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Full text of "Annual report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service"

BOSTON 

PUBLIC 

tlBRARY 




■?e«i«rim, 



ANNUAL 



. of the 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 




IVushinf^ton, D.C. 



B 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20536 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER 
OF IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION 



The Attorney General 

United States Department of Justice 

Sii': I have the honor to submit the Annual Report of the Immigration 
and NaturaHzation Service for the year ended June 30, 1967. 

Respectfully submitted. 




Raymond F. Farrell, 

Commissioner. 

Immigration and Naturalization Service. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office 
Washington, D.C. 20402 - Price $1.00 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

GENERAL 1 

TRAVEL CONTROL AND ADJUDICATIONS 1 

Travel Control 1 

Inspections 1 

Admissions 2 

Inadmissible Aliens 7 

Adjudications 7 

Adjustments 7 

Petitions Adjudicated 8 

Applications Adjudicated 10 

Policies, Procedures, and Public Information 10 

Service Operations Outside the United States 11 

BORDER PATROL AND INVESTIGATIONS H 

Deportable Aliens Located H 

Caribbean Program 16 

Foreign-born Law Violators 16 

Criminal Prosecution 19 

DETENTION AND DEPORTATION ACTIVITIES 19 

HEARINGS AND LITIGATION.-. 20 

Exclusion and Deportation Hearings 20 

Litigation 20 

ALIEN ADDRESS REPORTS 23 

CITIZENSHIP. 24 

Naturalization Activities 24 

Derivative Citizenship Certificates 27 

Other Citizenship Activities 27 

AD^HNISTRATIVE SERVICES 28 

TABLE 

1. Immigration to the United States: 1820-1967 31 

2. Aliens and citizens admitted and departed, by months: Years ended June 30, 1966 and 1967.. 32 

3. Aliens and citizens admitted at United States ports of entry: Years ended June 30, 1966 

an d 1 9 6 7 33 

4. Aliens admitted by classes under the immigration laws: Years ended June 30, 1963-67 34 

5. Immigrants admitted, by port: Years ended June 30, 1963-67 35 

6. Immigrants admitted by classes under the immigration laws and country or region of 

bu-th: Year ended June 30, 1967 36 

6A. Immigrants admitted by classes under the immigration laws and country or region of 

last permanent residence: Year ended June 30, 1967 37 

6B. Aliens who adjusted status to permanent residents in the United States, by country or 

region of birth : Year ended June 30, 1967 38 

6C. Aliens who were adjusted to permanent resident status in the United States under 

Section 245, Immigration and Nationahty Act, by status at entry and country or region 

of birth: Year ended June 30, 1967 . _- 39 

6D. Aliens who were adjusted to permanent resident status in the United States under 

Section 245, Immigration and Nationality Act, by year of entry and country or region 

of birth : Year ended June 30, 1967 40 

6E. Refugees admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 1946-67 41 

6F. Immigrants admitted, under the Act of September 26, 1961 (Pubhc Law 87-301) : September 

26,'l961-June 30, 1967 42 



TABLE Page 
6G. Immigrants admitted under the Act of October 24, 1962 (Public Law 87-885) by country or 

region of birth: October 24, 1962-June 30, 1967 43 

7. Immigrants admitted by quota charge: Year ended June 30, 1967 44 

7A. Immigrants admitted by quota charge and quota preferences: Year ended June 30, 1967_. 45 
S. Immigrants admitted, by covintry or region of birth and major occupation group : Year ended 

June 30, 1967 _ . _ . 46 

8 A. Beneficiaries of occupational preferences and other immigrants admitted by occupation: 

Year ended June 30, 1967 " 47 

9. Immigrants admitted, by country or region of birth, sex, and age: Year ended June 30, 1967__ 49 

10. Immigrants admitted, by sex and age: Years ended June 30, 1958-67 51 

lOA. Immigrants admitted by sex, marital status, age, and major occupation group: Years 

ended June 30, 1963-67 52 

11. Aliens and citizens admitted and departed: Years ended June 30, 1908-67 53 

12. Immigrants admitted, by state of intended future permanent residence: Years ended 

June 30, 1958-67 54 

12A. Immigrants admitted, by specified countries of birth and state of intended future perma- 
nent residence : Year ended June 30, 1967 55 

12B. Immigrants admitted, by specified countries of birth and rural and urban area and city: 

Year ended June 30, 1967 56 

13. Immigration by country, for decades: 1820-1967 58 

14. Immigrants admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 1958-67 61 

15. Nonimmigrants admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 1958-67__ 62 
15A. Temporary visitors admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 1958-67 _ 63 

16. Nonimmigrants admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and country or region 

of birth : Year ended June 30, 1967 64 

16A. Temporary workers admitted under Section 101 (a) (15) (H) of the Immigration and Na- 
tionality Act, by country: Years ended June 30, 1966 and 1967 65 

16B. Temporary workers admitted under Section 101(a)(15)(H) and Section 101(a)(15)(J) of 

the Immigration and Nationality Act, by occupation: Year ended June 30, 1967 66 

17. Nonimmigrants admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and country or region 

of last permanent residence : Year ended June 30, 1967 68 

17A. Temporary visitors and other nonimmigrants admitted, by port: Year ended June 30, 

1967 ^ ■ 69 

17B. Temporary visitors admitted at airports, by country of last permanent residence: Year 

ended June 30, 1967 70 

17C. Temporary visitors admitted at seaports, by country of last permanent residence: Year 

ended June 30, 1 967 71 

17D. Temporary visitors admitted, at land border ports, by country of last permanent residence: 

Year ended June 30, 1967 72 

IS. Foreign laborers admitted or paroled into the United States: Years ended June 30, 1958-67. _ 73 

19. Entries of alien and citizen border crossers over international land boundaries by State and 

port: Year ended June 30, 1967 74 

20. Entries of alien and citizen border crossers over international land boundaries: Years ended 

June 30, 1928-67 76 

20A. Special inquiry officer hearings completed, by regions and districts: Years ended June 30, 

1963-67 77 

21. Aliens excluded from the United States, by cause: Years ended June 30, 1892-1967 78 

22. Aliens excluded, by country or region of birth and cause: Year ended June 30, 1967 79 

23. Aliens apprehended, aliens deported, and aliens required to depart: Years ended June 30, 

1892-1967 80 

24. Aliens deported, by country to which deported and cause: Year ended June 30, 1967 81 

24A. Aliens required to depart, by nationality and cause: Year ended June 30, 1967 82 

24B. Aliens deported, by nationality and cause: Year ended June 30, 1967 83 

24C. Aliens required to depart, by country of destination and cause: Year ended June 30, 1967 84 

25. Aliens deported, by country to which deported and deportation expense: Year ended June 

30, 1967 85 

26. Aliens deported by cause: Years ended June 30, 1908-67 86 

26A. Aliens deported, by country to which deported: Years ended June 30, 1958-67 87 

27. Aliens deported and required to depart, by year of entry and status at entry: Year ended 

June 30, 1967 88 

27A. Aliens deported and required to depart, by status at entry: Years ended June 30, 1963-67 89 

27B. Deportable ahens located, by status at entry and nationahty: Year ended June 30, 1967__ 90 



TABLE Page 

28. Alien crewmen deserted at U.S. air and sea ports, by nationality and flag of carrier: Year 

ended June 30, 1967 " 91 

29. Vessels and airplanes inspected, crewmen admitted, alien crewmen deserted, and alien 

stowaways found, by location : Year ended June 30, 1967 92 

30. Principal activities and accomplishments of immigration border patrol: Years ended June 

30, 1958-67 . 93 

31. Passengers arrived in the United States, by sea and air, from foreign countries, by country 

of embarkation : Year ended June 30, 1967 94 

32. Passengers departed from the United States, by sea and air, to foreign countries, by country 

of debarkation : Year ended June 30, 1967 96 

33. Passenger travel between the United States and foreign countries, by sea and air, by port 

of arrival or departure: Year ended Jvuie 30, 1967 98 

34. Aliens who reported under the alien address program, by selected States (^ residence and 

nationality: During 1967 99 

35. Aliens who reported under the alien address program, by selected nationalities and States 

of residence : During 1967 100 

36. Alien population, by States of residence: 1940, 1951, 1960, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, and 

1967__ - -_- -___ - 101 

37. Declarations of intention filed, petitions for naturalization filed, persons naturalized, and 

petitions for naturalization denied : Years ended June 30, 1907-67 102 

37A. Persons naturalized, by general and special naturalization provisions: Years ended June 30, 

1963-67 ... - 1 03 

38. Persons naturalized, by general and special naturalization provisions and country or 

region of former allegiance: Year ended June 30, 1967 104 

39. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance: Years ended June 30, 

1958-67 _- 105 

40. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance and major occupation group: 

Year ended June 30, 1967 106 

41. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance, sex, and age: Year ended 

June 30, 1967 . 1 07 

41 A. Persons naturalized, by sex, marital status, median age, and major occupation group: 

Years ended June 30, 1963-67_ ------ - 109 

42. Persons naturalized, by states or territories of residence: Years ended June 30, 1958-67-. 110 
42A. Persons naturalized, by specified countries of former allegiance and by States or territories 

of residence: Year ended June 30, 1967 111 

42B. Persons naturalized, by type of court and States or territories of residence: Year ended 

June 30, 1967 ' 112 

43. Persons naturalized by specified countries of former allegiance and by rural and urban area 

and city: Year ended June 30, 1967 113 

44. Persons naturalized, by countrv or region of birth and year of entry: Year ended June 30, 

1967 ■ ■- 115 

45. Persons naturalized, by sex and age: Years ended June 30, 1959-67 116 

46. Administrative certificates of citizenship issued, by country or region of birth and reason 

for claim: Year ended June 30, 1967 117 

47. Administrative certificates of citizenship issued to persons who derived citizenship through 

naturalization of parents or through marriage, by country or region of birth and year 
derived: Year ended June 30, 1967 118 

48. Administrative certificates of citizenship issued to persons who acquired citizenship at 

birth abroad through citizen parents, by country or region of birth and year acquired: 

Year ended June 30, 1967— _ 1 19 

49. Peititions for naturalization denied, by reason: Years ended June 30, 1958-67 120 

50. Certificates of naturalization revoked, by grounds: Years ended June 30, 1958-67 121 

51. Persons expatriated, by grounds and year reports received: Years ended June 30, 1958-67- 121 

52. Persons repatriated : Years ended June 30, 1958-67 122 

53. Prosecutions for immigration and nationality violations: Years ended June 30, 1958-67-- 123 

54. Convictions for immigration and nationality violations: Years ended June 30, 1958-67-- 124 

55. Writs of habeas corpus, judicial review of order of deportation and declaratory judgments 

in exclusion and deportation cases: Years ended June 30, 1963-67 125 

56. Private immigration and nationality bills introduced and laws enacted, 75th Congress 

through 90th Congress, 1st session 126 

57. Private bills and beneficiaries of private bills, 90th Congress, 1st session — by type of bill 

and action (country of birth of beneficiaries for bills enacted) 127 



Report of the Commissioner of Immigration and Naturalization 



GENERAL 

The responsibilities of the Immigration and 
Naturalization Service cover many phases of the 
activities and control of aliens from the time peti- 
tions are filed for immigrant visas through the 
entry foi-malities and the adjudication of requests 
for various privileges accorded aliens once in the 
United States, and finally tlirough the naturaliza- 
tion process to Ignited States citizenship. To these 
positive actions within the law must be added 
duties of officers who see that the law is enforced 
by the exclusion process at ports of entry, by 
guardmg the ports and long land borders from 
surreptitious entries, and by searching out other 
violatoi'S of the immigration and nationality laws, 
following through to the ultimate deportation of 
aliens in illegal status. 

The years activities may best be summarized in 
terms of the operations of the various organiza- 
tional units of the Service which follow. 

TRAVEL CONTROL AND 
ADJUDICATION 

Travel Control 

Travel control is a general term that covers 
many facets of immigration work. Historically the 
examination of persons for admissibility was one 



of the first functions of tlie Service, and continues 
to be one of its more important responsibilities. 
As the body of immigration law has developed, 
other duties have accrued under the general head- 
ing of travel control and adjudications. 

For ejcample, before an alien seeking preference 
status under the law or claiming nonquota status 
as the immediate relative of a citizen may be issued 
a visa by the consular office of the State Depart- 
ment, an officer of this Service must appi'ove a visa 
petition attesting to the validity of the claim for 
such status. Likewise, determinations must be 
made as to eligibility for adjustment of status to 
permanent resident or immigrant status either 
through special legislation, such as adjustment to 
permanent status of Cuban refugees or through 
the adjustments available in the Immigration and 
Nationality Act. These and many related functions 
foi'm the broad base of travel control and 
adjudications. 

Inspections 

Facilitation of Travel. During the fiscal year 
1967, the Service took a number of steps within 
the framework of the immigration and nationality 
laws to ease and expedite the examination of the 
millions of persons who arrived from abroad and 
to make them feel genuinely welcome. 

The stopover privilege for aliens in transit who 
qualify for admission without a visa on their way 
to another country was extended for periods up to 




Inspection lanes then and now. Forty years ago, SlU.Odi) jirr.ions entered the United States at San Ysidro, Calif. In fiscal 

year 1967, the figure was 22,500,000. 



10 days. This privilege also was extended to aliens 
coming from abroad who wished to enter the 
United States enroute to Canada to attend Expo 
67, and an expeditious procedure was effected for 
the inspection of those visitors to Expo 67 who 
traveled to, from, or througli the United States. 

Travel by Mexican nationals to the United 
States was further facilitated by expanding the 
use of the Nonresident Mexican Alien Border 
Crossing Card, which theretofore was limited to 
use only on the United States-Mexican border. 
Mexican nationals now need only to present the 
border crossing card and a passport when coming 
to the United States from any part of the world. 

At busier airports, some inspection lanes have 
been designated for the accommodation of U.S. 
citizens during peak traffic periods. This has made 
it possible to clear waiting areas more rapidly after 
plane arrivals because inspection of U.S. citizens 
is accomplished in minimum time. 

In accordance with Presidential directives, 
many of the changes made and under study are 
calculated to assist interagency programs that 
encourage international travel as a means of 
promoting international understanding and a 
more favorable balance of payments for the 
United States. 




Partial view of inspection area at San. Francisco Inter- 
national Airport. 

Admissions 

More than 206.8 million entrants were inspected 
at over 400 ports, and admitted into the United 
States during fiscal year 1967. Tliis number ex- 
ceeded last year's figure by 5 percent and reached 
an alltime high. Persons "wlio frequently crossed 
over the land bordere or who arrived as crewmen 
accounted for 96 percent of the total. The others 
arrived as vessel or aircraft passengers at United 
States sea and air ports. Contributing to the large 
total was the attraction of Expo 67. United States 
bound flights preinspectcd at Montreal were up by 
40 percent, and the number of passengers inspected 
increased by 112 percent. At Champlain, N.Y., the 




Inspection of a group of Japanese agricultural trainee 
workers arriving at Seattle-Tacoma International Air- 
port. 

main surface route between New York and Mon- 
treal, huge traffic problems had to be solved — as on 
Memorial Day when 236 buses and 8,543 other ve- 
hicles with a combined passenger load of 42,922 
persons were inspected. 

The number of entries of aliens exceeded 120 
million. Of these entries, 114.6 million were made 
by border crossers from Mexico and Canada, an 
increase of 5 percent over last year. The remainder 
consisted of 2 million crewmen and 3.5 million im- 
migrants, documented nonimmigrants, and lawful 
residents returning from temporary visits to 
countries other than Canada or Mexico. 

Immigrants. Fiscal year 1967 was the first full 
year in which the Act of October 3, 1965 had been 
"in effect. The Act, Public Law 89-236, provides 
for three major groups; "special immigi'ants," 
principally natives of Western Hemisphere coun- 
tries, and "immediate relatives," i.e., the spouses, 
children, and parents of U.S. citizens. These two 
categories, not subject to numerical limitations, are 
tlie old nonquota classes. The third group, those 
limited by a numerical ceiling, corresponds to the 
former quota category with some changes in priori- 
ties or preferences, but still favors relatives of citi- 
zens and resident aliens and aliens with skills and 
other occupations needed in tlie United States. The 
quantitative limit of 170,000 applies only to coun- 
tries otlier than those of the Western Hemisphere. 

Tiie 361,972 aliens given status as lawful per- 
manent residents of tlie United States during the 
year exceeded the 1966 figure by 12 percent, and 
was tlie largest number admitted since 1924. Of 
tliat total, 290,027 obtained immigrant visas abroad 
and were admitted to tlie United States. The re- 
maining 71, 945 were already in the United States 
and adjusted their status to that of permanent 
resident. 



Tlie table below points up some of the effects of 
the new legislation. 

Invmigrants admitted : Years ended June 30, 1966 
and 1967 



Class of admission 



1967 1966 



Total Immigrants - 361,972 323,040 

I . Inimigrants subject to numerical limitations 153, 079 126, 310 

Relative preferences 79,671 54,935 

Parents of U.S. citizens, I. & N. Act 1,954 

Unmarried sons and daughters of U.S. citizens.,. 1.317 1,205 
Spouses, unmarried sons and daughters of resident 

aliens and their children _ 19,157 14,494 

Married sons and daughters of U.S. citizens 4, 336 3, 944 

Brothers and sisters of U.S. citizens. 18,632 9,328 

Spouses and children of married sons and daugh- 
ters and brothers and sisters of U.S.citizens.... 36, 229 24, 010 
Occupational preferences 25,365 10,525 

First preference, I. & N. Act 1,394 

Third preference, Act of October 3, 1965 9,979 3,628 

Sixth preference. Act of October 3, 1965 4,876 694 

Their spouses and children... 10,510 4,809 

Conditional entries '6,651 '6,444 

Nonpreference immigrants 40,635 63,700 

Aliens adjusted under Sec. 244, 1. & N. Act =757 2 706 

II. Immediate Relatives 46,903 39,231 

Parents of U.S. citizens, Act of October 3, 1965 8,799 6,142 

Spousesof U.S. citizens 29.537 26,297 

Childrenof U.S. citizens. 8,567 7,792 

III. Special immigrants . 126,370 148,623 

Natives of Western Hemisphere countries 123,110 144,911 

Spouses and children of natives of Western Hemi- 
sphere countries 2,172 2,995 

Other special immigrants 1,088 717 

IV. Inmiigrants admitted under speciallegislation 29,468 3,451 

Refugee-escapees who adjusted status, Act of July 14, 

1960 - - -. 3,210 2,359 

Immigrants, Act of October 24, 1962 385 869 

Cuban parolees who adjusted status, Act of Novem- 
ber 2, 1966 25,752 

Immigrants, other special acts Ill 223 

V. other immigrants not subject to numerical limitation. 6,162 5,425 

Aliens adjusted under Sec. 244, 1. & N. Act 72 169 

.\liens adjusted under Sec. 249, 1. & N. Act 3, 195 2, 595 

Other immigrants..-. - 2,895 2,661 



' Includes 4,106 conditional entrants in 1967. and 2.456 in 1966 whose immi- 
grant status does not become permanent until two years after entry. 
- Includes 40 aliens adjusting under special legislation in 1967 and 9 in 1966. 

"Special immigi-ants" admitted to the United 
States numbered 126,370. All but a few in this cate- 
gory were natives of Western Hemisphere coun- 
tries and their spouses and children. Predominate 
groups were natives of Mexico, 39,994; Canada, 
22,711 ; the Dominican Republic, 11,396 ; and Cuba, 
8,539. Not included in this number are the 25,752 
Cubans whose status was adjusted under Public 
Law 89-732 (see page 6). 

Particular interest centers on this classification 
because beginning on July 1, 1968, these persons 
will be subject to a numerical limitation of 120,000 
as provided in the Act of October 3, 1965, unless 
Congress decides otherwise. This will be the first 
time that Western Hemisphere countries will be 
limited as to numbers admitted to the TTnited 
States. A select commission a])])ointed to study tliis 
section of the law is considering the need for the 
ceiling and its aft'ect on relations with our Western 
Hemisphere neighbors. 

Tlie number of "immediate relatives" admitted 
as inimigrants totaled 46,903, coming principally 
from tlie countries of Germany, Italy, China and 



Taiwan, the Philippines, and Greece. Parents of 
U.S. citizens numbered 8,799 in contrast to 3,799 
in 1965 when, prior to the new law, they were 
subject to quotas. 

Public Law 89-236 amended Section 203(a) of 
the Immigration and Nationality Act by setting 
up a new system of ^preferences within the ceiling 
of 170,000, consisting of seven classes in place of 
the four which existed previously. The first, sec- 
ond, fourth, and fifth preferences are allocated 
to specified relatives of citizens and lawful perma- 
nent residents of the United States. The third and 
sixth preferences are for jjrofessional and highly 
skilled persons and others needed in the LT.S. econ- 
omy. The seventh preference pertains to certain 
refugees, and is roughly comparable to the Refu- 
gee-Escapee Act. 

During the j'ear, 79,671 close relatives of citizens 
and permanent resident aliens were admitted 
to the United States under tlie four relative 
preferences. 

The Act further provides specific maximum 
numbers to be assigned to each priority group, but 
specifies that numbers not used in the relative 
])references may descend to the next priority group 
(except the third preference) and so on to the 
fifth preference. 

The preference allotments and the numbers ad- 
mitted are shown below : 



Total 125,800 79,671 

1st preference— Unmarried sons and daughters of U.S. 
citizens over 21 years of age 34,000 1,317 

2d preference— Spouses, unmarried sons and daughters of 
resident aliens and their children 34.000 19.157 

4th preference— Married sons and daughters of IJ.S. citi- 
zens, their spouses and children 17.000 15,652 

5th preference- Brothers and sisters of U.S. citizens, their 
spouses and children 40,800 43,545 



Two other provisions of Public Law 89-236 af- 
fect the figures for the period ending June 30, 
1967. Until June 30, 1968, any vnsa numbers un- 
used during the prior year may be placed in a 
pool of numbers for use in the succeeding year. 
The other factor is that a maximum of 20,000 num- 
bers may be used by any single country in a given 
year. Thus admissions from Italy, with a large 
backlog of brothers and sisters in the fifth prefer- 
ence classification, might have reached many thou- 
sands more than the 19,970 that were admitted 
within the national ceiling. 

There were 9,979 members of the professions or 
persons with exceptional ability in the sciences or 
the arts admitted or adjusted under the third pref- 
erence. Aliens born in the countries of Asia ac- 
counted for 85 percent of the third preference 
group, and most of them were cases of adjust- 
ment under Section 245 of the Immigi-ation and 
Nationality Act; many were Chinese parolees ad- 
mitted from Hong Kong. Immigrants admitted 
(uider the sixth preference to fill jobs in the United 



IIIMI0RANTS SUBJECT TO NUMERICAL LIMITATIONS ADMITTED 

l$63 - 1967 

200,000 " 200,000 



J 50,000 



100,000 



50,000 




150,000 



100,000 



50,000 



1967 




i9S3 r9e4 i965 1966 

MLATJVCS OF CITIZCHS A«£> RESiOEKT AlfC«8 

WORKERS WITH nUO£Q SKILLS, THEIR SPOUSES AHO CHIlOaEJ* 

COKOiTtOif&t ENTRANTS 

80NPfiEi^EREliCE AND QTHEil 



States for which a shortage of workers existed 
numbered 4,876. Third and sixth preference prin- 
cipals were accompanied by 10,510 spouses and 
children. 

Under the seventh preference, 4,106 refugees 
conditionally entered tlie United States, and 2,- 
545 already in the United States were accorded 
lawful permanent resident status. For the first 
time, refugee legislation is incorporated into gen- 
eral immigation legislation. 

While the preference allotments theoretically 
would use all of the 170,00(1 numbers, 40,635 immi- 
grants were admitted as nonpreference immigrants 
within this ceiling. It may be anticipated that this 
number will decrease or disappear entirely as the 
use of the preferences becomes more i^revalent 
after July 1, 1968. Immigrants admitted as non- 
preference included 19,255 from the United King- 
dom, 5,828 from Germany, and 1,726 from Ireland. 
These countries, with generous quotas under the 



old national origins plan, have not heretofore 
needed to petition for preferences within the nu- 
merical hmitations snice visas were readily 
available. 

Other countries with sizable numbers of non- 
preference admissions were Sweden, 1,487; 
Switzerland, 1,470; France, 1,446; the Nether- 
lands, 1,111; and Norway, 1,059. 

Nonimmigrants. Aliens admitted to tlie United 
States for temporary periods are categorized as 
nonimmigrants. There are a variety of classifica- 
tions within that category. Exclusive of citizens 
of Canada and Mexico who enter frequently as 
border crossers, and exclusive of alien crewmen, 
a total of 2,608,193 nonimmigrants was admitted 
during the year, exceeding the number admitted 
in fiscal year 1966 by 11 percent. 

The following table indicates the various classi- 
fications under which nonimmigrants were 
admitted. 



Noninimig rants admitted: Years ended June 
1966 and 1967 



Nonimmigrant classes 


Number 
1967 1966 


Percent 
chanRB 


Total 


2,608,193 2,341,923 


11 



Foreign Eovernment officials... 42,916 39,327 

Temporary visitors for business 220,414 201,358 

Temporary visitors for pleasure.. 1,628,685 1,472,830 

Transit aliens 204,936 177,827 

Treatv traders and investors.. 9,983 8,628 

Students 63,370 55,716 

Spouses and children of students 5,867 4,851 

International representatives 18,386 16,369 

Temporary workers and industrial trainees . 70, 010 75, 848 

Workers ofdistinguished merit and ability. 9,352 8,213 

Other temporary workers.. 57,328 64,636 

Industrial trainees 3,330 2,999 

Representatives of foreign information 

media 3,257 2,925 

Exchange aliens 38,630 35,253 

Spouses and children of exchange aliens 15,067 11,204 

Returning residents 284,330 238.013 

NATO oflScials 2,442 1.774 



As may be noted from the table, visitors for 
l^leasure or tourists comprise the greatest number 
of nonimmigrants. Most of the visitors, exclusive 
of those from contiguous countries, came from the 
the United Kingdom, Germany, France, the Neth- 
erlands, Italy, and Japan. 

Of the 63,370 foreign students admitted to at- 
tend educational institutions in the United States, 
only 6,153 were from Europe, principally the 
United Kingdom, Germany, France, and Greece. 
Canada and Mexico accounted for 14,239 and 7,391, 
respectively. There were 7,121 from South Amer- 
ica and 1,656 from Africa. The 14,808 students 
from Asia included 3,019 from India, 2,094 from 
Taiwan, 1,624 from Japan, 1,287 from Hong Kong, 
1,188 from Thailand, and 1,096 from Iran. 

There were 38,630 exchange visitors admitted 
to the United States to participate in programs de- 
signed to further inteiTiational cultural exchange. 



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rMMISRANTS EXEMPT FROM NUMERICAL LIMimTlONS ADMITTED 

I963-I96T 



250.000 



200,000 



250,000 



150,000- 
100,000 — 



50,000 




— 200,000 

— 150,000 
- 100,000 



50,000 



1963 



l$64 



I9€5 



\ni 



r$$7 



^^^ HATtveS OF WCSTItM l«»f$f »f tt C9tHititf$ 
0TK€8 



NONIMMIGRANTS ADMITTED 
1963-1967 



3,000,000 



2,000,000 



3,000,000 



TOTAl NONIMMIGRANTS 
TOTAL TEMPORARY VISITORS 



1,000,000- 




2,000,000 



1,000,000 



1963 



1964 



1965 



1966 



1967 



Among those admitted as exchange visitors were 
3,483 from the United Kingdom, 2,537 from the 
Philii^pines, 2,440 from India, 2,054 from Ger- 
many, and 1,82S from Japan. 

Under tlie provisions of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act, which permit tlie temporary im- 
portation of workers if like workers arc not avail- 
able in the United States, 9,352 persons of distin- 
guished merit and ability, 3,330 trainees, and 
57,328 other temporary workers were brought to 
the United States. Of the latter group, some were 
admitted under specific labor programs. Included 
were 18,035 Canadian agricultural workers and 
woodsmen, 29,087 workers from the Caribbean 
area, 356 shecplierders from the Basque country, 
and 7,703 Mexican agricultural workers. 

Other noninnnigrants included 42,916 foreign 
government officials, 2,442 NATO officials, 18,386 
official representatives to international organiza- 
tions, 3,257 members of the foreign news media, 
and 9,983 treaty traders and investors. There were 
204,936. travelers admitted in transit through the 
United States to other countries. 

Creiomen. Alien crewmen numbering 2,036,877 
arrived at United States ports during the year 
and were granted shore leave. The program was 
continued under which bona fide crewmen are 
issued landing cards designed to provide a means 
of ready identification and to facilitate their 
landing. 

United States Cithem. The entries of U.S. citi- 
zens rose from 82.6 million in fiscal year 1966 to 



86.6 million this year. Of this number, 80.5 million 
were border crossers, 1 million were crewmen, and 
the remaining 5.1 million were citizens returning 
from visits to countries other than Mexico and 
Canada. The number of returning IT.S. citizens 
rertected an increase of some 364 thousand citizens 
who traveled abroad in 1967. 

Cnhan Refugees. During the ceremony at the 
Statue of Liberty on October 3, 1965, where the 
new immigration act was signed, President .John- 
son declared that Cubans seeking refuge in the 
United States would be welcome here. Arrange- 
ments were subsequently made for the orderly 
movement of refugees to this country from Cuba 
and during fiscal year 1967, 44,337 came here by 
airlift from Cuba. In cooperation with the De- 
partment of State, the Department of Health, Edu- 
cation and Welfare, and other agencies of the 
Government, the Service established effective 
screening procedures for these refugees. 

On November 2, 1966, Public Law 89-732 be- 
came effective. This Act provided for the adjust- 
ment to permanent resident status of qualified Cu- 
ban refugees who had been in the L^nited States for 
2 years or longer. By the end of fiscal year 1967, 
41,052 applications had been received and 25,752 
Cubans had become permanent residents. The Act 
also provided tlnit certain Cubans, who were al- 
ready in the United States as immigi-ants, could 
liave their date of admission as immigrants 
clianged to a date not to exceed 30 montlis before 
the effective date of the Act. Tlie advantage of this 






Information counter and waiting rooin at flic Cuban 
Adjustment Center, Miami. 



lirovision is tliat residence for naturalization can 
be establislied at an earlier date. In fiscal year 
1967, 1,562 Cubans had taken advantage of the 
provision. TTnder a third provision of this Act, the 
Service was enabled to adjust to permanent resi- 
dents 1,882 other Western Hemisphere aliens 
whose applications for adjustment of status to 
permanent resident had l>een filed with the At- 
torney General prior to December 1, 1965, the 
effective date of Pulilic Law 89-236, which pro- 
hibited adjustment of status under Section 245 
for aliens from the Western Hemisphere. 

Inadmissible Aliens 

Exclusion. The inspection of aliens at our ports 
of entry is to assure that those admitted meet the 
qualifications prescribed in the law, to set time 
limits for control on the departure of those admit- 
ted for a temporary period, and to turn back the 
aliens who do not qualify for entry. 

Of the 213,335 aliens not permitted to enter the 
United States in fiscal year 1967, 20,295 were crew- 
men who were denied the privilege of landing, 
157 were stowaways found and detained on the 
\'essels on which they arrived, 144,691 applied as 
border crossers and were refused admission, and 
47,724 others withdrew their applications for 
admission in preference to formal exclusion pro- 
ceedings. Of the 468 aliens who were excluded after 
iiearings before a special inquiry officer, 66 percent 
lacked documents required for admission. Thir- 
teen were excluded on subversive grounds, 10 were 
found by the Public Health Service to be inad- 
missible for medical reasons, and 67 had criminal, 
immoral, or narcotic records. 

Walvei'>i of Inadmisi^ihiriti/. Tender statutory 
authority, the Attorney General waived certain 
grounds of inadmissibility for 1,275 alien spouses, 
parents, and childi'en of U.S. citizens or permanent 
resident aliens who.se exclusion would have re- 
sulted in extreme hardship to the T'.S. citizen or 
permanent resident alien relatives and if the ad- 
mission of such aliens would not be against the 
national welfare, safety, or security of the United 



States. In addition, 5,057 waivers were granted to 
nonimmigrants whose admission was found to be 
in the public interest. 

Alien defectors from Commimism may be 
granted visas for entry into the United States if 
they can establish that they were actively opposed 
to that ideology for at least 5 years immediately 
prior to their application and if it can also be 
clearly shown that their admission would be in the 
public interest. In fiscal year 1967, 73 such aliens 
were admitted under the statutory authority pro- 
vided for this purpose. 

Adjudications 

For the first time in immigration history, ap- 
plications and petitions for various benefits and 
privileges under the immigration laws exceeded 
1 million, and Service officers adjudicated 993,324 
such applications and petitions. This was an in- 
crease in cases adjudicated of more than 16 per- 
cent over fiscal year 1966. 




Family of 12. ino.^t of ifliom iccrc hcncficicirici of .section 
245, which provider for adjustment of .'itatus to perma- 
nent resident. The two youngest ehildrcn tverc born in 
New York City. 



Adjustments 

Adjusttnent of Status — Section 2^6. With re- 
spect to applications for adjustment of status to 
])ermanent residence under Section 245 of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act, there was a 
leveling off of receipts of adjustment applications 
in fiscal year 1967. However, the total of 36,381 
applications received was 59 percent higher than 
in fiscal 1965, the last full year prior to the Act 
of October 3, 1965. Accounting for the higher 
number of applications is the provision in Public 
Law 89-236 which authorizes issuance until Jmie 
30, 1968 of the unused visa numbers of the prior 
fiscal year, thus permitting full utilization of the 



170,000 annual allocation of visa numbers. Since 
prior to the new Act as many as 80^000 iniused 
numbers in a year were lost, this greater availabil- 
ity of visa numbers has enabled aliens to obtain 
such numbers and apply for adjustment under 
Section 245. 

There were 36,381 applications for adjustment 
under Section 245. This number added to the 
41,052 apiDlications under Section 1 of the Act of 
November 2, 1966 totals 77,433 and exceeds last 
year's record total by 47 percent. 

Included among the 38,115 aliens granted a 
change of status to lawful permanent residence 
pursuant to Section 245 in fiscal year 1967 were 
11,123 third preference aliens and 2,431 sixth pref- 
erence aliens. 

There were also 8,907 preference relatives whose 
status was adjusted in the Ignited States, and 2,545 
refugees were adjusted under the proviso to Sec- 
tion 203(a)(7) of the Act. China and Taiwan. 
Hong Kong, and Spain were the principal coun- 
tries of birth represented by the latter niunber. 
Also granted lawful permanent residence under 
Section 245 were 9,079 parents, spouses, and 
unmarried minor children of U.S. citizens who, as 
"immediate i-elatives", are not subject to the numer- 
ical limitation of the Act. 

Creation of Record of Lawful Entry. The Act of 
October 3, 1965, advanced to June 30, 1948, the 
date prior to which an applicant for creation of a 
record of lawful entry must establish that lie has 



resided continuously in the United States. As a 
result, fiscal year 1966 showed a 25-percent increase 
over the previous year, and the 2,887 cases of rec- 
ords of lawful entiy created amomited to 13 per- 
cent more than in fiscal year 1966. Applications 
were denied in 130 cases. 

Other Adjustments. During the year, a total of 
3,210 refugee-escapees previously paroled into the 
United States under the Act of July 14, 1960, were 
examined by Service officers, found admissible, and 
accorded permanent resident status. Although 
adjustments under this provision of law are grad- 
ually phasing out since the enactment of the Act 
of July 14, 1960, a total of 16,072 refugee-escapees 
have Ijecome permanent residents. Also adjusted 
to permanent resident status were 37 former offi- 
cials of foreign governments or of international 
organizations and members of their families under 
Section 13 of the Act of September 11, 1957, which 
authorizes a maximum of 50 such adjustments 
annually. Adjustments also included 789 suspen- 
sion of deportation cases and 343 others. 

Petitions Adjudicated 

Visa Petitions. As stated earlier, immediate rel- 
ati\es of citizens are not subject to the numerical 
limitation of the Act. Innnediate relative status 
may 1)6 accorded, however, only upon approval of 
a. |)etition filed with the Service. During the year, 
49,5()t) such petitions were approved, a substantial 
increase over the 32,879 approved in 1965. One rea- 



ALIENS WHO BECAME PERMANENT RESIDENTS BY ADJUSTMENT 
UNDER SECTION 245, IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT 

1963-1967 



40,000 



30,000 



20,000 



10,000 



— ACT OF OCT. 24, 1962 

1 ST AND 4TH PREFERENCE 
PETITIONERS MADE 
NONQUOTA 



ACT OF OCT. 3,1965 
QUOTA NUMBERS RELEASED 
UNDER POOL PROVISIONS OF 
THE ACT 




NUMBER 

40,000 



30,000 



20,000 



10,000 



son for the increase is that under Public Law 
89-236 any person eligible must petition for inune- 
fliate relative status in order to conserve visa niun- 
bers within the numerical limitation for issuance 
to immigrants who are subject to such limitation. 
Included in the total petitions for immediate rela- 
tives of citizens were 1,918 petitions approved for 
orphans. Service officers abroad adjudicated 1,111 
of the orphan petitions. 

The first preference category is reserved for un- 
married sons and daughters of U.S. citizens. There 
were 1,621 petitions approved to accord such 
status. Petitions were approved for second pre- 
ference spouses and luimarried sons and daughters 
of lawful permanent resident aliens in 22,321 cases. 
Fourth preference is accorded to married sons and 



daughters of U.S. citizens. Fifth preference classi- 
fication is for brothers and sisters of U.S. citizens. 
Petitions appro\-ed for fourth and fifth preference 
categories totaled 34,242 in fiscal year 1967, a 32- 
percent increase over last year. 

The third preference classification is for aliens 
who qualify as members of the professions or per- 
sons of exceptional ability in the sciences or arts. 
A total of 18,314 sucli petitions was approved and 
694 denied after appropriate inquiry and investi- 
gation. The large number of approved petitions in 
this category, coupled with the fact that spouses 
and children of the beneficiaries are entitled to the 
same classification, brought about the establish- 
ment of a waiting list for visa numbers in this 
category, which is limited by law to 17,00(1 num- 



ADJUSTMENT OF STATUS UNDER SECTION 245 OF THE 
IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT BY STATUS AT ENTRY 

1963 - 1967 



20.000 



16.000 



12,000 



8.000 



4,000 




1963 1964 1965 

I I TEMPORARY VISITORS FOR PLEASURE 

^^ STUDENTS \'M'\ EXCHANGE VISITORS 

^^ PAROLEES I 



TEMPORARY WORKERS AND TRAINEES 



9 



bers annually. Detailed reports were furnished the 
Congress in each approved case, as required by 
law. 

The sixth preference classification is for aliens 
who qualify as skilled or unskilled workers in oc- 
cupations for which workers in the United States 
are in short supply as certified by the Department 
of Labor pursuant to Section 212(a) (14) of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act, as amended. 
There were 11,974 appro^•ed petitions, seven times 
as many as in the previous year. Detailed reports 
were also furnished to the Congress in these cases. 
Denied were 1,121 ])etitions in this category. 

Under the seventh or refugee preference, 10,200 
visa numbers annually may be assigned to refu- 
gees. Up to .5,100 of these numbers may be allo- 
cated to refugees in the TTiiited States who have 
been continuously physically present here for 2 
years prior to aj^plication for adjustment of status, 
[n contrast to the previous year, when 4,743 such 
applications were received, 1,461 refugees in the 
United States applied for conversion to permanent 
residence under this provision. 

Petitions to Im port T emfornry W orhers. Peti- 
tions may l)e filed by employers in the United 
States to imj^ort for temporary periods aliens of 
distinguished merit and ability, workers in short 
supply in the United States, and industrial train- 
ees. Petitions may be filed for one alien worker or 
for a group of up to several thousand. In fiscal 
year 1967, 16,340 petitions were filed compared to 
14,699 received the previous year. There were 
15,333 petitions approved and 678 denied. Before 
reaching a decision in many cases, the Service con- 
sulted Government agencies and representatives of 
labor and management. 

Applications Adjudicated 

During the year, 297,629 applications by nonim- 
migrants to extend their temporary stay in the 
United States were adjudicated as compared to 
265,269 last year. This was an increase of 32,360 
over fiscal year 1966 and in line with the continuing 
increase in alien tourist visitors in the United 
States. Alien border crossing cards permitting tem- 
porary entry into the TTnited States were issued to 
210,945 residents of Canada and Mexico who enter 
the United States frequently. Upon application, 
15,225 nonimmigi-ants in the United States were 
permitted to change from one nonimmigrant class 
to another. 

Schools desiring to enroll foreign students must 
first be autliorized to do so by the Service. Foreign 
students or excliange aliens nuist receive permis- 
sion before tliey may transfer from one scliool or 
exchange program to another, and students must 
obtain permission before tliey may accept pai-f- 
time employment. There were 48,671 applications 
in these categories approved during the year, an 
increase of 22 percent over fiscal year 1966. 

U.S. citizens wlio frequently cross the land bor- 
ders were issued 11,485 certificates of identity to 



facilitate their reentry into the United States; 
115,434 applications for reentry permits, extension 
of reentry pennits, and duplicate alien registration 
cards were adjudicated, up 19 percent over fiscal 
year 1966. Permission to reapply was accorded 
2,569 previously deported aliens, and advance per- 
mission to return was given 182 lawfully resident 
aliens who otherwise would have been inadmissible 
upon return to the United States following tem- 
I^orary absence abroad. 

Aliens admitted to the United States to par- 
ticipate in exchange programs must depart and 
reside in tlie country of their birth or last residence, 
or under certain circumstances in another foreign 
country, for 2 years before they can apply for 
immigrant visas or adjust their status to permanent 
residence. Tlie foreign residence requirement may 
be waived only wlien it is established that com- 
pliance with the requirement would cause excep- 
tional liardsliip to the alien's U.S. citizen or law- 
fully resident alien spouse or child, or ujion re- 
quest of an interested Government agency. A 
waiver may not be granted unless a favorable 
reconnnendation is received by the Service from 
the Secretai"y of State. There were 1,115 waivers 
granted in hardship cases and 429 granted at the 
request of other Government agencies during the 
year. 

Policies, Procedures, and Public Information 

The applications and petitions discussed above 
that are adjudicated by Travel Control deal with 
benefits under the immigration laws which affect 
vitally the rights of aliens to enter or remain in 
the United States and their activities while in this 
country. Many types of applications may be denied 
as a matter of discretion. Ever alert, to the need to 
accord due process to applicants and petitionei'S, 
the Service continued to exjiand its efforts to assure 
high standards of fairness in all of its adjudica- 
tions. Proposed regulations were also published to 
implement the Act popularly known as the Public 
Information Act, which becomes effective on July 
4, 1967. Involved in these proposals was the trans- 
fer into the regulations of many adjudicative 
guides which were deemed to affect the public. 

Toward that objective, additional information 
affecting the public was published in the Code of 
Federal Regulations. Among the matters pub- 
lished were procedures implementing the Act of 
November 2, 1966: procedures relating to labor 
certifications in connection with visa jwtitions filed 
on behalf of aliens who seek to engage in employ- 
ment in the United States; and clarification of 
])rocedures for revocation of approved visa peti- 
tions. To implement the President's desire to pro- 
mote better undei-standing between nations, regu- 
lations were promulgated to facilitate the tem- 
poiary admission of certain aliens who are invited 
lo international gatherings. 

Achievement of Service- wide uniformity in the 
interpretation and aiDplication of the laws, regula- 



10 



tions, and related administrative policies in the 
rendering of decisions continued to receive major 
emphasis. There were 46 decisions selected for 
puhlication or published during the year as 
precedents. Pulilished decisions are available for 
purchase from the Government Printing Office or 
for examination at the principal offices of the Serv- 
ice. Additionally, unpublished decisions have been 
made available for examination and copying. 

Service Operations Outside the United States 

Service officers stationed abroad continued to 
render invaluable assistance in detecting and pre- 
venting fraud, misref)resentation and other viola- 
tions of law, including counterfeit document op- 
erations, alien smuggling, etc. Adjudication of 
various types of applications and petitions filed 
by U.S. citizens and aliens residing abroad was 
current, notwithstanding that the provisions of the 
Act of October 3, 1965 greatly increased the work- 
loads of these officers. 

BORDER PATROL 
AND INVESTIGATIONS 

Deportable Aliens Located 

During fiscal vear 1967, Service officers located 
161,608 deportable aliens. Of the total, 108,327 or 
67 percent were Mexican, the number having in- 
creased by 20.7 percent from the 89,751 located in 
1966. Increases in apprehensions were noted also 
in the luunlier of Cuban, Canadian, and other 
AVestern Hemisphere aliens, and in the "all other" 
category, while decreases occurred in the balance 
of the nationality groups shown. The following 
table reflects a comparison of the violators by na- 
tionality groups for 1966 and 1967. 



from the previous year. Of the total, only 68.5 per- 
cent or 64,482 were apprehended by the 10 border 
sectors in the Southwest region, thus indicating 
the increasing movement of Mexican aliens away 
from the border area. 



Nationality 


Fiscal 


years 


Percent 
change 


1966 


1967 




89,751 


108,327 
1,251 
9,199 

1,770 
1,970 
7,313 
5,112 
4,063 
22,603 

161,608 


-1-20.7 




1,001 


-1-25.0 




9,089 


-1-1.2 




2,040 


-13.2 


BVVI and Britisli Honduran 

other Western Hemisphere.. 


2,336 

4,517 

5,779 


-15.7 
-1-61.9 
-11.6 


Greek 


4,279 


-5.1 




19,728 


-1-14.6 




138,520 


-)-16. 









'Status at Entry. About half (80,325) of the 
161,608 violators of the immigration laws found 
were aliens who entered illegally and the remainder 
(81,283) was aliens who became deportable after 
violating the status for which admitted. 

The illegal entries of Mexican aliens aci'oss the 
land borders in the Southwest accounted for 72 
percent of all Mexican immigration violations, and 
96.6 percent of all the surreptitious entries. 

The number of Mexican adult male aliens found 
deportable was 94,114, an increase of 21.8 percent 




Not Texas citrus grove tut New York State fruit belt. 
Border patrolmcm checks migrant labor orew near 
Montezuma, N.Y. 



The 65,902 aliens (other than crewmen) who 
wei-e legally admitted and who violated their sta- 
tus of admission included 48,009 visitors, 4,836 
students, 482 agricultural workers, 10,814 other 
nonimmigrants, and 1,761 immigrants. The num- 
ber of violators of status increased by 3,881 or 6.3 
percent over the number reported last year. 

Continued emphasis was given throughout the 
year to eft'ecting speedy apprehensions of the 
illegal aliens before they had become firmly en- 
trenched or had obtained employment. The pres- 
sure of illegal entiy and the use of various tricks 
and devices by aliens to evade apprehensions aug- 
mented the problem of control. Of the 150,811 
aliens (other than technical crewmen violatore) 
found in illegal status, 92,232 or 61.2 percent were 
located within 30 days, and 58,579 or 38.8 percent 
were located who had been here more than 30 days. 
It is significant to note that only 10,906 aliens or 
7.2 percent had been here for more than 1 year 
before they were located. 

•Smuggling. Creipinen, and Stowaway Controls. 
Border Patrol officers located 5,671 aliens who had 
been induced or aasisted to enter unlawfully or who 
had l>een transported unlawfully after entiy. 

In 1967, there were 1,155 principals or smugglers 
and 5,515 smuggled aliens located in the South- 
west. The rapid growth of alien smuggling may be 
judged by the fact that there were 31/2 times as 
many smugglers and eight times as many smuggled 
aliens in 1967 as there were 5 years ago. 

Most of the smuggling cases involved Mexican 



11 



DEPORTABLE ALIENS FOUND IN THE UNITED STATES 

1963 - 1967 

125,000] n """^ jJ25,0O0 



100,000 




100,000 



75,000 



-50,000 



- -25,000 



SURRE<>TtriOUS ENTRIES 



ALL OTHER ENTAtES 



aliens many of whom paid substantial fees for 
assistance in entering and for transportation to 
interior destinations. Sums as high as $250 report- 
edly were paid for the services of smugglers and 
transporters for passage to areas where shortages 
of laborers existed. 

Various ruses were used for smuof^ling aliens 
into the country : many were concealed^n trunks of 
cars and two were found under a platform cov- 
ered with hay in a horse trailer. Eented trucks and 
trailers were used in numerous instances. In one 
li/o-ton truck, 46 aliens were found who had paid 
from $60 to $150 for assistance in entering and for 
transportation to various places in California. Two 
( 'anadian girls had deluxe accommodations as they 
rode across the boi-der concealed inside a new auto- 
mol)ile aboard a car-transport trailer. 

The following case illustrates the extent to 
which some smugglers went to avoid detection. For 
tlie sum of $150 for each alien, a man and wife 
team transported aliens in Mexico to an isolated 
crossing pouit and instructed the aliens regarding 
the meeting place in the TTnited States. Tlie couple 
would then enter witli documents through a port of 
entry and transport the aliens to a hotel in Yuma, 



Ariz. After purchasing railroad tickets and giving 
them to the mdividuals, the couple would leave for 
Indio, Calif., In' auto to await tlie arrival of the 
smuo^gled aliens on a passenger train. The couple 
woulcl then transport the group by auto to the 
vicinity of Coalinga, Calif. 

Sei-vice investigators completed 1,042 smuggling 
investigations during the year. There were 551 
prosecutions instituted against violators of statutes 
relating to smuggling, assisting or inducing aliens 
to enter the United States unlawfully, or trans- 
porting or harboring of unlawfully entered aliens. 
Of the 390 cases completed, 322 were successful 
resulting in aggregate sentences of 2,395 months' 
imprisonment and fines totaling $13,150. 

A notewortliy smuggling investigation involved 
the Portuguese cruise liner Santa Maria, which 
made international news headlines in 1961 when 
the Portuguese rebel, Henrique Galvao, took com- 
mand of the vessel in an act of piracy and held the 
crew and 600 passengers in custody while he sailed 
the South Atlantic for 12 days. On November 5, 
1966, the Santa Maria arrived at Port Everglades, 
Fla., from Lisbon, Portugal. As a result of in- 
formation prexiously developed by Service officers. 



12 




Tnrcfitifiator 



'irstionniri sii.'ipcct alien creicman in New 
Orleans French Quarter. 



two Portuguese natives, Joaquim Maria Ferreira 
and Jose Francisco Henriques, wei-e apprehended 
within minutes after effecting an illegal entry 
from the vessel. Before complete and positive 
identification of the smugglers could be ascer- 
tained, the ship sailed for Lisbon. 

By the time the ''■^anfa Maria returned to Port 
Everglades on December 9, 1966, positive identifi- 
cation had been made of two of the smugglers; 
Jose Luis, a chief steward aboard the vessel, and 
Joao Alves de Azevedo, a steward. The identity 
of the third smuggler was unknown although 
photographs of all the crew members had been 
taken by Service officers. Prior to the return of the 
vessel, the Federal grand jury at Miami, Fla., re- 
turned a two-count nidictment of violation of title 
s. United States Code, section 132-1 against Luis 
and Azevedo. Service officers boarded the vessel 
upon its arrival on December !); the identity of 
the third (crewman) snniggler was established 
from the photographs as l)eing a steward named 
Joaquim de Oliveria Varandas and all three (crew- 
men) smugglers were arrested and remanded to 
the custody of the U.S. marshal. Service investiga- 
tion revealed that arrangements had been made in 
Portugal to smuggle the two aliens into the LTnited 




dheck being made at railroad yards in Detroit. Patrol 
officers have found illegal aliens hidden in automobiles 
hcing transported into the United States 



States for a fee of $700 each. On October 21, 1966, 
the aliens were taken aboard the San fa Maria in 
Lisbon and concealed in a storage room. During 
the 15 days aboard the vessel, they were fed by 
the three smugglers and upon arrival at Port Ever- 
glades, were furnished landing passes to permit 
them to disembark. On January 13, 1967, a Fed- 
eral jury in Miami, Fla., returned a verdict of 
guilty on two counts against Luis and guilty on 
one count against Azeveclo and Varandas. All three 
were sentenced to terms in a Federal penitentiary. 
As a result of information obtained during this 
investigation, two other Portuguese citizens, who 
had eft'ected entry as stowaways, were later appre- 
hended at Hudson, Mass. 

The numljer of alien crewmen found deportable 
on teciniical grounds when their ships remained in 
port beyond the 29-day statutory limit reflected a 
slight decline with 10,797 such violators encoun- 
tered this year compared with 11,347 located last 
fiscal year. 

The continuing close attention given to crewman 
control and antistowaway and smuggling pro- 
grams resulted in the quick location of 4,461 crew- 
men who had deserted their vessels, and 205 stow- 
aways who were landed or found unreported on 
board vessels. Service policy of close liaison and 
cooperation with law enforcement agencies and 
other persons greatly contributed to the successful 
control of crewmen. The following is a typical 
case. 



13 



On January 9, 1967, tlie Baltimore office received 
information that five Cliinese crewmen were de- 
serting their vessel and were destined to New York 
City by public transportation. Investigators were 
dispatched immediately to check transportation 
terminals. When the five Chinese were located and 
interviewed, it was established that they were 
crewmen from a vessel whicli was scheduled to sail 
foreign from Baltimore later that day. All the 
crewmen were dressed in two or three pairs of 
pants, shirts, and other miscellaneous clothing. 
They were without baggage, but had with them 
various articles, such as shaving gear, toothbrushes, 
and the like. They did not liave permission from 
the captain to proceed to Xew York and would 
have been unable to sail with the vessel had they 
gone to that city. They finally admitted they in- 
tended to desert the ship. Tlieir landing pennits 
were revoked, and they were returned to the vessel 
and ordered deported. 

As in every year since the 1958 opening of the 
St. Lawrence Seaway, Border Patrol efforts to 
prevent desertions from ships ti-aversing the U.S. 
section of the waterway were completely success- 
ful. During fiscal year 1967, Border Patrol officers 
checked 296 departing ships and verified departure 
from the United States of 813 crewmen who had 
been ordered detained on board. There were no 
reported desertions. This excellent control is all tlie 
more remarkable when considered in the light of 
tlie liigh rate of crewman desertions at Canadian 
ports. Canadian authorities reported -165 deser- 
tions in eastern Canada during fiscal year 1967, 
including 285 at the port of Montreal, less than 
100 miles from tiie U.S. section of the seaway. An 
important development which emphasized the de- 
sirability and need for good crewman control in 
the seaway was the sliarp increase in Iron Curtain 
vessels passing through the locks. It was consid- 
ered dramatic news, only a little more than 2 years 
ago, when the fii-st Soviet sliip travei-sed the 
U.S. portion of the seaway. Today, passage of 
Soviet bloc ships through the system has become 
commonplace. 

Air Oferatlom. The Service continued to use 
observation aircraft in its enforcement work with 
increasing effectiveness. In tlie Southwest region, 
21 light aircraft were used primarily to jirevent 
entry and to locate aliens attempting illegal entry. 
In each sector along the Mexican border, these air- 
craft, in tracking operations with ground teams, 
begin at dawn each day searching for aliens at- 
tempting illegal entry. Officer pilots of these air- 
craft performed in excess of 26,000 flight-hours 
and assisted in locating 8,599 deportable aliens, 
exceeding the 1966 figure by 584. Although the 
contribution of observation aircraft to the preven- 
tion of illegal entry cannot be measured statisti- 
cally, they have effectively discouraged illegal 
entry during daylight hours" permitting the assign- 
ment of more patrol officers to the critical houi-s of 
darkness. 



During the year, transport aircraft logged 
5,670 flight-hours and 29,665,738 passenger-miles 
without incident. Of the total, 26,705,536 passen- 
ger-miles accrued in transporting aliens from all 
parts of the United States to and lietween staging 
areas on the Mexican border. In addition, 2,960,062 
l^assenger-miles were logged in conveying prison- 
ers for the Bureau of Prisons. Tlie total number 
of passenger-miles flown increased 34 percent over 
the last fiscal year. Greater use was made of the 
Leon airlift and Presidio-Ojinaga trainlift in or- 
der to remove moi'e illegal Mexican adult male 
aliens to the interior of Mexico. During the year, 
12,840 aliens were airlifted to Leon, Guanajuato, 
Mexico. The regular Matamoras-Leon flights were 
supplemented by flights conveying 4,620 aliens 
from Mexicali to Leon and 780 from Juarez to 
Leon. The number removed by means of the 
Presidio-Ojinaga trainlift to Chihuahua City, 
Cliihuahua, Mexico, increased approximately 50 
percent, from 34,583 in fiscal year 1966 to 5i,781 
in 1967. 

The effectiveness of these programs is demon- 
strated by the fact that during fiscal year 1967 
only 8,812 or 5.5 percent of the previously buslifted 
and trainlift ed aliens and 3,238 or 3.4 percent of the 
aliens airlifted had returned illegally and had 
been apprehended again. 

Cooperation With Other Law Enforcement 
Agencies. Continued emphasis was given through- 
out the year to liaison and mutual cooperation with 
otlier law enforcement agencies. Many top field 
supervisors are regularly invited as instiaictors to 
various police schools throughout tlie country to 
acquaint the fledgling police officers with our oper- 
ations and the type of violators in which the Serv- 
ice has an interest. In many areas, these occasions 
constituted the veiy first contact for many of 
these young officers with the Service. It is felt that 
the relationships thus established will be lasting 
and mutually valuable to tlie agencies concerned. 
In addition. Border Patrol officers and investiga- 
tors represented the Service at regular meetings of 
organizations whose membership included officers 
of city, county. State, and Federal law enforce- 
ment agencies and \'arious foreign enforcement 
agencies in Canada and Mexico. The productive 
hours expended in liaison have been very fruitful 
and tlierefore such liaison is a necessary component 
of our operations. 

The success of this program is readily apparent 
from the statistics. Last year, other law enforce- 
ment agencies delivered to Border Patrol officers 
8,438 violators of the Immigration and Xationality 
Act, representing 22 percent more tlian the 6,900 
violators referred to our officers in fiscal year 1966. 
Border Patrol officers, incident to performing their 
duties, arrested and released to appropriate law 
enforcement agencies 742 violators of other laws 
including 67 narcotic violators. Coincidental to the 
apprehension of such violators, our officers seized 



14 



and recovered merchandise, narcotics, and prop- 
erty haviiiii- a total value of $1,988,569. 

In the light of the foregoing, it is evident that 
tliere has been a significant increase in the snnig- 
gling of marijuana across the Mexican border into 
the United States, particularly into the States of 
California and Arizona. 

The facts of a few of the largest and most note- 
worthy seizures made and other typical cases 
liigliligiiting mutual cooperation between Service 
officers and other law enforcement agencies are 
summarized below. 

Border Patrol officers in search of illegal aliens 
at a clieck jioint on Highway Xo. Ill, north of 
Niland, Calif., stopped a truck and questioned the 
driver. They quickly observed that the space be- 
tween the truck frame and immediately Iielow tlie 
bed was completely enclosed and gave tlie appear- 
ance of a double compartment. Further investiga- 
tion di.sclosed 462 pounds of marijuana concealed 
in this compartment. The officers arrested the 
smuggler, seized the marijuana and vehicle, and 
delivered the violator and contraband to the Cus- 
toms Service. 

During August and December 1966, officers at 
Campo, Calif., arrested eight X^.S. citizens with 
380 pounds of marijuana, 640 assorted dangerous 
drug capsules, and six capstdes of lieroin. These 
and numerous other similar cases, brought the 
value of narcotics seized to $1,718,937, or 41/0 times 
the value of seizures in 1966. 

On May 22, 1967, the Zapata County, Texas 
sheriff requested assistance of the Border Patrol 
in the appreliension of an illegal Mexican alien who 
was wanted for murder. Patrol inspectors located 
tlie suspect hiding in one of three small buildings 
located on a ranch about 7 miles from where the 
murder was committed. The suspect was not 
armed at tlie time, but admitted the murder and 
showed the officers the weapon, a 12-gage sliotgun, 
located in anotlier building along with other high 
powered rifles. 

In a bus station, New Orleans patrol inspectors 
on March 21, 1967, encountered a U.S. citizen 
armed with a .38-caliber revolver who was threat- 
ening to kill his wife. The subject was arrested 
and turned over to the city police. On a subsequent 
occasion, two New Orleans patrol inspectors on a 
bus-checking assignment saw an armed man in the 
act of picking tlie pockets of another person. The 
patrol inspectors arrested and disarmed the subject 
and detained him for the city police. 

An interesting and significant case reflecting 
assistance to the Border Patrol by other law en- 
forcement agencies involves the arrest of two 
professional snuigglers who were caught in the 
act of transporting illegal Mexican aliens into the 
United States. A fish and game warden and an 
employee of the State forestry service were patrol- 
ing a canyon road in search of lawbreaking spot- 
lighters. Tlie officers, noting signs of fresh car 
tracks, soon overtook and stopped a slow-traveling 



panel truck. Instead of game law violations, the 
officei-s found 21 illegal Mexican aliens in the track. 
Within 12 hours after receiving a folder, com- 
piled bj' this Service and Canadian police that 
contained photographs and biographical back- 
ground of Latin American criminals, the Metro- 
politan Police Department of Washington, D.C., 
apprehended two South American aliens on the 
Ijasis of this infonnation. These men were operat- 
ing a confidence game known as "three card 
monte." One of the aliens, Juan Jose Caicedo- 
Paredes, had been previously deported from the 
United States and had reentered with fraudulent 
documents. 

During August 1966, an illegal alien was ap- 
prehended who liad been bitten earlier by a rattle- 
snake. Only the action of the patrol inspector, who 
secured prompt medical aid, prevented probable 
amputation of the injured leg or the loss of the 
alien's life. 

Encounters With Armed Law Violators and 
Aliens Apprehended With Prior Records of 
Criminal and- Immigration. Law Violations. Not 
since the early days of the wetback era in the early 
1950"s have Service officers met with so much 
harassment and physical resistance in administer- 
ing the immigration and nationality laws and in 
bringing law violators to justice. The defiance has 
ranged from verbal threats and assaidts to physi- 
cal violence culminating in death as in the cases 
of the two officers who were recently murdered. 
During the year, 46,743 aliens with jirior violations 
of the immigration laws and of these more than 
3,500 with i^rior criminal records wexe taken into 
custody. Among those arrested, were 58 persons 
in possession of weapons including 32 pistols, five 
rifles, two shotguns, and 13 knives. 

A few typical cases wherein our officers were 
forcibly resisted while in the performance of their 
official duty are enumerated below. 

The most tragic of these encounters occurred 
during the early morning hours of June 17, 1967, 
when Patrol Inspectors Tlieodore L. Newton, Jr., 
and George F. Azrak, while performing traffic 
check in search of illegal aliens on Highway No. 
79 near Oak Grove, Calif., were overi^owered, 
taken to a cabin in a remote area, handcuffed, and 
then murdered. Their murders touched off a na- 
tional and international manhunt by the FBI for 
four suspects who have since been apjirehended, 
arraigned, and are now awaiting trial. 

AVith the deaths of these two officers, the Service 
has lost 57 officers killed in the performance of 
duty since 1919. Of the total, 31 have been killed 
l)y assaults. During the current year another offi- 
cer, Richard A. Lugo, was killed in line of duty 
on May 14, 1967, when his jeep overturned on a 
levee while assigned to sign-cutting operations. 

In another case, a patrol inspector, while per- 
forming fann and ranch check in search of 
illegal aliens near Modesto, Calif., was threatened 
by a farmer who pulled a shotgun from his pick- 



15 



up truck and swung it around into position in line 
with the officer. The officer acting quickly in self- 
defense grabbed the shotgun, pulled his re-\-olver, 
fired, and wounded the attacker in the shoulder, 
forcing him to release his shotgun. The farmer was 
tried in Federal court, pled guilty, and was fined. 

At El Paso, Tex., on July 6, 1966, a patrol in- 
spector in a tower observed three Mexican male 
aliens carrying bundles from the levee on the 
American side to the edge of the river and then 
saw them passing additional bundles over the 
backyard fence of a residence. Mobile units were 
notified by radio. Two of the men fled to Mexico, 
one was intercepted. The alien struggled with the 
officer in an attempt to get the officer's gun. The 
alien had burglarized tlie residence and records 
indicate that he had been arrested by the Service 
for illegal entry on August 21 and November 15, 
1960. The El Paso Police Department had previ- 
ously arrested him as a burglary suspect on Mav 
4, 1962, and again on April 29, "1965. The subject 
was returned to Mexico after each arrest. 

Two patrol inspectors at Chula Vista, Calif., 
while performing line watch duties on the night 
of April 23, 1967, observed seven subjects climbing 
over the International fence in what appeared to 
be a smuggling operation. Upon entry the group 
separated and ran with patrol inspectors in pur- 
suit. Two of the subjects returned to Mexico and 
one of the two fired six shots at the officers. The 
shooting attracted other Mexican citizens who ap- 
j)roached the boundary fence and commenced 
throwing stones at the officers. 

Caribbean Program 

The Service Caribbean Investigations Coordina- 
tion Program and the relating index maintained at 
Miami continued as effective measures in assisting 
to prevent the entry into the United States of Latin 
American aliens of the criminal, immoral, narcotic, 
and subversive classes. In addition to their impor- 
tance to Service operations, they have proved valu- 
able to other Go^•ernment agencies engaged in 
investigations involving the security of the United 
States. The index was augmented by approxi- 
mately 10,000 reference cards during fiscal year 
1967 and includes numerous references to individ- 
uals alleged or suspected of being agents of Cuba 
or other Caribbean and Latin American countries. 

During fiscal year 1967, there were in excess of 
180,000 checks made of the index resulting in the 
location of over 11,000 relating records. Primarily 
on the basis of information contained in the index, 
over 180 antisubversive investigations were initi- 
ated by the Service. These investigations involved 
some aliens currently in the United States, some 
attempting to enter the country illegally, and some 
applying for admission as permanent residents or 
as refugees on the Cuban airlift. There were 695 
investigations of Cubans completed during the 
year, 180 of whom were alleged to be of the sub- 



versive class and 89 allegedly of the criminal, 
immoral, and narcotic classes. 

An example of one of the types of cases handled 
under the program is that of Engenio Luis Ver- 
gara de la Guardia, an alleged Cuban Communist 
and employee of a Cuban Communist Party news- 
paper, who was ordered excluded and deported at 
a hearing accorded December 8, 1966. 

Other case examples are those of Cubans Alberto 
Enrique Castineira-Lopez de la Torre and Juan 
Miguel Haedo-Medina, both of whom were refused 
permission to enter the United States on the basis 
of security information contained in the index. 

Foreign-Born Law Violators 

Infemul Security and the Foreign Born. The 
Service Antisubversive Program is designed to 
identify foreign-born subversives and develop evi- 
dence upon which to institute exclusion or expul- 
sion proceedings, and to deny, where warranted, 
benefits under the U.S. immigration and nation- 
ality laws. A close liaison was maintained with 
other Government agencies concerned in security 
matters, and information developed was promptly 
furnished to the appropriate agency or agencies. 

A continuing effort was made to identify and 
compile evidence concerning various groups or or- 
ganizations to determine whether their character- 
fzation as subversive organizations was waiTanted 
and, if so, whether involvement in those organiza- 
tions by the foreign born justified Service action 
looking toward their exclusion or deportation from 
the United States, or in the case of naturalized 
citizens, the revocation of their citizenship. Invest- 
igations were conducted to identify certain aliens 
involved in demonstrations jDrotestmg the national 
effort in Vietnam and elsewhere, and determine 
their amenability to Service proceedings. 

Tlie Canadian and Mexican Border Antisub- 
versive Programs also served effectively as means 
of excluding from the United States aliens whose 
admission would adversely affect the security of 
this counti-y. Under the Canadian Border Anti- 
subversive Program, 64 Service lookouts were 
posted and six aliens applying for admission were 
rejected at the Ijorder on the basis of information 
developed. Under the Mexican Border Antisub- 
versive Program, there were 347 investigations 
completed on applicants or potential applicants 
for admission. Service lookouts were posted 
against 246 of the aliens involved, 31 such aliens 
were rejected at the border, and 14 permanent ex- 
clusion orders were issued. A total of 3,630 investi- 
gations was completed on aliens or naturalized 
citizens alleged to be of the subversive classes. 

Listed below are examples of the types of cases 
liandled under the Seiwice Antisubversive 
Program. 

Filippo Tornabene, native and citizen of Italy, 
was admitted to the United States as a temporary 
visitor on August 22, 1966. His application for 



16 



adjustment of status to that of a permanent resi- 
dent was denied on the basis of information re- 
ceived subsequent to his entry that he was a mem- 
ber of the Communist Party of Italy. Despite his 
denial of the charges, further investigation con- 
firmed his Connnunist Party membership and he 
was required to depart from the United states. 

Miroslav Petrovic, a native and citizen of Yugo- 
slavia, was apprehended on May 28, 1967, and 
following a hearing, was required to depart from 
the United States under safeguards. Petrovic was 
alleged to have been involved in the bombings of 
Yugoslav consulates in the United States and 
Canada. 

Zweledinga Pallo Jordan, born at Kroonstad, 
Orange Free State, United Kingdom, was ad- 
mitted to the United States as a student on Sep- 
tember 16, 1963, and thereafter became active in 
suspected subversive organizations and in demon- 
strations opposing United States intervention in 
Vietnam. His application for adjustment of status 
to that of a permanent resident was denied and he 
was required to depart from the United States on 
February 26, 1967. 

Foreign. Bom of the Criminal Glasses. There 
were 8,375 investigations involving aliens of the 
criminal, immoral, and narcotic classes completed 
during the year. Included were 89 revocation cases, 
3,185 deportation cases, 3,952 applicants for ad- 
mission, and 1,149 naturalization cases. Applica- 
tions for orders to show cause in deportation pro- 
ceedings were made in 730 of the cases investigated 
and 503 aliens of the criminal, immoral, and nar- 
cotic classes were deported from the United States. 
Prosecutions for nationality violations numbered 
366 cases instituted, 331 were acted upon, and there 
were 316 convictions. 

Nicola Femia, an Italian citizen, managed to 
conceal a conviction for homicide in Italy and ob- 
tained a nonimmigrant visa to visit the United 
States. Three months after his arrival, he was de- 
nied an extension of stay and was requested to de- 
part from the United States. He failed to depart 
and quickly disappeared. In the meantime, the 
concealment of his homicide conviction was dis- 
covered. He was found working in Greenwich, 
Conn., by Service investigators on July 13, 1966, 
and was deported to Italy on July 27, 1966. 

Angelica Pellecer-Arandi and her son. Hector 
Rene Galan-Pellecer, were admitted to the United 
States at Houston, Tex., as temporary visitors. 
Through the International Criminal Police Orga- 
nization, it was learned they were wanted by 
Guatemalan police for defrauding the Guatemalan 
Government of $220,000 in a lottery fraud opera- 
tion. Despite extensixe eilorts made by these in- 
dividuals to elude Service officers and disguise 
tiieir identities, they were located at New Orleans, 
La., on May 13, 1966, as they were preparing to 
depart from the city. On July 8, 1966, they were 
deported from the United States to Guatemala 
following notification to Guatemalan officials. 



Robert Gaetano Esposito was first deported 
from the United States for criminal activity in 
1956. He subsequently obtained a fraudulent 
Italian passport under an assumed name and while 
allegedly in transit through the United States to 
Panama on September 28, 1959, absconded and 
remained illegally in the country. He continued his 
criminal activities under his assumed identity and 
on September 21, 1960, he was sentenced to 9 years' 
imprisonment for interstate transportation of 
forged securities. His true identity came to light 
during his arrest on this charge and following his 
discharge from {he U.S. penitentiary at Leaven- 
worth, Ivans., he was deported to Italy on Novem- 
ber 15, 1966. 

During the year, liaison between Service officers 
and other law enforcement officers on programs de- 
signed to identify and control alien criminals at- 
tempting to cross the international borders was 
improved and strengthened. In particular, the 
Service cooperated with the newly formed Cana- 
dian Immigration Investigations L^nit in sujjply- 
ing information on criminals involved in organized 
criminal activities. With the advent of Expo 67, 
valuable information was supplied to the Canadian 
officers concerning the activities of alien i)rofes- 
sional pickpockets and shoplifters who ha\e op- 
erated from bases in Latin America. The following 
cases provide examples of investigative accom- 
plishment in the field of border program activity. 

.rohn Augustine Coughlin, a Canadian criminal 
who was previously convicted of perjury and 
armed robbery was arrested in Los Angeles, Calif., 
for drunk driving and turned over to Service in- 
vestigators. During the course of the investigation 
he was found to have been previously deported 
from the United States and among his effects were 
located an automatic pistol, a large amount of cash, 
and newspaper clippings describing a bank rob- 
bery in Seattle, "Wash., on October 28, 1966. A de- 
scription of the bank robber as contained in the 
clippings fitted Coughlin, and he admitted the rob- 
bery. The FBI was promptly notified. In the mean- 
time, Coughlin was sentenced to 2 years for viola- 
tion of 8 U.S.C. 1326 (illegal reentry following 
deportation) on December 5, 1966, and he is serv- 
ing his sentence at McNeil Island Penitentiary in 
Washington. 

Jerry Fernand Monahan, a resident of Canada, 
and Michael Frederick Abbott, a Canadian citizen, 
fled from Canada to Florida to escape arrest for 
robbery and shooting of a Toronto resident. Upon 
request of the Toronto police relayed through the 
FBI, investigation was instituted and both in- 
dividuals were located and apprehended by Service 
investigators in North Miami Beach, Fla., on 
March 3, 1967, when they were observed in a car 
owned by Abbott. Abbott was returned to the cus- 
tody of Toronto police from Florida on March 8, 
1967. Monahan was previously deported from the 
United States on September 29, 1966. On March 
17, 1967, he was convicted for violation of 8 U.S.C. 
1326 (illegal reentry following deportation). Fol- 



17 



lowing the serving of a sentence of 90 days, he 
was deported to Canada on June 6, 1967, and 
turned over to the Royal Canadian Mounted 
Police. 

Border criminal identification activity during 
the year resulted in the posting of 3,280 lookouts 
designed to prevent tlie admission to the United 
States of aliens of the criminal, immoral, and 
narcotic classes. As a result of the lookouts, 1,066 
aliens of these classes were rejected or excluded 
from the United States during the year. 

Latin American pickpockets and shoplifters con- 
tinued to operate throughout the country during 
the year and special emphasis was placed upon 
their prosecution for immigration law violations 
to prevent their speedy reentry under false identi- 
ties. The problem presented by these criminals was 
compounded during the year by the discovery of 
counterfeit nonimmigrant visas emanating from 
Colombia. Investigation of these frauds ancl coun- 
terfeits is being coordinated through the Depart- 
ment of State with authorities in Colombia. 

Frauds. Investigations completed during the last 
year which involved possible fraudulent activities 
in attempts to circumvent the immigration laws 
numbered 4,728. Many of the investigations re- 
sulted in the criminal prosecution of those involved 
in conspiracies in the preparation and use of 
fraudulent documents necessary to support the is- 
suance of an immigrant visa. 

These investigations disclosed a continuing pat- 
tern of use of altered or fraudulent passports and 
immigration documents and "sham" marriages to 
TT.S. citizens to ciix'umvent quota restrictions. Ex- 
amples of the success of these complex investiga- 
tions follow. 

Since the recent amendment of the immigration 
law requiring Department of Labor certification of 
innnigrants, several new types of frauds have de- 
veloped. Many aliens who are ineligible for labor 
certifications obtain immigrant visas by means of 
certifications secured through connivance and 
misrepresentations. The most recent pattern in- 
volves aliens who have secured certifications as 
live-in domestics, although this is not their prin- 
cipal occupation. Upon arrival in the United 
States, the alien either fails to appear for the con- 
tracted employment or remains in such employ- 
ment a very short time. When fraud or conspiracy 
to commit fraud is establislied, these cases are pre- 
sented to the U.S. attorneys for consideration of 
prosecution, after which deportation proceedings 
ai'e instituted. Numerous cases involve immigrants 
who have entei'ed into "sham" marriages with U.S. 
citizens to achieve immediate relative status and 
circumvent labor certification requirements. These 
cases usually involve an "arranger" such as Lino 
R. Salazar, a resident of Los Angeles, Calif., who 
pleaded guilty N"oveml)er 10, 1066, to two counts 
of a nine-count indictment charging him with ar- 
ranging "sham" marriages between Mexican aliens 
and U.S. citizens to evade labor certification re- 
(luirements. Salazar, for fees up to $800. provided 



the LT.S. -citizen spouses and prepared all of the 
fraudulent documentation necessary to secure im- 
migrant visas. When he failed to appear for sen- 
tencing December 15, 1966, a bench warrant was 
issued for his arrest. He is still a fugitive. Other 
cases involve the filing of false birth records in 
the United States of children actually born abroad. 
This false registration enables the parents, when 
applying for immigrant visas, to claim immediate 
relative status and thus evade the labor certifica- 
tion requirements. Investigation of this scheme has 
tluis far identified three Texas midwives, who 
falsely registered birtlis in the United States of 
some 47 children who were actually born in Mex- 
ico. In all cases the jjarents intended to use the 
false Texas birth certificates to avoid getting labor 
certifications in connection with applications for 
immigrant visas. 

After trial in the U.S. District Court, Southern 
District of New York, Ethelbert Bernard, a natu- 
ralized U.S. citizen, and Adria Foote, a native and 
citizen of Jamaica, were found guilty on nine 
counts of a 12-count indictment charging them 
with arranging "sham" marriages between Trini- 
dad nationals and U.S. citizens to evade quota re- 
strictions. Tlie male aliens paid fees up to $400 
from which the citizen spouses received $200. On 
May 26, 1967, the defendants were sentenced to 
serve 4 months and 6 months, respectively, and 
placed on probation for 2 years. Deportation pro- 
ceedings have been instituted against Foote, who 
liad been admitted to the United States as a tem- 
porary visitor. 

Raymond Rudolph Garcia, a San Diego public 
relations man and former announcer at the Jai 
Alai games in Tijuana, B.C., Mexico, pleaded guil- 
ty to one count of an indictment charging him with 
preparing and furnisliing fraudulent employment 
assurances to Mexican applicants for immigrant 
visas. On May 15, 1967, he was fined $250 and 
placed on probation for 5 years. 

During the last year, certain individuals in the 
Dominican Republic continued to furnish Domini- 
can nationals with altered Dominican passports 
and/or U.S. nonimmigrant visas. The most com- 
mon alterations involved photograph substitution 
or actual alterations of nonimmigrant visas. The 
price of the altered documents varied from $25 to 
$300. The cases of the aliens located were presented 
to the appropriate U.S. attorneys for consideration 
of prosecution, after which tlieir departures were 
effected. Close liaison has been maintained with 
the Department of State both on a local and seat of 
government level. 

Again this year, the workload at the Fraudulent 
Document Center exceeded all other years since 
the facility was established in 1958. An average of 
200 cases was received and indexed each month 
l)ringing the overall total of cases on file to 15,117 
I)V tlie end of the year. The number of new cases 
added to the files was 24 percent more than in the 
previous year. Inquiries for record checks increased 
by 8 percent, from 2,401 to 2,593. Positive re- 



18 



sponses to inquiries rose 29 percent, from 373 to 
482. Tiie percentage of positive responses fur- 
nislied in relation to tlie number of inquiries re- 
ceived, 18.6 percent, was the higrliest ever recorded. 

The number of false claims to citizenship en- 
countered l)y the Patrol increased for the sixth 
consecutive year. The 1,688 cases accounted for in 
the current period was 22 percent above the 1,385 
cases reported the year before. False claims were 
made by 1,657 Mexicans, 24 Canadians, and seven 
aliens of other nationalities. In tlie ]5ast 6 years 
tlie volume of false claims has more than doubled. 

The detection of a false claim to citizenship 
sometimes leads to the source of documents that 
appear to be genuine but are not. In a case devel- 
ope<l in the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas, a 
false claimant presented a baptismal certificate 
l)earing his true name and correct birth date. 
Inquiiy into the matter revealed that two churches 
in the ai'ea were using forms on which the seals and 
facsimile signatures were jilaced in advance to 
expedite issuance of copies of church records. On 
several occasions applicants have requested copies 
of baptismal records that did not exist, thereby 
causing the church employee to spend extra time 
searching the records. This alTorded ample time 
for theft of blank forms lying within reach of the 
applicants. The facts indicated an orgaaiized group 
was stealing the blank forms and selling them in 
Mexico where \endors executed the fonns in the 
true name, etc., of a prospective false claimant. As 
» result of the disclosures, security measures were 
instituted to safeguard the forms. 

Criminal Prosecution 

T'.S. attorneys authorized prosecutions for vio- 
lations of the immigration and nationality laws in 
3,577 cases. Of the cases disposed of, 93 percent 
residted in convictions with aggregate sentences of 
36,563 months and fines of $87,625. 

Of the aliens convicted. 1,619 were convicted of 
reentry after deportation without iDermission (8 
CS.C. 1326) ; 50!) persons wei'e convicted for doc- 
ument fraud (18 U.S.C. 1546); and the average 
sentence in these cases was 13 months. Of the 316 
persons convicted for nationality violations, 315 
convictions were for false representations as a U.S. 
citizen (18 U.S.C. 911). 

DETENTION AND DEPORTATION 
ACTIVITIES 

The number of aliens deported in fiscal year 1967 
under orders of deportation was 9,260, about 100 
more than the 9,168 deported in fiscal year 1966. 
Among those deported were 503 on criminal, 
immoral, and narcotic charges. 

Among the criminals deported was Georges Le 
May, who was wanted in Canada on charges of 
masterminding the robbery of the Bank of Nova 



Scotia in Montreal in 1961. In May 1965, his pho- 
tograph was shown on an Early Bird Satellite 
telecast as the "Most Wanted Man'" on the Royal 
Canadian Mounted Police list of wanted crimi- 
nals. The photograph was recognized by a resident 
of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., as that of a man living 
on a boat in a marina. As a result, Le May was 
taken into custody by officers of this Sei-vice on 
May 6, 1965, and deportation proceedings were 
instituted. "WHiile the proceedings were pending, 
he escaped from the Dade County Jail, Miami, 
Fla., in September 1965. He was arrested by the 
FBI in Las Vegas, Nev., in August 1966. Subse- 
quently, he was turned over to this Service and was 
deported to Canada in October 1966. A criminal 
wanted by the police in Italy was also deiwrted. 
Angelo Di Stefano, who had been convicted in 
France for fraud in 1962 and was wanted in Italy 
for fraud, false pretenses, and forgery was appre- 
hended in Detroit and subsequently deported to 
Italv in 1967. 

Of the aliens deported, 90 percent or 8,345 had 
entered without inspection or without proper docu- 
ments or failed to maintain their nonimmigrant 
status. There were 5,423 deportations to Mexico, 
938 to Canada, 657 to Greece, 143 to Spain, 140 
to the Dominican Republic, 91 to Germany, 91 to 
Great Britain, and 82 to Italy. 

The number of aliens required to depart without 
issuance of formal orders of deportation increased 
from 123,683 in the last fiscal year to 142,343. 
Among them were 11,559 crewmen who were tech- 
nical violators who remained longer than the time 
for which admitted, and 91,298 others, most of 
whom had entei'ed without inspection and who 
departed under safeguards. Comparable figures 
for 1966 were 10,328 crewmen and 73,845 others, 
respectively. 

The remainder, 39,486, departed after the is- 
suance of orders to show cause. Included were 72 
in the criminal, immoral, and narcotics classes, 82 
who had been previously excluded or deported, 29,- 
301 who failed to maintain or violated the status 
under which they were admitted, and 7,592 who 
entered without inspection. The principal coun- 
tries of destination of these aliens were Mexico, 
17,698; Canada, 6,205; Jamaica, 2,203; the Domi- 
nican Republic, 1,547; the Philippines, 1,063; 
Greece, 609; Italy, 575; Great Britain, 554; and 
Japan, 444. 

At their own request, 106 aliens who had fallen 
into distress were removed from the United States 
under Section 250 of the Iimnigration and Na- 
tionality Act. 

Thirty-eight mentally incompetent aliens were 
deported or removed. Up to the time of deporta- 
tion, approximately $201,666 had been expended 
for their care in the United States. If they had 
continued to remain institutionalized at public ex- 
pense, over $3,139,531 would have been disbursed 
for their maintenance and treatment during their 
expected lifetimes. 



19 



There were 37,621 aliens initially admitted to 
Sen'ice detention facilities and 56,427 to non- 
Sei-vice facilities. 

HEARINGS AND LITIGATION 

Exclusion and Deportation Hearings 

The fiscal year total of deportation hearings 
referred to Special Inquiry Officers increased from 
the previous year to 19,214, representing the second 
highest total on record for any single year. During 
this fiscal year, tlie IVew York district accounted 
for 31 percent of the country's total. Exclusion 
hearings referred to Special Inquiiy Officers to- 
taled 895, representing an increase over the total 
received in 1966. 

The impact of the Act of October 3, 1965, con- 
tinued to make itself felt; during fiscal year 1967, 
api^lication for withholding of deportation on the 
basis of a claim of pei-secution totaled 398, a 32- 
percent increase as compared with 1966. To the 
list of countries concerning which such claims were 
made in previous years, tliere were added during 
1967, Nigeria and Lebanon. During fiscal year 
1967, 542 cases were referred to Congress for ap- 
proval of orders granting suspension of de^jorta- 
tion. 

This fiscal year brought to the forefront added 
problems in the determniation by Special Inquiry 
Officers of deportation and exclusion cases, result- 
ing from two far-reaching and noteworthy deci- 
sions of the Sujireme Court. In Woodby v. INS'. 
385 U.S. 276, tlie Supreme Court concluded that in 
deportation proceedings it was incumbent uijon 
the Government in such proceedings to establish 
the facts supporting deportability by clear, un- 
equivocal, and convincing evidence. Ai\ increased 
number of claims are being made on behalf of 
respondents in deportation proceedings that this 
new burden of proof upon the Government has not 
been met, and it may reasonably be assumed that 
such contentions will continue to be made in the 
future, regardless of the soundness of that claim, 
until a broad body of case law has been established 
interpreting the scoj^e of this decision in respect 
to its application to deportation proceedings. 
Special Inquiry Officers consequently are faced 
witli the duty of being the initial decisionmaking 
agency in creating the necessary precedents, to the 
extent that such precedents can in fact be created. 

Litigation 

As chief law officer, tlie General Coimsel func- 
tions principally as adviser to the Commissioner 
and operating officials on legal mattei-s in carrying 
out Service enforcement and administrative duties 
under the immigration and nationality statutes. 
He provides executive and professional direction 
to four regional counsels, who maintain profes- 
sional sujiervision over trial attorneys whose pri- 



mary responsibility is to represent the Service in 
formal exclusion, expulsion, and rescission hear- 
ings before Special Inquiry Officers. Trial attor- 
neys, when requested, assist U.S. attorneys in civil 
and criminal actions arising out of the immigra- 
tion and nationality laws. The General Counsel, 
through two appellate trial attorneys represents 
tlie Service before the Board of Immigration Ap- 
peals in all appellate matters. 

During fiscal year 1967, the trial attorneys re- 
viewed 12,905 applications for orders to show cause 
in deportation proceedings and prepared for hear- 
ing 14,653 deportation cases. They participated 
in 2,635 cases involving the issue of deportability 
and 4,790 deportation cases where the issue was 
tlie grant or denial of administrative relief from 
deportability. They also prepared 2,043 legal briefs 
and memorandums, and entered appearances in 
503 exclusion cases. 

The Board of Immigration Appeals has jurisdic- 
tion of appeals in exclusion, expulsion, rescission 
of adjustment of status, and visa petition cases. 
During the fiscal year, the Board rendered 2,326 
decisions in appellate matters which decisions were 
reviewed by the appellate trial attorneys to deter- 
mine whether any conflicted with Ser^dce policies 
or interpretation of the law. In the event of possi- 
ble conflict, the decision is referred to the General 
Counsel for consideration as to whether a motion 
to reopen or reconsider should be suljmitted to the 
Board or whether recommendation should be made 
to the Commissioner that the case be certified to the 
Attorney General. In fiscal year 1967, the appellate 
trial attorneys argued 323 cases before the Board 
and submitted to the Board 24 briefs and 26 mo- 
tions to reopen or reconsider. 

Tliere was a marked increase during fiscal year 
1967 in court litigation challenging administrative 
decisions in immigration and nationality matters. 
A total of 813 actions were filed comjDared with 200 
the previous year. There were filed in the district 
courts of the United States 63 jjetitions for writ 
of habeas corpus and 325 declaratory judgment 
actions. The district courts decided 52 writ of 
habeas corpus cases favorably to the Government; 
two decisions were adverse. In the declaratory 
judgment actions the Government received 325 
favorable and no unfavorable decisions. In U.S. 
courts of appeals, 325 direct petitions for review 
of deportation cases were filed under Section 106 
of the Immigration and Nationality Act, as 
amended, 8 U.S.C. 1105a. Of the petitions for re- 
view decided by the courts of ajapeals, 159 were 
favorable to the Government and five adverse. The 
Sui)reiiie Court denied 15 petitions for certiorari 
in imniigration and nationality cases and granted 
two. 

During the past fiscal year, the Service witnessed 
several important decisions in the field of the Im- 
migration and Nationality Law. Section 241(f) 
of the Immigration and Nntionality Act, 8 U.S.C. 
1251(f), provides that certain alien relatives of 



20 



TLS. citizens or permanent resident aliens who 
procured immigration documents or entry into tlie 
Fnited States by fraud or misrepresentation are 
nondeportalde if tliey were othei-wise admissible at 
time of entry. This statute was construed by the 
Supreme Court in INS v. Errico, 385 U.S. 214 
(1066), and the term "otherwise admissible" was 
found not to refer to inadmissibility because of 
evasion of quota restrictions of tlie immigration 
law. The Errico decision also requii'ed a review 
of all pending deportation cases to determine 
whether any required administrative reconsidera- 
tion in tlie liglit of tlie Supreme Court's holding 
was necessary. Moreover, the Service has l>een 
confronted with a number of difficult proljlems 
in attempting to assess the impact of Eri-ico in 
various contexts. These ]iroblems are currently in 
the process of administrative and judicial 
determination. 

In Bereny! v. Dhtrlet Dirrrior. 385 U.S. 630 
(1967), tlie Supreme Court denied naturalization 
to Berenyi for falsely testifying tliat he had not 
been a memlier of or associated witli the Hun- 
garian Communist Party. In so ruling, the Su- 
preme Court reaffirmed its declaration in United 
States V. Macmtosh. 283 U.S. 605 (1931), that in 
a naturalization proceeding doubts should be re- 
sohed in favor of the United States and against 
the petitioner. 

The question before the Supreme Court in 
Boutilier v. INS, 387 U.S. 118 ( 1967) , was whether 
Congress in directing the exclusion of aliens af- 
flicted with psychopatliic personality intended to 
bar homosexuals such as the petitioner Boutilier 
and wliethcr tiiis exclusion statute was void for 
vagueness. Tlie Court concluded that the legisla- 
tive histon- of tlie statute left no doubt that Con- 
gress intended to exclude homosexuals and that 
this statute was not constitutionally defective 
because its sanction was not imposed on postentry 
conduct. 

^ In Afroyhn v. Rusk, 387 U.S. 253 (1967), the 
Supreme Court struck down as unconstitutional 
a statute declaring that a U.S. citizen is expatri- 
ated by voting in a foreign political election and 
expressly overruled Prrez v. BrowneJl. 356 U.S. 
44 ( 1958), which had lield the same statute consti- 
tutional as a reasonable implementation of the 
implied power to conduct foreign alfairs. The 
Court in Af royim found the statute in conflict with 
the 14th amendment which it construed as pro- 
tecting every citizen against a congressional de- 
struction of his citizenship. Tlie Court said that 
loss of citizenship may only result from a volun- 
tary relinquishment, and its sweeping language 
casts doubt on the validity of otiier expatriation 
statutes. 

The Supreme Coui't by denial of certiorari de- 
clined to re\iew tlie decision of tlie U.S. Court of 
Appeals for tlie Seventh Circuit in DeLucJa v. 
INS. 370 F. 2d 305 (1967), cert. den. 386 U.S. 912. 
DeLucia is a native of Italy who is nicknamed 
"Paul the Waiter" and has been characterized by 



the press as a top racketeer in the Chicago area. 
He entered the United States in 1920 and was nat- 
uralized in 1928. His certificate of naturalization 
was canceled in 1957 because he was found to have 
concealed material facts from the naturalization 
court. After a hearing, he was ordered deported 
on the grounds that lie had no passport at the 
time of entry and that prior to enti\y he had been 
convicted of a crime involving moral turpitude. 
The validity of the deportation order was upheld 
by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Cir- 
cuit. DeLucia v. Flagg. 297 F. 2d 58 (1962), cert, 
den. 369 U.S. 837. 

Tliereafter the deportation hearing was reopened 
to permit DeLucia to make applications for dis- 
cretionary relief from deportation. After a pro- 
tracted hearing his api:)lications were denied by a 
Special Inquiry Officer and by the Board of Im- 
migration Appeals. He challenged this denial by 
a petition to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 
Seventh Circuit which resulted in a decision ad- 
verse to him, and the Supreme Court refused to 
review as above stated. After denial of certiorari 
by the Supreme Court, DeLucia commenced an 
action in the LLS. District Court for the District 
of Columbia to enjoin the Service from represent- 
ing that he is an Italian national. The District 
Court dismissed this action and DeLucia now has 
an appeal pending in the IT.S. Court of Appeals 
for the District of Columbia from the judgment 
of tlie District Court. 

The Supreme Court also denied certiorari and 
refused to review the decision of the U.S. Court of 
Appeals for the Second Circuit in Tai Mid v. 
/i-ynrrh/. 371 F. 2d 772 (1966), cert. den. 386 U.S. 
1017. This involved four Chinese crewmen illegally 
in the United States who commenced actions in 
the Southern District of New York seeking stays 
of deportation to enable them to become permanent 
residents of the United States under the provisions 
of Section 203(a) (7) of the Immigration and Na- 
tionality Act, as amended, 8 U.S.C. 1153(a)(7), 
authorizing permanent resident status for certain 
refugees. Since numerous other cases involving the 
same issues had been filed in the Southern District 
of New York, Tai Mui and the three other cases 
were designated as pilot cases and counsel for tlie 
Government and the aliens in the other actions 
stipulated to be bound by the decision in the pilot 
cases. 

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Cir- 
cuit in affirming the District Court ruling in favor 
of the Government, found no merit in appellants' 
argument that the Service regulations should au- 
thorize the issuance of conditional entries to refu- 
gees in the United States and in the Orient. The 
court also agreed with the interpretation of the 
Service that the phrase "adjustment of status" in 
Section 203(a)(7) of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act, 8 U.S.C. 1153(a)(7), means ad- 
justment under Section 245 of the same Act, 8 
U.S.C. 1255, whose benefits are unavailable to 
alien crewmen like appellants. The U.S. Court 



21 



of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in Lee v. INS^ 
375 F. 2d 723 (1967), held that the phrase "adjust- 
ment of status'' in Section 203(a)(7) did not 
define a new method of adjustment but found it 
unnecessary to determine whether Section 245 is 
the exclusive method of adjustment of status of 
refugees under Section 203(a) (7). Review of this 
decision is sought by a petition for certiorari filed 
June 22, 1967, N. 281, Oct. 1967 Term. 

Conflict continues as to the scope of review of 
deportation cases by U.S. courts of appeals by di- 
rect petitions under Section 106 of the Immigi'a- 
tion and Nationality Act, 8 U.S.C. 1105a. In Foil 
V. INS, 375 U.S. 217 (1963), the Supreme Court 
liberally interpreted Section 106 by not limiting 
courts of appeals to review of the determination of 
deportability but extended review to ancillary or- 
ders entered in the deportation hearing, relating to 
the designation of the place of deportation and the 
denial of applications for discretionai-y i-elief such 
as suspension of deportation, voluntary departure, 
adjustment of status, registry, and the withhold- 
ing of deportation because of persecution for race, 
religion, or political opinion in the proposed coun- 
try of deportation. In a subsequent decision in 
G'iova V. Rosenherg, 379 U.S. 18 (1964), the 
Supreme Court extended Section 106 review to 
denial of a motion to reopen a deportation case. 

A divergence of opinion exists as to the jurisdic- 
tion of the IT.S. courts of appeals to review under 
Section 106 determinations made outside the de- 
portation proceeding which could delay or nullify 
the deportation order, such as decisions on visa 
petitions, applications for refugee classification, 
applications by exchange visitors for waiver of the 
foreign residence requirement and api^lications to 
District Directors for stay of deportation. The 
U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit 
gave an expansive construction to Section 106 and 
reviewed a denial of a visa petition in Shiftos v. 
INS, 332 F. 2d 203 (1964), and the denial of a 
stay of deportation by a District Director in 
Melone v. INS, 355 F. 2d 533 (1966). Of a similar 
view is the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth 
Circuit which reviewed the denial of a waiver of 
the foreign residence requirement of an exchange 
visitor in Tnlarera v. Peterson, 334 F. 2d 52 
(1964). The position of the Fifth Circuit is un- 
clear. In Samala v. INS. 336 F. 2d 7 (1964), it 
held that a district coui't and not a court of appeals 
had jurisdiction to review the denial of a waiver 
of an exchange visitor's foreign i-esidence require- 
ment, but this case was decided before the decision 
of the Supreme Court in Fotl. 

Other courts have taken a more restrictive ap- 
proach and limited their jurisdiction to review 
only determinations made in the deportation hear- 
ing. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second 
Circuit in Tai Mui, supm, held it had no jurisdic- 
tion to review under Section 106 a denial by a 
District Director of an application for stay of 
deportation and an application for refugee status. 
However, in the later case of Li Cheung et al. v. 



Esperdy, ?,11 F. 2d 819 (C.A. 2, 1967), which in- 
volved several petitions of Chinese crewmen to re- 
view the denial of stays of deportation by a Dis- 
trict Director, the Second Circuit, while not over- 
ruling Tai Mui, did pass on the merits of the peti- 
tions and upheld the District Director's decision. 
In partial support of its ruling in Tai Mui, the 
Second Circuit cited the decision of the Eighth 
Circuit in Mendez v. Major, 340 F. 2d 128 (1965), 
in which it was held that Section 106 did not con- 
fer jurisdiction on courts of appeals to review a 
denial by a District Director of a waiver of an 
exchange visitor's foreign residence requirement. 
The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit 
in the cases of Cheng Fan Kwok v. INS and Chan 
Kwan Chung v. INS, No. 16005 and No. 16027 
decided August 4, 1967, 381 F.2d 542, followed Tai 
Mui and declined to review the denial by a District 
Dii-ector of stays of deportation. 

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of 
Columbia is being asked to pass on similar juris- 
dictional disputes under Section 106 in two appeals 
now pending Ijefore it. Butterfield v. INS seeks 
to review the denial of a visa petition. DeLucia v. 
INS. supra, seeks to re\iew an alleged determina- 
tion that an alien under order of deportation is a 
national of Italy. In its previous decision in At- 
torney Generat v. Bufalino. 371 F. 2d 738 
(C.A.D.C. 1966), that Court ruled that a district 
court was precluded by Section 106 from entertain- 
ing- a contention that the conduct of deportation 
proceeding violated a prior court directive, since 
all challenges to the deportation order had to be 
made under the exclusive remedy in the appro- 
l)riate court of appeals provided by Section 106. 

The conflicting interpretations of Section 106 by 
the various U.S. courts of appeals have created 
opportunities for delay of deportation through 
bifurcated remedies. This situation can be cor- 
rected only by an authoritative ruling of the Su- 
preme Court or by legislative clarification of the 
statute. The need for clarifying legislation has 
been urged by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 
Second Circuit in Tai Mui, sup^ra, and by the Third 
Circuit in Cheng Fan KwoTc, supra. 

Some litigation has considered the application 
to de])ortation proceedings of the Supreme Court's 
well known decision in Miranda v. Arizona, 384 
U.S. 436 (1966), which held that a person in cus- 
tody in criminal proceedings cannot be interro- 
gated unless he is first warned of his right to re- 
main silent and to be represented by counsel. In 
Nawn V. INS. 370 F.2d 865 (C.A.2,"l967), it was 
argued that a statement taken by an immigration 
officer from Nason should not have been admitted 
as evidence in the deportation hearing because he 
was not advised that he might have a lawyer 
present at the interrogation. The U.S. Court of 
Appeals for the Second Circuit held that under 
the applicable law and regulations the absence of 
counsel did not render the statement inadmissible. 
In the earlier case of Ah Chiu Pang v. INS, 368 
F. 2d 637 (C.A. 3, 1966), a similar argument was 



22 



made to the Third Circuit relative to a statement 
made hy All Chiu Pang. The court sustained the 
admission of tlie statement into the deportation 
record stating that it was not prepared to extend 
to aliens in deportation pi-oceedings the same im- 
munities to be accorded defendants in criminal 
cases. Ah Chiu Pang filed a petition for certiorari 
which was denied on May 8, 1967, 386 U.S. 10.37. 
The Solicitor (ieneral in his memorandum in ojj- 
position to the petition of Ah Chiu Pang informed 
the court that under the current practice persons 
in Service custody are not interrogated until they 
are given a warning concerning their right to re- 
main silent and to be represented by counsel. 

ALIEN ADDRESS REPORTS 

In accordance with the requirements of the Im- 
migration and Xationality Act (66 Stat. 163), a 
total of 3,668,836 aliens reported their addresses 
to the Service in Januarv 1967. This is an increase 
of 186,283 ovei> 1966. Of the total, 3,210,768 were 
listed as permanent resident aliens and 458,068 as 



visitors, students, temporary workers, and others 
in the United States temporarily. 

Almost three-fourths of the permanent resident 
aliens reside in the following eiglit States : Califor- 
nia, 808,240 (25 percent) ; New York, 588,777 (18 
percent); Texas, 230,344 (7 percent); Illinois, 
213,104 (7 percent) ; New Jersey, 164,943 (5 per- 
cent) ; and Massachusetts, 131,489, Michigan, 129,- 
482, and Florida, 112,705 (all with apj^roximately 
4 percent). 

Again in 1967, Mexicans were the largest na- 
tionality group in the United States with 668,514 
permanent resident aliens, an increase of 3 percent 
over 1966. Ninety-five percent of the Mexican na- 
tionals gave their addresses in just five States; 
over half of tliem were in California, almost 30 
percent in Texas, 6 percent in Illinois, and 7 per- 
cent in Arizona and New Mexico combined. 

The second largest group, Canadians, numbered 
385,367. Again California took first place with 
95,706 Canadians reporting their addresses in that 
State, 79,337 in the New England States, 46,141 
in Michigan, 17,433 in Florida, and 16,097 in 
Washington. 



ALIENS IN THE UNITED STATES 


IN 


JANUARY 1967 

L EG END 






GERMANY 

ITALY 

UNITED KINGDOM 

OTHER EUROPEAN 

ASIA 

CANADA 

MEXICO 

CUBA 

OTHER NATIONALITIES 


^ 


1 * ^^^^^^^^^^^ta/ 


r% 




llllll, 




«i 








(M 




p7 





23 



While not a true increase in population, but 
rather a transfer from the count of i)ei-sons in tem- 
porary status, the Chinese showed the largest per- 
centage increase (25 percent) with the Chinese 
permanent resident alien population up from 
45,534 in 1966 to 56,770 in 1967. The Act of Octo- 
ber 3, 1965 (79 Stat. 911), which permitted the 
Hong Kong parolees to have their status adjusted 
to permanent resident aliens after 2 years in the 
United States, was a major factor in this increase. 

In 1967, there were 458,068 aliens who were in 
other than permanent resident status. Of this total. 
169,339 were Cuban nationals, an increase of 30 
percent over 1966. On November 6, 1965, negotia- 
tions were entered into by the United States to 
provide for the orderly movement of refugees to 
this country from Cuba. Since that time, from 
3,000 to 4,000 refugees have arrived each month 
from Cuba. This accounts for much of the increase 
in the number of Cubans in temporary status. 

CITIZENSHIP 

The citizenship activities of the Service include : 
piloting the alien applicant for naturalization 
through the ])rogressi\'e steps to tlie court hearing 
and the final attainment of citizenship; proWding 
certificates of proof of citizenship to children bom 
abi'oad to citizen parents or to those who derive 
citizensliip through the naturalization of parents; 
and fostering citizenship education in the schools 
and by meaningful naturalization ceremonies. 

In the public interest, expeditious processing 
was given to all cases involving servicemen, their 
dependents, and other persons going abroad for 
Government employment or on American business 
or commercial ventures. 

Naturalization Activities 

Naturalisations Gi-anted. During the fiscal year, 
595 Federal and State courts in the United States, 
Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands found 
104,902 persons of 140 different foreign nationali- 
ties qualified for naturalization. After taking the 
oath to support and defend the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, they became naturalized 
citizens. While the new citizens represented many 
diverse, foreign nationalities and cultures, approx- 
imately half of them, in the pattern of former 
years, had their origin in a relatively few foreign 
countries, namely: Germany, 13,204; Italy, 10,572 
the United Kingdom, 8,777"; Canada, 8,120 ; Mex- 
ico, 6,044; and Cuba, 5,485. 

Almost three-fourths of the new citizens had 
resided in the Ignited States for at least 5 years as 
required by the general provisions of the natural- 
ization law, wliereas the next largest group, 16.778 
in number, was comprised of the spouses of U.S. 
citizens who can be naturalized under the law after 
a lesser period of residence. Most of the others 
were 6,740 natural or adopted children of U.S. 



citizens naturalized on petitions filed by their par- 
ents and 2,691 servicemen or veterans admitted to 
citizenship upon the basis of their military serv- 
ice. It is also interesting to note that, consistent 
with the record of the past decade, naturalization 
of females exceeded that of males by approxi- 
mately 13,000, and the females were on tiie average 
about 2 years yoimger than the males. 

Many unusual human interest stories appeared 
upon the naturalization scene during the fiscal 
year. On June 12, in Santa Ciiiz, Calif., a superior 
court judge had the satisfaction and joy of presid- 
ing while his mother, 74 years of age, happily took 
the oath of allegiance which made her a citizen of 
the United States. 

Tlie concurrent admission to citizenship of sev- 
eral membere of a single family is not micommon, 
but on June 24, 1967, at Bogota, N.J., six brothers 
and sisters were naturalized together, while 2 days 
later, nine children of another family were acbnit- 
ted to citizenship by the Federal court in Pro\d- 
dence, R.I. Seldom, if ever, have family admissions 
in the past involved so many members of an indi- 
vidual family. 

Another unusual occurrence in one jurisdiction 
was the registration of 100 newly naturalized citi- 
zens as voters immediatelj' following their natural- 
izations. Tlie registrations were accomplished 
througli the good offices of tlie election board which 
convened at the courthouse to pennit compliance 
with the necessary formalities. 

Among those naturalized during the year were 
quite a few persons in the 70- and 80-year age 
brackets. In the Federal courts in New York City 
and Brooklyn, Fanny Mathilda Peterson, 94 years 
of age, and Emanuel Vadala, 100 years of age, were 
also found eligible for citizenship. In other courts, 
a blind person was awarded the privilege despite 
the handicap of his affliction, and a deaf-mute was 
able to qualify through the services of a sign lan- 
guage interpreter. 

With the cooperation of the courts, the Service 
also was able to Ijring U.S. citizenship to persons 
whose infirmities and illness made it impossible for 
tliem to appear for naturalization at tlie court- 
liouses. One petitioner, despite the gravity of her 
ill health, attempted to appear at the final court 
proceeding but, upon arrival at the courthouse, her 
condition was such that she could not leave the ve- 
hicle in which she arrived. Accordingly, despite 
inclement weather, the presiding judge with court 
and Service officers in attendance, held open court 
at the vehicle, the oath of allegiance was adminis- 
tered, and the petitioner received the citizenship 
she most earnestly desired. 

Naturalizafians denied. Of the 9,316 applicants 
for naturalization who failed in their efforts to 
become citizens during the fiscal year, 7,308 were 
persons who deferred filing tiieir petitions after 
an examination by a Service officer establishing 
their ineligibility. They thereby saved themselves 
the petition fee, and unfruitful appearances be- 
fore the courts. The Service policy of recommend- 



24 



NUMBER 
150,000 



100,000 



50,000 



PERSONS NATURALIZED 
1963-1967 



NUMBER 
150,000 




ulOO.OOO 



50,000 



19 64 
EUROPE I "I 



ALL OTHER 




Irisli nun and Korean girl among those naturalized during 
November 1966, in Madison, Wis. 



iiig such action in appropriate cases also saved the 
time of the courts and the Service, which would 
otherwise have been expended in the processing 
and disposition of the petitions. 

The remaining 2,008 unsuccessful applicants 
hied petitions for naturalization which were de- 
nied by the courts. However, 1,831 of these peti- 
tions were not judicially considered upon the 
merits, but were routinely denied because the peti- 
tioners had elected to withdraw or not prosecute 
them, and did not attend the court proceeding. 
(Tcnerally, such withdrawals or failures to prose- 
cute are fathered by petitioners' realizations that 
they cannot meet one or more of the statutory re- 
quirements for naturalization, that the courts 
would probably deny their petitions, and that with- 
out the reward of citizenship the time and money 
involved would not be worth the court appearance. 
The remaining 177 petitions were denied on the 
merits of the cases. 



25 



The following table shows reasons for denial on 
merits, and those denied because withdrawn or not 
prosecuted. 

Petitions for Naturalization Denied on Merits, on 
Grounds of '■'■Petition Withdrawn" and on 
Grounds of '■''Petition not Prosecuted," hy 
Reasons: Year Elided June 30. 1967 



Reasons for denial, withdrawal, or lack 
of prosecution 



On With- Not 
Total merits drawn prose- 
cuted 



Total 2,0 

Petitioner failed to establish good moral 
character during the period required by 
law. -.- 5 

Petitioner failed to establish attachment to 
the principles of the Constitution and 
favorable disposition to the United States 
during the period required by law 

Petitioner cannot speak (read, write) the 
EngUsh language.. 3 

Petitioner failed to establish lawful admis- 
sion for permanent residence 

Petition not supported by requhed affi- 
davits of witnesses (depositions, oral 
testimony) 4 

Petitioner failed to establish that he is not 
ineligible for naturalization under Section 
315 of the Immigration and Nationality 
Act.. 

Petitioner lacks knowledge and understand- 
ing of the fundamentals of the history 
and the principles and form of govern- 
ment of the United States. _ _ . 1 

Petitioner is unable to take the oath of 
allegiance to the United States 

Petitioner cannot meet requirements under 
special naturalization provisions 1 

All other reasons 2 



Under the naturalization law, an unsuccessful 
attempt to become a naturalized citizen does not 
necessarily mean tliat the jietitioner will be for- 
ever barred from becoming a citizen. Accordingly, 
unsuccessfid candidates were fully advised by the 
naturalization examiners as to what they must do 
to eventually attain eligibility and, if ix)ssible, 
as to when in the future they might renew their 
effoi"ts to become citizens with reasonable assur- 
ance of success. 

Citizenslu'p Education. Save for elderly, long- 
time resident aliens, evei-y naturalization appli- 
cant is statutorily required to have a speaking, 
reading, and writing knowledge of the English 
language, and all such applicants, without excep- 
tion, must acquire a reasonable understanding of 
the U.S. Constitution, the processes of government, 
and the more important aspects of American his- 
tory. It is patent that .such skills and knowledge 
are essential if the naturalized citizen is to play 
an active role in the community, and effectively 
fulfill his obligations as a citizen. Therefore, an 
important aspect of Service responsibility in the 
naturalization area, recognized by the statute, re- 
lates to citizenshij) education. 

During the fiscal year, in order to assure newly 
arrived immigrants the earliest possible oppor- 
tunity to prepare themselves educationally for 
citizenship, 150,797 names and addresses^ were 
furnished local public schools so tliat the educa- 
tional authorities could invite the immigrants to 



attend citizenship classes for appropriate instruc- 
tion and training. For the first time, the Service 
broadened this program to include the many 
thousands of noninunigrants who, after their ar- 
rival in tlie United States became potential appli- 
cants for naturalization, by adjusting their status 
to that of immigrant. To assure maximum follow- 
up action by the schools, as necessary, they were 
also furnished similar informational notifications 
when the aliens actually apjDlied for naturaliza- 
tion, or their petitions were continued for further 
study. Referrals in these categories during the fis- 
cal year totaled 31,522. 

Tlie 6,103 public school citizenship classes in op- 
eration througliout the United States during the 
fiscal year were attended by 13-1,138 actual or po- 
tential candidates for naturalization. The natural- 
ization examiner force continued the practice of 
visiting these study groups periodically to give 
any needed advice and assistance to instructors 
and students, and to assure a continued effec- 
tive cooperative relationship between the educa- 
tional authorities and the Service. These visits 
liave proved a jiroductive means of encouraging 
the continued maintenance of needed classes and 
the continued attendance of the students. 

Once again, units of the Federal Textbook on 
Citizenship, especially the relatively new Service 
publications comprising the "Becoming a Citizen 
Series," namely, "Our American Way of Life," 
"Our United States," "Our Government," and a 
related "Teacher's Guide" were extensively used 
by the public schools as the basis for instruction 
and study in the citizenship classes. During the 
fiscal year, 9-1,098 copies of the textbooks were dis- 
tributed to the public school authorities, without 
cost, as authorized by the statute. 

For aliens wishing to become citizens who can- 
not attend public school citizenship classes. Serv- 
ice home study courses are administered by State 
universities or State educational authorities. 
Tliere were 2,570 aliens enrolled in these, courses 
during the fiscal year. They were supplied with 
Service textbooks, specially designed for use in 
connection with this method of preparation. 

In tlie past year, the Service sought to emphasize 
tlie observance of law in relation to good citizen- 
ship and to stimulate the acceptance of citizen- 
sliip responsibility by all citizens. Citizenship Day, 
Constitution Week, and Law Day, annually pro- 
claimed by the President, constituted tlie principal 
settings for such activity in all parts of the United 
States. To make the public conscious of these oom- 
memorative occasions and their meaning, Service 
representatives sought the cooperation of press, 
radio, and television, and supplied appropriate 
publicity releases. The cooperation of citizens 
prominent in the life of the communities and of 
community organizations was also enlisted for the 
purpose of arranging public ceremonies. Wlierever 
possible, tlie public pi'ograms jirovided for the 
appearance of naturalized citizens and the par- 



26 



ticipatiou of Service officers. In many instances, 
final naturalization proceedings were conductecl 
on Citizenship Day and Law Day, and formed an 
impressive part of the special observances. Quanti- 
ties of the Citizenship Day Bulletin, a Service 
publication, were again distributed. They proved 
effective as a practical guide in jjlannnig suit- 
able ceremonies and assuring a maximum of 
participation. 

Legislation Affecting Naturalization Volimie. 
Although the number of persons naturalized in 
each of the last 3 fiscal years leveled off at a figure 
slightly in excess of 100,000, there is a reasonable 
expectancy that this volume will begin to rise in 
the years immediately ahead. Justifying this pro- 
jection is not only the increased level of immigra- 
tion in each of the years comprising the significant 
period 1963-1966, but also the enactment of legis- 
lation during the fiscal year which authorized 
Cuban refugees to adjust their status to that of 
permanent resident. Because the date of adjust- 
ment is retroactive under the law, many of these 
aliens will be able to apply for naturalization 
within the next few years. 

Other legislation pending in Congress, if ap- 
proved, will also increase tlie naturalization jjoten- 
tial. Under the present law, an exemption from 
the English language requirements is accorded 
only those applicants who, on December 24, 1952, 
were over 50 years of age and had been living in 
the United States for 20 years. Bills have been 
introduced which would advance the determina- 
tive date to a relatively recent one. With the en- 
actment of such legislation into law, thousands of 
otherwise qualified aliens would become immedi- 
ately eligible to apply for naturalization. 

Also being considered is legislation designating 
the period of the South Vietnam hostilities as a 
time of war. This legislation, amendatory of the 
present law, would allow the innnediate naturaliza- 
tion of aliens who have performed honorable mili- 
tary service for any length of time during the 
period. 

Throughout the past year, in cooperation with 
the military autliorities, servicemen from South 
Vietnam were flown to Hawaii or Guam, and were 
expeditiously naturalized under a special Service 
program before being returned to combat duty. 
However, these former aliens were able to qualify 
under other naturalization provisions. Enactment 
of the proposed legislation would broaden the 
scope of this program considerably in the coming 
year. 

Derivative Citizenship Certificates 

Throughout the fiscal year, 33,123 citizens who 
acquired citizenship status at birth abroad through 
U.S. citizen parents, or after birth as the result of 
the naturalization of a parent or parents, or by 
marriage to a U.S. citizen prior to September 22, 
1922, applied for certificates of citizenship. In the 



three categories mentioned, certificates made avail- 
able during the period totaled 15,918, 16,710, and 
■195, respectively. Issued by the Service only after 
interviews with the parties and the presentation 
of competent evidence establishing that the appli- 
cant became a citizen in the manner alleged, these 
certificates are acceptable everywhere as proof of 
the holder's status as a citizen. 

Implementation of Public Law 89-710, signed 
by the President on November 2, 1966, made its 
contribution to the volume of certificates of citizen- 
ship issued. Pursuant to provisions of the present 
and earlier statutes, a very considerable number of 
persons born and residing in the Panama Canal 
Zone (a leasehold, but not a part of the United 
States) and the Republic of Panama acquired citi- 
zenship at birth through their parents. However, 
the overwhelming majority of these citizens, esti- 
mated to total a]5proximately 5,000, have never ob- 
tained the certificate of citizenship because the 
statutes required delivery of the document to be 
made within the United States. By designating the 
Canal Zone as a part of the ITnited States for such 
purposes. Public Law 710 eliminated this impasse. 
Pursuant to this remedial legislation, and with 
tlie fullest cooperation of the Canal Zone authori- 
ties, the Service embarked on a program of con- 
structive action to supply the needs of these citi- 
zens. During a pilot detail to the Canal Zone in 
December 1966, a certificate of citizenship was is- 
sued and delivered in that leasehold for the first 
time in history. Since then, 700 additional appli- 
cations have been received from residents of the 
Canal Zone and the Republic of Panama, and a 
total of 300 certificates have been furnished them. 
Further details to the Isthmus are planned for the 
months ahead to process an expected steady influx 
of applications. 

As in years gone by, the factors which produced 
the substantial volume of derivative citizenship 
casework during the year just ended, included the 
extensive involvement abroad of U.S. citizens, the 
policy of the military authorities to encourage 
servicemen to obtain certificates for their clepend- 
ejits, the implementation of that policy by the 
Service, the extent to which Government agencies 
insist upon the presentation of the certificate by 
those persons seeking benefits under Federal or 
State laws based upon their derivative citizenship, 
and the effective Service practice of notifying 
every newly naturalized citizen of the derivative 
rights of his children and of tlie procedure leading 
to the issuance of the certificate. 

Other Citizenship Activities 

Other Nationality Documents Issved. Fre- 
quently overshadowed by the greater demands in 
the major workload areas are the processing and 
adjudication of other nationality applications, 
such as replacing certificates of naturalization and 
citizenship and declarations of intention that have 



27 



been lost, mutilated, or destroyed. In addition, 
naturalized citizens whose names have been 
changed by marriage or court order may be issued 
certificates reflecting tlie new name. Other docu- 
ments issued are special certificates of naturaliza- 
tion to be used by naturalized citizens in obtaining 
recognition as such by foreign states, and the ad- 
ministrative issuance of certifications for use in 
compliance witli State and Federal statutes, or in 
any judicial proceeding. Under present procedures, 
the various documents usually are issued and de- 
livered immediately following a hearing conducted 
within a re]ati\ely short time after receipt of the 
application. There were 8,584 applications of the 
types mentioned completed during fiscal year 1967, 
and it is expected that this level will be main- 
tained during the next fiscal year. Plans for the 
fullest compliance with the new public informa- 
tion law (Public Law 90-23, effective July -t, 1967), 
in its relationship to naturalization and citizen- 
ship matters, were also formulated during the past 
year. 

Loss of Citizeiv^hip. The U.S. Supreme Court in 
Beys Afroyhn v. Rusk, a case decided on ^lay 29, 
1967, reversed its previous position taken 9 years 
before in Perez v. Brownell and ruled that the law 
)>roviding for a loss of citizenship by voting in a 
foreign political election violated the U.S. Con- 
stitution. A voluntary exercise of the franchise in 
a foreign state has been a recognized statutory 
ground of expatriation since January 13, 1941, and, 
during tlie past decade alone, almost 10,000 citi- 
zens were found to have suffered a loss of citizen- 
sliip upon that basis. However, with the entry of 
the Afroy'mi. decision, such findings became invalid 
and the expatriates are regarded as not having lost 
their status as citizens by voting. Procedures 
designed to adjust these situations are already in 
effect. New or pending cases involving the issue 
will of course be resolved in ac<"ordance with the 
Afroyhn decision. Moreover, upon application, 
decided cases will be reopened and readjudicated 
upon the same premise, and where naturalization 
documents have been surrendered to the Service 
pursuant to an erroneous determination of citizen- 
ship loss, they will be returned to the citizens. 

As a result of the ruling in Afroyhn and the 
Supreme Court's invalidation of other statutory 
grounds of expatriation in earlier decisions, the 
number of persons losing citizenship during the 
fiscal year totaled only 2,010. Among this number 
were 921 citizens who" were expatriated by obtain- 
ing naturalization in, or taking an oatli of alle- 
giance to, a foreign state ; 485 citizens among the 
residue lost their citizenship by renouncing the 
status before an American consular officer abroad, 
while 126 others underwent expatriation by serv- 
ing in the armed forces of a foreign state. As 
distinguished from loss of nationality by operation 
of the statute, eight citizens were divested of their 
status in judicial proceedings Ijecause tlieir natu- 
ralizations were fraudulent or illegal. 



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 

Personnel. The Sei-vice emphasized the import- 
ance of employee development and training. The, 
following programs were conducted at the Serv- 
ice's Officer Development Center : a 2-week Execu- 
tive Development Seminar for 20 persons; three 
Patrol Inspector Trainee sessions of 13 weeks each 
with 201 graduates; two 2-week sessions for 39 
Senior Patrol Inspectors; and operational confer- 
ences for 42 Supervisory Investigators aiid 29 Sec- 
tor Supervisors. 

Service employees completed 2,408 lessons in the 
Extension Training Program. Employees of other 
agencies completed 350 lessons. This program con- 
sists of 12 home-study or eorresiwndence courses 
which are available to any employee who desires, 
through self-study, to improve himself at any time 
in his career and according to his own time 
schedule. 

The Service planned and conducted 20 separate 
training programs for 70 foreign officials from 21 
countries. Tliese officials received on-the-job train- 
ing and special briefings in records administration, 
border patrol, detention and deportation, and 
travel control activities. 

In the field of employee-management coopera- 
tion, a record numljer of requests (22) for formal 
and exclusive recognition were received from 
employee organizations. Nine exclusive and 11 
formal recognitions were granted. Fonnal replies 
relating to union matters other than recognition 
were prepared in 45 separate instances. 

Ineenth'e Award-s. There were 82 suggestions 
processed I^y the Service Incentive Awards Com- 
mittee. Approved were 224 outstanding perform- 
ance ratings, and 44 recommendations for quality 
increases, three for special acts, and 60 for sus- 
tained superior performance awards. Guidelines 
for tlie submission and evaluation of performance 
awards and quality increase recommendations were 
refined and issued to all regions. 

Fhiance. The accounting system of this Service 
was approved by the Comptroller General of the 
United States on April 18, 1967. This represents 
the culmination of several years' efforts to provide 
an accounting system that conforms in all resjiects 
witli the principles, standards, and related require- 
ments of the Comptroller General. 

Delivery of employee biweekly salary checks 
was advanced 4 days by reducing the pay lag. One 
region, on a test basis, was authorized to have the 
Treasury Department mail salary checks direct 
to the home. This further reduced the pay lag. 

A considerable amount of research and compila- 
tion was completed in connection with claims. Of 
particular note was the work performed on 114 
claims filed under decisions rendered by the U.S. 
Court of Claims (e.g., Lloyd G. Bishop, et cd., No. 
150-63; and Kenneth S. Adams, et al., No. 66-59). 
In addition, a claim for damage to an employee's 
jiorsonal property was settled under Public Law 



28 



89-185, and over 50 tort claims against the Service 
were paid. 

Under Public Law 89-516, several new benefits 
became payable to employees who changed official 
stations. ]\Iost significant among the new benefits 
was the payment of temporary subsistence allow- 
ances, real estate expense allowances, and miscel- 
laneous moving expense allowances. Also the maxi- 
mum weight limit on household goods and personal 
effects that may be shipped or stored was increased. 

At the end of calendar year 1966, the Payroll 
Units of the Central and Regional Offices distrib- 
uted Forms AV-2, emijloyee tax withholding state- 
ments, with the salary checks dated December 30, 
1966. This included the withholding and reporting 
of taxes for 28 States and the District of Columbia. 

Procurement and Property Management. Meet- 
ing new and recurring obligations through the use 
of more ingenuity rather than more dollars was 
emphasized. 

The computer orientation of the Service Look- 
out Book was completed. In addition to the in- 
crease of accuracy and speed of production, costs 
were reduced substantially. 

Records. This activity involves the custody and 
maintenance of all the records of the Service. The 
immigrant visas submitted by immigrants at time 
of admission are placed in active case files by one 
of the 48 files control offices in the area where the 
innuigrant resides. Case files are also opened for 
other persons subject to action by the Service. 
There were 813,349 new files i)repared, including 
over 360,000 files for new immigrants. 

More than 2.6 million documented nonimmi- 
grants were admitted to the United States during 
the fiscal year. The arrival/dej^arture recoixls, 
Form 1-94, are the basis for nonimmigrant control 
of aliens admitted for temporary periods. These 
records are joined with prior records in the master 
index, maintained in accordance with tlie provi- 
sions of Section 290(a) of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act. By the end of the fiscal year, the 
master index had grown to more than 47 million 
cards, including a card for each Service case file. 

Statlxf/r.s. The work measurement system was a 
much used tool in the management improvement 
programs of the Service. 

Fiscal 1967 was the first full year in which the 
Act of October 3, 1965 (Public Law 89-236), was 
in effect. Statistics on the relationships between the 
various preference classes of admission and the new 
numerical ceiling of 170,000 have, therefore, been 
of particular interest. Public Law 89-236 also jjro- 



vided that a numerical limit of 120,000 for Western 
Hemisphere countries should be made a controlling 
factor for such immigration beginning July 1, 
1968. The law also provided that before that date 
a Select Commission on Western Hemisphere Im- 
migration should study the problems and come up 
with recommendations for the administration of 
the 120,000 ceiling or recommend other courses of 
action. The Statistics Branch worked closely with 
the Commission staff, and furnished tables and ex- 
planatory notes to the Commission. 

Another area of great interest has been the so- 
called brain drain. A number of agencies and Con- 
gresional committees were provided with detailed 
statistics on the flow of immigrants in the profes- 
sional and highly skilled occupations being ad- 
mitted to the United States by occupations and 
countries. 

Other items of study were the increasing num- 
bers of illegal entrants, and the relationship of this 
factor to the volume of detention, deportation, and 
voluntary departure. Other statistics compiled in- 
cluded tliose on naturalization, passenger travel, 
nonimmigrant visitors, and alien address reports. 

B II it ding Program. ITnder the terms of the Con- 
vention Treaty exchange with Mexico — the Cham- 
izal Boundary Treaty — all Federal inspection fa- 
cilities in El Paso, Tex., had to be relocated. Plans 
and specifications for the new Border Patrol Sec- 
tor Headquarters and Alien Detention Facility 
were prepared by this Service and a contract 
awarded June 16, 1966. Final inspection has been 
made and the buildings are ready for occupancy. 
Cost of the project was $960,000. 

The contract for construction of the border sta- 
tions at Cordova Island and Santa Fe Bridge was 
awarded by the General Sen-ices Administration 
in the amount of $3,147,400 in November 1966. No- 
tice to proceed was forwarded November 15, 1966, 
and the project is estimated to be 90 i^ercent 
completed. 

Five projects at border ports were completed 
jointly with the Bureau of Customs. Two border 
patrol stations were built and five border inspec- 
tion stations were improved by GSA with the ac- 
tive coordination and cooperation of this Service. 

Liaison was maintained with GSA on review of 
requirements for a number of other new buildings 
or improvement projects. Another on-going proj- 
ect was the study and recommendation for im- 
provement of Service space in Federal office build- 
ings or Government-owned buildings. 



29 



TABLE 1, 



IMMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES: 
1820 - 1967 



ijTom 1820 to 1867 figures represent alien passengers arrived; 1868 through 1891 
and 1895 through 1897 immigrant aliens arrived^ 1892 through 1894 and from 1898 
to the present time immigrant aliens admitted^/ 





Number 




Number 




Number 




Number 


Year 


of 


Year 


of 


Year 


of 


Year 


of 




persons 




persons 




persons 




persons 


1820-1966 


1/ 43,976,285 


1855 .. 


200,877 


1892 ... 


579,663 


1931-1940 . 


528,431 






1856 .. 


200,436 


1893 ... 


439,730 


1931 ... 


97,139 


1820 . 


8,385 


1857 .. 


251,306 


1894 ... 


285,631 


1932 .. . 


35,576 






1858 . 


123,126 


189 5 ... 


258,536 


1933 ... 


23,068 


1821-1830 


143,439 


1859 . 


121,282 


1896 ... 


343,267 


1934 ... 


29,470 


1821 . 


9,127 


1860 .. 


153,640 


1897 ... 


230,832 


1935 ... 


34,956 


1822 . 


6,911 






1898 . . . 


229,299 


19 36 .. . 


36,329 


1823 . 


6,354 


1861-1870 


. 2,314,824 


1899 ... 


311,715 


19 37 .. 


50,244 


1824 . 


7,912 


1861 . 


91,918 


1900 ... 


448,572 


19 38 .. 


67,895 


1825 . 


10,199 


1862 . 


91,985 






19 39 .. 


82,998 


1826 . 


10,837 


1863 . 


176,282 


1901-1910 . 


8,795,386 


1940 .. 


70,756 


1827 . 


18,875 


1864 . 


193,418 


1901 ... 


487,918 






1828 . 


27,382 


1865 . 


248,120 


1902 ... 


648,743 


1941-1950 


1,035,039 


1829 . 


22,520 


1866 . 


318,568 


1903 ... 


857,046 


1941 .. 


51,776 


1830 . 


23,322 


1867 . 


315,722 


1904 . . . 


812,870 


1942 .. 


28,781 






1868 . 


138,840 


1905 . . . 


1,026,499 


1943 .. 


23,725 


1831-1840 


599,125 


1869 . 


352,768 


1906 ... 


1,100,735 


19 44 . . 


28,551 


1831 . 


22,633 


1870 . 


387,203 


1907 ... 


1,285,349 


1945 .. 


38,119 


1832 . 


60,482 






1908 ... 


782,870 


1946 .. 


108,721 


1833 . 


58,640 


1871-1880 


. 2,812,191 


1909 . . . 


751,786 


1947 .. 


147,29 2 


1834 . 


65,365 


1871 . 


321,350 


1910 ... 


1,041,570 


1948 .. 


170,570 


1835 . 


45,374 


1872 . 


404,806 






1949 .. 


188,317 


1836 . 


76,242 


1873 . 


459,803 


1911-1920 . 


5.735.811 


19 50 .. 


249,187 


1837 . 


79 , 340 


1874 . 


313,339 


1911 ... 


878,587 






1838 . 


38,914 


1875 . 


227,498 


1912 . . . 


838,172 


1951-1960 


2,515,479 


1839 . 


68,069 


1876 . 


169,986 


1913 . . . 


1,197,892 


1951 .. 


205,717 


1840 . 


84,066 


1877 . 


141,857 


1914 ... 


1,218,480 


1952 .. 


265,520 






1878 . 


138,469 


1915 . .. 


326,700 


1953 .. 


170,434 


1841-1850 


1.713,251 


1879 . 


177,826 


1916 ... 


298,826 


1954 .. 


208,177 


1841 . 


80,289 


1880 . 


457,257 


1917 ... 


29 5,403 


1955 .. 


237,790 


1842 . 


104,565 






1918 ... 


110,618 


1956 .. 


321,625 


1843 . 


52,496 


1881-1890 


. 5,246,613 


1919 ... 


141,132 


19 57 .. 


326,867 


1844 . 


78,615 


1881 . 


669,431 


1920 ... 


430,001 


19 58 .. 


253,265 


1845 . 


114,371 


1882 . 


788,992 






1959 .. 


260,686 


1846 . 


154,416 


1883 . 


603,322 


1921-1930 . 


4,107,209 


1960 .. 


265,398 


1847 . 


234,968 


1884 . 


518,592 


1921 ... 


805,228 






1848 . 


226,527 


1885 . 


39 5,346 


1922 ... 


309,556 


1961 .. 


271,344 


1849 . 


297,024 


1886 . 


334,203 


1923 ... 


522,919 


1962 .. 


283,763 


1850 . 


369,980 


1887 . 


490,109 


1924 . . . 


706,896 


1963 . . 


306,260 






1888 . 


546,889 


1925 ... 


294,314 


1964 .. 


29 2,248 


1851-1860 


2,598,214 


1889 . 


444,427 


1926 ... 


304,488 


1965 .. 


296,697 


1851 . 


379,466 


1890 . 


455,302 


1927 ... 


335,175 


1966 .. 


323,040 


1852 . 


371,603 






1928 .. 


307,255 


1967 .. 


361,972 


1853 . 


368,645 


1891-1900 


. 3,687,564 


1929 .. 


279,678 






1854 . 


427,833 


1891 . 


560,319 


19 30 .. 


241,700 







U Data are for fiscal years ended June 30, except 1820 through 1831 and 1844 through 1849 
fiscal years ended September 30; 1833 through 1842 and 1851 through 1867 years ended 
December 31; 1832 covers 15 months ended December 31; 1843 nine months ended September 30; 
1850 fifteen months ended December 31; and 1868 six months ended June 30. 



31 



TABLE 2. ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AND DEPARTED, BY MONTHS: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1966 AND 1967 

£Data exclude border crossers, crewmen, and aliens admitted on documentary walvers^/ 



ALIENS ADMITTED 



Iraml- 
erant 



Nonlm- 
^ migrant 



ALIENS 

DEPARTED 

1/ 



U.S. CITIZENS 1/ 



Departed 



Fiscal year 1967 .... 

July-December 1966 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January-June 1967 . 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 



Fiscal year 1966 .... 

July-December 1965 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January-June 1966 , 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 



361.972 



179,343 



36,690 
29,957 
27,293 
31,909 
26,742 
26,752 




323,040 



169,177 



30,483 
28,287 
28,164 
30,095 
26,073 
26,075 

153,863 



20 , 1 27 
18,976 
27,995 
30,663 
30,302 
25,800 



2,608,193 



2.970,165 



2.144.127 



4,073.538 



4.033.283 



1.459.947 



274,880 
269,638 
319,286 
212,642 
168,219 
215,282 



1,639,290 



311 ,570 
299,595 
346,579 
244,551 
194,961 
242,034 



1.330,875 



1,170,271 



210,044 
231,047 
201,330 
187,041 
157,431 
183,378 



973.856 



2.161.969 



398,772 
574,257 
388,212 
310,769 
252,062 
237,897 



1.911.569 



1.942.820 



491,837 
398,725 
325,871 
252,918 
222,108 
251,361 



2.090.463 



169,601 
1 39 , 509 
187,890 
206.245 
227,660 
217,341 



2,341,923 



195,999 

164,762 
220,430 
240,704 
260,845 
248,135 



2,664,963 



132,966 
123,134 
154,240 
156,796 
189,904 
216,816 



1.919,951 



273,293 
254,321 
322,141 
307,592 
351,851 
402,371 



3,613,855 



260,404 
274,913 
325,279 
328,155 
364,510 
537,202 



3.542.751 



1.886,043 



223,191 
243,622 
285,130 
204,455 
160,720 
179,459 



253,674 
271,909 
313,294 
234,550 
186,793 
205,534 



181 ,580 
212,861 
184,257 
187,826 
133,754 
152,249 

867,424 



349,817 
504,156 
348,197 
258,020 
225,525 
200,328 



125,881 
139,059 
140,537 
196,014 
232,610 
211,245 



146,008 
158,035 
168,532 
226,677 
262,912 
237,045 



119,306 
110,516 
133,479 
152,544 
163,446 
188,133 



231,464 
227,453 
279,643 
300,594 
333,121 
355,537 



432,621 
365,422 
264,823 
223,764 
195,335 
221,487 

1.839,299 



232,453 
248 , 204 
262,155 
329,508 
307,906 
459,073 



W Includes aliens departed and citizens arrived and departed by sea and air, except 
direct arrivals from or departures to Canada. 



32 



TABLE 3. ALIENS AND CITIZENS AEMITTED AT UNITED STATES PORTS OF ENTRY* 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1966 - 1967 

^ach entry of the same person counted separately^/ 



Class 



Total 



Aliens 



Citizens 



Total number 

Border crossers l/ 

Canadian 

Mexican 

Crewmen 

Others adnitted ... 



Tota 1 nunber 

Border crossers XJ 

Canadian 

Mexican 

Cre««nen 

Others admitted ... 



Year ended June 30, 1967 



206,837,454 


120.196.406 


86.641.048 


195.143.536 


114.630.122 


80.513.414 


67,265,449 


37,044,010 


30,221,439 


127,878,087 


77,586,112 


50,291,975 


3,046,559 


2,036,877 


1,009,682 


8,647,359 


3,529,407 2/ 


5,117,952 3/ 



Year ended June 30, 1966 



197.025.052 


114.436.674 


82.588.378 


186.139.285 


109.237.567 


76.901.718 


63,573,664 


35,629,433 


27,944,231 


122,565,621 


73,608,134 


48,957,487 


2,986,084 


2,053,459 


932,625 


7,899,683 


3,145,648 2/ 


4,754,035 3/ 



i/ Partially estimated. 

2/ Includes immigrants, documented nonimmigrants, aliens with multiple entry 

documents other than border crossers and crewmen, and aliens returning from 

Canada or Mexico after extended visits. 
2/ Includes all citizens arrived by sea and air and citizens returning from 

Canada or Mexico after extended visits. 



33 



ALIENS ADMITTED 
iIGRANTS 1/ 



Parents 


1st p 


2nd p 



3rd pref 
6th pref 
Their spou 



y y " "f' 


ranee 


liN AC 






A^^ ' f II e 






A 








f O t b \ 


ri'oE 








sons and daughte 


re.ld.n 


aliens. 


and their children ... 


f October 3 


cJ't"e 


































f U S citlze 






























daughte 


s and br 


thers and 





migrants of special skills, I&N Act ... 
in professions. Act of October 3. 1965 
rs. Act of October 3, 1965 



11. bU 
l.39i. 



Children of U.S. citizens 
Orphans adopted abroad i 
Other children 



Act of October 3. 1965 



Special immigrant 



Employees of U.S. Cov< 
Aliens adjusted under 



ent abroad, their spous 

tlon 2'.'.. UN Act 

tlon 249, l&N Act 



Iramlgrants. Act of September 11, 1957 ... 
Hungarian parolees. Act of July 25, 1958 
Refugee-escapees, Act of July 14. 1960 .. 
Immigrants, Act of September 26, 1961 ... 

Cuban refugees. Act of November 2, 1966 . 



NONIMMIGRANTS U 

Foreign government officia 
Temporary visitors for bus 
Temporary visitors for pie 



nal organization 
lal trainees ... 
rlt and ability 



of foreign Infon 



s and c 


^^^^^JJ.g^ 











(6,981 
1,312 
5.669 



2.005 
2,8'>8 
12,672 



34,043 
122,515 
944.929 
105,815 
5,593 

38,991 



,746 



7,168 
52,760 

3,549 

1,928 
30,002 

7,666 
135,701 



2.341.9211 2.608.193 



767 



2/ Conditional ent 



elude 4,106 com 






34 



All ports 

Atlantic 

Atlanta, Ga 

Baltimore, Md 

Bos ton . Mass 

Charleston, S.C 

Charlotte Amalle, V.I 

Miami, Fla 

Newark, N.J. (Includes McGulre A.F.B.) 

New York, N.Y 

Philadelphia. Pa 

Port Everglades, Fla 

San Juan. PR 

Washington. D.C 

Other Atlantic 

Gulf of Mexico 

Houston, Tex 

New Or 1 eans , La 

San Antonio, Tex 

Tampa, Fla 

Other Gulf 

Pacific 

Agana , Guam 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

Los Angeles. Calif 

San Diego. Calif 

San Francisco. Calif 

Seattle. Wash 

Other Pacific 

Alaska 

Anchorage 

Other Alaska 

Canadian Border 

Blaine. Wash 

Buffalo. N.Y 

Calais. Me 

Champlain. N.Y 

Chicago. Ill 

Cleveland. Ohio 

Derby Line. Vt 

Detroit. Mich 

Eastport. Idaho 

Highgate Springs, Vt 

Jackman . Me 

Lewiston. N.Y 

Niagara Falls, N.Y 

Norton, Vt 

Noyes, Minn 

Pembina, N.D 

Port Huron, Mich 

Rouses Point, N.Y 

St. Albans, Vt 

Sault Ste. Marie, Mich 

Sweetgrass , Mont 

Thousand Island Bridge, N.Y 

Vanceboro, Me 

Other Canadian Border 

Mexican Border 

Brownsville, Tex 

Calexico, Calif 

Dallas, Tex 

Del Rio, Tex 

Eagle Pass, Tex 

El Paso, Tex 

Hidalgo, Tex 

Laredo, Tex 

Nogales, Ariz 

Roma, Tex 

San Luis. Ariz 

San Ysldro. Calif 

Other Mexican Border 

All Other 



6.045 


5,393 


740 


1,231 


261 


334 


24.038 


28,284 


8.739 


6,921 


108,945 


108,552 


307 


39 2 


406 


378 


6,752 


6,212 



59,012 

5,033 

5,078 

2,550 

4,381 

6,716 

760 

659 

10,327 

994 

1,353 



3,092 
1,491 
1,577 



72 
341 
2,083 
8,764 
1.954 
4.710 
3.721 
99 5 



20,539 



63.09 3 
5.319 
4.834 
2,584 
5,169 
7,479 
802 
7 38 



2,039 

419 

1,708 

804 

2,661 

1,594 

1,856 

601 

1,050 



68 
284 
1,865 
5.578 
1.371 
3.717 
2.319 
1.224 
618 
11,016 



31,820 

5,437 

106,270 



61.592 
5,577 
4,790 
2,111 
5,335 
6,744 
744 



195 
348 
1,846 
6,049 
1,773 
5,130 
2,651 
1,335 
685 
12,316 



27 


511 


5 


157 


22 


516 




729 




281 


10 


640 


I 


017 



15,079 
12,346 



10.036 
5,323 



49.106 
3.526 
3.501 
I .424 
3.646 
7.357 
603 
589 



446 

1. 000 

560 



2.321 

7 53 

1.276 



1 ,615 
4.372 
2.200 
5,172 
3,004 
1,740 
1 .304 
16.240 
329 



35 



Auatrla 




C«echo«lo sliia 








CerHny 




Hunaary 




It«ly 


Netherland* 




Poland 




Rumania 




Sweden 


Swltiet land 






United KInBdon 




USSR (Europe an 


d Aala) 






Other birnpe 














Iraq 


larael 




Jordan 4/ 


Korea ~ 


















Other Alia 


nrth AwrlC. 




He«lco 


Cuba 


Barbadoa 






Haiti 






Trinidad & Tobaoo 


St Christopher 


Other Meat Indlea 




Co«ta Rica 








Nlcacaaua 




















ColoabU 


Ecuador 






Other South Aiierlca 




ric. 








South Africa 


United Arab Republl 




i^yp 


earn. 











3,946 



_J 'a.i'5 - 



36 





°'";i:.H^ 


region 


-■"- 


is 
1 s 


is 
Is 

- 8 

55 


1 
i 


s 


s 

1 
1 


s 


1 1 

u 


5Js 
1 °. ". 
Hi 

m 


„i::"r: :"., 






si 

'A 

s5i 


■% 8 




1 


AU c 






361 9;j 


079 


208 893 


9 799 




6.411 


8.567 


123.110 


2.172 


3.210 


102 


385 


33.011 












36 268 






3 089 










83 


?21 


I.J54 








u'.nt 


'»» 


1.598 


5 

135 


135 
'7*3 

225 












18 


49 




BeUluB 






U 










D ma k 






n 










P 






W) 


C rM V 






11H 










H «r 






18 










llalv 






iw 


N th I 


ndt 




37 










Poland 


92 


Po t 1 






!7 










c , 






B3 


s^d^n':::::::::::::::;::::::;:::::::;:: 


26 










T k ( 


E>.r<,p. .nd ». 




1) 








USSR 


(!„,op. .™l 


Aala) 


70 


V I 




22 


Othe Eu 


ope 




iU 








1.629 


ChlM 3/ 






1.254 
4!l!5 

432 


3.102 


'393 
528 




1.863 


150 










1 




QM) 










India 






<-J 


Indo •! 






6 


Iran 






3 






larael 


23 


Japan 


B3 










Ko a 






Ui. 


Lebanon 






\b 










Phlli 1 


J 




319 










s"'rlan A 


rab Republic 




9 


Vi tncM 




















29.796 








M.5« 


93 




95 
15 


25 
99 




15 


15.462 


235 


1 




1 




He»lco 


2.196 


Cuba 


23.405 


EU b«doa 






6 


Doalntca 






129 










Jamaica 






32 


T 1 Id d 


and Tob.go 




A 








Other We 


•t Indiea 




li 


B Utah 


Hond a 




8 


Coata m 


ca 




17 










Cuatemal 






21 


Hood • 






8 


Klcatag 






10 










Other Wo 


rth A..C1.. 




l.lSl 






207 


A tin 


^ 






285 


2.496 
4.590 


37 




51 


55 


107 


5S 
24 


73 






29 


Bolivia 






2 












12 








U7 










Peru 






19 


Venet al 






19 




■"" *-"" 










S' 


Cap. V.r 


da laland 




593 
580 


194 








105 


" 


102 
1' 


21 




; 












So th Af 


rlc« 




18 


United A 


rab RapubUc 




7 


Other Af 




n 








68 


Auatrall 


^ 






1.340 


lii 














: 


i 


- 


46 










New Zeal 


and 




U 










Other coon 


















1/ Inciud 


ea 4,106 cont 


icionat entranta unda 


S«e. 203(«)( 


)(A) of P 


L. (9-236 


whoi* IM 


lirsnt *(■ 


cut do«« n 


Ot b«COM 


final unti 


1 2 y««ra 


•ft.T .ntr 


;. .|«I St 


foreign go 


veri«ent 



13 of Act of Septo 



J' Inolud.i 25.752 < 



37 



Belglu" 

Hungary 

IreUnd 

Italy 

NetherUnda 

Poland 

Portugal .-. 

United Kingdom 

Yugoalavla 

Hong Kong 

India 

Iraq 

Urael 

Lebanon 

Ryukyu Islands 

Cuba 

Hattl .■ 

Trinidad & Tobago 

St. Chri.topher , 

South America 

Argentina 

Colombia , 

Peru , 

Other South America 

Africa , 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt 
Other Africa , 



of July 25. 1958 



38 



" STATUS IN THE I 



I STATES UNDEh : 






."-:":. 


status at ertcv 


--i^w,"'- 


[ 


11 


11 


i 


1.1 


i 


1 ° 


11 




I 1 

ill 


1 


Ill 


g 




1 


1 




























214 




jij_ 


6.650 


458 




















209 


51 


8 


10 


601 


J'- 


K^t 


125 
95 

'<.]! 
185 

!.«« 

959 

1.251 
85 

1,251 
197 


5 

- 

5 
25 


55 


138 
38 

397 
847 

65 

955 
150 




25 




5 


'l 


! 
249 




3 


' 




- 


'". 


- 


" 1 


I 




- 






Fi"?*'^d 




_ 




C mft 


Z 


Cr ce'' 


^ 


H •t¥ 




I ? d 




It 1 


t 


* *' . . 


J 


N way 




P U d 


^ 


1 


l 


. ■ 




S 


-> 


Sw*d 




Id 




Turkey (Europe snd Ails) 


g 


US.S.ll. lE^rop. .-d Ml.l .. 


\ 


0th Eu 






Ull 




66 
13/ 

1,055 
294 

1.407 
183 

158 


5 
13 


50 

5 


827 

47 5 

1,352 
62 


^ 


34 




25 


d 






lb 
44 

i 


" 




2 


45 






'\ 


lndon«tla 








Iraq 








, 








K r • 
































*"* 


5 




] 


31 






13 
65 


6 


- 


3 




12 


[ 






; 








-*. '^'* 




" bad 




Do 1 I R bile 




Haiti ^ 








r 1 Id d i Toba 








0th W It 1 dl a 








Costa Rica 








G stamala 












P ma* 




0th N th Ane lea 








tlna 


215 
53 
60 

182 

265 






34 

162 

43 






10 

2 54 


I 




Ji 






11 




-^ 


a. 




B ?1 




Brazil 




Chile 






1 


Et ado 


1 


Peru 




V nei ela 


- 


Oihe S th A e 








Ca V rde Uland 


268 
276 














25 








13 




■ 








Snulh Africa 




United Arab Republic (Egypt). 










15 








: 




51 














■ 


' 


[ 




Fl tl 








Other Oceania 



















































39 



OF THE 1 i. 



NENT RESIDENCE STATUS IN THE UNITED STATES, UNDER SEC. 

T, BY YEAR OF ENTRY iND COUNTRY OF BIRTH; 
YEAR ENDED JUNE JO. 19f.7 

R OF EN t"T" 



Belgium 

Chechoslovakia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

NeCherUnda 

Poland 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) .. 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

China 1/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Iran 

Israel 

Jordan 2/ 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Other Asia 

North Arocilca 

Canada 

Cuba 

Barbados 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Trinidad & Tobago 

St. Christopher 

Other West Indies 

British Honduras 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Other North America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Cape Verde Island 

Horocco 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

FIJI 

New Zealand 

Other Oceania 

Other countries 



9.05A 
2.015 
2,822 



eludes Tal 



g/ Includes Arab Pal. 



Si 






41 



IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED UNDER THE ACT OF SEPTEMBER 26, 1961 (P.L. 87-301) 
SEPTEMBER 26, 1961-JUNE 30, 1967 



Country or region of birth 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria 

Czechos lovakla 

France 

Ge rmany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Malta 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) . 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) .. 

Yugos lavla 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 2/ 

Cyprus 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

1 raq 

Israel 

Japan 

Jordan 3/ 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Malaysia 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Other Asia 

ftorth Ajnerlca 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Jamaica 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Other West Indies 

Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Africa 

Morocco 

Tunisia 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Other countries 

y Act of June 27, 1952. 

2/ Includes Taiwan. 

3/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



Number admitted 



11,660 



82 
«6 
34 

1,213 
418 

7,463 
40 
64 



531 
634 
197 
136 
234 



116 
101 



302 
174 



896 
15 



Beneficiary of 
2nd preference 1_, 



3,936 



261 
203 
158 



42 



TABLE 6G. IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED UNDER THE ACT OF OCTOBER 24, 1962 

(P.L. 87-885) BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH: 

OCTOBER 24, 1962 - JUNE 30, 1967 



Country or region of birth 


Number 
admitted 


-1 


Spouse or child 
of alien 
First 
Preference 1/ 


1 I 


Spouse or child 
of alien 
Fourth 
Preference U 


All countries 


21,682 


4,779 


5,094 


3,9 50 


7,859 




13,563 


1,305 


2,078 


3,395 


6,785 




U 
34 
18 
1.873 
21 

K , 1 /ll 

62 

1,946 

110 

431 

12 
606 

39 
152 

42 

6,/yo 


2 
4 

184 
2 

6 50 

14 

3 

5 

153 

1 

277 

2 

3 

5 

3,045 


5 

3 

171 

9 

1 ,501 

2 

27 

4 

8 

49 

6 

241 

32 

11 

2,541 


2 

2 

647 

5 

1 ,903 

15 

11 

560 

48 

74 

1 

51 

66 
10 

368 


1 1 




25 




9 




871 




5 




4,122 




1 ■) 




10 




1,379 




49 




155 




4 




37 




5 




74 




16 




H36 




2,317 

24 

196 

855 

27 

137 

2 30 

214 

500 

353 

525 

118 

50 

67 

1,075 

65 

37 

808 


1,186 

1 

84 

476 
16 
37 
29 
72 

230 
20 

310 
27 
19 
27 

474 
17 
20 

245 


1,057 

3 

72 

307 

11 

28 

32 

90 

220 

5 

215 

20 

31 

37 

389 

8 

16 

268 


35 
6 

3 
29 

27 
47 
10 
17 
93 

26 

1 

64 
10 

15H 


39 




14 




3 7 




43 








45 




122 




42 




33 




735 




- 




45 








2 




14H 




30 




1 




137 




51 
49 
518 
105 
24 
10 
51 

104 


10 

182 
35 
4 
9 

5 

36 


36 

3 

152 

64 
9 
1 
3 

63 


18 

93 

5 

4 

38 


5 




28 




91 




1 




7 








5 




5 




308 


109 


111 


27 


61 


q '^^h Af i 


70 

215 

23 

109 


23 
82 
4 

39 


43 

66 

2 

33 


1 
24 
2 

2 


3 




43 




15 




35 




104 

5 


36 
3 


31 

2 




35 











Act of June 27, 19 
Includes Taiwan. 
Includes Arab Pale 



43 



283-289 0-68— 4 



YEAR ENDED JUNE . 



MITTED BY QUOTA CHARGE 



ued and iwnlgcants admitCed will not necessarily agree. Diffe 



Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Dentnark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Great Britain and Northern Ireland 

Greece , 

Ireland (Eire) , 

Italy 

Utvla , 

Lithuania 

Ha 1 ta 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Burma 

Ceylon 

China 

Cyprua 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran (Persia) 

Iraq 

Israel 

Jordan and Arab Palestine 

Korea 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Thai land 

Africa 

Algeria 

Ethiopia 

Kenya 

Libya 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

Tunisia 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 

Other Africa 

Jceanla 

New Zealand 

Pacific Islands 

Tonga 

Western Samoa 

[/ The annual quota for 1965 and 1966 was 158.561 under P. 
Jamaica and Trinidad-Tobago, as quota charges after Dec 
2/ Figures include adjustment of status cases. Adjustment 
V Includes 667 section 2^.4 suspension of deportation case 
W Admissions with visas issued prior to December I, 1965. 



44 











...upatlon.l preleren.es 


Conditional 






quota 


I I 


,1 

I 1 o S 

s it": 


i it! 
1 11^ 


' 1 «l 


'. ; " 1 

Si S 8 


a. 


3rd preference 




1 


lis. 

3 1 i 




Quota ares 


II 


1 


s 


5 


If 


All quota areas 


153,079 


79,671 


1,317 


19,157 


15,652 


43,545 


25,365 


9,979 


6,931 


4.876 


3,679 




2.545 


41,392 


Eu rope 


111.032 


58,144 


616 


13.148 


10.633 


33.747 


8.623 


1.463 


1,027 


3,315 


P8I8 




826 


39,831 




175 

829 

656 

266 

1.151 

886 

77 

455 

2.251 

7,747 

27,656 

11,917 

1,285 

2,216 

19,822 

III 

127 

346 


65 
151 
43 

304 

57 

59 

518 

1,480 

5.316 

11.357 

539 

542 

16.462 

48 

325 
505 
97 
3.432 
12,363 
253 
744 

123 

622 

193 

2,294 


3 

5 
I 

3 

37 
11 

6 
177 

2 

I 
8 

88 

5 

5 
10 
69 

684 


50 
18 

45 

5 

175 
527 

1.387 

1.490 

89 

68 

4.892 

11 

61 

38 
1.260 
1.788 

52 
221 

35 

153 

499 
28 

5.545 


12 

53 

539 
436 
58 

325 

1,647 

39 

34 
797 


56 

242 

299 

3,290 
9,394 
381 
464 
4,905 
27 
29 

362 

1,601 
8,840 
160 
465 
33 
75 
430 

929 
8,968 


23 

23 
148 
2 50 

980 
524 

3,305 

5 

126 

451 

177 
549 
30 

594 

397 
8 

15,447 


11 

5 

35 

296 
170 
55 

145 
3 
2 

6 
117 

34 

2 

211 

91 

8.085 


16 

I 

25 
32 

199 
50 
32 

32 

207 
5.408 


36 

6 

1 

19 

2 

46 
112 

245 
197 

1,431 

9 
33 

188 
194 

56 
292 

15 

157 

5 

1,330 


12 

3 

53 
71 

238 

2 

85 
163 
59 
60 

624 


9 

3 

185 

354 

28 
10 

8 
363 

37 

1 
154 

104 

67 

1 ,518 


2 

183 

5 

5 

9 

15 

13 
11 

1,718 




Auatria 


590 




. 










Denmark 




Estonia 




Finland 


371 






Great Britain and Northern 




























Malta 


J 


Netherlands 


I 310 




I 

12 

1 
1 


177 

801 
120 
728 
601 


































743 

4,234 

213 

38,334 


437 






Asia 


996 




178 

17.520 

4,048 

294 

856 

875 

955 

1,355 

1,003 

1,719 

416 

216 

544 

7.097 

366 

100 
67 


54 
15 
10,300 
269 
713 
126 
377 
697 
483 
553 
943 
423 
292 
61 

4,233 
263 
37 
35 

20 

1.019 


I 

289 

6 

5 
16 

3 

2 

319 

6 

9 


22 
1.952 

453 

187 

154 

305 
219 
128 
15 
61 
1.341 
92 
32 

22 
9 

266 


3,019 

60 

28 
12 

13 
1,512 

61 


31 

5,040 
169 
208 
76 
181 
498 
253 
268 
561 
169 
145 
29 
45 

1,061 
150 

6 
63 
10 

683 


97 

4.930 

18 

3,322 

162 

476 

168 

462 

797 

52 

1,278 

89 

26 

420 

2,853 

80 

62 

20 

705 


41 

5 

2.552 

8 

1,936 

57 

280 

82 

187 

264 

38 

549 

41 

12 

271 

1,614 

38 

90 

15 

250 


27 

1.191 
67 
120 
53 

163 
227 

515 
30 

118 
979 

220 


13 

340 

9 

137 

23 

22 
50 
236 

11 

5 

15 
22 
32 

9 

113 


1 
58 
15 
32 

70 
88 

2 

57 
10 

10 

1 

122 


6 

5 

431 


1,669 


24 






















1 n (Pe sla) 


J 








9 


J«P«n 

Jordan and Arab Palestine 




Lebanon 










LO 






Thailand 


28 
62 








27 




479 




86 
50 
71 
87 
73 
303 
101 
399 
60 

1,133 


27 

29 
14 
48 

259 
27 
86 
19 
65 

396 
41 

402 


2 
3 


6 

29 
11 

39 
27 
43 

11 
78 
14 

198 


1 
15 

5 
3 
23 

3 

49 


21 

3 
43 
204 

13 
51 
292 
24 

147 


3 
6 

11 

301 
I 
9 

297 
18 

590 


I 
2 

12 
80 

137 
8 

181 


100 
102 
176 


3 

19 

1 
54 

3 
30 
2 

lie 


2 
5 
12 

67 
28 
115 


431 












39 




67 


Libya 


18 








12 






Tunisia 




United Arab Republic (Egypt) 


9 




I 


079 


86 






65 


2 

3 
2 


43 
11 
63 
34 
47 


45 


16 
22 
28 
17 


405 
158 
14 

13 


133 

47 

1 


121 
51 


76 
33 
8 

I 


75 
27 

1 

12 




1 


22 


New Zealand 


207 
106 
98 


19 








36 











45 



Hungary 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

United KlngdoB. 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) . 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

China i' 

J«P«n 

Lebanon 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Canada .'.'. 

Cuba ! '.. 

St. Christopher . .[[[[[[[W. 
El Salvador 

Bolivia !!!!.!!!! 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Other South America".'!!.'!!! 

Africa 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other A/rIca 

Fiji !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 

New Zealand 

Other Oceania 

I Taiwan. 



le 



2/ 



46 





Nuaber 


8«n«fl 


":[:\°'„°i 


ober 1. 1965 


•'"•""• 


uih«r 1/ 


OccuMllon 










llKBl- 




Total 










gram. 


All OCCUMllOOB 


361.972 


14.855 


2.732 


7.247 


3.107 


1.769 


J47 , 1 1 ; 


Profei.lon.l t«chnlc«l and kindr.d »Drk.r« 


41 652 












30.599 




lie 

SO 
1.284 

91 

676 
206 
96S 
266 
S.682 

2S7 

45i 
85 

287 
J.326 

25 

193 
91 

106 
83 

1.697 


6 
561 

965 

231 
71 

102 

45 

3.4U 

20 

43 
665 

91 

36 
135 

58 
405 


185 

15 
597 

3 

13 
13 

15 

2 


422 
750 

173 

33 

252 

32 
306 




2 




Actora and actrcsaes 


67 


Alrolana pllota and navlaacora 


iia 


ArchUacta 


296 


Arilata and art taachera 


ifbii 


Athlatea 


98 


Author! 


Ui, 


Chemlfita 


W^ 


(., 




7n9 


Profeaaora and Inatnjctora 


ulb 


Danceri and danclna ceachara 


25 

103 

3 

52 


115 


Hfl 




] ;^ 




i.i.') 




1 j5 




M66 




22\ 




•> i~!\ 




\Ui, 


Fo at ra nd conaervatlonlata 








Llbrarlana 


^92 


*ielclana aod mttU taschara 


ib^ 


N 


.. ^ly 




29 


P I nd I bo ralatlona workara 


^fl 


Ab Ic It r I eclenliata 


99 


a* . J 1 cl ntlata 


120 


Ce I i t nd hilt 


79 


Hath * tl I na * ** 


62 


Ph 1 1 t 


no 


HI It o a nat ral aclentlata 


60 




~>'>1 


Ph t ha 


279 




2,309 


Publl 1 tlo a aeo and publicity wrltera 


b3 


- P" r 


72 




19 




IbU 


So 1*1 d If k a Bxceot flrouD 


26S 




1 35 


Pa choloBliti 


65 




87 


HI tl 11 aclentlata 


a 


d fflcl la 


88 




78 




2. J97 


T ch a 


i.25'« 


* ■ " j*t"[ . If 1 d 


148 


V t 1 1 ' 


65 


Profe.alonal. technical, and kindred worker., other 


1,075 


ence t far. 










83 


112 


7.660 


flu** ' d d t t h da atore 


92 


5 

2 
5 


38 


55 


5 


62 


79 


Ha* * d "** 1 t d i' bulldl 


I2B 


Offi* 11 ^ nd 1 era ahlp 


7J 


Off.C.l. .„d .<..l„I..r.tor.. pobUc .d.lnl.tr.. Ion 


95 


^h* 1* d bu I cifled 


67 


Mm ffl 1 I d 1 t re other 


7.097 


8 


15,8^6 


e a a 


318 
833 

485 
57 

310 


13 
73 

96 

43 


10 




30 
18 


5 


269 


A ri " h 1 1 ' d d tl fa office 




1 1 ' ^ ^ 


346 




625 




479 


Fll Ik 




hi" 


472 


, ^ 


57 


- 


3 78 


Shi 1 d 1 In clerka 


210 






W* ?'* k ' d'^'t k 


277 






T*i**h*^ *** * ■ 


309 


* J* ^ '^^ * 


43 


' *H v. 'ri H k thar 






3.676 




164 


6 

I 


2 
5 


9 


1.131 


" 


139 


* t d b k a 


162 


naurance agen a a . 


48 


** "* * ** . 






17.133 


Craftamen, forenen. and Indre re 


615 
130 

57 


58 
13 








,; 


557 


ith 


1 17 


Bo kbl d 


56 


BrIck„.o„.. .ton.,„.o„.. .rd til. «tC„. 


1 -« 


c* 


? 1 l.'''7 


C It d t tt 6 


1 IOC) 


PO 




1 



47 



TABLE «A. BENEFK 





t,o„ 


:::^::d 


Beneficiaries of (tceupatlonAl Preferences 


other 1/ 


Occupa 




Third Pr 


ference 




lonl 












"•"'• 


C..,....„. ,o,e..n. .„. ..„d,«, 




18 3 
1.32B 

51 

es 

508 
125 

'l35 
168 

15.675 


34 

5 
101 

263 


1 




5 
9 










ii^ 




1 ,0O8 




wa 




IU7 


Unel'n'^ndTe^^I'^.'tlugi 


aph, telephone, and power .. 


y'.<)9i. 


Mechanics and repairmen 


Painters construction and mal 


ntenance 


Photoengravets and Uthographe 


ra 


''^ 




47 


Plumbers and pipe fitters 


309 

t.73 




fitting 








Structural metal workers 




64 


Tailors and CaUoresses 


TlnsBlths coppersmiths and s 


heet metal workers 


1 ..72 


Tool makers and die makers an 




89 3 








other 


t, M U d d K 








62 

3.251 

290 

'988 
4.837 


3 

5 
5 

603 


': 




5 


3 






3.8 


Attendants auto service and 


arklno 


Bus drivers 




54 


Ch.cker.. .x..l„.r.. .„d In.p. 


ctors, manufacturing 


Dellveryiuen and routemen 




'lOl 


Z"VTJ',"lTt"'7n6""":. 


except factory 


Laundry and drv cleanlnB opera 


tlves 


Meat cutters, except slaughter 












290 




and maintenance 






58 


Sailors and deck hands 


Sewers and stitchers roanufact 


jrlnR 


197 


T (cab drivers and chauffeurs 




■ . 


Truck and tractor drivers 












' 




other 


52 


Private household workers 




16 803 


Housekeepers, private househol 





5,521 
11.885 


517 




= 




91 


5.317 


Service workers, except private 


f,„„,^hold 


12 315 






457 
577 

119 

576 

1^308 
52 

5.277 


33 
30 




: 




'' 






urlstB 


565 








110 


Charwomen and cleaners 


Cooks except private househol 






Counter and fountain workers 




' a- 


Firemen fire protection 


, .J 


Guards watchmen and doorkeep 




! 26 


Hairdressers and cosmetoloRlst 




1 '>78 


"anltorrind sextonr^'"'' '" 


p. priv.te ho„..hold 










cj 


Policemen and detectives 


. ,, 


U S military 


W U 


Foreion ml lltary 






122 






712 


Service workers, except privat 


household other 


. ' ., 


FartD laborers and foremen 




b 2kl 


Laborers, except farm and mine 


10.129 








16 


J 


10 110 




208 


' 


- 




' 


'_ 




Gardeners except farm and or 


undekeepera 




Lumbennen craftsmen and wood 


hoppers 










occupation 






4!oil 
30.188 
















401 1 




' 


Children under U vears of ace 




85* 158 


Unknown or not reported 




11 037 


... . 





48 





Immigrants 












Males 








Country or region 


Total 




5-9 






30-39 




50-59 
years 


y.ars 


years 


and over 


AH co„n.r,.. 


361 972 




15.695 


lb no 


29.252 


33.278 






10.222 


5.341 




3« 


Europe 












13.529 


12.369 


b.913 


4,73b 




699 


160 


1.101 

l!l58 
586 

16!ol.l 
14.905 
2.016 

2!o39 

5!976 

2!45I 
3.620 

24!965 
5 [879 


566 

152 

4)223 

'974 

13,696 
856 

2.624 

l!l95 

'487 
1.045 

3.095 


37 

655 
35 


20 
22 

131 

79 
51 


23 

66 
31 

78 
1.580 

834 


175 
78 

1.759 

273 

20b 
155 

150 
2.346 


84 
127 

'251 
'212 

391 


3) 
252 


52 

10 
5 

1.J87 
301 

152 


13 
31 

577 

13 

134 


5 
57 

i55 




B 1 1 


1 


h 1 klA 


i 


D k 




Fl U d 




F 


5 


G nanv 


B 


Cr ece 


5 




i 


Ireland 


3 


It Iv 


36 


N th U ds 


2 


Norwftv 




P Und 


10 


_ , 


3 


- * 




S «1 


21 


Sw d 


t 


S It Id 


2 


Turk*y (Europe .nd A.U) 


20 


ll.S.S.R. (Europe .ndA.le) .... 


\ 




2 




»^ 


Chi 1/ 


5.355 

4.642 

lioll 

3.9 56 

752 

10.865 
555 


10.013 

2,798 

2.642 

213 

643 

1.025 

452 

55 
307 


129 
605 

23 

15 
16 


837 

24 
25 

63 

144 


1.553 

109 
30 
39 

120 

533 
26 


199 

279 

27 


3.097 

213 

1.083 

139 

205 
15 


1.489 
39 

53 

38 


863 

30 

] 

29 
3.817 


507 
145 


5 
24 

611 


30 




"; 




1 


, 


2 




3 


I« « I 


_ 




Q 


J d 2/ 








L ba 


J 


P kl 




PhlU 1 s 


to 




2 


S^ Ian Arab Reoubllc 


3 




_ 


0th Aala 


I 




loe 




421371 
33.321 

ll!514 
3.567 

2^160 

907 
l!045 


10.617 
19.816 
15.259 

4.709 
1.329 

49 3 

459 

545 
237 


2.150 
2.765 

75 
31 

65 

25 


1,581 
2,403 

29 

34 

38 

58 
55 

37 
86 


6.158 

3.085 

56 

1.675 

430 
115 
119 

133 

95 
200 
12 


4!l67 
2.060 

756 
219 
627 
178 
117 

67 
75 
125 

32 


l!735 


965 
2.568 

282 
32 


437 

255 
65 


118 


5 
45 




u . 


32 




52 


Barbados 




D In can Reoublu 


3 


Hat CI 




Jamaica 


1 


Trinidad & Tobaflo 




St ChrlBtobher 


_ 


Och r West Indlea 




Bri tlsh Honduras 


_ 


r sta R ca 


1 


El Sal ador 


_ 


C (nala 




H d rs6 




Ni araaua 




P acna 




0th North America 










2.477 
635 

4.556 
2.719 

'539 
1.409 


300 
l!o56 

555 


33 

5b 
45 


122 
35 

189 
56 


162 

361 
334 

95 


253 

81 


265 
34 

99 


ii 




5 






Bolivia 




B 11 




Chll 












p 




Venezuela 




0th r South America 








r V d Isl nd 


335 


178 




58 


30 


20 
51 


31 

115 

197 


'li, 


30 
21 


\ 


i 




M occo 




. ifrica 












Australia 




;i 






30 




35 


'I 


5 


\ 


' 










- 


Other Oceania 















t OF BIRTH, SEX, AND AGE: 



Belgium 
Denmark 



Dominican Republl 



Trinidad & Tobago 



Bolivia 

Brazil 

Colombia ... 

Venezuela . . 
Other South i 



> Republic (Egypt) 



l.OOS 

492 

1.153 



1.376 
l.OSO 



50 



TABLE 10. IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED, BY SEX AND ACE: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1958 - 1967 



1958-1967 1958 1959 I960 1961 1962 1963 1964 H65 1966 19b7 



Number admitted 

Under 5 years 

5- 9 years 

10-14 years 

15 years 

16-17 years 

18-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-29 years 

30-34 years 

35-39 years 

40-44 years 

45-49 years 

50-54 years 

55-59 years 

60-64 years 

65-69 years 

70-74 years 

75-79 years 

80 years and over . . . 
Not reported 

Males 

Under 5 years 

5- 9 years 

10-14 years 

15 years 

16-17 years 

18-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-29 years 

30-34 years 

35-39 years 

40-44 years 

45-49 years 

50-54 years 

55-59 years 

60-64 years 

65-69 years 

70-74 years 

7 5-79 years 

80 years and over . . 
Not reported 

Under 5 years 

5- 9 years 

10-14 years 

15 years 

16-17 years 

18-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-29 years 

30-34 years 

35-39 years 

40-44 years 

45-49 years 

50-54 years 

55-59 years 

60-64 years 

65-69 years 

70-74 years 

75-79 years 

80 years and over . 
Not reported 



253,265 



260,686 



271,344 



283,763 



296,697 



Jbl ,97_^ 



268,218 

217,306 

187,502 

37,592 

97,775 

157,103 

497,700 

422,043 

294,157 

209,101 

143,095 

110,997 

9 1 , 7 39 

69,674 

48,439 

30,7 54 

17,489 

8,831 

4,897 

261 



23,148 

18,727 

15,447 

2,802 

7,899 

13,385 

43,035 

39,674 

27,539 

18,216 

12,492 

10,248 

7,473 

5,455 

3,521 

2,040 

1,208 

582 

286 



109,121 



22,516 

17,760 

15,786 

2,764 

7,858 

14,204 

46,118 

38,690 

27,072 

19,272 

12,152 

11,417 

8,733 

6.489 

4,501 

2,767 

1,451 

731 

349 

56 

114,367 



24,09 8 

17,523 

15.386 

2,888 

8,255 

14,847 

47,674 

39,543 

27,748 

19,958 

12,059 

11,310 

8.395 

6,256 

4,316 

2,752 

1,359 

680 

321 

30 

116,687 



26,204 

18,924 

16,434 

2,982 

8,452 

14,996 

47,984 

39,558 

27,274 

19,873 

12,744 

11,082 

8,611 

6,151 

4,240 

2,867 

1,729 

834 

394 

11 

1 2 1 , 380 



25,494 

19 ,076 

16,544 

3,417 

8,835 

15,363 

51,487 

42,733 

29,421 

20,973 

13,652 

10,905 

8.808 

6,600 

4,617 

2,924 

1,577 

842 

46H 



131,575 



136,970 

109,882 

94,689 

18,9 30 

43,750 

52,451 

166,726 

191 ,101 

139,904 

100,872 

67,443 

50,680 

39,251 

28,918 

19,574 

12,412 

6,724 

3,358 

1,845 

112 



11,976 

9,488 

7,694 

1,304 

3,190 

4,294 

13,782 

17,493 

12,841 

8,840 

5,836 

4,545 

3,076 

2,050 

1,268 

737 

390 

17b 

105 

36 

144,144 



11,511 

8,960 

7,975 

1,363 

3,237 

4,7 39 

15,999 

17,306 

12,487 

9,199 

5,721 

5.346 

3,7B4 

2,752 

1,772 

1 ,168 

579 

317 

129 

23 

146,319 



12,299 

8,570 

7,731 

1,49 3 

3,565 

4,879 

15,836 

17,788 

12,919 

9,969 

5,827 

5 , 369 

3,762 

2,646 

1,801 

1 ,187 

592 

294 

14b 

14 

148,711 



13,203 

9,604 

8,29 5 

1,446 

3,537 

5,171 

16,618 

1 8 , 349 

13,063 

9,802 

6,247 

5,326 

3,865 

2,652 

1,7 56 

1,218 

732 

322 

168 



149,964 



131,248 

107,424 

92,813 

18.662 

54,025 

104,652 

330,974 

230,942 

154,253 

108,229 

75,652 

60,317 

52,488 

40,7 56 

28,865 

18,342 

10,765 

5,473 

3,052 

149 



11,1/2 

9,239 

7,753 

1,498 

4,709 

9,091 

29,253 

22.181 

14.698 

9.376 

6,656 

5,703 

4,397 

3,405 

2,253 

1,303 

818 

406 



1 1 ,005 

8,800 

7,811 

1.401 

4.621 

9.465 

30,119 

21,384 

14,585 

10,073 

6,431 

6,071 

4,949 

3,737 

2,729 

1,599 

872 

414 

220 

33 



11,799 

8,953 

7,655 

1.395 

4.690 

9.968 

31,838 

21,755 

14,829 

9,989 

6,232 

5,941 

4,633 

3,610 

2,515 

1,565 

767 

386 

175 

16 



13,001 

9,320 

8,139 

1,536 

4,915 

9,82 5 

31,3b6 

21,209 

14,211 

10,071 

6,497 

5,756 

4,746 

3,499 

2,484 

1,649 

997 

512 

226 



13, 126 

9,735 

8,313 

1 ,68 3 

3.888 

5,380 

19,541 

21,288 

15.146 

10,877 

6.854 

5,111 

3,810 

2,715 

1.862 

1,151 

580 

343 

164 



152.18 



28,991 

21 .621 

18,006 

3,89 2 

10,125 

17.518 

55.935 

45.321 

31,669 

21,924 

15,014 

10,815 

9,005 

6,458 

4,552 

2,746 

1,499 

780 

382 



139.297 



28,394 

21,362 

17.147 

3.541 

10.191 

16,987 

54.923 

42.798 

28,597 

19.455 

13.870 

9.611 

8,678 

6,402 

4,496 

2,856 

1,677 

805 

445 

13 

126,214 



27,674 

22,146 

18,642 

3,969 

10,704 

17,269 

57,000 

42,874 

27,545 

19.227 

14,033 

9,641 

8,735 

6,626 

4,538 

2,89 8 

1 ,79 3 

865 

518 



14,882 

10,876 

8,945 

1,919 

4,570 

6,016 

20,199 

21,542 

15,981 

11,028 

7,511 

5,154 

4,021 

2,700 

1,814 

1,099 

576 

313 



166,963 



14,539 

10,724 

8,691 

1,717 

4,609 

5,679 

18,042 

18,956 

13,284 

8,924 

6,469 

4,267 

3,619 

2,596 

1,875 

1,094 

655 

303 

167 



166.034 



14,112 

11 ,268 

9,466 

2,021 

4,867 

5,755 

18,938 

18,753 

12,578 

8,660 

6,251 

4,105 

3,517 

2,687 

I ,80b 

1 ,159 

687 

328 

21) 



169,526 



30,750 

28,562 

25,034 

5,369 

1 2 , 544 

16,647 

47,853 

43,239 

30,497 

22,614 

16,132 

11,118 

10,249 

8,354 

5,899 

3,879 

2.327 

1.186 

763 

24 

141.456 



30,949 

31 ,605 

29,07b 

5,968 

12,912 

15.8b; 

45,691 

47,613 

36,795 

27 , 589 

20,947 

14,8511 

13.052 

10,883 

7,7 59 

5,025 

2 , 869 

1.52b 

971 



,58, J 24 



15,627 

14,447 

12,778 

2,805 

6,108 

5,445 

15,086 

19,033 

14,181 

10,561 

7,357 

4,907 

4,225 

3,470 

2,369 

1,507 

855 

415 

270 

10 

181.584 



12,3 

9,341 

8,231 

1,734 

4,947 

9,983 

31,946 

21,445 

14,275 

10,09 6 

6.798 

5,794 

4,998 

3,885 

2.755 

1,773 

997 

499 

304 

19 



14,109 

10,745 

9,061 

1,973 

5.555 

11.502 

35,736 

23,779 

15,688 

10,89 6 

7,503 

5,661 

4,984 

3,758 

2,7 38 

1,647 

923 

467 

238 



13,855 

10,638 

8,456 

1,824 

5,582 

11,308 

36,881 

23,842 

15,313 

10.531 

7.401 

5.344 

5,059 

3,806 

2,621 

1,762 

1.022 

502 

278 



13,562 

10,878 

9,176 

1,948 

5,837 

11,514 

38.062 

24,121 

14,967 

10,567 

7,782 

5,536 

5,218 

3,939 

2,732 

1,7 39 

1,106 

537 

305 



1 5 , 69 5 

16,210 

14,801 

3,179 

6.179 

5.093 

12,685 

20.59 3 

17,42', 

13.01J 

9.370 

6.5M) 

5,572 

4,650 

3,251 

2 , 09 2 

1,078 

547 

339 



203,648 



15,123 
14,115 
12,256 
2,564 
6,436 
11,202 
32,767 
24,206 
16,316 
12,053 
8.775 
6. 211 
6,024 
4,884 
3,530 
2,372 
1,472 
771 
49 3 



15,254 

15,395 

14,275 

2,789 

6,731 

10,794 

33,006 

27,020 

19,371 

14,577 

11,577 

8,300 

7,480 

6,233 

4,508 

2,933 

1,/91 

979 

632 

1 



51 



TABLE LOA. IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED, BY SEX, MARITAL STATUS, AGE, 

AND MAJOR OCCUPATION GROUP: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 19 63 - 19 67 



Sex, marital status, 
age, and occupation 

Number admitted 

Sex and marital status: 

Males 

S i ng 1 e 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Females 

S 1 ng 1 e 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Males per 1,000 females 

Median age (years): 

Both sexes 

Ma 1 es 

Females 

Major occupation group: 

Professional, technical, and kindred 

workers 

Farmers and farm managers 

Managers, officials, and proprietors, 

except farm 

Clerical, sales, and kindred workers . 
Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred 

workers 

Operatives and kindred workers 

Private household workers 

Service workers, except private 

household 

Farm laborers and foremen 

Laborers, except farm and mine 

Housewives, children, and others with 

no occupation 

Housewives 

Retired persons 

Students 

Children under 14 years of age 

Unknown or not reported 



1963 



306.260 



139.29 7 



79,662 

57,703 

965 

912 

55 

166.963 



80,747 

77,704 

5,818 

2,646 

48 

834 



23.7 
24.5 
23.3 



27,930 
1,776 

5,986 
28,09 4 

18,158 
14,286 
9,522 

9,392 
9,463 
16,062 

152.470 



63,832 

1,903 

22,889 

63,846 

13,121 



126,214 



73,264 

51,161 

866 

860 

63 

166.034 



80,086 

77,642 

5,584 

2,703 

19 

760 



23.4 
23.8 
23.3 



28,756 
1,732 

6,822 
30,015 

17,568 

14,243 

8,451 

10,396 
3,988 
9,127 

151.076 



62,192 

2,146 
24,226 
62,512 

10,074 



29 6.697 



127.171 



74,711 

50 , 639 

838 

885 

98 

169.526 



83,443 
77,590 



674 

768 

51 



7 50 



23.2 
23.2 
23.2 



28,790 
1,833 

7,090 
29,779 

17,510 
14,166 
9,706 

10,743 
2,638 
8,556 

154,761 



61,669 

2,372 

27,255 

63,465 

11,125 



323.040 



141.456 



80,973 

58,552 

1,032 

746 

153 

181,584 



86,138 

85,988 

7,004 

2,39 2 

62 

779 



23.5 
23.5 
23.4 



30,039 
2,964 

6,773 
22,676 

16,535 
14,190 
10,558 

10,541 
4,227 
9,830 

181,634 



361,97; 



158.324 



83,761 

7 2,2 50 

1,304 

972 

37 

20 3^648 



69,833 

3,396 

30,676 

77,729 

13,073 



91,951 

100,536 

8,304 

Z,851 

6 

111 



24.9 
25.3 
24.7 



41,652 
3,276 

7,974 
19,7 83 

18,921 
15,675 
17,406 

12,832 

5,277 

10,129 

198,012 



78,653 

4,013 

30,188 

85,158 

11,035 



52 





ALIENS 


ADMITTED 


ALIENS 
DEPARTED H 


U. S. C I T 


1 Z E N S 2.1 




InmlKrant 


Nonimmigrant 1/ 


Arrived 




1908-1967 


18,633.519 


27.620.026 


30.069.396 


45.493,141 


44,845,817 


1908-1910 3/ 


2.576.226 


490,741 


1.495,638 






1911-1920 


5.735.811 


1,376,271 


3,988.157 


1,938,508 






878.587 
838.172 
1.197.892 
1.218,480 
326.700 
298.826 
295,403 
110,618 
141,132 
430,001 

4.107.209 


151.713 
178.983 
229.335 
184.601 
107,544 
67,922 
67,474 
101,235 
95,889 
191,575 

1.774,881 


518.215 
615.292 
611.924 
633.805 
384,174 
240,807 
146.379 
193.268 
216.231 
428.062 

2.694.778 


269,128 
280.801 
286,604 
286.586 
239.579 
121.930 
127.420 
72,867 
96,420 
157,173 

3,522.713 


349,472 
353.890 
347.702 
368.79 7 
172.371 
110.733 
126.011 
275.837 
218.929 
194,147 

3,519,519 




















1921-1930 




805.228 
309.556 
522.919 
706,896 
294,314 
304,488 
335,175 
307,255 
279,678 
241.700 

528.431 


172.935 
122,949 
150.487 
172,406 
164,121 
191.618 
202.826 
193.376 
199,649 
204,514 

1.574.071 


426.031 
345.384 
200.586 
216.745 
225.490 
227.755 
2 53.508 
274.356 
252.498 
272.425 

2,196,650 


222.712 
243.563 
308.471 
301.281 
339.239 
370.757 
378.520 
430,955 
449,955 
477,260 

3,365.432 


271 ,560 
309.477 
270,601 
277.850 
324.323 
372,480 
369,788 
429.575 










1926 

1927 








1931-1940 


3.357.936 




97.139 
35.576 
23.068 
29.470 
34.956 
36.329 
50.244 
67.895 
82.998 
70.756 

1.035,039 


183.540 
139.295 
127.660 
134.434 
144.765 
154.570 
181.640 
184.802 
185.333 
138.032 

2,461,359 


290.916 
287.657 
243.802 
177,172 
189.050 
193.284 
224.582 
222,614 
201.409 
166.164 

2.262,293 


439,897 
339.262 
305.001 
273.257 
282.515 
318.273 
386,872 
406.999 
354,438 
258,918 

3.223,233 




























1938 


397.875 






1941-1950 


2.880.414 




51,776 
28,781 
23,725 
28,551 
38,119 
108,721 
147,292 
170,570 
188,317 
249,187 

2,515,479 


100,008 
82,457 
81.117 
113.641 
164.247 
203.469 
366.305 
476.006 
447.272 
426,837 

7.113,023 


88.477 
74.552 
58.722 
84.409 
93.362 
204,353 
323,422 
448.218 
430.089 
456,689 

6,682,387 


175,935 
118,454 
105,729 
108,444 
175,568 
274,543 
437.690 
542.932 
620.371 
663.567 

12,531.988 




1942 

1944 

1945 

1946 


113.216 
62.403 
63.525 
103.019 
230.578 
451.845 
478,988 




552,361 




655,518 


1951-1960 


12,306,984 




205,717 
265.520 
170.434 
208,177 
237,790 
321,625 
326,867 
253,265 
260,686 
265,398 

271,344 
283,763 
306,260 
292,248 
296.697 
323,040 
361,972 


465,106 
516.082 
485.714 
566.613 
620.946 
686,259 
758.858 
847,764 
1,024,945 
1.140,736 

1,220,315 
1,331.383 
1,507,091 
1,744,808 
2.075,967 
2.341.923 
2.608,193 


472,901 
509.49 7 
544 , 502 
599,161 
665.800 
715,200 
574,608 
710,428 
885,913 
1.004,377 

1,093,937 
1,158,960 
1.266,843 
1.430,736 
1.734,939 
1.919,951 
2,144,127 


760.486 
807.225 
930.874 
1.021,327 
1,171,612 
1,281,110 
1,365,075 
1 ,469,262 
1,804,435 
1,920.582 

2.043.416 
2,199.326 
2.433.463 
2,786.907 
3,099.951 
3,613,855 
4,073,538 


667,126 




814,289 




925,861 




971,025 




1.096,146 




1.272,516 


1957 


1,402.107 
1.483.915 




1.739,046 




1,934,953 




1,969,119 




2,159,857 




2,421.348 




2.709,196 


1965 

1966 


3.084,921 
3,542.751 
4,033.283 







y Excludes border cronsers, crevmen, 

2/ Prior to 1957, Includes emigrant an 

departed by sea and air, except dlr 

3/ Departures of U.S. citizens first r 



ricultural labor 



nonemlgrant aliens departed; th 
ct departures to Canada, 
corded In 1910. 



dmitted under the Act 
, Includ 



of October 31, 1949, and aliens 

departed and citizens arrived and 



53 



TABLE 12. IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED, BV STATE OF INTENDED FUTURE PERMANENT RESIDENCE; 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 19 58 - 19 67 



o£ Intended 



Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 
Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

U.S. terr. and poss: 

Guam 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands .. . 

All other 



35,659 

3,508 

655,470 

16,382 
66,478 
4,407 
24,150 
135,050 

14,347 
20,458 
3,954 
153,544 
23,571 

9,228 
9,423 
8,096 
18,559 
14,502 

29,332 
125,647 
82,810 
18,731 
3,873 



18,700 
4,814 
6,005 
5,899 
9,233 

149.986 
13,155 

678,725 
12,767 
3,655 

56,988 
8,904 
16,684 
83,527 
15,859 

5,857 
2,182 
8,391 
136,251 
10,587 

6,549 
21,943 
41,928 

5,459 
24,483 

2.060 



253.265 260.685 



1.357 
5.940 



2.086 
9,262 



1,279 
1,407 
423 
16.447 
2.419 



2,464 
10,128 
9,727 
2,006 
394 

1,862 
497 
636 



13,420 
1,045 

59,505 

1,057 

330 

8,219 
927 
1,529 
9,062 
1,152 

539 

250 

754 

9,254 

1,095 



621 

2,837 

133 



1,376 
1.516 
441 
16.275 
2.9 49 

1.003 
1.094 
844 
1.999 
1.626 

2,59 2 



49 5 
544 
408 
713 

15.807 
894 

54.598 

1.206 

358 

9.783 
941 
1,353 
10,296 
1,244 

560 



1,229 

726 
2,012 
4,045 

656 
2,727 

201 



1,222 
1,519 
464 
15.132 
2.373 



11.953 

8.271 

1,970 

421 

1,884 
467 
650 
489 

797 

13,611 
1,105 

50,134 

1,179 

358 

6,829 
891 
1,715 
7,933 
1,578 



803 

12,992 

949 



1.743 
3,897 

505 
2,504 

201 



64,205 

1,483 
5,692 
336 
1,993 
13,009 

1,099 
1,762 



2.336 
12,091 
7.328 
1,852 
350 



975 

13,556 
1,473 

60,429 
1,119 



319 



1,857 
8,052 
1,403 



762 

14,952 

994 

539 
1,639 
3,977 

558 
2,426 

271 



255 

1,557 

450 



513 

348 

4,019 

277 

72,675 

1,495 
5,978 
356 
2,300 
14,009 



2,344 
11.578 



742 

13,367 
2,031 

62,311 

1,077 

327 



1,590 
7,535 
1,361 



17,345 
1,052 



452 
2,133 



5,049 

410 

79,090 

1.792 
5.944 
416 
2.495 
11.404 



849 

941 

840 

1.784 

1.487 

2,831 
13,571 
6,895 
1,7 56 
433 

1,750 



14,099 
2,012 
70,275 



5,504 
964 
1,590 
7,453 
1,249 

599 

251 

845 

15,514 

1,157 



1,707 
5,587 
512 
2,795 
13,414 

1.596 
1.523 
370 
15.634 
2.251 

905 
1,057 

948 
2,041 
1,489 



14,559 
1,460 

68,629 

1,349 

499 

5,619 
972 
1,822 
7,487 
1,143 

618 

286 

912 

13,269 

1,208 

671 



67.671 

1,880 
5,867 
488 
2,919 
15,077 

1,538 
1,721 
373 
15,587 
2,095 

822 

89 5 

824 

2,221 

1,491 

3,448 
11,455 
7,975 
1,733 
331 

1,9 68 
542 
580 
7 54 

1,142 

15,096 
1,367 

59.011 

1,431 

344 

5.444 
876 
2,040 
6,976 
1,159 

557 



615 
2,654 
3,722 

443 
2,190 

204 



4,158 

283 

73,073 

1,614 
7,788 
485 
2,655 
14,028 



18,158 
2,29 2 

777 

952 

7 60 

1,894 

1.224 



1,571 
8.432 
2,282 



865 

13,742 

935 

526 
2.345 
4.139 

463 
2,225 



54 



15; 



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57 



IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 - 1967 1/ 



/From 1820 Co 1867 figure« repr«ient alien passengers arrived; 1868 to 1891 Inclusive and 1895 to 1897 
Inclusive, Immigrant aliens arrived; 1892 to 1894 Inclusive and from 1898 to present time Immigrant 
• Hens admitted. Date for years prior to 1906 relate to country whence alien came; thereafter to 
country of last permanent residence. Because of changes in boundaries and changes in lists of 
countries, data for certain countries are not comparable throughoutj7 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria-Hungary 2/ 

Belgium 

Denmark 

France 

Germany 2/ 

(England 

Great (Scotland 

Britain (Wales 

(Not specified ^ . 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway) , . 
Sweden) — 

Poland i/ 

Portugal 

Rumania Ul 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe 

U.S.S.R. 6/ 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Japan 7/ 

Turkey In Asia 8/ 

Other Asia 

America 

Canada & Newfoundland 9/ ... 

Mexico 10/ 7 

West Indies 

Central America 

South America 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand 

Pacific Islands 

Not specified 

See footnotes at end of table. 



,e^i8^ 



7.691 



1 

20 

371 

968 

1,782 

266 

360 

3,616 
30 
49 



^^3-^39 



599-1" 



1-713.251 



2.598.214 



2.314.824 



98.817 



495.688 



1.597.501 



2.452.660 



2.065.270 



2.272.262 



27 

169 

8,497 

6,761 

14,055 

2,912 

170 

7,942 

20 

50,724 

409 

1,078 

91 



145 

2.477 

3,226 

20 

75 



22 

1,063 

45,575 

152,454 

7,611 

2,667 

185 

65,347 

49 

207,381 

2,253 

1,412 

1,201 

369 
829 

2,125 
4,821 

7 
277 
40 



5,074 

539 

77,262 

434,626 

32,092 

3,712 

1,261 

229,979 

16 

780,719 

1,870 

8,251 

13,903 

105 
550 

2,209 
4,644 



4,738 

3,749 

76,358 

951.667 

247,125 

38,331 

6,319 

132,199 

31 

914,119 

9,231 

10,789 

20,931 
1,164 
1,055 

9,298 

25,011 

83 

457 
5 



7,800 

6,734 

17,094 

35,986 

787,468 

222,277 

38,769 

4,313 

341,537 

72 

435,778 

11,725 

9,102 

(71,631 

(37,667 

2,027 

2,658 

6,697 

23,286 

129 

2,512 



41.^55 



64.630 



41,397 
43 



64,301 



11.564 



33.424 



62.469 



74.720 



166.607 



2,277 

4,817 

3,834 

105 

531 



13,624 

6,599 

12,301 

44 

856 



41,723 
3,271 

13,528 

368 

3,579 



59,309 
3,078 

10,660 

449 

1,224 



153,878 

2,191 

9.046 

95 

1,397 



312 
36 



69,911 



53,144 



29,169 



72,969 

7,221 

31,771 

72,206 

718,182 

437,706 

87,564 

6,631 

16,142 

210 

436,871 

55,759 

16,541 

(95,323 

(115,922 

12,970 

14,082 

11 

5,266 

28,293 

337 

39,284 

1,001 



123.823 



123,201 
163 
149 



404.044 



383,640 

5,162 

13,957 

157 

1,128 



358 
9,886 
1,028 

790 



58 



TABLE 13. IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 - 1967 1/ (Continued) 



1881-1890 1891-1900 1901-1910 1911-1920 1921-1930 1931-1940 1941-1950 



All countries 

Europe 

Albania 12/ 

Austria) 
Hungary ) - 

Belgium 

Bu Igarla H^ 

Czechos lovakla ^2/ 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 12/ 

France 

Germany 2/ 

(England 

Great (Scotland 

Britain (Wales 

(Not specified ^Z 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 12/ 

Li thuanla 12/ 

Luxembourg _1_6/ 

Netherlands 

Norway 4/ 

Poland J/ 

Portugal 

Rumania X^/ 

Spain 

Sweden 4/ 

Switzerland 

Turkey In Europe 

U.S.S.R. 6/ 

Yugoslavia H./ 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Japan 7/ 

Turkey in Asia 8/ 

Other Asia 

America 

Canada & Newfoundland 9/ . . . 

Mexico 10/ 

West Indies 

Central America 

South America 

Other America U</ 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand 

Pacific Islands 

Not specified l^/ 



5. 735.811 



4.737.046 



3.558.978 



8.136.016 



4.376.564 



2.477.853 



348.289 



353,719 
20,177 



50,464 

1,452,970 

644,680 

149,869 

1 2 , 640 

168 

2,308 

655,482 

307,309 



53,701 

176,586 

51,806 

16,978 

6,348 

4,419 

391,776 

81,988 

1,562 

213,282 

682 



68.380 



61,711 

269 

2,270 

2,220 

1,910 



426.967 



39 3,304 

1,913 

29,042 

404 

2,304 



857 
7,017 
5,557 

789 



592,707 

18,167 
160 



50,231 



30,770 
505,152 
216,726 

44,188 

10,557 
67 

15,979 
388,416 
651,893 



26,758 
95,015 
96,720 
27,508 
12,750 
8,731 

226,266 

31,179 

3,626 

505,290 

122 



2,145,266 

41,635 
39,280 



65,285 



73,379 
341,498 
388,017 
120,469 

17,464 

167,519 

339,065 

2,045,877 



48,262 
190,505 

69,149 
53,008 
27,935 
249,534 
34,922 
79,976 
1,597,306 

665 



(453,649 

(442,693 

33,746 

22,533 

3,426 

41,983 

7 56 

61,897 

143,945 

249,944 

78,357 

13,107 

184,201 

146,181 

1,109,524 



43,718 

66,395 

4,813 

89,732 

13,311 

68,611 

95,074 

23,091 

54,677 

921,201 

1,888 

8,111 



32,868 
30,680 
15,846 
2,945 
102,194 
32,430 

16,691 

49,610 

412,202 

157,420 

159,781 

13,012 

51,084 
220,591 
455,315 



26,948 
68,531 
227,734 
29,994 
67,646 
28,958 
97,249 
29,676 
14,659 
61,742 
49,064 
22,983 



2,040 

3,563 

7,861 

4,817 

938 

14,39 3 

2,559 

506 

2,146 

12,623 

114,058 

21,756 

6,887 

735 

9,119 

13,167 

68,028 

1,192 

2,201 

565 

7,150 

4,740 

17,026 

3,329 

3,871 

3,258 

3.960 

5.512 

737 

1,356 

5,835 

2,361 



71.236 



243.567 



192.559 



97.400 



15.344 



14,799 

68 

25,942 

26,799 

3,528 



20,605 
4,713 
129,797 
77,393 
11,059 



21,278 

2,082 

83,837 

79,389 

5,973 



29,907 
1,886 
33,462 
19,165 
12,980 



4,928 
496 

1,948 
328 

7,644 



36.972 



361.888 



3,311 

971 

33,066 

549 

1,075 



179,226 
49,642 

107,548 
8,192 
17,280 



1.143.671 



1.516.716 



160.037 



742,185 

219,004 

123,424 

17,159 

41,899 



924,515 

459,287 

74,899 

15,769 

42,215 

31 



108,527 

22,319 

15,502 

5,861 

7,803 

25 



350 

2,740 

1,225 

14,063 



7,368 
11,975 

1,049 
33,523 



8,443 

12,348 

1,079 

1,147 



6,286 

8,299 

427 

228 



1,750 
2,231 

780 



See footnotes at end of table. 



59 











12/ 










Hungary 
Belglun 
Bulgarl 










an/ . 

lovatcla 






Denmark 






















Germany 


2/ ... 





Poland ^/ ... . 

Rumania 13/ . . 

Spain 

Sweden U/ .... 
Switzerland .. 
Turkey In EurO| 
U.S.S.R. 6/ ,. 
YugoBiavla U./ 
Other Europe . 



India .. 
Japan 7/ 



Canada & Newfoi 



Africa 

Australia & New Zealand 

Pacific IsiandG jj/ 

Not specified 15/ 



67, 106 > 
36,637) 
18,575 



3,126 
5,738 
18,956 



1,737 
1,670 
1.697 



1,934 
6.785 
2.911 
126 
2.969 
2.056 
1.952 



3.016 
5.187 
10,874 



for fiscal years ended June 30. 



ept IS20 to 1831 Inclusive and 1844 to 1849 
elusive years ended December 31; 1832 covers 15 months i 
and 1868 6lx months ended June 30. 

not reported until 1861. Austria and Hungary have beei 
d with Germany. 

In the years 1901 to 1951, Included In other Europe. 

for Norway and Sweden were combined. 



16,595 
20.257 
2,552 



1850 

1945 



to 1898 and since 1920. Between 1899 and 1919. Pol, 
European U.S.S.R. and Asian U.S.S.R. Since 1964 to 



i.S.S.k. has been 






Bulgaria, Serbia, and Montenegro were first reported In 1899. Bulgaria has been reported separately since 1920 and In 1920 also a separ< 

enumeration was made for the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes. Since 1922 the Serb, Croat, and Slovene Kingdom has been recorded < 

Countries added to the list since the beginning of World War 1 are theretofore Included with the countries to which they belonged. Flgu 

available since 1920 for Czechoslovakia and Finland and since 1924 for Albania, Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. 

No record of Immigration from Rumania until 1880. 

included with countries not specified prior to 1925. 

The figure 33.523 in column headed 1901-1910, Includes 32,897 persons returning In 1906 to their homes In the United States. 

Figures for Luxembourg are available since 1925. 

Beginning with the year 1952, Asia Includes Philippines. From 1934 to 1951 the Philippines were Included In the Pacific Islands. Prior 

Che Philippines were recorded in separate tables as Insular travel. 

Beginning In 1957 China Includes Taiwan. 



60 



of Birth 

B^lglu™ 

CzechoBlovaltla 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlanda 

Poland 

Port"8«l 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Aaia) .. 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R, (Europe and Aala) 

Yugoalawla 

Other Europe 

China U 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indoneala 

Iran 

Iraq 

Ijrael 

Jordan 2/ 

Paklatan 

Philippine* 

Ryukyu Islands 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

HeKico 

Cuba 

Barbadoa 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Trinidad & Tobago 

St. Chriatopher 

Other West tndlea 

British Honduras 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Other North America 

South America 

Bolivia 

BratU 

Chile 

Colombia 

Peru 

Other South America 

Africa 

Cape Verde laland 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt 
Other Africa 

Australia 

FIJI 

New Zealand , 

Other Oceania , 

Other countries 

Tf Includes Taiwan 



3.591 

its? 

I.W3 

1,120 

3,559 

1,B26 

2.086 

895 

513 



1,413 

691 

3.732 



21,189 
2.277 
1.857 



1.310 
1.325 



61 



TABLE 15- NONI 



' COUNTRY OR 1 



YEARS ENDED JUNE 



Ail countries 

Belgium 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

HeCherlanda 

Poland 

ForCugal 

Sp«ln ■■■' '■'■ 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Aala) .... 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.K. (Europe and Aala) .. 
Yugoalavla 

China U 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indoneela 

Iran 

Urael 

Jordan 2/ 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Paklatan 

PhlUpplnea 

Ryukyu Islanda 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Vletnan 

Other Aala 

Canada 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Other Ueat Indlea 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Honduraa 

Other Central America 

Other North America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brasll 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Guyana 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Algeria':::::::::::::::;::;:; 

"'gerla 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt). 
Other Africa 

Australia ; 

New Zealand 

Pacific lalanda (U.S. adm.).. 
Other Oceania 



1/ includes Taiwan 



60.594 
599.611 
,2i.3.063 
158.251 
93.635 
169,099 
694,426 



212.038 

52,209 

.733,725 

59,917 



115,569 
24,268 
U3,316 



78,053 
411.605 
17,557 
31,783 



363,710 
59.118 

304.088 

786,598 
60,581 
74,975 

113,690 
53,766 
61.035 
70,218 
17,347 
40 , 346 



199.499 
23.720 

158.719 
94,908 

238,566 
69 . 708 
33.108 

154,833 

299,022 
39 . 1 1 1 

'92-8'4 



41,815 
26,367 
9,218 
11,502 



1.995 
2,123 
1,227 
10.058 



7.273 
2.553 
2.934 



1.408 
4.783 
9,188 
1,707 



34.637 
10.645 
12,276 
3,366 
3,240 
21,294 
12,655 



8,038 
2,999 
3.095 



S.601 
5.508 

13.071 
3.730 
2.101 
5.207 

25.979 
1.937 



543.906 
12.222 
9.278 
3.026 
15.935 
5.350 
37,617 



9,833 
13,374 
55,114 
41.391 
11.551 
11.764 



,100 



3,311 



3,705 
1.067 
5.373 



1.504 
2.951 
1,453 
10,435 



16,069 
3,920 
2.264 



3.695 

136.021 

5.864 



1.168 
6.246 
29. 301 
1.372 
1.771 
3.206 
1.730 
8,319 
394 



57,383 
185,175 

43,934 
9,102 
3,832 

18,070 

60,361 
3,139 



89,786 
17.242 

1.293 
12.450 

6,012 
13,906 

3,231 



6,489 



41,397 
12,852 
13,594 
5,681 
3,861 
23,853 
15,530 
19 , 649 



3,094 
3,614 
1.229 



5,131 
2,065 
3.711 



11,698 

3,220 
16,387 

6,21? 
57,903 
126,463 
15,063 

9.571 
15,561 
65,052 
42.396 
13.197 
14,142 

7.273 



2.803 
3.651 
2.821 
13,860 



14.845 
7,317 

27.945 
6.843 
3.005 

15.184 

27,010 



1,476 
1.183 
4.354 



16.759 
10,527 
18,916 



5.600 
7,863 
6.077 



12.119 
2.658 

12.824 
3.735 
5.808 
1.854 



151.649 
20.296 

2.947 
15.682 

9.772 
37,553 

9,216 

3.362 
19 , 269 
29,126 

4,426 



6.552 
17.442 

7.213 
81,618 
158,711 
19.703 
10,702 
23,198 
66 , 1 1 1 
46,965 
16,427 
17,874 
11,722 

6,082 
29,542 
23,897 
27,366 



3,448 
15,554 
3,560 
5,9 54 



55,662 
2,062 
4,717 
5.054 



355,137 
10.430 
52,638 
8,090 
47,791 
105.939 
8,575 
10,159 
14.919 
7.485 
9.060 
9.274 



179.173 
28,223 

3,343 
19.472 
12,369 
35.729 

9,672 

4,308 
24,287 
35,985 

5,785 



36,380 
11.850 
5.048 
2.588 



29 . 703 

7.196 

265.200 



3.647 
5,796 
1,625 
9,128 
59,982 
2,591 
5,076 



121,525 
9,669 
11,523 
17.747 



23.916 
15.849 
31.910 



28.861 
42.572 
5,728 



62 



ITTED, BY COUNTRY 
1(1. 1X5B - |ql.7 

l01U)(15)tB) of the ImmlRrat 



Country or region 


IVie-lIb? 


19 58 


1959 


1960 


196, 


1962 


196, 


19 64 


1965 


,966 


1.6- 




11.190.676 


59 6.004 


689.416 


779.205 


858.472 


928,021 


1 067 444 




1 498 979 






E„,„p, 


S.Oll.ai 


266.546 




388.962 


423.713 


448,982 


485,968 












105,180 
89.537 
32.990 

116.819 
45.439 

429,037 

943.334 
94,623 
81,627 

509 1508 
318.156 
70.031 
119.318 
41.410 
37.894 
148,884 
140,738 
164.929 
34,909 
1,245,839 
37,977 
57.773 
48.393 


7,249 

1.776 
7.122 
2.027 
20.175 
49 , 189 
4,213 
2.984 
5.396 
28.837 
20.167 
4.843 
9.488 
1.453 
2,615 
8,998 
7,223 
8,855 
2.567 
56 , 408 
2.782 
3,271 
4,146 


8.835 
5,69 3 
2,136 
9,383 
2.640 
22,801 
66,152 

5,126 
7,39 2 

24.119 
5.298 
9,877 
1.762 
2.698 

10,623 
9,284 

10,794 
2.790 

71.100 
3.140 
3.7 70 


9,64 3 

2.245 

4.079 
26.269 
80,144 
7,655 
8,837 
8,698 
40,535 
28,908 
5,945 
9,507 
2.259 
2,829 
1 1 , 646 
10.043 
12,318 
3,026 
83.228 
3.642 
4.79 3 


9,568 
7.528 
2.132 
1 1 . 59 1 
4.661 
29.135 
84.662 
8,758 
1 2 , 1 80 
9,280 
44,491 
30.161 
6.234 
10.206 
2,630 
3.097 
11,233 
11,230 
13,303 
2,320 
95.665 
3.745 
5.692 
4.191 


8,263 

2,362 
11,364 

4.671 
36,104 
86,545 

9,607 

8.319 
44,833 
31,432 

6,246 
11.031 

3,143 

3,254 
1 1 , 369 
11,392 
15.072 

3,280 
106,284 

3,653 


8!841 
2,422 

11,888 
4,584 

42,014 

9,809 

48,501 

6,308 
11,639 

3 , 663 
1 2 . 369 
14.216 
15.545 
3,151 
120,634 
3,693 
6,253 
4,095 


11.068 

3^859 
11.442 

4.757 
47.518 
102.666 

9,307 
9.485 
53,127 

7,232 
12.959 

4.163 
16.342 
15.685 
16,687 

3,268 

6^96 


13,052 
12,886 

5,347 
13.027 

5.708 
57.228 
119.415 

9.006 
13,056 
64,267 
35,656 

8, 100 

6,651 
5,121 

16,446 
21,082 

175,189 
4.328 


11,41) 
5,140 

13,788 
5,351 

66,567 
126.486 

12.321 

121977 
71,034 
39.540 

9.103 
14,804 

7,143 

5.112 
22.793 
20.440 
23,580 

5,191 
188,956 

4,523 

99.867 






11,/ 




' ' 71 


Defimark 


16,1.,, 




• 




184 


Greece 


13 9 7' 


H 


* . 




14 u '9 






N.-thetlands 


41, -,44 






P I 1 














22,779 


Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Aala) 


27,693 

5,273 

205.20, 


U.S.S.R. (Europe and Aala) 




01 her Europe 


128.046 


Hong Kong 


51,202 
13.922 
50.861 
17.416 
19,196 
7.476 
54.054 
255,503 
6.816 
10,044 
26,135 
8,597 
80.478 
1.919 
9.354 
3,029 
24,153 


2,623 

362 

1,803 

708 

343 

2,297 

5,500 

4 39 

219 

1,346 

90 
546 

1,131 


3,064 
49 3 

2,451 

1,213 
9 36 
39 7 

2,615 

284 

2,8 38 
103 
569 

1,339 


3,416 

651 

3.317 

l!l67 
564 

3,648 

12,329 

524 

338 

2,023 
410 

3,772 
112 
553 

1,510 


3.993 
978 

4,112 

1,343 

1.214 
646 

4.217 

18,157 

660 

589 

2,092 
646 

4,391 

187 
1,746 


1,160 
4,552 

1,2 38 
627 

19,745 

783 
2.242 

838 
5.758 

237 

242 
1,943 


4,883 

4,501 
1,5 34 

631 
5,765 
22.743 

2.599 
980 

186 

888 

258 

2.207 


5.544 
1 . 604 
5.605 

2,514 
33,479 

8,989 
305 

316 
2.711 

467.417 


6,539 
2,100 
7,277 
2,305 
3,033 

l!567 
1,79 5 
1,401 
1 2 , 560 

258 
1.337 

463 
3.269 

559,(3'! 


7,629 
2.285 
8,229 
2,694 

1.010 
5.832 
41.445 
1,286 

3.159 

14,874 

1,433 
555 

3,702 

653,4't4 


2 , 599 
9,014 




2.811 




3,218 




1 172 




9 241 




56 153 


Ji.td.n 2/ 


2,215 
2,429 




4 261 




1,520 


PhMi 


17,254 


H fcvu iBia dB 


267 


S la A ab ReDubllc 


1.586 




671 


Other Asia 


4.575 




705, 7JJ 




279,445 
2,291,336 
223,058 
259 , 689 
36.810 
131,258 
558,209 
46.580 
57,236 
92,404 
35,925 
43.920 
50,250 
13,277 
32.373 


15.728 
110,432 

3,252 
1,992 
3,976 
23,455 
2,206 
3,000 
5,971 
1.875 
2.095 
2.244 

47.651 


17,024 
123,223 

56.655 
3,409 
2,412 
6,205 

27,928 
2,670 
3.211 

2.024 
2,148 
2,665 

2,903 

52.281 


18,225 
133,845 

43.123 
2.820 
2.568 
6.841 

33.746 
2.884 
3,360 
7.023 
1.969 
2,245 
2,953 
583 

62.786 


18,114 
167,062 

30,633 
6,940 
2,314 
7.641 

40.491 
2.347 
3,297 
5.543 
1.845 
1.948 
3,125 
518 
2,740 

62,576 


20,901 
185,892 

10,681 

13,487 
2,832 
9.705 

44.763 
2,995 
3,977 
6,590 

2,685 
3,586 
1,575 

76,464 


25.208 

217.569 

3,276 

45.584 

1 2 , 89 5 
50 , 506 

5.556 

6,884 
3,370 

5,716 
1,801 

89.763 


31.324 
257,702 

3,603 
49 . 1 54 

4.399 
16,829 

6,334 
6,465 
9,055 
4,199 
5,473 
5,480 
1,768 
3 , 440 


36.571 

3,688 
36,018 

5,607 
20.216 
76,692 

6,735 

11,821 
5,371 
6.515 

2,203 
3,794 

138,117 


44,988 
375,931 

47 ',482 
5,512 
22,394 
91,755 

9,248 
14,657 
6,243 
6,247 
8,333 
2.260 
4.235 

155,986 


49 .362 


Mexico 


39 3,557 




5,305 


Dominican Reoublic 


51.543 




6.375 


J 


24.356 


0th r Ueat Indies 


106,881 


C ata Rica 


8,322 




11,214 




18,666 


. 


6,728 


Nt 


8,415 




9.256 


Other Central America 


1.638 
4.115 




171.677 




151.198 
19.224 

112.006 
70.932 

180.857 
50.704 
20.327 

124.044 

219.799 
20,985 


1,070 
7,546 
3.59 5 
8.125 
1.861 

788 
3.350 
13.883 

586 


7,758 
1.279 
5,465 
3,997 
8,510 
2,414 

3.648 

17.579 

587 


9.492 
1,370 
6,565 
5,197 

11,494 
2,717 
1,340 
4,279 

19,449 
683 

6,599 


13,724 

7^995 
4.457 
9.279 
2,197 
1,369 
4,523 
16,551 
1.188 

7,820 


15,948 
1,689 
8,455 
5,760 

13,826 
3,086 

8,514 
15,430 

9,071 


2.376 
10,575 

5,048 
20,601 

4,735 

1,739 
11.795 
19.174 

1.910 

10,166 


14,768 
2,947 

7!255 
29,994 
6,147 
2,353 
14,916 
22,089 

1 2 , 606 


21,673 

14,097 
9,365 

29,076 
7,041 
2,756 

20,272 

27.894 
3.921 

16.514 


24.473 
2.205 
17,251 
12.621 
25.104 
8.492 
3.462 
24,563 
34,080 
3,735 

19,350 




Bolivia 


2.973 




23.451 




13,637 










Cuvana 


3,466 






Venezuela 


33,670 








22,482 


Al 


9,327 
11,908 

2.943 
33,947 
32,047 
24.089 


248 

381 

59 

1.536 


451 

91 
1.839 


57 3 
6 38 
146 

1.729 
1.236 

20.071 


582 

845 

163 

2.664 

2.162 

1.404 

23.790 


653 
944 

2,610 

2,147 

26,473 


697 
980 

3.126 
2,746 
2,329 

28.727 


911 
1,234 

408 
3.898 
3.370 
2.765 

32,958 


1,314 

5,001 
4,569 
3,529 

40 , 29 1 


1,736 

2,106 

582 

5,237 

3,911 

44,746 


2.162 














Other Africa 


4,605 
49.031 




199.775 
68.169 
22.645 
7,515 


3!o73 
750 
219 

514 


12.547 

3.589 

654 

263 


14.664 

4,408 

679 

103 


16,888 

5,613 

87 5 


18,327 

1,361 
59 3 


19,366 
6,251 
2.470 

81 


22,090 

7.036 

3.002 

830 

75 


26,125 
9,035 
3.819 

237 


10,611 
3,623 
1,466 

J 26 




Nev Zealand 


5.412 
1,458 




1.468 



























63 



MONIMIIGRANTS AXMlTTUt I 



H 



„H3 



■algluB 

Baawrk 

riaUnd 

IriUM 

If If 

ll«tharUiid« 

•ton-y 

Volmmi 

Fortugal 

«P«l" 

8w«4m 

8wlti«cUM< 

Turka^ (birop* sad Asia) .. 

Ihilt«4 KlB«4aa 

U.S.S.K. (ftiTop« m4 A«1«). 

T«BO»laTl* 

Oth«T lurop* 

A«l« 

ChtM i/ 

In* , 

Un»'l ..'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'..'.'.'.'. ... 

Jor4«« 2/ 

Eoru 

Faklatan 

Ryukyv iBUadt 

Syrlaa Arak lapukUc 

Otbar Aala 

Kortk taarlca 

Caaada 

Kaalco 

Cuba 

Boalalcaa ftaywbllc 

Bald 

JaaMlca 

Otkat UaaC Ia41aa 

Coata Klea 

It Salvador 

CuaCaaaU 

■oaduraa 

Vaitaaa 

Otbar Cantral Aaarlea 

South Asarica 

Argaetlaa 

lollvla 

Iraill 

Cbllo 

Coloafcla 

GuyaM .!!!!!!.!!!!!!!!!!!; 

Vaaaauala 

Othar South Aaarlea 

Africa 

Algarla 

Mlgarla 

South Africa 

Ualtad Arab Kapubllcdsjrpt) 
Otkar Africa 

Aaatralla 

Raw Xaalaad 

ractflc lalanda (U.S. ada. ) 
Othar Ocaanla 



109,613 
170.160 
36,129 



50.567 
19,249 
11.233 
IJ.tlO 



37, (74 

32.794 

7,274 

27 1 , J79 



1,130 

710 

1,961 



17.531 
4,360 

19,625 
4,029 
6.421 
2,132 

12,191 



1.3S4 
2,453 

11.923 



*i*-2ai 

103.994 
439.330 



11,2S2 
13.071 
3.338 
9.2S3 



J1.744 
IS. 146 
33,197 
15.077 

5,159 
33.806 
44,523 

7,050 



12.967 
70,431 
33,634 



3,979 

6.677 
9,483 



46,990 

385.345 

4,63« 



1/ 



64 



TEMPORARY WORKERS , 





1967 1 


1966 




Country or Region 
Re*ld.nc. 






Temporary 


Trainees 


Total 


Worker, of 


lUllU) 


'"u."'.'.'.' 


»U coantr... 


70 010 






3.330 


75.848 




64,636 


2.999 












7,053 


4.507 


1.091 


1.455 




Hn — 

32 
1.302 

381 
573 
297 
53 

96 
3 

885 
220 
370 

5 


155 
26 

31 
150 

190 

71 
95 

156 
82 


35 

3 


32 


29 5 
2 58 

33 


123 
202 

327 
78 

359 
'362 


30 

1 




B I 1 


41 


C ho 1 kl« 


I 


D k 


23 


_ , . 


13 


F a 


19b 


C 


258 


C c 


8 


H 


1 


, ? J 


72 




52 




71 


Norw«V 


11 


P la d 




- . 


1 








20 




31 


g * * land 


149 




5 


U 11 d Kl d « 




U.S.S.R, (Europ. .ndA.l.) 










625 




113 

1.62 
5 
85 

155 


6 
51 

139 

5 


39 
23 


5 


5 
132 


43 
32 

3 


8 
46 






4 


India ' 


72 




1 


Iran 


3 






larael 


15 




437 










L b« 


/, 


. "■ 


12 


Phi 11 1 


18 




g 


yu yu R*o„bllc 








0th 


11 




679 




22,749 

9,078 

3 

88 

10.192 

5 
27 
34 


2.052 
1,071 


7!a82 
52 


125 
34 


20,375 

9,618 
16,866 

37 


1.732 
B35 

2 

15 


18.105 
3 

16.836 






112 






Do Inlcan Reoubllc 






I 


Jamaica 


g 














G t mala 




Ho d as 




Nl 


4 


P ama* 


1 


0th r Central Am rlca 




0th N th A lea 






120 




285 

32 

23 


203 


3 
25 


39 


51 


6 


57 






1 




38 


Chile 




Colonbla 




Ec d 




Guyana 


- 




q 


Other South America 


2 








53 


3 


1 


28 




5 










Nigeria 


g 


S th Af 


26 


United Arab Republic (Egypt) 


j= 


^ 






45 
6 






51 


19 
58 


9 

58 


19 




Pacific lalanda (U.S. Adm. ) 


,5 


h 











Includes TaIwsi 



65 



TEMPORARY WORKERS ADMITTED UNDER SECTION 10Ua)ll5)(H) AND SECTION 

OF THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, BY OCCUPATION; 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1967 



All 



Airplane pi lota and navlgatora 

Architects 

Athletes 

Authors 

Chemists 

Clergymen 

Professors and Instructors 

Dancers and dancing teachera 

Dentist 

Designers 

Dietitians and nutritionists 

Draftsmen 

Editors and reporters 

Engineers 

Entertainers 

Farm and home management advisors 

Foresters and conservationists 

Lawyers and Judges 

Librarians 

Musicians and ouslc teachers 

Nurses 

Optometrists 

Personnel and labor relations workers 

Agricultural scientists 

Biological scientists 

Geologists and geophyslclsts 

Physicists 

Miscellaneous natural scientists 

Pharmacists 

Photographers 

Physicians and surgeons 

Public relations men and publicity writers . 

Recreation and group workers 

Religious workers 

Social and welfare workers, except group ... 

Economists 

Psychologists 

Statisticians and actuaries 

Miscellaneous social scientists 

Sports Instructors and officials 

Technician 

Therapists and healers, not specified 

Veterinarians 

Professional, technical, and kindred workers 

Managers, officials, and proprietors, except f< 

Buyers and department heads, store 

Managers and superintendents, building 

Officers, pilots, pursers, and engineers, sh 
Officials and administrators, public admlnls 

Foreign government officials 

Purchasing agents and buyers, not specified 
Managers, officials, and proprietors, other 

Clerical and klndrad worker 

Aeents 

Bank tellera 

Bookkeepers 

Insurance adjusters, examiners, and investlgi 

Office machine operators 

Postal clerks 

Receptionists 

Shipping and receiving clerka 

Stenographers, typists, and secretarlea .... 

Telegraph operators 

Telephone operatora 

Clerical and kindred workers, other 

Sales workers 

Advertising agents and salesmen 

Insurance agents and brokera 

Stock and bond salesman 

Salesmen and sales clerks, other 



TEWPt^RARY WORKERS ADMITTED UNI 

OF THE IMMIGRATION AND 

YEAR ENDED JUr 



ER SECTION 10l(a)l IbllH) AND SE 
NATIONALITY ACT. BY OCCUPATION: 
E 30 1967 (COKTINUED) 






tUe .etcers . 




' 




, . 






d i Ic Ad hols 






' 






ing, grading, ttnd road 


machinery oper 


ators 








G, watchmakers, goldaml 
and servicemen, telegr 


ths, and sllve 
aph, telephone 


rsraUhs 


* 


d 






nt nance 




' 







Tailors and tallo 



ndan 



Dellverymen and routemen 

Furnacemen, aneltemen, and pour 
Laundry and dry cleaning operati 
Mine operatlvaa and laborers ... 
Oilers and greasers except auto . 



apper: 



,, 


eurs 


* 














kers. 








. 


ehold 









except private household 
iclans. and manicurists . 



Charwomen and cle< 
Cooks, except prl 
Counter and fount> 
Firemen, fire pro 



and doorkeeper 



epC private household 



for 



Carpenters* helpers, except logging and mln 

Fishermen and oystermen 

Gardeners , except farm, and groundskeepers 
Lumbermen, craftsmen, and woodchoppers ... 



67 



IICRANTS AOMITTED. 







\ 


: 


1 








1 






a 


. 


Is 






































Utt p«rAan**t rttidcnc* 


Nunbar 


J 


3 ■ 


" *J 


s 


w * 




" 


« - 





> i 


- 


u » 


• 


- 




adaltted 


g 


* S 


* 3 


^ 


\l 




|2 


B u 


A 


a S 


^ 


? M 


- 


- 






MB 


£■-5 




















a B 
































.i 












2 5 


<a 3 










3 i 
















































• il 


r 


lu 


\ 


l^ 


-c 


5 m 


• * 


w 


V C 


i 


; J 


t -s 


i 






S.~o 


|S 




H 


1 


l-s 


H 


|~| 


a 


1- 


i i 


^,, „„.„,.. 


2. 601. 193 


42.916 


„„ ^,^ 


1.628.515 


204,936 


9.983 


63.370 


5.867 , 


18.386 


,„„,„ 


3.237 


31 630 


15.067 


214.330 


2.442 


brop* 


7J3.7J5 


13.496 


123.31! 




85.150 






502 


7,558 


8,313 


2.119 


13.764 


4,673 


4.663 


2.216 




1.259 






5.553 


310 


12 


65 


8 


162 


313 


33 


27 2 


14 


24 


J 


••l«lu> 


12.924 


251 


3!594 


7,112 


742 


46 


112 


35 


262 


51 


30 


212 


114 


3! 


48 


Clachoilovakl* 


3,!39 


12 


347 


2, 119 


341 




17 


1 


131 


39 


25 


157 


77 


3 




Banaark 


13.960 


195 


2,281 


9,333 


966 


139 


101 


4 


216 


64 


41 


401 


141 


29 


42 


Finland 


6.231 


66 


721 


4,334 


191 


51 


85 


u 


122 


32 


21 


444 


121 


11 




Franca 


94.231 


1,770 


16,039 


54,722 


15.582 


59 5 


612 


52 


' .161 


585 


366 


1.611 


441 


300 


332 


SanaajF 


115.029 


1,923 


19,305 


75,554 


1,114 


1.13* 


700 


34 


331 


1.302 


456 


2.054 


636 


2.163 


1.253 


Sraaca 


14,392 


144 


907 


4,904 


7, 179 


47 


59 5 


39 


95 


92 


16 


234 


40 


55 


*5 


■antar; 


2.115 


54 


105 


2.427 


91 


I 


4 




97 


34 


7 


31 


21 


4 


- 


Iialand 


14.037 


77 


1.787 


10.553 


556 


111 


110 


10 


72 


311 


17 


230 


65 


66 


2 


Italy 


52.143 


689 


9.729 


30.100 


1,126 


539 


377 


17 


524 


573 


162 


725 


261 


274 


45 


Ratharlaada 


33.131 


275 


7.301 


21.011 


2,386 


139 


240 


24 


341 


297 


56 


56] 


242 


60 


119 


■oriiajr 


15.103 


243 


1.966 


6.665 


5,401 


57 


411 


33 


151 


53 


56 


359 


20! 


17 


109 


Pnlaad 


4.709 


360 


212 


3,441 


201 


1 


20 


3 


HI 


71 


15 


190 


32 


27 


1 


Portugal 


6.416 


250 


728 


2,259 


2,133 




66 


It 


73 


96 


6 


76 


36 


49 


10 


Ruaanla 


9 59 


136 


130 


101 


441 


1 






112 


3 




17 


4 






Spala 


17.624 


9 54 


2.69 2 


1,621 


3,119 


110 


239 


13 


271 


11! 


30 


312 


11 


154 


I 


Saadaa 


24.390 


39 2 


5.812 


15.531 


132 


11 


221 


14 


196 


220 


12 


699 


220 


13 


- 


Swltaarland 


27.129 


352 


5,873 


11.353 


968 


499 


263 


26 


367 


370 


!1 


501 


110 


45 




Turkay (luropa and Aala) 


3.527 


111 


354 


1.552 


57 


9 


324 


32 


97 


5 


2 


556 


71 


19 


54 


United Klngdoa 


240.41! 


4,229 


40,632 


156.441 


25,754 


1.082 


1 .383 


111 


1.607 


2.507 


564 


1.413 


1,412 


1.109 


152 


U.^ S R (luropa and Aalal 


2,100 


410 


306 


611 


129 




33 


_ 


792 


111 


40 


17 


61 


3 




Tugoalavla 


3.663 


112 


373 


2,092 


371 


112 


18 


4 


136 


69 


11 


193 


72 


23 




Ochar luropa 


4.292 


106 


546 


2,104 


302 




80 


15 


124 


90 


' 


113 


44 


40 


' 


A.la 


171.519 


10.110 


39.026 


67.151 


12.050 


4.866 


14.101 


1.744 


J. 441 


1.026 


642 


11.760 


1,151 


551 


16 


China U 






521 








2.127 


243 


226 




11 


386 


107 


24 




Bong tong 


7 [437 


21 


777 


3,201 


l!931 


4 


1.217 


26 


56 


10 


S 


95 


7 


17 




India 


14.924 


316 


2,027 


4,062 


944 


14 


3.019 


631 


49 2 


113 


16 


2.440 


74! 


32 


] 


Indonnala 
Iran . 


1.265 
5.509 


771 


360 


390 


65 
143 


34 


!i 


66 


60 
91 


,J 


2 
1 


110 
542 


15 

116 


3 
20 


2 


Iraq 
laraal 


99 2 

17.117 


115 
631 


71 
1,668 


'311 
12,325 


199 


384 


725 


56 


33 


93 


36 


45 

371 


411 


5 


: 


Japa. 


71.222 


2.427 


28,390 


26,295 


3.630 


4.149 


1.624 


113 


254 


462 


489 


1,121 


1,126 


231 


4 


Jordan J/ 


1.416 


196 


71 


482 


221 


I 


,254 


L6 


30 


5 


4 


97 


20 


17 


2 


Xoraa 


5.213 


631 


731 


1,149 


421 


100 


170 


174 


71 


15 


46 


613 


271 


30 




Ubanon 


3.404 


101 


561 


1,775 


326 


I 


317 


29 


73 


5 


2 


92 


19 


13 


- 


Faklatan 


2,681 


160 


505 


628 


204 


39 


329 


36 


167 


10 


1 


477 


121 


4 


5 


FhlUrplnaa 


11.432 


767 


2.130 


9,596 


1.503 


80 


179 


50 


235 


1!! 


10 


2.517 


199 


91 




trokmi lalaada 


609 


_ 


42 


191 


100 




22 


2 


1 




1 


204 


16 


21 




Syrian Arab lapubllc 


160 


49 


65 


276 


172 


2 


157 


11 


46 


2 


3 


46 


16 


5 


- 


Othar Alia 


lo!692 


1.033 
2.553 


io! 


271 


436 


12 


1.M6 


63 


452 


13 


2 


407 
1,450 


10 
193 


1 




north Aaarlca 


1.364,139 


7.777 


29.938 


877.52! 


66.927 


192 


32.343 


2.450 


2.81! 


59.512 


273 


3.418 


2.174 


271.412 


203 


Canada 




2.012 


5.150 


206.514 


19.631 


62 


14.239 


1.957 


341 


22.749 


79 


1.061 


690 


218 


31 


Haaico 


456!o51 


3.272 


9.370 


401.381 


15.791 


26 


7,391 


245 


441 


9,071 


150 


621 


341 


127 


94 


Cuba 


7 54 


26 


le 


419 


44 




1 




167 


3 


1 


3 




69 




DoMlnlcan lapubllc 


59 , 540 


2 30 


2,240 


51.539 


2.251 


5 


2,070 


20 


227 




17 


155 


56 


397 


31 


■altl 


1.124 


233 


532 


5.020 


2.344 


2 


234 


2 


123 


21 


1 


29 


42 


240 


1 


Jaaaica 


50.003 


253 


2,07 6 


23.533 


12.126 


13 


1,157 


42 


270 


10,192 


3 


105 


230 


3 


1 


Othar Uaat Indlaa 


156.032 


190 


7,621 


115.639 


11.494 


25 


3,120 


74 


203 


17,212 


4 


149 


14! 


71 


4 


Coaca Rica 


10.005 


119 


342 


1.011 


391 


_ 


470 


47 


205 


1 


. 


237 


152 


9 




11 Salvador 


13.474 


247 


236 


11.644 


254 


2 


609 


16 


141 


67 


! 


150 


15 


11 




Ouataaala 


21.754 


279 


657 


19.226 


219 


7 


569 


15 


187 


1 


2 


123 


156 


31. 




Honduraa 


9.304 


235 


316 


6.128 


913 


] 


676 




67 


5 


_ 




13 




_ 


Nl<aragua 


9,113 


2 34 


641 


7,671 


331 


5 


619 


3 


69 


11 


- 


110 


90 


1 


_ 


Fanaaa 


12.161 


263 


540 


9,277 


571 


7 


1,020 


17 


16! 


27 




165 


93 


22 


1 


Othar Cantral Aaarlca 


2.491 


31 


129 


1,722 


399 


I 


121 


3 




11 


1 






32 


1 


Othar North Aaarlca 


279.174 


146 


56 


2,010 


70 


35 


33 


1 


191 


14 


10 


12 


6 


176,461 


32 


South Aaarlca 


245.029 


6.441 


14.554 


112.632 


19.530 


201 


7.121 


688 


3.570 


635 


111 


5.985 


3.197 


312 


s 


Argentina 




574 


3.167 




1.251 




373 


53 


620 


98 


!7 


717 


440 






loUvla 


4^461 


161 


302 


21672 


697 


4 


131 


4 


178 




_ 


233 


60 


12 




■rail 1 


35.434 


1.900 


3.511 


23.718 


2.225 


12 




81 


653 


215 


69 


1.931 






1 


Chi la 


17.115 


756 


1.011 


12.794 


1.017 


_ 


231 


61 










415 


]1 


_ 


Coloabla 


31.610 


456 


1.515 


25.204 


1.329 


14 


1.502 




417 


32 




529 


411 


36 


1 


Ecuador 


14.597 


554 


332 


11.940 


602 














111 


176 






Guyana 


4.017 


83 






636 


3 


466 


37 


30 


16 








2 




Fani 


36.665 


610 


749 


30^770 




9 


9 30 


17 


303 


24 




574 


447 


13 




Vanaaaala 


60.522 


1,049 


3.047 


43.304 


1.791 


15 


2.504 


329 


215 


99 




441 


615 


26 


2 


Othar South Aaarlca 


6.177 


228 


640 


4.310 


71! 








365 


23 




324 


41 


19 


I 


Africa 


23.277 


2.301 


3.706 


9.401 


967 


17 


1.656 


279 


1.447 


116 


16 


J. 772 


509 


,j 




Algeria 






172 


266 


36 






5 








25 




I 




Moi occo 


1.362 


267 


108 


717 




1 


54 


I 


61 


J 








1 




aigarla 


1.910 


177 


117 


403 


74 


1 






106 


! 




324 


71 






South Africa 


7.173 


270 


1.897 


4.050 


133 




201 


67 


57 








127 


24 




United Arab lapuhltclSgypi) 


2.476 


119 


256 






3 


139 


37 




12 




354 


143 


3 




Other Africa 


9.679 


1.366 


1.016 


2!9 59 


421 






90 


1.035 


53 








50 


- 


Oceania 


10,212 


2,003 


9.171 


44,707 


19,611 


9 


1,215 


202 


547 


331 


55 


153 


661 


136 


2 


Auatralla 


49,293 


1,797 


7.218 


26,315 


11.536 


9 


375 


148 


331 




53 




131 


71 


1 


Mew Zealand 


19,619 


115 


1.153 


11.145 


5.030 


_ 


HI 


46 




4! 




161 


122 


21 




Fa<lflc lalaada 


7,671 


_ 


650 


4,776 


1,471 




731 










12 






1 


Other Oceania 


3,692 


21 


150 


l!771 


1,574 


- 




4 


11 


7 


- 


59 


1 


17 




Hot K.pcrt.d 


J12 


t 


4 


32 


. 


2 


4 


J 


1 




1 


1 




131 




























y Includea lal.an. 




































Port 


Number ..twitted 


for bviBlnfs, 


for pl-jasiire 


Other 


„, p„^, 


i 608 193 


220,414 


1.628.585 


759.194 


AU.nUc 












2,853 
34.512 
W.732 

1.927 
14,116 
287,752 

5,181 
925,431 

6.407 
23.106 
135,587 

1,551 
19,893 
15.028 

5,300 

83,309 


203 

5,608 

3,376 

50 

293 

7,157 

198 

124,542 

813 

81 

4.599 

7 

2.100 

229 

372 

3.050 


1 .643 
15.397 
27.859 

6,825 
213,576 

1 ,243 
462,881 

3,028 

7.972 

l!s27 
8.949 
2.6B2 
3.320 

62.394 








Charlotte AmaUe, V.l 

Cruz Bay. V.I 

Frederikoted. V.I 


'349 
6,996 


Newark. N.J 


3.740 










San Juan. P.R , 


53,544 


WsBhlngton. D. C 










17.865 




29,221 
34,311 
1,334 
1,669 

294.180 


661 
1.310 

38 
116 

40.278 


12,600 
19,478 
27,870 

i!j99 

145,024 






















108,378 




117!265 
107,785 
2,330 
24,210 
27,491 
491 

8.507 


1,367 

22,122 

4,991 

8 

6^276 
51 

1,682 


5,591 
56,247 

9.763 

10.059 

263 

2.403 


















8 984 




11 156 










Anchoraee 


8.106 
401 

353,753 


16 
17.797 


2,160 
264.412 


4,280 


Other Alaska 


142 




71,54'. 




23,568 

42,451 
2,641 

39.468 

55.603 
2,062 
2,295 

49.389 
1.335 
5.410 
8,924 
3.424 

12,140 
2,233 
2.468 

32.814 
4,704 

2!o93 
1,695 
9,355 
7.833 
2.797 
3,257 
1.940 
2,153 
8,155 
1,493 
1,267 
18,342 


423 
638 
54 
942 
9.862 
515 

2.438 

5 
164 

130 
35 
31 
252 
364 
81 
20 

166 
263 

28 

57 
131 
19 
55 
9 30 

7.923 


21,046 

l!831 
35,871 
25,654 

1^734 

37,307 

706 

7,737 
847 
11,226 
430 
2,239 
30,980 
2,920 
1,531 

834 
7,617 
6,105 
2 
2,467 
1,808 

6!707 
1,328 
1,018 
11,920 

318,260 


2 099 




3,607 




7 56 


Champlaln, N.V 


2,655 




274 




520 




9,644 




608 




5,327 




1 02 3 




2,533 


Lewlscon. N.Y 


1,768 


HasBena. N.V 

Nlagera Falls. N.Y 


198 
1,582 
1,420 




832 


Ogdensburg. N.Y 

Pembina. N.D 


272 




1,465 
2,795 




762 




1 16 




907 


Thousand laland Bridge. N.Y 

Trout River. N.Y 


1 ,317 
146 
194 




5,492 




22,566 


Brownsville Tex 


21.262 
41.747 
4,958 
1.715 
1.490 

47^746 
17.394 
96.750 
20 . 470 
4.069 
2.499 
67.386 
3.758 
5,364 

319 


627 
254 
315 
42 

91 
3.662 
719 
959 
166 
334 

544 
95 
56 

56 


17,532 
33.205 
4.096 
1,648 
1,353 
11,783 
40,398 
16.230 
93.533 
19.534 
3.689 
2.421 
64.720 
2.989 
5.U9 

218 


3,103 




8,288 




547 




25 




95 




267 




3,686 




445 




2,258 




7 70 




46 




61 




2,122 




674 


0th H lea Border 


179 




45 







69 



Gernany 

Greece 

Hungary 

IreUnd 

it«iy 

PoUnd 

Spein ..'...['....'.'....'..... 

United Klngdo. 

YugoaUvla 

Oiher Europe 

Chine U 

IndU 

Indonaaie , 

Iren 

tere«l 

-'•P«n 

Jord*"3/ 

ttoree , 

Lebenon 

PekUtan 

Philippines 

Hyukyu Islands 

El Salvador 

Panama 

Argentina 

Brail I ..'.......'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'..'. 

Chile 

Coloabia 

Other South America 

Africa 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt 
Other Africa 

lot Reported 

./ Includea Taiwan. 



70 



IITTED *r SEAPORTS, 



IrsUmt 

»"ly 

Pound 

S|-ln 

UnlC.d Klngdon 

U.S.S.R. (^rope «nd AalA) . 
YugoaUvlA 

Hong Kong 

India 

IndonaalA 

Iran 

Iiraat 

J-l-n 

Jordao j/ 

Fsklttan 

PhlUppin.. 

North Aaarlca 

He»tco 

Cuba 

Co«t« Itlca '. 

Ocher Central Aaarlca 

Other North Anerlca 

At-B*ntln. 

ColoBbia 

Ecuador 

Peru 

VenBEueU 

Other South AiMTlca 

Africa , 

Algeria 

Hlgarla , 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Kgypt) 
Other Africa 

New Zealand 

Pacific Ulanda (U.S. adn. ) . 



71 



: PORTS. RY COUNTRY i 



Portugal 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) 
YugOBlawla 

l"q 

Lebanon 

Syrian Arab Republic 

DocDlnlcan Republic 

El Salvador 

Brazil 

Colombia 

Peru 

Other South Anerlca 

Africa 

Algert* 

Nigeria ". 

United Arab Republic (Egypt 
Other Africa 

New Zealand !, 

Pacific Islands (U.S. adm. > 



72 





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73 



NDABIES BY STATE AND PORT: 






All ports U 

CANADIAN BORDBt 

Alaska 

Anchorage 

Eagle 

Fairbanks 

Haines 

Hyder 

Juneau 

Kecchlkan 

Skagway 

Tok 

Wrangell 

Idaho 

Porthlll 

Illinois ; 

Chicago 

Maine 

Bangor 

Brldgewater 

Calais 

Ferry Point 

HllUovn Bridge 

Coburn Core 

Easton 

Estcourt 

Forest City 

Fort Fairfield 

Fort Kent 

HasiUn 

Houlton 

Jackman 

Limestone 

Lubec 

Hadawaska 2/ 

Mars HUl-icnOKford Line 

Hontlcello 

Orient 

St.Aurelle 

St. Juste 

St. Pamphlle 

Van Buren 

Vanceboro 

Hlchlgan 

Algonac 

Alpena 

Afflherstburg 

Cheboygan 3/ 

Detour 4/ 7 

Detroit 

Ambassador Bridge .... 

Detroit & Canada Tunne 

Detroit City Airport . 

Detroit Metropolitan 
Airport 

Detroit River and 

River Rouge Terminal 

Hlchlgan Central Depot 

Houghton 

Isle Royala 

Mackinac Island j/ 

Marine City 

Marquette 

Port Huron 2/ 

Blue Water Bridge .... 

Canadian National 

Railway Station 

Roberts Landing 

Rogers City 6/ 

St. Clalr County Airport 
Sault Ste. Marie 



1.096 
4.753 
27,825 
6,065 
3,979 
U,83l 
23.496 
77.789 
248 



1,246 
1 ,678 
3.310 



10.933.171 



63.429 

165.810 

(2.726.532) 

2.327.546 

39B.986 

113,556 

26,635 

29,524 

15,383 

20,049 

16,554 

574,307 

1,003,481 

254.492 

537.963 

363.714 

189.882 

371,911 

2,928.618 

5.249 

6.247 

32.327 

28.460 



6.929.051 



34.8 



,966 



29,592 

103,132 

(1,707,300) 

1,446,803 

260,497 

85,079 

24,225 

16,538 

9,279 

14,545 

10,959 

367,375 

628,639 

196,892 

349 , 446 

201,767 

108,955 

215,695 

1,849,436 

3,518 

4,375 

20.254 

26.222 

32,620 

41,913 

614,139 

267,156 



1.004.120 



33,837 

62,678 

(1,019,232) 

880,743 

1 38 , 489 

28,477 

2,410 

12,986 

6,104 

5,504 

5,595 

206,932 

374,842 

57,600 

188,517 

161,947 

80,927 

156,216 

1,079,182 

1.731 

1.672 

12.073 

2,238 

2,225 

3,053 

360,254 

137,688 

8.407.850 



(11,140,890) 

3,998,165 

7,093,338 

4,989 



(5.126,709) 

1.452,381 

3,652,977 

1,258 



(6,014,181) 

2,545.784 

3,440,361 

3,731 



Minnesota 

Baudette 

Crane Lake 

Duluth 

Ely 

Grand Portage 

Indus 

Interi^tlonal Falls 2/ 

Lancaster 

Noyes 

Oak Island 7/ 

Pine Creek 7 

Ranler 

Roseau 

St. Paul 

Montana 

Chief Mountain 5/ 

Cut Bank (Airport) 

Del Bonlta 

Great Falls (Airport) 

Havre 

Morgan 

Ophelm 

Raymond 

RoosvlUe 

Scobey 

Sweetgrass 

Turner 

Whltetall 

WhUlash 

Wild Horse 

willow Creek 

New Kampshl re 

Pittsburg 

New York 

Alexandria Bay 7/ 

Black Rock 7 

Buffalo 

Buffalo Seaport 

Greater Buffalo Inter- 
Peace Bridge 

Cannons Corners 

Cape Vincent 

Chanplaln 

Chateaugay 

Churubusco 

Clayton 

Fort Covington 

Heart Island ^/ 

Hogansbu rg 

Jamison's Line 

Lewlston 2/ 

Hassena .7 

Mooers 

Niagara Falls 

fkinlclpal Airport 

Rainbow Bridge 2/ 

Whirlpool Rapids Bridge 21 

Ogdensburg 7. 

Oswego 4/ 

Rochester 

Municipal Airport 

Port Authority 

Rouses Point 

Syracuse 

Thousand island Bridge 

Trout River 

Watertown (Airport) 

Voungstown ^/ 



110 

796.039 

54.905 

259,735 

2,358 

49,991 

7,236 

34,164 

3.275 

102,111 

641.012 



360 
14,035 
15,842 
151,936 
78,262 
67,531 
22,169 
287.476 
20.002 
13,266 
2,805 
8,195 
7,374 

26.862 



13.968 

60.998 

.576.302 



.887.120 
101.512 
39.788 
106.547 
301 .174 
76.446 
305,028 
17,740 
,552,039 
905,271 
229,354 
619 



4.306,7 78 

1,202.504 

507,711 



613.361 



100.064 

2.211 

2,287 

1,874 

1 1 6 , 560 

78 

271 .590 

33.866 

145,485 



138 
10,408 
9.302 
71,789 
52,555 
29,071 
16.084 
154,737 
12,724 
10,696 
1 .365 
3.982 
5.484 

16.091 



7,117 

38,927 

(3,354,315 



2,459 
.351.782 
:*8,628 
15.245 
,685.636 
66.926 
21.347 
35,645 
155,373 
40,231 
181 ,794 
12,014 
931,165 
563,530 
119,765 



461 



2.567,211 
681,592 
303,835 



74 





All 




1 


State and port 


All 

Tof.l 


oersons cro 

41 l„n= 


Ing 




Total 














597,989 




1.436.910 


836.155 


600,755 




15.683 
19,047 
14.594 

190. 7B7 
33.645 
3.192 
1 2 . 306 
23,643 
2e,06B 
2,286 

HI ,409 
60,642 
47,397 

259,401 

245,924 
41 ,403 
17,860 
30,430 
55,335 
33.193 
592 


9,045 
12,085 
10,917 
55,903 
19.898 

8.618 

11.882 

17.411 

828 

68.651 

36.060 

25,568 

138,449 

132.274 

21 ,773 

5,946 

19,877 

30,836 

21,633 

185 


6,638 
6.962 
3.677 
134,884 
13,747 
2,183 
3,688 
11 ,761 
10,657 
I ,458 
42,7 58 
24.582 
21,829 
120,952 
113,650 
19,630 
11,914 
10,553 
24,499 
1 1 , 560 
407 

30,888 


Montreal, CJuebec 

Prince Rupert, B.C 

Toronto. Ontario 

(Malton Airport) 

Vancouver, B.C 

Victoria, B.C 

Winnipeg, Manitoba 


399,837 
31 ,800 

559.335 
134,430 
274,241 
37.267 

127.878.067 


263.093 

2.718 

416.416 
82.613 
50.918 
20,397 

77.586.112 


136,744 


1 


29,082 






. 


142,919 




51 ,817 


Grand Forks (Munlc Airport ) . 


223,323 
16,870 


„ . 




Mjtlri 




. . J 


50.291 .975 


, 




18.982.236 


12.370,185 






6.604,051 




Douclaa 2/ 


3,929,580 
11.760 
374,621 
1,169,365 
(8,797,501) 
5,929,534 
2,800,219 

6,335 

61 ,413 

4,582,080 

104,671 

12.658 

36.853.308 


2.161 ,080 

7,664 

1 38 , 506 

623,074 

(5,715,913) 

3.821,056 

1.852,694 

I ,676 

40,287 

3,663.171 

67.880 

897 

22.694.406 


1,768,500 


K1 


LochI 1 


4,09b 






236,1 15 


St^ J h~ 




546.291 






13.081 .588) 


H 




2.108.478 




Morley Avenue 

Nogales International 


947,325 








4,659 


T k Cat 


21.126 


Ohl 




918,909 


ri d 


26,509 

17.514 

986 


12.485 

1 ,346 

290 

3.113.056 


14.024 

16.168 

696 

1.831.798 




36,791 




Tucson Internatlor.al 






11,761 






14,158,902 


^'^ 


120,092 

78,860 

253,724 

249,289 

9.678 

105,793 

1,176,359 

110,368 

954.594 

30,631 

11,503 

326,890 

803,931 

437,654 

16,558 

258,930 


83,388 

67,583 

165,861 

158,040 

1,919 

66,926 
730,025 

74,585 
512,647 

18,855 

9,927 

215,290 

558,919 

8.609 
163,199 

4.142.409 


36,704 
11,277 
87,863 
91 ,249 
7,759 
38,867 
446,334 
35,783 
441,947 
11 ,776 
1 ,576 
1 1 1 , 600 
245,012 
160,371 
7.949 
95,731 

2.264.892 




547.839 
12,940,202 

1 30 , 1 50 

12,131 

22,581.850 

641,136 

271,419 


355.442 

9.813.278 

23.501 

2,059 

12,104,259 

395,867 

137.330 


192,397 






1,126,924 


h'^^pi 1 


Los Angeles (Airport) .. 


1 06 , 649 


F 1 1 


10.072 


er a 8 .. 




10,477,591 


Burlington rpo 




245,269 








,, d 


134,089 


c 




4.687 
266,732 

71.771.124 


3,192 
134,138 

42,376,191 


1,495 


HIghgate pr ngs ... 




132,594 








, _ 


29,394.933 


or r y . . . . 




9,572,997 

189 

35,877 

2,249,493 

5,343,657 

(31,954,882) 

5,566 

10,982,883 

18.702,733 

2,263.700 

503.446 

490,138 

49,659 

6,123,005 

15,733 

(11,362,255) 

11,345,371 

5,498 

11,386 

79.379 

5.715 

440.221 

955,151 

133,200 

2,373,110 

82,549 

468 


6,225,416 

56 

1 ,203 

1 ,010,897 

3.572,998 

(16,518,826) 

1,427 

4.392.488 

11.219.531 

905,380 

330,329 

1 46 , 346 

36,274 

. 4,284,708 

2,606 

(7,756,098 

7,748,270 

2,638 

5,190 

47,596 

2,500 

268,229 

571,859 

87,430 

1,509,474 

3,024 

322 


3.347,581 


Norton 


Corpus Chrlfitl 


133 







34,674 


St. Albans 

West BerkBh re 




1,238,596 






1,770,659 




El Paao 2/ 


115,436,056) 




64,940 

4.791 

(3,231,380) 

181,672 

3.049.708 

20.285 

45,199 

13,248 

161,716 

54,096 

342,122 

60,728 

233 

11,252 

448 , 300 

1,063,134 

2,639 

581 

67.821 

5,993 

808,715 

128 

1,532 


11,378 

1,078 

(2,050,117) 

120,721 

1 ,929,396 

14,217 

15,778 

7,170 

114,701 

25,216 

171,853 

28.725 

42 

4,666 

221,712 

969,743 

1,093 

51 

21,074 

2,683 

4»l,09l 

21 

663 


53.562 

3.713 

(1.181,263 

60,951 

1,120,312 

6,068 

29,421 

6.078 

47,015 

28,880 

170,269 

32,003 

191 

6,586 

226.588 

93,391 

1,546 

530 

46,747 

3,310 

327,624 

107 

869 


El Paso Airport 

Ave. of Americas 

(Cordova) 2/ 

Santa Fe Bridge 2/ ... 
Vsleta Bridge 2/ 


4,139 










Pacific Highway 


1 ,358,320 








Falcon Heights 2/ 

Fort Hancock 


343,792 






*^^^y 


Hidalgo 2/ 


1,838,297 


Frontier 


Houston Airport 


13,127 






Lynden 2 




3,597,101 


«' Ba' ' ' 


Municipal Airport 

Railroad Bridge 


2.860 










urovl I le 




3,215 






171,992 


Port Angeles 




383,292 




Rio Grande City 2/ 


45,770 


Spokane (Felts Field) 




San Antonio Airport 

San Ygnacio 


79.525 














1,532 


663 


869 










1/ Figures Include arrivals by p 
2/ Partially estimated. 
3/ July-September 1966 and April 
4/ July-November 1966 and June 1 
5/ July-September 1966 and June 


rlvate alrcraf 

-June 1967. 

967. 

1967. 


t at border p 













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76 



TABLE 20A. 



SPECIAL INQUIRY OFFICER HEARINGS COMPLETED, BY REGIONS AND DISTRICTS: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1963 - 1967 



Region 

and 

district 



Exclusion hearings 



1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 



Deportation hearings 



1963 



1964 



1965 



1966 



U.S. Total 

Northeast Region 

Boston, Mass 

Buffalo, N.Y 

Hartford, Conn 

Newark, N.J 

New York, N.Y 

Portland, Me 

St. Albans, Vt 

Southeast Region 

Atlanta, Ga 

Baltimore, Md 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Miami, Fla 

New Orleans, La 

Philadelphia, Pa. ... 

San Juan, P.R 

Washington, D.C 

Northwest Region 

Anchorage, Alaska ... 

Chicago , 111 

Detroit, Mich 

Helena, Mont 

Kansas City, Mo 

Omaha, Nebr 

Portland , Oreg 

St. Paul, Minn 

Seattle, Wash 

Southwest Region 

Denver, Colo 

El Paso, Tex 

Honolulu, Hawaii .... 
Los Angeles, Calif. . 

Phoenix, Ariz 

Port Isabel, Tex. . , . 
San Antonio, Tex. . . . 
San Francisco, Calif. 



979 



269 



33 
94 

7 
22 
90 
18 

5 

237 



4 
1 
3 
187 
9 
4 
22 
7 



13 

41 
1 
4 
1 
1 

24 

388 



1 
160 

5 
55 
10 
54 
89 
14 



951 



841 



87 6 



858 



12.805 



15.677 



18.961 



16.767 



156 



150 



136 



111 



4.981 



5.7 20 



7.809 



6.39 6 



30 
38 

4 
18 
49 
16 

1 

220 



167 



142 



199 

329 

104 

345 

3,980 

19 

5 

911 



319 

29 8 

121 

345 

4,604 

22 

11 

1,031 



319 

283 

129 

441 

6,605 

14 

18 

1^79 



382 

252 

152 

427 

5,158 

18 

7 

1.790 



6 

195 

3 

13 

1 



2 

78 
3 
7 

43 
6 

134 



54 
31 
113 
231 
68 
178 
114 
122 

1.276 



56 
64 
140 
267 
58 
171 
119 
156 

1.657 



54 
67 
143 
29 8 
48 
158 
183 
128 

1.775 



114 
124 
558 
75 
169 
467 
195 

2.222 



13 



497 



488 



501 



20 

43 

5 

6 

2 

2 

56 

471 



1 

545 

261 

18 

52 

61 

51 

79 

208 

5.637 



835 

299 

28 

62 

50 

54 

109 

220 

7.269 



1 

856 

326 

46 

72 

42 

49 

113 

270 

8.298 



10 
1,29 3 

334 
21 
70 
56 
73 
95 

270 

6.359 



4 

207 

3 

83 

9 

35 

140 

14 



3 

219 

4 

66 

12 

50 

117 

17 



3 
198 

3 
129 

9 

23 

131 

5 



132 

2 

100 

9 

30 

190 



83 

1,898 

23 

1,578 

102 

981 

352 

620 



102 

2,000 

45 

2,165 

106 
1,345 

454 
1,052 



47 
2,221 

40 
2,137 

97 

2,272 

440 

1,044 



47 

1,268 

34 

2,036 

88 

1,29 2 

689 

905 



77 



ALIENS EXCLUDED FROM THE UNITED STATES, BY CAUSE: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1892-1967 



£ln 1941-1953 figures represent all exclusions at sea and air ports 
and exclusions of aliens seeking entry for 30 days or longer at land ports 
After 1953 includes aliens excluded after formal heartngSj^/ 







.^ 
























.n 












3 
u 

x; 3 




u 




















u 




d 
































§ 








<u 




3 u 


^^ 










« 








a 




>, S iJ 








Period 


Total 


M 






01 







4-1 IJ (U 


^ 


"§ 2 




















COB 


























U 0) 














T) 






C u 




















O M 


























^ 




XJ 












a 




m 




« 
















o 




>^ U 




a u K 






































a 






S '^ 


» 































? % 














(U J3 


•n 3 




u C I- 




















tn 


< ■'^ a. 


u 




o 


1892 - 1967 


620,477 


1.305 


12,446 


8,185 


82,534 


219.350 


16,156 


181,583 


41.941 


13.679 


43.298 


1892 - 1900 


22,515 




65 


89 


1,309 


15,070 




. 


5,792 


. 


190 


1901 - 1910 


108,211 

178,109 

189,307 

68,217 


10 

27 

9 

5 


1,681 
4,353 
2,082 
1,261 


1,277 

4,824 

1,281 

253 


24,425 

42,129 

11,044 

1,530 


63,311 
90,045 
37,175 
12,519 


1,904 
8,447 
2,126 


94,084 
47,858 


12,991 

15,417 

6,274 

1,235 


5,083 

8,202 

258 


4,516 


1911 - 1920 


14,327 


1921 - 1930 


20,709 


1931 - 1940 


1,172 


1941 - 1950 


30,263 


60 


1,134 


80 


1,021 


1,072 


3,182 


22,441 


219 


108 


946 


1941 


2,929 
1,833 


- 


92 
70 


13 
10 


73 
51 


328 
161 


227 
252 


2,076 
1,207 


40 
26 


8 
9 


72 


1942 


47 


1943 


1,495 
1,642 


1 


68 
63 


6 
8 


63 
92 


96 
107 


11 
155 


1,106 
1,109 


26 
28 


8 
21 


44 


1944 


59 


1945 


2,341 

2,942 
4,771 
4,905 
3,834 
3,571 

20,585 


2 

1 
25 
31 

1,098 


87 

87 
139 
142 
187 
199 

1,735 


4 

3 
3 

5 
12 
16 

361 


HI 

65 
124 
205 
112 
125 

956 


56 

33 
70 
67 
99 
55 

149 


161 

361 
902 
709 
216 
122 

376 


1,805 

2,294 
3,316 
3,690 
2,970 
2,868 

14,657 


18 

13 
19 
11 
26 
12 

13 


23 

4 

11 

2 

9 

13 

26 


76 


1946 


80 


1947 


187 


1948 


73 


1949 


178 


1950 


130 


1951 - 1960 


1,214 


1951 


3,784 
2,944 
3,637 
3,313 
2,667 


29 

9 

48 

111 

89 


337 
285 
266 
296 
206 


15 
10 
27 
65 
124 


337 
67 
130 
127 
113 


78 
11 
15 
16 
9 


121 

74 

47 

2 

15 


2,783 
2,378 
2,937 
2,432 
1,832 


1 
5 
3 


3 
3 

3 

4 


80 


1952 


102 


1953 


164 


1954 


261 


1955 


275 


1956 


1,709 
907 
733 


117 
302 
255 


169 
91 
51 


64 
30 
18 


87 
40 
21 


14 
2 

1 


10 
14 
35 


1,079 
348 
299 


3 

1 


5 

7 
1 


164 


1957 


70 


1958 


51 


1959 


480 
411 


102 
36 


19 
15 


7 
1 


18 
16 


1 
2 


34 
24 


276 
293 


: 


- 


23 


1960 


24 


1961 


743 


21 


21 


3 


7 


1 


29 


634 


. 


. 


27 


1962 


388 
309 


13 
11 


24 
17 


2 
2 


23 
22 


1 
4 


17 
19 


280 
216 




2 


26 


1963 


18 


1964 


421 


16 


13 


4 


18 


- 


10 


343 




- 


17 


1965 


429 
512 


12 
10 


18 
20 


4 
2 


19 
21 


2 

1 


17 
16 


333 
415 






24 




27 


1967 


468 


13 


22 


3 


10 


' 


13 


322 






85 







78 



ALIENS EXCLUDED, BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH AND CAUSE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1967 



Country or region 
of birth 



i:^ 



All countries ... 

Europe 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Poland 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

Japan 

Philippines 

Taiwan 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic . 

Grenada 

Other West Indies . . 
British Honduras ... 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

South America 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Other South America 

Africa 

Oceania 



37 

269 

11 

18 



3 

198 

10 

17 



79 



ALIENS APPREHENDED, ALIENS DEPORTED, AND ALIENS REQUIRED TO DEPART: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1892-1967 





Aliens 
apprehended y 


A 1 I e 


n s e X p e 


lied 


Period 


Total 


Aliens 
deported 


Aliens required 
to depart 2/ 


1892 - 1967 


6,004,769 


6,682,840 


552,422 


6,130,418 


1892 - 1900 


128,484 
147,457 


3,127 

11,558 

27,912 

164,390 

210,416 


3,127 
11,558 
27,912 
92,157 

117,086 




1901 - 1910 


. 


1911 - 1920 


. 


1921 - 1930 

1931 - 1940 


72,233 
93,330 


1931 


22,276 
22,735 
20,949 
10,319 
11,016 
11,728 
13,054 
12,851 
12,037 
10,492 

1,377,210 


29,861 
30,201 
30,212 
16,889 
16,297 
17,446 
17,617 
18,553 
17,792 
15,548 

1,581,774 


18,142 
19,426 
19,865 
8,879 
8,319 
9,195 
8,829 
9,275 
8,202 
6,954 

110,849 


11,719 


1932 


10,775 


1933 


10,347 


1934 


8,010 


1935 


7,978 


1936 

1937 


8,251 
8,788 


1938 


9,278 


1939 


9,590 


19A0 


8,594 


1941 - 1950 


1,470,925 


1941 


11,294 

11,784 

11,175 

31,174 

69,164 

99,591 

193,657 

192,779 

288,253 

468,339 

3,584,229 


10,938 

10,613 

16,154 

39,449 

80,760 

116,320 

214,543 

217,555 

296,337 

579,105 

4,013,547 


4,407 

3,709 

4,207 

7,179 

11,270 

14,375 

18,663 

20,371 

20,040 

6,628 

129,887 


6,531 


1942 


6,904 


1943 


11,947 


1944 

1945 


32,270 
69,490 


1946 


101,945 
195,880 


1948 


197,184 




276,297 


1950 


572,477 


1951 - I960 


3,883,660 




509,040 

528,815 

885,587 

1,089,583 

254,096 

87,696 

59,918 

53,474 

45,336 

70,684 

88,823 
92,758 
88,712 
86,597 
110,371 
138,520 
161,608 


686,713 

723,959 

905,236 

1,101,228 

247,797 

88,188 

68,461 

67,742 

64,598 

59,625 

59,821 

61,801 

76,846 

81,788 

105,406 

132,851 

151,603 


13,544 
20,181 
19,845 
26,951 
15,028 

7,297 

5,082 

7,142 

7,988 

6,829 

7,438 
7,637 
7,454 
8,746 
10,143 
9,168 
9,260 



673,169 


1952 


703,778 




885,391 


1954 


1,074,277 
232,769 


1956 


80,891 
63,379 


1958 


60,600 




56,610 


1960 

1961 


52,796 
52,383 


1963 


54,164 
69,392 


1964 


73,042 


1965 

1966 

1967 


95,263 
123,683 
142,343 



y Aliens apprehended first recorded in 1925. Since 1960, deportable aliens located has 

Included nonwillful crewman violators. 
2/ Aliens required to depart first recorded in 1927. 



80 



ALIENS DEPORTED, BY COUtfTRY TO WHICH DEPORTED AND CAUSE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1967 



Country to which deported 



All countries 

Europe 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

Hong Kong 

India 

Iran 

Japan 

Korea 

Malaysia 

Philippines 

Taiwan 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Dominican Republic 

Jamaica 

Netherlands Antilles 

St. Christopher 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Other West Indies 

British Honduras 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

South America 

Argent Ina 

Chile 

Colombia 

Guyana 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Oceania 

Other Countries 



938 
5,423 



1,145 



471 
347 



81 



NATIONALITY AND CAUSE: 



and 90,185 ' 



All countries ... 

Belgium 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Ualy 

Netherlands 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 

China U 

India 

Iran 

Iraq 

Israel 

Jordan 2/ 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Thailand 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Hexlco 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic . 

Haiti 

Barbados 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Nicaragua 

South America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Guyana 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Uruguay 

Africa 

United Arab Republic 
Other Africa 

Auattalla 

Other Oceania 



2,874 
17,273 
1,'>2'> 
1,529 



82 



AU 



untr 



lurop* 

B<l|iUB 

D«na«rk 

rinUnd '■. 

franct 

C«rB«ny 

Craaca 

Hungary 

Iraland 

luly 

Natharlanda 

Norway 

roland 

Fortufal 

SfAln 

Swadan 

Svltiarland 

Turkay 

Unlcad Klngdoa 

Yu(oalavla 

Othar luropa 

Mia 

China 1/ 

India 

Iran 

Iraq 

laraal 

J»l»» 

Jordan J/ 

Koraa 

Labanon 

Halayala 

raklacan 

rhlUpplnaa 

Ochar Aala 

North AMFlca 

Canada 

Naxlco 

Cuba 

Doalnlcan Rapubllc . 

Haiti 

Jaaalca 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Coita tica 

II Salvador 

Guataaala 

Honduraa 

Nicaragua 

Panaaa 

South Aaarrlca 

Argentina 

Iraill 

Chll 

ColOBbla 

Ecuador 

Cuyana 

Paru 

Uruguay 

Vanaauala 

Othar South Aaerlca 

Africa 

Nlgarla 

Unltad Arab Rapubllc 
Othar Africa 

Ocaanla 

Auatralla 

Othar Ocaanla 

Othar countrlea 

i/ Includti TalMn. 
i> Includaa Arab Palei 



JiO_ 



360 



83 



Mliens required to depart totaled 1A2,343 (see table 23). 
were technical violators and 90.185 direct required departur 



his table does not Include 12,672 
under safeguards - chiefly Mexlca 



Country of destination 



All countries .. 

Europe 

Deniaark 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Iceland 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norvay 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

United Kingdom 

Other Europe 

Asia 

Hong Kong 

India 

Iran 

Israel 

Japan 

Korea 

Philippines 

Taiwan 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Netherlands Antllle 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Jamaica 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Antique 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Other West Indies . 

CoBta Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

British Honduras .. 

South America 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Guyana 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Oceania 

Other countries 



A07 
206 
UO 
232 
263 



'•60 
1,829 



5,455 

8,540 

227 



1.676 



394 
204 
110 
250 
262 



84 



ALIENS DEPORTED, BY COUNTRY TO WHICH DEPORTED AND DEPORTATION EXPENSE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1967 



ry to which deported 



Immigration 

and 

taturallzatlon 



All countries 

Denmark 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

Hong Kong 

India 

Iran 

Japan 

Korea 

Malaysia 

Philippines 

Taiwan 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Ant 1 gua 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Dominican Republic 

Jamaica 

Netherlands Antilles 

St. Christopher 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Other West Indies 

British Honduras 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

South America 

Argentina 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Guyana 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Oceania 

Other countries 



938 
5,423 



852 
5,309 



85 



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ALIENS DEPORTED, BY COUNTRY TO WHICH DEPORTED: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1958-1967 



Country to which deported 



1958- 
1967 



81.605 



14.509 



225 
202 
969 

139 

2,097 

422 

486 

378 

1,341 

188 

266 

1,129 

275 

548 

3.496 



937 
176 
135 
346 
87 
110 
130 
102 
460 
419 
594 

60.840 



All countries 

Europe 

Denmark 

France 

Ge rma ny 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

Hong Kong 

India 

Iran 

Japan 

Jordan 

Korea 

Malaysia 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Taiwan 

Other Asia 

No rth Aner lea 

Canada 

Mexico 

Ant Igua \l 

Bahamas , 

Barbados 

Dominican Republic 

Jamaica , 

Netherlands Antilles ..., 

St. Christopher 1/ , 

Trinidad and Tobago . . . . , 

Other West Indies 

British Honduras 

Costa Rica , 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

South America 

Argent Ina 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Guyana 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Oceania 

Other countries 



1/ Included In Other West Indies in 1958. 



10,337 
44,116 
201 
461 
270 
751 
7?5 
130 
144 
287 
1,322 
693 
104 
342 
342 
250 
84 
211 



189 
124 
302 
619 
126 
72 
226 
180 



7.142 



7,438 



7.637 



7.454 



8.746 



1.630 



2.008 



1,541 



409 
70 



18 
15 
91 

610 
14 

282 



1.676 



255 
47 



1,503 



1.015 



1.150 



1.213 



1.450 



103 
706 



1,060 
3,246 



992 
3,608 



1,151 
3,404 



1.206 
3,743 



1.098 
4,405 



1,003 
5,557 



1,044 
6,518 



6.705 



964 
4,770 



158 
207 



87 



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90 



ALIEN CREWMEN DESERTED AT UNITED STATES , 
BY NATIONALITY AND FLAG OF CARRIER: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 196T 



ND SEAPORTS, 





Tot.. 


FUk of carrier from which deserted 


Nationality 
of 




I 


■s 


! 


I 


J 


: 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


1 


i 


% 


^ 


Number deserted 


4.565 


1.500 


619 


540 


499 


269 


218 


159 


153 


123 


87 


54 


34 


3j 


30 


29 


25 


^, 


172 


Euro e 


3.29 2 


1.061 


489 


525 


107 


?4R 


138 


127 


77 


101 


27 


51 


14 






29 






69 


. 


8 

91 
33 
12 
224 

Lies 

5 

23 

137 

69 

298 

5 

54 

335 

71 

3 

15 

377 

57 

4 

840 


2 

3 

24 

848 

2 
38 
6 

5 

3 

2 
45 

354 


17 
12 

20 

278 
94 


520 

1 
2 


1 

3 
2 

9 

2 

2 
22 

252 

156 


169 

5 

3 
2 

1 
6 


2 
54 

34 

24 
2 

8 


5 
1 

3 
20 
58 

5 
2 
I 


1 

48 
20 

68 


69 

5 
18 

1 


1 

6 

1 

11 

1 
47 


3 

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- 


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^ 


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Oh Eu 




, 






700 

13 

8 
10 
35 
14 


334 

3 
3 
2 

3 
5 

57 


72 


3 


137 
13 

1 

1 


] 


24 


2 
2 


65 


3 


23 

24 


1 


': 


-_ 


30 




2 
1 
















in 


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, 


Mfll 




P kl t 








Other Asia 




^,,^^,,,,, 






67 
17 
1 

4 
22 
17 

5 

76 
108 


9 

5 

3 
1 

7 
22 
17 


- 
5 

14 


2 


1 
3 

3 

12 
3 


- 
1 

2 
3 

6 


3 

14 
5 

14 


5 
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2 
1 

17 


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3 


- 
2 


~_ 


: 


31 
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-_ 


- 


- 
- 


19 


















, 












. 












2 




„ 






South America 






11 
9 
16 
36 
15 
11 

3 


2 
I 

2 
1 


I 
3 


': 


2 




7 
3 


3 
1 




1 
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2 


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1 


\ 


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13 










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1 
2 

3 

5 

11 


2 

2 
1 




1 


3 


1 


1 


1 
? 


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1 






': 


': 


: 


: 
































Oceania 








1 
5 


3 


" 


I 


2 


" 




- 


1 


- 


' 


- 


- 


- 


" 























by Service 0££i 



91 



VESSELS AND AIRPLANES INSPECTED, CREWMEN ADMITTED, ALIEN CREWMEN DESERTED, 
AND ALIEN STOWAWAYS FOUND, BY LOCATION: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1967 



/^Each arrival of the same carrier or crewman counted separately/ 



Location 


Vessels and airplanes 
Inspected on arrival 


Crewmen admitted 


Allen y 
crewmen 
deserted 


Allen 
stowaways 




Vessels 


Airplanes 


Aliens 


Citizens 


found 


United States Total 


76,890 


261, 947 


2,036877 


1,009,682 


4,565 


123 


Northeast Region 


16,758 


52,540 


694,607 


231,242 


1,802 


58 




I,3A1 
3,8A6 

191 

5 

5,683 

5,199 

493 

31.025 


4,148 
7,363 
382 
2,480 
32,079 
2,683 
3,405 

82,665 


42,404 

18,013 

6,962 

3,134 

594,293 

29,801 

741,078 


15,431 

8,612 

657 

13,727 

187,089 

5,726 

320,530 


158 

12 

33 

502 

1,036 

60 

1 

1,800 




Buffalo, N.Y 


1 


Newark, N.J 

New York, N.Y 


9 
46 


St. Albans, Vt 




Southeast Region 


34 




2,063 
1,A64 
2,250 
11,573 
2,311 
1,702 
8,116 
1,546 

17,894 


685 

336 

5,052 

44,213 

1,753 

1,229 

27,421 

1,976 

43.656 


63,292 
51,319 
61,446 

251,046 
72,912 
63,954 

129,895 
47,214 

181,936 


15,020 

7,788 

6,270 

115,362 

22,040 

7,016 

127,657 

19,377 

110,108 


121 
259 

38 
312 
535 
337 

98 
100 

312 


1 




2 




3 


Miami, Fla 








Philadelphia, Pa 


A 


San Juan, P.R 

Washington, D.C 

Northwest Region 


24 
1 




1,290 

701 

3,909 

1,074 

224 

10,696 

10.066 


4,828 

4,680 

7,649 

2,863 

196 

60 

670 

11,623 

11,087 

51,571 


30,483 

35,194 

23,706 

476 

92 

23 

31,934 

4,888 

55,140 

303,452 


25,286 

12,787 

12,939 

4,575 

96 

78 

8,222 

4,746 

41,379 

222,577 


62 
14 

159 
20 

57 

651 




Chicago, 111 














1 










St. Paul, Minn 






. 


Southwest Region 


11 




1,237 
4,885 

2,478 

1,466 

1,147 


336 
2,189 
10,828 
13,209 
5,876 
4,607 
9,091 
5,435 

31,515 


225 

94 

65,096 

114,385 

1,870 

75,357 

5,065 

41,360 

115,804 


645 
72 
70,328 
47,713 
3 
20,650 
15,228 
67,938 

125.225 


19 

214 

236 
182 


1 






Honolulu, Hawaii 


3 


Los Angeles, Calif 


1 


Port Isabel, Texas 

San Antonio, Texas 

San Francisco, Calif 

Prelnspectlon offices 


1 
5 




21 
6 

2 
1,118 


2,362 
7,392 
5,959 
12,442 
2,395 

965 


15,656 
19,443 
12,603 
42,756 
5,027 
19,662 
657 


13,426 
23,761 
24,907 
23,204 
11,972 
22,202 
5,753 


- 


. 


Montreal, Canada 




Toronto, Canada 

Vancouver, Canada 


- 




. 


Border Patrol Sectors 


19 







1^/ Includes deserting crewmen reported by ships' masters and those found In the United States by 
Service officers. 



92 





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93 



IINTRIES, BY C0IIN1KV OF EMBARKATION: 





By 8 e 


a and air 


y sea 








Country of embarkation 


Total 




CltUena 


Total 


Aliens 


Citizens 


Total 


Allen. 


Citizens 


^1, „„„„,,, 


6.627.010 


2,553,472 


4,073,538 


753,948 


228,716 


525,232 


5.873.062 


2,324,756 


3,548,306 


Euro , 




1 .085.870 


1,672,319 


257.727 


117,415 


140.312 


2.500.462 


968,455 


1,532,007 




6,995 

62,911 

16 

883 

103,366 

3,637 

378,901 

407,969 

54,795 

79,707 

119,529 

248,274 

2,226 

194 

152.113 

17.643 

2,742 

96,381 

1 

135,469 

16,083 

87,731 

6,007 

771,255 

127 

2,074 

481,947 


1.369 

25.155 

16 

555 

51,241 

2,501 

127,714 

145,211 

262 

25,827 

37,347 

37,504 

93,493 

1,537 

47 

67,991 

7,648 

2,194 

32,772 

61,523 
9,122 
32,657 

786 

320,051 

127 

1,220 

218,468 


5.626 
37.756 

328 

52,125 

1,136 

251,187 

262,758 

898 

28,968 

42,360 

82.025 

154,781 

689 

84,122 

9,995 

548 

63,609 

1 

73,946 

6,961 

55,074 

5,221 

451 ,204 

854 

263,479 


1 ,009 

2,995 
198 
45,978 
24,732 
1,160 
11,889 
31 
2,552 
53,034 

19,024 
4.370 
2.742 
4.968 

12,435 
4,104 

45 
65,802 

659 

22,263 


595 

1,500 

164 

14,422 

10,348 

262 

8.090 

25 

596 

23.626 

8.891 
1,751 
2,194 
3,142 

8,783 
2,271 

37 
30,158 

560 

11,877 


414 

1.495 

34 

31.556 

14.384 

898 

3,799 

6 

1,956 

29,408 

10,133 

2,619 

546 

1,826 

3,652 
1,833 

8 
35.644 

99 

10,386 


6.995 

61.902 

16 

100,371 

3,439 

332,923 

383,237 

42,906 
79,676 
116,977 
195,240 
2,226 
194 
133,089 
13,273 

91,413 

1 

123,034 

11,979 

87,731 

5.962 

705.453 

127 

1.415 

459.684 


1.369 
24.560 

555 

49.741 

2.337 

113,292 

134,863 

17,737 
37,322 
36,908 
69,867 

1,537 

47 

59,100 

5,897 

29,630 

52,740 

6,851 

32,657 

749 

289,893 

127 

660 

206,591 


5,626 




37,342 








328 




50,630 


Fi I d 


1,102 


F 


219,631 


^ 


248,374 




_ 




25,169 




42,354 


1 H 


60,069 




125,373 




669 




147 




73,989 




7,376 


1 H 






61,783 


S Hfl I o 


1 




70,294 




5,128 




55,074 




5,213 




415,560 


U.S.S.R 


755 




253,093 




6 
125 

13 

171 

23,806 

5,156 

42 

2,668 

140 

31,162 

331,132 

1,325 

4,637 

125 

109 

298 

46,024 

14,423 

352 

464 

1,893 

4,822 

2,228 

10,826 

18,878 


6 

8 

120 

10,813 

3,794 

42 

1,071 

32 

11,559 

162,207 

580 

1,650 

46 

12 

60 

20,756 

1,514 

108 

168 

749 

1,174 

248 

1,707 

6.474 


81 

5 

51 

12,993 

1.362 

1,597 

108 

19,603 

168,925 

745 

2,987 

79 

97 

238 

25,268 

12,909 

244 

296 

1,144 

3,648 

9!ll9 

12,404 


6 

161 

2,763 

123 

39 

4.378 

11 .076 

17 

6 

50 

3 
3,029 

41 
367 

204 
1,073 


6 

110 

1,469 

102 

36 

2,211 
6,406 

10 
1 

19 

3 

30 
154 

202 
532 


51 

1,294 

21 

3 

2,167 

4,670 

7 

5 

31 

1 .911 

11 
213 

2 
541 


125 
13 

10 

21.043 

5.033 

42 

2,629 

140 

26,784 

320,056 

1,308 

4,631 

75 

109 

295 

42,995 

14,423 

352 

423 

1,526 

4,822 

2,228 

10,622 

17,805 


44 
8 

10 
9,344 
3,692 

1,035 

32 

9.348 

155.801 

570 

1.649 

12 

57 

19.638 

1,514 

108 

138 

595 

1 ,174 

248 

1,505 

5,942 


_ 




81 




5 




_ 


HonB Konn 


11,699 




1,341 




















































244 


















VI t 


9,117 




11,663 




113 

257 

122 

356 

190 

21 

1,158 

15 

373 

676 

2,618 

2,093 

668 

42 

2,494 

1,376 

1,914 

6 

1,763 

6 

89 

51 

181 

340 

1,952 


33 
3 

123 
48 
142 
112 

622 

5 

179 

215 

937 

186 

253 

6 

970 

19 

773 

5 

913 

1 

13 

27 

198 
614 


80 

1 

134 

74 

214 

78 

21 

536 

10 

194 

461 

1,681 

1,907 

415 

36 

1,524 

1,357 

1,141 

1 

850 

5 

76 

24 

104 

142 

1,338 


4 
122 

36 

21 
63 
129 

211 
42 

2 

6 
385 

1 

51 


3 
48 

30 

17 
24 
71 

74 
6 

5 
206 

1 

47 


74 

6 

39 
58 

137 
36 

1 
179 


113 

257 

356 

190 

21 

1,122 

15 

352 

613 

2,489 

2,093 

457 

2,494 
1,374 
1,914 

1,378 
5 
89 
51 
181 
340 
1,901 


33 

123 

142 
112 

592 
5 
162 
191 
866 
186 
179 

970 
19 

773 

707 

13 

27 

198 

567 
















Congo, Republic of the 


214 

78 




21 


Ghana 


530 


















Libya 


1,907 
278 












1,355 




1,141 








671 




5 




76 




24 




104 








1,334 







94 



AIR. FROM FOREIGN COLFNTKIES. BY COUNTRY OF EMBARKATION: 



Country of embar 



American Samoa 

Australia 

Chrlatmaa Uland 

FIJI 

Nauru 

New Caledonia 

New Zea I and 

Pacific Ulanda (U.S. Adn.) 

Polynesia French 

Wake and Hldway Ulanda 

North America 

Canada 

Greenland 

Mexico 

Vest Indloa 

Barbados 

Bermuda 

Cayman Islands 

Dominican Republic 

Guadeloupe 

Haiti 

L«eward Islands: 

Antigua 

British Virgin Islands . 

St. Christopher 

Martinique 

Netherlands West Indies .. 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Turks and Calcos Islands . 
Windward Islands: 

Dominica 

St. Lucia 

St. Vincent ' 

Central America 

British Honduras 

Canal Zone and Panama .... 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

South America 

Argentina ....; 

Bolivia 

Brail I 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Guyana 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Surinam (Netherlands Guiana) 

Venezuela 

Cruise 

Bahamas 

Bermuda 

Caribbean 

Europe and Mediterranean ... 

Far East 

Southern South America 

World cruise 

Other countries 

Flag of Carrier: 

United States 



2.515.013 



74,482 

2,537 

621,107 

(1,618,2141 

650,481 

33,631 

208,314 

8,334 

39,795 

132,172 

12,639 

18,629 

294,511 



9,650 
7,366 
58,676 



19 
(I98.b73i 
7,079 
80,471 
14,706 
18,084 
52,577 
16,120 
9,636 

357.792 



34.330 
3,114 
55,456 
17,802 
69,943 
23,778 
1,322 
1,873 
50,386 
603 



362.490 



186.864 
22,258 
117,461 
16,678 
5,070 
4,829 



13,602 
9,535 
10,889 



225,690 
(537,5161 
110,793 



7.112 
4.231 
22,944 
21,156 



33,216 
10,562 
6,562 



38.895 

2,451 

395,417 

1,080,698 

539,688 

18,646 

183,152 

5,493 

3,578 

29,724 

5,903 

7,727 

187,397 



19,361 
5,558 
3,074 

120,046 



10,220 
1,239 
22,306 
4,513 
21,377 
6,192 
443 
669 



336.437 



176.526 
21,578 
105,598 
15,292 
4,226 
4,389 
1,747 



(10.778) 
9,635 



362.490 



186,864 
22,258 
117,461 
16,678 
5,070 
4,829 
1 ,866 
7,464 



9,791 
1,422 



(3,121 
2,434 



(7.657) 
7.201 



176.526 
21,578 

105.598 
15,292 



12,822 
27,749 
17,795 



62,363 

2,537 

620,091 

.556,918 

639.747 

33.530 

204.024 

8,334 



9,223 
6,900 
56,894 
35.300 



351 .592 



33.450 
3.114 
54,053 
17,661 
69,483 
23.134 
1,315 
1,873 
49,749 



9,314 
6,848 
10,889 



27,950 

86 

225,041 

(495.222! 

106,738 

14.933 

23,618 

2,841 

36,044 

102,314 

6,453 



6,712 
3,S58 
21,698 
20,918 



34.413 

2,451 

39 5.050 

1.061.696 

533.009 

16.597 

180.406 

5.493 

3,570 

29.482 

5.781 

7.672 

187,148 



2,511 
3,042 
35.196 



(87.587) 
3,155 
44,136 
6,185 
6,435 
19,324 
5,282 
3,070 



95 



COUNTRIES, BY COUNTRY OF DEBARK 





B V 8 






By sea 




8 V air 








Citizens 


Total 


Aliens 


Citizens 


Total 


Aliens 


Citizens 




6.177,410 


2.144,127 


4.033.283 


712.667 


186,690 


525,977 


5.464,743 


1,957.437 


3,507.306 






932,137 


1,632.700 


238.022 


97.984 


140,038 


2,326,815 


834,153 


1.492,662 




7,003 

59.09<. 

1,035 

113,387 

4,223 

310.905 

378,840 

1,497 

45.813 

98 

75.011 

113,352 

233.296 

1.402 

288 

152.532 

22.878 

1.827 

84,877 

93,431 

18,668 

84,133 

5,597 

753,542 

90 

2,016 

465.720 


974 

21,028 

350 

52,188 

2,253 

119,540 

128,496 

380 

3 

31.476 

32.485 

70.959 

1.304 

93 

61.514 

8.347 

1.486 

16.908 

31.383 

9.465 

28.717 

772 

296.336 

75 

795 

167.564 


6.029 

38.066 

685 

61,199 

1,970 

191,365 

250,344 

1,117 

31,003 

95 

43,535 

80,867 

162,339 

98 

195 

91,018 

14,531 

341 

67.969 

62.048 

9.203 

55.416 

4.825 

457.206 

15 

1.221 

298.156 


1.431 

2.780 
140 
40.709 
21.936 
1.497 
8,468 

33 
4.176 
49,097 

94 
17,144 
5,470 
1,654 
6,252 
7,899 
4,647 

64.012 

506 

17.199 


658 

1,165 
99 
14,096 
10,057 
380 
3,758 

25 
1,013 
18,249 

48 

2,123 
1,429 
2,565 
4,844 
2,104 

62 
26,988 

310 

6.943 


773 

1,615 

26,613 
11,879 
1.117 
4,710 

8 
3.163 
30.848 

9.133 
3.347 
225 
3.687 
3.055 
2,543 

15 

37.024 

196 
10.256 


7,003 
57,663 

1,035 
110.607 

4,083 
270,196 
356.904 

37,345 

98 

74,978 

109,176 

184,201 

1,402 

194 

135,388 

17,408 

173 

78,625 

85,532 

14,021 

84,133 

5,520 

689.530 

90 

1,510 

448,521 


974 
20,370 
350 
51,023 
2,154 
105.444 
116.439 

11,052 

3 

31,451 

31,472 

52,710 

1,304 

45 

53,503 

6,224 

57 

14.343 

26.539 

7.361 

28.717 

710 

269,348 

75 

485 

160.621 






37.293 












1,929 




164.752 




238,465 












95 








77,704 




131.491 




98 




149 












116 












6.660 






Turkey 


4,810 


U.S.S.R 


15 
1,025 




287.900 




10 

62 

11 

3 

135 

10,511 

1.662 

41 

2.986 

62 

42.837 

320.742 

912 

5.123 

333 

15 

636 

44,773 

9,162 

485 

89 

963 

7,189 

7,350 

9,628 


18 

57 

3,103 

519 

25 

794 

21 

11.067 

134,211 

409 

1 ,457 

56 

94 
12,886 
340 
65 
26 
215 
812 
624 
758 

4.809 


6 

44 

10 

2 

78 

7.408 

1,143 

16 

2,192 

41 

31,770 

186,531 

503 

3,666 

277 

14 

542 

31.887 

8,822 

420 

63 

748 

6,377 

6.726 

16.761 


10 

135 

2.238 

274 

3.557 

7.408 

68 

144 

6 

49 
2.993 
4 
11 
87 
132 
29 
29 
25 

1.692 


4 

57 
655 
173 

1,428 

2,995 

15 

51 

5 

13 
1,442 

25 
49 

3 
22 

5 

467 


6 

1,583 
101 

2,129 

4,413 

53 

93 

1 

36 
1,551 
4 
10 
62 
83 
26 

20 

1.225 


62 
11 
3 

8,273 

1.388 

41 

2,986 

62 

39,280 

313,334 

844 

4,979 

327 

15 

567 

41,780 

9.156 

831 
7.160 
7.321 
9.603 

19,876 


18 

1 

2.446 

346 

25 

794 

21 

9.639 

131.216 

394 

1,406 

51 

1 

11,444 
340 
64 
1 
166 
809 
602 
753 

4.342 


_ 




44 
















5,825 




16 




2,192 




41 
29,641 




182,118 




450 


Lebanon 


3.573 












506 




30.336 




8.818 




410 








665 




6,351 




6,719 


Vietnam 


8,850 




15.536 




168 

337 

46 

91 

389 

130 

1,322 

56 

459 

838 

3,483 

2.080 

2.294 

69 

2,493 

45 

2.302 

1,630 
25 
73 
404 
271 
2,557 


30 
104 

18 

28 
124 

58 
302 

13 
149 
208 
766 
154 
457 

11 
682 

15 

647 

2 

615 

6 

13 

36 

97 
274 


138 

233 

28 

63 

265 

72 

1,020 

43 

310 

630 

2,717 

1,926 

1.837 

58 

1,811 

30 

1,655 

6 

1,015 

19 

60 

368 

174 

2.283 


46 

29 

33 
92 

129 
21 

593 
69 
60 
45 
25 

500 
42 


18 

15 

6 

59 

3 

119 

21 
15 

184 
12 


28 

33 
86 
70 
18 

474 
58 
39 
30 
23 
6 

316 

30 


168 
337 

91 

389 

130 

1,293 

56 

426 

746 

3.354 

2.059 

1.701 

2,433 

2,277 

1,130 
25 
73 

271 
2,515 


30 
104 

56 
287 

13 
149 
202 
707 
151 
338 

661 

645 

431 
6 
13 
36 
97 

262 


138 




233 






Congo 


63 
265 


Dahoney 


72 
1.006 








277 




544 




2.647 


Libya 


1 .908 
1.363 








1.772 






Senegal 


1,632 




699 


Tanganyika 


19 
60 




366 








2,253 







96 



HEICN COUNTRIES. 



:i"J1TY OF DEBARKATION; 



Oceania 

American Samoa 

ChrlsEmai Island 

FIJI 

Gilbert and Elllce !■ 

New Caledonia 

New Zealand 

Pacific Islanda lU.S. 
Polynesia French . . . . 
Wake and Midway Ulan 

North America 

Canada 

Greenland 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Barbados 

Bermuda 

Cayman Islands 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Ha 1 1 1 

Leeward Islanda: 

Antigua 

British Virgin Is 
St. Christopher . 

Martinique 

Netherlands Vest Ini 
Trinidad and Tobago 
Turks and Calcos la 
Windward Islands: 
Dominica 

St. Lucia 

St. Vincent 

Central America 

British Honduraa ., 
Canal Zone and Panai 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Hondura 

Nicaragua 

South America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Guyana 

Paraguay 

Pern 

Surlnan (Neth. Guiana' 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 

Cruise 

Bahamas 

Bermuda 

Ca r 1 bbean 

Europe and Medlterrant 

Far East 

Southern South Amerlci 

World cnjlse 

Other countries 

Flag of Carrier: 



1,570 
156 
(19?, 445) 
6,322 
94,548 
8,856 
17,637 

14,996 



49,908 
13,449 
59.613 
16,112 
2,527 
1,949 
45,269 

3.201 



16.314 

2 

25.961 



3.294 
58 . 309 
3,874 
7,277 



740 
69 
(93. 745) 
3,014 
15,553 
4,965 
10,360 
25,431 
9,042 
5,380 

195,263 



20,406 
3,916 
20.676 



48.830 
13,134 
59.069 
15.500 



21.693 
713 

28,756 
9,381 

38,559 

11,129 
1,265 
1,181 

29,866 
397 



339,' 



180.360 
21,683 

103.443 
15.060 
5.062 



97 



PASSENCEB TRAVEL BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND FOREIGN CIJUNTRIES, 
BY SEA AND AIR, BY PORT OF ARRIVAL OR DEPARTItRE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 196 7 



ARRIVED 

Alaska , Anchorage 

Calif.. Lob Angelee 

San Diego 

San Francisco 

Conn., Hartford 

O.C, Dulles International Alrporl 

Washington 

Fla., Miami 

Port Everglades 

Tampa 

West Palm Beach 

Ca., Atlanta 

Havall, HoMluIu 

III., Chicago 

La., Neu Orleans 

m., Baltimore 

Hass., Boston 

Mich., Detroit 

Minn., St. Paul 

N.J., McGulre A.F.B 

Newark .* 

N.Y., New York 

Niagara Falls 

Ohio, Cleveland 

Pa., Philadelphia 

P.R., San Juan 

S.C, Charleston 

Tex., Brownsville 

Corpus Chrlstl 

Dallas 

Houston 

San Antonio 

Va. , Norfolk 

V.I., Charlotte Amal la 

Frederlksted 

Wash., Seattle 

Other ports 

DEPARTED 

Alaska , Anchorage 

Arlr., Tucson 

Calif., Lob Angeles 

San Diego 

San Francisco 

Conn., Hartford 

D.C., Dulles International Airport 

Washington 

Fla.. Miami 

Port Everglades 

West Palm Beach 

Ca., Atlanta 

Guam, Agana 

Hawaii, Honolulu 

III., Chicago 

La., New Orleans 

Md., Baltimore . 

Mass., Boston 

Mich., Detroit 

Minn., St. Paul 

N.J., HcCulre A.F.B 

Newark 

Niagara Falls 

Ohio, Cleveland 

Pa., Philadelphia 

P.R., San Juan 

S.C, Charleston 

Tex.. Brownsville 

Corpus Chrlstl 

Dallas 

Houston 

San Antonio 

Va., Norfolk 

V.I., Charlotte Amalle 

Frederlksted 

Wash., Seattle 

Other ports 



121.579 


94.754 


11.094 


3,635 


316.499 


132,438 


5,021 


2,752 


107, 83B 


34.443 


2,799 


1.244 


58,053 


20.643 


3,750 


849 


1,062,448 


378,393 


129,712 


2o,9BO 


3,662 


1,055 


59,930 


15,038 


2,455 


117 


36,742 


20,059 


325,414 


155,095 


262,582 


77,695 


92,500 


31,399 


20,601 


2.668 


134,552 


43,765 


40,196 


12,153 


2,033 


137 


117.406 


10,538 


32,490 


1.656 



35,123 




626 


289,078 


185 


666 


16,747 




645 


4,365 




905 


3,459 




083 


39,491 




077 


51,287 


23 


326 


115,981 


35 


301 


5,817 




991 


76,295 


45 


376 


22,804 


15 


038 


62,922 


26 


789 


26,262 


9 


954 



157,737 


96,602 


10,726 


3,914 


299,588 


120.563 


13,150 


4,931 


33,733 


9,301 


1,324 


43 


48,459 


1 3 , 1 69 


4,779 


907 


968,455 


317,827 


86,930 


18,492 


8,236 


2,827 


48,345 


4,179 


1,444 


33 


58.020 


19,388 


317,445 


145,882 


251.440 


63,951 


84,380 


26,914 


20,226 


950 


167,091 


45,085 


20 , 709 


3,572 


2,721 


67 


85,545 


5,270 


28,292 


1,583 


2,768,950 


967,693 


3,319 


I ,678 


5,939 


254 


24,758 


3,621 


202,579 


110,606 


1 5 , 660 


581 



56,745 


22,885 


102,706 


33.756 


6,057 


805 


103,890 


44,792 


24,005 


14,847 


60,273 


16,788 


29,003 


9,486 



6,583 
1,650 
11,174 



1,372 

115 

4,936 



11,864 
2.701 



5,211 
1,535 
6,238 



5.873.062 2,324.756 3,548,306 



937,233 
73,136 
3,225 
58,250 



30,455 
1,197 
20,643 



30.829 
294,567 
262,582 

86,938 



49,317 


22,710 


115,981 


35,301 


3,969 


331 


20,256 


11,852 


22,797 


15,031 



10,726 
282,451 
13,150 
30,151 



841,895 
37,599 
8 ,,236 
46,019 



251,440 

77,797 

18,576 

155,917 

20,658 

2,721 

85,545 

28,292 

,411,331 

3,319 

5,797 

24,478 

186,383 



3,063 
47,250 
56.740 
102.706 



117 
14.537 
137.309 
77,695 
30,281 
2,008 
42,111 
11,999 
137 
10,538 



3,914 

1 1 5 , 290 

4,931 

8,420 



308 , 778 
3.962 

2.82/ 



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:SSf:sgS 



r<fPS2S^SS'°S^ 



:S3SSS28S8: 



JKSS S; 









I , 2 S S| ti j^-3 



s s :? •=; ^ 5 ^ . 



i-ssssss-s 



100 



; 5 1? 



I960. 19hJ. 19W. l')f.5, 



101 



TABLE 37. DECLARATIONS OF INTENTION FILED, PETITIONS FOR NATURALIZATION FILED, 
PERSONS NATURALIZED, AND PETITIONS FOR NATURALIZATION DENIED: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1907 _ 19(S7 



Period 


Declara- 
tions 
filed 


Petitions 
filed 


Persons naturalized 


Petitions 




Civi 1 ian 


Mi 1 i tarv 


Total 


denied 


1907 - 1967 


8,634,223 


9,058.182 


7,988,305 


529,457 


8,517,762 


457,668 


1907 - 1910 


526,322 


164,036 


111,738 




111,738 


17,702 


1911 - 1920 


2,686,909 


1,381,384 


884,672 


244,300 


1,128,972 


118,725 


1921 - 1930 


2,709,014 


1,884,277 


1,716,979 


56,206 


1,773,185 


165,49 3 


1931 - 1940 


1,369,479 


1,637,113 


1,498,573 


19,891 


1,518,464 


45,792 


1931 


106,272 
101,345 
83,046 
108,079 
136,524 
148,118 
176,195 
150,673 
155,691 
203,536 

920,284 


145,474 
131,062 
112,629 
117,125 
131,378 
167,127 
165,464 
175,413 
213,413 
278,028 

1,938,066 


140,271 
136,598 
112,368 
110,867 
118,945 
140,784 
162,923 
158,142 
185,175 
232,500 

1,837,229 


3,224 

2 

995 

2,802 

481 
2,053 
3,936 
3,638 
2,760 

149,799 


143,495 
136,600 
113,363 
in,669 
118,945 
141,265 
164,976 
162,078 
188,813 
235,260 

1,987,028 


7,514 


1932 


5 478 


1933 


4 703 


19 34 


1 133 


19 35 


2 765 


1936 


3, 124 


19 37 


4,042 


19 38 


4,854 


1939 


5 630 


1940 


6,549 


1941 - 1950 


64,814 


1941 


224,123 
221,796 
115,664 
42,368 
31,195 
28,787 
37,771 
60,187 
64,866 
93,527 

323,818 


277,807 

343,487 

377,125 

325,717 

195,917 

123,864 

88,802 

68,265 

71,044 

66,038 

1,230,483 


275,747 

268,762 

281,459 

39 2,7 66 

208,707 

134,849 

77,442 

69,080 

64,138 

64,279 

1 ,148,241 


1,547 

1,602 

37,474 

49 , 2 1 3 

22,695 

15,213 

16,462 

1,070 

2,456 

2,067 

41,705 


277,2941 

270,364 

318,933 

441,979 

231,402 

150,062 

93,904 

70,150 

66,594 

66,346 

1,189,946 


7 769 


1942 


8, 348 


1943 


13,656 


1944 


7,297 


1945 


9 ,782 


1946 


6,575 


1947 


3,953 


1948 


2,887 




2,271 


1950 


2,276 


1951 - 1960 


27,569 




91,497 
111,461 
23,558 
9,100 
10,855 
12,870 
15,911 
16,196 
16,115 
16,255 

15,921 
15,120 
14,478 
14,374 
13,082 
12,957 
12,465 


61,634 
94,086 
98,128 
130,7 22 
213,508 
137,701 
140,547 
117,344 
109,270 
127,543 

138,718 
129,682 
121,170 
113,218 
106,813 
104,853 
108,369 


53,741 
87,070 
90,476 
104,086 
197,568 
138,681 
137,198 
118,950 
102,623 
117,848 

130,731 
124,972 
121,618 
109,629 
101,214 
100,498 
102,211 


975 

1,585 

1,575 

13,745 

11,958 

7,204 

845 

916 

1,308 

1,594 

1,719 
2,335 
2,560 
2,605 
3,085 
2,561 
2,691 


54,716 
88,655 
92,051 
117,831 
209,526 
145,885 
138,043 
119,866 
103,931 
119,442 

132,450 
127,307 
124,178 
112,234 
104,299 
103,059 
104,902 


2,39 5 


1952 


2, 163 




2,300 


19 54 


2,084 




4,571 


1956 


3,935 




2,948 


1958 


2,688 




2, 208 


19 60 


2,277 


1961 


3, 175 




3,557 


1963 


2,436 


1964 


2,309 


1965 


2,059 


1966 


2,029 


1967 


2,008 







102 



TABLE 37A. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY GENERAL AND SPECIAL NATURALIZATION PROVISIONS: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, i^h^ - 1967 



1963-19f)7 



Naturalization provisions 

Total 

General provisions 

Special provisions 

Persons married to U. S. 

citizens 

Children, including adopted 

children of U. S. citizen 

parents 

Former U. S. citizens who 

lost citizenship by 

marriage 

Philippine citizens who 

entered the United States 

prior to May 1, 1934, and 

have resided continuously 

in the United States ...... 

Persons who served in U. S. 

Armed Forces for three 

years 

Persons who served in U. S. 

Armed Forces during World 

War 1, World War 11 or the 

Korean hostilities ^Z 

Lodge Act enlistees 

Persons who served on certain 

U. S . vessels 

Former U. S. citizens who 

lost citizenship by enter- 
ing the armed forces of 

foreign countries during 

World War 11 

Nationals but not citizens 

of the United States 

Persons naturalized under 

private law 

Other 

1^/ Section 22(b), Act of September 26, 1961, added: "or the Korean hostilities 



1963 



1965 



548,672 



124,178 



112,234 



104,299 



103,059 



407,334 



93,325 



82,621 



76,630 



141,338 



30,853 



29,613 



27,669 



26,845 



86,743 



40,541 



19 ,048 



9,136 



17,867 



8,341 



4,945 
216 



820 
100 



1,782 



749 
74 



13 
198 



16,602 



7,914 



38 



1,365 
24 



7,69 5 



37 



1,575 



971 
15 



103 



. NATURALIZATIOI 





J:.bVr 




P H r « „ 


A n « t u r 






C„„„t„ or ..,U,„ of eo™„ .„e,,.„ce 


Under generdi 
orovi.iom 








Or„,r 


Ml co„„.rl.. 


104.902 








2 m 




I„™ 


61.534 


47.272 












110 
337 

265 

\]',20l. 

2)376 

10)572 
353 

2.69S 
506 

367 
367 

B.777 
l.«76 


405 

8,686 

2,163 

8,'27l 
322 
377 

292 

489 

259 

6.732 

1.756 


jai 


'274 

8 
9 

203 
9 

10 


906 




Auatrl* 


2 


BelfliuB 




Czecho»Iov»ki« 




D k 
















Cernany 




(J 




Hunoary 










^ 










Netherl«nd» 






, 








J 








J 




( 












3 












1^ 




2,924 
326 

'384 

'351 
55 

2.958 

274 


1.434 

91 

1.950 

812 

237 

1,360 

205 


791 

98 
1.687 


310 

290 

36 
299 

1.133 


387 

5 

3 
657 








Indon«tl« 






































7 










Viatnaa 






2 




M 




6!o44 
43 

'321 

145 
7 30 


6.530 

5,166 

32 

'283 

311 
94 

122 

267 

591 


805 
11 
19 

16 


535 
328 

11 


245 
108 

29 














2 



































P«n«(M 










119 

204 
556 
352 

230 


86 

15a 
454 
296 


65 

31 
31 
38 








BolivU 






































90 
133 

36 
429 


18 
188 

329 


43 
58 




2 






























295 
63 


231 
41 
57 




7 
3 
2 

25 


' 














85 




1.966 




78 


70 


23 


^ 







IM 



J9 . PERSONS 



ill« 



All 



BcLglua 

CztchoBlovakla 

D«niMrk 

Esconl* 

Finland 

France 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Natharlandt 

"orwy 

Poland 

Portugal 

luaanla 

Spain 

Svadan 

Swltzarland 

Unltad Klngdoa 

U.S.S.H 

Yugoalavla 

Ochar biropa 

China y 

India 

Indonaala 

Iran 

Iraq 

laraal 

J«P«" 

Jordan _ 

Paklican 

PhlUpplnaa 

Syrian Arab KapubUc 

Thailand 

Othar Aala il 

North Anerlca 

HcKlco 

Barbadoa 

Cuba 

Dominican RapubUc 

Haiti 

Trinidad and Tobago J/ 

Coaca Rtca 

El Salvador 

Cuatanala 

Honduraa 

South Aaarica 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brail 1 

Chile 

Coloabia 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 2/ 

Africa 

Itorocco 

South Africa 

Tunltla 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 1*1 
Other Africa 2/ 

Oceania 

Auatralla 

Nev Zee land 

Other Oceania 2/ 

U.S. poaieaalona 

Statcleae end not reported 

17 Includea Teloen. 
1/ Independent countrlea. 
it Included In United Klngdoa pr 
^/ United Areb Republic Includea 
Froa 1959 to 1962 Svrien An 



2.755 
1,590 
2,00B 

1.505 
1.124 
1.057 
2.19a 
1.866 
5.493 

18.010 



3.476 
1,990 
1.635 
1. 181 



20.4S6 
3,370 
2.541 
3.259 
8.462 
2.511 
1,487 
2.000 
1.117 

U.03S 

1.049 

1.354 

634 

757 



10.990 
3.205 
2.121 



1.737 
18.568 
6.092 



9.696 
2.306 
2.628 



1.889 
19.165 
3.874 



105 













OCCUPAT. 




YEAR ZNDia 


JOHE 30. 


.9b7 














.ll.gl>IIC. 




I 'A 
III 




1 

III 


I s 


s 
^ 


?! 
c • S 

= 1 £ 


1 1 




1 i^ 

III 




1 B 












,8,9 


.63 




B (.hi 




^■?^? 




l,OB^ 


B.;oz 


4U 


























7.ni 


660 


S.159 


IU6 


i.ir 


ib.2b6 


Alb* 1 


21376 
ll)!572 

'31,7 
367 


87 






















S'i 










* " "*. 


kl 






D* k 






140 






l" d 


I.;? 


Fr»nc« 






/.ili 


Q '' 


l.fcli 










it*i* 


1 M'-, 






Lith * 1 






IMI 










n!> "^ 






^l»< 






P t I 






/'.S 










S 1 


114 S 






S It* I 


J 




i/l 


















u"s*s H 


ng OM 




J^i, 




* 






0th * Ku 






Itil 








7.b40 


Chin. 1/ 




































h^ 










, 






l,i 






J ^ J 


8i.<. 






J '*d« 


1 tv 






L ba 


161 










Phlll I 






I H7 


Syri.n At 


ab R.publlc 










VI tIM 






5J 
























433 






























B b«do« 






■ 5 


















Haiti ' 


•P 




, J 






Trinidad 


and Tobago 




^i. 








El Sal d 


^ 




67 










Ho d aa 






87 


















South Anet 














376 
556 
















- 


















Bcajll 


156 














Ec d r 






95 
















th A«rlca 2 
























'; 
















S "^th A£ 


^ ^ 




S8 
















■b (tapubUc 






0th " Af 


"«yp 


li 


0C,M».. 






,^^ 








63 






















' 




New ZeaU 


nd 




31 










U S 












t.d 


1 96. 






117 


il6 
























' 












' 



106 





„£::L 


N.U1 


^— - ""°" ""°'~' •"•"•"" 




U^d.r 










50- 


t 


1. 


£-:.. 




10^.902 








lO.OOB 


13.508 






2.47 3 


62 1 


-*" , 




1 












4.855 


2.603 


1.210 


378 


141 




337 

26S 

3.438 
2,376 

lo!572 
353 
397 

'367 

367 
57B 

'874 

1,976 

386 


366 

1^539 
1.349 

5^107 

326 

'375 
1,059 


15 


31 
28 

3 
154 


92 

10 

1.242 
296 

338 
1,330 

52 
2 59 
38 

54 
225 


88 
50 

1,260 

509 

1,535 

86 
254 
297 

49 


54 
53 

828 

51 

988 


31 

29 
15 

592 

361 
50 
112 


4 J 

15 
5b 








J 


"* [ * 


1 


* 1 kl 


1 


t*«c *°* 


^ 


- 


^ 


l" d 


1 


_ 




r»n e 


4 




j^ 


u 


(, 


1 ? d 


3 












f 


««™, 


- 


P rt al 


I 




i. 


s" 


(, 




■, 


S**!! " 1 nd 


2 




3 








li^' 




i 






Chi 1/ 


2.924 

2,276 

'384 

1.3S3 

351 

2,958 


83 

1.153 

344 




5 


23; 


2.7B5 


294 


265 
1.130 




92 

2JJ 








I d 1 








- 






5 


'^ * 


u 


J«pan . 






I 






* 






1 1 


S ''''a *b R 


1 






VI 












„ . 


6! 044 

5.485 
321 

143 

321 
221 
730 


3.033 
140 


263 
135 

6 


9 


846 
59 5 

54 


)8 
566 


872 
339 

31 
52 
304 


469 
215 

341 

IJO 


148 
361 

2 
58 


33 
13 






8<^ 


. 


1 




h 


" R bll 


I 






J 


I 






C t Rl * 








G temals 


_ 




I 


Nl 










, 




820 
119 

352 
230 


245 


3 


'1 


62 


166 

25 

50 

25 


93 

38 


5 

9 
34 
























_ . 




p 




V I 


1 




1 








90 
133 


25 
65 


i 


I 


15 


1 


5 






















U IC d A «b R bile (EBVDt) 












11 




130 




























u s 




















169 




43 


(2 







107 







Country or teglon of foraar &Hegl«nca 


Tot. I 




19 




30- 






m' 


7™- 


SO 






3.103 


ji.«27 


16.155 


17.456 


10.050 


5.023 


3.033 


1.035 


20i 


















I.BPO' 




126 


Mh« 


36 
607 

52 

973 
e.936 

i!o2; 

5!*65 

215 
1,25B 

262 
2.306 
1,131 

470 

5, 424 
192 


19 

45 
51B 

13 

329 

37 

5 

101 

135 

3 
206 


53 

369 

71 

26 

505 

102 
180 

11 

3 

150 

31 


10 

3.375 

717 

721 

51 
60 
313 
73 

302 

136 
61 

65 

1.311 

73 

216 


52 

2.962 
553 

292 
561 

23 
33 

396 
78 
398 
269 
26 

69 
151 

279 


65 

23 

1.053 
223 

29 
31 
284 
36 
534 
191 

63 
33 


15 

388 
130 

28 
37 

30 


15 

13 

214 
72 

324 

177 
50 

123 
53 

5 


29 

35 

61 

5 
51 




At"!* 




", 




C ho 1 kls 




n* k 




lit 1 




d 




_ 




J. 


11 


r««ce 








I ? d 




It 1 


32 


1 




Llth 




N th L d 




* ' 




P 1 r^ 


16 


P t 1* ' 




. * 




S I 




Sw d 




Swlt I d 




Tu k 




U It'd 


p 


U.S.S.R 




oth bi * 








Chi 1/ 


1.435 
69 

117 

1.123 

2.209 

134 

36 
50 


2 
1 


74 

5 
37 


26 
16 
33 
21 
233 

353 

330 


425 
25 
15 

23 

229 

1,403 

43 

637 


315 
281 

357 




30 

5 


5 




1 dl ~ 


_ 


Id 1 


_ 






. 




, ** , 


2 


'^ 


2 


d» 


, 


or It 








p "°" 




* 




S i»^ A b R bllc 


1 


Th«ll d 




VI 




0th A 1 2/ 






67 




4.452 
3.242 

2.452 

129 

115 
91 


180 

3 
3 

25 


224 

3 


965 

3 

34 
23 

39 


25 
24 


385 
36 
15 


5 
70 


200 
431 






M 




. . 




C b« 


1 


Do I i R bllc 








, , 


3 


T i IdAd And Tobaao 


1 


Costa RlcA 












J. . 




Ni 




P ■«• 










53 

215 
102 

155 

63 


26 


17 

I 


18 
18 


136 
20 
59 
31 

56 

25 


43 




3 






8o?i 1* 






^ 






ColoabiA 




Ecuador 




P ru 




V«nezu«U 




Other South An«rlc« 2/ 










65 

7 
15 


3 


5 


15 

S 


2 
3 




13 


5 








1 






Tunl»l« 




United Areb Reoubllc (EsVDt) 




Other AJtU. 2/ 






165 
30 


6 


^ 


29 


37 


72 

5 


3 


5 
3 






































3 













108 



TABLE 41A. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY SEX, MARITAL STATUS, 

MEDIAN AGE, AND MAJOR OCCUPATION GROUP: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1963-1967 



Sex, marital status, 
median age, and occupation 



1963 



1964 



1965 



1966 



Total naturalized 



124,178 



Sex and marital status: 

Males 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Females 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Males per 1,000 females 



Median age (years): 

Both sexes 

Males 

Females 



Major occupation group: 

Professional, technical, and 

kindred workers 

Farmers and farm managers 

Managers, officials, and 

proprietors , except farm 

Clerical, sales, and kindred 

workers 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred 

workers 

Operatives and kindred workers .. 

Private household workers 

Service workers, except private 

household 

Farm laborers and foremen 

Laborers, except farm and mine .. 
Housewives, children, and others 

with no occupation 



58,303 



18,500 

38,210 

690 

900 

3 

65.875 



12,991 

48,616 

2,957 

1,308 

3 

885 



33.8 
34.4 
33.3 



12,714 
269 

4,296 

11,588 

13,411 

11,927 

1,368 

10,362 

553 

5,166 

52,524 



112,234 



104,299 



103,059 



51,408 



48,495 



46,536 



16,851 

33,188 

593 

776 



60,826 



15,358 

31,766 

593 

773 

5 

55,804 



14,567 

30,611 

549 

798 

11 

56.523 



12,705 

44,534 

2,451 

1,136 



845 



33.1 
33.6 
32.7 



11,097 
241 

3,891 

10,279 

11,163 

11,027 

1,142 

9,535 

473 

4,145 

49,241 



11,746 

40,483 

2,416 

1,156 

3 

869 



34.1 
34.6 
33.7 



9,854 
198 

3,783 

9,637 

10,328 

10,117 

1,075 

9,591 

395 

4,035 

45,286 



12,143 

40,850 

2,272 

1,242 

16 

823 



33.2 
34.0 
32.5 



9,604 
208 

3,823 

9,660 

9,928 

10,319 

1,029 

8,686 

405 

3,761 

45,636 



104,902 



46,014 



13,162 

31,558 

503 

791 



58.888 



12.150 

43,201 

2,249 

1,286 

2 

781 



33.6 
34.8 
32.8 



9,899 
163 

4,166 

10,680 

9,959 

11,067 

1,085 

8,702 

411 

3,685 

45,085 



109 



PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY STATES OR TERRITORIES OF RESIDENCE; 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1958 - 19<i7 



of 



side 



19 58- 



Total 

Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbl. 
Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

U.S. terr. and poss 

Guam 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands . . 

All other 



119.666 



103.931 



3.255 
2,829 
8,349 
1,U3 
192,754 

10,100 
29,471 
2,240 
6,573 
28,796 

7,399 
15,927 

1,878 
84,937 
12,693 

4,652 
6,029 
3,633 
5,056 
3,992 

14,252 
51,525 
46,083 
8,602 
1,578 

9,349 
2,647 
4,29 3 
2,49 3 
3,480 

78,383 

3,510 

268,634 

5,144 

1,342 

42,828 
4,206 
7,476 

43,417 
6,368 

2,865 
1,298 
2,792 
46,654 
5,556 

2,002 
1 1 , 389 
19,038 

1,918 

13,646 

9 38 



2,761 
2,338 



301 
219 
690 
123 
16,269 

1,110 

2,917 

231 

661 

2,245 

1,254 
1,220 
174 
9,470 
1,460 

725 
568 
360 
482 
401 

1,472 
5,462 
6,017 
1,198 
146 

1,043 



340 

8,779 

338 

28,898 

480 

237 

6,053 
400 
752 



205 

274 

4,170 

650 

201 
1,013 
2,160 
278 
649 
140 



326 
204 
760 
126 
14,944 



324 

23,988 

524 

167 

3,810 
446 
872 

4,325 
572 

266 
113 
300 
4,386 
634 

233 
1,149 
1,990 



1,027 

4,398 

243 

581 

3,209 

719 
2,377 

256 
8,223 
1,472 

69 5 
594 
558 
422 
398 



5,146 

5,854 

660 



7,415 

332 

28,363 

326 

118 



243 
4,395 

646 

349 
1,239 
2,311 

282 

2,041 

87 



20,884 

1,361 

2,743 
242 
758 

2,944 

818 

1,668 

252 

10,478 

1,612 

426 
785 
364 
563 
618 



1,183 
241 
504 
263 
346 

8,761 



154 

5,514 
468 
911 

5,251 

877 



204 

936 
1,710 

269 
2,014 

125 



1,032 

3,219 

233 



547 
1,534 

203 
9,542 
1,268 



5,613 

5,227 

832 



387 

31.225 

604 

139 

4,283 
414 
744 

4,602 
685 

365 



1 ,19 3 

2,172 

204 



864 

103 

21,948 

1,273 

3.071 

246 

674 

2,754 



1,533 

5.634 



1,071 
200 
465 



276 

4.835 

620 

179 
1,282 
2,052 

205 
1,595 

116 



717 
1,542 



370 
486 
438 
513 
432 

1,443 

5,027 

4,073 

795 

168 

925 
272 
350 
285 



25,195 
548 
124 



3,957 
478 
824 

4,212 
558 

29 2 
109 
306 
4,518 
47 5 

160 
1,182 

2,102 



830 
2,625 



2.659 

7 36 
1,319 

158 
8,271 

992 

359 
500 
286 
590 
316 

1,353 
4,652 
3,451 



7 38 
196 
346 
273 
288 

7,128 

234 

24,540 

490 

61 

3,399 
456 
67 3 

3,611 
590 

245 
144 



39 8 

162 
1,152 
1,522 

123 

1,205 

85 



684 
3,189 

738 
1,625 

146 
7,451 

962 

349 



1,412 

4,304 

3,132 

69 7 

163 

807 



69 2 

3.467 

631 



4.694 
431 



1,096 

1,484 



110 



Hi 






:ss " "S' 



MM ; M M M : : • M M i MM- MM- MM- MM- • • M ■ M M M ^ ! M 
MM MI'S; M:M MM: MM- MM: Miij MMJ !MM MMM iMl 

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^^Mt-5 >>»j 



111 



PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY TYPE OF COURT AND STATES OR TERRITORIES OF RESIDENCE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 19f>7 



Total 

Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming . 

U. S. territories and pos 

Guam 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands 



104.902 



306 

335 

1,010 

86 

21,696 

69 5 

2,741 

216 

610 

3,790 

682 
1,902 

143 
6,863 
1,045 

325 
419 
240 

574 
294 

1,367 

4,596 

3,211 

606 

128 

755 
171 
. 383 
265 
296 

6,855 

270 

23,143 

607 

84 

3,211 
332 
596 

3,377 
655 



4.295 
424 

168 
1,147 
1,535 

123 

1,059 

52 



306 
211 



557 

2,221 

216 

610 

3.790 

682 

1,634 

86 

6,651 

1,045 

325 
290 
240 
574 
181 

988 

3,114 

2,476 

558 

128 

755 



19,839 
607 



401 
,365 
429 



231 

3,989 

106 

114 
1 ,147 
1,282 

123 

747 



26 



19.923 



124 
219 



379 

1,482 

735 



4,161 

159 

3,304 



19 5 

1,012 

226 



306 
318 



253 
312 



112 



IS 



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304 
261 

160 
166 
107 
315 
3,136 
401 

365 

814 
2,488 
552 
150 
129 

249 

260 
402 
121 
140 

115 

1,356 

98 

195 

157 
1,500 

87 

79 

354 

462 

373 
159 
138 
120 


5 5 


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113 



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114 





Total 


C A L t N Ll A K YEAR Of E N T » V 


"""""■-"'"" 


n.tu- 


9.7 


'- 


19.5 


,9.4 


,63 


,962 


1,61 


,960 


959 


,58 


957 


956 


955 


954 


,53 


952 


95, 


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I'Z' 


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l«'-,90? 


S7 


S6p 


479 


2.235 


.982 


6,»3 


19.715 


3,630 


9.345 


„, 


6.625 


7.1,0 


-.225 


.975 


,923 


,160 


,205 


.503 


,220 


6,3,8 
















































1.341 

3!367 
2,B89 

l!797 

2.067 

353 




i 


t 


52 

5 


114 

107 
114 


458 

91 
25 


326 
205 
456 

6„ 


170 
'373 

1.4,0 


130 

359 
544 

278 


,08 
,40 
'152 

25 
698 


320 




36 


387 


34 

U7 


425 
29 

59 


,25 

76 


30 
,4 

50 
5 


35 
30 

17 
I, J 




BelBium 


1 


Crechoglo««kl« 


7A 


D nmark 


J8 


Finland 


-J^ 


France 




G r n 




C e 


W 


Hunuarv 


Ri, 


Ir land 


;o4 


Italy 


iti6 


Heth rl nda 


27 


Norway 


'.1 


Poland 


^^•> 


Porcuoal 


rM 




^s 




''I 




bi.> 


Switzerland 


iU 




Ik^ 




^It 




ftU 




1.0.17 


Chin 1/ 


'299 
538 

1.332 

<.35 


25 


'\ 








300 


406 
76 
63 


13 


176 


125 






5 








364 


'i 


,,369 


i.60 


Hona Kona 


^ 




i 


1 do si 






^ 


J 






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J 


b7 


J d 2/ 


6 


K a ~ 


14 


. . 


JO 




■^ 




Iti 


R k i 1 da 


J 


Si A ab R public 


'■^ 


Vi 






HJ 




i.Wii 




1« 

324 
229 


3 


\ 




i 


i 




1, 




283 


51 


I 


149 


5,0 
15 


■° 


70 


19, 
56 


,-; 


" 


58 5 




M Ico 


I ,741 


C b 


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D 1 I n B Dublic 


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H 1 1 


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J , 


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0th W t I dl 


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Costa Rica 


^ 


El Salvador 


' 


Coalemala 


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Hond s 


" 


Niearait 




p " 


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Och C tral America 


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3; 


A 


350 
1S3 

286 




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20 


127 


I 


157 
2, 


69 


ii 


32 


27 


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Colombia 


' 


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p 


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V nez ela 


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0th So th Ame i 


^ 




K 




49 

139 
273 


3 


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57 


50 


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3' 


20 


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\ 


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12 


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Morocco 




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So ch Af 1 


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383 




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13 

1 




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N 2 1 d 


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P.CfU I.L.nd. .U.S. .d..) .... 


240 


Other co„„trl.. 


, 



115 



TABLE 45. PERSONS NATURALIZED BV SEX AND AGE: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1959-1967 



Sex and age 


1959-1967 


1959 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


1966 


1967 


Number admitted . . . 


1,031,802 


103,931 


119,442 


132.450 


127.307 


124,178 


112,234 


104,299 


103,059 


104,902 


Under 18 years 


63,761 
40,504 
97,649 
142,359 
155,399 
139,844 
99,061 
73,864 
62,679 
51,643 
42,795 
31,791 
17,505 
8,082 
4,043 
823 

465,154 


5,331 
3,064 
8,437 
12,991 
16,530 
14,324 
8,951 
8,727 
7,140 
6,549 
5,195 
3,514 
1,895 
846 
381 
56 

43,719 


5,849 
3,394 
9,478 
14,478 
17,031 
15,795 
9,769 
9,563 
8,292 
7,733 
6,310 
5.671 
3,323 
1,442 
602 
712 

50,896 


6,931 
3.793 
10.915 
15.851 
17,872 
17,053 
11,229 
10,055 
9.103 
8.402 
8,190 
6,615 
3,827 
1,796 
776 
42 

58,795 


8,950 
4.622 
12.290 
17.792 
18,762 
17,448 
11,750 
9,418 
7,833 
6,059 
5,269 
3,778 
2,004 
932 
397 
3 

60,988 


8,476 
4,774 
12,088 
18,470 
19,152 
17,726 
12,615 
8.288 
7.577 
5,261 
4,393 
2,816 
1,496 
692 
360 

58,303 


8,203 

5,026 

12.121 

16,989 

16,908 

15.366 

11.507 

6.938 

6,183 

4.607 

3.733 

2.473 

1.250 

598 

331 

1 

51,408 


7,053 
5,335 

10,824 
15,494 
16,327 
14,112 
10,993 
6,328 
5,721 
4,279 
3,293 
2,376 
1,268 
582 
314 

48.495 


6,921 

5,579 

10,691 

14.936 

16,030 

13,841 

10,865 

6,888 

5,422 

4,278 

3,141 

2,313 

1,169 

609 

367 

9 

46,536 


6,053 
4,917 
10,805 
15,358 
16,787 
14,179 
11,382 


20-24 years 




























70-74 years 






585 
515 

46,014 


80 years and over . . . 
Not reported 

Males 


Under 18 years .... 

18-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-29 years 

30-34 years 

35-39 years 

40-44 years 

45-49 years 

50-54 years 

55-59 years 

60-64 years 

65-69 years 

70-74 years 

75-79 years 

80 years and over . 
Not reported 

Females 


32,512 

19,187 
43,021 
54,293 
65,697 
64,489 
47,714 
37,177 
30,938 
23,662 
18,373 
13,607 
8,024 
3,972 
2,124 
364 

566,648 


2,805 

1,494 

3,221 

3,737 

6,161 

6,465 

4,372 

4,204 

3,159 

2,766 

2,161 

1,535 

941 

467 

211 

20 

60,212 


3,065 
1,738 
3,920 
4,827 
6,507 
6,911 
4,725 
4,784 
3,751 
3,257 
2,350 
2.169 
1,541 
720 
308 
323 

68.546 


3,626 
1,830 
4,789 
5,890 
7,396 
7,700 
5,441 
5,154 
4.475 
3.557 
3.296 
2.639 
1.705 
870 
410 
17 

73.655 


4.619 

2,236 

5,710 

7,585 

8.646 

- 8.538 

6.016 

5.051 

4,092 

2,926 

2,385 

1,634 

879 

453 

216 

66.319 


4,288 
2,379 
5,566 
7,818 
8,464 
8,277 
6,113 
4,329 
4,064 
2,568 
1,993 
1,271 
660 
332 
181 

65,875 


4,093 
2,429 
5,677 
6,918 
7.205 
6,905 
5,529 
3,402 
3,128 
2,221 
1,695 
1,170 
577 
292 
167 

60.826 


3.602 
2.482 
5,050 
6,285 
7,373 
6,749 
5,223 
3,139 
2,854 
2,057 
1,526 
1,096 
617 
289 
153 

55,804 


3,464 

2,509 

4,641 

5,672 

6,967 

6,414 

5,062 

3,356 

2,742 

2,123 

1,460 

1.127 

535 

295 

167 

2 

56,523 


2,950 

2,090 

4,447 

5,561 

6,978 

6,530 

5,233 

3,758 

2,673 

2,187 

1,507 

966 

569 

254 

311 

58,888 


Under 18 years 

18-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-29 years 

30-34 years 

35-39 years 

40-44 years 

45-49 years 

50-54 years 

55-59 years 

60-64 years 

65-69 years 

70-74 years 

75-79 years 

80 years and over . 
Not reported 


31,249 
21,317 
54,628 
88,066 
89,702 
75,355 
51,347 
36,687 
31,741 
27,981 
24,422 
18,184 
9.481 
4,110 
1,919 
459 


2,526 

1,570 

5,216 

9,254 

10,369 

7,859 

4,579 

4,523 

3,981 

3,783 

3,034 

1,979 

954 

379 

170 

36 


2.784 

1.656 

5.558 

9,651 

10,524 

8,884 

5,044 

4,779 

4,541 

4,476 

3,960 

3,502 

1.782 

722 

294 

389 


3,305 
1,963 
6.126 
9.961 
10.476 
9.353 
5.788 
4.901 
4.628 
4.845 
4,894 
3,976 
2,122 
926 
366 
25 


4.331 
2.386 
6.580 
10,207 
10,116 
8,910 
5,734 
4,367 
3.741 
3,133 
2,884 
2,144 
1,125 
479 
181 
1 


4,182 
2,395 
6,522 
10,652 
10,688 
9,449 
6,502 
3.959 
3.513 
2.693 
2.400 
1,545 
836 
360 
179 


4,110 

2.597 

6,444 

10,071 

9.703 

8,461 

5,978 

3,536 

3,055 

2,386 

2,038 

1,303 

673 

306 

164 

1 


3,451 
2,853 
5,774 
9,209 
8,954 
7,363 
5.770 
3,189 
2,867 
2,222 
1,767 
1,280 
651 
293 
161 


3,457 

3,070 

6.050 

9.264 

9,063 

7,427 

5,803 

3,532 

2,680 

2,155 

1,681 

1,186 

634 

314 

200 

7 


3,103 

2,827 

6,358 

9,797 

9,809 

7.649 

6.149 

3.901 

2,735 

2,288 

1,764 

1,269 

704 

331 

204 



116 





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nadOB 


USSR 


Eu nd Aal ) 


Y o 1 1 


P« 


0th &u 


■■ 






Bu " ' ' 


Chi 2/ 




H Ko 




India 




Ind 1 




( 




Ur«#l 


J 


Jo d 3/ 




K « ~ 




L b 


PhlUppIn 
Ryukyu la 




1 da " 








Olh A 1 








C d 






* 












R bile 


Haiti 


pu 


J Ic 


N th 1 


d Antlll a 


Trl Id d 


& Tobaao 


0th U 


I dl ■ 


C 1 Z n 


^ 


Guatenala 




Hond ras 




NIC 




P nama 




Other Cen 


tral America 






Areentina 




Bolivia 




g ,, 


Chile 


Colombia 




Ecuador 




P nj 


Venez ela 




0th So 


th Aaerlca 






Ethiopia 




Lib 




Morocco 


So th A£ 


Ua 


United A 


ab Republic (Eaypt) 




lea 






Augtralla 




New Zeala 


nd 















117 















YEAR 


ENDED 


JUNE 


0, 19f 


' 




















C™«ry or r.g.or, 




C.l.od., „„ .„.v.d 


of b.rth 




I9h: 


19,6 


1965 


1964 


196) 


1962 


1961 


iqhO 


l^^S. 


I9^fl 


nS7 


19 Sb 


195S 


1954 


195) 


19 52 


195, 


19 50 


19^V 


P^tO 


All count.,.. 


17 20S 


1 079 


3.65B 


1,071 


6,4 


639 


581 


525 


(.52 


388 


4(,5 


W. 


414 


476 


222 


12) 


110 


„ 


5, 




















394 


354 






r/s 


i,41 


327 


381 


144 


58 


„ 




,, 


JM 


4.2 38 




36 

12 

1.631 
32 

576 
112 

198 


5 


54 

549 
43 

15 
63 


26 
55 


59 








1 


3 


























,, 


C *h" kl 


infi 


D k 


W 


Fi 1 d 


- 


,1, 


_ 




'^ 


4,1 


J. 


?8»* 




^. 




I'l' 


IceU d 


^ 


1 1 d 


RS 


Italy 


-, , , 


Ut i 




Malt 


^ 


Neth I ds 


gi, 


No 


f,^ 


P I d 


^S? 


1 


,^ 


R ma 1 


V4 


S i 


14 


Sweden 


B". 


Sultze land 


^1 


T k (Eu d A 1 ) 


,j 


U It d Kl Rd m 


58^ 


USSR. lEurop. .nd A.I.) 


'»; 


0th Eu 


5h 


, 


86 




16 

MS 

39 
3.469 


5 
20 




( 
3 








i 


















\ 




'l 






Chi 1/ 


,4 


Hona Kona 




India 




Ind a la 




Iran 




Israel 




J a 




Jordan 2/ 




K 




Lebanon 


, 


PhlU in s 




Rvukvu Islands 




Thai land 




Vietnam 






Other Asia 








N th A I 






89 
30 


15 


5 


35 

3 








\ 


\ 


















\ 








Mexico 




BarbadoB 




B d 




Cuba 






J 




1 


Jamaica 




Netherlands Antlllea 




OtietXt I°Stl^ 


-1 


Canal Zone 


j^ 


Guatemala 


J 


Honduras 




Nicaraoua 


' 


Panama 




Other Central America 




South America 






15 

22 
32 

15 
45 

179 




57 
79 


5 
5 


















- 








[ 










Bolivia 


^ 








' 




' 




' 




' 


Venezuela 


^ 


Other South A I 




Africa 






12 
22 

95 


5 
9 


34 
25 


i 


6 
















\ 


: 






[ 


[ 
















South Africa 


" 


United Arab Republic (Egypt) 


3 


Oceania 






5B 






i 




I 


















^ 




[ 






[ 






1 


"-— 


■ 


-^ 


2 



118 















KEAR 




JUKE 


30. 19 


6- 


























Total 


C.l.„d.r ,..r.c,u,r,d 


o( blrrh 




1966 


1965 


1964 


1963 


1962 


1961 


• 960 


19 59 


19 58 


1957 


1956 


1955 


19 54 


1953 


19 52 


1951 


1950 


1949" 


I'J-l; 




15 918 


26 


356 


831 


1,066 


1,0>7 


926 


876 


707 


016 


^2" 


585 


2(- 


50^ 


405 


)90 


}>) 


298 


J5) 


7.^»Ii 


2.676 






^ 






622 




551 


5 34 




362 


278 




246 


224 


191 


160 


106 


84 






683 


Europ* 


3.453 

748 

30 
48 

224 

108 
1,271 

31 
15 

3.125 


5 


[ 


13 
207 


365 
15 

70 

1 
275 


1 


331 

3 
50 


316 
175 


2 
15 

142 


3 
50 


123 


29 
127 




_ 
110 


i 


i 


1 


» 


1 


5 
2 

2 
3 


5 






h I kl« 


18 


k 


3 


1 d 


b 


P *" 


17 




IB 


' 


15 


H 


i* 


? d 




1 1 d 


^1 


lUl 


4ai 




t 






N the I dt 


6 




10 


d 


32 




lU 


R ?• 


q 


S 


2 


S d 


J 


S It Und 


I 


Tu k (Su d Aal J 




Unit d Klnad 




U.S.S... (lurop. .~i A.I.) 


^\ 


0th EuroM 


6 




327 




10 
317 
36 

2 

1.308 

116 
35 
834 
320 
21 
8 


- 


7 


57 
65 


3 


39 


3 


1 
13 




3 
19 


78 


22 
119 




65 






2 
1 


32 


3 
179 


60 

5 




Chi 1/ 


lb3 


HonA Kons 




1 dl 




J . , ^ 






I, 




^ 


J 


U 


Jordin 2/ 


1 , 


J, 


4 


Lebanon 


u 




82 


. . 1.1- Am 


2 






Vi 






12 








1.331 

2.777 

25 
448 
12 
11 

145 
196 


1 


20 
45 

25 


55 

33 


23 

57 

2 


30 

1 


33 




15 

3 


5 


8 

I 


5 
2 


5 
20 


3 
3 


72 

5 








25 
116 

3 


327 
38 








fi«rb«doa 




. d« 


, 


C b« 


*.<) 


Do 1 1 R bll 


30 


Haul 


, 




^^ 


N th 1 da A till 










. 










Honduras 




Nlcaraaua 




Panama 


32 




South Aaarlca 






28 
13 

43 
!•) 
18 

34 

256 




6 


19 


26 


2 
30 


2 


[ 


; 


3 


\ 




; 


2 


; 




2 


2 


3 












' 




^ 




■| " 






















^ 








30 
105 

64 
9 
9 




9 




5 
1| 




13 
> 


3 




; 


? 




; 


5 


5 


























United Arab Republic (Egypt) 


1 








56 

37 
13 

10 




1 
6 




3 


i 




3 


■: 


] 


I 






[ 


















*• 


Pacific lalanda (U.S. Ada.) 































































119 



5 o^ 



O 00 

is 



r^ 


00 


00 






1 




c 


1 




-1 




<t oo 1 CN 








nO 




H 1 C 


M <J- O 


1 1 


^ 


o 












r^ 














O c- 


4 






7n <t 


CT* 


o 


























r^ ^ 








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Cvi 




































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NO O 1 00 o 




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n -1 <r uo ^ 1 


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m 










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nO cm r- 


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vO o 
















































ts 


























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lO 


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oo 1 m o 


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J 1 <f 


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u- 














~3- - 








m m 


ON 


o 


























nO cm 










rv; 






























~ 






<f 


ON 


nO 


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m 




oc 


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m <r 


cn en ^ ^ ^ 




J 1 ON 


o CNl n m CM 1 


-O 


o 












nC 














^ -. o 






in ^H ON 


tjv 




























r^ CO 










N 




































m 


NO 


rn 


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CO CNl 




r^ 1 00 00 


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ON 


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1 



120 



TABLE 50. CERTIFICATES OF NATURALIZATION REVOKED, BY GROUNDS: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1958 - 1967 



Grounds 


1958- 
1967 


1958 


1959 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


1966 


1967 


Total number 


557 


176 


154 


124 


44 


26 


7 


11 


2 






E»t«bll8hed permanent residence 
abroad within five years 


519 
1 

37 


168 

1 
7 


149 

5 


120 

4 


41 


23 

3 


1 
6 


9 
2 


1 

1 


2 
3 


5 






3 





TABLE 51. PERSONS EXPATRIATED, BY GROUNDS AND YEAR REPORTS RECEIVED: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1958 - 1967 



1958- 
1967 



Total number 1/ 



Voting In a foreign political 
election or plebiscite 2/ .. 

Continuous residence in a 
foreign state of birth or 
former nationality j/ 



Continuous residence in a 
state by dual national who 
sought benefits of Sec. 355 
I & N Act 



Residence in a foreign Stat 
under treaties and conven 
tions 4/ 



Naturalization In a foreign 
state 



Entering or serving ^n the 
armed forces of a foreign 
state 



elation of nationality .... 



Taking an oath of allegiance in 
a foreign state 



Accepting or performing duties 
under a foreign state 



Other grounds 



1,723 
2,599 



452 
200 



3.374 



3.657 



3.164 



1.919 



378 
213 



202 
194 



209 
189 



38 



134 
248 



19 



20 



113 
286 



22 



18 



U Cases of 90 persons expatriated for departing from or remaining away from the U.S. to avoid military service, 

reported for 1958-1963, were not Included because this statutory provision was ruled unconstitutional by the 

U.S. Supreme Court on February 18. 1963. (Kennedy v. Francisco Mendoza-Martinez (372 U.S. 144) and Rusk v. 

Joseph Henry Cort (372 U.S. 224)). 
2/ The Supreme Court decision in Afroyim v. Rusk (387 U.S. 253, May 29, 1967), ruled as unconstitutional the law 

providing for a loss of citizenship by voting in a foreign political election, 
i/ The Supreme Court decision in Schneider v. Rusk (377 U.S. 163, May 18, 1964), ruled as unconstitutional 

statutory provisions which cause naturalized citizens to lose their nationality by extended residence 

abroad. 
4/ Naturalized U.S. citizens expatriated in countries with which the United States has treaties or conventions 

providing on a reciprocal basis for loss of nationality through extended residence in the country of 

original citizenship. 



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124 



TABLE 55. WRITS OF HABEAS CORPUS, JUDICIAL REVIEW OF ORDER 

OF DEPORTATION AND DECLARATORY JUDGMENTS IN EXCLUSION AND DEPORTATION CASES: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1963 - 1967 



Action taken 



1963- 
1967 



Total writs of habeas corpus : 

Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government 

Unfavorable to U.S. Government .... 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed 

Pending end of year 

Involving exclusion : 

Dloposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government .. 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed . 

Pending end of year 

Involving deportation : 

Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government .. 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed . 

Pending end of year 

Total Judicial Review of Order of 
Deportation (Sec. 106 If.N Act) : 

Involving deportation : 

Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government .... 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government .. 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed ... 

Fending end of year 

Total declaratory judgments : 



Writs of habeas corpus 



308 


29 


41 


67 


110 


61 


270 


25 


36 


54 


103 


52 


17 


3 


1 


7 


4 


2 


21 


1 


4 


6 


3 


7 


13 


3 


9 


18 


13 


13 


42 


10 


9 


13 


4 


6 


31 


8 


7 


9 


2 


5 


6 


2 


- 


3 


1 


- 


5 


- 


2 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


4 


3 


5 


2 


266 


19 


32 


54 


106 


55 


239 


17 


29 


45 


101 


47 


11 


1 


1 


4 


3 


2 


16 


1 


2 


5 


2 


6 


11 


2 


5 


15 


8 


U 



Judicial Review 



512 


94 


51 


61 


99 


207 


334 


34 


35 


44 


62 


159 


28 


9 


7 


4 


3 


5 


150 


51 


9 


13 


34 


43 


206 


47 


44 


62 


86 


206 



Declaratory judgments 





796 


169 


87 


101 


107 


332 




697 
31 
68 

35 


120 
21 
28 

10 


69 

1 

17 

3 


88 
8 
5 

9 


95 

1 

11 

10 


325 






Withdrawn or otherwise closed 

Involving 8 USC 1503 


7 
3 




19 
2 

14 

761 


4 
2 

4 

159 


2 

1 
84 


6 

3 

92 


5 

5 

97 


2 






Withdrawn or otherwise closed 

Involving exclusion or deportation 


1 
329 


678 
29 

54 


116 
19 

24 


67 

1 

16 


82 
8 
2 


90 

1 
6 


323 






Withdrawn or otherwise closed 


6 



125 



TABLE 56. PRIVATE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY BILLS 

INTRODUCED AND LAWS ENACTED, 7 5TH CONGRESS 

THROUGH 90TH CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION 



Congress 



Bills 
introduced 



Laws 
enacted 



90th (First Session) 



87th 



85th 



80th 



3,954 

5,285 

3,647 

3,592 

3,069 

4,364 

4,474 

4,797 

3,669 

2,811 

1,141 

429 

163 

430 

601 



1,227 



75th 



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U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1968 O — 283-289 



BOSTON 



PUBUCUBBAR1 



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