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Full text of "Annual report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service"

BOSTON 

PUBLIC 

LIBRT^RY 




'l; 







annual report 

Immigration and 
Naturalization 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMFNT OF JUSTICE 
IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SFRVICE 
119 D Siroct, N. E. Washington, D. C. 20536 



^o had Us beglDTiiDgs on March 3, 1891, when Coogresj provided that there siicnihl be in the 
rvision of the Secretary of the Treasury, a Suporintendcnt of Immigration. In 1903, Ihc Bure 
functions were tr^ntferrvd to the newly established Department of Commerce <tnd Labor; in 
lu of Immigration and Naturaliiation; in I9n. the consolidated Bureau was traosferred to the 

Department of Labor and divided into two bureaus known as the Bureau of Immigration and the Biireau of Naturalization; and in 1933, the Bure 

were consolidated as the Immigratioo and Naturaliintion Service of the Department of Labor. 



The Imm 
Treasury Departn 
of IinmiRrAtion w 
1906,the Bureau i 



ation andNaiu............ ».. 

It, under the control and supt 
established, and imniigratioi 
Immigration became the Bun 



On June U, 1940, the Immigration and Naturalization Service was truufonred from the Department of Labor to the Department of Justice 
after Congressional approval of a plan submitted by the President under a general reorganization act which had been passed in 1939. Under terms 
of that plan, the office of Commis ioncr of Immigration and Naturaliratlon and all powers ;ind functions previously exercised by the Secretary of 
Labor relating to immigration and nationality were transferred to the Jurisdiction of the Attorney General. Since June 14, 1940, the Service hat 
functioned as a part of the Department of Justice under ihc direction of the Attorney General of the United States. 

REGIONAL AND DISTRICT OFFICE LOCATIONS 



NORTHEAST REGION 



NORTHWEST REGION 



SOUTHEAST REGION 



SOUTHWEST REGION 



Regional Office 



Regional Offi< 



Re gional Office 



Rcjlo 



Burlington, Vcmoot 0S401 
Federal Building 



Si. Paul, Minnesota SSI16 
790 South Cleveland Avenue 



Richmond, Virginia 23240 
Room 6226, Federal BuildJni; 
400 North Fighth Street 



I Pedro, Califoniia 90731 
:minal liland 



District Offices 



District Offit 



Boston, Ma^sachllSelt'I 0220) 
John Filigerald Kennedy 

Federal Buildrng 
Covemmeol Center 

Buffalo, New York 14202 
68 Court Street 

Hartford, Connecticut 06101 
Box 1530, Post Office Building 
US High Sitoet 

Newark, New Jersey 07102 
Federal Building 
970 Bread Siteet 

New York, New York 10007 
20 West Broadway 

Portland, Maine 04112 

P.O. Box 578 

319 U.S. Courthouse 

St. Albans, Vermont 05478 
Federal Building 
P.O. Box 591 



Anchorage, Alaska 99501 
Box 939 

Rivjm 143, U.S. Post Office C 
Courthouse Building 

Chicago, Illinois 60604 
Courthouse C Federal Office Bid 
219 South Dearborn Street 

Detroit, Michigan 48207 

Federal Building 

33] Ml. Elliott Street 

Helena, Montana 59601 
P.O. Box 1724 
Federal Building 

Kansas City, Missouri 64106 
819 U.S. Courthouse 
811 Grand Avenue 

Omaha, Nebraska 6B102 
Room 8411, New Federal Bldg. 
215 North 17lh Street 

Portland, Oregon 97205 
333 U.S. Courthouse 
Broadway € Main Streets 

St. Paul, Minnesota SSlOl 
932 New Port Office Building 
180 E. Kellogg Boulevard 



Atlanta, Georgia 30309 

Room 370 

1280 W. P.achlree Street, N. W, 

Baltimore, Maryland 21201 
Room 124, Federal Building 
31 Hopkins Plaia 

Cleveland, Ohio 44199 

Room 1917, Federal Office Bldg. 

1240 East Ninth Street 

Miami, Florida 3)130 
Room 1402, Federal B<lilding 
51 Southwest First Avenue 



New Federal Building 
701 Loyola Avenue 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19102 
128 North Broad Street 

San Juan, Puerto Rico 
Pan Am Building 
255 Ponce de Loon 
Comer of Bolivia Street 
Hato Rey, Puerto Rico 00917 

Washington, D. C. 20536 
1025 Vermont Avenue, N. W. 



Denver, Colorado 80202 
17027 Federal Office Building 

El Paso, Texas 79984 

P.O. Box 9398 

343 U. S. Courthouse 

Honolulu, Hawaii 96809 

P.O. Box 461 

595 Ala Moana Boulevard 

Los Angeles, Calif. 90012 
300 N. Los Angeles Street 

Phoenix, Ariiona 85025 

Federal Building 

230 Nortli First Avenue 

Pon Isabel, Texas 78S66 
Rural Route 3 
Los Fresnos, Te«as 

San Antonio, Texas 78206 

P.O. Box 2539 

U.S. Post Office C Courthouse 

San Francisco, Calif. 94111 
Appraisers Building 
630 Sansome Street 



Seattle, Washington 98134 
815 Airport Way, South 



DISTRICT OFRCES IN FOREIGN COUNTRIES 



Frankfurt, Germany 
c/o American Consulate 

General, Box 12 
APO, New York, 09757 



Manila, Philippines 
c/o American Embassy' 
APO, San Francisco, 
California, 96528 



Mexico City, Mexico 
c/o American Fjnbassy 
Pasco Dc La Reforma 305 
Mexico, D. F. , Mexico 



Rome, Italy 

c/o American Embassy 

APO, New York, 09794 



Ohiaiim-J rroi^ pcv-hroin^ Souircc '-^'^ki^oi^ h . 'l/vj 



i>:.-"\'lC-J 



TMXIl;;-::'.:.T Cr,. 



V -AR i,K.'.._' JlJA.L />0, 19 



-- 19 -vV. 



Ci\ R£G_OX Or 51 A^.". 



Country c 
oi hi 



All co.ini;^.. 



Eurcpe 

DaiiPaark . 

Fr..nco ' 

Gc-rr.::*ny 

Groice 

Ireland 

Italy 

Luxer.ibourj! 

Malta 

Poland 

Spain 

Turkey (E;.ropa t.r.c 

England 

Scotland 

Yugosiavic' 

Other E-jr^pe . . . . , 



Asia 

China and Taiwan 

Kong Kong 

Japa'a 

Korea 

Lebanon 



r.&c 
VY-: 



pint 
RyUkyL lai 
Thailand . 
Viecnam .. 
Other Asi; 



North Ar;:erica 

Barbados 

Other North Ar..eri 



South Ar.iarica 

Africa 

Australia and NC'.-; Zc-'av 
All Other 



Ado pi 
abro.! 



To be 

ad^ptt. 



3'5: 



237 



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19... 

13 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE 
WASHINGTON D.C. 20536 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER 
OF IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION 



The Attorney General, 

United States Department of Jtbstice 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the Annual Report of the Immigration 
and Naturalization Service for the year ended Jime 30, 1968. 

Respectfully submitted. 



' Raymond F. Farrell, 



Commissioner. 



Immigration and Natur^vlization Service. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office 
Wasliington, D.C. 20402 - Price $1.50 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

GENERAL 1 

TRAVEL CONTROL AND ADJUDICATIONS 1 

Travel Control 2 

Inspections 2 

Admissions 2 

Inadmissable Aliens 6 

Ad j udications 7 

Adjustment of Status 7 

Visa Petitions 8 

Other A])i)lications 9 

Service Operations Outside the United States 9 

DOMESTIC CONTROL 9 

Dejjor table Aliens Located 10 

Caribbean Investigations Coordination Program 15 

Foreign-born Law Violators 16 

Criminal Prosecution 19 

DETENTION AND DEPORTATION ACTR^ITIES 19 

HEARINGS AND LITIGATION.. 20 

Exclusion and Deportation Hearings 20 

Litigation 20 

ALIEN ADDRESS REPORTS 22 

CITIZENSHIP. _.._ 23 

N at \u-alization Activities 24 

Derivative Citizenship 26 

Othei' Citizensliip Activities 27 

Legislation Affecting Naturalization and Citizenship 27 

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 28 

TABLE 

1. Immigration to the United States: 1820-1968 ,31 

2. Aliens and citizens admitted and departed, by months; Years ended June 30, 1967 and 1968. 32 

3. Aliens and citizens admitted at United States ports of entry: Years ended June 30, 1967- 

1968.. _.. ......... 33 

4. Aliens admitted by classes under the immigration laws: Years ended June 30, 1964-1968.. 34 

5. Immigrants admitted, by port: Years ended June 30, 1964-1968 35 

6. Immigrants admitted by classes under the immigration laws and country or region of birth: 

Year ended June 30,"l968 36 

CA. Immigrants admitted by classes under the immigration laws and country or region of last 

permanent residence: Year ended June 30, 1968 37 

6B. Aliens who adjusted status to permanent residents in the United States, by country or 

region of birth : Year ended June 30, 1968 38 

6C. Aliens who were adjusted to permanent resident status in the United States under Section 
245, Immigration and Nationality Act, by status at entry and country or region of birth: 

Year ended June 30, 1968 ... ------ ^9 

6D. Aliens who were adjusted to permanent resident status in the United States under Section 
245, Immigration and Nationality Act, by year of entry and country or region of birth: 

Year ended June 30, 1968 .' 40 

6E. Refugees admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 1946-1968 41 

6F. Immigrants admitted", under the Act of September 26, 1961 (Public Law 87-301) : Septem- 
ber 26, 1961-June30, 1968 42 

6G. Immigrants admitted under the Act of October 24, 1962 (Public Law 87-885) by country or 

region of birth: October 24, 1962-June 30, 1968 43 

7. Immigrants admitted by quota charge: Year ended June 30, 1968 44 

7 A. Immigrants admitted by quota charge and quota preferences: Year ended June 30, 1968.. 45 



TABLE 

8. Immigrants admitted, by country or region of birth and major occupation group: Year 

ended June 30, 1968 _" 1 

8A. Beneficiaries of occupational preferences and otlier immigrants admitted by occupation: 
Year ended June 30, 1968 

9. Immigrants admitted, by country or region of birth, sex, and age: Year ended June 30, 1968. 

10. Immigrants admitted, by sex and age: Years ended June 30, 1959-1968 

lOA. Immigrants admitted by sex, marital status, age, and major occupation group: Years ended 

June 30, 1964-1968 

11. Aliens and citizens admitted and departed: Years ended June 30, 1908-1968 

12. Immigrants admitted, by state of intended future permanent residence: Years ended June 

30, 1959-1968 

12A. Immigrants admitted, by specified countries of birth and state of intended future perma- 
nent residence : Year ended June 30, 1968 

12B. Immigrants admitted by specified countries of birth and rural and urban area and city: 
Year ended June 30, 1968 

13. Immigration by country, for decades: 1820-1968 

14. Immigrants admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 1959-1968 

15. Nonimmigrants admitted, by covmtry or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 1959-1968. _ 
15A. Temporary visitors admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 1959- 

1968. ..1 -----..-- 

16. Nonimmigrants admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and country or region of 

birth: Year ended June 30, 1968 

16A. Temporary workers admitted under Section 101 (a) (15) (H) of the Immigration and Na- 
tionality Act, by country: Years ended June 30, 1967-1968 

16B. Temporary workers admitted under Section 101(a)(15)(H) and Section 101(a)(15)(J) of 
the Immigration and Nationality Act, by occupation: Year ended June 30, 1968 

17. Nonimmigrants admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and country or region of 

last permanent residence : Year ended June 30, 1968 

17A. Temporary visitors and other nonimmigrants admitted, by port: Year ended June 30, 1968. 
17B. Temporary visitors admitted at airports, by country of last permanent residence: Year 

ended June 30, 1968 

17C. Temporary visitors admitted at seaports, by country of last permanent residence: Year 

ended June 30, 1968 

17D. Temporary visitors admitted, at land border ports, by country of last permanent residence: 

Year ended June 30, 1968 

18. Foreign laborers admitted or paroled into the United States: Years ended June 30, 1959-68. 

19. Entries of alien and citizen border crossers over international land boundaries by State and 

port: Year ended June 30, 1968 

20. Entries of alien and citizen border crossers over international land boundaries: Years 

ended June 30, 1928-1968 

20A. Special inquiry officer hearings completed, by regions and districts: Years ended June 30, 
1964-1968.' t 

21. Aliens excluded from the United States, by cause: Years ended June 30, 1892-1968 

22. Aliens excluded, by country or region of birth and cause: Year ended June 30, 1968 

23. Aliens apprehended, aliens deported, and aliens required to depart: Years ended June 30, 

1892-1968 

24. Aliens dejiorted, by country to which deported and cause: Year ended June 30, 1968 

24A. Aliens required to depart, by nationality and cause: Year ended June 30, 1968 

24B. Aliens de]iorted, by nationality and cause: Year ended June 30, 1968 

24C. Aliens required to depart, by country of destination and cause: Year ended June 30, 1968. 

25. Aliens deported, by country to which deported and deportation expense: Year ended 

June 30, 1968.-.' 1 

26. Aliens deported by cause: Years ended June 30, 1908-1968 

26A. Aliens dejiorted, by country to which deported: Years ended June 30, 1959-1968 

27. Aliens de]iorted and required to depart, by year of entry and status at entry: Year ended 

June 30, 1968 

27A. Aliens deported and required to depart, by status at entry: Years ended June 30, 1964- 

1968 ■ "_ 

27B. Deportable aliens located, by status at entry and nationality: Year ended June 30, 1968.. 

28. Alien crewmen deserted at United States air and seaports, bj' nationality and flag 

of carrier: Year ended June 30, 1968 



TABLE Page 

29. Vessels and airplanes inspected, crewmen admitted, alien crewmen deserted, and alien 

stowaways found, by location: Year ended June 30, 1968 92 

'30. Principal activities and accomplishments of Immigration Border Patrol: Years ended 

June 30, 1959-1968 - - 93 

31. Passengers arrived in the United States, by sea and air, from foreign countries, by country 

(if embarkation: Year ended June 30, 1968 94 

32. Passengers departed from the United States, by sea and air, to foreign countries, by country 

of debarkation : Year ended June 30, 1968 96 

33. Passenger travel between the United States and foreign countries, by sea and air, by port 

of arrival or departure: Year ended June 30, 1968 98 

34. Aliens who reported under the alien address program, by selected states of residence and 

nationaht y : During 1968 . 99 

35. Aliens who reported under the alien address program, by selected nationalities and states 

of residence: During 1968 100 

36. Ahen population, by states of residence: 1940, 1951, 1960, and 1964 through 196S 101 

37. Declarations of intention filed, petitions for naturalization filed, persons naturalized, and 

petitions for naturalization denied: Years ended June 30, 1907-1968 102 

37 A. Persons naturalized, by general and special naturalization provisions: Years ended June 

30, 1964-1968 , _ _ _ 103 

38. Persons naturalized, by general and special naturalization pro\nsions and country or 

region of former allegiance: Year ended June 30, 1968 104 

39. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance: Years ended June 30, 

1959-1968 - 105 

40. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance and major occupation group: 

Year ended June 30', 1968__I 106 

41. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance, sex, and age: Year ended 

June 30, 1968 . - - - - - 107 

41 A. Persons naturalized, by sex, marital status, median age, and major occupation group: Years 

ended June 30, 1964-1968 109 

42. Persons naturalized, by states or territories of residence: Years ended June 30, 1959-1968_. 110 
42A. Persons naturalized, by specified countries of former allegiance and by states or territories 

of residence: Year ended June 30, 1968 111 

42B. Persons naturalized, by type of court and states or territories of residence: Year ended 

June 30, 1 968 ' 112 

43. Persons naturalized by specified countries of former allegiance and by rural and urban 

area and city: Year ended June 30, 1968 113 

44. Persons naturalized, by country or region of birth and year of entry: Year ended June 30, 

1968 115 

45. Persons naturalized, by sex and age: Years ended June 30, 1959-1968 116 

46. Administrative certificates of citizenship issued, by country or region of birth and reason 

for claim: Year ended June 30, 1968 _ 117 

47. Administrative certificates of citizenship issued to persons who derived citizenship through 

luUuralization of parents or through marriage, by country or region of birth and year 
derived : Year ended June 30, 1968'! T '_ - - 118 

48. Administrative certificates of citizenship issued to persons who acquired citizenship at birth 

abroad through citizen parents, bv country or region of birth and year acquired: Year 
ended June 30, 1968 1 119 

49. Petitions for naturalization denied, by reason: Years ended June 30, 1959-1968 120 

49A. Administratively issued uaturaliziUion certificates cancelled: Year ended June 30, 1968 121 

50. Certificates of naturalization revoked, by grounds: Years ended June 30, 1959-1968 121 

51. Persons expatriated, bv grounds and year reports received: Years ended June 30, 1959-1968. 121 

52. Persons repatriated: Years ended June 30, 1959-1968 122 

53. Prosecutions for immigration and nationality ^dolations: Years ended June 30, 1959-1968. 123 

54. Con\-ictions for immigration and nationality violations: Years ended June 30, 1959-1968.. 124 

55. Writs of habeas corpus, judicial review of order of deportation and declaratory judgments 

in exclusion and deportation cases: Years ended June 30, 1964-1968 125 

56. Private immio-ration and nationality bills introduced and laws enacted, 75th Congress 

through 90th Congress " --- 126 

57. Private bills and beneficiaries of private bills, 90th Congress — by type of bill and action 

(country of birth of beneficiaries for bills enacted) 127 



Report of the Commissioner of Immigration 
and. Naturalization 



GENERAL 

The Immigration and Naturalization Service is 
responsible for enforcement and administration of 
Federal statutes relatino- to inmiigration and 
naturalization. This involves the examination of 
every person seeking entry into the I'nited States 
to determine his admissibility under the provisions 
of immigration laws. It also includes granting or 
denying petitions for preference visas, importa- 
tion of alien workers, and discretionary relief or 
waivers for those seeking permanent residence 
while in the I'nited States. 

The Service is also charged with the prevention 
of illegal entry across the land borders or by sea 
or air, as well "as the detention, api)rehension. and 
deportation of aliens illegally in the United States. 
This involves the investigation of the cases of 
aliens in the United States who through violation 
cf status of admission oi- other violation of law lie- 
come amendable to deportation, and the detention 
and deportation of such aliens. 

Another principal area of responsibility is that 
of naturalization and citizenship. This includes 
the examination of aliens and witnesses to deter- 
mine whether the aliens qualify for citizenship 
through naturalization; the presentation of the 
facts in each case and recommendations to the 
naturalization courts; and the issuance of certifi- 
cates to derivative citizens. The Service also 
carries forward a program of cooperation with the 
public schools in fostering citizenship education. 

Fiscal year 1968 was marked by an miprec- 
edented volume of inspections of aliens and 
citizens with immigrant admissions topping the 
annual totals of eveiy year since 1924, and the 
number of tourists, students, and others in tem- 
jjorary status sui'passing all prior years of record. 
Border crossers, crewmen, and citizens inspected 
brought the grand total to almost 218 million. 

All the social ills encountered in the general 
population are found in the alien population. 
Frauds, illegal entry into the countr\', smuggling 
of aliens, and narcotics, criminals, and subversives 
occupied the attention of the enfoi-cement officers. 

In 1968, citizenship responsibilities were met not 
only through the naturalization process itself but 



by encouraging the education of aliens for citizen- 
ship through the publication of appropriate texts 
furnished the public schools for citizenship classes. 
Another responsibility that has expanded in re- 
cent years is that of issuing certificates to persons 
who "derive U.S. citizenship either through birth 
abroad to citizen parents or through the naturali- 
zation of parents. 

Possildy the most notable achievement in the 
field of management improvement was the inaugu- 
ration on a trial basis of the accelerated inspection 
system, whereby the four Government agencies 
having responsibilities relating to persons arriv- 
ing from abroad, combined forces to perform a 
single inspection covering the controlling factors 
of customs, public health, agriculture, and 
immigration. 

TRAVEL CONTROL 
AND ADJUDICATIONS 

By trains, planes, cars, vessels, snowmobiles, and 
hydrofoils and under their own power, people ar- 
rived at U.S. ports from foreign countries. Some 
came to make their homes in this country. Of these, 
some came to join relatives or to Avork here or, as 
refugees, to seek surcease from an intolerable situ- 
ation abroad. Some crossed the land borders to buy 
groceries or go to a movie or return home from a 
hvmtincr tripsin Canada or tour the United States. 
Xo matter how thev arrived or why, every per- 
son who entered the United States had met the 
requirements of the immigration laws for admis- 
sibility. To see that these standards are met is the 
function of inspections in Travel Control. But 
judging a person's admissibility by an inspector 
at the port is often neither the beginning nor the 
end of the process. Many aliens seeking admission 
as immigrants must have an approved petition 
before a visa mav be granted. Nonimmigrants or 
aliens admitted for temporaiy periods may seek 
an extension of their time in the United States 
or, under certain circumstances, seek to have their 
status adjusted to that of iwrmanent residents. 
Approval or disapproval of such privileges is the 
adjudicative function of Travel Control. 




Passeii 171 Tx a rri riii 
tcrnatiiiiiiil AirpDr 
erateil iii.yiritiuii" 
San Aiitoiiin. ']■,.,■ 
inspection III jHissi 
for four (lui-iriiini . 
Ho Hcdilh. 1111,1 .!(/, 



(/ fnint (ihroiid at John F. Kennedy In- 
t (ire iii^iiicted under the new "acceU 
■sii.si. III. iiliich in also being tested at the 
. I nil iiKilional Airport. The primary 
iii/i rx /.v done hi/ <i .lini/lr iiffin r mtinf/ 
•il ,11/1 nries. Iniiiii</nilinn. 1 ■ n.^tnni.-;. I'lih- 
■iilliire. For approxiiiuitihj Sil pc 



of the /;((,«(//(/(/. V, no further clearance will be necessary. 
The otinrs iril! be referred to Customs and Agriculture for 
complete baiji/aije inspection. 



TRAVEL CONTROL 
Inspections 

Travel Fdcil/fuf/ons. The Sen'ice, during the 
fiscal year 19(is, introduced new procedures to fa- 
cilitate the inspection and entry of the moimting 
millions of U.S. citizens and aliens who come to 
our ports of entry each year. 

A number of the improvements had to do with 
simplified documentation. The arrival/departure 
record required for all i>assengers arriving or de- 
parting by air and sea was eliminated for U.S. 
citizens. Since 63 percent of all air and sea pas- 
senger arrivals and departures are U.S. citizens, 
tliis action dispensed with nearly nine million such 
record forms a year and resulted in faster immi- 
gration clearance for citizens. In collabora- 



tion witli the Department of State, the "Visit 
U.S.A."' program was encouraged by temporary 
measures to simplify reenti-y from Canada of alien 
visitors to the United States who wished to visit 
Expo 67 and retum to the United States. Similar 
arrangements also were made to facilitate entry 
from Mexico by visitors to San Antonio's Hemis- 
Fair this summer. 

The requirement that nonimmigrant alien crew- 
men make application upon arrival for an Alien 
Crewman Landing Permit and Identification Card 
was discontinued, except that those employed on 
certain passenger ships which make regular trips 
to the Ignited States may still apply for tlie per- 
mits. Tliis step reduced the large amount of time 
previously consumed by Service employees in 
processing the applications and issuing the cards. 

Acting promptly on a major recommendation of 
the President's Inclustry-Government Special Task 
Force on Travel, the Service, in conjunction with 
the Customs Bureau, the Public Health Sei-v-ice, 
and the Department of Agriculture instituted an 
accelerated nispection procedure on an ejcperimen- 
tal l)asis at New York City's John F. Kennedy In- 
ternational Airport on June 10, 1968, and at the 
San Antonio, Texas, International Airport a few 
days later. Under this plan, the primai-y inspection 
of all an-iving air passengers is done by a single 
officer acting for all four agencies. The line officer 
is backed up by the necessary monitoi'ing and 
secondary operations by specialists of eacli agency. 
Only an estimated 15 to 20 percent of the passen- 
gers will be referred to Customs and Agriculture 
for complete baggage inspection. Over 200 offi- 
cers of tlie participating agencies have been 
trained to handle functions otlier than their own. 
The application of tliis concept promises a reduc- 
tion in tlie overall inspection time per passenger 
from an average 40 minutes with four separate in- 
spections to approximately 15 minutes with the 
"accelerated combined inspection". Better man- 
power and airport space utilization also are 
expected to accrue from this innovation. If antici- 
pated results are realized, the procedure will be 
installed at other major U.S. international airports 
and seaports. 

To encourage foreign nationals to visit the 
United States and thus lessen the adverse balance 
of payments, the United States Travel Service has 
devised a "Visit U.S.A. Hospitality Card'' which 
entitles such visitors to certain benefits. To co- 
operate, arrangements were made to validate such 
cards. This is done by the examining innnigrant 
inspector affixing an admission stamp on the cards 
when presented at a port of entry. Re]3lacement 
cards for those wliich may be lost can also be re- 
validated at immigration offices when presented by 
the issuing transportation company representative. 

Admissions 

More than 217 million persons were inspected 
and admitted into the United States during fiscal 
year 1968, exceeding last year's figure by 5 percent 



and rt'iichiiio- another alltime hiij-h. Persons ad- 
mitted over the huid borders or arriving as crew- 
men accounted for 1)6 percent of tliat total. The 
otliers arrived as vessel or aircraft passengers at 
United States sea and air ports. The number of 
aliens admitted exceeded 125 million, and of these 
entries, 120 million were made by border crossers 
from Mexico and Canada, an increase of 4 percent 
over last year. The remaining (> million consisted 
of crewmen, immigrants, docmnented noninuni- 
grants, and lawful alien residents returning from 
temporary visits to countries other than Canada or 
Mexico. 

The admission of U.S. citizens rose from 86,641,- 
048 in fiscal year 1967 to 92,086,163 this year. 
There were 86,()88,667 border crossers and 1,068,035 
crewmen; the remaining 4,929,4()1 were returning 
from visits to countries other than Mexico and 
Canada. 

Immigrants. Not since 1924 have so many aliens 
become lawful permanent residents of the Ignited 
States. The 454,448 who attained such status in- 
cluded 323,993 who obtained visas abi-oad and 
130,455 who were in the United States and whose 
status was adjusted to that of pernmnent residents. 
The number of adjustments was an increase of 
81 percent over last year. The major reason for 
the increase was the operation of two different laws 
affecting the Cuban refuo:ees in the United States. 
Public Law 89-732, wliich became effective No- 
vember 2, 1966, [novided that Cuban refugees who 
met the legal retinirements for permanent resi- 
dence could be adjusted to that status after 2 years' 
residence in the ITnited States. The Act of Octo- 
ber 3, 1965, which eliminated the national origins 
quota system, also established an annual numerical 
limitation of 120,000 to become effective July 1, 
1968, for natives of independent "Western Hemis- 
phere countries. Since this latter provision would 
apply to i^ei-sons born in Cuba as well as natives 
of other Western Hemisphere countries, many Cu- 
ban refugees rushed to file applications for adjust- 
ments that would l)e adjudicated prior to the estab- 
lishment of the 120,000 restriction, thereby 
avoiding competition for one of the 120,000 visa 
numbers, which would be necessai-y on and after 
July 1, 1968. 

The classes under which immigrants were ad- 
mitted are reflected in the table that follows. 

The Act of October 3, 1965 established three 
major categories of immigrants. Special immi- 
grants admitted munbered 155,127. The largest 
grouii within this category were natives of West- 
ern Hemisphere countries; Mexico accounted for 
41,290, Canada 27,018, Jamaica 17,414, Cuba 
10,748, and the Dominican Republic 9,097. A na- 
tive of a Western Hemisphere country seeking 
admission to the United States to work (except the 
parent, spouse, or child of a citizen or lawful per- 
manent resident of the United States) must obtain 
a labor certification from the Department of Labor 
certifying that there is a need for his particular 
type of work in the United States and that he will 



Immigrants admitted: 
Years ended June SO, 1967 and 1968 

Class of admission 1968 1967 

Total Immigrants. 464,448 361,972 

I. Immigrants subject to numerical limitations 156,212 153,079 

Relative Preferences... 68,384 79,671 

Unmarried sons and daughters of U.S. citizens... 1,105 1,317 

Spouses, unmarried sons and daughters of resi- 
dent aliens and their children 21,002 19,157 

Married sons and daughters of U.S. citizens, their 
spouses and children. 10,562 15,652 

Brothers and sisters of U.S. citizens, their spouses 

and children 35,716 43,545 

Occupational Preferences 26,865 25,365 

Uighly skilled and professional workers and their 

spouses and children 13, 761 16, 810 

other workers and their spouses and children 13,114 8,555 

Conditional entrants 1 6,658 6,651 

Nonpreference immigrants 53,992 40,635 

Aliens adjusted under Section 244, 1. & N. Act ^ — 313 757 

II. Immediate Relatives 43,677 46,903 

Spouses of U.S. citizens 27,890 29,537 

Childrenof U.S. citizens.... .-.. 7,866 8,567 

Parents of U.S. citizens 7,921 8,799 

III. Special Immigrants.. 155,127 126,370 

Natives of Western Hemisphere countries 151,147 123,110 

Spouses and children of natives of Western Hemi- 
sphere countries 2,782 2,172 

Other special immigrants 1,198 1,088 

IV. Immigrants admitted under special legislation 94,614 29,468 

Refugee-escapees who adjusted status 2,637 3,210 

Immigrants, Act of October 24, 1962 138 385 

Cuban parolees who adjusted status. Act of Novem- 
ber 2, 1966 91,520 25,752 

Immigrants, other special acts 219 111 

V. Other immigrants not subject to numerical limitations. 4, 918 6, 162 

Aliens adjusted under Section 244, 1. & N. Act 64 72 

Aliens adjusted under Section 249, 1. & N. Act 2, 148 3, 195 

Other immigrants 2,706 2,895 

' Includes 5,800 conditional entrants in 1968 and 4,106 in 1967 whose status 
does not become permanent until 2 years after entry. 
2 Includes 12 in 1968 and 40 in 1967 who adjusted under special legislation. 

not displace a United States worker nor adversely 
affect the economy of the ITnited States. Approxi- 
mately 40 percent of the natives of Western 
Hemisphere countries had met the labor certifi- 
cation requirements before visas were issued to 
them. The remainder was relatives of citizens and 
resident aliens and others not seeking employment 
in the United Stat-es. 

Special immigrants is a class that will be of par- 
ticular interest in fiscal year 1969, since, for the 
first time immigration of this group will be con- 
trolled as to numbers that may be admitted. Since 
there are no preferences such as were established 
for the Eastern Hemisphere, assignment of visas 
will be purely on a first-come, first-served basis. 
Spouses, children, and parents of U.S. citizens will 
not be counted against the 120.000. 

Historically, spouses and children of citizens, a 
category now referred to as immediate relatives, 
have been exempt from the need for a visa num- 
ber. Parents of citizens over 21 years of age were 
added to the immediate relative categoi-y by the 
Act of October 3, 1965. During 1968, there were 
43,677 immediate relatives admitted : 27,890 
spouses of citizens; 7,866 children including 
adopted children; and 7,921 parents of citizens, 
who came to join their citizen relatives in the 



United States. In 1967, 57 percent of the parents 
were from Italy (2,160) , China (1,414) , and Greece 
(1,125). During this year, there was a marked 
decrease in tlie number of parents born in China, 
probably because many of the Chinese parents 
were already in the United States as Hong Kong 
parolees, and mo.st of the adjustments to perma- 
nent residence for this group had been completed 
prior to 1968. 

As has been true for all the years since World 
"War II, spouses and children from Germany 
(6,097) have far exceeded the munbers from other 
countries such as Italy (."'.iSOfi), tlie Philijipines 
(3,704), the United Kingdom (2,643), Japan 
(2,271) and Korea (2,105). 

Under the provisions of Public Law 89-236, ef- 
fective December 1, 1965, a numerical limitation of 
170,000 for the Eastern Hemisphere was placed on 
the number of aliens who may l)e issued immigrant 
visas or who may otherwise acquire the status of 
lawful permanent residents in the United States 
each year. 

Public Law 89-236 also set up a new system of 
preferences consisting of seven classes in place of 
tlie four which existed previously. The new first, 
second, fourth, and fifth preferences are allocated 
to si")ecified relatives of citizens and lawful perma- 
nent residents of the United States. The new third 
and sixth preferences are occupational preferences, 
while the new seventh preference pertains to 
certain refugees. 

The numl)er of immigrants admitted under the 
numerical limitation during the year reached 
156,212 and came j^rimarily from the United 
Kingdom (24,393), Italy (17,248), the Philip- 
pines (12,332), Portugal (10,928^, Greece 
(10,479), China and Taiwan (9,241), and Ger- 
many (9,207). 

During the year, 68,384 close relatives of citizens 
ancl permanent resident aliens were admitted to the 
ITnited States under the first, second, fourth, and 
fifth preferences. Following are the percentages 
out of the 170.000 maximum that were allocated 
for relative preferences and the percentages used. 



First preference— Unmarried sons and daughters of U.S. 

citizens _ __ _ __ 

Second preference— Spouses and unmarried sons'and 

daugliters of permanent residents 

Fourth preference— Married sons and daughters of tf.S. 

citizens __ 

Fifth preference— Brothers and sisters of U.S. citizens 



Fortunately, the numbers not used in higher pri- 
ority preferences may be carried to the next lower 
preferences listed above, so there is a possibility of 
numbers being available in lower preferences" for 
numbers ob\iously not needed in the first and sec- 
ond preferences. 
^ Italy, Portugal, Greece, the Philippines, and 
China were the countries from whence the g-reatest 



numbers of relatives under the preferences were 
able to join close relatives in the United States. 

Ten percent of the 170,000 was allotted for the 
third preference and 10 percent for the sixth pref 
erence or a total of .34,000 for the two occupational 
preferences. Since the numeric limits for occupa- 
tional preferences must encompass both the pri- 
mary applicant and his family, visas in these pref- 
erences were all used, and waiting lists were created 
in these classes. However, there were only 26,86.'") 
admissions, including 8,153 members of the profes- 
sions or persons with exceptional aliility in the 
sciences or the arts admitted under the third pref- 
erence. Also, 7,940 persons were admitted under 
the sixth preference to fill jobs in the United States 
for which a shortage of workers existed. There 
were 10,772 spouses and children accompanying 
the third and sixth preference immigrants. Engi- 
neers, professors, professional nurses, doctors, and 
sui'geons, again were the ])rincipal occupations of 
immigrants in the third preference category. 
Tailors and tailoresses, private household workers, 
cooks, and sheepherders were some of the major 
occupations in the sixth preference category. 

There were 5,800 refugees who conditionally 
entered the United States, and 858 already in the 
United States were accorded lawful permanent res- 
ident status under the seventh preference category. 
Albania, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Hmigary, Ro- 
mania, Poland, and Yugoslavia were the principal 
countries of birth of those entering the United 
States. Most of those already in the United States 
were born in Hong Kong or China. 




Yugoslav family being interviewed hy Immigration Officer 
(center) at a refugee eamp in Italy, on their applications 

for cotKlitiiiniil rntrii into t/ir I nitnl .Slatrx undrr the 
.scniith pn fi f ii<r. 'I'll,' 1(1 rhililnii nnu/r i>i in/r from 10 
iiKDiths to III i/ciirs. \\ omiiH stinidinij at rii/ht ix interpreter. 

In addition, 53,992 immigrants were admitted 
under the nonpreference categoiy. The United 
Kingdom, Germany and the Scandinavian coun- 
tries with generous quotas were accustomed to 
enter in the nonpreference classification, since no 
petition was required. When the last \-estiges of the 
national origins system are eliminated beginning 
July 1, 1968, and the immigrant visa numbers are 
available on a worldwide basis, it is likely that 
there will be veiy few nonpreference numbers 
available. 

C'uhaii Refugees. The orderly movement of refu- 
gees to this country from Cuba continued during 



fiscal year 1968, 4-l:,:i04 arrivino- liy the airlift, down 
3 percent from the previous year. Ertective screen- 
ing procedures established in cooperation with the 
Department of State, the Department of Healtli, 
Education, and Welfare, and other agencies of the 
Government continued. 

As cited elsewhere in this report, there were 
91,520 Cubans who attained permanent resident 
status under special legislation. It was primarily 
this group that helped swell the total of immigrant 
admissions to its hiffli of 4.^4,44*^. 




Cuban airlift arrivals. Rrfiigcfs irait turn for inspection 
and admission processiiifi as polilical exiles at the process- 
ing center in Miami. Duriiui fixcul ii<ar 1968, Jfi,30Ji arrived 

hil iiirlift. 

Non/mmigrarit.^. Aliens admitted to the United 
States for temporary periods are classed as non- 
immigrants. In addition, returning residents who 
liave once been counted as immigrants or an addi- 
tion to the population are not again counted as 
immigrants but are counted for statistical purposes 
with nonimmigrants. There is a variety of classifi- 
cations within that category. Exclusive of citizens 
of Canada and Mexico who enter frequently as bor- 
der crossers and exclusive of alien crewmen, a total 
of :^,200,336 noninmiigrants was admitted during 
the year, exceeding the number admitted in fiscal 
year 1967 by 23 percent. Shown below are the 
classes under which noninnnigrants were admitted 
and a comparison with last year's figures. 

Nonimmigrants admitted: 
Years ended June 30, 1967 and 1968 



Class of admission 



TOTAL_. 3,200,336 2,608,193 

Foreign government officials 45,320 42,916 

Temporary visitors for business- 257,800 220,414 

Temporary visitors for pleasure 2,042,666 1,628,585 

Transit aliens- 232,731 204,936 

Treaty traders and investors 13,091 9,983 

Students.- 73,303 63,370 

Spouses and children of students. 7,009 6,867 

International representatives 19,826 18,386 

Temporary workers and industrial trainees.. 68,969 70,010 

Workers of distinguished merit and ability . 11,578 9,352 

Other temporary workers 52,798 57,328 

Industrial trainees. 4,593 3,330 

Representatives of foreign information media 3,622 3,257 

Exchange aliens 45,320 38,630 

Spouses and children of exchange aliens 15,163 15,067 

Returning residents . 373,252 284,330 

NATO officials. . 2,264 2,442 



Aliens coming to visit friends and relatives or 
coming as tourists, and who are classified as visi- 
tors for pleasure, made up the largest group of 
nonimmigrants and numbered 2,042,666, an in- 
crease of 25 percent over the preceding year. 

It is tliis group that the Travel Service and other 
agencies have sought after in order to spread a 
greater knowledge of the United States and its 
customs, institutions, and scenei-y and to better 
balance the payments between foreign countries 
:uid the United States. More than 629,000 
tourists were from Europe. The United Kingdom 
with 198,257 visitors and Germany with 102,822, 
followed by France with 93,427, comprised 63 per- 
cent of the visitors from Europe. F'rom the "West- 
em Hemisphere came 1,245,519 visitors, including 
454,804 from Mexico and 253,513 from Canada. 
Accoiuiting at least in part for the 23-percent in- 
crease in tourists from Canada was Expo 67. 
Similarly, the San Antonio HemisFair accounts 
for an inci'ease at the Mexican border. 

A 45-percent increase in visitors from Asia 
brought the total during the year to 98,612 with 
Jai)an (40,589), Israel a6,332), and the Phil- 
ippines (12,396) making up 70 percent of the total. 
In addition, there were 15,600 visitors from Africa 
and 53,428 from Oceania, principally Australia 
( 32,896 ) and New Zeal a nd ( 1 1 ,848 ) . 

Additionally, 257,800 persons were admitted 
temporarily as visitors for business. Included were 
46,814 from the United Kingdom, 36,957 from 
Jajian, 22,989 from Germany, and 17,077 from 
France. 

Others who entered to engage in business were 
13,091 treaty traders and investors. Historically 
more treaty ti'aders have come from Japan than 
any other countiy. This year was no exception with 
5,245, a number which far exceeded the next vol- 
ume countries of the Ignited Kingdom with 1,524, 
followed by Germany with 1,438. 

Foreign students coming to attend educational 
institutions in the United States numbered 73,303. 
They were accompanied by 7,009 spouses and chil- 
dren. For the 10 years prior to 1965, the number of 
students admitted annually averaged 35,200. Since 
then there has been a steady increase of 10 percent 
in 1966. 14 percent in 1967,'and 16 percent in 1968. 
The largest percentage increase in students ad- 
mitted was from the countries of Asia (27 per- 
cent), Africa (27 percent), and South America 
( 23 percent ) . 

Programs designed to further international cul- 
tural exchange were participated in by 45,320 ex- 
change visitors, who were accompanied by 15,163 
spouses and children. Many of these exchange 
aliens came as .students or to teach, do research, or 
work in medical institutions. All of them were 
admitted to participate in Government or privately 
sponsored programs. There were 5,930 exchange 
aliens from the TTnited Kinadom, followed bv the 
Philippines (2,661), Germany (2,570), and India 
(2,436). 

There are three classes of nonimmigrants who, 



Number 
4,000,000 



3,000,000- 



NONIMMIGRANTS ADMITTED 
1964-1968 

TOTAL NONIMMIGRANTS 
■M TOTAL TEMPORARY VISITORS 



2,000,000- 



[,000,000- 




0« 



1964 



965 



1966 



967 



1968 



contrary to tlie general rule for nonimmigrants, 
may be admitted temporarily to the United States 
to perform temporary services. These included 
11,578 persons of distinguished merit and ability, 
4,593 trainees, and 52,798 other nonimmigrants 
brought to tlie United States under the provisions 
of the Immigration and Nationality Act wliich 
permits the temporary importation of foreign 
workers if like workers are not available in the 
United States. Included in the other nonimmi- 
grants were 47,643 temporary workers admitted 
under specific agricultural and other labor pro- 
grams. Among the latter were 14,209 Canadian 
agricultural workers and woodsmen, 11,069 agri- 
cultural workers from the Caribbean area, 6,127 
Mexican agricultural workers, 15,735 other work- 
ers destined to the Tt.S. Virgin Islands, and 481 
sheepherders from Europe. 

Also among the nonimmigrants admitted durin<r 
fiscal year 1968 were 45,320 foreign government 
officials, 2,264 NATO officials, 19,826 official repre- 
sentatives to international organizations, and 
3,622 members of the foreign news media. Thei'e 
M-ere 232,731 travelers admitted in transit through 
the United States to other countries. 



More than 2,086,000 alien crewmen arrived at 
United States ports during the year and were 
granted shore leave. 

Inadmissible Aliens 

Aliens seeking to enter the United States must 
establish their admissibility under applicable laws. 
The inspection of aliens at our ports of entry is to 
assure that those admitted meet the qualifications 
prescribed in the law, to set time limits for control 
on the departure of those admitted for a temporary 
period, and to turn back the aliens who do not 
qualify for entry. 

Of the 225,362 aliens not permitted to enter the 
United States in the fiscal year 1968, 20,372 were 
crewmen who were denied the privilege of landing, 
185 were stowaways fovmd and detained on the ves- 
sels on which they arrived, 154,640 were denied ad- 
mission as border crossers, and 49,705 others with- 
drew their application for admission rather than 
await formal exclusion proceedings. Entry was re- 
fused 946 after hearings. Of these, 73 jjercent 
lacked do(nnnents required for admission. Four 
were excluded on subversive grounds, 89 had 
criminal, immoral, or narcotic records, and 160 



were found liy tlie Public Health Service to be 
iiiiulmissible for medical reasons. 

]Vaii'er-<^ of rnudiiiixK)J))lifi/. TTnder statutory au- 
thority, the Attorney (leneral has the power to 
waive the grounds of inatlniissibility for alien 
spouses, parents, and childi'eu of U.S. citizens or 
permanent resident aliens if the applicant's ex- 
(lusion would result in extreme hardship to the 
I '.S. citizen or permanent resident alien relatives 
and if the admission of such aliens would not be 
iiii'ainst the national welfare, safety, or security of 
the XTnited States. In fiscal year 1968, 1,098 such 
waivers, were approved. Additionally, 5,384 waiv- 
ers were granted to nonimmigrants whose admis- 
sion was found to be in the public interest. 

Alien defectors from connnunism may be 
granted visas for enry into the United Staters 
if they can establish that they were actively op- 
posed to that ideology for at least 5 years imme- 
diately prior to their application and if it can also 
be clearly shown that their admission would be in 
the public interest. In fiscal j'ear 1968, 79 such 
aliens were admitted under the statutory authority 
])rovided for this purpose. 

ADJUDICATIONS 

The Act of October 3, 1965 (Public Law 89- 
236), which established seven preferences within 
the 170,000 numerically controlled numbers for 
innnigrants from the Eastern Hemisphere, and the 
mounting numbers of noninnnigrants with their 
requests for extensions of stay, changes of status, 
permission for student employment, various waiv- 
ers from the law, and numerous other requests for 
privileges and benefits ine\itably increased the 
adjudicative workload. 

In fiscal year 1968, the Service continued its ef- 
forts to assure the further application of the mod- 
ei'n concej)ts of due jirocess standards to all of its 
administrative adjudications. In furtherance of 
that objective. Service regulations which contain 
information affecting the public were expanded. 
Also, regulations were, published implementing 
the law popularly known as the Public Informa- 
tion Act. These regulations included adjudicative 
guides which were deemed to affect the public. 

One of the most effective methods to achieve 
due process and Servicewide uniformity in the in- 
terpretation and application of the laws, regida- 
tions, and related administrative policies is the 
publication of precedent decisions. During the 
year, 49 decisions were designated for publica- 
tion as precedents. Published decisions are availa- 
ble for purchase from the Go^-ernment Printing 
Office or for examination at the principal offices 
of the Service. Additionally, unpublished decisions 
have been made available for examination and 
copvinsr at the district offices of origin and the Cen- 
tral Office. 

For the second consecutive fiscal year, receipts 
of applications and petitions for various benefits 
under the immigration laws exceeded one million. 



Receipts in fiscal year 1968 of 1,154,502 exceeded 
those of fiscal year 1967 by 11 percent. These acl- 
judications by "Service officers are exclusive of citi- 
zenship applications handled by naturalization of- 
fi<'ers and certain applications for discretionary re- 
lief filed before special inquiry officers in exclusion 
or expulsion hearings. The effect of the Act of 
October 3, 1965 (Public Law 89-236), which 
caused much of the increase in the workload, can 
be more fully apprei'iated when it is noted that 
the increase in the number of applications and pe- 
titions in fiscal year 1968 over fiscal year 1965, 
the last full year prior to the Act, was 44 percent. 

Adjustment of Status 

Cuban Adjmtment. Public Law 89-732, which 
became effective on Noveanber 2, 1966, made it 
possible for qualified Cuban refugees to become 
permanent residents of the ITnited States. By the 
end of fiscal year 1967, 41,052 Cuban refugees had 
applied for permanent resident status and 25,693 
cases had been adjudicated, leaving about 15,000 
cases to be processed in the succeeding fiscal }?ear. 
During 1968, the number of applications received 
doubled, and 95,679 applications were adjudicated. 
This astounding increase of 272.4 percent in ad- 
judications completed is partly accounted for by 
the tremendous influx of applications in the 
months of May and Jime when many eligible Cu- 
l)ans filed applications to avoid the effect of the 
120,000 numerical limitation imposed on AVestern 
Hemisphere natives beginning July 1, 1968. The 
Act also provided that Cuban refugees who had 
gone abroad, obtained inmiigrant visas, and re- 
entered as immigrants might have the date of their 
admission as immigrants backdated to a date not 
to exceed 30 months before the effective date of 
the Act. The advantage of this is that residence 
for naturalization can be established at an earlier 
date; and in fiscal year 1968, 1,350 Cubans took 
advantage of that provision. Another provision of 
the Act which was, in effect, a savings clause, en- 
abled the Service to accord permanent resident 
status to 600 other Western Hemisphere aliens 
whose applications for adjustment of status to per- 
manent residence had been filed with the Attorney 
General prior to December 1, 1965, and were pend- 
ing on that date. 

Section 2If5. In fiscal year 1968, the Service re- 
ceived 35,276 applications for adjustment of 
status to permanent residence pursuant to section 
245, a decline of 3 percent from the number re- 
ceived in fiscal year 1967 but 55 percent greater 
than the figure of fiscal year 1965, which was the 
last full year prior to the enactment of Public Law 
89-236. Prior to Pultlic Law 89-236, as many as 
55,000 quota numbers a year were unused. The pro- 
vision of Public Law 89-236 that authorized in 
fiscal year 1966, 1967, and 1968 the issuance of 
quota numbers not issued in each of the prior fiscal 
years, thus permitted full utilization of the 170.000 
"annual allocation of visa numbers. This avail- 



ability of visa numbers enabled greater numbers 
of nonimmigrant aliens in^the United States to 
qualify for assignment of visa numbers as immi- 
grants and subsequently to apply for adjustment. 
If the number of amjlications for adjustment 
under Section 1 of the Cuban Act is added to those 
applications under section 245, the total of 117,753 
applications exceeds last year's record total of 
applications for adjustment by 5'2 percent. 

The new third and sixth occupational prefer- 
ences resulted in a considerable number of appli- 
cations for adjustment under section 245. Included 
among the 33,595 aliens granted change of status 
to lawful permanent residence pursuant to section 
245 in fiscal year liXIS were 6,fi82 persons who were 
beneficiaries of the third preference classification 
and 4,783 persons who were beneficiaries of the 
sixth preference classification. Most of those who 
were adjusted to third preference status were born 
in China, India, Korea, and the Philippines. Spain, 
China, India, and Italy were the principal native 
countries of the sixth preference persons adjusted. 

There were 5,882 persons who adjusted to lawfid 
permanent resident status as relatives of citizens 
or lawful resident aliens. Most of the preference 
relatives who attained permanent status through 
adjustment were born in China (847), Italy (794), 
the Philippines (416), Greece (374), and' Poland 
(254). 

Of the 858 refugees or conditional entrants who 
were adjusted under the proviso to section 
203(a) (7), i.e., refugees in the United States who 
could adjust under the seventh preference category, 
425 were born in China and Taiwan, 215 in Hong 
Kong, and 157 in Spain. Also enabled to become 
lawful permanent residents under section 245 were 
7,66!) spouses and unmarried minor children and 
1,592 parents of United States citizens who, as 
"immediate relatives", are not chargeable to the 
numerical limitation of the Act. 

Crctit'ion of Record of Lawful Entry. The Act of 
October 3, 1965 advanced from June 28, 1940 to 
June 30, 1948, the date prior to which an ajjplicant 
for creation of a record of lawful entry must estab- 
lish that he has resided continuously in the ITnited 
States. As a result, fiscal year 1966 showed a 41- 
jDercent increase over the previous year. Receipts in 
fiscal year 1967, were 36 percent of fiscal year 1965, 
and the figure for fiscal year 1968 reflected a de- 
cline of 7 percent from the fiscal year 1965 figure. 
In fiscal year 1968, there were 2,129 cases of records 
of lawful entry created and 94 cases denied. 

Other AdfuMments. During the year, a total of 
2,637 refugee-escapees previously paroled into the 
United States under the Act of July 14, 1960 were 
examined by Service officers, found admissible, 
and accorded permanent resident status. Since the 
joint resolution of the Congress of July 14, 1960, 
on refugee-escapees, a total of 18,709 refugee- 
escapees have become permanent i-esidents. Ad- 
justments under this provision of law have been 
almost entirely phased out. Also adjusted to per- 
manent resident status were four former officials 



of foreign governments or of international orga- 
nizations and members of their families under Sec- 
tion 13 of the Act of September 11, 1957. Other 
adjustments included 363 suspension of deporta- 
tion cases, and 1,024 conditional entrants became 
permanent residents under sections 203 (g) and 
(h) following 2 years' physical presence in the 
United States. 

Visa Petitions 

With the abolishment, by the Act of October 3, 
1965, supra, of the term "nonquota", the law now 
provides for an equivalent status to be accorded to 
"immediate relatives'' of U.S. citizens, i.e., the 
spouses and minor children of U.S. citizens and 
the parents of adult U.S. citizens. Aliens accorded 
"immediate relative"" classification are not subject 
to the numerical limitation of the Act. Innnediate 
relative status may be accorded only upon approval 
by the Service of a petition filed by the U.S. citizen 
relative. During the year, 49,337 i>etitions to ac- 
cord immediate relative status were approved — a 
figure almost identical with 1967. Both figures rep- 
resent substantial increases over those in the years 
prior to enactment of Public Law 89-236. One rea- 
son is that Congress made it mandatory that any 
person who could qualify for innnediate relative 
status must be so classified so that visa numbers, 
which are numerically limited, may be reserved for 
aliens who are subject to the limitations. Effective 
July 1, 1968, an annual numerica.l limitation of 
12(r",000 will be inq>osed on "special immigrants'", 
mostly natives of independent countries of the 
Western Hemisphere, and, as in the case of the 
Eastern Hemisphere, those who are entitled to 
"innnediate relative" classification must so qualify. 
This will result in an increase in the number of 
petitions for immediate relative classification. In- 
cluded in the total petitions filed in fiscal year 1968 
by citizens were 1,699 petitions approved for 
orphans, a decline fi'om 1,918 such petitions ap- 
proved in the previous year. Service offices abi'oad 
adjudicated 933 of these jietitions on behalf of 
orphans. 

The first preference category, for mnnarried 
sons and daughters of U.S. citizens, resulted in 
1,822 petitions being approved to accord such sta- 
tus, an increase of 12 percent over the prior year. 
S]:)ouses and mnnarried sons and daughters of 
aliens lawfully admitted for permanent residence 
are accorded second preference status. A total of 
25,411 such petitions was approved in fiscal year 
1968, an increase of 14 percent over the previous 
year. 

A third preference classification for aliens who 
qualify as members of the professions or persons 
of exceptional ability in the sciences or arts pro- 
vides that such petitions may be filed by the alien 
himself or by any person acting in his behalf. A 
total of 23,369 such petitions was approved and 
1,151 denied after appropriate inquiry and inves- 
tigation. The large nmnber of approved petitions 



in tliis category, 28 percent more than in fiscal 
year 1967, coupled with the fact that spouses and 
children of the principal beneficiaries are entitled 
to the same classification, brought about the es- 
tablishment of a waiting list for visa numbers in 
this category. Detailed reports were furnished the 
Congi-ess in each approved case, as required by law. 

Fourth preference is accorded married sons and 
daughters of citizens. The fifth preference classi- 
fication is for brothers and sisters of citizens. Pe- 
titions approved in these categories totaled 26,97-1 
in fiscal year 1968. 

The sixth preference classification is for aliens 
who qualify as skilled or unskilled workers in oc- 
cupations for which workers in the United States 
are in short supply. The number of approved peti- 
tions increased by 9.3 percent over the previous 
year. In this category. 23,127 petitions were ap- 
proved and 1,632 denied. The tremendous number 
of petitions for workers resulted in the creation 
of a waiting list for the 17,000 numbers available 
annually in this classification. 

Section 2n3(a)(7) of the Act provides that 
10,200 visa numbers annually may be assigned to 
refugees. It also provides that up to .5,100 of these 
numbers may be utilized in adjusting the status of 
aliens who have been continuously physically 
present here for 2 years and who qualify as refu- 
gees. In contrast to fiscal year 1967 when 1,461 
such applications were received, only 841 applica- 
tions were received during fiscal year 1968, and 
8.53 persons were granted lawful pemianeut resi- 
dent status thereunder. 

Petitions filed by employers in the ITnited States 
to import for temporaiT periods aliens of distin- 
guished merit and al^ility, workere in short supply 
in the Ignited States, and industrial trainees to- 
taled 18,634 in fiscal year 1968 as compared to 
16, .340 received the previous year. There were 
17,345 approved and 501 denied by the Service 
after consultation with other Government agencies, 
representatives of labor and management, and 
other appropriate inquiries. Tmjiortatinn of all 
such aliens must l>e by petitions filed with the 
Service under the general pi-ovisions of the Immi- 
gration and Xationality Act. 

Other Applications 

During the year, 340,707 applications by non- 
immigrants to extend their temporary stay in the 
Ignited States were adjudicated as compared to 
297,629 last year, an increase of 14 percent. This is 
in line with the continuing increase of tourism in 
the Ignited States. Alien border crossing cards 
permitting temporary entry into the Ignited States 
were issued to 206,802 residents of Canada and 
Mexico who enter the United States frequently. 
Upon application, 17.240 nonimmigrants in the 
United States were permitted to change from one 
nonimmigrant class to another. 

Schools desiring to enroll foreign students must 
be authorized to do so bv the Service. Foreign stu- 



dents or exchange aliens must receive permission 
to transfer from one school or exchange program 
to another, and students must apply for permission 
to accept part-time employment. There were 51,313 
applications in these categories approved during 
tlie year, an increase of 9 percent over fiscal year 
1967. . 

Ignited States citizens who frequently cross the 
land borders were issued 11,045 certificat^es of 
identity to facilitate their reentry into the United 
States; for lawful permanent residents, 117,948 
applications for reentry permits, extensions of re- 
entry permits, and duplicate alien registration 
cards were adjudicated, up 2 percent over fiscal 
year 1967. Permission to reapply for admission to 
the Ignited States was accorded 3,134 previously 
deported aliens, and advance permission to return 
was given 123 resident aliens who otherwise would 
have been inaclmissible upon return to the United 
States following absences abroad. 

Aliens admitted to the United States to partici- 
pate in exchange programs must depart and reside 
in the countrv'of their birth or last residence, or 
under certain circumstances in another foreign 
country, for 2 years before they can apply for im- 
mio-rant visas or become permanent residents. This 
foreign residence requirement may be waived only 
wheifit is established that compliance with the 
requirement would cause exceptional hardship to 
the alien's United States citizen or lawful resident 
alien spouse or child, or upon the formal request of 
an interested Government agency. In each case the 
Secretary of State must ^Tcommend that the 
waiver be granted and the Attorney General must 
then make the final decision as to the waiver. There 
were 1,171 exceptional hardship waivers granted 
during the vear. In addition, 522 were granted 
upon ' the request of interested Government 
agencies. 

Service Operations Outside the 
United States 

Service officers stationed abroad continued to 
adjudicate applications and petitions filed by 
ITnited States citizens and permanent resident 
aliens who are abroad. They also work closely with 
U.S. consuls in matters involving functions of the 
Service and of the consular officers. 

DOMESTIC CONTROL 

Each year many aliens violate the immigration 
laws by "entering the countiy clandestinely or by 
fraudulent means. Others, " having entered the 
countiy in temporarv or permanent status, violate 
that status by not obeying the conditions of ad- 
mission or by engaging in criminal or other ac- 
tivity in violatioifof the Immigration and Xation- 
ality Act. The Investigations and Border Patrol 
Divisions of the Service share the responsibility 
for locating and apprehending such violators and 
gathering evidence to institute expulsion proceed- 



iiigs, criminal prosecution, or other control 
measures. 

The past year i-eflected a continuation of the 
increasing Mexican border pressure which began 
with the expiration of the Mexican Agriculture 
Act on December ?>!, 19fi4. This resulted in the 
location of 151,705 deportable Mexican aliens, a 
40-percent increase over last year. Most of these 
aliens were employed or seeking employment in 
agricultural pui-suits, particularly in the South- 
west. 

Border Patrol officers were deeply invoh-ed in 
the seizure of illicit narcotics and, in the perform- 
ance of their regular and incidental duties, en- 
countered an increasing number of law violators 
who were in possession of dangerous weapons. 
Alien smuggling practices were found to have con- 
tinued at a high level, and 1,210 alien smugglers 
or transporters were apprehended. 




Border patrohnan in. the Spokane station area, near Meta- 
line Falls. Wasliimitcii The misxioii i,f the llanlrr Patrol 
is to (leteet uml iinriiil tin' niinniiiliini innl inilairfiit 
entry of ali,ii.-< iiit,, tlir fiiil,<l states' aloiii/ tlie 8,000 
miles of boundary betireen the United States and Can- 
ada and Mexico. 



Immigration fi-aud investigations were given 
major emphasis during the year, and criminal con- 
spiracies to circumvent the "immigration laws were 
frequently uncovered. Since the"l9(i5 amendment 
to the immigration laws requiring Department of 
Labor certification of immigrants, new types of 
fraudulent schemes developed. These included 
"sham" marriages to citizens or resident aliens and 
the use of fictitious marriage and birth records. 

In^•estigati^•e programs aimed at immigration 
law violators of the subversive and criminal classes 
continued, and these resulted in the expulsion oi- 
exclusion of many undesirables. Special emphasis 



was placed on subversive actlAdties emanating from 
the Caribbean and on criminal activities of a pro- 
fessional and organized nature. 

DEPORTABLE ALIENS LOCATED 

During fiscal year 1968, Service officers located 
212,057 deportable aliens. Of the total, 151,705 or 
72 percent were Mexican nationals. This number 
was a 40-percent increase over the numl>er of Mexi- 
cans located last year. Increases in apprehensions 
were noted in all the other nationalities except 
Cuban and Greek. The table on the following page 
reflects a comparison of the violators by nationality 
groups for 1967 and 1968. 

Sfafu.^ nf Entry. Of the 212,057 violators of the 
immigration laws found, 121,047 or 57 ].>ercent were 
aliens who entered illegally, and the remainder 
(91,010) was aliens who l>ecam6 deportable after 
violating the status for which admitted. 

The illegal entries of Mexican aliens accounted 
for 96.8 percent of all surreptitious entries. Most of 
the remaining 3.2 percent who had entei-ed with- 
out inspection were from other countries of the 
"Western Hemisphere. 

The number of deportable adult male Mexican 
aliens found was l.'');j,024, an increase of 38,910 or 
41 percent fi'om the previous vear. Only 58 per- 
cent or 77,243 of the 133,024 adult male Mexicans 
were apprehended by the 10 border sectors in the 
Southwest Region. This, co'mi)ared to 68.5 percent 
last year and 81 percent the previcnis year, is in- 
dicative of a sharp upward trend in the movement 
of Mexican aliens in search of employment away 
from tlie border states. 

The 77,139 aliens (other than crewmen) who 
were legally admitted and who violated their status 
of admission included 57,114 visitors, 5,641 stu- 
dents, 660 agricultural workers, 12,053 other non- 
innnigrants, and 1,671 immigrants. The number of 
violators of status increased by 11,237 or 17 i^ercent 
over the niunber reported last year. Exclusive of 
Mexican nationals, the chief offenders were na- 
tionals of Canada, the West Indies, the Philip- 
pines. Italy, and the ITnited Kingdom. 

"With a greater ninnber of aliens entering ille- 
gally and the movement of greater numbers into 
the interior, emphasis was given to interce])ting 
aliens traveling highways either in automobiles or 
by pulslic transportation in order to effect immedi- 
ate apprehension and to hold to a minimum the 
nnml>er that was able to find gainful employment. 
Of the 202,437 aliens (other than technical crew- 
men violators) found in illegal status, 123,933 or 
61.2 percent wei'e located within 30 days, and 
78,504 or 38.8 percent were located who had been 
here more than 30 days — only 12,140 or 6 percent 
had lieen here more than 1 year before they were 
located. A total of 71,207 were in travel status at 
time of apprehension, an increase of 13,577 or 23.6 
percent from the previous year. There were 42,277 



10 



DEPORTABLE ALIENS FOUND IN THE UNITED STATES 
1964 — 1968 




Nationality 



Fiscal 


years 


Percent 
change 


1967 


1968 


108, 327 


151,705 


+40.0 


1,251 


591 


-52.8 


9, 199 


11,056 


+ 20.2 


1,770 


2, 101 


+ 18. 7 


1,970 


2,541 


+ 29.0 


7,313 


10, 953 


+ 49.8 


5, 112 


5,900 


+ 15.4 


4,063 


3,261 


-19.7 


22, 603 


23, 949 


+ 6.0 



Mexican 

Cuban 

Canadian 

Dominican 

BWI and British Honduran 
Other Western Hemisphere- 
Chinese 

Greek 

All others 

Total aliens found 



161, 608 



212, 057 



+ 31.2 



persons found employed in agriculture (41,426 
Mexicans) and 62,098 in industry or other fields. 
Smtiggling, Crewmen, and Stawairay Controls. 
Border Patrol officers located 6.662 aliens who had 
been induced or assisted to enter unlawfully or 
who had been transported imlawfully after entry. 
This represents a 17-percent mcrease over the 
number of smuggled aliens found in 1067. Alien 
smugglers and violators of statutes relating to un- 
lawful transportation of aliens numbered 1,210, 
a decrease of less than 1 percent in 1967. The high 
\olume of smuggling cases coincided with the high 



rate of Mexican aliens entering illegally across the 
southern border. 

The number of principals located is 21/2 times 
greater than in 1964, and the number of smuggled 
aliens located is almost six times greater in the 
same j'ear. 

The effectiveness of anti-smuggling operations 
by Border Patrol officers has caused smugglers of 
aliens to resort to more devious methods and more 
costly modes of transport. YA Paso officers appre- 
hended an alien as he attempted to depart the 
border area in a private aircraft. Officers of the 



11 




Seattle Investigator confers icith Mr. Don L. Smithe, 
supervisor of im<mi(/ration and naturalization services 
for the Bociiifl Airrmft ('iniipawy. His division handles 
all facets of alien (■iiiiiliiiDiiiiit. 

In the backffroiind, the iincstiflator conducts an inter- 
view at the Paine Fields plant where the new "jumtio" 
aircraft is being assembled. 



Del Rio and Marfa Sectors shared in a case in- 
volvino; the use of an airi)Iane to illeo-ally trans- 
port ^rexiran aliens from Del Rio to Seminole, 
Tex. The arrano-er, a farmer and businessman, 
traveled to the border and iiark in a chartered air- 
craft to meet and transport the aliens so they could 
work on his farm. 

A female resident alien was apprehended in the 
El Centro Sector and charged with violation of 
the smuggling statutes. When she stopped her car 
iust short of a traffic check point, two men who 
had aliofhted from her car were tracked and taken 
into custody. The aliens revealed that the woman 
had been collecting: P>ri per week from one of the 
aliens for almost a year for the assistance she had 
been renderino-. The other alien stated he was to 
pay her $40 or $50 for brinffinc: him into the 
United States in the trunk of her automobile and 
for transporting him to Coachella, Calif. 

At the close of the fiscal year, two individuals 
were awaiting pro.secution after illegal entry and 
their involvement in smngeling five aliens into the 
United States in a boat. The group departed En- 
senada, B.C.. Mexico, in an outboard cruiser bound 
for the San Diego area. Although a large supply 
of gasoline was carried, adverse weather and the 
heavy load caused excessive fuel con.sumption, and 
thefive smuggled aliens were put ashore short of 
their destination. T^nfortunately for the smugglers, 
the rubl:>er raft used to fern- the five ashore landed 
at the U.S. Navy base at North Island, where they 
were promptly apprehended and placed in the 
custody of Chula Yista officers. 

In addition to Border Patrol activities Service 
investigators completed 1,0!)1 smuggling investiga- 
tions during the year, a 5-)iercent increase over 
the 1,042 investigations conducted in 1967. Pros- 
ecution was authorized against 554 violators of the 
smuggling statutes. There were 395 convictions 



resulting in aggregate sentences of 3,357 months' 
imprisonment and fines totaling $31,500- 

Early in September 1967, information was de- 
veloped that there was an illegal movement of 
Cuban-Chinese across tlie Canadian border. Ap- 
parently a well-organized alien smuggling ring 
operating in Madrid, Spain, and Montreal and 
Toronto, Canada, was smuggling aliens across 
the border for fees as high as $1,500 per 
alien. Investigations were initiated and 10 aliens 
were found in the United States wlio had utilized 
the services of the smuggling ring to enter the 
counti-y illegally. In October, two Canadians were 
arrested at the Detroit Tunnel as they were at- 
tempting to aid two Cuban-Chinese to enter the 
United States illegally. The two smugglers were 
prosecuted, found guilty, and sentenced to im- 
jirisonment for 2 years. The two assisted aliens 
were deported to Canada. They stated they had 
paid a total of $1,850 to various members of the 
ring to help them enter the United States illegally. 

In Januarv', an Illinois State Trooper stopped a 
pickup truck near Morris, 111., because it was mov- 
ing at a slow rate of speed and ajipearcd tO' be 
heavily overloaded. The vehicle had l>een topped 
with aluminum and wood. The trooper found 52 
Spanish-speaking males jammed into the enclosed 
part of the van. Investigators from Chicago re- 
sponded to the call from the local officials and 
it was ascertained that all of the occupants, ex- 
cejit the driver, were illegal aliens from the State 
of Durango, Mexico, who had entered the United 
States without inspection in the El Paso area. 
It was develo])ed that the driver had contacted 
the aliens in Mexico and offered to assist them to 
enter the United States illegally and to transport 
them to Chicago for fees ranging up to $135 per 
person. The smuggler was charged with unlawful 
transportation of aliens and was sentenced to im- 
prisonment for 3 years on each of 11 counts, the 
sentences to be served concurrently. 

At Champlain, N.Y., inspectoi-s intercepted an 
attorney and his client, the latter an alien crewman 
who alleged T^.S. citizenship by claiming birth in 
Puerto Rico. The alien had previously been di- 
rected to depart from the Ignited States and was 
attemjiting reentry from Canada when the fraud 
was detected. The attorney's knowledge of his cli- 
ent's nationality status and his active participation 
in the attemj^ted fi'aud resulted in charges being 
lodged against him for inducing, aiding, and as- 
sisting an alien who was not lawfully entitled to 
enter the United States. 

Investigators and Border Patrol officers were 
called upon to assist in jirocessing smiiggled aliens 
who were intercepted at the border. In July 1967, 
an immigrant inspector at San Ysidro became sus- 
picions of the actions of the driver of an empty 
vinegar tank truck and decided to check the in- 
terior of the tank. As soon as the inspector climbed 
on top of the truck, the driver fled to Mexico. The 
inspector opened the tank and found 40 aliens who 



12 



were lioiiiii' snui<iplo(l into tlic T'nited States. The 
owner of the tank tru('k was identified later as a 
lei;al resident alien from Eciiadoi'. Tlie tnick owner 
has a history of prior smuggling violations ; how- 
ever, there was not sufficient evidence to implicate 
him in this case. 

De>ierfhi(/ Oreirmen and Stoivaways. Service 
officers continue to emphasize programs geared to 
the prevention of illegal entries of deserting crew- 
men and stowaways and the apprehension of such 
violators before they establish footholds and equi- 
ties in the United States. The internal collec- 
tion and dissemination of evaluated intelligence 
through the Marine Intelligence ITnit in New York 
]u-ovides all ins]iection officers, investigators, and 
]iatrol officers with current data regarding schemes, 
trends, and other factors affecting the programs. 
The Service policy of close cooperation with law 
enforcement agencies and other persons associated 
with waterfront activities contributes to the 
successful control of crewmen. The rapid investi- 
gation of a reported desertion, immediate develop- 
ment of any possible leads, and rapid communica- 
tion of data to other Service offices often result in 
the interception of the deserting crewman while 
in transit to his destination in the United States. 

The following case is a good example of results 
from these stringent Service enforcement measures. 
Seattle investigators checking on a report, that 
three Chinese had deserted their vessel in Port 
Angeles, "Wash., during mid-December 1967, de- 
velo]ied information that they were en route to New 
York by bus, each traveling separately. The in- 
formation was inunediately furnished to investiga- 
tors at Helena, Mont., and all three were inter- 
cepted and returned to their vessel within 36 hours 
after their reported desertion. Another example 
of coordinated efforts occurred at Norfolk, Va., on 
June 6, 1968, when tlie Cai:)tain of the il/Y "Im- 
perial II" advised the innnigration office that five 
stowaways had been discovered in compartment 
No. 3 while the vessel was being unloaded and that 
the group broke and ran upon disco\'e.i'y and had 
left the vessel. All local law enforcement agencies 
were immediately notified, and the five were ar- 
rested by the Norfolk Police within an hour. How- 
ever, the "alert'' to interested contacts developed 
information that three i^iersons had purchased one- 
way tickets to New York and that none could 
speak English. Immigration officers intercepted 
the bus which had already left the terminal and ar- 
rested three other stowaways who had avoided 
detection wlien they escaped from the same vessel. 
All of the stowaways were from Chile. Six de- 
parted on the vessel on which they arrived, and the 
other two were indicted for unlawful enti-y after 
deportation (8 U.S.C. 1326). 

During the year, 4,129 crewmen who had de- 
serted their vessels were located. There were 122 
landed stowaways ajiprehended. 

Prevention again keynoted the crewman control 
program along the I^.S. section of the St. Lawrence 
Seawav. Border Patrol officers of the Ogdensburg 



Sector continued excellent control with no success- 
ful desertions reported. The Massena Unit verified 
the departure of 761 detained crewmen aboard 
231 vessels during the year. These totals, affected 
by a Canadian strike which closed the Seaway late 
in the last quarter, are somewhat below those for 
fiscal year 1967 when 813 detained crewmen were 
checked out on 296 ships. Traffic of "iron curtain" 
ships continued to rise with 82 passages through 
the locks recorded during fiscal year 1968 com- 
pared with 28 the year before. 




Patrol Inspector checking papers of seaman 

Air Operations. The Service's present comple- 
ment of 21 obsei-vation airplanes, now concentrated 
in the Southwest Region, operated 24,092_ flight 
hours and was instrumental in the location of 
12,088 deportable aliens this fiscal year. This figiu-e 
surpassed last year's high of 8,599 deportable aliens 
located by 40.6 percent. 

For the most part this observation function is 
carried out dawn to dusk. Nonetheless, continued 
efforts to deploy these aircraft in the most effective 
manner possible has residted in successful use dur- 
ing the hours of darkness. In 1 month, one sector 
using two airplanes uncovered three alien smug- 
irling cases involving five vehicles and 27 smuggled 
aliens. In these cases, pilots of aircraft observed at 
night the movement of vehicles away from the bor- 
der and, by radio, directed ground teams to inter- 
cept the smugglers. 

Although the number of passenger seats as well 
as the number of transport airplanes was reduced, 
the passenger miles traveled, primarily in the re- 
moval of aliens, were increased 959,015 over last 
year for a total of 30,624,753 in fiscal year 1968. 



13 



This increase, with a reduction in capacity was 
made possible by consolidation of tlie maintenance 
and operatinjj base at El Paso, Tex., thus pennit- 
tinof more effective scheduling of the airplanes and 
total available crew time. 

The very rapid increase in the number of Mexi- 
can aliens located in the Southwest Region brought 
about significant changes in the various alien re- 
moval programs. On September 12, 1967, with 
concurrence of the Mexican Government, a buslift 
from Juarez, Chihuahua, to Jimenez, Chihuahua, 
was instituted to supplement the Presidio-Ojinaga- 
Chihuahua trainlift for the purpose of removing 
aliens closer to their homes in the interior of Mex- 
ico and away from the international boundai-y. A 
combined total of 88.546 aliens was i-eturned to the 
intei'ior of Mexico by these two operations this 
year. Although the effectiveness of removal by air 
charter is recognized, because of a limitation on 
funds, the Matamoras-Tveon airlift was used spar- 
ingly during the year and no aliens were airlifted 
from Mexicali, Baja California, to Leon after 
September of this year. A combined total of only 
8.286 aliens was removed in this fashion during 
fiscal year 1968. 

To date, since the inceptions of the removal pro- 
grams in 1956 and 1957. a total of 243,266 aliens 
has been returned to the interior of Mexico by the 
bus-trainlifts and a total of 101.967 by the airlifts. 
The effectiveness of the programs is demonstrated 
by the fact that during fiscal year 1968, only 17.642 
or 7.3 percent of tlie ureA'iously buslift ed and train- 
lifted aliens and 3,387 or 3.3 "percent of the aliens 
airlifted had returned illegally and had been 
apprehended again. 

Cooperation ii^ifh Other Law Enforcement 
Affenn'e.i. Law enforcement liaison continued to be 
emphasized throughout the year to the mutual 
lienefit of the Service and other local. State, Fed- 
eral, and foreign law enforcement agencies. Field 
supervisors throughout the country participated as 
instructors at various police schools and academies 
explaining the Service law enforcement mission 
and describing the violations of laws of primary 
interest to Service law enforcement officers. Service 
officers, in cooperation with the Agency for Inter- 
national Development, provided courses of instruc- 
tion in border control and immigration enforce- 
ment techniques for law enforcement officials from 
foreign countries at the International Police Acad- 
emy and at Service locations. Investigators pi' ' 
patrol inspectors represented the Service at sj/i- ^u: 
and regular meetings of organizations whose mem- 
bership included officers of local. State, Federal, 
and foreign law enforcement agencies. 

Tangible results from liaison activity are re- 
flected by the 10,925 violators of the immigration 
ancl nationalitv laws who were apprehended and 
delivered to Service officers during the year by 
other law enforcement agencies. As an example of 
this cooperation, on May 14, 1968, a single San 
Diego,_ Calif., police officer apprehended two 
U.S. citizens in the act of smuggling 15 Mexican 



aliens in a large enclosed rental truck. The aliens 
had been guided to a prearranged pickup point on 
the freeway to San Ysidro, Calif., when the officer 
became suspicious of the stopped vehicle. Without 
assistance he took the principals and aliens into 
custody and notified officers from the Chula Vista 
Sector. 

Incident to the performance of their regular 
duties. Service officers arrested and released to ap- 
propriate agencies 891 violators of other laws, in- 
cluding 160 narcotics law violators. They seized 
and recovered property, merchandise, and nar- 
cotics having a total value of $846,187. The value 
of all narcotics seized amounted to $688,205. Some 
typical cases of apprehensions of violators of laws 
other than immigration laws follow. 

A Canadian felon serving a 22-year sentence for 
armed robbery at Stoney Mountain Prison in Can- 
ada escaped from detention and entered the United 
States near Pembina, N. Dak., on Augu.st 17, 1967. 
When encountered by a patrol inspector from the 
Grand Forks, N. Dak., Sector, he attempted to 
escajie but was apprehended and turned over to the 
Royal Canadian Mounted Police. 

In January 1968, information was received from 
I^aredo, Tex., Border Patrol officers to the effect 
that a resident alien in Parlier, Calif., was engaged 
in smuggling firearms to Mexico. Patrol inspectors 
from the Fresno, Calif., Station alerted the LT.S. 
Alcoliol and Tax Division ancl local officials and 
assisted them in the arrest of the alien and the con- 
fiscation of 23 weapons he had in his possession. 
The alien was charged with a violation of the Cal- 
ifornia Penal Code. 

Patrol inspectors from El Centro, Calif., on 
January 11, 1968, intercepted two automobil&s en 
route to Los Angeles, Calif. They were driven by 
aliens from Mexico who had been hired in Mexico 
to drive the cars to Los Angeles and leave them 
at a predetennined location. A search of both auto- 
mobiles revealed 250 kilos of marijuana valued at 
$55,000. Seizure of the contraband and vehicles 
followed; the drivers were taken into custody 
and turned over to the Customs Bureau. 

During traffic check operations. Las Cruces, N. 
Mex., Border Patrol officers apprehended two per- 
sons who were in possession of a quantity of heroin 
valued at $50,000. The contraband was being de- 
livered to a third conspirator in Albuquerque, N. 
Mex., who was later apprehended by Customs 
agents. Another heroin smuggler in the act of con- 
veying $80,000 worth of heroin to San Antonio, 
Tex., was arrested by patrol inspectors from 
Laredo, Tex., during traffic check operations on 
Januaiy 28, 1968. 

During a traffic check being conducted on 
May 24, 1968, by patrol inspectors from the Teme- 
cula, Calif.. Station, it appeared that the bed of a 
truck had been raised by welding new metal under 
the truck bed. The flooring of the truck bed was re- 
moved and revealed 224 kilos of marijuana valued 
at $49,280. The two occupants of the tnick were 



14 



also relieved of a .-"iS oaliber pistol and taken into 
custody. 

In the area of comnninity relations and pnlilic 
services, Border Patrol officers in tlie Rio Crrande 
Valley of Texas assisted Civil Defense and local 
officials dnrinp: Hnri'ica.ne Beulali. The classes at 
the Border Patrol Academy at Port Isabel, Tex., 
were terminated, and the trainees devoted full ef- 
fort to assisting victims of the hurricane. On De- 
cember 20, 1967, a pilot from the Tucson Sector on 
routine patrol observed that the Santa Cniz River 
had flooded the Amado. Ariz., area and that the 
residents were stranded on roof tops. Air Force as- 
sistance was requested and helicopters succeeded in 
rescuinjj .S2 persons from the flood. 

A patrol inspector from the Rouses Point Sta- 
tion on patrol duty observed smoke comin<r from a 
house in Champlain, N.Y., early in the morninjr on 
February 29, 19P)R. He entered the burnintj dwel- 
linflf, found two small boys asjes 2 and 4, and carried 
them outside to safety. Since the older boy indi- 
cated his mother was still inside, the officer reen- 
tered the buildiiiir, located the mother, and suided 
her to safety. Tt then develojied that a baby was 
still in the house, but a second reentrv by the jiatrol 
inspector was, by then, impossible. Tliis courasxeous 
action was commended by local officials, the 
Commissioner, and the Attorney General. 

At the request of the Imperial Countv Sheriff, 
Yuma. Ariz., the Border Patrol, on May 27. 1908. 
gave aerial assistance in lociUino- a nolio victim 
who was last seen in an isolated area. This man was 
unable to walk and was drivins: a specially 
equipped vehicle. Tlie Border Patrol pilot found 
him lying helpless outside his car, badly sun- 
burned; and ground assistance was quickly 
summoned. 

Enrovntera w?'fh Ai'med Lair Violators and 
AlipvK Apprpheiidrd irith Prior Records of Crim- 
inal avd Immigration La^r Yiolafionx. During the 
course of their daily duties and in providing timely 
assistance to other law enforcement agencies. Serv- 
ice officers continued to encounter armed and 
dangerous violators of the Immigration and Na- 
tionality Act and other laws. Duriusr the vear, 
36,56.') aliens with prior violations of the immigra- 
tion laws were taken into custodv bv the Border 
Patrol. Of the aliens arrested. .3,.588 had ]irior 
criminal records. There were OS persons arrested 
who were in i^ossession of dangerous weai^ous, in- 
cluding 78 pistols of various calibei'S, four rifles, 
and 14 knives. 

The following cases are typical of situations 
where armed resistance was encountered by 
Service officers. 

Having been informed that the Milstead Ranch 
near Laredo, Tex., had been Imrglarized. officers 
from the Laredo Station, on November 17. 1967, 
promptly tracked down and arrested three aliens 
who had burglarized the ranch. One of these, when 
ajiprehended. had in his possession a fully loaded 
revolver he had taken fi'oni the ranch. 

On December 18. 1967, the Webb County. Tex., 



Sheriff requested Border Patrol assistance to ap- 
prehend two persons who had abducted a citizen 
and had shot a deputy sheriff. Observation aircraft 
from the Laredo Sector located the wanted per- 
sons, notified ground units, and directed operations 
although one of the aircraft encountered rifle fire. 
Approaching ground units made up of Border 
Patrol officers, deputy sheriffs, and public safety 
officers were also fired upon, but they quickly sub- 
dued the two fugitives and took them into custody. 

On March 13, 196S, the AVebb County Sheriff 
notified Laredo Sector Headquarters to be on the 
lookout for a dangerous suspect wanted for as- 
sault, threat to murder, and possession of a pro- 
hibited weapon. All units were notified and shortly 
thereafter patrol inspectors encountered the sus- 
l^ect on the highway 25 miles north of Laredo. A 
loaded .38 caliber revolver was located in his car. 
He was taken into custody and delivered to local 
officials. 

A patrol inspector from Chula Vista, Calif., ap- 
prehended an alien illegally in the United States 
near San Ysidro, Calif., on September 23, 1967. 
Upon initial search, a loaded pistol was discovered 
concealed on the alien's person, and a struggle for 
possession of the pistol ensued. A passerby came 
to the aid of the patrol inspector, and the alien was 
quickly subdued. Subsequent investigation devel- 
oped that the alien had committed a burglary in 
the San Ysidro area shortly before he was appre- 
hended, and the pistol was part of the loot taken 
by him during the burglary. 

Joint efforts of local police and the Indio Border 
Patrol ITnit resulted in the arrest of an armed 
criminal alien on May 1, 1968. The alien, using 
an alias, had purchased a pistol at a local hard- 
ware store. Examination of immigration records 
showed he had an extensive criminal and immigra- 
tion record and was using a false identity. He was 
soon located, and when taken into custody, the 
pistol was found loaded in the glove compartment 
of his car. He was turned over to local police, and 
])rosecution and deportation proceedings were 
instituted. 

A Canadian alien who had been deported from 
the Ignited States a numVr of times escaped from 
the Manitoba Provincial Prison, where he was 
serving a 22-year sentence for armed robbery. 
Shortly after entering the Ignited States on foot, 
he was apprehended by Border Patrol officers of 
the Grand Forks Sector and returned to the cus- 
tody of the Canadian authorities. 

CARIBBEAN INVESTIGATIONS 
COORDINATION PROGRAM 

The Caribbean Investigations Coordination 
Program and the relating index maintained at Mi- 
ami continued as effective measures in assisting to 
]irevent the entry into the ITnited States of Latin 
American aliens of the criminal, immoi-al, nar- 
cotic, and subversive classes. In addition to their 



15 



importance to Service operations, they proved val- 
uable to other Government investigative agencies. 

Maximum use was made of the index, which was 
augmented by several thousand reference cards 
during fiscal "year 196S excluding numerous refer- 
ences to individuals alleged or suspected of being 
agents of Cuba or other Latin America countries. 

During fiscal year 1968, there were 156,822 
checks made of the index resulting in the location 
of 21,457 relating records. Primarily on the basis 
of information contained in the index, several hun- 
dred anti-subversive investigations were initiated 
by the Service. These investigations included aliens 
in the United States and aliens who attempted to 
enter this country illegally or applied for admis- 
sion as permanent residents or as refugees on the 
Cuban Airlift. Although the majority of the in- 
vestigations involved Cuban nationals, many in- 
volved nationals of other Caribbean countries. 

There were 610 Cuban refugee investigations 
completed during fiscal year 1968. Of these, 211 
were based on subversive allegations, 8-1 involved 
persons alleged to be of the criminal, immoral, or 
narcotic classes, 159 were of a general categon'. 9 
involved fraud, and 147 were initiated as a result 
of search operations. There were 61 of these aliens 
ordered to depart. 

The following case resume is an example of the 
type handled under the program. 

Mario Cesar Chong-Perez, a native and citizen 
of the Dominican Republic, was admitted as a 
visitor on December 5, 1967, and failed to dejiart 
from the United States within the authorized 
period of admission. He was alleged to have been 
involved in a plot to assassinate President Bala- 
guer of the Dominican Republic and to have been 
arrested in that country for possession of firearms 
and explosives. He was taken into custody In' 
Service officers at New York, and at a hearing 
held Mai-ch 4, 1968, he was granted voluntary de- 
parture with an alternate order of deportation 
should he fail to depart. On April 2, 1968, he de- 
parted from the TTnited States. 

FOREIGN-BORN LAW VIOLATORS 

Internal Security ami the Foreign Born. The 
Service Antisubversive Progi-am is designed to 
identify foreign-lxirn subversives and develop 
evidence upon which to institute exclusion or ex- 
pulsion proceedings and to deny, where warranted, 
benefits under the U.S. immigration and nation- 
ality laws. Close liaison was maintained with other 
Government agencies concerned in security mat- 
ters, and infonnation developed was j^romptly 
furnished to the appropriate agency or agencies. 

A continuing effort, was made to identify and 
comijile evidence concerning various groups or 
organizations to determine whether their char- 
acterization as subversive organizations was war- 
i-antecl and, if so, whether involvement in those 
organizations by the foreign born justified Service 



action looking toward their exclusion or deporta- 
tion from the United States or in the case of 
naturalized citizens, the revocation of their citizen- 
ship. Investigations were conducted to identify 
aliens involved in demonstrations protesting the 
national effort in Vietnam and elsewhere, and to 
determine their amenability to Service proceedings. 

The Canadian and Mexican border antisubver- 
sive i:)rograms also served effectively as a means of 
excluding from the Ignited States aliens whose ad- 
mission would adversely affect the security of this 
countiy. Under the Canadian Border Antisubver- 
sive Program, there were 23 Service lookouts 
posted, and seven aliens applying for admission 
were rejected at the border on the basis of infor- 
mation developed. Under the Mexican Border 
Antisubversive Program, there were 289 in\estiga- 
tions completed on applicants or potential appli- 
cants for admission. Service lookouts were posted 
against 211 of the aliens involved; 26 such aliens 
were rejected at the lx)rder, and 22 pennanent ex- 
clusion orders were issued. 

Listed below are examples of the types of cases 
handled under the Service Antisubversive 
Program. 

Eric Ray Wenberg, native and citizen of Aus- 
tralia, was admitted as a visitor in June 1967. On 
August 28, 1967, Wenberg, described as a leader of 
the National Socialist Party also known as the 
Nazi Party in Au.stralia, was ordered deported 
from the Ignited States, and his appeal from the 
ordei- was dismissed. He jietitioned for judicial re- 
view of his de]iortation, but the ]ietition was dis- 
missed by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Dis- 
trict of Columbia Circuit on December 22, 1967. 
Wenberg was deported to Australia on June 16, 
1968. 

Peter Edward Gerald Arthur Remington, a 
native and citizen of Guyana, wa.s admitted to the 
United States as a student. He abandoned his status 
as a student and adopted the alias Colin Roach to 
avoid detection by this Service. He was located 
and apprehended" on May 13, 1968. On May 16, 
1968, he was permitted to de]iart from the United 
States under appropriate safeguards. Adverse in- 
formation of a security nature had been received 
concerning Remington. 

Another student Ali Ismail El Embaby, a native 
and citizen of the United Arab Republic, was ad- 
mitted to the Ignited States on Sci)tember 19, 1966. 
Information was obtained indicating that he had, 
subsequent to entry, engaged in activities inimical 
to the interests of the United States. He was re- 
quired to leave on August 28, 1967. 

Ettore Turchini, a native and citizen of Italy, 
was admitted to the United States as a ^^sitor on 
April 5, 1967. During Service investigation, he 
admitted having been a member of the Commu- 
nist Party of Italy from ajjproximately 1950 to 
1964. He was required to leave the United States 
and departed on September 29, 1967. 

A total of 3,700 investigations were comiileted 



16 



on aliens or naturalized U.S. citizens alleged to be 
of the subversive class. 

Foreign Bom of the Critninal Cla-sse^. Investi- 
gations involving 7,400 aliens of the criminal, im- 
moral, and narcotic classes were completed during 
the year. Applications for orders to show cause in 
deportation proceedings wei-e made in 587 of the 
cases investigated, and -1:24 aliens of the CIX 
classes were deported from the I'nited States. 

Among the aliens deiK>rted from the United 
States during the year was Antonio Farina, an 
Italian alien who originally entered the United 
States as a visitor in 1953. Shortly after entry, he 
was convicted of illegal importation and transpor- 
tation of narcotics. After a hearing, he was ordered 
deported on May 20, 1955. He was deported to 
Italy for violations of narco'tics laws and documen- 
tary requirements on January 15, 1958, after serv- 
ing sentence on the narcotics conviction. On Febru- 
ary 14, 1968, Farina reentei'ed the United States 
at Rouses Point. X.Y., as a visitor using an Italian 
passport and a nonimmigrant visa issued to Gino 
Minozzi. He was arraigned for illegal reentry in 
Xew York City on February 16, 1968, and held in 
lieu of $50,000 bail. On the same date, an order to 
show cause and warrant of arrest were issued by 
the Service in the case. He entered a plea of guilty 
to violation of Title 18 U.S.C. 1546 on May 20, 
1968, and was given a suspended sentence of 5 
years conditioned upon al)iding by Service rulings. 
After a hearing. Farina was again deported from 
the United States to Eome, Italy, on May 31, 1968. 

Emelio Manera, native of Italy, who entered the 
United States at San Juan. P.R.. on September 23, 
1965, in the false identity of Raul Domingo Ge- 
neyro, and his associates were discovei'ed to be 
members of an international check fraud ring. 
"V^Hien apprehended they were foimd to have pass- 
ports from eight countries, a large number of 
stolen checks, 150 foreign exchange money ordere, 
as well as about $20,000 in U.S. currency. Manera 
was indicted on a grand larceny, first degree 
charge and pleaded guilty. He was sentenced to 
the time already spent in jail. He was also tried 
for violation of 18 U.S.C. 1546, pleaded guilty, 
and was sentenced as on the grand larceny charge. 
Deportation proceedings were instituted and he 
was ordered deported on Xovember 17, 1965. He 
was deported to Italy on September 23, 1967. Such 
depoi-tation ended a 2-year period of motions and 
appeals. Italian authorities hold seven separate 
warrants for Manera's arrest. 

The Service's programs designed to identify 
and control alien criminals attempting to cross the 
international borders into the United States on 
ci'iminal missions or trying to enter illegally and 
avoid apprehension were emphasized again. 
Liaison efforts between law enforcement agencies 
of adjacent countries were continued and enlarged. 
The cases which follow illustrate the value and 
effectiveness of the border programs. 

Roy Ronald Colligan, a.k.a. James Leslie ^Ic- 
Cormack, a native and citizen of Canada and listed 



as one of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police's top 
six most wanted criminals, has a long criminal rec- 
ord in Canada. In October 1954, he was convicted 
on a charge of manslaughter and sentenced to life 
imprisonment. On June 29, 1962. he was released 
on parole. In April of 1966, he was arrested for 
armed robbery in Canada, his parole was revoked, 
and he was sentenced to serve the remainder of his 
life imprisonment and, in addition, two 10-year 
sentences to run concurrently. He escaped on Sep- 
tember 27, 1967, and through our liaison efforts in 
Ottawa, Colligan was found in custody on a bur- 
glary charge in Santa Monica, Calif, He was tried, 
convicted, and sentenced to 1 to 15 years. The 
Service will eti'ect his deportation upon his release. 

Border criminal identification activity during 
the year resulted in the posting of 3,095 lookouts 
designed to prevent the entry into the United 
States of aliens of the criminal, immoral, and nar- 
cotic classes. As a result of those lookouts, 923 
aliens of those classes were rejected or excluded 
from the t'nited States during the year. 

Frauds. Investigations of possible immigration 
frauds were completed in 5.950 cases during the 
last yenv. Major emphasis was given to investiga- 
tions of aliens and other persons engaged in crim- 
inal conspiracies to circumvent the immigration 
laws. These investigations revealed a continuation 
of previously known schemes involving the use of 
altered or fraudulent passports and immigration 
documents and "sham" marriages to U.S. citizens 
to evade former cjuota restrictions. The following 
are examples of the results of these highly complex 
investigations. 

A Xew York attorney was indicted by a Federal 
grand jury on February 14, 1968, on 60 counts. He 
prepared and submitted fraudulent applications 
for extensions of stay to this Service and fraudu- 
lent applications for labor certifications to the 
Department of Labor. The attorney also endeav- 
ored to influence an alien witness to recant previous 
testimony. He pleaded not guilty at arraignment 
on February 16, 1968, and is awaiting trial. 

During the last few months 45 Chinese aliens 
with counterfeit U.S. nonimmigrant visas, pur- 
portedly issued by the American Consul, Belem, 
Brazil, have been located in the L'nited States. The 
arranger of the operation has been identified as 
Lai Book Sang, part owner of a restaurant in 
Bogota, Colombia, where the transactions took 
place. Lai charged $450 to $800 and had nonim- 
migrant visas and entry and depai'ture stamps 
from Brazil placed in "the aliens' passports. A 
co-conspirator of Lai's was arrested under a LT.S. 
Commissioner's warrant on July 14, 1968, at El 
Paso, Tex., when he attempted entry there. He is 
awaiting trial. The cases of the aliens located were 
presented to the appropriate U.S. attorneys for 
consideration of prosecution, and deportation pro- 
ceedings have been instituted. Close liaison has 
been maintained with the Department of State 
on a local and seat of government level. 



17 



Since the 1965 amendment to tlie immigration 
law requiring Department of Labor certification 
of immigrants, several new types of frauds liave 
developed. These included various schemes to ac- 
quire immediate relative status and thereby evade 
tlie labor certification requirements, e.g., "sham" 
marriages to U.S. citizens or resident aliens, use 
of fictitious marriage and birth records, and false 
birth registrations in the United States of foi-eign 
born children whose parents are visa applicants. 
Investigation of the false birth registrations has 
thus far identified seven Texas niidwives who 
falsely registered births in the United States of 
several hundred children who were actually born 
in Mexico. In all cases, the ])arents were appli- 
cants for immigrant visas. Other schemes involve 
actual connivance to obtain labor certifications 
by fraudulent applications and supporting 
documentation. 

A vigorous i^rosecution program has been insti- 
tuted against third parties engaged in fraudulent 
practices in evading or obtaining labor certifica- 
tions. Examples of the success of such efforts 
follow. 

An operator of a New York City public rela- 
tions agency was arrested July 14, 1967, on a bench 
warrant arising out of a 28-count indictment filed 
by the Federal grand jury. He was charged with 
the submission of fraudulent api)lications for labor 
certifications to the Department of Labor and 
fraudulent applications to this Service to extend 
the time of aliens' temi^orary stays in the United 
States. He is now awaiting trial. 

The Federal grand jury. Phoenix, Ariz., on 
March 20, 1968, indicted a Yuma notary public 
on five counts. Investigation had disclosed' that the 
notary public had, for fees up to $1.30 each, fraud- 
ulently procured live-in maid labor certifications 
for Mexican immigrant visa applicants. He is 
awaiting trial. 

Maria de la Luz Estrada de Payan, a Mexican 
national, and Notary Public Mary G. Roman, a 
U.S. citizen, were indicted on January 31, 1968, 
in Los Angeles, Calif., by a Federal grand jury 
on eight counts. The subjects allegedly arranged 
eight "sham" marriages between Mexican aliens 
and U.S. citizens to evade labor certification re- 
quirements and provided the alien visa applicants 
with fraudulent income tax returns and affidavits 
of support. After a 2-day trial, on May 9, 1968, 
Payan was found guilty on five counts and Roman 
on four counts. On June 3, 1968, imposition of 
sentence was suspended, and they were placed on 
]n-obation for 3 years. As a result of the conviction, 
deportation proceedings are being instituted 
against Payan. 

The Fraudulent Document Center was estab- 
lished in 1958 as a repository for documents used 
by Mexican aliens to support false claims to U.S. 
citizenship. The records maintained consist of birth 
certificates, baptismal certificates, and other docu- 
ments relating to citizenship. The information at 
the Center is readily available to all Service offices 



and other Government agencies to aid in conduct- 
ing investigations and obtaining evidence where 
a false claim to citizenship is indicated. The rec- 
ords are so organized that a search can be con- 
ducted in a matter of minutes in response to 
telephonic or other types of inquiries. The work- 
load at the Center was greater in 1968 than in any 
of its 10 years of existence. New cases were added 
to the files at an a\erage of 220 per month, a 9- 
percent increase over last year, bringing the over- 
all total cases received and indexed to 17,753. 
Inquiries for record checks increased by 8 percent, 
from 2,593 to 2,805. Positive responses to inquiries 
rose 22 percent, from 482 to 588. The affirmative or 
positive responses were made in connection with 
21 percent of the inquiries, the highest percentage 
ever recorded. 

A case reported by the Blaine Sector illustrates 
the extent of information available at the Fraudu- 
lent Document Center, which is sometimes useful 
in developing false claim cases. A male Mexican 
alien entered the United States at Brownsville, 
Tex., in 1966 by claiming U.S. citizenship by rea- 
son of birth in San Benito, Tex. He presented a 
baptismal certificate in his own name to substan- 
tiate his claim. On August 22, 1967, he was en- 
countered near Stanwood, Wash., at which time 
he persisted in his false claim. A check with the 
Center indicated the subject's sister, herself a pre- 
vious false claimant, had executed a sworn affi- 
davit in which she admitted that she and all other 
members of her family were born in Mexico. AVlien 
confronted with the evidence, the subject admitted 
that he was a citizen of Mexico and not a citizen 
of the United States. 

For the 7th consecutive year, there was an in- 
crease in the number of false claims to citizenship 
encountered by the Border Patrol. The 2,052 cases 
developed were 22 percent above the 1,688 cases 
accounted for last year. The false claims were 
made by 2,025 Mexicans and 27 aliens of other 
nationalities. 

Various aspects of fraud were prevalent in a 
case developed in Brownsville, Tex., where officers 
apprehended an individual who was purchasing a 
copy of a baptismal certificate pertaining to As- 
cencion Sanchez. The apprehension was made as a 
direct result of liaison between the officers and em- 
ployees of various churches in the area. A church 
employee contacted the officers by telephone when 
she recalled that the person had previously pur- 
chased identical certificates. The employee stated 
she was reasonably sure the individual had, on 
several occasions, stolen blank copies of baptismal 
certificates from her desk. 

The subject admitted that he had purchased 
several copies of the baptismal certificate of As- 
ceiK'ion Sanchez. He contended tliat he had sold 
them to a man in ^Nlatamoros, N.L., Mexico, known 
to him only as "El Negro". A check of the records 
at the Fraudulent Document Center revealed that 
the documents iDertaining to Ascencion Sanchez 



18 



had l)eeii presented by false claimants nine times 
before. The description of the vendor in several of 
these cases fitted the snbject perfectly; however, 
he would not admit that he was the vendor. 

Service records revealed the individual, an alien 
illeo-ally in the Tnited States, previously had been 
apprehended and deported from the United 
States. At that time he had used a baptismal cer- 
tificate to support a false claim to citizenship. 

In a case reported by Liibbock oificers, an alien 
presented a fraudulent Texas birth certificate, 
which was given to him by his employer. The cer- 
tificate contained correct information concerninfj 
the alien's name, birth date, and his parents' 
names. The employer allegedly obtained a genuine 
blank certificate and had it exeK'uted by a county 
employee who had access to the county seal. 

CRIMINAL PROSECUTION 

Of the P>,.5P>.5 cases presented to United States at- 
torneys for violations of the immigration and na- 
tionality laws, .3,212 prosecutions were authorized. 
Of the cases disposed of 92 percent resulted in con- 
victions with aggregate sentences of 2fi,.^23 months 
and fines of $109,985. 

There were 1,08.5 aliens convicted of reentry 
after deportation without ]iermission (8 T'.S.C. 
132fi), and 3fi0 persons were convicted for docu- 
ment frauds (18 IT.S.C. 1546). The average sen- 
tence in these cases was 14 months. All 241 jiersons 
convicted for nationality violations were convicted 
for false i-epresentation as a U.S. citizen (18 
U.S.C.911). 




Investigator, at left, filing complaints against three aliens 
before United States Commissioner. 

DETENTION AND 
DEPORTATION ACTIVITIES 

The number of aliens deported in fiscal year 
1968 under oixlers of deportation was 9,130. This is 
130 less tlian the 9.260 deported in the prior year. 
Among those de]X)rted were 424 on criminal, im- 
moral, and narcotic charges. 

Among the criminals deported was Frederick 
Arthur Standfast, a native of Great Britain. He 



has an extensive criminal record in Canada for 
forgei-y and false pretenses and in the United 
States for interstate transportation of falsely made 
and forged checks. He was identified as a member 
of an international ring dealing in forged docu- 
ments, including passports. On August 14, 1967, 
he was deported to England where he was arrested 
by Scotland Yard officials. 

Also deported was Pierre Eioux, a Canadian 
with a juvenile arrest record and arrests as an 
adult for burglary, grand larceny, shooting with 
intent to kill, and other crimes. His deportation 
was efl'ected on February 15, 1968. 

Another Canadian, George Robert Staddon, at- 
tempted to extort $10,000 from one of the principal 
defendants in a INIichigan meat scandal investiga- 
tion. On March 2, 1967, he was convicted for the 
offense of extortion and sentenced to a term of 2 
to 20 years. He was deported on Januaiy 4, 1968, 
following his release from prison on parole. 

Three aliens wanted in Mexico for murder were 
deported during the year. Robert Diaz-Gonzalez 
was sentenced in Mexico to 30 years in prison for 
the murder of his mother-in-law and attempt 
to kill his wife. He escaped on December 4, 1966. 
As it was believed he may have entered the Ignited 
States, a Service lookout was posted. On Jan- 
uarv 2, 1968, he was arrested for drunken driving 
in El Centro, Calif., and sentenced to serve 50 
days. His finger])rint retmrn. as a result of the 
lookout, showed he was wanted by this Service. 
Dei^ortation proceeding's were instituted: and 
upon completion of his sentence, he was deported 
to Afexico where he is serving his 30-year sentence. 
Jose Cruz-Gonzalez was apprehended in Chicago 
for illegal entry and transferred to the Service 
detention facility at El Paso. Remarks made by 
him indicated he might be wanted in Mexico, and 
the Cliief of Police at Juarez was notified. He 
advised that they had been looking for him since 
1961 for killing a man with a .32 caliber pistol. He 
was returned over to Mexican authorities on De- 
cember 13, 1967. Mario Quesada-Lufan brutally 
murdered a school teacher in Mexico on Decem- 
l>er 4. 1966. Early in November 1967, Mexican po- 
lice authorities informed this Service that Quesada 
was believed to be living in Los Angeles. Tnvestisra- 
tors from our Los Anseles office located him within 
a short time and took him into custodv for illegal 
entry. He was returned to Mexico, where he was 
taken into custodv bv Chihuahua State authori- 
ties on November 16, 1967. 

Of the aliens deported 91 ^lercent or 8,333 had 
entered without inspection or without proper docu- 
ments or failed to maintain nonimmisrant status. 

The number of aliens required to depart without 
issuance of formal orders of deportation increased 
from 142.343 in the last fiscal year to 179,952. 
Amonc them were 9.694 ci'ewmen who were tech- 
nical violators who remained longer than the time 
for which admitted. 

At their own request 87 aliens who had fallen 



19 



into distress were removed from the United States 
under Section 250 of the Immigration and Na- 
tionality Act. 

There were 28 mentally incompetent aliens de- 
ported or removed. Up to the time of deportation 
approximately $192,907 had been expended for 
their care in the United States. If they had con- 
tinued to remain institutionalized at public ex- 
pense, over $3,887,833 would have been disbursed 
for their maintenance and treatments during their 
expected lifetimes. 

There were ,53,796 aliens initially admitted to 
Service detention facilities and 73,965 to non-Serv- 
ice facilities. 

HEARINGS AND LITIGATION 

EXCLUSION AND DEPORTATION 
HEARINGS 

The fiscal year total of deportation hearings re- 
ferred to special inquiry officers increased to 19,637. 
an alltime high for any single year. During fiscal 
year 1968, the New York District Office had 29 
pei'cent of the country's total of deportation hear- 
ings referred to special inquiry officers. Exclusion 
hearings referred to special inquiry officers totaled 
968, and increase over the 895 received in 1967. 

Applications for withholdings of deportation 
on the basis of a claim of persecution totaled 
530, a 33-percent increase over 1967. To the list of 
countries concerning which such claims have been 
made in previous years, thei'e were added Burma, 
Cambodia, Paraguay, the United Arab Republic, 
Switzerland, New Zealand, Kenya, and Libya. 

This fiscal year brought with it additional ju- 
dicial decisions bearing upon the matter of the 
burden of proof in proceedings within the juris- 
diction of special inquiry officers. Woodhy v. INS. 
385 U.S. 276 (1966), had made a drastic change in 
the law from that which had previously existed, 
holding that the burden of proof in a deportation 
proceeding was upon tlie Government to establish 
the facts supporting deportaliility by clear, unequi- 
vocal, and convincing evidence. In the cases of 
Rodrlques v. INS. 389 F.2d 129 (3 Cir. 1968) , and 
in ^yazm v. INS. 392 F.2d 55 (9 Cir. 1968), the 
court held that the burden of proof in rescission 
proceedings is the same as that in deportation 
proceedings. The aliens had been granted adjust- 
ment of status under Section 245 of the Act, which 
was rescinded following appropriate proceedings 
before special inquiry officers under section 246. 
It is now established, consequently, that an alien 
cannot be deported following a rescission of the 
adjustment of his immigration status, unless the 
truth of the facts allegecl by the Government are 
established in the rescission proceeding by clear, 
unequivical, and convincing evidence. 

Fiscal year 1968 also saw an enlargement of the 
powers and resjjonsibilities of special inquiry offi- 
cers, resulting from an amendment of the admin- 
istrative regulations. In connection with the con- 



duct of deportation j^roceedings, the special in- 
quiry officer has now been authorized to grant a 
stay of deportation in connection with, and pend- 
ing his determination of a motion to reopen or a 
motion to reconsider filed with him under the regu- 
lations i-elating to expulsion proceedings. In addi- 
tion, special inquiry officers have had conferred 
upon them discretionary power when first author- 
izing voluntar^r departure, to fix the time within 
which an alien, granted voluntary departure in 
lieu of deportation, shall depart from the United 
States. The conditions inider which such voluntary 
departure is to be accomplished remains within the 
jurisdiction of the District Director, and author- 
ity to extend the time within which the alien is to 
depart voluntarily specified initially by a special 
inquiiy officer or the Board of Innnigration Ap- 
]3eals remains exclusively within the sole jurisdic- 
tion of the District Director. It is believed that the 
amended regidations carry forward the traditional 
]iosture of the Service in seeing to it that proceed- 
ings before special inquiry officers shall be sur- 
rounded by reasonable and effective safeguards 
looking toward a fair and efficient administration 
of the law. 

LITIGATION 

The General Counsel is the chief law officer of 
the Service and fimctions primarily as advisor 
to the Commissioner and other officers on legal 
matters in carrying out Service enforcement and 
administrative tasks under the immigration and 
aationality laws. He provides executive and pro- 
fessional direction to four Regional Counsels, who 
mnintain j5i-ofessional supervision over trial at- 
torneys whose primary responsibility is to repre- 
sent the Service in formal exclusion, expulsion, 
and rescission hearings before special inquiiy offi- 
cers. Regional Counsels and trial attorneys when 
requested, assist U.S. attorneys in civil and crimi- 
nal actions arising under the immigration and 
nationality laws. Through two appellate trial at- 
lorneys tiie General Counsel also represents the 
Service before the Board of Immigration Appeals 
in all appellate matters. 

During fiscal year 1968, the trial attorney 
work continued to rise over previous years. They 
reviewed 13,997 applications for orders to show 
cause in deportation proceedings and prepared 
for heai-ing 15,606 de])ortation cases. They partic- 
ipated in 7,651 deportation hearings and prepared 
2,330 legal briefs and memorandums. They also 
appeared in 794 exclusion cases. All of these fig- 
ures are higher than the figures for fiscal year 
1967. 

The Board of Immigration Appeals has juris- 
diction of appeals in exclusion, expulsion, rescis- 
sion of adjustment of status, and visa petition 
cases. During the year, the Board received 2,015 
cases, all of which were reviewed by the appellate 
trial attorneys to determine whether argument 
by the Service before the Board was necessary to 



20 



avoid conflict with Service policy or interpreta- 
tion of the hiw. After the' decisions were made by 
the Board, tliey were referred to the General Coun- 
sel for consideration as to whether a motion to 
reopen or for reconsideration should be suljmitted 
to the Board or whether recommendation should 
be made to the Commissioner that the case be 
certified to the Attorney General. The appellate 
trial attorneys argued -184 cases before the Board 
and sul)mitted to the Board 12 briefs and 20 mo- 
tions to reopen or reconsider. 

Court litigation challenging administrative de- 
cisions in immigration and nationality matters 
continued at a high level during fiscal year 1968. A 
total of Sl.'J actions were filed. In the district courts 
of the United States, there were filed 44 petitions 
for writ of habeas corpus and 109 declaratory 
judgment actions. The district courts decided all 
wi'it of habeas corpus cases favorably to the Gov- 
ernment. In the declarator}' judgment actions, the 
Government received 107 favorable and two im- 
favorable decisions. In the United States courts of 
appeals, 314 direct petitions for review of deporta- 
tion cases were filed under Section 10(i of the 
Immigration and Xationality Act, as amended, 8 
U.S.C. 1105a. Of the petitions for review decided 
by the courts of appeals during fiscal year 1968, 
328 were favorable to the Government and two 
were adverse. The Supreme Court denied 11 peti- 
tions for certiorari in immigration and nationality 
cases, denied one petition for rehearing, granted 
certiorari in two companion eases, and wrote an 
opinion in one of the latter and a In-ief per curiam 
decision in the other. 

The court rendered one very important decision 
helping to clarifv- the conflict among the U.S. 
courts of appeals regarding the scope of the review 
of deporation cases under Section 106 of the Im- 
migration and Xationalitv Act, 8 U.S.C. llO.ia. 
In Cheng Fan. Ku-oh v. INS, 392 U.S. 206 (1968), 
the Supreme Court by a ^'ote of 8 to 1 declared 
that proceedings under Section 106(a) of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act may not be 
brought to challenge an order of the District Di- 
rector denying a stay of deportation. This affirmed 
the decision of the Court of Appeals for the Third 
Circuit, 381 F. 2d 542 (1967). The opinion of the 
court was based upon its determination that sec- 
tion 106 proceedings may be brought only to 
challenge a final order of deportation or an order 
entered in the course of administrative proceed- 
ings conducted under Section 242(b) of the Im- 
migration and Xationality Act, 8 U.S.C, 1252(b). 
In a brief per curiam opinion in Chan Kvan 
Chung v. LVS. 392 U.S. 642 (1968), the Supreme 
Court' rendered another decision to the same effect. 

The Supreme Court by denial of certiorari de- 
clined to review the decision of the U.S. Court of 
Appeals for the Xinth Circuit in Wing Wa Lee v. 
INS. 375 F. 2d 723 (1967). cert. den. 389 U.S. 856 
(1967). This left- undisturbed the ruling of the 
Ninth Circuit that found that Section 203(a) (7) 
of the Immigration and Xationality Act, 8 U.S.C. 



1153(a) (7), did not in and of itself define a right 
to apply for adjustment of status and that the 
alien could not bring himself within the provisions 
of anv of the sections of the Act providing for such 
adjustment. In Wright v. INS. 379 F. 2d 275 
( 1067 ) , cert. den. 389 U.S. 928 ( 1967) , the Supreme 
Court by denying certiorari left undisturbed the 
ruling of the Sixth Circuit that found that the 
regulation providing for automatic revocation of 
approval of a petition for a visa filed by a citizen 
husband to classify his wife as a nonquota immi- 
grant, upon his withdrawal of the petition, is valid 
and that a hearing is not required. In Rnis Ruhio 
V. INS, 380 F. 2cl 29 (1967), cert. den. 389 U.S. 
944 (1967), the Supreme Court refused to review 
the decision of the Ninth Circuit that found that 
an alien who pleads nolo contendere to a charge of 
possession of marijuana in a California superior 
court and is sentenced therefor, is subject to de- 
portation as a person who has been convicted of 
the violation. Bv denial of certiorari in Goon Mee 
Ilevng v. INS. 380 F. 2d 236 (1967), cert. den. 389 
I'.S. 975 (1967). the Supreme Court left undis- 
turbed the ruling of the First Circuit that found 
that the word "inspected" in Section 245(a) of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act, 8 U.S.C. 1255 
(a), means inspected as an alien and that where 
a false claim to citizenship has been made and ac- 
cepted there has been no inspection under the im- 
migration laws. In Cheng Kai Fw v. INS. 386 F. 
2d' 750 (1967), cert. den. 390 U.S. 1003 (1968), 
the Supreme Court refused to disturb the ruling 
of the Second Circuit that it was not an abuse 
of discretion for the District Director and the 
Board of Immigration Appeals to refuse to 
reopen the deportation hearing of the petitioner 
to permit him to apply for a stay of deportation 
to Hong Kong under Section 243(h) of the Immi- 
gration and Nationality Act, 8 U.S.C. 1253 (h) . The 
court of appeals had found that the petitioner had 
not made an adequate showing that he would be 
subject to perseciition in Hong Kong. In Ho Yeh 
Sze V. INS. 389 F. 2d 978 (1968), cert. den. 390 
IT.S. 1040 (1968), the Supreme Court denied re- 
view of the ruling by the Second Circuit rejecting 
the alien's contention that the order to show cause 
in the deportation proceeding was fatally defective 
for failure to name the country to which the Gov- 
ernment would ask the special inquiry officer to di- 
rect deportation (Sections 242(b) and 243(a) of 
the Immigration and Nationality Act, 8 U.S.C. 
1252(b) and 1253(a)). The Supreme Court also 
denied certiorari in Lapeniel-s v. AVIS', 389 F. 2d 
.343 (1968), cert. den. 391 U.S. 951 (1968), leaving 
undisturbed the ruling by the Ninth Circuit that 
the alien was effectively "relieved" from military 
service in 1952 (and thus is ineligible for immigra- 
tion and naturalization benefits) on his claim of 
exemption, even though the exemption was sub- 
sequently eliminated by a 1956 change of Selective 
Service regulations under which the alien took a 
pre-induction jjliysical examination in 1957 and 



21 



was found unfit (Section 315(a) of the Immigra- 
tion and Nationality Act, 8 U.S.C. 1426(a)). 
Certiorai'i was denied in DeLiicia v. INS. 40?) F. 
2d 565 (1968), cert. den. ?,92 U.S. 909 (1968) leav- 
ing undisturbed the rulino- by the Court, of Appeals 
for the District of Columbia which held that the 
District Court for the District of Columbia lacked 
jurisdiction to entertain a challenge to a determi- 
nation made by the District Director, Chicago, that 
the alien is a citizen of Italy in attempting to exe- 
cute the depoi-tation order. In Yk-h Chin v. INS. 
.".Sfi F. 2d 935 ( 1967) , cert. den. 392 U.S. 927 ( 1968 ) , 
the Supreme Court refused to review the ruling of 
the Xinth Circuit which held that an order not 
entered in the course of section 242(b) deportation 
proceedings and not ancillary to such proceedings 
is not reviewable under Section 106(a) of the Im- 
migration and Nationalitv Act, 8 U.S.C. 1105a (a) . 
In Konik V. E. openly. 3S'6 F. 2d 232 (1967), cert, 
den. 392 U.S. 935 (1968), the Supreme Court, re- 
fused to review the decision of the Court of Ap- 
peals for the Second Circuit holding that crewmen 
who deserted their ship while on shore leave were 
not entitled to withholding of deportation ]iro- 
ceedings pursuant to Section 243(h) of the Immi- 
gration and Nationality Act. 8 U.S.C. 1253(h), 
before a special inquirv officer. Bv denial of certi- 
orari in Brett v. INS.'?,^ F. 2d 439 (1967), cert, 
den. 392 U.S. 935 (1968), the Supreme Court left 
undistui'lied the decision of the Court of Appeals 
for the Second Circuit which held that tlie crime 
ol' petty larceny does involve moral turpitude. 

There were several decisions by the Courts of 
A]>peals having significant impact on Service ac- 
tivities. In Ynmafla v. INS. 384 F.2d 214 (1967), 
the Ninth Circuit held that it had no jurisdiction 
under Section 106(a) of the Immigration and Na- 
tionality Act, 8 IT.S.C. 1105a (a), for direct re- 
view of an order denying a visa petition to classify 
an alien as a first preference quota immigrant. In 
Wazhi V. INS. 392 F.2d 55 (1968), the Ninth Cir- 
cuit held that it had jurisdiction under Section 
106(a) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, 
8 IT.S.C. 1105a (a), to review an order rescinding 
permanent residence status under Section 246 of 
the Immigration and Nationality Act,, 8 U.S.C. 
1256. It also held that the burden of proof im- 
posed by ^yoodhy v. INS. 385 U.S. 276 (1966) — 
that an alien is not to be deported unless the de- 
portation charges are found to be supported by 
clear, unequivocal, and convincing evidence — is 
also api)licable to rescission cases. In Rorlrtqiief! v. 
INS. 389 F.2d 129 (1968), the Third Circuit like- 
wise held that the Woodhy standard of proof was 
applicable to rescission proceedings. 

ALIEN ADDRESS REPORTS 

The Immigration and Nationality Act (66 Stat. 
163) requires that every alien in the United States 



on January 1 of each year report his address (to 
the Service) during that month. A record 3,876,304 
aliens so reported tlieir addresses in January 1968. 
This is an increase of 207,468 over 1967. Of the 
t(»tal reports received, 3,405,177 (88 percent) were 
listed as permanent resident aliens and 471,127 as 
visitors, students, temporaiy workers, and othei"s 
in the United States temporarily. 

Over 75 percent of the total reported alien popu- 
lation of January 1968 resided in nine States. 
California with 923,145 reported aliens, some 24 
percent of the total, led the nation. Following 
California were : New York, 708,823 (18 percent) ; 
Illinois, 252,545 (7 percent); Texas, 242,024 (6 
percent) ; Florida, 241,081 (6 percent) ; New Jer- 
sey, 208,222 (5 percent) ; Massachu.setts, 149,654 (4 
percent); Micliigan, 144,272 (4 percent); and 
Pennsylvania, 104,741 (3 percent). 

Following the pattern of past years, the greatest 
concentration of aliens was in the Southwest. Mex- 
icans were the largest nationality group in the 
ITnited States with 684,533 permanent resident 
aliens reporting (a slight 2.4-percent increase over 
1967). Of the total Mexican nationals 94 percent 
resided in just five states; 53 percent in Califor- 
nia; 28 percent in Texas; 6 percent in Illinois; 
5 percent in Arizona; and nearly 2 percent in 
New Mexico. 

The second largest nationality group was 
Canadians. There were 384,539 Canadian nation- 
als listed as permanently residing in the United 
Stales in January 1968 — some 828 fewer than re^ 
ported in 1967. By States, most resident Canadians 
(93,741) lived in California while 78,926 perma- 
nent resident Canadians were found in the New 
England States; 42,726 in Michigan; 40,569 in 
New York; and 18,223 in Florida. 

The number of Cubans repiorting their addresses 
to the Service rose from 317,144 in 1967 to 358,601 
in 1968. Public Law 89-732 permitted Cubans to 
adjust their refugee status to that of pennanent 
resident aliens. The full impact of this law is in- 
dicated by the 207,561 Cubans who reported as 
permanent residents in 1968, an increase of 40 per- 
cent over tJie 147,805 so reported in 1967. At the 
same time that the number of permanent resident 
Cubans increased, the number in temporary status 
declined 18,299 from a 1967 total of 169,-339 to a 
1968 total of 151,040. 

The number of permanent resident aliens from 
Far Eastern comitries increased in 1968 (as a re- 
sult of the Act of October 3, 1965, which provided 
for unused quota numbers to be pooled and used 
by preference petitioners whose national origins 
quotas were exhausted). For example, resident 
aliens of Chinese nationalitv increased 28 percent 
( 15,942) from 1967 to a 1968 total of 72,712 ; those 
from the Philippines increased 17 percent (9,160) 
to a total of 61,852; and those from India in- 
creased some 65 percent (5,250) to a 1968 total 
of 13,359. 



22 



ALIEN ADDRESS REPORTS 
1968 




VIRGIN ISLANDS 



CITIZENSHIP 

Generally, foreign-born persons entering the 
United States for permanent residence wish to be- 
come citizens at the earliest possible moment, but 
few know when and how they may proceed. The 
Service mission in tlie naturalization field therefore 
included action to assure that this lack of knowl- 
edge did not frustrate a commendable desire for 
early citizenship. 

Utilizing the annual alien address report form 
as a means of communication, aliens who wished 
to apply for citizenship were directed to a Service 
office. Made available to them there were not only 
applications and simplified brochures explaining 
the naturalization procedures and req^uirements 
but also the personal counsel and assistance of 
trained contact representatives and naturalization 
officers. Similar pertinent information was also dis- 
seminated through the clerks of the naturalization 
courts and voluntary organizations interested in 
furthering the naturalization of the foreign born 
and, on occasion, by radio and other information 
media. 




i'oung Korean girl at right among those naturalised in 
Milwaukee. Wi-f., on Law Day 1968. 

— Milwaukee Sentinel Photo. 



23 



NATURALIZATION ACTIVITIES 

Citizenship Instruction and Training. The inter- 
est of the Nation is well served when the immi- 
grant learns our social and political customs and 
ideals so that he can become a well-informed, par- 
ticipating, responsible citizen. Congressional rec- 
ognition of this truth led to the requirement that 
naturalization candidates be able to speak, under- 
stand, read, and write the English language and 
show a fair knowledge of this country's history, 
Government, and Constitution. 

Moreover, by statute, this Service is authorized 
to engage in specified activity designed to promote 
their insti-uction and training along such lines. 

Throughout the fiscal year, pursuant to this au- 
thority, the names and addresses of 179,942 new 
permanent resident aliens were furnished the local 
public schools so that these prospective citizens 
could be invited to attend citizenship classes. As 
followup, similar information was sent to the 
schools for 29,981 aliens, who filed applications 
for naturalization or whose cases were continued 
for further study. Thus, as this program unfolds, 
each potential citizen is afforded an opportunity 
to study and prepare himself for naturalization 
from the time of his arrival until he attains the 
goal of citizenship. 

Rosters of availalile citizenship classes and home 
study courses were maintained at all Service of- 
fices for the information of aliens desiring to. pre- 
pare themselves educationally for naturalization. 
Visits to the schools by naturalization officers as- 
sured coo))eration between the Service and the 
educational authorities and tended to encourage 
the continued attendance of the students. During 
the fiscal year, 129,.560 aliens attended 5,084 public 
school citizenship classes in all parts of the T^nited 
States, and 2,659 other applicants were enrolled 
in the home study courses. Of the 102,726 persons 
naturalized during the period, 21,786 had used 
these sei'vices as a means of- preparation. 

The Service Federal Textbook on Citizenship 
also contributed materially to the education and 
training of aliens in citizenship matters. A prin- 
cipal part of this publication is the "Becoming a 
Citizen Series", which is comprised of three mod- 
ern textbooks entitled "Our American Way of 
Life", "Our United States", and "Our Govern- 
ment", and a related "Teacher's Guide". Each of 
the first three units mentioned is a complete basic 
text prepared at a different literacy level, which 
develops in the user a comprehensive conception 
of citizenship responsibility, an improved com- 
mand of English, and greater knowledge of our 
history and Government. In the space of the past 
year, 105,672 copies of the various parts of the 
Federal Textbook on Citizen.ship were furnished 
the public schools free of cost and formed the basis 
for instruction and study in the citizenship classes. 

The educational authorities and institutions in 
42 States administered tlie correspondence courses 



for aliens during the fiscal year. Made available 
for the use of these prospective citizens, as text- 
l)ook and study material, were 79,801 copies of 
other units of the Federal Textbook on Citizen- 
ship, specially designed for home study. The Serv- 
ice portfolio of films depicting the naturalization 
process, its educational aspects, and significant 
historical events also continued to be available on 
loan for use by recognized civic, patriotic, and 
adult education organizations. 

Persons Naturalhcd. Pursuant to formal rec- 
ommendations entered by naturalization officers 
of the Service, 102,726 persons of 140 different 
nationalities were awarded the privilege of citi- 
zenship, slightly less than the number of aliens 
naturalized during fiscal year 1967. 

The naturalizations were accomplished at pro- 
ceedings, often impressive in their ceremonial fea- 
tures, conducted in a reduced number of Federal 
(203) and State (383) courts throughout the 
Ignited States, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Virgin 
Islands. Tlie reduction in the number of courts, 
streamlined processing procedures, and mobile 
deployment of personnel enabled the Service to 
maintain currency in the overall disposition of 
its workload, ancl at the same time to pursue a 
policy of according expeditious handling to cases 
involving foreign-bound servicemen, their depend- 
ents, and other aliens about to proceed abroad in 
connection with important Government projects. 

The numerical differences in immigration quotas 
assigned the various foreign countries, the ab- 
sence of quotas for certain countries, and other 
factors have produced in the TTnited States a resi- 
dent alien po|)ulation in which some nationality 
groups greatly jiredominate. Naturally enough, 
as was consistently the case for the past decade, 
a major percentage of the persons naturalized dur- 
ing the fiscal year were members of these numeri- 
cally greater groupings; namely, former citizens 
or subjects of Germany (12,692), Italy (9,379), 
the United Kingdom "(8,466), Canada (6,984), 
Cuba (6,784), and Me.xico_ (6,134). 

The new citizens comprised a cross section of 
the elements found in every productive society. 
Among them were the elders, the middle-aged, the 
youth, and the very young, and the married and 
unmarried. Tliere were more women (57,624) than 
men (45,102). Within the group were professional 
men (10,939), skilled technicians and craftsmen 
(20,237), managerial and foremen personnel 
(4,051), merchants and clerical (8,657), sales and 
service workers (11,120), jn'ivate household work- 
ers (948), laborers (3,379), housewives (42,908), 
and others not in the labor force. It is interesting 
to note that only 487 of the new citizens are farm- 
ers or are engaged in farm labor, and that this 
same condition has prevailed with lespect to per- 
sons naturalized during the past decade. 

Residence in the T'nited States for 5 years is 
normally required for naturalization so that the 
alien can prepare himself educationally for citi- 



24 



NUMBER 
150,000 



PERSONS NATURALIZED 
1964- 1968 



100,000 



50,000 




964 1965 

■I EUROPE i 



1966 i967 1968 

ASIA k\\\i NORTH AMERICA Q 



AIL OTHER 



zenship and demonstrate by his conduct tliat he 
is worthy of the privilege. Ilowever, Congress was 
of the opinion that these objectives ai'e realized 
more rapidly where the alien's spouse is a citizen 
and lowered the residence requirement to 3 years in 
such cases. Similarly, where military service for 
this country is honorable and thereby betokens a 
worthiness for citizenship, residence ceases to be 
a prerequisite. As in former years, a great majority 
of the newly naturalized persons, 76,377 in num- 
ber, qualified under the 5-year provision, 17,156 
were the spouses of citizens, while 2,438 were 
servicemen or veterans with honorable service in 
the Armed Forces. The remainder, 6,755, were 
for the most part natural or adopted children 
whose naturalizations were accomplished pursuant 
to petitions filed by citizen parents. 

Denials of Natural hat ion. Where an alien 
proves to be ineligible for naturalization, the costs 
of prosecuting the case are nonetheless borne by 
him but without the reward of citizenship. During 
the fiscal year, a very great majority of the ineligi- 
ble cases was disposed of in a manner which not 
only materially reduced these costs in the interest 
of the applicants but also the time which the Serv- 
ice and the courts had to devote to such cases. Ap- 
plications to file naturalization petitions, for 
example, were discontinued when preliminary 
screening disclosed statutory ineligibility while, 
after interview, other applicants accepted the ad- 




Marine naturalized at a special hearing on his return 
from Vietnam. 

— Milwaukee Sentinel Photo. 



25 



vice of naturalization officers and elected to defer 
the filing of their petitions for the same reason. 
Additionally, ineligibility established after the 
filing of the petitions prompted petitioners to with- 
draw or not prosecute the petitions, making it 
possible for the courts to enter routine orders of 
denial upon such basis without time-consuming 
determinations on the merits, or the appearance 
of tlie petitioners at the final court hearings. Of 
the 1,962 petitions denied by the courts, only 
162 cases were based upon the court's actual deter- 
mination that the petitioner had failed to meet one 
or more of the statutory prerequisites for naturali- 
zation. Moreover, in a majority of these cases 
the courts were content to accept the findings, con- 
clusions, and recommendations of the naturaliza- 
tion officer in attendance and conducted no further 
inquiry in open court. 

The following table sets forth the reason for 
denial on merits and those denied because with- 
drawn or not prosecuted. 

Petitions for Natxiralization Denied on Merits, on 

Groinuh oj ''Petition Withdrawn" and on Grounds 

of "Petition not Prosecuted", by Reasons Year Ended 

June 30, 1968 



On With- Not 
Total merits drawn prose- 
cuted 



Total--.- - l,9(i; 

Petitioner failed to establish good moral 
character during the period required by 
law- 

Petitioner failed to establish attachment to 
the principles of the Constitution and 
favorable disposition to the United States 
during the period required by law 

Petitioner cannot speak (read, write) the 
English language - 

Petitioner failed to establish lawful admis- 
sion for permanent residence-- 

Petition not supported by required affida- 
vits of witnesses (depositions, oral testi- 
mony) 

Petitioner failed to establish that he is not 
ineligible for naturalization under Section 
315 of the Immigration and Nationality 
Act 

Petitioner lacks knowledge and understand- 
ing of the fimdanientals of the history and 
the principles and form of Government of 
the United States _ 

Petitioner is unable to take the oath of al- 
legiance to the United States 

Petitioner cannot meet requirements under 
special naturalization provisions 

All other reasons 



545 



16 



85 



293 



In accordance with established Service practice, 
the candidates who failed educationally were ad- 
vised concerning the availability of citizenship 
classes or home study courses as a means of over- 
coming their deficiency and eventually qualifying. 
The situations of other unsuccessful applicants 
were evaluated, and if corrective action was possi- 
ble, they were informed as to when tliey might re- 
apply with reasonable certainty of success. 

Citizenship Olservances. The President, in his 
annual proclamation designating Citizenship Day 
and Constitution Week, urged that meaningful 
exercises be conducted during the commemorative 
period not only to honor the newly naturalizecl 



citizens and other first-time voters but also as a 
means of inspiring all citizens to renew their faith 
in the Constitution and rededicate themselves to 
the support and defense of its principles. Once 
again, the Service was in the forefront of a nation- 
wide eti'ort to achieve these objectives. 

Service field offices publicized the history and 
significance of Citizenship Day and Constitution 
Week and effectively focused widespread public 
attention upon the Presidential proclamation. At 
the State and city levels of govermnent, many 
Governors and Mayors issued corresponding proc- 
lamations. The local press, generally, lent support 
by featuring special articles and editorials, and 
local radio and television stations cooperated fully 
by presenting special programs in recognition of 
the occasion. The Service also solicited the aid of 
civic, fraternal, social, and patriotic organizations, 
bar associations, public officials, and outstanding 
private citizens in the arrangement of suitable 
public ceremonies. 

The Service distributed approximately 28,000 
copies of tlie Service Citizenship Day and Con- 
,stitiition Week Bulletin for use in these cere- 
monies. Naturalization proceedings formed an im- 
portant part of many programs, and overall, there 
was a maximiun participation by naturalized citi- 
zens, new voters, the judiciary, Federal, State, and 
city officials, public-sj^irited organizations, and 
Service officers. 

Law Day, obsei-ved in many States to com- 
memorate the role of the law in our society, was 
another occasion during the fiscal year on which 
tlie Service partici]iated in meaningful ceremonies. 
(\areful planning by the Service in cooperation 
with tlie courts permitted many final naturaliza- 
tion hearings to be conducted on Law Day. Na- 
turally enough, the judges and various bar associa- 
tions played an important part, in the programs, 
and they received maximum cooperation from the 
Service. Among the principal speakers were out- 
standing members of the ]udiciary, high public 
law officials, and prominent members of the bar. 
Their addresses .stressing respect for and obedi- 
ence to the law were most timely in the light of 
recent grievous events. 

DERIVATIVE CITIZENSHIP 

Derivation of Citizenship. It is probable that 
the average individual, if asked to state how U.S. 
citizenship may be acquired, would recognize only 
two methods of acquisition, namely, by birth in 
the United States and through naturalization by 
a court. Yet, almost from the Nation's inception, 
statutes liave provided that under specified condi- 
tions, citizenship is acquired at birth by the for- 
eign-ljorn offspring of U.S. citizens and after birth 
when alien parents become naturalized citizens of 
the United States. Moreover, in the past, alien 
women could derive citizensiiip upon marriage to 
a citizen or upon an alien husband's naturalization. 

A demonstrated need for some official indicia 



26 



which could be used by such citizens to gain gen- 
eral recognition of their citizenship status 
prompted Congress to authorize the issuance of 
certificates of citizenship by the Service in such 
cases. The documents may be issued only when the 
applicant has presented evidence wliich satisfac- 
torily establishes that citizenship was derived in 
one of the ways mentioned and has not since been 
lost. 

Certificate of citizenship proceedings consti- 
tuted a major segment of Service operation where 
33,379 certificates were issued to citizens in the 
three categories mentioned above. Reflecting in 
large part the extent to which American service- 
men and their wives and other U.S. Government 
representatives and their families are and have 
been stationed abroad, 17,631 of the documents 
issued affirmed the acquisition of citizenship by 
ciiiidren born abroad to citizen parents. 

During the fiscal year, the dependents of many 
servicemen were issued certificates of citizenship 
in proceedings conducted entirely at a domestic 
military base. This well-established program not 
only permits more efficient Service operation, but 
it also affords servicemen an opportunity to ob- 
tain the certificates for their dependents at a mini- 
mum of expense and under the most convenient 
circumstances. The merits of the program were 
recognized during Law Day observances at Nellis 
Air Force Base on May 3, 1968, when a plaque 
for outstanding service to that base was awarded 
to the San Francisco District Office. 

At final naturalization hearings, new citizens 
are notified concerning the derivative citizenship 
rights of their children and of the availability to 
them of certificates of citizenship. As a conse- 




Two Korean orphans naturalized in Circuit Court. 
Wausaii, Wisconsin. 



quence, 57 percent of the derivative certificates 
issued were to children whose parents were natu- 
ralized in the past decade. 

The Service continued its implementation of 
Public Law 89-710, which authorized for the first 
time the issuance and delivery of certificates of 
citizenship in the Panama Canal Zone to persons 
who were born in that leasehold or the Republic 
of Panama and acquired citizenship through their 
citizen parents. During two details to the Canal 
Zone in fiscal year 1968, Service officers issued and 
delivered 900 certificates. 

Although the statute providing for derivation 
of citizenship through marriage to a citizen male 
ceased to be effective more than 45 years ago, 382 
women were issued certificates upon this basis. 

OTHER CITIZENSHIP ACTIVITIES 

The fiscal year witnessed a very considerable 
demand for other nationality documents and bene- 
fits. There were 14,590 applications filed by persons 
who sought declarations of intention for state li- 
censing and other purposes ; new naturalization or 
citizenship certificates to replace original docu- 
ments which had been lost, destroyed, or muti- 
lated; new naturalization certificates in legally 
changed names; special certificates of naturaliza- 
tion attesting to their status as citizens for use 
in connection with property claims abroad; or 
administrative orders preserving their residence 
for naturalization purposes during periods of em- 
ployment abroad. 

During the yearly period, 369 certificates of citi- 
zenship were administratively cancelled for fraud- 
ulent procurement, almost all of them being 
documents which had been issued to Chinese per- 
sons. Additionally, despite the extent to which the 
LTnited States Supreme Court has invalidated 
expatriatory grounds in recent years, 1,400 citi- 
zens were held to have lost their citizenship by 
the voluntary performance of acts designated as 
expafriatoi-y in the statute. Numbered among these 
expatriates were 569 who divested themselves of 
citizenship by naturalization in, or taking an oath 
of allegiance to a foreign state. The remainder 
included 677 citizens who renounced their citizen- 
ship before an American consular officer in a for- 
eign country and 69 citizens who lost their citizen- 
ship by foreign military service. 

LEGISLATION AFFECTING NATURAL- 
IZATION AND CITIZENSHIP 

Remedial NafuraUzation Legidation. The Con- 
gress took constructive action during the fiscal 
year to remedy the situation of certain aliens whose 
continuous employment abroad in flie interest of 
the United States has made it impossible for them 
to meet the normal residence requirements for nat- 
uralization. Under Public Law 90-215, approved 



325-586 O - 69 - 3 



27 



December 18, 1967, persons who were admitted for 
permanent residence and were thereafter con- 
tinuously employed abroad for at least 5 years 
by United States incoi-porated nonprofit informa- 
tion organizations, such as Free Europe, Inc. and 
Radio Liberty Committee, Inc., may be naturalized 
without regard to the extent of their previous resi- 
dence in this country. Preliminary Service liaison 
with the organizations in question permitted a 
prompt, efficient implementation of the new pi-o- 
visions, and 59 persons had been naturalized under 
this law by the end of June. 

Under (he Immig;ration and Nationality Act, 
naturalization based upon marriage to a United 
States citizen could not be granted where the 
citizen's death occurs befoi-e the alien spouse is 
actually admitted to citizenship by the court. A 
number of cases involving the spouse of a service- 
man killed in A^ietnam prompted the Congress 
to pass legislation alleviating this hardship. Tender 
Public Law 90-369, approved by the President on 
June 29, 1968, the Immigration and Nationality 
Act was amended to pi-ovide that the death of 
the citizen serviceman during a period of hon- 
orable active service with the Armed Forces does 
not preclude the alien spouse's naturalization. 
Furthermore, the widow becomes exempt from the 
normal naturalization requirements of residence 
and physical presence in the Ignited States. 

Other legislation authorizing naturalization 
based upon honorable service with the U.S. Armed 
Forces during the period of the Vietnam hostili- 
ties and future conflicts was approved by the 
House of Representatives and was ready for con- 
sideration by the Senate at the end of the fiscal 
year. 

Other remedial legislation awaiting final con- 
gressional action at the end of the fiscal year 
would liberalize the statutory exemption from the 
naturalization literacy requirements. Since De- 
cember 24, 1952, persons who were at least 50 
years of age and had lived in the United States 
a minimum of 20 years as of such date have been 
eligible for naturalization without the ability to 
.speak, understand, read, and write the English 
language. Under the amendatory legislation being 
considered, a grant of the literacy exemption will 
no longer be governed by a deadline date. Rather, 
as aliens attain 50 years of age and accumulate at 
least 20 years' residence, they will become qualified 
for the exemption. 

Pending Derivative Citizenship Legislation. 
Awaiting final action by the Congress at the end 
of the fiscal year was pending legislation which 
would materially change the provisions relating to 
the derivation of citizenship through the naturali- 
zation of a parent. The proposed legislation would 
confer derivative citizenship if the requirements 
therefor are satisfied befoi-e the child arrives at 
his 18th birthday while, under present law, the 
prerequisites must be met before the child attains 
16 years of age. If this legislation is enacted into 



law, many more children will become derivative 
citizens and will not have to be naturalized by a 
court. 

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 

Personnel. The Service Officer Development 
Center at Port Isabel, Tex., suffered considerable 
hurricane damage in September 1967, thereby 
limiting training at the facility during fiscal year 
1968 to three patrol inspector trainee sessions and 
a 2-week executive development seminar. In addi- 
tion, formal training coui-ses offered by the Civil 
Service Cominission and other agencies were at- 
tended by 221 Service employees. There were 28 
Service pilots who completed special courses at the 
Federal Aviation Agency Academy. 

Added emphasis was given to the Service's Ex- 
tension Training Program to encourage greater 
employee participation during this fiscal year. Of 
the 3,647 lessons completed, 375 were by employees 
of other agencies. A total of 1,080 supervisors en-- 
rolled in a new training program entitled the "INS 
Supervisory Development Conference Series", 
which was introduced throughout the Service dur- 
ing the year. In addition, many other less formal 
training" programs conducted by individual offices 
have resulted in improved performance in Service 
ojw rat ions. 

During fiscal year 1968, 437 Federal employees 
from other departments and agencies participated 
in training programs of the Ser\ac6. 

Evidence submitted with 35 requests for formal 
and exclusive recognition resulted in 13 employee 
organizations being granted exclusive recognition 
and eight being granted formal recognition. This 
year also marked the negotiation and signing of 
the first major contract between the Service and 
an employee organization (The National Council 
of Border Patrol Lodges) representing employees 
on a national level. The most notable of the ex- 
clusive recognitions granted was to the National 
Council of I. & N. Lodges as the representative of 
all nonsupervisory and nonprofessional employees 
not assigned to Border Patrol sectors. 

Incentive Awards. During fiscal year 1968, the 
Service Incentive Awards Program was very ac- 
tive with 79 employe* suggestions being adopted 
from the 364 submitted. A total of 474 sustained 
superior performance recommendations, 247 qual- 
ity increase recommendations, and 39 special acts 
recommendations were approved under the Serv- 
ive Incentive Awards Progi-am. In cooperation 
witli Service Performance Rating Committees, 
the Service Incentive Awards Committee ap- 
jn-oved 288 outstanding performance ratings. 

Finance. Changes brought about by the Federal 
Salary Act of 1967, P.L. 90-206. wliich was passed 
on December 16, 1967, increased the workload for 
Finance employees. The Act provided that uncon- 
trollable overtime would be paid at 4 pei-centage 
rates, depending on the hours worked, as well as 



28 



providing payment of overtime to employees in a 
travel status under certain conditions. Optional 
life insurance of $10,000 was also made available 
during the fiscal year. 

A total of 440 claims for overtime compensation 
for worli performed prior to April 25, 1955, were 
filed under decisions rendered by the U.S. Court 
of Claims (e.g., Kenneth S. Adams, et al., No. 
66-59). Another decision by the U.S. Court of 
Claims (e.g., Laure/n-s L. Delano, et al., No. 35-63) 
has resulted in the reinstitution of payment of 
extra compensation under the Act of March 2, 
1931, to employees for services performed as extra 
inspectors to assist in the examination of passen- 
gers on southbound trains entering the United 
States from Canada. 

Instructions were issued and placed into effect 
implementing Attorney General Order No. 387-67, 
dated November 29, 1967, which authorizes the 
Commissioner of the Immigration and Naturaliza- 
tion Service to settle tort claims of $2,500 or less. 

The Central Office Finance Branch was sub- 
jected to a complete internal audit during the year, 
and eacli regional office was visited to coorduiate 
the yearend closing of the books of account. Em- 
ployee tax withholding statements Forms W-2 
were distributed to all employees with the last 
salary checks of the calendar year. 

Procurement and Property Management. Dur- 
ing 1968, cost reductions were in effect throughout 
the Service. Emphasis was put on the })rocurement 
of essential needs and the utilization of excess 
property. During the nationwide "Operation 
Cleanup" campaign held in February 1968, the 
Service made available property valued at approx- 
imately $7,000 for reutilization within the Gov- 
ernment. 

Records. The increasing amount of record ma- 
terial maintained by the Service continues to re- 
quire additional shelving for storage of files as well 
as mechanical equipment to facilitate file location. 
During fiscal year 1968, open-shelf filing was au- 
thorized for the Houston, Tex., and Providence, 
R.L, offices; and plans were made to install addi- 
tional open-shelf sections in Phoenix, Ariz., San 
Diego, Calif., and Miami, Fla. Additional index 
machines were ordered for the San Diego, Los 
Angeles, IMiami, and Washington District Offices. 
The Master Index required by Section 290 of the 
Immigi'ation and Nationality Act now contains 
over 50 million documents. 

With a continuing effort to reduce storage costs, 
4,799 cubic feet of records, equivalent to 600 five- 
drawer file cabinets were transferred to Federal 
Records Centers. Another 5,261 cubic feet of rec- 
ords were destroyed by the Central Office and field 
offices under existing disposal schedules. 

Public reading rooms were established in the 

Central, Regional, District, and 16 other Service 

offices in compliance with the provisions of the 

Public Information Act. 

Statistics. The Service's work measurement sys- 




Puhlic reading room at the S< rrirr's Cmtral Office, 
Washingtoti, D.V. 

tem continues to play its important role in the ef- 
fective utilization of manpower. 

Increasing workloads in most areas of Service 
activity have required emphasis to be given to 
developing new methods in the handling of sta- 
tistical data. With additional re-quests being made 
each year for data compiled by the St<at.istic8 
Branch, a continuous effort is being made to take 
advantage of new technological developments in 
data handling. The first step'in this modernization 
was made during fiscal year 1968 with the instal- 
lation of a Univac 1005 Card Processing System 
which has given the Service the facility to process 
all its own work. 

Representative of the interest which continues 
in the flow of professional and highly skilled 
inunigrants is an "Annual Indicator" booklet be- 
ing published for the Council on International 
Education and Cultural Affairs and the Educa- 
tional and Cultural Affairs Office of the Depart- 
ment of State. The movement of aliens across the 
United States-lVIexican border received special 
attention with labor disputes arising in the South- 
west involving Mexican nationals, as well as the 
ever-increasing number of illegal entrants being 
apprehended in this same geographical area. De- 
tailed statistics wei-e. also compiled on naturaliza- 
tion, passenger travel, nonimmigrant visitors, and 
alien address reports during the fiscal year. 

Building Program. Pro'jects at. Portal, Sher- 
wood, and Westhope, N. Dak.; Sweetgrass and 
Turner, Mont. ; and Laurier, Wash., which were 
being constructed jointly with the Bureau of Cus- 
toms, were completed during fiscal year 1968. INS 
completed the construction of a Border Patrol sta- 
tion and three cottages in Browning, Mont. A con- 
tract was awarded' by the Sendee and shared 
jointly with the Bureau of Customs to constiiiot 
a new border inspection station at Amistad Dam, 
Tex. Other projects completed during the fiscal 
year for which funds were appropriated to GSA 
included: pistol ranges at the Border Patrol sec- 
tor heaciquartei-s in Del Rio, Tex., and Swanton, 
Vt., and border inspection stations in Porthill, 
Idaho, and Houlton, Maine; and improvements 
to border stations at Nogales, Ariz., and Cham- 
plain, N.Y. 



29 



All construction in El Paso, Tex., made neces- 
sary by the relocation of Service facilities by the 
terms of the Chamizal Convention Treaty have 
now been completed. New border inspection sta- 
tions at Cordova Island and tlie Bridge of the 
Americas have also been constructed, and the 
buildings are now occupied. 

The extensive hurricane damage to the Port 
Isabel, Tex., facility, the site of the Officer Devel- 
opment Center, has been surveyed, and a contra<?t 
has been negotiated to repair the installation. 

Service facilities which have moved to new 
Federal office buildings during the fiscal year were 
as follows : Baltimore, Md. ; Bangor, Maine ; Boise, 
Idaho; Cleveland, Ohio; Las Vegas, Nev. ; New- 
ark, N.J. ; Spokane, Wash.; and Fresno, Calif. 
Coordination has continued with GSA in regard 



to assignment of upgraded space in 
office buildings or other Government 

at 15 other Service locations. 






new Federal 
o\vn6d spar« 




The new border inspection station at the Bridge of the 
Americas, El Paso, Tea;. 



30 



IMMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES: 
1820 - 1968 



^From 1820 to 1867 figures represent alien passengers arrived; 1868 through 1891 
and 1895 through 1897 Immigrant aliens arrived^ 1892 through 1.89A and from 1898 



to the present time immigrant aliens admltted_j_/ 





Number 




Number 




Number 1 




Number 


Year 


of 


Yeat 


of 


Year of | 


Year 


of 




persons 




persons 




persons 




persons 


1820-1968 


1/ 44,430,733 


1855 


200,877 


1892 


579,663 


1931-1940 


528,431 






1856 


200,436 


1893 


439,730 


1931 . 


97,139 


1820 . 


8,385 


1857 


251,306 


1894 


285,631 


1932 . 


35,576 






1858 


123,126 


1895 


258,536 


1933 . 


23,068 


1821-1830 


143,439 


1859 


121,282 


1896 


343,267 


1934 . 


29,470 


1821 . 


9,127 


1860 


153,640 


1897 


230,832 


1935 . 


34,956 


1822 . 


6,911 






1898 


229,299 


1936 . 


36,329 


1823 . 


6,354 


1861-1870 . 2,314,824 


1899 


311,715 


1937 . 


50,244 


182A . 


7,912 


1861 


91,918 


1900 


448,572 


19 38 . 


67,89 5 


1825 . 


10,199 


1862 


91,985 






19 39 . 


82,998 


1826 . 


10,837 


1863 


176,282 


1901-1910 . 8,795,386 i 


1940 . 


70,756 


1827 . 


18,875 


1864 


193,418 


1901 


487,918 






1828 . 


27,382 


1865 


248,120 


1902 


648,743 


1941-1950 


. 1,035,039 


1829 . 


22,520 


1866 


318,568 


1903 


857,046 


1941 . 


51,776 


1830 . 


23,322 


1867 


315,722 


1904 


812,870 


1942 . 


28,781 






1868 


138,840 


1905 


.. 1,026,499 


1943 . 


23,725 


1831-18A0 


599,125 


1869 


352,768 


1906 


.. 1,100,735 


1944 . 


28,551 


1831 . 


22,633 


1870 


387,203 


1907 


.. 1,285,349 


1945 . 


38,119 


1832 . 


60,482 






1908 


782,870 


1946 . 


108,721 


1833 . 


58,640 


1871-188( 


) . 2,812,191 


1909 


751,786 


1947 . 


147,292 


1834 . 


65,365 


1871 


321,350 


1910 


.. 1,041,570 


1948 . 


170,570 


1835 . 


45,374 


1872 


404,806 






1949 . 


188,317 


1836 . 


76,242 


1873 


459,803 


1911-192 


D . 5,735,811 


1950 . 


249,187 


1837 . 


79,340 


1874 


313,339 


1911 


878,587 






1838 . 


38,914 


1875 


227,498 


1912 


838,172 


1951-1960 


. 2,515,479 


1839 . 


68,069 


1876 


169,986 


1913 


.. 1,197,892 


1951 . 


205,717 


1840 . 


84,066 


1877 


141,857 


1914 


.. 1,218,480 


1952 . 


265,520 






1878 


138,469 


1915 


326,700 


1953 . 


170,434 


1841-1850 


1,713,251 


1879 


177,826 


1916 


298,826 


19 54 . 


208,177 


1841 . 


80,289 


1880 


457,257 


1917 


295,403 


1955 . 


237,790 


1842 . 


104.565 






1918 


110,618 


1956 . 


321,625 


1843 . 


52,496 


1881-189( 


D . 5,246,613 


1919 


141,132 


1957 . 


326,867 


1844 . 


78,615 


1881 


669,431 


1920 


430,001 


1958 . 


253,265 


1845 . 


114,371 


1882 


788,992 






19 59 . 


260,686 


1846 . 


154,416 


1883 


603,322 


1921-193 


3 . 4,107,209 


19 60 . 


265,398 


1847 . 


234,968 


1884 


518,592 


1921 


805,228 






1848 . 


226,527 


1885 


395,346 


1922 


309,556 


1961 . 


271,344 


1849 . 


297,024 


1886 


334,203 


1923 


522,919 


1962 . 


283,763 


1850 . 


369,980 


1887 


490,109 


19 24 


706,896 


1963 . 


306.260 






1888 


546,889 


1925 


294,314 


19 64 . 


29 2,248 


1851-1860 


2,598,214 


1889 


444,427 


1926 


304,488 


1965 . 


296,697 


1851 . 


379,466 


1890 


455,302 


1927 


335,175 


1966 . 


323,040 


1852 . 


371,603 






1928 


307,255 


1967 . 


361,972 


1853 . 


368,645 


1891-190 


D . 3,687,564 


1929 


279,678 


1968 . 


A54,448 


1854 . 


427,833 


1891 


560,319 


19 30 


241,700 







y Data are for fiscal years ended June 30. except 1820 through 1831 and 1844 through 1849 
fiscal years ended September 30; 1833 through 1842 and 1851 through 1867 years ended 
December 31; 1832 covers 15 months ended December 31; 1843 nine months ended September 30; 
1850 fifteen months ended December 31; and 1868 six months ended June 30. 



31 



TABLE 2. ALIEhB AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AND DEPARTED, BY MONTHS: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1967 AND 1968 



/Data exclude border crossers, crewmen, and aliens admitted on documentary waivers/ 



Imml- 
grant 



Nonlm- 
migrant 



ALIENS 
DEPARTED 

i^ 



U. S. CITIZENS 1/ 



Departed 



Fiscal year 1968 

July-Deceraber 1967 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January-June 1968 . 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Fiscal year 1967 . . . . 

July-December 1966 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January-June 1967 . 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 



454,448 



214.900 



38,946 
37,748 
35,036 
39,525 
31,040 
32,605 

239.548 



32,387 
28,788 
34,195 
34,724 
39,475 
69,979 

361.972 



179,343 



36,690 
29,957 
27,293 
31,909 
26,742 
26,752 

182,629 



26,398 
25,253 
32,540 
34,459 
33,185 
30,794 



3.654,784 



2.473.742 



4.645.045 



4.587.389 



1.836.410 



2.051.310 



1.384.386 



2.475.106 



2.247.982 



411,781 
356,274 
406,180 
256,594 
201,546 
204,035 

1.363.926 



450,727 
394,022 
441,216 
296,119 
232,586 
236,640 

1.603.474 



247,210 
290,791 
243,209 
226,371 
172,345 
204,460 

1.089.356 



454,831 
655,828 
434,172 
360,202 
291,727 
278,346 

2.169.939 



565,084 
474,723 
365,389 
295,910 
248,514 
298,362 

2,339,407 



198,085 
156,932 
192.572 
235,482 
279,734 
301,121 

2.608.193 



230,472 
185,720 
226,767 
270,206 
319,209 
371,100 

2.970.165 



154,078 
138,106 
167,871 
184,887 
206,259 
238,155 



319,951 
306,325 
350,023 
371,376 
383,100 
439,164 

4.073,538 



322,172 
333,791 
358,622 
374,488 
391,135 
559,199 

4,033.283 



1.459.947 



1.639.290 



1.170.271 



2.161.969 



1.942.820 



274,880 
269,638 
319,286 
212,642 
168,219 
215,282 

1.148.246 



311,570 
299,595 
346,579 
•244,551 
194,961 
242,034 

1.330.675 



210.044 
231,047 
201,330 
187,041 
157,431 
183,378 

973.856 



398,772 
574,257 
388,212 
310,769 
252,062 
237,897 

1,911.569 



491,837 
398,725 
325,871 
252,918 
222,108 
251,361 

2.090.463 



169,601 
139,509 
187,890 
206,245 
227,660 
217,341 



195,999 
164,762 
220,430 
240,704 
260,845 
248,135 



132,966 
123,134 
154,240 
156,796 
189,904 
216,816 



273,293 
254,321 
322,141 
307,592 
351,851 
402,371 



260,404 
274,913 
325,279 
328,155 
364,510 
537,202 



1/ Includes aliens departed and citizens arrived and departed by sea and air, except 
direct arrivals from or departures to Canada. 



32 



TABLE 3. ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AT UNITED STATES PORTS OF ENTRY: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1967 - 1968 

/Each entry of the same person counted separately_^/ 



Total number 

Border crossers 1/ 

Canadian 

Mexican 

Crewmen 

Others admitted ... 



Total number 

Border crossers 1/ 

Canadian 

Mexican 

Crewmen 

Others admitted . . . 



Year ended June 30, 196 



217,943,897 


125,857,734 


92,086,163 


205,762,516 


119,673,849 


86,088,667 


69,918,151 


37,605,781 


32,312,370 


135,844,365 


82,068,068 


53,776,297 


3,154,401 


2,086,366 


1 ,068,035 


9,026,980 


4,097,519 2/ 


4,929,461 3/ 



Year ended June 30, 1967 



206.837,454 


120,196,406 


86,641,048 


195,143,536 


114,630,122 


80,513,414 


67,265,449 


37.044,010 


30,221 ,439 


127,878,087 


77,586,112 


50,291,975 


3.046,559 


2,036,877 


1,009,682 


8,647,359 


3,529,407 2/ 


5,117,952 3/ 



]_/ Partially estimated. 

2/ Includes immigrants, documented nonimmigrants, aliens with multiple entry 

documents other than border crossers and crewmen, and aliens returning from 

Canada or Mexico after extended visits. 
3/ Includes all citizens arrived by sea and air and citizens returning from 

Canada or Mexico after extended visits. 



of October 31. 1549, 



Dec-ember 31.. 1964. 



Cla 



ALIENS AOMITTED 

IMMIGRANTS 1/ 

Immigrants subject to numeric limitations 

Relative preferences 

Parents of U.S. citizens. 2nd preference. liN Act 

Unmarried sons and daughters of U.S. citizens 

2nd preference, liN Act 

1st preference. Act of October 3, 1965 

Spouses, unmarried sons and daughters of resident aliens, and their childrt 

3rd preference, liN Act 

2nd preference. Act of October 3. 1965 

Married sons and daughters of U.S. citizens 

'.th preference, I&N Act 

4th preference. Act of October 3, 1965 

Brothers and sisters of U.S. citizens 

4th preference. liN Act 

5th preference. Act of October 3. 1965 

Spouses and children of married sons and daughters and brothers and 

sisters of U.S. citizens 

4th preference . I&N Act 

4th preference. Act of October 3. 1965 

5th preference. Act of October 3. 1965 

Occupational preferences 

1st preference, selected immigrants of special skills, I6N Act 

3rd preference, immigrants in professions. Act of October 3. 1965 

6th preference, other workers. Act of October 3, 1965 

Their spouses and children 

7th preference, conditional entries. Act of October 3. 1965 2/ 

^te^preference quota (Note: Includes private bill cases) 

Adjustments under Section 244 of the liN Act 

Foreign government officials adjusted under Section 13 of the Act of 

September 11. 1957 

Immigrants exempt from numeric limitations 

Immediate relatives 

Wives of U.S. citizens 

Husbands of U.S. citizens 

Children of U.S. citizens 

Orphans adopted abroad or to be adopted 

Other chl Idren 

Parents of U.S. citizens. Act of October 3, 1965 

Special Immigrants 

Natives of Uestern Hemisphere countries, their spouses and children .... 

Ministers of religion, their spouses, and children 

Employees of U.S. Government abroad, their spouses, and children 

Children born abroad to resident aliens or subsequent to Issuance of vis 

Aliens adjusted under Section 244, If,N Act 

Aliens adjusted under Section 249, I&N Act 

Immigrants, Act of September 11, 1957 

Hungarian parolees. Act of July 25, 1958 

Refugee-escapees. Act of July 14, 1960 

Immigrants, Act of September 26, 1961 

Immigrants, Act of October 24, 1962 

Cuban refugees. Act of November 2, 1966 

Other nonquota Immigrants 

NONIMMIGRANTS U 

Foreign government officials 

Temporary visitors for business 

Temporary visitors for pleasure 

Transit aliens ,,] 

Treaty traders and Investors 

Students !!!!!!! 

Their spouses and children 

Representatives to International organizations 

Temporary workers end Industrial trainees 

Workers of distinguished merit and ability 

Representatives of foreign Information media 

Exchange visitors 

Their spouses and children 

Returning resident aliens 1/ 

NATO officials 



189,404 



33j.669_ 
19.701 
6,437 
(7,531) 
1,651 
5. 880 



8.434 

(24.010) 
1.424 
10.939 
11.647 
10,525 



I 1.317) 



18.632 

(36.229) 

11,316 
24,913 
25,365 



9.979 
4.876 
10,510 



196.730 



6,417 
(7,2831 
1,448 
5,835 



- i5j.231_ 
19.457 
6,840 
(7,792) 
1,679 
6.113 
5.142 
153.575 



147,906 
585 



8,799 
_132^095_ 
125,282 



1.744,1 



2,075,967 



2,341.923 



2,608,193 



34 , 644 

144.660 

1,105.268 

119.360 

6,912 

44,952 

3.486 

12,875 

(60,470) 

6,272 

50,402 

3,796 

2,654 

33,371 

8,875 

165,429 

1,832 



38,544 

175,500 

1,323,479 

142,686 

7.639 

50.435 

4.032 

14.026 

(67,869) 

8,295 

56,654 

2.920 

2,681 

33,768 

9,991 

203,235 

2,082 



39,327 

201,358 

1,472.830 

177,827 

8,628 

55,716 

4,851 

16,369 



8,213 
64,636 

2,999 

2,925 
35.253 
11.204 
238.013 

1.774 



42.916 

220.414 

1,628,585 

204,936 

9,983 

63.370 

5.867 

18.386 

170.010) 

9.352 

57,328 

3,330 

3,257 

38,630 

15,067 

284,330 



1/ 



alle 



admitted for 



side 



although the Immigration laws defl 



34 



All port» 

Atlantic 

Atl«nt«, Ca 

B«ltl»or«. Hd 

Boaton. Haaa 

Charlaiton, S, C 

Charlotte Analla. V. 1 

Fraderlkated, V. I 

Key Ueat, Fla 

Hlaul, Fla 

HeMrk, N. J. (Includea HcCulra A.F.B.) 

New York, N. 1 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Port Evergladea, Fla 

San Juan, P. R 

Waihlngton, D. C 

Ueat Pais Beach, Fla 

Other Atlantic 

Gulf of Menlco 

Houaton, Tex 

New Or leana , La 

San Antonio, TeK 

Taopa , Fla 

Other Oulf 

Pacific 

Agana , Cuan 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

Loa Angelea, Calif 

San Diego, Calif 

San Franclico, Calif 

Seattle, Waah 

Other Pacific 

Alaika 

Other Alaaka 

Canadian Border 

Blaine. Waah 

Buffalo, N. 1 

Calais, He 

Chanplaln, N. 1 

Chicago, 111 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Derby Line, Vt 

Detroit, Mich 

Highgate Springs, Vt 

Jackoan , He 

Lewiaton, N. » 

Niagara Falla, N. t 

Norton, Vt 

Noyea, Minn 

Pembina, N. D 

Port Huron, Hich 

Rouaea Point, N. 1 

Sault Ste. Marie, Mich 

Sweetgra.e, Mont 

Thouaand Island Bridge, N. Y 

Other Canadian Border 

Mexican Border 

Brownsville, Tex 

Calexlco, Calif 

Dallas, Tex 

Del Rio, Tex 

Eagle Paas, Tex 

El Paso, Tea 

Hidalgo, Te< 

Laredo, Tex 

Nogales , Ariz 

Rooa , Tex 

San Luis, Ariz 

San Ysldro, Calif 

Other Mexican Border 



28,28'< 

6,921 

108,552 



1,865 
5,578 
1,371 
3,717 



31,820 

5,437 

106,270 



27,511 

5,157 

122,516 



946 
11,397 
1,186 



195 
348 
1,846 
6,049 
1,773 
5,130 
2.651 
1.335 
885 
12.316 



235 
436 
1.615 
4.372 
2.200 
5.172 
3.004 
1.740 
1.304 
16.240 
329 



46.76 



2,874 
3,841 
1,145 
3.264 
8.657 
1.303 
778 
9,580 



443 
367 
1,659 
4,564 
2.388 
5,028 
1,684 
1,518 
1.265 
14.912 
421 



13,663 

479 

1,514 

1,675 

2,357 

107,772 

4,071 

151,053 

1,329 

1 ,002 

8,039 

1,800 

309 

646 



50.959 



3,616 
4.436 
1,129 
3,715 
10,866 
1.125 
889 
9.433 



2.536 
4,923 
2,809 
6.062 
1.465 
1.349 
1.012 
14,145 
318 



35 





:::•;:. 


H 




J 




I 


I 




i 






Hi 

m 


..™.,...n. »n. A.,..t.ent. .n... | 




' :r.u.r'- 


II 


i 
1 


11 

si 


Is 

5^i 


21" 


5^ 


1 1 


1 


All „„n,,l.. 


1.51, 1,1.8 












7.866 




2.782 








91.520 




l^,o„ 












































































France 


25 


















Italy 


1)6 






























SwItEerland 


^, 


















Other Europe 


32 


Aal« 






































India 


iU 




















85 














PaklBian 


,, 














Thailand 


5 










Ncrth America 








: 
: 






























99 


E 


'° 


Hi 




















Jamaica 


J, 




















^ 




I 




















Panama 


, 






South America 








I 












Hi 


3 








ll 


























^■^ 














"""' S"'-^^'^"'" — 


'^ 




J.58B 


1.755 


629 


I 


11 
















[ 


1 














Oceania 


10 


J^'l'*''* 


J 






'j 


i 








'^ 










79 


Ne« Zealand 


1 






— 




!— 










__L_ 


1 



36 





:::r;i. 


11 




r 


£ 


" 


1 


" 






-... 




"' '"■■-""""" 


fi 


1^ 
"J 

352 


^1 
51 


5 S 


. 1 

-.J 
I5! 


1 


^,, cpuntrl 


4JA.4I.B 


1>6,^W 


i««.;ii. 


7.9;i 


,, ^1, 


b ^it 












m 






^,o„ 


































































' 














"«""•"-"• 


> 




li 
























, ^^^ 






6J 






























S d 


















:: 


i 












..1. 












'■i 


















". 












.. 












' 
































































»,„h..,„c. 








































j 


?i 




























Hj,,,, '' 


Ih 




















































Other North Aa^rlc* 


j^, 


South A»,rlc. 




;/7 
















; 






























- 




































Other South tecrick 


,, 


















i.^ 






'^ 


..; 


















































'I 


i 




n 



























































1/ i»ci»a. 

J/ IntUd. 



37 



^-r^r," """' 



Turk6Y (Europe and A< 
U.S.S.R, (Europe and 
Other Europe 



Philippic 
Ryukyu Is 
Syrian Ar, 
Thailand 
Vietnam . 
Other As I, 

North Amerli 



Cuba 



1 Republi' 



DomlnU. 
Haiti . 

L Tobago . 

, Chlstophei 



Brltlsli 
Costa R 
El Salv 

Hondura 



Tndie 



Colombia 
Ecuador . 



FIJI ... 

New Zeal 
Other Oci 



■ Act of July 25, 195B. 



38 





.."^:^". 


Si«t„ 




'"■"V.ZJ.""" 


1 


1 




1 


11 


1 


1 ° 
III 


i I 


11 


? 1 


1 


1 ° ' 

Ill 


g 


^1 


s 


1 


All cOunCrleB 


33,>95 


591 


610 


H.O'.S 


i.2 


332 


7.937 


1.077 


216 


875 


33 


802 


205 


11 


2«) 


1.429 


U8 


^^ 


15.S73 


332 


































521 




^ 


2,E 






" 


"i 


'\ 








2 


















Denmark 




Finland 












Creec 




Hunoary 




Ireland 




Ualv 




Netherlands 




Norway 




Poland 




Portuoal 




HoBanla 




Spain 




Sweden 




Switzerland 












Other Europe 




Aala 






285 




^^ 


56 




J 


2.159 
152 


I 


■i 






"' 






23 


5 




Honn Kono 


11 


India 








Iran 








Isra 1 








J da 2/ 




Korea ~ 




Lebanon 




Pakistan 


_ 


Philippines 


9 


Bvukvu Islands 




nilnL*'""""""" 










2 


North America 


I 




13 




■ 








j 






















Cuba 






_ 


Costa Rica 


_ 




_ 


Guatemala 








Nlcaracua 




Panama 


1 


Other North America 








Areentina 




[ 


i 


i 






■ 








1 


3S 


15 


- 


: 


■ 




Bolivia 




Brazil 












Ecuador 




Guyana 








Venezuela 




Other South America 






7 




n\ 


i 


^ 


«i 






2» 


i 




\ 






5 












1 


South Africa 




United Arab Republic (Egypt). 


^ 




, 




372 
95 


'^ 


] 


;i 






',0 


\ 




3 




"^ 


] 


^ 


; 




I 


Fill 

















3& 



i_a t E.A K 



Ireland 

I"ly 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Portugal 

Spain '....'. ! 

Urit*d Kingdom 

It.S.S.R. (Europe and Aala) . 

Hong Kong 

India 

Iraq 

Israel 

Japan 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Thailand 

Other Asia 

Cuba 

Other Ueat Indiea 

Other North America 

South America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil , 

Chile , 

Guyana . ^^'.]'.'.'.'.\'.'.V.'.\'.V. 

Peru 

Van«m«la 

Othar South Aacrlca 

Africa 

Cape Verde Islands 

Horocco , 

South Africa , 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa , 

FIJI 

Other Oceania 

17 Includea Tali 



> Pal< 



40 



^£-JJ 



p 
§1 



3 S S E 3 •"' ; 



|s55|ll|;i jHfHf |!|t ill^s;] a| 



5a« t 



= 1 ' 



1?^ 



41 



IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED UNDER THE ACT OF SEPTEMBER 26, 1961 (P. L. 87-301) 
SEPTEMBER 26, 1961-JUNE 30, 1968 



Country or region of birth 



Number admitted 



Beneficiary of 
2nd preference \J 



Beneficiary of 
3rd preference \J 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria 

Czechoslovakia 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Malta 

Poland 

Portugal 

Romanl a 

Spain 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) .... 
U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) .. 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asi a 

China 2/ 

Cyprus 

Hong Kong 

Ind i a 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Iraq 

Israel 

Japan 

Jordan 3/ 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Malaysia 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Other Asia 

North America 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Jamaica 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Other West Indies 

Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Africa 

Morocco 

Tunisia 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Other countries 



16.275 



11.704 



1,213 

418 

7,474 



532 
635 
197 
136 
235 



1,391 



303 
174 



6.290 



3.953 



1,871 
39 



262 
203 
158 



7.751 



588 

332 

5,603 



270 
432 



1.694 



536 
26 



115 

49 

155 

9 



1/ Act of June 27, 1952. 

2/ Includes Taiwan. 

3/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



42 



IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED UNDER THE ACT OF OCTOBER 24, 1962 
(P.L. 87-885) BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH: 
OCTOBER 24, 1962 - JUNE 30, 1968 



Country or region of birth 


Number 
admitted 


HI 


Spouse or child 
of alien 
First 
Preference 1/ 


C 3 <U 


Spouse or child 
of alien 
Fourth 
Preference _1/ 


All countries 


21,820 


4,780 


5,116 


3,977 


7.947 




13,666 


1,306 


2,088 


3,414 


6,858 




11 

34 

18 
1,883 

21 
8,260 

30 

62 

1,953 

110 

431 

12 
608 

39 
152 

42 

6.825 


2 
4 

184 
2 

651 

14 
3 

5 
153 
1 
277 
2 
3 
5 

3.045 


5 

3 
171 

9 
1,511 

2 
27 

4 

8 
49 

5 
241 
32 

9 
11 

2.553 


2 

2 

649 

5 

1,917 

15 

11 

562 

48 

74 

1 

52 

66 
10 

376 


11 




25 




9 




879 




5 




4,181 




13 




10 




1,384 


Romania 


49 




155 




4 




38 




5 




74 




16 




851 




2,325 

24 

198 

862 

27 

137 

230 

214 

500 

355 

525 

120 

50 

67 

1,089 

65 

37 

808 


1,186 

1 
84 

476 
16 
37 
29 
72 

2 30 
20 

310 
27 
19 
27 

474 
17 
20 

245 


1,064 

3 

74 

309 

11 

28 

32 

90 

220 

5 

215 

20 

31 

37 

390 

8 

16 

268 


36 
6 

3 
29 

27 
47 
10 
17 
93 

28 

1 
69 
10 

158 


39 




14 




37 




48 








45 




122 




42 




33 




237 








45 








2 




156 




30 




1 




137 




51 
49 
518 
105 
24 
10 
51 

104 


10 

182 

35 

4 

9 

5 

36 


36 

3 

152 

64 
9 
1 
3 

63 


18 
93 

5 
4 

38 


5 




28 




91 




1 




7 








5 




5 




308 


109 


HI 


27 


61 




70 
213 
23 

109 


23 
82 
4 

39 


43 
66 
2 

33 


1 
24 
2 

2 


3 




43 




15 




35 




104 

5 


36 
3 


31 
2 


2 


35 


0th a la 









U Act of June 27, 1952. 

2/ Includes Taiwan. 

3/ Includes Arab Palestln 



325-586 O - 69 - ' 



43 



(umbers of visas 1 


ssued and Immigrant 


s admitted will not ne 


cessarlt 


agree. 


of the alien to n 


ake use of the visa 


Issued, or by Irmlgra 


nts who 


re admit 


following the one 


In which the visa 


was Issued, or by adju 


stuients 


hargeabl 









Quota I 


migrants Admit 


edi/ 






Quota 1/ 
(1) 


1966 
(2) 




1966 




1967 
(3) 


(4) 


egular Quota 
(5) 


(6) 


All ,ota areas 


158.^61 


126.310 


153.079 




79.849 


76.363 




149.697 














100 
1,405 
1,297 

2,859 

1.175 

115 

566 

3,069 

25,814 

65,361 

308 

865 

17,756 

5,666 

235 

384 

100 

3,136 

2,364 

6,486 

438 

289 

3,295 

1,698 

225 

2,697 

942 

700 

3.590 


145 

905 

784 

221 

1,415 

901 

91 

377 

2,283 

14,461 

23,721 

4,906 

3,068 
18,955 

273 

228 
2,242 
1,584 
7,103 
7,163 
1,090 

982 
1,778 
1,310 

672 
1,748 
2,370 


175 
829 
656 
266 
1,151 
886 

455 

2,251 

7,747 

27,656 

11,917 

1,285 

2,216 

19,822 

111 

127 

346 

1,942 

1,177 

121801 
1,120 
1,728 
1,601 
1,729 
1,367 

4,234 
213 

38.334 


478 

951 

594 

376 

1,456 

1,080 

67 

572 

2,788 

9,557 

33,550 

10,442 

1,413 

2,587 

17,130 

126 

147 

217 

2,179 

1,173 

'675 

1,741 

1,511 

1,734 

983 

950 

5,295 

250 

35.510 


100 

951 

594 

100 

1,456 

1,080 

67 

566 

2,788 

9,557 

33,550 

308 

865 

2,587 

5,666 

126 

147 

100 

2,179 

1,173 

'438 
289 
250 
1,511 
1,698 
225 
950 
942 
250 

2.679 










. 


























Germany 




































Norway 


- 














Sweden 




Turkey 

U.S.S.R 


758 


Other Europe 

Asia 


32.831 




100 
100 

100 
100 
200 
100 
100 
lOO 
185 
200 
100 
100 
400 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 


154 

84 

11,963 

226 

1,946 
214 
331 
475 
411 

• 677 
687 
528 
227 
192 
256 

2,687 
155 
88 
104 
103 
136 


178 

87 

17,520 

287 

4,048 

294 

856 

875 

955 

1,355 

1,003 

1,719 

416 

216 

544 

7,097 

366 

190 

161 

100 

67 

2.634 


279 

119 

9,202 

240 

4,061 

455 

724 

401 

1,229 

1,098 

1,366 

1,549 

547 

259 

588 

12,349 

441 

266 

94 

107 

136 

3.321 


100 
100 

205 
100 

200 
100 
100 
100 
185 
200 
100 
100 
259 
100 
100 
100 
100 
94 
100 
136 

1.419 














140 




3,961 












301 




1,129 




913 




1,166 
















488 








341 




166 




. 


Yemen 


I 




1.902 




574 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
149 
100 
100 
100 
100 
2,651 


148 
61 
71 
76 

145 
94 

168 
82 
94 

461 

191 

708 


86 

71 
87 
73 
303 
101 
399 
60 
77 
1,133 
194 

1.079 


117 
43 
89 

102 
96 

270 

149 

321 
68 

109 
1,600 

357 

1.171 


117 
43 
89 

100 
96 
100 
149 
100 
68 
100 
100 
357 

494 














^ 




170 








221 








9 


United Arab Republic (Egypt) 


1,500 




677 




100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
200 


274 
122 
131 
105 
75 
1 


581 
207 
106 
98 
87 


612 
234 
119 

112 
89 

5 


100 
100 
100 
100 
89 


512 




134 




19 




12 




. 












- 


'453/ 
58 3/ 



















X/ The annual quota for 1966 was IM 

JamalCd and Trinidad-Tobago, as qi 

2/ Figures Include adjustment of sta 

2/ Admissions with visas Issued prLo; 



, under P.L. 89-236 the establish^ 
charges after December 1, 1965. 
cases. Adjustments chargeable ti 
I December 1, 1965. 



reduced with the elltnln 
6 axe included in the y. 



the Asla-Paclfli 
■ of adjus' 



44 



Itel«tlv«i pr«fe 



tiis; 



Occupational prefe 



ndltlona 



Poland .. 
Portugal 

Spain ... 



U.S.S.R. ... 
Yugoslavia . 
Other Europe 



ran (Persia) 



Arab Palestln 



Pakistan 

Philippines 

Syrian Arab Republic 
Thailand 



Africa ... 
Algeria 
Ethiopia 
Ghana . . 

Libya .. 



Mor 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

Sudan 

Tunisia 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 



New Zealand , . . . 
Pacific Islands 

Western Samoa . . 



1,229 
1,09S 
1,366 
1.549 



6.307 17.729 



45 



Country or r.jlor 


admitted 


III 


•8 

tt 

is 


1 

HI 
it- 

1=1 




s 


1 11 




i 

si 
ii 


Ml 


S S 
If 

h 


ii 

SI 

i E 

J5 


i i 
"^ Si 

5-2 3 § 


AU .oontrl.. 








9 4.36 


23 876 






27 893 












Eorop, 






























'7O6 
is!920 

2!lfi5 




1 








195 














B«lfllu» 


363 






D nmark 


uite 




262 




1 7 58 






g ^ 


I'i'ii 


H a 


733 


Irefand 


8^.2 


Italy 




Helherl.nd. ...., 




Poland 


2 597 


Port Hsl 


7 58 5 






8Mln 


2 768 


Sweden 


'615 


Swlti land 


725 


T rkev (Europe And Aala) 


963 




lA 553 


U.S.SJl. (Europe .nd A.I.J 


520 




8(16 








'525 


2.5J6 
5 


3 


539 




19 










' 










India 


2' IQl, 


Indoneila 


301 


Iran 


464 


Iraq 


225 


larael 


1 174 




2 698 






Korea ~ 


2*811 




514 


Paklatan 


259 


PhlUpplnea 


8 551 






Svrlan Arab Raoubllc 




Thailand 


3B4 




499 


Other Alia 


832 


North Axerle. 






43! 563 
'u>9 


36 


3! 




39 




533 


599 
715 

10 


617 

970 

645 

6,765 

413 
29 


us 

U4 
1.033 




52 






29*719 






Barbadoi 


494 


Dominican Republic 


961 


K4ltl 


3*702 


Jamaica 


3.946 


Trinidad & Tobaao 




574 


Other Weat IndJea 




''If 5 


Coata Rica 


951 


El Salvador 


7 24 


n...r.«..i. 


002 


Honduraa 


002 


Nicaragua 


' 














3.i2S 
568 

2,525 
965 


175 
151 
63 








15 


541 

253 
50 


5 


185 

725 


83 
13 

137 


2 


5 




Bolivia 


Jz 


Braril 


1.549 


Chile 


Coloobia 


7?7 


Bcuador 


3.727 




1,761 




ff 




768 




306 


Africa 




2.588 




15 


5 


3 
37 

116 


1 


,60 














(to roc CO 


267 




1.029 












307 
23 




26 










'l 












!" 






Other countrlea 
























1/ Include* TalMn. 





























4« 







Z'uZ. 




Other 1/ 


Occupation 




Third Pr 


eference 


Sixth Preference 1 










ttonl' 


Ad]ust- 


grants 


»n „ccup...o„. 










1* 264 




438.355 


P„„..,o™> t.cKn,c., .„d.,„.„dw. 
















37.569 






i53 

52 
506 


156 

3.153 
23 

56 
59 

58 
45 


166 

564 

31 
53 


162 


13 






Actor* and actresses 


97 


Al pla pilots and navlaators 


106 


A hit cts 


430 


Artists a d art teachers 




Athl t s 




Autho B 


67 


Chemists 


912 


Cle vmen 


938 


P of^s o 8 and instructors 


I 063 


Dancers and dancing teachers 


99 


D tlBt 




D sleners 


545 


Dlecltiaos and nutritionists 




Draftsmen 




Edit sad porters 




Enclneers 


6 157 


E t tal 


124 


Foresters and conservationists 


25 


La«.iV 8 a d 1 dges 


268 


Librarians 


246 


Musicians and ta sic teachera 


397 


J, 


5 783 




36 


P s lad labo Utions workers 




37 


Aorlc It ral scientists 




84 


Blolo leal i tl 


132 




113 


Math ^tl la 


64 




330 


Ml 11 til tlat 


29 




336 


Photo aph a 








l\,bllc r.l.tlon. ..n .„d publicity .rl 


ters 


102 




72 


R c aclo and o o workers 


27 


RellHlo B uorkefs 


396 


Social a d welfare workera except aro 


up 


269 






164 


PsvcholoBlsts 


79 




83 


MUc lla o 8 social scientists 


28 


Soortfl 1 atr ctors and officials 


127 


Survevora 


99 


Technicians 


3.449 


Tab 


4 857 


Theraplecs and healers not specified 




242 


V terlnarlans 




83 


Professional, technical, and kindred workera. other 


1.297 


Mana .rs offlcUU and ro rl«or. 


c»pt f. ™ 






7i 




89 


132 


9.052 






52 

e.757 


35A 


73 




94 


5 
185 




Manaoers and superintendents buildinH 




163 




rs ship 


45 


Oft,ci.l. .„a .d.lrl..,.tor.. public . 


d.l„Utr.tIo 


^66 


Purchaslno aaents and buvera not spec 




76 






8 403 




23.562 




326 

'556 
8,933 


2 




5 


25 


28 


315 




office 


62 




473 




1.403 






File clerks 


63 


Office machine operators 


802 


Postal clerks 


67 


Re-ceptlonists 


336 






Stenographers, typists, and secretarle 


^ 


9 118 




555 


Telenraph operators 


47 


Telephone operators 


306 




47 




6,838 


S.le. «>rk.r. 


3.153 




235 






3 


3 
1.113 


553 




Insurance agents and brokers 


225 


Real estate agents and brokers 


82 


Salesaen and sales clerka other 


4.718 


C f f 




27.260 








5 
36 
51 










973 




92 


Bookbinders 


69 




ters 


1,371 






715 




2,598 


Coaposltors and ty»eaetcers 


187 







47 





«:n::d 


B.„ef,c,.,,.sjf^O„up.tlo„,,Jr.f.re„c.. 


Other 1/ 


Occupation 


Tot.l 








Imml- 






"l"T' 






gr.nt. 


C,.a...n. for..,o. .nd Undr.d work.r. (Confd, 
















Electriclani 




Foremen 


512 


Furriers 


99 


Inspectors other 


345 


Unllen^inrl^l^c^ml^/tBulIIp!!; tel^jione'Tirpow;;' 1 ' 




McchanlcB and repalnoen 




Painters conitnictlon and maintenance 


586 


Photoenoravers and 1 1 thooraphsrB 


j5 


Plasterers 




Plumbers and pipe fitters 




P a and plat printers prlntJno 


^.90 


ShoefMkers and repalrerB encept factorv 




Stone c tt a a d sto a v ra 












Tl 1th 1th a d sh t tal wo k 




Tool makers and die makerB and acttere 










1 303 


eratlves and kindred workers 






2,089 
l!oi5 


1 
133 




': 








Aaeemblera 


BB5 


Actendanta auto service and parkins 


119 


Ekjs drivers 


127 




'66 


Dellveryinen and routemen 




Dresarnakers and seanstresseB eKtepl factorv 




Knitters loopers and toppers teKtllo 


196 


Laundry and drv cleanlno operatives 


A5B 


Meat cutters eKcept slauahter and packlno house 




Mine operatlvea and laborers 






553 


Painters except construction and maintenance 


7^.9 




65 






Sewers and stltchera manufac turlno 




Taxicab drivers and chauffeurs 


1 155 


Truck and tractors drivers 


1 010 


Weavers textile 


250 


Welders and flame cutters 


1 596 


Operatives and kindred workers other 


11 51b 


Private household workera 


2i..U0 




7,815 














Private household workers other 




Service workers exce t rivate houaehold 


15.643 




659 
233 

3.196 
1,519 


50 




\ 








Barbers beauticians and manicurists 


559 




232 


Chambermaids and maids 




Charwomen and cleaners 




Cooks except private houaehold 


2 722 


Counter and fountain workers 


112 


Firemen fire protection 


73 


Guards watchmen and doorkeepers 


400 


Halrdressere and cosmetoloolsta 


1 469 




501 


Kitchen workera other 


598 


Midwlvea 


77 


Policemen and detectives 


256 


U S military 


644 




82 


Porte ra 




Practical nuraes 




Waltera and waltressea 


2 305 




2 502 




5.752 


Laborere. except fann and mine 


















256 














Gdrdenera except farm and sroundakeepert 


246 


Lumbermen craftsmen and woodchoppera 


291 


Uborers other 


13 496 




228.156 




i'293 








-_ 






Retired persona 






37,941 








17.261 









48 



Belgiuo. 

Denmark 

France 

C«nuny 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Kecherlandt 

Poland 

Portugal 

Romania 

Sp«in 

Sweden 

Swltserlaod 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. <Europe and Aila) 

YugoBlavla 

Other Europe 

China y 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indoneala 

Iran 

larael 

J*P«n 

Lebanon 

Pakiitan 

Phlltpplnea 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Thailand 

Vietnam 

Other Aala 

Trinidad and Tobago 

BrUUh Hondura 

Coeta Rica 

Panaina 

Other North America 

Bolivia 

Chile 

Peru !..'!!!!!! 

Other South AMrlca 

Africa 

Cape Verde lalanda 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic <Egypt 
Other Africa 

Auatralla , 

FIJI 

Other countries 

IT Includea TaiMn. 

g/ Inctudea Arab Paleatlne. 



27,662 
^.3.563 
99.312 





Female. 






Country or r.glor, 
of birth 




Under 5 


5-9 


ll:\l 


^arl 


30-39 


^r! 


50-59 
veari 


60-69 
vear. 


70-79 
year. 


and over 


A.l countr... 


254.716 


16.109 


18.251 


41.335 


74.460 


43.022 


^274 


18.533 


10.452 


4.129 


1.151 










U.529 


26.713 


11.707 


6.908 


5.021 


3.425 


1.423 


281 


A il Is 


423 

803 

2.11.3 

10,879 

6,369 

983 

ll!s51 

'854 

'912 

liiea 

'943 

'647 
3.215 


46 

334 
68 
98 

67 

46 


20 

494 
450 

45 

113 
666 

58 
35 

28 


79 

225 
1.519 
1.257 

350 

'134 
139 

1.385 

131 

58 


165 
362 

1,015 

5,476 

1,574 

273 

2)492 
638 
511 
663 

'l32 

701 

185 
6,717 

859 


97 
65 

343 
1,319 

'190 

1,734 
214 
64 
540 

175 
445 
Ul 

114 
2,583 
55 
630 
167 


418 
692 

122 

541 
842 
236 
267 

32 

106 

1,052 


23 

1.225 
15 
533 

635 

167 
95 

1.294 


61 
52 

54 

138 
76 

916 


25 
35 

5 

68 

306 

3 

55 
346 




a^iaium 




Ctechoalovakla 


5 




1 




_ 


Franca 


U 


Gennanv 


U 


C c 


16 


H a 


3 


1 land 


u 




35 




2 




1 


Poland 


19 




13 


R la 


7 




55 


Sweden 


e. 


Svltzerland 


1 




13 




67 




14 




4 


Other Eurooe 


14 




8? 




6,727 

1,845 

2,043 

313 

'425 

9.596 

283 

494 


337 
18 

91 
309 

56 


129 
389 
148 

19 
91 

36 


956 

194 
38 
55 

218 
124 
214 
223 

27 


"313 

116 
166 
66 

1,142 

1,356 
96 
132 

'2I8 
56 
304 

262 


1,348 
130 
346 

39 

944 
120 

87 

59 

2,328 

129 

120 

138 


733 
85 
24 
33 

819 

40 
13 

16.646 


35 

5 
45 
369 

5 
11.312 


467 
11 

13 
5.689 


220 

3 

IS 
2.250 


58 




I 




4 


1 don a la 


2 




- 




- 




- 


Jaoan 


4 




3 




3 


Lebanon 


3 


Pakistan 






a 


Rvukvu UlandB 






2 




_ 




_ 


Other Asia 


I 


North /taerlc. 


763 




22^921 
54,686 

5)137 

121796 

3.392 

615 

914 
li343 

1,311 


2)678 

166 

53 
23 

25 

73 
46 
104 

36 

73 


2)268 
349 

37 

72 
103 

33 
93 


5)688 

'153 

1,464 

905 

383 
107 

171 

275 

37 


5,958 
8,891 

435 
1,040 

881 
4,064 

787 

269 
395 
502 
283 

478 
70 


9)027 

3,686 

126 
579 
95 
113 

236 

56 

143 


l)676 

9.227 

196 

531 

'509 
62 

83 

107 
45 


1.120 
'101 

38 

36 
56 

59 
33 

747 


570 

25 

168 
179 

54 
37 
337 


1,749 

8 
81 






24 




655 


Barbados 


3 




10 




8 


Jamaica 


IS 


Trinidad and TobaRO 


3 








4 




I 




1 




1 




I 


Honduras 


3 


Nlcaraoua 


2 


Panama 


2 




15 




1,744 
361 

1,4S1 
592 

3.890 

2,288 
717 

401 
376 


191 

209 
53 
325 
141 

70 
56 
17 


201 

66 
56 

23 


186 

607 
356 
88 
115 

59 


544 

1.241 
726 
206 
331 
112 
129 


366 

123 
645 

168 
160 

54 
87 


138 

116 
59 

222 

63 
22 
35 


263 
58 

118 


21 
131 
65 
29 

65 


9 
6 

9 

5 
3 




Bolivia 


_ 












u 




2 




2 


Peru 


3 




2 








3 




246 
343 

712 


53 
70 


IS 

83 
56 


51 

41 
152 
90 


39 
89 
150 
241 
332 


41 
162 


18 
31 

77 


41 


6 
10 

33 


I 






- 




- 


United Arab Republic (Bgypt) 


2 








156 

280 


96 
12 

16 


79 
25 


71 
50 
26 
54 


35 
132 
»7 


135 

38 
31 


15 
13 




3 

3 

1 


3 


- 












- 




. 



























I? Inciudaa Taiwan. 
i/ Include* Arab ?al. 



50 



TABLE 10. IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED, BY SEX AND AGE! 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1959 - 1968 



22,516 

17,760 

15,786 

2,764 

7,858 

14,204 

46,118 

38,690 

27,072 

19,272 

12,152 

11,417 

8,733 

6,489 

4,501 

2,767 

1,451 

731 

349 



Number admitted 3,115,856 

Under 5 years 277,657 

5- 9 years 235,498 

10-14 years 207,094 

15 years 42,039 

16-17 years 105,451 

18-19 years 162,400 

20-24 years 513,137 

25-29 years 442,917 

30-34 years 312,504 

35-39 years 226,352 

40-44 years 158,571 

45-49 years 122,165 

50-54 years 101 ,474 

55-59 years 79,367 

60-64 years 55,999 

65-69 years 35,798 

70-74 vears 20,289 

75-79 years 10,699 

80 years and over 6,270 

Not reported 175 56 

Males 1,376.203 114.367 

Under 5 years 141,472 11.511 

5- 9 years 119.062 8.960 

10-14 years 104.762 7,975 

15 years 21,338 1,363 

16-17 years 47,872 3,237 

18-19 years 54,576 4,739 

20-24 years 170,729 15,999 

25-29 years 200,383 17,306 

30-34 years 149,042 12,487 

35-39 years 108,384 9,199 

40-44 years 74,206 5,721 

45-49 years 55,646 5,346 

50-54 years 43,494 3,784 

55-59 years 33,372 2,752 

60-64 years 23,070 1,772 

65-69 years 14,624 1,168 

70-74 years 7,831 579 

75-79 years 4,014 317 

80 years and over 2,249 129 

Not reported 77 23 

Females 1,739.653 146,319 

Under 5 years 136,185 11,005 

5- 9 years 116,436 8,800 

10-14 years 102,332 7,811 

15 years 20,701 1,401 

16-17 years 57,579 4,621 

18-19 years 107,824 9,465 

20-24 years 342,408 30,119 

25-29 years 242,534 21,384 

30-34 years 163,462 14,585 

35-39 years 117,968 10,073 

40-44 years 84,365 6,431 

45-49 years 66,519 6,071 

50-^54 years 57,980 4,949 

55-59 years 45,995 3,737 

60-64 years 32,929 2,729 

65-69 years 21,174 1,599 

70-74 years 12,458 872 

75-79 years 6,685 414 

80 years and over 4,021 220 

Not reported 98 33 



24,098 

17,523 

15,386 

2,888 

8,255 

14,847 

47,674 

39,543 

27.748 

19.958 

12,059 

11,310 

8.39 5 

6,256 

4,316 

2,752 

1,359 

680 

321 

30 

116,667 

12,299 

8,570 

7,731 

1,493 

3,565 

4,879 

15,836 

17,788 

12,919 

9,969 

5,827 

5,369 

3,762 

2,646 

1,801 

1,187 

592 

294 

146 

14 

148,711 

11,799 

8,953 

7,655 

1,395 

4,690 

9,968 

31,838 

21,755 

14,829 

9,989 

6,232 

5,941 

4,633 

3,610 

2,515 

1,565 

767 

386 

175 

16 



271,344 

26,204 

18,924 

16,434 

2,982 

8,452 

14,996 

47,984 

39,558 

27,274 

19,873 

12.744 

11.082 

8.611 

6,151 

4,240 

2,867 

1,729 

834 

394 

11 

121.380 

13,203 

9,604 

8,295 

1,446 

3,537 

5,171 

16,618 

18,349 

13,063 

9,802 

6,247 

5,326 

3,865 

2,652 

1,756 

1,218 

732 

322 

168 



149,964 

13,001 

9,320 

8,139 

1,536 

4,915 

9,825 

31,366 

21,209 

14,211 

10,071 

6,497 

5,756 

4,746 

3,499 

2,484 

1,649 

997 

512 

226 



283,763 

25,494 

19,076 

16,544 

3,417 

8.835 

15,363 

51,487 

42,733 

29,421 

20,973 

13,652 

10,905 

8,808 

6,600 

4,617 

2,924 

1,577 

842 

468 

27 

131,575 

13,126 

9,735 

8,313 

1,683 

3,888 

5,380 

19,541 

21,288 

15.146 

10.877 

6,854 

5,111 

3,810 

2,715 

1,862 

1,151 

580 

343 

164 



152.188 

12,368 

9,341 

8,231 

1,734 

4,947 

9,983 

31,946 

21,445 

14,275 

10,096 

6,798 

5,794 

4,998 

3,885 

2,755 

1,773 

997 

499 

304 

19 



28,991 

21,621 

18,006 

3,892 

10,125 

17,518 

55,935 

45,321 

31,669 

21,924 

15,014 

10,815 

9,005 

6,458 

4,552 

2,746 

1,499 

780 

382 



139,297 

14,882 

10,876 

8,945 

1,919 

4,570 

6,016 

20,199 

21,542 

15,981 

11,028 

7,511 

5,154 

4,021 

2,700 

1,814 

1,099 

576 

313 

144 



166,963 

14,109 

10,745 

9,061 

1,973 

5,555 

11,502 

35,736 

23,779 

15,688 

10,896 

7,503 

5,661 

4,984 

3,758 

2,738 

1,647 

923 

467 

238 



28,394 

21,362 

17,147 

3,541 

10,191 

16,987 

54,923 

42,798 

28,597 

19,455 

13,870 

9,611 

8,678 

6,402 

4,496 

2,856 

1.677 

805 

445 

13 

126.214 

14,539 

10,724 

8,691 

1,717 

4,609 

5,679 

18,042 

18,956 

13,284 

8,924 

6,469 

4,267 

3,619 

2,596 

1,875 

1,094 

655 

303 

167 



166.034 

13,855 

10.638 

8,456 

1,824 

5,582 

11,308 

36,881 

23,842 

15,313 

10,531 

7,401 

5,344 

5,059 

3,806 

2,621 

1,762 

1,022 

502 

278 



296,697 

27,674 

22,146 

18,642 

3,969 

10,704 

17,269 

57,000 

42,874 

27,545 

19,227 

14,033 

9,641 

8,735 

6,626 

4,538 

2,898 

1,793 

865 

518 



127, '71 

14,112 

11,268 

9,466 

2,021 

4,867 

5,755 

18,938 

18,753 

12,578 

8,660 

6,251 

4,105 

3,517 

2,687 

1,806 

1,159 

687 

328 

213 



169,526 

13,562 

10,878 

9,176 

1,948 

5,837 

11,514 

38,062 

24,121 

14,967 

10,567 

7,782 

5,536 

5,218 

3,939 

2,732 

1,739 

1,106 

537 

305 



30,750 

28,562 

25,034 

5,369 

12,544 

16,647 

47,853 

43,239 

30,497 

22,614 

16,132 

11,118 

10,249 

8,354 

5,899 

3,879 

2,327 

1,186 

763 

24 

141,456 

15.627 

14,447 

12,778 

2,805 

6,108 

5,445 

15,086 

19,033 

14,181 

10,561 

7,357 

4,907 

4,225 

3,470 

2,369 

1,507 

855 

415 

270 



181,584 

15,123 

14,115 

12,256 

2,564 

6,436 

11,202 

32,767 

24,206 

16,316 

12,053 

8,775 

6,211 

6,024 

4,884 

3,530 

2,372 

1,472 

771 

493 

14 



30,949 

31,605 

29,076 

5,968 

12,912 

15,887 

45,691 

47,613 

36,795 

27,589 

20,947 

14,850 

13.052 

10.883 

7.759 

5.025 

2.869 

1.526 

971 



,58.324 

15.695 

16,210 

14,801 

3,179 

6,179 

5,093 

12,685 

20,593 

17.424 

13.012 

9.370 

6.550 

5.572 

4.650 

3.251 

2.092 

1.078 

547 

339 



203,648 

15,254 

15,395 

14,275 

2,789 

6,733 

10,794 

33,006 

27,020 

19,371 

14,577 

11,577 

8,300 

7,480 

6,233 

4,508 

2,933 

1,791 

979 

632 



32,587 

36,919 

35,039 

7,249 

15,575 

18,682 

58,472 

60,548 

45,886 

35,467 

27,968 

21.416 

17.208 

15,148 

11,081 

7,084 

4,008 

2,450 

1,659 



199,732 

16,478 

18,668 

17,767 

3,712 

7,312 

6,419 

17.785 

26.775 

21.979 

16.352 

12.599 

9.511 

7.319 

6.504 

4,764 

2,949 

1,497 

832 

509 



.716 
,109 
.251 
,272 
,537 
,263 
,263 
,687 
,773 
,907 
,115 
,369 
,905 
,889 
,644 
,317 
,135 
,511 
,618 
,150 



51 



TABLE lOA. IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED, BY SEX, MARITAL STATUS, AGE, 

AND MAJOR OCCUPATION GROUP: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 196A - 1968 



Sex, marital status, 
age, and occupation 

Number admitted 

Sex and marital status: 

Males 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Females 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Males per 1,000 females 

Median age (years): 

Both sexes 

Males 

Females 

Major occupation group: 

Professional, technical, and kindred 

workers 

Farmers and farm managers 

Managers, officials, and proprietors, 

except farm 

Clerical, sales, and kindred workers . 
Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred 

workers 

Operatives and kindred workers 

Private household workers 

Service workers, except private 

household 

Farm laborers and foremen 

Laborers, except farm and mine 

Housewives, children, and others with 

no occupation 

Housewives 

Retired persons 

Students 

Children under 14 years of age .... 

Unknown or not reported 



292,248 



296,697 



361.972 



454,448 



126,214 



127,171 



141,456 



158,324 



199,732 



73,264 

51,161 

866 

860 

63 

166.034 



74,711 

50,639 

838 

885 

98 

169.526 



80,973 

58,552 

1,032 

746 

153 

181.584 



83,761 

72,250 

1,304 

972 

37 

203.648 



99,818 

96,468 

1,608 

1,805 

33 

254.716 



80,086 

77,642 

5,584 

2,703 

19 

760 



23.4 
23.8 
23.3 



28,756 
1,732 

6,822 
30,015 

17,568 

14,243 

8,451 

10,396 
3,988 
9,127 

151,076 



83,443 

77,590 

5,674 

2,768 

51 

750 



23.2 
23.2 
23.2 



28,790 
1,833 

7,090 
29,779 

17,510 

14,166 

9,706 

10,743 
2,638 
8,556 

154,761 



86,138 

85,988 

7,004 

2,392 

62 

779 



23.5 
23.5 
23.4 



30,039 
2,964 

6,773 
22,676 

16,535 
14,190 
10,558 

10,541 
4,227 
9,830 

181,634 



91,951 

100,536 

8,304 

2,851 

6 

777 



24.9 
25.3 
24.7 



41,652 
3,276 

7,974 
19,783 

18,921 
15,675 
17,406 

12,832 

5,277 

10,129 

198,012 



115,219 

122,985 

11,280 

5,208 

24 

784 



25.9 
26.2 
25.6 



48,753 
2,727 

9,436 
29,090 

28,926 
27,893 
25.419 

16,411 

6,002 

14,374 

228.156 



62,192 

2,146 

24,226 

62,512 

10,074 



61,669 

2,372 

27,255 

63,465 

11,125 



69,833 

3,396 

30,676 

77,729 

13,073 



78,653 

4,013 

30,188 

85,158 

11,035 



88,679 

4,293 

37,941 

97,243 

17,261 



52 



Period 


AL!EN5 AbhtTYEB 


ALIENS 
DEPARTED 2/ 


UTT. CITIZENS 77 


Immigrant 


Nonimmigrant 1/ 


Arrived 


Departed 


1908-1968 


19,067.967 


30.820.362 


32,543,136 


50.138,186 


49,433.206 


1908-1910 


2.576,226 


490,741 


1.495,638 


660,611 




1911-1920 


5.735,811 


1,376,271 


3,988.157 






1911 


878,587 
838,172 
1.197,892 
1,218,480 
326.700 
298.826 
29 5,403 
110,618 
141,132 
430,001 

4,107,209 


151,713 
176,983 
229,335 
164,601 
107,544 
67,922 
67,474 
101,235 
95,869 
191,575 

1,774,881 


518,215 
615,292 
611.924 
633.805 
384,174 
240,607 
146,379 
193.268 
216,231 
428.062 

2,694,778 


269,126 
280,801 
266,604 
266.586 
239,579 
121,930 
127,420 
72,867 
96.420 
157.173 


349,472 
353,890 
347,702 
366.797 
172.371 
110,733 
126,011 
275,837 
216,929 
194,147 




1913 




1915 
















805.228 
309,556 
522,919 
706,896 
294,314 
304,488 
335,175 
307.255 
279,678 
241,700 

528,431 


172.935 
122.949 
150.467 
172,406 
164,121 
191.618 
202.826 
193.376 
199,649 
204.514 

1,574.071 


426,031 
345,384 
200,566 
216,745 
225,490 
227,755 
253,508 
274,356 
252,498 
272,425 

2,196,650 


222.712 
243.563 
308.471 
301.281 
339,239 
370,757 
378,520 
430,955 
449,955 
477.260 

3,365,432 










270.601 












1927 


369.788 
429,575 














97.139 
35.576 
23.068 
29.470 
34.956 
36.329 
50.244 
67,895 
62,998 
70,756 

1,035,039 


183.540 
139,295 
127,660 
134,434 
144.765 
154.570 
181.640 
184,802 
185.333 
136.032 

2,461,359 


290.916 
287.657 
243.802 
177.172 
169,050 
193,284 
224,562 
222,614 
201,409 
166,164 

2,262.293 


439.697 
339.262 
305,001 
273,257 
282,515 
318,273 
386,672 
406,999 
354.438 
256,918 

3.223,233 






380,837 
336,545 
262,091 


















1939 

1940 


333,399 




2,880.414 




51,776 
26,781 
23,725 
26,551 
38,119 
108,721 
147,292 
170,570 
168,317 
249,187 

2.515.479 


100.008 
62.457 
61.117 
113.641 
164.247 
203.469 
366,305 
476,006 
447,272 
426,637 

7,113,023 


66.477 
74,552 
58,722 
84,409 
93,362 
204.353 
323.422 
448,218 
430,089 
456,689 

6.662.387 


175,935 
118.454 
105.729 
108.444 
175.568 
274.543 
437.690 
542.932 
620,371 
663,567 

12.531,966 








1943 

1945 


62,403 
63,525 
103,019 
230,578 
451,845 




478,966 
552,361 




655,518 




12,306,984 


1951 


205.717 
265.520 
170,434 
208,177 
237,790 
321,625 
326,867 
253,265 
260,686 
265,398 

271,344 
263,763 
306,260 
292.246 
296,697 
323.040 
361,972 
454,446 


465,106 
516,062 
485.714 
566,613 
620,946 
686,259 
756,658 
847,764 
1,024.945 
1,140,736 

1,220,315 
1,331,383 
1,507.091 
1,744,808 
2,075.967 
2,341,923 
2,608,193 
3,200,336 


4721901 
509.497 
544,502 
599,161 
665,800 
715,200 
574,606 
710,426 
885.913 
1.004.377 

1.093.937 
1.158.960 
1.266,843 
1.430.736 
1,734,939 
1,919,951 
2.144,127 
2,473,742 


766:466 
807.225 
930.874 
1,021,327 
1,171,612 
1,281,110 
1,365,075 
1,469,262 
1.604,435 
1.920,582 

2,043,416 
2,199,326 
2,433.463 
2,766.907 
3,099,951 
3,613,855 
4,073,538 
4,645,045 


667,126 










1955 

1956 

1957 


1,096,146 
1,272.516 
1.402.107 










1961 


1,969,119 




















4.033,283 







U Excludee border crOBsere, crewmen, Mexican 

2/ Prior to 1957, Includes emigrant and nonera 

departures to Canada. 
3/ Includes citizens arrived and departed by 

citizens first recorded In 1910, 



ricultural laborers admitted under the Act of October 31. 19^9, and aliens admitted 
ant aliens departed, thereafter Included aliens departed by sea and air except direct 
and air except direct arrivals and departures to or from Canada. Departures of U.S. 



53 



state ot Intended 



side 



All states .. 

Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columt 
Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire , . , . 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina . . . 
North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina . . . 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoml ng 

U.S. terr. and pos 

Guam 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands . 



3.115,856 



7,006 
2,913 
36.170 
3,489 
676.640 

16,936 
71,692 
4,722 
25,880 
193,250 

15,387 
23,744 
3,933 
171,998 
24.200 

9,476 
9,423 
8.103 
19.680 
14,711 

31,986 
135,858 
83,774 
18.746 
3.843 

19,154 
4.645 
5.933 
6.402 
9,720 

164,278 
13,119 

716,922 
13,364 
3,672 

67,446 
8,861 
17,119 
85,237 
17,704 

6.097 
2,143 
8.690 
144,332 
10,238 

6,500 
23,709 
44,967 

5,337 
24,307 

2,083 



5,969 

42,106 
8,388 



2,315 

471 

49,673 

1,737 

6,004 

429 



1,376 
1,616 
441 
16,275 
2,949 

1,003 
1,094 
844 
1,999 
1,626 

2,592 
9,855 
8,243 
2,133 
481 

2,150 
49 5 
644 
408 
713 

15,807 
»94 

64,698 

1,206 

358 

9,783 
941 
1,353 
10,296 
1,244 

580 



726 
2,012 
4,045 

666 
2,727 

201 



1,653 
5,769 



1,222 
1,619 
464 
15,132 
2,373 

1,041 

969 

803 

1,443 

1,553 

2,399 
11,953 
8,271 
1,970 
421 

1,884 
467 
650 
489 
797 

13,611 
1,105 

60.134 

1,179 

358 

6,829 
891 
1,715 
7,933 
1,578 



803 

12,992 

949 



64,205 

1,483 
5,692 
336 
1,993 
13.009 



1,645 
1,465 



2,336 
12,091 

7,328 

1,852 

3 50 

1,737 
448 
637 
542 
976 

13,556 
1 , '*73 

60,429 

1,119 

319 

5,741 
849 
1,857 
8,052 
1,403 

533 
220 
762 
14,952 
994 

639 
1,639 
3,977 

558 
2,426 

271 



256 

1,557 

450 



348 
4,019 



2,300 
14.009 



2.048 

374 

14,710 

1,991 

746 

823 

649 

1,540 

1,369 

2,344 
11,578 



742 

13,367 
2,031 

62,311 

1,077 

327 

5,201 

859 

1,590 



481 

219 

667 

17,345 

1,052 

577 



363 
2,956 



5,049 

410 

79,090 

1,792 
5,944 
416 
2,495 
11.404 

1.277 
1,767 
429 
16,020 
2,053 

849 

941 

840 

1.784 

1,487 

2,831 
13,571 
6,895 
1,756 
433 

1,750 



977 

14,099 
2,012 

70,275 

1,335 

415 

5,504 
964 
1,590 
7,463 
1,249 

599 

251 

845 

16, .514 

1,167 



664 

3,303 

434 



3,609 

340 

67,407 



2,796 
13,414 

1,595 
1,623 
370 
15,634 
2,251 

906 
1,057 

948 
2,041 
1,489 

3,143 
12,650 
7,298 
1,931 



1,024 

14,559 
1,450 

68,629 

1,349 

499 

5,619 
972 
1,822 
7,487 
1,143 

618 

286 

912 

13,269 

1,208 

671 



4,101 
386 



3,866 

309 

67,671 

1,880 
6,867 
488 
2,919 
15,077 

1,538 



822 

896 

824 

2,221 

1,491 

3,448 
11,455 
7,975 
1,733 



331 



1,142 

15,096 
1,367 

69,011 

1,431 

344 

5,444 
875 
2,040 
6,976 
1,159 

557 

167 

657 

14,674 

1,207 

615 
2,654 



73,073 

1,614 

7,788 

485 

2,655 

14,028 

1,371 
3,070 
333 
18,158 
2,292 

777 

952 

760 

1,894 

1,224 

3,263 
15,120 
9,180 
1,613 
332 



17,567 

875 

77,279 

1,395 

376 

6,333 



526 
2,345 



744 

7,030 

708 



2,601 
3,825 
378 
20.270 
2,908 

1,224 



4.512 
18,246 
11.522 

2.123 
420 



339 

8,315 
884 
1,617 
10,291 
3,298 

798 

140 

1,205 

14,349 

750 

501 



54 



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!: 


1 |] Is i 

1 i = 


i: 




lii I . 


11; ■ 


Pd., Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh 

Tefin. , MemphlB 


lis 


c3 

•f 


1; 


;i 1 



57 



IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 - 1968 1/ 



ITron 1820 to 1867 figure! repreii 
inclusive, Immigrant aliens arrlv 
• Hens admitted. Date for years 
country of last permanent resider 
countries, data for certain count 



nt alien passengers arrived; 1868 to 1891 inclusive and 1895 to 1897 
ed; 1892 to 1894 inclusive and from 1898 to present time immigrant 
prior to 1906 relate to country whence alien came; thereafter to 
ce. Because of changes in boundaries and changes in lists of 
ries are not comparable throughout,^? 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria-Hungary 2/ 

Belgium 

Denmark 

France 

Germany 2/ 

(England 

Great ( Scot land 

Britain (Wales 

(Not specified j/ 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway) , . 

Sweden) - 

Poland ^Z 

Portugal 

Romania jj/ 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe 

U.S.S.R. 6/ 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Japan 2/ 

Turkey In Asia 8/ 

Other Asia 

America 

Canada & Newfoundland £/ .. 

Mexico 10/ 

West Indies 

Central America 

South America 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand 

Pacific Islands 

Not specified 



^^8^ 



7.691 



I 

20 

371 

968 

1,782 

268 

360 



Jll 



K3.439 



l-''t3.25l 



2.598.214 



2.812.191 



98.817 



495.688 



1.597.501 



2.452.660 



2.065.270 



2.27 2.262 



27 

169 

8,497 

6,761 

14,055 

2,912 

170 

7,942 

20 

50,724 

409 

1,078 



2,477 
3,226 



22 

1,063 

45,575 

152,454 

7,611 

2,667 

185 

65,347 

49 

207,381 

2,253 

1,412 



2,125 
4,821 



5,074 

539 

77,262 

434,626 

32,092 

3,712 

1,261 

229,979 

16 

780,719 

1,870 

8,251 



105 
550 



2,209 
4,644 



4,738 

3,749 

76,358 

951,667 

247,125 

38,331 

6,319 

132,199 

31 

914,119 

9,231 

10,789 



1.164 
1,055 



9,298 
25,011 



7,800 

6.734 

17,094 

35,986 

787,468 

222,277 

38,769 

4,313 

341,537 

72 

435,778 

11,725 

9,102 

(71,631 

(37,567 

2,027 

2,558 

6,697 

23,285 

129 

2,512 

8 



^1.^55 



41,397 
43 



64.630 



54,301 
59 
186 



11.564 



52.469 



2,277 

4,817 

3,834 

105 

531 



13,524 
6,599 
12,301 



41,723 
3,271 

13,528 

358 

3,579 



74.720 



155.607 



59 , 309 
3,078 

10,650 

449 

1,224 



153,878 

2,191 

9,046 

95 

1,397 



312 
35 



72,959 

7,221 

31,771 

7 2,205 

718,182 

437,706 

87,554 

6,631 

15,142 

210 

436,871 

55,759 

16,541 

(95,323 

(115,922 

12,970 

14,082 

11 

5,266 

28,293 

337 

39,284 

1,001 



123.823 



123,201 
153 
149 



404.044 



383,540 

5,152 

13,957 

157 

1,128 



358 
9,886 
1,028 

790 



See footnotes at end of table. 



58 



TABLE 13. IMMIGRATION BV COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820 - 1968 1/ (Continued) 



1861-1890 1891-1900 1901-1910 1911-1920 1921-1930 1931-1940 1941-1950 



All countries 

Europe 

Albania 12/ 

Austria) 
Hungary) — 

Belgium 

Bulgaria U^/ 

Clechoalovakla 12/ 

Denmark 

Eitonla 

Finland 12/ 

France 

Germany 21 

( England 

Great . (Scotland 

Britain (Wales 

(Not specified y 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 12/ 

Lithuania 12/ 

Luxembourg 16/ 

Netherlands 

Norway 4/ 

Poland 5/ 

Portugal 

Romania U/ 

Spain 

Sweden 4/ 

Switzerland 

Turkey In Europe 

U.S.S.R. 6/ 

Yugoslavia \\_l 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Japan 2/ 

Turkey In Asia 8/ 

Other Asia 

America 

Canada & Newfoundland 9/ ... 

Mexico 10/ 7 

West Indies 

Central America 

South America 

Other America 14/ 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand 

Pacific Islands 

Not specified \^l 



5.735.811 



3.556.978 



8.136.016 



4.376.564 



348.289 



353,719 
20,177 



50,464 

1,452,970 

644,680 

149,869 

1 2 , 640 

168 

2,308 

655,482 

307,309 



53,701 

176,586 

51 ,806 

16.978 

6,348 

4,419 

391,776 

61 ,988 

1.562 

213,282 

662 



68.380 



61,711 

269 

2,270 

2,220 

1.910 



426.967 



39 3,304 

1,913 

29,042 

404 

2,304 



857 
7,017 
5,557 



18,167 
160 



30,770 
505,152 
216,726 

44,188 

10,557 
67 

15,979 
388,416 
651,693 



26,758 
95,015 
96,720 
27,508 
12,750 
8,731 

226,266 
31,179 
3,626 

505,290 

122 



41,635 
39,280 



73,379 
341,496 
388,017 
120,469 

17,464 

167,519 

339,065 

2,045.877 



48,262 
190,505 

69,149 
53,008 
27,935 
249,534 
34,922 
79,976 
1,597,306 

665 



(453,649 

(442,693 

33,746 

22,533 

3,426 

41,983 



184 

146 

1,109 



756 
,897 
,945 
,944 
.357 
,107 

,201 
,181 
.524 



43,718 

66,395 

4,813 

89,732 

13,311 

68,611 

95,074 

23,091 

54,677 

921,201 

1,888 

8,111 



32,868 
30,680 
15,846 
2,945 
102,194 
32,430 

16,691 
49,610 
412,202 
157,420 
159,781 
13,012 

51,084 
220,591 
455,315 



i,948 
!,531 
',734 
1,994 
',646 
!,958 
',249 
>.676 
• ,659 
1,742 
),064 
!,983 



2,040 

3,563 

7,861 

4,817 

938 

14,393 

2,559 

506 

2,146 

12,623 

114,058 

21,756 

6,887 

735 

9,119 

13,167 

68,028 

1,192 

2,201 

565 

7,150 

4,740 

17,026 

3,329 

3,871 

3,258 

3,960 

5,512 

737 

1,356 

5,835 

2,361 



243.567 



192,559 



15.344 



25,942 
26,799 
3,628 



20,605 
4,713 
129,797 
77,393 
11,059 



21,278 

2,082 

83,837 

79,389 

5,973 



33,462 
19,165 
12,980 



4,928 
496 

1,948 
328 

7,644 



36.9 72 



361.888 



3.311 

971 

33,065 

549 

1,075 



179,226 
49,642 

107,548 
6,192 
17,280 



742,185 
219,004 
123,424 
17,159 
41,699 



924,515 

459,287 

74,699 

15,769 

42,215 

31 



108,527 
22,319 
15,502 



350 
2,740 
1,225 
14,063 



7,368 
11,975 

1,049 
33,523 



8,443 

12,348 

1,079 

1,147 



6,286 

6,299 

427 

228 



1,750 

2,231 

780 



621.704 



85 

24,360 

3,469 

12,189 

37 5 

8,347 

5,393 

212 

2,503 

38,809 

226,578 

112,252 

16,131 

3,209 

8,973 

26,967 

57,661 

361 

683 

820 

14,860 

10,100 

7,571 

7,423 

1,076 

2,898 

10,665 

10,547 

580 

548 

1,576 

3,983 



31.780 



15,709 

1,761 

1,555 

218 

11,537 



354.804 



171,718 
50 , 589 
49,725 
21,665 
21,831 
29,276 



7,367 

13,805 

5.437 

142 



See footnotes at end of table 



325-586 O - 69 - 



59 



Total 
1820-196 



i""pe 

Albania U/ 

Austria 2/ 

HLingary 2/ 

Belgium 

Bulgaria U/ 

Czechoa lovakla 12/ 

Dennark 

Eatonla 12/ 

Finland H/ 

Trance 

Germany 2/ 

(England 

Great (Scotland 

Britain (Wales 

(Not specified j/ 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 12/ 

Lithuania 12/ 

Luxembourg 16/ 

Netherlanda 

Nomay A/ 

Poland y 

Portugal 

Romania 13/ 

Spain 

Sweden 4/ 

Suitieriand 

Turkey in Europe 

U.S.S.R. 6/ 

Yugoslavia 11/ 

laia 17/ 

China 18/ 

India 

Japan 7/ 

Turkey in Asia 8/ 

Other Asia 

Canada & Newfoundland 9/ 

Mexico 10/ 

West Indies 

Central America 

South America 

Other America 14/ 

Vfrica 

Australia & New Zealand 

Pacific Islands 1?/ 

tot specified 15/ 



67,1061 
36,637) 
18,575 



185 
4,925 
51,121 
477,765 
156,171 
32.854 
2.589 
3,884 



.608 



52.277 
22,935 
9,985 



21,697 
17,675 
2.653 



9.657 
1.973 
46,250 



996.944 
377.952 
299.811 
123.091 
44.751 
91.628 
59,711 



14,092 
11.506 
4.698 
12.493 



6,638) 


1.446 


2,591) 


627 


5,463 


887 


397 


57 


1.005 


286 


4,987 


953 


94 


24 


2.164 


374 


24,431 


4,173 


118.945 


17,661 


88.7 30 


16,018 


19,469 


2.573 


1,167 


184 


69 6 


664 


19,290 


8.221 


27,844 


2,603 


78,893 


26.449 



344 
303 
22.218 
10,301 
32.889 
14.308 
1,158 
16,057 
10,095 
9,921 
2,727 
872 



104,305 
8,156 
2.602 

19,759 
1,603 

72,185 



795,080 
243,400 
228,401 
119,596 

52.182 
138,052 

1 3 , 449 



983 



1,922 
1,620 
8,470 
8,481 
241 
4,944 
1,863 
1,995 



2,948 
2,293 
3.468 



162,552 
37,273 
47,217 
37,999 

9,889 
28,113 

2,061 



16,595 
20,257 
2,552 



14,194 
1,991 
28,487 



1,786 
1,282 
4,356 
13,400 
179 
4,562 
1,822 
2,279 



444 



34,768 
43,034 
61,987 



534 



16.590 
22,970 
2,818 



12,185 
2,268 
25,882 



2,051 
1,196 
3.676 
11,827 
214 
7,904 
1,748 
2,187 



140.827 
11,051 
23,991 



659 



196,935 

66,67 5 

131.264 

359,459 

1,049 

30,594 

723,251 

6,896,085 

3,057,589 

810.191 

93,975 

800.486 

541,079 

4,711,113 

5.122.086 

2.332 

3.630 

2,547 

348,87 3 

852,289 

481.702 

331,071 

160,852 

214,382 

1.265.338 

340 , 284 

163.715 

3.346.201 

79.052 

51,261 



431.612 
26.796 
356,558 
209.231 
331.864 



7.143.817 
3.912,555 
1,502,023 
980,196 
197,554 
443,479 
108,010 



64,914 
94,430 
22.59 3 
269,321 



1/ Data for fiscal years ended June 30, except 1820 to 1831 Inclusive and 1844 to 1849 inclusive fiscal years ended September 30; 
1833 to 1842 Inclusive and 1851 to 1867 inclusive years ended December 31; 1832 covers 15 months ended December 31; 1843 nine 
months ended September 30; 1850 15 months ended December 31; and 1868 six months ended June 30. 
2/ Data for Austria-Hungary were not reported until 1861. Austria and Hungary have been recorded aeparately since 1905. In the 

years 1938 to 1945 inclusive Austria was included with Germany. 
i/ Great Britain not specified. In the years 1901 to 1951, Included in other Europe. 
4/ From 1820 to 1868 the figures for Norway and Sweden were combined, 
i/ Poland was recorded as a separate country from 1820 to 1898 and since 1920. Between 1899 and 1919, Poland was included with 

Austria-Hungary, Germany, and Hussia. 
6/ Between 1931 and 1963 U.S.S.R. was broken down into European U.S.S.R. and Asian U.S.S.R. Since 1964 total U.S.S.R. has been 

reported in Europe. 
7/ No record of immigration from Japan until 1861. 
8/ No record of immigration from Turkey in Asia until 1869. 

9/ Prior to 1920 Canada and Newfoundland were recorded aa British North America. From 1820 to 1898 the figures included all 
British North American poasesalons. 
10/ No record of Immigration from Mexico from 1886 to 1893. 
11/ Bulgaria, Serbia, and Montenegro were first reported in 1899. Bulgaria has been reported aeparately since 1920 and In 1920 

also a separate enumeration was made for the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes. Since 1922 the Serb, Croat, and Slovene 
Kingdom has been recorded as Yugoslavia. 
12/ Countries added to the Hat aince the beginning of World War 1 aie theretofore included with the countries to which they belonged. 

Figures are available since 1920 for Czechoslovakia and Flnlard and since 1924 for Albania, Estonia. Latvia, and Lithuania. 
13/ No record of inmigratlon from Romania until 1880. 
14/ Included with countries not specified prior to 1925. 

15/ The figure 33.523 in column headed 1901-1910 Includes 32.897 persons returning in 1906 to their homes in the United States. 
16/ Figures for Luxembourg are available since 1925. 
17/ Beginning with the year 1952. Asia Inclules rhlllppines. From 1934 to 1951 the Philippines were Included in the Pacific Islands. 

Prior to 1934 the Philippines were recorded in separate tables aa insular travel. 
18/ Beginning in 1957 China includes Taiwan. 



60 



Blr 



Belgium 

France 

Germany 

Hungary 

it-iy 

Noruay 

Poland 

Spain 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia). 

Other Europe 

China 1/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Jordan 2/ 

Philippines 

Thailand 

Hexlco 

Cuba 

D-itBlnlca. Republic 

Trinidad i Tobago 

St. Christopher 

Other North America 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Chile 

Peru 

Vfrlca 

Cape Verde Islands 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt 
Other Africa 



1.284 
1.512 



61 



/Oat. 



Country or r.glon 


iqw-l^s 


1959 


1960 


1961 


,962 


1963 


1954 


1065 


,9« 


,967 


.968 




18.195.697 


.024.945 


1.140.736 


i,;?o,3is 


1.331.383 


1.507.091 


1,744,808 


2.075.967 


2,341,9.3 


2,608,193 


3,200,33« 












627.273 


673.809 


755.677 


892.680 


975.943 


1,017,294 


1,331,710 


Austria 


5eIo!i6 
723, 32J 

'iSl'.ABl 
101,333 
190,991 
7B3,861 
453,597 
153,109 
156,709 

9?, 834 

50,886 
273,674' 
213,306 
251,394 

56,651 
2,004,501 

63,797 

7o!o98 


1 1 , 368 
8,171 
3,008 

13,844 
3,901 

32,958 

86,010 

5,933 
11,680 
47,566 
34,837 
10,645 
12,276 
3,366 
3,240 
21,294 
12,655 
14,434 
4,336 
104,698 
5,405 
5,007 
6,035 


12,222 

3)026 
15,935 

5,350 
37,617 
103,723 
11,253 

9,833 
13,374 

41)391 
11,551 
11,764 
4,100 
3,318 
23,878 
13,825 
16,432 
4,503 
117,972 
6,728 
5,913 
5,806 


12,167 
10,044 

15)811 
6,111 
41,181 
109,520 
13,981 

15)816 

39,705 
11,893 
12,642 
4,672 
3,825 
24,465 
14,936 
17,753 

136)o21 
5,864 
7,310 
5,663 


12,366 
10,669 

15)731 
6,153 

113)bi7 
15,823 
11,871 
15,774 
60,935 
41,397 
12,852 
13,594 
5,661 
3,861 
23,853 
15,530 
19,649 

149)959 

8)o37 
5,312 


1 2,403 
11,696 

3,220 
16,367 

6,217 
57,903 
126,463 
15,083 

9,571 
15,561 
65,052 
42,395 
13,197 
14,142 

7,273 

22)606 
18,809 
20,535 
4,948 
166,670 
5,758 
7,683 
5,608 

113.757 


14,089 
12,598 
4,582 
15,665 
6,343 
65,298 
136,462 
16,759 
10,527 
18,916 
74,366 
43,421 
14,552 
15,451 
9,557 
5,094 
23,927 
20,573 
22,058 
5,178 
200,811 
5,600 
7,663 
6,077 

138.953 


16,195 
15,895 

5,552 
17,442 

7,213 
81,618 
158,711 
19,703 
10,702 
23,198 
86,111 
46,965 
16,427 
17,674 
11,722 

6,082 
29,542 
23,697 
27,366 

6,189 
238,560 

6,490 

6,561 

7,663 

159.517 


16,352 
14,8.8 

6,788 
18,229 

7,253 
94,935 
170,885 
24,174 

9,232 
23,895 
95,428 
51,121 
18,450 
18,187 
14,927 

6,305 
31,700 
26,371 
29,703 

7,196 
265,200 

6,919 

9,456 

6,396 

168.873 


15,858 
15,825 
7,107 

6)514 
109,515 
170,880 
26,129 
6,788 
22,433 

50)357 
19,249 
18,252 
13,810 
7,152 
33,496 
27,874 
32,794 
7,276 
271,379 
6,986 
9,524 
6,338 

205.77, 


23,753 


B lalum 


24,350 


Czechoslovakia 


11,145 


Denmark 


28,259 
10,901 




151,647 


CSermany 


215,7M 
35,563 


Hunqarv 


11,480 


Ireland 


30,343 


Itelv 


131,250 




61,997 


Norway 


24,283 
22,327 




17,526 


H mania 


7,583 


S In 


38,713 


Sweden 


36,834 




50,660 


Turkey (Europe and Asla> 


6,420 
353,231 


U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) 


8,337 
14,146 


Other Europe 


,1,180 
279.259 


China i/ 


130,851 
31,298 

133,555 
35,921 
52,293 
15,097 
94,154 

501,543 
19,948 
39,097 
41,790 

173I926 
6,469 
16,199 
18,179 
81,474 


1,036 
5,143 
2,862 
3,351 

812 
3,619 
26,031 

872 
1,531 

1)333 

10,083 

611 

803 

1,448 


6,669 
1,317 
7,576 
3,432 

l)o67 
5,373 

29,731 
1,056 
1,504 
2,951 
1,453 

10,435 

753 

846 

1,636 

5,195 


9,221 
1,792 
9,312 
3,001 
3,426 
1,168 
6,246 
29,301 
1,372 
1,771 
3,206 
1,730 
6,319 
394 

1,239 
5,036 


9.954 

10)209 

3)614 
1,229 
7,316 

32,476 
1,406 
2,112 
3,232 
2,108 

11,133 

1,151 

5,704 
446.798 


10,560 
2,338 

10,976 
2,958 
4,685 
1,373 
8,626 

37,481 
1,443 
2,803 
3,651 
2,821 

13,860 
512 
1,461 
1,698 
5,511 

534.723 


.■)658 
12,824 
3,735 
5,608 
1,854 
10,067 
49,212 
2,139 
4,068 

2)900 
16,450 
730 
1,676 
1,256 
7,200 

628.526 


3)550 

l)639 
11,704 
55,662 
2,062 
4,717 
5,054 
2,912 

'755 
1,845 
1,354 

8,973 

741.532 


15,224 
4,021 
16,389 

5)796 
1,625 
9,126 
59,982 
2,591 
5,075 
4,733 

22)803 
605 
2,236 
1,837 
9,803 

862.494 


17,551 

19)525 

5)421 
2,132 
12,191 
76,668 

5)206 
5,798 
3,221 

25,943 

692 

2,584 

2,455 

11,925 

926.281 


23,230 
7,632 


India 


24,945 


Indonesia 


5,583 


Iran 


9,533 




2,196 




19,564 




104,977 


Jordan 2? 

Korea 

Lebanon 


9)309 
3)571 




34,536 




968 


p . ^^ p |,bllc 


2,626 


Vietnam 


3,843 


Other Asia 


15.533 








2,887,642 
276,962 
439,606 
73,182 
349,110 

69^695 

13l!a32 
63,815 
70,386 
83,063 
20,196 
43,647 


44,276 
138,391 

5)756 

17)206 
40,743 
3,570 

8)o38 
2,999 
3,095 
4,122 
754 
3,702 


51,027 
150,310 

66,112 
4,437 
4.107 

21,027 

49,938 
3,786 
4.723 
9,045 
2,600 
3,300 
4,466 
841 
3,513 


57,363 
185,175 

43,934 
9,102 
3,832 

18,070 

60,361 
3,139 
4,667 
5,479 
4,794 
2,969 
4,447 
733 
3,480 


71,24J 

17)119 
18,227 
4,694 
23,226 
70,485 
3,680 
5,451 
6,375 
3,228 
3,967 
5,131 
2,065 
3,711 


238)389 
6,897 
56,236 
4,650 
29,046 
76,514 
5,073 
7,237 
8,873 

5)836 
6,138 
2,098 


84,671 
282,533 

9,448 
64,476 

6,341 
36,652 
87,466 

8,311 

11)716 
6,155 
7,737 
8,135 
2,198 
4,235 


94,535 
355,137 
10,430 
52,636 
8.090 
47,791 
105,939 
8,575 
10, 159 
14,919 

9)060 
9,274 
2,841 
4,558 

179.173 


113.801 
411,505 
11,475 
68,870 

9,271 
46,531 
121,525 

9,669 
11,523 
17,747 

8,771 
10,855 
10,873 

2,642 

5,136 

200.714 


102,994 
439,350 
12,005 
76,791 
10,990 
52,639 
141,018 
10,721 
14,121 
22,223 
10,235 
11,282 
12,072 
2,358 
5,262 

224.097 


120,455 




480,956 




14,177 




81,073 




17,259 




54,520 


Other West Indies 


167,598 


Costa RUa 


11,971 








25,415 




12,602 






Panama 


16,383 




3,466 




6,590 




273.226 




227,910 
28,512 
187,503 
111,599 
273,624 
89,716 
39,709 
179,653 
333,932 
46,156 


10,783 

8)601 
5,508 
13,071 
3,730 
2,101 

25)979 
1,937 


12,758 
1,370 
9,762 
7,045 

16,069 
3,920 
2,264 
5,842 

28,514 
2,170 


17,242 

12)450 
6,012 

13,906 
3,231 
2,406 
6,489 

24,164 
2,571 


1,689 
11,836 

6.010 
19,124 

4,261 

3,613 
11,105 
21,941 


15,572 
2,376 

14,845 
7,317 

27,945 

3)005 
15,164 
27,010 

4,172 


20,296 

15)582 
9,772 

37,553 
9,216 
3,362 

19,269 

29,126 
4,426 


28,223 

19)472 
12,369 
35,729 
9,672 

24)287 
35,985 
5,785 

27.113 


31,834 
3,740 
23,915 
15,849 
31,910 
11,024 
5,260 
28,861 
42,572 

31.562 


31,762 
4,613 
31,744 
16,145 
32,197 
15,077 
5,159 
33,806 
44,523 
7,050 

35.410 














21,571 






Ecuador 


22,742 
8,009 






Venezuela 


54,096 




6,752 




45.130 




14,875 
20,598 
12,261 
53,170 
56,009 
73,678 


569 
696 

2,481 
2,334 
2,364 


695 

963 

412 

3,090 

3,133 

2,914 


1,252 
649 
3,643 
3,640 
4,233 


780 
1,292 

666 
3,560 
4,091 
5,603 


932 
1,476 
1,183 
4,354 
4,376 
6,680 


1,169 
1,572 
1,345 
5,135 
5,197 


1,501 
2,155 
1.391 
6,570 
6,443 
6,753 

55.866 


2,196 
2,627 
1,956 
6,932 

9)967 

67.506 


2,716 
3,579 
1,969 
7,451 
8,821 
10,844 

71.892 


3,469 




4,566 




2 004 




9,944 


Ihlted Arab Republic ( Egypt) . 


10,290 




90.814 




314,059 
107,666 
43,356 
17,337 

309.610 


16,070 

4,707 

1,257 

412 


1)245 

553 


20.497 

6,853 

1,293 

673 

751 


23,672 
8,029 
1,961 
1,154 

694 


8,588 
3,528 
1,281 

1.390 


29,888 
9,410 
3,833 
1,644 

3,105 


36.360 
11,850 
5,048 
2,588 

20.086 


42,939 
15,462 
6,201 
2,884 

34.831 


42,839 

2)813 
127,449 


57,646 






Pacific Islands (U.S. adm. ) ... 


10,355 


Other countries 


li9.9W 



g/ Includes Arab Palestlrn 



62 



"' hlrth 



All countrl.t 

B-Ul"" 

CtKchoi lovskift 

DanMrk 

FlnUnd 

Or««c« 

Hung* ry 

IraUnd 

lt«ly 

N«th«rUnd« 

?oUnd 

Portugal 

RoMitU 

Spala 

Svaden 

SMltzarUnd 

Turkey (Suropc «nd Aalft) .. 

United Klngdoa 

U.S.S.R. (birope snd Ael*) 
YugoelevU 

Chin* 1/ 

Hong Kong 

IndU 

Indonetl* 

Iran 

tarael 

Jordan g/ 

Ubanon 

Paklatan 

Philippines 

Ryukyu I e lande 

SyrUn Ar«b Republic 

Other Aal* 

North Anerlca 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Doalnlcan Republic 

Jaaalca 

Othar Uaat Indlea 

Coata Rica 

■I Salvador 

Guaceaala 

Honduraa 

Panama 

Other Central Aaerlca 

Other North Aaerlca 

South Aaerlca 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Braxll 

Chile 

Coloabla 

Guyana 

Venezuela 

Other South Aaerlca 

Africa 

Al8«rl« 

Morocco 

Nigarl. 

South Africa , 

United Arab Republic (Egypt 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Auatralla , 

New Zealand 

Pacific lalanda (U.S. a<te.) 
Other Oceania 



109.462 
88,0BS 
I09,<:i62 
580.678 
346.652 
78.490 



20 . UO 
23,319 
8.698 
65,282 

329,710 
10.251 
13.540 
29.624 
10.163 

101,638 
2.252 
10.571 



303.429 
44.766 
158.458 



172.447 
21.966 
132.908 



145.001 
245,335 
26,386 



226,430 
76,286 
28,451 
9,201 



1.Q01.52Q 



L,B39 
1.2B8 
1.021 



ie.3i7 
6,192 
1,361 



26.125 
9.035 
3,819 
1.312 



10.611 
3.623 
1.466 



63 



! CLASSES UNDBD ' 



Country or [.|lon 


adalttad 


1. 




11 


1 
1 


II 


i 




: 

ll 

u 

s t 


1 

t ! 

li 


1 ] 

1!! 


a 


It'. 

I i i, 

Ml 


1 

?! 
|l 
11 


3 


... c™„.r,.. 






257.800 


2.042.666 


232.731 


13.091 


73.303 


7.009 


19.826 


68.969 


3,622 


45.320 


15.163 


J7J.252 


?.?64 














6.479 


9.305 


878 


8.453 


.2.770 


2.428 


19.695 


6.189 


128,486 


1,746 


Au**! 1* 


I51.6fc7 
17!526 


510 


.!54I 
91256 


17!505 
15!869 

5^334 




45 


338 


21 
57 
106 

8 

36 
61 
59 
15 

56 


342 

165 
145 

1.799 




662 


5.717 
41 

12.594 


165 

56 

333 

341 


'591 
271543 

If, 437 




B 1 1 


33 






D nM k 


72 






_ 


189 


. V ' 


831 


- '' 


36 


H 




I land 


3 


Italv 


32 


N th !«ndi 


93 


N <M 


146 


Poland 


1 


Po t al 


7 


Rom !• 




g , 


2 


S d 


I 






I.rk-V («orop. .nd A.,.1 ... 


20 
267 


U.S.S... .Iur<,p..nd A.l.K. 


' 


Q ? _ ^ 


1 




26 




Z3.230 


20 


2.562 
2.) 






265 
5.206 

5 


1.553 


36 






,5 




144 


55 




Hon* Kona 




India 


1 


Indoneila 


10 


I a 




I a 




lira I 




Japan 


1 


lordan !/ 




Korea ~ 


1 


Ubanon 


1 


PakUtan 




Phlllpplnea 


3 


Hyukyu Iilands 




Syrian Arab Republic 




Other Aala 


7 




477 




4Bo!956 
61590 


5. 


578 
375 


59.381 
12^456 


372 
582 








396 

156 
.45 






6.288 


25 


.0.513 
.9.555 




HeKico 


5 


Cuba 


1 










JatMlca 








Cotta Rica 












Mondurat 




MIcaranua 




Panama 




Other Central Aaarlca 






B.009 
29.603 
54.098 


4.6 


307 


4^735 
23.675 


7'759 




2.520 


32 




15 
108 


56 


281 

'779 
625 

.16 
2.397 


603 


'327 

1,599 

1.840 

516 

1.335 








Brazil 


_ 


Chile 


. 


ColoBbIa 




Ecuador 




a* van* 






_ 




_ 


Other South Anerlca 

Africa 


II 








154 
l!o93 


3!657 

5.936 
7.153 
6.256 


563 


35 




2 


250 
..009 


233 




45 




259 




Morocco 




Nigeria 




South Africa 




United Arab Republic (Egypt) 










57.666 

lo!355 
3.335 


1.911 
265 


2.104 
165 
167 


61391 
1.738 


\:Z 










58 




25 
50 




119.049 






2 





























iudea Arab Pal* 





19 


68 i 


1967 


Country or Region 








'Hiinn 


X..1 


"XIT.T 


'^7 


'j;-;jf-'' 


All countrie. 


68.969 


11.578 


52.798 


4.593 


70.010 


9.352 


57.328 


.1.330 


Europe 




















1.066 
900 


<.51 
54 

52 
30 


135 
537 


522 
158 

237 


585 

53 

3 


155 
39 

769 
150 

12 

95 

3 

156 

1.659 
59 


3 
3 

521 




EJelal at 




Czechoslovakia 




Denmark 


36 


Finland 


..J 


France 




Germanv 




Greece 


J 


Hunoarv 




Ireland 


31 


Italy 


66 




lOA 


Norway 


29 


Poland 




Porlunat 










2b 




53 




196 


Turkey (Europe and Aila) 


^ 


United JCIrBdoin 


500 


USSR (Europe and Aala) 


I 


YueoBlavIa 


2 


Other Europe 


7 


».i. 


i.71 




t 
511 

27 


3B 

I 






155 
49 


33 

5 
3.286 


55.591 




Hono Kona 


4 




62 


I d ela 






3 


Iraq 


2 




jl 


Japan 


300 




2 


Kor a ' 


3i 




4 




5 




19 


Ryukyu lelanda 






1 


Vietnam 


2 




4 


»« h 


705 




l!600 

5 

20.940 
10 

32 


2.609 
37 


21.344 

7.713 

5 

13 




22.749 
9.07B 

635 


2.052 
375 


10.166 
17.210 

?3 


507 






Cuba 






9 




1 




20 


Other West Indlee 


34 




- 


El Salvador 


2 


Guatemala 




Honduras 


2 


Nlcaraoua 


I 


Panaina 




Other Central America 


2 


Other North Aaerlca 


2 




167 






143 
83 


3 


54 


56 
116 


203 

5 


3 

s 


16 








43 




39 




28 




2 




2 




19 




14 


Other South America 


4 


«rU« 


48 






94 






3 

53 
338 


3 
250 


23 


- 


ftorocco 


3 




2 




28 


United Arab Republic (Egypt) 


1^ 




65 




15 




5 


1° 




216 


I 




New Zealand 


6 


P.clflc I.l.nd. (U.S. .d..) 









65 



TABLE 16B. TEMPORARY 



e pll 


3t. . 


nd n. 






and 




e»che 


g 


g 






g 


en 


ors a 


Ic" 


ng te 


ore 


and 


chers 








ans a 


.d nu 


trUl 


niatfl 


en 




and 


repor 


ter. 




rs 




Iners 








d horn 


7i 


tfr" 


t advisors 


ra an 


lonlate 


and 




ans 






ns an 


»>,s 


IC te 








rlets 









el and labor 



Survey. 
Teache 



g 






eoufl n 


tural 


dentists 


tB 




hers 




urgeon 






d publlcltv writers 


rators 




n and 


roupw 


rkers 










era except aroup 


g 




Ists 


Ian an 


^cfaf^B 


rles 


eoua a 


lentlets 


struct 


officials 






na 




E and 


ealere 


not specified 


lans 





nal, technical, and kindred woi 
farm managers 





d'sJorek 


Ig^l^g 




and secretaries 




eepera 






L and kl 


ndred wo 










lea cler 


alestnen 




akere 






n and sa 


8. Other ;. 



TEMPORARY WORKERS ADMITTED UNDBl SECTION 101 (fl) ( 1 5) (H) AND SECTION 

UF THE TMMIOIATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, BV OCCUPATION: 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1968 (CONTINUED) 



Occupation 


Tor.l 


dlstlngutahed 


"=' 


Industrial 


it:;-',: 


Craftamen foremen ar.d kindred workere 










170 




45 

1.137 

17 

79 

313 

56 
39 

49 

.l\ 
9 
190 
49 
234 


17 
2 
21 

2 

, 
1 

1 
2 

8 


1,15! 

56 

311 
78 

39 

'1 

1.957 


20 

1 

14 
51 

1 
1.235 
















Cranemen derrlckmen and holBtmen 






1 1 








2 




g 












U 




94 








2 


Plaiterere 
















Structural metal workera 




Tailors and talloreeses 


I 


Tlnitolthfl ccoperBmithfl and sheet metal workera 




Tool foakera and die makers and setters 




Craftsmen and kindred workers other 




.r.t.ve. .nd kindred worker. 


133 


Apprentices 


1.424 
229 
144 

5 

50 

56 
37 
6 
74 
1S5 
632 
355 


103 
10 


5 
35 
54 

624 
295 


1.166 
34 












Bus drivers 


I 




_ 




4 




2 


Packers and wrapiwrs 


_ 


Painters encppt construction and nalnCenance 


2 




3 




I 




_ 


Truck and tractor drlvera 


1 




_ 




17 


fr...t. household workers 


9 


HouB k D s Drlvat houaehold 


2.653 
1.552 




2,652 
2.822 


42 




Private household workers other 


9 




3J3 




158 

139 

6 

2 56 

13 
30 
124 
584 

220 
12 
53 
835 
433 

13.346 


106 

1 
1 

6 
31 


25 

157 

139 

6 

57 
187 

30 
123 
583 

1 

52 

347 

13.010 


10 

2 

1 
224 


20 


Barbers beauticians and (oanlcurlats 






1 






Charwomen and cleaners 


_ 


Cooks cKcept private household 


6 


Co t a d f tal k 




Guards watchmen and doorkeepers 


1 




_ 




_ 


Janitors and sextons 


I 


Kitchen workers other 


_ 


Mldwlves 


1 


Policemen and detectives 


218 


Forelon military 


11 




1 




3 


Service workers except private household other 


70 




81 






6 


16.113 


49 


56 




128 

9.125 
6.143 

21.903 


20 


5 

9.119 
6.088 

10 


27 
9 

353 




Flsherm n and ovsterroen 


_ 




12 


Lumbenn n c aftsm n and woodchoppera 


1 




43 




21.520 






711 


1.821 


34V 


1.520 









67 



' LAST PQIMAKEHT f 



'••°"^™"-"""-"-"" 


:ziz. 


I 


11 


i 8 
1^ 


i 


"1 


i 


11 


1 ; 


J? 


til 


i 


1 ? 


1 I 


g 


All cc„„,r... 








2 042 666 




13 091 


















2.264 












93.963 




7.335 




8.407 


10.630 


2.429 


19.643 


6.031 


6.493 


1.768 




51925 

21. MJ 
33.671 


195 

346 


17 077 
'l!290 

723 
7! 429 


4,593 

3.567 

313 

11.378 

3l!805 


l!210 


587 

10 

1.524 

166 


183 

322 
1,604 


53 
54 

164 


'342 
109 

1.779 
1,032 


59 
430 


453 

58 
659 


1.065 

153 
12.531 


54 


105 




BelDfuB 


42 


CzechoBlovskla 


1 


Denmark 


71 




_ 




213 


Cerma 




Greece 


36 


Hunnarv 


_ 


Ireland 




Italy 


30 


Netherlands 


103 


Noruav 


154 


Poland 




Port aai 


7 


Romania 






2 






Switzerland 


2 


Turkey (trop, .„d A.,.1 ., 




U.S.S.R. (E„rop..„d A.,.). 




Other Europe 


1 


A... 


^ 




25.500 

57.631 
1.580 

3. 219 


925 
2.'9B5 


662 

2,457 
36.957 

50 
185 


2.369 

40^589 
574 


3)386 
5!827 


31 

5.245 

5 

158 


l!673 

'395 
131 


746 

257 
35 


225 


55.003 


479 


570 
1.854 

3,655 


570 
1.385 


25 

364.927 




Nona Kona 




India 




Indonesia 




Iran 


_ 


Iraq 




Israel 




Japan 


1 


Jordan 2/ 




Korea ~ 




Lebanon 




Pakistan 




Philippines 


3 






Syrian Arab Republic 




Other Asia 




North Aaerlca 


488 




3,656 


360 
262 


11^562 


12i964 
2.657 


530 




4!o58 
56 




354 
202 




35 

5 


6.363 


1.701 


136 

456 
79 

105 
618 




Mexico 


5 


Cuba 


I 


l>o.,„Ic.nl.,pabUt 




Jans lea 




Other West Indies 


424 






El Salvador 




Guatemala 


_ 


Honduras 


_ 


Nlcaracua 


_ 


Panama 




-"""---■":::■•: 


' 






567 
533 
99 


'403 


35!674 








30 


205 




35 


2.133 


258 
562 


59 




Bolivia 




Brazil 












Ecuador 


_ 


Guyana 


- 


Venezuela 




Other South America 


2 








2.285 


5.999 






292 
1,089 


37 












165 




Morocco 




Nigeria 






2 


United Arab Republic (Egypt) 


- 


Oceania 


2 




li 


'•'» 


»? 


'iiti 


'ii 


\ 


^ 






« 


™ 






25 




Nev Zealand 


1 


Pacific Islands 




Other Oceania 









TABLE 17A. 



ADMITTED. BY PORT: 



Port 


Number admitted 


Temporary visitors 
for business 


Temporary visitors 
for pleasure 


Other 
nonimmigrants 




3.200.336 


257.800 


2.042.666 


899.870 




1.883.524 


172.256 


1,069.791 


641,477 




3.804 
50.095 
44,719 

4,447 
26,830 

1.410 
373.609 

6.215 
1.159.146 
10.014 
32.234 
130.914 
23.662 
13.541 

2.884 


239 

7.718 

2.136 

83 

598 

10.116 

292 

142.538 

1.726 

48 

4,227 

2,288 

160 

80 

2,714 


2.129 
24.485 
30.594 

3.457 
16.365 

1.205 
275,306 

1,969 
609,571 

4.603 
11.283 
72.465 
10.444 

3.600 

2.315 

74.722 




' 




Charlotte AiMlle. V. 1 

Cruz B«y. V. I 

FrederlkBted, V. I 


11,989 

907 

9,667 






Newark, N. J 

New York. N. Y 


3.954 
407.037 




20.903 


San Juan. P. R 

Uashlngton. D. C 


54.222 
10.930 








20.461 




17.902 
31.625 
45.730 
1.408 
1,232 

377,946 


590 
1.104 
924 
29 
67 

50.701 


13,917 
21,153 
37,547 
1,146 
959 

190.334 








_ A t 1 T 










206 




136.911 




27,042 
137,148 
126,632 
3,232 
37,011 
44,544 
2,137 

8,220 


1.831 
25.880 
6.794 
12 
7.597 
8,476 
111 

1,899 


12.535 
67.179 
75.005 
2.975 
15.040 
16,911 
689 

2.794 










45.033 




245 








19.157 




1,337 




3,527 




7,876 
344 

468,365 


11 
20.562 


2.481 
313 

362.576 


3.507 




20 




85.225 




29,587 

53,378 
3,227 

64.263 

70,947 
2,200 
3,604 

69 , 3 1 5 
1,440 
3.975 

11,566 
2.752 

17,736 
3,671 
3,151 

51,040 
2,482 
2,651 
2,281 
2,076 

11,085 
9.208 
2,684 
3,388 
1,863 
2,448 
2.483 
9,446 
1,643 

22,775 

363,808 


365 

767 

72 

1.081 

11,656 

510 

39 

2.783 

214 
21 

156 
13 
27 

430 
38 

103 
12 
96 

173 

153 

54 
14 
10 
103 
128 
15 
1.499 

9.593 


26.231 
48.075 

59!537 

35.791 
1.414 
2.878 

51.014 

806 

117 

9,985 

842 

16,287 

583 

2,800 

47,592 
1,999 
1.534 
1.963 
1.155 
9.230 
7.366 
87 
2.482 
1,770 
2,286 
1,464 
7,616 
1,492 

16,036 

342,072 


2.991 


Buffalo. N. Y 


4.536 

i.ooe 


Champlaln, N. Y 


3.645 
23.500 




276 




687 




15.518 




606 




3,856 




1,367 




1.889 


Leulston. N. Y 


1.293 
3.075 


Haasena, N. Y 

Niagara Falla. N. Y 


324 
3.018 

445 




1.014 


Ogdensburg, N. Y 


306 
825 




1.682 


Rouses Point. N. Y 


1.689 
2.597 




852 




79 




152 




916 


Trout Rluer. N. Y 


1.702 

136 

5.240 




12.143 




17,838 
32,150 
3,164 
2,398 
1.969 
15,424 
47,653 
19,620 
98,582 
21,290 
5.125 
2.996 
82.476 
2,600 
4,986 
5.537 

576 


838 
733 
157 

85 

63 
138 
4.502 
866 
963 

85 

239 

5 

762 

15 

58 
75 


15,980 
30,780 
2,787 
2,257 
1,815 
14,970 
39,820 
18,076 
95,842 
20,564 
4.468 
2.959 
79,724 
2,553 
4,090 
5,387 

375 


1.020 




637 




220 




56 


* 


91 


F ? P* T 


316 




3,331 




678 




1,777 


J. 1 ' . , 


641 




418 


* . 


32 




1,990 




32 




812 




92 




126 













■ LAST PERMANENT F 



Country of 
last p#rman.nt r.sld.nco 


Total 


V 


\i 


L- 


P 


^1 




1 j 


II 


J 
> 


ii 




i 

s . 
r 


1" 


5" 
1° 




11 


All oountH.s 














47 447 




32 063 


















Euro. 






































14io76 

5)216 
81,541 
110,927 

14,624 
46,709 
27,680 

sign 

13,348 

27,213 
29,944 

19o!ll3 
1.694 


10)273 
60I472 

90,331 
6,313 
2,607 
11,963 
37,606 
20,210 

2)939 

22,'495 

1.672 
125,151 


26 
586 

'l89 
15 
161 

64 
1.180 

1.334 

25 
8.120 


16 

1,207 

665 

22 

61 

611 

61 

49 

1,354 
376 
228 

1 
39 


96 

30 

3 

169 

1 

384 
6.160 

56 


69 
4,938 
3,673 
65 
195 
262 
972 

30 

182 

841 

8,731 

38 


197 

3,207 

6,783 

267 

128 

573 

1.927 

536 

17 

1)335 

443 
175 


15 

66 
20 


3,247 

3,903 

270 

164 

319 

1.014 

29 
39 


54 

33 

36 


1.997 
166 

1,095 

27 

360 

1.185 

20 

48 
2.699 

2,978 
29 


36 
716 
2.645 
23 
23 

271 

417 

41 

6 

23 
2.339 

45 
19 


496 
290 

125 

25 

60 
396 


13 

33 
11 
113 
243 

71 
32 

19 

145 

12 
171 


158 
29 
72 
34 
1,290 
1,757 

26 

269 
105 

3 

10 

131 

39 

5,010 

798 


IB 
176 
23 

150 
616 

3 

317 

232 

271 






771 






Denmark " 




Finland 


74 


France 


1 7S6 


Germanv 












I I nd 




Italv 




Netherlands 




Nor 


205 


Pol and 


49 






Romania 




Soaln 




Sweden 








Turkey (Eiirope and Asia) 


50 


U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) ... 


58 




104 






China V 

Hong Kong 


2,513 

16,901 

1I166 

13,859 

3B5 

365 

725 

5,124 


15,641 
10.036 

1,680 


15 

661 
16 

1 


278 
6 

16 


'4O6 
221 
63 

61 
33,762 

35 


4,461 
112 


9 

26 
171 
766 
46 
69 
105 

16 


541 
14 


23 
169 
83 

151 

273 

16 


22 
24.196 


W4 
702 
100 

5,966 

591 

16 
1.327 

1.797 


6,333 

334 

30 

993 


227 
17 

12 
16.529 


1 
53 
45 

11.569 


16 

116 

61 
179 
12 

119 
1.433 


17 
11 

1.275 


112 
172 


1 donesla 


11 


I an 


no 


Iraq 


10 


J 


8,655 


Jordan 2j 

Korea 


365 




29 




1,279 




57 


Syrian Arab Republic 


8 




62 








31.093 




75,479 
138,087 

7^042 

30,218 

139,912 

8,794 

191566 
I3I086 


18,207 
31,965 

6,646 
3,703 

33)529 

1.031 

'376 


30.985 

7.235 

1)300 

4)470 

9.923 

1.419 

63 


3,221 
J7.820 
10.981 

106 

36 
133 

230 


1)003 
13 

48 

9 
33 
12 


2)402 
3.372 


2,557 

10,012 

15 

12 
6 

93 
19 

12 
1 
91 


649 
33,190 

5 

109 
131 

29 


1.150 
16 


29 

106 
41 

1 


213 


173 

19 
51 

483 


13 

2)914 
957 

506 
2.539 


105 

1 

165 

634 
85 
148 
702 

11 

856 


123 
1,068 

3 

104 

16 
13 

21 
357 


8 
8?. 




Mexico 


14,500 


Cuba 


57 








25 




268 




7,774 




58 


El Salvador 


69 


G atemal 


175 


Honduras 


47 




34 




66 


Other Centeral America 


18 




1,266 




29,649 

15l8b7 
36,457 
19,220 
3,905 
25,768 
49,728 


16.021 
17)319 
11)294 

6)897 
22.371 


1.959 
8.517 
6.321 
22.151 
14.466 
373 

16)339 


65 
593 

'l04 
246 

'299 


156 
188 

73 
16 


281 
3.100 
1,181 

865 

2,458 
983 
236 


139 

63 
19 
13 
107 
131 


497 

296 
130 
143 
53 

200 
135 


11 


1 
26 

16 


5 


66 

194 

21 
14 

134 


144 
19 

1,857 
27 

22 


56 
122 

13 


35 

1 
57 

6 

275 


21 

3 






19 








108 


Colombia 


169 


Ecuador 


63 


Guyana 


29 


Peru 


192 


Venezuela 


172 




50 




413 


Nigeria 


463 
972 
520 


369 

4,576 
907 


10 
390 




362 
14 


34 


17 
20 

43 
199 


2 
13 


10 
252 


1 
19 


31 
855 


762 


9 
250 


1 


132 

?51 


129 


53 
167 


United teat Republic (Egypt) . 






7,?74 








1.232 


19 


23 
1,102 


573 


208 

1 


21 






583 




^^ 


63 


166 


43 




New Zealand 


149 




6,162 







70 



— ...-.. pe™-.... ....enc. 


.... 


^ ^ 




11 




° > 


1^ 
J' 


^5 


s 

3 

Si 

1 


i 

u 


L 
i 


1 : 


»l 


2: 
II 




AM counlr... 


81 .Mi. 


2<..e<.4 


26 196 


6.099 


'..ibU 


<. 993 


1.629 


1 966 
















Europe 


SI.;".! 
































3.19! 
3,065 

9,BB3 

5 


905 
63 


5 
125 














ii 














'" 






DenfBarW 


' 


Finland 


113 


France 


2tt 


Gerroany 


126 


Greece 


813 




91 




^ 


Italy 


16 


Netherlands 


7A 


Norway 


175 


Poland 


U03 




'^ 


Ronanla 


12 




^ 




80 




105 




3H 




7^ 






Yuooalavia 






^* 


AalB 






37 

5 












■ 
















''■ 








Hn 






Iran 








larael 
















Lebanon 








Phlllpplnei 


22 






Syrian Arab Republic 








Other Aila 


g 


North Anerlca 






102 


750 
71 




















■ 








Mexico 


81 




1 


Dominican Republic 


2 




2 


Jaaaica 


3 




133 


Coita Hlca 


16 




^ 


Guatemala 


^ 




113 


Nlcaranua 


I 




lA 


Other Central Aiaerlca 


9 


Other North America 


1 


South Aaerlca 












13 


156 
59 


20 


27 


■^ 


: 




25 










Bolivia 


I 




35 




40 




(.3 




32 


Guyana 


2 


Peru 


10 


Venezuela 


68 




7 








32 
































2 


Nloerla 


I 




41 


United Arab Republic (Bgypt) 


g 




1.176 




'•"' 






2.J01 


'l 






2<.9 




^ 


; 


66 


' 








195 




375 




24 







71 



"""' •" ~ '— "" 






Ji5 


1- 


^1 


5,- 


•I' 


s 

ft 


33 


zs 




ia 


1- 




11 


It 


All counirle. 






80 «J6 


bO hi'. 




.) ta\ 


!.<. ttl. 


4J <.i, 


J, j„, 








16 <.<.j 














.„ 


w,*,. 




,■,.„ 


».., 


„,, 


































































' 


































;;-'""'"'" 


'■S 


























































\ 














































































































1 


































J0.5« 


















■ 




















"« 


















' 


















.«.,h *»e,lc. 








, 


," 










H 


^ 






























L,.i.,„i,|« 


,j 






^^,^^lj 


61 














Afrlc. 








\ 












; 












































, 








il 


" 


'! 


1' 


'" 


] 


r» 


'» 


'' 










" 








New Zealand 


277 























72 



•?5,- 



a ij 4-1 4j 



O -r^ 14-1 



CD -4 1-1 tJ 



!0 


-n 


d) 


, 




T 














X 




u 




01 







j: 



73 



All portB 1/ 

CANADIAN BOKDER 

Alaska 

Anchorage 

EagU 

FalrbankB 

Haines 

Hyder 

Juneau 

Ketchikan 

Skagway 

Tok 

Wrangell 

PorthlU 

Illinois 

Chicago 

Halne 

Bangor 

Brldgewater 

Calais 

Ferry Point 

HlUtown Bridge 

Coburn Gore 

Easton 

Estcourt 

Forest City 

Fort Fairfield 

Fort Kent 

Hamlin 

Houlton 

Jackman 

Hadswaska 2/ 

Hars Hlll-Knoxford Line . 

Montlcello 

Orient 

St. Aurellc 

St. Juste 

St. Faniphlle 

Van Buren 

Vanceboro 

Michigan 

Algonac 

Alpena 

Anherstburg 3/ 

Cheboygan it/~ 

Detour 5/ 7 

Detroit 

Ambassador Bridge 

Detroit & Canada Tunnel 

Detroit City Airport .. 

Detroit Metropolitan 

Detroit River and River 

Rouge Terminals 

Michigan Central Depot. 

Houghton 

Isle Royale 

Mackinac Island V 

Marine City 

Marquette 

Muskegon 

Port Huron 2/ 

Blue Water Bridge 

Canadian National 

Railway Station 

Roberts Landing 

St. Clair County Airport. 
Sault Ste. Marie 



205,762,516 



86,088,667 



69,918,151 



37,605,781 



163,563 



505 

4.994 
26.514 
6,615 
4,284 
16,589 
24,821 
77,413 
344 



2.071 
2,871 
3,498 



3,922 
1,518 
1,950 



10,291.579 



6.518,223 



3.773,356 



61.392 

157.994 

(2.798,6521 

2.412,012 

386,640 

101,869 

42,748 

30,589 

16,503 

14,410 

17,195 

522,810 

872,996 

244.306 

539.519 

396.563 

209.194 

300.169 

2,575.296 

4.547 

6.329 

30.042 

38,933 

841 

22,300 

875,550 

410,832 



30,198 

101,198 

(1,755,585) 

1,505,228 

250,357 

70,946 

39,280 

18,853 

10,778 

9,419 

11,174 

344.852 

540,287 

194,582 

345,753 

211,849 

111,948 

183,818 

1.627.570 

3,209 

4,559 

17,371 

36,809 

800 

20,910 

545.392 

281,083 



31.194 

56.796 

(1,043,067) 

906,784 

136.283 

30.923 

3,468 

11,736 

5.725 

4,991 

6,021 

177.958 

332.709 

49.724 

193.766 

184,714 

97,246 

116.351 

947.726 

1.338 

1.770 

12.671 

2.124 

41 

1,390 

330,158 

129.749 



( 10.774,641) 

3,832,927 

6,903,868 

4,703 



(4,940.463) 

1.392,803 

3,535,782 

1,065 



(5,834,158) 

2.440,124 

3,368.086 

3.638 



63,103 
112,002 

1,788 
1,453,258 



38.820 

49,070 

1,191 

758,784 



Duluth 

Ely 

Grand Marals' 

Grand Portage 

Indus 

International Falls 2/ 

Lancaster 

Noyee 

Oak Island 6/ 

Pine Creek 7 

Ranler 

Roseau 

St. Paul 

Chief Mountain 3/ 

Cut Bank (Airport) 

Del Bonlta 

Great Falls (Airport) 

Havre 

"oi-ea" 

Ophelm 

Plegan 

RooevI lie 

Scobey 

Sweetgrase 

Turner 

Uhltetall 

Whltlash 

«Ild Horse 

ml low Creek 

New Hampshl re 

Pittsburg 

New Vo"rk 

Alexandria Bay 7/ 

Black Rock 

Buffalo 

Buffalo Seaport 

Greater Buffalo Inter- 
national Airport 

Peace Bridge 2/ 

Cannons Corners 

Cape Vincent 

Champlain 

Chateaugay 

ChurubuBco 

Clayton 8/ 

Fort Covington 

Heart Island 3/ 

Hogansburg 

Jamison's Line 

Lewlston 2/ 

Hassena 

Niagara Falla 

Municipal Airport 

Rainbow Bridge 2/ 

Vhlrlpool Rapids Bridge 2/. 

Ogdensburg 

Oswego 9 / 

Rochester 

Municipal Airport 

Port Authority 

Rouses Point 

Syracuse 

Thousand Island Bridge 

Trout River 

Watertown (Airport) 

Voungstoun 3/ 



159.150 

7,887 

6,478 

25,067 

4,058 

312,311 

252 

896.292 

59,770 

240,731 

2,219 

33,206 

7,433 

42.364 

3.804 

108.142 



456 
15,981 
14,682 
162,239 
82.778 
70,192 
22,283 
350,307 
19,614 
13,915 
3,425 
10,629 
7,769 

24,610 



128 
11,703 
8,481 
77,843 
55,469 
28,357 
16,790 
203,857 
12.174 
11,392 
1,742 
5,425 
5,880 



24,633,959 



12,494,666 



9.578 

57.976 

(7,415,814) 

47 

9,224 

7,406,543 

39,392 

36,069 

4,371.964 

105,571 

44.330 

115.683 

356.893 

85.083 

298.176 

17,490 

1,677,968 

939,357 

229.254 

(5,200.683 

1.191 

4,300.374 

899,318 

535,220 

138 



646,009 
10,598 
1.697.306 
726.364 
2.669 
12.884 



4.854 

35,982 

(3,382,937) 



2,397 

3,380,514 

28,452 

14,457 

1,944,402 

70,657 

22.462 

45.885 

163.532 

46.767 

183.003 

10.723 

1.006.782 

597.519 

130.441 

(3.063,762) 

231 

2,552,430 

511,101 

312,098 



410,413 

6.094 

604.746 

402.387 



74 



TABLE 19. ENTRIES OF ALIEN 



North Dakota 

Ambrose 

Antler 

Dunaelth 

Fortuna 

Grand Forks ( Munlc. Alrpoi 
Hannah 

Halda 

Neche 

Noonan 

Northgata 

Portal 2/ 

St. John 

Sarles 

Sherwood 

Ualhalla 

Ues t hope 

WllUston, Sloulln Field 

Ohio 

Cleveland 

Sandusky 

Vermont 

Alburg Springs 

Beebe Plain 

Beecher Falls 

Burlington Airport 

Derby Line 

East RIchford 

Hlghgate Springs 

Norses Line 

North Troy 

Norton 

RIchford 

St. Albans 

West Berkshire 

Washington 

BeUlngham 

Blaine 

Pacific Highway 

Peace Arch 

Boundary 

Danville 

Ferry 

Frontier 

Laurler 

Lynden II 

Hetallne Fall 

Neah Bay 

Orovllle 

Point Roberts 

Port Angeles 

Port Townsend 

Seattle 

Spokane (Felts Field) ... 

Sumas 

Tacoma 

Wisconsin 

Green Bay 

HI Iwaukee 

Racine 



15.6i8 
19. 341 
15.765 

199,932 
32,570 
3,537 
12,347 
20,816 
30,338 
2,439 

100,443 
64,424 
48,886 

273,787 

251,742 
42.299 
20,732 
25,987 
57,172 
33,790 
716 



651.267 



8.974 

12.150 

12,611 

56,035 

19,335 

838 

7.690 

9.878 

18.725 

555 

60,015 

38,372 

25,030 

146,676 

136,455 

22,988 

7.542 

16,785 

29,237 

21,214 

162 



26,249 
16,144 
1.160 

5.263.809 



134,073 
78,020 
2 50,079 
239,195 
10,871 
120,724 
1,265,542 
120,845 
1,044,723 
35.163 
10,449 
367,449 
852,220 
512,561 
6,129 
215,766 

7.054.585 



76,015 

5,313 

3,577.867) 

204.521 

3.373.346 

24 , 69 7 

55,900 

26,061 

149,763 

62,480 

392,358 

57,285 

151 

508,843 

1,186,970 

2,025 

820 

72,298 

6,726 

848,907 



80.000 

65.101 

156.374 

147.606 

1,607 

69,273 
747,778 

76,611 
487,974 

18.809 
8.536 
222.801 
546.703 
321.213 
2.805 
132.010 

4.680.567 



12,014 

1,619 

(2.352.250) 

141,559 

2.210.691 

17,398 

28,240 

19,284 

103,687 

29,601 

208,639 

28,198 



21,829 

2,887 

502,735 



85 



621,444 



1 ,049,180 



6,674 
7.191 
3,154 
143,897 
13,235 
2,699 
4,657 
10.938 
11,613 
1.884 
40.428 
26,052 
23.856 
127,111 
115,287 
19,311 
13,190 
9,202 
27,935 
12,576 



2.176.608 



54.073 
12,919 
93,705 
91,589 
9,264 
51,451 
517,764 
44,234 
556,749 
16.354 
1.913 
144,648 
305,517 
191,348 
3,324 
83,756 

2,374.018 



64.001 

3,694 

:i. 225, 617) 

62,962 

1,162,655 

7,299 

27,660 

6,777 

46,076 

32,879 

183,719 

29,087 

138 

240.146 

104.449 

1,232 

747 

50.469 

3.839 

346,172 



(Hal ton Airport) 



MEXICAN BORDER 

Arizona 

Douglas 2/ 

Lochlel 

Lukevllle 

Nogales 

Grand Avenue 

Morley Avenue 

Nogales International 

Truck Gate 

San Luis 

Tucson International 
Airport 

California 

Andrade 

Calexlco 

Los Angeles (Airport) . 

San Diego 

San Ysidro 2/ 

Tecate 

New Mexico ,j ^, 

Antelope Wells 

Columbus 1^1 

Brownsville 

Corpus Christ! 

Dallas Airport 

Del Rio 

Eagle Pass 

El Paso 21 

El Paso Airport 

Ave. of Americas 

(Cordova) 2/ 

Santa Fe Bridge 2/ .. 

Ysleta Bridge 2/ 

Falcon Heights 2/ 

Fort Hancock 

Hidalgo 2/ 

Houston Airport 

Municipal Airport ... 

Railroad Bridge 

Los Ebanos 

Marathon 

Presidio 

Progreso 

Rio Grande City 2/ 

Roma 2/ 

San Antonio Airport ... 
San Ygnacio 



703 , 306 
195.096 
293.815 
51.958 



19,126,974 



3.976,828 
11.300 
415,392 
1,186.620 
(9,020.581) 
5,839.995 
3,119,593 

6,844 

54.149 

4.394,775 

106.462 



39.626.879 



12.368,316 



TtTeTTTTs?" 

7.358 

113.915 

617,504 

(5,860,845 

3,784.041 

2.038,414 

1.927 



6,758,658 



1,792.269 

3,942 

301,477 

569,116 

3,159.736) 

2,055,954 

1.081.179 

4.917 



15.599,927 



571,766 
13,422,482 

135,215 

11.575 

24,778.592 

707 , 249 

277.659 



1.443 

13.024.470 

436.037 



200.225 
3,243,177 
121,059 
10,132 
11,754,122 
271,212 

140,623 



45,535,764 



9.086.640 

242 

37,225 

2,468,146 

5,570,942 

(35,555,447) 

6,983 



13,997,045 

18.687.329 

2.864,090 

511,766 

600,322 

50,463 

6,418,832 

23,778 

( 11,904.125) 

11.887.345 

5,884 

10,896 

66.857 

8.059 

477.323 

987.572 

255.666 

2,690,637 

98,455 

356 



5,904,021 

54 

1.042 

1,108.456 

3,724.110 

(18,834,479 

1,749 



5,924,398 

11,762,695 

1,145,637 

336,961 

156,021 

35,711 

4,491,724 

968 

(7.940.491; 

7.932.194 

2,888 

5,409 

40,015 

4,876 

285,949 

590,968 

196,013 

1,879,797 

3,784 

324 



3,182,619 

188 

36,183 

1,359,690 

1,846,832 

(16,720,968) 

5.234 

8,072,647 

6,924.634 

1,718,453 

174,805 

444,301 

14,752 

1,927,108 

22.810 

(3,963,634) 

3,955,151 

2.996 

5.487 

26.842 

3.183 

191.374 

396,604 

59,653 

810,840 

94,671 

32 



U Figures Include arrivals by private aircr 

2/ Partially estimated. 

3/ July-September 1967 and May-June 1968. 

4/ July-September 1967. 

5/ July-November 1967 and May-June 1968. 

6/ July-November 1967 and January-June 1968. 

7/ July-October 1967. 

6/ July-October 1967 and May-June 1968. 

9/ July-December 1967 and April-June 1968. 



325-586 O - 



76 



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76 



SPECIAL INQUIRY OFFICER HEARINGS COMPLETED, BY REGIONS AND DISTRICTS: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 196A - 1968 



Region 
and 


Ex 


clusl 


on hearing 






Deportation heai 


ings 




district 


1964 


1965 


1966 


1967 


1968 


1964 


1965 


1966 


1967 


1968 


U.S. Total 


951 
156 


841 


876 


858 


946 


15,677 


18,961 


16,767 


18,682 


19,811 


Northeast Region 


150 


136 


111 


145 


5,720 


7,809 


6,396 


6,938 


7,500 




30 


33 


25 


20 


27 


319 


319 


382 


375 


495 


Buffalo, N.Y 


38 


36 


38 


28 


42 


298 


283 


252 


270 


272 


Hartford, Conn 


A 


4 


2 


1 


3 


121 


129 


152 


162 


151 


Newark, N.J 


18 


6 


2 


2 


11 


345 


441 


427 


540 


787 


New York, N.Y 


49 


58 


64 


55 


54 


4,604 


6,605 


5,158 


5,579 


5,774 




16 
1 


9 

4 


5 


5 


8 


22 
11 


14 
18 


18 

7 


6 
6 


14 


St. Albans, Vt 


7 


Southeast Region 


220 


121 


167 


142 


154 


1.031 


1,079 


1,790 


1,619 


1,962 




2 


3 


1 
4 


3 


4 
6 


56 
64 


54 
67 


88 
114 


141 
148 


166 


Baltimore, Md 


144 


Cleveland, Ohio 


6 


4 


4 


2 


1 


140 


143 


124 


137 


131 


Miami Fla 


195 
3 


61 

2 


53 

4 


78 
3 


78 

1 


267 
58 


298 
48 


558 
75 


386 
61 


610 


New Orleans, La 


64 


Philadelphia, Pa 


- 


11 


5 


7 


5 


171 


158 


169 


209 


265 


San Juan, P.R 


13 


37 


91 


43 


53 


119 


183 


467 


306 


347 


Washington, D.C 


1 


3 


5 


6 


6 


156 


128 


195 


231 


235 


Northwest Region 


78 


82 


72 


134 


100 


1,657 


1,775 


2,222 


2,557 


2,655 


Anchorage, Alaska 


- 


. 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


10 


7 


8 


Chicago 111 


15 

48 


19 
31 


11 

28 


20 
43 


13 

25 


835 
299 


856 
326 


1,293 

334 


1,456 
422 


1,509 


Detroit , Mich 


475 




1 
1 


6 

2 


2 


5 
6 


6 


28 
62 


46 
72 


21 
70 


32 
89 


40 


Kansas City, Mo 


68 




: 


3 

1 


2 


2 


2 


50 
54 


42 
49 


56 
73 


26 
98 


28 


Portland, Ore 


-71 


St. Paul, Minn 


- 


- 


2 


2 


2 


109 


113 


95 


115 


128 


Seattle, Wash 


13 


20 


26 


56 


52 


220 


270 


270 


312 


328 


Southwest Region 


497 


488 


501 


471 


547 


7,269 


8.298 


6,359 


7,568 


7,694 




4 

207 

3 


3 

219 

4 


3 

198 

3 


132 
2 


3 
167 

5 


102 

2,000 

45 


47 

2,221 

40 


47 

1,268 

34 


80 

1,219 

40 


92 




2,038 


Honolulu, Hawaii 


57 


Los Angeles, Calif. ... 


85 


66 


129 


100 


136 


2,165 


2,137 


2,036 


2,802 


2,409 


Phoenix, Ariz 


9 


12 


9 


9 


32 


106 


97 


88 


82 


66 


Port Isabel, Tex 


35 


50 


23 


30 


21 


1,345 


2,272 


1,292 


1,434 


1,220 


San Antonio, Tex 


140 


117 


131 


190 


138 


454 


440 


689 


826 


846 


San Francisco, Calif. . 


14 


17 


5 


8 


45 


1,052 


1,044 


905 


1,085 


966 



77 



ALIENS EXCLUDED FROM THE UNITED STATES, BY CAUSE: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1892-1968 



/In 1941-1953 figures represent all exclusions at sea and air ports 
and exclusions of aliens seeking entry for 30 days or longer at land porta 
After 1953 Includes aliens excluded after formal hearings^/ 



3 u 

>, 3 2 



1892 - 1968 

1892 - 1900 

1901 - 1910 

I9I1 - 1920 

1921 - 1930 

1931 - 1940 

1941 - 1950 

1941 

1942 

1943 

1944 

1945 

1946 

1947 

1948 

1949 

1950 

1951 - I960 

1951 

1952 

1953 

1954 

1955 

1956 

1957 

1958 

1959 

1960 

1961 

1962 

1963 

1964 

1965 

1966 

1967 

1968 



620.937 



1.312 



12.459 



82.547 



219.356 



16.173 



41.941 



13.679 



• 22,515 
108,211 
178,109 
189,307 
68,217 

30.263 



65 
1,681 
4,353 
2,082 
1,261 

1.134 



1,277 

4,824 

1,281 

253 

80 



1,309 
24,425 
42,129 
11,044 

1,530 

1.021 



15,070 
63,311 
90,045 
37,175 
12,519 

1.072 



1,904 
8,447 
2,126 

3.182 



94,084 
47,858 



22.441 



5,792 

12,991 

15,417 

6,274 

1,235 

Zll 



5,083 

8,202 

258 



2,929 
1,833 
1,495 
1,642 
2,341 

2,942 
4,771 
4,905 
3,834 
3,571 

20.585 



1.098 



139 
142 
187 
199 

1.735 



65 
124 
205 
112 
125 



227 
252 
77 
155 
161 

361 
902 
709 
216 
122 



2,076 
1,207 
1,106 
1,109 
1,805 

2,294 
3,316 
3,690 
2,970 
2,868 

14.657 



3,784 
2,944 
3,637 
3,313 
2,667 

1,709 
907 
733 
480 
411 

743 
388 
309 
421 
429 

512 
468 
460 



117 
302 
255 
102 
36 

21 
13 
11 
16 
12 



337 
285 
266 
29 6 
206 

169 
91 
51 



337 
67 
130 
127 
113 



2,783 
2,378 
2,937 
2,432 
1,832 

1,079 
348 
299 
276 
29 3 

634 
280 
216 
343 
333 

415 
322 
323 



78 



ALIENS EXCLUDED, BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH AND CAUSE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1968 



Country or region 
of birth 



Al 1 countries 

Europe 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Italy 

Spain . . 

Turkey, (Europe & Asia) 

United Kingdom 

Other Europe 

Asia 

Hong Kong 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Philippines 

China U Taiwan 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic .... 

Jamaica 

Trinidad £. Tobago 

Antiqua 

St. Christopher 

Other West Indies 

British Honduras 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Nicaragua 

Other Central America . 

South America 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Co lombia 

Ecuador 

Guyana 

Peru '. 

Africa 

South Africa 

Other Africa 

Oceania 



28 
251 



79 



ALIENS APPREHENDED, ALIENS DEPORTED, AND ALIENS REQUIRED TO DEPART: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1892-1968 



Aliens 
apprehended _!/ 



Aliens 



Aliens 
deported 



Aliens required 
to depart 2^1 



1892 - 1968 

189 2 - 1900 

1901 - 1910 

1911 - 1920 

1921 - 1930 

1931 - 19A0 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

1936 

1937 

1938 

1939 

1940 

1941 - 1950 

1941 

194Z 

1943 

1944 

1945 

1946 

1947 

1948 

1949 

1950 

1951 - 1960 

1951 

1952 

1953 

1954 

1955 

19 56 

1957 

19 58 

1959 

1960 

1961 

1962 

1963 

1964 

1965 

1966 

19 67 

1968 



128,484 



,276 
,735 
,949 
,319 
,016 
,728 
,054 
,851 
,037 
,492 



1,377.210 



11 

11 

11 

31 

69 

99 

193 

192 

288 

468 



,294 
,784 
,175 
,174 
,164 
,591 
,657 
,779 
,253 
,339 



3.584.229 



509,040 

528,815 

885,587 

1,089,583 

254,096 

87,69 6 

59,918 

53,474 

45,336 

70,684 

88,823 
92,758 
88,712 
86,597 
110,371 
138,520 
161,608 
212,0' 7 



).871.c 



22 



561.552 



3,127 

11,558 

27,912 

164,390 

210.416 



29,861 
30,201 
30,212 
16,889 
16,297 
17,446 
17,617 
18,553 
17,792 
15,548 



10,938 

10,613 

16,154 

39 , 449 

80,760 

116,320 

214,543 

217,555 

29 6,337 

579,105 

^.013,547 



686,713 

723,959 

905,236 

1,101,228 

247,797 

88,188 

68,461 

67,742 

64,59 8 

59,625 

59,821 
61,801 
76,846 
81,788 
105,406 
132,851 
151,603 
189,082 



3,127 
11,558 
27,912 
92,157 

117.086 



18,142 
19,426 
19,865 
8,879 
8,319 
9,195 
8,829 
9,275 
8,202 
6,954 

110.849 



4,407 

3,709 

4.207 

7,179 

11,270 

14,375 

18,663 

20,371 

20,040 

6,628 

129,887 



13,544 

20,181 

19,845 

26,951 

15,028 

7,297 

5,082 

7,142 

7,988 

6,829 

7,438 
7,637 
7,454 
8,746 
10,143 
9,168 
9,260 
9,130 



72,233 



93.J30 



11,719 
10,775 
10,347 
8,010 
7,978 
8,251 
8,788 
9,278 
9,590 
8,594 



6,531 

6,904 

11,947 

32,270 

69,490 

101,945 

19 5,880 

197,184 

276,297 

572,477 

3.883.660 



673,169 

703,778 

885,391 

1,074,277 

232,769 

80,891 

63,379 

60,600 

56,610 

52,796 

52,383 
54,164 
69,392 
73,042 
95,263 
123,683 
142,343 
179,952 



\l. Aliens apprehended first recorded in 1925. Since 1960, deportable aliens located has 

included nonwillful crewman violators, 
2/ Aliens required to depart first recorded in 1927. 



80 



J 



Country to which deported 


To«al 


1^ 


1 


2 


^1 


1^ 


1 1 
> -o 


1 1 
u a 


2; i 

^ a c 


« a w 


1 


All Countries 


9,130 




266 


21 


137 


8 


345 


1,356 


3,200 


3,777 


20 




9^.2 




39 


2 


7 


2 


21 


19 


78 5 


66 


1 




16 
97 
459 
13 
68 
19 
23 
17 
81 
9 
83 
12 
45 

589 




3 
10 
2 
3 

2 
2 

1 

11 
1 

4 

4 


1 

1 


I 
1 

2 

1 
2 

3 


1 

1 

1 


4 
6 

2 

3 

4 
2 
2 


2 
1 
6 

1 

2 

1 
1 

4 

1 

5 


7 
7S 
409 
10 
56 
13 
21 
15 
68 

8 
55 

9 
36 

524 


3 
2 
35 

6 

2 
I 
6 

7 
2 
2 

50 










1 




































_ 




. 


Asia 






259 
21 
12 
13 
45 
17 
42 

130 
50 

7,153 




1 

1 

2 
208 


13 


1 

2 
122 


1 
4 


1 
295 


2 

1 

1 

1 
1,317 


218 
19 
11 
11 
44 
17 
38 

123 
43 

1,567 


37 

1 
1 

2 
5 

4 

3,609 




































North America 


16 




852 
5,208 
27 
17 
33 
102 
146 
11 
18 
75 
40 
55 
40 
155 
291 
38 
19 
26 

364 


- 


122 
75 

1 

1 

3 

2 
1 
1 

1 

1 
10 


10 

2 

1 
5 


26 
85 

1 

1 
2 

1 

2 
2 

4 


2 
2 


144 
127 

2 
26 


69 
1,175 

1 

1 
4 
4 

21 
2 

5 
3 
7 
16 
3 
2 
4 

U 


417 
313 
25 
13 
31 
87 
132 
11 
14 
45 
33 
12 
29 
116 
243 
20 
12 
14 

264 


60 
3,412 

1 

5 
8 

1 
9 
1 
30 
7 
30 
26 
13 
3 
3 

44 






17 












. 




. 














Trinidad and Tobago 


1 




































28 
21 
56 
110 
60 
42 
16 
19 
12 

39 




2 

6 

1 
1 


4 

1 


3 

1 




2 
20 
2 
2 


2 
2 

1 
4 
1 

1 
2 


19 
16 
29 
73 
54 
34 
12 
17 
10 

33 


1 
3 
24 
4 

1 
4 
3 
2 
2 

4 










































16 




1 










1 


13 


1 






13 
3 

27 




1 
4 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 
1 


10 

3 

14 


1 
3 










1 







81 






Belgli"" 

Czechoslovukia 

Finland 

Franca 

Cermany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norvay 

Poland 

Portugal 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

United Kingdom 

VugOBlavla 

Other Europe 

India 7 

Iran 

Israel 

Jordan 2/ 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Thailand 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic . 

Haiti 

Barbados 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

South America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Paraguay 

PerM 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 

Africa 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

Other Oceania 

Other countries 



elude 



82 



All 



AuaCrla 

Denmark 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Utvla 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Spain 

Sweden 

Turkey 

United Kingdom 

Yugoelavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China y 

India 

Iran 

1 raq 

Jordan 2/ 

Malaysia 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Barbados 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic . 
Haiti 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

South America 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Nigeria 

Other Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

Tonga 

Other countries 



83 



lied 179,952 (s 



able 23). This table 



All Countries ... 

Europe 

Denmark 

France 

Greece 

Iceland 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Nor^^y 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

Hong Kong 

India 

Iran 

Israel 

Korea 

Philippines 

liilwan 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Netherlands Antilles 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Dominican Republic . 

Haiti 

Other West Indies . . 
British Honduras ... 

Costa Rlca 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

South America 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Guyana 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

Other Oceania 

Other Countries 



84 



TABLE 25. ALIENS DEPORTED, 



which deported 



Other 



Steamship 
companies 



Alie 
depcr 



Aliens 
reshipped 



All countries . . . 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

Hong Kong 

India 

Iran 

Israel 

Japan 

Malaysia 

Philippines 

Taiwan 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

Antigua 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Dominican Republic . 

Jamaica 

Netherlands Antilles 

St. Christopher 

Trinidad and Tobago 
Other West Indies .. 
British Honduras .. . 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

South America 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

Other Oceania 

Other countries 



852 
5,208 



7.412 



147 
285 



85 



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86 



TABLE 26A 



ALIENS DEPORTED, BY COUNTRY TO WHICH DEPORTED: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 19 59-1968 



Country to which deported 


1959- 
1968 


19 59 


I960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1954 


1965 


1956 


1967 


1958 


All Countries 


83,793 


7,988 


6.829 


7.438 


7,637 


7,454 


8,746 


10,143 


9,158 


9,260 


9,130 


























Europe 


13,821 


2,008 


1,541 


1,676 


1,503 


1,015 


1,150 


1,213 


.1,450 


1,323 


942 


Denmark 


202 
196 
991 

5,778 
137 

1,877 
376 
439 
319 

1,292 
168 
250 

1,062 
2 70 
464 

3,789 


26 
20 

122 

749 
10 

409 
70 
72 
69 

163 
19 
37 

105 
54 
83 

293 


18 
15 
91 

610 
14 

282 
53 
45 
34 

118 
27 
26 

119 
43 
46 

246 


34 
26 
90 

680 
19 

255 
47 
50 
21 

147 
22 
29 

152 
50 
54 

277 


35 
17 

148 

562 
8 

215 
28 
30 
25 

168 
19 
36 

135 
28 
49 

416 


14 
24 
69 

363 
16 

133 
29 
36 
32 

111 
12 
32 
93 
22 
29 

192 


10 

18 
78 

479 
19 

134 
42 
41 
30 

110 
14 
29 
90 
14 
42 

225 


17 
20 

102 

513 
14 

135 
30 
35 
30 

134 
12 
26 
87 
13 
44 

373 


24 
17 

103 

706 
13 

153 
17 
52 
37 

117 
20 
15 

107 
14 
35 

660 


17 
23 
91 

557 
11 
82 
41 
45 
24 

143 
14 
12 
91 
20 
52 

518 


7 
16 






Greece 

Ireland 


459 
13 
68 




19 




23 




17 




81 




9 


Turkey (Europe and Asia) .. 


8 
83 




12 




30 




589 




1,167 
189 
142 
125 
377 

81 
106 
139 

91 
447 
544 
381 

63,034 


57 
13 
10 
12 
14 
5 
10 
11 
12 
43 
31 
75 

5,470 


34 
10 
9 
10 
20 
7 
8 
14 
16 
67 
10 
41 

4,858 


38 
11 
17 
13 
18 
7 
10 
9 
8 
32 
33 
81 

5,044 


171 
8 
13 
16 
40 
9 
12 
14 
9 
41 
48 
35 

5,433 


45 

12 
1 
19 
34 
8 
9 
6 
4 
25 
18 
11 

5,957 


37 
12 
1 
12 
68 
14 
14 
3 
3 
31 
11 
19 

7,129 


90 

22 
21 
12 
48 

6 
11 
35 

9 
51 
41 
27 

8,227 


270 
34 
27 
9 
47 
13 
12 
20 
11 
59 

123 
25 

5,705 


156 
46 
31 

9 
43 

6 
13 
10 

7 
46 
99 
42 

7,058 


259 




21 




12 




13 




45 


Jordon 


6 




7 




17 




12 




42 




130 




25 




7.153 




10,129 
46,078 
228 
402 
286 
829 
894 
130 
162 
341 
1,075 
700 
137 
467 
600 
254 
99 
223 

2,139 


992 
3,608 
21 
127 
25 
23 
76 
8 
4 
15 
396 
72 
8 
20 
30 
23 
6 
16 

177 


881 
3,442 

4 
55 
20 
15 
54 

8 

2 
23 
196 
70 

8 
22 
21 
U 

5 
11 

116 


1,151 
3,404 

5 
22 
22 

2 
55 

9 

2 
29 
156 
56 

6 
37 
25 
29 

6 

8 

138 


1,205 
3,743 
25 
39 
31 
33 
54 

7 
18 
21 
70 
53 

9 
31 
27 
18 

9 
39 

183 


1,098 
4,405 
13 
26 
13 
68 
46 
11 
7 
23 
42 
60 
16 
45 
36 
23 
10 
15 

183 


1,003 
5,557 
20 
28 
19 
107 
82 
6 
7 
28 
43 
79 
12 
49 
29 
21 
8 
31 

170 


1,044 
6,518 
28 
34 
22 
181 
95 
21 
20 
47 
36 
58 
11 
31 
22 
19 
15 
23 

230 


964 
4,770 
58 
28 
74 
158 
207 
37 
55 
36 
48 
92 
13 
43 
46 
40 
9 
25 

287 


938 
5,423 
27 
26 
27 
140 
68 
12 
28 
44 
38 
95 
14 
34 
73 
32 
11 
28 

291 


852 




5,208 




27 




17 


Barbados 

Dominican Republic 


33 
102 
145 


Netherlands Antilles 


11 
IB 


Trinidad and Tobago 


75 
40 




55 




40 




155 


Guatemala 


291 
38 




19 




26 




364 




199 
134 
329 
709 
178 

73 
253 

43 
178 

43 

235 


22 
16 
39 
24 
20 
6 
14 

28 
8 

17 


14 

5 
22 
30 
10 

6 
11 

2 
13 

3 

15 


18 
9 

27 

44 
4 
5 

17 
2 
9 
3 

23 


21 
20 
31 

53 
7 
7 

15 
3 

22 
4 

22 


15 
10 
29 
56 
12 

5 
39 

3 
11 

3 

23 


19 
10 
34 
58 

4 

9 
17 

5 
13 

1 

24 


26 
13 
26 
100 

5 

7 
21 

2 
28 

1 

17 


13 
21 
30 
115 
23 

8 
40 

4 
21 
11 

20 


23 
9 
35 

118 
32 
13 
37 

6 
14 

4 

35 


28 




21 


Chile 


56 




110 


Ecuador 


60 

7 


Peru 


42 


Venezuela 


16 
19 




5 
39 


Oceania 


194 


16 


19 


31 


23 


17 


16 


13 


12 


31 


16 




144 
50 

581 


11 

5 

7 


16 

3 

34 


19 
12 

249 


17 
6 

57 


15 
2 

57 


10 
6 

32 


9 
4 

70 


7 
5 

34 


27 
4 

4 


13 




3 


Other Countries 


27 


















. 



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TABLE 28. ALIEN CREUMEN DESERTED AT UNITED STATES AIR AND SEAPORTS, 



rler froii uMch de«erted 



Norvay 

Poland 

Portugal 

Stain 

Sweden 

Switzerland . 

Turkey 

United Klngdoi 
Yugoslavia .. 
Other Europe 



Korea 

Malaysia . 
Pakistan . 
Philippine 
Singapore 
Other Asia 



orth Anerica 

Canada 

Mexico 

Barbados 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic , 
Haiti 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Costa Rica 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 



Ch<le .. 
Colombia 
Ecuador 



Other South 



Other Afric 



ting crewnen reported by ships' mas' 



and those found In the United States by Servic 



325-586 O - 69 - 7 



91 



VESSELS AND AIRPLANES INSPECTED, CREWMEN ADMITTED, ALIEN CREWMEN DESERTED, 
AND ALIEN STOWAWAYS FOUND, BY LOCATION: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1968 

/Each arrival of the same carrier or crewmen counted separatelyT 





Vessels and 


alrolanes 






Aliens y 


Allen 


Location 


insoected on arrival 


Crewmen a 


draltted 


deserted 


stowaways 




Vessels 


Airplanes 


Aliens 


Citizens 


found 


United States Total .... 


77,554 


293,257 


2,086,366 


1,068,035 


4,866 


122 


Northeast Region 


17,373 


61,276 


690,436 


236,826 


2,098 


53 


Boston, Mass 


1,219 


4,857 


41,641 


13,013 


155 


1 


Buffalo, N.Y 


A, 898 


9,484 


13,263 


10,346 


3 


- 


Hartford , Conn 


209 


391 


6,984 


669 


79 


- 


Newark, N. J 


_ 


2,251 


2,306 


13,103 


552 


8 


New York, N. Y 


5,196 


37,540 


592,793 


192,233 


1,247 


44 


Portland, Me 


5,447 


2,240 


32,936 


4,472 


62 


- 


St. Albans, Vt 


404 


4,513 


513 


2,990 


- 


- 


Southeast Region 


31,330 


83,847 


757,445 


277,135 


1,723 


41 


Altanta, Ga 


2,152 


774 


64,503 


14,786 


156 


2 


Baltimore, Md 


1,442 


281 


49,827 


7,673 


242 


5 


Cleveland, Ohio 


1,880 


5,718 


51,251 


7,503 


16 


1 


Miami, Fla 


12,001 


51,244 


275,958 


128,137 


342 


4 


New Orleans, La 


2,277 


1,890 


70,624 


22,942 


409 


3 


Philadelphia, Pa 


1,506 


1,398 


57,637 


8,494 


321 


5 


San Juan, P. R 


8,553 


20,309 


141,723 


63,766 


122 


12 


Washington, D. C 


1,519 


2,233 


45,922 


23,834 


115 


9 


Northwest Region 


17,180 


47,491 


189,948 


118,890 


289 


4 


Anchorage , Alaska 


1,390 


5,151 


32,254 


25,474 


1 


- 


Chicago, 111 


634 


4,953 


33,461 


14,736 


43 


2 


Detroit, Mich 


2,379 


7,769 


19,536 


11,621 


18 


- 


Helena, Mont 


13 


3,160 


701 


4,517 


- 


- 


Kansas City, Mo 


_ 


253 


71 


288 


- 


- 


Omaha, Nebr 


_ 


87 


61 


74 


- 


- 


Portland, Oreg 


1,253 


742 


36,749 


8,878 


114 


2 


St. Paul, Minn 


181 


12,318 


2,156 


5,390 


7 


- 


Seattle, Wash 


1 1 , 330 


13,058 


64,959 


47,912 


106 


- 


Southwest Region 


10,480 


54,541 


323,308 


236,982 


756 


6 


Denver, Col 


- 


447 


382 


673 


- 


- 


El Paso, Texas 


_ 


2,308 


26 


97 


- 


- 


Honolulu, Hawaii 


1,589 


10,753 


78,595 


79,832 


17 


1 


Los Angeles, Calif 


4,932 


14,371 


123,253 


57,902 


207 


1 


Phoenix, Ariz 


_ 


6,701 


1,567 


154 


- 


- 


Port Isabel, Texas 


2,524 


4,540 


77,815 


18,755 


283 


1 


San Antonio , Texas 


_ 


10,168 


4,886 


16,676 


- 


- 


San Francisco, Calif 


1,435 


5,253 


36,784 


62,893 


249 


3 


Preinspection Offices 


1,191 


46,102 


125,229 


198,202 


_ 


_ 


Hamilton, Bermuda 


35 


2,939 


7,731 


18,146 


- 


- 


Montreal, Canada 


_ 


11,211 


28,821 


36,652 


- 


- 


Nassau, Bahamas 


_ 


7,488 


15,125 


30,007 


- 


- 


Toronto , Canada 


_ 


19,175 


45,201 


58,890 


- 


- 


Vancouver , Canada 


I 


4,082 


7,118 


22,272 


- 


- 


Victoria, Canada 


1,155 


_ 


20,640 


24,653 


- 


- 


Winnipeg, Canada 


_ 


1,156 


558 


7,175 


- 


- 


Frankfurt , Germany 


- 


51 


35 


407 


- 


- 


Border Patrol Sectors 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


18 









!_/. Includes deserting crewmen reported by ships' masters 
Service officers. 



and those found in the United States by 



92 



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1 







PASSENGERS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES, By SEA AND AIR, FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES, BV COUNTRY OF EMBARKATIONr 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 19 6S 



Belgium 

CzechoslovakU 

Finland 

France 

Gibraltar 

Iceland 

Ireland 

Italy 

Luxembourg 

Monaco 

Netherlands 

Portugal 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Unl ted Kl ngdoa 

U.S.S.R 

Yugoslavia 

Asia 

Bonln Islands 

Burma , 

Cyprus 

Hong Kong 

India 

Israel 

Laos 

Lebanon 

Halaysla , 

Nepal 

Pakistan 

Palestine 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Island* 

Saudi Arabia 

Singapore ■ . . . 

Taiwan 

Thailand 

Timor 

Vietnam 

Africa 

Algeria 

Cape Verde Islands 

Congo, Republic of the 

Dahomey 

Ethiopia 

Ghana 

Ivory Coast 

Liberia 

Libya 

Horocco 

Hozaabique 

Nl8«rl« 

St. H<len* 

Sen«g4l 

Slerr* Uona 

South Africa 

Tanganyika 

Tunisia 

Uganda 

Unltad Arab Rapubllc (Egypt) 



Ul,5i2 
5.852 
351.958 
485.487 
650 
64.31 
62,935 
139.379 
280,841 
20.463 



742 

110,487 

145,543 

18,769 

99,099 

8,456 

838,318 

310 

2,323 



4,085 

53.187 

352,454 

4,718 



1,214 
1,164 
1,853 



30,027 

1,370 
59.488 
3.561 
134,883 
165,590 
188 
30,463 
26,731 
43,508 
103,466 
10,532 



34,575 
61,055 
10,740 
35,898 



1,539 

16,397 

189,016 

2,171 



44,275 

1,052 

62,054 

2,291 

217,075 

319,897 

462 

33,854 

36,204 

95,871 

177,375 

9,931 



363 
75.912 
84,488 
8.029 
63,201 
7,535 
475,666 
171 



2,546 

36,790 

163,438 

2,547 



5.558 
6,554 
3,355 



1,449 
2,903 
2,343 



1,214 
1,164 
1.853 



29,377 

61 

1,370 

58.524 

3.426 

124,063 

156,603 

25,977 
26,679 
43,136 
83,701 
10,532 



337,213 

108 

1,034 



29,123 


13,213 


5,764 


4,412 


314 


237 


4,073 


1.527 


50,922 


15,052 


343,321 


183,987 


4,701 


2,160 



94 



TABLE 31 . PASSENGERS ARRIV 



OF EHBAUCATIOH: 



AaerlcAn S«ao« 

ChrlBttMa laUrtd 

"Jl 

New Caledonia 

Naw Zea land 

Pacific lalanda (U.S. Ada.) . 

Polynaala (Prancti) 

Uaka and Hlduay Island 

North America 

Canada 

Greenland 

Mexico 

Waac Lndlaa 

Bahamaa 

BarbadoB 

Berauda 

Cayman lalanda 

Cgl>a 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Antigua 

British Virgin lalanda .. 

St. Chrlatophar 

Martinique 

Netherlands Antilles 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Turks end Calcoa lalanda .. 
UindMttrd lalanda: 

Grenada 

St. Uicia 

St. Vincent 

Central America 

Brltiah Honduraa 

Canal Zone and Panama 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Nicaragua 

A'«e"tl"« 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chil 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Guiana (Franch) 

Paraguay 

Surlnaa (Netharlanda Gulan«) 
Uruguay 

Bermuda 

Caribbean 

Airopa and Madlterranean .... 

Far Bast 

Southern South Aaarlca 

World cculaa 

Other countrlea 

Flag of carrier: 

United States 

Foreign 

"*~ScIu 



!. 937. 251 
75,042 
2.074 
709,522 
,931.340) 
781,481 
44,732 
239,272 
12,367 
45,552 
144 , 3B9 



90,763 
49,156 
1,263 



(219,273) 
8.759 
86,297 



397.282 
174,574 
37.196 
145,473 
9,647 
4,408 
2,991 
3,521 
19,472 



373.252 
166,319 
35.843 
132,6 
9,411 
4,146 
2,861 
3,374 
18,629 



2,098 

(57,615 

9,073 



174,574 
37,196 
145,473 
9,647 
4,408 
2,991 
3,521 
19,472 



1,239 
41.337) 
3,022 



(3,122) 
2,523 



8,255 
1.353 

12,804 



166,319 
35,843 
132,669 
9,411 
4,146 
2,861 
3,374 
18,629 



34,400 
21,739 
4,369 



44,645 
237,795 
12,355 
45,531 
144,245 
14,836 
29,479 
322,169 



89,407 
48,756 
1.283 



9,776 
11,974 
10.673 



4,347 
22,426 
11.066 

3.900 



619 



457.328 

)|a,285,277) 

636.388 

24,990 

209,162 

8.187 

3.344 

41,361 

6,538 

10.574 

209.765 

36.537 
7,981 
14 
2.444 
3.239 
63.387 
18.512 
1.171 

394 



(97,587) 
4.200 
49,001 
5,467 
9,998 
19,873 
5,744 
3,304 

1^2-791 
12,387 

1,352 
29,524 

5.613 
25.163 

7.373 



554 



95 



TABLE 32. PASSENGHIS DEPARTED 



REICN COUNTRIES, BY COUNTRY OF DEBARKATION; 



All CI 

Europe ,., 
Austria 
Belgium 
Czechosl' 



Cerinany 
Clbralt 

Iceland 



6.370.075 2.303. 



58,008 
2,239 
168,713 
341 ,858 
739 
39,333 
49,829 
91,957 
175,975 



9, US 

166 

2.841 



United Arab Republic (Egypt) 



67,499 
78,656 
8,634 
61,210 



Kuualt 

Lebanon 

Malaysia 

Pakistan 

Philippines .. 
Ryukyu Islands 
Saudi Arabia . 
Singapore 



2,299 

7 

4,464 



2,800 
7.513 
5,181 
9,933 



1,108 
16,610 
163,922 



2,805 
56,940 
178,947 



3,913 
71,172 
336,903 



1,108 
15,583 
161,068 



Islands 



Cape V. 

Congo, Republic of the 

Dshoney 

Ethiopia 

Ghana 

Liberia 

Libya 

Morocco 

Nigeria ...'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 
St. Helena 

Sierra Leone 

South Africa 

Tanganyika 

Tanzania 

Tunisia 



1.169 

388 
1,250 



2,653 
3,224 
2,665 



3,297 
3,294 
2,388 



96 



PASS&NCERS DEPARTED I 



lES. BY COIiNTRY I 





toa 








land 








g 







12,304 
11.979 
10.051 



Creenlai 



3.710 

(46,683) 

6,513 



lique 



Trinidad and Tobago 
Turks and Calcos Isli 
Windward Islands: 

Grenada 

St. Vincent 

British Honduras ... 
Canal Zone and Fanam 



3,426 

141 

00,556) 



403.466 
170,313 
38,396 
155,611 
8,760 
3,934 
3,267 
2,993 
20.192 



8.146 
1,378 
12,519 



162,167 
37,018 
143,092 



between Unit 



97 



PASSENGER THAVEL BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND FOREIGN COUN-miES. 
BY SEA AND AIR. BY PORT OF ARRIVAL OR DEPARTURE; * 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1968 



126,814 



Port Everglades 
Vest Palm Beach 



McCulre A.F.B 

Newark 

New York 

Niagara FalU 



Alaska, Anchorage 



Port Everglades 
Vest Pala Beach 



Hawaii, Honolulu 






McCblre A.F.B. 

Neork 

New York 

Niagara Falls 
Cleveland .... 
Philadelphia . 

San Juan 

Charleston ... 

Henphis 

Brownsville .. 

Dallas 

Hidalgo 

Houston 



175 



344.37 5 
7.866 

131.515 
2,169 
71,541 
4,548 



91.291 

36.626 

3,309,447 

12.570 

6,158 
47 , 790 
324,023 
12,312 

2,667 

5,349 
39.17 

5,360 
63,219 
143,000 

5,109 
98,527 

2,560 
42,169 
93.533 

5.464 
25,362 



109,228 

5,662 

125,514 

8,417 

11,269 

32 

17,033 

669 

378,612 

15,052 

1.733 

4,364 

28,171 
176,043 
61,914 
29,169 

3,146 



,550 

3,74 



2.027 
5,098 
2,313 
26,413 



50,13V 
2,206 
22,767 
27,423 



.,645,045 

22,963 

9,199 

200 . 196 

3.915 

87.671 

1,128 

49,146 

3,504 

788,703 

104,723 

2,356 

53,068 

4,701 

25,703 

174,153 

197,065 

72,169 

26,035 

114,800 

33,825 

83,877 

34,274 

,040,090 

6,675 

5,673 

37,355 

134,426 

11,232 

1,973 

3,256 

34.960 

3,036 

36,056 

97,713 

4,150 

46.232 

245 

15,879 

31,021 

3,977 

17,922 



47,684 

8,801 

197,916 

12,921 



713,020 193.222 



758.352 

73.346 

3,603 

49,267 

357 

47,019 

167,888 

183,627 

68,235 

41,210 

144,046 

13,423 

120,676 

25,300 

2.035,608 

5,923 

2,061 

22,401 

117,386 

10,893 

2,301 

2,985 

36.068 

3.404 

37,258 

84,970 

6,266 

73,826 

236 

15,351 

63,302 

2,203 

10,960 



19.671 
3.776 



2.832 
170.258 



5.173 
1,120 



5.185 
1,604 
5.840 



2,023 
5,098 
2,313 
26,379 



15.716 
2.206 
22.741 
27,081 



land borders (cxcapt Kexican sir travel), crewaen, military personnel. 



between the United States < 



.lEFfi WHO REPORTED UNDER THE ALIEN ADDRESS PROGRAM, 
;CTED STATES OF RESIDENCE AND NATIONALITY I/: 
DURING 1968 



92 



IV 

if 





^ 


s 


£ 


a 


s 


i 


2 


5 


s 


-3 — 


1= 


1 


R 


!- 


! 


::- 


5 


5 


3 


:■ 


1 


g 


i 


i 


3 


s 


. 


' 


I 


i 


s 


s 


s 


s 


! 


:- 


!- 


:- 


:- 


s 


R 


^- 


!- 


3 


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! 


-■ 


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:- 


s 


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-sis 

g.2 


8 


-■''°°' S"'S-^'s"'~'-'2'^'~'-"-'"--'sS'~' ■'' -'--'S g~' o'-'-'S '"'-'' -'2~' -n-« -'-■- 


II 


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3 




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= -«~sS5_H3!-3sS^ = iSSJ.s53s°-sS/oS2s_3sp§^ -=' 


1=1 


S 


- s 


1 


! 


S5 8ssK|sssPsssssss25S|5^ssssss3sg!g::|sag|;;2S|ssg£Ss:2 ~s~ 


1 


^ 


5"58s23SR|SS_Sg_S82SgSSS = SS5S82SSS|3SSS2gS83£S|S||S2S £- 


. ! 


s 


:■ :■ - - 2 :■ :- 




^ 


35a~2 = 3-SS-§SSSSS§SS5sisSa533SSS|SSSgS5S^S££S::Sg5r 8- 


■S-r 


s' 




■g 


s 


S^SSp|2S = 3- = ggS£SSS5||32gS2S3 52gSS|3S^_|S-5§gS2PS|= '2' 


1 


s 




3 


i 




1 
s 


s 




1 1 


1 




1 


i 


'^rE5r^!5P!§r'^!?E5!^'r!!!^|rr!!P''^ ''- 


1 


< 


S235p.?-s^.5sg|SSS-FSss3°S.SsSSssS.B-?^ss--^ -r 


4i 


§ 




52 
(J (2 


£ 




1 


3 


1 

J 


, 








1- 


; 




i 


J 


X Z 


: 




1 




1 






1 


J 
1 


I 




I 




1 




1 






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J 


i 






1 


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^ 


> 




J 




3 




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1 



100 



TABLE 36. ALIEN POPULATION. 



' STATES OP ReSIDENCEi 1940, 1951, I960, 

ttratlon of 1940, sU«n •ddrcts rcportt r« 
1951, 1960, •fid 1964 through 1963/ 



Stat* of 




Number 




p.rcn, 


Real dene* 


IMO 


1951 


1940 


1964 


1945 


1946 


1967 


1968 


1940 


1951 


1960 


1964 


1965 


1964 


1967 


1969 


^^^^^ 


s.oM.ei^ 


2.265.032 


2.948.973 


3.335.591 


3,393,209 


3.482.553 
























IM, 138 
5,167 

17.310 
47,233 

303. 103 
13)777 

ie.«3 
t.iie 

30.538 

279, 199 

1, 257)501 

loi4B2 

203,038 

2,188 

5)137 
213,898 
10,497 

15,927 
10,093 
81,634 

75)127 
5,917 

14,BS4 
3,853 

6,528 


24)061 
326) 158 

13,508 
71,223 
2,571 

26)oil 

3,061 

66,181 

3,791 

110,563 

7)678 
18,931 

22,156 

6)897 
118.580 

2)811 
98)481 

8)848 

45)097 
6.940 

17.293 
2.108 

24 
3,193 
1,378 

11,965 


2)597 
35,163 
2,147 

75)299 

n)766 
83,577 

9,004 

51,316 

4,882 

199,405 

9,938 
10,650 

28,411 
127,710 
141,719 

25,439 
2,910 

21,162 

151.437 
2)945 

18)421 
126,073 
17,743 

4)409 
34,684 

8,172 
5,578 
3,286 


43)865 
767)022 

21,124 
78,371 

175)448 

11,661 

9,861 
11,160 

6,293 
17.485 
20.007 

3)441 

20,247 
5,134 

7,577 
4,933 
10,851 

172,381 
15,777 
408,120 

86,958 
8,155 
21,032 
104,549 
17,749 

4,754 
2,112 

7,445 
19,149 
52,054 

5,491 
31,247 

7,424 
34,784 


2)822 

43,702 

2,470 

810,400 

79)045 

4,627 

14,410 

175,219 

12,594 
46,352 
4,398 
197,734 
27,552 

11)766 
6,412 
17,644 
20,040 

33.639 
133,000 

20,381 
4,944 

7,410 

11)121 
176,835 

2)977 

82,320 
8,844 
22,312 
102,465 
17,507 

4,848 
2,024 
7,163 
245,880 
13,080 

7,459 
22,954 
50,914 

5,452 
32,396 

7,442 

30,408 


5.809 

2)541 
848,844 

20,362 

184)849 

12.862 

208)437 
37,348 

9,599 
11,157 

37,301 
135,417 
134,596 

20,815 
3,472 

20,299 

95,445 

17)384 

5,045 
1,979 
7,155 
240,954 
12,719 

7,467 
22,744 
51,333 

5,398 
31,712 

2,334 

8,159 
7)917 


6.044 

21.312 
209)529 

239)018 

ii)ieo 

19)547 

2o)874 
3.532 

21.109 

4)979 
8.072 
11.817 

190.627 
15,238 
661,608 

9)133 

33,500 

1)702 

24o)898 
12,457 

7,456 
25.207 
55,384 

5,167 
31,927 

2,193 

8,821 
43,737 
10,339 


6,383 
48) 144 
923)145 

93,085 

5,454 

19,933 

241,081 

15,516 

252,545 

4)910 
20,965 
19,943 

45,205 

4)359 
6,647 
8,584 
13,134 

208,332 
15,038 

708,833 
13,802 
3,135 

93,159 

9,370 

33,542 

104,741 

55)326 

5,374 

10,269 
47,167 
12,121 


0,1 

3)2 

0)3 
0.8 

0,1 

0)3 
0.9 

0)1 
0.7 

1)0 

0)1 
0.3 


0.1 

1)1 
0.1 

0)1 
1)3 

0,1 

o)e 

1.0 
6.5 

0)5 

0)1 

3.4 
0.1 
0.7 
4.3 
0.9 

0.3 
0.4 
2.0 

0)1 


0.1 
1.3 
0.1 
19.2 

0.3 
1.7 
0.2 

0.9 
4.3 

0)1 

3.7 
0.2 
0.6 
4.3 
0.6 

0.1 
0.1 
0.2 
8.1 
0.4 

0.3 
0.6 
1.7 
0.2 
1.2 
0.1 


0.1 
1.3 
0.1 
23.0 

0)1 

0.3 
0)1 
0)9 

0.3 
0.3 
0.2 

0)7 
0.1 

0)3 

5.2 
0.5 

0)3 
0.1 

0)2 
0.6 
3.2 
0.5 

0.1 
0)3 
0)4 

0.2 
0.6 
1.6 
0.2 

0)2 


1.3 
0.1 
33.9 

1)4 

5)9 
0.8 

0.3 
0.3 
0.2 

1.0 

il 

0.6 
0.1 

0,6 
O.l 
0.2 
0,2 
0.3 

5.2 
0.5 

0)3 

1)0 
0.1 

0.2 
0.9 


0.3 
0.2 
0.5 
0.6 

0)1 
0.2 
0.2 
0.3 

5.1 
0.5 
19.1 

2.5 
0)4 
0)5 

0)2 
0.9 
0.1 


0)5 

0)1 
0.2 
0.2 
0.3 

19)0 

2.4 
0.2 
0.6 

0)5 
0.1 

0,2 

1)5 

0.1 

o.» 

0.1 




Alaska 


0.1 
1.2 
0.1 


iJi'.":.'.':::::::;::::: 




ml";:.';j"i;;i;i;;" 


2.4 

0.1 
0.5 




0.4 




Idaho 


0.1 


IlUo»Jt 






lo-a 


o'.l 


Maryland 


1.2 






Mlnna»ota 




MlaaliBlppl 






0)2 

5.4 

19)3 








0.2 
0.6 


Or«9on 


Rhod* Uland 


0.5 

0.2 
0.1 
0.2 






6,2 




0.2 
0.7 






i»«at Virginia 

ITyoflilng 

U.S. T«rr. and Poai.i 


0.1 


Pu«rto Rico 

Virgin Iil«nda 


1.2 
0.3 








101 



DECLARATIONS OF INTENTION FILED, PETITIONS FOR NATURALIZATION FILED, 
PERSONS NATURALIZED, AND PETITIONS FOR NATURALIZATION DENIED: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1907-1968 



Period 


Declara- 
tions 
filed 


Petitions 
filed 


Persons naturali 


zed 


Petitions 




Civilian 


Military 


Total 


denied 


1907 - 1968 


8,647,817 


9.161.267 


8,088,593 


531.895 


8.620,488 


459,630 


1907 - 1910 


526,322 


164,036 


111,738 




111,738 


17,702 


1911 - 1920 


2.686.909 


1,381,384 


884,672 


244.300 


1,128,972 


118,725 


1921 - 1930 


2.709,014 


1,884,277 


1.716,979 


56,206 


1,773,185 


165,493 


1931 - 1940 


1,369,479 


1,637,113 


1,498,573 


19,891 


1,518,464 


45,792 


1931 


106,272 
101,345 
83,046 
108,079 
136,524 
148,118 
176,195 
150,673 
155,691 
203,536 

920,284 


145,474 
131,062 
112,629 
117,125 
131,378 
167,127 
165,464 
175,413 
213,413 
278,028 

1,938,066 


140,271 
136,598 
112,368 
110,867 
118,945 
140,784 
162,923 
158,142 
185,175 
232,500 

1,837,229 


3,224 

2 

995 

2,802 

481 
2,053 
3,936 
3,638 
2,760 

149,799 


143,495 
136,600 
113,363 
113,669 
118,945 
141,265 
164,976 
162,078 
188,813 
235,260 

1,987,028 


7,514 


1932 


5,478 


1933 


4,703 


1934 


1,133 


1935 

1936 


2,765 
3,124 


1937 


4,042 


1938 , 


4,854 


1939 

1940 


5,630 
6,549 


1941 - 1950 


64,814 


1941 


224,123 
221,796 
115,664 
42,368 
31,195 
28,787 
37,771 
60,187 
64,866 
93,527 

323,818 


277,807 

343,487 

377,125 

325,717 

195,917 

123,864 

88,802 

68,265 

71,044 

66,038 

1,230,483 


275,747 

268,762 

281,459 

392,766 

208,707 

1-34,849 

77,442 

69,080 

64,138 

64,279 

1,148,241 


1,547 

1,602 

37,474 

49,213 

22,695 

15,213 

16,462 

1,070 

2,456 

2,067 

41,705 


277,294 

270,364 

318,933 

441,979 

231,402 

150,062 

93,904 

70,150 

66,594 

66,346 

1,189,946 


7,769 


1942 

1943 

1944 

1945 

1946 

1947 

1948 

1949 

1950 


8,348 
13,656 
7,297 
9,782 
6,575 
3,953 
2,887 
2,271 
2,276 


1951 - 1960 


27,569 


1951 


91,497 
111,461 
23,558 
9,100 
10,855 
12,870 
15,911 
16,196 
16,115 
16,255 

15,921 
15,120 
14,478 
14,374 
13,082 
12,957 
12,465 
13,594 


61,634 
94,086 
98,128 
130,722 
213,508 
137,701 
140,547 
117,344 
109,270 
127,543 

138,718 
129,682 
121,170 
113,218 
106,813 
104,853 
108,369 
103,085 


53,741 
87,070 
90,476 
104,086 
197,568 
138,681 
137,198 
118,950 
102,623 
117,848 

130,731 
124,972 
121,618 
109,629 
101,214 
100,498 
102,211 
100,288 


975 

1,585 

1,575 

13,745 

11,958 

7,204 

845 

916 

1,308 

1,594 

1,719 
2,335 
2,560 
2,605 
3,085 
2,561 
2,691 
2,438 


54,716 
88,655 
92,051 
117,831 
209,526 
145,885 
138,043 
119,866 
103,931 
119,442 

132,450 
127,307 
124,178 
112,234 
104,299' 
103,059 
104,902 
102,726 


2,395 


1952 


2,163 


1953 


2,300 


1954 


2,084 


1955 


4,571 


1956 


3,935 


1957 


2,948 


1958 


2,688 


1959 


2,208 


1960 

1961 

1962 

1963 

1964 

1965 


2,277 

3,175 
3,557 
2,436 
2,309 
2,059 


1966 


2,029 


1967 

1968 


2,008 
1,962 



102 



PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY GENERAL AND SPECIAL NATURALIZATION PROVISIONS: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 196A - 1968 



Naturalization provisions 



1964-1968 



1965 



1968 



General provisions 
Special provisions 



Persons married to U. S. 

citizens 

Children, including adopted 
children of U. S. citizen 
parents 

Former U. S. citizens who lost 
citizenship by marriage 

Philippine citizens who 
entered the United States 
prior to May 1, 1934, and 
have resided continuously 
in the United States 

Persons who served in U. S. 
Armed Forces for three 
years 

Person who served iii U. S. 
Armed Forces during World 
War I, World War II or the 
Korean hostilities 

Lodge Act enlistees 

Persons who served on certain 
U. S. vessels 

Former U. S. citizens who 
lost citizenship by enter- 
ing the Armed Forces of 
foreign countries during 
World War II 

Nationals but not citizens 
of the United States 

Persons naturalized under 

private law 

Employees of nonprofit organi- 
zations engaged In dissemi- 
nating Information promoting 
U. S. interests 1/ 

Other 



390.386 



136.834 



84,851 

37,984 
190 



4,837 
122 



14 

234 

4 



59 

4 



112,234 



104,299 



103,059 



104,902 



102,726 



82,621 



76.630 



76,214 



78 . 544 



29.613 



27.669 



26,845 



26,358 



17,867 

9,056 
41 



1,782 



749 
74 



16,602 

7,914 
38 



1,696 



1,365 
24 



18 



16,448 

7,695 
37 



1,575 



971 
15 



16,778 

6,740 
36 



1,648 



1,040 
3 



76.377 



26.349 



17,156 

6,579 
38 



1,720 



712 
6 



2 
65 



W Section 319 of the Immigration and Nationality act amended December 18, 1967 
(P. L. 90-215) 



103 



ENDED JUNE 30, 





number 


Pprfions n«t,. rnllT*H """" 


c„„„.n. or „„<.„„, ,„™„.,„„a„„ 




U.ll'uil^n. 


*'s"''r^? °' 


miu.,. 


0..., 


All countries 


102 726 






6 579 






^^^^ 




«520 












2!959 
56 

521 


103 
t..36S 


3.392 

206 
235 


5 
75 


54 








Belnium ' 




Ekjloarla 




Czechoslovakia 


' 




^ 












~ 


Cennany 


' 


Greece 


' 


Hunoary 




Ireland 




rtaly 




Ucvia 


' 


Lithuania 




Luxembouro 




Malta 




Netherlands 




Norvay 
























Switzerland 


. 


Turkey ' 










3 


Other Eufope 




^^,^ 






'399 

2.807 
135 


271 

31 
1.-242 


' 9i. 








Cyprus' 




India 












Iraq 




Israel 




Japan 


. 


Jordan 




Korea 


2 


Lebanon 












Syrian Arab Bepubllc 




Thailand 




Vietnam 








North America 




Canada 


'3fc3 


'j29 




15 








I 






Cuba 


3 










latoalca 




Trinidad and T«b«Ro 




Costa Rica 












Honduras 


I 


Nicaragua 




Panama 


1 


South America 


I 






154 










Bolivia 




Brail 1 


I 










Ecuador 




Guyana 




Paraouay 




Peru 




Uruguay 




Venezuela 












SI 






' 




South Africa 












UceanlH 


1 


AiiBlralia 




3! 




I5 


^ 




New Zealand 










1 


U.S. possessions 


07 


Stateless and net re ri.=d 




1 JH 




bO 















104 



I REGION OF FORMER I 



Malta 1/ ... 
Netherlands 



Switzerland 

Ihlted Kingdom . 



Jordan .. 
Lebanon , 



Thailand ., 
Vietnam ... 
Other Asia 

North Amerlc, 



Bolivia ... 

Brazil 

Chile 

Coloinbla ., 

Guyana fi/*; 
Paraguay ., 

Ifrugusy ... 
Venezuela , 



Africa 

Morocco 

South Afrlci 

Sudan 

Tunisia 

Other Afrlci 

Oceania 

New Zealand 



1959 - 1968 



Republic (Egypt) 



31,636 
2,932 
1,823 
2,437 



1.172 
2,347 
1,984 
5,975 



3,754 

19,365 
1,485 



1,737 
18,568 
6,092 



10,969 
1,B77 
2,2B4 





13 1 


3)322 

10,742 


2! 

10, 



^, 


ncluded In Ur 


ited Kingdom prior to 1965. 


?/ 


Inclined In'ur 


Ited Kingdom prior to 1961. 


4/ 


ncluded In I 


ited Arab Republic (Egypt) pri 


?/ 


ndependent c 


un tries. 


6/ 


included In I 


Ited Kingdom prior to 1967. 


V 


included in I 


Ited Kingdom prior to 1963. 


8/ 


Included In U 


S. possessions prior to 1963. 



105 



• lUgUnc. 




III 


1 1 


1 




5 


III 


ll 

li 


s 

ss 
£1 




1^ 


1 

2 E 
SS 


1 83? 


All coontrU. 


102 726 
























hZ 908 


Euro e 






























2SI 

2!95! 
56 

359 


332 

' 63 


'. 




3 












- 


12 

25 




Austria 


351 


BelBium 


12i. 


Buloarla 


It) 






Denmark 


175 


Eetonitt 


30 


Finland 


12*. 


France 


687 






Greece 


1*422 


Huncary 


632 


Ir la c; 


I 050 


Ualy 


3 245 


Latvia 


147 






Luxembouro 


28 


Malta 


55 


Netherlands 


959 






Poland 


1 296 


Pott al 


649 




246 






Sw den 


159 


Switzerland 


206 






U it d Kt d 




"■ss.« 


594 






Asia 












'i 










'i 










Cyprus 


22 






Indonesia 


5, 


1 a 


8S 


Iraq 


53 


Israel 


800 




1 937 




133 






L ba 


134 


Pakistan 


9 


PhiUppines 


1 175 










Vietnam 


105 


Other Asia 2/ 


80 


North America 












;i 














; 






Mexico 


3 072 






Cuba 


1 755 


Dominican Republic 


100 


Haiti 


64 




82 


T Inldad and Tobago 


31 


Coflta Rica 


90 










H rx3 


91 


Nl a a a 


90 


Panama 


221 


South Aaierlca 








95 

27 
^6 




'j 
















9 




Boll la 


56 


Braall 


119 


Chll 


74 


Colonbla 


199 


Ecuador 


120 






Pa ''a 


12 


Peru 


79 


Uruouay 


25 


V n E la 


86 




315 










1? 
















10 




South Africa 


53 


United Arab Republic (Egypt) 


'» 


Oceania 


216 












'i 






' 




37 




19 




N u Z aland 


32 


Pacific Islands 


38 


Other Oceania 2/ 


17 


u s 


210 












169 


42 






, 








528 







106 







M.l«» 




Country or region of fon.er .ll.gl.nce 


n-r^rn".., 


rot.l 




19 










69- 


J" 




All contrlo. 


102 726 








10.034 


13.577 


8 701 


4. 580 


2.6f5 


697 


131 




















1.337 


296 


6^ 




825 
330 

251 

121692 
3.256 

'«03 

2.555 

'717 

359 
521 

2.067 


150 

97 
U475 

'218 
341 

222 


35 

3 


5 
243 


35 

324 
1,305 

57 


1.165 
643 

15 
233 


56 
76 


132 
68 
461 

325 
654 


68 
33 

55 

473 


157 




A St la 


it 


S«l 1 


_ 


Bui aria 


_ 


C ^ho lovakla 


_ 




1 






Finland 


2 




I 


_ 


4 


Greece 


3 




u 




2 




B 


Latvia 


1 




3 


Luxemboura 


_ 




- 


N therlanda 


_ 




1 


Poland 


6 




3 




I 




_ 


Sw den 


I 




\ 








9 


"■=■=■« 


2 


Other Europe 


- 




26 




3.186 
303 

53 
2.807 

135 
237 


136 

413 


5 
10 




85 


131 
99 

2.953 


312 

199 

25 

2.375 


196 
1.196 


195 

3 
663 


15 
9 

196 




f. 


_ 




I 


Indon sla 


- 




_ 


. 


. 




L 


Japan 


4 




- 


^ 


1 




l> 


PaklBtan 


- 


PhlllDDlnea 


2 


S A b R bll 


- 




- 


VI t 


- 








38 


C d 


303 

235 
1«3 

236 


3.178 
2.903 

3.700 
183 

55 


15 


122 
63 


34 

45 
38 

370 


465 

1.174 

58 

119 


745 

1,004 
40 

53 
9 

55 
307 


378 
225 

3 
V 


314 

5 
9 

53 


29 

16 


I* 




29 


Ba bad 






4 


Dc inican R public 




H Itl 


- 


J 


1 




- 




- 




- 


Guat EOAls 


- 


Ho d 


- 


* " ' 


- 




- 




_ 


A tlna 




139 

124 

32 
32 
491 


15 

5 


5 


3 


193 
27 

83 
189 


31 

35 
36 


8 
64 


19 

5 


i 


- 


Boll la 




B U 




Chll 


- 


Colonbla 




Ec d 




„ 




Pa a u« 


- 


P 


- 


U 


- 


V n^iuela 


- 








134 


i 


3 
5 


10 


3 
38 


52 


79 
54 


8 


9 

3 
14 


1 


- 


So th Af 1 a 




U It d A ab Roubllc (Eavot) 


- 








_ 


Aust alia 


286 
65 


123 


\ 




10 


21 


5 


10 


12 


> 


- 


N Z I d 


- 


P Ifl 1 landa 


- 


0th Oceania 2/ 


- 












21. 


41 


160 


144 


179 


137 


76 


22 


3 


p" 







107 



PBtSONS SATURALIZED, 





Fenales 


Country or region of former •Ueglamr 


TO,., 


Under 


19' 


20- 












M yoci 


All coontn.. 










17 469 








B21 


121 


























154, 
964 

1 ,i2B 
376 

S.339 
56 


5 
32 

29 

205 

5 


31 

3 
28 
307 
66 

185 
13 

130 

3 


145 

298 
'646 

1.590 
X17 
102 
' 88 


53 

338 

3.034 

27 

429 

58 
171 
65 

35 


85 
47 

159 

259 

111 
54 

57 

1.038 
140 
203 


3 
38 

336 
35 

69 


21 

38 
188 

104 
39 

37 

10 

253 
56 


3 

5 
37 

13 
15 




Auetrla 


( 




1 






Czecho8low«kl« 


^ 


Denmark 












France 


2 


Certaanv 


^ 


Greece 


I 


Hun ary 




Ic land 




Italv 


j3 


Latvia 




Lithuania 




LuKembo ra 




Halta 




Hetherlanda 


2 


Norway 


1 


Poland 




Portuaal 






( 






Sweden 




Switzerland 






















31 

86 


3 

286 

1 
125 

16 . 


39 

5 


57 

297 

15 
50 


28 

" 36 

574 

537 
30 


3 

286 
57 

13 


163 

3 
170 


5, 


















Iran 




Irao 






1 










Korea 




Lebanon 




Pakistan 




Phlllpplnoa 












Vietnam 






1 










3 
3 


306 
123 


873 
568 

33 
39 


1.048 
60 

IS 

31 

166 


861 

834 
51 

29 
22 

268 


475 
23 


392 

3 

2 
5 
58 


116 
2 
17 

9 


6 


Mexico 




Barbadoi 


_ 


Cuba 


_ 


DoBlnlcan Republic 


_ 


Haiti 


_ 


Jamaica 






1 




_ 


Bl Salvador 


_ 


Gu*-eiBala 


_ 


Honduras 


_ 


Hlcaraoua 


I 


Panama 




Soath *.„,„ 




Argentina 


359 
69 

300 
170 

15 


10 

5 


11 
13 

10 


65 

43 
18 

53 

6 


143 

30 
99 

5 


59 

2 


3 
13 

13 
20 


17 

6 


1 






_ 












_ 


Ecuador 


_ 


Guyana 


_ 


Paraguay 




Peru 




Uruguay 


_ 


Venezuela ' 


_ 


Africa 




Morocco 


68 
65 


3 
3 

6 




IS 
38 
29 


23 
55 

62 


13 
56 
8 


3 
23 

31 


14 
3 


I 
1 


_ 




_ 




. 










Australia 


37 
31 






9 


36 


57 


25 






_ 


New Zealand 










_ 






Stateles. and not re rfd 














107 


74 


23 


5 













108 



TABLE 41A. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY SEX, MARITAL STATUS, 
MEDIAN AGE, AND MAJOR OCCUPATION GROUP: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1964-1968 



Sex, marital status, 
median age, and occupation 



1965 



1966 



1968 



Total naturalized 



Sex and marital status; 

Males 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Fema les 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Males per 1,000 females 



Median age (years): 

Both sexes 

Males 

Females 



Major occupation group: 

Professional, technical, and 

kindred workers 

Farmers and farm managers 

Managers, officials and 

proprietors, except fa,rm 

Clerical, sales, and kindred 

workers 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred 

workers 

Operatives and kindred workers . . 

Private household workers 

Service workers, except private 

household 

Farm laborers and foremen 

Laborers, except farm and mine .. 
Housewives, children, and others 

with no occupation 



112,234 



51.408 



16,851 

33,188 

593 

776 



60,826 



12,705 

44,534 

2,451 

1,136 



33.1 
33.6 
32.7 



11,097 

241 

3,891 

10,279 

11,163 

11,027 

1,142 

9,535 

473 
4,145 

49,241 



104,299 



48,495 



15,358 

31,766 

593 

773 

5 

55.804 



103,059 



46,536 



46,014 



11,746 

40,483 

2,416 

1,156 

3 

869 



34.1 
34.6 
33.7 



9,854 
198 

3,783 

9,637 

10,328 

10,117 

1,075 

9,591 

395 

4,035 

45,286 



14,567 

30,611 

549 

798 

11 

56,523 



12,143 

40,850 

2,272 

1,242 

16 

823 



33.2 
34.0 
32.5 



9,604 
208 

3,823 

9,660 

9,928 

10,319 

1,029 

8,686 

405 

3,761 

45,636 



13,162 

31,558 

503 

791 



58,888 



12,150 

43,201 

2,249 

1,286 

2 

781 



33.6 
34.8 
32.8 



9,899 
163 

4,166 

10,680 

9,959 

11,067 

1,085 

8,702 

411 

3,685 

45,085 



45,102 



12,947 

30,760 

468 

926 

1 

57,624 



11,671 

42,295 

2,158 

1,499 

1 

783 



33.9 

34.7 
33.2 



10,939 
154 

4,051 

10,942 

9,421 

10,816 

948 

8,835 

333 

3,379 

42,908 



109 



side 



Total 

AUbama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Colunib 
Florida 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Hississlppi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire . . . . 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina ... 
North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina . . . 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

U.S. terr. and poe 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands . 

All other 



119.'i42 



112. 23A 



3,346 
2,858 
8,695 
1,168 
196,652 

9,781 
29,027 
2,208 
6,358 
30,443 

6.943 
16,308 

1,834 
82.545 
12,126 

■4,283 
5,870 
3,554 
5,100 
3,852 

14,149 
50,213 
43.096 
7.999 
1.592 

9,045 
2,497 
3.896 
2,584 
3,452 

76,342 
3,484 
262,586 
5,230 
1,183 

39,519 
4,178 
7,338 

41,474 
6.236 

2,875 
1,169 
2,900 
47,012 
5,343 

1,965 
11,628 
18,595 

1,774 
14,140 



3,190 

3,021 

818 



632 
2.212 



489 
1,029 



1,290 

4,727 



919 
300 
428 
259 
431 

7,316 

324 

23,988 

524 

167 

3,810 
446 
872 

4,325 
572 



300 

I., 386 
634 



1,149 
1,990 



719 
2.377 

256 
8,223 
1.472 

695 



5.146 

5,854 

660 



7,415 

332 

28,363 

326 

118 



1,239 
2,311 



397 
317 
919 



1.361 

2.743 



818 
1.668 

252 
10.478 
1.612 

426 
785 
364 
563 
618 

1,481 
6,364 
5,371 
1,197 
208 

1,183 
241 
504 
263 
346 



154 

5.514 
468 
911 

5,251 
877 

323 



1.032 

3.219 

233 



547 
1.534 

203 
9.542 
1,268 

493 
647 
308 
460 
441 

1,213 
5,613 
5,227 



1,047 
298 
332 
201 

417 

8,869 

387 

31,225 

604 

139 

4,283 
414 
744 

4,602 
685 

365 
119 
250 
5,816 
635 



1,273 
3,071 

246 

674 

2,754 

688 
1.629 

207 
9.461 
1.345 

421 



1.533 
5.634 



194 

1.071 
200 
465 
289 
326 

8,314 



276 

4,835 

620 

179 
1,282 
2,052 

205 
1,595 

116 



905 

2,605 

219 



717 
1,542 

148 
8,115 
1,072 

370 
486 
438 
513 
432 

1,443 

5.027 

4.073 

795 

168 



301 

7.758 

366 

25,195 

548 

124 

3,957 
478 
824 

4,212 



558 



160 
1,182 
2,102 



830 
2,625 



606 
2,659 



736 
1,319 



1,353 
4,652 
3,451 



234 

24,540 

490 

61 

3,399 
456 
673 

3,611 
590 

245 



684 
3,189 



1,412 
4,304 
3,132 

697 
163 



362 

22,971 

472 



1,096 
1,484 



335 

1,010 

88 

21,696 

695 

2,741 

216 

610 

3,790 

682 
1.902 



325 
419 
240 
574 
294 

1.367 
4.596 



383 
265 
296 

6.855 

270 

23.143 

607 

84 

3.211 
332 
596 

3.377 
655 

209 



110 



SK r> 3 S !S g 3omR3 



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f 

i 



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s"°-2s aa*s? 



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RSS2- P5£3S f S-SS 



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' '• ' m "g o-ww' ":!•' ::>,e. uac^-" r fl-fr ■'i-^^s ;«*»• «••■■ '«3if-' t'oi 

3««ii -oui-og • ■-• .jj«- Ciaoj aS.-f «l5o° 'ic>.'^ (3fl«-. Sc'*''3? " 

5qS-£ ESJtS «-oc« '•3«» -,,--«- o«3-33 f^t >* ^ ji *Jo«« ji^S«' o-.5*o-- "SSI 

«S"2^ -^C-^iiO QX4-'-a >CC3- Lauaa acj3>> f 9 » u u ^•^ffeg sacSll CETaaao (AuCa 

•c<<-<0 OOaau. uai-<MM .~i:2k<-JX rxxxx xxaxz x:£z22 ooo&>iK mmhhs >>333s a 



111 



TABLE 42B. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY TYPE OF COURT AND STATES OR TERRITORIES OF RESIDENCE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1968 



Total 

Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa , 

Kansas 

Kentucky , 

Louisiana , 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming , 

U. S. territories and possessions: 

Guam 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands 



392 

248 

1,036 

148 

20,167 

791 

2,473 

199 

446 

3,892 

798 
1,601 

130 
7,078 

893 

356 
409 
281 
526 
261 

1,369 

4,150 

3,030 

595 

160 

739 
149 
274 
261 
312 

6,738 

312 

22,850 

566 

78 

2,744 
372 
614 

3,254 
539 

281 

76 

382 

4,528 

437 

164 
1,252 
1,717 

134 

1,143 

67 



431 

837 



392 
187 
744 
148 
16,129 

642 

2,092 

199 

446 



798 

1,456 

72 

6,849 

893 

356 
320 
281 
526 



,023 
,732 
,535 
567 
160 



272 
206 
67 



2,765 

157 

19,715 

566 

78 

2,220 
187 
441 

2,347 
344 



382 

4,071 

124 

121 

1,252 

1,433 

134 

832 

36 



431 
837 



149 
381 



346 

1,418 

495 



3,973 

155 

3,135 



524 
185 
173 
907 



457 
313 



284 
311 



112 



-«?9-So5S-- 



s £^ iiH^ssssHsss I ills I ^11 55 



S i 3 1 i 



113 



l!i 



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a I 



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si »f E *ss52? 



SSiSPa :3 Si 






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114 





,:t;°"L 


CALENDAR YEAR OF ENTRY 


''"""oJVrt"*"''" 


1,69 


1967 


1966 


1963 


,964 


1963 


1962 


1,61 


1960 


195, 


1958 


1,57 


1,56 


1,55 


1950 
1954 


1,40 
1949 


'\Z' 


All countries 


102. 7« 


247 


907 


855 


1,971 


6.458 


6.421 


19.910 


12.054 


8.525 


6.414 


5,650 


5.670 


6,015 


3.709 


9.466 


3,689 


4.865 


Eoro . 


59 434 


45 










3 367 




6 978 






















'437 
1.327 
3'l25 
3!o03 

'397 

'475 

526 

21525 

686 


3 


15 

1 

3 
5 


5 


32 
153 


37 
9 

43 

5 

132 
36 

15 
25 


92 

83 
546 

15 
79 

295 


61 
55 

1,671 
528 

1.258 

705 
173 

129 
194 

725 
150 


126 
66 

57 

152 

187 
396 

93 
24 

68 

168 


52 

1.150 

213 

343 

34 
169 

32 
405 

31 
64 

20 
636 
83 


34 

1.025 
323 

122 

162 
59 


135 
116 

71 
563 


54 
258 

628 
43 
11, 

429 


655 

157 

169 
29 

25 

376 

237 
54 


115 
539 

2,3 
25 


165 
56 

'l65 
,4 

35 
9 

115 
532 


19 

43 

234 

13 

5 
71 

318 




Bel 


g 


C hoolovakla 




D nmark 




Finland 


22 


France 


24 


Germany 


196 


Cr ec 


79 


H a 


71 


Ir land 


167 


J . 


294 


Latvia 


■J 


LUh ania 


2B 




26 


Norway 


36 




231 


Fort eal 


57 




30 


Soaln 


18 


Sweden 


50 


Switzerland 


21 






United Klnadon 








VuBosUvla 






22 




823 




3.265 
319 

1.958 
1.755 


13 
53 


53 

158 


58 

53 
134 


107 

105 
136 


60 
156 
305 

33 


414 

9 
30 
39 

59 

295 
23 

14 


577 
79 

188 

129 

163 
25 

15 


27 

103 
166 
56 

, 

22 


56 

3 

13 
13 


5 

166 
4, 

5 

5 


162 

5 


12 

131 

5 

1.243 


104 

15 

1.47 5 


45 


2.744 


1,289 






2 


India 


3 








4 




I 


Israel 






60 




5 




9 


L banon 


15 








319 




5 




21 






Other Asia 


1 


North toer.c. 


1.9,2 




61684 
»7 

'233 

295 
827 


3 


5 
3 

12 






85 

5 


97 
15 

18 

11 
IS 

16 


1.944 

69 

75 
31 

12 


1.349 

74 

, 

23 
1S8 

493 


500 

656 
22 

43 
110 

15 
IS 

114 
335 


416 

19 
19 

16 

14 
19 

63 
12 

229 


244 

24 
54 

5 

26 
16 

15 

192 


15 
15 

33 
21 

180 


424 

26 
22 
22 

131 


227 

285 
11 
9 

19 

5 
89 


1.225 

52 
23 

58 
17} 


565 
92 

16 

27 


418 


MeKico 


1,335 




17 


Dominican Reoubllc 


6 




1 


Jamaica 


19 




53 


Coata Rica 


3 




3 


Guatemala 


2 


Honduras 


2 


Nicara a 


2 




4 


Other Central America 


3 


Other North America 


24 




37 


Araentlna 


139 

574 
127 
225 


I 


"t 






9 


55 

16 
19 

156 


36 

50 
750 


20 
99 


100 
31 
55 

35 


55 

15 
51 

65 


56 
25 
35 


30 
39 


1, 
IS 
34 

13 

22 


15 
9 

9 


10 
15 

33 


15 


10 




1 




4 




i 




7 




I 


Guyana 


5 




1 




5 




e 




163 
136 

296 




] 




13 


3 

40 
23 


5 

92 
26 

25 


43 

563 
91 

73 


8 
19 

51 


5 
48 


16 
20 

34 




5 
14 


5 
14 


' 




58 


I 


Morocco 


I 


South Africa 


1 


United Arab Republic (Eeypt) 


2 




3 


Oc..„.. 


85 


American Samoa 


172 




\ 


! 




e 




20 

33 

3 


9 


1 


'2 


3 
1 


I 


^ 


3 


5 
, 

1 


'I 






' 




1 




1 


Other Oceania 


' 




1 







325-586 O - 69 - 9 



115 



195<) I960 



1962 1963 1964 1965 



112.23'. 104,299 



Under 18 years 
18-19 years ... 
20-24 years ... 
25-29 years ... 
30-34 years ... 
35-39 years ... 
40-44 years ... 
45-49 years ... 
50-54 years ... 
55-59 years ... 
60-64 years ... 
65-69 years ... 
70-74 years ... 
75-79 years ... 
BO years and ov 
Not reported . . 

Males 

Under 18 year 
18-19 years . 
20-24 years . 
25-29 years . 
30-34 years . 
35-39 years . 
40-44 years . 
45-49 years . 
50-54 years . 
55-59 years . 
60-64 years . 
65-69 years . 
70-74 yeara . 
75-79 years . 
eo years and 
Not reported 

Females 

Under 18 year 
18-19 years . 
20-24 years . 
25-29 years . 
30-34 years . 
35-39 years . 
40-44 years . 
45-49 years . 
50-54 years . 
55-50 years . 
60-64 years . 
65-69 years . 
70-74 years . 
75-79 years . 
80 years and 
Not reported 



69,719 
44.997 
108,602 
157,152 
172,142 
154,147 
110,132 
81,478 
67,670 
56,117 
46,096 
34,053 
18,543 
8,562 
4,295 
823 



510.256 



35,400 
21,026 
47,741 
59,607 
72,719 
71,044 
52,780 
40,812 
33,344 
25,836 
19,942 
14,693 
8,510 
4,183 
2,255 
364 



624.272 



34,319 
23,971 
60.861 
97,545 
99,423 
83,103 
57,352 
40,666 
34,326 
30,281 
26,154 
19,360 
10,033 
4,379 
2,040 
459 



5,331 
3,064 
8,437 
12,991 
16,530 
14,324 
8,951 
8,727 



43.719 



5.849 
3.394 
9,478 
14,478 
17,031 
15.795 
9,769 
9,563 
8,292 
7,733 
6,310 
5,671 
3,323 
1,442 
602 
712 



50.896 



6.931 
3.793 
10,915 
15,851 
17,872 
17,053 
11,229 
10,055 
9,103 
8.402 
8.190 
6,615 
3.827 
1,796 
776 
42 



58.795 



8,9 50 
4.622 
12,290 
17,792 
18,762 
17,448 
11,750 
9,418 
7.833 
6,059 
5,269 
3,778 
2,004 
932 
39 7 



60.988 



8.470 
4,774 
12,088 
18,470 
19,152 
17,726 
12,615 
8,288 
7.577 
5,261 
4,393 
2,816 
1.496 
692 
360 



58.303 



8,203 
5.026 
12,121 
16.989 
16.906 
15,366 
11.507 
6,938 
6,183 
4,607 
3,733 
2,473 
1,250 
598 
331 



51.408 



2.805 
1.494 
3,221 
3,737 
6,161 
6,465 
4,372 
4,204 
3,159 
2,766 
2,161 
1,535 
941 
467 



60,212 



3,065 
1,738 
3,920 
4,827 
6,507 
6,911 
4,725 
4,784 
3,751 
3.257 
2.350 
2,169 
1,541 
720 
308 
323 



68,546 



3,626 
1,830 
4,789 
5.890 
7.396 
7,700 
5.441 
5,154 
4,475 
3,557 
3,296 
2,639 
1,705 
870 
410 
17 



73,655 



4.619 
2.236 
5.710 
7.585 
8,646 
8,538 
6,016 
5,051 
4,092 
2,926 
2,385 
1,634 
879 
453 



66,319 



2,526 
1,570 
5.216 
9,254 
10.369 
7,859 
4,579 
4,523 
3,981 
3,783 
3,034 
1,979 
954 
379 
170 



2,784 
1,656 
5,558 
9,651 
10,524 
8,884 
5,044 
4,779 
4,541 
4,476 
3.960 
3,502 
1,782 
722 
294 



3,305 
1,963 
6,126 
9,961 
10,476 
9,353 
5,788 
4,901 
4,628 
4,845 
4,894 
3,976 
2,122 
926 
366 
25 



4,331 
2.386 
6.580 
10.207 
10,116 
8.910 
5.734 
4,367 
3.741 
3,133 
2,884 
2,144 
1,125 
479 
181 



4,288 
2,379 
5,566 
7,818 
8,464 
8,277 
6,113 
4,329 
4,064 
2.568 
1,993 
1,271 
660 



65,875 



4,093 
2.429 
5.677 
6.918 
7,205 
6,905 
5,529 
3,402 
3.128 
2,221 
1.695 
1,170 
577 
292 



60,826 



4.182 
2.395 
6.522 
10.652 
10,688 
9,449 
6,502 
3,959 
3,513 
2,693 
2.400 
1.545 
836 
360 
179 



4,110 
2,597 
6,444 
10.071 
9,703 
8,461 
5,978 
3,536 
3,055 
2,386 
2.038 
1,303 
673 
306 
164 



7,053 
5,335 
10,824 
15.494 
16,327 
14,112 
10,993 
6,328 
5,721 
4,279 
3,293 
2.376 
1.268 
582 
314 



48.495 



6,921 
5.579 
10.691 
14.936 
16,030 
13,841 
10,865 
6,888 
5,422 
4,278 
3,141 
2,313 
1,169 
609 
367 



46.536 



6.053 
4.917 
10.805 
15.358 
16,787 
14.179 
11.382 
7,659 
5,408 
4,475 
3,271 
2,235 
1.273 
585 
515 



46.014 



3,602 
2.482 
5.050 
6,285 
7,373 
6,749 
5,223 
3,139 
2.854 
2,057 
1,526 
1,096 
617 
289 
153 



55.804 



3.464 
2,509 
4.641 
5,672 
6.967 
6,414 
5.062 
3,356 
2,742 
2,123 
1,460 
1,127 
53 5 
295 



56,523 



2,950 

2,090 

4.447 

5.561 

6.978 

6.530 

5.233 

3.758 

2,673 

2,187 

1,507 

966 

569 

254 



58,888 



3,451 
2,853 
5,774 
9,209 
8,954 
7.363 
5.770 
3,189 
2.867 
2.222 
1,767 
1,280 
651 
293 



3,457 
3,070 
6,050 
9,264 
9,063 
7,427 
5,803 
3,532 
2,680 
2,155 
1,681 
1,186 
634 
314 
200 



3,103 
2,827 
6,358 
9,707 
9,809 
7,649 
6,149 
3.901 
2.735 
2.288 
1,764 
1,269 
704 
331 



116 





T„,M 




'-i?.::.-"- 


1 !" 





is 


S 1 


jH 


2J 
Si 
it 


PI 


Hi 

1^ >. 


1 

i 


A,, ,.,unlrl.^ 


33.379 


17,631 


4.362 


2.482 


8.356 


64 


302 


80 


15 


67 


Euro e 
























MS 
31S 

737 

131 

145 

225 

191 

64 


753 
50 


54 
36 


36 

5 

29 


427 
195 

39 












B«L I B 




Ciechofil«v«kla 




DeoiMrk 




Fl land 


^ 


Franc 




Cemanv 




Gr« ce 




Hunoary 




Iceland 




Ireland 


J 


Italy 


19 


Lithuania 


2 


HsUa 




Neth rlanda 










7 


Portuaal 


2 


Rumania 










1 


Switzerland 






2 


United Klnndom 


3 


USSR (Europe and Asia) 


( 


Yuaoilavla 




0th r EuroD 


3 


A 1 






351 

1.529 

58 

"456 


156 


39 




5 
16 

52 






9 


12 








Hona Kona 


3 














Urael 








Jordan 3/ 




Korea " 




Lebanon 


2 




7 


Byukyu Island* 


_ 






VlelMB 


_ 


Other Alia 


_ 




26 


Canada 


2.609 
38 

5: 


1.370 

5 
276 


502 

5 


217 
9 


'109 

499 

9 

32 

3 


2 


35 




1 








Barbados 






_ 




I 




1 


Jamaica 


I 




- 






Other West Indlea 




Brltlah Honduras 


_ 


Canal Zone 






1 


Honduras 










3 












35 


32 






15 
175 










_ 






Brazil 






_ 












- 






Other South Aaerlca 




.frlo. 






137 
IM 

53 


30 
30 


5 




25 

63 
36 

52 




2 




I 


_ 


Libya 




Nleerla 






_ 








- 








1: 




^ 














- 




- 


Pacific lalande (U S ada ) 






- 



































117 



ADMINISTRATIVE CERTIHCATES OF CITIZENSHIP ISSUED TO PERSONS WHO DERIVED CITIZENSHIP THROUOl NATURALIZATION 
OF PARENTS OR THROUGH HARRIAGE, BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH AND YEAR DERIVED: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1968 



Calendar year derived 



1967 1966 1965 1964 1963 



All countrlea 

Europe 

P«l8l«« 

CEechoa lovakla 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Greece 

Hungary 

Iceland 

Ireland 

I"ly 

Lithuania 

HaUa 

Netherlands 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) ... 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Aala) . 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Burma 

China 1/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Israel 

Jordan 2/ 

Lebanon 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Thai land 

Vietnam 

Other Asia 

North America 

Barbados 

Bcrvuda 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Jamaica 

Trinidad & Tobago 

British Virgin Islands 

Netherlands Antilles 

Other West Indies 

British Honduras 

Canal Zone 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Other Central Ax~erlca 

Other Horth America 

South America 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South Aaerlca 

Africa 

Ethiopia 

Libya 

■ Nigeria 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

New Zea land 

Pacific Islands (U.S. adm.). 
Other Oceania 

1/ Includes Taiwan. 



118 



:1T1ZENSHIP ISSUED 1 



IcaUnd 

IreUnd 

I"ly 

Halts 

Neth«rl«ndt 

RoMnU 

Spain 

Sweden 

Swlteerland 

Turkey (Europe and Aata) . 

Yugoalavia 

Buma 

China 1/ 

Hong Kong 

Indoneala 

larael 

Jordan 2/ 

Phillpplnea 

Ryukyu Island. 

Thailand 

DoMlnlcan Republic 

Trinidad (. Tobago 

Brltl.h Virgin I.landa ... 

Natharland Antilles 

Other Wast Indlaa 

Brltlih Honduraa 

Canal Zone 

Psnaaa 

Other Central Aaerlca 

Other North Aaerlca 

South AMrlca 

Brail 1 

Peru 

Venecuela 

Other South Anertca 

Ethiopia 

Libya 

Nigeria 

IMtcdAiab tepiillc (EgypO ... 
Other Africa 

Australia 

New Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U.S. ada) 

Other countries 

U Includes Taiwan. 

2/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



119 



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120 



Number oE 


Total 


Country of birth 


certlftotee cancelled 


China 


Mexico 


Australia 


Germany 


Tot«l 


369 


352 


15 


I 


1 




365 


349 


15 


1 






27 
338 

A 


23 
326 

3 


A 
11 


1 








Citizenship derived through parentage or marriage 


1 




A 


3 










1 







Grounds 


1959- 
1968 


1959 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


196A 


1965 


1966 


1967 


1968 




386 


15A 


12A 


AA 


26 


7 


11 


2 


5 


B 


5 


Established permanent residence 
abroad within five years 


351 

35 


1A9 
5 


120 


Al 
3 


23 

3 


6 


9 
2 


1 


2 
3 


5 

3 










5 







Total number 1/ 



Voting In a foreign political 
election or plebiscite 2/ .. 



Continuous residence In a 
foreign state of birth or 
fonser nationality 3/ . . . 



Continuous residence In a state 
by dual national who sought 
benefits of Sec. 350 I & N Act 



Naturalization In a foreign 



Entering or serving in the armed 
forces of a foreign state 



Renunciation of nationality 



Taking an oath of allegla 
a foreign stste 



Accepting or performing dutie 
under a foreign state 



Other grounds 



I.AIA 
3,065 



210 



10 



38 



lA 



19 



20 



22 



18 



Al 



22 



y Cases of A5 persons expatriated for departing from or remaining away from the U.S. to avoid military service, reported for 

1959-1963, were not included because this statutory provision was ruled unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court on February 18, 
1963. (Kennedy v. Francisco Hendoza -Mart Inez (372 U.S. lAA) and Rusk v. Joseph Henry Cort (372 U.S. 22A).) 

2/ The Supreme Court decision In Afroylm v. Rusk (387 U.S. 253, May 29. 1967). ruled as unconstitutional the law providing for a 
loss of citizenship by voting In a foreign political election. 

3/ The Supreme Court decision In Schneider v. Rusk (377 U.S. 163. May 18, 196A), ruled as unconstitutional statutory provisions 
which cause naturalized citizens to lose their nationality by extended residence abroad. 

A/ Naturalized U.S. citizens expatriated In countries with which the United States has treaties or conventions providing on a 
reciprocal basis for loss of nationality through extended residence In the country of original cltlienshlp. 



121 



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124 



TABLE 55. WRITS OF HABEAS CORPUS, JUDICIAL REVIEW OF ORDER 
OF DEPORTATION AND DECLARATORY JUDGMENTS IN EXCLUSION AND DEPORTATION CASES: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 196A - 1968 



Action taken 



1964- 
1968 



Total writs of habeas corpus : 

Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government 

Unfavorable to U.S. Government .... 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed 

Pending end of year 

Involving exclusion : 

Disposed of 

Favorable to, U.S. Government .. 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed , 

Pending end of year 

Involving deportation : 

Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government ,. 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed , 

Pending end of year 

Total Judicial Review of Order of 
Deportation (Sec. 106 IfeiN Act) : 

Involving deportation : 

Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government ,.,, 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government .. 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed ... 

Pending end of year 

Total declaratory judgments: 



Writs of habeas corpus 



338 


41 


67 


110 


61 


59 


296 


36 


54 


103 


52 


51 


14 


1 


7 


4 


2 


- 


28 


4 


6 


3 


7 


8 


6 


9 


18 


13 


13 


6 


37 


9 


13 


4 


6 


5 


27 


7 


9 


2 


5 


4 


U 


_ 


3 


1 


- 


- 


b 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


4 


3 


5 


2 


1 


301 


32 


54 


106 


55 


54 


269 


29 


45 


101 


47 


47 


10 


1 


4 


3 


2 


- 


22 


2 


5 


2 


6 


7 


5 


5 


15 


8 


11 


5 



Judicial Review 



816 


51 


61 


99 


207 


398 


635 


35 


44 


62 


159 


335 


24 


7 


4 


3 


5 


5 


157 


9 


13 


34 


43 


58 


152 


44 


62 


86 


206 


152 



Declaratory judgments 





743 


87 


101 


107 


332 


116 




684 
12 

47 

31 


69 
1 

17 

3 


88 
8 

5 

9 


95 

1 
11 

10 


325 

7 
3 


107 




2 




7 


Involving 8 USC 1503 


6 




19 

1 
11 

712 


2 

1 

84 


6 

3 

92 


5 

5 
97 


2 

1 

329 


4 




1 




1 


Involving exclusion or deportation 


110 


665 
11 
36 


67 

1 

16 


82 
8 
2 


90 

1 
6 


323 
6 


103 




1 




6 







125 



TABLE 56. PRIVATE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY BILLS 

INTRODUCED AND LAWS ENACTED, 75TH CONGRESS 

THROUGH 90TH CONGRESS 



Congress 



Bills 
introduced 



Laws 
enacted 



90th 
89th 
88 th 
87th 
86th 
85th 
84th 
83rd 
82nd 

8l8t 

80th 
79 th 
78th 
77th 
76th 
75th 



7,293 

5,285 

3,647 

3,592 

3,069 

A,36A 

4,474 

4,797 

3,669 

2,811 

1,141 

429 

163 

430 

601 

293 



544 



1,227 



755 



14 



65 
30 



126 





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U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1969 O — 325-586 



BOSTON 



PUBLIC LlBBAn'' 



■»S"S351 977 9