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Full text of "Annual report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service"





Lk^li^i^l' 



BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 







J- \J t) ^IJ annual report 

Immigration and 
Naturalization 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 
IMMIGRATION AND NATURAUZATION SERVICE 
119 D Street, N. E. Wasliinpon, D. C. 20536 

The Immigration and Ntturalttatlon Service had its beginnings on March 3, 1891, when Congress provided thBt there should be In the 
Treijutv Department, under the control and supervision of the Secretary of the Treasury, a Superintendent of Immigration. In 1903, the Bureau 
of Immigration was established, and immigration functions were transferred to the newly established Department of Commerce and Labor; in 1906, 
the Bureau of Immigration became the Bureau of Immigration and Neturallzatiou; in 1913, the consolidated Bureau was transferred to the new 
Department of Labor and divided into two bureaus known as the Bureau of Immigration and the Bureau of Naturaliiation; and in 1933, the Bureaus 
wer« consolidated as the Immigration and Naturalization Service of the E)epartment of Labor. 

On )une 14, 1940, the Immigration and Naturalization Service was transferred from the Department of Labor to the Department of Justice 
after Congressional approval of a plan submitted by the President under a general reorganization act which had been passed in 1939. Under terms 
of that plan, the office of Commissioner of Immigration and Naturalization and all powers and functions previously exercised by the Secretary of 
Labor relating to immigration and nationality were transferred to the jurisdiction of the Attorney General, Since June 14, 1940, the Service hai 
functioned as a part of the Department of Justice under the direction of the Attorney General of the United States. 

REGIONAL AND DISTRICT OFFICE LOCATIONS 



NORTH EAST REGION 



NORTHWEST REGION 



SOUTHEAST REGION 



SOUTHWEST REGION 



Regional OfSc 



Regional Offic 



Regional Offlc 



Regional Offic 



Burlington, Vermont 05401 
Federal Building 



Twin Cities, Minnesota 55111 
Federal Building 
Fort Snelling 



Richmond, Virginia 23240 
Room^ 6226, federal Building 
400 North Fighth Street 



San Pedro, California 90731 
Terminal Island 



District Offlc 



District Offic 



Boston, Massachusetts 02203 
John Fitzgerald Kennedy 

Federal Building 
Covenaroent Center 

Buffalo, New York 14202 
68 Court Street 

Hartford, Connecticut 06101 
Box 1530, Post Office Building 
135 High Street 

Newark, New Jersey 07102 
Federal Building 
970 Broad Street 

New York, New York 10007 
20 West Broadway 

Portland, Maine 04112 

P. O. Box 578 

319 U. S. Courthouse 

St. Albans, Vermont 05478 
P. O. Box 591 
Federal Building 



Anchorage, Alaska 99501 
Box 939 

Room 143, U.S. Post Office C 
Courthouse Building 

Chicago, Illinois 60604 
Courthouse G Federal Office BIdg. 
219 South Dearborn Street 

Detroit, Michigan 48207 

Federal Building 

333 Mt. Elliott Street 

Helena, Montana 59601 
P.O. Box 1724 
Federal Building 

Kansas City, Missouri 64106 
819 U. S. Courthouse 
81 1 Grand Avenue 

Omaha, Nebraska 68102 
Room 8411, New Federal Bldg. 
215 North 17th Street 

Portland, Oregon 97<!05 
333 U. S. Courthouse 
Broadway C Main Streets 

St. Paul, Minnesota 5SI01 
932 New Post Office Building 
180 E. Kellogg Boulevard 



Georgia 30309 



Room 370 
1280 W. Pe 



ichtree Street, N. W. 



Baltimore, Maryland 21201 
Room 124, Federal Builcling 
31 Hopkins Plaza 

Cleveland, Ohio 44199 
Room 1917, Federal Office Bid 
1240 East Ninth Street 

Miami, Florida 33130 
Room 1402, Federal Building 
51 Southwest First Avenue 

New Orleans, Louisiana 70113 
New Federal Building 
701 Loyola Avenue 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19: 
128 North Broad Street 

Hato Rey, Puerto Rico 00917 
Pan \m Building 
255 Ponce de Leon 
Comer of Bolivia Street 

Washington, D. C 20536 
1025 Vermont Avenue, N. W. 



Denver, Colorado 80202 
17027 Federal Office Building 

El Paso, Texas 79984 

P.O. Box 9398 

343 U.S. Courthouse 

Honolulu, Hawaii 96809 

P. O. Box 461 

595 Ala Moana Boulevard 

Los Angeles, Calif. 90012 
300 N. Los Angeles Street 

Phoenix, Arizona 85025 

Federal Building 

230 North First Avenue 

Los Fresnos, Texaa 78566 
Rural Route 3 

San Antonio, Texas 78206 

P. O. Box 2539 

U. S. Post Office 6 Courthouse 

San Francisco, CaliL 94111 
Appraisers Building 
630 Sansome Street 



Seattle, Washington 98134 
815 Airport Way, South 



DISTRICT OFnCES IN FOREICN COUNTRIES 



Frankfurt, Germany 
c/o American Consulate 

General, Box 12 
APO, New York, 09757 



Manila, Philippines 
c/o American Embassy 
APO| San Francisco, 
California, 96528 



Mexico Oty, Mexico 
c/o American Embassy 
Paseo De La Refoima 305 
Mexico, D. F. , Mexico 



Rome, Italy 

c/o American &nbassy 

APO, New Yorii, 09794 



Olo^ine-d -ProiA^ P'^-Zron: Source i-^-^Ki^ouj^ <o/i'}/ 



73 



/ 



Ll.-i^ifd States 11upai;r-..-'iit of JufLicc 
1 i.iir.i] J', ra! i CHI and !'.'. . I Lirr. 1 i /. 1 1: i en Servj'^c- 
l'.'.-if;hi ii;;l (nu, ' n.C . -January ]Q , Tiyo 



IMMIGRANT Ol'i'iiA^n ADM] •|'Ti':i) TO Ifli; Ui!] TEH STAll^S, i;y COliirj'kY C 
/// YKAR EKIJKD JV<^.V. 30, 19 69 



)R R/X. 



OV V,\ Riti; 



Count. ly or tfr.ion 
ol birth 



All C( 



Europe . . 
• F I 1 nc e 

Gc rin?.n> 

Greece . . . . 

Ireland .., 

1 : ay 

[ 1 sc-iiiVi'iurf' 



l'> land 

I'.irtugal 

S pai n o . . 

T'.i rkey (Fuirope and Asia) 

Tn^land ., c < . 

Scotland ......,...,..== 

Yi'gos ] avia ....... >.o.; . 

Other Europe ........... 



A9i T 

China and Taivran 
Hong Kong ....... 

Japan . > , 



.I,-";uanon , 

r'lii lippi nes . , 
Ryuky.i Island' 
Thailand . . . . . 

Vietnam ...... 

Other Asia . , , 



Narth America 

Canada 

MeKico 

'Other North Americ; 



South Arp.erica , 



Afi 



Australia and Nev Zcalan 



Total 



?_,080__ 

___ 349_ 

3 

290 

-'i6 

6 
33 

2 
11 

8 
1? 
If. 

3 
90. 

I; 

9 
]() 

7 5 

A 6 

91 

746 

8 
7 2 

9 

28 

• 49 

31 

3.1JL 

26 
29 



27 

I 

lf> t 



13 



Adopt ft! 
chroed 



_S97^ 

Ji'i. 

2 

216 

37 

1 

10 



11 

3 

12 

8 
6 

_37S_ 

42 
3 

84 

17 6 

8 

5 

9 

23 
4 

24 

J.?L 

106 

24 

21 

..is.. 
12 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20536 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER 
OF IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION 



The Attorney General 

United States Department of Justice 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the Annual Report of the Immigration and 
Naturalization Service for the year ended June 30, 1969. 

Respectfully submitted. 




^U^i^/^-^■^ 



Raymond F. Farrell, 

Commissioner . 



Immigration and Naturalization Service. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office 
Washington, D.C. 20402 - Price $1. 50 



CONTENTS 



Page 

GENERAL 1 

TRAVEL CONTROL AND ADJUDICATIONS 2 

Travel Control 2 

Admissions 3 

Immigrants 3 

Nonimmigrants 6 

Citizens and Resident Aliens Who Returned to the United 

States 7 

Inadmissible Aliens 7 

Adjudications 9 

Adjustment of Status 9 

Visa Petitions 10 

Other Applications 11 

Service Operations Outside the United States 11 

DOMESTIC CONTROL 12 

Deportable Aliens Located 12 

Caribbean Investigations Coordination Program 18 

Foreign-born Law Violators 19 

Criminal Prosecution 21 

DETENTION AND DEPORTATION ACTIVITIES 22 

HEARING AND LITIGATION 22 

Exclusion and Deportation Hearings 22 

Litigation 23 

ALIEN ADDRESS REPORTS 25 

CITIZENSHIP 25 

Naturalization Activities 26 

Derivative Citizenship 29 

Other Citizenship Activities 30 

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 31 

TABLE 

1. Immigration to the United States: 1820-1969 35 

2. Aliens and citizens admitted and departed, by months: Years ended June 30, 1968 

and 1969 36 

3. Aliens and citizens admitted at U.S. ports of entry: Years ended June 30, 1968 and 

1969 37 

4. Aliens admitted, by classes under the immigration laws: Years ended June 30, 

1965-69 38 

5. Immigrants admitted, by port: Years ended June 30, 1965-69 39 

6. Immigrants admitted by classes under the immigration laws and country or region 

of birth: Year ended June 30, 1969 40 

6A. Immigrants admitted by classes under the immigration laws and country or region 

of last permanent residence: Year ended June 30, 1969 41 

6B. Aliens who adjusted status to permanent residence in the United States, by country 

or region of birth: Year ended June 30, 1969 42 



TABLE — Continued Page 

6C. Aliens who were adjusted to permanent resident status in the United States under 
Section 245, Immigration and Nationality Act, by status at entry and country or 
region of birth: Year ended June 30, 1969 43 

6D. Aliens who were adjusted to permanent residence status in the United States, under 
Section 245, Immigration and Nationality Act, by year of entry and country or 
region of birth: Year ended June 30, 1969 44 

6E. Refugees admitted, by country or region of birth : Years ended June 30, 1946-69 . . 45 

6F. Immigrants admitted under the Act of September 26, 1961 (Public Law 87-301): 

September 26, 1961-June 30, 1969 46 

6G. Immigrants admitted under the Act of October 24, 1962 (Public Law 87-885), by 

country or region of birth: October 24, 1962-June 30, 1969 46 

7. Immigrants admitted by foreign state of chargeability and preferences under the 

numerical limitation of 170,000 for the Eastern Hemisphere (Public Law 89-236): 

Years ended June 30, 1967-69 47 

7A. Immigrants admitted by foreign state of chargeability and preferences under the 
numerical limitation of 170,000 for the Eastern Hemisphere (Public Law 89-236): 
Year ended June 30, 1969 48 

8. Immigrants admitted, by country or region of birth and major occupation group: 

Year ended June 30, 1969 49 

8A. Beneficiaries of occupational preferences and other immigrants admitted by occupa- 
tion: Year ended June 30, 1969 50 

9. Immigrants admitted, by country or region of birth, sex, and age: Year ended 

June 30, 1969 52 

10. Immigrants admitted, by sex and age: Years ended June 30, 1960-69 54 

lOA. Immigrants admitted, by sex, marital status, age, and major occupation group: 

Years ended June 30, 1 965-69 55 

1 1 . Aliens and citizens admitted and departed: Years ended June 30, 1908-69 56 

12. Immigrants admitted, by State of intended future permanent residence: Years 

ended June 30, 1960-69 57 

12A. Immigrants admitted, by specified countries of birth and State of intended perma- 
nent residence: Year ended June 30, 1969 58 

12B. Immigrants admitted, by specified countries of birth and rural and urban area and 

city: Year ended June 30, 1969 59 

13. Immigration by country, for decades: 1820-1969 61 

14. Immigrants admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 1960-69. 64 

15. Nonimmigrants admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 

1960-69 65 

ISA. Temporary visitors admitted, by country or region of birth: Years ended June 30, 

1960-69 66 

16. Nonimmigrants admitted by classes under the immigration laws and country or 

region of birth: Year ended June 30, 1969 67 

16A. Temporary workers admitted under Section 101(a)(15)(H) of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act, by country or region of last permanent residence: Years ended 

June 30, 1968 and 1969 68 

16B. Temporary workers admitted under Section 101 (a)(15)(H) and Section 101(a)(15)(J) 
of the Immigration and Nationality Act, by occupation: Year ended June 30, 
1969 69 

17. Nonimmigrants admitted, by classes under the immigration laws and country or 

region of last permanent residence: Year ended June 30, 1969 71 

17A. Temporary visitors and other nonimmigrants admitted, by port: Year ended 

June 30, 1969 72 

17B. Temporary visitors admitted at airports, by country or region of last permanent 

residence: Year ended June 30, 1969 73 

17C. Temporary visitors admitted at seaports, by country or region of last permanent 

residence: Year ended June 30, 1969 74 

17D. Temporary visitors admitted at land border ports, by country or region of last 

permanent residence: Year ended June 30, 1969 75 

18. Foreign laborers admitted or paroled into the United States: Years ended June 30, 

1960-69 76 

19. Entries of alien and citizen border crossers over international land boundaries, by 

State and port: Year ended June 30, 1969 77 

20. Entries of alien and citizen border crossers over international land boundaries: 

Years ended June 30, 1928-69 79 

20A. Special inquiry officer hearings completed, by regions and districts: Years ended 

June 30, 1965-69 80 

21. Aliensexcludedfrom the United States, by cause: Years ended June 30, 1892-1969. 81 

22. Aliens excluded, by country or region of birth and cause : Year ended June 30, 1 969 . 82 

23. Aliens apprehended, aliens deported, and aliens required to depart: Years ended 

June 30, 1892-1969 83 



TABLE — Continued Page 

24. Aliens deported, by country to which deported and cause: Year ended June 30, 

1969 84 

24A. Aliens required to depart, by nationality and cause: Year ended June 30, 1969. ... 85 

24B. Aliens deported, by nationality and cause: Year ended June 30, 1969 86 

24C. Aliens required to depart, by country of destination and cause: Year ended June 30, 

1969 87 

25. Aliens deported, by country to which deported and deportation expense: Year 

ended June 30, 1 969 88 

26. Aliens deported by cause: Years ended June 30, 1908-69 89 

26A. Aliens deported, by country to which deported: Years ended June 30, 1960-69. ... 90 

27. Aliens deported and required to depart, by year of entry and status at entry: Year 

ended June 30, 1969 ■ 91 

27A. Aliens deported and required to depart, by status at entry: Years ended June 30, 

1965-69 92 

27B. Deportable aliens located, by status at entry and nationality: Year ended June 30, 

1969 93 

28. Alien crewmen deserted at United States air and sea ports, by nationality and flag 

of carrier: Year ended June 30, 1969 94 

29. Vessels and airplanes inspected, crewmen admitted, alien crewmen deserted, and 

alien stowaways found, by location: Year ended June 30, 1969 95 

30. Principal activities and accomplishments of Immigration Border Patrol: Years 

ended June 30, 1960-69 96 

31. Passengers arrived in the United States, by sea and air, from foreign countries of 

embarkation: Year ended June 30, 1969 97 

32. Passengers departed from the United States, by sea and air, to foreign countries, 

by country of debarkation: Year ended June 30, 1969 99 

33. Passenger travel between the United States and foreign countries, by sea and air, 

by port of arrival or departure: Year ended June 30, 1969 101 

34. Aliens who reported under the alien address program, by selected States of residence 

and nationality: During 1969 102 

35. Aliens who reported under the alien address program by selected nationalities and 

States of residence: During 1969 103 

36. Alien population, by States of residence: 1940, 1951, 1960, 1965 through 1969 104 

37. Declarations of intention filed, petitions for naturalization filed, persons naturalized, 

and petitions for naturalization denied: Years ended June 30, 1907-69 105 

37A. Persons naturalized, by general and special naturalization provisions: Years ended 

June 30, 1965-69 106 

38. Persons naturalized, by general and special naturalization provisions and country 

or region of former allegiance: Year ended June 30, 1969 107 

39. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance: Years ended June 30, 

1960-69 108 

40. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance and major occupa- 

tion group: Year ended June 30, 1969 109 

41. Persons naturalized, by country or region of former allegiance, sex, and age: Year 

ended June 30, 1969 110 

41 A. Persons naturalized, by sex, marital status, median age, and major occupation group: 

Years ended June 30, 1965-69 112 

42. Persons naturalized, by States or territories of residence: Years ended June 30, 

1960-69 113 

42A. Persons naturalized, by specified countries of former allegiance and by States or 

territories of residence: Year ended June 30, 1969 1 14 

42B. Persons naturalized, by type of court and States or territories of residence: Year 

ended June 30, 1969 115 

43. Persons naturalized by specified countries of former allegiance and by rural and 

urban area and city : Year ended June 30, 1 969 116 

44. Persons naturalized, by country or region of birth and year of entry: Year ended 

June 30, 1969 118 

45. Persons naturalized by sex and age: Years ended June 30, 1960-69 119 

46. Administrative certificates of citizenship issued, by country or region of birth and 

reason for claim: Year ended June 30, 1969 120 

47. Administrative certificates of citizenship issued to persons who derived citizenship 

through naturalization of parents or through marriage, by country or region of 
birth and year derived: Year ended June 30, 1969 121 

48. Administrative certificates of citizenship issued to persons who acquired citizenship 

at birth abroad through citizen parents, by country or region of birth and year 
acquired: Year ended June 30, 1969 122 

49. Petitions for naturalization denied, by reasons: Years ended June 30, 1960-69 123 

49A. Administratively issued naturalization certificates cancelled: Year ended June 30, 

1969 124 



TABLE — Continued Page 

50. Certificates of naturalization revoked, by grounds: Years ended June 30, 1960-69. . 124 

51. Persons expatriated, by grounds and year reports received: Years ended June 30, 

1960-69 124 

52. Persons repatriated: Years ended June 30, 1960-69 125 

53. Prosecutions for immigration and nationality violations: Years ended June 30, 

1960-69 126 

54. Convictions for immigration and nationality violations: Years ended June 30, 

1960-69 127 

55. Writs of habeas corpus, judicial review of order of deportation and declaratory 

judgments in exclusion and deportation cases: Years ended June 30, 1965-69. . . 128 

56. Private immigration and nationality bills, introduced and laws enacted 75th Congress 

through 91st Congress, First Session 129 



Report of the 

Commissioner of Immigration 

and Naturalization 



General 

The Immigration and Naturalization Sei-vice is re- 
sponsible for enforcing and administering the immigra- 
tion laws. The inspection of aliens seeking to enter the 
United States and the adjudication process, whereby 
decisions are made which grant or deny rights and 
privileges affecting the lives and destinies of many 
persons, are the two functions of Travel Control in 
the organizational scheme. As in every recent year, 
assiduous efforts were made to insure better use of the 
inspection force and to improve procedures, thereby 
enabling an unprecedented number of travelers arriv- 
ing at ports in the United States to be examined withm 
a ver)' short time. Possibly, the outstanding innovation 
was the expansion of the accelerated inspection system, 
whereby a single inspector trained in the job of 
Customs, Public Health, Plant Quarantine, and Immi- 
gration inspection completes the inspection for the four 
agencies in 75 percent of the cases. 

The investigations and Border Patrol functions of 
the Immigration and Naturalization Sei-vice are desig- 
nated Domestic Control in the organizational pattern. 
Law enforcement officers found that almost every 
phase of their work was accelerated by the increase in 
offenders against immigration and nationality laws. 
Incidents of the smuggling of aliens into the United 
States were all too frequent; the use of counterfeit 
identification cards, false birth certificates, labor cer- 
tifications obtained through fraud, marriages entered 
into to acquire a citizen spouse thereby avoiding the 
need for labor certification, aliens who came to visit 
but who stayed to work, crewmen who deserted their 
ships, and the all too common EWI's (entered with- 
out inspection) were all part of the composite picture 
of 283,557 deportable aliens located. 

The Annual Report of the Commissioner General 
of Immigration for 1930 starts out with this statement. 
"The problem of regulating immigration varies in no 
small degree in complexity and difficulty inversely as 



its volume is legislatively curtailed" Thi.s, of course, 
was at the end of the first year of the application of 
the national origins quotas. The purpose of the Act 
of October 3, 1965 was far different from that which 
established the national origins quotas. In fact, it may 
be said its main purpose was to eliminate this system. 
But, when, 40 years later, on July 1, 1968, the Act of 
October 3, 1965 was fully implemented, and there 
were no country quotas, and natives of Western Hemi- 
sphere countries were subject to numerical controls, 
again, subterfuges (as listed above) to circumvent the 
law were on the increase. The 1930 statement that 
new controls augment the difficulties of enforcement 
still seems to be true. 

In addition to Travel Control and Domestic Control, 
another principal area of responsibility is that of 
naturalization and citizenship. This includes the exami- 
nation of aliens and witnesses to determine whether 
the aliens qualify for citizenship through naturaliza- 
tion; the presentation of the facts in each case and 
recommendations to the naturalization courts; and the 
issuance of certificates to derivative citizens. The Serv- 
ice also carries forward a program of cooperation with 
the public schools in fostering citizenship education. 

In 1969, citizenship responsibilities were met not 
only through the naturalization process itself but also 
by encouraging the education of aliens for citizenship 
through the publication of appropriate texts furnished 
the public schools for citizenship classes. Another re- 
sponsibility that has expanded in recent years is that 
of issuing certificates to persons who derive U.S. 
citizenship either through birth abroad to citizen 
parents or through the naturalization of parents. 

Other auxiliary services covered in this report are 
detention and deportation, the work of special inquiry 
officers, and the office of the chief law officer, the 
General Counsel, as well as the many support sei-vices 
of finance, personnel, procurement, statistics, records 
keeping, and management analysis. 



Travel Control 
and Adjudications 

TRAVEL CONTROL 

This past decade has really been the decade of travel 
explosion. In 1969, 231 million inspections of aliens 
and citizens were made, a 43-percent increase over a 
decade ago. Even more striking is the mounting num- 
ber of passengers arriving by air in international 
travel— 2,357,565 in 1960 and 8,036,304 in 1969— 
a 241-percent gain. 

Prior to June 1968, an international traveler could 
speed across the Atlantic Ocean in 5 or 6 hours and 
arrive at John F. Kennedy Airport to face individually 
and sequentially the following: the Public Health In- 
spector, the Immigrant Inspector, the Customs In- 
spector, and the Plant Quarantine Inspector. Some- 
times it took the visitor, returning resident, or citizen 
a third as long as the flight across the ocean to pass all 
these barriers to gain admission to this country. 

Today, 75 to 80 percent of travelers arriving at John 
F. Kennedy International Airport are cleared through 
Customs, Public Health, Plant Quarantine, and Im- 
migration in less than 2 minutes by a single inspector, 
who is trained to do the job of all four agencies. All 
passengers and hand-carried luggage are inspected by 
the single inspector. The 20 to 25 percent of the 
travelers whose inspection cannot be completed by this 
one officer are referred to a secondary officer who is a 
specialist for one of the four agencies. It may be that 
the Public Health specialist has to make a further de- 
termination of the passenger's admissibility on medical 
grounds, or the Plant Quarantine specialist needs to 
determine whether fruit carried by a passenger should 
be confiscated, or a Customs specialist may be needed 
to assess the value of certain rare articles, or the Im- 
migration specialist must resolve whether an alien is 
entitled to the visa he has presented. After installing 
this accelerated inspection system at John F. Kennedy 
and San Antonio International Airports in June of 
1968, the System was successively extended during fis- 
cal year 1969 to four additional airports and is gradu- 
ally being extended to other large airports of entry. 

Other significant steps have already been taken in 
smoothing the path of entry for international travelers. 
A number of years ago, preclearance procedures were 
instituted at five Canadian ports and in Nassau, 
Bahamas, and Hamilton, Bermuda. No further inspec- 
tion is required to the traveler upon his arrival in the 
United States. In 1969, 2,557,088 air passengers were 
preinspected. Expansion of preclearance to other for- 
eign places is one of the possibilities of the future in 
coping with vastly expanding international travel. 

In recent times, the Service has contributed to the 
facilitation of international travel by adopting special 




nmigrant Inspector performing Customs baggage inspection of a 
visitor arriving from Manila at SeattleTacoma Airport. The ac- 
celerated inspection system, which proved to be a success at 
John F. Kennedy and San Antonio International Airports, was 
extended to four additional airports in 1969. 



procedures on an ad hoc basis for particular situations. 
Thus, while holders of Nonresident Mexican Border 
Crossing Cards were permitted to visit in Texas for 
no more than 3 days under regulations in effect in 
1968, special regulations were promulgated to admit 
such persons for a period of up to 10 days so that they 
could visit the HemisFair 1968 in San Antonio during 
the 6 months of the Fair's existence. Similarly, regula- 
tions were placed in effect in connection with the 
Ol^Tnpic games in Mexico City. 

In the past and particularly in the year of this report, 
the Service has attempted to adjust to its responsibilities 
with flexibility and imagination. All manner of recom- 
mendations and suggestions have been submitted to us 
not only by our own employees but also by representa- 
tives of interested organizations such as the carriers 
who are, of course, enormously interested in insuring 
that their passengers will encounter a minimum of gov- 
ernmental requirements upon arrival in the United 
States. The Service shares this concern and supports 
any measure to facilitate inspection consistent with the 
administration of the immigration laws and protection 
of the public interest. Some future possibilities are: 
the electronic screening of the names of arriving 
passengers and crewmen to determine instantaneously 
whether any pertinent derogatory information exists; 



or reciprocity among nations to eliminate visa require- 
ments on a larger scale or to adopt international visas 
good for travel to any country' ; or the expansion of pre- 
clearance abroad to enable the great bulk of travelers, 
upon arrival in the United States, to simply gather 
their baggage and proceed to their destinations. 

Admissions 

Immigrants 

In fiscal year 1969, 358,579 aliens were given status 
as lawful permanent residents of the United States, a 
decrease of 21 percent over 1968. Of that total, 319,791 
obtained immigrant visas abroad and were admitted to 
the United States. The remaining 38,788 were already 
in the United States and adjusted their status to that 
of permanent resident. Of the total number of immi- 
grants in fiscal year 1969, 157,306 were preference and 
nonpreference aliens, 127,346 were special immigrants 
born in independent Western Hemisphere countries 
and their spouses and children, 1 ,699 ^\•ere other spe- 
cial immigrants, 60,016 were immediate relatives, and 
12,212 were in other classes. 

The parent of an adult U.S. citizen and the spouse 
or child of a U.S. citizen are classified as "immediate 
relative" when the Sei-vice approves a visa petition to 
accord the alien relative such status. The annual nu- 
merical limitations on the issuance of immigrant visas, 
generally applicable to Western and Eastern Hemi- 
sphere natives, do not apply to immediate relatives who 
thus are not required to wait for the allocation of 
visa numbers. 

The classes under which immigrants were admitted 
are reflected in the table that follows. 

Numerical Limitations. From 1921 when the first 
quota law was passed until [uly 1, 1968 when the Act 
of October 3, 1965 (Public Law 89-236) became fully 
effecti\e, there were laws and prescribed formulas 
limiting the number of immigrants who could be ad- 
mitted from every country except the independent 
countries of the Western Hemisphere. However, be- 
ginning on July 1, 1968, the prospective immigrant 
has been made aware that for immigration purposes, 
too, his world is divided into two parts, the Eastern 
and Western Hemispheres. With few e.xceptions, every 
immigrant, no matter where he is bom, is subject to an 
annual numerical limitation on the number of immi- 
grant visas which may be issued and must compete 
in the geographic hemisphere to which he belongs for 
a visa number. 

A native of an independent country of the Western 
Hemisphere, with certain exceptions, is by law con- 
sidered to be a special immigrant. No more than 
120,000 visa numbers may be allocated to such natives 
and their spouses and children who accompany or fol- 
low to join them in any one fiscal year. As of July 



Immigrants Admitted: Years Ended June 30, 1968 and 1969 



Total immigrants 358,579 454,448 

I. Immigrants subject to numerical limitations of Eastern Hem- 

isphere 157,306 156,212 

Relative preferences... 92,458 68,384 

Unmarried sons and daughters of U.S. citizens 1,124 1,105 

Spouses, unmarried sons and daughters of resident 

aliens and their children 25,719 21,002 

Married sons and daughters of U.S. citizens, their 

spouses and children 9,914 10,562 

Brothers and sisters of U.S. citizens, their spouses and 

children 55,701 35,715 

Occupational preferences. 31, 763 26, 865 

Highly skilled and professional workers, their spouses 

and children 16,213 13,751 

Other workers, their spouses and children 15,550 13,114 

Conditional entrants' 9,533 6,658 

Nonpreference immigrants..-. 23,170 53,994 

Aliens adjusted under sec. 244, I. &N. Act! 382 311 

II. Immediate relatives... 60,016 43,677 

Spouses of U.S. citizens 39,273 27,890 

Children of U.S. citizens 12,731 7,866 

Parents o! U.S. citizens 8,012 7,921 

III. Special immigrants 128,935 155,127 

Natives of Western Hemisphere countries, their spouses 

and children..... '127,346 153,929 

Other specal immgrants 1,589 1,198 

IV. Immigrants admitted under special legislation 7,645 94,514 

Refugee-escapees who adjusted status 985 2,637 

Immigrants, Act of Oct 24. 1962 93 138 

Cuban parolees who adjusted status, Act of Nov. 2, 1966- - J6,343 91,520 

Immigrants, other special acts 224 219 

V. Other immigrants not subject to numerical limitations. 4, 677 4, 918 

Aliens adjusted under sec. 244, 1. & N. Act... 46 64 

Aliens adjusted under sec. 249, I. & N. Act 1,565 2,148 

Other immigrants. 3,066 2,706 

1 Includes 8,987 conditional entrants in 1969 and 5,800 in 1968 whose status does not 
become permanent until 2 years after entry. 
: Includes 10 in 1969 and 12 in 1968 who adjusted under special legislation. 
' Immigrants subject to the numerical limitations of the Western Hemisphere. 

1 969, 1 year after that numerical limitation took effect, 
so many persons had applied that a waiting list became 
necessary, and visas were being issued only to those 
who had established a priority date before October 8, 
1968. Natives of Canada, Mexico, and other inde- 
pendent countries in the Western Hemisphere who, 
prior to July 1, 1968, had been admitted without 
regard to a numerical limit are finding it necessary 
now to wait for extensive periods before being issued 
immigrant visas. In 1969, there were 129,045 special 
inunigrants admitted, a reduction of 17 percent from 
the 1968 figure of 155,308. 

Exclusive of the independent countries of the West- 
ern Hemisphere, the rest of the world, including those 
areas of the world which have no independent status, 
are considered for visa allocation purposes as the East- 
em Hemisphere. With some exceptions, e.g., immediate 



IMMIGRANTS BORN IN NORTH AND SOUTH AMERICA 
ADMITTED UNDER THE NUMERICAL LIMITATION OF THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE 
YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1969 



CENTRAL AMERICA 




TOTAL ADMITTED 133,689 \J 

WEST INDIES 54,386 

MEXICO 31 ,933 

SOUTH AMERICA 22,085 

CANADA 14,617 

CENTRAL AMERICA 8,322 

OTHER 2,346 



\_l Numbers of visas issued and immigrants admitted will not necessarily agree. Differences may be 
caused by failure of aliens to make use of the visas issued or by immigrants who are admitted to 
to the United States in the year following the one in which the visa was issued. 



relatives of U.S. citizens, all Eastern Hemisphere na- 
tives must qualify for a preference in the allocation 
of visa numbers or be eligible for a nonpreference 
number when numbers in that category are available. 
(Not until the second half of fiscal year 1969 did non- 
preference numbers become available in any signifi- 
cant quantity.) Prospective immigrants in the Eastern 
Hemisphere compete for one of 170,000 nimibers 
annually. 

Before December 1, 1965, there were four prefer- 
ences; now there are seven. The first, second, fourth, 
and fifth preferences are allocated to specified relatives 
of citizens and lawful permanent residents of the 
United States. The third and sixdi preferences are 
occupational preferences, while the seventh preference 
pertains to certain refugees. 

During the year, we admitted to the United States 
92,458 close relatives of citizens and permanent resi- 
dents under the first, second, fourth, and fifth prefer- 
ences; 9,677 persons who qualified as members of the 
professions or as persons with exceptional ability in 
the sciences or the arts and 6,536 spouses and children 
under the third preference; and 9.100 persons to fill 
jobs in the United States for which a shortage of 



workers existed as certified by the Department of La- 
bor and 6,450 spouses and children under the sixth 
preference. 

Under the seventh preference, 8,987 refugees con- 
ditionally entered the United States. These conditional 
entrants are able to acquire status as permanent resi- 
dents after they have resided here for 2 years. In ad- 
dition, persons already in the United States for at least 
2 years who were not admitted as conditional entrants 
but qualify as refugees are eligible to apply for adjust- 
ment to lawful resident status. In the year of this report, 
we adjusted status in 546 such cases. There were 23,169 
immigrants \\'ho were admitted to the United States 
under the nonpreference category, the smallest nimiber 
since enactment of Public Law 89-236. 

Characteristics of Immigrants of 1969. Of the 
358,579 immigrants counted in 1969, 38,788 were 
already in the United States and were adjusted to 
permanent status, and 319,791 entered as immigrants. 
Both these groups were additions to the permanent 
population of the United States. There were 165,472 
males and 193,107 females, or 857 males for every 1,000 
females. Of the males, 61,440 were under 20, 98,263 
were 20 to 60 years old, and 5,769 were 60 and over. 



PREFERENCE AND NONPREFERENCE IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED 
YEAR ENDING JUNE 30. 1969 




NONPREFERENCE 8.5% 




EUROPE - 98,480 



ASIA -53,000 



♦CHARGED TO THE COUNTRIES OF EUROPE AND ASIA WITHIN THE NUMERICAL 
LIMITATION OF THE EASTERN HEMISPHERE, 



For the females, 64,383 were under 20, 120.149 were 
20 to 60 years old, and 8,575 were over 60. Mexico had 
the largest proportion (52 percent) of immigrants 
under 20 years of age, as well as the largest number 
(23,412) . The greatest number of oldsters, 60 years of 
age and over, came from Italy and China. This is not 
surprising, since they were also the countries from 
whence the most "parents of citizens" were admitted. 

On the average, immigrants were about a year 
younger than those admitted in 1968. 

Half the female immigrants were married, 4.2 per- 
cent were widowed or divorced, and 46 percent were 
single. For the males, 45.5 percent were married, 1.2 
jjercent were widowed or divorced, and the remaining 
53.3 percent were single. 



Total 24.8 

Males 25.2 

Females 24. 3 



26.2 
25.6 



Better than half (56.6 percent) of the 1969 im- 
migrants did not report an occupation at entry. Most 
of these people were housewives and children under 14. 
Students and retired persons were in lesser numbers. 
Among those who reported an occupation, 11.3 per- 
cent were in the professional, technical, and kindred 
categories. The breakdown by continents shows some 
interesting differences; 24.5 percent of the professionals 
came from Europe, 44.0 percent from Asia, 4.6 percent 
from Africa, 1.1 percent from Oceania, 20.5 percent 
from North America, and 5.3 percent from South 
America. The country with the highest proportion of 
professionals was India with 48 percent of the 5,963 
immigrants in the professional occupations. Of the 
20,744 immigrants born in the Philippines, more than a 
third reported professional occupations. 

White-collar workers, i.e., managers, salesmen, and 
clerical workers, comprised about 6 percent of im- 
migrants admitted. Sixteen percent of the immigrants 
were blue-collar workers — craftsmen, operatives, and 
laborers except farm laborers. Craftsmen came jjrin- 
cipally from Greece, Italy, Portugal, Yugoslavia, 



Mexico, the West Indies, Colombia, and Ecuador. Most 
of the operatives were from North America and 
Europe. 

The current problems of American housewives in 
finding domestic help gives rise to some interest in the 
"private household workers." In 1969, 16,822 private 
household workers were admitted, of whom 2,951 were 
bom in Europe (Portugal 756, Italy 535, Greece 310, 
the United Kingdom 300, Spain 171, and Yugoslavia 
131); 1,254 were born in Asia, including 478 bom 
in China, 317 in the Philippines. Most of the remainder, 
12,534, were born in the Western Hemisphere coun- 
tries of Mexico (2,056), Jamaica (4,495), Trinidad 
and Tobago (1,370), the Dominican Republic (913), 
Central America ( 1,151 ), and South America (1,235). 

Until 1960, more newly arriving immigrants planned 
to establish residency in New York than in any other 
State. With the beginning of the decade, however, 
California emerged from a rather distant second choice 
to surpass New York. In 1964, the positions were again 
reversed and since that year more and more im- 
migrants indicate New York is the State where they 
intend to reside. In 1969, for example, one of every 
four new immigrants planned to reside in New York, 
and 23,220 more of them planned to reside there than 
in California ( 94,403 vs. 7 1 , 1 83 ) . 

The predominant number of immigrants from south- 
ern Europe and the Caribbean planned to reside in 
New York: in 1969, 44 percent of all arriving Italian 
immigrants planned to reside there, as did 29 percent 
of the Greeks; 62 percent of the Jamaicans; 73 percent 
of the Dominicans; 79 percent of the Haitians; and 
58 percent of the immigrants from Trinidad and 
Tobago. Also, in 1969, most immigrants from Mexico 
and Canada, and from the Far East chose to reside 
in California : one of every two Mexicans did so ; 1 3 
percent of the Canadians; 39 percent of the Filipinos; 
36 percent of the Chinese; 18 percent of the Koreans; 
and 16 percent of the Indians. Twenty percent of all 
new Portuguese immigrants planned to reside in 
California, in keeping with the well established 
Portuguese population of that State. 

Cuban Refugees. Cuban refugees arrived by airlift 
from Cuba to the United States at the rate of two 
flights a day, 5 days a week, except when weather con- 
ditions or other problems caused a temporaiy suspen- 
sion. In fiscal year 1969, 41,751 Cuban refugees arrived. 
At the end of the year, more than 155,600 Cubans had 
found a haven in this country by means of the air- 
lift, and the great majority of new arrivals was re- 
united with families already here. 

Under Public Law 89-732, enacted November 2, 
1966, Cubans who had been in the United States for 
2 years or longer could have their status adjusted to 
that of permanent residents. From the passage of the 
Act to June 30, 1969, 123,615 Cubans had gained per- 




Aged Cuban refugee is greeted by representatives of the Depart- 
ment of Health, Education, and Welfare and the National Catholic 
Welfare Conference. During the year, 41,751 Cuban refugees 
arrived by airlift. 



manent status under this Act (6,343 in 1969). Most 
of the adjustments occurred in fiscal year 1968 wiien 
over 90,000 Cubans were converted to permanent 
status prior to the establishment of the Western Hem- 
isphere numerical limitation. Only 6,343 attained per- 
manent status under Public Law 89-732 in 1969. 

Nonimmigrants 

A person who comes to the United States for a 
temporary period is called a nonimmigrant. The fol- 
lowing persons are all categorized as nonimmigrants; 
diplomats and their families, attendants, sen'ants, and 
personal employees; visitors for business or pleasure; 
persons transiting the United States; crewmen on ves- 
sels or aircraft; treaty traders and treaty investors; 
students; four categories of representatives to inter- 
national organizations and their attendants, servants, 
and personal employees; three types of temporary 
workers or trainees; foreign correspondents; and ex- 
change visitors. Alien residents returning from tem- 
porary visits abroad, although they are immigrants, are 



included statistically in the nonimmigrant count in 
order to keep the count of immigrants limited to those 
who are a new addition to the total population. Ex- 
clusive of citizens of Canada and Mexico who enter 
frequently as border crossers and exclusive of alien 
crewmen, a total of 3,645,328 nonimmigrants was ad- 
mitted during the year, an increase of 14 percent over 
fiscal year 1968. Shown below are the classes under 
which nonimmigrants were admitted and a comparison 
with last year's figures. 

Those persons who came to visit friends and relatives 
or came as tourists and who are classified as visitors 
for pleasure make up the largest group of non- 
immigrants and numbered 2,382,198, an increase of 
17 percent over the preceding year. Additionally, 299,- 
810 persons were admitted temporarily as visitors for 
business. Mexico (689,957), Canada (318,974), the 
United Kingdom (195,877), and Germany (107,818) 
ranked highest in the number of visitors for pleasure. 
The greatest numbers of business visitors came from 
the United Kingdom (51,052), Japan (47,776), Ger- 
many (25,676),^ France (19,728), Mexico (13,812), 
Italy ( 12,637) , Canada ( 10,650) , and the Netherlands 
(10,243). 

Foreign students entering to attend educational in- 
stitutions numbered 90,486. They were accompanied 
by 8,302 spouses and children. Also, 47,175 exchange 
visitors to participate in Government- and privately- 
sponsored programs designed to further international 
cultural exchange were admitted, accompanied by 
15,301 spouses and children. Students and exchange 
visitors from North America numbered 41,837, from 
Asia 37,095, and from Europe 30,539. 

One of three groups of temporary workers or train- 
ees relates to persons who are of distinguished merit 

Nonimmigrants Admitted: Years Ended June 30, 1968 and 1969 



Class of admission 



1969 



1968 



Total 3,645,328 3,200,336 

Foreign government officials... 44,940 45,320 

Temporary visitors for business... 299,810 257,800 

Temporary visitors for pleasure _ 2,382, 198 2,042,666 

Transit aliens 210,543 232,731 

Treaty traders and investors 15,264 13,091 

Students 90,486 73,303 

Spouses and ctrildren of students.. 8,302 7,009 

International representatives.. 19,956 19,826 

Temporary v»orkers and industrial trainees 62,952 68,969 

Worlsers of distinguistied merit and ability 8,941 11,578 

Ottier temporary workers 49,913 52,798 

Industrial trainees 4,098 4,593 

Representatives of foreign information media 4,164 3,622 

Exchange visitors _ 47,175 45,320 

Spouses and children of exchange visitors 15,301 15,163 

Returning residents 441,082 373,252 

MATO officials 3 155 2 264 



+16.3 
+ 16.6 
-9.5 
+ 16.6 
+23.4 
+ 18.4 
+0.7 
-8.7 



-22.8 
-5.5 
-10 8 
+ 15.0 
+4.1 
+0 9 
+ 18.2 
+39.4 



and ability, who wish to enter the United States to 
perform temporary services which require such dis- 
tinguished merit and ability. Of the 8,941 such per- 
sons who were brought to the United States, 7,700 
were in professional occupations. Other skilled and un- 
skilled \\orkers whose services were needed in the 
United States amounted to 49,913, of whom there were 
7,514 in the professional or technical categories, 8,255 
craftsmen, 13,800 farm laborers or foremen, and 10,564 
carpenters' helpers, lumbermen, gardeners, and the 
like. Trainees are persons who are given training in 
various industries and in agriculture who are not able 
to obtain such training in their own countries, and 
who do not displace American workers. There were 
4,098 such trainees. 

Among the temporaiy workers who came to the 
United States during this reporting year were 12,818 
agricultural workers from the Caribbean area and 10 
from the British Virgin Islands; 9,740 Canadian agri- 
cultural workers and woodsmen; 391 sheepherders from 
Europe; 16,841 other workers destined to the U.S. 
Virgin Islands; and 318 destined to Guam from Korea 
and the Philippines. 

Other nonimmigrants admitted included 44,940 
foreign government officials, 19,956 official representa- 
tives to international organizations, 15,264 treaty 
traders and investors, 4,164 members of the foreign 
news media, and 3,155 N.\TO officials. Admitted were 
210,543 travelers in transit through the United States 
to other countries. Almost 2,140,000 alien crewmen 
arrived at U.S. ports during the year and were granted 
shore leave. 

Citizens and Resident Aliens 

Who Returned to the United States 

The number of U.S. citizens \vho returned from a 
visit abroad rose from 92,086,163 in fiscal year 1968 
to 96,145,919 this year. Of these, 89,603,348 were 
border crossers, 1,106,630 were crewmen, and the re- 
maining 5,435,941 came back from countries other 
than Mexico and Canada. Lawful permanent residents 
returning from visits abroad via air and sea transporta- 
tion were admitted back into the United States in the 
number of 441,082, which was an 18-percent increase 
over fiscal year 1968. The number of citizens arrived 
from abroad showed a 17-percent increase over last 
year. Largest percentage increases were 39 percent 
from Africa and 23 percent from the West Indies, 
principally, the Bahamas, Bermuda, and Jamaica. 

Inadmissible Aliens 

Entries Denied. One of our principal functions is to 
insure that aliens who have no right to enter the United 
States or whose entry would not be in our best interests 
do not, in fact, enter. The inspection of aliens is, there- 
fore, designed to permit the entry as expeditiously as 



NONIMMIGRANTS ADMITTED 
1965-1969 



4,000,000 



3,000,000 



2,000,000 



.000,000 




969 



possible of all aliens who meet the qualifications set 
out by law, to establish time limits for control on the 
departure of those who have been admitted for a 
temporary period, and to turn back the aliens who do 
not qualify for entry. The Service prides itself on set- 
ting generous entry terms for admissible aliens and 
giving humane and considerate treatment to those who 
are asked to return to their own countries. 

Entry was denied to 262,954 aliens in fiscal year 
1969. Of this number, 17,924 were crewmen who were 
denied the privilege of landing. There were 185 stow- 
aways found and detained on the vessels on which they 
arrived, 185,665 applied as border crossers, and 58,655 
others withdrew their application for admission rather 
than face formal exclusion proceedings. 

After being accorded a hearing by a special inquiry 
officer, 525 aliens were denied entry. Of these, 70 
percent lacked documents required for the type of 
admission they sought. Fourteen were excluded on 
subversive grounds, 66 had criminal, immoral, or 
narcotic records, and eight were certified by the Public 
Health Service as being afflicted with mental or phys- 



ical defects which rendered them inadmissible under 
the immigration laws. 

Waivers of Inadmissibility. Congress has given to 
the Attorney General the authority to waive certain 
grounds of inadmissibility for pemianent residence of 
alien spouses, parents, and children of lawful penna- 
nent residents or citizens of the United States when 
he finds that the alien's continued exclusion from the 
United States would result in extreme hardship to the 
lawful permanent resident or citizen of the United 
States and that the admission of such alien would not 
be contrary to the welfare, safety, or security of the 
United States. Approved were 1,212 such waivers in 
fiscal year 1969. Additionally, 6,236 waivers were 
granted to nonimmigrants whose admission was found 
to be in the public interest. 

Aliens who have defected from Communism may be 
granted visas for entry into the United States if they 
can establish that they were actively opposed to that 
ideology for at least 5 years prior to their application 
for admission to the United States and if it can also be 
already shown that their admission would be in the 



public interest. In fiscal year 1969, 77 such aliens were 
admitted after having been granted waivers of their 
inadmissibility by the Attorney General. 

ADJUDICATIONS 

Determinations on petitions and applications for 
preference in visa classification, extensions of stay, 
change of status, waivers of certain grounds of in- 
admissibility, and other aspects of the immigration 
laws are the responsibility of the adjudications person- 
nel in Travel Control. The adjudicator's task is not an 
easy one. He must make judgments which have a far- 
reaching effect upon the lives of aliens. For example, 
he must determine whether families will be reunited 
or remain separated or judge whether exceptional 
hardship to a U.S. citizen or lawful resident alien can 
be alleviated. He must determine whether an inadmis- 
sible alien may be permitted to enter for urgent per- 
sonal reasons or whether an alien in the United States 
may continue his stay in this country either temporarily 
or permanently. 

For the third straight year, there were more than 1 
million receipts, 1,247,841, a number that exceeded 
fiscal year 1968 by 8 percent. What a difference 10 
years make. In 1960, total receipts of adjudications 
amounted to 696,721. Ten years later, this figure al- 
most doubled, but the officer force adjudicating this 
expanded workload today is somewhat lower than that 
of 10 years ago. In addition, the quality of Service 
adjudications has steadily improved. Today the pub- 
lic can see more of how and why cases are decided 
than ever before. Decisions are based entirely on the 
evidence in the record. Denial decisions spell out pre- 
cisely the grounds on which they are based in language 
easily understood by laymen and especially by persons 
who are not at home with the English language. More 
precedent decisions have been published than ever 
before in our history. Regulations are fuller and more 
explicit than ever before. 

Adjustment of Status 

Cuban Adjustments. Since the Cuban revolution 
a little more than 10 years ago, Cubans have sought 
refuge in the United States. These refugees were 
paroled into the United States which meant that while 
they could stay here, they had no recognized im- 
migration status. It is tme that in the beginning most 
Cubans hoped and confidently expected they would 
soon be going home again. 

As the years passed this hope faded. Their children 
went to American schools and adopted the American 
way of life as their own. The parents and breadwinners 
wanted to earn their own way, and many were quali- 
fied to make real contributions to our society. But in 
order to get the jobs they could splendidly fill, they 



often found that they needed to be pemianent residents 
or citizens of the United States. As parolees, they could 
not be either. 

The Congress, recognizing the situation and wanting 
to help the refugees become self-sufficient, enacted 
Public Law 89-732. This law, effective November 2, 

1966, made it possible for qualified Cuban refugees to 
become pemianent residents of the United States. By 
November 14, 1966, we began to distribute application 
forms to eligible Cubans, and, at the end of fiscal year 

1967. 41,052 applications had been filed and 25,693 
applications adjudicated. Last year, 82,477 applica- 
tions were received and 95,679 adjudicated. In fiscal 
year 1969, receipts were only 23,451, and of these only 
7,306 were adjudicated. 

There are several reasons for this decline of 72 per- 
cent in receipts and 92 percent in adjudications com- 
pleted. In May and June of 1968, many eligible Cubans 
filed their applications to avoid the effect of the nu- 
merical limitation imposed on Western Hemisphere 
natives beginning July 1, 1968. Secondly, at the time 
of enactment of Public Law 89-732, more than 125,- 
000 Cubans were eligible to apply to become perma- 
nent residents, because they had resided in the LTnited 
States for 2 years or longer. From fiscal year 1969 on, it 
is estimated the number of eligibles will be no more 
than 40,000, since that is the approximate number 
of Cuban refugees being paroled into the United States 
each year. Additionally, the numerical limitation al- 
luded to has obliged the Cuban refugees to compete 
with other Western Hemisphere natives for the 120,- 
000 visa numbers allocated annually under the Im- 
migration and Nationality Act, as amended, to such 
natives. 

Public Law 89-732 also provided that Cuban 
refugees who had gone abroad, obtained immigrant 
visas, and reentered as immigrants might have the date 
of their admission as immigrants backdated not to ex- 
ceed 30 months before the date of the law. This was 
a privilege sought mostly by professionals who needed 
this benefit in order to become eligible more quickly 
for citizenship so that they could practice their profes- 
sions in those States which required U.S. citizenship 
as a prerequisite to practice. In 1969, 1,847 Cubans 
took advantage of this provision of the Act compared 
with 1,350 the prior year. 

Section 245. In the days before the Immigration and 
Nationality Act of December 24, 1952 came into 
being, an alien could not become a permanent resident 
of the United States unless he applied for and ob- 
tained from an American consular officer abroad an 
immigrant visa. Section 245 of the Act authorizes ad- 
justment of status to that of a peiTnanent resident in 
the case of an alien in the United States without re- 
quiring him to obtain a visa from a consular officer. 
Section 245 has undergone several changes since 1952. 
Today three requirements must be met before an alien 



in the United States may become a permanent resi- 
dent: he must make application for such status; he 
must be eligible to receive an immigrant visa and 
must be admissible to the United States for pemianent 
residence; and an immigrant visa number must be 
immediately available to him at the time his applica- 
tion is approved. The Act expressly precludes from 
this privilege of adjustment of status natives of any 
country of the Western Hemisphere or of any adjacent 
island and crewmen. 

In fiscal years 1966, 1967, and 1968, Public Law 
89-236 allowed the use of quota numbers which had 
not been issued in each of the prior fiscal years. Since, 
prior to Public Law 89-236, as many as 80,000 num- 
bers a year had gone unused, the greater availability 
of visa numbers made it possible for nonimmigrants 
in the United States to qualify for assignment of visa 
numbers as preference or nonpreference immigrants 
and subsequently to apply for adjustment. Con- 
sequently, there were 52,714 applicants in fiscal year 
1966, 36,381 in 1967, 35,276 in 1968, and 41,683 in 
1969. Compared with the receipt of 22,814 adjust- 
ment applications under section 245 in 1965, the last 
full year prior to the enactment of Public Law 89-236, 
the effect of the new law comes into sharp focus. 

Other Adjustments. The Joint Resolution of July 14, 
1960 provided that refugee-escapees who had been 
paroled into and remained in the United States for 2 
years could become permanent residents of the United 
States if found admissible under the immigration laws. 
In fiscal year 1969, 985 refugee-escapees were found 
admissible and were accorded permanent resident 
status. Since passage of the Joint Resolution, a total of 
19,694 refugee-escapees have become permanent 
residents. 

Section 13 of the Act of September 11, 1957 provides 
that persons who had been admitted as diplomats or 
international representatives and who are not main- 
taining that status may be accorded permanent resi- 
dent status. While 50 such adjustments per year are 
permitted, only 20 former officials of foreign govern- 
ments or of international organizations and members 
of their families were adjusted under this provision of 
law during the fiscal year. 

Visa Petitions 

The visa petition or a procedure similar to it, as the 
vehicle by which a person is accorded a classification 
under the immigration laws for the purpose of obtain- 
ing a certain nonimmigrant or immigrant visa, has 
been in effect since the Act of February 5, 1917 (fourth 
proviso to section 3) when the Congress gave the 
Attorney General the authority to determine if an 
alien could be brought to the United States to perform 
skilled labor. Section 9 of the Act of May 26, 1924 



broadened the use of the visa petition to accord 
classification to aliens as relatives who thus became 
eligible to obtain either nonquota or quota immigra- 
tion visas. Again the Immigration and Nationality Act 
of 1952 broadened and refined the visa petition proce- 
dure by expanding the preference categories. 

Public Law 89-236 abolished the term "nonquota" 
and substituted the equivalent status of "immediate 
relative" which includes the spouses, minor unmarried 
children of United States citizens (including adopted 
or to be adopted children) , and parents of adult United 
States citizens. Aliens who are accorded "immediate 
relative" classification are not subject to the annual 
numerical limitation on immigration. In addition, Con- 
gress intended that any person who could qualify as 
an immediate relative must do so. Thus, such persons, 
not having to obtain visa numbers, would not eat into 
the authorized number of immigrant visas. This came 
fully into play on and after July 1, 1968, when special 
immigrants were limited to 120,000 numbers annually. 
The necessity to qualify aliens as immediate relatives 
when possible, resulted in a large increase of immediate 
relative petitions. During the year, 75,308 immediate 
relative petitions, including 2,178 orphan petitions, 
were approved as against 49,337 immediate relative 
petitions, of which 1,699 were orphans, approved in the 
previous year. Service offices abroad adjudicated 962 
of the orphan petitions. 

Under the Act of October 3, 1965, there were four 
preferences established for relatives of United States 
citizens and resident aliens. The first preference cate- 
gory is reserved for unmarried sons and daughters of 
United States citizens, and, in fiscal year 1969, 1,781 
petitions were approved to accord this status as con- 
trasted with 1,822 approved petitions in 1968. Spouses 
and unmarried sons and daughters of aliens lawfully 
admitted for pennanent residence are accorded sec- 
ond preference. A total of 30,222 such petitions was 
approved as against 25,41 1 approved a year ago. Mar- 
ried sons and daughters are now entitled to fourth 
preference status, and the fifth preference classifica- 
tion is for brothers and sisters of citizens. Petitions ap- 
proved in these categories totalled 24,696 during the 
year. 

The third preference category is for members of the 
professions and persons of exceptional ability in the 
sciences or arts. It is the only category in which the 
petition may be filed by the prospective immigrant 
himself or by a person in his behalf. A total of 34,570 
such petitions was approved and 2,520 denied. Only 
17,000 visa numbers are available \vorldwide for aliens 
who have third preference classification. The demand 
for one of these numbers is such that even in those 
months of fiscal year 1969 when allocation of visa 
numbers was current for most categories in a good part 
of the world, the third preference category remained 
oversubscribed. 



10 



The sixth preference category for aUens who qualify 
as skilled or unskilled workers in occupations for which 
workere in the United States are in short supply showed 
a decrease of 40 percent in approved petitions in fiscal 
year 1969 from the number approved in 1968. Reduc- 
tion in the issuance of Labor Department certifications 
concerning availability of workers may have been a 
factor in this decline. 

Section 203(a) (7) of the Act provides that 10,200 
visa numbers annually may be assigned to refugees. 
It also provides that up to 5,100 of these numbers may 
be used in adjusting the status of aliens who have been 
continuously physically present here for 2 years and 
who qualify as refugees. For the first time since the 
Act became efTective, fiscal year 1969 saw the number 
of refugees abroad who sought entry into the United 
States under this section exceed the visas available. 
This situation arose primarily because the Soviet inva- 
sion of Czechoslovakia led several thousand nationals 
of that country to flee mainly into Austria and Ger- 
many, where they sought classification as refugees. The 
number of applications for classification as refugees 
from persons in the United States continued to decline 
as only 654 were received in 1969. 

Petitions filed by employers in the United States to 
import for temporary periods aliens of distinguished 
merit and ability, workers in short supply in the United 
States, and industrial trainees totalled 22,133 in fiscal 
year 1969 as compared to 18,654 received the previous 
year. There were 20,522 approved and 862 denied. 
Many cases involved consultation with other Govern- 
ment agencies and representatives of labor and man- 
agement. The statute requires in the cases of temporary 
workers that the work they perform, in and of itself, 
be temporary in nature. In 1969, when Western Hemi- 
sphere natives came under the annual limitation of 
120,000 visa numbers and immigrant visas were no 
longer immediately available to them, petitions for 
temporar)' workers increased. The most difficult ques- 
tion to resolve in these cases is whether the work, in and 
of itself, is temporary in nature. 

Other Applications 

During the year, 390,696 applications by nonimmi- 
grants to extend their temporary stay in the United 
States were adjudicated as compared to 340,707 last 
year, an increase of 15 percent. This is an area where 
increases may continue to be anticipated so long as 
tourism remains on the rise. There were 206,267 alien 
border crossing cards issued to residents of Canada and 
Mexico who enter the United States frequently. Some 
19,766 nonimmigrants in the United States were per- 
mitted to change to other nonimmigrant classes. As has 
been true in the past, the bulk of the requests for change 
involved visitors for pleasure who decided after entry 

376-870 O — 70 2 



that they wished to continue their education in Ameri- 
can schools. 

No school may enroll nonimmigrant students unless 
authorized to do so by the Service. Nonimmigrant stu- 
dents and exchange visitors must receive permission 
from the Service to transfer from one school or ex- 
change program to another or, in the case of students, 
to accept part-time employment. During the year, 
59,774 applications were approved in these categories, 
an increase of 14 percent over 1968. 

Some U.S. citizens have need to frequently cross our 
land borders. To facilitate their reentry into the United 
States, they were issued 11.969 certificates of identity. 
Permanent resident aliens often require reentry permits 
or extension of reentry permits, or duplicate alien 
registration cards, and, in fiscal year 1969, 131,012 
applications for such documents were acted upon as 
compared to 1 1 6,843 a year ago. Deported aliens 
granted permission to reapply for admission to the 
United States numbered 3,159. In addition, permission 
to return to the United States was granted to 184 
resident aliens who had departed but who otherwise 
would have been ineligible to reenter. 

.\liens admitted to the United States to participate 
in exchange programs must depart from the United 
States and reside for 2 years in the country of their 
nationality or last residence or, under certain circum- 
stances, in another foreign countr)' before they can 
apply for immigrant visas or become permanent resi- 
dents. This foreign residence requirement may be 
waived only if it is established that compliance with 
the requirement would cause exceptional hardship to 
the alien's U.S. citizen or lawfully resident alien spouse 
or child. It may also be waived upon fonnal request 
of an interested U.S. Government agency. In each case, 
the Secretary of State must recommend whether the 
waiver should be granted or denied, and the Attorney 
General must then make the final decision as to the 
waiver. Granted during the year were 1,818 such 
waivers out of a total of 2,466 applications received 
by the Service. Also in 1969, regulations were issued 
establishing the right of an applicant whose applica- 
tion for waiver had been denied by a district director 
to appeal that decision to the appropriate regional 
commissioner. 

Service Operations Outside the 
United States 

Service officers stationed abroad continued to adju- 
dicate applications and petitions filed by U.S. citizens 
and permanent resident aliens who are abroad. They 
worked closely with U.S. consuls in matters involving 
functions of the Service and the consuls. The Service, 
like other Government agencies with employees sta- 
tioned abroad, reduced the number of its personnel 
stationed in foreign countries in order to help improve 



11 



the balance-of-payments situation. At the same time, as 
a service to intending immigrants, consular officers 
were authorized to adjudicate relative petitions filed 
by persons abroad in countries where no Sei-vice officers 
were stationed. 



Domestic Control 

Domestic Control operates as the enforcement arm 
of the Service through coordinated action of its two 
divisions, the Border Patrol in uniform and Investiga- 
tions in plain clothes. Fiscal year 1969 saw an increase 
in every phase of this work. More aliens were located 
who had breached the borders or violated their status 
after admission than at any time since 1954. 

Smuggling cases were encountered in increasing 
numbers, both by the Border Patrol and Investigations 
Divisions. Most of the increase was in the Southwest 
Region. This resulted primarily from the imposition 
of the numerical limitations on Western Hemisphere 
immigration, more stringent labor certification require- 
ments, and the vast difference in economy and job 
opportunities between Mexico and the United States. 

Liaison with other law enforcement officers gave an 
assist to the Service in some 17,000 cases. At the same 
time Border Patrol officers uncovered some spectacular 
and wily methods for importing drugs and turned the 
perpetrators of these attempts over to Customs officers. 

Frauds of many kinds, some old and some inspired 
by changes in the laws, were a major problem in 1969. 
"Sham" marriages, false birth certificates, false peti- 
tions for relative status, and false labor certifications 
were some of the means used to attain an immigration 
status. 

To combat these and other types of violations, the 
Service maintains various systems for discovering per- 
sons who scheme to circumvent the immigration and 
nationality laws. The Caribbean Index was an effective 
instrument in identifying and thus preventing the 
entry of Latin Americans known to be in criminal, 
immoral, narcotic, or subversive classes. Suspected 
documents, such as birth or baptisimal certificates, can 
be checked on a 24-hour-a-day basis by communica- 
tion with our Fraudulent Document Center, a reposi- 
tory for information concerning the use of counterfeit 
or altered documents or misuse of genuine documents 
by imposters. On both the northern and southern 
borders, records are maintained on known alien crim- 
inals, racketeers, and subversives who live on the other 
side of the border. Through use of these data, the entiy 
of such persons has eflCectively been prevented. 

There are many incidents of accomplishments dur- 
ing the year, but the fact that 10,505 aliens were 
deported and 240,958 required to depart is probably 
one of the most solid proofs of work accomplished. 



DEPORTABLE ALIENS LOCATED 

During fiscal year 1969, Service officers located 
283,557 deportable aliens. This is an increase of 71,500 
or 34 percent over fiscal year 1968, attributable, in the 
most part, to the increase of 49,93 1 in the number of 
Mexican aliens located and the increase of 15,767 in 
the number of nonwillful crewman violators. Of the 
total, 201,636 or 71 percent were Mexican nationals. 
This number is a 33-percent increase over the number 
of Mexicans located last year. Similar increases are 
noted for most all of the other nationalities as well, 
with increases in the number of Greeks and Chinese 
attributable mainly to the increase in the number re- 
ported as nonwillful crewman violators. The following 
table reflects a comparison of the violators by nation- 
ality groups for 1968 and 1969 : 



Mexican.. 151,705 201,636 +33 

Cuban 591 1,657 +180 

Canadian 11,056 12,753 +15 

Dominican 2,101 2,134 +2 

BWI and British Honduran... 2,541 3,053 +20 

Other Western Hemisphere 10,953 13,035 +19 

Chinese 5,900 7,678 +30 

Philippine 3,121 4,502 +44 

Greek.--- 3,261 6,043 +85 

Italian 2,915 2,733 -6 

United Kingdom.. 1,926 3,281 +70 

Allothers 15,987 25,052 +57 

Total aliens found 212,057 283,557 +34 

Status at Entry. Of the 283,557 violators of the 
immigration laws found, 167,174 or 59 percent were 
aliens who entered illegally at other than ports of in- 
spection. The remaining 41 percent (116,383) had 
come in at designated ports of entiy and were later 
found deportable for violation of the conditions of 
admission, remaining longer than authorized, securing 
entry by fraud, or conviction for crime involving moral 
turpitude, etc. 

The illegal entries of Mexican aliens accounted for 
96.7 percent of all surreptitious entries. Most of the 
remaining 3.3 percent who entered without inspection 
were from other countries of the Western Hemisphere. 

The number of deportable adult male Mexican 
aliens found was 179,196, an increase of 46,172 or 35 
percent from the previous year. Of this total, 121,743 
or 68 percent were apprehended by the 10 border 
sectors in the southwest. This compares to 81 percent 
in 1966 and is indicative of the continuing trend for 
large numbers of Mexican aliens to move away from 
the border areas in search of employment. 

The 116,383 aliens found deportable after entry 
includes those who had been admitted as immigrants 
(2,420), visitors (63,152), students (5,712), crewmen 
(29,837), temporary workers in agriculture (738), as 
well as 14,524 others. 



12 




Border Patrol officers apprehending aliens on the bank of 
the All-Amerjcan Canal, one of the natural barriers in the 
Andrade, Calif, area. 



Throughout the year, there was a mounting influx 
of aliens illegally seeking employment, however brief, 
menial, or poorly paid. In order to escape detection 
for as long as possible, these aliens sought to reach 
interior destinations by various means including public 
transportation, rented vehicles, cooperatively pur- 
chased cheap cars, and, in many instances, by pa)ing 
exhorbitant fees to unscrupulous smugglers and trans- 
porters. Accordingly, steps were taken to increase our 
traffic checks and those at transportation terminals 



in order to intercept the violators and reduce to the 
minimum the adverse eff'ect that their employment 
would have created on the wages and working condi- 
tions of American labor. Of the 258,472 aliens (other 
than technical crewman violators) found in illegal 
status, 164,746 or 64 percent were located within 30 
days, and of the remaining 93,726 or 36 percent who 
had been here more than 30 days, only 13,791 or 5 
percent had been here more than 1 year before they 
were located. A total of 105,282 were in travel status 
at time of apprehension, an increase of 34,075 or 48 
percent over last year. There were 54,532 persons 
found employed in agriculture (53,684 Mexicans) and 
66,189 in industry or other fields. 

Smuggling. Border Patrol officers located 11,784 
aliens who had been induced or assisted to enter unlaw- 
fully or who had been transported unlawfully after 
entry. This represents a 77-percent increase over the 
number of smuggled aliens found in 1968. Alien smug- 
glers and violators of statutes relating to unlawful 
transportation of aliens numbered 2,048, an increase 
of 69 percent over the 1.210 violators apprehended 
in 1968. 

The 2,048 smugglers located in the year represent 
the highest number reported since the Border Patrol 
was established in 1924. The previous highs were 
recorded in fiscal years 1953 and 1954 when the offi- 
cial figures were 1,540 and 1,822, respectively. 



220,000 

200,000 

180,000 

160,000 

140,000 

120,000 

100,000 

80,000 

60,000 

40,000 

20,000 





DEPORTABLE ALIENS FOUND IN THE UNITED STATES 
1965- 1969 



MEXICANS 



I I ALL OTHER ENTRIES 



SURREPTITIOUS 
ENTRIES 



OTHER NATIONALITIES 



I I ALL OTHER ENTRIES 

^H SURREPTITIOUS ENTRIES 




1965 



1966 1967 1968 1969 



1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 



220,000 
200,000 
180,000 
160,000 
140,000 
120,000 
100,000 

80,000 
60,000 

40,000 
20,000 




13 



Smuggling cases were encountered in increasing 
numbers in all sections of the country, but the volume 
in the Southwest Region remained the most important 
factor in the significant rises in the national totals. 
The present magnitude of the alien smuggling prob- 
lem in the Southwest Region compared to recent years 
is shown in the table below. 

The table also illustrates that the number of prin- 
cipals located in 1969 is four times greater, and the 
number of smuggled aliens located is seven times 
greater than in 1965. 

Service investigators completed 1 ,386 smuggling in- 
vestigations during the year. Prosecution was author- 
ized against 815 violators of the smuggling statutes. 
There were 563 convictions resulting in aggregate sen- 
tences of 7,447 months and fines totaling $43,000. 
Imposition of sentence was suspended on 88 convic- 
tions, and, in those cases where sentence was imposed, 
over 57 percent of the time to serve was suspended 
resulting in a 6.6 months' net average sentence to 
serve for each violation. The payment of $8,500 of the 
fines was suspended. 

The San Antonio District handled one of the largest 
and most notorious alien smuggling cases developed 
in recent years, involving 46 aliens smuggled into the 
United States near Eagle Pass, Tex., destined to 
Chicago, 111. They were conveyed from the border to 
San Antonio in an enclosed rented truck which meas- 

Smugglers and Smuggled Aliens Located In Southwest Region 



1969 1968 1967 1966 1965 



Total ; 

Principals --- 1.899 1.128 1,155 877 459 

Smuggled aliens.. 11,442 6,490 5,515 3,624 1,629 

Percent change by years: 

Principals ..._ +68 -2 +32 +91 — 

Smuggled aliens +76 +18 +52 +122 — 



ured 7 X 12 feet. As a result of being locked in the 
truck, three of the aliens died from heat and lack of 
oxygen and many more were hospitalized. The case 
received a great deal of publicity, both national and 
international, and created public comment and 
indignation. 

Late in the afternoon on September 30, 1968, San 
Antonio police officers found the 46 aliens at a rented 
house in San Antonio. No one except the aliens was 
present. The aliens were unable to identify anyone and 
did not even know where they were. The only person 
they had seen was the man who collected money from 
them after they entered the truck in the brush on the 
bank of the Rio Grande, and they were not sure they 
could identify him. Through various investigative 
techniques, such as comparison of handwriting, latent 
fingerprints, photographs, and interviews, three sus- 
pects were identified. 

The investigation was long, tedious, and quite com- 
plicated. All suspects refused to be interviewed or even 
to appear with their attorneys before complaints were 
filed, and they refused to furnish any infomiation after- 
wards. However, when they appeared in court in the 
Del Rio Division of the Western District of Texas, 
U.S. District Court, all three defendants pleaded guilty 
for violation of 8 U.S.C. 1324. John T. Eguia, leader 
of the large smuggling operation, was given two 15- 
year sentences, to be served concurrently; Carlos Be- 
cerra received two 10- year sentences to be served con- 
currently; and Joe Roy Campos received 10 years to 
serve. 

Through arrangements with the Mexican consul, 23 
of the aliens were delivered to the custody of Mexican 
officials at Piedras Negras, Mexico. As a result of their 
identification and testimony, the smuggler from Piedras 
Negras, who had been cooperating with the smug- 
glers from the United States, was tried in Mexico and 
received a sentence of 3 years and 3 months to serve. 




nethod devised to smuggle aliens into ttie United States not clever enough to elude detection. Special compartment strapped 
onto undercarriage of car. Picture at right illustrates how alien concealed himself in the compartment. 



14 



Early in 1968, the Border Patrol sectors in Del Rio, 
McAllen, and Laredo developed information which 
indicated that a large group of persons residing in the 
Dilley, Tex., area were involved in smuggling opera- 
tions, moving large groups of aliens at a time. The 
smugglers were transporting the aliens into the 
Chicago, 111., area for a fee of $200 per person. On 
October 1, 1968, Border Patrol officers at Hebbron- 
ville, Tex., stopped two camper-equipped trucks and 
upon inspection ascertained that they contained 32 
smuggled Mexican aliens who ^vere destined to 
Chicago. Intensive efforts, both by the Patrol officers 
and investigators, developed evidence against 13 mem- 
bers of this group which was used in the prosecution 
and conviction in all cases. This group owned and used 
22 trucks and cars in their operations. 

A lengthy investigation at Miami, Fla., led to a 
Federal grand juiy indictment on April 23, 1969, on 
four counts charging Verent Thompson, a U.S. citi- 
zen, with transporting aliens who \vere illegally in the 
United States, shielding aliens from detection, and 
falsely representing himself to be an agent of the Serv- 
ice. He is a part-time lay preacher, but his main oc- 
cupation is that of a labor contractor, furnishing 
laborers to pick citrus in the Indian River citrus area. 
Thompson also operates a rooming house and restau- 
rant to house and feed the laborers. Investigations re- 
vealed that the indicted person would go to various 
labor camps operated by the U.S. Sugar CorjD. and 
the Florida Fruit & Vegetable Association to house 
British West Indian agricultural laborers brought to 
the United States under contract to these two com- 
panies. For fees ranging from $20 to $50 per man, he 
would offer to secure employment for the laborers at 
jobs which would be in violation of the temis of their 
admission. He then transported these persons from the 
Lake Okeechobee area to Fort Pierce, Fla., where he 
placed them in citrus' harvest. The investigation re- 
vealed that he was engaged in a rather lucrative busi- 
ness, he would collect for transporting aliens, profit 
from the room and board he furnished them, plus col- 
lect a fee for each box of fruit picked by the aliens. 
On June 10, 1969, in the U.S. District Court, Miami, 
he entered pleas of not guilty to the four counts. 
{ Thompson pleaded guilty at his trial and, on Octo- 
ber 29, 1969, was fined $1,000 and placed on proba- 
tion for 3 years.) 

Deserting Crewmen and Stowaways. The Service 
is constantly reviewing, evaluating and revising present 
programs and initiating new programs to prevent the 
illegal entry of deserting crewmen and stowaways. 
Close cooperation with shipping agents, law enforce- 
ment agencies, and waterfront contacts contributes 
significantly to the coastal control operation. 

The following are typical cases in point : 

In Januaiy 1969, four Greek crewmen deserted from 
the Liberian SS World Explorer at Norfolk, Va. In- 




Ship's captain welcomes Investigators aboard at San Francisco. 
He expresses hopes that the investigation will discourage other 
deserters. 



vestigators developed information which indicated they 
were en route by air to New York in the company of 
an unknown person. This information enabled an im- 
migrant inspector at the John F. Kennedy Airport to 
apprehend the four as they disembarked from the 
plane. Their companion was a previous deserter who 
was also apprehended. 

On May 29, 1969, the San Juan office received in- 
formation that 14 stowaways were concealed in a 
trailer container aboard the MV Rio Haina, a ship 
operated by Sealand Corp. plying between Rio Haina, 
Dominican Republic, and San Juan, Puerto Rico. The 
14 stowaways were located on the main deck of the 
vessel when it docked at San Juan. They had secreted 
themselves in a trailer container before it was loaded 
aboard ship and, after the ship had gotten underway, 
had cut a hole in the side of the trailer to get out, since 
it was impossible to open the trailer doors from the 
inside. The 14 stowaways were assisted in secreting 
themselves in the container by an imknown person 
Identified only as Jesus. The publicity generated by 
this incident had far-reaching results in that all 14 
stowaways were fined upon their return to the Domini- 
can Republic for leaving the country without an exit 
permit. The representative of the Dominican Republic 
Customs assigned to the Sealand operation at Rio 
Haina was removed from office, since it was his respon- 
sibility to see that the trailers were searched before 
being loaded aboard ship. 

Some deserters go to extremes to prevent appre- 
hension. In November 1968, a team of investigators 
encountered three Chinese working at a nursery in 
Sunnyvale, Calif., who ran in opposite directions when 
the officers approached them. Two were apprehended 
after a short chase, and, when questioned, it was ascer- 
tained that they were deserters. These two were placed 
in the custody of the local police. The investigators 



15 



returned to the area of the nursery and by cutting 
sign determined that the third person had entered a 
storm drain. One investigator handed the other down 
into the drain system, and. after a pursuit that covered 
about 1 5/2 miles under the city of Sunnyvale, the fleeing 
deserter was apprehended. 

The Border Patrol officers of the Ogdensburg Sector 
continue their successful control of crewnnen at the 
St. Lawrence Seaway. The sui-veillance of suspect 
vessels and checks of detained crewmen, coupled with 
the excellent cooperation of the seaway personnel, 
resulted in the season closing with no desertions re- 
ported. The Messena Unit verified the departure of 
549 detained crewmen and maintained surveillance 
on 211 vessels, including 121 vessels operated by Iron 
Curtain countries which passed through the seaway 
locks. 

Air Operations. The Service continues to maintain 
a fleet of 2 1 obsei-vation aircraft and three large trans- 
port aircraft. The entire Service obsei-vation aircraft 
fleet is deployed along the Mexican border in the 
Southwest Region, and the transport fleet is based at 
El Paso. During the year, the 21 observation aircraft 
were instrumental in locating a total of 16,576 de- 
portable aliens. The above figure represents a 37.1- 
percent increase in the total number of aliens located 
as a result of air operations. 

In addition to the normal functions of patrolling the 
borders and farm and ranch check, Border Patrol 
observation aircraft have sometimes figured in public 
services under unusual circumstances. As an example, 
Border Patrol pilots detected a burglar on Padre Island 
and led Sheriff's deputies to his hiding place through 
use of the loudspeakers mounted on the airplane. 

Modification of two Service transport aircraft in- 
creased the seating capacity from 170 to 191 passengers 
for the three such Service aircraft. In order to main- 
tain pace with the transportation needs brought about 




Patrol Inspector verifying the presence of two crewmen detained 
on board a foreign stiip. Officers periodically check the vessels 
to confirm that detained crewmen have not absconded. 



by the increased incidence of deportable aliens located 
in northern California and Arizona, emphasis was 
placed on the use of the transport aircraft for the move- 
ment of those aliens to border staging areas. It was in 
fact possible to meet these needs with 825 fewer flight 
hours due to the increased seating capacity of the two 
aircraft and the shorter trip mileage required. During 
the year, a total of 23,844,046 passenger miles were 
flown of which 59,038 were flown for other Govern- 
ment agencies. 

With the concurrence of the Mexican Government, 
a total of 112,398 deportable Mexican aliens were re- 
turned to the interior of Mexico during fiscal year 
1969; 109,640 by bus and train from various border 
points to the interior of Mexico, and 2,758 by contract 
airlift from Matamoros, Tamaulipas, Mexico, to Leon, 
Gto., Mexico. This airlift was replaced by a buslift in 
April 1969. 

The utilization of additional points of departure 
along the Mexican border made it possible to eliminate 
much of the expensive and awkward lateral movement 
heretofore involved in assembling deportable aliens 
at more widely dispersed staging areas. Additional 
savings were effected as the result of reduced detention 
time, particularly at interior points where it is not 
possible to detain deportable aliens in Service operated 
facilities pending their removal to border staging areas. 

A logistics problem was simplified, with resultant 
increase in efficiency and economy, by the concentra- 
tion of heavy aircraft on shorter haul transport of 
aliens from interior points, where they are taken into 
custody, to more conveniently located border staging 
points. Fiscal year 1969 saw an increase of 26,094 
deportable Mexican aliens removed by contract bus 
and train over those removed the previous year. The 
impact of the improved removal program is obvious. 

Since the inception of the various removal programs 
in 1956, a total of 104,722 deportable Mexican aliens 
has been returned to the interior of Mexico by airlift 
and 352,906 by the trainlift and various buslifts. 

Cooperation with Other Law Enforcement Agen- 
cies. The Service has continued to emphasize liaison 
throughout the year with Federal, State, local, and 
foreign law enforcement agencies. Field supervisors 
throughout the country have instructed at various 
police schools and academies and have carried on per- 
sonal contacts to explain the mission of the Service and 
describe the problems and violations of law which are 
of primary interest to the Service. Field visits and 
courses of instruction in border control and immigra- 
tion enforcement techniques have been carried out by 
the Service for law enforcement officials from foreign 
countries in cooperation with the Agency for Inter- 
national Development. 

Investigators and other Sei-vice officers at the seat 
of government worked closely during the year with 
other law enforcement agencies in matters of mutual 



16 



interest; specifically, with the office of the American 
representative to Interpol and with the Royal Canadian 
Mounted Police in matters relating to aliens engaged 
in international crime, with the Department of State 
in passport and visa fraud, with the Department of 
Labor in the field of labor certification frauds, with 
the U.S. Secret Sei-vice in matters affecting the ]3ro- 
tection of the President, and with the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation in matters of mutual concern. 

Tangible results from liaison activity are reflected 
by the 17,724 violators of immigration and nationality 
laws who were encountered by other law enforcement 
agencies and referred to Border Patrol officers. .\n 
example of this cooperation occurred in the Nogales 
area when an electronic intrusion device showed a 
large number of persons had passed. The alarm for this 
device is triggered in the local police department which 
in turn notifies the Border Patrol by radio. Due to 
the great volume of beeps, not only was the Border 
Patrol notified, but the police sent several units to 
assist. Without the unsolicited and timely help of the 
police, it is doubtful if the two patrol inspectors who 
responded to the call could have controlled and appre- 
hended the group of 28 aliens without some escaping. 

Another incident involved the San Diego Harbor 
Police who became suspicious \vhen they obseived a 
person lead three Mexican nationals to seats at widely 
separated locations in the international airport. They 
alerted the Border Patrol who arrested all four of the 
individuals after the principal had regrouped them 
and led them to the boarding gate of a northbound 
airliner in an attempt to smuggle them into the interior 
of the United States. 

Incident to the performance of their regular duties. 
Border Patrol officers arrested and released to appro- 
priate agencies 1,178 violators of other laws, including 
280 narcotics law violators. In line with the increased 
illegal traffic in narcotics and dangerous dnigs, the 
Border Patrol seized over $1.2 million worth of mari- 
juana, narcotics, and dangerous drugs. This included 
over 12,500 pounds of marijuana. An additional 
$475,187 worth of merchandise and property was 
seized. 

Some typical cases of the seizure of narcotics and 
dangerous drugs which often invoked armed \'iolators 
are as follows : 

On February 10, 1969, two patrol inspectors pursued 
and captured two Mexican citizens in a camper pickup 
after they had crashed through the international 
boundary fence west of Nogales, Ariz. Over 1,200 
pKDunds of marijuana, largest single cache of marijuana 
ever seized in this area, was found in the camper and 
turned over to the U.S. Customs Agency Service. The 
occupants were turned over to Customs for prosecution. 

On February 25, 1969, a Border Patrol observation 
pilot and a patrol inspector in a scout vehicle initiated 
nearly simultaneous radio alerts concerning the illegal 



entry of a low-flying Twin Cessna airplane across the 
Imperial Desert of California. Although the Border 
Patrol plane was too slow to pursue the imidentified 
aircraft, the pilot determined that it was on an approxi- 
mate course to Indio, Calif. He alerted the Indio 
Border Patrol Station as well as the Federal Aviation 
Agency and the aircraft was subsequently intercepted 
by patrol inspectors at an airport near Indio. One 
occupant of the airplane was captured as he tried to 
elude capture on foot. The pilot, who had remained 
in the aircraft, eluded the patrol officers and took off. 
Knowing the aircraft to be low on fuel, the patrol 
officers scouted out likely abandoned airstrips in the 
area. They found over 800 pounds of marijuana at an 
airstrip in the desert. Working closely with alerted 
agents of the Federal Aviation Agency and U.S. Cus- 
toms Agency Service the pilot and aircraft were lo- 
cated along with several other individuals involved in 
the smuggling attempt. Customs took over the investi- 
gation for narcotic smuggling violations. 

On June 20, 1969, patrol inspectors while observing 
traffic near Oceanside, Calif., noticed a car hanging 
very low in the rear. Upon pursuing and stopping the 
vehicle, seven cardboard boxes containing over $13,000 
worth of dangerous drugs were found in the trunk. The 
drugs which had been smuggled into the United States 
from Mexico were turned over to the U.S. Customs 
Agency Service. The occupants were turned over to 
Customs for prosecution. 

Patrol inspectors also played key roles in other types 
of criminal cases. Upon receiving notice on March 24, 
1969, that the Ferndale Branch of the Bellingham Na- 
tional Bank had been robbed of over $9,000, patrol 
inspectors went to an area where an abandoned car 
had been found in February after a previous robbery 
of the same bank. They found a suspect car and upon 
searching the area found a campsite nearby. Other law 
enforcement officers surrounded the area and after an 
all night vigil, the patrol inspectors were alerted by a 
barking dog at a nearby farmhouse. With the owner's 
permission, the patrol inspectors searched the outbuild- 
ings and foimd the suspects who were armed with a 
rifle and re\olver, in a shed. They were turned over 
to the Federal Bureau of Investigation and a complaint 
was filed with the U.S. Commissioner on the charge of 
bank robbery. 

In May 1969, a patrol inspector at Fort Fairfield, 
Maine, noticed two persons acting very suspiciously at 
the scene of a fire. He passed this information to the 
local police and, while keeping the suspects under 
surveillance, observed another fire at an implement 
company. He entered the building, but was unable 
to extinguish the flame. The two suspects were located 
by the local police and after being confronted with 
evidence observed by the patrol inspector in the burn- 
ing building admitted setting fire to the two buildings. 



17 



This episode ended a series of unexplained fires sus- 
pected of being set by an arsonist. 

In the best traditions of the Service, officers have 
assisted persons in time of need while both on and off 
duty. Examples are : 

A patrol inspector at Jackman, Maine, while off 
duty, responded to the request of out-of-State hunters 
by escorting a doctor through heavy snow to an isolated 
area to render medical assistance to a hunter with a 
serious back injury. He then organized an evacuation 
party and assisted in moving the injured man to a 
hospital. 

In April 1969, Border Patrolmen responded to the 
call for assistance from the Imperial County SherifT's 
Department to help find a 6-year-old girl lost in the 
desert. After a 9-hour search, the child was found 
unharmed, by experienced Border Patrol trackers. 
Approximately 10 patrol inspectors participated in the 
search while off duty. 

Encounters With Armed Law Violators and Aliens 
Apprehended With Prior Records of Criminal and 
Immigration Law Violations. The number of en- 
counters with armed and dangerous violators of the 
immigration and nationality laws as well as violators 
of Federal, State, and local laws has continued to in- 
crease. During the year, 51,756 aliens with prior viola- 
tions of immigration laws were taken into custody by 
the Border Patrol. Of the aliens taken into custody, 
4,184 had prior criminal records. There were 75 per- 
sons arrested who were in possession of revolvers or 
pistols, 12 with rifles and shotguns, and 15 with daggers 
and switch-blade knives. 

The following are typical cases of encounters with 
armed aliens and citizens who were in violation of Fed- 
eral or State laws : 

On October 17, 1968, a patrol inspector from Chula 
Vista, Calif., while conducting still watch on the bor- 
der, was overpowered by two U.S. citizens as one of 
the men drew a gun on the patrol inspector and hand- 
cuffed him to a telephone power pole. Approximately 
1 hour later, these men were apprehended by other 
patrol inspectors and placed under arrest. They had 
over 30 kilos of marijuana. 

On October 31, 1968, investigators of the New York 
office, following assigned leads, located two persons 
in a rooming house in New York City. Investigation 
developed both were aliens illegally in the countiy, 
having deserted ships at U.S. ports. One of the aliens 
when opening a briefcase grasped a dagger inside, but 
was restrained. A further search of the room revealed 
three daggers, a .22 caliber automatic pistol loaded 
with six rounds, and an unloaded .22 caliber auto- 
matic rifle. 

On the night of December 30, 1968, patrol inspec- 
tors at Laredo, Tex., were assigned to a still watch on 
the Rio Grande River near the port of entry. They 
encountered a U.S. citizen emerging from the Rio 



Grande after wading the river from Mexico. He was 
armed with a .22 caliber pistol. It was detemiined 
that he was one of a group of citizens smuggling 
marijuana, and subsequently two other U.S. citizens 
were apprehended with some 8 pounds of marijuana 
which was turned over to the U.S. Customs Agency. 



CARIBBEAN INVESTIGATIONS 
COORDINATION PROGRAM 

The Caribbean Investigations Coordination Pro- 
gram and the relating Index maintained at Miami 
continued to be effective measures in assisting to pre- 
vent the entry into the United States of Latin American 
aliens of the criminal, immoral, narcotic, and subver- 
sive classes. In addition to its importance to Service 
operations, it proved valuable to other Government 
investigative agencies. During fiscal year 1969, there 
were 143,849 checks made of the Index and 14,282 
relating records were located. Primarily on the basis of 
information contained in the Index, several hundred 
antisubversive investigations were initiated by the 
Service. These investigations involved some aliens cur- 
rently in the United States and some attempting to 
enter this country illegally or applying for admission 
as permanent residents or as refugees on the Cuban 
airlift. Although the majority of the investigations in- 
volved Cuban nationals, many involved nationals of 
othe.r Caribbean countries. 

The illegal entry of Cuban aliens into the United 
States from Mexico has been a Service problem since 
the take over of Cuba by Castro. However, during 
fiscal year 1969, the Service became increasingly con- 
cerned with the rise in the number of Cuban aliens 
being located in the United States following illegal 
entry from Mexico. When interrogated, the majority 
conceded to having been assisted in various degrees 
in effecting their entries. The modus ojjerandi dis- 
closed by such interrogation suggested the existence of 
well organized smuggling rings, the centers of which 
appeared to be located in Mexico. 

Service officers in Mexico intensified their liaison 
with Mexican Government officials. Emphasis was 
placed on more comprehensive investigations and 
interrogation of the aliens involved to obtain specific 
information essential to establish the complete modus 
operandi and to identify the operators, smugglers, 
transporters, and other individuals involved in encour- 
aging the Cubans to enter unlawfully. Mexican officials 
were furnished complete information on all identified 
smugglers residing in Mexico with the request that 
consideration be given to prosecution of the smugglers 
and others involved as a vital step in frustrating the 
conspirators preying upon refugees seeking to arrange 
for clandestine entry. In addition, Mexican authorities 
were asked to accept the return to Mexico of those 
Cuban aliens who had entered the United States 



18 



illegally. This has served to discourage Cuban aliens 
from attempting illegal entries and at the same time 
to dr>' up the source of income for those unscrupulous 
individuals who have engaged in illicit smuggling 
of Cuban aliens. The cooperation of the Mexican offi- 
cials with our Service officers has been greatly en- 
hanced, and continued efforts are being made to main- 
tain this liaison at a high level. 

FOREIGN-BORN LAW VIOLATORS 

Interttal Security and the Foreign Born. Continued 
emphasis was placed on the Sen'ice Antisubversive 
Program designed to identify foreign-born subversives 
and develop evidence upon which to institute ex- 
clusion or expulsion proceedings and to deny where 
warranted, benefits under the U.S. immigration and 
nationality laws. Close liaison was maintained with 
other Government agencies concerned in security mat- 
ters, and information developed was promptly fur- 
nished to the appropriate agency or agencies. 

A continuing effort was made to identify and com- 
pile evidence concerning various groups or organiza- 
tions to determine whether their characterization as 
subversive organizations was warranted and, if so, 
whether involvement in those organizations by the 
foreign born justified Service action looking toward 
their exclusion or deportation from the United States, 
or in the cases of naturalized citizens, the revocation of 
their citizenship. Investigations were conducted to 
identify aliens involved in demonstrations protesting 
the national effort in Vietnam and aliens involved in 
student disorders to determine their amenability to 
Service proceedings. 

The Canadian and Mexican border antisubversive 
programs also served effectively as a means of exclud- 
ing from the United States aliens whose admission 
would adversely afTect the security of this country. Un- 
der the Canadian program, there were 28 Seivice look- 
outs posted and six aliens applying for admission were 
rejected at the border on the basis of information de- 
veloped. Under the Mexican program, there were 199 
investigations completed on applicants or potential ap- 
plicants for admission. Service lookouts were posted 
against 1 3 1 of the aliens involved, 26 such aliens were 
rejected at the border, and 18 permanent exclusion 
orders were issued. 

Listed below are examples of the types of cases han- 
dled under the Service Antisubversive Program: 

George Salem Haggar, native of Lebanon and a 
naturalized citizen of Canada, was admitted as an ex- 
change visitor on August 28, 1968. Hagger was ap- 
pointed by Southern University in New Orleans, La., 
to serve as an Assistant Professor of Political Science 
for the academic year 1968-69. \n April and May 
1969, he was involved in several incidents at that 
University which resulted in disruption of normal Uni- 



versity procedures, and he attempted to organize a 
student boycott at Southern University in May 1969. 
On May 7, 1969, he was suspended from his position 
at Southern University. Deportation proceedings were 
instituted on June 16, 1969, and on June 24, 1969, an 
order of deportation was entered by a special inquiry 
officer. Shortly thereafter, Haggar left for Canada and 
thereby executed the deportation order from which he 
had taken no appeal. 

Phillip E. Sandford, native and citizen of Australia, 
was admitted as an exchange visitor on September 19, 
1967, and was granted an extension of stay to Septem- 
ber 15, 1969, to attend Florida State University. While 
in attendance there, he became a member of the 
Students for a Democratic Society. He failed to register 
for the school quarter beginning in early April 1969. De- 
portation proceedings were instituted on May 8, 1969, 
on the ground that he had failed to maintain his status 
as an exchange visitor. An order of deportation was 
entered on May 27, 1969. On June 4, 1969, Sandford 
was convicted of interfering with a police officer in 
the performance of his duty and was sentenced to im- 
prisonment for 1 year. On the same date, he was also 
sentenced for disorderly conduct, receiving a sentence 
to imprisonment for 6 months and a fine of $500. The 
court reduced the sentences to imprisonment to time 
served, and his deportation from the United States 
was effected on June 13, 1969. 

Foreign Born of the Criminal Classes. Investiga- 
tions involving 11,374 aliens of the criminal, immoral, 
and narcotic classes were completed during the year 
as the result of Service efforts in this field. Applications 
for orders to show cause in deportation proceedings 
were made in 1,403 of the cases investigated and 441 
aliens of the criminal, immoral, or narcotic classes were 
deported from the United States during the year. 

Frank Raymond Bezoet De Bie entered the United 
States for permanent residence in April 1960, from 
Indonesia. He was convicted on March 14, 1968, in 
Dauphin County, Pa., of unlawful possession of nar- 
cotics ; on March 22, 1968, in Middlesex County, Mass., 
of breaking and entering with intent to commit 
larceny; and on October 22, 1968, in Boston, Mass., of 
larceny. He was deported to Amsterdam, Netherlands, 
onAprilH, 1969. 

Lydia Bascialdo, a native of Argentina, entered the 
United States as a visitor in June 1968. Shortly after 
entry, she was convicted of conspiracy to smuggle 
heroin into the United States. She was given a sus- 
pended sentence of 2 years on September 18, 1968. An 
order to show cause and a warrant of arrest were issued 
by the Service on the same date. After hearing, she 
was ordered deported, and was deported on Septem- 
ber 2 1,1 968. 

Patrick Joseph Mulkerrins, born in Ireland, was 
admitted to the United States as a permanent resident 
in 1958. In 1963, he was convicted in Suffolk County, 



19 



Mass., of manslaughter and sentenced to imprisonment 
not to exceed 20 years. He was paroled to the custody 
of this Service for the purpose of affecting his deporta- 
tion. After hearing he was ordered deported. Deporta- 
tion to Ireland was affected on April 19, 1969. 

The programs of the Service established to control 
criminal aliens considered likely to cross the interna- 
tional borders into the United States in pursuit of their 
criminal endeavors or to enter the United States 
illegally so as to avoid apprehension were again 
emphasized. Close and frequent liaison between the 
Service and law enforcement agencies of adjacent coun- 
tries was continued and enlarged. 

Border criminal identification activity during the 
year resulted in the posting of 2,626 lookouts designed 
to prevent entry into the United States of aliens of the 
criminal, immoral, and narcotic classes. The posting 
of these lookouts resulted in the rejection or exclusion 
of 894 aliens of these classes. 

Among the undesirable aliens from adjacent coun- 
tries, coming under Service action was Maurice De 
Meulle, a native of Canada, arrested by Clark County, 
Nev., authorities in connection with the cashing of 
stolen American Express Traveler's Checks and the 
passing of counterfeit Canadian currency. Investiga- 
tion by local authorities indicated that there may be 
several million dollars in counterfeit currency involved. 
It was alleged that the traveler's checks were obtained 
in a bank robbery in MacMasterville, Quebec. l)e 
Meulle, who has a criminal record in Canada, claimed 
entry near Plattsburgh, N.Y., on November ll, 1968. 
He was deported to Montreal on January 14, 1969, 
where he was taken into custody by the Montreal 
Police Department and the Royal Canadian Mounted 
Police. 

The Service's problems involving professional, well- 
trained, organized, and well-financed shoplifters and 
pickpockets are continuing. The majority of these 
persons come to the United States from Central and 
South America. They are usually encountered in large 
metropolitan areas and frequent events which draw 
crowds of people. During the year a comparatively 
large number of such criminal aliens were deported 
from the United States. 

Frauds. Investigations of 11,419 possible immigra- 
tion frauds were completed during this year, an in- 
crease of 49 percent over the previous year. Major 
emphasis continued to be placed on investigations of 
aliens and other persons engaged in criminal con- 
spiracies to circumvent the immigration laws. 

Investigations of the new types of frauds, which 
developed subsequent to the 1965 amendment to the 
immigration law requiring Department of Labor cer- 
tification of immigrants, are largely responsible for 
the record number of fraud investigations completed 
this year. Various schemes evolved in efforts made to 
acquire immediate relative status and thereby evade 



the labor certification requirements, e.g., "sham" 
marriages to U.S. citizens or resident aliens, use of 
counterfeit marriage and birth records, and false birth 
registrations in the United States of foreign-born 
children whose parents are visa applicants. 

Investigation of the false birth registrations has thus 
far identified 20 Texas midwives who falsely registered 
births in the United States of over a thousand children 
who were actually born in Mexico. The parents of 
these children were all applicants, or intended appli- 
cants, for immigrant visas. The local authorities are 
being requested to note or purge the false registration 
records to preclude their illegal use in the future. 

Other schemes involved actual connivance to obtain 
labor certifications by fraudulent applications and sup- 
porting documentation. A vigorous prosecution pro- 
gram has been continued against third parties engaged 
in these fraudulent practices in evading or obtaining 
labor certifications. 

The investigations disclosed a continuation of pre- 
viously known schemes involving the use of counterfeit, 
altered, or fraudulent passports and immigration 
documents and "sham" marriages to U.S. citizens to 
evade fonner quota restrictions. 

Examples of the success of these highly complex 
investigations follow : 

Salvatore Vavolizza, President of the Vavolizza 
Travel Service, Inc., Bronx, N.Y., and one codefendant 
pleaded guilty on October 14, 1968, to two counts of 
a 73-count indictment in the Federal District Court, 
Eastern District of New York. The indictment charged 
that they had executed supporting documents for first 
preference visas containing false statements as to the 
nature of the business, urgent need for the services of 
the aliens, the duties required to be perfomied, illegal 
notarizations, etc. On Februaiy 7, 1 969, Vavolizza was 
fined $7,500, and he and his codefendant were placed 
on probation for 1 year. 

On February 14, 1968, a Federal grand jury returned 
a 60-count indictment against a New York attorney, 
Hyman Abrams, charging him with causing false 
statements to be made to the Immigration and Nat- 
uralization Service, the Department of Labor, and the 
Department of State to help aliens from the West 
Indies extend their temporary visitor's penriits or to 
obtain permanent residence status. (On July 8, 1969, 
after trial, Abrams was found guilty on five counts 
and, on August 13, 1969, was sentenced to serve 1 
year. He is at liberty under $5,000 bond pending 
appeal. ) 

Enrique Armando Garcia- Valera, a citizen of the 
Dominican Republic and operator of the Garcia 
Agency, a public relations and insurance business lo- 
cated in New York City, was indicted on July 14, 
1967, by a Federal grand jury on 28 counts. He was 
charged with conspiring to defraud this Service and 
the De]3artnient of Labor by filing fraudulent applica- 



20 



tions for labor certifications on behalf of visa applicants. 
Garcia- Valera was found guilty on Febniary 20, 1969, 
on six counts of the indictment and, on May 19, 1969, 
was placed on probation for 3 years. The sentence in- 
cluded the additional restriction that he not engage in 
any deals with or on behalf of any alien, with this 
Service, the New York State Department of Labor, 
the U.S. Departtiient of Labor, or an American con- 
sulate in connection with visas, and that he turn over 
all such pending matters to someone else. 

On May 16 and 22, 1969, a Modesto, Calif., hotel 
owner Ghulam Khan, a native of Pakistan and perma- 
nent resident of the United States, and four co- 
defendants entered pleas of guilty to violation of 18 
U.S.C. 1001 in the U.S. District Court, Sacramento, 
Calif. They had been charged with participating in a 
bogus marriage operation which, for fees of $500 to 
$1,000, hired American "brides" for Pakistani aliens 
to enable the aliens to obtain immediate relative status 
and thus adjust their status from temporary visitors to 
permanent residents. On June 5, 1969, Ghulam Khan 
was sentenced to 5 months' confinement, fined $3,000, 
and placed on probation for 5 years. The four co- 
defendants were given similar sentences. 

On June 2, 1969, Mohammad Amin, a native of 
Pakistan and permanent resident of the LInited States, 
and a codefendant were also sentenced in the same 
court for their actions in a similar marriage fraud. 

Illustrative of the many midwife investigations being 
conducted by the Service is the case of Guadalupe San 
Miguel, who pleaded guilty on October 11, 1968, in 
the U.S. District Court, Del Rio, to four counts under 
18 U.S.C. 1425(b) (procurement of citizenship unlaw- 
fully) . The investigation had disclosed that for a fee 
she falsely registered the births of approximately 100 
children, who were actually born in Mexico, as having 
been born at Eagle Pass, Tex., during the last 4 years. 
On November 26, 1968, she was fined $500 and placed 
on probation for 5 years. 

Since 1958, the Fraudulent Document Center has 
been operated as a repository for documents used by 
Mexican aliens to support false claims to LT.S. citizen- 
ship. Records at the Center consist of birth certificates, 
baptismal certificates, and other documents relating to 
citizenship. Since the inception of the facility, a total 
of 21,326 cases has been received and indexed. In- 
quiries for record checks increased 34 percent, from 
2,805 in 1968 to 3,759 this year, which includes in- 
quiries concerning suspect applicants for U.S. passports 
received from American consuls in Mexico. Positive 
responses to inquiries rose 23 percent, from 588 to 721. 
Affirmative or positive response was furnished in nearly 
one of every five inquires in 1969. 

A check with the Fraudulent Document Center was 
sufficient for Port Huron officers to establish a false 
claim to citizenship by an alien who had previously 



evaded apprehension. The records at the Center re- 
vealed that birth certificates identical to the one pre- 
sented had been used three times previously to support 
false claims to citizenship. The alien claimed he found 
the birth certificate in Mexico. 

For the 8th consecutive year, there was an increase 
in the number of false claims to citizenship encountered 
by the Border Patrol. The 2,862 cases developed were 
40 percent above the 2,050 cases accounted for last 
year. The false claims were made by 2,839 Mexicans 
and 24 aliens of other nationalities. The Border Patrol 
also reported 1,987 cases wherein Service forms 1-151 
and 1-186 and other documents were used by aliens 
to support fraudulent claims to legal status in the 
United States. The number of these frauds was 55 
percent greater than those reported in the previous 
year. 

The following cases illustrate the variety of frauds 
attempted to obtain the benefits of citizenship or legal 
status in the United States : 

In June, officers of the Jacksonville Station engaged 
in checking bus passengers apprehended six Domini- 
can nationals, five males and one female, when it was 
determined the aliens had presented fraudulent visas 
in connection with their admission as visitors. They 
had been admitted to the United States at Miami after 
having presented passports which contained counter- 
feit, machine-stamped visas of excellent quality. The 
subjects stated that Andre Guzman, a Dominican who 
reportedly accompanied the aliens to Miami, intro- 
duced them to an American named Harrington or 
Harrelton in Santo Domingo, D.R. This American 
took their passports and later returned them with the 
counterfeit visas imprinted therein. Each of the men 
paid $200 and the female paid $400 in Dominican 
currency for the documents. Prosecution under 18 
U.S.C. 1546 was authorized. (All six aliens were found 
guilty on the one-count indictment. On October 16, 
1969, they were sentenced to 2 years, suspended. After 
immigration hearings, they were ordered deported, and 
their deportations were effected on October 18, 1969.) 



CRIMINAL PROSECUTION 

Of the 8,711 cases presented to U.S. attorneys for 
violations of the immigration and nationality laws, 
5,096 prosecutions were authorized. Convictions num- 
bered 4,623 (91 percent of the 5,079 cases disposed of) 
resulting in actual, suspended, and probationary sen- 
tences totaling over 3,970 years and fines of $172,105. 

There were 1,413 aliens convicted of reentiy after 
deportation without permission (8 U.S.C. 1326) ; 863 
persons convicted for document frauds (18 U.S.C. 
1546) ; 498 persons convicted for nationality viola- 
tions, and all but one were for false representation as 
a U.S. citizen (18 U.S.C. 911) . 



21 



Detention and 
Deportation Activities 

The number of aliens deported in fiscal year 1969 
under orders of deportation was 10,505. This is 1,375 
more than the 9,130 deported in fiscal year 1968. Of 
the aliens deported, 92 percent or 9,673 had entered 
without inspection or without proper documents or 
failed to maintain nonimmigrant status, 441 were de- 
ported on criminal, immoral, or narcotic charges, and 
391 on other charges. There were 6,859 deportations 
to Mexico, 795 to Canada, 490 to Greece, 206 to 
Hong Kong, 180 to Jamaica, 143 to Guatemala, and 
124 to Colombia. 

Among the 272 criminals deported was Alvin Karpis 
who was sentenced to a life term for conspiracy in the 
1933 kidnapping of William Hamm, Jr., a wealthy St. 
Paul, Minn., businessman who was released unharmed 
after payment of $100,000 ransom. Karpis was bom 
Alvin Karpavicz in Montreal, Canada, in 1908 and was 
brought to this country by his parents in 1915. He was 
deported to Canada in January 1969. 

Michael Bourne Rutt, a native of England, fled 
England in June 1963, to avoid arrest by the London 
police for theft and swindling. He gained entry into 
the United States by deserting the vessel on which he 
served as a crewman. He was arrested in March of 
1967 for his involvement in the theft of about $250,000 
worth of paintings from the home of Hans Hoffman, 
a well known artist. He was convicted of receiving 
stolen goods and was sentenced to confinement in the 
Massachusetts Correctional Institution for 2/2 to 4 
years. In February 1969, he was deported to England 
where the London ]x>lice were awaiting his return. 

Peter Richard Karl SchifTman, a member of the 
criminal class, was deported to Germany on Novem- 
ber 29, 1968, for the third time in I/2 years follow- 
ing completion of a sentence for illegal entry after 
deportation. Mr. SchifTman is well known throughout 
Europe and the Western Hemisphere for defrauding 
airlines and hotels. He was taken into custody by Ger- 
man police authorities upon his arrival there as a 
deportee. 

Jose Alfonso Alvarez-Henao, a native of Colombia, 
was among the 155 aliens deported on narcotic charges. 
He was identified as one of the many professional 
couriers active in narcotic circles. When arrested dur- 
ing inspecdon at Miami International Aii-port, he had 
790 grams of marijuana in his possession. He was con- 
victed in Federal court of smuggling and was deported 
to Colombia on August 3, 1968. 

The number of aliens required to depart without 
the issuance of formal orders of deportation increased 
from 179,952 in the last fiscal year to 240,958 in 1969. 
Among these aliens were 27,072 crewmen technical 
violators, who had remained longer than the time 



for which admitted and 161,283 who entered without 
inspection. These two groups departed under 
safeguards. 

There were 52,603 who departed after the issuance 
of documents requiring departure. Included in this 
number were 38,211 nonimmigrants who failed to 
maintain the status under which admitted and 11,522 
aliens who entered without inspection. The principal 
nationalities of these aliens were 21,767 Mexican, 3,077 
Canadian, 1,904 Jamaican, 1,838 Philippine, 1,773 
British, and 1,650 Dominican. 

At their own request, 7 1 aliens who had fallen into 
distress were removed from the United States under 
Section 250 of the Immigration and Nationality Act. 

Twenty-eight mentally incompetent aliens were de- 
ported or removed. Up to the time of deportation, ap- 
proximately $207,000 had been expended for their 
care in the United States. If they had continued to re- 
main institutionalized at public expense, over $4.6 mil- 
lion would have been disbursed for their maintenance 
and treatments during their expected lifetimes. 

There were 59,771 aliens initially admitted to Serv- 
ice detention facilities and 89,477 to non-Service 
facilities, increases of 11 percent and 21 percent, re- 
spectively, over last year. 



Hearings and Litigation 

EXCLUSION AND DEPORTATION 
HEARINGS 

Once again and continuing the previous trend, the 
volume of deportation and exclusion cases referred 
to special inquiiy officers during 1969 showed a marked 
increase. Deportation hearings referred to special in- 
quiry oflBcers nationally increased to 25,479, represent- 
ing an alltime high record for any single year — the 
New York District Office alone received 22 percent of 
the country's total. Exclusion hearings referred to spe- 
cial inquiry officers totaled 1,232 nationally, represent- 
ing an increase over the total of 968 received in fiscal 
1968. 

Wliile the number of applications for withholding 
of deportation on the basis of a claim of persecution 
decreased slightly during the year as compared with 
1968, the list of countries concerning which such claims 
had been made in previous years was augmented by the 
addition of Uruguay, Sudan, Estonia, Malawi, and 
Portugal. 

Fiscal year 1969 brought with it an enlargement in 
the jurisdiction, powers, and responsibilities of special 
inquiiy officers resulting from amendment of adminis- 
trative regulations. In connection with expulsion pro- 
ceedings, district directors and other administrative 
officers have been, in the past, vested with exclusive 



22 



authority to determine whether an aHen should be 
continued or detained in custody, whether he should 
be released, and whether an alien should be released 
under bond and the amount thereof. Appeals from 
such determinations were, under fonner regulations, 
taken directly to the Board of Immigration Appeals. 
Under the new rules which became effective during 
fiscal year 1969, appeals from such determinations of 
district directors were eliminated. However, there was 
conferred upon special inquiiy officers authority to 
consider a request by an alien for release from custody 
or release under bond, or for reduction in the amount 
thereof, notwithstanding a previous deteiTnination by 
a district director. The consideration of such a request 
by the special inquiry officer is separate and apart 
from the deportation hearing or proceeding and forms 
no part of such hearing or proceeding, or of the record 
thereof. The Government or the alien may take an 
appeal to the Board of Immigration Appeals from the 
determination of the special inquiry officer. This recent 
amendment to the regulations confers upon a quasi- 
judicial officer the authority to make an independent 
determination respecting the freedom from custody, 
detention, or bond of an alien involved in deportation 
proceedings. Here again, the trend in the implementa- 
tion of the immigration laws is in the direction of add- 
ing safeguards which will advance the fair and efficient 
administration of the law. 



LITIGATION 

The General Counsel is the chief law officer of the 
Service and functions primarily as adviser to the Com- 
missioner and other officers on legal matters in carry- 
ing out Service enforcement and administrative tasks 
under the immigration and nationality laws. He pro- 
vides executive and professional direction to four re- 
gional counsels, who maintain professional supervision 
over trial attorneys whose primary responsibility is to 
represent the Service in formal exclusion, expulsion, 
and rescission hearings before special inquiry officers. 
Regional counsels and trial attorneys, when requested, 
assist U.S. attorneys in civil and criminal actions aris- 
ing under the immigration and nationality laws. 
Through two appellate trial attorneys, the General 
Counsel also represents the Senice before the Board 
of Immigration Appeals in all appellate matters. 

Reflecting the increase in special inquiry' officer hear- 
ings, trial attorney work in fiscal year 1969 substan- 
tially e.xceeded the previous year's record figures. Trial 
attorneys reviewed 15,079 applications for orders to 
show cause in deportation proceedings. They par- 
ticipated in 9,102 deportation hearings and in 981 
exclusion hearings. Trial attorney appearances in ad- 
ministrative hearings of all kinds totaled 10,341, a rise 
of 20 percent over fiscal year 1968. Trial attorneys 
prepared 2,363 legal briefs and memoranda. 



The Board of Immigration Appeals has jurisdiction 
of appeals in e.xclusion, expulsion, rescission of adjust- 
ment of status, and visa petition cases. During the 
year, the Board received 1,742 cases, all of which were 
reviewed by the appellate trial attorneys to determine 
whether argument by the Service before the Board 
was necessary to avoid conflict with Service policy or 
interpretation of the law. After the decisions were 
made by the Board, they were referred to the General 
Counsel for consideration as to whether a motion to 
reopen or for reconsideration should be submitted to 
the Board or \v'hether recommendation should be made 
to the Commissioner that the case be certified to the 
Attorney General. The appellate trial attorneys argued 
363 cases before the Board and submitted to the Board 
32 briefs and 10 motions to reopen or reconsider. The 
year was marked by the briefing and arguing of a wide 
variety of cases involving alleged violations of the 
exclusion statute requiring labor certifications, Section 
212(a) (14) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, 
8 U.S.C. 1182(a) (14); thereby the Board was pro- 
vided with the means of issuing a definitive series of 
precedent decisions. 

Court litigation challenging administrative deci- 
sions in immigration and nationality matters reflected 
a decrease from the previous fiscal year of 27 percent 
in new suits instituted. However, completions of court 
actions did not keep pace with receipts, and there were 
left pending at the end of fiscal year 1969, 20 percent 
more cases than had been pending at the beginning. 
This was attributable principally to overall heavy case- 
loads in the courts and in the offices of the U.S. at- 
torneys. A total of 376 court actions were filed. In the 
district courts, there were filed 34 petitions for writs 
of habeas corpus and 71 declaratory judgment actions. 
All decisions in habeas corpus proceedings were favor- 
able to the Service, as were the decisions in all but one 
of the declaratory judgment suits. In the courts of ap- 
peals, 224 direct petitions for review of deportation 
cases were filed under Section 106 of the Immigra- 
tion and Nationality Act, 8 U.S.C. 1105a. Of the 
decisions of the courts of appeals during the year on 
petitions for review, 164 were favorable to the Sei-vice 
and five were adverse. The Supreme Court denied 
16 petitions for certiorari in civil immigration and na- 
tionality cases, denied three petitions for rehearing, 
agreed to hear and decided one case, and in one other 
case summarily affirmed the lower court's judgment 
on a constitutional issue. 

The one case argued before and decided by the 
Supreme Court during the year resolved a conflict 
between two courts of appeals and was important to 
the efficiency of Service operations. INS v. Stanisic, 
395 U.S. 62, concerned an alien seaman whose condi- 
tional entry had been revoked and who had been 
ordered detained and deported aboard his vessel pur- 
suant to Section 252 (b) of the Immigration and Na- 



23 



tionality Act, 8 U.S.C. 1282(b), and who had also 
been refused asylum in the United States on his claim 
that he would be persecuted in his countr)'. The alien 
had contrived through litigation and private bills in 
Congress to prolong his stay in the United States until 
long after his ship had departed. The Supreme Court 
ruled that it was lawful for the Service to provide for 
adjudication of the seaman's persecution claim by a 
district director under the parole statute. Section 212 
(d)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, 8 
U.S.C. 1182(d)(5), rather than by a special inquiry 
officer in expulsion proceedings under Section 242(b) 
of the Act, 8 U.S.C. 1252(bj. The Court also ruled 
that a deportation order under Section 252(b) of the 
Act, the crewman statute, made while the alien's ship 
was in the United States remained enforceable after 
the ship departed, and that it was not necessary, as 
had been declared below by the Court of Appeals, 
Ninth Circuit (393 F. 2d 539), to start over again 
under Section 242(b) of the Act, the general deporta- 
tion hearing statute. In Dymytryshyn v. Esperdy, 393 
U.S. 77, the Supreme Court affirmed without opinion 
a decision by a three-judge constitutional court in the 
Southern District of New York (285 F. Supp. 507) 
that Section 242(d) of the Immigration and National- 
ity Act, 8 U.S.C. 1252(d), authorizing supervision 
orders for aliens who have been in the United States 
more than 6 months under orders of deportation, is 
not an unconstitutional bill of attainder when applied 
to aliens whose deportability rests on membership in 
the Communist Party. 

The Government was upheld in all of the 16 civil 
cases in which the Supreme Court denied certiorari, 
thereby declining to review the decisions of the lower 
courts. The denial of certiorari in de la Cruz-Martinez 
v. INS, 404 F. 2d 1198, cert. den. 394 U.S. 955, left 
undisturbed the ruling of the Ninth Circuit that an 
alien was deportable under Section 241 (a) ( 1 1 ) of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act, 8 U.S.C. 1251(a) 
(11), for a narcotics conviction even though after his 
commitment to the California Youth Authority his 
conviction was set aside pursuant to California law 
when he earned an honorable discharge from the 
Youth Authority. The denial of certiorari in Kwai 
Chiu Yuen v. INS, 406 F. 2d 499, 773, 774, cert. den. 
395 U.S. 908, left undisturbed the ruling by the Ninth 
Circuit that it was not an unconstitutional abridgment 
of the power of executive clemency for Congress to 
provide in Section 241(b) of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act, 8 U.S.C. 1251(b), that a full and 
unconditional pardon by the governor of a State for 
a narcotics law conviction would be ineffective to 
prevent deportation on the basis of that conviction. 
The denial of certiorari in Tormey v. INS, 393 U.S. 
854, left undisturbed the ruling of the Second Circuit 
that a petition for judicial review under Section 106(a) 
of the Immigration and Nationality Act, 8 U.S.C. 



1105(a), of a motion addressed to the administrative 
authority years after the deportation order cannot be 
used as the means of belatedly seeking review of the 
original order. (Cf. Velasquez-Espinosa v. INS, 404 
F. 2d 544, C.A. 9, 1968, to the same eflfect.) The denial 
of certiorari in Yuen Kam Chucn v. Esperdy, 279 
F. Supp. 151 (S.D.N.Y.), aff'd. 393 F. 2d 938 (2nd 
Cir.) cert. den. 393 U.S. 858, rehearing den. 393 U.S. 
956, left undisturbed the district court's ruling that the 
restricted choice stated in Section 254(c) of the Immi- 
gration and Nationality Act, 8 U.S.C. 1284(c) does 
not prohibit the deportation by airplane of a paroled 
seaman who arrived by ship. The denial of certiorari 
in Cherig Ho Mui v. Rinaldi, 408 F. 2d 28, cert. den. 
395 U.S^ 963, left undisturbed the ruling by the Third 
Circuit, agreeing essentially with the Second Circuit's 
1966 ruling in Tai Mui v. Esperdy, 371 F. 2d 772, cert, 
den. 386 U.S. 1017, and rejecting an attack on Service 
regulations for failure to designate either the United 
States or a Far Eastern country as a place where an 
alien crewman may apply for conditional entry into the 
United States as a refugee under Section 203(a) (7) 
of the Immigration and Nationality Act, 8 U.S.C. 
1153(a)(7).' 

During the year, there were a number of important 
final decisions by courts of appeals. In de Vargas v. 
INS, 409 F. 2d 335 and in Velasquez-Espinosa v. INS, 
404 F. 2d 544, decided respectively by the Fifth and 
Ninth Circuits, it was held that an alien who obtains 
an immigrant visa by fraudulently concealing that he 
belongs to a qualitative excludable class (previous de- 
portee and draft dodger) is not protected from depor- 
tation by Section 241 (f) of the Immigration and Na- 
tionality Act, 8 U.S.C. 1251(f), because he was not 
"othenvise admissible". In Bilhao-Bastida v. INS, 409 
F. 2d 820, the Ninth Circuit niled that the Service 
cou.ld lawfully restrict the use of alien registration 
receipt cards so that if a resident alien traveled to Cuba, 
a prohibited area, his card would lose its validity as a 
travel document, and he would need an immigrant 
visa in order to reenter the United States. In Dong 
Yup Lee V. 7A^^, 407 F. 2d 1110, the Ninth Circuit 
rejected an alien's contention that after he had been 
found entitled to a temporary visa for employment as 
a musician "of distinguished merit and ability" under 
Section 101 (a) (15) (H) (i) of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act, 8 U..S.C. 1 101 (a) ( 15) (H) (i) , he was 
automatically qualified for a preference visa for perma- 
nent residence as a person "of exceptional ability in 
the . . . arts" as defined by Section 203(a)(3) of 
the Immigration and Nationality Act, 8 U.S.C. 1153 
(a)(3). The court upheld the administrative ruling 
that the latter requirement is more stringent. In Kovac 
V. INS, 407 F. 2d 102, the Ninth Circuit ruled that an 
erroneous legal standard had been used in the adminis- 
trative denial of an application under Section 243(h) 
of the Immigration and Nationality Act, 8 U.S.C. 



24 



1253(h) for withholding of deportation to the alien's 
country on the ground of persecution. The court held 
that the 1965 amendment of section 243(h) was in- 
tended to lighten the burden on an alien, shifting the 
emphasis from the consequences of oppressive govern- 
mental conduct to its motivation. A deliberate impo- 
sition of substantial economic disadvantage could 
constitute persecution without amoimting to depriva- 
tion of all means of gaining a livelihood. The Second 
Circuit mled in Wong Kam Cheung v. INS, 408 F. 2d 
35. that under Section 243(a) of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act, 8 U.S.C. 1253(a) , an alien is entided 
to make only one designation of a country of deporta- 
tion and has no absolute right to withdraw the desig- 
nation. In another case involving section 243(a), Ngai 
Chi Lam v. Esperdy, 411 F. 2d 3'^10, the Second Circuit 
held that when an alien designates a country of de- 
portation frivolously, admitting that he does not want 
to go there and that his motive is delay, the special 
inquiry officer may decline to accept the designation. 



One of the sharpest proportional increases of per- 
manent resident aliens is found among Cuban na- 
tionals. This is primarily the result of Public Law 89- 
732 which permits Cubans to adjust their refugee 
status to that of permanent resident aliens. For ex- 
ample, in 1968 a total of 358,601 Cubans reported 
their addresses, of which 207,561 (58 percent) were 
permanent residents; in 1969, 395,008 reported and 
265,366 (67 percent) were permanent residents, an 
increase of 28 percent. The increase of Cuban per- 
manent resident aliens since 1967 is even more strik- 
ing: out of 317,144 reports received in 1967 only 
147,805 (47 percent) were permanent residents. Thus, 
from 1967 to 1969 there has been an increase of 80 
percent (117,561) in the number of permanent resi- 
dent Cuban aliens. The number of Cubans in the 
United States in temporary status has declined accord- 
ingly from 169,339 in 1967, to 151,040 in 1968, to 
129,642 in 1969. 



Alien Address Reports 

A total of 4,002,668 aliens reported their addresses 
during January 1969 in accordance with the require- 
ments of the Immigration and Nationality Act (66 Stat. 
163). With the exception of the initial registration of 
aliens in 1940, this is a record number and represents 
a slight increase of 126,364 over the number of reports 
received in 1968 (3,876,304). In January 1969, 
3,506,359 (87.6 percent) of all aliens reporting were 
listed as permanent residents and 496,309 as visitors, 
students, and others in the United States temporarily. 

Over three-fourths of the total reported alien popu- 
lation reside in the following nine States: California, 
944,149 (23.6 percent); New York, 740,369 (18.5 
percent) ; Florida, 267,360 (6.7 percent) ; Texas, 
249,735 (6.2 percent) : Illinois, 239,705 (6.0 percent) ; 
New Jersey, 219.406 (5.5 percent) ; Massachusetts, 
160,048 (4.0 percent) ; Michigan, 149,099 (3.7 per- 
cent) ; and Pennsylvania, 107,303 (2.7 percent). 

Mexicans again made up the largest nationality 
group with a total of 720,820 reporting. Of tliis total, 
97 percent (701,979) were permanent resident aliens. 
Nearly 81 percent of the permanent resident Mexican 
aliens reside in California and Texas. Aliens of these 
nationalities followed Mexico in terms of volume: 
Canada, 409,494 (382,116 or 93 percent were perma- 
nent residents) ; Cuba, 395,008 (265,366 or 67 percent 
permanent residents) ; the United Kingdom, 321,705 
(239,349 or 74 percent permanent residents) ; Italy, 
241,230 (230,094 or 95 percent permanent residents) ; 
and Germany, 229,565 (217,489 or 95 percent perma- 
nent residents) . 



Citizenship 

It is in the public interest for every qualified alien 
to have the earliest possible opportunity to become a 
citizen if such be his desire. Aliens sometimes fail to 
apply for naturalization, because they do not realize 
that they have achieved eligibility under the statute. 
Others sometimes procrastinate because their misun- 
derstanding of the naturalization process leads them to 
believe that they are incapable of qualifying for one 
reason or another. Accordingly, the Service provides 
information clarifying these matters. 

A Service booldet and other material describing and 
explaining the naturalization requirements and pro- 
cedures in the simplest of terms were made readily 
available to all interested parties. During the fiscal 
year, the informative booklet was not only revised to 
include a reference to the new special benefits con- 
ferred upon Vietnam servicemen and veterans, but 
for the first time a Spanish language edition was 
printed to meet the needs of the many Spanish-speak- 
ing aliens residing in the southwestern part of the 
Nation. Constnictive guidance and assistance also were 
offered by specially trained personnel at the field offices 
and by naturalization examiners during their periodic 
visits to the naturalization courts, to the public school 
citizenship classes, and to many of the militaiy installa- 
tions in the United States. The clerks of the naturaliza- 
tion courts continued to lend their valuable assistance 
as a source of infomiation, and the infomiation media 
constituted another means of reaching potential can- 
didates for naturalization. Service motion picture 
films, such as the one entitled "Are You a Citizen," also 
were used to acquaint aliens with the mechanics of 
the naturalization process and especially to eliminate 



25 



ALIEN ADDRESS REPORTS 
1969 




the often erroneous impression that the cherished goal 
of citizenship is beyond their capacity. Service films are 
available for loan to recognized organizations engaged 
in promoting good citizenship and encouraging aliens 
to apply for naturalization. 

During the fiscal year, the Service also continued to 
implement its policy of notifying newly naturalized 
citizens of their statutory right to petition for the 
naturalization of their alien children. Under the 
statute, such naturalizations have to be completed be- 
fore the child is 18 years of age. Before this notifica- 
tion program was put into practice, a great majority 
of naturalized persons through ignorance either failed 
to apply in behalf of their children or waited until the 
children were too old to qualify under the law. 

NATURALIZATION ACTIVITIES 

Citizenship Instruction and Training. Although 
the Congress has authorized the naturalization of cer- 
tain elderly, long-time alien residents of the United 
States despite their inability to speak, understand, 
read, and write words in ordinary English usage, the 



overwhelming majority of naturalization petitioners 
are obliged to meet these English language require- 
ments. Moreover, closely related to the fulfillment of 
citizenship responsibility is the further statutory pre- 
requisite (from which there is no e.xception) ; namely, 
a fair knowledge of the history, Government, and 
Constitution of the United States. For more than 50 
years, the law has authorized Federal agency activity 
to promote the instruction and training of naturaliza- 
tion applicants in these matters. 

The Service effort to assist prospective citizens in 
their preparation to meet the educational requirements 
for naturalization begins with their entry into the 
United States. The names and addresses of 164,271 
immigrants who arrived during the fiscal year were for- 
warded to public schools located in the places of in- 
tended residence in order that invitations to enroll in 
citizenship classes might be extended to the newcomers. 
For the same use, similar infonnation was supplied for 
25,197 naturalization candidates, either upon receipt 
of their applications or the continuance of their peti- 
tions for failure to satisfy the educational prerequisites. 



26 




Young and old become citizens. At a naturalization ceremony in 
Milwaukee, the youngest of 72 new citizens was 5 years old: 
the boy was adopted in Germany. The oldest of the group to 
share the honors was an 88year-old native of China. 

— Milwaukee Sentinel Photo. 



Of the candidates for naturalization, 115,450 were 
in attendance at 5,590 public school citizenship classes 
during the fiscal year; and 2,759 other aliens who could 
not attend school received their instruction through 
enrollment in the Service home study courses adminis- 
tered by the educational authorities or institutions in 
42 States. Late in the fiscal year, the Bureau of Special 
Continuing Education, State Educational Department, 
Albany, N.Y., completed plans to administer home 
study citizenship courses for the residents of New York 
State who, theretofore, had been without such services. 

The Service-published textbooks of the "Becoming 
a Citizen Series'' and a major part of the modern 
"Federal Textbook on Citizenship" were once again 
extensively used as text and study material by natural- 
ization candidates attending the public school citizen- 
ship classes. During the year, a total of 79,518 units 
of the textbook were furnished for such use without 
cost as authorized by statute. Additionally, 39,834 other 
units of the textbook, especially adapted for home study 
preparation, were furnished for the use of those aliens 
who enrolled in the correspondence courses. 

Also contributing to the furtherance of citizenship 
education were historical films such as "The American 
Flag," "Early Settlers of New England," "The Decla- 
ration of Independence by the Colonies," and "The 
Bill of Rights of the United States," which were made 
available by the Service to civic, patriotic, and other 



recognized organizations dedicated to the education 
and assimilation of the foreign born. As the year closed, 
the Service completed arrangements for the purchase 
of six additional films, all in color, entitled, respectively, 
"The Constitution — Guardian of Liberty," "Our Im- 
migrant Heritage," "The Plymouth Colony: The First 
Year," "How We Elect Our Representatives," "Are 
You a Good Citizen," and "The Jamestown Colony." 
The Service is confident that these new additions to its 
motion picture portfolio will make a material contribu- 
tion to the realization of the educational objectives. 

Citizenship Day, celebrated every year in all parts 
of the LTnited States, and Law Day and Loyalty Day, 
recognized in some States, were occasions for exten- 
sive Service activity designed to stress citizenship re- 
sponsibility and stimulate the practice of good citizen- 
ship by all citizens — natural born and naturalized alike. 
Service officers, in cooperation with many patriotic 
and public-spirited citizens and organizations, planned 
and participated in many impressive ceremonies and 
observances on such occasions to further these 
objectives. 

No exercises conducted on these commemorative oc- 
casions were more inspirational or moving than the 
naturalization proceedings in which American service- 
men — many on brief leave from Vietnam duties — • 
received their citizenship. Representative of such pro- 
ceedings was the Law Day ceremony conducted in the 
U.S. District Court at Agana, Guam, when 108 persons 
were naturalized. Among the new citizens ^vere 23 
members of the Armed Forces of the United States. 
Under special arrangements with the military authori- 
ties, the applications of these petitioners were received 
and processed by Service officers before the men ar- 
rived on Guam by air, with interviews and examina- 
tions accomplished quickly after arrival. Following 




rmy sergeant is granted U.S. citizenship while on leave from his 
duty station in West Germany. The judge who presided at the 
hearing is seen here with the sergeant and his wife and 
daughter. 



27 



376-870 O— 7 



the impressive hearing, the military men were flown 
back to their post of duty, some returning to combat 
stations in Vietnam. 

Outstanding, impressive, Law Day observances were 
also conducted in conjunction with naturalization 
proceedings in the U.S. District Court at Honolulu. On 
this occasion, 61 U.S. servicemen and 133 civilians 
were admitted to citizenship at a special outdoor cere- 
mony held on the parade grounds of Fort DeRussy. 

Persons Naturalized. While more applications for 
naturalization were received in 1969 than in 1968, 
there was a slight decrease in the number of persons 
admitted to citizenship during 1969. Primarily, this 
was caused by unavoidable clerical shortages. Generally 
speaking, however, by putting emergency innovations 
into operation, the Service was able to maintain a sat- 
isfactory currency in the disposition of the caseload. A 
further increase in the basic naturalization volume in 
the years immediately ahead may be expected, not 
only because of increased immigration in recent years, 
but also because almost 90,000 Cuban refugees will 
become eligible to apply during the period. 

During the year, Service officers appeared at final 
naturalization hearings in 580 Federal and State courts 
and, based upon their examinations and representa- 
tions, a total of 98,709 aliens were admitted to U.S. 
citizenship at these proceedings. Before being granted 
naturalization, each alien was required to take a solemn 
oath of allegiance to the United States, whereby he or 
she renounced all foreign allegiance and promised to 
support and defend the Constitution and laws of this 
country against all enemies, foreign and domestic. 

As in years gone by, the greatest number (73,489) 
of the new citizens achieved naturalization under the 
general provisions of the statute, which require con- 
tinuous permanent residence in the United States for 
5 years. Based upon their status as the spouses of U.S. 
citizens requiring 3 years' residence, 14,346 were 
granted citizenship. The group also included 5,271 
natural or adopted children of U.S. citizens, bene- 
ficiaries of petitions filed by their parents; 5,458 serv- 
icemen or veterans who were able to establish eligibil- 
ity irrespective of residence, based upon a period of 
honorable military service; and 145 others. During the 
year, nine widows of citizen servicemen killed in Viet- 
nam, ineligible for naturalization under normal provi- 
sions of the law, received immediate citizenship under 
the remedial legislation enacted in the last session of 
Congress. 

A majority of the newly naturalized persons were 
formerly nationals of a relatively few countries, i.e., 
Germany (10,618), Cuba (9,654), Italy (8,773), the 
United Kingdom (7,979), Canada (6,387), and 
Mexico (5,1 1 1 ) . The remainder was comprised of citi- 
zens or subjects of 109 other foreign states situated on 
all parts of the globe. Among the new citizens were 




Mrs. Margarete Hallett, whose citizen husband died in Vietnam, 
was one of the first widows to benefit from special legislation 
which provided for expeditious naturalization. 



11,420 persons in the professions; 8,765 skilled techni- 
cians and craftsmen; 4,087 managers, foremen, and 
merchants; 21,351 clerical, sales, and sei-vice workers; 
1 1,222 operatives; 876 private household workers; and 
3,276 farmers, farm laborers, and laborers. 

The fiscal year witnessed many interesting events in 
the naturalization area. Among them were the appear- 
ance of President Nixon, then the Republican Presi- 
dential candidate, as a witness to petitions for natural- 
ization filed by two of his employees, and the use of the 
White House as a setting for a final naturalization 
ceremony in the U.S. District Court for the District 
of Columbia. A deaf-mute who was able to undergo 
examination and take the requisite oath of allegiance 
through a sign language interpreter achieved natural- 
ization during the period, as did several persons whose 
inability to appear at courthouses on account of severe 
illnesses prompted the courts to authorize their natural- 
ization at the places \\here they were bedridden. 

A number of the military naturalizations during the 
past year involved an application of the relatively 
recent enactment which amended the statute to au- 
thorize expeditious naturalization based upon honor- 
able active service during the period of the South Viet- 
nam hostilities. The Service collaborated with the 



28 



PERSONS NATURALIZED 
1965-1969 



150,000 



100,000 



50.000 




1965 1966 

i EUROPE 



1967 1968 1969 

ASIA V/A NORTH AMERICA IMiJ ALL OTHER 



Department of Defense in the preparation of a detailed 
set of instructions relative to the new legislation and 
naturalization procedure. This Department of Defense 
directive should assure that each alien serviceman will 
have the infomiation he needs to obtain citizenship on 
the earliest date possible under the circumstances in 
his particular case. 

Denials of Naturalization. The number of petitions 
for naturalization denied totaled 2,043, a small in- 
crease over the figure of a year ago. Of those denied, 
981 petitions were voluntarily withdrawn when it be- 
came clear to the petitioner that the statutoiy require- 
ments for naturalization could not be met at the time, 
and that it would be a waste of time and money for 
him to appear at the final hearing in court in an effort 
to contest the matter. Similarly, another substantial 
group of 910 petitions was denied because the peti- 
tioners failed to prosecute their cases to completion. 
A high percentage of these denials and withdrawals 
related to the petitions of persons who were unable to 
meet the educational prerequisites and needed addi- 
tional time to study. A deficiency in English literacy 
accounted for 306 denials compared with the 288 
denied on that premise in 1968. 

The petitions denied because the petitioner did not 
have a fair knowledge of the history, Government, and 



Constitution of the United States totaled 212, 13 per- 
cent more than the number denied upon such basis 
a year ago. Some of the other reasons for denial were 
lack of good moral character, inability to take the oath 
of allegiance, petition not supported by required 
affidavits of ^\•itnesses, etc. 

DERIVATIVE CITIZENSHIP 

Almost since the beginning of the Nation, the law 
has provided for circumstances under which the for- 
eign-born children of U.S. citizens acquire U.S. citizen- 
ship at birth. Under a succession of other statutes 
extending back through the years, children who did 
not become citizens at birth in a foreign country could 
derive U.S. citizenship after birth upon the natural- 
ization of their parents. 

At one time, alien women were able to obtain citizen- 
ship by marriage to a U.S. citizen or as a result of an 
alien husband's naturalization during the existence of 
the marital status. Citizens within these derivative 
classes frequently experienced difficulty in proving 
their citizenship, and to alleviate this situation, the 
issuance of certificates of citizenship was authorized by 
the Congress. The law provides that once the docu- 



29 



Petitions for Naturalization Denied on "Merits," on Grounds of "Petition 
Withdrawn" and on Grounds of "Petition not Prosecuted," by Reasons: Year 
Ended June 30, 1969 



Total 2,043 152 981 

Petitioner failed to establish good moral character 
during the period required by law 571 13 449 

Petitioner failed to establish attachment to the 
principles of the Constitution and favorable dis- 
position to the United States during the period 
required by law 26 1 20 

Petitioner cannot speak (read, write) the English 
language- 306 66 99 

Petitioner failed to establish lawful admission for 
permanent residence 23 2 17 

Petition not supported by required affidavits of 
witnesses (depositions, oral testimony) 412 7 138 

Petitioner failed to establish that he is not ineligi- 
ble for naturalization under sec. 315 of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act - 8 3 5 

Petitioner lacks knowledge and understanding of 
the fundamentals of the h istory and the princi- 
ples and form of Government of the United 
States 212 18 64 

Petitioner is unable to take the oath of allegiance 
to the United States 30 3 15 

Petitioner cannot meet requirements under spe- 
cial naturalization provisions - 119 2 71 

Another reasons... 336 37 103 



ment is issued by the Service, it must be accepted 
everywhere as proof of the holder's citizenship. 

Of the 29,739 derivative certificates issued during 
1969, 16,606 were furnished children who acquired 
citizenship at birth abroad, 12,822 were issued to chil- 
dren who derived citizenship through the naturaliza- 
tion of their parents, and 311 were made available 
to women who became citizens through marriage. This 
last group is a very substantial number when one 
realizes that citizenship has not been conferred in this 
manner since the relevant statute was repealed on 
September 22, 1922. Included in the total were 300 
certificates issued to persons who became citizens 
through their parents at birth in the Panama Canal 
Zone or the Republic of Panama. Until the enact- 
ment of remedial legislation 3 years ago, the certificates 
of citizenship could not be delivered outside the United 
States. 



OTHER CITIZENSHIP ACTIVITIES 

Because of the major demands of the naturalization 
and citizenship status caseloads, the importance of 
other nationality applications which are processed and 
adjudicated by the Ser\'ice is sometimes overlooked. 
By statute, certificates of naturalization and citizenship 
and declarations of intention, when lost, mutilated, 
or destroyed, can be replaced by the Service. A certif- 
icate can also be replaced with one issued in a new 
name, if it is established that the name appearing on 



the original document has been legally changed. Spe- 
cial certificates of naturalization for use by naturalized 
citizens in obtaining recognition as such by foreign 
states may also be issued. Certifications from nation- 
ality records and documents for use in compliance with 
Federal and State statutes and in judicial proceedings, 
or where they are to be used for some other legitimate 
purpose, are likewise available. Pursuant to applica- 
tion, the Sei-vice may also issue an order preserving 
an alien's residence for naturalization purposes during 
a period of extended absence. By the end of the fiscal 
year, 10,603 such applications had been handled by 
the Service e.xceeding soinewhat the total of each of 
the last 2 years. 

For many years, statutes enacted by the Congress 
have provided that U.S. citizenship may be lost by 
the voluntary performances of specified acts. However, 
in recent years, decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court 
have invalidated a number of expatriatory grounds. 
As a result, the number of reported expatriations dur- 
ing the fiscal year declined to 450 compared with 
3,374, 10 years ago. This total included four who lost 
their citizenship by obtaining naturalization in a for- 
eign state, two by taking an oath of allegiance to a 
foreign state, and 444 by express renunciations. During 
the past year, 274 certificates of citizenship administra- 
tively issued were canceled for fraudulent procuiement 
of such certificates. 

The U.S. Supreme Court in its most recent deci- 
sion relating to expatriations, namely, the decision 
in Afroyim v. Rusk, stated that a U.S. citizen has a 
constitutional right to remain a citizen unless he 
voluntary relinquishes that citizenship. During the 
fiscal year, the Attorney General issued a Statement of 
Interpretation relative to the effect of this statement 
upon the validity of statutory grounds for expatriation 
which were not under consideration in Afroyim v. 
Rusk. Thereafter, representatives of the Service, the 
Department of Justice, and the Department of State 
met in consultations to formulate rules which would 
assure a uniform application of the Attorney General's 
Statement of Interpretation and a resultant uniformity 
in decisionmaking. 

Beginning with the Act of June 29, 1906, the nat- 
uralization statutes have contained provisions author- 
izing the citizenship of naturalized citizens to be 
revoked in judicial proceedings where it appeared that 
their admission to citizenship was illegal or fraudulent 
in nature. The elimination of illegality and fraud from 
the naturalization process is largely dependent upon a 
skillful and thorough examination of the applicants by 
Service officers, to the end that perjuiy, concealment, 
and misrepresentation by the applicants will not be 
possible. Bearing witness to the ever-increasing ef- 
fectiveness of the naturalization examiners along such 
lines is the fact that, during the past decade, the 
annual volume of revocations decreased from 154 cases 



30 



in fiscal year 1959 to only five cases in fiscal year 1968. 
Moreover, this trend not only continued throughout 
fiscal year 1969, but it achieved a climax in that no 
naturalizations were revoked during the yearly period. 



Administrative Services 

Administrative Sei-vices covers the many steps needed 
to service the needs of the operations' ann of the 
Service. Personnel assignments, employee relations, pay 
checks, procurement, building programs, and statistics 
are all details necessary to forward the active programs 
of the Service. 

Personnel. Greater emphasis was placed on estab- 
lishing a successful position classification program 
throughout the Service in fiscal year 1969. An exten- 
sive revision of the classification policy encourages the 
active participation of all supervisory employees in 
the classification process. Many of the Service's major 
occupational groupings including investigators. Border 
Patrol oflficers, and General Attorneys, have been given 
intensive study, sometimes in conjunction with the 
Department of Justice or the Civil Service Commis- 
sion. Thus, communication lines have been increased 
between the Central Office and field oflfices, the Depart- 
ment, and the Commission, all of which has helped 
to promote the successful operation of the classification 
program. 

Training continued to be stressed during 1969. At 
the Service Officer Development Center at Port Isabel, 
Tex., a total of 290 officers and other employees com- 
pleted courses. Among these students were 128 patrol 
inspectors (trainee) and seven investigators (trainee) 
graduated from two Border Patrol Academy sessions. 
In addition, Service employees completed 2,882 lessons 
in the Sei-vice's Extension Training Program, while 
employees of other agencies completed 344 lessons. A 
total of 33,248 man-hours of off-the-job training in 
the Servicewide "INS Supervisory Development Con- 
ference Series" was reported. A new insei-vice program 
of instruction entitled "Training Program for Elec- 
tronic Technicians" was planned and implemented by 
Service Engineers on June 18, 1969. A total of 242 
interagency training programs was completed by 
Service personnel during the year, while the Sei-vice 
provided training for 372 employees of other agencies. 

Service employees, as well as employees in Customs, 
Plant Quarantine, and Public Health participated in 
a 2-week program of instruction entitled "Accelerated 
Inspection System Interagency Training Program for 
Primary Inspection." The objective of this course is to 
train officers to carry out the multiple duties of the four 
agencies in a speedy, courteous, and efficient inspection 
of each person entering this country at an airport. 



During the past year, negotiations 'oetween repre- 
sentatives of the Service and representatives of the 
National Border Patrol Council and the National 
Council of Immigration and Naturalization Service 
Employees resulted in two separate national collective 
bargaining agreements. 

Incentive Awards. The year saw 496 employees re- 
ceive lump sum monetary awards in recognition of 
superior performance or special acts. An additional 
301 employees were accorded quality within-grade 
salary increases for superior work performance. A total 
of 369 employee suggestions were received of which 
101 were adopted for use by the Sei"vice. 

Finance. More than 275,000 checks were issued by 
the Treasury Department this year in payment of 
73,425 vouchers certified by Finance personnel. Most 
of the checks covered employees' salaries, but payments 
were also made for travel and transportation expenses, 
refunds, reimbursements, imprest fund replenishments, 
taxes, claims, and all contractual obligations. In addi- 
tion, the 56,000 cash payments made by the Service's 
215 imprest fund cashiers resulted in a substantial 
savings to the Service. 

The reinstitution of overtime inspection charges for 
small private aircraft and vessels created an additional 
workload in bills rendered to and collected from own- 
ers and a flood of inquiries requesting clarification of 
amounts charged and their legality. 

Based on recommendations of the President's Com- 
mission on Budget Concepts, the Treasury Department 
required all agencies to submit on a test basis, begin- 
ning in July 1968, new reports of Selected Balances for 
Stating Budget Results on an Accrual Basis. As the 
Immigration and Naturalization Service's accounting 
system has been established under the accrual concept 
since 1967, only nominal modification was necessary. 
The Service was cited by the Treasui-y Department as 
one of the agencies to demonstrate the reporting capa- 
bility from the essential standpoint of timeliness. 

Statistics. A continuing effort by the Government 
to economize in the administration of public agencies 
has increased the need for proper management infor- 
mation tools to effectively allocate manpower and 
resources. For this reason, the Service work measure- 
ment system's importance to all levels of management 
has been emphasized. It continues to remain the sole 
source of statistical data that encompasses the entire 
scope of Service activities, providing infonnation to the 
first line supervisor as well as top management. 

During the year, a major change was made in ob- 
taining statistical data relating to immigration, nat- 
uralization, passenger travel, and other areas of 
Service activity. For a number of reasons, the Service 
converted its data processing system to utilize the more 
widely used 80-column statistical pimchcards in lieu 
of the outdated 90-column system. This change has 
enabled the Service to not only obtain newer equip- 



31 



ment for processing data, but also provide a data base 
for which additional technological improvements in 
data handling may be made in future years. It also 
provides data on punchcards which is compatible with 
the majority of large computer systems in other Gov- 
ernment agencies, as well as private industry, thereby 
increasing the potential utility of the data collected 
throughout the Service. 

Detailed statistics on immigration, naturalization, 
passenger travel, nonimmigrant visitors, and alien ad- 
dress reports were compiled. The interest of transpor- 
tation lines, the U.S. Travel Service, and other 
Government agencies in alien and citizen travelers into 
and out of the United States is evident in the numerous 
requests for detailed infonnation not contained in 
published reports. The admission of immigrants in the 
professional and highly technical positions continues. 
To meet this quest for information from many scholars 
and research agencies, the "Annual Indicator" relating 
to the flow of professional and highly skilled immigrants 
was again published as a result of the interest expressed 
in the information available in last year's first such 
report. Continued interest lies in the southwestern 
United States where both legal and illegal movement 
of aliens across the United States-Mexican border has 
caused considerable concern. 

Procurement and Property Management. In fiscal 
year 1969, 158 contracts or leases were completed, and 



8,343 purchase orders were issued by the Service. 
Servicewide printing facilities duplicated over 17 mil- 
lion pages of instructions, reports, regulations, and 
procedures. 

The upgrading of the Service's vehicle fleet greatly 
alleviated the abnormally high cost of maintaining the 
high-mileage vehicles previously in use. 

Records. Additional open-shelf filing sections were 
acquired in an attempt to adequately house the ever- 
increasing volume of required record material of the 
Service. During the past fiscal year, nearly a million 
new Service files on newly arrived immigrants and 
other persons involved in Service actions were created. 
This number represents a 7-percent increase over last 
year. To facilitate the location of this material, addi- 
tional mechanical equipment was installed at various 
Service locations. A double-digit sorter was installed at 
the Master Index in Washington, D.C., and a power 
file for housing subject files was installed in the Central 
Office. The Master Index required by Section 290 of 
the Immigration and Nationality Act now contains 
over 58 million documents. 

A continued effort to reduce storage costs by utiliz- 
ing economical storage at Federal Records Centers 
resulted in the removal of 6,042 cubic feet of records, 
equivalent to 755 five-drawer file cabinets, from the 
crowded, costly storage facilities in Service Files Con- 
trol Centers, and 5,011 cubic feet of records were 




The Master Index of the Service, containing approximately 58 million entries, is house 
rapid communication of results of index searches, 21 Teleautograph substations 
background. Annually, searches of over 800,000 documents and filing of approx 



in 84 mechanical in 
ire connected to the 
nately 5 million docu 



ex machines. To pro 
naster console in the 
nents are performed. 



32 



destroyed under approved disposal schedules through- 
out the Service. 

The Friden Flexowriter Units, introduced in 1964 
to automate the visa processing procedure, were sup- 
plemented throughout the Service. With the establish- 
ment of a Visa Processing Center in Twin Cities, 
Minn., all four regions now have improved facilities 
to perform this essential Sei-vice task. To further take 
advantage of this time saving automated system, a 
Visa Processing Center has also been established in the 
Central Office. 

Building Programs. The St. Albans, Vermont, Dis- 
trict Office and the Northwest Regional Office moved 
into Federal Office Buildings. Projects awarded and 
appropriated by the U.S. Customs Service \vhich were 
planned in conjunction with this Service and com- 
pleted in the past year \vere a new border station at 
Churubusco, N.Y., and cottages to house inspectors at 
both Coburn Core, Maine, and Raymond, Mont. No 
projects were contracted jointly by the Service and 
U.S. Customs. 

The following projects were completed during fiscal 
year 1969 with funds appropriated by the General 
Services Administration: improvements to border sta- 
tions at Blaine, Wash., Eagle Pass, Tex., and Douglas, 
Ariz. ; improvements to the Border Patrol sector head- 
quarters and the construction of pistol ranges at Del 
Rio, Tex., and Havre, Mont.; and the leasing of a 
border station at Rio Grande City, Tex. 

Repairs due to extensive damage caused by hurri- 
cane Beulah at the Sei-vice installation at Port Isabel, 
Tex., the site of the Service Officer Development Cen- 
ter, were completed. 

Physical changes to implement the accelerated in- 
spection system were completed at airports in Anchor- 



age, Seattle, San Antonio, and Dulles Airport in Wash- 
ington, D.C., Logan Airport in Boston, and John F. 
Kennedy Airport in New York City. The system will 
be operational in Chicago as soon as the necessary 
changes can be made. Meetings are continuing with 
airport authorities for the early implementation of the 
system at additional locations, including Los Angeles, 
San Francisco, Honolulu, and Miami. 

A nimiber of other projects are being reviewed \vith 
the General Seivices Administration in an effort to 
provide better facilities and adequate housing at ports 
of entry and Border Patrol stations throughout the 
country. 




utomatic writing machines being used to process immigrant visas 
at the Central Office. An eight-channel punched paper tape is 
produced that can be rerun on auxiliary equipment using various 
program tapes to produce other required forms to provide evi- 
dence of alien registration and gather statistical data. 



33 



IMMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES; 
1820-1969 



/From 1820 to 1867 figures represent alien passengers arrived; 1868 through 1891 

and 1895 through 1897 immigrant aliens arrived; 1892 through 1_894 and from 1898 

to the present time immigrant aliens admitted^/ 



Number 

of 
persons 



Number 

of 
persons 



Number 

of 
persons 



1820-1969 \/ AA. 789. 312 
1820 .. . 



1821-1830 

1821 . 

1822 . 

1823 . 

1824 . 

1825 . 

1826 . 

1827 . 

1828 . 

1829 . 

1830 . 

1831-1840 

1831 . 

1832 . 

1833 . 

1834 . 

1835 . 

1836 . 

1837 . 

1838 . 

1839 . 

1840 . 

1841-1850 

1841 . 

1842 . 

1843 . 

1844 . 

1845 . 

1846 . 

1847 . 

1848 . 

1849 . 

1850 . 

1851-1860 

1851 ., 

1852 ., 

1853 .. 

1854 .. 



8,385 

143,439 

9,127 

6,911 

6,354 

7,912 

10,199 

10,837 

18,875 

27,382 

22,520 

23,322 

599,125 
22,633 
60,482 
58,640 
65,365 
45,374 
76,242 
79,340 
38,914 
68,069 
84,066 

1.713,251 

80,289 

104,565 

52,496 

78,615 

114,371 

154,416 

234,968 

226,527 

297,024 

369,980 



2.598.214 
379,466 
371 ,603 
368,645 
427,833 



1855 

1856 . 

1857 . 
18 58 . 

1859 . 

1860 . 

1861-1870 

1861 . 

1862 . 

1863 . 

1864 . 

1865 . 

1866 . 

1867 . 

1868 . 

1869 . 

1870 . 

1871-1880 

1871 . 

1872 . 

1873 . 

1874 . 

1875 . 

1876 . 

1877 . 

1878 . 

1879 . 

1880 . 

1881-1890 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 

1891-1900 
1891 . 



200,877 
200,436 
251 ,306 
123,126 
121,282 
153,640 

2.314.824 
91,918 
91,985 
176,282 
193,418 
248,120 
318,568 
315,722 
138,840 
352,768 
387,203 

2.812.191 
321,350 
404,806 
459,803 
313,339 
227,498 
169,986 
141,857 
138,469 
177,826 
457,257 

5.246,613 
669,431 
• 788,992 
603,322 
518,592 
395,346 
334,203 
490,109 
546,889 
444,427 
455,302 



3.687.564 
560,31* 



1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 

1901-1910 

1901 . 

1902 . 

1903 . 

1904 . 

1905 . 

1906 . 

1907 . 

1908 . 
! 909 . 

1910 . 

1911-1920 

1911 . 

1912 . 

1913 . 

1914 . 

1915 . 

1916 . 

1917 . 

1918 . 

1919 . 

1920 . 

1921-1930 

1921 . 

1922 . 

1923 . 

1924 . 

1925 . 

1926 . 

1927 . 

1928 . 

1929 . 

1930 . 



579,663 
439,730 
285,631 
258,536 
343,267 
230,832 
229,299 
311,715 
448,572 

8.795.386 

487,918 

648,743 

857,046 

812,870 

I ,026,499 

1,100,735 

1,285,349 

782,870 

751 ,786 

1,041,570 

5.735.811 
878,587 
838,172 
1,197,892 
1,218,480 
326,700 
298,826 
295,403 
110,618 
141,132 
430,001 



4.107.209 
805,228 
309,556 
522,919 
706,896 
294,314 
304,488 
335,175 
307,255 
279,678 
241,700 



1931-1940 

1931 . 

1932 . 

1933 . 

1934 . 

1935 . 

1936 . 

1937 . 

1938 . 

1939 . 

1940 . 

1941-1950 

1941 . 

1942 . 

1943 . 

1944 . 

1945 . 

1946 . 

1947 . 

1948 . 

1949 . 

1950 . 

1951-1960 

1951 . 

1952 . 

1953 . 

1954 . 

1955 . 

1956 . 

1957 . 

1958 . 

1959 . 

1960 . 

1961-1969 

1961 . 

1962 . 

1963 . 

1964 . 

1965 . 

1966 . 

1967 . 

1968 . 

1969 . 



528,431 
97,139 
35,576 
23,068 
29,470 
34,956 
36,329 
50,244 
67,895 
82,998 
70,756 

1,035.039 

51,776 

28,781 

23,725 

28,551 

38,119 

108,721 

147,292 

170,570 

188,317 

249,187 

2,515,479 
205,717 
265,520 
170,434 
208,177 
237,790 
321,625 
326,867 
253,265 
260,686 
265,398 

2.948.351 
271,344 
283,763 
306,260 
292,248 
296,697 
323,040 
361,972 
454,448 
358,579 



1/ Data are for fiscal years ended June 30, except 1820 through 1831 and 1844 through 1849 
fiscal years ended Septeaiber 30; 1833 through 1842 and 1851 through 1867 years ended 
December 31; 1832 covers 15 months ended December 31; 1843, 9 months ended September 30; 
1850, 15 months ended December 31; and 1868, 6 months ended June 30. 



35 



TABLE 2. ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AND DEPARTED, BY MONTHS: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1968 and 1969 

_/Data exclude border crossers, crewmen, and aliens admitted on documentary waivers/ 



Period 


ALIENS ADMITTED 


ALIENS 
DEPARTED 

x/ 


U.S. CITIZENS 1/ 


Immigrant 


Non- 
immigrant 


Total 


Arrived 


Departed 


Fiscal year 1969 


358,579 


3,645.328 


4,003,907 


2.807,618 


5,457,266 


5.221,574 


July-December 1968 . 


181,980 


1,892,423 


2,074,403 


1,524,031 


2,850,591 


2.480,785 


July 


35,059 
33,105 
28,923 
30,191 
27,039 
27,663 

176,599 


382,792 
336,491 
426,624 
289,728 
219,470 
237,318 

1,752,905 


417,851 
369,596 
455,547 
319,919 
246,509 
264,981 

1,929,504 


260,383 
311,226 
264,095 
250,087 
199,850 
238,390 

1,283,587 


532,762 
808,684 
484,658 
371,409 
314,109 
338,969 

2,606,675 


626,960 
527 843 


September 

October 


367,005 
310,058 




294,453 




354,466 


January-June 1969 . . 


2,740,789 


January 

February 

March 

April 


28,074 
25,546 
30,426 
31,358 
31,888 
29,307 

454,448 


221,029 
214,586 
280,707 
325,411 
362,780 
348,392 

3,200,336 


249,103 
240,132 
311,133 
356,769 
394,668 
377,699 

3,654,784 


179,079 
157,305 
198,075 
211,535 
251,048 
286,545 

2,473,742 


390,714 
352,586 
425,892 
459,898 
454,766 
522,819 

4,645,045 


353,796 
363,421 
423,588 
427,084 


May 


477,517 
695,383 


Fiscal year 1968 


4,587,389 
















July-December 1967 . 


214,900 


1,836,410 


2,051,310 


1,384,386 


2,475,106 


2,247,982 


July 


38,946 
37,748 
35,036 
39,525 
31,040 
32,605 

239,548 


411,781 
356,274 
406,180 
256,594 
201,546 
204,035 

1,363,926 


450,727 
394,022 
441,216 
296,119 
232,586 
236,640 

1,603,474 


247,210 
290,791 
243,209 
226,371 
172,345 
204,460 

1,089,356 


454,831 
655,828 
434,172 
360,202 
291,727 
278,346 

2,169,939 


565,084 
474,723 


September 

October 


365,389 
295,910 




248,514 




298,362 


January-June 1968 .. 


2,339,407 


January 

February 

March 

April 


32,387 
28,788 
34,195 
34,724 
39,475 
69,979 


198,085 
156,932 
192,572 
235,482 
279,734 
301,121 


230,472 
185,720 
226,767 
270,206 
319,209 
371,100 


154,078 
138,106 
167,871 
184,887 
206,259 
238,155 


319,951 
306,325 
350,023 
371,376 
383,100 
439,164 


322,172 
333,791 
358,622 
374,488 


May 

June 


391,135 
559,199 



l^/ Includes aliens departed and citizens arrived and departed by sea and air, except 
direct arrivals from or departures to Canada. 



36 



TABLE 3. ALIENS AND CITIZENS ADMITTED AT UNITED STATES PORTS OF ENTRY: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1968 AND 1969 

/Each entry of the same person counted s^parately^y 



CI ass 



Total 



Citizens 



Total number 

Border crossers \J 

Canadian 

Mexican 

Crewmen 

Others admitted ... 



Total number 

Border crossers l/ 

Canadian 

Mexican 

Crewmen 

Others admitted . . . 



Year ended June 30, 1969 



231,087,619 


134,941,700 


96,145,919 


217,680,053 


128,076,705 


89,603,348 


69,948,201 


38,953,525 


30,994,676 


147,731,852 


89,123,180 


58,608,672 


3,246,581 


2,139,951 


1,106,630 


10,160,985 


4,725,044 2/ 


5,435,941 3/ 



Year ended June 30, 1968 



217,943,897 


125.857.734 


92,086,163 


205.762,516 


119,673,849 


86,088,667 


69,918,151 


37,605,781 


32,312,370 


135,844,365 


82,068,068 


53,776,297 


3,154,401 


2,086,366 ■ 


1,068,035 


9,026.980 


4,097,519 2/ 


4,929,461 3/ 



37 Partially estimated. 

2/ Includes immigrants, documented nonimmigrants, aliens with multiple entry 

documents other than border crossers and crewmen, and aliens returning from 

Canada or Mexico after extended visits. 
3/ Includes all citizens arrived by sea and air and citizens returning from 

Canada or Mexico after extended visits. 



37 



/Dal 



ALIkNb ADMITTED 

imiGRANTS 1/ 

Immigrants subject to numerical limitations of Eastern Hemisphere 

Relative preferences 

Parents of U.S. citizens, 2nd preference, ISN Act 

Unmarried sons and daughters of U.S. citizens 

2nd preference, I&N Act 

1st preference. Act of October 3, 1965 

Spouses, unmarried sons and daughters of resident aliens, and their chlliJren ... 

3rd preference, I&N Act 

2nd preference. Act of October 3, 1965 

Married sons and daughters of U.S. citizens 

4th preference, I&N Act 

4th preference. Act of October 3, 1965 

Brothers and sisters of U.S. citizens 

4th preference, I&N Act 

5th preference. Act of October 3, 1965 

Spouses of children of marfled sons and daughters and brothers and 

sisters of U.S. citizens 

4th preference, I8N Act 

4th preference. Act of October 3, 1965 

5th preference. Act of October 3, 1965 

Occupational preferences 

1st preference, selected Immigrants of special skills, I&N Act 

3rd preference, limlgrants In professions. Act of October 3, 1965 

6th preference, other workers. Act of October 3, 1965 

Their spouses and children 

7th preference, conditional entrants. Act of October 3, 1965 

Nonpref ercnce 3/ 

Adjustments under Section 244 of the I&N Act 

Foreign government officials adjusted under Section 13 of the Act of 

September U, 1957 

Immigrants exempt from numerical limitations 

Immediate relatives 

Wives of U.S. citizens 

Husbands of U.S. citizens 

Children of U.S. citizens 

Orphans adopted abroad or to be adopted 

Other Chi Idren 

Parents of U.S. citizens. Act of October 3, 1965 

Special Immigrants 

Natives of Western Hemisphere countries, their spouses and children 

Cuban Refugees, Act of November 2, 1966 

Ministers of religion, their spouses and children 

Employees of U.S. Government abroad, their spouses and children 

Children born abroad to resident aliens or subsquent to Issuance of visa 

Aliens adjusted under Section 244, I&N Act 

Aliens adjusted under Section 249, I&N Act 

Imnlgrants, Act of Septbmber II, 1957 

Hungarian parolees, Act of July 25, 1958 

Refugee-escapees, Act of July 14, I960 

Immigrants, Act of September 11, 1961 

Immigrants, Act of October 24, 1962 

Other Immigrants not subject to numerical limitations 

NONIMMIGRANTS V 

Foreign government officials 

Temporary visitors for business 

Temporary visitors for pleasuse 

Transit aliens \\] .].[]] .].]]]].]...[..... ..... 

Treaty traders and investors 

Students 

Their spouses and children '...'..'... 

Representatives to international or9anizatlons 

Temporary workers and industrial trainees 

Workers of distinguished merit and ability 

Other teiTporary workers 

Industri si trainees 

Representatives of foreign information media 

Exchange visitors 

Their spouses and children 

Returning resident aliens 1/ 

NATO officials 

i/ An imnlgrant is an alien admitted for permanent residence. A nonltranlgrant is an al 
who have once been counted as limnlgrants are Included with nonimmigrants, although 

2/ Conditional entrants Include 9,9B7 conditional entrants who will not become permane 
status was adjusted under section 245 and section 203(a)(7)(A). 

i/ Includes private bill cases. 

4/ Immigrants subject to the numerical limitations of the Western Hemisphere. 



_13,g82 

3,799 
(392) 



_54,935 
1,954 
(1,205 



(/4,01" 
1,424 
10,939 



_79,67J^ . 

(1,317) 



_6S,384 
(1,105) 



_92,45B _ 
(1,124) 



16,632 

(36,229) 

11,316 
24,913 
25.365 



15,572 
(27,616) 



22,570 

(40,226) 

7,095 
33,131 
31^763 _ 



196.730 



10,510 
6,651 
40,639 



20B,B93 



10,772 
6,659 
53,994 



(7,283) 
1,44B 
5,835 



_39,231 
19,457 
6,840 
(7,792) 
1,679 
6,113 
5,142 
153^575 
147,906" 



46,903 

"23,126 

6,411 

(8,567) 

1,905 

6,662 

8,799 

_132j.095 

125,282 

25,752 

953 

122 



9,100 
12,986 

9,533 2/ 
23,170 



201.273 



6,479 

(7,866) 

1,612 

6,254 

7,921 

lb9j,924 

"153,929" 

91,520 

1,024 

166 

2,593 



2.341,983 



60,016 
"26,915 " 

10,358 
(12,731) 
2,080 
10,651 
6,012 
I39j.819_ 
"l27,346 4/ 
6,343 4/ 
1,357 
227 
2,935 
46 
1,565 



3.645.328 



38,544 

175,500 

1,323,479 

142,686 

7,639 

50,435 

4,032 

14,026 

_ _67,862 

8, 295 

56,654 

2,920 

2,681 

33,768 

9,991 



3<k327 
201,558 
,472,830 



4,851 
16,369 
75,848 



42,916 

220,414 

,626,585 

204,936 

9,983 

63,370 

5,667 

18,386 

70,010 



45,320 

257,600 

2,042,666 



8,213 
64,636 

2,999 

2,925 
35,253 
11,204 
236,013 

1,774 



9,352 
57,326 

3,330 

3,257 
38,630 
15,067 
264,330 

2,442 



44,940 
299,810 
2,382,198 
210,543 
15,264 
90,486 
8,302 
19,956 
62,252 



4,593 
3,622 
45,320 
15,163 
373,252 
2,264 



47,175 

15,301 

441,082 

3,155 



11 aft. 



Ret 



ning 



38 



port 


1965 


1966 


1967 


1956 


1969 


All ports 


295.697 


323.040 


361.972 


454.448 


358.579 


Atlantic 


159.566 


180.032 


212,374 


296,482 


205.372 




155 
335 

5,026 
756 
276 
179 

5,32<) 

31,820 

106,270 

365 

260 

7,537 
509 
529 

3.560 


223 

320 

9,903 

507 

534 

75 

5,039 

27,511 

122,516 

729 

281 

10,540 

1,017 

736 

2.873 


434 

320 

12,707 

726 

1,092 

200 

6,273 

40,495 

136,744 

1,047 

450 

9,182 

1,386 

1,316 

2.814 


471 

302 

13,663 

479 

1,514 

1,675 

3,910 

107,772 

151,053 

1,329 

1,002 

8,039 

1,800 

3,473 

3.315 






551 








Charlotte Amalle, V.I 






1,563 
































2,359 




595 

1,593 

353 

818 

32.673 


532 

1,445 

333 

563 

43.935 


525 

1,510 

335 

443 

55.031 


532 

1,928 

418 

437 

57.639 


417 








380 








67.060 




651 
9,007 
14,362 
38 
317 
4,445 
3,818 

29 

1.344 


741 

15,079 

12,345 

36 

322 

10,036 

5,323 

5 

47 

2.076 


1,016 

23,990 

11,981 

119 

419 

9,414 

7,904 

129 

59 

2.932 


1,226 

23,420 

14,000 

211 

391 

8,543 

9,452 

242 

154 

1.829 


1,413 




24,735 








283 




342 




13,222 




12,793 




290 




31 




2.863 




1,237 
107 

51.592 


2,001 
75 

49.106 


2,900 
32 

45.768 


1,774 
55 

50.959 


2,842 




21 




36.547 




5,577 
4,790 
2,111 
5,335 
5,744 

946 
11,397 

1,186 
340 
5«9 
866 
460 

2,157 
530 

1,455 
821 

2,882 

1,352 
551 

1,090 
819 

8,870 

37.847 


3,526 

3,501 

1,424 

3,646 

7,357 

603 

589 

9,740 

1,000 

155 

560 

809 

328 

2,147 

435 

1,064 

411 

2,321 

753 

425 

720 

686 

6,895 

44.619 


2,874 

3,841 

1,145 

3,264 

6,557 

1,303 

778 

9,580 

865 

177 

372 

1,232 

198 

1,520 

447 

698 

523 

1,744 

984 

279 

453 

949 

4,905 

41.815 


3,616 

4,436 

1,129 

3,715 

10,666 

1,125 

889 

9,433 

703 

269 

698 

1,455 

254 

1,529 

621 

491 

447 

1,751 

1,037 

380 

446 

1,292 

4,357 

43,434 


1,619 




3,146 




568 




3,304 




6,146 




709 




655 




6,791 




600 




324 




482 




1,215 




253 




1,242 




409 




313 




350 




1,142 




700 




273 




289 




837 




2,958 




43.655 




1,543 
3,539 

195 

348 
39 
1,846 
6,049 
1,773 
5,130 
2,551 
1,335 

895 
12,316 

198 

115 


1,698 

6,274 

235 

436 

54 

1,515 

4,372 

2,200 

5,172 

3,004 

1,740 

1,304 

16,240 

275 

399 


1,714 

5,853 

443 

367 

87 

1,659 

4,564 

2,388 

5,028 

1,584 

1,518 

1,255 

14,912 

334 

217 


2,500 

5,222 

408 

585 

113 

2,536 

4,923 

2,809 

6,062 

1,465 

1,349 

1,012 

14,145 

205 

790 


2,268 




5,236 




274 




593 




222 




2,277 




6,211 




2,766 




5,091 




1,426 


" * 


1,359 




1,101 




14,724 




307 




503 







39 





It". 




1 

1 s 

1 s 

- ! 


i 


j 


i 
■s 
1 


s 


""'•"""■:- '"""'"" 




"""irM;.;"""" 


-•' 


~= 


"•--"' 


e 


2 J 

^i5 


H 


5^ 


^ 






20O.OS5 


157.WJ 


1J,1.689 


1,7. W". 


M.OW 


«.915 


I0,J5«.. 


W.73. 


9»5 


1' 


9J 


6.^1 






«.n 








U lUO 


11 III 




i.7ii; 


BSi 


1, 


»2 


l.^H^ 




!!;i 


lis?? 








'i 


z 




i 






'"? 




1 , la 


.'H 


"■■'t'"" 


'7 


1 *^l Ir. akU 


1 7 


l> 8 k 


1 I 


P ^ 


II 


r 1 


III-. 


^. 


-li 


J, 


I'- 


1 l« d 


1 J'> 


Hrtlv 


l.'M 


H ih la dB 


J5 


U 


10 


P la 1 


7] 


P t fll 


ifi 


R na la 


27 


Sou In 


1 iH 


Su^d n 


26 


Swliz riond 


1 J 


I.,rk,.v (E,.,npo.n,l ..I.I 


--M 


II.S.S.R. (Ei.ri'p^ -tnrt Aslal 


H 


lllhet Fiiropc 


4(1 




1 179 








1.6W 




'mj 




i 














Cvptiiii" 


7 




*« 




47 




.^ 


Iran 






, 




ll 




hi 


lor<lan 3/ 


11 


Cnrt-a ~ 


j^ 








_ 


Phi llppin n 


1«^ 




10 










Vl^itirtm 


. 






M..rth A™.ric- 


. -,79 




6!a35 




- _ i.QSJ . 




_ i!s56 _ 


- i3| . . 


. .'»95 . 


. - _ 1» - 




,--!-_ 




._.;. 






■-? 


i2i . 






. _ i'6 - 




12 


Ciiha 




t>o.lnlc.„ .,p,.bMc 


w, 


larwU.) 






JJ 




47 




- . i-'t> . 


r^atpmaU 


' 




T 


Hi.arduua 


" 






" 


UiheXrtrUlr^"" 


10 


Snuth A™*rlc. 






S.676 


'«« 




J. 730 




'i 
















Bolivia 


h^ 


Brazil 


' ' 


(hll* 


19 




' ^ 




70 


Guvana 


■"l 








J2 


V..,H.K,»-I« 


" 


tithft So.ith Anerlca 


'' 


«MC. 




fou't"Af;ici 




3.088 
l.MI 


295 










ii 












United Arab R.Fubllc (Egypt) .. 


15 


UcMnl. 


" 




? 












371 


. 


i 








4 3 




(< 


ilth.r countrl.. 





1 







,r^:d 




i 1 


i 


d 


1 




"-■ -,"'— • 1 




■"""-™"'»""--'" 


--' 


"--"' 


Hem.spI.et.- 


= 




.1 
51 




1 

s 


All cnuntrle. 


356.579 


2yo.y.j 


IS'. JOS 


lii,b>it 


6/.S8^ 


h 01 ■ 


.8.^1^ 














^^ 






























' I5;7B5 


























Auitrta 


" 














D <• * 


14 






G rnvinv 


Jb 


^--^'' 


56 


I'H-d 


109 


Npch^ la dB 


'75 






P 1 i>d 


SO 


P t 1 


26 










S*" d n 


,, 






T k (E d A 1 ) 


g 






USSR (E a d Aal 1 


J6 










































Cvpr- 


" 




















2fl 






J ''d 3/ 


^ 








,g 










ft k ''''ui d 


(.7 


Syr.-n Arab Republic 


^ 




,3 














. 50l6i2_ 


. _ 2.i8i . 


_ i8l2il_ 


_ -ils^B. 


267 


_ .'m . 


_ ."bJl . 


_ _"^M . 






_ _ I _ . 




H Kief 


2 2b6 


W"' '"d'-* 


_ . ^82 - 






C b 


14 














t"i Id d d T bB 


16 




















792 








! 














Hondutaa 


|i, 












Ij 




















;79 








62 


;o 












B 11 


23 










o o^ • " ■ ■ • 


4B 






'' 


27 


u 


12 






Oh S th A 1 


1 




61 


Ho * 




































0th Af ic '^ 


34 




7S 














.1 

































41 



: South Aaerlc* . 



> Republic (Egypt 



42 



TABLE *iC, ALIENS I 



■ PERMANENT RESI 
ACT. RY STATUS 
YEAR ENDED TH 



-"":rj;.r"'"" 


Number 
adjusted 


Status at entry 


L 


1^ 

? s 


^1 

IS 


I 


Is 
§1 


1 


lit 


1 ; 


IS 


; 1 

ill 


1 


1 o ; 
III 


s 
1 


"1 


£ 


1 


Al 1 couotrled 




477 


531 


15 4»3 


47 


252 


7 493 


1 346 


208 


741 


193 




229 


12 


117 


1 121 


ry. 


^,,,,^^ 


11.737 


215 


171 




19 




769 


97 


69 




56 




45 


,, 


, 


447 


48 




68 

1,077 
1.133 

275 

661 
358 

15.790 




3 
5 

5 

36 

5 
3 

322 


117 
65 

252 

596 
115 

573 


5 


1 


5» 

13 
15 

51 




2 


3 

305 

5 


3 


3 


3 
5 


• 


: 


115 




A Blrla 




B lK< m 




B.lortr la 




C -ha lovskls 




(1 ma k 




F 


. 


r iT<an 


^ 


ffece 












Italy 


2 


NeLhpt lands 




Norway 


.J 




. 




^ 




^ 




5 




^ 




' 






Afila 






2,779 
110 
739 
2fli 
851 
997 
312 

1.812 
238 
355 

3« 


^^ 




865 
43 
75 

1,529 

75 
65 


3 


25 


1,917 
1 ,567 

45 


31 


« 


3 5 

2 


i 


9 


5 
13 




- 

3 


3 
5 




Cvpri.s" 




H.mu Kone 


1 . 


India 




Indent's la 








Iraq 




Israel 




la pan 


, 


Jnrdao 2/ 




Knrea ~ 














- 


Rviikvu IslADde 






- 










Other Asia 




N..rth An-.-rlca 






2 
- _ 6 


- 


- 


I 


- 
















- 










Wpfli Indies 








j 


': 


I 


" 






















3 












Central .\mprlca 






9 

1 
12 


\ 


': 


9 
9 


; 


': 


; 


': 








; 


; 










Cviatrniflla 








Nlcaraaua 








Other NnrCh America 




S,.uth America 






] 


15 


26 


6 
492 






292 


67 






13 


35 


: 


















Ecuador 




Guyana 












Othpr South America 




Africa 






667 


" 


2 
2 
13 


115 
52 
196 
129 


■ 


3 


11 
23 
93 
165 


2 
5 

20 

35 


5 
9 






3 


5 

1 




- 






South Africa 






3 


Iceanla 






398 

3 


15 


8 


63 






11 






3 


: 


} 




': 


- 








'' 






Other countries 









Include. Tal 



.376-870 O — 70- 



43 



ITED STATES, 



SECTION 2^.5. 



C„„ntrv ,.r ..jlon 


Total 


C. 1 e n d a r V e a , o f e n . r y | 


of birlh 


,96, U 


1968 


1967 


1,66 


1965 


1964 


1,6, 


1,62 


,961 


1960 


,959 


1,58 


1957 


Prior i 


All counttlos 


i').2^7 


351 


6.344 


8,134 


4.35B 


3.065 


2.330 


1 .625 


1,088 


710 


444 


244 


1 30 


112 


322 










4 097 


1.548 


656 


485 


,48 


,66 


9, 














3 
IhO 

458 
1.077 

275 
15.790 


3 
6 

31 

5 

19 

5 
5 
3 
6 

10 

5 

106 


5 

502 
233 
HI 

595 

35 

125 
76 

225 
45 
64 

52 
186 

1.912 


399 
36 7 
149 

327 
144 
162 
226 
38 

459 
57 

3.529 


5 

10 

95 
212 

257 
19 

2.587 


17 
99 

5 
38 
3 

2.255 


1.748 


11 

U 

127 
6 

1.209 


^' 


13 


,2 

367 


5 


2 


1 




Alibi rla 






Czechoslovakia 


Denmark 


France 


Germany 






Ireland 


































3.665 
63 
315 

7 39 

312 

1.812 

238 

169 
238 


18 

2 

10 
19 


276 
19 

324 

17 

134 

50 
52 

42 


580 

630 
16 

344 

79 
50 

8 


499 

555 
23 

159 

41 
60 

5 
38 


658 
76 

5 

72 

238 
16 
67 

.2 
32 


521 

303 
10 

49 
15 

32 


,43 
25 

36 

24 

3 


228 

3 

23 

140 

13 
1,2 


163 
,3 

88 


105 
39 

43 

3 


6, 

5 
,7 

5 

3 
25 


'i 


1 


154 

3 

3 
53 












Iraq 






















Other Asia 


Nr.rth America 




I 






~ 


- 


I 






, 




- 














1 






I 


': 


3 










I 




_ 






Haiti 








1 
28 


; 


2 


; 


; 


12 






3 


3 


I 






I 














South America 




3 
2 

1 




1 
239 




136 


1 
77 


3 
3 

55 


52 


1 


: 




: 






















Africa 




667 


3 
6 


34 
30 
110 
65 


33 
105 


20 
17 

45 


10 

30 
33 


5 
23 
19 


21 


3 
25 




' 


3 




- 




United Arab Republic (Egypt) 


Oceania 




398 




151 

54 

1 


124 
59 


21 






6 


5 
3 


2 


' 


; 




1 


2 

1 








3 



44 



i,3 ■ S. 






45 



TAbLE '>F. IMMIGRANTS , 



CMuntry nr rfegiun of birth 




B.neficUri.- of 
?nd preference- 1,' 


llr.nr.flcljries of 
li.l preference ly' 


All countries 


16.292 


•i.J 1 


9.991 


Europe 


11.710 


3.950 


7.754 




1,214 
418 

63b 
197 
136 
235 

3.b07 


621, 
B6 
1,874 
?62 
203 

88 
204 
138 

318 

1.810 




Hungary 


332 






Portugal 




Romania 
















Other Europe 


167 
1.697 


China 2/ 


1,39'> 
117 
101 
304 
174 
912 
504 

895 


859 
32 
10 

210 
21 

515 

163 

4 73 


536 
85 






Jordan 3/ 


153 






North Am?rlca 


4 22 




713 


338 


375 




393 
320 
162 


278 
135 
16 












South America 


46 


Africa 


83 


36 


47 




j^ 




23 


Other countrl^'^ 


, 




2 







IMMIGRANTS . 



'-685), BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTHi 





ad":u"d 


1st preference 1/ 


4th pref 


rence J/ 




Country of region of birth 


Beneficiaries 


of aliens 


Beneficiaries 


Spouses or children 
of aliens 










3.998 


8.014 




13.748 


1.306 


2.091 


3.433 


6.918 




1,898 
8,319 
1,958 
110 
431 
608 
152 
272 

6.835 


184 

651 

3 

5 

153 

2T7 

3 

30 

3.045 


171 
1,514 

8 

241 

95 

2.555 


1,928 
564 

48 

378 


889 
4,226 
1,387 
49 
155 
38 

inn 

857 




















Turkey (Europe and Aslal 








Other Europe 

Asia 




China 2/ 


2,326 
198 
862 
137 
230 
216 
500 
358 
525 

1,092 
271 


1,186 
84 

476 
37 
29 
72 

230 
20 

310 
27 

100 


1,065 

309 
28 
32 

220 

5 

215 

390 
107 


36 
3 
29 
27 

11 
17 

28 
69 
17 

158 


39 
37 
48 
45 

122 
43 
33 

239 

159 
47 

137 
























Jordan 3/ 












North America 




West Ifxtles 


696 

518 
105 
73 
112 


in 

182 


228 
T52 
64 

12 
40 

63 


122 

93 
5 

38 


127 

1 
35 
10 


-- 














South America 




Africa 






111 


27 




Uilted Arab Republic (Egypt) 


215 
93 


82 
27 


66 


3 

2 


43 
IB 

35 




Oceania 













_ Act of June 27, 1952. 

2/ Includes TaUan. 

3/ Includes Arab palestii 



46 



^1 



< 

H a: I 



••at >s 

3 3 

••-D«»*-a)aJ««»in .^..<o.^ , .g)CM«d 

• .c-^<oa c:e*< .(B-H.-aj-oo^c^fl < * -^ • -* <« u * c 



I H > >- O 



S - Q ^ 
O o S .. 
U. r- cd 3 . 



2:^ 



i<fl'H(0a)OOOOa333 .3. 



47 



YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1969 





'--■- 


R.U.We preferences 


Occupational preferences 


conditional 


is 

£ S 

If 

si 




11 


.1 

'if..- 


s sl5 
ill's 


lie 

jlis 

Il5i 


ml 


|| 


3rc( 


preference 


1 




J-Z:^^. 


Is 


1^ 

Is 


1 


1 

II 


Total 






..,.4 


25.719 


9.914 


55.701 


31.763 


9.677 


6.536 


9.10c 


6.450 


8.987 


546 


23.552 










15.628 


















259 


17,255 




3,051 
400 

190 
15,586 

i,3og 

106 
1,«5 

' 81 

3J0 

15!a36 
1,074 
2,551 

1,499 


131 

100 

1,340 

5,906 

'361 

I4I233 
1,011 

567 
198 


IB 
11 

2 


2 
41 

619 

1)900 
108 

60 
615 


3 

23 

18 

4,1^' 

6 
97 


I1I54B 
226 

218 
358 

11,022 
227 
707 
49 


69 

1,323 
'28B 

36 

1,256 

247 
807 

142 


31 

22 

1 

1 

21 
21 

43 

1 


1 

1 
32 




11 
639 

85 
162 

309 
3 


2,171 

319 

83 

172 

3,302 

1 


1 




A strl 


?ii^ 


B^\ql:m 


IS 


Ci choslovakla 


351 


De mark 


7CC 


Est nla 


25 


Finland 


53 


France 


550 




2.070 


Gre.t Britain .„d Northern 




Greece 


431 


Hunaarv 


162 


Iceland 


41 




7 72 






Latvia 


24 




22 




6 


Nftlerlandt 


426 




333 


Poland 






346 




146 






Sweden 


351 




221 






IJ.S.S.R 






17 


^ 


4.527 




15,341 
325 

902 
1,081 
1,832 
1,594 
2,120 

542 
174 


10,341 

281 

1,153 

317 

355 

BO 
223 

89 


159 
5 

11 
17 


2,647 

168 

513 
174 

108 


10 

1 

1,681 

40 

63 

29 

5 
1,559 


23 

5,854 

184 

265 

613 

506 

1,267 

534 

490 

110 
1,622 

380 
22 


114 
566 
623 

1,261 
216 
26 

9,313 


1,021 

121 

55 
73 

301 

5,662 
31 

14 


11 

63 
13 
52 
51 
39 
219 


15 

130 

205 
349 
65 

81 
12 


150 
36 


26 


2 




Ceylon 


27 




769 
























27B 






Jordan and Arab Palestine 


64 


Lebanon 








Pakistan 


164 




17 


Syrian Aiab Republic 


61 






Vietnam 


46 


Yemen 


15 








1.498 




93 
62 
143 

103 


IS 

337 
491 


1 


40 


1 


10 
10 

3 

33 


17 
10 
6 

6 


3 

1 




3 

97 


89 


1 
593 






Ethiopia 












Llberl.* 


















87 














ea 1 






659 

1 




1 


«' 




26 


'f. 


] 




53 


128 

2 








Now Guinea 


J 


New Zealand 


79 


?on'"' """'" ^"•^" '*"■' 


I 




4 











1 


/ 






















^ ;,r„;;.,7 


,::::;;:. 


1 


1 E 




ll 


s 


11 
11 


I s 

1! 


si 
£1 


Jiii 




s'l 
3: 


51 ss 

Pi! 

||S2 


All countries 


)>«,>"( 


40.4;/ 


3. be; 


5.356 


14,701 


2.(47 


26.678 






10.461 


5.224 


13.062 




g^^^p^ 


ui'.uab 




























1.989 


1)'. 

354 
I5.' 
























A t 1 


ihti 


B 1 




B 1 ana 


,,^ 


Ci h Bl akia 


1 312 


Denmark 


ini 


_. 




Germa 


hl^b 


='"" 


9,884 


Ir Und 


^^J 




1 1 hhh 




'?«/ 


No 


^yii 


Pola d 


1 8h7 


P rt isal 


10 J21 


R manl 


'5*.^ 


S 


1 RB9 


Sweden 


it', 






Turkey I Ei t pe and Asia) 


1 1 IB 


United Kino dm 


fl Bin 




'.oe 


Yuaoal la 


4 BOO 


0th t E 


t.4f. 


A . 


Ui 081 


China 1/ 


'bus 

'a5i 


'l!5 

1,081 

148 
349 


45 


32 


65 






6.385 




?.'»> 


l.?6> 






Hona Kono 




1 dl 




Ind 






^i,^ 


Iraa 


776 


I a 1 


1 2li 




I 8<»7 




I 760 


Korea ~ 


U iiOi 




79) 


Pakistan 


322 




10 515 




f>79 


SI A b ft bll 


It?? 


Thall nd "^ 


740 


VI t a 


822 


_ . ^^ 


917 


North »»e„c. 


76,041 




18.58; 
2',W1 


- _4,8i8_ 
215 

6b3 

1.704 

622 


i" 












2.056 










H xl 


11.730 






* 


"1 


35 














203 


28 




B b d 


585 


C b 


7,720 




7,086 


Haiti 


).L51 




5,139 


Trinidad and Tobago 


l'.lh3 


C t I Ain I 


5^043 


C sta Rica 




105 












159 


58 
1.235 


466 


IS 


106 


1 ,087 


El S I d 


Fih<) 


C t 1 


l.OJl 


H d as 


781 


Nl a a a 


22't 


Panama 


980 


0th C t I A 1 « 


271 


0th N th Am la 


67 




12.206 




ill 


338 












359 
131 


165 
39 




13 


46 


2.081 


B n 


237 




1 ,104 


Chll 


533 


C I bl 


i.,0S7 


E d 


1.B38 




718 


P 


fi9 3 




318 


V I 


480 




107 




2. 82 J 


M. r cc 




1.31.5 










«e 


ie 


44 


!5 


» 


11 


339 




219 


United Arab Republic lEgyptl 


''ei3 




J.bbl 


A Bt alia 


1.384 






31 










30 


' 


'' 


^\ 


831 




291 


Och I 


5 39 




» 











49 





:::':::. 


n.„.rU-,.r,.J .,( „rru|,,U.,„.l^gr.f,r,„o„ | 


„»„LS 1/ 








T,„rdpr,f,.re„.. | 


SC.il. pref.reMc^ | 








"'JT.' 


"?:;r 


'm^.nts' 




All ..ttupntl,.,.« 


158. S7S 


18.777 


6.510 


3.167 








PrnfesRl-nal lec-hnlcal and k 1 ndred wrl.... s 


40.427 
















S'5 

lOi 

1.205 
■)75 

59 
7,098 
5,4hf, 

34 

222 
2.756 

87 

95 

5i<.24 
1,765 


245 
18 

54 

1.078 

64 
75 

5 
5 

35 
423 
9U 


617 
13 


45 

1 

20 

3 
U 


5 


22 

1 
3 


130 
87 

312 

2.371 
854 




Artors and hcTt % *><; 




Alrolanp nil tv and >a leal ra 




Architect-; 




A«,.„„„d .,. „.H„r, 




Auth 




Cha I9ts 




CUrflvmen 




















Diet i tia a d Irt tl lata 












En 1 s 




EntettalnPTfi 




Forpsttrs ard c nservatl nleta 




Lawvera end ludaes 




Librarians 




Huslciana and mualc teacher* 




Nurars 




inmetrlBta 




P re 1 a d 1 bor 1 tl ns wi rk ri 




Aoricultural scl ntlsts 




BioloElcal BclsntlBt^ 




GeoloBlst^ and oe hvBlclsta 




Mathematlrians ^ 




PhvslclKts 




Ml^cellane us nat ra 1 scl ntlBta 












PhvBiclans and surBenns 




Public relati ■; m ad bll Itv writ rs 




Radio prat rs 




Recreallm and Eroup workers 




RellBloui vnrkers 




Social and wplf re wr rkero except or up 




Economlsti ' P 8 P 




Psvch lo IStB 




Statisticians and actuarlen 




MlGcellanei UH s clal sclcntUtB 




Sports Instructors and offl-Iala 




Survey rs 




TechnUlans 












Veterlnarla s ' 




Professional, technical, and kindred Markers, other 


















4 989 




48 
105 

255 




: 


: 


145 




45 

244 
57 

4,369 

14.065 




Ma a e a d s 1 t d ts b Ildl 




Officers pU tB rsers a d en ine rs shin 




Offlcl.l. .nd .d™,n,.tr.tor., pubHc .dn.nl.tr.tlo. 




Purchasine a nta a d b v re t a Ifled 




Manaeers offlclalB and proprlet rs ther 




Cl.r.c.l .„d k,„dr.<. worker. 




A e tB 


203 
205 

'313 

46 
553 

145 

52 
4,311 


15 

48 

5 

3 
5 




-_ 


3 




188 

'1O8 
105 

5 29 
6,360 




Bank teller<; 




B kk^e ers 




Call lers 




Fl lp clerks 




MesKenaers and office bov5 




UEfice machin' operat irs 




Payroll and t itnekeeplnB cl rks 




Postal clerks 




Receptionists 




Shlpplnc and recelvlne clerks 




Stenocraphers typists and secretaries 




Stuck clerks and at r ketoers 




Teleeranh and telephone iperators 




rickft station and eKpress ae nta 




Clerical and kindred workers other 




S.U. triers 




Aduertlslne aoents and salesfnen 




5 










161 




Insurance aaentB and brokers 




Real estate aoents and brokers 




Salesmen and asl s cl rka oth r 




Cr.f.smcn f„r.».n .nd kl.dr.d -„rl„r. 




Bakers 


l'995 

59 


105 


: 




i 


■'» 


'■Hi 




Blacksmiths 




Bt IcUmaBnns sConemas ns and llU setters 




Cahlnetm/ikerfi 




Carpenters 




Cempi.t and concrete finishers 




fnnp.Rllirs and tvprscttrrs 










50 





Number 
ad.altlEd 




Other 


up* Ion 






efereiiip 


sixth D eference 1 


Bt.nt. 1/ 




Ad.l.- 


''JT.- 


ii't,'.' 


•±n- 


'''^c";t;r!°irC:n^"-dre»Ir.'^;'!!!/.!!"^ 


82 
28] 
135 
154 

1.551 

78 

511 

276 

1,285 

134 

2,925 

525 


39 2 

31 

13 
571 

58 


': 


': 


39 
41 


10 
23 
3 
17 


1,813 


KKc«v«ti™i oradlna and road owchlne ooerstora 


Foremen othar 


270 


Furrier* 


Inapectori other 


li 


Jewelera. ustchnAkera, goldanlth*. and allvaradilCha 

Linemen and aervlcemen, telagraph. telephone, and pover ... 


613 
1.372 


Mechanlca and repalmen 




52 




PalnterB cona t mc t loi> and maintenance 


80 








262 




Stone cuttera and atone carvera 


' 


Structural met^l workora 




Tallora and tatloreaaaa 


. 


VtzT': rs'diriiv^/^od'i'" n"' ""■''" 


^.23 




Craftamen and kindred workora orher 


, 


eratlvaa and kindred -orkera 






381 
263 

5« 
5.269 

374 

1,127 
346 

1,283 
505 

1.460 
3.«12 


2 

21 
53 

1.043 


- 




78 
650 


2 
3 


261 


Aasejnblera 


Attendanta auto aervlce and parklna 








" 




, ,Qo 


Fllera orlndcra and poUahera metal 


* 69 




103 


Laundry and drv cl anlna o ratlvea 


2'i^ 




350 


Mine f^ratt'ea and laborera 


90 


Pack ra and wra 


IZ6 


Palnteri exce t cmatructlnn and Batntenance 


4^9 




UB 


Sailora and deck handa 


1 121 




336 










U t Ktll 


236 


Ueldere'and fl e cuttera 


1 407 


rati a d kl d d »«orkara other 


3 709 










708 


- 




206 
768 


129 




P ivate ho a hold k ra oth r 










317 
533 
152 

39 

24 3 

147 

361 

1,27S 

1,021 


29 

785 

2 

66 
59 

3 

3 
15 
31 

72 

24S 


- 


': 


5 

46 

5 

6 
20 


I 

32 
13 

3 

18 

U 

228 




B. b r« b«« tlcl. a and ■anicurt.t. 




B.rt d'ra ' 




Chfl b« Id d «*ld 


261 






hold 




J" ** 








C d ' t ha d doo k 






1,003 


Hou.ekeeper. .nd Bt.Mrda, except private houaehold 


555 

2 39 




260 


Hid 1 ' 


76 




214 




360 


7 lilt 


64 


• 


144 




346 


U It d It 


1.224 


Service tnrkera, except privet* houaehold, other 


4.976 










. 


36 


13 


13.013 


Flaherien and oyat.r«n 


250 

216 

162 

12,434 


17 


': 


- 


13 




246 


1 h^^**"' ^hH '***"■ * ^^ 


12,406 


Kouaawlvea, children, and oehera with no 


190. 6B4 


Ho^ 


71,593 
3,021 
30,354 
85.716 


': 


- 


- 


- 


" 


71,593 




3,021 


t 


30,354 


16 fa 


85,716 




1 


W.IV 


P" 







51 



Hungary 

IreUnd 

Italy 

Norwdy 

Portugal 

Spain ..;!;;;;;;: 

Sweden 

bwitzerUnd 

Turkpy (Europe ar 
United Kingdom ., 
U.S.S.R. (Europe 

Yugoslavia , 

Other Europe .... 



China V . 
Hong Kong 



Pakistan 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands .. .. 
Syrian Arab Republl 



Central Amerlc 
Costa Rica . 
El Salvador 
Guatemala .. 
Honduras ... 
Nicaragua .. 



Other South Amerlc 



Arab Republic (Egypt) 



8,600 
21,819 
25i849_ 



6,306 

3,064 
1,159 



7,627 


3,579 


5,0S6 


2,194 


1,615 


622 


1,160 


489 



y Inclu. 



1,582 
2,944 
_1»319 , 



1,212 
2,609 
2i5i6 



1,219 
2,281 

_5i6g5_ 



52 



Austria 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

France 

Germany 

Hungary 

Irelmd 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Romania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) 

Uhlted Kingdom 

U.S.S.B. (Europe and Asia) .. 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China i/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Israel 

Jordan j/ 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Thailand 

Vietnam 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Other West Indies 

Central America 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Other Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Peru 

Other South America 

Africa 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

Other Oceania 

Other countries 

1/ Includes Taiwan. 

Z/ Includes Arab Palestine, 



1,533 
6,184 
6,220 



1,216 
2,757 
6,637 



53 



TABLE 10. IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED, BY SEX AND AGE: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1960-1969 



Numbe 



admitted 



Under 5 years . 

5- 9 years ... 

10-14 years .. . 

1 5 years . . . 

16-17 years ... 

18-19 years . . . 

20-24 years .. . 

25-29 years . . . 

30-34 years . . . 

35-39 years ... 

40-44 years . . . 

45-49 years . . . 

50-54 years ... 

55-59 years ... 

60-64 years .. . 

65-69 years . . . 

70-74 years . . . 

75-79 years ... 
80 years and ov 
Not reported . . 

Males 

Under 5 years 
5- 9 years . 
10-14 years . 
15 years . 
16-17 years . 
18-19 years . 
20-24 years . 
25-29 years . 
30-34 years . 
35-39 years . 
40-44 years . 
45-49 years . 
50-54 years . 
55-59 years . 
60-64 years . 
65-69 years . 
70-74 years . 
75-79 years . 
80 years and 
Not reported 

Females 

Under 5 years 
5- 9 years . 
10-14 years . 
15 years . 
16-17 years . 
18-19 years . 
20-24 years . 
25-29 years . 
30-34 years . 
35-39 years . 
40-44 years , 
45-49 years , 
50-54 years . 
55-59 years . 
60-64 years , 
65-69 years . 
70-74 years . 
75-79 years . 
80 years and 
Not reported 



286,020 

250,006 

220,460 

45,143 

110,241 

163,204 

513,453 

454,173 

323,702 

234,771 

167,103 

126,092 

103,341 

82,321 

57,805 

37,139 

20,865 

11,123 

6,666 

121 



145,610 

126,480 

111 ,397 

22,997 

50,843 

55,410 

170,601 

206,201 

155,706 

113,020 

78,455 

57,551 

44,469 

34,822 

23,914 

15,201 

8,010 

4,078 

2,388 

55 

1,786.441 
140,410 
123,526 
109,063 
22,146 
59,398 
107,794 
342.852 
247,972 
167,996 
121,751 
88,648 
68,441 
58,872 
47,499 
33,891 
21,938 
12,855 
7,045 
4,278 
66 



24,098 

17,523 

15,386 

2,888 

8,255 

14,847 

47,674 

39,543 

27,748 

19,958 

12,059 

11,310 

8,395 

6,256 

4,316 

2,752 

1,359 

680 

321 

30 

116,687 
12,299 
8,570 
7,731 
1,493 
3,565 
4,879 
15,836 
17,788 
12,919 
9,969 
5,827 
5,369 
3,762 
2,646 
1,801 
1,187 
592 
294 
146 
14 

148,711 

11,799 

8,953 

7.655 

1,395 

4,690 

9,968 

31,838 

21,755 

14,829 

9,989 

6,232 

5,941 

4,633 

3,610 

2,515 

1,565 

767 

386 

175 

16 



271,344 

26 , 204 

18,924 

16,434 

2,982 

8,452 

14,996 

47,984 

39,558 

27,274 

19,873 

12,744 

11,082 

8,611 

6,151 

4,240 

2,867 

1,729 

834 

394 

11 

121,380 
13,203 
9,604 
8,295 
1,446 
3,537 
5,171 
16,618 
18,349 
13,063 
9,802 
6,247 
5,326 
3,865 
2,652 
1,756 
1,218 
732 
322 
168 



283,763 

25,494 

19,076 

16,544 

3,417 

8,835 

15,353 

51,487 

42,733 

29,421 

20,973 

13,552 

10,905 

8,808 

6,600 

4,617 

2,924 

1,577 

842 

468 

27 

131,575 
13,126 
9,735 
8,313 
1,683 
3,888 
5,380 
19,541 
21,288 
15,145 
10,877 
6,854 
5,111 
3,810 
2,715 
1,862 
1,151 
580 
343 
154 



149,964 

13,001 

9,320 

8,139 

1,535 

4,915 

9,825 

31,356 

21 ,209 

14,211 

10,071 

5,497 

5,756 

4,746 

3,499 

2,484 

1,649 

997 

512 

226 



152,188 
12,368 
9,341 
8,231 

1,7 34 

4,947 

9,983 

31,946 

21,445 

14,275 

10,096 

6,798 

5,794 

4,998 

3,885 

2,755 

1,773 

997 

499 

304 

19 



306 , 260 

28,991 

21 ,621 

18,005 

3,892 

10,125 

17,518 

55,935 

45.321 

31,559 

21 ,924 

15,014 

10,815 

9,005 

6,458 

4,552 

2,746 

1,499 

780 

382 



292.248 

28,394 
21 ,362 
17,147 
3,541 
10,191 
16,987 
54,923 
42,798 
28,597 
19,455 
13,870 
9,611 
8,678 
6,402 
4,495 
2,855 
1,677 
805 
445 



296.697 

27.674 
22,146 
18,642 
3,969 
10,704 
17,269 
57,000 
42,874 
27,545 
19,227 
14,033 
9,641 
8.735 
5.625 
4,538 
2,898 
1,793 



139,297 
14,882 
10.875 
8,945 
1,919 
4,570 
6,016 
20,199 
21,542 
15,981 
11,028 
7,511 
5,154 
4,021 
2,700 
1,814 
1,099 
575 
313 
144 



13 

126,214 

14,539 

10,724 

8,591 

1,717 

4,509 

5,579 

18,042 

18,956 

13,284 

8,924 

5,469 

4,267 

3,619 

2,596 

1,875 

1,094 

655 

303 

157 



166.963 

14,109 

10,745 

9,051 

1,973 

5,555 

11,502 

35,735 

23,779 

15,588 

10,895 

7,503 

5,551 

4,984 

3,758 

2,738 

1,547 

923 

467 

238 



166,034 
13,855 
10,538 
8,455 
1,824 
5,582 
1 1 , 308 
36,881 
23,842 
15,313 
10,531 
7,401 
5,344 
5,059 
3,806 
2,521 
1,762 
1 ,022 
502 
278 



518 



127.171 
14.112 
11 ,268 
9,455 
2,021 
4,857 
5,755 
18,938 
18,753 
12,578 
8,650 
6,251 
4,105 
3,517 
2,587 
1,806 
1,159 
687 
328 
213 



169.525 

13.562 

10,878 

9,175 

1,948 

5,837 

11,514 

38,052 

24,121 

14,957 

10,557 

7,782 

5,535 

5,218 

3,939 

2,732 

1,739 

1,106 

537 

305 



323,040 

30,750 

28,552 

25,034 

5,369 

12,544 

16,547 

47,853 

43,239 

30.497 

22,614 

16.132 

11,118 

10,249 

8,354 

5,899 

3,879 

2,327 

1,185 

763 

24 

141,456 
15,527 
14,447 
12,778 
2,805 
6,108 
5,445 
15,086 
19,033 
14,181 
10,561 
7,357 
4,907 
4,225 
3,470 
2,369 
1,507 
855 
415 
270 
10 

181.584 
15,123 
14,115 
12,256 
2,564 
6.436 
11 ,202 
32,767 
24,?06 
16,315 
12,053 
8,775 
6,211 
6,024 
4,884 
3,530 
2,372 
1,472 
771 
493 
14 



361 .972 

30.949 

31 ,605 

29,076 

5,968 

12,912 

15,887 

45,691 

47,613 

36,795 

27,589 

20,947 

14,850 

13,052 

10,883 

7,759 

5,025 

2,869 

1,526 

971 



454,448 

32,587 

35,919 

35,039 

7,249 

15.575 

18,582 

58,472 

60,548 

45,885 

35,467 

27,968 

21 ,415 

17, 

15,148 

11 ,081 

7,084 

4,008 

2,450 

1 ,659 



158,324 
15,595 
16,210 
14,801 
3,179 
6,179 
5,093 
12,685 
20,593 
17,424 
13,012 
9,370 
6,550 
5,572 
4,550 
3,251 
2,092 
1,078 
547 
339 



203,648 
15,254 
15,395 
14,275 
2,789 
5,733 
10,794 
33,006 
27,020 
19,371 
14,577 
11,577 
8,300 
7,480 
6,233 
4,508 
2,933 
1,791 
979 
532 



15,478 
18 
17,757 
3,712 
7,312 
6,419 
17,785 
26,775 
21,979 
15,352 
12,599 
9,511 
7,319 
5,504 
4,764 
2,949 
1,497 
832 
509 
1 

254,715 

16,109 

18,251 

17,272 

3,537 

8,263 

12,263 

40,687 

33,773 

23,907 

19,115 

15,369 

11,905 

9,889 

8,644 

6,317 

4,135 

2,511 

1,618 

1,150 

1 



54 



TABLE lOA. IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED, BY SEX, MARITAL STATUS, AGE, 

AND MAJOR OCCUPATION GROUP: 

YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1965-1969 



Sex, marital status, 
age, and occupation 



1966 



1967 



1968 



1969 



Number admitted 

Sex and marital status: 

Males 

Single 

Mirried 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Females 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Males per 1,000 females 

Median age (years): 

Both sexes 

Males 

Females 

Major occupation group: 

Professional, technical, and kindred 

workers 

Farmers and farm managers 

Managers, officials, and proprietors, 

except farm 

Clerical, sales, and kindred workers . 
Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred 

workers 

Operatives and kindred workers 

Private household workers 

Service workers, except private 

household 

Farm laborers and foremen 

Laborers, except farm and mine 

Housewives, children, and others with 

no occupation 

Housewives 

Retired persons 

Students 

Children under 14 years of age ..... 

Unknown or not reported 



296.697 



361.97? 



454,448 



127.171 



141.456 



158,324 



199,732 



165,472 



74,711 

50,639 

838 

885 

98 

169.526 



8'"i,973 

58,552 

1,032 

746 

153 

181.584 



83,443 

77,590 

5,674 

2,768 

51 

750 



23.2 
23.2 
23.2 



28,790 
1,833 

7,090 
29,779 

17,510 
14,166 
9,706 

10,743 
2,638 
8,556 

154.761 



86,138 

85,988 

7,004 

2,392 

62 

779 



23.5 
23.5 
23.4 



30,039 
2,964 

6,773 
22,676 

16,535 
14,190 
10,558 

10,541 
4,227 
9,830 

181.634 



83,761 

72,250 

1,304 

972 

37 

203.648 



91,951 

100,536 

8,304 

2,851 

6 

777 



24.9 
25.3 
24.7 



41,652 
3,276 

7,974 
19,783 

18,921 
15,675 
17,406 

12,832 

5,277 

10, 129 

198.012 



99,818 

96,468 

1,608 

1,805 

33 

254.716 



115,219 

122,985 

11,280 

5,208 

24 

784 



25.9 
26.2 
25.6 



48,753 
2,727 

9,436 
29,090 

28,926 
27,893 
25,419 

16,411 
6,002 
14,374 

228.156 



88,267 

75,269 

994 

941 

1 

193.107 



88,298 

96,658 

6,133 

2,018 



857 



24.8 
25.2 
24,3 



39,980 

3,690 

5,556 
17,692 

26,678 
16,588 
16,822 

10,461 

5,224 

13,062 

190.684 



61,669 

2,372 

27,255 

63,465 

11,125 



69,833 

3,396 

30,676 

77,729 

13,073 



78,653 

4,013 

30,188 

85,158 

11,035 



8P,679 

4,293 

37,941 

97,243 

17,261 



71,593 

3,021 

30,354 

85,716 

12,142 



55 



ALIENS ADMITTED 
Nonimmigrant \l 



T I Z E N S 3/ 



1908-1969 
1908-1910 

1911-1920 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1920 

1921-1930 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 

1928 

1929 

1930 

1931-1940 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

1936 

1937 

1938 

1939 

1940 

1941-1950 

1941 

1942 

1943 

1944 

1945 

1946 

1947 

1948 

1949 

1950 

1951-1960 

1951 

1952 

1953 

1954 

1955 

1956 

1957 

1958 

1959 

1960 

1961-1969 

1961 

1962 

1963 

1964 

1965 

1966 

1967 

1968 

1969 



5. 735.811 
878,587 
838,172 
1 ,197,892 
1 ,218,480 
326,700 
298,826 
29 5,403 
110,618 
141 ,132 
430,001 

4.107,209 
805,228 
309,556 
522,919 
706,896 
294,314 
304,488 
335,175 
307,2 55 
279,678 
241 ,700 

528,431 
97,139 
35,576 
23,058 
29,470 
34,956 
36,329 
50,244 
67,895 



51 ,776 
28,781 
23,725 
28,551 
38,119 
108.721 
147,292 
170,570 
188.317 
249,187 



205,717 
265,520 
170,434 
208.177 
237,790 
321,625 
326.867 
253,265 
260.686 
265,398 



271,344 
283.763 
306.260 
292,248 
296.697 
323,040 
361,972 
454,448 
358,579 



151 ,713 
178,983 
229,335 
184,601 
107,544 
67,922 
67,474 
101,235 
95,889 
191,575 



172,935 
122,949 
150,487 
172,406 
164,121 
191 ,618 
202,825 
193,376 
199,549 
204,514 



183,540 
139,295 
127,550 
134,434 
144,755 
154,570 
181 ,540 
184,802 
185,333 
138,032 



100,008 
82,457 
81,117 
113,641 
164,247 
203,469 
356,305 
476,006 
447,272 
426,837 

7,113.023 
455,106 
516,082 
485,714 
556,613 
620,946 
685,259 
758,858 
847,754 
1,024,945 
1,140,735 

19,675,344 
1,220,315 
1,331,383 
1,507,091 
1,744,808 
2,075.967 
2.341.923 
2,608,193 
3,200,335 
3,645,328 



518.215 
515.292 
511,924 
633,805 
384,174 
240,807 
145,379 
193,268 
216,231 
428,062 



426,031 
345,384 
200,586 
216,745 
225,490 
227,755 
253,508 
274,356 
252,498 
272,425 



290,916 
287,557 
243,802 
177,172 
189,050 
193,284 
224,582 
222,614 
201 ,409 
155,154 



88,477 
74,552 
58,722 
84,409 
93,352 
204,353 
323.422 
448,218 
430,089 
456,689 

5,582.387 
472,901 
509.497 
544,502 
599,151 
665,800 
715,200 
574,608 
710,428 
8J5.913 

1,004,377 

15,030,853 
1,093,937 
1,158,960 
1,265,843 
1,430,735 
1,734,939 
1,919,951 
2,144,127 
2,473,742 
2,807,618 



269,128 
280,801 
286,604 
286,586 
239,579 
121,930 
127,420 
72,857 
95,420 
157,173 



222,712 
243,563 
308,471 
301,281 
339,239 
370,7 57 
378,520 
430,955 
449,955 
477,260 



439,897 
339,262 
305,001 
273,257 
282,515 
318,273 
386,872 
405,999 
354,438 
258,918 



175,935 
118,454 
105,729 
108,444 
175,568 
274,543 
437,590 
542,932 
620,371 
663,567 

12,531,988 

760,486 

807,225 

930,874 

1,021,327 

1,171,612 

1,281,110 

1,355,075 

1,459,262 

1,804,435 

1,920,582 

30,352,767 
2,043,4;5 
2,199,326 
2,433,463 
2,786,907 
3,099,951 
3,613,855 
4,073,538 
4,645,045 
5,457,266 



1 1 Excludes border crosserB 

on documentary waivers. 
2/ Prior to 1957, includes emigrant and nonei 

departures to Canada. 
3/ Includes citizens arrived and departed by 

clcitens first recorded In 1910. 



Mexican agricultural laborers admitted under the Act of October 31, 1949, and aliens admitted 
d nonemigrant aliens departed, thereafter includes aliens departed by sea and air except dlrec 

nd air, except direct arrivals and departures to or from Canada. Departures of U.S. 



66 



IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED, BY STATE OF INTENDED FUTURE PERMANENT RESIDENCE! 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1960-1959 



future permane 
residence 



1950- 
1959 



All states 

Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia . 
Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas , 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi I.... 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

U.S. terr. and poss. i 

Guam 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands 

All other 



3.213.749 



265.398 



271.344 



283.763 



295.697 



323.040 



361.972 



454.448 



6,683 
2,850 
37,356 
3,310 
698, 150 

15,698 
74,020 
4,717 
26,806 
197,771 

15,582 
27,327 
3,922 
176,143 
23,865 

9,515 
9,197 
7,890 
19,458 
14,476 

34,044 
145,046 
84,938 
18,450 
3,732 

19,211 
4,399 
5,890 
5,576 

10,053 

167,406 
13,207 

746,627 
13,635 
3,521 

65,097 
8,678 
17,358 
84,982 
20,252 

6,118 
2,042 
8,695 
152,911 
9,778 

6,287 
24,707 
45,243 

5,206 
23,645 

2,045 



7,165 
45,792 
10, 163 



734 

218 

3,129 

380 

61,325 

1,653 
5,759 
353 
1,942 
10,713 

1,222 
1,619 
464 
15,132 
2,373 

1,041 

969 

803 

1,443 

1,553 

2,399 
11,953 
8,271 
1,970 
421 

1,884 
467 
650 
489 

797 

13,6 11 
1,105 

60,134 

1,179 

358 

5,829 
891 
1,715 
7,933 
1,578 

554 
186 
803 
12,992 
949 

780 
1,743 
3,897 

605 
2,504 

201 



292 
848 
369 

1,206 



503 

300 

3,473 

299 

64,205 

1,483 
5,592 
336 
1,993 
13,009 

1,099 
1,762 
379 
15,311 
2,240 



779 

733 

1,645 

1,465 

2,335 
12,091 
7,328 
1,852 
350 

1,737 
448 
637 
542 
976 

13,556 
1,473 

60,429 

1,119 

319 

5,741 
849 
1,857 
8,052 
1,403 

533 
220 
762 
14,952 
994 

639 
1,639 
3,977 

558 
2,426 

271 



256 

1,557 

450 



513 

348 

4,019 

277 

72,575 

1,495 
5,978 
356 
2,300 
14,009 



2,048 

374 

14,710 

1,991 

745 

823 

649 

1,540 

1,369 

2,344 
11,578 
5,371 
1,514 
347 

1,567 
471 
572 
711 
742 

13,367 
2,031 

62,311 

1,077 

327 

5,201 
859 
1,590 
7,535 
1,361 

481 

219 

667 

17,345 

1,052 

577 
1,721 
4,144 

452 
2,133 

299 



363 

2,956 

569 



681 

297 

5,049 

410 

79,090 

1,792 
5,944 
416 
2,495 
11,404 

1,277 
1,767 
429 
15,020 
2,053 

849 

941 

840 

1,784 

1,487 

2,631 
13,571 
5,895 
1,756 
433 

1,750 
522 
585 
719 
977 

14,099 
2,012 

70,275 

1,335 

415 

5,504 
954 
1,590 
7,463 
1,249 

599 

251 

845 

16,514 

1,167 

782 
2,277 
4,521 

567 
2,234 

226 



564 

3,303 

4:1 

1,906 



346 

3,509 

340 

67,407 

1,707 
5,587 
512 
2,795 
13,414 

1,595 
1,623 
370 
15,534 
2,251 

906 
1,057 

948 
2,041 
1,489 

3,143 
12,650 
7,298 
1,931 
354 

1,753 
515 
597 
783 

1,024 

14,559 
1,460 

58,529 

1,349 

499 

5,619 
972 
1,822 
7,487 
1,143 

618 

286 

912 

13,269 

1,208 

671 
2,504 
3,851 

569 
2,311 

179 



601 

4,101 

386 



694 

363 

3,856 

309 

67,571 

1,880 
5,867 
488 
2,919 
15,077 

1,538 
1,721 
373 
15,587 
2,095 

822 

896 

824 

2,221 

1,491 

3,448 
11,455 
7,975 
1,733 
331 

1,968 
542 
580 
754 

1,142 

15,095 
1,357 

69,011 

1,431 

344 

5,444 
875 
2,040 
5,976 
1,159 

557 

157 

557 

14,674 

1,207 

615 
2,554 
3,722 

443 

2,190 

204 



540 

4,767 

505 

2,321 



691 

285 

4,158 

283 

73,073 

1,514 
7,788 
485 
2,655 
14,028 

1,371 
3,070 
333 
18,158 
2,292 

777 

952 

760 

1,894 

1,224 

3,253 
15,120 
9,180 
1,513 
332 

1,895 
503 
532 
616 

1,015 

17,567 
875 

77,279 

1,395 

376 

6,333 
741 
1,571 
8,432 
2,282 

598 
176 
865 
13,742 
935 

525 
2,345 
4,139 

463 
2,225 

167 



744 

7,030 

708 



844 

222 

3,393 

361 

69,150 

1,564 

9,909 

633 

3,161 

22,748 

2,601 
3,825 
378 
20,270 
2,908 

1,224 

981 

931 

2,194 

1,154 

4,512 
18,246 
11,522 

2,123 
420 

2,134 
354 
573 
565 

1,157 

18,804 
903 

85,354 

1,609 

339 

8,315 
884 
1,517 
10,291 
3,298 

798 

140 

1,205 

14,349 

750 

501 
3,233 
5,501 

515 
2,896 

179 



987 
6,239 
1,389 



735 

285 

3,159 

359 

72,371 

1,911 

11,154 

714 

3,533 
69,586 

2,319 
4,693 
392 
24,901 
3,048 

1,210 
931 
771 

2,919 

1,853 

5,118 
19,339 
10,591 

2,021 
364 

2,316 
328 
553 
814 

1,176 

27,712 
999 

97,802 

1,664 

337 

8,577 
884 
1,964 
10,772 
2,987 

779 

211 

1,053 

17,335 

747 

683 
3,581 
7,160 

499 
2,551 

156 



1,215 
10,630 
3,413 



3,501 

292 

71,183 

1,499 
8,332 
424 
3,012 
13,783 

1,571 

5,199 

430 

20,420 

2,614 

1,042 

858 

631 

1,787 

1,391 

4,b50 
19,043 
9,407 
1,837 
370 

2,207 
249 
601 
582 

1,045 

18,935 
982 

94,403 

1,477 

207 

8,434 
758 
1,502 
10,041 
3,802 

601 
186 
927 
17,739 
769 

513 
3,010 
4,321 

535 
2,055 

163 



1,403 
4,361 
1,940 



57 



I*WIGRANTS AnMIITED, BY 5PFCIFIED COIWTRIPS OF BIRTH 
ANP STATE OF INTENDED PERMANENT RESIDENrEi 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 3n, IQfeq 



Alt states 

Arizona 

California 

Colorddo 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Dlst. of Columbia 
Florida 

Hawaii 

u'llnols 

Indiana 

10W9 

Kentucky ...'.'...'. 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

Nevada , 

New Hampshire .. , . 

New Jersey 

New Mexico , 

New York , 

Ohio , 

Oklahoma , 

Oregon , 

Rhorte Island ..... 

South Carolina ... 

South Dakota 

Tennessee , 

Texas , 

Virginia , 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

U.S. terr. & poss 

Guam 

Puerto Rico ... 
Virgin Islands 

All other 

V InU.d,S T.l.., 



I,38n 

23 

5,223 



1,051 

3 

10,587 



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59 



376-870 O— 70 5 



sS 



:S SR 2S a 



S 3 SSS 3 



jj J sssiE J "^'^Jsj 



i ..j£-..5 ] ^ g-;'* £ 



lis^ll i: J2 ^.2 li . : 



: 1 1 n I 



TABLE 13. IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: 
1820-1969 \J 

/prom 1820 to 1867, figures represent alien passengers arrived; 1868 to 1891, inclusive, and 1895 to 1897, 
inclusive, immigrant aliens arrived; 1892 to 1894, inclusive, and 1898 to the present time, immigrant 
aliens admitted. Data for years prior to 1906 relate to country whence alien came; thereafter to 
country of last permanent residence. Because of changes in boundaries and changes in lists of 
countries, data for certain countries are not comparable throughout^ 



Countries 



1820 



1821-1830 



1831-1840 



1841-1850 



1851-1860 



All countries 

Europe 

Austria-Hungary 2/5/ 

Belgium 

Denmark 

France 

Germany 2/ ^/ . , 

(England 

Great (Scotland 

Britain (Wales 

(Not specified ^/ . 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway) , 
Sweden) ~ 

Poland 5/ 

Portugal 

Romania _13/ 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Turkey In Europe 

U.S.S.R. 5/6/ 

Other Europe 

As la 

China 

India 

Japan l_l 

Turkey in Asia 8/ 

Other Asia 

America 

Canada fit Newfoundland 9/ . . . 

Mexico jjO/ 

West Indies 

Central America 

South America 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U^S^; ad». ) .. 
Not specified 

See footnotes at end of table. 



1 

20 

371 

9 68 

1,782 

268 



360 

,614 
30 
49 



139 
31 



^^^6.21^ 



2.314.624 



2.812.191 



1.597.501 



2.452.660 



2.065.270 



2.272.262 



27 

169 

8,497 

6,761 

14,055 

2,912 

170 

7,942 

20 

50,724 

409 

1,078 



2,477 
3,226 



22 

1,063 

45.575 

152,454 

7,611 

2,667 

185 

65,347 

49 

207,381 

2,253 

1,412 



369 
829 

2,125 

4,821 

7 

277 

40 



5,074 

539 

77,262 

434,626 

32,092 

3,712 

1,261 

229,979 

16 

780,719 

1,870 

8,251 

13,903 

105 
530 

2,209 
4,644 

59 
551 

79 



4,738 

3,749 

76,358 

951,667 

247.125 

38,331 

6,319 

132,199 

31 

914,119 

9,231 

10,789 

20,9 31 
1,164 
1,055 

9,298 

25,011 

83 

457 

5 



7,800 

6,734 

17,094 

35,986 

787,468 

222,277 

38,769 

4,313 

341,537 

72 

435,778 

11,725 

9,102 

(71,631 

(37,667 

2,027 

2,658 

6,697 

23,286 

129 

2,512 



41.455 



41,397 
43 



11.564 



62.469 



74.720 



166.607 



2,277 

4,817 

3,834 

105 

531 



13,624 
6,599 
12,301 



41,723 
3,271 

13,528 

368 

3,579 



59,309 
3,078 

10,660 

449 

1,224 



153,878 

2,191 

9,046 

95 

1,397 



69,911 



29,169 



17,969 



72,969 

7,221 

31,771 

72,206 

718,182 

437,706 

87,564 

6,631 

16,142 

210 

436,871 

55,759 

16,541 

(95,323 

(115,922 

12,970 

14,082 

11 

5,266 

28,293 

337 

39 , 284 

1,001 



123,201 
163 
149 



404 . 044 



383,640 

5,162 

13,957 

157 

1,128 



358 
9,886 
1,028 

790 



61 



IMMIGRATION BY COUNTRY, FOR DECADES: (Contd. ) 
1820-1969 1/ 



1911-1920 1921-1930 1931-1940 1941-1950 



AH countries 

Europe 

Albania U/ 

Austria) 

Hungary) 2/ 5/ 

Belgium 

Bulgaria U^/ 

Czechoslovakia 12/ 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 12/ 

France 

Germany 2/5/ 

( England 

Great (Scotland 

Britain (Wales 

(Not specified i/ 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 12/ 

Li thuanla 12/ 

Luxembourg lb/ 

Netherlands 

Norway 4/ 

Poland J/ 

Portugal 

Romania 13/ 

Spain 

Sweden 4/ 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe 

U.S.S.R. 5/6/ 

Yugoslavia ^/ 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 

India 

Japan 7/ 

Turkey in Asia 8/ 

Other Asia 7 

America 

Canada & Newfoundland 9/ ... 

Mexico 10/ 

West Indies 

Central America 

South America 

Other America U/ 

Africa 

Australia & New Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U.S. adm. ) ,. 
Not specified l^/ 

See footnotes at end of table. 



4.737.046 



3.55B.978 



8.136.016 



5.735.811 
4,376.564 



4,107.209 
2.477.853 



353,719 
20,177 



50,464 

1,452,970 

644,680 

149,869 

1 2 , 640 

166 

2,308 

655,482 

307 , 309 



53,701 

176,585 

51,806 

16,978 

6.348 

4,419 

391,776 

81,988 

1,562 

213,282 

682 



68.380 



61,711 

269 

2,270 

2,220 

1,910 



426.967 



393,304 

1,913 

29,042 

404 

2,304 



857 
7,017 
5,557 

789 



18,167 
160 



30,770 
505,152 
216,726 

44,188 

10,557 
67 

15,979 
388,416 
651,893 



26,758 
95,015 
96,720 
27,508 
12,750 
8,731 

226,266 

31,179 

3,626 

505,290 

122 



2,145,266 

41,635 
39,280 

65,285 



73,379 
341,498 
388,017 
120,469 

17,464 

167,519 

339,065 

2,045,877 



48,262 
190,505 

69,149 
53,008 
27,935 
249,534 
34,922 
79,976 
1,597,306 

665 



(453,649 

(442,693 

33,746 

22,533 

3,426 

41,983 

756 

61,897 

143,945 

249,944 

78,357 

13,107 

184,201 

146,181 

1,109.524 



43,718 

66,395 

4,813 

89,732 

13,311 

68,611 

95,074 

23,091 

54,677 

921,201 

1,888 

8,111 



32,868 
30,680 
15,846 
2,945 
102,194 
32,430 

16,691 

49,610 

412,202 

157,420 

159,781 

13,012 

51,084 
220,591 
455,315 



26,948 
68,531 
227,734 
29,994 
67,646 
28,958 
97,249 
29,676 
14,659 
61,742 
49,064 
22,983 



2,040 

3,563 

7,861 

4,817 

938 

14,393 

2,559 

506 

2,146 

12,623 

114,058 

21,756 

6,887 

735 

9,119 

13,167 

68,028 

1,19 2 

2,201 

565 

7,150 

4,740 

17,026 

3,329 

3,871 

3,258 

3,960 

5,512 

737 

1,356 

5,835 

2,361 



71.236 



14,799 

68 

25,942 

26,799 

3,628 



243.567 



192.559 



97_.400 



15.344 



20,605 

4,713 

129,797 

77,393 

11,059 



21,278 

2,082 

83,837 

79,389 

5,973 



29,907 
1,886 
33,462 
19,165 
12,980 



4,928 
496 

1,948 
328 

7,644 



38.972 



361,888 



160.037 



3,311 

971 

33,065 

549 

1,075 



179,226 
49,542 

107,548 
8,192 
17,280 



742,185 

219,004 

123,424 

17,159 

41,899 



924,515 

459,287 

74,899 

15,769 

42,215 

31 



108,527 
22,319 
15,502 
5,861 
7,803 
25 



350 

2,740 

1,225 

14,053 



7,368 
11,975 

1,049 
33,523 



8,443 

12,348 

1,079 

1,147 



6,286 

8,299 

427 

228 



1,750 

2,231 

780 



62 



All couiilrlps 

Europe 

Albania J2/ 

A.,5lrlai/5/ 

Hungary 2,' 5/ 

B^nluni 

Bulgaria 11/ 

Czechoslovakia V2j 

Denmark 

Estonia 12/ 

Finland ^2/ 

France 

Germany 2/5/ 

(England 

Great (Scotland 

Britain (Wales 

(Not specified 3/ 

Greece 

Ireland t. 

"»iy 

Latvia \2j 

Lithuania 12/ 

Lnxembourg 16/ 

Netherlands 

Nor»ay 4/ 

Poland 5/ 

Portugal 

Roman 1 a 13/ 

Spain 

Sweden 4/ 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe 

U.S.S.R. 5/6/ 

Yugoslavia \\J 

Other Europe 

Asia 17/ 

China )Sj 

India 

lap"" IJ 

Turkey in Asia 8/ 

Other Asia 

America 

Canada and Newfoundland 9/ ..., 

Mexico iO/ 

West Indies 

Central America 

South America 

Other America 14/ 

Africa 

Australia and New Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U.S. adm. ) n/ 
Not specified lb/ 



67,11)6) 
36,637) 
18,^75 



18b 
4,925 
51,121 
477,765 
156,171 
32,854 
2,589 
3,884 
4 7,6nR 



7,894 
21,697 
17,675 

2,653 



6,638) 
2,591) 
5,463 



4,987 

91 

2,164 

24,431 

118,945 

88,730 

19,489 

1,167 

696 

19,29n 



344 
303 
22,218 
10,301 
32,889 
14,308 
1,158 
16,057 
10,095 
9,921 
2,727 
872 



16,595 
20,257 
2,552 



16,590 
22,970 
2,818 



12,185 
2,268 
25,882 



2,051 
1,196 
3,676 
11,827 



3,203 
10,380 
13,522 

1,397 



16,634 
1,567 
27,033 



4,944 
1,863 
1,995 



4,562 
1,822 
2,279 



197,497 

66,913 

131,796 

350,039 

1,057 

30,841 

726,454 

6,906,465 

3,071,111 

811,588 

94,128 

800,900 

557,713 

4,713,680 

5,149,119 

3,370 

3,657 

2,582 

350,158 

853,891 

483,817 

346,856 

161,118 

220,311 

1,366,127 

34 1 , 143 

164,569 

3,345,455 

83,130 

51,839 



2,948 
3,293 
3,468 



436,876 
32,001 
360,653 
209,787 
389,703 



996.944 



170.235 



377,952 
299,811 
123,091 
44,751 
91,628 
59,711 



119,596 
52,182 

138,052 
13,449 



37,273 
47,217 
37,999 



34 , 768 
43,034 
61,987 

8,862 
18,562 

3,022 



140,827 
11,051 
23,991 



53,190 
9,857 
35,542 



3,941,858 
1,547,771 
1,033,386 



\J Data for fiscal years ended June 301 
Inclusive, and 1851 to 1857, Inclusi 
months ended December 31 1 and 1868, 

2/ Data for Austria-Hungary 



Austria 



epf 1830 to 1831, in 

nths ended June 30. 
ed until 1861. Aust 



IB32 covi 



sln,,e 1905. In the yea: 



n the years 1901 to 1951, Included ir 
for Norway and Sweden were combined, 
te country from 1820 to 1898 and 5ln< 



3/ Great Britain not specified 
4/ From 1820 to 1858, the flgu: 
5/ Poland was recorded as a se| 

and Russia. 
6/ Between 1931 and 1963, the U.S.S.R. was broken 

Europe. 
7/ No record of Imilgratlon from Japan until 1861. 
8/ No record of Immigration from Turkey in Asia un 
9/ Prior to 1920, Canada and Newfoundland were recorded as British North Ame 

ig/ No record of Iranlgratlon from Mexico from 1886 to 1893. 

11/ Bulgaria, Serbia, and Wsntenegro were first reported in 1899. Bulgaria h 

enumeration was made for the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes. Sin 

Yugoslavia. 
)2J Countries added to the list since the beginning of World War I are theret. 

available since 1920 for Czechoslovakia and Finland and, since 1924, for 
13/ No record of iTmigratlon from Romania until 1880. 
H/ Included with countries not specified prior to 1925. 

iV The figure 33,523 In column headed 1901-1910 Includes 32,897 persons retu 
16,' Figures for Luxembourg are available since 1925. 
XTJ Beginning with the year 1952, Asia includes the Philippines. From 1934 t 

the Philippines were recorded In separate tables as Insular travel. 
18/ Beginning in 1957, China includes Taiwan. 



e 1920. Betwee 
S.S.R. and Asia 



1899 and 
U.S.S.R. 



1919, Poland 
Since 1954 



1820 to 1898, 



ning in 1906 to their 
1951, the Philippine 



included w 
1 U.S.S.R. 



eluded all Brltis 



hlch they belonge' 



Pacific Isla 



63 



All countries . 

Europe 

Albania 

Austria 

Belglun 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia .... 

France 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain ...! 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and 
United Kingdom .... 
U.S.S.R. (Europe am 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 



China jy . 
Cyprus ... 
Hong Kong 



Jordan 2/ 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Thailand 

Vietnam 

Other Asia 

lorth Ajnerlca 



Trinidad and Tobai 



k)uth America 

Bolivia .... 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colontlo ... 
Ecuador .... 

Guyan 

Peru 

Uruguay .... 
Venezuela ., 
Other South 



1,406 


1,678 


1,158 


1,307 


3,440 


■3,402 


16,041 


15,920 


14,905 


13,047 


2,016 


2,063 


2,624 


3,004 


26,565 


23,593 


2,039 


2,245 


1,341 


1,306 


5,976 


5,995 


13,927 


12,212 


2,457 


1,833 


3,620 


5,260 


1,763 


1,665 


1,886 


1,898 


2,213 


1,760 


24,965 


28,586 


1,033 


1,113 


5,879 


6,783 


1,802 


1,813 



Africa 

Morocco 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

New Zeal and 

Other Oceania 



30,990 
32,684 
14.047 



32,038 
41,632 
_22,25e 



14,287 
3,045 
1,025 
1,283 



1,154 
1,063 
2,098 



1,443 
1,120 
3,559 
1,826 



1,973 
1,153 
5,733 
4,283 

273 
2,528 

277 
1,169 



1,732 
ilx500_ 
2,729 



1,776 
1,531 
1,750 



1,509 
10,446 
3,917 

296 
2,585 

357 
1,250 



2,869 
1,872 
10,885 
4,392 



1,414 


1,280 


1,071 


540 


1,481 


1,989 


3,946 


3,613 


1,604 


2,010 


3,956 


3,811 



28,358 
45,163 
43^B04_ 1 _65,273 

224 " 
1,037 
33,321 
11,514 
3,567 
10,483 
2,160 
2,967 

- §-■"'2 

1,T75 
1,045 
1,469 
1,550 
729 



1,911 
_9i658_ 
1,M2 



2,397 
1,260 
9,504 
4,111 



1,676 

836 

4,556 



274 
2,024 

99,312 
9,250 
6,806 

17,470 
5,266 
5,349 

iOi862_ 
1,668 
1,625 
2,148 
1,720 
646 



6,902 
3,663 
1,143 
1,426 



7,627 
5,086 
1,615 
1,180 



64 



/hat. 



admitted with dni 



Europe 

Austria 

Belgium 

Czechoslouakia 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Portugal 

Romania 

Spain 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) ... 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) . 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China 1/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Israel 

Jordan 2/ 

Lebanon 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Thailand 

Vietnam 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Antigua 

Bahamas 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

St. Christopher 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Other West Indies 

Central America 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemai a 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Other Central America 

Other North America 

South America 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa- 

Algeria 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

New Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U.S. Adm. ) 
Other Oceania 

Other countries 

1/ Includes Taiwan. 

2/ Includes Arab Palestine. 



?I0,5B1 
106,466 
213,128 



?42,958 
280, IW 

62,086 
2,267,557 

66,532 

96,553 

73,' 



38,366 
60,17 
16,623 
113,296 
611,943 
22,975 
50,044 
47, 135 
27,441 



928,722 
3,470,446 
_<i3£lil™_ 
96,654 
330, 136 
209,340 
535,304 
88,443 
392,071 
123, 244 
133,407 
432,571 
_607i689_ 
79,641 
101,486 
152,994 
75,905 
79,064 
95,270 
23,329 
45,122 



269,717 
33,372 
219,840 
130,621 
316,328 
111,492 
48,173 
199,884 
362,566 
54,771 

268.729 
17,173 
24,761 
14,288 
60,882 
56,326 
65,299 

553.446 
352,721 
124,374 
54,496 
21,855 



9,278 

3,026 
15,93'j 

5,350 
37,617 
103,723 
11,253 

9,833 
13,374 
55,114 
41,391 
11,551 

4,100 
3,318 
23,878 
13,825 
16,432 
4,503 
117,972 



1,056 
l,5tl4 
2,95! 



3,327 
13,996 
68,112 
4,437 
4,107 
21,027 
3,393 
5,352 
23,870 
_28,983 



9,045 
2,800 
3,300 



12,758 
1,370 
9,762 
7,045 

16,069 
3,920 
2,264 



3,090 
3,133 
2,914 



18,485 
5,564 
1,245 



15,811 
6,111 
41,161 
109,520 
13,981 
13,396 
15,816 
61,494 



3,625 
24,465 
14,936 



3,206 
1,730 
8,319 



1,542 
1,239 
3,496 



5,479 
4,794 
2,969 



17,242 
1,293 

12,450 
6,012 

13,906 
3,231 
2,408 
6,489 

24,184 
2,571 

14.123 



3,643 
3,640 
4,233 



20,497 
6,853 
1,293 



15,711 

6,153 

50,552 

113,817 



21,853 
15,530 
19,649 



98.898 
9,951 
2,296 

10,209 
3,094 
3,614 
1,229 
7,316 

32,478 
1,408 
2,112 
3,232 
2,108 

11,133 
449 
1,151 
1,775 
1,411 
3,929 



71,243 
205,996 
133,751 
6,471 
18,123 
17,119 
18,227 



3,880 
5,451 
8,375 
3,228 
3,967 
5,131 
2,065 
3,711 



3,560 
4,091 
5,803 



23,672 

8,029 
1,961 



6,217 
57,903 
126,463 
15,083 



10,560 
2,338 

10,976 
2,958 
4,685 
1,373 
8,626 



76,550 

238,389 

_173j^343_ 

7,453 

19,383 

6,697 

56,236 

4,650 

29,046 

8,636 

8,800 

32,242 

_ 43^.00 1_ 

6,073 



7,317 
27,945 

6,843 

3,005 
15,184 
27,010 

4,172 

19.003 



12,598 
4,682 

15,665 
6,343 

65,298 
136,462 

16,759 

10,527 



916 



74,366 
43,421 
14,552 
15,451 

9,557 

23,927 
20,573 
22,068 



138.953 
12, no 
?,65P 
12,824 
3,735 
5,808 
1,854 
10,067 
49,212 
2,139 



1,678 
2,435 
1,256 



8,282 
22,413 
9,448 
64,476 
6,341 
36,852 
11,114 
9,288 
36,369 
_52,506 
8,311 
8,252 
11,718 
6,155 
7,737 
8,135 
2,198 



151.649 
20,296 

2,947 
15,682 

9,772 
37,553 

9,216 

3,362 
19,269 
29,126 

4,426 

21.921 
1,189 
1,672 
1,345 
5,135 
5,197 
7,383 



17, 

',213 
81,618 
158,711 
19,703 
111,702 
23,19 
8'Mll 
46, 
16,427 
17,874 
1 1 , 722 
6,082 

23,897 

6! 189 

238,560 

6,490 

8,561 

7,663 

159.51? 

14,060 
3,448 

15,554 
3,560 
5,954 
1,639 

11,704 

55,662 
2,062 
4,717 



1,281 
1.390 



14,919 
7,485 
9,060 
9,274 
2,641 
4,558 

179.173 
28,223 

3,343 
19,472 
12,369 
35,729 

9,672 

4,308 
24,287 
35,985 

5,785 

27.113 
1,601 
2,155 
1,591 
6,570 
6,443 
8,753 

55.866 
36,380 
11,850 
5,048 



170,680 


215,750 


26,129 


35,583 


8,788 


11,480 


22,433 


30,343 


104,545 


131,250 


50,367 


61,997 


16,252 


22,327 


13,810 


17,526 


7,152 


7,583 


13,496 


38,713 


27,874 


38,634 


^2, /94 


50,660 


7,2/6 


a,42o 


271,379 


353,. -SI 


6,986 


8,337 


9,524 


14,148 


8,338 


11,180 



439,350 
_295,_643 
12,842" 
38,911 
12,005 
78,791 
10,990 
52,839 
16,897 
16,039 
56,279 
_ 83^012 
10,721 
14,121 
22,223 
10,235 
11,282 
12,072 
2,358 
5,282 



31,782 
4,613 
31,744 
18,146 
32, 197 
15,077 
5,159 
33,806 
44,523 
7,050 



2,716 
3,579 
1,969 



42,839 
17,605 
8,635 
2,813 



120,455 
480,956 
354,727 



66,491 
-98,416 
11,971 
16,292 
25,415 
12,602 
12,285 
16,383 
3,468 
6,590 

273.226 
37,274 

5,862 
39,195 
21,571 
46,120 
22,742 

6,009 
29,603 
54,098 

6,752 

45.130 
3,489 
4,666 
2,004 
9,944 
10,290 
14,717 



57,646 
19,478 
10,355 
3,335 



65 



tlon 101(a)(15)(B) of the I™lgratlon and Natlnnallty Acl^ 



All 



Austria 

Belgium 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Poland 

Portugal k 

Romanl a 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) .... 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) .. 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 

Asia 

China \J 

Hbng Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Israel 

Jordan 2/ 

Lebanon 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Vietnam 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

West Indies 

Antigua 

Bahamas 

Cuba 

Domlcian Republic 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

St. Christopher 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Other West Indies 

Central America 

Costa Rica 

EI Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Other Central America .... 
Other North America 

South America 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Guyana 

Peru 

Other South Americ 

Africa 

Algeria 

Morocco 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

Ne» Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U.S. adm. ) 
Other Oceania 



126,470 
118, 9Bg 

48,952 
144,130 

07,705 

607,793 

1,170,969 

125,067 

92,194 
119,812 
664,667 
375,589 

B6,999 



185,976 
187,365 
222,405 
, 42,230 
1,632,941 
43,081 
76,304 
55,446 



23,038 
•71,882 
22,545 
27,548 

9,936 
77,902 
432,117 
12,207 
19,031 
33,633 
11,907 
128,501 

2,837 
12,147 

5,521 
36,666 



401,287 
3,181,787 
1,522,693 



58,717 
299,355 
115,880 
356,586 

53,230 
184,443 

71,980 

88,501 
294,001 
464,207 



61,658 
79,484 
126,125 
51,185 
57,226 
70,713 
17,816 
35,229 



197,693 
24,705 

156,213 
98,559 

241,958 
86,395 
29,088 

161,269 

266,089 
32,593 

168. 196 



46,375 
48,209 
36,203 



253,423 
89,243 
35,620 
11,442 



9,643 
7,138 
2,245 
11,061 
4,079 
26,269 
60,144 
7,655 
8,837 



40,535 
28,908 
5,945 
9,507 
2(259 
2,829 
11,646 
10,043 
12,318 
3,026 
83,226 
3,642 
4,793 
4,514 



9,568 
7,528 
2,132 
11,591 



6,756 
12,180 

9,280 
44,491 
30,161 

6,234 



206 



2,630 

3,097 
11,233 
11,230 
13,303 

2,320 
95,665 

3,745 



9,761 
8,263 
2,362 
11,364 
4,671 
36,104 
86,545 
9,607 
10,816 
8,319 
44,833 
31,432 
6,248 
11,031 
3,143 
3,254 
11,369 
1 1 , 392 
15,072 
3,260 
106,284 
3,653 
6,247 
3,932 



9,696 
8,841 
2,422 



8,364 
7,138 
48,501 
32,165 
6,308 
11,639 
4,249 
3,663 
12,369 
14,216 
15,545 
3,151 
120,634 
3,693 
6,253 



651.044 



,095 



11,066 
9,900 
3,859 



47,518 

102,666 

10,437 

9,307 



4,163 
16,342 
15,685 
16,687 

3,268 
143,172 

3,816 

6,196 



78.213 



13,052 
12,886 

5,347 
13,027 

5,708 
57,228 
119,415 
11,629 

9,006 
13,056 
64,267 
35,856 

8, 100 
14,778 

6,651 

5,123 
20,143 
18,446 
21,082 

4,043 
175,189 

4,328 

6,794 



94.622 



3,317 


4,112 


1,206 


1,343 


1,167 


1,214 


564 


646 


3,648 


4,217 


12,329 


18,157 



1,490 
4,501 
1,534 
2,310 



5,544 
1,604 
5,605 
1,666 
2,514 
918 
7,067 



1,262 
2,978 
1,174 



6,539 
2,100 
7,277 
2,305 
3,033 
968 
8,401 
38,283 
1,046 
1,567 
3,795 



.219 



1,762 
10,311 
43,123 
2,620 
2,566 
6,841 
1,897 
2,987 
16,789 
21,017 



2,163 
15,522 
30,633 
6,940 
2,314 
7,641 
2,142 
3,595 
17,069 
18.623 



Bi.l 



3,205 
15,0^ 
10,681 
13,487 
2,832 
9,705 
2,946 
5,251 
18,305 
23,709 



25,208 
217,569 
_115i.060 



31,324 
257,702 
136,177 



3,762 
16,750 

3,276 
45,584 

2,799 
12,895 

4,449 

5,724 
19,821 
32^082 



20,262 
3,603 

49,154 
4,399 

16,829 
6,013 
6,868 

24,132 

38,774 



1,969 
2,245 
2,953 



62.766 



9,492 
1,370 
6,555 
5,197 

11,494 
2,717 
1,340 
4,279 

19,449 



2,347 
3,297 
5,543 
1,845 
1,948 
3,125 
518 
2,740 

62.576 



2,277 
1,729 
1,236 



13,724 
1,293 
7,995 
4,457 
9,279 
2,197 
1,369 
4,523 

16,551 
1,186 



2,664 
2,162 
1,404 



2,995 
3,977 
6,590 
2,301 
2,685 
3,586 
1,575 
2,923 

76.464 



4,606 
5,556 
6,884 

3,370 



15,948 
1,689 
8,455 
5,760 

13.826 
3,086 
2,010 
8,514 

15,430 
1,746 

9.071 



2,610 
2,476 
2,147 



18,327 
6,192 
1,351 



5,334 
6,465 
9,055 
4,199 
5,473 
5,460 
1,768 
3,440 



11,610 
2,376 

10,575 
5,043 



1,739 
11,795 
19,174 

1,910 



3,126 
2,746 
2,329 



19,366 
6,251 
2,470 



14,768 
2,947 

10,606 
7,255 

29,994 
6,147 
2,353 

14,918 



3,898 
3,370 
2,785 



38,571 
326,123 
142^221 



36,018 
5,607 
20,216 



29,213 
47^445 
6, 735' 



11,821 
5,371 
6,515 
6,692 
2,203 
3,794 

138.117 



21,673 
2,022 

14,097 
9,365 

29,076 
7,041 
2,756 

20,272 

27,894 
3,921 

16.514 



5,001 
4,559 
3,529 



12,717 
11,433 

5,140 
13.768 

5,351 
66,567 
126,485 
12,321 

7,677 
12,977 
71,034 
39, MO 

9,103 
14,604 

7,143 

5,112 
22,793 
20,440 
23,580 

5,191 
188,956 

4,523 



99.867 



770.562 



13,791 
13,093 

5,571 
16,153 

6,941 
81,226 
134,384 
13,972 

7,310 
14,929 
60,616 
41,544 
10,720 
15,029 

7,243 

5,340 
23,358 
22,779 
27,693 

5,273 
205,203 

4,655 



19,141 
20, 324 

8,963 
22,443 

8,552 
122,859 
167,954 
19,052 

9,442 
18,186 
100,007 
49,663 
13,302 
18,240 

9,922 

5,137 
27,107 
30,827 
43,344 

6,106 
255,119 

5,525 
10,952 

6,319 

178.174 



7,629 
2,285 
8,229 
2,694 
2,358 
1,010 
5,632 
41, 
1,286 
1,609 
3,159 
1,046 
14,674 

221 
1,433 

555 
3,702 



2,599 
9,014 
2,811 
3,216 
1,372 
9,2 
55,153 
2,215 
2,429 



1,588 

671 

4,575 



4,831 
1,565 
13,525 
79, 707 
1,874 
3,715 
4,635 
1, 



49,362 
393,557 
194,460 



47,482 
5,512 
22,394 



8,709 
36,740 

5,305 
51,543 

6,375 
24,356 
10,971 
11,575 
38,885 
64,239 



62,179 
442,205 
237,357 



10,673 
54,215 

5,551 
45,992 

9,948 
31,176 
14,423 
17,365 



6,243 
8,247 
8,333 

2,260 



155.986 



8,322 
11,214 
18,656 

6,728 



171.677 



24,473 
2,205 
17,251 
12,621 
25,104 
8,492 
3,462 
24,563 
34,080 
3,735 

19.350 



24,905 
2,973 
23,451 
13,637 
24,646 
12,014 
3,466 
26,182 
33,570 
4,731 

22.482 



9,306 
12,902 
21,090 
6,535 
9,083 
13,034 
2,603 
4,602 

206.639 



28,096 
3,612 
28,448 
15,624 
35,687 
19,217 
5,042 
24,307 
39,419 
5,987 

31.905 



5,237 
5,778 
3,911 



5,759 
6,786 
4,605 



29,046 
10,511 
3,623 
1,465 



29,800 
12,351 
5,412 
1,458 



37,577 
13,190 
6,555 
1,905 



\J Includes Taiwan. 
2/ Includes Arab Pale 



66 



Portugal 

Spain 

Jugoslavia 

China II 

"""6 Kong 

Indonesia 

lean 

Iraq 

•Jordan 1' 

Pakistan 

Ryukyu Islands 

Central America 

Argentina 

Colonbla 

Other South Aaerlca 

Ifrlca 

Algefi* 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic <Egyp( 
Other Africa 



67 



TEM"-\)RAHY WORKERS ADMITTED UNDER SECTION 1' '1 ( s) ( l*)) (il ) OF THE IMMIGRATrOfJ J 
BY COUNTRY OR flEGEON OF LAST PERMANENT RESLDEN^Ei 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 3n, l-Jbe AND ]T=.<) 





._ _ 1 9 6 9 1 


19 6 8 




Country or region 

of last p«marn?nt 

residenco 


Total 


Horkors o( 
di-,tlngui!hed 

"(Hd)' 


temporary 
workers 
(HdO) 


Industrial 
("('iTlH 


Total 


distinguished 
merit and 
ability 
(H(l)) 


Other 
(HUH) 


(H(iilH 


All countries 


62.952 


8.941 


49.913 


4.098 


68.969 


11.578 


52.798 


4,593 


Euro 9 




4.526 




2.513 


10.630 


6.123 


1,841 


2,666 


Au=*ria 


87 
HI 
147 

700 

i,j4e 

245 

301 
63 
64 
82 

160 

319 
33B 
23 
2,759 
140 

46 


113 

89 
73 

75 
38 
83 
321 
178 

45 

33 
157 
359 

67 
106 

16 

1,464 

136 

122 

36 


205 
5 

80 
159 

81 
63 

16 

17 
45 

423 
15 

55 

648 

3 

6 

779 


102 
55 

66 
43 
223 

61 
106 

3 

35 

237 

177 

6 

I 
373 


665 

275 

103 
187 

1,081 
146 
59 
430 
1,066 
247 
229 
116 
59 
2 

328 
408 

2,819 
158 
314 
36 

2.201 


342 

265 
48 
162 
481 
451 

54 
137 

118 

16 

98 

52 

1 

4B2 

204 

III 

5 

l,6n2 

156 

296 

30 

841 


72 

108 
93 
1 

12 
190 
17 

365 
14 

60 

1 

537 

13 

482 


176 


Bela 'm 


134 


Czechoslovakia 


4 




49 




23 




267 




522 


Greece 


9 


H aa V 


4 


I eland 


158 




84 




117 


No 


23 


Poland 


1 


P t oal • 


1 


J, r 


1 




53 


S d n 


110 




237 


T k (E and Asia) 


4 




680 


U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia) 


; 


0th E 


4 




878 


Hong Kong 


11 
5 

293 
561 

i 
207 
13 

9 

1 

2 
16 
23 


6 

78 
1 

87 
190 

98 
1 

66 

1 

1 
5 


3 
1 

188 
183 

274 

15 
5 


23 

18 

188 

1 

29 

3 
14 
1 
3 
2 

13 

808 


19 

50 
163 

3 

2 

511 

1,144 

117 
13 
13 
72 
29 
12 
1 
27 
18 

55.003 


38 
104 
2 
2 
1 

270 

6B 
2 
3 

3 

9 
9 

4.039 


2 
5 

1 
179 
218 

15 

18 

50.268 


14 

10 


Indon sla 


1 




4 


J 






23 


. 


656 




4^ 
11 


P kstan 


10 




25 


k Tsl ds 


14 


Th "1 d 


3 


- . . . Renuhlic 








Qth Asi 


8 




696 




20,843 
1,425 

2B^427__ 

3,263 

26 

3 

222 


2,105 

1,080 

195 

2 

6 

2 

20 

5 

108 

30 


18,145 

229 

28il68 

3,261 

1 

9,612 
6,859 
2,554 
5,690 
1B8 


593 
116 

6 

25 
1 
3 

15 
14 
34 


24,453 

1,600 

2B,B36 

4,103 

36 

11 

142 

7,738 
7,110 
1,732 
7,959 
108 


2,609 
1,298 

106_ _ 

3 
10 
40 

5 
14 

25 


21,344 
176 
28,675 . 

7,713 
7,105 
1,722 
7,908 
67 


500 


Mexico 

Wjst Indies 


126 
55. _ 

1 




4 


C ba 




















Trinidad and Tobago 


26 






9 
26 

140 
13 

52 

736 


2 

20 

B 

2 

270 


5 

128 
8 

264 


3 

1 
10 
12 

5 

1 

202 


10 
10 
14 
32 
15 
26 
1 
6 

677 


10 
353 


5 
13 
120 
















Nicaraaua 


















199 




141 
51 
91 
34 
5 
50 

166 


75 

55 
10 

1 

14 

82 
22 


30 

53 

75 
6 

31 


36 
1 
34 
34 

6 

29 
8 

90 


181 
6 
137 
82 
93 
17 
8 

'ii 

187 


83 
46 

3 

2 
42 
8 

117 


8 

1 

n 

58 
3 

16 






5 


B zil 














"^ 


Guyana 














^ 




54 




1 
3 
9 

11 
115 


1 
22 


9 

1 
21 


1 
2 

29 

3 

112 


1 
5 
1 
61 
3 
116 

271 


3 

17 
2 

100 


8 

1 

71 






^ 


Niaeria 


36 




United Arab Republic (Egypt) 


16 




100 




193 

50 
26 
17 


90 
12 


37 
15 

13 


66 
23 
19 


186 
15 


68 
12 


5 
2 








Pacific Islands (U.S. adm. ) 


1 







2/ Incl 



68 



lVr.ip«t|..n 


,„c.. 


Workers of 


Other 
temporary 
workers 


InduEtrlal 


Exchange 


Al 1 t.M.nlrtps 
























Professional. l.cl)nltal. and klndrt-d workers 


33.83^ 


7.700 


7,514 


1 ,497 


17,121 


A. .Miiniants and auditors 


85 

2.405 

73 

2.523 

5<1 

21 
205 

34 
25 
212 
49 
6,789 
1.898 
16 
30 
308 
234 
115 
82 
328 
121 

21 

4.759 

29 

780 
31 
128 
250 
52 
51 

305 
53 

987 

1.942 

51 

m 

1.645 
109 


1 .263 

10 
294 
571 

14 

193 
1 .564 

2,588 

22 
50 

57 
121 

231 
2 


15 
115 

5 
22 

1 ,093 

8 
42 
72 

39 

161 

275 
617 
16 

1 

16 

1 
2 
8 

2 
1 

2 

1 

20 

1 
204 

15 

1 

242 
21 

163 

151 
2 
2 

119 

15 


65 

13 
16 

6 
14 
1 
1 

3 
35 

3 
2 

3 
19 
8 

10 
28 

2 
15 

2 

5 
217 

5 
3 
33 

3 

3 

125 

20 

33 




AclniK and atrrrsse-s 




a! ular e (l>ls ani lavlealo 




Ar. hi I HI 1 = 


72 


Artiits and art teacht-rs 




Atlllf IPK 












CI rpvmpn 




p r'(*"^',f s and In-Jiructn 




Da- f -fi 1 la 1 c t ach 


4 


[1 t 1 tB 


56 












7 




94 






E t^ ral 


9 


F t h t d 1 s 


15 


F . ^ at I i ts 


21 


... 


178 


. . ' ' ■ 


39 


Mi* d ( t a h 


181 




1 ,871 
15 




17 


A 


266 


R^ 1 ■ 1 


208 


r 1 i r ri h ' i 1 t 


72 


M th ^ t 1 '^ ^ 


63 




272 




105 




53 




11 


. . 


4,460 




14 


^ 


6 




570 




21 


C , \ A \f h 


105 


Fit 


206 




45 


, 


42 


Ml 


86 




14 




22 




642 


T 


1.650 




41 




57 


. Lfi oth 


1.132 




59 






70 


92 


207 


1,402 


anajiers . ' h'' h^ r 


70 
924 

22 

27 
126 

78 
5.4 

516 


8 
2 

3 

55 

8 


17 
2 
15 

6 

51 

203 


3 
23 

166 
125 


49 


u ers n epa 


911 




1 


nagers an supe . g 


1 


tticers, p lo , pu , g t atlon 


110 


Officials and adn net , pu 


78 




252 




180 




32 
54 
20 
11 
29 
64 
21 
17 
21 
247 

486 


[ 


11 

n 

1 
3 
15 
10 
3 
18 
130 

335 


19 
25 
6 
6 
9 
22 

2 
2 
30 

loe 


2 




28 


" ^ ^'^ 


3 


Boo eepere 


4 




17 


mac ne pe r 


26 




7 


U 1 U 1- 






1 


Ticket .station, and exp e g 


81 




39 




33 
43 
12 
398 


3 


2 
315 


24 
25 

52 


6 


Advert s ng ge f 


4 


gen 




Stock and bon sa esme 




Salesmen and 5 e 





69 



TABLE 16B. 



TEMPORARY WORKERS ADMITTED UNDER SECTION 101(a)<15KH) AND SECTION 101 (« ) ( 1 5 ) ( J ) 
OF THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, BY OCCUPATION: (Cont'd) 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1969 



Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers , 

Boilermakers 

Cenent and concrete finishers 

Cranemen, derrlckmen, and holatmen 

Electricians 

Excavating, grading, and road machinery operaCors 

Foremen 

Inspectors , other 

Linemen and servicemen, telegraph, telephone, and power 

Machinists 

Mechanics and repairmen 

Millwrights 

Plasterers V. ....... . 

Plumbers and pipe fitters 

Pressmen and plate printers, printing 

Stone cutters and Stone carvers 

Structural metal workers 

Tailors and talloresBes 

Tinsmiths, coppersml ths , and sheet metal workers 

Tool makers, and die makere and setters 

Craftsmen and kindred workers, othar 

Operatives and kindred workers 

Apprentices 

Asbestos and Insulation workers 

Attendants, auto service and parking 

Bus drivers 

Checkers , examiners, and Inspectors , manufacturing . . , . 

Laundry and dry cleaning operatives 

Mine operatives and laborers 

Packers and wrappers 

Painters, except construction and maintenance 

Sailors and deck hands 

Taxlcab drivers and chauffeurs 

Truck and tractor drivers 

Weavers, textile 

Welders and flame cutters 

Operatives and kindred workers, other 

Private household workers 

Housekeepers , private household 

Private household workers, other 

Service workers, except private household 

Barbers, beauticians, and manicurists 

Bartenders 

Bootblacks 

Chambermaids and maids 

Cooks , except private household 

Counter and fountain workers 

Guards , watchmen, and doorkeepers 

Hairdressers and cosmetologists 

Housekeepers and stewards, except private household ... 

Kitchen workers, other 

Kidwjves 

Policemen and detectives 

Foreign military 

Porters 

Walters and waitresses 

Service workera, except privat* houaahold, other 

Fara laborers and foremen 

Laborera, except fam and alne 

Carpenters' helpers, except logging and mining 

Flahersen and oysteraen 

Gardeners, except fara, and groundskeepers 

Luaberaent craftaaen, and woodchoppers 

Laborers * othar 

Students 

Unknown or not reported 



70 



Denmark 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

PoUnd 

Portugal 

Sp*tn 

United Kingdom 

VugoaUvla 

Other Europe 

China 1/ 

Hnng Kong 

India 

Iran , 

Jordan J/ 

Pakistan 

Dominican Republic 

Trinidad and Tobago 

El Salvador 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Argentina 

Chile 

Ecuador 

Guyana 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South Aoerlca 

Africa 

AlgerV* 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt 
Other Africa 



3.2b5 Ibl.715 



1,173 
5 

1.125 



1,563 
850 

3.275 



1.174 , U..3Z8. 



1.563 . _3^4Q3. 



^3.298 



5.20b 



1,270 
_ 152. 



2.945 
3,100 



ted < 



Include! Tal»*n. 



71 



/D.1U exclude borde 
ring with multiple entr; 
nt aliens admitted with 



rewmen, and insular travelers. Students and others 
re only counted on the first admission. Includes ret 
I addition to the Alien Registration Receipt Card, Fon 



Temporary visit 



Baltimore, Md 

Boston, Mass 

Charlotte Amalie, V.I 

Cruz Bay, V. 1 

Fredorlk.';tr-d, V. I 

HarllLrd, Conn 

Miami, Fla 

Newark, N,J 

New York, N.I 

Norfolk, Va 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Port Everglades, Fla 

San Juan, P.B 

Washington, D.C 

West Palm Beach, Fia. ..... 

Other Atlantic 

Oulf of Mexico 

Houston, Tex 

New Orleans, U 

San Antonio, Tex 

Tampa , Fla 

Other Gulf 

Pacific 

Agana , Guam 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

Los Angeles, Calif 

San Diego, Calif 

San Francisco, Calif 

Seattle, Wash 

Other Pacific 

Alaska 

Canad ian Border 

Bangor, Me 

Blaine, Wash 

Buffalo, N.Y 

Calais, Me 

Champlain, N.Y 

Chicago, 111 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Derby Line, Vt 

Detroit, Mich 

Eastport, Idaho 

Fort Kent, Me 

Hlghgate Springs, Vt 

Houlton, Me 

Juckman , Me 

Lewlston, K.Y 

Madawaska , Me 

Hassena, N.I 

Niagara Falls, N.Y 

Norton, Vt 

Noyes, Minn 

Ogdensijurg, N.Y 

Pembina, N.D 

Piegan, Mont 

PorUl, N.D 

Port Huron, Mich 

Rouses Point, N.Y 

Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. ... 

Spokane, Wash 

Sweetgrass , Mont 

Thousand Island Bridge, N.Y 

Trout fiiver, N.Y 

Other Canadian Border 

Mexican Border 

Brownsville, Tex 

Calexico, Calif 

Columbus, N.M 

Dallas, Tex 

Del Bio, Tex 

Douglas, Ariz 

Eagle Pass, Tex 

El Paso, Tex 

Hidalgo, Tex 

Laredo, Tex 

Lukevllle, Ariz 

Nogales, Ariz 

Ronia, Tex 

San Ysldro, Calif 

Tecate, Calif 

Tucson, Ariz 

Other Mexican Border 

All other 



Ui,460 
3,112 
1,1M,348 
1,311 
If., 543 
30,479 
1U,395 
32,742 
ie),273 
7,368 

107.016 



20,690 
34,989 
48,718 
1,498 



452.253 



35.050 
152,714 
155,350 
2,842 
56,423 
47,883 



458.719 



30,636 

53,204 
3,544 

62,770 

56,264 
2,524 
4,490 

66,483 
1,694 
1,991 

11,337 
1,782 
3,103 

20,744 
2,877 
3,381 

53,683 
2,135 
2,618 
2,U5 
2,183 
1,313 
1,279 

11,997 
7,546 
3,775 
193 
2,655 

12,352 
1,314 

24,519 

596.9 



25,934 
51,848 
5,872 
5,539 
4,554 
13,127 
37,350 
65,431 
27,209 
112,479 
3,237 
58,325 
7,322 
157,825 
3,308 
5,437 
11,684 

8.760 



2,568 
27,226 

8,692 



314.021 

1,591 

582,272 



16,281 
23.717 
39,511 



21,324 
83,776 
87,971 
2.540 



361.725 



1,638 
27,421 
43,490 

2,454 
53,205 
29,529 

1,579 

3,201 

4 J, 622 

864 

155 



10,185 
6,079 
2,573 



570.243 



23, 
4?l,647 
5,858 
4,766 
4,405 
12,873 
37,382 
58,826 
25,437 
109,768 
3,161 
57,374 
7,030 
151,780 
3,253 
4,415 
1 1 , 377 

5.724 



'W,491 
1,247 
430,497 
443 
6,258 
16,796 
56,624 
15,562 
11,507 
4,557 

22.023 



1,939 
1,835 
2,331 



1,6U 
1,284 
1,159 



72 



Belglu" 

Czechoatuvskla 

Finland 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Portugal 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia 
United Kingdom 

Yugoalavla 

China 1/ 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Iraq 

Israel 

Lebanon 

Ryukyu Islands 

Syrian Arab Republic .- 

North America 

Canada 

West Indlea 

Antigua 

Ucher West Indlea ... 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Other North America . .. 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other South Anerlca ... 

Africa 

Algsrla 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

United Arab Rep. (Egypt 

Auatralla 

New Zealand 

Pacific lalands (U.S. ai 
Other Oceania 

U Includes Tal««n. 



108,601 
146.266 

i 59 ,89 2 
8,138 



15,581 
1,622 



13,005 
7,761 
3,075 



73 



■f^MIORARY VISITORS ADMITTFU 



' OH RFC.ION OF LAST TFRMAtJFNT RFSIDFUCEi 



Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey (Europe and Asia) 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia 

Other Europe 



Ryukyu Islands ... . 
Syrian Arab Repubil 
Thailand 






St. Chrlstophi 
Trinidad and ' 
Othe; 
Central Ameri 



Indi. 



Cos 



I Rlc 



El Salvadi 
Guatemala 
Honduras 



Colombia 



Algeria 

Nigeria 

South Africa 

United Arab Republic (Egypt) 
Other Africa 



2/ Inclu 



74 



I MlttHAHV VIMIOI(.j AIAIini 



Ti-rl«^y (Europe 
United Klnqrtom , 
U.S.S.R. (E..rnr> 













tophe 


Trl 


nldad 


and ■ 


Other We-; 


t Im 


Centr 


al Ame 


rlca 



Other Afr 
Oceania ... 



I Republic (Egypt) 



376-S70 O— 70 6 



75 



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76 



TABLE J<). ENTRIES OF ALIEN ANli CITIZEN BORDER CROSSERS OVER INTERNATIONAL LAND BOUNDARIES, 8V STATE AMD PORTl 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 3n, 1969 

/Each entry of the same person counted separately.? 



11 po 



U 



CANAI'IAN BORDER 

Fsirtank^ 

Hyder 

Juneau 

Ketchikan 

Northway 

Ska9»ay 

Tok 

Wrancjell 

Idaho 

East Port j: 

Porthil 1 

Illinois 

Cliicajn 

Maine 

Bangor 

Bridqe^ater 

Calais 

Ferry Point 

Mi 11 town Bridqe 

Cobiirn Gore 

Easton 

Eastporl 

Eslcourl 

Fort Fairfield 

Fort Kent 

Mamlin 

Itiulton 

Jaokman 

Limeslone 

Lubec 

Mada»aska 3/ 

Monticello 

Orient 

St. Aurelie 

3t. Pamphi le 

Van Buren 

Vanceboro 

Michigan 

Algonac 

Alpena 

Amherstburg 4/ 

Detour i/ 

Detroit 

Ambassador Bridge ....'.. 
Detroit & Canada Tunnel 
Detroit City Airport ... 
Detroit Metropolitan 

Detroit River and River 
Rouge Terminals 

Michigan Central Depot. 

Escanaba 7/ 

Houghton 6/ 

Isle Royale 

Mackinac Island 2/ 

Marine City 

Marquette 

Muskegon 

Pcche Island ?,^ 

Port Huron 3/ 

Blue Water Bridge 

Canadian National RaiUay 

Station 

Roberts Landing 

Rogers City 7/ 

St. Clair County Airport ... 
Sault Ste. Marie 



32,5^3 
3,^115,9^5 
3, 528, 5*^7 



1,'193 
5,27? 

5,?6i 



5.67B 



31, .198 
lll,f>53 

1,566,886 
228,858 
73,757 
32,878 
21,632 



186,468 

106,310 
195,281 
,179,737 
4,957 
70,237 
22,6)5 



5^243^5^7 

" 1,507, 432" 

3,725,385 

1,165 



1,160 
I_,68l3,248 
"1,641,234'" 



119 
4,875 

22,517 
1,414 
4,079 

20,357 
1,516 

29,080 

72,090 



3.944. 



37,272 

59,466 

J ,144 ,204 

1,012,334 

131,870 

25,747 

2,019 

14,441 

5,888 

3,629 

5,87) 

202,650 

327,958 

52,357 

292,016 

116,264 

97,225 

125,499 

963,108 

2,198 

12,753 

1,246 

2,225 

349,176 

10n,59A 



6,110,647 

2,?0B,49'5 

3,493,100 

3,797 



31,363 
_1,915,J47 
1,887,303 



Minnesota 

Baudette 3,' 

Crane Lake 

Diiluth 

Ely 

Grand Marais 

Grand Portage 

International Falls 3/ 

Oak Island 8/ 

Pine Creek 

Ranier 

Rosea. 

St. Paul 

ttintana 

Chief Mountain 4/ 

Cut Bank (Airport } 

Del Bonita 

Great Falls (Airport) 

Havre 

Opheim 

Piegan 

Raymnno 

Roosville 

Scobey 

Sweetqrass 

Turner 

Whitetall 

Whitlash 

Wild Horse 

Willow Creek 

New Hampshire 

Pittsburg 

New York 

Black Rock 

Buffalo 

Buffalo Seaport 

Greater Buffalo Inter- 
Peace Bridge 3/ 

Cannons Corners 

Cape Vincent 9/ 

Champlain 

Chateaugay 

Churubusco 

Clayton 5/ 

Fort Covington 

Heart Island 6/ 

Hogansburg 

Lewiston 3/ 

Massena 

Mooers 

Niagara Falls 

Municipal Airport 

Rainbow Bridge 3/ 

Whirlpool Rapids Bridge 3/ 

Ogdensburg 

Rochester 

Minicipal Airport 

Port Authority 

Rouses Point 

Syracuse 

Thousand Island Bridge 

Trout River 

Watertown (Airport) 

Youngstown 4/ 



1,030,208 
66,562 
252,866 



8,556 

7,545,195 

41,242 

35,898 

3,223,128 

11)3,375 

44,910 



285,209 

16,789 

1,803,637 

935,794 

224,555 

5j483j501_ 

1,113 

4,295,725 

1,185,763 

582,343 

J, 206 



1,190 

16 

594,089 

13,048 

1,717,865 

667,327 

2,308 

16,697 



12,566 
6,361 
85,973 



2,177,947 

69,906 

21,694 

48,430 

173,296 

56,013 

178,494 

10,282 

1,082,338 

638,993 

118,633 

3j224j990 

294" 

2,555,937 

668,759 

360,950 



434,905 
8,237 

680,269 



53,868 

6,402 

3,4)6 

23,164 

4,343 

209,997 

ino 

673,399 

22,326 

113,734 

1,749 

10,647 

5,179 

15,698 

3,237 

25,913 



16,368 

140 

4,121 

4,597 

83,154 

25,525 

45, 198 

5,847 

I6n,747 

5,015 

2,412 

1,287 

4,820 

1,769 



1),474 

21,580 

l,n45,)8) 

33,459 

23,215 

51,359 

155,434 

34,775 

106,715 

6,507 

721,299 

296,801 

106,022 

2, 256,6 U 

819 ■ 
1,740,788 
517,004 
221,393 



037,597 

207,915 

1,646 



77 



TABLE 19. ENTRIES OF ALIEN AND CITIZEN BORDER CROSSERS OVER INTERNATIONAL LAND BOUNDARIE 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1969 

/Each entry of the same person counted separate 



S, BY STATE AND PORTi (Contd.) 



Antler . 
Carbury 



Mai 



Mlnot (Airport) 

Portal 3/ 

St. John 

Sarles 

Sherwood 

Walhalla 

Westhope 

WllUston, Sloulin Fii 

Ohio 

Cleveland 

Toledo 



Alburg 

Alburg Springs .. 

Beebe Plain . 

Beecher Falls ... 
Burlington Airpor 



Canaan ... 
Derby Line 



Pacific Highway 



Frontier 

Laurier 

Lynden 3/ 

Metaline Falls 

Neah Bay 

Oroville 

Point Roberts 3/ 

Port Angeles 

Port Townsend 

Seattle 

Spokane (Felts Field) 

S.-as V 

Tacoma 

lisconsln 



17,209 

16,125 

191,198 

29,19iJ 

3,94b 

13,540 

24,225 

32,198 

2,399 

95,580 

61,035 

60,950 

291,522 

205,834 

41,042 

22,984 

IB. 895 

61,751 

32,906 



24,683 
18,888 
1,718 



10,136 
12,lo7 
57,495 
16,876 



705 
58,158 
35,890 
35,f>57 
165,582 
111,202 
22,718 
8,231 
11,579 
31,156 
18,886 



82,641 

63,817 

140,523 

166,300 

1,510 

89,228 
711,809 

72,566 
541,292 

14,634 
9,503 



362,658 

2,849 

142,196 

4.930.951 

12,646 

1,386 

2,402,131 

168,594 

2,233,237 

18,197 

28,799 

15,960 

109,223 

29,371 

221,609 

28,716 

46 



20,825 

4,301 

557,657 



4,758 
133,703 
12,312 

3,015 

5,333 
13,562 
12,483 

1 ,.694 
37,422 
25,745 
25,293 
125,940 
94,632 
18,324 
14,753 

7,316 

30,595 

14,020 

664 

30.866 
11,757 
17,720 
1,369 



53,542 
12,351 
72,410 
82,615 
5,397 
38,153 
393,977 
46,569 
364,812 
10,834 
1,257 
130,949 
116,785 
195,965 
2,336 
62,907 



70,653 

,080,533 

7,784 

29,177 

6,159 

48,620 

30,951 

194,966 

30,926 

110 

230,638 

117,845 

1,356 

1,079 

51,301 

4,835 

390,841 



(Malton Airport) ... 



MEXICAN BORDER 

Arizona 

Douglas 3/ 

Lochiel 

Lukeville 

Naco 

Nogales 

Grand Avenue 

Worley Avenue 

Nogales Inter- 
Truck Gate 

San Luis 

Sasabe 

Tucson International 

California 

Andrade 

Calexlco 

Los Angeles (Airport) 

San Diego 

San Ysldro 3/ 

Tecate 

New Mexico 

Antelope Wei 1 s 

Columbus 3/ 

Texas 

Brownsvil le 

Corpus Christi 

Dallas Airport 

Del Rio 

Eagle Pass 

El Paso 3/ 

El Paso Airport .... 

Ave. of Americas 
(Cordova) 3/ 

Paso Del Norte 

Bridge 3/ 

Ysleta Bridge 3/ . . . 

Fabens 

Falcon Heights 3/ .... 

Fort Hancock 

Hidalgo 3/ 

Houston Airport 

Rai Iroad Bridge ... . 

Los Ebanos 

Marathon 

Presidio 

Progreso 

Rio Grande City 3/ . .. 

Roma 3/ 

San Antonio Airport .. 



634,668 
233,904 
296,087 
62,293 



19.623.355 

4,178,113 

9,971 

419,521 

1,206,206 

_ '?J 2J>5j 9jp5_ 

5,989,997 

3,192,948 

7,446 

69,514 

4,412,330 

113,182 



45.435.445 
572,405 

14,577,035 
156,437 
12,046 

29,316,675 
800,847 

294.264 



62.376.568 



45,748 
2,469,552 
5,783,984 
37.919,611 



16,058,994 

18,666,796 

3,163,877 

515,571 

581,223 

47,696 

7,246,693 

24,033 

13^171^0J5_ 

13,159,622 

6,470 

4,923 

91,360 

6,593 

503,563 

1,171,866 

273,815 

2,390,720 

111,856 

234 



622,724 
138,710 
49,971 
32,691 



12.041.576 

2,296,653 

6,768 

99,215 

624,074 

_6,015,_946 

3,842,811 " 

2,120,236 

2,134 

50,765 

3,523,202 

74,567 



2,264 
16,622,556 
493,456 



1,102 

1,115,306 

3,857,951 

19,_030,^4_6 

1,732' 

5,620,648 

12,134,717 

1,273,549 

338,194 

145,046 

33,247 

5,071,052 

2,261 

8,764,276 

8,759,363 " 

2,785 
2,128 

54,939 

3,959 

301,860 

701,203 

205,106 

1,670,331 

4,593 

211 



1/ Figures Include arrivals by private aircraft at border p 

2/ July-September 1966. 

3/ Partially estimated. 

4/ July-September 1968 and May-June 1969. 

5/ July-October 1968 and May-June 1969. 

6/ July-October 1968 and February-June 1969. 

7/ July-December 1966 and April-June 1969. 

8/ July-November 1968 and May-June 1969. 

2/ July-Dece(rfcer 1966 and January-February, May- June 1969, 



78 



g? 



e 8 



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r- — (NO r- r-fOr-rnr--.0 — Om >r\ ^u^u-lCMc^u^a^lA^DCT' in o^"-lr-QD^O_^0^"-lo^^-r^ -O ccOOo^cr-^O^f-'^ 

^ il !? CO S ? 00 '^ '^. '^ -^, — . * •^. '^ " O '^ ° ^. "^^ '^. ■^^ "^ ^ "^ ° '^_ ^ '^. °°. ^ °1 °°. ^ ". *^, ^ ^. '^. ■^^ "^^ "^ ^ ^. "^^ ° '^. ''' 

H J- ,--,.... ^. J. r-i'cNu^ r^ ' ' ' 

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a J °; "^ *' j;i "^ 3^ '~^" ^' s" s{ S '^ '^ o' r5 ^* ?? if "^ 3 S S S 8 - ^' 8 if '^* ^ S -* ° * C^ ^ S ^' ° " s' -' ^ "^ '^' ° 

o 8 "^ ^, ^. o ^. ^ -^^ '"^ '^. 'i ^. ^ "^ "t ^ °i ^. ^. "^ °°. "^ '^ '^ ^. "^ ~^, "^. ^. ^ "^ '^. "° ^ ^ ^ ° "^ ^ *- ^, ^. ^. "^ ~ '", *, 



79 



SPECIAL INQUIRY OFFICER HEARINGS COMPLETED, BY REGIONS AND DISTRICTS; 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1965-1969 



Region 

and 

district 



Exclusion hearings 



Deportation hearings 



1965 1966 1967 I96B 1969 



1965 



1966 1967 



1969 



U.S. Total 

Northeast Region 

Boston, Mass 

Buffalo, N.Y 

Hartford, Conn 

Newark, N.J 

New York, N.Y 

Portland, Maine 

St. Albans, Vt 

Southeast Region 

Atlanta, Ga 

Baltimore, Md 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Miami, Fla 

New Orleans, La 

Philadelphia, Pa. ... 

San Juan, P.R 

Washington, D.C 

Northwest Region 

Anchorage, Alaska ... 

Chicago, 111 

Detroit, Mich 

Helena, Mont 

Kansas City, Mo 

Omaha, Nebr 

Portland, Oreg 

St. Paul, Minn 

Seattle, Wash 

Southwest Region 

Denver, Colo 

El Paso, Tex 

Honolulu, Hawaii .... 
Los Angeles, Calif. . 

Phoenix, Ariz 

Port Isabel, Tex. ... 
San Antonio, Tex. ... 
San Francisco, Calif. 



3 
219 

4 
66 
12 
50 
117 
17 



1.222 



18.96] 



16.7b7 



18.682 



19.811 



111 



6.396 



6.938 



7.500 



25 
38 



2 
64 



167 



154 



319 

283 

129 

441 

6,605 

14 

18 



382 
252 
152 
427 
5,158 
18 



1.790 



375 

270 

162 

540 

5,579 

6 

6 

1.619 



495 

272 

151 

787 

5,774 

14 

7 

1.962 



1 
4 
4 

53 
4 
5 

91 
5 



4 
5 
73 
3 
4 
110 
2 

106 



54 
67 
143 
298 
48 
158 
183 
128 

1.775 



114 
124 
558 
75 
169 
467 
195 

2.222 



141 
148 
137 
386 
61 
209 
306 
231 

2.557 



166 
144 
131 
610 
64 
265 
347 
235 

2.655 



501 



2 

2 

52 

547 



724 



1 

856 
326 
46 
72 
42 
49 
113 
270 

8.298 



10 
1,293 

334 
21 
70 
56 
73 
95 

270 

6.359 



7 

1,456 

422 

32 

89 

26 

98 

115 

312 

7.568 



1,509 
475 
40 
68 
28 
71 
128 
328 

7.694 



3 
198 

3 
129 

9 

23 

131 

5 



132 
2 

100 

9 

30 

190 



3 

167 

5 

136 

32 

21 

138 

45 



135 
5 

218 
39 
47 

203 
73 



47 
2,221 

40 
2,137 

97 

2,272 

440 

1,044 



47 

1,268 

34 

2,036 

88 

1,292 

689 

905 



1.219 

40 
2,802 

82 

1,434 

826 

1,085 



92 

2.038 

57 

2,409 

66 

1,220 

846 

966 



80 



ALIENS EXCLUDED FROM THE UNITED STATES, BY CAUSE: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1892-1969 



Zin 


1941-1953 figures represent a 


11 excl 


jsions a 


t sea and air ports 






and exc 


usions 


F aliens seeking entry for 30 days or longer at land ports 








After 1953 includes al 


lens excluded 


after formal hearings^ 
















C 


a u 


s e s 




















-C 




0) 
























CTl 




















-p S +-' 
















































S M 01 




i^ 




















o E 


(H 


o 
















e 




>• 3 


0) 






















M C O 








Period 


Total 


o 






^0) 


O 0) 

a> en 




•MOO 

c --1 r> 

CD •*-> 
o ^^ 


XI 


0, ro 

^^ 0) 

>- 


3 

o 

0) 


















-D 01 <D 




















+J o 


>- 


a> Q. O- 


-t-" 






















+J w o 




















>• o 


s 


a c M 
























e -H a 
















Q 


+J 01 




3 


a> 


















C > 


^ XI 


o 














3 C 


u 


B 


S^ 


■H 3 

J a 




< o o 


o 


83, 


s 


1892-1969 


621,462 


1,326 


12.471 


8.187 


82,555 


219.362 


16.188 


182.299 


41,941 


13.679 


43.454 


1892-1900 


22,515 


. 


65 


89 


1,309 


15,070 


. 


- 


5,792 


- 


190 


1901-1910 


108,211 
178,109 


10 
27 


1,681 
4,353 


1,277 
4,824 


24,425 
42,129 


63,311 
90,045 


1,904 


: 


12,991 
15,417 


5,083 


4,516 


1911-1920 


14,327 


1921-1930 


189,307 
68,217 


9 
5 


2,082 
1,261 


1,281 
253 


11,044 
1,530 


37,175 
12,519 


8,447 
2,126 


94,084 
47,858 


6,274 
1,235 


8,202 
258 


20,709 


1931-1940 


1,172 


1941-1950 

1941 


30,263 


60 


1.134 


80 


1.021 


1.072 


3.182 


22.441 


219 


108 


946 


2,929 
1,833 
1,495 


1 


92 
70 
68 


13 

10 
6 


73 
51 
63 


328 
161 
96 


227 

252 

77 


2,076 
1,207 
1,106 


40 
26 
26 


8 
9 
8 


72 


1942 


47 


1943 


44 


1944 


1,642 
2,341 


" 


63 

87 


8 
4 


92 
111 


107 
56 


155 
161 


1,109 
1,805 


28 
18 


21 
23 


59 


1945 


76 


1946 


2,942 


2 


R7 


3 


65 


33 


361 


2,794 


13 


4 


80 


1947 


4,771 


- 


139 


3 


124 


70 


902 


3,316 


19 


11 


187 


1948 


4,905 


1 


142 


5 


205 


67 


709 


3,690 


11 


2 


73 


1949 


3,834 


25 


187 


12 


112 


99 


216 


2,970 


26 


9 


178 


1950 


3,571 


31 


199 


16 


125 


55 


122 


2,868 


12 


13 


130 


1951-1960 

1951 


20,585 


1,098 


1.735 


361 


956 


149 


376 


14.657 


13 


26 


1.214 


3,784 


29 


337 


15 


337 


78 


121 


2,783 


1 


3 


80 


195? 


2,944 
3,637 


9 
48 


285 
266 


10 
27 


67 
130 


11 
15 


74 
47 


2,378 
2,937 


5 
3 


3 


102 


1953 


164 


1954 


3,313 
2,667 

1,709 


111 
89 

117 


296 

206 

169 


65 
124 

64 


127 
113 

87 


16 
9 

14 


2 
15 

10 


2,432 
1,832 

1,079 


- 


3 
4 

5 


261 


1955 


275 


1956 


164 


1957 


907 


302 


91 


30 


40 


2 


14 


348 


3 


7 


70 


1958 


733 
480 
411 


255 

102 

36 


51 
19 
15 


18 
7 

1 


21 
18 
16 


1 
1 
2 


35 
34 
24 


299 
276 
293 


1 


1 


51 


1959 


23 


1960 


24 


1961-1969 

1961 


4,255 


117 


160 


22 


141 


21 


153 


3.259 


- 


2 


380 


743 
388 


21 

13 


21 
24 


3 

2 


7 
23 


1 
1 


29 
17 


634 
280 


- 


2 


27 


1962 


26 


1963 


309 
421 
429 

51? 


11 
16 
12 

10 


17 
13 
18 

20 


2 
4 
4 

2 


22 
18 
19 

21 


4 

2 

1 


19 
10 
17 

16 


216 
343 
333 

415 


- 


- 


18 


1964 


17 


1965 


24 


1966 


27 


1967 


468 


13 


22 


3 


10 


- 


13 


322 


- 


- 


85 


1968 


46'"i 


7 


13 


1 


13 


6 


17 


323 


- 


- 


80 


1969 


525 


14 


12 


1 


8 


6 


15 


393 






76 


1 










Jl 















ALIENS EXCLUDED, BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIRTH AND CAUSEi 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1969 





Total 










C a I 


1 s e £ 










Country or region 
of birth 


u 
o 

> •-> 

XI (0 


c 

B 
U 


CO 


o a 

c 
u 

11 


-■ 
II 


a 


J3 u 

o x; 
>- u 

13 I 


is 
1 1 

ID 
111 





c ^ 
c 

>. u a 

c a « 

c la 
T3 - 

a 3 -. 
Boa 
0) x; MJ 

*J -H > 

<: a XI 


c a 

D 
iJ iJ c 

a 3 «) 

SOB 

«) j: 3 


3 
O 

a 




525 


u 


12 


1 


■53 


8 


6 


2 


15 


23 


370 


21 


Europe 

Germany 

Italy . 


29 


3 


1 




5 








1 




18 


1 


2 
4 
2 
3 

5 

2 
7 

LI 


1 

1 
1 


1 
1 


- 


1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

9 


2 


- 


- 


1 
3 


- 


1 
3 
2 
2 
3 
2 

5 

32 


- 




_ 


Poland 


- 




_ 




1 




_ 




_ 


Asia 


. 


China 1/ 

India 


K 
3 
U 
2 

2 
25 

3 

i23 


9 


1 
10 


1 


1 

1 
5 
1 
1 

36 


1 

1 
6 


6 


2 


1 
1 

1 
3 


23 


3 

2 
2 
2 
1 
19 
2 
1 

307 


- 


Japan 


- 




- 


Philippines 

Thailand 


- 




_ 




20 




26 

317 

. _ 43.. . 

2 
27 

2 

5 

3 

2 

2 
. _ iV_ _ 

7 
23 

2 

3 

2 

21 


2 
7 

2 


3 

7 


1 


2 

23 

_ 2 _ 

6 
1 

_ 4 _ 
1 

3 
3 


5 
_ 1 _ 

1 


_6_ 

5 
1 


2 


1 

_ 2 _ 

1 
1 

i. 


23 


7 
241 
_25_ 
2 

20 
1 
5 
3 
2 
2 

24 
5 

15 
1 
1 
2 

12 


10 




9 


Antigua 




Haiti 


- 




_ 




- 




1 
1 


Guatemala 


- 




_ 


Other Central America 


~ 




4 
2 
3 
3 
2 
5 
2 

1 


1 

1 


- 


- 


2 

1 


- 


- 


- 


1 
3 


- 


2 
3 

2 
4 

1 

1 


_ 


Bolivia 


_ 


Chile 


- 




_ 




_ 




; 


United Arab Republic (Egypt) . 


1 


- 


- 


~ 


" 


" 


~ 


" 


i 


~ 


1 


; 




4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


- 


- 


- 



T/ Includes Taiwan 



82 



TABLE ^). ALIENS 


APPREHENDEn. ALIENS DEPORTED, AND ALIENS REQUIRED TO 
YEARS ENDED )UNE 30, \H92- 19h9 


DEPART: 




Aliens 
apprehended 1/ 


Aliens exp 


e 1 1 e d 


Period 


Total 


Aliens 
deported 


Aliens required 
to depart 2/ 


1892-1969 


i). 500. 383 


7.123.385 


572,057 


6.551.328 


1892-1900 


128,484 
147,457 


3,127 

11,558 

27,912 

164,390 

210,416 


3,127 
11,558 
27,912 
92,157 

117,086 




1901 1910 




1911-1920 




1921 1930 


72,233 


1931-1940 


93.330 


1931 


22,276 
22,735 
20,949 
10,319 
11,016 
11 ,728 
13,054 
12,851 
12,037 
10,492 

1.377,210 


29,861 
30,201 
30,212 
16,889 
16,297 
17,446 
17,617 
18,553 
17, 792 
1 5 , 548 

1,581,774 


18,142 
19,426 
19,865 
8,879 
8,319 
9,195 
8,829 
9,275 
8,202 
6,954 

110,849 


11,719 


1932 


10,775 


1933 


10,347 


1934 


8,010 


1935 


7,978 


1936 


8,251 




8,788 


1938 


9,278 




9,590 


1940 


8.594 


1941-1950 


1,470,925 




11,294 

11, 784 

11,175 

31,174 

69,164 

99,591 

193,657 

192,779 

288,253 

468,339 

3,584.229 


10,938 

10,613 

16,154 

39,449 

80,760 

116,320 

214,543 

217,555 

296,337 

579,105 

4,013,547 


4,407 

3,709 

4,207 

7,179 

11,270 

14,375 

18,663 

20,371 

20,040 

6,628 

129,887 


6,531 


1942 


6,904 


1943 


11,947 


1944 


32,270 




69,490 


1946 


101,945 




195,880 


1948 


197,184 




276,297 


1950 , 


572,477 


1951-1960 


3,883.660 




509,040 

528,815 

885,587 

1,089,583 

254,096 

87,696 

59,918 

53,474 

45,336 

70,684 

1.263.003 


686,713 

723,959 

905,236 

1,101,228 

247,797 

88,188 

68,461 

67,742 

64,598 

59,625 

1,110,661 


1 3 , 544 

20,181 

19,845 

26,951 

15,028 

7,297 

5,082 

7,142 

7,988 

6,829 

79,481 


673,169 


1952 


703,778 




885,391 


1954 


1,074,277 




232,769 


1956 


80,891 




63,379 


1958 


60,600 




56,610 


I960 


52,796 


1961-1969 


1,031.180 




88,823 
92,758 
88,712 
86,597 
110,371 
138,520 
161,608 
212,057 
283,557 


59,821 

61,801 

76,846 

81,788 

105,406 

132,851 

151,603 

189,082 

251,463 


7,438 
7,637 
7,454 
8,746 

10,143 
9,168 
9,260 
9,130 

10,505 


52,383 


1962 


54,164 


1963 


69,392 


1964 


73,042 




95,263 


1966 


123,683 




142,343 


1968 


179,952 




240,958 







1/ Aliens apprehended first recorded in 1925 

nonwillful crewman violators. 
2/ Aliens required to depart first recorded In 1927 



Since 1960, deportable aliens located has Included 



83 





Total 










C a 


uses 










Country to which deported 


1 1 


1 


1 


•s 1 
1 s 


1^ 


T3 
1 I 


1 1 


Failed to maintain 
or comply with con- 
ditions of nonlmml- 


1 c i 

i 1^ 


7: 


Al I countries 


10.505 


3 


272 


14 


155 


12 


361 


1,789 


2,901 


4.983 


15 


























Europe 


911 


_ 


25 


3 


19 


6 


11 


19 


759 


69 






15 

63 

A90 

15 

68 
20 
16 
9 
12 
bU 
85 
17 
37 

531 


- 


8 
2 
3 


1 

2 


1 

2 
1 
1 
1 

3 

1 

2 
6 

1 

1 


1 

1 
1 
1 

1 

1 
1 


I 
4 

2 

1 
1 

1 

1 

I 


3 
4 

2 

1 

1 
2 
1 
2 
3 

4 


12 
51 
437 
10 
52 
14 
12 
7 
7 
53 
60 
15 
29 

489 


2 

40 

1 

8 

4 
6 

7 

1 
32 
















Italy 


- 






























Alia 






206 
16 
10 
11 
44 
18 
88 
81 
9 
48 

8.515 


: 


1 

1 

1 
222 


11 


I 
119 


1 

2 


1 
319 


1 
1 

1 

1 

1.752 


182 
14 
8 
9 
38 
18 
88 
79 
9 
44 

1.260 


23 
1 

1 

2 

1 

4.815 








Iran 








Japon 


- 


















North America 


15 




795 

6,859 

495 


- 


140 
56 
19 


9 
2 


33 

77 
7 


1 


129 

153 
18 


45 

1,672 

8 


384 
232 
404 


53 

4,656 

36 










2 


Antleua 


38 
17 
31 
52 
28 

ISO 
17 
34 
13 
61 
24 

366 


\ 


4 

2 

1 
2 

5 
1 
1 
3 
7 


- 


2 

2 
2 

1 

2 


1 
I 


1 

1 
2 

1 

5 

4 
4 
19 


1 

4 
1 

2 

27 


31 
13 
30 
34 
28 

163 
13 
22 
12 
45 
13 

240 


I 
2 

9 

11 

9 
2 
70 
































St. Vincent 




Trinidad and Tobago 




Central America 






37 
25 
109 
143 
18 
12 
22 

427 


\ 


1 
1 

1 
1 

3 
8 


1 


1 

1 
12 


1 


6 

5 
2 
1 

I 
29 


9 

3 
6 
5 

2 

2 

7 


12 
17 
71 
HI 
9 
8 
12 
315 


8 
4 
28 
20 
4 
2 
4 

56 




























South America 






36 
48 
53 
124 
70 
14 
41 
16 
18 
7 

26 


- 


3 

4 

1 


- 


2 

I 

4 
2 

1 

2 


- 


1 

8 
18 

1 

1 


1 
1 

4 

1 


31 
46 
10 
80 
62 
13 
37 
15 
15 
6 

23 


1 

32 

14 

5 

2 
1 

1 

2 




Brazil 




Chile 




Colombia 












Peru 
















Africa 




Oceania 


52 


_ 


1 


. 


. 


. 


. 




46 


4 








Pacific Islands (U.S. adm.) 


29 
11 

43 


3 


1 
13 


- 


- 


3 


I 


1 

5 


29 
6 

9 


3 

5 























84 



/a1 lens 



tlonj 



Austria . 
Belgium . 
Czechoslo 



Gerniany . 

Ireland . 
Italy ... 
NetherUn 

Poland .. 
Portugal 
Spain ... 
Sweden . , 
Swlt 



rla 



Ur.ited Klngdoi 
Yugoslavia .. 
Other Europe 



China \J 
India ... 
Iran 

Israel .. 



Philippine 
Thailand . 
Other Asia 



Dominican 
Haiti ... 
Jamaica . 
Trinidad 



Bolivia . 
Brazil .. 
Chile ... 
Colombia 
Ecuador . 
Guyana .. 
Paraguay 

Uruguay . 



Africa 

South Africa 

united Arab Republic 
Other Africa 



Oceania 

Australia ... 
New Zealand . 
Other Oceania 

Other countries 



\J Includes Taiwan. 
2/ Includes Arab Pale 



1,926 
1,192 
2.618 



1,891 
1,184 
2,M4 



85 





Total 




C a ,i s e s 


Natlonalltv 


II 


1 


1 


= 1 


25 
11 


J. 


St 

It 


1? °s 


j5i 


1 


All cDuntrlen 


10.505 


3 


272 


14 


155 


12 


361 


1.789 


2.901 


4,983 


15 


Eu rope 






56 














98 






6 

14 
66 
551 
8 
13 

21 
16 
19 
21 
62 
6 
9 
5 
319 

20 
13 

557 


1 


1 

4 

5 

2 
3 

3 

2 
2 

5 


1 


1 
1 

1 
5 

1 

2 

10 

5 


1 
1 

3 

1 
1 

I 


5 

I 
1 

19 


2 
3 

1 

I 
2 

I 
14 

1 

2 
7 


3 

7 

49 

49 2 

3 

9 
15 
52 

6 

a 

226 
1 
15 
8 

503 


1 
6 
42 
3 
1 
8 

5 
5 

1 

23 

1 

33 






















































































334 
15 

9 
10 
9 
9 
8 
23 
98 
8 


1 


1 
1 

1 


11 


4 

1 
114 


1 


1 
299 


2 

1 

1 
1 


300 
13 
9 

6 
5 

9 

23 
98 
8 
17 

1.069 


27 

1 
3 

2 

4,773 


















































15 




727 

6,845 

121 


- 


134 
'3 


9 

2 


29 

77 
2 




126 
153 

7 


39 
1,669 

8 


343 
233 

^74 


44 

4,642 

28 








West Indies 


i 




25 
6 
52 
7 
181 
58 
314 


- 




- 


2 
1 
1 

2 

1 




2 

1 
13 


1 
4 

I 
2 
15 


25 
2 
35 
5 
165 
42 
219 


I 
10 

9 
59 


























. 




107 
144 
17 
12 
12 


'-_ 




\ 


1 


[ 


5 
2 
1 

1 


2 

6 

2 

I 


15 

111 

7 
7 

292 


3 
2 

I 






























30 
45 
55 
121 
71 
41 
18 
IS 
20 


- 


: 


\ 


2 

1 

2 

I 

2 


I 


9 
19 

1 


1 
1 

1 


27 
43 
10 
77 
62 
37 
16 
2 
18 

22 


33 
13 
6 
3 
2 
14 
1 

3 




































Africa 






20 


\ 


-_ 


\ 


\ 


I 


: 


2 


14 
16 


3 
3 


















12 


- 




- 


'- 


- 






II 
5 


1 

































86 



^Aliens required to depart toUled 1^40. 958 (see table 23). This table does not include 27,082 required departures of ' 

were technical violators and 161,273 dire-it required departures under safeguards — chiefly Mexicans who entered without inspectionj_/ 





Total 






C a u s 








Country of destination 


i 


1 


I \ 


II 


1 \ 


s 1 


2-;| 


s 1^ 


1 


1 




52.t)0 3 


78 


1 3 


14 


23 


107 




38.211 


11.522 


, 


8 




5.135 




3 


1 




5 




5.0.-2 


57 








64 
IL 
137 
264 
432 
759 
103 
224 
879 
137 
243 
3" 
121 
236 
69 
78 
764 
91 
149 

3.125 


1 


1 
1 


1 


3 


2 
1 

4 


1 
3 

4 

2 

1 

2 
3 

15 


t,4 
72 
134 
2bl 

lyi 

103 
2134 
863 
133 
242 
309 
118 

73 
74t) 

88 
146 

3.087 


2 

4 
14 

18 
1 

1 
15 




- 




_ 




- 




- 




- 




- 








- 


Italy 


: 




- 


p , J 


- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 






Other Europe 






108 
206 
113 
166 
645 
75 
1,420 
99 
67 
226 

39.802 


1 
72 


- 
7 


: 


1 
'J 


96 


8 
4 

2 


1tl4 
205 
111 
163 
640 
75 
1 ,406 
94 
67 
222 

25.643 


3 

2 

3 

5 
1 

11.417 


1 


- 




- 








- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




8 




7,349 
24,448 

. _ i,654 _ 
335 
328 
324 
1,295 
397 
1,572 
146 
949 
308 

. - 2,151 _ 
163 
216 
535 
828 
225 
112 
272 

4.131 


U 

26 
1_ 

1 


3 
4 


5 


7 
1 

, 2_ 

5 


31 
55 

7_ 

1 
1 
3 

2 

- -3_ 

3 

1 


479 
1,989 

3i 

2 
2 

3 

3 
16 

4 
2 

3i 

4 
4 
7 
5 
3 
2 
8 

27 


6,544 

11,238 

. i,i7i 

331 

321 

321 

1,282 
389 

1,540 
146 
943 
302 
. 2,286 
146 
209 
525 
819 
216 
109 
262 

4,076 


233 
11 ,122 

36 

2 
5 

8 
4 
12 

2 

2 
26 
10 
1 
3 
4 
5 

20 


--:- 








West Indies 


. _ - - 


Rflh 


" 




' 




~ 




- 




" 




- 




*■ 


Other West Indies 

Central America 


■-:- 




- 




" 




~ 




- 


N^ 


~ 




" 




- 




401 
193 
194 
1,143 
1,062 
261 
373 
299 
205 


- 


1 
1 


: 


1 

2 


\ 


1 
10 
5 

6 
3 
1 

1 


399 
191 
186 
1,127 
1,056 
261 
367 
290 
199 

119 


1 

6 
3 

4 
3 


-_ 


- 














„ . 






" 
















- 






1 






. 


. 


4 


163 


2 


- 


- 




95 
33 
42 

117 


1 
2 


1 


2 


- 


- 


'' 


91 
41 
101 


1 
9 


- 


" 


U 7 1 H 








Other countries 


- 



87 



ALIENS DEPORTED, BY COUNTRY TO WHICH DEPORTED AND DEPORTATION EXPENSE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1969 



Country to which deported 



D 



P ?i 



Immigration 

and 

Naturalization 

Service 



Other 
Government 
agpncies 



Steamship 
companies 



Aliens 
deported 



All countries 

Europe 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Spain 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe ; 

Asia 

Hong Kong 

India 

Iran 

Israel 

Japan 

Pakistan 

Philippines 

Taiwan 

Thailand 

Other Asia 

North America 

Canada 

Mexico 

West Indies 

Antigua 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Dominican Republic 

Grenada 

Jamaica 

Netherlands Antilles 

St. Christopher 

St . Vincent 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Other West Indies 

Central America 

British Honduras 

CosU Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

South America 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Guyana 

Peru 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 

Other South America 

Africa 

Oceania 

Australia 

Pacific Islands (U.S. adm.) 
Other Oceania 

Other countries 



8.7A7 



403 
3 



15 

292 



8.515 



8 .0^9 



795 


726 


6,859 


6,7U 


.. 495 


252 


38 


34 


17 


13 


V 


13 


52 


26 


28 


5 


180 


59 


17 


5 


34 


34 


13 


4 



266 
37 
25 
109 
143 



121 
32 

23 

105 
131 



_2Qi_ 



30 
105 
49 

8 
33 
14 

3 



3 
3 
17 
22 
23 
109 



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ALIENS [JEPOHTED, BY CDUNTRY TO WHICH DEPORTPLii 
YEARS ENDED JIINE 30, 1960-lq6t) 



Country to which deported 


1960- 
1969 


196n 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


1965 


1967 


191.8 


1969 


All countries 


86,310 


6,829 


7,438 


7,637 


7,454 


8.746 


10^143 


9,168 


9.260 


9,130 


10,505 


Europe 


12,724 


1.541 


1,676 


1,503 


1.015 


1.150 


1,213 


1,450 


1,323 


942 


911 




181 
191 
932 

b,519 
142 

1,536 
326 
383 

J^ 

1,193 
218 

1,042 
233 
493 

4,027 


18 
15 
91 

610 
14 

2H2 
53 
45 
8 
J 4 

118 
26 

119 
43 
55 

246 


34 
26 

.90 

680 
19 

255 
47 
50 
12 
21 

147 
29 

152 
50 
64 

277 


35 
17 

148 

562 
8 

215 
28 
30 
8 
25 

168 
36 

135 
28 
60 

416 


14 
24 
69 

363 
16 

133 
29 
36 
5 
32 

111 
32 
93 
22 
36 

192 


10 
18 
78 

479 
19 

134 
42 
41 
2 
30 

110 
29 
90 
14 
54 

225 


17 
20 

102 

513 
14 

136 
30 
35 
13 
30 

134 
26 
87 
13 
43 

373 


24 
17 
103 

706 
13 

163 
17 
62 
7 
37 

117 
15 

107 
14 
48 

660 


17 
23 
91 

657 

n 

82 
41 
45 
7 
24 
143 
12 
91 
20 
59 

518 


7 
16 
97 

459 
13 
68 
19 
23 
2 
17 
81 
8 
83 
12 
37 

589 


■j 








63 








15 




58 




20 




16 








12 




64 
















27 


Asia 


531 




1,316 
192 

142 
124 
407 

85 
104 

97 
492 
594 

26 
448 

66,079 


34 
10 
9 

10 
20 
7 
8 
16 
67 
10 
1 
54 

4,858 


38 
11 
17 
13 

18 
7 

10 
8 

32 

33 
2 

88 

5,044 


171 

8 
13 
16 
40 

9 
12 

9 
41 
48 

2 
47 

5.433 


45 
12 
1 
19 
34 
8 
9 
4 
25 
18 
1 
16 

5.957 


37 
12 

1 
12 
58 
14 
14 

3 
31 
11 

22 

7.129 


90 
22 
21 
12 

48 
6 
11 

9 
51 
41 

3 
59 

8.227 


270 
34 
27 
9 
47 
13 
12 
11 
69 

123 

43 
6.705 


166 
46 
31 

43 
6 

13 
7 

4b 

4 
48 

7,058 


259 
21 
12 
13 
45 
t. 
7 
12 
42 

130 

40 
7,153 


206 
15 




10 




11 












8 








88 


Taiwan 


81 










North Atn-rica 


8,515 




9,932 

49,329 

4,147 


881 

3,442 
387 


1,151 

3,404 

312 


1,206 
3,743 
298 ^ 


1,098 

4,405 

249 


1,003 

5,557 

340 


1,044 

6,518 

485 


964 

4,770 

702 


938 

5,423 

410 


852 

5,208 

469 






6,859 


West Indies 


495 




245 
292 
292 
858 

47 
998 
139 
192 

22 

387 

675 

2,671 


4 

55 

20 

15 

3 

64 

8 

2 

1 

23 

192 

148 


5 
22 
22 

2 

55 

9 

2 

1 

29 

165 

177 


25 
39 
31 
33 

54 

7 

18 

1 

21 

69 

186 ^ 


13 
26 
13 
68 

46 
11 
7 

23 
42 
205 


20 
28 
19 
107 
2 
82 
6 
7 

28 
41 
229 


28 

34 

22 

181 

2 

96 

21 

20 
1 

47 

33 
180 , 


58 
28 
74 

158 
4 

207 
37 
56 
4 
36 
40 

259 


27 
26 
27 
140 

68 
12 
28 

44 
38 
287 


27 
17 
33 

102 
8 

146 
11 
18 
1 
75 
31 

624 


38 




17 




31 




52 




23 


Jamaica 


180 




17 




34 




13 




61 




24 




366 




665 
154 
556 
713 
249 
105 
229 

2,389 


70 
• 8 
22 
21 
11 
5 
11 

116 


66 
6 
37 
25 
29 
6 
8 

138 


53 
9 

31 

27 
18 
9 
39 

183 


60 
16 
45 
36 
23 
10 
15 

183 


79 
12 
49 
29 
21 
8 
31 

170 


58 
11 
31 
22 
19 
16 
23 

230 


92 
13 
43 
46 
40 
9 
26 

287 


95 
14 
34 
73 
32 
11 
28 

291 


55 
40 
155 
291 
38 
19 
26 

364 


37 








109 




143 




18 








22 


South America 


427 




213 
166 
343 
809 
228 

81 
280 

59 
168 

42 

244 


14 

5 
22 
30 
10 

6 
11 

2 
13 

3 

15 


18 
9 

27 

44 
4 
5 

17 
2 
9 
3 

23 


21 
20 
31 
53 

7 

7 
15 

3 
22 

4 

22 


15 
10 
29 
56 
12 

5 
39 

3 
11 

3 

23 


19 
10 
34 
58 

4 

9 
17 

5 
13 

1 

24 


26 
13 
26 
100 

6 

7 
21 

2 
28 

1 

17 


13 
21 
30 
116 
23 

8 
40 

4 
21 
11 


23 
9 
35 
118 
32 
13 
37 
6 
14 
4 

35 


28 
21 
56 
110 

60 
7 
42 
16 
19 
5 

39 




Brazil 


48 




53 








70 




14 




41 


Uruguay 


16 
18 




7 


Africa 


26 


Oceania 


230 


19 


31 


23 


17 


16 


13 


12 


31 


16 


52 




145 
33 
52 

617 


16 
3 
34 


19 
4 
8 

249 


17 
6 

57 


15 
2 

67 


10 
32 


4 
70 


7 
5 
34 


27 
4 
4 


13 
3 

27 


12 


Pacific Islands (U.S. adm. ) 


29 
11 




43 





















90 



ALIENS DEPORTED AND REQUIRED TO DEPART, BY YEAR OF ENTRY AND STATUS AT ENTRYi 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1969 



19691/ 1968 1967 1966 ''^l" I'^l- 1941- 
1965 I 1960 1950 



Before 
1941 



Total deported 

Immigrant (except displaced person) 

Displaced person or refugee 

Foreign government official 

Representative of foreign Information media . 
Representative to international organization 

Exchange visitor 

Temporary visitor 

Agricultural laborer 

Other temporary worker or industrial trainee 

Transit alien 

Returning resident alien 

Student 

United States citizenship claimed 

Crewman 

Treaty trader or Investor 

Entered without inspection 

Stowaway 

Other 



Total required to depart 2/ 

Immigrant (except displaced person) 

Displaced person or refugee 

Foreign government official 

Representative of foreign information media . 
Representative to international organization 

Exchange visitor 

Temporary visitor 

Agricultural laborer 

Other temporary worker or industrial trainee 

Transit alien 

Returning resident alien 

Student 

United States citizenship claimed 

Crewman 

Treaty trader or investor 

Entered without Inspection 

Stowaway 

Other 



2,346 
208 



298 
1,138 



52.603 



12 

1,360 

32,787 

281 

334 

364 

46 

1,803 

284 

2,685 



5.807 



1,807 



6.222 



1,300 
165 



26.930 



10.792 



3.547 



66 



16,799 



2,295 



177 
8,413 



1,027 



368 
2,214 



693 
2,155 



T/ Six-month figure, January-June 1969. 

2/ Excludes 27,082 required departures of crewman technical 



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93 



ALIEN CREWMEN DESERTED AT UNITED STATES AIR AND SEA PORTS , 
BY NATIONALITY AND FLAG OF CARRIER: 1/ 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, IS69 





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earn 


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Zf Include! Tainan. 



ed by ships' masters and those found In the United State* \tj Se 



94 



TABLE 29. VESSELS AND AIRPLANES INSPECTED, CREWMEN ADMITTED, ALIEN CREWMEN DESERTED, 

AND ALIEN STOWAWAYS FOUND, BY LOCATION: 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1069 

/Each arrival of the same carrier or crewman counted separately/ 



Vessels and airplane; 
inspected on arrival 



Airplanes 



Crewmen admitted 



Alien 1/ 

crewmen 

deserted 



Alien 

stowaways 

found 



United States Total 



Northeast Region . 
Boston, Mass. . . 
Buffalo, N.Y. .. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Newark, N.J. . . . 
New York, N.Y. . 
Portland, Maine 
St. Albans, Vt. 



20,866 



Southeast Region . . . 

Atlanta, Ga 

Baltimore, Md. ... 
Cleveland, Ohio . . 

Miami, Fla 

New Orleans, La. , 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
San Juan, P.R. . . , 
Washington, D.C. . 



Northwest Region ... 
Anchorage, Alaska 

Chicago, 111 

Detroit, Mich. . . . 

Helena, Mont 

Kansas City, Mo. . 

Omaha, Nebr 

Portland, Oreg. .. 
St. Paul, Minn. .. 
Seattle, Wash. ... 



Southwest Region 

Denver, Colo 

El Paso, Tex 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

Los Angeles, Calif. .. 

Phoenix, Ariz 

Port Isabel, Tex 

San Antonio, Tex. 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Preinspection Officers , 
Hamilton, Bermuda .... 

Montreal, Canada 

Nassau, Bahamas 

Toronto, Canada 

Vancouver, Canada ..., 
Victoria, Canada ..... 
Winnipeg, Canada ..... 
Frankrurt, Germany . . 



Border Patrol Sectors 



1,' 

9,304 

195 

4,809 

4,805 

538 

32.176 



2,037 
1 , 309 
1,894 
12,899 
2,222 
1,541 
8,783 
1,491 

19.330 



1,428 

576 

3,048 

29 



1,192 

177 

12,880 

10.048 



1,590 
4,943 

2,123 

1,392 

1.287 



30 



1,257 



316.540 



1.106.630 



64,056 



687.056 



233.376 



5,461 
8,469 
5-^5 
2, 171 
41,951 
2,560 
2,919 

94.534 



42, 131 

14,598 

6,489 

1,707 

593, "50 

28,032 

849 

801.934 



14,408 

14,694 

894 

12, "43 

184,315 

4,927 

1,895 

295,134 



6,689 
58,873 

2,081 

1,779 
20,832 

2,972 

51.324 



57,975 
43,128 
54,413 

319,303 
67,333 
57,054 

158,174 
44,554 

198.611 



18,081 
8, 131 
6,505 
144,457 
21,613 
10,885 
60,408 
25,054 

130.328 



6,406 

5,229 

8,713 

3,353 

277 

127 

692 

12,972 

13,555 

58.406 



38,237 

36,968 

19,466 

1,259 

58 

56 

34,280 

2,601 

65,686 

326.041 



29,484 
16,548 
12,256 
4,422 
260 
154 
8,266 
4,874 
54,064 

232.363 



688 
2,711 
11,149 
15,309 
7,781 
5,109 
11,250 
4,409 

48.220 



520 

11 

78,800 

138,076 

1,514 

64,111 

5,914 

37,095 

126.309 



2,360 
102 
82,926 
55,662 
831 
19,334 
18,150 
52,998 

215.429 



3,813 

10,030 



20,680 
4,180 



1,466 
63 



27,370 

15,738 

46,463 

7,580 

21,031 

225 

33 



24,391 
28,087 
35,322 
69,419 
22,865 
25,669 
9,206 
470 



6.356 



2.637 



160 

8 

81 

562 

1,743 



177 
358 
37 
458 
432 
540 
133 
210 



116 

9 

109 

1.033 



36 
391 



256 
350 



IT 



Includes deserting crewmen reported by ships' 
Service officers. 



nasters and those found in the United States by 



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1 



PASSENGERS 



Belgium 

Czechonlovakla 

Denmark 

France 

Gibraltar 

Greece 

Iceland 

Ireland 

I ta 1 y 

Luxembourg 

Malta 

NetherlandH 

Poland 

Portugal 

Romania 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey 

United Kingdom 

U.SS.R 

Yugoalavla 

Burma 

Ceylon 

Cocoe (Keeling Islands) .., 

Cyprus 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Israel 

Kuwait 

Lebanon 

Malaysia 

Palestine 

Philippines 

Ryukyu Islands 

Saudi Arabia 

Singapore 

Syrian Arab Republic 

Taiwan 

Thailand 

Turkey 

Vietnam 

Yemen 

Cape Verde Islands 

Congo 

Congo, Republic of the .... 

Ethiopia 

Ghana 

Ivory Coast 

Kenya 

Liberia 

Libya 

Mozambique 

Nigeria 

St. Helena 

Senegal 

Sierra Leone 

South Africa 

Tanganyika 

Tanzania 

Tunisia 

Uganda 

United Arab Republic (Egypt 



134.930 

6,824 

371,134 

549,226 



178,570 
19,386 

110,622 
7,138 

954,767 
3,696 
2,371 



5,298 
10,701 

1,289 
15,394 



1.728 
1,262 
2,502 



8,338 
39,744 
2,211 



38,371 
12.041 
49.466 
112,741 
19,546 
468 
91,784 



1,920 
17,958 
242,496 



2,675 
221,863 
368,177 
7 
49,195 
15,912 
111,679 
195,273 
26,857 
29 2 



3,066 
43,208 
184,538 



3,207 
7,858 
1.109 
12,642 



3,311 
2,055 



1,521 
28 

1,67 3 

2,765 
874 



1 6 , 247 
90,258 
3,187 
133,579 
6.634 
345.174 
532,754 

81,474 
27,9 24 
1 58 , 408 
269,943 



173.750 
17.737 
110.622 



55 


667 


23,079 


7 


694 


5.136 




516 


294 


4 


984 


1.918 


59 


235 


16.952 


16 


346 


235.481 



5,002 
10,700 

1,289 
15.384 



1.194 
2,663 
1,073 
3,381 
3 
1,728 
1,262 
2,502 



65,860 

3,976 

139,893 

173.903 

34,07 2 
12,023 
49.077 
93,356 
19,546 



61,839 
10.831 
38.434 
1,163 



97 



PASSENGERS 



UNTRIES, BY CUliNTRY OK EMBARKATIO 



Oceania 

Auscralia 

Christmas Islanri 

FIJI 

New Ca 1 edon la 

New Zealand 

Pacific Islands (U.S. adm, ) 

Hake and Midway Islands 

Western Samoa 

Canada 

Gireenland 

Mexico 

Swan Island 

Uesl Indies 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Bermuda 

Cayman Islands 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Guadeloupe 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Leeward Islands: 

Antigua 

British Virgin Islands . 

Montserrat 

St. Christopher 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Turks and CalcoB islands . 
Windward Islands: 

Dominica 

Grenada 

St. Vincent 

Central America 

British Honduras 

Canal Zone and Panama 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

South America 

Atgentln. 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Co loobla 

Ecuador 

Guiana (French) 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Surinam (Netheclanda Guiana) 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 

Cruise 

Bahamas 

Bermuda 

Europe and H«dl terranean .... 

Far East 

Southern South America 

World orulse 

Other countries 

Fl«g of carrier: 

United States 

Foreign 



8,423 
17,015 
14,406 



61,944 

1,903 

826,874 



14,285 
43,394 

173,870 
23,714 
39,514 

345,530 



10,221 
2,100 



2,6IB 
1,268 



_ 243^165. 
9,354 
88,759 
16,696 
29,298 
67,789 
21.053 
10,206 



494.914 



_710^aL4. 
178,392 
21,521 
34.37 3 



11,333 
23.113 
124,446 



11,628 
4,264 
29,724 
35.659 



129,504 
4,898 
34,219 
9,900 
16,595 
43,778 
13,666 
6,448 

311.765 



12,846 
85.051 
28,228 
1,321 



1.120 

215 

n3.i66l_ 

4.466 
54 , 540 

6.796 
12.703 
24.011 

7.387 

3.758 

183.149 



_5^1i9_ 

33 

5.577 



824.774 

10 

i, 257. 308 

968,673 
55.051 

272.022 
14.258 
43.266 

173.069 
23,513 
39.425 

344,201 



16.946 

1 1 3 . 1 29 

63.29 5 

1.433 



79.365 
15.353 
29.252 
67.709 
20.635 
10.181 

488.846 



21.474 
31.633 
4.212 
37.951 

117.983 
11,141 
23.067 

123.973 



5.122 
1,859 
0.813 



4.172 
3.577 
3.389 



23 
3.462 
12,826 
84.578 
27,826 
1.317 



79,133 
20,774 
101,450 
37,038 
59 
5.849 
1.745 
54.918 
1,048 



460.109 



32.556 

2.510 

44,263 

14,577 

71.840 

28.172 

56 

3.814 

951 

■ 35,324 



14,670 

1.633 
34,870 

6,197 
29,610 

8.656 
3 

2.035 



26.232 



45.452 
4.143 

77,646 

20,617 
100,953 

36,599 

59 

5,641 

1,745 

54,642 
1.025 



i2i.212 
4,864 
30.502 
9.806 
16.570 
43,723 
13.399 
6.425 



307.778 



161.066 



31.904 
2.510 
43.340 
14.483 
71.534 
28,105 
56 
3,607 
951 
35,244 



14.548 

1,633 
34.306 

5.134 
29.429 

8,494 
3 

2,034 

794 

19,398 



450 . 109 



>26.232 



186,612 
46,070 
166.271 
9.240 
2,952 
4,776 
267 
23,901 



10,084 
1,887 
19,936 



176,526 
44,163 
166,333 
8,916 
2,733 
4,500 
280 



186,612 
46.070 
166.271 
9.240 
2.952 
4.776 
267 



10.084 
1,687 
19.938 



176.526 
44.163 
166.333 
8.918 
2.733 
4.500 
280 
22.757 



Excli 



of 



land 



RIREICN COUNTRIES. BY COUNTRY OF DEBARK 



Iceland 
Ireland 
Italv .. 



Arab Republic (Egypt) 



3.3()1 
82.940 
406 , )89 



1.435 
4,320 
1.943 



1.830 
1.190 
3.097 



9,961 
46 , 609 
1.491 



10b. 561 
8.972 
70.230 



1.417 
1.184 
2,454 



99, 



O'UNTRIES, BY COUNTRY OF DEBARKATIO 



Country of deharkatlon 


B V B 


a a n c 


a 1 r 


8 V e e a 


8 V a 




Total 




Citizens 


Total 


Aliens 


Citizens 


Total 


Aliens 


Citizens 


Oceania 




98.268 




18.178 












Afoerican Samoa 


7.149 
66.698 
9 
20.939 
529 
17.286 
43.859 
29.226 
4.883 

3.056.251 


918 
46.265 

12.109 

289 

10.440 

947.913 


6.231 

20.433 

9 

8.830 

240 

27.589 
2,108.338 


12.093 

923 
219 
4.542 
133 
68 

60.464 


10.055 

881 

116 

2.663 

240 

9 

35.391 


2.038 

42 
103 
1.859 
93 
59 

25.073 


7,149 

54.605 

9 

20.016 

310 

43!526 
29.158 
4,883 

2.995,787 


918 
36,210 

11 .228 
173 
7.757 
16,030 
1 1 , 207 
761 

912.522 


6,231 
18.395 












New Zealand 






















64.771 

1.685 

776.933 

1.996^557 

854.101 

48.671 

228.977 

14.591 

2.473 

159.524 

24.168 

30.045 

314.186 

76.875 

63.968 

16 

13.679 

8.340 

106.254 

40.680 

679 

1 .999 

651 

6.030 

450 

216j.305 

8.227 

82.476 

16.220 

23.391 

53.840 

20.805 

11.346 

443.746 


21,191 

62 

266.980 

552.378 

153.416 
12.596 
22.785 
3.877 
370 
104.640 
9.279 
16.005 
90.795 

31.920 
43,036 
6 
10,447 
3,310 
25,250 
18,414 
38 

1 ,377 

248 

4,440 

129 

107,302 

3,698 

28,352 

8,939 

14,381 

32,510 

12,791 

6.631 

269.885 


43,580 

1 .623 

509.953 

~700T685" " 
36.075 
206.192 
10.714 
2.103 
54.884 
14,889 
14,040 
223,391 

44.955 
20,932 
10 
3,432 
5,030 
81,004 
22,266 
641 

622 

403 

1,590 

321 

, _109^003_ _ 

4,529 

54,124 

7,281 

9,010 

21,330 

8.014 

4.715 

173.861 


1 ,559 

1,905 
52,325 

' "6Te46~ 

49 

1,603 

141 

687 

89 
686 

68 
39.590 

18 

7 28 

1 .167 

596 

4.161 
156 
25 
59 
260 

6.146 


859 

1,253 
32 , 540 

9T6" 
8 

10 
569 
16 
30 
165 

57 
29,132 

12 
53 
585 
186 

13 

'39- 

465 
32 

28 
183 

3.770 


700 

5,930 

41 
815 

131 
118 
5 
59 
521 

31 
10,458 

675 
582 
410 

_3j.936_ 

3,696 

124 

31 

2.376 


63,212 

1,685 

775,026 

1.944.232 

847.255 
48,622 

227,374 
14,591 
2.332 

158,637 
24,147 
29,956 

313,500 

76,767 
24.378 
16 
13.861 
7.612 
105.087 
40.084 

1.999 

635 

6.030 

450 

211.630 

6.221 

78,315 

16,064 

23,366 

53,761 

20.545 

11,338 

437,600 


20,332 

62 

265,727 

519^836 

152.500 

12,588 

21.997 

3.877 

360 

9^263 
15,975 
90,630 

31,663 
13,904 
6 
10,435 
3.257 
24,665 
18.228 

1 .377 

235 

4.440 

129 

106^563 

3.692 

27.887 

8.907 

14.364 

32.462 

12.608 

6,623 

266.115 












West Indies 


_lj_424^394_ _ 


































Leeward islands: 
















































Central America 


_ -125j.067_ _ 


















Ho d 


7,937 








171.485 




44.813 
4.650 
70.932 
20.611 
87.866 
32.059 
3.268 
1.800 
56,230 
1.634 
4,188 
115,695 


28.570 
2,811 
39,484 
14,210 
56.004 
21 .846 
1,922 
950 
33,128 
675 
2,464 
67,821 

37,182 


16.243 

1.839 
31.448 

6.401 
31.862 
10.213 

1.346 

850 

23.102 

959 

1,724 
47,874 

439,801 


712 

1.193 

349 
524 

355 

70 

25 

2.741 

476.983 


286 

827 

236 
302 
10 

70 

16 
1.934 

37.182 


426 

366 
82 
113 
222 

285 

62 

9 

807 

439.601 


44,101 
4,650 
69.739 
20.448 
67.517 
31,535 
3,254 
1,800 
55,875 
1,564 
4,163 
112,954 


28.284 
2.811 
38.657 
14.129 
55.768 
21 ,544 
1.912 
950 
33.058 
667 
2.448 
65.667 


15.617 




1 ,639 


Brazil . 






6,319 




31,749 




9,991 




1,342 




850 


Peru 


22,817 




897 




1 ,715 




47,067 








206,121 
46,554 
183.982 
10.156 
4.203 
6.076 
935 
18.956 

4,044.433 
3.984.759 


11,481 
1.803 
21.095 
1,571 
140 
215 

699 

1,061.928 
1,745,690 


194.640 
44.751 
162,887 
8,585 
4,063 
5,861 
757 
18,257 

2,982.505 
2.239.069 


206.121 
46.554 
183.982 
10.156 
4.203 
6.076 
935 
18.956 

67.340 
696.268 


11,481 

1,803 

21.095 

1,571 

140 

215 

178 

699 

11,716 
175.865 


194,640 
44,751 
162,887 
8,585 
4,063 
5.861 
757 
18.257 

55.624 
520.403 


3,977,093 
3.288,491 


1P50. 212 
1^69. 825 


_ 


Bermuda 


- 




_ 




_ 




_ 




_ 




_ 


Flag of Carrier: 


2, 92b, 881 




1,718.666 







Che Unitec) Sta 



100 





lAHLE 


33. PASSENGER TRAVEL BETWEEN Till- lltllTED STATES AND FOREIGN COUNTRIES, 
BY SEA AND AIR, BY PORT OF ARRIVAL OR DEPARTURE! 1/ 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1969 










Tori 


BY sea and air 


By s .; a 1 


B 


y air 






Total 


Aliens 


Citizin 


Total 


Aliens 


Citiiuns 


To' jl 


Aliens 


Citizenc 




ARRIVED 


168,894 

J?, 603 

462,929 

',842 

164,764 

1114,046 

1,908 

1,379,999 

161,725 

7,761 

84,152 

5,553 

71,550 

397,324 

266,6-11 

111,555 

54,679 

224,778 

68,469 

95,471 

43,053 

3,689,337 

32,049 

9,640 

63,566 

5,910 

389,796 

14,094 

3,195 

111,407 

51,124 

5,452 

79,420 

157,641 

6,233 

111,383 

3,256 

62,023 

111,373 

6,158 

54,623 

8.029,192 


3.34j,e81 


5.457.206 


763,843 


198,464 


505.379 


8.njr,,3,j<i 


J 111417 


4.891.867 






13M76 

5,276 

192,545 

3,700 
70, 128 
33,086 

486,656 

34,691 

1,502 

17,725 

319 

39,468 

197,066 

86,761 

37,201 

2,830 

4,798 

61,704 

15,179 

6,669 

3,431 

1,395,182 

16,855 

611 

17,750 

253 

212,602 

1,207 

22 

4,156 

6,827 

2,245 

34,336 

49,677 

1,331 

51,540 

3,033 

38,042 

50,601 

1,082 

14,840 

2.807.618 


31,718 

17,527 

270,384 

4,142 

94,636 

7 1,960 

1,201 

891,343 

127,034 

6,259 

66,427 

5,234 

32,082 

200,236 

179,840 

74,354 

4,739 

49,881 

163,074 

53,290 

88,11-2 

30,622 

2,294,155 

15,194 

9,029 

65,818 

5,657 

177, 194 

12,687 

3,173 

6,251 

44,297 

3,206 

45,064 

107,964 

4,892 

59,843 

223 

23,981 

60,772 

5,076 

39,783 

5.221.574 


32,544 

346 

7,510 

93 

176,707 

57,543 

552 

4,320 

4,844 
26,143 

4,661 

2,302 

1,072 

98 

314,715 

254 
321 

33,605 

10 
1 
36 

- 
525 

1,164 

66,159 

259 

2,467 
656 
111 

4,801 

763.608 


7,109 

32 

4,593 

89 

13,256 

21,225 

142 

312 

3,773 
17,086 

887 

641 
301 
86 

75,803 

176 

240 

10,588 

1 
36 

430 

556 
36,044 
254 
200 
246 
71 
2,281 

187.581 


25,435 

316 

2,917 

163,451 
36,318 

410 
4,008 

1,071 
9,055 

711 
12 

238,912 

78 
81 

23,017 

608 

46,115 

5 

2,287 

412 

2,520 

576,027 


158,694 
22,603 
4 30,385 

157)254 

104,041, 

1,815 

1,203,292 

104,162 

7,209 

79,832 

5,553 

66,706 

371,181 

266,601 

106,894 

7, "19 

■..',377 

63,371 
95,471 

5,91'! 

35>,,191 

1 1,"84 

3,114 

10,171 

5,452 
78,895 
157,641 

5,059 
25,224 

2,997 
59,-536 
110,715 

6,047 
49,822 

7.255.564 


137,176 

5,276 

165,436 

3,568 

65,535 

33,066 

618 

475,400 

13,465 

1,360 

17,413 

319 

35,695 

179,998 

86,761 

36,314 

2,B»i 

4,157 

61,403 

15,093 

6,659 

3,431 

1,319,379 

15,855 

435 

17,510 

253 

:'o,\oi4 

1,203 

21 

4,120 

6,827 

2,246 

33,906 

49,677 

775 

13,496 

2,779 

37,842 

50,355 

1,011 

11,559 

2.520.037 


31,718 


Ariz. 
Calif 


, Anciorai 


I An 1 


244,949 


* San Dleq.i 








D.C.. 


Dulles International Airport ... 


70,960 


















5,849 


P 


















111., 


* Chicaao 
























162,303 


Mich. 
N.J., 






McGuire A.F.B 


63,802 


N Y 


^ York 




' 






Ohio, 












Pittsburgh 


5,557 
154,177 






12,861 






3,173 


Tex., 




5,251 




44,297 






3,306 






44,989 






107,964 






4,284 






11,726 


• 




218 






21,694 


Wash 




60,360 






5,036 


Other 


DOrts 


37,263 






4.645.547 






183,251 

21,991 

437,208 

15,330 

33,025 

84,863 

676 

1,312,820 

116, 001 

12,518 

68,450 

181 

83,949 

497,461 

247,404 

100,656 

15,006 

47,319 

243,357 

35,119 

74,460 

24,235 

3,434,414 

25,186 

3,917 

27,070 

6,274 

323,072 

13,880 

2,463 

9,416 

40,307 

5,460 

71,389 

155,916 

6,543 

158,317 

3,506 

48,325 

107,208 

3,613 

17,410 


135,688 

5,562 

166,326 

7,568 
10,261 
22,328 
483 
423,127 
31,601 
4,206 
6,455 

37,242 

213,025 

60,173 

30,667 

2,766 

1,721 

54,460 

5,673 

2,697 

1,505 

1,170,231 

14,252 

175 

4,719 

378 

175,302 

190 

12 

4,123 

9,199 

1,898 

31,166 

46,682 

1,017 

60,980 

3,167 

26,869 

30,349 

405 

2,346 


47,563 

16,429 

270,882 

7,762 

22,744 

62,535 

195 

889,693 

84,200 

6,310 

61,99- 

181 

46,707 

194,456 

187,231 

70,191 

12,240 

45,598 

188,897 

29,246 

71,763 

22,730 

2,264,183 

10,934 

3,742 

22,351 

5,696 

14/, 770 

13,690 

2,451 

5,293 

31,108 

3,562 

40,223 

109,036 

5,526 

97,337 

339 

21,456 

76,659 

3,208 

15,062 


26,958 
3,679 

188,210 
40,503 

-»-,»58 

2,852 
24,075 

4,662 

746 

9,245 

41 

306,091 

11 

237 

15,916 

294 

2,328 

126,516 

5 

3,491 

553 

139 

2,192 


4,238 

960 

11,737 
23,076 

185 

2,056 
15,762 

700 

194 

4,363 

4! 

71,545 

5 
171 

7,347 

265 

836 
42,498 

195 

219 

66 

1,122 


25,720 
2,719 

176,473 
17,427 

4,673 

795 
8,313 

3,952 

552 
4,882 

234,546 

6 
66 

8,569 

29 

1,492 

64,020 

5 

3,296 

334 

73 

1,070 


163,251 
21,991 

410,250 

15,330 

29,346 

84,653 

578 

1,124,610 

75,498 

12,518 

53,592 

161 

81,097 

363,406 

247,404 

96,195 

15,006 

46,573 

234,112 

J5,078 

74,460 

24,235 

3,128,323 

25,185 

3,006 

25,633 

6,274 

307,155 

13,880 

2,463 

9,412 

40,307 

5,460 

71,095 

155,918 

4,215 

31,799 

3,501 

44,834 

106,655 

3,474 

15,216 


135,686 
5,552 

152,088 

7,^8 

9,321 

22,328 

483 

411,390 
8,725 
4,208 
6,270 

35, 166 

197,253 

60,173 

29,957 

2,765 

1,527 

50,097 

5,832 

2,697 

1,505 

1,098,686 

14,252 

170 

4,548 

378 

167,955 

190 

4,123 

9, 199 

1,8:>8 

30,901 

45,882 

181 

18,462 

3,167 

26,574 

30,130 

339 

1,226 


47,563 






16,429 


Calif 




246,162 


' C f,-^ 


7,762 






20,025 


D.C., 


Dulles International Airport ... 


62,535 
195 


Fla., 


Miami 


713,220 
56,773 




-. 


8,310 






57,322 


Ca., 
Guam, 
Hanal 
111., 




181 




45,911 




186,143 




167,231 




66,229 


Maine 




12,240 


Baltimore 


45,046 


' 




134,015 


Mich. 
N.J., 




29,246 


McGuire A.F.B 


71,763 
22,730 


N.Y., 


N Yo k 


2,029,537 




10,934 


Ohio, 
Pa., 




3,736 




22,265 




5,896 






139,201 


S.C, 


P 1 ston 


13,690 




2,451 






5,269 




D lias 


31,108 




, . 


3,562 




ston 


40,194 




S Antonio 


109,036 


Va., 
V.I., 




4,034 




13,317 




334 




F d ' k t d 


18,150 






76,525 






3,135 


Other 




13,992 


^ 




\J E» 


elusive of travel over land borders (ex 


cept Mexican a 


ir travel). 


crewmen, mil 


Itary person 






en the Unite 




Its 



101 



Europf- 

AlbanU 

Austria 

Bi-ltjl'irr, 

UiihMrl ^ 

Dmmiark 

Estofil.i 

Flnlar.! 

Fran... 

G*:rinanY 

Iralan.l 

Italy 

Lijxembourtl .... 
Netherlanis ... 
NiTway 

Swltzerlan'l ... 
lurksy 

ll.S.b.ft 

India 

Indnnesla 

Iran 

Israel 

'apsn 

Jordan 

Kor»a 

Pal.^stlne 

Philippines ... 
Other Asia 

North AnTica ... 

»te«lcc 

Barbados 

Dnm. Repol.lic . 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Trln, & Tobago 
Costa Rica .... 
El Salvador ... 
Guatemala 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

South America . . . 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Other So. Amerl 

Africa 

South Africa .. 

Tunisia 

U.A.R. (Egypt) 
Other Africa .. 

Oceania 

Australia 

Nex Zealand ... 
Other Oceania . 

Stateless 

All Other 



3,372 
I^,g46 
1,231 



.',863 
n,en8 



?,5<>B 
1,081 
1,534 



4^\cn5 

39,983 
12,892 



2,982 
3,332 
27,167 



2,455 
1,063 
12,909 
5,941 



1,110 
10,340 
2,596 



9,576 
2,579 
1,588 



1,014 
1,701 
14,834 



1/ Aliens «ho are n 
2/ Includes Taiwan. 



102 



J 3 3 o S - S - 



iS33; 






i S 3 ° S n I 



'I^SS-SS^'^'^il 






5l2 



;3sg! 









!3S: 



i = a 



11 

5d 



:|o|££|S£SS 



:ss: 






> tJ R 8 S S S ! 












•s ^2 "" 12^ a'''!- 



s 
5-?:: 



!Si:sss::sassasss£i2Si 






illssi -III 



65 through 1^69/ 



District of Colum 
Florida 

Georgia 

Kentucky 

HasGachuetELS 

Michigan 

MlBsUslppl 

New Jercey 

New York , 

NorLh Carolina .. 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Khode Island .... 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Virginia'!!;!!!;; 

Washington 

West Virginia ... 

Wyoming 

U.S.Terr, and Posi 

Puerto Rico ... 
Virgin Islands 



13,598 
2.571 



118.580 

6,294 

545,990 



29.2 

9.938 
10,650 
5,355 

19.967 
28,411 



151.437 
12,712 
553.703 



176.835 
17.003 

620.119 
11.420 



7,662 
30,6O8 
7.955 



12.862 


14,508 


45,794 


46,998 


4,347 


4.393 


208.427 


238,018 


27,368 


27 . 560 



37,201 
135.417 
136.596 



22.764 
51,333 
5,398 



6.794 
12.535 



8,465 
249.735 
11,919 



104 



37. UECLARATKlNS UF INTENTION FILEO, PETITIONS FOR NATUHALiZAT ION FILED, 
PERSONS NATimAI.IZED, AND PETITIONS FOR NATURALIZATION DENIEIj: 
YEARS ENDP;n JUNE Ji), 1'i07-1 'V/T 



;bir:i- 

I.t) 



Pel.iti 

rii. 



Persons natural iy.ed 



Mi Ij tary 



P'-t.] t.ionr 
detiied 



r'()7-l-iC/ 

1 107-1910 

191T-1')?0 

m;'1-i-)ii) 

:'ni-v,'/,o 

i»i 

1932 

vn3 

1734 

1935 

1036 

1937 

193f? 

1939 

1 940 

^'K^-^')5o 

19/J 

1 942 

1943 

1944 

1945 

1946 

1947 

1948 

1949 

1950 

1951 -I960 

1951 

1952 

1953 

1954 

1955 

1956 

1957 

1958 

1959 

1960 

1961-1969 

1961 

1962 

1963 

1964 

1965 

1966 

1967 

1968 

1969 



^26,3.2 



.686.909 



.709.014 



1.369.479 



106,272 
101,345 
83,046 
108,079 
136,524 
148,118 
176,195 
150,673 
155,691 
203,536 

920.284 



224,123 
221 ,796 
1 1 5 , 664 
42,368 
31,195 
28,787 
37,771 
60,187 
64,866 
93,527 

323.818 



91,497 
1 1 1 , 461 
23,558 
9,100 
10,855 
12,870 
15,911 
16,196 
16,115 
16,255 

126.093 



15,921 
1 5 , 1 20 
14,478 
14,374 
13,082 
12,957 
12,465 
13,594 
14,102 



9.2^3.584 



:^.'8l.34A 



5y/,xo 



8.71'.', 1'// 



V61.073 



1''-'4,0^6 



111.758 



'11.738 



17.702 



1.381.384 



1 .884.277 



1 .637.113 



145,474 
131,062 
112,f,29 
117,125 
1 31 , 378 
167,127 
165,464 
175,413 
213,413 
278,028 

1.938.066 



277,807 

343,487 

377,125 

325,717 

195,917 

123,864 

83,802 

68,265 

71,044 

66,038 

1.230.483 



61,634 
94,086 
98,128 
130,722 
213,508 
137,701 
140,547 
117,344 
109,270 
127,543 

1.028.225 



138,718 
129,682 
121,170 
113,218 
106,813 
104,853 
108,369 
103,085 
102,317 



■^JiE 



2V>J' 



1 .128.97^ 



1 18.725 



1.716.979 



50.206 



1,773.185 



165.493 



1.49 8 .573 



140,271 
136,598 
112,368 
110,867 
118,945 
140,784 
162,923 
158,142 
185,175 
232,500 

1 .837.229 



19.891 



1. 518.4^4 



275,747 

268,762 

281 ,459 

392,766 

208,707 

134,849 

77,442 

69,080 

64,138 

64,279 

1.148.241 



53,741 
87,070 
90,476 
104,086 
197,568 
138,681 
1 37 , 1 98 
118,950 
102,623 
117,848 

984.4^2 



130,731 
124,972 
121,618 
109,629 
101,214 
1 00 , 498 
102,211 
100,288 
93,251 



3,224 
2 

995 
2,802 

481 
2,053 
3,936 
3,638 
2,760 

1 49 . 799 



1,547 

1,602 

37,474 

49,213 

22,695 

15,213 

16,462 

1 ,070 

2,456 

2,067 

O -705 



143,495 
136,600 
113,363 
113,669 
118,945 
141,265 
164,976 
162,078 
188,813 
235,260 

1 .987.028 



211, Z^U 

270,364 

318,933 

441,979 

231,402 

150,062 

93,904 

70,150 

66,594 

66,346 

1.189.946 



975 

1,585 

1,575 

13,745 

11,958 

7,204 

845 

916 

1,308 

1,594 

25.452 



1,719 
2,335 
2,560 
2,605 
3,085 
2,561 
2,691 
2,433 
5,458 



54,716 
88,655 
92,051 
117,831 
209,526 
145,385 
138,043 
119,866 
103,931 
119,442 

1 .009.864 



132,450 
127,307 
124,178 
112,234 
104,299 
103,059 
104,902 
102,726 
98,709 



^5.792 



7,514 
5,478 
4,703 
1,135 
2,76'. 
3,124 
4,042 
4,854 
5,630 
6,54'> 

64.814 



7,769 
8,348 
13,656 
7,297 
9,782 
6,575 
3,953 
2,887 
2,271 
2,276 

27.569 



2,395 
2,163 
2 , 300 
2,084 
4,571 
3,935 
2,948 
2,688 
2,208 
2,277 

21.578 



3,175 
3,557 
2,436 
2,309 
2,059 
2,029 
2,008 
1,962 
2,043 



105 



TABLE 37A. 



PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY GENERAL AND SPECIAL NATURALIZATION PROVISIONS: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1965-1969 



Naturalization provisions 


1965-1969 


1965 


1966 


1967 


1968 


1969 


Total 


513.695 


104,299 


103,059 


104,902 


102,726 


98,709 


General provisions 


381,:ps6 


76,630 


76,214 


78,544 


76,377 


73,489 


Special provisions 


132,441 


27,669 


26,845 


26,358 


26,349 


25,220 


Persons married to U.S. 

citizens 


81,330 


16,602 


16,448 


16,778 


17,156 


14,346 


Children, including adopted 
children of U.S. citizen 




parents 


3A,199 


7,914 


7,695 


6,740 


6,579 


5,271 


Former U.S. citizens who lost 




citizenship* by marriage ... 


177 


38 


37 


36 


38 


28 


Philippine citizens who 
entered the United States 














prior to May 1, 193A, and 














have resided continuously 














in the United States 


9 


3 


- 


5 


1 


_ 


Persons who served in the U.S 














Armed Forces for 3 years . . 


7,51^ 


1,696 


1,575 


1,648 


1,720 


875 


Persons who served in the U.S 














Armed Forces during World 














War I, World War II, the 














Korean hostilities, or the 














Vietnam hostilities \_l .... 
Lodge Act enlistees 


8,666 
53 


1,365 
24 


971 
15 


1,040 

3 


712 
6 


4,578 
5 


Surviving spouses of 




citizen members of the 














Armed Forces of the United 














States 2/ 


9 










9 


.Persons who served on certain 




U.S. vessels 


93 


18 


22 


18 


11 


24 


Former U.S. citizens who 




lost citizenship by enter- 














ing the armed forces of 














foreign countries during 
World War II 


16 


4 


3 


2 


2 


5 


Nationals but not citizens 




of the United States 


285 


5 


77 


87 


65 


51 


Persons naturalized under 














private law 


8 




I 






7 


Employees of nonprofit organi- 
zations engaged In dissemi- 




nating Information promoting 


80 
2 


- 


1 


I 


59 


21 


u.o. inceresc j/ .•«.••••••. 

Other T 









y Section 329 of the Immigration and Nationality Act amended October 24, 1968, to 

Include Vietnam hostilities (P.L. 90-633). 
2/ Section 319 of the immigration and Nationality Act amended June 29, 1968, (P.L, 

90-369). 
3/ Section 319 of the Immigration and Nationality Act amended December 18, 1967 

(P.L. 90-215). 



106 





—«'™ ""•■'•'"—" 


ZXl 






s n a t u r 








Co„„, 


nlTlIrl ul.u'l, 








„..,. 


All countries 


9K,im 


7!. ..1.9 


14.34h 


5.271 


5,458 


145 












2.520 


1.472 


38 


Alba la 


3,643 
325 


lisso 

29 

2.332 

323 

3.320 
265 


98 
50 


1.293 


161 


14 
23 




A t la 




B I 




B I*a la 




C *h ilovakU 












p. .^^j 




_ 




C nu 




C c« 




H a 




I la d 




1 1 d 




, . 




Latvia 




Llth a la 




L xenboura 




Malta 




N th la dl 




N rwav 




Pola d 




Po t al 




fl OM U 












Sit Id d 




T rUev 




U It d Kin don 




USSR * 


















3.399 
62 

316 

'397 
1.646 

3.877 


153 
20.449 


702 
105 


37 
6 


322 
19 

1.408 




China 1/ 












I do I la 




Iran 












Japan 




Jordan 








L bano 








Phlllppinea 




Syrian Arab Republic 














Veoi«n 




°"'" """ ^ 




Canada 


6.387 




584 


458 








Heitlco 










9.654 
522 
283 

■ 58 


8.526 
348 


513 

85 




29 
19 

23 

l_59 


I 




Cuba 




Doalrlcan Republic 














Trinidad and Tobao 


jj 












159 




23 

83 


10 
55 




\ 








Guatemala 








Nlcaraoua 




Panama 




Soo.h ta.r.c. 






261 


136 

30 

75 
159 

475 


13 

3 

32 
139 


25 












- . ' 




Chile 




Columbia 




Ecuador 




Gu ana 




Pa'' a * ' " 












V ner el« 












51 


19 




3 


• 




-^ . Af 1 a 




UnU«d Arab Republic 


(EavDt) 




tgyp 












29 


li 




3 


'- 




H Zeal nd 






d ) 






* • 




U S .aeaalona* 






,.,i 


1.5,1 




79 












1 







376-870 0—70 8 



107 





,.„,:, -,0,„ 


,9^n 


1961 


,96, 


,9,,, 


,06, 


I -165 


196,, 


196 7 


I068 


,969 




l,U'9,3ue> 


119.442 


132,450 


127,jo; 


124,178 


112, .34 . 


104,299 


10 3, 05. 


l0J,)o2 


102,726 


98, 709 






85,11!) 








71.636 


66.. .20 




61.534 


58.26 7 


51.847 




■ •jT.'sM 
'.,441 

7,?9n 
b|f)90 


71 

414 

1,979 
P.floj 

Mi560 

1,562 

1,164 

62 

2,134 

8,021 

1,258 

624 

1 1 , 303 
2^211 


236 

'mi 

1,499 

422 

1,854 
18,738 
6,140 
1,546 

3, 754 
18,365 
1,485 

' 63 

2,134 

1,005 

8,605 

1,493 

752 

862 

682 

3I850 
2,810 


303 

175 
1,12; 

362 

1,737 

6^092 
5,682 

17)449 

165 

3,260 

811 

5,362 

1,163 

687 
616 

513 

2)306 

2,628 


119 

241 
1,889 

'liftoi 

'856 

62 

3,5«. 

1)356 
484 

523 

392 
10,989 
1,877 
2,264 


138 
1,196 

681 

182 
328 

4)721 

624 

2,M8 

3,969 

'38' 
692 

421 

1)329 
1,965 


1,163 

96 
658 

159 
280 
1,521 
14,920 
3,256 
4,054 

3, 32 J 

'545 

61 

56 

2,503 

4,017 

1,718 

387 

679 
403 

9,370 
2)013 


1,012 

127 

265 

1,446 

13,7W, 

2)971 

2,885 
lo,9Rl 

393 

HI 
2, '62 

3,833 
2,179 

731 

347 

'848 
1,764 


no 

337 
75 
458 

265 
1,472 
13,2"4 
3,138 

'l53 

397 

131 
2,698 

506 

2)156 

1,776 
84 


109 

92 
418 

251 
1,124 

2)139 
26 

360 
122 

70 
14,980 




A '' U 


688 


R 1 " 


29] 


R 1 


74 


'-^"■•-■^'■'-'<''- 


316 


E^tcnV.i 




F r 




r 




P 


3 029 




1 725 


I Piflnd 


45 




2,620 








331 


1 ■ ti 


345 


1'.—'"!" 


56 








461 




3 643 


p, rtin:li 


1 543 




434 










S ■ t Id 














66 




15.J62 




2hi 
33,385 

'its 

'qu 

1,3^? 


2 
1,968 

20 

81 

1,145 

4,189 

187 

32 


2,683 
8 

38 

106 
1,143 
3,790 

287 
1,031 

54 
18 


4,109 
147 

134 
3,563 
1 , 169 

2,438 

17 

38 
173 


174 
113 

. 125 

24 

19.560 


14 

46 

252 

319 

3,n?9 

3,061 

333 

'378 

"121 
26 

19.782 


26 

37 
20? 

295 

2,883 

2,660 

390 

46 

2,499 

129 

33 

156 
18,626 


36 

3,111 

54 

357 
2,814 

1,180 

2,384 
133 

20,899 


35 

262 
145 

164 
2,276 
2,553 

1,353 

"117 
72 
138 


3,166 

303 
178 

196 

2)476 

1,776 
J46 

'l62 

135 

145 

23.167 




Chins 2/ 


3,399 




364 


1 'i <=" :i 






346 


Irsn 






1,836 


. pn 


2,067 




397 


l- 


1,646 




338 




44 




3,877 


Syrian Arab Rep^ibltc 4/ 


127 


Vi-=mam 




Vem^n 






141 
24.831 




87,V)2 

60,067 

.--"2.187. 

277 

39,971 

2! 026 
2,918 

TI759 " 

l!207 

2,527 
2.136 


10,215 

5,913 

. .2t301_ 

1,928 

136 

_ J>P1'- 

95 
83 
167 
173 


8^405 
- 3,165 . 

2,774 
280 
111 

_ 1,212 - 

129 
130 

166 
216 
464 

1.391 


9,272 

7,205 

_ _2i660_ 

'3I8 
131 

119 
88 
183 

521 

1.427 


_ 2la77 . 
'330 

201 

~ ~'T63 
113 

123 
251 

205 

1.986 


5)213 
- .3i594_ 

2,683 
290 
164 
374 
83 
- 1,«6 _ 
158 

119 

207 

2.139 


0,489 

5,080 

_ 3,561 _ 

2,522 
261 
217 
481 

80 

120 

194 
610 

2.136 


8,579 

5,677 

- _5i031_ 

3,829 

238 
519 
112 

. _ i.6i2 . 

170 
119 
125 
266 
198 

2.538 


6)044 

. - 6,670 _ 

43 

5,485 

321 

245 

143 
1^763 
199 
147 
145 
321 
221 
730 


6,984 
6,134 

6,784 

303 
118 

■ - -'T- - 

302 
236 
843 


6,387 


Mex'ro 




Barbados 6/ 


_U,219 . 
122 










J->i"7/ 


158 


Central America 


^63" 








198 


Honduras 


343 








848 




3.758 




6,049 
1,103 
2,695 

4 1 334 

2,569 
179 
189 

2,092 
458 

1,476 


253 

184 
105 
258 
178 

134 
86 


291 

117 

183 

11 

28 
102 


323 
78 

287 
165 

15 
144 
27 


545 
108 

353 

185 
119 


125 
224 
160 
419 
206 

12 
176 

141 

589 


655 
111 
241 
179 
381 
203 

11 
175 

133 

656 


719 

316 

481 
261 

16 
218 

60 
164 

562 


820 

376 

5;* 
352 

30 
298 

230 


362 


1 014 




172 




366 










Ecuador 






365 








211 




671 




9'.2 

2I/75 
1,169 


78 
208 


68 
250 
64 


89 
111 

156 

378 


170 
133 

391 


141 
270 
76 

421 


103 

1.'3 
295 


HI 
131 


101 


513 
159 






136 




334 
364 




2,871 
660 
290 
256 


293 
73 

6 


271 
67 


298 


23 
16 


297 
69 

16 

251 


321 

67 


278 

36 

36 

437 


295 
32 


i 






44 




49 




44 


u ■; i 


285 




15 343 






1.362 


1.232 


1.692 


1 438 


1,422 


1,966 


1,5,18 


1.571 













1/ irclud. 


In Unl 


ed KIngdo 


2/ include 


Taiwan 




3/ Incl,jd. 


In Unl 


ed Klngdo 


4/ include 


In Uni 


ed Arab 1 


5/ Indepen 


ent cou 


nlrles. 


^;i:js 


In Unl 


led Klngdo 


8/ include 


in IJ.S 


. possess 



108 



of former allegiance 


„„^';;;i„. 




1 1 


it 1 


^ 


1 




■ti 


£1 


III 


li 


•1 

li 


nil 


JH ,„„nulPS 


,,„-,, 


11.420 


113 


4.067 


B.642 








876 


10 534 








Europe 










4 333 










5 025 










103 
'331 


48 

39 

' 60 
166 


13 


233 
31 


113 

1 

5» 
699 






193 




12 
31 


■! 










Belgium 


302 






Czechoslovakia 


13 






Estonia 


^?B 


Finland 


107 










Greece 


i;i46 








Ireland 


B^l 




2 908 








111 








49 
















'519 










Sweden 


138 












3 283 


"•S.S.R 


271 






Asia 






'33a 


121 






148 

1 


762 


18 
15 

I 
5 

1.853 


184 

16 
3.218 


279 


26 
2.403 


Ill 


652 




Chin. 1/ 


'•■*23 


India 








Iran 














1 519 








I 211 








14 




1,074 








53 




131 








43 
S.265 




uisis . 

2.114 . 

159 








325 


122 


- -es9_ . 


.U957. 


27 
103 


1*159 „ 


11 








2,500 


West Indies 


_2xy3_ 




78 
- - 2U _ 
13 




10 
5i . 


62 

3B3_ . 

28 


312 

- - "6- ■ 

17 
107 


56 

291 


384 


27 
- _21_ 

45 


36 
_ 322 _ 

317 


1 


?6 _ 




Cuba 


2,226 












86 




21 


Central America 


. . 623 - 






' ^ J "' 


70 






Nl" ^aau8 


97 




210 




i.085 




'l72 


41 




6 
42 


Bl 


1 
25 


19 

27 


91 
46 


16 


10 
43 




'" 






63 


Brazil 


149 






Col rnbia' 


205 






-. ^ ^^ 


U 






^ai 9u Y ... 


B2 












240 


Jj^ 


136 

104 


104 






42 


5 
16 




18 


f 






1 














39 




'^ 


Australia 


24V 


58 




10 


2 
11 




3 




> 


'i 




1' 






19 






Othe f" 2/ 


14 




14i 


PO 




^39 




101 




35 


158 


172 


12 


128 


1 


I' 


W9 







109 





.,»'m^i"u..H 










M 1 P 


5 











' "1 '■• '"■'■1' ■'■ '■'""•" "II ■■'-""'- 


r..u, 


18 


19 




10- 






t 






. 1 


98,709 


45.177 




1.668 
















E..ro e 


51,8^7 


22.251 


1.355 




5 533 


6,819 


4 007 




1.238 








B,771 

las 

56 

n? 

l,93n 

.161 

3,643 

1,M3 

721 

'767 
1,808 

15,362 

Ml 

2!o67 

1,646 
338 

3,877 
127 

96 

24.831 


272 

3,334 

1,136 

'l49 

22 

986 

1,630 

338 

1,03? 


13 

476 

5 
32 

57 

a 
20 

I'l 

16 


1 
17 

182 

16 

112 

2 

13 


1! 
98 

20 

117 
95" 
338 

5 
17 

357 
209 

28 


20 

10 
31 

1,"27 
624 
313 

19 

5 
11 
332 

76 
233 

128 

91 
988 

24 
361 

2.981 


21 

21 

16 
16 

IRl 
16B 
28 

201 
438 

no 

91 
31 

71 


5 
16 
13 

165 
112 

23 

69 

33 
36 
15 
14 

31 

59 

no 


B 
21 

8 

]■' 
111 

8? 

32 

2 

3 

17 
124 

29 

54 

399 


















n m? ^ 




f>'™'-' 




France 




rprmanv 




r pcp 




"-'"" 




1 1 d 








1 1 








































,- ^^ 








T k 




rjl lt»H K■^nl^^'m 


J 




5 


Other Enripp 




A 1 


15 




?n 

1?6 

335 
27? 

379 
187 

?,545 
81 

?5 

93 
12.025 


? 

96 
137 

1 
12 
6 

580 


1 

8 

488 


3 
16 

35 

627 

3 
13 


18 

241 
78 

161 

59 
39 

3.269 


379 

3 

in 
16 
41 
?6 

8 

3 
12 
18 

2.494 


3 
1?0 

1.292 


16 

1 
114 

1 
554 


1?3 






T 


rvprns 




TiHl;» 












Iran 




,^ ^ . 


■X 




T 






K a 








Pakistan 






.^ 


Sv Ian A ah ReDiibllc 
















Other Asia 2/ 

North Aiiverlca 


27 




6,387 
5,111 

11.212- 

122 

282 
481 
158 

2.114. 

263 
159 
19B 

303 
848 

3.758 


?,941 

2,476 

5,716 

65 

'249 
145 

98 

822 

""1I6" 

135 


257 

157 

.118. 

2 

'"4 

1 
9 

48 
11 

5 

18 
73 


220 

..1». 

2 

81 

12 

1 
2 

5 
54 


957 

i.i^a . 

12 

967 
72 
39 

42 

-323- 
35 
29 
34 
55 

122 

498 


710 
415 
1x876 
23 
1,610 
94 
55 

- -26B. 
42 

29 

64 

80 
759 


658 

277 

1.429 _ 

14 
1,264 
41 
32 
60 
17 
131 
19 

10 
2? 
?1 
51 

360 


181 

- -'21. . 

6 

650 
16 

31 

8 
_-63_ 

3 

5 
10 
35 

134 


97 

191 

.251- 

225 

3 

15 
2 

1 
51 


15 














3 


(Vnnlnlcan Reoubllc 








Jamaica 




Ontral America 


- -1- _ 






















Sni.th Am«>rlc3 






1,014 
261 

35 
365 

84 
211 


30 
18 
2?3 

104 


15 

12 

18 

1 
1 

2 


19 

1 


80 

34 
116 

8 
66 

16 


30 
46 

13 

99 
17 


138 
10 

24 

3 

35 
5 
25 


9 
9 

1 

8 
5 
18 


11 

6 

3 

5 
1 

5 






















Ecuador 




Guyana 












Venezuela 










136 
334 


70 
224 


6 


11 


8 
11 


15 
25 
83 
22 

59 


5 
17 

8 


2 
6 
23 

3 


1 
2 

2 

2 










UnltwJ Arab Republic (Egypt) 












114 
23 




1 


13 

5 
26 


38 
1? 

31 


33 
3 
13 


16 

3 
5 


2 
3 










Other Ocean! a 2/ 

U.S. po5ses?lon5 








830 








158 


186 


140 


84 


26 


^ 





















F-n^ 



110 



Finland 

Francp 

Lilhu^nla 

UKfrnboiirg 

Norw-iy 

Roman U 

Spain 

SwpdHFi 

Switzerland 

Turkey 

IJnltPd KinoHiffl 

II.S.S.R 

Yuq"-l3vl;i 

Olhpr Enrrr" 

Burma 

China y 

Cyprn*. 

India 

Iraq 

Israel 

Jap^n 

Jordan 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Paki&l.;»n 

Philippines 

Syrian Arab Republl 
Thailand 

oIITt aIW't}".::'.'. 

Canada 

We«^t Indies 

Barbadn^ 

Cuba 

Dominican Republ 1 

Jamaica 

TrVnldad and Toba 
Central America ... 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Hcndiira^ 

Nicaragua 

South Amprlca 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Paraguay 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 

Africa 

South Africa 

Other Africa 2/' ... 

Oceania 

An<;tralia 

New Zealand 

Othor O.eanla \' .. 

U.S. possession^ .... 

T? Incl-H.'-i Tai*-m. 



1,B48 

12 

1,621 



111 



TABLK /JA. PERSUNS NATimA LI/KD, HI SHX, MARITAL STATUS 
MF.DIAN AOR, AND MAJUR DCCIIPATION GROUP: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1 'j'-.5-1 9fi',' 



S«x, marital status, 
median age, and occupation 



1965 



1 '}6fc. 



1 467 



1 968 



Total naturalized . . . 

Sex and marital status: 

Males 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Females 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Unknown 

Males per 1 ,000 females 



Median age (years): 

Both sexes 

Males 

Females 



ijor occupation group: 

Professional, technical, and 

kindred workers 

Farmers and farm managers 

Managers, officials, and 

proprietors, except farm 

Clerical, sales, and kindred 

workers . . i 

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred 

workers 

Operatives and kindred workers . . 

Private household workers 

Service workers, except private 

household 

Farm laborers and foremen 

Laborers, except farm and mine .. 
Housewives, children, and others 

with no occupation 



1QA.299 



48.49 ^ 



15,358 

31,766 

593 

773 

5 



11,746 

40, /^83 

2,/^16 

1,156 

3 

869 



34.1 
34.6 
33.7 



9,854 
198 

3,783 

9,637 

10,328 

10,117 

1,075 

9,591 

395 

4,035 

45,286 



103.059 



104.90:^ 



102.726 



46.536 



14,567 

30,611 

549 

798 

11 

^6.52^ 



A6.0U 



13,162 

31,558 

503 

791 



45.102 



12,U3 

40,850 

2,272 

1 ,242 

16 

823 



33.2 
34.0 
32.5 



9,604 
208 

3,823 

9,660 

9,928 

10,319 

1,029 

8,686 

405 

3,761 

45,636 



12,947 

30,760 

468 

926 

1 

57.624 



12,150 

43,201 

2,249 

1,286 



781 



33.6 
34.8 
32.8 



9,899 
163 

4,166 

10,680 

9,959 

11,067 

1,085 

8,702 

411 

3,685 

45,085 



1 1 , 671 

42,295 

2,158 

1,499 

1 

783 



3K9 
34.7 
33.2 



10,939 
154 

4,051 

10,942 

9,421 

10,816 

948 

8,835 

333 

3,379 

42,908 



S.709 



45.177 



12,155 
31,629 

400 

989 

4 

53.532 



10,725 

39,334 

1,936 

1,534 

3 

844 



33.2 
33.7 
32.7 



11,420 
113 

4,087 

10,817 

8,765 

11 ,222 

876 

10,534 

310 

2,853 

37,712 



112 



TABLE 1,2. PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY STATES OR TERRITORIES OF RESIDENCE: 
YEARS ENDED JIFNE 30, 1960-1qM 



1960-1969 1960 



Total 

Alabama 

AUska 

Arizona 

Gallfornla 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 
Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Waiio 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucicy 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

U.S. terr. and poss. 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands ... 

All other 



1.1^9.306 



1I ?.442 



13^.^50 



1-^7.307 



12^.178 



'12-23^ 



'0 4. 2 99 



10A.902 



102.726 



8,4^1 

1 ,171 

200,239 

9,570 
29,163 
2,201 
6,1U 
32,965 

7,120 
16,304 

1,757 
82, U1 
11,i38 

4,068 
5,260 
3,423 
5,313 
3,632 

14,315 
49,546 
40,345 
7,649 
1,600 

8,916 
2,304 
3,772 
2,614 
3,349 

75,841 

3,413 

260,872 

5,200 

1,097 

38,363 
4,076 
7,042 

40,213 
6,219 

2,866 
1,122 
2,933 
46,066 
5,066 

1,875 
11,787 
18,142 

1.737 

14,249 

854 



3,389 

3,540 

874 



317 
179 
790 
118 
17,006 

1,027 

4,398 

243 

581 

3,209 

719 
2,377 

256 
8,223 
1,472 

695 
594 
558 
422 



5,146 

5,854 

660 

146 

861 
489 
549 
237 
490 

7,415 

332 

28,363 

326 

118 

4,335 
364 
651 

4,867 
590 

267 

84 

243 

4,395 

646 

349 
1,239 
2,311 

282 

2,041 

87 



397 
317 
919 
123 
20,884 

1,361 

2,743 

242 

758 

2,944 

818 
1,668 

252 
10,478 
1,612 

426 
785 
364 
563 
618 

1,481 
6,364 
5,371 
1,197 
208 

1,183 
241 
504 
263 
346 

8,761 

525 

31 ,467 

404 

154 

5,514 
468 
911. 

5,251 
877 

323 
169 
341 

5,326 
643 

204 

936 
1,710 

269 
2,014 

125 



379 
307 
754 
116 
21,010 

1 ,032 

3,219 

233 

799 
2,907 

547 
1,534 

203 
9,542 
1,268 

493 
647 
308 

460 
4/,l 

1,213 

5,613 

5,227 

832 

159 

1,047 
298 
332 
201 
417 



387 

31,225 

604 

139 

4,283 
414 
7U 

4,602 
685 

365 
119 
250 
5,816 
635 

187 
1,193 
2,172 

204 

1,801 

94 



304 
361 
864 
103 
21,948 

1,273 

3,071 

246 

674 

2,754 



9,461 
1 , 345 

421 
611 
379 
526 
361 

1,533 

5,634 

4,179 

921 

194 

1,071 
200 
465 
289 
326 

8,314 

372 

28,844 

689 

133 

5,133 
495 
761 

4,508 
539 

320 
181 
276 
4,835 
620 

179 
1,282 
2,052 

205 
1,595 

116 



413 
194 
84 



363 
321 
881 
139 
20,425 

905 

2,605 

219 

568 

2,887 

717 
1,542 

148 
8,115 
1 ,072 

370 
486 
438 
513 
432 

1,443 

5,027 

4,073 

795 

168 

925 
272 
350 
285 
301 

7,758 

366 

25,195 

548 

124 

3,957 
478 
824 

4,212 
558 

292 
109 
306 
4,518 
475 

160 
1,182 

2,102 

161 

1,368 

92 



443 
129 



289 
305 
862 
125 
18,742 

8 30 

2,625 

231 

606 

2,659 

736 
1,319 

158 
8,271 

992 

359 
500 
286 

590 
316 

1,353 

4,652 

3,451 

741 

143 

738 
196 
346 
273 



7,128 

234 

24,540 

490 

61 

3,399 
456 
673 

3,611 
590 

245 

144 

269 

4,219 



162 
1,152 
1,522 

123 

1,205 
85 



273 
281 
819 
82 
19,830 

869 

2,713 

182 

684 

3,189 

738 
1,625 

146 
7,451 

962 

349 
390 
303 
444 
295 

1,412 

4,304 

3,132 

697 

163 

807 
181 
265 
251 
.245 

7,188 

362 

22,971 

472 

125 

3,133 
353 
692 

3,467 
631 

307 
97 
302 
4,694 
431 

159 
1,096 
1,484 

138 

1,078 

72 



272 
342 
111 



306 

335 

1,010 

88 

21,696 

695 

2,741 

216 

610 

3,790 

682 
1,902 

143 
6,863 
1,045 

325 
419 

240 
574 
294 

1,367 

4,596 

3,211 

606 

128 

755 
171 
383 
265 
296 

6,855 

270 

23,143 

607 

84 

3,211 
332 
596 

3,377 
655 

209 
77 
231 
4,295 
424 



1,147 

1,535 

123 

1,059 

52 



392 

248 

1,036 

148 

20,167 

791 

2,473 

199 

446 

3,892 

798 
1,601 

130 
7,078 

893 

356 
409 
281 
526 
261 

1,369 

4,150 

3,030 

595 

160 

739 
149 
274 
261 
312 

6,738 

312 

22,850 

566 

78 

2,744 
372 
614 

3,254 
539 

281 
76 
382 
4,528 
437 

164 
1,252 
1,717 

134 

1,143 

67 



431 

837 

46 



113 



"I 5S'2§ =s's5 3S352 Kg|5- 3~3-- l^^SI" 3^=^?" S^£2g S^3SS2 SS 



M 

il 



II 

I 

i 



I -a-g s: 



s-r' S'^- 



'SS 



^s"s sa'""s ^""-sp 



8 =-K-2 ^-^ss 2s-c: 



= 2""^ ^^ 'S° 



g ..c-^ ....o; -.-p -.-.-. sj.; 



^SS" 'SS'^S- 



S-SS ' S-^S" 



5 
1 



H 



2S2-?; iPi-'i;::: :::s-22 ■^--s'^ ssss- 



i-'i 



'a" "S-2~ — S" 



:as"- S2S2 



'"?"? "K-'~5 ~S2SS :22aS SSPo"- 32:S5 S"|S2 sss^s 
SS3i§ SSSSS Sulfas :C3Sg2 SSSSS ;:2S3S SSSS" g32Sf; 



S"3SS ICSS" 



r^r^ 



s s-':: = s 



g-ss- 



2 KS|SA Sosss sssss 322 = s |ssl^ s ^ ;: s s =s|S2 ssSs^ Psrss "35::S= =■"" 
s SK§55 sS§5r siSsE ssIsS ;§sg5 Isiss sSk5= HksS 5-SI5 SIksss s|5 



y 



||§|£ sssrs ssoSS -ss^^ ssifs:: 35SS5 J!:g:2^^ -iit. ..s.- s.s^=-gs -asr 
'"^?5 ?i-:"S SS-5 = 5 sss^i s-sts:: SSi?, ,.,St SiffgS ^5^3^ l?-SSSI ^3£S 
^^Si3 33 SS:: SSS::S 22S3S ISSli SiS^S m^k ggiiS S.S.&Si iSSm -J 



114 



PERSONS NATURALIZED, BY TYPE OF COURT AND STATES OR TERRITuRIES OF RESIDENCE: 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1969 



State or territory of 



Total 

Alabama 

Alaaka 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia ... 
Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada * 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Da^kota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

U,S, territories and poE 

Puerto Rico 

Virgin Islands 



80.907 



352 


352 


276 


195 


1,006 


799 


129 


129 


18,531 


15,145 


787 


658 


2,575 


2,210 


190 


190 


418 


418 


4,734 


4,730 


677 


677 


1,607 


1,473 


114 


54 


6,959 


6,736 


777 


777 


274 


274 


419 


286 


266 


266 


695 


695 


216 


127 


1,456 


914 


4,060 


2,787 


2,817 


2,276 


605 


575 


131 


131 


790 


790 


107 


44 


304 


287 


289 


222 


328 


80 


6,815 


2,609 


253 


102 


22,274 


19,289 


494 


494 


81 


81 


2,654 


2,162 


3U 


235 


576 


419 


3,064 


2,203 


555 


339 


257 


257 


66 


51 


333 


333 


3,440 


3,260 


357 


132 


143 


104 


1,308 


1,308 


1,537 


1,263 


98 


96 


945 


676 


64 


35 


392 


392 


644 


64A 


126 


126 



129 

365 



134 
60 
223 



89 

542 

1,273 

541 

30 



63 
17 
67 
248 

4,206 

151 

2,985 



492 
109 
157 
861 
216 



180 
225 



269 
29 



115 



s ss 2:sss::sSD;gSiK::c p; ss?;2 3 ssss as g 82 ::2; 



1 



s 
I 

_i 



1"^ 



I I s s 



I 53 " ' S'"2SS'"3SSSS2 



>.A S'-'°2!;S!SSS:SSSSS 2 2 S ' '" ■- ■- S S :: 



;2SSsS#Si2 S 



' IC" S " •" ■" : R " 



IS-'S '" S S" ~"2 ^ i K S g'"^?!; 



3 ;;■' ' ss 



^. :|-»'"--S5*SSS322 i -o^^ J- ■»2-»s 2S S gS «"^ S " g K 3 g « "^ i 2 



Sl 



: • : ■ ,'. : .; 1 •: • J ? a? .' 3 J : s ^ s e 2 i : t : -J J ■ i 1:1 • z S £ : 



tlli 



I I ^ 



I i i U 



116 



[is'l^ . Ill 21 



117 



lreUn< 






Lebanon . . 
Ryukyu IbIi 



Barbados 



South A£rlca 

United Arab Republl 
Other Africa 



Other cm 



y Slx-sonth figur**, January-Juna 1969. 

2/ Include! TalMn. 

3/ Includat Arab Paleatlne. 



118 



TABLE 45. PERSONS NATURALIZED BY SEX AND AGEl 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1960-1959 



Nunnber admitted . 

Under 18 years 

18-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-29 years 

30-34 years 

35-39 years 

40-44 years 

45-49 years 

50-54 years 

55-59 years 

60-64 years 

65-69 years 

70-74 years 

75-79 years 

80 years and over . . 
Not reported 

Males 

Under 18 years . , , 

18-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-29 years 

30-34 years 

35-39 years 

40-44 years 

45-49 years 

50-54 years 

55-59 years 

60-64 years 

65-69 years 

70-74 years 

75-79 years 

80 years and over 
Not reported 

Females 

Under 18 years . . . 

18-19 years 

20-24 years 

25-29 years 

30-34 years 

35-39 years 

40-44 years 

45-49 years 

50-54 years 

55-59 years 

60-64 years 

65-69 years 

70-74 years 

75-79 years 

80 years and over 
Not reported 



69,9511 
46,145 
111, 220 
158,681 
172,456 
153,596 
1 1 1 , 449 
80,090 
55,176 
53,784 
43,921 
32,374 
17,470 
8,098 
4,118 
768 



511.714 



35,243 
21,200 
49,620 
51,795 
74,197 
71,161 
53,245 
40,083 
32,432 
25,126 
19,244 
14,040 
7,949 
3,893 
2,142 
344 



617.592 



34,707 
24,945 
61,600 
96,886 
98,269 
82,435 
58,204 
40,007 
32,744 
28,658 
24,677 
18,334 
9,521 
4,205 
1,976 
424 



119.442 



5,849 
3,394 
9,478 
14,478 
17,031 
15,795 
9,769 
9,553 
8,292 
7,733 
5,310 
5,671 
3,323 
1,442 
602 
712 



50.896 



3,055 
1,738 
3,920 
4,827 
6,507 
6,911 
4,725 
4,784 
3,751 
3,257 
2,350 
2,169 
1,541 
720 
308 
323 



68.546 



2,784 

1,656 

5,558 

9,651 

10,524 

8,884 

5,044 

4,779 

4,541 

4,476 

3,960 

3,502 

1,782 

722 

294 

389 



6,931 
3,793 
10,915 
15,851 
17,872 
17,053 
11,229 
10,055 
9,103 
8,402 
8,190 
6,615 
3,827 
1,796 
775 
42 



58.795 



3,625 
1,830 
4,789 
5,890 
7,395 
7,700 
5,441 
5,154 
4,475 
3,557 
3,296 
2,639 
1,705 
870 
410 
17 



73.655 



3,305 

1,963 

6,126 

9,961 

10,476 

9,353 

5,788 

4,901 

4,628 

4,845 

4,894 

3,976 

2,122 

926 

366 

25 



127.307 



8,950 
4,622 
12,290 
17,792 
18,762 
17,448 
11,750 
9,418 
7,833 
6,059 
5,269 
3,778 
2,004 
932 
397 



60. 



4,619 
2,236 
5,710 
7,585 
8,646 
8,538 
6,016 
5,051 
4,092 
2,926 
2,385 
1,634 
879 
453 
216 



65.319 



4,331 
2,386 
6,580 
10,207 
10,116 
8,910 
5,734 
4,367 
3,741 
3,133 
2,884 
2,144 
1,125 
479 
181 
1 



8,470 
4,774 
12,088 
18,470 
19,152 
17,726 
12,615 
8,288 
7,577 
5,261 
4,393 
2,816 
1,496 
692 
350 



58,303 



4, 
2,379 
5,566 
7,818 
8,464 
8,277 
6,113 
4,329 
4,064 
2,568 
1,993 
1,271 
660 
332 
181 



55.875 



4,182 
2,395 
6,522 
10,652 
10,688 
9,449 
6,502 
3,959 
3,513 
2,693 
2,400 
1,545 
836 
360 
179 



112.234 



8,203 
5,026 
12,121 
16,989 
15,908 
15,356 
11,507 
6,938 
6,183 
4,607 
3,733 
2,473 
1,250 
598 
331 
1 



51.408 



4,093 
2,429 
5,677 
6,918 
7,205 
6,905 
5,529 
3,402 
3,128 
2,221 
1,6^5 
1,170 
577 
292 
157 



50.826 



4,110 

2,597 

6,444 

10,071 

9,703 

8,461 

5,978 

3,536 

3,055 

2,386 

2,038 

1,303 

673 

306 

164 

1 



7,053 
5,335 
10,824 
15,494 
16,327 
14,112 
10,993 
6,328 
5,721 
4,279 
3,293 
2,376 
1,268 
582 
314 



48.495 



3,602 
2,482 
5,050 
6,285 
7,373 
6,749 
5,223 
3,139 
2,854 
2,057 
1,526 
1,096 
617 
289 
153 



55.804 



3,451 
2,853 
5,774 
9,209 
8,954 
7,363 
5,770 
3,189 
2,857 
2,222 
1,757 
1,280 
651 
293 
161 



103.059 



6,921 
5,579 
10,691 
14,935 
16,030 
13,841 
10,865 
6,888 
5,422 
4,278 
3,141 
2,313 
1,169 
609 
367 



46.535 



3,464 
2,509 
4,641 
5,672 
6,967 
6,414 
5,052 
3,356 
2,742 
2,123 
1,460 
1,127 
535 
295 
167 



56.523 



3,457 
3,070 
6,050 
9,264 
9,063 
7,427 
5,803 
3,532 
2,680 
2,155 
1,681 
1,186 
634 
314 
200 



5,053 
4,917 
10,805 
15,358 
16,787 
14,179 
11,382 
7,659 
5,408 
4,475 
3,271 
2,235 
1,273 
585 
515 



46.014 



2,950 

2,090 

4,447 

5,561 

6,978 

6,530 

5,233 

3,758 

2,673 

2,187 

1,507 

966 

569 

254 

311 



58.888 



3,103 
2,827 
6,358 
9,797 
9,809 
7,649 
6,149 
3,901 
2,735 
2,288 
1,764 
1,269 
704 
331 
204 



5,958 
4,493 
10,953 
14,793 
16,743 
14,303 
11,071 
7,614 
4,991 
4,474 
3,301 
2,262 
1,038 
480 
252 



45.102 



2,888 
1,839 
4,720 
5,314 
7,022 
6,555 
5,066 
3,535 
2,406 
2,174 
1,569 
1,086 
486 
211 
131 



57.624 



3,070 
2,554 
6,233 
9,479 
9,721 
7,748 
6,005 
3,979 
2,585 
2,300 
1,732 
1,176 
552 
269 
121 



119 





r.\zr'"" 


i/ 


R e a ■ <■ 11 1 ■■ r claim 


- 


l'^ 


! 1 


P 


p 


lis 


"1 

It 




11; 


! 


AH countries 


^9.739 


16,606 


!.2I9 


2.223 


7,232 


44 


256 


55 


28 


76 


Ev.ro 












34 








4[ 


A L la 


307 


255 


" 


i 


^H 




i 




i 


'! 




B 1 1 




C % 1 Bkia 




Denmark 




Finland 




France 




Germany 




Greece 




Huncarv 
























Malta 




N th l« da 




Norway 




Pola d 




Po al 




Romania 


















a) 




United Kin dom 






U.S.S.K. (E„„p. .na A,l.) 




0th E 














iS 




'§ 










23 




Hon Kon 




Id! * 




Indo ala 








Is a 1 




, 




Jordan 3/ 








Lebanon 




PhlllpplneB 




Rvukvu Islands 




Syrian Arabia Republl 
























2.9f.9 
_1 ! 302 _ 


3!u3 


_.i_ 


_ _157_ _ 


ec^ 


I 








S 
. .5_ _ 

1 




H xico 




"=« ln«e- 


-- 


B h ^ 




B bad 




B d 




C ba 




Dominican Republic 










Trinidad and Tobago 






J 




h d ^A tm 






0th W t 1 dl 8 








-- 


Ca 2o 








Guac mala 








Pa ama 




Olh C t al Am i 


ca 




0th N th America 










A ti a 




11 


' 




54 


s 


' 




1 


; 












Chll 




Col bla 




E d 




p 




V*™ "la 




0th* So th Ame'ica 




Af 1 








ii 


6 


] 










1 


1 








Lib 




' ^ 












United Arab Republic 






gyp 








^"" " "■ 


u-i 


2 


^ 


: 










■ 


■ 








P* Ifl I lands <u S 


odn ) 




0th a la 












It See Tables ' 

2/ Includes Taiwan. 

^/ Includes Arab Pal< 



120 



Country or rsRlon 


T„., 


C.L.„d., , = .r d.r, ..d 


of birth 


1«, ,, 


.„, 


,«7 


„.«. 


1.63 


„6. 


„„ 


„« 


„M 


,«0 


,» 


>„8 


,«7 


„« 


„ss 


Vi' 


2«" 


"iSo" 


All countri,. 




















































































!! 




















'i 


'i 


! 


\ 


i 


" 














D k 




Finland 




Fr» ce 


21 














[c ?« d 












Latvi'a 


J, 






Malta 


3 
















q 










S^den 


j3 












417 








38 








M 














.1 


'] 




' 










45 


<.i 


25 


eB 


69 




H n Kon 








Indon ala 












Japa 










I 








4 






















North Anverlca 


i.63 




- ?ei _ 


_iii_ _ 


. >ii_ 












, _1J _ - 


-i'. . 




.10.. 


.10.- 


. ». 


. ii. _ 


. 1. 


>!- - 


-10 - 

i 








«"t '"<"" 


-28- 






Barbados 


2 






Cbba 


16 










Trinidad and Tobaao 


1 








I 






Central America 


. _«_ 










Guateaala 


1 










Othar Central toerica 










13 




















:' 










: 
















B azll 


f, 




1 










p 








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1 







;/ 5c,.«>nth tit^„ 



121 



ADMINISTRATIVE CERTIFICATES OF CITIZENSHIP ISSUKD TO h'ERSOlIS i 
THROUGH CITIZEN PARENTS, BY COUNTRY OR REGION OF BIHTi 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, iq6<) 



AT HIRTH ABROAD 



All 



Austria . 
Belgium . 
Czechoslo 
Denmark . 
Finland . 



France .. 
Germany , 



Norway .. 
Poland .. 
Portugal 



Switzerland 

Turkey {Europe and Asia) 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. (Europe and Asia 

Yugos 1 avl a 

Other Europe 



Korea 

Lebanon 

Philippines 

Byukyu Islands 

Syrian Arab Republli 

Thailand 

Vietnam 



Bahamas 
Barbados 



Brazil . 

Chile .. 
Colombia 



Other South Amerlc 



Africa 

Congo, Republic of 

Ethiopia 

Libya 



Nigeria ... 

South Afrlc 
Unitad Arab 
Other Afrlc 

Oceania 



Other Oce 
Other count: 



Six-month flgui 
Includes Talwar 
Includes Ar&b I 



January- June 1969. 



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-U2. 



TAHLK /.M. AININlSTRATIVKLi; ISSUED NATURALISATION CERTIFICATES CANCELLED! 
fEAR ENDED JUNE 30, I'Vc'l 



NiiinbHr or 


Tutal 


Country of birth 


rertiflcatHS canoellpd 


China 


Mexico 


Canada 


Greece 


Total number 


27i 


27'J 


2 


1 




Citizenship acquired at birth abroad 


265 


262 


2 


1 




Certificate Illegally obtained 


213 

9 


50 
212 

8 


1 

1 


1 








Citizenship derived through parentage or marriage 


1 




1 

8 


8 


" 


- 




Certificate fraudulently obtained 









TABLE 50. CERTIFICATES OF NATURALIZATION REVOKED, BY GROUNDS: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1960-1969 



Grounds 


1960- 
1969 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


1966 


1967 


1968 


1969 


Total number 


2 32 


12i 


U 


26 


7 


11 


^ 


5 


8 


5 




Established permanent residenc 


abroad within 


202 
30 


120 


3 


23 
3 


1 
6 


9 


1 

1 


2 
3 


5 
3 


5 




see aneousgrouns 











TABLE 51. PERSONS EXPATRIATED, BY GROUNDS AND YEAR REPORTS RECEIVED: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1960-1969 



1960- 
1969 



Total number 1/ 



Zl.-iflfl 



3-374 



3.657 



3.164 



2.321 



1.919 



2.010 



Voting in a foreign politic 
or plebiscite 2/ 



Continuous residence in a foreign state 
of birth or former nationality ^ ... 



Continuous residence in a state by dual 

national who sought benefits of Section 350, 
Immigration and Nationality Act 



7,045 
4,624 

276 



1,239 
873 

21 



1 ,290 
1,027 

52 



Residence in a foreign state under treatie 
and conventions 4/ 



Naturalization in 



Entering or serving in the armed for 
a foreign state 



Renunciation of nationality 

Taking an oath of allegiance in a foreign state 



Accepting or performing duties under 
foreign state 



Other grounds 



379 


68 


5,737 


625 


1,243 


202 


3,321 


194 


503 


85 


258 


57 


204 


10 



38 



20 



22 



T7 Cases of 32 persons expatriated for departing from or remaining away from the United States to avoid military service, reported 
for 1960-1963, were not included because this statutory provision was ruled unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court on 
February 18, 1963. ( Kennedy v. Francisco Mendoza - Martinez /372 U.S. 144? and Rusk v. Joseph Henry Cort Z372 U.S. 224/) 

2/ The Supreme Court decision in Afrovim v. Rusk (387 U.S. 253, May 29, 1967) ruled as unconstitutional the law providing for a 
loss of citizenship by voting In a foreign political election 

y The Supreme Court decision in Schneider v. Rusk (377 U.S. 163, May 18, 1964) ruled as unconstitutional statutory provisions 
which cause naturalized citizens to lose their nationality by extended residence abroad. 

4/ Naturalized United States citizens expatriated in countries with which the United States has treaties or conventions providing 
on a reciprocal basis for loss of nationality through extended residence in the country of original citizenship. 



124 



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2 









127 



TABLE 55. WRITS OF HABEAS CORPUS, JUDICIAL REVIEW OF ORDER 
OF DEPORTATION AND DECLARATORY JUDGMENTS IN EXCLUSION AND DEPORTATION CASES: 
YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1965-1969 



Action taken 



1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 



Writs of Habeas Corpus : 



Writs of Habeas Corpus 



Total disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government .. 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed . 



Total pending end of year 
Involving exclusion : 



Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government .. 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed . 



Pending end of year 
Involving deportation : 



Disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government .. 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed . 



Pending end of year 

Judicial Review of Order of 

Deportation (Sec. 106 16.N Act) : 



327 


67 


110 


61 


59 


30 


288 


54 


103 


52 


51 


28 


13 


7 


4 


2 


_ 


_ 


26 


6 


3 


7 


8 


2 


9 


18 


13 


13 


6 


9 


35 


13 


4 


6 


5 


7 


26 


9 


2 


5 


4 


6 


A 


3 


I 


_ 


_ 


_ 


5 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


3 


5 


2 


1 


1 


292 


54 


106 


55 


54 


23 


262 


45 


101 


47 


47 


22 


9 


4 


3 


2 


_ 


_ 


21 


5 


2 


6 


7 


I 


8 


15 


8 


11 


5 


8 



Judicial Review 



Involving deportation : 

Total disposed of 

Favorable to U.S. Government .. 
Unfavorable to U.S. Government 
Withdrawn or otherwise closed . 

Total pending end of year 

Declaratory Judgments : 



979 


61 


99 


207 


398 


214 


756 

27 

196 

198 


44 
4 
13 

62 


62 
3 

34 

86 


159 

5 
43 

206 


335 

5 

58 

152 


156 
10 

48 

198 



Declaratory Judgments 



Total disposed of 


719 


lOl 


107 


332 


116 


63 






669 
12 
38 

32 


88 
8 

5 

9 


95 

I 
11 

10 


325 

7 
3 


107 
2 

7 

6 


54 

1 
8 

4 








Withdrawn or otherwise closed 

Involving 8 USC 1503 






19 

2 

11 

687 


6 

3 

92 


5 

5 

97 


2 

I 

329 


4 

1 
I 

no 


2 
1 

I 

59 








Withdrawn or otherwise closed 

Involving exclusion or deportation 






650 
10 
27 


82 
8 
2 


90 
1 
6 


323 
6 


103 

I 

6 


52 

7 








Withdrawn or otherwise closed 





128 



TAbLE 5h. PRIVATE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY BILLS INTRODUCED AND LAWS ENACTED 
7 5TH CONGRESS THROUGH 9 1ST CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION 



Congress 


Bills 
i nLroduced 


Laws 
enacted 




5,620 

7,29 3 

5,285 

3,6A7 

3,592 

3,069 

4,364 

4,474 

4,797 

3,669 

2,811 

1,141 

429 

163 

430 

601 

293 


49 


90th 


218 


89 th 


279 


88th 


196 


87 th 


544 


86th 


488 


85th 


927 


84th 


1,227 


83rd 


755 


82nd 


729 


81st 


505 


80 th 


121 


79th 

78th 


14 
12 


77 th 


22 


76th 


65 


75th 


30 







129 



U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE ; 1970 O— 376-870 



9!mgm§m£mm$mm 



BOSTON 



PUBLIC tlBBAB'' 



»5""06351 977 9