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Full text of "Annual report of the Minister of Natural Resources of the Province of Ontario, 1973"

NATURAL RESOURCES 

ONTARIO 

1973 



ANNUAL REPORT 
OF THE MINISTER 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE MINISTER 

OF NATURAL RESOURCES 

OF THE PROVINCE 

OF ONTARIO 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 

ENDING MARCH 31, 1973 

PRICE: $0.50 



TO HIS HONOUR, 

The Lieutenant-Governor 
of the Province of Ontario. 

MAY IT PLEASE YOUR HONOUR 

The undersigned begs respectfully to present to your Honour, the Annual 
Report of the Ministry of Natural Resources for the fiscal year beginning 
April 1, 1972, and ending March 31, 1973. 

LEO BERNIER 

Minister 




Ministry of 

Natural 

Resources 



Ontario 



FOREWORD 



The Ministry of Natural Resources was established within 
the Resources Development policy field in the new organi- 
zation of government which became effective on April 1, 
1972. 

In terms of the previous organization, the new Ministry 
is composed principally of the Department of Lands and 
Forests, the Department of Mines and Northern Affairs, 
Conservation Authorities Branch from the Department of 
the Environment, and Historic Sites Branch from the 
Department of Tourism and Information. 

Five ministerial agencies, Niagara Parks Commission, St. 
Lawrence Parks Commission, St. Clair Parkway Commission, 
the Mining Commissioner, and Ontario Energy Board, have 
been designated to report to the Minister of Natural 
Resources. 

In its first year, the Ministry made significant advances 
in decentralization to improve its service to the public. 

The new organization is indicated below and on Page 14 
under "Disposition of Senior Administration Staff , March 31, 
1973'. 

This is the first Annual Report of the Minister of 
Natural Resources. Related detail of interest is reported in 
The Mining R eview 1972 and Statistics, 1973. 



CONTENTS PAGE 

RESOURCES AND RECREATION 

DIVISION OF FORESTS 

Forest Research Branch 4 

Forest Management Branch 4 

Timber Sales Branch 5 

DIVISION OF MINES 

Geological Branch 7 

Mines Engineering Branch 7 

Mineral Research Branch 7 

DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE 

Commercial Fish and Fur Branch 8 

Sport Fisheries Branch 9 

Wildlife Branch 9 

Fish and Wildlife Research Branch 10 

DIVISION OF PARKS 

Park Planning Branch 10 

Park Management Branch 11 

Historic Sites Branch 11 

ADMINISTRATION 

FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION DIVISION 

Financial Management Branch 12 

Northern Affairs Branch 20 

Legal Service Branch 20 

Administrative Services Branch 20 

Personnel Branch 21 

Information Branch 23 

POLICY RESEARCH BRANCH 23 

LANDS AND WATERS 

DIVISION OF LANDS 

Lands Administration Branch 24 

Land Use Co-ordination Branch 24 

Surveys and Mapping Branch 25 

FIELD SERVICES DIVISION 

Forest Fire Control Branch 25 

Air Service Branch 25 

Engineering Services Branch 25 

CONSERVATION AUTHORITIES BRANCH 26 



AGENCIES 



THE MINING COMMISSIONER 26 

ONTARIO ENERGY BOARD 26 



DIVISION OF FORESTS 



FOREST RESEARCH BRANCH 

The Branch provides scientific and technical knowledge 
through research for the management of forest resources in 
Ontario. In the year under review, the highlight was the 
development of a number of fast-growing poplar clones 
which are suitable for pulping. (A clone is a group of plants 
which have originated by vegetative propagation from a 
single individual.) Industry, particularly in southeastern 
Ontario, is interested in this development. 



FOREST MANAGEMENT BRANCH 

The objective of the Branch is to produce optimum, con- 
tinuous industrial, social and environmental benefits from 
public forests and to encourage and assist similar production 
on private forests in Ontario. 

TREE SEED 

Inventory, June 1, 1972 3,067,000,000 viable seeds 

Distributed, 1972-3 608,000,000 viable seeds 

Collected, 1972 5,864 hectolitres 

TREE IMPROVEMENT 

Plus trees, collected 5,940 scions 

planted 2,015 grafted trees 

Seed production areas 490.5 acres 

Seed orchards 137.5 acres 

PLANTING STOCK 

Distribution, conifers 66,101,829 

hardwoods 2,059,210 

Total 68,161,039 

Production targets seeded 76,752,000 



PRIVATE LANDS 

The Woodlands No. of 

Improvement Act Agreements Acres 

1972-3 497 23,581 

Total to March 31, 1973 2,635 149,082 

Management programs prepared. . . 482 18,146 

Number of Trees Planted 8,751,400 

AGREEMENT FORESTS, 1972-3 

Acres Acres 

Agreements With Added Released Total 

Government of Canada . . - 100.00 3,532.00 

Conservation Authorities .2,094.78 103.10 91,018.97 

Counties 2,950.80 82.74 145,146.03 

Townships - 3,229.24 

Regional Municipalities . . 1 ,450.00 7,435.08 

Totals 6,495.58 285.84 250,361.32 



ADVISORY SERVICES 

1. Total number of enquiries 22,613 

2. Number of field inspections made . . 4,865 

3. No. of management programs prepared 485 

4. Areas, management plans prepared . . 10,652 acres 

5. Trees planted 3,191,555 

6. Timber marked — Sawtimber 1,325,164 cu. ft. 

— Pulpwood 5,818 cords 

7. Activities with youth groups 371 groups 

8. Public education activities 1,256 items 

9. Days spent on forestry instruction 

at schools, colleges, universities 250 days 



DEVELOPMENT 

A prototype model of a new planting machine, designed for 
use in Boreal Forest Regions of the Province, was tested in 
Ontario during the summer and fall. By special arrangement 
with Weyerhaeuser Company, the machine was tested in 
four States during February and March. The tests have been 
encouraging, and plans are being made to manufacture the 
planter in Ontario under licence to the Minister. 

A proto-type multi-row nursery stock harvester was 
completed and successfully tested at Kemptville nursery. 

Three planting machines and a scarification plow were 
tested and evaluated under the joint Federal-Provincial 
equipment testing program during the summer. 



PEST CONTROL 

The most destructive of all the forest insects and diseases 
in 1972 was the spruce budworm, which infested balsam 
and white spruce trees on a gross forested area of almost 
20 million acres. Most of this acreage was in the north- 
central, north-eastern, and south-eastern portions of the 
province. After a careful assessment of values to be pro- 
tected, spraying operations to control the insect were con- 
fined to approximately 47,000 acres of Crown land. The 
insecticide used was Zectran, at a rate of 1 .2 ounces of active 
material per acre. 

Other pest problems requiring control treatments were 
the white pine weevil, several species of sawflies of pines 
and spruce, white grubs, the blister rust of white pine, 
the annosus root rot, and mice. A total of 15,000 acres 
were treated to control these problems. 



REGENERATION AND TENDING, 1972-3 

(Areas in Acres) 



REGENERATION 


Crown 
Lands 


Agreement 
Forests 


W.I.A. 


Sub-Total 


Other 

Patent 

Lands 


Total 


Planting 

Nursery stock 


69,443 


2,843 


10,661 


82,947 


6,177 


89,124 


Container stock 


6,034 


- 


- 


6,034 


- 


6,034 


Seeding 


21,749 


10 


5 


21,764 


- 


21,764 


Modified harvest cut 


37,324 


762 


693 


38,779 


21,355 


60,134 


Scarification 


10,014 


75 


46 


10,135 


- 


10,135 


Seed trees 


5,480 


- 


60 


5,540 


500 


6,040 


Total 


150,044 


3,690 


11,465 


165,199 


28,032 


193,231 


TENDING 
Hand clearing 


9,656 


3,825 


625 


14,107 





14,107 


Herbicide spraying 


8,609 


247 


407 


9,263 


50 


9,313 


Thinning, improve- 
ment cuts 


17,202 


4,085 


6,850 


28,137 


825 


28,962 


Girdling, frilling 
poisoning 


(included with herbicide 


spraying) 








Marking 


32,152 


2,980 


9,034 


44,166 


3,131 


47,297 


Pruning 


2,542 


611 


445 


3,598 


100 


3,698 


Fertilization 
Drainage 


896 


35 


30 


961 


100 


1,061 


Total 


71,057 


11,783 


17,392 


100,232 


4,206 


104,438 


TOTAL AREA TREATED 


221,101 


15,473 


28,857 


265,431 


32,238 


297,669 


Site preparation for 
seeding, planting or 
modified harvest cutting 


57,765 


778 


2,523 


61,066 


100 


61,166 



TIMBER SALES BRANCH 

SCALING 

Scaling determines the volume of wood cut on Crown land 
and Agreement Forests. It is the basis for revenue and 
statistics related to primary wood-using industries. New 
measurement techniques are being continuously developed. 
The most promising at the moment is weight scaling. 



MANAGEMENT PLANS 

These provide the broad framework within which forest 
operations are carried out. More detailed operating plans 
(for shorter time periods) identify the stands to be cut, 
regenerated and tended, and the roads and other improve- 
ments required. 



LICENCES 

Areas under Crown Timber Square 

Licence, Mar. 31, 1973 Miles 

Under Sect. 2 C.T. A 275.0 

Under Sect. 3 C.T .A 92,868.5 

Under Sect. 5 C.T .A 100.1 

Total 93,243.6 



STATUS OF PLANS 








Agreement 




C 


rown 


Company 


Forests 


Areas in square miles 


No. 


Area 


No. 


Area 


No. 


Area 


Approved standard 














plans 


36 


24,865 


- 


- 


23 


181 


Initial plans in force 


13 


21,323 


33 


40,115 


- 


- 


Under prep or revision 


27 


25,161 


24 


49,870 


37 


200 


Not under plans 


10 


28,408 


- 


- 


- 


- 



Total 



86100,757 57 89,985 60 381 



ACCESS ROADS 

A total of 89.5 miles of new roads was built, and 29.8 miles 
of existing roads were improved during the fiscal year. Of 
these totals, logging access roads (for which costs are re- 
covered over a five-year period through increased stumpage) 
amounted to 24.5 and 2.0 miles respectively. The remainder 
are forest access roads built for a variety of uses. 



FOREST RESOURCES INVENTORY 

New aerial photography covered 35,730 square miles in 
northeastern and southwestern Ontario during the fiscal 
year. Forest stand maps and inventory tabulations were 
completed for 7,100 miles. 



VOLUME AND VALUE OF WOOD CUT FROM CROWN 
LAND, 1972-3 



PHOTO 

PROCESSING 

SUMMARY 



Volume Volume in Dollars 
in Cash Ministry 
Sq. Ft. Receipts Work 



Year 
Ended 
Mar. 
Total 31 



Contact Prints .141,080 

Mosaics 1,461 

Enlargements . 5,755 $79,280 $53,497 $132,777 1970 
Diapositives ... 697 67,342 36,082 103,424 1971 
Copy Negatives 1,046 77,528 28,280 105,808 1972 
Repro-positives 17,402 83,301 89,294 172,595 1973 



PULP CHIPS 

PRODUCTION CONSUMPTION 

Ontario No. Quantity No. Quantity 

1972 Mills b.d.t. Mills b.d.t 

Ontario 94 1,073,268 14 903,273 

Quebec - 6 106,564 

U.S.A 4 63,431 



LUMBER PRODUCTION 

Ontario Softwood- 828 .0 millions of foot-board measure 

1 972 Hardwood - 231.1 millions of foot-board measure 

Total —1,059.1 millions of foot-board measure 



Species Cubic Feet 

SOFTWOODS 

White Pine 16,182,644.26 

Red Pine 4,230,671 .60 

Jack Pine 138,382,543.18 

Spruce (all) 216,274,005.96 

Hemlock 1,706,803.62 

Balsam 13,717,649.35 

Cedar (all) 299,251.98 

Tamarack 52,802.99 

Conifers (all) 136,398.33 

Total Softwoods 390,982,771.27 

HARDWOODS 

Maple (all) 6,739,667.56 

Yellow Birch. 5,191,681.58 

White Birch 2,501,177.11 

Oak (all) 302,736.93 

Beech 383,332.80 

Ash (all) 44,519.92 

Elm 114,319.63 

Basswood... 234,510.35 

Black Cherry 31 ,509.38 

Poplar (all) 28,036,45 1 .37 

Hardwoods (all) 9,278,341 .97 

Total Hardwoods 52,858,248.60 

Total Wood Cut 443,841 ,019.87 



Stumpage 
Value 



J 979,900.45 

273,219.62 

3,511,479.54 

7,312,698.78 

63,674.18 

301,246.44 

19,838.23 

1,329.84 

3,825.20 

12,467,212.28 



398,386.51 

473,404.73 

48,321.37 

17,072.77 

14,331.59 

2,381.05 

7,562.82 

21,507.31 

1,430.71 

299,045.49 

147,421.77 

1,430,866.12 

13,898,078.40 



VOLUME AND VALUE OF WOOD 

CUT FROM AGREEMENT FORESTS, 1972-3 

Volume Value 

Sawlogs (cu. ft.) 205,593.52 $ 44,492.97 

* Poles, posts, etc. (cu. ft.) 41,093.56 7,245.28 

Fuelwood (cords) 718.19 5 ,49 1 .99 

Pulpwood (cords) 11,184.99 54,862.15 

Miscellaneous 7,002.19 

Total, All Products 1,258,457.38 119,094.58 



DIVISION OF MINES 



GEOLOGICAL BRANCH 

The Branch is responsible for the study of the geology and 
mineral deposits in Ontario. Its most important function 
is to give assistance to those engaged in the discovery and 
development of mineral wealth and to provide information 
for the planning of resource utilization for optimum benefit. 
A Mineral Exploration Assistance Program now includes 
the areas of Cobalt-Gowganda, Geraldton-Beardmore, 
Kirkland Lake and Red Lake. Here the Government will 
repay an individual or company for one-third of the cost 
of approved expenditures up to $100,000. During the fiscal 
year, reimbursements under this plan amounted to 
$469,491.33. 



MINES ENGINEERING BRANCH 

The function of the Branch is primarily to ensure com- 
pliance with the requirements of The Mining Act. It was 
also responsible in 1972 for the administration and enforce- 
ment of The Pits and Quarries Control Act which regulates 
the siting, development and rehabilitation of pits and 
quarries in designated areas. By March 31, 1973, seventy 
geographic townships in southern Ontario had been 
designated. 

The Industrial Minerals Section and the Petroleum 
Resources Section were transferred to the newly created 
Mineral Resources Branch in 1973. 



GEOSCIENCE FIELD WORK 

During the summer of 1972, the Branch had 29 geological 
surveys, three geophysical survey parties, and two 
geochemical surveys in the field; 37 projects were under- 
taken by 160 persons. 



GEOLOGICAL SURVEYS SECTION 

Twenty-two detailed geological mapping projects were dis- 
tributed throughout the Canadian Shield in northern 
Ontario. Helicopter-supported reconnaissance covered 
15,800 square miles in the District of Kenora (Patricia 
portion). 



INDUSTRIAL MINERALS SECTION 

During 1972, eight field studies were in progress. Quaternary 
geology surveys were carried out in four areas. The inventory 
of sand and gravel deposits in southern Ontario was 
continued. 



RESIDENT GEOLOGISTS SECTION 

Resident geologists were located at eight offices in Kenora, 
Red Lake, Thunder Bay, Sault S te. Marie, Sudbury, Timmins, 
Kirkland Lake, and Toronto. 



DATA RETRIEVAL AND EDUCATION SECTION 

Some 210 Source Mineral Records for copper, nickel, lead 
and zinc were completed. Basic Mineral Exploration Classes, 
with 18 hours of instruction, were given at 14 places with 
an average attendance of 78 persons. 



SCIENTIFIC REVIEW SECTION 

During the year, the Section produced 22 reports, 20 'open 
file' reports, 87 preliminary maps, one coloured brochure, 
and several hundred illustrations, displays and transparencies. 

CARTOGRAPHY SECTION 

During the year, the Section produced 24 major maps, 323 
base maps, 63 zinc etchings, 33 illustrations and a further 
addition to the popular "geological guidebook" series. It 
supplied miscellaneous graphic services for Branch programs. 



CABLE TESTING LABORATORY 

The Laboratory examines all mine hoisting ropes and con- 
ducts breaking tests. It completed 1,012 tests in 1972. 

Tests for Ontario Mines 250 

Special information tests 20 

Tests for wire rope manufacturers 241 

Tests for mines outside Ontario 482 

Tests for industries other than mining 17 

Other tests 2 

Total 1,012 



MINING RESCUE TRAINING 

Seven fully equipped and staffed mine rescue stations, and 
16 sub-stations equipped with breathing apparatus and 
supplies for emergency use, are in operation. Approximately 
1 ,000 miners and supervisors receive training in the use of 
breathing apparatus and in the techniques of underground 
mine fire control for one full day every two months. 

Sales of the Ontario Mine Rescue Handbook have 
expanded to new countries such as the Philippines and 
Norway. Throughout the world, several government agencies 
have adopted Ontario's system of mine rescue training. 

During the year, 39 mine rescue teams entered district 
mine rescue competitions, and seven competed in the 
Provincial finals. The winner was the team representing 
Rio Algom Mines Limited, Quirke Division. 



MINERAL RESEARCH BRANCH 

The Branch is organized in two groups: the laboratory in 
Toronto and the Temiskaming Testing Laboratories in 
Cobalt. 



Toronto Laboratory 

The Laboratory provides technical services for Geological 
Branch in the form of rock analyses, mineralogical and 
petrological examinations, assays, geochemical analyses, 
studies of clays, soils and building stones, and special 
investigations and research projects. 



Examinations, analyses and studies of products and 
raw materials are carried out for prospectors, geologists and 
engineers who may be private individuals or companies. 
Free work is done as a direct aid to exploration according 
to a coupon system. Holders of miner's licences, who have 
recorded claims or carried out assessment work, are issued 
free coupons which are redeemable in laboratory work. 

for 
for Geol. 
WORK CARRIED OUT Public Branch Total 

Assays 1,498 2,794 4,292 

30-element spectographic analyses . 268 649 917 
Mineral Identifications 157 76 233 

Whole Rock Analyses .... 304 

Geochemical Analyses .... 9,644 

Special Analyses 2,089 

Soils, Sand, Gravels 700 



Temiskaming Testing Laboratories 



The primary functions of this plant are the bulk sampling 
of silver, cobalt ores and concentrates and the determination 
of cobalt, nickel and copper so that the market value of 
mines shipments can be established. 

Shipments are sampled, assayed and weighed, and then 
loaded and shipped on behalf of the producers. 

Assay and analytical services also serve the public and 
provide assay facilities for some mines for control work. 

Since 1971, assay coupons have been accepted in payment 
of analytical work. 



Silver ore sampled 1,288,134 pounds 

Silver bullion melted 22,1 18 pounds 



DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE 



The Division of Fish and Wildlife was formed on September 
1, 1972, from four branches: Wildlife and Sport Fisheries 
from the former Outdoor Recreation Division; Commercial 
Fish and Fur from the former Resource Products Division; 
and Fish and Wildlife Research, newly formed from segments 



of the former Research Branch. 

The objective of the Division is to provide and encourage 
recreational and industrial opportunities based on the fish 
wildlife resources of Ontario. 



COMMERCIAL 
FUR BRANCH 



FISH AND 



THE FRESHWATER FISH INDUSTRY 

The 1972 harvest remained stable at 42.9 million pounds of 
food-fish ($8 million) and 12 million pounds of bait-fish 
($1.8 million). The industry employed 5,300 people. Some 
of the major developments during the year were as follows. 

The resumption of fishing for Lake Erie white bass 
under lO 1 /^ inches after mercury testing showed they were 
marketable. 

The establishment of quotas on Lake Superior herring 
and Rainy Lake pickerel to ensure sustained harvest. 

The continuation of experiments to find selective harvest- 
ing techniques for whitefish in northern Ontario. 

Exploratory fishing to locate exploitable quantities of 
perch and coarse fish in Lake Erie, herring and chub in Lake 
Superior, and coarse fish in northern inland lakes. 

The development of domestic markets for smoked 
sucker. 



The investigation of new gear and holding facilities for 
bait-fish. 

The withdrawal of a portion of northwestern Ontario 
from the jurisdiction of the Freshwater Fish Marketing 
Corporation. 

The settlement of six claims for redundancy resulting 
from the operation of the Freshwater Fish Marketing 
Corporation ($144,395). 

The termination of the Fisheries Loans Act program with 
the provision of loans at 50% of last year's amount 
($145,100). 

The continuing availability of reasonable boat insurance 
through federal-provincial co-operation in the Fishing Vessel 
Insurance Plan. 

THE WILD FUR INDUSTRY 

The major effort in fur management has been directed 
towards beaver. This involved aerial census of beaver 
colonies and specimen collections by trappers. A computer 
program was developed to analyze harvested beaver for 



weight, age structure, family size and pelt quality by trap- 
line or township, and physiographic units. From this 
analysis, the habitat can be evaluated and harvests and 
seasons set. 

Continuing the emphasis on effective harvesting, the 
Branch was engaged in programs such as trapper workshops, 
Conibear trap exchange, financial and technical assistance 
to trap inventors, and the testing of new traps. 

A marten and fisher study was initiated in Parry Sound 
District in co-operation with the University of Guelph. 

RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT (Native People) 

The following types of projects were carried out during 
the fiscal year under the Federal-Provincial Resources 
Development Agreement. 

Fur. Trappers and their families from James Bay were 
assisted in establishing themselves on vacant traplines in 
central Ontario. 

Commercial Fish. Lakes were surveyed to assess* their 
potential. Fishermen were instructed in the netting, cleaning 
and packing of fish. 

Tourism. Indian bands along the coast of Hudson and 
James Bays were assisted in setting up and operating 
tourist camps. 

Hide Collection. 4,500 moose and deer hides were 
collected from hunters in the Province and distributed at 
tanning costs to Indian bands. 

Timber. To assist Indians in managing reserve forests, 
technical advice was provided on reforestation, logging and 
lumber production. 

Planning. Indians attended district meetings and took 
an active part in the planning of projects. 



SPORT FISHERIES BRANCH 

LICENCES 

The Canadian Resident Angling Licence was established in 
1972 to enable residents of Canada, who are not residents 
of Ontario, to angle in Ontario at a reduced cost of $3.00. 
A total of 14,469 were sold the first year. 

Sales of non-resident angling licences increased by small 
percentages in 1972 to 425,001 seasonal and 233,333 three- 
day. 

WATER QUALITY STUDIES 

In co-operation with the Ministry of Transportation and 
Communications, a detailed three-year study was initiated 
to assess the impact of highway construction on a small 
watershed. Investigations were continued at Nanticoke 
Generating Station on Lake Erie to determine the effects of 
thermal discharge on the aquatic environment. 

FISH HABITAT ENHANCEMENT 

An experimental project was begun to restore the fish habitat 
of Wilmot Creek. Knowledge gained here will be applied 
to appropriate areas of the Province. 

Other activities included construction of a fish ladder 
on the Ganaraska River, and a study of the effects of the 
controlled harvest of aquatic vegetation on fish production 
in the Kawartha Lakes. 

LAKE AND STREAM SURVEYS 

During 1972, a total of 757 lakes and 46 streams were 
examined to determine the capability of each water to 



produce fish; 164 fishing maps were prepared for dis- 
tribution to the public. 

ANGLER SURVEYS 

A province-wide creel census program, and a data processing 
system for analyzing the results, was initiated during the 
year. 

Provincial Fish Hatcheries 

Fourteen fish hatcheries were operated during the year. 
These included eight trout rearing stations, five pond 
stations, and one trough station. 

The new sub-station at Chatsworth Hatchery was com- 
pleted. The new rearing facility will be used primarily to 
produce highly selected splake to rehabilitate Lake Huron. 

Studies were undertaken for a new sub-station at Dorion 
Hatchery. Further studies were made of the proposal to 
locate a large hatchery complex adjacent to the Lennox 
Power Generating Station in southeastern Ontario with 
facilities for the supply of heated effluent water from the 
Hydro plant. 

Research was continued in fish nutrition and fish diseases 
under a conjoint agreement with the University of Guelph. 



WILDLIFE BRANCH 

The Branch objective is to maintain wildlife populations 
for the recreational and economic benefit of the people of 
Ontario. Much effort is directed to the maintenance and 
improvement of wildlife habitat as it is habitat which 
determines the potential in wildlife numbers. 

BIG GAME MANAGEMENT 

The deer herd was favoured with a mild winter, the first 
in five years. The number of deer had been declining 
because of a series of unusually severe winters and because 
of a long-term trend in forest maturation. Hunter success 
remained at 20 per cent. 

The moose herd is faring well. While the number of deer 
hunters has decreased since 1968, the number of moose 
hunters has been increasing. Therefore, more intensive 
management measures for moose are being formulated. 

Black bear numbers, though difficult to assess, are 
believed to be holding constant. Nuisance bear are destroyed 
or, where possible, trapped and released elsewhere. The 
number of bear hunters is increasing. 

Timber wolf numbers have held steady for 1 5 years, and 
coyotes have increased in the past 10 years. The wolf 
bounty was rescinded in 1972. The Wolf Damage to Live 
Stock Compensation Act, 1972, authorizes the payment of 
compensation to landowners who lose livestock to wolves 
or coyotes. 

UPLAND GAME MANAGEMENT 

Of the species which are subject to cyclic fluctuations, 
ruffed grouse are generally abundant, European hare are 
recovering from a low, cottontail rabbits and Hungarian 
partridge are still low, and sharp-tailed grouse are still 
declining in numbers. 

Several of these species are declining because of the 
loss of habitat resulting from clean farming practices. The 
ring-necked pheasant is especially affected. Released birds 



supplement the wild stock, but only in the fall, and only to a 
limited extent. 

Woodcock, a migratory bird, breeds in large numbers in 
Ontario. Raccoon are plentiful. 

WATERFOWL MANAGEMENT 

A program to establish a wild-breeding population of the 
giant Canada goose has been underway since 1968, and wild 
birds may be seen in many places. 

Snow geese in the far north reproduced poorly in 1972, 
resulting in low numbers in Ontario. The 1973 nesting 
season was much more favourable. 

The fall populations of ducks of various species were 
similar to those in earlier years. 

WILDLIFE EXTENSION AND PROVINCIAL WILDLIFE 
AREAS 

More viewing and hunting opportunities became available 
during the year by an increase in managed properties from 
18,000 to 35,000 acres. The program now includes inter- 
pretive programs on some agreement areas and on Provincial 
Wildlife Areas. Habitat is managed on the latter to provide 
viewing and hunting where these activities are restricted. 

FIELD SERVICES 

Conservation officers are responsible for the enforcement 
of laws and regulations under The Game and Fish Act, the 
Ontario Fishery Regulations, and the Migratory Birds 
Convention Act. Convictions totalled 5,103, about 100 
more than in the previous year, and about 100 fewer than 
the record number registered in 1969-70. 

Ministry officers supervised 24,823 hunter examinations 
in 1972, and 87 per cent of the candidates were successful. 

CENTRAL LICENCE BUREAU 

The Bureau records angling and hunting licences and obtains 
statistics through mailed questionnaires. 



FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH 
BRANCH 

The Branch was formed within the new Division of Fish and 
Wildlife to integrate the programs of the Fisheries and 
Wildlife Sections of the former Research Branch more 
closely with the management branches and field units. 

We have been fortunate to have several excellent long- 
term series of data collected by our research units on each 
of the Great Lakes and in Algonquin Provincial Park. As a 
consequence, our scientists have been in the forefront of 
a major international effort. The initial synthesis of this 
effort appeared in the June, 1972, issue of the Journal of 
the Fisheries Research Board to which our scientists con- 
tributed 1 1 of the 34 papers. 

More recently, the Great Lakes Fishery Commission has 
published major background reports by our scientists on 
Lakes Ontario, Huron, Superior and Opeongo. 

The use of our lake trout-brook trout hybrid, the 
splake, as the preferred stock for the rehabilitation of Lake 
Huron (and perhaps other depleted trout waters) has 
attracted attention abroad and led to the request that our 
scientists provide a chapter on the subject for the Com- 
memorative Volume to be issued at the 19th Congress of 
the International Association of Limnology. 

A major effort, to immunize wildlife against rabies, is 
near maturity. In co-operation with other agencies, an 
oral vaccine has been developed, and preliminary 
experiments on the delivery system have been conducted. 
This program has elicited world-wide interest. 



DIVISION OF PARKS 



PARK PLANNING BRANCH 

Work continued on the evaluation of future parkland for 
Ontario residents with emphasis on increased recreation 
facilities in southern Ontario. 

In the implementation of the Niagara Escarpment Report, 
7,773 acres were purchased during the year, making a total 
of 27,592 acres acquired to date. 

An additional 11,612 acres of beach properties on the 
Great Lakes were purchased during the year. 

A 1 ,700-acre property was purchased at Indian Point on 
Balsam Lake, initiating the program recommended by the 
Canada-Ontario Trent-Severn-Rideau Study (C.O.R.T.S.). 

MASTER PLANNING 

Planning studies are now underway for more than 30 
Provincial Parks. Planning was initiated and completed on 



Fathom Five, Peche Island, and Credit Forks. Continuing 
studies were made of Lake Superior, Killarney, and Ouimet 
Canyon. 

During the year, the Bronte Creek Provincial Park 
Advisory Committee completed its recommendations, and a 
master plan was finalized and published. 

The Advisory Committee for Quetico Provincial Park 
completed its report in June, 1972. 

NEW PROJECTS 

Silent Lake, ten miles north of Apsley on Highway 28, is 
a proposed natural environment park with camping and day- 
use programs. Master planning is completed, and the develop- 
ment of roads, buildings and campsites is underway. 
Petroglyph Park, 35 miles north-east of Peterborough, 
near Nephton, is a proposed historical park which protects 
Indian rock carvings. 



10 



Methodist Point, ten miles north of Midland, is a proposed 
natural environment park with historical zones to preserve 
significant remains of Indian encampments and unique 
vegetative and geological features. 

SKI STUDY 

A special study was initiated during the year to assess the 
existing skiing operations in southern Ontario. A second 
stage will evaluate the potential of 200 possible new sites 
within 18 months. 



NATURE RESERVES 

Two new Nature Reserves were acquired during the year: 
East Sister Island, a 36-acre island in Lake Erie; and six 
properties totalling 338 acres on Pelee Island. Both contain 
significant Carolinian forest resources and wildlife features. 



WINTER PARKS 

During the winter of 1972-3, four parks were operated on 
a winter basis: Arrowhead, near Huntsville; Sibbald Point, 
on Lake Simcoe; Pinery, on Lake Huron; and Rondeau, on 
Lake Erie. Winter facilities included snow-plowed roads and 
campsites, heated washrooms with hot water, central drink- 
ing water, fuelwood supply, garbage disposal, and electrical 
outlets (except at Rondeau). 

Ski-tows were operated at Pinery and Remi Lake 
Provincial Parks. Many other parks were used informally for 
activities such as snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, and 
tobogganing. 



SNOWMOBILE TRAILS 

Snowmobiling was permitted in Provincial Parks on approxi- 
mately 200 miles of marked trails and 700 miles of park 
roads during the winter of 1972-3. In addition, over 600 
miles of cross-country snowmobile trails were operated on 
public lands in Parry Sound, Lindsay and Tweed Districts. 



PARK MANAGEMENT BRANCH 

Park visitation declined during the 1972 season, reflecting 
the bad weather on the majority of weekends. A total of 
12,320,794 visitors (a 9.8 per cent decrease from the 
previous year) were accommodated, including 1,498,474 
campers (a 7.5 per cent decrease). 

In southern Ontario, many families had to be turned 
away on busy weekends despite the addition of nearly 1,000 
more campsites to the system. 

Facilities were improved at several parks. 

Two new Provincial Parks were added to the system 
during the year, increasing the number from 113 to 115: 

Charleston Lake, a natural environment park of 2,066 
acres, 17 miles north-east of Gananoque; and 

FushimiLake, a 3,000-acre park west of Hearst and north 
of Highway 1 1 . Both parks provide camping facilities. 

INTERPRETIVE SERVICES 

During the year, 796,709 park visitors attended exhibits, 
conducted trips and lectures to learn more about Ontario 
and its parks, environment, resources management and 
history. 

A Waterfowl Viewing Weekend was held at Long Point 
Provincial Park in co-operation with the Federation of 
Ontario Naturalists, and 18,000 visitors attended the event. 

The number of parks offering interpretive programs 
continued to expand. Several new audio-visual programs 
were produced. A special logging exhibit was installed at 
. Wakami Provincial Park. 



PROVINCIAL PARK FEES 



1971 



Vehicle and Campsite Permit $ 2.50 

with electricity 3.00 

Vehicle Entry Permit 1 .00 

10.00 

Bus Entry Permit 6.00 

Interior Camping Permit. ... 1.00 

5.00 
Group Camping Permit .... 0.10 



Snowmobile Permit 
Ski-tow Permit .... 



0.00 
1.00 



per day . 
per day . 
per day . 
per year, 
per day . 
per day . 
for 16 days 
per person 
per day . . . 
per day . . . 
per day . . . 



1972 

i 3.50 

4.00 

1.50 

15.00 

10.00 

2.00 

20.00 

0.00 
1.00 
2.00 



ACCESS POINTS 

During the year, over 675 access points with parking areas 
and boat launch ramps were maintained to provide boaters 
with access to lakes and rivers. The program is expanding 
by 40 to 50 sites a year. 



CANOE ROUTES 

In 1972, more than 82,000 persons entered Algonquin and 
Quetico Provincial Parks for interior canoe camping. 

A booklet, Northern Ontario Canoe Routes, summarizes 
1 25 routes representing 1 1 ,000 miles of canoeing waterways. 

A program to document canoe waterways in southern 
Ontario was started in 1972. 



HISTORIC SITES BRANCH 

The Branch provides archaeological and historical research 
for historic sites and zones and is engaged in a survey of 
historical sites throughout the Province. It operates three 
Historic Parks. 

Sainte-Marie Among the Hurons, Midland, is a recon- 
structed Jesuit Mission of the early 1600s which functions 
as a tourist attraction, educational resource, study centre 
and archival repository. It had 133,000 visitors in 1972. 

Museum of the Upper Lakes, Wasaga Beach, tells the 
story of the schooner, Nancy, in the War of 1812. It had 
14,121 visitors in 1972. 

The Royal Navy and Military Establishments, 
Penetanguishene, commemorates the British establishment, 
1814-56. It was reconstructed in 1972. 

A major project of the Branch is the co-ordination of the 
reconstruction of Fort William, the North-West Company's 
fur-trading post and fort, Thunder Bay. 



11 



FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION DIVISION 



Statement No. 1 



FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT BRANCH 

Financial Report for Year Ended March 31, 1973 
Statement of Revenue 

For Year Ended March 31, 1973 
Ministry Administration 

Sale of Maps, Publications, etc $ 266,594 

Rentals - Ministry Houses 260,394 $ 526,988 

Land Management 
Recovery of Prior Year's Expenditures 

Canada Land Inventory $ 16,221 

Land Acquisition 7,009 

Lac Seul Agreement 12,821 

Air Service 14,278 

Conservation Authorities 322,251 

Miscellaneous 6,986 $ 379,566 

Taxation - Mines Acreage Tax 673,804 

Royalties — Forest Protection Charges 1 ,900,485 

Fees and Licences — Mines 472,904 

Public Domain 

Leasings and Licensing of Lands $ 693,336 

Gas and Mining Leases 743,246 1 ,436,582 

Sales 

Land and Buildings $ 265,804 

Air Service — Flying Fees 83,581 

Recovery Fire Fighting Costs 180,979 

Sundry Sales 30,741 561,105 

Reimbursements of Expenditures — Government of Canada 

Grants - Conservation Authorities 856,530 6,280,976 

Outdoor Recreation 
Recovery of Prior Year's Expenditures 

ARDA - Park Improvements $ 155,789 

Nanticoke Agreement 15,179 

Miscellaneous 11,124 $ 182,092 

Recreation Areas 

Park Entrance and Camping Fees $ 3,974,725 

Park Concessions 179,41 1 

Park Miscellaneous 22,250 4,176,386 

Historical Sites 

Fees $ 106,181 

Sales 16,498 122,679 

Fish and Wildlife 

Hunting and Fishing Licences $ 9,517,071 

Hunter Safety Program 81,084 

Royalties 188,984 

Confiscated Articles 29,821 

Miscellaneous - Fish and Wildlife 96,569 9,913,529 

St. Lawrence Parks 

Fees $ l ,289,360 

Sales 730,738 

Facilities 55,221 

Miscellaneous 1 1,072 2,086,391 16,481,077 



Carried Forward $23,289,041 

12 



Statement of Revenue (continued) 

Statement No. 1 
For Year Ended March 31, 1973 
Brought Forward $23,289,041 

Resource Development 

Renewable Resource Development 
Recovery of Prior Year's Expenditures 

Industrial Development Agreement $ 18,703 

ARDA - Grants to Municipalities and Conservation Authorities . . 36,881 

Fresh Water Fish Marketing Act 72,198 

Logging Roads — construction costs 237,716 

Forest Access Roads — construction costs 173,862 

Miscellaneous 8,708 $ 548,068 

Forest Management 

Stumpage $13,189,265 

Forest Management 146,230 

Forest Products 120,181 

Stock Production 209,552 

Miscellaneous Timber 21,375 13,686,603 

Reimbursements of Expenditures - Government of Canada 
Forest Management 

ARDA - Private Land Forestry $ 190,444 

ARDA - Forest Stand Improvement 107,607 

Commercial Fish and Fur 

Resource Development Agreement 100,000 398,051 14,632,722 

Non-Renewable Resource Development 
Mineral Management 
Recovery of Prior Year's Expenditures 

Mine Rescue Stations — Recovery of Operational Costs $ 75,598 

Mining Tax 16,344,101 

Royalties 720,645 

Fees, Licenses 85,186 1 7,225,530 

Miscellaneous 
Recovery of Prior Year's Expenditures 14,570 

Total Revenue $55,161,863 



13 



Total Expenditures 

For Year Ende 



Vote 


Activity 


Total 


Total 


$ 


$ 


18,506,360 






1,653,181 




3,834,861 




1,521,683 




1,588,152 




885,758 




255,154 




748,565 




1,621,813 




3,065,670 




3,331,523 


18,506,360 


18,506,360 


57,468,324 






644,857 




13,554,192 



Programs 

Ministry Administration 

(Pro-rated by operating Activities) 

Main Office 

Field Operational Services 

Financial Management 

Administrative Services 

Information Services 

Legal Services 

Personnel 

Junior Ranger Program 

Research 

Youth Corps (S.W.E.E.P.) 

Land Management 

Program Administration (Pro-rated by activities) 

Environment Protection 

Protection Service 

Communication Service 

Plant Operating and Repair 

Stock Control and Repair 

Air Service — Operating and Repair 

Extra Fire Fighting 2,999,965 

Lands and Waters 13,186,301 

Lands Service 

Land Use Planning 

Annuities and Bonuses to Indians 

Construction of Summer Resort Roads 

Ontario Land Inventory 

Land Assessment and Tax 

Land Acquisition 

Surveys and Engineering 5,147,274 

Engineering and Surveys Service 

Construction of Dams, Docks and Dredging 

Maintenance of Dams, Docks, Locks 

Maintenance of Access Roads 

Mining Lands 990,491 

Mines Service 

Recording 

Claim Inspecting 

Pits and Quarries 

Conservation Authorities 20,945,244 

Conservation Service 

Grants 

57,468,324 57,468,324 



14 



Allocated to Main Services 

hrch31, 1973 







Environ- 


Parks & 












Sub-Activity 


Land 


mental 


Historical 


Fish& 


Forest 


Mineral 


Conservation 




Total 


Management 


Protection 


Sites 


Wildlife 


Management 


Management 


Authorities 


Others 



1,653,181 

3,834,861 

1,521,683 

1,588,152 

885,758 

255,154 

748,565 

1,621,813 

3,065,670 

3,331,523 



140,851 

326,730 

129,647 

135,310 

75,467 

21,739 

63,778 

105,315 

42,699 

240,919 



241,860 

561,040 

222,622 

232,347 

129,586 

37,329 

109,515 

117,436 

68,390 

90,907 



413,626 
959,482 
380,725 
397,356 
221,617 

63,840 
187,291 
827,017 

17,089 
433,339 



233,429 
541,483 
214,862 
224,247 
125,069 

36,028 
105,697 

91,089 

1,898,565 

265,186 



450,492 

1 ,044,999 

414,659 

432,771 

241,369 

69,529 

203,984 

480,956 

1,038,927 

224,334 



119,360 

276,878 

109,866 

114,665 

63,952 

18,422 

54,046 



53,563 
124,249 
49,302 
51,456 
28,698 
8,267 
24,254 



6,277 1,737,991 



18,506,360 1,282,455 1,811,032 3,901,382 3,735,655 4,602,020 



763,466 2,077,780 



644,857 



169,081 



320,042 



31,212 



38,047 



46,172 



7,480 



32,823 



8,011,608 
706,821 

1,275,811 
945,050 

2,614,902 

2,999,965 


61,776 
111,506 

82,597 
180,213 


8,011,608 
100,510 
181,420 
134,386 

1,357,224 
2,999,965 


187,096 
337,707 
250,155 
170,805 


88,282 
159,349 
118,037 
667,146 


200,595 
362,075 
268,205 
223,053 


57,394 

103,596 

76,738 

4,276 


11,168 
20,158 
14,932 
12,185 


2,015,004 

314,714 

42,600 

37,383 

433,827 

293,278 

10,049,495 


2,015,004 

314,714 

42,600 

37,383 

433,827 

293,278 

31,832 




8,956,678 


697,268 


363,717 






2,527,543 
885,683 
316,580 

1,417,468 


1,973,727 

411,842 

147,210 

95,342 


553,816 
136,217 


177,137 

63,316 

128,463 


296,704 
106,054 
167,959 


889,487 






487,626 

333,000 

97,323 

72,542 


487,626 

333,000 

97,323 










72,542 




1,323,435 
19,621,809 














1,323,435 
19,621,809 


57,468,324 


7,319,881 


13,795,188 


10,302,569 


2,338,846 


2,353,304 


322,026 


21,036,510 









Total Expenditures Allocated 

For Year Endei 



Vote Activity 

Total Total 

Programs $ $ 

Outdoor Recreation 30,882,337 

Program Administration (Pro-rated by Activities) 1 ,700,239 

General Outdoor Recreation 14,199,61 1 

Parks Service 

Parks Operating 

Parks Development 

Fish and Wildlife 8,776,386 

Fish & Wildlife Services 

Sport Fish Management 

Hatcheries Operation 

Wildlife Management 

Game & Fish Enforcement 

St. Lawrence Parks Commission 3,643,614 

Parks Service 

Operating 

Historical Parks 2,562,487 

Parks Service 

Operating 

Construction 



Resource Development 30,882,337 30,882,337 i 

Renewable Resource Development 22,030,1 91 

Program Administration 707,35 1 

(Pro-rated by Activities) 
Resource Production 1 7,576,597 

Resource Service 

Stock Production 

Construction of Logging Roads 

Construction of Forest Access Roads 

Grants to Municipalities and Conservation Authorities 

Commercial Fish & Fur 

Industry Information, support and sales 3,601,161 

Services 

Cruising 

Scaling 

Fish & Fur Development 

Statutory — Loans under The Fisheries Loan Act 145,082 

22,030,191 22,030,191 



16 



to Main Services (Continued) 

torch 31, 1973 







Parks & 




ub-Activity 


Land Environmental 


Historical 


Fish& 


Total 


Management Protection 


Sites 


Wildlife 



Forest Mineral Conservation 

Managem ent Management Authorities Others 



1,700,239 1,188,807 511,432 

4,003,171 4,003,171 

5,856,713 5,856,713 

4,339,727 4,339,727 



2,397,845 






2,397,845 




: 1,404,811 

j 1,007,358 

i 1,480,402 

2,485,970 






1,404,811 
1,007,358 
1 ,480,402 
2,485,970 




1,207,247 
2,436,367 




1,207,247 
2,436,367 






33,479 

614,557 

1 1,914,451 




33,479 

614,557 

1,914,451 






1 30,882,337 




21,594,519 


9,287,818 




707,351 


1,273 


565 354 


18,321 


686,838 


13,703,096 
2,354,373 
273,875 
905,831 
222,374 
117,048 


39,306 


15,672 10,335 


43,674 
117,048 


13,703,096 

2,354,373 
273,875 
796,844 
222,374 


1,989,624 

111 1 SA 






5,037 


1,984,587 

111 1 SA 



,042,754 1,042,754 

241,629 241,629 

145,082 145,082 



22,030,191 40,579 16,237 10,689 570,791 21,391,895 



17 



Total Expenditure Allocated 

For Year Endec 



Programs 

Non-Renewable Resource Development 

Program Administration (Pro-rated by Activities) 

Access to Resources 

Geological Services and Shared Exploration Costs 

Geological Service 

Shared Exploration Costs 

Geological Surveys 

Geological Cartography. 

Mines Engineering 

Engineering Service 

Mines Inspection 

Laboratory Services 

Laboratory Service 

Temiskaming Testing Lab 

Ontario Energy Board 

Mine Rescue Training 

Northern Affairs 

Total Net Expenditure 

Percentage of Total 



Vote 
Total 



9,219,064 



Activity 
Total 



192,167 
3,782,970 
3,691,919 



774,112 



463,832 



232,180 
81,884 



9,219,064 


9,219,064 


836,192 


836,192 


138,942,468 


138,942,468 



S.W.E.E.P. Projects manag» 



18 



to Main Services (Continued) 

larch 31, 1973 



Parks & 
Sub-Activity Land Environmental Historical Fish & Forest Mineral Conservation 

Total Management Protection Sites Wildlife Management Management Authorities Other 



30,324 143,203 

1,388,473 1,541,376 

1,589,928 
469,491 

1,089,867 
542,633 

78,272 78,272 

695,840 695,840 

326,866 326,866 

136,966 136,966 

232,180 232,180 

81,884 81,884 



192,167 


12,279 


3,517 • 


2,844 


3,782,970 


562,652 


159,991 


130,478 


1,589,928 








469,491 








1,089,867 








542,633 









9,219,064 


574,931 


163,508 


133,322 


- 


1,418,797 


6,696,326 




232,180 


836,192 
















836,192 


138,942,468 


9,217,846 


15,785,965 


35,942,481 


15,933,110 


29,766,016 


7,781,818 


23,114,290 


1 ,400,942 



6.63% 11.36% 25.87% 11.46% 21.42% 5.61% 16.64% 1.01% 



>y the Ministry of Environment 



19 



NORTHERN AFFAIRS BRANCH 

The Branch operates a small co-ordinating office in Toronto 
and three regional and 23 "storefront" offices in northern 
Ontario. Small communities in the north are served through 
50 satellite offices manned on a voluntary basis by 
employees of other government agencies. 

Northern Affairs offices aid citizens with problems 
related to all levels of government. They supply pamphlets 
and forms for many agencies and provide information on 
many programs. 

Northern Affairs officers perform specific functions for 
other agencies. They hold letters of authority under several 
Acts administered by other Ministries. 

A total of 80,958 transactions was handled in 1972, an 
increase of 22,466 on the year. 



LEGAL SERVICES BRANCH 

During the fiscal year commencing with April 1st, 1972, 
and ending with March 31st, 1973, Legal Services Branch 
prepared and processed amendments to The Crown Timber 
Act (by Statutes of Ontario 1972, Chapter 26); to The 
Provincial Parks Act (by Statutes of Ontario 1972, Chapter 
27); to The Public Lands Act (by Statutes of Ontario 1972, 
Chapter 29); to The Surveyor's Act (by Statutes of Ontario 
1972, Chapter 30); and to The Mining Act (by Statutes of 
Ontario 1972, Chapter 116). 

The Wolf and Bear Bounty Act was repealed by Statutes 
of Ontario 1972, Chapter 144, and The Water Powers 
Regulation Act was repealed by Statutes of Ontario 1972, 
Chapter 28. 

The Mining Tax Act was rewritten and updated by 
Statutes of Ontario 1972, Chapter 140, and The Wolf 
Damage to Live Stock Compensation Act, 1972, Statutes 
of Ontario 1972, Chapter 145 was enacted. 

Sixty-seven regulations made under the authority of 
Acts administered by the Ministry and 426 orders-in- 
council were prepared and processed through the Branch 
during the fiscal year. 

Two Federal-Provincial co-operative agreements dated 
February 8, 1972, and March 29, 1973, which provided 
for a two-year renewal of the co-operative agreement 
relating to resource management and, for the performance 
of a high resolution aeromagnetic survey in the Kirkland 
Lake area, respectively, were entered into by the Ministry 
during the fiscal year. 

The Patents Office, which is responsible for maintenance 
of records of Crown land and transactions respecting, and 
legal dispositions of Crown land, other than dispositions 
under The Mining Act, processed a total of 1,526 docu- 
ments during the fiscal year ending with March 31st, 1973. 



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES BRANCH 

The branch is a support group offering those administrative 
type services that lie outside the personnel and financial 
fields. 

The branch is divided into two sections - 
Operations and Services 

Operations consists of Office Management, Purchasing and 
Central Supply. 

Services consists of the Map Office, the Mines Publications 
Office, the Aerial Photo Library and the Accommodation 
Office. 



OFFICE MANAGEMENT 

This unit is responsible for the design, standardization, 
issuance and replacement of any of the twenty-three (23) 
different uniform items issued to the 1,100 regular staff, 
and 900 summer casual staff - (mainly parks). 

The unit is also responsible for the continual updating 
of the Ministry's listing in telephone directories across the 
Province, as well as preparing input information for the 
Government Telephone Directory. A total of 1,400 tele- 
phone credit cards and over 3,500 identification cards were 
issued to the Ministry staff. 
Other responsibilities include: 

1 . All branch personnel and accounting functions. 

2. The distribution of all Government manuals and 
their revisions, as well as all the Ministry's policy 
and procedure directives and key personnel directory. 

3. The Ministry equipment inventory control. 

4. The reproduction facilities: (Photo-copy and Mimeo- 
graph machines) 

Approximately 160,000 photo copies and 25,000 
mimeograph copies per month. 

5. The management of over 200,000 active Crown 
land files and the several incoming documents that 
necessitate the recording of over 140 entries on the 
cross-reference index system and the retrieval of over 
255 files daily. 

PURCHASING 

With the continuing expansion and re-organization within 
the Ministry, procurement activity was more varied and 
widespread. Over 20,000 requisitions were received and 
they were the basis for the issuance of 8,893 Purchase 
Orders, 6,739 Central Stationery Requisitions, 1,049 
Printing Requisitions, 494 Government Service Requisitions, 
703 Telephone Requisitions and 1,701 Central Duplicating 
Requisitions. Underlying these orders and requisitions 
were the many and varied details which are part of the 
purchasing function, such as searching, consulting, inter- 
viewing, telephone usage, correspondence, quotation calls 
customs clearance. Basically, it is a matter of supply and 
demand with the Purchasing Section ensuring that the 
Ministry's requirements are met immediately, economically, 
with the best quality available, and overall best value obtained 
for money expended. 

Direction and supervision were maintained on leases and 
property for the Ministry throughout the Province in 
conjunction with the Ministry of Government Services. 

CENTRAL SUPPLY WAREHOUSE 

During the fiscal year, the Section received a total of 710 
tons of supplies and equipment and shipped a total of 413 
tons, excluding mail. Shipments were made by express, 
freight, transport and mail, and by internal supply to 
Ministry offices. 

Thirty types of licences were distributed to District 
Offices and approximately 17,133 licence issuers on in- 
voices. The 2,188,505 licences included hunting, angling 
bait fish, roll net, dip net, frog, guide, trapping, trap-line, and 
dog. A total of 1,278,640 Provincial Park Permits were 
distributed. 

ACCOMMODATION OFFICE 

The accommodation office is responsible for the directing 
and coordinating of the approval of all leasing transactions, 
land purchases for the erection of buildings as well as their 
construction and maintenance; the preparation of the 
Ministry master accommodation plan, the establishment of 



20 



immediate, medium and long range accommodation ob- 
jectives; the coordination of the funding requirements for 
all general and special purpose facilities involving major 
and minor capital improvements; the planned program for 
the inspection of Ministry facilities in order to promote 
and improve communication between field and Head 
Office; the maintenance of official liason with the Ministry 
of Government Services in all matters pertaining to 
accommodation. 

MINES PUBLICATIONS OFFICE 

This office is responsible for the sale and distribution of 
geological maps and reports, circulars, industrial mineral 
reports, bulletins and other technical publications prepared 
in the Ministry. 



MAP OFFICE 

This office serves the public through the sale of printed 
maps produced by the Ministry of Transportation and 
Communications, lake contour map series produced 
by the Sport Fisheries Branch, the National Topographic 
Series and the Provincial Topographic Series. 

AIR PHOTO LIBRARY 

This library has samples of all air photographs available 
for the Province of Ontario. Orders may be placed at the 
Library for contact prints (10" by 10") enlargements made 
from the negatives of contact prints, and mosaics which 
may also be enlarged. The Air Photo Library also sells 
Forest Resources Inventory Maps. 



RECORDS MANAGEMENT (New Section) 

The Ministry is currently undertaking a study of all forms 
used and this study will result in an ongoing Central Forms 
Management Program. Initial steps were taken to create 
this new section. 

This section will be responsible for maintaining appro- 
priate control over the initiation, maintenance, protection, 
retention and disposition of all Ministry records in accor- 
dance with the policies of the Ministry and the Records 
Management Committee of Management Board. Submits to 
the committee, for approval, all proposals for microfilming 
Ministry records and the installation of microrecord systems. 
Monitors requests from Ministry offices for new or used 
filing equipment by investigating and justifying each request 
on merit and current policies. 

Forms management is an activity within the records 
management program and a study is currently being made 
of all the forms used in the Ministry. This study will result 
in an ongoing Ministry forms management program. The 
aim is: 

1. to contain the growth of forms and the printing and 
clerical costs relating to forms. 

2. to simplify the flow of each form in use in a system 
and to simplify the preparation and handling of the 
form by removing all superfluous and redundant data 
and 

3. to maintain controls over design, procurement and an 
inventory of forms with special emphasis on the 
supervision and regulation of all forms used by the 
Ministry staff in all locations. This Central Program 
will be supplemented by the establishment of Branch 
coordinators for the forms management program. 



PERSONNEL BRANCH 

DISPOSITION OF SENIOR ADMINISTRATION STAFF 
MARCH 31, 1973 

DEPUTY MINISTER 

W. Q. Macnee 

ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTERS 

L. Ringham (for Northern Ontario) 

W. T. Foster (for Southern Ontario) 

A. J. Herridge (for Resources and Recreation) 

J. W. Giles (for Lands and Waters) 

ONTARIO COMMITTEE, MAN AND RESOURCES 

R. Hummel Chairman 

REGIONAL DIRECTORS 

J. R. Oatway Northwestern (Kenora) 

R. A. Baxter North-Central (Thunder Bay) 

G. A. McCormack Northern (Cochrane) 

J. N. Hughes Northeastern (Sault Ste. Marie) 

J. S. Ball Algonquin (Huntsville) 

T. W. Hueston Eastern (Kemptville) 

A. H. Peacock Central (Richmond Hill) 

W. H. Charlton Southwestern (London) 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTORS 

J. W. Lockwood Division of Forests 

G. A. Jewett Division of Mines 

K. K. Irizawa Division of Fish and Wildlife 

J . W. Keenan Division of Parks 

L. H. Eckel Division of Lands 

W. G. Cleaveley Field Services Division 

R. R. MacBean Finance and Administration Division 



21 



PERSONNEL BRANCH (Continued) 

DISPOSITION OF SENIOR ADMINISTRATION STAFF (Continued) 
MARCH 31, 1973 

DIRECTORS 

R. M. Dixon Forest Management Branch 

J. M. Barron Timber Sales Branch 

D. H. Burton Forest Research Branch 

Dr. E. G. Pye Geological Branch 

D. A. Moddle Mineral Research Branch 

H. F. R. Davis Mines Engineering Branch 

D. R. Johnston Wildlife Branch 

K. H. Loftus Sport Fisheries Branch 

M. J. Brubacher Commercial Fish and Fur Branch 

J. D. Roseborough Fish and Wildlife Research Branch 

R. H. Hambly Park Management Branch 

T. E. Lee Park Planning Branch 

J. R. Sloan Historical Sites Branch (Midland) 

J. McGinn Lands Administration Branch 

R. J. Burgar Land Use Co-Ordination Branch 

R. G. Code Surveys and Mapping Branch 

W. L. Sleeman Forest Fire Control Branch 

T. C. Cooke Air Service Branch 

S. B. Panting Engineering Services Branch 

R. V. Scott Northern Affairs Branch 

G. H. Ferguson Legal Services Branch 

A. C. Goddard Financial Management Branch 

J. M. Taylor Personnel Branch 

J. A. Queen Administrative Services Branch 

G. A. Hamilton Information Branch 

Dr. W. R. Henson Policy Research Branch 

N. D. Patrick Conservation Authorities Branch 

DISTRICT FORESTERS 

G. P. Elliot Chapleau 

E. Gillespie Cochrane (Acting) 

R. A. Balkwill Fort Frances 

W. K. Fullerton Geraldton 

D. A. Fawcett Kapuskasing 

P. Anslow Kemptville (Acting) 

M. J. Morison Kenora 

W. B. Clarke Lake Erie (Aylmer) 

J. M. Halpenny Lake Huron (Hespeler) 

F. E. Sider Lake Simcoe (Maple) 

A. E. Walroth Lindsay 

D. J. Vance North Bay 

C. Douglas Parry Sound (Acting) 

J. A. Simpson Pembroke 

J. H. Sellers Sault Ste. Marie (Acting) 

F. L. Hall Sioux Lookout 

S. R. Hamilton Sudbury 

E. Markus Swastika 

L. M. Affleck Thunder Bay 

D. E. Gage Tweed 

A. S. Holder White River 

ONTARIO FOREST TECHNICAL SCHOOL 

V. B. Collins Acting Director 

TOTAL STAFF Probat . Undass . 

March 31,1973 Regular ionary ified Total 

HeadOffice 1,337 135 ' 316 1,788 

Field 2,395 121 1,033 3,549 

Total 3,732 256 1 ,349 5,337 

Total Complement of Positions 4, 1 1 3 

Vacancies in Complement 186 

Regular and Probationary Staff 3,927 

New Employees Hired, 1 972-73 318 

22 



PROFESSIONAL STAFF 

March 31, 1973 

Biologists 92 

Economists 9 

Engineers 22 

Foresters 214 

Geologists 48 

Legal Officers 5 

Mining Engineers 23 

Miscellaneous 84 

Total 497 

Resource Technicians 

with Diplomas 1 ,49 1 

Licensed Scalers ■ 989 



STAFF TURNOVER* 

March 31, 1973 

Deceased 6 

Superannuated 64 

Transferred 101 

Resigned 143 

Dismissed 6 

Miscellaneous 13 

Total 333 



*Ratio of separations to total regular and probationary 
staff at March 31,1 973, was 8. 1 per cent. 



INFORMATION BRANCH 

CONSERVATION INFORMATION SECTION 

The first issue of A ski, a small eight-page monthly for the 
information of staff, appeared in June, 1972. Aski means 
"land" in Crée. 

A newsletter was mailed weekly to 3,800 news outlets 
and special interest groups. The French translation went 
to 180 outlets. Urgent news was supplied directly to 
important outlets. 

Ontario Outdoors, a radio series, was used by 47 
stations in the Province. Program material was supplied to 
television stations. 

During the year, information was mailed to 39,600 
persons who requested assistance. The Photograph Library 
supplied material from a stock of 39,600 negatives and 
1 1 ,000 colour transparencies. 

Editorial service included the supply of information 
and statements to outside agencies and work on Ministry 
publications. New Ministry releases included the following: 



GEOLOGY AND SCENERY - North Shore of Lake Huron and 

Region (S2.50). 

THE FISHERIES OF LAKE OF THE WOODS ($ 1 .00) 

RAINBOW TROUT IN THE GREAT LAKES ($1.00) 

BIRDS OF ALGONQUIN PROVINCIAL PARK ($0.75) 

BOW HUNTING FOR DEER 

WINTER RECREATION ON PUBLIC LANDS 

PLANTATION MANAGEMENT ($0.50) 

OUT OF THE WOODS (folder) 

FORESTRY IN ONTARIO (Series of 10 booklets) 

FOREST FIRE CONTROL IN ONTARIO 



CONSERVATION EDUCATION SECTION 

The Section prepared exhibits for 70 fairs and shows 
where the Ministry area was staffed by Districts. It pre- 
pared and managed Ministry exhibits at the Canadian 
National Exhibition in Toronto, Central Canada Exhibition 
in Ottawa, Western Fair in London, Canadian Lakehead 
Exhibition in Thunder Bay, International Plowing Match 
in Sebringville, Royal Winter Fair in Toronto, and Canadian 
National Sportsmen's Show in Toronto. 

The Film Library added 20 films to head office and 
field office film libraries to bring the library's total to 
330 titles with two or more prints of many of the titles. 
During the year, approximately 1,500 films were loaned to 
field offices. 

Illustrated lectures were given on many aspects of the 
Ministry's activities to schools and youth organizations, 
church and service groups, and conservation associations. 

ACCIDENT CONTROL SECTION 

During the year, driver improvement training and testing 
was extended to staff in all districts. 

Employees were given the safety training applicable to 
their particular working hazards. 

North Bay District won the Safety Trophy with an 
injury frequency rate of 5.6. 

The number of certified Hunter Safety Training in- 
structors increased by 20 to 1,373. 

In Algonquin and Killarney Provincial Parks, 62 canoeing- 
camping demonstrations were given by the Ontario Safety 
League under the Ministry's sponsorship. 

Workmen's Compensation costs were $330,231.59, in- 
cluding pensions and administrative charges. Compensable 
claims number 1,065. 



POLICY RESEARCH BRANCH 



Policy Research is a new Branch, established in September, 
1972, from elements of former Branches. It reports 
directly to the Deputy Minister. Its responsibilities are as 
follows. 

1. Ministry liaison with other Ministries and the central 
agencies of Government. 

2. Co-ordination and regulation of activities related 
to environmental quality. Ministry responsibilities 
toward Environmental Impact Review Board. 

3. Conduct and co-ordination of research basic to 



policy formulation in fields such as proposed water 
diversion areas, proposed industrial development, 
unorganized areas in north, resource prices, resource 
transportation, resource allocation, and recreation 
demand and supply. 

4. General supervision of research and development. 

5. Development of a modern information system, and 
the operation of Ministry libraries. 

6. Technical background support in biometrics, econo- 
mics and various biological disciplines. 

7. Study of experience elsewhere, notably in Soviets. 



23 



DIVISION OF LANDS 



LANDS ADMINISTRATION BRANCH 

The Branch is responsible for policy and objectives in the 
administration of Crown lands (public and mining) in 
Ontario, and for acquiring private lands for Ministry 
purposes. 

LAND ACQUISITION SECTION 

The Section is responsible for acquiring private lands 
in support of programs such as public recreation and 
timber management. Since 1962, some 500,000 acres of 
land have been purchased, and some 15,000 acres have 
been transferred to the Ministry from other Provincial 
agencies. Recent purchases related to Niagara Escarpment 
lands, the Wasaga Beach area, and Bronte Creek Provincial 
Park. 

TITLE SECTION 

The Section prepares and engrosses the title documents 
required to dispose of Crown lands under The Public Lands 
Act and The Mining Act. In addition, the Section levies 
mining acreage tax and carries out the procedures required 
to effect forfeiture to the Crown of alienated mining lands 
when the owners of such lands default. 



In territory that is not municipally organized, control is 
exercised over uses and development of privately owned land 
through the designation of Restricted Areas under Section 
17 of The Public Lands Act. Twenty-two areas, comprising 
more than 1 2,000 square miles, have so far been designated. 

When land is to be disposed of, the Section prescribes 
terms and conditions in accord with land-use plans for the 
area. In unorganized territory, leasehold tenure is usually 
prescribed. 

Price is based on the appraised market value of the land. 

Annual rent is derived from the Regulations or based on 
seven per cent of the land's value. 

Improvement requirements are imposed to ensure quality 
development, for the purpose for which the land was 
granted, within a specified time. 

Land is disposed of by sale, lease, easement, licence of 
occupation, or land use permit, or by vesting order when 
transferred to another agency of government. 

In the case of cottage lots for private use, tenure is 
by lease only. These lots are available only in registered 
subdivisions and may not be leased to non-Canadians until 
they have been available for lease to Canadians and landed 
immigrants for one full year. 



Mining Lands Section 

Under The Mining Act, the Section prepares rulings for 
leases and Exploratory Licences of Occupation; disposes 
of land for sand and gravel purposes, and collects royalties 
for salt and sand and gravel removals; withdraws lands 
from disposition; and collects and assesses all geophysical, 
geological, geochemical and other technical reports. With 
a budget of $50,000 in 1972-3 for the rehabilitation of 
depleted pits and quarries, approximately 26 pits were 
rehabilitated. 

Under The Beach Protection Act, all commercial removals 
of sand and gravel (except by municipalities) from beaches, 
banks or waters of lakes and streams are licensed by the 
Section following consultation with Fish and Wildlife 
field offices, Ministry of the Environment and the Federal 
Department of Transport. Regular inspections are made of 
licensed areas to ensure that operations cause no significant 
erosion or damage to the ecology. 



Public Lands Section 

In the administration of public lands, other than mining 
lands, the emphasis is changing from land disposition to 
management. Land management includes: 

Allowing the public to use and enjoy public lands and 
waters wherever possible; 

Minimizing conflicts between user groups; 

Reserving areas for future public or government purposes 
to protect unique or sensitive features or to preserve the 
natural wilderness; 

Zoning areas for or against certain uses; 

Controlling garbage, litter, dumping and dredging; and 

Removing unauthorized occupations of public land. 



LAND USE CO-ORDINATION BRANCH 

The Branch was established in 1972 to give added emphasis 
to the Ministry's concern with la"nd use and land-use 
planning. 

LAND USE PLANNING SECTION 

In the first phase of land-use planning, the Ministry is 
preparing, or assisting other Ministries to prepare, land-use 
plans for specific areas. In 1972, the Ministry was involved 
in planning at Ignace, Sault Ste. Marie North, Maple 
Mountain, Lake Temagami, and the Regional Municipality 
of Muskoka, with public hearings on power line locations 
most notably the Nanticoke-Pickering line. 

During the year, the Section was assigned the responsi- 
bility of ensuring that comprehensive Provincial and Regional 
land-use plans were prepared by 1975. This led to the 
second phase of land-use planning. A document, Guidelines 
for Land Use Planning, was prepared and published in 
1972. Throughout the year, field staff gathered data 
relevant to planning. 

LAND USE LIAISON SECTION 

Many meetings and training sessions were held in 1972 with 
head office and field staff and with the staff of all other 



24 



Ministries interested in land use. The purpose was to 
explain in detail the need for comprehensive land-use 
planning and the methods of planning, and to co-ordinate 
the policies of individual agencies. 

MUNICIPAL PLAN REVIEW SECTION 

In 1972, the Section was assigned the responsibilities of 
the previous Conservation Planning Section in Conservation 
Authorities Branch. Staff were obtained and trained. 

A total of 698 subdivision, 60 severance and 20 
condominium proposals were reviewed, and recommen- 
dations concerning conditions of draft approval were pre- 
pared. In addition, 113 draft municipal official plans, and/ 
or amendments to approved official plans, were reviewed 
and conditions of approval recommended. 



SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH 

The Surveys Section performed, or obtained through 
private surveyors, surveys of a variety of Crown lands prior 
to their disposal under The Public Lands Act and The 
Mining Act. Township boundaries resurveyed totalled 300 
miles, and restored under OSEP, 174 miles. 

The Cartography and Inventory Sections produced 
geological, planimetric and thematic maps as a result of 
field surveys undertaken in various Ministry programs. 

The naming of geographical features was performed 
by the Ontario Geographical Names Board. 

In connection with the interpretation of space and 
airborne pictures, a Federal-Provincial link was established, 
and provision was made for an Ontario centre for remote 
sensing within the Ministry. 



FIELD SERVICES DIVISION 



FOREST FIRE CONTROL BRANCH 

A total of 1,573 forest fires burned over 65,458 acres in 
Ontario during the 1972 fire season. An additional 31 fires 
occurred within the fire district but outside the area of 
intensive protection. These fires burned 13,284 acres. 

Two high fire loads were experienced. The first, from 
the middle of May to the first week in June, saw province- 
wide fire occurence and accounted for 64 per cent of the 
season's fires and 91 per cent of the acres burned. Twenty- 
three large fires were experienced, and some equipment 
and manpower shortages occurred. The peak was reached 
on May 28 when 60 new fires made a total of 156 fires 
burning on that day. 

A more localized situation occurred during the first 
week of July in Geraldton and Sioux Lookout Districts when 
approximately 280 fires were experienced. 

The remainder of the fire season was exceptionally 
quiet. 

Lightning was again the major source of fire ignition. It 
accounted for 33 per cent of 1972 fires and 78 per cent 
of the area burned. 

Again in 1972, three Avenger fire bombers were con- 
tracted and positioned at the Dryden Fire Centre 
Northwestern Region to perform initial attack and support 
functions with long-term fire retardants. This land-based 
operation was meshed with the over-all fire attack system 
and worked well. 

On the basis of two year's experienced with the Tracker 
fife bomber, this aircraft was selected to be the land-based 
air attack aircraft in the Ministry fleet. Five more were 
acquired for the 1973 fire season. 

FIRE PREVENTION 

Five fire prevention pamphlets, Debris Burning, Fire 
Prevention, Children and Fire, Smoking, and Campfires, 
were published and distributed to the public. 

TRAINING 

Two four-week courses were given in basic fire suppression 
(Fire Suppression I). A total of 41 staff and two National 
Park personnel completed the course. 

The third annual advanced fire management course (Fire 
Suppression II) was given to 24 staff. 



DEVELOPMENT WORK 

Field evaluations of various items of forest fire control 
equipment were made during the 1972 fire season. These 
included: field test of synthetic fire hose; operational 
evaluation of the Gorman-Rupp pump; modification of fire- 
line camp gear; and modification of fire hose laying 
technique and packaging methods. 



AIR SERVICE BRANCH 

The purchase of five Grumman Tracker aircraft increased 
the Ministry fleet to 48 aircraft, operated out of 20 bases 
of which eleven were open the year round. 

During the year, Ministry aircraft flew a total of 
14,55 1 : 1 5 hours and delivered loads that totalled 27,1 37,880 
pounds. 

Leased helicopters flew a total of 3,032:10 hours. 

Twenty-eight mercy and emergency flights were made to 
rescue ill and injured persons from isolated locations. These 
flights accounted for 42:25 flying hours. 



ENGINEERING SERVICES BRANCH 

Engineering Services is a new Branch formed from elements 
of the former Surveys and Engineering Branch in the 
Ministry reorganization which became effective on Sep - 
tember 1, 1972. 

The Branch supplied support in the aspects of Ministry 
programs requiring professional engineering, engineering 
technology, and construction expertise. 

The engineering projects related to water use and 
management were carried out by means of pre-engineering 
surveys, feasibility studies, designs, plans, specifications, 
consultation, reports, employment of engineering con- 
sultants, and the construction of dams, docks, navigation 
locks and other hydraulic structures and facilities. 

The Branch carried out a program of inspection and 
maintenance on some of the 265 Ministry-owned dams along 
with improvements to flow channels, dredging and removal 
of floatwood. 



25 



An extension service to the public on erosion control 
was expanded to cope with the increased erosion and 
flooding resulting from a combination of high water levels 
on the Great Lakes and several severe storms, notably those 
of November 13-14, 1972, and March 17, 1973. 

Co-ordination of the Ministry sign program was imple- 
mented in accordance with the policy established by the 
Sign Committee. 

Consultation was provided for the construction and 
maintenance of forest access roads, and assistance is given 
to the Northern Ontario Resource Transportation Committee 
secretariat. 



The administration of The Lakes and Rivers Improve- 
ment Act required the examination and approval of all 
proposed dams in the Province, the investigation of com- 
plaints, and special studies of water levels and shorelines. 

Under the Major Capital construction program, the 
Branch provided liaison between the Ministry of Government 
Services, Management Board and the appropriate branches, 
districts and regions. 

Maintenance and minor construction of buildings and 
other facilities was carried out under the Minor Capital 
works program. 



CONSERVATION AUTHORITIES BRANCH 



The Branch co-ordinates assistance to Conservation 
Authorities which include grants (for capital projects and 
administration of Authority programs), technical advice, 
watershed studies and reports. The Branch reports to the 
Assistant Deputy Minister for lands and waters. 

Funds contributed through the Branch in 1972-3 were 
$23,071,983, made up of $19,516,402 for capital projects 
and administration, $1,900,740 in winter works transfer 
payments, and $1,654,841 in SWEEP transfer payments, 
and an additional $378,246 in Parks Assistance Act pay- 
ments made directly to the municipalities. 



Some of the more important dams, reservoirs and channel 
improvements either in process of construction or com- 
pleted in 1972-3 were at Binbrook (Niagara), High Finch 
(Metro Toronto), Woolwich (Grand River), Third Depot 
(Napanee), Hilton Falls and Fourteen Mile Creek (Halton), 
Head Street (Sydenham Valley), and East Davignon (Sault 
Ste. Marie). 

Both Toronto Metro and Hamilton Region Authorities 
began waterfront development plans during the year. 

Large conservation areas undergoing development in 
1972-3 were at Christie (Hamilton), Brantford (Grand River), 
Lake Whittaker (Kettle), and the Mill of Kentail(Mississippi). 



THE MINING COMMISSIONER 



The Mining Commissioner presides over a tribunal which 
exercises the judicial and administrative functions conferred 
upon it under The Mining Act, The Mining Tax Act and 
The Beach Protection Act. During the past fiscal year, the 
following matters were determined and disposed of. 
Orders extending time for performing work 

or applying and paying for leases 874 

Orders extending time for tagging 6 

Orders authorizing special renewal of licences 52 

Miscellaneous orders and judgements 65 

Total Number of Orders 997 



REVENUE DERIVED FROM No. of 

FILING EXTENSION ORDERS Claims 



Revenue 



Prior to Default 9,609 $48,045.00 

Relief from Forfeiture 1,203 12,030.00 

Prior Tagging 6 30.00 

Total 10,818 60,105.00 



During the year, sittings were held at Toronto, Kirkland 
Lake, Thunder Bay, Sioux Lookout and Timmins. 



ONTARIO ENERGY BOARD 



During the past year, the Board held more than one hundred 
public hearings, usually in Toronto. Hearings were also held 
at Mount Forest, Cayuga, Sarnia, Windsor, Chatham, 
Woodstock and Guelph. 

Board activities during the year included the granting 



of leave to construct pipe lines, authority to expropriate 
pipe line rights-of-way when easements could not be 
negotiated, certificates of public convenience and necessity 
for the distribution of gas, and approval of the drilling of 
wells for oil or gas in designated gas storage areas. 



26