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Full text of "Annual report of the officers, boards, and activities of the town of Haddam"

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ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 




3 1833 01885 9337 



GC 

974.602 
H11AR, 
1923 



STATEMENT 



OF THE 



FINANCIAL AFFAIRS 



OF THE 



Town of Haddam 



FROM 



*% 



September 1, 1922 to September 1, 1923 



With an Abstract of the Grand Levy of the 



Town for the Year 1923 



Portland, Conn. 

The Middlesex County Printery 

1923 



(Alien uounw *■*«-"'-- 



STATEMENT 



OF THE 



FINANCIAL AFFAIRS 



OF THE 



Town of Haddam 



FROM 



September 1, 1922 to Septemberfl, 1923 

With an Abstract of the Grand Levy of the 
Town for the Year 1923 



Portland, Conn. 

The Middlesex County Printery 

1923 



Selectmen's Report 

September 1, 1922 to September 1, 1923 



BUDGET 



Selectmen's Estimate of Expenses fop Year Ending August 31 f 1924 

Borrowed Money $6,500 00 

Highways and Bridges 6,000 00 

State Aid Highways 50 00 

Election Expenses 100 00 

State Military Tax 275 00 

State Tax 1,275 00 

County Tax 820 00 

Interest 845 00 

Surety Bonds 45 00 

Town Officers 1,550 00 

Health Officer 150 00 

Clerical Work 400 00 

Road Equipment, Tools, etc 200 00 

Tractor 200 00 

Schools „ 30,000 00 

Poor 3,500 00 

Miscellaneous 700 00 

$52,610 00 



Estimated Receipts for Year Ending August 31, 1924 

Balance in Treasury August 31, 1923 $310 99 

Tax on Bank Stock „ 400 00 

Dog Fund 150 00 

Pool License 10 00 

Rent of Town Hall 15 00 

Support of Schools Grant 6,450 50 

Enumeration Grant -. 1,000 00 



HADDAM TOWN REPORT 



Library Grant 60 00 

High School Tuition Grant 2,100 00 

High School Transportation 1,400 00 

Special Grant 1,000 00 

Personal Taxes ...., 1,488 00 

Probable collection of Back Taxes 4,000 00 

State of Connecticut, Town Poor Account 200 00 

Amount to be raised by taxation 



$18,584 49 



$34,025 51 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES 



William Maynard $134 00 

Domiano Manica 3 75 

Lafayette Gladwin 39 25 

Wilbur Smith 16 50 

E. S. Spencer : 25 50 

R. S. Stebbins 100 75 

Elmer Treadwell 1 40 

Giacomo Donatoni 85 00 

Frank Albert 44 00 

John Delemarre 42 42 

John Traskos 6 00 

R. E. Thayer 24 40 

Richard Johnson 46 50 

A. A. Towner _ 42 00 

John C. Knowles 11 00 

J. Jacob Johnson 154 00 

Henry Smith 40 50 

Carl Andeen 40 50 

W. P. Skinner .". 237 00 

M. W. Merchant 27 00 

John Sallak 9 00 

Eugene O. Burr 33 00 

Smith Spencer 153 50 

William L. Spencer *. 279 00 

Ellis Spencer 26 75 

A. R. Shailer 2 50 

Henry Clark 114 50 

Roger Spencer 18 00 

Leonard Johnson 41 25 

W. R. Chapman 12 00 



HADDAM TOWN REPORT 

H. D. Peck 54 35 

John Ostergren 177 75 

Julius B. Schutte 13 00 

Edward Burr -, 21 00 

William Quanstrom 9 00 

E. C. Brainard 10 50 

Axel Johnson 5 25 

John Guagnini 21 00 

Chauncey Clark 6 00 

Neils Neilson 5 00 

Harold Sandin 2 25 

Tracy Neff 18 50 

Anson Strong 35 00 

Clayton Harlow , 5 33 

Selden Brothers 6 00 

John Millinese 16 25 

J. Olsen 2 50 

Harvey Brainerd Ill 05 

Arthur Brooks, Sr 71 00 

Fred Brookes 281 70 

T. J. Selden 1 50 

Edward Skinner 35 00 

James Flood 30 00 

Chauncey Brookes 10 00 

C. B. Brookes 30 00 

W. S. Bowen 27 50 

David Flood, Jr 18 00 

F. A. House 7 02 

David Flood, Sr 38 75 

George Spencer 6 00 

Dondoglio 12 00 

Charles Jones 42 00 

C. Freeman 4 50 

R. Clement 7 20 

Guy Matthews 1 20 

Clarence Ball 150 50 

M. Waters 20 70 

Joseph Brookes 49 50 

John Bertelinna 9 00 

Dudley Stone 12 00 

Joseph Mazanek 16 23 

W. E. S. Burr 37 00 

John Lolla 54 00 

Thomas Rogan ri 34 00 

C. E. Hubbard „.. 45 50 



6 

Gub Swanson 


HADDAM TOWN REPORT 


6 00 


Arthur Skinner .. 
John Cochran 


t 

EQUIPMENT 


109 50 
15 00 

«o qfio Aft 







Blade for road machine $7 80 

Railroad plow and share 45 20 

Stone crusher 1,471 96 

Freight on crusher 65 07 

Rubber belting and hammers 58 80 

Plank 155 25 

Culverts 1 108 48 

Governor for tractor 18 50 

Road scraper 12 50 

Shovels, nails, etc 15 87 



TRACTOR 

A. C. Michaelson, gas, oil, etc 

Harry W. Arnold, gas 

Elmer Company, oil, parts, etc 

Arthur Brooks, Jr., repair work, gas, etc. 
Felix Petrofsky, dry cells, gas, etc 



$1,959 43 



$13 


35 


13 


05 


66 


42 


31 


20 


36 


98 



$161 00 



STATE AID HIGHWAYS 

State Treasurer, Town's share of repairs $21 68 

* 

TAXES 

State Treasurer, general state tax $1,294 66 

State Treasurer, militia 143 34 

County Treasurer, County Tax 764 01 

$2,202 01 



HADDAM TOWN REPORT 7 

INTEREST 

At Middletown National Bank $350 80 

ELECTION EXPENSES 



First District 

Second District 

Third District 

Advertising 

L. T. Treat, moving booths 
Ballots 



$82 


00 


100 


10 


74 


00 


2 


25 


3 


00 


71 


00 



TOWN OFFICERS (Salaries and Compensations) 

William L. Spencer, First Selectman $300 00 

Harvey Brainerd, Second Selectman 60 00 

J. Jacob Johnson, Third Selectman 60 00 

George A. Dickinson, Town Clerk 100 00 

Albert H. Hubbard, Town Treasurer 100 00 

Myron G. Skinner, Assessor 80 00 

Walter E. Kingsland, Assessor 60 00 

John Collins, Assessor 36 00 

Robert S. Bailey, Board of Relief 12 00 

Elmer S. Hubbard, Board of Relief 15 00 

George A. Dickinson 21 00 

Leonard Selden, Auditor 15 00 

Eugene Burr, Auditor 15 00 

Richard Johnson, Auditor 15 00 

Richard Johnson, Registrar 6 00 

Rutherford Chalker, Registrar 6 00 

Paul A. Priest, Tax Collector 756 43 



$332 35 



$1,657 43 



BORROWED MONEY 

Middletown National Bank, Sept. 26, 1922 $5,000 00 

Paid Middletown National Bank, May 31, 1923 5,000 00 



8 HADDAM TOWN REPORT 

POOR 

State of Connecticut, care of patients at Connecti- 
cut Hospital $1,054 29 

Aid to Anna Docar's family 512 68 

Board for William Buell 240 00 

Aid to Anna Lungar 36 00 

Board for Grace Buell 308 22 

Raymond Magnusen, Hartford Hospital 428 60 

Aid to Arland Rose family 21 10 

Care of John Anderson at Middletown 24 50 

Care of Paul Rebut family at Middletown 152 19 

Care of Augustine family at Middletown 49 65 

Care of Mrs. Spencer at Middletown 265 98 

Care of Ann Smith at Middletown 272 25 

Care of Odell Stevens at Middletown 299 55 

Aid to John Jason family 56 00 

Aid to David Long 107 50 



CLERICAL WORK 

Indexing of land records $1,878 95 

Enumeration of persons liable to personal and 

military tax t 36 55 

Registrar of vital statistics 57 60 

Grand List 20 00 

Recording tax liens 43 25 

Rate Book 25 00 

Town Report 20 00 



MISCELLANEOUS 

Adkins Printing Co., land index, etc $78 58 

Connecticut Power & Light Co 32 20 

Surety Bonds 42 00 

Pelton & King, Assessor's blanks, binding tax lists, 

Tax Collector's supplies, etc 76 85 

Dr. LeRoy Smith, Health Officer 20 80 

Dr. M. W. Plumstead, acting Health Officer 32 50 

Dr. LeRoy Smith, examinations, working certificates 9 00 



$3,828 51 



$2,081 35 



HADDAM TOWN REPORT 

Town Reports 

Dog license tags - 

Wood for Town Hall - 

Advertising 

Expenses, three assessors 

Expenses, First Selectman 

Expenses, Town Treasurer 

George Smith, Dog Warden 

Dr. Lawson, returns of births and deaths 

J. A. Broatch, Index books * 

Damage done to sheep by dogs 

Postage, Tax Collector 

Cleveland Blank Office, Tax Collector's supplies 

Flags for soldiers' graves 

Traveling expenses 

Rent of land for stone crusher 



RECAPITULATION 

Town Highways and Bridges :. $3,563 00 

Equipment 1,959 43 

Tractor 161 00 

State Aid Highways 21 68 

Taxes j 2,202 01 

Interest '. 350 80 

Election Expenses 332 35 

Town Officers '. 1,657 43 

Clerical Work 2,081 35 

Poor 3,828 51 

Miscellaneous 675 94 



148 


00 


12 


74 


18 


00 


19 


48 


9 


05 


15 


35 


18 


23 


11 


60 


1 


00 


2 


00 


26 


00 


15 


00 


24 


00 


14 


56 


39 


00 


10 


00 



$675 94 



$16,833 50 

Borrowed money 5,000 00 

Amount paid on orders 5,000 00 



Total Town Orders drawn $26,833 50 

ABATEMENTS 
Abatements, Levy 1922 $116 88 



10 HADDAM TOWN REPORT 

Inasmuch as in October, 1922 the town began to borrow money on 
notes instead of on town orders, as heretofore, the Selectmen's Report 
does not contain a detailed account of borrowed money. It will be 
noticed at the beginning of the town year that $9,000 had been borrowed, 
in September 1922 $5,000 more was borrowed, making a total of $14,000 
borrowed previous to the October election, 1922. The Treasurer's Report 
shows $21,500 was borrowed during the year; $24,000 was paid out, 
leaving a balance of $6,500 borrowed money. Town orders have been 
drawn covering interest charges of $350.80 and Treasurer's Report shows 
discounts in town notes of $830.83, making total interest for the year 
$1,181.63, with a refund of $14.60, making net interest charges of $1,167.03. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. L. SPENCER, 

J. JACOB JOHNSON, 

Selectmen. 



Personally appeared before me the above Selectmen, and verified by 
oath the foregoing report. 

ELWYN T. CLARK, 

Justice of the Peace. 



Haddam, Conn., Sept. 28, 1923. 

We hereby certify that we have examined and verified the accounts 
of the Selectmen, Town Treasurer, Tax Collector and Town School Com- 
mittee, and found them correct. 

RICHARD J. JOHNSON, 

THOMAS J. RILEY, 

, Auditors. 



Subscribed and sworn to before me this 27th day of September, 1923. 

EUGENE O. BURR, Notary Public. 



HADDAM TOWN REPORT 11 



Report of the Town Treasurer 

Fiscal Year Ending August 31, 1923 



RECEIPTS FOR YEAR 

Balance in Treasury August 31, 1922 , $2,820 69 

From Paul A. Priest, Tax Collector 37,947 20 

Levy Tax Lien Interest Total 

1922 $31,239 81 $68 98 $31,308 79 

1921 4,682 80 $9 50 341 88 5,034 18 

1920 668 76 5 00 100 49 774 25 

1919 194 32 2 50 45 87 242 69 

1918 207 19 2 00 76 34 285 53 

1917 2 59 1 40 3 99 

1916 1 19 82 2 01 



$36,996 66 $19 00 $635 78 $37,651 44 

Undistributed at closing of books 295 76 



$37,947 20 



From Middletown National Bank, borrowed money $21,500 00 

From State of Connecticut: 

Support of Schools Grant 6,635 21 

Enumeration Grant 1,041 75 

Department Agencies and Institutions 181 69 

Bureau of Child Welfare 270 63 

Distribution Dog License Funds 110 00 

Estate Penalty Tax 32 00 

Stock Tax Distribution 363 87 

From Higganum Savings Bank:, 

Dividend of Susan P. Freeman Account 80 



39 


00 




330 


94 




14 


60 




333 


71 




10 


00 




20 


55 




4 


55 


$71,657 19 



12 HADDAM TOWN REPORT 

From Middletown City School Dist., tuition refund 

From Town Clerk, Dog License Funds 

From Middletown Nat. Bank, refund on discounts 

Court Fees and Fines 

Pool License 

School Bus Insurance Refund 

Sale of barrels and cement bags 

Total Receipts 



DISBURSEMENTS FOR YEAR 

Selectmen or Town Orders paid $26,833 50 

School Orders paid 29,173 56 

Dog License Funds— paid to State 304 22 

Court Fees '. 204 09 

Loans paid Middletown Nat. Bank, money borrowed 
on Notes — an additional $10,000 is included 

under Selectmen or Town Orders paid 14,000 00 

Discount on Notes 830 83 

Total Disbursements $71,346 20 

Balance in Treasury August 31, 1923 $310 99 

Amount money borrowed August 31, 1922 $9,000 00 

Amount money borrowed during year 1922-1923 21,500 00 

$30,500 00 

Loans paid during year 1922-1923 24,000 00 

Amount money borrowed August 31, 1923 $6,500 00 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALBERT H. HUBBARD, Treasurer. 
Haddam, Conn., Sept. 19, 1923. 



Personally appeared before me, Albert H. Hubbard, Treasurer of the 
Town of Haddam, and verified by oath the foregoing report. 

EUGENE O. BURR, Notary Public. 



HADDAM TOWN REPORT 13 



Uncollected Taxes 



Levy 1904 to 1911 .. $47 13 

1912 129 40 

1913 263 11 

1914 143 80 

1915 127 02 

1916 179 23 

1917 210 70 

1918 256 46 

1919 ., 496 88 

1920 2,194 46 

1921 T 2,515 61 

1922 5,868 56 



$12,432 36 



14 HADDAM TOWN REPORT 



ASSETS 

Balance in Treasury August 31, 1923 $310 99 

Frederick Wilcox, mortgage note 90 00 

Amount due from State on School Grant 4,565 00 

Uncollected Taxes 12,432 36 

Two school busses 2,000 00 

Fordson Tractor, pulley and governor 300 00 

Unused plank 160 00 

Two road drags 40 00 

Three road machines : 350 00 

Small tools 50 00 

Plow 40 00 

Stone crusher 1,500 00 

Culverts 90 00 

Road hand scraper 12 00 

Rubber belting 40 00 

Two hundred ton of crushed stone 200 00 

Amount due from Masonic Lodge, one-half amount 

of lighting Town Hall 16 10 

Rent of Town Hall 40 00 

$22,236 45 

Liabilities 6,500 00 



Surplus $15,736 45 



HADDAM TOWN REPORT 15 



Grand Levy of the Town 



603% dwelling houses $592,710 00 

586 barns, sheds, garages, etc - 87,645 00 

25 stores, shops, halls, etc 18,655 00 

27 mills, manufactories, water power, etc 153,550 00 

24,742 acres of land 311,348 00 

2 quarries 7,000 00 

186 horses and mules 11,895 00 

676 neat cattle 24,685 00 

60 sheep, swine and poultry 2,795 00 

Carriages and wagons 950 00 

240 automobiles and motors 64,120 00 

Watches and jewelry 2,265 00 

Furniture and musical instruments 7,060 00 

Farm produce 50 00 

Farming implements and mechanical tools 1,600 00 

Goods of merchandise, traders and manufacturers 58,750 00 

Cable and wires 4,100 00 

Boats 2,200 00 

Money at interest on hand or on deposit 15,760 00 

Taxable property not mentioned 200 00 

Ten per cent, additional 15,343 00 



$1,382,676 00 



Final Grand List as corrected by Board of Relief 1,367,393 00 

Twenty-eight mill tax will raise 38,287 00 



16 HADDAM TOWN REPORT 



School Committee's Report 



At the beginning of the year, of the ten teachers employed, only one 
was a beginner, and the total salaries were the lowest for several years. 
Changing conditions have resulted in numerous changes in the system 
and have added considerably to the expense, but expenditures have been 
kept well within the adopted budget. 

The total orders drawn for the year on account of the school busses 
was $5,729.05, and $20.55 of this amount was returned as a rebate on 
insurance. Aside from the cost of the new bus, $2,200, the total cost of 
the service was $3,508.50, to which should be added the depreciation of 
40% on the new bus, or $880, and the depreciation of 20% on the old bus, 
or $440. Thus the total cost of the bus service for the year is found to 
be $4,828.50. This amount is apportioned, on the number of miles 
travelled, $3,027.86 for high school and $1,800.64 for in-town transportation. 

There were forty-two Middletown High School pupils who used the 
school busses at a cost of $1.94 each per week, which is considerably 
less than hired conveyance would have cost. It should be noted in this 
connection that the busses were probably more suitable and more com- 
fortable and convenient than hired busses would have been, and that, in 
order to render the service required by law, they went out beyond the 
school houses in the Candlewood Hill and Burr districts. 

But it is in the matter of in-town transportation that the greatest 
economy has been effected by the operation of the busses. As stated 
above, this service cost $1,800.64, and resulted in a saving of teachers' 
salaries in the Tylerville, Shailerville and Candlewood Hill districts for 
the full year and in the Burr, Brainerd Hill and Turkey Hill districts for 
a little more than half the year. The minimum salary at the opening of 
the school year was $1,050, and on this basis the saving in teachers' 
salaries alone was over '$4,500. Further savings were effected in supplies, 
fuel, janitors' services, up-keep, etc. Thus the economy of the busses, 
even though not used to capacity, is very evident this year as it was last. 

In figuring the cost of the bus service 40% was allowed for depreci- 
ation on each bus for the first year and 20% for the second year. Thus 
it may be noted that already the entire cost of one of the busses has 



HADDAM TOWN REPORT 17 

been absorbed in the transportation allowance of $2,448.65 last year, and 
•$3,508.50 for this year. Of the former amount, the state paid $762.67 and 
of the latter amount $1,576.22, as its share of high school transportation, 
a total of $2,338.89, leaving the cost to the town for the two years of 
13,618.26. 

During the past year eight pupils graduated from the Middletown 
High School and one from Deep River. As was the case last year, so this 
year, high school pupils have been permitted to select which school they 
wished to attend. This year the busses are conveying thirty-seven high 
school and three trade school pupils, as against forty-two last year. The 
total attendance in Middletown High School this year is forty-one, against 
fifty last year; in Deep River two this year, against four last year; and 
in trade school five this year, against two last year, a total of forty-eight 
this year, as against fifty-six last year, forty the year previous, and for 
the years immediately preceeding, thirty-three, twenty-four, twenty and 
sixteen respectively. So it is possible that the peak of high school at- 
tendance has been reached and, if so, the two busses should accommodate 
them for several years. 

From the financial tables it will be seen that the cost for the fifty-six 
pupils who attended high and trade schools was $10,322.45, while the cost 
for the 341 registered in the elementary schools was $17,911.56. The 
committee feels that to justify this large expense all high school pupils 
should be expected to do faithful work, and to that end a high school 
committee has been appointed for the present year. The schedule and 
standing of each pupil will be examined and tuition and transportation 
will be denied any who fails to do satisfactory work. 

Mention should be made of the loss to this committee of its senior 
member, Eugene O. Burr, who has served faithfully since 1910, and also 
Edward W. Hazen, who has served as its courteous, competent, consci- 
entious chairman since 1916. 

A recent tour of the various districts by the entire committee showed 
the need of better lighting in several schools. Aside from this the 
schools have been put in good repair and are in charge of competent 
teachers. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LEONARD J. SELDEN, Secretary. 

SCHOOL INCOME FOR 1922-1923 
From State Grants: 

Enumeration $1,041 75 

Support of Schools Grant 1922-23 5,891 08 

High School Tuition 1922-23 2,535 00 

High School Transportation 1922-23 1,960 00 

Library Grant 70 00 

*Total from State $11,497 83 



18 HADDAM TOWN REPORT 

From the Town: 

Miscellaneous Receipts $4 55 

A six mill tax raises 8,204 36 

Amount drawn from Treasury above six mill tax 8,527 27 

**Total from Town $16,736 18 



$28,234 01 
*This amount will be increased by the amount of the special aid 
grant not yet received; and 

♦♦This amount will be correspondingly decreased. 

SCHOOL EXPENDITURES FOR 1922-1923 
General Control: 

Telephone, office expense, salary of Secretary $107 12 
Supervisor's expense, postage, travel, telephone 39 46 

Teachers' meetings 45 78 

$192 36 

Instruction: 

Teachers' salaries $13,091 29 

Text books 303 60 

Supplies of instruction , 470 53 

High School tuition (54 pupils) 5,924 00 

Tuition Granat children in Middletown 142 12 

$19,931 54 

Operation School Plant: 

Salaries of janitors $607 40 

Fuel, light and janitor's supplies 706 15 

$1,313 55 

Maintenance of School Plant: 

Repairs $274 24 

Insurance 10 80 

$285 04 

Auxiliary Agencies: 

School Library $73 16 

♦High School transportation 4,398 45 

♦In Town bus transportation 1,800 64 

Transportation Granat children 116 70 

Miscellaneous expenses 85 16 

$6,474 11 

Capital Outlay: 

New equipment $37 41 

Total expense for schools for year $28,234 01 

♦These figures include 40% of cost of new bus and 20% of cost of 
old bus. 



HADDAM TOWN REPORT 



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20 HADDAM TOWN REPORT 

SCHOOL BUDGET FOR 1923-1924 

Estimated total expense $27,800 00 

Estimated grants from the State 12,017 50 



Balance to be raised by town taxation $15,782 50 



TOWN SCHOOL COMMITTEE 1922-1923 

Charles B. Carlson, John C. Russell, Mrs. Mabel D. Porter, 1920-1923. 

Elmer S. Hubbard, Miss Ella V. Burr, Leonard J. Selden, 1921-1924. 

Charles W. Scovill, Fred E. Brookes, Daniel S. Brooks, 1922-1925. 

Chairman: Charles B. Carlson. 

Secretary and Treasurer: Leonard J. Selden. 

State Supervisor: Edwin I. Arthur, Cromwell, Conn. 

Property Committee: Fred E. Brookes, John C. Russell, Leonard J. 
Selden. 

Transportation Committee: Elmer S. Hubbard, Mabel D. Porter, 
Leonard J. Selden. 

Teachers' Hiring Committee: Charles B. Carlson, Leonard J. Selden, 
Edwin I. Arthur. 

Finance Committee: Chairman and Secretary. 

Text Book and Library Committee: John C. Russell, Ella V. Burr, 
Leonard J. Selden. 



HADDAM TOWN REPORT 



21 



Report of State Supervisor of Schools 





REGISTER DATA 






Building 
Higganum : 

Julia A. Castelli 


Net Regis- 
tration 
34 


Left 
during 
Year 

7 


Year-end 
Member- 
ship 

27 


Promo- 
tions 

27 


Av. 
Attend- 
ance 
26.37 


Hazel P. Brown 


28 


8 


20 


18 . 


26.37 


Grace M. Stafford 


44 


6 


38 


33 


38.07 


Maude E. Stevens 


40 


6 


34 


31 


32.05 


Beatrice E. Neff 


27 


4 


23 


18 


22.05 


Center: 












Ursula H. Brainard 


35 


10 


25 


24 


25.54 


Mrs. W. W. Pike 


34 


10 


24 


20 


22.78 


Ponsett Center: 












Rosalie Marshall 


32 


8 


24 


22 


25.48 


Little City: 


• 










Anna Lundgren 


22 


5 


17 


15 


17.60 


Brainerd Hill: 












T. Agnes McCarthy 


16 


2 


14 


13 


11.24 


Burr : 

H. Dorothy Johnson 


10 





10 ( 


9 


8.45 


Turkey Hill: 












Mrs. E. H. Gildersleeve 8 





8 


8 


7.57 


Haddam Neck: 












Vivian Taylor 


9 


2 


7 


7 


6.98 



Totals, 13 teachers 



339 



271 



245 



266.17 



TOTAL ATTENDANCE 



In town schools (elementary) 
Middletown (elementary) 
New Britain Trade School 
Meriden Trade School 
Deep River High School 
Middletown High School 



Aggregate 


Averag 


46315.5 


266.17 


336. 


1.81 


196.5 


.98 


141. 


.70 


699. 


3.81 


8373. 


44.07 



Totals 



56061.0 



317.54 



22 



HADDAM TOWN REPORT 
MEMBERSHIP— JUNE 22, 1923 



District 








Grade 












Higganum: 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


Room 


Bldg 


Julia A. Castelli 














7 


20 


27 




Hazel P. Brown 












14 


6 




20 




Grace M. Stafford 








24 


14 








38 




Maude E. Stevens 




11 


23 












34 




Beatrice E. Neff 


19 


4 














23 






19 


15 


23 


24 


14 


14 


13 


20 


142 


142 


Center: 






















Ursula H. Brainard 








6 


11 


2 


6 




25 




Mrs. W. W. Pike 


11 


4 


9 












24 






11 


4 


9 


6 


11 


2 


6 




49 


49 


Ponsett Center: 






















Rosalie Marshall 


5 


2 


2 


5 


3 


4 


3 




24 


24 


Little City: 






















Anna Lundgren 


4 


1 


1 


4 


1 


3 


3 




17 


17 


Brainerd Hill: 






















T. Agnes McCarthy 


2 


1 


3 


4 


2 


2 






14 


14 


Burr: 






















H. Dorothy Johnson 


3 


3 


1 




3 








10 


10 


Turkey Hill: 






















Mrs. E. H. Gildersleeve 


2 


2 




1 


• 2 




1 




8 


8 


Haddam Neck: 






















Vivian Taylor 


2 


1 






1 




3 




7 


7 




48 


29 


39 


44 


37 


25 


29 


20 


271 


271 



MEMBERSHIP— SEPTEMBER 1923 



District 








Grade 












Higganum : 

Julia A. Castelli 
Bertha Meyers 
H. Dorothy Johnson 
Louise E. Brainard 
Beatrice Neff 


1 
21 


2 
16 


3 
16 


4 
22 


5 

20 


6 
16 


7 
6 
8 


8 
17 


Room 
23 
24 
42 
32 
21 


Bldg 


Center: 

Ursula H. Brainard 
Mrs. W. W. Pike 


21 

7 


16 

8 


16 
4 


22 
9 


20 
6 


16 
9 


14 
3 


17 


142 

27 
19 


142 

• 


Ponsett Center: 

Rosalie Marshall 

Little City: 

Anna C. Lundgren 


7 
2 


8 
5 
4 


4 
3 
1 


9 
1 


6 
5 
3 


9 
4 
2 


3 
4 
3 


2 
3 


25 
17 


46 
25 
17 



HADDAM TOWN REPORT 



Brainerd Hill: 

Regina A. Marsh 2123411 14 14 

Burr : 

Frances Emily 4 2 3 1 3 13 13 

Turkey Hill: 

Irene C. Coen 12 2 5 5 

Haddam Neck: 

Elsie Sandin 12 1 12 7 7 

37 39 32 36 38 37 26 24 269 



CONTEST WINNERS 

Speaking— Town. First, Cornelia Ryon; second, Donald Riley. 

Speaking — District (Intertown.) Second, Cornelia Ryon. 

Spelling— Town. First, Thomas Quinn; second, Barbara Carpenter, 
Haddam Neck. 

Spelling — State. Second, Thomas Quinn. 
Athletics for boys— Town. First, Edward Adametz; second, Harold 
Parmelee. 

Athletics for boys — District. Third, Edward Adametz. 

Athletics for girls — Town. First, Mary Knowles, Ponsett; second, 
Winifred Carlson. 

W. C. T. U. Essay Contest. First, Julia Kazimir, Ponsett; second, 
Arthur Nelson; third, Edward Adametz. 



PERFECT ATTENDANCE FOR YEAR 1922-23 

Miss Castelli's Room: Emil Planeta. 
Miss Steven's Room; William Todeschini. 
Miss Taylor's Room: Eleanor Johnson. 



ELEMENTARY GRADUATES 1923 



Thomas James Quinn, Catherine Clark Williams, Leon Craft Nelson, 
Stanley Joseph Traskos, Loy Donald Riley, Arthur Gotfried Nelson, Her- 
bert Scovill Johnson, Edward Joseph Adametz, Emil Joseph Planeta, Josie 
Agnes Nosal, Marguerite Egan Graves, Charlotte Elizabeth Graham, 
Winnifred Edna Carlson, Clifford Francis Maynarcl, Gilbert William 
Doyle, Grace Evelyn Mellish, Harold Edward Fredrickson, Anna May 
Muzik, John Chatfield Russell, Harold Leon Parmelee. 



24 HADDAM town report 

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES 1923 

At Deep River. Mary Arnold. 

At Middletown. Dorothy E. Brainerd, Ella C. Gillette, Harriette L. 
Gillette, Dorothy E. Hall, Dolly B. Hubbard, Julia A. Russell, Ruby M\ 
Thompson, Anna M. Nilsen. 

CHANGES IN TEACHING STAFF DURING YEAR 1922-23 

Higganum. Grades VIII-VI, Estella Brown, principal, resigned; fol- 
lowed by Julia A. Castelli. Grades VII-VI, Julia A. Castelli, transferred; 
followed by Hazel P. Brown. Grades V-IV, Hazel P. Brown, transferred; 
followed by Grace M. Stafford. 

ADDITIONS TO TEACHING STAFF DURING YEAR 1922-23 

Brainerd Hill: T. Agnes McCarthy. 

Burr: H. Dorothy Johnson. 

Turkey Hill: Mrs. E_. H. Gildersleeve. 

CHANGES IN TEACHING STAFF FOR 1923-1924 

Teachers resigned: Mrs. E. H. Gildersleeve, and Misses Brown, 
Stevens, Stafford, McCarthy and Taylor. 

Teachers transferred: H. Dorothy Johnson from Burr to Higganum. 

New Teachers. For Higganum: Grades, VII-VI, Bertha Meyers, 
graduate of Woodstock Academy and attended at full course of 1921 State 
Summer School, three years' teaching experience; Grades III-II, Louise 
E. Brainard, graduate of Northfield Seminary, two years' teaching experi- 
ence. For Burr: Frances Emily, graduate of Deep River High School and 
attendant at full course of 1923 State Summer School. For Brainerd 
Hill: Regina A. Marsh, graduate of Middletown High School and at- 
tendant at full course of 1923 State Summer School. For Turkey Hill: 
Irene C. Coen, graduate of Naugatuck High School and one year at New 
Haven Normal, attendant at full course of 1923 State Summer School. 
For Haddam Neck: Elsie Sandin, who has had two years' experience in 
that school. 

SCHOOLS OPENED DURING YEAR 1922-1923 

Three schools, in accordance with action of the school committee, 
were re-opened during the year — Turkey Hill on January 22, Burr on 
January 23 and Brainerd Hill on February 6. 



HADDAM TOWN REPORT 25 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF THE YEAR 

The earnest work of the teachers and their disposition to recognize 
and endorse such improved methods of teaching as are supported by 
scientific evidence were factors during the year for some substantial 
developments. The teachers moved conservatively but agreeably and 
progressively with reference to certain types of teaching. 

The teaching of handwriting improved somewhat in some schools. 
A more general use, by the teachers, of handwriting scales, which indicate 
-what standard ought to be attained by each grade, will be a further step 
in the teaching of handwriting. 

Definite advance was made in some instances in the selection of 
words and arrangement of the selected words for spelling lessons. As 
in the case of handwriting, the business of teaching pupils to spell will 
be further developed by greater use of scales which measure the results 
'Of spelling instruction. 

The work in silent reading is becoming more effective each year. 
Increased emphasis is being given to the subject. 

The teachers are endeavoring to teach pupils to write as well as 
they will need to write; to spell as well as they will need to spell and 
to comprehend and remember what they read. Likewise, in arithmetic, 
the teachers are acquiring more and more skill in emphasizing those 
topics and operations that are in common use. 

In the teaching of geography, history and civics, continued progress 
marked the efforts of the teachers, particularly in presenting the subjects 
with a view to the growth of the pupils' understanding of every day 
'experiences. 

Briefly, the schools of the town made well balanced progress during 
the year toward those objectives upon which they would have the pupils 
concentrate their energies. All statutory subjects were taught as re- 
quired by law — reading, including phonics, writing, arithmetic, language 
and grammar, spelling, history, geography, citizenship, humane education, 
physiology and hygiene and physical education. 

In the Higganum School thirty minutes per week was given to the 
study of agriculture, grades VI-VIII; thirty minutes per week to general 
science, grades VI-VIII; thirty minutes per week to mechanical drawing, 
grades VI-VIII; and thirty minutes per week each to free-hand drawing, 
music and sewing. Miss Castelli taught general science and mechanical 
drawing; Miss Brown taught agriculture and sewing; Miss Stevens taught 
free-hand drawing. Each teacher instructed her own pupils in music. 
In the other schools of the town instruction was given in two or more of 
the special subjects. 



26 HADDAM TOWN REPORT 

EXTRA-CURRICULUM ACTIVITIES 

The importance of a study of current events in the upper grades has 
been firmly established. The publication, "Current Events," was regular- 
ly read and studied in both the Higganum school and the rural schools, 
excepting two. 

The demonstration school, held by the principal of the Higganum 
building, was so well attended as to indicate the desirability of more 
frequent work in this direction. 

The Parent-Teacher Association is another avenue through which 
demonstration classes functioned — Miss Castelli conducting such a class 
at the March meeting in Higganum. 

The special field day exercises held by Miss Brainard and Mrs. Pike 
at the Haddam Center School indicates the value of music as a means of 
instruction in physcal education. The good marching and co-ordination 
of effort in the drills was due, in large measure, to the daily practice of 
using the piano to accompany the marching drills. 

The schools of the town endeavored so to observe some of our 
national holidays as to realize educational benefit from the observance. 

Through the Parent-Teacher Association school lunches were served 
during the winter months in the Higganum, Center and Ponsett schools. 

Mention should be made of the disposition aroused in the boys of 
the Ponsett School by Miss Marshall to participate enjoyably in such 
practical activities as making bird houses, a school garden; and in the 
girls to make useful articles such as aprons, handkerchiefs, etc. 

An instructive stereopticon lecture for the pupils of Little City School 
should be mentioned as one of the things accomplished by Miss Lund- 
gren for the profit and pleasure of her pupils. The individual folders in 
which the pupils kept work representative of each stage of development 
during the year was another good feature of Miss Lundgren's work. 

The accumulation and utilization of pictures as a means of enjoyable 
and useful indirect observation of the things in which pupils have an 
interest was carried on quite effectively in several schools. 

The large number of certificates of accomplishment in library and 
home reading issued, indicates the effective guidance being given in the 
matter of the formation of reading habits. 

MATERIAL CONDITION OF SCHOOLS 

Higganum. There are things to be desired at the Higganum school. 
It is unfortunate that the play ground is one on which the pupils cannot 
play properly. The assembly hall is not attractive. An assembly hall 
should be attractive. A flag pole should be erected. 

Center. The building itself is in good condition. A furnace will 



HADDAM TOWN REPORT 27 

probably be installed some day. This is the greatest single need in the 
Center School. 

Ponsett. Building adequate for its purposes. The boulders should 
be removed from the yard. 

Little City. Building not suitable. Interior now in usable condition. 

Burr. Adequate for present enrollment. 

Turkey Hill. Adequate for present enrollment. Interior and exterior 
of building in good condition. 

Brainerd Hill. Adequate for present enrollment. Interior and ex- 
terior of building in good condition. 

Haddam Neck. Adequate for present enrollment. Interior and ex- 
terior of building in good condition. 

Neither in the case of the Higganum building, nor the Ponsett build- 
ing, nor the Center building were the needed repairs and changes as 
indicated above, asked for at this time by the Supervisor. In all instances 
such repairs as were asked for were made. 



TEACHER TRAINING 

Such training has included, visitation of approved schools, attendance 
at institute and convention, teachers' meetings once each month, regular 
reading of school publications, and summer school for several teachers, 

PARENT-TEACHER ASSOCIATION 

The bearing of a Parent-Teacher Association on the work of public 
schools; the relation of such an association to the progress of school life 
and a workable schedule for such an organization are matters to which 
the officers and members of the association gave considerable thought 
last year. To be an effective factor in helping toward school efficiency, 
the association felt that the. programmes should be such as to meet with 
certain and wide approval. To this end the committee worked. It 
succeeded. It is earnestly hoped that the organization may be so fortu- 
nate as to again hear those who spoke last year. At some of the coming 
meetings such topics as the following will be discussed: 

The period of the teens — its needs and problems. 

What the community has a right to expect of its schools. 

What the school has a right to expect of the community. 
, - The, individual child. 

The above subjects may serve to indicate somewhat the positive 
force which the association will continue to be in the school affairs of 
Haddam. 



28 HADDAM TOWN REPORT 

NEED OF A SCHOOL NURSE 

The school nurse, by co-operation with the health officer, the teachers 
and the parents can sometimes prevent epidemics. School nurses have 
done it. She can go to the homes of pupils with help and suggestions; 
she can assist the health officer by treating many pupils directly at a 
time when they need prompt attention; she can save time for the doctor 
when time is valuable. Reliable statistics are available showing the 
effective work of school nurses in times of special need. 

But the school nurse would be in the schools every day. She would 
see and assist children every day with sores, headache, nervous trouble, 
bad tonsils, catarrh, fatigue. Children with such ailments are in school 
every day. The cost for a school nurse is not large. She may be 
classified as a teacher and the town may receive back from the state the 
same percent, of her pay as of the pay of the regular teachers. 

PROCEDURE FOR SECURING EMPLOYMENT CERTIFICATE 

The following data is necessary in order to receive a certificate per- 
mitting employment in a mechanical, manufacturing or mercantile es- 
tablishment. 

1. A birth certificate. Blue form No. 9 is preferred, though certain 
other forms may be accepted, e. g., a priest's certificate of baptism or a 
passport showing child's date and place of birth. This certificate must 
show that the child is at least 14 years old. 

2. On yellow form No. 16. 

(a) Promise of a job signed by prospective employer. 

(b) Consent signed by parent or guardian. This consent should 
be signed in the presence of the Supervisor. 

(c) If the parent or guardian cannot conveniently come to the 
supervisor he may sign his consent in the presence of some other school 
officer, e. g., principal, teacher or school committee member; in which 
case have such school officer sign the statement that parent or guardian 
signed consent in his presence. 

(d) Recommendation by supervisor will be signed when he has 
received all necessary papers properly filled or executed. 

3. Medical certificate form No. 54. The child presents this to the 
physician whose name is written thereon, for a free physical examination 
as provided by law. Get the physician to fill in the blank spaces and see 
that the certificate is returned to the supervisor promptly. 

4. Employment form No. 4 called "information card." On this be 
sure to tell the color of the hair, eyes and complexion. The supervisor 
can fill in all the other spaces. 

5. Employment form No. 8 "Transcript from Registrar." This paper 



HADDAM TOWN REPORT 29 

is to be filled in by the person holding the register in which the appli- 
cant's attendance is last recorded. During the school year the teacher 
has the register, but during the summer the supervisor has it. Therefore 
during the summer the supervisor will attend to filling the above 
mentioned card, form 8. It must show that the child has passed Grade VI. 

When all the above papers are in the Supervisor's hands, correctly 
filled out, he will immediately forward them to the office of the State 
Board of Education. 

The foregoing forms may be obtained from the principal or super- 
visor. 

SCHOOL CALENDAR FOR 1923-1924 
FIRST TERM— 16 weeks. 

Teachers' meeting Tuesday, Sept. 4, A. M., at Higganum. 
Schools open Wednesday, A. M., September 5. 
Days out: 

Labor Day, September 3. 

Teachers' meeting as above, September 4. 

Institute, 1 day, Oct. 10, Middletown High School building. 

Visitation, 2 days. 

Thanksgiving, 2 days, November 29 and 30. 
Schools close Thursday, Dec. 20, after a 4 hour session. 
CHRISTMAS VACATION— 1 week. 

SECOND TERM— 13 weeks. 

Schools open Wednesday, A. M., January 2. 
Days out: 

December 31 and January 1. 

State Convention, 1 day. 

Visitation, 1 day. 

February 22, Washington's Birthday. 

Good Friday. 
Schools close Thursday, March 27. 
EASTER VACATION— 1 week. 

THIRD TERM— 11 weeks. 

Schools open Monday, April 7. 
Days out: 

Friday, May 30, Memorial Day. 
Schools close Friday, June 20. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWIN I. ARTHUR, 



05/20/2011 
FT 229419 5 29 00 



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