 years 

70-74 years 

75-79 years 

80 years and over . 
Not reported 

Females 

Under 5 years 

5- 9 years 

10-14 years 

15 years 

16-17 years 

18-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-29 years 

30-34 years 

35-39 years 

40-44 years • 

45-49 years 

50-54 years 

55-59 years 

60-64 years 

65-69 years 

70-74 years 

75-79 years 

80 years and over . 
Not reported 



326,867 



253. ?65 



260.686 



265.398 



271.344 



283.763 



306.260 



292.248 



296.697 



323.040 



267,985 

212,255 

177,650 

35,270 

94,531 

156,555 

503,367 

424,466 

295,826 

205,582 

140,877 

110,196 

88,362 

65,539 

44,614 

28,030 

15,826 

7,923 

4,289 

425 



30,716 

26,554 

19,224 

3,646 

9,668 

15,339 

51,358 

50,036 

38,464 

24,070 

18,729 

14,049 

9,675 

6,748 

3,934 

2,301 

1,206 

618 

363 

169 

155.201 



23,148 

18,727 

15,447 

2,802 

7,899 

13,385 

43,035 

39,674 

27,539 

18,216 

12,492 

10,248 

7,473 

5,455 

3,521 

2,040 

1,208 

582 

286 



109.121 



22,516 

17,760 

15,786 

2,764 

7,858 

14,204 

46,118 

38,690 

27,072 

19,272 

12,152 

11,417 

8,733 

6,489 

4,501 

2,767 

1,451 

731 

349 

56 

114.367 



24,098 

17,523 

15,386 

2,888 

8,255 

14,847 

47,674 

39,543 

27,748 

19,958 

12,059 

11,310 

8,395 

6,256 

4,316 

2,752 

1,359 

680 

321 

30 

116.687 



26,204 

18,924 

16,434 

2,982 

8,452 

14,996 

47,984 

39,558 

27,274 

19,873 

12,744 

11,082 

8,611 

6,151 

4,240 

2,867 

1,729 

834 

394 

11 

121.380 



25,494 

19,076 

16,544 

3,417 

8,835 

15,363 

51,487 

42,733 

29,421 

20,973 

13,652 

10,905 

8,808 

6,600 

4,617 

2,924 

1,577 

842 

468 

27 

131.575 



137,041 

107,124 

89,786 

17,515 

41,818 

53,311 

174,155 

194,494 

142,117 

100,512 

67,818 

51,296 

38,240 

27,185 

17,902 

11,212 

6,091 

3,025 

1,636 

191 



130,944 

105,131 

87,864 

17,755 

52,713 

103,244 

329,212 

229,972 

153,709 

105,070 

73,059 

58,900 

50,122 

38,354 

26,712 

16,818 

9,735 

4,898 

2,653 

234 



15,766 

13,452 

9,898 

1,764 

4,247 

5,953 

20,114 

23,986 

19,637 

12,652 

9,745 

7,166 

4,561 

2,917 

1,579 

892 

445 

214 

130 

83 

171.666 



11,976 

9,488 

7,694 

1,304 

3,190 

4,294 

13,782 

17,493 

12,841 

8,840 

5,836 

4,545 

3,076 

2,050 

1,268 

737 

390 

176 

105 

36 

144.144 



14,950 

13,102 

9,326 

1,882 

5,421 

9,386 

31,244 

26,050 

18,827 

11,418 

8,984 

6,883 

5,114 

3,831 

2,355 

1,409 

761 

404 

233 

86 



11,172 

9,239 

7,753 

1,498 

4,709 

9,091 

29,253 

22,181 

14,698 

9,376 

6,656 

5,703 

4,397 

3,405 

2,253 

1,303 

818 

406 

181 

52 



11,511 

8,960 

7,975 

1,363 

3,237 

4,739 

15,999 

17,306 

12,487 

9,199 

5,721 

5,346 

3,784 

2,752 

1,772 

1,168 

579 

317 

129 

23 

146^212 



11,005 

8,800 

7,811 

1,401 

4,621 

9,465 

30,119 

21,384 

14,585 

10,073 

6,431 

6,071 

4,949 

3,737 

2,729 

1,599 

872 

414 

220 

33 



12,299 

8,570 

7,731 

1,493 

3,565 

4,879 

15,836 

17,788 

12,919 

9,969 

5,827 

5,369 

3,762 

2,646 

1,801 

1,187 

592 

294 

146 

14 

148.711 



11,799 

8,953 

7,655 

1,395 

4,690 

9,968 

31,838 

21,755 

14,829 

9,989 

6,232 

5,941 

4,633 

3,610 

2,515 

1,565 

767 

386 

175 

16 



13,203 

9,604 

8,295 

1,446 

3,537 

5,171 

16,618 

18,349 

13,063 

9,802 

6,247 

5,326 

3,865 

2,652 

1,756 

1,218 

732 

322 

168 

6 

149.964 



28,991 

21,621 

18,006 

3,892 

10,125 

17,518 

55,935 

45,321 

31,669 

21,924 

15,014 

10,815 

9,005 

6,458 

4,552 

2,746 

1,499 

780 

382 



139.297 



13,001 

9,320 

8,139 

1,536 

4,915 

9,825 

31,366 

21,209 

14,211 

10,071 

6,497 

5,756 

4,746 

3,499 

2,484 

1,649 

997 

512 

226 

5 



13,126 

9,735 

8,313 

1,683 

3,888 

5,380 

19,541 

21,288 

15,146 

10,877 

6,854 

5,111 

3,810 

2,715 

1,862 

1,151 

580 

343 

164 



152.188 



12,368 

9,341 

8,231 

1,734 

4,947 

9,983 

31,946 

21,445 

14,275 

10,096 

6,798 

5,794 

4,998 

3,885 

2,755 

1,773 

997 

499 

304 

19 



14,882 

10,876 

8,945 

1,919 

4,570 

6,016 

20,199 

21,542 

15,981 

11,028 

7,511 

5,154 

4,021 

2,700 

1,814 

1,099 

576 

313 

144 



166.963 



28,394 

21,362 

17,147 

3,541 

10,191 

16,987 

54,923 

42,798 

28,597 

19,455 

13,870 

9,611 

8,678 

6,402 

4,496 

2,856 

1,677 

805 

445 

13 

126.214 



14,109 

10,745 

9,061 

1,973 

5,555 

11,502 

35,736 

23,779 

15,688 

10,896 

7,503 

5,661 

4,984 

3,758 

2,738 

1,647 

923 

467 

238 



14,539 

10,724 

8,691 

1,717 

4,609 

5,679 

18,042 

18,956 

13,284 

8,924 

6,469 

4,267 

3,619 

2,596 

1,875 

1,094 

655 

303 

167 



166.034 



27,674 

22,146 

18,642 

3,969 

10,704 

17,269 

57,000 

42,874 

27,545 

19,227 

14,033 

9,641 

8,735 

6,626 

4,538 

2,898 

1,793 

865 

518 



127.171 



30,750 

28,562 

25,034 

5,369 

12,544 

16,647 

47,853 

43,239 

30,497 

22,614 

16,132 

11,118 

10,249 

8,354 

5,899 

3,879 

2,327 

1,186 

763 

24 

141,456 



13,855 

10,638 

8,456 

1,824 

5,582 

11,308 

36,881 

23,842 

15,313 

10,531 

7,401 

5,344 

5,059 

3,806 

2,621 

1,762 

1,022 

502 

278 

9 



14,112 

11,268 

9,466 

2,021 

4,867 

5,755 

18,938 

18,753 

12,578 

8,660 

6,251 

4,105 

3,517 

2,687 

1,806 

1,159 

687 

328 

213 



169.526 



13,562 

10,878 

9,176 

1,948 

5,837 

11,514 

38,062 

24,121 

14,967 

10,567 

7,782 

5,536 

5,218 

3,939 

2,732 

1,739 

1,106 

537 

305 



15,627 

14,447 

12,778 

2,805 

6,108 

5,445 

15,086 

19,033 

14,181 

10,561 

7,357 

4,907 

4,225 

3,470 

2,369 

1,507 

855 

415 

270 

10 

181.584 



15,123 

14,115 

12,256 

2,564 

6,436 

11,202 

32,767 

24,206 

16,316 

12,053 

8,775 

6,211 

6,024 

4,884 

3,530 

2,372 

1,472 

771 

493 

14 



49 



TABLE lOA. IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED, BY SEX, MARITAL STATUS, AGE, AND MAJOR 
OCCUPATION GROUP: YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1962 - 1966 



Sex, marital status, 

age, and 

occuoatlon 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


1966 


Number admitted 


283.763 


306.260 


292.248 


296.697 


323.040 


Sex and marital status: 

Males 


131,575 


139.297 


126.214 


127,171 


141,456 


Single 


73,264 

56,309 

1,037 

915 

50 

152.188 


79,662 

57,703 

965 

912 

55 

166,963 


73,264 

51,161 

866 

860 

63 

166.034 


74,711 

50,639 

838 

885 

98 

169.526 


80,973 


Married 


58,552 


Widowed 


1,032 




746 




153 




181.584 


Single 


73,318 

70,047 

6,140 

2,626 

57 

865 

25.2 
26.0 
24.6 

23,710 
1,589 

5,554 
26,304 
17,172 
12,976 
9,690 
9,414 
10,801 
17,614 

136.752 


80,747 

77,704 

5,818 

2,646 

48 

834 

23.7 
24.5 
23.3 

27,930 
1,776 

5,986 

28,094 

18,158 

14,286 

9,522 

9,392 

9,463 

16,062 

152.470 


80,086 

77,642 

5,584 

2,703 

19 

760 

23.4 
23.8 
23.3 

28,756 
1,732 

6,822 
30,015 
17,568 
14,243 

8,451 
10,396 

3,988 

9,127 

151,076 


83,443 

77,590 

5,674 

2,768 

51 

750 

23.2 
23.2 
23.2 

28,790 
1,833 

7,090 
29,779 
17,510 
14,166 

9,706 
10,743 

2,638 

8,556 

154.761 


86,138 




85,988 




7,004 




2,392 




62 




779 


Median age (years): 


23.5 




23.5 




23.4 


Professional, technical, and kindred 


30,039 




2,964 


Managers, officials, and proprietors. 


6,773 


Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers ... 


22,676 
16,535 
14,190 




10,558 


Service workers, except private household . 


10,541 
4,227 




9,830 


Housewives, children, and others with no 
occupation 


181,634 




58,153 

1,885 

19,410 

57,304 

12,187 


63,832 

1,903 

22,889 

63,846 

13,121 


62,192 

2,146 

24,226 

62,512 

10,074 


61,669 

2,372 

27,255 

63,465 

11,125 


69,833 




3,396 




30,676 




77,729 




13,073 







50 



ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AND DEPARTED: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1908 - 1966 



1908 



ALIENS ADMITTED 

Nonlnml- 

ttant 1/ 



ALIENS 
DEPARTED 2/ 



U. S. CITIZENS 2/ 



1908-1910 3/ 
1911-1920 ... 

1911 

1912 

1913 

19U 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1920 

1921-1930 ... 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 

1928 

1929 

1930 



678,587 
838,172 
1,197,892 
1,218,480 
326,700 
298,826 
295,403 
110,618 
141,132 
430,001 

4.107.209 
805.228 
309,556 
522,919 
706,896 
294,314 
304,488 
335,175 
307,255 
279,678 
241,700 



490,741 
.376.271 
151,713 
178,983 
229,335 
184,601 
107,544 
67,922 
67,474 
101,235 
95,889 
191,575 



172,935 
122,949 
150,487 
172,406 
164,121 
191,618 
202,826 
193,376 
199,649 
204,514 



1.495.638 
3.988.157 
518,215 
615,292 
611,924 
633,805 
384,174 
240,807 
146,379 
193,268 
216,231 
428,062 



426,031 
345,384 
200,586 
216,745 
225,490 
227,755 
253,508 
274,356 
252,498 
272,425 



660.811 
,938.508 
269,128 
280,801 
286,604 
286,586 
239,579 
121,930 
127,420 
72,867 
96,420 
157,173 



222,712 
243,563 
308,471 
301,281 
339,239 
370,7 57 
378,520 
430,955 
449,955 
477,260 



1931-1940 

1931 .. 

1932 .. 

1933 .. 

1934 .. 

1935 .. 

1936 .. 

1937 .. 

1938 .. 

1939 .. 

1940 .. 



528.431 
97.139 
35,576 
23,068 
29,470 
34,956 
36,329 
50,244 
67,895 
82,998 
70,756 



183,540 
139,295 
127,660 
134,434 
144,765 
154,570 
181,640 
184,802 
185,333 
138,032 



2.196.650 
290,916 
287,657 
243,802 
177,172 
189,050 
193,284 
224,582 
222,614 
201,409 
166,164 



439,897 
339,262 
305,001 
273,257 
282,515 
318,273 
386,872 
406,999 
354,438 
258,918 



1941-1950 

1941 .. 

1942 .. 

1943 .. 

1944 .. 

1945 .. 

1946 .. 

1947 .. 

1948 .. 

1949 .. 

1950 .. 

1951-1960 

1951 .. 

1952 .. 

1953 .. 

1954 .. 

1955 .. 

1956 .. 

1957 .. 

1958 .. 

1959 .. 

1960 .. 

1961 .. 

1962 .. 

1963 .. 

1964 .. 

1965 .. 

1966 .. 



51,776 
28,781 
23,725 
28,551 
38,119 
108,721 
147,292 
170,570 
188,317 
249,187 



205,717 
265,520 
170,434 
208,177 
237,790 
321,625 
326,867 
253,265 
260,686 
265,398 

271,344 
283,763 
306,260 
292,248 
296,697 
323,040 



100,008 
82,457 
81,117 
113,641 
164,247 
203,469 
366,305 
476,006 
447,272 
426,837 



465,106 
516,082 
485,714 
566,613 
620,946 
686,259 
758,858 
847,764 
,024,945 
,140,736 



1,220,315 
1,331,383 
1,507,091 
1,744,808 
2,075,967 
2,341,923 



2.262.293 
88,477 
74,552 
58,722 
84,409 
93,362 
204,353 
323,422 
448,218 
430,089 
456,689 

6.682.387 
472,901 
509,497 
544,502 
599,161 
665,800 
715,200 
574,608 
710,428 
885,913 

1,004,377 

1,093,937 
1,158,960 
1,266,843 
1,430,736 
1,734,939 
1,919,951 



175,935 
118,454 
105,729 
108,444 
175,568 
274,543 
437,690 
542,932 
620,371 
663,567 

.I2.»l.?88 

760,486 

807,225 

930,874 

1,021,327 

1,171,612 

1,281,110 

1,365,075 

1,469,262 

1,804,435 

1,920,582 

2,043,416 
2,199,326 
2,433,463 
2,786,907 
3,099,951 
3,613,855 



Excludet border croiiara, crawHn, Mexican agricultural laborera adaltced under the Act of October 31, 1949 and alie 

on docunentary walvera. 
Prior to 1957, Include! ealgrant and nonealgrant allena departed; thereafter Includea aliens departed and cttlsena a 

departed by aea and air, except direct departures to Canada. 
Departures of U.S. citizens first recorded in 1910. 



I admitted 
rived and 



51 



TABLE 12. IMMIGRAM3 ADMITTED, 

BY STATE OF INTENDED FUTURE PERMANENT RESIDENCE: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1966 



State of Intended 
future permanent 


1957-1966 


1957 


1958 


19 59 


19 60 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


1966 




2.879.568 


326.867 


253.265 


260,686 


265,398 


271,344 


283,763 


306,260 


29 2.248 


296,697 


323,040 


Ala ama 


6.892 
2,689 
35,216 
3.555 
644,772 

16.544 
63,596 
4,286 
22,999 
123,494 

12,886 
18,017 
4,072 
168,512 
24,289 

9,270 
9.528 
8.118 
17,981 
15.242 

28,455 
119,661 
86,575 
19,326 
3,820 

18,990 
5,105 
6,210 
5,717 
8.9 66 

148,485 
13,849 

669,7 27 
12,276 
3,781 

70,822 
9.015 
16,865 
84,384 
13 729 

5.611 
2,334 
7,974 
144,187 
11,209 

6,829 
20,656 
41,105 

5.532 
25,784 

2,142 

4,067 
26,548 
3,902 

13,972 


740 

180 

2.940 

408 

58.452 

1,826 
7,027 
512 
2,010 
11,182 

1,140 
1,384 
486 
25,238 
3,626 

1,266 
1,086 
953 
1,616 
1.794 

3.635 
11.260 
15.287 

2,718 
367 

2,424 
645 

777 
384 
890 

17,303 
1,586 

77,356 

1.118 

455 

12,149 
99 5 

1,798 
11,148 

1,158 

552 

292 

788 

22.285 

1.372 

781 
1,946 

4,678 
588 

4,197 
261 

165 
615 
151 

877 


726 

103 

2.658 

378 

51.201 

1,357 
5.940 
399 
1,803 
11,396 

1,279 
1,407 
423 
16,447 
2.419 

962 

931 

7 64 

1.798 

1.744 

2.464 
10,128 
9,727 
2,006 
394 

1 ,862 
497 
636 
311 
689 

13,420 
1,046 

59,605 

1.067 

330 

8,219 
927 
1,529 
9,062 
1.152 

539 

250 

754 

9.254 

1 096 

732 
1,815 
4,121 

621 
2,837 

133 

135 
69 6 
165 

911 


822 

249 

2.315 

471 

49.673 

1,737 
6.004 
429 
2.086 
9,262 

1,376 
1,616 
441 
16,275 
2,949 

1.003 
1 .094 
844 
1.999 
1.626 

2.592 
9.855 
8.243 
2.133 
481 

2,150 
49 5 
644 
408 
713 

15,807 

894 

64.698 

1.206 

358 

9.783 
941 
1.353 
10.296 
1.244 

580 

287 

921 

9.160 

1.229 

726 
2,012 
4.045 

666 
2.727 

201 

207 
67 5 
165 

520 


734 

218 

3.129 

380 

61.325 

1,653 
5,769 
353 
1,942 
10.713 

1,222 
1.619 
464 
15,132 
2,373 

1.041 

969 

803 

1.443 

1.553 

2.399 
11,953 
8,271 
1,970 
421 

1,864 
467 
650 
489 
797 

13,611 
1,105 

60,134 

1,179 

358 

6,829 
891 
1,715 
7,933 
1,578 

554 
186 
803 
12,992 
949 

780 
1,743 
3,897 

605 
2,504 

201 

29 2 
848 
369 

1,206 


603 

300 

3,473 

299 

64,205 

1,483 
5,69 2 
336 
1,993 
13,009 

1,099 
1,762 
379 
15,311 
2,240 

898 

7 79 

733 

1,645 

1,465 

2,336 
12.091 
7,328 
1,852 
350 

1,737 
448 
637 
542 
976 

13,556 
1,473 

60,429 

1,119 

319 

5,741 
849 
1,857 
8,052 
1,403 

533 
220 
762 
14,952 
994 

639 
1,639 
3,977 

558 
2,426 

271 

256 

1,557 

450 

1,311 

1 


513 

348 

4,019 

277 

72,675 

1,495 
5,978 
356 
2,300 
14,009 

988 
2,048 

374 
14,710 
1,991 

746 

823 

649 

1,540 

1,369 

2,344 
11,578 
6,371 
1,614 
347 

1,567 
471 
57 2 
711 
742 

13,367 
2,031 

62,311 

1,077 

327 

5,201 
859 
1,590 
7,535 
1,361 

481 

219 

667 

17,345 

1,052 

577 
1,721 
4, 144 

452 
2,133 

299 

363 

2,956 

569 

1,601 


681 

29 7 

5.049 

410 

79,090 

1,792 
5,944 
416 
2,495 
11,404 

1,277 
1,767 
429 
16,020 
2,053 

849 

941 

840 

1,784 

1,487 

2,831 
13.571 
6.89 5 
1.756 
433 

1.750 
522 
585 
719 

977 

14,099 
2,012 

70,275 

1,335 

415 

5,504 
9 64 
1,590 
7,463 
1,249 

599 

251 

845 

16,514 

1,167 

782 
2,277 
4,521 

567 
2,234 

226 

664 

3,303 

434 

1,906 


588 

346 

3,609 

340 

67,407 

1,707 
6,587 
512 
2,796 
13,414 

1,596 
1,623 
370 
15,634 
2,251 

906 
1,057 

948 
2,041 
1,489 

3,143 
12,650 
7,298 
1,931 
364 

1,753 
515 

597 

783 

1 ,024 

14,559 
1,460 

68,629 

1,349 

499 

5,619 
972 
1,822 
7,487 
1,143 

618 

286 

912 

13,269 

1,208 

671 
2,504 
3,861 

569 
2,311 

179 

601 

4, 101 

386 

1.854 


694 

363 

3,866 

309 

67,671 

1,880 

6,867 

488 

2,919 

15,077 

1,538 
1,721 
37 3 
15,587 
2,095 

822 

896 

824 

2,221 

1,491 

3,448 
11,455 
7.975 
1.733 
331 

1 .968 
542 
580 
754 

1. 142 

15.096 
1.367 

69.011 
1.431 

344 

5.444 
876 
2.040 
6,976 
1,159 

557 

167 

657 

14,674 

1,207 

615 
2.654 
3,722 

443 
2,190 

204 

640 

4,767 

505 

2,321 


691 




285 


Alas a 


4,158 


Arizona 


283 




73.073 




1,614 


Connect cu 


7,788 




485 


ueiawar 


2,655 


Pl^'^iii'^"^ ° ° " ^ 


14,028 




1,37 1 


Georg a 


3,070 




333 




18,158 




2,292 


lo a 


777 




952 




760 


I* i 1 *" 


1,894 


1 


1,224 




3,263 
15,120 




9,180 


^ 


1,613 




332 




1,89 5 


M 


503 




532 




616 


N %*m ahlre 


1,016 




17,667 


M Ml 


875 




77,279 




1,395 




376 




6,333 




741 




1,571 




8,432 


Rhode Island 


2,262 
59 8 
















935 


























U.S. terr. and poss: 

Guam 


744 















52 



IHHICRANTS ADMITTED. BY SPECIFIED COUKTRl ES OF I 
I STATE OF INTENDED FITTURE PERMANENT RESIDENCE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1966 



lilt of Cotuoibta 
entucky 

I'^f^U*" 

llBSlselppl 

orth Carolina . .. 
brth Dakota 

hlo 

klahoma 

regon 

ennsytvanla 

hode Island 

outh Carolina ... 

Irglnia 

aahlngton 

est Virginia 

yo"»ng 



15.120 
9.180 
1.613 



2.958 

15 

26,582 



I Tal' 



Sp.ln,(l 



54 



IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 - 1966 1/ 



/Trom 1820 to 1867 figures represent alien passengers arrived; 1868 to 1891 Inclusive and 1895 to 1897 
Inclusive, immigrant aliens arrived; 1892 to 1894 Inclusive and from 1898 to present time immigrant 
aliens admitted. Date for years prior to 1906 relate to country whence alien came; thereafter to 
country of last permanent residence. Because of changes in boundaries and changes in lists of 
countries, data for certain countries are not comparable throughoutj7 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria-Hungary 2/ 

Belgium 

Denmark 

F ranee 

Germany 2/ 

(England 

Great (Scotland 

Britain (Wales 

(Not specified 3/ 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway) , . 
Sweden) - 

Poland 5/ 

Portugal 

Rumania 13/ 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe 

U.S.S.R. 6/ 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Japan 7/ 

Turkey in Asia 8/ 

Other Asia 

America 

Canada & Newfoundland 9/ . . 

Mexico ^/ 

West Indies 

Central America 

South America 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand 

Pacific Islands 

Not specified 



1 

20 

371 

968 

1,782 

268 

360 

3,614 
30 
49 



5 
35 

139 

31 

1 



599.125 



98.817 



495.688 



1.597.501 



2.452.660 



2.065.270 



2.272.262 



27 

169 

8,497 

6,761 

14,055 

2,912 

170 

7,942 

20 

50,724 

409 

1,078 

91 

16 

145 

2,477 

3,226 

20 

75 

3 



22 

1,063 

45,575 

152,454 

7,611 

2,667 

185 

65,347 

49 

207,381 

2,253 

1,412 

1,201 

369 
829 

2,125 

4,821 

7 

277 

40 



5,074 

539 

77,262 

434,626 

32,092 

3,712 

1,261 

229,979 

16 

780,719 

1,870 

8,251 

13,903 

105 
550 

2,209 
4,644 

59 
551 

79 



4,738 

3,749 

76,358 

951,667 

247,125 

38,331 

6,319 

132,199 

31 

914,119 

9,231 

10,789 

20,931 
1,164 
1,055 

9,298 

25,011 

83 

457 

5 



7,800 

6,734 

17,094 

35,986 

787,468 

222,277 

38,769 

4,313 

341,537 

72 

435,778 

11,725 

9,102 

(71,631 

(37,667 

2,027 

2,658 

6,697 

23,286 

129 

2,512 



64.630 



41,397 
43 



64,301 

69 

186 

2 

72 



11.564 



33.424 



62.469 



74.720 



166.607 



2,277 

4,817 

3,834 

105 

531 



13,624 

6,599 

12,301 

44 

856 



41,723 
3,271 

13,528 

368 

3,579 



59,309 
3,078 

10,660 

449 

1,224 



153,878 

2,191 

9,046 

95 

1,397 



33,032 



69,911 



53,144 



29,169 



312 
36 



17,969 



72,969 

7,221 

31,771 

7 2,206 

718,182 

437,706 

87,564 

6,631 

16,142 

210 

436,871 

55,759 

16,541 

(95,323 

(115,922 

12,970 

14,082 

11 

5.266 

28,293 

337 

39,284 

1,001 



123.823 



123,201 

163 

149 

67 

243 



404.044 



383,640 

5,162 

13,957 

157 

1.128 



358 
9,886 
1,028 

790 



See footnotes at end of table. 



55 



TABLE 13. IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 - 1966 1/ (Continued) 



1881-1890 1891-1900 1901-1910 1911-1920 1921-1930 1931-19AO 1941-1950 



All countries 

Europe 

Albania 12/ 

Austria) 
Hungary) - 

Belgium 

Bulgaria H.^ 

Czechos lovakla ^2/ 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland ^2/ 

France 

Germany 2/ 

(England 

Great (Scotland 

Britain (Wales 

(Not specified 2.' 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 12/ 

Lithuania 12/ 

Luxembourg 16/ 

Netherlands 

Norway 4/ 

Poland J/ 

Portugal 

Rumania Vil 

Spain 

Sweden 4/ 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe 

U.S.S.R. 6/ 

Yugoslavia 11 / 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Japan 7/ 

Turkey in Asia 8/ 

Other Asia 

America 

Canada & Newfoundland 9/ . . . 

Mexico 10/ 

West Indies 

Central America 

South America 

Other America ^4/ 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand 

Pacific Islands 

Not specified \^l 



5.246.613 



3.687.564 



4.737.046 



8.136.016 



S-735.8U 
4.376.564 



4.107.209 
2.477.853 



528.431 
348.289 



353,719 
20,177 



88,132 



50,464 

1,452,970 

644,680 

149,869 

1 2 , 640 

168 

2,308 

655,482 

307,309 



53,701 

176,586 

51,806 

16,978 

6,348 

4,419 

391,776 

81,988 

1,562 

213,282 

682 



68.380 



61,711 

269 

2,270 

2,220 

1,910 



426.967 



39 3 , 304 

1,913 

29,042 

404 

2,304 



857 
7,017 
5,557 

789 



592,707 

18,167 
160 



50,231 



30,770 
505,152 
216,726 

44,188 

10,557 
67 

15,979 
388,415 
651,893 



26,758 
95,015 
96,720 
27,508 
12,750 
8,731 

226,266 

31,179 

3,626 

505,290 

122 



2,145,266 

41,635 
39,280 

65,285 



73,379 
341,498 
388,017 
120,469 

17,464 

167,519 

339,065 

2,045,877 



48,262 
190,505 

59,149 
53,008 
27,935 
249,534 
34,922 
79,975 
1,597,306 

665 



(453,649 

(442,693 

33,746 

22,533 

3,426 

41,983 

7 56 

61,897 

143,945 

249,944 

78,357 

13,107 

184,201 

146,181 

1,109,524 



43,718 

66,395 

4,813 

89,732 

13,311 

58,611 

95,074 

23,091 

54,677 

921,201 

1,888 

8,111 



32,868 
30,680 
15,846 
2,945 
102,194 
32,430 

16,691 

49,610 

412,202 

157,420 

159,781 

13,012 

51,084 
220,591 
455,315 



26,948 
68,531 
227,734 
29,994 
67,646 
28,958 
97,249 
29,676 
14,659 
61,742 
49,064 
22,983 



2,040 

3,563 

7,861 

4,817 

938 

14,393 

2,559 

506 

2,146 

12,623 

114,058 

21,756 

6,887 

735 

9,119 

13,167 

68,028 

1,19 2 

2,201 

555 

7,150 

4,740 

17,025 

3,329 

3,871 

3,258 

3,960 

5,512 

737 

1,356 

5,835 

2,361 



71.235 



243.557 



192.559 



97.400 



15.344 



14,799 

68 

25,942 

26,799 

3,628 



20,605 

4,713 

129,797 

77,393 

11,059 



21,278 

2,082 

83,837 

79,389 

5,973 



29,907 
1,886 
33,462 
19,155 
12,980 



4,928 
496 

1,948 
328 

7,644 



38.972 



3,311 

971 

33,065 

549 

1,075 



361.888 



1.143.571 



1.516.716 



160.037 



179,225 
49,642 

107,548 
8,192 
17,280 



742,185 

219,004 

123,424 

17,159 

41,899 



924,515 

459,287 

74,899 

15,769 

42,215 

31 



108,527 

22,319 

15,502 

5,861 

7,803 

25 



350 

2,740 

1,225 

14,063 



7,368 
11,975 

1,049 
33,523 



8,443 

12,348 

1,079 

1,147 



5,286 
8.299 



1,750 
2,231 

780 



See footnotes at end of table. 



56 



TABLE 13. IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 - 1966 1/ (Continued) 



Total 
147 years 
1820-1966 



All countries 

Europe 

Albania 12/ 

Austria 2/ 

Hungary 2/ 

Belgium 

Bu Igarla 11./ 

Czechoslovakia 12/ 

Denmark 

Estonia 12/ 

Finland 12/ 

France 

Germany 2/ 

( England 

Great (Scotland 

Britain (Wales 

(Not specified 3/ 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 12/ 

Lithuania 12/ 

Luxembourg 16/ 

Netherlands 

Norway ft/ 

Poland 1/ 

Portugal 

Rumania 13/ 

Spain 

Sweden 4/ 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe 

U.S.S.R. 6/ 

Yugoslavia 11/ 

Other Europe 

Asia 17/ 

China 18/ 

India 

Japan 7/ 

Turkey In Asia 8/ 

Other Asia 



2. 515. 479 



271.344 



283.763 



306.260 



29 2.248 



323.040 



43.614.313 



1.328.293 



59 

67,106) 

36,637) 

18,575 

104 

918 

10,984 

185 

4,925 

51,121 

477,765 

156,171 

32,854 

2,589 

3,884 

47,608 

57,332 

185,491 

352 

242 

684 

52,277 

22,935 

9,985 

19,588 

1,039 

7,894 

21,697 

17,675 

2,653 

584 

8,225 

8,155 



108.532 



108.215 



101.468 



115.898 



147.453 



9,657 
1,973 

46,250 
866 

88,707 



1,114) 

397) 

1,131 

34 

212 

902 

43 

474 

4,403 

25,815 

14,936 

3,587 

196 

124 

3,124 

5,738 

18,956 

84 

125 

42 

7,362 

2,204 

6,254 

3,832 

175 

1,737 

1,670 

1,697 

410 

270 

1,188 

286 



19.495 



900 

292 

4,490 

296 

13,517 



12 

944) 

400) 

959 

37 

103 

957 

14 

505 

3,931 

21,477 

14,970 

2,915 

181 

130 

4,408 

5,118 

20,119 

52 

52 

56 

6,378 

1,839 

5,660 

3,622 

135 

3,353 

1,760 

1,793 

581 

130 

1,086 

312 



20.249 



1,356 
390 

4,054 

304 

14,145 



9 

1,526) 

635) 

922 

36 

111 

1,070 

8 

358 

4,9 26 

24,727 

18,314 

4,139 

255 

159 

4,744 

5,746 

16,175 

48 

58 

52 

4,086 

1,934 

6,785 

2,911 

126 

2,969 

2,056 

1,952 

834 

119 

972 

304 



35.221.800 



23.242 



1,605 

965 

4,147 

307 

16,218 



1,311) 

649) 

1,296 

261 

190 

970 

15 

495 

5,598 

24,494 

21,067 

4,408 

283 

139 

3,998 

6,055 

12,769 

40 

50 

68 

2,039 

2,145 

7,097 

2,006 

287 

4,069 

2,196 

2,119 

506 

163 

1,098 

326 



21.279 



2,684 

488 

3,774 

331 

14,002 



10 

1,743) 

510) 

1,155 

29 

389 

1,088 

14 

332 

5,573 

22,432 

19,443 

4,440 

252 

144 

3,016 

5,187 

10,874 

37 

59 

85 

2,353 

2,179 

7,093 

1,937 

434 

3,929 

2,413 

2,360 

396 

190 

1,051 

321 



20J40 



1,611 

467 

3,294 

365 

14,303 



10 

1,446) 

627) 

887 

57 

286 

953 

24 

374 

4,173 

17,661 

16,018 

2,573 

184 

664 

8,221 

2,603 

26,449 

67 

63 

59 

1,922 

1,620 

8,470 

8,481 

241 

4,944 

1,863 

1,995 

579 

259 

1,611 

514 



40.112 



2,948 

2,293 

3,468 

365 

31,038 



2.242 
4,287,149 

195,319 

66,789 

130,569 

357,342 

1,021 

29,559 

713,532 

6,862,900 

3,014,362 

804,821 

93,543 

798,985 

514,700 

4,706,854 

5,067,717 

2,233 

3,533 

2,431 

345,036 

849,811 

473,670 

305,844 

160,459 

201,916 

1,261,768 

335,818 

162,412 

3,345,610 

73,594 

50,261 



419,643 
18,502 
348,623 
208,415 
247,006 



See footnotes at end of table. 



TABLE 13. IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 - 1966 1/ (Continued) 



1951-1960 1961 



1962 1963 1964 1965 



Total 
147 years 
1820-1966 



America 

Canada & Newfoundland 9/ 

Mexico 20/ 

West Indies 

Central America 

South America 

Other America Vt/ 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand ... 

Pacific Islands L?/ 

Not specified \bl 



996.944 



139.560 



155.871 



169.966 



158.644 



171.019 



162.552 



299,811 

123,091 

44,751 

91,628 

59,711 



41,476 
20,520 

7,27 2 
19,095 

3,747 



44,27 2 
55,805 
20,917 

9,639 
22,550 

2,688 



50,509 
55,986 
22,951 
10,706 
27,759 
2,055 



51,114 
34,448 
24,067 
11,829 
34,891 
2,295 



50,035 
40,686 
31,141 
12,736 
33,757 
2,664 



37,273 
47,217 
37,999 

9,889 
28,113 

2,061 



14,092 
11,506 
4,698 
12,493 



1,851 

1,556 

325 

5 



1,834 

1,427 

144 

249 



1,982 

1,642 

136 

226 



2,015 
1,767 



1,949 

1,803 

155 

263 



1,967 

1,890 

177 

444 



6.710.846 



3,836,071 
1,414,273 
777,382 
177,641 
400,926 
104,553 



59,117 

89,928 

22,305 

268,128 



1' 

k' 

7/ 

y 

10/ 

11/ 



13/ 

14/ 
11' 

16/ 
17/ 



Data for fiscal years ended June 30, except 1820 to 1831 Inclusive and 1844 to 1849 Inclusive fiscal years 

ended September 30; 1833 to 1842 Inclusive and 1851 to 1867 Inclusive years ended December 31; 1832 

covers 15 months ended December 31; 1843 nine months ended September 30; 1850 15 months ended 

December 31; and 1866 six months ended June 30. 
Data for Austria-Hungary were not reported until 1861. Austria and Hungary have been recorded separately 

since 1905. In the years 1938 to 1945 Inclusive Austria was included with Germany. 
Great Britain not specified. In the years 1901 to 1951, Included in other Europe. 
From 1620 to 1868 the figures for Norway and Sweden were combined. 
Poland was recorded as a separate country from 1820 to 1896 and since 1920. Between 1899 and 1919, Poland 

was Included with Austria-Hungary, Germany, and Russia, 
Since 1931 the Russian Empire has been broken down Into European U.S.S.R. and Siberia or Asiatic U.S.S.R. 
No record of immigration from Japan until 1861. 
No record of Immigration from Turkey In Asia until 1869. 
Prior to 1920 Canada and Newfoundland were recorded as British North America. From 1820 to 1898 the 

figures Include all British North American possessions. 
No record of immigration from Mexico from 1886 to 1893. 
Bulgaria, Serbia, and Montenegro were first reported In 1899. Bulgaria has been reported separately since 

1920 and In 1920 also a separate enumeration was made for the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes. 

Since 1922 the Serb, Croat, and Slovene Kingdom has been recorded as Yugoslavia. 
Countries added to the list since the beginning of World War I are theretofore Included with the countries 

to which they belonged. Figures are available since 1920 for Czechoslovakia and Finland and since 1924 

for Albania, Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. 
No record of immigration from Rumania until 1880. 
Included with countries not specified prior to 1925. 
The figure 33,523 in column headed 1901-1910, includes 32,897 persons returning in 1906 to their homes in 

the United States. 
Figures for Luxembourg are available since 1925. 
Beginning with the year 1952, Asia includes Philippines. From 1934 to 1951 the Philippines were included 

in the Pacific Islands. Prior to 1934 the Philippines were recorded in separate tables as Insular 

travel. 
Beginning in 1957 China Includes Taiwan. 



58 



All countrlea 

Belgluf" 

CzechollovskK 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherland 

fo'tugal 

Runanla 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Aala) .... 

United Klngdon 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Aaia) .. 

Yugoilavla 

Other Europe 

Aila 

China 2/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indoneala 

Iran 

laraal 

Jordan J/ 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Pakistan 

Phlllpplnea 

Kyukyu lalsnda 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Viet Nan 

Other Aala 

North Anarlca 

Canada 

Mexico 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Other Ueat Indlea 

Coita Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduraa 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Other Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

A'g'"""' 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

*lg"l« 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Auatralla 

New Zealand 

Pacific lalands (U.S. adm. ) . 



7,560 
19,333 
6,019 
3,250 
13,152 
46,7 39 
7,599 
18,150 
4,453 
1.781 
31.841 
3,773 
2.342 
1,227 
9,296 



3,39 2 
7,895 
8,042 



6,699 
2,667 
1,329 
2,241 



1,5 20 
3,541 
1.373 



8,705 
9.124 

19.061 

12,416 
2.533 

11,225 
1,537 
2,57 3 
1,009 
2,294 
1,800 
771 

27,570 
4.657 
9,842 
4,730 



33,203 
49,154 
13,733 
1,004 



,798 


389 


,871 


1,274 


,015 


715 


,883 


1,961 


,992 


1.002 



7 38 
4.100 

32,145 
3,079 
1.583 

10.383 

24,479 
3,711 
2.385 
6,607 
1,635 
805 
1,354 
2,224 
1,7 39 
1,046 

27,613 
2.114 
2.260 
2.025 

19.336 



30,055 
26,712 
11,581 



1,016 
1,326 
1,744 



2,355 
1,145 
2,813 
1,450 
689 
4.487 

31.422 
4.507 

30,098 
7,371 

16,251 
4,005 
2,484 
8,301 
2,694 
1,345 
1,528 
2,079 
1,783 
1,068 

20,954 
2.872 
4,349 
2,751 



23,082 
23,061 
7,021 



1,970 
1,066 
2,391 
1,495 
7 54 
4,253 

31,768 
3,797 
7,257 
7,687 

14.933 
5.070 
2,533 
7,949 
6,968 
99 3 



30,990 
32,684 
8,283 



1,735 
1.123 
1,978 
1,326 
689 
3,957 

29,048 
3,392 
1,466 
6.541 

20,652 
4,608 
2,353 
9,281 
3,960 
813 
1,812 
1,699 
1,673 
770 

22,717 
2,352 
1,989 
1,815 



3,045 
1,025 
1,283 
2.618 



3,591 

437 

1,443 

1,120 

3,559 

1,826 

2,086 

895 

513 



1,633 
1,042 
1,691 
1.413 



4,702 
1.355 
5,486 

21,442 
4,317 
1,983 
8,098 
3,730 
784 
2,148 
1,696 
1,777 
914 

21,189 
2,277 
1,857 
1,647 



30,377 
55,291 
16,254 
4,603 
1,322 
1,573 
2,720 
1,407 
1,289 
939 
1,154 
1,083 
2,098 



530 
1,560 
1,137 
4,391 
2.562 
2.667 
1.037 

723 



1,769 
1,029 
1,845 
1.487 



4,825 
1,766 
6,178 
16,588 
3,656 
2,089 
9,546 
2,975 



854 



1,262 
25,916 
2,045 
2,560 



129,705 
36,003 
55,253 
10,587 
10,683 
1,851 
1,880 
2,599 
1,754 
1,695 
1,228 
1,504 
1,430 
2,184 
480 
574 



5,733 
4,283 
2,528 



1,645 
1,055 
1,666 
1.322 
694 
4.039 

26,739 
3,909 
1,813 
6,307 

13,245 
2,851 
2,238 
8.884 
2.077 
1,391 
2,252 
2,173 
1,865 
960 

29,108 
1,802 
3,098 
1,931 



112.973 
38,074 
32,967 
15,808 
7,537 
2,082 
1,762 
2,771 
2,729 
1,684 
1,436 
1,776 
1,531 
1,750 
594 
47 2 



2,416 
1,509 
10,446 
3,917 
2,585 
1,250 
983 



1,005 
1,894 
1,384 
669 
4,039 

24,045 
3,002 
1,574 
5,463 

10,821 
3,085 
2,256 
8,465 
2,005 
1,644 
2,200 
2,411 
1,984 



27,358 
1,853 
2,818 
1,769 



126.729 
38,327 
37,969 
19,760 
9,504 
3,609 
1,837 
2,873 
2,911 
1.768 
1,613 
2,355 
1,332 
1,933 
511 



2,869 
1,87 2 
10,885 



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60 



TABLE 14B, HONG KONG CHINESE PAROLED INTO THE UNITED STATES 

BY SEX, MARITAL STATUS, AGE, AND MAJOR OCCUPATION GROUP: 

JUNE 4, 1962 - JUNE 30, 1966 



Sex, marital status, 

age, and 
occupation 



Number 
admitted 



Number admitted 

Sex: 

Males 

Females 

Marital status: 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Age: 

Under 5 years 

5-9 years 

10 - 19 years 

20 - 29 years 

30 - 39 years 

40 - 49 years 

50 - 59 years 

60 - 69 years 

70 - 79 years 

80 years and over 

Not reported 

Major occupation group: 

Professional, technical, and kindred workers 

Farmers and farm managers 

Managers, officials, and proprietors, except farm .. 

Clerical, sales, and kindred workers 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers 

Operatives and kindred workers 

Private household workers 

Service workers, except private household 

Farm laborers and foremen 

Laborers , except farm and mine 

Housewives, children, and others with no occupation 

Housewives 

Retired persons 

Students 

Chi Idren under 14 years of age 

Unknown or not reported 



14.757 



7,422 
7,335 



8,819 

5,285 

583 

51 

19 



2,064 

2,051 

3,146 

2,317 

2,311 

1,419 

809 

435 

171 

30 

4 



769 

30 

329 

665 

365 

507 

183 

249 

40 

138 

10.609 



2,889 

54 

2,198 

5,468 

873 



61 



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62 



Ing without doc 



of birth 



1957 - 1966 1957 



All countrlel 

Auitrla 

Belgium 

Czechoalovakla 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Nethorland 

Norvay 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Alia) ... 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) . 

Yugoalavla 

Other Europe 

Alia 

China y 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Israel 

Jordan 2/ 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Ryukyu islands 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Viet Nam 

Other Aala 

North America 

Mexico 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Other West Indie 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Other Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Morocco .!., 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania , 

Australia , 

New Zea land 

Pacific Islands (U.S. adm.) , 
Other Oceania 

Other countries 



6.273.750 



124.993 
105,661 
39,119 
150.765 
55.842 
515, 479 
1,126,429 
139,089 
89,167 
156,051 
631,031 
390,113 
127,539 
139,387 
68,031 
43,043 
229,956 
165,314 
188,602 
48,269 
1,551,519 
57,360 
68,252 
62,740 

1.039.261 



361,744 



8,562 
5,838 
3,233 

10,669 
3,862 

25,482 

54,246 
6,967 
4,320 
9,365 

41,150 

22,513 
8,744 

11,755 
2,695 
3,724 

12,772 
9,105 
9,358 
3,336 

89,173 
4,429 
3,884 
6,542 

47.806 



377.587 



543.906 



104,248 
20,209 
97,964 
30,264 
40,657 
12,532 
68,269 

347,910 
14,455 
27,375 
33,464 
19,874 

130,204 
5,363 
12,548 
14,057 
59,868 

4.951.268 



9,268 
6,641 
2,489 

11 ,052 
3,439 

27,934 

64,592 
6,353 
3,782 
8,451 

41,615 

26,367 
9,218 

11,502 
3,838 
3,168 

15,719 
9,611 

1 1 , 304 
3,978 

62,455 
4,457 
4,536 
5,618 

60,167 



591,271 



627,273 



673.809 



11.368 
8,171 
3,008 
13,844 
3,901 
32,958 
88,010 
8,993 
5,933 
11,680 
47,566 
34,837 
10,645 
12,276 
3,366 
3,240 
21,294 
12,655 
14,434 
4,336 
104,696 
5.405 
5,007 
6,035 

76,684 



12,222 
9,278 
3,026 
15,935 
5,350 
37,617 
103,723 
11,253 
9.833 
13,374 
55.114 
41,391 
11,551 
11,764 
4,100 
3,318 
23,876 
13,825 
16,432 
4,503 
117,972 
6,728 
5,913 
5,806 

86,903 



10,044 
3,084 
15,611 
6,111 
41,181 
109,520 
13,981 
13,396 
15,816 
61,494 
39,705 
11,693 
12,842 
4,672 
3,825 
24,465 
14,938 
17,753 
3,695 
136,021 
5,864 
7,310 
5,683 

87.503 



12,366 
10,669 

3,037 
15,731 

6,153 
50,552 
113,817 
15,823 
11,871 
15,774 
60,935 
41,397 
12,652 
13,594 



3,861 
23,853 
15,530 
19,649 
4,910 
149,959 
5,710 
8,037 
5,312 

98,898 



12,403 
1 1 , 698 
3,220 
16,367 
6,217 
57,903 
126,463 
15,083 
9,571 
15,561 
65,052 
42,396 
13,197 
14,142 
7,273 
4,426 
22,606 
18,809 
20,535 
4,948 
166,670 
5,758 
7,663 
5,608 

113,757 



4,273 
1,867 
1,723 

894 
2,407 
12,993 

648 
1,798 
1,785 
1,015 
6,799 

165 

729 



871 
3,583 
15.039 

864 
1,995 
2,123 
1,227 
10,058 

369 

830 
1,148 
3,921 

315,049 



9,063 
1,036 
6,143 
2,682 
3,351 

612 
3,819 
26,031 

872 
1,531 
2,474 
1,333 
10,063 

611 

803 



364.504 



8,669 
1,317 
7,578 
3,432 
3,705 
1,067 
5,373 

29,731 
1,056 
1,504 
2,951 
1,453 

10,435 
753 
846 



361.454 



9,221 
1,792 
9,312 
3,001 
3,426 
1,168 
6,246 
29,301 
1,372 
1,771 
3,206 
1,730 
8,319 
394 
967 



407.565 



9,954 
2,296 

10,209 
3,094 
3,614 
1,229 
7,316 

32,476 
1,408 
2,112 
3,232 
2,108 

11,133 
449 
1,151 
1,411 
5,704 

446.798 



10,560 
2,336 

10,976 
2,958 
4,685 
1,373 
8,626 

37,481 
1,443 
2,803 
3,651 
2,821 

13,860 
512 
1,461 
1,698 
6,511 

534,723 



15,665 
6,343 
65,298 
136,462 
16,759 
10,527 
18,916 
74,366 
43,421 
14,552 
15,451 
9,557 
5,094 
23,927 
20,573 
22,066 
5,176 
200,611 
5,600 
7,663 
6,077 

138,953 



16,196 
15,896 

6,552 
17.442 

7,213 
81.618 
158,711 
19,703 
10,702 
23,198 
88 , 1 1 1 
46,965 
16,427 
17,874 
11,722 

6,082 
29,542 
23,897 
27,366 

6,189 
238.560 

6,490 

8.561 

7,663 

159,517 



12,119 
2,658 

12,624 
3,735 
5,608 
1,854 

10,067 

49,212 
2,139 
4,068 
4,255 
2,900 

16,450 
730 
1,676 
1,256 
7,200 

628.528 



669,494 
2,197,856 
385,801 
289,119 
50,962 
257,663 
671,109 
52,409 
65,178 
98,523 
45,693 
52,076 
61,719 
15,383 
38,279 

1.142.716 



34,948 
106,695 

62,403 
4,200 
2,834 
6,414 

25,529 
2,549 
4,324 
7,056 
2,162 
2,325 
3,573 
394 
3,215 



40,957 
123,627 

72,616 
5,177 
3,195 
9,496 

32,609 
2,857 
4,307 
7,273 
2,553 
2,934 
3,538 
617 
3,289 

66.106 



175,526 

20,024 
137,575 

60,855 
214,682 

56,971 
125,532 
268,913 

62,638 

163.506 



7,809 
917 

10,600 
4,093 
8,313 
2,340 
4,505 

14,414 
2,628 



8,663 
1,070 

10,411 
4,880 

11,062 
2,734 
4,783 

19,168 



44,278 
138,391 

63,365 
5,756 
3,946 

1 7 , 208 

40,743 
3,570 
4,535 
8,038 
2,999 
3,095 
4,122 
754 
3,702 

78.196 



9,546 
13,430 

6,575 
39,269 
40,669 
52,017 

356.544 



10,783 
1,279 
8,601 
5,508 

13,071 
3,730 
5,207 

25,979 
4,038 

8,708 



51,027 
150,310 

68,112 
4,437 
4,107 

21,027 

49,938 
3,766 
4,723 
9,045 
2,800 
3,300 
4,488 
641 
3,513 

89,714 



57,383 
185,175 

43,934 
9,102 
3,832 

18,070 

60,361 
3,139 
4,667 
5,479 
4,794 



9.786 



71,243 
205,996 
17,119 
18,227 
4,694 
23,226 
70,485 
3,880 
5,451 
6,375 
3,228 
3,967 
5,131 
2,065 
3,711 

106,490 



12,758 
1,370 
9,762 
7,045 

16,069 
3,920 
5,842 

28,514 
4,434 

11,207 



17,242 
1,293 

12,450 
6,012 

13,906 
3,231 
6,489 

24,184 
4,979 



21,146 

1,689 
11,836 

6,010 
19,124 

4,261 
11,105 
21,941 

7,378 



76,550 

238,389 

6,697 

56,236 
4,650 

29,046 

76,514 
6,073 
7,237 
6,873 
4,746 
5,636 
8,138 
2,096 
3,440 

125,269 



84,671 

262,533 

9,448 

64,476 
6,341 

36,852 

87,466 
8,311 
8,252 

11,716 
6,155 
7,737 
8,135 
2,198 
4,235 

151,649 



14,060 
3,448 

15,554 
3,560 
5,954 
1,639 

1 1 , 704 

55,662 
2,062 
4,717 
5,054 
2,912 

20,264 
755 
1,845 
1,354 
8,973 

741,532 



16,572 

2,376 
14,845 

7,317 
27,945 

6,843 
15,184 
27,010 

7,177 

19,003 



20,296 

2,947 
15,682 

9,772 
37.553 

9,216 
19,269 
29,126 

71786 

21,921 



94,636 
355,137 
10,430 
52,638 
6,090 
47,791 
105,939 
6,575 
10,159 
14,919 
7,485 
9,060 
9,274 
2,841 
4,558 

179,173 



28,223 
3,343 
19,472 
12,369 
35,729 
9,672 
24,287 
35,985 
10,093 

27.113 



1,403 

1,744 
1,814 



2,101 
2,027 
2,086 



2,481 
2,334 
2,384 



3,090 
3,133 
2,914 



3,643 
3,640 
4,233 



239,355 
78,196 
26,980 
12,011 



11,650 
3,380 
1,324 



14,131 
4,235 
1,290 



16,070 
4,707 
1,257 



18,485 
5,564 
1,245 



20,497 
6,853 
1,293 



3,560 
4,091 
5,803 

34.816 



23,672 
8,029 
1,961 
1,154 

694 



932 
1,476 
1,163 
4,354 
4,378 
6,680 

39.140 



1,189 
1,672 
1,345 
5,135 
5,197 
7,383 

44,775 



29,686 
9,410 
3,833 
1,644 



1,601 
2,155 
1,591 
6,570 
6,443 
8,753 

55.866 



36,380 
11,650 
5,048 
2,588 

20.086 



i' 



eludes Tal« 



2/ Includes Arab Pale 



63 



/Aliens mJinltted under Sec. 101 (s) ( 15) ( B) of the Immigration und Nationality A,clJ 



Country or raglon 
of birth 


1957-1966 


1957 


1958 


1959 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


1966 




9.879.437 


537,760 


596.004 


589.416 


779.205 


856.472 


928.021 












4.487.184 


246.531 


266,546 


329.067 


368,962 


423,713 


446,96 2 


485,968 


545.904 


651.044 


700.467 




96,291 
80,810 
29,995 
106,928 
40,613 
367,240 
853,173 
84,401 
77,471 
86,480 
458.399 
292,320 
63,887 
114,151 
35.227 
35,786 
134,269 
124,994 
144,912 
31,736 
1,089,541 
36,375 
53,253 
46,932 

533.495 


6,702 
4,366 
2,576 
6,262 
2,115 
19,429 
43,223 
3,750 
3,154 
4,739 
29,509 
16,708 
4,576 
9,862 
1,060 
.3,232 
8,753 
7,035 
7,676 
2,100 
48,905 
3.053 
2,788 
4,958 

19.386 


7,249 
4,762 
1 ,776 
7,122 
2,027 
20,175 
49,169 
4,213 
2,984 
5,396 
28,837 
20,167 
4,643 
9,488 
1,453 
2,615 
8,996 
7,223 
8.855 
2,567 
55,408 
2,782 
3,271 
4,146 

21.376 


8,635 
5,693 
2,136 
9,383 
2.640 

22.601 

66,152 
6,222 
5,126 
7,392 

33,065 

24,119 
5,296 
9,877 
1,762 
2,698 

10,623 
9,264 

10,794 
2,790 

71.100 
3,140 
3,770 
4,367 

26,466 


9,643 
7,138 
2,245 
11,061 
4,079 
26,269 
80,144 
7,655 
8,837 
8,696 
40,535 
26,906 
5,945 
9,507 
2,259 
2,829 
11,646 
10,043 
12,318 
3,026 
83,228 
3,642 
4,793 
4,514 

35,682 


9,566 
7,528 
2,132 
11,591 
4,681 
29,135 
84,662 
6,758 
12,160 
9,280 
44,491 
30,161 
6,234 
10,206 
2,630 
3,097 
11,233 
11,230 
13,303 
2,320 
95,665 
3,745 
5,692 
4,191 

45.744 


9.761 
8.263 
2,362 
11,364 
4,671 
36,104 
86,545 
9,607 
10,616 
8,319 
44,833 
31,432 
6,248 
11 ,031 
3,143 
3,254 
11,369 
11 ,392 
15,072 
3,260 
106,284 
3,653 
6,247 
3,932 

52.098 


9,696 
6,841 
2,422 
11,868 
4,584 
42,014 
94,691 
9,809 
8,384 
7,138 
48,501 
32,185 
6,308 
11,639 
4,249 
3,663 
12,369 
14,216 
15,545 
3,151 
120,634 
3,693 
6,253 
4,095 

60.041 


1 1 ,066 
9,900 
3,859 

11,442 
4,757 

47,518 
102,666 

10,437 
9,307 
9,485 

53,327 

33,244 
7,232 

12,959 
4,677 
4,163 

16,342 

15,685 

16,687 
3,268 
143,172 
3,816 
6.196 
4.497 

78.213 


13,052 
12,886 

5,347 
13,027 

5,708 
57.228 
119,415 
11,629 

9,006 
13,056 
64,267 
35,856 

6,100 
14,778 

6,651 

5,123 
20,143 
18,446 
21,062 

4,043 
175,189 

4,328 

6,794 

5,890 

94.622 
































H 








Italy 


71,034 










Portucat 






































6,342 
99.867 




44,357 
11,553 
43.585 
15,486 
16,626 
6.569 
46,541 
204,781 
7,009 
7,783 
23,069 
7,325 
65,710 
1,692 
8,296 
2,648 
20,465 

3.660.100 


2,013 
230 

1,738 
881 
648 
465 

1,728 

5,431 
406 
168 

1,195 
248 

2,486 
40 
530 
290 
887 

214.063 


2.623 
362 

1,803 
949 
708 
343 

2,297 

5,500 
439 
219 

1,346 
294 

2,632 
90 
546 
94 

1,131 

240.466 


3,064 
493 

2,451 

1,213 
936 
397 

2,615 

7,669 
466 
284 

1,640 
288 

2,83^ 
103 
569 
101 

1.339 

259.205 


3,416 
651 

3,317 

1,206 

1,167 
564 

3,648 

12,329 

524 

338 

2,023 
410 

3,772 
112 
553 
142 

1,510 

265.002 


3,993 
978 

4,112 

1,343 

1,214 
646 

4,217 

16.157 

660 

589 

2,092 
646 

4,391 
140 
633 
187 

1,746 

294.756 


4,653 

1,360 

4,552 

1,493 

1,236 

627 

4,971 

19,745 

669 

783 

2,242 

638 

5,758 

237 

727 

242 

1,943 


4,883 

1,490 

4,501 

1,534 

2,310 

631 

5,765 

22,743 

692 

964 

2,599 

980 

7,410 

186 

888 

258 

2,207 

392.698 


5,544 
1,604 
5,605 
1,666 
2,514 

918 
7,067 
33,479 

799 
1,262 
2,978 
1,174 
8,989 

305 
1,080 

316 
2,711 

467.417 


6,539 
2,100 
7,277 
2,305 
3,033 
968 
6,401 

38,283 
1,046 
1,567 
3,795 
1,401 

1 2 , 560 

258 

1,337 

463 

3,269 

556.154 






































































653.444 




243,277 
1,993,348 
273,518 
211,238 
32,357 
110,807 
472,314 
40,175 
49,139 
79,620 
30,779 
37,189 
43,518 
11,940 
30,881 

838.804 


13,194 
95,569 
55,765 
3,092 
1,922 
3,905 
20,986 
1,917 
3,117 
5,882 
1,582 
1,684 
2,524 
301 
2,623 

40,405 


15,728 
110,432 

61.216 
3,252 
1,992 
3,976 

23,455 
2,206 
3,000 
5,971 
1,875 
2,095 
2,244 
397 
2.627 

47.651 


17,024 
123,223 

56,655 
3,409 
2,412 
6,205 

27,926 
2,670 
3,211 
6,194 
2,024 
2,148 
2,665 
534 
2,903 

52.281 


18,225 
133,845 

43,123 
2,820 
2,566 
6,841 

33,746 
2,864 
3,360 
7,023 
1,969 
2,245 
2,953 
583 
2,617 

62,786 


18,114 
167,062 

30,633 
6,940 
2,314 
7,841 

40,491 
2,347 
3,297 
5.543 
1.645 
1,946 
3,125 
518 
2,740 

62.576 


20,901 
185,892 

10,681 

13,467 
2,632 
9,705 

44,763 
2,995 
3,977 
6,590 
2,301 
2,665 
3,586 
1,575 
2,923 

76,464 


25,208 

217,569 

3,276 

45,584 
2,799 

12,895 

50,506 
4,606 
5,556 
6,884 
3,370 
4,149 
5,716 
1,601 
2,779 

89,763 


31,324 

257,702 

3,803 

49,154 
4,399 

16,829 

61,992 
6,334 
6,465 
9,055 
4,199 
5,473 
5,460 
1,768 
3,440 

112,775 


36,571 

326,123 

3,688 

36,016 
5,607 

20,216 

76,692 
6,735 
7,908 

11,821 
5,371 
6,515 
6,692 
2,203 
3,794 

138,117 


























91,755 












14,657 




6,243 


NlcaraBua 


8,247 




8,333 




2,260 




4,235 




155.986 




132,391 
17,168 
96,556 
60,226 

162,285 
40,277 
98,980 

196,519 
34,402 

95,437 


6,098 
917 
6,001 
2,931 
6,076 
1,587 
3,118 
10,390 
1,287 

3,658 


6,647 
1,070 
7,546 
3,595 
6,125 
1,861 
3,350 
13.863 
1,374 

4,487 


7,756 
1,279 
5,465 
3,997 
8,510 
2,414 
3,648 
17,579 
1,631 

5,166 


9,492 
1,370 
6,565 
5,197 

11.494 
2,717 
4,279 

19,449 
2,223 

6.599 


13,724 
1,293 
7,995 
4,457 
9,279 
2,197 
4,523 

16,551 
2,557 

7,620 


15,946 
1,689 
8,455 
5,760 

13,826 
3,086 
8,514 

15,430 
3,756 

9,071 


11,610 

2,376 
10,575 

5,048 
20,801 

4,735 
11,795 
19,174 

3,649 

10,166 


14,768 

2,947 
10,606 

7,255 
29,994 

6,147 
14,918 
22,089 

4,051 

12,606 


21,673 

2,022 
14,097 

9,365 
29,076 

7,041 
20,272 
27,894 

6,677 

16,514 


24,473 




2,205 




17,251 




12,621 




25,104 




8,492 




24,563 




34,080 




7,197 


Atrica 


19.350 




7,469 
9,471 
2,509 
29,228 
26,256 
20,504 

261.375 


304 
227 
70 

1,040 
997 

1,020 

12.302 


248 

381 

59 

1,536 

1,141 

1,122 

14,964 


451 

476 

91 

1,839 

1,288 

1,021 

17.053 


573 

638 

146 

2,277 

1,729 

1,236 

20,071 


582 

845 

163 

2,664 

2,162 

1,404 

23.790 


653 

944 

241 

2,610 

2,476 

2,147 

26,473 


697 

980 

288 

3,126 

2,746 

2,329 

26,727 


911 
1,234 

408 
3,898 
3,370 
2,785 

32,958 


1,314 
1,640 
461 
5,001 
4,569 
3,529 

40,291 


1,736 




2,106 




582 




5,237 




5,778 




3,911 


Oceania 


44.746 




178,910 
58.187 
17,933 
6,345 

3,042 


8,935 

2,379 

700 

288 

1,415 


10,922 

3,073 

750 

219 

514 


12.547 

3,589 

654 

263 

178 


14,664 

4,406 

679 

320 

103 


16,888 

5,613 

875 

414 

71 


18,327 

6,192 

1,361 

593 

40 


19,366 

6,251 

2,470 

640 

81 


22,090 

7,036 

3,002 

830 

75 


26,125 
9,035 
3,819 
1,312 

237 






10,611 




3,623 




1,466 


Other countries 


328 























1/ Include 



eludes Arab Pale 



64 



BelgluB 

Czachoi lovakia 

Danmark 

Finland 

Creeca 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlanda 

Poland 

Portugal 

Ruaanla 

Turk«y (Europe and Aala) .... 

United KlngdoB 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Aala) .. 
YugoBlavla 

Aala 

China 1/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indoneala 

Iran 

larael 

Jordan 2/ 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Paklacan 

Phlllpplnea 

Ryukyu lalanda 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Viet Nan 

Other Aala 

North Aner lea 

Mexico 

DoBlnlcan Republic 

Haiti 

Other Weat Indiea 

SI Salvador 

Cuadeiiala 

Konduraa 

Panama 

Other Central Aaerlca 

Other North Aserlca 

South Aaerlca 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chi la 

Colonbla 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

A»8«l« 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic <Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Auatralla 

New Zealand 

Pacific lalanda (U.S. ada. ) . 
Other Oceania 

Other Councriea 

17 Includea Taiwan. 

2/ Includes Arab Paleatlne. 



2.026 

196 

2.305 



42.939 
15,482 
6.201 
2.664 



6,431 


22.615 


1.523 


9.068 


66 


3.557 


86 


1.380 



11.511 
3.543 
5.159 



6.692 


4.064 


1.589 


1.559 



5? 



65 



TmPORARY WORKERS ADMITTED UNDER SECTION 1011 .)( 15 )(H ) OF THE 
IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, BV COUNTRY: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30. 1965 AND 1966 



Country or r«g 
of U>t Periuix 
R<lld«nc< 



All 



trla 



Au»trl« 

B«lglu« 

CKchoi lovikl* 

Danaark 

FlnUnd 

rranca 

GanMny 

Hungary -• • 

Iraland 

Italy 

Natharlanda 

Poland 

Portugal 

Ruaanla 

Spain 

Svcdan 

SvltEOrland 

Turkay (Europa and Aala) 

Unitad KlngdoB 

U.S.S.R. (Europa and Alia) ... 

Tugoalavla 

Othar Europa 

Aala 

China 1/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonaata 

Iran 

laraal 

Jordan 2/ 

Koraa .' 

Labanon 

Paklatan 

Phlllpplnaa 

Ryukyu 1 a landa 

Syrian Arab RapubUc 

Vlat Naa 

Othar Aala 

North AMrlca 

Maxlco 

Cuba 

Doalnlcan Republic 

Haiti 

Jaaalca 

Othar Waat Indlaa 

Coata Rica 

EI Salvador 

Guateaala 

Nicaragua 

Panau 

Othar Central Aoarlca 

Othar North AMrlca 

South AMrlca 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Braail 

Chile 

Coloabia 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Veneaue la 

Othar South Aaerica 

Africa 

Algeria 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

(3ceenla 

Auetralla 

Naa Zbaland 

Pacific lalande (U.S. Ada.) . 
Other Oceania 

Other countriaa 

p Includea Taltian. 

2/ Includae Arab Paleatina. 



Workera of 

>litlngulahed 

Merit and 

Ability 

(H (D) 



«-2'3 



Tenporary 
Workera 
(H(il)) 



Indultrlal 
Tralneee 
(HdlD) 



Workera o 

Diatingulahed 

Merit and 

Ability 

(H (D) 



B.295 



Other 

Temporary 

Workera 

(H(li)) 



66 



i.. 
SS 3 



Ill 



3 &>c 



Is 



All countrUa 

""'Of 

AuICrU 

B«lglua 

Ctachotlovakla 

Daimark 

Finland 

Iraland 

I"l> 

Katharlanll 

Portugal 

Kuaanla 

Spain 

Salciarland 

Tiirkay (Europa and Aala) .... 

United KIngdoa 

U.S.S.K. CEurcpa and Aala) .. 

Yugoalavla 

Othar Europa 

Aala 

Clilna i/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonaala 

laraal 

Jordan g/ 

Labanon 

Paklatan 

FhlUpplnaa 

Ryukyu lalanda 

Syrian Arab Kapubllc 

Viae Naa 

Othar Aala 

Korth Aaarlca 

Canada 

Hailco 

Cuba 

Doalnlcan Xapublic 

Haiti 

Jaaalca 

Otbar Vaat India 

Coata Ulca 

El Salvador 

Guataaala 

Honduraa 

Nicaragua 

Panaaa 

Othar Cantral AMrIca 

Othar North Aaarlca 

South Aaarlca 

Bolivia 

Brail 1 

Chlla 

Coluabla 

Ecuador 

Vanaiuala 

Othar South Aaarlca 

Africa 

Algarla 

Morocco 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

Unltad Arab tapubllc (Egypt) 
Othar Africa 

Oceania 

Auatralla 

New Zealand 

Pacific lalanda 

Othar Oceania 



6?1 . <'?? 



7,312 
ll.OOl 

3.483 
11.439 

5,002 
78,692 
100,957 
13,66S 

3,427 
12.042 
45,631 
31,519 
13,847 

4,419 

8,426 
945 
16,975 
21,847 
24,097 

3,762 
222,443 

2,573 

3,823 

4,169 

146.900 



3,174 

354 

1,983 

467 

14,504 

18,244 

1,076 

91 

1,508 

8,765 

6.753 

1,804 



2,616 
5,634 
5.984 



4,938 
6.061 
2,057 
7.191 
3.360 
43,064 
67,883 
4,512 
2,873 
9,219 
28,300 
19.700 
5.488 
3,079 
2,869 
211 
8,903 
13,535 
15.131 



13,855 

5,377 
6,670 



5.071 
2.900 
5,125 

151 
4.248 

298 
2.657 



6,610 
7,122 
12.519 
1.171 
4.857 
977 
16.443 
56,857 
1,103 



1.191 
2,876 
3,797 



53,653 
7,487 

46,383 

133,803 

9,108 

10,942 

17,510 
6,201 
9,311 

10,924 

3,124 

233,081 

217-846 



32,164 
3,649 
27,283 
15,516 
31,146 
10,735 
31,736 



21.853 



47,065 
4,647 

21,915 

99,531 
7,349 
9,446 

15,296 
6,253 
7,522 
8,301 
2,343 
1,361 

168,796 



1,607 
1,368 
11,183 

7,738 



450 
1.157 
2,056 
6,419 
2,303 
9,468 

7''.539 



26,060 
2,103 
17,902 
11,975 
25,695 
8,465 
27,119 
43,551 
5,908 



1.549 
4,891 
1.390 



16,939 
5,590 
3,672 



25,617 
9,676 
3,560 

1,776 



11,610 

4,434 
1,175 
1,583 



a exclude borde 
nlng reBldente, 



itudente end other! entering without doc 



Port 


Nunbar 
admitted 


Tanporary 
vliltor. for 


Tanporary 
vlaltora for 


Ochar 
nonlnalgranta 


All port 


2.3M.923 


201.358 


1.472.830 


W^i}> 




l.SSA.Jlt 


140.009 


771.977 


452.230 




1,996 
30,600 
35,898 
1,22'> 
1,603 
11,162 
260. 416 

853, 5U 
5,096 
17,851 
106,131 
U,898 
14,369 
4,966 

66.798 


189 

4,589 

3,271 

8 

55 

100 

8,012 

138 

116,523 

680 

55 

4,087 

1,696 

190 

414 

2.430 


1,165 

14,529 

22,842 

772 

1,062 

5,104 

196,900 

949 

440,293 

2,471 

8,197 

66,594 

6,057 

2,116 

2,926 

30.269 


642 




1 1 , 482 


Cherlotte Analle, V.I 

Chrlitlanited, V.I 

CruE Bey, V,I 

Frederlketed, V.I 


9,783 
444 
488 

5,958 
55,304 


Newark, N.J 

New York, N.V 


3,403 

296,696 

1,943 




9,399 


Sen Juan, F.R 

Waahlngton, D.C. , 


35,430 
7,145 
12,063 




1,626 


Gulf of Mexico 


14.079 




12,745 
25,500 
26,310 
1,063 
1,180 

261.177 


594 
1,056 
746 
29 
25 

33.949 


9,818 

17,299 

21,273 

854 

1,025 

128.358 


2,333 




7,145 




4,291 




180 




130 




98.870 




11,035 
108,891 
97,422 
3,107 
15,759 
24,570 
393 

6.195 


385 
19.111 
4,948 
97 
3,275 
6,114 
19 

1.002 


4,117 
31,521 
34,725 
2,412 
7,119 
8,213 
251 

1.696 


6,533 




38,259 




37,749 








5,365 


Seattle, Vaah 


10,243 


Other f aclf Ic 


123 

3.497 




5,978 
217 

299.852 


998 

4 

15.299 


1,499 
197 

222.384 


3,481 




16 




61.969 




19,189 

37,305 
2,589 

31,765 

47,967 
1,731 
1,606 

41,756 
1,016 
4,755 
8,129 
3,789 
9,383 
4,513 
2,335 

26,103 
1,699 
2,456 
2,159 
1,363 
7,987 
5,968 
2,956 
1,739 
2,431 
1,989 
1,840 
3,905 
1,393 

16,034 

343.423 


297 

498 
50 

414 
9,307 

478 

27 

2,149 

24 

2 

112 
28 

131 
11 
27 

186 
30 
89 
30 
59 

149 

149 
60 

27 
3 
50 
61 
23 
826 

8.623 


17,113 

32,920 

1,331 

29,101 

22,462 

1,046 

1,269 

31,941 

588 

92 

7,053 

474 

8.788 

574 

2,123 

25,264 

1,213 

1,427 

1,828 

641 

6,435 

4,858 

2,336 

1,819 
1,820 
822 
3,036 
1,256 
10.752 

297.742 


1,779 


Buffalo. N.Y 


3,887 
1,008 


ChAmpUln, N.Y 


2,250 
16,198 




207 




310 




7,666 




404 




4,661 




962 




3,287 


LewUton, N.Y 


464 
3,928 


Haaeana, N.Y .'7 

Niagara Falla, N.Y 


165 
653 
456 




942 


Ogdenaburg, N.Y 

Peablna, N.D 


301 
663 

1,403 


Rouaei Point, N.Y 


961 
560 




1,739 




585 




164 




968 


Thouaand laland Bridge, N.Y 

Trout River, N.Y 


808 
114 

4,436 


Mexican Border 


37.038 




28,085 
46,719 
4,339 
1,296 
10,889 
42,375 
15,374 
91,965 
20,757 
4,090 
1,888 
69,094 
2,343 
4,211 

260 


705 

193 

334 

22 

74 

2,524 

1,789 

1,269 

623 

349 

27 

368 

13 

133 

24 


18,974 
27,548 
3,617 
1,241 
10,504 
36,778 
13,290 
88,601 
19,174 
3,688 
1,820 
66,695 
1,860 
3,952 

204 


8,406 




18,978 




388 




33 




311 




3,073 




293 




2,095 






Rosa, Tex 


53 




41 























fiS 



Belgium 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Greece 

"""gary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlanda 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) .. 

Yugoalavla 

Other Europe 

Aela 

China 1/ 

Ho"B "^""g 

India 

Indoneala 

Iran 

Jordan 2/ 

Korea 

Pakistan 

Ryukyu Islands 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Other Asia 

Canada 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Other Weat indies 

Coata Rica 

El Salvador 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Other Central America 

Other North America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Algeria 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

New Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U.S. adm.) . 
Other Oceania 

T/ Includea Taiwan. 

2/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



1.311 
9,779 



1.573 
3.230 
2,072 



69 



TABLE 17C. TEMPORARY VISITORS ADMITTED AT SEAPORTS. Br COUNTRY 
OF LAST PERMANENT RESIDENCE: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1966 



ed under Sec, 101 (a)(15)(B) of the In. 



1^ 



3iS 



All 



Austria 

Belgium 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Rumania 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) .... 

United Kingdom 

U,S,S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China U 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

larael 

Jordan 2/ 

Lebanon 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Ryukyu I a lands 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Viet Nam 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Other West Indies 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Honduras 

Panama 

Other Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Go lombla 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Algeria 

Morocco 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

New Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U,S, adm, ) . 
Other Oceania 



3,311 
8,387 
1,013 



Elude 



2/ Includes Arab Pale 



70 



All countries 

Europe , 

Austria 

Belgium 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Cennany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway , 

Poland 

Portugal 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey {Europe and Asia) .... 

United Kingdom , 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) ., 

Yugoslavia , 

Other Europe 

China 1/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Israel 

Jordan 2/ 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Viet Nam 

Other Asia 

North America 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Other West Indie 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Other Central Asierica 

Other North America 

South America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia ....••••.•.. 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Algeria 

Morocco 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

New Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U.S. ada.) 
Other Oceania 



1,026 

77 
29,620 



1/ Includes Taiwan. 

1/ Includea Arab Palestln 



71 



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-^cl|<^^ 



72 



try of the ■*ro« pa 



ed aaparfltcly_t^/ 



All porta U 

CANADIAN BORDER 

Alaaka 

Anchorags' 

i«si« 

Fairbanks 

Halnaa 

Hyder 

Junaau 

Ketchikan 

Skagway 

Tok 

Wrang.U 

Idaho 

Eaacport 

Porthlll 

tlllnola 

Chicago 

Malna 

Bangor 

Brldgevatar 

Calais 

Ferry Point 

Hllltown Bridge 

Coburn Core 

Easton 

Eastport 

Estcourt 

Foreat City 

Fort Fairfield 

Fort Kent 

Hamlin 

HouUon 

Jackman 

Limestone 

Madawaska 2/ 

Hare HI 1 1-Knolcford Line 

Montlcello 

Orient 

St. Auralle 

St. Juste 

St. Pamphlle 

Van Buren 

Venceboro 

Michigan 

Algonac 

Alpena 

Amherstburg 

Cheboygan J/ 

Detour 4/ 

Detroit 

Ambassador Bridge .... 

Detroit and Canada 
Tunnel 

Detroit City Airport . 

Detroit Metropolitan 
Airport 

Detroit River and 
River Rouge Temlnal 

Keen's Detroit Yacht 
Harbor 

Michigan Central Depot 

Ecorso 

Crosse He 

Houghton 

Isle Royala 

Jefferson Beach Marina . 

Mackinac Island j/ 

Marine City 

Marquette 

Harysvllle 

Port Huron 2/ 

Black River 



139.435 



120.626 



9M 
1.223 
3,710 
23,694 
6,607 
4.352 
13,641 
17,634 
67 , 007 
423 



61,211 

163,054 

2.668.374 



2,260,395 

407,979 

112,152 

27,137 

30,387 

15,331 

14,827 

18,150 

530,722 

962,266 

309,475 

465,093 

309,041 

187,478 

339,139 

2,821.403 

5,893 

6,718 

35,362 

15,541 

28,764 

21,137 

1,010,005 

428,588 

15.628.912 



476 
n.072.579 



5.979 

7,476 

35,646 

2,824 

2,835 

271 

199 

2,530 

464 

100,377 

278 

2,313 

2.943.566 



28,490 

104,146 

1.631.172 



1,367,074 
264,098 
84,994 
24,947 
19,392 
9,788 
12,983 
11,797 
337,716 
598,576 
241,236 
294,330 
181,291 
103,441 
201.563 
1,819,961 
3,850 
4,688 
23,172 
15,428 
26,337 
20,095 
617,901 
285,992 



299 
1,201 
3,169 
19,356 
1,408 
3,778 
11,524 
14,877 
64.780 
2 34 



32,721 

58,908 

1-037 .202 



893,321 

143,881 

27,158 

2,190 

10,995 

5,543 

1,844 

6,353 

193,006 

363,690 

68,239 

170,763 

127,750 

84,037 

137,576 

1,001,442 

2,043 

2,030 

12,190 

113 

2,427 

1,042 

39 2,104 

142,596 



3,335,952 

2,474 



2,681 
5,325 



16,263 
2,291 
2,574 



2,269 

446 

39,617 

218 

1,710 

1.461.264 



4,988 



Michigan (Cont'd) 
Port Huron (Cont'd) 
Blue Water Bridge . . . 
Canadian National 
Railway Station ... 

Roberts Landing 

Rogers City 4/ 

St. Clair County Airpot 
Sault Ste. Marie 

Minneaota 

Baudette 

Crane Lake 

Duluth 

Ely 

Grand Portage 

Indus 

International Falls 2/ 

Lancaater 

Noyea 

Oak Uland 6/ 

Pine Creek T 

Ranler 

Roseau 

St. Paul 

Warroad 

Montana 

Chief Mountain 5/ 

Cut Bank (Airport) .... 

Del Bonita 

Great Falls (Airport) . 

Havre 

Morgan 

Ophelm 

Plegan 

Raymond 

RooaviUe 

Scobey 

Sweetgrass 

Turner 

Whitetail 

Whltlash 

Wild Horse 

Willow Creek 

New Hampshire 

Pittsburg 

New York 

Alenandria Bay 6/ 

Black Rock 

Buffalo 

Buffalo Seaport 

Greater Buffalo Inter 

Peace Bridge 

Cannons Corners 

Cape Vincent 

Champlain 

Chateaguay 

Churubusco 

Clayton 

Fort Covington 

Heart Island 7/ 

Hogansburg 

Jamison's Line 

Lewlston 2/ 

Massena 

Mooera 

Morrlstown 

Niagara Falls 

Municipal Airport ... 

Rainbow Bridge V ... 

Whirlpool Rapids 

Bridge 2/ 

Ogdensburg 

Oswego 4/ 

Rochester 

Municipal Airport ... 

Port Authority 

Rouaes Point 



1,828 
1,255,974 



141,890 

8,308 

4,460 

22,105 

279,826 

102 

800,471 

43,270 

263,572 

1,911 

49,603 

7,226 

25,825 

3,205 

89,271 

767.603 



44,494 
61,888 



749.393 



95,269 

2,004 

1,713 

1,963 

92,947 

69 

256,955 

25,409 

148,581 



89,329 

723 

15,369 

23,480 

353 

11,729 

14,747 

158,183 

70,696 

67,115 

22,583 

244,148 

19,113 

14,161 

2,632 

6,796 

6,446 

24.098 



8,591 
8,436 
81,915 
46,716 
32,176 
16,413 
145,182 
12,184 
11,404 
1,356 
3,701 
4,661 

13.188 



16,086 

64,906 

■515.712 



461 

7,919 

,507,332 

39,220 

30,498 

:, 205,9 19 

98,49 2 

37,068 

96,521 

267,278 

■:66,812 

308,679 

10,930 

,387,618 

822,321 

231,623 

623 

.439.165 



9,832 

41,389 

3.525.785 



1,205 
,252,907 



51 

2,273 

3,523,461 

26,473 

11,773 

1,573,100 

65,602 

18,043 

27,548 

138,525 

33,157 

177,575 

7,322 

824,276 

531,610 

108,471 

37 2 

3.218.532 



73 



TABLE 19. ENTRIES OF ALIEN AND CITIZEN BORDER CROSSERS OVER INTERNATIONAL LAND BOUNDARIES 
BY STATE AND PORT: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1966 



ry of the saDe person 



nted eeperately^/ 



State and port 



Rev York (Cont'd) 

Syracuaa 

Thouaand Island Bridge 

Trout River 

Uatartown (Airport) 

Young* town j/ 

North Daliot* 

Aabroae 

Antler 

Carbury 

Dunialth 

Fortune 

Grand Forks (Hunlc. Airport). 

Hannah 

Hanaboro 

Halda 

Mlnot (Airport) 

Neche 

Noonan 

Northgate 

Fenblna 

Portal 2/ 

St. John 

Series 

Sherwood 

Walhslla 

Westhope 

WlUlston, Sloulln Fisid 

Ohio 

Cleveland 

Sandusky 

Toledo 

Vamont 

Alburg 

Alburg Spring* 

Beebe Plain 

Beecher Falls 

Burlington Airport 

Derby Line 

East Rlchford 

Hlghgate Springs 

Morses Line 

Newport 

North Troy 

Norton 

Rlchford 

St. Albans 

West Berkshire 

Washington 

Anacortes 

Belli ngham 

Blaine 

Pacific Highway 

Peace Arch 

Boundary 6/ 

Danville 7 

Ferry 

Frontier 

Laurler 

Lynden 2/ 

Metallne Falla 

Neah Bay 

Nlghthauk 

Orovllle 

Point Robert* 

Port Angeles 

Port Townsend 

Seattle 

Spokane (Felts Field) 

Sumas 

Tacoma 

Wisconsin 

Milwaukee 



3,290 

1,232,539 

497,141 

2,010 

11,797 

1.167.039 



13.697 
17,096 
14,267 

173,683 
32,278 
2,135 
12,048 
24,031 
31,206 
2,514 

114,714 
58,198 
45,004 

241,617 

207,9 27 
46,142 
18,362 
28,405 
49,736 
33,256 
723 



25,293 

16,446 

7 28 



1,453 
532,171 
363,7 30 



593.296 



6,224 

10,062 

11,421 

50,436 

18,604 

568 

8,160 

11,798 

17,139 

632 

69,369 

31,505 

23,295 

126,821 

110,569 

25,092 

5,431 

17,335 

26,938 

19,743 

154 



82,077 

62,857 

166,153 

156,757 

2,064 

58,893 
888,112 

66,222 
463,728 

18,964 
9,399 
216,134 
418,794 
29 3 , 699 

34,546 
145,470 



11,425 

980 

2.057.103 



150,669 

1,906,434 

5,708 

15,195 

9,996 

116,535 

22,658 

145,790 

28,103 

56 

4,461 

196,679 

701,995 



19,036 
1,833 

418,511 



1,637 

700,368 

133,411 

1,361 

5,653 

573.743 



5,473 
7,034 
2,846 
123,247 
13,674 
1,567 



1,882 
45,345 
26,693 
21,709 
114,796 
97,358 
21,050 
12,931 
11,070 
22,798 
13,513 



569 



13,473 
15,279 



36,677 
10,494 
80,9 24 
63,248 
3,711 
30,739 
490,601 
29,294 
289,094 
13,520 
1,070 
119,327 
147,89 3 
154,344 
27,693 
100,768 



3,123 



57,127 

965,37 2 

1,427 

29,622 

7,545 

43,996 

26,320 

129,228 

29,364 

118 

4,926 

207,757 

77,339 

1,204 

496 

38,236 

2,807 

266,471 

105 



elude 



si* by prlv 



Figure* Ini 
Partially estimated. 

July-September 1965 and AprlUune 1966. 
July-J>ecember 1965 and April-June 1966, 
July-September 1965 and May_Iune 1966. 
July-November 1965 and May-June 1966. 
July-September 1965 and June 1966. 
January-June 1966. 



at border ports 



Canada 

Montreal, (Quebec 

Prince Rupert, B.C. . . 
Toronto, Ontario 

(Malton Airport) ... 

Vancouver, B.C 

Victoria, B.C 

Winnipeg, Manitoba ... 

MEXICAN BORDER 

Arizona 

Douglas 2/ 

Lochlel T 

UkeviUe 

Naco 

Nogales 

Grand Avenue 

Morley Avenue 

Nogales Internatloni 
Airport 

Truck Gate 

San Luis 

Sasabe 

Tucson International 

California 

Andrade 

Calesico 

Loa Angeles (Airport) 

San Diego 

San Ysidro 2/ 

Tecata 

New Mexico 

Antelope Wells 

Columbus _2/ 

Brownsville 

Corpus Chrlstl 

Dsllaa Airport 

Del Rio 

Eagle Pass -. 

El Paso 2/ 

Ave. of Americas 
(Cordova) 2/ 

Santa Fe Bridge 2/ . 

Ysleta Bridge 2/ . . . 

Fabans 

Falcon Heights 2/ 

Fort Hancock 

Hidalgo 2/ 

Houston Airport 

Laredo 

Municipal Airport .. 

Railroad Bridge . . . . 

Lo* Ebanos 

Marathon 

Presidio 

Progreso 

Rio Grande City 2/ . . . 

Rona 2/ 

San Antonio Airport .. 
San Ygnaclo 



496,647 
116,628 
249,034 
34,165 



2,321 

377,664 
65,241 
47,565 
17,066 



18.524.071 



3.880,964 

11,219 

300,065 

1,075,924 

8.691.438 



112,292 

578,666 

5.7A1.469 



6,115 
113,390 
,241,976 
111,599 

10,666 



4,081,091 
1,619,539 

1,911 

38,9 28 

3,400,319 

7 3,366 

973 

21.324.582 



487,565 

12.373,400 

98,855 

9,118 

22,160,649 

593,144 



313,212 

9,374,668 

15,325 

1,890 

11,264,235 

355.252 



4,476 
110,722 



68.091 .827 



2,159,570 
4,426,746 
31.869.509 



970,624 
2,959,255 
16.841.219 



10,475,940 

19,381,391 

2,032,178 

496,548 

370,362 

34,570 

5,634,527 

13,020 

10.9 30.687 



4,190,377 

11,837,976 

812,866 

324,456 

135,923 

24,916 

3,942,483 

617 

7.308.745 



10,913,086 

4,616 

12,963 

78,893 

3,432 

526,510 

637,840 

36,578 

2,331,801 

66,430 

410 



7,301,211 

2,147 

5,367 

47,197 

49 2 

345,971 

501,737 

26,968 

1,405,442 

3,021 

291 



41 

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1 



SPECIAL INQUIRY OFFICER HEARINGS COMPLETED, BY REGIONS AND DISTRICTS: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1962 - 1966 



Region 
and 


Exclus 


ion heartn 


gs 




Depo 


rtatlon 


learlngs 




district 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


1966 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


1966 


United States total 


1.010 


979 


951 


841 


876 


10.431 


12.805 


15.677 


18.961 


16.767 


Northeast Region 


221 


269 


156 


150 


136 


3.621 


4.981 


5.720 


7.809 


6.396 




38 
81 


33 
94 


30 
38 


33 
36 


25 
38 


151 
324 


199 

329 


319 
298 


319 
283 


382 


Buffalo, N.Y 


252 


Hartford, Conn 


2 


7 


4 


4 


2 


95 


104 


121 


129 


152 


Newark, N.J 


15 


22 


18 


6 


2 


417 


345 


345 


441 


427 


New York, N.Y 


73 


90 


49 


58 


64 


2,595 


3,980 


4,604 


6,605 


5,158 


Portland, Me 


12 


18 

5 


16 

1 


9 

4 


5 


25 
14 


19 

5 


22 
11 


14 
18 


18 


St. Albans, Vt 


7 


Southeast Region 


273 


237 


220 


121 


167 


894 


911 


1.031 


1.079 


1.790 


Atlanta, Ga 


4 


4 
1 


2 


3 


1 
4 


31 
55 


54 
31 


56 
64 


54 
67 


88 


Baltimore, Md 


114 


Cleveland, Ohio 


8 


3 


6 


4 


4 


105 


113 


140 


143 


124 


Miami, Fla 


226 
6 


187 
9 


195 
3 


61 

2 


53 

4 


229 
84 


231 
68 


267 
58 


298 
48 


558 


New Orleans, La 


75 


Philadelphia, Pa 


5 


4 


- 


11 


5 


179 


178 


171 


158 


169 


San Juan, P.R 


23 


22 


13 


37 


91 


99 


114 


119 


183 


467 


Washington, D.C 


1 


7 


1 


3 


5 


112 


122 


156 


128 


195 


Northwest Region 


85 


85 


78 


82 


72 


1.124 


1.276 


1.657 


1.775 


2.222 


Anchorage , Alaska 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 


1 


_ 


1 


10 


Chicago, 111 


12 


13 


15 


19 


11 


505 


545 


835 


856 


1,293 


Detroit, Mich 


40 


41 


48 


31 


28 


211 


261 


299 


326 


334 




2 

4 


1 

4 


1 
1 


6 
2 


2 


30 

43 


18 
52 


28 
62 


46 
72 


21 
70 


Kansas City, Mo 




2 


1 

1 


- 


3 

1 


2 


32 

44 


61 
51 


50 

54 


42 
49 


56 

73 


Portland, Oreg 


St. Paul, Minn 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2 


71 


79 


109 


113 


95 


Seattle, Wash 


25 


24 


13 


20 


26 


187 


208 


220 


270 


270 


Southwest Region 


431 


388 


497 


488 


501 


4.792 


5,637 


7.269 


8.298 


6.359 




2 
199 


1 
160 

5 


4 

207 

3 


3 
219 

4 


3 

198 

3 


44 

1,282 

11 


83 

1,898 

23 


102 
2,000 

45 


47 

2,221 

40 


47 

1,268 

34 


El Paso, Tex 


Honolulu, Hawaii 


Los Angeles, Calif. ... 


87 


55 


85 


66 


129 


1,533 


1,578 


2,165 


2,137 


2,036 


Phoenix, Ariz 


8 


10 


9 


12 


9 


113 


102 


106 


97 


88 


Port Isabel, Tex 


45 


54 


35 


50 


23 


627 


981 


1,345 


2,272 


1,292 


Sa'i Antonio, Tex 


76 


89 


140 


117 


131 


596 


352 


454 


440 


689 


San Francisco, Calif. . 


14 


14 


14 


17 


5 


586 


620 


1,052 


1,044 


905 



76 



TABLE 21. ALIENS EXCLUDED FROM THE UNITED STATES, BY CAUSE: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1892 - 1966 

/In 19A1-1953 figures represent all exclusions at seaports and exclusions 
of aliens seeking entry for 30 days or longer at land port8_^/ 



j< u g 



82 



$% 

3 -- 



620.009 



1.292 



12.424 



8.182 



82,524 



219.350 



161.261 



41.941 



13.679 



43.213 



22.515 
108,211 
178,109 
189,307 

68,217 

30.263 



2,929 
1,833 
1,495 
1,642 
2,341 

2,942 
4,771 
4,905 
3,834 
3,571 

20.585 



65 
1,681 
4,353 
2,082 
1,261 

1.134 



89 

1,277 

4,824 

1,281 

253 

80 



1,309 
24,425 
42,129 
11,044 

1,530 

1.021 



15,070 
63,311 
90,045 
37,175 
12,519 

1.072 



1,904 
8,447 
2,126 

3.182 



94,084 
47,858 



22.441 



5,792 
12,991 

15.417 
6,274 
1,235 

219 



5,083 

8,202 

258 



1 
25 
31 

1.098 



92 
70 
68 
63 
87 

87 
139 
142 
187 
199 

1.735 



13 
10 
6 
8 
4 

3 

3 

5 

12 

16 

361 



73 
51 
63 
92 
111 

65 
124 
205 
112 
125 

956 



328 
161 

96 
107 

56 

33 
70 
67 
99 
55 

149 



227 
252 
77 
155 
161 

361 
902 
709 
216 
122 

376 



2,076 
1,207 
1,106 
1,109 
1,805 

2,294 
3,316 
3,690 
2,970 
2,868 

14.657 



3,784 
2,944 
3,637 
3,313 
2,667 

1,709 
907 
733 
480 
411 

743 
388 
309 
421 
429 



29 

9 

48 

111 

89 

117 
302 
255 
102 
36 

21 
13 
11 
16 
12 



337 
285 
266 
296 
206 

169 
91 
51 
19 
15 

21 
24 
17 
13 
18 



15 
10 

27 

65 

124 

64 
30 

18 
7 
1 

3 

2 
2 

4 
4 



337 
67 
130 
127 
113 

87 
40 

21 
18 
16 

7 
23 
22 
18 
19 



121 

74 

47 

2 

15 

10 

14 
35 
34 
24 

29 
17 
19 
10 
17 



2,783 
2,378 
2,937 
2,432 
1,832 

1,079 
348 
299 
276 
293 

634 
280 
216 
343 
333 

415 



190 

4,516 

14,327 

20,709 

1,172 

946 



72 
47 
44 
59 
76 

80 
187 

73 
178 
130 

1.214 



80 
102 
164 
261 
275 

164 
70 
51 
23 
24 

27 
26 
18 
17 
24 



ALIENS EXCLUDED, BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH AND CAUSE; 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1966 



Country or region 
of birth 



C U-l 

z: XI 



All countries 

Europe 

Germany 

Greece 

Italy 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

United Kingdom 

Yugos lavla 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 1/ 

India 

Iran 

Israel 

Japan 

Philippines ...1 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic ... 
Trinidad and Tobago . . 
Other West Indies .... 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

British Honduras 

Other Central America 

South America 

Argentina 

Columbia 

Peru 

Other South America .. 

Africa 

Ethiopia 

Oceania 

Tonga 

1./ Includes Taiwan 



2 
2 
2 
2 
8 
5 
3 

435 



26 

284 

34 

73 

3 

5 

2 

2 

4 

2 

18 



19 



78 



TABLF 23. ALIPNS APFRFHFNOED, ALIFNS DPrOPTFO, AND ALIFNS RFQUIPFD TO i)FPAPT: 
YFARS EN:3ED JUNF 30. 1892 - 1966 



F eriod 



Al iens 
apprphendpd _l/ 



Total 



Aljpns FxpellPd 



Aliens 
deported 



Aliens required 
to depart 2/ 



1892 - 1966 



1892 - 1900 

1901 - 1910 

1911 - 1920 

1921 - 1930 

1931 - 1940 

1931 

1932 .... 

1933 

1934 

1935 .... 

1936 

1937 

1938 

1939 

1940 



1941 - 1950 

1941 

1942 .... 

1943 

1944 .... 

1945 

1946 

1947 

1948 

1949 

1950 



1951 - 1960 
1951 .... 

1952 

1953 

1954 

1955 

1956 .... 

1957 .... 

1958 

1959 

1960 



1961 
1962 
1963 
1964 
1965 
1966 



5,843,161 



128,484 



147,457 



22,276 
22,735 
20,949 
10,319 
11,016 
11,728 
13,054 
12,851 
12,037 
10,492 

1.377.210 



11,294 

11,784 

11,175 

31,174 

69,164 

99,591 

193,657 

192,779 

288,253 

468,339 

3.584.229 



509,040 

528,815 

885,587 

1,089,583 

254,096 

87,696 

59,918 

53,474 

45,336 

70,684 

88,823 
92,758 
88,712 
86,597 
110,371 
138,520 



6,531,237 



543,162 



11 
27 

164 

210 



29 
30 
30 
16 
16 
17 
17 
18 
17 
15 

1.581 



10 

10 

16 

39 

80 

116 

214 

217 

296 

579 

4.013 



686 

723 

905 

1,101 

247 

88 

68 

67 

64 

59 

59 
61 
76 
81 
105 
132 



127 
558 
912 
390 

416 



11 
27 
92 

117 



861 
201 
212 
889 
297 
446 
617 
553 
792 
548 

774 



110 



938 
613 
154 
449 
760 
320 
543 
555 
337 
105 

547 



4 

3 

4 

7 

11 

14 

18 

20 

20 

6 

129 



713 
959 
236 
228 
797 
188 
461 
742 
598 
625 

821 
801 
846 
788 
406 
851 



127 
558 
912 
157 

086 



142 
426 
865 
879 
319 
195 
829 
275 
202 
954 

849 



407 
709 
207 
179 
270 
375 
663 
371 
040 
628 

887 



544 
181 
845 
951 
028 
297 
082 
142 
988 
829 

438 

637 
454 
746 
143 
168 



5,988,075 



72,233 
93.330 



11,719 
10,775 
10,347 
8,010 
7,978 
8,251 
8,788 
9,278 
9,590 
8,594 

1.470,925 



6,531 

6,904 

11,947 

32,270 

69,490 

101,945 

195,880 

197,184 

276,297 

572,477 

3.883.660 



673,169 

703,778 

885,391 

1,074,277 

232,769 

80,891 

63,379 

60,600 

56,610 

52,796 

52,383 
54,164 
69,392 
73,042 
95,263 
123,683 



y Aliens apprehended first recorded in 1925. 
including nonwilful crewman violators. 



From 1960, deportable aliens located 
including nonwilful crewman violators. 
2/ Aliens required to depart first recorded in 1927, 



ALIENS DEPORTED, BY COUNTRY TO WHICH DEPORTED AND CAUSE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1966 



Country to which 
deported 


Total 


1 1 


1 

a 


1 


1 s 


c ^ 


•s 

■a 

^2 

3 

a. 

> T3 


S a 

T^ U 

a o 
•a 

■J v 

2 S. 

u a 


° " 

111 

-< "a c 

~- a 


1 

» 

« 

c 


C 

C U 


r 


All countriea 


9.168 
1.450 


I 
1 


323 
38 


30 


130 

4 


13 

4 


336 
21 


16 


3.568 
1.289 


3. 


615 


68 




74 






24 
17 

103 

706 
13 

163 
17 
62 
37 

117 
20 
15 

107 
U 
35 

660 


1 


1 
1 
10 
2 
2 
3 
1 
2 
1 

1 
11 

3 
10 


1 
1 

1 


1 
- 

3 
5 


1 
1 

- 
1 

1 

2 


1 

9 

4 
2 

1 

4 
6 


1 
3 

3 

1 

1 

3 

1 
3 

11 


21 
13 
83 

659 
8 

139 
12 
59 
29 

115 
19 
13 
82 
11 
26 

551 


2 
1 
6 

32 
3 

14 
1 

5 
2 

2 
3 

1 
2 

75 






_ 








_ 




_ 


Italy 


_ 












_ 


Spain 


_ 






Turkey (Europe and Aala) 


- 








_ 


Aala 






270 
34 
27 
47 
13 
12 
20 
11 
69 

123 
34 

6.705 


_ 


1 
1 
1 

1 

4 

1 
1 

264 


27 


1 

2 

2 

113 


1 
1 

4 


2 

1 

3 
286 


3 

1 
2 

4 

1 

944 


204 
32 
26 
40 
7 
12 
17 
11 
56 

115 
31 

1,565 


3 


61 

435 




India 












Jordan 
















Philippines 




Taiwan 




Other Asia 




North America 


67 


Canada 


964 
4,770 
58 
28 
74 
158 
207 
37 
56 
36 
48 
92 
13 
43 
46 
40 
22 
13 

287 


- 


162 

83 

3 

1 
2 

1 
1 
3 

3 

- 

2 
1 
2 

10 


13 
8 

4 

1 
1 


12 
89 

1 
4 
3 

2 

1 

1 

7 


1 

2 

1 
3 


147 
118 
1 
2 
1 
2 

1 
3 
2 
6 

1 

2 

23 


88 
824 

1 
7 

1 

10 

1 
2 
4 
3 
2 

12 


473 
339 
52 
23 
70 
133 
200 
35 
51 
28 
35 
40 
11 
15 
19 
20 
13 
B 

202 


3 


67 
243 

33 

25 
23 
11 

29 


1 


Mexico 


66 






























Trinidad and Tobago 


- 










El Salvador 




















South America 


1 




13 
21 
30 
116 
23 
40 
21 
23 

20 


- 


1 

2 
6 

1 

1 


- 


1 
2 

3 

1 


1 
1 
1 


2 
20 

1 


1 

1 
1 
4 

1 

4 


11 
18 
16 
70 
16 
34 
19 
18 

19 


1 
8 
13 
6 

1 




Brazil 




Chile 




























Oceania 


12 








1 






1 


8 


2 




Other Countries 


34 
















34 































80 



TABLE 24a. ALIENS REQUIRED TO DEPART, BY NATIONALITY AND CAUSE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1956 



^Aliens required to depar 
13,274 required departur 
required departures unde 



Dtaled 123.683 (see table 23). This 
of crewmen who were technical vlolat 
afeguarda - chiefly Menlcana who ent 



able does not Include 

B and 70,699 direct 

ed without Inspectlonj^/ 



2^ 8 



All countries .. 

Europe 

Austria 

Denmark 

France 

Germany ,\ 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlande 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey 

United Klngdon 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Alia 

China 1/ 

India T 

I ran 

Iraq 

Israel 

Japan 

Jordan 2/ 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Malaysia 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North AoMrlca 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Donlnlcan Republic . 

Haiti 

Jonalca 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guateaala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

South America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Bratil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Paraguay 

Pern 

Uruguay 

Venei 

Africa 

United Arab Republii 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

New Zealand 

Other Oceania 

Other countries 

U 



138 

1,980 

120 



2,334 
16,649 



322 
1,763 



SI 



ALIENS DEPORTED, BY NATIONALITY AND CAUSE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1966 



Nationality 


Total 


1^ 


s 

a 


1 


"S 1 


■] u 


1 
1 \ 


a 

1 
? . 

T3 C 




• 0. « 


• 
z: 




9.168 


1 


3?3 


10 


no 


11 


116 


984 


3.668 


3.615 


68 




1.987 


1 


56 


4 


8 




15 


ia 


1.710 


130 






12 
IB 
17 

108 

773 
12 
9 

178 
22 
73 
11 
49 

138 
17 
4 
20 

488 
21 
17 

679 


1 


2 
1 
1 
10 

2 
2 
2 
3 
2 
2 

2 

1 

24 
2 
10 


1 

1 

1 

1 


1 

7 
1 


1 

1 

2 
1 

? 


1 
9 

4 
2 

1 

1 
17 
6 


1 

3 
2 

4 
1 

1 
2 

1 

1 

18 
2 
2 

12 


9 

16 

15 

85 

721 

3 

6 

155 

15 

68 

9 

38 

134 

16 

3 

18 

372 

15 

12 

570 


1 

9 

37 
4 
1 

12 
2 
2 
1 
6 
2 

2 
47 
3 
1 

76 












Garaany 




Graaca 




Hungary 


- 


Italy 


- 


Norway 


- 


















Turkey • 


- 


Yugoalavla 




Othar Europa 

Ada 


- 


China y 


441 
28 
28 
7 
9 
15 
15 
17 
11 
13 
13 
71 
11 

6.222 


- 


1 
1 
I 

1 
1 

1 

4 
745 


76 


1 

2 
111 


I 


5 

1 

771 


5 

2 

1 

4 
922 


362 
26 
27 
7 
8 
U 
9 
16 
10 
12 
13 
58 
11 

1.203 


68 

1 
1 
2 

1 
3 

3.374 


- 


Iran 








laraal 




Japan 




Jordan gl 


- 






Halayala 
















North AMrlca 


67 




859 

4,749 

62 

161 

4 

199 

29 

13 

43 

46 

40 

8 

9 

242 


- 


156 
82 

1 
2 

2 
I 
1 

10 


13 
8 

4 

1 


12 
90 

4 

3 

1 
1 
7 


2 

1 


145 
119 

2 

2 

1 
2 

?1 


80 
819 

4 

7 

1 
1 
3 
4 
2 

1 

11 


403 

332 

38 

137 

4 

193 

23 

11 

14 

17 

21 

5 

5 

157 


49 

3,231 

19 

5 

3 
3 

1 
25 
25 
U 

1 
1 

30 




Haxlco 




Cuba 








Haiti 
















El Salvador 




















South AMrlca 


1 




15 
7 
9 

32 
115 

22 

34 
4 
4 

14 


- 


1 

2 
6 
1 


- 


1 

1 
2 

3 


1 
1 


2 
20 

1 


2 

1 

7 

1 


12 
6 
6 
18 
67 
16 
27 
4 
1 

14 


12 
2 












Chi la 




Colonbla 
















Vanaruala 








Unltad Arab Repullc 


4 
10 

14 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


I 


4 
10 

9 


3 












Auitralla 


7 
4 
3 

10 


- 


2 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


5 
2 
2 

5 


1 
1 
I 

2 








Other Oceania 




Other countrle 









Include* Taiwan 
Includaa Arab Falaatlna. 



82 



MUens required to depart totaled 123,683 (see table 23). This tal 
13,27^ required departures of crewmen who were technical violators 
required departures under safeguards _ chiefly Mexicans who entere( 



untry of 
stlnatlon 



le does not Include 
and 70,899 direct 
without Inspection 



All countries 

Europe 

Denmark 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Turkey (Europe and At la) 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Alia 

Hong Kong 

India 

Iran 

Japan 

Jordan U 

Korea 

Malaysia 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Taiwan 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Antigua 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Dominican Republic 

Jamaica 

Netherlands Antilles 

St. Christopher 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Other West Indies 

British Honduras 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Panama 

Other Central America . . . 
St. Pierre and Miquelon . 

South America 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Chile 

Co lombla 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Oceania 

Other Countries 

1/ Includes Arab Palestin< 



115 
231 
334 
627 
177 
577 
138 
224 
240 
39 5 



259 
142 
511 



30,902 

7,626 

16,989 

143 

486 

163 

2,361 

1,078 

230 

22 

297 

345 

231 

67 

134 

180 

126 

266 



125 
134 
85 
299 
117 
209 
397 



2.170 



7.266 



7.155 



7,012 


199 


8,232 


6,922 


142 


I 


484 


1 


163 


- 


2.353 


5 


1,062 


6 


227 


2 


21 


I 


295 


_ 


336 


4 


222 


4 


66 


I 


134 


- 


172 


5 


126 


_ 


260 


3 


153 


I 



83 



ALIFNS OEPOnTED, BY COUhfTRY TO WHICH DEPOPTFD AND DEPORTATION EXPENSE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1966 





Total 




Deportati 


on expense boi 


ne byi 




Country to which 
deported 


Immigration 
and 
Natural ization 
Service 


Other 

government 

agencies 


Steamship 
companies 


Aliens 
deported 


Aliens 
reshipped 


All countries 


9.168 


6.839 


21 


1.725 


487 


96 




1.450 


238 


4 


1.066 


90 


52 




24 
17 

103 

706 
13 

163 
17 
62 
37 

117 
20 
15 

107 
14 
35 

660 


3 
10 
27 
68 
4 
42 
5 
4 
16 
4 
2 
5 
35 
2 
11 

162 


1 

1 

2 

3 


19 

6 

71 

575 

4 
97 
12 
56 

5 

108 

14 

9 
62 
11 
17 

429 


1 

1 
3 

29 
5 

19 

1 

15 

3 

1 

1 
5 

6 

55 


1 






Germany 


2 

34 






Italy 


4 




. 


Norway 


1 




2 




3 


Turkey (Europe and Asia). 
United Kingdom 


3 

1 


Other Europe 

Asia 


1 
11 




270 
34 
27 
47 
13 
12 
20 
11 
69 

123 
34 

6.705 


19 

10 

22 

10 

10 

9 

2 

1 

46 

8 

25 

6.230 


2 

1 
14 


233 
22 

1 
28 

1 

1 

16 

10 

11 

101 

5 

131 


14 
1 
4 
4 
2 
2 
2 

12 
12 
2 

316 


4 


India 


1 








3 








. 




. 




. 




_ 




2 




1 


North America 


14 




964 
4,770 
58 
28 
74 
158 
207 
37 
56 
36 
48 
92 
13 
43 
46 
40 
22 
13 

287 


839 

4,659 

55 

10 

59 

113 

162 

4 

56 

24 

33 

81 

10 

42 

42 

23 

10 

8 

189 


7 
3 

1 

2 

1 


18 
8 
1 

14 
6 
4 
5 

32 

9 
7 
2 

4 
12 
7 
2 

60 


97 

96 

2 

3 

9 

41 

35 

2 

8 

7 
3 

1 

5 
5 
2 

24 


3 


Mexico 


4 








1 






Dominican Republic 


4 


Netherlands Antilles 


1 


Trinidad and Tobago 

Other West Indies 

British Honduras 


1 




. 












. 


Other Central America ... 
South America 


14 




13 
21 
30 
116 
23 
40 
21 
23 

20 


10 
5 
17 
96 
15 
29 
2 
15 

9 


- 


2 
10 
11 
14 

4 

16 
3 

11 


1 
3 
1 
5 
4 
4 
1 
5 


_ 


Brazil 


3 




1 




1 








7 




2 


Other South America 

Africa 




Oceania 


12 


11 




1 






Other Countries 


34 






27 


2 


5 









84 



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3 - 1910 
1 - 1920 
L - 1930 
I - 1940 
I - 1950 




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85 



TABLE 26A 


. ALIENS DEPORTED, BY COUNTHV TO WHICH DEPORTED: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1957 - 1966 










Country to which 
dacorcad 


1957- 
1966 


1957 


1958 


1959 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


1966 




77,627 


5,082 


7j^l42 


7,988 


6,829 


7,438 


7,637 


7,454 


8,746 


10,143 


9,168 




U.278 


1.092 


1.630 


2.008 


1.541 


1.676 


1.503 


1.015 


1.150 


1.213 


1.450 




226 
202 
929 

5,466 
143 

2,220 
417 
498 
435 

1,303 
193 
270 

1,157 
263 
556 

3.294 


18 
23 
51 

279 
15 

205 
36 
57 
81 

105 
19 
16 

119 
8 
60 

316 


30 
22 
75 

525 
15 

288 
65 
70 
76 

130 
29 
24 

150 
17 

114 

296 


26 
20 

122 

749 
10 

409 
70 
72 
69 

163 
19 
37 

105 
54 
83 

293 


18 
15 
91 

610 
14 

282 
53 
45 
34 

118 
27 
26 

119 
43 
46 

246 


34 
26 
90 

680 
19 

255 
47 
50 
21 

147 
22 
29 

152 
50 
54 

277 


35 
17 

148 

562 
8 

215 
28 
30 
25 

168 
19 
36 

135 
28 
49 

416 


14 
24 
69 

363 
16 

133 
29 
36 
32 

111 
12 
32 
93 
22 
29 

192 


10 
18 
78 

479 
19 

134 
42 
41 
30 

110 
14 
29 
90 
14 
42 

225 


17 
20 

102 

513 
14 

136 
30 
35 
30 

134 
12 
26 
87 
13 
44 

373 








Germany 


103 
706 








163 
















117 








15 


United Kingdom 


107 






Alia 


660 




781 
140 
110 
318 
88 
102 
132 
125 
465 
324 
709 

57.302 


10 
10 

6 
15 

7 

5 
12 
30 
51 

4 
166 

3.520 


29 

8 

5 

14 

12 

11 

8 

23 

55 

5 

126 

4.959 


57 
13 
10 
14 
5 
10 
11 
12 
43 
31 
87 

5.470 


34 
10 
9 
20 
7 
8 
14 
16 
67 
10 
51 

4.858 


38 
11 
17 
IS 
7 
10 
9 
8 
32 
33 
94 

5.044 


171 
8 
13 
40 
9 
12 
14 
9 
41 
48 
51 

5.433 


45 
12 
1 
34 
8 
9 
6 
4 
25 
18 
30 

5.957 


37 

12 

1 

68 

14 

14 

3 

3 

31 

11 

31 

7.129 


90 
22 
21 
48 

6 
11 
35 

9 
51 
41 
39 

8.227 


270 


India 


34 












13 
















69 












6.705 




10,337 
40,732 
174 
466 
268 
621 
801 
125 
116 
257 
1,484 
652 
97 
345 
311 
240 
172 
104 

1.721 


938 
2,039 

31 
25 
10 

74 

7 

14 

201 

54 

7 
37 
42 
22 
10 

9 

102 


1,060 
3,246 

76 
17 
24 
47 
11 

21 
286 
48 

7 
30 
33 
34 
13 

6 

135 


992 

3,608 

21 

127 

25 

23 

76 

8 

4 

15 

396 

72 

8 

20 

30 

23 

16 

6 

177 


881 
3,442 

4 
55 
20 
15 
64 

8 

2 
23 
196 
70 

8 
22 
21 
11 
11 

5 

116 


1,151 
3,404 

5 
22 
22 

2 
55 

9 

2 
29 
166 
66 

6 
37 
25 
29 

7 

7 

138 


1,206 
3,743 
25 
39 
31 
33 
54 
7 
18 
21 
70 
53 
9 
31 
27 
18 
34 
14 

183 


1,098 
4,405 
13 
26 
13 
68 
46 
11 
7 
23 
42 
60 
16 
45 
36 
23 
14 
11 

183 


1,003 
5,557 
20 
28 
19 
107 
82 
6 
7 
28 
43 
79 
12 
49 
29 
21 
27 
12 

170 


1,044 
6,518 
28 
34 
22 
181 
96 
21 
20 
47 
36 
58 
11 
31 
22 
19 
18 
21 

230 












Bahamaa 

BarbadoB 


28 

74 




158 














Trinidad and Tobago 


36 




92 








43 




46 
















287 


Arffsntlna 


176 
119 
286 
517 
105 
203 
181 
134 

200 

195 

637 


10 
4 
19 
16 
11 
14 
15 
13 

18 

22 

12 


18 
11 
29 
20 
8 
15 
21 
13 

21 

26 

75 


22 
16 
39 
24 
20 
14 
28 
14 

17 

16 

7 


14 
5 
22 
30 
10 
U 
13 
11 

15 

19 

34 


18 
9 

27 
44 

4 
17 

9 
10 

23 

31 
249 


21 
20 
31 
53 

7 
15 
22 
14 

22 

23 

57 


15 
10 
29 
56 
12 
39 
11 
11 

23 

17 

67 


19 
10 
34 
58 
4 
17 
13 
15 

24 

16 

32 


26 
13 
26 
100 
6 
21 
28 
10 

17 

13 

70 








Chile 






116 



































1/ Included In Other Weat Indlea prior to 1959. 



86 





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89 



ALIEN CREWMEN DESERTED AT UNITED STATES ATR AND SEAPORTS, 
BY NATIONALITY AND FLAG OF CARRIER: U 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1966 





Total 


Flag of carrier from which deaerted 


Nationality 
of 


^ 


I 




si 
• 

03 


I 


1 


1 


1 


1 

z 


5 


c 


c 


1 


c 

t 


22 


c 

3 
1 


1 


1 


Number deserted 


4,427 


1.273 


624 


623 


547 


254 


253 


119 


107 


102 


80 


73 


44 


42 


25 


23 


23 


22 


193 




3.370 


958 


5?? 


610 


340 


235 


im 


94 


86 


69 


34 


71 




4? 


23 


5 




?? 


76 




20 

4 

61 

17 

7 

232 

1,447 

7 

7 

261 

53 

345 

6 

43 

329 

53 

7 

11 

403 

52 

5 

633 


2 

27 
732 

66 
3 

4 

8 
65 
2 

46 
3 

245 


4 
2 
9 

5 

14 
4 
2 

39 

7 
311 

4 
85 

7 
I 

24 
2 
2 

44 


1 
- 

590 

1 

7 

1 

8 

1 

1 
3 


3 

44 

4 
3 

2 
2 

8 

1 

273 
161 


7 
1 

170 

2 

5 

43 

1 
4 

1 
I 

9 


57 
62 

27 
25 


1 
45 

2 
4 

1 
2 
18 

1 
1 
14 

1 

1 
3 

n 


19 

34 


2 

I 
3 

1 

1 
33 

4 
19 

5 

30 


3 

3 

4 

2 

10 
12 

27 


70 

1 


44 


1 
41 


22 

1 


1 

1 
1 

2 

n 




21 

1 














10 








































































38 




486 
21 
21 
10 
5 
5 
32 
42 
11 

293 


207 

1 
1 
1 
5 

19 
11 

49 


32 

4 

6 
2 

41 


1 

2 
5 


145 
10 

2 

4 

17 


3 

1 

3 

I 
1 

4 


1 
54 


5 

6 
11 


1 

5 


28 

1 

1 
? 


6 
19 

2 


: 


44 


- 


: 


7 
2 

2 


23 


- 






10 




















8 




11 






North America 


45 




75 
19 
3 
31 
6 
21 
26 
15 
2 
2 
84 
7 
2 

89 


3 

1 
1 
1 

6 
9 
3 

24 
I 

2 


24 

5 

3 

1 

7 
1 

14 


1 

4 
3 


20 

1 
2 
3 
3 
1 

7 

5 


1 
2 

1 
6 


4 
2 

3 
2 
9 
9 

2 
22 

I 

8 


3 
1 

1 

2 

1 

2 

1 

3 


3 

1 

1 
9 


1 
I 


1 

3 
5 


2 


- 


- 


1 

1 


I 

3 
1 


23 


- 


17 




8 




I 


















Trinidad and Tobago 












Nlcaraoua 


4 








28 




14 
11 
16 
19 
17 
8 
I 
3 

20 


2 
8 


2 

4 
4 

1 
2 

1 


2 

1 

2 


2 

2 

2 


3 

1 
2 


3 

I 
2 

2 
I 


3 


3 
1 
2 

1 
1 
1 

1 


1 


I 
8 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


4 






Chile 






9 


















Africa 


4 




2 
8 


3 
1 
1 
I 
2 

1 


t 


1 
1 


1 

1 
2 


\ 


1 


[ 


1 
3 


- 


1 


- 


. 


] 


- 


1 


_ 


- 








Morocco 












United Arab Republic (Egypt) 




Oceania 


I 




6 
2 

14 


I 
10 


1 
? 


- 


I 

1 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 








Other countrle 


1 











































eported by ships 



tha United States by Servlc 



90 



VESSELS AND AIRPLANES INSPECTED, CREWMEN ADMITTED, ALIEN CREWMEN 
DESERTED, AND ALIEN STOWAWAYS FOUND, BY LOCATION: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1966 



£Each arrival of the same carrier or crevman counted separately/ 



Vessels and airplanes 
Inspected on arrival 



Airplanes 



Crewmen admitted 



Allen y 

crewmen 

deserted 



United States total 

Northeast Region 

Boston, Mass 

Buffalo, N.Y 

Hartford, Conn 

Newark, N.J 

New York, N.Y 

Portland, Me 

St. Albans, Vt 

Southeast Region 

Atlanta , Ga 

Baltimore, Md 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Miami, Fla 

New Orleans, La 

Philadelphia, Pa 

San Juan, P.R 

Washington, D.C 

Northwest Region 

Anchorage, Alaska 

Chicago , 111 

Detroit, Mich 

Helena, Mont 

Kansas City, Mo 

Omaha , Nebr 

Portland , Oreg. 

St. Paul, Minn 

Seattle, Wash 

Southwest Region 

Denver, Colo 

El Paso, Tex 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

Los Angeles, Calif. ... 

Phoenix, Ariz 

Port Isabel, Tex 

San Antonio, Tex 

San Francisco, Calif. . 

Prelnspectlon offices ,., 

Hamilton, Bermuda 

Montreal, Can 

Nassau, Bahamas 

Toronto, Can 

Vancouver, Can 

Victoria, Can 

Winnipeg, Can 

Border Patrol Sectors .., 



83.151 



15.581 



1,349 

3,803 

181 

5,262 

4,862 

12A 

33.106 



1,978 
1,477 
2,879 
11,859 
2,402 
1,770 
9,022 
1,719 

23.308 



1,247 

698 

9,582 



1,000 

343 

10,438 

9,949 



1,313 
4,624 

2,644 

1,368 

1.207 



176 
10 



1,021 



236,798 



2,053.459 



932.625 



4,427 



46.051 



J3.102 



229,773 



1,685 



3,790 
6.773 
281 
2,163 
28.750 
2,176 
2,118 

84.772 



627 

336 

4,662 

38,591 

1,741 

1,148 

36,225 

1,442 

36.173 



40,783 

23,096 

6,346 

2,247 

583,266 

27,363 

1 

762.242 



61,251 
50,668 
79,361 

264,978 
78,927 
68,220 

104,807 
54,030 

187.450 



17,552 

7,225 

727 

11,887 

184,890 

7,485 



318.875 



13,762 

8,764 

8,197 

101,218 

21,668 

7,925 

141,013 

16,328 

96.756 



84 

18 

34 

382 

1,101 

64 

2 

1.861 



3,336 
4,273 
6,839 
2,353 

276 
47 

545 
9,943 
8,561 

42.101 



25,401 

37,480 

34,981 

400 

32 

31 

30,555 

10,379 

48,191 

311.579 



16,703 

13,874 

16,661 

3,014 

52 

61 

7.299 

5,028 

34,064 

183.142 



275 
2,000 
7,873 
11,193 
5,507 
4,098 
7,329 
3,826 

27.701 



332 

42 

66,443 

116,852 

1,882 

81,541 

4,335 

40,152 

109.086 



469 

18 

58,703 

41,597 

19,710 
9,188 

53,457 

104.079 



2,161 
6,203 
5,462 
10,461 
2,320 

1,094 



27,900 
15,649 
11,309 
39,404 
2,664 
11,581 
579 



11,865 
19,457 
19,160 
1 3 , 400 
12,079 
21,961 
6,157 



98 
315 

24 
345 
582 
269 

67 
161 



20 

207 



246 
99 



Includes deserting crewmen reported by ships' masters and those found In the U.S. by Service 
officers . 



91 



1 r- O 



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I ^ >» m CO <M 

■^ r^ -^ 00 sD 

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<r <t O rn ^ 



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tn ^ CM ^ <j m 



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o r^ 



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r- fM 
ro 00 



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J o 
O 3 









> W 



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CO -H tn r^ 

CM lA o o 

^ >» (N fO ^ ■ 



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00 en 00 ' 

r- 00 ro , 



r^ ^o lA ^ li^ 



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3 3 O 




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a u ui m X u 

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CO 0) 



TABLE 31. PASSENGERS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES, BY SEA AND AIR, 

FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES, BY COUNTRY OF EMBARKATION: 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1966 



/Exclusive of Canadian travel over land borders/ 



Page 1. 



Country of 
enbarkatlon 



By sea and atr 



Total Aliens 



By sea 



Citi- 
zens 



By air 



All countries , 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgium 

Czechoslovakia ... 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Gibraltar 

Greece 

Hungary 

Iceland 

Ireland 

Italy 

Luxembourg 

Malta 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

San Marino 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey 

United Kingdom . . . 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Asia 

Aden 

Afghanistan 

Arabian Peninsula 
Bonln Islands . . . . 

Burma 

Ceylon 

Cyprus 

Formosa 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Iraq 

Israel 

Japan 

Korea 

Kuwait 

Lebanon 

Malaysia 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands ... 

Saudi Arabia 

Thailand 

Turkey 

Viet Nam 



5.867.001 



2.253.146 



3.613.855 



815.781 



258.217 



557.564 



5.051.220 



1.994.929 



2.497.129 



3,633 

52,630 

727 

96,621 

2,169 

363,038 

373,740 

1,491 

40,832 

98 

66,962 

107,106 

232,378 

1,959 

135 

145,135 

13,837 

6,156 

77,382 

156 

119,602 

14,944 

74,743 

5,219 

694,254 

172 

2,010 

405.845 



12 

8 

HI 

796 

17,488 

3,869 

16 

2,724 

144 

30,946 

269,716 

886 

3 

4,380 

389 

468 

50,033 

13,000 

232 

3,480 

2,706 

4,278 



972.384 



1.347 

23,046 

402 

45,086 

1,341 

115,071 

124,554 

353 

13,735 

14 

33,572 

34,419 

91,517 

1,464 

26 

66,894 

6,369 

5,321 

24,458 

154 

52,652 

8,341 

28,559 

1,008 

291,128 

172 

1,381 

179.223 



1.524.745 



293.306 



2,286 

29,584 

325 

51,535 

828 

247,967 

249,186 

1,138 

27,097 

84 

33,390 

72,687 

140,861 

495 

109 

78,241 

7,468 

835 

52,924 

2 

66,950 

6,603 

46,184 

4,211 

403,126 

629 

226.622 



2.203.823 



843.935 



1,227 

2,772 

156 

51,354 

41,618 

1,491 
10,019 

51 

3.703 

61,227 



18,448 
4,644 
6,000 
2,539 

10,152 

4,767 



72,548 

515 

28.431 



651 

1,065 

127 

14,961 

15,106 

353 

5,910 

43 

672 

28,955 



8,756 
2,171 

5,274 
785 

6,264 
2,308 



34,571 
422 



1,707 

29 

36,393 

26,512 

1,138 

4,109 



3,031 
32,272 

16 
9,692 

2,473 

726 

1,754 

3,888 
2,459 



15.527 



3,633 

51,403 

727 

93,849 

2,013 

311,684 

332,122 

30,813 

98 

66,911 

103,403 

171,151 

1,959 

117 

126,687 

9,193 

156 

74,843 

156 

109,450 

10,177 

74,743 

5,162 

621,706 

172 

1,495 

377,414 



1,347 
22,395 
402 
44,021 
1,214 
100,110 
109,448 

7,825 

14 

33,529 

33,747 

62,562 

1,464 

24 

58,138 

4,198 

47 

23,673 

154 

46,388 

6,033 

28,559 

955 

256,557 

172 

959 

166.319 



10 

8 

73 

181 

7,139 

2,932 

10 

1,136 

103 

11,795 

129,828 

311 

3 

1,902 

136 

103 

19,383 

1,134 

62 

1,210 

701 

1,021 



38 

615 

10,349 

937 

6 

1,588 

41 

19,151 

139,888 

575 

2,478 

253 

365 

30,650 

11,866 

170 

2,270 

2,005 

3,257 



111 

455 

3,416 

119 

37 

6 

7,270 

11,185 



4,665 
537 



148 
1,686 



,648 
,919 

56 



307 
1,730 



,622 
,266 



2,906 
503 



341 

14,072 

3,750 

16 

2,687 

138 

23,676 

258,531 

809 

4,353 

259 

457 

45,368 

12,463 

232 

3,209 

2,704 

4,183 



5,453 

2,845 

10 

1,105 

101 

8,147 

124,909 

255 

1,881 



17,624 

1,100 

62 

940 

699 

928 



93 



TABLE 31. PASSENGERS ARRIVED IN TliS UNITED STATES, BY SEA AND AIR, 

FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES, BY COUNTRY OF EMBARKATION: 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1966 (Cont'd) 



/Exclusive of Canadian travel over land border^/ 



Page 2. 



Country of 
embarkatlc 



By sea and al 



Citi- 
zens 



Total Aliens 



Africa 

Algeria 

Angola 

Cameroon 

Cape Verde Islands 

Congo 

Congo, Republic of the 

Dahomey 

Ethiopia 

Ghana 

Guinea 

Ivory Coast 

Kenya 

Liberia 

Libya 

Mauritania 

Morocco 

Mozambique 

Nigeria 

St. Helena 

Senegal 

Seychel lea 

Sierra Leone 

South Africa 

South West Africa 

Tunisia 

Uganda 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 

Oceania 

American Samoa 

Australia 

Christmas Island 

Cook Islands 

Fiji 

Gilbert and El lice Islands . 

Nauru 

New Caledonia 

New Guinea 

New Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U.S. Adm.) 

Polynesia French 

Solomon Islands (British) .. 
Wake and Midway Islands . . . . 

North America 

Canada 

Greenland 

Mexico 

Swan Island 

West Indies 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Bermuda 

Cayman Islands 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 



282 

135 

3 

504 

120 

4 

845 

148 

297 

557 

2,264 

2,312 

5 

776 

22 

2,557 

1,184 

1,717 



1,651 



3,378 
45,376 



124 

26 

8 

11,259 

23,452 

13,847 



51,873 

2,556 

538,425 

5 

1,373,620 

533,488 

26,830 

197,499 

6,609 

30,800 

105,444 



11.695 



144 
282 
730 



133 



501 

98 

153 

275 

1,534 

2,124 

2 

538 

16 

1,387 

1,168 

992 



128 

4 

1,233 



195 
282 



486 
120 

808 
148 
283 
513 
2,151 
2,294 

522 

2,556 
1,184 
1,592 



136 
273 
569 
170 



94,113 



599 
31,369 



8,657 
123 



8,815 
7,409 
8,160 



2,779 
14,007 



2,454 
16,053 
5,687 



5,518 
1,138 



4,668 
733 



,837 
255 
.433 

,742 
,837 
,608 
,427 
,675 
,529 
,216 



28,035 

2,311 

334,993 

5 

921,878 

439,551 

15.222 

174,072 

3,934 

3,271 

15,228 



16,781 
3,056 



75.445 
20,478 



11,292 

1.996 

46.256 

6.471 

36 

1,943 

6 

3,195 

381 



3,349 
31.736 



5,751 
22,324 
13,845 



2.043.352 



597 
20.457 



4.147 
5.676 
8,159 



718,937 



5,489 
1,070 



30,189 

14,007 



45,092 

2,566 

535.360 

5 

1.297,175 

513,010 

26.764 

189.903 

6,603 

27.561 

104.879 



22.545 

255 

201.437 

405.485 
87,365 
11,572 
21 ,484 
2,669 
24,334 
89,835 



94 



TABLE 31. PASSENGERS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES, BY SEA AND AIR, 
FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES, BY COUNTRY OF EMBARKATION; 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1966 (Cont'd) 

/Exclusive of Canadian travel over land borders/ 



ountry of 
mbarkation 



North America (Cont'd): 
West Indies (Cont'd): 

Guadeloupe 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Leeward Islands; 

Antigua 

British Virgin Islands 

Montserrat 

St. Christopher 

Martinique 

Netherlands West Indies 
Trinidad and Tobago .... 
Turks and Calcos Islands 
Windward Islands: 

Dominica 

Grenada 

St. Lucia 

St. Vincent 

Central America 

British Honduras 

Canal Zone and Panama . . 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

South America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

British Guiana 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

French Guiana 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Surinam (Neth. Guiana) ... 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 

Cruise 

Bahamas 

Bermuda 

Caribbean 

Europe and Mediterranean . 

Far East 

Southern South America ... 

World cruise 

Other countries 

Flag of Carrier; 

United States 

Foreign 



9,654 

16,734 

253,440 

45,538 

46.952 

117 

8,224 

4,618 

57,747 

28,161 

9 29 

18 



174,702 



6,626 
75,134 
12,591 
12,136 
46,014 
14.027 

8,174 

324.256 



36,246 

1,7 50 
49,096 

2,488 

17,034 

63.979 

19,549 

1 

1,511 

42,715 

868 

1.4'.3 
87,576 

355,804 



183,825 
43,316 
100,757 
14,461 
2,778 
3,618 
3,476 
3,57 3 



2,743,969 
3,123,032 



sea and air 



4,669 
10,847 
83,674 

20,188 

33,760 

11 

5.569 

2.409 

24.770 

16.026 

55 



93.737 



3,776 
30,026 
7,811 
8,122 
28,933 
9,457 
5,612 

216.603 



26.690 
1.132 
27.719 
1,782 
12,47 5 
44,886 
14,311 

964 

28,495 

370 

1.119 

56.860 

30.046 



11,871 

2,111 

13,855 

1,175 

351 

210 

326 

147 



798,388 
1,454,758 



Cltl- 
zens 



4,985 

5,887 

169,766 

25,350 

13,192 

106 

2.655 

2.209 

32.977 

12.135 

874 

12 



80,965 



2,850 
45,108 
4,780 
4,014 
17,081 
4.570 
2.562 

107,453 



9,556 

618 

21,377 

706 

4,559 

19.093 

5.238 

1 

547 

14,220 

49 8 

324 

30,716 

325.758 



171.954 
41.205 
86.902 
13.286 
2.427 
3,408 
3,150 
3,426 



1.945.581 
1.668,274 



194 
35.695 



3,566 

504 



10,130 
345 



355.804 



183,825 
43,316 
100,757 
14.461 
2.778 
3.618 
3.476 
3,57 3 



128,354 
687.427 



159 
27.860 



2,065 
153 



4.523 



3.743 
128 



5.372 



30,046 



11.871 

2.111 

13.855 

1,175 

351 

210 

326 

147 



24,814 
233,403 



Citi- 
zens 



1,501 
351 



7.025 



6.387 
217 



325.758 



171.954 

41.205 

86.902 

13,286 

2.427 

3.408 

3.150 

3,426 



103,540 
454,024 



9,577 

16,657 

249,933 

45.344 
11.257 
114 
7,389 
4,587 
54.181 
27.657 
9 29 

18 



163.154 



.618 
65,004 
12,246 
12,115 
45,891 
13,182 
8,098 

315.942 



35.203 

1,7 50 
47,193 

2,482 

16,713 

63,610 

19 ,079 

1 

1,511 

42,282 

852 

1,434 
83,832 



2,615,615 
2,435,605 



4,627 
10,834 
80,482 

20,029 
5,900 



2,39 2 
22,705 
15,873 



89.214 



3,7 68 
26,283 
7,683 
8,110 
28,871 
8,926 
5,57 3 

211.431 



26,183 
1,132 
26,474 
1,778 
12,314 
44,694 
14,150 

9 64 

28,363 

369 

1,110 

53,900 



773.574 
1.221.355 



4.950 

5.823 

169.451 

25.315 

5,357 

105 

2.539 

2.195 

31,476 

11,784 

874 

12 



73.940 



2,850 
38,721 
4,563 
4,005 
17,020 
4,256 
2,525 

104.511 



9.020 

618 

20.719 

704 

4.399 

18.916 

4.9 29 

1 

547 

13.919 

483 

324 

29.932 



1.842,041 
1,214,250 



95 



PASSENGERS DEPARTED FROM THE UNITED STATES, BY SEA AND AIR, 
TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES, BY COUNTRY OF DEBARKATION: 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1966 
/Exclusive of Canadian travel over land borders/ 



Country of 
debarkation 



By sea and a 



Citi- 
zens 



By sea 



By air 



All countries . . . . 

Europe 

Austria 

Belgium 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Gibraltar 

Greece 

Hungary 

Iceland 

Ireland 

Italy 

Luxembourg 

Malta 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Asia 

Aden 

Bonln Islands 

Burma 

Cyprus 

Formosa 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Iraq 

Israel 

Japan 

Jordan 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Malaysia 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Saudi Arabia 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Thailand 

Turkey 

Viet Nam 



5.462.702 



1.919.951 



3.542.751 



52A.161 



4.729.071 



1.710.481 



2.312.014 



854.987 



5,254 

46,669 

832 

95,818 

1,863 

291,501 

338,229 

2,067 

38,609 

297 

69 , 800 

98,562 

213,830 

1,526 

140 

139,030 

18,280 

797 

67,730 

85,716 

17,407 

72,428 

6,993 

696,838 

114 

1,684 

446.717 



27 

20 

160 

364 

11,482 

1,567 

67 

3.113 

114 

48.807 

306,650 

2 

282 

4,933 

699 

860 

39,781 

9,043 

441 

35 

6,626 

6,666 

6,971 



1,236 

17,787 

251 

49,476 

657 

105,155 

115,205 

553 

9,431 

29 

31,822 

29,700 

66,336 

1,389 

32 

58,221 

6,433 

534 

15,401 

30,338 

9,330 

26,114 

9 59 

277,480 

HI 

1,007 

143.658 



4,018 

28,882 

581 

46,342 

1,206 

186,346 

223,024 

1,514 

29,178 

268 

37,978 

68,862 

147,494 

137 

108 

80,809 

11,847 

263 

52,329 

55,378 

8,077 

46,314 

6,034 

419,358 

3 

677 



1,604 

3.678 

141 

46,949 

36,418 

2,067 
10,242 

122 
4,742 
52,635 

23 
20,132 
6,067 
797 
4,465 
8,079 
4,598 

61 

69,863 

59 

351 



1,691 
92 
16,545 
13,875 
553 
4,484 



89 

1,069 

19.215 



8,519 
2,762 
534 
1,795 
4,653 
2,068 

58 

28,887 

59 

225 

11.721 



1,987 

49 

30,404 

22,543 

1,514 

5,758 

33 

3,673 

33,420 

14 
11,613 
3,305 
263 
2,670 
3,426 
2,530 



40,976 

126 

15.506 



5,254 
45,065 
832 
92,140 
1,722 
244,552 
301,811 

28,367 

297 

69,67 8 

93,820 

161,195 

1,526 

117 

118,898 

12,213 

63,265 

77,637 

12,809 

72,428 

6,932 

626,975 

55 

1,333 



1,236 
16,983 
251 
47,785 
565 
88,610 
101,330 

4,947 

29 

31,733 

28,631 

47,121 

1,389 

23 

49,702 

3,671 

13,606 

25,685 

7,262 

26,114 

901 

248,59 3 

52 

782 

131.937 



3,306 
394 



12,412 

110,646 

2 

48 

1,480 

175 

112 

11,562 

310 

43 

4 

723 

639 

863 



16 

12 

109 

282 

8,176 

1,173 

63 

2,385 

66 

36,395 

196,004 

234 
3,453 

524 

748 
28,219 
8,733 

398 

31 

5,903 

6,027 

6,108 



160 

149 

2,713 

307 



8,469 

11,111 

2 

116 

177 

258 

23 

3,403 

236 



3,523 
5,205 



1,908 
182 



4,946 
5,906 



1,723 
230 



215 

8,769 

1,260 

67 

3,109 

114 

40,338 

295,539 

166 
4,756 

441 

837 
36,378 
8,807 

441 

25 

6,597 

6,635 

6,949 



2,501 
269 



8,889 
105,441 



1,423 



723 
621 
857 



PASSENGERS DEPARTED FROM THE UNITED STATES, BY SEA AND AIR, 
TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES, BY COUNTRY OF DEBARKATION: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1966 (Cont'd) 

/Exclusive of Canadian travel over land borders/ 



Country of 
debarkation 



By sea and al 



Cltl- 
zens 



Total Aliens 



By air 



Africa 

Algeria 

Cape Verde Islands 

Congo, Republic of the 

Dahomey 

Ethiopia 

Fr. Somaliland 

Ghana 

Guinea 

Ivory Coast 

Kenya 

Liberia 

Libya 

Mauritania 

Morocco 

Mozambique - 

Nigeria 

St. Helena 

Senegal 

Sierra Leone 

South Africa 

Southwest Africa 

Tunisia 

Uganda 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 

Oceania 

American Samoa 

Australia 

Br. Solomon Islands 

Christmas Island 

Fiji 

New Caledonia 

New Guinea 

New Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U.S. adm. ) . 

Polynesia French 

Wake and Midway Islands 

North America 

Canada 

Greenland 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Bermuda 

Cayman Islands 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 



246 
261 



18 

4 

863 

400 

364 

661 

3,215 

2,873 

8 

1,714 



361 

115 

3,351 

119.446 
4.001 



15 

37,444 

434 

425 

10,958 

24,279 

15,931 

3,669 

1.980.416 



43,004 

2,669 

515,732 

1.238,741 



513,414 

19,744 

197,401 

7,367 

3,204 

90,949 



4.403 



1.585 



241 
260 



832 
400 
356 
607 
,114 
,832 



3.796 



361 
115 



620 
13,949 



27,201 

287 

361 

7,142 

7,282 

8,850 

469 

662.678 



3,381 
8,339 

15 
10.243 
147 
64 
3,816 
16,997 
7,081 
3,200 

1.317.738 



424 
5,537 



69.307 



360 

3,883 

611 



49.532 



1,654 
270 



39.775 



,992 
,626 



36,953 
350 
1 
5,421 
23,398 
15,849 
3,669 

n.109 



52.946 



20,083 



187,282 
364,506 



100,976 

7,095 

27,648 

2,978 

29 5 

76,900 



22,921 

2,571 

328,450 

874.235 



9,752 
69,731 



5,104 
41,084 



412,438 
12,649 
169,753 
4,389 
2,909 
14,049 



6,077 

4 

5,919 



4,648 
28.647 



41,292 

2,669 

505,980 

1,169.010 



619 
5,925 



26,882 

285 

1 

3,259 

6,671 

8,835 

469 

613.146 



16.225 



38 


203 


53 


207 


136 


417 


16 


34 


2 


- 


186 


646 


64 


336 


115 


241 


122 


485 


676 


2,438 


152 


2,680 



1,465 



2,753 



3,373 
5,701 



10,071 
65 

2,162 
16,727 
7,014 
3,200 



182,178 
323.422 



22,204 

2,571 

323,802 

845.588 



14,518 

12 

6,788 



175 
396 



492,819 

19,728 

184,694 

7,367 

3,029 

90,553 



94,899 
7,091 

21,729 

2,978 

288 

76,712 



397,920 
12,637 
162,965 
4,389 
2,741 
13,841 



97 



PASSENGERS DEPARTED FROM THE UNITED STATES. BY SEA AND AIR, 
TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES, BY COUNTRY OF DEBARKATION: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 19 66 (Cont'd) 



/Exclusive of Canadian travel over land borders/ 



Country of 
debarkatlor 



North America (Cont'd): 
West Indies (Cont'd): 

Guadeloupe 

Haiti 

Jamaica ■ 

Leeward Islands: 

Antigua 

British Virgin Islands 

Montserrat 

St. Christopher 

Martinique 

Netherlands West Indies 
Trinidad and Tobago .... 

Turks and Calcos 

Windward Islands: 

Dominica 

Grenada 

St. Lucia 

St. Vincent 

Central America 

British Honduras 

Canal Zone and Panama .. 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala . • 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

South America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

British Guiana 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Surinam (Neth. Guiana) ... 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 

Cruise 

Bahamas 

Bermuda 

Caribbean 

Europe and Mediterranean . 

Far East 

Southern South America ... 

World cruise 

Other countries 

Flag of Carrier: 

United States 

Foreign 



By aea and al 



8,158 

10,923 

214,369 

41,837 

45,280 

93 

7,423 

3,856 

51,177 

22,019 

236 

94 



180,270 



5,955 
102,169 

9,083 
12,647 
31,913 
11,854 

6,649 

264,067 



28,9 20 

355 

48,640 

2,860 

7,773 
51,932 
11,251 

1,149 

27,535 

779 

2,180 
80,693 

315.829 



185,874 

40,758 

54,674 

21,355 

5,059 

2,003 

2,763 

3,343 



2,531,974 
2,930,728 



3,974 
6,525 
51,163 

15,355 

33,764 
U 
5,187 
1,957 
19,978 
9 ,950 
39 



90.709 



3,113 
42,615 
5,297 
8,067 
19,344 
7,622 
4,651 

166,29 2 



20,300 

208 

26,884 

1,401 

5,929 

33,351 

8,231 

699 

19,555 

347 

1,353 

47,934 

21.770 



12,682 

1,452 

4,435 

2,475 

204 

154 

250 

IC 



650,127 
1,269,824 



4,184 

4,398 

163,206 

25,481 

11,516 

82 

2,236 

1,899 

31,199 

12,069 

197 

47 



89.561 



2,842 
59,554 
3,786 
4,580 
12,569 
4,232 
1,998 

97.775 



8,620 

147 

21,756 

1,459 

1,844 

18,581 

3,020 

450 

7,880 

432 

827 

32,759 



173,192 
39,305 
50,239 
18,880 
4,855 
1,839 
2,513 



1,881,847 
1,560,904 



Total Aliens 



211 

484 



315.829 



185,874 

40,758 

54,574 

21,355 

5,059 

2,003 

2,763 

3,343 



111,317 
522,314 



By sea 



2.349 



21.770 



12,682 

1.452 

4,435 

2,475 

204 

164 

250 

108 



21,161 
188,309 



173,192 
39,306 
50,239 
18,880 
4,855 
1,839 
2,513 
3,235 



90,156 
434,005 



8,109 

10,712 

213,885 

41,800 
11,580 
93 
7,151 
3,849 
50,568 
21,536 
236 

94 



172.158 



5,955 
94,988 

9,036 
12,645 
31,733 
11,160 

5,641 

256.256 



28,037 

355 

45,525 

2,813 

7,241 
51,484 
10,624 

1,149 

26.762 

704 

2,166 
78,295 



2,420,657 
2,308,414 



By alt 



3,933 

5,357 

51,060 

15,345 
5,746 
U 
4,994 
1,953 
19,714 
9,863 
39 



465 
186 



88.360 



3,113 
40,826 
5,272 
8,065 
19,293 
7,141 
4,550 

161.655 



19,816 

208 

25,278 

1,386 

5,715 

33,036 

7,953 

599 

19,481 

334 

1,343 

45,405 



628,956 
1,081,515 



TABLE 33. PASSENGER TRAVEL BETUEEN THE I'NITED STATES AND FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
BY SEA AND AIR, BV PORT OF ARRIVAL OR DEPARTURE: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1966 



/Exclullve of C«n«dl« 



land border 



ARRIVED 

Alaak*, Anchorage 

Aril. , Tucson 

Calif., Loa Angelea 

San Diego 

San Franclaco . .. 

D.C., Dullea Internatlo 

Airport 

Waahlngton 

Fla., Jackaonvllle 

Miami 

Port Everglades . 

Tampa 

West Palm Beach . 

Guam, Agana 

Hawaii, Honolulu 

in., Chicago 

La. , New Orleans 

Hd., Baltimore 

Mass. , Boston 

Mich., Detroit 

N.J. , McGuire A.F.B. . . 

Newark 

N.Y. , New York 

Niagara Falls . .. 

Ohio, Cleveland 

Pa. , Philadelphia 

P.R., San Juan 

S.C. , Charleston 

Tex. , Brownsville 

Dallas 

Houston 

San Antonio 

Va. , Norfolk 

V.I., Charlotte Amalie 

Frederiksted 

Wash. , Seattle 

Other ports 

DEPARTED 

Alaska. Anchorage 

Ariz. , Tucson 

Calif. , Los Angelea 

San Diego 

San Franclaco . . . 

D.C., Dulles Internatlo 

Airport 

Waahlngton 

Fla., Jackaonvllle 

Miami 

Port Everglades . 

Tampa 

Weat Palm Beach . 

Guam, Agana 

Hawaii, Honolulu 

111., Chicago 

La. , New Orleans 

Md., BaltiiDore 

Mass. , Boston 

Mich., Detroit 

N.J., McGulre A.P.B. .. 

Newark 

N.Y., New York 

Niagara Falls .. . 

Ohio, Cleveland 

Pa., Philadelphia 

P.R. , San Juan 

S.C, Charleston 

Tex., Brownsville 

Dallas 

Houston 

San Antonio 

Va., Norfolk 

V.I., Charlotte Amalle 

Frederiksted 

Wash., Seattle 

Other ports 



,126 
,637 
,678 

510 
573 
448 
658 
700 
,460 
,695 
208 
514 
254 
398 
975 
,416 
57 5 
,046 
756 
352 
437 
289 
553 
530 
502 
697 
891 
,499 
,620 
.751 
,738 
,466 
.421 
,408 



,611 

,877 
,204 
,644 
,072 

.525 
,263 
444 
,924 
,722 
,349 
,268 
,929 
,175 
,885 
,768 
,022 
,706 
,707 
,369 
,974 
,863 
,620 
,932 
,148 
,39 2 
,987 
,682 
,665 
,641 
,084 
,033 
,590 
,881 
,671 
,075 



74,475 

2,664 

115,527 

3,218 

30,936 

15,212 

704 

477 

332,611 

22,221 

630 

14,510 

15,423 

135,874 

64.756 

28,493 

2,096 

37,026 

9,642 

8,525 

1,147 

1,020,669 

1,809 

401 

5,800 

160,340 

1,422 

7,755 

5,596 

21,497 

26,350 

1,248 

37,437 

11,101 

21,720 

13,834 

1.919.951 

76,925 

2,968 

102,685 

4,623 

9,848 

10,229 

544 

246 

283,174 

23,875 

1,946 

3,992 

15,414 

125,653 

53,435 

26.433 

330 

41,878 

2,681 

3,129 

717 

904,840 

1.67 3 

185 

1.922 

96,509 

497 

7,003 

5,233 

19,533 

25,038 

876 

38,371 

14,016 

9,736 

3,794 



Citi- 

|3,fe'3.853 

16,864 
6,217 
153,599 
2,419 
59,742 

36,298 

5,869 

971 

610,047 

86,479 

1,830 
44,185 
14,785 
160,640 
147,498 
56,905 

9,879 
91,390 
23,933 
92,521 
19,609 
1,663,683 
628 

3,888 
20,753 
84,190 
14,080 

2,942 
17,295 
27,002 
64,270 

4,503 
16,301 

6,365 
28,701 
17,574 



42,686 

5,909 

157,519 

7,021 

26,224 

34,296 

3,719 

198 

578,750 

62,847 

3,403 

47,276 

29,515 

151,522 

144,450 

51,335 

7,692 

118,828 

11,026 

7 1 , 240 

15,257 

1,648,023 

947 

4,747 

13,226 

68,883 

15,490 

2,679 

20,432 

27,108 

52,046 

5,157 

14,219 

9,865 

75.935 

13,281 



18,777 
1,434 
12,755 



I 

684 

135,288 

53,809 

500 

1,866 

4,901 

39,414 

6,779 

4,277 

3,276 

344 



446,087 

27 5 
742 
29,866 
740 
188 

1,644 

3,144 

35,404 

425 

917 

12,244 

733.631 



24,611 
2,978 



303 
137,401 
46,585 

3,345 
3,615 
30,476 

7,580 
1,928 

17,678 



255 

4,217 

863 



3,135 
33,810 



839 
2,282 



9,455 
934 

7,778 



I 

420 

12,577 

17,244 

286 

172 

3,694 

23,211 

2,013 
766 

1,586 
180 



120.006 

211 
559 
16,650 
505 
144 

663 

1,039 

27,803 

150 

383 

9,787 

209.470 



9,458 
1,240 



11,336 
19,742 

136 
2,641 
17,651 

1,871 

144 

6,902 



165 

,576 
296 



812 
28,108 



353 
1,389 



557.564 



9,322 

500 

4,977 



264 

122,711 

36,565 

214 

1,694 

1,207 

16,203 

4,766 

3,511 

1,690 

164 



183 

13,216 

235 



981 

2,105 

7,601 

27 5 

534 

2,457 



15,153 
1,738 



126,065 
26,843 

3,209 

974 

12,825 

5,709 
1,784 
10,776 



2,323 
5,702 



486 
89 3 



5.051.220 

91,339 

8,881 

250,349 

4,203 

77.923 



51,510 

6,572 

764 

807,370 

54,891 

1,960 

56,829 

25,307 

257,100 

212,254 

78,619 

7,698 

125,140 

33,231 

101,046 

20,756 

,238,265 

2,437 

4,014 

25,811 

214,664 

14,762 

10,509 

22,891 

46,855 

90,620 

2,607 

18,334 

17,041 

49,504 

19,164 



119,611 
8,877 

235,593 
11,644 
33,094 

44,525 

4,263 

141 

724,523 

40,137 

5,349 

47,923 

41,314 

246,699 

197,885 

70,188 

6,094 

143,028 

13,610 

74,369 

15,974 

2,141,306 

2,620 

4,919 

14,89 3 

161,175 

15,124 

9,640 

25,665 

46,628 

77,084 

2,898 

18,780 

23,873 

84,832 

14,793 



74,475 

2,664 

106,072 

2,284 

23,158 

15,212 

703 

57 

320,034 

4,977 

344 

14,338 

11,729 

112,663 

64,756 

26,480 

1,330 

35,440 

9,462 

8,525 

1,147 

900,663 

1,809 

190 

5,241 

143,590 

917 

7,611 

5.59 6 

20,834 

26,350 

209 

9,634 

10,951 

21,337 

4,047 



93,227 
4,623 
8,608 

10,229 

544 

15 

271,838 

4,133 

1,946 

3,856 

12,773 

108,002 

53,435 

24,562 

186 

34,975 

2,680 

3,129 

717 

799,478 

1,673 

181 

1,757 

94,933 

201 

5,972 

5,233 

19,520 

25,038 

64 

10,263 

14,008 

9,383 

2,405 



99 



ToMl ::<lieornla 



TOTAL ALIENS 

PERMAHEHT RESIDENTS 

Europ« ,.,.,...,.. 

Albania 

Auatria 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoalovakla 

Eatocila 

Finland 

Prance 

Cernany 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Luxembourg 

Ketherlandl 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Soeden 

SolCzerland 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe ^ 

China 2/ 

India 7 

Indoneaia 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Paklscan 

Palestine 

FhlUpplnea 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Kepubllc 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Cuatemria 

Hondura 

Nicaragua 

South America 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Peni 

Veneauela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Morocco 

South Africa 

Tunisia 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Australia 

New Zealand 

Other Oceania 

Stateles 

All other 

OTHER THAN PERMANENT RESIDENTS . . . 



2,211 
26,956 

9.105 

1,219 
U.658 
12,351 

3,219 
10,707 
38,617 
235,628 
34,1 
30,730 
56,275 
210,649 
12,961 
20,1 

595 
52,159 
19,548 
128,200 
37,901 

8,779 
17.315 
21,026 
13, 

9,104 
264,599 
48,206 
32,627 

6,035 

215.300 



.283.691 
373,045 
646,579 
135,617 
38,227 
10,814 
11,944 
2,546 
10,344 
10,566 
7,642 
10,564 
11,894 
13,909 

134.903 
27,915 
12,541 
7,980 
39.145 
20,516 
13,265 
7,066 
6,475 

9.241 



9.995 
2,481 
1,945 

29,893 

21,973 

394,420 



1,528 
8,439 

36,402 
3.088 
3.859 
6.217 

15.816 



95.488 

325,931 

9,699 



927 
322 

2,9*1 

1,214 

53,659 



3,838 

198,675 

1,614 



181 

4 

12,105 
3,759 
67.812 



1.501 
21.970 
3,443 
2,093 



24,547 

57 

1,397 



10,740 
5,879 
7,698 



9,572 
37,104 
3.948 



16.916 
1.411 
44,251 



I,404 
18,679 



2,863 
1,455 



3,563 

287 
12,363 



I4,I0B 
2.546 
1.962 
1.527 



121 
1,082 
10,615 
1.593 

2.274 

2,604 

16,192 

619 

1,257 
25 

1,036 
216 

8,482 
248 
520 
332 



8,051 
1,549 
1,121 



1,109 
11,725 



2,463 
6,671 



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100 



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TABLE 36. ALIEN POPUUIION, BY STATES Op RESIDENCEl 1940, 1951, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965 . 



1940 1951 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 



Total ... 

Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbl 
Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Io«a 

Kansas 

l<antucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

North Carolina .... 
North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

U.S. Terr, and Poss 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands .. 

Other 



5.009.657 2.265.032 2.948.973 3.038.304 3.128.765 3.236.664 3.335.591 3.393.209 3.482.553 



100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1 00.0 100.0 



5,132 
3,405 
31,954 
3,389 
542,464 

27,473 
158,128 
6,428 
14,752 
41,327 

5,187 
91,447 
8,232 
325,070 
44,385 

24,648 
15,955 
5,558 
17,310 
47,233 

37,792 
364,421 
303,103 

61,433 
3,219 

43,550 
13,777 
18,933 
6,118 
30,538 

279,199 

12,402 

1,257,501 

4,207 

10,482 

203,038 
6,946 

34,424 
370,020 

52,570 



7,400 

5,137 

213,698 

10,487 

15,927 
10,093 
81,636 
23,662 
75,127 
5,917 



2,426 
1,103 
24,061 
1,418 
326,158 

13,598 
71,223 
2,571 
9,314 
26,011 

3,061 
66,161 
3,791 
110,563 
18,652 

9,826 
6,127 
2,873 
7,678 
18,931 

22,156 
146,028 
128,816 

19,970 
1,698 

15,274 
4,738 
6,697 
2,991 

11,031 

116,580 
6,294 

545,990 
3,959 
2,790 

77,351 
2,811 
16,947 



1,471 

1,822 

3,065 

165,927 



7,704 

9,260 
45,097 

6,940 
17,293 

2,108 



4,583 
2,597 
35,163 
2,147 
567,464 

19,536 
75,298 
4,942 
17,766 
83,577 



9,938 
10,650 

5,355 
13,001 
19,967 



21,162 
5,263 
7,755 
4,465 

10,344 

151,437 
12,712 

553,703 
10,173 
2,665 

108,892 
6,239 

18,421 
126,073 

17,743 

3,879 
2,370 
5,401 
237,514 
12,260 

7,669 
18,625 
51,217 

6,409 
34,684 

2,491 



8,172 
5,578 
3,286 



2,699 

36,890 

2,173 

617,733 

19,340 
76,869 
5,028 
15,494 
117,619 



10,644 
11,103 
5,287 
13,404 
20,206 

26,632 
126,458 
144,456 

22,711 
2,650 

20,732 
5,136 
7,226 
4,680 

10,263 

154,661 
13,033 

563,700 
8,657 
3,012 

109,299 
6,256 

19,049 
123,382 

17,483 

4,198 
2,293 
5,669 
233,579 
12,202 

7,557 
16,711 
51,684 

6,182 
33,601 

2,451 



6,846 
8,556 
3,755 



3,205 

40,242 

2,316 

660,416 

19,921 
75,100 
4,392 
16,436 
155,810 

9,549 
49,196 

4,992 
199,001 
27,817 

10,349 
11,228 
5,248 
14,185 
20,081 

29,455 
130,462 
135,378 

22,522 
2,943 

20,076 
5,196 
7,528 
5,262 

10,464 

153,179 

14,615 

574,637 

9,339 

3,127 

96,561 
7,262 
20,128 
119,058 
17,678 

4,312 
2,354 
6,068 
237,749 
11,992 

7,473 
17,399 
52,016 

6,101 
34,489 

2,412 



5,952 
15,581 
5,926 



2,945 

41,754 

2,432 

710,419 

21,090 
77,153 
4,154 
15,032 
182,250 



10,359 
10,833 
5,988 
16,157 
20,280 

30,853 
132,774 
129,160 

21,880 
3,402 

20,223 
5,227 
7,442 
6,080 

10,614 

159,549 
15,139 

600,468 
9,550 
3,099 

92,778 
7,620 
20,476 
109,737 
17,559 

5,355 
2,299 
6,345 
241,001 
12,408 

7,600 
16,986 
52,930 

5,944 
33,405 

2,580 



6,985 
21,805 
6,699 



5,271 
2,776 
43,665 
2,715 
767,022 

21,124 
73,371 
3,711 
17,221 
175,448 

11,661 
47,616 
4,482 
203,406 
27,013 

9,861 
11,160 

6,293 
17,685 
20,007 

31,778 
135,341 
135,412 

21,771 
3,641 

20,247 
5,136 
7,577 
6,933 

10,851 



86,958 
8,155 
21,032 
104,549 
17,749 

4,754 
2,112 
6,907 
246,280 
12,656 

7,465 
19.149 
52,054 

5,691 
31,267 

2,402 



7,424 
26,784 
7,507 



6,069 
2,822 
43,702 
2,470 
610,400 

21,098 



12,596 
46,352 
4,398 
197,734 
27,552 

10,070 
11,766 
6,612 
17,646 
20,040 

33,639 
133,000 
131,210 

20,883 
3,195 

20,361 
4,946 
7,410 
7,407 

11,121 

176,835 
17,003 

620,119 
11,420 
2,977 

82,320 
8,844 
22,312 
102,465 
17,507 

4,868 
2,024 
7,163 
245,880 
13,080 

7,459 
22,854 
50,914 

5,452 
32,296 

2,352 



2,873 

47,607 

2,541 

848,846 

20,362 
81,266 
5,023 
17,955 
184,869 

12,662 
45,794 
4,347 
208,427 
27,366 

9,599 
11,157 

6,387 
18,416 
20,312 

37,201 
135,417 
136,596 

20,815 
3,472 

20,299 
4,842 
7,436 
8,036 

11,652 

177,351 
16,580 

629,052 
11,019 
3,029 

85,465 
8,708 
22,285 
99,220 
17,384 

5,045 
1,978 
7,155 
240,954 
12,719 

7,467 
22,764 
51,333 

5,396 
31,712 

2,334 

8,159 
40,037 
7,617 



DECLARATIONS OF INTENTION FILED, PETITIONS FOR NATURALIZATION FILED, 
PERSONS NATURALIZED, AND PETITIONS FOR NATURALIZATION DENIED: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1907 - 1966 



Declara- 
tions 
filed 



Petitions 
filed 



Persons naturalized 



Military 



Petitions 
denied 



1907 _ 1966 
1907 - 1910 

1911 - 1920 

1921 - 1930 

1931 - 19A0 

1931 

1932 

1933 

193A 

1935 

1936 

1937 

1938 

1939 

1940 

1941 _ 1950 

1941 

1942 

1943 

1944 

1945 

1946 

1947 

1948 

1949 

1950 

1951 - 1960 

1951 

1952 

1953 

1954 

1955 

1956 

1957 

1958 

1959 

1960 

1961 

1962 

1963 

1964 

1965 

1966 



526.322 



2.686 



2.709 



1.369 



106 
101 
83 
108 
136 
148 
176 
150 
155 
203 

920 



224 
221 
115 
42 
31 
28 
37 
60 
64 
93 

323 



91 
111 
23 
9 
10 
12 
15 
16 
16 
16 

15 
15 
14 
14 
13 
12 



164.036 



1.381 



1.884 



479 



1.637 



145 
131 
112 
117 
131 
167 
165 
175 
213 
278 

1.938 



277 
343 
377 
325 
195 
123 



1.230 



61 
94 
98 
130 
213 
137 
140 
117 
109 
127 

138 
129 
121 
113 
106 
104 



7. 886.094 
111.738 



1.716 



113 



474 
062 
629 
125 
378 
127 
464 
413 
413 
028 

066 



140 
136 
112 
110 
118 
140 
162 
158 
185 
232 

1.837 



807 
487 
125 
717 
917 
864 
802 
265 
044 
038 

483 



275 

268 

281 

39 2 

208 

134 

77 

69 

64 

64 

1.148 



634 
086 
128 
722 
508 
701 
547 
344 
270 
543 

718 
682 
170 
218 
813 
853 



53 
87 
90 
104 
197 
138 
137 
118 
102 
117 

130 
124 
121 
109 
101 
100 



.412.860 
111.738 



67 2 



244.300 



1.128 



56.206 



1.773 



573 



19,891 



1,518 



3,224 

2 

99 5 

2,802 

481 
2,053 
3,936 
3,638 
2,760 

149,799 



143 
136 
113 
113 
118 
141 
164 
162 
188 
235 

1.987 



747 
762 
459 
766 
707 
849 
442 
080 
138 
279 

241 



1,547 

1,602 

37,474 

49,213 

22,695 

15,213 

16,462 

1,070 

2,456 

2,067 

41.705 



277 

270 

318 

441 

231 

150 

93 

70 

66 

66 



741 
070 
476 
086 
568 
681 
198 
9 50 
623 
848 

731 
972 
618 
629 
214 
49 8 



975 

1,585 

1,575 

13,745 

11,958 

7,204 

845 

916 

1,308 

1,594 

1,719 
2,335 
2,560 
2,605 
3,085 
2,561 



54 
88 
92 
117 
209 
145 
138 
119 
103 
119 

132 
127 
124 
112 
104 
103 



185 



464 



10.-) 



TABLE 37A. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY GENERAL AND SPECIAL NATURALIZATION PROVISIONSi 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1962 - 1966 



Naturalization provisions 



1962- 
1966 



1962 



1963 



1964 



1965 



Total 



General provisions 
Special provisions 



Persons married to U. S. 
citizens 

Children, including adopted 
children of U. S. citizen 
parents 

Former U. S. citizens who 
lost citizenship by 
marriage 

Philippine citizens who 
entered the United States 
prior to May 1, 1934, and 
have resided continuously 
in the United States 

Persons who served in U. S. 
Armed Forces for three 
years 

Persons who served in U. S. 
Armed Forces during World 
War I, World War II or the 
Korean hostilities \/ 

Lodge Act enlistees 

Persons who served on certain 
U. S. vessels 

Former U.S. citizens who 
lost citizenship by enter- 
ing the armed forces of 
foreign countries during 
World War II 

Nationals but not citizens 
of the United States 

Persons naturalized under 
private law 

Other 



571,077 



127.307 



124.178 



112.234 



104.299 



427,529 

143.548 



87,344 

42,524 

224 

25 
8,175 



4,695 
276 



133 

14 

128 

5 
5 



98,739 
28.568 



93,325 

30.853 



82,621 
29.613 



76,630 
27.669 



17,379 

8,723 

55 

17 
1,482 



790 
63 

37 



3 
17 



19,048 



9,136 



53 



1,640 

820 
100 

30 

1 

20 

1 



17,867 



9,056 



41 



1,782 

749 

74 

26 

3 

9 

3 
2 



16,602 



7,914 



38 



1,696 



1,365 
24 

18 



1/ Section 22(b), Act of September 26, 1961, added: "or the Korean hostilities". 



10-i 



8. PERSONS HATURALIZED, BY GENERAL AND SPECIAL NATURALIZATION PROVISIONS 
AND COUNTRY OR REGION OF FORMER ALLEGIANCE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1966 

^S«* Table 37A for detailed flgurei by natural tzatlon prDvt'aloniT 









Pe 


raona natura 


U«J 


Country or region of foraer all«glanc« 


Tot.1 
nuBb>«r 


Under 
general 

UaClon 
Drovlilona 


Married 

V. S. 
cltliena 


Children 
of U. S. 


Military 


Other 




103.059 


76.214 


16.448 


7.695 


2.561 


141 




62,410 


47.503 


9,701 


4,358 


831 


17 




no 

1,012 
334 
551 
408 
127 
265 

1,446 
13.706 

3,373 

2,971 

2.B85 

10.981 

388 

393 

2.762 
497 

3,833 

2,179 
299 
731 
327 
587 
347 

8.930 
848 

1,764 
356 


106 

817 

267 

501 

316 

119 

222 

952 

8.776 

1,869 

2,733 

2,594 

8.485 

353 

366 

2.429 

413 

3,421 

1.605 

273 

416 

279 

494 

209 

6.811 

806 

1,577 

274 

7.270 


3 

106 

38 

34 

74 

6 

29 

390 

3,287 

1,167 

99 

97 

1,568 

21 

12 

201 

59 

213 

166 

20 

249 

31 

77 

123 

1.462 

16 

116 

37 

4.326 


1 

75 

25 

11 

8 

2 

11 

80 

1,337 

321 

87 

141 

892 

11 
71 
15 
175 
397 
3 
62 
11 
12 
15 
481 
17 
56 
37 

1.748 


14 

5 
9 

3 
24 
306 
16 
51 
52 
33 
10 

60 
10 
23 
10 
3 

6 
3 

150 
9 
14 
8 

l.OU 












CsectioilovAkla 


1 














G«r^nv 










1 




1 




3 








_ 




1 








I 




1 








_ 








1 








6 


U.S.S.R 


1 




_ 




14 




3,111 

128 

357 

175 

2.814 

2,673 

401 

1,180 

374 

59 

2.384 

133 

50 

69 

237 

20.899 


1.552 

134 

102 

219 

100 

2,418 

762 

267 

162 

228 

28 

1.003 

90 

19 

11 

175 

17.303 


695 

74 
12 

121 
67 

257 

1.576 

88 

622 
97 
27 

580 
30 
20 
20 
40 

1.746 


458 
15 
9 
13 

5 
136 
314 
40 
388 
48 
3 
243 
13 
11 
38 
14 

1.261 


403 

1 
5 

3 
3 
12 
6 

1 

1 

558 

7 
572 


3 








_ 




_ 




_ 




_ 




9 




_ 




1 




_ 




_ 




_ 




_ 




_ 




- 




1 




17 




8,579 
5,677 
3.829 
333 
2 38 
519 
112 
170 
119 
125 
266 
198 
734 

2.538 


6,788 
4,782 
3,453 
291 
218 
406 
74 
115 
97 
96 
230 
175 
578 

2.021 


895 
328 
201 
28 
12 
88 
32 
16 

17 
17 
13 
92 

278 


651 
404 

91 
6 
5 

16 
1 

33 
7 
7 
6 
2 

32 

158 


241 
161 
81 
8 
3 
9 
5 

8 

5 
8 
7 
32 

77 


4 




2 




3 




_ 




_ 




_ 




2 




- 




_ 




5 




1 




_ 




4 




719 
103 
316 
200 
481 
261 
218 
164 
76 

562 


614 
75 
248 
133 

384 
225 

170 
117 
55 

398 


63 
11 
37 
35 

14 
29 
31 
14 

121 


32 
10 
26 
24 
29 

9 

15 
6 

38 


9 

5 
8 

22 
15 
9 

1 
1 

5 


1 




_ 




_ 




_ 




2 




_ 




1 




- 




- 






^. 


101 
111 
45 
34 
219 
52 


52 
77 
36 
30 
174 
29 

312 


43 
23 
2 
3 
37 
13 

87 


5 
10 
7 
1 

8 

12 


1 

1 

1 
2 

10 


- 




_ 




_ 


T 


_ 




_ 




_ 




1 




278 
72 
72 

437 
1.422 


218 
48 
46 

186 
1.221 


51 
20 
16 

116 

73 


7 
3 
2 

32 
88 


2 
1 

7 

27 
28 


_ 




_ 




1 




76 


gj . notd 


12 







10^ 



Country or region of 
former .llegl.noe 


1957- 
1966 


1957 


1958 


1959 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


1966 






138,043 


119.866 


103.931 


119.442 


132.450 


127.307 


124.178 


112.234 


104.299 


103.059 


Europe 


825,112 


107,358 


91.595 


74.613 


85.116 


93.122 


88.302 


84.940 


71.636 


66.020 


62.410 




1.657 
15.056 
4,965 
13.483 
5.990 
4.601 
3.924 
18.530 
177.128 
40.132 
37,923 
35,187 
122,188 
15.142 
10.349 
25,235 
8,541 
73,456 
13,356 
7,242 
6,891 
5,988 
7.466 
3.922 
107.286 
29.433 
26,597 
3.444 

121.335 


163 
2.319 

653 
2,739 

777 
1.432 

460 
2,357 
17.445 
4.791 
3,924 
3.624 
9,056 
4,482 
2.391 
2.060 
1.288 
16,582 

981 
1,586 

664 

905 

837 

509 
13.210 
6.993 
4.647 

483 

7.548 


120 

1.868 

594 

2,271 

768 

739 

397 

2,130 

20,486 

3,370 

2,541 

3,259 

8,462 

2.511 

1.487 

2,000 

1.117 

11.038 

1.049 

1,354 

634 

757 

784 

316 

12,428 

4,582 

4,154 

379 

7.496 


87 

1.510 

528 

1.474 

629 

523 

405 

1,920 

18,442 

2,457 

1,444 

3,163 

8,079 

1,634 

1.132 

2,078 

941 

7,603 

976 

682 

533 

681 

768 

312 

10.990 

3,205 

2,121 

296 

8.313 


147 

1.602 

545 

1.522 

683 

414 

502 

1,979 

19.003 

3,413 

1,437 

3,673 

14,560 

1,562 

1,164 

2,134 

971 

8,021 

1,258 

624 

805 

754 

799 

385 

1 1 , 303 

3,372 

2,211 

273 

11.071 


236 

1.660 

541 

1.499 

664 

422 

555 

1,854 

18,738 

6,140 

1,546 

3,7 54 

18,365 

1,485 

1,287 

2,134 

1,005 

8,605 

1,493 

752 

862 

682 

867 

470 

10.544 

3.850 

2,810 

302 

12.308 


303 

1.474 

471 

1.127 

603 

362 

404 

1.737 

18.568 

6.092 

5,682 

3,507 

17.449 

1.055 

821 

3.260 

811 

5,362 

1,163 

687 

616 

513 

770 

345 

9,696 

2,306 

2,628 

490 

14.573 


198 

1.352 

494 

961 

562 

241 

328 

1.889 

19.165 

3.874 

9.601 

4.303 

12,171 

856 

656 

3,556 

711 

4,426 

1,356 

484 

675 

523 

719 

392 

10,989 

1,877 

2,284 

297 

15.253 


138 

1.196 

399 

681 

522 

182 

328 

1.697 

16.646 

3.360 

4.723 

3.697 

12.323 

624 

520 

2,748 

673 

3,969 

1,183 

387 

692 

443 

712 

421 

9,826 

1,329 

1,965 

246 

15.724 


155 

1.063 

406 

658 

374 

159 

280 

1,521 

14,929 

3,256 

4,054 

3,322 

10,742 

545 

498 

2,503 

527 

4,017 

1,718 

387 

679 

403 

623 

425 

9.370 

1.071 

2,013 

322 

14.680 
















Denmark 


408 


Finland 


265 


Gemany 


13.706 


Hunsarv 


































2.179 
























8,930 


U.S.S.R 


848 


Other Europe 


356 
14.369 




28.304 

1.526 

470 

2.268 

1.124 

16.800 

32.086 

3.022 

8.409 

3,132 

423 

20,773 

775 

180 

211 

1,832 

196.302 


1,491 
80 
16 
149 
67 
405 
2,861 
112 
122 
246 
25 
1.695 
138 

' 

2 

138 

18.942 


1.542 

76 

7 

138 

86 

616 

2.736 

140 

168 

263 

24 

1.431 

129 

1 
135 


1,395 
89 
16 
150 

65 
946 
3.094 
172 
416 
283 
28 
1.506 

To 

9 
134 

18.035 


1.968 

133 

20 

187 

81 

1.145 

4,189 

187 

651 

269 

32 

2.085 

4/ 

10 
107 

19.503 


2.683 

149 

36 

206 

106 

1.143 

3.790 

287 

1.031 

323 

54 

2.329 

4/ 

13 

18 

138 


4.109 

147 

70 

207 

134 

1.545 

3.563 

565 

1,169 

291 

36 

2.438 

4/ 

17 

17 

265 

20.378 


4.268 

174 

66 

260 

113 

2.274 

3,459 

435 

1,249 

362 

67 

2,132 

125 

17 

18 

19,560 


4.045 

252 

54 

319 

147 

3.029 

3,061 

333 

1.396 

378 

52 

2.274 

121 

26 

34 

203 

19.782 


3.692 

202 

55 

295 

150 

2,883 

2.660 

390 

1.027 

343 

46 

2.499 

129 

35 

33 

241 

18.626 






















2.814 




































69 


Other Asia 2/ 


237 
20.899 




97,437 
58 , 508 
22,034 
2,671 
1,392 
1,575 
321 
1,421 
1.064 
982 
2.026 
1,780 
5.091 

15.871 


10,891 

5.541 

1.344 

237 

47 

115 

87 
70 
149 
133 
328 

926 


10,211 

5,042 

1,323 

186 

70 

124 
98 
69 
153 
120 
361 

917 


10,324 

5,147 

1,319 

199 

79 

120 
82 
73 
163 
151 
378 


10,215 
5,913 
1,928 

237 
136 

107 
95 
83 
167 
173 
449 

1.318 


10,033 
8,405 

2,774 
280 
111 

129 
130 
112 
166 
216 
464 

1.391 


9,272 

7,205 

2,211 

318 

131 

147 
119 
88 
183 
183 
521 

1.427 


9,944 
5,285 
2.101 
330 
199 
201 
46 
163 
113 
123 
251 
205 
599 

1.986 


9.479 
5,213 
2,683 
290 
164 
374 
83 
158 
115 
119 
250 
207 
647 

2.139 


8,489 
5,080 
2,522 
261 
217 
481 
80 
188 
106 
120 
278 
194 
610 

2.136 








Cuba 


3.829 
333 










Trinidad and Tobago 3/ 


112 
























2.538 




3.951 
809 
2,047 
1.263 
3.122 
1,761 
1.431 
1.003 
484 

4.705 


166 
24 

138 
89 

202 

123 
94 
52 
38 

210 


174 
43 

141 
65 

227 

106 
87 
46 
28 

207 


196 
75 
143 
103 
244 
121 
102 
67 
42 

415 


253 
76 
184 
105 
2 58 
178 
134 
86 
44 

452 


291 
66 
207 
117 
270 
183 
116 
102 
39 

461 


323 
78 
199 
96 
287 
165 
144 
93 
42 

620 


545 
108 
254 
149 
353 
215 
185 
119 
58 

533 


629 
125 
224 
160 
419 
206 
176 
141 
59 

589 


655 
111 
241 
179 
381 
203 
175 
133 
58 

656 


























218 






Other South Aaarlca 2/ 

Africa 


76 
562 




744 
901 
226 
437 
2.079 
318 

4.004 


48 
12 
27 
106 

17 

491 


62 

e 

28 
86 
16 


61 
75 
19 
28 
211 
21 


76 
78 
31 
33 
208 
26 


79 
68 
18 
25 
250 
21 

345 


89 
111 

20 

95 
264 

41 

378 


126 
104 
26 
61 
170 
46 

391 


102 
141 
17 
21 
270 
38 

421 


103 
103 
30 
85 
295 
40 

474 








Sudan 


45 




219 




422 




3.014 
707 
283 

2.390 
15.090 


396 
93 
2 

135 
2.433 


315 
65 

3 

106 
1.405 


260 
61 
6 

181 
954 


293 
73 
6 

201 
1.409 


271 
67 

260 
1.743 


298 

73 

7 

267 
1.362 


285 
67 
39 

283 
1.232 


297 
69 
55 

251 
1.692 


321 
67 
86 

269 

1,438 
















Stateless and not reported 


1,422 



Includes Taiwan. 
Independent countries. 

Included In United Kingdom prior to 1963. 
United Arab Republic Includes Egypt only, prior 
From 1959 to 1962 Syrian Arab Republic Is In 



TABLE 40. PERS 



Countrv or region 
of former 
.Ueslence 


S3 
S 5 


II : 
III 


1 i 

: 8 
11 


1 


1 * 
I? 


3 s 




111 




X « 

1 1 = 




5 S^ 
S S % 


Housewives, 
children, and 
others vlth no 

occupation not 
reported 




103.059 


9.604 


208 


3,823 


7.430 


2,230 


9.928 


10,319 


1.029 


8.686 


405 


3.761 


45.636 




62.410 


5.039 


105 


1.919 


4.242 


1.131 


7.250 


6.909 


624 


5.170 


136 


2.718 


27.167 


"ITh* 


110 

1,012 

334 

551 

408 

127 

265 

1,446 

13,706 

3.373 

2.971 

2.665 

10,981 

388 

393 

2,762 

497 

3.833 

2.179 

299 

731 

327 

587 

347 

8,930 

84B 

1,764 

356 


5 
108 
45 
64 

14 

18 

126 

842 

162 

343 

302 

289 

51 

39 

427 

52 

282 

35 

68 
38 
118 

1.193 
72 
141 
40 


3 

1 
1 

2 
29 
2 
3 

5 

2 
27 

5 
6 
1 
2 
2 

1 
6 

1 
23 


24 
12 
33 
21 

52 
344 
218 
117 
61 
196 
9 
7 

22 
101 

27 
16 
43 
23 
348 
33 
40 
7 

754 


81 

29 

27 

26 

17 

14 

97 

1,020 

108 

135 

337 

453 

43 

27 

238 

23 

240 

62 

23 

31 

24 

51 

14 

944 

53 

83 

38 

705 


25 
10 
16 

3 

32 
249 
49 
36 
65 
90 

89 
15 

56 
13 
3 
6 
6 
21 
5 
267 
26 
18 

262 


19 

105 

65 
62 
14 
45 
87 
1,374 
341 
550 
284 
1,762 
50 
42 
322 

509 
179 
35 

35 

28 
716 

92 
307 

38 

700 


16 

73 

22 

64 

24 

9 

10 

83 

857 

400 

437 

242 

2,028 

34 

46 

201 

29 

633 

673 

33 

60 

13 

20 

32 

104 
2 58 
34 

1.077 


13 

5 
7 
3 
2 
10 
16 
106 

41 
90 
36 

22 
10 
39 
17 
6 

5 
6 

143 
13 
16 

J' 


26 
79 
33 
54 
24 
6 

140 
953 
445 
275 
352 
899 

33 

37 
159 

29 
330 
117 

25 

33 

54 
19 

711 
72 

178 
21 

1.492 


2 

1 

11 

3 
B 

1 
15 

3 
51 

1 
8 
1 

2 
1 
94 


26 
6 
18 

2 
10 
38 
223 
96 
136 
167 
1,045 
17 
28 

19 
219 

214 
13 
26 
5 
3 
7 
132 
35 

9 

211 












C h 1 ekle 




n^* 
























„ 
















. . . 












rt 


1 ,416 






1 
















T 








U.S.S.R 


581 


Oh E 


160 




7.?23 




3.111 
224 
128 
357 
175 

2,814 

2.673 
401 

1,180 
374 
59 

2,384 
133 
50 
69 
237 


316 
98 

21 
136 
37 
313 
65 
36 
81 

26 

195 

27 

9 

7 
26 


2 

2 

7 


336 
11 

20 
25 
195 
26 
52 
12 
25 
10 
17 

1 
1 
17 


118 

14 
8 
25 
11 
194 
71 
37 
26 
17 
5 
146 
5 
5 
3 
20 

1.991 


51 

3 
2 
8 
6 
91 
13 
30 

3 
8 

7 
696 


36 
3 
15 

15 

9 

415 

16 

30 
6 

20 

97 
14 

20 
1.509 


281 

2 
16 
25 
15 
339 
134 
23 
31 

139 
13 
2 

30 

1.919 


6 

2 

3 

13 
14 
1 
6 

1 
303 


390 
5 
13 
18 
6 
132 
113 
29 
44 
18 

686 
6 

3 

29 
1.638 


5 
2 

1 
72 

6 
166 


16 
2 

5 

27 
41 

2 
8 

95 
2 

706 




- 


74 








66 




















L h 






^ 








54 












^^ 




8.772 




8,579 
5.677 
3.829 
333 
238 
519 
112 
170 
119 
125 
266 
198 
734 


1,156 
159 
613 
54 
41 
47 
20 
12 
10 
11 
26 
25 


31 
35 
6 


433 
117 
296 
13 
6 
9 

3 
1 
1 
5 

16 


790 
301 
462 
37 
40 
62 
16 
13 
25 
22 
34 
35 
154 

289 


347 
141 
150 
11 

5 
8 

3 

2 
2 
15 

69 


664 
336 
280 
19 
15 
64 
8 
15 
10 
U 
21 
13 
53 

209 


543 
483 
517 
68 
40 
51 
14 
17 
12 

58 

32 
73 

170 


53 
129 

3 
15 

25 
3 
5 
I 
2 
9 

30 

20 


545 
382 
345 
32 
20 
113 
12 
21 
13 
11 
30 
16 
98 

179 


10 

154 

1 


439 
56 

8 
9 

2 

7 
5 
50 


3.001 

1,078 

95 

131 
30 
80 
























65 
246 








916 


^°A"'e*ti™" 


719 
103 
316 
200 
481 
261 
218 
164 
76 


178 
31 
48 
30 
95 
34 
45 
34 
15 


2 

1 


13 
12 
17 
11 
2 

5 

36 


79 
7 
26 
19 
61 

34 
13 
6 

58 


29 
1 
2 
6 
9 
8 

5 
2 

20 


68 
3 
21 
19 

18 
19 
13 

24 


41 
1 
35 

31 
30 
18 

5 

2 

30 


9 

1 


41 
11 
16 
14 

37 
23 
24 
8 

5 

27 


1 
1 


15 

8 
6 

5 
1 

6 




Rofi 


136 
89 








85 
64 
69 

34 












246 


j^ *^* 


101 
111 
45 
34 
219 
52 


13 
30 

1 
55 


: 


3 
5 
3 

20 

15 


13 
8 

2 
25 

3 

25 


5 

1 
9 

23 


2 

5 
2 
5 
9 

1 

37 


3 
3 
9 

5 


'- 


3 
2 
9 

29 


1 


2 

1 

9 


50 
20 








83 

24 


United Ar«b KepubUc (Egypt) ... 




195 




278 
72 
72 

437 
1.422 


46 

14 

1 

170 


;; 


11 

3 
1 

5 


21 

3 
1 

20 
100 


13 
6 


26 

5 
6 

21 
178 


12 
3 

146 


17 


16 
107 


1 
2 


3 

31 
30 






36 






240 
577 





1(17 



Total 
parioni 
CurallKd 



All countrls 



Au>trU 

••'•l" 

Ci«chotlov«klA 
DanaArk 

rinUnd 

Hun|>ry 

Iraland 

IMly 

Utvl* 

Lithuania 

Natharlanda ... 

Poland 

Portugal 

tuaanla 

Spain 

Swadan 

Sultlarland ... 

Unltad Klngdoa 

U.S.S.K 

Yugoslavia .... 
Othar Europa . . 



China y 
India ... 
Indonaata 



Jordan 

L.banon 

Pakistan 

Phltlpplnaa 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Thailand 

Viet Nan 

Other Asia II 

North Anrlca 

Canada 

Ha>lco 

Cuba 

Doalnlcan Republic .. 

Haiti 

Jaaalca 

Trinidad and Tobago . 

Costa Rlcs 

El Salvador 

Cuateiula 

Hondura 

Nicaragua 

Panana 

South Aaarlea 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Bratll 

Clllla 

ColoabU 

Peru ............ 



Horocco 

South Africa 

Sudan 

Unltad Arab Republic (IgypC 
Othar Africa II 

Oceania 

Auatralla 

New ZealanS 

Other Oceania p 

U.S. poaeesslona- 

Statelesa jnd QOt reported ^, 



l.ltUi 


473 


13,706 


4,661 


3.373 


1,620 


2.971 


1,730 


2.885 


1,313 


10.981 


5,625 



8,930 

848 

1,764 



8.579 
5,677 
3,829 



108 





FeinA 


Ci 


Country or r«glon of for»«r •Ueglanc* 


Total 


Undar 
18 


18- 
19 


20- 
29 


30- 
39 


49 
vaara 


50- 
59 
vaara 


60- 
Ve»r» 


70- 80 
79 yaara 
VtlTl and ov,r 




56.523 


3.457 


3.070 


15.314 


16.490 


9.335 


4.835 


2.667 


948 


207 






1.916 




10.457 


9.605 


5.467 


2.894 


1.746 


596 


110 


Alh < ' 


30 
579 
182 
265 

155 

973 

9,045 

1.753 

1,241 

1,572 

5,356 

199 

201 

1.2B9 

247 

2.073 

1.147 

165 

430 

324 

5,409 
469 
852 
190 


26 
6 
6 

5 

1 

43 
592 
157 
32 
49 
387 
1 

28 

71 

35 

3 
5 
205 
6 
30 
19 

838 


53 
13 
20 

5 
9 
29 
487 
83 
80 
25 
550 

19 
94 

190 
79 

3 
10 

8 

32 
38 
9 

314 


140 
32 
36 

76 

32 
274 
3,347 
680 
274 
620 
1.723 

58 

43 
317 

64 
360 
366 

19 
115 

54 

42 
1.375 
63 
195 
49 

1.761 


8 

154 
57 
52 
68 

33 
363 
2.936 
459 
312 
450 
1.065 

31 

27 
428 

66 
360 
227 

29 
156 

55 
160 

38 
1,722 

31 
231 

58 

3,169 


41 
66 

22 
34 
155 
1.015 
192 
2 30 
187 
747 
35 
45 
302 
49 
485 
151 
41 
62 
32 
59 
29 
1,038 
108 
183 
30 

1,162 


48 
11 
55 
17 

19 
56 
435 
101 
158 
130 
523 
30 
35 
95 
31 
269 
83 
23 
26 
22 
20 
26 
485 
71 
91 
15 

435 


6 

43 
20 
34 
5 
7 
15 

184 
64 

104 
90 

245 
30 
17 
18 
21 

173 
36 
41 
15 
16 
15 
20 

298 

110 
68 
7 

199 


22 
2 
12 

3 
5 
8 
35 
17 
42 
IB 
95 
6 
12 

5 
116 

6 
10 
8 
I 
8 
95 
39 
13 

39 






7 




- 


* * . , 




k 








. 




_ 




r^* 


12 


' 




n** 




f nd 




. . 


21 


* J' 




I It-h 1 




* . 




* 




P 1 nd 




i ' 




t 




c 








. , J 




T 




IJ It d Ki d 


17 


U.S.S.R 




"^ 








* ' 


1,392 
68 
57 
139 
58 
1,364 
2,299 
162 
927 

8 
1,049 
52 
37 
50 
89 


179 

5 
5 

3 

47 
144 

17 
263 

29 
1 

93 

26 
551 


67 
4 
2 
3 
3 
157 
22 
13 
6 

5 
582 


401 
20 
7 
32 
20 

214 

313 
69 

331 
37 

250 
10 
9 
15 
29 

2.474 


392 
25 
26 

13 

293 

1.527 

45 

294 

2 
407 
14 
16 

9 
18 

2.864 


193 

5 

26 

409 
228 
9 
22 
20 
1 
205 
8 
3 

13 

2.188 


111 
5 
5 

6 

175 

8 

5 

61 

3 

11 

1.240 


41 
4 
1 

18 
1 

60 

34 

6 
11 

8 
769 


6 

6 

1 
6 

3 
3 

1 
269 




Inril ~ 


- 


" ' 


- 


J 




an . ... 


- 


** . 


1 


/^ 


2 


[T 


- 


„ 


- 


■ " * 


- 




- 


Phi 


- 


A . p" * ... 




Th il nd 




y „ 






- 




89 


c^ d "^ * 


4.703 

2.938 

1,769 

193 

135 

276 

lie 

72 
75 
120 
112 
457 


235 
203 

42 
3 
3 
9 

1 
24 

3 
1 
19 


239 

238 

58 

9 

U 

5 

3 

3 


989 
7 30 
393 
48 
23 

17 
21 
28 

27 
39 
94 


1.320 
420 
615 
62 
45 
78 
25 
20 

39 
53 
38 
132 


1,077 
312 
431 

41 
65 

20 
15 

19 
12 
130 

228 


573 
306 
169 

15 
35 

15 

14 
16 
63 

116 


216 
455 
46 

20 

3 

I 
1 
2 
7 

43 


45 
198 
12 

1 
1 

1 


7 






" 




_ ... 




B n a «p 


- 






_ . . -J T h- 


- 








- 




- 


Ho fid 


- 






_ *" 


- 




. 




347 

190 
107 
235 
130 
90 
80 
37 


19 

15 
13 
13 
5 

3 
6 
2 

18 


9 

1 

3 

10 
3 

5 


81 

12 
27 

71 
36 
22 
10 

64 


128 
13 
68 
38 
83 
46 
37 
23 

92 


60 

43 
21 

19 

18 
23 

3 

36 


40 
2 

19 
8 

21 
9 
5 

3 

26 


10 
2 
8 

2 

5 

11 


1 
1 

9 


- 


rI??"« '** 




It 


- 


^** 


- 




- 




- 


"* 


- 


V 1 


- 




- 




_ 


" 


70 
53 
24 
17 
90 
29 

239 


3 
5 
3 

3 

6 


1 
1 

2 

9 


30 
11 
8 
6 
18 
11 

46 


32 
15 

5 
5 
27 
6 

65 


3 
10 

3 

2 
15 

5 

82 


1 
6 

3 

13 

1 

23 


1 
5 
1 

5 


1 

1 
6 




aJ^'^^m". 




_ . 




_, . 


- 




- 




- 




1 


*'*'"J* 11 


160 

42 
37 

284 
678 


5 

1 

16 
29 


3 
6 

9 

62 


21 
13 

IJ 

71 
137 


45 

7 
13 

118 


62 
17 

133 


18 

4 
1 

22 
79 


1 

8 
86 


2 

3 
26 


- 


H Z 1 nd 




- I "i/ 


- 




- 


St t ?° rvl t tMl 




ft e ••■ a no apo 





109 



TABLE 41A. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY SEX, MARITAL STATUS, MEDIAN AGE 
AND MAJOR OCCUPATION GROUP: YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 19 62 - 1966 



Sex, marital status, median 
age, and occupation 



1962 



1963 



1964 



1965 



Total naturalized 

Sex and marital status: 

Males 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Females 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Males per 1,000 females 

Median age (years): 

Both sexes 

Males 

Females 

Major occupation group: 

Professional, technical, and kindred workers 

Farmers and farm managers 

Managers, officials, and proprietors, 

except farm 

Clerical, sales, and kindred workers 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers 

Operatives and kindred workers 

Private household workers 

Service workers, except private household ... 

Farm laborers and foremen 

Laborers, except farm and mine 

Housewives, children, and others with no 

occupation 



127.307 



124.178 



112.234 



104.299 



60.988 



19,269 

39,986 

919 

814 



66.319 



12,798 

48,433 

3,776 

1,312 



9 20 



35.3 
36.0 
34.8 



11,053 
389 

4,059 
11,405 
13,769 
13,456 

1,398 

11,269 

744 

7,086 

52,679 



58.303 



18,500 

38,210 

690 

900 

3 

65.875 



51.408 



48.49 5 



16,851 

33,188 

593 

776 



60.826 



15,358 

31,766 

593 

773 
5 

55.804 



12,991 

48,616 

2,957 

1,308 

3 

885 



33.8 
34.4 
33.3 



12,714 
269 

4,296 
11,588 
13,411 
11,927 

1,368 

10,362 

553 

5,166 

52,524 



12,705 

44,534 

2,451 

1,136 



845 



33.1 
33.6 
32.7 



11,097 
241 

3,891 
10,279 
11,163 
11,027 

1,142 

9,535 
473 

4,145 

49,241 



11,746 

40,483 

2,416 

1,156 

3 



34.1 
34.6 
33.7 



9,854 
198 

3,783 

9,637 

10,328 

10,117 

1,075 

9,591 

395 

4,035 

45,286 



110 



PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY STATES OR TERRITORIES OF RESIDENCE: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1957 - 1966 



State or territory 
of residence 



1957- 
1966 



Total 

Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 
Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoml ng 

U.S. terr, and poBS.: 

Guam 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands 

All other 



119.866 



103.931 



119.442 



132.450 



127.307 



124.176 



104.299 



3,233 
2,782 
8,161 
1,197 
190,049 

10,789 
30,350 
2,329 
6,980 
27,351 

7,299 
15,312 

1,929 
88,084 
13,812 

5,205 
6,132 

4,027 
4,996 
4,177 

14,717 
52,818 
49,650 
9,940 
1,563 

9.710 
2,798 
4,621 
2,492 
3,575 

81,583 

3,547 

280,923 

4,989 

1,611 

46,247 
4,233 
7,774 

46,187 
6,433 



1,444 

2,888 

46,194 

5,641 

2,115 
11,555 
19,585 

2,000 
13,873 

1,017 



2,889 

1,888 

886 



284 
288 
822 
142 
18,991 

1,384 
3,620 
305 
1,017 
2,345 

582 

1,287 

194 

10,010 

2,164 

878 
522 
634 
514 
479 

1,832 
5,889 
6,778 
1,944 
113 

1,116 
322 
711 
264 
391 

10,055 
307 

35,432 
452 
353 

6,630 
359 
894 

6,147 
7 20 

242 
223 
327 
3,835 
509 

281 
1,313 
2,082 

205 
1,286 

131 



301 
219 
690 
123 
16,259 

1,110 

2,917 

231 

661 

2,245 

1,254 
1,220 
174 
9,470 
1,460 

725 
568 
360 
482 
401 

1,472 
5,462 
6,017 
1,198 
146 

1,043 
299 
671 
170 
340 

8,779 

338 

28,898 

480 

237 

6,053 
400 
752 

5,197 
671 

271 
205 
274 
4,170 
650 

201 
1,013 
2,160 
278 
649 
140 



326 
204 
7 60 
126 
14,944 

998 

2,439 

197 

632 

2,212 

500 
1,111 

191 
7,063 
1,465 

489 
1,029 
397 
482 
436 

1,290 

4,727 

5,568 

955 

123 

919 
300 
428 
259 
431 

7,316 

324 

23,988 

524 

167 

3,810 
446 
872 

4,325 
57 2 

266 
113 
300 
4,386 
634 

233 
1,149 
1,990 

135 

,836 
75 



317 
179 
790 
118 
17,006 

1,027 

4,398 

243 

581 

3,209 

719 
2,377 

256 
8,223 
1,472 

69 5 
594 
558 
422 
398 

1,688 

5,146 

5,854 

660 

146 

861 
489 
549 
237 
490 

7,415 

332 

28,363 

326 

118 

4,335 
364 
651 

4,867 
590 

267 
84 
243 
4,395 
646 

349 
1,239 
2,311 

282 

2,041 

87 



397 
317 
919 
123 
20,884 

1,361 

2,743 
242 
758 

2,944 

818 
1,668 

252 
10,478 
1,612 

426 
785 
364 
563 
618 

1,481 
6,364 
5.371 
1,197 
208 

1,183 
241 
504 
263 
346 

8,761 

525 

31,467 

404 

154 

5,514 
468 
911 

5,251 

877 

323 
169 
341 
5,326 
643 

204 

936 
1,710 

269 
2,014 

125 



379 
307 
754 
116 
21,010 

1,032 

3,219 

233 

799 

2,907 

547 
1,534 

203 
9,542 
1,268 

493 
547 
308 
460 
441 

1,213 

5,613 

5,227 

832 

159 

1,047 
298 
332 
201 
417 

8,869 

387 

31,225 

604 

139 

4,283 
414 
744 

4,602 
585 

365 
119 
250 
5,816 
635 

187 
1,193 
2,172 

204 

1,801 

94 



304 
361 
864 
103 
21,948 

1,273 

3,071 

246 

674 

2,754 

688 
1,629 

207 
9,461 
1,345 

421 
611 
379 
525 
361 

1,533 

5,534 

4,179 

921 

194 

1,071 
200 
455 
289 
326 

8,314 

372 

28,844 

689 

133 

5,133 

49 5 

761 

4,508 

539 

320 
181 

275 

4,835 

620 

179 
1,282 
2,052 

205 
1,595 

116 



413 
194 



353 
321 
881 
139 
20,425 

905 

2,605 

219 

568 

2,887 

717 
1.542 

148 
8,115 
1,07 2 

370 
485 
438 
513 
432 

1,443 

5,027 

4,07 3 

795 

168 

925 
272 
350 
285 
301 

7,7 58 

355 

25,195 

548 

124 

3,957 
478 
824 

4,212 
558 

292 
109 

306 

4,518 

475 

160 
1,182 
2,102 

161 

1,368 

92 



289 
305 
862 
125 
18,742 

830 

2,525 

231 

506 

2,659 

736 
1,319 

158 
8,271 

992 

359 
500 
286 
590 
315 

1,353 

4,652 

3,451 

741 

143 

7 38 
196 
345 
273 



7,128 

234 

24,540 

490 

61 

3,399 
456 
673 

3,611 
590 

245 
144 
269 
4,219 
398 

162 
1,152 
1,522 

123 

1,205 

85 



297 
196 
118 



111 



(7«-»^r^M M*-lm^ -4^toei< 



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112 



Total 

Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut . . . . 

Delaware 

District of Colu 
■Ida 



irgla 
Hawaii 
Idaho . 
1111 
Indiana 



TABLE 42B. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY TYPE OF COURT AND STATES 
OR TERRITORIES OF RESIDENCE: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1966 



103,059 

27 3 
281 
819 



is 



Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Mary land 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

nesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New Yo rk 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Penns/lvania 

Rhode : 8 land 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

U, S. territories and possessions: 

Guam 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands 



272 
342 
111 



273 
182 
623 



869 


686 


2,713 


2,185 


182 


182 


684 


684 


3,189 


3,088 


738 


7 38 


1,625 


1 ,460 


146 


97 


7,451 


7,250 


962 


962 


349 


349 


39 


277 


303 


303 


444 


444 


295 


173 


1,412 


939 


4,304 


2,763 


3,132 


2,389 


697 


665 


163 


163 


807 


807 


181 


20 


265 


265 


251 


153 


245 


84 


7,188 


2,804 


362 


156 


2,971 


19,825 


47 2 


47 2 


125 


125 


3,133 


2,544 


353 


174 


69 2 


448 


3,467 


2,399 


631 


460 



302 


302 


4,694 


3,941 


431 


95 


159 


115 


1,096 


1,096 


1,484 


1,232 


138 


138 


1,078 


776 



272 
342 
HI 



113 



•nd < 



UrUn , 

Arl*.. fho«nl« 

ULir.. AnahAl* 

CUndftl* ... 
Long Buch . 
Loa Ang.U* 

Oakland 

Paiadana ... 

San Franclac 
San Joaa ... 
Santa Ana .. 

Conn.. Bridgeport . 
Hartford ... 

Ill . , Chicago .... 
lod. . Gary 

Sptlngfl.ld 

St. Paul ... 

Rochatcar .. 
Syracuaa ... 

Phlladalphlt 
Pltt.burgh 

Ban Antonio 
Utah. Salt Uka C< 

TacoM 

WUc. Hllwukaa . 

P Inctudaa Taiwan 



114 



■ BIRTO AND YEAR ( 



All 



rl«* 



Buropa 

Austria 

Belgium 

CzechoilovAkla 

Danna rk 

Flnlind 

Franca 

Cannany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

NeCharland 

Poland 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) .... 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Aaia) .. 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

China y 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Israel 

Japan 

Jordan g/ 

Korea 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Other West Indies 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Other Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Alger^ia 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

Now Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U.S. adm. ) . 





297 


13 


»M 




265 




001 


10 


897 



115 



TABLE 45. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY SEX AND AGEt 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1959 - 1966 



Sex and age 



1959-1966 



1960 



1961 



1962 



1963 



1964 



1965 



Number actailttedl .. 

Under 18 years 

18-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-29 years 

30-34 years 

35-39 years «. 

40-44 years 

45-49 years 

50-54 years 

55-59 years 

60-64 years 

65-69 years 

70-74 years 

75-79 years 

80 years and over .. 
Not reported 

Males 

Under 18 years ... 

18-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-29 years 

30-34 years 

35-39 years 

40-44 years 

45-49 years 

50-54 years 

55-59 years 

60-64 years 

65-69 years 

70-74 years 

75-79 years 

80 years and over 
Not reported 

Females 

Under 18 years ... 

18-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-29 years 

30-34 years 

35-39 years 

40-44 years 

45-49 years 

50-54 years 

55-59 years 

60-64 years 

65-69 years 

70-74 years 

75-/9 years 

80 years and over 
Not reported ..... 



9^6.999 



103.931 



119.442 



132.450 



127.397 



124.178 



112.234 



104.299 



57,708 

35,587 

86,844 

127,001 

138,612 

125,665 

87,679 

66,205 

57,271 

47,168 

39,524 

29,556 

16,232 

7,497 

3,528 

823 

419.140 



29,562 

17,097 

38,574 

48,732 

58,719 

57,959 

42,481 

33,419 

28,265 

21,475 

16,866 

12,641 

7,455 

3,718 

1,813 

364 

507.760 



28,146 

18,490 

48,270 

78,269 

79,893 

67,706 

45,198 

32,786 

29,006 

25,693 

22,658 

16,915 

8,777 

3,779 

1,715 

459 



5,331 

3,064 

8,437 

12,991 

16,530 

14,324 

8,951 

8,727 

7,140 

6,549 

5,195 

3,514 

1,895 

846 

381 

56 

43-719 



2,805 

1,494 

3,221 

3,737 

6,161 

6,465 

4,372 

4,204 

3,159 

2,766 

2,161 

1,535 

941 

467 

211 

20 

60.212 



5,849 

3,394 

9,478 

14,478 

17,031 

15,795 

9,769 

9,563 

8,292 

7,733 

6,310 

5,671 

3,323 

1,442 

602 

712 

50.896 



2,526 

1,570 

5,216 

9,254 

10,369 

7,859 

4,579 

4,523 

3,981 

3,783 

3,034 

1,979 

954 

379 

170 

36 



3,065 
1,738 
3,920 
4,827 
6,507 
6,911 
4,725 
4,784 
3,751 
3,257 
2,350 
2,169 
1,541 
720 
308 
323 

68.546 



6,931 

3,793 

10,915 

15,851 

17,872 

17,053 

11,229 

10,055 

9,103 

8,402 

8,190 

6,615 

3,827 

1,796 

776 

42 

58.795 



3,626 
1,830 
4,789 
5,890 
7,396 
7,700 
5,441 
5,154 
4,475 
3,557 
3,296 
2,639 
1,705 
870 
410 
17 

73.655 



8,950 

4,622 

12,290 

17,792 

18,762 

17,448 

11,750 

9,418 

7,833 

6,059 

5,269 

3,778 

2,004 

932 

397 

3 

60.988 



8,470 

4,774 

12,088 

18,470 

19,152 

17,726 

12,615 

8,288 

7,577 

5,261 

4,393 

2,816 

1,496 

692 

360 



58.303 



8,203 

5,026 

12,121 

16,989 

16,908 

15,366 

11,507 

6,938 

6,183 

4,607 

3,733 

2,473 

1,250 

598 

331 

1 

51.408 



7,053 

5,335 

10,824 

15,494 

16,327 

14,112 

10,993 

6,328 

5,721 

4,279 

3,293 

2,376 

1,268 

582 

314 



48.495 



4,619 

2,236 

5,710 

7,585 

8,646 

8,538 

6,016 

5,051 

4,092 

2,926 

2,385 

1,634 

879 

453 

216 

2 

66.319 



4,288 
2,379 
5,566 
7,818 
8,464 
8,277 
6,113 
4,329 
4,064 
2,568 
1,993 
1,271 
660 
332 
181 



65.875 



4,093 
2,429 
5,677 
6,918 
7,205 
6,905 
5,529 
3,402 
3,128 
2,221 
1,695 
1,170 
577 
292 
167 



60.826 



3,602 
2,482 
5,050 
6,285 
7,373 
6,749 
5,223 
3,139 
2,854 
2,057 
1,526 
1,096 
617 
289 
133 



55.804 



2,784 

1,656 

5,558 

9,651 

10,524 

8,884 

5,044 

4,779 

4,541 

4,476 

3,960 

3,502 

1,782 

722 

294 

389 



3,305 

1,963 

6,126 

9,961 

10,476 

9,353 

5,788 

4,901 

4,628 

4,845 

4,894 

3,976 

2,122 

926 

366 

25 



4,331 

2,386 

6,580 

10,207 

10,116 

8,910 

5,734 

4,367 

3,741 

3,133 

2,884 

2,144 

1,125 

479 

181 

1 



4,182 

2,395 

6,522 

10,652 

10,688 

9,449 

6,502 

3,959 

3,513 

2,693 

2,400 

1,545 

836 

360 

179 



4,110 

2,597 

6,444 

10,071 

9,703 

8,461 

5,978 

3,536 

3,055 

2,386 

2,038 

1,303 

673 

306 

164 

1 



3,451 
2,853 
5,774 
9,209 
8,954 
7,363 
5,770 
3,189 
2,867 
2,222 
1,767 
1,280 
651 
293 
161 



116 



All 



Auitrla 

BalgluB 

Czechoslovakia 

Danurk 

Finland 

Franca 

Cantany 

Creaca 

Hungary 

Iraland 

Italy 

Natharlanda 

Poland 

Portugal 

Sweden 

SwltEarland 

Turkey (Europe and Aala) . 

United Klngdo- 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Aala) 

Yugoalavla 

Other Europe 

China 2/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

larael 

Japan 

Jordan 3/ 

PhlUpptnea 

Ryukyu lalanda 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Cuba 

Other Ueat Indlea 

El Salvador 

Guateula 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Other Central Anarica 

South AMrlca 

Bolivia 

Braill 

Chile 

ColoBbla 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South Asarica 

Africa 

Algeria . .'. 

Kerocco , i 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

New Zealand 

Pacific Islanda (U. S. ads. 
Other Oceania 

Other countries 

P See Tables 47 and 48 

2/ In 



1/ In. 



• Pale 



117 



Country or r«glon 
of birth 


Total 


Calendar year derived 


1966 


1965 


1964 


1963 


1962 


1961 


1960 


1959 


1958 


1957 


1956 


1955 


1954 


1953 


1952 


1951 


1950 


1940- 
1949 


Before 
1940 


All countrlaa 


16.149 


996 


3.806 


1.123 


690 


71? 


495 


439 


424 


452 


601 


474 


495 


275 


91 


106 


61 


46 


408 


4.452 




10.943 


567 


2.138 


576 


413 


494 


?ll 


312 


296 


348 


4<I6 


38? 


412 


207 


53 


64 


30 


2^ 


209 


3.605 




521 
128 
171 
82 
45 
264 
3,056 
209 
493 
176 
1.567 
522 
122 
570 
143 
82 
61 
135 
66 
76 
1,423 
717 
166 
146 


26 
5 
2 

4 
23 
213 

5 
21 
10 
50 
30 

5 
32 
18 

5 
4 
6 
3 
85 
2 
9 
7 

171 


102 

34 

3 

10 

5 

68 

665 

72 

110 

29 

293 

164 

18 

81 

67 

3 

\l 
10 
20 
292 
9 
39 
14 

563 


17 
19 

2 
1 
2 
15 
165 
16 
62 
12 
75 
46 
1 
8 
11 
1 
7 
5 
2 
1 
96 

10 
2 

199 


24 
7 
5 
3 
1 

13 

116 

6 

42 
8 

53 

37 
B 
8 
6 
4 
2 
4 
3 
2 

54 
1 
4 
2 

77 


25 
8 
5 

1 
1 
14 
154 
14 
91 
7 
51 
49 
2 
2 
2 

2 
2 
5 
2 
55 

2 
73 


15 

4 
2 
4 
2 
17 
116 
6 
4 

53 
16 
2 
2 

4 

55 

3 
2 

48 


23 
4 
2 

1 
8 
127 
6 
3 
6 
55 
15 
1 
3 
5 
2 
5 
1 

38 

5 
2 

25 


24 
6 
4 
4 
4 

15 
110 
3 
2 
1 

24 

21 

2 
7 
3 
1 
6 
1 
1 
45 
2 
2 
8 

33 


16 
8 
7 
4 
1 

17 
160 
2 
3 
3 

34 

18 
2 
3 
3 
I 

4 
1 
2 
46 
1 
1 

21 


36 

4 
4 

9 

281 
4 

12 
6 

24 

20 
5 

10 
2 
3 

5 
2 
1 
52 
4 
7 
5 

16 


21 
1 

10 
1 

9 

202 
8 

16 
3 

34 

U 
3 

13 
3 
2 

2 
2 

28 
1 
5 

10 

20 


20 
2 
9 

2 

11 
243 

1 
10 

I 
24 
13 

3 
12 

1 

1 

5 
1 
29 
4 

12 

16 


6 

12 
1 

5 
72 
2 
3 

16 
15 
2 
6 

1 
I 

5 
5 

35 
4 
1 

10 


2 
1 

5 
16 

3 
2 
6 

5 

1 

7 


4 
1 
3 
2 
1 
5 
15 

1 
14 

1 

5 

7 
2 
1 
2 

II 


3 

1 
8 
2 

5 
2 

9 

5 


1 

1 
1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

6 

1 
2 

4 


9 

12 

1 

5 
49 
5 
4 
3 
50 
6 
3 
8 
1 
1 

3 

4 

32 
1 
2 
6 

42 


147 




19 


Czechoslovakia 

Detmrk 

Finland 


87 

22 
23 


G«nunv 


339 


c 




H naarv 


107 


Ireland 


80 
































19 


Turkey (BuTope and Aala) ... 


43 


U.S.S.R. (Europe and Aeia) . 


686 






Aala 


65 




141 
104 
17 
69 
22 
18 
512 
136 
42 
58 
39 
4 
109 
18 
23 
4 
40 

3.210 


9 

2 

9 

56 

7 
1 
17 
4 

10 

3 

3 

227 


39 
53 

4 
39 

5 
U 
252 
46 

9 
24 

8 

2 
24 
10 

8 

3 
Z» 

846 


16 
25 
3 
7 
11 

92 

13 
7 
5 
6 
1 

10 
1 

2 
249 


8 
8 

1 
6 

_ 
40 

5 

3 

4 
2 

171 


15 
6 

1 
5 
2 

24 
9 

5 
2 
3 

1 
127 


7 
6 

1 
3 
2 
13 
9 
1 

3 

3 

1?4 


5 
1 

8 
5 
2 
1 

2 

1 
84 


1 

2 
11 
6 

1 

8 

1 
I 

84 


2 
1 

1 
I 
9 

1 
5 

1 
76 


2 
4 

5 

1 
84 


1 
3 
2 
1 
1 
2 

5 

1 

56 


1 
1 

2 

2 

5 
1 

61 


2 

1 
4 
2 
1 

51 


I 

1 
3 

2 
30 


2 

3 

1 

2 

2 
1 

26 


2 

1 

1 

1 

23 


1 

1 
2 

14 


4 
1 

1 

1 
5 
3 
2 

1 

18 
1 
3 

2 

148 
























































Syrian Arab Republic 

Viet Nan 


9 


North America 


732 




2,142 

363 

311 

31 

9 

77 

132 

4 

5 

8 

34 

14 

51 

29 

340 


108 

5 
83 
8 

1 
2 
3 

2 
3 

5 

3 

44 


541 
53 
149 
4 
5 
24 
34 
1 
2 
6 
10 
2 
11 

127 


176 
13 
21 
4 

3 
17 

1 

5 

1 
7 
I 

55 


HI 

17 
9 

3 

5 
8 

1 

7 

8 
2 

18 


82 

5 
4 

2 
3 
17 

2 

2 
1 

n 


80 
25 

7 

1 

4 
3 

2 

1 
1 

9 


54 

9 

1 
1 

5 
7 

1 
2 

13 


55 
15 
2 

5 
3 

2 

2 

7 


49 
8 
1 
3 

6 
8 
1 

1 
1 


63 

5 
2 

3 
10 

1 
2 


35 
8 
2 
2 

2 

4 

1 
1 
1 

6 


41 
9 
1 

3 

4 

1 

2 

2 


36 
8 

2 
2 

2 

1 
6 


26 
3 

1 

1 


14 
8 

I 

3 
2 


11 

7 
1 

1 

1 

1 

1 
3 


9 

3 
1 

1 


68 
68 

2 

2 
2 

2 
2 








































Honduraa 








Panama 

Other Central America 

South America 


5 
8 

26 


Arsentlna 


123 
19 
63 
24 
30 
12 
11 
43 
15 

205 


15 
2 

1 
7 
5 

4 
9 
1 

70 


39 

7 
33 

8 
10 

6 

3 
16 

5 

94 


21 
> 1 

11 
2 
9 
2 
1 
8 

32 


11 

1 
6 
8 


1 

4 
3 

2 

1 

2 

7 


5 
2 

2 

3 


4 

2 
4 
1 
1 

1 

4 


6 
1 
3 


2 
1 

1 
1 


2 
3 


3 
1 

1 
1 

4 


2 

4 


2 

1 
2 

I 
1 


1 


1 

1 


1 
1 

I 




1 
1 

4 














, 


















Other South America 

Africa 


1 
15 




2 
30 

42 
81 
50 

91 


3 

3 
10 

4 

17 


2 
19 

18 
43 
12 

38 


2 

5 
12 
13 

12 


2 

2 

1 
3 

1 


2 
2 

3 

4 


2 
1 


1 


1 
2 
1 


1 


1 

1 
1 


1 
3 

3 


1 
1 
2 


1 


1 


2 


j 


: 


2 

2 

3 
















United Arab Republic (Egypt) 


6 


Oceania 


7 




64 
11 


6 

5 
2 
4 


32 

I 

3 


8 

1 
2 

1 


3 


2 
2 

2 


- 


1 


1 


- 


': 


2 
1 


\ 


[ 


- 


1 


[ 


1 


3 








Pacific lalanda (U.S. adm.) 


- 





















































118 



TABLE 48. ADMINISTKATIVE CERTIFICATES OF CITIZENSHIP ISSUED TO PERSONS WHO ACQUIRED CITIZENSHIP AT BIBTH ABROAD 
THROUGH CITIZEN PARENTS, BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH AND YEAR ACQUIRED: YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1966 



Country or region 
of birth 


Total 




1966 


1965 


1964 


1963 


1962 


1961 


I960 


1959 


1958 


1957 


1956 


1955 


1954 


1953 


1952 


1951 


195( 


1940- 
1949 


Befor. 
1940 


All countrl«« 


16.297 


11 


330 


811 


1 .025 


1.014 


1.039 


922 


807 


695 


657 


596 


493 


411 


399 


316 


341 


34 


3.197 


2.686 


Eu rop« 


7.383 


4 


148 


413 


631 


606 


642 


57? 


507 


388 


397 


296 


240 


182 


172 














47 

29 

37 

7 

7 

680 

3.543 

154 

12 

40 

766 

32 

29 

52 

242 

4 

250 

9 

14 

106 

1,242 

8 

29 

44 

3.211 


2 
1 

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2 


1 
15 
82 

3 

1 
6 

1 

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6 

8 
15 

1 
69 


1 

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48 
229 

5 

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22 
1 
2 
20 
55 
1 

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216 


1 

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367 
10 

20 
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1 

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41 

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78 

2 
248 


68 
352 
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46 

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368 

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113 

242 


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345 

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1 

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301 

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1 
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2 

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160 

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72 
151 


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1 

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93 


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104 

1 

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3 

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1 

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32 


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2 

80 
3 

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1 


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1 

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2 


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12 
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52 
307 

33 

9 

152 

6 

8 

45 
2 
2 
2 
5 
3 
238 
1 
6 
7 


4 
4 
29 




CzechoB lovakta 








































42 
130 












Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Aela) 


3 

5 


U.S.S.R. (Europe and Aala) 


23 

14 


Other Europe 




335 
42 
39 
10 
20 
4 
13 
1,442 
14 

100 
26 
7 

803 

284 
11 
14 
47 

5.052 


1 

1 

3 


7 
1 

19 

3 

2 
22 
13 

- 

2 
94 


13 

1 
1 

2 

84 

5 

1 
69 
25 

4 

7 

139 


25 

1 
2 

1 
103 

15 
1 
1 

46 
41 

4 
4 

108 


15 
1 
3 

133 
1 
15 

25 
40 
1 
1 
6 

121 


8 

5 
2 
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122 
1 
18 

40 
36 
1 
1 

116 


9 

3 

126 
11 

19 

25 

3 
113 


6 

1 

I 
93 

18 
25 
1 
2 

127 


1 

1 

1 

96 

1 
20 
10 

I 

5 

130 


3 
1 
1 

92 

22 
12 

109 


4 
2 
1 

107 
6 

18 
11 

2 
119 


1 
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3 

1 

81 

1 

22 
9 

109 


3 
2 

1 
1 

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48 

2 

28 
6 

I 
175 


1 
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1 
58 

3 

28 
6 

1 
108 


2 

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1 
33 

22 
8 

114 


1 
2 

1 
32 

134 


6 

1 

1 

50 

43 
151 


61 
5 
8 

1 
2 

3 

1 37 

4 
6 
1 
249 
7 
1 

5 

1.592 


166 
11 
17 


Hong Kong 






* 


1 raq 


- 




20 
8 
4 

15 












80 






^ 




^ 






North America 


1.545 




1.338 

2,B52 

141 

34 

3 

6 

139 

B 

7 

11 

18 

13 

116 

366 

220 


2 

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2 


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12 


36 
58 

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10 


23 
61 
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12 

1 
16 

6 


22 

71 

1 

8 

2 
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9 


26 
65 

5 

10 

1 

2 
13 

5 


27 

75 
3 
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9 
2 

13 

5 


19 

71 
3 

4 

1 

1 
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19 
76 
5 

6 


14 
71 

1 

3 
1 

1 

1 
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14 

6 


13 
91 

2 

3 

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8 
6 

3 


15 

76 

1 
1 

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3 

7 

8 


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79 

3 
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1 

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5 


13 
98 

1 

7 

5 
10 

8 


21 

114 

3 

1 

2 
8 

5 


349 
1 ,016 

35 
5 
1 
3 

40 

3 
6 

84 
82 


643 
661 
75 
22 












^ 




20 










6 










35 
48 

23 




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21 
6 
58 
29 
35 
12 
18 
31 
10 

322 


1 
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5 


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31 


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19 
10 
14 
8 
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9 
6 


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4 
4 
4 


Chile 








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Algeria 


3 
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14 
16 
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106 


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1 
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1 


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6 

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1 


1 

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3 


1 
2 


3 
1 

6 
10 

^ 69 












United Arab Republic (Egypt) 


9 

7 


Oceania 




71 
8 
14 
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1 

1 


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1 


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1 


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120 



TABLE 50. CERTIFICATES OF NATURALIZATION REVOKED, BY GROUNDS: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1957 - 1966 



Grounds 


1957- 
1966 


1957 


1958 


1959 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


1966 


Total number 


818 


269 


176 


15A 


124 


44 


26 


7 


11 


2 


5 


Established permanent 
residence abroad within 
five years after 


40 


260 
3 
6 


168 
1 

7 


149 
5 


120 

4 


41 

3 


23 
3 


1 
6 


9 


1 
1 


2 








3 







TABLE 51. PERSONS EXPATRIATED, BY GROUNDS AND YEAR REPORTS RECEIVED: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1957 - 1966 



Grounds 


1957- 
1966 


1957 


1958 


1959 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


1966 


Total number 1/ 


33.995 


5.503 


5,863 


2.899 


3,374 


3.657 


3.212 


3.164 


2.321 


2.083 


1,919 


Voting In a foreign political 
election or plebiscite 

Continuous residence In a 
foreign state of birth or 
former nationality 2/ 

Residence In a foreign state 
under treaties and conven- 


10,910 

9,180 

1,850 
5,905 

2,020 
2,364 

945 

580 
241 


1,515 

1,595 

628 
616 

423 
250 

248 

146 
82 


1,748 

2,165 

427 
565 

378 
213 

230 

125 
12 


992 

796 

221 
383 

171 
188 

64 

78 
6 


1,239 

873 

89 
625 

202 
194 

85 

57 
10 


1,290 

1,027 

124 
619 

209 
189 

99 

62 
38 


977 
1,017 

96 

642 

187 
183 

46 

50 
14 


943 

1,089 

67 
585 

134 
248 

59 

20 
19 


568 

618 

83 
653 

92 
234 

42 

11 
20 


869 

82 
662 

113 
286 

32 

17 
22 


769 
33 


Naturallzatlon in a foreign 


555 


Entering or serving In the 
armed forces of a foreign 
state 


111 


Renunciation of nationality .. 
Taking an oath of allegiance 


379 
40 


Accepting or performing 
duties under a foreign 
state 


14 


Other ground! 


18 



\l Cases of 359 persons expatriated for deparlng from or remaining away from the U.S. to avoid 

military service, reported for 1955-1963, were not included because this statutory provision 

was ruled unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court on February 18, 1963. (Kennedy v. Francisco 

Mendoza-Martlnez (372 U.S. 144) and Rusk v. Joseph Henry Cort (372 U.S. 224)). 

2/ The Supreme Court decision In Schneider v. Rusk (377 U.S. 163, May 18, 1964) ruled as unconstitutional 
statutory provisions which cause naturalized citizens to lose their nationality by extended residence 
abroad . 

3/ Naturalized U.S. citizens expatriated in countries with which the United States has treaties or 

conventions providing on a reciprocal basis for loss of nationality through extended residence In 
the country or original citizenship. 



121 



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124 



TABLE 55. WRITS OF HABEAS CORPUS, JUDICIAL REVIEW OF ORDER 

OF DEPORTATION AND DECLARATORY JUDGMENTS IN EXCLUSION AND DEPORTATION CASES: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1962 - 1966 



Action taken 



1962- 
1966 



Total writs of habeas corpus : 

Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government 

Unfavorable to U.S. Government .... 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed 

Pending end of year 

Involving exclusion : 

Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government .. 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed . 

Pending end of year 

Involving deportation : 

Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed . 

Pending end of year 

Total Judicial Review of Order of 
Deportation (Sec. 106 I6.N Act) : J./ 

Involving deportation : 

Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government .... 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government .. 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed ... 

Pending end of year 

Total declaratory judgments : 

1/ Not reported prior to January 1, 1962 



Writs of habeas corpus 



322 


75 


29 


41 


67 


110 


282 


64 


25 


36 


54 


103 


21 


6 


3 


1 


7 


4 


19 


5 


1 


4 


6 


3 


13 


6 


3 


9 


18 


13 


45 


9 


10 


9 


13 


4 


35 


9 


8 


7 


9 


2 


6 


_ 


2 


_ 


3 


1 


4 


- 


- 


2 


1 


1 


5 


3 


1 


4 


3 


5 


277 


66 


19 


32 


54 


106 


247 


55 


17 


29 


45 


101 


15 


6 


1 


1 


4 


3 


15 


5 


1 


2 


5 


2 


8 


3 


2 


5 


15 


8 



Judicial Review 



330 


25 


94 


51 


61 


99 


196 


21 


34 


35 


44 


62 


24 


1 


9 


7 


4 


3 


HO 


3 


51 


9 


13 


34 


86 


95 


47 


44 


62 


86 



Declaratory Judgments 



Disposed of 


791 


327 


169 


87 


101 


107 




598 
90 
103 

37 


226 
59 
42 

5 


120 
21 
28 

10 


69 
1 

17 

3 


88 
8 
5 

9 


95 

1 
11 

10 




Withdrawn or otherwise closed 

Involving 8 USC 1503 




21 

2 

14 

754 


4 

1 

322 


4 
2 

4 

159 


2 

1 
84 


6 

3 

92 


5 




Withdrawn or otherwise closed 

Involving exclusion or deportation 


5 
97 


Favorable to U.S. Government 


577 
88 
89 


222 
59 
41 


116 
19 

24 


67 

1 

16 


82 
8 
2 


90 


Withdrawn or otherwise closed 


6 



125 



TABLE 56. PRIVATE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY BILLS 
INTRODUCED AND LAWS ENACTED, 75TH CONGRESS 
THROUGH 89TH CONGRESS 



Congress 


Bills 
Introduced 


Laws 
enacted 


89th 


5,285 

3,647 

3,592 

3,069 

4,364 

4,474 

4,797 

3,669 

2,811 

1,141 

429 

163 

430 

601 

2Q3 


279 


88th 


196 


87th 


544 


86th 


488 


85th 


927 


84th 


1,227 


83rd 


755 


82nd 


729 


aist , 


505 


80th 


121 


79th 


14 


78th 


12 


77th 


22 


76th 


65 


75th 


30 







126 





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